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HISTORltAL ALMAiNAl 



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ADVEETISEMENTS. 



AlDnadine, Oayley's celebrated, 




26 


American Life Insurance and Trust Company, 




. 14 


Ayer's Cherry Pectoral, 


• 


24 


Bailey k Co., Jewellers, 




6 


Booksellers and Publishers : — 


, 




American S. S. Union, 




9 


Biblical Repertory; Peter Walker, Publisher, . 


• 


18 


Challen, James & Son, 




. 25 


Desilver, Chas., .... 


• . 


18 


Gould & Lincoln, . . / . 




. 4,5 


Harding k Son, .... 


• 


17 


Merriam, G., • • 




. 12 


Parry & McMillan, .... 


• 


7 


Presbyterian Board of Publication, 




8 


Presbyterian Publication Committee, . 


. 


11 


Smith, English & Co., . . . , 




2 


Stockton, Rer. T. H., . 


• 


22 


Wilson, Joseph M., . . . . 




19, 20, 23 


Caldwell, J. E., & Co., Jewellers, 


• 


8 


Chickering's Pianos, 


front of title page. 


Doremus & Nixon, Church Furnishing, . 


. 


1 


Electro-Magnetic Machines, W. C, & J. Neff, Manuf 


acturers, 


. 19 


Gibson, John, Painter and Church Decorator, 


, 


22 


Great Western Insurance and Trust Company, 


, 


. 10 


Holloway's Pills and Ointment, . 


• 


21 



Jaques, John Jr. & Brc, Grape Wines, for Church Communion ft Medical use, 2 
Lagrange Synodical College, ..... 22 

Me AllisterA Bro., Opticians; Magic Lanterns, for S. S,, Public Exhibitions, 16 
Media Classical Institute, Rev S. M. Gayley, and T. G. (Jayley, Principals, 15 



Oglethorpe University, Rev. S. K. Talmage, D. D., President, 

Organ Building, J. Buffington, . 

Schmitt & Stubenrauch, Fancy Hair Jewellers,- 

Taylor's, (Br.) Institution, 

West Jersey Academy, David Thompson, A. M.^ Principal; 



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MINOFUTORERS OF 

(Krauij Jatlur, toatii g^uare ani Sptig|t 

PIANO FORTES. 




This is the largest and oldest manufactory in the United States, 
having been established in 1823 ; since which time, we have made 
and sold 

20.500PIAJfOS; 

And have received as testimonials of their superiority over all others, 

11 Gold, 18 Silver, and 4 Bronze Medals, 

MANUFACTORY and WAREROOM, Tremont Street, Boston. 

Branoh House, 694, Broadway, New York. 
Branch House, 1307, Chestnut Street, Philadelphia. 



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- t» THE 

PRESBYTERIAN 

HISTORICAL ALMANAC. 

AND 

OF THE CHURCH, 



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1868—1869. 

•T 

JOSEPH M. WILSON, 



PHILADELPHIA : 
JOSEPH M. WILSON, 

NO. Ill SOUTH TENTH STREET, BELOW CHESTNUT STREET. 

JAMXS HISBItT * CO.. VO. 11 BKBKKBS ST.. LOKDOK. 0. AITCHTSOlf. HO. • HIGH ST., BELTAOT. 

D. KcLBLXaH. HAMILTOK. C. W. J. DUBBIB. OTTAWA. CTT. W. CLDCR. ST. 8TKPHBI, X, B. 

BPBATT * LY8LB. ALLKGHRNT CITT, PA. J. CULBKBTSON. PITTSBUBO. PA. 

J. A. BATL. KKOXYILLB, TKinf. B. WAYNK, HEW 0BLKAH8, LA. 



1859. 

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Entortd at SUtionen* Hall, England. 



Entered according to the Act of Congress, in the year 1858, by 

JOSEPH M. WILSON, 

in the Clerk's Office of the District Court for the Eastern Distriot of 
PcnnsyWania. 



inaxoTTPD BT jBSPn UiOLDixG * Soir, 

IVQUiaiR BtTILMirO. SOUTH THUD tTRKXTp PBILA. 

Cnnningham 4 Doyle, Printers. 



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Corresponding Secretary or the Board of Education 



OP THE PSBSBTTRRUir GHUBOH IN THE UKITED 8TATBiy 



THIS VOLUXK 



IS RESPECTFULLY DEDICATED 



THE AUTHOR. 



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1>REFACE. 



The Presbyterian Historical Almanac has been prepared 
to supply a want experienced by many of the brethren. 
Spread abroad as the Presbyterian Church is over the whole 
world — divided into numerous bodies — it has been difficult even 
for the most enterprising and zealous of her members to keep 
fully aware of her progress and her power. 

DifTering as they do from each other^ still the golden vein 
of Calvinism pervades each organization ; and though distinct 
aa the billows, they are one as the sea. 

Believing that a volume such as is now presented to the pub- 
lic would prove useful — founded as it is upon the most reliable 
data, all our statements being derived from official sources, 
I have prepared the plan and carried it out to the best of my 
ability. 

That such a work was needed has been a prevalent idea 
in the minds of many, as an extensive and wide-spread cor- 
respondence has fully revealed. The generous co-operation 
of numerous friends aided me in obtaining the documents and 
facts needed to complete my design ; and though to enumerate 
all who have thus placed me under obligation, would extend 
this Preface beyond a reasonable limit, I must be allowed the 
privilege of placing upon record the names of Rev. John Weir, 
D. D., of London ; Robert Barbour, Esq., of Manchester ; 
Rev. Alex. Beith, D. D., of Stirling, Rev. John Eadie, 
D. D. LL. D., of Glasgow, Scotland ; Rev. Robt. Park, of 

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10 FREFACB. 

Ballymoneyy Ireland ; Rev. Wm. Reid, A. M.^ of Toronto, 
Canada ; Rev. A. F. Kemp, of Montreal, Canada ; Rev. Wm. 
Elder,of St. Stephen, N.B.; Rev. Wm, E. Ward, of Nashville, 
Tenn.; Rev. J. I. Bonner, of Due West, S. C; Rev. Chas. H. 
Read, D. D., of Richmond, Va.; Rev. J. L. Craig, of Princeton, 
Ind.; and Rev. T. W. J. Wylie, of Philadelphia, as those who 
have manifested more than ordinary interest in the suo- 
cess and value of the undertaking. 

In the Introduction will be found an outline of the plan 
and the basis on which were founded our Statistical Tables. 

In the preparation of these tables I was greatly aided by 
my friend William Palmer^ Esq., of this city. 

J. M. W. 
Philadslphu, January 1. 1859. 



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INTRODUCTION. 



As might naturally be ezpeeted, many plans suggested tbemselTes as 
suitable for a work like this ; but the following was adopted as comprehend- 
ing all that was needful, and though it could hardly be anticipated that in 
the Initial number it could be fully and completely carried out, still the 
defects which may appear are the result of circumstances beyond control* 

Whilst preserving the integrity of the announcement, that The Presbyte- 
rian Historical Almanac would give a clear and concise account of the 
operations of the year, the plan permits the introduction of various 
tables of value and interest; such as those prepared of the Deceased 
Ministers — the operations of the Boards of the Presbyterian Church for 
a series of years — the list of those who have died in the Presbyterian 
Church of Canada ; and of the Associate Church during its career as a dis- 
tinct organization. These tables can be enlarged to a considerable extent. 

That a work purely statistical would not be favourably received is appa- 
rent to all ; we have therefore given The Almanac a Literary and Historical 
value, by commencing the account of each Assembly or Synod with a fair, 
though condensed, report of the Discourse preached by the retiring Mode- 
rator, and by giving a History of the Churches where the Assemblies or 
Synods held their annual sessioo. 

That the literary merit of the Discourses should be high is inferred from 
the fact that they are prepared by appointment, and delivered under circum- 
stances of peculiar interest. The Historical Sketches of the churches are 
valuable, being written by persons thoroughly acquainted with all neces- 
sary facts and details, and furnish rich materials for subsequent historians. 

This being an age for Hlustrations, we have placed before the reader the 
Portraits of those honoured with the Moderatorship during the current 
year; together with the Drawings of those Churches where the an- 
nual sessions were held, giving as they do a good idea of the style of archi- 

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12 INTRODUCTION. 

lecture of different places and periods. We need scarcely remark that tbe 
Portraits, and Views of Churches were drawn expressly for the Almanac. 

The Tables are all prepared to save the time of the student or reader 
— the lists of names of Ministers, Presbyteries, or Synods, are alphabet- 
ically arranged; and to give the work a practical character, we reduced it 
into a reply to this question : '' What is it I ought to know concerning the 
Presbyterian Church ?''— keeping this question constantly before the mind, 
this volume grew to its present proportions. 

The value of Statistics is more and more acknowledged, and their careful 
arrangement and thoroughness of detail are of great use to the student and 
others searching for knowledge. 

Tbe Tables giving the operations of the Boards of the Presbyteria6 
Churches for several years, throw much light upon their operations. 

The Presbyteriul Statistics, being divided into many columns, enable the 
reader to learn the number of Pastors, Stated Supplies, Teachers, Agents, or 
Editors, and those without charge in each Presbytery ; also the number of 
Churches with Pastors, or Stated Supplies — the number vacant — the number 
reporting additions to the Communion of the Chutoh, and the number 
making no report, besides the usual list of Licentiates, and Candidates, &c.| 
Ac., also the number of Churches in each Presbytery contributing to the 
various benevolent operations of the Church. The first column shows the 
nsmber of Churches in each Presbytery^ the next shows the number of 
Churches giving to a certain object, the next column shows the amount given, 
fte., ftc. By these Tables the reader can see at a glance the hold each object 
has upon the hearts of the people. 

The official documents of each body being the basis of all our statements 
and tables, they are more or less complete according to circumstances, and 
where marked deficiences occur, they arise from the absence of any reliable 
data. In computing the collections in the Foreign Churches, w6 have 
brought up the amounts to the American Standard of Dollars, rating the 
Pound in the currency of the British Provinoes at $4.00, that of Great 
Britain at S4.80. 

With these general remarks, we tmbmit the result of our labours to the 
public and the Church, promising to do all we can to profit by our experi- 
ence and the criticisms of our friends^ and earnestly hoping that each suo- 
oeeding year may Bee The Almanac more valuable and interesting than its 
predecessor. 

Philadelphia, Januatp 5, 1869. 



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ILLUSTRATIONS 



Portraits of the Rev. 



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William A. Scott^ 
M. L. P. Thompson, 
Charles H. Read, 
Joseph T. Cooper, 
Donald C. McLaren, 
John T. Pressly, . 
Andrew Gifford Wylie, 
Robert C. Grier, 
Felix Johnson, 
Thomas Wardrope, 
Alexander Beith, 
John Johnston, 
Robert Nevin, 
Thomas McCrie, 



Engravings of the First Presbyterian Church, New Orleans, La., 

" " Second Presbyterian Church, Chicago, Illinois, 

" " Second Presbyterian Church, Knoxville, Tenn., . 

" " First Associate Presby. Church, Pittsburg, Pa,, 

" " First Assoc. Ref. Presb. Ch., Allegheny City, Pa., 

" " Reformed Presbyterian Church, Eden, Illinois, 

« « Assoc. Ref. Presby. Church, Due West, S. C, 

« " McNab St. Presby. Ch., Hamilton, Canada West, 

" First Presbyterian Church, Londonderry, Ireland, 

" Coyenanters' Church, Londonderry, Ireland, 

" Reformed Presby. Church, Cnllybackey, Ireland, 

<^ Grosvenor Square Presb. Ch,, Manchester, Eng., 

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105 
148 
157 
178 
188 
193 
203 
217 
234 
275 
297 
304 
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240 
303 
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807 
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CONTENTS. 



-^^Amociatb Pbesbytbbian Synod. Meeting, . . . .163 

Opening Discourse^ Rev. D. W. French| . . • 153 

Proceedings, 156 

Whole number of Deceased MinisterSy . . • 167 

Stutistics, Listof Ministera, &o., 164 

Historical Sketch of First Presby. Cbaroh, PittsbargV Pa. 169 

— AasociAT£ Reformed General Synod. Meeting, . . • 173r 

Opening Discuurse, Rev. D. R. Kerr, D. B., . . • 173 

Proceedings, ......... 177 

Statistics, List of Ministers, &o., 181 

Hist. Sketch of First Assoc. Ref. Gharch, Alle^ben j (Sif,, Pa^ IM 

Associate Reformed Synod of the South. Meeting, * . . 202 

Opening Discourse, Rev. D. F. Haddon, . . . 202 

Proceedings, • . 203 

Lbt of Ministers, Ac, 210 

Hist. Sketch of Assoc. Ref. Church, Due West^ S. O.^ . • 20? 

^ Church of Scotland. Meeting, ...•*. 264 

Statistics and List of Ministers, 265 

— Cumberland Presbyterian Church. Meeting, . 211; 

Openins: Discourse, Rev. 0. P. Reed, .... 211 

Proceedings, 21ft' 

^ Statistics, List of Ministers, &c., 222 

Eastern Reformed Presbyterian Church of Ireland^ Mteifingi 307 

Hist. Sketch of Cull^backey Church, Ireland, . . . 80» 

Free Presbyterian Church, of the U. S. Meeting, . . 228t 

List of Ministers, &c., 228 

^OPree Church of Nova Scotia. Meeting, .... 257 

List of Ministers and Statistics, 259t 

— Free Church of Scotland. Meeting, ... * 275* 

Statistics and List of Ministers, 276 

----' Presbyterian Church (0. S.) Meeting, .... 25 

Opening Discourse, Rev. C. Van Rensselaer, D. D.,, • . 25 

Proceedings, 83 

Deceased Ministers, 45 

Statistics, 66 

List of Ministers, &c., 75 

Hist. Sketch of First Presby. Church, New Orleans, La., . 93 

^' Presbyterian Church, (N. S.) Meeting, .... 95 

Opening Discourse, Rev. S. W. Fisher, D. D., . . 95 

Proceedings, 103 

Statistics, 116 

List of Ministers, &c., 121 

Hist. Sketch of Second Presby. Church, Chicago, LI., . 182 

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16 CONTENTS. 

^ PaxsBTTERiAN Churoh Of CANADA. Meeting, .... 229 

Opening Disconrsei Rev. Geo. Smellie, • . • 229 

Proceedings, 283 

Statistics, List of Ministers, kc, 236 

Hist. Sketch of Presby. Churches in Hamilton, Canada West 240 

^- PUSBTTERIAN Ch. o?..Cajiada, (Ch. OF ScoTiiANP.) Meeting, 248 

List of Ministers, 249 

"^ Prbsbttsrian Church in England. Meeting, . . 309 

Statistics, and List of Ministers, ... . . . 810 

Hist. Sketch of Orosvenor Square Church, Manchester, . 811 

,_,^Jtt3B8BTTERIAN ChUROH IN IRELAND. Mcetine, . . . . 290 

Opening Discourse, by Rer. A. P. Ooudy, D. D., • . 299 

Proceedings, 297 

List of Ministers, 299 

Hist. Sketch of First Presbyterian Churoh, Londonderry, . 303 

— ^ Presbttbrian Church in New Brunswick. Meeting, 260 

Preoeedings and List of Ministers, 261 

Presbyterian Churoh of Nova Sootia. Meeting, . 250- 

Opening Discourse, ReT& Q-. Patterson, .... 250 

Proceedings, 255 

Statistics and List of Ministers, 256 

^"■^^ BftiORMBD Presbttertan Gbnbral Synoi>. Meeting, . . 190 

Opening Discourse, Rev. J. A^ Crawford, .... 199 

Proceedings, ........ 198 

Statistics, List of Ministers, &c., 196 

.^ Hist. Sketch of Ref. Preshy. Church in Eden, Illinois, . 197 

Bevormed Prebryterian Synod. Meeting, List of Ministers, &e., 201 

, Ke». Presby. Church of Ireland. Meeting and List of Ministers, 304' 

Hist. Sketch of Covenanters' Church, Londonderry, . 805 

^ BEroRMKD Presbyterian Church of Scotland. Meeting &c., 284 

"^ Synod OF New Brunswick, (of the Ch. of Scotland.) Meeting, 263 

— Synod of Nova Scotia, (of the Church of Scotland.; Meeting, 269 

List of Ministers, . . . . . . . 260 

United Original Secbders of Scotla^yd. Ministers, . . 289 

Untted Presbyterian Church, N. A. Organization, . . 187 

— ^^KiTED Presbyterian Church of Canada. Meeting, . 243 

•Opening Discourse, Rev. John Porteous, . . 248 

^ Statistics and List of Ministers, .*..«. 247 

United Presbyterian Church of Scotland. Meeting, &o., 285 

United Synod of the Presbyterian Church. Or^nization, . 185 

Opening Discourse, Rev. J. D. Mitchell, D. Di, • . 189 

Proceedings, * . 142 

Sutistics^ List of Ministers, &c., 149 

^ Hist Sketch of Second Presby. Church, Knoxville, Tenn., . 151 



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PBSIBTTBRIAN HISTOBIOAL ALXANAO. 



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Iftttftftrf. 



BatnrdAT. 

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ToMdaj. 

Wedneidaj. 

nmdaj. 

FridAT. 

8«taruT. 

SirilDAT. 

Xoadaj. 

TnMdaj. 

WtdiiMday. 

ThvrtdAT. 

VridftT. 

flatnrday. 

smrDAT 

Xoadaj. 

TaMdaj. 

Wedneiday. 

TkvidAj. 

Tridaj. 

BaturdaT. 

BVHDAT. 

Monday. 

Tneiday. 

Wodn«tday. 

Thivfday. 

TtidaT. 

Batuday. 

Xoaday. 



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New Years* day. 

RiVaVBBR THB SlBBATH DAT TO KBBP R HOLT. Bx. XX. 8. 

BafcUe of Princeton, 1777. 

Rer. Aaron Burr bom» 1716. 

John Howie, author of Soota Worthies, died, 1798. 

8. BetUe of New Orleans, 1815. 

Rer. Samael MUler, D. D., died, 1850. 

Roase's Torsion of the psalms approved by Seottish Parliament, 1650. 

Thb Sob op Mah is Lord also of thb Sabbath. Lake tL 2. 

9. Antaretio Continent disooTored, 1840. 

First Lottery mentioned in Bngiish history, 1569. 

Linnaeus, natoralisti died* 1778. 

16. Battle of the Cowpens. 1778. 

Congress ratified peace, 1784. 

Liturgy established bj Bngiish Parliament, 1549. 

Thb Sabbath was madbfor ham, mot mam for Sabbath. Harli iL87. 

Benjamin Franklin bom, 1706. 

Daniel Webster bom, 1782. 

22. Imprisonment of Rot. Francis Makemie, father of Am. Pros., 1707. 

Independence aeknowledged. 1783. 

Greenland Mission begun* 1783. 

American Philosophical Society formed, 1769. 

Vbrilt, mt Sabbatos tb shall kbep. Ex. xxxL 13. 

Frederick the Qreat, bom, 1712. 

Unirersity of Virginia esUblished, 1819. 

Sunday Schools esUblished, 1784. 

Chrysostom died, 438. 

Soots Confession of Faith, signed by James YI, 1581. 

Copy of the CoTenant in erery church, 1645. 

Thb childrbr op Israbl shall kbbp thh Sabbath. Ex. xxxL 16. 

Bon. Jonson bora, 1574. 



J[ilrr«sir|. 



TftOBday. 

Wednotday. 

Thnnday. 

Friday. 

Batarday. 

smrDAY. 

Xonday. 
Tnofday. 
Wednetday. 
Thursday. 
Friday. 
Saturday. 
SinrBAT. 
Xonday. 
Tnotday. 
Wednetday* 
ntarsday. 
Friday. 
Satard ay. 
SmiDAT. 
Xonday. 
TnoBday. 
Wednaiday. 
Tbnraday. 
Friday. 
Batnrd ay. 
SUVBAT. 
Koaday. 
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First President of the United States elected, 1789. 

4. John Rogers. Martjr, burned at the stake, 1555. 

Br- Eltsha K. Kane, the Arctic explorer, bon, 1822. 

Rer. Samuel DaTies died. 1761. 

Gilbert Tennent bora, 1703. 

It shall bb ubto tou a Sabbath of rbst. Lct. xxiii. 82. 

United States Constitution adopted by Massachusettss, 1788. 

6. Am. Stamp Tax Bill introduced into the British Parliament 1786. 

Hooper and Taylor burnt, 1555. 

11. Peace declared with England, 1816. 

Dr. Dwight, President of Tale College, died, 1817. 

Disoorery of Gold in Australia, 1851. 

Yb shall kbbp ht sabbaths. Ler. xztL 2. 

Captain Cook killed by Sandwich Islanders, 1779. 

Galileo bora, 1564. 

Frigate Philadelphia destroyed, 1804. 

Renwick, last Scottish Martyr, executed in Edinburgh, 1688. 

Ifartin Luther died, 1546. 

18. Hon. William Wirt died, 1834. 

Kbbp thb Sabbath dat to sAjionrr it. Bent r. 12. 

Rer. Robert Hall died, 1881. 

George Washington bora. 1732. 

Battle of Bnena Vista, 1847. 

Persecution of Chsistians, by Diocletian commenced, 808. 

24. Battle between brigs Hornet aod Peacock, 1813. 

Thomas Moore, the poet, died, 1852. 

Thb Lord oohhaitdbd tbbb to ship thb Sabbath dat. BohI. t. 16. 

BatUe of Saeramento, 1847. 



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PRKSBtTBBIAir mStORICAL JLLJKAXtAO. 



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TtidAT. 

BatordaT. 

8VHDAT. 

Monday. 

TiiMday. 

Wedaeiday. 

Thursday. 

Prlday. 

Saturday. 

8UHDAT. 

Monday. 

Tnofday. 

Widnetday. 

Thuraday. 

Friday. 

Saturday. 

8inn)AT. 

Monday. 
Tueiday. 
Wednesday. 
Thursday. 



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The Spectator first published, 1711. 

John Wesley died, 1791. 

Geo. Herbert, divine snd poet, died, 16S8. 

Federal Constitation of the United States irent into effbet» 1789. 

Boston msssaere, 1770. 

Ahd m adbst krowh umto tbbv tbt holt SiBBATB. Neb. izi 14. 

Frigate Randolph destroyed, 1778. 

Williain 3d of England, died, 1702. 

18. Planet Qeorgiom Sidus disoovered by Hersohel^ 1781. 

New South Wales diseorered, 1787. 

Benjamin West died, 1830. 

Dean Berkely bom, 1684. 

Ahd hallow vt Sabbaths. Ecek. xti 20« 

Planet Uranas disoovered* 1781. 

Battle of Gnilfdrd Coort Honse, 1781« 

17. Ber. Dr. Ohalmers born^ 1780. 

British Troops evaenated Boston* 1778. 

21. The great plagoe broke out in London, 1665. 

First eclipse reeorded; seen at Babylon, 721, B. C. 

To DAT IS A Sabbath riiTO tbb Lord. Ex. xtL 25. 

Cranmer bnmt at the stake; 1556. 

RsT. Jonathan Edwards died, 1758. 

Commeroial Treaty ooneluded with Japan^ 1S54. 

Diet of Worms assembled, 1555. 

Boston Port Bill, 1774. 

English Slare Trade abolished, 1807 

Thb Lord hath oitbn too tbb Sabbath. Ex. xtl. 29. 

Raphael, the great painter, bom, 1488. 

Vera Cms surrendered to Oen. Scott, 1847. 

29. Planet Pallas diseovered by Gibers^ 1802. 

John 0. Calhoun died, 1850. 



%^tiL 



Friday. 

8atiurda7. 

8TrNDAT. 

Monday. 

Tuesday. 

Wednesday. 

Thursday. 

Friday. 

8atarday. 

SVITDAT. 

Monday. 

Tuesday. 

Wednesday. 

Thursday. 

Friday. 

8atnrday. 

8TrHDAT. 

Monday. 

Tneeday. 

Wednesday. 

Thnreday. 

Friday. 

8atarday. 

8TrNDAT. 

Monday. 

Tuesday 

WMneeday. 

Thursday. 

Friday 

Saturday. 



1 
8 
8 
4 

6 
6 
7 
8 

9 
10 
11 
12 
18 
14 
15 
16 
17 
18 
19 
20 
21 
22 
28 
24 
26 
26 
27 
28 
29 
80 



Thos. Jefferson, 3d President of the United States^ bom, 1748. 

A SA.BBATR or RBST TO TBB LORD. Ex. XXXf. 2. 

William Henry Harrison, President of the United States, died« 1841. 

Robert Raikes, foander of Sunday Schools, died, 1811. 

Dartmoor massaere« 1815. 

8. Washington Irving bom, 1783. 

War proclaimed between England and Russia, 1854. 

10. Bank of the United States ineorporated, 1815. 

It is thb Sabbath of thb Lord ib all tovr vwblubos. Lot. zbHI. S. 

Edward Etrerett bom, 1794. 

Henry Clay bom, 1777. 

16. The first New England Presbytery formed, 1745, 
Charleston; S. C, eyacuated by the Brifeisfa^ 1783. 

17. Protestants first so called, 1550. 
Battle of Culioden, 1746. 

Nbithbb carry forth a burdbh ob tbb Sabbath dat. Jer. zvii. 28. 

Rev. David Brainerd bora, 1718. 

Battle of Lexington, 1775. 

Cromwell dissolved the Parliament, 1653, 

Battle of San Jacinto, Texas, 1836. 

Rev. Jonathan Dickinson born, 1688. 

Shakspeare born, 1564. 

Hallow thb Sabbath, as I oohmahdbd tour f athbrs. Jer. zvii. 22. 

Cowper, the poet, died, 1800. 

The Oerman divine, Neander, died, 

26. Josiah Qainoy, Jr., died, 1775. 

United States Constitotion adopted by Maryland, 1788. 

Peace between Russia and the Allied Powers, 1856. 

President Washington swora into ofiiccf 1789, 



Digitized by 



Googk 



PBSSBTTEItlAN HISTOBIOAIi ALIIAKAO. 



19 



Monday. 

TiMidaj. 

WednotdAj. 

Thnrsdaj. 

Friday. 

Batarday. 

81JHDAT. 

Monday. 

Tuooday. 

Wodmoday. 

Thuriday. 

Friday. 

Saturday* 

STTHDAT. 

Monday. 

Tnoiday. 

WodaMday. 

Tlimday. 

Friday. 

Baturday. 

SVHDAT. 

Monday. 

Tnoiday. 

Wodnavday. 

Thnroday. 

Fridair. 

Batnid ay. 

8U1DAT. 

Monday. 

Tnoiday. 



1 
2 
S 

4 
ft 
6 
7 
8 
9 
10 
11 
18 
18 
14 
16 
18 
17 
18 
18 
90 
91 
S9 
28 
94 
96 
96 
97 
98 
99 
80 
81 



AhD BK BB ASOKSD Ilf THB STHAOOOrB BTSBT SaBBJ^H. Aotf XTlil. 4. 

Athanaslas, Greek ibeoloffian» died, 873. 

1. First trial of John Fitoh'a steamboat, 1Y8T. 

36th anolTersary of the Ameriean Sunday School UnioD. 

Napoleon Bonaparte died, 1821. 

General Assembly of the (0. S.) Pres. Chnroh met at N. Orleans, 1858. 

John Rodgers, first Moderator Gen. Assem., Pres.Church,T7. 8.f died 1811. 

It is lawful to do wbll ob tbb Sabbath dat. Matt zii, 12. 

Battle of Resaoa de la Pal ma, 1846. 

East India mutiny broke oat at Meetnt, 1857. 

Peace of Utrecht, 1713. 

61st anniyersary of the Pennsylronia Bible Society. 

Charleston. S. C, surrendered to the British, 1780. 

Yaocination first applied, 1796. 

7b shall kbbp THB Sabb^th thbbbvobb. Bx. zzzi. 14. 

Mrs. Hemans died, 1830. 

English Conyentide Act passedt 1664. 

Napoleon Bonaparte declared Emperor of France, 1804. 

General Assembly, (0. S.) Pres. Church meets at Indianapolis, 1S59. 

John Eliot, - Apostle to the Indians', died, 1690. 

1st meeting of the Gen. Assem. of the Pres. Church in the V. 8.t 1789. 

AMD call tbb Sabbath a dblioht. Isa. ItUI. 13. 

Sir John Franklin's Arctic Expedition sailed, 1846. 

Copernicus died, 1643. 

27. Habeas Corpus Act passed in England, 1679. 

Augustin died, 604. 

John OaWin died at Genera, 1664, aged 55. 

William Pitt born, 1769. 

I WAS IB THB Spirit on tbb Lord's day. Rer. 1. 10. 

Union of New Tork and Philadelphia Presbyterian Synods, 1768. 

RcT. Dr. Chalmers died, 1847. 



|lB«l. 



Wodnoiday. 

Thnnday. 

Friday. 

8atnrday. 

8U]n>AT. 

Monday. 

Tnotday. 

Wodnoiday. 

Anrtday. 

Friday. 

Satnraay. 

SUHBAT. 

Monday. 

Tnotday. 

Wodnooday. 

Hinriday. 

fridav. 

Batnrd ay. 

SmiDAz. 

Mondaf. 

tnoiday. 

Wodnoiday. 

ntunday. 

Friday. 

Batnrd ay. 

STJITBAT. 

Xoaday. 

Taeidqr. 

Wodnooday, 

Thuriday. 



1 
9 
8 

4 

8 

8 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

19 

18 

14 

16 

18 

17 

18 

19 

90 

91 

99 

98 

94 

96 

98 

9r 

98 

99 
80 



Port of Boston closed, 1774. 

Popery riots in London, 1780. 

Peace with Tripoli, 1804. 

Chinese Mission Chapel, Saa Francisco, Cal., dedicated, 1854. 

ThbB shall THB LABD BMJOT HBR SABBATHS. L^. ZZTL 34. 

Gen. Gaines died, 1849. 

Presbyterian Goremment established in Seotknd, 1690. 

Gen. Andrew Jackson died, 1845. 

Jerusalem besieged by the Crusaders, 1099. 

First meeting of Presbjtorians in Ireland, 1642. 

12, Westminster Ajsembly called by an ordinanoe of Parliament, 164f. 

This dat is holt ubto thb Lord, tour God. Nehem. yiii. 9. 

Anerican Missionaries martyred by Nena Sahib, at Cawnpore, In., 1957. 

Bz- President, James K. Polk, died, 1849. 

Massacre of Christians at Jeddah, 1868. 

Rer. Samuel J. Mills died, 1818. 

Battle of Bunker HiU, 1776. 

War declared against Great Britain, 1812. , 

It shall bb a Sabbath or rbst unto toxt. Lev. zVi. 21. 

James Madison died, 1836. 

United States Constitutiott adopted by New HampAlre, 1788. 

Affair of Martin Kostza, at Smyrna, 1858. 

Longest day in the year. 

Bowdoin Colle|^ Maine* ebarteredf 1794. 

Paley, author of "Natural Theology," died 1805. 

Ahd tb shall do vo work ob that sahb DAT. Lot. zziii. id'. 

First Protestant church in Italy opened, 1840. 

Battle of Monmouth, 1778. 

Henry Clay died, 1852. 

29. Unsncoessful attettpttolay tho Attanliio Telogra^h CaUe» 18lAr. 



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Googk 



ao 



I 



PBBSBTTKBIAN HISTORICAL ALKANAO. 



|ffll|. 



Bfttarday. 

•UHDAT. 

KoBday. 

Tneidaj. 

Wftdneidftj. 

TknrtdAT. 

FridftT. 

SatordaT. 

8inn>AT. 

Xoiiday. 

TttMday. 

Wednesday. 

Tkunday. 

Triday. 

BatiTiiay. 

SUNDAT. 

Monday. 

TftMday. 

Wednaiday. 

Thnriday. 

Triday. 

Batnrday. 

8VHDAT. 

Monday. 

Tnotday. 

Wodnoiday. 

Thursday. 

Friday. 

Saturday. 

•irNDAT. 



1 

8 

8 

4 

ft 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

18 

18 

14 

16 

16 

17 

18 

19 

80 

81 

88 

88 

84 

86 

86 

87 

88 

89 

80 

81 



MM8aer« of Wyoming. 1778. 

1. Asseroblj of Divines at WestminsUr, 1643. 

0« THB FIRST DAT SHALL BK A SaBBATB. Ii«r. ZZlU. 39. 

Declaration of Independenee figned, 1770. 

Battle of Chippewa, 1814. 

Rev. Athbel Qreen born. 1762. 

Martyrdom of Huss, 1415. 

Elihu Tale, a liberal benefactor of Talo College, died, 1781. 

John Calvin born, 1509. 

Tb shall not do aht work thbrkin. Lev. xzix. 7. 

Alexander Hamilton killed in a duel, by Aaron Burr, 1804. 

Battle of the Bojne Water, 1690. 

Captain Cook returned from circnmnavlgating the globe, 17T1« 

New York Crystal Palace opened, 1853. 

Jemmlem taken by the Crutaders* 1100. 

Era of the Hegira commenced, 622. 

ThB SBYBirTH DAT IS THB SaBBATH OF THB LoRD THT GOD. Doot T. 14. 

17. Isaao Watu. D. D., born, 1674. 

Donati's comet seen from Harvard University, 1858. 

Prelacy abolished in Scotland, 1689. 

Robert Bams died, 1796. 

20. Rev. Alexander Macwhorter died, 1807. 

20. Day of humiliation, fasting and prayer on account of the war, 1774. 

Jbsus hbalkd or THB Sabbath DAT. Loko xili. 14. 

Battle of Landy's Lane, 1814. 

United States Constitution adopted by New York, 1778. 

Commodore Bainbridge died, 1 833. 

Shorter Catechism approved, 1648. 

John Knox preached before King James, 1567. 

First Masonic Lodge established in the United States, 1733. 

Thb advbrsaribs did mock at THB Sabbaths. Jer. i. 7. 



%t$t$t. 



Monday. 

TuMday. 

Wedneiday. 

Thursday. 

FridaT. 

Baturday. 

8VHDAT. 

Monday. 

Tnasday. 

Wednesday. 

Thursday. 

FridaT. 

Baturday. 

fUVBAT. 

Monday. 

Tuesday. 

Wadnasday. 

Thursday. 

FHduT. 

Baturday. 

BITVDAT. 

Monday. 

Tnasday. 

Wodnasday. 

Thursday. 

FHdaT. 

Baturday. 

BirraAT. 

Monday. 
Tuesday. 
Wednesday. 



1 
8 
8 

4 
8 
6 
7 
8 
9 
10 
11 
18 
18 
14 
18 
16 
17 
18 
19 
80 
81 
88 
88 
84 
88 
86 
87 
88 
89 
80 
81 



Battle of the Nile, 1798. 

6. The Mayflower set sail for America. 1620. 
Columbus sailed on his voyage of discovery. 1493. 
Atlantic Telegraph Cable successfully laid, 1858. 

John Rodgera, Moderator of the First Qen.Assom.,Pro8.Cb., bom* 1787. 

Ben. Johnson died, 1637. 

Thou hast propanrd mt Sabbaths. Esek. xxi!. 8. 

7. Fulton's steamer Clermont left N. Y. for Albany on iU trial trip, 1808. 
M. Dnguerre died, 1851. 

14. First book printed. 1457. 

Princeton Theological Seminary eitablishod, 1818. 

Albert Gallatin died. 1849. 

Jeremy Taylor died, 1667. 

OOD RB8TBD OR THB SaBBATH DAT PROV ALL HIS WORKS. Gon. U. 8. 

Napoleon Bonaparte bom, 1769. 

Henry Martyn died, 1812. 

Frederick the Great, of Pmsiia, died, 1786. 

21. Adam Clarke, commentator, died, 1833. 

Battle between Constitution and Guerriere, 1813. 

Battles of Contreras and Churubnsco, 1847. 

Krbp vt Sabbaths : I ah thb Lord tour God. Lot. xix. 8. 

First English Newspaper, called the " London Gatetto," pub., 1648. 

Annexation of New Mexico, 1846. 

City of Washington taken and almost doitroyod by the British, 1814. 

Sir John Herscbel died, 1822. 

27. Mutinies of Native Troops in India, 1857. 
Battle of Flatbush. Long Island, 1776. 

Yb briro wrath upor Israbl, PROFARiiro THU Sabbatv. Neb. xiif. 18. 

28. 1 St Submarine Telegraph laid (between France aod BoglaBd,) I860. 
81. Mohammed died. 632. 

John Bunyan died, 1688. 



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Googk 



PBBSBTTBBIAK HI8T0BICAL ALVANAO. 



21 



§i||ft<mlir« 



Thnrtiay. 

Ifttsrday. 

SUVBAT. 

Monday. 

Tnatday. 

WodBttday. 

Thursday. 

Friday. 

BatnrdaT. 

BTODAT. 

Monday. 

Taoiday. 

Wodnofday. 

Thursday. 

Friday. 

Bator lay. 

SmiDAT. 

Monday. 

Taoiday. 

Wednesday. 

Thursday. 

Friday. 

latnrday. 

SinrDAT. 

Monday. 

Tuesday. 

Wednesday. 

Thursday. 

Friday. 



1 

t 

t 

4 

6 

6 

7 

t 

9 

10 

11 

12 

18 

14 

15 

16 

17 

It 

19 

SO 

21 

23 

28 

24 

26 

26 

27 

28 

29 

80 



Planet Jano, diaoov«red by Harding, 1804. 
The Great Fire in London. 1666. 
OliTer Cromwell died, 1658. 

TaiK SHALL THE LAHD KBBP A SaBBATH UNTO THB LOBD. LeV. XZT. 8. 

Fin t Continental Congreei met in Philadelphia* 1774. 

Lafayette born, 1757. 

California admitted into the Union, 1849. 

BaUle of Molino del Rej, 1847. 

American Colonies first called the United SUtes, 1786. 

BatUeofLake Erie. 1813. 

FboK BYBB unto B7BN CBLBBRATB TOUB SABBATH. LeV. ZXlil. 82. 

Steamship Central America wrecked, 500 IItos lost, 1857. 

Burning of the steamship Austria at sea« oyer 500 lives lost, 1858. 

12. Act of Congress passed, sanctioning the pab. of Am. ed. of Script 

J. Fennimore Cooper born, 1780. 

First Railroad opened in England* 

Battle between Bon Homme Richard and Serapis, 1778. 

BlBSSBD 18 THB MAN THAT KBKPKTH THB SabBATH. U. ItL 2. 

First English book, printed by Caxton* 1471 

Battle of the Alma, Crimea, 1854. 

Sir Walter Scott died, 1832. 

Republicanism esUblished in France. 1702. 

Anniversary of Fulton St. (N. York) prayer meeting, 1857. 

Rev. Aaron Burr died, 1757. 

Sanctify thb Sabbath day. Keh. xiii. 22. 

Philadelphia taken* 1777. 

JesuiU established by Paul 3d, 1540. 

27. Steamship Aretip wrecked oiF Cape Race, nearly 800 lives loily 1854. 

Invasion of England, by William the Conqueror, 1066. 

Whitefield died, 1770. 



it 



tr. 



Saturday. 

8UVBAT. 

Monday. 

Tnssday. 

Wednesday. 

Thursday. 

FridaT. 

Satarday. 

8UHDAT. 

Monday. 

Tassday. 

Wednesday. 

Thursday. 

FcidaT. 

Saturday. 

8VJ]n>AT. 

Monday. 

Tuesday. 

Wednesday. 

Thursday. 

Fridav. 

Saturday. 

SmiDAT. 

Monday. 

Tuesday. 

Wednesday. 

Thursday. 

Friday. 

Saturday. 

SWDAT. 

Monday. 



1 

2 

8 

4 

6 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

18 

14 

15 

16 

17 

18 

19 

20 

21 

22 

2S 

24 

25 

26 

27 

28 

29 

80 

81 



2. Concert for prayer throughout the world, 1841. 

OBSBarn thb Sabbath for a pbrpbtual Cotxhabt. Ex. xxzi. 6. 

First American steamboat launched, 1807. 

First edition of the " Whole English Bible," 1535 

Rev. Jonathan Edwards bom, 1703. 

New Tork Crystal Palace destroyed by fire, 1858. 

First American Congress, 1765. 

Congreve rockets first used, 1806* 

I gatb thkm my Sabbaths to bb a sigh bbtwbbh us. Ex. xx. 12. 

9. Rev. David Brainerd died, 1747. 

Election day in Pennsylvania 

America discovered by Columbus 1402. 

Battle between the sloops of war, Wasp end Frolic^ 1812. 

William Penn bom, 1644. 

Capitulation of Burgoyne. at Saratoga, 1777. 

EVBRY OBB that DBFILBTH THB SaBBATH SHALL ]>IB. Ex. XXx!. 14. 

Ridley end Latimer burned at Oxford, 1555. 

16. Matthew Henry bom, 1662. 

Surrender of Lord Cornwallis at Torktown, 1782. 

Battle of Navarino, 1827. 

Battle of Trafalgar. Death of Lord Nelson, 1805. 

Rev. Archibald Alexander died, 1851. 

Froh okb Sabbath to amothbr shall all worship. Is. Ixvi. 23. 

Edict of Nantes revoked by Louis XIV. of France^ 1685. 

Battle of Balaklava, 1854. 

Hogarth died, 1764. 

Michael Servetus burnt, 1553. 

Harvard College established, 1686. 

30. John Adams bora, 1735. 

Eybry Sabbath skt ih ordbb bhforh tbb Lord. Lby* zxiv. 8. 

Hallowe'en. 



Digitized by 



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•82 






Taesdty. 

Wednesday. 

Thnnday. 

Friday. 

•atnrday. 

Xonday. 

Tuesday. 

Wednesday. 

Thursday. 

TridaT. 

■atuToay. 

SmiDAT. 

Xonday. 

Tuesday. 

Wednesday. 

Thursday. 

Friday. 

Saturday. 

siriTDAy. 

Monday. 

Tuesday. 

Wednesday. 

Thursday. 

Friday. 

laturday. 

SmiDAY. 

Xonday. 

Tuesday. 

Wednesday. 



1 

t 

8 

4 

5 

« 

7 

• 

9 

K) 

11 

12 

18 

14 

15 

16 

17 

18 

19 

SO 

81 

88 

88 

84 

86 

86 

87 

88 

89 

80 



The ^eat earthquake at LiBbon, 17$5. 
8. Prince of Orange borUf 1650. 
Toplady born, 1740. 
Guadalonpe disoovered, 1403. 
Battle of Inkermann, Crimea, 1854. 

Oo FORTH OH THE S ABBATB ; KEEP WATCH OF THE IiORD. 2 EhljgS^ xL T. 

Battle of Tippecanoe. 1812. 

John Milton died, 1874. 

Declaration of William 3d of England, in favoar of PreBbjterianJi« 16UB. 

First meeting of Presbyteriaoa in Western Kew York, 1802. 

Luther bom, 1483. 

Richard Baxter born, 1815. 

There shall be 90 burdeit brought in 05 the S AiiAra. Neb. zUi. 19. 

Source of the River Nile, discovered by Bruce, 17.70. 

Articles of confederation adopted, 1777. 

Tea thrown overboard in Boston harbour, 1773. 

14. A shower of fiery meteors all over the United States, 1833. 

15. Rev. John Witherspoon died, 1794. 

16. Rev. John McMillan died, 1833. 

There rem aiseth a rest, a xebpuco ov Sabbatb. Heb. iv. 9. 
20. First Presbyterian Meeting House established in England, 1572. 
Lord Glive, of India, committed suicide, 1774. 

24. Rev. Jas. Caldwell, of revolutionary memoiy, ssnrdered, 1781. 
John Knox died, 1572. 

Isaac Watts, D. D., died, 1748. 

Convention of United States and England bold, 1828. 

God did rest or the Sabbath day frox all his works. Bob. It.4. 

25. Qeneral Havelock died, 1857. 
Revolt in Poland, 1830. 

Articles of peace signed hj Eqgland and Am«riea, 1782. 



tsmitt. 



Thursday. 

IMdur. 

Saturday. 

SUHDAT. 

Monday. 

Tuesday. 

Wednesday. 

Thursday. 

Mday. 

Saturday. 

SVHDAT. 

Xonday. 

Tuesday. 

Wednesday. 

Thursday. 

Ttiday. 

Saturday. 

SXnfDAT. 

Xonday. 

Tuesday. 

Wednesday. 

Thursday. 

IHday. 

Saturday. 

SUNDAY. 

Xonday. 

Tuesday. 

Wednesday. 

Thursday. 

Friday. 

Satnrdaj. 



1 

8 

8 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

18 

18 

14 

lA 

16 

17 

18 

19 

SO 

81 

88 

88 

84 

86 

86 

87 

88 

89 

80 

81 



Alexander, Emperor of Russia, died, 1826. 

Louis Napoleon declared Emperor of Franee^ 1852. 

Battle of Uohenlinden, 1800. 

Keep vt Sabbaths ahd take bold of kt Ootuast. Is. lvi.4. 

Authorised English Bible iwued, 1611. 

Wbitefield bom, 1714. 

Gates of Derry shut, 188$. 

8th. American gold coinage of eaglei half and qaar. eagles began, 1792. 

American Embargo BUI, 1807* 

Luther bums the Popes' bull of ezcommnnication, 1520. 

He was TEACHiRe iH THE Stkagooue oe the S ABBATB. Luko JOiL 10. 

United States Constitution adopted by PennsyWania, 1787. 

Council of Trent opened, 1546. 

Oeorge Washington died, 1700. 

Qen. Anthony Wayne died, 1706. 

Great fire at New York, 1835. 

18. United SUtes Conatitntion adopted by New Jeney, 1787. 

The land enjoyed heb SABBAms. 2 Cbron. xxxxi. 21. 

18. Samuel Rogers, the poet, died, 1865. 

22. Hugh Miller died, 1856. 

Shortest day in the year. 

Landing of the Pilgrim Fathers at Plymouth Rock, 1620. 

Cotton died, 1652. 

Peaee with England, 1814. 

Cheistmas DAT. — We wovld hot but it oh THE S ABBATB. Neh. ix. 81. 

First record of the minutes of the Presbyteiy of Philadelphia, 1706; 

Rev. Dr. Mason of New York, died, 1829. 

Insurrection of Slarei in Jameiea. 1831. 

25. Battle of Trenton, New Jersey, 1776. 

PesfcmotiTe plague at ConsUntiaople, 1836. 

Wiokliffe died, 1884. 



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FBBSBTTBBUN HI8T0BI0AL ALMANAC. 28 

TIME AND PLACE OF MEETING 

or THB DIfriBBHT 

PRESBYTERIAN BODIES IN 1859. 



Thb Presbyterian Cfaarcb, (0. S.,) meets in Indianapolis, Ind., May 
19th, at 11 o'clock, A. M. 

The Presbyterian Church, (N. S.,) meets in Wilmington, Del., 
May 19th, at 11 o'clock, A. M. 

The United Synod of the Presbyterian Church meets in Lynch- 
burg, Va., May 19th, at 7f o'clock, P. M. 

The United Presbyterian Church meets in Xenia, Ohio, May 18th. 

The General Synod of the Reformed Presbyterian Church meets 
in Philadelphia, May 23rd, at 7J o'clock, P. M. 

The Synod of the Reformed Presbyterian Church meets in Alle- 
gheny City, May 24th, at 10 o'clock, A. M. 

The Associate Reformed Church, South, meets in Hopewell, Tenn., 
October 10th, at 7J o'clock, P. M. 

The Cumberland Presbyterian Church meets in Evansville, Ind., 
May 19th. 

The Free Presbyterian Ch. meets in Darlington, Pa., Oct. 27th. 

The Presbyterian Church of Canada meets in Toronto, June 14th. 

The United Presby'n Ch. of Canada meets in Toronto, June 118th. 

The Presbyterian Church of Canada, in connection with the 
Church of Scotland^ meets in Ottawa City, May 25th. 

The Presbyterian Church of Nova Scotia meets in New Glasgow, 
June 28th. The Synod of NoTa Scotia meets in Pictou June 29th. 

The Free Church of Nova Scotia meets in Halifax, June 2Sd. 

The Presbyterian Church of New Brunswick meets in St. John, 
June 16th. 

The Synod of New Brunswick, in connection with the Church of 
Scotland, meets in St. John, July 14th. 

The Church of Scotland meets ia Edinburgh, May 19th. 

The Free Church of Scotland meets in Edinburgh, May 19th. 

The United Presby'n Ch. of Scotland meets in Edinburgh, May 2d. 

The Reformed Presby'n Ch. of Scotland meets in Glasgow, May 2d. 

The United Original Seceders of Scotland meet in Glasgow, 
May 17th. 

The Synod of the Church of Scotland, in England, meets in Lon- 
don, May 8d. 

The Presbyterian Church in England meets in London, April 18th. 

The Reformed Presbyterian Church of Ireland meets in Belfast, 
Jane 27th. 

The Eastern Reformed Presbyterian Church of Ireland m^ts in 
Belfast, July 14th. 

The Presbyterian Church in Ireland meets in Dublin, July 4th. 



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THE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH, (0. S.) 



Thb Sbvbntibth Session op thb General Assembly, (0. S.) 
OP THE Presbyterian Church in the United States op Akeri- 
CA, met according to appointment, in the First Presby teriaa Church 
in the city of New Orleans, on Thursday, the 6th of May, A. D. 
1858 ; and was opened with a discourse by the retiring Moderator. 

$i8t0sm Irs ^t^^ (LatihrOit Vu ^mithtt, $* $. 

Cor. xiii. 11. Be of one mind, live in peace, and the God of love and peace shall 
be with you. 

Unity, Pbaoe, and Blessedness are the three thoughts which 
shine forth from the text, in the blended rays of Divine truth. 

I. " Be of one Mind.*' — Let us be unanimous in our general 
views of religion. Let there be no division among us in regard to 
Bible doctrine. Christian experience, or religious duty. 

1. Doctrines are the glory of revelation. When sin had smit- 
ten with death the souls of our original parents, the dawn of the 
first promise of a Redeemer came to tlie world with the joy of 
angels, and with hope to lost men. The atonement of the Lord Je- 
sus Christ is revelation's substance and glory. As our blessed Lord 
was born and ascended to Heaven again, with the retinue of wit- 
nessing and glorifying angels, so his atonement upon the Cross re- 
ceives the homage of all the promises, prophecies, and providences 
of unfolding redemption. Every promise in the darkness of the 
old dispensation twinkled with theGod-light of Jesus Christ. The 
prophecies, like attending guards, relieved each other with renewed 
strength to watch over the advent of the Son of Man. All the 
providences were the demonstrations of God's ceaseless care of his 
truth, and were the perpetual memorials, in the vista of ages, of 
the great principles of salvation. Doctrine is the basis of the tem- 
ple, which goes up with the shoutings of "grace unto it" 

Doctrines are essential, inborn characteristics of the plan of sal- 
vation. They are the mountain ranges which traverse the system 
of the world of grace, whose solid strata are old as the eternal ages; 
from whose sides flow down rills and rivers to gladden the earth ; 
and whose peaks lift up their heads to the skies, in the grandeur 
and mystery of heights inaccessible. 

The Church ought to be unanimous in regard to the nature of 

Christian doctrines. The churches of the Beformation enjoyed a 

substantial unity of belief. The crucifixion of the Son of God, as 

an atoning sacrifice, original sin, total depravity, regeneration by 

4 (26) 



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26 PBSSBTTERIAK HISTORICAL ALMANAC 

the Spirit, justification by faith, electing love and persevering^raoe, 
resurrection from the dead, and eternal retribution in heaven or 
hell, received universal homage. The world never loved these 
doctrines and never will. 

The ingenuity of perverse interpretation is unwilling to submit 
to tests which expose its object. Creeds are by some declared to 
be hostile to freedom of inquiry, and to liberty of conscience; by 
others they are received for "substance of doctrine," or for shadow 
of truth. No wonder that errorists dread them. Framed from the 
Bible, they search out heresy with the mighty power of discerning 
and uncompromising orthodoxy. 

Let us " be of one mind" in preaching and teaching these doo- 
trines of salvation. The Presbyterian Church has been truly cha- 
racterized as a doctrine-loving Church. Doctrine is the basis of 
effectual instruction. Exhortation, good in its place, degenerates 
into sound, when unaccompanied by appeals to the understandiDg. 
Moral essays and philosophical speculations are disingenuous sub- 
stitutes. God moves the heart through the mind ; and the mind 
through the truth. Doctrine must be preached, and taught with 
seal and earnestness, with passionate sensibility, in demonstration 
of the Spirit, and with power. It must be taught, not only in the 
public preaching, but in the forms of the Catechism— of the re- 
nowned Catechism of the Westminster Assembly — a Catechism, 
which boldly, simply, expressively, conveys the sublimest truths of 
God to the minds of children and youth. It is the religious mas- 
ter-work of question and answer. Through Divine grace, it has 
catechized many a soul into the gates of Heaven ; and its very 
echoes, sent back to the earth, urge to perseverance in the " good 
old way" of teaching sinners to " glorify God and enjoy him for- 
ever." 

2. Again, nnity in regard to the views of Christian experience 
18 of the utmost consequence to the Church. Truth is promotive 
of godliness. Those who are favoured with purity of doctrine are 
bound to hold it in purity of life. Orthodoxy is associated in dull 
and inimical minds with want of spiritual devotion ; whereas, the 
true knowledge of God is the natural and spiritual antecedent of 
holiness. 

Christian experience has its origin in the power of the Holy 
Ghost. '^ Be ye of one mind," brethren, in reference to the true 
source of spiritual life in our fallen nature. Error imperils immor- 
tality. God alone can give life to the '* dead in trespasses and in 
sins." " Which were born not of hhod; nor of tJie will of the flesh ; 
nor of the will of man f^ these three negatives exhaust all supposa- 
ble cases of human instrumentality. What then ? What is the 
only other conceivable supposition ? The only possible author of 
regeneration is God himself. 

The work of grace is, in its naiure^ a progressive work, in the 
experience of the saints. They '*grow in grace, and in the know- 
ledge of the Lord Jesus." " Not as though they were already per- 
feot," but they *' press toward the mark." Behold the verdure of 



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TfilB PBSSBTTSmAir CHGBOH, (Q. 8») 27 

Bpring, bow renewed life ezpanda in the lea^f and the bnd, which 
grow up in gladness to their perfect form; blown about, indeed, by 
rude winds and stormy rains, and yet nurtured into maturity by 
the invigorating roughness of elemental strife. So the Christian 
has growth in the implanted power of quiokening grace. 

The evidences of conversion are in holy living. ''By their fruits 
ye shall know them." Let no roan say, " We have Abraham to opr 
father." 

The greatest test of conversion by the Spirit 13 in walking in the 
Spirit. ''For they that are afler the flesh, do mind the things of 
the flesh ; and they that are afWr the Spirit, the things of the Spirit." 
Likeness to Je^us Christ is the great aim lyad result of the plan of 
redemption. 

Vital piety should ever claim in the Church uniformity of mind. 
Let us take care that the Gospel be preached by faithful men. 
Let us take care that the Church receive into her communion, so 
far as human administration can secure it, true sons and daughters. 
Not numbers ; not the mighty, or the learned in fame ; not the 
self*confident in character ; but the poor in spirit, the children of 
penitence and faith, the broken-hearted, the bapti^sed of God, the 
pure in heart, and the holy in life — these conatUute strength in the 
Church and bring glory to the et^nal King. 

3. " Be ye of one mind" in viewB of Christian duty ; be unani- 
mous in advancing the kingdom of our Lord Jesus Christ, to the 
utmost of all capability, in the individual believer, or through or- 
ganized Church effort. Christianity first recreates, and then sends 
forth into service. It makes anew, in order ^ set to do. The 
work of advancing the cause of redemption is co-work with God. 
To help forward the kingdom of the Sou of Man is to sympathize 
with his life of benevolence, his mediatorial su£EeidngB, b^ ^xaltefl 
intercession, his universal dominion. 

Fathers and mothers of the Church, be ye unanipioiiui in self- 
denying and persevering efforts, through Divine grace, in impress- 
ing religion upon the minds of your children. Never ckn there 
be a substitute for household education. The family is the church 
in the house. After the flood, God gave the bow as a pledge of 
perpetual seedtime and harvest, and he gave the covenant as the 
pledge and channel of salvation to the children of believers, until 
the harvest of the end of the world. The covenant with Abraham 
was a family covenant ; and the Divine proiaisee, like the cover- 
ings of the tabernacle, curtain with miraculous texture the cradles 
of babes. " Oh," said Bichard Baxter, " if parents did but do their 
duty to their children, iew souls need be converted under the 
preaching of the word." 

The carrying of the truth to living men by the living ministry is 
the divinely appointed method of public aggression upon the world 
lying in wickedness. And the Presbyterian Church, in Divine 
providence, is of one mind in doing this work in the name of 
the Church, and under the authority of the Church. Being abso- 
lutely unaaimous in our views of the duty^ and of the methods of 



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28 FBSSBYTEBIAN HI8TORI0AL ALHAKAC. 

evangelizing the world, what we lack is, to press forward in oar 
plans. 

11. "LiVB IN Peace." — This is the second injunction of the 
text. Living in peace is a true correlative of being of one mind. 
Spiritual congeniality of feeling sweetly accompanies agreement ia 
sentiment. Heart unanimity is a glorious form of religious one- 
ness. Religion is " first pure ; then peaceable." 

1. The nature of the peace recommended, includes hve to our 
brethren in Christ, and good will towards all men. To live in peace, 
is to love the saints of Christ. Our blessed Lord laid great empha- 
sis upon the kind treatment of every soul redeemed by his blood. 
"Verily, I say unto you, inasmuch as you have done it unto the 
least of these my brethren, ye have done it unto me." Hence the 
urgency of the injunctions: "Be kindly affectioned one to another; 
in honour preferring one another." " Let brotherly love continue." 
" Love as brethren ; be pitiful, be courteous." Yea, we are even 
commanded to "lay down our lives for the brethren." 

Good will towards all men is also an element of a life of peace. 
True benevolence of heart seeks the good of others and never their 
harm. "As much as lieth in you, live peaceably with all men." 

2. The obligations to peace are manifest and manifold. 

(1.) Peace is the fruit of the Spirit. " We have passed from 
death unto life, because we love the brethren." 

(2.) The good of the Church is another of the obligations to live 
in peace. " Behold, how good and how pleasant it is for brethren 
to dwell together in unity ;" it is good in itself, and it is a pleasant 
and commendatory exhibition of the power of the Gospel. The 
Church suffers immeasurably by needless and sinful controversies. 
The controversies in our own Church, in past years, however 
necessary on the side of righteousness, produced much serious 
injury. 

(3.) The happiness of the individual is an obligation to live 
peaceably. The stirrer up of strife among brethren is, first a mur- 
derer, and then commits suicide. He destroys his own peace of 
mind in his work of injuring others. Deadly and tormenting are 
"hatred, variance, emulation, wrath, strife." How widely diflfer- 
ent is the peacemaker ! " Blessed are the peacemakers ; for they 
shall be called the children of God." 

(4.) A regard for the salvation of others is an obligation to live 
a life of peace. Much evil is done to thousands who are without, 
by unamiable exhibitions of spirit, and by a persistence of contro- 
versial inclinations, which savour not of the things that be Christ's. 
Many a controversy has turned away hearers from the instructions 
of the sanctuary, and thus incidentally destroyed souls. 

(6.) The Heavenly state shows the obligations to a life of peace. 
No angel in glory disturbs the harmony of the heavenly abode ; no 
saint in light provokes discord among the perfect ones in Christ 
Jesus. 

8. The manifestations of peace in our lives, may be briefly illus- 
trated in reference to our own Church, and in its relation to other 



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THE FRSSBYTEBIAN CHUBOH, (O. 8.) 29 

oburches. In our oivn Churchy the manifestations of peace con- 
sist, in part, in a kind and conciliatory treatment of all sectional 
questions. Few strifes are more violent than those of this charac- 
ter; nor is the Church free from them. The mighty torrent of 
political agitation, which has its periodical seasons of high over- 
flow, sometimes crevasses inundation into the rich and cultivated 
possessions of the Church. But, instead of contention, such a crisis 
demands harmony. All Christians must learn to bear and forbear 
with one another. Fortunately for the Presbyterian Church, the 
world has not only witnessed a mutual forbearance in different 
sections of our country, on one of the most divisive of all sectional 
questions, but also a substantial agreement in the principles which 
underlie the whole subject. 

The meeting of our body in this great city of the Southwest, 
the capital of the first slave territory acquired by the United 
States, is, itself, a telegraph to the whole country of the peace 
which prevails among Old School Presbyterians. At a period of 
intense general excitement throughout the land, it may be affirmed 
in advance, that, on whatever other questions divisions of sentiment 
may arise in this body, its peace cannot be interrupted by discussions 
on this one. And the reason is, not that the General Assembly ever 
has, or ever will, compromise principle, before God or man, but 
because its deliverances have been made in the light of Scriptural 
truth ; received, perhaps, with some shades of difference, but ac- 
quiesced in and acted upon in the spirit of Christian moderation. 

A life of peace may be further manifested in the Church, in our 
personal intercourse with our brethren. Happy is he who lives with 
prayer on his lips and with love in his heart I Oh, how lovely is 
a loving man I 

Fathers and brethren I M^y the manifestations of peace in these 
and in all other respects, show our prevalent desire to serve God 
in all sincerity, wisdom, and meekness; and may the world say of 
us, with an admiration compelled by our peaceful lives, "Behold, 
how these Christians love one another.** 

The manifestations of peace in our relations to other Churches may 
be shown in two particulars : 

Presbyterians, so far as I am aware — although being one of them, 
not, therefore, an impartial witness — but so far as I am aware, 
Presbyterians are not specially obnoxious in the community, for 
the exclusiveness of their religious claims. They, indeed, love 
their own Church, as a dutiful child loves a precious mother, who 
has nursed with tenderness, consecrated to God with faith, and 
trained up for heaven with zeal. But Presbyterians love all other 
evangelical Churches, — all " mothers in Israel," — to whatever tribe 
in the true commonwealth they belong. It is sufficient, and I 
hope not too much, to say, that Presbyterians do not unchurch 
other denominations; that they always recognize as brethren, the 
ministers of other Christian Churches; and that they have never 
exalted either the Lord's Supper or Baptism as the necessary 
means of true access to God on the part of the penitent believer. 



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8iO FREsdrrtilttAK Ml^tomokL almanac. 

Anotheir temptation in otlr relation to other churches^ i$ unne- 
cessary ecclesiastical c<mtrovetsy with them. Let me not be miff- 
understood. There ai*iB times and seaBons when it is the doty of 
Christians to follotr controversy, to resist error, to "contend ear- 
nestly for the faith." Praise be to the God of Zion, for the cham-^ 
pions whom he raised up in periods of danger, to protect our banner 
upon the ramparts ! Yes, brethren, there is a time to fight ; we have 
all seen that day, and may live to see it again. Bat there is too 
much controversy ; there id a time for peace. Although we may 
not agree with the denominational peculiarities of other Churches, 
it becomes us to cultirate their fraternal intercourse. When con- 
troversy is forced upon us, it, of course, cannot be avoided ; but we 
may so live as to disarm controversy of much of its offensive and 
aggressive power. Above all, our Church need not contend with 
other Churches in regard to externals, which do not necessarily in- 
volve error of doctrine. For example, an Episcopalian may hold 
to the Apostolic succession, as Cranmer did, in a sense that does 
not exclude the acknowledgment of the ministry of all evangelical 
Churches, or may defend the rite of Confirmation on grounds per- 
fectly consistent with religious toleration. Other points might be 
specified. The principle of peace is, for all churches to endeavour 
to hold the peculiarities of their own inalienable liberty in a way 
that does not encroach upon the liberty of others. 

III. First Unity^ then Peace^ then BUssedness. "The God of 
loVe and peace shall be with you." 

What a honefUl indication of the blessings that follow unity and 
peace is found in the very names here claimed by Qt>d ! He is the 
God " of love and peace." 'the head of the Church appropriates 
to himself a character that insures the prosperity of all his crea* 
tures, who possess the same moral attributes. 

God is the God of " love and peace." Love goes with " peace ;" 
and he is called the God of peace, fitst^ because he is the soured 
of all peace. He is the only, the all-sufficient and the inexhausti- 
ble source of peace to angels throughout the universe, to the saints 
made perfect in light, and to human beings upon the earth. 
Secondly^ God is the God of peace, because he alone secures peace 
to any of his creatures. As he is its source, so he is the author of 
it in others, wherever it is found. He originates it in created mind, 
and cultivates it, and preserves it as the "Prince of peace." And 
thirdly, he is the God of peace, because he takes infinite delight in 
its exhibitions among all Who serye him, on earth or in heaven. 

"And the God of love and peace shall be with you." 

1. He will bless his Church with the indwelling of his Soly 
Spirit. The Spirit delights to abide with them who love one an- 
other. " The fruit of righteousness is sown in peace, of them 
that make peace." The cultivation of the graces of religion is im- 
peded by divisions, "for where envy and strife is, there is con- 
fusion and every evil work." The Spirit has often been grieved 
away by the absence of love among brethren. He has been 
quenched in the hearts of individual telievers, in the circle of the 



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THB PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH, (O. S.) tfl 

household, and in the sanctuary of the Most High. Oh, hovf* often 
have revivals of religion been hindered or arrested by some rising 
jealousy, or disaffection, or disagreement 1 How often have meet- 
ings of Presbyteries, and Synods, and General Assemblies, beeti 
deprived of the presence and grace of the Holy Spirit, by ill-tem- 
pered zeal, and unfratcriial conduct I If we would enjoy the pre- 
sence of the God of grace, we liinst "endeavour to keep the unity 
of the Spirit in the bond of peace." 

2. Again, " the God of love and peace will be with you," to en- 
large the prosperity of the Church in his providence. The Church 
makes the greatest progress in times of inward peace. When all 
her members love one another, see eye to eye, and work hand to 
hand ; when prayer and supplication are united and fervent ; when 
there is no division in doctrine or policy, and no alienation among 
her niembers, then her records show a power of advancement un- 
known to the evil times of discord. 

With continued unity and peace in our councils, our Church, 
which is the largest national Church in the land, will go onward, 
with increasing prosperity, to win souls to Christ, and bring na- 
tions to the obedience of the faith. "Peace be within thy walls, 
and prosperity within thy palaces." 

8. Once more, " the God of love and peace will be with his lov- 
ing disciples, to crown them with salvation in his ghry,^^ "The 
meek will he beautify with salvation." The unity and peace of 
earth shall end in the large rewards of heaven. Our blessed Lord, 
in his last prayer, had in special view two things : the unity of 
his Church in its estate below, and its glory in the world above. 
Father, I will that they also, whom thou hast given me, be with 
me where I am, that they may behold my glory^ which thou hast 
given me." 

Fathers and brethren of the General Assembly, I claim your in- 
dulgence before closing this discourse, whilst I appeal, in behalf of 
unity and peace, in the name of the faithful dead in Jesus Christ, 
who have gone to slefep since our meeting last year in Lexington. 
They have done with all the labours, strifes, temptations, and care» 
of earth. They have gone up to " the General Assembly and Church 
of the first born, whose names are written in heaven." The vener- 
able form of Father Moody, saint-like and lamb-like, will never 
more bless his brethren among the springs of Pebnsylvania. Auld, 
of Florida, gifted in mind and heart, and abundant in missionary 
labours, even to the overburdening of a frail frame; his body shall 
yet be full of vigour, and his crown wear the evergreen of heaven. 
Shannon, of Ohio, earnest in life, was no less earnest to depart, and 
to dwell beside the river that makes glad the city of our God. Fin- 
ley, of Alabama, logical, candid, open-hearted, was wasted by dis- 
ease, until his noble intellect became impaired; but he recovered 
his reason in the very hour before his final departure, and soared 
away into fulness of light. Edmunds, of New Jersey, youthfully 
energetic, with all the clothing of aged humility, went away in the 
vigour of years into the land where work is no • more toil. Dear 



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82 PRESBYTERIAN HISTORICAL ALMANAC 

Daniel Baker, of the Lone Star State, with his tongue of truth 
and heart of flame, shall no more preach Jesus on earth, either in 
the new or in the '* blessed old States;*' but hundreds of stars shall 
flash the light of Christ's glory from his crown of rejoicing. Dk- 
RUBLLE was struck down by the visitation of God, in the woods 
of North Carolina, like a towering pine riven by a thunderbolt. 
Wyly, of Tennessee, was wrapped away from these scenes of dark- 
ness, in the holy mystery of a sorrowful and unsearchable Provi- 
dence. Brown, descended from that noble spiritual ancestry of 
Virginia, which is loftier than the boasts of worldly genealogy, has 
gone to the fellowship of "the first born of every creature." John 
0. Young, of Kentucky, a prince of Israel in personal presence, 
character, acquirement, position, influence, and usefulness, and whose 
concern for Centre College was like that of Elijah for Bethel, has 
gone upward amid the exclamations, " My father, my father, the cha- 
riot of Israel and the horsemen thereof I" 

On Ganges' banks, " where every prospect pleases, and only man 
is vile," behold a company of beloved missionaries awaiting death 
with meek and undaunted spirit, before the double threatenings of 
Brahma's vengeance, and the false prophet's curse. The serene dig- 
nity of the disciples of the Lord in the hour of danger, exacts, as 
with the authority of their King, forbearance from the wonted per- 
sonal indignities. The last prayer is offered from submissive and 
exultant hearts, and incense-like, it is wafted to heaven, whilst the 
dark smoke of murderous musketry palls the dead bodies of Freb- 
HAN, and Campbell, and MoMullin, and Johnson. Blessed fol- 
lowers of the martyred Stephen! Before ye "fell asleep," saw ye 
not " the heavens opened, and the Son of man standing at the right 
hand of God?" 

All these ministers of the Church, with a score of others, not less 
faithful, who have died during the year, and whose memorials will 
survive the scrolling up of time, admonish all of us, who remain, 
of our duty and our doom — of the divine contingeneies, which, in 
another year, may make as strange selections of death — unexpected 
always to the living, but by God's grace, made welcome to the dying. 

Fathers and brethren I Know we not that these departed servants 
of Christ, could they return to earth, would "seek peace and pursue 
it ?" Oh, how the visions of heaven nurture unity and love I Soon 
our own earthly labours will end, and we be laid in the grave, with 
guarded repose, until the resurrection. For us, pastoral relations, 
Church Sessions, Presbyteries, Synods, and General Assemblies, will 
very soon be no more. In the name of mortals ready to be trans- 
figured into immortality, in the name of the spirits of just men made 
perfect, in the name of the Mediator of the new covenant, the Lord 
of all, " whose blood speaks better things than that of Abel," I be- 
seech you to be united in the truth, and to love one another. "Be 
of one mind, live in peace, and the God of love and peace shall be 
with you." 

After the Sermon, the Moderator proceeded to constitute the ses- 
sions with prayer. 



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THS FSEaBYTSiOAN OHURCH, (O. 8.) 



88 



The Stated Clerk then reported that the following persoDS had 
been duly appointed, and were enrolled as Oommissioners to this 
General Assembly, viz.: 



llmlrtn id % StinMi Smm. 



MIHOTIBHI* 


PKHSBITBUUW. 


8TVOD8. 


RDLDrO KLDBBS. 


Adamb, W. T., p. 


Peoria. 


Illinois. 


A.S.McKinney. 


AtkiDBOD, JoflephM.,p. 


Orange. 


North Carolina. 


.•••«. 


AXHOD, I. S.K., p. 


Hopewell. 


Georgia. 


Thos. R Cobb. 


Axtel, GharleB, p. 


Rock River. 


Chicago. 


A. K. Philleo. 


Baird, B. T.. 8. 8. 
Barber, D. M., w. a 


Tombeckbee. 


Mississippi. 
Philadelphia. 


W. B. Cavanah. 


Northnmberkind. 


A. Hepburn. 


Barkley, A. H., 8. b. 


Knoxville. 


NashTille. 


...••• 


Barrett, Myron, p. 


Newton. 


New Jersey. 




Biahop, Pierpont E., p. 


Harmony. 


South Carolina. 


Esra M.Gr'egg. 


Bishop, William, w. o. 


Madison. 


Indiana. 


Robert Marshall. 


BittiDger, M. H., 8. 8. 


Greenbrier. 


Virginia. 


R V. Shanklin. 


Blair, W.C.,8.8. 


Western Texas. 


Texas. 


Warwick TunstaU 


Bland, P. R., s. s. 


Memphis. 
NewToik. 


Memphis. 
New York. 


T.M.Shelby. 


Botsford, Eli 0., p. 


John Stuart. 


Bowman, Francis, p. 


Geoi^a. 


Georgia. 


■•••«• 


Breckinridge, B. J., pbf 


. West Lexington. 


Kentucky. 


Glass Marshall. 


Caldwbll, J. M. M., PHs. Cherokee. 


Geonria. 
Viiyinia. 


N. Hart. 


Calhoun, Philo, t. 


Montgomery. 


Wm. 0. Hapan. 


Cambem, H. H., p. 


White Water. 




Jam. Hendricks. 


Campbell, R. B., 8. s. 


Central Mississippi. Mississippi 


R. Bamett. 


Carnahan, D. T„ p. 


Baltimore. 


Baltimore. 


Wm. B. Canfield. 


Cathcart, William, p. 


Port Wayne. 


Northern Indiana. 




Cleland, James, p. 


Ogdensburgh. 


Buffalo. 




Colton, Simeon. 8. s. 
Cowan, John P., p. 


Fayetteville. 


Northern Carolina 


k. Barthoi'w.*Fuller. 


St. Louis. 


Missouri. 


Archibald Gamble. 


Crane, W. H., t. 


Florida. 


Georgia. 




Craven, E. R, p. 


Passaic 


New Jersey. 


WiHiam Rankin. 


Criswell, R. A., p. 


Sangamon. 


Illinois. 


N. English. 


Crow, George^ C, s. s. 


Platte. 


Upper Missouri. 
Allegheny. 




Cunningham, David A., i 


\ All^heny City. 




Cunningham, Wm. M., i 


•. Flint River. 


Georgia. 
North Carolina. 




Cnrrie, Archibald, p. 


Orange. 


C. L. Payne. 


DOAK, D. G., 8. 8. 


North Mississippi. Memphis. 


G.W.Buford. 


Doak, S. W., PM. 


Holston. 


Nashvine. 


••■.•. 


Drake, J. M., 8. 8. 


Cincinnati 


Cincinnati. 


T.P.Beggs. 


Drake, R T., p. 
Dumont, A. H., w. a 


Des Moines. 


Southern Iowa. 




Connecticut. 


New York. 




Eaoleton, John, p. 


Washington. 


Wheeling. 


Edw. H. Pitzhugh. 


Edward?, John, P.M. 


Indian. 


Arkansas. 


J. P. Kingsbury. 


Emerson, E., p. 


Carlisle. 


Baltimore. 


James McClure. 


Emerson, T. P., s. 8. 


Manmee. 


Cincinnati. 




English, James T., p. 
Erddne, Ebenezer, w. a 


Eli2abeAtown. 


New Jersey. 
Philadelphia. 




Donegal. 




FiNDLAT, John R, p. 


Erie. 


Allegheny. 
Cincinnati. 


Michael Van Tuyl 


Findley, W. T., p. 


Miami. 


Floyd, Moses, w. c. 


Huntingdon. 


Philadelphia. 




Ford, J. Franklin, p. 
6 


Red River. 


Mississippi. 


Digitized by VjOO^ 



S4 



FBESBYTBRIAN HISTORIOAL ALHAKAO. 



MnnSTERS. 



PRBSBrnCRTlM. 



SYNODS. 



suLnia 



Galbratth, R. C, p. 
Green, Lewis W., prs. 
Grier, John W.. chp. 



Baltimore. 
Transylvania. 
New Castle. 



Baltimore. 
Eentacky. 
Philadelphia 



D. S. Goartnev. 
Robert Rassell. 



Grimes. W. M., p. 


St. Clairsville. 


Wheeling. 


John W. Milligan. 


Grimes, W. Morris, p. 


Zanesville. 


Ohio. 


J. K. Caldwell. 


Hall, David, p. 


Allegheny. 


Allegheny. 


Nathaniel Cooper. 


Halley, E., p. 


Albany. 


Albany. 


Arch. McClure. 


Hal8ey,L.J., p. 


Louisville. 


Kentucky. 


Samuel Cassaday. 


fiamill, Hagh, prin. 


New Brunswick. 


New Jersey 


1 • 


Hanna, James W., p. 


Wooster. 


Ohio. 




Harrison, Elias, p. 


Winchester. 


Baltimore. 


J. Carr Baker. 


Harrison, W. A., p. 


Nashville. 


Nashville. 





Hatch, L. D., s. s. 


Tuscaloosa. 


Alabama. 


Patrick May. 


Hay, Lawrence G., f. x. 


Allahabad. 


Northern India. 




Henry, R. W., p. 


Chicago. 


Chicago. 




Hepburn, Slater C, p. 


Hudson. 


New York. 




Hewit, Nathaniel, p. 


New York. 


New York. 


Walter Lowrie. 


Hill George, p. 


Blairsville. 


Pittsburgh. 


Z. G. Stewart 


Hoge, James, w. a 


Columbus, 


Ohio. 


William M. Awl. 


Hoge, W. J., PRP. 


West Hanover. 


Virginia. 


William D. Hart 


Holmes, James, s. s. 


Western District 


Memphis. 


S.W.Penn. 


Hoovier, Thomas D., p. 


New Brunswick. 


New Jersey. 


Wm. R. Murphy. 


Howe, George, prf. 


Charleston. 


South Carolina. 


Dan. S. Henderson. 


Howell, Jesse L., p. 


Bedford. 


New York. 


W.P.V.Renssehier. 


Hoyt, T. A., p, 


South Carolina. 


South Carolina. 


William Phillips. 


Hughes. S.K., w.o. 


Richland. 


Ohio. 





Hynes, Thomas W., p. 


Kaskaskia. 


Illinois. 


Joseph T. Eccles. 


Jambs, A. A., p. 


Bethel. 


South Carolina. 


John Enox. 


Jones, John, p. 


GenesBee River. 


Buffalo. 


, 


Junkin, D. X., p. 


Huntingdon. 


Philadelphia. 


WUliamBaird. 


Krieider, B. S., p. 


Ooncord. 


North Carolina. 


Alexander Long. 


Ladd, F. D., p. 


PhiladelphiA. 


Philadelphia. 




Logan, S. 0„ p. 


Cincinnati. 


Cincinnati. 


Lewis Whiteraan. 


Long, L. H., p. 


Sidney. 


Cincinnati. 


John M. Glover. 


Love, S. J., p. 


Lexington. 


Virginia. 


Wm. C. Lewis. 


Martin, 0. B. H., s. s. 


New Albany. 


Indiana. 


J. H. McCampbell. 


Martin, Edward, p. 


East Hanover. 


Virginia. 


Abel Head. 


McClelland, A. C, p. 


Logansport. 


Northern Indiana. 


George Gilleford. 


McGaughey, Alex., p. 


Redstone. 


Pittsburgh. 




McGill. A. T., PRF. 


New Brunswick. 


New Jersey. 




McKay, Clement V., p. 


Ohio. 


Pittsburgh. 




McKean, John, p. 


Clarion. 


Pittsburgh. 


...... 


Mc Kinney, David, rdt. 


Ohio. 


Pittsburgh. 


Samuel Rea. 


McKinney, John, w. c. 


Chicago. 


Chicago. 


Eiios Tomkins. 


McMurray, Francis, p. 
McNair, Daniel, p. 


East Alabama. 


Alabama. 


C.H.Gingles. 
J. M. McCormick. 


Brazos. 


Texas. 


McQueen, D., p. 


Harmony. 


South Carolina. 


W. E. James. 


McWilliam, James, t. 


Susquehanna. 


New Jersey. 




Mershon, Stephen L., p. 


Long Island. 


New York. 




Miller, J. H., p. 
• Mitchell, Robert A., p. 


Chickasaw. 


Memphis. 


J. M. Dozier. 


Palestine. 


Indiana. 


James M. Miller. 


Mitchell, Wm. H.. p. 


Tuscumbia. 


Nashville. 





Montgomery, A. D., p. 
Moore, J. W., s. s. 


South Carolina. 


South Carolina. 


John Logan. 


Arkansas. 


Arkansas. 





Morris, George, p 


Carlisle. 


Baltimore. 


Samuel Wherry 



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THE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH, (O. 8.) 



86 



FRISBTTBRnS. 



8TVOD8. 



VaUXa SLDKR8. 



Mosgraye, Geo. W., a s. Philadelphia. 
OsB, Franklin, p. Saltsborgh. 



Painter, H. M., p. 
Palmer, B. M., p. 
Parke, N. G., p. 
Patteu, Hugh H., w. o. 
Perkins, C. H., p. 
Pitzer, A. W., s. s. 
Porter, Abner A., p. 
Prioe^ Robert, p. 

BANCiir, Alex. T., s. s. 
Ray, Charles, p. 
Rice, John H., p. 
Rockwell, J. Edaon, p. 

SATAOBfThomas, p. 
Scott, W. A., p. 
Seelye, E. £., s. s. 
Semple, Philo M., p. 
Sheetz, Wm. 0., p. 
Smith, Thomas G., s. s. 
Smith, ThoB. T., p. 
Smylie, J. A., 8. a. 
Spofford, L. 0., p. 
Sqaier, John, p. 
Stanton, R L., p. 
Stearns, T., p. 
Steele, John, s. s. 
Stevenson, David, p. 
Stewart, Daniel, p. 
Studdiford, P. A., p. 
Swanej, Alexander, agt. 
Symington, R. S., s. s. 

Taylor, H. W., s. s. 
Tenny, Levi, p. 
Thompson, J. H., a. a. 
Thomson, P. W., p. 
Tally, D., p. 



MissonrL 

New Orleans. 

Lnzerne. 

Yincennes. 

Marion. 

Highland. 

South Alabama. 



Buffalo River. 
Rochester City. 
Louisville. 
Nassau. 

Londonderry. 

California. 

Troy. 

Coshocton. 

Concord. 

PotosL 

Peoria. 

Louisiana. 

Winnebago. 

New Castle. 

Chillioothe. 

Iowa. 

Lake. 

Indianapolis. 

West Jersey. 

Raritan. 

Steubenville. 

La Fayette. 

Oxford. 
Central Texas 
East Mississippi. 
Schuyler. 
Albany. 



Van Rbhbbrlabb 0., o. s. Burlington. 



Waooonbr, David, p. 
Wallace, M. J., a. s. 
Williams, C. Foster, a. 8. 
Williams, Fenwick T., p. 
Williamson, Samuel, p. 
Willis, H. P. S., s. s. 
Worrall, John M., p. 



Beaver. 
Eastern Texas. 
Maury. 
North River. 
Ouachita. 
Palmyra. 
Ebenezer. 
Hocking. 
St Paul. 



Philadelphia. 

Pittsburgh. 

Missouri. 

Mississippi. 

New Jersey. 

Indiana. 

Ohio. 

Upper Miaaonri. 

Alabama. 

MisaissippL 

Buffalo. 
Buffalo. 
Kentucky. 
New York. 

Albany. 

Pacific. 

Albany. 

Ohio. 

North Carolina. 

Missouri. 

Illinois. 

Mississippi. 

Wisconsin. 

Philadelphia. 

Cincinnati. 

Southern Iowa. 

Northern Indiana. 

Indiana. 

New Jersey. 

New Jersey. 

Wheeling. 

Upper Missouri. 

Cincinnati. 

Texas. 

Mississippi. 

Chicago. 

Albany. 

New Jersey. 

» 
Allegheny. 
Texas. 
Nashville. 
New York. 
Arkansas. 
Missouri. 
Kentucky. 
Ohio. 
Iowa. 



William A. Piper. 

J, E. Caruthera. 

James Quarlea. 
Frederick Stringer. 



A. B. McKee. 



James M. Calhoun. 
Israel Spencer. 

A.W.Paige. 
Laurens Reeve. 



Alex. Thompson. 
Thos. fi. McRorie. 



J. R Galtney. 



William Wilson. 
David Wills. 
Denlse Denise. 



G. H. Van Odder. 



John Ebersole. 
A.W.Hutchina. 



James Panckey. 
G. S. Collins. 
Thomas Geddes. 
S. B. Edwards. 



J. A. Lawrence. 
James M. Trierson. 



Joel W. Hanna. 
Moses Faqua. 
E.W.Bedinger. 
A. G. Brown. 
G. W. Farrington. 



DELSiJATES FROM CORRESPONDING BODIES. 

Oenerd Synod of the Reformed Dutch Church — Rev. Talbot W. Chaxbirs^ d j>. 
JseociaU Reformed Synod of the South — Rev. J. M. Young. 



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86 FBBSBTTBBIAN HISTORICAL ALMANAC. 

The Assembly proceeded to the election of a Moderator ; and be- 
fore the announcement of the rote, there being three candidates, it 
was, on motion, 

Ordered^ That in this, and all subsequent elections by thia Assem- 
bly, a majority of all the votes given shall be necessary to a choice. 

The Kev. William A. Scott, of the Presbytery of California, 
having received a majority of all the votes given, was declared duly 
elected Moderator, and assumed the Chair. 

The Rev. David X. Jcnkin, having received a majority of all tbe 
votes given, was oihoseii Temporary Clerk. 



§iU8 snli Mniuti. 

The Committee on Bills and Overtures, Rev. Cortlandt Vaw 
RsN^ssLAEB Chairman,, reported the following overtures : 

Overture, No. L — A request from the Presbytery of West Hanover, to change the 
time of meeting of the Synod of Yirginia, in the town of OharlotteviOe, from the 
20th of October, to the 3d of November next, at 12 o'clock, M. 

The Committee recommend that the change be made. Adopted. 

OwitTUBS, No. II. — ^Prom the Presbytery of Memphis, to " change Ae boundary 
line between the Synods of Nashville and Memphis, so that the Presbyterian chnrch in 
Savannah, Hardin County, Tennessee, si mated on the east bank of the Tennessee River, 
and within the ecclesiastical boands of the Presbytery of Tuscambia, and Synod of 
Nashville, may be within the bounds of the Synoa and Presbytery of Memf^is." 

The Committee recommend that the petition be granted. Adopted. 

OvBimmB, No. m. — ^A request from the Be^. Williara 0. Mosher, of the Presbytery 
ef Stockton, to be transferred ttom said Presbytenr, which is at present without a 
quorum of attending members, to the Presbyterv of Michigan, within tiie bounds of 
which he has, in the providence of God, been called to hibonr. 

The Committee recommend that the request be granted. Adopted. 

OvEBTUSE, No. TV 4 — An afiplication from the Presbytery of White Water, to re- 
ceiTe bto membership, the Kev. J. A. Devine, a foreign minister of the United 
Presbyterian Church of Oana^ who, hasfing spent the requisite time under the care 
of the Presbytery of Baltimore, although only seven months within their bounds, had 
been dismissed by that Presbytery to the Presbytery of White Water, and after ex- 
amination, been received under its care. 

The Committee recommend that the rnle of the Assembly, re- 
quiring a foreign minister to spend a whole year under the care 
of the Presbytery that desires to receire him into membership, be 
not suspended in the present case. Adopted. 

OvKBTtna, No. Y. — From the Presbytery of Palestine, to be transferred from 
the Synod of Indiana to the Synod of filinois ; due notice having been given, by 
said Presbytery, to both Synods. 

The Committee recommend that the petition be granted. Adopted. 

OvKBTHitB, No. YI. — ^From the Presbytery of Knozyille, asking that the Psahna 
of David, in Bouse*s version, or in such other version as the Associate Reformed 
Synod of the South may prefer, be published in the front jyart of our present hymn 
books, provided that such a procedure be agreeable and satisilBkCtory to said Synod. 

The Committee recommend that no action be taken on the sub- 
ject at the present time. Adopted. 



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r>^^' 



m 



c^<^=:^€c: 



Pastor of Calvary PrestyteriaJi Cliurcli, San Francisco, Cal^ 
Moderator of the Gieneral Assembly, 1858. j 

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THE FBSSBTTJBBIAir CHUBOH, (O. 8.) 37 

OvnmnEB, No. yn.p— >A petition from the Presbyteay of I^ke Superior, id rela- 
tioD to its boandary lines, ana also a petitioa from certain members, stating that the 
Praibytery had been dissolved by the death of the Bev. T. R. Elder, one of its 
members. 

The Committee recommend the adoption of the following reso- 
lutions : 

Besolvkd, 1. — That the Presbytery of Lake Superior be re-constituted, and 
shall consist of the following ministers and churches : — Bev. J. Irwin Smith, and 
Rev. J. M. Barnett, ministers of the former Presbytery of Superior, and Rev. William 
B. McEee, of the Presbytery of Allegheny City, together with the churches of On- 
tonagon, Superior, Sault St. Marie, and Bayfield. 

RssoLVBD, 2. — ^That the boundaries of the Presbytery of Lake Superior be the 
following, viz : — To commence at the St. Msry's river, and follow the 46 ° parall^ 
of latitude west to the 93d degree of longitude, thence north along said meridian to 
the bonndaiT line between the United States and Canada, and thence east along 
that line to Lake Superior, and the point of beginning. 

Resolved, 3. — ^lliat Rev. J. Irwin Smith be appointed to preach the opening 
sermon, and preside until a Moderator be chosen ; and that the first meeting of the 
Presbytery be at Ontonagon, Michigan, on the first Wednesday of August next. 

Resolved.— 4. That the Presbytery of Lake Superior be connected with the 
Synod of Wisconsin. 

Adopted. 

OwBTURB, No. VUI. — ^From the Presbytery of Newcastle, to set off all the 
churches of our connection, in the peninsula, not already within the bounds of the 
Presbytery of Newcastle, to that Presbytery, 

The Ck>mmittee recommend that, from want of sufficient informa- 
tion, no action be taken on the subject by this Assembly. Adopted^ 

Overture, No. IX. — From the S^odsof Texas and Mississi^i, for the establish- 
ment of a Committee of Domestic Missions in New Orleans. 

Finally referred to the next General Assembly. 

Overture, No. X. — A minute in relation to the centennial celebration, and is as 
followt: 

This General Assembly having been called apoo, in the providence of Gkxl, to 
unite in a centennial commemoratioo of the re-union of the Synods of New York 
and Philaddphia, in 1758, deems it proper, on this occasion, to adopt a minute rela- 
ting to that interesting and important event. 

The Assembly recognize the good hand of God in early bringing to these shores 
emimnts of Scotch, Scotch-Irish, English, and Huguenot extraction, to assist in 
establishing the Church of the liOrd Jesus Christ among the waste places of this con- 
tinent The memory of the ministers who commenced the work of evangeliaatioQ^ 
and who laid the foandations of the Church, is treasared by this Assembly, with 
gratitude to Him who sent them forth to aooomplish his porposee^ with many self^ 
denials, abundant labours, and great snccess. 

The Assembly record the goodness of God in leading the fathers to adopt authorita- 
tively the Westminster standards for the future guidance of the Church, and under 
sach circometances, in the ratification of the *^ Adopting Act," as to afford the clear- 
est evidence of the entire nnanimity of the Synod m doctrinal ^entimentt and in all 
matters pertaining to Presbyterian order. 

The Assembly further record their views of the unspeakable importance and bless- 
edness of pure revivals of religion in the Church ; praising God for the general re- 
sults of the great revival of religion within our bounds, in the days of Whitefield 
and the Tennents, and rejoicing that the present year has been signalized by the 
same precious and glorious outpourings of the Holy Sphrit. 

The Assembly further put upon record their sense of the obligations of the Church 
to its g^t Head in nreservin^ incorrupt its outward forms of order in the olden 
time ; in gradnallv and surely increasing its edncational and evangelistic resources^ 
and in endowing it, after the lapse of the first oenturv of re-union, with such enlarge- 
ment of its misaonary work at home and in heathen lands. 



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88 PBBSBTTEBIAN HISTORICAL ALMANAC. 

On an occasion wbich forcibly brings to mind the blesrings of God npon re>iinion, 
and which commemorates the dwelling together of brethren in unity, the Assembly 
express a deep conviction of the deairabieness of the onion of all sound Presbyte- 
rians ; and do hereby cordially and earnestly extend an invitation to all, who are of 
like mind with ourselves, to unite with this Qeneral Assembly in the way and man- 
ner conformable to the acts and deliverances on this subject, already made by this 
Assembly. 

Adopted. 

OvKRTURB, No. XI. — Certain papers, which have a necessary connection with 
each other, viz i — Paper No. 1, wbicn is the petition of certain ministers in Nebraska 
Territory, aalcing to be set off into a new Presbytery ; Paper No. 2, which is the pe- 
tition of the Presbytery of Council Bluffi. askm^ that the ministers in Nebraska 
Territory, with the Rev. D. L. Hughes, of Huntingdon Presbytery, be attached to 
the Presbytery of Council BIu£& ; and Papers Nos. 3 and 4, which are petitions of 
the Presbyteries of Des Moines and Iowa, in favour of strengthening the Presby- 
tery of Council BlufGs, and against the organization of a Presbytery in Nebraska 
Territory. 

The Committee, after consultation with the parties interested, 
recommend the following action as the best, unaer all the circum- 
stances: 

Resolvkd, 1. — ^Tbat a new Presbytery be erected out of the Territory of Nebras- 
ka, to be called the Presbytery of Omaha, which shall consist of the following minis- 
ters and churches, viz • — Kev. William Hamilton, of the Presbytery of Upper Mis- 
souri ; Rev. George P. Bergen, of the Presbyteir of Cincinnati ; Rev. Simeon Peck, 
of the Presbytery of Findlay ; Rev. William Young Brown, of the Presbytery of 
New Lisbon ; Rev. Charles Sturges, of the Presbytery of Long Island ; and Kev. 
William B. Hall, of the Presbytery of ; together with all the 

churches in the Territory of Nebraska. 

Rbsolvbd, 2. — ^That the Presbytery of Omaha be connected with the Synod of 
Southern Iowa ; and that it meet for organization on the second Wednesday of Jnlv 
next, at II o'clock, A. M., at Omaha City ; and that Rev. William Hamilton preach 
the opening sermon, and preside until a Moderator be appointed ; and that ^v. G. 
P. Bergen be his alternate. 

RisoLViD, 3. — ^That Rev. D. L. Hughes, of the Presbytery of Huntingdon, be 
transferred to the Presbytery of Council Blu&, and that the latter Presbytery be di- 
rected to meet at Pacific City, Iowa, on the third Tuesday of July next, at 8 o'clock. 
A. M. ; and that Rev. John Hancock preach the opening sermon, and preside until 
a Moderator be appointed ; and that Rev. D. L. Hughes be his alternate. 

Adopted. 

OvERTUBi, No. Xn.— A memorial from Synod of Southern Iowa, to change the 
boundary lines between the Synods of Iowa and of Southern Iowa, so as to attach 
the county of Muscatine to the latter Synod ; together with a remonstrance from the 
Presbytery of Cedar, against the proposed change. 

The Committee recommend that no action be taken on the sub- 
ject. Adopted. 

OvKRTURi, No. XIII. — On Demission of the Ministerial Office, is as follows, viz : 
RisoLvin. — ^That it be referred to the Presbyteries whether the following sections 
shall be added to the 15th chapter of the Form of Government, viz: 

16. The office of a minister of the gospel is perpetual, and cannot be laid aside 
at pleasure. No person can be divested of it but by deposition. Tet, from variou)^ 
causes, a minister may become incapable of performing tne dnties of the office ; or he 
may, though chargeable with neither heresy nor immorality, become unacceptable in 
his official character. In such case he may cease to be an acting minister. 

17. Whenever a minister, from any cause not inferring heresy, crime, or scandal, 
shall be incapable of serving the Church to edification, the Presbytery shall take 
order on the subject, and state the fact, together with the reason of it, on their record. 
And when any person has thus ceased to be an acting minister, he shall not be a 
member of any Presbytery or Synod, but shall be subject to disdpliDe as other minis- 



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THS FBXSBTTBRIAN GHUBOH, (O. 8.) 89. 

ters ; provided always that nothing of this kind shall be done without the consent of 
the individual in question, except by advice of the Synod ; and provided, also, that no 
case shall be finally decided except at a stated meeting of the Presbytery. 

18. Any minister having demitted the exercise of his office in the manner 
herein provided, may, if the I'resbytery which acted on his demission think proper, 
be restored to the exercise thereof, and to all the rights incident thereto, provided 
that the consent of the Synod be obtained, in case his demission was ordered by 
the Synod in the manner above recited. 

Ordered tbat it be sent down to the Presbyteries, with the request 
that they take action, and report to the next General Assembly. 

Overture, No. XIV. — A memorial from the Presbytery of Highland, in Kansas, 
stating that the Presbytery of Kansas has failed in two attempts to organize, and 
that that Presbytery is virtually dissolved from want of a quorum, and asking the 
General Assembly to take action in the premises. 

The Committee recommend the adoption of the following resolu- 
tion: 

RssoLvsn. — That the Rev. W. W. Backus, of the Presbytery of Dane, and the 
Rev. P. P. Montfort, of the Presbytery of White Water, be transferred to the Presby- 
tery of Highland, together with the churches of Leavenworth City, Lecompton, and 
Big Spring, and all other churches organized in the territory, so that the jurisdiction 
of the Presbytery of Highland shall extend, for the present, over the whole territory 
of Kansas. 

Adopted. 

Overture, No. XV* — A memorial from Dr. Awl, of the Presbytery of Colnmbust 
asking the Assembly to take measures for the observance of a national prayer-meet- 
ing on the 4th day of July next. 

The Committee recommend, that, inasmuch as the 4th of July 
occurs this year on the Sabbath, the Assembly recommend that 
special prayer be offered on that day for the blessing of God upon 
our whole country, in all the relations of its national and interna- 
tional affairs. Adopted. 

Overture, No. XVI. — A memorial from the Presbytery of Lodiana, asking the 
General Assembly to recommend the first Monday of January next, as a day of spe- 
cial prayer for the blessing of God upon Foreign Missions throughout the world. 

The Committee submit the following resolution : 

Resolved. — ^ITiat the Assemblv entertains an increasing conviction of the import- 
ance of Foreign Missions, and of the close connection, under God, between prayer 
and their success, and earnestly recommend to all their churches, the regular, conscien- 
tious, and fervent observance of the monthly concerts for prayer. 

Adopted. 

Overture, No. XVTI. — A joint request from the Synod of Georgia and the 
Presbytery of East Alabama, for the Assembly to attach to the Presbytery of East 
Alabama, that portion of Florida within the bounds of the Synod of Georgia and 
west of Holmes County, Florida. 

The Committee recommend that the petition be granted. Adopted. 

Overture, No. XV III. — An overture from the Synod of Illinois, in reference to 
the transfer of the Theological Seminary of the Northwest^ located at Ghicafo, to 
the control of the General Assembly ; said Synod agreeing to said transfer with cer- 
tain stipulations. 

The Committee submit the following resolutions : 

Resolved, 1. — That inasmuch as only one Synod has given notice to the Assembly 
of a desire to transfer to the Assembly the control of the Theological Seminary of the 
Northwest, located at Chicago, and inasmuch as it requires a constitutional majority 
of the Synods now having the control of said Seminary, to bring the matter within 
the jurisdiction of the Assembly, it is judged not to be expedient to take any action 
at the present time. 



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40 PBUBTTSKUJr SIOTOBIOAL ALXAHAO. 

Bksoltied, 2.— That the memorial from the Synod of Illinois be placed on file, 
among the papers of the Assemblj. 

Adopted. 

Otbrtubs, No. XIX. — A memorial from John Woodman, an elder in the Presbj^- 
teiy of Iowa, asking the Assembly to define the rights of the session of a church, m 
regard to the singing in the house of God. 

The Committee recommend that the petitioner be referred, for a 
sufficient answer, to the action of the Assembly in 1845, minutes, 
pages 20 and 21, or Baird's Digest, page 170. Adopted. 

Overture, No. XX. — A memorial from the Fresbytery of Ohio, on the subject 
of temperance. 

The Committee submit the following resolution : 

Bbsolved. — That the Assembly continues to cherish a deep interest on the sub- 
ject of t^perance, and refers to its previous testimonies iu answer to the memoriaL 



The Committee on Judicial Cases, Bev. Gbobgb Howe Chair* 
man, reported the following, viz : 

Judicial Case, No. 1. — ^The complaint of Rev. James F. Fisher against the ac- 
tion of the Synod of Albany, in the case of Rev. George H. Thatcher. The Albany 
Fresbytery allowed Mr. Thatcher to demit the office of the gospel ministry, of 
which complaiot was made to the Synod, in 1856, by Mr. Fisher. This complaint 
was sustained, but no copy of it appears on record, and the Svnod did not, in sus- 
taining the complaint, make any order to Fresbytery as to what disposition they 
should make of Mr. Thatcher ; but no protest was entered against this action, nor 
any complaint taken to this body at that time. At Synod, in 1867, a memorial was 
presented from Albany Fresbytery, asking Synod to define their action in the case, 
which memorial was laid on the table. Tne complaint before ns purports to lie against 
this latter action, vet it is entitled " a complaint of the action of Synod in the case of 
Bev. G. H. Thatcher," and all the reasons of complaint are aimed agarost that action. 

The Committee recommend that case he dismissed, for these reasons : 

1. The complainant f&iled to make bis complaint at the proper time. 

2. The case, being once adjudicated, should not be revived on a 
simple memoriaL 8. Even if the Assembly were disposed to enter- 
tain the complaint, no right decision could be had, as neither the 
complaint which the Sjnoa sustained, nor the records of the Presby- 
tery are to be had here. The report of the committee was con- 
curred in and the case dismissed. 

Judicial Gasb, No. II. — ^This was called an appeal, taken by the Presbytery of 
Easkaskia from the decision of the Synod of Illinois, in the case of the complaint of 
Bev. J. Staflbrd and others, against the Fresbytery, for refusing to receive a church 
organized at Trenton. 

The Committee believed that the act referred to was not judicial, 
but administrative, and considered it rather a case of complaint than 
of appeal, and therefore recommended that it be so issued. 

E. T. Baird moved that this case cannot be tried as an appeal, 
and that the appeal be dismissed. The motion was carried ; Thomas 
W. Hynes, in behalf of himself and others, giving notice that he 
protested against this action. 

Judicial Oasb, No. III. — The complaint of E. N. Sawyer and others, against the 
decision of the Synod of Chicago, in the case of 0. W. Hoagland. Mr. lloagiand 
had been summoned to appear before his session, on the chai^ of prevarication. 
After the session had begun the trial, they referred it to Fresbvtery, who decided 
that there was no valid ground of accusation against him. Appeal was taken to th« 



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THB PRBSSYTKBtAN CHtntOH| (o. 6.) 41 

SyDod of Chicago, who confirmed this decision. An appeal was dow taken to the 
Aiasembly, but the Committee report the case as being falleo from, as the complain- 
ants have Cfiiled to appear and prosecate their complaint. 

They recommend that the complaint be dismissed, and that Mn 
Hoagland be considered as entitled to all his former rights and 
privSeges in the Church of Hopewell. The report was adopted. 

Judicial Cask, No. IV. — ^The appeal and compUiint of Rev. Robert Fmley and 
Smith Bloomfieldy against the Synod of New Jersey, for their action touching the 
afiairs of the Second Church in Woodbridge, N. J. K. J. Breckinridge was allowed, 
at the request of Rev. Robert Finley, to aid him in conducting his cause ; and James 
Hoge and Nathaniel Hewit were allowed, at the request of Myron Barrett, to aid 
him in the absence of two other members of a Committee appointed by the Synod 
of New Jersey, to defend the Synod in this case. The Assembly took up the busi- 
nesfi, as recommended by the Judicial Committee. The ninates of the Presbytery 
of ElinbethtowD were read, in everything pertaining to the case, nntil it was carried 
bjy appeal to Synod of New Jersey. The parties in the case being called, R J. Brecken- 
ndge was heard in behalf of Robert Finlev. A question arose when he concluded, 
respecting the original parties — ^whether the Presbytery of Elisabethtown or the 
Synod of New Jersey diould be regarded as the other party ; upon which the Mo 
derator decided that the action of the Assembly, in allowing James Hoge and Na- 
thaniel Hewit to take the place of absent members of the Connnittce appointed by 
Synod of New Jersey, did virtually recognize Synod as the party to be heard at this 
stage of the proceedmgs. N. Hewit was excused from assisting the Committee, and 
James T. English allowed to take his place. Rev. Messrs, English and Barrett then 

3K)ke in defence of the Synod, then Rev, James Hoge on the same side, and R J. 
reckenridge in defence of the appellants, and then the parties all withdrew. The 
poll was called, and the final vote taken ; 84 voted to sustain ; 24 to sustain in part ; 
and 30 not to sustain ; 2 were ezcused from voting. 

A Committee of seven were appointed to bring in a minute, ex- 
pressing the sense of the Asaembly in this decision. They reported 
accordingly. B. M. Palmer moved to lay the report on the table, 
for the purpose of considering a substitute, which he read. His 
paper is as follows, viz : 

This General Assembly sustains the appeal and complaint of Robert Fmley and 
Smith Bloomfield, against the Synod of New Jersey. In this decision, it is not in- 
tended to censure the eourts below for want of zeal and faithfulness in doing accord- 
ing to their best iudgment what the case required. Much less is it intended to i^ 
verse, in form, what has been done in the case of Mr. Finley, so as to restore him to 
bis pastoral relation in the Second Church of Woodbridge ; for this would not only be 
impracticable, in the circumstances, as they now exist, but inexpedient, even if it were 

Sracticable. But the Presbytery of Elizabeth town erred in attempting too much to 
irect and control the action of that seflsioD, interfering without being called to do 
so, according to the forms of our constitution ; in arresting the proeess of discipline, be- 
fore it had been iBsued, while the session were pursning it in an orderly manner ; Mid 
in dissolving the pastoral relation upon the mere prnmnption of a majority of the 
people desiring it, without the regular application of either party ; thus making what 
th^ judged a necessity in the case, of more tmportanoe than the forms of the constitution. 
The Synod of New Jersey erred, not only in sostaining the action of the Presby- 
tery in this case, but also in refusing to entertain as an appeal the remedy sought bj 
a party, who was both iiHnred anl aggrieved by said action of the Fresbytery. 
Hie original report was laid on the table, and this report adopted as a minute of the 
Assembly, by a vote of 80 to 47. John H. Bioe kA othere entered their dissent 
on the minutes, as follows : 

The undersigned dissent from the vote of the General Assembly, ossigniDg leasont 
for the decision in the case of the appeal of the Rev. Robert Finley, because in their 
opinion it does not express the sense of the court deciding the case, and because tJw 
minority were permitted by this vote to change or modify the ddiberale decision of a 
majority of the court John H. Rice, E. W. Bedinger, J. A. Smylie, P. £. BishofK 
R. y. Shanklin, James Cleland, L. H. Long, R. C. Galbndth, LilbiuD B. Bailor, 
D. M. Queen, W. E. James, C. M. Gregg. 
6 



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42 PBESBYTBRIAN HTSTORIOAL ALMANAC. 

• 

The Records of the Synods of Alabama, Arkansas, Baltimore, 
Buffalo, Chicago, Indiana, Kentucky, Memphis, Mississippi, 
Missouri, Nashville, New York, North Carolina, Northern 
Indiana, Ohio, Pittsburgh, Upper Missouri, and Virginia, 
were approved without exception, and those of Philadelphia with 
exceptions. 

The Records of the Synods of Albany and New Jersey were 
approved, subject to the decision of the Assembly in judicial cases 
now pending. 

The Records of the Synod of Wheeling were approved, with 
the following exception : That certain abbreviations appear where 
words should be written in full. 

The Records of the Synod of Georgia were approved with the 
exceptions : 

Ist — That they have not been presented to the Qeneral Asaembly for examination 
and approval for two years, and, 

2d.— That on page 337 we have the following minute, " That the rule in the book 
requiring the members of the inferior judicatory to withdraw from the house, be un- 
derstood metaphoricaUy, and that the rule be understood as fully complied with, by 
excluding the Flint Presbytery from any further participation in the discusBion, and 
from voting in the case. 

The Records of the Synods of Allegheny, Cincinnati, Iowa, 
Northern India, Paoipio, South Carolina, and Texas, were 
reported as not sent up for review. 

The Records of the Synod of Illinois were reported by the Com- 
mittee, and the report put upon the docket. 

The Records of the Synods of Southern Iowa and Wisconsin 
were not reported. 

ICsrrstibt of i\t ^hit of ^tligion. 

Rev. L. J. Halsey, Chairman of the Committee on the Narrative, 
made the followitig report, which was adopted, and sent out to the 
churches under the care of the Assembly. 

Ilie General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church in Ihe United States, met in the 
city of New Orleans, is once more permitted, with the most profound and grateful 
acknowledgments to God for his mercies, to greet all under its care and supervision, 
with another annual narrative of tiie state of religion. 

One hundred and seventeen Presbyteries have sent up reports on the work of the 
Lord within their bounds during the past year; and from a careful examination of these, 
we are enabled now to send back to the churches, for their information and encourage- 
ment, the following condensed statement of what the Lord, in his infinite and ama- 
zing grace, has done for us and for our people, since the meeting of the lost Assembly. 

ft is manifest, on the very face of these reports, that it has been a memorable 
year in Zion— a year of the right hand of the most High. It has been a year of 
great awakening in our churches — a year of refreshing influences from the presence 
of the Lord. " The Lord bath visited and redeemed his people." ^ The Lord hath 
done great things for ns, whereof we are glad." It has been a year marked by unu- 
sual peace, concord, unanimity, co-operation, and brotherly kindness among our 
churcnes ; unusual encouragement, fidelity, zeal, and success in all the labours of our 
ministry. It has been a year in which all the great charities and enterprises of the 
Church have moved steadily and successfully forward. And notwithstanding the 



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THX FBBSBYTSBIAK OHUBOH, (o. 8.) 4A 

commercial rereraeB which at one time visited onr coantry, and the sad difastere 
which fell upon a portion of our foreign field, still of our Zion it may be said* that we 
have had ^ peace within her walls, and prosperity in all her palaces." The great 
majority of reports comiDgnp to us from all parts of our vast domai]>— the l^rth, 
the South, the East, the West — open with ascriptions of humble yet adoring love 
and thanksgiving to the great Head of the Church, for this wonderful manifestation 
of his presence and power. 

1. A small number of oar Presbyteries— very small, as compared with the 
whole, — ^have no glad tidings to report. The cloud of gracious visitation which has 
overshadowed our land, seems not as yet to have reached them. Th^ speak of cold- 
ness and discouragement within ; of prevailing worldliness and iniquity without 

And yet these reports come to us breathing the spirit of prayer ; burthened with 
the most earnest longings for a better state of thinss ; full of expressions of faith and 
hope in God. and of strong determination to cry aloud, and spare not— holding forth 
the word of life until the Lord shall appear for their help. 

2. Tbe second, and a much larger division of these reports, embraces all those 
Presbyteries in which thdre has been a gradual and most marked increase of activitv 
in tbe churches during the year, and especially the latter portion of it They speak 
of the williogness of the people to hear the gospel, of growing attendance on all the 
means of grace, of new life and zeal in the eldership, and of constant accessions to the 
membership of the churches ; but yet without such marked manifestations of the 
Spirit's power as usually attend revivals. 

In all these Presbyteries, the work of the Lord in the conversion of sinners, the 
edification of saints, and the training of the lambs of the fiock, seems to have gone 
steadily forward, widening and deepening in interest to the very close of our year, 
lliey tell us with grateful hearts, how the gospel has been preached, as with a new 
unction from on high ; how the children and youth of their charges have been cared for 
and instructed in catechetical and Bible classes ; how the cdoured people at the 
South are receiving the fostering care of our churches ; how the Sabbatn-scnool cause 
has been sustained ; how feeble churches have been strengthened, pastoral relations 
cemented, backsliders reclaimed ; how systematic benevolence, church extension, and 
all the Boards of the Assembly have been steadily growing in favour with the people. 

3. But another, and by &r the largest class of these reports, embracing m fact 
about seventy Presbyteries, or nearly two-thirds of the whole number reported, bring 
us the blessed and glorious tidings of deep and powerful revivals. They record the 
signal and mighty operations of the Spirit of Gkd, poured out almost simultaneously 
upon a vast multitude of our churches, covering an area almost as wide as our whole 
domain. It is manifest that these teveaty Presbyteries, scattered in all parts of our 
land, have been blessed with displays of the presence, power, and grace of the Holy 
Ghost, to a degree which must render the latter portion of the vear for ever memo- 
rable in our annals, as the era of a general and widespread awakening of the public 
mind of our country to the great things of salvation. 

In some of these reports this ^reat work is described as exceeding in power, and 
in all its blessed infiuences, anything that the most aged servants of Goa had ever 
witnessed before. It is invariably and universally represented as deep, solemn, and 
silent ; unattended by any extravagances, excitements, or extraordinary measures ; 
coming not by human might or power, but as by the still small voice of God's Spirit ; 
coming as a direct answer to the prayers of his people, and in the regular faithful use 
of all the appointed means of grace ; but chiefiy the preaching of the word and 
prayer. Many of the Presbyteries were enjoying these seasons of refreshing at the 
very date of their re]}orts, and some of them, where the interest had long existed, 
speak of it as continuing with unabated power. 

Among the pleasing results recorded in these reports, we must not fail to mention, 
that the Lord has poured out his Spirit upon several of our Colleges, Schools, ana 
Presbyterial Academies, and many of our beloved youth, both male and female, have 
been led to seek and find an interest in the Saviour. Tliis has been the case, espe- 
cially in Davidson College, N. C, in Oglethorpe University, Ga., in Hanover College, 
Ind., in Washington and Jefferson Colleges, Pa., in Miami University, O., and in 
Bichmond College, Mo. 

One of the most remarkable features of this great awakening has been the disposi- 
tion on the part of the people of God everywhere to gather together around the 
throne of grace in the social prayer-meeting. Christians have loved to meet their 



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44 ntSSBYTKBIASr mSTORIOAL AIMANJLC. 

feDow-OhrigtiaiiB, of all evaogelScal dinrehes, in the house of prayer ; to lift up Che 
yoioe of bow, of tbankflgiyin^, and of supplicatioD together, at morning;, noon, and 
nigbt, arouDQ one common mercy-eeat ; wnilst men, nnosed to prayer have qoit the 
biunnees of the world, saying, Come and let os go np to the house of the Lord. 

Another remarkable featare, is the new seal and actrrity manifested on the part of 
the rtlifig eldere and deacons of the churches, enabling them to uphold the hands of 
the ministry, not only bv their prayers, but by their own efficient oo-operetion and 
asnstanoe, m meetings for prayer and inquiry, in Bible classes, and especMy in 
personal Tisitation ftim house to house. 

And now, brethren betored in the Loid, mfnisters, ruling elders, and people of our 
great charge, on an oceasion so extraordinary as this, and after such a reyiew of the 
unspeakable mercies of God^ vouchsafed to us as a Church, we should fail to discharge 
<rar high and solemn obligations, as the chief judicatory of the whole Church, if we did 
not se^ to impress upon your mitads, however briefly, some of those great practical les- 
sons which have been so deeply impressed upon our own, by the Lord's dealings with us. 

1. The first relates to the manner m which this visitation has come ; showing 
that the Head of the Church is the God that governs the world, and that he n 
working aH thrags for her good. At the opening of the year there was a tide of 
worlcBy prosperity in our land that threatened to enffulph all serious thoughts of 
God and eternity. God laid his hand upon us, and &en there was a cry of alarm 
and distress in all tiie walks of industry and labour, which caused men's hearts to fail 
and turned their thoughts directly to God and another world. But as if this was 
not enough, our Son was called to listen to a tale of horror, ooming across the wa- 
ters from the graves of her martyred misskmariei, which fiRed all ms with tears, all 
hearts with dismay. What was the (%«rch to do at such a time, her substance and 
her sons destroyed abroad, and the arm of her power so crippled at home that die 
seemed utterly unable to fill up the vacuum ? bhe could only do what she has ever 
done in the hour of calamity— arise ^nd call mighttiv upon God. Tliis, by grace^ 
she was enabled to do ; and this great revival of her vital spirit is the result 
Through the fires of affliction and disaster she was led to humiliation and repentance, 
and stronger trust in God ; and by these to die blessings of his grace. 

2. The next great lesson is derived from considering the means Whidi have been 
used in all thu season of revival. They have been those, and those only, which God 
has authorised in the Scriptures — earnest, importunate ^yer, the fhithfol preaching 
of ffospel truth, the instruction of the youn^, pastoral visitation firom house to house, 
ana steady perseverance in every work and labour of love. Never in tiie annals of 
our Church has her ministry appeared more agreed and determined to know nothing 
but Christ and him crucified ; to leave all human devices and inventions, and preacn 
boldly and solely the grand dootrines of salvation as expounded in our Calvinistic 
standards, whether men will hear or forbear to hear, than daring the past year. And 
lo I what has God done T How has he rolled away our reproach, put honor upon the 
preaching of the cross, and all the means of grace ; and made us feel, as by a public 
deraoDStration from heayen, even by the descent of that same Spirit whicn was 
poured upon the disciples on the day of Pentecost, tint this go^iel is the power of 
Qod and the wisdom of God unto salvation to all thtst believe I 

8. Once moreu What a lesson of encouragement for all the future does this record 
of the past read to us I Is there any alignment for Christianity more powerful, any 
evidence of piety more pleosmg, any motive to exertion more blessed and glorious, 
than to feel diat the Lord God lias been with us ; has succoured us in distress ; has 
heard our poor prayers ; has answered and blessed our unworthy labours ? But hun- 
dreds of our ministers, thoumnds of our people, have had this testimony from God 
during the past year. And we all have it toniay, as we send forth this annual narra- 
tive. Let us then, with renewed nal, gird on the whole armour of the gospel for 
Ibe eonfliots and the labours of another year ; feeling that no fhithful labour snail be 
kst, and no praying breath spent in vaia In due season we shall reap, if we fhint not 

With the most profound gratitude to God, we would record tiie feet, that this 
year, which doses a century since the great re-union of 1758, has been marked as a 
year of revivals. And now, as we enter the labours of a new century, we would hum- 
bly commit ourselves and all our people to God. 

Grace, meroy, and peace be multiplied to all, fWMn the Father, and the Son, and 
the Holy Ghost, world widioat end. Amen. 

WILLIAM A. SCOTT, Moderator. 



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VBM nXSBTTKKUir CHUJtOH, (O. 8.) 



tf 



During the year the Mowing Brethren are reported as having rested from their 
laboars : — 

DTSBASR, fto. 



AoAMB, James 
Aald, Donald J. 
Baker, Daniel 
Barrett, Qerrith 
Bennett, Asa 
Blain, William 
Brown, Samnel Henry 
Baie, Archibald 
Campbell, David Elliott 
Church, A. B. 
Coiidit, Philip 
Canoingham, James 
Deraelle, Daniel 
Dodd, Cephas 
Edmonds, James BL 
Elder, Thomas B. 
Finiejr, David 
Flemmg, George 0. 
Freeman, John Edgar 
Gait, Thomas 
Glenn, Robert 
Graham, William A* 
Hooker, Richard 
Inffles, James David 
Johnson, Albert O. 
Kniffin, William Claris 

Mitchell, Elisha 

Moody, John 
Morrison, William 8. 
Morrow, John Morton 
Manzenmaier, Qotleib 
McCullough, William 
McMullin, Robert 
Orr, William 
Penland, Noble Alex. 
Piatt, Isaac Watts 
Polk, David 
Qoarterman, John W. 
Qaarterman, Joseph M. 
Reed, Isaac 
Reid, William 
Robinson, S. E. 
Satterfield, James 
Shannon, Isaac Newton 
Spilman, Thomas A« 
Tod. D. 8. 
Ustic, H. 8. 
Williams. liswis W. 
Wilson. James Knox 
Wyly. 8amnel Y. 
Yomig, John Clarke 



Hudson. 

Florida. 

Brazos. 

Oonnectieat 

Michigan. 

Hudson. 

Greenbrier. 

Harmony. 

Furrukhabad. 

Rock River. 

Orc^n. 

Richland. 

N. Brunswick. 

Washington. 

West Jersey. 

Lake Superior. 

E. Alabama. 

Georgia. 

Furrukhabad. 

Easkaskia. 

Brie. 

Baltimore. 

Hopewell. 

Cherokee. 

Furrukhabad. 

W. Lexington. 

Orange. 

Carlisle. 

Huntioffdon. 

Tombeckbee. 

New Orleans. 

Erie. 

Furrukhabad. 

Ebeneaer. 

Brazos. 

New York 2d. 

Clarion. 

Ninepo. 

Flonda. 

Cohimbua. 

Winnebago. 

East Alabama. 

Beaver. 

Richland. 

Sangamon. 

C. Mississippi, 

Oxford. 

Carlisle. 

New Castle, 

Holston. 

Transylvania. 



TSASOV 


TMAM 09 




ownrA'oM. 


»BA«. 


XQM. 


1832 


1857 


55 


1839 


1867 


48 


1818 


1857 


66 


1827 


1857 


60 


1825 


1858 


65 


1816 


1857 


73 


1856 


1857 


29 


1826 


1857 


83 


1850 


1857 


33 


1826 


1857 


59 


1840 


1866 


47 


1810 


1867 


85 


1827 


1868 


62 


1803 


1868 


78 


1866 


1858 


31 


1857 


1867 


24 


1840 


1868 


43 


1864 


1858 


36 


1838 


1857 


49 


1836 


1867 


54 


1832 


1857 


56 


1847 


1867 


35 


1830 


1857 


49 


1834 


1857 


52 


1855 


1857 


25 


1825 


1857 


58 


1821 


1857 


64 


1803 


1857 


81 


1852 


1868 


37 


1842 


1867 


46 


1853 


1858 


28 


1853 


1858 


34 


1856 


1857 


25 


1836 


1857 


52 


18 


1857 


47 


1820 


1858 


70 


1835 


1857 


48 


1847 


1858 


36 


1851 


1868 


30 


1818 


1858 


70 


1856 


1857 


35 


1842 


1857 


.... 


1800 


1857 


90 


1861 


1858 


39 


1827 


1858 


60 


1833 


1857 


MM 


18 


1857 


M.. 


1841 


1857 


50 


1803 


1857 


87 


1839 


1856 


.... 


1829 


1857 


55 



Consumption. 
Typhoidf Fever. 
Angina Pectoris, 

Typhoid Pneunenla. 
Paralysis. 
Typhoid Fever. 
Aflhction of the Braia. 
Martyred. 
ConsnmptioQ. 

ErysipekuB. 
Apoplexy and alone. 
Infirmities of Ago, 
I'yphoid Fever. 
Ih^ntery. 
Nervous Debility. 
Consumption. 
Martyred. 
Consumption. 
Consumption. 
Bilious Fever. 
Consumption. 
Suddenly and ahme. 
Martvred. 
Paralvsis, (alone.) 
Fell from a precipice 
onBlk.Mt8.SnN.C. 
Infirmities of Age. 
Consumption. 
Typhoid Pneumonia. 
Consumption. 
Consumption. 
Martyred. 
Apoplexy. 
Dysenteiy. 
Chronic Gastril^ 
CompUeaUd. 
Small Pox. 
Congestion of Brun, 
Pneumonia. 
Apoplexy. 
General DebiUfy. 
Infirmitiee of Aga. 
CoDsomptioiu 
ParalytM. 

Typhoid Peyer. 
F^eumonia. 
Suddenly and aloiis. 

Hemor^ge'cTstomacfc. 



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46 FBXSBTTEBIAN HISTOBIOA.L ALXAKAO. 

Bev. D. X. JuNKiN, Chairman of the Committee on Systematic 
Benevolence, submitted the following report : 

Two distinct subjects have devolved upon this Committee. 

Ist. The great subject directly appertaining to this Standing 
Committee of the Assembly: and, 

2d. The report of the Committee of the Trustees of the General 
Assembly, for disbursing the money given for "disabled ministers 
in need, and the needy widows and orphans of deceased ministers.*' 

Upon the first mentioned subiect the Committee are gratified to be able to state, 
that Ihe recommendations of the General Assembly have been regarded, with a good 
degree of efficiency. Many Presbyteries have obeyed the injunctions of the Assem- 
bly, and have taken order to bring the churches under their care to adopt regular 
systems of making collections for our Boards, and to spread the scriptural principles 
that lie at the foundation of Christian benevolence. It is evident from the reports 
of these Presbyteries, that decided progress has been made, in diffusing right senti- 
ments, in the inauguration of regular plana of benevolence, in the recognition of 
contribution and distribution as part and parcel of practical religion, and in holding 
the churches to such regular accountability as cannot fail to stimulate and encourage 
the discharge of this part of Christian duty. 

The Committee propose to the Assembly, the following deliver- 
ance concerning the doctrine and duty of Christian stewardship : 

1. Every man is a steward of Gk)d, in the use and mangement of the talents, time, 
and substance which God has entrusted to him. 

2. Under the command ? " Occupy till I come," the steward is bound to employ 
the trust, be it ^at or small, for God's glory and the good of the world. 

3. Contribution of our worldly substance for religious purposes, from religious 
motives, and in a scriptural way, is a Christian duty, and is part of true piety, as 
fully and completely as are praise, prayer, sacraments, or any other religious duty or 
exercise. He who is not regularly a man of prayer, cannot be accounted a consis- 
tent Christian, neither can he who is not regularly a man of beneficence. 

4. Offerings of property to God for religious purposes, formed a large part of the 
worship of the ancient Church. (Heb. ziii. 16.) 

5. <* As God hath prospered" the donor^ so does he require hhn to give. 

6. Contribution is a means of grace, as well as a part of practical piety, and 
ought to be as regularly and systematically employed as any other means. 

In view of these principles, therefore be it 

Resolved, That this General Assembly do most eamestljr urge upon all the Pres- 
byteries and Sessions, to persevere in their endeavours to inaugurate in all the con- 
gregations such plans for systematic benevolence as may most effectively cultivate 
and call into exercise the graces of giving ; striving to lead all, of every age and con- 
dition, to attend as regularly to this part of piety as any other. 

In regard to the other subject, the following is submitted: 

1. That no scheme of beneficence more powerfullv appeals to the justice of the 
Church than this, which aims to make provision for the necessities of ministers 
disabled b;^ age or other infirmity, and for the needy widows and orphans of de- 
ceased ministers. 

2. ^rhe very nature and circumstances of the service to which the ministry of our 
Church is called, prevent the ordinary possibility of their accumulating worldly sub- 
stance against the day of sickness, age, or death : but it appears that very little 
attention has been paid to the previous action of the General A^mbly upon this sub- 
ject, therefore, 

Resolved, That this General Assembly most earnestly requests Presbyteries and 
church sessions to see to it, that in every chnrch a collection be made ever^ year for 
this fund, and forwarded to the Treasurer of the General Assembljp at Philadelphia, 
and that every minister be requested to present this cause to his charge, at least 
once a year, and ask for the gifts of the people in aid of this fund. 



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THB FBSSBYTEBIAK CHUBOH, (O. B.) 47 

Bey. B. J. Brbokinridob asked and obtained leave to offer the 
following paper; and it was, on motion, adopted ananimously, 
viz: 

By a TOte of the GeDeral Assembly of 1857, an OTertore to that body, which is 
printed in its Minates, pp. 35, 36, relating to the American Bible Society's new 
standard English Bible, and to the best method of preserying, in its integrity, the 
common version of the Bnglish Bible, was specially referred to the consideration of 
the present Gksneral Assembly. During the y^r which has intervenedt the attention 
of the Christian public has been diverted to this important subject in a very unusual 
degree ; and so far as this Assembly has the means of judging, it is apparent that 
the Presbyterian Church throughout the couutry is decidedly opposed to the line 
of conduct in the premises pursued by the late Committee on Yersions of that So- 
ciety, and to the circulation by that Society of their new standard English Bible. 
It is therefore, matter of great satisfaction to this General Assembly, that the Direc- 
tors of the American Bible Society have resolved to cease publishing and circulating 
the aforesaid new standard Bible, and to resume the publication and circulation of the 
standard English Bible in exclusive use by the Society before the hito work of collation 
and change, commenced about the year 1847. We also cordially approve the further 
action of the Board of Directors, so far as it secures a more vigilant oversight, in 
future, of the work of its Committee on Versions, and prevente any future change, 
either of the text or its accessories, without the carefm consideration and special 
order of the Board of Directors. With regard to any change whatever, either m the 
text of the English Version of the Bible, commonly called King James*s Version, or 
in the accessories to that text as they were commonly printed at the formation of the 
American Bible Society : we do not admit that the said Society has any power or 
authority to make any alteration in said accessories or said text, except such as 
appertain to a printer and not to an editor. By the text of King James's Version, 
we do not mean a copy corrupted by errors and unauthorized changes — no matter 
where that copy may have been printed, nor how those errors may have occurred, nor 
who may luive ventured to make those changes; — ^but we mean the true text in 
English, produced and published after the labours of the translators appointed by 
King James the First of England, which for nearly two centuries and a half has been 
the standard Bible of allpeople speaking the English language, and which the Pres- 
byterian Church in the United States of America is resolved to preserve in its in- 
tegrity and purity, and to use and circulate. Along with the greater portion of the 
Christian public in this country, we have confided to the American Bible Society 
the great work of circulating the English Scriptures, in the version in common use, 
and while we deeply regret the serious error into which it was betrayed, its recent 
action, in the premises, demands a cordial response from all the earnest supporters 
of the great work in which it is engin^. In discharge, therefore, of our duty as the 
Genenu Assembly of one branch of the Church of the Lord Jesus Christ, to which 
he has committed his most blessed Word for the guidance and salvation of men, we 
have made this deliverance. And upon the terms herein set forth, we reiterate our 
approval of the principles upon whicn the American Bible Society was founded, our 
desire to co-operate with our brethren of all Christian denominations, in united efforts 
to furnish the whole world with the word of God, and our earnest recommendation 
to our people to give liberally to the support of this good cause. 



Rev. N. Hewtt, Chairman of the Committee on Foreign Corres- 
pondence reported a letter from the President of the Synod of 
the Free Church in France. 

The letter is most afifectionate, expressing their congratulations 
for our harmony and rapid growth ; and more especially with 



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48. FBSSBTTJISUN VT8X0XICAL ALMASMC. 

thanksgiving and praise to the great Head of the Church, for the 
remarkable outpouring of the Holy Ghost upon our Church, and 
upon the evangelical churches throughout our land. 

Also requesting this Assenbly to send a delegate to the next 
jneeting of their Synod, at Yicau, in August next 

Your Committee offer the following resolution, which was adopted: 
Resolved, 1. That oar Moderator be requested to reply to the Presideot of the 
Synod, expressive of the sympathy, yeneration, and afiectOD of this Assembly far 
that sister Chorch. And that if any of our brethren ^all visit Europe, he be em- 
powered to commisrion them to represent this Assembly m tiiat Synod. 

H^ttiittti tti f ttoes €tttU)t. 

Bev. D. MgKiknsy offered the fbllowing paper, which was 
adopted: 

Reaoiotd, 1. That the coantiet of Northaaqiton and Aeoomae in Ya., Worcester, 
Somerset, Dorobetler, Talbot, Oaroline and Qneeo Anoe in Md., and Sussex in Del., 
be, and they hereby are, constituted the Presbytery of Lewes ; to which, with the 
consent of the Presbytery of Newcastle, shall aho be added the county of Kent, ia 
Bel. Said Preibytery to be attached to and Ibnn a part of the Synod of Baltimore. 

Resolvedy 2. That said Presbytery hold its first meeting in the diurch of Lewea, 
Sussex Co., Del, on the iltird Wednesday of Sept, 1858, and that Bev. A. a 
Heaton, or the ddest minister present, preach the sermon, constitute the Presbytery, 
and preside tiU a Moderator be chosen. 



Rev. C. Yan Beksselakb, Chairman of the Committee in the 
matter of the proposals made to this General Assembly, on behalf 
of the United Dynod of the Presbyterian Chureh, lately constituted 
in the State of Tennessee, reported. This General Assembly makes 
the following deliverance : 

1. The Committee appointed by the Synod of the United Presbyterian Churchy 
has commnnicated to this Assembly the official action of the said Synod, settling, 
on their part^ the " Terms of Union" deemed by them to be '^ indispensable f and the 
Assembly ismformed, tbrou^ the pnUic presL of the contents of a paper adopted 
by that Synod, and called, " A Deckuraiion of Principles," In the judgment of this 
Assembly, those official papers do not afford a basis of conference, upon which this 
Assembly is able to see that there is any prospect of advanciuff the interests of 
Christ's kingdom in general, or those of the Presbyterian Churda in the United 
States, or thoee of the United S^od of the Presbyterian Church, in particular. 

2. The Pretbyterian Church ra the United States of America has always received 
frankly, and in Christiaa love, all churches, office-bearers, and private persons, of ail 
denominations, making application for admission into her communion, upon the sin- 

gle condition that they were like-minded with herself. At this time, ample provision 
I made in her existing Acts and Ordinances for the reception of all such into her 
communion, on terms and by methods precisely equivalent, and where it is possible, 
identical with those provided with regard to her own children, reared in ner own 
bosom. Seeing that it was in a voluntary secession from the Presbyterian Church, 
that the present difficulties of the United Synod of the Presbyterian Church had 
their origin, and that the door has always been open for the orderly return of such 
of thoee who left us, as were like-minded with us, it can hardly be unexpected that 
we decline any official conference, based on terms which appear to us to involve a 
condemnation of ourselves, and a renunciation of the rich and peculiar favour of God 
upon us, in the very matters which led to their secession from onr Church twenty 
yean ago. 



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THB PRESBYTEHIAN CHURCH, (o. S.) 49 

3. With reference to the recent schism in the New-school Presbyterian body, this 
General Assembly does not see in that event, or in anything which has hitherto re- 
sulted from it, any call of Providence for the Presbyterian Church to take any new 
slep whatever, either with the view of union, or that of closer intercourse than now 
exists, with either of the parts into which that body is now divided. The subjects 
upon which the whole New-school body differed from us at the period of their separa- 
tion from us, and the subject upon which the two very unequal portions of that body 
have recently separated from each other, are questions upon which we, as a denomina^ 
tion, are at peace ; and with regard to the whole of which we see no occasion to revise 
the constant and unalterable faith of our Church, or to enter into fruitless conferences. 

It was then ordered, that a copy of this minute, duly certified by the Moderator, 
be communicated to the Stated Clerk, or the Committee of this United Synod. 



On motion of Rev. John Jonbs, Overture No. 20, referred by 
the last General Assembly, was taken up, and the following resolu- 
tion adopted : 

Resolved, That the Overture from the Genessee River Presbytery, calling attention 
to the general law, under which most of the churches of the State of New York are 
incorporated, and referred by the last Assembly to a Committee to report to this 
Assembly, be again referred to the same Committee, substituting the name of Mr. 
£. B. Miller for that of Mr. Putnam. 

J. Eagleson, from the Committee to whom was referred the re- 
port of the Committee of Conference, in relation to a closer union 
with the Associate Reformed Synod of the South, reported the fol- 
lowing resolutions, which were adopted unanimously, after another 
brief address from the Eev. J. M. Young, delegate of that body, viz: 

Resolved, 1. Iliat the fidelity of the Committee be approved, and that it be con- 
tinned, with the addition of Messrs, J. Johnson, T. Hoyt, T. L. McBride, and J. H. 
Thorn well, said Committee to report to the next Assembly. 

Resolved, 2. That it be recommended to all, and especially our ministers and church- 
es in the South, to circulate, for examination and use, the Psalms in metre, accord- 
ing to the version used in the Church of Scotland. 

On motion, the thanks of (he Assembly were voted to C. Van Rensselaer, for the 
address delivered in accordance with the order of the last Assembly ; a copy was re- 
quested for publication, and it was committed to the Board of Publication, to pub- 
lish the address in a- book, containing, with the address, the whole record of proceed* 
ings respecting this occasion. Also to Rev. B. C. De Lancy, Chairman of the 
Committee of Arrangements, for his generous and successful efforts in securing from 
so many steamboats and railroad companies free return tickets for tlie members of 
this body. Also to the citizens of New Orleans, for their kindness and hospitality to 
the members of this Assembly. 

Also to the Hon. Mayor of the city, for his great courtesy in the efforts he has 
made to keep our place of meeting free from molestation, by the ordinary noises of 
the street. Also to the Mercantile Library Association of the city of New Orleans, 
and. the Toung Men*s Christian Association, for the hospitalities of their Halls, and 
the free use of their Libraries and News-rooms. 

Also to the editors and reporters of the daily press of this city, for the exceedingly 
&ithful reprts which they have published of our proceedings. 

On motion of James Hoge, the minutes were read and approved. And it was then 

Resolved, That this General Assembly be now dissolved ; and that another General 
Assembly, choeen in like manner, be required to meet in the citv of Indianapolis, In- 
diana, in the Third Presbyterian Church, on the third Thursday of May, 1859, at 
eleven o'clock, A. M. 

Closed, May 18th, with singing, prayer, and the apostolic benediction. 
ALEXANDER T. McGILL, JOHN LEYBURN, 

Pbkmanbnt Clbrk. Stated Clbbk. 

7 



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60 



FRSSBYTSRIAK HISTORICAL ALMAlTAO. 



In presenting their Fifty-sixth Annual Beport to the General 
Assembly, the Board of Domestic Missions feel that they have great 
cause for gratitude and praise to Almighty God for the signal fa- 
vours shown to them during a year, in which our country suffered 
an extraordinary commercial and financial revulsion, rendering 
thousands bankrupt, and reducing hundreds of thousands of opera- 
tives to actual want. At the commencement of this sudden and 
violent monetary crisis, the treasury of the Board was nearly ex- 
hausted. As our fiscal year progressed, however, we were gradually 
relieved by the liberal contributions of individuals and churches. 

The kuxbbr or Missionarirs in Commission during the Year laboured withik 
THE Bounds of the following Presbtteries. 



Altenj, . 
Allegheny, 
Allegheny City, 
ArkADHU, 
Baltimore, . 
Beaver, . 
Bedford, 
Benlcia, . 
Bethel, 
BbdrsTllle^ 
Bruofl, 
Baffalo City, 
Barllngton, 
CtrUfde. . 
Oedur, . 
Central Mlailasippl, 
Oentral Texaa, . 
Cherokee, 
(%lcago, . 
Ghiekanwy . 
Chillleothe, 
Cincinnati, . 
Clarloo, . 
Golnmbaa, . 
Concord, . 
Oonnectlcttt, . 
Ooalmeton, 
Council Blnflk, 
CrawfordsTtlle, . 
Dane, . 
Des Molnea, 
Dnbaqae, . 
Bast Hanover, . 
Bast HiMiMlppi, . 
Eaatern Texas, 
Kbeneser, . 



■Uiabefhtown, 


, 2 


Mohawk, . . 




Salteburg, 


1 


Erie, . . . 


6 


Montgomery, . , 






, 1 


FayetteTiUe, . 


• 8 


Muhlenberg, . 




Schuyler, . 


9 


Flndlay, 


6 


Muttcle, . . . 




Sidney. . . 
Sioux City. . 


8 


Florida, . . 





Nashville, . . 






Fort Wayne, 


, 7 


Nassau, . . . 




South Alabama, . 




OeneaseeRlTsr, 


4 


New Albany, 




South Ckrollna, 




ueorgia, . • 


• 1 






StClairsvIUe, . 




Greenbrier, . 


, 1 


New Castle, 




St Louis, 




Highland, . . 


, 2 


New Lisbon, . . 




St. Paul, . . 




Hocking 


8 


New Orleans, . 




Stockton, . . 




HoUton, . . 


, 1 


New York, . . 


*10 


Susquehanna, 




Hadson, . 


8 


New Tork 2d, 




Transylvania, , 




Hnntingdmi, . 


, s 


Newton. . . . 




Troy, . . 






, 1 


North Mississippi, 




Tuscalooaa. 




Iowa, . 


. 18 


North Blver, . . 




Tuscumbts, . 




Kaskaskia, . 


• 8 






Upper Missouri, 
Vi»cennes, . . 




KnozTllle^ . . 


. 2 


Ogdensburg, . . 






Leikyette, . 


. 2 


Ohio, . . . 








Lake,. . . 


4 


Omnge, . . . 




Western Dfaitriet, . 




Uke Superior, 




OnacWte, . ' . ' . 




West Hanover, . 
West Jersey, . 






Oxford. . . . 




West Lexington, 




\si^'\ 


• 1 


Paduoah, . . . 




Western Texas, . 




, 1 


Palestine, . . 




Whitewater, . 




1 


Palmyra, . . . 








LouisTlUe^ . . 


• 8 


PasMle, . . 




Winnebago, . 


. 14 


Luseme^ . . 


. 10 


Peoria, • • • 


'l4 


Wooster, . . 




Madison, . . 


• 8 


Philadelphia, 


.12 


ZanesvlUe, 




Marion, . . 


. 2 


•Philadelphia 2d, . 








Maumee, . . 


4 


Potosi, . . . 




Not settled. 


14 


Memphis, . . 





Raritain, . . . 








Miami, . . . 


6 


Redstone, . . 




IWal,. . . 


«10 


Michigan. . . 


, 7 


Richland, . . . 








Mllwankls^ . . 


. 4 


Rochester City, . 








Missouri, . . 


2 


Bock Klver, . . 


'l2 







The following Tablb will show the progress that has been made nr the last 

FIVE TEARS. 



Tear. 


Number of 
Mliskma- 
ries. 


Individual dona- 
tions and legar 
des. 


Contributions 
from Churches. 


IMalReoelpta. 


Amount appro- 
priated to the 
MiMdonaries. 


1853-4, 
186 V^, 
1866-6, 
186fi-7, 
1867-8, 


628 
626 
666 
690 
610 


$11,095.47 
9,168.44 
28,601.26 
21,341.98 
94,734.81 




$76,207.80 
71,834.47 
97,244.62 
93,248.99 

106,277.62 


r6,42l.02 
74,494.42 
87,194,17 
06,104.92 
96,110.00 



The number of charches and missionary stations, is 990. Newly organised 
churches 45. 

The number of admissions on examination, and certificate is 4,158. The number 
of baptisms is 2,568. The number in communion with charches connected with the 



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.THB PRBSBTTSBIAK CHUBCH, (O. S.) 61 

Board i8 23,384. The namber of Sabbath-Bchoob is 383 ; of teachers, 2,440 ; aod 
of scholars, 15,910. 

Thv Appbopriatioks made to our missioiiaries, from March 1, 1857, to March 1 
1858, have been 996,110.00. 

Thb BsonpTfl from all sources, for the year, is 9105,277.52 ; to which add bal^ 
aooe OD band, March 1, 1857, 4(19,260.40 ; making a total of $124,537.92. 

During the year the Board have established new miflsioos in yarions sections of 
onr country, as well in larger cities and towns as in smaller villages aod rural districts. 
They have also, to the extent of their ability, re-inforced onr mi^onaries in the new^ 
States and Territories. Two missionaries have been added to the number in Oalifoi^ 
nia, aod one in Oregon, aod arrangements have bees made to send an additional mis- 
sionary to the Territory of Washington. 

One has laboured among the French, two among the Welsh, and eighteen amonff 
the Germans. Seven of our missionaries have kboared chiefly among the coloured 
people. Duriyg the year, thirty-five of onr missionaries have been oommiasiooed and 
employed as itineranis. 

Rev. D. M'KiNNET, Chairman of the Committee, offered the fol- 
lowing resolutions, which were adopted by the General Assembly; 

Resolved, 1. That the deepest gratitnde of this Assembly is due to God for his good- 
ness, in that, during a year of great financial embarrassment, he has disponed and 
enabled' his people to supply the wants of the Board ; making the period to close hap- 
pily, with an increase of fands and labourers. 

Retolved, 2. That the Assembly reioioe in the increase of contributing churches ; 
and now cherish the hope that, by one effort, all nay ultimately be induced to da 
their part in the work. 

R^ved, 3. That this Assemblv give devoat thanks to Qad for the outpouring of 
his Spirit upon our missionary churches, in common with other portions of his be- 
loved Zion. 

Resotned, 4. That while the Board have prudently made thehr appropriations, 
still the want of funds is such, and the demands upoo the treasaiy are so great and 
numerous, that there is a large amount of work needed which can scarcely be at- 
tempted. The Assembly hence reflnret that there should be need for an intimation in 
the Board's Report, that possibly there are churches receiving aid which ooght to be 
self-sustaining, and others receiving more help than is really necessary. It is, there* 
fore, earnestly recommended to Presbyteries to look into this subject, and to use aH 
possible caution in presenting churches for aid ; and also, when practicable, to unite 
several small churches in one charge ; and thus save men and money for use in other 
parts of the field. 

Resolvedy 5. That the magnitude of the cause, the adaptation of the Prasbvlerian 
Church to a successful work in every part of the country, aod the calls for kboor- 
ers, multiplying with the country's increase, demand of the Assembly new efforts to 
enlarge their contributions of both men and meana The field is the world ; but the 
part of the field specially entrusted to this Church's care, comprises the States and 
Territories where God has given her a being. 

Risolvedy 6. That the Assembly is pleased with the efforts of the Board to in- 
crease the number of itinerating labourers, believing that the qntem may be extended 
to the great advantage of sparsely settled districts. 

Resolved, 7. That the failure of nearly one-third of the missionaries to send in a 
special report for the use of the Assembly, is to be deeply regretted ; and that they 
be urged, hereafter, to promptitude and punctuality. 

Reeved, 8. That in view of the many demands upon the treasury, and also of the 
happy working and bright prospects of the scheme of Systematic Benevolence, the 
Assembly suggest to the Board the propriety of considering the question, whether 
the services of an Associate Secretary might not be dispensed with, and the amount 
of the salary of the office saved : whilst the Assembly cherish full confidence and re- 
gard for the brother now holding this appointment 

OFFICBRS OF THS BOABD. 

Riv. JoHK McDowicLL, D. D., President, Samukl D. Powbl, IVsonirsr. 

Rev. G. W. MusoRAVK, D. D., Corresponding Secretary. 
Bev. B. HAPPEBSffTT, D. D., Associate Secretary, 



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62 



PRESBYTERIAN HISTORICAL ALMANAC. 



The Thirty-Ninth Annual Report of the Board of Education 
of the Presbyterian Church is herewith presented to the General 
Assembly. The first part of the Report exhibits the operations of 
the year in the department of Ministerial Education. The sec- 
ond part of the Report gives a view of the operation of the year in 
the department of Schools, Academies, and Colleges. 
Part ]. — MnfismiAL Education. 
CandidaUa^ — ^The following table of the BtatiBticA of caodidates shows the operations 
Of the Board of Education in the MiDisterial department 

The number of new candidates received has been ... 103 

Making in all from the banning, (1819,) - - • 2630 

llie whole number on the roll during this year has been - - 385 

In their Theological course, - - - - 122 

" Collegiate " 178 

« Academical *' 73 

" Stage of study not reported, . - . - g 

** Teaching, or otherwise absent, ... 6 

The Report discasses ihe eausa of anxiety to voung tnm and candidates who think 
of entering on the work of the ministry. 1st. llie want of sufficient piety. 2d. The 
want of sufficient erklences of a divine call to the work of the ministry. 3d. Hie want 
of pecuniary means. 4th. Advanced age, beyond the usual period. 5th. lU health. 
6th. Defectiveness of early education. 7th. A profession in life already selected and 
entered upon. 8th. The scanty salaries of ministers. 9th. The opposition of rela- 
tives and friends. 10th. The want of natural ability. 11th. Obscure birth in a low 
condition of life. 12th. The ministry is too vast a profession. 

These various topics are discussed with the purpose of removing the objections and 
anxieties of candid and inquiring minds. Throughout the whole discussion the Board 
not only assume, but lay stress upon the following propositions : 1. The individual pos- 
sesses, in other respects, the qualifications requisite for making a useful minister. 2. The 
Holy Spirit can alone give a call to the work. 3. The standard of mental and moral 
requirement, prevalent in the Presbyterian Church, is not intended to be lowered by 
the arguments and incidents herein stated, but, on the contrary, the age demands 
higher qualifications than any preceding one. 
The following table shows the disposition of the candidates during the last five years. 



Tmn, 


Nnmlwrln 1 


NumtMrln 


Nnmber in 


Number 


TbtaL 


New 


Theo.Semln'7. 


Colleges. 


Academy. 


Teaching, kc 


CaDdidatea. 


ISM 


98 


IST 


m 


10 


842 


104 


1866 


lOT 


171 


70 


7 


864 


126 


1866 


114 


177 


82 





882 


102 


1867 


ISO 


187 


78 


12 


S8S 


02 


1868 


122 


178 


78 


19 


886 


108 



Part II^^OHKisnAN Education in Schools, Academies, and Colleges. 

Primary Schools. — The aggregate number is about one hundred. Thirty-two have 
been aided by the funds of the Board. Six of them report considerable religious in- 
terest among the pupils. 

The number of Presbvterial Academies is sixty. In four of these institutions there 
have been revivals of religion during the year, lliey are distributed among the follow- 
iug Presbyteries, &c 



AHianj, 
Allegbeor, . 
BeaTer and N. Lisbon, 
BetbeU . . . 
Blatrernie, . 
BallUo Oitj, . 
Chicago, . 

Ohlekaaaify . . . 
Oonoord, • • . 
CrawlbrdarlUe, . 
Bastern Texai, 
rayetteTille^ 
Florida, . 



Highland, . 
Kaiikaakla, . 
KnozTille, . 
Lexington, . 
Loalaiana,. 
LuMrne, 
Marlon, 
Hanraee, 
Memphia, . 
Miami, . . 
adiasiarippi, 
Montgnmeiy, 
Mnhlenbexg, 



New Albanj, . 
Newton, . 
Oregon, • • 
Padueah, . 
PaleHtIne» . . 
Palmyra, . 
Redetone, . 
KlchUnd,. . 
Rock KiTor, 
Schnyler, . 
Sonth Alabama, . 
South Carolina, . 
SLLoula, 



StPanl, . . 
!<uaqaehanna, 
TranRyWanla, . 
Weetom District . 
Weet Jersey, . 
Wentem Texai, . 
White Water, . 
Zaneariile, . 
Buffalo Symdt . 
Georgia Sjfnod. . 
NaahTille iS^nod; , 

Total, . . 



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TH£ PRESBTTERIAK GHUBOH, (O. S.) 



63 



COLLEGES. 

The Board of Education has not lost sight of this important part 
of the work committed by the General Assembly to its supervision. 

The following is a list of Presbyterian Colleges which are under the supervision of 
our Synods and Pi-esbyteries, or which are controlled by ministers and members of our 
Church. Seven of them have been visited with the effusions of the Holy Spirit. 





LOOATIOH. 


VAMX. 


LOOATXOX. 


Alexandria. 


Dntraqae, Iowa. 




Haeomb, HI. 


Aranauia. 


GoUad, Texaa. 


New Jereej. 


PrittceiOD, N.J. 


Au«Un. 


HunUTille, Texas. 


OakUnd. 


Claiborne co., Mias. 


Carroll. 


Waukesha, Wte. 


Oglethorpe VMwrs&y, 
Peoria tfiUvertU^, 


MilledgeTille^Ga. 


Ceotre. 


DanvUle, Ky. 


Peoria, HlB. 


DaTidaon. 


UeckIenburghoo.«N.C. 


Richmond. 


Richmond, Mo. 


Hampden Sldnaj. 


Prince Edward, Va. 


Stewart. 


GlarksTille, Tenn. 


Hanover. 


Hanover, Indiana 


Washington. 


Lexington, Va. 


Jefferson. 


Washington. 


Washington, Pa. 


Lafayette. 
Lagranfj^e. 


Baston, Pa. 

La Orange, Tenn. 


West Liberty IMver. 


Washington ca, Tenn. 
West Uberty, Ohio. 


iSkemie. 


Bateaviile, Ark. 


Weatmloster. 

• 


Fulton, Ho. 



Total receipts for the year, including balance, are $56,492 06 ; total payments, 
$48,980 55 ; total balances, exclusive of the permanent African Fund, $6511 52. 

Rev. J. E. Rockwell, Chairman of the Committee, presented tbe 
following resolutions, which were adopted : 

Resolved, 1. That the General Assembly record with profound gratitude to God, 
the abundant tokens of the Divine, blessing which have attended the efforts of the 
Board of Education to introduce young men into the ministry, and to aid in the 
religions instruction of our children and youth, as seen in the unfaltering attachment 
of our Church to the cause, manifested even during a period of commercial disaster, 
in the numbers who have already been assisted to enter the Gospel ministry, the en- 
larged number of institutions for Christian education, and the special influences of the 
Spirit of God, which have been poured out upon many of the colleges and schools under 
the care of this Assembly, or in connection with -Synods and Presbyteries of our church. 

