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Full text of "Presidential campaign activities of 1972, Senate resolution 60; Watergate and related activities"

PRESIDENTIAL CAMPAIGN ACTIVITIES OF 1972 



1 SENATE RESOLUTION 60 

173 ^— — =^— ^^ 



EXECUTIVE SESSION HEARINGS 



BEFORE THE 



SELECT COMMITTEE ON 
PRESIDENTIAL CAMPAIGN ACTIVITIES 



OF THE 



UNITED STATES SENATE 

NINETY-THIRD CONGRESS 

SECOND SESSION 



WATERGATE AND RELATED ACTIVITIES 
The Hughes-Rebozo Investigation and Related Matters 

WASHINGTON, D.C., MARCH 22, 23, 28, APRIL 1, 10, 11, 15, AND 16, 1974 

Book 22 




Printed for the use of the 
Select Committee on Presidential Campaign Activities 



ncord. New HamD> 



r\%\ 



i-^tlr o'wi' \ 



OCT 



PRESIDENTIAL CAMPAIGN ACTIVITIES OF 1972 

SENATE RESOLUTION 60 



EXECUTIVE SESSION HEARINGS 



BEFORE THE 



SELECT COMMITTEE ON 
PRESIDENTIAL CAMPAIGN ACTIVITIES 

OF THE 

UNITED STATES SENATE 

NINETY-THIRD CONGRESS 

SECOND SESSION 



WATERGATE AND RELATED ACTIVITIES 
The Hughes-Rebozo Investigation and Related Matters 

WASHINGTON, D.C., MARCH 22, 23, 28, APRIL 1, 10, 11, 15, AND 16, 1974 

Book 22 




Printed for the use of the 
Select Committee on Presidential Campaign Activities 

U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE 
31-889 O WASHINGTON : 1974 



For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Goveinment Printing Office 
Washington, D.C. 20402 - Price $3.80 



SENATE SELECT COMMITTEE ON PRESIDENTIAL 
CAMPAIGN ACTIVITIES 

(Established by S. Res. 60, 93d Congress, 1st Session) 



SAM J. ERVIN, Jr., North Carolina, Chairman 
HOWARD H. BAKER, Jr., Tennessee, Vice Chairman 

HERMAN E. TALMADOE, Georgia EDWARD J. GURNEY, Florida 

DANIEL K. INOUYE, Hawaii LOWELL P. WEICKER, Jr., Connecticut 

JOSEPH M. MONTOYA, New Mexico 

Samuel Dash, Chief Counsel and Staff Director 

Fred D. Thompson, Minority Counsel 

RuFUS L. Edmisten, Deputy Chief Counsel 

Arthur S. Miller, Chief Consultant 

David M. Dorsen, Assistant Chief Counsel 

Terry F. LEKztiER, Assistant Chief Counsel 

James Hamilton, Assistant Chief Counsel 

Carmine S. Bellino, Chief Investigator 

Marc Lackritz, Assistant Counsel 

James C. Moore, Assistant Counsel 

Ronald D. Rotvsd a. Assistant Counsel 

Barry Schochet, Assistant Counsel 
W. Dennis Summers, Assistant Counsel 

Alan S. Weitz, Assistant Counsel 

Robert F. Muse Jr., Assistant Counsel 

Mark J. Biros, Assistant Counsel 

R. Scott Armstrong, Investigator 

Michael J. Hershman, Investigator 

Donald G. Sanders, Deputy Minority Counsel 

Howard S. Liebengood, Assistant Minority Counsel 

Michael J. Madigan, Assistant Minority Counsel 

Richard L. Schultz, Assistant Minority Counsel 

Robert Silverstein, Assistant Minority Counsel 

Carolyn M. Andrade, Administrative Assistant 

Carolyn E. Cohen, Office Manager 

Joan C. Cole, Secretary to the Minority 



[Executive session hearings released to the public after the filing 
of the final report of the Senate Select Committee.] 

(II) 



CONTENTS 



HEARING DAYS 

Page 

Friday, March 22, 1974 10193 

Siiturcbv, March 23, 1974 10341 

Thursday, l\ I arch 28, 3974 .- 10411 

Monday,' April 1, 1974 104S5 

Wednesday, April 10, 1974 10539 

Thursday,' At)ril 11, 1974 10561 

INlonday, April 15, 1974 10591 

Tuesda'y, April 16, 1974 10037 

CHRONOLOGICAL LIST OF WITNESSES 
Friday, March 22, 1974 

Woods, Rose ]\Liry, personal secretary to President Nixon, accompanied 
by Charles Rhjaie and William lihyne, counsel 10193 

Saturday, March 23, 1974 

Caulflold, John J., former law enforcement official with the Treasury De- 
partment, accompanied by John P. Sears, counsel 10341 

Thursday, March 28, 1974 

Griffin, William E., secretary of the Precision Valve Corp., accompanied 
by Miles Aml;rose, counsel 10411 

Monday, April 1, 1974 

Moncourt, Mrs. Nicole, bookkeeper for C. G. Rebozo, accompanied by 

Alan G. Greer, counsel 10485 

Wednesday, April 10, 1974 

Buzhardt, J. Frederick, Special Counsel to the President 10539 

Thursday, April 11, 1974 

Davis. A. D., of the Winn-Dixie supermarket chain, accompanied by Alan 

Cole, counsel 10561 

Monday, April 15, 1974 

Nixon, Edward C, brother of the President, accompanied by Meyer Blatt 

and Stanley W. McKiernan, counsel 10591 

McKiernan. "Stanley W., attorney for Edward C. Nixon and F. Donald 

Nixon, accompanied by Meyer Blatt, counsel 10615 

Tuesday, April 16, 1974 

McKiernan, Stanley W., testimony continued 10637 

Nixon, F. Donald, brother of the President, accompanied by Meyer Blait 

and Stanley W. McKiernan, counsel 10665 

(HI) 



IV 

MATERIAL SUBMITTED FOR THE RECORD 

Page 

Correspondence between Charles Rhyne and Senator Ervin concerning 

withdrawal of subpcna of Rose Mary Woods 10258 

Affidavit of Rose Mary Woods with 80 pages of questions and answers of 

Miss Woods; followed by certification by Marjoric Acker 10262 

Woods Exhibits 

No. 1— (10200) Letter from Rose Mary Woods to John Bartlett, IRS, 
dated October 18, 1973, re campaign contribution 
delivered to Mr. Rebozo by Mr. Danner 10283 

No. 2 — (10232) Cover letter from Leonard Garment to Sam Dash, 
dated July 18, 1973, for pre-April 7 list of contrib- 
utors 10284 

No. 3 — (10244) White House memorandum for John Dean from Jack 
Caulfield dated October 7, 1971. Subject: Ballot 
security for 1972. (Supplement to earlier memo on 
1972 security n^eds.) 10339 

Griffin Exhibits 



No. 1— (00000) 
No. 2— (00000) 
No. 3— (10415) 
No. 4— (10417) 



No. 5— (10418) 
No. 6— (10457) 



Not for publication. 

Not for publication. 

Subpena served on Mr. Griffin 10476 

Letter sent to William Griffin, Sr., by Senator Ervin 
dated March 21, 1974, re subpenaing of Mr. 
Griffin's telephone records. Also letter to A.T. & T. 
canceling subpenaed phone records of Mr. 
Griffin 10479 

Checks written by Mr. Griffin to Florida hotels. En- 
dorsements also shown 10481 

Letter to Chester Davis dated June 22, 1973; no sig- 
nature on letter. Subject: Returning of $100,000 in 
$100 bills 10483 



MoNcoTjRT Exhibit 

No. 1— (10497) Check in the amount of $225,000 from Precision Valve 

Corp. to C. G. Rebozo, dated November 27, 1972. 10538 

A. D. Davis Exhibit 

No. 1 — (10577) Jack Anderson column of January 23, 1974, re cash 
contributions for President Nixon and $10,000 checks 
from the Davis brothers, founders of Winn-Dixie 
supermarket chain 10590 

Note. Figures in parentheses indicate page that exhibit was made part of the record. 



PRESIDENTIAL CAMPAIGN ACTIVITIES OF 1972 

THE HUGHES-REBOZO INVESTIGATION, AND 
RELATED MATTERS 



FRIDAY, MARCH 22, 1974 

U.S. Senate, 
Select Committee on- 
Presidential Campaign Activities, 

Washhigton, B.C. 

Tlio Select Committee met, pursuant to notice, at 0:20 a.m.. in room 
S-148. the Capitol Buildinii". Senator Howard H. Baker, presiding. 

Present : Senators Baker. ]\rontoya, and Tnouye. 

Also present: Samuel Dash, chief counsel and staff director; Fred 
D. Tliompson, minority counsel ; Terry F. Lenzner, assistant chief 
counsel; Marc Lackritz. assistant majority counsel; Richard L. 
Schultz. assistant minority, couiisel ; Scott Armstrong, investigator; 
Filer Ravnholt and Richard Rust, assistants to Senator Inouye; 
Emily Sheketoff, research assistant. 

Senator Baker. The committee will come to order. 

Miss Woods, would you raise your right hand, please? 

Miss Woods. Do you want me to stand? 

Senator Bakee. Fither way. 

Do you swear that the testimony you are about to give is the truth, 
the whole truth, and nothing but the truth, so help you God? 

]Miss Woods. I do. 

Senator Baker. Let's go off the record for a minute. 

[Discussion off the record.] 

Senator Baker. Maybe we better put all of this on the record. 

TESTIMONY OF EOSE MARY WOODS, ACCOMPANIED BY CHARLES 
RHYNE AND WILLIAM RHYNE, COUNSEL 

Miss Woods. Let's put this on the record because I asked Mr. 
Lenzner if he had any more questions to ask and the testimony shows 
he said "Xo," and that was at the end of 2V2 hours. 

Mr. Dash. Generally our executive sessions last about a day. 

Miss AYooDS. T can understand that if they all start this way. 

Mr. Dash. We are not that late. 

]Mr. Charles Ehtne. I w-ould like to put my understanding of 
what :Mr. Lenzner told me. He said they w-anted her to repeat under 
oath what she had said at the original executive session, so I see no 
reason that you should take all day. That took us 2 hours the first 
time. 

]Mr. Dash. First, we did not complete our inquiries at that time. 
We were permitted about 2 hours, I think we were a little over 2 
hours, about 21^ hours. 

(10193) 



10194 

Miss Woods. Two and one-half. 

IVIr. Dash. But Mr. Rhyne took the position we couldn't take any 
longer time. 

Since that time we also interviewed in executive session Mr. 
Rebozo and additional information from ISIr. Rebozo has been ob- 
tained. As you know, vSenator. in an executive session, to have a 
complete investigation and interrogation, a time limit of 1 hour 
or 2 hours — and we had this before — cannot be a reasonable jperiod 
of time T think the committee and its staff has the responsibility to 
fully get the facts and that no interrogation, that no investigation 
can have a time limit put on it. Now, we will not repeat questions. 
Under oath we may have to go into some of the matters that we did 
go into in your office because that was not an executive session. 

But it is very important, sinci^^we are not holding public hearings 
any more and since the committee did vote unanimously^ for us to 
complete our investigation, to get the facts and this is an effort to 
complete our investigation and complete it as expeditiously as 
possible. 

Mr, Charles Rhyxe. Let me say, Senator Baker, this initial session 
that we had I had understood was an executive session because Mr. 
Dash agreed to 2 hours, and it was on that basis and the basis that 
no subpena would be issued that I agreed to it, so we have lived up to 
our agreement. Did you say we didn't live up to our agreement? 

INIr. Dash. No, the original 2 hours that we talked about 

Mr, Charles Rhyne, Didn't you agree to 2 hours? That is all I 
want to know. 

INIr. Dash. You say that was all you could give us. When we were 
acting without a subpena 

Mr, Charles Rhyxe. In lieu of a subpena. 

Mr. Dash. No, without a subpena because we weren't talking about 
a subpena and 

Mr. Charles Rhyxe. But, Mr. Dash, don't you have to admit on 
this record that you told me that you wanted to question her for 2 
hours in lieu of a subpena? You did do that? Did you do that? 

Mr, Dash, Mr. Rhyne, I will respond to your questions as I can. 

Mr, Charles Rhyxe, But didn't you do that' Can't you just 
answer that? 

Mr, Dash, No, I did not. 

Miss Woods, Put him under oath, 

Mr. Dash. JNIr. Rhyne, you set the limit. First of all you set a limit 
of 2 hours because you claimed — well, we were first going to meet 
from 3 to 5 one day — and you said it had to be 2 hours because your 
wife was there and you didn't want to stay there. Then you said 
Rose Mary Woods was busy, had commitments at the White House 
and we shouldn't take more than 2 hours of her time. We were in an 
informal inteiview where we were at your command because without 
a subpena you could have thrown us out at any time you wanted 
if you wanted to. 

i^Ir. Lexzxer. Can I throw out a suggestion ? 

Mr. Dash. Let me just continue because I was asked a question. 

Miss Woods. Senator, may I say one thing, too ? 



10195 

Senator Baker. Rose Mary, one second and let me just say this. 
1 think 

]Mr. Dash. We have never been limited in any questioning in this. 

Senator Baker. I think we ought to keep two or three things in 
perspective and then I want JSIiss Woods to say what she wants. 

No. 1: At the beginning and in the hearings, as all here will 
literally verify, a subpena was not issued because the committee 
agreed' that the question of issuing a subpena on the personal secre- 
tary of the Prpsident was a matter of such delicacy that it ought to 
be avoided if ;.: all possible. N)o. 2: That arrangements were under- 
taken by couns. 1 for the committee to interview Miss Woods infor- 
mally without u ^^ubpena ; and No. 3 : 

Mr. Dash. From beginning October until February. 

Mr. Charles Rhyxe. And Miss Woods was not notified of that, sir. 

Senator Baker. No. 3: We have an obvious dispute between Mr. 
Rhvne and ;Mr. Dash over the nature of that undertaking; and 
NoI 4: After 2i/^ hours of interview in the nature of an executive 
session 

Mr. Dash. No, we can never do that in executive session ; we can't 
have an executive session without a Senator, without swearing, and 
Avithout an official court reporter. 

Senator Baker. Well, I think you are making too much of a point ; 
but anyway, in an informal interview after 21/2 hours it was ter- 
minated. Next, as I understand it, it is the contention of Mr. Rhyne 
that the purpose of this executive session is to reiterate, under oath, 
matters covered in the previous interview, but it is your contention 
that there are other matters to be covered as well as covering the 
original matters, to be covered under oath. 

I think we might as well just settle down to what our under- 
standing is. It was my instruction to the staff, which of course the 
staff can appeal to the committee if they wish, that they expedite 
this matter as much as possible, in consideration of the original 
motivation that suggests to the committee that we ought to treat 
delicately Avith the time and with the subpena on the personal secre- 
tary of the President. Therefore, I think it ought to be done as fast 
as possible. 

Mr. Dash. Senator 

Senator Baker. Wait a minute. 

No. 5 : I think you sjiould proceed with the reiteration under oath 
of the points you think are required for these purposes ; and No. 6 : 
Cover such additional matters as may be required but I think all day 
is a long time and I think we ought to improve on that very 
materially. 

So with that explanation, I suggest to the staff they proceed. 
Mr. Dash. Senator Baker, I think in light of your statement I do 
think I have to put on the record that the Senate committee voted 
unanimouslv for the subpena. We were asked to seek an informal 
interview if we could rather than subpena and under our general 
rules we wanted to do that with all l\Tiite House personnel. That 
was our general guideline. 

We were seeking that first with Mr. Buzhardt beginning right 
after the vote of the committee in October and through very reason- 
able grounds we could not 



10196 

Miss Woods. May I interrupt one more time in the middle of that 
to toll you that Mr. Biizliardt never told me until after I had Mr. 
Khyne as my attorney, so I cannot be held responsible for that. 

Mr. Dasii. I believe that and I don't believe you are responsible, 
but I am just saying our efforts began in October and for actually 
good reasons Ave could not, because of Judge Sirica's hearings and 
other hearings and later because of the State of the Union Message 
of the President, we could not 

Miss Woods. And one day because you went to a bar mizvah in 
Philadelphia. 

Mr. Dash. Well, that was negotiated. We were negotiating the day. 

ISIiss Woods. No. we had agreed on the date, sir, and I was coming. 

INIr. Dasit. Well, that was way back about 2 or 3 months. 

Miss Woods. It was a date justlike all the others. 

Mr. Dash. That isn't the issue. Wiiat I wanted to get on the record 
Senator, is that in our executive sessions of all witnesses, including 
witnesses that the majority has called and the minority has called, 
this committee has not restricted the full inquiry by the staff or the 
committee of a witness considered material to our investigation. We 
will expedite it. I think it has always been our purpose not to lengthen 
a hearing longer than necessary, but I think it is very important for 
this committee, as it has done with every single witness that has ever 
been called, to fully investigate the matter and not to call a halt to it 
just for the purpose of having brevity. 

Senator Baker. Was it counsel's understanding that is what the 
acting chairman has done? 

Mr. Dash. I thought you said, "A day is too long," and I said 

Senator Baker. No, I said, "A day is a long time." 

Now, look, Sam, for the record, you and I are not going to argue. 
I am saying to you that the same situation that occurred in the 
original instance when we first decided that we would try to inter- 
view Miss Woods without a subpena because of the uniqueness of the 
relationship, still occurs. 

Mr. Dash. That is right. 

Senator Baker. And I am telling you that it is my direction that 
the staff expedite this hearing. If you wish to appeal that you may 
do so. 

INIr. Dash. Well, I am saying we will expedite it but do it as fully 
as we can because we have responsibilities. 

Senator Baker. And the record should clearly show that I did not 
say that a day was too long but I said, "A day is a long time." That 
implies it was my judgment that it is too long, what you had said, 
and I have not made that judgment. However, I suggest that the 
staff try as hard as possible to limit themselves to a reiteration under 
oath of the matters already covered, to cover the material now that 
has been developed since the interview, and to do it as promptly as 
possible. That is the Chair's admonition to the staff. 

Mr. Dash. AVe will do that. 

Senator I^aker. I suggest you proceed. 

Mr. Lenzner. We will do that. 

INIr. ScHULTz. Senator, the interview of Miss Woods, it is my 
understanding, she has affirmed by affidavit. I am wondering whether 



10197 

or not that mijrlit be made a part of the record and questions pro- 
pounded from this interview? 

]\[r. Dash. Well. I would object to that. 

INIr. SciiULTz. She stated under oath she adopts it. 

INIr. Dash. Althou<2:h they were minutes to be given us and although 
she has prepared an affidavit, this is an executive session under our 
rules, and it is prepared bv INIiss Woods' secretary 

]\Iiss Woods. And one of the best secretaries in town. 

]Mr. Dash. I am not doubting that, but in all of our executive ses- 
sions we have used an official reporter. 

INIr. ScHULTz. Sam, I am just asking, do we have to ask each and 
every single question over again? 

Mr. Dash. No. 

Senator I^aker. The Chair says Ave are wasting time. My admoni- 
tion to you is to move on as fast as you can and I will Avatch and 
I will indicate Avhen I think we are laeing redundant. 

jNliss Woods. I would like to join that and ask that my own am- 
daA'it be made a part of my testimony, as before. 

Senator Baker. Does staff object to that? 

Mr. Dash. I don't object to that. 

Senator Baker. If there is no objection, then the previous affidavit 
of the witness will be incorporated in the record at this point. 

INIiss Woods. And the attachments, everything we sent to each 
Senator and to just Mr. Thompson and Mr. Dash. 

Senator Baker. Do I understand the letter that transmitted the 
exhibits — you are asking that be made a part of the record, too? 

Mr. Charles Rhine. Yes. 

]Mr. Dash. And Senator Ervin's response. 

Senator Baker. Is there any objection that INIr. Ehyne's letter and 
the attachment and Senator Ervin's response and the affidavit be 
made a part of the record? Since there are no other members present, 
does the staff liave any objection? 

Mr. Dash. No objection. 

Senator Baker. If there is no objection, that will be placed in the 
record. 

[The documents referred to are shown on pp. 10258-62.] 

Mr. Lexzner. Go ahead. 

INIr. Armstrong. INIiss Woods, may we please have your full name 
and present address for the record? 

Miss AVooDS. Are we going to repeat each question? 

Rose ]Mary ^^''oods, 2500 Virginia Avenue. 

Mr. Armstrong. Other than area code [deleted], do you have any 
other phone lines in your home ? 

]Miss Woods. I would like to ask Iioav you got that number, sir? 

Mr. Lenzner. Just answer the (question. 

Mr. Armstrong. AVe received that under subpena from the phone 
company. 

Miss Woods. Under subpena from the phone company? 

Mr. Armstrong. Would you just answer the cpiestion, please? 

Miss Woods. That is my private luilisted number, which I refused 
to give you before, and it shoAvs in the testimony that I used *ha,t 



10198 

for my family because I do have two White House lines that come 
in that any of you, who had to roach me, could call on that line. 

Mr. xVrmstrong. Could you give us the numbers of those two 
White House extensions? 

Miss Woods. No, I don't know those numbers. I don't look at 
those numbers. The AVhite House operators are perfectly capable 
of knowing- Avhich ones are mine. 

Mr. Armstrong. Could those be provided for us? 

Miss Woods. You can call the White House switchboard. 

Mr. Ar:hstr()ng. AVell, I don't believe they will give us the numbers. 

Miss Woods. I don't know whether they have numbers or not, I 
would have to look on the phones. I really don't know that they have 
numbers. I will look. Did you t.ap my line, sir? 

Mr. Armstrong. No, ma'am. 

Miss Woods. You have been known to make statements that 
sounded as though you had. 

Mr. Armstrong. That is also incorrect. But at any rate 

Mr. Dash. Mr. Chairman, the witness is here in executive session. 
I think she should amplify any answer that she has, but a question, 
she is not here to question the committee. We are here to question 
the witness. 

If she wants to subpena any member of our staff in any proper 
proceeding, she may do so; but she is here to respond to questions. 

Miss Woods. I would like to reserve that right. There are several 
things that 

JNIr, Dash. You always have that right. 

Senator Baker. I think the Chair's ruling would be that the 
witness is certainly entitled to observe matters that she wishes to 
iiH|uire about. Obviously, in her relationship as a witness, she is in 
no position to question the staff, but she is perfectly in the right to 
note for tlie record questions she has. 

Miss AVooDs. Senator, do I have the right to have a private 
phone number? 

Senator Bakkr. Well, by all means, and I don't think Mr. Arm- 
strong disputes that. 

I gather your question is, you are surprised at how the number 
was obtained and I understand Mr. Armstrong's representation to 
you was it had been subpenaed from the telephone company. 

Miss Woods. Senator, I want the private number, if I may tell 
you why? In the middle of the night, I, as secretary to the Presi- 
dent, get all kinds of crazy calls. And I do have a terribly hard job. 
I just cannot have my pi-ivate line given out. The White House 
doesn't ring after a certain hour, after midnight they don't ring. I 
get calls at 2:80 or 3 whenever these lunnbers get out. It has been 
my experience, and you can see from last Saturday's Jack Anderson 
column, that even letters sent only to Senators, and a carbon copy 
to Mr. Dash and a carbon copy to Mr. Thompson, appear in Jack 
Anderson's column in the Post. Now, I think for our records, I 
would like to know who all is in the room. 