Resolved, 2. That the field which now lies before oar beloved church, demanding, 
as it does, a vast increase of ministers of the word, calls for earnest prayer to the 
Lord of the harvest, that he would send forth labourers into his harvest ; and that the 
Assembly, while they trust that the cause will be daily remeihbered by the people 
of God, recommend the last Thursday of Februarv as a dav of special and united 
prayer for the outpouring of the Spirit upon oar colleges and seminaries of learning. 

Keaoioed, 3. That in view of the great work which Christ has laid upon his 
Church, to preach the Gospel to every creature, it be earnestly enjoined on pastors 
to set before youth of piety and promise, the question of their responsibilities in this 
matter ; and to endeavour so to direct and assist them, as that there shall be an in- 
crease of candidates for the Gospel ministry, in some measure proportioned to the 
growing demands of the Church and tbe world. 

Resolved, 4. That this Assembly earnestly urge parents to oonsecrate their children 
to the work of extending the kingdom of the Saviour in the earth ; train them for it, 
and, when prepared to enter upon the work, cheerfully to give them up to go wher- 
ever God, in his providence, may call them. 

Resolvedy 5. That the last Thursday in February next be observed as a ^ay of 
prayer for the children and youth, especially those collected in academies, colleges, 
and seminaries, whether at home or in the foreign field. 

R^olved, 6. That the present gratifying condition of the treasury of the Board 
encourages this Assembly to believe that tbe churehes are impressed with a sense 
of the duty of providing for tbe liberal support and maintenance of indigent yoong 
men desirous of entering the Gospel ministry, and authorizes a renewed invitation ta 
such to enter upon the studies necessary to fit them for the duties of such office, with 
the confident assurance of being sustained by the churches, through this Board 
0FFI0BR8 OF THB BOARD OF BDUCATION. 
James N. Dickson, Presideni. 
C. Van Rensselaer. D. D., Corresponding Secretary, 
Wm. Chester, D. D., Associate Secretary and General AffmL 
James Wood, D. D., Associate Corresponding Secretary. 
William Main, Treasurer, 



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64 PRKSBYTXBIAK HISTORICAL ALMANAC. 

g0arlr at Iflrtip ^issms. 

The Board present to the Assembly their twenty-first annaal re- 
port : 

Missionaries sent out.— To Chirui, eight misBionaries and assistaDt miasioiiaries ; 
to Siamj three ; to J^ta, one ; to Western Africa, two ; to the Indian Tribet, auteen : 
M follows : ' ' 

To China. 
D. B. M'Cartee, M. D., and wife. 
Rev, M. Simpflon Oalbertson,and wife. 
Rev. Henry V. Rankin, and wife. 
Mrs. John L Nevius. 
Mr. William Gamble, printer. 

To Siam, 



Rev. Jonathan Wilson, and wife. 
Rev. Daniel McGilvary. * 

To India. 
Mrs. Joseph Owen. 

To Western Africa. 
Rev. Thomas S. Ogden, and wife. 

7b {he Choctaw Missions, 
Rev. James Frothingham, and wife. 



Rev. George Ainslie, and wife. 
Mr. Nathaniel Wiggins, and wife; 
Miss Sarah B. Wiggins. 
Miss Elizabeth Diament 
MisR Julia M. Hitchcock. 
Miss Nancy Morehead. 



Chippewa and Ottawa Mission. 
Miss Polly A. Beach. 

Kickapoo Mission. 

Rev. A. A. Thorn, and wife. 

Creek Mission. 

MisB Jane H. Tarbot 
Miss Jane Garrison. 

Chickasaw Mission. 

Miss G. Stanislaus. 



Missions among the Indian Tribes. — Among the Ghippewas and Ottawas, Omaha^ 
Ottoes, lowas, Eickapoos, Greeks, Seminoles, Ghickasaws. and Ghoctaws, there are 
fifteen ministers, one of whom is an Indian ; fifteen male, and forty-nine female assistant 
missionaries, and nine Indian assistants ; 570 communicants ; 272 boys and 254 girb 
Id boarding-schools, besides some scholars in day-schools. 

Missions in Africa. — At three places In Liberia, at Settra Kroo, and at three sta- 
tions on Goriflco, there are nine ministers, eight male and eight female assistant mi»> 
nonaries, and three native assstants ; 1 46 communicants ; 58 boys and 16 girls In 
boarding-schools, and 136 boys in day-schools. 

Missions in India. — Sixteen stations are under the care of the Board in the north, 
western part of this country ; twenty-four ministers, two of whom are Hindus ; one 
male ana eighteen female assistant missionaries. Gwing to the calamitous events de- 
scribed in the Rej)ort, as connected with the mutiny of the Sepoys, the statistics can- 
not be reported with accuracy, and the Board forbear to dwell on the details of tliese 
deeply afflicting events, inasmuch as they have been widely made known to the Ghris- 
tian public ; yet there is but little else to be reported. The heavy IO0 of mission 
property, the trials of the native converts, and the martyrdom of the Rev. Messrs. 
John E. Freeman, David E. Gampbell Albert G. Johnson, and Robert McMullin, 
and their wives. 

The particulars communicated in their letters during the period of great excitement 
before they left the place, show that their minds were kept in peace. For more than 
two weeks they lived in daily apprehension of their immediate and violent death, but 
it is delightfully evident that they were supported and comforted by the presence of 
the gracious Saviour. 

Mission in Siam. — ^In connection witb this mission there are four ministers, three 
assistant missionaries, and one native assistant ; 47 scholars are reported in the board- 
ing-school. 

Missions nr Ghina. — At Macao, near Ganton, Shanghai, and Ningpo, there are 
fourteen ministers, three male, and fifteen female assistant missionaries, and ten native 
assistants ; 58 communicants ; 31 boys and 63 girls in boardiiig^chools, besides some 
scholars in day-schools. 

MnsiONS in South AmuoAw-^At Buenos Avres there is one minister, and at Bo- 
gota one minister. Another minister and his wife are ready to embark for the latter 
field. 

Missions in Papal EuRorB/— The sum of $6466.67 was remitted to.Ghristian friends 



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THK PBSSBYTIBUK CHUBGH, (O. 8.) 06 

in BroaBelfl, Paris, Geoeya, the Waldeosian Yalleya, to,, to be expended in efibrts for 

the spread of the gospel amongst Bonuw Catholic peoples. 
Mission to thi Jews. — One missionary is employed among the Jews in New York 

and its vicinity, who is also pastor of a German church ; and a o^ is made for enlarged 

labonrs for the lost sheep of the house of Israel. 
FiKANCBs.— The receipts from all soaroes, inclading babuoe, is, - $223,977 79 

The payments have been, 9196.020 67 

Special contribatioDs for losaeB m India, QDezpended,- 18,112 57 

•214,133 24 



Leaving a balance against the Treasaiy, oo general aocoont, q( $1^186 29 

Bev. B. L. Stanton, Chairman, reported thefoUow^ing resolutions, 
which were adopted : 

Resolved, I. That we are eaHed upon aa a Obnrcb, to record oar especial thanks- 
givings to God for the favour which be has shown us in this department of the labour. 
1. In that, in the midst of an unparalleled monetary disaster, the receipts of our For- 
eign Board have been larger than in any former year. 2. In that, while his hand 
has been laid heavily upon us in the melancholy death of our beloved brethren in In- 
dia, the same hand has beep stretched out for the deliverance of the great body of our 
missionaries and their families ;— and 3. In that the salutary effect upon the people at 
large of the death of those who have fallen victims to Mohammedan and Pagan cruel- 
ties, in awaking the Church to deeper humiliation, and more earnest prayer for Zion's 
increase, has so signally illustrated a proverb of primitive times, that *^ the blood of 
the martyrs is the seed of the Church.** 

Resolvedj U. That while we are encouraged by the continued liberality of the peo- 
ple in their contributions to Foreign Missions, we feel called upon to admonish the 
Churches to make even mater sacrifices in this regard, in view of two important 
considerations, presented in the Annual Beport of the Board, viz : — 1. That they 
may repair the ^p-eat losses sustained in the destruction of the mission property in In- 
dia, amounting tn the aggregate to $150,000, only $25,000 of which have been re- 
funded by an assessment of the British government upon the city of Lodiana, under 
circumstances, however* which do not apply to any other case ;— and 2. That the Board 
may promptly enter ** the new fields for missionary enterprise, in portions of the earth 
heretofore inaccessible." 

Resolved, III. That we highly approve of the action of the Board in giving the 
" Foreign Missionary" gratuitous circalation in all our Sabbath-schools, which make 
contributions to the Board ; and that all church sessions be, and they are hereby recom- 
mended to aid in this work, that the children of the entire Church may early become 
interested in the Foreign Missionary cause, and be trained in the duties oi an active 
Christian charity. 

Resolved, lY. That the great loss of property sustained by our Board in the Sepoy 
revolt, is no discouragement to our future work in India, and that it is the manifest 
duty of the Church at once to repair these desolations ; and with this view, while, as a 
general rule, we should rely upon the regular and steady rather than special contribu- 
tions to all our Boards, the General Assembly, under Uie peculiar circumstances of 
the present case, eamestl^r urge upon the churches, and in particular apon individuals 
whom Qod has blessed with wealth, contributions to a special fund which the Board 
is endeavouring to raise for this purpose, now amounting to over $18,000, which con- 
tributions, however, should in no case interfere with the regular collections for the or- 
dinary and progressive operations of the missionary work. 
OFFICERS OF THE BOARD. 

President. —Bev, Oardinkb SFiaNO,D. D. 

Correnonding Secretaries,— V^Blisr Lowrie, Esq., Bev. John C« Lowrie, D. D., and 
Bev. J. Leighton Wilson. D. D. 

Treasurer, — William Bankin, Jr. 



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66 



PRSSBYTEBIAN HISTORICAL ALMANAC. 



§0Br)> 0{ $sMitiiti0R* 



The Twentieth Annual Report is respectfully submitted to the 
Assembly. 

Notwithstanding the extraordinary commercial embarrasements of the past year, 
the Board is enabled to report results which compare favourably with those of any 
former year. 

1. In thb DEPARTiffENT OF pRODUGTioir. Fifty-five new works have been issued, 
of which 45 are new volumes. 85,750 copies printed. 24,000 copies of 9 new tracts, 
and 30,000 copies of the Presbyterian Almanac, making in all 139,750 copies of new 
publications. Besides these, there have been published 326,750 copies of works be- 
fore upon the Board's Catalogue. 

llie total number of copies issued during the year has been 466,500 copies. 

The following Table will show the operatidns of the Board in this department for 
the past five years: 



NUMBEE OF NEW VOLUMES PUBLISHED AND THB KUXBEB OF COPIES PRINTED. 



Yni. 


8tO. 


12mOL 


lOmo. 


ism* 


82mo. 


Ml>eel. 
Tolumea. 


Total 
No. of 

TOlB. 


Tracts 
and 


New 

B.*T. 

each 

year. 


Books 

and 

Tract! 

reprld 


1854 
1866 
1866 
1867 
1868 


i* 

1 
2 


260 
1.000 

1.600 




4.760 
11.600 
6.600 
6.000 
10.260 


4 
2 

8 


8.000 
4.000 

6Jm6 


6 
20 

8 
38 
30 


13.600 
38.000 
15.000 
62.000 
60.600 


S 
2 

1 

1 


12.000 
4.000 
2.000 

2.000 


6 
2 

1 
1 


26.000 
2.000 
6.000 
6.000 


88.260 
83.760 
26.600 
78.000 
86.760 


11 
12 
22 
16 
10 


61.000 
66.000 
86.000 
52.000 
64000 


80.260 
148.760 
111.600 
126.000 
189.760 


506.600 
317.700 
486.260 
677.600 
326.760 



Graad 
ToUlof 
pnbl1e*n 
N.AR. 

605.750 
466.460 
606.760 
802.600 
466.600 



Total 2.027.960 
Pablidwd preyioiia to 1864. 8.802.488 

TotaL 6.820.438 



The Confession of Faith has been published in German, and other German publica- 
tions are now passing through the press. 

The Board aims to furnish, as soon as possible, all needful fecilities for Bible-class 
and Sabbath-school instruction. A good beginning has already been made by fur- 
nishing a variety of catechisms, question-books, and commentaries. 

Penodicals, The circulation of the Home and Foreign Record is 17,500 copies, 
and the Sabbath-school Visitor, 54,000. 

2. In the Department of Distribution. The regular sales at the publishing- 
house have been during the year 191,993 volumes of tracts, 706,963 pages. The 
Executive Committee have granted 3724 volumes, and 246,395 pages of tracts, and 
by colportage, a most important amount of divine truth has been ]3ut in circulation. 

The following Table will show the operations of the Board in this department, for 
the past five years : 





Books 


Tean. 


sold at 




Store. 


1864 


149.661 


1866 


159.479 


1866 


171.616 


1867 


193.678 


1868 


19L998 



Books 

sold by 
OolpoHVs. 


Books 


Books 

given by 
Ex. Com. 


Total 
Books. 


Pages of 
Tracts 
sold. 


Pages 
uoiporrrs. 


PagM 


Total 
Pages of 
Trarts. 


91.886 

07.863 

126.790 

124.679 

123.924 


9.681 
10.780 
13.918 
14.R02 
16.678 


6.617 
6.366 
8.269 
8.951 
8.724 


267.684 
274.477 
814.488 
836.910 
886.819 


865.470 
890.970 
406.627 
477.441 
706.963 


1.800.647 
1.046.964 
1.061.406 
2.140JS79 
1.666.409 


881.082 
842.662 
111.878 
162.682 
246.895 


2.047.049 
1.782.696 
1.668.906 
2.780.402 
2.608.827 



3. Ik the Department op Sustentation. The Treasurer's Report shows an ag- 
gregate of receipts for the year of $126,960.28. The total of expenditures has been 
|l 06,801,68, leaving a balance in the Treasurer's hands of $20,158.60. The following 
will diow the receipts, &c., for the last five years : 



Tsars. 


Balanee. 


For 

Books nld. 


ftor 

CUporlag». 


From Misodla- 


Onmd TotaL 


1864 

1866 
1866 
1867 
1868 


17.176.86 
18.106.60 
14.476.79 
17.033.96 
17.646.67 


$77,648.85 
66.793.44 
66.841.11 
81.066.86 
78.871.65 


$16,866.27 
14.016.64 
14.497.28 
24.828.62 
21.869.76 


$10,099.84 
7.790.63 
8.767.81 
18.441.66 
14J72.40 


$110,719.82 
106.796.10 
108.072.99 
186.854.99 
126.900^8 



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THB FRSSBYTSBIAN OHOROH, (O. Si) 



57 



The following will lihow the number and location of the Colportenn for the past 
five years ^— 



LoOATlOir. 


1864 


1866 


18M 


1867 


1868 


Alabama. 












Arkanaaa. 












Canada, Baft 












Oanada,WMt 








11 


16 


CklUbniia. 












Cbina. 
























D«)1avara. 




8 


1 






Vlorlda. 












Georgia* 


16 










Illlnoli. 


10 








S6 


Indlau. 


U 








19 


Iowa. 










16 


Kaosaa. 












Kentneky. 












Loolaiana. 












Maine. 




































Michigan. 












MlnoaaoU. 













LOCATIOH. 


1864 


1865 

1 


S£sr 




4 


Naw Branswlek. 




2 


New Hampahire. 




1 


New Jeraey. 




8 


New Tork. 




1» 


Northern India. 







North GaroUna. 




•21 


Nora Bootla. 




2 


Ohio. 




23 


Oregon. 











28 


South Carolina. 







Tenneaaee. 







Texaa. 




4 


Vermont 







Virginia. 




2 


Waahington. 







Wlaeonsin. 




1 


PrtMifUUrietkS^nodt. 









161 


178 



Rev. Wm. H. Mitohbll, Chairman, reported the following resolu- 
tions, which were adopted : 

Resolved, 1. That the Assembly recognizes and commends the Board as an efficient 
and honoured instrumentality in counteracting the pernicious effects of a licentious 
and corrupt literature ; and in disseminating through the waste places of our Ziou, the 
seeds of sound theolocry and of vital piety. 

Resolved, 2. That it is the subject matter for devout gratitude to Ood, that, al- 
though within a year of unprecedented commercial embarrassment, the Lord put into 
the hearts of the members of our churches, a spirit of more than ordinary benevolence ; 
the amount of church collections for the colportage fund being larger than they had 
been in any former year. 

Jiestoilvedf 3. That it gives the Assembly pleasure to learn that the Board, as fast as 
circumstances justify, are publishing evangelical works in the German language, suita- 
ble to the wants of the German population. 

Resolved, 4. That the humble and self-denying colporteur is doine God's work, and 
deserves the sympathies of Qod's people ; and that, as he visits from house to houi<e the 
Lord's poor, with Christ's love in his heart, and the books of the Board in his hand, 
he is aiding the missionary of the cross in diffusing Christian light and knowledge, 
where darkness and ignorance prevail. 

Resolved, 5. That the Assembly earnestly urges on the churches the importance of 
increasing their contributions to colportage, in order to enable the Board not only to 
pay off the arrears which during the past year necessarily accrued, but also to ex- 
pand its operations in a degree commensurate with the demands of the Church. 

Resolved, 6. That the Assembly expresses its heartfelt gratification at the laudable 
and successful efforts which the Board has made to publish works for Sunday-school 
libraries ; and that this body, believing, as it does, that the books published are ad- 
mirably adapted to the wants of children, would impress on the minds of ministers and 
members, that it is their duty to purchase and circulate the books of the Board rather 
than those published by any societies not connected with our beloved Church ; and 
that whenever Sabbath-schools have funds to expend for the purchase of libraries to 
present to feeble churches in various parts of the land, the Board should have a deci- 
ded preference. 



%\t CBmmtntsri 011 i\t Stt^iuxts. 

B. J. Brsckinridgs offered the following resolutions which, on 
motion of C. Yak Bsnssslasr, were referred to the next Assembly: 

Inasmuch as the want of a sound, godly, and thorough Commentary upon the whole 
word of God, composed in the sense of the constant faith of the Church of God, as 
8 



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68 PB88BTTBRIAK HISTOBICAX ALMAKAO. 

thai M briefly set forth in the 8t«ndard8 of the Westminster Ajsembly, hdd by die 
Presbyterian Church in the United States of America, has long been felt to be a 
grievous want, whereby a great lack of due service to God and to his truth occurs, 
and whereby constant danger arises to men of needless ignorance on one side, and of 
dangerous misguidance on the other : Therefore, be it 

Resolvedf By the General Assembly, that the Board of Publication shall, and it is 
hereby directed to proceed, with ail convenient dispatch, to have such Commentary 
composed, prepared for the press, and published. And in the execution of this great 
work, the following rules and orders, together with such further as may be adopted 
from time to time by the General Assembly, shall be carefully observed by the Board 
of Publication, and by all others in any way engaged in the execstion of any part 
thereof: 

1. The Commentary shall be prepared exclusively by members of this Church. 
And in the preparing of it, they shall have all such indulgence, as to time, as they 
shall ren)ectively demand. And for their compenj«tion, they and their heirs, for the 
legal period of twenty-eight years, shall receive a fair per centum on the price of the 
work sold, which shall be settled in advance by tlie Board of Publication, and which 
shall be uniform, and in lien of all claim and cost of every sort in ^ny way connected 
with their said work. 

2. The said Commentary shall be fitted for common use by aR men, and in the 
preparation of it, free use may be made of all materials that may exist, the design 
being to produce, not so much what mav be original, as what may be best, in the 
way of enlightening and saving men. It shall not be prolix, but so arranged that the 
whole may bo embraced in five or six royal octavo volumes, of good print, containing, 
besides the Commentary, the English text in full, together with the usual accessories 
thereof, and such other suitable helps to its understanding as plain people need. And 
the text used in it shall be strictly that of the version prepared by the translators ap- 
pointed by James the First, King of England. 

3. In order to secure the fittest men for this great work, the Board of Publication 
shall make special application to the several Synods of our Church at their next 
stated meetings respectively ; and the said Synods shall, upon careful consideration, 
nominate to the saia Board of Publication any number of tneir own members, not to 
exceed five from any one Synod, of such as they shall consider qualified to undertake 
the work. And the Board of Publication may add not more than five in addition to 
the whole number thus nominated to it. And it shall communicate the list of names 
thus obtained by sifting the Church, to the General Assembly, at its stated meeting 
in May of next year ; making, at the same time, and from year to year thereafter, 
report of its doings under and by virtue of this minute. 

4. The General Assemblv of 1859 will take such further order in the premises, 
especially with regard to the selection of persons out of the list communicated to it, 
to the distribution of the work amongst them, and to all things needful for its effectual 
prosecution, as shall seem most expedient. 

The following resolution was adopted : 

Whereas, Hymns No. 336 and No. 454, of the Assembly's coUeetion, are one and 
the same, therefore, 

Resolved, That the Board of Publication be authorized and directed to replace 
Hymn No. 336 with some other, not now found in the book, of the same typographic 
cal dimensions, and of evangelical sentiment and decided poetic merit. 

OFFICERS. 
Presideni^BjdY,W. W. Phillips, D. D. 
Corresponding Secretartf — Rev. Willum £. Schbnck. 
Ed/tor— Rev. Wm. M. Englbs, D. D. 
Treeuurer-^-^AMEa Dunlap. 
Publishing Agenir^osxfn P. Enolb. 
Superintendent of Colportage — ^Wimthbop Sabobiit. 



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THB PSXSBTTXBIAN CHUBOH, (O. 8.) 



09 



C)[an|f (iximin €amm\Ut. 

The Church Extension Committee are glad to prefaoe their Third 
Annual Report, with the statement that it shows a decided advance 
in the work entrusted to them. 

The DQinber of applications for aid during the year, is om hdkdrid. Eigfaty-Dine 
ef tbeee ask for aid, amoanling to 941,238.68. The other eleven woold sweJi the 
amount to $46,000. 

Besides these applications, there were on file and undisposed of, at the beginning of 
the year, fortufour applications calling for nearly $17,000. 

The Committee have, therefore, had ooe hundred and forty-four applieations, catling 
for $62,000. 

There remained on file, April 1, 1858, awaiting the receipt of additional informa- 
tion, sixty applications, calling for $25,000. 

Appropriations, During the year ending April 1, 1858, appropriations were 
made to sbvsntt-six churches, amounting to $27,571.03. 

TaBLB SHOWIMO TBX PrBBBYTSBRS WHKRS OhUROHIS ABM WHICH BBOUVBD AID 
FROM TlUB GOMMRTBB. 

1S67 INS 





isvr 

1 


1869 
1 




1847 


18M 


▲1U1I7. 


Florida. 




8 


Baltimoiv. 


1 


2 


FortWavne. 
ereenbrier. 


2 


1 


BwTer. 


., 


1 




1 


Bruofl. 


„ 


1 


Hockioc. 




1 


Cedar. 


2 


8 


Indlao. 




1 


ChM-lafltoD. 


.. 


1 


Iowa. 




„ 


Cherokee. 


1 


„ 


Lafiiyette^ 




^ 


Chkago. 


1 


a 


Uke. 




. 


ChilUcofhe. 


2 


„ 


Lexington. 




1 


Ooehoeton. 


1 


., 


Ljganiiport. 




„ 


Dane. 


3 


„ 


LoolBUna. 




2 


Bee Moiaea. 


4 


fi 


UuisTille. 




2 


Dubaqae. 
Sast Alabama. 


8 


4 


Lnieme.' 




1 


„ 


1 


MadlMO. 




1 


X.HInleeippl. 


^ 


1 


Martoa. 




1 


Eastern Texas. 


I 


1 


Manmee. 




2 


Xbeneier. 


1 


^ 


Miami. 




1 


Xrle. 


1 


„ 


Michigan. 






FayetteTUla. 


I 


„ 


Mohawk. 




i 


findlay. 


ft 


2 


HuQde. 




1 



New Albany. 
N. Bmnswlek. 
Nebraska Tte. 
New OuUe. 
New Orleans. 
Newton. 
New Tork. 
New Tork 2d. 
Northumb'd. 



Palestine. 
Palmyra. 
Peoria. 
PotosL 

Philadela. 2d. 
Hed RlTer. 



Richland. 
Rook Rirer. 



1867 


1868 


1 


1 




1 


« 


1 




^ 




^ 




„ 




1 




2 




^ 




,, 




^ 




8 




„ 




8 








1 




. 




„ 




^ 


« 


1 I 



Schnyler. 

Sidney. 

aiooxClty. 

S. Carolina. 

St.ClairsTiUe. 

81 Paul. 

Suaqoebanna. 

TransTWaoia. 

Tuscaloosa. 

Up. Missouri. 

Vinoennes. 

Washington. 

West Texas. 

Winchester. 

Wlnnebsga 

Wooster. 



1866 . . 71 78 76 



Sixty-five churches received their appropriations during the year. The amount paid 
to these churches is $21,342.53, which leaving out of view the special appropriations, 
ther average two hundred and seventy-six dollars each. 

Rkceipts and Expknditurbs. liie balance in the treasury, April 1, 1857, was 
$8,63458. The receipts from April 1, 1857, to April 1, 1858, from all sources, were 
$24,741.15, of which $14,341.48 was from churches, $9,094.50 from individuals, and 
$253.18 from Sabbath-schools. The available resources of the year were therefore 
$33,375.73. 

The expenditures of the year were $24,384.03, leaving in the treasury, Aprfl 1. 
1858, balance of $8,991.70. 

The Church Extension Committee have continued to act in accordance with the 
reconunendation of the last Qeiieral Assembly, iu reference to the cost of church edifices. 

As nearly as can be ascertained, /orfy-«even of the seventy-six churches aided during 
the last year, cost from $500 to $2.500 ; twenty-two cost from $2,500 to $5,000 ; and 
seven over $5,000. Four of the seven appropriations to churches costing over $5,000» 
were speciiJ appropriations. 

In tne two and a half years the Committee have been fiiirly at work, they have made 
appropriations to two hundred and five dififerent churches. One hundred and fifty- 
three of these two hundred and five church buildings cost from $500 to $2,500 ; 
thirty-nine from $2,500 to $5,000 ; and the other thirteen over $5,000. Five of the 
thirteen were special appropriations. 

The simple met that the cost of three-fourths of all the churches aided does not ex- 
ceed $2,500, proves that the work of the Committee has been mainly among the pooTi 
and in aid of those who are not extravagant in their desires. 



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60 FRESBYTSBIAN HISTORICAL ALMANAC. 

A carefal analysis of the number of members in the two hundred and five churches 
aided, shows that one hundred and sixty of them had from 3 to 60 members ; thirty- 
nine from 50 to 100 ; and six over 100 members. One-half the whole number of 
churches aided had less than 30 members. 

In accordance with the recommendation of the General Assembly of 1856, the 
Committee have continued to recognize the right of donors, whether churches or in- 
dividuals, to say who shall be the recipients of their bounty. Contributions accompa- 
nied by directions as to the channels in which they shall flow, are entered by the 
Treasurer as special donations, and appropriated by the Committee according to tba 
directions received. Such appropriations are termed special, 

AcnoK OF THS General Assbmblt op 1858 on thi subject of Church Exteksiov. 

B. J. Breceinridgb, Chairman, reported the following resolutions, 
which were unanimoysly adopted: 

1. lliat the Church Extension Committee appears to have conducted the great 
interest committed to them by the Assembly, with diligence and fidelity ; and the 
Lord has blessed and prospered them, for which thanks are due to his blessed name. 

2. Inasmuch as the work of building houses of worship over a region so immense 
and so diversified as that covered thinly by the Presbjrterian Church, presents diffi- 
culties BO various in their nature, as to render it impossible to give specific directions 
concerning them ; the General Assembly exhorting the Committee to press forward 
in the important work, and exhorting the churches to contribute liberally to it, con- 
tents itself with the general authorization to the Committee to prosecute it in such 
manner as its own increasing experience, and the continual indications of Providence, 
shall satisfy them is most wise and effectual, diffusing their aid impartially through- 
out the Church. 

3. Such of our congregations as have insufficient accommodations for public worship^ 
are exhorted, according to their means, to provide themselves with good and perma- 
nent places for the public worship of God ; such as have none of their own, are ex- 
horted to make vigorous efforts to provide themselves with them, this being the form 
of christian eflbrt, especially in neighbourhoods where we have no stated place of 
worship, towards which those without are usually most disposed to contribute. 

4. All our congregations in country places, and especially those in new settlements, 
are exhorted to make provision, where it is possible, of suitable and sufficient grounds 
for a school for their children, a home for tneir minister, and a burial place ror their 
dead, all convenient to their place of worship ; and in all these necessary matters se- 
cured while the land is still low priced. Let all parsimony be avoided, and due care 
be taken to secure Uieir titles alike against future disputes, and future injury to the 
cause of truth. And thus laying sure foundations, they may act as becomes those who 
trust God and build for many generations. 

5. Seeing the vast extent of the land yet to be possessed, the almost indispensable 
necessity of a sufficient place of worship to the nermanent establishment of a congre- 
gation, and the great and constant blessing or God upon our Church in all its en- 
deavours, it becomes all our ministers and people, whose lot is so cast as to enable 
them to sciTe the Lord in this way, to use a wise forecast in the matter of obtaining, 
as fur as may be necessary, in good time, such necessary sites for church buildings, 
both in towns and in country places, as will facilitate the constant extension of Uie 
Church, and its firm establishment in every quarter of the country. 

OFFICERS OF THB CHURCH EXTENSION COMMITTEE. 

Chairman— Bev. 8. J. P. Andrrsok, D. D, 
Corresponding Seerdartf^BjSY. Hxmbt L Cob, 
Treaswres^^AxcBiBALD Gamble. 



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THB PRSSBYTSBtAK CHTTROH, (O. 8.) 



61 



The Board of Directors of the Theological Seminary at Princeton, New Jersey, 
present to the General Assembly their Forty-sixth Annual Report 

Since the date of their last Annual Report, they have received into the Seminary, 
fifty-two new stadents, as follows, viz : 

NUMBER OF STUDENTS ENTERINQ. 



Adams, Lyell T^ College of New Jera^, N. J. 
Allen, Edward B^ Union College, N. T. 
Barnard, Joaepb H., La&« ette College, Pa. 
Bartiett, Nathaniel J., WUliama ColleRe, Haas. 
Blauvelt, J. AU^yne, CoUei$e of New Jersey, N. J. 
Bridgman, Cheirter, Amherat College. Alaas. 
Bryant, Kdwln G., Wabaah Oollege, Ind. 
Butler, Francia K^ Tale College, Con. 
Caakey, John P.. Hamilton College, N. Y. 
Coble, John 11 . University of North Carolina. 
Cochrane, Wlllhun, Hauorar College, Ind. 
Collier. Kdward A., University of New York. 
Cook, Pbttip B., CoUege of New Jersey, N.J. 
Craven, Hugh L, « *' « 

Darrach.John u u u 

Dinsmore. William H., « «« « 

FeaRlea, Robert 8, « « « 

Finney. H. Graham, Univerpitj of New York. 
Gregory, Daniel S., Colle$;e of New Jersey, N. J. 
Harrison, Samuel. Washington College, Pa. 
Henry, J. Addison, College of New Jersey, N. J. 
Hooker. K. C, Williams College. Mass. 
Janeway, J. Howell, College of New Jersey, N. J. 
Johnson, Andrew J., Jefferson College, Pa. 
Kins, Albert B., College of New Jersey, N. J. 
Kngler, John B., « « « 



Lowrey, John, College of New Jersey, N. J. 
Bfagie, David, Jr., « « « 

MarahaU. William R., Muskingum College 0. 
Majrer, Gnstavus W., College of New Jersey, N. J. 
Mayne, James S., College of New Jersey, N. J. 
McConaugby, N., Western Reserre Oollego» O. 
Mitchell, David H . College of New Jersey, N. J. 
Morey, Alexander B., Union College, N. T. 
McMurray, J. W., Uanorer College, Ind. 
Patterson. Isaac M., Picton College, N. S. 
Patterson, Joseph A., Lalkyette College, Pa. 
Penney, J. Gardiner, University of Roefaestar, N. T. 
Pering, John D., University or Indiana. 
Qoarles, Jamee A., University of Virginia. 
Sherard, Thomas, University of MIchigao. 
Shields, £dward P., Miami University, 0. 
Smith, Sanford U., CoUege of New Jersey, N. J. 
Stitt, William C « a a 

Strong, Robert, u u u 

Studdlford, Samuel M., « « « 

Sutphen, Morris C, u u tt 

Thom, John C, Jefferson College, Pa. 
WilllAmson, D. M., Hanover College, Ind. 
Wood. John Rloe, College of New Jersey, N. J. 
Woods, Alexander M., ** *• ** 

Yeomana, Alfred, u « m 



The whole number in attendance npon the exercises of the Institution, during the pre* 
sent year, has been one hundred and thiTty4ieOt including one resident missionary and 
four resident licentiates. 

Table showikq the Operation for the fast Five Tears* 



Years. 


Whole 
Number. 


New. 


Graduates. 


1864 
1865 
1866 
1867 
1868 


lOT 
109 
101 
110 
182 


42 
62 
88 
60 
62 


14 
82 
24 
28 
20 



One student, viz : Charles H. Young, has died in the course of the session. 

The Professors reported to the Board, that the religious life of the students, as far as it 
has come under their observation, has been exemplary, llie customary religious meet- 
ings have been maintained with usual frequency, and with apparent devotion. The 
interest in the work of foreign missions has been more marked than ordinary, and several 
are expecting to engage personally in labours amon^ the heathen. 

At the close of the session, the students were examined, for nearly a week, in presence 
of a Committee of the Board. 

Certificates of having finished the whole course prescribed in the Plan, were conferred 
on the following twenty^ine students, viz : Henry 0. Alexander, Robert Alexander, 
Lewis C. Baker, James F. Brewster, Augustus Brodhead, Edwin W. Condict, John Y. 
Cowhick, Floyd A. Crane, William Cunningham, Anderson 0. Forbes, Alanson A. 
Haines, Edward J. Hamilton, Charles E. Hedges, Sheldon Jackson, Albert B. King, 
James S. King, Nathaniel McConauehy, James McDongall, George Nixon, Henry 
A. Post, William C. Roberts, Edward C. Sickels, Ashbel G. Simonton, Julius Spen- 
cer, Calvin W. Stewart, Alexander Telford, John C. Thompson, William M. Wells, 
and Alexander M. Woods. 

PROFESSORS OP THE SEMINARY. 

Rev.CBARLES Hodqr,D. D., Profsesor of Exegetical, Didacticand Polemic Theology. 
Rev. Joseph Addison Alexander, D. D., Prof, of Biblical and Kcclesiastical History. 
Rev. William Hbnrt Green, D. D., Professor of Oriental and Biblical Literature. 
Rev. Alexander T. McGill, D. D., Professor of Pastoral Theology, Church Govern- 
ment, and the Composition and Delivery of Sermons. 



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<n 



PRSSBTTERIAK HISTOBIGAL ALMAKAO. 



From the Librarian*8 Report it appears there have been added to the h'brary throaph 
the year, by donation, 531 volunes, aod by purchase, 1 volume ; making the entire 
namber of volumes now in the library, 14,661. 

The Presbyterian Board of Publication h%ve presented 47 volumes of their ismes ; 
the Smithsonian Institution their last Report, and the last volume of their Contribu- 
tions to EnowleiLre ; Rev. Dr. Sprague, volumes 3 and 4 of the Annals of the Ameri- 
can Pulpit ; the Rev. Evan Davies of Richmond, England, 6 volumes, of which he 
was the Editor or Author ; and Samuel Agnew, Esq., of Philadelphia, 475 volumes. 

These last are part of a collection which Mr. Agnew has been gathering with great 
pains and diligence for a number of years, and in which he has endeavou^ to bring 
together all the rare and valuable publications which have appeared upon certain specific 
subjects. These volumes compnsc, in addition to other viilnable works, a complete 
set of the books of the Parker Society, except one volume, which it has been impossi- 
ble to obtain ; the most complete and sumptuous editions of the works of the venerable 
Bede, and Boston, and a large number of publications on the Trinity, many of whidi 
are very rare and difficult to be procured. 

A large amount of binding has been executed at the expense of Robert L. Stuart, Esq. 

Valuable boxes of clothing for the Students have been received from the Female 
Charitable Society of Morris Plain ; the lliird Presbyterian Church, Newark, N. J. ; 
and from the Ladies of the Church under the care of the Rev. James W. Alexander, 
D. D., New York. Some of the Professsors have also received benefactions for the 
use of the students, from benevolent persons, whose names have not been reported. 

The Committee on Theological Seminaries respectfully report, that they have re- 
ceived and considered the annual rq>orts of the Seminaries under the care of the Gene- 
ral Assembly, viz : Princeton, N. J. ; Union, Va. ; Western, Pa. ; and Danville, Ky. 

The Assembly will learn, with jo]^ and devout gratitude to the Head of the Church, 
that all these Institutions have during the past year been highly favoured ; that the 
teachers have been faithful in their work or instruction ; that the pupils have been 
diligent in study, and exemplary in their deportment. It is also gratifying to know 
that the numbers in attendance have been increased, and an enlarged desire for the 
foreign missionary field has been manifested. 

In respect to then* finandal aspect, the ALflsemUy, while rejoicing in what has 
already been done, will appreciate the need of continued effort to enlarge their means, 
and complete their endowments. Tour Committee would recommend the reiteration 
of the resolution adopted by the last Assembly, vi£ : 

^ That the churches be urged to complete the endowment of those Seminaries that 
are not yet fully endowed, to increase the number of scholarships, to furnish funds for 
repairs and erection of suitable buildings, and the enlargement of libraries.'' 

John McDowbll, D. D., Seerdary, 



The Directors of the Western Theological Seminary present to the Assembly their 
Thirty-first Annual Report Since the last Report the following students have matri- 
culated, viz : 

NUMBIB OF STUDENTS KNTBBINO. 



Alllflon, Junes W., HanoTer College, Ind. 
Boyd, Andrew W., Jeflbraon College, Pa. 
Carntbera, Jamea £., *< •« « 

Cooper, Daniel W. Miami UniTeraltT, 0. 
Downs, Caleb B., Jefferson College, Pa, 
Dunlan, Silas G., « « « 

Bdijerton, Jobn M., Marietta Onlleee, O. 
Xvans, Bicbard J- Jefferson College, F^ 
Fisher, Daniel W., « « « 

Fitsgeiatd, James D., << <* « 

French, Charles P., Wsshlnfrton College, Pa. 
Grenoogh, William. UniTerKity of New York City. 
Hair, Samnel G., Mount Union College, O. 
Heagan, John W., Jefferson College^ Pa. 
Jackson, Richard H., ** " ** 

Johnston, William F., « " •« 

Kennedy, Robert P., « « « 

King, Conrtlan, Washington College, Pa. 
Kinkaid, Samuel P., " *" *' 

Launits, John, OymnaHium, Franklbrt'On>tha-RUn«. 
Lee^ Charles H., Washington College, Pa. 



Logan, DaTld 8., Jefferson Oollege, Pa. 
L/nn, Francis, Union College, N. T. 
McDonald, Noah A., Jeffprson College, Pa. 
MrFarland, Samuel G., Washington College, Pa. 
MeUren, WUliam £., Jefferson College, Pa. 
Moffittt, Francis J., Westminster College, Pa. 
MoShtt WUliam J., « «^^ « 

Moore, "Wm. Braden, Jefferaom Oollsfew Pa. 
Neely, William C " « « 

Niocols, Samuel J.^efferton CoHege, Pa. 
Ramsey, Samuel. Washington College, Pa. 
SteTens, Lawrence M., Miami University, a 
Stockton, John P., Washington College, Pa. 
Swift Edward P., Jefferson College. Pa. 
Tanner, Beqjamin P., Alleghany College, ftk 
Walker, WUliam B., Oberlin Collef^e, 0. 
Wallace, Thomas P., Jefferson College, Pa. 
Wauffh. Joseph, Washington College, Pa. 
Wood, WiUiam 8., Jefferson CoUon, Pa. 
Van Eman, Craig R., « « •« 
Total, 41. 



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TBB PltSSBTnaUAN CRtTBOH, (O. 8.) 

Thb ivMe ininibdr of etad^nts on tin roll for the carrent year k niiiety-Ava. 
Table sHowiNa thb Opkrations op ras past Fivi Tears. 



Tean. 


Ntimlwr. 


V€W. 


Ondoates. 


1864 


64 


22 


7 


18M 


bi 


90 


11 


16M 


19 


« 


IS 


1867 


81 


81 


18 


1866 


06 


41 


87 



The foUowiDg members of the Senior Class have completed the whole course of 
study prescribe in the Institution : James W. Allison, Jono E. Annan, Calvin Barr, 
D. . Henry Barron, J. Shields Boyd, James S. Eilder, James A. Ewing, James T. 
Fredericks, George tiraham, John R. Hamilton, Jesse W. Hamilton, J. Hughes 
Harris, John C. Irwin, B. Oliver Jnnkin, William B. Keeling, John Y. McCartney, 
James A. Mclntyre, William B. McKee, Robert R. Moore, William P. Moore, 
William D. Patterson, Georsre K. Scott, Samuel M. Sharp, Bernard W. Slagle, 
George W. Sloan, G. Meredith Spargrove, and Danid W. Townsend. 

The students have been examinoi, at the close of the term, in the presence of a Com- 
mittee of the Board, who report that the attendance and attention of the students 
were highly commendable. 

The Faculty take pleasure in reporting a very aroused interest in the work of For- 
eign Missions. Three of the students in the different classes have already ofibred 
themselves to the Board and been accepted, and others are purposed to offer them- 
selves at the proper time. The present wide^read religions awakening with which 
God has very signally blessed this region of our land, has furnished the students a pre- 
cious opportanity of labouring in the great hafvest field. In this densely settled 
Presbyterian r^ion there has been the amplest opportunity of training in this practi- 
cal department, and the happy eflbct of snch exercise has been very manifest on the 
students themselves." 

The state of religious interest in the Seminary has been peculiarly gratifying, and 
calls for special gratitude to the great Head of the Church. 

PB0FBS8OB8 IN THB SBMIKABT. 

Rev. David Elliott, D. D., Prof of Polemic and Historical Theol, and Church Qov. 
Rev. M. W. Jaoobus, D. D. Professor of Oriental and Biblical Literature and Exegesis. 
Rev. William S. Pluubr, D. D., Professor of Didactic and Pastoral Theology. 
Rev. Samurl J. Wilson, A. M., Professor of Church History and Homiletics. 

The real estate of the Western Theological Seminary, is valued at sixty-thousand 
dollars. 

The Librarian reports the following donations of books to the library durii^ tbe 
year : From Rev. Cyrus Huntingdon, 3 volumes ; Hon. Judge Irwin, 93 ; Rev. Dr. 
Howe, 12 ; Rev. Lemu^ G. Ohnstead, 8 ; Rev. Dr. Sprague, N. T., 4 ; Rev. S. F. 
Leake, Indiana, 4 ; Franklin Knight, Esq., 3 ; Rev. Robert Steele, 20 ; Rev. H. 
Ruffner, D. D., 32 ; Samuel Agnew, Esq., 147 ; W. S. Martien, 4 : Rev. Charles 
Hodge, D. D., 20 ; Mrs. Wallace, Terre Haute, Indiana, 50 ; Gov. James Pollock, 
Pa., 30 ; Smithsonian Institute, the publications of the year. 



Vni0n f (t0l08ital Smiuxji. 

Report of the Union Seminary of the General Assembly, under the care of the 
Synods of Virginia and North Carolina, and tbe Presbytery of Winchester ; located 
in Prince Edward County, Virginia. 

To the General Assembly of 1858. — ^The undersigned, the Faculty of the above 
Seminary, were authorized and appointed by the Synods of Virginia and North 
Carolina, at their last regular meeting, to prepare the usual Annual Report to the 
General Assembly, Inasmuch as the meeting of that venerable body is this year before 
the meeting of the Board. We therefore submit, on behalf of the Board of Direc- 
tors, the following Report of the state of the Institution from May Ist, 1857, to April 
15th, 1858. 



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64 



PRBSBYTERTAK HISTORICAL ALU ANAO. 



The Dnmber of stndentB receiving iDstniction daring the year has been twenty-one, 
of whom nine were matriculated this year, viz : 



Ganrington Alexandar B., Unlyenltj oTTirginia. 
OraTM Robert J., WllUam and Mary OoIIeKe, Va. 
Hopklna, Aboer C, Hampden Sidney OoUege^ Ta. 
LacT, Matthew L}le, « " m u 

Mci5oDald, Edward H.« ** •* « « 



Moore, Bamnel M^ Lalkyeite GoUem, Pa. 
Pannlll, David H., UnlTersltT of Virginia. 
ThompaoD, 8ilaaH., Dojlestown College, Pa. 
Whiter Hemj M, Waahington College, Pa. 



Tablb showikq trb Opkbations of TBS PAST FiYB Yeabs. 



Teura. 


Whole 
Number. 


Hew. 




18M 


U 


8 




1866 


28 


12 


8 


1860 


28 





6 


1867 


26 


10 





1868 


SI 


9 


T 



The following students have completed the course of studies prescribed bj the Plan 
of the Seminary, viz : — John B. Shearer and F. H. Johnston. The remainder of the 
Senior Glass left the Seminary to apply for licensure without fully completing the course, 
viz:— E. H. Harding, G. W. White, T. W. Hooper, R. Mcllvainc, and S. Homes. 

The course of studies appointed by the General Assembly and the Judicatories im- 
mediately in charge of the Seminary, has been diligently carried out. 

The real estate of the Seminary consists of about thirty-five acres of land, the Semi- 
nary building, capable of accommodating from 60 to 80 students, four Professors' 
houses, and a large and convenient Steward's house. The Library now consists of 
4627 volumes— and the increase during the year has been 184 volumes, by donations, 
as follows : Mr. G. W. Grettcr, 1ft volumes ; Presbyterian Board of Publication, 44 ; 
members of Congress, 8 ; Mrs. Dr. J. H. Rice, 1 ; Rev. James N. Lewis, 58 ; Rev. 
W. B. Sprague, D. D., 4 ; Mrs. L. G. Shearer, 9 ; and from the Society of Alumni, 46, 

There are at present four Scholarships, and beginnings made for three others. 

The Faculty of the Seminary are. 
Rev. Samuel B. Wilson, D. D., Pres., and Prof, of Systematic and Pastoral Theology. 
Rev. R. L. Dabney, D. D., Prof, of Church History and Polity, and Sacred Rhetoric. 
Rev. B. M. Smith, D. D., Professor of Oriental Literature. 
Rev. William J. Hook, Professor of Biblical Introduction. 

The Post Office address of the Seminary is, ** Hampden Sydney, Virginia^ 



The Directors of the Theological Seminary, at Danville, Kentucky, respectfully sub- 
mit to the General Assembly their Fifth Annual Report, as follows : 

During the year now closed, the whole number of students in attendance has been 
forty. Of these, the following twenty-four new students have been matriculated : 

NUMBER OP STUDENTS BNTBRINO. 



Archer, Stereimon, Oakland College. Ky. 
Bedlnger. Everett W , Tale College, Con. 
Bonde. Hennr B.. Centre College, Ky. 
Crawft>rd, John M., .* « « 
Dunn, OliTer S., « « « 
Frraman. D. Kerr, La&} ette College, Pa. 
Hall, William A., Oakland CoUege, Ky. 
Keifprin, Henry, llanoTer Collexe, Ind. 
Lippe, A. Yonder, Brenlau College. Pmsala. 
Liggett, J. Albert, Ufkyette College, Pa. 
McNair, Kvander, Centre CoMege. Ky. 
KeNair, Blaloom, Union Theological Seminary, Ta. 



Miller, George, Centre GoUece, Kj. 

Mitchell, Samuel W.," " & 

Morrlnon, George, College of New iwwej. N. J. 

Park, John 8., Unlverelty of MfMimlpl. 

Payne, Alexander O., Centre College, Ky. 

Praigg, John O., •« «^ «' 

Saundem, Allies, " « " 

Tate, John C, a « «, 

TraTla, John M., Union Theological Seminary, Ta. 

Truax, W. B , HanoTer CoUege, Ind. 

Vara, Lachlan C, College of New Jemey, N. jr. 

Yeater, A. J., New Albany Theological Seminaiy. 



T-r. 


Whole 
Number. 


New. 


Oraduatet. 


1864 
1855 
1866 
1867 
1858 


45 

36 

40 


24 
20 
22 
6 
24 


2 

4 

10 

12 

9 



The following candidates for the ministry, having completed the course of study pre- 



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preBcribed bj the Plan of the Seminary, and having sustained a final examination on the 
whole course, in the several departments, in the presence of the Board of Directors 
and the Professors, have received the certificate of the Seminary. 

Herman H. Allen, of Ky. ; John 0. Brown, Va. ; Samuel Hibben, Alphens H. 
HoUoway, A. 0. Kemper, 0. ; Matthew McFeaters, Pa. ; William B. Moore, Ky. ; 
William A. Sample, Tenn. ; and Henry M. Scudder, Ky. 

The Facalty report to the Directors, that the students have been regular, punctual, 
and diligent ; and that much interest has been awakened among them in respect to the 
missionary work of the Church, both foreign and domestic. 

THB FACULTY. 

BoBBRT J. BRKCxxNRiDaiB, Professor of Exegetical, Didactic, and Polemic Theology. 
Edward P. HuMFBRsr, Professor of Biblical and Ecclesiastical History. 
Btsphbn Txbxbb, Professor of Biblical and Oriental Literature. 

The librarian reports the followinff additions to the Library, all by donations :— 
from the late John Allen, M. D., of Shelbyville, Ky., 462 volumes ; the Presbyterian 
Board of Publication, 36 ; Rev. Alexander M. Cowan, 45 ; Rev. Dr. Van Rensselaer, 
(Calvin's Works translated,) 23; Hon. John J. Crittenden, 6; University of New 
York, 12 ; Rev. George Armstrong, 2 ; Mr. Gleorge Morrison, 3 ; Rev. James Mat- 
thews, 1 ; and David A. Sayre, Esq., 1. 



f|(t0l0gical ^eminsr];; €a\umVn, S* C. 

Theological Seminary at Coliimbia, S. C. ; under the care of the 
Synods of South Carolina, Georgia, and Alabama. 

FACULTY. 

Gborob Howi, D. D., Professor of Biblical Literature. 
A. W. LiLAKD, D. D., Professor of Sacred Rhetoric and Pastoral Theology. 
J. H. TiioRNWELL, D. D., LL. D., Professor of Didactic and Polemic Theology. 
J. B. Adger, D. D., Professor of Ecclesiastical History and Church Polity. 
Rev. Jambs Cohen, A. M., Tator in Hebrew. 

STUDENTS. 

The whole number of Students connected with the Seminary during the past year 
has been 40, sixteen of whom were admitted during the year, viz : 

BrMrley. H. M^ UnlTerflity of Nortti GhraUna. 
Cvwrj, W. L., Furman UnlTendtT. 
DuTidson, K. C, UnlTersity of MbidMippL 
Do Veaax, T. L^ Charl««toii Oollega 
Orefn;, W. A^ telethorpe Dniyeralty. 
Hunter, Bei^. T., « " 

Hnmphreya, D. W^ Darldflon Obllege. 
Mclntyn, D. K Oglethorpe UnlTeraity. 



Hajee, J. F. B^ Pumum Unlrenlty. 
Hullallj, Frandi P., 
PanoDS, L. H^ 

Riley, J. R., Sonth OaroIlDa Oollega 
Stoddartl, W. R., Enklne College. 
ThomaR, J. S. N., Dayldaon Collejte. 
Underwood, J. L., Oglethorpe Unlrenltj. 
WUlbanka, J. 8^ SrskiDe Oollege. 



Table bhowiko thb Operations of thb past Five Tears. 



Tean. 


Whole 
Number. 


New. 


Qradnatet. 


1864 


40 


17 


11 


1866 


81 


8 


12 


1866 


80 


16 


7 


1867 


84 


16 


6 


1868 


40 


16 


9 



The following stndents have completed the course of stndy, viz : 
S. B. Axon, Geo. H.Coit, Ga.; David Fairly, Miss.; W. T. Hall, N. C. ; A. R. 
Liddell Ga.; W. F. Pearson, S. C. ; Hugh M. Morrison, Miss. ; A. P. Smith, Ala.; 
T. £. Smith, Ga. ; and Jas. A. Walker, S. 0. 

The Library contains 17260 volumes. — The endowment consists of the Professon' 
Fund of $123,679. Students' Fund, $17,441. Buildings, (value,) $40,000. 
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ALPHABETICAL LIST 



01 



MINISTERS AND LICENTIATES 

OF THE GENEBAL A88BMBLT 07 THE PBE8BYTEBIAN OHUBOH, (o. 8.) 

[NoTS.— Id the Jbllowing Uit, T. tndloites PtiHor; ■. •., SUOed 3iq)plf; s. M. and V.M., Domestie and 
F^eian MtiHonariu ; W 0^ Mtfund Charge; CHp., Cfuxplain; PRt. or PRJr., as PretidaU or Proftuor 1a 
« OoUege or Homlnaiy; BDT., A/itor; 0. •., Omrt^'pfmd'.ng Secretaiy; T^ Tiadur; and L^ Xioentiat*; AOT., 
AgenL The PosioffloM are oorreeted up to the ttina of going to pruee.] 



HAMS. 



POBT-OmCS. 



I 



pftxsBTTXST. rosTorvics. 



Abbott, G. J^ t. 
Abbott, K.Bnt-B. 
Adam, M.T^e.e. 
Adam, Wm.,W.a. 
Adams. W. C, P. 



Adams, J. M. U., P. Bethel. 

Adams, Joe., w. o. Dubuque. 

Adams, Joe. B., p. 

Adams, J. U., P. 

Adams,W.T..P. 

Adger, J. B., PEF. 

Agnew, B. L., P. 

Agnew, J. K., W. 0. 

Aiken, J.J., W.O. 

Aiken, Silas, P. 

Aikin, WUllam, P. 

Aitkin, George, T. 

Aitkin, Thomas, P. 

Akej, J. B.. L. 

Alden, J., pes. 

Aiderdioe, T. H., a. s. Vinoennes. 

Alexander, U. a, L. New York. 



8 e. Loots. St Lonl». Ho. 
White Water. BrookTille. Ind. 
N. York 2d. New York Citj. 
Hantingdon. Huntingdon, Pa. 
OonneeUeut. ThompeonylUe, 0. 



YorkTiUe, S.a 

VrankTille, Iowa. 
Northnmb*d. Hifflinbuig, Pa. 
Londondenry. Gorham, Me. 
Peoria. Washington, UL 

8. Garollna. Oolumua, 8. C. 
BlairsTiUe. Johnstown, Pa. 
StenbenTlUe. 8teubenTUle, Ohio. 
BufEdoCltr- BUicottTille, N. Y. 
Londonderry. Rutland, Vt 
Washington. West LlbertiN Ta. 
Bbeneser. Sherburne, Ky. 
QenesseeB. North Sparta, N. Y. 
Ooehoeton. Plainfleld, Ohio. 
Ohio. Gannonsburg, Pa. 

Worthington, Ind. 

Princeton, N.J. 



Alexander, J., P. St. Glairflrllle. Martin's Ferry, 0. 
Alexander,J. A..pmr N. Brunswick. Princeton, N. J. 
Alexander, J. H., P. 0. Mississippi. Kosciusko, Miss. 
Alexander, J. M., T. PalesUne. Palestine, HI. 
Alexander, J. W., P. New York. New York City. 
Alexander, J. E , T. ZanesTllle. Washington, Ohio. 
Alexander, Rob., L. St. ClairsTille. 
Alexander, 8. C., P. Ooneord. Miranda, N. 0. 

Alexander, S.D., p. New York. New York City. 
Alexander,S.R..W.o. VlnoennHS. Vinoennes, Ind. 
Alexander, T., s. s. Central Texas Cotton Gin, Texas. 
Alexander, W. J., p. Washington. Dallas, Va. 
Allen, A. C, P. Indianapolis. Franklin, Ind. 

Allen, B. R.. P. Londonderry. Marblehead, Mass. 

Allen, H. H., L. LoulsTiUe. 
Allen, Jerome. 1». Dubuque. Dubuque, Iowa. 
Allen, K. H., P. Logansport Ldhyette, Ind. 
Allen, R. W., P. Sangamon. JaeksonTille, DL 
Allen, W.O., w 0. Muhlenburg. Unlontown, Ky. 
AUen, Wm. Y., P. Crawfordsr'e. RockTille, Ind. 
Allison, James, P. Allegheny 0. SewlckleyviUe^Pa. 
Allison, J. W., L. Palestine. Areola, IIL 
Allison, .Matthew. P. Huntingdon. Mlilintown, Pa. 
Alrlch, Wm. P., s s. Washington. Washington. Pa. 
Amerman,T.A.,w.o. Winnebago. Waukau, Wis. 
Amrine, A H., L. St. ClalrsTille. Martin's Ferry, 0. 
Anderson, D.S., D.M. Maumee. Bryan, Ohio. 

Anderson, JC, P. 8. Alabama. Summerfteld, Ala. 
Anderson, Jas., P. Richland, 
Anderson, John, P. Dee Motnes. 
Aud«*rson, J , t. Bast. Texas. 
A udereon, J A , p. California. 
Ander8on,J M.,w 0. BetheL 
Ander8on,R.N.,w 0. W. Hanorer. CMra, Va.' 
Anderson, S. J. P.. P. St Louis. St Louis, Mo. 
Anderson, S. Mc, p. Coshocton. Fredericksburg, 0. 
Anderson, W.C. P. Oalift>mia. Ban Frandsoo, a 
Anderson, W.J.,w o. W. District. Paris, Tenn. 
Andrews, J., w 0. Peoria. QuiTer, HI. 

Andrews, S. M.. P. Philadel*a. 2d. Doyleetown, Pa. 
Annan, Wm., w o. Allegheny 0. Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Annin, John A , p. West Jersey. Cedanrille, N. J. 
Armlsted, J. S., P. W. Hanoyer. Stony Pt Mills, Vs. 
Armstrong, A. L., p. N. Brunswick. Dutch Neck. N. J. 
Armstrong,O.B.,s a. Bbeneier. Crittenden, Ky. 
Armstrong, O. D, p. B Haikorer. Norfolk, Va. 



Lexington, Ohio. 
Chariton. Iowa. 
Glarkesville, Tez. 
Stockton, Cal. 
YorkTille,&a 



Armstrong, H., s. s. 
Armstrong, J., s. s. 
Armstrong, li., P. 
Armstrong, W., s. s. 
Arthur, J., P. 
Ash, G. W., W. o. 
Atkinson, J. M.. P. 
Atkinson, J., pes. 
Atwater, L.H., PEF. 
Augliey, J.H.,a.a. 
Arery, H. R~P. 
Axson, I. 8. K., P. 
Axtell, Chaa., P. 

Babbk, Jas^w a 
Backus. J. C, P. 
Backus, J. T., P. 
Backus, W. W. 
Baoon, H. M., P. 



Susquehanna. 

Luaerne. 

St. GUIrsTlUe. 

Munde. 

ZanesTille. 

Palmyra. 

Orange. 

W. Hanorer. 

N. Brunswick. 

Chickasaw. 

N.Brunswick. 

HopewelL 

BocklUTsr. 



Laporte, Pa. 
Hasleton, Pa. 
Adena, Ohio. 
New Castle, Ind. 
High Hill, Ohio. 

Raleigh, N.a 
Hampden Bld.Ta. 
Princeton, N.J. 
Waterfbrd, Mlsi. 
Squan VIL, N.J. 
SaTannab, Ga. 
UL 



kU,R.M.,a.a. 
Bailey, R.W., W.O. 
Bailey, W., p. 
Bain, J. R., w. o. 
Baird,B.T.,s.s. 
Baird,C.W.,w.o. 
Baird, H.M.,L. 
Baird, J. H., P. 
Baird, J. R., s s. 
Baird, Robt,w o. 
Baird,8am'LJ., P. 
Baird, Wash., s •. 
Baker, Arch., p 
Baker, D.S., a s 
Baker, John F.. a. a. 
Baker,J. W.,T. 
Baker, Lewis C , L. 
Bakei, R. M., s a. 
Baker, W.E.s a. 
Baker, W.M. p. 
Balch, J T. w c. 
Baleh T. B., w o. 

Baldridge, S. C. a a. 
Baldwin, J. A., p. 
Baldwin. Jon.i V. 
Balentlne, H F M. 
Ball, Hosea, w c. 
Bailentine, Jax.. p. 
Banks, A. B., P. 
Banks, Wm., P. 
Bannard, Wm.. P. 
BanUy, J., n. m. 
Barber, D. M.. w c. 
Barbour, L. O. t. 
Bard, Isaac, d. m. 
Bard, J. A., L. 
BardwelL Joa., p. 
Barklny, A. 
Blu-kley. A. H.. a s. 
Barnes, G. O., F k. 
Barnes, J. C, w. o. 
Bamett, J. M. 
Barr, Andrew, a a. 
Barr, Calrin, D K. 
Barr, Bwd«. s B. 
Barr, J. C, P- 
Barr, .la!i. S a. a. 
Barr, 8. K, P. 



Columbus. Columbus, Ohto. 
Baltimore. Baltimore, Md. 
Albany. 8eheneetadT,N.Y 

Kansas. LeaTenwortti, Ki 

CrawfordST'e. Corington, Ind. 
FlndUy. Lima, Ohio. 

Lexington. HuntsTlUe, Tez. 
Bedford. Brewster's S.,N.Y 

NashTlUe. NashTille, Tenn. 
Tombeckbee. Yonkers, N. Y. 
N. Brunswick. CrawfordsTlL Mil. 
N. Brunswick. Princeton, N.J. 
North umb'd. LockhsTen, Pa. 
Bethel. CUy Hill, 8.0. 

N.BruiiBwIek. N. Y. City, N. Y. 
West Jersey. Woodbury, N . J. 
" " " SparUnburg.8.0. 

Salisbury, N.C. 

Gn>BM Tete, La. 

Lexington, Va. 

Maritftta, Ga. 



8. Carolina. 

Concord. 

Louisiana. 

Cherokee. 

Cherokee. 

Panslae. 

Cherokee. 

Lexlntcton. 



Lsfayette, Ga. 

Staunton, Va. 
CeiitralTtfxafi. AukUu City, Tez. 
Central Texas. Corsicaua, Texas. 
Wlncbentvr. Brlstoe St'n., Va. 
N. RruitNwK-k. 

, Palestine. FrlendsvUle, lU. 
Klisabethl'n. Providence, N. J. 
MiMlmippi. Crown Point Ind 
Cn»ek ...•.i.>o. Doaksyille, Ark. 
North Ivor. Monroe W., N. Y 
Koi-h«K;er C. ChUi Ct^ntre, N.Y 
Ouachita. Tulip. Ark. 
Beth«) . Haalewood, 8. 0. 

New York. N. Y. City, N. Y. 
Dubuiiue. Dubuque, Iowa 
Northumb'd. Washingt'vil., P«. 
W. I>exin((ton. Lexington, Ky. 
Muhlenburg. Greenville, Ky. 
Concord. 

Tombeckbee. Aberdeen, Miss. 
Hulston. 

KnoxviUe. MadlsonvU., Ten. 
Lodlana. Lahore, N. India. 

Transylvania. Haynesvllle, Mo. 

Superior, Wis. 

DaltoQ, Ohio. 



Oolumbns. 
Ohio. 
Wooeter. 
Rock Klver. 
Ouachita. 
New Albany. 



Bmithvflle, Ohtow 
Maiden, III. 
Mount HoUy^Ark. 
LLT0nla,Ind. 
(76^ 



Digitized by 



Googk 



76 



PRESBYTERIAN HISTORICAL ALMANAC. 



vAm. 



PKSSBTTZKT. POBT^OmCX. 



7SXSVTTXST. TOKT-OWnCM. 



But, Thos. H.. P. Wooster. CanaaD, Ohio. 

Barrett, £.D.,W.C. Salt^burgh. 

Barrett Myron, P. Newton. Newton, N. J. 

Barron, D H., L. Redatone. Mt Pleasant, Pa. 

Bnrstow, Z. 8., p. Londondarry. Kaene, N. U. 

Bartholomew, A. Miami. Springfield, Ohio. 

BarUey, J. M. C, P. Londonderry. fiamp*tead. N. H. 

Bates, J. U., P- Londonderry. Antrim, N. H. 

Batea, L. P., W. 0. New Liabon. 

Batcheldor,J.M.,p. Des Molnea. Albia, Iowa. 

BayleM, J. C, •. ■ Ebeneser. Aahland, Ky. 

Bayleas, 8. M., aot. W.Lexington. Lexington, Ky. 

Baynea, J. W . a ■ Michigan. Hudson, Mich. 

Beach Chaa.. a a. Louisiana. CharlottesTil., Ya. 

Beall. B. L.. a. a. Bethel. Cheat OroTe, 8. C. 

Beattie, Alex., a a. Ouarbita. Arkadelphia,ArlL. 

Boattie, David, P. Hudson. Scotchtown, N.T. 

Beattie, Janies. P. New York. W Che(iter,N. Y. 

BMttie, K. H.. P. North Hirer. 8aliab*y.Ms.,N.T. 

Beatty, C. C, w 0. SteubenvUle. Steubanvitlfs 0. 

BMiiuger, £. W . L. Bbeneaer. Walton, Ky. 

Beekman, J.. W o. New York. Middletown, N. J. 

Beer, Thomas. P. Wooster. Rowsburg, Ohio. 

BefCK«, Joseph, P. Philadei'a. 2d. LeTerington, Pa. 

Bt'Jden, £. L . P. Cedar. Muscatine, Iowa. 

Bell, John, PXF. Baat Texaa. Larrisaa, Texas. 

Bell, L. O , o M. Coun. Blufh. Sidney, Iowa. 

Bell, Holjert, a a. IS.Mississlppi. Decatur, Misa. 

Bell, Hobt 8., W.O. Winchester. Washington, Ya. 

Bell. Wm. 0., T. MissourL Boonville, Mo. 

Bt'llamy, T., a. a. Rochester 0. Webster, N. Y. 

B«lvllle, Jacob. T. Philadei'a. 2d. HartsTille, Pa. 

Bellvllle. J. L , W.O. Miami. CentreviUe, Ohio. 

Beman, C P.. T. HopewelL Mount Zlon, Oa. 

Bement, R. B, WO. Marion. TilBn, Ohio. 

Benedict K. P., P. Bedford. Patterson, N. T. 

Benedict Henry. P. Bedford. Port Chester,N.Y. 

Bergen, George P. Omaha City, N. T. 

Benren, J. O., a. a. Sangamon. Springfield, 111. 

Berry, Robert T. Winchester. Martifisburg, Va. 

Berton, 8. R., a. a. Mississippi Port Gibson, Miss. 

Bev^ridge, A. M.. P. Troy. Lanslngb'g., N. Y. 

Bigelow, Albert P. Naaaan. WiUiamsb'g.,N.Y. 

BlgK*. H.W.. p. Redstone. Morgantown. Va. 

Bi)rKS.Thos.J.,W.C. Cincinnati. Cincinnati. Ohio. 

BUliuipily, A. S. Bearer. Florence, Neb. T. 

Bingham, 9. J., P. Tuscaloosa. Intercourse, Ala. 

Bingham. W. R.,p. Philadelphia. Warren Tar., Pa. 

Biohnp, Noah. Sangamon. 

Bishop, P. K., P Harmony. Bennettsril., 8. G. 

Bishop, Wm., w 0. Madison. 8. Hanorer, Ind. 

BittluKer, B. F . P. Baltimore. Washington, D.C. 

Bittinger, K.C.,WO. Orange. Philadelphia, Pa. 

Bittinger, M., a. a. Greenbrier. Indian Creek, Ya. 

Blarhly. Kben. Dane. 

Black, D. B., p. . Fayetteyllle. Dogwood G., N. G. 
Black, James, a. a. ClndnnatL CindnnatJ, Ohio. 
Black, James. P. Redstone. Connelsrille, Pa. 
Black. James, W.O. Carliale. 8hepherdst'n.,Va. 

Blackbum,W.M.,p. Krie. Brie, Pa. 

Blackford, A. L., L. Waahington. 
Blackwell. H., p. St. Louis. Flint HIH, Mo. 
Blackwood, Wm., P. Philadelphia. PhiladelphU Pa. 
Blain, John S., a a. Lexington. Deerfield, Ya. 
Blain, «. W, T. W. Hanorer. Greenwood D.,Ya. 
Blain, Wm. J , a. a. Hudson. Oaoaan Cen.,N.Y. 

Blair, W.C, a. a. West Texaa. Laraca, Texaa. 
Blake. B. S., w. o. Allegheny C. Pittaburgh, Pa. 
Blanchard,S.M.,B a. Londonderry. Bath, N.H. 
Bland, Peter R..a.a. Memphis. Bellemonta, Tan. 
Blanke, H., w. o. St. Louia. 
Blanton, L. H . P. W. Lexington. Yeraalllea, Ky. 
BlauTelt, W. W., P. Blizabetht'n. N. German tn.,N J 
Blayner, J. B., P. Marion. Iberia, Ohio. 

Bliss, J. T., a. a. Schuyler. WalnatOroTe.TlI. 
Blodgett G. M.. a.a Albany. Fsrmington, 111. 

Blondit Tbanlel, P. Newton. Stillwater, N. J. 

BIythe, J. W., w. 0. Yinoennes. 8. Hanorer, Ind. 
Boag, Robert a. a. Oedar. Lisbon, Iowa. 

Boardman. H.A., P. Philadelphia. Philadelphia, Pa. 
Boardman.W.E..B a Phlladdphla. Gloucester C..N.J. 
Booock, John H., p. Baltimore. Georgetown, D.C. 
Boggs, D.C.,L. 8. Carrilina. Oconee 8ta'n.,8.C. 

Bogga, Geo. W., P. Hopewell. Washington, Oa. 
Boggs, Geo. W^ a. a. Harmony. Wlnsboro', 8. C. 
Boggs, John IL, P. Dubuque^ Independence, la. 



Bogle, John A., a s. Transylrania. Unatonrille, Ky. 

Bollman, 8 F..W c. SalUbnrgh. 

Bomberger, C.C. , P. Coahocton. West Carlisia, a 

Bonar, Wm., a a. Fort Wayne. AlUon, Ind. 

Bond, Lewis. W.C. Kliaabetht'n. PUinfleld, N.J. 

Bon ham, B. B.,l> M. Benicla. Bealdsbnrg, CkL 

Boone, Joseph, a. a. Central Texaa. La Orange, Texaa. 

Booth, U. A., P. St Lonla. Rock Hill, Mo. 

Booaer,J.L Orange. 

Bosworth, E., w. 0. BalUmora. Baltimore, Md. 

Botsford, Eli C, P. New York- York v 111©, N. Y. 

BotUford, A. P., P. Rochester 0. Port Byron, N. T. 

Bowden, N. T., L. Fayetterille. Poweiton, N. C. 

Bower, E. R., P. North Rirer. Wappln'r. F.,N.T. 

Bowman, F., P. Georgia. Way SUt'n., Oa. 

Bowman, F. H.,a.a. Georgia. Rlceborough, Ga. 

Bowman, F. H., L. Louisiana. WoodTille, Miaa. 

Bowman, J. R., P. Tuscaloosa. Butaw, Ala. 

Bowman, R.A.4> M. Londonderry. Manchester, N.H. 

Boyd, Alex., a. a. Cedar. Solon, Iowa. 

Boyd, Benj.. W.O. Bbeneaer. Newport Ky. 

Boyd, C. L. K., a. a. B. AUbama. Cross Keys, Ala. 

Boyd, Jamea 8., h. Allegheny. Butler, Pa. 

Boyd, John F., P. Allegheny. HarrirrUle, Pa. 

Boyd, John N., P. Hudson. Liberty, N. Y. 

Boyd, Saml.. a. a. gt. ClairsrlUei Bridgeport. Ohio. 

Bracken, New., p. Allegheny. PortersTille, Pa. 

Bracken, T. A., p. Laftyette. Independ., Mo. 

Bradbury, E.. w.c. Klixabetht'n. Hudson, N. Y. 

Braddock, C. G.. P. Ohio. HeniottSTille,Pa. 

Braddock, J.8.,w.c. Loulsrille. LeUnon, Ky. 

Bradford, T.B.,wc. Philadei'a. Jd. I>ot«, DeL 

Bradner, T. 8.,W 0. Bedford. 

Bradshaw, F^ P. Tuscaloosa. Bridgevllle, Ala. 

Brainerd, T.G., p. Londonderry. Halilkx, Mass. 

Brank, R. 0., p. W.Lexingtti. Lexington, Ky. 

Breariev, Wm., p. Harmony. Dariinjrton, 8. C. 

Breck, R. L., P. Hopewell New Albany,lDd. 

Breckinridge, H pp. W.Lexington. Danrille. Kt. 

Breckinridge, W. L. LoulsvUlo. Louisrllle. fcy. 

Breed. Wm P. p. Philadelphia. PhlUdelpbia, Pa. 

Brengle, J. P.. a a. ly^g Molnea. Leon, Iowa. 

Brewster, J. P.. L. Elisabetht'n. 

BrewaUr, Lj, P. Hudson. Bethel, N. T. 

Brlce. Wm. K.. p. rindlay. Pleasant Ohio. 

5riJf»»V i- ?:' '• West District Trenton, Tenn. 
Bristol, C.B..S. a. Pchuyler. Farlow's G., HL 
Brodhead, A., r. M. Hudson. Futtehgurh India. 

Brt.lwton, W.,w. c. Mllwaukla. Wheatland, Wis. 
Brc.nw.n, E., a. a. Luseme. Mehoopany, Pa. 
Bronson,E.C.,i. Albany. 
Brookes, J. H., P. gt. Louis. Bt Louis, Mo. 
Broughton. J., s a. Chillicothe. CynthUna, Ohio. 
Brown, A. B., a. a. ohIo. Canoousb'g., Pa. 

Brown, A. H., o M. West Jeney. May's Und., N J. 
Brown, D., w o. Maury. Ashwood, Tenn. 

Brown, E., w. c. Chicago. Roscoe, IJl. 

Brown, Fred. T., P. Wooster. Clereland. Ohio. 

Brown, Geo.. P. New York 2A. Hamden, N. Y. 
Brown, Henry, P. Florida. Alligator. Pla. 

Brown, Hu^h A.. P. w. Hanorer. Mossing F. D.,Ya. 
Brown, I. > ., w c. N. Brunswick. Bordeiitown. N.J. 
Brown, Jas. C, P. Lake. Yalpsralso, Ind. 

Brown, J. H., PBF. 8chuyler. Monmouth, IIL 
Brown, Jas. M.. p. Grwnbrier. Kanawha C.H.Ya 
Brown, John, p. Allegheny a Freedom, Pa. 
Brown, John A., ». Blairsvllle. Ugonier, Pa. 
Brown, John C, L. Greenbrier. 
Brown, J. H., p. Sangamon. Springfield, HI. 
Brown, Jos., a. a. Florida. Little KWer, FU. 

Brown, Joseph, P. Hsrmony. Mars Bluff, 8. C. 
Brown, M. W., p. Coshocton. MlUersburg.Ohlo, 
Brown, Richard, P. gteubeuTilla. N.Hagerstown. 0. 
Brown, R. A. Chicago. Hagerstown, Md. 

Brown, Rob., M., L. New York, 
Brown, 8aml., P. Lexington. Mlllboro' 8., Va. 
Brown, S^ 8., P. c. Mississippi. Shongalo, Miss. 
Brown, Thoa., T. Montgomery. Abingdon, Ya. 
Brown, Wm., P. Lexington. Mt. Sidney, Ya. 
Brown, Wm. Y.,b.8. New Lisbon. Omaha, Neb. Tar 
Browne, W.B., s.a. W.Uxington. Oxford. Ky. 
Browuson, J. I., p. Washington. Waahington, Pa. 
Brugh, Wm. J., p. SteubenTllle. Mechanlcsfn., 0. 
Bryan, E. D., p. Bedford Rye. N. Y. 

Buchanan, J. M., P. MUwaukla. MllwaukieJPril. 
Buck, J. J., p. Albany. Jewett, N. T. 



Digitized by 



Googk 



THK PRESBTTEBIAN CHUBCH, (O. 8.) 



77 



mxuM. 



PRSSBTTXHT. POST^omCS. 



BneU Fred., aot. California. 
Boerben, W.. D K. Hilwaukie. 
Bulst, E. T.. •. 8. 8. Carolina. 
Bulkley, U. W , L. Albaoj. 
Bull, Kalpb. P HudBon. 

Bulliona, A. B^W.C. Troy. 
BullioDB, G. D.. P. Albany. 
BuUock, J. J.. T. WJ^xingrton. 
Banting, R. F.. •. a We^t Texaa. 
Burch, J. K., w.c. TraosylTanla. 
Burgett, J. W.. a. ■. Riciiland. 
Bamham, P.J.. t.s. Albany. 
Borns, John. ■ ■. Richland. 
Bums, J IL, P. MiatnL 
Burr, H. B , 8 8. Chicago. 
Burroughn. U.w.c. Baltimoro. 
BurrowM. Qeo., P. Pbiladela. 2d. 
Burtt, Juhn. •. 8. West Jersey. 
Burt^N.C, P. Baltimore. 

Burtis, Arthur. • 8. BuCEalo City. 
Burtis, John ii , L Buffitlo City. 
Burvrell, Kob., w c Conoord. 
Bush, Ueo. C. P. Newton. 
Butler, Z.. P. MissiadppL 

Butler, O. W.. w c Knozvilla. 
Buttolph. D. L. 8 8 Oeorgia. 
Butt^, Joebua,w c. New York. 
Byem. Hob. U.. P. Braios. 
Byington, C, F. M 



Caffrst, p. S., l. N.Bninawkk. 
Calras, GeorgP. P Peoria. 
Caldwell, A., w. c Buflklo City. 
Caldwell. A.II..8 8. N. Mississippi. 
Oaldwell, C. K.. P. Orange. 
Caldwell, James. P. Iowa, 
Caldwell, John, s s. CineinnatL 
Caldwell, J. C, D k. St PaoL 
Osldwell, J. D.. p. Dubuque. 
Caldwell, J. P., P. Richland. 
OsldweU, J.M., PRs. Cherokee. 
Caldwell, H. P., s s. Ebenesar. 
Caldwell, S., w c Ohio. 
Calhoun,N.W..w.c. St. Loala. 
Calhoun, Philo, t. Montgomery. 
Calhoun, J. Y., p. Washington. 
Callen, J. H . s s. Luseme. 
CalTin, Jos. U., p. Tuscaloosa. 
Oambern, H. H., p. White Water. 
Cameron, Jas , 8 s. Peoria. 
Oameron, J. J., p Albany. 
Camp. Phllsnd.. T. BusquehamuL 
CampbfU, A.D.wc Ohio. 
Campbell, A.D.w c Harmony. 
Campbell. C..\..w c Psducah. 
Campbell, C. M., L. Winchester. 
Campbell, D. K., p. Stenbenrille. 
Campbell, £. S . a s. W. District. 
Oampbt'll, 0., p Londonderry. 
Campbell, J , w c Highland. 
Campbell, J. K..8 s. New York. 
Oimpbell, J. A , a a. Sidney. 
Campbell, J. N., p. Albany. 
Camp^^M, R. B.aa. C.Mississippi. 
Cnmpbell, S. B., s s. Montgomery. 
CnmpMl, S. D., s s. R- Alabama. 
Campbell, T C . L Ohio. 
Campbell. Wm . p. Wooster. 
Campbell, W. A., p. S. Hanoyer. 
Campbell, W , w c Conoord. 
Candee, I. N. s s Schuyler. 
Canfleld.T.W..w.c. U. Missouri. 
Oargen, Wm.. • a. Dane. 
Carleton, M.M. f m. Lodiana. 
Carllle, Wm.. a. a. S. Carolina. 
Camahan, D. T.. p. Baltimore. 
Camahan, J., w. c. N.Brunswiek. 
Carothers, J. N., p. Tombeckbee. 
Carothers, R., w. c. Blairsrille. 
Carpenter, Geo., p. Oolnfaibus. 
Oari>enter, H. S. New York. 
Carrell, BenJ., P. Raritan. 
Oarrell, J. J., p. Genessee RW. 
Carroll, J. H.. w. c. N. Brunswick. 
Carson, Irwin, p. Des Moines. 
Garaon, Jaa. C, P. Blairsr lUe. 



Sau Francisco, C. 
W.GranviUe, Wis. 
Laurens C JI.^.C. 

West Town, N. Y. 
Truy. N.Y. 
W. MUton, N. Y. 
Lexington, Ky. 
iSan Antonio, Tex. 
Deceased. 
Mauslield, Ohio. 
Wolcott, N. Y. 
Mil wood. Ohio. 
Blue Ball, Ohio. 
BelTidere, III. 
Baltimore, Md. 
Newtown, Pa. 
Blackwoodtn.,NJ 
Baltimore, Md. 
Buflklo, N.Y. 

Charlotte, N.C. 
8tewartsville,NJ. 
Port Gibson, Miss. 
RiceTiUe, Tenn. 
Kiceborough, Ga. 
YorkriUe, N. Y. 
Houston, Texas. 
ICagle Town, Ark. 



Prinoerille, m. 



Misa. 
OreensW, N. C. 
LlbertyTii., Iowa. 
Loveland, Ohio. 
StUl water, Min. 
Barclay, Iowa, 
Fredericktown,0. 
Rome, QtL, 
Sharpsburg, Ky. 
PitUburgh, Pa. 
St Charles, Mo. 
Christiansb'g.,Va. 
Psris, Pa. 
Tama4ua,Pa. 
Boligee, Ala. 
Rushville, Ind. 
Brunswick, 111. 
N. Scotland, N.Y. 
McAllisterrU., Pa. 
Allegheny C. Pa. 
BennetsTille, S. C. 
Paducah, Ky. 
Charlestown, Va. 
Wlutenrille, 0. 
Shiloh, Tenn. 
N e w buryp' t, Mas. 
Highland, Kan. 
N.YorkCity.N.Y. 
Fletcher. Ohk>. 
Albany, N.Y. 
Camden, Miss. 
Broad Ford, Va. 
Elba, Ala. 
Allegheny C, Pa. 
Northfleld, Ohio. 
Smith vllle, Ta. 
8atiBbury. N.C. 
Oalesburgh, 111. 
StewartsTllle. Mo. 
Cambridge, Wis. 
Anibala, N.India. 
Andernon, 8. C. 
Baltimore, Md. 
Princeton. N. J. 
Houston, Misa. 

Kingston, Ohio. 

Clover Hill, N.J. 
Gro»eland, N. Y. 
Aiken, 8. C. 
Oixkaloosa, Iowa. 
Salem pi Rs., Pa. I 



PSKSBTTXBT. P08T-OFFICS. 



Carson, John K., P 

Carson, W. r., s. s 

Carter, H. C, w c, 

Carter, J P.. pRS. 

Carter, T.M..L 

Carter, W. B., w. c. Holston. 

Cartledge, G. H , P. UopeweU. 

Caruthers, E. W., P. Orange. 

Caruthers, J. E.. L. SaltHburgh. 

Caruthers, John, P. Saltsburgh. 

" ■ — W. UanoTer. 



Coshocton. Apple Creek, O. 
Chicago. Winnebago D.,I1L 

Chumkee. Calhoun, Ga. 
Bdltimt>re. Oxford, Pa. 
TraoffylTania. Bryantsrille, Ky. 



Caruthers. W. 

Carver, Thos. G. 

Case, Jc«lT., s a 

Castleton, Thos . P. Loui^iaua. 

Cater, Edwin, s a. ChaHeston. 

Cathcart Wm.. P. 

CatteU, T. W., P. 

Cattell, W. C, PRF. Newton. 

Catto, William T. 

Center, Samuel 



Bold Spring, Ga. 
Shaw's Milk, N.O. 

Mahoning, Pa. 



West Texas. Ylctorla, Texas. 

Baton Rouge, La. 

Wappetaw, S. C. 

La Grange, Ind. 

Deerfleld, N.J. 

Kaston, Pa. 
In Transitu. Washiogton, D.O. 
Albany 



Fort Wayne. 
West Jeraey. 



Chamberlain. A.. L. North River. 
Chamberlain.il ,s s West. Texas. Brownsville, Tex. 
Chamberlain, w.c. iNew Orleans. Thibodeux. 
Chandler, A. £., Harmony. Wh. Springs, Fla. 
" N.Brunswick. Freehold, N.J. 

Lafayette. Waverley, Mo. 

St. Paul. Owatonna, MIn. 

Steubenville. Stenbeuville, 0. 

"■ * Beaver Dam, Wis. 

Asheville, N. C. 



Chandler, F., P 

Chaney, J. M., p. 

Chapin, H, d.m 

Chapin, U. B.. p. 

Chapman, L.W.,8 a. Winnebago. 

Chapman, K. U., p. Concord. 



Charles, B. H. Transylvania. Chester, 111. 

Chase, B., w. c. MiKslsMppL Natchex, Miss. 

Chase, J. M., s. a. Schuyler. Macomb, 111. 
Cheek, 8. B.. t. Transylvania. Danville, Ky. 

Cheney, 8. W., P. Louisville. Shelby ville, Ky. 
Chees^^man, L., P. Philadelphia. Philadelphia, Pa. 

Cherry, H., w. c. Florida. Jackson, Mich. 

Chesnut, T. M., a a. Sioux City. Sioux City, Iowa. 

Chester, A., w. c. Passaic. Morristown, N. J. 

Chester. £. F., w.c. Chicago. Lane, III. 

Chester, Wm., ▲ a. Philadelphia. Philadelphia, Pa. 
Chevalier, N., PRa. N.MissiiisippL Holly Springs.Mla. 

Childs, Thoa. 8., P. Connecticut Hartford, Conn. 

Christian, L. H.. p. Philadelphia. PhUadelphla, Pa. 

Church, Alonzo. p. Hopewell. Athens, Ga. 

Clark, James, w. c. NorthurnVd. PhUadelphla, Pa. 
Clark, James H.. L. PAssaic. 

Clark, Joseph, w c. Carlisle. ChamberaVg., Pii 

CUrk, John U., P. Cariisle. Landlsburg, Pa. 

Clark, J. H., P. CinrinnaU. Sixteen M. 8d., Q 

Clark, J. W., P. La&yette. Elmwood. Mo. 

Clark, Orlando, L. Miami. Dayton, Ohio. 
Clark, Wm.. aot. Londonderry. Amherst, N. H. 

Clarke, A. B., P. Huntingdon. Altoona, Pa. 

Clarke, D. D., p. Huntingdon. McYeyton, Pa. 

Clarke, H. S., P. Philadelphia. Philadelphia, Pa. 

Clarke, R. W., p. Londonderry. Brooklvn, N. Y. 

CUyton, J. A., s s. Michigan. Clarkston, Mich. 

Cleghom, E.B..AOT. New Orleans. New Orleana, La. 

Clelaud, JamoH. P Ogdenaburg. Ogdenaburg, N. Y. 

CWand, T. H , D M. MlRslssippL " 

Clelland, 8., s. a. Rock River. 
Clemen8,W.M..F u. Washington. 
Cllsby,A.W., a a. Florida. 
Cobb, A. P., p 
Cochran, And., P. 
Cochran, A. G.. t. Troy. 
Cochran, E. L.,w c. W. Hanover. 
Cochran, Isaac, P. W. Hanover. 
Cochran, J. M., p. West Texaa. 
Cochran, W. P., p. Palmyra. 



Cochrane, David, L W. District 



Natches, Miss. 

Pleasant Rid., HI. 

WheeUng, Va. 

Marianne. Fla. 
Philadelphia. Philadelphia, Pa. 
Mohawk. DurhamTille,N.Y. 

ScbuylervU.. N.Y. 

Amherst, Va. 

Darlington H.,V». 

Victoria, Texas. 

Hanson, Mo. 

Lexingt^m, Tenn. 

Northville, Mich. 

St Louis, Mo. 



Cochrane, 8., P. Michigan. 

Coe, Henry I., sxc. St Louis. 

Cogshall, K. C ,w c. Londonderry. New Boston. N.H. 

Cogswell, J., w. c. N. Brunswick. N. Brun8w'k.,N.J. 

Charleston. Columbia, S.C 

Harmony. Cheraw, 8. C. 

N. Brunswick. Trenton, N. J. 

St. i^.uis. 8t Louis, Mo. 

Philadelphia. Philadelphia, Pa. 

Saltsburgh. KiUnning. Pa^ 

Huntingdon, 



Cohen, James, T. 

Colt J. Cm W.c. 

Cole, David, L 

Cole, Thos.. w. c. 

Coleman, L.. t. 

Cblledge, Wm.. p. 

Collins, B. K.. p. 

Collins, Chas. J., p. Northumb'd. 

Colraery, R. C. P. Wooster. 

Colmery, W.W.,8.b. CineinnatL 



Sbirleysburg, Pla. 
Danville, Pa. 
Wooster, Ohk>. 
Ohk). 



Digitized by 



Googk 



78 



PRESBYTERIAN HISTORICAl. ALKANAG. 



HAMS. 



PBXSBTTBKT. POST-OTFICS. 



PXXtBTTXHT. POIIHjmCB. 



OoU, Sam'l.. F. P. Liueriie. Pottsville, Pa. 

OoltoD. Simeon, ■ t. rAynttevllle. Aahborough, N.C. 

Gomlngo. II. G.. p. SteabeuTilU. Stenbenvlllts 0. 

Ogdtfnsbiiig. Eran's Mllla,N.Y. 

PmmIo. ...... 

Erie. 

Ebeoeser. Wuhlngton, Ky. 

Mohawk. Oswego, N. T. 

Newton. SUllwator, N.J. 



Gooant, R. T., 1 1. 

Oondict. e. Wh l. 

Oondit, Ira M.. L. 

CoDdit, J. II., P. 

Condit, R. W., P. 

Gondii, T. B., P. 

Oonkling, N.S.,wo. i*angamon. 

OnnDelly. J. M..8 s Wust. Texas. 

Connitt, O. W., P. Oonnectieut 

OoDolIy,M.G.,wo. Brasoc 

Ooaover, Rob., B.B. 

Oonrad, L L., P. 

Oook, Darwin, P. 

Cook, J. J., L. 



Texana, Texas. 

I>eep River, Oonn. 

Richmond, Texas. 

Bloomiogton, III. 

W.BIanchester,Pa. 



Peoria. 

Allegheny 0. 

Susquehanna. Merryall, Pa. 

Transylvania. ...... 

Gooley, Eli F., vr o N. Brnnswlck. Trenton, N. J. 

Goon. Jaeib, s. t. Rock River. Morrison, III. 

Goons, O. W.O^. c. Ebeneser. Maysville, Ky. 

Goons, John ¥.. s.s. Ebencoer. Maysville, Ky. 

Gooper, G W., p. Long IsUnd. Babylon, N. T. 
Gooper, Edw., l. West. Distriei Paris, Tenn. 
Oooper, J., PBV. Transylvania. Danville^ Ky. 

Gooper, S. M., T. Huntingdon. Walker, Pa. 

Gooper, Wm. H., P. Long Island. Bell Port, N. T. 

Gopeland, C.C.,V.M. Indian. Armst'g., A.. Ark. 

Copp, Jos. A., p. Long Island. Ghelsea, Mass. 

Corbett, Wm. B., P. Gbarleston. Adams* Run, S.G. 

Gnrnelison, I. A., P. Peoria. Metamora, III. 

Cornell, F. P., P. EllsabethVn. Raritan, N.J. 

Cornish, 8. TL, w. o. Nassau. Brooklyn, N. T. 
Corss, C. 0., s. a. Susquehanna. E. Smithfleld, Pa. 

Cortelyou, T. F., P. Cincinnati. Williamsburgh,0. 

Cory, BenJ., P. Eliiabetht'n. Perth Ambqy,N J. 

Gorjr, Joseph. P. New York. Nyack, N. Y. 

Cosby, J. v., p. lioulsvilla. Bardstown, Ky. 

Coulter, David, P. Ulkyette. Wagon Knob, Mo. 

Gnulter, James, • a. Brie. Exchangevilla,Pa. 

Cuulrer, John, P. Allegheny. Coulters viUe, Pa. 

Coulter, J. R., P. Allegheny. Big Bend. Pa. 

Gonsar, J. A., p. Harmony. Selkirk. S.G. 

Cowan, A. .M.. aoT. Sidney. Urbana, Ohio. 

Cowan, J. F., P. St Louli. Corondelet, Mo. 

Gowles, Salmon, P. Iowa. West Point, Iowa. 

Crabb, John M., p. Maumea. Bryan, Ohio. 

Craig, Adam. Albany. Millhrd, Del. 

Craig, W. B., P. Carilsla. N. Bloomfleld, Pa. 

Cramer. J. K., P. Carllsla. Williamsport,Md. 

Crane, Edw., P.,s ■ Florida. St.Augnstine, Fa. 

Crane, Kliaa N., P. Eliiabetht'n. Morrlstown, N.J. 

Crane, Floyd A.. L Hudson. 

Crane, Jas. B.,w.o. Elisabetht'n. Elisabeth, N. J. 



Crane, N. M.. p. Clarlouc 
Crane, Wm. II., T. Florida. 
Craven, E. R., p. Passaic. 
Crawford.A.L.,w o. Harmony. 
Crawford, Jas..w c. Vincennes. 
Crawford. J., s. s. New Albany. 
Grawlbrd. Robert. Philadelphia. 
Crawfbrd, T. C, p. Cherokee. 
Grawlbrd, T. M., p. Donegal. 
Crawfitrd, T. R., p. "• — ■ 
Crawford. W.B. 
Creigh, Thofl., p. 
Gri.iwell, R. A., P. 
Critchlow. B. C, P. Beaver. 
Crittenden, L. B.. T. Iowa. 
Crittenden, S. W. Bedford. 
Crocker, J. N.. P. 
Crosby, S. L., ■ s. 
Cr'^ss. A. B., w o. 
Grow, O. C., 8 B 
Crowe, J. F.. pxr. 
Crowe, Jas. B., s b. Cmwfbrdsvll. 
Crowe, Thos. S., P. Madison. 
Growpll, J. M., P. 
Crosier, John, b s Palestine. 



Iowa. 

Quiney« Fla. 
Newark, N.J. 

Grayrilleiind. 

Poke Run, Ind. 

Deerfleld. Mass. 

Dirt Town, Ga. 

Slate Hill, Pa. 
StCIairavlIla. Morefleld, Pa. 

Transylvania. 

Oarllsle. MeroerabuiK, Pis. 

Sangamon. Peteraburg, 111. 

N. Brighton, Pa. 



Albany. 



Charlton, N. Y. 
Crawfordsvil. W. Lebanon. Ind. 
Baltimore. Baltimore, Md. 

8av innah. Mo. 

8. Hnnover, Ind. 

Crawfordsvil., In. 

8. Hanover. Ind. 
Philadelphia. Philadelphia, Pa. 

Olney, lU. 



U. Missouri. 
Madison. 



Cruikshank, R. s b Philadela. 2d. Pottatown. Pa. 



Gnlbert8on,.\f .,r M. Ningpo. 
Cnnmins, Charlf^n. Iowa. 
Cummins. C. P., P. Clarion. 
Cummins, D. H., p. Memphli. 
Cummins, F. P , P. Lake. 
Cunningham, A.,p. Allegheny. 



Ningpo^ China. 

Brookvfllal'Pia. 
Mountain, Tenn. 
Laporte,Ind. 
Whitestown. Fa. 



Cunningham, D.|p. Allegheny 0. Rochester, Pa. 



Gannlngam.D.w C. Greenbrier. Mount. Cove, Va. 

Cunningham, U.P. Concord. Charlotte, N. G. 

Cunningham. T., P. Muncle. IndianapoliSylnd. 

Cunningham.W .L. BlalravUIa. 

Cunningham, W..P Flint River. La Grange, Ga. 

Curran, Rich.. P. Huntingdon. Shaver's Ck., Pa. 

Currle, Arch., P Orange. West Oranga,N.GL 

Curtis, D. £.. B B. Missouri. Conrad, Mo. 
Curtis, J. B., w c. East UanoTer. SmithviUe, Va. 

Curtis, L. W., w c. Bethel. Oanaan, P.C.,N.7. 

Curtiss, W. B.. P Burlington. New Kf^rpt, N.J. 

Custor, P. M , w. c. Greenbrier. Lewisburg, Va. 

Dabrst, R.L.. Pxr W. Hanover. Hampden S*y.,Ta. 
Dale, James W.. p Philadelphia. Media, Pa. 
Dale, John. P. Peoria. Selma, Ul. 

Daltou, P. H., D M. Orange. MadJaon, N.C. 

Dalstfll, Wm., b b. Findlay. Kenton, Ohto. 

Dana. Daniel, w. o. Londondmry. Newburyp't.,Maa. 
Dana. W. C., P. Charieston. Charleston, 8 a 
Davidson, A. B. b s. Lexington. Lexington, Va. 
Davidson, T. J. d m. Tusesloosa. Elyton, Ala. 
Davidson, J. T.. s b. Red River. Homer, La. 
Davidson, R., P. N. Brunswick. N .Brunsw 'k.,N.J, 
Davlea, J. A., p. Bethel. Meek*s Hill, S. a 

Davies, J. L., w. 0. Bethel. Ooates' Tav., 8. a 

Davies, 8. W., a. b. C. Mississippi. Lake Prov., Ia. 
Davis, HeniT L. St CUinvllle. ...... 

Davis, Jesse B., p. N Brunswick. Tltusvllle, N. J. 
Davis, John, ■ b. Blairavllle. BlairsviUe, Pa. 
Davis, John, T. Allegheny 0. Allegheny C, Fa. 
Davis, J. H., P Winehestar. Hartford, Va. 

Davis, J. K., W. c. Troy. Troy, N. Y. 

Davis, J. K., P. Newton. Coolbaugha, Pa. 

Davis, R. H., L. N . Brunswick. 

Davis, R. N., B. a. Concord. Llneolnton, N. a 

Davis, 8. H., P. E. Hanovar. Amelia, C. U., Va. 
Davis, S. 8., a. a. Hopewell. Augusta, Oa. 
Davia, Thomas B. Concord. ...... 

Davis. Thomas K. Stoekton. 
Davis, W. C, T. Luaeme. 
Davis, W. H., P. 8. Oarollna. 
DaTlBOB, 1. 8., P. New York. 
Deane, H. L., b. a. Georgia. 
De Here, C, V. M. Wooeter. 



De Lanoey, R., a»t. New Orla 



Mlddletown, Pa. 

Wilkesbarre, Pa. 

MtOarmel,8.a 

N.York CIty.N.T. 

Wavnesvllle, Oa. 

Gorisco, AMea. 

New Orleans, La. 
Demarest, W., vr. c. Eliuibetht'n. Raritan, N . J. 
Dematoa, A., p. Sangamon. Jacksonville, UL 
Denny, J. G., L. Orange. Tally-Ho, N. a 

Denton, J., w. o. Passale. Mendham, N. J. 

De Veuve, P. A., P. N. Brunswick. Trenton, N. J. 
Devine, J. A., b b. White Water. DunlapaviUe,Ind. 
Dewing, Jarad,w.o. New York. New York GIty. 
Dewing, T. 8., b. b. Susquehanna. Oseeola, Pa. 
De Witt, A., w. 0. New Castie. Pah- Hill, Md. 
Dickey, J. W.. p. Brie. Venango, Pa. 

Dickey, J. M., w. o New Osatla. Oxford, Pa. 
Dickey, J. 8., a b. Bock River. Dakotah, 11L 
Dickey, 8., w o. Donegal. Oxford, Pa. 

Dickev, Wm., p. Chilllcotha. Bioomlngb'g., O. 
Diekinson, R., w o. New York Sd. N. York City, S.Y. 
Dickson, A. F.. s. s. Charleston. Orangeburg, 8. C. 
Baltimore. Baltimore, Md. 

Mohawk. ~ 

Gent Texas. 
New Lisbon. 
Lafayette. 



lAiayette 
. Richland. 
Beaver. 
Iowa. 



Dickson, Cyrus P. 

Dickson, H. 8.. p 

Dickson, M., b a 

Dickson, R., p. 

Dickson, W., w. c. 

DiefTendori; 8. pbf. 

Dilworth, R., p. 

Dinsmore, F. B.. p, 

Dinsmore, J., vir. o. Louisville. 

Dinsmore. J. .M., p. Richland. 

Dinsmore, T. H.. p. Iowa. 

Doak, A. A., pbb. Holston. 

Doak, D. G., a a. N. Misstaslppi. 

Doak, J. W. K.. W.C. Holston. 

Doak, 8.W., PXB. Holston. 

Doak, W. 8., w o. 

Dobson, A. T., P. 

Dod, C. 8., PXB. 

Dod. Wm. A., p. 

Dodd. Luther, P. 

Dodder, E.L.,B. a. 

Dodge,J.V.,W.C. 

Dodice, N., T. 

Dodge, R. v., P. 



Utica, N. Y. 
Milford, Texas. 
Hanoverton, 0. 
Dover, Mo. 
Uayeaville, Ohio. 
Enon Valley, Pa. 
Morning Sun, la. 
8helbyvlUe,Ky. 
Mt Vernon, Ohio. 
Washington, la. 
Leesburg, Tenxu 



Greenville, Tenn. 

Greenville, Tenn. 
Transylvania. London, Ky. 
Long Island. E. Moriches, N. T. 
W. District Jackson, Tenn. 
N. Brunswick. Princeton, N. J. 
Cedar Toledo, Iowa. 

Sioux City. Fort Dodge, Iowa. 
Saugiimon. Siirin^rflold, III. 
Dont>val. Mount Joy. Pa. 

Wa«hiiigton. Wheeling, Va. 



Digitized by 



Googk 



THE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH, (O. 8.) 



79 



Donald, Judm, •. •. 
Donaldson, A., P. 
DooaldaoD, J., •. ■. 
DonAldK)n,W.M.,p. 
Donnelly, 8^ •. •. 
Dool, Wm. S., 9. 
DooUtUa, H. L., 9. 
Doremua, J.&, PftF. 
DorUnd, L., D. M. 
Donrmnca, B. C, L. 
Dorranea, John. r. 
Dougherty, P., WM. 
Douglas, James, P. 
Douglas, John. • •. 
Douglas, R. 
Dow, John R., 9. 
Downer, Bdwin, T. 
Drake, F.T.,F. 
Drake,J.W.,s a. 
Draka, J. M^ 9. 
Drake, L. I., P. 
Drake, R. T., P. 
Dubois, R P., P. 
Duboae, J. IL, o M. 
Dttbuar, JameN. P. 
Dudley, J. D^ P. 
Duffleld, J.T.. PKt. 
Dukea, Joseph, l 
Dumont, A. II.,w.c. 
Dundas, John R^ P. 
Duncan, J. R., P. 
Duncan, W.W., P. 
Dunham, George. 
Dunham, S. P., p. 
Dunlap, James, P. 
Dunlap, M. D., a. ■. 
Dunlop, J^ I*. 
Dunn, R. P^ P»t. 
Dunton, S., w. c. 
Dunwody, J3.,wxi. 
Dupr6, B., a. a. 
Dutton, W. B., P. 
Dwight,J.&,L. 

lAOLSTOK, J., P. 
Eakins, D. W., P.M. 
Kastman, J. B., a. a. 
Kawtman, W. P., P. 
£aton, S.J. M.,a a. 
Saton, William. 
.Eckard, J. R., p. 
Edgar, David, w. o. 
Edgar, K.B.,P. 
Edgar, J. T.. P. 
Edgar, William. P. 
Edmunds, N. W. 
Edwards, J. C p 
Edwards, Jesse. a.a 
Edwards, J., P. M. 
Edwards, J., P. 
Edwards, R. R , L. 
Eels, Edward, s. a. 
Eels, Wm. W., p. 
Ek'm, John, w. c. 
Elcock, Thomas, P. 
Elder, James S., L. 
Eldridge, E. D., a. s. 
Elliott, C, PRP. 
Elliott, DaTld, PKP. 
Elliott, Oeorge. p 
Elliott, J. L., w. o. 
Elliott, John, a a. 
Elliott, John, P 
Ely, James, w c. 
Ely, SamM.R. a.a. 
Emerson, B., P. 
Emerson, L., P. 
Em«r8on,T. P., D.M. 
Emerson, W. G., s s. 
Sngl«4fl. W. M., BDT. 
Knirliflh, J. T., P. 
Ent;li.4h. T. K., p. 
Enlne. AfMh<<l. T. 
Epstlne. K. M , L. 
Enkiue, E., w. c. 



PftSaBTmT. POST-OFFICX. 

Ormnga. YanoeyTille, N . C. 

Dane. Mt. Vernon, Wla. 

Saltsburgh. Eldenrldga^ FtL 

Paducah. Salem, Ky. 

Fort Wayna. BlufRon, Ind. 

B. CarDllna. Greenwood, 8. a 

8t Clairavaie. Hope Dale, Ohio. 

Northumb'd. Mill Hall, Pa. 

MlssisflippL Oakland Ool., Mia. 

Haumee. West Unity, Ohio. 

Luseme. Wilkesbarre, Pa. 

Luaerne. WUkesbarre, Pa. 

New York. Mackinaw, Mich. 

Harmony. Winnsboro', 8.0. 

Charleston. Charleston, 8. C. 

LonlsTille. 

Charleston. John'a IalA&d,8.G. 

Hudson. 

Long Island. Taphank,N.T. 

Marion. Mnnda, Ind. 

CindnnatL Mainyille, Ohia 

Bidner. West Uberty, O. 

Des Moines. Bes Moines, Iowa. 

New CasUe. New London, Pa. 

FUnt RiTer. TalUhassee, Fla. 

Michigan. NorthTUle. Mich. 

W. UanoTer. Dover Mills, Va. 
N. Brunswick. Princeton, N.J. 

Indian. Wheeioek, Ark. 

Connecticut Newport, R. I. 

New Lisbon. Middle Sandy, 0. 

ZanesTille. Cumberland, 0. 

TransylTsnia. Bpringfleld, Ky. 

Redstone. 

ChilUcothe. Balnbridge, Ohio. 

Columbus. X Roads, Mad.e.,0. 

Greenbrier. Academy, Va. 

BetheL 

West Jersey. ProTidence, R. I. 

Troy. Saratoga Sp«.,N . Y. 

Charleston. 

Cherokee. Marietta, Oa. 

Winrhester. Charlestown, Va. 

Indian. DoaksrlUe. Ark. 

Washington. Buflklo, Pa. 

Creek Nation. 

Albany. Windsor, N.Y. 

ChilUcotha. ChilUcothe, Ohio. 

Erie. Franklin, Pa. 
Redstone. ••*••* 

Baltimore. Washington, D.O. 

New York. Watertbrd, N. Y. 

EUsabetht'n. Westfleld, N.J. 

NashTiUe. NashTiUe, Tenn. 

BUlrsTille. Murraysrille, Pa. 

Charleston. 

PiMNilc. Morrlstown, N.J. 

Winnebago. PloTer, Wis. 

Indian. Wheeioek, Ark. 

PhiUdelphU. Phihulelphla, Pa. 

Luseme. 

Eaut. Texas. Ban Antonio, Tax. 

Ckriisle. Carlisle, Pa. 

Ohio. Le CUira, Iowa. 

Flndlay. Van Wert, Ohio. 

Saltsburgh. 

RopeweU. MUledgeTiUe, Ga. 

Oxford. Oxford, Ohio. 

Allegheny C. Allegheny C, Pa. 

Huntingdon. ReedTille, Pa. 

Philadelphia. Washington, D.O. 

Chicago. Genoa, III. 

Huntingdon. Rock Springs, Pa. 

Connecticut ThompeonTllle, C. 

Nassau. Rosly^ (L.I.)N.Y. 

CarliAle. Gnnincastle, Pa. 

Lexington. Middlebrook, Va. 

Maumee. Mct^mb, Ohio. 
E. Mixeifwippi. MeridUn, Misa. 

Philad(>lphia. Philadelphia, Pa. 

Elizabeth t'n. Liberty JC Jr., N. J. 

Harmony. BiRbopville, S. C. 

N. MimiMiippi. Holly .^p's.. Miss. 

New York. N. York C, N.Y. 

Donegal. Sterling, UL 



KAMB. 



PmSSBTTSmT. POST-OVPICS. 



Erwln, T. W., P. 
Krana, B. D., w. c. 
BTans, Eran, a. a. 
Erans, J. S., P. 
BTans, R. R., P. 
ETana, 8. N., a. a. 
ETans, Thos. J., P. 
Ewing, C.H., s a. 
Ewing, D. B., P. 
Ewtog,F.N.,P. 
Ewing, J. A., L. 
Ewing, J. D., W.C. 
Ewing, William, P. 



Concord. 

Columbus. 

Marion. 

Long Island. 

Memphis. 

Chicago. 

New York. 

Philadelphia. 

W. Hanorar. 

Peoria. 

Saltsburgh. 

Montgomacy. 

Ohio. 



PUtta. 
Benleia. 



RlT. 



Facklbb, J. G., P. 
Pairbairn, A., a a. 
FairchUd, A.Q., P. 
Faria, John M., P. Chicago. 
Farlow, J. M., a. a. Genessee 
Famham, J..M.,L. Albany. 
Farquhar, John, p. DonegaL 
Farrls. Robt P., P. Peoria. 
Fauoette, T. U., a. a. Orange. 
Fay, B. M., T. Muncie. 

Fee, R. A., P. Louisiana. 

Fenton, J. F., a a. Bt Louis. 
Ferguson, Jamea, P. Peoriv 
Ferguson, W. M., p. Zanesrille. 
Ferrier, Edsall, L. New YorlL 
Ferrill, O. W., P. Orange. 
Field, Jacob T.,w.o. Newton. 
Field, Thoa. P., p. Troy. 
Field, William, L. IndSan. 
Findley. J R., P. 
Flndley, Sam'l.. P. 
Findley, W.T^ P. 
Fine, Lamb., &, P. 
Finlay, John B. 
Finley, C. W., s a. 
Finley, J. P., a. a 
Finley, Rob. M.. a.a. Wooster. 
Finley, R. B., aot. Sangamoi 
Finney, £. D., p. Missisalpiil. 
Finney, Wm., w. c. Donegal. 
Fisher, Jamea P., P. '" 
Fi«her, M. M., L. 
Fisk, C. It, w. o. 
Fisk, Exra W., P. 
Fisk, Pliny, V.H. 
Fitch, Charles. 

Fitagerald, J.H.,a.a. Redstone. 
Flanagan, Jamea P. Redstone. 
Fleming, Jamea, P. Washington. 
Fleming, John, a. a. Chicago. 
Fleming, W. A., p. Peoria. 
Flatcber, J.C. Munds. 

Flinn, WUUam, P. Hopewell. 
Floyd, Moeea, w. c. Huntingdon. 
Foote, Chas. H., I. ~- ~ 
Foote, Wm. H., P. 



Brie. 
Ohio. 
Miami. 
Otfllsla. 

Colnmbos. 
Palmyra. 



Fancy Um,N.a 
N. CalifornU, 0. 
Radnor, Ohio. 
BeUuket, N. Y. 
Germant'n., Ten. 
Una, III. 
BUuTeltBTlUN.T. 
West PhUada..Pa. 
GordonsTill^ Va. 
Bloomington, lit 

Fancy HiJ'l, Va. 
Oannonsbnrg, Pa. 

8t Josephs, Mo. 
Santa Rosa, CaL 
Bmithfleld, Pa. 
Rockford, III. 
Moscow, N. Y. 

L-Chanceford, Fa. 
Peoria, 111. 
Oxford, N. 0. 
Flint, Mich. 
Williamsport, Lft. 
Labadl^ Mo. 
West Jersey, III. 
Washington, 0. 
Princeton, N. J. 
Tally-Ho,N.C. 
BelTldere, N. J. 
N. London, Conn. 
DoaksTlUe, Ark. 
Mercer, Pa. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Springfield, Ohio. 
Chambersb'g., Pa. 



London, Ohio. 

Paris, Mo. 

Wooster, Ohio. 

Springfield, 111. 

Washington, Mis. 

ChurehTille, Md. 
Albany. Johnstown, N. J. 

MisSourL 

Chicago. Mendota, III. 

CrawfordsrlUeGreencastle, Ind. 
Indian. DoaksTille, Afk. 

Vlneennea. FrankTille, Iowa. 

Klngwood, Va. 



W. Alexander, Pa. 

EarWllle, HI. 

Lewlstown, HI. 

Philadelphia, Pa. 

MilledgeTOIe, Ga. 

BelleTille. Pa. 
N. Brunswick. Jerseyrille. IIL 
Winchester. Romney, Va. 



Forbes, A. Cl. PhUadelphia. 
Forbes, Cochran, p. Fort Wayne. Kendalville, Ind. 
Ford. Charlea It, p. West Jeraey. WUliamsCn., N. J 
Ford, J. F., P. Red River. Minden, La. 

Foreman, Step., T. Creek Nation. Tahlequah, Ark. 
Foreeman, R., B., p. Newton. Maddsgh's. Pa. 

Forman, A. P., T. Palmyra. Hannibal, Mo. 

Forman, C.W., v. H. LodUna. Lah«»re, N. I. 

Forman, Bsekiel, P. TransyWanla. Rirhmond, Ky. 
Forest John, T. Charleston. Charleston, S. 0. 

Forsythe, Joseph. Bedford. 

Forsythe, W.H., a.s. W. Lexington. QrnthUna, Ky. 
Foster, G. R., P. Bast Alabama. Wetumpka, Ala. 
Foster, Jos. C P. Bedford. Red Mills, N. Y. 

Foster, Julius, P. Susquehanna. Towanda, Pa. 
Fox, M. A., P. Dane. Madison, Wis. 

Frame, Reuben, P. Winnebago. Fond du Lac, W. 
Fraser, Don'd., a a. Florida. JaeksonTille. Fla. 

Eraser, George. P. W. Lexington. Nirholasville, Ky 
Fraser, M. D., a s. Harmony. Winnsboro', S. 0. 
Fraser, Thoa., a. a. Arkansaa. Little llock. Ark. 
Fraser, Wm. J., a. a. Missouri. St FraneiflTiI.,Mo 

Fredericks, J. T., L. Washington. Furghettst'n.. Pa. 
Fn^eland, D. N.. P. Hudson. Monroe, N.Y. 

French, John B. Canton. Canton, China. 

Frierson, D. it, a.s. Harmony. Marion, S. C. 



Digitized by 



Googk 



80 



PRESBYTERIAN HISTORICAL ALMANAC. 



Prior»Jii,B 0..« •. 
Frlertwn, J. S.. P. 
FHersoD, J. S.. P. 
FrIt)rso»i, S. K., p 
Frierson, W.V.,W C 
Fries. Henry C, > a 
FrontI*, S., w c. 
Frothingham^^P.M 
Frothini?hain.W.,P. 
Fry, Henry B., >. >. 
Fullenwider, P.,8 >. 
FuilertoQ, J. S., P. 
Fullerton, H. 8.. P. 
FuUertoo, R. S.,P.u. 
Fulton^ Jaa. P..P. 
Fulton, Samuel, P. 
Fulton, W. R^ •. •. 



PSB8BTTXRT. P08T-0V7ICK. 



Madiflon, P«. 
SpringhiU, Tenn. 
Mt praajiant.Ten. 
StarkTllle, Miss. 
Pontotoc, Mias. 
Sealbrd , Del. 
Spring QroTe,N.O. 
Spencer Acad., A. 
GuilderUnd, N.Y. 
Marion, Ohio. 
Huntsrille, Tex. 
Ht. Vernon, Iowa. 
South Salem, O. 
Futtehgurh, Ida. 
New Derry, Pa. 
Plttoburgh, Pa. 
Or^on, Mo. 



Florida. 

Maury. 

Maury. 

Tombeekbee. 

Chickasaw. 

New CaiiUe. 

Concor4. 

Albany. 

Albany. 

Findlay. 

Brasofl. 

Cedar. 

CbUlicothe. 

Furrukhabad. 

BlairsTille. 

Ohio. 

Platte. 



Qaom, William, p. Ohillioothe. 
Gnillard, S. S.. P. S. Carolina. 
Oainea. L. G , 8. 8. Cincinnati. 
Oalbraith, Ja8.,w c. New Lisbon. 
Gnlbmith, J. N., P St. Louis. 
Galbraith, R. C, P. Columbus. 
Oalbraith, R. C^ P. Baltimore. 
Gal breath, W.M. P. Sidney. 
Gallaudet, T^ w c. Baltimore. 



LatU's, Ohio. 
GreeuTille, S. 0. 
CumminsYille, 0. 
W. Fairfield, Pa. 
Kirkwood, Mo. 
Lancaster, Ohio. 
Goranstown, Md. 
De Graff, Ohio. 
Westminster, Md. 



Galloway, J. M.. p. Huntingdon. Clearfield, Pa. 
Galloway, J.S.. aot. M iami. Springfield, Ohio. 

Oalpln, H., w. N. York 2d. N. York C» N. Y, 
Gamble, Jas., w. c. Cherokee. Sammerrille, Ga. 
Gamble, Robert, P. Donegal. Gap, Pa. 

Gardiner, A. S., P. North Rlrer. Cold Spring, N.T. 
Gardiner, C.W.,W.C N. Brunswick. Hrirrisburg, Pa. 
Gardiner, James, p. Ogdensburg. Hammond N. Y. 
Gardiner. R. D.. P. Long Island. Ellsworth, Conn. 
Gardner, A., 8. 8. Winnebago. Weyauwega, Wis. 
Garrison, R.C., 8 8 West District. WoodfiUe, Tenn. 

Garritt, J. B.. prf. Madison. 

Garth waite, W , 8 8. North Riror. Hnghsonrll., N.T. 
Gaston, Daniel, p. Philadelphia. Philadelphia, Pa. 
Gaston, Lo Roy, 8. 8. Chickasaw. Corinth, Miss. 
Gayley, S. A., P. New Castle. 
Gayley, S. M., T. New CasUe. 
Gayley, S. R., t M. New Castle. 
Gazley, Sayres,w c. Cincinnati. 
Geary, Edw. R., s 8. Oregon. 
Geary, .Tnhn M., p. Louisiana. 
Gibbs, G. M., P. FayetteTilla. 
GUbert, Joseph, p. S.Carolina. 
Gibert, J. .F, p. 8. Carolina. 
Gibson, Wm. J., P. Huntingdon. Walker, Pa. 
Gi^er, George M., L. N. Brunswick. Princeton, N. J. 
Gilchrist, A., P. Fayetteville. Fayettorille, N. C. 
Gibhrist, Jas.,s s Whit« Water. MtCarmel, Ind. 
Gildersleeve. B.. BO. East HanoTer. Richmond, Va. 
Gill, James IL, P. Sidney. Troy, Ohio. 

Gill, Sydney, L N. Mississippi. Cenotobia, Miss. 
Otilnnd, J. R., 8 8. Harmony. Indiantown, S. C. 
" " West District. Denmark, Tenn. 

West District. Denmark, Tenn. 

Blairsville. Latrobe, Pa. 
GilliUod, A. B., 8. 8. Oxford. Koes, Ohio. 

Gilmor, J. S., L. PhUadela. 2d. Princeton, N. J. 

Gllmour, James. L. Albany. 

Giltner, H. M.. 8 8. Council Blafls. Nebraska C, N. T. 
Oirard. Grand E. 8 8 Chillicothe. Ripley, Ohio. 
Girardeau, J.L..D H. Charleston. Charieiiton, S. C. 
Oladney, R. S., prf. Tombeekbee. Aberdeen, Miss. 
Glen, Wm. U., p. Newton. German Yai.. N.J. 

Goble. Gershom. p. Montgomery. New Castle, Va. 
GoUiday, P. H., 8. 8. White Water. Forrest Hill, Ind. 



W.Nottingam,Md 
Media, Pa. 
Shanghae, China. 
Williamsburg, 0. 
CorTallis, Or. Ter. 
Phdns Store, La. 
ainton,N.C. 
LoundesTil., S. C. 
Abbeville, S. C, 



Gill^pie, J. H.. P. 
Gillespie, W F.. L 
Glllett. N.H.,P 



Goodale, M. S., P. Albany. 

Goodell, J. W..8 8. Oregon. 

Goodhue, G. F..PX8. Chicago. 

Goodman, E. ,w. c. Troy. 

Goodrich, H. P., i. St. Louis. 

Gordon, J. S., P. Carlisle. 
Gordon, T. P., 8. 8. 
Gasman, A., P. 



Amsterdam, N. Y. 

G. Mound, W.T. 

Marengo, 111. 

Cnldwell, N. Y. 

St. Liouis, Mo. 

Fan nettsburg,Pa. 
Crawfordsril. Terre Haute, Ind. 
N. Brunswick. LawrenceTil.,N.J. 



Goul. J. M., L. L<*xlngton. 

Gould. W R., w.o. Philadela,2d. Pottetown, Pa. 

Goulding, .F R. Cherokee. 

Graff. J. J., p. Baltimore. Annapolis, Md. 

Graham, G., w. o. Richland. Bucyrus. Ohio. 

Glliham, Jas. R., P. Winchester. Winchester, Va. 



HAMS. 



PSXSBTTntT. P08T-OinCS. 



Graham, John B., P. 
Graham, J. C.,w.c, 
Graham, R. G, T. 
Grasty, John S.. P. 
Graves, A. R., 8. 8. 
GraTes,A.T.,A. XD. 
OraTes, Eli, 8. 8. 
Graves, E., w. c. 
Graves, Joel S., 8. 8. 
Graves, L.M., w.c. 
Graves, N. Z., w. c. 
Grty. D, L., 8. 8. 
Gray, Q<i*K, W.C. 
Gruyt John, P. 
Graj. J IC, PR8. 
Grny, ilof. J., w.o. 
Gray, T. McK., P. 
Grav\ Wm.A.,P. 
Gr^ ,i,iv, \\\ P- D.M. 
Gi-.' lu E iridD., L. 
Grwco, iJ, fl., P. 
Green, James, P. 
Green, L. W., PR8. 
Green, Matthew. 
Green, W. H., PRF. 
Green, Wm. L., p. 
Green, Zech., P. 
Greene, Ab^jah, P. 
Greenlee, Anw., 8.8. 
Greenlea^ J., P. 
Gregg, Geo. C., P. 
Gregory, 0. R., P. 
Greer, James, PR*. 
Grier, David, P. 
Grier, Inac, P. 
Grier, John H., 8. 8. 
Grier, J.N. C P. 
Grier, J. W., chp. 
Grier, lAverty, p. 
Grier, Matt. B.. p. 
Grier, Robert S., P. 
Grier, Smith F., P. 
Grimes, J. S., P. 
Grimes, Wm.M., p. 
Grimes, W. M., P. 
Grove, Thos. A., s 8. 
Grundy, R. C, p. 
Gubby, JameK, p. 
Gttiteau, S., w.c. 
Gurley, P.D.. p. 
Guthrie, H. W.,f jc. 

Habdxn, J. B., 8. 8. 
Haight, John, L. 
Hagaman, A., s. 8 
Haines, A. W., s 8. 
Hair, G. M., 8. s. 
Hair, Samuel, d. h. 
Hale, George, p. 
Hall, A. G., P. 
Hall, David, P. 
Hall. F. B., L. 
Han, Isaac. 
Hall, James D., P. 
Hall, John, p. 
Hall, John P.. L. 
Hall, J. M., 8.8. 
Hall, N. U., P. 
Hall, R. J., w. c. 
Hall, S. B., s. 8. 
Hall. Wm.A. 8.8. 
Hall, William, s. 8 
Hall, Wm. T.. L. 
Halley, Eben'r, P. 
Halliday, D. M.. P. 
Ualsey, Job P., P 
Halney, Luther, 8.8. 
Halsey, L. J.. P. 
Hamersly, Wm., P. 
lUmill, Hugh, T. 
Hamill. Robert P. 
Haniill, S: M., T. 
Hamilton, A. R.. P. 
Hamilton, Alf , P. 
Hamilton, K. J., L. 
Hamilton, J. J., s.s. 



St. Clairsville. 

New Orleans. 

Montgomery. 

Montgomery. 

B. MississippL 

Louisville. 

Florida. 

West. Texas. 

Florida. 

Saltsborgh. 

Orange. 

Arkansas. 

Huntingdon. 

Philadela. 2d. 

Alemphis. 

Schuyler. 

Long Island. 

Chickasaw. 

S. Carolina. 

Richland. 

Memphis. 

Des Moines. 

Transylvania. 

Charleston. 

N.Brunswidc. 

Dane. 

Long Island. 

New York. 

Palmyra. 

Nassau. 

Harmony. 

Mohawk. 

Lexington. 

Erie. 

Northomb'd. 

Northumb'd. 

New Castle. 

New CasUe. 

SteubeuTille. 

Fayetterllle. 

Cariisle. 

Washington. 

Donegal. 

St. Clairsrille. 

Zanesvilie. 

St aairsTiUe. 

Memphis. 

Connecticut 

Baltimore. 

Baltimore. 

Allegheny C. 

Dubuque. 

Miami. 

Louisiana. 

Iowa. 

MiamL 

Oxford. 

N. Brunswick. 

Rochester C. 

Allegheny. 

Albany. 

Sidney. 

Concord. 

N.Brunswick. 

PhiladeiphU. 

Red River. 

Missouri. 

Miami. 

Mississippi. 

West District 

Genessee Riv. 

Concord. 

Albany. 

N. York 2d. 

PhiladeU.2d. 

Hudson. 

Louisville. 

W. HanoTer. 

N. Brunswick. 

Huntingdon. 

N. Brunswick. 

Zanesvilie. 

New Outle. 

New York. 

Huntingdon. 



Morristown. Ohio. 
Wellington, Tex. 
Mack's M. D., Ya. 
Fincastle, Va 
Zion9em'y.,MiM. 
Louisville, Ky. 
Boston, Ga. 
Bma Antonio, Tax. 
Ocklocknee, Qm. 



Warrenton, N. C 
Watte«aw, Ark. 
Waterloo, PHL 
Easton, Pa. 
La Grange, Tenn. 
Barr's Store, IIL 
Bridghamp'n.,N.T 
Ripley, Miaa. 
Bach. Bet, S.O. 

Portersville, Ten. 
Indianapolis, La. 
Danville, Ky. 



Princeton, N.J. 
Madison, Wis. 
Hempstead, N. Y. 
Bleecker, N. Y. 
Philadelphia, Ma 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Maysvflle, S.C. 
Oneida, N. Y. 
Brownsburs, Va. 
W. Greenfield, Pa. 
MifiSInburg, Pa. 
Jersey Shore, Pa. 
Brandy w*e..M.,PR 
Philadelphia, Pa. 
E. Springfield, O. 
Wilmington, N. a 
Emmettsb'g., Md. 
N. Cumb»d., Va. 
Columbia, Pa. 
Cadis, Obia 
McConnellsTiL, O. 
Wegee, Ohio. 
Memphis, Tenn. 
Providence, R. I. 
Baltimore. Md. 
Washington, D.G. 
B«nnett^sS.,K.T. 

Iowa. 

Bel Ibrook, Ohio. 
Jackson, Lai 
Keosauqua. Iowr. 
Franklin, Ohio. 
Oxford, Ohio. 
Pennington, N. J. 
Rochester, N. T. 
Adams, Pa. 



Wood Lawn, N. OL 
Trenton, N. J. 

Vienna. lL 
Columbia, Ma 
Lebanon, Ohio. 
Natches, Miss. 
Eaton, Tenn. 
Oakland, N. Y. 



Albany, N. Y. 
Peckskill, N. Y. 
Norristown, Pa. 



Louisville, Ky. 
Rough Creek, Va 
Lawrencevil., N JF. 
Boalsburgh, Pa. 
Lawrencevil., N J 
Brownsville, 0. 
Cochran ville, Pa. 
Princeton, N.J. 
Tipton, Pa. 



Digitized by 



Googk 



THE PRBSBTTERIAN CHURCH, (O. S.) 



81 



HAMS. 



HAIDlltOD, J. K.. L. 

Hamilton, J. W L. 
Hamilton, W.,>.> 
Hamilton, W. 
Hiunilt<m. W. V.. T. 
Hamilton, W. K., P. 
Hamner, J. G..W c. 
Hancock, John, a a. 
Hand. Aaron H., P. 
Handy, Wm. C, P. 
Hanna, Arch., w c. 
Hanna, Jaa. W., p. 
Hanna, J.C, w c 
TIanna, Job. A., a a 
llanwn, Heaek., P. 
Happer. A. P., t M 
Ilapperaott, K.. bec. 
Harbison, Darld P. 
Harbimn. J. B., a a. 
Uarbaugh, ?. K., p. 
Uardie, Henry. 
HanlinR, K. H., a. 8. 
Hark 1 1 em. Jaa., P. 
Harlow, H A., p 
Harlow, Jamea M. 
Harmon, MeritD ac. 
Hamed, A.O., s a. 
Ilarpur. .lamea. P 
Hurriu;;ton, J, W C. 
HnrriM, Kdw., W. C. 
Harris, V. D., p 
)IiirriH,John il.. a.a. 
Harrim John K. L 
Hania, J. L.. D K. 
Ilarrim J. S., P 
Uarrla. John M.. L. 
Harris, ()8.-ar. P 
Harris. Ralph. 8 8 
Harrison, D. C. CHP. 
HarriKin. D. 8 a. 
llnrrisnii, Kllas P. 
Harrison, J., w. c. 
Harrison, J. 0.. w. c. 
HarrLwn, P., w c. 
UurriKon, S , F M. 
Hnrrison, W. A. P. 
Harrison, W.H..W.C. 
Harrison, Wm. P., P. 
UarriHon, W. P. 
H.irry, John, L. 
Unniha, Wm-W.,p. 
Har8be,Wm.P.,8S. 
Hart, Andrew, P. 
Hart. Kdsnn, aoh 
Hart, Jaoob, W c. 
Hart, Samuel. 8 a. 
Harvoy, Joa.. W C. 
Haakel, Samuel. L. 
HassiiiKer. P.. 8. a. 
HastiuRs, J. M.. P 
Hatch. L. D., o M 
Hatt«ry, John,w c. 
HawHS, Lowman. p. 
Hawkins, J. L., 8. a. 
Hawthorn, Jaa.. P. 
HaT. Law 0., p m. 
Hay, II. S., P. 
Hayes, Isaac N., P. 
Hays, J. 8., P. 
Hays, 0. B., w. c. 
Hays, Robert, P. 
Hailett, John W., p. 
Hazlett, Silaa, o ac. 
Heacock, J. 8., w. c. 
Heaton, A. C, p. 
Heckiiian. G.C., P. 
Hed^fHs, Chaa. E..L 
Heborton. A., w C. 
Heider. Dnn'l.,w. c. 
Helm, Jaa. I., w.O. 
Helme. S. P., i. 
Hempstead, Thoa. 
Uendef , Homer. 
Henderson, I.J.,F. 
Henderson, J. S., P. 
Henderson, J. 8., P. 
11 



PB«8BrmT. P08T-0V7ICB. 

BlairsTille. 

StenbenTille. 

Kaskaskla. Oreenrllle, 111. 

U..MiK.<ioari. Brllevuo, X.T. 

Redstone. Uiilontr-wn, I'a, 

Florida. Monlioello, Fla. 

Baltimore. Baltimore, Md. 
Council Blulh. Hluff City. Inwa. 

Newton. Bloonci'iury, N. J. 

Baltimore. Lewes, Del. 

Wooster. K. UreenTllIe, 0. 

Woofitor. Canal Fulton, 0. 

Peoria. Brimfleld, 111 

Oregon. Cot vallis, Or. Ter. 

Schuyler. Oquawka, HI. 

Canton. Canton. China. 

Philad«>la. 'id. Phllndelphla, Pa. 

BlalrsTillo Kbensburg. Pa. 

U. Misaoun. Richmond, Mo. 

Burlini^tun. Burlington, N. J. 

Orange 

Orange. Black Walnut Ta. 

Rochester C. Rorh«>ster. X. Y. 
N. Brunswick. N.BrunBw'k.,N.J. 

Oenesse River. 

Dubuque. Hopkinton, Iowa. 

Luzerne. Slatington, Pa 

rnrllsle. Shippensbnrg.Pa. 

Harmony. Mayt-s^ 11 le, 8. C. 

Pas.«mlc. Newbem, N. C. 

Philadela. 2d. Bristol. l»a. 

Wooster. McArthur. Ohio. 

New York. Princeton, N. J. 

TuscumbU. SomerriUe. Ala. 

Bt^thel. OntbriAsviIle,S.C. 

Win cheater. Romney, Va. 

Hudson. Wells' Cor., N. T. 

1). .^lissouri. Cameron. .Mo. 

W. Htiiover. University of Va. 

Bethel. Liberty Hill, 8. G. 

Winchester. Alexandria, Va. 

Iowa. Fulton, .Mo 
W. Uzington. Walton, Ky. 

W. HanoTer Carteniville. Va. 

West Africa. Monrovia, Liberia 

NashTllle. t.;.llatlii. Tenn. 

Choro':!'.. .Ti'fr^rson, Ga. 

Washington. Amity, I'a. 

Washington. 

Allahabad. 

Rock RWer. Dixon, III. 

Palmyra. Auburn. Mo. 

Montgomery. Pat tot sburg, Ya. 

New Orleans. New Orle.tn«, La. 

Rochester C. K. B thany, N . Y. 

SchuyW. Keithburg, 111. 

Connecticut. Marquette, Mich. 

Ix>nd''nderry. 

Kaskaskla. Trenton. 111. 

BlalrsTilla. WUklnsburg, Pa. 

Tuscaloosa. (1reensboro\ Ala. 
BtClairsTilie. Bell Air, Ohio. 

Madison. Madison, Ind. 

Palestine. Lebanon, Ind. 

Paducah. PrincetoM Ky. 

Allahabad. Indianapolis. Ind. 

Harmony. Camden. 8. C. 

Carlisle. Shippensburg.Pa. 

NaahTille. Nashville, Tenn. 

NaahvlllR. Nashville. Tenn. 

New Liabon. Inverness. Ohio. 

Ohio. Carrick. Pa. 

St PauU Uke City, Mln. 

Albany. Gloversvillo, N.Y. 

Bnltim^re. FHnoesa Ann, Md. 

Winnebago. Portage City,Wl8. 

Passaic. 

NorthumbM. Media, Pa. 

Des Moines. Sigoumey, Iowa. 

Philadelphia. Princeton, N.J. 

Red River. Shreveport, Ia. 

Florida." "'.!!! 

New Orieiins. New Orleans. Ia. 

r.i.llslp. New villa, Pa. 

Chirugo. Mend tn. 111. 



HAUM. 



PKKSBTTXBY. POST-OFFICB. 



Henderson, R.. D M. Chickasaw. 

Ilendrick, J. T.. P aah^ iUe. 

Hendriek, J. T., P. Maury. 

Uendrick, J. P., a a Kbeneser. 

Hendricks, J. R. L. W. Lexington. 

Hendricks, A. T.. 8 a. VIncennea. 

Hennlgh, H. K., a. b. Cincinnati. 

Henry, liiben.. w. c, Allegheny. 

Henry, JM^. V.,W.C. New Yo»^k. 

Henry. W. W., P. Chicago. 

Hepburn, A. D., L. Carlisle. 

Hepburn, 8. C, P Hudfipn. 

Heroy, P. B., P. Bedford. 

Herring, Amos » M. West Africa. 

Herring, N., 8 a FsyettevUle. 

Herron, Fran., w c. Ohio. 

Herron, Robert. P Stoubenville. 

Hershey, A. M., D.M. Winchester. 

Hervey, David, 8. 8. Washington. 

llervey, Henry, P. 

Hervey, James, P. 

Hewlt, Nath., P 

Ilibben, 8. K., L. 

Hickman, 0. 

Hickman, Wm. P.. P. 

Hickok, Henry F., l 

Hickok,Milo, J, P. 

Higgina, 8. H., P. 

High. K.S., 8 a. 

Hill, Getjrge, P. 

Hill. Sam m-l, 8. 8. 

illlLW W.,BD.A8KC. l^uisvlfie. 

liitlhouse, J. B., s. a. 8. Carolioa. 

nines, tdw., P. Orange. 

Hinsdale, H. G., P. Nassau. 

Hitchcock. R. ^.,P. 

Hobb.s, 8. L., F M 

Hobson, B M., P 

Hodge, Arch. A., P. 

liodi^e, C. W., P. 

Hodge, Chas.. pbf. 

i lodge, J. A., P 

Hodge, Sam'l., pbf. 

Ilodgman, :<. A. 

Ilofford, .M.L.. L. 

Hoge, James, w c 

Iloge, John M., O M. Dubuque. 

Hoge. .Moses A, P Zanesvllle. 

H«)ge, .Moses D.. P. East Hanover. 

Hogo, Wm. J., PBF W. Hanover. 

Hogshead, A. L.,D.M. Montgomery. 

Ilogue, Aaron A. p Transylvania. 

iloltlday. W. A.,W c Muncie. 

H<How.««y, A. H.. L Transylvania. 

Hollyday, R. H.,w c. Flndlay . 

Hollyday, W.C. T Iowa. 

H()hne?<, James, a. a West District 

H.ilnies, S. Dane. 

liclmes, W. B.. a. a Mohawk. 

Ilnlnies, Z L., a. 8 8. Carolina. 

IIouuclI, W. H., 8, 8 Hlghhind. 

Hoover, T. D., P. N. Brunswick. 

Hope. M.B., PBF. N. Brunswick. 

Hopkiu8.H. H. F 

Hopkins, J. II.. L 

Hopkins, T. M.. P 

Hopper, Edw.. p 

Hornblower,W.il p. 

Hotchkin, E., F. M. IndUn. 

House, 8. R., F. M. Troy. 

House. WilUam. 

Houston, R. A., w c. Bast Alabama. 

Houston. 8. R, P. Greenbrier. 

Howard, W.D., P. Ohio. 

Howard. W. W.. L NortbomVd. 

Howe. George. PBF. Charleston. 

Howell, BliM, 8 8. Palestine. 
I Howell, Jesse L.. P. Bedford. 
I Howell, John 8.. as. Kaskaskla. 
i Howell, S. N., T. AH any. 
! Howell. Seth. Sidney. 

i Howsley, A. 8.. a 8. Muhlenbnrgh. 
' Hoyte, J. W.. P Nashville. 

I Hoyt Nathan, p. Hopewell. 
I HoytT A., P P.Carolina. 

! Hubbard, J. W., P. West Jersey. 



DaMxIlle. MihB. 
Clarks\i lie. Tenn. 
AshwoiKi, Tenn. 
Flemingsburg.Ky 



KIchlnnd. 

Washington. 

New York. 

Chillicothe. 

Lafayette. 
. Montgomery. 
• Luserne. 

Luzerne. 

Flint River. 

Peoria. 

Blairsvllle. 

Huntingdon. 



Baltimore. 

Indian. 

Lafayette. 

Kast Hanover. 

New Castle. 

N. Brunswick. 

Lnxeme. 

Holston. 

Brazos. 

Philadela.2d. 

Columbus. 



Petersburgh, T&d. 
Feesburpl), Ohio. 
Bunker Hill, 0. 
N.Brunsw'k.,NJ. 
Chicago, III. 
Brownsbnrg. Va. 
Goshen, N.Y. 
Bedford. X. Y. 
Monrovia, Liberia. 
Ke)isnf»\i;itf, X.C 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 
An-ber, <.»hio. 
Br»nts\ille. Va. 
Wcllsburg, Va. 
MnninKl.urg, 0. 
Tridelphia. Va. 
Brldgport. Conn. 
HiUhboruugh, 0. 



Blacksburg, Va. 
Princeto:.. N. J. 
Scran ton. Pa. 
Cc'lunibus, Ga. 
Tonica. 111. 
Blalrsville, Pa. 
Kast Barrn. Pa. 
IiOui«viIU., Ky. 
Tyleis^nic. S.C. 
Sassafrns Fk.,r:.0. 
German to.vn. Pa. 
Bnltlmoiv. Md. 
Doaksville, Ark. 
Lezintrt'tn, Mo. 
Frederick sb'g.jVa. 
Oxford. Pa. 
Princeton, N. J. 
Maurh Chunk, Pa. 
Washing. Col., T. 

Beverly. N. J. 
Columbus. Ohio. 
Fayette, Iowa. 
Zanesville. Ohio. 
Richmond. Va. 
Hampden Sid.,Va. 
Abingdon, Va. 
Lebanon, Ky. 
IndianapoIi8.In<L 
flreensliurg. Ky. 
FIndlnv. Ohio. 
West Point Iowa. 
Covington, Tonn. 



LouisYiUe. 
Nassau. 
Miami. 
Long Island. 
. Passale. 



Bald Mount, Pa. 
Ijiur«>n8,C.H.,8.C. 
IjOdlsnn, Kansas. 
rr.i»therry, N. J. 
Prln.-.'ton, N.J. 
Owensboro'. Ky. 



N. Brunswick. 



Yellow fJps., 0. 
Sag Harbour.N.Y. 
Pateraon, N. J. 
Doaksville. Ark. 
Bankok, Slnm. 



Greensboro', Ga. 
Union, Va, 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Jersey Phore, Pa. 
Columbia, S. C. 
Marshall, HI. 
Dobb's Ferry. N.Y. 
Duncan non, 111. 
Mystic, Conn. 



Greenville. Ky. 
Nashville, Tenu. 
Athens, Ga. 
Abbeville. 8. C. 
Princeton, N.J. 



Digitized by 



Googk 



82 



PRKSBYTKRIAN HISTORICAL ALMANAC. 



HAMS. 



PKXSBTTXRT. POST-OWICB. 



Hadxm, John, • «. 
HudfOD, John, P^ r. 
HiU(heR, A. a.. P. 
Hagh«a, Daniel. L. 
Hughes, James B..P. 
Ha;<he8, James l*..T. 
Hu){hee, Jan. R. P. 
Hashes, J. D., P 
Huj^hes, J. M., PK7. 
Hughea, LotI, p 
Hatches, 8. K.. w. o 
Httitbee, Wn w c. 
Hughes, Wm.. p. 
Hu/heff, Jr., T. K.. p. 
Hu^hi, T. K.. 8. • 
Hulbard, II., w o. 
Hull, David, P 
Humphrey. K.P.. PV. 
Hampbreys, D., P. 
Uumphreyti, J. C , L. 
Humphreys, J-^*« T. 
Hunt, H. W., p 
Uunt,Tho«.P., D.M. 
Hunt, Wm. B., P. 
Hunter, John. w. o 
Hunter, WlllUm, P. 
Huntington, C, P. 
Huntington, H.S.. L 
Huntington, J.,w c. 
Huntting. J.M.. T. 
Hunttlng.Wm.,w o. 
Husted, John N., p. 
Huston, John. 8 8. 
Hutcbings, S.. c M. 
Hutchinson, J. I(..T. 
Hutcbifton, W., wo. 
Hyde, K. Fi. p. 
Hyde, 0. 0., a. 8 
Hyiidflhaw. J., w. o. 
Hynes, Thoa. W., P. 

IMBKIB. Ohaa. K., F. 
In<(lis, Geo. S., 8 a. 
Insiee, E. B. 
Inrine. J. F., T. 
IfTln, Geo. A., L. 
Irvlu, S. M., P. M. 
Irving, David, P. 
Irwia, David C, P. 
Irwin, J. C, L. 
Irwin, fiesMe. p. 
Irwin, Robert. 8. 8. 
Irwin, Jr., Ribt.. 8.8. 
Irwin, 8. M., t M. 
Iveson, John. 

jACKBOlf, M.W„T. 
Jaekson, 8hel., t M. 
Jackson, W. P., 8 8 
Jaixib, Prosper H , P. 
Jarobs. Ferd., T. 
Jacobus, M.W..PKV. 
Jagger, 8. H., P. 
James, A. A., P. 
James, David >(.. P. 
JamcK, Wm., w. c 
Jamiesnn, J. M., W M. 
Janeway, J.J. 
•laiieway, J. L., P. 
Janeway, T. L., P 
Janvier, G.W., WC. 
Janvier. Levi, P. M. 
Jardine. Andrew, P. 
Jeffrey, 8 H., P. 
Jeffr.*y, Wm.. W. C. 
Jennintm, C.P.,wo. 
Jeniiin;Xi>. J. H., P. 
Jennings, 8. C, P. 
Jennison, J. F.. P. 
Jewett, S.. W. C. 
Johnson. A., 8 8- 
Johnson. A. G , s.8 
JohnKtn, Itakar. 8 8. 
Johnson, Daniel, 8 8. 
Johtis'Hi, John. 8 a. 
Johnson, Silas, 8 8. 



Cedar. 

NorthumVd. 

Orange. 

Huntingdon. 

Baltimore, 

Luserna. 

Redstoua. 

Wooater. 

Oxford. 

Logansport. 

RiehUnd. 

Redstone. 

Richland. 

Oxfbrd. 

Oxford. 

CoJumboa. 

Northumb'd. 

LoulsTille. 

8. Carolina. 

Hopewell. 

Hontgomefy. 

Newton. 

Luieme. 

Coshocton. 

TranayWanla. 

Ohio. 

Baltimore. 

Troy. 

Naahvnie. 

Nassau. 

Blixabetht*n. 

New Gaatte. 

Palestine. 

Passaic. 

New Orleana. 

Marlon. 

8. Carolina. 

Louisiana. 

Elizabetht'n. 

Kaskaskia. 

New York. 

Rock RlTer. 

MisslsslppL 

Zanesvllle. 

Fort Wayne. 

U. Missouri. 

Passaic. 

Lexington. 

Richland. 

Philadela. 2d. 

Logansport. 

Lo^nsport. 

Highland. 

Susquehanna. 

W Hanorer. 

Albany. 

Oenessee RIt. 

Des Moinea. 

Charleston. 

Ohio. 

North Rlrer. 

Bethel. 

Passaic. 

Albany. 

Lodlnna. 

N. Brunswick. 

Raritan. 

N. Brunswick. 

West Jersey. 

Lodiana. 

Huntingdon. 

Waahlngton. 

Ohio. 

Iowa. 

Wincheater. 

Ohio. 

Philadelphia. 

Chi«it;o. 

N. Mi!iMls«lpp|. 

Cherokee. 

Winntxbsiro. 

Fnyettevllle. 

Luzorne. 

Columbus. 



W.LIbeity,Iowa. 
Turbotvllle, Pa. 
Maaon Hall, N.a 
Pacific Clty.Iowa. 
B:iltlmora, .Md. 
Princeton, N.J. 
Bellevernon, Pa. 
M<^^dore, Ohio. 
Seven Mile,Ohia 
Logansport, Ind. 
Chesterville, 0. 
Weet New ton. Pa. 
Loudonrille, O. 
Springdale, Ohio. 
Seren Mile, Ohio. 
Columbus, Ohio. 
Lycoming C, Pa. 
DanTlile, Ky. 
Rock Mills, S.O. 
Augusta. Ga. 
Blaeksburg, Va. 
Schooley's H..N.J 
Wyoming, Pa. 
Coshocton, Ohia 
Jackaon, MIsa. 
Clinton, Pa. 
Kllioott'8M.,Md. 

NaahTiUe, Tenn. 
Jamaica, N.T. 
Plainfleld, N. J. 
Zion, Md. 
Montieello, HL 
Newark, N. J. 
Carrollton, La. 
Solon, Tenn. 
Williamston, 8.0. 
Slmaport, 8. G. 
Plainfleld, N. J. 
Greenville, 111. 

Jera^ 01^, N. J. 
Andover, 111. 
Nlngpo, China. 
Ht Vernon, 0. 
FortWayne, Ind. 
Iowa Point, Kan. 
Morristown, N. J. 
Harriaonb'g., Va. 



Bath, Pa. 
Montloello, Ind. 
Loganaport, Ind. 
Highland, Kan. 



Bough Creek, Va. 
Spencer Ac, Ark. 
PortagevUle,N.T. 
Knoxville, Iowa. 
Charleston, 8. G. 
AUegbeny C, Pa. 
Mariboro', N. Y. 
Jonesvtlle, 8. C. 
Budd's Lake,N.J. 
Albany, N. Y. 
Wankeaha, Wla. 

Flemlngton, N. J. 
Kingston, N.J. 
Plttsgrove, N. J. 
Lodiana, N.India 
MeCoyavllIe, Pa. 
Wayneeburg, Pa. 
HerriottavlllcPa. 
Springfield, III. 
Tomahawk S. Va. 
Moon, Pa. 
PhoenlxTille, Pa. 



Water Val.. Mias. 
CaNxvilie, Ga. 
Oxford. Wis. 
Gilopolls, N. C. 
SybertsvlIIe, Pa. 
Worthlngton, O. 



PKXaBTTSmT. P08T-OFFICS. 



J >hnston, Andw.. P. 
Johnston, J. R.. w c. 
Johnston, John. P. 
Johnston, J. W., p. 
Johnston, Robt., p. 
Johnston, R., w. o. 
Johnston, T. P., w.c. 
Johnston, T.P.. aot. 
Johnston. W.H..W c 
Johnstone, J., w. c. 
Johnstone, R. A., P. 
Johnstone. W. O., p 
Jones, Chas. C, 8 a. 
Jonea, Charle* J. P. 
Jones, Isaac, w. O. 
Jonea, John, P. 
Jonea, John. p. 
Jonea, John M.. P. 
Jo'ies, Jos. H.. P. 
Jones, Saml. B., P. 
Jones, Simeon R. 
Jonea. WiHiMm, WO. 
Jones. Wm. D., aot. 
Jones, Wm. K.. P 
Jordan, D. K.. w c 
Junkln. Renj. O. L. 
Juokin, D. X.. P. 
Junkln, E. D.. P. 
Junkln, Geo , PB8. 
Junkln, Wm. F., P. 

KalB, Andrew. 
Kalb, George L., P. 
Kaufman, J. H., P. 
Kay, Richard. 8 8. 
Keen, Wm. F., P. 
Keeling, Wm. B.. P. 
Kehoo, John L.. P. 
Keir, William, L 
Keith, Wm. J., -OT. 
Kellar, Isaac, w. c. 
Kellogg, E. W., 8 8. 
Kellogg, E. M., w O. 
Kellogg, Saml., w.o. 
Kelly, Darid, 8. 8. 
Kelly, John, p. 
Kelly, W. W. C, 8 a. 
Kemper, A. C, L. 
Kemper, J as. 8., P. 
Kempshall. £., 8 a. 
Kennedy, J. P.. L. 
KenniMly, David, P. 
Kennedy, Dune., P. 
Kennedy, F<dw.,w c. 
Kennedy, J. C, L. 
Kennedy, J. F., p. 
Kennedy, J. L., 8 a. 
Kennedy, R.W., D M. 
Kennedy, Wm. S.. p. 
Ker, J. W. E.. w. c 
Kerr, Aaron H.. d m. 
Kerr, A. H., 8. a. 
Kerr, H. H., a a. 
Kerr, John. P. 
Kerr, Joseph, CRP. 
Ketchum, R. C. P. 
Killen. J. T.. PBP. 
Kimball, D . w. c. 
Kimball, Joseph, P. 
King, Albert B.. L 
King, ChAS B . 8. 8 
King, Esra, w. o. 
King, James, L 
King, John C, p. 
King, J. L.. 8 8. 
King. 0. J.. W c. 
King. T.D., 8. 8. 
Kingery, David. 8 a 
Klngfihury, C . V M. 
Kirk. Jnmes. a. 8 
Kirk. Wm. H., w. 0. 
Kirkpatnck, D., P. 
Kirkparri.'k, J.. P 
Klrkpf»t'-ifk. J..WC. 
Kirkpnt-ik.J.n.s8. 
Klrkp*til.'k,J. L., P. 



Hudson. 

Hudson. 

Wincheater. 

Bearer. 

Peoria. 

Beaver. 

Beaver. 

Concord. 

Cherokee. 

New York. 

Tranaylvania. 

Philadelphia. 

Georgia. 

New York. 

Missouri. 

Geneasee Rlr. 

Cherokee. 

Cedar. 

Philadelphia. 

Weet Jersey. 

Susquehanna. 

Columbua. 

Holston. 

Genessee Rlr. 

Orange. 

Clarion. 

Huntingdon. 

Concord. 

Lexington. 

Montgomery. 



Bullville, N. Y. 

Luney*8 C, Va. 
Darlington, Pa. 
Peoria. HI. 
New Castle, Fa. 
Lima, Ohio. 
New Castle. Ten. 
Ringgold, Ga. 
Hofbtt, Scoti'd. 
Paint Uek, Kj. 
Kensiogtoa. Pa. 
Rioeboro*, Oa. 
New York City. 
Columbia, Mo. 
8oottaville,N.r. 
Rome, Ga. 
Waloott. Iowa. 
Philadelphia. Pa. 
Bridgeton, M.J. 



Thriton, Ohio. 

Caledonia, NY. 
Plymouth, N. C 



Columbua. 

Baltimore. 

Michigan. 

Allegheny. 

Washington. 

N. Brunswick. 

Allegheny 0. 

Flint River. 

Peoria. 

BuOido City. 

Londonderry. 

Hudson. 

Rock River. 

Zaneavllle. 

Louisiana. 

Transylvania. 

Miami. 

Buffalo City. 

Blairsville. 

Long Island. 

Troy. 

Northumb'd. 

Concord. 

Carlisle. 

8. Carolina. 

Tuscaloosa. 

Richland. 

Baltimore. 

St Patth 

Memphl8. 

Memphla. 

Ohio. 

Iowa. 

Hopewell. 

Oxford. 

Londonderry. 

RocbfKter C. 

Elixabetht'n. 

Hopewell. 

Long Island. 

New York. 

Schuyler. 

Flint Hirer. 

Gounril Bluffs. 

E. .Mississippi. 

Peoria. 

Indian. 

Cedar. 

Norih River. 

Blairaville. 

Karitan. 

N. Brunswick. 

S.Hlt«bun?h. 

Charleston. 



Hollldaysb'g.Pa. 
Davidson C.,N.C. 
Lexington. Va 
Fancy Hall, V« 



Clreleville, Ohio. 
Baltimore, Md. 
WoodhulUHIeh. 
Freeport, Pa. 
Hickory, Pa 
Manalapan. N J". 
Allegheny CPa. 
Griffin, Ga. 
Peoria, ni. 
Tonawanda,N.Y. 
Naahua, N.H. 



Rock Island. HL 
Chandler8vil.,0. 
Amite City, La. 

Dayton, Ohio. 
Rochester, N. T. 
Newman's M., P. 
Southamp., N.Y. 
Troy. N.Y. 
Osceola. 1*8. 
Statesvllle, N. a 
Dickinson, Pa. 
Kquality, S.C. 
Pleas. Kid., Ala. 
Sandusky C. O. 
Baltimore, Md. 
St. Peter. MIn. 
Delta, Tenn. 
Purdy. Tenn. 
Monong'a. C.Pa. 
Fairfield. Iowa. 
Clarksville. Ga. 
Oxford. Ohio. 
Hanover, N. H. 
Brockport, N. Y. 



Savannah, Ga. 
Miller's P., N.Y. 
Princeton, N.J. 
Bardolpb, HI. 
Cuthbert, Ga. 
8idnev. Iowa. 
Dry Creek, .Miaa. 
Onarga. 111. 
Doaksville, Ark. 
Vinton, Iowa. 
PhiUdelphia,Pa. 
Poke Run, Pa. 
Klngoes, N. J. 
Trentun, N.J. 



Charleston, S.G. 



Digitized by 



Googk 



THI FKESBTTXBIAN CHURCH, (O. 8.) 



8S 



PKSsBTTny. rosT-ovriCB. 



Klrkpatriek,J.M.,P. 
KirUftnd,O.U,P. 
KHtridca^O, w.o. 
Kline, A. L., P. 
Klink, N.B.P. 
Knight, M.Qn P.M. 
Kulghfeon, FriKl.,P. 
Knott, John W.,w.o. 
Knox, JamM, L. 
Knox,J.U.lL,P. 
Knox, John, w o. 
Knox, John P^ P. 
Kolb, Andrew, p. 
Kolh, Jacob, P. 
KoUockf&K^P. 
KontifWrn. ?.,■••. 
KoAt, J.K^ w.o 
Kreba, John M., P. 
Krider, B. 8^ P- 
Kudobe, Krnat, L. 

I/HOMBKAL, Tj V Jt. 
Laej, Beverly T. 
Lacy, Drary, pm. 

Ladd, Frands ]>, p. 
Lafar,D.X^T. 
Laflerty, R. H., P. 
Laird,V.H.L^t.t. 
Lamb, H.J^p. 
Lanuon. Sam'l., w.c. 
Lane, Cbaa. W., prf. 
Lane, C. K., P. 
Lane, Geo. W^ P. 
Lane, John J^ P. 
Lane, Saurlo, B^ P. 
Lanios, J. W^ P. 
lAnneaa, B.B., XDT. 
Lanneao, J.V., a. i. 
Lannlng, A. U., L. 
Lapsley, J.T^a •. 
lApeley, B.A^ w.o. 
Larkio, B. W., w c. 
Larrimore, J. W^ h. 
Latta, James, P. 
Latta, Wm. W., P. 
Law, S. a^ L. 
Lawrence, A. B., a. a. 
Lawrence, Sam'l ,■ a. 
LaweoD, Orr, L. 
Laverty, W. W., a a 
Laws, S. S., PHS. 
Layman, J. M.. d. m. 
Lea, Kiehard, P. 
Lea, T. D., a s. 
Leake, L-F., w.o. 
Leaman, John 
Leamn, Thos. a., p. 
Luavonswortb, C.. P. 
Leavitt, Bdw.II. r m. 
Leekey, A. U^ w. c. 
Lee, Charles, P. 
Lee, Cbaun. G., W c. 
Lee, Edmund, W c. 
Lee, Uenderscin. o M. 
Lee, Lewis il., P. 
Lee, WiUUm 8.. P. 
Lefevre, J. A, P 
Leffler, Black., w c. 
Legart, J. 8. K.. T. 
Legar6, T. U., T. 
Leggett, John H.. p. 
Leisveld, Jacob, dm. 
Leland, A. W., pkf. 
Leonard, Jos. T., p. 
Leonard. Lum'l., t. 
Leps, James U., p. 
Lester, Wra.H., p. 
Lowers, James, p. 
Lewis, DaTid J., 9.H. 
Lewis, H. R., a a. 
Lewis, James N., p. 
Lewis, Reuben, p. 
Leyburn. John, sot. 
Life, WiliUm, p. 
LiUie^ John, p. 



Orange. 

Paasale. 

Rochester 0. 

Tuacnmbia. 

Newton. 

LoulBTllla. 

Newton. 

Marion. 

K Alabama. 

PhiladeU.'2d. 

SteabenTiiie. 

Nassau. 

BoekRiTer. 

Cedar. 

West Jersey. 

Logansport. 

Ooiumbus. 

New York. 

Ooncord. 

Dubuque. 

New York. 

Montgomery. 

Oonoord. 

Ouachita. 

Philadelphia. 

Cliarieston. 

Concord. 

Potoai. 

Londonderry. 

Nassau. 

UopewelL 

Luseme. 

BttffiUo Clfy. 



PBSSBTTBBT. POST-OPVICB. 



Albany. 

CrawfordayiL 

Charleeton. 

Cherokee. 

Indian. 

Lalkyette. 

NashTiUe. 

Hock Rirer. 

Albany. 

Newcastle. 

Donegal. 

Dubuque. 

C. Mississippi. 

Httutingdon. 

Clarion. 

SteubenTille. 

Missiiuri. 

Maumee. 

Ohk>. 

C. Mississippi. 

CrawfbrdsTiL 

Donegal. 

Saltaburgh. 

Schuyler. 

Lodiana. 

Rock Rirer. 

Madison. 

Connecticut. 

Florida. 

W. Hanoyer. 

Troy. 

Charleston. 

Bdltimon*. 

Indianapolis. 

Charleston. 

Charleston. 

Hudson. 

Dane. 

Charleston. 

Lafayette 

Genesee Rirer. 

Greenbrier. 

Washington. 

Newton. 

CalifomU. 

Sangamon. 

Montgomery. 

Redstone. 

Philsdeipbla. 

North umb'd. 

North RiTer. 



DanriUe, Va. 
Springfield, N.J. 
West Greece, N.Y 
Tuseumbia, Ala. 
Fairmount, N.J. 
LonisTiile, Ky. 
Belridere, N.J. 
Shelby, Ohio. 
IiayneTllle,N.a 
Gennantown, Pa. 
Springfield, Ohio. 
Newtown, N. Y. 
Galena, Ul. 
Muscatine, Iowa. 
Greenwich, N. J. 
Logansport, Ind. 
Tarlton, Ohio. 
N.Yorkaty,H.Y 
Rowan Miils,N.C. 
r,Wi«. 



Bu*8.Ayres,8.A. 
Frankfbrt, Ky. 
Davidson OoLN.C 
Kl Dorado, Ark. 
PhiUdelphia, Pa. 
Charleaton, &.0, 
Charlotte, N. a 
Potosi, Mo. 
West Suffleld, C. 
New York City. 
Talmage,Ga. 
Tunkhannock,Fa 
Bethany, N.Y. 
WrightsTille, Pia. 
Galway, N.Y. 
Wareland, Ind. 
Charleston, S. a 
Marietta, Ga. 
Llsha'a Hill, N.Y. 
Pleasant UUl,Mo. 
Carthage, Tenn. 
Plaquemioe, La. 



Black Horse, Pa. 
Honey Brook,Pa. 
Northport. N. Y. 
Bovina, Miss. 
Mllroy, Pa. 



WellsTllle, Ohio. 
Fulton, Mo. 
Hicksville, Ohio. 
PitUburgh, Pa. 
UreenTille. Miss. 
Terre Haute, ind. 
Bastou, Pa. 
Leechburg, Pa. 
Macomb, 111. 



Lilley, John, f. m. 

Uily, R. H., w c Palestine. 

Undley, Daniel, fji. Concord. 

Lindsay, J. 0^ a. a. B. Carolina. 

Lindsley, A. L., P. Bedford. 

Undslev. J. B., w. c. Nashrilie. 

Linn, Alonao, It. Redstone. 

Linn, Jamea, P. Huntingdon. 

Littell, Luther, P. Hudson. 

Uttte) B. G., P. Londonderry. Middled ., Mass. 

Little. Jamea, w.o. CrawfordsriL Dartington,Ind. 

Lkvd,J.P. Marlon. 

Locke, N. C, P. Nassau. Hempstead.N.T. 

Locke, Wm. B^ T. Palmyra. Pigeon Ck., Mo. 

Loekrldge, A. Y., a ■.Cherokee. Summerrii., Ga. 

Lockwood, L. R.,w.c. Genesee Blvar. Cameron, N. T. 



Freeport, III. 
Dupont. Ind. 
New Haven. Con. 
Manattee, Fla. 
Lunenburg, Va. 
Waterford, N.Y. 
Bdisto Isld., 8. C. 
BalUmore, Md. 
Tipton, Ind. 
Orangeburg, S. C. 
Orangeburg, 8. C. 
MiddletowiuN.Y. 
Rockville, Wis. 
Columbia, 8. C. 
Harrisonville, Mo. 
Geneseo, N. Y. 
Parkersburg, Va. 
W.Alexander,Pa. 
Ashbury, N.J. 
San Francisco, C. 



Creek Natkm. Mekko, Ark. 

W. Urbana, IlL 
Port NaUl, S.A. 
Calhoun's M.S.0 
S.Salem, N.Y. 
Nashville,Tenn. 
Cannonsb'g.,Pa. 
Bellefonte, Pa. 
Mt Hope, N.Y. 



Loewenthal,I.,V.X. Lodiana. 
Logan, Robert ...... 

Logan, S. C, P. (^dnnatl. 

Long, Cheater, w. O. Long Island. 

Long, L. H., P. Sidney. 

Loomls, A. W., B. B. Rook River. 

Loomis, C. L. 

Lorance, Jas. H., P. 

Lord, Chas. 8. 

Lord, John C. P. 

Lord. Willis. P. 

Lord, J. 8., w. o. 

Louden, Clarke, P. 

Love, S. J., p. 

Love, Thomas, P. 



Pnshawarjndia. 



Cincinnati, 0. 
Farmingd'e,N.Y 
Urbana, Ohio. 
Millersburg, IlL 

MlssourL 

Tuseumbia. Oonrtlaud, Ala. 

Long Island. 

BufUoCity. Buffalo, N.Y. 

Nassau. Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Chicago. 

PhiUdelphla. PhQadeU., Pa. 

Lexington. Swope's D., Va. 

Newcastle. LoveviUe, Del. 
Loughead, S. D., s. a. Missouri. JefBBrson C.,Ma 
Loughridge, A. J.,8 s. Central Texas. AlU Sps., Tex. 
Loughridge,K.M..F.M Creek NaUon. Ck. Agency,Ark 
Lowe, Beig. I., w. o. Zanesville. GranviUe, Ohio. 
Lowes, J. A. I., T. ChilUcothe. South Salem, 0. 
Lowrie,John C, nc. New York. N. York,C., N.Y. 
Lowrie, John M., p. Fort Wayne. Fort Wayne, la. 
Lowtie, Reuben Luseme. Shanghae, Cha. 

Lowrie, 8am'l.T., L. Ohio. Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Lowry, Andw. M., P. Luseme. Port Carbon.Pa. 

Lloyd, J. P., P. Marion. Mt. Gilead,Ohlo. 



Lyle, J. K., P. 



Wytheville, Va. 
Fairmount, Va. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 
Mancy, Pa. 
Kingston, N.Y. 



Lyman, Henry, W.c Allwny. 
Lynch, Thos., a. a. Orange. 
Lynn, E. K. Schuyler. 

Lynn, Samuel, a. a. Sangamon. 
Lyou, D. W. Dubuque. 

Lyon, David. P Albany. 

Lyon, David I . D M. Winnebago. 
Lyon, Eph. K . P Schuyler. 
Lyou, iKuae L.. w o. Chicl^^. 
Lyon, James A . P. Tombeekbee. 
Lyon, John. w. c Cariiale. 
Lyon, William, aot. B. Hanover. 
Lyons, N. B., P. liadiaon. 

Lyons, W. L , a a. Dee Moines. 



W. Lexington. Lexington, Ky. 



Boston, Mass. 
Mason H., N. C. 



MA.GSON ILD, J.M.. P. 

Maegregor, J. M., s.s. 
Mack, Jolin. a. a. 
Mack, Tbumas, P. 
Mack, Hilllam. w.O. 
Mackey, E. D., P. 
Mackey, Jas.L.,F.H. 
Mackey, Wm. D., L. 
Macklio, Alex,P. 
Maclay, Charles B. 
Maclean, John, P. 
Maenair, John, p. 
Magee, Geo. A.. P. 
Magie, David, p. 
Magill, David. P. 
Magruder, T.P.,wc. 
Mahaflfoy, Sam'l., p. 
Mahon, James C, P. 
Mahon, Joseph, aot. 
MiUor, John W., T. 
Mallard, Robt.Q.. P. 
Maltbie, E. D., aot. 
Maltby, Henry, wc. 
Manderville, U., P. 
Mann, Jos. K., wo. 
Manning, R. 8.. P. 
March, Wm.G,P. 
I Markham,T.R.,p. 



N. Brunswick. 

Ogdensburgh. 

Kaskaskia. 

Hudson. 

Maury. 

Baltimore. 

New Castle. 

New Castle. 

Philadelphia. 

Allegheny C. 

N. Brunswick. 

Rariton. 

Nassau. 

Passaic. 

PhiladelpbU. 

Schuyler. 

St.ClairsTiUe. 

Peoria. 

N. Brunswick. 

Genesee River. 

Georfria. 

Mohawk. 

St. Paul. 

S. Alabama. 

New York 2d. 

N. Brunswick. 

New Lisbon. 

New Orleans. 



Nortbamp., N.Y 
Fox Lake, Wis. 
Aledo, III. 
Chicsgo, 111. 
ColumbuSjMlfls. 
Kirkwood. Mo. 
Richmond, Va. 
Hubbard, 0. 
Wlntersett, la. 

Princeton, N. J. 
Hammi)nd,N.Y. 
Salem, III. 
Damascus, Pa. 
Columbia, Tenn 
Snow Hill, Md. 
Corisflo, Africa. 



Phlladela., Pa. 



Princeton, N. J. 
Clinton, N.J. 
Wllmsb'g., N.Y 
Elisabeth, N. J. 
Phlladela., Pa. 
RuRbviUe, Ul. 
Washington, 0. 
Lexington, 111. 
Shippeo8b'g.,Pa 
Laurinb'g., N.O. 
WalthourvlLGa 
Syracuse^ N. Y, 
St. Paul, Min. 
Mobile, Ala. 
N. York C, N.Y. 
HamOton8..NJ 
Canfleld, Ohk>. 
NewOrlean^LB. 



Digitized by 



Googk 



84 



PRKSBYTERIAN HISTORICAL ALMANAC. 



FXX8BTTBBT. POtT-OFriCS. 



Mnrkltf, Jusiab.w.c. 
MarkM. Uich.T, >.b. 
MarquiH. John, P. 
Marquui, J.8.,8.8. 
Marquis, J. K , 8 8. 
Marquis, K. W. P. 
Marr, Juneph. w. o. 
Marp, P. B., 8. 8 
Marriiier, a Km P. 
MHmhall, A.B., P. 
HnrBball. Geo.* P. 
MamhitU, Qaorgo. P. 
Marshall, John, 8.8. 
Marshall, Jofi. 11. L. 
Marshall, S. V.,8 8. 
MHrshall, Wm . w c 
Marshall, W. K^ 8 8. 
MnrUn. .Alex., P. 
MartlsC.B. H., 83. 
Martin, C.i'.B.T. 
Martin, Kdw.. P. 
Mir. in, James 
Martin, James, P. 
.M.if(ia, Ji'hn 
Martin, John L.,8 8 
Blartin, John W.. p. 
Martin, J'>s., w. C. 
Marti u, 8. N., V M. 
Martin. Thos., w. 0. 
Martin. W. P., P. if. 
Martin, Wm. M., P. 
M <H 'n. Cyrus 
M.niiou, James D., p. 
MnNoii, Wm. C, 8 8. 
MaKturs, F. U., P 
Mnt^r, Joseph. P. 
Mathers. J. II.. 8 8. 
Ma then. A. A , 8 8. 
Hathex. A. U., 8 8. 
Matth-ws, J., W C. 
Matthews, J. D.. P. 
Matthews, J., PXr. 
Matthews, K.C^ P. 
Matthews, Wm.y 8.8. 
Matthews W. C, P. 
&iHlt<»on, Step., V M. 
Maxwell, A. B., DM. 
Mavnard. W., P. 
Mebane. W. N., P. 
Mei-hlin. 0. W., P. 
Meriks, J. A., 8.8. 
Meikle, Wm., 8 8. 
Melifk, P. W., P. 
Merrirk, Jas. L., P. 
Merrill, Frulilin. P. 
Merrill, Kicb., 8.8. 
Mershon, S. L., P. 
Merwin, M. T., W C. 
Metcalfe, A. D., wjc. 
Mickle, It. A.,w.c. 
Miller, Altx., PX8. 
Miller, Allen G., 8.8. 
Miller. A.W., p. 
Miller, Chas. A ,I>.H. 
Miller, Jacob B., 8 8. 
Miller, James B.,P. 
Miller, John B., P. 
Miller, John H.. p. 
Miller, J. V., W O. 
Miller, J. W., 8. 8. 
Miller, L. M., p. 
Miller, M. R., 8 8. 
Miller, O.H., 8.8. 
Miller. SamueL P. 
Miller. SamLJ. P. 
Miller. Willis J.., P. 
Milligan, JoRlah, P. 
Milli|can,Wm.V.,p. 
Mil iken, 8. J., P. 
Mills. Chas. R..VM. 
MilU. David, w.c. 
Milne, Charles. P. 
Milner. K. W., 8. 8. 
Mit4hen, A. D.. P. 
Mitchell. BenJ.. P. 
Mitchell, J. C P. 



Passaic. 

Fliut Kire.-. 

PeorU. 

Washington. 

Richland. 

Coshocton. 

Northumb'd. 

Northumb'd. 

Susqoehauna. 

Cedar. 

New Castle. 

Ohia 

Schuyler. 

Rock Hirer. 

C. Mississippi. 

New York id. 

i£aat. Texas. 

W. llanoTer. 

New Allwny. 

Flint Rirer. 

East ilauoTer. 

Arkansas. 

K.MlHtone. 

New Lisbon. 

Vincetines. 

New Lisbon. 

Arkansas. 

Niugpo. 

Redstone. 

Nlntqpo. 

Elizabethan. 

New York. 

Cedar. 

Ro<rk River. 

North River. 

Clarion. 

Bane. 

Potosi. 

Holiiton. 

Kaskaskla. 

W. Lexington. 

Transylvania. 

Schuyler. 

Florida. 

LouisTille. 

Troy. 

New Lisbon. 

Ciilumbas. 

Orange. 

Baltsburgfa. 

Findlay. 

S. Alabama. 

Newton. 

Conneetieat 

Troy. 

StonbenTllIe. 

Ling Island. 

N. Brunswielc. 

Bfemphis. 

CbarleBton. 

Marion. 

OhlcBgo. 

Kast ilanorer. 

Montgomery. 

Troy. 

Newton. 

New Lisbon. 

Chickasaw. 

AUeglieny. 

Brasos. 

Ogdensbnigh. 

Zanesville. 

Ohia 

Burlington. 

Chlllieotlie. 

Orange. 

Rock RiTer. 

ZanesTille. 

Florida. 

Buffalo City. 

Saltsburgli. 

Albany. 

UopeweU. 

Carlisle. 

8t. ClairsriUe. 



Chester, N.J. 
Wh.Sul.Sp.,Qa. 
GmnTille, lU. 
SistersvUle. Va. 
Shelby, Ohio. 
Keene, Ohio. 
MUton, Pa. 
liowisbnrg. Pa. 
Warrenham, Pa. 
Marion, Iowa. 
Fair liill, Md. 
Upper St.CIair,Pt 
IXKldsTille, m. 
Beota, III. 
Fort Gibson, Mis. 
Port Chester, N.Y 
Rusk, Texas. 
PittsyiTanla, Va. 
Corydon, Ind. 
eriffln, Oa. 
Nottoway, Va. 

Elisabeth,' Pa. 



Vinoennea, Ind. 
Doe Rnn, Pa. 
Searoy, Ark. 
Ningpo, Ohloa. 
Petersburg, Ind. 
Niugpo, China. 
Woodbridgcs NJ. 



Davenport, Iowa. 
Fulton City, III. 
Matteawan, N.Y. 
CurlsTiUe, Pa. 
RicfaUnd C Wis. 
Altonburg, Mo. 
Oraysburg, Ten. 
Steele's Ms , 111. 
Lexington, Ky. 
DauTille, Ky. 
Monmouth, III. 
Bainbrldge, Ga. 
ShelbyTllle, Ky. 
Ban kok, Slam. 
AllUnce, Ohio. 
Columbus, Ohio. 
Madison, N.C. 
Dayton, Pa. 
Findley, Ohio. 
Mobile, Ala. 
Mt. Bethel, N.J. 
8. Amherst,Mass. 
Stillwater, N. Y. 
Waynesburgh, 0. 
E.Hampton,N.Y. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 
Maeon, Tenn. 
Oriflln, Ga. 
Delaware, Ohio. 
White Rock, 111. 
Petersburg, Va. 
Christian8b'g.,Va 
Green Isl'd., N.Y. 
Btroudsburg, Pa. 
£.Weetvllle,Ohio. 
Pontotoc, Miss. 
North Hope, Pa. 
Gay Hill, Texas. 
Ogdensburg.N.T. 
Marietta, Ohio. 
Wapello, Iowa. 
Mt. Holly, N. J. 
Washington, O. 
PitUboro', N.C. 
Princeton, III. 
Cambridge, Ohio. 
Quincy, Fk. 
Shanghae, China. 

Broada'lbin, N. Y. 
Paoli, Ga. 
Harrisburg, Pa. 
Mt. Pleasant, O 
Greensboro', Ala. 



MAMB. 



PBBSBTTBBT. P081H>VPICS. 



Mitchell, J. C, D M. Oxford. Salem, OhIOL 

.Mitchell, J. D., w. c. Loseme. Scranton, Pa. 

MitcbeU, J. Y., P. Newton. PhiUipsbarpr. VJ 

Mitchell, John, p. Madison. Lexington, Ind. 

Mitchell, John, 8. 8 Albany. W. Galway^ N . T. 

Mitebell, R. A., P. i^aleettne. Charleston, IlL 
Mitchell. Stuart, s s. Winnebago. Newport, Wis. 

MiUhell,Wm.,AGT Albany. 

Mitchell, W.H.. p. Tuscnmbla. Florenee, Ala. 
Mitchell, W L.,w d Ufayetto. Burlington. Iowa. 
Moflat, Jas. C PBV. N. Brunswick. Princeton, N. J. 
MoflEat. John, P. St. ClairsTille. St. ClairsvUie, O. 

Indianapolis. Greenfield, Ind. 

Schuyler. Maeomb, 111. 

Brownrille. Kon. 

White Water. Liberty, Ind. 

~ ' Cincinnati, t)hlo. 

Waukwha, Wia. 



Monfort^ David, P. 

Monfort, Dt w. c. 

Monfort, ¥. P. 

Monfort, I. W., P. 

Monfort, J. G.,BDT. Cincinnati. 

Montelth, W J.,w c. Milwaukie. 



.Montgomery ,A.D.,p. S. Carolina. 
Montgomery, J., P. Clarion. 
Montgomery, J. 8 .P. Miiwiwippl. 
Montgomery, J., s s. Missouri. 
Montgomery, J.W p. Orange. 
Montgomery, S.. s s Louisiana. 
Montgomery, T..W c Cheruk»e. 
Mooney, A. .M., w c. Tombeekbee. 
Moore, Amb. Y., P. Lake. 
>loore, Isaac B., L. Schuyler. 
Moore, Jas. Q., W c. Passaic. 
Moore^ John, s s. W^asblngton, 
Moore, John , p. Huntingdon 
Moore, Joeepb P.. L Washington. 
Moore, J. U., s. 8. Peoria. 
Moore, J. R., L 
Moore, J. W., s. 8. 



Newbeny, 8. C. 
Clarion, Pa. 
Yaxoo City, Miss. 
Longwood, Mo. 
Lawsonvine,N .O. 
ainton, La. 
Wh.Sul.sJips.,Oa. 
Pontotoc. Mim. 
South B«*nd.Ind. 
Bushnell, 111. 
Philadelpbia.Maw 
Bull Creek, Va. 
Huntingdon. Willianisb'g., Pia. 



AUanta, lU. 

Redstone. Morgantown, Ra. 

Arkansas. Oakland G., AriE. 

Moore, Robert R.. L. Beaver. 

Moore, Thos. V., P Kast Hanover. Richmond. Va. 
Moor*, Wm. D., prf. Musissippl. Oakland Col.,aiS& 
Moore, W. H., 8 s White Water. Rising Sun, Ind. 
Moore, W. L., w. c. Luxeme. N. Brunswick, N .J 

Moore, Wm. P., L. Blairsvllle. 
Moore, W. 8., D M. Concord. Franklin, N. C. 

More, Gaylord L. s 8. New Orleans. New Orleans. La. 



Morgan, A. M., w c. Ouachita. 

Morgan, G., PRF. Harmony. 

Morgan, J. J. A., P. Philadela. 2d. Bridesbnrg, I*^ 

Morgan, N. R., w c. Tuscaloosa. Kutaw, Ala, 

Morgan, Wm. F., P. Saltoburgh. 

Morris, F.C., 8 8. Memphis. 

Morris, George, P. Carlisle. 

Morris, H. W.. p Albany. 

Morris, Robt. D., 8 8. Philadela. 2d. Newton, Pa 

Morrison, A. A., 8 8. Kaskaskla. Chester, HI. 

Morrison, A. G., P. New CasUe. OoatesvUle, 

.Morrison, H. McK. N.Mississippi. 

Morrison, Jas., PRS. Lexington. Belma, Ala. 

Morrison, J. R., D M. Concord. 

Morrison, J. H., P.M. Lodlana. 

Morrison, Robt,, s s. Louisville. 

Morrison, R. U., s 8. Concord. 

Morrison, W.N.,w c Concord. 



Washington Ark. 
Harmony C. S.C. 



Rural Valley, Vm, 
Osceola, Ark. 
Mechanlo«b*g.,PB 
Little Falls, N.T. 



Wadesboro'.N.a 
Rawal Pindl, N.I. 
Cedar Creek, Ky. 
Cottage H., N.d 
Asheville, N.a 
Morrison, W.W.. 8.8. East Alabama. N. Harmony, Ala. 



Morrow, R. Hm 
Morse, A. A., P. 
Morse, A. B., V. H. 



Cedar. Cedar Rap., low^ 

S. Carolina. Anderson, S. C 

N.Brunswick. Eaton, N.Y. 

Morse, Stephen, P. Londonderry. Thetfiird, Vt. 

Morton, F. R., 8. 8. Vinoennrs. Rockport, Ind. 

Morton, George, p. Saltoburgh. Ebeneser, I'a. 

Morton, H. T., L. Vincennes. Princeton. Ind. 

Morton, John B., P. Miami. Middletown, O. 

Morton, Robt 8., P. Washington. Hookstown, Pa. 

Mosely, Hillery. LnuisUna. 

Mowly, J. W., 8. 8. C. Mississippi. Monticello. La. 

Moiiher, W. C, 8. 8. Michigan. Pontlac, Mich. 

Mott, George S.. P. £lissb«tht*n. Rahway, N. J. 

Motzer, Daniel, o M. Baltimore. Middlebrook, Md. 

MuUan, H. C, L. New Albany. N.Phlladela., Ind. 

Mundy, Bxra F., P. Long IsUnd. Smitbt'n B.,N.Y. 

Munn, Chas. A.. 8 s. Logansport Frankfort, Ind. 

Munnis, U. M., V. M. Allahabad. Allahabad. N. I. 

I Munroe, U. A.. P. Fayettoville. Klisabetbt'n, N.C 

Munson, Asahel P. Potosi. Jackson, Mo 

Munson, John, P. All^heny. London, Pa. 

M unlock, D. A., s 8. Highland. Doniphan, Kan. 

Murkland.S.S.,wc. Ka«t Hanover. Hampden Sid., Va 

Murphy, Thomas, P. PhiladeU. 2d. Fraakford, Fa. 



Digitized by 



Googk 



THB PRESBTTEBIAN CHURCH, (O. B.) 



86 



HAMM. 



PXStBTTXKT. POtT-OVPICX. 



Marphy,W.J^wc. 
Murphey.T.O., p. 

Murray, Jos. A., P. 
Murray, Lem^ •. 8. 
• Murray, NIoh.. P. 
Mu!U?raTe,G.W..C.». 
Mnt«hmor0, S.A..«4. 
Myers, Jos. H., P. 
McAboy, L. R., P. 
McAtUm, Wm. T., P. 
McAftw, R.L, W.o. 
McAl«eM), D. M., P. 
McAUtttor, Heetor, p. 
McAlhit«r, K. S., 8 8. 
McAuIey.W.H.,8.8. 
McBride. J. B., 8 8. 
McBryde, D D., p. 
McBryde, T. L., P. 
Mci Vichrsn, R., W. C. 
MrCnin. Com , W. C. 
McCalU, William L. 
Mefallom, A., 8 8. 
MoCandiHh W^ s. 8. 
Mdliine, C, L. 
MiOarrell, A., P. 
HcCartee, R , P. 
McCttrter, DsTid, P. 
McCartney, J. Y. 
M-<!artnoy,W.D.,8.8. 
Mt^ifiMk'e, Jas., P. 
MH'Auley, Thos.p. 
MrOay. David. P. 
Mc('hord. J. M., 8. 8. 
M.'Clmn, 0. 0., P. 
>M1el.ii)d. A. 0.. P. 
M<€llnU>ck,John. p 
McOlunx, J. A., P. 
Mctnunjf, S. .M..P. 
Md:iuHkey,JW..8.8. 
McCluskey, John, P. 
MiOill. D. D., P. 
MK>>mb. D. S., 8 8. 
MeOonanghey, N., L. 
McConnell, Jon., s. s. 
Mc(V)nnell, WillUm 
MrOmneU, W. C^ p 
McConou)rhey,J.w.c 
M.-Oord, W.J, P. 
Molorkle. A.B.. 8. 8. 
McGormlck. Th>)s. 
MROormlek, W.J., p. 
MoOown, B. II., T. 
McCoy, Robert, s 8. 
MrCrao, John. 8 s. 
MrOrwdy. A., w. c. 
McOalloch, R.,D.M. 
MrCulloh. Sam'l^ L. 
M(H^ullou)(h, J., 8. 8 
MeCullouffh, Robert 
McOune, John W„ p. 
McCuoe. R. L., w.c. 
McCun(». 8. C. P. 
McDavitt, John J. 
McDermott. T., W. c. 
McDonald, Oeo.. L 
McDonnld, Hen , s 8 
McDotmM, J.. W C 
McDonald. J. W.,W C 
McDonald. Neill P. 
McDonald. S.H.,W o. 
McDougall, Jas., P. 
McDoufTtH, Jr.,J.. L 
McDowell, James, p. 
McDowolI, John, P. 
McKlhenny, John. p. 
McRlroy, F.B.,w.c. 
McKlroy, Joseph. P 
McKlroy, John !tf., p. 
McKlwain, Andw., p. 
McFarland, A., w. c. 
McFarland, D. F., P. 
MoFteland, F., p. 
McFarland, J., s. s. 
McFSrren, Saml., p, 
MeFeatten, M., l. 
M«Oaaghey, A^ p. 



UuntingduQ. 

New Castle. 

Csrlisle. 

West. District. 

Elisabetht'n. 

Philadelphia. 

Muhlenburg. 

Elisabetht'u. 

AUei^heny C. 

Buaver. 

Missouri. 

Hudson. 

fayetteTilla. 

New Orleans. 

8. Alabama. 

Iowa. 

FayetteTille. 

8 CaroUoa. 

Osriisto. 

PUtte. 

Tombeckbee. 

MisatssippL 

8chuyler. 

Lafkyette. 

Washington. 

New York. 

Marion. 

Saltsburgh. 

Coshocton. 

Philadelphia. 

Long Island. 

Clarion. 

Vinoennes. 

Huntingdon. 

Logansport 

Reidstone. 

Bbeneser. 

Saltsbnrgh. 

Logansport. 

PhiladHla.2d. 

Rochwt«tr C. 

Sioux aty. 

N. Brunswick. 

Schuyler. 

New Orleans. 

New Orleans. 

Chicago. 

Albany. 

B. Alabama. 

Ohio. 

Bethel. 

LouisTille. 

Memphis. 

Cinrinnatl. 

BuaTer. 

Stockton. 

Arkansas. 

Braxos. 

Miami. 

Brie. 

K. Altbwna. 

Iowa. 

LouisrUIe. 

Wooster. 

Washington. 

Mi4isKippL 

Palestine. 

Oene^ee River. 

FayetteTille 

Huntingdon. 

Nassau. 

Nassau. 

Harmony. 

Philadnlphia. 

Oreenhrier. 

Palmyra. 

New York 2d. 

Des Moines. 

S«ltKburgh. 

White River. 

Peoria. 

Lexington. 

LarayHtr^). 

Bltirs villa. 

W. liexin-^fton. 



Dover, Del. 
DUlsburg, Pa. 
Ripley, Tenn. 
Biisabeth, N.J. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 
Bowling Q., Ky. 
Plainfleld,N.J. 
Wexford, Pa. 
Meroer, Pa. 
Oolumbia, Mo. 
MontgDroery,N.T. 
Manchester, N.C. 
Thibodwaux, La. 
Uniontown, Ala. 
New London, la. 
Averysboro', N. C. 
Pendleton, S. C. 
NewvUl*s Pa. 
Iowa Point, Kan. 



U. Church, Miss. 
Funtenelle, N. L. 
Oregon, Mo. 
Claysville, Pa. 
New York City. 
Delaware, Ohio. 



HolmesTille. 0. 
PfaiUdelphia, Pa. 
Huntingdon.N.Y 
Callennburgb^Pa. 
Bruceville, Ind. 
Huntington, Pa. 
Peru, Ind. 
Ckrmichaels, Pa. 
Maysvllle, Ky. 
New Texas. Pa. 
Otmden, Ind. 
Smyrna. Del. 
8oottsvIlle,N.T. 
Algona, Iowa. 



N. MaysviUa, HI. 

Honma, La. 
Une, 111. 
Tribes Hill, N. Y. 
Talledega, Ala. 



YonguesviUe.S.C 
Williamson, Ky. 
Maoon, Tenn. 
Rending. Ohio. 
N.Wilmingtou,P. 
Chinese Camp. C. 
Jacksonport, A. 



Wheeling, Ind. 
Mercer, Pa. 
Goshen Brid.. Va. 
Fairfield, Iowa. 

»alIfordV6hla 
Harrlsville, Va. 
Fayette, Miss. 
Charleston, 111. 
Baton, N. Y. 
Fayotterllle, N.C. 
BellvUle, Pa. 
Freeport, N Y. 

SnmterV's.O. 
Philadelphia. Pa. 
Lewisburg, Va. 
Hannibal, Mo. 
Nmw York City. 
Ottumwa, Iowa. 
Indiana, Pa. 
PalesUne, IIL 
Blmwood. III. 
Mint Spring, Va. 
Orennfleld, Mo. 
Harvey's 6 Pt«.,P. 
Danville, Ky. 
Tinker Run, Pa. 



McOee, W. C, P. 
.MeUlll, A. T., fBF. 
McGUvery. D, P. M. 
McQlashen, A , sxc. 
McOookin, Wm., T. 
McGregor, E. R 
McGregor, J.W..W c. 
McQufley,W.H.par 
McGuli^an, R., 8 8. 
Mrllhinny, Sauil.. L. 
Mcllvaine, J.H..P. 
Mellvalne, W. B., P. 
Mcllwalne, Rich.. L. 
Mdnnis, Rich., XDT 
MoIatoeh,J. R.,w.c. 
Mclntyre, Thos. L 
Melver, J. L., Miss 
McJlmpMey,W..w.c. 
McKaig, 0. v., p. 
McKay, Neill. P. 
MoKean, Jas., w o. 
McKeaa, John, P. 
McKee, Chas. B.. P. 
MoKee, D. D., w c. 
McKee, James A., P. 
McKee. J. L., 8.8 
McKee, Jas. M., p. 
Mi'Kee, Jos. B.,8.8. 
McKee. Wm. B., D.M. 
McKennan.J.W.. p. 
McKinley, Geo., p 
McKinl«y,W.D.. s.s. 
Mc Kinney, C, P. 
McKlnney, D., sdt. 
McKlnney, B., t. 
McKlnney, B., T. 
McKlnney. B, w.c. 
McKlnney, LN. P. 
McKlnney, J., w.c. 
McKlnney, Samuel 
McKittrick, J.. 8 8. 
McKnIght, William 
McLaiu, C.G., w c. 
McLain, John, w. c. 
McLaren, Donald. P. 
McLaren, J. F.. s s. 
McLean, D. V., w c. 
McLean, Hector, P. 
McLean, James. L. 
McLees, John, P 
McLees, Robert, P. 
McMartin, P. A., p. 
MeMaster, A. S.. p 
McMaster, K.D.PRF. 
McMast«rs.R.McK,L 
McUichael, Wm., p. 
McVIillan, And , 8.8. 
McMillan, A. J., s. s. 
McMillan, J. P.. L. 
McMillan. Robt., P. 
McMillen, G. W., p. 
McMuUen, J. P., p. 
McMullen, R. B., P. 
McMulIen, S. H., P. 
McMurray, F., P. 
McMurrar, Jos., s 8. 
MeNalr. Danie', P. 
McNaIr, Bvander 
McNalr, John Calvin 
McNair, i^nlomon. p, 
McNalr, W. W. 8. 8. 
McNeelv, L.. W. C. 
McNeill. AC. P. 
McNellL D.. PSs 
McNeill, Geo.. XDT. 
McNeill, Hector. P. 
.McNeill, J. H., w c 
McNulty, John. 8 s 
MrNutt, S. H., w c. 
McPhall,G.W., p. 
McPheeters. S B. P. 
Mcl»heeters. W.C . P. 
MePberson,J.K..D M. 
Mcpherson, J. P..S.8. 
McPherson, R.. p. 
Modoeen, D., P. 



PftltSBTTSBT. POST-OFPICB. 

Newton. Jobnsonb'g., N J. 

N.firunswisk. Friiuvu>n. N.J. 

Orange. Baukok, 81am. 

8. AUbama. Mobile, Abi. 

Sidney. Springfield, Ohla 

New Lisbon. 

Richland. Mansfield, Ohio. 

W. Hanover. University of Va. 

Iowa. Middletown, la. 
Bllsabeth'n. 

Rochester C. Rochester, N.T. 

Ohio. Wilklns, Pa. 

B. Hanover. Petersburg, Va. 

New Orleans. New Orleans, La. 

E. Alabama. Bufltia, Ala. 

Munrie. Indlanapolis.Ind. 

Fayettevllle. BulBUo, N. C. 

New York 2d. New Ywk aty. 

Ohio. Candor, Pa. 

Fayettevllle. BummervllTe,N.C. 

Dubuque. Scotch Grove, la. 

Clarion. Hamilton. Pa. 

Winchester. Lewinsvllle, Va. 

Cedar. Marion. Iowa. 

Indianapolis. Franklin. Ind. 

Transylvania. Columbia, Ky. 

E. AUbama. Orion, Ala. 

Redstone. West Newton,Pa. 

Allegheny 0. Bayfield, Wis. 

Washington. Frankfurt 8p4*.. P. 

Sangamon. Mlddletown.UI. 

Genesee River. Tuscarora^ N. Y. 

West. District Jackson, Tenn. 

Ohio. Pittsbmvh, Pa. 

Chilllootbe. Hillsbortiu^h. 0. 

White Watsr. I>anUpKville,Iad. 
CarUsla. 

Ohio. layette. Pa. 

Chicago. Oswego, lU. 

Louisiana. 

Flint River. Oak Hill, Ga. 

West. District 

Indianapolis. Ind]anapoiia,I]id. 

Miami. Tiflln, Ohio. 

N. Brunswick. Englishtown,NJ. 

Allegheny C. Alle»;heny C., Pa. 

PhUad«la.2d ^Baston, Pa. 

FsyettevUla. Melrose, N . G. 

Marlon. U. Sandusky, 0. 

8. Carolina. Greenwood, 8.0. 

8. Carolina. Newborry, S. C, 

Orange. HlUiboro', N. 0, 

New Lisbon. Poland, Ohio. 

New Albany. Albany, Ind. 

Le.\lngton. Cedar Grove, Va. 

Clarion. Agnew's Ms., Pa. 

B. Alabama. Perote, Ala. 

Hock ing. Burl ington, Ohio. 

Transylvania. Edninnton, Ky. 

Saltsburgh. Apollo. I'a. 

Albany. Princet^mn, N. Y. 

Tuscaloosa. PleaMut R.. Ala. 

Knoxville. Knoxville, TeiiA. 

North River. Newburgh, N . Y . 

B. Alabama. Union Sps., Ala. 

Philadela.2<L NewportvillH, Pa. 

Bras'is. Galveston, Tex. 

Itraaos. 

Fayettevllle. 

Newton. WaHhin:^on, N.J, 

Chippewa. lEau CJalre, Wis. 

Memphis. Bndora. Tenn. 

S. Alabama. Richmond, Ala. 

Florida. Tallahassee, Fla. 

Fayettevllle. Fayettevllle. N.C. 

Fayetteville. Montpeller, N.C, 

Klizabetht'n. Elizabeth, N.J. 

Winnebago. Dekora, Wii. 

CrawfttrdsvlUe. Rockvlllo, Ind. 

PhiladHla.2d. Easton, Pa, 

.St. Louis. St Louis. Ho» 

W. Lexington. Keene, Ky. 

Cnnoord. ¥. Ilembree, N. C. 

Fayettevllle. Springfield, N. C. 

Ohio. Rich Valley, Pa. 

Harmony. Sompter, a. C. 



Digitized by 



Googk 



86 



PRESBTTBRIAK HISTORIOAL ALMANAC. 



nxuM, 



PRB8BTTSBT. PO>T-0t7ICS. 



MoQuiM.1, (i^ r M. 
Mev^uji.i, Janna* p. 
McQu:Ma, M., 8 >. 
McKaa, rhiid., P. 
MoRej, J. M^ ft •. 
MoKotf, W. F^ 8. 8. 
MoKoberta,S.S.,8 8. 
MeWiUUm, Jaa., t. 
MeWhortar, W.,o.m. 

Null, Fred. K , P. 
Nu«i,G.W.,T. 

Iif8flaf,AK^ p. 
NiftodiTt Juha, P. 

NdlUTtNi B. w.c. 

NvHi Wm^ W c. 

Nelw}CU A. 1^., P^ 

Nn#blt, Wtti., w 0. 
NbmbUV J»(^pli. P- 
Na^bHU!!. r. J.,w.o. 

Nufla, a K., w 0. 

NuTlm. J.H, p. 
NdfViiii, J. L f t K. 
If«V9lU Off). H-. £•■ 
N«wd3.a.W.» 8. 
N4IW0II. Uuvy. d 8. 

K^^WttlL* [!iAUiUl.4. P. 

NowftlL T. U* P. 
NawhfllU Kbfti , P. 

Ni«tocL» lleary. P. 
New&oa, JobD, w.tL 
N«»to!i* T. U.. P 
Nitl, PnUr, U. H. 
Nkbolt»CrriiA,«8. 
NtaMir S^ma». t. 
Nlmma, J« , a i. 
NIxcQi, 0«onf«» If. 

Norths N.O^T. 
Northnlp^J.H..\rc 
NnUilLHphRlfit,P£8. 
Notir»* J* t*, w c. 
J^friy.t^ VarnriDi, 4 8. 

OAKXS, I8U0, W. 0. 
0§k»f, Peter D^ P 
Oftkley, G. H.. 8.8. 
Ogden, Eph., P. 
Ogdao, J. W.. D. x. 
OgdMi, J08. M., p. 
Ogden, T.A.,D.X. 
Ogdan, TI108., V. x. 
Olnutead, J.M.,w o, 
Olmstaad, L.O.,w c. 
Orbiaon, J.H^V.X. 
Ordwaj, Moees 
Orr, Frmnklln, P. 
Orr, Samuel, L. 
Osborn, Robert, 8. 8 
Osborne, Michael, P. 
Osokond, Joa., 8. 8. 
Onnond, S. M., 8 8. 
Ostrom, V.C, w c. 
Otleraon. Ja8.,D M. 
Orentreet, R. M.,8 8. 
Oriatt, T. H., P. 
Owen, Orifflth. p. 
Owen, Joeeph. V. X. 
Owen, Roger, P. 
Owen, Thoa., w o. 
Owen, Tbo8. R.,w.o, 



Albany. 

i^ayetteTille. 

FayetttfTiUe. 

Louisiana. 

Lake. 

S. Alabama. 

TnuujlTanla. 

Susquehanna. 

S. Oarolina. 



S. 

Fayetteville. 

N. Brunswick. 

Genesee Rifer. 

Lodiana. 

ChilUoothe. 

W. HanoTar. 

Nassau. 

Chickasaw. 

Michigan. 

Cherokee. 

Philadtfia. 2d. 

Mississippi 

CariiAld. 

Huntingdon, 

Chicago. 

Bearer. 

Pliiladelphia. 

Cincinnati. 

Philadelphia. 

Allegheny C. 

W. lioxington. 

Schuyler. 

Nin^cpo. 

Washington. 

Northnmb'd. 

Iowa. 

Palestine. 

Peoria. 

Londonderry. 

Troy. 

HopeweH. 

l>odlana. 

St. Louis. 

Fort Wayne. 

Dane. 

Genesee RiTer. 

Long Island. 

New York. 

Troy. 

Potosi. 

New Orleans. 

West. Jersey. 

Albany. 

Baltimore. 

Wooster. 

Allahabad. 

Geneaee Rirer. 

Nassau. 

Long Island. 

Allegheny. 

NaahTille. 

Passaic 

Misiiissippi. 

N. Brunswick. 

PhUadelphia. 

iirie. 

Lodiana. 

Chicago. 

Saltsburgh. 

Cherokee. 

Greenbrier. 

W. Hanover. 

Luserne. 

RariUn. 

New Orleans. 

New CasUe. 

Central Texas. 

Iowa. 

Baltimore. 

AlUhabad. 

Phlladela.2d. 

Long Island. 

Orange. 



Corisoo, Africa. 
FayetteTUle,N.C. 
Bostlck's Hs.,N.C 
Jackson, La. 
RoIUng Pra.,Ind. 
MobUe, AU. 
Stanford, Kj 
Towanda, Pa. 
Pickens, S. a 

Mobile, Ala. 
GUopolis, N. 0. 
LawrenoeTil.,NJ 
Warsaw, N. T. 
Jalandhar, N. I. 
Greenfield, Ohio. 
Middleton. Mixs. 
WillUmsb'g.,N.T 
Oxford, .Miss. 
Detroit, Mich. 
Newburgh,N.Y. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 
Gallatin, Miss. 
Chambersb'g, Pa. 

Chicago,"ill. 
New Bedford, Pa. 
Norristown, Pa. 
Cincinnati, Ohio. 
Philadelphia. Pa. 
SewlckvUle, Pa. 
Lexington, Ky. 
N.Iiender8on,Ill. 
Ningpo, China. 
McKenney's, Va. 
Blue Ball, Pa. 
Sharon, Iowa. 
Paris, III. 
WaynesTllIe, 111. 
Thornton F.,N.H 
Cambridge, N. T. 
Jeflerson, Oa. 
Sabathu, N. I. 
St Louis, Mo. 
Vera Crus, Ind. 
Racine, Wis. 
Rochester, N. T. 
Isllp, N. Y. 
Princeton, N.J. 
Cambridge, N.Y. 
Cape Island, N.J. 
Cliariestown, Va. 
MiliTille,N.J. 
Schenectady,N.Y 
Annapolis, Md. 
Guilford, Ohio. 
Futtehpore, Ind. 

Nunda, N. Y. 
Jamaica, N. Y. 
Farmingdale,N.Y 
Glade Hills, Pa. 
Nashville, Tenn. 
Chatham, N. J. 
Nnteh0S,MiM. 
Corisoo, Africa. 
PhiUdelphia, Pa. 
New York, N. Y. 
AmbaU, N. Ind. 

Kent, Pal* 

Point piMst.,ya. 
Farmviile, Va. 
Kckley, Pa. 
Perry, 111. 

H.CUy Fae.,D«L 
Georgetown,Tez. 
Burlington, la. 
Baltimore, Md. 
Allahabad, N. I. 
Chestnut Hill, P. 
MorWshes, N. Y. 
Tarboro'fN.a 



PBMBTTmT. POST-OVtICS. 



Faiox, JameB A., P. 
Paine, James, P 
Paine, Henry U^ r. 
Painter, ILM, P. 
Painter, Joseph, P. 
Paisley, Sam L, 8 8. 
Palmer, B. M., p. 
Palmer, K. P., P. 
Palmer, Kdw., P. 
Palmer, N. S., 8. 8. 
Park, Chas. H.. L. 
Park, James, PES. 
Park, Oscar, P. 
Parke, N. G., P. 
Parke, Samuel, w c. 
Parker, A. H., w. c. 
Parkinson, M. A., P. 
Parks, G. D., P. 
Parmelee, J.IL. col. 
Parsons, L H., L. 
Parsons, H. M., T. 
Parsons, W. S. 
Patterson, A 0., P. 
Patterson, I. M., L. 
Patterson, J. C^PKs. 
Patterson, M. A., P 
Patterson, M.B.,w c 
Patterson, Sam'l.. P. 
Patterson, Wnu, P. 
Patton, F., 8. 8. 
Patton, H. H., w.o. 
Patton, J. H., L. 
Paul, Samuel, w. c. 
Paull. Alfred. P. 
Pawling, W.H ,w.c 
Paxton, J. D., s. s. 
Paxton, J. T., s. s. 
Paxton, J. W. 
Paxton, T. N., O X. 
Paxton, W. M., p. 
Peacock, W. N., W.c. 
Peairs, H. R., x.. 
Peck, Ellas S., w. c. 
Peck, Simeon, s s. 
Peck. Thos. K., p. 
Peden, A. G., s s. 
Peden, M., 8. s. 
Pelan. James, w. C. 
PeUn, Wm., P. 
Pel ton, Sam'U w.c. 
Penlck, D. A., p. 
Peiiick, jr., D. A., P. 
Penlck, P. T., P. 
Penland, A., o x. 
Penney, Jos , w. c. 
Pentxer, Ji^b, T . 
Peregriue, J.. W. C. 
Perkins, C. II., P. 
Perkins, G. K., s s. 
Perkins, Henry. P. 
Perry, David I., w.c. 
Perry, G. B., W. c. 
Perry, T. C, 8 8. 
Peters, B. F.. 8. 8. 
Petrie,G.H.W., p. 
Petrie, James, p. 
Pettigrew, S.,w.o. 
Pharr. H. N.,P. 
Pharr,S.C..P. 
Pharr, W. W , P. 
Pharr, W. W., P. 
Pharr, W. W., P. 
Pbelpa, Joshua, P. 
Phillips, And., 8.8. 
Phillips, B.T., p. 
PhilUps, Bradley 
Phillips, Chas., PSV. 
PhiUips,Jam«s,8.8. 
Phillips, John, D. X. 
Phillips, N.O., p. 
PhilUps, Wm. W, P. 
Phraner, Wilson. P. 
Pickard, J.H., w.c. 
PickenSjA. M^]|.x. 
Pickens, J. A., L. 



St. Louis. 

Memphis. 

N. MisMlssippL 

Missouri. 

Saltsburgh. 

Fayettevllie. 

New Orleans. 

Cherokee. 

Charleston. 

Palestine. 

Northumb'd. 

Holston. 

MilwaukiA. 

Luserne. 

DonegaL 

Philadelphia. 

SteubenvUle. 

Concord. 

Zaoesvilla. 

K.AUbama. 

Luserne. 

Luzerne. 

Hedstone. 

N. Brunswick. 

FUnt River. 

K. Alabama. 

Northumb'd. 

SteubenvUle. 

Bedford. 

Potosi. 

Vincennes. 

New York. 

Baltimore. 

Washington. 

La&yette. 

Vincennes. 

Lafiiyotte. 

Carlisle. 

Concord. 

Ohio. 

Florida. 

Allegheny 0. 

Winnebsgo. 

FIndUy. 

Baltimore. 

Flint Kiver. 

Tombeckbee. 

Marion. 

White Water. 

Hudson. 

Concord. 

Concord. 

Concord. 

TuscumUa. 

New York. 

MUmi. 

Madison. 

Marion. 

Paducah. 

Burlington. 

PeorU. 

Londonderry. 

New York. 

Red River. 

B. Alabama. 

New York 2d. 

St Lonis. 

B. Alabama. 

Concord. 

Conoord. 

Concord. 

Concord. 

Dubuque. 

Ogdensburg. 

North River. 

Chippewa. 

Orange. 

Orange. 

Winchester. 

8. Alabama. 

New York. 

New York 2d. 

Orangn. 

West. District 

West DUtriet 



St Louis, Mo. 
Somerfille,Ten. 
Holly Sps., Mis. 
Boonville, Bio. 
Kittanning,Pa. 
Carbonton, N.O. 
N. Orleans, La. 
MarietU, Ga. 
Coosabatchie,80 
Grandview, lU. 
DanvlUe, Pa. 
Rogersville, T. 
Waukesha, Wis. 
PitUton, Pa. 
SUte HUi, Pa. 
Nether Prov., P. 
Island Creek. 0. 
White llall, N.O. 
Duncan's F., O. 
Uayneville, N.a 
CimonSps.,N.Y. 



West Newton, P. 



Griffin, Ga. 
Louisville, Ala. 
White Deer, Pa. 
Deersvilte, 0. 
Poundridge,N.Y 
Girardeau, Mo. 
Princeton, Ind. 
New York City. 



Wheeling, Va. 
DanviUe, Ky. 
Princeton, Ind. 
Arrow Rock,Mo. 

Marlon,' N.C. 
Pittsburgh. Pa. 
Madison, Fla. 
Allegheny C, P. 
Waupun, Wis. 



Baltimore, Md. 
Erin, Ga. 
Prospect Miss. 
Tiffin aty. 0. 
ConnersvUie, L 



Pioneer M8.,N.O 
Oak Uwn, N. 0. 
Concord, N. 0. 
Whitesburg, A. 
Nyack, N. Y. 
Miamisburg, 0. 
Paris, Ind. 
Milfbrd Cen., 0. 
Kddyville, Ky. 
Allentown, N.J. 
Bloomington.Ill 
Groveiand, Mas. 

Reachi^La. 
Montgomery, A. 
Jersey City, N J. 
St Louis, Mo. 
Chambers, Ala. 
Hopewell, N.C. 
Statesvllle. N C. 
Park's Store. N.O 
Coddle Ck.. N.C. 
Dubuque, Iowa. 
Morri8town,N .Y 
Rondout N.Y. 
Chippewa F., W. 
Chapel liill.N.C. 
Chapol Hill,N.C. 
Grants ville, Md. 
Alrmount, Ala. 
New York City. 
Sing Sing. .N. Y. 
Locust 11 111.. N.C. 
Centr« Pt., Ten. 
Denmark, Teuu. 



Digitized by 



Googk 



THB PRBSBTTSBIAN OHDRCH, (O. 8.) 



87 



■Am. 



PKItBTTSST. FOST-OmOX. 



PmXtKTTXXT. FosT-ovncs. 



Pletoa,ThoB^w.c. Bedford. 
Ptoroe, J. J., 8 •. Mahlenburg. 
Pleniom D. H., W.O. PSMalc 
Plerson, Philip. P. Haroumj. 
pigeoOfO. D., W.O. Londonderry. 
Pik<>. John, P. Londondony. 

Pillsbary, I., P. Sehnyler. 
Pinkerton, John, P. Lexington. 
Pinkarton, J. A , P. 8«ngunon. 
Piiik»rton, Wm.. P. Lexlnirton. 
Pliin«.y, J. B., •■C. New York. 
Pitkin, John, • t. Richhuid. 
Pitman, B. H., w. o. Albanj. 
Pitwr, A. W, Highland. 

Piatt, J.ime0 M., P. ZanesTllleb 
Piatt, Joseph, w. o. Paleetino. 
Plainer, W. S. PSV. Allegheny a 
PluQilj, G. S.. P. Bliaabetht'n. 
Pliimstorid. J.B.,wxy Winnebaga 
Poa^e, J. B., 8 8. Palmyra. 
Pomroy, J. S., P. Waahlngton. 
Porter, Abner A., P. 8. Alabama 
Por»er, David H., P. Georgia. 
PortAT, Kdw. B.. 8. 8. Memphis. 
Porter. Georjre D., p. Cedar. 
Porter, Jolin W.,WX>. Clarion. 
Porter, J. D., 8. 8. 8. Alabama. 
Porter, J. W., L. Lnaeme. 
Porter, R. K., P. HopewelL 
Porter, Sam'l. V.,8 8. Raritan. 
Purterfleld. W., 8.8. Chicago. 
Post, Keuben, P. Charleston. 
Potter. James H., P. Dubuque. 
Potter, L.D., PSF. Cincinnati, 
Fott«r, S. Sm PBF. 
Potts, Oeor,^, P. 
Powell. Walter, P. 
Power, F. H., L. 
Powers. Uriaa, 8 8. 
Pratt. P. A., D M. 
Pratt IL B., F. X. 
Pratt, J. H., P. 
Pratt, J. W., PKF. 
Pratt. N. A., P. 
Preston, C J. 
Price, II. ii., P. 
Price, Israel, P 
Price, Robert, P. 

Price, SamH. J.. AAT. W. HanoTer. 
Price. Wm. T., 8. 8. Lexington. 
Priest. Jas. M., F X. W. Africa. 
Prime, iG.D.a.,BiyT. Nassau. 
Prime, Sam'l. I., m, Nassau. 
Prints. George, w. o. Lnserne. 
Proctor. D. C, W O. Louisville. 
Proctor, John 0., P. Winchester. 
Proctor. Robert, L. Roeiiester G. 
Proudflt, Alex^ w o. Troy. 
Pry or, Theodotic P. K. ilanoTor. 
Pryse, John, 8. s. Sioux City. 
Pn^h, John W., P. Winchester. 
Piirviance. a.D.W o Baltimore. 
Punrianee, J., PXS. UlsslssippL 

QiriLLiN, Exek.. s 8. Washington. 
Quiuan, T. H., w. o. Baltimors. 



Cindonatl. 

N.York. 

Donegal. 

Redstone. 

llontgomary. 

St Paul. 

Cherokee. 

Hooking. 

Tuscaloosa. 

Cherokee. 

Albany. 

Sidney. 

SteubenTllle. 

Mississippi. 



RaffenspergeriB.B .P 
Ralston, Jas. G., T. 
Ramsay, Jas. B., P. 
Ramsay, J. R., F. X 
Rankin. Alex.,T.,8 8. 
Rankin. iSdw. B.. P. 
Rankin. H. V., F IC. 
Rankin, Jesse, staw. 
Rankin, John C. P. 
Rankin, W. A.,w. c. 
Ray, Charles, p. 
Raymond, H. K^ p. 
Raymond, Hoses, p. 
Reiid. H. C, 8. 8. 
Reardnn, J. D , P. 
Reasoner, J. S.. W 0. 
Reed. Alexander, P. 
Reed. A. .M.. L. 
Bsed, David B., WO. 



Hoboken, N.J. 
Henderson, Ky. 
Elisabeth, N.J. 
New Zion, S.C. 
Aubumd*e,Mas. 
Rowley, Mass. 
Macomb, IlL 
Mt Solon, Va. 
Petersburg, HI. 
OoUler8town,Va. 
New York Clij, 
Mllfordtoo,0. 
Albany, N. Y. 
LesTenworth, K. 
ZaneSTille,Ohia 
Varmington, 111. 
AlteghnnyCPa. 
Metarhh>,N.J. 
Portage C, Wis. 
Ashler, Mo. 
VairTlew, Va. 
Selma, Ala. 
Sarannah, Oa. 
Memphis, Tenn. 
Tipton, Iowa. 

8tockton,"Ala. 
Baston. Pa. 
BarseUa,0«. 
Malta, 111. 
Morris, lU. 
Charleston, S. 0. 
Maqnoketa, la. 
Olendale, Ohio. 
Gleodale, Ohia 
New York City. 
Lancaster, Pa. 

Big UeiCVa. 
LakeriUtt, Mln. 
Bogota, S. A. 
Athens, Ohia 
Tuscaloosa, Ala. 
BoswaU,Oa. 
Canton, China. 
Urbana, Ohio. 
Annapolis, 0. 
Rodney, Miss. 
Hampden 8.,Va. 
Bath, Va, 
GreeuTille, Lib. 
N.YorkC.,N,Y. 
N.York C,N.Y. 
Reading, Pa. 
Frankfort Ky. 
Gerardstown,Va. 
Prineetown.N.Y. 
Saratoga 8., N.Y 
Petersburg, Va. 
Kldora, Iowa. 
Warrenton, Ta. 
BalUmore, Md. 
Oakland C, Mis. 

Wellsburg, Ta. 
Baltimore^ Md. 



Sidney. 

NewOsstls. 

Lexington. 

Creek Nation. 

BuflhIoOity. 

New York. 

Ningpo. 

Concord. 

Bliaabethtown. 

Donegal. 

Rochester C. 

S. Alabama. 

Winchester. 

TransylTanla. 

Northumb'd. 

Oregon. 

New Osstle. 

SteubenTille. 



Bellslbntalna, 0. 
Norrlstown, Pa. 
Kerr's Creek, Va. 
Mieeo, Ark. 
Black Rook.N.Y. 
New York City. 
Ningpo^ China. 
Lenoir, N. C. 
Baakinrldge,NJ 



S N.Y. 
Marion, Ala. 
Springfield, Va. 
Glasgow, Ky. 
Sunbury. Pa. 
St Helens. Orog. 
Parkesbnrg, Pa. 

8. HanoTor, Lid. 



Reed, David C, p. Bearer. Worth, Pa. 

Reed, Geoqse J., t. Louisville. 8helbyrille,Ky. 

Reed, Hugh Hocking. 

Reed, Isaac Columbus. 

Reed, t>amuel. w. c St ClairsrlUe. BeaUsvUle, 0. 

Reed. V. D., PXS. Troy. Dubuque. Iowa. 

Reed, William, P. New Lisbon. Cslcutta, Ohio. 

Reed, William, F. Zanesville. Malta, Ohio. 

Reese, R. S., x.. La&yette. Pleasant H.,Mo. 

Reeve, Wm. B., 8. 8. Long Island. Quogue, N.Y. 



Reeves, Henry, P. Newton. 

Reeves, RobtH.,P. Newton. 

Reid, Alex., F. x. Indian. 

Reid, John W.,8.8. Hopewell. 



S. Carolina. 
N. Mississippi. 
Harmony. 
Newton 



Reid, R. H., P. 

Reid, S., 8. 8. 

Reid, W. M., P. 

Reily, John A., P. 

Reinhart B. H., P. 

Remington, Jas., P. 

Renskers, John. D K. Dane. 

Revels, U. R., w o. St Louis 

Reynolds, A. J., P. 

Reynolds, J. V., P. 

Rice, George S., x.. 

Rice, James M., P. 

Rice, John, P. 

Riee, John H., P. 

Rice, N. L. 

Rice, S.D.,8.8. 

Rice, W. H., 8. 8. 



Cincinnati. 

Brie. 

New Lisbon. 

Montgomery. 

SalUburgh. 

LonUvllW. 

St. Louis. 

W. Hanover. 

East. Texss. 



Rice, WUlard, M.,L. Phlhulelphia. 
Bice, Wm. G., 8. s. Muhienburg. 
Richards, J. G., P. - ■ • 



B«rlvidere,N.J. 

Hope, N. J. 

DoakesviUe, A. 

Philomath, Ga. 

Spartanb'g.,S.C. 

HoUy Sps., Mis. 

Mayesvi]le,S.C. 

Blairstown, N J. 
Elisabethtown. BlixabethptN J 
Buflkio City. Alden, N. Y. 

Wawkon, Iowa. 

Baltimore. Md. 

Pleasant Run,0. 

Meadville, Pa. . 

Poland, Ohio. 

Dagger's Sp.,Va. 

Penn Kun, Pa. 

Louisville. Ky. 

Chitago, 111. 

Mount ZiocVa. 

Palestine, Tox. 

Philadelphia. 
_ 8. Union, Ky. 

. _ . Bethel. Ebeneser, 8.0. 

Richardson, R.. w c. Rochester City Marengo, 111. 
Richardson, W.T., P. Lexington. Waynesbo', Va. 
Riddle, J. P., 8. 8. Paducah. Smithland, Ky. 

Riddle. Wm., D. X. Mississippi P. Gibson, Miss 
Biggs, Ellas, F. X. Elisabethtown. Constantinople. 
Rigga. CvroB C, P. Redstone. W. Nowtou. Pa. 

Riheldafler, J. G.,8.8. St PauL St Paul, Min. 

Rinker, Henry ...... 

Ripley, J. B., P. Philadelphia. PhiladelphU,F)K. 
Kittenhouse, J.M.,P. Donegal. Bart Pa. 

Roane, W. H., P. MississippL U. Churvh, Miss. 
Robe, Robert 8 8. Oregon. Eugene C, Oreg. 

Roberts, R. M., P. Kaskaskla. HiUsboro', 111. 

Roberts, Wm. C L. Passaic. 

Robertson. H. M., P. Winnebago. Horicou, Wis. 
Robertson, S., 8. 8. Winnebaga Winneoonne, W. 
Robertson, W.W .8.8. Missouri Fulton, Mo. 

Robins, J. P.. W.c. Donegal. Snow Hill, Md. 

Robinson, C.8 , P. Troy. Troy, N. Y. 

Robinson, David, P. New Lisbon. Calcutta, Ohio 
Robinson, John, P. Richland. Ashland, Ohio. 

Robinson, Stuart, P. Louisville. Louisville, Ky. 
Robinson, W. M., P. ZanesviUe. Newark, Oliio. 
Rockwell, A. 0.. P. Ohio. FinleyvUle, Pn. 

Rockwell, C, W.O. Londonderry. 

Rockwell, E. F., PKF. Concord. Davidson C.,NjO 

Rockwell, J. E., P. Nasssu. Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Rodenbaugh, H.S. P. PhiUdela. 2d. Eaglevllle, Pa. 
Rodsers, Jss. L.. T. Miami Springfield, 0. 

Rodgers, R. K.. P N. Brunswick. Boundb'k., N.J. 
Rogers, A. H., w c Peoria. AUsnta, lU. 

Rogers, James, w. o Ogdeusburgh. Ogdensb'g., N.T. 
Rogers, J. L.. 8 8. Flint River. Atlanta, Ga. 
Rogers, J. M.. P. N. Brunswick. Mldd]et'n,P.N J 
Rogers, Joseph, P. Raritan. French t'n , N. J. 

Rogers, O. F., P. Chickasaw. Camargo, Miss. 

Rogertt. W. 8., FSF. Oxford. Oxford, Ohio. 

Root Timothy, w c. E. Alabama. Onntersville, A. 
Itosamond, J., s s. Tombeckbee. 
Rosborough, ILO.. P. Redstone. 
Rose, Henry B.. D x. Montgomery. 
Rosentiial. C. D., p. Passaic. 

8. Carolina. 

M uncle 

Baltimore. 

Winnebago. 

Hocking. 

N. Brunswick. 

Schuyler. 



A. W.. 8. 8 

Ross, John, W. 0. 

Ross, John, B.. P. 

Rosseel, J. A., p. 

Bowe, John. s. 8. 

Rowell, Morse, d x. 

Roweli, Thomp.. L 

Rowland, Jas., w. c. Richland. 
, Rowland, L. P., s. 8. PotosL 
1 RoystOQ, C.A.,1.. 



West Point, M. 

New Genevs, P. 

Indian Ck„ Va. 

Paterson, N.J. 

Pendleton, 8.0. 

Kokoma, Ind. 

Frederick, Md. 

Neenah, Wis. 

Oallipolis, 0. 

New York City. 

Bloomliigton.M. 

Mansfield* Ohk>. 

Patteraon, Mo. 

eNSBTUle,!^ 



Digitized by 



Googk 



88 



PRESBYTBRIAN HISTORICAL ALMANAC. 



PKSSBTTSBT . 



POST-OVriCX. 



Radolph, A^ F M. 
Ruffaar, Henry, • 8. 
Raffaer,W.H., w.C. 
Rumpltt, Jtfthro. F. 
Russell, Geo. A^ L. 
RuMell, MoROR. P. 
Rusiiell, R. D.. W. C. 
Ruwell, Watson 
Ratherfurd. fi. U., F 
Ruttor. L.O.. P. 
Ryeraoa, M. W.. L. 
Uyors, Alfred, dec'd. 

SAC4BS H., W.C. 
Sa:kett, M. A.. P 
Sttfford, J. P., P. 
Safford. Henry, aot. 
Sahier, DauiHl D., L. 
Sviaiple, Robt. F., P. 
Sa idernon, Jo.<. P 
Sauderaon. D. D., P. 
Str>reat, John H. 
Saondere, B. D., w c. 
Sauadera, J. N., P. 
Savage, J. A., PRS. 
Savage, Thomas, P. 
Savage, Wm. T., s s. 
Sawney, Al«x^ aot. 
8awt«Ue, B, N., P. 
S^aye. James H.. 8. s. 
Saye, John B., s s 
Scarboroogh, W. U..P. 
Schaible, Juhn G., P. 
Schenck,A. y.C.,8 8. 
Scheuck^KliasS., 8 8. 
Schenck, W. E., bmc. 
Scwartz, Jacob, P. 
Sooti, Alexander, P. 
Soott, Alexander, L. 
Scott, George E^ L. 
Soott, H. B. 
Scott, James, P. 
Soott, J.L., r M. 
Scott, J. M., p. 
Scott, John A., p. 
Soott, John W., PS8. 
Scott J. W., PKS. 
Scott Robert, 8 8. 
Scott, Stephen, w. c. 
Scott, Thos. G^ p. 
Scott, Win. A., P. 
Scott, Wm M,, p. 
SooTal, S. F., P. 
Scovel, Alden, s 8. 
Scribiier, Wm., w.C. 
Scudder, U. M., L. 
See, Chas. S. H., P. 
Seeley. A H^ F. «. 
Se^'ly, A. H„ L. 
Seelye, Kdw. B., 8.8. 
Sellers, Duncan, 8 s. 
Semple, Philo M., p. 
8?nour, F., P. 
Seymour. J. L.. w. o. 
Shaiffer, Geo. W.. p. 
Shand. Alex., w. c. 
Sliand, Wra O., p. 
Shane, J.D. W.c. 
Sharon, J. 0., w. c. 
Sharp, J. D., s 8. 
Sharp, S. M., L. 
Bliarp, W. W.. w. c. 
Shaw, GoIIa,s 8. 
Shaw, H. W., I. 
Shaw, Peter H., wo. 
ShMrer, F. A.. P. 
Bhaarer, J., w. o. 
Shearer, John B., P. 
Sheddan, 8.S.,P. 
Sheets, Wm.0.. P. 
Sheldon. Geo., w c. 
Shepherd, I. N., wo. 
Bhepley. S. H., T. 
8hepper8on,C.M.,8 8. 
Bhepperacm, J. G., p. 
8lMfTiU,R.&,F. 



Lodlana. 

Greenbrier. 

Lexington. 

Concord. 

Orange. 

Miami. 

S. Alabama. 

Carlisle. 

0. Mississippi. 

Donegal. 

New York. 



Lodiatia, lud. 
Kenawba S.,Va. 
Harrison b'g,Va. 
Sharon, N. 0. 
Carthage, N. C. 
Clifton, Ohio. 
Nanafalia, Ala. 



Yicksbufg, Mis. 
Ciieetnut L., Pa. 
Prinoeton, N. J. 



Ixmisrnie. 

CinolnnatL 

Sidney. 

Hopewell. 

New York. 

Oirlisle. 

New York 2d. 

S. Alabama. 

Philadelphia. 

Philadelphia. 

Louisville. 

Hilwankie. 

Londonderry. 

N.MiasissippL 

Steabenviile. 

Arkansas. 

Bethel. 

Palestine^ 

Baltimore. 

StLoois. 

St. Louis. 

St Lonis. 

Philadelphia. 

Dane. 

RIchUnd. 

Philadela.2d. 

Washington. 

Red River. 

Philadela. 2d. 

Furrukhabad. 

W. Lexington. 

W. Hanover. 

Washington. 

Oxibrd. 

Platte. 

Missouri. 

Beaver. 

Calllbmia. 

CindnnatL 

N. Albany. 

Burlington. 

N. Brunswick. 

Ebeneier. 

Lexington. 

Fnrrukhabad. 

Albany. 

Troy. 

Fayetterille. 

Coshocton. 

Louisville. 

Londonderry. 

Huntingdon. 

Allegheny aty, 

Saltsburgh. 

W. Lexington. 

Palmyra. 

K. Texas. 

Steubenvnie. 

B. Carolina. 

FayettevlUe. 

Logansport 

New York. 

Cedar. 

Cincinnati. 

W. Hanover. 

Elisabethtown. 

Concord. 

Elisabethtown. 

Marion. 

BlairsTille. 

Flint River. 

W. Hanover. 



Madison, Ind. 
Mt. Vernon, 0. 
Piqua, Ohio. 
Greensboro*, Ga. 
Red Bank, N.J. 
Bedford, Pa. 
New York aty. 
Marion, Ala. 



W. Phila., Pa. 

Bloomfleld. Ky. 
Wattkesha,Wis. 
Bedford, N. H. 
Grenada, Miss. 
OarrnUton,Ohio. 
Batesville, Ark. 
Union, 8. C. 
Lawrenoarll,!!!.. 
Taneytowu, Md. 
Gales' Pre., Mo. 
St Charles, Mo. 
St Charles, .Mo. 
Philadelphia, Pa 
Platteville, Wis. 
Savannah, Ohio. 
Prinoeton, N. J. 



HoImeBbnrg,Pa. 
Futtehgurh, In. 
Winchester, Ky. 
Haliikx, Va. 
Washington,Pa. 
Oxfbrd, Ohio. 
RIdgely, Mo. 
Mexico, Mo. 
Mt. Jackson, Pa. 
S. Francisco, C. 
Cincinnati, 0. 
Jefferson vil.,Id. 
Bardent*n., N.J. 
Middtet'n.P.N.J 
Elisaville, Ky. 
Barter Brk, Va. 
N.Salem, N.Y. 
Garllflle. N. Y. 
Sandy HIU.N.Y. 
Harrington,N.C. 
Berlin, Ohio. 
LouJsrille, Ky. 



Shirleysb'g., Pa. 



Home, Pa. 
Lexington, Kt. 
Dirmingham,Li. 
Alto, Texas. 
BogoU, S. A. 



Gravelly H.,N.C 
Logansportlnd. 
Greenfield U..C. 
Iowa City.Iowa. 
Pleasant Kid .0. 
Ilamp Sid.,Va. 
Rahway. N.J. 
Morgan t'n.,N.C. 
Plalnfleld.N.J. 
Marion. Ohio. 
BlairsvUle. Pa. 
Bellevue. Ga. 
Otter Bridge, Va. 
Danoy ville, Ten. 



Sherwood, J. M., P. 
Sblde. Rudolph 
Shields, C. W., P. 
Shields. £. P., w c. 
Shields, James M., P. 
Shields, John W., L. 
Sbiland, Andw., p 
Shimeall, R.C.. W.C. 
Shlnn, James G., P. 
Shirley, Matthias, l. 
Shive, Rufus W., L. 
Shockley, U. M. 
Shotwell, Albert 
Shotwell, Nath.,wc. 
Shryock, L. B.W., s s. 
Shnbert, Wm. A. 
Shultx, J.N., 8.S. 
Sickles, Wm., w. c. 
Sickles, Wm. W.,s. s. 
Sill, Amos U., P. 
Sillimau. A. P., p 
Sim, William R., s 8. 
Simanton, Eph., P. 
Simouton, A. G., L. 
Simonton, L. A., P. 
Simonton, Wm„ p. 
8imrall, J. G., s. 8 
Simpson, Robert, 8 a. 
Simpson, T. W., P. 
Sinclair. Alex.. P 
Sinclair, James, P. 
Siuclair, J.C.. 8 8. 
Slngletsry, W. H. 
Skillman. C.H,8 8. 
Slack, E., w. c. 
SUgle,B.W.,L. 
Sloan, Geo., W.. D H. 
Sloan, James, P. 
Small, A. M., w. c. 
Smalley, E., dee'd., P. 
Smalley, John, w. c. 
RmalU, J. H., w. c. 
Smiley, J. H., P. 
Smith, Alex., s 8. 
Smith, B. M., PBP. 
Smith, C. R., w. c. 
Smith. D. W., w.c. 
Smith David. L. 
Smith, D. F., 8 8. 
Smith, D. M., w. c. 
Smith, E. D., p. 
Smith, Frederick, L. 
Smith, H. A., 8. 8. 
Smith, H. .M., P. 
Smith, James, w. c. 
Smith, J amen, W.c. 
Smith, James, P. 
Smith, James, s. 8. 
Smith, James 1. 
Smith, Jaroee M., P. 
Smith, John F., P. 
Smith, John, .M., 8.8. 
Smith, Joseph, p. 
Smith. Jo^pb T., P. 
Smith, Josiah D.. P. 
Smith, J. Henry, p. 
Smith, Rapin £., L. 
Smith, Keuben.w. c. 
Smith. Robt C , pef. 
Smith, Robt H., L. 
Smith, Samuel B. 
Smith, Thos.C, s 8. 
Smith, Thos. G., p. 
Smith, T. S. C, P. 
Smith, T T., P. 
hmith, Wm., pip. 
Smith, W. A., s 8. 
Smith, W. G., D M. 
Smith, W. C, 8 s 
Smock, D. v., w. c. 
Smoot, R. K.. L. 
Smuller, H.W.,P. 
Smylie, J. A.. D M. 
Smyth, Chas. B., P. 
Smyth, James J., P. 
Smyth,0.H.P.,8.8. 



PKBSBTTXRT. POST-OFPICS. 

Orange. Washlngton.NC 

Transylvania. Cincinnati, 0. 

Philadelphia. Phila deia , Pa. 

New Albany. PitU^rove, N.J. 

Erie. KxchanKevi]..P. 

.Miami. Blue Bull. Ohio. 

Bedford. MtKiBco,N.Y. 

Hudson. 

Philadelphia. P. Richmond.Pa 

SalUburgh. 

Tuscumbia. Decatur, Ala. 

Oxfoi-d. 

Bbeneser. 

Huntingdon. Milroy, Pa. 

Kbeneser. Crittenden, Ky. 
St Louis. 

Lake. Crown Pt, Ind. 

Indianapolis. Indianapolis. L 

New Albany. Bedford, Ind. 

Baltimore. 

Tuscaloosa. Clinton. Ala. 

Kaskaskia. Jordan's G., IIL 

Newton. Vienna, N.J. 

Carlisle. Uarrisburg, Pa. 

HopewelL Sparta, Ga. 

Northumb'nd. Williamsp't.Pa 

W. Lexington. Lexington, Ky. 

Palestine. Newton, III. 

Baltimore. SvkesviUe, Md. 

Concord. Charlotte, N.C. 

Fayetteville. Queen8dale,N.O 
AUegheny City Allegheny C.,Pa 

Charlotte, N. C. 

Albany. Luserne, N. Y. 

Cincinnati. Cincinnati, 0. 

Washington. Harrisville, Va. 

Ohio. Washington Ter 

Washington. Dunningsvil. P. 

Harmony. 

Troy. 

Allegheny. Waverly, Iowa. 

Philadelphia. PhiladeU., Pa. 

MississippL U. Church, Mis. 

Maury. Fayetteville, T. 

W. Hanover. Hamp. Sid., Va. 

E. Alabama. Sp. Garden, Ala. 

Milwaukie. Richmond, Wis. 

Wooster. Bon Air, Tenu. 

Cherokee. Summervil.,Ga. 
Albany. 

New York. N. York C. N.T. 

Dubuque. Dubuque, Iowa. 

S. Alabama. CUuselvil., Ala. 

New Orleans. N.Orleans, La. 

Philadelphia. Philadela., Pa. 

Chicago, 

Dont^al. Mount Joy, Pa. 

Marion. Marysville, O. 

Erie, Ontonagon. M. 

Ohio. Industry, Pa. 

Whitewater. Richmond, Ind. 

Ohio. Pittsburgh. Pa. 

Redstone. Greennburg. Pa. 

Baltimore. Baltimore, Md. 

Columhna. CoIumbus.Ohio. 

W. Hanover. CharlottesTll.,P. 
Philadelphia. 

Winnebago. Beaver Dam, W. 

K. Alabama. Talmage, Ga. 
Philadelphia. 

Schuyler. 

Potosi. Farmlngton.Mo 

Cinrinnati Cindnnsti. 0. 

Baltimore. JarretUvil.,Md. 

Peoria. Henry. 111. 

Ohio. Cannon8b'g.,Pa. 

W. Texas. Cedar Ck., Tex. 

Michigan. St John's, Mich 

Flint River. Laurenrevil., Q. 

Iowa. tfigoumey,Iowa. 

W. District Huntingdon, T. 

Bedford. Carmel, N.Y. 

Louisiana. Livonia, La. 

New York 2d. Delhi, N. Y. 

Orange. G reensbo*, N . 0. 

" * ' LouisTiUe^Mlaa. 



Digitized by 



Googk 



THE FBESBYTSBTAN CHUBOH, (O. 8.) 



89 



KAMS. PBBtBTTKBT. POBT-OrVICB. 

Sinvth, Th'>ma8, P. ChariestoD. Cluirl«fton, 8.0. 

Kmytha, W. M., w c. S. AUbaouL Cababa, Ala. 

bDodKraflS, W.D.. P. Uudun. Goafaen, N.T. 

boowden, K. U^ > •• Luierne. Kingnton, Pa. 

8nydt»r, Heory, PBF. W. Uanover. Uamp. Sid., Va. 

Snydw, W. M.. w c Albany. 

Somerville. J., W c. TuaealooM. BridgeTllIa, Ala. 

SoDu>rTUI«.W O.PrfV. Braaos. UaataTille,Tez. 

Boatbwortb T.D.vtr.c Londonderry. FrankUn, MaM. 

Sparrow, P. J., • •• S. Alabama. Bagdad, Fla. 

8parrowgrova, (i., L. St. ClalrsYlUa 

Bpayd, Henry JL, p KariUn. Brownsb'g., Pa. 

SptMr, William, r. M. Oallfornla. 

ScM<*n(, Tboman P., P. UaniingdoQ. Lewtotown, Pa. 

Spenca, W. B , P. Sidney. Sidney, Obio. 

^pdDi'ur, Jullua, L. St. Louto. Kirkwood, Mo. 

Spiluiau, B. If., P Kaakaskia. Sbawneat'n., IIL 

Spilinan, J. B , L. W. Lexington. NlcholaaTU.,Ky. 

SpiuninK, Cbas. P., L. Palestine. Paris, 111. 

Sp'^'tvnski, 8.« I.. New York. St Louie, Ma 

Spofrird. L. C. P. Winnebago. Depere, Wle. 

Spotswood. J. B.. P. New Caalle. New Castle, Del. 

Spr.i/ue, W. B., P. Albany. Albany, N. Y. 

Sprinif, Gardiner, P. New York. New York Clb[. 

Spwie, Wm. T., P. North Hirer. Newbargfa,N.Y. 

Sproull, A. W., P. Philadelphia. Chester, Pa. 

Sprunt, J. M., P. FayettHTille. Kenansyll.,N.C. 

S'luier, John, P. New Castle. Pt Deposit, Md. 

Stacey, James, P. Flint RWer. Newman, Ga. 

HUttT»rd, Jas. B..W. c. Chickasaw. DauTille, Miss. 

Stafford, James, w.c. Kaskaskia. Trenton, III. 

Stanflttld, S.A., P. Orange. Milton, N.C.. 

Staunton, K. L. P. Chillleothe. Chilllcothe, 0. 

SUples. Hoses W., p Kanktt, m. 

Stark, John, w. c. Saltsburgh. 

Stark, OllTer P., r. U. IndUn. DoaksYille, Ark. 

StUbam. F.C., L. Cherokee. BelleTue, Ga. 

St^d, Baqj., F., P. Nassau. Aitoria, N. Y. 

Stoarns, Timothy. P. Iowa. Mt Pleasant, I. 

BtebbiiiB, Gea, w. c. Rock RiTsr. Wethersflald-Ill. 

SUtbbins, Jan.. w. c. Burlington. Princeton, N. J. 

Stedman, Jss., O., P. Memphis. Blemphis, Tenn. 
Steel, Kobert. P. Philadelphia 2. Abln^ton, Pa. 

Steel, Samuel, P. CbiUloothe. HlUsboro', 0. 

Steele, Daniel, P. Kaskaskia. PlnckneyTll.,111 

St«ele, John, s s. lAke. South Bend, Id. 

Steele, John A., w.c. Palestine. Grand View, III. 

8t4»lns. Frederick, p. New York. N. York CN. Y. 
Steinthsl, B.. w c. Phlladephla. 

Sterling, J. W.,PRF. Dane. Madison, Wis. 

Sterrett, Alex., P. Vincennes. EransTlIle, Ind. 

Sterrett, Darid, w c Huntingdon. Carlisle, Pa. 
Stevens, Joseph, P. Northumberl'd. Jersey Shore.Pa 

Stevens, J. H., s s. Flint River. Morgan, Ga. ' 

Stevenson, David. P. Indianapolis. Indianapolis, Id. 

Stevenson, Jos.,W c. Sidney. Bailefontaine.O. 

StHven«eu, J. M.,eBC. New York. N. York C, N.Y. 

Stevenson, P. B , T. Passaic Madison, N. J. 

8t*«vensou, Kos>«,w c. Blalrsville. Armagh, Pa. 

Stevenson, S. H., P. Peoria. Hey worth. III. 

StevenK'tii, Tbos.. P. Huntingdon. Rock Spring,Pa. 

St**wHrd, J. B.. P Oxford. Oxford, Ohio. 

St *wart, A. 8., w c. Chippewa. Osaukle, Wis. 

Sti'w^art, C. B . s s. S. Carolina. Oentreville. S.C. 

Stewart, C. W.. p. Donegal. Colerain, Pa. 

Stewart, C.S cip. N. Brunswick. New York City. 

Stewart, Daniel, P. West Jersey. Camden, N. J. 

St4<wart. D. M.. s s. White Water. Rusbville. Ind. 
Stewart. Geo D , P. Geniwee Rlrer. Bath. N. Y. 

Stewart, John, s. s. Oxford. Harrison, Ohio. 

Stewart, J. B. Wooster. 

Stewart, J. C. L S. Alabama. Fancy Hill,N. C. 

Stewart. L. L , w c Concord. Fancy Hill, N.C. 

Stewart, Wm. B. Baltimore. 

Sti.kney.W.W., D M W. Hanover. Olade Sp. D., Va. 

Stillinan. C. A . P Tui(caloo«L Gainesville, AU. 

Btirrat. Jas. A.. D M S . Paul. 

Stockton, B. B. w c. Rochester City. Jerw»y Clty.NJ. 

Stockton, John p. Washington. Cross Ck. V11.,P. 

Stoddard, Wm . L Winchester. F. Union, N. M. 

Stone. J .tr»d M . PBP. Cedar. Iowa City, Iowa. 

Su^neroad. Joel. p. Redstone. Woodvale, Pa. 

Strsban. F. G . s s. Mnhlenbnrg. Hopkins vll.,Ky. 

Strain. John B.. P. Carlisle. Millerstown, Pa. 

Stratton, Daniel. P. Wsst Jersey. Salem, N. J. 

Stratton, James, P. Mlsai«lp|il. Natches, MIm. 
12 



RAMB. 



PBSSBTTBBT. 



POST-OFTICB. 



Stratton, Jos. B . P. 
Stratton, Wm. 0., P. 
Strauss, Julius, L. 
Street, Robert, P. 
Strother. J.W., s s. 
Stryker, W. M., t. 
Stuart, David T., T. 
Stuart, Sam'l. D., P. 
Stuart,Thos.C., 8. •. 
Studdilbrd, P. A., p. 
Studdlford, P.O., P. 
Sturdevant, C, t. 
Sturges, Chas, P.M. 
Sutton, Wm. C. 
Swan, Benj. C., P. 
Swan, Geo. M., w c. 
Swan, James N., P. 
Swan, Samuel, s. s. 
Swaney, Alexander 
Sweetmau, Jos., w c. 
Swift Bliiiha P., p. 
Swift, Klliott K., P. 
Swift, William, s s. 
Swing, David, pkp. 
Symington, R.S., SB, 
Symington. W. B., L, 
Symmes, F. M., p. 
Symmes, J. H.. P. 
Symmes, Jos. 0., P. 



MisslMiippl. 
N Usbon. 
New York. 
Passsic. 
W. District. 
Logsnsport. 
Louisville. 
Montgomery. 
Chickasaw. 
Raritan. 
Raritan. 
MiamL 
Long Island. 
Concord. 
Schuyler. 
Iowa. 

Fort Wayne. 
Chicago. 
Steubenvnie. 
Albany. 
Allegheny C. 
Beaver. 
Cherokee. 
Oxford. 
Lafayette. 
, Transylvania. 
Madison. 
Carlisle. 
N. Brunswick. 



Natehex,MIs8. 
N. Benton,OhlOb 
London, Eng. 
Union, N. J. 
Brownsvil..Ten. 
F. Des MolneB,L 
Shelbyvllle, Ky. 
CbristiansbV.V 
Pontotoc, »Iiss. 
Milford, N.J. 
LanibertTil.,NJ 
Springfield, 0. 
Blackbird U.,N. 



Carthage. 111. 
Brighton, Iowa. 
Columbia C.,Ind 
Leland, 111. 



Chariton, N. Y. 
Allegheny C.,Pa. 
New Castle, Pa. 
Canton, (ia. 
Oxlbrd, Ohio. 
C, Mo. 



TASLOCK, J. D., PBS. 

Talbot, W.K..D M. 

Talmage, S. K., pbs. 

Tsppan, Wlnthrop 

Tate, Robert, w. c. 

Taylor, A A. B., p. 

Taylor, C. P., s. s. 

Taylor, Charles H. 

Taylor, K. W. 

Taylor, George J. 

Taylor, llutchlns 

Taylor, H W., s. 8. 

Taylor, R. F., w o. 

Taylor, Robert J., p. 

TSsylor, Rufus, P. 

Taylor, Tbos. J., P. 

Tayk>r, Wm.G.p. 

Teese, David, s. 8. 

Telford, Alex., L. 

Telford, Wm. B.. s 8. 

Templeton, J., W C. 

Templeton, MJIo, P. 

Templeton. S. M.. P. 

Teuipleton.W.n.,W C 

Tenney, Ijovi, P. 

Terhuue, K. P., p. 

Thayer, Charles. 8 s. 

Thayer, E. W., w. c. 

Thayer, Loren, P. 

Thomas, B. D., s. s. 

Thomas, Enoch, D. M. 

Thomss Henry E., p. 

Tbomss. John, l. 

Thomas, John, P. 

Thomas, Tbos., s. 8. 

Thomas, Thos. B.. p. 

Thompson, C. K., s. 8. 

Thompson, O. W., P. 

Thompson, H. P.. s s. 

Thompson, J.C., l. 

Thompson, LowIk.s s 

Thompson, P. W.. P. 

Thompson, RG.,wc. 

Thompson, W. II., p. 

Thompson, W. 8., p. 

Thomson, A. E., P. 

Thomson, J. H., s s. 

Thomson, John, p. 

Thomson, P. W., p. 

Thomson, S H. 
I Thorn, A. K., PXV. 
I Thorn, A. S. 

Thornton, P., 8. 8. 
! Thornton, J. C, L. 
I Thorn well, J.H.,PBV. 
1 Tidball,W.B.,8.8. 



HolstoQ. 

Paducah. 

Hopewell. 

Philadelphia. 

Fsyetteviile. 

Louisville. 

Iowa. 

Albany. 

8. Alabsma. 

B. MisslssippL 

Peoria. 

Oxford. 

B. Texas. 
E. Hanover. 
N. Brunswick. 
Cedar. 
Allegheny. 
Bedford. 
Oxford. 
Cherokee. 
St. Louis. 
Marion. 
Peoria. 
Creek Nation. 

C. Texas. 
W. Hanover. 
St. Paul. 
Palestine. 
Londonderry. 



Pleasant, Ind. 
Cumberl'd, Md. 
Cranberry, N. J, 

Jonesboro', Ten. 
Columbus, Ky. 
Talmage, Ga. 

SlirsCrwk.N.a 
Louisville, Ky. 
Ft. Madison, la. 
BalsionCN.T. 



Eaton, Ohio. 



Portsmouth ,Ta. 
Hightstown.NJ 
Montexuma, la. 
Tarentum, Pa. 
Wh.Plalns,N.T. 



Kingston . Ga. 

St Louis, Mo. 

MarseUles,()hlo. 

DeUvan, 111. 

Brandyw*e M.,P 

Carolina, Texas. 

Charlotte, Va. 

Hudson, Wis. 

Decatur, lU. 
. Windham, N.H. 
C. Mississippi. Camden, Miss. 
Lexington. Beverly, Va. 
New Albany. Chsrlest*n ,Ind. 
Miami. S. Chariestfin, O. 

Northnmberl'd. Wash 'ton vll .,Pa 
Susquehanna. Orwell, Pa 
Miami. Dayton, Obio. 

Orawfordsville. Darlington, Ind. 
Huntingdon. Acsdemia. Pa. 
Ebenezcr. Carlisle, Ky. 

New Castle. 
Oregon. 
Schuyler. 
Chicago. 
Memphis. 
W. Hanover. 
Chicago. 
E. MisslsslpL 
New York. 
Schuyler. 
Madison. 
Brasos. 
Highland. 
Louisville. 
U. Missouri. 
Charleston. 
W. Hanover. 



Lexhigton, Org. 

BeloiCwis. 
Bolivar, Tenn. 
N. Canton, Va. 
Oswego, III. 
McI.eod*s Miss. 
N. York C, N.Y. 
Prairie City, HL 



Huntsville, Tex, 
Bentkuk, Kan. 
Louis vUle, Ky. 
lilbertT. Mo. 
Columbia, S. a 
Bpoat Sp., Til 



Digitized by 



Googk 



90 



PRESBYTERIAN HISTORICAL ALMANAC. 



KAMI. ntBSBTTBXT. POtT-orPICX. 

Timlow, H. Bi p. LondoDdarrj. Mewbarjp't.,M. 

TImiow, P.J., w.o. Donegal. 

Todd, D. Km l. Miami. Alexandenrll.O. 

Todd, Geo. T., w. o. North River. Fon da Lac, W. 

Todd, Isaac, P Hudson. Miitbrd, Pa. 

Todd, Nath., w. c. Allegheny 0. AlleKheny 0.,Pa 

Todd, OUpliaDi. >!., p. Washington. Fl'^rence, Pa. 

Todd. Richard K . P. Chicago. Woodstock, 111. 

Tomlinson, Geo., s.s. Buflaio City. Mapleton, N. Y. 

Torreace. Adam. P. BlairsTille. Alexandria, Pa. 

Town, Edwin. P Raritan. LambertriljNJ. 

Towles, D. r., • 8. Fayetterllle. Long Creek,N.a 

Townley, Wm., T Schuyler. Ali>ao, III. 

Trimble. E. C . D M. W. District. Paris, Tenn. 

Trimble, W. W., p. Lexington. CeiarOioreyYa. 

Tuck, N. v., T. Ebeneser. Corlngton, Ky. 

Tudehope, A., w c Philadelphia. Gindnnati, 0. 

Tully, Andrew, p. Newton. Harmony, N. J. 

TuUy, David, P. Albany. Balaton S, N. Y. 

Turbitt, Jiihn Peoria. 

Turner, D. McNeill Florida. 

Turner, J. H., w c. U. Hanover. Liberty, Va. 

Tustin, Sept., s. s. Baltimore. Washington,D.C 

Twitchell, Pliny, s s Genesee River. Wyoming, N.Y. 
Tyler, F. A., s •. N. MississlppL 

ULLMA.ir, J. F., F H. Furrakhabad. Mynpoorie, In. 

Umsted, J. T.. P. Iowa. Keokuk, Iowa. 

Urmston, T. H., w. c. W. Lexington. Trinity, La. 

Urm.ston, N. M.,w.c. Iowa. Keokuk, Iowa. 

Ustiek, John, P. Chicago. EarlvlUa, 111. 

Yail. E. I., w. c. Califbmla. Crescent C, Cal. 

Yaill, Thomas S., P. Schuyler. Knoxville, III. 
Vnlentine, Rich., P. Louisville. New Castle, Ky. 

Yallandlgham.J.L P . New CasUe. Newark, Del. 

YntlandiKbam,a.S.L. N. Lisbon. N. Usbon, Ohio. 

Yan Artsdalen G,w.c. Phiiadela. 2d. Colerain, Pa. 

Yance, Andw., • 8. Knoxville. Cloyd*s Ck.,Ten. 

Yan Court, J.U.,w c. Louisiana. St Louis, Ho. 

Yan Deman, H., P. Marion. Delaware, Ohio. 

YandeHas, John. L. Bock River. Kingsbury, IlL 

Yan Doren, I., w. c. N. Brunswick. N.Brunsw'k,NJ 

Yan Doren, L. U.. P. Paducah. Paducah, Ky. 

Yan Dyke, H. J., P. Nassau. Brooklyn, N. T. 

Yan Dyke, J. P., P. Cincinnati. Pleasant R., 0. 

Yan Rman, Geo., s 8. Findlay. Yan Buren, 0. 

Yan Eman, Geo., 8 •. Palmyra. Florida, Mo. 

Yan Eman, T. B., p. Ohio. Bentleysvil., Pa. 

Yannatta, P. R., DM. Kaskaskla. Salem, 111. 

Yannuys, H. L., p. Lake. Goshen, Ind. 

Yan RensBelaerC.8XC Burlington. Phiiadela., Pa. 

Yan Vliet A., P. Dubuque. Dubuque, Iowa. 

Van Wyck, G. P.. P. Carii»le. Oettys\)arg Pa. 

Yaughan, C. R., w 0. W. Hanover. FarmviUe, Ya. 
Yeeder, P. Y., w. 0. Albany. Napa City. Cal. 

Yeenhuizen, A. B..P. Rochester City. William8on,N.T 

Yeith, Herman, wo. Luseme. 

Yenable, U. 1 , 8. s. Palestine. Oakland, DL 

Yermllye, A.G., P. Londo derry. Newbu.yp't.H. 
Yermilye, R.G. Mohawk! 

Yinoent, W. R., p. St Clairsville. Union town, 0. 

Virtue, Andrew, p. Bitirsv.lla. Monroevllle, Pa. 
Vlsscher, 8. G., L. Albany. 

Waddbll, J. N.,PKV. Chickasaw. La Orange, Ten. 

WadswoKh, Chas., p. PhUadelphia. Phiiadela., Pa. 

Wajcgoner D., p. Beaver. Pulaski, Pa. 

WaiU), J. T H., P. Baltimore. Salisbury, Md. 

Wailoa, B. M.. P. W. Hanover. Greenfield, Ya. 

WaldburKer,JJ.,DJC. Allegheny. Butler, Pa. 

Waldo, M. New Orleans. 

Walker, J. W., p. Blairsville. W. Fairfield, Pa. 

Walker, R. B., P. Allegheny. Plalngrove. Pa. 

Walker, R. C, P. Lexington. OhurchvUle, Va. 

Walker, T. M., p. Schuyler. Fou itain G.Jll. 

Wail, Bloomfleld. F. Iowa. Kossuth, Iowa. 

Wall, Edward, P. Albany. Kingsboro\N.Y. 

Wall, T. G., P. Orange. New hem, N. 0. 

Wallace, D. A., P. Kaskaskla. Nashville, HI. 

Wallace, J. A., F. Harmony. Kingstrm, S. 

Wallace, John, F. Donegal. PequMi. Pa. 

Wallace, J. H., w.o. Montgo nery. Clear Branch, Ya. 

Wallace, J. W., a. 8. Lafayette. In lApend'e . Mo. 

Wallace, M. J., a. a. B. Texas. < 1 1 kory Hill, T. 

Wallaea^ B. 11, f. Redstona. Br.wuarille, Pa. 



NAMB. 



PBBSBTTSBT. 



POST-OrVICX. 



Waller, David J., P. Northnmberl'd. 
Wallis, James, a. s. W. Texas. 
Waish, Henry. P. N. MississlppL 
Walsh, J. J., w. M. Furrakhabad. 
Walton, J. E., p. Baltimore. 
Wampler, J. M., bot. CineinnatL 
Ward, F. De W., P. Genesee River. 
Ward, I. W., w. c. Huntingdon. 
Ward, Thomas, l. Huntingdon. 
Warden, Wm., L. Winchester. 
Wardlaw, T. De L.. P. Ebeneier. 
Warner, Austin, s. s. Missouri. 
Warner, John R., p. Carlisle. 
Warren, Joseph White Water. 

Warrener, P.W.,aot. Eastern Texaa. 
Washburn, C, s s Arkansas. 
Washburn, D., colp. Zanesville. 
Washburn, EboM., p. Columbus. 
Waterman, G., w. c. Baltimore. 
Watkins, S. W., s s. W. Hanover. 
Watson, A. M., a s. B. Alabama. 
Watson, James, P. S. Alabama. 
Watson, Jas. C, P. Northumberl'd 
Watson, John, p. Steubenville. 
Watson, Sam'l. L., p Bethel. 
Watson, Thomas. P. St Louis. 
Watt, John S., w. c. St Louis. 
Watts, Robert, p. Philadelphia. 
Way, Rich. Q., r. m. Ningpo. 
Way ne,BenJaminAOT Louisiana. 
Weaver, John S., a. a. Miami. 
Webber, Henry, p. Beaver. 
Webster, Chas., w.c. N. Branswiek. 
Weed, Henry R.. p. Washington. 
Weeks, Joseph, d m. MississlppL 
Weitsel^ohn, a. a. Chicago. 
Welsh, Thos. R., a. a. Arkansas. 
W " " 'T .V H., p. Luseme. 
W-i!-. ti.in,,-! L. New York. 
Wr.ii^. .h.hii U.,f. Nassau. 
W-IIh, J. (r, T. PotosL 

Wll^. N.ir, L North RlTer. 

W-IU. UK, w.c. BalUmore. 
W,.nK, i^h-jp.. ^riT. Maury. 
W<*ll^ 8. T., D M. Sk)ux city. 
W,4Ib, W. H., h. BariUn. 
W^ntx. i!. A. rH. Indian. 
W r \. 1 ,, : ,1, p. Philadelphia. 
W i., p. Cincinnati 

W«.t, \\ .„«„ A., p. Carlisle. 
Westbrook, R. B., c a. Burlington. 
Weatoott, L, w. c. Nassau. 
Westoott, W. A., P. Hudson. 
Westervelt, J.P.,w c. Albany. 
Weatervelt,8.D., p. Bedford. 
Westervelt, W. E., p. Newton. 
Whaley, F. N., p. Orange. 
Whallon, Thos., a a. Logansport. 
Wbarey, Thomas, L W. Hanover. 
White, Ansley D.. p. N. Brunswiok. 
White, Charles, P. Winchester. 
White, Geo. W.. L. W. Hanover. 
White, James B., p. Bethel. 
White, John, P. Luserae. 

White, John L., s a. Bedford. 
White, John W..w c. Carlisle. 
White, M. M., T. Iowa. 
Wfalte,N.G,p. Carlisle. 

White, R. B., P. Tuscaloosa. 

White, W. S., P. Lexington. 

Whitworth,G.F.,wc Oregon. 
Wight, J. K. In TrantUu, 

Wiley, Calvin H., L. Oangu. 
Wlllett Marinus, p. New York. 
Williams, A., w. c G^ifornla. 
Williams, A., pbp. Ohio. 
Williams, A., w c. Arkansys. 
Williams, CF.s. a. Maury. 
WillLims, D., w c. R •dstone. 
Wllltams. E.T., r m. W. Africa. 
Williams, F. T., p. N >rf h River. 
Williams, John . p. 8. Carolina. 
Williams, M. A., o m. California. 
Williams, Nath.. p. Chiliioothe. 
Williams, R. E , p. M. Furrakhabad. 
Williams, Saml., p. Alleghany. 



•urg, i 
Concrete, Tei 
Horn Uke,Mis. 
Fnttehgurh, In. 
West River. Md- 
Cinninnati,Ohio. 
Geneseo, N. Y. 
Birmingam, Pa. 



Wardensvil., Ya. 
Paris, Ky. 
N.BloomfieId,Mo 
Gettysburg, Pa. 
Quincy, III. 
N.'DanTille,Tex. 
NorristowUfAriL. 
Marietta, Ohio. 
C. College, Ohio. 



Greenw'd.D., Va. 
Selma, Ala. 
Selma, Ala. 
Milton, Pa. 
Amsterdam, 0. 
Bethel, S.C. 
Naylor's S., Mo. 



PhUadela., Pa. 
Ningpo, China. 
N. Orleans, La. 
Oarilsie Sta., 0. 
N. Sewickly, Pa. 
Middlet'n.P.N.J 
Wheeling. Ya. 
Natchez, Miss. 
Sharon, Wis. 
Helena, Ark. 
Kingston, Pa. 
Goshen, N. Y. 
WlUiamsb'g.N.T 
Jackson, Mo. 



Gorans town,Md. 
Columbia, Tenn. 
Bpworth, Iowa. 



Doaksville, Ark. 
PhiUdela., Pa. 
Cincinnati, O. 
Spring Run, Pa. 
Phiiadela., Pa. 
Brooklyn, N.T. 
Florida, N. T. 
Ephrata, N. Y. 
Yorktown, N.T. 
Bioom8b*y.,N.J. 
Clarksvll., Va. 
Rensselaer, Ind. 



Trenton, N. J. 
BerryvUle, Va. 



Chester, 8.C. 
Summit H., Pa. 
N. SUmford, C. 
Middletown, Pa. 
Mt Pelasantla. 
McConellsb'g.,P. 
Tuscaloosa, Ala. 
Lexington. Va. 
Olympia, W.Ter. 
Sand Lake. N.Y. 
GreensboroSN.C 
Black Rock, C. 
Princeton, N. J. 
Canonsb'g., Pa. 
Brownsville, A. 
Ashwood, Tenn. 

Monrovia, Ub. 
N.Ham b'g.,N.Y. 
Ookesbury, S. 0. 
8. Franrisco,GsL 
Newmarket, O. 
Agra, N. India. 
Slippery R., Pa. 



Digitized by 



Googk 



THE mxSBTTBBTAN CHUBCH, (O. 8.) 



91 



PEMBTTBST. POST-OVTICB. 



HAMS 



PSSSBTTSET. POST-OTVICI. 



Wmiams, Sam'U '• Louisville. 
Williams, Stephen L. BMltimore. 
WillUma, Wm., w c. CnlifornlM. 
WilliamBjW.O.. PBr. Tus<!umbia. 

WilUAmHOQ, A., • 8. PlUSfllc. 

WiUtemaon, Jtm^ P. SuiquehaniiA. 

WillUmaon, J O. • •. New Albanj. 

WillamBon, McK.,».s. Hocklnic- 

WiUlAinjon, Muees-P. W. Jermy. 

Williamson, K. B , L. Philadelphia. 

WUlUmiion, S., P. Ouachita. 

WUIIs, H. P. S., 8 8. 

WilUs, David, P 

Wilaoo, Alex^ w. o 

Wilaon, C. U., r it. 

Wiliion, D. A., r v. 

Wilwn, Elijah, w.c. DoneRal. 

Wilaon, K. S., l. LooiaTilla. 

Wilaon, H. M.. P. 

Wilaon, H. R., P. 

WitaoQ, Hugh, 8. 8. 

Wilaon, Jainea, a. 8. 

Wilaon, Jamea, a a. 

Wilmn, Jaa. G., a. a 

Wilaon, Jamea J. 

Wilaon, Jaa M..D K. Montgo'merj. 

Wilaon, John S., p. Flint Ulver. 

Wilson, Jonath..v.K. Bearer. 

Wilson, J. D., 8. 8. Concord. 

WllaoD, J. L., a a. 

Wilaon, J L., axe. 

Wilaon. J. M., a. 8. 

Wilson, J. R., p. 

Wilaon, Ij F., p. 

Wilaon, R. F., p. 

Wilaon, R. R., P. 

Wilaon, Samuel, P. 

Wilaon, Samuel, P. 

Wilson, 8. B., PRt. 

Wilson, S. J., PRF. 

Wilson, S. M., w. o. 

Wilaon, S. T., p. 

Wilaon, S. B. , P. 

Wilson, 8. R., p. 

Wilson, Thoa. B., Pc 

Wilson, Thadden8,P. N. Brunawiek. 

Wilaon, W. 8., p. Fort Wayne. 

Wilson, W. Vy P. — • 

Wilaon, W. W., P. 

Wilaon, Wm., d. h. 

Wimpy, Jeaae, a. 8. 

WInea, B. C, pbf. 

Winn, John 

Winn, T. S., 8. a. 

WInalett, Darid, L. 

Winters, Jacob, w o. Greenbrier. 

Wlra, John G., D. H. Elliabethtonm. 

Wlaeman, John, 8. a. Chilllcothe. 

With0npoon,A J.^.8 S. Alabama. 



£llxabetht'n,Ky 



La Grange, Ala. 
Walnut Gr.,N J. 
BelTllle, Pa. 
Pa( 11, Ind. 
HebardsTille, 0. 
Gold Sprlng,N J. 



Palmyra. 
S. Carolina. 
Orange. 
Indian. 
W. Africa. 



Nhw York. 

Allecheny CItj. 

Central Tazaa. 

BraaoB. 

KnoxvUle. 

Iowa. 

Loganqport. 



Dubuqne. 

Harmony. 

W. Texaa. 

Hopewell. 

WInchebter. 

Redstone. 

Chilllcothe. 

ZaneaTllla. 

Redstone. 

W. Hanover. 

Waahlngtoti. 

Columbua. 

Rock River. 

Concord. 

dudnnatL 

Miami. 



Wlncheater. 

Harmony. 

Brie. 

Memphis. 

Washington. 

Georgia. 

Tuacalooaa. 

Creek Nation. 



Waahington. Ar. 
Memphia, Mo. 
Laurena, 8. 0. 
Melville, N. C. 
Boggy l>ep.,Ark. 
Gettyabnrg, Pa. 
Me(Ua,Pa. 



New York City. 
Sewickleyvil., P, 
Lexington, Tex. 
Wheelock, Tex. 
Concord. Tenn. 
Grand view, Ll 



Floyd, Ya. 
Decatur, Oa. 
Bankok, Slam. 
Rowan Ms., N.C. 
Scotch Grove, la. 
MiHaionH.,N.Y. 
Seguin, Texaa. 
Anenata, Ga. 
Hedgeavllle, Ya. 
McKeespori, Pa. 
Bloomingb'g., 0. 
New Concord, 0. 
Merrittatown, P. 
Hamp. Sid., Ya. 
BuU Creek, Ya. 
Clinton, lU. 
Rock laknd, Dl. 
Rowan Ma., N.C. 
Cincinnati, 0. 
Xenla, Ohio. 
Shrew8bary,NJ 
Waraaw, Ind. 
Hoorelleld, Ya. 
BlahopviUe, B.C. 
Leeompton, K.T. 
Marloi^ Ark. 
Waahld|rton,Pa. 
Henry, IlL 
Havanna, Ala. 
Creek Agency ,A. 
Louiaiana, Mo. 
Elisabeth, N.J. 
Grttenlleld,Ohio. 
I^rndan, Ala. 



Wlthrow, Thoa. 8., P. 
Wolcott, John J., L. 
Wolfe, A. R., w.o. 
Wood, Charles, w, C 
Wood, Jamea, axe. 
Wood, John W., a. a. 
Wood, Jeremiah, P. 
Wood, M. D., P. 
Wood, WUliam A., L. 
Woodbridge, J., P. 
Woodbrldge, J., P. 
Woodbridge, 8., P. 
Woodbridge, Jr.,8.,P. 
Woodend. W. W., P. 
WoodhuU, G.B.,P. 
Woodhull, G. T., P. 
Woodrow, Thoa., P. 
Wooda, Alex. M., It. 
Woods, B. F., P. 
Wooda, Edgar,. P. 
Wooda, Jamea, a. a. 
Wooda, Jan. 8., p. 
Woods, John B., p. 
Wooda, W. H., 8. 8. 
Woodworth, M.W., P. 
Work, W. R., w. 0. 
Worrall, J. M., p. 
Worrell, Chaa. F , P. 
Worrell, Joseph, 8. 8. 
Wortman, M. L., L. 
Wray, John, P, 
Wright, AUen,V.K. 
Wright, A. H., V. M. 
Wright, Edward, 8.8. 
Wright, E. W., P. 
Wurta, Edward, w.c. 
Wyelh, 0. A., I. 
Wylle, C. A. 
Wylle, Wm. 
Wynkoop, S. E., W.O. 

Yabtis, J.L.,PB8. 
Yatea, Wm. B., 8. 0. 
Yeater, Andrew J.,L. 
Yeomans, B. D., p. 
Yeomans, J.W., P. 
Yorkea, Step., pbv. 
Young, A. T., a. a. 
Young, A. W., a. 8. 
Young, Daniel P., P. 
Young, H., L. 
Young, Jamea, P. 
Young, J. N., w. o. 
Young, Loyal, P. 
Young, P.D., p. 
Young, P. H., 8. a. 
Young, Wm., 8. 8. 



Wlncheater. 

AUegheny Qitj. 

Florida. 

Newton. 

Philadelphia 2d. 

Oeneaee River. 

AlUuy. 

Charleaton. 

Concord. 

MuhlenbuK. 

Albany. 

New Orleans. 

Benicla. 

Saltabnrg. 

Greenbrier. 

North River. 

W. Lexington. 

Huntingdon. 

Indianapolis. 

Columbus. 

Benlria. 

Huntingdon. 

Iowa. 

Transylvania. 

Winchester. 

Philadelphia 2d. 

Ebeneaer. 

N. Brunswick. 

Schuyler. 

SteubenvilU. 

Clarion. 

Indian. 

E. Hanover. 

Fort Wayne. 

Logansport. 

U. Mississippi. 

Memphia. 

Upper MissonrL 



Washlngton,Va. 
Allegheny C.,Pa. 
N.York a, N.Y. 
Philadelphia, Pa 
PhiUidelphia,Pa. 
Wyoming, N.Y. 
MaylIeld,N.Y. 
Walterboro',S.O. 

Henderson, Ky. 
Saratoga 8.,N.Y. 
New OrIeans,Iia. 
Benieia, Oal. 
Saltabnrg, Pa. 
Point Pleas., Ya. 
FlshkiIl,N.Y. 
MicliolasvUle,Kj 

Franklin, Ind. 
Columbus, Ohio. 
8uison,Oal. 
Lewistown, Pn. 
Bentonsport, la. 
Qreenaburg, Ky. 
N.Ck.Sta., Ya. 
Frankford, Pa. 
Covington, Ky. 
PerrinevUIe,NJ 
Chili, 111. 

Alvan, Pa. 
Ann'g.Acad,Ark. 

Auburn, Ind. 
Delphi, Ind. 
Lake Prov., tia. 
Dan^viUe,Ten. 
StewartavilUMo 



Nefw Castle. New Haven, 0. 



Upper Missouri. 
Charleston. 
New Albany. 
Northumberl'd. 
Northumberl'd. 
W. Lexington. 
Rochester City. 
N. MlaalBalppL 
W. Lexington. 
Cincinnati. 
Greenbrier. 
Upper Miaaonri. 
Allegheny. 
Sangamon. 
Brasos. 
Flndlay. 



Zahbiub, G. W., p. Erie. 



RIdimond, Mo. 
Charleaton, 8. 0. 

McBwensviLyPa. 
Danville, Pa. 
Danville, Ky. 
Chariotte, N. T. 
Panola, Miss. 
Georgetown, Ky. 
Cincinnati, 0. 
French Ck., Ya. 
Gentryvllla, Mo. 
Butler, Pa. 

Galveston, Tmc. 
Flndlay, Ohio. 

Conn8autvlL,Pa 



Digitized by 



Googk 



92 



THE PBS8BTTBSIAN CHURCH, (O. 8.) 



Il0j>mt0rs ai tfet §mnl ^ssmWj al % Ipreskattnan €\iaq. 



■AMX. 



Rodgera, D D., John 
Smith, DJ>., Robert 
Woodhull, D D., John 
King, B.D., John 
Latta, D D., JamM 
McWhortar, B D^ Alexander 
McKnlght D.D^ John 
Davldaon, n s., Robert 
Tvnnent, d.d., William M. 
Smith, D.j>^ John Blair 
Smitb, D.D., LL.n.. 8. Stanhope 
Clark, D D., Joseph 
Irwin, Nathaniel 
Roe, D n., AmI 
Hall, D.D , Jamea 
Armatrong, James F. 
Richards. S.S., James 
Idlller, D D., Bamnel 
Alexander, SB., Archibald 
Mill«doler,DD., Philip 
Lacy, Drury 

Romeyn, d d., John Broadhead 
Nott, n.B.. Eliphalet 
Plinn, D B., Andrew 
Blatchford, n.B., Samuel 
IdkUs, b b., James 
yelil, B.B., William 
Blythe, B B., James 
Ooe, B.n^ Jonas 
Janeway. B n., Jaeob J. 
Rice, B.B., John Holt 
McDowfll, B.B., John 
Bill, B.B^ William 
Jennings. B B., Obadkh 
Chester, b.b., John 
Oreen, B B., ll.b, Ashbel 
Rowan, b b , Stephen N. 
HcAoley. B.B., ll.b., Thomas 
Herron, B b., Francis 
Ely, B B., Kara Styles 
Rice, B B., Benjamin Holt 
Flsk, B B., Bsra 
Beman, b.b., Nathan B. 8. 
Hoge, B B., James 
McDowell, B.B., WlUiam A. 
LindHlay. BB., Philip 
PhilUpa, BB., William W. 
Wlthempoon, B.B., John 
BlUott, B B., DaTid 
Plumer, B B , William S. 
Wilson, B B., Joehna L. 
En gins, B B., William M. 
Breckinridge, B.B., LLJ)., Kobt J. 
Kdgar. B B., John T. 
Spring, B B., Gardlnei 
Junkin. BB., George 
Krebs, B B., John M. 
Hf <dge, B B., Charles 
Thorn well, B B., James H. 
MeOtll, B B., Alexander T. 
Murray, B.B., Nicholas 
Leiand, B B., Aaron W. 
Humphrey, b.b., Edward P. 
Lord, B B . John C. 
Toung. B B., John 0. 
Boardman, b.b., Henry A. 
Rice. B B., Nathan h. 
McFarland, BB., Francis 
Van Rensselaer. D.n„ Oortlandt 
Seott, BJ>., WlUlam A. 



PSMBTTKBT rUAM OF ' . 

WHSN XLBCTXB. okdmat'ii clec 



New York. 

New Castle. 

New Brunswick. 

Ou-Iisle. 

New CaKtle. 

New York. 

New York. 

Carlisle. 

Philadelphia. 

Albany. 

New Brunswick. 

New Brunswick. 

Philadelphia. 

New York. 

Concord. 

New Brunswick. 

New York. 

New York. 

PhlUdelpUa. 

New York. 

Hanover. 

New York. 

Albany. 

Harmony. 

Columbia. 

Baltimore. 

Albany. 

West Lexington 

Columbia. 

Philadelphia. 

HanoTor. 

Jersey. 

Winchester. 

Steubenyllle. 

Albany. 

PbiUdelphla. 

New York. 

New York. 

Ohio. 

Philadelphia. 

HanoTer. 

Hudson. 

Troy. 

Columbus. 

Charleston Union. 

NashTille. 

New York. 

Harmony. 

Ohio. 

East HanoTer. 

Cincinnati. 

Philadelphia. 

Baltimore. 

NasbTille. 

New York. 

Oxford. 

New York. 

New Brunswick. 

Charleston. 

Ohio. 

Elisabethtown. 

Charleston. 

Louisville. 

Buffalo City. 

Transylvania. 

Philadelphia. 

St. Louis. 

Lexington. 

Burlington. 

CaUfornia. 



1749 
1761 
1770 
1769 
1769 
1769 
1777 
1773 
1772 
1779 
1774 
1784 
1774 
17e*i 
1778 
1778 
1797 
1793 
1794 
1796 
1788 
1799 
1798 
1803 
1789 
1802 
1806 
1793 
1798 
1799 
1803 
1804 
1792 
1817 
1810 
1787 
IS- 
IS— 
1800 
1»— 
1812 
1810 
18— 
1808 
1813 
1817 
1818 
18— 
1812 
1827 
1804 
1820 
1832 
1817 
1810 
1818 
1830 
1822 
1*— 
1836 
1829 
18— 
1834 
1832 
1829 
1833 
1833 
1822 
1834 
1838 



Tsim ov 


TUB or 


AaSAV 


PLACX OW MXXT- 


KLEC'll. 


DBATH. 


DBATB 


INO. 


1789 


1811 


88 


PbiUdelphla. 


1790 


1793 


71 


PbiUdelphla. 


1791 


1824 


80 


Philadelphia. 


1792 


1818 


72 


Cariisle. Pa. 


1793 


1801 


69 


Philadelphia. 


1794 


1807 


78 


Philadelphia. 


1796 


1824 


69 


CariUle, Pa. 


1796 


1812 


62 


PbiUdelphla. 


1797 


1810 


60 


PhlUdelphU. 


1798 


1799 


48 


PbtUdelphU. 


1799 


1819 


69 


Winchester, Ya. 


1800 


1813 


62 


Philadelphia. 


1801 


1812 


66 


Philadelphia. 


1802 


1816 


77 


PhiladelphU. 


1803 


18-26 


62 


PhiUdelpbU. 


1804 


1816 


66 


Philadelphia. 


1806 


1843 


76 


PhiUdelphia. 


1806 


1860 


81 


Philadelphia. 


1807 


1851 


79 


Philadelphia. 


1H08 


1852 


... 


Philadelphia. 


1809 


1816 


67 


PhiUdelphia. 


1810 


1826 


48 


PbiUdelphla. 


1811 





... 


PhiUdelphia. 


1612 


1820 


47 


Philadelphia. 


1813 


1828 


61 


Philadelphia. 


1814 


1820 


48 


PhiUdelpbU. 


1816 




... 


PhiUdelphia. 


1816 


1842 


77 


Philadelphia. 


1817 


18-22 


68 


Philadelphia. 


1818 


1868 


84 


PhiUdelpbU. 


1819 


1831 


64 


Philadelphia. 


1820 





... 


PhiladelphU. 


1821 


1862 


88 


Philadelphia. 


1822 


1832 


64 


Philadelphia. 


1823 


1829 


44 


PhiUdelphia. 


18-24 


1848 


86 


Philadelphia. 


18-26 


1836 


... 


PhiUdelphia. 


1826 


186- 


... 


Philadelphia. 


1827 




... 


Philadelphia. 


18-28 




... 


PhiUdelphia. 


1829 


1866 


74 


Philadelphia. 


1830 


1833 


48 


Philadelphia. 


1831 


...... 


... 


Philadelphia. 


1832 • 


... 


... 


Philadelphia. 


1833 


1861 


62 


PhiUdelphia. 


1834 


1866 


69 


Philadelphia. 


1836 




... 


Pittsburgh, Pa. 


1836 


1864 


... 


Pitteburgh, Pa. 


1837 




... 


Philadelphia. 


1838 





... 


Philadelphia. 


1839 


1846 


72 


Philadelphia. 


1840 




... 


Philadelphia. 


1841 





... 


Phnadelphla. 


1842 





... 


PhiladelphU. 


1843 





... 


Philadelphia. 


1844 





... 


Louisville, Kr. 


1846 





... 


Cincinnatl,Ohlo. 


1846 





... 


PhiladelphU. 


1847 





... 


Richmond, Va. 


1848 





... 


Baltimore. Md. 


1849 





... 


Pittsburgh, Pa. 


1850 


, 


... 


CincinnaaOhio. 


1861 





... 


St. Louis, Mo. 


1862 





... 


Charleston, S. 0. 


1863 


1867 


66 


PhiUdelphia. 
Buflalo, N. Y. 


1864 




... 


1856 


...... 


... 


Nashville, Ten. 


1866 


...... 


... 


New York City. 


1867 


.M... 


... 


Lexington. Ky. 
New Orleans, uu 


1868 





... 



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Rev BENJAMIN X. }''ALMEK, D. B, Pastor . 



Fubhsled by Joseph M. Wilson, N^UL SouihlO'^'S' Phil' 

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PBESBYTSBIAK HISTOBIOAL ALKANAO. 93 



fistflrual Skdt|f ai t\t iixit Irtsbjttrisn ^ntt\, 

®rUans, fs* 



This Church is located at the corner of South and St. Mary 
Streets, opposite Lafayette Square, — it covers an area of 150 feet 
in length and 100 feet in width, the main tower is twenty feet 
square at its base, and is 219 feet in height. The style of architec- 
ture is Gothic, of the fourteenth century. 

The audience room is ninety-eight feet long, and seventy-five in 
width, and forty-two feet high, — it will seat 1100 persons, the gal- 
leries on each side will accommodate 450 persons. 

In the rear of the audience room, there are two large rooms for 
lecture and school rooms. 

The site on which the church stands is the same as the building 
which was destroyed by fire in October, 1854.* 

The pastor, Rev. B. M. Palmer, D. I)., preached the dedication 
sermon, from John iv. 28, 24. 

• In Bome future number of the Presbyterian Hisiarical Almanac^ we expect to 

Eublish a Historical Sketch of Presbyteriaoism in New Orleans. It doubtless would 
ave appeared in this volume ; but during the summer and fall, the very time to prepare 
the sketch, the yellow fever raged with great violence in New Orleans, and Rev. Dr. 
Palmer was deeply engaged in attending to his pastoral and other duties. He with his 
brother Presbyterian ministers remaining at their posts. 
The above description of the church is taken from the columns of Ths Fresbyterian, 



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u 



THE PB&SBTTBBIAN OHUBOH. (K. S.) 

OFFICERS, ETC., 



PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. (N. S.,) 

TOR 1858-59. 



Rev. M. L. P. THOMPSON, d.d. 



Itrmantnt ^Ittk 
bbv. henry darung. 



Rbv, EDWIN F. HATFIELD, d.d. 



Wtmmx. 

ANTHONY P. HALSBY, Esq. 



Cntstees of % Cffttzc^ €mtion J^»nb. 

RiT. JAMBS W. MoLANB, d.d.| Secretary. 
OLIVER H. LEE, Treaturer. 

^rtsbsttnan $»blxca&m Connmtttt. 

Riy. JOHN W. DULLES, Seerelarw, 
WILLIAM H. PURYES, Treaturtr. 



Cnistees of l^t $rtsb{ttriati fonse. 

Riy. BBNJ. J. WALLACE, Secretary, 
E. S. WHELEN, TrMwiirtr. 

thicvAon Commiita. 

RsT. T. A. MILLS, d.d.. Secretary, 
JOSEPH B. SHEFFIELD, Treaeurer, 



€}jnxt\i (Bdtnsion Committee. 

RiT. BBNJ. J. WALLACE, Secretary. B. B. COMBGYS, Treasurer. 



THEOLOGICAL SEMINARIES. 



ttmon, ^bs Sork Aitg. 

Bdw. RoBTHBOH, Pro/, of Biblical Literature. 
T. H. Skirbkr, " Sacred Rhetoric, &c. 

HiMRT B. Smith, " Syttematie Theology. 
R. D. Hitchcock, " Church Hiatory. 
G. S. DuNNiHO, Jnetructor in Hebrew, Ac 

ITane, ntar Atndnnati, ®bio. 

D, H. Allen, Prof, of Didactic Theology, 
G. E. Day, " Biblical Literature, 

Hbmbt Smith, << Sacred Bhetoric, Ac. 



^nimnr, |ttb gork Aits. 

S. M. Hopkins, Prof, of EccUeiaeL Hiet., Ac. 
Edwin Hall, " Chrietian Theology, 

E. A. HuNTlNOTON, " Biblical Gritieiem. 
J. B. CONDIT, <' iSdcred Bhetoric, Ac. 



j^ost^bestenr, parsbUU, Snra. 

Rer. Isaac Andbrson, d.d. 
Rot. John S. Craio. 
Rot. John J. Robinson. 



Slackfmnc, CarlinMIIt, |1L 



PERIODICALS. 



vamb. 

The ChridUm Obeerver. 

Ammean Preebyterian, 

The Btungdiat. 

3Kt Presbytery Reporter. 

The Preehyierian Quarterly Beview. 

The Minutes ofiht General Assembly. 

The Preabyteriati Historical Almanao, 



B9XTOK. 

rbt. a. converse. 

Rbt. D. HOUGHTON. 
Rbt. CRAIGHKAD k FIELD. 
Rbt. a. T. NORTON. 
Rbt. B. J. WALLACE. 
THE STATED CLERK. 
JOSEPH M. WILSON. 



PLACB. 

PhOaddphia, Pbl 
PhUaddphia, Ftu 
New Turk. 
Chicago. JU. 
PhUaddphia, PiBU 
New York. 
PhiJUidefykia, A. 



WMily. 

Weekly. 

Weekly. 

Monthly. 

Quarterly, 

AtmuaL 

AmwaL 



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THB PRBSBTTSRIAN OHUBCH, (N. 8.) 95 



THE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH, (N. S.) 



The General Assembly Prbsbtterian Ohuroh, in the Uia- 
TBD States of Ambkiga, met in the Seoond Presbyterian Church, 
Chicago, 111.; on Thursday, May 20th, 1858, at 11 o'clock, A. M. ; 
and was opened with a discourse by the retiring Moderator. 

^mnxit Irs 3^^* S^muti M. $ii\tx, i* i« 

Acts, ix. 31. Then had the churches rest thronghout all Jadea and Gklilee and Sa> 
maria, and were edified, and walking in the fear of the Lord, and in the comfort of 
the Holy Ghost, were multiplied. 

Thus ended the first persecution. It had subserved an import- 
ant purpose in the preparation of the infant church for its great 
mission. It had tested the faith of its members. They had expe- 
rienced that baptism of fire, which from age to age was destined to 
fall upon the church of Jesus. They had begun to enter upon the 
fellowship of Christ's sufferings. The blood of the first Christian 
martyr, shed in attestation of the truth, revealed the path of suffer- 
ing along which the church must pass, the power of the faith to 
lift her above the fear of death. And more than this, these Chris- 
tians scattered abroad, as the flames hidden for a season in a sin- 
gle building, when flung forth by an explosion, spread themselves 
on all sides, so they went everywhere bearing the holy fire, and 
kindling the flames of divine love in thousands of hearts. 

Then came the season of repose. The fiercest of her persecutors, 
now become the lowliest of her children, was passing through that 
experience which was to make him the profoundest expositor of 
Christian theology, the boldest and most successful evangelist to 
the Qentiles, the grandest and most remarkable figure in the whole 
college of the Apostles. From this retirement, where had been 
nourished into full strength the great principles of the doctrine of 
Jesus, he was soon to issue forth on that holy career which set two 
continents in a blaze, prepared the way and laid broad the foun- 
dation for still mightier triumphs. The church, now at peace, 
began to organize and consolidate her forces. Her faith, deepened 
and strengthened by trial, instinct with a divine life, gave an irre- 
sistible momentum to her advance. Looking up to the captain of 
her salvation, she entered upon that path of conquest which is to 
cease only when the kingdoms of this world have become the king- 
doms of her Lord. This season of repose was full of blessing. It 



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9 

96 PRESBYTERIAN HISTORICAL ALMANAC. 

was needed, lest the young life should be utterly crushed out by the 
powers of darkness. 

The season of peace gave time for the edification of the church. 
The Holy Spirit, working ever in harmony with mental laws, then 
went forth on his special mission of renovation. New churches 
were organized ; believers multiplied ; Christianity gained a higher 
and broader position for future conquest. This was the second 
great revival. Thus we have brought out directly in our text the 
state of rest which the church enjoyed and the ministrations of the 
spirit under which she was edified and multiplied. But as we can- 
not well discuss the subject of rest without also looking at the state 
of conflict which is so effectively connected with it, I propose to call 
your attention first to the conditions of conflict and of rest into which 
the church from time to time passes, and then briefly to the minis- 
tration of the Spirit through wbicb alone either of these conditions 
are made to subserve her highest good. 

Conflict rather than rest has been the chief characteristic of an 
advancing church ; and what has been true for a time will still be, 
tintil the conditions which have induced it are largely changed. 
Side by side with the angelic chorus, " Peace on earth and good 
will to men," stands that prophetic declaration of the Master, " I come 
not to send peace, but a sword." The individual christian repre- 
sents in himself alike the necessity and the sources of this conflict in 
which the church must engage. Advancing in knowledge, he learns 
how more fully to apply the principles of Christianity to practical 
life, and sees more clearly evils once embraced or tolerated, which 
now must be renounced cost what it may, so the church in her pro- 
gress reaches a position to which, with a riper judgment, she ap* 
plies the touchstone of truth to practices adopted in some hour of 
inexperience, tolerated while the light was increasing, but now seem 
to be evils — evils to be renounced cost what it may. So at Geneva, 
Calvin, while in principle giving all spiritual power to the church, 
permitted the state to hold a relationship to it which time has de- 
monstrated to be the source of manifold evils. So in the English 
Reformation, elements of that spiritual despotism out of which the 
church had come, were permitted to remain, which have since 
brought forth only evil. 

This state of conflict has advantages and disadvantages. 

1. The first of the happy results of this condition of things, is that 
which immediately followed this persecution. It scattered abroad 
the disciples. It stirred up their quiet nest at Jerusalem. It opened 
to their minds the breadth of their mission, and taught them, as 
when all prosperous and happy at home, they could not so well 
have learned the true meaning of Christ's last command. Naturally 
enough they would have supposed, that the city of the great King, 
the religious centre of the world, must first be thoroughly subdued 
to Christ, before the gospel could go forth to other cities. But God 
had other purposes. Jerusalem is no longer to be the central glory 
of the earth. Fire shall devour its temple; famine and the sword 
its people; while Titus shall drive his ploughshare over Mount Zion. 



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THE PRB8BTTSRIAK OHUROH, (K. S.) 97 

The same results have repeatedly followed persecutioQ along the 
history of the churches. The Huguenot and the Puritan, obeying 
the spirit of the injunction, ** when they persecute you in this city, 
flee ye into another,'' have erected a kingdom for Jesus in this new 
world — a kingdom so situated, with such vast resources, its subjects 
BO governed and trained in the truth, its youth so rich in intelli- 
gence, enterprise, and strength, that, unless the powers of darkness 
shall be permitted to corrupt its spirit, its manhood will stretch its 
arms forth to embrace all tne families and tribes of men and draw 
them into fellowship with Jesus. 

2. A second happy effect of this extreme conflict is seen in its in- 
fluence upon the experience of the Church. Brought into deepest 
fellowship with the sufferings of their Lord, the awful power of his 
resurrection is felt all through the spirit dead to this world, making 
it alive to the world to come. The love, the faith, the hope of the 
Church shine at no time With so unearthly a light as in the hours 
of suffering which darken her history. 

There is one result of the internal conflicts of the church of 
inestimable value. I refer to the systematic development of the 
doctrines of Christianity. It is an unquestionable fact that the con- 
troversies which have arisen in the bosom of the church itself, in 
respect to the great principles of Christian faith, have served to de- 
fine and settle these principles in opposition to vital error. 

But when quieter times came, philosophy entered and sought to 
shape God's truth in accordance with man's thought. 

The old and loose phraseology of the fathers — a merely apologetic 
Christianity in opposition to heathenism — was of little avail in 
meeting these new developments of speculative mind in the Church. 

The protest at Spires not only gave power to Protestantism : it 
made it certain the Bomish Church could never be again, while it 
existed alongside of the Beformed Church, what it once was. No 
Tetzels shall hereafter be seen hawking indulgences in sight of Pro- 
testant steeples. The exodus of the Free Church of Scotland, not 
only developed an unceasing vitality in this Church itself, but sti- 
mulated to a more Christian activity that from which they came. 
And in giving such a signal vindication to the independence of the 
spiritual on the civil, it has clothed this principle with an energy 
that in time will work out still grander triumphs. 

But while these conflicts at times work together for good, yet this 
is not true in all cases. Springing from corruption and ignorance, 
its legitimate results are only evil. Counteracted by the spirit and 
providence of Qod, it is often made, as we have seen, the means of 
blessing. But, for purposes of infinite wisdom, these trials of the 
Church are sometimes permitted to issue disastrously for the time. 
The advantages on which I have dwelt have each their counterpart 
of evil. 

1. First, persecution, instead of promoting the immediate spread 

of true religion, not unfrequently greatly retards its progress, 

and within certain limits sometimes seems to crush out all vital 

piety. When power is arrayed against Jesus when the Scribes and 

13 



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$8 pnSSBT*rBRIAK HIsrORTCAL AMCAKAO. 

Phariseee oombine to dethrone and crnciff liim, then the timid 
shrink back and the time serying join hands with his opposers. In 
the minds of mnltrtudeB authority and power are mightier than con- 
science. And 80 when we sing our pseans of victory, and rejoice 
that the blood of the martyrs has som^imes been the seed of the 
church, let vs not forget that natnrally it is not bo; that only through 
God^s special benediction is it erer so; that still the cry ascends 
irora beneath the altar — the wail of myriads of souls of them that 
were slain for the word of Gt>d, and for the testimony which they 
held — " How long, Lord, holy and tr«e, dost thou not judge and 
arenge our blood on them that dwell on the earth? And white 
robes were given unto every one of them, and it was said unto them 
that they should rest yel for a little season, until thetr felhw-Bervfrnts 
also and their bnlthm^^ ihxU iihould be killed as they were, should be 
fulfilled/' Thus for a time hath a cloud rested on the altar of re- 
ligion ; and the blood of the martyr and the tears of confessors 
have wailed in sadness for the quickening breath of the Holy Ghost. 

2. We have seen the happy result of tne conflicts of the Church 
in the clear statement and vindicalion of the Christian laith. But 
in this respect also the benefits hav« not been unmixed with evil. 
The same influemces which, at length, have set forth the truth 
in its fulness, have ofken, during the progress of the church to this 
high position, served to distort, and unduly magnify partial truths. 
Controversy tends to produce an exaggerated estimate, and also an 
exaggerated statement of the truth. 

And if this distortion of truth is sometimes thcTesuIt of outward 
conflict, the same thing is equally manifest in the controversies 
which have «prung up in the bosom of the church. It belongs to 
our nature that, as a doctrine of our faith is disputed, the feelings 
gather round it, the enthusiasm kindles OTcr it, the mind concen- 
trates itself upon it^ until it stands forth enlarged and coloured with 
our prejudices, magnified through them into a disproportionate 
greatness. Tew minds are large enough or so well balanced as in 
uie heat of controversy to hold all the truths of a system in their 
just estimation. 

Athanasius and his co-workers in the great controversv respecting 
the nature of Christ, ofl;en approached as near to tri*theism as to 
tri-unity. Augustine, whose genius towers up in the past like the 
pyramid of Cheops over Egypt, gives us at times such statements 
of &Uen humanity as virtually annihilates our distinctive moral man- 
hood. Luther, in his tremendous vindication of justification by 
faith, uses language that legitimately stamps all good works with 
the signet of Satan* Nor is this exaggeration of statement the onl v 
evil. While it lasts, the point in dispute beoomes the central pil- 
lar of the whole temple of religion. At one time the form of bap- 
tism enlists all the acumen and intellect of the ecclesiastical Samsons. 
At another mediate and immediate imputation of the sin of Adam — 
at another the philosophy and extent of the atonement, the irresisti- 
bleness of the Spirit in regeneration, the nature and effect of election, 
inability, and free agency, and thus ranging down from lofty to 



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nu PBBflBrrfflUAK ohcsob, (n. s.) 99 

minute, a man's salvation has been made to depend on irh^tlier or 
so aa in&nt sinned with ite first breath, and the irfaole orthodozj 
of the Oharch, like a pjrRmid balanced oa its apex, is made to rest 
on an infinitesimal qxiantity, rather than on die broad fiwts of Ood^ 
revelation. Thns the really distanetire and easential gospel of J^ 
sns Christ is ihrast aside, md faith beooraes a<yt a childlike embra* 
cing him in his great officea, bat a power of philosophical discrivf^ 
ination, a capacity to hold in the inlielleot the hard, abstract, extreme 
dogmas of the schoolmen of the time; but which, as men in the mass 
are not moral ostriches, the body of the Chnrch, after maaifaUI| 
ioeffiBOtnal trials, repudiates as beyond the power of digestion. 

S. We have seen how outward trials tend to deepen the expe- 
rienoe and pwrify the hearts of the people of God. But we cannot 
affirm this of all kinds of conflict Internal oontroversy hath usu* 
ally an opposite iafluenee. When at peace within itself, the Church 
Bftay be in coafliet with all around it and grow stronger and purer ; 
when at strife within, though it should be at rest in respect to ex*- 
temal opposition, it nooriahes an element of weakness. Controvert 
mes in tiie Church tend to create a spirit which, imagining that tbe 
triumph of a party is the triumph of truth, aims rather at the pos* 
session of power and the demonstration of a perscmal victory, than 
at the spread of tiie tnith. 

Let us now consider briefly the condition of the churefa as at rest 
As in Christian experience true peace is not only a rich fruit of the 
Spirit, but the point of oonflnenee to which all the other graees teod^ 
BO in tbe churcdd a high state of spiritual prosperity is ever distin- 
guished as one of rest ^^ Pray for the pecux of Jerosalem, they shall 
prosper tiMt live there," is the sentiment that gushes frotn the Chri»> 
iitn heart 

1. One of the firrt things most obvious in such a state is its har«> 
mony with the acK>8t complete growth of a religious character. In 
a state of conflict the whole stress of the Christian life is throws 
upon one or two points. The antagoniatic, courageous feelings are 
fully developed. The gentler, quieter virtues, among whtoli lova 
reigns as queen, grow more vigorously under the culture of rest 
And bwMe this condition of rest is associated in scripture with the 
freest, noblest development of religion in the head and lifk of tha 
Church. 

2. In this state of rest the Church is best able to earry ibrward 
a system of thorough culture, and organize those forces which are 
necessary to her fullest development F<m' the Church is not an agw 
gregation of loose materials, but in its best state an organic exi» 
tence, embracing within itself the means of growth and prosperity. 
She forms hersdf into various societies, and. establishes for tbem a 
regular system of spiritual cultura She builds churches withia 
which to worship ; organises the means of instruction for the3rounff; 
educates her ministry ; and combines individual societies into sum 
forms as will best subserve the preservation of her purity, the No- 
vation of her members, and the spread of the gospel. The Dedans 
tion of Independence befitted a state of war, but the framing at the 



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100 PBBSBYTBRIAN HISTORIOAL ALVANAO. 

OoDBtitution, and the full inauguration of our National Bepublio 
was the work of peace. David was a warrior king and won the 
strong-hold of Salem ; but it was committed to Solomon during a 
reign of peace to rear the temple on Moriah. Calvin could find no 
rest in native France. But God prepared Geneva for his home ; 
and there, within the walls of that joung republic, secure alike from 
the rage of Francis, Charles, and the Duke of Savoy, beneath the 
awful shadow of Jura, beside the quiet waters of Lake Leman, he 
framed and established that ecclesiastical polity, which, restoring 
the early form of the house of God, has served as the pattern for so 
large a portion of the Reformed churches ; he planted that university 
which sent forth a ministry to Scotland and Switzerland, and France 
and Holland; he instituted that simple, spiritual culture which has 
prevailed so largely and succeeded so admirably in nurturing gene- 
rations of christians in the faith and love of Jesus. So in the times 
of Elizabeth and James, despite the bigotry of the latter and the 
prudery of the former, the word of God had found a home in En- 
gland. Had peace continued, that leaven might have leavened the 
whole lump, and in time the simple institutions of puritan Chris- 
tianity have grown up into full vigor on British soil. 

8. In this state of rest the Church is best prepared, to carry for- 
ward the work of the gospel out of herself, and the world is in the 
best state to hear the truth. There, free from the necessity of con- 
centrating her energies on herself, she can quietly put in motion all 
the enginery of Christianity for the great conquest. 

All the great revivals of religion, which have formed eras in the 
progress of the religion of Jesus, have occurred when the Church 
was at rest, and when the minds of men have been delivered from 
those agitations which are incident to conflict or which are like 
onto it It was so with the great awakening of the last century in 
Great Britain and the United States. It was so with the great re- 
Yival which opened this century. It was so with that which spread 
over the land thirty years ago. It is so with that which is now mo- 
ying around us in such a wave of redeeming love and peace. 

But while a state of rest hath in it so much of good to the Church, 
we are not to forget that it hath also its dangers. '' Silence," says 
one, '' is divine." But with equal truth another has said that if 
" rictory is silent, so is defeat." While on the one hand a state of 
rest may afford to the Church an opportunity for the silent working 
of those forces which are to gain the victory, yet, if long continued, 
it may also afford the opportunity for inferior and evil forces, spring* 
ing from our corruption, to work out her defeat. 

1. In this state of outward prosperity, you will notice, among 
other things, a secret influence hostile to a lofty, a vigorous faith. 
Faith hath this peculiarity, that as it is the vision and the grasping 
of the unseen and eternal, so it needs to be often shaken loose from 
the associations of things seen and temporal, and brought into di* 
reot (face to face and hand to hand) communion with its great objects. 
It must often feel itself sinking in the waters in order to quicken 
its grasp upon the Saviour. 



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THK PRESBTTKBIAN OHUROH, (N. 8.) 101 

The times of suffering have developed an unheard of manhood in 
the church, while the times of peace have dwarfed the proportions 
and withered the energy of the christian soldier. It is wonderful 
to read in Heb. xL, how the faith of the leaders of the elect host has 
grown to greatness amidst the furnace of trial rather than in the 
smooth and open path of rest. 

2. Directly connected with this, you are to consider how strong 
is the tendency in a time of peace to a self-indulgence in matters of 
religion, and a surprising activity in matters of worldly interest. 
We love not self-denial. It crosses the bent of our earthly nature; 
nay, it is the mortification unto death of that nature. Only as we 
look calmly, clearly, steadily at the vast interests at stake ; only as 
under the influence of motives drawn from the eternal world, we 
gird ourselves for the work, do we take up our cross daily and fol- 
low Jesus. 

Nor are these the only dangers of peace. Hand in hand with 
this spirit of self-indulgence and worlaly activity, there grows up a 
looseness of practice and a looseness of belief. 

And along with this degeneracy in the life of the church there 
creep in the slimy serpents of error. One by one the vital doctrines 
of the cross are dropped out of the pulpit and out of the heart. 
The dogmas of a pure faith enshrined m confessions and liturgies, 
like flies in amber, have no response and no vitality in the expe- 
rience of the people. While the very word of God, subject to the 
same degradation, is used as a form, juggled with as an enigma, and 
at length cast down as an impostor. 

We are brought to recognize directly the mission of the Holy 
Ghost as the mighty animating power, the true source of life within 
the church. It was only when the disciples walked in the fear of 
the Lord and the comfort of the Holy Ghost, that the rest they en- 
joyed contributed to their edification and increase. The church 
naturally, despite her new born nature, her holy principles, her di- 
vine light, left to herself would lapse into error, would fall into sin, 
would perish utterly from the earth. Those intermitting states of 
conflict and repose, might be conditions precedent to her progress 
at certain stages of her growth, but of themselves they would no 
more secure that growth, than the alternations of wind and calm with- 
out the rain and the sunshine would make the corn rise to fruitful- 
ness. It is the Spirit of God which must descend before her, rank in 
her, and overrule these outward changes to suit her necessities. This 
is *Uhe great promise of the Christian dispensation." Conjoined 
with the Messianic prophecies, and characteristic of the period over 
which the reign of Christ is to extend, are the most glowing pro- 
ductions of the mission of the Spirit. Jesus, our king, hath come, 
hath suffered, hath ascended his throne. Redemption, on the side 
of God, is all accomplished ; but on the side of man it is yet only 
in a small measure accomplished. 

The Spirit moves not upon the Church alone* The dry bones 
feel his presence; they come together, they rise up, a great army 
fall of life, and prepared to fight the battles of Immanuel. The 



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102 FRBSBTTEiaAK HISTORICAL ALHINAO* 

soenes of Pentecost are renewed. ConflicU is&ae in victories. Best 
opens still wide the gates of the kingdom to the thronging nations. 

And, here, fathers and brethren, is the great lesson which this 
scripture brings home to us* It is not the outward oiroumstances 
of trial or of prosperity, that will pull down or build up the ohorcL. 
For He who sits sovereign over her, doth ordain these as the coa- 
ditions through which for a time she most pass. It is the divine 
Spirit alone that can make these things a benediction rather than a 
curse. If we wait upon the Lord — if we cherish a deep lense of our 
dependence upon his power — if we magnify and honour the Holv 
Ghost in all our thoughts and acts — if we seek for this as the grand- 
est gift of Christ's victory, then our toials will be transformed into 
triumphs, and our rest from conflict will be the flood tide of a wide 
and glorious success. 

Fathers and brethren, ministersand elders, we assemble here amidst 
tbe brightoess of these scenes of revival— scenes sncb as the Church 
of Christ has perhaps never enjoved so richly before* But as my 
eye passes over this audience a shade of sadness steals in upon my 
heart* There are those who have been wont to sit with us in this 
high council, whose hearty greeting we miss to day. Taking ex- 
ception to the ancient, the uniform, the ofl repeated testimony of oar 
church, as well as to the mode of its utterance — respecting one of 
the greatest moral and organic evils of the age ; deeming it better 
to occupy a platform, foreign indeed to tbe genius of our free, re- 
publican institutions, yet adapted, in their view, to the fuller prom- 
ulgation of the gospel in the section where thiey dwell, they have 
preferred to take an independent position ; and while we cannot co- 
mcide with them in their views on this subject ; while we know 
that tbis separation has been precipitated upon us, not sought by 
us; yet remembering the days when with us they stood shoulder to 
shoulder against ecclesiastical usurpation and revolution^ when in 
deepest sympathy we have gone to the house of Ood in company, 
and mingled our prayers before a common mercy -seat, we cannot but 
pray for their peace and prosperity. We claim no monopoly of wis- 
dom and right. If in our course hitherto we have been moved to 
acts or deeds unfraternal or unbefitting our mutual relations; if in 
the attempt to maintain our ancient priciples and apply the gospel 
to the heart of this gigantic evil, we have given utterance to lan- 
guage that has tended to exasperate rather than quicken to duty, 
we claim no exemption from censure, we ask the forgiveness we aro 
equally ready to accord. 