Senator Baker. I think the reporter always does that anyway. 

Miss Woods. Everyone's name? 



10199 

]\Ir. Dash. Yes. 

Miss Woods. I mean, are all these people part of the committee? 

Mr. Dash. Yes, all are staff. 

I think in response, this ()n<>ht to be noted on the record, Mr. 
Chaiiman, 

Mr. Frates, who represents ]SIr. Kebozo, came to the executive 
session with a copy of your correspondence and vrith the transcript. 

Miss Woods. Yes. he ^ot it after it was in the Post. 

Mr. Dash. And that letter was sent bv ^Nlr. Rhyne to all of the 
Senators, and not just to Senator Ervin, and no one — and we traced 
that down — and no one kno\\s. It could have been released by you 
people as well as our people. We did not release it. 

]\Iiss Woods. Well, we did not and Ave never release to the Jack 
Anderson column. 

Mr. Dash. Now, on the question on the unlisted number, that is 
an executive session that would be reported in and under our rules — 
will be kept private. An uidisted number is an unlisted lumiber that 
is kept private from the general ])ublic but, under the law, a sub- 
pena by a court or a pro]>er committee would 

Miss Woods. Then I will remove my private line because I am 
not goin<^ to be bothered by kookie calls at nioht. 

]\[r. Dash. Well, you won't have this released by us. 

JMiss Woods. I would like to be sure of that, sir. 

Mr. Dash. Well, all I am saying is that a subpena to the telephone 
company compels the telephone company to give us any number 
listed or unlisted. 

Miss Woods. All right, I will remove my telephone number. That 
is all. You will dei)rive me of a private line because I cannot do my 
job and be bothered in the middle of the night. 

Mr. Dash. Do you want to continue? 

Mr. Ciiakles Rhyxe. I really don't know. Senator, what my 
position is here, but frankly I don't see Avhat her private telephone 
has to do with anything that is before this committee. I really would 
fviel that you are entitled to all kinds of information but her private 
telephone is a little far from the statement of jurisdiction of the 
committee, as I read it. 

Mr, Armstkoxg. The pending question was, what White House 
extensions 

Miss AVooDs. Do you want me to call the White House operator 
and ask her? 

Mr. Armstroxg. Xo, I asked if you could get that information at 
a later date, and if you are willing to agree we can move on. 

Miss Woods. All right. 

Mr. Lexzxer. ]Miss AVoods 

Miss Woods. Do you mind? I just want to write down what I have 
to provide, but I will tell you 

Mr. Lexzxer. Yes, ma'am, take your time. 

Miss Woods. But I will tell you that I am going to keep a private 
line or no line because I simply have to protect myself that much 
in my job. 

All right. I am sorry. 



10200 

Mr. Lexzxer. Can you tell me when you first learned about the 
oontribution from the Hu<2:hes people to Mr. Rebozo? 

Miss AVoons. As I have testified before, sir, on February 20, I 
believe it was. I do not know the exact date. 

Mr. Lexzxer. Do you recall what month or year? 

INIiss Woods. Xo, I do not. 

Mr. Lexzxer. And you arc saying now that you cannot recall 
what year it was that Mr. Kebozo advised you of the contribution? 

Miss Woods. I am saying that. I will give you the letter that I 
wrote to IIvS, if I can find it in my briefcase — oh, here it is. I have 
submitted this previously. 

Mr. Lexzner. Yes, ma'am. 

Miss Woods. Submitted it to the committee, and this is my recol- 
lection of that transaction. *• 

Mr. Lexzxer. May I have this marked as exhibit 1? 

Senator Baker. That will be received and so marked. 

[The document referred to was marked Woods exhibit Xo. 1 for 
identification.*] 

Miss Woods. I think I should explain, as I have before, I get 
maybe 50 or 60 telephone calls every day and I talk to many, many 
people every day. I have worked for the President now over 22 
years. I am sorry, I would like to be an expert. I don't think there 
are any living who can remember dates, years. I doubt if very many 
people know what they were doing, let's say, April 10, 1970, or 1968, 
or any other year. 

Mr. Lexzxer. Do you recall Avho first told you about the Hughes 
contribution? 

]Miss AVooDs. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Lexzxer. Who was that? 

Miss Woods. Mr. Rebozo. 

Mr. Lexzxp:r. And do you recall where he told you? 

Miss Woods. And I don't like you saying "who first told you." 
He is the man who told me. 

Mr. Lexzxer. All I was trying to ascertain was whether you had 
any prior conversations with anybody before Mr. Rebozo ' advised 
you of the contribution ? 

Miss Woods. Xo, sir; I did not. 

Mr. Lexzxer. And do you recall where Mr. Rebozo advised you? 

Miss Woods. Xo, I am sorry. I do not know Avhether it was by 
phone or person or whether it was in AVashington or whether it was 
in Florida. I really do not remember. 

Mr. Lexzxer. And I take it then you also do not recall whether 
any other individuals were present? 

Miss AVooDs. I do recall there were no other individuals present 
because I don't talk with— because I can't imagine Mr. Rebozo 
telling me something like that with someone present. I do not carry 
on conversations of that sort— of anything that someone would con- 
sider private, personal, or whatever — with someone else present. 

♦♦Seep. 10283. 



10201 

Mr, Lexzxer. And do yon know how soon after he received the 
money that ho told yon that lie received it, Miss Woods? 

Miss AVooDS. No, sir. 

Mr. Lexzner. In othei- words 

JNIiss Woods. I am sorry; I do not. 

Mr. Lexzxer. I am sorry. Let me let yon finish yonr answer. Go 
ahead. 

Miss AVooDs. I do not recall because 1 don't recall when he told 
me, 1 don't recall when he o:ot tlie money, so I do not know how soon 
after. 

Mr. Lexzxer. T was just wonderinij;, did you get any impression 
from him as to whether he had just received it or he had it for some 
time ? 

Miss AVooDS. AVhat my imi)ression at that time was I really 
couldn't say. I don't want to guess, sir, and I don't think you would 
want me to. 

Mr. Lexzxer. Xow, would you tell us. to the best of your recol- 
lection, the substance of what Mr, Rebozo advised you when he did 
advise you of this contribution? 

Miss AA\)ODs, It is in the letter, sir, 

Mr, Lexzxer. AA^ell, vou certainlv mav look at the letter and refresh 
your recollection. I am asking noAv, to the best of your recollection, 
what Mr. Eebozo told you? 

]Miss AA'ooDs. Tliat he had a contribution from Hughes, and I have 
already testified that I cannot remember whether he said the amount 
at that time, that he Avas puting it in a safe deposit box .h in- 
structions for his attorney, and that those instructions ..ere to 
deliver — it was my understanding from liim but I did not see the 
instructions — that he Avas to deliver the money, the contents of the 
box, to the campaign chairman and the finance chairman of the next 
campaign, and I can't tell you what the next campaign was, not 
knowing exactly. 

Mr, Lexzxer. So when Mr, Ixebozo advised you of the contribution 
he did not specify which campaign the contribution was designated 
for? 

Miss AA^)()Ds. I did not ask him and he did not specify, 

Mr. Lexzxer. Fine. And do you recall whether he had first advised 
you of the contribution in the same jear that you wrote this letter? 
Can you pin it down that way? 

Miss AA^ooDs. Xo. I can certainly tell you it was not the same year, 
I don't think. This letter was Avritten October 18, 1973, and it was 
actually, as I testified previously, prepared by Mr. Buzhardt after 
he asked my recollection. And in fact he came back and changed 
some of the language. It was typed twice. 

Ml-. Lexzxer. AA^'U, why don't we go into that, INIiss AA^oods, so we 
can get that on the record, the background. I think you tall d about 
this the last time? 

Miss AA^ooDS. Yes, sir; I did. I seem to have talked about every- 
thing last time. 

Mr. Lexzx^^er. Except last time you did not indicate, I think, that 
the. letter was typed twice. 



10202 

Miss Woods. I think I said he had changed it, sir, I believe, I do 
not know. 

Mr. Lexzxer. Well, anyway, let's ^ro on now. 

Can you tell the committee the circumstances around which this 
letter was prepared from the beginning ? 

Miss Woods. From the beginning? Mr. Buzhardt came in and said 
that the IKS was a]:)parently in there checking or they were going 
over Mr. Rebozo's files. He Avanted — Mr, Buzhardt wanted to give 
them a letter on the Hughes' loan, I mean, the Hughes contribution, 
and he asked if I would be Avilling to sign a letter they could give 
to the IRS and I said. "Yes, I would,'' and I gave him the best of 
my knowledge on it. He wrote the letter and then, as I say, it was 
typed twice because he just changed a couple of words in the letter. 
There was no major change. I*" don't even remember whether he 
changed "to" or a "by" or what it was, because he prepared the 
letter and Mrs. Acker t^ped it. 

Mr. Lexzxer. Do you recall anybody else being present when Mr. 
Buzhardt asked you to prepare the letter? 

Miss Woods. He didn't ask me to prepare the letter. He asked me 
the facts and he prepared the letter. 

Mr. Lexzxer. All right. Do you remember who else was present 
at that time? 

Miss Woods. No, I don't imagine anyone was. I think I was sitting 
at my desk and he came in. 

Mr. Lexzxer. And did he indicate who specifically had requested 
him to get that letter? 

Miss A^''()ODS. I don't believe he did, sir. He said something about 
IRS. I don't recall that he indicated. 

He addressed tlie letter to ]Mr. John Bartlett, but whether some- 
body else asked him, you would have to ask Mr. Buzhardt about 
that. 

Mr. Lex'zner. What I was getting at was you were not aware 
that ]Mr. Gemmill had any communication witli INIr. Buzhardt with 
respect to this letter ? 

Miss Woods. Sir? Mr. Buzhardt and I do not have very many 
occasions to have to talk to each other. I don't know whether Mr. 
Gemmill asked him to get the letter or not from me. 

Mr. Lexzxer. As I understand it, you furnished him the informa- 
tion and he had it typed up ; Mrs. Acker typed it up ? 

Miss Woods. No, iVIrs. Acker typed it up. He changed, or someone 
changed it. He brought it back, she was in the office when he brought 
it back and she retyped it. 

Mr. Lexzxer. Now, did you review it before he made changes on 
the letter? ^ 

Miss Woods. I had signed it, sir. 
Mr. Lexzner. You had signed it? 
Miss AVooDs. Yes, and he brought it back; yes. 
Mr. Lexzxer. And then you gave it back to Mr. Buzhardt? 
Miss Woods. I didn't give it back to him. I gave it to him when 
I signed it, yes. 

Mr. Lexzxer. And he looked at it and what was his reaction? 



10203 

Miss Woods. AVell, I don't know. His reaction— I don't know. He 
took it away, he came back and changed a couple of words and it 
was retyped. 

jNIr. Lexzxer. And did he discuss with you the changes in the 
letter? 

iNIiss Woods. Asked if that was all right with me and whether I 
would sign it and I said, "Yes, sir, I would be glad to." 

Mr. Lexzxer. Do you know if he talked to anybody, other than 
you, about the changes in the letter? 

Miss Woods. I do not know, sir, you will have to ask Mr. Buzhardt 
that. I didn't follow him out of the office. I have a very busy job 
and I staved in mv own office and did my own work. 

Mr. Lexzxer. He didn't indicate to you, "I talked to Mr. Rebozo" 
or somebody else "and he feels it was this way." 

Miss Woods. Xo, he did not indicate that. 

Mr. Lexzxer. Do you recall what changes were made in the body 
of the letter? 

Miss Woods. No. To my knowledge, as I recall, they were insig- 
nificant and I do not recall. 

INIr. Lexzxer. Did you keep a copy of the first letter? 

Miss Woods. No. 

JNIr. Lexzxer. You say you did sign the first letter? 