Taking our position &r above the feelings of the hour, we sea 
the same great sovereignty, which through dark conflicts bath con- 
ducted the Church up to a position of wide influence, preparing the 
way for tbe noble triumphs of our common Christianity. For more 
than twenty years we have been subject to a strange discipline, 
sometimes to a baptism of fire. It was necessary for us to suffer in 
order that we might triumph. He who in every age bath seen fit 
thus to settle His Church upon the rock, and then crown her stead- 
£Ast adherence to truth with victory, hath brought us forth more 



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TB» PBE8BTTSIUAN CHURCH, (X. &) 



103 



compaot, more yigorous, better prepared in simple dependence upon 
bis power to baild up His Kingdom. Never before have we occupied 
so commanding a position, — a position so truly in sympathy with 
the great heart of Christianity abroad and at home, a position from 
which we ean send forth so wide and far-reaching an influence. We 
have a vast field to cultivate. We may have to adjust our cnachioery 
to our advanced condition. The methods which were wise in 
one generation, are not alwajra wise in another. Churches develope 
themselves inevitably, if they develope at all, in harmony with the 
circumstances arouna them. He who attempts to resist this law 
must die. All foreign churches on our soil are bound to become 
American io genius, in power, in manifestation, or perish. We 
must develope ourselves in the line of God's providence. What is 
a General Assembly worth, — what are ecclesiastical councils worth, 
if they only stereotype the p«at» while they refose to recognise a new» 
a grand» a nobler present? It is the remark of a very profound 
writer in subetanoe. that the foree of t^j one great movement in 
the Church is limited to some thirty or forty yearsu Then a new 
era must commence, if the Chureh advances. Let us see to it thai 
we wisely adapt ourselves to the field we have open to us ; that we 
seek, in the Catholic spirit towards other branches of the Church of 
Jesus which has been one of our noblest oharacteristics, to develope 
our resources i^ harmony witb the true genius of our Constitution 
and Discipline* But while we do this, let us not forget that peace 
hath ber defeats as well as her victories. Let us remember that it 
is only as we walk in the fear of the Lord, in the comfort of the 
Holy Ghost, that we can expect our churches to be built up in the 
faith, and converts multipliea. And lei as all unite in the prayer, 
" Give ear, Shepherd of Israel ; thou that leadest Joseph like a 
flock, thou that dwellest between the cherubims, shine forth. Before 
Ephraim^ Benjamin, and Manasseh, stir up thy strength. Let thy 
priests be dotned with salvation, and let thy saints rejoice in goodness." 
After the disonurae, the Assembly was constituted with praver. 
The Permanent Clerk announced the following persons as members 
of the General Assembly, riz : 



STNOM. 



RULDCO BLDBSS* 



Amies, Daniel 
ArmstroDg, Ohester S. 
Ashvon, BUas H. 

Baldwiit, William 
Barnard, O. Holmes 
Beckwitlu Bam^ B« 
Beebe, EH W. 
Bevan, Philip 
Bird, Thompson 
Blaisdell, James J. 
Boardman, Qeot^ S. 
Bradley* Miltoa 



Blue Earth. 
Marshall. 
Fox Biver. 

Otsego. 

Niafifara. 

St. Lawrence. 

Erie. 

Salem. 

Des Moines. 

Cincinnati. 

Onondaga. 

Kalamazoo, 



Peoria. 

Michigan. 

IViscoQsin. 



Shahael R. Greens. 
Lyman Dayton. 



SaBqnebannA. 

Qeiiesee. Charles H. West 

Utica. Ira Chandler. 
West Pennaylvania-David S. Clark. 

Indiana. John S. B. Kelso, M. D. 

Iowa. John 6. Weeks, M. D, 

Chicinnati. Joseph Guild. 

Onondaga. John Hartshorn. 

Michigan. Albert Arms. 



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104 



mSBTTBRIAN HISTORICAL AULLSAO. 



Brown, John M. 


BlOQMiwtoll. 


IVorm. 




LbmdW.Ohml 


Btti»h» SttplM 


JJbmj. 


AlUiqr. 




WHliftB BvtOQ. 


CANriBUK S. a, D. IX 


Onomligtt. 


(h^otA^ 




Zebuloo Oitrai. 


rkw«^^» WillwM M. 


Dftjtoa. 


CillPMMti 




Gcn^e I. Mmrj. 


OlMVttHr, JOMh 


Sciota. 


ObiOL 




BeojaaiD Xewtflo. 


eiwk. nww 


lowm CItT. 


Io«tt. 






i\M^hl«ll. Jmm 


Pitubwck 


WttCFtevi 


rhvim 


. iMmndam R LiTii«rtaA 




TraMlwil 


WtttenBii 


nv^ 


lUrtiBAIko. 


IVkwm^ 




L 




i\uHW.Ktmj 


Fort Wi^jML 


Wdb^ 




Ikud S. Bmt. 


P4Vt5». Qeory* F* 


S«teTl«. 


Dl'oc*. 




ClMrksBtlkM. 


IVK^vmik U^?oqp> K. 


l>Mb«;<|MW 


lo««. 




WUJaM BodivriL 


Uk-ivv* Nmimii ^ 


MailkWtt. 


Imlam. 




ThcoML. PftiDe. 


1V>«m»>YiUimR 


B^tk 


G««m. 




AbnlmmWMo^ 


l>llUlM.^^W. 


inu]aiii.ai. 


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k 


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J.ManUIPu2,M.IlL 
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CWvo^M^ 


W«Btm Be 


iVl^ 


Ft!CH«^ ABlktV X 


TVpy. 


A!tMT. 




L«»air;<j9. 


f>«tttt.ilil» Ij^jk 


Vr«^«MW. 


Mmij^ 




l4aKi&Gf«HL 


\L«, Oorv» V^ P. P. iriK>3L 


l^ori^ 




1ilI!sBl.Ij«L 


i;a:ruw. Wiiiiam q. 


ThiwiBL 


I'liiww. 




TVnMS Mofft^ 


iiiio^rt. U^nMi W. 


i^tMlMCOW 




^ 


K. I>rrri«i WicK. 


v;o%K^it«ka, KifutMftS^ 


i u.a w*wt 


MxQi«M. 




Jaon Otamdlt-r. 


l>vMii(iL N^ihott 


Ot&ftwm. 


PWm*. 




OMSti-r BL BoBhaof^ 


i;^ruv<<»« |<l»iiHimilt 


Hjjniltuo^ 


CimrtooAd. 




F.'ntf Kimier. 


tirnilt^. ^sMiL UL, J>^ TK ^WMra. 


Ii«w«m. 




Bi iiMi BLJai 


Hc/«. VNitii.l>.I>. 


vX't^ 


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Ejb;. Jofai FjrtBT. 


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tia«>^«, K:ftki9«.>m 


v^rveo Ctetift. 


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. Jttrrs C^nmia. 


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104 



PBBSBTTBBIAN HI8T0BICAL ALMAKAO. 



MnmRM. 


PRKSBTTISnS. 


STMODS. 


KDLmO KLDmifl. 


Brown, JohoM. 


Bloomlngton. 


Peoria. 


Lumen W. Capen. 


Bush, Btephea 


Albany. 


Albany. 


William Burton. 


GANFnLD,S. B.,D. D. 


Onondaga. 


Onondaga. 


Zebulon Ostrom. 


Gbeever, William M. 


Dayton. 
Scioto. 


Cincinnati 


George L. Massey. 


Gbegter, Joeeph 


Ohio. 


Benjamin Newton. 


Clark, Daniel 


Iowa City. 


Iowa. 




Ck)chran, James 


Pittsburgh. 
TrumbulL 


West Pennsylvania. Lauriston B. Livingston. 


Gone, Aogustos 


Western Boerve. 


Martin Allen. 


Gornwell, laaac D. 


Delaware. 


Susquehanna. 
Wabash. 





Gurtifl, Eleroj 


Fort Wayne. 


Daniel S. BeaVer. 


Datib, George P. 


Schnyler. 


Blinoifl. 


Charles Ballou. 


Delevan, George E. 


Dubuque. 


Iowa. 


William BothweU. 


Dickey, Ninian S. 


Madison. 


Indiana. 


Thomas L. Paine. i 


Downs, William R 


Bath. 


Geneva. 


Abraham Waugh. 


Dalles, John W. 


Philada.3d. 


Pennsylvania. 


...... 


Earli. Gomellofl, Jr., 


Philada. 4th. 


Pennsylvania. 


J. Marshall Paul, M.D. 


Bdlfl, James 


Cleveland. 


Western Beserve. 


Jei^miah Holt 




Troy. 


Albany. 


Lyman Wilder. 


Franklin, Benj. 


Washtenaw. 


Michigan. 


Daniel B. Greene. 




Peoria. 


William K Lee, 


Gallaiier, William Q. 


Illinois. 


Illinois. 


Thomss Moffltt 


Gilbert, Hiram W. 


Chenango. 


Snsquehanna. 
Michigan. 


B. Percival Wilcox, 


Goodman, Beabea S. 


Cold Water. 


John Chandler. 


Gould, Nahum 


Ottawa. 


Peoria. 


Chester B. Bushmore. 


Graves, Benjamin 


Hamilton. 


Cincinnati. 


Elias Eumler. 


Gridl^,SamLH.,D.D 


. Geneva. 


Geneva. 


Ebenenr B. Jones. 


Hall, Edwin, D.D. 


Cayuga. 


Onondaga. 


Hon. John Porter. 


Hall, Saml. H. 


Tioga. 
St. Joseph. 
Meadyille. 


Onondaga. 
Wabash. 


Alvan Wheeler, M. D. 


Hamilton, Lewis 


Amos Davis. 


Hampson, Geo. M. 


WestPennsylTMila. 


Hancock, Joeeph W. 


Minnesota. 


Peoria. 


Henry M. Knox. 


Hawley, Bansom 


Green Casde. 


Indiana. 


.....a 


Heacock,Grow W., D. D. Buflhlo. 


Genesee. 


Charles Taintor. 


Hill, Samuel N. 


Detroit 


Michigan. 


Samuel Zug. 
. James W. Bishop. 


Hitchcok, B. D., D. D. 


New York 8d. 


N.Y.&N. Jersey 


Holmes, Henry B. 


Belvidere. 


Peoria. 





Hopkins, Timothy IL 


Cayuga. 
Philada. 3d. 


Onondaga. 


Sylvester WiUard, M, D. 
Hon.A.Naudain,M.D. 


Hotchkin, Beriah B, 


Pennsylvania. 


JoHMsoK, Obadiah M. 


Hudson. 


N.Y.&N. Jersey 


. Hon. Bobert Denniston. 


Jones, WiUiston 


Cedar Valley. 


Iowa. 




Kanodsb, John G. 


Columbus. 


Wisconsin. 


Milton Jennings. 


Karr, WiUiam S. 


Brooklyn. 


N.Y.& N.Jersey 


. Jarvis Carman. 


Lakdis, Bobert W. 


Gr.B'r. Valley 


. Michigan. 


Sarell Wood. 


Lilly, Alvah 


Geneva. 


Geneva. 


Benjamin Young. 


Lindsley, Chas. E. 
Little, Jacob, D. D. 


N.York 4th. 


N. Y. Sc N. Jersey. Henry D. Banney, M. D. 


Pataskala. 


Ohia 




Lacas, George G. 


N. York 3d. 


N. Y. A N. Jersey. George Belts. 


McGabb, Francis S. 


Loganpport, 
Lake Superior 


Wabash. 


Davis H. Grouse. 


McCorkle,Wm. A. 


Michigan. 




McOnllough. Saml. J. 


Pennsylvania. 


Geneva. 


Jesse Shepherd. 
Benjamin Bangs. 


McLanrin, James 


Saginaw. 


Michigan. 


Miller, Adam 


Montrose. 


N.Y.& N.Jersey 


.James Deans. 


Mills. Caleb. LL. D 


Crawfordsville. Wabash. 


Thos. W. Fry, M. D. 


Hoore^ Edwin G. 


Ontario. 


Genesee. 


Abraham H. Williams. 



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-■'■] 



.S**" 



.^^' 



Pastor of the Firsl Prestjteriaa CliurcK BuEfalo, New York. 
Moderator of Uie General AssemMy 18^8 

lizedbyGoOQle 

fiuins.hfd Ij hsejii Af HO/j„^ A''///, .OW /^* S'J'M' 



THB PBXSBYTSBIAN CHVBOH, (K. 8.) 



105 



STNODS. 



SDLINO XCDIRS. 



Nash, Alvan 
Newton, Oren H. 
Nilefl, William A. 
Norton, Augostos T. 

PAuncB, Cbas. H. 
Payeon, Eliot H. 
Pieraon, Job Jr. 
Pomeroy, Anratos 
Powell, John N. 

Ransom, Gyrenioa 
Richards, Elias J. 
Richardson, Willard 
Robinson, Samuel N. 
Robinson, Thos. H. 
Rowland, H.A.»D.D. 
Raasell, Benjamin 
Rosaell, Daniel 

Satrv, William N. 
Scott, Joseph H. 
Shnmwaj, Qeo. R H. 
Sinclair, James 
Smith, Henry B.. D. D. 
Smith, J. Few, D. D. 
Smith, T. Ralston 
Snyder, Peter 
Spencer, Tlieodore 
Steuart, Robert 
Stillman, Timothy, D. D. 
Strong, Addison K. 



Grand River. 
Franklin. 
Milwaukee. 
Alton. 

Wabash. 

Utica. 

Rochester. 

Ithaca. 

Galena. 

Champlain. 

PhUaria. 4th. 

Montrose. 

Cortland. 

Harrisbnrgh. 

Newark. 

Chemang. 

Uenesee. 

North River. 

Portage. 

Lyona 

liOiw Island. 

N. York 4tb. 

Newark. 

N. York 3d. 

Watertown. 

Utica. 

Alton. 

Buffiilo. 

Monroe. 



Western Reserve. 

Ohio. Gilbert Green. 

Wisconsin. Samnel C. West. 

Illinois. Russell Tuthill 



THoifP80N,M. L. P., D.D. Bnfiato. 
Tindall, George P. Indianapolis. 
Toof, Ebenezer M. Rochester. 

Trotter. Alexander Catskill. 
Turner, William C. Maumee. 
Twombly, Israel S. Athens. 



Wadswokth, Henry T. 
Walter, John H. 
Wight, J. Ambrose 
Wilber, Francis A. 
Williams, Stephen H. 
Wiswell. George F. 
Wood, Glen 



Rockaway. 

Huron. 

Chicago. 

Elyria. 

Champlain. 

Wilmmgt(»]. 

Keokuk. 

Osv/ego» 



Illinois. 

Utica. 

Uenesee. 

Geneva. 

Peoria. 

Albany. 
Pennsylvania. 
N.Y.& N.Jersey. 
Onondaga. 
Pennsylvania. 
N.Y. ft N.Jersey. 
Geneva, 
uenesee. 

N.Y.& N.Jersey. 

Western Reserve. 

Geneva. 

N.Y. AN. Jersey. 

N.Y.& N.Jersey. 

N.Y.& N.Jersey. 

N.Y.&N.Jereey. 

Utica. 

Utica. 

Illinois. 



Wm. M. Allison. 
Calvin Bishop. 
Harl^ N. Bushnell 



Michigan. 



AsaD. Moore. 
Benedict D. Stewart 
Joab I'yler. 
Charles A. Cook. 
Elisba Covert. 
Ira Taylor. 
Tvler H. Al)bey. 
Elias Foot 

Joseph Bartlett 

Hiram Foster. 

Samuel M.Biatchford. 
Asa H. Holden. 
George D. Cragin* 
Albert P. Brayton. 
Noah White. 
Lawson A. Parks. 
Thomas Farnham. 
Hon. Charles Noble. 



Uenesee. ...... 

Indiana. Robert Hamill, 

Genesee. Joeiah Pierson. 

Albany. 

Western Reserve. Horatio Conant M. D. 

Ohio. James Patterson. 

N. Y. t N. Jersey. Albert R Riggs. 

Western Reserve. John Seymour. 



Peoria. 

Western Reserve. 

Albany. 

Pennsylvania. 

Iowa. 

Utica. 



Henry E. Seelye. 
Elijah Dewett 
Hascal D. Savage. 
Edward T. Taylor. 
William Coleman. 
John E. Dutton. 



DKLBGATES PBOM OOBRBSrONSING BODIES. 

Rev, Joseph R Page, General Association of Connecticut 

Rev. Silas McEeen, General Convention of Vermont 

Rev. Jeremiah Porter, Presbyterian and Conmgational Convention of Wisconsin. 

Rev. Hugh McMillan, D. D., General Synod of the Ref. Pres. Church in N. America. 

The Assembly proceeded to the Election of a Moderator, when 
Bev. M. L. P. Thompson, B. D. of Bufialo, New York, was chosen. 
Rev. Geobgb F. Wiswell of Wilmington, Del., and Rev. Chablbs 
£. LiNDSLEY of New York, were chosen Temporary Clerks. 
14 



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106 FRKSBYTBRIAir H18IOBICAL AXiMANAiO. 

The Committee on Bills and Overtures, Bey. Samuel E. GbidleTi 
Chairman, reported the following ; 

Otxrture. — BelatiDg to the preparation of a snminarj of Christian doctrine 
to be qaed in reoaving^ members into the Church. The Com. reconmeod : That hi 
Tiew of the want of milformity in the Fonmilas need bj the chnrches^ under the care 
of the Geneial Asaeiiblv, in the receptioa of members* this Assembly propoae and re- 
commend a summary of the doctrimn taught in oar Confession of Faita ; together 
with a form of covenant, and send the aane down to the aeTeral presbvteneB. That 
a Committee, consisting of three ministers and two elders, be appointed to draft snch 
summary of doctrine and form of coTeaaat^ and report to the next Aswnbly. Th$ 
report was adopted, and Bev. 8. H. Gridley, J. Lit^ F, Bnyder,. and Men, J. IL 
Paul, M. D., and J. Holt were appointed, 

OvRRVUBB. — A Memorial on tie subiiMt of SkTOT^ from the Fietbjtery of 
Franklin. 

The Committee recommend the following resolntioii, which was 
adopted : 

Resolved, — ^lliat this Assembly, while extending to the memorialists assurances of 
Christian eonsideratioD and regard, can answer their piarer only by referring them to 
the acts of past Assemblies as being* in ow judgmetttg all that the General Assembly 
can properly do on the subject of the memoriaL 

The Com. reported a Memorial from the Preabjtery of Bine Earth, 
praying that a new Synod may be created^ to conaisi of the Pres- 
byteries of Blue Earth, Minuesota, and Dacotah, which last Presby- 
tery is not now in connection with any higher ecclesiastical body ; 
they recommend the following resolutionsi which were adopted : 

Resolved, 1.— That the Presbyteries of Blue Earth and Minnesota be directed to meet 
at St Paul, Min., in the First Presbyterian Church, on the second Wednesday of Sep^ 
1858, at 7 o'clock, P. M. ; with the view of uniting, if the way be prepared, with the 
Presbytery of Dacotah, in the organization of a Synod. Resdlvedf 3.-*Tbat the Sta- 
ted Clerk of the Assembly address a letter to the Presbytery of Dacotah, inviting 
them to meet with the Presbyteries of Blue Earth and Minnesota, at the above time 
and place, and, if the way be prepared, to become Incorporated with them in a Synod 
under the care of thia Qeneral Assemblv. Resolved^ 3. — ^That, in the event of con^ 
pHance with this invitation by the Presbytery of Dacotah, the Presbyteries of Blue 
Earth, Minnesota, and Dacotah shall then and there become a Synod under the name of 
the Synod of Minnesota ; and that the Bev. T. S. Williams, or, in case of bis absence, 
the oldest minister present, shall preach a sermon, and preside until a new Moderator 
be chosen. 

The Com. reported a Memorial from several individuals, members of diflisrent pres- 
byteries, under the care of the General Assembly, praying the Assembly to provide, 
that, in exceptional cases, churches and congregations may receive aid in building 
houses of worship, beyond the limited amount now offered by the Church Erection 
Fund ; and also an Overture from the Presbytery of Iowa on the same subject 

The Committee recommend that the papers be referred to the Board 
of Trustees of the Church Erection Fund. 

The Com. reported a Memorial from several individuals of Uttfi Synodls of Tltinois 
and Peoria, asking that the bounds of these two Synods may be defined, as follows : 

The south line of the counties of Henderson, McDonough, Fulton, Mason, Tazewell, 
and Dewitt the first township line south of TJrbanna, ro Champaign Co., and the 
first township line north of DaoviUe in VermillioB Oo^ lUinois. 

The Committee reeommend that the requeat of the memorialists 
be granted. 



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TEX PBBSBYTBBIAir CHVBCH, (K. 8.) lOT 

The Committee on Judieial Obhms^ Bev, Hrarmr A. Bowlakd, 
CSiairmaB, reported: 

Judicial Oasb, No. 1« — ^The Committee reported that &paper bad been put into 
their baods, purporting to be a request from Mr. C. H. Baldwin, that bis appeal 
from a decision of the Synod of Gtencsee be continued to the next Gtenecal Assembljt, 
and offering reasons for nis fkilare to appear and prosecate it The Com. recommend 
that in view of the reasons offered, and oat of a desire to grant the appellant every 
reasonable indalgence, that Ms case be continnedi it being understood, that the sentence 
of the Presbytery remain in fhH force agafant him, till the case be finally issned, in 
accordance with the provisions of our Form of Disciplia^ obap. TiLSec 3^ asticle 16. 

The report was adopted. 

Judicial Cask, "So. 2. — An appeal of the Rev. G. Sheldon, from a decision of the 
Synod of Western Reserve. The appeal was not sttaiamed by a vote of 94 to 19. 
The following proCett was entsicd on the mimiteB : 

We, the uadenigned membem of the Assenbiyifeel eonstraiaed to ptolesl against 
the decision of the General Assembly, in not sustaining the appeal of Mr. Geo. 
Sheldon ; we protest against the action of the General Aaembly, virtually confirming 
the act of deoosition prononnocd against Mr. Sheldon, as being contrary to the former 
decisiona of the General Assemblv, contrary to the established praotiee of oor Jtidic»> 
tory, contrary to the personal rights of Mr. Sbekloa. and dero^torj to the hono«r of 
Jesus Christ as represented by his Church in the highest judicatory. And, because 
we are unwilling to be thought co ns en ting to such action, we here respectfully enter 
our solemn protest, and pray that it may be admitted apoa the minutes of the 
Assembly. 

H. A. Rowland, R B. Beekwith, S. M. Blatcbford. Q. W. Heaoock. G. 0. lacas, 
G. Betts, D. C^ark, B. W. Landis, G. E. Delavan, B. Graves, T. B. Smith, E. Covert, 
T. Stillman, C. S. Armstrong. 

JusioiAL CiB% No. a.--A couplont off Bev^. T. Biid, ii beUlf ef the Presbytenr 
of Des Moines, against a deeisioo off the Synod of Iowa» in the ease of Bev. J. JEL 
Shields, who had been deposed by the Presbvtefy, for marriage with a woman di* 
Yoroed, as alleged, for iiBomeieni grouada; and whom the Sjjaoa had rettoved* The 
complaint was sustiuned by a vote of 106 to 52. A Committee waa appointed to 
prqwre a minute ob this case, which 100* ^cUtpied^ and is ae folWws i 

In the yw 1853, Maria 0. Cowles presented a petition mider oath to the Distriet 
Court of Wayne Co., Iowa, praying for a divoree from her kusban^ Wm. A. Cowke^ 
in which it was stated snbstaotially, thai she had beeo married to said Cowlea ia 
Janoary, 1839,in Massachuaetts; that they had lived together thaienntil August, 1851» 
when she separated herself from him, and proceeded to Iowa, wbera she baa since re* 
tided. That, previous to her departing from him in 1851, her husband was in the 
habit of becoming intoxicated, and when so intoxicated, was iU-nataied and abusive— 
80 much so, that her sitaation as his wife became intoletable; and she had been wider 
the necessity of leaving his hooea and of making her own Uviii^ sioce that time, the 
defendant having neglected to make provinoD for her support noee the period off her 
separation from him. No pertinent proof off the troth off these aUegatioaa waa made ; 
but the Courts notwithstaiiding, nanted her a divorce a amcttfo mairiimamis when 
Jas. H, Shields, then a member of the Fresbyterv of Pea Moines^ bemg oogninnt of 
all the facts in the case, was married to the said Maria C. Cowles, and has eontinued 
to cohabit with her as his wife. In April, 1856, the Presbvtery inatitnted proceed- 
ings against him for adultery, and finally convicted him of that o&aee, and deposed 
him from the ministry and excommunicated him from the ehorch. Thereupon the 
said Shields appealed to the Synod off Iowa, whkh reversed the deoisioD off PMsby tery. 
The case is before this General Assembly 00 a eompUiint off Bev. T. Bir4 en behalff 
of the Presbytery, against the action of Synod. 

It has not beeo made to appear, that the said Maria C. Cowlea ttttempted toea- 
tablish the fact of adultery against her husband. Wm. A. Cowlea^ Neither has there 
been proved '* sueh wUfol denrtion" on his part» *< as can no way be remedied by the 
ehnrcn, or civil aiagistrate," as is recognized in the Confession of Faith, (cfaap^ SM» 
Sec. 6,} as ** cause sufficient of dissolving the bend off marriage." 



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108 PRSSBTTSRIAK HI8T0BICAL ALMAKAG. 

The Qenerftl Aasembly do, therefore consider that the said Jaa. H. Shidds was 
properly convicted of adnltery ; and the decision of the Synod of Iowa in this case, is 
nerebv reversed, and the jadgment of the Presbytery of Des Moines, therein confirmed. 
The Assembly, whilst rendenng this decision, takes occasion to call the attention of 
the churches under its care to a tendency, manifest in some portions of our country, 
to relax the sacredness of the marriage-tie. Lying, as the institution of marriage 
does, at the very foundation of order, purity, and prosperity in the State and in the 
Church ; the Assembly cannot view witnout abhorrence any attempt to diminish its 
sanctity or to extend beyond the warrant of the Holy Scriptures the ground of divorce. 



On the recommendation of the respective Committees, the records 
of the following Synods were approved as far as written: — Albany, 
Cincinnati, Genesbb, Gsnbva, Indiana, Iowa, Michigan, New 
York and Nbw Jersey, Ohio, Onondaga, Pennsylvania, Pbo- 
BiA, Utioa, Wabash, Wbstshn Bbserve, West Pennsylvania, 
Wisconsin, 

No reports were received from the Synods of Alta CaliforniAi 
Illinois, Kentucky, Mississipi, Missouri, Susquehanna, Ten- 
nessee, Virginia, West Tennessee. 



Ifarrstilri uf t\t Sinit uf Sitligkit* 

Bev. George 0. Lucas, Chairman of the Committee, reported the 
following, which was adopted : 

The cloeiog sentiiDeDt id the NarratiTC of the last year, was the desire expressed 
for tlie reTival of God's worlc The cheerine iotelligeQce which now reaches as from 
ererr part of the land, is the realization of this desire. We trace a most manifest con- 
nection between the intense longing breathed thronghoot the whole Ghnrdi a year 
ago, and the manrelloas work of grace that we are now enjoying. 

The meeting of the present Assembly occore in the midst of what has been very 
properly styled, ** The mat awakening." In this remarkable work of grace, onr own 
Church has shared, and is sharing larsely ; so that, with gratitade and rejoicing, we 
mention it as the chief feature of the Narrative. The members of the AsBembhr have 
come from scenes of revival, to mingle in a revival promssing in this place of meet- 
ing. This wave of blessing is rolling over the land. Already it has reached every 
Presbytery within onr bounds; and th^e is scarcely a church that has not felt, in 
some degree, its cheering inflnenoe. 

This Pentecostal season manifested itself at an early fjeriod of the present year, in 
a remarkable degree, in the cities of New York and Philadelphia. Individuals from 
the east and the meet, from the north and the south, came to these business centres, aud, 
like the men of old who visited Jemsalem, they were filled with the Holy Ghost, and 
returned home to kindle the sacred flame at thehr own altars, and in the places where 
they dwelt, until the holy fire was lighted in almost every city and village of the land, 
where it is still burning more or less brightly. 

In the financial revulsion which preceded this awakening, this truth is equally 
illustrated. Men were forced to the acknowledgment. This is ike hand of God, The 
perplexities, the reverses, and the losses, which attended it, demonstrating so clearly 
the instability and the InsuflBciency of earthly good, exerted, we doubt not, a most 
salutary influence on thousands, preparing the way for the operations of the Divine 
Spirit 

The general characteristics of this great work of grace have been singularly uni- 
form, in nearly all our churches, lliere has been less than usual of overpowering ex- 
citement, both in the experience of Christians and in the exercises of the awakened ; 
but much clear conviction of sin and ruin, calm submission to the will of God, and 
simple fiuth in the atoning blood of Jesos Christ. 



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THB PBBSBTTIBIAN CHUBGH, (K. 8.) 109 

The Presbyteries bear nuited testimony to the happy loflQenoe exerted by timoii 
puyeMMdings, id qaickening believen, in awakening sinnen, and in l^ing them 
to Obrist. ** The prayer^meeting/' says one, <* always so important, has occupied an 
extraordinary place in the instrumentalities employed. The prominence given to the 
praTer-meeting has indeed, with us, as throughout the country, been one of tbo una- 
Bual features of this work of grace ; and, in connection with it, there has been a de- 
Telopment of the piety and ability of the members of the Church, which will, no 
doubt, be one of the most blessed and permanent influences of the revival.'' 

God has honoured the ordinary means of grace. There has been do demand for 
new agencies, such as evangelists and revival preachers, technically so styled : and but 
little demand for pulpit ministrations beyond the strength of the pastors, llie work 
in oar churches has tnus been directly ander pastoral supervision. To no one class 
of truths has special prominence been given in preaching. The claims of the law of 
Qod, with its solemn sanctions ; the pollution, the g^uilt, aid the rain of man ; the atoning 
work of Christ ; the sanctifying work of the Spirit; the fulness and the freeness of the 
Gospel ofler, have each been exhibited in turn, with great simplicity and earnestness. 

It is impossible to measure the inflaence that this great revival will exert apon the 
Chnreh and the world. 

It is not to be expected, that its outward manifestations will continue ; but its 
power, its internal litie, will remain in the church. The great awakening, that oc- 
curred in connection with the labours of Whitefield and his co>adjut(irs, teft its im- 
press upon the Charch ; its influence has come down to ns, and we feel its power. 
I1ie Church was then lifted into a higher position, and clothed with new energy. 
The influence of the present awakening, we believe, will be still mere salutary and 
permanent upon the Church. Never, in the same space of time, has the Church 
advanced so much in living energy and abiding power. She has taken another step 
upward. The moral grandeur of her position, and the majestic force which, under 
God, she has been enabled to wield, have given her a deeper hold upon the hearts and 
consciences of all classes, than perhaps she ever had before. 

The Church of Christ has snfllirea for years, because the sapplv of ministers was 
not equal to the increased, and constantly increasing, demand. God has now taken 
this matter into his own hands. 

It is reported that a larffe number of the students at Yale and Amherst Colleges 
have already been converted ; and that at Beloit College seventy are hoping in Christ, 
thirty-six of whom are studying for the ministry. 

It will vitalize Christian doctrine. The forms of orthodoxy will breathe with a 
new life. Truth will be viewed less in the abstract, more in tte concrete. Beligion 
will be regarded not merely as a belief in creeds, but as a life ; the Bible, as a book 
not merely designated to teach systematic theolc^y, but as containing great truths 
adapted to meet the wants of the soul. 

It has brought those connected with diflerent religious sects to labour and pray to- 
sether, not merely as members of any one denomination, but as ChrUHansi Its bear- 
ing has been most marked m the influence already felt^ and yet to be exerted, on a co- 
operative Christianity. 

The instructions, growing oat of this remarkable work of grace, are tmpartani to 
the Church and the ministry. This blessing came to encourage her members and her 
ministers, and to inspire them with new confidence in the power of Christ. It has 
been abundantly verified, that ^ he that goetb forth and weepeth, bearing precious 
seed, shall doubtless come again with rejoicing, bringing his sheaves with him." 

Another lesson taaght is, that a condition of spiritual life in the Church is one also 
of great external prosperity. It is a law of life to work outward, and build for it- 
self a body, a habitation to dwell in. This vital force sets all the machinery of the 
Charch in motion, for the Spirit of the living God is in the wheels. We should natu- 
rally expect, therefore, to find what the Narratives of the diflerent Presbyteries within 
our bounds actually reveal : that new church edifices have been erected, while others 
have been enlarged and improved ; in some cases, debts have been diminished or paid 
off; new churches have been organized ; and in some instances, new Presbyteries have 
been formed. Notwithstanding the financial pressure, ** the contributions to the va- 
rious objects which have usually received the patronage of our churches, have fallen 
bat little below those of the previous year," and in some instances they have been en- 
larged. A lively interest is manifested by the Presbyteries in the plans adopted for 
extending the borders, and increasing the efficiency, of the Church, that ^e may meet 
her weighty responsibilities. 



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110 



mvaTnoMux msitnioix alkastao. 



Ipinisbri iiiim ftif^i art ^t^saWi. 

Daring the ywt Hie foUowii^ Brethren are reported as having rested from their 



KAMM, ' 




OBOIHA'OK. 


BBAn. 


AGS. 


DTSVASE, &e. 


BABf jcfw, JosefAi 
Batee, Chatidler 
Beedier, Jelra WyBye 
Barton, WiUiam 


Montrose. 
Boehester. 
Utica. 
Grand Biver. 


1820 
1821 
1832 


1858 
1857 
1858 


71 

71 
54 
.... 


Burned to Death. 
ARthmatic Consonf). 
Consumption. 




ProTidenoe* 
iSeoesee. 




185*7 


•••• 
«... 


•*•*•• 


DcniHAX, ^^coileB B. 
Dwight, Henry 


Galena. 
Geneva. 


1842 

1812 


1858 
1857 


42 

74 


Consumption. 
General Prostration. 




Enoz. 


••...• 


1858 


.... 




Hail, Georae L. 
Herriek. Habert P. 
Hunt, Hollowaj W, 


Ithaca. 

Kcw York 3d 

Philade1a.4th. 


1849 
1853 


1857 
1857 
1858 


42 
31 


Typhoid Fever. 
African Fever. 


MoElbot, Hoffh Sneed 
McKtfight^Jdm 


Detroit 
Philadela. 3d. 


1850 


1857 
1867 


29 

68 


Tirphoid Fever. 


OsBORNjJoel 

Osborne, Bthaa 


North River. ' 
Philadela. 4th. 


1813 

••a... 


1856 
1858 


66 
100 


Dropsy. 


PovEBOT, Thaddeos 


Onondaga. 


1815 


1858 


76 


Cancer in Stomadh. 


Bood, AnaoQ 


P1)!!ad^a.Sd. 
Philadela. 3d. 


*••«.• 


1857 
1857 


••*• 


Bronchitis. 


Tatlok, Beaben 
Templeton, Becg.F. 


Cleveland. 
Philadela. 4th. 
Chicago. 


1810 


1857 
1858 
1«57 


91' 


Disease of the liver. 



By Older of the General Aasemhly, 

M. L. P. THOMPSON, McOenOor. 
Eownr F. Hatfixld, Stated Clerh. 



Th« Committee on the Preparation of a Book of Tunes respect- 
fully report to the General Assembly, that the work intrusted to 
them is in progress and will shortly be completed. It will be oare- 
fully prepared under the supervision of a competent professor of 
sacred music. If the Assembly desire, as some have suggested, a 
Hymn Book with tunes incorporated, after the manner of the " Tem- 
ple Melodies,'* it will be necessary for them to give the C!ommitte« 
specific instructions to that effect. 

The report was adopted. 

Communications were received from the Presbytery of Harmony, 
also from Bev. A. H. H. Boyd, in behalf of the " United Synod of the 



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TOB PBXSHTTSBtAH CHUMK, (V« B.) Ill 

Presbyterian Church." They were referred to a special Committee, 
who reported the foTloirmg reBolotions, which were adopted : 

Resohed, 1. — ^Tbat this Assembly reeqgnuge and reciprocate the friendlpr pvetingB 
and fraternal Bpirit evinced ni these commanicationg, as well as in the Chnstiau bear- 
ing and conrlesy df the Rev. A. H. H. BoycL D. D., the aecredited representative cf 
ilie Uoited Syvod. 

Resolved, 2.~ltet this AssemUv regmt the wsatnraJ asDaratioD whieh then 
bodies have felt themselves coostrainea to create, by the action which they have taken, 
both because of onr family affinitSes and sympathfes, and 1>eeaase it weakens our 
ability, and diinuiishes oar opportunities for mutual aid and encouragement, in the 
great work for which the Church exists. We had hoped, that, by perpetnatii^ oar 
relations, bj kind interchange of views, and mutaal prayers, and by that light which 
time and patient inquhy secure, we should ultimately "be of one mind toaching the 
subfect of Slaveiy, as we now are in relation to other moral qnestttms. 

Resolved, 3.~That the consideration and adjastment of the claims to the fondi of 
Ihe Assembly preferred by the Presbvtery of Harmony and the United Synod, be 
]>06tponed to the next Qeneral Assembly for the following reasons : (1.) That suitable 
time may be given for a full examination of questions bearing on the equitable charac- 
ter, and of the l^al consequences, of grantioff the claims preferred. (2.) That the 
Assemblv may he able to ascertam what and now many churches under ^e care of 
the Presbyteries and Synods, which have withdrawn or waq withdraw from our con- 
nection, may desire to retain their relations to the Assembly, and whose claim to a 
share in the distribution of the Church Erection ^nd will consequently remain un- 
disputed. <3.) That the final adinstment of these dafms, mode as the result of due 
deliberation, mutual conference m tlie parties, and prayer to Hhn who giveth wfadom 
to his servants, may he aatjsfactoiy, ff possible, to all concerned. 

Reeolvedf 4.— That the whole subject of these claims be referred to the Board of 
Trustees of the Church Erection Fund to consider and report to the next Assembly. 

The thanks of the General Assemblv were returned to the Ulimns Central Baflroad 
Co., for the pleasant eacursion ailbrded os <m Ae Hue of theur road. 

To the Chicago and Milwaakee Railread Company. 

To the Bock Island Railroad Company, for their delicalieand generoos invitatioii 
received through Henry Farnum, Esq., to visit the Mississippi Biver, over their road, 
at ovr eoBvenienoe. 

To the nmmeroas BaOroad Conpaniee Who hsv« fe iw a r de d aod retomod tfw nMmVeM 
of the Assembly, at a reduced price, on their way to and from this city. 

To the citiaens of Chicago, for the generous nospitalitgr extanded to Ihe Comnii^ 
aieoera and others in attendance. 

To the Committee of Arrangements, for their promptness and activity hi providky 
for onr oomfort 

To the Trustees of the Second Presbyterian Chnrch, for the acoommodatioDB 6Z« 
tended to the Assembly during its present sessioDe. 

To the Editors of tlie daily papers of the city, for thdr full and nunute reports of 
theproceedings of the Assembly* 

To the Bev. M. L. P. Thompson, D. D., for the dignified and impartisl manner in 
which he has presided dnriog the deliberations of this bo^y- 

The baainess of the AssemUj haying been finished, and the YOta 
haying been taken lor the dissolying of the Asaemblj, the Modera- 
tor with prayer and the Apostolio benediction, declar^ the Assera-* 
b1 J dissolyea ; and required another General Assembly, chosen in 
ihe same manner, to meet in the Central Presbyterian Church, in the 
city of Wilmington, Delaware, on the third Thursday of May, 1869^ 
at 1 1 o'clock, A.M. 

EDWIN P. HATFIELD, Statbd Clioik. 

GEORGE T. WIS WELL, ) r,,^^^„,_ rir 

OHAS. B. LINDSLEF, [ ^^oiury Clbkb. 



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112 PBISBTTIBIAK HISTOBICAL ALMANAC. 

%\t $rt8lrittnsit ftlrlifstkit 4iBmmitUt. 

In presenting the Sixth Annual Beport, your Committee has 
been painfully restricted, during the past year, by want of means — 
a point to which attention will be again called in their report. 
They have adopted and stereotyped the following tracts: 

SiooMD Sksib. No. 1. GoivroBMiTY TO TBI WoBLD, hj Albert BaneB. 36 
paffes, 18mo. 

Ko. 2. Influxnci of tor Thsatbi, by Bev. Thomas Bnuoerd, D. D. 36 pa- 
ges, 18mo. 

No. 3. LnBom op Hubbavdrt, by Key. B. B. Hotchkin. 36 pages 18mo. 

or the American PaBSBTTBRUir Alhanao for 1656, iS pages, 12mo, they iasoed 
9a thousand copies. 

They have had compiled, stereotyped, and printed, in accordaooe with the recom- 
mendation of the last AssemUv, 

Thb Tbrttmomt of thb I^resbttkbiax Church on thk Subjrgt of Slayert. 
31 pages, 8vo. 

The Committee are now issoing the Church Pbauust in Tarioiis sizes and styles 
of binding. 

The Committee have other tracts in hand, or in oonrse of preparation, and look 
for still others from Tarioos portions of the Charch, to be pablished, as they shall be 
supplied with the means of so doing. 

The DiossT of the Gteneral Assembly, a work greatly needed by oar ministers and 
elders, is. ready for pablication. It will be stereotyped and issued, as soon as the 
Committee is furnished with the necessary funds. 

By the Treasurer's Beport, herewith presented, it appears that the — 

Balance on hand, May 1, 1857, was 9230 77 

Donations received during the year, ending May 1, 1858, .... 8,179 55 

Interest on funds, : 48 60 

Sales at Presbyterian Book Store, 3,715 05 

Total Becetpts,' 12,173 97 

Orders paid for sundry ezpenditm!es by the Treasurer, • • . • 11,058 07 

Balance in the Treasury, 1,115 90 

It is proper to remark, that of the amount reported as donations, namely, $8179.55, 
the city of Philadelphia contributed $6996.94, and with two other contributions 
from tlie lliird and Fourth Presbvteries of Philadelphia, (but not strictly from the 
city itself,) $7556.94 ; leaving?, as the total receipts of the Committee, from all churches 
without the bounds of the Pmkdelphia Presbyteries, for the year ending Jf ay 1, 1858, 
the sum of $622.61. ^ 

The Committee find themselves, at the present time, in a posiUon of great embar* 
rassment Whilst thev are able and happy to report progress in their work, and 
whilst they find themselves within sight, and almost within grasp, of more substantial 
and valuable progress, they also find themselves on the eve of complete disaster. 

Since the first action of the Qeneral Assembly (after the disruption) for the cause 
of Presbyterian Publication — the action of 1852, by which this Committee was or- 
ganized with the title of " The Doctrinal Tract Committee" since changed to that 
of the Prisbvtrrian Pubuoation Committrb — the progress of this cause, in the fa- 
Tour of the denomination, has been steady and cheering. Bv the enlargement of the 
powers of the Committee, by the unanimous approval of its labours by successive As- 
semblies, and by the instructions, from time to time given to it, the Publication 
Cause has grown in importance and in value to the Church. 

The eum, abauluiely needed to carrv the Committee through the present year, may 
be stated, in round numbers, at ten ihou8€md dollars. For the publication of the 
Tune Book, Digest of the Assembly's Acts, the Chant Book, and minor works essen- 
tial to the usefulness and continued life of the Committee, six thousand dollars more 
are needed. If the Committee could receive, this year, from all sources, $16,000, it 
could be made self-supporting, as to its organization. By owning a few works needed 



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THE FRBSBYTSBIAN CHUBCH, (N. 8.) 113 

by the denomination (membere or ministers) all of its expenses wonid be paid, whibt 
the body was profited. After this, all moneys contribnied wonld go direct, and nn- 
tonched by expenses, to the publication of books for sale and distribution. Event- 
ually all donations might be applied to the gratuitous distribution of books and tracts 
for the promotion of the interests of the denomination and of religion. 

It will be noted, that, in the estimate of funds needed by the Committee, no men- 
tion is made of presses or machinery. It is no part of the Committee's plan to own 
any of the machinery of book-making. Their property will be restricted to copy* 
rights and plates, which they must necessarily own. AH their work, in the manufao- 
ture of books, is done for them by contract* and by printers and binders having no 
connection with the Committee. 



JoHK W. BuLLSs, Secretary. 



ALBERT BARNES, Chairman. 



%\t frnsttes at t^t ^rtsbstman ffliist. 

The Fourth Annual Eeport relates to the transfer of the Presby- 
terian House from the temporary Trustees to the Trustees of the 
General Assembly, the purchase money having been paid to ac- 
complish this object. The Treasurer furnishes the following view 
of the funds : 

Balance in the Treasury per last Report, $737 38 

Received from John A. Brown, Esq., .;•••. 10,31167 

" Renta 2,176 70 

" « CollecUons, 122 79 

$13,348 54 
Expenditures, 12,655 73 

Balance in Treasary, $692 81 

It will be seen, that one half of the purchase-money of the house, or $20,000, has 
now l)een paid. Every other indebtedness of every kind has also been met, leaving 
$20,000 on ground-rent upon the building. 

It is hoped that during the present fiscal year, the Trustees will be able to begin 
the Sinking Fund to pay off the $20,000 still unpaid. During the year now closed, 
the ground-rent was $1800 ; on account of the embarrassments of the Presbyterian 
Publication Committee, $400, being one half of the rent of the store occupied by 
them, was remitted ; and, on account of the financial difficulties of the times, some 
of the rents of rooms in the building have necessarily been reduced. This, it is hoped, 
will only be temporary. During the coming year the ground-rent will be but $1200, 
and the means to pay one half of it are in hand ; so that if the rooms in the building 
are aJl rented, something may be set apart for the Sinking Fund. 

The term of the following Trustees expires during the present sessions of the As- 
sembly : Mr. John A. Brown, Mr. M. W. Baldwin, Hon. William Darling, Rev. 
Thomas Brainerd, D. D., and Rev. George Chandler. According to the rule requir- 
ing an equal number of ministers and laymen in the Board, it will be neces»iry to 
elect two ministers and three lawmen who, by the terms of the Charter, must be citi- 
sens of the State of Pennsylvania. 

Respectiyiy submitted by order of the Board of Trustees, 
BENJ. J. WALLACE, Seoretary. 
15 



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114 PBSSBYTEBIAK HI8T0BTCAL ALMANAC. 

Tbe Church Extension Committee, in presenting their Third An- 
nual Report, would remark that during the past year, the cause under 
their control has made considerable progress. 

The number of MiasioDaries in commission was twenty-six, beine an increase of 
twelve over the previous year. The receipts for tlieyear have been 96090.60. 

The year has been an ezoeedinglv difficult one, as is known, for all benevolent opera- 
tions. It is a subject for congratulation tliat in these circumstances the receipts of the 
C!ommittee have not only been equal to, but far in advance of those of last year. 

But the Committee, though their receipts and missionaries have thus nearly doub- 
led within the vear, are by no means satisBed that our Church is doing what it ought 
through this channel. So embarrassed have we been for funds, so painful has it 
been to postpone applications which ought to be granted, and to be in debt to mis- 
sionaries for sums which they really and sometimes distressingly need, that the Com. 
determined, after much thought and deliberation, to depart so far from their for- 
mer system of leaving the raising of funds entirely to tlie pastors and meml)erB of 
our churches, as to authorize their Secretary to visit ecdosiastical bodies and such 
churches as it might be thought best, in order that the importance of the opera- 
tions of the Com. might be so seen, as to produce the reauisite response. I'his course 
was, however, only entered upon late in January, and the Secretary immediately be- 
ffan the arrangement of his other engagements, which were very numerous and press- 
ing, so that he might fully meet the views of the Committee. He found this arrange- 
ment of his business more difficult than he expected, and occupying much more time, 
so that but little could be done before the close of the ecclesiastical year. This mat- 
ter, he hopes, will be so arrange ere long that he will be able, during the coming 
ecclesiastical vear, to procure funds to' meet all proper calls. 

Our Church now has exploring missionaries in Northern and Southern Illinois, in 
Wisconsin, and in Iowa. We expect to commission men, ere long, for Michigan, for 
Minnesota, and for Nebraska and Kansas. It is emphatically a seed-time, and the 
seed sown will yield thirty, sixty, and an hundred fola. 

BENJ. J. WALLACE, Secretary. 



In presenting their Fourth Annual Report, it is with no little pleasure that the 
Board would state to the General Assembly that notwithstanding the unparalleled 
embarrassments of the last year in monetary affiiirs, the consequent failures in business, 
and the great depreciation in all kinds of securities, the Fund has suffered no loss 
whatever. The present amount is 1^105,394.46. 

The whole number of applications received during the year is thirty-two. The 
total amount of grants maae during the year is $11,685. This amount has not as 
yet all been paid out by the Treasurer. The amount of grants will always be in 
advance of what is paid out by the Treasurer, because a considerable time must 
necessarily elapse before the papers sent to the parties, after the grant is made, can 
be executed and recorded by them and returned to the Secretary for approval by the 
Board, all of which has to be done before a draft upon the Ti^easurer for the amount 
granted, is sent to them. The number of donations made during the year is eight, 
and their average amount is $187. The number of loans is twenty-four, and their 
average $424. There has, therefore, been a decrea.«e in the average amount of dona- 
tions, from that of the previous year, of some four dollars ; and an increase in that of 
loans of some twenty-eight dollars. I'he whole amount of the Fund, thus far disbursed 
in grants is $30,328, or nearly one third of the Fund, as it existed at the beginning. 

The Board would call the attention of tbe General Assembly to the XlVth article 
of the Plan, and recommend that the following sentence be added to the first para- 
graph in sec. 3, namely : ^ And in case any church or congregation receiving a loan, 
shall afterwards withdraw from the General Assembly, the whole amount of that 
loan, remaining unpaid, shall at once become due.** 

8. T. SPEAR, President. 



Digitized by 



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THE PRiBSBTTSB^AN CHUBOH, (N. S.) 115 

The Committee, Rev. Caleb Mills, Chairman, to whom was re- 
ferred the Annual Beport of the Committee on Education, presented 
the following resolutions, which were adopted: 

Resolved, 1. 1'hat this Assembly find, in the practical workings of the plan for 
Ministerial Edacation inaugurated by the last Aiasembly, reason to regard it with 
increasing confidence, and consider it eminently wise, and admirably adapted to de- 
yelop the zeal and activity of the whole Charch in this department of her outy. 

Kesclvedy 2. 11iat, in laying the foandation for this work in a living Christianity, 
and devolving the execution of it on individual chnrches and Presbyteries, the As- 
sembly has proposed the most evangelical and effective method of accomplishing this 
enterprise. 

Resolved^ 3. That, while the responsibility of performing this nart of her mission 
rests on the Christian parents and the individual members and eldere of the Church, 
it also presses, with peculiar weight, on onr ministers ; and, from a becoming spirit 
and example in their daily labour, and a faithful and frequent presentation, to Chris- 
tian parents and youth, of their obligations of covenanted consecration, the happiest 
results may be reasonably expected. 

Resolved, 4. That it is deeply to be lamented, that the Saviour's command, 
'* Pray ye the Lord of the harvest that he would send forth labourers into his harvest," 
has so extensively passed from the minds and hearts of his people ; and tliis Assembly 
admonish all its ministers and churches of this neglect, earnestly exhorting them to 
give appropriate attention to it in their private, domestic, social, and public devo. 
tions ; and especially to remember it at the Monthly Concert, as well as at the An< 
Dual Concert of Prayer for Educational Institutions, on the last Thursday of Feb 
mary. 

Resolved, 5. That it is highly desirable, that the subject of the increase of the 
ministry should be annually presented to the churches, on the Sabbath preceding or 
Bncceeding the Annual Concert of Prayer for our Educational Institutions ; that con- 
tributions be made on one of the Sabbaths above named, when it will not interfere 
with, or disturb, systematic arrangements already adopted ; and that it is the high 
privilege and imperative duty of every church, however small or feeble, to contribute 
to this cause. 

Resolved, 6. That the Assembly recommend, as a general principle, that candidates 
for the ministrv, especially those who are connected with churches under the care af 
our newer and smaller Presbyteries, retain their church and preebyterial relations 
nnchanged during the progress of their studies. 

They would further recommend ihe adoption of the following minute : that this As- 
sembly rejoices to hear of the continuea prosperity of Union, Auburn, Lane, and 
Blackburn Theological Seminaries, in the increased number of their students, and the 
gracious visitation of the Spirit so richly experienced by those who are soon to assume 
the responsibilities of the sacred office ; ana most cordially commend these Semina- 
ries to the sympathies of the Church. 

Resolved, 7. That this Assembly expresses its deep conviction of the wisdom and 
necessitv of placing our colleges on such a pecuniary foundation, as to accomplish 
most eflfectually the purpose of their establishment ; and, inasmuch as thev are an es- 
sential part of onr educational system, it earnestly recommends, to the churches and 
presbyteries, the exercise of a wise discretion in the location of such institutions, and 
that they gather around those already established by pioneer faith and aeal, with a 
cordial sympathy and corresponding liberality. 



Digitized by 



Googk 



lie 



THB PRXSBYTSSIAV CHUBOH, (K. S.) 



'«C4co^>o<oi->aoa»e^9«eQ^o« 



SS^aSMMSS^SSSSSSfiS 



Total. 






glTao for PUBLICA-I ^Q .'^ce^M : :i»»Pl ■••* -CD^* : -^CO^A i9imn • jH^^ :« ••. 



s 

I 

31 
s 

M 

s 

g 



Nnmlwr of Charebat 
giving* and ainoant 
giTen for Ed VGA- 



p =ss8 ="£|2| '^-sSII ^saasssz ;| iSgSS iS 'I 



Ntuntacr ofChvrohM 
giving, and amount 
ffiven for toAXiON 
MxMioRa. 



g5 ='^SSS =Spg =8"S|ii =sS2sss882 =8ga««s =1 



«• :4«eieeR 



^ IN M V4 *4 «< 



giving^ and amount I • ^ '^ ; ;— 



gtvingt ai _ 

giTen for DOKXtTic 1 '^ 
Mr • 



«'^ 9 M r4 m fm m ^ 






Nnmber of Chnretaea 
givimg, and amount 
ffiTen for OXMSBAL 
laaiMBLT. 






• *4aD :« 






Com>to.add.doaKx|§i : 8 g g 8 ^ g § £ ? 8 g ^ ^I g 3§i8gag^S g^^^^^ Sg 



I $2S»'gS'^g'^^^25;Sg^3S3:23?^*'aS;:SS~*"SS'*3:S2'"833 



8 



Ch'g.maklngnoRap.j'^a i^'^ i^ ..^;Hco.^c.^.gcc^g>. i^c^c^cta^^ : ;c.^>d :» :^ 



Ch'i.lto|> .Additfona. ra ;3a"<»^^a2a«>;2*ga-^a :^^^;;oo..oo> rccgo^g tg 

t- CO t- w oe «o 90 •♦ »♦ « eo o t-i ri "* •« M • w o • ^e« ^ »-« «• «o •-• 



I Me«^««oc<i<o 



ChttrebM with Past's • '^ * . 



Candidates. 



V 



:oc» :«o : : : '.r^ :«i- 



• ^M : :ie G9 : 



LiMnttaW. 



M 



op^ph^ : jr^ J S"* i : :** : 



Total. 



|;i;;'^g;r3°°''S?:g«''^^:^f?a^'^ 



9aim^o»«'O>O'^>o«co<0aD<2O^ 



Without Charge. | 



pHd ••o«-*i-iMeooi<oo?«««f-no^«o 



• ^ pH M k> r<( tH r^ Ct «9 J 



Tsa. A^ 4c I < 



:p4e« :p4(Sk> 



:«eo>^ tovs •eeo :r^ :f-<iec4r 



StotedSappUea. | 



oeoM'^oeo 



«<*Maoo«'*«-akio«oco«"*»^waorfsc<f-#«rt« :c«.««9^*o«o^'* 



FMtort. 



I «i-lf-l«e«rarH :«-eOt*t-rHfc-t-000«« :'#C*rH-9^«0 :««rHe9«p^ 







ill J 



••f •.•.■•*•■.■■ ." 




lA • 



S' . 



:j. 



Iil^lifl; 



•J. 




|r.««^o«i-oo<.o-j*«jo35=o28s»a3assiSS5ssa3;3«B8 



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PBESBTTSBIAN HI6T0BICAL ALMANAC. 



117 



! 

I 






'P 



I i I : : i : :8 ig|a|gS|| :8 : i i»«gg ig^S lgS| ! SSSg iggg 






4 . 

H 






»p4 :C0 :• : -CO 



^ ^ WW WW w 



S|!|S '8 :« i =g iig|8S||8 la ! i iSS§SSsSSggR| i | |§ IjgS 



ll: 



^ ' ' * ' «N ^* WW CfH rt rt *^ 






^88 
51 



'^ ' 'Hw wrt ^ H ^rt "^w 9 ^^ 



A.iup|as»8 :s i iS saaasssaa :» i : ig^aasasasaagnsssjaaa^ 



Tot. 






ccT.igaas iS I IS is8S8§;388 -ga i lai^agsgjssgesgg i iggg lasa 



c.Ex.|888| sto : ;g sss^aaass la" i ig^gggs^s^^isga \ iggg ifsa i 



TOT. |>;*>«a«3«<»«s3a ;!;sga38a^'^a**^^ss?;::a'-^S8a;sga25^sa:aa 



No IL I -'*•*-'-> l^ 8 i-^ s^o^o ^^^'Pg ; i'^ : :*■ l^^^^-^^'-cowg^ » .o>^o :oo«- j 



■ I I ^»— ^— ^^-^»i .— -^ .»«>._ « ^t ^ <M _^ .A aft fla ^ ea >^ 



Vac I ;'^ww'*'^c<'<i ;^^co-<'.acocowo« ;f««oco«<i i^hw |W>. ;>i»>t« jw^^iwp^kxow wi^ 






' '" ~" : i*^ : i :SS : : : : : 



Lte. I « i •'^ : •'^ t*^ 1 : : : : 5 : : : 5 : :*"^ s t*^ i i 



Tot. igg'Q«'^°'g'^a s^g*sa;ssg3'";:'*':^*^**S2S''^*^s*sa8**'^3 g s^^gas s 



W 0. I C4'«<M'^ «<'-"-' :'H^>eo««r^^ : : :-*«« :r-ieor^<Xr^ j :•♦ ;«eo« ; .>N ^.ofHwo«<ic< 



Ac I ■" • '"^ :'#«M'*«9«M««or^ :««• :Mi-i^ : j.^ joiwrH :»-• .r^^^cor^j^ 



g-g .o>.o'wacOC< ;WeOO ;^OiHOC0<0OtP ;>H^CO<P>HaaO>^^CO<D«OWO r « »9 ^« *- « «<•* "^ • 



ti 








«gia(«8K«8iSSSS8888»389::989:| 



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118 



THK PBKSBTTERIAN CHUSOH, (N. S.) 



[■.;.«^aM.-»»gg»;g3;ggs»gasg3a.3SS8a8SS8a888o 



^Um ill i iii^^* ii 1 ill i I ]m ipii is 



1i 



LISS =11 'H '■ -ISa '» '2 -IS = = =iiS ^s =22 =1 = 



Bn«QD :OlM :«fe* : :i»«iO \m :0I : :fc«^ 



j^^fll :« :Cai :• 1 






g3 =|2|| i22 i i5| :S8 i| i |8§ i i l|8S :| ISS i| ! 



tet :aMe« ■••« • •*« -nH ■« : -^is j i jwetoi :• jveo :< i 






ps53|| ijg i igggBg if i ig§ u isii i|325 ;§ •; 



«e0ieee0OlM :eO« j -OlAfe^^N :H l :«« | j -^COOD JF^F^ODfe* :« : 



Si 



g-Sl^li '51 ' 'gsllS •=! » ^53 ' ^ ^e-S 'l-iS '3 






>4 H 



g^sss^g is«s i i;?ssj;3S ;9 ! i^s i i r^sssii iS;?S3 ;a : 






ABapl'^'aSSgS 3* 5 i .-8558^ iJ* : :S5 : i :S«2 555288 :S : |g 



Tot. 



m^r^ iH 44 lO e< N iH »H ^^ C« rH r^ CO -« i^ »H r^ ^ 



c.c«r.|8'*a3'-2l 18* i issss^ -rS^ssa 5 i issa 12^:1:5 35 1 1| 



C.Ex.|S*aB:82g ig- : :8|5S^ iS^-SS ; I l^^U :iS?S2 :S : || 






NoR.|* 



:4H« I teot^moia ;t~^r«f- 



>«<*io :«e«fi4o :« 



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Vac. (*►• 



vH«o«OMee-«vH«ome< • m eo r' vi co « 



kioo : :MievH<Di^vHf-4<DM«3(o la 



3.8. |< 



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Pm. 



*38 



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TOT- (*SSi7Sl5a*'*5J*SS^t**"*';3**'*i::'*'*'*'*SSS22c3''2S'*5* || 



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9.8. r 



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PRISBTTSKLAN HI8TOBICAL ALMANAC. 



119 



l^etM •^i leo*. «o o» o 



-*»a «D »« oook 



s 58 a aas 



111! 



'2 i 6|s 



38| 



: i 






8 :S: :§ 3 I; 



i 


No. of 
Oonunu- 
nfcanU. 


i^l i ill 1 1 


i 


§1 


i 


4666 
7769 

11179 


4289 

8989 
6286 
7106 


;»«« £ ai? 


i 


i 


•2 
i 

CS 

o 


Tot. 


a^Sg 1 sss s s^ 


1 


ss 


s 


;:s 9 


S: S3S 


9s s tossa 


1 




Vac. 


S :S ^ 2«;s s a 


a 


sa 


a 


sa * 


a ssa 


ss ;? S3- 13 


1 


8.8. 


a-a :3 558 ^ s 


$ 


aa 


3 


sa 3 


a asss 


?3a s sas 


i 


i 


Pm. 


a-- g s-s - 5 


a 


»^»- 


s^ 


sa 5 


a SS3 


s- a a— 


1 


Can. 


- :- •• S«S5 S s 


s 


«■* 


n 


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a -"s^ 


*-« a '^^'^ |g 




Ll«m. 


00:2^ ^^^ . . 


IH 


MM 


a 


^s -» 


« : :-» 


►.«• « : :- |S 


5 

3] 


2 

H 
it, 

s 


Tot. 
W.C. 


2;:55 g 2S58 5 S 


S3 


as 


§ 


ss s 


S 9^3 


$S & 5Sg s 


S 


s :• a aa* ^ « 


S2 


:>a 


9 


sa s 


a ••-3 


Mk. ^ r««e« 


§ 
1 


ad 


T.Ae 


3«2 s ss*- ^ « 


s 


■41 C9 


s 


•a a 


s ^«;: 


a- s '^«- 


•0 


8.8. 


a-* 5 :;S2 t; - 


a 


sa 


ss 


ss ^ 


;s ;!:s;3 


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S 
S 


Pm. 


-^.^ g |;00<» « : 


a 


fOO 


s 


sa :j 


a 2«a 


• « g C5^« 1 












<0^^ « 00 01 «^ 01 



mi' 






S 3 n S 









^4( H neoco 






Ill 



^ I- 

i«J Cadi 
J', a ;^ * 



5, e . 



■lis 



K 



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I 









*5 



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S|r- 



Him 



1=- 



■1= 



f 



lis 

II* 

■Si *^^ 



» J] £ li^ # « 

* « * 5 .3 -T 






Date of 
Orpini* 
cation. 



ill I Hi i i i M i si I i Is! & 1 1 III 



H 




III 



:r'c5| ad d 

EJ fl4tai§ flu ^ 






niii^ 



? fai ft « S *<'^a 



o 
as 



«? I III 13 



<<(5 



l^o 




s 3:3 s ^ ^^Ta M a a aaa 



Digitized by 



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120 



THX PBISBTTBBIAlf CHUBOO, (N. S.) 



^tihmitttt 0f % ^timl ^stmbls 0f % Irtsliittnsn ^jfsrtt 



-^ 




va&m p9 


TBAaOV 


TBABOe 


AOSAT 


PLACSOVMXXT- 




OBBOIAVa 




OBA1B. 


naAn 


MO. 


BodgmfBB^Jolui 
Smith, BJ), Robert 


New York. 


1749 


1780 


1811 


88 




New Caatte. 


1761 


1700 


1703 


71 


Philadelphia. 


WoodhuU, B B., Johm « 


New Brunawlek. 


1770 


1701 


1824 


80 




King, B.D^ John 


Carlisle. 


1750 


1702 


1813 


72 


Cariide.'Pa. 


Latta,BB., Jamea 


NewCantle. 


1760 


1708 


1801 


60 


Philadelphia. 


MeWhorter, BB., Alncander 
McKnlght, B B., John 


New York. 


1750 


1704 


1807 


T8 


Philadelphia. 


New York. 


1777 


1708 


1824 


00 


Carlisle, Pa, 


Davldmn, b b., Robert 


Garliale. ^ 


1778 


1708 


1812 


62 


Philadelphia. 


Tennent, B.B., WUllam M. 


1772 


1707 


1810 


60 


Phibtdelphia. 


Smith, B.B., John Blair 


Albany. 


1770 


1706 


1700 


48 


Philadelphia. 


Smith, B.D , LL.B^ 8. Stanhope 
Clark, B B.. Joaeph 
Irwin, Nathaniel 


1774 


1700 


1810 


60 


WineheAer, Ya. 


New Brunawiek. 


1784 


1800 


1818 


82 






1774 


1801 


1812 


66 


Philadelphia. 


Roe,BB,Aiel 


New York. 


1702 


1802 


1816 


77 


Philadelphia. 


Hall, Bj>, Jamea 


Conoord. 


1778 


1808 


1826 


62 




Armatrong, Jamea V. 


New Brunawiek. 


1778 


1804 


1816 


66 


Philadelphia. 


Rlcharda, b.b^ Jamea 


New York. 


170T 


1806 


1848 


76 




Miller, BB., Samuel t 


New York. 


1708 


1806 


1860 


81 


Philadelphia. 


Alexander, B B., Arehibiad 


Philadelphia. 
NewYoft. 


1704 


1807 


1851 


70 


Philadelphia 


Mllledoler,BB^PhUlp 


1706 


1808 


1862 


... 


PhUadelphia. 


Laej, Drorr 


Hanorer. 


1788 


1800 


1816 


67 


Philadelphia. 


Romeyn, B B^ John Broadhead 
Nott,BB.,XUphalet 


New York. 


1700 


1810 


1826 


48 


Philadelphia. 


Albany. 


1708 


1811 


...... 


... 


Philadelphia. 


Fllnn, B B., Andrew 


Harmony. 
ColnmbiL 


1808 


1812 


1820 


47 


Philadelph^ 


Blatchford, b.b^ Samuel 


1780 


1813 


1828 


61 


Philadelphia. 


Inglla, B B.. Jamea 




1802 


1814 


1820 


48 


Philadelphia. 


Nelll, B.B., WUllam 
Bl7the,BB.,Jamei 


Albanj. 

Weet Lexington 


1806 
1708 


1816 
1816 


1842 


77 


Philadelphia. 


Ooe, B.B^ Jonaa 


Columbia. 


1708 


1817 


1822 


68 


Philadelphia. 


Janeway. B B^ Jaeob J. 




1700 


1818 


1868 


84 


Philadelphia. 


Rioe, B.B., John Holt 


HanoTer. 


1808 


1810 


1881 


64 


Philadelphia. 


MeDoweU, B.B^ John 


y?a^. 


1804 


1820 





... 


Philadelphia.' 


UUl, B.B., William 


1702 


1821 


1862 


88 


Philadelphia. 


Jennlnxa,BB.,ObBdlab 
Cheater, B b , John 


StenbenTlIle. 


1817 


1822 


1832 


64 


Phihuldphia. 


Albany. 

PhiUdelphia. 

NewYoriL 


1810 


1823 


1820 


44 


Philadelphia. 


Green, B b , ll b, Aahbel 


1787 


1824 


1848 


86 


Philadelphia. 


Rowan, B B , Stephen N. 


18— 


1826 


1836 


.M 


Philadelphia. 


MeAuley. B B., ll.b., Thomaa 


New York. 


18— 


1820 


186- 


... 


Philadelphia. 


Herron, B B., Vranda 


Ohio. 


1800 


1827 


•..*.• 


M. 




Bly, BB., BsraStylea 




18- 


1828 


...... 


... 


Philadelphia. 


Rloe,BB^ Benjamin Holt 


Hanover. 


1812 


1820 


1866 


74 




nak,BB.,B«ra 


Hudaoo. 


1810 


1830 


1883 


46 


Philadelphia. 


Beman, B B., LL.B., NatfuB B. 8. 


Troy. 


1810 


1831 




.». 


Philadelphia. 


Horn, B B^ Jamea 
McDowell. B.B., Wffllaa A. 


Colnmbua. 


1808 


1882 


■ M... 


... 




Gharleaton Union. 


1818 


1888 


1861 


62 


Philadelphia.^ 


Undaley. B B., Philip 


NaahviUe. 


1817 


1834 


1866 


00 


Philadelphia. 


PhUllpa, B B., William W. 


New York. 


1818 


1636 






Pittabufgh, Pa. 


Wlthenipoon, B.B^ John 


Hannonj. 


18— 


1886 


isM 


.M 


Pitteburgh, Pa. 


Blliott, B B., David 


Ohio. 


1812 


1887 


... ... 


... 


Philadelphia. 


nsher, B B . Samuel 


Newark. 


1806 


1838 


1866 


70 


Phihulelphia. 


Dlckinaon. B B., Baxter 


ClndnnatL 


18— 


1880 




... 


Phibtdelphia. 


Wiener. BB., William 


Itha<». 


1812 


1840 


...... 


... 




Eddy, B.B.. Anael D. 


Newark. 


18— 


1843 


.M... 


... 


Philadelphia. 




Brooklyn. 


1817 


1846 


.M... 


„, 


PhUadelphia. 


Hay, BB.PhUlpa 
Riddle, BB,DaTidH. 


pitSbufgh. 


1820 
18— 


1840 
1860 


...... 


- 


Philadelphia. 
Detroit, Mich. 


Bameis Albert 


Philadelphia 4th. 


1826 


1861 


...... 


... 


Utica,N.Y. 


AdAmK,BB.,WUliam 
Allen, BB., D.Howe 


New York 4th. 


1881 


1862 


.M.M 


«M 


WaehlngtonCltj 


Clndnnati. 


18— 


1868 


....M 


W. 


Buffalo, N.Y. 


Skinner, B B., ll b., Thomaa H. 


New York 8d. 


1818 


1864 


M.... 


M. 




Wiener, BB^ William a 


Niagara. 


18— 


1866 


.W... 


M. 


St. Louie. Ho. 


Hiekok,BB^UurenaP. 


Trt^. 


1824 


1866 


.M... 


M. 


New York City. 
CloTeland. Ohio. 


Fisher. B.B., Samuel W. 


ChidnnatL 


1880 


1867 


.M... 


M. 


Thompaon,BJ)i,M.L.P. 


Bttfido. 


1880 


1868 


...... 


^ . 


CUoBga^HL 



Digitized by 



Googk 



ALPHABETICAL LIST 



MINISTERS AND LICENTIATES 

or THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY OT THE PBB8BYTERL1N GHUBOH, (N. S.) 

[NoTX.— In the fbHowtng List, P imUoalM AuAw; i. ■., Stated SupfAy; S.M., and r. m^ Heme and 
twtign MiatUmarUa; w.c. Without Charge; chp., Chaplain; pri., or pkp^ President or Pro/uior ia 
• Coll«g» or Seminary ; bdt ., fiiCor; o. ■., OnretpontHng Seoretarg • r.f7hacher; l*., Licenliate; aot., 
Tba PoatoffloM are ourreeted op to the time of (oing to preeaj 



PKSSBTTXET. POT-OPPICS. 



▲bbst, Darld A., i.e. 

Abbott, Q. D^ T. 

Abenieth7,H.O., P. 

Abraham, A., V X. 

Adair, Robert, axo. 

Adami, G. W^ p. 

Adams, EU P.. T. 

Adams, B.J^ w.c. 

Adams, G.A^ s s. 

Adams, Isaac F., s ■. 

Adams, William, P. 

Adams,W.H., f.a. 

Agnew, J. H., T. 

Aiken, 8. G., P. 
y Alkman, Robt., P. 
V Alkman, Wm., P. 

Alden, Lyman, ■. f. 

Alexander, J., w.c. 
' Allen, D. H., PKF. 

Allen, D. 0., w c. 

Allen, Edward, s s. 

Allen, John B., s. i. 

Allen, Nathan, p. 

Allen, Orson B., V x. 

AUlM>n,Kobt.G.,L. 

Amee, I)aniel, T. 

Anderson, Chas., P. 

Anderson, Jos.. T. 

Anderson, P., w. c. 

Anderson, K. C., s. s. 

Attdrevs, G. B., w. K. 

Andrews, W., s. s. 

Andrews, Wm., a. ■. 
-jL Arms, G.S.,P. 

Armstrong, G. S., P. 

Armstrong, J. R., s.s. 

Armstrong, R., w. o. 

Ashman, S. U... s.s. 

Aspinwall, Jad8on.L. 

Atkinson, G. M., s. s. 
^C Atterbury, J. G., P. 
y Atterbury, W. W., p. 

Avery, A.3.. s.f. 

Avery, John A., w.c. 

Avery. K. A., P. 
y. Aydelott, B. P., w. o. 

» Babb, G. B., bot. 
> Babbitt, W. H., P. 

Babcock, H. A., w.c. 

Bacon, QeorKe, X<. 

Bacon, SamT F.. p. 
-• Bacon, William, W.C. 

Bacon, Wm. N., L. 

Bailey, J. W., P. 

Belley, 8. W., f. s. 

Baker. Spenoer, coL. 
-•Baldwin, Burr, B X. 

Baldwin, G. S., w. x. 

Baldwin, J. II., w.c. 

Baldwin, P. G.. P. 
7^ Baldwin, T., sbc. 

Baldwin, T., w. c 

Baldwin, Wm., s s. 

Ballantine. E., PBP. 

Ballon, Jas.M.,f.s. 

Barber, A. D., p. 

16 



Ghemnng. 
N. York 4th. 
Sehnyler. 
N. York 3d. 
Philadela.8d. 
Hanover. 
Harmony. 
Philadela.4th. 
Maumee. 
Pennsylvania. 
N.York 4th. 
Ithaca. 
Newark. 
Cleveland. 
Newark. 
WKmington. 
ficioto. 
Shlloh. 
GinelnnaU. 
N.York Sd. 
Montr<web 
Glevelan<L 
Angelica. 
Ontario. 
Harrisbavg. 
Blue Earth. 
Gayuga. 
N.York 8d. 
IndianapoUs. 
Piedmont 
Trumbull. 
BloomingtoQ. 
Dayton. 
Hudson. 
MarshaUL 
N. Missouri. 
Detroit 
Vox River. 
Cayuga. 
Glinton. 
Salem. 
, Madlsoo. 
Alton. 
, Onondaga. 
Onondaga. 
, ClncinnatL 

Clnctnnat!. 
N. York 3d. 
Grand River. 
Cincinnati. 
Tioga. 
.Cayuga. 
Cayuga. 
Knriz. 

N.York 4th. 
Ottawa. 
Montrose. 
Newark. 
Belvldersu 
Maumee. 
Alton. 
Onondaga. 
Otsego. 
Salem. 
BaffiUo. 
Champlain. 



New MlUbrd,Pa. 
New York City. 
Oneida, lU. 
MapumuLo, S A. 
Phiisdela., Pa. 
Richmond, Va. 
May's Lick.,Ky. 
Hartford, Gt 
Perrysburgh, 0. 
SeelyeGk.,N.Y. 
New York City. 
Danby, N.Y. 
Pitt^eld, Masa 
Cleveland, Ohio. 
Elisabeth, N.J. 
Wilmington, D. 
Freeport, Hi. 
Milton, Tenn. 
Walnut HiUs,0. 
Lowell, Mass. 
Harford, Pa. 
Brooklyn, Ohio. 
Cuba, N. Y. 



Chicago, 111. 
Bennett, N.Y. 
New York Cltv. 
Zionsville, Ind. 
Irisburgh, Va. 
Lahainaluna,S.I 
Washlngton,lll. 
Cincinnati,Ohio. 
Ridgebarv,N.Y. 
lAnslng, Mich. 
West Ely. Mo. 
Nankin, Mich. 
Dayton, Wis. 

Gsnton,"MlaB. 
N.Albany, Ind. 
Madison. Ind. 
Metropolis, lU. 
Syracuse, N. Y. 
Liverpool, N.Y. 
GindnnaU»(Hiio. 

CindnnatI,Ohio 
Hoboken, N. J. 
Wayne, Ohio. 



Ihaxb. 



PKXSBTTBBT. P0«T-OPFICB. 



Union, N. Y. 
Auburn, N. Y. 



Oalesbnrgh, HI. 
New York City. 
Lodi, 111. 
Montrose, Pa. 
Fuh Gbau, C. 
Lake Forest, IlL 
Waterville. 0. 
New York City. 
Cioero,N.Y. 
Oneonta, N. Y. 
Bloomington.Id. 
Clarenoe, N. Y. 
WlUlston, Yt 



Barber, Bldad, p. Elyria. 
Barber, Elihu, 9. s. Chicago. 
Barbour, Phil., a. s. Albany.' 
Baridon, Louis, h. x. Champlain. 
Barker, W. P., w. x. N. York Sd. 
Barks, Joseph V., s s. Osage. 
Barnard, John, w. c. Ontario. 
Barnard, 0. H., a. a. Niagara. 
Barnes, Albert, P. PhiladeU 4th. 
Barnes, Albert U., P. Pennsylvania. 
Barnes, E. S., s a. Utlca. 
Barr, A. K., w. c. Huron. 
Barr, Hugh, w. c. Illinois. 
Barrett, Newton, s. s Ottawa. 
Barteau, 8. U., aot. Fox River. 
Bartholomew, 0., p. Utica. 
Bartlett, 0. L, H. X. Chlcsfo. 
BarUett, I. L., w. c D. of Coinmbia 
Bartlett, P. M., w. o. Franklin. 
BarUett, W. F. V., L. N. York 8d. 
Basoom, John, L. Cayuga. 
Bassett, Arch., w. c. Delaware. 
Bassett, D. A^ a. s. Madison. 
Bassett Jamea, L dncienatl. 
Bay, Wnu, H., P. Athens. 
Beach, Chas. F., s. s. Otsego. 
Beach, £ben.G.,w.c. Onondaga. 
Beach, E. A., w. c . Pataskala. 
Beach, Isaac G., w.c. Cincinnati. 
Beaman, Q. C, a. s. Keokuk. 
Beardsley, O.G., f.a. Rochester. 
Beckwith, B. B., P. St Lawrence. 
Beebe, A. T., w. X. Chenango. 
Beebe, Eli W., a a. Erie. 
Beebe, B. J. M., p. Lexington. 
Beecher, L, w. c. Cincinnati. 
Beers, Daniel, w. c. Long laUad. 
Beldon, Jr., Wm , T. N. York 4th. 
Bell, James M., L. N. York ad. 
Bell, Samuel B, a. ■. San Joa6. 
Bell, Thomas D., P. Winchester. 
Beman, N. S. S., P. Troy. 
Benedict, S., w. c. Batk 
Benedict, E. B.. w. c. Pennsylvania. 
Benedict W. W., a. s. MarshalL 
Benton, A. L, L. Oayuga. 
Benton, 0. N., P. Tioga. 
Bergen, Henrv, w c. Otuwa. 
Bernard, H., L. Oswego. 

Berridife, L. K , ■ ■. HarrUbucg. 
Best Jacob, P. X. N. York M. 
Betta. Alfred U., s s. Klyria. 
Betta, Xenophon.s s. TrumbuU. 
Bevan, Philip, a s. Salem. 
Bidwell, O. B., w c. N. York Sd. 
BtdweU, W. H., bdt. N. York 3d. 
Billings, Silas, W. c. Brooklyn. 
BUlington, L W. s s. Rochester. 
Bingham, Araoa,w c. Phlladula, ftl. 
Bingham, H., w c. Portage. 
Bird, ThomiMoa.«. a. Dee Moinsa. 
Bird, Wm. U., s s. Alton. 
Birgs, Chester, W. 0. Portage. 
Bishop, John M.. s.f. Salem. 
Bishop, S. E., p. X. N. York 4th. 
BlsaelT, H. N., a. a. Detroit 
Blssell, Lemuel, F x. Huron. 



Florenoe, Ohio. 
NapiervlUe, lU. 
BrainardB,.N.Y.<t( 
Mooers,N.Y. 
Khokar, India. 
Warsaw, Mo. 
Lima, N. Y. 
LyndonvU.,N.Y 
PhiladeU., Pa. 
Lawrmioevil.fPa 
Lenox, N. Y. 
D^ton, Ohio. 
Carrolltou, 111. 
Mendota,Ill. X 
Baraboo, Wis. 
Augusta, N. Y. 
Du Page, 111. 
8umterville,S.a 
WiUiamst'n., M. 



Walton, N.Y, 
N. Madiaon^nd. 



Ohio. 
W.Uberty,Iowa. 
l4yKinder,N.Y. 

CineinnaU, 0. 
Croton, Iowa. 
Middleport,N.Y 
Govemeur,N.Y.- 
Maraah, Syria. 
Edinboro', Pa. 
Brunswick, Mo. 
Brooklyn, N.Y. 
Orient L L 
New York dtj. 

OakUndiCal. 
Harrlsonb'g.,ya. 
Troy, N. Y. 
Jamesvlllt,N Y. 
Covington, Pa. 
VermontvU., M. 

Apaiachifn. N.Y. 
Semonank, IlL 
New York. 
Hublersb'g.,Pa. 
Gaboon, W. A 
Brownhelm, O. 
Vienna, Ohio. 
JelTeraonvil.. Id. 
New York City. 
New York City. 
Bsooklyn, N. Y. 



N.Bergen, N.Y. 
Pbiladela., Pa. 
Windham, 0. 
F.Des Moinea, L 
Yaadalia, IlL 
Hudson, Ohio. 
Bedford, Ind. ^ 
Lahalna,8.IslB. 
MtGleman8,IL 



(121) 

Digitized by VjOOQ iC 



122 



PBESBYTBRIAN HISTORICAL ALMANAC. 



PmUBTTXKT. POST-orPICS. 



BifMll, Samuel. T. Portaffo. 

Bissell, S. R. • s. Port Wajna. 
« Bittinger, J. B., P. CleTeland. 
<^ Blackbam, A., w. c. New RIyer. 

Blaekbarn, J. N.. 8 i. Kingston. 

Blair, A. Alex., pev. Holston. 

Bhiedell, J. J., P. OindnnatL 

Blakeley, J. B^ L. Cayoga. 

Blakely, Abram., ■ a. Ljoni. 

BlakelT, DaTld, w o. Cedar VaUey. Waterloo. Iowa. 

Blakede^ Jaa., ■ i. Penniylrania. UlytMe, N. T. 

Blinn, Henry Q.. P. Hcmroe. TeeumaehfHich. 

Blodgett, L. P~ w. o. OtMgo. Oooperat'n, N.Y. 

Blood, Daniel 0.. • i. OleTeland. MaMillon« Ohio. 

Boal, John M^ W. o. CincinnatL Gindnnatl,Ohlo 

Board, James H., P. Roekaway. 

Boardman, Q. M., ■ a. Detroit. 
« Boardman, O. S., p. Onondaga. 

Boggs, Jas. H., P. PhiladeUTith. Falrton, N 

Bogue, H. P., AAT. Onondaga. Syracuse, ' 

Boles, Harper, w. o. Delaware. 

Bolng, Ellas L.. ■. ■. Gatokill. 

Bonar, James B., P. N. York 8d. 

Bonham, J. C, 1. 1. Madison. 

Bonney, B. H., ■ t. Utica. 

Bonney, 8. W^ F M. OindnnatL 

Booth, LeTi R., s t. Salem. 

Bootb, Robt R., P. N. York Sd. 

Boswell, Jos. O., 1. 1. Montrose. 

BoKWorth, Byron, ■ a. Oaynga. 

Bnsworth, Nath.. a a. Rochester. 

Boughton, P^ AOT. Detroit 

Bowen, Qeorge. V M. N. York Sd. 



Twinwburgh, 
Huntlngdon,Id- 
Clereland, Ohio. 
KnoxTille, Ten. 
Benton, Tenn. 
RogersTille, T. 
Gincinnati,01iio. 

8odus,"N.*Y. 



W. Milford,N. J. 
8. Plymouth, M. 
Gaaenovia, " 



,i^Y. 



Monroe. 
Oenera. 



Utiea. 

Wilmington, 

Brie. 



Boyoe, W. C, W. 0. Tioga. 

Boyd, And. H. H., P. * 

Boyd, B. J^ PEP. 

Boyd, James K., T. 

Boynton H., w. o. 

Boyter, Chas.. a t. 

Braca, 8. W., ABT, 

Brace, S. 0., L. 

Bradford, T. T., P. 

Bridford, Wm.,w.o. N.Tork Sd. 

Bradley, Milton, p. Kalamaaoo. 

Bradley, Wm., T. Newark. 

BradKhaw, Amsl, a t. Shiloh. 

Br4dflhaw, C, w. 0. Osage. 

Bradsbaw, J. N., P. Kingston. 

Bi&dshaw, John, P. Champlaln. 

Bradsbaw, T. R., s.t. Kingston, 

Briinerd, Asa, T. «- • - 

Brainerd, Thos , P. 

Brautly, Kdwlo T. 

Bray too, Isaac, P. 

Brayton, I. H., sdt. 

Breck, Jos. H., w. o. 

Brier, W. W., p. 



Caynga. 

PhlladeU. 4th. Bererlr, N. J, 



HarperfleId,K.Y 

Durham, N. Y. 

Montreal, C. E. 

Rising Sun,Ind. 

Vernon C, N.Y. 

Hong Kong, G. 

Seymour, Ind. 

Stamford, Ot 

Harford, Pa. 

Kingston, Maw. 

Pairport, N. Y. 

Sandusky 0., 0. 

Bombay, India. 

Aurora, N T. 

Winchester, Ya. 

Monroe, Mich. 

Plttsfleld. Mass. 

ainton, N. Y. 



Utlca,N.Y. 
Phihulela., Pa. 
Waterford, Pa. 
New York aty. 
Richland, Mich. 
Newark, N. J. 
Mnrfreesbo', T. 
UtUe Osage,Mo. 
Chattanooga, T. 
Crown Pt., N.Y. 
MadisonTiL, T. 

St. Lawrenoa. 

Phlladebk 4th. PhlladeU., Pa. 

GreenTill^ Ten. 

Watertown. Watertown,N.Y. 
San Prandsoo. Ssn FrandscaC. 
Clereland. Newburgh,Ohla 
San Jos6. AWeradn, Cal. 

Brinkerhofl;A.D.,w o. Qumplaln. Champlaln, N.Y. 
Brinkerhoff,W.H..f.f. Franklin. Jerome, Ohio. 

Brittan, Thos. 8.,w 0. Brooklyn . Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Brodt, John H.. w o. San Frandseo. Petaluma, Gal. 
Broniwn, M. G , f. t. Albany. 
Brooks, A. L., P. Chicago. 
Brooks, John F.. *. lUinoTs. 
Brooks, Lemuel.w.o. Rochester. 
Broughtoo, N.H..f t. Richland. 
Brown, Alonso, w.O. N. York 8d. 
Brown, A. P., w. 0. Schuyler. 

Brown, B., w. 0. Troy. 

Brown, Chas., ft. Phlladela. 8d. PhiUdela., Pa. 
Brown, D. B., w. o. Pennsylvania. Coudersport,Pa. 
Brown, Fred. H., P. Trumbull. Youngstown, 0. 

Brown, George, W. 0. St Joseph. 

Brown, John M., g.t. Bloomlngton. Mlnonk, m. 

Brown, Lee, H. M . New Rlrer. 

Brown, Lee C, H. X. New Rirer. 

Brown, M. A., L. Cayuga. 

Brown, T. 8., P. Newark. 

Brown, Thomas, t. a. Kingston. 

Brown, Wm. B., 1. 1. Kingston. 

Brownlee, Jas., H M. Indianapolis. 

Bruen, Edw. B., W.O. Phlladela. 4th. PhlladeU., Pa. 
Brundage, A., w. 0. Newark. W.BI<iomfl'd,NJ 

Brundage, Israel, P. Montrose. Prompton, N. J. 
Bryant Alfred, p. Kalamasoo. Nlles, Mich. 
Buck, Elijah, W.O. Cold Watar. JonesTUU,Mleh. 



Chicago, lU. 
Spdngfleld, IlL 
ChurdiTiI.,N.Y. 
Petersburgh, T. 

BushTiiie, m. 



HUUtUU, Ya. 

PUtnlieV<£ N. J. 
Phliadda., Ten. 
Spring Place.Ga. 
BrownsTli.,K.T. 



PEKSBTTXET. POaT^PFICB. 



Buckingham, E., P. 
Burbank, Caleb,w c. 
Burchard, l£li, a a. 
Burehard, S. D., P. 
Burgess, Chalon, a a, 
Bumap, Bliss, s s. 
Burritt S. W., W c. 
Burton, 8. M., aot. 
Bush, Charles P., p. 
Bush, 8. W., P. 
Bush, Stephen, P. 
Bushnell, A., V. X. 
Busbnell, C, w. o. 
Bushnell, Eben., P. 
Busbnell, H^ w. c. 
Bushnell, J. J., PEP. 
Busbnell, L., L. 
Butler, C. F., w. 0. 
Butler, J. O., P. 
Butler, Joseph, w. 0. 
Buttolph, MtltoD,a a. 
Byington,T. L.,F.X. 



Pataskala. 

Elyria. 

UtIca. 

N. York Sd. 

BufUlo. 

St. Lawrence. 

CleTeUukd. 

Poi;tage. 

Belvldera. 

Otsego. 

Albany. 

ClndnnatL 

OtUwa. 

Huron. 

Franklin. 

Portage. 

N.YorkSd. 

Utiea. 

PhiUdeU.Sd. 

Wabash. 

Ontario. 

Newark. 



Oanton, Ohio. 
Chatham. Ohio. 
Cllntoa, N. Y. 
New York City. 
Lit Yalley.N.Y. 
ParishTll.,N.Y. 
CleTeUnd, Ohio. 
Twinsbnrg.Ohlo .^ 
Belolt WU. ^ 
Coopenit'n.,N.T 
Cohoes,N.Y. 
Gaboon, AfHca. 
LUbon, IlL 
Fremont Ohio. 
MontioeUo,Mte. 
Bek>it» Wis. 

Ysrona^N.Y. 
W.PbUadela,P». 
Albion, IlL 
Honeoye, N. Y. 
OonatanUnopU. 



CiJ.i> WELL , K . 1 1 . L. Cayuga. 

Cal«4wMU, Q. A., a t. Kingston. Athens, Tenn. 

OalWlLJ M.st. Union. Rock ford. Teon. 

Ca ' " I , i a. Richland. Pulaski, Tenn. 

Ga 1 , » s. Kingston. CleyeUnd, Ten. 

Ca I .. p, PennsylTanla. Wellsboro% Pa. 

Ct 1 1 L 1 ill , , H I ■ 1 1 ry , p. Chenango. Oxford, N. Y. 

Cam p, [^iliiuieiii, W. 0. UUca. Whitesbo*, N. T. 

CtJupU^I, A H.. p. Schuyler. Mendon, IB. 

Ga n L |i Ut*t I , A . t:., aw. N . York 3d. New York City. 

CampUII, D a, B.a. Saginaw. Vienna, Mich. 

Cacn^ilH IL 1>. A,, s a. Clinton. Brando^i, MiasL 

CantpUil, Jo^Ua.t. Rockawaj. Lafiiyette, N. J. 

Oaiu ]>lit^ 1 1, J . V-i I I. Wabash. Oerro Gordo, HI 

Cam p W\ I Rob t^tLM. Clinton. Trinity, La. 

Cam [J I hA L, 3. M ., p. Ontario. DansTille, N. Y. 

Can riHidt Jos. A^ P. Watertown. Gbaumont N.Y. 

CsEj CI'. Id, 9. fi., P. Onondaga. Syracuse, N. Y. 

Oaiui, thm. U., L. Wilmington. Wllmlngtoiu D. 

Gannon, F. B., aao. Geneva. Geneva, N. Y. 

Carey, Isaac B., p. Knox. Peoria, IlL 

Carey, Sylvester, t.a. Washtenaw. Stockbridge, ML 

Cargan, Wm., L. Utica. 

Camahan, J. A., 1. 1. Logansport Dayton, Ind. 
Gamahan, J. G., P. Pennsylyanla. Nelson, Pa. 
Garothers, A. G., P. D. of CoIumbU WashingtOB 0. 7<^ 



Carpenter, H. 8., P. Brooklyn. 

Garr, Charles C, p. Chemung. 

Carr, Wm. H., w. a Albany. 

Oarrier, A. H., a. a. Harmony. 

Garruth, J. H., W.O. Watertown. 

Carson, E. H., P. Lexington. 

Carson, J. C, W. O. Union. 

Cass, Moses G., a. a. Keokuk. 

Chamberlain, E.B., P. Champlaln. 

ChamberUin,E.B.,a a Grand KWer. 

Chandler, Geo., P. PhiUdeU. 4th. PhiUdela., I'a. 

Chandler, J. B.. P. X. Cincinnati. BattaUgunda, L 

ChandUr, Loomls^ t. TrumbulL 

Ohapln, A. L., t. a. UtIca. 

Cbapin, Che8t6r,w o. CleveUnd. 

Chapin, Bph., W. o. Geneva. 

Chapin, L. D., P. Washtenaw. 

Cbapin, 0. N., a. t. Meadville. 

Chapman, A. D., ■ a. Franklin. 

Chapman, Chas., a a. Chemung. 

Chapman, E. J., W 0. Onondaga. 

Charbonell, T., 1. 1. ChampUln. 



Chase, Moody, W. 0. Crawfbrdsvllle Parkersb'g.,Ind 



ipu 
ft)r< 



Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Painted P., N.Y. 
Albany, N. Y. 
Paris, Ky. 
Ot-awatomie, K. 
Savannah, Mo. 
Mill River. N. a 
MuscatlDe,lowa 
PUtUburK.N.Y. 
\f ayne, Ohl«. 



KIlRworth,Ohio. 
Amsterdam,NY 
Brecksvil., Ohio. 
Waterloo, N.Y. 
Ann Arbor, M. 
SparUnRb'g.,Pa. 
Porter, Ohio. 
Mead's Ck.,N.Y. 
Oneida L., N.Y. 
Canada East 



Chase, Moses, a. t. ChampUln. 
Chassell, David, WjO. Utlca. 



Cheadle, H.C., L. 

Cheadle, J. R., a. t. 

Cbeever, Eben., P. 

Cheever, W. M., P. 

Chester, A. T., P. 

Chester, C. M., w. 0, 

Chester, Edw., 1. 1. 

Chester, Eras., W.O. TrumbnlL 

Chester, Joseph. P. Scioto. 

Cblrhester, D.. p. Chemung. 

Chichester, Iiwic, P. Geneva. 

ChldUw, B. W., AOT. HamUton. 



Brafcher F.,N.Y. 
Newport, N. Y. 
Niconsa, Ind. 
Shiloh, Ind. 
Paterson. N. J.^ 
Troy. Ohio. 
BuAilo, N. Y. ^ 
Geneva, N. Y. 
New York 4th. Manhatanv.N.T 
Hudson, Ohio. 
Ironton, Ohio. 
Coming, N. Y.< 
Benin^n, N.Y. 
CLodunatifOhio. 



Greencastle. 

Fort Wayne. 

Newark. 

Dayton. 

Buffalo. 

NUgara. 



Digitized by 



Googk 



THS FBESBTTKBIAN CHURCH, {V. S.) 



128 



ntnsTTxmT. pmt-otpicx. 



ChUdi, raiM, w. o. Ot8«go. 
Chiistopher, W.B., P. Bloomiogtoii. 



l>ep<Mit,N.T. 
Lncon, 111. 
Obasterto'mN.T. 
Huntington, 0. 
Truxtnn, N. Y. 
HiUsdab. Mich. 
Dexter, Ukh. 
NUm, 111. 



Lyons, Iowa. 
Medina, N. T. 



Clapp, Kaftu a, T. Troy. 

Clark, Anwl IL, wo. Klyrta. 

Clark, Caleb, w. o. Cortland. 

Clark, Calvin, P. Cold Water. 

Clark, Chas.a., i.t. Waditenatr. 

Clark, C. Kufua, W.c. Chieaoo. 

Clark, Daniel. P. Iowa City. 

Clark, Kdgar W, P. Niagara. 

Clark, Fred. O., P. New York ith. New York City. 

Clark, Card. K., 1.8. Cortland. 
» Clark, Jan. M., w O. Ottawa. 

Clark, St)th (*., axo. Clereland. 

Clark, Wm. C, P. TrambalL 

Clarke, T. S., • a. Delaware. 

CleaTeland. G. W.. P. Brie. 

Cleland, Philip S., p. Indianapolla. 

CleUnd, T. H.. a a. Providenoe. 

Cleveland, W. N., T. Brooklyn. 

CioM, 11. K., AOT. Chemung. 

Clute, N. M., > a. Niagara. 

Conn, Oao. W., P. M. Oeneaee. 

C>bb, Nehamiah. a a. Buflklo. 

Cochran, B. V„ w c. Green Rlrer. 

Cochran, J. O., F. M. 

Cochrane, Jamet. p. 
y Cue, David B., axe. 

Coe, Harvey, w. o. 

Coffln,N.C., a a. 

Colt, John T., P. 

Cole, BenJ. F., w. c. 

Cole, Braatua, a a. 

Oil Una, Levi, w 0. 

Colllna, V. D., w o. 

CoUina, Wm. W.. a a. Lyona. 

Colton, U. S , w. c. Ottawa. 

Colaton. Hobert, a. a. 

Conde,D.T., P.M. 

Condlt,B,L. • 
.^Condlt, J. B , pmp. 

Cone, Aguatoa a a. 

Cone, Luther U., P. 

Gone, RevHo J., p. 

Conger, Bnoch, a a. 

Conklln, Luther. P 



Saratoga, 
OtUwa,llL 
Brooklyn, Ohio. 
Warren, Ohio. 
Cuyahoga F.. 0. 
MoreheadviL,Pa. 
Oivenwood, Ind. 
liAbanon, Ky. 
Brooklyn, N. 1 
Blmira, N. Y. 
Byron. N. Y. 
Oroomiah,Perala. 
8trykeraTil,N Y. 
Metropolia, III. 
Seir, Persia. 
Pleast.UnltT,Pa. 



KAMS. 



P&KSITTXST. POST-OPFICB. 



aflklo. 



BaflDUo. 

Pittsburgh. 

New York 8d. New York City. 



Hudaon, Ohio. 
Piqua, Ohio. 
Albion, N. Y. 
Granville, Ohio. 
Litchfield, Ohia 
BelTldere, IlL 



Keokuk. 
Buliklo. 
ClndnnatL 

Trumbull. 
New York 3d. 



Portage. 

Dayton. 

Niagara. 

Oreeneaatle. 

Blrria. 

Belvldera. 

New York 3d. 

B. Palmyra,N.Y. 
Bristol, III. 
Lancaater, Iowa. 
Saratoga 9.,N-Y. 
Walnut Hllla,0. 
Auburn, N. Y/ 
Guatarua, Ohio. 

Springfield. Maa. 

New York Sd. Sherman, Ct 
Huron. Greenfield, Ohio. 

OnUrio. K.Bloomfl'd,N.Y 

Conklln^ Oliver P., P. Geneva. Ovid, N. Y. 

Conkling, C. 8., p. Philadela. 4th. Mt. Pleas't, N.J. 
Onnley, James, a. a. Fox River. Ashlpun, Wis. 
Conrad, Jaoob lS..a a. Blue Karth. Mapleton, Minn. 
Converse, A., bdt. Philadela. 4th. Phlladela., Pa. 
Cook, Joahna. p. Niaoira. Lewlaton, N. Y. 

Cook, P. O., AAT. Buflklo. Buflalo, N. Y. 

Cboke, George, pma. Union. KnoxvlUe, Ten. 

Cooke, Sylveeter, P. Boekaway. Deckertown,N.J 
Cooper, Alvan, P. BuflUo. Gowanda, N. Y. 

V Cooper, David M., P. Saginaw. Saginaw Ctty,M. 

Cope, Edward, t. a. Chenango. GilhertSTil..N.Y. 
Copeland. J., P. Rooheater. HoUey, N. Y. 

Corilss, Albert H., P. Utiea. HolUnd Pt.,N.Y 

Corning, Jaa. L., P. BuflUo. Buflalo, N. Y. 

Coming, Wm.H., P. Troj. Whitehall, N. Y. 

Comweli, laaae D., P. Delaware. Hancock, N. Y. 
Oorwln, Kli, p. San Joa^. San Joa^, Oal. 

Corwin, Gabriel 8.. P. Geneaee. Blba, N. Y. 

Cory, Christ, w c. St Joseph. Uma, Ind. 

Cossitt, S. P., w. o. Boekaway. 

Couch, W. v., p. Genesee. B.Pemb'ke,N.Y. 

Covert John. r. Hamilton. Terra Haute. In. 
Cowles, A. W., PES. Chemung. Elmira, N. Y. 
Cowlen, Sylvester a a. Buflklo. Clean, NY. 

Cox, Samuel H., PKa. Genesee. Le Roy, N. Y. 

Coyner, David H.,a t. Franklin. Lexington.Ohio. 

Coaaens, 8. W., P. Utica. Temon, N. Y. 

Crabb, Isaac w o. Monroe. Fairfield, Mich. 

Craig. John 8., PEF. Union. IfaryTilLs, Ten. 

> Craighead, J. G., sdt. Harriabws. New York City. 
'^-^ Craighead, Rich., P MeadviUe. MeadTllle, Pa. 
Crampton, R. 8., aot. Rochester. BochoHter, N. Y. 
Crane, Daniel, w a Hudaon. Cornwall, N. Y. 

Orane, Olirer, P. Chemung. WaTerly, N.Y. 
Crawford, John. a. a. Oswego. North Bay, N.Y. 

Crawford, Levi P., a.a. OtUwa. Sandwich, IlL 

Crawford, Wm. A., L. Wlnebester. Newark, DeL 

Crittenden, I. N.. a a. Cayuga. 

X Crittenden, 8. W., P. New York Sd. Qilton, N. Y. 



Croeker, Amos, a. a. 
Crocker, Ch.ta., a. a. 
Oosa, Marcus B.,w.o. 
Crossett, Robert, wo. 
Crowell, John, P. 
CulTsr, Andrew, P. 
Cumpaton, B. H., p. 
Ounnln|^iam,A.N.,a a 
Cunnlngham,J. W. ,p. 
Currr, Wm. »., w.o. 
Curtia, Chaa. D., t. a. 
Curtia, Bleroy, p. 
Curtia, Geo. 0., p. 
Curtia, Harv«y, p. 
Curtia, Wm. 8., PEF. 
Cuahoaan, John P., L. 



Dasa, Wm. B., P. Cayuga. 




DtOy, Lemuel, w. 0. Oawego. 
Danforth, J. N., AO 



King*aF.,N.Y. 
01enwood,N.Y. 
Darby, Pa. 
8uoeaauna,NJ. 
Orange, N.J. -• 
Manayunk, Fa. > 
P.Kdward,Ya."^ 
SheHyyvUle, T. 
U Porte, Ind. 
Genera, N. Y. 
Hoeking Pt,0. 
FtWayne,Ind. 
Adrian, Mich. * 
Oaleabnrg, IlL ^ 
Clinton, N. Y. 
Troy, N.Y. 

Jaokson,Miflfa. 
Fulton, N. Y. 
Aax. D.ofODlnmbla. Alexandria, Vai* 
Darling, Henry, P. PhiladeU.Sd. Philadela., Pa. 
Darrah, Jaa. A., a. a. 8t Louia. Troy, Mo. 

Dashiell, A. H., PEa. Philadela. 4th. Murfreeabo^, T. 
Davidaon,D.B.. a.a. Portage. Fftrmerab'g- L 

Davlea, David, w c. Sdoto. ..^ Iowa. 

Davia, Kdwio R., P Onondaga. Ononda' V,N. Y. 
Davia, George F., a. a. Sch uyler. Mt.8teriing.I1l. 

DavIa, James M , a a. PhlladeU. Sd. PhiladeU., Pm, 
Davia, John W., a. a. Harrlsburg. Dauphin, Pa. 
DaTia, SamL R., T. Newark. New York City. 

Day, Alvah, a. a. OtUwa. Lisbon, 111. 

Day,GsorgeB.,PEF. CinclnnatL Walnutllills,0. 
Day, Henry N., PEF. Portage. Hudson, Ohio. 

Day, Robert, a. a. Troy. Naasai^ N. Y. 

Day, Samuel M., P. ChemuuK. HaTanna, N.Y. 
Day, WiUiam, o M. aeveUind. Clereland, 0. 
Dean, Artemaa, w. o. Hudaon. Saliab^.M,N.Y. 

Delamater, laaae, P. CrawfordariUe AtUca, Ind. 
Delamater, J. A., L. Cleveland. Cleveland, 0. 
Delavan, Geo. £.,•*• Dubuque. Wyoming, I. 
De Long, C. H., a a. Keokuk. Oakalooaa,Iow» 

De Long, Ira O^L. New York 4th. \^ 
~ ■ ~ ' Huron. ...... 

Cbamplaln. 

Albany. 

Harrisbuif. 



Doming, F. A., w. o. 
Doming, R. it, a. M. 
Devoe, Isaac, P. 

Dewitt, Wm. R., P. 

Dexter. R. Hart a a. Geneaee. 
Deyo, 6. H., w. o. North River. 
Dickerson, A. C, a. a. Green River. 
Dickerson, U. L., a. a. Greeneaatle. 



Burke, N.Y. 
Mech»lcaT.,N.Y 
Harriabnrg,Pa. * 
Corfti,N.Y. 
N.PsltsLandPg 
Bowling G.,Ky. 
Danville, Ind. 

Dickey, N. 8., a a. Madison. Colnmbus,Ind. 

Dickinson, B., SBO. New York 3d. Boston, Mass. 

Dickson, James, s. a. PitUburgh. Buchanan, Pa. 

Dimoek. 8. H., P. Columbia. ValsUe. N. Y. 

Diuond. David, a a. Sidney. Rock Hill, Mo. 

Diver, Cbas F., P. PhlladeU. 4th. Cedarville,N.J.^ 

Dixon, David R., COL. Washtenaw. Unadiila, Mich 

Doane, K. T.. F M. New York Sd. Ascension Isld. 

Doane, Hiram. P. Chenango. Norwich, N.Y. 

Dodd, K. M., F. M. Newark. Zahleh, Syria. 

Doolittle, Chas., P. Albany. Sand Lake,N.r 

DoolltUe, H. H., s. s. Geneva. 

DooUtUe, Justus F M. Cayuga. Fuh Chan, 0. 

Dorman, Lester N.. L. New York 8d. 

Donbleday, W. T . s a. Otsego. GllbertsTil,N.T 

Douglas, J. W., w o. San Frandaeo. 

Downer, J. C, AOT. lllinola. GarliuTllle, IlL 

Downa, Wm. It, a a. Bath. Howard, N. Y. 

Drake, Bei^. B., w c. Chicago. Blkgrore, IIL 

Drew, Steph. F., a a. Madison. Laurel, Ind. 

Drysdale, W. 8., T. Philadela. 8d. Uncaster, PE. 

Dubois, A. C, w. o. Huron. Plymoutfel, 0. 

Dudlev, La Fayette,P. Iowa City. Cedar Rap., L 

Duflleld, George, P. Detroit Detroit BCieh. — 

Duflleld, Jr., Geo., p. Philadela. 4th. Philadela., Pa. 

Dullea, J. W., aso. Philadela. 3d. Philadela., Pa. 

Dunbar, John, w. o. Lexington. Orpgon, Mo. 

Duncan, Alex., T. Pataakala. Newark, Ohio. 

Duncan, J. McKim,P. Philadela. 8d. Xlkton, Md. 

Dunlap, A. B., T. Geneva. Elmira, N. Y. 

DnnUp, L. W., a. t. Schuyler. Mt. 8terling,Ill 

Dunlap, W. C, a a. Texaa. Marahall, Tex. 

Dunn, Ambroae, P. Rrie. Falnrlew, Pa. 

Dunn, Jamea R.. a a. Bloomlngton. Winona, IlL 

Dunning, A. G., a. a. Columbua. Arlington, Wta. 

Dunning, C. 8., a. a. New York 8d. VrankUa, N. T. 



Digitized by 



Googk 



124 



PBBSBTTXRIAK HISTORICAL ALMANAC. 



VmVtlTTnT. VOtT^FTXCX. 



«* Bannlngt HalMj, r. 
Jhuaingf Kleb., w. o. 
Donaer, J. 0., L. 

Dwiffht, Jm. Um • •. 
I»wight,S.O., P.K. 
Dwight, Wbl B., l. 
Jhryor, RobOTt D^ L. 
Dyer, Hiram, : •. 
Dyer, SpaiieerO.,ra 
Dyke, John, ft. i. 
Djftut, ILH.,i.i. 

Baolbtoh, W., ■ a. 
^ BmrU, CorDellns, P. 
^ Xatott, Horaoa, P. 

Eddj, Altnd, a. a. 

BAdy. ABud a w c. 

Eddy, Wm. W., ». M. 

Sdwarda, Joa 8^ a a. 

KelA, Jamea, P. 

Keln, OsUa S^ a. a. 

Kgbert Jiiaea C^ P. 

Bldrod, Heory B., p. 

%£neDwood.r. r., t. 

KUiott, Geo. W., Aax. 

Xlllott, J. W., AOT. 

Elliott, Mad . w. c. 
ElHMr. Nathaniel. P. 
Ely, Kara 8tylea,w.o. 
Emerson, D. H., P. 
y^ Bra, Wm. T., P. 
Everest, Geo. T., P. 
Everett, Kben., W. 0. 
Bwhig, Jokui 0^ a. a. 

VamcHiLD. B.R.,aao. 

f airtfaild, John, a. a. 

lalrley. Alex., s.a. 

rancher, Bela, P. 

Faneher, Bsra B..a. a. 

Parrand, B., w. 0. 

fay, Nathaniel T., p. 

Velio va, L. H., w. c. 

VeUowa, 8. H.. L. 

Venn, BenJ., w.o. 

Vennell, Andw. J^ P. 

Venner, Jamea, P. 

Verry, Wm. H. w. o. 

Vieid, Henry ftL, SOT. 

VlUmora, laaaeO., P. 

Vlneh, H. W^ I.. 

Vlih, Bdw.V.,W.O. 

Vliih, John B., a. a. 

Viaher, Joaiah, P. 

Vliiber,Jr.Joalah,sa. 

Viaher, 8. W^ P. 

Vlteh. OetaTioa, w. o. 

Fleming, Saml., a. a. 

Fletcher, P., P. 

Flint, Fredarie W., L. 

Vloto, Rodolph, T. 

FoboB. G. P^ P. 

Foot, OeoTRe, p 

Foot, Homee, w. 0. 
• Force. Ohaa. H., a.s. 

Ford, V. F^ a t. 

Ford, John, w o. 

Ford,J.B.,F x. 

Ford, L. 0., a. t. 

Ford, Bfareaa,P. 

Fetter, OnataT. L., p. 

Vowler, John B., a. t. 
^Vowler,P.H.,P. 

Vox, WaiL A,, p. 

VmnUIn, Bei^. p. 

Vranklln, Wm. 8,. p. 

Vrary, .Teaae L., T. 

Vraaar, Hovana, a. a. 

VraMr, Oria, • a. 

Vraaer, Wm^ w. o. 

Vraar, Waiter, t. a. 
'^ Freeman, A. 8., p. 

Fraeman, A. N., p. 

~ - ,A.W„p. 
i Om, W,e. 



DuifOolnmhIa. 

Onondaga. 

Ohiaago. 

Bew Twk 4th. 
New York 8d. 
New Tork 4th. 
QanoTar. 
Oawego. 
St. Joaaph, 
Union. 
Kaokok. 

Shlloli. 

PhihMlala.4«h. 

LTans. 

Bloomington. 

Ohiaago. 

Newark. 

Alton. 

GleTeland. 

Tmmbnll. 

New York Sd. 

TrumbnU. 

Roeheater. 

Milwankie. 

Wilmington. 

Elyria. 

CbemuBg. 

PhlhuleU. 4fh. 

Wilmington. 

Newark. 

Chenango. 

GenoTa. 



Baltimore, Md. 
Jordan, N. Y. 

OHnton, N. Y, 
Cherry V., N. Y. 
Molokai,8.IaU. 
New York Cily. 

N. HaTen,N.Y. 
Michigan Cm In. 
Unlth^ Tenn. 
Troy, Iowa.. 

Mn ifr ee eb o*, T. 
Cataaauqna, Pa. 
Pahnyra,N.Y. 
Bloomington,!!. 
Chicago, IlL 



Bidon, Syria, 
^eraerrllle, Dl. 
CleTeland,Ohk>. 



JohnitouTll., O. 
Hoboken,N.Y. 
Kinsman, Ohio. 
Roeheater, N.Y. 
MUwankie,Wia. 
PhiUdela., Pa. 
Bocheater &^, 
E. ATon, N. X. 
Philadela., Pa. 
8t.Oeorgo'B,IM. 
Newark, N.J. 
MaflonvUle,N.Y 
Phelpa,N.Y. 
Winimraetilowa. 



New York City, 
Wabaah, Ind. 
MUlerb'g.,Iowm. 
Homer, Mich. 
MeOr«wyn.,N.Y 
Deekerto'n, N.J. 
Prairie D., Ohio. 
W.Darham,N.Y 
W.Darham,N.Y 
Hartford. Ohkk. 

Troy. Glenn*s F, N.Y. 

Rodiaatar. Chili, N. Y. 

G. RlTer Vallay G. Haren, Mich. 

New York 4th. New York City. 
BaUTla,N.Y. 
E.Whiteh%N.Y 



TtAMM. 



PKxavTxx&T. Poax-oFncB. 



HndJHm. 

Fort Waynau 

Iowa City, 

Ifarahall. 

Oourtland. 

Roekaway. 

Maamea. 

OktokilL 

Catakltl. 

Tramhnll. 

Ti 

~ rtar. 



New York 8d. 

Iowa City, 

CkitakiU. 

Boekaway. 

Roekaway. 

ClndnnAa. 

Ithnca. 

Kalamaaoo. 

Wlneheater. 

Genera. 

Ottawa. 



Big HoUow,N.Y 
Bttcoaanna, VJ. 



Wilmington. 

Portage. 

Ottawa. 

EockawaT. 



Clnclnnati,Ohlo 
Branch Pt,N.Y. 
Decatur, Mich. 
Dnffleld'a, Va. 

Peru,'m.' 
Attica, N. Y. 
Glasgow, DeL 



Ottawa, HL 
Le Roy, N.Y. 
Paralppany,N.J. 
New Yorfc 401. Beirnt, Syria. 



Sdoto. Jackaon, Ohio. 

Tioga. Newark y.,N.Y. 

Washtenaw, Yndlanti, Ulch. 
Enron. Pfymoath.Ohlo 

Utica. 13ti«a,N.Y. 

Rochester. 8penoerpt.,N.Y. 
Washtenaw. Saline, Mleh. 
Chyuga. Fire Cora., N.Y. 

WlncAeater. 8hflph'dsto*n,Y. 
Genera. Ganog^ N. Y. 

Bath. Btarkey, N.Y. 

Delaware. Hamden, N. Y. 

Sierra Nerada. Ptaoerrll., Iowa. 
New York 4th. IIaTenit'w.,N.Y. 
Brooklyn. Bmoklyn, N. Y. 
Madison. Aurora, tnd. 

N. Y. 



Milwankie. 

New YorkSd. Beiffen, N.J. 

North River. 8.Amenia,N.T. 

Albany. 

Bloomington. Chicago, ni. 

Philadela. Sd. Boston, Masa. 

^ Sturgis. Mich. 

.Y. 



French, 0. R., w. 0. 

French, B. W., P. 

Frtasell, A.C.,P. 

Fxoat, D. C, a. a. 

Froat, Joi. H., w.c. 

Frvet, Nath., CHP. 

Fuller, William, a a. Cold Water. 

Fuiman, C. B., aot 



Gaui. Geo. W« w.c. Knox. 

Gallagher, J. 8., AOT Newark. 

Gallaher, A.G., w c N. MiaaouiL 

Gallaher, F. R,, a. a. StLonia. 

Gallaher, W.O., a. a. lUinolft. 

Gamage, 8. P., w c Utica. 

Gano, Lonla, w. o. Troy. 

Garland. E., a. a. Pataakala. 

Garnet, Hennr H , P. New York U. New York City. 

Oarriaon, 8. Y., w. c. Green River. Bowling G., K; 

Qaaion, A.H.,a.a. Kslsmasoo 

Qaylord,F.S.,P. Bath. 

Oaylord, H. J., P. WUmington. 

Gelston, Haltby, P. MarahaU. 

Oelston, M . B., a. a. Bath. 



Galeabor^ DL / 
Bloomfkeld,NX^ 
Lick Creek, Ma 
8t.Joae|»h,Mo. 
JacksouTU., DL 
N. Scituate,RX 
Albany, lU. 
Johnatown, 0. 



Gerrlsh, John, P. 
Gibba, Charles, L. 



Dayton. 

BnlUo. 

Troy. 

Alton. 

Chenaogo. 



Gibbs, 

Oibhs, DanieL w. O. 
Gibba, J. C, P. 
Oibaon, John, w.c. 
QUbert, H. W, P. 
Gilbert, Jaa. J., w.o. Champlaln, 
Gilbert, L. O, W. c. Chicago. 
Gillett, B. J., pma. Keokuk. 
GiUett, Bara H., P. 
GIUett,J.M.,P. 

Gillette, Charlea, P. Champlaln. 
Oleaaon, Ansonjr. x. Buflalo, 
Glenn, Robert, a. a. Lexington. 
Gloucester, J. N.,W.C. Brooklyn. 
GloTer, L. H., P. UUnoU. 
GoddenLewlBjW.o. Madison. 
Goehring, Geo. C P. Newark. 
Goertner, N. W., w.c. GeneTa. 
Qoetschiua, S.zLw.c. Roeheater. 
Goldamith, B. M., P. Genera. 
Goodell, Wm., w. o. Chemung. 
Goodman, R. 8., P. Cold Water. 
Goodman, 8. 8., p. Otaego. 
Goodman, T. 8,, L. GIndnnatL 
Goodrich, Chaa.,w.o. Genera. 
Goodrich, C. B., CHp. Utica. 
Goodrich, B. W-, L. New York Uh. 
Goodrich, W. H., p. Tioga. 
Gordon, Jamea, a. a. Cedar Yall^. 
Gordon, Joaeph, o. M . Alton. 
Gordon, Peter, P. Troy. 
Gone, Simon 8., P. Cayuga. 
Gould, Nahum, P. Ottawa. 
GoTan, Andrew, w. o. Detroit 
Graham, Jaa. H., L. WInchei4er. 
Oinley, Alfred A., a.a. 



Hastinga, MlcL 

Hopew^,N.Y. 

Port Penn, DeL X 

Albion, Mich. 

Naples, N. Y. 

N. Wash'toh;ln. 

Lima, Ohio. 

ElpUy, N. Y. 

Troy, N. Y. 

BelleTUle, lU. 

Greene, N. Y. 

Fairharen, Yt 

Crate, IlL 

Koesuth, Iowa. ^ 
New York 4th. Harlem, N.Y. > 
Grand Rirer. AHhUbula,Ohio 

F.OoT'gton,N.T 

IrTlQg,N.Y. 

Lexington, Mo. 

New York City. 

Jaeksonvil., llL /> 

N.MadisonJLnd. 

Pateraon,N.J. 

Philadela., Pa. 

Fahi)ort,N.Y. 

Benton, N. Y. 

Auburn, N. Y. 

Cold Water, M. 

MUford. N.Y. 

ChUloothe,Ohla 

Penn Yan. N.Y. 

Ctka, N.Y. 



Blngh*pton,N.T 
Albion, Iowa. 
Vandalia, IIL 
6. Beaton, N.Y. 
Meridian, N.Y. 
8omonauk, IlL 
Brandun, Pa. 
Winchester, Va, 
Ponpey, N. Y. 

Granger, Oalrin, a. a. Montrose. Waverly, Pa. 

Grant, John L,, W.c. Philadela. U. Swedesbo', N.J. 

Grassie, Wm., P. Erie. Wattsbargh,Pa. 

Grares, BeqJ., w. c. Hamilton. Bnyton. €mla 

Grares, Frederic, s s. Genesee. PUTllion, N. Y. 

Graves, F. W., w. c. New York Sd. UomeilsT., N.Y. f- 



OraTss, Wm., a. a 

Gray, Alf. W., W. C 

Gray, B. B., P. 

Gray, CalTla, a. t. 

Qnj, F. R., a a. 

Gray, John, a. t. 

Gray, John, p. 

Gray, Robert, P. 

Gragg, Hiram, a. a. 

Gregory, D.D., P. 

Gregory, E. E., w. C, 

Oridtey,A.D., w.c. 

Gridley, 8. H., P. 

Griffln, Phllan., a. a. 

Oriflltha, Thoa., a. a. 

Griawold, LctI, w.c. Ci^uga. 

Groarenor, D, A^ a.«. Blyrla. 

Qurl^, R. R., L. Djof Cdmnbia. Waafaington 0. 



Union. 

BttflUa 

GeneTa. 

Galena. 

Harmony. 

Chemung. 

North BHer. 

HanoTw. 

Oolnmbw. 

Cincinnati. 



Utiea. 

Geneva. 

Bnflhlo. 



Mill RiTsr, N.a 
MUwankie^Wta. 
Seneca oTn.Y. 
Mt. Carroll, IlL 
Yeraaillea, Ky. 
Morehuid,N.Y. 
Butmn'k F,NY 
Franklin a, Ya. 
Baraboo, Wla. 
CInolnnatL Ol 
Howell, Mich. 
OUBtoo,N.Y. 
Waterioo,N.Y.*- 
Buflilo,N.Y. 



i,Ct 



Digitized by 



Googk 



THB PRBSBTTBBIAN CHUflOH, (N. S.) 



FBMITTSET. P08T-0rPl|CX. 



HAXNSSi a. a., L. UockAWAT. 

Haines, Selden. P. Champlala. 

<«r Hale, Albert, P. Ullaoia. 

HalU Chauocv, t. •. Columbus. 

• Hall, Bdwin, PAT. Cayuga. 

Hall, John H., s. s. " 

Hall, J. W., pas. 

Hall, Samuel, w c. 
7C Hall, Samuel H., P. 

Hall, Thrts. J., w c. 

Halfiey, Chas. P., s. •. Cbamplain. 

Halmy, Her., W. c. Niagara. 



Hamburg, N.J. 

ChampliM,N.Y 

Springfield, 111. 

C^odunia, Iowa 

Auburn, N. Y. 
New York 4tli. CcUlforDla. 
Hamilton, Oxford, Ohio. 
Belvldere. Genera, Wis. 
Tioga. Oweao, N. Y. 

W.Tennease*. Bowling Q., Ky. 

Wausaa, Wis. 

S.Wilson, N. Y. 



Hamilton, Laur., s s. Sierra NeTada. Columbia, OaL 
Hamilton, Lewis. P. St. Joseph. Lima, Ind. 
Hamlin, Jas. T., s. s. Long Island. Mattituck, L. I. 
Hammer, Geo. H..8.t. Ueadrille. Tionesta, Pa. 
Hampson, O. W., P. Meadville. Woodcock, Pa. 
Hancock, J. W., i •. Minnesota. Red Wing, Hin. 
Hancock, Wm.. w. c. Troy. Salem, N. Y. 

Handy, Isaac W., P. Hanover. Portsmouth, Va. 

Hanfbrd, Wm., w. c. Portage. Tallmadge, 0. 

Uanmer, Henry ,w c. Indianapcdis. Bastford, Ct 
Uardin, Robt, s. s. W. Tenn ess ee. Lewiiiburg,Ten. 
Hardy, Seth, s.s. Washtenaw. Ypsilanti,.Mioh. 
Harlan. Geo. W.. s. s. Osage. Osoeola, Mo. 

Harmon, Pisk, s. s. Troy. Panora, Iowa. 

Harmon, d. S., i. s. Sierra Nerada. Sonora, Cal. 



HAIU. 



125 



PKKSBTTKST. POftT'OFPICZ. 



Westfleld, M<4S& 
St. Lou ill. Mo. 
Chester, Pa. 
Sulphur S., N.a 
Daiidridge, Tun. 



Lexington. 

St l>oui8. 

Wilmington. 

Union. 

Union. 

Hanover. 

New York 3d. Jersey C, N. J. ^ 



Union Sps.,N.Y.* 
Auburn, N . Y. 
Cayuga, N.Y.- 



Harrin^^m, A.L.,t ■ Schuyler. 
Uarrlagt«>n, F., s. s. Chemung. 
Harris, Hiram, s. s. '" 
Harrison, Jas., s. s. 
Harrison, Wm., St. 
Hart, Obas.C., s.s. 
tiartpence. A., •. s. 
Haskell, T.N., P. 



Peru, 111. 
BlgFUtt8,N.Y. 
Reed's Cor.,N.Y 
JanesTille,Iowa 
N. Market, Ten. 
Logan, Ohio. 
NashTille, Ten. 



Geneva. 

Cedar YaUey. 

Union. 

Athens. 

Shiloh. 

D.or Columbia. Boston, Mass. 
HasUngs, P. C, w. o. Onondaga. Rutland, Yt 
- Hastings, T. 8., P. New York 4th. New York City. 
^Hatfield, B. F., P. New York Sd. New York aty. 
Hawley, A. P., w. o. Buf&do. New York City. 

' Hawley, ChaSn P. Cayuga. Auburn, N. Y. 

Haw.ey, Ransom.i i. Greencastle. Putnamvll.,Ind 
Hawley, Silas, s . s. MUwaukie. 
" Newark. 

Troy. 

Galena. 

huflhlo. 

Watertown. 



y Hay, Philip C T. 

Hayden. Gard-, w. 0. 

Hayes, H. II., w.c. 
^ Heacoek G. W., P. 

Headley, P. C, p. 

Hebard, G. D. A..B M. UUca. 

Heckman, C. H., s. s. Lexington 

HelfTenstein, J., p. ~ 

Helmer, Chas. D., L. 



Peekskill, N. Y. 
Orange, N. J. 
8ehaghtlco',N.Y 
Rock Island, HI 
Buflklo,N.Y. 
Greenfleld,Maaa 
-^— Iowa, 
Parkvllle, Mo. 
Philadela. 4th. Germanto'n, Pa 
New York 4th. New York City. 



Hender8on,A.W.,w c Chicago. Chioa^o, 111. 

Henderson, D. C s a. Texas. BirdviUe, Tex. 

Henderson, John, L. ClndnnatL 

Hendricks, F., s. i. Harrisburg. Northumb'd, P. 

Hendriekson,W.,D.X, Schuyler. Plymouth, HI. 

Hequembnrg,C.L.,s.s Bnffiilo. Warren, Pa. 

Herrick, Uenry,s.s. Delaware. Downsvll]e,N.Y. 

Herrick, John K., i.f. Champlain. Malone, N. Y. 

Herritt, Wm., a. s. Schuyler. Newtown, HI. 

Hibbard, 0. D., s. i. Buffklo. Randolph, N. Y, 

Hickey, Yates, B. M. Chicago. Chicas^. 111. 

^ Hlrkock, L. P., pes. Troy. 8chenectady,NY 

Hickok, Henry, s. s. Onondaga. Wampevil.,N.Y 

Hicks, Marcus, s. s. Minnesota. Monticello,Min 

Higble, Daniel, w. o. Rockaway. Newark, N. J. 

Hlldreth, S. P. Pataskala. Dresden, Ohio. 

Hill, Sam'l. N., s ■. Detroit. Birmingham,M. 

^ Hill, Timothy, s i. St Louis. St Louis, Mo. 

Hitchcock, H.L..PEi. Portage. Hudson, Ohio. 

Hitchcock, M.H.,F m. Rochester. Ceylon, India. 

Hitchcock, R.D..PRP. New York ad. New York City. 



Hodgman, T. M.. p. Genesee. 
Hof, Philip, J , i s. Detroit 
Hoffmelster, J.M.,Sf. Holston. 
Hogarth, Wm., P. Detroit 
Hogshead, C. P., w o. Athens. 
Holbrook, D. A , T. Utlca. 
Holeomh, Ohes., i. i. Lyons. 
Holloway, C. P., w.c. Catsklll. 



Holmes, H. B., p. 
Holmes, I. C, s. ■. 
/ Holmes, Mead, P. 
Holmes, S., w. o. 
Holt £• D., w. 0. 



Belvldere. 
Milwaukle. 
Milwaukie. 
Watertown. 
Blue Karth. 



Holton, Isaac F.,pev. New York 4tli. 



Perry Cen.,N.Y. 
Detroit Mich. 
RogersTille, T. 
Detroit Mich. 
Hanging R., 0. 
Clinton, N. Y. 
Joy, N.Y. 

Belvldere, HI. 
Manitowoc, Wis. 
Manitowoc, Wis, 
N.Bedford.Has. 
Chatfleld, Mln. 



Cayuga. 
New York 8d. 
PhlUdela. 3d. 
Fort Wayne. 
OnUrio. 



Wallace P.O.,Pa 
Fort Wayne, 



HiioiM, Win-. W C. 

H^tol. Jmrob, m 1 

tl'>xl. Nmth.. I. A. 

tliX^jtif, T, W, 1-. 

II«nw*>rT IJhartee, P- 

U i>^»kiiui, D. C, w. C Cayuga. 

liMpkluB. joeiUh. a s. Cayuga 

11 rpkioM, S. yi^ ^Kf . Cayuga. 

Hniiklii*, T, iL, s. 1 ~ 

11'jU>IlIe1(l, B. U.. P 
il< xiiiU, Jfttiti. w o. 
Muu^h, J.S. w 
U,>u;|kitmi,Dl\ EOT. Genesee Philadela., Pa. 

Uo¥«y, H O,, rfc». Crawlbrdsville. CrawfordBvil..L 
HavAy, H. €.» t s. Madison. N. Madison, Ind 

UoTiiy , Janath., w. c . N iagara. Barre Cen.,N . Y. 

1 1 &vey , J. P.. P N ew York 4th. New York CI ty. 

Howard, il. A.. P. CatskilL Catsklll. N. Y. - 

llowH. F. !l^ P Lyons. Phelps. NY. 

\Uwf,, Ih K.. w 0, Athens. Pine Grove, 0. 

Iowa City. Iowa City,Iowa. 

Pataskala. PatarkaKOhlo. 

Philadela. 4th. Dutotsburg. Pa. 

Cincinnati. Marietta, Ohla 

Niagara. Gaines, N. Y. 

Newark. Orange, N. J. 

Chenango. Coventry, N.Y. 

Ralamasoo. 

North River. 

Chenango. 

Albany. 

Troy. 
s. Ontario. 

Utlca. 



Uowut 3 !^., AEG- 
EIn*v^ T. W., p. 
Howi^iJ. IL £., s i, 

Uriyl, U. J,B., Si. 

IJiivL Janii[4i» P. 
Hri.^t. John B., F. 

Hi^t 3benna», P. 
Halt W. M., p. 

Hojt, Z T., B » 
Hulibifd.C. ]l.,i.S. 
Hubbiird,.r.KM 
llQbhard. J. B., 



Kalamaxoo, M. HI 
Pleasant P.,N. Y 
Nineveh, N. Y. 
Greenfield, N.Y. 
Bennington, Vt 



ItaMiAnl, W G., SB. Cortland. 

Mil uhf ins, M^ p. Belvldere. 

1 1 L] .r^ k E19, W, ^., p. Kalamaaoo. 
Hu^h^, hAwhl, V. Athens. 
IIidilla«<lt^<i lU «tiT. Newark. 
Iliiiaplirvj,. !^. J , p. Patask.ila. 
lluni|jhrie«,H.G,,WXJ New York 3d. New York City, 
if qiin^ D. L.. w. c. Rochester. Buffalo, N. Y. 
Eliint Tho«L i'., F. Philadela. 4tb. Reading, Pa. 



Whltesbo'. N.Y. 
Dryden, N. Y. 
Rockford, m. 
Kalamasoo, .M. 
N. Plymouth,0. 
Bloonifleld, N.J. 
Newark, Ohio. 



Hunt, TJmrithy D., P. Ithaea. 
Iluiilt^r, Wm, F. Ontario. 
I] u I ji till gtoa, A. . H. B. Chenango. 
H EtTi tkigtnn, tlA.PBP Cayuga. 
HurrI, Edwlu U. P. Schujrler. 
Hiinl, irniha N.. t.K. Chemung, 
llurd, Nath., ■ a. Rochester. 
LL urtbnj't, J PS,, w.c. Troy. 
Hyiui«>', John, L. Scioto. 
Ilnti^hlnB, C^J\, P. Harrisburg. 
ritiUliluKkD. d, p. Salem. 
l]yil«, i>Kn, w. Oh. Onondaga. 
Hyde, Wm. L,, p. BulBOo. 



Ithaea, N.Y. 
Springwa'r,N.Y 
Gullfbrd CN.Y 
Auburn, N. Y. 
Augusta, ni. 
Chintadrepetah 
Bergen, N. Y. 



Walnut Hs., a 
York, Pa. 
N. Albany, Ind. 
Fayettevil.,N.Y. 
Dunkirk, N. Y. 



lxoKiiJOLL,J. F,,w.c CatskiU. Catsklll, N. Y. 
ItiicmhAm^ Ira. s s. Geneva. Geneva, N. Y. 
IrtriD. Jabn W.H t, Philadela. 8d. Danbury, Ct 
lAliqin, Wofren, a, I. Lake Superior. 



JACIL Andir.U.TM. 
JjiUucks, iL F., t. s. 
JmtUi6* JUBtU-lfi L., a s. 
Janktait, John, p. 
Jf^nkfof, Wurruii. P. 
JeiiEiey, Klleibia, W, C. 
.r«*nuUij^ Wtii. J, p. 
Jurouie^ Chiirlwt, p, 
Jarvia, T. Bk, s i. 
Jessop, TlAU V M. 
Jefldvp, ftUiiJ!, w.c. 
jBittflL ¥ J?., i*RP, 
J n well, Jijol, 1 ■. 

jnwfiL J. n., S • 

JfitfflJ. Mt.mms. CLP. 
Jiniiiian,. A. A.„ P. 
JtmlKon^ M. p.^ p. 
JikhnooiiT Aha. a B. 
irr-ho*Ji», Daii'L.w.O. 
Johofioaf K. \i^ Ph 
'tohDSQO, J. M.J p. 



CrawibrdsviUe. 

Buffslo. 

Grand River. 

Philadela. Sd. 

Franklin. 

Illinois. 

Geneva. 

BulfiUo. 

Utlca. 

Monetise. 

Ottawa. 

Albany. 

Pennsylvania. 

Saginaw. 

D.of Columbia. 

Athens. 

Hivmllton. 

Des Moines. 

Rochester. 

Dayton. 

Rockawaj. 



Gaboon, Africa. 
Buffalo, N. Y. 
Chester XR., a 
Philadela., Pa. 
Galena, Ohio. 
Waveriy, III. 
Seneca Fs., N.Y. 
£llicotvnie,N.Y 
Newpott N. Y. 
Tripoli, Syria. 



Albany. N. Y. 
French's M.,Pe. 
Gaines, Mich. 
Geniigeto'n, D.O. 
Gallipolls, Ohio. 
College Hill, 0. 
Wisootta, Iow«. 
Fairport N. Y. 
N. Carlisle, 0. 



Digitized by 



Googk 



126 



PBBSBYTERIAN HISTORICAL ALMANAC. 



FBZtBTTSKT. rOST-OVPICS. 



ntXSBTTnT. PMT-OFFICB. 



Johiuoa, Lwn., W. o. 
Johnflon, 0. .V., P. 
Johnflon. Wm., L 
Johastoa, CIum., w c. 
Johufltoa. K. C, • a. 
Johnston. J. U., 8 • 
JohDiton, T. S., P 
Johnston, W.J..t.». 
Jones, Amass, s s. 
Jones, Amos, s s. 
Jones, Daniel, s l. 
Jones, Ksra, s. s. 
Jones, John L.. s s. 
Jones, J. L, w c. 
Jones, S. J , w. c. 
Jones, Wmiston. s. s. 
Judd, Fred. F., L. 
^ Jndd, 01d<Mn N.,P. 
Jndson, David F., s s. 
Jodflon, Qoald C, P. 

KAsmcHBm,O.J.,s.«. 

KAl(>pothakas,M..P.x. 

Kanoose, J. Q., s s. 
•y Kanouse. Peter, ■. s. 

Karr, Wm. S., P. 

Keeler, Chas. A., i i. 

K-llogs, H. H., w. 0. 

Kellogg. Lewis, P. 

KelloiCK, Norman, P. 

K 1 ogg. Robt R., P. 

K -Isuy. Ljrsan., aot. 
y Kundall, Henry, P. 

Kondiill, John, L. 

Ktinmore, Cbas., s. s. 

Kennedy, Joel, w.c. 

V Kent, Arastus, aot. 
Kent, Brainerd, T. 
Kent,]Sliphalet,w.o. 
Kepler, Raphael, L. 
Kerr, Qeonce. T. 

>( Keteham. Alfred, P. 

Keys, John, w o. 

Keys, RJ sh. 0., s. t. 

Kidd, John, s s 

Kimball, Mlltoii,w o. 

KimbaU, Peter, w. o. 
y King, Barnabas. P. 
y King, George I., P. 

King, George P.,W.C, 

Kii^(, James, P. 

King, John R^ i. i. 

King, RufuB. P. 

King, Sam'l. A., i.i. 

King, SamM. B., l. 

King, Wm M., s i. 

King-ibnry, A., P. 

KlajHbury. B., H M. 

Kingsley, D. H., i i. 

KIngslay, P., w c. 

Kinne, P. R., W c. 

V Kirk, R. Richard, P. 
Kittredge, H., H. x. 
Knox, James, T 
Knox, Wm. R., P. 
Krliaer, William. L. 
Kubns Kiyab. s s. 
Kumler, J. P. B., ■ i. 

Ladd, Beaufbrt, i ■. 
Lain, John W.. s s. 
Lalne, Lewis F., P. 
Lamar, Thos. J., T. 
Lambert, A. B., p. 
LandlB, Robt. W . s. s. 
Lane, Aaron D., w c. 
Lane, Joshua, a s 
Lareom, Thos., s. s. 
Lathrop, D. W., a»t. 
Lathrop, H. T.. w c. 
LaTerty, Jas. C. P 
Lawrence, Hub..w c. 
Leaeh, J. 11. C, P. 
LesTenworth, A. J..T. 
LeaTltt, Wm. S., p. 
> Iisdoax, L. P., r s. 



Hudson. 

Wluehdster. 

Oayuga 

CrawfordSTille 

Crawfordsville 

Phlladela. 3d. 

Balfldere. 

Osage. 

Logansport 

Monroe. 

Niagara. 

Rochester. 

New York 4th. 

Bdoto. 

Cedar Valley. 

Tioga. 

Hudson. 

Ghemnng. 

Uyria. 

Chenangoi 

HanoTer. 

Col nm bus. 

Roekaway. 

Brooklyn. 

Buffalo. 

Utlea. 

Ithaca. 

St Joseph. 

OnUrio. 

Franklin. 

Plttobnrgh. 

Oaynga. 

Alton. 

Nlagva. 

Galena. 

Columbia. 

Indianapolis. 

Montrose. 

Delaware. 

Chenango. 

Clereland. 

Watertown 

MllwanUa. 

Sehnyler. 

Bnflklo. 

Roekaway. 

Schuyler. 

Detroit 

New RlT«r. 

Holstnn. 

Bufblo. 

Texas. 

Scbuyler. 

Texas. 

Pataskala. 

Wabash. 

Chicago. 

CleTeland. 

Ithaca. 

St. Lawrenos. 

Marshall. 

New York 8d. 

UUca. 

Geneva. 

Franklin. 

Dayton. 



Triangle, N.Y. 
N.Hampt'n,N.Y 
Berryville, Ya. 
LMli. N.Y. 
Balnbridge,Ind. 
Crawf>rd8TU.,I. 
W. PbUada., Pa 
Lena, 111. 
Deep Water,Mo. 
Pitt8burgh,Ind. 
DoTer, Mich. 
Sherman, N. T. 
Riga, N.Y. 
New York City. 
Bangor, Wis. 
Iowa Fs., Iowa. 

MontgoiB*ryNY 
Addison, N. Y. 
Boggles, Ohio. 

Preston, N.T. 

CottagttG ,Wis. 
Deekerto'n,N.J. 
Brooklyn, N.Y. 
Eden, N. Y. 
Rome, N. Y. 
Trumanb'g,NY. 
Mi8hAwaka,Ind 
Lim.% N. Y. 
OolumboSfOhio. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 



Lyons. 

Angelica. 

Buflklo. 

Lexington. 

Troy. 

O. RlT. Yalley. 

Geneva. 

Baffi&lo. 

Delawara. 

Klvria. 

Mllwauki«. 

PbiladeU.3d. 

BIyrU. 

Piedmont 

Hanover. 

Colombia. 

North RlTsr. 



MtYemon,Ill. 

Galena, IIL 
Chicago. lUL 
BhelbyrlUe^Ind. 

FrankUn^'N.Y. 
Sidney Ps.,N.Y. 
DoTer, Ohio. 
Watartown,N.Y 
Jollet, UL 
Augusta, m. 

Rockawinr, N J. 
Qoincy, lIL 
Jacknin, Midi. 
Bristol, Tenn. 
Holston V.,Ten. 
Jamestown. NY 
Crockett, Tex. 
Walnut Hs., 0. 
Garden Val., T. 
Putnam, Ohla 
Danville, 111. 
Dnnton, III. 
Cleveland, Ohla 
Varna, N.Y. 
Potsdam, N. Y. 
Eckford, Mich. 
Stuigis, Mich. 
Borne, N.Y. 

Darby"Gk.,Ohio. 
OreenTllle, 0. 

Wayne oo.,N.Y. 
Oentrevll., N.Y. 
PorUand, N. Y. 
Maryville, Ten. 
8alem,W.co.NY 
Ionia. Mich. 
Waterloo, N.Y. 
BTansC, N.Y. 
8haverto'n,N.Y 
New Haren, Ct. 
Palmyra, Wis. 
Marpte,Pa. 
Hudson. Ohio. 
FarmTille, Va. 
Petersburg, Va. 
Hudson. N, Y. 
Cornwall, N. Y. 



Le Due Chas. S.. s. i. 
Lee, Samuel, w. o. 
Lee, Thomas, W C. 
Lelghtou, John, S S. 
Leigbton, Natb.. s.s. 
Lemon, Alex., s s 
Leo, Patrick J., aot. 
Leonard, G. E. W.. P. 
Leonard, R. H., ssc. 
Leonard, Sam'!., w c. 
Leonard. S. W., w o. 
Lestrade. Jos. P., P. 
Lewis, John N., w c. 
Ley burn, G W., B M. 
Llebenau, M. F.. P. 
Lilly, Alvah, s i. 
Lilly, A. H., s. s 
Undsley,C.B.,.P. 
LippincottjThos.. ss. 
UtUe, Geo. L., s s. 
LitUe, Henry, aot. 
Uttle, Jacob, P. 
Livingston, Chas., L. 
Uoyd, Geo. W.. s.s. 
Lock wood, L.C.,wc. 
Lockwood, Peter,w c. 
Lockwood, R. S., w c. 
Loekwood, V. L.,w.o. 
Logan, John B.. s s. 
Long, Clement, PKi. 
Long, Mablon, T. 
Loomis, llarmon,sac. 
Loomis, Samuel, s s. 
Lord, AmasaC. W.c. 
Lord, C. W., 1. 1. 
Lord, Daniel M., P. 
Lord, Kdward, P. 
Lord, J. S. a. s. 
Lord. Nathan L.,F.lf. 
Lord, Nathan. L., s ■. 
Loss, Lewis H., i s. 
Loonsbury, T., w. o. 
Lowry, 8.G., s.s. 
Lowry, Tbeop., w. o. 
Lucas, Geo. C., P. 
Luce, Abraham. W.O. 
Ludlow, H. 0., P. 
Lose, Andrew, s. ■. 
Lnsk, William, s s. 
Luther, Z. M. P.,BJC. 
Lynch, BenJ., P. 
Lyon, G. A., P. 
Lyon, Harvey, T. 
Lyons, Jonathan.AOT. 
Lyons. J. L., F. M. 
Lyons, Lorenao, w. m. 



Mlnnesote 

Portege. 

Cleveland. 

N. Missouri. 

Roekaway. 

Iowa City. 

N. York 3d. 

Iowa City. 

Cleveland. 

Buffalo. 

Oswego. 

CatskllL 

Hudson. 

Piedmont 

North River. 

Genera. 

Buffalo. 

New York 4th. 

Alton. 

Chicagow 

Madison. 

Pataskala. 

New York 4th. 

Roekaway. 

New York 3d. 

Tioga. 

Huron. 

Ottowa. 

Holston. 

Cayuga. 

PhiUdela. 4th. 

Harrisbarg. 

Pataskala. 

Ottawa. 

BuffUo. 

Long Island. 

Oswfigo. 

Mllwaukie. 

Portage. 

Logansport 

Chicago. 

Geneva. 

Blue Earth. 

Blue Earth. 

New York 8d. 

Long Island 

North River. 

Alton. 

Cnlumbus. 

Champlaln. 

New York Sd. 

Erie. 

Cleveland. 

Holston. 

Montrose. 

Cayuga. 



Hastings, Mln. 
Mantua, Ohio. 
Bmoklyn, Ohio. 
Piilmyrs, Mo. 
B^mervil., N J. 
B^ar Ck., Iowa. 
Boston, Mass. 
Cedar Rapids. L 
Cleveland,Ohla 



W.Monroe,N.Y. 
Hunter, N.Y. )c 
Greenwich, Ct 
LibeHy, B.oo.V. 
N.P.Und.,N.Y < 
Gorham, N. Y. 
Silver Ck., N.Y. 
N. RoeheUe,N.Y 
Duquoine, HI. 
Waukegan, IIL 
Madison, Ind. ^ 
Granville, Ohio. 
MattepolsettM. 
BranchviUcNJ 
New York City. 
Bing*ampt*,N.Y 
Mt Vernon, 0. 
Granville, IIL 
Blooutville, T. 
Hanover, N. H. 
Harteville, Pa. v 
New York City. 
Ronetllle, Ohio. 
Somonauk, 111. 
Springvlile.N.Y 
Shelter Isl.,N.Y 
Fnlten, N.Y. 
Barton, Wis. 
Oodoopitty, In. 
Rochester, Ind. 
Jollet, 111. K 
Ovid, N.Y. 
Somnor, Minn. 



New York City. 
Wading R.,L.L 
Pou*kepsie,N.Y. 
BellvlUe, 111. 
Reedsbarg,Wis. 
Ellenburg, N.Y 
Newtown, N.Y. 
Erie, Pa. ^ 

St rongsville, 0. 
Benton, Tenn. 
Tripoli, Syria. 
Walmea, Hawal 



MABLX. Peter A., s a. 
McBride, H. C s. s. 
McBride, Robert, a a. 
McCabe, F. S., s. s. 
McOampbell, J., s t. 
McCampbell, J., s s. 
McCsrer, W. H., P. 
McObain, James, p. 
McClure, David, s.s. 
McOoU, Alex., P. 
McCool. Joseph, P. 
McCord, J. W., s. B. 
McCord, Robt L., L. 
McOorkIa, P. A., ■. s. 
MrCorkle, W. A., s ■. 
McCoy, R.K., s.s. 
McCreery, Jas. B., P. 
Mci;u lough, S. J., s.a. 
McCutchan, J., a. s. 
McDerm<m, J., W. O. 
McDougal. Arch.. P. 
McKlroy, W T., W. 0. 
McGiffert Jos. N., P. 
McQlffert, Wm. H., L. 
McGlashan, L., s. s. 
Mellarg, Chas, K., P. 
Mcllarg, Wm. N.. P. . 
Mcllvaine, Iiaac.w.O 
MeIntlr6^Jas.,w.o. 



Galena. 

Pateskala. 

Washtenaw. 

Logansport 

Union. 

Lexington 8. 

Salem. 

New Rirer. 

San Francisco. 

Niagara. 

PhlladeU. 3d. 

Alton. 

Cincinnati. 

Holston. 

Lake Superior. 

Schuyler. 

Montrose. 

Pennsylvania. 

Huron. 

Piedmont 

Chenango. 

Providenoa. 

Utical 

Cayuga. 

Geneva. 

New York 8d. 

Ithaca. 

Newark. 

Wilmington. 



Beynoldsb*g., 0. 
Howell, Mich. 
Peru, Ind. 
Tuckahoe, Ten. 
Lexington, Mia. 
EvansvtUa, Ind. ^ 
Abingdon, Va. « 
Martiues, CaL 
Niagara Fs.,N.Y 
Potteville, Pa. -^ 
Rlehview, HI. 

Greenville, Ten. 
Superior, Wis. 
Clayton, 111. 
Great Bend, Pa. 
Tioga. Pa. 
Peru, Ohio. 
Evergreen, Va. 
Sherburne, N.Y 

8anqo4t,'*N.Y. 

Weston^'N. Y. 
Irvington, N.Y < 
Lyons, N. Y. 
Newark, N.J. ^ 
Blkton^Md. 



Digitized by 



Googk 



THK PRESBTTSBIAN OHUKCH, (N. B.) 



127 



nSSBTTSmT. POtT-OFPICX. 



Chemang. 



MeeUlnb'gvNT 
Bing'amton.NT 
Anuuulmtoto. 



Newton. Bnterpriae, Hit. 

■hingtoi 



McKinney, O, • •. 

McKlnnej, 8^ w. o. 

MoKlnney, SUa».v M. Tioga. 

McLiUn, RobL, a. a. Newk_ 

MoLaio, Wm., aao. D.of OolambU. Waahington 0. 
^ MoLana, Jaa. W., P. Brooklyn. Brooklyn, N. T. 
>c MeUi]ghlln,D D.,w c New York 8d. New York City. 

UcLaarin, Jas., • t. Saginaw. yentonrille, M. 

MeLean, Jas. Bi.. P Newton. Mobile, Ala. 

McLean, H. M., i i. Newton. BrldseriUe^Ala. 

McLeiah, John, a a. Chenango. New Berlln,N.T 

UcLeod, John, axe PbiUidela. 4tb. Philadela., Pa. 

MoMahon, Jaa. J., P- HanoTer. Rlehmond, Ya. 

McHaiiter, Jamea. P. Genera. 

McMaater, John, p. IfeadvIIle. PIttafleld, Pa. 

MeMath, Robt., a. a. OeaeTa. W.Drea4en,N.T. 

McMUlan, Kdw., a. a . Ililnoi*. CarlinriUe, IIL 

McMillan, O. W., a a. New York 8d. Yorktown, N.Y. 

McMillan, John, a a. Owige. Crooked Ck., A. 

McMurmn, J. W.. L WIneheater. Pine View, Ya. 

McMurrar, J. K.,w.c. lllinota. 

MeVay, llomer, a. a. Franklin. 

Macbin, Gharltia, a a Utiea. 

Maehln, Cbarlea, a. a. (lawegtk 

Mack, Kll T., L. T.t>y. 

Mack, William, a a. W. Tenne 

Macreadiog. C.8.,w.c. Mfiwankie. 

Magionls, v., a. a. «•-•-- 



pxsaBTTXST. poar-owicx. 



Cerro Gordo, 111. 
Radnor, Ohio. 
CasUle,N.Y. 
Williatnt*n,N.T 
O nil ford, Gt. 
Columbia, Ten. 



Utic*. 
North RiTer. 
Geneaee. 
Lyons. 
Ithaea. 



OtUwa. 

Monroe. 

Richland. 

Cdd Water. 

Keokok. 

Piedmont. 

Galena. 

Unioa. 

Dayton. 

Cbamplain 

Delaware. 

Detroit 



Malln, David, asc. 
Mallery, D. 0., P. 
Mandell, Albert, P. 
ManderrlUe, S.. P. 
Manly, B. N., a a. 
Manly, Lyman, a a. 
Mann, Royal, a a 
Manning, S. N.. aot. Chicago. 
Marks, Jas. J., w c. Sohn^ler. 
Marsh, Cutting, a. a. Fox Klver. 
Marsh, Edwards, p. Knox. 
Marsh, George, a a. 
Marah, Juatln, a a. 
Marshall, M. M., a a 
Martin, A.G^ P. 
MarUn, Aaa, a a. 
Martin, B. A., a a. 
Martin, B. R., P. 
Martin, Joa. H , a a. 
Martin, John, a a 
Marvin, B^ti^., w. c. 
Marvin, Cbas. S.. P. 
Mather.O. W., w. c. 
Matthews, Henry, P. Winchester. 
Matthews, W. U.. P. Piedmont. 
Mattocks, John, P. Minnesota. 
Maxwell, G. M., P. Indianapolia. 
Maxwell, Sam'l., PRP. Athens. 
Mayo, Warren, w c. Delaware. 
Mears, John W., P. Wilmington. 
Meeker, David C, a a. Rockaway. 
- Megle. Bnrtls C . P. Rockaway. 
Megie, Daniel £., P. Rockaway. 
Megie, Wm. H., a a. Lyons. 
Meigs, Matthew, T. Wilmington. 
Merrell. 8am1. L., a a. Watertown. 
Merserean, Law., t. Otsego. 
Merwln, Charles, p. Athens. 
Messer. Asa, w c. Geneva. 
Mickson, George, L Roefaetter. 
Miles, Henry O.. a a. Rochester. 
Miles, 8.S.. w.c. Knox. 
Millar, And , M., a a Cbamplain. 
Millard. Bei^. F., W c. Bath. 
Miller, Adam, P. Montrose. 

Miller, Geo. D., w o. Logansport. 
Miller, Jer., azc Harrisbnrg. 

Miliar, Wm.Y.,w c Knox. 
MiUerd, Henry N.. p. Cayuga. 
Mllligan, Thos. 8. s a Greencastle. 
Milliksn, Wm. F..8 a. Manmee. 
Mills, Bc*njamln. • a. Harmony, 
Mills. Ca^b, pm» - - - 
Mills, Cvros T.. 8 a 



Cleveland. OoUamer,Ohlo. 
Philadela. 4th. Philadela., Pa. 
Philadela. 4th. Norrlatown, Pa. 



Westervil.,N.T. 
Freedom P.,N.Y 
CarTville,N.T. 
Richmond, N.Y. 
Penlleld, N. T. 
Kankakee, IIL 
Quincy, 111. 
Wanpaka, Wla. 
Canton, lU. 
Scott, HL 
Franklin, Mich. 
FayetteTllle, T. 
Three Ri vers, M. 
W. Grove, Iowa. 
Morris Ch., Va. 
Prophetat'n, Ul. 
Knoxville, Ten. 
Christian b'g.,0. 
Ban«or, N.Y. 
Harperfield.NT. 
Wb. Lake, Mich. 
Sheperdst'n., V. 
Fancy Grove, V. 
St. Paul, Minn. 
Indianapolis, I. 
Marietta, Ohio. 
Msnhattan, K. 
Mllford, Del. 
Hamburg, N.J. 
Dover. N. J. 
B<K>nton, N.J. 
Junius, N. Y. 
Pottatown, Pa. 
C.Vincent, N.Y. 
LitUe Falls,N.Y 
AmeavlUe,Ohlo. 
Geneva, N. Y. 



Hedgesvll..N.Y. 
Knoxville, IIL 
ChaUugay,N.Y 
Chicago, 111. 
Harford, Pa. 



Philadela., Pa. 

Knoxville, IH. 

Auburn, N.T. 

Giwport, Ind. 

Maumee C. 0. 

Frankfort, Ky. 
Cravrfordsrille CrawfnrdsvIL, I. 
Tioga. Berkshire, N/Y. 



Mills, Henry, pxp. Ohiynga. Auburn, N. Y. 

Mills, Louis, w c. 0. Ri». Valley. Portland, Mich. 
Mills, .Sidney, T. Penn<y1vania. Lawranoevil.. P. 

MUla, Thorn. A., axe. Indianapolis. New York City. 



Minnia, Wm., a a. 
Mitchell, J. Duch^. P 
Mitchell, Walter, a. a. 
Mixer, Jr., P., L. 
Moaae, John, w. c. 
Montelth, John, w. c 
Montgomery, A., aot 
Montgomery, 8., a a. 
Montsylvage, R., aot. 
Moore, Kdwin G., a a. 
Moore, Geo. R., w. c. 
Moorp, Wm. K^ P. 
Mot. SI, Utfiirj, h. m. 
Morcy, Ira, W.c?. 
MOTJC^D, II. E., D M. 
Biorii.To, .lohii C.^W C. 
Uort^nUn Tiuiothv.s a. 
MorrJA, »^nj ¥.,'t M. 
Morrlff, lldw D., P. 
MorrJttoiL^ A- W,. s. a. 
MorrNjEi, LitYi It^a a. 
MoriiHiii. IL H., a. a. 
Mccruff, Thos, i.a. 
Morton, Jamea, P. 
Moaeley, J. W., H. x. 
Moeer, John R., w.c. 
Mosea, John C, a. t. 
Murdock, David, p. 
Mnrphy, B. D., P. 
Murray, J. A., axe. 
Mnssey, Chaa.F., P. 
Mnatard, C. H., a. a. 
Myers, Joeeph, w.o. 
Myera,P.J.H.,P. 

Napv, Isaae N., t a. 
Nash, Alvan, a. a. 
NeaL BenJ. T., p. 
NeUI, Edw.T.,a.a. 
Nelson, Henry A., P. 
Newbanka, J.,w.c. 
Newberry, K. D., P. 
Newbury, 8^ W.C. 
Newoomb, H., a. a. 
Newcomb.G. W., aot. 
Newell, Wm.W., p. 
NeweU, Kills J., Pxa. 
Newton, Alex., a a. 
Newton, Alfred, P. 
Newton, Jas. H^ aot. 
Newton, Oren H., P. 
Newton, Oscar, L. 
Nichols, E. N.,w.c. 
Nichols, H. M., P. 
Nichols, W., AOT. 
Nickels, C. M., p. 
Nicolls,G.W., W.C. 
Niles, Henry E., a. a. 
NUes, Wm.A.,a.a. 
Noble, J. H., P. 
Noble, Mason, CHP. 
Noel, Eph. P., a. a. 
North, Alfred, a. a. 
Northrop, H. H., P. 
Norton, A. T., axe. 
Norton, 0. W., w. c. 
Nourse, Chas. H., T. 
Noyes, D. P., axe 
Noyes,G.W., p. 
Noyes, Geo. C., L. 
Nutting, Rufu8,T. 
Nutting, Jr., R., pxr. 

OoDXX, Isaae G.. a. a. 
Olds, Ira M., w c. 
Olmsted, K. B., a a 
Ordway, Moses, w. c. 
Orton, A. G., P. 
Orion, E. F. B.. PXP. 
Orton, 8. G., DM 
Osbom, Chauncy. a s. 
Osbom, Bnos A..C M. 
Osborn, Henry, T 
Osbom, H. 8., a a. 
Oainga, 8., L. 
Oatrom, Jaa. I., P. 



Union. 

Piedmont 

CiodnnaU. 

CineinnatL 

CatokiU. 

Elyria. 

Belviderew 

Huron. 

Brooklyn. 

Ontario. 

Harrisbmrg. 

PhUadela.3d. 

Cbamplain. 

Holston. 

Watertown. 

Cayuga. 

Lexington. 

Madlaon. 

Franklin. 

Oaage. 

Osage. 

Lexington 8. 



N. Market, Ten. 
Lynchburg, Va. x 
N.Riehmood,0. 



Wilmington. 

Clinton. 

GMieva. 

Geneva. 

Chemung. 

Brooklyn. 

Geneva. 

BuffiUo. 

Wilmington. 

Onondaga. 

Brooklyn. 

New River. 
Grand River. 
Logansport 
Minnesota. 
StLouia. 



Troy. 

PhiladeUuSd. 

Dubuque. 

Brooklyn. 

Detroit 

Onondaga. 

D.of Columbia. 

Clinton. 

Huron. 

Maumee. 

Franklin. 

Clinton. 

Monroe. 

Minnesota. 

Dayton. 

Newark. 

Cold Water. 

Columbia. 

Milwaukie. 

Troy. 

D.of Columbia 

8t Louis. 

Rochester. 

Saginaw. 

Alton. 

Montrose. 

Winchester. 

Brooklyn. 

New York 4th. 

New York 4th. 

Washtenaw. 

lUlnoli. 

Bnilklo. 

Detroit 

Alton. 

B^lvidere. 

CortUnd. 

Albany. 

Buflhio. 

Wsshtenaw. 

Newarjc. 

Hudson. 

Piedmont 

Chicago. 

North River. 



Elyria, Ohio. 
B«lolt Wis. 
Republic, Ohio. 
Carthagena,S.A 
Lakeville,N.T. 
Lyons, Iowa. 
Weatchester, P. 

, Kanaaa T. 

Lebanon, Tenn. 
Antlocb, Syria. 
Ira, N. Y. 
Gentryville,Mo. 
ConneravUle, I. 
Golumbns,OhiQ. 
Bentonville, A. 
C. Timbers, Mo. 
Lexington, Mis. 
8omerville,Ala. 
Delaware C, D. 
Deerfleld,U. 
Phelps, N.Y. , 
Lenox, N. Y. \ 
Blmhra, N. Y. 
Avon, Ct 
Geneva, N.Y. 
Weatfleld, N.Y. 
Lewea, DeL 
Liverpool, N.Y. 
Haver8traw,NY 

Jefli9r8onvU.,Va. 
Conneaut, Ohio 
Monticello, Ind. 
St Paul, Minn V 
St. Louis, Mo. 
Troy, N. Y. 
Philadela., Pa. 
Dubuque, Iowa. 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Detroit, Mich. 
Syracuse, N. Y. 
Newark, Del. 
Jackson, Misa. 
Norwalk, Ohio, y 
C1eveUnd,0bi0b 
Delaware, Ohla 
Jackaon, Miss. 
Tecumseh, M. 
Stillwater, M. T. 
Lima, Ohio. 
Newark, N.J. 
N.Adams,Mich. 
Angelica, N. Y. 
Watertown, W. 
Sbaghticoke,NY ^ 
Washington C. Y 
Troy, Mo. 
PIttaford, N. Y. 
Flint, Mich. 
Alton, III. 
Sherman, N.Y. 
Leeeburg, Va. 
NfW York City. 
, New Haven, Ct 
. New York City. 
Ix>di. Mich. 
Jacksonvil., lU. 

Allegheny, N.Y. 
South Lyon, M. 
Caledonia, III. 
Rockfurd, IIL 
Lisle, N. Y. 
Albany, N.Y. 
North Ifast, Pa. 
Byron, Mich. 
Newark, N. J. 
Chester, N. Y. 
Bedford oo., Va. 



Newbnrg, N. Y. > 



Digitized by 



Googk 



128 



PBBSBTTKBIAN HISTORICAL ALKAJf Aa 



rmmnrnaet. potr-onricx. 



Oiwald, Robt, a. a. Golambiu. Biff Rock, Iowa. 
Otin. Aahabttl^t.s. OorUand. Virgil, N.Y. 

Ott«nK4»r, Wm. 8 i. Dm Moinaa. Swwla Pt, loira. 
Ottinan, ».,t a Lyona. R«d Creak, N.Y. 

OwBQ, J. J., PBF. New York 3d. New York Gi^. 



< PAOX. Joeaph H., P. 
Painter, Georga P. 
Paimtfr. C. H.. a a. 
PalDiDr, David F.. P. 
PalflMr. H. W., i. a. 
Palmar, M.. w. c. 
P^mer, W. IL, s l. 
Parish, Coasider, T. 
Parker, Alex., i. i. 
Parker, Joel, P. 
Parker, Petar, P. M. 
Parker, Saou'l., w.c. 
Parker, 8. J., L. 
Parka, Wm. H., i. i. 
Parmelaa, A., a a. 
Parxneiee, A. U., P. 
Parmelee, A.. W. c. 
Parsonf, J. W., f .K. 
Paraooa, LevL w.o. 
Paraona, Jr., L , P. 
Partington, J., i. i« 
Pa tell, Jacob, a. a. 
Patrick, EliUiy. a a. 
Pattengill, H., W.c. 
PattetiglU, J. a., P. 

— PatterwD, N., W.c. 

- fttteraon, R. W., p. 
Pattoo, John, P. 
PajRon, G. U., L. 
Payion, £. H., P. 
Paaae, L. Hm • ft. 
Peok, John, a. a. 
Peloabet, A. 0.,w.o. 
Penlngtoa,J.W,w c. 
PepooD, J. A., w. G. 
Perkina, Edgar, T. 
Perry, Geo. w., L. 
Petrte, Jer., a a. 
Pettibona, K., CRp. 
Phelps, Jaa U.. a.a. 
Phillipa, J. M^ P. 
Phillipe, J. W., P. 
Piaree, K.J., P.M. 
Pierce, Geo. £.,w.c. 
Pierpont, II. B.,w.c. 
Plerpont, Jaa., a. i. 
Pieraon, Geo., p. 
Pieraon, Geo., V. X. 
Pieraott, II. W..AOT. 
Pienon, Jr., Job, p. 
Pieraon, N. B., p. 
PIngry, J. P.. p. 
Pitkin, Caleb, w. o. 
Pitkin, C. J., i. a. 
Pitkin, B. A., CLP. 
putt, A. W., a. a. 
Piatt, W. K., P. 
Plamb, E. W., r. 
Pogue, J. P., ». M. 

> Pollock, A. D., ft. t. 

Pomeroy, A., p. 

Pomeroy, Medad, P. 

Pond. Bliloaa, w. C. 

Pond, G. U., P. 
-Poor, Daniel W., P. 

Pope, Fielding, P. 

Porter, Alex., i. i. 

Porter^ J. J., P. 

Porter, J. 0., P. 

Porter, Joaiah, w.o. 
t Porter, Steph., W.O. 

Pout, Jacob, P. 

Poat, M. M., p. 

Poat, Wm. 8., i. t. 

Potter, Tboa., a. a. 

Powell, C. U., L. 

Powell, David, 1. 1. 

PowelL J. N., 1. i. 

Pratt, B. F., a. a. 

PBat«,E.P.,P. 



Ontario. Stratford, Ct 

New Rirar. Draper'aTai.,ya. 

Wabaah. Middle Port, lU. 

. New Rirer. Marion, Ya. 

Grand Rirer. KingBTlUa, Ohio. 

Blyria. FitehTilla, Ohio. 

Wabaah. DanviUe, III. 

. Clinton. Clinton, Miaa^ 

Madiaon. AllansTlUe, Ind. 

New York 4th. New York Citj. 

Philadela.3d. Canton, China. 
. lUiaea. Ithaea, N. Y. 

New York 4th. MoUIa, Ala. 

St. Unla. St Louia, Mo. 

Wateriown. ManoaTlUa, N.Y. 

Ontario. LlTonia, N. Y. 

Ghampkln. Malona,N.Y. 

New York 4th. Ba«heh^ak,Tar. 



Cajnga. 

Ontario. 

Niagara. 

StJoaap 

Alton. 

Bnth. 

Delawara 

Wilmington. 



Chicago. 
Phlladala.8d. 



Mareelloa, N. Y 

Mt.Morria, N.T. 

Yoang8to'n,N.Y. 

Orland, Ind. 

Marion, 111. 

HomeliaTlL,N.T. 

Walton, N.Y. 

WUmlagton,DaL 

Ohieago, IlL 

PhiladaLL, Pa. 
New York 8d. 
Utiea. N.IIartlbrd,N.Y 

Albany. S.Hampton, M. 

Cortland. Marathon, N. Y. 

Hodaon. Bloomflald, N. J. 

New York 84. New York City. 
Grand Rirar. Manaon, Ohio. 
Cortland. Klndarhook,N.Y. 

CineinnatL 

Oawego. CleTaland, N. Y. 

St. Lawranoa* Dannamora, N.Y. 
Roeheater. Parma, N. Y. 
Cedar Valley. Cedar Falla,Iow» 
N. MisROuri. Hannibal, Mo. 
Philadela.8d. Gaboon, W.Afk'lc* 
Portage. Hmdaon, OhlOb 

Ontario. 

San Fraadsoo. Petaluma, CaL 
Hudson. Florida, N. Y. 

IlUnola. Strong's laid., BI. 

ProTidenoo. Looisrllle, Ky. 
Roeheater. Ylctor, N. Y. 
Chemnng. Horaa Haads,NY 
Newark. Newark, N. J. 

Portage. Hudson, Ohio. 

IlUnoia. Winchester, III. 

Washtenaw. Ypailantt, MIeh. 
Iowa City. CUnton, Iowa. 
New York 3d. Somers, N. Y. 
StUwrenoe. Potsdam, N.Y. 



PUMBTTSST. POam>flTICK. 



Cincinnati. 

Wineheatar. 

Ithaea. 

Onondaga. 

Illinois. 

Minnesota. 

Newark. 

Union. 

Erie. 

StLonla. 

Chicago. 

niinoia. 

Geneva. 

Onondaga. 

Logana^Mi. 

Alton. 

Klyria. 

New York 8d. 

Roeheater. 



Chemung. 
Scioto. 



Hawati, S. Islda. 
Warrenton, Va. 
OrotonyU.,N.Y. 
OUsco, N. Y. 
Richland, III. 
Bloomington, M. 
Newark, N.J. 
Maryvllla, Taan. 
Girard, Pa. 
St Lonia, Mo. 
Wilmington, HI. 
Chatham, HI. 
GeneTa, N. Y. 
Manliua, N. Y. 
lioganaport Ind. 
Carbondale, 111. 
Huntington, 0. 

Kendai'l',"N.Y. 
Window, III. 
Campbell, N. Y. 
Portamoutb, 0. 



Pratt, RuAis, 4. s. St. Uwrenee. ColumbiaTU.,NY. 

Prentiss, O. L^ w.c. New York 3d. New York City. 

Preston, John B., P. Fox Riven. Ocnomowoe, W. 

Priafit,J.Addison,P. Newark. W.Bloomfi'd,NJ. 

Prime, Jacob A., p. BuflUa BuflUo, N. Y. 

Prttehett, B. C, a. a. Geneva. Geneva, N. Y. 

Putnam, C. M., p. Pataskala. Jeraay, Ohio. 

Putnam, F., ft. ft. Indianapolis. Thomtown, Ind* 



QmcK, Jamaa, F. M. Knox. 
Quigly, T. U., t. i. Genaaea. 
Randall, S.Q.,w.c. ChampUln. 
Rankin, J. O., ■. >. IlUnoia. 
Rankin, W. C, w.c. Schuyler. 
Ranney, J. A., r. Kalamaioo. 
Banaom, C, ■ . a. Champlaiii. 
Rawaon, S. A., i. a. Angelica. 
Raymond, A.R., a.i. Montroaa. 
RiVmond,S.W.,w.c. Utiea. 
BajQor, J. W., a. t. Montroaa^ 
Read, Chaa. U^ P. Hanover. 
Read, HoUia, ft a. Brooklyn. 
Read, Jaa. F., w.o. Erie. 
Redflald, H. 8., a. t. Troy. 
Reed, Frye B., w. 0. Fox Rlvac. 
Road, Royal, w. 0. Ghleago. 

Reeve, Tappan S. 

Raid, A. S., a . a. 8t Josej^ 

Raid, John, P. Long lafaad. 

Bald, Lewia H., P. Onondaga. 

Ramley, M.A.,w.c. Madison. 

RendaJl, John, WM. Schuyler. 

Ranahaw, R., w. o. OedarYallaj. 

Requa, W. 0., t. a. Osaga. 

Rondt, G. T., a. a. Cincinnati. 

Rhaa, 8. A., v. m. Holston. 

Rice, Daniel, PEF. Dayton. 

Riea, Oeonn G., as. New York 8d. CouneU Bluff, L 

Richards, Chaa., a a. Huron. Monroeville,Ohlo 

Richarda, E.J., p. PhUadda. 4th. Reading, Pa. ^ 

Riehardaon,B.M.,a.s Lexington S. Granada, MIm. 

Richardson,0. P., L. Lexington 8. ~ 

Riehardaon,J.M..ft.s Newton. 
Riohardaon, J., aot. Geneva. 
Richardson, J.C , L. Genesea. 
Richardson, L., T. Montrose. 
Richardson, S., w u, Knox. 
Richardson, W.. s.ft. MontitMSh 
Ricketts, I. B., s. a. Ouage. 
RifKft* H. 0., a. a. 
Riggs, Joa. L., w. 0, 



Ceylon, Ind. 
Sheldon, N.Y. 

Boefcibrd,nL 
Oarrollton, IlL 
Quiney, lU. 
Allegan, Mich. 
Moriah, N. Y. 
Alexander, N.T. 
HamUton, Pa. 
Clhtton, N. Y. 
Springville, Pa. 
Richmond, Ta. * 
CraneviUe,N.J. 
Erie, Pa. 
Chestertown^.T 
Omro, Wis. 
Joliet, IlL 
St Charles, Mo. 
Yevay, Ind. 
Jameaport, L. I. 
FayettevilIe,N.Y. 
Tripton, Ind. 
Madura, £. In. 
Iowa Falla, Iowa. 
Paplnsville, Mo. 
dndnnati, Ohio. 
Qawar, Penia. 
Troy, Ohio. 



Greenwood, Miaa* 
Enterprise, Miss. 
Geneva, N. Y. 



Rit»«>Zena% w.c. Newark. 
Riley, Benj.O., a. a. Columbus. 
Riley, H. A., P. Montroaa. 

Rinker, Henry, a. a. Ithaea. 
Roberta, B., ft. a. Green River. 



Harford, Pa. 

Armbkir, W.Aria. 

Klrkwood, N.Y. 

Wolf Creek, Mo. 
New York 8d. St.Gatharine,C.W 
Pennsylvania. 



Plainfletd,N.J. 
Lodi, Wis. 
MontnMe, Pa. 
Burdette, N. Y. 
Hiekman, Ky. 



Robinaon, E., PKf . New York Sd. New York City. 



Robinson, J.J. .psr. Harmony. 
Robinson, M.. a. a. Cedar Valley. 
Robinson, N.C.. P. Iowa City. 
Robinson, P., P. Delaware. 
Robinson, R., s s. Oswego. 
Robinson, S. N.. p. CorUand. 
Robinson, T. H., P. Harrisboig. 
Roe, Sanf >rd W., p. CatakiU. 
Rogan, Daniel, a. s. Holston. 
Rogers, K. P., p. Newark. 
Rogers, W. H.. a. a. Hamilton. 
Rollo, Eber M., p. Albany. 
Rollo, S. P., P. Albauv. 

Rood, Lorrain. a. a. Fox Uiver. 
Root, «. W., p. Hamilton. 

Root, Henry, H. M . MarahalL 
Root, L. I., a. s. Saginaw. 

Roeenkrans, C B.,P. Columbus. 
Rosenkrans, Jos., P. Geneva. 
Roas, Fred. A., P. RichLmd. 
RoMdter, F. Z., L. Cinciunatl. 
RoMiltor, H. A., a. a. Greencaatle. 
Ro*<tlter, W. D., asc. Madison. 
Rowland, H. A., p. Newark. 
Rowlett Jas., W. O. Bath. 
Rudd. Geo. R., w. C. Cayuga. 
Rnwiell, Daniel, P. Geneaee. 
Kus.<iell, Jaa ,W. c. Delaware. 
Ruasell, Bei\j., ft. t. Chemung. 



MaryvlUe, Tenn. 
Steamboat R., lo. 
Vinton, Iowa. 
Jefferaon, N.Y. 
ConBtantia,N.Y. 
Whitney P.,N.Y. 
Harriaburg, Fa. 
Cairo, N. Y. 
Kingsport, Tens. 
Newark, N.J. 
Maaon, Ohio. 
Gr«enbuah,N.Y. -^ 
Edinburgh, N. T. 
Omro, Wia. 
Oxford, Ohio. 
FeltaP.O., Mieh. 
Bay City, Mich. 
Columbus, Wis. 
Romulus, N.Y. 
Huataville, Ala. -* 

Greeneastle, Ind. 
N. Madison, Ind. 
Newark, N. J. • 
Weaton, N. Y. 
Lyons. N. Y. 
Pike, N. Y. 
MoresviUe.N.T. 
Andovar, N.Y. 



Digitized by 



Googk 



THB PRBSBTTBBIAN CHURCH, (K. B.) 



129 



FOSY-OFTICX. 



glftB, Joa. M^ AOT. 

8t.CroU,P.L^w.c. 

8tJolm,0.&,T. 

Sailor, John, P. 

Salter, H. H.. P. 

Sampaoa, J , w. 0. 

Saabuma, P. P., t. •. 

Bandars, W.D.Pkf. 

8anfbctl,ILM,a • 

8airt«U,]aiN^CHP. 

8awt«li,JrnK.N.,tt. 

Sawyer, R.A^ P. 
> Sawyer, temoel, bm. 

S&ztoii. Joe. A^w c. 

Bajra, Win. N^ ■ i. 

Sebaafler, 8^ w. o. 

Scbloaaer.Jes^s.t. 

SooAald, A^ • •. 

Seolleld, IL, • a. 

Soott, John, a i. 

Seott, Joa.U..P. 

Seorel, Kara, 8 1. 

SeovU, Dwicht. L. 

Searle, M. 0^ a»t. 

Beaton, a SL. P. 

Seeley, A, W , w. o. 
■^ Saelye, 8. T, P. 

SeUlek,OhaB.O,T. 

Bew to na» John, t. 

Severanee. J. F., i. a. 

Seward, A., P. 
« Seward, D. M^ P. 

Seward, John, P. 

Bewail, J. N^ a a. 

Beymoor, Khon^ IV 

Beymour.Ova Has. 

Bhaller, larael, CLP. 

Sharp, BeiU F^ P. 

Bhnrp, £Uaa O, P. 

8hart«,D.W^a.a. 

8haw, Arch. M.. L. 

Shaw, Jamea, P. 
^haw, Jaa. B., P. 

Shaw, S. B^ w. c. 

Bhedd, llenry, P 

Bbedd, J. H^ L. 

Sheldon, A^ aot. 

Sheldon, F. K^ a •. 

Sheldon, J. B., ■ a 

Bhepard, Panl, w. o. 

Shepherd, L.M., a a. 

Shepherd, T. J., p. 

Bherwood, fi. B., p. 

Sherwood, J.ll.,w c. 

Sherwood. N.B.,W c. 

Shielda, U K., a a. 

Shnmway, G.R., a a. 

8immaB,J^P. 

Simpaon, C. D., a. a. 

Sinclair, Jas^ P. 

Skinner, L. A., w. o 
-^^ Skinner, T.H^ PEP. 

Skinner, Jr., T.H^ P. 

Sloan, laaae 0.. P. 

Sloat, Arch. H.. P. 

Sloenm, J.J, AaT. 

SoMlley, Seth. H x. 

Smith, Albert, p. 

Smith, Aaa D.. p. 

Smith, B. J., T. 

Smith, B. B., w. c. 

Smith, B. 0., P. 

Smith, Oarloa. a a. 

Smith, Chaa. A^ P. 

Smith, a. a a. 

8mlth,KllB..a.a. 

Smith, 0.« w. c. 

Smith, G. M., p. 

Smith, H. A., L. 

Smith, Harrey. a. a. 

Smlth,H. R., a.a. 

Smith, Henry, a a. 
, Smith, Henry, pep. 
> Smith, H.B., PET. 

Smith, Hiram, a a. 

8nlth,I.B.,t.a. 
17 



Oreencaatla. 

Tioga. 

New York 4th. 

8t.Joaeph. 

Monroew 

Pataakala. 

Ontario. 

Illln<4a. 

Buffalo. 

Cleveland. 

Unkm. 

New York 8d. 

Fort Wayne. 

New York 4th. 

North KlTer. 

MuDtroae. 

Petaakala. 

Saginaw. 

HMnilUm. 

Buffalo. 

Portage. 

Tioga. 

Cayuga. 

Utiea. 

Champlaln. 

Utica. 

Albany. 

lUinola. 

St. fjawrenee. 

Nligara. 

Hndaon. 

New York 3d. 

CleveUnd. 

Troy. 

Newark. 

Chenango. 

Portage. 

Cleveland. 



*ortageb 
hitakllL 



Oitak] 

Caynn. 

Cleveland. 

Koebeater. 

Chemung. 

Franklin. 

Franklin. 

Long laland. 

Madiaon. 

KlyrU. 

Monroe. 

Lyons. 

Pbiladala.4tb. 

Kaiamaaoo. 

Newark. 

Niagara. 

Klehland. 

Lyons. 

North Rirer. 

Lexington. 

Long Island. 

Buflklo. 

New York Sd. 

Montrose. 

Hanover. 

Piedmont. 

Cbioago. 



Oreeneastlejnd. 
Unkm Oen.,N.Y. 
New York aty. 
MkOilgan CInd 
Laanlie, Mloh. 
Westfleld. Iowa. 
W.Bloomfl'd,NY 
Jaekson villa, lU. 
eriffln's M.,N.Y. 
Havre, France. 
Kuseellvil., Tea. 
Yonkers, N. Y. 
.Marlon, Ind. 
New York aty. 
Pine Plains,N.Y 
Waverly, Pa. 
Baltimore, Ohk>. 
Oomnna, Mich. 
Madison, Ind. 
Hamburgh, N.Y 
Twinsburgh, 0. 
W.Newark, N.T. 

Uttca, N. Y. 
Charlotte, Yt 
Frauklbrt, N. Y. 
Albany, N.Y. 
JacksonvU., IIL 
Watertown,N.Y. 
Wlhmn, N. Y. 
Port JerTls,N.Y. 
Yonkers, N. Y, 
Solon, Ohio. 
N. Oranvil.,N.Y. 
Bloomileld, N. J. 

RlehflakLOhlo. 
lndependenee,0. 
Atwater, Ohk>. 



Alton 

New York 8d. 

Richland. 

Ontario. 

Bath. 

Portage. 

Phlladela.Sd. 

O.KIver Valley 

Clinton. 

New York 4th. 

Cortland. 

Philadela.8d. 

TlngA. 

Winchester. 

New River. 

CIneinnatl. 

New York 4th. 

Huron. 

Mew York 4th. 



NewborghyOhlo. 
Rochester, N. Y. 
Havanna, N.Y. 
Mt.GUead,Ohk). 
Walnut Hs.. 0. 
New Haven, Ct. 
Patriot, Ind. 
Lyme, Ohio. 

, Kan. Tbr. 

Huron, N. Y. 
Philadela., Pa. 
£dwardsb*g.. M. 
Bloomileld. N J. 
MillviUa, N. Y. 
Lynnville, Ten. 
Newark, N. Y. 
Ganterbury,N.Y 
Glasgow, Mo. 
Cutchogue, L. I. 
Westfleld, N. Y. 
New York City. 
Honesdala, Pa. 
Talleysville, Ta. 
Liberty, Va. 

Aognsta, MIeh. 
Godfrey, 111. 
New York City. 
Austin, Texas. 

N. i^-ivtr,i.r Y. 
Pi Y. 

T» lo. 

PIiil;<.1-k,. i'H. 
Qr^jnd lisp., M. 
RnroioTid, Miss. 
Wiuhli](ftr^n,D.C 



Ma(ne, N. Y. 
Leesburgh« Ya. 
Abingdon, Ya. 
Wfllnnt Hs.. 0. 
New York City. 
Castalia, Ohto. 



smith, Jas.C.,P. 
Smith, Jas. B., s. a. 

Smith, John, w. c. 
Smith, John C, P. 
Smith, J. F., P. 
Smith,L.S., w.c. 
Smith, Marcus, w.o. 
Smith, Matthew, a s. 
Smith, Nath., w. c. 
Smith, 8. D., w. c. 
Smith, Socrates, w.o. 
Smith, T. R., P. 
Smith, W.C, a a. 
Smith, W. H., w. c. 
Smith, W. H., a. a. 
Smith, W. H., a. a. 
Smyth, Anaon, aot. 
8need,8.IL,a.8. 
Snoddy, R. H., a. s. 
Snyder, A. J., P. 
Snyder, Peter, P. 
Sparka, S. M., P. 
Spaoldlng, Geo., P. 
bpauldins, J.,w.c. 
Spear, 8. T., P. 
Speea, dhubael, P. 
Spencer, A., W. c. 
^pencer, F. A., P. 
Spencer, Theo.,aac. 
Sftencer, Thoa., T. 
Spencer, Wm. H.. P. 
ttprague, D. G., P. 
Sprague, Isaac N. 
Springer, B. 0.. a. a. 
Sqnler, M. P., PEP. 
8Unley,H.L., p. 
Starr, Fred., aot. 
Stearns, J. F., P. 
Stebbins,aB.. l. 
Steele, Wm.N..s. a. 
Sterling, Wm., P. 
Stevens, C B., a a. 
Stevena, 8., a. a. 
Stewart, Robt, a. s. 
Sttles,Jos.a,sxc. 
SUllman, T., axe. 
Stimpaon , W.N .,w.c. 
Stoddard, K. W., p. 
Stona, Collins, T. 
Stone, John S.,H M. 
Stone, Seth B., P. M. 
Stowe, A. M- AOT. 
Stratton, B H., s. s. 
Stratton, £dw., p. 
Street, Thomaa, P. 
Streit, Lawrence, s a. 
Strong, A. K., P. 
Strong, John D..f.a 
Strong, Saimon.w.c. 
Strong, W. L., W. c. 
Stryker, I. P., a. a. 
Stuart, BenJ. F., a a. 
Summers, John, s s, 
Sunderland, B., P. 
Sutton, Joa.F., w.c. 
Swasy, Arthur, P. 
Swift, Alfred B., P. 
Swift, Warren, s s. 
Sylvestar, C. 8., a. s. 

TALCOTT, Joel, w c. 
Tr— n. n P^PEs. 
Ti 4. L.. s.s. 

Ti >in, L. 

Ti r 1 L, a a. 

Tj r ^ <3^ S S. 

T«yl'>Pt Kph., s a. 
Tnvitir, El. S., P. M. 
TnVlor, a 8, W. c. 
TnylCT* S. i>., a s. 
Tjitlor, T, K., w.c. 
TuVlor, V.D., s s. 
Tiiiflnr, Wanen,W.C. 
Tjivl'>r, W. A., s.s. 
Tijylor, W. W, P. 



Cortland. 

Galena. 

Bath. 

DjofOolnmbhL 

Newark. 

G.RIver Yall^ 

CatakUL 

Keokuk. 

BuflUow 

Dayton. 

Alton. 

New York Sd. 

Saginaw. 

Osage. 

OtUwa. 

Unk>n. 

Franklin. 

Alton. 

Unkm. 

PhiladeU.4th. 

Watertown. 

PitUborg. 

Bath. 

New York 4th. 

Brooklyn. 

Mllwankia. 

Lyons. 

Utka. 

Utiea. 

Hamilton. 

Knox. 

Newark. 

Newark. 

Keokuk. 

Belvldera. 

Cold Water. 



Newark. 

Geneva. 

Loganspori. 

Harrlsburg 

Cleveland, 

Gold Water. 

Alton. , 

New YoAl 8d. 

BufEOo. 

Indianapolis. 

North Kiver. 

Franklin. 

Champlain. 

Brooklyn. 



CatskiU. 

PhlladehLSd. 

Meadvlile. 

Monroe. 

Columbus. 

Utiea. 

Onondaga. 

Bloomingtoo. 

Iowa City. 

Iowa City. 

D.of Columbia. 

Roekaway. 

Galena. 

Troy. 

Pataakala. 

Columbia. 

Xlyria. 

New York 4th. 



Summer H^NT 
Plum Kiver,lll. 
Urbana,N.Y. 
Waahingtona — 
Newark, N.J. < 
MUl Polnt,Mieh 
Syracuaa, M. Y. 
CentrevU.,Iow« 
Buflblo, N. Y. 
Morrow, OhkK 
GreenvilL, III. 
New York Citf. 
K. Saginaw, M. 
Oalhoan, Mow 
Granville, IIL 
New Port, Ten. 
ColumbiiB,Oliia. 
Godfrey, UL 
KnoxviUe, Tea. 
Whltemarah,Pa 
WAtertown,N.Y '^ 
PIttaburg, Pa. 
Oanisteo, N. Y. 
New York City. 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 
MUwauklcWia. 
Briatol C, N.Y. 
M.Hartt>rd,Ot 
Utiea, N.Y. < 
N. Albany, In4. 
Rock Island. 
8. Orange, N.J. ^ 
CaldweU, N.J. 
Decatur C, la 
Geneva, N.Y. -^ 
Joneavllle,Mteh 
Auburn, N.Y. ^ ^ • 
Newark, N.J. ^ - / 

Romnqr, Ind. 
WiUlaraRpt.,Pa. K. 
Braeksvll.,Ohla 

Greenviiia, IB. 
New HarsB, OL </ 
Dunkirk. N.Y. ^ 
Franklin, Ia4. 
Amenia, N. Y. 
Coltimbua.OhJa 
An Sable F.,NT 
Uklh, 8. AfHca. 
Oanandaig*,N.Y < 
Orangevil.,N.Y. 
Aahlaad, N. Y. 
Phlladda^ Pa.^ 
Sunvilie, Pa. 
Monroe, Mich. 
Lowvllle, Wla, 
ainton. If. Y. 
FaTettevll.,N.T 
Urbana, Ul. 
Nevada, lowa^ 
SheUaburg, la 
Washington C 
Parsippanv,N.J. 
Galena, III. 
M. OranvU.,N.Y 
Homer, Ohio. 

l»n,M.Y. 



Cayuga. 

N.Miaaourl. 

Osage. 

Bulikia*^ 
Huron. 

BuflSlor 
North River. 
Qeveland. 
Scioto. 
StLooiai 



Wakeraaa, 0. 
Ann Arbor, M. 
JBlktoo, Teas. 

HodistoirMa 
Walnut Gr.,Ma 
Alton, in. 
Randolph, N.Y. 



MandahaaallaJ. 
um.N.Yr 
Bvan's a, N. Y 



Auban 



Honolulu, 8.1a. 
Dover, Ohia 
Portsmouth, a 
HlghHi]l,Md 
Panii Yau^.Y. 



Digitized by 



Googk 



180 



PRESBTTBBIAN HISTOBICAL ALHANAO. 



PRnBYTSKT. rOtT-OFFICX. 



PEXtBTTXET. FOtT-OWICX. 



Tddford, R. K., • •. Unloa. BlanrTillo, Ten. 

T«nney, K..W c. Athens. Marietta, Ohio. 

Terry, Panihall. w c. Cortland. 

Ttaateher, Moiieci. P. Cortlaad. Pitcher, N.T. 

Theberath, G.U..C M. Newark. Newark, N. J. 

Thomaa, J. D., L. D. ofOoIambla. Poplar 8iMi.,Md 



Thompiioa, F. A.. 8 t. W. Tern 
Tbompeon,O.W.,w c Onondaga. 
Thompson, J. W., p. Franklin. 
Thompnon, Lew in, P. Rockaway. 
Thompson, M., w. c. Salem. 
Thompeon, M.L P. P. Buffalo. 
TJiompaon, R. R . s s. New York 3d. New York City. 
Thompson, W.M pm. CindnnatL Sldon, Syria. 
Thomson, Jas^ a s. Blue Karth. Mankato, Mln. 
Thomson, John,w c. CrawfordsTille. Crawfordsril.,!. 
Thomson, 8. 8., pep. CrawfbrdsTille. Orawfbrdsril.,!. 
Thomson, Wm., s s. PennsylTania. Blossborg, Pa. 

Thornton, A. O., L. Cayuga. 

Thurston, 0., s •. Chemung. 
Tiflkny. J. A., a. s. Greencai^. 
Timlow, Wm., w. c. Hudson. 
Tlndall, Geo. P., p. Indianapolis. 

Montrose. 

New York U. 

Troy. 

Cayuga. 

RochestOT. 

Delaware. 

Sdoto. 



Spring HUi, T. 
Syracuse, N. Y. 
Oonstantia, 0. 
Whippany,N.J 
Bloomington,!. 
Buffiilo,N.Y. 



Athens, Pa. 
RoekTiUe, Ind 
Amity, N. Y. 
Indianapolis. I. 
Sunquehana, P. 



New York City. 
N.Y. 



£agle Ms. 
Mareellas,N.Y, 
BaldwlnsT',NY 
Delhi, N.Y. 
Hanging R., 0. 
Elbridge, N. Y. 
Bloomington,n 
Dunmore, Pa. 
Cincinnati, 0. 
8pringfleld,NY. 
Pasumalie, In. 
PewlcklyrlL, P. 
Ludlowvit.,NY. 
Theresa, N. Y. 
Boston, Mass. 
Acra, N. Y. 
Dubuque,Iowa. 
Constantinople. 
Defiance, Ohio. 
Dearborn, Mich. 



Fostorio, Ohio. 
PawPaw,Mlch. 
Edinburgh, O. 
Jersey, Ohio. 
Roekaway,N.J. 
-■ ■ N.J. 



Todd. Geo. N., s s. 

Toelke, Henry, P. 

Tomb, J. 8. L., P 

Tompkins, John, P. 

tour, Kben. M., s. s. 
y Torrey, Darid, P. 

Tnwler, Thos., s s. 

Townsend, K. G.. s s. Cayuga 

Townsend. J.B..W c. St. Louis. 

Townsend, T. R., s.s. MMitrose. 

Tracy, H. A., sec. CindnnatL 

Tracy, 8. J., w. c. Otsego. 

Tracy, William. WM. Harrisburg 

TraTelli, J. 8., T. Pittsburg. 

TraTer, Allen, s. s. OnondaipL 

Treadwefl, O.W., s s Watertown. 
^ Treat, Selah B.. sec. Newark. 

Trotter, Alex., P. CatsklU. 

Trowbridge, J. EI., p. Dubuque. 

Trowbridtfe, T.C .p.m Brooklyn. 

Tueker, B. R., P. Maumee. 

Tucker, N., s. i. Detroit. 

Turner, D. K., P. Philadela. 4th. Hartsrille, Pa. 

Turner, Oeoige, 8 8. Fox Rirer. SteTens* Pt,W. 

Turner, Wm. C, s. a Maumee. 

Tnttio, Amos C. s. s. Kalamaaoo. 

Tuttle, A. Y., w. c. Portage. 

Tuttle, Jacob, w. o. Pataskala. 
•« Tuttle, Jos. F., P. Rockaway. 

TntUe, 8. L., p. Newark. 

Twining, Wm., w. c. CrawibrdfTlUe. CrawfordsTiI.,I 

Twombly, L 8., a. a. Athens. Pomeroy, Ohio. 

UHLrBLDBB, 8., 8 t. Oolombua. Logansrllle, W. 

yAII.,F.Y.,AOT. 

Tanoe, Joseph, p. 
Van Deurs, G., L. 
Van De Vere, O.W.,P. 
Tan Dyck, L. B.. P. 
Van lIonghton.H..p. 
Van Lennep,HJ.P. X 
Van Nest, P. 8., s.s. 
Van 8taToren,A., as. 
Van Valkenb'g.D.s.s 
Van Vleck, William 
Van Vleck, W., W. 0. 
Veale, Jas. A., 8. a. 
Vemor, Wm. H.. a. a. 
Vincent, J. G., T. 
Verbis, Stephen 
Vrooman, D., w. M . 

WAi>swoETn,0..8 a. 
WadRWorth.H.F..B t. 
Walth, Wm., P. 
Walth, Jr., W., t. a. 
Wakeman, M., s. 8. 
WsldenmeTer,M..8.8 
Waldu, K. F., s. 8. 
Waldo, L. B., 8. 8. 
Waldo, MUton, s. a. 
Walker, A. 8., s a. 



CindnnatL 


College H., 0. 


Erie. 


Belle Val., Pa. 


Cayuga. 





Mllwaukto. 


MllwauklcWls 
Windh'CN.Y. 


Catakill. 


Montrose. 


Ilawley, Pa. 


Brooklyn. 


Toeat, Turkey. 


Iowa City. 


Iowa City, Iowa 


Keokuk. 


Montrose, Iowa 


Otsego. 


8pringfl'd..N.Y. 
E.aeTeland, 0. 


Clereia'nd. 




Logaosport 


Loganspt, Ind. 


Richland. 


LynnTillcTea. 


Lexington. 


Trenton. Mo. 







Portage. 


Canton, China. 


Otaego. 


Richfield S..NY 


Rockaway. 


Newfound!', N J 


Buffalo. 


Ripley, X. Y. 


Buffalo. 


Lancaster, N .Y. 


Onondl^^. 


Lafayette. N.Y. 


i»phuyler. 


Nauvoo, III. 


Mllwankie. 


Palmrra. Win. 


Utica. 


MorrisTillcN.Y 


BelTldere. 


Lawrence. 111. 


New York 8d. 


1^11, N.J. 



Walker, BenJ., a. a. TnunbulL 
Walker, Jamea, 8 s. Galena. 
Walker, John, a. s. Chlcaga 

Walker, Richard, P. ~ 

Wallace, B. J., sec. 
Wallace, 0, a, p. 
Walsworth, K. B., P. 
Walter, J. H., P. 
Walton, J. 8., s 8. 
Ward, Eben., w. C 
Ward, Ellas 0., s a. 
Ward, John, w. C. 
Ward, J. J., 8. s. 
Ward, Samuel, a. a. 
Ward,T..SP. 
Warner, G. W., 8. s. 
Warner, J. K., s. s. 
Warren, F. V., a. s. 
Warren, H. V., L, 
Warren, W. N., a. a. Troy. 
Wastall, W. P., s. s. Detroit 
Waterbury, C, P. Knox. 
Wafers, John, w.c. Knox. 
Waters, M. V.D.,s s. Utlca. 
Watson, C. L., 8. 8 . Illinois. 
Waugh, John,P. 
Weed, Ira M., AOT. 
Weed, J. B., a. a. 
Weed, Thos. A., P. 
Wt<Us, A. 8., 8. s. 
Wells, B. D., w. o. 
Weils, John 0., P. 
Wells, N.M.,c.it. 
Wells, Rufns P., P. 
Wells,W.W..8.8. *.««. 
Wentworth, J.T., L. Chicago. 
West, Amasa, w. c. BuflUo. 
Watherill, I., w. o. Philadela. Sd. 
Whaley, 8., a. a. Montrose. 
Wheeler, L. H., V X. Lake Superior. 
Whipple, W.W., P. N. Missouri. 
Whitaker, Bpher, P. 
Whitaker, J. A., P. 
White. Albert, a a. 
White, A. F., s.s. 
Whit^^has., PES. 
White, Chas.T., F.X. Bath. 
White, B. N., L. New York Sd. 

While, F. 8., w. o. Huron. 
White, G. H., P. M. Indianapolis. 
White, 0. 8., a. s. Union. 
White, 0. H., a. a. New York 4th. 
White, 0. D. W.,w.c. MarshalL 
White, Samuel,w. C. Bath. 
White, 3. J., 8. s. Delaware. 
White, T. F., P. Rockaway. 

White, W. C. L. New York 4th. 
Whitfield, J. W., a. a. Utica. 
Whiting, F. L., w. c. Chemung. 
Whitney, J. C, a. s. Minneeota. 
Whittaker, Wm., V. Long Island. 
Whlttemore,I.T..s. s. Bloomington. 
Whittlesey ,S.H..w c PoHage. 
WIckea, T. 8., w. c. North RlTsr. 
Wight, J. A., P. 
Wilber, F. A., p. 
Wiley, Chas, W.C. 
Wile. BenJ. F., P. 
Wilkinson, R., W. o. Athens. 
Willard, L., P. Rockaway. 

WilMt, Jo(i.T..P 
Wllley, 8. H., P. 
Williams, C. A..W.C. Ottawa. 
WilllamR, D., w. c. Montrose. 
Williams, D., p. Utim. 

Williiiins, B. B., P. Utica. 
Williamis K- C, w C Buffitlo. 
William*. J.N. , s s. Dubuque. 
WilliamR, S. II., H X. Champlain. 
Williams. W.F.. P X.. Utlca. ' 
Wllliiims. W..II.,DX. Ki*<ikuk. 
Williams. W. W., p. Maumee. 
Willi tmsrm. J. G , P. PhiUd«^la. 4th. 
Willlamiion. K. H..L. New York 4th. 
Willifl. i£ D.. s. s. l).'lvi.l(Te. 
WUliston, T., w. c. CAtskill. 



Philadela. 4th. 

Philadela. Sd. 

New York 3d. 

Sierra Nerada. 

Huron. 

Athens. 

CleTeland. 

Montrose. 

Newark. 

Niagara. 

Wabash. 

Montrose. 

Cayuga. 

Geneva. 

Bath. 

St. Joseph. 



St. Lawrenoa. 

Chicago. 

Franklin. 

Oswego. 

Chicago. 

PennsylTania. 

CalskiU. 

Detroit 

Holston. 

Alton. 



Long Island. 
Philadela. 4th. 
Chenango. 
San Joa^ 
CmwlbrdsTina. 



Newton Fs., 0. 
Tekonsha, Mioh. 
Au Sable. 111. 
AUentown, Pa. ^ 
Philadela., Pa. 
TremontN.Y. 
.MarysTllle, CaL 
Mihin, Ohk). 
Constitution, <X 
Solon, Ohio. 
Bethany, Pa. 
Philadela., Pa. 
KnowlesTll.,N.T 
Naogo, 111. 
Oarbondale, Pn. 
Weedsport, N.Y. 
Dundee, N. Y. 
HarmonyTll,NT 
Walnut Ha., O. 
N. Berkshire, Vt 

KnoxTille, III. 
Galesburgh, III. 
Ohio, N.Y. 
Richland, III. 
Canton, N.Y. 
Waukegan, Dl. 
MarysvUle,Ohlo. 
Mexieo, N. Y. 
Monee, 111. 
LawrenceTil.,Pa 
QreenTille. N.Y. 
Detroit, Mich, y 
Jonesboro Ten. 
LaSalie,in. 



PrOTldenoe, P». 
Odanab, Wis. 
La Grange, Mo. - 
Boutbold, L L^ . 
Belridere,N.J. 

Gllroyrci. 
CrawlbrdsTil.,1. 
Puluqr, India. 



Fremont, Ohio. 
Oorfk, Syria. 
Academla, Ten. 
Meriden, Ct 



Starkey, N. Y. 
CannonRTil.,N.Y 
Mendham, N.J. 



Verona, N. Y. 
Big Flatts, N. T. 
Forest City,Min. 
Greenport L. I. 
PonUac, 111. 



Chicago. 
Klvria. 
Milwaukle. 
North River. 



Champlain. 
San Frandsoo. 



Pou*keepsle,N.T 
Chicago. 111. 
Elyria, Ohio. 
La Fayette, Ind. 
Pleasant V.,N.Y * 
Fairfield, Iowa. 
Sparta, N. J. 
Essex, N.Y. 
San FranclsoOyC . 



Wysox, Pa. 
Bnonvllle, N. Y. 
Warsaw, N. Y. 
Dunkirk, N. Y. 
Dubuque, Iowa 
Peru, N. Y. 
Mosul, Assyria. 
Keokuk, Iowa. 
Toledo, Ohio. 
Sidney, N.J. 
New York nty. 
pMvtonim. Ill, 
Bethany, Pa. 



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THX PRBSBTTBRIAN OHUKOH, (X. 8.) 



131 



PBK8BTTXST. FOIT-OVPICS. 



PBSSBTTSET. POIT OVVICX. 



Willooghbj, B.F., L. 

WiUougbb7,K.C^t s. 

Wilson, D. M., V. M. 

WIlRon, Jas. B., 1. 1. 

Wilflon, James, L. 

Wilnon, Jaa. P., P. 

Wilson, Joseph, 1. 1. 

WUson, J.O., >•«• 

Wilson, Levi B., ft.t. 
^ WiUon, Robt. B., p. 
y wimpy, Jesse, 1. 1. 

Wioans, Lnae, 1. 1. 
*Wlng,C.P.,P. 

WInnes, Wm., ■. t. 

Wlnslow, H., P. 

Winter, Oeo^ a. a. 

Wishard, S. B^ P. 

Wiiner, Wm., w. o. 

Wisner, Wm. C^ P. 
--Wiswell, G. F., P. 

Witter, Dext«r,a.a. 

Wood, A. A., P. 

Wood, A. T., 8. a 

Wood, D. T., P. 

Wood, Oeo. 0.. AOT. 

Wood, Geo. W., axo. 

Wood, Glen. aot. 

Wood, Jaa. W^ P. 



Oayuga. 

Galena. 

Cincinnati. 

OtUwa. 

ClncinnatL 

Newark. 

Wabash. 

Oreencastle. 

Portage. 

Lyons. 

RichUnd. 

Trumbull. 

Harrisburg. 

Cincinnati. 

GeneTa. 

Saginaw. 

Schuyler. 

Ithaca. 

Niagara. 

Wilmington. 

Grand KiTer. 

New Tork 4th. 

Bath. 

Hudson. 

Alton. 

New York 4th. 

Keokuk. 

Hudson. 



Horns, Syria. 
Shabony G., 111. 

Newark,"N.J. 
ShelbyrUU, Ul. 
Terre Haute, I. 
Windham,Ohla 
Clyde, N. 'l. 
SaTannah, Ten. 
Mecca, Ohio. 
Carlisle, Pa. 
dncinnatl, 0. 
G-Mh-.Ta,N,T. 
Alia?, >lklk. 
RiiAtiTllkH ML 

l^x^kpciTt, N.Y, 

Burl-m. libio. 
N«w York C!ty. 
BronrbpU NY, 
JlldaUtoXS Y 

New York CHj. 
DciifDirk. iQWtu 
r.H.Y. 



Wood, Joslah, aot. 

Woodbridge,J.M.,wc 

Woodbridge, T..W. o. 

Woodbury, S., s. ■. 
JWoodruff, B. T.,w. o. 
TWoodrutr, J., w. o. 

Woodruff, J. A., w.o. 

Woodruff, S.R.,s.f. 

Woods, Harrey, T. 

Woods, W. .W, AOT. 

Woodward, 0. 8., p. 

Woodworth,f.C.,W)T. 

Wortbington, A.,8S. 

Wright, Aaher, P. M. 

Wright, B., AOT. 

Wright, Edwin 8., P. 

Wright, Jas. B., T. 

Wright, Jas. R., s. s. 

Wright, Thoa., aot. 



Yai^ CalTin, w. o. 
Young, C, w.o. 
Young, Robert, T. 
Young, Wm., L. 
Youngs, Bsra, w. 0. 

ZiTLiT, John H.,s t. 
SKonna, Peter, p. 



Alton. 

Athens. 

Colombia. 

Green River. 

Grand RlTer. 

Tioga. 

L. Superior. 

Ohamplain. 

Newton. 

Dubuque. 

Lexington. 

New York 8d. 

Buffalo. 

Buffalo. 

St. Louis. 

BuflUo. 

Lexington. 

Maumee. 

Washtenaw. 

Watertown. 
Indianapolis. 
Cincinnati. 
Lyons. 
Long Tf i^nd 

Texas. 
MUwankto. 



Duquolne, 111. 
Marietta, Ohio. 
Spencerto'n.N.Y 
W. Trace, P.O.,T. 
WiUiamsfl'd.. 0. 
Cohocton, Mich. 
Conneaut, Ohio. 
Beckmant', N.Y 
MobUe, Ala. y. 
Iowa City Jowa. 
ParkTllle, Mo. 
New York City. 



Irrlng, N. Y. 
St Louis, Mo. 
Fredonia, N. Y. 
Weston, Mo. 
RldgeTilIe,Ohio. 
YpsUanU, Mich. 

Martlnsb»g.,N.Y 
Thornton, Ind. 
Cincinnati, 0. 
Ontario, N. Y. 
Cutdiogne, L J. 

Austin C Tex. 
HoUand, Wis. 



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132 THB PRASBTTBRIAK ORHROH, (K. S.) 



The Second Presbyterian Chnrcb, in the city of Chicago, was 
formed by a colony of twenty-six persons from the First Presbyte- 
rian Church, and was organized on the first day of June, 1842. 
Its organization was conducted with the full concurrence of the 
session and principal members of the First Church, and its pastor, 
the Bev. Flavel Basoom; for the purpose of extending the Bedeem- 
er's kingdom by a more adequate provision for the future moral 
wants of the rapidly Rowing city. 

The articles of faith and covenant were adopted, and Messrs. 
B. W. Baymond, S. Willard, and W. H. Brown, were chosen Buling 
Elders. Immediately after its organization, the Church extended 
a call to the Bev. Bobert W. Patterson, which was accepted ; he 
was ordained and installed by the Presbytery of Ottawa, on the 
14th of September, 1842, and is still their Pastor. In the follow- 
ing year, Capt. S. Johnson and J. C. Williams, were elected Elders, 
making five in all. On the removal of Capt. Johnson, Thos. B. 
Carter was elected in 1845. J. A. Wight was elected in 1848. In 
April, 1856, he was ordained a Minister of the Gospel, when B. 
D. Jones, E. Baker, and D. B. Holt, were elected, increasing the 
number to seven. 

The session consists, at present, of the following members, Bev. 
B. W. Patterson, Pastor ; Elders, E. Baker, W. H. Brown, P. B. 
Carter, B. D. Jones, D. B. Holt, B. W. Baymond, and J. C. Wil- 
liams. The Church increased in strength, and it numbers at present 
875 members, being one of the largest, most flourishing, and in- 
fluential congregations in the denomination. The whole number 
admitted from all sources since its organization has been 575. Of 
these, more than one third have been received on profession of 
their faith, the remainder being additions from other churches, the 
largest number being from the Congregational, with a few from the 
Baptist, Dutch Beformed, Episcopal, Methodist, and Beformed Pres- 
byterian. 

Since the organization, between one and two hundred have been 
dismissed to other churches. Of those sent out to new enterprises, 
twelve were dismissed to aid in forming the Westminster (Presby.j 
Church, eleven the North Presbyterian, (O. S.,) three the Thira 
Presbyterian, and two the New England (Cong.) Church. Between 
thirty and forty members have died, a large proportion of them du- 
ring the Asiatic Cholera seasons of 1849, '50, '51, '52 and '54. Nine 
persons have been* excommunicated, but with two exceptions, they 
were those received by letter. Much of the present prosperity and 
great usefulness of the Church may be attributed to the regular 
maintenance of their prayer-meetings, one being held on Wednes- 
day evening of each week, one on Sabbath morning, by the young 



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Rev ' RDBERT V/ P.^TBm : " 



Tiihlisheo. h- fosevl M- Ylilson, A'' ill ScrtA lo'/'S* Phils d. 



PSIhiYHik5c>Mb>h^h:. 



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FBXSBTTXRIAK HIBTOBtOAlb ALMANAC. 189 

iMQ of the Ohuroh, besides one, and sometimte two fenial^ prayer- 
meetings, held during the week, at private residences. This has 
tended to keep up a lively interest in spiritual things, at times 
when the Ohurch at large has been in a cold, dead state, and although 
no season until the present has been signalized by a very large 
number of conversions, many have found hope from time to time^ 
through the influence of these meetings. 

There have been five seasons of peculiar interest, when the Holy 
Spirit has descended with unusual power ; those of the winter and 
spring of the years 1847) '60, '52, '64, and during the present year. 
Each successive manifestation of the Holy Spirit has been more 
marked and powerful than that which preceded it ; the last onOi 
which is still in a measure continued, being the most important, 
having resulted thus far in the hopeful conversion of nearly one 
hundred souls. During these seasons of interest, the number of 
meetings for prayer and preaching has been much increased, daily 
prayer-meetings being held at times, for months in succession. 
Many who have become hopeful converts during these seasons, have 
formed other Church relations. 

A Sabbath school in connection with the Church has, from the 
beginning, been sustained, and numbers at present nearly 200 mem- 
hers. In addition to this school, for several years two mission 
schools have been sustained by the members of the Church, one 
numbering 200, and the other oOO members, being situated, one on 
the north side of the river, at the Bethel Church, the other in the 
south part of the city, at the corner of Taylor and Buffalo Sts. 
The present superintendent of the school in connection with the 
Church is Devillo B. Holt. 

A flourishing in&nt class is also in operation, and at the close of 
the morning service, a Bible Class for young men, and two Jbr 
young ladies, are held. 

A Young Men's Christian Association was organised in January^ 
1856 ; its object being to promote mutual acquaintance among the 
young men of the Church and Congregation, and to enlist them in 
useful labours. The two Mission Schools before mentioned, are 
under their care, and they have employed the Rev. J. A. Wight, a 
member of Chicago Presby., as a City Missionary, with a salary of 
$1200. The financial affairs of the Church are in a prosperous con- 
dition. The annual income of the Church is now nearly $5000, 
which is derived from the rent of their pews. 

A collection taken up at each communion, forms a fund for the 
relief of any indigent persons connected with the Church, and for 
any other similar use, if there is no such call for the money. Many 
boxes of clothing, &c., have been prepared, and sent off to indigent 
ministers of the gospel, by the ladies; a society of whom meet 
weekly for this purpose. The donations of the Church for benevo* 
lent purposes since its organization, up to 1856, amounted to $36,« 
827. For that year, they were $7,890. The public services of the 
church were at first held for several Sabbaths in the City Saloon^ 
and then, by invitation, for a season, in the Unitarian Church. 



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184 THE FRSSBYTBRIAK CHUBOH, (N. 8.) 

In July, 1842, a plain edifice, 40 by 60 feet, and costing about 
$1600, was commenced, on the south side of Randolph Street, east 
of Clark Street, and dedicated on the 13th of Sept., and this build- 
ing with two additions, one in 1843, the other in 1847, served the 
uses of the Church till 1851, when the handsome Gothic edifice 
which they now occupy, was finished. 

The lot on which this building stands, was purchased in 1847, 
the corner-stone laid in Aug., 1849 ; the work finished in the latter 
part of 1850, and it was dedicated to the service of God, on the 24th 
of Jan., 1851. The building was designed by J. Benwick, Jr., of 
New York, and is located on Wabash Avenue and Washington St. 
The material is limestone mixed with silex, and strongly impregna- 
ted with bitumen, or petroleum, which gives to the colour a peculiar 
variety of light and snade, and imparts to the exterior of the build- 
ing a remarkably ancient and unique appearance. The breadth of 
the front, including the tower, is eighty feet, and the whole depth 
180 feet. The audience-room is 64| by 82|, and the lecture-room, 
back, 27 by 84. The number of pews on the first floor is 144, on 
the second floor, exclusive of orchestra, 60. It is capable of seating 
1400 persons. The entrance front is finished with two towers, the 
height of the larger one, being 165 feet. A large organ built by E« 
Andrews, of Utica, was purchased in 1854, which cost $3600. The 
cost of edifice, ground, organ, and clock is about $50,000. The 
building alone, about $40,000. The value of property has increased 
so much since its erection, that it is now worth, ground included, 
from $110,000 to $120,000. 

The Second Presbyterian Church has, firom its organization on- 
ward, had a steady and healthful growth ; and has never before 
been as strong as it now is. It a£fords an example of conservative 
pjx)gres6, of moderation without sluggishness, of the Kingdom com- 
ing *'not with observation." 7ew other Churches in the denomina- 
tion are more prosperous, or more widely useful ; and few other 
congregations are larger, or more influential. 

Chicago^ October 20<A, 1858. 



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THE UNITED SYNOD OF THK PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. 135 

THE UNITED SYNOD 
OF THE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. 

IN THE UNITED SATES OF AMERICA. 



This body was organized in Knoxville, Tenn. — on the second 
day of April, 1858. The following address, issued by members of 
the General Assembly, which met in Cleveland, Ohio, in May, 
1857, sets forth the reasons for the organization : 

Dear Brethrin : — ^The undersigned, members of the General Assembly now in sea- 
sion in Cleveland, Ohio, are constrained to address you with reference to Ihe state 
of our beloved Church, nd to indicate the course which should be pursued by all 
who adhere to the principles of our Constitution, as interpreted by its framers, and as 
practically ackDOwiedged during the ahnost entire period of our history as a church. 

The action of the present Assembly on the subject of Slavery, especially when con- 
sidered in connection with the spirit and manifest purpose of several of the Western 
Synods, has impressed us with the belief that peace and harmony can no longer pre- 
vail amongst us ; that the Assembly, as at present constituted, instead of bebg a bond 
of union l^tween different sections of the church, will continue to be the theatre of 
strife and discord ; and that the glory of God, the welfare of our churches, and the 
good of the country demand a separation of the discordant elements, and the existence 
of another Assembly, in which the agitation of the Slavery question will be unknown. 

We had hoped that our brethren who have been disposed to introduce this subject 
into the General Assembly would ere this have been convinced that no good could 
result to the Church from this agitation — that it was alienating brethren of a common 
Christian faith, and was calculated to render the condition of the slave more undesira- 
ble, and to sunder the ties that bind our union together. In this regard we have 
been sadly disappointed. In consequence of the political agitation of the subject, 
and of the pressure brought to bear upon them by Congregational Churches holding 
the most ultra abolition sentiments, many of our Western Presbyteries have become 
more urgent in demanding progressive action of the Assembly. They have not been 
satisfied with the past declarations of the Assembly. They have desired the Assembly 
to express its views of the sin of slave-holding so clearly, that they can be made the 
basis of discipline by the Courts of the Churcn. This action has now been virtually 
taken by the Assembly. It has avowed that the relation of ouister and servant — 
which necessarily involves the idea of property in the services of the latter — is a sin 
in the sight of God, an o^nce in the sense in which the term is used in the Constitu- 
tion of Uie Church. This declaration has been made, although confessedly there is 
not the most remote allusion to slave-holding in our standards, and also with the 
knowledge of the fact that when our Constitution was adopted, twelve out of the 
thirteen States were slave-holding States, and many of those who composed the As- 
sembly of 1789, if not slave-holders themselves, were the representatives of Presbyte- 
ries in which were churches whose members were slave-holders. We regard this ac- 
tion of the General Assembly as a palpable violation of the spirit and letter of the 
Constitution of the Church. The principle involved in it, if carried into practice, would 
convert the hig:liest judicatory of the Church into an ecclesiastical despotism as tyranni- 
cal as that which has distinguished the Church of Rome. It makes the Assembly not 
only the interpreter of law in an irregular way, but also the supreme legislature of the 
Church— a position which has been always repudiated by the Presbvterian Church. 

Apart, therefore, from the disastrous consequence resulting from the agitation of the 
subject of Shivery in the General Assembly — destroying, as it does, our peace, keeping, 
us in a state of excitement unfavourable to spiritual growth, and paralyzing our efforts 
to advance the cause of the Redeemer through the channel of our admiraUe system 



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186 PSESBYTERUK HISTORICAL ALMAKAO. 

of government — we consider that the Assembly has so far departed from the Consti- 
tution of the Church as to render our adherence to it undesirable and imj^ible. 
Having protested repeatedly against this agitatioB, and fiudins that our brethren are 
determined to continue it, we have deliberately and prayerfuny come to the conclu- 
sion that, however painftil it may be to us, the good of toe Church and of the coun- 
try required a separation from them. We shall hold our brethren who have disturbed 
our peace, by the introduction of this vexed question into our judicatories, as iJone re- 
sponsible for the coDsequenoes of this division. 

With these convictions as to the necessity of a separation from our once united and 
beloved Zion, the only question that remains for as now to settle, pertains to the 
mode of separation. The undersigned are satisfied that but one course is left to us — 
and that il^ to invite all Constitutional Presbyterians in the land, who are oppcoed to 
the agitation of Slavery in the General AflBembly, to nnite in an organization in 
which this subject shall be utterly eschewed. We do not restrict our invitation to 
the Southern Churches. We wish to have a National Church — that is, a Church, 
the constituent parts of which will come from every section of the Union, Holdii^ 
to the same Confession of Faith, we shall have a common Imsis as to doctrine and gov- 
ernment—and an understanding that, however, we may differ in our views respecting 
Slavery, the subject is never to bo introduced into the Assembly either by Northern 
or Southern men, uniera, indeed indicial cases are brought up regularly from the lower 
courts. In the judgment of the undersigned, this course is our only alternative. 
There is so much of the same abolition spirit pervading other Churches that adhere 
to the same standards of Faith, that we could not expect peace on this subject by 
uniting with them. We are persuaded that, although this question may be sup- 
pressra in their judicatories for a while, the abolition spirit exists to such an extent as 
to threaten their dismemberment. The result may be that the disturbing elements of 
the different branches of the Presbyterian Church may be united in one body, and 
that the conservative portions of the same may ultimately be brought together, and 
thus prove more efficient in promoting the cause of the Redeemer, and in diffusing 
through the land a truly national spirit. At present, however, the union of these 
Churdies would not afford relief to tnose who are wearied of this Slavery agitation. 
We are desirous of forming an organization where we shall not be liable to another 
division from this exciting subject 

The undersigned, therefore, would invite all Presbyterians, fVoro all sections of the 
country, to meet in Convention in the city of Washington, on the 27th dav of August, 
1857, for the purpose of consultation, and of organizing a General Assembly, io which 
it will be distinctly understood, the subject of Slavery will not be introduced. [ The 
place for the meeting of the proposed Convention was afterwards changed to Rich* 
mond, Ya., — ^in the United Presbyterian Church.] We propose this course, instead 
of organizing an Assembly at once, as being due to the Presbyteries we represent 
We would suggest that the Presbyteries be called together as soon as possible ; and 
that, while the Presbyteries appoint their delegates to the Convention in the usual 
proportion, it is desirable that as many ministers and elders should attend tlie Conven- 
tion as can do so. We suggest, also, that In case any of the Presbyteries desiring to be 
connected with this new Assembly, should find it impossible to be represented in the Con* 
rention, it would be important that the Convention should be informed of their action. 
Praying that God may overrule the distractions of Zion for his own glory, and that 
we may be guided in this crisis of our history by hia unerring counsel, we subscribe 
ourselves your brethren in Christ, 

Fbkdbrick a. Boss, D. D. Michaicl S. Shitck. 

GvoRos PAiirrKft. Isaao W. K. Handt. 

William E. Caldwsix. Jambs G. Hamnkb, D. D. 

John B. Logan. Henbt Mathbws. 

BoBBBT P. Bhba. Pbactht R. Gbattak. 

Abchbb C. Dickbbson, Gbobgb W. HnrcHnm. 

Thomas H. Clblano. Bluah A. Cabsom. 

FiNOELTOS B. Grat. 
The undersigned, though not members of the General Assembly now in session in 
Cleveland, have been present during its discussion of Slavery. Being fuUv convinced 
that there'is no prospect of the cessation of this agitation in the Assembly, and that 
the action taken is a violation <tf the Constitution of the Charch, we eordially unite 
in the above invitation. 

A. H. H. BoTD, D. D. Omobos M. Crawvobd. 



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THK UNCFSD BYKOD OF THS PRSSBYTERIAN OHUBCH. 137 

BiOHKOKB, Ya., August 27^ 1867. 

The Delegates to the GonreatioQ oalled by the SoutherD membere 
of the last General Assembly of the Presbyterian Churoh, which met 
at Cleveland, assembled in the United Presbyterian Church, at 8 
o'clock, P. M. 

The Hon, Ho&aob Matnard, of Tennessee, was chosen tempo- 
rary Chairman, and Ber. T. D. Bsll and Mr. P. B. Price, were ap* 
pointed temporary Clerks. 

A roll was formed, when it was found that the following persons 
were members of the Convention : 

Synod of Tbnnksbbs. PreahyUry of HoUton. — Revs. A. A Blair» Daniel RogsOt 
J. B. King. Elden, Woi. ADderaon, K. P. Rhea, R B. Rhea, J. W. Regan, Samad 
Rbea, John Ketberland, Hon. S. J. W. Lncky, Hon. A. McLdlan. 

Presbutery of Utiion. — RevB. J. H. Martin, Fielding Pope. Elders, Hon. Horace 
Maynard, Jacob 0. Smith, Edward M. Roes, Hon. Wm. M. Cocke, G. A. Rice. 

Presbytery of Kingtfton.-^Bjbvs, G. A. Oaldwell, W. £. CkMwell, T. R. Bradshaw, 
J. N. Bradshaw. Eidera, T. H. McOaUie, W. A. Moore, Wm. P. H. McDermott, 
Milton P. Jarnagin, S. M. Gaines. 

Presbytery of New River, — Revs. A. Blaokbam, James King, H. Smith. James 
McCbain, Geo. Painter, I. N. Naff, Lee 0. Brown, D. F. Palmer. Elders, John G. 
Kin^y Theodore P. Olapp, John Eakin, Isaac Hudson, Joseph Glojd, J. F. Preston^ 
Abtjah lliomas, Abram Painter, Isaac Painter, Rafus Britam. 

Synod or Esrtucky. Presbytery of Harmony. -^BeY. F. R. Gray. Elder, Sttth 

E. Burton. 

Presbytery of Green River. — ^Revs, A. C. Dickerson, B. Roberts. 

Synod of Sfissoimi. Presbvtery of Osage.-^Uev. L. R. Morrisoo. 

Presbytery o/Iiexiii^toii.— Elder, Dr. George M. Brinker. 

Synod of Wkst Xbnnbssvk. Pre^rytery of Richland, — ReTS^ M. M. Marshal], 

F. A. Rots, D. D., N. H. Bronghtoo. Eiders, James R. Bright, Marion OhildresB, 
Dr. E. N. Ordway. 

Presbytery of West TbmeffMe.— Elders, James Y. Ewing, R. G. McClnre. 

Synod of YntaiNiA* Pretbytery of ^»neAerterw--Rev& T. D. Bell, John W. 
McMorran, P. Fletcher, J. L. Frary, A. H. H. Boyd, D. D., H. Mathews. Elders, 
R. M. Campbell, Clark Gather, Thomas S. Sangster, James Ghipley, Wm. Henning, 
R. H. Walton, Samuel Kendrick, R G. Braden, John M. Ciimer,*Dr. Thomas M. 
Miller, Maior Alexander Gordon, Peter Kemper, John R. Tneker, K T. H. Warren, 
William Engle, Gerard M. Effinger. 

Presbytery of Hanover. — Revs. G. W. Leybum, B. A. Martin, J. McDearmon, A« 
J. Leavenworth, E. H. Gumpetoo, Robert Gray, L W. K. Handy, R. G. Anderson, 
J. H. G. Leach, D. D., J. D. Mitchell. G. H, Read, D. D., L. P. Ledoux, Wm. H. 
lilathews, J. J. McMahon. Elders, John Nettles, James G. Hunt, D. R. Hunt, W. 
H. Graig, E. W. Gone, 0. P. Mebane, John H. Winston, G. B. Williams, P. R. 
Grattan, W. P. Mayo, S. T. Hartt, Patrick H. Jackson, Charles H. Henderson, 
Richard Y. Gaines, Dr. H. P. La^, David F. Morton, Dr. J. T. Royall, D. B. PayD^ 
Melville M. Johns, Thomas L. Leftwich, J. B. Gardner, Thomas W. Hooper, E. 
8. Blanton, John A. Allen, Alexander Kerr, George Bagby, Robert Howard, Joseph 
Beanie, Dr. S. P. Christian, B. Farnham, Dr. Geo. W. Pollard, Dr. Wm. F. Gaines, 
H. G. Wingfield, B. Graig, A. W. Taylor, Gol. Thomas G. Tinsley, Wm. E. Norment, 
E. G. Howard, John McC. Yenable, McDowell R. Yenable, Edwin Edmunds, Got 
Edwin Shelton, S. L. Dunton, R. G. Bell, Dr. E. J. YouQg, Thomas Samson, P. 
B. Price, Wm. B. Hudson. 

Presbytery of the District of Columbia. — ^Elder, Andrew J. Fleminff. 

Synod of Missibsippl Presbytery ofLexinfftont Sotdh. — Rev. E. M. Richardson. 
Elder, Dr. E. McLean. 

Presbytery of Clinton. — Rev. A. Newton, D. D. Elders, J. N. Le Grand. 

Presbytery of Nei0(on.— Rev. J. M. McLean. Elder, Thomas Longhlin. 

Synod of Pennsylvania. Presbytery of Wilmington, — Rev. James Mclbtire. 
Elder, Andrew Molntire. 

The temporary Chairman, Hon. Horacb Maynard, was then 

18 



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138 FRESBYTERIAir HISTORICAL ALMAKAO. 

unanimously elected President of the Convention ; and the tempo- 
rary Clerks, Rev. T. D. Bell and Mr. P. B. Price, were elected Per- 
manent Secretaries. 

Rev. Alexander Nbwton, D.D. and Rev. J. H. C. Leach, D. D., 
were elected Vice Presidents of the Convention. 

The Business Committee, consisting of the following persons, — 

From the Sunodof Ftrgtnta— Rev. A. H. H. Boyd, D. D., and Peachy R Grsttan, Esq. 

Synod of WeH Tenriessee — Rev. F. A. Ross, D. D., and James B. Brigbti Esq. 

Synod ofMt8susippir--'Be!v, A. Newton, D. D., and Dr. J. N. Le Grand. 

Syrtod of Pennsylvania — Rev. J. Mclntire, and Andrew Mclntire. 

Synod of Missouri — Bev. L. R. Morrison, and Dr. George M. Brinker. 

Synodof Kentucky— Bay. F. R Gray, and Stith B. Burton. 

Synod of Tennessee — Rev. A. Blackburn, and Milton P. Jamagin, Esq. 

— ^submitted their report, which was elaborately discussed, and after 
amendment was adopted, and is as follows : 

Whereas, all acts, resolutions, and testimonies of past General Aflsemblies. and espe- 
ciallv the action of the last Gleneral Assembly, whereby suspicions and doubts of the 
good standing and equal rights and privileges of slaveholding members of the Church, 
or imputations or charges against their Christian character, have been either implied 
or expressed, are contrary to the example and teachings of Christ and his Apostles, 
and are a violation of the Constitution of the Presbyterian Church : 

And, whereas, the relation of master and servant, in itself considered ^ or further 
than the relative duties arising therefrom, and slavery, as an institution of the State, 
do not properly belong to the Church judicatories as subjects for discussion and in- 
quiry : 

And, whereas, in the judgment of the Convention, there Is no prospect of the cessa- 
tion of this agitation of slavery in the General Assembly so long as there are slave- 
holders in connection with the Church ; therefore, 

. 1. Resolved, That we recommend to the Presbyteries in connection with the Gene> 
ral Assembly of the Presbyterian Church in the United States of America, to with- 
draw from said body. 

2. Resdvedj That in the judgment of this Convention, nothing can be made the 
basis for discipline in the Presbyterian Church which is not specifically referred to in 
the Constitution, as crime or heresy. 

3. Resolved, That the General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church have no power 
to pronounce a sentence of condemnation on a lower judicatory or individuals for any 
cause, unless they have been brought before the Assembly in the way prescribed by 
the Constitution. 

4. Resolvedj That the Convention recommend to all the Presbvteries in the Presby- 
terian Church, which are opposed to the agitation of slavery in the highest judicatory 
of the Church, to appoint delegates, in the proportion prescribed by our Form of 
(Government for the appointment of Commissioners to the Assembly, to meet at Knox- 
ville, Tenn., on the first Thursday in AprU, 1858, for the purpose of organizing a 
general Synod under the name of ** The United Synod of the Presbyterian Church in 
the United States of America." 

6. Resolved, That the members of this Convention adhere to and abide by the Con- 
fession of Faith of the Presbyterian Church, as containing the system of doctrine 
taught in the Holy Scripture ; and that we adhere to the Form of Government and 
Book of Discipline of said Church. 

On motion it was 

Resolved, That a Union between us and our Old School brethren, could it be effected 
on terms acceptable on both sides, would be conducive to the best interests of the 
Church of Christ ; and this Convention, after a free and full interchanee of views and 
opinions on this subject, do now recommend that the United Synod, when formed 
and dul^ organized, shall invite the General Assembly (0. S.) to a fraternal conference 
with us in reference to such union. 



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THK VSITSD SYNOD OV THX FBXSBTTEBIAN CHDBOH. 139 

THE UNITED SYNOD 
OP THE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. 



In pursuance of the recommendation of the Convention held in 
Eichmond, Va ; Commissioners appointed by the Presbyteries here- 
after mentioned, met in the Secona Presbyterian Church in Knox- 
ville, Tenn., on the 1st of April, 1858, at 7 J P. M., and was opened 
with a 

Mat. zxviii. 20. And lo, I am with you alway, even unto the end of the world 

Precious words I conveying the last promise of our blessed Sa- 
viour, coupled with his last and most imperative command to his 
faithful servants, "Go ye, therefore, and teach all nations, baptizing 
them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy 
Ghost ; teaching them to observe all things whatsoever I have com- 
manded you ; and lo, I am with you alway, even unto the end of 
the world." The promise accompanies the command to teach all 
nations. The world is to be converted. The disciples were in- 
structed to enter upon the work ; to preach the gospel wholly and 
solely. The design of preaching should always be the conversion, 
the sanctificatioD, and the saving of souls. What a beautiful exam- 
ple we have in the conduct of the apostles I They stopped not to 
arrange government ; they accepted that as it was, believing that 
the powers that be are ordained of God ; they did not wander off 
into metaphysical abstractions; they thought of nothing, preached 
nothing, save Christ and him crucified. Their reliance was on God; 
they obeyed the divine command ; thev fulfilled their mission, and 
their Master verified his promise, and he was with them. See him 
there, standing amid a scoffing, jeering, hissing crowd, persecuted, 
crucified. He was taken from them, but he was to meet with them 
again. The disciples had been to Jesus and had learned of him, and 
their Saviour was with them, not in his bodily presence indeed, but 
in the sight of &ith by his spirit. Divine strength now guides 
them ; holy love fires and impels them'; Christ is with them. Thus 
they go forth in his name, speaking and acting wondrous things. 
It was Christ that was with them ; he it was that enabled them to 
revile not against those that persecuted them — to forgive their ene- 
mies — ^to labour and pray for those that most despitefuUy used 
them. 



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140 FRESBTTBRIAK HldTORIOAL ALltAKAC, 

But the command was to preach to all the world, and to every 
(Sreature. Surely it was not intended for the apostles alone. They 
could not live long enough to penetrate to every section of the 
globe ; they were too few to hope to address every sinful, erring 
creature. They could not even reach all the Boman Empire, much 
less the world. The oommand was then not solely to the Apostolic 
Church. The promise accompanied the command, and whoever 
fulfils the command receives the promise. Outward prosperity is 
not necessarily included in, but it will be fulfilled to those who obey 
it. Christ was in the fiery furnace with Shadrach, Meshech, and 
Abednego. He is always with his people in their trials. He was 
present to comfort the early disciples in their persecutions, and he 
always will sustain those who trust in him. Tne apostles did not 
stop on account of sufiTering. Jewish councils could not suppress 
them, nor could imperial authority drive them iVom the &ce of the 
earth, because Christ was with them. They introduced Christianity 
into the Boman Empire. In course of time that Christianity be^ 
came corrupted ; papal innovations were introduced ; councils and 
popes established ; new rites and doctrines laid down ; prayers to 
the saints, confessions to the priests, religious homage to pictures 
and images taught; excommunication from the church was the 
penalty for not adhering to its decisions. For more than a thous- 
and years thick moral darkness enveloped the earth. During all 
this time, where was Christ? Where? With his people. Every 
heart purified was a temple. Every house consecrated was a church. 
Was he in his degraded Church — when they were anathema* 
tizing each other and excommunicating from their Councils ? Oh 
no. His promise was only to those who teach and preach what he 
has commanded. In every age he has had his own people. When 
the Jewish Church lo8t sight of God, amid the fogs of their rites, 
customs, and superstitions, he could find an humble unpretending 
family to whom he could manifest his presence at Bethlehem. 
While Bomish clouds obscured the Sun of Bighteoosness, he had 
his faithful men, the Donatists, who here and there in little commu- 
nities still adhered to the truth, mingled though it may have been 
with somewhat of error. In his own good time God raised up good 
men, such as John Huss, Jerome of Prague, and others. Burned 
at the stake they were, but Jesus Christ was with his servants. 
Who can read their lives without believing that Wicklifie would 
have met a similar fiite, had he lived long enough ? But afler having 
rendered invaluable service by the translation of the Bible, God 
permitted him to die peacefully in his bed. Luther, Calvin, Me- 
lanchthon, and Beza, and a host of mighty champions for the truth, 
rose from the earth. John Knox dealt such heavy blows upon the 
pillars, the supports of Bomanism in Scotland, that the whole su- 
perstructure fell to the earth. But there were times when even 
those men were tempted to despond. But if they had? The world, 
wealth, power, influence, every earthly oonsideration were leagued 
against them. But in Christ they trusted, and sang with Luther 
the 46th Psalm. With a price set upon the persecuted man's 



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THB UNinO aTKOI> OF THS rKXSBTTEIUAN CHURCH. 141 

beftd, driYen out into obaonrity, Enox feared that all was over. 
His beloved Scotland roust lie do wd and surrender to papal tyranny. 
He could do nothing more. But in his retirement he watched a 
persevering spider building his web» time and again he failed, and 
as often renewed the attempt until at length success crowned hia 
efforts. He learned the lesson from it, '^ Does not God speak to me 
by this little insect 7^ From his breaking heart he cried, " Oh Jesus, 

E've me Scotland, give me Scotland or I die,'' and Protestant Scot- 
nd, the most Christianized of nations, is a bright memorial of his 
persevering efforts. 

Christ manifests bis presencOi He gives emphatic evidence of it in 
various ways. He reveals it to the heart of the man. He exhibits 
it in revivals. Do we forget the works of Divine grace in our own 
land under Whitefield, Edwards, Tennent^ and Davies? Thou- 
sands upon thousands were converted. True, there was a reaction, 
a decline, but as after harvest )t is necessary that there should 
be a sifting to separate the wheat from the chaff that has been 
gathered in, so in the religious world, the harvest gathered into 
the Church needs purifying and cleansing. But this revival was 
an infinite blessing to this land and the world. It checked infi- 
delity. Those were dark days. Voltaire was in the height of his 
fisime. Frederick of Prussia was decking infidelity with the charms 
of regal magnificence. Shaftesbury's works, with Bolingbroke's com- 
ments, were being circulated. Collins, Hobbes, and a host of Ea« 
glish, French, and Prussian writers were deluging the world with 
their deistic and atheistic notions. Just then *'a new light" burst 
forth. The Gospel preached became the power of God unto salva- 
tion. Many leading skeptics were overpowered. Truly, Christ 
was there. 

Again, shortly after the war of Independence, our land was in 
peril. French infidelity^ by reason of French sympathy, was gain- 
ing a strong foothold in this country. Tom Paine was a great re- 
publican. He was in the. height of his popularity. His books 
were found among the soldiers, in the camp, everywhere. A large 
edition, labelled on the cover, '^Holy Bible," had been sent over to 
this country, and found their way to every section. His princi- 
ples were boldly defended. Priestley's principles, too, were under- 
mining the more refined circles. Then, again, God displayed his 
wondrous power to save. The standard of the Lord was unfurled, 
and his wonderful works of redeeming love and praise revealed ; 
Gideon Blackburn, Blythe, James Turner, Cleland, Wm. Hill, and 
many others, are familiar to you — mighty men, endowed with in- 
tellect, and above all, with a double portion of the Spirit of God. 
At that time he prepared the way for domestic and foreign Missions, 
and made necessary Theological Seminaries. From a few individu- 
als at that time, sprung up a mighty body of Christians — the Cum- 
berland Presbyterians. The Master has been with them, as be is 
with all who preach the leading doctrines of the Christian re* 
ligion. 

The promise is not given to any hierarchy, or to any eedesiasti* 



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142 PRESBYTERIAN HISTORIOAL ALKANAO. 

cal establishment — ^but to all who hold steadfast these great truths, 
and teach man so. Wherever he finds his truth, there does he 
abide. The highest happiness on earth, is in the consciousness of 
his presence ; if he is with us, all is well. When Paul was in 
trouble, Christ appeared to him and said: ''Be of good cheer." 
And he is always with his people, to comfort and sustain them. It 
matters not, whether they be a large or a small body, they may be 
sure that Christ is with them. 

We are here to-night, because God has led us. We give our 
cause into his hand. 

The course of our commissioners to the General Assembly, at 
Cleveland, was almost universally approved among us. The Con« 
vention met in Bichmond, in the fear of God, pervaded by a spirit 
of prayer. The spirit of Jesus was with us, and led us to harmo- 
nious views. Union and love prevailed. The final vote was unani- 
mous. God was with us. His word preached there, led sinners to 
Christ. I raise the Ebenezer, ana write on it, " The Lord has 
brought us here." Here we are, to organize a body to execute his 
last command — but let us remember that it makes little difference 
whether that body be large or small. Without God's presence, let 
us not move one step. Our hearts' desire is to fulfil his commands. 
He is with us. Let no man falter or despond for an instant, and 
when we come to the solemn act of organization, let us lay our« 
selves, our churches, our all, upon this altar, and say: "Here we 
are, Lord." Even now, the place is filled with his glory. He looks 
on and addresses us as he did his disciples, '' Lo, I am with you." 
Brethren, let us go forward, Christ is with us, and will be with us 
to the end. 

What is true of the Church, is true of every Christian man. Ap- 
ply the words to yourselves, individually. Accept the command, 
and he will be with you. But the sinner who does not follow him, 
who forfeits his claim to Christ's last promise, who spurns, despises 
him — what companion will he have to accompany him through life 
and across that dark river ? 

After singing the 519th hymn, 

'* Pour out thy Spirit from on high," 

the benediction was pronounced. 

The Commissioners were called to order by the Bev. J. D. Mitch- 
ell, who presided in the organization of the Synod, and Bev. A. 
Blackburn acted as Clerk. 

l^tmbm 0f i\t WiU)i Ssnffl) at t\tix first mttting 
in J^uxbilU, %tM. 

MIKIBTBRS. PRB8BTTBRIBS. STNODB. RUUNO 



BoTD, A. H. H., D. D. Winchester. Virginia. Wm. Engle. 

Bradshaw, J. N. Eiogstou. Tennessee. Hon. A. D. Keyee. 

Eagletok, Geo. B. Richland. W. Tennessee. T. T. Kennedy,M. D. 

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Pastor of the United Preshyteriari Church, Richmond V^ 
Moderator of the United Synod of the Presbyterian Church. i8o5 . 

zedby Vji^^^QIC 



THB UNITED SYNOD OF THB FBSSBYTBRIAN CHUBCH. 143 



KnnsfBBS. 



PBSSBYTKBIBS. 



STN0I>8. 



BULIKa BU>BRS« 



MiTCHiix,J.D.,D.D. 
McGampbell, John 
McLain, itobert 

Paintbb, George 
Parish, Gonsider 

RBAD,Cha9.H.»D.D. 
Bofls, Fred. A., D. D. 

Whitb, Gideon S. 



Piedmont. Yirginia. 

Lexington Soath. Mississippi. 
Newton. MissiasippL 



T. L. Leftwich. 



New River. 
Clinton. 

Hanover. 
N. Alabama. 

Union. 
Holston. 



Tennesape. 
Mississippi. 

Virginia. 
W. Tennessee. 

Tennessee. 
Tennessee^ 



TheophilosP. Glapp. 
John Montgomery. 

W, F. Gainea. M, D. 
G. N. Ordway,M.D. 

Daniel Meek. 
Samuel Hhea. 



It was moved and carried that the Commissioners present do 
now proceed to the formation of the United Synod, by the election 
of the usual officers. Whereupon Rev. Charles H. Read, D. D., 
was unanimously chosen Moderator; Rev. Robert MoLain was 
chosen Temporary Clerk, and Rev. J. N. Bradshaw, Assistant 
Clerk. 

It was moved and carried that this body be styled and hereafter 
known by the name of "The United Synod of the Presbyterian 
Church in the United States of America." 

Rev. Thomas D. Bell, of Harrisonburg, Va., was elected Stated 
Clerk, and Rev. Joseph H. Martin, of Knoxville, Tenn., Perma- 
nent Clerk of Synod. 

The Committee on Bills and Overtures reported a paper, setting 
forth a Declaration of Principles for the consideration and action of 
Synod, which after a few verbal alterations was unanimously adop- 
ted, and is as follows : 

Whereas J In the Providence of God, we, the reDresentatiyes of Presbyteries hereto- 
fore in connection with the General Assembly of tne Presbyterian Church in the Uoi? 
ted States of America, have been constrained by a regard to our convictions of duty to 
ourselves, to the Church of Christ, and to our entire country, to withdraw from said 
General Assembly, and to form a separate ecclesiastical judicatory, under the name 
of the United Synod of the Presbyterian Church in the United States of America, to 
be possessed of powers similar to those recognized in the Confession of Faith, as be- 
longing to the General Assembly ; and Whereas, It seems to be necessary, in order 
to avoid misapprehensions of our position, both now and hereafter, that we should 
place upon permanent record, a statement of the principles which have governed us 
in forming a separate organization ; therefore — 

Resolved, That this ** United Synod" make the following Declaration of Principles, 
as, in their judgment, in accordance with the Word of God, and the Constitution of 
the Presbyterian Church, and as essential to the peace, unity and permanent pros- 
perity of the Presbyterian Church in this land. 

1. We declare our agreement in, and approbation of, the Westminster Confession 
of Faith, with the Larger and Shorter Catechisms of the Westminster Assembly, as 
containing the system of doctrine taught in the Holy Scriptures ; and also our adhe- 
rence to the Form of Government and Book of Discipline of the Presbyterian Church 
in these United States. 

In thus adopting the Westminster Confession of Faith as containing the system 
of doctrine taught in the Holy Scriptures, we adopt it in the sense in which we be- 
lieve the fathers of the American Presbyterian Church received it, to wit : not as 
requiring an agreement in sentiment with every opinion expressed in said Confession, 
but a belief in the fundamental doctrines of Christianity, and in the doctrines which 
distinguish the Calvinistic system from the Pelagian, Sociiiian, Arminian, and other 
systems of Theology. This system we understand to include the following doctrines, 
viz : the Trinity ; the Incarnation and Supreme Deity of Christ; the Fall and Original 



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liA PBBSBTTKBIAir HISTORIOAL AhUAJSfAO. 

8iD; AtoDenMDt; Justification by Faith; Peraoiml Electioo ; Eflfeetaal Calling; 
Peraeveraiice of the Sainbi ; Etenml HappinesB of the righteous, and Eternal Pudim- 
ment of the wicked. Whilst varioiiB modes of stating and explaining these truths 
may be adopted, yet when they are received according to the nsual way of interpret- 
ing language, and as they have been onderstood by the great body of the Presbyte- 
rian Church m this country, from the period of the adoption of the Westminster Coo- 
feflsion, in 1729, to the present day, the requisitions of the Confession of Faith are 
complied with, and all such persons are to be regarded as having received as their 
doctrinal creed this system of doctrines taught in the Holy Scriptures. 

2. It is a fundamental principle of the Constitution of the Presbyterian Chnrch, 
that no judicatory, or minister, or private member, can be censured or condemned, 
or excluded from diurch privileges, by any court of the church, for doctrinal senti- 
ments expressed, or for practices that tiie court may regard as sinful and inconsistent 
with the requirements of the Confession of Faith, without a process of trial, such as 
18 prescribea in said Constitution. To censure or condemn individuals or judicatories, 
for heresy or crime, is a judicial act ; and if a court of the church has the constitutional 
right, in any case, to condemn or cut off from the church, members or judicatories, 
for heresy or crime, wUkout trials it can be exercised whenever, in their judgment, 
•aid members or jodicatories are guilty of teaching heresy or practising immorality; 
and thus the Constitution would not onW be inconsistent with itself, but it would 
sanction the violation of the principles of"^ common justice, which are recognized in 
every civilized countrv in the world. 

3. According to the Constitution of the Presbyterian Church, the General As- 
sembly is an advisorv and judicial body. It possesses no legiriative power in the pro- 
per acceptation of the term. It cannot enact laws that are binding upon the lower 
judicatories. The constitution expressly provides that all ecclesiastical rules or 
changes in the Constitution shall receive the approval of a majority of the Presbyte- 
ries before they can be obligatory upon the churches. This *" United Synod," there* 
fore, disclaims the right to l^islate, or to make laws upon any snbiect that will be 
binding upon the lower judicatories, or upon any portion of tlie Presbyterian -Church. 

4. In virtue of their advisory capacity, the different judicatories of the Presbyte- 
rian Church can testify against what they may regard as heresies and immoralities 
prevailing in the community. But they have no power to bear their testimony against 
judicatories, or ministers, or private members of the church, for teaching heretical 
sentiments, or practising immoralities. The testifying and judicial powers of church 
judicatories are distinct They cannot perform Ajudicicd act in their advisory ca> 
pacity. To individuaUzef in thie form of testimony, judicatories, or ministers, or pri- 
vate members, as guilty of heresy or immorality, is assuming their guilt, without proof 
or trial. This " United Synod," therefore, whilst they recognize the right of the ja« 
dicatories of the church, in a judicial capacity, to prosecute ministers and private 
members for heresy and crime, in the way prescribed by the Book of Discipline, af* 
firm that it would be a palpable violation of the spirit and letter of the Coostitntioa 
of the Presbyterian Church, for any judicatory in its advisory capacity to bear its 
testimony acainst other judicatories, or ministers, or private members, for s 



J acainst other judicatories, or mmisters, or prrvate members, for supposed 
heresy or crime, and wiUiout such a judicial process as is specified in the Book of 
Discipline. 

5. In the judgment of this *' United Synod," nothing can be made the basis of dis- 
cipline in the Presbyterian Church, which is not specifieaUy referred to in the Consti- 
tution of the Church as crime or heresy. The Westminster Confession of Faith, with 
the Larger and Shorter Catechisms, contains what we believe to be essential to truth 
and morality. Presbyterians profess to be governed by ConsiUutumal law as it is de- 
veloped in the Confession of Faith, and not by the opinions of a Session, or Presby- 
tery, or Synod, or General Assembly, further than tliey act in a judicial capacity with 
respect to matters distinctly referred to in said Confession. A departure from this 
prioeiple, and a recognition of the right of an ecclesiastical judicatory to decide what 
18 heresy or crime, when there is no allusion in the Confession of Faith to that which 
is so regarded, would be tantamount to making the judicatory, instead of the Confes* 
siott of Faith, the standard of truth aix) morality, and as the decision of one judica- 
tory cannot bind another, there might be as many difierent opinions in reference to 
the supposed heresy or crime, as there are judicatories in the Church. This ** United 
Synod,'' therefore, deny the right of any ludicatory of the Presbyterian Church to 
make anything a subject of discipline which, accordmg to the usual' mode of interpret* 



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THK U2TITBD 8TN0P OP THE PBBSBTTMIAN CHURCH. 145 

in^ langaage, and the manifest intent of the framec9 of the CopfeeiBioD, is not specifi- 
caily referred to in the Constitution of the Church. 

6. As slaveholding, or the relation between master and slaye, is not referred to in 
the Confession of Faith, either directly or indirectly, as an offence,, it cannot, in Uself 
considered^ in any case, be made the basis of discipline in the Presbyterian Church. 
At the same time, we declare the right of the Church Courts to take cognizance, in 
their judicial capacity, of cruelties practised in this and other relations in life. Tiie 
Confession of Faith gives to Church judicatories the power to discipline members 
of the Church for cruelties, whether the^ occur in the parental or any other relation, 
implying in the language of the Confession, superiors and inferiors, 

7. Inasmuch as slaveholders were admitted into the Churches organized by the 
Apostles, and as neither Christ nor his Apostles intimated that the slavehotding rela- 
tion wa»a sin, although they lived in the midst of the institution,) and enjoined upon 
masters to treat their slaves with kindness, it follows necessarily, that a Church Court 
that makes slaveholding, in any ciise^ a bar to oommuttion, is usurping authority that 
belongs only to the Great Heaid of the Cbnrch. . Such a Court would be legislating 
where Christ has not legislated. It would be prescribing terms of membership which 
the Son of God himself did not prescribe, notwithstanding he was surrounded by 
slaveholders. I'his Synod denies that any ecclesiastical judicatory, has the. power to 
make terms of membership which neither Christ nor his Apostles recognized, when 
placed in similar circumstances as respects the existence of toe slaveholdmg relation. 
• 8. Inasmuch as neither the Saviour nor his Apostles intimated that the slavehold- 
ing relation was sinful, and as they did not attempt to remove slaveholders, from the 
church by legislation or by testifying against it; and further, asr tj^e system of slavery 
is an institution of the State, its continuance or abolition depending entirely upon the 
will of the State, irrespective of the views and decisions of church, courts, it is the 
opinion of this Synod that the discussion or agitation. of slavery in the judicatories 
of the Church, except so &r as respects the moral and religious duties growing out 
of the relation of master and slave, is inappropriate to said jodio^tocies. This Synod 
representing Presbyteries that have withdrawn from their former ecclesiastical con- 
nection, because of the reputed and unconstitutional action on slavery by the General 
Assembly, therefore declares, that, under the present Constitution of the Presbyterian 
Church, the agitation of slavery in any of our judicatories, further, than pertains to 
Uie moral and religions duties arising from the relation, would be inconsistent with 
the design of our withdrawal from our former connection, and in forming a separate 
organization. Whilst, then, we propose no alteration of the Constitution of the 
Presbyterian Church, believing thatas it now stands the spirit of it.ia against the agita- 
tion of slaveholding in the Church, we express the opinion that those who unite with 
US, or who may come after us, will be under a moral obligation, so Jong as the Constitu- 
tion remains as it is, to exclude slavery, the agitation of which has already divided three 
large denominations in this eountry, as a subject of discussion from the Church Courts. 

9. Entertaining the above views, and disclaiming all responsibility for, and endorse^ 
meut of the actions, resolutions, and testimonies of past General Assemblies of the 
Presbyterian Church, whereby suspicions and doubts of the good standing and equal 
rights and privileges of the slaveholding members of the Church, or implications or 
charges a^inst their Christian character, have been either implied ox exj>nessed, this 
" Ignited Synod" is organized. And to avoid misapprehensions of our position, we 
hereby express the wish that Presbyteries from every section of the Union — who 
adopt the Westminster Confession of Faith as their system of doctrine, and adhere to 
its Form of Government and Book of Discipline, and who, whatever may be their 
opinion of slavery as a civil institution, believe that the relation of master and servant 
should be no bar to membership in the Church of Christ, aud that the agitation of the 
question of slavery, further than pertains to the performance of the ^uties which the 
Scriptures state as imposed upon the master and slave, is inappropriate to . the funo- 
tions of the Church, and therefore ought not to be introduced into the Church Courts-— 
should unite with our body, and thus aid in the diffusion of the truths of our common 
Christianity, free from an agitation that has already resulted in the dismemberment 
of several evangelical Churches. 

A report from the Committee on Bills and Overtures, relating 
to terms of union with the Old School General Assembly, was adop- 
ted, and is as follows : 
19 



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146 PRB8BTTBRIAN HISTORICAL ALMANAO. 

Wfterea$t This Synod believe that a union between Christian brethren who adopt 
the same standards of fkith and practice, when it can be eflH'ted without compro- 
mitting vital principles, is always desirable; and Wher«u, The sentiment exists 
among members of oar churches that a union between this Synod and the Old School 
Oeneral Assembly might be effected upon terms honourable to both parties : and 
Wkereast The Convention of ministers and laymen held in Richmond, Ya., in Au^t, 
1857, for the purpose of consulting as to the wisest course to be pursued by those 
who felt aggrievea by the abolition action of the General Assembly at Cleveland, Ohio, 
in May, 1857, recommended to this Synod, when organised, to anpoint a Committee to 
confer with one from the Old School Assembly, (if they should think proper to appoint 
a Committee for the purpose,) with reference to a union of these two branches of the 
Presbyterian Church ; therefore— 

1 . Resohedt That a Committee of two be appointed to confer with a Committee of 
the Old School Assembly, in the event of that body appointing one for the purpose, 
with reference to a union of the two bodies. 

2. Resolved, That Bev. 0. H. Bead, D. D., and Bev. M. M. Marshall be said 
Committee, and that Bev. JL H. H. Boyd, D. D., and Bev. Bobt. McLain be al- 
ternates. 

.3. Reeolved, Tliat said Committee be directed to propose to the Committee ap- 
pointed by the General Assembly the following terms cf union, as indispensable to an 
honourable union on our part : 

Firet. We agree to unite as ecdesiastical bodies bv declaring, as this Synod now 
does, our approval of the Westminster Confession of Faith, and Larger and Shorter 
Catechbms, as an orthodox and excellent system of christian doctrine— end also our 
adherence to the plan of Worship, Government, and Discipline contained in the West- 
minster Directory. 

Second, Both bodies agree in declaring it to be a fundamental principle in the 
Presbyterian Church, that no judicatory of the Church can, for any cause tohatevert 
by an act of l^slation, constitutionally condemn, or exclude fVom tne Church other 
judicatories, or ministers, or private members, without a prooera of trial, such as la 
prescribed in the Constitution of the Presbyterian Church. 

Third, Both bodies agree that it is consistent with the requirements of the West- 
minster Confession of Faith, to receive said Confession according to the Adopting 
Act of 1729, to wit : as containing all the essential truths of Christianity, and also 
the doctrines that distinguish the Calvinistio from the Pdagian, Socinian, and Ar^ 
minian s^tems of Theology. We agree, likewise, in believing that this system of 
doctrine includes the following truths, viz : the Trinity ; the Incarnation and Deity 
of Christ ; the Fall and Original Sin ; Atonement ; Justification by Faith ; Personal 
Election ; Eflfectual Calling ; Perseverance of the Saints ; the Eternal Happiness of 
the righteous, and Eternal Panishment of the wicked. 

Fourth. Both bodies agree in declaring that slaveholdinp^, or the relation of mas- 
ter and slave, cannot, in ani( ease, be a bar to membership m the Church of Christ. 
And whilst they admit the right of the judicatories of the Church to take cognizance, 
in the way prescribed in Uie Constitution, of cruelties practised in the relation, they 
hereby declare the opinion Uiat, as the continuance or abolition of the system of sla- 
very m this country belongs exclusively to the State, the discussion or agitation of 
slavery, further than pertains to the moral and religious duties arising from the rela- 
tion, is inappropriate to the functions of Church indicatories. 

Fifth, it is further agreed that in efifecting the union, the Presbyteries connected 
with this Synod shall be united as Presbyteries, and without an examination of their 
ministers, with the Synods belonging to the General Assembly to which, because of 
their geographical limits, they should be attached, excepting that the Synod of Ten. 
nessee and the North Alabama Presbytery shall retain their name, and occupy their 
present territory. 

Sixth. In the event of the General Assembly agreeing to the above terms, the 
Committee of Synod are directed to communicate the fact to the Presbyteries in con- 
nection with the Synod, and the Presbyteries are hereby requested by the United 
Synod to take action upon the terms of union agreed upon b^ the Committees of Synod 
and the General Assembly, and to send a copy of their minute to the United Synod 
that will meet in Lynchburg on the third Thursday in May, 1859. 

Seoenth. The Committee appointed by this Synod to confer with a Committee of 
the General Assembly, are hereby directed to attend the meeting of the Assembly in 



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THB jQKITBD SYKOD OF THE PBISBTTEBIAK OHUBOH. 147 

New Orleans id May next, and present the preamble and first two resolutions adopted 
by this Synod as their authority for requesting a conference with a Committee ap 
pointed by the General Assembly, to the General Assembly which will then be in 
session in that city. And if no member of the Committee should be able^o attend 
the meeting of the Assembly in New Orleans, they are directed to send a copy of the 
preamble and first two resolutions to the Moderator of the Assembly, and reonest 
that body, if they should think proper to appoint a Committee for the purpose above 
specified, to designate a time immediately after the adjournment of the Assembly for 
a conference of the Committees. The Committee of this Synod are requested, in the 
event of a conference being had with a Committee of the Old School Assembly, to 
publish, as soon &s practicable, the result of their consultations. 

The following additional article was submitted and adopted : 

Eighth. That in the event no union is agreed to, the Committee be directed to 
propose to the General Assembly the establishment of a mutual correspondence in the 
future between us as ecclesiastical bodies. 

A report was made by the Committee on the Polity of the 
Church. This paper was received and adopted, and is as follows: 

Whereagf This body nas been organized as recommended by the Biohmood Conven- 
tion, and styled '* The United S^nod of the Presbyterian Church in the United Stales 
of America ;" and Whereas, It is intended to represent in one body all the particukr 
churches of the denomination ; therefore— 

Resolved, That an overture be sent down to the Presbyteries recommending the 
following changes in Chapter xii. of Form of Government, viz : 

1. Shall the 12th chapter of the Form of Government be altered by snbetituting the 
words *' United Synod," in the heading of the chapter, for the words '* General As- 
sembly r 

2. Shall the title of the Church be chanced, b^ inserting in the first section the 
words ** United Synod of the Presbyterian Church in the United States of America?" 

3. Shall section second be changed, bv substituting "six" for " twenty-four/' and 
** more than six** for ** more than twenty-four," and *^for every six" in place of '< for 
every twenty-four f " and shall the words *' United Synod" be substituted for the words 
'* General Assembly/' and the term << Synod'' be substituted for the term "* Assembly," 
wherever these occur in the book ? 

4. Shall section third be altered, by substituting the number " ten" instead of 
"fourteen?" 

Resolved, 1. Hat the Stated Clerk be directed to send the above overture to eaeh of 
the Presbyteries connected with our several Synods, requesting them to consider the 
changes proposed to be made in our Constitution, and to report to him in writing, 
thdr approval or disapproval of the proposed changes. 

2. Should a majority of Presbvteries signir^ their approval of such changes in 
writing, then the Stated Clerk shall immediatelj^ inform all the Presbyteries of the fiict. 

3. The Presbyteries may then elect Commissioners to the '' United Synod,*' on the 
new ratio of representatioo. 

A number of persons, together with the existing Board of the 
Presbyteries of Hanover and Piedmont, were elected a Board of 
Domestic and Foreign Missions. 

The Committee on Nomination reported the names of the follow- 
ing gentlemen as Trustees of this Synod : 

Hon. A. D. Keyes, Athens, Tenn. ; P. Dickinson, Enozville, Tenn. ; Gen. Wra. 
Wallace, Maryville, Tenn. ; Wm. M. Stakely, MadiBonville, Tenn.; John A. McKio- 
ney, Bogersville, Tenn. 

The business of the United Synod having been finished, and the 
vote having been taken for the dissolving of the Synod, the Modera- 
tor, with prayer and the Apostolic benediction, declared the Synod 
dissolved — ^and required another United Synod, chosen in the same 
manner, to meet in the Second Presbyterian Church, in Lynchburg, 
Ya., on the third Thursday of May, 1859, at a quarter before 8 
o'clock, P. M« 



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148 PBXSBTTSSIAK HISTORICAL XLUANXO* 

OPPICERS, ETC., 

or TBI 

UNITED SYNOD OP THE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH, 

ton 1858-59. 

Rev. CHARLES H. READ, d.d. 

fiBT. JOSEPH H. MABTIN. Bxv. TH01CA8 D, BELL. 

fmsartr. 

DAVID B. PATNEi Esq. 



INSTITUTIONS, ETC. 

PsrslitlU ittWtp, f inn. 

WACcvn, 
Bbt. JOHN J. KOBINSON, FreHdcrd and Profetsor of Vidadic Theolo^. 
Bit. THOMAS J. lJJ£AJ3i, Professor of BiWed laUraiur^ 

l^iMM Institott at Wixffim. 

Bky. J. D. MITCHELL, President ofihc Board of Trustees. 
Bky. a. H. SLO at, Prvncipdt. 

Db. WILLIAM P. GAINES, President. 

0. B. WILLIAMS, Esq., Corresponding Secretary. 

PEACHY B. GBATTAN, Esq.. President. 
P. B, PmCB Esq., Secretary and IVeasurer. 



PERIODICALS. 



Tk€ C^rUHtm 0&««rv<r— Rbt. A CONVERSB. PuhlttAgrand Editor, Pliladelpkia, (weMy.) 
The Pr§9byUr%an TTtliMM— Rbt. A BLACEBURK, Pvb. and Editor, Bristol, Ton., (we«Hy.) 
The MinutM of the United Synod— ^TUE STATED CLERK, (amtuaL) 

The Preebyterian Hietonoal Almanac— J08. H. WILSON, Puhlisher PhUade^hia, {anmuaL) 



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THE UKITSD SYNOD OF THE PBESBYTBBIAN CHUBCH. 149 






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ALPHABETICAL LIST 



MINISTERS AND LICENTIATES 

or THl UNITID 8TN0D Or THE PBK8BTTXBIAN CHUEOH. 

[NOTS^— In tlM following Liat, f IndleatM Ftulor; ■. f^ Bated Supjiv; h.m^ and v. m^ Eom€ and 
WSnion MttHonariei! w.o, Withmd Charge; chp., OftapCerfn; pm., or p&r^ PntidmU or Fntfestor In 
ft OouQg* or Btminary ; BOT^ Alitor; o. s^ CbrrapoAding Seeretary ; t., Ttaehtr; UfLicetUiaU; aot. 
' Tte Poi^«fleM an eorroetwl np to the Urn* of going to prws.] 



PMSBTTBRT. POtT^PVICB. 



pnnBTTRBT. PotT-ovncn. 



D.oTOolnaibU. 



Now RUtr. 

Kingston* 

HoUton. 

WInehastv. 

Shiloh. 

Kiogtton. 

Kingston. 



Now Rlvar. 
Now RlTor. 
Kingston. 



. ALBBA.1CSBB, J.,W 0. 

Andoraon, H. O, • s. 
AtUnMn, a IL, ■ •. 

Babtlbtt, J.L.,w«. 
Boli,Thoo.]>.,F. 
BUekbum, A., bbt. 
Blaokbnm, J. N., • •. 
Blnlr,A.A., W.O. 
Boyd, A.H.H.,F. 
Bmdshaw, Amil, • • 
Bnulsbaw, J. N., F. 
Bradshaw, T. R., a. a. 
BranUj, B.T.,a.a. 
Bronghton, N. tL^M. 
Brown, Lao» 9, M. 
Brown, L.O.,n.K. 
Brown, Thomaa, a. a. 
Brown, W. B, a. a. 

OALBwrnH O.A., a a. 
Oaldwoli,J.M.ia. 
OaldwoU, W.B^a.a. 
OampbeU,D.A^a.a. 
OsmplMU; R., T. 
Osrothers, A. O., F. 
Osraon, J. O, w. o. 
Onig, Jobn 8^ FEF. 
Crawford, U.,a.a. 
Crawford, W. A., I>. 
Oampston, B. IL, f. 

]>AHVOETBj.N.,A«T. 

Bnniap, W. a, a. a. 
Dunning^ H., F. 

Baalstoic, a.B., a.a. 
■agloton, w.,a.a. 

rtxTovn, P., a.a. 
frmrj, J. Li, W. 0. g 

BtiAMMMj J. W., I. 

OraT«a,W.,a.a. 
Qnj, Kobori, F. 
Onrlsy, R. R., b. 

HA.ni»T, J. W. K., F. HanoTor. 
Hardin, R« a. a. RIeUand. 

Harrison, W., a. a. Union. 
HartpMiea, A., a. a. Shiloh. 
Hondorson, D. 0., a.a. Tozaa. 
Roffmolster, J.lL,a.a. Holston. 
Rood, J., a. a. Union. 

Hood, N., a. a. Union. 

— IT, J. W., F. HanoTor. 



Shiloh. Milton, Tonn. 

Piodmont. Irisbnrg, Va. 
Clinton. Canton, Miaa. 



Liybnm, Q. W., SJf. Piedmont. Liberty, Va. 
Lyons, J^ a. a. Holston. JolbroonTil., Y. 



8nBitorTiU8.a 
Harriaonb'g.,V. 
Bristol, Tenn. 
Benton, Tonn. 
OreenTille,Ton. 
Wineheator,Va. 
Mnrftoeabo^, T. 
Chattanooga, T. 
MadisonTUI^T. 
GraenriUoiTeo. 
Potorsburg, T. 

HIUsTliliK Ya. 
Phlladelphia,T. 
Spring Plaee,a. 



Kingston. Athens, Tenn. 

Union. Boeliford, Ten. 

Kingsfeoo. Claireland, Ten. 

Clinton. Bnmdon, Mlsa. 
Clinton. ...... 

D. of Colnmbia. Washlngt',D.O 

Union. MUls RIt., N.C. 

Union. MarysTllle, T. 

Wlnebsster. Talrfoz, Ya. 



HanoTsr. 



i Yiew, Ya. 



MARTIB,B.A.,a.8. 

Martin, Jos. H., a. s. 
Marahall,M.M.,s.a. 
Matthewa, H., F. 
Matthews, W. H^ F. 
Hinnis, Wm., F. 
Mitchell, J. D.,F. 
Morrison, R. M., a. a. 
Morrow, J., w.o. 
MoCampbeil, J., a. a. 
MeOampbell, J., a. a. 
MeChaIn, J., F. 
MeCorlUe,f.A,f.a. 
McDeannon, J.,w.c. 
MoLaln,R.s.a. 
MeLaln, W., sio. 
MeLoan,J.k,F. 
McLean, M. J. a. a. 
McMahon, J. J., f. 
McMnrran, J. W., F. 

Naff, J. N., a. a. 

Newlin, 8.f.,FKa. 
Newton, A., s. a. 
Newton, 0., L. 
Noble, Mason, CHF. 
Nonrae, C. H., t. 



Union. 



/■WILL, M., OLF. 



D. of OolvmUa. Aloxandor, Ya. 
Texas. Marahall, Tex. 

I>. of ColomUa. Baltlmoro, Md. 



OomersTllle, T. 
Mnrfraesbo',T. 



WlnebestM^. MiddleVg., Ya. 
Winohester. Sh^pherdt*, Ya. 

Winchester. ....^ 

Union. Mnis Rivor.N.G 

Winohester. Woodstock, Va. 
B.ofColnmUa. ...... 



Porlsmonth, Y. 
Tarmlngton, T. 
New Market, T. 
NashvUle, Ten. 
BlrdTiUa,Tex. 
RocersTtlle, T. 
Unitia, Tenn. 
Dandrige, Ten. 
Hanorer, Ya. 



D. of Odnmhla. Goorgst*, D. C. 



Kalapotheksa,M.,v.M Hanovor. 
King. James, F. New RiTir. 

King, J. R., a. a. Holston. 
King, 8. A., a. a. Texas. 
Klng^ W. 8., a. f . Texas. 

LaMAB, T. f ., FRF. Union. 
LsaA, J. H. a, F Piedmont 
Lsaronworth, A J., v. Hanorsr. 

(1*0) 



Bristol, Tenn. 
Holston V^ T. 
CroeketLTex. 
Garden Y., T. 

BfaiTTine, Ten. 
ftomTllle, Va. 
P«tenibnrg,Ya. 



WInefaester. 
Piedmont. 
Union. 
Piedmont. 
Lexington 8. 
N. Alabama. 
Lexington 8. 
Union. 
New RiTor. 
Holston. 



Newton. 

D. of Colnmbia. 

Newton. 

Newton. 

Hanover. 



Morris Cb.,Ya. 
KnoxTille,Ten. 
PayettoTil., T. 
Bhepherdst', Y. 
Taney OroTe,Y. 
New Market, T. 
LTnchb'g., Va. 
8hongato,MiBB. 
Somerril., Ala. 
Lexington,Mis. 
Tnskahoe^ Ten. 
Abingdon, Va. 
GreenTlI]e,Ten. 
Brergreen, Va. 
Xnton»rlse,Mis. 
Washingt', D.a 
Mobile, Ala. 
Bridg»Tllle,Ala. 
Richmond, Va. 
Pine View, Va. 



New River. New DnbUn. Va 
D. of Colnmbia. Newark, Del. 
atnton. Jackson, Miss. 

Clinton. Jackson, Miss. 

D. of Columbia. Wa«hingt',D.a 
Winchester. Leesbnig, Va. 



OsBORK, H. 8., FRF. Piedmont Salom, Ya 



Paxvtrr, Geo., p. New RItot. 

Palmer, D. f ., p. New Rirer. 

Parish, C, T. Clinton. 

Pollock, A. D., a. a. Winehestsr. 

Pope, P., F. Union. 

Prlee^ P. B., L. Hanorsr. 

RXAS, C. H., F. HanoTer. 

Rhea, & A., V. K. Holston. 
Richardson, B.M.,SA Lexington 8. 
Rieliardson, G. P., L. Lexington 8. 
Richardson, J. M. T. Newton. 
Ross,V.A., F. N. " ^ 

8RXRi.iia, H. K., a. a. 
Sloan, L 0., P. 
Sloat, A.H.,a.a. 
Smlth,B.J.,w.o. 
Smith, U., a. a. 
Smith, H.R.,a.a. 
Smith, J.C, P. 
Smith, W. A» a. a. 
Snoddy, R. H., a. a. 
Sunderland, B., F. 

Tarbit, W. L., a. a. N.AlabamiL Xlkton, Tenn. 
Tedford, R. B., W. c. Union. MaryTille, Ten. 

Thomas, J. IX, L. D. of Colnmbia. Poplar 8p«., Va. 

VBRVOB, W. a, w. 0. Bkihland. Lnmpkia, Tan 



Dnpen Y., Ya. 
Marion, Gen. 
Clinton, Miss. 
Warrentown,V. 
MaryviUe, Ten. 



Richmond, Vs. 
Ganar, Persia. 
Grenada, Hifs. 

Xnterprlw, M. 

HnntsTUle,Ala. 



RIdiland. Lynnrflle, Ten. 

HanoTor. TallyTille, Vs. 

Piedmont Liberty, Va. 
RiehUnd. 

New River. Abingdon, Ya. 
Windiester. I^eeKburg, V«. 
D. of Colnmbia. Washingt'.D.C. 
Union. Newport, Ten. 

Union. KnnxTille.Ten. 

D. of ColnmMa. Washingt',D.C. 



Wblls, R. p., f. 
White, G. 8., s. a. 
Woodi^ H., a. a. 



Holston. 

Union. 

Newton. 



ZnrLBT, J. H., a. a. Tnu,- 



Jonesboro',Ten 
Academis, Tka. 
WahaUk, Mint. 

Anstin, Teua. 



Digitized by 



Googk 



! and 

ACT. 



Ten. 
,T. 
',V. 
e,7. 
t,T. 

v.. 

liA 

MU. 

r«ii. 

Pen. 
Va. 

).a 




Digitized by 



Googk 




gitizedby VJi^^^Vl 



TSB UNITin) 8TN0D OF THS PBXSBTTKRIAN OHUROH. 161 

Jistiriirsl S^hU\ at t\t S^ttn)i l^tti\iUtm (L\utc\, 
in |tii0)rlrill(, tftnn* 

This.ohuroh was organized by Union Presbytery, October 24th, 
1819. The number of original members is not known. One of 
the few survivors, Mrs. Catharine Parsons, a resident of LoaisianSi 
is now on a visit to Knoxville, and from her the writer has ob- 
tained information with regard to the origin and early history of 
the enterprise. She took a lively interest in it, and was actively 
concernea in the formation of the Society. She went herself to 
Mary ville, fifteen miles distant, to engage the Rev. Isaac Anderson, 
D. D., to preach to those associated in the movement, and have them 
organized into a church. His first sermon was delivered in the 
Court House from the words, '*For what intent have ye sent for me?*' 
They worshipped for some time in the Court House, until they 
succeeded in putting up the building which is still used by the con- 
gregation. The exact date when it was erected has not been ascer- 
toined, probably 1820 or 1821. 

Dr. Anderson was the first preacher, and continued his labours 
about ten years. He resided at Mary ville, where he was pastor of a 
very large church, and also the Head of a Literary and Theological 
Institution. He came over and preached in Knoxville, once in 
every two weeks. 

SucoBBDiNa Ministers. — The Bev. Jefierson E. Montgomery 
commenced preaching in 1881, and discontinued in 1888. 

In October, 1840, Rev. William Mack commenced his regular la- 
bours as a minister, and discontinued in December, 1848. 

The Bev. John W. Cunningham had charge of the church one 
year, from February 15th, 1845, to February 15th, 1846. 

The Bev. Joseph H. Myers commenced his regular labours in 
May, 1846, was installed pastor in October 80th, 1847, and discon- 
tinued in April Ist, 1851. 

The Bev. Joseph H. Martin commenced his labours in July 1st, 
1851, and is the minister at the present time. 

Eldbbs. — The first elders were Archibald Bhea, John McCamp- 
bell, Thomas Craighead, Joseph Brown, and John Taylor. 

Other elders have been ordained in the following order: John 
Webb in 1824. William S. Howell and Thomas Bodgers, October 
24th, 1829. Hugh Brown, James H. Cowan, and Hugh A. M. 
White in 1836. Campbell Wallace, April 19th, 1845. Jesse Lin- 
coln, Solomon D. Jacobs, and Horace Maynard, January 28th, 1849. 
The present elders are Messrs. Bodgers, Cowan, Wallace, and May- 
nard. 

Dbacons. — Horace Maynard, James Bodgers, Amos K. Clampe, 
and James McAffry, were ordained deacons, November 7th, 1847. 
Daniel L. Coffin and A. A. Barnes, April 16ih, 1853. J. B. O. 
Kinsloe, October 29th, 1854. The present deacons are Messrs. 
Bodgers, McAfiry, Barnes, and Kinsloe. 

Bevivals. — ^A revival appears to have occurred in 1822. One 



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162 PBSSBTTEBIAN HISTORICAL ALMANAO. 

of great power took place in 1828, in connection with a meeting of 
the Synod of Tennessee. The Bev. James Gall aher preached and 
laboured on the occasion. Thirty persons united with the church 
on profession, three of whom afterwards became elders, and one a 
minister of the gospel, to wit, Bev. Thomas W* Humes, at present 
Sector of St. John's (Episcopal) Church, Knoxville. 

October 24th, 1829. The church received Bobert McLain, now 
the Bev. Robert Mcl^ain, of Enterprise, Miss., who assisted in the 
organization: of the United Synod and was the Temporary Clerk. 

1882 and 1883 were years of prosperity, forty-nine new members 
having been received on exapiination in the former, and thirty- 
three iti the latter. 

A revival occurred in the winter of 1841-2. Among the subjects 
of the work were several students of East Tennessee University. 
Four of these entered the ministry, viz: Edwin T. Brantley, Fred- 
erick A. Thompson, William W. Wright, and Joseph H. Martin. 
Another had the same object in view, but died before his theologi- 
cal course waa completed. 

Another revival took place a year later, in the winter of 1842-3* 
Befreshiug seasons were also enjoyed in 1848 and 1852. The last 
revival, which was one of considerable extent and power, occurred 
in May, 1867. . The church received an accession of thirty-seven 
members on profession. 

Whole number of members from the beginning, 661. Added 
on examination, 848; on: certificate, 213. Adults baptized, 102. 
Infants baptized, 291. Number of communicants at the present 
time, 182. 

A few words concerning the building, of which a view is given. 
A gentleman from abroad, who attended the meeting of the United 
Synod, has written of it as follows : " The church in which the 
United Synod recently met, is a venerable edifice. For nearly half a 
oentury it hasresoulided with the words of truth as they have fal- 
len from the lips of those who have successively occupied the pul- 
pit. The building bearsthe marks of time, in its internal arrange- 
ments, in the aspect of its ceiling, pews, floor, and wklls. Though 
not a handsome church, it is a comfortable one." 

Taking us back to the time when East Tennessee was almost a 
wilderness, with residents few and distant from each other, it is a 
good specimen of the architecture of the dav ; we hope this land- 
mark as it were in the religious history of the State may long be 
preserved, and if the demands of the present age will prompt the 
erection of a more stately edifice, this Housb of God where our 
Fathers worshipped will remain; sacred from the hands of the 
spoiler, as a monument of what God has done for us in times 
past. 

KnoxvUU^ Tmn. 



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V xmt ASSOCIATI FBXSBTTBBIAN SYNOD. 15$ 

THE ASSOCIATE PRESBYTEEIAN SYNOD 

OF 

NORTH AMERICA. 



The Fifty seventh Annual meeting of the Associate Synod, was 
held in the First Associate Presbyterian Church, Pittsburg, Pa., on 
May 19th, 1858 ; and was openea with a discourse by the retiring 
Moderator. 

1 Sam. iv. 13. Lo, Eli sat on a seat by the way side, watching : for hia heart 
trembled for the ark of Qod. 

The sermon was introduced by a reference to the removal of the 
ark from its resting place in Shiloh. Its exposure to the perils of 
the battle field. Its falling into the hands of the Philistines, and 
the solicitude of Eli for its safety, evinced by the fact that when 
the messenger arrived with the tidings Eli sat on a seat by the way 
side, watching ; while his heart trembled for the ark of God. 

The following order« was observed in the discussion : 

I. An inquiry what it was in the ark of God, which called forth 
this solicitude on the part of Eli, 

II. A specification of some things in the church of God now, 
symbolized by the ark, which call for the same solicitude on the 
part of God's people. 

III. A suggestion of some ways in which this solicitude should 
be manifested. 

Under the first topic, the unity of the church of God was dis- 
cussed, and the difterence of dispensation illustrated. The great 
object under all dispensations was to exhibit Christ and the cove- 
nant of grace, and the difference consisted mainly in the peculiar 
manner in which these were exhibited. The ceremonial law was 
a description of the manner in which Christ and the covenant of 
grace were exhibited to the people, and the Book of Leviticus was 
the Gospel to the Jews. Christ was also exhibited by types. They 
proclaimed the same things by signs which the Prophecies did by 
words. The types of the Bible formed a comple system ; Christ 
and all new covenant provisions for life and salvation were repre- 
sented by them, and in this system of types the ark of the covenant 
was the great centre. It was the soul in the body of types — the 
centre-piece in the great arch of symbols. Hence, it was called the 
glory of God. When the psalmist, in the 78th Psalm, refers to its 
being taken by the Philistines, he says he gave his glory into the 
hand of the enemy, and the wife of Phinehas exclaimed, The glory 
20 



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154 PRKSBTTSRIAN HISTQBIGAL ALKAKAO. 

has departed from Israel, for the ark of God is taken ; and in the 
24th Psalm which was sung when the ark was taken to Jerusalem, 
it seems to have been honoured with the name of the great Ante* 
type, when admission was demanded of the porters for the ark, 
which was called the king of glory. They inquire. Who is this 
king of glory ? and receive this emphatic reply, The Lord of hosts, 
he is the king of glory. 

But the more immediate cause of solicitude was the fact that it 
was the medium of communication between God and his people, 
hence the taking of the ark was like breaking their intercourse 
with their covenant God. Ex. xxv. 22. (Here a description of the 
ark was given.) The ark contained the law of God. If it had 
been left without a covering, the law as a broken covenant would 
have been exposed to view. The curse would have been visible. 
But the mercy-seat was placed over it ; God could sit on this cover- 
ing and commune with sinners. The broken covenant was hid. 
This represented the atonement of Christ. The cherubim which 
were a part of, or extension of the mercy-seat, represented Christ 
in his intercessory character. Their eyes were turned towards each 
other, so that they would meet on God, seated between them, and 
downward toward the mercy seat, indicating that they only plead 
for mercy through the merits of the Saviour. These cherubim 
are sometimes supposed to refer to created angels, but there is as 
much importance attached to them as to the mercy-seat, and as 
much stress laid upon the fact that God sits between the cherubim, 
as that he sits on the mercy-seat. If he were not between the cheru- 
bim, he could not commune with sinners. But God does not com- 
mune with sinners, because he is between guardian angels, or be- 
cause he is between anxious angels, but because their Advocate 
pleads that mercy be extended to them through the atonement. 
These considerations were sufficient to produce solicitude on the 
part of Eli, and cause his heart to tremble when the ark was ex- 
posed to danger. 

The second topic proposed was to specify some things in the 
church of God which were symbolized by the ark, and call for so- 
licitude still. 

The discussion of this division of the discourse was introduced 
by a reference to the fact, that while the church organization was 
the same in all ages, yet her solicitude under the Old Testament was 
often directed more immediately to the type, but under the gospel 
dispensation to the Antetype. Eli was solicitous for the honour and 
safety of the ark, for by means of this he held communion with 
God. Those who possess the spirit of Eli are solicitous for the 
honour of Jesus Christ, for through him we all have access to God. 
After some discussion of this point, there was a specification of some 
ways in which Christ should be kept prominent in the church. 

1. The church should be solicitous that Christ be kept prominent 
in her doctrinal creed ; every branch of the church has ner creed, 
either verbal or written, for there can be no distinct organization 
without it. The great object of such creed should be to exhibit 



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THX AS80CIATB FRKSBTTBBIAK SYNOD. 155 

Jesos Christ as the Author and Finisher of oar jhith, and to give 
prominence to gospel doctrine, which is so iutimatelj associated 
with the divine glory. , Every gospel doctrine is a beam of light 
from Ood, enabling us to see more clearly the glory of his charac- 
ter and the foundation of our hope and salvation. The doctrines 
of grace should be fully exhibited, as the^ present Christ as " the 
first, the middle, and the last'' of our salvation. 

2. She should be solicitous that Christ be kept prominent in 
verbal instruction. 

Through the preaching of the terrors of the law, the sinner is 
often made to feel the danger of his situation ; and he should feel his 
danger. Paul made Felix tremble when he reasoned of temperance, 
righteousness, and judgment to come. But if no other influence be 
exerted, the ark is not there. There is no glory discovered. The 
gospel must be exhibited as the power of Ood to salvation, to every 
one that believeth. There is this difierence between the preaching 
of the law and of the gospel. The one presents the ark without 
the mercy-seat, the law is exposed, the curse visible, the sin- 
ner's doom is written in it The preaching of the gospel places the 
mercy-seat over the law, sets up the cherubim, and proclaims the 
blessedness of the man whose transgression is forgiven, whose sin 
is covered, 

3. That Christ be prominent in the ordinances under this topic, 
the design of the ordinances was discussed, their references to 
Christ illustrated, and the profane and unmeaning character of all 
ceremonies in which Christ is not recognized as the only way of 
access to Ood was exposed. 

III. How is this solicitude to be manifested ? 

1. By vigilance. Eli sat on a seat by the way side watching. 
His eyes were turned toward the ark. This was a dictate of nature, 
when persons are solicitous for the safety of any object sacred or 
pro&ne, their eyes will often turn in that direction. There were 
many things connected with the warfare between Israel and the 
Philistines, which might have produced anxiety on the mind of 
Eli; but all minor matters seem to have been overlooked, while his 
attention was directed toward the ark of Ood. This was the all 
absorbing thought. 

Is the ark safe? Christians should manifest the same vigilance 
now, directing their whole attention toward those things which re- 
late to the honour of Christ and the glory of his kingdom. 

Their instrumentalities are employed for promoting a revival of 
religion, of awakening those who are sleeping in a state of carnal 
security in the church, or of arousing those who are regardless of 
their souls' salvation, to inquire what thev shall do to be saved. 
The church should anxiously inquire, Is Christ kept prominent in 
these efforts ? Is the great principle recognized ? " Not by might, 
nor by power, but by my Spirit, saith the Lord." 

This vigilance should be an anxious one. Eli's heart trembled. 
The christian does not watch simply because from his profession 
it becomes his duty, but because his soul prompts him to perform 



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166 



FBSSBYTERIAir HISTORICAL ALKAITAO. 



that duty. There are often many trembling hearts in the chnrcli 
of God, and many a pang has been occasioned by the efforts to as- 
sign Christ a secondary place in his own kingdom. 

This solicitade will be associated with activity. Efforts to ban- 
ish Christ from his church will be resisted. Christ is always wil- 
ling to occapy his own position in his church. It is his kingdom, 
and he delights more in the gates of Zion than in all the dwellings 
of Jacob; hence if there be consistency on the part of the church 
herself, there will be no difficulty in retaining the ark. When our 
Saviour was in the tomb, the Jews attemptea to keep him there; 
but he was not willing to remain in the grave. It was not his ap- 
propriate place afler the object of his burial was accomplished, and 
under sucn circumstances, Government Seals and Roman Guards 
were of no avail. But Christ delights in his church. He says of 
her, "This is my rest, here will I stay, for I have desired it." Christ 
is then willing to occupy his place as king on his holy hill in Zion. 
We should watch anxiously that the crown be kept on his head. 
That it may be said with confidence and consolation: The glory 
is still preserved for Christ, is enthroned in his kingdom. 

The sessions were constituted with prayer. The following per* 
sons were members of the 



lifts ^thntt ^nml S^tssln. 



FKMBrmT. 



FRXSBTTXBT. 



ACSsiOH, Robt, p. 


N.niinois. 


Wm. Patterson. 


Babton, John S., P. 


Muskingum. 


Robt. B. George. 


Alexander, Jo«iah,P 


Ohio. 


Joseph Sharp. 


Bdie,J.A.,P. 


Monmouth. 


M..M 


Alexander, 8^ P. 


Ohio. 


James Bord. 








Andenon, Sam'l., F 


Alleghenr. 
FhUadelphia. 


Thos. Dickson. 


iramifn, 8\ F., f. 


New York. 


... ... 


Andrew Jas. Q., F. 


Wm. Wilson. 


Forrester, Robt., P. 


MlamL 




Amott, Hoses, P. 


8. Indiana. 


Wm. Patterson. 


French. Darid W., F 


Shenango. 


T.McClymondfc 


A8tieahiut,J.ir.»F. 




Samuel Ewlng. 


French, Wm. H., F. 




Wm. IrTine. 


Bi.incs, Joseph, w. o 


. Shenaaoo. 


• M.U 


OALnaxTX, Wm.,F 


.Allegheny. 


Hugh Reed. 


Basdleld, TitiMW 0. Ohio. 


*....* 


Gibson, W.\f.C.,F. 


Chartiers. 


Isaac Part 


BeTeridg«s T , PRF. 


MlamL 


Joseph CoUlns. 


Gilkemon, Thos., P. 


Allegheny. 


John CaldwelL 


BeTeridie, T. H., P. 


Philadelphia. 


••«..• 


GoodwilUe, DaTid, P 


Ohia 


J. B. Kennedy. 


Blaek, Andw. M.. P. 


Bhenango. 


John Sharp. 


GoodwiUle, D. H., F. 


Stamford. 


...... 


BUek,Win.A.,v.o 








Cambridga. 


M.M. 


Blair, DaTid, P. 


AUeghenj. 


George Row. 








Blair, Hugh H.,F. 


New York. 


...... 








Boyd, B., P. 


Chartlers. 


N.Bnehanan. 


HALL,G.M.,F. 


Albany. 


...... 


Broirn, James, F. 


Iowa. 


Smith HamiU. 


Hanna, Thomas, F. 


Chartiers. 


M.H.CUrk. 


Brown, Thomas, P. 


MusMmnim. 


Robt Bnmside. 


Harper, James, P. 


New York. 


J.B.Tallmaa. 


Brownlee, John T^F. Chartitrs. 


Jos. Brownlee. 


Henderson, 0. D., F. 


N.niinois. 





Bmee, James, P. 


PhiUddphla. 


Wm. Patterson. 


Henderaon.J.H.,F. 


Muskingum. 


Samuel Lse. 


Brooe, WlllUm, P. 


Philadelphia. 


Samuel Reed. 


Henning, Wm. B., p 




Wm. A.White. 


Brace, William, P. 


Shenanieo. 


John Blair. 


Herron,Bam*1.T.,p. 


Ohio. 


Jas. Brewster. 


Brran, John P. 


8. Indiana. 


• .«M 


Htndman, Sam!., P. 


Iowa. 


, 


Bull, J. L^ P. 


Miami. 


*.«•• 


Houston, A. Y , P. 


Chartiers. 


Wm. Murray. 


BolUons, Peter, F. 


Albany. 






.Chartiers. 


John D. Reed. 


Carsok, D. W., f. 


Chartiers. 


S.KennedT. 


I]mxB,DaTidR.,F 


. Shenango. 


J.MeOonneU. 


Carson, James 0., F 


. tJhsrtiers. 


H.MoClelland. 


Insfies, James, F. 


8. Indiana. 





Chureh, Frands. P. 


Philadelphia. 


Wm. S. Young. 


Ingles, N., F. 


N. Indiana. 


John Barnes. 


Clark, John B., p. 


Chartiers. 


James Wilson. 


Irons, Andrew, F. 


Detroit. 


...... 


CleUnd, Wm. J., F. 


AlbauT. 











Collins, DaTid W^ F. RIehland. 


JohnOibson. 


JaCKSOK, W. C F. 


Shsnaago. 


JamsiHiutsr 


Collins, Samuel. P. 


N. Illinois 











Cooper, Joseph T., I 


. PhUadelphia. 


J.MeCartn^. 


Kn&,8amn.M.,F. 


Shenango. 


Wm.Tt]ieeni 


Oommlns, Ojms, p 



















LATOBKin, J. N., F. 


Miami. 


N.MeOonneD. 


Dicssoir, James, f. 


N.Indiana. 


James DaUell. 


Uw, Imac, P. 




, 


Oolg, James R., F. 


Iowa. 


James Dawson. 


Uw, Jamem w. 0. 


Cambridge. 


James Lowrle. 


Donnan, Darld, F. 


New York. 


...... 




Albany 


...... 


Bnff, D. K., P. 


Clarion. 


Robt MarshaU. 


Logu«^ .Iame« W.. F 


Ohio. 


Samuel PurTii. 


Duff, J. A., P. 


Cambridge. 


Wm.BieNeiL 


Lusk,HughK.,w.c 


. Allegheny. 


John Armitagt 


Dunn, John &, p. 


Cambridge. 


...... 


LyUe, James P., F. 


Muskingum. 


And. B. Miller. 



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3 cbrcl 
tstoas- 

to ban- 
}'s wil. 

'el lings 

churci 

en oar 

there; 

aisap- 

fd, and 

ruards 

173 of 

Christ 

Zion. 

head 

glorj 

per- 




oodi 
e. 

I. 



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Pastor of the Second Associate Pre style nan Church, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Moderator of llie Associate Synod for 1858 . 



fuhJished hj Jose/Jt M Wilson. N'lil South Wl^S' PhM' 



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THS ASSOCIATB PSISBTTKBIAN BTNOD. 



157 



mxsBTTnT. 



mSSBTTSBT. 



MAVOHXillV. J. S., F. 
McArthiir, Ja8.,wc. 
Mcirthar, Sam'l., p. 
McAul«7, John, P. 
HcBurnej, V.« P. 
McCrwdy.J.SMP. 
McFarUnd, J. W., P. 
Heaill, Jamef. P. 
MeOill, John A., p. 
HcUenry, D. S., P. 
McKm, Jowph, P. 
MeLaan,D.H.A.,wc. 
Uel/ean, J. L., w. o. 
McNeil, 8. 0., P. 
Morrow, S. V., P. 
Munch, J. C, P. 
Morray, Alex., P. 



Iowa. 

Yermont. 

Iowa. 

Clarion. 

Philadelphia. 

Hoakingum. 

Richland. 

Ohio. 

Ohla 

Albanr. 

PhiladelpUft. 

Allegheny. 

N. IndUna. 

N. Indiana. 

Albany. 

ChsrUen. 

Bhenango. 



Wm. Rankin. 
James Barr. 
Wm. Miller. 
BenJ. Wallace. 
llartd Pollock. 
Bobt DiaTidMm. 



Joseph Strain. 
Robert Burns. 
J.CMcClymond 



Nash, John H., P. Monmouth. ...~. 

Pattxksoh. J.,w. 0. Bhenango. A. J. Burgess. 

Patterson, .lohn, P. MuRkingum. W^ Wylie. 

Pollock, Itobt. U., P. Miami. 

Porter, Byron, P. Allegheny. B. B. Mor»head. 

Price, Jamem P. Philadelphia. 

Purdy, James L., P. Clarion. Jas. Verguson. 

Ramskt, Jas. P,w c. Shenango. J. C. McLean. 

Rankin, Alex. R., P. Shenango. T.-McClymonds. 

Rankin, Jas. Q., p. Chartiers. R.Donaldson. 

Reed, Sam'l. B., p. Allegheny. Sam'I. Celhonn. 

Beid,S.C., P. Muskingum. JohnMcMUlen. 



Rodgers, A. A., w. o. Monmouth. 
Bodgers, James, P. Allegheny. 



8AWTXK. B. P., P. 
Soott, John, P. 
Seroggs, Joseph, P. 
Small. Kdward, P. 
Small, Gilbert, P. 
Smart, James P., P. 
Smith, WUIiam, p. 
Snodgrass, J. M., p. 
Strang, BuTld, w. c. 



Obia 

Monmouth. 

Allegheny. 

aheoango. 

Miami. 

MlamL 

Clarion. 

Miami. 

Albany. 



TSLVOXD, J. C, P. Clarion. 
Thompson, James, p. New York. 
Thompson, J. K., P Chartiers. 
Thompson, Josiah, p. Chartiers. 
Todd. Hugh W., p. New Yurkk 
Todd, John, P. Clarion. 

Tancs, J. A., w. c. Iowa. 
Vincent, Qeo. C, P. Shenango. 

Wallacs, James, P. Miami. 
W bitten. Jas. B . P. New York. 
Wilson, Sam'U prp. Miami. 
Wishart, Wm., p. MusklnguHi. 

Chartiers. 

Chartiers. 

Chartiers. 

Sialkot 



J.MeOandlsH. 

David McLean. 
Wm. Nash. 
Joseph Elder. 
D.M.Beattie. 

DaTidWallaoa. 
Dickey. 



Jks.M.Cre«r7: 

Wm. oildwell, 
Joslah Harper. 

Wm. Morrison. 



John Couden. 
BobeK Brown. 



Wm, Cf>Illn8. 
Wm. Stewart 
Wm.Oatbraith. 
Wm. Jones. 
Jas. MoPeak. 



On motion, Rev. Joseph T. Coopbr, D. D., of Philadelphia, was 
chosen Moderator. 



§ill8 ul, ©Irntttns; 

The Committee on Bills and Overtures, Rev. P. Bullions, D. D., 
Chairman, reported 

Ist. They have had under consideration so much of the report of the Presbytery 
of Cambridge, as relates to advising probatiooers to preface on the Psalms, respect- 
fully report that while they regard the practice referred to as good and profitable, 
and would encourage its continuance, yet as there is no rule on the subject in the 
church, and the practice is not uniform, even in settled congregations, it seems to 
your committee inexpedient to recommend to Synod any action on this subject, fur- 
ther than to express their judgment, that probationers as well as others, while at 
liberty to n^e their discretion in this matter, should pay all proper respect to the wishes 
of the people to whom they minister. Also 

2d. So much of the reports of the Presbyteries of Philadelphia and S. Indiana, as 
relates to amended Psalmody, report that they regard the matter as one of great im- 
portance, and its speedy and right settlement as a matter of duty and pressing neces* 
sity. As this matter concerns not this church alone, but all the churches which 
adhere to a Scripture Psalmody, and it is important to secure uniformity in the 
Psalmody u.'sed by them all, it seems highly proper that all should unite in preparing 
an amended Psalmody acceptable to all. In order to the attainment of this end, 
your committee, therefore, 

Readvedf that a special committee on Psalmody be appointed to correspond with 
all the churches interested in this matter, and, with them, endeavour to take such 
measures as may seem proper to effect so desirable an object, and report at next meet- 
ing of Synod. 

Rev. Thos. Beveridge, D. D., Rev, Jas. P. Smart, and Rev. Jas. 
Patterson, D. D., were appointed the Committee. Also 

3d. The question transmitted by the Presbytery of Sialkot, respecting the baptism of 
orphan children b( heathen parents, received into the families of the missionarieSi 



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16S PBBSBYTKKIAN HISTORICAL ALMANAC. 

Tbey regard it aa a question of mnch iroportai^ce, and to which a well considered, and 
not a hasty or rash reply should be given ; that its settlement depends on the right 
settlement of another question equally important, and still undecided by Synod, viz : 
whether it is right to baptize adopted children, where neither of the parents were 
members of the visible cnurch ; and as this is a question likely to lead to much dis- 
cussion, and one in which the body with which we are negotiating for union has an 
equal interest with ourselves, we are of opinion it would be better to defer this ques- 
tion, till that of union is decided, so that if union takes place it may receive the 
full oonsideratioQ of the United Church, and for this purpose submit the following 
resolution : — 

Ruolved, that a decision respecting the baptizing of heathen orphan children re- 
ceived into the families of our forei^ missionaries be deferred for the present, and 
the matter be commended to the serious and prayerful consideration of the members 
of Synod, with a view to its future settlement, and that in the mean time the mis- 
nonaries be authorized to exercise their discretion on the subject. 



The Committee on Appeals, Bev. James Wallacs, Chairman, re- 
ported. 

As the charge against Mr. M^Bride, found proven by the Presbyterr of Philadel- 
phia, was one of a very weighty and serious nature, justice bolh to the Presbytery 
and to the appellant requires that the case should be carefully considered. The tes- 
timony is somewhat voluminous ; and as we apprehend the members of Synod could 
not find time to make a full investigation, we oflfer the following resolution as, in oar 
view, the best for th^ disposition of the case. 

Resolvedf That a commission of five persons be appointed to meet to investigate 
and decide on the appeal of Mr. Bobert M* Bride. 

The following persons were appointed the commission, viz: 
Messrs. J. S. Easton, S. F. Morrow, T. Brown, F. A. Hutchinson, 
and B. B. George. 



The Committee on Missions, Bey. James B. Doio, Chairman, 
reported 

That, having examined the papers relating to the missionary operations referred 
to them, they find most things of a character calcukited to cheer and encourage the 
hearts of those who love the cause of Christ 

A dark cloud gathered in the sky, and a storm burst upon, and swept over India, 
that might well cause the stoutest heart to quail. But now that this tempest has 
passed by that portion of India occupied by our missionaries, we have reason to re- 
joice and give God thanks, that whilst other missionaries have fallen sacrifices to 
heathen rage, their lives have all been spared, and the field of Uieir labours but little 
harmed, comparatively, inviting anew their arduous labours with, perhaps, increased 
prospect of success. 

The hearts of your missionaries at Sialkot have been already cheered by four con- 
Terts from heathenism, as the fruits of their labour under the blessing of God. We 
would confidently hope that these are the first — the early fruits of a future and aband> 
aot harvest. 

Five, in all^ were added to their little congregation, before consisting of eleven ; one, 
however, having been called away by death. About seventy scholars are under their 
instruction and influence, and seven orphan children have been received into the (kmi- 
lies of missionaries, and are supported mainly by the liberality of Sabbath-schools and 
congregations in connection with this Synod. 

1. Ketolvcdf that we return our sincere thanks to the great Head of the church for 



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THE ASSOCIATE PBBSBTTXRIAN STKOD. 159 

his marked preeeryation of our miadonarieB in India, and that we will make iocreaaed 
effi>rtB to Bostain this miasion. 

2. Ruohed, that we will continue our support of Mr. Brown at Savanna Graode, 
Trinidad, and will make prompt efforts to sustain him. 

3. Resolved, that we direct Mr. Herron, our missionary in California, to explore so 
much of that state as he can during the summer, and unless he finds a more encourag- 
ing field, he be invited to return as soon as practicable. 

4. Resolvedt that Synod return her thanks to Mr. Isaac Geery, for the kind assist- 
anoe rendered our board in transmitting money to our missionaries. 



The Committee on the Theological Seminary, Eev. Wm. Wishabt, 
Chairman, reported : 

The Board of Managers of the Theological Seminary rejpoTt. — ^That during the 
past session there were in attendance the following students, viz : of the year closing 
at the middle of the session : — Messrs. B. Wallace, J. I. Frazier. Of the year closing 
at the.end. of the session }— Messrs. A. R. Anderson, J. Robb, J. Stevenson, W. ll 
Wilson. Of the class whose course would terminate at the middle of next session :— 
Messrs. J. M. Adair, W. W. Barr, D. Forsythe, T. P. Kennedy. Of the second 
year, according to the present course : — Messrs. W. H. Jefiers, W. McEce, H. Tedford, 

J. N. White, Armstrong. Of the first year :— Messrs. W. M. Bell, W. Campbell, 

D. H. French, T. Hanna, T. McCartney. The Board held two meetings, one in the 
month of December, and the other on the 21st day of April, «being the close of the 
session. At these meetings the students delivered discourses, with which the Board 
were highly gratified, aa giving good evidence of diligence, both on the part. of the 
professors and students. 

We would again call the attention of Synod to the condition of our library. We 
acknowledge a donation from Mr. Bentoul, of Pittsburgh, Pa., of ten dollars in 
books. 