Miss Woods. That is right. There was no reason to keep it. There 
was only reason to keep the one that went on record and that we have 
done and supplied. 

Mr. Lexzxer. Did you destroy the first letter ? 

Miss Woods. Probably, probably tore it up and threw it in the burn 
bag or in my waste basket or maybe INIarge did when she retyped it. 
I couldn't swear to either one. 

Mr. Lexzxer. Are you saying now you have no recollection of what 
you did with the original letter that you signed ? 

Miss Woods. I am not saying I have no recollection, I am saying 
"probably" which would be 'my practice. It was not going to be used, 
it was scratched out whatever words, or whatever was changed. It was 
torn up, as I think most offices tear up things. You just don't have 
room to keep things that are not of any consequence sitting around 
that have been changed. You keep the one that is the official docu- 
ment. At least that is the way our office is run. 1 can't speak for other 
offices. 

Mr. Lexzxer. Do you recall if there was any change with regard to 
the sentence indicating ^Mr. Eebozo had told you that he put the cam- 
paign contribution in a safe deposit box? Was that changed at all? 

INIiss Woods. I don't believe, sir, because that is what he told me. I 
can't believe they would change that. 

Mr. Lexzxer.' Was there any change in the sentence: "It was my 
understanding that these instructions were to deliver the content to 
the campaign chairman or finance chairman of the next campaign"? 

Miss Woods. I think I have already testified, sir, I did not talk 
with anyone else about the contribution. 

Mr. Lexzxer. Ever again; is that what you are saying now? 

Miss Woods. You asked me whether I — would you repeat your 
question ? 



10204 

Mr. Lenzner. "Wlien was the next time you discussed the Hughes 
contribution? 

IMiss Woods. You said "Avith anyone else"? 

INIr. Lenzner. Let me just leave it like that, ^^Hien was the next time 
you discussed the Hughes contribution after ]Mr, Rebozo first told you 
about it? 

Miss Woods. I haven't any idea, whether he mentioned it in pass- 
ing. You see, when someone tells you or at least tells me something 
important, they might mention it in passing some other time. I don't 
think I would ever say it was really discussed. If he mentioned — if he 
were to mention — when we were in Florida or when he comes to the 
"\Miite House he always stops by — and I want you all to know he did 
this morning just to say he had been here 2 days and he wished me 
well, and gave me a kiss because •'vve have been friends since 1952, and 
that would be sort of expected. And if he ever came in the AVhite 
House and didn't come by the office and say "Hi" I would be insulted. 
He may have at some time in Florida or Washington or somewhere 
mentioned it, but I would not say it was what I would call a discus- 
sion. 

INIr. Lenzner. Do you recall whether on the first occasion that he 
discussed this, that he had told you that he had received a contribution 
and was expecting additional funds? 

Miss Woods. I do not recall that, sir. 

INIr. Lenzner. Do you recall whether he ever told you after the first 
discussion that he had, in fact, received a subsequent second contri- 
bution ? 

Miss Woods. I do not recall that. I only know that whatever he had 
gotten from Hughes was — what I know about is in that letter — that 
he had gotten it from Hughes and it was in a safe deposit box. 

Mr. Lenzner. Do you ever recall him telling you that Mr. Danner 
had delivered the money to him? 

INIiss Woods. Yes and you will find that in the letter. I am sorry. I 
have your copy or you must have a copy right in front of you. Is this 
their copy? 

Mr. Lenzner. That is the exhibit for the record. 

Miss Woods. Yes, I am sorry. 

Mr. William Rhyne. Is it marked ? 

Mr. Lenzner. Yes. So what you are saying now, INIiss Woods, as I 
understand it, that you had several conversations or discussions. 

Miss Woods. Xo, sir. 

Mr. Lenzner. Well, the subject came up again — let's put it that 
way — didn't it? 

Miss Woods. Now, please. I would like you not to misquote me, sir. 
I did not say "we had several discussions." I said that when someone 
tells me something, which I think is important, that is the thing that 
I Avould remember that I knew it. If it were mentioned in passing, 
that wouldn't mean anything to me. If I were supposed to remember 
something and not talk about it, that would be the important thing to 
me. 

But if Bebe — Mr. Rebozo T should say for the record — would, in 
passing, say something, I personally would not say that was a dis- 



10205 

cussion. I don't think we had several discussions, there was nothing 
to discuss so far as I know. 

Mr. Lenzner. Well, when Mr. Buzhardt asked you to prepare this 
letter for the IRS, was that the first occasion that you were aware of 
that fact that the IRS was investigating this case? 

;Mr. Woods. I don't think so, sir. I think I heard it before. 

INIr. Lenzxer. And approximately how long before Mr. Buzhardt 
had this conversation, did you hear that? 

Miss Woods. I don't even know when the IRS started to investigate 
]\Ir. Rebozo. I just remember his calling one day to talk about some 
other things and saying the IRS is there, is here, and I remember 
really being very sympathetic to him because I think in running a 
bank, particularly it is a little hard if your customers read in the 
newspapers that you are being investigated by IRS. And if any of us 
have a friend, I think you would sympathize with them. 

But what the date was, I am sorry, I don't know. I couldn't tell 
you. I don't know what date they went in. ^Maybe it has been in the 
"paper but I have very little time to read the papers and don't really 
waste much of my time on them. 

INIr. Lexzxer. And what exactly do you recall Mr. Rebozo telling 
you at that time when he called you ? 

Miss Woods. Just what I said, "The IRS is here." 

Mr. Lexzxer. And did he indicate they were investigating him? 

Miss Woods. Well, I would assume so.'Why would they be there if 
they weren't investigating him ? 

Mr. Lexzxer. Well, I am not asking for assumptions. I am just 
asking for your recollection of what Mr. Rebozo told you. 

INIiss Woods. I am telling you I have no recollection. I don't know 
whether he said they are investigating me personally. 

Mr. Lexzxer. Did you ask him why the IRS was there? 

Miss Woods. Xo, sir! I did not ask why the IRS was there. 

Mr. Lexv.xer. So as far as you knew when you hung up the phone 
that day, the IRS being there had nothing to do with the Hughes 
contribution ? 

Miss Woods. I didn't know that it did, sir, no. 

]\Ir. Lexzxer. Did you tell anybody else that the IRS was investi- 
gating, or had been talking to INIr. Rebozo ? 

Miss Woods. I don't believe so. I don't recall telling anyone else. I 
would have no reason to because what could I do about it? Nothing. 

INIr. Lexzxer. Did you have any other conversations that you can 
now recall in addition to that telephone call with Mr. Rebozo, any 
conversations with regard to the IRS investigation ? 

INIiss Woods. When we have been down there maybe he has men- 
tioned that they had been in and out several times or one group had 
been in and said they were going to stay so long or something. I 
don't reallv recall because I don't know that much about INIr. Rebozo's 
business, about the IRS. I don't know. I am sure that has gone on 
for, it seems to me, a long time. Whether it is completed or not, I 
don't even know that. 

Mr. Lexzxer. Did you learn on some occasion from Mr. Rebozo 
that, in fact, the IRS was looking into his reception of the $100,000 
from Hughes? 



10206 

Miss Woods. T don't kno\r whether T learned it from ]Mr. Rebozo, 
from the paper, from tlie committee. I have testified so much now. I 
liave lieard so many thin<rs from some other people. And as I testified 
on the 20tli, I remember seeing the gentleman, whoever he was, bring- 
ing the money to the committee, which I think must have been quite 
a shock and a temptation to everyone. But I don't know. I would just 
have to say again, I really don't know. 

Mr. Lkxzner. So you are saying that you can't recall ISIr. Kebozo 
ever saying to you, however he calls you, "The IRS is here looking 
into that contribution that I had told you about before"? 

^liss Woods. No, sir. I don't think we discussed specific things that 
IRS was investigating. He is busy and— good morning, Senator, 
Inouye — and I certainly am busy. And when he does call, he doesn't 
call the President, as I think t testified before, or the first family 
very often. He does call me, asking how things are going, and has 
over the years. As I say, I have known him since 1952. 

What he said and what I have said in those many, many conversa- 
tions, I am sorry, I just don't remember. 

Mr. Lexzxer. Did there come a time when you learned that Mr. 
Cox's office, the former Special Prosecutor, was also beginning to 
conduct an investigation with regard to INIr. Rebozo? 

]Miss Woods. No, sir, I never knew anything about Mr. Cox. You 
see, that would be the counsel's office or someone else. No, sir, I did 
not know that ]\Ir. Cox's office was investigating ISIr. Rebozo, if they 
were in fact. 

INIr. Lexzner. But Mr. Rebozo never so indicated to you ? 

INIiss Woods. No, he did not. 

INIr. Lexzner. Can you approximate how many times the contribu- 
tion came up in discussion with Mr. Rebozo? 

Miss Woods. Sir, I would doubt if it came up more than twice and, 
if that, just very brief things. And I don't know if it even came up. 
I really have no firm recollection. 

Mr. Lexzxer. You think about twice? That would be the first time 
he told you and another time? 

]Miss Woods. Maybe once he may have mentioned the Hughes peo- 
ple seemed to be having so much trouble or something, but no dis- 
cussion, sir. I want to make that clear. It would be only a casual 
remark. 

Mr. Lexzxer. He never offered any details with regard to the con- 
tribution in addition to Avhat you have already written in the letter 
or details regarding the Hughes outfit and the problems that they 
were having? 

]Nriss Woods. No, sir. I wasn't interested in their problems, sir. 

Senator Baker. Could I interrupt for a moment? It is necessary 
for me to leave now and the record should show that Senator Inouye 
and Senator Montoya are here. Of course, if the committee requires 
my presence, I have advised counsel where I will be. 

Mr. Lenzner. Miss Woods, let me ask you now, do you have any 
other documents, besides the correspondence that you sent to Mr. 
Bartlett — was prepared actually by Mr. Buzhardt, related to the 
Hughes contribution ? 

Miss Woods. No, sir, I do not. 



10207 

]\rr. Lexzxer. Did you ever have occasion after October 18, 1973, 
which is the date of exhibit 1. to discuss your letter with Mr. Rebozo? 

Miss Woods. I really don't know. I am sure that either we must 
have sent him a copy or INIr. Buzhardt — by "we" I mean Mrs. Acker 
mioht have sent him a copy, but I don't think we discussed it. I don't 
recall discussin«r it. 

Mr. Lexzxer. Have you discussed the contribution with Mr. Rebozo 
in the last 2 Aveeks? 

Mis "Woods. The Hu<ihes contribution in the last 2 weeks? 

]Mr. Lexzxp:r. Yes. ma'am. 

INIiss Woods. I don't recall doino; so ; I don't recall it, sir. I think 
the last I heard of the Hughes coritribution was quite some time ago 
after it had been. T don't know how it went back, but it went back 
somewhere and then ended up at the committee, and I don't know 
whore it is now 

Mr. Lexzxer. You mean the money itself? 

]Miss Woods. Yes. I do recall his saying that the money was exactly 
the same money that he had received. And I don't know enough about 
huge sums of money to know how that is established unless it is all 
wrapped up or something. I don't realh' know. 

Mr. Lexzxer. Do you recall when Mr. Rebozo told you that? 

]\riss Woods. Xo. I don't, sir. 

jNIr. Lexzxer. Was it on or about 

JNIiss Woods. But it wasn't in the last 2 weeks, I wouldn't think. 

Mr. Lexzxer. Do you tie that conversation, or as you say, "men- 
tioning," into the delivery of the funds to the committee? 

]Miss Woods. Approximately that time, sir, would be the best of my 
recollection. 

Mr. Lexzxer. And that is the first time that he told you it was 
exactly the same money? 