The Board recommended for license, Messrs. Anderson, Bobb, Stevenson, Wilson, 
Adair, Barr, Forsythe, Kennedy. 

J. P. Skabt, Sec of Board. 

On motion — Resolved, That the young men recommended for 
license be referred to their respective Presbyteries to be taken on 
trials for license. 

On motion — Resolved^ That a Committee be appointed to address 
the churches on the subject of the debt against the Theological 
Seminary. The Board of Trustees were appointed that Committee. 

llie Presbytery of Chartiers requested that Mr. Wm. Ballentine, who has been 
studying under their care during the past year, be enrolled as a student of the third 
year ; lUso, the Presbytery of Shenango request that Messrs. Bain, Gailey, Graham, 
and Taylor, who have been admitted to the study of theology, and in consideration of 
their circumstances, permitted to pursue their studies under the care of Presbytery, 
have credit for one year*s study, and that Mr. Crow, who has been studying under 
their care during the same period of time, in consideration of his circumstances and 
praiseworthy attainments, nave credit for two years. . After some reflection, your 
committee have concluded to recommend to Synod that these requests be granted ; at 
the same time, we cannot but express our sincere regret that so many of our young 
men should be pursuing their studies under the care of Presbytery, and would urge 
that our Presbyteries should exert all lawful influence to have those engaged in the 
study of theology attend the Theological Seminary, where the opportunities of acquir- 
ing tbbological knowledge and qualifications for the work of the roioistry are so 
much superior. 

From the report of the board of managers of the Theological Seminary, it would 
seem that the number of our theological students is on the decrease. Only twenty 
wtre in attendance at the Theological Seminary during the past year, eight of whom 



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160 



FRESBYTSBIAK HISTOBICAL ALMANAG. 



are to be licensed to preach the GoBpdi this sammer. We would call the attentioD of 
the cbarch to this fiftct, aod urgentlj^ recommend all to renew their exertions io seek- 
ing out, aod urging young men of gifts and piety to derote themaelres to the work of 
the ministry. 



The Committee on Preabyterial Reports, Bey. Moses Arnot, 
Chairman, reported as follows : 

Your committee take pleasure in stating that the reports of Presbyteries indicate 
a remarkably encouraging state of religion throughout the church. I'his appears 
from the increased attendance upon Divine ordinances, and the inoreiNung interest 
felt in them. 

Social prayer-meetings are well attended, and many additional ones haveheen or- 
ganized during the past year. Increased attention is given to the lambs of the flock. 

Many additional Sabbath-schools have been organized, for the spiritual benefit of 
the children of the church, and especially for those poor children, for whose souls 
their parents do not care. It is encouraging to find among all our people an earnest 
desire for the union of the Reformed Churches, and such a union as is based upon, 
and is a manifestation of the oneness of the Spirit 

There is a prevalent disposition to look upon the pflst with regret, and to seek a 
reformation which will manifest itself in greater spirituality, and more extensive prac- 
tical godliness. It appears from the reports that the blessing of God has in a re- 
markable manner attended the means of grace, public and private. 

Our ministers and people have experienced a little reviving in our bondage. The 
blessed results of that ever memorable convention of brethren at Xenia last March, 
are every where spoken of with gratitude and humility. In most parts of the church 
our accessions have been larger uian in former years. 

In what God has done for us the past year, we see more clearly tlian ever the con- 
nection between a revived church and the success of missions, or that a successful 
church must be a revived church. In view of all these blessings, it becomes us to 
say with gratitude and humility, "The Lord hath done g^reat things for us, whereof 
we are glad." "Thou, O God, didst send a plentiful rain, whei-eby thou didst confirm 
thine inheritance when it was weary." 

But while there is very much in these report that makes us thank God and take 
eoarage, vet they do also complain that there is too much of that spirit which leads 
us to seek, every man his own, and not the things which are Jesus Christ's. With 
all our comparative liberality, there is yet a want of liberality, a want of cheerful 
self-denial for Christ There is a spirit of worldly-mindedness, which hinders the 
growth of the grace of the Spirit, and deprives us of his consolation. There is a 
disposition to think that what we do for Christ is much, while it is so little. There 
is a want of that compassion for souls which breaks over the barriers of false modesty, 
and like the woman ot Samaria, commends Christ to others, and there is reason to 
believe that the little heart we have to speak of Christ to others, arises from our own 
defective apprehensions of his excellency. 

In view of all these things, your committee would recommend the appointment by 
Synod of the first Sabbath of July as a day of special prayer to God for the outpour- 
ing of his Spirit ; 

And the appointment of the third Wednesday of October as a day of humiliation 
and prayer. 

The following Mikisters have died durino the tear: 



XAMB. 


nMVtTTRY. 


Tear of 
Ordination 


Tear of 
Death. 


AaM. 


siavAss. 


Bmownn. JavM Canoa 
Bttlllons, Alexander, . . . 

Pattoh, Samuel 

Strajto, James .... 


Muflklnffum, . 
Cambridge, . . 

Detroit, . . . 

SUmford,. . . 


1854 
1808 

1853 

1832 


1858 
1867 

1867 

1867 


84 
78 

27 


Oontnunption. 
Apoplexy. 

Poeomonia. 

GeDeral DebUity. 



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THB JkSSOOIATB FRBBBYTSBUK SYNOD. 161 

§0sr]b[ tti |«rttp SHissions* 

The CSominittee on Foreign Misaions made the following report, 
whioh waa adopted : 

Id sabmitting this, oar anonal report, we may adopt the laognage of the Ptalmist : — 
" I will sing of mercy and of judgment. Unto thee, O Lord, will I Biog." 

There are nnder the care of ypar Board five ordaiiied miaionaries, one female teacher, 
and two native lioentiates. These are labonring in three different stations, viz : India, 
Trinidad, and California. 

In India there are nnder the care of the Board, three ordained missionaries, one fe- 
male teacher, and two native licentiates. The trials which our missionaries in this 
field of laboar have been called to endnre are doubtless familiar to yon all — trials 
which we are nol without reasons for believing, *'have fallen out rather to the further- 
ance of the gospel." The political disturbances, which for a time interrupted their 
labours at Sialkot, have, in a great measure, subsided, so that at our latest accounts 
they were allactively engaged in prosecuting the work for which they had been sent 
to that distant field. Nor has their labour been in vain — ^already are their hearts 
encouraged by evidences that their efforts have been blessed for the conversion of 
souls. Four are reported to have been brought out of the darkness of heathenism to 
the enjoyment of the light of the goepd. Thuff-titegood seed of the word sown by 
our missionaries has even now begun to bring forth promised frait- 

It IB gratifying to the Board to be able to state that the loss in a pecuniary respect 
to our mission, in consequence of the fearful insurrection that has taken place during 
the past year iben, has not been eztensive. Funds deposited in the Delhi bank, to 
the amount of about 9500, which our missionaries had despaired of recovering— the 
managers of the bank have generously amed to make good to them, together with 
the accruing interest On the whole, so mr as has been ascertained, the loss of mis- 
sion property does not amount in value to more than $370. while local contributions 
have diminished oven this considerably. In view of these nets, we have much reason 
for thankfulness. 

The a&irs of our California mianon are at the present time io a very unsettled 
condition. 

Synod are no doubt aware of some of the difficulties with which brother Herron 
has always had to contend in his efforts to build up our cause in that place. From 
the very commencement of his labours at Napa, he has met with opposition in his 
endeavours to carry out some of theprinciples and usages of the Associate Church. 
One of these, which has been most oflenave to many of those among whom this brother 
has been labouring, is our mode of conducting the praise of Qod. The brother there 
has, in all his communications with the Board touching this matter, ezpreflsed a strong 
doubt of ever being able to bring the people among whom he has been labouring to 
use in worship our present version of the Psalms, or conform to our mode of singing 
them. 

On account of the introductun of instrumental music in the worship of God, the 
relation that hitherto existed between Mr. Herron and the congregation of Napa has 
been dissolved. From all that the Board could learn on the subject* they are of the 
opinion that the action on the part of the congregation was unpresbytonal and dis- 
orderly. Although the chairman of the Board has addressed a letter to those by 
whose action the relation has been dissolved, there is no prospect of the breach that 
has taken place ever being healed ; as we learn that the congregation has, since the 
dismissal of Mr. Herron, obtained the services of another pastor. 

Our missionary there is at present labouring in the vicinity of Napa wherever God, 
in his providence, opens a door of usefulness. Under these circumstances the Boitfd 
would ask Synod to indicate the course to be adopted in reference to the missioo. 
SI 



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112 TmBTTKKXAF mSfOBIOAL JLIACiJrAO. 

The Oommittee on Board of Edvottfekm maire the feilavfing re- 
port: 

Hio oponfiotis of ow Bstrd, daring Hw'past yvB^f Iwfo 'been carried oo wHk en- 
couraging evidanoes of uBefolDesa Id order that jronr Board may coDthrae to give 
eflioieDt ud in tlie aU-importaot departaieitt of bringiiig fiitbfdl Jabooren into the 
gospel-field, a liberal share of the chareh's benevoleDee is aolicited. The aoeompaoy- 
iDg report of the Treasurer will exhibit the state of oor fondi. 

1857. 

May 28th. Bdatioe in treasarr, 1654^ 

Beoeived duriog the yeari •••••• 363 77 

Total, «1018 47} 

Paid o&t, • • $869 81 

«I48 66i 
Batxd MoKes, Trecu. 



The Cbmmitiee presented the following jreport which wm adopted : 

The seleet committee to whom was referred the sribject of amending the plan of the 
Bible and Book Establishment, beig leare to report several amendments for adoption 
bv the Svnod. These amendments and alterations are deemed necessary to adapt the 
pUin to the extended operations which the present and prospective mcrease of the 
fanda warrant, cuid the necessities of the charch and Of the thnes demand. These, 
together with so much of the mles heretofore adopted as is retained, are incorporated 
in tlie p\9xi appointed, which we woald respectfbtly rec om mend to Synod for adoption. 

Ist That Synod at its present meeting proceed to elect a Board, consisting of 
twelve persons : six ministers and six lay members of tiie charch ; two ministers and 
two lav menlbers to eo oat of office each ^^car, and their places to' be filled by Synod ; 
the Bible and Book llstaUishroent to be intrusted to the general management of said 
Board, who shall meet annually, or oftener, as they may determine, seven members 
beiiMf necessary to form a quorum for doing business. 

2d. That said Board proceed to establish a principal depodtory In Pittsburgh, in 
which shall be kept a constant supply of pocket and famllv JBibles, Psalm Book^ Oon- 
ieaaions of Faith, and Testimonies of tiie Church, the Book of Discipline, and of such 
other books as Fisher's Catechism, Patterson on Shorter Catechism, Boston's Four- 
fold State, Marrow of Modem Divinitv, and any others of similar character, which 
may from time to time be selected — ^it being understood that all the Bibles circulated 
have the Psalms in metre, and none the Apocrypha. 

3d. That said Board be authorized, as soon as the means st fheir disposal shall yrw- 
rant it, to publish, or procure the publication cff sudh works, new or old, as may be 
approved by themselves, or ordered by the Synod. 

4th. That Branch depositories may be established at ancfa places as the Synod, on 
the recomniendation of the Board, may select. 

5th. That said principal depositorv shall be phiced under the char^ of some suita- 
ble person, to #hom the Board shall grant, on proper security, for its safe keeping 
and prompt return in money or books when demanded, such a sum out of any moneys 
whicn may come into their hands for this purpose, as they may judge necessary for 
conducting this part of the business of said Board. 

6th. That at said depository or depositories, the above books, and such others as 
may be selected or published by the Board, shall be furnished to our ministers and 
congregations at the lowest prices, and on such credit as may be consiBtent with the 
interests of the depository. To be determined and r^gukted from time to time by 
the Board. 

7th. Said Board may appoint any five of their members as an executive committee^ 



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91^ A$i»pouni ffimmxBUjf 0rai3s>. 10B 

who shall have the Immediate eupervieioii of all the operatioDs cooiiected with the 
said book coocero, ander euch nueoaod Bj-Lawe as the Board may adopt, oonsia* 
tant widi the ptbove regulations. 

The oomoii^tee iKmiiiiate the IbOowiqg penoqs as meipbere of the ^Board referred to 
in the above report ^-Dr. S/ogaa, John B. Clark, Jas. McQiU, H. K. Losk, S. An- 
dersoo, and i). Jd. A. McLeao, ministers. Jas. McCandlesB, Wm. Qrier, Wm. Ste- 
yenson, Wm. 8« Yonng, John Dean, and David Barr, lay mi^nbers. 

The above penoos w e r e e lee t ed. 



The Committee to which was referred the memprial on Intemper- 
ance presented a report, which was adopted, as follows : 

In view of the great iqerease of "the evil >of iotemperanoe, the refusal of the civil 
power to do any thing to reelriet this evil, the danger ^to^wbi^ the yoath of the church 
are ezpoeed. and the strong temptation held out to all to indulge in thw vice, it be- 
comes the caonsh to do all that can be done to prsserve her own parity, and to extend 
her protecting care over the rismg generation. And as tiie Scnptures fire to be our 
only guide in removing all evils, in looking to its-teacbings, wefind thai two general prin- 
ciples are presented as applicable to this matter. T%e first is under the form of a pre- 
cept, where those in dang!ar of beiqg overcome are directed not to <* look upon the 
wine when it is red, when it mpveth itself ariffht^" and the other principle giveth in 
the resolution of tiie apostle when he declared his willin^^ness not to eat meat while 
the world stood, if it would make bis brother to offend ; m which it appears that it is 
our duty to practise self-denial, even in that which might be necessary and innocent 
in its use, for the sake of the safety and well beingof others. Under the application 
of these two principles, we think that professing Christians are called on to abstain 
entirely from the use of intozicatiiu^ li(^uor as a bevemga And aa season, ezperienoe* 
scienoe, and revelation, all show tlAt its use is injurious to the system, and danger- 
ous to the soul, we ace therefore called on to ^wooaoteiwiMe its oonmion use^ 
Therefore, 

Resolved, 1. That our ministers be directed in an ecpecial manner to call the atten- 
tion of their peo^e to the dangerous consequences to themselves, -and the evil influence 
of their example upon others, arising from the ordinary use of intoxicating liquors. 

Reeolvedy 2. That sessions be directed to admonish those who indulge in their com- 
mon use, and should they persevere in it to the djagnee of their profession, to suspend 
them from the communion of the church. 

Resolved, 3. That in the judgment of this Synod, the manufacturing or vending 
of intoxicating liquors for the purpose of being uped as a common beverage, is a cen- 
surable oflfenoe. 

On motion, the thanks of Synod are hereby tendered to Thomas 
M'Connell, Esq., and John Penney, Esq., for their gratuitous servi- 
ces in giving to a Committee of Synod legal cowisel and ^vice. 

Resolved^ That we tender our thanks to the lu^ethren ip Pittsburgh 
and Allegheny cities, for their Ohristian hospitality in tentertaining 
the members of.Synod in their fiE^milies during its session. Also, 
to the various Bail Boad Companies, who hav« generpusly agreed 
to carry the members of Synod over their respective roads at half fare. 

After prayer, singing a part of the 20th Psalm, and the Moderator 
pronouncing the apostolic benediction, Synod adjourned to meet on 
the third Wednesday of May, 1869, in Xenia, Ohio, at 2 o'clock, P. M. 

Thomas Hanka, SynocPa Clerk. 

* The Bfisolntioos adopted concerning the Union with the Associate Reformed 
Chwrd^ wiU be fouiid under the oi^ganieation of the VnUid PresbigUnan Ukurth^ 
Seepage 



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aott 



PBBSBTTERIAN HI8T0BICAL ALMANAC. 



Number of Charebat 
giving^ and amoant 
ilT«ii for BXBLS 



Number of Charehea 
giving^ and amount 
flTen for Bsvoa- 



Nvmbar of Ghurchea 
giving^ and amount 
riTen for India 
Miaaioira. 



Nnmbar of GhuroiMa 
gMttgf and amount 
ghren forCAUVom. 
KA MxaaioHB. 



Number of ChurelMfl 
gMng, and anwunt 
itm for HoMs 
Mittxoirt. 



TOTAI- 



WIDOWB'and Os- 
PHAm' FvNn. 



s^?; 



^Iisi^^spjisssipi '^^%^ 



iSS* ! I : ? 



:-«- i 



N umber of Chnrchwi 
giving^ and amount 
fflTen fti TBUni»40 
Miaaiom. 



Number of Churchea 
giving^ and amount 
glrefuforSTiroD't 
ruNn. 



i 5* I : i !»• 



; : J :•» I ! : : : i 



3 



5 J»< ! i : l'^^'* i I I 



gSSS i :5 :S28*- :2g«« : ^ : S § 






93 



: : :J5*o2 •'••'♦® :• : • « 



^■4 :N 



:»^-« jfi^Nf^N :*« } : i i I* 



g|g§ •: :SS9S : iSSgSS) iSSS I 



«aife»N : :*4«ee« i |9ieo«4tt^ ir^mm 



BaptlMd. 



Number of 
Oommunkaais. 



Addlttonf. 



Total, 



Oh's. making no Bep. 



Gh*i. Rep. Additiona. 



Yacandea. 



Pailort. 



UoentUtea. 



TOTAL. 



WHbont Charg*. 



Paatora. 



9 



|S§8««gS5sa§s|§ss5S8q|| 



fe»20«eieeoo«ai«eee»^eo««« immok 



g:8«- 



58i JSSa I : !«- : 



C9 ■»<»« iv4 :««« 



i i-»^ : :»^ j : 



|i§|S8|g«Sg§B§|5g .359 






SS^§|S^&5$S5^88Si52 :888 



gllliiliiliggipa^^sii 



SsssS^SSI^S^'^S^S''^'^^ 



'*:3SS!7**S3*t3^9'A**oiMei-ioa« 



»»;saj;»-aa*a 









e4iose«o«'4>^t««>ao :r^e4«^eoio 



i 



1 



i 



s 



-a<»SS"S3-!SS— •SS^S""'*'' fg 



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:r-i ;i-i : : :©« : 



11 



ssss*-''as-5a'»''sa"s''"""'js 



!« 










Digitized by LjOOQ IC 



ALPHABETICAL LIST 



«r 



MINISTERS AND LICENTIATES 

OV THE ABBOOIATB PRISBTTXBIAN OHXTEOH. 




tad V. x^ B9m§ iii4 
tidmU or Pt^/ft$mr la 



MtT-OFFIOB. 



H.niliioia. G«kna,I]L 



AcKxsoir, Bobt, r. 
▲dair, J. IL, It. --^..^.-.j . 

AdanUfJohn, w.o. PMIadtlphlfc 
AlMCUMto, Joriah, r. Ohio. 
AlMuadM^ &, r. Ohio. 
Allan, A. J., p. Iowa. 

Andanon, A. &^ L. OhartUM. 
AndaraoB, Baaa^L, r. Allaghanj. 
Andraw Jaa. H^ r. FUladalptak 

Amott, lfo8M, P. 8. 

Aahanhiiat,J.T.,P. B 



Ohio. 



PhUadalphia. 



Axuit^J.Q^w.a. Philadalphta. 

BAXta-Joasph, 

Banr, W. W., L. 
BaadWd, Tltas,w.o. 
BoTaridf*, T., PBV. 
Barerldga, T. H., p. 
Blaek, AQdw. M ^ P. 
Black, Wm.A.,w.o. 
Blair, David, P. 
Blair, Hugh H., P. 
Bojd* B., P. 
Brown, H., P. 
Brown, JaoMa, p. 
Brown, Thomaa, P. 
BrownlM, B. A., L. 
Brownlaa, John T^P. 
Bmoa, Jamea, P. 
Bmoa, William, P. 
Braoo, WllUam, p. 
Bryan, John p. 
Boll, J. Ifc, P. 
Bolllona, Potar, P. 

CA]CPBXiJ.,aaw 
Ounpball, P., w. o, 



Bbaoaogo. 

AIlagboDT. 

NawTorL 

Ohartlara. 

Oambrldga. 

Iowa. 

Maakln|[UBL 

Charilara. 

OhartiMra. 

PbiUddphia. 

Phlladalphla. 



8. Indiana. 



Albany. 



N. Badftird, Pa. 
M t. Jaokaon,Pa. 

flaoteh Orova, L 

W. Labanon,Pa. 
Oxford, Pa. 
8. BanoTorJnd. 
Hi^iTlllak Ohio. 



XMiia,Oh]& 
Philadala., Pa. 
Harlanab^g.»Pa. 

Indiana, Pa. 
Now York. 
8trabana,Pa. 
Shnntn, N.T. 
Kaoknk, Iowa. 
0ambrtd8a,0. 

W.Middiatfn,P. 
Marmrab'g., Pa. 
Balttniora,Md. 
AdamsrUle, Pa. 
Bloomlnfton, I. 
Kanion, Ohio. 
Troj,N.T. 



Gawn,P. 

Oaraon, D. w., P. 
Garion, Jamaa O., i 
GaMill,A.B.,L. 
Ohnreb, Franda, P, 
Clark, John B., P. 
deland, Wm. J., p. 
Oolaman, W^ L. 
OolUna, BaTid W., p. 
OolUna, Joa.A.,p. 
OolUna, flamnal, P. 
Ooopar. Joaaph T., P. 
Cnmmina, Oyrvm, P. 
Cnnnlngham, J J>.^. 
Cnrria, W.P.yP. 

Biouoir, JaoMa, p. 
Dinamora^ Jaa., p. 
Doig, Jamaa B., P. 
Bonaldton, J., w. o. 
Bonnan,Al, W.o. 
Donnan, DaTld, P. 
])onthat,W.,w.a 
Boff, D. K., p. 
DnS; J. A., p. 
Bonn, John B^ '• 



Oambrldga 
Chartiara. 



low 



Ohafiiors. 

Albanj. 

Batrolt. 

Riehland. 

Sbeoango. 

N.niinola. 

PhOadalphln. 



Iowa. 



N.] 

Now York. 

Iowa. 

Mnakingnok 

Chartiara. 

Haw York. 

Iowa. 

Clarion. 

Oambridga. 



•,Yt 

8arTifl^"Pa. 
CialraTilla, PS. 

Phnad^ll', Pk. 
Cl^avilla, Pa. 
Ciroton, N. Y. 

Maaafleliohlo. 
TamanTille,Pa. 
YorkTtlla, Wia. 
PhUadala., Pa. 
JaBMatown,0. 
LaMotta,Iowa. 
Eaaorar, BL 

Portland Mi., L 
Now York. 
WaahlagCoB,!. 



Newark, N.J. 

Bayton, Pa. 

8.Arg7la,N.Y. 

B.QrMBw'h.NY 



BAtTox, John 8n P. Mnaklngmt. 
AMta^WmiiunyP. PhiladJpWa 



BmjnMfBm, 



PBXiBTTSET. POir«VFXCB. 



Swing, B. 



J. A- p. 

rTb.,] 



Moomonth. N.Handav«m,L 



New York. 



AUagbany. 



Ohartlara. 

Allaghanj. 

StamJbrd. 



Stamford. 
Yormonl 



Pakkmb, 8. F. P. 

Pomatar, Bobt, P. 

Porqrtha, J., l^ Ohartlara. 

Praaeiv J. J., L. MlamL 
Praneh, Barid W., P. Shanango. 

Pranch, E. W., P. N. Illlnola. 
Praneh, Wm. H., P. 



aALSKAim, Wnk, p. 
GibaoB, John, L. 
Olbaon, W. MoO., P. 
Ollkaraon, Thoa., P. 
OUlaapla,John,v. 
Oflmora, Bobart» L. 
Qoodwf Ilia, BaTid, P. 
OoodwiUia, D. H^ P. 
OoodwUUa, Thoa., P. 
Gordon, Andw.,v.il. 
Oordon, Hanry, P. 
Oraham, John, w. o. 
Grimaa, WUUam, P. 

Halz., O. M., p. 
ILunmoad,R.J.,WO. 
Haana, Thomaa, P. 
Harper, Jamaa, P. 
Haraba, John, W. o. 
Hawthoma, Wm., P. 
Handaraon, G. B., p. 
Handaraon, J. M^ p. 
Manning. Wm. B., p. 
Harron, Jaa. a, V. M. 
Herron, 8amM. T., p. 
Hill, R. A., P.M. 
HIndman, J., w. o. 
Hindman, 8aml., p. 
Honaton, A. Y., P. 
Howla, Jaa., W. o. 
Hntehinaon, F. A., p. 



Brooklyn, N.Y. 
B^yncddab^l 



•60. 



Ifaretr, Pa. 
Fraaland, HL 
Ibaria,OhSo. 

Ftaipoit, Pi. 

N. BnflklOL Pik 



Apollo, Pa. 
llllton,0.1l 

Poland Can., a 
Btamlbrd,0.W. 
Bam0t,¥t 



Cambridga. 

Iowa. 

Mnakii^wn. 

Albany. 

Iowa. 

Chartiara. 

New York. 

Ounbridga. 

0hmbrid«a. 

N.nitaiola. 

Mnaklognm. 

Ounbri^ 

Ohio.* 

Slalkot 

Clarion. 

Iowa. 

Ohartlara. 

Albany. 

Ohartlara. 



Bamat, 
Sialkc' 
CoUa, 



Slalkot, N. la. 
^N.Y. 



ImEXl, Bavid IL, p. Shanango. 
Inglat, Jamaa, P. 8. Indfama. 
Inglaa, N., P. N. Indiana. 

Irona, Andrew, P. Batrcrtt 
Irrina^ Bam'L, P. 



jAciaoir, W. C, p. 

KekkmoTj T. J., L. Cbartlar*. 
Karr, 8am*L BL, p. Bhanango. 
Kiar,M.L.,L. Ghartian. 

Latohsas^ J. N., p. MlamL 
Law, laaae, P. Ounbridga^ 

Law, Jamaa, w. o. Oambridga. 
Laa, Jamaa B., p. Albany. 
Undaay, D., w. O. Iowa. 
Logna, Jamaa W.. p. Ohio. 
LiMk, Hugh K.,w o. Allaghany. 
Lytla,JamaaP.,P. Mnakingui. 

MAmuA, John A., P. OUa, 



0. 

l»8 F.,P. 

WaBhington,Pa 
Now York. 

llbon^'8P'o..NT 
GranTilto, lU. 
0taag0)0hia 
N. Argyla» N.Y. 
Napa,(6al. 
New Llabon, O. 
Slalkot, M. In. 

AIbia.iowa. 
Bowar HiU, Pa. 

Noblaatown,Pn. 

N.Wilmingt'.P. 
Beotland, Ind. 
Lockport, Ind. 
Bomea, Mieh. 
Frodaiiekb'g.,a 

W.araanTil.,P. 

Harriarliia^Pa. 

N. OtfUbmia, 0. 
Pntnam,NrY. 

BoTlnavia.,N.Y 

NorthiMid,a 

Nafv Ooaaotd. 

BwTw.aH.,P. 
(1«5) 



Digitized by 



Googk 



166 



THX ASSOCIATB PBESBYTSBIAN SYNOD. 



FUtBTTSKT. MMT-OrnOS. 



PSStSTTXET. POtT-OVVXCa. 



lUughlin, J. Sm r. Iowa. 
MeAUUtw, Robt, p. StamlbrdL 
McArthar, Ju^ w.c. Temionti. 
MeArthar, Jm. P., L. Gambridtf*. 
MeArthar^ 8am'L, p. Iowa. 
McAoley, John, P. Clarion. 
MeBorney, f ., P. Philadelphia. 
MoOariney, A^ L. MiamL 
MoCUntoekL J., ^. tf. I^wA 
MoCUntoeZ, J., W. e. fiUdai^. 
MoOoy, BlUah. P. Monmouth. 
MeOready, J. S., P. Ma«Ungani. 
MeDowaU, N., P. faint. 
MoKlhanj, W.O^P. New York. 
IteElwei^WMjiP. Cb^rtlm. 
Kclarlmd, J W, P. 
]iiit«rl«wl.W.lf.,L. 
Mdllll, Jamee, P. 
McHlltt*!!. A^ W.C. 
MrlUttMD^ A^ w.o. 

Bcllejcirv, l> .H., P. 

MaKw, Jcvvpfa, P. 
SteK«»J.A,P, 

M-^Wm.Dwfin.. ir.C. 
l1oLt*n,D,H.A ,ir.C. 
Bl«?liMan, J^ L.. W.O. 
If(^?4aj, J.D^ wo. 

MeUlD, Wm., w.o. 

Mariili, J, C.j P 
HuTcKMh, A,, W.O. 
Mivrayi A1m.» p. 

Naih,. John 6., p. 
N)BllyJ.»'W.e. 

^Bumir, Wm., w. o. N. minoli. 
OMkaa,lL,w.o. 



(Mien 8.,Iowa. 
P.iiob'Mn,O.W. 



Blrmlnghamjo. 
■"Pa. 
Pk. 



Kitoierflb'g^Pa. 
Ghanoefbrd, 



Detroit 

Ohio. 

Miami. 

N.niiaola. 

HUmL 

Albany. 

Ohia . . 

Philadelphia. 

9, IHInob. 

Iowa. 

AU«hiMiy. 

N. Indiana. 

8.1ndhuia. 

N.Indtana. 

Albany. 

Albany. 

liewYoril 



Olena, HL 
Cadis. Ohio. 
OM#rordtVfl., L 
Hoboken, N. J. 
rrnakforlPai 
Wooater, Ohk>. 

OtavelandyOhlo. 



Peoria. N.T. 

Bloomflitdd, Pa. 
PMdnfleM, lU. 
Gvrmano, Ohio. 



Ptttabnr^ Ind. 
AIbW,"N.T. 



^tmrlUe^Pa. 

iloninonfh. im dalr, to vft 
Chartleis. ^^ 



PATTSSaoir, J.,w. o. ffhenasftt. N, Wlbn^ton« P. 

(ifttteraott, John, P, MnaUnfom* Umdondenr.O. 

Polloek, Robt. H., p. Miami. Clnolnnati,Ohlo 

VrUt, J^ron, p. AUeghMy. Sheloeta, Pa. 

Price, Jamea, P. Phlladelpliik ffmaUbrdfAk 

Krliwle, Wm., W. 0. Yemoni 

Pordyt JoMa L., p. GlarloB. LwnUrOLyPa. 



Sllpmry R., Pa. 
BaringlonvPa. 



BAXtST, Jaa. P,w.o. Shenanso. 
Bankln, Alas. B., P. ShenMi^A. 
RanUn, Jaa. Q., p. Ohartien. _ . 

B«ed, SABl. B., P. AUegheny. Ptttabargh, Pa. 
Reld« 8. 0., P. Muaklnfam. KImboltoo, O. 

Bobh, John P., L. Iowa. 
Boherlaonte.S.,L. Cambridge. ^.^ 

Rodgera, A. A., w. 0. Monmovth. 

uJaMM,P. Allegheny. AUaghanj, P& 



Sawhxll. J^ l. 
Sawyer^ B. P., p« 

jootj,«.F.,;.ifc 

SoMt) JobB)' p. 
Scott, J. P., P. 
Serogga, Joieph, P. 
Shankhind, J. A.,W.O 
Shearer, J., L. 
SlMpeon, T. K^ f, 
SKellM, J.,#.0. 
Slenta, J.B., W.a 
Small, Bdward, P. 
Sbtfl, inbef t, r. 
Smart, John a.,W.O. 
fliBartrJaneaP.«^P. 
SmealUe, J. M., P. 
Smith, Jaa. N., W.O. 
SmtUvWUilanifP. 
Snodgraas, J. M., p. 
Snodgraaa, V.»P 
SCerenaon, S.H.,V.]t 
SteTeaaon, Joalaa, L. 
Story, Alexander, P 
Strang, I>arid,W. p. 
Sturg^Km, Hqgh, P. 

swirt,x.p.,v.K. 

tAT«, ^.t;,P. 

Tellbrd,i.a,P. 
Templeton, W. W., I». 
Thomaa, Andrew, p. 
Thompeon, Jaona, p. 
Tbompaon, Josiah, p. 
Thompeon, J. K., P. 
Todd, ^qgh W., p. 
Tbdd, John, P. 
Torrence, O., L. 
Torrenea, Qeo, X. 
Torrenee, J., fi. 
Tria,A.i3,if.«j. 
Trae^dak,J.,i.. 

Varcs, J. A., •¥. 0. 
y|Q«antyOeo.a,P. 

Hf ALLAOa, iaflMa, p. 
Wallace^ John, w.o. 
WaUace, R. 0., L. 
WebetflP, 0., p. 
Whitten, Jaa. B., p. 
Wiinaauon^J«MP. 
WilllHiiaon, R. D., L. 
WUeoB,J.B.,P. 
Wllion, Sua'U nty. 
Wilflon,Thoa.,w.o. 
Wllion, Wm.,p. 
WMaon»W.W«^ 
Winter, Thoa.,L. 
Wishart, Wm., p. 
WoMb,J.I>.*w.o. 



Iowa. 
Ohio, 
ikot 



■oni 



Richland. 
Allegheny. 
Detroit 
Iowa. 

Iowa. 

Sbeaango. 

MkhiL 

Oambridga. 

MlaBL 

Detroit 

]fow«. 

Clarion^ 

Miami. 



Slalkot 

Alleghaoer. 

Iowa. 

Albany. 

Iowa. 

Slalkot 

Qarkm. 

Ghartiei* 

Albany. 

NewToit. 

Chartlerft 

Chartiera. 

NewYoit. 

CWkNL 

Iowa. . 



Iowa. 



Miamt 
Monmovlh. 



OambrMgnt 
l^ewYoriL 
Hew York. 
MiamL 



MiamL 



Iowa. 



Darilngtofn, Pa. 
SUlkot, N. In. 
Monmouth, Uh 
MUlersburg, 0. 
Llgonler,Pn. 

Sodi*''i'8.W.,0. 



Mercer, Pa. 
XokmanarlL, 0. 

ZetfiaToMfw 



IHddleaez; Par 

Lelpdc, Ohio. 
Cuatarda,Pa. 
MalkoCn.In. 

ColaBbnaO.,Iau 

Oedar Rap., lo. 
Slalkot, N. In. 

»ahdx Oreekao. 
Mahoning, Pa. 

JohnatownJV.T 
Vew York. 
01IntQn,Pn. 
Hickory, Pa. 
Pat e g aO B L W.J. 
Brookrliia, Pft 



ir.WIl»t0n,V 
H«n«iriIHO. 



Ol«in>F.,N.T. 
New York. 



V.Illhieii. 
MnakfaignnL 



90lfcr,C.W. 
Zenk^Ohlo. 

Waahington,Id. 



Digitized by 



Googk 



9HS AfiSOOAXX FUSBYVBBIAK STVOD. 



ie7 



^tcmt'i ^mita at % ^ssortate €\iat\. 



MAumt, 


FBSSBmBT. 


OBD*B. 


SIBD. 


MAIOU. 


pmSSSYTSBT. 


OBD*]>. 


nxD. 


ALUtoir, Thot. 


Ohartiara. 


1808 


1840 







1888 




Aiid«rM>B,A. 


Ghartlen. 


18« 


1856 


Kandall, Thot. 8. 


.•..M 


188- 


...... 


▲ndanon,-A. 


Allagbenj. 


1847 


••••» 


K«Dii«d7,JamM 


MUmL 


1806 


18^ 


And«noo,DATtd 




18M 


184- 


K«telMii, ThM. 


OaraUnaa. 


1890 


1888 


Anderaoa» Jolu 


ChMTtlera. 


, 1788 


1880 


Klnloek, Sam'L 




1707 




▲rmstroiiLBolli. 


KnliHki; 


17W 


im 




* 








OMibridf*. 


1848 


1840 


Lll»l,J.A. 
WH.W. 


Chvtiara. 
AUeghenjr. 


1854 
1860 


1655 

186& 


B«iOT«ft»iL 


MlHiri. 


' ••■.■• 


•«.M 


Ijfo^JMM* 




1895 




BrownlMsJ.a 


Mnskiagom. 


1868 


1858 










Brueo, JmdmO. 


•M.M 


1881 


•M... 






1765 


1808 


Bmn^BolMrt; 
BuUloiii, Altf. 


o£l^ 


1806 
1806 


: X6IB 
1657 


Millar, Jmbm p. 


CbnOm. 
Mlaalomaij. 


1824 
1827 


1846 
166. 










Mnrmy, AIm. 


....*. 


16U 




Oamov^DstM 


CharttM. 


im 


18« 


VoCkTMlI, JUBM 


Ghartfan. 


1880 


1866 


Olarluon, Jamw 


PIUIiMWphlfc 


18X1 


VeCUntoek, T. 


Ohia 


1801 


1881 


OUrkaOD,T.]r. 


nuUklBbla. 


I82S 


1686 


MeLeu^DttDtol 




1805 


1855 


OoatU; D»Tia 


..*... 


18M 


M..M 


VeL«iD,8uik% 


»•• ••• 


•MM! 




Oria»JDhn 


1Um%»lL 


ms 


1805 


HeMUUB^O. 




, -^ 


^^ 


SBFrnnBT^aE. 


llbiiqr. 


nn 


ms 


PAmm, fiMEl. 


Detiott 


. 1868 


165T 


Dkker, John 


GlarkM. 


mx 


TSn 


Pttnock,wiii.a 




' 1835 




Dkk^, Jobii F. 
DoogUuiyBDbert 


!-I 


ss 


ZZ 


PriDgle,Jr^P. 


OaroUiiaa. 


1814 
1814 


iiii 

18U 




MT.iniaoift 


1690 


*»v 


BAXfMT, JattM 


Cbartlert. 


1805 


1856 


Vlah6r,JMi>bP. 


Mlmi 


mi 


i8te 


IMd, Arahibuld 


Ounbridgtt. 






Fonjth^ J. 


•M«M 


mm-—» 


•••••• 


nadgen^Joba 


PeimaylVanJa. 


Sfi 


im 


FraaoB, Jolm 


OlnrtlMv; 


tm 


•••.M 




Sttunfod. 


1826 


1854 


Vrancb, D«Tfd 


Ohtttiera. 


uia 


1806 










rn»iich,XH. 


Quctitra. 


184t 


1818 


8auM«a,S.N. 

8a«ggLJohBll. 

SbawvJoMpb 


OUo. 


; 1890 


1851 


rolton, Andivr 


KMitiiBky. 


xror 


I818 


















iios 


mi 


Gklla*R.t, JUmt. 




ma 


nei 


Bmltb, TbomM 








OoodwilUa, &•»]>. 
Gordoa, Aloz. 


Alhsoy. 


1786 
1818 


USD 
1645 


Sotterrffle, D. 
Stnuig,J«ii« 


StanJ^rd. 


• nil 

188S 


itSI 

I65T 


QordoD, DsTid 


HlHloiuuy. 


X88SI 


—••m 


















Tmlwaol, Dftvtd 


••••M 


1767 


,„,„ 


HAllILTOir,ThOft 




lata 


U16 


Tempieton^JM. 


nilnoia. 


1830 


16a 


Hana«^ Thof. BL 


Chwtten. 


1640 


166S 










Hnmek WiUAuB 


Glurtl«n. 


UDO 


1804 


WAUDOLJobll 
Walker, wm. H. 


Iftekiflgifm. 


1811 
1840 


1846 










Wtflaee, John 


Miami."' 


IW2 


lis 


IrriM, JaiD«« 


OMk 


i6oe 


184S 


Wbytv^ArdL 


Oambrldgtt. 


1780 


1840 


Anmy. 


1824 


1835 


Wbyto, JamM 


Cambridgab 


T825 


1827 


Jmmtt, JLu&nm 


Hxnkligdflk 


1820 


1840 


Wilaon, ITm. 


GhartSark. 


1800 





Thi/oOow^ Mmitfen ««r« fdaiud im ih$ AineiaU Ckuteh^ hUdUdmU of it. 



AnnaiH Bobari 
Begga. laaM 
Dnnean, ilr 
Logan, Wl 
ManbaU,Jote 



NMrTortt. 



ffauaylTaBbik 



169V 



irra 



1886 

1788 



1788 



MarHn^Jaaaa 

Mvnaj, Joha 



Patton, AMiffvar 



Nair York. 



OaroHnaa. 
PaMuylvaaia. 

PhlUdalfhia. 



1775 
17T6 
1811 
1776 

1171 



1781 
1789 
1880 
1781 
1788 

i6or 



Th^fiUpmkig IiiM tr ^ Mow wko wen ordained cmt of XM Chureh, ht$i died in U, 



Baaka, Jdha 
BeTaridga, Ibos. 
DiekaoD, Wat. 
HaodaraoD, M. 



PblladalpUa. 

OavoUaaa. 
PaBMilTanla. 



Bao*B. 


BIB*. 


1700 


M96 


1784 


1708 


1806 


1881 


1766 


1705 


1U» 





McHfllan, Fator 
(Nf Tar, Audraw 
Pringto, Fraaeia 
Stalker, Dnoaan 
8tark»AiMlTO« 



Albanr. 
CambrldfBb 
Haw York. 



Bwn. 
1803 
1804 
1700 
1831 
1628 



1888 
1856 



nefoUowin^jMnoimt wko iMna Manhtn of ths Ckurekfor « <mm, |pir« ordamsd oui 

ii, and diod out t^ M, 



o/ 



Olark,1 
Ula&Bobaft 



Haw York. 

AlbMl. 



Bao*B. 

1765 

1706 



1788 
1880 



Maaon, Joba 



Hair York. 
|OambrIdga» 



Bac*». I usn. 
1788 

1818 isat 



ThM foiloming fiot diod wMU Lieentiatoi, 



OralftWn 
Boathatt, 
HagU]^ WUUaaaJ. 



1818 
1687 
1865 



MoOlallaad, Winiaaa . 
Thompaon, Alautadar 



188- 



Laagbaad, WUSmb 



ThsfoUoving three died while SUidenU^ 
.... I 1816 II Tadfoid, Akzaadar . 



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168 



TH8 ASSOCIATB BTVOD OF THE PBSB. CHUBCH. 



Pohratots of t\t ^uatMt ^polr at i\t Iresbstttisn %r4 

I^am Hi OrgcamatiUm m 1801, to <A« Union with the Auodatt ReforvMd Synod m 1858. 
mrarmBT 



ManhaU, wmuini . . 
darkaon. Jamaa . . . 
floHlwUlle, DaTtd . . . 
Prlngle, PraaelB, . • . 
Hamilton, Thomaa . • . 
Anderson. D-D^ John . 
lAlng, Robert .... 
Btnka, ».»., John . . 
Bullion*, Alexander . . 
Kruoe, Robert .... 
McLean, Darld .... 
WiLwn, William . . . 
Whyte, Archibald . . . 
Smith, Thomaa . . . 
Mnrray, Alexander . . 
Pringle, Jamea . . • 
Tmbiie, Br., Davtd . . . 
Banka, D J>., John . . 
Armatrong, Robert • • 
Heron, Andrew ■ • • 
Millar, Jamea . . . • 
Gordon, Alexander . . 
Wllaon, William . . . 
Mnrray. Alexander . . 
Stark, Andrew . . . . 
Kameey, DJi., Jamea . 
BeTerldge, Thomaa • . 
Pringle, Pranda . . . 
Walker, John . . • . 
Martin, Junea . . . 
Adama, Jamea . . . . 
Irrlne, Jamee .... 
Miller, Jamea P. . . . 
Hanna, Thomaa . . . 
Clokey, Joee|»h . . . . 
Snarl, John 0. . . . 
Andenon, Abraham . . 
Walker, John .... 
MeNauKhton,F.W. . . 
Kendall, ThtMnaaa S. 
BeTeridge, BJ)., Thomaa 
Hanna, Thomaa . . • 
Mnrtln. » B., Jamea . . 
MeBlwee, B.D., Wm. M. 
Henderaon, Jamee M. . 
Rmiton, John 8. . . • 
WilM>n, Samnel • . . 
Gooper, Joeeph T. . . 
Patteraon, Jamea . • . 
Smart, Jamea P. . . . 
Vineent, aeorge 0. . . 
Brown, Jamea .... 
IMckaon, Jamea . • . . 
Smart, John G. . . . 

8eott,John 

Morrow, Samuel F. . . 
Prendi, DaTid W. . . • 
Cooper, BA., Joaeph T. . 



Philadelphia. 

Philadelphia. 

Cambridge. 

PhiUdelphla. 

Philadelphia. 



Cambridge. 

Philadelphia. 

Cambridge. 

Cbartlera. 

Ohio. 

Ghartlera. 

Cambridge. 

Phihulelptala. 



CaroUnaa. 

Ohio. 

PhOadelphin. 

Kentneky. 

CaroUnaa. 

Ounbridge. 

Philadelphia 

Chartiera. 

Ohio. 

Cambridge. 

GhartierB. 

Philadelphia. 

PhUadelphla. 

Mnaklngnm. 

Cambridge. 

MiamL 

Albany. 

Cambridge. 

Mnakinguia. 

Mnakinguia. 

Albany. 

Cambridge. 

Mnaklngnm. 

Philadelphia. 

MiamL 

Chartiera. 

Mnaklngnm. 

Chartiera. 

Chartiera. 

Mnaklngnm. 

Philadelphia. 

Miami. 

Philadelphia. 

Mnaklngnm. 

Miami. 

Shenango. 

S. Indiana. 

N.Indiana. 

Camhrldsa. 

Iowa. 

Albany. 

Shenango. 

PhUaAB^ihia. 



TXIB OV 


TBABOe 

Buo'a. 


TBABOe 

vaAfli. 


rLaCI OV MXXTXHS. 


1765 


1801 


1802 


Philadelphia, Pa. 


1778 


1802 


1811 


Philadelphia, Pa. 


1788 


1808 


1880 


PhOadelpbla, Pa. 


1771 


1804 


1888 


Philadelphia. Pa. 


1802 


1806 


1818 


Philadelphia, Pa. 


1788 


1806 


1880 


Philadelphia, Pa. 


1706 


1807 


1889 


Philadelphia, Pa. 


1799 


1808 


1826 


Philadelphia, Pa. 


1808 


1800 


1867 


Philadelphia, Pa. 


1808 


1810 


1846 


PhiUdelphla, Pa. 


1808 


1811 


1866 


Canonabuiv, Ohio. 


1800 


1812 


M.... 


OarllBle, Pa. 


1789 


1818 


1840 


Pittabnrgh, Pa. 
PhiUdelphla, Pa. 


17— 


1814 


.MM. 


1811 


1816 


...... 




1818 


1816 


1818 


Huntingdon, Pa. 


1806 


1817 


1842 


Pittaburg, Pa. 


1799 


1818 


1826 


PhiUdelphla, Pa. 
Pittaburgh, Pa. 


1797 


1819 


1821 


1816 


1820 


• MM. 


Huntingdon, Pa. 


1819 


1821 


1826 


Pittabuiv, Pa. 


1818 


1822 


1846 


PhlUdelphU, Pa. 


1800 


1828 


...M. 


PlUaburg. Pa. 


1811 


1824 


•M... 


PhlUdelphU, Pa. 


1818 


1826 


•M.M 


PIttabnig, Pa. 


1806 


1826 


1866 


Philadelphia, Pa. 


1820 


1827 


M..M 


PitUburg, Pa. 


1771 


1828 


1888 


Philadelphia, Pa. 


1811 


1829 


1846 


Plttabuiv, Pa. 


1824 


1880 


1846 




1822 
1824 


1881 
18S2 


1888 
1886 


Canonabnrg, Ohio. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 


1827 


1888 


186- 


Oanonabnnr, Ohio. 
Baltimore, If d. 


1821 


1884 




1837 


1886 


•M.M 


PhlUdelphU, Pa. 


1829 


1886 


...M. 


1822 


1887 


1866 


Pittaburg, Pa. 


1811 


1888 


1846 




1888 


1889 


M..M 


Pittaburg, Pa. 


188- 


1840 


...... 


Baltimore, Md. 


1820 


1841 


M.... 


S2;!'8££''" 


1821 


1842 


...... 


1824 


1848 


1846 




1827 
1884 


18U 

1846 


M.... 


Xen^hio. 


1836 


1846 


.M... 


PhiUdelphla, Pa. 


1880 
1880 


1847 
1848 





Allea^Mny, Pa. 
ZenU, Ohio. 


1887 
1889 


1849 
1860 


.M.M 


^^f^'^ 


1841 


1861 


M..M 


Zenla,Okio. 


1841 
1887 


1862 
1868 


"••- 


Allegheny, Pa. 
Pittaburg, Pa. 
Albany, N.T. 


1829 


1864 


M.M. 


1848 


1866 


M.M. 


Xenla,Ohlo. 


1846 


1866 


....M 


Allegheny, Pa. 


1847 


1867 


M.M. 


Philadelphia, Pa. 


1889 


1868 


M.M. 


PIttabnig, Pa. 



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— -^ 




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1 



J 



PBSSBYTSRIAN HISTOBICAL ALMAKAO. 169 

^ fistflricsl »ltU\ of t\it iitsi 
^siBchtt H^tn^itxm i^\ntc\ at Itttsbsrgt $s. 

This oongregation was organized in the year 1800, by Rev. Daniel 
McLean. Rev. Francis Pringle came over from the General Asso- 
ciate Synod of Ireland, in 1799. He was to supply in New York ; 
but fearing that he was not coming, Mr. M*Lean was sent in his 
place; and while he was on the way Mr. Pringle arrived. Mr. 
M'Lean's services not being needed in New York, he returned, and 
organized the congregation of Pittsburgh soon afterwards. Thus 
then it is the oldest church in the city, with one or two exceptions, 
and has an extensive ofbpring. 

The first pastor of this congregation was Rev. Ebenezer Hen- 
derson. The first student licensed by the Associate Presbytery 
of Pennsylvania, was Mr. William Wilson, in 1795; the next, Mr. 
James Duncan, probably in 1796 ; next to them a class, consisting 
of Messrs. Thomas M'Clintock, and Daniel M'Lean, probably in 
1797, and next to them a class consisting of Messrs. Thomas Alison, 
Thomas Hamilton, and Ebenezer Henderson, probably in 1798. 
Thus by the process of providence, the man is in the field; but 
where is to be his garden in that field? The same infallible Head 
of the Church, that qualified him for work and war&re, pointed 
him to a place to exercise his powers. Of course he could not 
have been settled here before 1800 ; various considerations show 
that it could not have been as late as 1806 ; and many circumstan- 
ces combine in saying that it was about 1804 He remained here 
only about two years, and then resigned his charge, and took the 
pastorate of the church in the City of Philadelphia. During his 
ministry the congregation worshipped in a small log-house, and 
was very weak. 

The second pastor was Rev. Robert Bruce. Mr. Bruce was a 
native of Scotland. He was born Feb. 20th, 1776, in the Parish 
of Scone, Perthshire. After much preparatory training, and a 
thorough course, he graduated at the TJniversity of Edinburgh. In 
1806 he was licensed by the Associate Presbytery of Perth ; and in 
the same year was sent a Missionary to the United States of America. 
In August, 1808, he was ordained by the Associate Presbytery of 
Chartiers, and installed pastor of the united charge of Pittsburgh 
and Peterscreek, to each place he devoted half his time. 

During this arrangement the Pittsburgh branch worshipped in a 
small German Church located on the corner of Sixth and Smithfield 
Streets, where the lar^e German Church now stands. This consti- 
tution of things lasted about four years; then Mr. Bruce resigned 
the Peterscreek Branch and confined himself to the pastorate of the 
Pittsburgh congregation ; and then they erected a small church on 
the site of the present building. In 1821 this church was enlarged 
some twenty feet in front, and was occupied by the congregation 
during the whole remaining term of his ministry. In 1822 he was 
elected Principal of the Western University of Pennsylvania, loca- 



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170 THB AaBOeiMM FRBS&YTBBIAli gT^fOfib 

ted in the City of Pittaburoh. This office he held for twenty years, 
with great adceptanoe and Aoble restdts^ la 1823 the title of D. D. 
waa oonferred on him by Jefferson College* In 1848 he left the 
ITnirersity, and established Duqaesde Coll^e^ of which he was 
Piresident^ and over whieh h» pveaided till bis death, a period of 
about fouY yeara^ The esteem in which, he has held here was mani* 
feat to allv bill by nothing waa it better exhibited than by the deep 
Mpveission of feeliii^g given by hid students when they received the 
tidings^ of bis death. He wasr also Preaident of the Learned Philo- 
sophical Society of Western Peiniiiylvan.ia» Dr« Bruo^ was highly 
esteeftied in bis congregation, the city, Ghurch, countyr He was a 
oivil, literary, and spiritual benefaoter« He lived to see the sixty* 
ninth year of his age, and forty-first of bis ministry. He preached 
in Pittsburgh till the day of bis deaths a period of about thirty-eight 
years. On the 14th of June, 1846^ after mneh intense suffering, he 
died. It was on Sabbath evening— -^atwiTTMrntM Sabbath evening,, 
that he took his seat at the Marriage Sapper of the Lamb abovet 
Be came to his g^ve 'Mn foil agjs as a shock of corn cometh in his 
season,'^ At this timer tbo eongregation nvunbered 180 £EuniIieS| 
mA 250 communioantSb 

The third pastor was Bev. Abs^hak Ain>EB80K^born near Can^ 
ttoniburgh, Pa^. He wat early indoctrinated in the princifdes of out 
holy religion^and madoa pubuc profeesfoaof bis faith when seventeen 
years of agew Early in life be had an ardent thirst for the work of 
the holy ministrv, which in process of time he was permitted to 
gratify* He graduated at Jefferson College in the Autumn of 1842, 
and finished his course of Theological training at Cannonsburgh^ 
in the spring oi 1846. This was the soring in which Dr. Bruce 
died. Thus God did not take away ono shepherd till he had another 
feady for the flook. In the spring of 1847, he accepted the call to 
the Associate Congregation of Pittsburgh, and he was ordained, and 
installed over his charge in the Fall oS the same year. His sojourn 
here waa very interesting and useful; but it was very brief— only 
about two years. During his brief ministry, the congregation wor« 
shipped in the same church buildings where they hi^ so long en- 
joyed the ministrationa of Dr. Bruce. During the session of the 
Associate Synod^ which met in Allegheny City, May 24th, 1849, 
he was takso with typhoid fever. The disease gradually got a 
firmer hold upon bim ; and at 6 o*clock| A. M., July 27th, 1849. 
after a severe refining process in the furnace, he yielded up hie soul 
to the angelic postillion who were waiting to bear it home to God. 
He died in tbe thirty-first year of his age and third of his ministry. 
His beloved companion died but a few weeks afterwards. Though 
the congregation had greatly decreased while vacant, yet it in* 
creased rapidly, during the ministry of Mr. Anderson, and at his 
death numbered 100 families, and 275 communicants. 

The fourth pastor was ilev. Hans W. Lbb. Mr. Lee was born 
near Cadiz, Ohio, Oct. 29th, 1825. He entered Franklin College in 
1840, and graduated there in 1844. After the usual course of 
theological training atCannonsburgh, he was licensed by Muskingum 



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nsramBuur manoBXCM^ iSMAXAa 171 

Preebjt^fy, m the sprmg of 1849^ to premh Aa nMeariAabloHobM 
of the gospel. lu the epring of 1850, he teomved ami ftocept^ < 
iSidl from tbe* AssooiaHe Congi^egiiticiK of Pittsbargh, an^ hi the a*' 
tann of the same jr^ear he was otdained^ aind installecl pastor of this 
tshirjpSj and ia it her labotired with: ^eat ftivotir and msoomn ttil his 
deaths Winaiaig as a Mao, aiutaotcr^ S9 » pveateher, syftiptt^isiiig 
Ite tt pdBtof, and oottfldiDg as^a frien^thett ptsoo of wofsUp ¥^«s 
soOD deemed insvffioieiit to tpoooasinodste those who (n^otrded to en^^ 
joy his ministratioiM 'y alccofdiogl j; iii tbe simiiietr of 1851) the l»yild<' 
kig exhibited m thnr eagraring was ereeted. It 19 stttfaHed on Stf7* 
eath Stf 6M9t, midlray between G^vant and SmilMetd SttseCSl Though 
plain, it is large and comfortafblei Indneive df gaUerf, k frSk son^ 
▼enientlj stet 126D Mrsms^ but hai ofteit aoeomniddtfeed iMnv 
iftore^ It stands oH the site of tho old bvildfiig, bot €ff»\sp\^ nraefi 
more jroom. While it wad hi piroosss of Mreeitoii the eoftgfttj^tk)iii 
worshipped in the Lutiienin Ghur^ oa the opposite sid^ of the 
streeit. In tkrar liew chnroh ^iflo^^ Mr. Leis^ am hk people^ seemed 
to flourish more than; orer *^ bat soon Uv heailich begkif to decline, 
in hope of vestoratioi^ he treni to Gnba^ near HavaiMv ead spent the 
last months of 1852, and the first months of 1853; he then retumedl 
and performed his offioial diiiiep ia fais^ ehafge^ with sonfte intcfffap- 
tionsy till near the ^se of 1864^ wbea bo fbsmd it Moebsaiy to M- 
visit the Soath ; and not receiving the beaeftt aMioipated, be fell 
eompelled to re£^ hid ohatrge^ which he did te thereaiifljr pairt of 1^5 ; 
soon after he went Weist with the vesolvd that if bis Master would 
Mstore hm and prepaid the way, ha woM. serve bias in a late la* 
bcvions field. He had visited Kansais, afnd w^ tm bi« warr to New 
Wilteington» Lawrence Go., Pa.; bot wbito sqijoaniiiig al Cra^wfordr 
ville, loWa, he was taken with tvpbold fever, mid died after aa ill" 
»e0i of eleven da^ys. He departed hm life October 12lh, 1^56, in th^ 
tOth yeai* of bis a^, and fifth of his Saiiiistiy. The ooagrejtatio^ 
broughd baok his remains and honooraUy interred them in the 
Gitv CesMtery^ At the de^th of Mr. Lee tbs congro^ion nimbered 
218 femilies^ and 464 eommanicaoits.^ 

Thb ELDBBSHiF.^lst In Bev. Mr. Hend^nrsm's tliim It is iiApoe* 
nble to be yery definite about this mattet*, b«t we ean arrive nearly 
at ]t« It is thought that Messrs. John Atken^ Jafiies Yowng, John 
Bosebnrg^ John Katen, James May, WiUiam Woodi^ and WiUiatu 
Bell, were M elders in Mr. Henderson's time herei 

2d. Bev.BobertBraoei Those already mentioned cMitflirted tb# 
sesiion at the coasmeneem^t of his ministry^ Ut, Jdbtt Atken 
left at the time that some importaart changed took place in refe^enc^ 
to singing in the congregation, and on thai account. Mr. Jobil 
Bosebvrg wiul the grajodfatber of a krse Md infloential ecMineetiotti 
Of that name^ now living In Pittsburgh, and Allegheny City. Mr. 
James Tonng, asnally known as Squire Toungi survived Df. Bruce 
ten yeiM, be died in 1866. The seraion was increased m 1^27 by 
the election of Messrs. John Graham, Jobd Ohambers, and Robert 
Moore. Mr. John Graham is the President of Pittsburg^ Bank, 
and still a member of session. Mr. Chambers united himself with 



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172 THH ASSOCIATB FBBSBTTBBIAN SYNOD. 

Dr. Rodgera' congregation at its commencement in 1884, and ia 
still a member of that session. Mr. Moore also became a member 
of Dr. Rodgers' session, and died of cholera in 1865. In 1887 
Messrs. Thomas Mitchell, Thomas Dixon, John Boyd, John Lowry, 
and Alexander George, were elected ruling elders. About this 
time Mr. Crawford was elected; left at length, now belongs to 
Dr. Bodgers' session. Mr. Boyd was long the superintendent of 
the Sabbath-school of the congregation, took a deep interest in the 
cause of Christ, and was greatly beloved. He died in 1855. His 
widow and several children are still living, an eminently godly 
family. Mr. George was the brother of our present member of ses- 
sion of that name. He died in 1840. 

8d. Bev. Mr. Anderson. There was no election of elders in his 
time. His session consisted of Messrs. James Young, John Boyd, 
Thomas Mitchell, Thomas Dixon, John Lowry, John Graham. 

4th. BeV. H. W. Lee. There was one election in his time. In 
1853, Messrs. Samuel George, John Herron, and George Bodgers 
were elected, who with James Youn^, John Graham, John Boyd, 
Thomas Mitchell, Thomas Dixon, Jonn Lowry, composed the ses- 
sion. 

5th. S. B. Beed. The present session consists of John Graham, 
Thomas Mitchell, Thomas Dixon, John Lowry, John Herron, Samuel 
George, George Bodgers. 

The Sabbath-Sohool. — ^It was organized about eighteen years 
ago. It was started much longer ago than that in connection with 
Dr. Black's Sabbath-school. But at length that connection was dis- 
solved, and the school was broken up. It was commenced by Mr. 
William Dickey, now general agent for Westminster College, and Mr. 
John Boyd, long a member of session but now deceased. It was es- 
tablished in a small brick school-house in the 5th Ward of the city ; 
and at length transferred to the church. The first superintendent 
was Mr. John Boyd. He filled the office with great acceptance and 
noble results for eleven or twelve vears. The second superintendent 
was Mr. William Chambers. He held the office for one or two years^ 
The third superintendent was Mr. George Bodgers. He laboured in 
the office for three years. The present superintendent is Mr. James 
Montgomery. His assistant is Mr. George Beed. Through the un- 
tiring efforts of all these men, the school has greatly increas^ and 
prospered. It now consists of seven officers, twenty-five teachers, 
and :including the Bible-class, about 800 scholars. 

The fifth pastor is Bev. S. B. Beed. He was born in Huntingdon 
Co., Pa., June 6th, 1881 ; graduated at Franklin College, in 1863, 
was licensed by Philadelphia Presbytery, May 16th, 1866, received 
and accepted the call to Pittsburgh, in the autumn of 1866, — was or- 
dained by Allegheny Presbytery, and installed over this charge April 
29th, 1857. The congregation now numbers something more than 
when Mr. Lee died, although it had greatly decreased while a va» 
cancy. Ebenezer 1 To Qod be all the praise. 

Pittsburgh^ Pa, 



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PBKSBTTKBIAK HIBTOBIOAL ALKANAO. 173 

THE GENERAL SYNOD 

Of THB 

ASSOCIATE REFORMED PRESBY'N CHURCH. 



The General Synod of the Associate Beformed Presbyterian 
Charch of North America, met in the First Associate Reformed 
Church, Allegheny, on Wednesday evening, May 19th, at 7^ o^cIock, 
and was opened with a discourse by the retiring Moderator. 

!§mtiuxst Irs $t))f. i. $. "j^m, $. $. 

Psalm IxxxyIL 3. Qlorioos things are spoken of thee^ dty of God. 

Aftbb some remarks npon the figurative language of the text, 
showing its application to the churco, and particularly the church 
as a visible community, it was proposed to speak of some of its glo- 
ries. Among these were placed the details, generally, of the or- 
ganization, ordinances, and privileges of the church. 

1. That the church had the glory of being a Divine institution ; 
that while other institutions may have had noble founders, great 
and good men, loved and honoured men, whose names and deeds 
were enrolled on lists of earthly fame that would endure while earth 
itself endures, it was the distinction of the church to claim as its 
founder, the great Qod^ who has laid the foundation of the earth, by 
whom all things were created in heaven and on earth — whose 
greatness none can comprehend. High and lofty as he is, inhabit- 
ing eternity as he does, he not merely condescends to look upon 
the humble and contrite ones, but has constituted a community of 
them in his church, in which he might dwell on earth, over which 
he has spread the banner of his love, and in which he reveals him- 
self "glorious in holiness, fearful in praises, doing wonders." 

2. The church has been constituted for glorious purposes, not 
merely as the dwelling-place of God, but as the great instrumentality 
for the accomplishment of the scheme of salvation revealed in the 
Gospel. 

In respect to the glory of God, the highest end for which any 
bein^, or association of beings, can exist, it has been committed to 
the church to make the grandest display. 

Other ends subordinate to these were accomplished by the church, 
of inestimable importance to man in his earthly relations and in- 
terests. The highest ranges of science, the purest and loftiest lit^ 
eratore, the truest and grandest schemes of benevolence the noblest 



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174 THE AaSQPlM» WfOSIWaBP raUEDSBnSKAK SYNOa 

forms of social and civil privileges that bave adorned the history 
of the world, are but effects of influences emanating from the churoh. 
Bat all these and all similar ends, various as they are, important as 
they are, ennobling ms they are to man in his earthly existence, 
although the highest ends of the best of all other institutions, are 
but incidents to the great ends 4)f ibe church's existence, the glory 
of God in the salvation of man. 

m. The church h^a ,a glorious Head And Ki^e — ^^ '^^^ w^iely 
been created by Divine nuthority, tut ex:ists under the government 
of a Divine ruler. The constitution of the church was the act of the 
Triune God. The government of the -ob^iKsh has been committed 
to the eternal Son. 

If he hujoibled hinutelf by taking upon bim o^r nature fqr the 
redemption of his church, he has in that nature been highly exalted- 
It is the privilege of the church, not merely to praise him for bis 
redemption, but to rejoice in the honours to Which he has been ex- 
alted as her Bedeemer and Head. 

To the same event the speaks applied the sublime language of 
the 24th Psalm, 7 — 10th, giving it in full. Head of the church he 
has been constituted — ^head over all things to the church. 

IV. The church has a glorious history. It is a history that 
i»h<>w0 a gloriaus antiquity. lib is a history that not merely shows 
a continuous existence of the church, but is throughout luatroi«9 
with glorious manifestations of divinity. Of these some have been 
providential, and aome miraculous. But these, though for good 
and necessary ends, w^e in a sense external to the church. Ff^r 
more glorious, thongfa :of less observation to men, has been the 
working of Divine power within the ohurch, in the minds and the 
hearts of her members by the agency of the Spirit. 

The church has a glorious future. This might be assumed from 
what had already been «hown. But there was also a sure word of 
prophecy. In fulfilment of these predictiona, (some of which were 
quoted,) the earth would yet be full of the knowledge of the Lord as 
the waters cover the sea. The triumph of the church would be 
complete. Her Lord would be univenBally acknowledged. All na- 
tions would call him blessed. All would submit to his authority, 
and rejoioe in his love and obedience. 

Mighty changes must take place in the hietory of the world, be- 
fore the church shall be thus triumphant. Many and great diffi- 
culties are to be overcome, which defy the policy and power of 
man. But "the seal of the Lord of hosts will perform this." He 
bath said it and he will do it; he hath spoken it, and he will make 
it good. 

1. The honour and happiness of membership in the church. It 
is a distinction which .men prize, to be subjects of an honoured 
earthly kingdom ; still more to be admitted to relations of intimacy 
with the sovereign of such a kingdom. But how poorly does all 
such honour compare with what is enjoyed by all who are subjects 
of His kingdom, who is the King of kings and Lord of lords ; and 
are freely admitted to relations of &vour and intimate fellowship 



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FSISBYTSBIAir HDKFOMOAL kUUJSlML Yl^ 

with bim f Or, in the flgtne cf tlie test, wbat hosiotir « eompara- 
ble to that of b^Bg ideaiseos of this city of Ood ? Who wottl4 
fliot Govetlhe dialaiietioii of which the PsaJmist sfwaks in afollow«- 
ing verae, of being ooonted aa Imm tiiere <prhen the Lord wrileth up 
the people 7 And who, that haa an j jaat appreciation of the blea- 
mnga there enjojed, ia not porepared to unite with the okwing senti- 
ment of the Psalia, in reapeot to tbe chmeh, *'AM woj aprings are 
in thee?" Not thait there are bo otheor eouroea of enjoyment ; bat 
that, away from these, there ax^e mme Ihat are aatisfying. There 
are no earthly objeots, however great, and faowoFer fully poasesaedi 
that can satisfy a soul immortal, ^eqpeeially wfaea flying under the 
power of ain. It ia in the cburch that the only mtiafying conroea 
of enjoyment are opened up. It ia bere that has been opened up 
the fountain for sin .and ittncleannoaa. It is throiogh the truth and 
the ordinanoea heire enjoyed, that "we hare aoceaa to Bim who ia th|9 
aouree of all blesaedness as of all being, ete. 

2. The dignity and reaponaibility <rf offiee in the churdi. Thia 
is inferable from every part of the aubject^ but especially from the 
dignity of the church's Head; and the ends for which the church 
exists. They who properly hold <offiee in the dnnrch, do ao by 
authority of Christ, who in aasential dignity is the equal of the Fa- 
ther, and ae Sing of Zion has been formally invested with the aov- 
«^gnty of the universe. They avs his miniaters, in whatever 
rank of offiee thev may be. They who are called to preach the 
gospel are so in the highest and moat responsible rank. They are 
authorized to go before their fellow men, and say, in meekness but 
in confidence, ^' We are ambassadors of Ofariat, as though God did 
beseech you by us ; we pray you, in Christ^ stead, be ye reconciled 
to God." 

In dischai^ging the duties of this sacred enibaasy, they have to 
act for all the great interests for which the ohureh has been consti- 
tuted. A hi^er dignity or weightier responsibility was never 
{Jlaoed on creatures of God, not even upon angels. And when we 
xefleet upon human weakness and infirmities, bow justly may the 
question force itself from deeply humbled hearts : '* Who is suffi* 
cient for these things:?" Who ia sufficient to represent God in 
these things 7^-^to declare his connsel—^ administer his ordinan- 
ces — to govern his church, so as best to advance the work in which 
lies bis highei^ glory 7 Who is sufficient to minister aright things 
in which the highest inteiesta of men are so involved— ^to teach 
them the knowledge of the Lord, to direct them in the way of life, 
to influence them to believe the word and obey the ordinances by 
which alone they can be brought to receive and ei\joy the great 
salvation? Who is suffiGimtfar these tkingsf In his own strength 
no man is sufficient; and even with all the strength we are author- 
ized to expect from on high, with all the encouragement the Master 
has been pleased to give us, what heart may not be weighed down 
under the sense of such responsibilities^ With what trembling 
solicitude does it become us to engage in any part of his service r 

And on an occasion like the present^ when assembling as mem- 



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176 THE ASSOCIATE RBFOBKED PRESBYTERIAN SYNOD. 

bers of a Court of the Church, how lively should be all the feelings 
proper to his service I How far awaj should be every unhallowed 
thought, every unworthy desire ! How with singleness of purpose 
and supremacy of devotion, we should seek the honour of the Lord 
in the purity and peace and prosperity of his church 1 

8. We may infer the love that is due the church. Her King is 
the chief among ten thousand and altogether lovely. Zion herself 
stands most beautiful, the joy of the whole earth. In her Scriptu- 
ral ideal, that in which she has existed and shall yet exist on earth, 
she is the perfection of beauty. 

If she do not answer to this ideal now, if her beauty has been 
defaced, and many of her walls and palaces have been torn down, 
and her power and privileges been impaired, our hearts still cling- 
ing in affection should be filled witn sorrow. Like the ancient 
people of God, in the severe adversity of the Babylonish captivity, 
the sentiment of every heart should be, '* If I forget thee, O Jerusa- 
lem, may my right hand forget her cunning; may my tongue cleave 
to the roof of my mouth, if I do not set Jerusalem above my chief 

joy." 

No such adversity may be upon the church now. Since that 
time she has been advanced to great enlargement of privileges. 
But how poorly are they appreciated! How sadly is she held in 
bondage by the world! How dishonoured and disabled she is, as 
much from defection within as from the subtlety and power of ene- 
mies without! Who that loves her may not weep when he thinks 
of Zion? But, 

4. Our duty to the church does not consist of emotion merely. 
The inference is just as strong of our duty to seek by all proper 
means and agencies the highest order of prosperity for 'the church. 
And, hot to be tedious here, as her past history proves that the 
great element of her prosperity is an energy that is divine, this 
above all things we shouldf seek. More of this energy, more of the 
presence and power of the Spirit, is just what the church now molt 
needs. She has means enough and facilities enough to carry the 

fospel to the ends of the earth — far more than the Apostles and 
rst propagators of the gospel had, whose ministry was attended 
with a success which in these days of inefficiency appears as if 
miraculous. Doubtless, something of the effect is to be referred to 
their miracles. But any power of working miracles they had, never 
converted any one. It enabled them to prove their divine com- 
mission, and secure audience of men, but never worked conversion 
of souls. It was the truth, as it is in Jesus, preached in faithful- 
ness and zeal, and accompanied by the enlightening and renewing 
influences of the Spirit, that accomplished this. That truth is still 
in the church ; and that Spirit is still in the church, and would be 
given as freely now as then, if as earnestly sought for, and as 
fiiithfully and zealously preached. Even now we might have a 
Pentecostal time, not in circumstances, but in substantial effects. 
And happily it is for this the prayers of God's people are now in 
unusual earnestness ascending. Let them continue to ascend. "Ye 



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PRfiSBYTSRIAN HISTORICAL ALMANAC. 



1T7 



that make mention of the Lord, keep not silence ; and give him no 
rest, till he establish, and till he make Jerusalem a praise in the 
whole earth." 

Finally, and in a few words, if we love the church, and desire 
and seek her prosperity, we will desire and seek her unity. Visi- 
ble, even organic unity, is an element of prosperity and of the per- 
fection of the church in which she originally existed, and in which 
she shall yet exist. It is a state of the church for which the Saviour 
made one of his most impassioned prayers ; and one which all who 
have the same mind which was also in Christ Jesus, should most 
earnestly seek. They will seek it for the greater efficiency of the 
church. They will seek it for the good of all who are to be influ- 
enced by the church. They will seek it for the glory of her great 
Head. They will seek it in the fulfilment of his prayer for his 
disciples of all ages: "That they all may be one, as thou, Father, 
art in me and I in thee; that they all may be one in us, that the world 
may believe that thou hast sent meJ^ 

After the sermon, the Synod was constituted with prayer and 
singing Psalm ixxii. 16; to the end. 



Itemhrs at Mineral §p0lr. 



HTNISTERS. 



PBKSBTTERnSS. 



SYNODS. 



RT7LTN0 ELDERS. 



Allen, Henry, p. 
Anderson. John p. 
Andrew, W. H., p. 
Archibald, G.D., p. 
Arnold, Geo. C, p. 

BLAncEB, Alex., p. 
Bonner, J. R., p. 
Brown, M. M., w. o. 
Brown, B. A., p. 

Campbell, J. 0., p. 
Chambers, J. P., P. 
Clarke, A. D., w. o. 
Clokey, Joe., p. 
Cochran, D. 0., P. 

Dick, John N., p. 

-.• 
Fairlet, J. L., p. 
Findley,Wm.,w. c. 
Forsythe, H., p. 

Gaylet, Richard, p. 
Glenn, J. D., p. 
Gracey, Robt., p. 
Graham, H. Q., p. 
Gray, Robt., p. 

Heron, J. M., w. a 
Hervey, H. H., p. 
Hatcheson, J. P., P. 
23 



Le Claire. 
Michigan. 
Monongahela. 
Ohio 1st. 
Philadelphia. 

Boston. 
Sidney. 
Illinois 1st, 
Lawrence. 

SteabenTille. 
Iowa. 
Wheeling. 
Springfield. 
Illinois 2d 

Batler. 

Allegheny, 
Lawrence. 
Ohio 2d. 

Mansfield. 

Michigan. 

Monongahela. 

Blairsville. 

Indiana. 

Saratoga. 

Lakes. 

Indi 



Illinois. 
West 2d. 
West Ist 
West 2d. 
New York. 

New York. 
West 2d 
Illinois. 
West Ist 

West 1st. 
Illinois. 
West Ist. 
West 2d. 
Illinois. 

West Ist. 

West Ist 
West 1st 
West Ist 

West 1st 
West 2d. 
West 1st 
West 1st 
West 2d. 

New York. 
West 1st 
West 2d. 



Alexander Blair. 

Wra. Kerr. 

Wni. Getty. ' 

Jas. D. Jeffers. 
Joseph Savage. 



J. A. M'Lanry. 

Hugh Fergus. 

Thomas Duff. 
Joseph Bigger. 
Wm. R. JamiesoiL 

James Blair. 

Samael Fleming. 
Joseph Eissick. 
Andrew Walker. 

John Irvin. 



J. M. M'Elroy. 
H. M.WilsoD. 
R. F. Martin. 



Oliver Dunn. 
Joseph Rankin, 



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17B THK ASSOCIATE BEPOBirarD FRESHYTEKIAN OHUBOH. 



miRSTKES* 


pmBBBmRiBa. 


flnrN(H>s. 


HCUNO KLDBRS. 


Jaicib80M| Saml^ r. 


Westmoreland. 


Westlat 


John Shaw. 


EERB,DaY!dB,w.c, 


Monongaheia. 


West Ist. 


John Cook. 


Maodtul^ DftTid, p« 


ChiUioothe. 


West 2d. 


JobDS.PattoD. 


MatMiiU, D.. w. c 


Illinoia 2d 


Illinois. 




)l'Ayeul,RMA.F, 


Iowa. 


Illinois. 




M'Oarrell, J., p. 


New York. 


New York. 




-lI'Oracken,S.W.,p. 


Ohio Ist* 


West 2d. 


...... 


M'Oaiw, W, 0.^ p. 


Ohio Ist, 


WeBt2d. 


L. Monfort 


M'HattoD, Joseph, F. 


Sidney. 


West 2d. 


J(^n Shaw. 


M'Kee, S. E., p. 


Le Claire. 


Illinoia 




M'KiostrT, M., p. 
M'Lareo,D.O^w.a 


WestmordaDd. 


West Ist. 


£. Henderson. 


Caledonia. 


New York. 




M'Leao, John, p. 


Illinois Ist. 


Illinois. 


Joseph Hamill. 


Millen, S.. p. 


Illinois 2d. 


Illinois. 


J. M'Clanahan. 


Morrow, David, p. 


Michigan. 


West 2d. 


Bobt Peuton. 


NiBLOcnc, Isaiah, p. 


Batler. 


West let 


J. W. Christy. 


Patton, George, p. 


Caledonia. 


New York. 


Bobt. Sterrett 


Pea«>ck, J. H., p. 


Ohio 2d. 


West 1st. 


Jas. Campbell. 


PoHodi, D. H.. p. 


Westinoreland. 


Westlflt 


John Bose. 


Preasly, Jos. H., p. 


Lakes. 


West Ist. 


T. C. Cochran. 


Pressly, J. T., p. 


Allegheny. 


West 1st 


Alex. Dallas. 


Prestley, Jas., p., 


New York. 


New York. 




PresUey, W, H., p. 


Chillicothe. 


West 2d. 


John Platter. 


RiTCHiK, Andrew, p. 


Ohillicothe. 


West 2d. 


Jos. P. Wright 


Boss, Rpbert, w. o. 


Illinois 2d. 


Illinois. 


W. R Jamieson. 


BoovLLVBy Jas. B., p. 


Washington. 


New York. 


A. P. Bobinson. 


Scouller, J. T., p. 


Ohio Ui. 


West 2d. 


B. C. Stewart 


Bhafer, A. G., p. 


Allegheny. 
Big Spriny. 


West Ist, 


A. Miller. 


Shields, Jsmes, p.- 


West Ist 


W. Uraccy. 


Stewart, B. £., p. 


Springfield. 


West 2d. 


S. Barnett 


Taog^bt, S^ p. 


Steabenyilie. 


West Ist. 


S. Smiley. 


VAKBATO!f,John,P. 


Caledonia. 


New York. 




Waddlb, Benj., p. 
Walboe, B. H., p. 


Ohio 2d. 


West 1st. 


D. Cowden. 


New York. 


New York. 


J. KimbalU 


Wallace, D. A., p. 


Illinois 2d. 


Illinois. 




Wallace, S., p. 


Sidney. 


West 2d. 


E. B. Glenn. 


White, Joseph, p. 
Wilkin, H.S,w,c. 


Iowa. 


Illinois. 


Jas. Smiley. 


New York. 


New York. 


T. M. Niven. 


Wilson, Alex , w. o. 


Wheeling. 
BlairsTille. 


West Ist. 


C. Warful. 


Wilson, M. H., p. 


West Ist, 


B. Henderaon. 


YouKG, Alex. w. c. 


Wheeling. 


West 1st. 


T. Sweeny. 



Ker. D. C. M*Laren, D. D., of Presbytery of Caledonia, was 
elected Moderator. 

The call being made for Presbyterial Beports, the following responded : — Allb- 
OHBNT, Blairsyillr, Bio Spriico, Boston, Butlrr, Caledonia, Chillioothk, Indi- 
ana, Ilunoib 1st Illinois 2d, Iowa, Lawrxncb, Lb Clairb, Mansfield, MiCHiaAir, 
MoNONOASKLA, New York, Omo 1st Ohio 2d, Philadrlphia, Saratooa, Sidnht, 
SpRWocnBLD, StkubbnyxllBi Wabhinotok, WssTMORiLAiO), Whebuno. 



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n n f} ^ ty^ tfG 



Geneva New York 
Moderator of the Associate Refurmed Presbyterian Churcli. 'X'^'6. 



PnhJishd hyJosej^fi M. Wjlson, NUll Soulh %^JI,^^00^ 




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PRS8BTTSKIAN HISTORICAL ALMANAC. 



179 



Sihtt at $Hij[|i0R. 

The Committee on the state of religion, Eev. B. Waddle, Chair- 
man, reported as follows, which was adopted : 

That some Presbyteries make no allasion to the state of religion in their bounds. 
This is the more remarkable, in view of the general religioas interest experienced 
in onr cities, towns, and rural districts. Other Presbyteries report no special awaken- 
ing of sinners and reviving of professing Christians in their congregations. Most of 
the Presbyteries, however, are happy in having cause to record the loving-kindness 
of our God to his people. Worldtiness, a rage for novelty in the manner of preach- 
ing, parental neglect in training children, and other caus^ of complaint, are noticed 
in the Presbyterial reports. Still, however low the state of religion has been, and 
now is, yet its present tendency is upwards. The social means of grace are more 
highly appreciated, and generally more used than formerly. Meetings for prayer, 
praise, and conference, are frequent, earnest, and edifying. Sabbath-schools are flour- 
ishing — Christian benevolence, though embarrassed by the recent financial crisis, is 
active and strong — the spirit of missions is undying. A desire for union among the 
followers of the Lamb is becoming stronger and stronger. Attendance on the word 
preached and ordinances dispensed, is in general regular and good. Very encourag- 
mg accessions have been realized by many of our congregations. 

Demands for preaching in vacancies and missionary stations are numerous and 
urgent, beyond tne means and abilities of Presbyteries fully to supply. The spirit 
of religions revival is being poured out upon our congregations ana families. The 
children of Son have much cause to rejoice in their King. Among them is a grow- 
ing regard for the purity and peace, unity and prosperity of the church. Let minis- 
ters, and elders, and members, individually and in their associated capacity, thank 
God and take courage. Many in all the churches are coming up to ti^ help of the 
Lord against the mighty. 

Thi following Ministebs have died dcrinq the teak 





FBISBTTBT. 


Tear of 
Ordination 


Tear of 
I>eath. 


Aas. 


nSKASS. 


Bkucs, James C. 


I1Unola2d, . 


1831" 


1M7 


67 


Phthisis. 


Dbsxnsx, ThomM . . . 


Boiler, . . 


18fi3 


1867 


83 


Oonsnmption 


JOHNIT05, James .... 


Mansfield, 





1858 


74 






lUlnolsSd, . . 




1867 


84 


l)ys«ntefy. 



The Committee on Foreign Missions, Rev. John T. Pbesslt, 
Chairman, reported the following, which was adopted : 

Another year of our missionary operations has passed away, memorable for the 
pressure which has been felt throughout the commercial world ; distinguished us a 
season of trial to many of our brethren engaged in the foreign missionary field ; and 
not less remarkable for a religious awakening, which has prevailed to a greater ex- 
tent than any one which has occurred at any former period in the history of the 
church. The friends of Zion have thus had occasion to sing of mercy and of judg- 
ment. While we are called to sympathize with our brethren, who have suflfernl 
so severely in India, and to mourn over the loss of manv valuable lives, we desire 
to be thankful for that kind Providence which has watched over the brethren em- 
ployed in the mission more immediately under our supervision. Though they have 
experienced trials of various kinds, their lives have been preserved, and they have 
been enabled to persevere in the prosecution of their work of faith and labour 
of love. 

During the past year, our Syrian mission has received an important accession in the 
persons of Dr. A. Hattie^ and Rev. John Crawford and lady. 



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180 THB PRBSBYTEBIAN CHURCH OP CANADA. 

In the month of October laet, we are sorry to have to say, our beloved sister, Miss 
Dales, was 8eriously injured by a fall from her horse. By this distressing occurrence, 
she was subjected to the necessity of suspending her labours in her school for a time. 
But we are happy to learn, that through the favour of a kind Providence, her health 
is again restored. 

The school for the instruction of boys is still continued, and the prospect of useful- 
ness in this department of labour is encouraging. The number of scholars in attend- 
ance is about twenty-five. 

The Book Depository, under the care of the mission, has thus far proved an im- 
portant auxiliary in the diflFusion of religious knowledge, in exciting a spirit of in- 
quiry, and in promoting a taste for reading. Quite a considerable number of Bibles 
and religions books have been circulated during the past year. 

In the conclusion of our report, we would cm the attention of pastors and congre- 
gations to the fact that our missionary force has been enlarged ; and while it is hoped 
that our brethren will thus be enabled to prosecute their work with greater efficiency, 
it may be well to remember that the expenses of our mission will be augmented, and 
consequently that our missionary fund will need to be more liberally supplied. All 
which is respectfully submitted. 



The following resolution was offered by Rev. Messrs. S. Wallace 
and J. Shields, and adopted: 

Whereas, It is important that the youth of our church should be educated under 
the influence of sound religions principles : and whereas, Westminster College, at 
New Wilmington, Pa. ; Franklin College, at New Athens, 0. ; Madison College, 
At Antrim, O. ; Muskingum College, at New Concord, 0. ; Monmouth College, at 
Monmouth, 111. ; and Washington College, at Washington, Iowa, are to a greater 
or less extent, under the control of the United Church, and afford opportunities for 
such an education, therefore 

Resolved f That members of the church are earnestly recommended to patronize these 
institutions, and render all possible aid in promoting their prosperity. 

On motion the thanks of the Synod were rendered to T. McConnell, and J. P. 
Penny, Rsqs., for their counsels ; also to the Pittsburgh, Fort Wayne and Chicago, 
Newark and Sandusky, Ohio, Steuben ville and Indiana, Pennsylvania Centrnl, Spring- 
field and Mount Vernon, and Bellefontaine and Indiana Bailroads, for reduction of 
fare, and excursion tickets furnbhed to members of Synod. Also 

To the citizens of Allegheny, Pittsburgh, and vicinity, for their kind hospitality to 
the members of Synod, — and to the Gazette, Dispatch, Evening Chronicle, and Uni- 
ted Presbyterian, for having reported the proceedings of Synod. 

On motion, Synod adjourned to meet at Xenia, Ohio, on the 8d 
Wednesday of May, 1859, at 2 o'clock, P. M. 

Closed with prayer by the Rev. D. Macdill, D. D., singing the 
183d Psalm, and pronouncing the apostolic benediction. 

D. 0. M*Laren, Moderator. 
Jahes Prestlet, Clerk. 



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A8SO0IATB REFORMED SYNOD OP THB PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. 181 



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S?J?i;53SS5S25 



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ALPHABETICAL LIST 

OF 

MINISTERS AND LICENTIATES 

or THE ABBOOIATB REFORMED STNOD OF THE PRE8BTTERIAN CHURCH. 



[NoTS.^Iii the following Lfnt, P IndicatM Pastor; 0. b^ Stated Supply; X.M., and J. M., Home and 
Imreiffn Misnonaries; W.C., }^thout Charge; CUF., Chaplain; TRB.^ or nw^ Preatdent or Professor la 
a Coll«ge or Seminary ; Mat ^Editor; c. e^ Corresponding Secretary ; t.tTBaeher; h., lAoentiate ; JMl, 
AgesU. The Poat-offloes are oorreeted up to the time of going to praaa.] 



PXMBTTSBT. POaT-«VriCX. 



A9An, Alex., I*. 
Allen, Henry, P. 
Anderaon. J., P. 
Andrew, W. U., ». 
Andrerwa, Joaeph, P. 
Andrews, J. K., P. 
Arbuthnot, J., P. 
Archibald, 0. D., P. 
Armstrong, J., P. 
Annatroiig, R., P. 
Arnold, 0. C, P. 
Aten, A., P. 
Atan, J. L., b 

BALOKIIIOBfB.L^D.M 
Baldrldge, 8. C , P. 
Bamett, James, p.m. 
Bell, A. P., L. 
Bigger, M., P. 
Black, J. K., L. 
Blaike, A , P. 
Bonner, J. H., w. c. 
Bonner, J. K., P. 
Boyoe, W. M., p. 
Boyd, J., w.c. 
Boyd, J C, I'. 
Boyd, T. F., P. 
Bradford, D.G., p. 
Brash, J., P. 
Broaden, W. P., P. 
Brown, J. G., P. 
Brown, M. H., T. 
Brown 8.. P. 
Browne, R. A., P. 
Rryson, J. C, P. 
Bachanan, J., l*. 
Bucbanaot J. H., T. 
Buchanan, J. N., P. 
Bachanan, J. S..W c. 
Bachanan, W. II., L. 
Burrows, J., P. 



Saratoga. 

U Claire. 

Miohlgao. 

Monongahela. 

Steubenrllle. 

StenbenTttle. 

ChllUcothe. 

Ohio 1st. 

Lawrence. 

Philadelphia. 

Philadelphia. 

Ohlolst 

OhIolBt. 

Michigan. 

Michigan. 

Ohio lat. 

Ohio 2d. 

lUlnols 2d. 

Ohio Ist 

Boston. 

Chilllcoilie. 

Sidney. 

Iowa. 

Big Spring. 

Monongahela. 

Caledonia. 

Allegheny. 

New York. 

Butler. 

Monongahela. 

Illinois 1st. 

BlalrsvUle. 

Lawrence. 

Allegheny. 

StenbenTllle, 

Ohio 1st. 

Michigan. 

Chillicothe; 

Ohio Ist 



Iowa City,Iowa. 
New Paris, Ind. 
Canonsburg, Pa* 
Locust Hill. Pa. 
StenbenTille, 0. 
Wheat Ridge,0. 
Cincinnati, 0. 
Worth, Pa. 
Phlladela., Pa. 
PhtladeU., Pa. 
New Paris, 0. 
ClDcinnati, 0. 

LeaTenworth,K. 
Jefleraon, Ind. 
(Wro, Egypt. 



Callarah, T.. w c. 
Calderhead, B. B., P. 
Calhoun. A., i*. 
Campbell, J. A.. P. 
Campbell, J. C, P. 
Campbell, 11. K., p. 
Campbell. R. 8., p. 
Carlile, W., w. c. 
Chambers, J. P.. P. 
CUriaty. D. B., L. 
Clark, James A., L. 
Clark, Joiteph lI, l. 
dark, 8. W , P. 
Clarke, A.D.. PXf. 
Clarke, U., d. m. 
Clements, A.. P. 
Clokey, Joseph, P. 
Cochran, D C P. 
Connelly, H.. W. c. 
Conner, W., P. 
Connor, W., w. o. 
Cooke, William, L. 
OonHf 8. H., V« 

(182) 



Aledo, 111. 

Boeton, Man. 
Kariden, Ohio. 
Ganonsborg, 0. 
Keoknk, Iowa. 

Mt.Lebanon.Pa. 
Rochester, N. T. 
Allegheny CP. 
New York City. 
Coultersril., Pa. 
PltUburg, Pla. 
Sparta, III. 
Willet, Pa. 
New Castle, Pa. 
Moon. Pa. 
Comet8buiig,Pla. 
Oxlbrd, Ohio. 
Hebron, Ind. 
Jackson, Ohla 
Oxford, Ohio. 
8hakeleyTiI.,Pa. 

Sidney. Kenton, Ohio. 

Ohio id. KnshTille, Ohio. 

Mansfield. Satku nah, Ohio. 

BuUer. Baldwin, Pa. 

SteubenTille. Paris, Pa. 

Ohio 1st ]6MileStand,0. 

Le Claire. Bewitt, Iowa. 

Big Spring. York Fur., Pa. 

Iowa. Mlddlet'n.,Iowa 

Iowa. Monmouth, III. 

Monongahela. Allegheny C, P. 

Sarato^. 

" E. LWerpool, 0. 

New Athens, 0. 
Bloomington,Ill 
New York City. 



SteuhenvlUe. 
Wheeling. 
Illinois 2d. 
New York. 
Springfield. 
IlUnois 2d. 
New York. 
BlalrsTllIe 



Springfield, 0. 
Viola, lU. 
Newbnrv, N.Y. 
Blairsvlfie, Pa. 



Westmoreland. BlairsTille, Vsu 

Wheeling. 

lUlnois24L 8iiawz,m. 



HAMS. 



PBXSSTTBRT. POeV-CMrPICB. 



Cornin, J., P. Ohio 2d. 

Craig, J. L., P. Indiana. 

Crawford, J., P. H. Washington. 

Cnrrie, D., w.c. Caledonia. 

Carrie» W., &. Caledonia. 

DAX.n, J. B.. p. PhUadelphla. 

Davidson, Wm., P. Ohio lat 

Dick. J. N., P. Butler. 
Dickson, Thos., w. c. Illinois 2d. 

Drennen, P. H., P. Illinois 2d. 



Dnff, J., P. 
Dnncan, James, P. 

KMAS,J.,L. 
Ersklne, J., P. 
Ersklne, W. R., P. 

Faiblxt, J. L., P. 
Paries, Isaiah, P. 
Varmington,T.T., P. 
Pee, R. N., P. 
Fife, J. H., P. 
Flndley,J.J., w.c. 
Flndley, 8., pbs. 
Flndley, W., PBP. 
Forsyth, J., P. 
Forsvtbe, H., P. 
Forsythe, J.CmW.C. 
Praser, J. A., P. H. 
Freetly, John, w.c. 
Fulton, J. G., P. 

Gatlst, Richard, P. 
Geun, J. D., P. 
Gibson, J. D., P. 
Qllmore, J., P. 
Glren, James, w. c. 
Glen, J. W., P. 
GloTer, 8., w. c. 
Golden, James, P. 
Gordon, J. M., P. 
Oawdy, G. W,, p. 
Graooy, R., P. 
Graham, H. Q., P. 
Graham, J. M., p. 
Graham, W. H., P. 
Gray, R., P. 
Greer, J. C, P. 
Grier, James, P. 

Haooabtt, J., L. 
Harper, J., L. 
Harper, R. D., p. 
Henry, Addison, I.. 
Heron, J. M., w. c. 
Herrey, H., P. 
Uowder, W., w. c. 
Hatehinson, J. F., P. 
Hutehlnaon, S.M., p. 

Ibtxha, C, p. 

Jack, William, P. 
Jackaon, W. C, l. 



Sidney. 
Ohk>2d. 

New York. 

Saratoga. 

llliooh2d. 

Allegheny. 

Caledonia. 

Washington. 

Le Claire. 

Westmorland. 

Lakes. 

Ohio 2d. 

Iiawrence. 

New York. 

Ohio 2d. 

Wheeling. 

Michigan. 

Illinoto 2d. 

Westmoreland. 

Mansfield. 

Michigan. 

Saratoga. 

ChlUlcothe. 

Allegheny. 

Illinois Ist 

Illinois 2d. 

Steubenville. 

Illinois 1st. 

Springfield. 

Monongahela. 

BlabvTUle. 

Illinok 2d. 

Iowa. 

Indiana. 

Blalnrille. 

Mcmongahda. 

Monongahela. 

Washington. 

Springfield. 

Moi _ " ■ 

Saraton. 

Lakes. 

Washington. 

Indiana. 

Le Claire. 



Saratoga. 

New York. 
StenbenTille. 



Rlx's Mills. 0. 
Princeton, Ind. 
Damascus, Sy 
Steriing, N. Y. 
Sterling, N. Y. 

Phlladela., Pa. 
Hamilton, 0. 
Kntaaing, Pa. 
Moorefleldflnd. 
Washburn, 111. 
Perrysburg. 0. 
Mantna, Ohio. 

New York City. 
N.Kortrig'tNT 
Oquawka, 111. 

Conrtneys, Pa. 
Mvmford,N.Y. 
Oxbow, N.Y. 
Wapello, Iowa. 
Mt Pleas't, Pa. 
Wayae Oor.,Pa. 
Antrfan, Ohio. 
N.Waroiogt'.P. 
Newburgh.N.T 
FBlnrlew,Ohio. 
Salem. N. Y. 
Damascus, St. 
Robs Grove, III. 
Turtle Ck., Pa. 

HasttngR,Ohlo. 
Ellzaville, Ind. 
S.Kortrig%NY 
Tranquility, 0. 
AllegbenyC.,P. 
Freston, 111. 
Cbenoa, III. 
Dnngannon, 0. 
Berlin, lU. 
ColnmbuSfOhio 
Pitttburg, Pa. 
N. Florence, Pa. 
Klmira, 111. 
Morn'g.SunJo. 
Sammervil.,In. 
Homer, Pa. 
Nobleetown, P. 

ADeghenyCP. 
Ltobon, N. Y. 
Xenh^ Ohio. 
W.Charieat'NT 
ThompaonT',C. 
Hartstown, Pa. 
W. Aarora,N.Y 
Ogden, Ind. 
Davenport, lo. 

Xortricht»N.T. 

Newbnrgh,N.T 
WenarUle^ a 



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ASSOCIATE RSFOBXJBD SYNO]> OF THS PRBSBYtV. CHURCH. 18S 



rmmamwtmaiT, mmv-ovficb. 



Jamlsoii, J^ ». 
<JamlMii, 83 p. 
JmmlMon, W. IL, p. 
Johnson, 'H. U., p. 
Johnatont Wm., P* 
Jones, D.B.,» M. 



Jsnkin, A. C^ w.«. Boston. 



Butler. f reeport, Pn. 

Westmoreland. Btiabetk, Pa. 
Bntler. Wklteatovn^Pn. 

Boston. B. Boston,Biau. 

Ohio 2d. Washington, O. 

Big Spring. Goneord, Pa. 



Xenla,Ohlow 



fUirz, OllTer, c. 
Kelso, James, P. 
Kendall, C^ P. 
Kerr, B. R^ pnr. 
Kerr, 8. R., i.. 



Westmoreland. Tnrtle Gk., Pa. 
Westmoreland. New Texas, Pa. 
Lakes. Buffalo, N. T. 

Honongahala. Plttshvrg, Ba. 
Honoagahela. Allegheny G^ P- 



pRBsaraniT. postowicb. 



Klrkpatrlck,N.,w.c. GhUlieothe. JickmanTltte, a 



Laiva, James, p. 
Lansing. G., r. ml 
LlDd, W., w. c. 
Lorlmar, W., p. 
Love, T., P. 
Lowman, A., L. 



Saratoga. 
New Tork. 
Michigan. 
BCeubenTille. 



BlairsTiUe. 



AUCAVLAT, J., w. c Washington. 
MacdUl, D., P. GhlUicothe. 

Maelaren, W., P. Boston. 
Maooubray, A.K.,K.. Allegheny. 
Uaesurely, W.J., X.. Chlliicothe. 
Magaw, J. A. P., c. Ohio 1st 
Baris, G., w.c. Washington. 

McAyeal, R. A., P. Iowa. 
If oCagne, T., r K . ChiUloothe. 
McCakan, A., w. c. Michigan. 
HeCalister, J.R.,wc. Illinois 2d. 
McCarrell, A., P New York. 

McCaughan, C. T.. P. Sidney. 
MoCUaabau, A.W.,p. Chillioothe. 
McClelland, A., c. New Tork. 
McClure, J. T., P. WheeUng. 
MeOonnell, W.L.. P. Allegheny, 
MeCracken, J.S..W o. Ohio 1st. 
McGracken. S. W., P. Ohio 1st 
McCulIouKh, J.S.,L. Lakes. 
McCace, W. C., p. Ohio 1st 
McDIll, D , BBT. Illinois 2d. 

MeDill, N.Cp. lodUna. 

McBlwee, Wm., L. Monongahela. 
McFarlaad. II.C.,w« Moaongahela. 
McHatton, J., p. Sidney. 
McKee, S. £ , P. Le aalre. 

McKinstry, M,P. Westmoreland. 
McKnight. J. C, P. Illinois 2d. 
McLarea, D. C., w. c. Galedonia. 
McLaren. W. S., P. Caledonia. 
McLean, J., P. Illinois Ist 

McNab, P. D.. L. Caledonia. 
M<tNeal, J., P. Ohio 2d. 

McNnlty, J. M., wc. Saratoga. 
McVean, D. C, P. Caledonia. 
McWatty, R., P. Lawrence. 
WcWlllUims, A., P. New York. 
Mehard, W. A., P. Lawrence. 



Mercer, T , L. 
Millen, S.C. P. 
Miller, A., w.c. 
Miller, J., w.c. 
Miller, 8., P. 
Honfort P-i P. 
Morrison. M.. p« 
Morrow, D., P. 
Morrow, J., P. 

Nbil, J., p. 
Niblock,J., P. 



ChUIicothe. 
IlUnols 2d. 
BhtirsTiUa. 
Iowa. 

[lUnoU ad. 
Ohio Ist 
Illinois 2d. 
Michigan. 
nUaois 1st 

Lawrence. 
Butler. 



OKMOxn, B. K., L. Moaongahela. 
Ormond, G. K, w. c. Munongahela. 
Ormond, M. K., L. Monongahela. 

Paus, Jr., n., P. WheeUng. StClair8Tille» a 



Aades, N. T, 

Alexandria, Bgy 
GentreTiUe^Mfa. 
Riehmoad,Ohio. 
Waterford, Pa. 
Saltsiku^, Pa. 

Ogdensbarg,Nr 
BekmanTlUe, O. 
VsU Blrer, Mas. 

WheariUdge,0. 
Oquawka, Ul. 
Argyle, N. Y. 
Oskaloosa,Iowa. 
Cairo, Kgjat 
Rcasvllle, Ind. 
Bock Isiand,IU. 
Newburgh,N.Y. 
Urbana, Ohio. 
Decatur, Ohla 
New York Oty. 
WheeUng, Va. 
Allegheny, Ba. 
GedarTille,Ohlo. 
Morning 8«n,0. 

CiR'MniJiiiii.KPtjio 
MuBinouMi. lit. 
MilfOT, iDd. 
All<i'^liemyCPa. 
WUklnii, I'a. 
Bellh.foiiUiiii-,0. 
U a*.lTe C, Jo. 

(Ji^tiieTa, N'. ¥. 
C'Tili-doiiiii, N.Y. 

Barlow, Ohio. 
Ciarkson. N. Y. 
rrankl]nv',N.Y. 
Mercer, Pa. 
Waldea, N. Y. 
N.Wilmlngt', P. 
Mayber, Ohio, 
aayton, Ul. 
BrookrBle, Pa. 

Monniouth, HI. 
College Cor., 0. 
Monmouth, 111. 
Warren, Ind, 
Sparta, III. 

MtJaek«on,Pa. 
Butler, Pa. 

Sharon, Pa. 
Pittsburg. Pa. 
Pittsburg, Pa. 



Battarson, A., p. 
Patterson, 8., P. 
Batton, George, P. 
Paul, D., w.c. 
Peacock, J. H., P. 
Pinkerton, J.W.,L. 
PoHoek, D. U., p. 
PoUoek, W. A., L. 
PoUock, W.G.,w.c. 
Porter, J. G., P. 
Potter, G.K..D.K. 
Fnesaly, J. H., P. 
Pressly, J. N., P. 
Pressly, J. T,, P. 
Prestley, James, P. 
PresUey, W. U., P. 
Proctor, 8. M.. 1.. 
ProudiMy R., vmw. 

Ramsbt, S., L. 
Reed, W.G., w.c. 
Reid, a F., P. 
Rlppey, John, P. 
Ritchie, A., P. 
Robertson, J. U, L. 
Robertson, J. S., P. 
Robertson, P.C.wc. 
Ross, Randall, P 
Ross, Robert, Rir. 

SCX)I«JI.UB, J. B., P. 
ScouUer, J.Y.. P. 
Shafer, A. G., P. 
Shepherd, J. R., P. 
Shields. J., P. 
8borttW.B.,P. 
Smith, R., P. 
Somers^W.C, W.C. 
Steele, J. C, P. 
Steele, J. D., o. x. 
Stewart, J., C 
Stewart, J. P., P. 
Stewart R. J£., ». 
Sturgeon, J. R., ii. 



Iowa. 
Allegheny- 
Caledonia. 
Bidnay. 
Ohio 2d. 
Illinois 2d. 
Westmoreland. 
Ohio 1st 
Bader. 
IlHnois 2d. 
nilaols 2d. 
Lakes. 
Iowa. 
AUeghenv:. 
New York. 
GhUlieothe. 
Mansfleld. 
Saratoga. 

Westmoreland. 

Lawrence. 

WheeUng. 

Saratoga. 

GhilMoothe. 

SteubeoTllle. 

Ohio 1st 

Caledonia. 

Ohio 2d. 

IliinUs 2d. 

Washlngtoa. 

Ohio let 

Allegheny. 

Mleblgam. 

Big Spring. 

Washington. 

Michigan. 

Caledonia. 

Allegheny, 

lowm. 

Le Claire. 

n&nois 2d. 

hpringfleld. 

Monongaliela. 

SteubenTiOe. 



Ing. 
igabela. 



Taqoamt, S., p. 
Taggart W., w . c. Wheeling. 
Taylor, James R., L. Mononi 
Thompson, H. H.. r. 
Thompson, R. O., p. Mansfleld. 
Thompson, 8. T., P. Illinois 2d. 
Turner, T., P. Illinois 1st 

Turner, W., P. Indiana. 



W. Point, Iowa. 
Darlington, Pa. 
Geneva, N. Y. 
Sidney, Ohio. 
Mt Vernon, a 
SmithiTUle,IL 
W-Nawto^Pa. 

Arospect, Pa. 
Uttle York, IB. 
BlooQiington,fl| 
Erie, Pa. 
Indlanolajowa. 
ABegheny, Pa. 
New York. 
GhUlieothe, 0. 

8ehtaeeta'(ltr>NT 

N.Alexandria,P, 
Springdale, Pa. 
Union tow«, 0. 
Kortright N. T, 
Greenfleld,Ohk». 
Carroltott, Ohio. 
Monroe, Ohio. 
B«.Ylsta.N.Y. 
Sharon, Ohio. 
Monmouth, lU. 

Argyle, N, Y. 
FalrhaTen, Ohle 
Rural IUdge,Pa. 
Holland, Mich. 
Mexico, Pa. 
CambHdge,N.Y. 
HolUnd, Mich. 

W.Manchesf,P. 
IieaTenw',a,K. 
Andrew, Iowa. 
Sparta, III. 
Belfarouk, Ohio. 
Sparta, lU. 

W.Middlet*n.,P. 
Union town, 0. 
Allegheny G., P. 
Codiranton,N.7 
De Kalb, Ohiow 
Roes Grove, 111. 
Carmi, III. 
Bloomlngton,Li 

Washington, lo. 
York,N.Y. 

New Concord,0. 



TavarvA, 8. F., p. Le Claire. 

Yan Baton, J., P. Caledonia. 

Waddlb, B., p. Ohio 2d. 

Waddle, W. G., L. Ohio 2d. 

Walker, Jos,, par. Ohio 2d. 

Walker, J. R., P. Indiana. Bpringfleld,Tnd. 

Wallace, A. G., P. Westmoreland. Tinker Run,Pa. 

Wallace, D. A., P. Illinois 2d. Monmonth, lU. 

Wallace, J., w. c. Ohio 2d. 

Wallace, R. H., P. New York. Blooming 0,NY 

Wallace, R. U., p. New York. L. Britain, N. Y. 

WalUce, 8., p. Sidney. PIqna, Ohio. 

Weed, N.C., P. Springfield. Snarland, HI. 

White. J., P. Iowa. Knoxville, lo. 

Wilkin, II. 8.. w. c. New Tork. Brooklyn, N. T. 

Wilson, A., w. c. Wheeling. Cadis, Ohio. 

Wilson, M. H., P. BlalrsTine. Kent, Pa. 

Wright J. R., r- Springfield. Gedarville, Ohio. 

Wright, W., L. Ohio let Oxford, Ohio. 

Wright, W., P. Sidney. Qnlncy, Ohio. 

Yomio, Alex., P&v. Wheeling. Monnioatb,IIL 

Young, J. H., L. Monongahda. Pittsburg, Pa. 

Young, R. H., L. Monongahela. Pittsburg, Pa. 



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184 PBBSBTTBRIAN HISTORICAL AlrMANJia 

Jist0rit5l 5feetc|[ «f tfee lirst |ls80nate 'gttoxmi 

Thb General Synod of the Associate Reformed Church of North 
America, met in the First Associate Reformed Church, Allegheny 
City, 19th May, 1858. 

This church was built in 1882, and rebuilt in 1838. At the 
first organization of the congregation, the present pastor, who at 
that time had the care of the Theological Seminary, was called to 
take charge of it. The congregation at first numbered twenty fa- 
milies and fifty-five communicants. At the close of the sixth year, 
the first house being filled, it was resolved to take it down, and 
erect, upon the same lot, the present building, which is 95 feet in 
length by 68 in width. 

Though, in the interior, a commodious and very conveoient build- 
ing, of sufficient capacity to hold 1200 hearers, its exterior shows 
that it is a very plain building. In the basement, we have two 
spacious rooms for the accommodation of the Sabbath school, and 
for holding the weekly prayer-meetings. Two looms in the front 
of the basement are occupied as store-rooms. 

When first organized, Messrs. Thomas Hanna and Hezekiab 
Nixon were elected Ruling Elders. The former died a few years 
since, after spending an exemplary and most useful life. In his 
last will he left a large legacy for religious and benevolent pur- 
poses ; 12,000 dollars of which have been appropriated to the erec- 
tion of our Theological Seminary Building. Mr. Nixon is now a 
Ruling Elder in our second church. 

In the year 1819, the congregation erected a house in the adjoin- 
ing village of Manchester, for the accommodation of the members 
residing there. At that time, some thirty families, and about sixty 
communicants were dismissed to form the new congregation. 

At the close of the year 1855, the congregation had increased^ 
until it was found that additional room was necessary. Accord- 
ingly a meeting of the congregation was called, when it was unani- 
mously resolvea to procure a lot and erect another house of worship, 
which, when completed, might be occupied by any who were so dis- 
posed. In accordance with this resolution, a lot was procured on 
Ridge Street, on which is erected a neat and commodious building. 
On this occasion some forty families were dismissed, and about one 
hundred communicants, to form our Second Associate Reformed 
Church in this city. 

At our first communion, 30th June, 1833, sixty -six communicants 
united in the celebration of our Lord^s death. Since the first or- 
ganization of the church, we have received into communion ( 1759) 
one thousand seven hundred and fifty -nine. Of these, in the course of 
twenty-six years, a considerable number have been removed by 
death ; more have left to commence the two congregations which 
we have planted ; and some have removed to other parts of the 
church. 



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THE PBESBYTEBUN CHUBCH OF CANADA. 186 

Thus, in the space of a little over twenty years, this congregation, 
commencing with twenty families, has erected two buildings for 
her own accommodation, and two others for the convenience of her 
daughters. And by the good hand of our God upon us, we num- 
ber 225 familiea, and 566 communicants. 

Our present session is composed of John Sterritt, James M. 
Walker, Thomas McCance, James McCutcheon, Samuel W. McGin- 
nis, William McHendry, and John Hopkins. John Sterritt and 
Addison Lysle are the superintendents of our Sabbath-school. 

Our Sabbath -school numbers some 800 children, and, in connec- 
tion with sister United Presbyterian Churches of this city, supports 
four mission Sabbath-schools. From past experience of the good- 
ness of God, we would take encouragement, and with grateful hearts 
would erect our Ebenezer, sayings Hitherto the Lord hath 
HELPED us. 

Allegheny City, Pa. 

The General Synod of the Associate Reformed Church 
was constituted at Greencastle, Pa., Wednesday, May 30th, 1804, and 
opened with a sermon by Rev. John M. Mason, D. D., from Titus 
i. 9. Holding fast tlie faithful word. 



1804. Rev. Alexander Dobbin. Pa. 

1805. Rev. James Mairs. N. Y. 

1806. Rev. P:henezer Dickey, D. D., Pa. 

1807. Rev. Matthew Henderson, Pa. 

1808. Rev. Robert Proadfit, D. D.. N. T. 

1809. Rev. Jamea Lanrie, D. D., D. 0. 

1810. Rev. Jolin M Mason, D. D., N. T. 

1811. Rev. Jnmea M. Matthews, D. D., N. Y. 

1812. Rev. Ebenezer Dickey, D. D., Pa. 

1813. Rev. Alexander Proudfit, D. D., N. Y. 

1814. Rev. James Lanrie, D. D. 
181.5. Rev. Robert Forrest. N. Y. 

1816. Rev. E. Dickey, D. D.. Pa. 

1817. Rev. Robert B. E. McLeod, N. Y, 

1818. Rev. Thomas White, X. Y. 

1819. Rev. John M. Dnncan. D. D., N. Y. 

1820. Rev. A, Proudfit, D. D., N. Y. 

1821. Rev. John Lind, Md. 

1822. Rev. James Laurie, D. D., D. 0. 

1856. Rev. Joseph Clokie, D, D., 0. 

1857. Rev. D. R. Kerr, D. D.. Pa, 

1858. Rev. D. C. McLaren, D. D., N. Y. 



5tatt]r €\tx\i. 



1804. Rev. James Gray, D. D. 1816. 

1816. Rev. A. J. Stnnsbnry. 1818. 

1818. Rev. Robert McCartee,D.D. 1821. 

1821. Rev. J. Arbuekle. 1822. 

1856. Rev. Jas. Prestley. 



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186 THB UNITED PRESBTTBBIAK OHDRCH OF H. AiaBICA. 

OFFICERS, ETC., 

OF THX 

UNITED PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH, 

FOR 1868-69. 

Kev. JOHN T. PRESSLY, d.d. 
Bky. SAMUEL WILSON, dj). 



THEOLOGICAL SEMINARIES. 

PACULTT. 

Rev. JOS. MoCARRELL, d.d., Profetsor of Systematic cuid Pastoral Theology. 
Rinr. JOHN FORSYTH', d.d., Prof, of Biblical LUeraiure, Church History^ &c 

J18S0- l^tl %\tz. ^mxmi at ^egfeenj €Mi, |s- 

Rkv. JOHN T. PRESSLY, d.d., Prof of Theoloffy— Didactic, Polemic, and Pastoral, 

Rrv. a. D. CLARKE, d.d., Prof of Biblical Literature and Criticism, 

Rkt. D. R. KERR, D.D., Prof of Ecclesiastical History and Church Government. 

^m. ^ta, Sminarj at |enia, ^ia. 

Rev. T. BEVERIDGE, d.d., Prof of Biblical Literature and Ecclesiastical History. 
Ekv. S. WILSON, D.D., P. of Hebrew and Tlieology— Didactic, Polemic^ and Pastoral. 

^sstt. "^tU Seminarj at (©j^forlr, ®fek 

Rkt. ALEXANDER YOUNG, Professor of Hebrew emd Greek. 
Rev. JOHN SCOTT, Professor of Ecclesiastical History. 



Colleges* 



FRANKLIN, at New Atheru, Ohio. 
MADISON, at AntHm, Ohio, 
MUSKINGUM, at New Concord, Ohio. 



MONMOUTH, at Monmouth, Ulinoit. 
WASHINGTON, a< Waehington, Iowa. 
W£STMINSTER, ai New Wiiminffton, Pa. 



PERIODICALS. 

HAMS. XOITOS. PVBLIimX. PLACX. 

fht United Presbyterian, KXSB St McLxAK, ^IcLbaii A FssovtOK. Pitttbmvh, I^Weekl^. 

Ike Vmted Preeffjierian ^ tkeWed, D. Hacdill. Moxxisoh A Pattsuoh, Monmovth, 10. 



Ihe Preel>^ertaH HflneM. 
JU Wutmt'neter Herald, 
BoanaeUcal Rtporitmy. 
Uie Chrittlan Instructor. 
lU Preabytaim Hiet, AJtmoMOC 



B. H. POLLOCI. 

G.CViKcxNT kOQu. 0. C. VnrcsHT. 
T. H. BxvsKiDox. W. 8. Yon NO. 
J. B. Dalxs W. S. You no. 

Jot. M. WiLtOX. Jot. H. WILSOX. 



andnnaii, Ohio. '< 
N.WOminfiten, Ptu** 
Philadeki.,Pti.,MonlhJ9. 
PhUadeMiia, Pol. ** 
Phaadda,,Pt.,AMmiA 



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IHB UNITED PRSSBTTEBIAIT CHUBOH QV S. AHKBICA. 187 



THE UNITED PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 

NORTH AMERICA. 



Thb negotiations which had been carried on for several years, 
between the Assooiat£ and Associate: Reformed Presbyterian 
Churches were brought to a close by the formation of the United 
Pesbyterian Church of North America.* 

The joint action of the Associate and Associate Reformed 
Churches on the subject of Union is as follows: 

RESOLUTIONS ON THB SUBJECT OF UNION. 

WTiereas, It is anderstood that the Testimony submitted to the General Synod of 
the Associate Reformed Church by the Associate Synod, was proposed and accepted 
as a terra of communion, on the adoption of which the union of the two Churches 
was to be consummated ; and, whereas, it is agreed between the two Churches that the 
forbearance in love, which is required by the law of God, will be exercised towards 
any brethren who may not be able fully to subscribe the Standards of the United 
Church, while they do not determinedly oppose them, but follow the things which 
make for peace, and things wherewith one may edify another : — 

Resolved, 1. That these Churches, when united, shall be called the " United Presby- 
terian Church of North America." 

Resolved, 2. That the respective Presbyteries of the Churches shall remain as at 
present constituted, until otherwise ordered, as convenience shall suggest 

Resolved, 3. That the Supreme Court of this Church shall be a General Assembly, 
to meet annually, to be composed of delegates from the respective Presbyteries, the 
number of delegates to be according to the proportion of the members constituting 
each Presbyterv, as now fixed by the rules of the Associate Reformed Church, until 
a change shall be found expedient. 

Resolved, 4. That there shall be subordinate Synods, and these shall be the same 
as those now existing in the Associate Beformed Church, to which Synods the differ- 
ent Presbyteries in the Associate Church shall attach tnemselves for the present ac- 
cording to their location, provided that the separate Synods and Presbyteries of the 
said Associate Beformed and Associate Churches shall also continue as at present 
constituted until otherwise directed. 

Resolved, 5. That the General and subordinate Synods shall be regral&ted according- 
to the rules presently in force in the Associate Beformed Charch, until the United 
Church shall see fit to alter such rules. 

Resolved, 6. That the different Boards and Institutions of the respective Churches 
shall not be affected by this union, but shall have the control of then* funds, and retain 
all their corporate, or other rights and privileges, until the interests of the Church 
shall require a change. 

Resolved^ 7. That these and other regulations found necessary, being agreed upon 
by the respective Synods at the present meeting in the city or AUeghenv, the two 
Synods shall meet at such a place as shall mutually be agreed upon, and after addres* 

* A full account of these negotiations, with the speeches, Ac, &c, will be found in 
'' The Church Memorial,^' prepared by Bev. B. D. Harper of Xenia, Ohio, and pub- 
lished by Fleming k Crawford ; a 12mo volume of 407 pages. 



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188 PBBSBTTEBIAN HISTORICAL ALMANAC. 

8GS by Dr. Rodgers, Dr. Pressly, Rev. Mr. Smart, and Rev. Mr. PresUey, be consti- 
tuted with prayer by the Senior Moderator, after which a Moderator and Clei'k shall 
be chosen by the United Charch. 

According to the report of the joint committee of arrangements, 
the two Synods met at the corner of Sraithfield and Seventh Streets, 
Pittsburgh, and marched in procession to the City Hall, where the 
fraternization took place; Rev. Joseph T. Cooper led the Assembly 
in prayer, and Rev. Donald C. McLaren read the 100th Psalm. The 
addresses having been delivered by those appointed, and a few re- 
marks by Rev. W. S. Plumer, of the Presbyterian Church, (O. S.,) 
and Prayer by Rev. Wra. Davidson. 

The ceremony of Union was as follows: 

Dr. Pressly : The design was that in this aggregate meeting the Union should be 
oonsummated. I now move that Dr. McLaren, in the name of the Associate Reformed 
Synod, give the right hand of fellowship to Dr. Cooper, Moderator of the Associate 
Synod. The motion was carried. 

The two Moderators then approached each other, and taking each other's right 
hand. 

Dr. McLaren : In the presence of this assembly, in the presence of the members 
of this Synod, in tlie presence of Almighty Qod, I extend to yon, my brother, the 
right hand of fellowship, in love indeed, aud may this Union be to the glory of Qod, 
forever ! Amen. 

Dr. Cooper : Most cordially I reciprocate this expression of my dear brother's 
heart In the name of the Associate Synod of Nortn America, I give a brother's 
hand and a brother's heart. Let onr hands thus linked together be the token and 
the emblem of this union. Here let us pledge our mutual fidelity and our mutual 
love. Let us bury in a common grave our past differences. Here we have unfurled 
our banner, on one side inscribed, *• The truth of God,*' and on the other, •* For- 
BEARANCB IN LovB.** Let US foUow ouf glorlous Captain, and seek to glory only 
in his cross. 

The whole assembly then arose, and sang the 18th and 19th verses of the kxii 
Psalm. 

Dr. McLaren then pronounced the Apostolic benediction: The erace of oar 
Lord Jesus Christ, the love of God, and the communion of the Holy Ghost, be with 
you all. Amen. 

THE UNITED PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH CONSTITUTED. 

Dr. Pressly moved that, as the union was consummatecl, it be 
now constituted with prayer, which was then offered by Dr. Mc- 
Laren. 

Dr. Cooper moved that Rev. Dr. Pressly, of Allegheny, be cho- 
sen Moderator of the United Presbyterian Church. He was unani- 
mously elected by acclamation. 

Dr. Pressly : Suffer me to render thanks to God that my life 
has been spared to see the union consummated, for which I have 
laboured for twenty-two years, and permit me to render thanks 
to you for the unexpected honour of presiding over the first 
meeting. 

Rev. Dr. Clokey moved that Dr. Wilson, of Xenia, be elected 
Clerk. 

Rev. Mr. Smart moved that the Synod of the United Presbyterian 
Church do now adjourn to meet at Xenia, Ohio, on the third Wed- 
nesday of May, 1859, at 7 o'clock, P. M. Carried. 

Rev. Dr. Pressly pronounced the benediction, and the Synod 
adjourned. 



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^5.J)uyiJa5bn LifhPhil 




Fron^* 



Pastor of the First United Presbyterian Church, AUcgiLeny City.P^ 
Moderator cf IJie United Presbyterian Syno(i>I858.- 

PijoJiJ^ed by Joseph M. Wilson, N^ HI, South mS^PhiUddphia . 




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THE UKITBD PBBSBTTEBIAK CHURCH OF OBSOON. 



189 



THE UNITED PRESBYTERIAH CHURCH 

OF 

OREGON. 



This is a religious body, composed by a union of the Associate 
and Associate Eeformed Ministers and people, in the year 1852. 



Thb following is a list of their Ministers. 



NAMES. 



PRK8BTTERT. 



POUT OFFICE. 






BlaiD, William Oregon. Union Point, Oregon Territory. 

Dick, J. M. " '* 

Gager, S. D. " «• " 

Heannon, J. B. ** 

Irvine, S. G. " 

Kendall, T.S. 

Thompson, David " u u 

There is but one Presbytery ; the basis of their union is substan- 
tially the same as that upon which the Synods united, in May, 
1858, in the City of Pittsburgh, Pa. They have been invited to 
send their representatives to "Thb General Assembly of the 
United Presbyterian Church," which meets in May, 1859, in Xe- 
nia, Ohio. 



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190 GKKKBAL 8TN0D OF BXFORUBD FBESBTTEBIAN CHUBCH. 



THE GENERAL STNOD 

or THB 

BEFOBMED PBESBYTEBIAN CHUBGU 

IS 

NOBTH AMBRICA. 



I 



The General Synod of the Eeformed Presbyterian Churcli in 
North America met in the First Reformed Presbyterian Church, 
Eden, Illinois, May 27th, 1858, and was opened with a discourse 
by the retiring Moderator. 

2 Cor., xiii. 8. We cao do nothing against the trath. 

While some things are debtors for their charms to circumstances, 
others have a native and a winning beauty. The moon shines by 
another's light. The sun has a brightness of its own. The ordi- 
nary fruit trees wait for the coming of the summer, that she may 
ut their foliage on, and hang the golden fruits upon their limbs; 
ut the cedar stands up in its native glory and greenness all the 
bleak winter through. And thus in the moral world. Men and 
governments and human arrangements lean on something external 
to themselves ; but Truth has a strength of its own. It wears the 
stamp of an immortal thing, and cannot be successfully assailed. 

I. Time can do nothing against the Truth. He is the waster 
who destroys at noon-day, and in the night; who touches all things 
indiscriminately, and by whose mysterious power the monuments 
decay, and the mountains crumble, and all the works of art are 
found to disappear. Time is against every created thing — against 
the feeble and the strong, against the lowly and the high, against 
the granite rock and the fragile plants. 

But he cannot touch the Truth, save as he touches the fruits to 
mature and perfect them ; or as he does the pictures of the old mas- 
ters, to throw a richer, lovelier light upon them all. What time can- 
not destroy, he adorns and elevates. 

Our estimate of goodness can affect it in no way whatever. The 
Greenlander glories in his bleak abode ; and all the asserted charms 
of a more genial clime fade in his view, when compared with the 
frosty decorations, and the glittering icebergs, and the deep blue 
sky, and the bright burning stars that make the garniture of his 



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PRBISBTTBRIAN HISTORIOAL ALMANAC. 191 

Eolar home. But let a southern summer once show to him one of 
er lovelier scenes, and throw around him the comforts of a true 
oivilization, and then the inferior no longer charms. Thus truth 
shall, at last, be thought a thing of glory everywhere, and in the 
latter and better era sit as a queen. Time is but the amber cover- 
ing of truth, the golden setting of the priceless jewel. 

II. Truth cannot be put down. There are perceptible antagon- 
isms in the universe of God. We know how evil pursues good 
with all the malice of a furious and baiHed foe, how error lies in 
wait for truth and plots its overthrow by every artifice ; but all 
in vain. This deadly Upas stretches out its limbs, and shakes its 
noxious boughs, and blights by its shade the plants of paradise. 
The graves of the good are everywhere, many of them prematurely 
green, and hiding and covering from our view many of the best 
and purest of the sons of earth. But has truth perished because 
these are no more ? 

Could evil have crushed the ohurcVs creed in the past, and re- 
duced its living, burning, heavenly truths to a thing of nought, it 
would have found no gain in slaying the church's children. When 
Paganism let out her furious beasts upon the guiltless Christians in 
the amphitheatre, it was not to these helpless men it bore the grudge, 
but to that eternal truth which so lived itself out in their holy 
carriage, as to give strange power to a dormant heathen conscience. 
Bome blew the fires on Smithfield, and offered up the holocaust to 
St. Bartholomew, not because she feared those she slew. 'Twas that 
she hoped through the death of these Protesting men to pierce and 
crucify the truth they loved. But all in vain. And as there is one 
clime in which death cannot stay, and one unseen city which is ex- 
empt from harmful change, so is there one immortal corporation over 
which seasons and circumstances and wasting influences pass harm- 
lessly, and that is the church of God, the pillar and ground of truth. 

III. Truth cannot be resisted. Some things have great power 
of resistance, but no aggressive force. The rock stands up from 
age to age, unmoved by all the waves that beat upon it, yet it makes 
310 advance. But truth both bears up against all pressure, and 
pushes its own resistless way. 

There is a league between all true things in the universe. He, 
therefore, who opposes truth, is arrayed not against an isolated 
thing. He faces a multitude, and in his personal feebleness sets 
himself against a phalanx, whose resistless force and whose heavy 
tread shall quite bear down every enemy. There is a strange vi- 
tality in truth. You may push the painted buoy below the sur- 
face of the sea, but it will leap instantly to it again. You may 
cut off every limb from the green and growing tree, but you cannot 
thus reach the law of its growth, nor hinder the outspringing of 
yet more vigorous buds. And thus with the truth of God. It is 
aggressive and resistless. As the perennial spring, around which 
you build the wall of adamant, will make its way to the light by 
avenues and channels you cannot see nor shut^ so with truth. See 
' India, China, Birraah, and Africa. 



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192 PRESBYTERIAN HISTORICAL ALMANAC. 

IV. The task which God has set for truth will explain the text. 
This is to renew and raise, and perfect man — to put the garden's 
bloom on the wilderness — to set up the authority of Christ. There 
is a work to be done as well in the State as the Church. And this 
shall be a work both of demolition and of repair. There are thrones 
of iniquity which must come down. National sin must be assaulted 
in its citadel. Vile men must be pulled from the prominence to 
which they have no claim. Political corruption must be ferreted 
from its fastness near the throne and behind the constitution, and 
vice and wrong lie bound and still. 

Nor this alone, for there is a work of repair to be done. The 
yoke must be broken from the necks of the guiltless. With us 
God's law is spurned, and he who departeth from evil maketh him- 
self a prey. And he who pleads for the authority of the "higher 
law'' shall hear the howl of hate as it comes up from the mcJb, and 
shall we say it ? — the hissings of the pulpit. We are ridden over by 
the wrong. The crown of political martyrdom is woven for the 
head of him who shall attempt the hopeless work of reform. No, 
not hopeless, for yet the rights of God shall be owned. This maw- 
kish sympathy with legalized evil shall be abashed. The race of 
demagogues shall die. The State's vocabulary shall be re-written. 
The civil disabilities shall fall, as they should, on the heads of the 
vile, and virtue be no longer the high road to political obscurity, but 
to fame and power. The church, too, shall be reformed. 

V. A good man can do nothing, wittingly, against the truth. 
Let us learn hence, 

1. The true mission of the church. This is not merely to con- 
vert men to God, but to exhibit a system of sound doctrine, to 
maintain a pure worship, and prepare thus the redeemed for glory. 
The church is the appointed guardian for truth, and must keep it, 
as kept those ancient vestals their sacred fire; as keeps the sleep- 
less miser his yellow gold ; as keeps the servant what the master 
has confided to his loving care. Fallen man of himself would 
neither know nor guard the truth. If a shower of golden rain 
should fall upon a territory of savages unacquainted with the pre- 
cious metal, although the glittering drops might cause a momentary 
delight, they would soon be sufiered to lie neglected on the ground. 

So would it be with truth. God therefore, named and prepared 
his holy church for the office of the truth's guardian. She is the 
light of the world — ^the city on the hill that may be seen from afar. 
And then the church is to go forth girt for the great work of the 
world's conversion, asserting the rights of the Redeemer, and pres- 
sing his claim on men and governments everywhere. 

2. Learn the secret of the church's success. "Not by might," &c. 
But this divine leadership she may not look for, should she prove 
recreant to her trust, or betray or ignore the truth* She must 
cleave to all the truth. Do you know any one revealed truth you 
would follow to-day to its burial ? Will you dig its grave, or write 
its epitaph ? 

Things are true as well as statements. The church's past, and the 



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Pastor of Ik Reformed Pre^tvtenaL CKurch DuanesVir^ri New York. 
Muderaior of llie fej^Svjioi of the Re&me 4 Presbyterian Ciiurci. ii. ^^Anienr.i 1B58. 



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OENEBAL SYNOD OF RSPORXSD PR83BTTEBIAN CHUBCH. 198 

church's worship, so far as it is moral in its kind and God-given, is 
as certainly true as her creed is. God is best served by his own 
golden censers^ and with his own incense and his own ritual. 

Emasculated and partial truth shall not secure the victory. What 
would the fire's blaze and glare amount to without its heat — or what 
a gorgeous temple without its girders ? The great truths of the 
past may be just the ones for which the future awaits. If mistakes 
in the physical sciences be dreaded and dangerous, why not much 
more in the moral 7 Truth alone shall triumph in the end, and 
that which follows it. 

8. Learn the true idea of schism. Not in holding to all the 
truth, but seeking promotion and enlargement by its surrenderings- 
Better be with Athanasius against the world, and with John in the 
isle a prisoner for Christ's testimony, than with the mass against 
them. 

The Sessions were constituted with prayer, and the following were 

Ittntljers |rtstnt at t\t Pitting 0( iftt Spfllr^ 



MIinSTBKg. 


ntBtBTTnT. 




HimiTSMa. 


nMBTTSBT. 


SLim* 


ALVOKD, John 


Western. 


BobertJack. 


McMaster, John 


Weatora. 


WUllam Wyatt. 








HeMUIan,Gayln 


OMo. 


•M... 


Black, A. W., djj. 


Pittsburg. 


...... 


McMilUn^O.R. 


Pittabws. 


...... 




PhlladdphliL 




McMillan, Hugh^BJi. Ohio. 


Thomas Lyitla. 


Cbawvoed, J. ▲. 


Ohto. 


J.C.5esbit 


nemiuin. .fonn 
aiorrlwB,J.W. 


Chkago. 


Sk^jiliiSa^ 


Crow, N. K. 


]fMteni. 


John Bbir. 












PamsfOV, Rohart GUeago. 


JofanOaldwen. 


QVTBBB, T. 0^ D. D. PittebOfS^ 


A-Hantow. 














FCOTT, Jamei 8. 


Chieago. 


George Clark. 


Habsraw, mebael 


Wertera. 





Shaw, William P. 


Ohio. 




HoroQ, Andraw, P.]> 


Ohio. 


J. 0. MeHlBan. 


8tewitft,A.M. 


PlttabuTg. 





McAOLVT, A.G. 


Philadelphia 




WALsn, Andrew 


Chicago. 


J. Eirkpattlck. 


McBride, MaUlMW 


Cbieago. 


BobertSmyth. 


Wilson, Wm., DJ. 


Ohio. 


...... 


McTnicken, R. 


Western. 


A.Chrathera. 


Wylle, Andrew 0. 


NorUiern. 


Jaa.N.Offt^rd. 


McKelTey, Hui^h A. 
MeLeod, Jobn N.,D.i 


Chlciigo. 


, 


Wylle, {iamnel 


Wsatern. 


A.Uar8haU,KA 


BNortbBra. 


JameaSlevari. 


WjUe^WUHaaT. 





Rev. Andrew GiflEbrd Wylie of Duanesburgh, New York, was 
elected Moderator. 

To a call for Reports, the following Presbyteries responded: 
Chicago, Northern Ohio, Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, Saharanpur, and 
Western. These were referred to a Committee, of which Rev. J. 
A. Crawford was Chairman, and they reported as follows : 

During tJie Bynodical year there has been a steady iDcrease in the Church's mem* 
bersbip. The precious season of revival which God has granted, will doubtless ac- 
count for this. 

Brethren tell us tiiat the baptism of fire has been enjoyed, and that, as the rcinilt 
of this, not only have sinners been converted unto God, but the Church herself has 
seemed a holier and lovelier thing^ of late. We cannot, and would not be ingrntes 
amid scenes so joy-begetting and suggestive as those tliat have been witnesGed. We 
thank God aiiisl take courage. 

The Reports handed us show also an increase, though it be moderate, of our minis, 
terial force. And yet, how inadequate the supply I Of this inadequacy all the Pres- 
byteries are complaining, and urge on Synod to put in operation at once the ma* 
chinery of our Theological Seminary. We earnestly commend this thing to Synod. 
The Theological Seminary has become almost a necessity to the Church in this our 
day. For, whatever may be the honest difference of view in regard to its alleged 
advantages over the old mode of fitting men for the ministry, it is agreed that the 
25 



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194 PKBSBTTJEBIAK HISTOBIGAL ALMANAC. 

public Christian seDtiment demands it, and that young men cannot be patisfied with- 
out it. We urge Synod to fill the vacant chairs, and let the Church know that we 
have a seminary. 

The matter of Union is referred to by some of these Beports, and Synod is urged 
to give to it a prayerful consideration, especially as it is sought by difierent parts of 
the Reformed Churches. 

There is a request preferred by the Northern Presbytery, that those members of it 
living in Nova Scotia and New Brunswick, be set off as a distinct and separate 
Presbytery. We recommend, for various reasons, that the request be granted, in 
such form as Synod may direct. 

We find in the Report of the Saharanpur Presbytery most grateful mention of the 
loving-kindness of the Lord, to our dear brethren in India during the late fearful 
insurrection. The Presbytery there has been preserved in its integprity, and the 
Church is called to rejoice. 



€mmitUt 011 €axttipn}itnct. 

The Committee of Correspondence with the Synod of the Re- 
formed Presbyterian Church, presented the following report which 
was adopted, as follows : 

The Committee of Correspondence with the other department of 
the Beformed Presbyterian Church, report to Synod: 

That they received from said bi-eihreu u reply to our last communication, re- 
spectful in language, and breathing a spirit of brotherly love and unity. To this 
letter we have ma^e a re^\j ; but as in our former letter, there was a suggestion, as 
to the meeting of the committees for mutual conference, which was by them accepted ; 
and as this meeting has not yet taken place, it is thought best not to report either 
their letter to us, or our replv to it, but to wait the result of our anticipated meeting 
of conference, when we shall be able to make a more full and satisfactory report, than 
can be done at the present The Committee would only further state, that the cor- 
respondence thus far conducted, is hopeful in its results, and therefore recommend the 
ooDtinuance of the Committee. ^ 



€mmiiUt an H^teUmxnUs. 

The special Committee on the Professorates reported as follows : 

The Committee to whom was referred the matter of filling the 
chairs in the Theological Seminary, vacated last year by the resigna- 
tion of the professors, would respectfully report : 

That having taken the matter into consideration, after a full and free interchange 
of views, they have agreed to recommend to Synod, that they proceed to elect by 
ballot a professor of Theology ; and having effected this, that they elect the remain- 
ing professors in the same way. 

In the event of the acceptance of the appointments by the individuals chosen by 
Synod, it is further recommended, that the pulpits of such as sustain pastoral relation- 
i^ips, be supplied by arrangement of Synoa during the sessions of the Seminary. 

They would also recommend that a salary of $400 be paid the professors for their 
aervices. And in the event of their finding it necessary to resign their present pas- 
toral relationships, in order to discharge the duties of the Seminary, thAum of $1000 
be the annual salarr allowed them. Should other relationships be constituted subse- 
quently, Synod will be at liberty to make such change in the last named salary aa 
may be judged equitable. 

in conclusion, they would recommend that the Trustees of the Seminary use all due 
diligence to secure Uie full endowment of the Seminary as enjoined by last Synod. 
And also, should the former residence of the late Dr. Wylie be attainable, they 
are directed to take the necessary steps to secure it for the uses of the Seminary. 



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GENBRAL SYNOD OF RSTORHSD PRSSBYTSBUN CHUBCH. 195 

And farther, that until such time as the endowment becomes available, collectiona 
be taken up annually for the support of the Seminary. 

Rev. John N. MoLbod was elected profesor of Doctrinal and 
Pastoral Theology. Bey. A. W. Blace was elected professor of 
Exegetical, Historical, and Evangelistic Theology. 

The Superintendent of the Theological Seminary reported as 
follows : 

Inasmuch as the Seminary has not been in operation during the past year, our 
report is of necessity limited. We have held a meeting consulting for the interests 
of the Seminary, and hoped to have been able to report something in regard to the 
completion of the endowment But the financial crisis, through whicn we have 
passed, in connection with the fact of the Seminary not being in active operation, 
nas prevented anything from being definitely done. As, however, by the present 
action of Synod, the chairs in the Seminary have been filled, we recommend tnat the 
Trustees be directed, as soon as possible, to complete the endowment to make ar- 
rangements for the purchase of the i^esidence of the late Dr. Wylie, for the use of the 
Seminary, if this be practicable, and see to any other things neoeasary for the carry- 
ing the Seminary Into efficient operation. 



Resolved 1. That should the way be fotind clear, at any time 
prior to the next meeting of the General Synod, the ministers now 
Delonging to the Northern Presbytery, and residing in the British 
provinces of Nova Scotia and New Brunswick, with their connec- 
tions, or a majority of them, with ruling elders, be authorized to 
constitute a Presbytery in subordination to this Synod. 

Resolved 2. That the name of such Presbytery, when duly con- 
stituted, shall be the Reformed Presbytery of Nova Scotia and New 
Brunswick, in connection with the General Synod of the Beformed 
Presbyterian Church in North America. 

Resolved 3. That the Rev. Alexander Clarke, Senior Minister^ 
of Amherst, Nova Scotia, be directed to open the Presbytery with 
a sermon, and constitute it, in the name of Jesus Christ the only 
King and Head of the Church. 

Resolved, That the thanks of the Synod be returned to the inhabi- 
tants of Eden and its vicinity for their hearty and efficient hospi- 
talities to the members ; also to the Moderator for his excellent 
sermon preached at the opening of their present sessions ; also to 
those railroad companies, and their officers, from whom accommo- 
dations have been received in attending the presept meeting. 

Resolved, That Synod do now adjourn, to meet in the city of 
Philadelphia, on the fourth Monday of May, 1859, at half past 
7 o'clock, P. M. 

Adjourned, after prayer, singing the ISSd psalm, and receiving 
the apostolic benediction from the Moderator. 
Signed, 

Andrew Gifpobd Wtlib, Maderaiar. 
John Neil MoLeod, StaUd Ckrk. 

Abn, ininais, June 2d, 1868. 



Digitized by 



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196 



THK BBFOBMBO FBBSBTTXBIAN CHUBOH 



livmbn Bi D^intstirs. 



PmMBTTXBT. rOSt-0V7IC«. 



Alfoeb, John 
bUck, A.W^B.ak 
Black, R. J. 
B.>1«, John 
Boobommd, 8. 



Westacn. 

PitUbanr. SewieklvTil^ Pa 
PblladelphiA. Philadelphia, Pa. 
Northern. 8. Hyegat«, Tt 
PhiUdelphla. Philadelphia, Pa. 



Saharanpnr. 
Saharanpnr. 
Saharanpur. 
Amherst, N. 8co. 
Cedarrille, Ohio. 
Xenia, Ohio. 
Vayette^ille^ Pft. 
MarlMa,IIL 



DjJUiAH,W.8. Morthen. QooMlUT«r,N.9. 

Douglas, John, n.9. Plttebiurft ?ltts1>«if , Pn, 



CALmniwooB, Wm. 8ahanuipnr. 
QUd well, Joseph Saharanpur. 
Campbell, J. B., BJk Saharanpur. 
Clarke^ Aittumdsr Northern. 
Cooper, B. Ohio. 

CA«fi>Td,J.A. Ohio. 

Crow, n7k. Western. 



FlHVST,8i.U 

Qailst, a. R. 
tivthrie,T.C.,B.aL 



HoraMtn. M«v York. 



Chicago. 
PlttsbnrK. 



Dundee, 111. 
Ogle P.O., Pa. 



nASSHAW, Michael Western. Sparta, m. 
Heron, Andrew, S.S. Ohio. Steers R CJnd. 

Ilerron, Darid Saharanpur. Dehra, India. 

Ilerron, Samnel P. Philadelphia. Philadelphia. 

Kq AVUT, A. a. Philadelphia. PhUadelnhla. 
Chicago. Marion, Iowa. 



McBride, M. 
McCorkell, John 
McCraekea, R» 



Chicago. 
Western. 



£lgin, III. 
Hoii>e,XU. 



HIIPSTSBS. maSBTtXXT. FOSS OIVXO& 



MeDoweU, W.J. 
UcKelvej, U. A. 
McLeod, John N.,]>.I>. 
McMaster, John 
McMillan, Gavin 
McMUIan, O. R. 
HcMi:ian, I]ugh,9.l>. 
McMillan, John 
Morrison, John W. 

Nimr, John 

PAT^mov, D. J. 
Patterfeon, John 



Northern. 

Chlesgo. 

Northern. 

Western. 

Ohio. 

Ptttsbnrg. 

Ohio. 

Pittsbarg. 

Chicago. 

Pittsburg. 

Korlhera. 
Chicago. 



Lisbon Cen.,N.T. 
Mapleton, Minn. 
New York. 
Princeton, lud. 
Morning Snn, O. 
New«aatle, Pn. 
C«derTllle, Ohio. 
Allegheny, Pn. 
~" , I»L 



AdaauvOle^ Pa. 

BitiokljB, 

ChlcagovJ 

Roamsoif, Alex. Northern. Chlmogoes^ N.B. 



Brook|jB.N.T. 

Chlcago^l. 



SCOTT, George 
Scott, James 8. 
Shaw, W. P. 
BtiUman, W. D. 
Sterrett, William 
Stewart, Alex. M. 

Walesb, Andrew 
Wilson, WUliamB. 
Woodside, John 8. 
Wylie, Andrew Q. 
Wylie, Samnel 
Wylle, T. A. 
Wylie, T.W.J. 
Wylle, W. X. 



PltUbnrg. E. Palestine, O. 
Ohicega Monmoutli, III. 

Ohio. Belle Centre, 0. 

Northern. Madrid, N.T. 
PhiUdelphla. Philadelphla,Pa. 
PltUbnrg. PltUbnrg, Pa. 



Chicago. 
D. Ohio. 
Saharanpnr. 
Northern. 
Western. 
Western. 



Bock Prairie, 111. 
Cincinnati, Ohio. 
Dehra Doon, la. 
Dnaiie«bnrf,N.T 
Sparta, 111. 
Bloomlr 



loomlngton.In. 
Philadelphia. Phlladelphia.Pa. 
PlUIadelphia. MUton, Piv 



^tstistttal fsbU. 



Chicago, 

Northwa, .... 

Ohio, 

PMladalphIa, . . . 
PltUbnrg, .... 
Saliaranpar, . . . 
WesUm, 

H. T 



FVasBT. CI.IBX. 



J. 8. Scott, . . . 
D, J. Patlerfoa, . . 
B. Cooper, . . . 
William Stsmtt« . 
Oeorge Scott, . . 
W. OMderwood, . . 
John McMaster, . 

»0»A^, 



Minis- 


Chui- 


Foreign 


Domest. 


«Bdnca. 


Bustent. 


Tot* 


ters. 


ehes. 


Miss. 


MiRS. 


tion. 


Fnnd. 


8 


11 


183 


71 




36 


290 


ID 


19 


566 


10 




60 


826 


7 


10 


268 


238 




63 


664 


8 


8 


1688 


69 




178 


1826 


8 


21 


6»7 


62 




81 


780 


6 


6 






SIpecial. 






7 


9 


267 


68 


846* 


4a 


36^ 


6a 


63 


3648 


488 


m 


880 


4428 
•819 



TOTq 



6?77 





ft!t0fl|r0>tr8t0r5 


» 




SAME. 


BATX. 

1808 


NAME. 


DATE. 

1880 


SAME. 


»AT» 


OUb«CMcM««Ur,S]>, . 


Saptpel Wylie, .... 


Gordon T.Bwl^. . . 


1847 


J<dinKell 


1812 


Samuel W. Crawford, dj).. 


1831 


Andrew Heron, D.P., . 


Ui9 


Alexander MeLeod, SA, . 


1814 


Hugh MeMlUan, D.P., . . 


1888 


Samuel Wylle, . . . 
Gilbert McMaster, PJ>., 


IM 




1816 


John N. McLeod, nj>., . . 


1835 


IMl 


Robert Lnsk, 


1817 


John Black, lU), . . . 


1837 


George Scott, . . . 


1852 




1818 


Garln McMillan, . . . 


1830 


Andi«wW.BhKk,B.B., 


1863 


JohnQannin,' .... 


1819 


Andrew W.Bkwk,Bj>L,. 


1842 


John W. Morrison, . 


1854 


John Gibson, . . 


1M21 


William Wilson, BJ).,. . 


1843 


Theodoras W.J. Wylle, 


1855 


Jamss R. WIIsqb, SJ»i» . . 


1828 


Thomas C. Guthrle» itA, 


1844 


Alexander CUrke, . . 


1866 


James Mllligan, .... 
Qllberi McMasUr, l»J>., . 


1826 


John McMaster, . . . 


1845 


John Agnew Crawlbrd, 


1857 


1827 


Andrew Gilford Wylle^ . . 


1840 


Aa«iww<iiftn«Wyll%: 


- 1858 


Jamss Ghiyttlet .... 


1828 











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gitizGCI by '■V-^OOQ I 



PRE8BYTSBIAN HISIOBIOAL MLUMSA.O. 197 

$iiiatia\ S^hU\ at t\t ^ttatmt)! |mkihriitit 
€\ttt\ti IK Sostfttrn Illinois. 

t 

Saku&l Wtlie, the writer of the following sketch, ft native 
of Ireland, removed to the United States of America, in 1807, and in 
1811, received the degree of Bachelor of Arts in the University of 
Pennsylvania; after which, entering the Divinity Hall in Philadel- 
phia, under the Presidency of the Rev. S. B. Wylie, D. D., in 1816 by 
the Philadelphia Presbyterv of the Reformed Presbyterian Church, 
he was licensed to preach the gospel of our Lord Jesus Christ. He 
visited the Churches in many of the States in the summers of 1815 
and 1816, returning and spending the winters of each of those yeai*s 
in the Theological School in Philadelphia. 

Finding in the Eastern and Middle States, many owning small 
farms, or renting land and labouring under great disadvantages, 
who, by selling and removing west, could have large farms; and 
religious families, by locating near each other, could have their 
churches and schools convenient, and so be profited in worldly 

Soods, in intelligence, and in grace. Influenced by the above re- 
ection, the summer and fall of 1817 were spent in exploring new 
countries, travelling west as far as any settlements were found. 
Illinois was a wilderness from Yincennes to St. Louis, sometimes 
over twenty miles from house to house. Crossing the Mississippi 
at St. Louis, the course was continued west as far as Franklin and 
Boons vlUe, Mo* 

Leaving Missouri in November, and passing through Illinois, 
Kentucky, and Tennessee to Chester, South Carolina, there spend- 
ing the winter; in spring left for Pittsburgh, where, in May 1818, 
the Synod of the Reformed Presbyterian Church was in session. 
He (3. W.) having reported to Synod his travels, and the prospect 
of Church extension in the West, was ordained to the office of the 
holy ministry, and sent a missionary to Southern Illinois. 

In the summer of 1818, Delegates met in convention, in Kaskas- 
kia, to frame a state constitution, there being then some over 40,000 
inhabitants in the Territory. At the same time S. W. began his 
missionary operations in Randolph, and parts of St Clair, Wash- 
ington, and Perry Counties. During the sessions of the Convention 
he was often present, and in conversation, privately, with the Pres- 
ident (Judge Thomas) and other members of the Convention, urged 
the propriety, duty, and necessity of owning and honouring the 
Qod of nations, and regarding his law as supreme ; as now they 
were laying the foundation-stone on which the edifice of a great 
state was to be reared. 

A petition signed by Robert Thompson and others, members of 
the Associate Reformed Church, near Kaskaskia, was brought be- 
fore the Convention, praying that the Bible be recognized in the 
constitution as a Divine Revelation, — ^the Law of Ood, the paramount 
Rule, and Jesus, the Messiah owned as Head and Lord of all. The 
Convention was composed of diverse materials ; some Christian 



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198 GXNBRAL BTVOD OF BBFOBHED PBBSBTTEBIAK CHUBCIL 

men, some respecters of religion, and one or more openly avowed 
infidels. The first motion to dispose of the petition was " that it 
be laid on the table till the fourth of July.*' This motion failing, 
it was referred to a select committee, which not having been called 
on to report, near the close of the session asked to be dismissed. 
These items are stated in the journal of the Convention. 

There being no members of the Reformed Presbyterian Church 
in Southern Illinois, S. W., on request, agreed to make his princi- 
pal preaching station with a Society of the Associate Befbrmed 
people, who, at a still earlier date, had removed from South Caro- 
lina. 

Emigrants of the Presbyterian order aimed for the settlement 
where the gospel on the Bible plan of the Westminster Confession 
of Faith, and Catechisms Larger and Shorter, was regularly preached. 
In 1821 a congregation of the Reformed Presbyterian Church was 
organized, and called Rev. S. Wylie to be their pastor. He accepted 
their call, having thirty-five names annexed to the call ; and set- 
tled with a salary of $208. The congregation claiming only half 
the services of their pastor, missionary operations, to a consiaerable 
extent, were still continued ; including an area whose diameter would 
be from twenty-four to thirty miles. 