Miss Woods. I believe so, sir. 

jNlr. Lexzxer. There was a discussion in the newspapers in a column 
on August 6, 1971, which disclosed publicly that Mr. Rebozo had 
received $100,000 from Mr. Danner. I believe that was in Jack An- 
derson's column. Do you recall reading that article or having any dis- 
cussions with regard to that article? 

Miss Woods. I think you will recall, sir, I testified on February 20, 
I never read Jack Anderson's column. 

Mr. Lexzxer. I understand that. 

Miss Woods. So I Avould not have — so the answer to your question 
is no, I did not read Jack Anderson's column. 

Mr. Lexzxer. Did you have any discussion with anybody with re- 
gard to that column ? 

INIiss Woods. I doubt that. 

Mr. Lexzxer. You have no recollection of it? 

IVIiss Woods. I have no recollection of it. 

Mr. Armstroxg. ]Miss Woods, at any time did anyone come and ask 
you whether or not the Hughes Tool Co. or ]Mr. Howard Hughes had 
made any contributions to the Presidential campaign in 1972? 

Miss Woods. Not to my recollection, sir. I don't know why they 
would ask me that. 

At what time ? At any time ? 



10208 

Mr. Armstroxg. Any time. 

Miss Woods. T am sorry, sir, could you repeat that? "Would you re- 
peat your (juostion? 

Sonntor Mc^xtoya. Would you confine the time? 

INlr. Armstroxg. Well, after January 1, 1969, did anyone ever come 
to you 

5lr. Dastt. ITntil what date? I think there oucht to be a timeframe. 

Miss A^^■>ons. T don't know that my memory is this good. 

Mr. Armstroxg. Up to the time you wrote the letter to the Internal 
Revenue Service, did anvone come to you and ask whether or not Mr. 
Huirhps or the Hughes tool Co. had contributed $100,000 to the Dick 
Nixon 197*2 Presidential campaign? 

]Miss Woods. Xo, sir, I don't recall anyone coming and asking me 
that, because I think I have already testified that I discussed that 
contribution with no one but ]\k. Rebozo. 

Mr. Armstroxg. AVell. it wouldn't necessaiily be contradictory that 
someone had asked you, but that you liad not discussed it. 

I am asking if anyone has ever posed that question? 

]\Iiss Woods. I do not recall anyone ever posing the question. 

]\Ir. Armstroxg. Had anyone posed that question, you would re- 
call it. would you not ? 

JMiss Woods. I would certainly think so, but I do not remember 
every conversation I have had in the last even 5 or 6 years, sir. 

INlr. ARjvrsTROXG. Since January 1, 1969, has anyone asked you 
whether Mr. Howard Hughes or the Hughes Tool (>o. made a con- 
tribution to the 1970 congressional campaign and whether it was 
received? 

INIiss Woods. By "anyone" who do you mean, sir? 

Mr. Armstroxg. I mean anyone. 

INIr. Dash. Up until what date? 

Mr. Armstroxg. Up until the time that you signed the letter to the 
Intei'ual Revenue Service? 

]Miss Woods. I don't remember whether anyone ever asked me, but 
I do not recall anyone asking me, sir. 

jNIr. Armstroxg, Is that not something you would also recall if 
someone asked you a question about whether or not a contribution 
had been nuide by ]\[r. Hughes and the Hughes Tool Co. to the 1970 
congressional campaign ? 

Miss Woods. No, sir, I must tell you 1 wouldn't because a lot of 
people asked me whother David Rockefeller has cojitributed to cer- 
tain campaigns, whether someone in California has contributed a cer- 
tain amount. That would not be an unusual (juestion and I wouldn't 
really be able to answer unless I w^ent to a list or something to look. 

INIr. Armstroxg. If they asked you whether or not Mr. Rebozo had 
received such a contribution, would you not remember it then? 

Aliss Woods. I am not sure. I would think I would, but I do not — 
and as I have testified previously — I do not recall anvone asking me 
that. 

Mr. Armstrong. OK. Do you recall if anyone since January 1, 1969, 
has asked you Avhether or not JNIr. Howard Hughes, the Hughes Tool 
Co., contributed to the 1968 Presidential campaign up until the time 
that you signed the letter for the IRS ? 



10209 

INIiss AVooDs. I do not recall being asked about any specific contri- 
bTitions, sir. As I say again, someone might say, "Did Mr. Scott Arm- 
strong donate to the campaign" and I Avouldn't remember that either. 

Mr. Arivistrong. And if Mr. Rebozo's name were mentioned, would 
you not tlien recall it? 

Miss AVooDs. Xot necessarily. I have known INIr. Rebozo, as I said, 
22 years or so, and his name is mentioned in many instances. But I 
have never discussed the $100,000 with anyone but Mr. Rebozo. 

Mr. Armstrong. Well, if someone had asked you the question after 
the time ]Mr. Rebozo informed you he had received the contribution, 
would you not in fact recall? 

]\riss Woods. I have already said, sir, I w^ould not recall because I 
don't recall. If I did recall, I would be glad to tell you. 

INIr. Dasti. I think the question has been answered. 

]Miss Woods. I am trying teri'ibly hard to cooperate. 

]Mr. Dash. To expedite it, I don't think you have to ask it again. I 
don't think we should repeat questions. 

]Mr. AR:NrsTR0XG. I don't believe we have. 

At any time, did ^Nlr. James Golden come and ask you whether or 
not ]Mr. Hughes had made a contribution? 

Miss Woods. I don't recall that he did, sir, and I think I testified 
to that on February 20. 

]Mr. Armstrong. At any time did ]Mr. Jack Gleason ask you whether 
or not Mr. Hughes had made such a contribution? 

jNIiss Woods. I don't — no, sir, I just do not recall his ever asking me 
who made contributions and I do not remember it. 

jNIr. AR]\rsTR0NG. Do you know Mr. Gleason ? Are vou familiar with 
him? 

]Miss Woods. I have met Mr. Gleason. I know him. I do not know 
him well. 

^Nfr. Ar^estrong. Do you know what his responsibilities were during 
1970 in the congressional and senatorial campaigns? 

jNIiss Woods. I think, as I testified previously, I think he helped out 
in campaign fundraising in some way. How, I do not know. I had 
nothing — I would like to make clear to the Senators who were not 
present on February 20 — I have never had anything to do with rais- 
ing of political campaign funds. And the only reason that I have had 
these lists— and these gentlemen have not heard this — I have lists be- 
cause I think everybody who ever runs for office would keep a list of 
everyone who contributed because they have to submit it anyway to 
the Clerk of the House or whoever the proper authority is. 

My lists were for the reason of having lists for invitations to din- 
ners. They were not just contributors. I have thousands of names of 
Democrats for Xixon, as I think I testified previously ; of attorneys, 
doctors, everyone. 

So, I just — so my mind cannot remember every name I have ever 
seen or heard of. 

Mr. Armstrong. Do you recall if Mr. Gleason on any occasion con- 
sulted you as to whether or not individuals had made campaign con- 
tributions ? 

Miss Woods. I don't believe he ever did, sir, I do not recall it 

Mr. Armstrong. OK. So you therefore would not recall 



10210 

Miss "Woods [contiimino:]. Because they would not make the con- 
tribution to me. sir. So if he had to ask that, I think he would ask 
wlioever was tlie campai<rn chairman, 

Mr. Akmstuoxo. But are you sure he never asked you to consult 
your dinner list? 

Miss Woods. I am sorry? 

Mr. Ahmstkoxg. Asked you to consult youi- invitation list to see if 
someone liad made a campai<rn contribution? 

Miss A\'ooDs. I don-t recall his asking me to consult my invitation 
lists. 

Mr. AiorsTRONo. Do you recall an instance in which he asked you to 
consult the list— and this is to help you refresh your recollectioii— 
ask you to consult the list to see if Mr. ilu<rhes contributed to the 
11)()8 oi- li)TO campai<iiis and at -that time you informed him that you 
couldn't be bothered, that was Iluirhcs' problem, or something to that 
efl'ect ? ])o you recall any such instance? 

Miss AA'ooDS. He asked me about a list and whether Mr. Hughes had 
contributed and I said that I couldn't be bothered because that was 
somebody else's problem ? 

]Mr. AimsTROXG. Ivight. 

IMiss "Woods. Xo, sir, that doesn't even sound like me. I don't 
think— I may have red hair and I may have a temper, but I don't 
think I am rude. I really don't. 

Mr. Armstkoxg. You don't recall an instance in which he indicated 
the substance of that, regardless of the form? 

Miss "Woods. Xo, sir. I do not recall that. And I do not believe he 
would ask or anyone would ask from an invitation list whether some- 
one had contributed because, and I think anybody who reads the so- 
ciety section of any paper will tell you that the lists of people — that 
an invitation list is made up maybe l/50th on a big occasion — if it is 
a stag dinner — might be contributors. 

Xow a State dinner, we are very lucky if two contributors are in 
the dinner. 

The President and ^Irs. Xixon have tried to include as many dif- 
ferent people because they feel, and I think everyone should feel, the 
AVhite House belongs to the public and many people, different Sena- 
tors, Congressmen and I think also you will lind a lot of aides to the 
Senators and Congressmen have been invited to functions at the 
"NATiite House to try to get in as many as possible. 

And so a contributors' list and an invitation list are two separate 
things. 

Mr. AR:\rsTR0XG. I understand that, ^Nliss "Woods. I don't want to 
require you to repeat all of your previous testimony, but did you not 
tell us. and I believe it was February 20th. that, in fact, contributor 
lists were forwarded to you for the purpose of making invitations to 
the "White House? Ts that correct or not correct? 

Miss Woods. That is correct, sir. But T also told you that there are 
45 or 50 other lists, which are contributed for exactly the same rea- 
son, for invitation. 

Mr. Armstkoxg. Fine. Xow I gather 

Miss Woods. And I think I gave you a pretty long list of them and 
I can present a whole list if you would like. 



10211 

Mr. Armstroxg. Yes, we would like that. 

]\riss Woods. All right. 

INIr. Armstrong. ^Nliss "Woods, let me make sure I understand that. 
It would be highly unusual for someone to call you and ask you to 
consult those lists to find out if someone had made a contribution, is 
that correct ? 

Miss Woods. I don't think anybody would ever ask me to consult 
my invitation lists, to see if anybody made a contribution. 

^Ir. Armstrong. So you can say without doubt that Mr. Gleason 
did not ? 

]Miss "Woods. I can say to my recollection he never asked me. If he 
said he did. maybe he called and asked my office, but my office would 
not know from an invitation list whether someone contributed. 

Mr. Armstrong. But he did not speak to you personally about it? 

jSIiss "Woods. Xo, sir. 

ISlr. Armstrong. At any time, have you referred anyone who was 
making inquiries about contributions to Mr. Gleason? 

Mr. CiTARLEs Rhtne. Could you start over? 

]Mr, Armstrong. Yes. At any time since January 1, 1969, have you 
referred any individual, who was making inquiries about contribu- 
tions, to Mr. Gleason? 

]Miss "Woods. Xot to the best of my knowledge. I have no recollec- 
tion of ever referring anyone to ^Ir. Gleason. 

]Mr. Armstrong. And therefore you would have no recollection of 
referring ]Mr. Golden to Mr. Gleason? 

INIiss "\Voods. Xo, sir. 

]Mr. Armstrong. And would you recall such a matter if he had? 

]Miss "Woods. I would think so. As I say, I don't really know Mr. 
Gleason well. I met him. I know he apparently worked with Mr. 
Stans. I don't really knoAV who he worked for and I don't know 
where he works now. 

]\Ir. Lenzner. Did you ever discuss with ]Mr. Golden anything to do 
with the Hughes organization ? 