The congregation increased in a few years, till over 850 commu- 
nicants; their distant societies were becoming strong, claiming, and 
obtaining organization ; and some of them now are settled congrega* 
tions. Salem on the north was first set off and organized ; then, 
Hill Prairie, N. W., and Concord, S. E., being organized, called 
and obtained for their pastor Rev. M. Harshaw, who ministered 
to the joint charge for some years ; and having given up Hill Prairie, 
continues the Pastor of Concord. Grand-cote, N. E., was organ- 
ized, and in connection with Unity, called and enjoyed the pastoral 
labours of Rev. James Pearson, till his removal by death. Unity 
and Hill Prairie have been enjoying the pastoral labours of Rev. 
N. K. Crow, for nearly two years. Bethel, the original stock, and 
first congregation under the pastoral care of Rev. S. Wylie, wor- 
ships in Eden. The congregation is compact; few members distant, 
it numbers over 280 communicants. 

There was a division in the Reformed Presbyterian Church in 
1833, which affected all or almost all the congregations of the 
body ; Eden and its neighbouring congregations also suffered. The 
separating brethren are known as the Synod of the Reformed Pres- 
byterian Church, and the original body as the General Syni>d of 
the Reformed Presbyterian Church. Of the separating brethren 
there are four coi^gregations and four ministers, — two settled, and 
two not settled. The Associate Reformed have had seven congre- 
gations, and four ministers, — three settled, and one professor in 
the Seminary. The Associate have one congregation. 

In May, 1858, a union was effected between the Associate and As- 
sociate Reformed, and hereafter to be known as the United Presby- 
terian Church. 

Church Officers. — Sessional records of some of the earliest 



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PBSSBTTSRIAK HISTOBICAL ALHAKAC. 199 

years after the church organization have been lost, or are not forth* 
coming. But three, whose names were on the call accepted in 1821, 
are in our congregation, and two of those are now members of 
our session. 

Our session at first was organized with two Buling Elders, 
namely: Samuel Little and William Edgar, who had been ordained 
in Tennessee, and removed to Illinois in 1820. 

William Edgar was a man of quiet, sober habits ; aiming in all 
that he did at a blameless and holy life. Samuel Little was a man 
of more extended information in matters civil and religious, zeal- 
ous for soundness in doctrine and strictness in discipline in the 
house of Qod. From that small beginning with two Buling El- 
ders, our members in session wera increased from time to time; 
some elected in the congregation and ordained, and some who had 
been ordained in other places elected by the congregation. 

James McClurkin, a member of the Associate Reformed Church, 
took great interest in helping strangers to find out good locations, 
leaving his plough and for days searching out lines, and pointing 
out good lands. He soon joined the Beformed Presbyterian Church, 
and being elected was ordained a Buling Elder. His widow is still 
with us, an honoured and godly mother in Israel. 

James Monford, a ruling elder from South Carolina, became a 
member of our session ; after his death his son David Monford be- 
came a member of session, and when Qrand-cote congregation was 
set oft* from us, he and James Wilson, another of our Elders, be- 
longed to it. 

Samuel Nesbit, William Jamison, and William Pattison were at 
one time elected and ordained. William Jamison is long since 
dead; William Pattison with a large family of sons removed to Ore- 
gon, and afterwards to Washington Ter., near Olympia. Samuel 
Nesbit is still an honoured member of our session, he is fast nearing 
his four-score. 

James Wilson, Sr., whose family and connections were the first 
Beformed Presbyterians that came to this settlement, had a large 
family of sons and daughters. He laboured much for the good of 
the infant congregation, and died in a good old age, in the full as- 
surance of faith. Three of his sons have been members of our ses- 
sion. His youngest son, Henry Wilson, a youth of exemplary 
piety, after having ruled faithfully for a period in the house of God; 
was early called home to be present with the Lord, leaving a widow 
and six children. 

James Wilson, as stated above, is a Buling Elder in Grand-cote 
congregation. John, the eldest son, is still a member of our ses- 
sion. John Bicbman, ordained in our session, became a Buling 
Elder in Concord congregation, when it received organization. 

John Fulton, ordained in Ohio, was chosen a member of our ses- 
sion, and remained an active and useful member till removed by 
death. His son David Fulton has been, and still continues, a rerj 
useful and active member of the Board of Trustees. 

John K. Tailor and Thomas Blair, ordained in Tennessee, having 



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200 GENERAL SYNOD OF XEFOBXSD FRESBYTXRIAN CHURCH. 

been elected in the coDgregation, were members of session for some 
years, both men of piety and sound judgment ; both rest from their 
labours. Thomas Armour, a member dT session for several years, 
has for a long time been numbered with the dead ; a son of bis is now 
in the ministry. John Campbell, formerly an elder with ns, is now 
in the Unity congregation. 

Charles McKelvey, elected and ordained a Buling Elder with us; 
was a meek and unassuming Christian; a man of sound judgment; 
labouring always for the peace and prosperity of Zion. He died in 
18&6, leaving the widow and a numerous family, to be comforted 
in sorrow, by knowing that for him to be absent from the body 
was to be present with the Lord. His eldest son, Bev. H. A. 
McKelvey, is a missionary in the State of Minnesota. 

There have been in all, twenty-seven (27) Ruling Elders in our 
session, from its organization. The session at present is composed 
of ten Buling Elders, with the Moderator. 

Names of Elders:— James Blair, Samuel Nesbit,. John McCauchan, 
John Wilson, Bobert W. Marshall, M. D., James Craig, William 
McHenry, Joseph McHenry, James Crawford, and Samuel L. Boyd. 

Names of the members of the present Board of Trustees : — Bryce 
Crawford, David Fulton, John Watson, Samuel McKelvey, Bobert 
McLaughlin. The congregation have no Deacons. 

Within an area of something over twenty-four miles diameter, 
all embraced in the first missionary ground of the Beformed Pres- 
byterian Church, are, 

Of General Synod of the Ref. Prcs. Church, 3 MiDisters and 5 organiased congregfttioiia. 
Synod, ** « 4 " " 5 " ** 

A88O. k Ajbso. Ref.. now United Fres., 4 *• « 7 •* ** 

Presbyterian, 0. S.. 2 •* " 3 « ** 

Presbyterian, N. S., ** " 1 " " 

In all, 13 •^ •• 21 « 

God has given the inhabitants of this land his best and richest 
blessings ; the Bible "a light to the foot and a lamp to the path ;" 
the Gospel, calling sinners to repent, and directing them to Jesus. 
May not the dwellers of this land say, " The Lord hath done great 
things for us, whereof we are glad ?" 

Bapid has been the advance of Illinois since it became a State, 
especially in the last half-dozen years. Population in 1818 scarcely 
reaching 40,000, now, largely over a million ; then, no graded roads 
or turn-pikes, now, a net-work of Bailroads overspreads the state ; 
then, only a few small towns and villages, now, large cities and 
flourishing towns; then, the interior of the state far removed from 
market, now, market brought to the door ; then, few schools, now, 
colleges and public schools adorn the state. 

The present advancing state is but the dawn of an opening and 
brighter day. Honouring the Lord, he will exalt the nation. "They 
that honour God he will honour ; but they that despise him shall 
be lightl V esteemed." " Blessed is the nation whose God is the Lord." 
" O Lord God of hosts, blessed is the man that trusteth in thee." 

JESoien, Illinois. 



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STMOD OF THB VMTOKtXV PRBSB. OHUBCH IN IT. A. 201 



TH£ SYNOD 

or THB 

REFORMED PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 

IS 

NORTH AMERICA. 



Thb Thirtieth Session of the Reformed Presbyterian Church 
met in the Church at Northwood, Logan Co., Ohio, May 27th, 1867, 
and adjourned June 3rd, to meet in Allegheny City, Pa., May, 1859. 
Not having held any session during the year 1858, we only give 
the list of Ministers as reported, 1857. 

fist flf Itittisttrs, ^c. 



PKHBTTSBT. POST-OFnCX. 



PKXIBTTXST POSTOfFICK. 



SSATTIS. J. M. 


New York. 


Byegate, N. Y. 


MeFarland, A 


Ukes. 


Kden, Ohio. 


Bowdfco, S. 


Rochester. 


YbrkN.Y. 


MeKee, D. 


Philadelphia. Phihidelphla,Pa. 


Boyd, J. 0. 


Lakes. 


Sandusky, Ohio. 


MclA'-bUn, Jamef 


Rochester. 


Lishcn. N. Y. 








MIddleton. J. 


Philadelphia. Philadelphia, Pa 


CANiroa, R. B. 


niinoU. 




MUIiipin, A. M. 


PIttsborg. 


N.Alexandria,P. 


Carlisle, 8. 


New York. 


Newburg, N.Y. 


MllliKnn, BO., Jss. 


Pittsburg. 




Crosier, J. 


nttsbarg. 




Milli((an,J.C.K. 


lsk«M. 


MlamCoblo. 








MUligan. J. 8. T. 


Ukes. 


8outhfle]d.0hlo. 


lODM, J. 


Lakes. 


Oarrison, Ohio. 


3Iilroy, WUliam 


Lakes. 


Miami, Ohio. 


Fbxhch, John 




Cedar Lske, 0. 


KSELt, James 


Illinois. 





Oalbsaith. J. 




Pine Creek. Pa. 


PxxB. Robert 


Pittsburg. 


Brookland, Pa. 


Ge«n5.,W.F. 


Lakes. 


Uacedon, Ohio. 


Roberts, W.L. 


IlUaois. 




nAVNAT. T. 


VltiMhnrg. 


WUkIusburg,Pa 


FCOW, D. 






H anr*T. J^aeph 
UutcbenoD, 11. 


PitUbuiv. 


Shaw, D. J. 


Illinois. 


BIoomlDston,IlL 
Miller's Run,Pa. 


Lskes. 


, 


FlatM', William 


Plttaburn. 








Sl.iane, J. U. W. 


New York. 


New York, N.Y. 


JOHKtTON. J. B. 


Leken. 


Miami, Ohio. 


Spmnll. T. 


Pittsburg. 


Pittsburg. Pa. 
BesTer, f*a. 


Johiutiuu, N. li. 


New York. 


Topsham, N.Y. 


SterHt, Samuel 


Pittsburg. 


Johnston, R. 


Boehester. 


Toronto, C. W. 


SteTencon, A. 


New York. 


New York, N. Y. 








8tott,J. 


lUlnols. 


Prin«etoD, IlL 


KXHHXDT, J. 


Philadelphia. OoD'oeheag', Md. 


TKOKnOH, J. R. 


New York. 


Nswbvigh, N.T. 


lAWtOH . J. R. 


New York. 


Boston, Mess. 


Wallacb, James 


Illinois. 


Old Bethel. IB. 

Pterling, N.Y. 


Love, James 


Pittsburg. 




AVllklns, M. 








...... 


Williams, J. B. 


New York. 


White lAka.N.Y 


McrLU»Kni,H.P. 


Plttsbnrg. 




Williion. J. M. 


Philadelphia. PhiUdelphla,PB. 


MrClarkin,J.J. 


PltUbnrg. 


Fpringfleld, Pa. 
Clarinda, III. 


Win8on.R.Z. 


Illinois. 


...... 


MeCracken.Jeeeph 


Illinois. 


Wlllsoii. 8. M. 


New York. 




HeCnlloiiffb^B. 


Lakes. 


Detroit, Mich. 


Wylk., P.H. 


Lakes. 


Lake Kflsa, 0. 


McDoDftld^J.M. 
36 


UUaols. 


Sharon, 111. 


WyUe^ S.a 





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202 FBE8BTTBBIAN HISTOBIOAL XLICANAC. 

THE ASSOCIATE REFORMED 

PEESBYTERIAN SYNOD OF THE SOUTH, 



Thb Associate Reformed Synod of the South met agreeably 
to appointment, at Due West, Abbeville District, South Carolina, 
on Monday, 11th of October, 1858, and was opened with a discourse 
by the retiring Moderator. 

Jeremiab, zxiii: 5. Behold, the days come, saith the Lord, that I will raisie unto 
David a rii;hteous branch, and a King ahall reign and prosper, and shall execute judg- 
ment and justice in the earth. 

The coming of the Messiah was foretold by the Prophets. In 
this verse He is described as a Branchy a righteous Branch. Then 
He is called a King. 

I. Christ as King. 

What was implied in the term King? 

1. Supreme power. 2. Legislative authority. S. Bighteous ad- 
ministration. 

II. The reign of Christ.' 1. His reign is lawful. 

2. His reign is spiritual. His kingdom is not meat and drink; 
but righteousness and peace, and joy in the Holy Ghost. 

The means by which his kingdom is promoted are spiritual. 
" The weapons of our warfare are not carnal, but spiritual." 

3. His reign is benevolent. To bring glory to Ood, and peace 
to man is its object. 

III. Christ's reign prosperous. 

A cheering truth. It has prospered. Its extent proves its pros- 
perity. It is to be still more extensive. It shall embrace all peo- 
ple. His dominion shall extend from sea to sea, &c. In order 
thereto, the world must undergo a great change. Institutions of 
men must be overturned; Mohammedanism must be destroyed; Pa- 
ganism must be removed; the Boman apostasy must be overcome. 

IV. The means to be employed in extending Christ's kingdom, 
is the preaching of the gospel. This is the great instrumentality. 
The command : — " Preach the gospel." 

The gospel has been successful, and is now preached in almost 
every land. 

Ministers should remember whose they are. They should labour 
and pray for the coming of Christ's kingdom. They should dedi- 
cate their all to their Lord and Master. 

Conclusion. — It is pleasant to return again to this seat of science; 
the birth place of some of us, — the spiritual birth-place of others. 
Our first inquiry should be, " Watchman, what of the night?" 



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rii, 



Tolins, 
cooree 



h 
Ilea 




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^^SM S. 



^^ c^e^yty 



Due Wesl. Soullv Caroljjia. 
Moderator of the Associate Reformed Syjiod of t"he Soulh, 1858. 



A^/^sAe^^/ Jo^e/AM mjso;, A'^UJ Souih JG^S'/^iUJ 



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PBSSBYTSRIAK HISTOBIOAL ALHAKAO. 



208 



After the discourse, the sessions were constituted with prayer, 
and the following were the 

^mUti $rtstntKt i\i Ipttting tti 1^1 1 Stuh 



MUrUTXM. 






MXinSTXHS. 


nXSBTTSBT. BUUOt 


Bsns, C. B. 


First 


T.P.Orier. 




Georgia. 


M.... 


Bonner, J. J. 


Beoond. 





Pressly, David 






Boyoe, K. B. 


mnL 


William McQill. 


Pressly, S. B., D.S. 


Beoond. 


D.O. Hawthorn. 


bJJTbw?'- 


lint. 


Robert Brloe. 


Pressly,J.B. 


First 


J. P. White. 


nnt. 


J.Y.MUla. 


Pressly, J. P, 1>A 


Second. 


James Sloan. 


Brjtin, J. H. 


Tennoweo. 




Pressly, John 8. 


Seoond. 


L.W.MeAilistsr. 








Pressly, W. B. 


First 


J.O.Xnloe. 


Caitlm, J. R. 


nrfft 


J.D.Wylie. 








Chmlinen,J.a 


Beoond. 


...... 


QTO«,H. 


Gemgla. 


. — 


Datxs, 8. P. 


BeooDd. 


...... 


Ravsoh, a. 


First 


H.L.XUlott 








Bobinson,D.P. 


First. 


A.BeottNssbit 


GAXJ.OWAT, J. 

Gordon, 0. 


BeooDd. 
Kentneky. 


J.J.Bbanka. 


Robinson, H. H. 
Ross, A. R. 


Memphis. 
Flrst*^ 


John M^'night 


Gordon, N. Bf. 


Kentocky. 


...... 








Grier»Ii.G^]>D. 


Beoond. 


, 


8LOA>, A. S. 


Tnwntssos 


•M... 








Sloan, H. T. 


Second. 


....M 


Habvoh, D. f . 


Beoond. 


...... 


Sloan« J. A. 


Memphis. 


M.M* 


HempbUl, W. B. 


8«iond. 


J. R. Todd. 


Strong, J. H. 


Memphis. 


•■•M* 


Uanter, John 


nrst. 


James Uood. 














Tatlok, R. F. 


First 


D.HcAuley. 


LUiThoausB. 


Kenloekj. 





Tomer, Thomai 


Gecfsis. 


W.8.L0W17. 


HxLLAm, John 
Miller, J. a. 


AUbhma. 
Beoond. 





WiLsoH, John 


Memphis. 


A.L.MoCB]n. 


Marphy, H. L. 


Kentucky. 


M.... 


TOVHO, J. L. 


Memphis. 


W.M. 


Second. 


...... 


ToQng,J.N. 


Beoond. 


W.W.McMonlea. 


McDonald, L. 


nnt. 


John Simpson. 


...... 


Memphis. 


E. Agnew, M.l>. 


MeKlwM, W. H. 


Virginia. 


John Anderson. 


•M... 


Tennessee. 


James £. English. 
J. Kfrkpatfiek. 
J.LsTsT 


Mcl£lro7, A. 


Georgia. 


Joseph Sylvester. 
Wm. B. dMdiran. 


, 


Tirginia. 


MeLaugfalln,J.G. 


Firrt. 


...... 


Virginia. 



The Synod proceeded to the election of a Moderator, which re- 
sulted in the choice of Rev. R. C. Grier, D. D. 
Rev, J. E. Pressly was appointed Assistant Clerk. 



The Committee on Presbyterial Reports, Rev. L. McDonald, 
Chairman, reported as follows : 

A careful revision of the several reports will justify the following conclo^ons : 

Firgi. That God has blessed us as ministers and people, with an unusnal amoant 
of health, in consequence of which, the ordinances have been administered and eo- 
joyed to an extent perhaps unprecedented in our history as a church. 

Second. That the outpouring of the Holy Spirit has been manifested and enjoyed 
amongst our churches to an unprecedented extent. One-half, or more of our Presby- 
teries report more or less powerful worlcs of £^cc within their respective boonds, re« 
suiting, not only in quiclcening God's own people, but in gathering into the fold of 
Christ many precious souls, who hitherto naa '* cared for none of these things," as 
also in reclaiming backsliders from the declensions in which thev had fallen. In con- 
templating this glorious feature of God*s dealings, we may well exclaim, " The Lord 
hath done great things for us, whereof we are glad." Ho has verified hia promise 
graciously made to his people, that he would pour out his Spirit, " as water upon the 
thirsty, and as floods on the dry ground.^' And oh, what encouragement does it af- 
ford OS, to labour and pray for the extension of his kingdom, and for the diffusion of 
a savour of his knowledge, in all our land, and throughout the world I 

Third. 1'hat in all oar bounds there seems to be an increased attention given to the 
administration of ordinances ; that prayer meetings have been established, Bible clas- 
ses formed, and catechetical instruction of children and servants more generally at^ 
tended to, than in years past ; and another pleasing feature is tlie fact that peace and 
harmony and concord exist between the pastors and their respective flocks. 



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204 THE ASSOCULTB MFORKBD OHUROH| SOUTH. 

But the fiitvre is oot aU brightneBs, but has its shades. Some portions of oar 
charch are represented, as Laodicea of old. as being " luke-warm and neither cold nor 
hot," to whom oar Lord and Master addressees the solemn admonition, '* Because 
thou art luke^warm, and neither cold uor hot, I will spew thee oat of my month." 
Thisfthonld be for a lameDtation, and should hanible us in the sight of our God. 

In November IsMt, Rev. A. F. Quay departed this life^ at his residence, in Cabar- 
roa County, North Carolina, after several years' service m the Church, sostsin^, as 
we might have supposed, by the Oliristian's hope. This visitation should teach us the 
Bolemu lesson, that constant preparation fur death is our highest dut^, seeing that 
we know not the hour when our Master shall come. It also should stimulate us to 
fidelity in oar Master's work, as the time is short, and a great work is to be per- 
formed. 



The Oonimittee on Erskine College, Be v. John Wilson, Chair- 
man, reported as follows : 

That they have examined the papers put into their hands, and they afford pleasing 
evidence of the increasing prosperity and usefulness of the institution. The last 
graduating class is one of the largest that has ever graduated at the place ; and the 
whole number of students in attendance has been larger than usual. They are also 
reported as conducting themselves with greater propriety during the latter part of 
the collegiate year. 

The report of the Committee of Examination shows, that they had attended to their 
duty faithfully, and they were well satisfied with the evidence of faithfulness on the 
part of the Faculty, and with tfa« scholarship and gentlemanly deportment of the 
young men in general. 

The finances of the institution appear to be on the whole in a prosperous condition. 
The money subscribed for the endowment is being invested in permanent stock, as 
fast as it can be collected. 

The Board of Trustees reoommend some changes, which they hope the Synod will 
ire and ratify. The first is, that the examination of the senior class shall take 

Etwo weeks before the week of commencement, and that the faculty invite a 
of Visitors with the Trustees to attend the examination, that the students may 
have two weeks to prepare their commencement exercises. The committee recom- 
mend that this suggestion be approved aiul ratified. 

The next thing that the Board recommend is, that the session in college shall for 
the future commence on the second Monday in September in each year, and terminate 
on the second Wednesday of July, with a recess of two weeks at Christmai>. 

Another change suggested is, that the salaries of the President and Professors shall 
each be raised two hundred dollars, pro rata, as the funds of the institution may 
warrant 

The Board of Trustees have adopted measures in regard to the management of the 
fmids, which your committee think wise and judicious. 

The last thing brought before us in the report of the Board, is the fact that Dr. 
Grier, our respected President, and Professor Young, have tendered their resignations. 
On this the Boainl took no action, but they refer the whole matter to Synod. Your 
Committee reoommend that the resignation of Dr. Grier be accepted, with tlie under- 
standing that he act as Pi-esident pro Urn, until a successor can be secured to take his 
place. We also reoommend that Professor Young's resignation be not accepted for 
the present^ and that he be requested to serve us as formerly, at least for another 
year. 



The Committee on Union reported as follows : 

Whereas, The principle of an inspired Psalmody is sacred to us, and whereas the 
late communication of the Committee of the General Assembly does not give that 



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PRESBTTBRIAN HISTORICAL ALKANAO. 205 

prominenoe to the principle, wbich in our earneflt desire for union, and from some 
previous action and proressed poutioo of their body on the subject, we had expected : 

Resolvedj 1. Tliat if the late communication is to be understood as furnishing tn 
their ultimatum in the way of proposals, we canuot encourage our Synod in the hope 
of a union beiog efifeoted, nor could we regard the continuance of the present negotia- 
tions as desirable. 

Resolved, 2. That, although we are unwilling to unite on the g^unds that ha,Te 
been oflered, we hold ourselves bound to consider propositiona (if there be anyO which 
the General Assembly in their judgment may yet think proper to make. 

Rev. Mr. Hoyt, by requeet, r-ead the letter from the Committee of 
the General Assembly to the Committee oF the Associate Beformed 
Synod. The members of the Assembly's Committee were invited 
by the Moderator to address the Synod on the subject of union. 
Addresses were then delivered by Dr. Howe and Rev. E. Cater, 
explanatory of their views and wishes upon the subject. 

The Rev. N. M. Gordon offered the following substitute: 

Resdvedf That the Committee on Union proceeding upon the substantial oneness 
of the Presbyterian and Associate Reformed Churches, and accepting the fact of tbeir 
difference in Psalmody, be directed to treat on the following basis : 

That the Associate Beformed Churches be guarded in their principles and nsaires, 
that the Presbyterians adopt a mutually acceptable rersion of the Psalms into their 
book, and that the Associate Beformed Churches continue to have control of their 
institutions and property. 

When the Synod was about to take the vote on Mr. Gordon^s 
substitute, Rev. John Wilson offered the following resolutiooa : 

Resolved, L That the n^otiations with a view to orgauic union be for the pi^osent 
suspended. 

Kesolved, 2. That the matter of comronnion with the Old School Presbyterian 
Church be left to the discretion of Church Sessions, they taking the word of Uod and 
the Constitution of the Associate Beformed Church as their guide. > 

These resolutions were lost ; the Synod then fell back upon the 
Minority Report on Union, or Mr. Gordon's substitute, and when 
preparing to take the vote; — on motion of Rev. E. E. Pressly, D.D., 
sustained by a full vote of the house, the subject of union and the 
reports which have been discussed, and all the papers connected 
therewith, were laid on the table, with the understanding that the 
majority and minority reports of the Union Committee, and the 
resolutions of Mr. Wilson be published in the minutes. On motion 
af Mr. McElroy, thanks were given to Almighty God for the happy 
termination to these excited discussions. 

The Moderator was directed to communicate by letter this informa- 
tion to the Chairman of the General Assembly's Committee on 
Union, 



The Committee on the Theological Seminory, Rev. J. N. YotTNG, 
Chairman, submitted the following report, which was adopted: 

That in their Juds^ment it is expedient to organize a Theological Seminary, distinct 
from the Literary department of Erskine College, but to be under the supervision of 
the Board of Trustees of the College. 

As it appears we will have the funds availahle for his salary, we recommend the 
appointment of one Professor of Theology. 



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206 THE Jlssooiate rssobhed church, south. 

We would recommend that the ProfesBora in College be requested to con tin ae aa 
heretofore to give instructions in the several branches of study, until the Professor 
elect may be ready to assume the duties of the station. 

We recommend that Uie necessary details for the operations of the Seminary far 

the pi*e6ent year be attended to by the Board of Trustees, and that be a Gotn- 

mittee to present a scheme of more complete organization, to be presented at next 
meeting of Synod. 

It was resolved that a Theological Professor pro tempore be now 
elected. * 

Dr. R. C. Grier, late President of Erskine College, was chosen to 
thatProfessorship by acclamation. 

The Synod now proceeded to the election of a President of Ers- 
kine College, which resulted in the choice of Rev. John Miller; 
by a rising vote, which was unanimous; who, on beins; interrogated 
by the Moderator in relation to his election, intimated his willing- 
ness to accept the appointment. 

The treasurer of the Domestic Mission reported that during the 
year he received $1358. 

The thanks of this Synod were tendered to Dr. B. G. Grier for the able and satis- 
factory manner with which he has discharged his daties as Presdent of Erskine 
Ollege. Also, 

To the families in Dne West and vicinity for their kindness to the members daring 
the present session. Also, 

To all those Railroads who have furnished a grataitons passa^ either in whole 
or in part to members in coming to, and returning from, this meetmg. Also, 

The business being transacted, the Minutes were read and cor- 
rected. Adjourned at the hour of 11, P. M., to meet at Hopewell, 
Maury County, Tennessee, 2d Monday in October, 1859, with 
prayer, singing a psalm, and pronouncing the Apostolic Benedic- 
tion* 

JAMES BOYCE, Olibk. & 0. GRIEB, Modkratqb. 



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THB ASaOCIATB REFORMSB CHUBOH, SOUTH. 207 

it int Wtit, SiBut\ (SmbUu. 

Prior to the year 1835, the location of the beautiful villnge of 
Due West was an unbroken forest. A church building of very 
humble pretensions was the only object which marked the spot. 
The surrounding country possessed many charms. As a conse- 
quence, it attracted the attention of emigrants from the. old country 
at an early period in the settlement of the state. The first settlers 
were, for the most part, pious families from Ireland. A congrega* 
tioa was organized even before the revolutionary war, and enjoyed 
frequently the ministrations of the Bev. Thomas Clark, M. D., of 
precious memory. The church has borne the present name, which 
is also the name of the village that has grown up around it, from 
the first settlement of the country. But the reasons which led to 
the appellation are utterly lost. The congregation secured the 
services of Bev. Peter McMillan as their first pastor. He was an 
Irishman by birth and education. Possessed of great physical 
strength, stentorian lungs, and popular talents generally, his settle- 
ment promised extensive usefulness. During the early part of his 
ministry, his energy and zeal were instrumental in collecting a large 
and flourishing congregation. The pastor's hands were strength* 
ened by a session which embraced some of the excellent ones of the 
earth. Few ruling elders have been so extensively useful, or left 
behind them a memory so precious, or an example so valuable, as 
John Murphy. A man of sound understanding, cultivated intellect, 
and glowing piety ; he was truly a pillar in the church. Owing to 
his influence, under God, the church outlived the difficulties which 
began to threaten its very existence in the latter part of Mr. McMil- 
lan's pastorate. 

Charges involving his ministerial standing were preferred against 
Mr. McMillan, and after many'very unpleasant occurrences, he de- 
clined the authority of Presbytery and lefk the congregation. Ac- 
cordingly Presbytery directed Bev. A. Porter to preach at Due 
West and declare the congregation vacant. These things occurred 
about the beginning of the present century. 

From this period we commence a dark and dreary chapter in the 
history of Due West At that time there was a great lack of minis- 
terial aid in the Associate Beformed Church. Few young men 
were entering the ministry. The labourers were scattered over a 
large surface of country, and it was not possible that pastors 
could give a large share of attention to vacant congregations. Con- 
sequently for thirty years Due West remained a vacancy. Her sec- 
ond pastor was not born for eight or ten years after the departure 
of the first. During this long and dark period a small remnant re- 
mained true to the principles and practices of the ehureb of their 
fathers. Many in the progress of this period sought a resting place 
in the bosom of surrounding denominations. Death claimed others 
as its victims, and in 1S14, when Bev. A. Porter emigrated west 



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208 PBSSBTTBBIAN HISTORICAL ALXANAO. 

of the Ohio river, nearly one half of the congregation of Due West 
accompanied him to his ne\f home. In the meantime, as opportu* 
nity offered, calls were addressed to various probationers, but with- 
out success. Under all these discouragements, the faith and active 
efforts of John Murphy were the means blessed, to keep the few 
sheep left without a shepherd, from fainting and giving up all as lost. 
His work of faith was nobly seconded by John Lindsay, Bobert 
Wallace, and John Brown, (since Judge Brown of Indiana.) 

In its desolate condition the congregation was cared for by Pres^ 
bytery. The fathers, Irwin, Renwiok, and Porter, frequently visited 
them, and brake to them the bread of life, and more recently they 
received supplies of preaching from Rev. J. T. Pressly, S. P. Preasly, 
J. Loury, ana others. These labours vere so far blessed, at least, as 
to keep the people united in a church capacity, and to direct the 
fLttention of all to the necessity of employing all proper means to 
secure a pastor. 

But their prospects seemed to grow darker. The youth were 
generally connected with other branches of the church ; death had 
removed some of the most prayerful and active of their number; 
John Murphy, to whom all looked a^ a leader, had fallen asleep, hav- 
ing served the will of God. Yet God looked on the long desola- 
tions, he heard their prayer and sent them a youthful pastor in 
August, 1830, in the person of Ebenezer Erskine Pressly. At 
this time a long expect^ object was accomplished, yet there were 
many serious obstacles to be overcome. The congregation was 
reduced in numbers. Twenty*five members constituted their whole 
strength. There was no suitable house of worship, the salary 
promised was small, and the pastor was youthful and inexperienced. 
Yet, by the "good band of God upon them," the cause prospered, 
A new and more comfortable house of worship was erected during 
the first year of the new pastorship. Valuable members were ad- 
ded to the church; and the session, which had been reduced to two 
members, was increased at an early day by setting apart to the of- 
fice of Ruling Elderi^ men of energy and sterling worth. 

The new session was composed of eight men, mostly in the prime 
of life. The following is the roll : — Robert Wallace, John Brown, 
A. Haddon, James Lindsay, J. L. Simes, James Farr, John L. Ellis, 
and Andrew C. Hauthorn. Under thi» new state of things, the 
cause of God prospered; large accessions were received from time to 
time. In the midst of this prosperous season reverses were expe- 
rienced. The ravages of death soon removed the fathers, and emi- 
gration, that desolating scourge of the churches in the south, began 
to do its work. Of the session, Robert Wallace^ one of the old 
men who had seen the country in its pristine beauty, and had been 
ooncerned in the first organization of the church at Due West, 
passed to his reward; John Brown, who had been specially active in 
securing the administration of the ordinances, removed to a distant 
portion of the church. But, as a portion were called away, others 
were raised up who occupied their places. In 1838 or 18S4, the 
paator was chosen to the office of Theological Professor, and for a 



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THE ASSOCIATE BEFOBHED CHUBCH, SOUTH. 209 

length of time devoted his energies in rearing up and training oan* 
didates for the holy ministry. Rev's. Ralston, McDonald, Chal- 
mers, and John N. Pressly, were the pupils first educated' for thel 
ministry under this appointment. In 1835, the Associated Reformed 
Synod of the South resolved to embark in the important enterprise 
of setting up in her bounds a Literary and Theological Institution. 

Due West was selected as the location of the contemplated semi- 
nary. Many considerations led to this selection. The position 
was central, the surrounding country was remarkably healthful, 
and the community moral and enterprizing. The congregation, 
unassisted, erected the first building for the Literary Institution, in 
the midst of the native forest. In the exercise of a sound discrimi- 
nation, a lot of seventy acres of land had been secured as the site 
of the church in the early history of the congregation. This, by 
their consent, was divided into lots of suitable size, and sold to such 
persons as were disposed to identify themselves with the enterprise 
of Synod. Hence the origin of the beautiful rural village of Due 
West. About the year 1887, Synod resolved to give to her insti* 
tution the character and advantages of a college. The literary insti- 
tution, under the name of " Clark and Erskine Seminary,** had suc- 
ceeded beyond the most sanguine expectations of its friends. The 
college was put into operation, and the pastor of the congregation 
was chosen the first President of Erskine College. As professor of 
theology, president of the college, and pastor of the congregation, 
he devoted all his energies to the fulfilment of the weighty re- 
sponsibilities resting upon him. This state of things continued 
until the year 1848, when, in consequence of the entire prostration 
of his physical energies, he was released from the active duties 
arising from his connection with the Institution of Synod. The 
pastorship continues to this day. It will be seen by this, that the 
pastor has participated largely in all the enterprises of the church, 
and has been engaged in training a large proportion of its ministry. 

The complicated engagements of the pastor, while they may have 
increased his means of usefulness, and seemed to be demanded by 
the wants of the church, have operated injuriously upon the inter- 
ests of the congregation. It is obvious that it has not received the 
amount of attention which its interest demanded. Yet it has al- 
ways been advancing. If its numbers are not great, it is not be- 
cause a sufficient increase annually has not been realized. In many 
instances, as many as twenty-five, and thirty, and thirty-five have 
been added in a single year. Yet by death and removals as great 
a number, or greater, have left us. 

It is worthy of remark that a larger share of attention has been 
given, at Due West, to the religious improvement of the coloured 
race, than in most of our congregations. Consequently, there is a 
larger membership derived from that class than is usually found 
among us. 

The congregation has passed through many vicissitudes. In her 
history there is light and shade. In a few years past, it experienced 
a sad reverse in the death of one of her most active and devoted 
27 



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210 



THB FBBSBYTEBIAN HISTOBICAL ALMANAC. 



elders, James Lindsay, Esq., who fell at his post in the midst of a 
career of usefalness. He had exerted himself, with energy and ac- 
tivity, in procuring the erection of the beautiful and spacious church 
edifice in which the congregation now worship. He was permitted 
to see it rise in its beautiful proportions ; in it he was permitted to 
hear the proclamation of mercy to sinful men, and then he was 
called to lay down his mortal remains under the shadow of that lofby 
spire, the completion of which was among the last acts of his life. 

Recently the session was enlarged by the addition of D. 0. Hau- 
thorn, J. H. Haddon, and B. G. Sharp. 

During the past eventful year the congregation have experienced 
some of the manifestations of the presence and power of God's Holy 
Spirit. Thirty individuals, mostly in the morning of life, have 
connected themselves with the church. Of these several have al- 
ready devoted themselves to the study of theology, preparatory to 
entering the ministry. 

It is worthy of remark that some of the most active and useful 
ministers of the Associate Reformed Synod of the South have been 
reared up within the pastoral charge of E. E. Pressly. Of these it 
may be proper to record the names of D. F. Haddon, J. 0. Lindsay, 
W. M. Sharp, and Neal M., and G. Gordon. 



tiii ai linittKS. 



nSSBTTBtT. 



poiT-omcx. 



AanxYTf S. A. 

BsAXSB, A. B. 

Beits, 0. B. 
Bonner, T. J. 
Bonner, J. I. 
Boyoa, B. B. 
Boyee, J., D Jl. 
Boyce, J. K. 
Boyce, 8. a 
Boyd, I. 0. 
Brie*, R. W. 
Brown, J. BL 
Bryeon, H. H. 
Bryeon, J. H. 

Gastlbs, J. R. 
Chalmers, J. 0. 

Davis, 8. P. 
Dickson, J. A. 

Fi]n.xT,J.W. 

Oallowat, J. 
Gordon, O. 
Gordon, N. H. 
Orier, R.C^9J>. 
Grler, R. L. 

Haspon, D. F. 
Hemphill, W. R. 
Hunter, John 

Lathas, R. 
Lee, Thomas S. 

MeCAiar, J. N. 
MeDaniel, J. L. 
McDonald, L. 
MoRlwee, W. M. 
McKlroy, A. 



Memphis. Corona, Miss. 



Virginia. 
First 



Second. 

First 

First 

Memphis. 

Kentucky. 

Second. 

First 

Tennessee. 

Teni 



First 
Second. 



Second. 



Kentucky. 

Second. 

Kentucky. 

Kentucky. 

Second. 

First 

Second. 
Second. 
First 

First 
Kentucky. 

Georgia. 

Memphis. 

First 

Virginia. 

Georgia. 



Union, Ta. 
Wlnnsboro. 8. G. 
Camden, Ala. 
Due West, S.O. 
Bethany, 8. 0. 
Bells, 8. a 



KlrksTlIIe, Ky. 
Due West, 8. 0. 
WeU Ridge, 8. 0. 

YineyOrore, Ten, 
Hopewell, Tenn. 

Hkkory G., 8. 0. 



LowndsTille,8.C. 
Camden, Ala. 

8haipsburg, Ky. 

Newberry, 8. 0. 
LonlsTille, Ky. 
Keene, Ky. 
Due Wes^ 8. 0. 



8cuffletown, 8. G. 
Due West, 8. G. 
Laurel Sp'g. N. G. 



Millersburg, Ky. 

Preston, Ga. 
Cotton PUnt, Mis. 
LewUTiile, 8. 0. 
Lexington, Ta. 
Attapulgns, Qa. 



HAMV. 



ntXSBTTXKT. 



posT-orricx. 



McLaughlin, I. G. 
Miller, Jonh 
Miller, J. G. 
Moflktt, W. 8. 
Montsomery, A. 8. 
Murphy, H. L. 

Oats,M. 

Patrick, J. 
Phillips, D. 6. 
Pressly, DaTid 
Pressly, B. B., d.d. 
Pressly, J. E. 
Pressly, J. P., B.B. 
Pressly, John 8. 
Pressly, W. B. 

QviM, H. 

R4L8TOV, 8. 8. 
Ranson, A. 
Robinson, D. P. 
Robinson, H. H. 
Ross, R. A. 

Sloar, a. 8. 
Sloan, H.T. 
Sloan, J. A. 
Spenoe, W. W. 
Strong, J. H. 

Tatlor, R. F. 
Thompson, d.d., H. 
Turner, Thomas 

W«TO, J. P. 
Wilson, John 

Tovno, J. L. 
Toung, J. M. 
Toung, J. N. 



First 



Second. 

Memphis. 

Kentucky. 



Gharlotte, N. C. 
Allentnwn. Ala. 
Nashville, Tenn. 
Monticello, Ark. 
Palmetto, Tenn. 
Newberiy, 8. C 



RusselTille, Ark. 
Loulsrille, Ga. 
Starkvllle, Miss. 
Due West, 8. G. 
OoddleGroek, N.a 
Due West, 8 G. 
MoffatsTflle, 8. 0. 
Sioney Point, N.a 



First 

Memphis. 

Georgia. 

Alabama. 

Second. 

First. 

Second. 

Second. 

First 



Georgia. Oorington, Ga. 



Kentucky. 

First 

First. 

Memphis^ 

Fint 



Memphis. 
Alabama. 
Memphis. 

First. 

Virginia. 

Georgia. 

Memphis. 
Memphis. 

Memphis. 
Alabama, 



Auburn, Mo. 
Alexandria, N. G. 
CraJgTille, S. G. 
Gotton Plant, His. 
BlalrsYiUe, S. G. 

Mollno, Tenn. 
HaniRburg, 8. G. 
Gold WAter. Miss. 
Gamd<«n, Ala. 
Gaawell, Miss. 

Flint Gap, Tenn. 
Timber Wldipe, Va. 
Garmi, Illinois 

Troy, Tenn. 
PortersriUe,TeDB. 

Gorona, Miss. 
Forks, Ala. 
Due West, 8. a 



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PRBSBYTSRIAN HISTOBIOAL ALMANAC. 211 



THE 



CUMBERLAND PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. 



Thk Twknty-bighth Session op the Gbnbbal Assbmbly op 
THE Cumbebland Pbbsbytbbian Chubgh was held at Huntsville, 
Alabama, on Thursday, May 20th, 1858, and was opened with a dis- 
course by the retiring Moderator. 

2 Tim., iv. 2. Preach the word. 

This was a part of the charge which Paul gave , to Timothy, a 
little before he suffered martyrdom, and it is a part of the solemn 
charge which was given to each minister present at the time of his 
ordination. No one ever received it in a proper manner who 
did not feel a peculiar solemnity at that time. 

It is right that that solemnity be kept up in our minds, and there- 
fore we should often recur to it. 

On the present occasion I propose to offer some remarks : 1. 
On a divine call to the work of the ministry. 2. The subject mat- 
ter of preaching the word. 8. The manner of preaching. 

1. The divine call to the work of the ministry. It is only ne- 
cessary to turn your attention to the divine record to find ample 
proof that God has reserved this right to himself. Paul in speak- 
ings of Aaron's office, and no doubt he intended a reference to the 
ministry, said, "No man taketh this honour unto himself, but he 
that is called of Ood as was Aaron." God has had ministers of 
his religion, ever since he made his promise to man. Whatever 
services Adam, Abel, and Enoch performed were by divine appoint- 
ment. Abraham, Moses, and all the Prophets were called of God. 
The Saviour said to his disciples, "Ye have not chosen me, but 
I have chosen you, and ordained you." 

Paul was " called to be an Apostle." There has, moreover, al- 
ways been a divine attestation accompanying those divinely author- 
ized to minister in holy things. And the divine disapprobation 
has almost as uniformly attended the ministry of those who have 
presumed upon the authority of God. A number of instances iu 
the scriptures might be cited in verification, such as Korah, Da- 
than, and Abiram, and others. 

If God called men under the Law, and at the introduction of the 



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212 THi; CUMBEBLAND FBESBYTEKIAK CHUBCH. 

Gospel, to the work of the ministry ; where is the authority that 
that prerogative does not still exist? Is not Christ still the head 
of the Church ? To whom has he delegated that authority ? There 
are those who profess to have and claim it, but there is no divine 
warrant for such claims. Jesus Christ personally called men to the 
ministry, while on earth, and he directed his disciples to pray the 
Lord of the harvest to send out more labourers. This Lord of the 
harvest was, doubtless, the Holy Ghost, which he promised in the 
event that he went away. He did go away, and the Holy Ghost 
descended, and has been calling men, guiding and superintending 
the affairs of the church to the present time, and will, until the 
whole design of the plan of salvation shall be closed. 

But whom does the Holy Spirit call to the work of the ministry ? 
Not unregenerate men, — surely not. That would be inconsistent 
in the very nature of things. How would it comport with reason 
or propriety for our Government to appoint a man as ambassador 
to a foreign court, and to intrust in his hands matters involving 
the interest and honour of this country, knowing that the man ap- 
pointed was an enemy, in heart to this confederacy ? So, the great 
Head of the church calls only such as are truly converted or regen- 
erated, — true men, — safe, loyal men ; men whose hearts and inter- 
ests are identifiejd with his own* That some have had premonitions 
in reference to the ministry, before their conversion, I doubt not ; 
but that they were actually called before conversion — needs proof. 
I doubt not that many would be in the fields who are not, and will 
not, because they are unconverted. Nor does God call all converted 
men to the work of the ministry ; nor are those called, called by 
voices or dreams. But the Holy Spirit powerfully moves them to 
the sacred work. 

The glory of God, and the good of souls, constitute the motive ; 
and such as are called, must and do feel the force of that impressive 
injunction : " Go ye into all the world and preach the gospel to every 
creature," and do, in some degree, appreciate what Paul meant when 
he said : — "Wo is unto me if I preach not the gospel." These men,, 
too, are truly sensible that a dispensation of the gospel is committed 
to them. 

Again : When a man is called to preach the word, if he. is not quali- 
fied, he is equally called to qualify himself. God know3 the capacity 
of the man, and never requires '^more than that man can perform. 
He has so constructed the mind that, by its own eflforts, it may over- 
come most of the difficulties that lie in the way ; and in his provi- 
dence, he has furnished so many means of education, that none need 
fail of the requjsite.qualifications for the sacred office. 

Our fathers in the ministry laboured under serious disadvanta- 
ges in this particular. In 1800 there were few good schools or 
colleges in the Western country ; now, there are many. They had 
no Theological School ; for this they had to substitute a circulating 
library. There ji?e now, no doubt, more classic scholars in our 
country and our church, than there were grammarians in those 
days. What a change has been wrought ! At almost every county 



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PBSSBTTBRIAK HISTORIOAL ALHAli'AG. 213 

town tliere is how isi good academy or a college. We have now 
theological schools, and a young man has- no excuse for remaining 
in ignorance. It would be a crying sin. 

But literary and theological attainments are not only the prerequis- 
ites ; he must be la man of prayer — fervent prayer. A prayerless 
minister would be an anomaly. The minister's mind must be im- 
bued with heavenly wisdom ; his conversation must be in heaven ; 
he must live much upon h\s knees; he must be a man of self-denial. 
The heathen prohibit their priests from going to theatres, and all 
places of unsanctified amusement; they, too, prohibit the use of 
wihes to their prie&ts, and total abstinence was enjoined upon them. 
If these idolatoi*s were thus exact, how loudly is that purity, which 
is above sdspicion, called for, from the ministers of the religion of 
the Lord Jesus Christ I ' 

The success of a minister depends much upon his moral deport- 
ment. He must not only be a man of prayer and self-denial, but 
he must be a man of study. The Bible is his text-book. From 
this fountain of knowledge he is to furnish himself, "unto every 
good word and work," Other professional men are found in their 
offices, arranging and preparing for those exigencies that may come 
up in the course of their practice. They study as if all depended 
upon it ; the afifairs of time alone depend on their study ; and will 
the called minister of Jesus Christ be lax and indolent when his cause 
relates to eternity f Surely not. 

Having dwelt thus far on the call, and some of the qualifications 
for the ministerial work, I proceed to notice, 

2. The subject matter of preaching : Preach the Word. We 
understand the apostle to mean, preach tfbe doctrines contained in 
the word of God. It would be impossible to preach all the word 
at any one time. Such is the infinite variety of the scriptures, that 
thousands have been engaged in their exposition, for thousands of 
years, and yet, after the deepest researches of the deepest men, 
there remains an unfathomed depth, in which many of the truths 
of our holy religion lie concealed. There they will perhaps re- 
main, unless revealed by the interposition of providence, until the 
soul ceases to " look through a glass darkly." There is not only 
infinite variety, but there is an exhaustless fulness in the word of 
God. 

The first great truth to which our attention is drawn, is the exis- 
tence of God. This is the foundation upon which the whole super- 
structure rests. The revelation of this truth through the word, 
would doubtless have been unnecessary, had no derangement taken 

Elace in the moral world. Man — the creature — would have seen 
is Creator in all the works of his hands. We have, in the mate- 
rial universe, a manifestation of the natural perfections of the Deity ; 
but not of his moral. At least, they are not sufficiently developed 
for man's salvation; but in the word or law of God, those perfec- 
tions are fullv set forth. This was added by reason of transgression. 
We are wholly indebted to the word for information, in reference 
to the fall of man. The heathen themselves have admitted that 



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214 THB C0MBSRLAKD FBSSBTTEKIAK CHURCH. 

there is a derangement, and their wisest philosophers acknowledged 
their incompetence to solve the difHculty. Their ablest legislators 
were not wise enough to devise such laws as would remedy the evil. 
The simple and unvarnished story of the fall, and of redemption, 
is related to us in the word, and to the truth and power of this storji 
the lives of men have testified for near six thousand years. 

The fall of man was total ; so the word informs us. " The whole 
head is sick, and the whole heart is faint ; there is no soundness in 
us." The fall was general. All have gone out of the way. There 
is none that doeth good ; no, not one. It was a federal act ; by one 
man's disobedience all were made sinners. All were involved in a 
common calamity by the unfaithfulness of our first progenitor. 
The scriptures affirm, " By the offence of one, judgment came upon 
all men to condemnation." The experience and observation of men 
confirm the truth of God's word. 

But is there no remedy, — no balm in Gilead ? Is man doomed 
eternally to ignorance and darkness ? No, there is a remedy. The 
word informs us that, "God so loved the world that he gave his 
only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in him should not 
perish, but have everlasting life." God sent not his Son into the 
world to condemn the world, but that the world through him might 
be saved. Again the scriptures affirm that, " He by the grace of 
God tasted death for every man ;" and, that he is the propitiation 
for our sins, and not for ours only, but for the sins of the whole 
world. The word does not tell us why he loved the world, but 
that he so loved the world — loved with that strength of affection 
and pity, that induced him to give up the Son of his bosom, to 
suffer for the redemption of the world. 

The Lord Jesus Christ, by divine appointment, voluntarily un- 
dertook the redemption of the world, and hence became the federal 
head, and placed himself under the same law that man transgressed, 
and was thus constituted the Second Adam — the Lord from Heaven. 
The first Adam having failed, the Second stood the test. He kept the 
law for man, and then suffered its penalty on the cross — became a 
vicarious sacrifice, and thus redeemed man from immediate execu- 
tion, procured for him a dispensation of mercy, and a day of pro- 
bation. The death of Jesus Christ did not necessitate the salvation 
of any, but made salvation possible for all. Founded on the atone- 
ment are the operations of the Holy Spirit, for the word informs us 
that Jesus said, "If I go not away, the Comforter or Holy Spirit 
will not come, but if I go, I will send him, and he shall reprove 
the world of sin, and of righteousness and of judgment." Jesus 
did go away, and, according to his own promise, the Spirit came. 

The first work, therefore, of the Spirit is, to reprove or convince. 
Man's position is that of a moral, free agent, under the light and 
influence of the word and Spirit, in the exercise of which agency 
he may receive the benefits of the atonement, or he may reject them. 
The word informs us that faith is the condition of salvation. " He 
that believeth and is baptized, shall be saved, and he that believeth 
not shall be damned." It must be so, if man is a moral, free agent, 



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PRESBYTSBIAK HISTOBICAL ALHAKAO. 



215 



and if he is not, I cannot ascertain the justice of his condemnation. 
Bepentance is an exercise of an agent ; hence he is required to re- 
pent, and repentance is made a condition of salvation. "Except 
ye repent, ye shall all likewise perish." So that in the gospel plan 
repentance precedes saving faith, and faith unites the soul to Christ, 
and being united to Christ, the believer is adopted into the heavenly 
family and made a joint heir with Christ, to that inheritance pur- 
chased with his blood. The relationship that the believer sustained 
to Adam is dissolved ; he enters a new relationship. That relation- 
ship is in Christ. Christ therefore says, "Because I live, ye shall 
live also." How firm the basis on which the believer rests 1 Earth, 
sin, and hell may rage, but all in vain ; the believer's life is "hid 
with Christ in God." This new relationship contemplates a new 
nature, or change of the moral man. The work is a thorough work. 
In his moral nature man is now fit for heaven. 

But the economy of grace contemplates more than the redemption 
of the spirit. If this were all, the work would seem but partially 
done. The resurrection of the Lord Jesus Christ from the dead, se- 
cures the certain resurrection of all his followers ; nay, of all man- 
kind, as he was the representative of all. This mortal must put on 
immortality; death will be swallowed up in victory; then shall be 
brought to pass the saying: — "0 death 1 where is thy sting? 
grave ! where is thy victory ?" 

Then from the redeemed shall come up the response: — "Thanks 
be to God, who giveth us the victory, through our Lord Jesus 
Christ." The wicked will be also raised, but it will be to "shame 
and everlasting contempt," and they will be constrained to acknow- 
ledge the justice of that sentence which dooms them to eternal 
misery. 

Having spent the hour, the speaker declined the consideration of 
the third general division of the subject. 

After the discourse the Assembly was constituted with prayer. 

The Stated Clerk reported the following members of the Twenty- 
eighth Session. 

a list of the members of the twentt-eighth gsnrral assembly of the 
Cumberland Presbyteriak Church. 

MINISTERS. presbyteries. SYNODS. RULING ELDERS, 

Alsup, a. H.. D. D. McMinDville. Middle TeoDessee. C. P. Pattoo. 
Anderson, T.C.,D. D. Lebanon. Middle Tennessee. 

Baird, a. J. Tenuessee. Colambia. M. H. Roberts. 

Baird, W. F. Iowa. Mississippi 2d. 

Baker, Martin Cumberland. KentucKy. 

Baker, W. B. Bed River. 'I^exas. Morgan Colbert 

Bates, T. F. Sparta. Middle Tennessee. 

Baucom, A. T. Obion. West Tennessee. W. L. Fuqaa. 

Beard, R., D. D. Lebanon. Middle Tennessee. D. C. Hibbitts. 

Benge, M. L. McDonald. Hernando. M. Johnson. 

Bird, Milton, D. D. Princetown. Green River. 

Bone, Tliomas Memphis. West Tennessee. G. W. Fisher. 

Brockett, M. Y. Sparta. Middle Tennessee. 



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216 



THS CUMBERLAND FBEBBTTBRUK OHUBCH. 



^nnsms. 



BULINO KLI>KIUf. 



Brown, W. W. 


Yaodalia. 


Bruce, B. 


Ewing. 


Bacbanan, John 


Arkansas. 


Bariiey,W. 8. 


Qxforf. 


Borrow, AAroo 


Indiaoa. 


Borrow, R, D. D. 


Hopewelh 


Canai>t, E. 


little River, 


GbapiDaD, B. G. 


Riehlaiid. 


Cbaae, J. A. 


Logao. 


Cofifey, D. P. 


Searcy. 


Cowap, S. M. 


Tennessee. 


Cirawford, W. H. 


Knozville. 


CrimittD, £. B. 


Colorado. 


Davm, G. a. 


Lexington. 


Davis, G. W. 


Bartholomew. 


I>eDDi8^ Samuel 


Tazoo. 


Donoway. W. M, 


MadiaoD. 



EmfmoN, J. N, 

FuMami, M. B. 

Finl^^W. H. 

Hat, C. B. 
Haynes, Cyroa 
Hedges, T. K. 



Miami. 

Monroe. 
McUo. 

Obion. 
Des Moinea, 
Mackinaw. 



Itt. a, 8. McMinnville. 

JoHK80N,Fdiz,D.D. McGready. 



Kino, P. E. 
King, J. F. 

liAMBSRT, J. B. 

Lambert, Samoel 
Laoflden, A. W. 
Logan, J. B. 

McCarbmx, J. B. 
McGaogbey, J. F. 
McMahan, John A. 
Moreman, B. A* A. 

PlAltSON, B. D. 

Penick, J. M. 
Finer, P. D. 
Provinc, J. 0. 

Bandolfh, M. 
Bead, R. A. 
Reed. 0. P. 
Reed, John 
Reed, W. M. 
Bitchey, James 
Roach, J. M. B. 
Robertson, A, 3. 
Bo68,R.L. 



Red Oak. 
Washington. 

Helena. 
Union. 
Sangamon. 
Yandalia. 

Charlotte. 
New Hope. 
Mor^n. 
Madison. 

Salt River. 
Anderson. 
White Rocka. 
Nashville. 

Illinois. 

Logan. 

Richland. 

New Lebanon. 

Nashville. 

Wabash. 

Klyton. 

Sangamon. 

MisBiflBippl 



JUinois. 

Illinois. 

Arkansas. 

Hernando. 

Indiana. 

West TeDDCBsee. 

Colorado. 

Columbia. 

Kentockj. 

Arkansas. 

Colombia. 

East TenneBsee. 

Colorado^ 

Missoori. 
Ooacbita. 
Mississippi Ist 
West Tennessee. 

duo. 

Hernando. 
Illinois. 

West Tennessee. 
Mississippi 2d. 
Sangamon. 

Middle Tennessee. 

Columbiik 

Brazos^ 

Arkansas, 

Hernandoi 
Hernando. 
Sangamon^ 
Illinois. 

Middle Tennessee. 

Mississippi Ist. 

Indiana. 

West Tennessee. 

McAdow. 
Green River. 
Texas. 
Middle Tennessee. 

Illinois. 

Kentucky. 

Colombia. 

Missoori. 

Middle Tennessee. 

Indiana, 

Union. 

Sangamon. 

Mississippi 2d. 



D. L. Herron. 
Edwin Adams. 
S.H. FergoaoD. 



James Wilsoo. 
JohnFrizselL 



C. T. Sawyers. 



J. T. Sairoders. 
A. Stewart. 

H. Gregory. 



H. H. Harrison. 
J. T. Abematby. 



J. F. Hardy. 
W. M. Kerr. 



J. Wildridge. 
£. B. Gaston. 

J. H. BlMkV 

P. A. Carrey. 
E, T. Porter. 



T. D. Carson. 
N. C. Buford, 
Jesse McFarland. 
Goodlett Brown. 



P. H. Nabers. 
Wm. L. Poi 



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ron. 



son. 

k 



IS. 



JO 




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President of Bethel College Mn.eniores7i][e . rennessee. 
Moderator of tlie Oen^Assemlilj of the CuTulierland Presbyterian Chi]rc]i.l858 



Puhhshelh .hsenA M Wihon^ N°l/I. Cor^l I(] '^S^.F}.:hiL 



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PBBSBTTBBIAN BmiOBIOAL ALUAKAO. 



217 



lONIflTBBS. FBBiBTTBRXBS. STK0D8. RtrUira XLDEK8. 

_ - - ■ ■ ■ . ■ . ■ 

Soorr, W, B. Ouachita. Ouachita. 

Sharp, Jas. E. McGee. McAdow. John T. Smith. 

ShooK, Isaac Elk. Columbia. K A. Wilson. 

Smith, H. R. Platte. Missouri. 

Smith, J. W. L Talladega. Union. J. McCampbdl. 

Smothermao^J. B. Elk. Columbia. Lewis Tucker. 

Stewart, S. T. Bushville. Sangamon. 

Stockton, E. J. Jackson. Columbia. John Allison. 

Templeton, A. Ocoee. East Tennessee. 

Ward, John S. Ohio. Green River. Wm. Bruiik. 

Warren, H. B. Hopewell. West Tennessee. M. M. Houston. 

Wear, J. C. Alabama. Union. N. Waller. 

Weedin, Caleb Kentucky. Kentucky. A. F. Cox. 

West, Samuel B. Hiwassee, East Teunessee. Thomas Boyd. 

Wolstenholme, Thos. New Hope. Mississippi 1st. 

Woods, Le Boy Chillicotbe. Missouri. Wm. Houx. 

Zelkre, M. Memphis. West Tennessee. Bice Bond. 

Ely ton. Union. N. Lee, 

Lebanon. Middle Tennessee. B. L. Caruthers. 

Marshall. Texas. J. Fisher. 

Bev. Felix Johnson, D. D., was elected Moderator, and Mr. H. 
H. Haerison, Clerk. 



§iUs irn)» (B)itttuxts. 

The Committee on Bills and Overtures, Rev. R. BuRROW, Chair- 
man, reported a Memorial from Kelly's Creek Congregation of 
Tennessee Presbytery, asking a decision in relation to questions 
involving Ecclesiastical law ; one also from the Talladega Presby- 
tery of the Union Synod of the same nature, both of which we re- 
commend you to hand over to the Judiciary Committee. 

Also, a memorial from the Miami Presbytery, asking your opinion as to the con- 
stitutionality of Ohio Synod, vhich met in Alexandria, Athens county, Ohio, Sept. 
17th, 1858, and organized on the 19th of the same month. The facts in the case 
are as follows : — I'he Synod was composed of three Presbyteries. From two of these 
there were present six ministers, three from each, and from the third there was no 
minister, and but one elder. We are of the opinion tha4; an elder is as truly and con- 
stitutionally a member of Presbytery, Synod, and the General Assembly, as a minister, 
when duly appointed by the Session ; forasmuch as the Church sessions are integral 
parts and essential elements of the church, and all her judicatories, we therefore recom- 
mend for your adoption the following resolution : 

Resolved by the General Aisembly, That the Ohio Synod at named aboTe, was a 
constitutional Synod, and her doings valid. 

"We have considered the merits of a memorial from the West Tennessee Synod, 
which memorial prays that you alter the form of government in relation to the con- 
stitutional organization of Synods, by striking out section 2 of chapter 10, and insert- 
ing the following : 

*< The representation in Synods shall be the same as in Presbyteries, and subject to 
the same regulations, and five ministers with as many elders as may be present, shall 
be a quorum to transact synodical business ; provided, a majority of said members be of 
no one presbytery. Svnods shall meet annually on their own adjournments, and if a 
quorum fails to meet, the Moderator shall proceed according to the provisions made 
and provided in such cases for the Presbyteries." 
28 



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218 THB OUHBEBLAND PBESBTTEBUN CHUBOH. 

Yoar committee woald recommend that the prayer of the memorialists be granted, 
and that yoa direct the revisioo to be sent to all the Presbyteries of the Cnmberland 
PresbjteriaD Oharcb, for their approval in relation to it, and their wish to be retamed 
in writing to the next Assembly. 



The Judiciary Committee, Rev. Isaao Shook, Chairman, re- 
ported : 

On the Memorial of the Church session of Kelly's Ci-eek Congregation. The Me- 
morialists complain of the Tennessee Presbytery not entertaining charges preferred 
by said session against a member of said Presbytery at the fall session thereof, 1857. 
The Memorialists refer to the Minutes of said Presbytery. We have examined said 
Minutes, and find nothing claiming the attention of your reverend body, as there is no 
violation of law. . The Presbytery very properly refused to entertain the charges on 
the ground that there was no testimony, except hearsay. Your Committee therefore 
pray to be discharged from any further consideration of the subject Adopted. 

Also, on the following questions referred to them, submitted by Rev. Samuel Den- 
nis : *' Has the Church Session the right to exscind the names of persons in certain 
coses without a formal trial?" that there are no specified directions laid down in our 
Book of Discipline on this subject, but in the f^rm of Government, ch. 8, sec. 2, it is 
said *' the Church Session is competent to the spiritual government of the congrega- 
tion." We think Church Sessions may exercise some discretionary power, but would 
always be careful not to violate any principle of law. 

They have examined the memorial from the Talladega Presbytei^ with the ac- 
companying documents, and find the burden of the same contained in the following 
questions, which the Presbytery propound, and desire your reverend body should 
answer. 

1. Q. When a minister, under censure by his Presbvtery, appeals to the Synod, 
has the Synod the right to judge the man ; that is^to find him guilty, or not guilty, or 
to judge of the proceedings and approve or condemn them, and if out of order remand 
the case with instructions ? 

A. Your committee would answer, that any judicature to which an appeal has been 
taken, has a right to examine the whole proceedings with the testimony, and if they 
find it according to order, affirm the decision of the court below ; and if not according 
to order, to remand it with instructions. 

2. Q. If a Presbvtery feels aggrieved by the action of a Synod, and is deprived 
of the right of appeal, in what way ought it to seek redress ? 

jL By an appeal to the General Assembly. 

3. Q. How ought a minister, suspended fW>m the functions of his office, to be 
treated by his Presbytery ? 

A, With kindness— endeavouring to bring him to repentance. 

4. Q. If the Synod has a right to acquit a minister of charges preferred by a 
Presbytery, can it then find him guilty of offences not charged by any Presbytery ? 

A, If, in the progress of the examination the Synod finds evidence of guilt, not 
contained in any of the charges, they should instruct the Presbytery to take up and 
try bim on these points, if deemed of sufficient importance to demand the censure of 
the church. 

5. Q. Is dealing in lottery stock or tickets gaming 7 and if so, is it honest ? 

A. It is taking a risk for money, and as such is a species of gaming that is sinful, 
and ought to be discountenanced by every church court and Christian. 



listrstilrt at i^t Ststt at litligiffn* 

The Committee on the State of Religion, Rev. Milton Bird, 
Chairman, reported : 
We are pleased to record the fact that the last ecclesiastical year has been charao- 



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PBS8BTTSBIAK HISTORICAL ALMAKAO. 219 

terized by glorious and powerful reviTals of religion in the different parts of the 
Church with some few exceptions. In the eeveral Synods there have been many con- 
versions and accessions to the Church. Kew and happy converts have crowded the 
gates of Zion, and enlisted io the army of Christ. May the pra;^ers and efforts of our 
Church for the onward movement of his cause never cease. It is time for the whole 
Church to awake to a consciousness of a higher life, and a stronger faith ; and to seek 
the blessings of God anew with entire consecration to bis service. 

Revivals of religion renew the life and strength of the Church, and prevent it be- 
coming like the sapless body of a decaying tree. 

It is with feelings of no ordinary interest that we have viewed the rise and progress 
of the great and powerful religious awakening in the large cities of our countrjr, and 
in many villages and country places. We trust the effect will be to restram the 
strong tendencies of the age to formalism, irreligion, infidelity, and licentiousness. 
We regard the extraordinary religious movement with hope not unmingled with fear. 
We take it to be genuine because of the unity and co-operation which it produces 
among evangelical denominations, and its happy effect in reclaiming the backslidden, 
and in reforming the wicked ; though we fear that, when the time of reaction will 
have come, the Church may be found filled with a larger number of unconverted 
professors, and an increased amount of the form without the power of godliness. 

All should be taught the absolute necessity of watching over each other in love, 
helping each other by every possible means, so that if any become discouraged, they 
may feel, by the kind solicitude evinced for them by their brethren, inspirited to press 
on m the path of duty. 

We are gratified to see the Church endeavouring to keep the unity of the Spirit io 
the bonds of peace. All Christians are brethren, children of the same Father, mem- 
bers of the same family, heirs of the same inheritance, travellers to the same heavenly 
home ; they need the same succours, and are liable to the same affections. They have, 
therefore, claims one upon another. The law of kindness should influence all their 
feelings and actions towards each other. Brotherly kindness is the bond of perfect- 
nees. 

We recommend that increased attention be given to personal religion ; also to fa- 
mily worship and the religious instruction of children and servants. Each congrega- 
tion should nave its social prayer-meeting, observe the monthly concert, and maintain 
its Sabbath school, and spare no pains to secure the regular administration of the 
word and ordinances. 

Since it is very evident that it is the Devil's policy at present, all the world over, 
to abolish the day of rest, we therefore recommend our ministers and people to use all 
suitable means to maintain the sanctity of the holy Sabbath. 

Let us abound in the use of the appropriate means to promote the cause of spiritual 
religion, to provide a pious, well-trained, and consecrated ministry, a devoted, warm- 
hearted membership ; and that God who blessed our fathers, will continue to bless us, 
and lead us forward in the fulfilment of the mission of our existence, as a branch of 
the household of faith. And to this end may '* grace and peace be multiplied unto 
you through the knowledge of God, and of Jesus, our Lord, according as his divine 
power hath given unto us all things that pertain unto life and godliness, through the 
Knowledge of Him that hath called us to glory and to virtue.'' 

8TATEMKNT IN RBFBRRNCB TO STATISTICB. 

Your Committee r^ret the want of annual reports from all the Presbyteries. 
Owing to this we cannot give a correct and full report. It is not possible to do it 
until the Presbyteries perform their duty in this respect. 



Tlie Committee on Education, Rev. T. 0. Andbbsok, Chairman, 
reported : 

Your Committee are happy to say for your encouragement, that from the informa- 
tion we have been able to collect, that our coarse in this important department of 
our work is onward. 

From the information placed in our hands, we submit the following statistical facts : 



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220 THB CUMBERLAND FRESBTTKRLIlN OHUKCH. 

Camberland UniTenity, at Lebaoon, Tenn.; has 490 stadents, as follows : 

Id the Coli^ate departmeDt, ...... 292 

" LawSchool •* 188 

" Eogineering " 6. In the Theological departitteDt^ 5. . . 10 

Total, . . . 490 

There are in the Faculty of this Institution eleven members, all of whom are ooo- 
stantly employed in the work of instruction. The work of endowing the institution is 
still being prosecuted with encouraging success. That fund now, exdusire of the 
Theological department, amounts to about 960,000. For the Theological School 
they have, exclusive of the Ewing bequest, $28,000. The property of thb Institution, 
consisting of ground and building, is estimated to be worth 935,000. The library, 
cabinets, and apparatus, $15,000. 

The present prosperity of the University is unequalled by any period of its former 
history. 

They also report with heartfelt gratification, the fact, that during the paat winter 
in that institution, they enjoyed a glorious revival of religion, in which ninety-five of 
the students were, as we humbly trust, trul^ converted to God. 

Bethel College, McLemoresville, 1'enn., is in a prosperous condition. Five teach- 
ers are employ^. They have 165 students, incluaing fifteen who are in the Theologi- 
cal dejMrtment. 

Union Female College, Oxford, Miss. Propertv $25,000 ; teachers, 5 ; pupils 100. 

Cumberland College, — Chapel Hill College, — \V aynesburg, Pa., — no ddSuite report, 

Larissa College, Texas, has 4 teachers, and 175 students. 

Armstrong Academy — teachers, 2 : pupils, 52. Value of property — ^real estate — 
four sections of land with building, $15,000 ; stock, $38,000. 

Greenville Female Institute, Ky., has four teachers and seventy-eight pupils. Value 
of property, $40,000. 

Union Female College. Property, $25,000. Teachers, 5, pupils, 100. 

In view of the above statements of facts, your committee are happy in believinr 
that you will see much cause of ^ratification. Feeling as we do, fully impressed with 
the fact, that the education and proper training of the children and youth of our 
country, is inseparably connected with the faithful discharge of our duties as Chris- 
tians, and as ministers of Jesus Christ, and with the very best and dearest interests 
of the church of God upon earth. 



fissions* 

The Committee on Missions, Rev. Bighabd Beabd, Chairman, 
reported: 

The missionary work is the great work of the age. It is in the highest sense an 
expression of that enlarged benevolence required in both the law and gospel. The 
requisition of the law is, love to our neighbour as to ouradves. This requisition is 
fulfilled by the exercise of a universal benevolence towards man, " who is my neigh- 
bour," in the sense of the law is easily ascertained. My neighbour is my fellow-man ; 
my fellow-man in America, in Europe, in Africa, in Asia, in the Islands of the S^, 
VRj fellow-man wherever he may be found. 

The Cumberland Presbyterian Church ought to consider itself a missionary church. 
It originated upon missionary ground, and was built up in it8 early state chiefiy hj 
missionary labour. We are glad to know that it appreciates its obligations in this 
respect ; at least to some extent, it is engaged in the missionary work. 

Our domestic misBions, according to the report of the Board already presented to 
the Assembly, are all of them in a hopeful condition, and some of them in a prosper- 
ous condition. Missionary labours which have been performed among the Indians 
have been very successful. Certainly a membership of six hundred among the Chicka- 
saws and Choctaws is an illustration of the faithfulness of the men who have laboured 
among them. 

Your Committee would urge upon the Assembly, and through you upon the 
chnrohes, the necessity of inorefued liberality in promoting the missionary cause. We 
are doing something, but not a tithe of what we ought to do. We are not our own, 
mnoh less is oar property oan. We belong to God. Our property belongs to God. 



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PBBSBYTSRIAK HISTORICAL iXKANAC. 221 

Oar missionary collections ongbt to amount to sixty thonsand dollars, instead of six 
thousand dollars per year. Will we not briag them up to this sum in the course of 
the miffiionai^ year now conmiencing? 

In conclusion, your committee recommend the adoption of .the following resolutions: 

Resolved, That it be urged upon all the congregations within the care of the Gene- 
ral Assembly, to observe the monthly concert for payer^ for the success of the cause 
of missions, and that missionary collections be taken up on these occasions for the 
support of our missions. 

Resolved, That it be recommended to the pastors and stated supplies of all congre- 
gations, to preach at least one missionary sermon to his congregation in the course 
of the year, and to lift a public collection for missionary purposes. 

Resolved, That in order to concert of action on this subject, the Sabbath succeed- 
ing the fourth day of February, 1859, the anniversary of the origin of our church, or 
as soon thereafter as convenient, be recommended as the day for the missionary sermon. 

Resolved, That it be recommended to members of our congregations who may feel dis- 
posed to liberate their servants and send them to Liberia, to direct their attention espe- 
cially to Cape Mount, where such manumitted servants may collect together, establish a 
Christian society, and contribute to the prosperity of the mission established there. 



The Ciommittee on Publication, Rev. R. Beard, Chairmnn, re- 
ported as follows : 

The necessity of a supply of cheap denominational works seems to be acknowledged 
by all. It is a want, too, which must be deeply felt. The people do not read many 
nor large books. A cheap practical literature is better suited to their circumstances. 
If we t^Iieve the doctrine of our own Church to be true, we ought to furnish our people 
with such works as will contain plain and scriptural expositions of those doctrines. 
We would therefore recommend that the General Assembly shall appoint a com 
mittee of three, who shall be styled the Committee of Publication. The members of 
this committee shall be located contiguous to each other, so that they can co-operate 
without difficulty or embarrassment. 

The present Board of Publication shall be reouired to wind up their business, and, 
hand over all the proceeds to the Committee of Publication, or their agent. 

The committee shall be recfuired to report annually and fully to the General Assembly. 

The committee shall not mvolve themselves in debt, or extend their business be- 
yond the reasonable and practicable means under their control. 

The Assembly shall appoint seven commissioners who shall be authorized to receive 
propositions from various points with a view to the estabiishmentof a general book de- 
pository and store, and ultimately, if the prospects should justify, a house of publication. 



Resolved, That the thanks of this General Assembly be tendered to the citizens 
of Huntsville and vicinity, who have extended their kind and cordial hespitality to 
its members ; also to the officers of the Methodist Church for the use of their 
Church in holding the meetings of this General Assembly; and to the Moderator for 
the prompt, faithful and impartial discharge of the duties of the chair. 

The Moderator, by virtne of the authority delegated to him, dis- 
solved the General Assembly, and required that another Assembly, 
chosen in the same manner, should meet at Evansville, Indiana, on 
the third Thursday in May, 1859, at 11 o'clock, A. M. 

Concluded mth prayer, and the Apostolic benediction. 

H. H. HABBISONr Clerk. FEIIX JOHNSON, Modkratob. 



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222 



THE CUHBEBLAND PBBSBTTEBIAK CHUBCH. 



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ALPHABETICAL LIST 
or 

MINISTERS AND LICENTIATES 

OV THE CUMBERLAND PBESBTTERIAN 0HT7RCH. 



PSUBTTXST. PosT-orrics. 



ABSRNATHT, 8. B. 

Ad«mSf Jmm 
AdkioaoD, A. J. 
AlexAoder, J. L. 
Alexander, — • 
Allen, O.D. 
Alattis A. H. 
Amos, D. W. 
Anderaon, JeM« 
Anderson, John 
Anderson, M. 
Anderson, 8. T. 
Anderaon, s.]»^ T. C. 
Ashmore, H. H. 
Ashmore, Jamef 
Aston, 8. M. 
Atkison, P.L. 
Austin, W. B. 
Await, 8. 
Axtell, Lntbsr 
Axtell, Philip 

Baixd, a. J. 
Balrd, B. T. 
Balrd, James P. 
Balrd, W.f. 
Baker, Martin 
Baker, W. K. 
Baldrldge.W.H. 
Baleer, Samuel 
Ballff, Robert 
Barger, Kit 
Barlow, Joseph 
Barnett, John 0. 
Bates, J. B. 
Bates, J. H. 
fieals, James 
Beard, John 
Beard, D D., R. 
Bi^eson, W. E. 
Btll, A. A. 
hell U. 8. 
Bell, D. K. 
Bell, U. 
Bell. Jodeph 
Bell, William 
Bell, W. C. 
Bennett, John 
Bennett^ John M. 
Bennett, -~~^ 
Bernard. F. 
Berry, A. H. 
Berry, John M. 
Bileit, 0. 

Bird, D.O., MUton 
Biiibon, P. W. 
Black, P.O. 
Back, James 
Blackwell, Jams! 
BIsir, James 
BUir, R. D. 
BLike,T.a 
Blanton, Jaeob 
BlewettO.W. 
Q.J. 



Quadaloaps. 

PennsylTsnia. 

Oolorado. 

NsshvUls. 

Voster. 



MeSiinnTUls. 



I/)ckhart, Tex. 
Merrlt8town,Pa. 
Lagrange, Tex. 
Greenhlll, Tenn. 
SpringTlUe. lU. 
Fillmore, Mo. 
HudlestonHRa. 
Hall, Mo. 
Louisville, Ky. 
Dangerfleld,Tex. 
Walnut Cp.,Ark 
I)sngerfleld,Tex. 
Lebanon, Tenn. 
Georgetown, III. 
Georgetown, 111. 
Decatur, 
liowlsburg, Ten. 
Washington, Ark 
Pine Tree, Tex. 
Simpson's S.,Pa. 
Ten Mile, Pft. 

Winebsster, T. 
Waynesbui^. 
Bmltbfleld, Pa. 
Burlington, la 
BurksYille, Ky. 
Armstrong Aesd 
Oolnmbla, Ten. 
Lawreneeb'g., T. 
York, 111. 
Maeon, Geo. 
WalshTille, DL 
Chlseno, Texas. 
Newburgh, Ind. 
Gamp Point, 111. 
BpringTille, Di. 
Abington, 111. 
Lebanon, Tenn. 
Dangerfield.Tex. 
Ple>i8antH111,A. 
Sesrcy, Ark. 
Otter Creek. 
Pleasant Groro. 
Jackson, Miss. 
Lexington. 
Greenfield, 111. 
Hopedale, Ten. 
TaylirsTiile. 
HartsTiUe. 
RushTllIe, Ark. 
ShelbyyiUe. 
Glnton. 

Od. Mound, W.T. 
St Louis, Mo. 
LeRoy. 

CenterTi11e,Tnd. 
OoffervlUe, Tex. 



Lenolrs. 
Jeffersontown. 
Lebanon, Tenn. 
Di>s Are, Ark. 
Plsno,Tex. 
QlasirlUafs^Ark 



PSBSBTTSST. POST-omCB. 



Bone, J. M. 
Bone, M. H. 
Bone, Thomas 
Bone, Wilson 
Bomb, Jacob F. 
Boahart, David 
Boswell, C. C. 
Bowling, John 
Bowman, J. A. 
Boyd, A. 
Boyd, B. B 
Bradley, J. a 
Braley, J. B. 
Bridgeman, F. 
Broome, A. H. 
Brown, II. W. 
Brown, Joseph 
Brown, W. W. 
Browning, A. 
Browning, T.J. 
Browning, W. J. 
Bruee, Benjamin 
Bryan, A. M. 
Bryan, W. M. 
Burdlne, John J. 
Burgess, Wiley 
Burgess, WiUes 
Burks, R. M. 
Burleeon, J. 
Bumey, H. L. 
Bumey, d.s., 8.0. 
Bumey, W. 8. 
Bums, Hugh 
Bums, Lard. 
Burrow, D.D., R. 
Burrow, Jr., R. 

Caldwbll, R. H. 
Caldwell, 8. B.F. 
Calhoun, James 
Calhoun, Samuel 
Calhoun, W. W. 
CaNert, John N. 
Campbell, A. 
Campbell, David 
Campbell. J. 
Campbell, J. P. 
Campbell, William 
Campbell, W.S. 
Carker, Leonard 
Carter, J. W. 
Cary, J. N. 
Cary, John 
Caaky, W.O. 
Cathron, J. 
Cavanaugh, W. W. 
Chadlck, 8.R. 
Chadlck, W.D. 
Chapman, B. OL 
Chase, J. A. 
Cherry, J. B. 
CUrk, Jacob 
Clark, T. 0. 
Clark, Wyly 
CobbSjD.A. 




Bear Creek. 
MaysTille, Ala. 
Hickory with. 
Uniontown, Ky. 
OrayTille. III.. 
Henry sviUe,A1a. 
Owensboro,' Ky. 
GaylesTille, Ala. 
New Castle, Pa. 
GreenTille, Ky. 
MsDlyTiIle,Tmi. 
Parii, Texas. 
Argo, Ma 
Concord, 111. 
Oakland, Miss. 
Linden, Ark. 
Poplar Ridge. T. 
XdwardsTiUe.Ill 
McLemnresTi],T. 



MtPrairis. 

Kwing. 

Memphis. 



Brownstown, A. 
Grswibrd, 111. 
Memphis, Tenn. 



Jackson. 



Hay's 8tore,Ala. 



Elk. 



Bellhst, Tenn. 
Sp. Gardon, Ala. 
San Marros.Tex. 
Clarksville, Ten. 
Oxlbrd, Miss. 



Guadaloupe. 

NashTUle. 

Oxford. 



GreenTille. Blackjack G., T. 



Hopewell. 
Memphis. 



McLemoresTlLT. 
Oakland. 



Kentucky. Danrille, Ky. 
McOee. Bloomington.Mo 

Richland. Henryfnrllle.Ten. 
Ohio. Owensboro, Ky. 

Cumberland. Oreensburg, Ky. 
Illinois. Marion. 

RnshTlUe. McComb. HI. 
McLln. Burnt Pralri«,ll. 

Tennessee. Winchester. Ten 
NnBhTllle. Springfield. Ten. 
Allegheny. AlleghenjC. Pa. 
RushTille. Oquawka, 111. 
New Hope. Slloam. 
Sangamon. Virginia, HI. 
Pennsylvania. Carmicbael, Pik 
Pennsylvania. Prosperity, Pa« 
Anderson. Elkton, Ky. 
I>o^n. Woodbury, Ky. 

Chllllcothe. Carrolton. 

Cofferrflle, Tex. 

HuntsTllle, Ala. 

Columbia. Tenn. 

Woodbura. Kt. 

Aberdeen, Miss. 

Mt Helicon,Ha 

Bnrilngton, To. 

Chillicothe,Oblo. 

Cantrill'sHB^T. 
(223) 




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224 



FRBSBYTBBUK HISTORICAL ALHAKAC. 



PKKSBTTXST. POST-OmCS. 



CoflTee, D. P. 
Goker, A. 
OoUier, John 
OolUnsworth, J. R. 
Gompton, W. 
Gooner, James 
Ooodry, Jonathan 
Cooper, A. B. 
Cooper, A. S. 
Cooper, J. J. 
Corder, J. C. 
Gorley, Samuel 
Cornwall, J. A. 
Ooe8ltt,D.ii^F.R. 
Cothran, W. A. 
Coulter, J. H. 
Cowan, J. D. 
Cowan, S. M. 
Cox, A. 

Crawford, John 
Cnwlbrd, John 
Crawlbrd, Jomph 
Crider, P. H. 
Crlsmon, E. B. 
Croekett, Robert 
Cruteher, W. H. 
Cnrrsy, A. B. 

DAXm, Darkl 
DaTenport, O. 
Daridaon, 8. C. 
DaTis,aA. 
Darto, F. B. 
Daris, James B. 
DaTia, O. W. 
DaTte, N. A. 
DaTis, Robert M. 
Daris, S. C. 
DfMiola, Samuel 
])ewltt,M.B. 
Dlllard, Samuel 
Dixon, T. J. 
Dodda, Qllbert 
Donathan, S. W. 
Douglas,— —~ 
Diake, J<^n H. 
Duke, W. 8. 
Dunaway, W. 11 
Dnnlap, R. R. 
Dunlap,T.B.M. 
I>yiart,J. 
Dysart, Jarasa 
DysartjJ.B. 

Baoan, Harrison 
Baton, J. G. 
Bdgar, 8. L. 
Bdmldton, J. S. 
Bdmonson, J. 0. 
Blliott, J. C. 
Batell, W. W. 
Bthely, WHliam 
Bwlog, WUUam M. 

Fiin.BT, A. 
Pialey, WUUam 
Finley, W. M. 
Flint, J. H. 
Flower, Georee A. 
VolscMn. IsraeL 
Forbes, C 
Forbes, John 
Void, H. M. 
Foster. F. a 
Fbx, N. J. 
Fraaier, A. G. 
Fraaier, Jaxes 
Freeman, A. 
French, C. 
Friar, J. R. 
Fnllerton, Wm. M. 

Oali., W. 
Gallagher, James 
Gardner, W. C. 
Gamt^W.J. 



Searcy. 

Searcy. 

LitUe Rlrer. 

Elk. 

New Lebanon. 

Madison. 

Foster. 

Hopewell. 

Chilllootha. 

Union. 

GreeuTtlle. 

Red River. 

Oregon. 



Memphis. 



RushrlUe. 

Memphis. 

Bwing. 

Bwing. 

RnshTlUa. 

Elk. 

Prinostoii. 



New Lebanon. 
Guadaioupe. 
St Louis. 

Indiana. 

Osark. 

McGee. 

Lexlngtov. 

Iiebanon. 

Mackinaw. 

Memphis. 

Talladega. 

Swing. 

McOee. 

Yaaoo. 



Stonr Pt, Ark. 
Sulphur Rk., A. 
Waeoa, Texas. 
LewisburgjTen. 
Warsaw. 
Spring Ck.,Ten. 
Yermllion. 
MeLemor«Til,T. 
Garrolton. 
Ripley. 

Mt. Pleasant, T. 
Armstrong Aca. 
La(kyett(>,O.T. 
Lebanon, Tenn. 
Coneordia, Ten. 
Lebanon, Ohio. 
RuahTille, 111. 
Memphis, Tenn. 
Pittoburgh,Ark. 
Crawford, 111. 
Abington, 111. 
HiUvboro'. 
Fredonla. 
Winchester, T. 
Ridge Prairie. 
San Marcos, T. 
St Louis, Mo. 

Princeton. 
Greenfield. 
Bloomington.M. 
Lexington, Mo. 
Lagardo, Tenn. 
Hopedale. 
Moscow, Tenn. 
Wh. Plains, Ahu 
Roland, IlL 



Oregon. 

Rlohland. 

Sangamon. 

New Hope. 

Des Moines. 

Jackson. 

Nashrllle. 

Madison. 

White Rock. 

HopewelL 

Logan. 

McGee. 

McOee. 



Tennessee. 
Allegheny. 
HopewelL 
Oaarfc. 



Richland, Miss. 
Castallan 8p , T. 
Eugene, O. T. 
CoIumblA,Tenn. 
Petersburg, III. 
Choctaw Ag./M. 
Wiuterset lo. 
Hadens, Ala. 
Nashville, Ten. 
Medon, Tenn. 
Piano, Tex. 
Dresden, Tenn. 
Sugar GroTB,M. 
Middle Fk., Mo. 
WestTille» Mo. 

Salem, HI. 
Cheriy Tal.,Mo. 
Richmond. 
Lebanon, Ohio. 
ElletsTllle, Ind. 
Athens, Ala. 
Wineheeter,Ten 
CrosspIain8,Ten 
Nowberne, Ten. 

Salem, HL 
Grayville, HI. 
Salem, III. 
CarroIiTille,Mls. 
Diuigerfleld,Tex, 
Armstrong Acs. 
Helena, Tele. 
Alta Sps., Tex. 
BowUng G., Ky. 
Bettou, Tex. 
Colttmbua,Miss. 
Orasabia, Miss. 
Elkton, Ky. 
McIiSmoresTille. 
Middle Fk., Ma 
Brie, Tenn. 
Morgan's Ck., T. 

Elkton, TcsuL 
Franklin. 
MeLemoreril, T. 
Qraeafleld, Mo. 



MXHIBTSKS. 



PKSSBTTKKT. POBT-OrVXCS. 



Gaston, James C 
Gaston, J. G. 
Gibson, J. S. 
Gill, J. M. 
Gill, J. S. 
Gill, N. F. 
Gillespie, Jaeob 
Gilliam, W. B. 
Gilliam, F. H. 
aminwaters,B.a 
GlTens, Newton 
Ooldberge, C. 
Golden, Benjamin 
Golden, Geofge 
Good, John 
Goodlett,A.G. 
Ooodright 8.W. 
Goodpasture, A. H. 
Graham, B. 
Green, W. M. 



Gregory, D.G. 
Gregory, W. S. 
Grider, J.S. 
Orifflo, R. F. 
Grigsby, Aaron 
Grinter, J. A. 
GiOTSS, J. B. 
GroTes R. B. 
Guthrie, J. 8. 
Guthrie^ W.H. 

HACVBylsaae 
Hall, B. 
Hall, B, 
Hall, B.W. 
lUlsell, W. 
Hamilton, J. 0. 
Hamilton, W. M. 
Hamilton, Y. H. 
Ilandly, Samuel 
Hannah, J. W. 
Hannah, William 
Hannah, William 
Haiden, B. 
Harris, C. H. D. 
Harris, F.E. 
Harris, J. G. 
Harris, R.K. 
Harris, W. B. 
Harris, William 0. 
Harris, W. H. 
Harrison, 0. B. 
Harton, Thomas 
Hastings, G. P. 
HaU^O. 
Hay, J. P. 
Hay, H. S. 
Haynes, A. J. 
Bayne% Cyrus 
Haynes, LstI 
Ilayter, A. 8. 
Hedges, T. K. 
Henderaoo, K P. 
Henderson, B. 8. 
Henderson, J. H. D. 
Henderson, J. T. A. 
Henderson, Robsrt 
Hendrix, B. W. 
Hendrix, W.W. 
Herron. A. 
Hes«^N.J. 
Hickman, Jabes 
Hill, H. B. 
HobertMilo 
Hockersmltb, D. 
Hogg, J. N. 
Holland, -^ 
Holt, W. J. 
Hooker, R.W. 
Howard, J. 
Howard, J. 8. 
Hnwerd, 8. B. 
Hubbard, J. B. 
Hubbard, ViocsDt 
Hndaoo^aT. 



McLin. Fairfield, 111. 

White Bock. Pilot Point,Tsz. 
U^ion. Smithfield, Pa. 

Andersen. Elkton, Ky. 
Mt Prairia. Woodlawn,Ark. 
NashTiUe. NashTille, Tan. 
Oregon. Bugene, 0. T. 

Bichland. Lawrenesb'g.,T. 
...... Clinton, Mo. 

. Union. Corinth. Miss. 

Arkansas. Brownsboro', A. 
RedRiTer. Clarksrllle, Tex. 
Mt Prairie. Archadelphia,A. 
Oolorada Maneha, Tex. 
Red River. Paris, Texas. 
NashTille. NashTille, Tw. 
Vandalia. Windsor^HL 
Sangamon. Petersburg, lU. 
Union. McLean's Stoin. 

Logan. 8. Union, Ky. 

HopewelL McLemoresT*, T. 
Colorado. Lagrange, Tex. 

White Boek. Sherman. Tex. 

BowHng G., By. 

Oxford, Miss. 

Jsflbrson, Tex. 

RusselTllle, Ky. 

Helena, Ark. 

MUford, Tex. 

Alton, Tenn. 

ManlyTfile,Tsii. 



Oxft 

MarshalL 

Logan. 

HriMia. 

Tywaeany. 

Red Oak. 

Hopewell. 



Kooxrilla^ HL 
Newburg, Ind. 
ElletlSTilleJnd 

Indiana. Yinconnes, Ind. 

Logan. Woodbury, Ky. 

RushTiUa. Pmirie City, IlL 

niinols. Vienna, lU. 

Texaa. Hendenion,Tex. 

MarshaU. CofliBrTille,Tex. 

Wabash. Bainbrtdge, 111. 

PeonsylTanla. Van Buren, Pa. 

Union. Smithfield, Pa. 

Tennesssa. Elkton, Tenn. 

West Point 
Albany, Tenn. 
VandaUa, lU. 
AdairsTllle, Ky. 
GreenTille, III. 
AdalivTille, Ky. 
Dallaa^ Ark. 
Sharon, Missi 
Mlddleton, Ten. 
MnrTal.Tex. 
Bainbrtdge, lU. 
NcTada, Iowa. 
Washington, A. 
CentreTllle, lo. 
Milton, Mo. 
Mt Enterprisa. 
Lincoln, 111. 
Eugene, 0. T. 
Cofl«rTille,Mls8. 
Lafiiyetta, 0. T. 
BrownsTlIle. 
Mt Yemon,T0n 
Mlddleton, Ten. 
FoaterTille,Ten. 
8eguln,T0X. 
Trenton, Tenn. 
LexiBgton,M]aB. 
Smyrna, Tenn. 
Ablngton, 111. 
Clay ViIlage,Ky 
Vienna. Ill, 
8prlngfleld,Ten. 
Vienna, Ala. 
Rural Hill, Ten. 
Newbem, Iowa. 
St. John, Mo. 
LouisTille, Kr. 
CUytOQ,IU. 

Baroni^'TelUL 



Digitized by 



Googk 



THB QUlIBSBUUri) PSKraTTKIOAK OBOBOH. 



226 



MZKUTBtS. PEMBTTBIT. PO«T-«meX. 



Hadfloo, a. K. 
Hantor, D. K. 
lIuatM-, J. M. 
Hateblion,W.F. 

IVT, A. 8. 

jACuoir, D. f . 
Jaekaon, J. B. 
Jacobs, SamiMl 
Jamlaon, MUton 
Jenkins, J. & 
Johnson, A. 
Johnson, A. 
Johnson, Felix 
Johnson, Vnnds 
Johnscm, Jamas 
JchoMon, L. 
Johnson, N«iU 
Johnson, S. 
Johnson, W.O. 
Joiner, Thomas 
Jollej, WUUam 
Jolly, A. 
Jolly, Dartd 
Jonea, H. Sf. 
Jones, R.(X 
Jopling, J. B. 
Jordan,—— 
Justice, A. A. 

KSLLST, Wn. 
Kerr, A. IL 
King, Ira 
King, R. D. 
King, R. M. 
King,T.K. 
Klnkald, •^- 
KlnsolTlng, Q.W. 
KlrUand, James 
Kirkpatrlek, H. 
Klrkpatrkk,W.J. 
Knight, Joel 
Knight, John 



Lambert, Joel 
Lunbert, J.B. 
Lambert, Bamoal 
Lane,O.W. 
Langdoo, Wm.8. 
lAngston, N. A. 
Landsdao, A. W. 

Lard, 

Larklns, H. 

lAwrie, 

Ledgeswood, D. 
Lewis, J. A. 
Lewis, J. P. 
Lewis, L. M. 
Lewis, W. P. 
LI1es,M. 
Logan, Jsnai 
Logan, J. B. 
Loomis, Nelson 
Lougbiy, J. N. 
Lots, w. 0. 
Lots, W. M. 
Low^ A. 
Lownnee^ J. B. 
Lowranes^ J.B. 
Lowraooe, W.f. 
Lowry,^— 
Lyles,]>. 
I>nn, WilUaa 

MALLOT,D.a. 

Malloy,H.B. 
Bfalone,T.J. 
Wangwai, VT.A. 
Manning, W.^ 
]Can8fdd,0. 
llaiisileldjl.a 



PennqrlTwila. Waynesbiujb Pft. 
' * HnntsTllle, Ala. 

Versailles, Tens. 

QreettTiUe, lU. 

MeMlnnvUla LasOuaa,Taa. 



Blk. 
Vandalia. 



Blk. 

MashTUla. 

PennsylTanla. 

RuiihTlUew 

Indiana. 

Mackinaw. 

StLooia. 

MoUlaon. 

Logan. 

Hlwasaaa. 

Bwing, Ark. 

Oregon. 

StTonls. 

HopeweU. 

Swing, IlL 

Oregon. 



TalladMa. 

WhlteBoek. 

Tasoo. 

Hopewell. 

HopeweU. 



Shelbyrllle, Ten. 
Jefferson, Tenn. 
Plttsbuig, Pa. 
Oqnawka, lU. 
Washington^nd. 
Le Roy, HI. 
aifty Dale, Mo. 
MeLemoresTU.,T. 
Franklin, Ky. 
Loudon, Tenn. 
PttUbnrgh, Ark. 
Baterllle, 0. T. 
Hopewell Fur, Ho 
Dresden, Tenn. 
Duncantown, 111. 
Hllbbon/, 0. T. 
Newbem, Iowa. 
Lebanon. Ohio. 
White PUins,Ala 
Bowham, Tex. 
Bmoty, Miss. 
Newbnue, Tenn. 
TorkTlUe, Tenn. 

Johnson's S.,Tez. 
Saronia, Tenn. 
Rome, Ttonn. 
Wazahatehle,TlBZ 
Spring River, Mo. 
Wazahatehle,TeK 
Fkrmlngton, Ma 
Princeton, Ky. 
MooresTllle. Ten. 
Goodlettsrille, T. 
Oolnmbla, Tenn. 
SulllTsn, III. 
▼andaUa,IU. 

8tTiOQia,Mo. 
Purdy. Tenn. 
Caswell, Miss. 
Henderson, Ky. 
Yalley Orore, A. 
Baulsberry, Ten. 



DeaMolnas. 

Hopewell. 

BopewelL 

Iowa. 

MeMlnnrllle. 

Bed Oak. 
RIehalnd. 
White Rook. 
UUttols. 
MoQee. 



FSMtmoir. poflt-omcM. 



>7 Orore^ A, 
ibenry, Ten. 
and. Miss. 



NaATlUe, Tenn. 
WestTllU Mo. 
Lick Greek, lU. 
Oraaab^MIsSL 
Salem, Tenn. 
ManlyTllIe,Tenn. 
BeTerldge^Tenn. 
BoonTilb, Ind. 
Oreensboro', Mis. 



Dallas, O.T. 
McLeinor8STfl-.,T. 
Lebanon, Ohio. 
Alton, III. 
Butler, Iowa. 



Fredoola, Ky. 
Gray UlU, Tex. 
Syeamon Ms., T. 
Bldorado. Iowa. 
Oreenileld, III. 
Bloomfleld, Iowa. 
ManlyTUle,Tenn. 
Dyersbnrgh, Ten. 
Butter, Iowa. 
BradlrriUe,Tenn. 

Wasahatflhla^Tnc 
Spring HUl, TWi. 
Piano, Texas. 
Vienna, III. 
Milton, Mo. 
BuasellTlIla, Ky. 



Marlow, M. A. NashTllto. OlarksrUle, Tens. 

Marshall, D. R. Elk. Boon's Hill. 

Marshall, James NashTlIle. NsshTllle, Tenn. 

Marshall, Thomas Cumberland. Greensburg, Ky. 

'^ — -•- ' NewUbanon.Mar8haU. 



Logan. 
HopeweU. 
RushrUIei 
Memphis. 
Mt Prairie. 



Richland. 
Wabash. 
Mt Prairie. 
QreenTllle. 
White Rock. 
Blk. 



Martin. Ji 
Mattock, Samuel 

MeBride^ 

MeGamy,W.a 
McCleland, Tboi. 
McCUnton, H. 
McOluskey, Wm. 
MoOord, A. D. 
McOord, Klan 
MeCord, R. 
MeOorkle, A. 
McCorkle,S.W. 
McCutchan, J. F. 
McDole, James N. 
McDowell, J. L. 
McDowell, J. W. 
McFlariand, James Iowa. 
McFerron, J. W. NashTUle. 
McGaughey, J. F. 
McOee,A.G. 
McQehee, W. 
McQehes,W.a 
McGough, Jamea 
McKee, 8. W. 
McKensie, W. B. 
Merjemore, T. A. 
McLeskqr, W. H. 
McMaekIn, W. IL 
McMahen, W. W. 
McMurry, G. W. 
McMurry, J. Bf. 
McNabb, N. B. 
McNutt, James P. Taioo. 
Mcpherson, a G. Memphis. 
McPherson, J« " ' 
McSpaddeo, 8. 
Means, C. 
MelTln,A.O. 
MelTin, Oriaon 
Meredith, W. H. 
Menitt, WUUam 
Mesdek. James 

Milam, Wm.!. 

Miller, Alexander McMlnnrllla. 
Miller, A. B. Unton, Pa. 



Woodburn, Ky. 

Morgan's Ck.,Ten. 

McComb, 111. 

Raleigb, Tenn. 

Washington, Ark. 

Washington, Ind. 

Mount Hope, Ala. 

Bralnbridge. 

Ar«faadelphla,Ark 

Grey Rock, Tex. 

Kaufman, Tex. 

Manchester,Tenn. 

Columbia, Tenn. 
Sangamon. Virginia, 111. 
New Lebanon. Galiibmla. 

Peedee, Iowa 



New Hope. 

Hlwassee. 

Richland. 

Princeton. 

Richland. 

White 



Irvine, Tenn. 
Caledonia, Tenn. 
LouIsvUle, Tenn. 
Ht. Hope, Ala. 
Princeton, Ky. 
ColumbUB. 
Honey GroTe,Tex. 
Fremont, Mo. 
Jackson, Tenn. 
Dresden, Tenn. 

,ni. 

Oxford, Miss. 
McMlnuTillew FosiervIIle, Tenn. 
McMIunTllle. MeSlInnTill6,Ten. 

Sfadlson, Tenn. 

MIddleton, MIm. 

Memphis, T»nn. 

Vermillion. 

MechanicsTlRe, T. 

Linn Flat, Tex. 

Ml Helicon, Ho. 

Crawford. 

Tampa, Fla. 

Burnt Pralria, HI. 



Madison. 
HopewelL 
McLln. 
Oxford. 



Hlwai 



Foster. 

McMInnTille^ 

Texas. 

St Louis. 

Bwlng^ III. 

Alabama. 

McLln. 

Anderson. 

Cnmberland. 



Memphis. 
Swing, HI. 



Miller, B. 

Miller, John M. 

Milligan, M. G. 

Mitchell, D.R. Tennessee. 

Mitchell, G. W. Tennessee. 

Mitchell, Jonathan Talladega. 

Mitchell, J. B. McGee. 

Mitchell, 8.0. Wabash. 

Moad,G.J. 

Modrall, N. P. 



Montgomery, G.W. Osark. 

Montgomery, J. D. Oiark. 

Moora, A. A. 

Moore, D. B. 

Moore^ A.B. 

Moore, D. G. 

Moreman, R. 

Morgan, Thoi 

Morris, 8. R. 

Morrow, J. W. 

Moses, M.F. 

Murry,G.W. 



Morganileld, Ky. 

BurksTlUe, Ky. 

MechanicsTiile,T, 

Waynesbni^, Pa. 

Germantown,Ten . 

Knileld, HI. 

Hadena,Ala. 

Petersbttrgh,Ten. 

Athens, Ala. 

Nixburg, Ala. 

Middle Fork, Mo. 

Oayton, Ind. 
New Lebanon. Fair Point 
Tywaeany. Hlllsboro', Tte. 



Greenfield, Mo. 
Oreenileld, Mo. 
HarrisonTllle, Mo. 
McMlnnTllls. Lebanon. Tenn. 



Blk. 
Richland. 



McGee. 
Union, Mlai 
Tywaeany* 



MoorasTllle, Tenn. 
Santa Fe, Tenn. 
MtComfortTenn. 
Lexington, Tenn. 
LarkinvrUle, Ala. 
Ronoak, Mob 
Troy, Miss. 
Fairfield, Ttt. 



NAaAs, B B. 
Nance, F.W. 
Neal, Minor 
Neal, William 
Neely, J. 
Nelson, H. 
Nelson, 8. M. 
NoTlls, D. a 
NcTlna, J. B. 
Nicholson, John 
Nkkdl,J.H. 

Onn, WnuG. 
OQy«tt»H.ilL 



Union, 

Pleasant , 

New Lebanon. Florence, Mo. 



Hlekorr Flat, MIf. 

:hiii,mo. 



Cumberland. OIa'VO^K?. 
" Princeton, Ind. 



GreeuTlUek 



Texas. 



LoneOnk. 
Uniontown, Ala. 
Henderson. Tax. 
LInnsDua, Ma 
Beareridge, Tenn. 
PMntoou^Kj. 



NtwHepib Oded opia.^ 

"' FistBribnitfii Tail 



Hlwassee. 



Digitized by 



Googk 



226 



PRESBYTERIAir HISTORICiX ALVAKAC. 



MIffUTn«. PSXSBTTUT. POtT OmCS. 



Orsborn, A. 0. 
Oabaro, :511m 

PAmisH, n.8. 
Parks, H. 
Fair, J. O. 
Pattan, John 
Patterson, J. H. 
Pation, B. P. 
Patton, J. J. 
Paiton, M. G. 
Patton, Robert 
Payne, J. I4. 
Peirae^HbttrtB. 
Pearee,M.J. 
Peanoo, K. D. 
Peeler, Joeeph 
Penniek, J. ». 
Phelpa, H. B&. 
Phllipe, Joriah 
PhiUey, OelTln 
Pickens, J. 8. 
Pierce, O. N. 
Finer, f. D. 
Poindexter, J.W. 
Pope, John 
Portjr, 0. B. 
l^ter, John 
Porter, N. 
Powers, N. F. 
ProTine, J. C. 
Prorine, W. A. 



Union, Pa. 
Iowa. 

Cumberland. 

Uopewell. 

Marshall. 

Marshall. 

MeMlnnvUle. 

Mackinaw. 

Klk. 

MoQee. 

Mackinaw. 

Blk. 

Kwing, ni. 

Bwlng, 111. 

Salt KlTer. 

Hlwassee. 

Anderson. 

MeUn. 

LiiUe BiTer. 

Yaxoo. 

Memphis. 

New Lebenon. 

Red Hirer. 

McUlnnTlUe. 

Madison. 

Blehland. 

ICwinAlll. 

Logan. 

Tennessee. 

Nasbrllle. 

White Rock. 



CvAlTB, W. G. L. Helena. 

Balstoh, Wm. 
Ramsey, J. H. 
Randolph, StaroiM 
Rankin, A. f . 
Ransom, L.G. 
Rawling, T. 
Rea,P.G. 
Read, John 
Reed, C. P. 
Reed,H.a 
Reed,H.R. 
Reed,H.W. 
Reed,R. 
Reed, R. A. 
Reed,R.S. 
Reed. W. M. 
Heeler, Joseph 
Renick, Henry 
Reynolds. 0. W. 
Rhone, J. A. 
Richards, J. C. 
Richards, Wm. 
Riehey, D. 
Ridunond, Joslah 
Kldley, G. V. 
Rllmr, James J. 
Ritehey, James 
Hitchie» J. 0. 
Roarh, John 
RoM:h,J.a 
Roach, J. R. 



Roach, William 
Robertson, J. 
LB.B. 



IW 



Ross, Wm.0. 
Rowdon, J. 0. 
Howe, B. p. 
Rowland, M.O. 
Rudolph, R. M. 
Ruley. 8. C. 
Rnssell, J. P. 
RnssslI, 8. R. 
RosselK T. K. 
Ryan, David 

8AMPSOX.Y. N. 

Banders, R.B. 
8ellars,W.M. 
^ ..J.l. 



Iiebanon. 

Kentucky. 

Illinois. 

Klk. 

Alabama. 

Illinois. 

New Lebanon. 

New Lebanon. 

Richland. 

Cumberland. 

Hopewell. 

MeUinnTille. 

Union, Hiss. 

Logan. 

New Lebanon. 

NashTille. 

Hlwaffsee. 

Colorado. 

8angamon. 

RushrUie. 

Texas. 

Madison. 

McMinnrflle. 

Hlwassee. 

Rushrllle. 

Swing, IlL 

Wabash. 

St. Louis. 

Mackinaw. 

Hopewell. 

Princeton. 

Mackinaw. 

Princeton. 

Oregon. 

Tandalla. 

Madison. 

New Hope. 

Lebanon. 

Kentucky. 

Tywacany. 

White Roek. 

McGee. 

Talladega. 
Mackinaw. 
Talladega. 

MaekhMw. 



WoodTale, Pa. 
Ottumwa, Iowa. 

BurksTlUe, Ky. 
Newbeme, Tenn. 
Marshall, Tex. 
Dangerfldd, Tex. 
Muirreesboro*, T. 
Le Boy, IlL 
Beech Orore, Ten. 
Middle Fork. Ho. 
Stout's Qrow% 111. 
Klk RiTer, Tsnn. 
Roland, 111. 
Roland, III. 
Louisiana, Mo. 
4 Mile Branch, T. 
eikton, Ky. 
Vairfleld. 111. 
Belton,S.O. 
Greensboro', Miss. 
Moscow, Tsnn. 
Clark's Fork. 
Sherman, Tex. 
McMinnTille»Ten. 
Denmark, Tenn. 
Lexington, Ala. 
RoUnd, III. 
Sugar Grore, Ky. 
Salem, Tenn. 
NashTille, Tenn. 
Honey GroTe,Tex. 

Helena, Arte. 

Lebanon, Tenn. 
Winchester, Ky. 
Golconda, 111 ' 
Farmlngton, Ten. 
Selma, Ala. 
Saratoga, 111. 
Marshall, Mo. 
High Point, Mo. 
Pulaski, Tenn. 
Marrowbone, Ky. 
YorkrUle. Tenn. 
MeMinuTille, Ten. 
McLsan's S., His. 

Morgantown, Kr. 
, Clark's Fork, Ho. 

Nashrille, Tenn. 

4 Mile Branch, T. 

Lagrange, Tex. 

AthensTllle, III. 

Monmouth, III. 

Buena Vista, Tex. 

Purdy, Tenn. 

AltamoDt, Tenn. 

RobertsTille, Ten. 

Ablngton, 111. 

Harrlsburgfa, HI. 

Brainbrldge, Ind. 

Argo, Mo. 

Atlanta, lU. 

AluTse, Tenn. 

Birmingham, Ky. 

Atlanta, III. 

EddyrillcKy. 

Lafliyette, 0. T. 

ZanesTlUe, III. 

Medon, Tenn. 

Macon, Miss. 

Hartsrille, Tenn. 

Floydsburgh, Ky. 

SpringflMd, Tex. 

Honey GroTe,Tex. 

Blooralngton, Mo. 

Boonsboro*, Ark. 

OaylesTille, Ala. 

Wappollan, 111. 

OaylesTllle, Ala. 



MimsTKBa. nuuBTTssT. posT-opnem. 



Shelby, A. Helena. 

Shelton, Darid Union, Miss. 

Shook, Isaac Klk. 

Simpson, Lerl Illinois. 

Simpson, L. J. Illinois. 

Small, M. Taliadsga. 

Small, Thos. H. Oregon. 

Smith, A.Q. Tennessee. 

Smith, B. A. Dee Holnes. 

Smith, J. A. McHinnTllle. 

Smith, J. B. Talladega. 

Smith, J. G. Sangamon. 

Smith, J. W. LIttie River. 

Smith, J. W. L. Talladega. 

Smith, MltdMll Texas. 

Smith, M.B. Anderson. 

Smith, R. D. St. Louis. 

Smith, UrUh YThite Roek. 

Smith, William Madison. 
Smith, William 
Smith, W.O. 
Smith, Z. 

Smotberman, J. R. Klk. 

Sparks, N. M. Ml Prairie. 
Sparks, W. C. 
Speer, Robert 
Spencer, BenJ. 
St. John, W. P. 
SUneel, J. 
Standard, Wm. 
SUInback,Q.T. 
Stapo, James P. 
Steels^ A. J. 

SteUe, WiUiam Osark. 

Stevenson, A. Searcy. 

Stewart, S. T. Rushrille. 
Stockard,A.C. Hlwassee. 

Stoekard, G. C Richland. 

Stockton, B. J. Jackson. 

Stone, A. M. Red Rlrer. 

Strain, A. J. Morgan. 
Strickland, W. W. Kwing, Ark. 

Swayne, A. J. Union, Pa. 

Sweeney, A. W. Orsgon. 



Wabash. 
McMhinTille. 



Mt Prairie. 
Chllllcothe. 
Marshall. 
Jackson. 



Illinois. 
Oxfbrd. 
RushTllle. 



WaTnesTille, HI. 
Tywacany. Springfield, Tex. 
MeHinnvUle. Las Oassas, Tenn. 
MoGee. KirksrUle, Mo. 



TaXB, Thomas 
Tate, John 
Tatum, A. C. 
Taylor, A. D. 
Taylor, N. J. 
Taylor, S. A. 
Taylor, William 
Templeman, J. R. 
Templeton, A. 
Templeton, 0. 8. 
Thomas, A.D. 
Thomss, A. J. 
Thomas, G. B. 
Thomas, J. B. 
Thomas, R. 8. 
Thomas, 8. Y. 
Thompeon, J. C. 
Tilford, Hugh 
Traughber, D. 
Travelstead. A. 
Trousdale, Felix 
Trousdale, J. R. 
Tucker, J. M. 
Tucker, M. M. 

YaMCB, J. W. 
Vanderenter, D. 
Vannoy, R. B. 
Vannory, Wm. 
Vaughn. M. M. 
Vincy, J. N. 
Vineyard, W. J. 

Wadlit, D.O.N. 
Waggaman, J. C 
Waggoner, T. J. 
Walker, A. H. 
Walker, Jas.N. 
Walker, John P. 
Walker, W. a 
Wall, J. F. 



FrUr's Point, Mis. 
Jacinto, Miss. 
Flat Greek, Tenn. 
Mt Pleasant, lit 
Cross Koads, III. 
Van Buren, Ala. 
Salem. 0. T. 
Fayetterille, Ten. 
Indianapolis. lo. 
MechsnlcsTille, T. 
TalUdega, Ala. 
Decature, 111. 
Waooe, Tex. 
Van Buren, Ala. 
Carthage, Tex. 
Casey ville, Ky. 
St Louis, Mo. 
McKinnay, Tex. 
Brownsville, Ten. 
Cageville, Tenn. 
Camden, Ind. 
Auburn, Tenn. 
Middleton, Tenn. 
Woodlawn, Ark. 
Center Point Ark. 
Perkins* arove,Mo 
Msrshall, Tex. 
Summit Ala. 
Pleasant Hill, Ala. 
Mt Plearant, HI. 
Oxford. MlHi. 
McComb, III. 
New Market, Ala. 
Mt. Vernon, Mo. 
Augusta, Ark. 
Peoria, 111. 
Cleveland, Tenn. 
BIglyvnie. Tenn. 
Dodsonsvtile, Ala. 
Clarksville, Tex. 
Jasper. 
Dover, Ark. 
Brownsville. Pa. 
Kngene, 0. T. 



New Hope. 

Hlwassee. 

McMlnnvllIe. 

Mackinaw. 

New Hope. 

Nashville. 

Mackinaw. 

Princeton. 

Hlwassee. 

Greenville. 

Memphis. 

Mackinaw, 

Cbillicothe. 

Osark. 

Oxlbrd. 

Hopewell. 

Pennsylvania. 

Nashville. 

Sangamon. 

Red River. 

BfcLin. 

Mackinaw. 

Oiark. 

Cumberiand. 

White Roek. 

Mackinaw. 

Ohio. 

Oxford. 

Lebanon. 

Sangamon. 

Helena. 

Madison. 

RushviUe. 

Nashville. 

Gnadaloape. 

Richland. 

Richland. 

Richland. 

Allegheny. 



Chof!taw Ag., Mis. 
PblladelphU.Ten. 
Woodbury, Tenn. 
Dewltt III. 
Lebanon, Tenn. 
NasbvUle. Tenn. 
Le Hoy, HI. 
Princeton. Ry. 
Chattanooga, Ten. 
Wlnnosboro*. Tex. 
Concordia. Tenn. 
Waynesville, III. 
Linneos, Mo. 
Sareoxle, Mo. 
Coffervllle, Miss. 
York ville, Tenn. 
Van Buren, Pa. 
Rural Hill. Tenn. 
Decatur. IlL 
Paris, Tex. 
Fairfield. IIL 
Le Roy. HI. 
Greenfield, Ind. 
Columbia, Ky. 

Rockwell, Tex. 
Delevan, HI. 
Mudfordsville, 0. 
Oakland. Min. 
I^egardo, Tenn. 
Greenfield. HI. 
Helena, Ark. 

Lexington, Tenn. 
Ablngton, HI. 
Nashville, Tenn. 
Helena. Tex. 
Waynesboro*, T. 
Mt Pleasant,Ten. 
Rogersvllle, Ala. 
Centretown. 



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THB OUMBBBLANS PBESBTTBBUK OHVBOH. 



227 



MimSTSBt. PmUBYTXBT. PMT-OFVICS. 



Wallace, W. D. 
WnIK J. 
Walsknhoma, T. 
Waltara, JamM 
AVaUeni, R. 
Wanl, K. 
Ward, J. 8. 
Ward, W. B. 
Warrea, H. B. 
Writmi, J. B. 
Wartb&m, S. 
Watkins, A. H. 
Watkina, K. D. 
Watklna, R. O. 
Watteraon, W. B. 
Wear, J. A. 
Wear, J. C. 
Wear, J. L. 
Wear, R. B. 
W«ir, W. B. 
Wear, W. B. 
Wear, W. D. 
Wearer, Joneph 
Wearer. S. W. 
Weddington. K. G. 
Weedan, Caleb 
Weeden, Henry 
Wells, T. P. 
West, J. H. 
Wert, 8..B. 
Wharton, Wm. 



Dee Molnea. 

Cumberland. 

New Hope. 

Logan. 

Osark. 

Ohio. 

Ohio. 

NasbTille. 

HopeweU. 

Tennesaee. 

Ohio. 

Texas. 

White Civak. 

Texaa. 

Klk. 

New Lebanon. 

Alabama. 

New Lebanon. 

Qoadaloape. 

Little Hirer. 

Wblte Greek. 

Richland. 

Ohio. 

OreenTllIe. 

Hopewell. 

Kentucky. 

New Lebanon, 

Clk. 

New Hope. 

Hlwasiee. 

Tywaeany. 



St John, Mo. 
Campbellrme»Ky. 
Olinda, Ala. 
Woodbum, Ky. 
Ht. Vernon, Mo. 
8t«phen8bnrg,Ky. 
MiUentown, Ky. 
Naahrille, Tenn. 
Trenton, Tenn. 
Petenbunth, Ten. 
Stephennburg, 0. 
Murral, Tex. 
Benny's, Tex. 
Kemp, Tex. 
Beech GroTe» Ten. 
OttenrUle. 
Oamden. 
Fair Point, Mo. 
Concrete, Tex. 
Sansaba, Tex. 
McKlnney, Tex. 
Spring HIU, Tenn. 
Owensboro*. 
Sulphur Spa.,TM. 
Aluvee. Tenn. 
Danrllle, Ky. 
Martha! 1. Mo 
Flat Creek, Tenn. 
Olinda, Ala. 
Wllmn, Tenn. 
Starling, Tex. 



MnruTXXt. 



rSMBTTSBT. POfT^FnCS. 



Wheat, W. 
White, James 
White, John G. 
WhIUock, AJlen 
Whlttaett, W. 
WUd«,T.J. 
WUklna, S. M. 
Wilklne. W. H. 
Willett, N. A. 
WUlUma, F. A. M. 
Wnilama, Wm A. 
WUIoughby.J.H. 
WUahlne, T. L. 
WUion, A. M. 
WUion, J. 
Wilaon, 8. E. 
Wllion, D.9., T. B. 
Wilaon, William 
WUaon,W.A. 
Winford, J. 8. 
WInget, Stephen 
Wltherspoon, VJL. 
Woodfln, W. G. 
Wooda, L. R. 
Wools, J. W, 
Wray, John 

TOAXm, F. L. 

Young, A. 
Young, Joaaph R. 



CumberlAnd. 
Sangamon. 
St Louis. 
Foster. 
Helena. 
Princeton. 
Anderson. 
Oxford. 
Colorado. 
. Wblte Rock. 
White Rock. 
Tftlladega. 
Red Oak. 
Vandal la. 
Mt Prairie. 
Klk. 

MarsbaU. 
Lebanon. 
Kwing, Ark. 
Memphis. 
Pennsylrania. 
New Lebanon. 
New Hope. 
Moroan. 
McLiiT 



l^waeany. 

McMinnriUe. 

Yaioo. 



aunpbellTllle,K. 
Virginia, III. 
St Louis, Ma 
Georgetown. 
Mariana, Ark. 
Walnut G., Ky. 
GraenrUle, Ky. 
Oxlbrd, Miss. 
Young's P., Tax. 
Bowman, Tex. 
McKlnney, Tex. 
GayleeviUe, Ala. 
Alramdo. 
Upper Alton, HI. 
Arehadelpfaia, A. 
Bvlflist Tenn. 
Marshall. Tex. 
Hartn?llle, Ten. 
Lewisbnrg. 
Concordia, Tenn. 
Prosperity, Pa. 
Pilot Orore, Mo. 
Gbolson- 
JeffersonrlUe. 
Albi6n. 
OampbellsTil., T. 

Trwarany, Tax. 
McMlnnrille, T. 
Borer, Miss. 



Znan, M. Memphis. Moscow, Tenn. 



PERIODICALS. 



KBWSPAraRt. 
WBSKLT. 
Rinrur of Pnact. 
S^.. LmtU OhMerver. 
Cumberland Presbjftcrian, 

MOKTHLT. 

Chtmhertand UnivfrtUjf Magatine, 
The Ladiu? Ftarl. 

QVAKTSBLT. 

The neoiogieed Medium. 



W. B. WARD. 

A. F. COX. 

WM. CAMPBELL. 



NINE STUDENTS. 
LOGAN A BROWN. 



PLACX OF FVBLXCATIOV. 



W. E. WARD. JfashmUe, Tenn. 

M. BIRD, D B. £1. Xouif, Mo, 

Rby. wm. CAMPBELL. Wa^netbwy, i^ 



NINE STUDENTS. LOfanon, fenn, 

J. B. LOG AN A BROWN. St. Lotrit, Jfo. 



OBSERVER OFnCB. M.BIRD,BJ». 



AivmrAL. 
The Minutu^ STATED CLERK. STATED CLERK. 

fh€ Ptt^byif Han Hi^tanad Almanac JOS. M. WILSON. JO&M. WILSON. 



aULmtU^Ma. 



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228 



PBBBTTIXUir BanCOBIOAL AXJUITAO. 



THE SYNOD OF THE 
FREE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH, 



The Synod of the Free Presbyterian Church met in Ripley, Ohio, 
on the 28th October, 1858, in the Second Presbyterian Church of 
that place, of which Bev. John Rankin is pastor. Rev. William G. 
Kephart was chosen Moderator. ... ,• . j 

The usual routine of ecclesiastical business was accomplished. 

An overture was drawn up and passed,— addressed to the New 
School General Assembly, which is to meet in Wilmington, Del^ 
in May next: urging that body to make slave-holding a term of 
membership; and proposing an ecclesiastical union m case they 

Rev. A. B. Bradford was delegated to visit that body and present 

Various other matters occupied the attention of the Synod, but 
nothini? which the writer supposes would be of general interest. 

The next meeting of the Synod will be at Darlington, Pa., on 
the fourth Thursday of October, 1859. 

GEO. GORDON, Ol«bk. W. G. KEPHABT, Modbeiioi. 



€\vitc\ Bi tire %nitt)i states. 



rSSSBTTSmT. 



POIT-OFnCS. 



Mahoning. 
Central 0. 
Mahoning. 
FranUln. 
rranklin. 
ineU,Walls M a honin g. 



BwmAM. J.O. 

Boyd, S. Z. 
Bradford, A. B. 
BttrgMS, Djw 
Baraaa*. Robt 
BnahnaU 



CAB.V. J. 
Craig, DaTid 

BsWiTT.LulM 

Fimnrr, T. M. 

Flah«r, John 
Frastor,A.B. 

Gicsojr, J. R. 
OUmer, Dantol 
Gordon, Geo. 

UMTSMYf 8. p. 

Hont, John 

Kahs 8. K. 
Kephart W.Q. 
Klng,V.M. 

LooKAmT, JesM 
lAunadsn, Wm. 



N.WilmlDgton,P». 
Iberia, Ohio. 
Newoaitle, Pn. 
Hanging Rock, O. 
W. Alexander, Pn. 
Mt. Jackson, Pa. 

tee, Ohio. 
New Atheni, 0. 



Blpley. 
VrankUn. 

Illinois. Albany, Ohio. 

Central 0. Martlnsbw^ 0. 
Illinoia. IlUnola. 



Rlpl^. 
lUlnoia. 
Central 0. 

Central 0. 
Central 0. 

Mahoning. 

FrankllB. 

Klpley. 

Ripley. 
Ripley. 



rSMBTTSmT. 



franklbrt, Ohio. 
Band Creflk, HL 
Iberia, 0. 

Iberia, Ohio. 
Delaware, 0. 

Diarlington, Pa. 
Porter, Ohio. 
Cherry Fork, Ohio. 

RuHelTlUe, Ohio. 
Bed Oak, Ohio. 



MclSLHBNT, Geo. Mahoning. WorthiiurtoB, Pa. 

McLean, 8. N. Mahoning. ClarkeTiUe, Pa. 

MerritL Thoe. Iowa. Newton, Iowa. 

Moore, D. M. Ripley. Oreenfleld, Ohio. 



NXOl, B. M. 

psmciKi, Wm. 
Poage, George 
PfMge,J. 8. 

Raxs, Aea 
Rankin, John 
Rankin, M. L. 
Rankin, 8. G. 
Rathbun,KUhn 
RnUierford,R. 



lUinoia. ninola. 

Ripley. andnnatl, (Milo. 
lllnoia. 



lUlnols. 



Illinoia. 
Aledo, lUlBola. 



BCahonlng. 

Ripley. Ripley, Ohio. 
Illinois. niTooli. 
Ripley. New 1 
Iowa. Iowa. 

lUhioIa. 



WInehester, OhIOi. 
Tan Boren, Ohio. 
Merear, Pa. 



TeoMPaol A. Rip1«y. 

Thompeon. H. Central 0. 

Tbmne^J.V. Central a 

Vahvtes, 8.N. Iowa. Iowa. 



WEM7, J. W. Ripley. 
WheCtam, Jna Central 0. 
Whettam, Joa. Iowa. 



George Town, Ohkk. 

Keeiie,a 

Iowa. 



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PBEBBTTBBIAN HISTORICAL ALHANAC. 229 



THB 



PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH OF CANADA. 



The Stnod op thb Prbsbtteriait Church of Canada met 
according to appointment in the McNab Street Presbyterian Church 
in Hamilton, Canada West; and was opened with a discourse by 
the retiring Moderator. 

Isaiah xivi. 1—3. In that day Bhatl this song be sang in the land of Jadah : 
We hare a atroiig city, Ac. 

Beoardinq thifl passage as legitimately and chiefly relating to 
times which are yet before as, we shall eDdeayour to set forth, as 
suggested by it, 

L The description which it gives of the True Cbarcb. By the 
expression, the true churchy we do not mean any particular branch 
of the church visible^ — not even that which we may regard as the 
purest and most scriptural in its constitution, but all persons in 
every place, of every age, and of every name, who hold the truth 
of God, observe his ordinances, and keep his commandments^ 

The true church is here presented under a two-fold aspect, — that 
of the character of its constituent members, and that of the position 
which they occupy. 

1. Those who compose the true church are described as " the 
righteous nation that keepeth the truth.** Such were originally 
sinners like all others ; but in the gracious providence of God they 
have been made aware of their dangerous condition, acquainted 
with the way of salvation, justified through the righteousness of 
Christ, and brought to peace with God. They are also sanctified 
through the truth. And though never perfect in this life, are yet 
ever advancing in the righteous ways of the Lord, and in the di* 
rection of the word, and the guidance of the Holy Spirit. 

The members of the true church stand in a peculiar and closd 
relation to one another, and to the Bedeemer. They are a nationj 
a people gathered out of all nations, and not reckoned among the 
nations of this world, yet " the people of the saints of the Most 
High,*' to whom is promised the dominion. Dan. vit. 27* A "right- 
eous,** a "holy nation, a peculiar people;'* aspiritual organization in 
the world, yet not of it, united by a feeling of love to one another, 
and of loyalty to Christ ; constituted in his name, incorporated by 
the charter of the everlasting covenant, having interests and priv* 



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280 THB PBBSBYTERIAN CHURCH OF CANADA. 

ileges in common, and governed by the same righteous and heaven - 
devised laws. 

And they are incorporated for high and holy ends. The church 
is intended to testify for, and maintain "the truth." Not only is 
every portion of divine truth precious to the people of God, person- 
ally, and so they " walk in it/' 8 John 4 ; and not only do they 
recognize the truth as it is in Jesus to be the sole foundation of a 
sinner's hope, and the only directory of a believer's life; but in their 
public capacity, they regard themselves as its guardians and custo- 
diers. And as it is one of the principal tests of a true church that 
it holds fast "the truth," Rom. iii. 2, so the faithful people of 
God have ever been characterized by a jealous defence of the in- 
tegrity of the written word, and an uncompromising testimony to 
all that it contains. 

2. The position occupied by those who compose this true church 
is described as a "strong city," — strong not from natural situation, 
like Jerusalem, surrounded by the mountains; nor from artifi- 
cial fortification like ancient Babylon with her proud walls; but 
strong in the favour and protection of her king. Prov. xviii. 10. 
Zech. ii. 6. Eph. ii. 10. 

The church of Christ in the world resembles a beleaguered fort- 
ress. She is surrounded by enemies. But though portions of the 
visible church may be undermined and pass away, as most of the 
seven churches of Asia have disappeared ; or though the entire 
outward institute called the Church may have her defence withdrawn 
from her for a time, like Jerusalem in the day of her unfaithful- 
ness, Sam. iv. 7 ; yet the church in its true sense is indestructi- 
ble. Ps. xlvi. 5. Isa. liv. 17. Matt. xvi. 18. 

And the inhabitants of Zion are all safe. Though not yet in 
heaven, they are already saved : they are within the pale of the 
church, which is the object of the Saviour's jealous care ; they com- 
pose the number of his elect; all sin is forgiven them; their in- 
ward corruption has received its death-blow ; the powers of dark- 
ness are under the restraint of the Captain of their salvation ; holy 
angels form their guard ; and every attribute of the divine nature is 
enlisted in their behalf. 

The battlements of Zion, therefore, re-echo with this song of joy 
and praise : " We have a strong city, salvation," — not something 
to protect or save, but salvation itself, — " will God appoint for walls 
and bulwarks?" And thus may we triumph in the position, 
which, as a branch of the trne church we occupy. While we 
** glory only in the Lord," Jer. ix. 23, 24, we cannot too highly 
appreciate the privileges which he has secured for his people. And 
though we are not in any narrow, bigoted, or papistical sense to 
make churchy church our watchword, yet we may not think lightly 
of the honour which belongs to the true church as " the spouse 
of Christ Her name as well as his shall be " the Lord our right- 
eousness." Jer. xxiiL 6. and xxxiii. 16. "Glorious things," also, 
" are spoken of thee, O city of God." And God will yet " make 
Jerusalem a praise in the earth." Neither are we to underrate the 



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PBSSBTTBBIAN HISTOBIOAL ALMANAC. 231 

confldence which may be reposed in her stability, for she is des- 
tined to continae throughout all time, and to outlive all changes, — 
even the wreck of the world itself. Aud again, though we ought not 
with sectarian pride to chant our denominational titles, or seek 
exclusively to promote our sectional interests ; yet we dare not 
forego the special testimony which we are honoured to bear to the 
headship of the Lord Jesus Christ, — not as regarding that branch 
of the church to which we belong the best, because we belong to it; 
but as adhering to it, because we intelligently believe it to be the 
most scriptural in its constitution and standards. 

II. The direction given to those who are entrusted with the in- 
terests of the church, viz : — " Open ye the gates," &c. 

1. As Teachers and Ministers of the word, we are admonished to 
oflFer every facility to "the righteous nation," — that is, to perishing 
sinners, called righteous^ by way of anticipation, by Him who fore- 
sees what those who believe shall be made to become, — to enter 
into **the strong city." The gate, though narrow in respect of 
man's unbelief, is wide in respect of God's offer. And we should 
guard against the judgment pronounced upon the scribes of old, 
Matt, xviii. 18, and aim at removing every obstacle which ignor- 
ance, prejudice, or unbelief may have thrown in the way of a cor- 
dial acceptance of the gospel invitation. It has indeed been a 
common objection againdt preachers of the word, who give promi- 
nence to the doctrines which are usually styled Calvinistic, that 
they limit the grace of God. Now, while we are prepared to main- 
tain that the doctrines referred to by no means have the effect al- 
leged; and that whatever be the consequence, we are not at liberty 
to throw down the walls in order to widen the gates, — let us be 
careful practically to leave no colour for this false imputation, and 
proclaim freely, as the scriptures teach, the doctrines of reconcilia- 
tion to a rebellious world. 

2. As Rulers, we are jealously to guard the entrance into the 
visible church, so that, if possible, unworthy persons may not gain 
admission. The gate is to be set open with the restricted inten- 
tion that "the righteous nation" and none else "may enter in." 
And though it belongs not to man to judge the heart, and unworthy 
parties will creep into the church, yet we may not admit any who 
do not make a credible profession of faith in Christ ; and we are to 
use all diligence and faithfulness to make entrance into the visible 
church, as nearly as practicable, commensurate with that into the 
true. 

In regard to Christian fellowship — ^so far as free communion is 
understood to imply indiscriminate admission of all who choose to 
sealing ordinances, the idea is too gross to be for a moment enter- 
tained. But so far as it supposes fellowship at the Lord's table, 
among Christians of different denominations; if it be not held as 
a claim which one branch of the church may reasonably make upon 
another without conforming to the rules of that other, but held as 
an expression of Christian charity to be extended with the same 
caution as in the reception of communicants from one congregation 



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THB PItSSBYTSRIAN CHURCH OF CANADA. 

iDto another of the ^ame body, it may be observed io aooordao^ 
with good order and goveroment. And we believe that it is thus 
occasionally practised among us, and roost evangelical churches. 

And in connection with ecclesiastical government, it may be 
remarked that discipline is to be exercised, not only in dealing with 
individuals, but sometimes also with church members collectively, 
notwithstanding that, as in other matters, the innocent may partially 
suffer with the guilty. Congregations or sections of congregations, 
setting order and justice at defiance in a refractory or contumacious 
manner, should be visited with the censure of the church, so far as it 
can be brought to bear upop them ; and that, irrespectively of pos- 
sible consequences. And a temporary suspension of privileges 
would not only be, io such a case, perfectly consistent with 
principle, but might be expected, if inflicted in the name of the 
great Head of the church, to operate in the most salutary way. 

III. The blessedness of those who are brought within the pale 
of the true church. " Thou wilt keep him in perfect peace whose 
mind is stayed in thee," &c. The fundamental blessing belonging 
to the people of God is, that they are safe. There is, however, a 
further privilege provided for them, viz : the happiness of know- 
ing that they are safe. And it is the combination of these two 
elements, safety and consciousness of being safe, which is implied 
in the expression before us; as it is the union of safety and happi- 
ness which constitutes what is conveyed by the rich scriptural 
term, blessedness. 

There is a true peace, and there is 9k false peaoe. True peace le 
the offspring of faith in God, and none are entitled to be at 
peace except those who trust in him. The believer, while sur* 
rounded with outward troubles, may enjoy much inward peace. 
John xiv. 1. and xvi. 83. Apart from a natural stayedness of 
mind, and the comfort which it imparts, there is a peculiar sincerity 
which distinguishes him, and is fitted to uphold him in all circum- 
stances of trial and of suffering ; not that his peace, any more than 
other graces pertaining to him, is in the present state ever abso- 
lutely perfect, or always uninterrupted, but that so far as he trusts 
in God, his peace remains and abounds. 

And the Lord ''will keep his people in peace." He, "the God 
of peace," has ordained peace for them. v. 12. God the Son, "the 
Prince of peace," bequeathed it as a legacy to his followers. John 
xiv. 27. And God the Holy Ghost, " the Comforter," is promised 
as the Dispenser of this blessing. John xvi. 1, 7. But he who or- 
dains the endy ordains also the means: he does pot give peaco 
without faith, Rom. v. i, nor continue it except along with the 
exercise of the same grace with which it was originally communi- 
cated. And faith can be preserved alive, only by the blessing of 
God upon the unremitting use of appointed means. It is thuH 
that the believer enjoys a "peace which passeth all understanding," 
Ac. Phil. iv. 6, 7. 

Conclusion.-^!. A word of application to the general audience. 
There is no "rest to the wicked," Isa. Ivii. 20, 21, or those who are 



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FBX8BTTBBIAN HISTOBIGAL ALHAKAO. 



288 



not of Ohrist The qaestion then for each and all is, whether they be 
in the enjoyment of that peace which rests on a sure foundation, 
and is so freely offered in Christ And those who intelligently 
feel that they are at peace with God on spiritual grounds, are war- 
ranted and required to adopt this song of grateful praise : — " We 
have a strong city," &c. 

2. A word of encouragement to the Fathers and Brethren in the 
ministry. We need encouragement as well as others,-*encourage- 
ment personally as weak, sinful creatures, and officially as the ser* 
vants of the Lord, laid under a mighty charge and responsibility* 
The text holds out the prospect of this glorious song being raised 
by the redeemed of Ood in every land. Let this animate our faith, 
and stimulate us to renewed faithfulness and diligence in preaching 
'* the glorious gospel of the blessed God," as also in administering 
the government of his church. And let it excite us to earnest 
prayer for the outpouring of the Holy Spirit, that the time mav 
soon come when it shall be sung throughout the length and breadth 
of our adopted country, — when the melody of spiritual joy and 
health shall ascend from all its families, — when in our assemblies 
those of every name who love the Lord Jesus Christ, shall be found 
blending their voices in holy harmony, — when the watchmen on the 
walls of Zion shall ^Mift up the voice, and with the voice together 
shall sing," — and when this holy rejoicing of a regenerate world 
shall usher in the everlasting hallelujahs of heaven. Amen. 

After the sermon, the sessions were constituted with prayer, and 
the following were reported as 





ittmbtrs ni 


i\t Sessisn. 




Mfvitnnui. 


PaStBTTSKT. BLSnU. 


MmsTnts. 


PKSiBTTVn 




AVAMS, JM., F. 


Toronto. 




Gavld, John, p. 


London. 


John Brown. 


AlexMMtor. J^ P 


HamUton. 


Jame^ Woodi. 


Gelkle, A. C, P. 


Hamlltim. 


George DnTUtaCMi 


Alexander, J^ P. 


Toronto. 


Alex. Wallace. 


Gordon, Daniel, P. 


MontreaL 






Oofaourf. 





Gordon, Heniy, P. 


Kingaton. 


e.W.Ltodi«j. 


Allan, Daniel, p. 


London. 


...... 


Goorlay, J. L, P. 


Ottawa. 


....M 


Anderson, J., p. 


Montreal. 


H.Ounpbell. 


Graham. Wm., P. 


London. 


Andrew McAn. 








Gray, John, P. 


Toronto. 


D.MeCallnnL 


Ball, W. S., a«t. 


London. 


...... 


Gray, Peter, p. 
Gregs, WUllam, P. 


KIngrtwit 




Bayne, John, p. 


Hamilton. 


Jamat Cowan. 


Toronto. 


J^B^fifl.' 


Beaitie. DavM, P. 
BUekTJamBs. P. 


liondon. 


P.Dewar. 








Hamilton. 


Alex.MiteiMU. 


Hassm, Jamea 


TONBto. 


•M.M 


BUln, William, P. 


Oobouf,. 




HodgBkin,T.J.,p. 


HamlltMi. 


P.Idlngton. 


Bloant,Jame«,P. 


London. 











Bowie, Jamea, P. 


BrocfrUie. 


.M... 


TiWLU, DaTid, P. 


HimiflioB. 


RoheriXvM. 


Boyd, Bobert, P. 


JoaephRekL 


Inrlne, John, p. 


HamUton. 


GaorgiHaUaj. 


Bumi, Robt« PEF. 


Toronto. 


...... 


Irrlne, Robt, P. 


Hamlltoa. 


...M. 


Barn>,B6btr^P. 


HatJItoo. 




Jamimov, B, p. 


Bnattlom 




Camskor, D., p. 


Montnal. 


ArrbibaldMeXah. 








Campbell, II., P. 


Moolmal. 


R. Craig. 


Kmp,A.P..p. 


MonlreaL 


M>M 


Cheyne. Geo, P. 


Hamilton. 


William Brown. 


King, William, P. 


London. 


B.T«nTnnk]B 


CUrk,W.B.,P. 


MoatraaL 










Oorbett, John. P. 


Ottawa. 


...—, 


Laiot, John, P. 


«}rOBtOL 


Wni.lH«w(ak 


Oralgie, Wm., p. 




...... 


Lowry, Thoa., P. 


Toronto. 


Wm. Heron. 




BlonUeaL 


Jamea GIbbu 








Cuthbertaon,0.,p. 


HamUton. 


«M.*. 


MoABTSVm, R., P« 


MOBlMl. 




Carrie, Peter, P. 


MontiMl. 


.«..«. 


McAaley, A.J,P. 


HamUton. 


WUliaaCMT. 








MeOonechy, J., P. 
MeDlamld,D.,p. 


MontreaL 


M*>** 


1>0AK.WniUlll,P. 


London. 


M..M 


London. 


.M.W 


Duncan, J. B^ P. 


Ottawa. 


Thomas Nleol. 


Helndoe. Wm., P. 


HamUton. 


M.M. 


Duncan, Peter, P. 


Cobonrf. 


Georfe Inglta. 


MeKensle, D.. p. 


London. 










lfeKeQaie,W.J..P. 


Oobovf, 


Allan MbiteiMb. 


rSBauMV. J^ p. 


London. 


M..M 


MrLarhlan. J., P. 


Tbronto. 


D. Kennedy. 


rorrait, Wm., P. 


LondoD. 


....M 


MeUren, Wm., P. 


MontreaL 


M.M. 


IMMT, Donald, r. 
SO 


MontreaL 


...... 


McLean, Alex., p. 


Hamilton. 





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284 



THE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH OF CANADA. 



MINItTSKt: 



PKXtBTTSKT. 



SLxnni. 



XXXIITXmt. PBBtVTTXRT. 



McLean, Alex., P. 
■McLeiin, And., P. 
»lcI.«od, D., p. 
McM^kln, U. 
McMillan. J.. P. 
HcM alien, W.J.,P. 
MePherion, L., P. 
McPhenoD, T., p. 
McRobid, John, P. 
JfeRiuu-; D., P. 
MeTavish, John, P. 
■Meldram, Wm., P. 
Mellrille, Aod^ P. 
Uiddlemlga, J., P. 
HUne, John 
Mitchell, Jas, p. 
Montgomery, D., P. 

KisBST, Jamea, P. 

BWD, W., a. A»T. 
Kennlo, John, p. 
Roger, J. M., P. 
Roes, John, P. 

FCOTT, Jnhn, P. 
Scott, WlUiani, p. 



Hamilton. 

Hamilton. 

Cobonrg. 

Ottawa. 

liondon. 

London. 

London. 

London. 

Hamilton. 

Hamilton. 

Toronto. 

London. 

BrockTille. 

Hamilton. 

Montreal. 

Toronto. 

Broekville. 



J. Sanderaon. 
Andrew Jeflirey. 



Matthew Reld. 
l>onald Fraaer. 
Moaea Douglaa. 
Joaeph Abraham. 
Geo. Cuthbertaon. 
Alex. Calder. 



Hum. McKenale. 
D. GatUnaefa. 
Jame« Keadi. 
James Allan. 



Toronto. James Maedonald. 

Toronto. 

London. 
Cobonrg. 
London. 



James Hamilton. 



London. 
Montreal. 



Wm. CUrk. 



Smellie, Oeo., P. 
Smith, Jamea, P. 
Smith, John, P. 
Smith, J. W., p. 
Stark, M. Y.. P. 
Staven, Andrew 
Stralth, John, p. 
Swinton, R. C, P. 

TsoMSOir, J., W.C. 
Troup, Wm.| P. 

IJfti, Robert 



M'ALXXB, D., P. 
Wallace, Robert, P. 
Wardrope, D., P. 
Wardrope, T., P. 
White, W.F., P. 
Wlghtman, T., p. 
Wilaon, And.. P. 
Wlabart, DaTid, P. 

Yofm«, Alex., P. 
Young, G. P., rap. 
I Young, Samuel 



Hamilton. 

BrockTille. 

Cobonrg. 

Cobourg. 

Hamilton. 

Hamilton. 

London. 

Toronto. 



J. McGtanghliB. 
J. Camthen. 
Thomaa Hair. 
Peter Ghriatie. 
Jamea Bojd. 
R. Hopkln. 



Kingston. Janes ThomMm. 



Toronto. Wm. Leslie;. 



London. 

London. 

Ottawa. 

Ottawa. 

Kingston. 

Toronto 

Kingston. 

Kingston. 

landoa. 
Toronto. 
Hamilton. 



F. Blalke. 
Joseph Bilker. 



D. Robertson. 
R. Holden, K.D. 
Thomas Reive. 
Ja«. MclAugblln. 
Robert Cooper. 



John Blair. 



The Synod proceeded to elect a Moderator, when Rev. Thomas 
Wardrope, of Ottawa, was unanimously elected. 



§Ul8 anb ^trertnrts* 

The Committee on Bills and Overtures, Rev. George SusLLiBy 
Chairman, reported 

An Overture from the Pres. of Montreal, on the relation of baptized children to the 
church, and the best mode of recognizing that connection. 

On motion, a committee was appointed to take into consideration 
the whole subject and report. — Rev. D. Fraser, chairman of com- 
mittee. 

An Overture from the Pres. of Brockville and Ottawa, for a division of said Pres- 
bytery. The Synod granted the request, and ordered the Presbytery of Brockville 
to meet in Brockville, on the last Tuesday in July, at 7^, P. M., and the Presbytery 
of Ottawa on the first Tuesday of August at 7}, P. M. 

An Overture from several members of Synod of the subject of ordination of minis- 
ters from foreign churches. 

Whereas, The Pi'esbyterian Church of Ireland does invariably ordain probatt^nei^ 
coming from that body to this church; and whereas, the circumstances of these 
Provinces are not such as to call for such procedure : It is hereby respectfully over- 
tured to Synod that a communication be addressed to that sister Church, directing at- 
tention to the practice complained of, and earnestly recommending its discontinuance ; 

A Committee was appointed to carry out the recommendation. 

An Overture from the Presbytery of London, on the subject of worldly amusements. 
The Synod would affectionately and earnestly call the attention of the members of 
the Church to the necessity of avoiding the appearance of evil, in the way of con- 
formity to the customs of an ungodly world ; and the Synod further direct the atten- 
tion of Sessions to the great importance of acting with caution, affection, and faith- 
fulness, in dealing with any who may seem to conduct themselves inconsistently in the 
matter referred to. 

Several Overtures were presented which were sent down to the 
Presbyteries. 



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Faslor of tne^KnoK" Presbyterian Clnircli, Ottawa, Canada West 
MuJeralor qF tlie Presbyterian [luii'di of Lariacla. 185B. • 



P.,l,.<;,^. fv Jiscpr. MWi:s^j,'^'i:.,: 



. (■' jzed 



.b.y„)^pogle 



•K- 



^i.r" 



Digitized by 



Googk 



PRESBYTBBIAK HISTORICAL ALMANAC. 



285 



MiNIBTBBS WHO HAYS DIED IN OOKNSOTION WITH THIS ChUBOB : 



MJLMM. 



BSTHUHB, Nail . . 

Bstox, Hrarr, A.M. 

Oalb, Alazandw A. . 

HAm&is, Joieph . . 

LiNMAT, RobMi . . 

aiASSBAU., Andrew 

BixToirT«, WllllAin, a. 
Kobb, KaJpb . . 



rmBSBTYBBT. 



LoadoD, . . 
Toronto^ 
Hamilton, . 

Ilamllton, . 

Toronto, . . 

MontrM), . 
Hamilton, . . 



Year of 
Ordination 


Year of 
Dmth. 


Age at 
Ddath. 


IMO 


1866 


82 


...... 


1858 


68 


1820 


1864 


64 


18S8 


1860 


47 


1881 


1864 


68 





1867 


... 


1821 
1827 


1861 
1860 


64 
60 



OompHoatod. 

Bronohitia. 

Aryiipelaa. 

BUloaii Ferer 

Oonramptioo 

Cholera. 
Kryiipelafl. 



The Committee, Bev. Wm. GRBa«>, Chairman, reported. 
After discussion, the following deliverance was agreed to, viz: 

*' That the Report be received and sostained, and in view of the paramount impor- 
tance of the Theological Seminary to the welfare of oar church and country, aaopt 
its recommendation for the appointment of a day of special prayer on its behalf ; and 
farther, that the thanks of the Synod be tendered to the Bey. Dr. Burns and the 
Rev. D. Fraser, for their energetic and successful efforts in Great Britain and Ireland, 
on behalf of the College Building Fund, and to the Colonial Committees of the Pi-es- 
byterian Church of Ireland, and of the Free Church of Scotland, as well as to ChriA- 
tian friends in these countries, and in England, for their liberal donations to this 
institution. The Synod also would express their thanks to the Qovernor and members 
of the Committee for their diligence, and regret to find that the income of the College 
has not yet met the necessary expenditure, and again urge upon Presbyteries and 
office-t)earers of the Church the necessity of increased contributions, and remit to the 
College Committee to be appointed the consideration of any special measures that 
may be required to liquidate the present arrears on the ordinary College Fund. The 
Synod further appoint the first Sabbath of November as a day of special prayer 
throughout the Church in behalf of the College." 



^srrstibt at t^ft ^tste at $eIi0t0K« 

The Committee on the State of Religion, J. Scott, Chairman, re- 
ported: 

The report now presented is not strictly on the state of religion, but rather on 
the means employed throughout Uie Church for maintaining and promoting it The 
effect of these means hasauo been inquired after, but, in oitlinary circumstanoesi this 
is a subject which cannot be very definitely presented. 

For the jDurpose of obtaining the information necessary for forming the report, 
certain queries were sent to the corresponding members of the several Presbyteries, 
to which they were requested to furnish replies. These replies were returned from 
all the Presbyteries with the exception of one, and such is the information which we 
have gathered respecting the state of religion, and the means being employed through- 
out the Church for maintaining and promoting it. This statement shows that there 
is much activity and diligence in the use of means, and in many instances happy re- 
sults attendinff the use of these means, for which the Synod has reason to be thankful 
to God, but shows also that, specially in some departments, there is great need for im- 
provements. Your Committee would, therefore, oooclude by respectfully submitting 
the following suggestions : 



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28« 



THE PRBSBTTSBLL9 CBXTBOR OF OAKADA. 



1. That the Sjnod again call the special attention of Presbjrteries to the import- 
ance of exercising a proper sopenrision over the congregation within their boanos by 
regular Presbyterial visitations, held at sach interval as maj seem to them best 

2. That ministers be reoomroeoded to carry oat, as far as possible, the practice of 
catechising, not only the children of Sabbath-schools, and the pupils of !^ible clas- 
ses, but tl^ grown youth in ^neral, who are connected witli the Church, and that 
Sessions be enjoined to use diligence for .securing the general practice of pareatal cate- 
chizing. 

3. That in connection with the Presbyterial conference on the state of religion^ 
there might also be a conference on the subject of preaohinff, or the best meth(3 of 
presenting the truth of the gospel, in order to its taking hold, by the grace of God, 
of the conscience and hearts of the hearers. 



The Committee on Statistics, Bev. J. Lainq, Chairman, reported: 

Tour Committee feel no little measure of embarrassment. They are sensible that 
the Reports will not be found as interesting, as those which have been, from time to 
time, submitted by the former Convener. 'Fhey have, however, endeavoured to accom- 
plish the work eatrusted to them as well as time would permit, and the reports given 
into their hands enabled them. 



Fer9onal SuuMcs of the Presbyterian 


Ckwrch cf Canada. 






8TAT«0 Ol/KB. 


HINI9TERS. 


Gumwtim. 


4 


^11 


111 


tt^ 


PRBSBYrSBISl. 


? 


^t 


1 


L 

ifl 
1m 


11 

T 
4t 


I 

17 
IS 

m 
leie 


Si.? 


Oobourir, * , . . . 
IlmtBJItoiij .... 


WfLllam Dnnk, 
WlULuaOngi^ . 


13 
IS 

34 

n 


3 

IT 


IS 
13 

1 
«1 
IS 


m 
lan 

138 

144 
l&A 


lOT 
100 
439 

IIT 


1«10 

urn 

1836 


144 

t:i 


i^^6y£fn«i, . p 7 


1349 


1163 


liSao 


loua 




Hl4S9l»ill4 SOflOi uiitt 



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PRBSBYTBBIAK HISTORICAL ALMANAC. 287 



Stistellaneffss. 

The Synod called for Beport of Home Mission Committee. 

On motion, it wos agreed to receire the Beport, and appoint Mr. 
McTavish to proceed to the Bed Biver settlement without delay, 
with a view to encourage Mr. Black in his important work, and 
also to obtain information respecting other fields of missionary la- 
bour ; re-appoint the Committee, and instruct them to secure suita- 
ble supplies for Mr. McTavish's congregation in his absence. 