Miss Woods. Xot the Hughes organization. I remember INIr. Golden 
dropping in, as I think I testified on February 20. He was a Secret 
Service man. When the President was "V^ice President and we had 
only two Secret Service men — and I think I would like to bring this 
up "and I haven't done this previously and I would like to say some- 
thing — when ]\[r. Xixon was Vice President, he became Vice Presi- 
dent after having been a junior Senator from California, and we had 
to drop, I believe, seven people from the staff because the Vice Pres- 
ident then did not have very much of an allotment. We had two Se- 
cret Service men who did go to his home to bring him to work. His 
home was not guarded. Jim Golden eventually became one of those 
people. They came to the office at 9 and unless the Vice President and 
his wife were going to some enormous event we had no coverage. We 
had a staff of 15. 

So I know Jim Golden because he came in after — well, first we had 
Jack Sherwood and Rex Scouten, Dale Grub, and Jim Golden I think 
replaced them as they left, but then Jim Golden went to California 
with us for a period, I believe, of about a few months. He would have 
to tell you how many months. I don't know. 



10212 

"^ATien he comes to the AVhite House, he. I believe, or at least it has 
been my experience, stops first to see Shelly Buchanan, who was one 
of the people who Avas with us in 19G0, visits with her and visits with 
all of liis old friends. And he has dropped in to see me but I do not 
believe he has ever made an appointment to see me, sir. 

And as far as the Ilufrhes thing;, and T believe this is in your tes- 
timony which I mailed to each Senator, which Mr. Ehyne mailed, he 
did toll mo some wild tales — and it must be a wild thing to work for 
Mr. Hn<rhes — about ^oiiiir from — and I don"t know whether it was 
from Nevada to the Bahamas or from the Bahamas to Canada, but 
he did tell me all of the things necessary to move someone like that 
and I was fascinated by that story and even then I don't remember 
wliich move it was. 

]\Ir. Li.xzni-:r. INIiss Woods, did INIr. Rebozo ever indicate to you 
that ho had lost the kejs to his safe deposit box that he had placed 
the money in? 

Miss Woods. Xot to the best of my recollection, sir. 

Mr. Lexzxer. Did he indicate to you that he had other political 
contributions in the same safe deposit box? 

]\liss Woods. Not to the best of my recollection. I don't remember. 
The only recollection I have is of the $100,000 of the Hughes'. 

Mr. Lexzxer. And did he ever tell you that he had removed the 
wrappers from the $100,000? 

]Miss Woods. No, sir. That is why I said I didn't know how — that 
I don't know enough about money to know and if — I don't know any- 
thing. In other words as I say, he said it was the same money, but I 
don't know how people know it is the same money unless they have a 
listing of the bills, I suppose. 

Mr. Lexzxer. But he did tell you it was $100,000? 

iNIiss AVoods. At some time. He either told me or I read it in the 
paper or I saw when it came to the committee, and I think that also 
has been testified to several times. 

Mr. Lexzxer, Did he discuss the return of the funds with you be- 
fore he returned them? 

Miss Woods. I don't recall, he may have said, you know, "I am try- 
ing to return them.'' I don't really know. Jlo didn't discuss it Avith me. 
Again, we liave a difl'erent definition of a discussion. To my mind a 
discussion is something where you would have part in something. If 
he said, ''I am tiying to return the Hughes money" in passing — I dun't 
recall that he did ; he may have — that again Avould not be my problem, 
sir. That would be Mr. liebozo's problem. 

Mr. Lexzxer. Well, as I understand it, some time last year 

Miss Woods. An awful lot has happened in the last year. 

Mr. Lenzxer. Tlial is also true, but that is not a considerable 
amount of time and I wonder if you could recall any specific convei'sa- 
tions with him with regard to tlie return of the funds? 

Miss "\A'()()DS. No, sii-. 1 recall no specific conversation. 

Mr. Lexzxer. Do you recall Mr. Kobozo advising you that he was 
also discussing this with General Haig? 

Miss Woods. No, sir; I don't recall his telling me that. 

Mr. Lexzxer. Well, did you ever become aware of that from other 
sources ? 



10213 

Miss "Woods. T don't recall, no. 

A^ain, let me tell you that General Haig's office and mine are close 
together. Mr. Rebozo stops in to say hello and I am sure he talks with 
General Haig about a lot of things, but he doesn't — but nobody who 
comes in talks to everybody about the same thing and I don't recall 
that Haig part at all, no. 

INIr. Lexzxer. Did "Sir. Eebozo ever advise you that he discussed 
this with INIr. Garment? 

Miss Woods. No, not to my knowledge, sir. 

INIr. Lexzxer. And you never learned it from anv other source that 
he was discussing this contribution with Mr. Garment? 

Miss Woods. Discussing a returning of the money? 

]Mr. Lexzx'er. Discussing the contributions generally with Mr. Gar- 
ment, generally. 

Miss Woods. You see that is a different question, sir. 

INIr. Lenzxer. Well, let me ask two questions : Did you learn that 
]Mr. Rebozo was discussing with INIr. Garment the Hughes' contribu- 
tion ? 

i\Iiss Woods. No, sir. not to the best of my recollection did I ever 
know he talked to INIr. Garment. I don't even know he talked to Mr. 
Garment about anything. 

]\Ir. Lexzxer. Did you ever learn from INIr. Rebozo or others that 
he had discussed the contribution with Mr. William Griffin? 

INIiss Woods. I learned that, I believe, last week, since I have testi- 
fied to you that he discussed it. 

Mr. Lexzxer. Mr. Rebozo told you last week about that? 

ISIiss Woods. No, I heard that from — yes, I think Mr. Rebozo said 
he asked ]Mr. Griffin his advice or something. But that was last — that 
was I think when we were in Key Biscayne which was last week, 
which was a couple of weeks ago, whenever I was there. I would have 
to look at the calendar. 

But it has been since I had testified to you before. And as I told 
you then I am sure — and I don't remember the exact words — but I 
only know Mr. Griffin as- — and I met him socially in New York — 
and I know him as INIr. Abplanalp's attorney and is considered a very 
bright man. And this is the context in which the last time we were in 
Key Biscayne, Bebe and I — I am sorry, INIr. Rebozo I should say— 
this is the context. INIr. Rebozo mentioned that he had discussed this 
matter with INIr. Griffin, simply because he was a very bright man. 
And then as I say again, I only know Mr. Griffin socially. 

Mr. Lexzxer. You have never discussed it with him? 

Miss Woods. No, sir. 

INIr. Lexzxer. Who else was present at Key Biscayne when you had 
this conversation with ]Mr. Rebozo? 

ISIiss Woods. I haven't the slightest idea. When we are in Key Bis- 
cayne, once in awhile Mr. Rebozo and I will have lunch together or 
breakfast or dinner together or maybe, you know, I might see him for 
a few minutes. I don't know whether we were alone or not. I just re- 
member hearing JNIr. Griffin's name mentioned. 

Mr. Lex^zxer. Well, do you recall if President Nixon was present 
during that discussion ? 

]Miss Woods. No, sir, I do not recall. Mr. Rebozo may remember. 
If he says he was, he was. I don't know. 



10214 

Mr. Lenzxer. "Well, I don't mean to press on this, but now we are 
talking about a conversation of a few weeks a<j:o at most and is it your 
testimony that you cannot recall who else was present when Mr. Re- 
bozo advised you he had previously discussed this with Mr. Griflin? 

Miss Woods. That is my testimony, sir. 

INIr. Lexzxer. Did Mr. Rebozo tell you when he discussed this with 
Mr. Griffin? 

]Miss Woods. I don't believe so, sir. I just know that he said he dis- 
cussed it with him. I didn't ask him. Again, it didn't matter to me 
when he discussed it with ]Mr. Griffin. I wouldn't ask him when he 
discussed it with Mr. Griffin. 

I think the reason it was even mentioned is that he was saying that 
]Mr. Abplanalp had a very bright man and, as I remember it, it was 
just in passing he mentioned tli?.t he had talked with INIr. Griffin. But 
who was present, I am sorry I cannot tell you. 

Mr. Lenzner. Well how did the whole subject of the Hughes con- 
tribution arise several weeks ago in Key Biscayne in the conversation ? 

Miss Woods, Is this — ^you mean the Bill Griffin topic ? Is that what 
you are saying ? 

INIr. Lexzner. Yes. 

Miss Woods. I don't know how it arose, sir. I just don't know, sir, 
how it arose. 

I suppose just — after all, we have been terribly concerned about an 
awful lot of things, and I don't know. Most of the things I don't have 
a chance to read. I have been, as you know, testifying so much. I don't 
remember how the discussion started. If I thought I had to, as I re- 
marked, I would have kept notes of everyone I talked to for the last 
few years, how long, who they were and what they said. But I don't 
know how the discussion started, no. I don't know how it happened to 
come up except it has to be on everybody's mind. 

]Mr. Lenzxer. All right. I take it you have had discussions in the 
last several weeks on occasion with Mr. Rebozo with regard to his 
being called up here and your previous discussions with us. Is that not 
an accurate statement ? 

JNIiss Woods. Discussions Avith him in the last several weeks with 
regard to his coming up here? 

Mr. Lenzner. Yes. 

Miss Woods. "^Ylien we were there I remember his saying that many 
of your people had been down there to question him. I believe Mr. 
Thompson was down one time. I think that was — but that Avas after 
there had been many others. And I am not sure. I don't know which 
of you had questioned him. 

I remember one time hearing that he was supposed to come up for 
a public hearing, and I don't know whether he told me this or some- 
one else, which was called off the Saturday before it was to start. I 
don't know if this is right or wrong but that is my recollection. 

Of his specifically coming here, I think I found out that — well, 
let's see, was he here yesterday or the day before ? 

Mr. Dash. Both days, starting on Wednesday and also yesterday. 

Miss Woods. Both days ? Then I may have found out — and I don't 
know liow many days ago but whenever — that he was going to be here. 

Mr. Lenzner. How did you find that out ? Did he call you on that ? 



10215 

Miss Woods. Oh, heavens, I don't know. All of us have been run- 
ning up and down to committee so often. I am not really sure he 
called and said "I will be up and I will see you and I will say hello" 
or not. And as I testified earlier he stopped in this morning and 
wished me well and said he had been here at the committee and was 
going back to Florida, T believe, this morning. 

Mr. Lenzxer. Did IMr. Rebozo discuss the substance of his testi- 
mony with you today? 

]Miss "Woods. No, sir ; he did not discuss the substance of his testi- 
mony. My girls were in my office. I was getting ready to put my coat 
on to meet Mr. Rhyne and he just said, "good luck." 

Mr. Lexzxer. Between the time he arrived here and the time he 
saw you this morning, has he discussed anything with regard to his 
testimony ? 

Miss Woods. His testimony? Xo, sir. I had seen him just briefly as 
he left. He came by yesterday morning and said — well, I think one 
day that he was testifying, I called ancl left a message for him to call 
because two or three people had called to ask for him and I had mes- 
sages. As a matter of fact he got out so late that I was gone because 

1 was going to the ]Moroccan Embassy so I did not talk with him. 
Last night I don't know how late he was here. I did not talk to him 

at all. 

I did not discuss with him at all last night. This morning, Mrs. 
Xelson and all of us were in there and he just stopped by to say, you 
know, good morning and good luck, but no testimony. 

]Mr. Lexzxer. Do vou know if he met with the President in the last 

2 days? 

]\Iiss Woods. Well, let's see. He may well have but I haven't. If you 
are trying to imp]}' that the President had talked with me, sir — I 
haven't because I haven't seen the President since he just came back 
from Houston and deliberately so, because I wanted to talk to no one 
at the White House about coming up here. I felt everything I had to 
say had already been said February 20, but I cannot stress too 
strongly that I just wouldn't discuss testimony. I don't think it would 
be right. And if I couldn't think of my own recollection, I might be 
giving 3^ou someone else's. 

INIr. Lexzxer. I understand that and appreciate that. My only ques- 
tion Avas, did you learn that Mr. Rebozo saw the President in the last 
2 days? 

Miss Woods. Yes, he saw him. 

]\Ir. Lexzxer. And how did you know that ? 

Miss Woods. Because Helen Smith called me yesterday. 

INIr. Lexzxer. Who is Helen Smith ? 

IVIiss Woods. JNlrs. Nixon's press secretary. 

Mr. Lexzxer. I see. And what was that conversation with regard 
to? 

ISIiss Woods. She asked me whether he spent the night at the White 
House. I told her "I didn't know ; I wasn't in charge of who stays at 
the White House." She said the Ushers' Office had informed her he 
had. I said, "Well, if they said he did, maybe lie did, but you better 
check with Mr. and Mrs. Nixon. I don't know." 



10216 

]\fr. Lkxzxer. "Well, did Mr. Rebozo advise yoii that he had, in fact, 
seen the President? 

Miss "Woods. T don't know whether he said that this morninof or not. 
T don't believe lie did, but I am sure he probably did. I can't ima<jjine 
that the President, havinp; had a friend of that many years, if he 
spent the ni<rht m the house, that he wouldn't at least say hello to him. 

Mr. TjKxznkr. Now other than the discussion in Key Biscayne, I 
<]:uess 2 weeks an:o or so 

ISfiss Woons. I think so. T think that date is approximately 2 weeks. 

IMr. Lexzxer (continuin<xl. Have you had other discussions with 
Mr. Rebozo with re<;ard to tlie Iluirhes contribution in the last sev- 
eral weeks other than the ojie you just described in Key Biscayne? 

INIiss Woods. No. sir. I told you all that I know about the Hughes 
contribution. If he in passings mentioned it, I can't remember any 
other discussions, sir. 

IVlr. Lkxzxer. Well going back to the discussions in Key Biscayne, 
did INIr. Rebozo advise you that he had had Mr. Griffin fly down to 
Florida to talk to him? 

INIiss Woods. No, he just said he talked with Mr. Griffin. I don't 
know where they talked. 

INIr. Lex-^zner. Did Mr. Rebozo advise j'ou as to what counsel ISIr. 
Griffin had given? 

Miss Woods. No, sir: and T didn't ask. I don't — again, I want you 
to know that I wouldn't feel that was any of my business to ask 
someone — he had asked counsel of — would advise him. INIaybe I am 
wrong but I just wouldn't and it w'asn't that serious a conversation. 
It was really saying how bright he felt Bill Griffin was. And I don't 
know Bill Griffin except having met him socially and that he is Mr. 
Abplanalp's, I don't know, his general counsel or his attorney or 
something. 

Mr. Lexzxer. But he did advise vou that he had consulted with 
Mr. Griffm? 

Miss Woods. He had consulted with INIr. Griffin because he felt he 
was a very bright man. 

Mr. Lexzxer. Did he advise you Avhether he, at that time, had 
consulted with other individuals? 

INIiss Woods. I don't believe so. I only remember hearing the name 
Griffin, and that Avas again, as I said, brought up because of his say- 
ing, "]Mr. Abplanalp had a gem" or something. I can't remember the 
words. 

Conversations which are just brief conversations or something, I 
am sorry I just don't have a complete total recall. 

i\[r. Lexzxer. Mr. Abplanalp liad a jam? 

Miss Woods. Something like that, tliat he had a very bright — and 
I am not talking about a "gem" that is a ring. 

]Mr. Lenzner. Oh, I see, a gem. 

Miss Woods. Have you never called anyone a gem, sir? 

Mr. Lexzxer. Yes, I thought you said ''jam." 

INIiss Woods. Oh. 

Mr. Lexzxer. Did you have any other discussions 

Mr. Charles Riiyne. He was a gem, g-e-m. 



10217 

Miss Woods. Yes. The other day I testified and I was talking about 
a stag dinner and a state dinner and someone thought I said a steak 
dinner, so maybe I should speak more clearly. I am sorry. 

Mr. Lexzxer. Did you have any other discussions in Key Biscayne 
with ]\Ir. Rebozo with regard to the Hughes contribution aside from 
the GrifRn business? 

Miss Woods. Good heavens, not to my recollection, sir. I thought 
that was all over and gone. 

Mr. Lexzxer. Well, you thought it was all over and gone, but didn't 
INfr. Rebozo advise you that he liad been summoned to appear here 
and you had also testified on February 20; in other words, you 
thought in Key Biscayne 2 Aveeks ago that the whole subject was 
closed ? 

^Nliss Woods. No, sir. You asked me — would you ask one question 
at a time ? You asked me whether we had discussed the Hughes loan, 
the Hughes contribution. I keep saying, "loan" because everybody 
goes back to 1953 and 1954, and my memory is not even good for a few 
months. 

I think your question — could you repeat the question ? 

[Whereupon the reporter read back the pending question.] 

Miss Woods. You see, you are involving so many things, sir. Mr. 
Rebozo — well, why don't we start over? 

Mr. Lexzxer. Fine. 

Miss Woods. Because Mr. Rebozo could hardly advise me what I 
testified on February 20. 

Mr. Lexzxer. Well, let's establish that. This conversation with Mr. 
Rebozo in Key Biscayne Avas after your testimony in Mr. Rhyne's 
office? 

INIiss Woods. "\Miat date is today ? I don't know. 

Mr. Dash. The 22d. February 20 was about a month ago. 

IMiss Woods. All right, a couple of weeks ago, yes. I assumed that 
the discussion about j\Ir. GriiShi was after that, yes. Let me add it up. 
I think 

Mr. Lexzxer. Take your time. 

INIiss Woods. Do you have our calendar? Does anyone? Do we know 
when we were in Key Biscayne ? 

Should I call the office and ask? [Pause.] I think it was — I think it 
was after. 

]\Ir. Armstroxg. Here is a calendar. 

Mr. William Rhtne. No, she means the official calendar. 

INIiss Woods. I am sorry. I Avas trying to think of — well, as you 
know, Ave haA^e been in Chicago and we have been in Nashville and I 
am just trying to think of the Aveekend Ave Avere in Key Biscayne. But 
[ am quite — I feel quite confident it Avas after the 20th, yes. 

Mr. Dash. I think for the record, if you have any uncertainty and 
you Avant to check that during the recess, you may, and you may cor- 
rect your testimony because I don't Avant you to just guess at it. 

Miss Woods. TAHiich I Avill. Thank you, because we do so much 
traveling, the dates 

Mr. Lexzxer. Well, we will leave the record open on that issue. You 
may amend it. 

Miss AVoods. I will get the date during the recess. 



10218 

Mr. Lenzxer. Do you recall discussing with Mr. Ivcbozo any of the 
questions or the answers that you gave on February 20 when the 
committee interviewed you? 

jMiss Woons. "While Ave were down there ? 

Mr. Lexzneh. Yes, madam. 

INIiss Woods. Xo, sir. T sent him a copy of the testimony that T gave 
to your connnittee the other day after it appeared in the Post, in the 
Jack Anderson column, I should say. which was called to my atten- 
tion. 

Mr. TiExzxER. But you had no discussions in Key Biscayne with 
regard to that testimony? 

iSriss Woods. None that I recall, sir. 

]Mr. Lexzxer. Have you discussed that testimony or that news ar- 
ticle with anvone besides youi;- counsel, with any other employees of 
the White House? 

jNIiss Woods. 1 am sure that when Marge Acker, my secretary', 
brought it in, I probably called INIr. Anderson a name, which T don't 
want to put on the record, if you don't mind. 

Mr. Lexzxer. Not at all. I Avouldn't comment on it. 

Miss AV(X)DS. Ikcause I usually try to be a lady. And I was very 
annoA'ed to sec that colunni, frankly. 

Mr. Dash. As we were, too. I woukl like to put that on the record. 

Mr. Lexzxer. Did you have any discussions though with the Pres- 
ident or anybody else with regard to the news article or the interview? 

Miss AVooDs. No, sir. I think I told you before that — I would like 
briefly again to talk about my work with the President. I never 
go in and bother the President. 1 don't know whether the Presi- 
dent knows I am here today. 1 left word ^^itll my staff, if he 
buzzed, then to tell him, because he is a man Avith a big job to do. 
And I have felt ver}' privileged to be a part of, let us say, opening 
the door to China and going to liussia, and Avorking on a lot of 
things. AVhen he is Avorking on a speech, Avhen he is working on 
something like that, I am around a lot. As you usually notice, if 
I go to Camp David, someone ahvays expects there to be a speech 
the next Aveek or something like that or, you knoAV, something of 
this sort. 

But just to sit doAvn and talk, no. I, after all of these years, aaouIcI 
never consider taking anything that 1 thought was a problem that 
T could solve or going in and saying, "oh, I have to go before the 
Ervin connnittee tomorrow" or anytliing like that to him, because 
I think those are things tluit there is no need to bother the Presi- 
dent Avith. 

So, no, as far as I knoAV, he doesn't knoAv I am here unless he 
buzzed for me tliis morning, and my secretary told him. 

Mr. Lexzxer. Xoav going back to the Key Biscayne meeting 
Avith Mr. Kebozo, did you haA'e any discussions at that time or at 
other times Avith Mr. Rebozo Avith regard to 

ATLss AVooDs. AVait a nnnute. AA^ould you sIoav doAvn a little bit? 

Mr. Lexzxer. I am sorry. 

Going back to the Key Biscayne meeting, and let's hold it on 
that one, Avlien you saAV Mr. Rebozo in Key Biscayne 2 Aveeks ago, 



10219 

did you discuss the meeting at Camp David on or about May 20, 
1973? 

Miss Woods. I don't even know what meeting you are talking 
about but, no, we didn't discuss Camp David at all to my recol- 
lection. 

Mr. Lexzxer, The meeting that Mr. Rebozo, the President and 
Mr. Danner had at Camp David on May 20, 1973? 

Miss Woods. No, sir, I did not. The only thing that I have ever 
seen on that was a clipping in the newspaper that someone said 
they had met. That is all I ever heard of that. 

Mr. Lexzxer. You were not aware of the existence or the fact 
that that meeting took place? 

Miss Woods. No, sir. 

]Mr. Lexzxer. You were in Camp David, though, during that 
period of time, Avere you not? 

Miss Woods. I have no idea. I would have to find out and look 
at the manifest of who went up there and check whether I was 
there. If I were there, sir — and I think I have described it and I 
would like to for the Senator and those of you who weren't bored 
by my description before — Camp David is a series of cottages. And 
if I am working in my cottage, I would not necessarily see anyone 
else who came up with us for the whole weekend unless we were 
working together or something. So I Avill check if you would like 
me to, M'hether I was there on May 20. 

Mr. Lexzxer. Yes, madam. I believe that was just prior to the 
statement that the President delivered on May 22. 

Miss Woods. Yes, I will check. 

Senator Moxtoya. You may proceed. 

Miss Woods. I think the Senator wants to say something. 

Mr. Lexzxer. He just said to proceed. 

INIiss Woods. Oh. 

Mr. Lexzxer. Well, now, let's ask this: Do you remember when 
you were in Key Biscayne 2 weeks ago, did the subject of the Camp 
David meeting come up or not? 

Miss Woods. I think I just answered that, no, sir. 

Mr. Lexzxer. Did Mr. Rebozo ever advise you that he had dis- 
cussed the Hughes contribution with President Nixon? 

Miss Woods. Mr. Rebozo never talked to me about anything he 
discusses with the President. 

Mr. Lexzxer. So the answer is, "No." He never told you? 

Miss Woods. That is right, sir. 

Mr. Lexzxer. Did he ever tell you he had discussed it with Mr. 
Haldeman ? 

Miss Woods. No, sir. 

]\fr. Lexzxer. Did he ever tell you he discussed it with Mr. 
Ehrlichman, that is, the Hughes contribution? 

Miss Woods. No, sir. 