The Synod called for the Beport of the Committee on Sabbath 
observance. 

On motion, it was agreed that the Synod receiye the Beport and 
adopt its recommendations, and re-appoint the Committee, direct- 
ing their special attention to the present state of the law respecting 
Sabbath observance. 

The quarterly collections were appointed as follows: 

1. For the French Canadian Misslonaiy Society, on 3cl Sabbath of July. 

2. For Bozton Miflsion and Svnod Fand, on 3d Sabbath of October. 
8, For Foreign Mission, on 2d Sabbath of Janoary. 

4. For Widows' and Orphans' Fund, on 3d Sabbath of March. 

On motion made and seconded, it was agreed : — 

''That the thanks of the Synod be ffiren to the office-bearers of the McNab Street 
Church, for the comfortable accommodation afforded to the Synod during its session ; 
also to the accommodation Committee, and the friends in Hamilton, gently, for the 
hospitable manner in which they hare received the Ministers and Elckrs of the Synod ; 
and to the anthorities of the Grand Trunk Railway for their liberality in granting 
return tidnis to the members of the Synod." 

The bnsiness^ of Synod bein^ now oonclnded, after singing part 
of the 22d Psalm, and prayer, the Moderator addressed the Synod 
in appropriate terms, appointed next ordinary meeting of Synod 
to take place in Toronto, on the second Tuesday of June, 1869, at 7| 
P. M., and dismissed the Synod with the Apostolic benediction. 

WILLIAM BEID, A. M., Gudk. THOMAS WABDBOPB, Moduutok. 



Digitized by 



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ALPHABETICAL LIST 



MINISTERS AND LICENTIATES 

OF THE OANADIAN PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. 



[NOTB— Tn the following U%U r.IndleatM Pauior; f. t^ SUOed Supply; X.M., and W. X^ Borne and 
FGrtign Mutsutnaria ,' w.c^ WUhmU CJiarge; CHP., Chaplain; pas., or TRW^ President or JPro/e$9or In 
a Collcife or Stfmluary ; wm^SiUor; c. •., Qnresponding Secreiary ; r^Teacker; h,, LioenUate ; Aar., 
>l^»t. The PostroAow »re eurracted up to tba time of going to praaa.] 



KiifiaTBKa. 



PRMBTTBKT. POaT-OFBICB. 



PBBSBTTBBT. POtT-OFFlCB. 



ADAXa. Jaa., P. 
Al»xand«r. J.. P. 
Alexander, J., P. 
Altfxaoder, T.. p. 
Allan, Alex.. P. 
Allan. Daniel, P. 
Anderson, D., P. 
Andarson, J., P. 
Andrews, F., P. 

Ball, W. S.. aot. 
B^jne, John, p. 
BMtUe, David, P. 
Black, James, p. 
Black, John, p. 
Blain, William, p. 
Blount, James, P. 
Bowie, James, P. 
Boyd, Bobert, P. 
Barns, Robt., pbf. 
Bama, Robt F., P. 

Caxbbon, D., p. 
Campbell, H., P. 
Chambers, T. S, W.C. 
Cheanut, J. W., L. 



Toronto. 

ll.imUttm. 

Toronto. 

Cobourg. 

Montreal. 

London. 

Toronto. 

Montreal. 

Cobourg. 

London. 

Hnmllton. 

London. 

Hamilton. 

Toronto. 

Cobourg. 

London. 

Cobourg. 

BrockTiUa. 

Toronto. 

Hamilton. 

HontreaL 
MontreaL 



Nobleton. 

Brantlbrd. 

Norval. 

Norham. 

St. Kustaehe. 

Stratford. 

Wick. 

Lancaster 



Woodstock. 

Oalt. 

St. Mary*!. 

Seneca. 

Bad Rlrar. 

Sprlngrllle. 

Bosanquet. 

Norwood. 

Preacott. 

Toronto. 

St. Oatbuine*!. 

Kenyon. 
Cornwall. 



Cbayne. Oea. p. 


Hamilton. 


Taplejtown. 


Clark,W.B.,P. 


MontreaL 


Quebec. 


Corbett, John, P. 


Ottawa. 


Wakefield. 


Cralgle, Wm., p. 


Hamilton. 


Port Dover. 


Crawford, Arch., P. 


BrockTille. 


Weatport. 


Cromble, John, P. 


Montreal. 


Inverness. 


Cutbbertaon, 0., p. 


Hamilton. 


Woolwich. 


Carrie, Peter, P. 


Montreal. 


YanklaekbOI. 


DoAK, William, P. 




Port Stanley. 


DougliM, Jas., P. 


Cobourg. 


MHIbrook. 


Duncan, J. B., P. 


Ottawa. 


Perth. 


Duncan, Peter, p. 


Cobourg. 


Culboma. 


FBBovsoir, J., p. 


London. 


Lobo. 


Findiay, .Ian., P. 


London. 


Mitchell. 


ForreHt. Wm., P. 


Lindon. 


Uid^town. 


Fraser, Donald, P. 


Montreal. 


MontreaL 


Gauld, John, P. 


Tendon 


Mo<^ 


Oeif^le, James, P. 


Ottawa. 


Watson's Corner. 


Grtlkle, A. C, p. 


Hamilton. 


Berlin. 


Gillespie, John, P. 


Hamilton. 


Princeton. 


Gordon, Daniel, p. 


Montreal. 


Athol. 


Gordon, Henry, p. 


Kingston. 




Gourlay, J. L., P. 


Ottawa. 


Aylmer. 


Graham, Wm., p. 


London. 


BgmondTiUo. 


Gray, John, p. 


Toronto. 


Orlllla. 


Gray, Peter, P. 


Kingston. 


Kingston. 


Gregg, William, F. 


Toronto. 


Toronto. 


IlABBia, Jaa.,w.c. 


Toronto. 


Egllnton. 


Henry, ThoN., P. 


Montreal. 


T^aehute. 


Hnd^skln, T. J., P. 


Hamilton. 


Doon. 


Holmea, A.T. 






Hume, Jamea, p. 


Kingston. 


Melrose. 


(238) 







iNOLia, David, p. Hamilton. Hamilton. 

IrTlne,John, P. Hamilton. AUanavllla. 

Irvine, Robt., P. Hamilton. Hamilton. 

Jaxibsok, R., p. Hamilton. DunnviUe. 



Kbmp, a. F., p. 
King, WillUm, P. 

LAxna, John, p. 
Lochead, Wm., P. 
Lowry, Thos., P. 

McAllmtbb,W., P. 
McArthur, R., P. 
MoAulay, A. J., p. 
McGoll, Angus, P. 
McConechy, J., P. 
BIcDiarmid, A., l. 
McDIarmld, D., p. 
McDonald, A D., L. 
Mclndoe. Wm., P. 
McKay, John, l. 
McKenaie, D., p. 
McKensle, R.. L. 
McRensie,W.J^p. 
McKonxie, W., p. 
MclAchlan, J., p. 
McLaren, Wm., p. 
McLean, Alex., p. 
McLean, Alex., F. 
McLean, And., p. 
Mcl<ean, Ewen, F. 
McLean, Robt, L. 
McLeod, D., P. 
McMechan, J., L. 
McMeekin, H , P. 
McMilUn, D., P. 
McMillan. J., P. 
McMullen,W.J.,P. 
Mc.\augfaton, J.H. 
Mcpherson, L., P. 
McPherson, T., P. 
.McRobie, John, P. 
McRuar. D., P. 
McTavish, John, P. 
Meldrum, Wm., P. 
MellvlUe, And., F. 
MiddlemlM. J., p. 
Milnu, John, F. 
Mitchell. Jas., P. 
Montgomery, D., P. 



MontreaL Montreal. 

London. Buxton. 

Toronto. Aglneoort 

BroekvUle. Kan. 

Toronto. Whitby. 

Montreal. Metis. 

MontreaL St Iionlt do O. 

Hamilton. Nasaagaweya. 

London. AldborDugh. 

Montreal. lioeds. 



Woodstock. 

Watartown. 

Bmbra" 

Baltlnanl 

Ramsay. 

Acton. 

Boaton, U. S. 

Aberfoyla. 

KUbrids. 

Pualinch. 

Gould. 



I^ndon. 
Hamilton. 



London. 



Ooboan& 

OtUwa. 

Toronto. 

MontreaL 

Hamilton. 

Hamilton. 

Hamilton. 

Montreal. 



Cobourg. Cobourg. 



OtUwa. 

London. 

I^ondon. 

London. 

London. 

London. 

London. 

Hamilton. 

Hamilton. 

Toronto. 

London. 

Brockville. 

Hamilton. 

Montreal. 

Toronto. 

BrockvUla. 



Pembroke. 

Aldborough. 

Fingal. 

MUlbank. 

Saugeen. 

WillUms. 

StratlhrtL 

Jarvla. 

Ayr. 

Beavarton. 

Harrington. 

Edwardshnrffli. 

Blora. 

Howick. 

Milton. 

8. Oower. 



NxsBBT, Jamea, p. Toronto. OakTlHe^ 



Pabk, William, L. 
Paterson, N., L. 



Quiif, John C. P. BrockTille. Kflmptrillab 

Fbtd, W., o. AOT. Toronto. Torontow 
Rennie, John, P. London. Beachville. 



Digitized by 



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PRXSBYTBBUir HISTOBIOAL ALXANAO. 



289 



MIlfltTKRS. 



PKSSBTTXBT. 



POST OWWICZ. 



Rogwr, J.M.. p. 
IUmb, John, P. 

Scott, John, P. 
swtu wmum. p. 

Sharp, Thofl^ P. 
Shaw, S. U., L. 
Smart, Wm., w.c. 
Smttllie, U«o., p. 
Smith. Jamais, p. 
Smith, John, p. 
8mIth.J. \V., p. 
SUrk. M. Y.. p. 
St«)T«u, Andrew, P. 
Stewart, Jai., L. 
Stniith. John, P. 
8uthdrland,\V. It., p. 
Swinton, R. C, P. 

Tait. Jamefl, L. 
Thomson, J., w.o. 



Ooboan^ 
London. 



London. 

Montraol. 

Toronto. 



BroekTUle. 

Hamilton. 

BroelCTill«. 

Cohottrg. 

Cobourg. 

Hamilton, 

IJamlltou. 

London. 
London. 
Toronto. 



Peterboroogh. 
Bruoofiald. 



London. 
St. SylTMter. 
Ash bum. 

BellTiliir 

Fergus. 

BrockTUIe. 

Darlington. 

Oralton. 

Bundas. 

Paris. 

Tilbunr'ieast 

Strathbaru. 

Buttonrille. 



KIinSTBKS. 



pbusttzst. poiT-oFncs. 



Thornton, J. A., L. 
f olmie. And., P. 
Troup, Wm, P. 

Ubb, Robert, P. 

WALKZ&, B., p. 

Wallace, Robert, P. 
Wardrope, D., P. 
Wardrope, T., P. 
White, W.F., P. 
White, James, L. 
Whyte, James, p. 
Wightman, T., P. 
Willis, M., PBF. 
Wiliion, And., P. 
WindeIl,W. C, P. 
Wiahart, Bavid, P. 

Toimo, Alex., P. 
Young, 0. P., PBF. 
Young, S., w.c. 



London. 
London 

Toronto. 

London. 
London. 
OtUwa. 
Ottawa. 
Kiugstoo. 



Ottawa. 

Toronto. 

Toronto. 

Kingston. 

Cobourg. 

Kingston. 

Iiondon. 
Toronto. 
UamUton. 



Innerkip. 
Plympton. 

StreetsTllU. 

Samia. 

IngeraolL 

Bristol. 

Ottawa. 

BeUrilla. 

Osffoode.** 

Lefroy. 

Toronto^ 

Kingston. 

BallyduA 

Madoe. 

St Thomas. 

Toronto. 

Ouelph. 



Pabtral0rs of t\t ^sno^. 







Year of 


Year of 


Year of 


Age at 


PLACB OV 






Ordination 


Klectlon. 


Death. 


Death. 


KBBTIHe. 


Stark. Mark Y 


tTaniitt<n, . . 


18.33 


1844 






Kingston. 


Burns, D.n^ Kobert . . . 


Torouto, . . 


1811 


1845 




... 


Cobourg. 


Bayne, D D., John .... 


Elamilton, . . 


1834 


1846 


..• ... 


... 


Hamilton. 


Rnger, A.at., John M. . . . 


Oobourg, . . 


1838 


1847 


...... 


... 


Kingston. 


McKencie. Donald . . . 


rx>ndun, . . . 


1834 


1848 


...... 


... 


Toronto. 


Willis, DO, Michael . . . 


Toronto, . . . 


IStJl 


1849 


... ... 


... 


Toronto. 


IWid. A.M., William . . . 


Kingston, . . . 


1840 


1850 


... ... 


... 


Toronto. 


Boyd, D D., Robert .... 


BrockTUIe, . . 


1821 


1861 


... ... 


... 


Kingston. 


Wightmnn, Thomas . . . 


Toronto, . . . 


1853 


1852 





... 


Kingfcton. 


Gale, A M., Alexander . . . 


damllton, . . 


1826 


1863 


1864 


64 


Hamilton. 


Gordon, Ilenry 


Kingston,. . . 


1833 


1854 


...M. 


... 


Toronto. 


I^wry, Heni7 


Toronto, . . . 


1833 


1855 


... ... 


... 


MontreaL 


Cheyne, George .... 


ilamilk>n, . . 


1831 


1856 


... ... 


... 


London. 


Smellie, George 


Hamilton, . . 


1836 


1867 


...... 


... 


Kingston. 


Wardrope, Thomas . . . 


vittawa, . . . 


1845 


1858 


...... 


... 


Hamilton. 



PERIODICALS. 



BAMX. 

Ecde*ia$iieal and Minianary Reootd. 

The Canadian Prtsbyter. 

The PresbjfUrian Hutorical Almanac. 



XVXTOE. 
Bxv. WM. RBID, AM. 
Rbt. a. F. KEVIP a D. FRASRR. 
JOSKPH H. WILSON. 



PLACB OB PVB. TjMB. 

Toronto, cm Mmthly. 

Montreal, 0. B. « 

Philadelphia. AwnuaL 



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240 THE PBKSBTTEBIAir OHUBOH OF CANADA. 

T^iiiatial Slttc\ of t\t fmlrtttrian €\ux[\ts in 
SxmiUfir, ^unU ISSitiU 

Thb city of Hamilton, G. W., is a place of considerable trade and 
importance ; is beautifully situated on the south western extremity 
of Burlington Bay, Lake Ontario. It was originally laid out in 
1813, but its progress up till 1840 — when its population scarcely 
amounted to 8000 — was slow. In 1850 its population had in- 
creased to about 10,000, and progressing during the last eieht years 
with greatly increased rapidity, it is now estimated that the num- 
ber of souls is nearly 80,000. 

At a very early period in the history of Hamilton, an American 
Presbyterian Church was organized, and a place of worship erected 
on John Street. For some years this organization has ceased to 
exist, and about a year and a half ago the building was sold, the 
proceeds being generously donated by the trustees, to the building 
fund of the McNab Street Church. 

The first Presbyterian minister ever settled in Hamilton was 
the Rev. Mr. Marsh, pastor of the American Presbyterian Church. 
He demitted his charge in 1885, and was succeeded by the Bev. 
Mr. Furman, who remained pastor until 1888. 

In the autumn of 1838, the Bev. Alexander Gale removed to 
Hamilton, at the invitation of seven persons, two of whom were 
Episcopalians. The services were at first held in a private room, 
the little congregation sitting around the table. Towards the close 
of the same year Mr. Oale was inducted pastor, by the Presbytery 
of Toronto, in connection with the Church of Scotland. In 1835 
a small frame church capable of accommodating about 200 persons, 
was erected, and called St Andrew's Church. It was thrice en- 
larged, until it held upwards of 500. 

In consequence of the Free Church movement in Scotland^ the 
church in Canada was divided in 1844. Mr. Gale at that time severed 
his connection with the Church of Scotland, as by law established, and 
was one of the twenty-three ministers who founded the Presbyterian 
Church of Canada, a body which now numbers 130 settled pastors. 
Nearly the whole of the congregation of St. Andrew's Church ad- 
hered to their pastor ; but the few who still adhered to the estab- 
lished church, having threatened them with legal proceedings, they 
at onee vacated their place of worship, and having securra a fa- 
vourable site, took immediate steps for the erection of a new 
church. The congregation remaining in St Andrew's Church were 
for a considerable time without any settled minister, but at length 
the Bev. Alexander McKidd was settled over them, and he after a 
short pastorate having demitted bis charge, was succeeded by the 
Bev. D. McKnee, who also resigned, and was succeeded bv the Bev. 
Bobert Burnet, the present efficient pastor. In 1855 the church 
which they at present occupy was erected by this congregation 
upon the site of old St Andrew's. It will accommodate a^ut 1000 



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W% Mf tti^B STPRHSMTERIAH CMURCH.H, 

Kev^DAVII] INB 



Published hj Joseph M Wilson. N' lU Scuih ID "^ S' Ph:!^: 



PSTuvdlScScnsiiVhPhi: 



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PBSSBYTSBIAN HI8T0BICAL ALMANAC. 241 

persons, and is considered to be one of the most handsome gothio 
churches in the province. The old frame church having been re- 
moved to a new site, is occasionally occupied by a German congre- 
gation. " This congregation have lately commenced the formation 
of a new station in a hitherto destitute locality, the extreme eastern 
portion of the city, and through the great exertions of their excellent 
pastor, a neat roughcast church has been erected, called St. John's 
Church. The new congregation is already in such a forward state 
that they purpose obtaining a minister of their own, at an early elated 

We now go back for some years to trace tile history of another 
congregation, viz : that in connection with the United Presbyterian 
Church in Scotland. In 1886 a station was formed in Hamilton, 
in connection with this denomination, then called the United Se- 
cession Church, and was visited at stated intervals by the Bev. 
Thomas Christie of Flamborough, and others, till 1841, when a con- 
gregation was organized, and a small stone church built. In 1847, 
the Eev. J. E. Dalrymple was inducted pastor. He resigned in 
1850, and was succeeded by the Eev. John Hogg. Mr. Hogg de- 
mitted his charge in 1855, and in 1867 was succeeded by the present 
very popular pastor, the Eev. Wm. Ormiston, under whose minis- 
try the congregation has so much increased, that although the 
original building had been considerably enlarged during the time 
of Mr. Hogg's ministry, it was found altogether too small, and the 
congregation, shortly after Mr. Ormiston's settlement amongst them, 
commenced the erection of a very commodious and beautiful struc- 
ture, which they at present occupy. It was opened for public worship 
in the early part of last winter, is built of white pressed brick, 114 
feet in length, by 68 feet in breadth, and will accommodate nearly 
1500 persons ; for this beautiful building the congregation are princi- 
pally indebted to the liberality of a tried friend of Presbyterian ism 
in Hamilton, and valued elder of the body, Calvin McQuestin, Esq. 

After this brief notice of the other Presbyterian Churches, we 
return to the congregation in connection with the Presbyterian 
Church of Canada. Mr. Gale and his people worshipped for some 
Sabbaths in the Secession Church, and aflierwards for about a year 
and a half, in the Wesleyan Methodist Church, John Street, while 
their own church was in process of erection. In 1846, the new 
church on James' Street, called Knox's Church, was opened for 
public worship. It is a neat and very comfortable building, built 
of stone, and was seated in the first instance to contain about 600 
persons, but it has been twice enlarged, first in 1850, and again in 
1855, and now holds about 1200. 

In 1847 Mr. Gale, having been called to the professorship of clas- 
sical literature in Knox's College, removed to Toronto, and was 
succeeded in the ministry of this congregation by the Eev. Salph 
Eobb, who after a brief pastorate of three years was removed by 
death, in the month of July, 1850. The Eev. George Paxton Young 
was inducted as his successor in November of the same year. Mr. 
Young was called to the professorship of logic and moral philosophv 
in Knox's College, and removed to Toronto in the autumn of lo5o, 
31 



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242 THS PRSSBYTBRIAN GHUBOH OF CANADA. 

and in May 1854 the Rev. Robert Irvine, D. B., was inducted, and 
remains pastor of Knox^s Church. 

This has brought us to the brief history of the McNab Street 
Church. For some time before Mr. Young's removal, Knox's 
Church was overcrowded, and the necessity for church extension 
was deeply felt. Daring the vacancy, it was agreed upon at a meet* 
ing of the congregation, to purchase a site for a new church, but 
that there should be no division of the congregation until after the 
settlement of another minister in Knox's Church. Agreeably to 
this arrangement, soon after the induction of the present pastor, the 
Presbytery of Hamilton, in compliance with a memorial from three 
of the elders of Knox's Church, appointed a committee to open a 
new preaching station in the city. Divine service was accordingly 
held in the Hall of the Mechanics' Institute, and about forty persona 
were organized into a congregation in August 1854. The little 
congregation went energetically to work, and towards the close of 
the same year a new and commodious house of worship, holding 
upwards of 400 persons, was opened for their reception ; only six 
weeks having been occupied in the erection. In the month of May, 
1855, the Rev. David Inglis was inducted as their first pastor. 

The names of the Trustees who disposed of the old American 
Presbyterian Church property, and handed the proceeds to the 
building fund of the McNab Street Presbyterian Church, are as 
follows: — J. P. Dickerman, Calvin McQuestin, James Osborne, Esq's. 

The names of the Elders who left Knox's Church, and com- 
menced the formation of the McNab Street Presbyterian Church, 
are Adam Cook, Robert Ewen, and Donald McLellan. 

The present office bearers of the McNab Street Presbyterian 
Church are J. Boyd, J. Brown, A. Cook, R. Hopkins, Plummer Dewar, 
Robert Ewen, A* J. McKenzie, Donald McLellan, Maitland 
Young, Sr., elders. James Buntin, Wm. Chisholm, J. M. Dingwall, 
William Mowat, George McKay, A. Skinner, Angus Sutherland, 
Maitland Young, Jr., deacons. 

The membership of the McNab Street Presbyterian Church at 
Mr. Inglis's settlement. May, 1855, amounted to forty-six. Num- 
ber joined since, 312. Number removed by death and certificate, 
fifby-five. Present number of members, 803. It was soon found 
necessary to enlarge the church accommodation, and in April, 1866, 
the foundation stone of the present spacious house of worship was 
laid. It was opened in Juno of the following year, 1857. 

The building of which the accompanying engraving is a sketch, 
is massive in its structure, and occupies a commanding site. It is 
built in the gothic style of architecture, of the beautiful stone obtained 
from the mountain, immediately in rear of the city. Its dimensions 
are 114 feet in length, including the tower, by sixty-six feet in breadth, 
and with the galleries will comfortably seat about 1300 persons. 

Hamilton^ Canada WesU 



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THX UKITKD PRXSBTTKBIAK CHURCH IK CANADA. 248 

THE SYNOD OP THE 
UNITED PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH IN CANADA. 



The twenty-second session of the United Presbyterian Church 
in Canada, was held in the Presbyterian Church of Hamilton, Canada, 
on Tuesday, June 1st, 1858, and was opened with a discourse by 
the retiring Moderator. 

John xvii. 20, 21. Neither pray I for these alone, but for them also which shall 
oelieve in me through their word ; that they all may be one, as thoa Father art in 
mei &c. 

Unity pervades all things, whether regarded as connected with 
the world of matter or mind. God, "in the fulness of time, gathers 
together in one, all things in Christ, both which are in heaven and 
which are on earth, even in him." 

At present, however, we have to do with the unity of the church 
only, and the number of scripture passages connected with and bear- 
ing upon this subject is truly astonishing. It is foretold and com- 
manded : the pattern of it is presented ; actual instances are given ; 
it is beautifully illustrated, and a goodly portion of our Saviour's 
intercessory prayer is occupied with it, while dissension and divis- 
ive courses are strongly condemned. 

Nor is this wonderful, for various reasons ; and it is not difficult 
to see that union among evangelical Christians is probably the 
great desideratum of the present day. Let us then consider the 
nature, necessity^ and means of the union recommended. 

I. The nature of the union recommended. It is evidently not 
one of mere external formal character. A family or a neighbour- 
hood, outwardly only, may be really full of division and heart- 
burnings ; and we know the state of the one Church of Corinth, 
"One said, I am of Paul, &c." 

The union enjoined must be spiritual. Christians, as our Saviour 
prays, must be "one in us." This leaves true independence of mind, 
and permits corresponding discrepancies, as may be seen in the life 
of Christ, given by the four Evangelists. But all enmity, malice, 
and selfishness are excluded, while candour, forbearance, and charity 
must certainly appear. Add to this, oneness of/orm, and the unity 
is complete. 

II. The necessity of such a union. 

Being commanded, it is proper, nay, necessary at all times; but 
we conceive it to be especially so at the present time. 

1. To stem the rising tide of Popery and Puseyism, which are 
probably making more strenuous and systematic exertions than at 



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244 PBBSBYTBBUN HISTORICAL ALMANAC. 

any former period. They are thoroughly drilled, obey one im- 
pulse, discover the secrets of families through the confessional, and 
seek to enslave by destroying our system of national education. 

Now, under God, the antidote to this is union among them that 
love our Lord Jesus Christ, so will a close united phalanx be pre- 
sented, and the greatness of truth then embodied must soon lead 
to victory in the overthrow of these human systems and the salva- 
tion of souls. 

2. To meet, advantageously, that religious indifference, if not posi- 
tive infidelity, which prevails among us to an alarming extent, 
especially among the young. Our mixed population, and diversity 
of creeds, and party spirit tend to confound young men who have 
not a good example and Christian training at home, and come 
among us; and it is difficult for the Christian to reach these and 
such like cases. Our mutual division, and want of brotherly love 
are speedily mentioned, in reply to any advice we may tender. We 
say to them, " Choose for yourselves ;" they answer: — "It is not easy 
to choose among so many. Besides, what benefit would be got from 
such a choice, for you all are about equally jealous of and bitter 
towards each other?" 

8. To enable the church to carry on, with more energy and suc- 
cess, the care of missions. 

There are many places at home, where Presbyterians can get no 
ministerial supply, because we are all employed in mere frontier 
positions, keeping up sickly societies, that look to the thought- 
less as if they were not columns of the same great Christian army, 
but hostile squadrons. 

Besides, our divisions cripple our exertions in the foreign field. 
To maintain the sectional position at home, needs both the men and 
the means that might have been employed successfully abroad. 
And to make the divisions more unjustifiable, it is doubtful whether 
there ever were a wider foreign door, or a more earnest cry, " Come 
over and help us," that at the present time. 

III. Notice shortly the means of union. 

No union will be of any real value without a personal subjection 
to the cross of Christ, and the presence and powerful operation of 
the Holy Spirit. But where these exist, the means both of co-opera- 
tion and incorporation are at hand. I notice, 

1. The Bible Society at present, a noble platform in which all 
who love our Lord Jesus Christ may stand, become acquainted with 
each other, and its unspeakable good to myriads. 

2. Evangelical Alliance, which lately at Berlin presented a sight, 
I believe, unprecedented in the Christian church ; while the best evi- 
dence of the importance of that gathering is found in the anger it 
excited among the ranks of Ultramontanism, High-churchism, and 
scepticism in Great Britain, France, and Germany. 

S. In many cases, incorporation ought to be resorted to. 

What is to hinder those bodies of the same families from uniting? 
For example, the Presbyterian family. I bless God because our 
church has set the example, first in 1820, and again in 1847 ; and 



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THK UNITED PBBSBYTBRIAN CHURCH IN CANADA. 



245 



I believe that we are ready to consummate a third, with the (Free) 
Presbyterian Church of Canada, between which church and us ne- 
gotiations for this purpose have been going on for the last ten years. 
May God speed it, if it be his holy will. Amen. 

The session was constituted with prayer. 

Rev. William Aitkbn, of South Falls, was elected Moderator. 



ilmlrtM Ittsent at Iteeting ai SunolJ* 



KUnBISBS. 



AiTKXX, Wm. 

Bass, Matthew 
Barrie, Wm. 

Caldwill, Ju. 
Cnsfile, John 
Oaran, Wm. 
Caw, Darld 
Christie, ThM. 
Christie, Wm. H. 
Gouttfl, David 

DxWAX, Robt 
Dick, Jas. 
Diek«on, W. 
Dmmmond, A. A. 
Duff. John 
Dnnbar, John 

FSKKIBX, D.D., And 
Fotherin^ham, Jno. 
Vraaer, Wm. 

GiBson, Jas. 
Olasslbrd, Peter 

Hxif oB&soNi Alex. 

IstoiUf Wm. 

Jakes, John 
Jennings, s.!)., Jno. 



Lanark. 

London. 
WelUngton. 

Wellington. 

Durham 

London. 

Brant 

Flamboro*. 

Flamboro*. 

Torontoi. 

Grey. 

Toronto. 

Flamboro*. 

Brant. 

Wellington 

Brant. 

Flamboro.* 

London. 

Toronto. 

Grey. 
TjrontD. 

Lanark. 

London. 

Wellington. 
Toronto. 





MXKIBTXBS. 


FRMBTTSST. 


ILSKES. 




KSXHXDT, Alex. 


Toronto. 


Wm. Dunbar. 




King, John M. 


Durham. 


Wm. Mathie«>n. 


James Bell. 








Henry Soott 


Lawsxncx, Geo. 


Durham. 







Lees, John 


Flamboro'. 


Jno. Robertson. 




Logle,John 


London. 





WmrMitchell. 










Hacihtobh, Jas. 


Durham. 


...... 


Geo.*McVicar. 
James Spence. 
B. Aberdlen,MD. 


Morrison, John 


Canada East. 





OKKieioH, A.M., W. Flamboro'. 


CMcQuestin. 












POBTKOU8, Jno. 


Flamboro*. 


Jno. Halcom. 


...... 


Pringle, James 


Toronto. 


Jno. Austin. 


And. Buchan. 


Pn>ndfoot,J.J.A. 


London. 


Jno. Crombla. 


Bobt Chriftie. 











RosoxM, Robt 


Brant 





Jos. Oeddes. 








Bobt. Sloan. 


ficoTT, Jno. 


Durhsm. 







Skinner, Jai. 


London. 


James Fraser, 


Jaa. Stewart 


Stevenson, Thoa. 


Brant 


D. M'Naughton 


...... 


Taylor, d.d.,m.».,J. Toronto. 


...... 




Taylor, D.D., Wm. 


Canada East. J.CBeeket 


M.... 


Thornton, U. H. 


Durham. 







Torrance, Bobt 


^VelUngton. 





••..•• 


Walker, Wm. 


London. 


...... 




Watson, Jas. 


Canada East 




Bobt Fleming. 


Watson, Thos. 


Lanark. 









Flamboro.* 


John Walker. 


Adam Ker. 





Flamboro*. 


Jas. Young. 


Jas. McFarlane. 




Flamboro*. 


Pat Thornton. 



Eeports were received from the Presbyteries of Brant, Canada 
East, Durham, Flamboro, Grey, Lanark, London, Toronto, and Wel- 
lington. 

The Committee on distribution of probationers reported the fol- 
lowing resolutions, which were adopted : 

Resolved, That no preacher or minister, who has not been re^larlj received into 
fall ministerial connection with the chnrch shall be eligible for nomination in a call 
by any congregation ; and that when he shall be received, he shall obtain appoint- 
ments only through the Committee of Distribution and the Fresbyterics in whose 
bonnds vacancies may be situated. 

Resolved, That should any preacher or minister see fit to withdraw his services 
from the church, from any cause whatever, except want of health, or necessary ab- 
sence from the country, his name shall not be restored to the list of probationers in or- 
der to receive appointments, except by the direct action of the Presbytery in whose 
bounds he may nave resided, as in the case of all preachers who are received for the 
first time into connection with the church. 

The following resolutions were adopted, in reference to the union 
with the Presbyterian Church of Canada : 

Resolvedf That this Synod is sincerely and earnestly desirous of union with the 
Presbyterian Church of Canada, and is fully persuaded of the practicability of such 



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246 PRESBYTBBIAN HISTORIOAL ALMANAC. 

nnioD, on grounds that will compromiae the principles of neither of the churches, and 
secure the harmooioos action of both. 

That the basis of union, when prepared and agreed upon bj the Joint- Com- 
mittees, shall be sent down for the cousideration of the Presbyteries and SessioDS 
of this church, with instructions to report on the same by the month of October, 
when a special meeting of Synod may be called for theur consideration, with a view 
to immediate union. 

The following resolution on Instrumental Music, was adopted: 

That the use of musical instruments in conducting the public worship of God is highly 

inexpedient, and order the Presbytery of London to use due diligence to see that the 

congregation of London cease from the practice complained of. 

Also on the independence of the church: 

1. That an address on the self-sustentation of the church, and the best means 
of attaining it, be drawn up and read from all the pulpits, that it be printed also, 
and circulated throughout the church ; one copy of it, at least, to be furnished to 
every household connected with the church, either by membership or adherence. 

2. That a Missionary Society be formed in every congregation of the body, and 
collectors appointed to take up subscriptions monthly or quarterly, as may be deemed 
most convenient for the people. 

3. That the existence of such a Society in the congr^ation requiring aid, be a 
condition of their receiving supplement out of the Mission Funds of the church. 

4. That Presbyteries be instructed to bring these resolutions under the considera- 
tion of the congregations within their bounds, and afford them every assistance and 
encouragement in carrying them out. 

Also on the suppression of intemperance: 

That the Synod deeply deplore the sad ravages of intemperance in the church, at 
well as in the world, and earnestly exhort all the office-bearers of the church to use 
their utmost endeavours by doctrine and discipline, example and influence, to arrest 
and remove this widely extended and destructive vice. 

That the several Presbyteries and Sessions of the church are hereby recommended 
to take such steps as in their judgment may seem most efficient for the suppression of 
intemperance, and for the maintenance of a pure and scriptural discipline on this mat- 
ter in each of their respective congregations. 

The thanks of Synod were then given to the Rev. William Or- 
miston, to the office bearers, and congregation of the United Pres- 
byterian congregation of Hamilton, for the accommodation furnished 
to this meeting, and also to the members of the congregation, and 
other friends, for the kind and generous hospitality with which 
they have entertained members of the Synod on this occasion. 

After engaging in praise, the Moderator announced that the next 
meeting of Synod would be held in the first United Presbyterian 
Church, Toronto, on the second Monday of June, 1858, at 7 J o'clock, 
P. M., and closed the session with the Apostolic benediction. 

WILLIAM FRASER, Clerk. WIUJAM AITKEX, Moderator. 



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THE UNITSD FBKSBTTK1UAN CBUBCH IN CANADA. 247 



S^UtisiUi at t^t Inittlt |mbsterian ^\vitc\ in 



PKXbBTTXKIXS. 



Brant. . . 
Canada East. 
Durham. . 
Flamboro'. . 
Grey . . . 
Lanark. . . 
London. . 
Toronto. . . 
Wellington. 



STATU) CLUUS. 



John Dunbar . . 
W. Taylor, ».». . . 
R. H. Thornton. , 
John Porteoua. . . 
Robert Dewar. . 
Alex. Henderson. . 
J. J. A. Proudfbot 
James Dkk. . . . 
Robt. TorraoM . . 

Total. . . . 



Miins- 

TXKS. 


CHVmCHBS 


Mission 

ruNii. 


IN^TITOTB 
FUND. 


SYNOD 
»UND. 


FORSIOir 
TVND. 


TOTAL. 




14 

6 


n 


»J2 


$13 
80 


f« 


^ 




18 


211 


40 


18 


12 


200 




15 


417 


172 


86 


50 


726 







11 





2 




22 




8 


... 


4 




... 


4 


12 


33 


291 


14 


22 


21 


848 


10 


18 


163 


82 


43 




288 


6 


7 


138 


37 


22 


12 


209 


60 


123 


91266 


400 


215 


263 1 


2164 



fist at pnisters. 



MIIVISTXRS. nLUBTTIKT. 


posTorricB. 


MimSTBRS. PBBSBTTBBT. 


POST-OFrXCB. 


AiTKXN, Wm. 


Lanark. 


Smith's Falls. 


Jambs, John 


Wellington. 


Gait 








Jennings, ]).i>.|Jno. Toronto. 


Toronto. 


Baisd, John 


Toronto 


Dumbarton. 








Barr, Matthew 


London. 


Harpurhey. 


Kb^nbdt, Alex. 


Toronto. 


Dumbarton. 


Barrle, Wni. 


Wellington. 


Guelph. 


King, John M. 


Durham. 


Columbus. 


Caldwsll, Jas. 


Wellington. 


Ftewartnn. 


Lawbbncb, Geo. 


Durham. 


Orono. 


CasKie, John 


Durham. 


Port Hope. 

St Mary's BUU 


Lees, John 


Flamboro*. 


AncastM-. 


Caran, Wm. 


Tx>ndon. 


Logie, John 


London. 


Hay. 


Caw, DaTld 


Brant 


Paris. 








Christie, Thos. 


Flamboro'. 


West FUmboro. 


Hacirtoss, Jm. 


Durham. 




Christie, Wm. M. 


Flamhoro*. 


Chippawa. 
Mayfleld. 


M'Faul, Alez. 


Toronto. 


C«ledon. 


Coutta, David 


Toronto. 


Mofiht, Robt 0. 


Grey. 


Walkertown. 


Cross, Arch'd. 


Brant 


IngersoU. 


Mont«ath, Robt 


Durham. 


Prince Albert 








.Morrison, John 


Canada J£ast 


Waddhig»n,N.Y. 


DBAS, Wm. 
D«war, Robt. 


Grey. 


WIsbeach. 
Leith. 


OmiiUTOii, A Ji., W 


.Flamhoro>. 


Hamilton. 


Dirk, Jas. 
DIrkhon, W. 
Drummond, A. A. 
Duff. John 


Toronto. 
Flamboro^. 
Brant 
Wellington. 


Richmond Hill. 
Thorold. 
West's Comer. 
Klora. 


POBTBOV9, JnO. 

Pringle, James 
Proodfbot,J.J. A. 


Flamboro*. 

Toronto. 

London. 


Kirkwall. 
Brampton. 

London. 


Dnnbar, John 


Brant 


Qlonmorrls. 


RiTCHiB, Alex. 


Flamboro'. 


Ayr. 
Derehun. 




London. 


Bayfield. 


Rodgera,Robt 


Biant 


Bwiiie,Johii 


Durham. 


Mt Pleasant 


ScoTT, Jno. 


Durham. 


Bath. 


Fbbbibb, » .»., And .Flamboro.' 
FotherinKham, Jno. London. 
Fraaer, .lohn London. 


Senem, 

KIrliton. 

Goderich. 


Skinner, Jas. 
Sterenson, Thos. 
Stuart, A. C. 


London. 

Brant 

Durham. 


Birr. 
Stratlhrd. 


f raser, Wm. 


Toronto. 


Bond Head. 


Tatlob, dj).,mj).,J Toronto. 


Toronto. 








Taylor, D.D., Wm. 


Canada Rast 


MontreaL 


CiBSOiv, Jan. 


Grey. 




Thornton, R. U. 


Durham. 


Oshawa, 


Glassford, Peter 


Toronto. 


Coleraine. 


Torrance, Robt 


Wellington. 


Guelph. 


HBiTDBRsoir, Alez. 


Lanark. 


Vitiroy Harbor. 


Wadobll, Alex.W 


'. London. 


Ridfcetown. 








Walker, Wm. 


Loudon. 


Chatham. 


ISIOLIS, WaltM- 


awy. 


Rlrermlale. 


Watson, Jas. 


Canada Kast 


HunUngdon. 


Inglis, Wm. 


London. 


London. 


Wataon, Thos. 







PERIODICALS. 

raBXOSICALiL rVBLISHCRS . 

The Cbmadian United Prttb/jfUrian Magagtnt, Committee of Synod, Toronto. JfenflUy. 
The PrabfUrioM Hittorical Mmanac Joseph H. WUson, PhibuU. AnmaL 



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248 



PBBSBTTSRIAN HISTORICAL ALMANAC. 



THE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH IN CANADA, 



IN COHMBCnON WITH 



THE CHURCH OF SCOTLAND. 



The Synod of the Presbyterian Church in Canada, in connection 
with the Church of Scotland, met in St. Andrew's Church, Montreal, 
on the 26th of May, 1858, and was opened with a discourse by the 
retiring Moderator, the Rev. George Macdonnell, on the text, tTohn 
X. 4. 5. 

The roll was called, and the following is a list of 

Pmbm $tesent at Iteeting nt 5pirlr- 



MimsTims. 



PRUBTTXXT. 



PBMBTTSmT. XLSB&S. 



Andssson. Danean Quebec. 
AnderflOQ, Jan. Montreal. 

Andenon, Joa. Batharat 



Baw, Wm. 
Barclay, D.D., Jno. 
Bell, Geo. 
Buchan, Alex. 
Burnet, Robt 

Campbsll, Jno. 
Cook, D.D., Jno. 

DAYiiMon, Jno. 
Boble, Robt. 

Fxxansox, dj>. a. 

GiBfov, GUunilton 

LixiMAT, Peter 

Macdohald, Don. 
McDonald, John 
Macdonnell, Geo. 
Maehar, D o., Jno. 
Maekaj, Wm. B. 
Mackerraa, Jno. H. 
Mackld, Alex. 



Bathnrat 

Toronto. 
Hamilton. 
Kingston. 
Hamilton. 

Toronto. 
Quebec. 

Olengary 
Olengary. 

Quebec 

HamllUm. 

Bathurst 

Olengarj. 

Montreal. 

Hamilton. 

Kingston. 

Kingston. 

Toronto.. 

London. 



Jaa. Venton. 



E. W. Thomson 



O. H. Boulter. 
Alex. Logie. 

John Thomion. 



Arch'd. Petrie. 



F. 8. Verity, M J. 
A. S. Cadenhead. 



Jas. A. Thomaon 



Maclenn^n, Ken. 
Maemorine, Jno. 
McPberson, Thoa. 
McVicar. Peter 
Mair, William 
Mann, Alex. 
Mathleaon, BJt., A. 
Monroe, Donald 
Morrison, Duncan 
Mulr, Jaa. C. 

Null, Kobt 
MlTen, Hugh 



Hamilton. 
Bathurst 
Olengary. 
Olengary. 
Montreal. 
Bathurst. 
Montreal. 
Oloigary. 
Bathurst. 
MontreaL 

Kingston. 
Hamilton. 



SiSYXRiaHT, Jaa. Quebec 

Simpson, Wm. MontreaL 

Suodgrass, Wm. Montreal. 

Spence, Alex. Bathurst 

Bym, Fred. P. Montreal. 

Thoksor, Geo. Bathurst 

UHQUHAmt, D.])., H. Olengary. 



Walkxk, AreVd. 
Wallace, Alex. 
Watson. Peter 
White, Wm. 
Whyte, John 



Kingston. 
Montreal. 
Olengary. 
Bathurst 
Hamilton. 



Alax. Kohertaon. 

Alex. Morris. 
0«>.MaUodi. 



D. Brymner. 
Thoa. Allen. 
J. Orsenahlalda. 
T. McDonald. 



Wm. Kaj. 
Geo. NeUsoo. 
Jaa. Grant 



On motion. Rev. George Bell, B. A., minister at Clifbon, was 
elected Moderator. 

The reports from the Presbyteries were received : 

The Eleventh Annual Report of the ministers, widows, and orphans' fundi was 
read. Daring the year the receipts were $4,285. 

The number of annuitants is eighteen ; three having been added during the past 
year. 

The Synod record their profound gratitude to Divine Providence 
for the continued prosperity of this valuable fund. 

Reports were read and adopted on Church Property, Jewish Mis- 
sion, Sabbath Schools, nature and power of a Commission of Synod, 



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THE PBESBTTBBIAK CHUBCH IN CANADA. 



249 



the formation of a General Assembly, Sabbath Observanoe, and the 
French Mission. 

Addresses to Her Majesty the Qaeen, and His Excellency the 
Governor General, were adopted. 

The Moderator then addressed the Synod, and after prayer and 
praise said:— In the name of the Lord Jesus Christ, the King and 
only Head of this Church, and in the name of this Synod, I appoint 
the next annual meeting of Synod, to be held in St. Andrew's 
Church, Ottawa City, on the last Wednesday of May, 1859, at 11 
o'clock, A. M. 

WILLIAM SNODGBASS, Olbrx. GEORGE BELL, Moderator. 



fist 0f linisUts. 



xnriBTxxa. 


nXSBTTXXT. 


poaTorncs. 


mHxsnu. 


PSBSBTTIET. 




AHDixsoir. Duncan Quebec. 


Point Levi. 


Haekid, Alex. 


London. 


Qoderich. 


Anderaon, Jaa. 


MontreaL 


Ormstown. 


McLaren, Robt G, 


London. 


London. 


Anderion, Jot. 


Bathurrt. 


South Gower 


Maelennan, Ken 


Hamilton. 


Paisley. 








Maanorine,Jna 


Bathurst 


Ramsay. 


BAXir, Ju. 




Searboro. 


Macmurchy,Jno. 


Tbronto. 


Eldon. 


Bain,Wm. 


Bathunt 


Perth. 


McPherson, Thos. 


Glengary. 


Lancaster. 


Barclay, D.B., Jno. 
Barr, Wm. 


Toronto. 


Toronto. 


McVlcar, Peter 


Glengary. 
Montreal. 


Martintowu. 


Toronto. 


Hornby. 


Malr, William 


Chatham. 


Bell, Geo. 


HamUton. 


Clifton. 


Mann, Alex. 


Bathurst 


Pakenham. 


Bell, WUliam 


London. 


Shakspeare. 


Manhall, Alex. P. 


Kingston. 


Kingston. 


Brown, John 


Ttnronto. 


Newmarket 


Masson, Wm. 


Hamilton. 





Buchan, Alex. 


Kingston. 


Stirling, 


Mathie8on.]>J».,A. 
Merlin, John 


Montreal. 


Montmal. 


Burnet, Robt. 


Hamilton. 


Hamilton. 


MontnaL 


Hemlngford. 








Miller, Wm. 


London. 


Stattfbnl. 




Toronto. 


, 


MoflDnt, John 


Montreal. 




Campbell, Jno. 


Toronto. 


NottowaMga. 


Monroe, Donald 


Glengary. 


Finch." 


Campbell, Jno. 


Toronto. 


Brock. 


Mowat, John B. 


Kingston. 


Kingston. 
BroekriUe. 


Cleland, Wm. 


Toronto. 


SoottJkUzbridge. 


Morrison, Duncan 


Bathunt. 


Colqnhon, Arah'd. 


Toronto. 


Mulmur. 


Muir, Jas. C. 


MontreaL 




Cook, D.D., Jna 


Quebec. 


Quebec. 


Mylne, Solomon. 


Bathunt 


Smith's Falls. 


DATiDaoN , Jno. 


Olengary. 


WmUmaburgh. 


Nkill, Robt 


Kingston. 


Seymour. 


Dobie, Robt 


Glengary. 


Canabrnck. 


NiTen, Hugh 


Hamilton. 




Etans, Darld 


Bathunt 


Kltlqy. 


Paterson, James 


MontreaL 










Paul, Jas. T. 


Montraal. 


StLouJsdaGoni. 


FBKouaoN, n.D. 0. 


Quebec 


Three RlTera. 


Porter, Sam'l. 


Toronto. 


Clarke. 


Ferguson, Peter 


Kingston. 


Kingston. 








Fraser, Thoa. 


Bathunt. 


Lanark. 


Rannie, John 
Robb, John 


MontreaL 


... 








London. 


Chatham. 


GxoROX, D.D., Jaa. 


Kingston. 


Kingston. 


Rass,D. 


Toronto. 




Gibson, Hamilton 


Hamilton. 


Gait 


Ross,W.E. 


Toronto. 


...... 


Gordon, Jas. 


Toronto. 


Markham. 








Grlgor, Oolln 


Glengary. 


Plantagenet 


Scott, Thos. 


Glengary. 


...... 








Shanks, Darld 


Quebec 


Talcartierg. 


Haio, Thoa. 


Montreal. 


...... 


Slereright Jas. 


Quebec 


Melbourne. 


Herald, Jaa. 


Hamilton. 


...... 


Simpson, Wm. 
Sinclair, Jas. 


Montraal. 


Laehine. 








Bathurst. 


Huntley. 


JoKNaoH, Thos. 


Toronto. 


Chln'quaoousy. 


Skinner, D.D., Jno. 


Hamilton. 


Waterdown. 


Johnson, Wm. 


Glengary. 


L'Orignal. 




Montreal. 


Montreal. 








Spenee, Alex. 


Bathunt 


Ottawa City. 


KIWG, Wm. 


London. 


....w 


London. 


WUUams. 








Stuart, James 
Sym, Fred. P. 


London. 


Woodstock. 


Lxwia, Alex. 


Toronto. 


Mono. 


MontreaL 


Russeltown. 


Lindsay, Peter 


Bathunt 


Cumberland. 








LlYlngston, M. W. 


Hamilton. 


Bimcoe. 


Tawsi, John 
Thom, Jas. 


Toronto. 
HamUton. 


King. 
WinlerbonriMw 


McCaijohet.S. 0. 


Toronto. 


Pickering. 


Thomson, Geo. 


Bathurst 


Benft«w. 


Macdonald, Don. 


Olengary. 


Lochiel. 








McDonald, John 


Montreal. 


Norton Creek. 


UBQUHAKT, D.D., H. Glengavy. 


ComwalL 


VaodonneU, Oe& 


Hamilton. 


Fergus. 








McEwen, Jas. 


London. 


London. 


Walkxb, Areih*d. 


Kingston. 
Mo^eaL 


BeUerlUa. 


McBwen, Wm. 


London. 


London. 


Wallace, Alet. 


Huntingdon. 


Machar,i>i>.,Jno. 


Kingfton. 


Kingston. 


Watson, David 


Toronto. 


Tborah. 


Meriutchi!ion,Wm. Bathnrat. 


Beckwlth. 


Watson, Peter 


Glengary. 


WUliamstown. 


Mackay, Wm. £. 


Kingston. 


Camden. 


White, Wm. 


Bathurst 


Blehmond. 


Markee, Wm. 


Toronto. 


Innifffll. 


Whyte, John 
Williamson, LT.,D. J 


HamUton. 


Arthur. 


Hackerras, Jno. H. Toronto. 

32 


Darlington. 


r.Khigston. 


Kingston. 










Digitized by VjOOQU 



260 PRBSBTTSRIAN HI8T0BICAL ALHAKAC. 

THE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH OF 

NOVA SCOTIA 



The Synod of the Presbyterian Church of Nova Scotia, met in 
Prince Street Church, Pictou, N. S., on Wednesday, June 16th, 
1858, at 7 o'clock, P. M., and was opened with a discourse by the 
retiring Moderator. 

2 Peter, i. 12. The Present Truth. 

Thb great truths of the gospel are unchanged and unchangeable. 
This must be the case from the manner in which they have been 
made known to man. They are not the result of human specula- 
tion, and therefore cannot share the fate of such enquiries, where the 
conclusions of one age are overthrown or are superseded by the 
more matured investigations of its successor. They are not the 
result of human discovery, and no subsequent progress of man can 
render them obsolete, or unfold any other or more advanced system 
to take their place. On the contrary they come to us by the inspi- 
ration of the Most High, — and as no new revelation is promised, 
we are to expect during all this sublunary state of things no sub- 
stitute for them. 

Hence in every age and under all circumstances the same doctrines 
are to be proclaimed to men for their salvation, and are blessed by 
God for that end. Christianity in its primal truth reaches man in 
the lowest barbarism or the highest civilization. The profoundest 
philosopher and the most illiterate peasant alike find rest and com- 
fort in the Saviour which it proclaims, and the lapse of time effects 
no change in its virtue. 

Yet in another sense each age has its peculiar truths to maintain. 
The enemy does not assault the citadel at every point at the samo 
time, nor at the same point in every age. And hence the defenders 
are called upon, according to the times in which they live, to defend 
particular portions of the edifice, and to exhibit more energetically 
those particular truths, which may be the subject of special assault. 

Besides, too, the truth in its development is progressive. We 
do not mean by this, that there are many new truths being discov- 
ered, or that any of the old become obsolete. But the principles 
of God's word are only slowly appreciated, and their full bearing 
only comprehended in the lapse of ages. And it has commonly 
happened that each period in the church's history has had some 
great truth to maintain. The storms of discussion are made the 
means of its clearer elucidation— circumstances in providence excite 
attention to it— experience teaches its value and importance, and 



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THS PBS8BTT£RIAN CHURCH OP NOVA SCOTIA. 261 

the peculiar vigour of the assaults of the great adversary upon it 
endear it to the hearts of the faithful. Principles which may have 
for a time been dormant in the word of God, or only partially ap- 
preciated, become thus established as part of the faith of the church, 
and are interwoven with its whole experience and practice. 

While therefore we are to "contend earnestly for the faith once 
delivered unto the saints," to preach the whole system of divine 
truth, to "keep back nothing that is profitable/' and "not to shun 
to declare the whole counsel of God," we must observe what par- 
ticular portions of the system of divine truth the times and situa- 
tions in which we are placed require us to hold forth most promi- 
nently. If we do not attend to this, though we may preach no 
positive error, yet our preaching may have the same effect as if we 
did. To preach morality, when men are trusting to their own do- 
ings, would be equivalent to preaching justification by the works 
of the law. But to insist mainly on justification by faith, when men 
are already running into Antinomian excesses, would have the same 
effect as preaching our release from the law as a rule of life. Will 
my fathers and brethren in the ministry then suffer an imperfect at- 
tempt to exhibit "the present truth?" 

In attending to this subject one general remark may be made in 
the outset, viz: that a peculiar characteristic of false teachers in the 
present day, is to assume the language and phrases of orthodoxy. 
There is no honest assault upon the truth in our times. All the 
operations of the enemy are carried on by sapping and mining. 
So that it is now impossible to judge merely by the language em- 
ployed, whether a preacher or writer be orthodox or not. 

I. We are especially called in the present day to maintain theinspi- 
ration of the scriptures and the authority of the whole word of Ood, 

Formerly infidelity attempted to prove the Bible a forgery, and 
the claim of inspiration for its authors an imposition upon human 
credulity. Now it has entirely changed its tactics. It now profes- 
ses not only to believe in inspiration, but to maintain it in its ful- 
lest sense. But it is only such an inspiration for the writers of the 
books of scripture, as is possessed by men of genius in every age. 
According to the advocates of this system, Paul was inspired but 
so was Shakespeare — Isaiah was inspired and so was Milton — John, 
the apostle of love, was divinely inspired and so was Byron, the 
apostle of misanthropy. This view is openly advocated by the West* 
minster Review^ a publication, conducted with eminent ability and 
extensively circulated among ourselves. It is the view of a large 
class of philosophical writers and of the distinguished Litterateurs 
of the day. It is a favourite idea of the Bationalists of Germany, 
and, worse than all this, it has lately been openly avowed by cler- 
gymen of the Church of England, as Maurice, Jowett, and McNaught^ 
if not also by some leading members of the English Dissenters. 

In connection with this, we may remark that the Old Testament has 
been made the special subject of assault, and we are particularly called 
upon to maintain the divine authority of the whole revelation of 
God. In former times the Old and New Testament have generally 



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262 PBBSBYTRBL^ HISTORICAL ALKANAC. 

sto6d together. But in the present day we hear the loudest com- 
mendations of the New Testament, while the Old is decried as use- 
less or worse. 

This error is far more extensive than the last, as it is held by many 
who hold most of the distinguishing doctrines of Christianity. In 
particular, the Christian public was not long since shocked by the 
open avowal on the part of Dr. Wayland, a man whose writings on 
moral science had won him a high reputation, that he did not re- 
gard the Old Testament as any part of the standard of divine truth. 
Those who have come in contact with the Baptists in this Province 
must have observed a tendency to the saipe view, and will not be 
surprised at the open avowal of it by one of the most eminent men 
of that body. 

II. We are at the present moment called upon to maintain the doc- 
trine of a Trinity of persons in the Godhead^ and especially of the Eternal 
Sonship of Christ. We do not say that there is any general revival 
of Unitarianism throughout the world. On the contrary we think, 
thatf in the United States particularly, it is dying out. 

My allusion is a local onel Hitherto as achurchwe havenever been 
disturbed with any discussions as to the person of Christ. The 
doctrine of his proper Godhead has been universally received, and 
the census of the Province scarcely exhibits a single avowed Unita- 
rian. But we should be prepared. "A little leaven leaveneth the 
whole lump." And that leaven has begun. James Morrison's 
works, giving a most earthly and sensual view of the Sonship of 
Christ, are most industriously circulated among us. In these, in- 
stead of being described as the Eternal Son of God, it is taught that 
he " became the Son of God when he was begotten in the womb of 
the Virgin Mary," — that he is the Son of God, because "God only was 
his father," and "the Son of Man, because he had Mary for his mother." 

III, We are in the present day called on to maintain the doctrines 
of sovereign grace against some peculiar modes^ either of denying them 
or of neutralizing them. 

The material progress which man is making, his advancement 
in the arts and sciences, and the improvements making in social life, 
have induced a boastfulness of spirit, which has been extended to 
moral and religious subjects. And hence in the present day those 
views which exalt man, and tend to give him honour and credit in 
his own salvation, are prominent and public; while Calvinism, which 
lays man prostrate at the feet of his Creator, is often regarded as 
distanced by the progress of the age. 

It is not, however, so much against the open denial of the doc- 
trines of grace, that we have to contend, as the spirit so prevalent 
of keeping out of sight the sterner features of the system — to clip 
ofif what we regard as its rugged corners, and plane down its rough- 
ness, that it may pass smoothly through the world. There is a 
disposition prevalent in the church, to insist on what is general, 
and to confine attention to the principles that are considered com- 
mon to all evangelical bodies. 

But more than this, there has been a strong disposition to modify 



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THB PKBSBYTKRIAN CHURCH OF NOVA SCOTIA. 258 

the system — to seek some middle ground — ^to explain its doctrines 
according to some prevailing theory of the human mind, and thus 
to harmonize them with human philosophy. 

In some instances they have originated in an attempt to amend 
the nomenclature of Theology — to exchange what is considered the 
scholastic form of a past age for a more scientific terminology suited 
to the present day. In this way some good men have lent their 
names to the speculations which have ended in the grossest forms 
of Pelagianism. This is the real character of what is called 
Finneyism, from the Rev. 0. G. Finney, and sometimes "Oberlin 
doctrines/' from his having founded his theological school at Oberlin. 

We are not, however, to regard the New School Presbyterians, 
or the advocates of what is called New England Theology as op- 
posed to Calvinism. This is supposed to be the case, but it is not 
correct. The adherents of the latter system speak of it as "Calvin- 
ism in an improved form." "It is," said one of its leading advo- 
cates, "not mere Calvinism, but it is consistent Calvinism. It is a 
revised and corrected edition of the Genevan creed," They in gene- 
ral agree with Calvinists in holding the doctrines of the divine de- 
crees, election, and the perseverance of the saints. But they differ 
from the "Old Calvinists" in denying the doctrine of human ina- 
bility, making man's responsibility commensurate with his ability ; 
also in denying the doctrine of the imputation either of Adam's sin 
or of Christ's righteousness, and of any covenant relations between 
Adam and his posterity, or Christ and his people, and of a definite 
efiicacious atonement. On these and kindred topics they have 
adopted certain speculations founded principally on certain philoso- 
phical theories of the human mind, which have led to every variety 
of error. 

The present is an age in which the Roman Catholic controversy 
is revived. Everywhere we see Rome putting forth extraordinary 
efforts, and that in her twofold form of the beast and the false pro- 
phet. Taking the beast to denote the Pope as the head of the ten 
kingdoms of Europe, and of the Church of Rome as a politico-eccle- 
siastical system, we behold desperate efforts made to reestablish 
her influence over the Governments of the world. Concordats have 
been entered into not only with Austria, but with some of the mi- 
nor Powers of Europe, by which in their civil administration, they 
are placed entirely at the disposal of the Church of Rome, and the 
power which she wielded in the dark ages is again in a large meas- 
ure restored to her. The same thing has been either attempted or 
actually accomplished in Mexico and South America. We do not 
say that in these countries the influence of Popery over the mass 
of the population is increased ; on the contrary, we believe that 
nothing is more certain than that it is dying out, and nowhere 
more thoroughly than in the very Roman States themselves. 

At home, every county in Ireland and every populous town in 
England has its Papal missionaries. In 1829, the Propaganda ex- 
pended nothing on missions in England, but in one year lately they 
spent the sum of £40,000. In our own Province we cannot 



Digitized by 



Googk 



254 PRESBTTBBIAN HISTOBIOAL ALKANAO. 

but have observed lately a great increase of activity in building 
chapels, training priests, and other means for advancing the inter- 
ests of the Church. 

And farther, the system of Tractarianisra or Puseyism, both in the 
United States and England, has been the means of a vast increase 
of the teaching of Popish doctrines, and has led a large number of 
the aristocracy and clergy of the Church of England into the bo- 
som of the Bomish Church. 

IV. We think that the one great principle which it seems the 
mission of the present age to establish is the spiritual character of 
Chrisis hingdom. 

Our Lord taught that his "kingdom was not of this world." When 
his disciples misunderstood its nature, he instructed them by the 
declaration, " The kingdom of God is within your Its subjects are 
spiritual. "Ye are not of the world, but I have chosen you out of 
the world." When men desired its establishment amid the pompous 
decorations of earthly grandeur, he taught them that " the kingdom 
of God Cometh not with observation." All its services are spiritual. 
"God is a Spirit and they that worship him must worship him ia 
spirit and in truth." "The kingdom of God is not meat and drink, but 
righteousness and peace and joy in the Holy Ghost." Its privileges 
are spiritual. When two of the favoured disciples asked that " they 
might sit, the one on his right hand and the other on the left, in his 
kingdom," he said, " Ye know not what ye ask," and he promised 
that their reign should be with him hereafter in glory. And, espe- 
cially, it is to be maintained and advanced by spiritual means. 
" If my kingdom were of this world, then would my servants fight. 
" The weapons of our warfare are not carnal." 

But another source in the present day from which we have to 
contend with opposition to the spiritual character of Christ^s king- 
dom, is from the Millenarian theories so prevalent. This heresy 
seems to arise at every period of great excitement, and considering 
the agitated state of society in the present day throughout the world, 
we are not surprised that it should have broken out with fresh vig- 
our. It is now maintained by a large number of the clergy both 
of Britain and America, and advocated by many of the most popu- 
lar writers of the day. 

In connection with the spiritual character of the Christian Church, 
as exhibited in the movements and discussions of the present age, 
may be mentioned its diflFusive or aggressive character. The pre- 
sent is the great missionary age. There have been other ages in 
which there have been missionary operations, but none in which 
they have been carried on so extensively and so systematically. 
The present is the age in which the missionary enterprise is first 
re^rded as belonging essentially to the character of the Churchy — when 
it has been shown to be her chief duty, and a principal end for 
which she has been instituted, to evangelize the nations. So that 
now any Church, that is not engaged in one way or another in ex« 
tending the gospel, is regarded as neglecting an important part of 
ber obligations. 



Digitized by 



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THB PRBSBTTSRIAK CHURCH OF KOYA SCOTIA. 



266 



But the progress of the church is still onward. Its goal in this 
age is its starting point in the next. Its present attainments form 
but the stage from which it takes a higher ascent. " Forgetting 
those things that are behind, she reaches forth unto those things 
that are before." What then is to be her next step ? 

More combination will be needed for that fearful conflict that is 
evidently approaching. Every student of prophecy is anticipating 
a struggle political and religious. Whether it will be the final 
struggle, preparatory to the ushering in of the Millennial glory of 
the Church, we would not decide; but in our view, circumstances 
in Providence, as well as God's word, indicate that it will be. 

But if there is reason for gloom, there is also reason for hope. 
Even should the skies grow darker around us, the christian has no 
reason to be disheartened. Among the shaking of the nations, the 
things that cannot be shaken will remain, and be is the subject of a 
kingdom that cannot be moved. 

What, then, though the years coming should travail in the pangs 
of a new birth, and "have sorrow because her hour is come," in a 
little she will no more remember her sorrow, for joy that a new age 
is born unto the world. Zion shall be redeemed with judgment, 
and her converts with righteousness. These judgments are simul- 
taneous with the dawning of the Millennial glory of the church. 
Happy they who are watching for the dawning of that day, and 
whose hearts are prepared by the Spirit of God for its blissful 
ohanges I 

After the discourse the sessions were constituted with prayer, and 
the following were the 

^tmbm $tesent st D:tttin8 at ^polr* 



MTKItTIXS. 


ntssBinotT. 


SLDn«. 


KXiritTnt. 


pmnBTTXBT. sLsms. 




PrinMSd.lBL 


>.>... 


McGregor, P. 0. 
M'Kay.y. MO. 


HalUhz. 


Don. Fraser. 








Truro. 


John Wasson. 




Tnaro. 


BaTldM'Curty. 


McLean, James 


Hallihx. 


Tbos. Fulton. 


Bayne, JamM 


PietoQ. 


Jas. Prawr. 


Murdoch, Jno. L. 


Halifax. 




By era, James 


Pictou. 





Murray, Isaac 


P. £dw. Island. 




Truro. 




PATTSKsoir, Geo. 


Ptetou. 


Jas. McLean. 




UalUkx. 







P. Kdw. Island. 


Campbell, Jno. 


Picton. 


....M 








ChrlKtie, Geo. 


Hallfiuc. 


■ ...M 


RomncK, Geo. 


Pictou. 


Geo. M'Connell. 


Crawlbrd, Henry 


P.Edw.IflUmd. 





Ross, KheneaerK. 


Truro. 


Thos. Fletcher. 


Ctinia, Jno. 


Trnro. 


Junes Putnam. 


Roy, Dark! 


Pictou. 


John M*Kay. 


TmAasx, Allan 


P. Idw. Island 




^SDOStncK. Robt 


Halfftix. 


Alex. M<Curdy. 








Smith, James 


Truro. 


Jas. A. Logan. 


ItonxjUASi, Dkt, 


Pletoa. 


•...M 














Tbomsoh, James 


Pletoa. 


Banl. Cameron. 


KmoL, D.D., Jno. 


P.Bdw.IdaiMkJaa. Bearitto. 








SlfTTLLOCH, Wm. 


Tniro. 


B. WJkrehibald. 


WA99SLL, Jas. 


Pictou. 


5 B.LangIl]e,1etw 
{ G.Tattrie,2dw'k. 


MTurdy, John 


Pieton. 


...... 


Walker, Geo. 


Pictou. 


IlughM'Kay. 


M'Oilvray, Angui 


Pictou. 


Colin M'Innlii. 


WyUle, Alex. h. 


Truro. 


Jofh. Thomson. 



Rev. James Allan of Cove Head, P. E. I., was elected Moderator, 
Reports were received from the Presbyteries of Halifax, Pictou, 
Prince Edward Island, and Truro ; which were referred to a com- 
mittee, which reported that 'the minutes had been generally care- 
fully kept. 



Digitized by 



Googk 



256 



PBESBYTBRIAN HISTORICAL ALMANAC. 



The Rev. J. L. Mubdoch, Chairman of the Committee on the Use 
of Tobacco, reported ; when the following resolution was adopted : 

That the Synod is gratified to hear that the use of tobacco is decreasing among the 
office-bearers of this Church, and the Synod strongly recommend the rising ministry 
to avoid acquiring or continuing habits which are of an injurious tendency, especially 
among the young in the church and in society. 

The Rev. John J. Baxter, Chairman of Committee on Colportage, 
reported, that during the year 5136 volumes had been disposed of, 
making a total of 50,000, put in circulation during the past six 
years. 

An overture from the Presbytery of Pictou, to the effect that 
Synod should take measures to resume the negotiations for union, 
with the Free Synod of Nova Scotia, provided that Synod should 
be prepared for similar action. On motion it was agreed that a 
Committee, Rev. Prof. Keir, Chairman, be appointed to wait upon 
the Synod of the Free Church at their sessions in New Glasgow, and 
state the step just taken anent the union. 

During the sessions, a deputation from the Free Church, with 
Rev. Prof. King as Chairman, waited upon the Synod, dnd after ad- 
dresses the following resolution was adopted: 

Resolvedf That this Synod express the pleasure and the ^tification with which 
they have received the brethren of the Free Church deputation, and listened to tlieir 
statements, especially in regard to tlie action of the Free Church Synod on Union. 
Cordially reciprocate their expressions of esteem , and their hope for the early success 
of the negotiations for union now entered on. 

On motion, the thanks of Synod were voted to the congregation 
of Prince Street, for their hospitality and attention to members of 
Synod, during the present session. 

The Synod adjourned to meet in James' Church, New Glasgow, 
N. S., on the fourth Tuesday of June, 1859, at 11 o'clock, A. M. 

Closed with praise and the apostolic benediction. 



PETER McGregor, Clerk. 



JAMES ALLAN, Moderator. 



Statistical Table of the Pt'esbyterian Church of Nova Scotia. 



PKEBBTTlStKf 


STATED CLTMKS 


i 


1 


lilt 

• - ~i 


1! 


Children in 8. 
Schools and 
Bible GasMS. 


li 


i 

P. 

Ii 


1 


ill 


i 


i 

1 




|f*U(kl. . . 


J. t. MuFdorli. 


1 


14 


1^'h68 


146 


1085 


$4646 


Mfi 


1 ±i?« 


63 m* 




rn2 


76WJ 


Pkt/JU, . . 


0. WaHti^r, . , 


14 


17 


UP 11.40 


227 


2086 


5088 


l.iM 


3W 


ea 2M 


4A1 


4 177 


12064 


?. kUt. IilanC 


J. h. ^t^Uaod. 


f 


1A 


fl'2 ! 167 


166 


677 


2003 


:m 


IflS 


$2, 74 


%m 


■J789 


6840 


TtiiriM^ . * * 


K. iKva. . . . 


n 


m 


tnu K66 


ISl 


1870 


4165 


43a 


4»& 


IW, 404 


2LHS 


■lUQ 


8201 




TotiL . . 


S9 


H 


U* 6381 


720 


6118 


10882 


3Cri4 


1207 


MOlltM 


783 


lu368 


34809 



Digitized by 



Googk 



THE PBBSBYTKRIA.N CHUBCH OP NOVA SOOTIA. 



267 



list ai Itinisttrs 0f i\t IrMbjttrian €\n(\ al 



PSZ8BTTZKT. POST OPPICS. 



AX.LA.!!, Jamet 

BAXTim. Jno. J. 
Bay no, Jaraes 
By era, James 

CAMxmox, Alex. 
Cameron. John 
Campbell. Jno. 
Christie, Geo. 
Clarke, Geo. M. 
Cravrford. Henry 
Crowe, Thos. S. 
Currie, J do. 

Fbaszh, Allan 

IIOXSTMA9, Bav. 

JoHXSTOX, Saml. 

KxiB, D.D., Jno. 

M*CxrLLOCH. Wm. 
M'Curdy, Danl. 
M'Curdy, John 



Prinea£d.l8l. Cove Uead,P.B.I 



Truro. 
Pictou. 
Pictou. 

Truro. . 

iralifax. 

Pictou. 

llalifkz. 

Halilkz. 

P. Edw. Island. 

Truro. 

Truro. 

P. Edw. Island. 

Pictou. 

Truro. 

P. Edw. Island. 

Truro. 
Truro. 
Pictou. 



Onslow. 
IMctou. 
Tatamagouehee. 

Brookfleld. 

Nine Mile River. 

8h««rbrooke. 

Yarmouth. 

9ht>lburne. 

St Peters, P.B.I. 

Noel. 

MaiUand. 

W. Polnt,P.B.I. 

Antlgonish. 

Harvey, N. B. 

Prinoetown. 

Truro. 

Wentworth,N.B. 
Miramlehi, N. B. 



MINISTZKS. 


PKZSBTTZBT. 


posT-orncx. 


M'Gilvray, Angus 
M'Gregor, P. 0. 
MKay, J. M. O. 
M'Kinnon, Jno. 
M'Lean, James 
M Leod, Jno. 
Miller, And. P. 
Murdoch, Jno. L 
Murray, Isaac 


Pictou. E. Branch, E. R. 
Halifax. Halifax. 
Truro. Parrsboro.* 
Pictou. W. Branch, E.R. 
Haliflix. Jjovr. Stewiacke. 
P. B. Island. Richmond Bay. 
Pictou. Merigomish. 
Halifluc. Windsor. 
P. £dw. Island ^^^ London. 


Pattzbsok, Geo. 
Patterson, Bobt. S. 


Pictou. 

P. Edw. Island 


Green Hill. 
. Bede<iui,P.E.I. 


Roddick, Geo. 
Row, KbenezerE. 
Roy, David 


Pictou. 
Truro. 
Pictou. 


West River. 
Up. Tx>ndonder. 
N.Glasgow. 


SzDoztncz, Robt 
Smith, James 


Halifax. 
Truro. 


Musquodoboit 
Up. Stewiacke. 


Thoiuox, James 


Pictou. 


West River. 


Waddzll, Jas. 
Walker, Geo. 
Wyllie, Alex. L. 


Pictou. 
Pictou. 
Truro, 


River John. 

New Glasgow. 
L.Londonderry. 



PERIODICALS. 



ThA PrnhyUrian Witntn, 

The Christian Tntiructcr. 

MinuUi of S'fnod, 

The Fresbylcriaa Sistorieal Almanae. 



PUBLISHZBS. 

JAMES BARNES. 
SYNOD. 

STATKD CLERK. 
JOSEPH M. WILSON. 



Halifax. iV. S. 
HiUifax. N. S. 
Halifax. N. S, 
PhaauU.S, 



Weekly. 
Monthly 
Annual. 
Annual 



THE FREE CHURCH OF. NOVA SCOTiIiA. 

The Synod of the Free Church of Nova Scotia, met in Knox's 
Church, New Glasgow, N. S., on June 17th, 1858, and was opened 
with a discourse by Rev. John Munro, retiring Moderator, from 
Rev. xi. 15. " The kingdoms of this world are become the king- 
doms of our Lord," &c. 

The sessions were constituted with prayer, and the following 
were 

^embers fttsent at Uteting 0{ Sp0l>. 



MI.VX8TZRS. 


PRZSBTTKET 


ZM)ZK8. 




PRKSBTTSZY. 


ZLBzas. 


Buaxr, Dun. B. 


Pictou. 


A. Robertson. 


)f unro, Alex. 


P. E. Island. 










Munro, John 


Pictou. 


John Frasor. 


C\MPBZLL, Alex. 


Pictou. 


John McKay. 


Murray, Wm. 


Halifax. 





Dtt»p, Wm. 


Halilkx. 





Ross, Chas. L. 
Ross, James 


Richmond. 





Kixo, Andrew Proil Halilkx. 


...... 














Stewakt, John H 


Pictou. 


Aninis Cameron. 


McTktosr, a. 


Victoria. 


....M 


Ptewart, John Jr. 


Pictou. 


Alex. Ross. 


McKay, Neil 


P. !;:. Island. 


H. Mcl^ean. 


Stewart, Murdock 


Richmond. 


...... 


McKensie, Ken. 


Victoria. 





SutberUnd. Alex. 


P. B. Island. 


, 


McKnIght, Alex. 


Halifax. 







P.S. Island. 


•..»• 


33 


P. £. Island. 


...... 









Digitized by 



Googk 



268 



PRESBTTKBUN HISTORICAL ALKAKAC. 



Rev. Alexander Munro, of Brown^s Creek, P. E. L, was elected 
Moderator. 

Eeports were received from the Presbyteries of Pictou, Prince 
Edward Island, and Richmond and Victoria, — which were referred 
to appropriate committees ; the Presbytery of Gape Breton did not 
report. 

An overture from the Presbytery of Pictou, on the proposed 
union with the Presbyterian Church of Nova Scotia, was taken up, 
and a committee. Rev. Prof. King, Chairman, was appointed to confer 
with any similar committee appointed by the Presbyterian Church 
ofN. S. 

The Home Mission Committee reported; when Synod voted forty- 
eight pounds ($192) for nine Catechists at Cape Breton, also thirty 
pounds ($120) to Woodville, P. E. I. 

The deputation from the Presbyterian Church of Nova Scotia, 
were introduced. Rev. Prof. Kkir, Chairman ; they addressed the 
Synod on the desirableness of the speedy union of the two bodies. 

The Moderator then addressed the deputation, expressing the 
pleasure with which the Synod had listened to their friendly greetings. 

The report of the Committee on Temperance was taken up and 
adopted, with the understanding that the Synod do not commit 
themselves to the principle of total abstinence, which it seems to 
indicate. 

Various reports on Sabbath Observance, Popery, &c., were pre- 
sented. 

The announcement of the deaths of Rev. A. Farquharson of Mid- 
dle River, Cape Breton, and Rev. Murdoch Sutherland of Pictou, 
was made, and a vote of sympathy with their churches and families 
adopted. 

The Synod adjourned to meet at Halifax on the third Thursday 
of June, 1859. Closed with praise and the apostolic benediction. . 
W M. DUFF, Clebjc. ALEX. MUNRO, Moderator; 



fijt 0f linisttr^ 



rBStSTTIEr. POIT OFVICS. 



BLAim, Dun. B. 


Pieton. 


Barney's Rirer. 


McKnight, Alex. 


Halilkx. 


Dartmouth. 








McLeod, D V. I{Qgh Cape Breton. 


Sydney. 


OhUntttLt Alex. 


Picton. 


Lccfaaber. 


McNeU, Donald 


P.R. Island. 


WoodvUle. 




Pictou. 

















Monro, Alex. 


P. K Island. 


Brown*s Creek. 


Duf f , Wm. 


Halilkz. 


LanenbuTg. 


Manro, John 


Pictou. 


Wallace. 








Murray, Wm. 


Haliikx. 


Comwallis. 


FOBUB, Wm. 0. 


Kichmond. 


Plaister Cots. 








Vrasar, Jus. 


Cape Breton. 


Boularderie. 


Ross, Alex. 


Halilkx. 


Harbour Oraea. 








Rom, Chas. L. 


Richmond. 


Whyfocomah. 


GURR, John 


Yletorla. 


Broad Core. 


Boss, James 


Richmond. 


Grand Rlvw. 


Habvst, Moms 


Halilkx. 


8t John's, N. P. 


Stislb, Howard D 


. Halilkx. 




Hunter, John 


Ualifhz. 


Halifax. 


Stewart, John, Jr. 


Pictou. 


Ktrltown. 








Stewart, John H. 


Pictou. 


New Glasgow. 


Kxv«, Profl Andrew Halilkx. 


Chaloaer'sGh'di. 


Stewart, Murdoch 


Richmond. 


West Bay. 








Sutherland. Alex. 


HalMkx. 


lAWreiieefowB. 


LTALL, Piq£ Wm. 


Ballftz. 


Chalmer'B Ch'di. 


Sutherland, Alex. 


P. E. Ii^Iand. 


New London. 








SutherUnd, Geo. 


P. B. Island. 


Charlottetown. 


MeTHTOtB, A. 


Victoria. 


St. Ann's. 








McKay, Alex. 


Halilkx. 


Hamilton, Bsr. 
Mnrnij Hwbo^r. 


THOBBvmv, Wal. 


Halilkx. 


Bermuda. 


McKaj, Nell 


P. K. Iiland. 










TIetorU. 


BaddsSk. 


WILSOR, Matt 


Gape Breton. 


BydnsyHbiM. 



PKBSBTTRKT. POST-OrnCS. 



Digitized by 



Googk 



tHlB 8TN0D OF NOVA SCOTIA. 



269 



Penanal Statistics of the Free Church of Nova Scotia. 



PRSSBYTERISS. 



CftpflBratoiL . . . 

IMUks, 

Pletoo, 

PrlnoB Edward Idand, 
Rlehmondl, .... 
Victoria, 



Total, 



*n 




CHURCHRS. 




i 






I? 


3 


ft 


r 


1 


r 


f 


1 


f 


7 


... 












160 




12 


14 


... 


10 




14 


73 


457 


102 


516 




18 


'I 


. 4 


AJ 


16 


15 


416 


104 


680 




9 




3 






80 


ISO 


121 


430 




8 


... 


8 






4 


80 


26 


2M 







1 


3 






8 


22 


80 


80 


82 


6T 


8 


28 


87 


60 


126 


1104 


682 


IMO 



I^mancial Statistics of the Dree Church o/Ifava Scotia^ 



PRESBTTEBISS. 



Gnpe Breton, .... 

HaliJkx, 

Pletoo, 

Prince Edward Island, . 
Kichmood, .... 
Victoria, 



TOTIL, 




88 



$1000 

8337 

1468 

1239 

801 

480 



8820 



IT-'- 



Hi 



27 



292 
70 

163 
27 

200 

2U 



1036 



III 



359 



*» B o 



m 



6 12 

7 87 

8 18 



37 718 89 196 801 82 28 8961 $19667 



f 



1400 
5200 
967 
214 
1080 



$2964 
9007 
8002 

1595 
2258 
811 



PERIODICALS. 



RAKSa. 



!%€ BedeHastioal and Miuioncay Rteord. 

lh€ MinuUa of Synod. 

Tht PmibyUriaii Hittorical AJmame. 



rUBLMHSKS. 

BYNOD. 

STATISD CLERK. 
JOSRPU U. WILSON. 



PLACW. 

BiOifttx, N. & Montblv. 
Halifax. X. S. Annual. 
Phdadelphia, U. & AnnnaL 



THE SYNOD OP NOVA SCOTIA, OF THE 

CHURCH OF SCOTLAND. 

Thb Synod of Nova Scotia, of the Church of Scotland, met in St. 
Jfunes' Church, Charlottetown, P. E. I., on Wednesday, June 80tb, 
1858, and was opened with a discourse by the retiring Moderator, 
Rev. Alexander Mackay, from 1. Tim. v. 17. 

After the discourse the session was constituted with prayer. 

Members present at meeting of Synod were 

Thoe. Dancan, Geo. Bojd. A. W. Herdman, II10B. Jardine, And. Lochhead, Jas. 
Mair, Alex. Macgillivray, Alex, Mackay, John Martin, A. McLean, D. Macrae, 
Francis Nichol, A. Pollock, Wilson, Ministers, 

Hod. John Holmes, Col. Gray, and Mcssni. J. McKay, Fraser, and Wall, Elder$, 

Rev. A. Pollock, Presbytery of Pictou, was elected Moderator. 



Digitized by 



Googk 



U(W 



PRESBYTBBIAN HISTORICAL ALMANAC. 



Various questious were brought before the Synod on Temperance, 
Popery, Psalmody, Home Missions, &c.; and after debate were dis- 
posed of. 

Rev. Jas. Mair was appointed a delegate to the meeting of the 
Synod of New Brunswick, and Rev. Thos. Jardine to the Canadian 
Synod. 

The Synod adjourned, and will meet in Pictou, N. S., on the last 
Wednesday of June, 1869. 

JAMES MAIR, Clerk. A. POLLOCK, Moderator. 



fist tti llinisttrj. 



HjLifa. 


ntSSBTTniT. 


rOtT OFVICS. 


ITAMS. 


PBZSBTTBBT. 


posT-orrxcB. 


BOTD, Geo. B. A. 


Haliftz. 


Halifluc. 


Mackay, Alex. 
MaoUae, D. 


P. K Island. 
Pictou. 


Belfiiit, P. E. L 


CHU8TIB,— 


HaUfkx. 


• M ... 


Mair, James 


Pirtou. 











Martin, J^hn 


Halifax. 


Halifax. 


DWP. Ja». 


Plcten. 





McLean, A. 


Pictou. 





Duncan, Tiiomaa 


P. K. Island. 


Charlotte Town. 














NICBOL, F. 


HalUkx. 


Hallfiuc. 


IIXBDVA2r,A.W.A X. Pletou. 


Picton. 














Scott, John 


HalUkx. 


Hallfhz. 


JABBINS, Thomas 


Hallfiix. 


Hallflkz. 


TVLLOCH,— 






LOCHBIAD, And. 


P. B. Idand. 


Georgetown. 


WnaoR,— 


Eall&z. 




MA00IU.ITB1.T, A. 


Plcten. 


Madennan*8 Mt. 









THE SYNOD OF THE 

PRESBY'N CHURCH OF NEW BRUNSWfCK. 

The Synod met in St. David's Church, St. John, N. B., on Wed- 
nesday, June 16th, 1858, and waa opened with a discourse by the 
retiring Moderator, Rev. James Law, from 1 Cor. ii. 2. "For I de- 
termined not to know anything among you, save Jesus Christ and 
him crucified." 

After a suitable introduction, attention was directed first to the 
object which engrossed the apostle's attention, and second to the con 
siderations calculated to justify his preference in illustrating the 
latter topic, the preacher referred with great eflect to the transform- 
inginfluence of the gospel upon the Corinthians. 

He showed that the knowledge of Christ crucified was not only 
the most excellent of the sciences, but that without it there could 
be little right knowledge of anything. God, himself, although re- 
vealed as to many of his attributes by his works, was only known 
in Christ. This knowledge was especially suited to guilty men. 
It, and it alone, revealed the way of pardon. This earth was not 
made that it might be a place of court intrigue, or a great slaughter- 
house, or a philosopher's cabinet, or a grand ware-house. No! it 
was made that it might form a resting place for the foot of the cross, 
and be the scene of the great work of redemption. The truths 
which the apostles proclaimed retained their ancient power. If the 



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THE PBBSBTTEKIAN CHURCH IN H. B. 



261 



like results did not now follow, the reason frequently was, the apos- 
tolic fervour, simplicity, or plainness of speech, was departed from. 
The preacher concluded by an appeal to his brethren in the ministry; 
to make Jesus Christ and him crucified the theme of their preaching, 
and to the congregation generally, to see to it that they each pos- 
sessed personal and experimental knowledge of the crucified Sa- 
viour whom Paul proclaimed. 



ilmhrs present st IJeeting at Spoi* 



rUtBTTZVT. lELUSt. 



AX.VXS, Wm. ▲. X. 


8t. John. 


A. McAlTee. 


Bkicnctt. Jm. 
Bennett, Wm. 


St. John. 


B. Kedey. 


Doitalu^ ABdraw 


St John. 












TxsKrc, Wm. 
Vowler, Jai. 


8t John. 
UirunichL 


Dr. Patterson. 



MIM1STZH8. 


PRUSTTXXT. 


ILDIBS 


Jack, LewiK, 
Johnston, T. 0. 


St. John. 
Minunichl. 





Law, Jas. a. ic 


HinmichL 


Jameg Main. 


Hackst. Hector 
M«cmast«r, Angus 
Miller, Wm. 


York. 
Miramichl. 
8t. Stephen. 


••••• 


Nicholson, Thos. 


York. . 





Salmon. .Tames 
Smith, Alex. 


York. 
York. 


James Sarage. 


TcKNBVLL, Jno. 


Bt.Stei)hen. 


J. McKenste. 



Glass. C. J. York. A. Moody. 

Gray, James St John. K. Woods. 

Rev. Wm. Bennet was elected Moderator. 

Various questions were brought before the Synod, and resolutions 
passed concerning the Sustentation Fund; Incidental Fund; Sabbath 
Observance; Home Mission, &c. 

The next meeting of Synod will be held in the St. John Presbyte- 
rian Church, St. John, N. B, on the third Wednesday of June, 1859. 



fist at W^mins. 



HAMSS. 




POST OTTICS. 


Altks, Wm. 


St. John. 


St John. 


Baibd, Junes 
Bennett, James 
Bennett, Wm. 


St John. 
St. John. 
St Stephen. 


Carlton. 

St. John. 
Bocabee. 


DoSALB, Andrew 


York. 


Hampton Ferry. 


Eloxs, Wm 


St. Stephen. 


8t Stephen. 


ys«v», w. 

Fowler, Jamsf 


St, John. 


St John. 
Honckton. 


Glass, 0. 


York. 


Prinee WUllam. 


Jack, L. 


St John. 
York. 


Springfield. 
Kichmond. 



PaESBTTBSY. POST-OVriCX. 



Law, James Miramlchl. 


RIchibucto. 


McKat, Hector York. 
Maem>iiiter, A. Miramlehl. 
Miller, Wm. St Stephen. 


Salmon RlTesu 

NewmiUs. 

BaUUe. 


NicHOLsox, Tkom. York. 





Salmov, James York. 
Smith, Alex. York. 
Stirling, Alex. 


Harvey. 


TranvLL, John St Stephen. 


St James. 


WHiTX,W.F. 





PERIODICALS, 



TheOtiUmial 
The.Pntbjfterian 



UstoiicdlMmanae, 



PVBLISHns. 

Bkv. wm. elder. 
JOSEPH M. WILSON. 



St. John, N. B.' Weekly. 
PhOaaapMa, IT, 8, AnnnaL 



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262 PRBSBYTSRUK HISTOBICAL ALMANAC. 

fistflrusl ShU\ at t\t Iresbsterisn ^Xitc\ in 

This is one of those Presbyterian bodies which was organized on 
this continent, in consequence of the disruption of the Church of 
Scotland, in 1848. The Synod of New Brunswick, in connection 
with the established Church of Scotland, soon after the disruption, 
felt constrained to express its sentiments upon that event. The 
resolutions adopted by the majority of the Synod were to the effect, 
that as this Synod was not represented in the General Assembly, 
it did not feel itself called upon to express any judgment on the 
conduct of the Church of Scotland. 

The Synod further resolved to continue " in connection with the 
Church of Scotland, as by law established." Although the resolu- 
tions aimed at avoiding any homologation of the principles of the 
Established Church of Scotland, after that Church had submitted to 
what the Free Church party regarded as the Erastian encroachment 
of the State, they did not fully do so ; nor could any person con- 
sistently remain connected with that Synod who aid not ap- 
prove of the acts of the established Church of Scotland, to which he 
would by such connection lend his influence, and with which the 
Synod remained in communion, although the parent church did 
not seek to exercise any jurisdiction over it. 

Accordingly, on the 17th day of March, 1845, three ministers 
of the Synod seceded and formed themselves into a new organiza- 
tion. The names of these brethren were John Turnbull, then 
minister of the gospel at Blackville and Nelson, Andrew Stevens, 
then minister of the gospel at St. Stephen and St. James, and An- 
drew Donald, then minister of the gospel at Hammond River,Norton, 
and Salt Springs. 

The smallness of the body, to which however further accessions 
were soon received, induced the brethren to resolve their Synod 
into a Presbytery. This arrangement continued until the year 
1864, when the Presbytery at its annual meeting held at St. Stephen, 
in June, was again formed into a Synod, which now consisted of 
three Presbyteries, one of which was afterwards divided, as at 
present; the Synod now consisting of four Presbyteries. 

At this meeting the style assumed was that by which the body had 
been previously generally known, and which appeared in a charter 
granted by the legislature: namely, that of the Presbyterian Church 
of New Brunswick. 

It will be noticed that, while the grounds on which the new or- 
ganization was formed were the attitude which the Synod of New 
Brunswick retained or assumed towards the present Church of 
Scotland, the new organization was not formally connected with 
any foreign ecclesiastical body. On the subject of the spiritual 
independence of the Church of Christ, it gave no uncertain sound. 
It was thought wiser, however, to form an organization which 
might hold precisely the same relation to all foreign bodies who 



Digitized by 



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THB PBBSBTTSRIAN OHUBCH OF M. B. 268 

held the same principles, without becoming part of, or assuming the 
name of any of them, and which might at the same time attach itself 
to the soil of New Brunswick, and endeavour to gather around the. 
sympathies of the youth and people of the province. It was also 
hoped that, in the course of time, all the persons of the province 
who held the rightful spiritual independence of the Church of 
Christ might fall in with such a body, in giving up their foreign 
relationships. This expectation was deemed the more probable, 
inasmuch a^ the circumstances which led to the disruption had no 
existence in New Brunswick. 

The Free Church of Scotland, and the Presbyterian Church of 
Ireland, at once entered into correspondence and fellowship with 
the new organization, which received much assistance and advice 
from a deputation from the former church, who were at that time 
in the province, and who, in their visits to various parts of the pro- 
vince, gave a luminous exposition of the state of ecclesiastical mat- 
ters in Scotland. 

For several years the number of ministers received from Scotland 
and Ireland was quite inadequate to the wants of the Presbyterian 
population. Latterly, however, several missionaries were obtained 
from both countries; and through the establishment of a Free Church 
College for the lower provinces at Halifax, Nova Scotia, through 
the liberality of the Free Church of Scotland, aided by local contri- 
butions, several young men, natives of the country, have been 
trained for the gospel ministry, and are now ministering to their 
long neglected and spiritually destitute brethren. 



THE SYNOD OF NEW BRUNSWICK 

IN CONNECIION WITH 

THE CHURCH OF SCOTLAND. 

Thb Synod met in St. James's Church, New Castle, K B., on 
Thursday, July 15, 1858, and was opened with a discourse by the 
retiring Moderator, Rev. Peter Keay, A. M., from 2 Cor. iv. 4. 
The glorious Gospel, &c. 

The sessions were constituted with prayer. 

Rev. Wm. Macrobib was chosen Moderator. 

Various questions were brought before the Synod, concerning 
the Home Mission, Temperance, Popery, &c., which were disposed 
of. The Synod renewed the order, requesting ministers to prepare 
a Historical account of their churches. ^ 

The Synod adjourned; the next meeting will be held in St. An- 
drew's Church, St. John, on the second Thursday of July, 1859, 

JOHN M. BROOKE, D. D., Clerk. WM. MACROBIE, Moderator. 



Digitized by 



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204 



FBSSBTTEBIAir HISTORICAL ALMANAC. 



fist at Slinisttrs. 



KAMI. 



PBZSBTTERT. P08T-0»»IC«. 



Brooks, J. U. od. St. John. 
DoxALD, W. A. x. St. John. 
FORBU, A. F. Miramlcfal. 

H«SD&Rto.v, W. MlramiehL 
Kart, p. a. x. St John. 



Fred«rlckton. 
St John. 
Dftlhonaie. 
N«w Oistle. 
KsBhwMk. 



PRZSBTTnr. POST OTVICX 



MC IJIRDT, 
Mnrrobie, Wm. 
Murray, Jm. 
Murray y Wm. 

Rom, John 

Ftewart, Wm. 
Steven-s Jamea 
Stofct» Da?ld 



MiniDiiobi. 
>IiranilchL 
St John. 

8t John. 

Mlnunichl. 
MiramichL 
St John. 



Tiil.uniDtae. 

Bttthumt 

Monkton. 

St John. 

Chatham. 

Xesti^ourhe. 

Woodatoek. 



THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY OF 

THE CHURCH OF SCOTLAND. 

Thb General Assembly met within the Assembly Hall, Edin- 
burgh, on Thursday, May 20th, 1858, and was opened with a dis- 
course from the retiring Moderator, Rev. James Robertson, D. D. 

The sessions were constituted with prayer. 

Rev. Matthbw Leish^an, of Govan, was proposed by Rev. Dr. 
Robertson as a fit person to be Moderator, and the selection was 
unanimously agreed to, whereupon Dr. Leishman took the chair; 
and the assembly being thus constituted, the Queen's commission 
to the Right Hon. Wm. David, Earl of Mansfield, appointing him 
Her Majesty's representative in this Assembly, was read with all 
due honour and respect. 

The Queen's most gracious letter to this Assembly was also read, 
and ordered to be recorded. 

Her Majesty's High Commissioner then addressed the Assembly 
from the Throne, and the Moderator replied. 

A Committee was appointed to answer Her Majesty's letter, also 
to name Ministers to preach before His Grace the Commissioner. 

The General Assembly agreed to present an address to the Queen 
on the occasion of her birth-day, and to Her Majesty and the Prince 
Consort on the nuptials of Her Royal Highness, the Princess Royal. 

The Procurator was authorized to draw from the Exchequer, the 
Royal Grant of £2,000, ($10,000,) and deliver the amount to the 
Finance Committee on the Royal Bounty. 

Various committees were then appointed, and reports subsequently 
received concerning the Protestant brethren of Piedmont, France, 
and Geneva; the Jews; also one adopting a "Memorial to Her 
Majesty's Government, setting forth the reason why the Church of 
Scotland claim an increase in the number of Scotch Chaplains in the 
Indian Service;" on Parochial Schools; the Home Mission Scheme; 
tlie India or Foreign Mission Committee; Education Committee; 
Sabbath-schools, and Popery. Synod ical records were examined, 
and generally approved. The Assembly concluded with prayer, 
singing of psalms, and the apostolic benediction. 

The next session will be held in Edinburgh, on Thursday, May 
19th, 1859. 

JOHN LEE, Clerk, MATTHEW LEISHMAN, Moderator. 



Digitized by 



Googk 



THE CHURCH OF SCOTLAND. 



265 



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266 



PRBSBTTSRIAK HISTOBICAL ALMANAC. 



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Digitized by VjOOQlC 



ALPHABETICAL LIST 



MINISTERS OF THE CHURCH OF SCOTLAND. 



HAMB. 



PSmBTTBST. rOBT-OFFlCB. 



Abbl, John 
Adam, Jits. 
Adamaon, John 
Adl«, V l> , Cha«. 
AdiA, Chas. 8. 
AIrd, Hugh 
Altken, B o., D. 
Aitken, Jaa. 
Aitken, Jaa. 
Alton, o D^ 
Alexander, Oeo. 
Allan, Alex. 
AlUn, Jaa. 
Allan, John 
Allan, Wm. 
Allan, Wm. 
Allardyoe, J. M. 
Allardyce, W. 
Anderaou, A. 
And«nion, Archd. 
Anderson, D.D., J. 
Andemnn, Jan. 
Anderson, Jaa. 
Anderson, Jns. 
Anderson, John 
Anderson, John 
Anderson, John 
Anderson, John 
Anderson, John 
Anderson, Jos. 
Anderson, Thos. 
Anderson, Wm. 
Annand, Thos. 
Archibald. Robt 
Arklay, Geo. 
Annstron;;, Jaa. 
Armstrong, M. 
A mot, D.D., DaTid 
Arthur, Alex. 
Arthur, Jas. 
Asher, Wm. 
Auld, Robt. T. 
Austin, John, M. 

Bain, William. 
Baird. John 
Balfour, D.D., Lewis 
Balfbur, Peter 
Balmer, Stephen 
Barclay, Jas. 
Barclay, John 
Barclay, D.D., T. 
Barnot. John 
Barr, D D., Jas. 
Barrack. John 
Barton. n.D., Angus 
Barty, n.n., Jas. H. 
Barty, Patrick 
Beatson, Henry 
Beattie. Wm. 
Begg, Wm. 
Bell, V. D., And. 
Bell. Bryoe, J. 
Bell. Darid 
Bell, James 
Bell, Patrick 
BaU,«4ephen 



Turriff. 

Aberdeen. 

Dalkeith. 

Dundee. 

Brechin. 

Paisley. 

Jedbm^gh. 

Irvine. 

Paisley. 

BIggar. 

Paisley. 

Aberdeen. 

Irrine. 

Aberdeen. 

Fortkr. 

Arbroatb. 

Selkirk. 

Btrathbogle. 

Strathbogie. 

Kineardi'e O'N. 

Cupar. 

Cupar. 

Perth. 

Arbroatlk. 

North Isles. 

Perth. 

Annan. 

Dalkeith. 

Stirling. 

Dumfries. 

Lanark. 

Calrston. 

Strathbogie. 

Hamilton. 

Arbroath. 

Weem. 

BIggar. 

Edinburgh. 

Glasgow. 

Glasgow. 

Aberlonr. 

Perth. 

Dumftiei. 

Kirkcaldy. 

KelM). 

Edinburgh. 

Stirling. 

fltjanrasr. 

Burraroe. 

Wigtown. 

Edinburgh. 

Lochcarron. 

Glasgow. 

Fordoun. 

liangholm. 

Meigle. 

Melgle. 

Ulst 

Kirkwall. 

Linlithgow. 

Linlithgow. 

Hamilton. 

KirkpaUy. 

Haddington. 

Arbroath. 

Ghimslde. 



Vorgue. 

Aberdeen. 

Dalkeith. 

Dundee. 

Brechin. 

Glasgow. 

Hawick. 

Kilmamoelc. 

Paisley. 

Dolphinton. 

Psisley. 

Aberdeen. 

Kilmarnock. 

Aberdeen. 

Forlkr. 

Carnoustie. 

Melrose. 

Rhynle. 

BaniT 

Bsllater. 

Newburgh. 

liSdybank. 

Bridge of Earn. 

Forfkr. 

KIrkwalL 

Perth. 

Annan. 

Dalkeith. 

Denny. 

Dumfries. 

Abini 



Keith. 

Airdrie. 

Chsnce Tnn. 

PItlochrie. 

Sklrilng. 

Edinburgh. 

Glssgow. 

Glasgow. 

BallindaUocb. 

Perth. 

Dumfries. 

MarkindL 

Kelso. 

Colinton. 

Alloa. 

Stranraer. 

Mid. A S. Ten. 

Newton-Stuart 

Currle. 

Lochcsrron. 

Glasgow. 

Stoneharen. 

Canonble. 

Gonpar-Angus. 

MelKle. 

Lncbmaddy. 

Kirkwall. 

Falkirk. 

Llnllthsow. 

Coatbridge. 

Marklnrh. 

Hsddlngton. 

ArbroAth. 

Ayton. 



XAMB. 



PRSSBTTSBT. POST-OTFIOB. 



Bennet, B.D., And. 
Bennet, David 
Bethune, A. S. 
Bereridge. J. 0. 
BIggar, J. B. 
Blrkmyre, B.n., J. 
BIsset, oj>., James 
Bhick, Jas. 
Blackwood, W. B. 
BUikle. John 
Blair, Chas. 
Blair, John 
Blair, John 
Blair, Saml. 
Blake, J. L. 
Boag, Geo. 
Boe, Jas. 
Bonallo, DsTid 
Bonar, And. R. 
Booth, P. 
Bower, John 
Bowie, Mat 
Boyd. A. K. H. 
Boyd, Bn., Jas. 
Boyd, W. L. G. 
Brander, !>.]>., A. 
Branks. Wm. 
Bremner, l>.D., R, 
Brewster, David 
Brewster, Henry 
Brewster, Pat. 
Brewster, Wm. 
Bromfleld. R. 0. 
Brotchle, Jas. 
Brotherston, D-D., P 
Brown, Alex. 
Brown, And. 
Brown, B. 0. 
Brown, David 
Brown, J. C. 0. 
Brown, D n., J. R. 
Brown, John 
Brown, Peter 
Brown, Thos. 
Brown, Thos. 
Browne, And. 
Bryce, John 
Bryden. M. J. 
Bttchan, v.n., C. F. 
Buchanan, Arch. 
Buchanan, John 
Buchanan, b.d., T. 
BulKt, o.n., Geo. 
Burnet, Wm. 
Burnett Thos. 
Bums, G. 8. 
Bams, Jas. 
Bums, John 
Bums, Thos 
Burt, AIhx. 
Byers, John 

CssAB. Jas. 
Capsar, Wm. 
Csird. John 
Calder, John 
Cameron, Danl 



PenPoint. 

Stranraer. 

Lewis. 

Dalkeith. 

Ayr. 

Kdlnburi^ 

Garioch. 

Arbn)ath. 

Edinburgh. 

Kirkcaldy. 

Chirasidew 

Ayr. 

Ayr. 

Kirkcudbright 

Peebles. 

Linlithgow. 

Dunblane. 

Auchterardsr. 

Edinburgh. 

Peebles. 

Aberdeen. 

Kirkcaldy. 

Dumfries. 

Glasgow. 

Greenock. 

Elgin. 

LInUthgow. 

Fordyee. 

Annan. 

Brschln. 

Paisley. 

Ellon. 

Kelso. 

North Isles. 

Stirilng. 

Dunoon. 

Stirilng. 

Hsmilton. 

Kirkcaldy. 

Cupar. 

Greenock. 

Olnaflrth. 

Glasgow. 

Greenock. 

Perth. 

Irvine. 

Irvine. 

Kirkcaldy. 

Fordoun. 

Edinburgh. 

Dunoon. 

Perth. 

Ft Andrews. 

lAngbolm. 

Garioch. 

Paisley. 

Nairn. 

St. Andrews. 

Lanark. 

Kinross. 

Linlithgow. 



Dumfries. 

Stranraer. 

Storaoway. 

Mussel bur|^ 

Mauchline. 

Edinburgh. 

Old Meldram. 

Arbroath. 

Kdlnburyh. 

Kirkcaldy. 

Berwick. 

Ayr. 

Maybole. 

Castle-Douglao. 

Stobo. 

Winchburg. 

Dunblane. 

Brsoo. 

Edinburgh. 

Inverloltheo. 

Aberdeen. 

Kinghora. 

Dumfries. 

Glasgow. 

Largs. 

klgfn. 

Linlilbgow. 

Bsnff. 

Annan. 

Brpchln. 

Paisley. 

Ellon. 

Kelso. 

Kirkwall. 

Alloa A PIIUV. 

Rothesay. 

Stirling. 

Airdrie. 

lisven. 

Cupar. 

Greenock. 

Whalsay. 

Glssgow. 

Greenock. 

Perth. 

Beith. 

Saltcoats. 

KirkraldT. 

Anchlnbiaa. 

Leith. 

Rothesay. 

Perth. 

St Andrews. 

Canonble. 

Old SItfldrum. 

Johnston. 

Nairn. 

St Andrews. 

I<esmahaguw. 

Kinross. 

Bathgate. 



Arbroath. Csraonstle. 

Haddington. Tranent. 
Glasgow. West Park. 

Glasgow. Partlek. 

Chlrnslds. Ayton. 

(267) 



Digitized by 



Googk 



268 



PRESBYTERIAN HISTORICAL ALMANAC. 



PBKIBTTBRT. rOiT-omCB. 



Cameron, Peter 

Gitnuron, W. 
C»mpbc>II, D.D., A. 
CamplxrII, Alex. 
C&inpbell, Alex. 
Camphfll. Alex. 
CiimpU)!!, Arch. 
CiiiDpbtflU C. F. 
Campbell, Don. 
Campbell, D. N. 
Campbell, Dug. 
Campbell, Duo. 
Campbell, Dun. 
Campbell. Dun. 
Campbell. Geo. 
Campbell, G«o. 
Campbell, J. R. 
Campbell, Ja«. 
Campltcll, J. 
Ctiuipbell, J as. 
Campbell, J. J. 
Cninpbvll, John 
Campbell, Uan. 
Campbell. H. 
Carriek, >Vm. 
Caskay, Joa. 
CaAfila, Jaa. F. 
Cbalmers, 9.O., P. 
Chapman, Alex. 
Char I us, D D., Jan. 
ChHiies. John 
Chartoriit, Jna. 
CUarterU, John 
Chreo. Chaa. 
ChilBtlc, John 
Christie. John 
Chriatiatm, Alex. 
Christ ison. J. 
ChryaUl, Jas. 
Clark, Jan. 
Clark, John 
Clark, D D., John 
Clark, John 
Clarke, John 
Clerk, Arch. 
Clerk, Duncan 
Clouaton, Chas. 
Cochrane, J. 
Crichrane, M. 
Cock. John 
CoUllIa, Geo. 
CoWUie, W. 
Col Tin, John 
ColTln, W. L. 
Cook, Geo. 
Cook, D.D., John 
Cook, DD.,John 
Copland, Robt 
Corbet, Adam 
Cordiner. Chaa. 
Corson, Wm. 
Cosens, Alex. 
Cowan, Saml. 
Cowie, Wm. 
Crals, A. 
Cralk. D D., Jaa. 
Crnwfurd, Jas. 
Crawford, John 
Crawford, D D.. T. J. 
Crawford, A. U. 
Crlchton, Jas. 
Ciichton, John 
Crockot, John 
Cromblt*. D S., J. 
Cron. Wm. 
Crosbin, John 
Crudon. JamM 
CrulcRshf.nk, F. 
CrulckRhank, DS.,J 
CruiokMhank, J. 
CralckHhank, J. 
Crulckshank, J. 
Camming. J. E. 
Cunningham, A. 



Dundee. 

Weeui. 

Lochcarron. 

IrTine. 

Kintyre. 

Weem. 

Forfkr. 

Lorn. 

KIntyre. 

Inverary. 

Lorn. 

KIntyre. 

Dnnkeld. 

Inverary. 

Pumbarton. 

Tain. 

Paialey. 

KIntyre. 

Peebles. 

Hamilton. 

Cupar. 

Stranraer. 

Weem. 

Mull. 

Chauonrj. 

Hamilton. 

North Isles. 

Fordyce. 

Dunfermline. 

Turriff. 

Wigtown. 

Fordoun. 

Peebles. 

Lerwick. 

Meigle. 

Arbroath. 

Allbrd. 

Chlrnslda. 

Blggar. 

Ayr. 

Greenock. 

Edinburgh. 

Dunoon. 

Auehterarder. 

Aberlour. 

Abertarff. 

Mull. 

Carlston. 

Cupar. 

Qlasgoir. 

Deer. 

Iiangholm. 

Glasgow. 

Glasgow. 

Kdlnbnrgh. 

KincardineO'N 

Bt. Andrews. 

Haddington. 

Aberdeen. 

Aberdeen. 

Deer. 

Ayr. 

Blif(?ar. 

Kirkcudbright 

Strathbogle. 

Jedburgh. 

Glasgow. 

Ayr. 

Dalkeith. 

Edinburgh. 

Ayr. 

Fordyce. 

Hamilton. 

Dumfries. 

Perth. 

Brechin. 

Haddington. 

Turriff. 

Brechin. 

Turriff 

Btrathbogla. 

IrTlne. 

Turriff. 

Perth. 

Jedboigh. 



DundtH). 

Dunkeld. 

Dingwall. 

Irvine. 

Campbelton. 

Aberfeldy. 

Forfar. 

Oban. 

Ardrossan. 

I/ichgllphead. 

Oban. 

Campbelton. 

Pitlochrie. 

Ixichgllphead. 

Luss. 

Tain. 

GIssgow. 

Tarbert. 

Traqualr. 

Clerkston. 

Newport, Fife. 

Ptrsnraer. 

Killin. 

Aroe. 

InTemesa. 

East Kilbrida. 

Banff!** * 

Dunfermline. 

Fyvle. 

Kirkowan. 

Laurencekirk. 

Noblehousa. 

Lerwick. 

Kirriemuir. 

Arbroath. 

Mossat. 

Berwick. 

Blggar. 

Cumnock. 

Largs. 

Edinburgh. 

Dunoon i Kll. 

Auehterarder. 

Craigpllachie. 

Fort William. 

Oban. 

BtromnsM. 

Cupar. 

Glasgow. 

Mintlaw. 

Canonbie. 

Glasgow. 

Glasgow. 

Cramond. 

Klncardi'e 0»N 

Bt Leonards. 

Haddington. 

Alterdeen. 

Aberdeen^ 

»Iintlaw. 

Oinran. 

Ranhan Mill. 

Castle-Douglaa. 

Huntly. 

Jedburgh. 

Glasgow. 

May bole. 

Ford. 

Kdlnbufgb. 

IrTlne. 

Buckle. 

Hamilton. 

Dumfries. 

Perth. 

Brechin. 

Prestonkirk. 

Banff. 

Brechin. 

FyTle. 

Craigellaehie. 

Bt^Tenston. 

Turriff, 

Perth. 



PBBSBTTBBT. POST-OFriCK. 



Cunningham, J. 


Auchterard*'r. 


Crieff. 


Cunningham, J. 


Auehterarder. 


Stirling. 


Curdle, Jas. 


KIntyre. 


Fayinloan. 


Currle, John J. 


Dundee. 


Dundee. 


Currie, J. 11. 


Lochmaben. 


Lofkerby 


Currle, Itobt. 


Dunfermline. 


Dunfermline. 


CuRhny, Alex. 




Pitraple. 


Cuiihny, John 


Elgin. 


Fochabers. 


Cushny, Robt 


Strathbogle. 


Fochabers. 


Dalzibl, Wm. 


Caithness. 


Thurso. 


Davidson, A. 


Edinburgh. 


Leith. 


Davidson, Geo. 


KincardiueO'N 


Davidaon,G.M. 


Caithness. 


Watten. 


Davidson, G. 8. 


Perth. 


Perlh. 


Dsvidson, John 


Ayr. 


Kilmarnock. 


Davidson, John 


Garioeh. 


Keith HaU 


Davidson, Pat. 


Garioeh. 


Inscb. 


Davidson, Robt 


Dumfriea. 


Dumfries. 


Davidson. Thos. 


Dunse. 


Dunae. 


Davidson. W. 


Bt Andrews. 


Leven. 


Dawson, T. H. 


Garioeh. 


Moneymusk. 


Dewar, Donald 


DumhartOD. 


Dumbarton. 


Dewar, Duncan 


Weem. 


Aberfeldy. 


Dewar, Hugh 


Hamilton. 


Hamilton. 


Dewar, Jaa. 


Dunoon. 


Calmdow. 


Dewar, Jas. 


Isia A Jura. 


Bowmore. 


Dewar, Jaa. 


I»la k Jura. 


Bowmore. 


Dewar, Thos. 


Aliwdeen. 


Aberdeen. 


Dickie, David 


Irvine. 


Kllmainock. 


Dickson, Geo. 


Bt Andrews. 


Anstruther. 


Dickson, John J. 


Dumfriea. 


Dumfries. 


Dickson, W. P. 


Ft. Andraws. 


Bt. Andrews. 


Dill, Wm. 


Stranraer. 


Girvan. 


Dingwall, 0. 


Tnrriff. 


Turriff. 


Doble, Hugh 


Lochmaben. 


Dumfries. 


Doble, Wm. 


Dalkeith. 


Mussel buigh. 

Mellvllle Ch. 1 


Dodds. Jaa. 


Brechin. 


Donald. Jas. 


Deer. 


Peterhead. j 
Banquhar. 


Donaldson, J. 


Penpont 


Douglas, A. B. 


Dunfermline. 


Dunfermline. 


DrumwnndfDsT. 


Chlmsida. 


Grant's Hoiaie. 


Drummond, David 


Weem. 


Aberfeldy. 


Drummond, J. 


Fordoun. 


Btonehsven. 


Drummond, T. 


Haddington. 


Hsddlngton. 


Duff, Alex. 


Fortkr. 


Kirriemuir. 


Duff. D D., David 


Weem. 


Ken more. 


Duff, Henry 


P^lnburgh. 


Leith. 


Duguld, s s., Wm 


Strathbogle. 


Huntly 


Dunbar, D.D., W. 


Lochmaben. 


liockerby. 
Thonihill. 


Dunbar, W. B. 


Penpont 


Duncan, A. B. 


Dunfermline. 




Duncan, Alex. 


Ayr. 


Ayr. 


Danean, David 


Perth. 


Newbnrt^ 


Duncan, John 


Klrkc«ldy. 




Duncan, John 


Cupar. 


Kewburgh. 


Duncan, Jos. R. 


Dumfries. 


Dumfries. 


Dun ran, 1) D., T. T. 


Dumfries. 


Dumfries. 


Dunlop, David 


Dunse. 


Dunse. 


Dun lop. John 


Dunse. 


Dunse. 


Dunn, Jaa. 


Hamilton. 


Wishaw. 


Dunn, Wm. 


Dumbarton. 


Dumbarton. 


Dykes, Thos. 


Ayr. 


Ayr 


Eastor, Jas. 


Garioeh. 


Old Meldram. 


Edgar. And. 


Dunoon. 


Greenock. 


Eduar, John 


Chirnslde. 


Berwick. 


Elder, Wm. 


Dundee. 


Dundee. 


Esdaile. David 


Forfiir. 


Forfar. 


Ewen, John 


Jedburgh. 


Bawlck. 


Faiblie. Arch. 


North IslM. 


Kirkwall. ' 


Fairlle, Jas. 


Ayr. 


Nauchline. ' 


Falrweather. R. 


Aberdeen. 


Aberdeeii. 


Falconer. Alex. 


Btiriing. 


Denny. 
Turriff. 


Falroner, John 


Turriff. 


Farquharson, J. 


Belklrk. 


Belkirk. 


Farrles, Peter 


Forres. 


Forres. 


Fergus, John 


CalthnsM. 


Bower. 


Ferguson, A. M. 


Klnroes. 


Btiriing. 


Ferguson, Jss. 


Strsnraar. 


Btranraer. 


Ferguson, John 


Jedburgh. 


Jedbur^ 
Greenock. 


Ferguson, Mar. 


Dunoon. 


Ferguson, Wm. 


Kinroas. 


Kinross. 


Fergusson, SA, J. 




BlairMtaa. < 



Digitized by 



Googk 



THE CHUBCH OF SCOTLAND; 



26» 



FBSSBTTraT. 



FOtT OVFICS. 



Terguraon, Saml. 
f iddoe, U. 
Ftndlny, J. 
Findlay, Wm. 
FindUy, Wm. 
Fhher, Matt. 
Fisher, Kobt F. 
Flaming, Arch. 
Fleming, Darld 
Fleming, Jaa. 
rUming, Jobs 
Fleming, Thoi. 
Fnjxvro, iHrid L. 
Fngo. John L. 
Forbes, John 
Forbes, John 
Forrester, A. Sf . 
Forsyth, n a. J. 
Forsyth, Jas. 
Forsyth, Wm. 
Fowler, 9 D., J. a 
Frasar, And. 
Fraser, Darid 
Traser, Donald 
Fraser, Jas. 
Fmwr, Jas. 
Frtjit^r, John 
FriKM, Kobt. W. 
Fr i»'r, Roderleic 
Fraser, Simon 
Fmspr, Thos. 
Fraser, Wm. 
Fratier, Wm. 
Vreooh, Jaa. 

Gafv, Wm. 
Gardiner, Jm. 
Gardiner, D.D., M. 
Gardner, Alex. 
Gardner, J. 
Gardner, Jaa. 
Gabble, Wm. 
OHmmell, J. 
Qlbb, Geo. 
Gibbon, Chas. 
Gibson, Henry 
Gibson, on., Ja«. 
Gibson, Jaa. 
Gibson, John 8. 
CI (Ten, Cor. 
Gilchrist, John 
Glllan, Geo. O. 
Glliaa« Jas. 
Gnian, S.D., Robt 
Gillespie, Geo. 
Ollruth, Pat. G. 
Glegg. John 
Glen, John 
Gloag, Patton 
Glover, d i>.,.Wm. 
Goldle, Thos. S. 
Ooldltf, Wm. 
Ooodall, Chan. 
Gordon, And. 
Gordon, Alex. 
Gordon, D. W. 
Gordon, Geo. 
Gordon, Thoa. 
Gordon, Wm. 
Gordon, Wm. 
Onarlsr, Adam 
Gourlle, J. H. 
Graham, Alex. 
Gmham, Jas. 
Orabam, D D., J. 
Graham, M. II. 
Graham, Robt. 
Graham, Robt. 
U ih iin, Wm. 
Graham, Wm. 
Grant, D.D., Jac. 
Grant, Jas. 
Grant, Jas. 
Grant, J. R. 
Grant, L. W. 



Weem. 

Aberdeen. 

Ayr. 

Turriff. 

Stirling. 

Kirkwall. 

Cupar. 

Perth. 

Linlithgow. 

Ayr. 

Paisley. 

Kdinhurgh. 

St. Andrews. 

Dumbarton. 

Biggar. 

SIcye. 

Peebles. 

Aberdeen. 

Dundee. 

Dornoch. 

Kdlnburgfa. 

Garloch. 

Tain. 

Tain. 

JDumfrles. 

Aberdeen. 

Invernesi. 

Edinburgli. 

liewis. 

DingwalL 

Nairn. 

Mull. 

Meigle. 

Dunfermline. 

Paisley. 

Fordyee. 

llamlltoB. 

Brerhin. 

Linlithgow. 

North Lilee. 

IrTlne. 

Caithnesa. 

Melgle. 

Deer. 

Stranraer. 

Chanonry. 

Ayr. 

helkirlc. 

Ayr. 

Cupar. 

Dunoon. 

Alford. 

Glasgow. 

Anna'i. 

KirkwaU. 

Fordoun. 

Kelso. 

A uchterarder. 

Kdinbur^. 

Ghtrnside. 

Lanark. 

Perth. 

Ellon. 

Turriff. 

Lauder. 

Klgin. 

Dalkeith. 

Alford. 

KirkwaU. 

Selkirk. 

Annan. 

Haddington. 

Penpont. 

Dumbarton. 

Kelao. 

PntsleT. 

DiindM. 

Pai<l«»y. 

Edinburgh. 

Edinburgh . 

Fordyoe. 

Abemethy. 



Aberfvldy. 

Ab«rdtfen. 

May bole. 

Banff. 

Stirling. 

Kirkwall. 

Cupar. 

Perth. 

Born)W8tnun's. 

Kilmarnock. 

Palffley. 

Leith. 

Ijevpu. 

Helensburgh. 

Bigear. 

Brondfbrd. 

Penicuik. 

Aberdeen. 

Dundee. 

Dornoch. 

Leith. 

Piicnple. 

1*arkhill. 

Tiiln. 

Dumfriea. 

Aberdeen. 

Inyemess. 

Kdifiburyli. 

Stornoway. 

Beauly. 

Ard<*rs!er. 

Aros. 

Blairgowrie. 

Dunfermline. 

Johnston. 

Buckle. 

Bothwell. 

Brecliin. 

Mid Calder. 

KirkwaU. 

StewartoB. 

Wick. 

Meigle. 

Mini law. 

Glenapp. 

luTemess. 

Glrran. 

Selkirk. 

Maybole. 

N'«i>iiigh. 

Kilmun. 

Aberdeen. 

Annan. 

S. Konaldahay. 

BerTle. 

Kelao. 

EdlnhuiKh. 

Coldstream. 

Abington. 

Bridge of J 

Ell'in. 

Turriff. 

Eariston. 

Elgin. 

Dnlkelth. 

Bucket 

Kirkwall. 

Llille^Ieaf. 

Annan. 

Haddington. 

Thorn hiU 

Glasgow. 

Kelso. 

Johnston. 

Inchture. 

Paisley. 

T^ith. 

Edinburgh. 

KHth. 

Bnllindslloch. 



PXBSBTTBmT. rOBT-OFFICI, 



Kirkcudbright CasUeDouglaf. 
Fordyoe. B .nff. 



Grant, Pat. 
firant, I'eter 
Grant, Peter 
Grant, P. M. 
Grant, Robt. 
Grant, W. C. M. 
Grant, Wm. 
Gray, B D., Alex. 
Gray, Alex. 
Gray, Alex. H. 
Gray, And. 
Gray, And. 
Gray, Geo. 
Gray, Thos. 
Gray, Wm. H. 
Greenhill, C. K. 
Gretg, Geo. 
Greitf, Jas. 
Grieve, John 
Gunn, Jas. 

HALDAirs, Jaa. 0. 
Halkett, And. 
Hamilton, J. B. 
Hamilton, Jas. 
Hamilton. Z. M. 
Hardy, Thos. 
Harris, David 
Harris, Gfta 
Hart, John 
Hatton,Jas.B. 
Hay, Jas. 
Hay, John 
Henderson, D. 
Iltfuderson, G. 
Henderson, D.B., 11. 
Henderson, J. 
Henderson, W.D. 
llerdman, Wm. 
Iliddleston, R. 
Hill, Alex. 
Hill, Thos. 

llOSg, I^Tld 

Holdom, Wm. 
Home, J<^n 
Home, Walter 
Honey, J. A. 
Hope, Chaa. 
Hope, John 
Home, David 
Home, R. 8. 
Hume, Kd. 
Hunter, Geo. 
Hunter, o n., John 
Hunter. Wm. 
Hutcheson, Jas. 
Hutchison, G. 
Hntton, R. 8. 
Hutton, W. M. 
Hyslop, Robt 

iKVLlfl, John 
IntrlK Kobt 
ln/ii«, D.D.,Thofl. 
Ingram, Jas. 
In/ram, Jas. 
Ingram, Gordon 
Innes, John 
Irvine, Alex. 
Irvine, Alex. R. 
Irvine, Thos. 
Irvine. Walter 
Irvine, W. F. 

J*CK. Hn^h M. 
Jackson. Donald 
Jaffray, John 
Jameson, And. 
Janiiejton, O. 
Jamieson, J. C. 
Jamleson, 1>.1>., R. 
Jeffrey, Wm. 
Jenkins, Jas. 
.loiinHon, J. S. 
Johnston, Alas 



Duukeld. 

Dundee. 

Skye. 

KIrkcaldx. 

Brechin. 

Tongue. 

Abemethy. 

Dunblane. 

Aberdeen. 

Auchterarder. 

Dumbarton. 

Dundee. 

Aberlour. 

Peeblea. 

F.dlnbundi. 

Selkirk. 

Dumfries 

Garloch. 

Lauder. 

Lewis. 

Meigle. 

Brechin. 

Irvine. 

Dumfries. 

liOrwick. 

Auchterarder. 

Brechin. 

Breohln. 

Kirkcaldy. 

Kirkcaldy. 

Arbroath. 

Perth. 

Cupar. 

Fordyee. 

Dunkeld. 

Arbroath. 

Glasgow. 

Dunkeld. 

Cariston. 

Glasgow. 

Brechin. 

Dumfries. 

Linlithgow. 

Dalkeith. 

Dunse. 

Dundee. 

Biggar. 

Dumfries. 

Edinburgh. 

Linlithgow. 

Deer. 

Jedburgh. 

Edinburgh. 

Dumbarton. 



Kincardfe 0*N 
Hamilton. 
Dunas. 
Stranraer. 

Penpont 

Ayr. 

Dumfries. 

Dalkeith. 

Paisley. 

Turriff. 

Fordyee. 

Deer. 

Dunkeld. 

Dundee. 

Arbroath. 

Stirling. 

Kirkcudbright 

luTerary. 

Dunbar. 

liocbmaben. 

Strathbogie. 

Irvine. 

G lasgow. 

Ayr. 

KlneardfneO'N 

Hamilton. 

Ayr. 



BlairathoU. 

Dundee. 

Arlsaip. 

Kirki-aldy. 

Brechin. 

Golspie. 

Carr Bridge. 

Blalrdrumm^d. 

Ilolburn. 

Auchterarder. 

Dumberton. 

Durdee. 

Keith. 

Koblehouse. 

Edinburgh. 

Hawick. 

Dumfries. 

Pitraple. 

St BosweU*a. 

Stornoway. 

Kirriemuir. 

Brerhin. 

Kilmarnock. 

Dumfries. 

Lerwick. 

Crieff. 

Brechin. 

Kirkcaldy. 

Kirkcaldy. 

Lunan. 

Stanley. 

Strsthmlglo. 

Cullen. 

Stanley, Perth. 

Arbroath. 

Gliisgow. 

Blairgowrie. 

Kirkwall. 

Kilsyth. 

Montrose. 

Dumfries. 

Grangemouth. 

Penicuik. 

Dunse. 

Inchture. 

WndeHALam 

Dumfries. 

Corstorphlne. 

Falkirk, 

Fraserburgh. 

Hawick. 

Edinburgh. 

Glasgow. 

Greenock. 

Banchory Ter. 

Canibusneth'n 

Dunse. 

Stranraer. 



Kllmsmoek. 

Dumfries. 

Blackshiels. 

Glasgow. 

Biinff. 

Portsoy. 

PeterhMd. 

RIairatholI. 

Dundee. 

Arbroath. 

Stirilng. 

Gatehouse. 

liOchgilphead. 

Dunbar. 

liockerby. 

Keith. 

Irvine. 

Glasgow. 

Kilmarnock. 

Aboyne. 

Glnstrow. 

Muirklrk. 



Digitized by 



Googk 



270 



PBKSBTTSRIAN HISTORICAL ALMANAC 



MAMS. 



PBSIBTTXBT. POfT-OFVXCB. 



Johnftoo, And. 
Johnston, D. 
Joharton, John 
Johnstone, M. 8. 
Johnstone, It. J. 
Johnstone, Thos. 
Jolly, Peter 

KxiLLOB, John 
Keith, Jas. 
Keith, John 
Keith, D o., P. H: 
Kemp, John 8. 
Ker, John 
Ker, Wm. 
Kerr, Saml. 
Kidd, Wm. 
King, Alex. 
KInrom, .Tohn 
Klrke, Robt 
Klrkwood, T. D. 
Knox, Francla 
K jd, O.9., John 

Laxslaw, Jas. 
Lamb, D d , Wm. 
Lamb, Wm. 
Lament, Jas. 
Lamont, John 
Landale, Darid 
Lang, Gayln 
Lang, John M, 
Langwill, Jas. 
Lanrie. John 
Law, Jas. 
Law, Wm. 
Law, Wm. 
Lawrie, D D., G. J. 
Lawson, Alex. 
Learmooth, W. 
Leek, Alex. 
Leekie,J. McR. 
LedloKham, J. 
Lee, D D., Robt. 
Lee, Wm. 
LeeH,Ja«.a 
Lelper, And. 
Irishman, d.d., M. 
LeUhman, K. 
Lelshman, Thofl. 
I^elteh, Robt 
Leitcfa, Wm. 
Leslie, Jas. 
Leslie, Joha 
Lerie, Wm. 
Liddell, D.D., T. 
LlUie, Dj>^ Wm. 
Lludsay, David 
Lindsay, John 
Liston, Wm. 
Little, Geo. 
Little, John 
Little, Walter 
Little, Wm. 
Loehead, John 
Loehore, Alex. 
Loehore, OaTin 
Lochtle, John 
Lockhart, S.D., L. 
Loekhart, Wm. 
Logan, Angus 
Logan, Jas. 
Logan, Peter 
Logan, R. 
Logle, Wm. 
Lorraine, J. 0. 
London, Geo. 
London, Jot. 
Low, Alex. 
Low, Walter 
Low«,Jaa.lL 
Lyell, Hugh A. 

If ACALUTBB, D. 

K*Artlmr,i>A,D. 



Kirkcaldy. 

Glasgow. 

Hamilton. 

Wigtown. 

IhinblaDe. 



Kirkcaldy. 
Glasgow. 
Coatbridge. 
Mewton Stew. 
Bridge of Allan 



Kirkeadbrlght Gateho 
Caithness. Dunnet. 



KAMI. 



PBSsBTTUT. roBT-orncB. 



North 1 

Forres. 

Garloeh. 

Hamilton. 

Aberdeen. 

Linlithgow. 

Stranraer. 

Haddington. 

Dumbarton. 

Irvine. 

Greenock. 

Paisley. 

Perth. 

Kilon. 



KlrkwaU. 

Forres. 

KeithhalUK*U 

Hamilton. 

Aberdeen. 

Falkirk. 

Olenluoa. 

Haddington. 

Glasgow. 

8altcoata 

Largs. 

Paisley. 

Bridge of lain. 

Farres. 

Sgln. 



Penpon*. 

Lanark. 

Kelso. 

Dundee. 

8kye. 

Dnnkeld. 

Hamilton, 

Aberdeen. 

Lauder. 

Arbroath. 

Aberdeen. 

Paisley. 

Ayr. 

Cupar. 

Linlithgow. 

Glasgow. 

Glasgow. 

TordToe. 

Kdinbui^ 

Kelso. 

Dingwall. 

Glasgow. 

Glasgow. 

Dnnkeld. 

Kelso. 

Glasgow. 

Cupar. 

KlneardineCyM 

Xllon. 

Olnaflrth. 



Leadhilli. 

Lanark. 

KelK». 



DuuTegan. 

Perth. 

Hamilton. 

Aberdeen. 

Earlston. 

Camwath. 

Arbroath. 

Aberdeen. 

Glasgow. 

At- 

Cupar. 

MidCaldsr. 

Leek. 

Glasgow. 

CuUen. 

ISdinbur^ 

Kelso. 

Dingwall. 

Greenhead. 

Glasgow. 

Blairgowrie. 

Kelso. 

Denny. 

Ladybank. 

Aboyne. 

Udny. 

Meeting. 



Wlek. 



Helensburgh. 

Perth. 

Kirkintilloch. 

Peebles. 

Kinroes. 

Hofflftt 

Bridge of AUaa 

Glasgow. 

■"Irkwall. 



Kirkwa 

^^asswai 
y^Renfrei 



Caithness. 

Melgle. 

Dumbarton. 

Perth. 

GUwgow. 

Peebles. 

Kinross. 

Loehmaben. 

Dunblane. 

Dumbarton. 

Kirkwall. 

Dalkeith. 

Palsloy. y^Renfrew. 

Linlithgow. Qneensftrrj. 

Tongue. Lairg. 

Chlrnside. Coldstream. 

Dunfermline. Kincardine. 

Dundee. Dundee. 

Cariston. Thurso A Phin. 

Dumfries. Dumfries. 

Forfkr. Forikr. 

HamUton. DaliieU 

Alfbrd. Kelg. 

Brechin. Brechin. 

Kirkcaldy. Kirkealdy. 

Dundee. Dundee. 



Kelsow 
Mnll. 



M'Arthur, J. 
M'Arthnr, Jas. 
H' Arthur, H. 
Macbride. Danl. 
M-Calg, Donald 
MCall, J. D. 
MKSallum, Dun. 
M<Callum, Dun. 
Bl'Calman, D. 
M'Calman, H. 
M^Clure, J. G, 
Maoeoll, A. M. 
MK)oll, Donald 
M'Comble, C. 
M'Connocfale, D. 
Bl*Oorkindale, G. 
M'CuUoch, C. 
IfCulloch, n D., J. 
M«Diannid, H. 
McDonald, A. 
Maedonald, Alex. 
Macdonald, B.D., D. 
Maedonald, D. 
M'Donald, Donald 
Uaodonald, H. F. 
Macdonald, Hugh 
M'Donala, B.B., J. 
Macdonald, John 
Macdonald, J. 
Macdonald, Jno. N. 
Macdonald, Rod. 
Macdonald, Wm. 
Macdougall, J. 
Macdougall, Jas. E. 
Macdowall, John 
Macduff, R. C. H. 
M'DuIK; John R. 
M'Ewen, John 
M*Sw«n, John 
M'Fadyen, Don. 
M*Fadyen, Jas. 
Madkdyen, T. 1. 
M<Farlan, Jas. 
Maeflurlan, P. 
M'Farlane, Don. 
M'Farlane, J. A. 
Maeftrlane, R. M. 
M'Farlane, Dun. 
M'Farlane, B.9., J. 
M'Farlane, S.9., J. 
Macfkrlane, John 
M'Farlane, Wal. 
M'Pariane, And. 
MTie, Dunl. 
MFIe, Danl. 
MHiilchrist, M. 
M'Glashan.A. 
MaeQonn, R. W. 
M«Gowan, J. 
MacOregor, A. 
Maegregor, Alex. 
Maogregor, A. M. 
M'Oregor, G. 
M'Gregor, Jas. 
M«Gregor, Jas. 
M>Gufte, Jaa. 
M^Hardy, John 
M'innes, Dun. 
M'lntosh, Don. 
M'intosh, Hugh 
M'Intcish, Jas. 
M'Intoeh, W. 
Maelntyre, Angus 
M*in^re, Don. 
M«intyre, J. 
M'intyre, John 
M'lntyra, Mai. 
BMntyra, NeU 
M*iver, Farquhar 
Madrer, John 
MiTor, Alex. 
Mackay, John 8. 
M*Kay;jas. 
M<Kay, Donald 



Dunoon. 


Rothesay. 


Glasgow. 


Glasgow. 


8kye. 


Portree. 


Dunkeld. 


Dnnkeld. 


OUngow. 


Glasgow. 


IrTlne. 


Ardrossan. 


MuU. 


...... 


Skye. 


Dunvegan. 


Lorn. 


Bonaw. 


Qdthness. 


Latberon. 


Fordoun. 


Montrosa 


Jedburgh. 


Hawick. 


Lorn. 


Dalmally. 


KincardineO*N Banchory Ter. 


Abertorff. 


InTemess. 


Greenock. 


Greenock. 


Brechin. 


Montrose. 


Greenock. 




Dunblane. 


Callander 


Dornoch. 


Golnpie. 


Bkye. 


Portree. 


TnTemess. 


InTemess. 


Abemethy. 


Lynwily. 


Isia A Jura. 


Portaskaig. 


Dunoon. 


Glasgow. 


UisL 


Loehmaddy. 




Crieff. 


Forres. 


Forres. 


Tain. 


Bonar Bridg*. 


Uist 


Storaoway. 


Uist 


AberUrft 


InTemeea. 


Dunoon. 


Kilmorieh. 


Arbroath. 


Arbroath. 


etrannuir. 


Glenluee. 


Cupar. 


FalkUnd. 


Glai^w. 


Glasgow. 


Forres. 


Forres. 


l^U. 


Msybole. 
Strontian. 


Mull. 


Strontian. 


LioHtbgow. 
Bi. Andrews. 


Liniithgow. 
Plttenweem. 


Kintyre. 


Barr. 


Tongue 


Golspie. 


Greenock. 


Greenock. 


Weem. 


Pitlodirie. 


Bdlnbufvrh. 


Edinburgh. 


Dumbarton. 


Arroquhar. 


luTerary. 


Ixichgilphead. 


Dumfries. 


Dumfries. 


Olnaflrth. 


Lunna. 


Edinburgh. 


Edinburgh. 


Isla A Jun. 


Bowmore. 


Perth. 


Perth. 


Lanark. 


Lanark. 


Edinburgh. 


Edtnbnrgli. 


Fordoun. 


Laurencekirk. 


luTemess. 


InTemess. 


Mull. 


Aros. 


Dunblane. 




Lorn. 


B&frv^wrie. 
PaUl^. 


Melgle. 
Paisley. 


Irrlne. 


Dairy. 


KlncardlneCN Farland. 


Abemethy. 


Grantuwn. 


Tain. 


Tain. 


Forres. 


Forres. 


gSGIt». 


CuUen. 
Glasgow. 


MuU. 


Oba£ 


Tain. 


Bonar Bridgtt. 


Abertarff. 


FoK Augustni 


Olnaflrth. 


DelUng. 


MulL 


Tobermoiy. 


Abemethy. 


LynwUy. 



Lochcanon* 
Bkye. 
Dunoon. 
Lochcarroo. 



Portree. 



Dingwall. 



Dunfemline. InTerksithSng. 
Domodi. Laifg. 

Dnnkeld "^ ' 



Digitized by 



Googk 



THK CHUBCH OF SCOTLAND. 



S71 



PBXSBTTBBT. 



POBT-OrUCB. 



M'KelLir, Dagald Dornocb. Golnple. 

M'Keiule, Alex. InTerarj. Ardriahalg. 

MackAnsle, Alex. Tain. Parkhill. 

M*Kensle, Cutin Maim. Nairn. 

Mackende, GoHn Dingwall. StrathpeflEsr. 

Uackenaie. D. 8. LochoanDn. Dingwall. 

Mackentto, K. InTem««a. 

M 'Kenile, Geo. Aberdeen. Aberdeen. 

Hackensie, H. InTemess. InTemen. 

Maekenxie, Hugh Invemesa. InTerneaa. 

Markonsi^ John Cbanonry. Fortrcse. 

Mackensie, John Locbearron. liocbearron. 

aiackensle, J. A. Melgle. Ooupar Angni. 

Maekoutlo, Ken. linlithgoir. Borrowstoun's. 

M'Keiiale, Ken. Tongue. Thnrao. 

MackenKlij, K. Loehcarron. Lodieanron. 

Mackenxie, Laeh. lala A Jnnu Lochgilphead. 

Mackenzie, M. 0, DalkeiUk. I^awwade. 

M'Kensle, Nell Lorn. InTemrr. 

M'Kenzi<», Peter DlngwaU. Dingwall. 

Uackiehan, Dog. InTemeM. Invemeaa. 

Mackle, And. Kelao. Keln. 

MackUs Jaa. Klgln. Elgin. 

Mackto, P. J. Elgin. Xlgla. 

M'Kle, Thoe. Greenock. Glaagow. 

Mackinnon, Don. Skye. Broadford. 

Macklnnon, Nell Dornoch. Bonar Bridge. 

Mackintoah, D. Dnnoon. Caimdow. 

Hacklntoeh. O. U. BnrraToe. Unit 

Mackintoeh, T. Fordoun. Montroae. 

Madachlan, D. Inverarj. InTorary. 

M'Laren, Alex. Edinburgh. Edinburgh. 

M'Uran, Alex. Kirkcaldy. Markinch. 

M'Laren, Alex. Bt Andrews. Cnpar. 

M'Laren, John Btlrling. Falkirk. 

M'Laren, Peter Greenock. port Glasgow. 

Madaurin, R. Olnaflrth. Landstlng. 

M'Laurin, J. B. Edinburgh. Sdinburso. 

Maclean, D.D., A. DiugwaU. Eranton. 

Madean. Alex. II. Lanark. I^nark. 

M*Lean, Allan GltNgow. Oalton. 

M<Lean. Chaa. Loehcarron. Ullapool. 

H'Lean, C. S. Olaagow. St Luke*!. 

U'Lean, Hector Loehcarron Loebalah. 

M*Iiean,John Paialey. Palaley. 

U'Laan, Lachlaa Dundee. Dundee. 

McLean, NeU CaithneM. Halkirk. 

M*Lean, Neil Mull. Tobermory. 

M'lioan, Wm. Selkirk. Arbkirk. 

M*Iiennan,J. A. Abemethy. Balllndalloeli. 

M'Laod. S.D., J. UuU. Oban. 

M'lieod, John Abertarft Lagjan. 

M'Leod, J. N. Glangow. Blahopbrlggt. 

M*Leod, D.9., N. Glasgow. Glasgow. 

M'Leod, Norman Glasgow. Glasgow. 

M*Lfltchle, BJ)., J. Edinburgh. Edinburgh. 

M'MllUn, 0. Caithnera. Berriedale.' 

Maemoreland, P. Haddington. N. Berwick. 

Maonair, Jas. Cupar. Auchtermnc'y. 

M'Naughton, B.D.,A Lanark. Lesmahagow. 

M*Nattghton, A. , InTerneat. luTemesi. 

M'Nanghton, J. Inrertiess. InTemess. 

M'Pheraon, B.B., A. Dornoch. Golspla. 

M'Phenion, L. Nahv. Nairn. 

M-Phermn, W. Tain. ParkhlU. 

M*Qaba«, D.n., 8. Ayr. Ayr. 

M*IUe. Flnlay lilst. Lochaaddy. 

Macrae, John A. Vist. Lodimaddy. 

M*Rae, John Jedburgh. Hawick. 

Macrae, John Loehcarron. Lochalsh. 

M'Rae. John Lewis. Ftomoway. 

M'Ready, Angelo Lanark. Lanark. 

M'Taggart, B.D., D. Glasgow. Glasgow. 

Maetaggart, D. G. Inrerary. Inverary. 

M-TaTUh, Alex. Dunoon. Greenock. 

HTaTlsh. Arch. Isla A Jura. Bowmore. 

Macturk, Jas. W. Lanj^lm. Langholm. 

M*V«Mui, 0. A. Lorn. Oban. 

M'Vicar, B.B., J. G. Lochmaben. Moflat 

N'Watt, Jas. Haddington. Tranent 

M*Whannely A. KInroiis. Stirling. 

Malr. John Jedburgh. Hawick. 

Maitland, B.n., J. Kirkeudbrkht New Galloway. 

Makellar. Don. Paisley. Glai«ow. 

HaijoribwilL%T. Dnnbar. Pnatonklrk. 



nUMBTTBBT, POBT-OmCB. 



Markland, James Dunblane. Fort of Ment*h 

Marshall, Aiex. Greenock. Largs. 

Martin, Angus Skye. Portree. 

Martin, David KlneardlneO*N Banchory Ter. 

Martin, .Tauie.o Auchterarder. Auchterardor. 

Martin, Thos. Irriue. Kilmarnock. 

Masaon, Don. Edinburgh. Edinburgh. 

Maason, K. M. Dingwall. DlngwalL 

Masaon, W. Strathbogie. Keith. 

Blatheson, Alex. Dunblane. Kippen. 

Mathason, y. Dornoch. Lairg. 

Matwell, D. 8. Dumbarton. GlaKgow. 

Meams, Wm. Fordoun. Bervle. 

Melkl^john, R. AUbrd. Stiathdon. 

Melklem, Jas. Glaivow. Glasgow. 

Memes, B.B., J. 8. Hamilton. Hamilton. 

Memdes, Geo. Dunkeld. Blairgowrie. 

Henales, John Dingwall. Btrathpeffer. 

Mensies, Robt Annan. Ecdel^han. 

Menales, BB.,W. Ayr. Maybole. 

Mensles, B.D., W. Penpont Thomhill. 

Meraon, Chaa. Arbroath. Arbroath. 

Marson, W. Bt Androwa. Crmll. 

Mfddleton, J. KlncartlineO'N Ballater. 

Miller, John Bt Andrews. Collnnburgli. 

Mllligan, B.B., G. Bt. Andrews. Collnsburgh. 

Mllligan, John Kirkcudbright Twynbolm. 

Milligan, Peter Arbitiath. Arbroath. 

MOllgan, Wm. Bt. Andrews. CollnKbnrgh. 

Milne, Alex. Alford. WhitchouM). 

Milne, Alex. Deer. FniMrburgh. 

Milne, David Aberdeen. Aberdmn. 

Milne, Jas. TurrilT. Turriff. 

Milne, Robt Perth. PeHh. 

MUroy, Adam Perth. Perth. 

Blllroy, John Btxanracr. Ballantme. 

Milroy, Jaa. Irvine. 

Mlntx, Wm. AUbrd. KJnnethmont. 

Mitchell, BB.. A. GarkMJi. ...... 

Mitchell, Alex. Dunfermline. Ihinfermllne. 

MltohelU B.B., G. Linlithgow. Whitburn. 

Mitchell, G. Dunblane. Doune. 

Mitchell, Henry Turriff. TurrilT. 

Mitchell, J. Fordoun. 

Mitchell, Jas. Gla^ow. GUtfgow. 

Mitchell. Jas. Deer. Peterhead. 

Mitchell, John Deer. Pet«rbc«d. 

Mitchell, Koht Brechin. Montrow. 

Mitchell, T. W. Ghuvow. Kirkintilloch. 

Mitchell, Thos. Dunbar. CorkbumFp'h. 

Moffat Geo. 0. Greenock. Port Glasgow. 

Moir, Robert Btrathbogle. HnnUy. 

MoniUws, Geo. n. Peebles. Peebles. 

Moniimwa, Jaa. Annan. Annan. 

Monro, Thos. Qlugow, Glasgow. 

Mouteath, R. K. Glasgow. Glaagnw. 

Montelth, Wm. Dunblane. Callander. 

Montgomery, T. Penpont Banquhar. 

Moor, John Melgle. Coupar Angus. 

Morgan, John Lerwick. Lei wick. 

Morison, Jaa. Lochearron. Loehalxh. 

Morrison, Jaa. Dingwall. Alness. 

Morriron, Peter Dunfermline. Dunfrrmlina. 

Morrison. Thos. Kirkcaldy. Leren. 

MuJr, John Arbroath. Arbroath. 

Mulr, John Wigtown. Creetown. 

Mulr,John8. Dalkeith. Usswade. 

Mulr. Robt H. Linlithgow. Queensfbrry. 

Mulr, B B , W. Edinburgh. Kdinbunrh. 

Mulr, William Kirkcaldy. Kirkcaldy. 

Mungall, Wm. Palaley. Glasgow. 

Munro, Daniel Abemethy. Kingussie. 

Monro, David K. H. Chimside. Ayton. 

Munro, W. R. Chanonry. Cromarty. 

Murdoch, Alex. Aberlour. Keith. 

Murdoch, Alex. Btranraer. Olrvan. 

Murdoch, John Annan. KlrkpatrlekFL 

Murdoch, John Perth. Perth. 

Murray, A. B. Lochmaben. Dumfries. 

Murray, Alex. J. Peebles. Eddleaton. 

Murray, Geo. Kirkcudbright N. Galloway. 

Murray, Jas. Ayr. Old CnaiBoek. 

Murray, Jas. Caithness. Reay. 

Murray, John Penpont ThornhUL 

Morray, Petar lovdyssk 



Digitized by 



Googk 



272 



PRESBTTSBIAN HISTORICAL ALMANAC. 



rSMBTTSBT . TO •T-OmC«. 



Murray, Kobt K. 


Ayr. 


New Cumnock. 


Murray, Wm. 


Beiklrk. 


Melroae. 


W>er«, AJex. 8. 


Fordoun. 


Bervie. 


UylM, ThM. 


For&r. 


Forfar. 


Kapim. d »., P. 


Cajigow. 


GUagow. 


M.hol, Arch. 


OInaflrth. 


Walla. 


Nich.Uoii, ChrlB. 


WiKtown. 


Whithorn. 


Niohnlsnn, Max. 


Kdinburgh. 


Kdlnhurgh. 


Nirol, David 


Dunfermline. 


Burntlaland. 


Nlcoll, John 


Heigle. 


Melgle. 


Nlc ilP^n, Rod. 


Lochearron. 


lioi'hcarron. 


NJsbet, Arch. 


Glasgow. 


Glaagow. 


Nifibut,i>i>.,Robt 


Kdlnhurgh. 


Kdlnhurgh. 


h'ivon, AltiX. 


Dumbarton. 


Glaagow. 


Nlvlson, Rich. 


Annan. 


Kcclefecban. 


OOILTIS, W. 


Aberdeen. 


Aberdeen. 


0>c«, Uhas. 


Deer. 


Mini law. 


Oi r. John 


Irvine. 


Belth. 


Oowald, John 


UnlUhgow. 


Falkirk. 


I'AisLBT, John 


Dumbarton. 


Holpniiburgh. 


Paisley. Robt. 


SUrllng. 


Stirling. 


P«rk, Hugh 


Oiaagow. 


Glawgow. 


Park, Juhu 


Glaagow. 


BiBbopbrigga. 


Park, D D., John 


8t. Andrew*. 


8t. Andrews. 


Park, John 


Perth. 


Perth. 


Park, Wm. 


Stirling. 


Falkirk. 


Paternon, D.D., J. 


Bre<*hin. 


Montrose. 


J'at«rRon, 8aml. 


Hamilton. 


Blantyre. 


Paterson, W. B. 8 


Dumbarton. 


Dumbarton. 


Pater»)ti, W. 


Dunbar. 


Cookburnsp*h. 


PntoM, Jc»hn 


Jedburgh. 


Jedburgh. 


Paton, o D , Robt 


GIa!*gow. 


Olaagow. 


Patullo, Uenry 


Glaogow. 


Glasgow. 


Paul, D D , John 


Kdinburgh. 


Kdinburgh. 


Paul. © D., W. 


Aberdeen. 


Aberdeen. 


Paul, Wm. L. 


Dunbar. 


Prefftonkirk. 


Paull. D 0., Jas. 


Alf*rd. 


ForlK»8. 


pHHrKou, Jaa. 


Dumbarton. 


Glrtagow. 


Peniu'Il. Jaa. 


Kinr< as. 


Kirkcaldy. 


Peter, Uea 


Oarloch. 


Keith Uall. 


PaU*r, Jail. 


Deer. 


Mlntlaw. 


Peter, Jaa. 


Oarloch. 


Inach. 


Peteri^ Wm. 


Klnroaa. 


KinroM. 


Phiu. Ken. M. 


Selkirk. 


Galanhlels. 


Phln, Wm. 


GalthneaP. 


Cafitleton. 


PUtendrelRh, Q. 


Edinburgh. 


Kdinburgh. 


Plavfair. David 


Linlithgow. 


Queensferry. 


Pulldk, Robt. 


Glaagow. 


.(Mnsgnw. 


PolBon, Wm. 


Kirkcaldy. 


Kirkcaldy. 


Porteous, Jaa. 


Dunbttr. 


Prestonkirk. 


Proudfoot,R.F. 


Dunne. 


Dunse. 


Kab. David S. 


Dunkeld. 


Bhiirgowrle. 


Kae, R. Reid 


Hamilton. 


Hamilton. 


Kalny, Alex. 


Turriff. 


Huntly. 


lUmaffe, Alex. 


KlnrardlneO'N Cluny.' 


Bamsay, David 


Carlwton. 


StromneRS. 


Kamaay, D. Q. D. 


. Forfar. 


KirTl.»muir. 


Ramnay, Hugh 


Hamilton. 


Coatbridge. 


Kamwiy, Jas. 


MolKle. 


>Iel«le. 


Kammy, John 


Haddington. 


Gladsmulr. 


Ramray, R. 


Perth. 


Perth. 


Kanken. J. 


Dundee. 





Ranklne, John 


Ayr. 


Maurbline. 


Itattrav, Alex. 


Glaagnw. 


OliiJ4};ow. 


Held, Jaa. 


Nairn. 


Nairn. 


Retd, Jas. 


Diilkeith. 


Gnrebridge. 


Keld, Jaa. 


Wigtown. 


Wlu^owu. 


Held, John 


Deer. 


Kllon. 


Keid. John 


Dumbarton. 


Olnsir