Mr. Lexzxer. Did you ever learn Mr. Ehrlichman had called 
Mr. Rebozo and advised him that the IRS wanted to interview 
Mr. Rebozo? 

Miss Woods. From you, sir, on February 20. 



10220 

Mr. Lkxzxer. Xot before that? 

Miss Woods. Xot before that and I liaven't heard anything about 
it since. 

Mr. I-iKxzxKU. You have not discussed that issue with Mr. Rebozo 
at any time? 

Miss Woods. Xo, I did not. As a matter of fact, I am not sure 
you tokl me they called. I think you told nie Mr. Khrlichman briefed 
the President, t am tryinjr to rememlu'r the notes. ]^ut I think, in 
the question intr. you said that Mi-. Ehrlichnian briefed the Presi- 
dent on the IliS-something investioation of Mr. Eebozo and you 
asked Avhether I had been told by the President about that and I 
answered, no, and that still holds. Whether it was a phone call or 
a briefing or whatever, no, I do not know. 

Mr. Lkxzxkr. AVell, this is a different question. 

]\Iiss Woods. All light. Xow, what is your question? 

Mr. Lex'zxer. The question I asked was: Did you know or learn 
that Mr. Ehrlichnian called Mr. Rebozo and advised him that the 
IRS wanted to interview him prior to the IRS contacting Mr. 
Rebozo ? 

JNIiss Woods. Xo, sir. 

Mr. Lexzxkr. Do you know if Mr. Rebozo ever discussed the 
Hughes contribution with Mr. Biizhardt? 

jNIiss Woods. I do not kriow that of my own knowledge. You 
Avould liave to ask INIr. Buzhardt and Mr. Rebozo that question. 
. Mr. Lexzxer. The answer is no? 

]Miss Woods. The answer is I do not know of my own knowledge. 

Mr. Lexzxer. Do you know whether he discussed that contribu- 
tion with Mr. Kenneth Gemmill? 

Miss Woods. He has been here 2 days and I don't know who he 
discussed it with. I am sorry, you will have to ask that of Mr. 
Rebozo and Mr. Gemmill. 

Mr. Lexzxer. Well you knoAv he discussed it with Mr. Griffin, 
do you not? 

;^liss Woods. That is right. 

Mr. Lexzxer. I am trying to find out if you know whether he 
spoke to anybody else? 

Miss Woods. I told you that is the one person he mentioned to 
me. I believe I testified that that is the person he told me he had 
discussed it with. I don't know Avho else. And I think it only fair 
to say that Mr. Rebozo, himself, should have told you that. I don't 
know. 

Mr. Lexzxer. Xow, Miss Woods, have you discussed the contri- 
bution on more than one occasion with Mr. Buzhardt. 

Miss Woods. Xo, sir. The only question I had ever had of it is 
when he brought tluit letter over. 

Mr. J.,exzner. That is the only time? 

Miss AVooDs. Tiiat is right. 

Mr. Lenzxer. Have you discussed it with any other employees 
of the White House or AVhite House counsel, that is, the Hughes 
contribution ? 



10221 

Miss Woods. Not to my knowledge, sir. I have no recollection of 
discussing it at all. 

]Mr. Lenzner. Did yon have any discussion, Miss Woods, with 
Mr. Rebozo when he first told you about the funds, as to whether 
he should turn them over to a finance committee at that time? 

Miss AVooDS. No, sir, as I said, as I testified over and over again, 
all I recall is that he said that he had the contribution and that he 
had put it in a safe-deposit box. I didn't discuss it any further. 
And I think, since we made a record of the fact that Senator Baker 
left, I think we should record the fact that now we have Senator 
Montoya and that Senator Inouye has departed. 

Mr. Lexzxer. Yes, I think that is appropriate. 

Senator, can we take a short 5-minute break at this point. 

Senator Moxtoya. Yes. 

[Recess.] 

Mr. Lexzxer. Getting back to that one train of questioning, did 
Mr. Rebozo ever advise you that he had also discussed this Hughes 
contribution with Mr. Herbert Kalmbach? 

Miss Woods. No, sir; he never advised me of that. 

Mr. Lexzxer. Did you ever have any discussions with Mr. Kalm- 
bach with regard to the $100,000 contribution? 

Miss Woods. No, sir. 

Mr. Lexzxer. Do you have any recollection of seeing Mr. Kalm- 
bach with Mr. Rebozo in the spring of 1973, shortly after Mr. 
Ehrlichman and Mr. Haldeman and Mr. Dean left the White 
House, or were about to leave the White House? 

Miss Woods. Mr. Rebozo and Mr. Kalmbach? 

Mr. Lexzxer. Yes. 

Miss Woods. I have no recollection of that at all. I don't think so. 

Mr. Lexzxer. All right. Now, you did mention that Mr. Rebozo 
told you something about the problems with the Hughes organiza- 
tion. Can you describe what Mr. Rebozo told you about that? 

Miss Woods. Well, I think we just — anyone could see in the paper, 
suits. And we knew that — frankly Maheu and other people were 
fighting for jurisdiction and what have you, but no specific prob- 
lems. Just that obviously there is — well, I don't know if it is a fight 
for power or money in the organization but they seemed to always be 
fighting and have been for years. 

Mr. Lexzxer. And that is with Mr. Rebozo ? 

Miss Woods. Just a general discussion of that type, yes. 

Mr. Lexzxer. Did he relate that in any way to the contribution 
that he had received? 

Miss Woods. No, sir. 

Mr. Lexzxer. Did you ever have any discussions with President 
Nixon with regard to Howard Hughes or the Hughes Tool Co. ? 

Miss Woods. No, sir; I never had any discussions about Howard 
Hughes with anybody. I don't think any of us have ever seen him. 
As far as I know, nobody has seen him except the people who work 
with him. 

Mr. Lexzxer. The answer to the question is, "No"? 

Miss Woods. No, sir. If you don't mind, I will add the "sir". 



31-889 O - 74 - pt. 22 - 3 



10222 

Mr. Armstrong. Miss Woods, since January 1, 1969, can you 
please tell us where you have maintained or had access to any 
checking account or accounts? 

Miss Woods. I believe— did I give you that before? 

Mr. Armstrong. No, madam. 

Miss Woods. Let me look at my checkbook that is in my purse. 
Well, now, are you talkins: about" after we arrived here, I gather? 
You know we arrived here January 1969. 

Mr. Armstrong. Well, since January 1, 1969, and if you had a 
Xew York account, I would prefer to get that. 

Miss Woods. Good heavens, I don't even know the name of the 
bank. 

Mr. Armstrong. Well, if we can get that at a later time? 

Miss Woods. I would have t(rlook that up. I just can't remember. 
It was down close to the office, but there were so many banks down 
there close to 20th and Broad. I don't remember it. The checking 
account here is at the First National Bank of Washington. 

Mr. Armstrong. OK. And are those the only two you have had 
in that period of time? 

Miss Woods. I also only have one checking account, sir, which I 
send my salary check to. 

Mr. Armstrong. None in California or Florida? 

]Miss Woods. When I lived in California, I had one. 

Mr. Armstrong. But that was prior to January 1, 1969? 

Miss Woods. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Armstrong. And none outside of the United States? 

Miss Woods. No, sir. I wish I had that much money. 

Mr. Armstrong. Since January 1, 1969, have you been the signa- 
tory on any other checking accounts, that is to say not personal 
accounts, but others? 

Miss Woods. I believe that I am listed as — what do you call peo- 
ple who are allowed to sign checks? I can sign a check for Richard 
Nixon. What do you call that? 

Senator Montoya. Power of attorney. 

Miss Woods. Power of attorney for a check. 

Mr. Armstrong. Is that on all of the President's accounts? 

Miss Woods. I don't even know how many accounts he has. I 
think it is the Key Biscayne account, sir. Again, I would have to 
ask that. 

]Mr. Armstrong. Have you ever exercised this? 

Miss Woods. I think twice when we had to get, you know, when 
some bill had to be paid promptly at this end or something, then 
I have. I believe it is two checks that have been signed by me. 

Mr. Lenzner. There is a record vote — this is off the record. 

[Discussion off the record.] 

Mr. Armstrong. Since January 1, 1969, have you maintained or 
had access to any savings accounts ? 

Miss Woods. Columbia Federal Savings and Loan, I think it is 
called, on the corner of I7th and Pennsylvania. 

Mr. Armstrong. And anywhere else iii New York, Florida? 



10223 

Miss Woods. None in New York. You mean since January 1, 
1969 ? 

Mr. Armstrong. Ri^ht, that you have had since then. You might 
have opened it previously, but 1 mean that you have had since then. 

Miss Woods. Gee, I don't remember whether I had one before I 
left. I think I had $1,500 but, again I would have to check whether 
I had $1,500 in the bank up there. 

Mr. Armstrong. In New York? 

Miss Woods. But it isn't there now, sir. It would have been while 
I was up there. 

Mr. Armstrong. Have you been the signatory or been able to 
withdraw funds from any other savings accounts? 

Miss Woods. No, sir. I have my sister's. I have an account, as I 
told you at Columbia Federal Savings and I have a small account 
in Alliance, Ohio, where my one sister is, and I would have to ask 
her what the name of that is. 

Mr. Armstrong. Is that in your name or your sister's? 

Miss Woods. It is in one of the — do they call them death ac- 
counts, so that if I die or something, it is her's? 

Mr. William Rhyne. Joint accounts. 

Mr. Armstrong. Now, since January 1, 1969, have you maintained 
or had access to any safety deposit boxes? 

Miss Woods. No, sir; T never had access to a safety deposit box. 

Mr. Armstrong. So you are not a signatory on anyone else's box, 
either ? 

Miss Woods. No, sir. 

Mr. Armstrong. And you never had any cause to go into a safe- 
deposit box since January 1, 1969 ? 

Miss Woods. I don't think I have ever been in a safe-deposit box. 
Not in one, but opened one. 

Mr. Armstrong. Do you remember having been in a safe- deposit 
box in Mr. Rebozo's bank ? 

Miss Woods. No, sir; I never have been. I have been in his office. 

Mr. Armstrong. But not in the vault or not in the safe-deposit 
box room? 

Miss Woods. No, sir. 

Mr. Armstrong. And he has never brought a safe-deposit box in 
while 3'ou were in his office? 

Miss Woods. No, sir. 

Mr. Armstrong. And have you had any loan accounts since 
January 1, 1969? 

Miss Woods. I had — what do you call it? I had a loan on the 
apartment. It was a demand note. You see, I am not very up on 
these things. When I had to make a downpayment on my apart- 
ment, and I did not have the money at that time and had to pull 
everything together. I had a demand note for $25,000, which was 
repaid within a few months by pulling out my savings and every- 
thing. 

May I ask, on the Alliance, Ohio, one, did you want the name of 
that? I would have to call to get that. 

Mr. Armstrong. I would appreciate that. 



10224 

[Testimony of a personal and financial nature relative to the wit- 
ness and others has been deleted.] 

Mr. Armstr()X(;. So this was a private business transaction? 

Miss Woods. It was completely private and it was, as I say, a 
demand note, so that if anything happened to him, I had to pay it 
immediately. 

Mr. Armstrong. Do you have any brokerage accounts or any 
stocks or any investments? 

Miss Woods. I have no brokerage account. I have — let's see, well 
they totaled them up the other day and I think I have a few shares 
of Higher and Walker, I think. I would have to get that listing 
because we had to list that, you know, the White House demands 
that list. So I have that. 

Mr. Armstroxg. Since Januarry 1, 1969, have you oAvned any in- 
terest in any other companies or corporations, partnerships? 

Miss Woods. Owned an interest in a company or partnership? 

Mr. Armstrong. Stock or indirect interest? 

Miss Woods. Are you talking about the Fisher Island stock? 

Mr. Armstrong. That would be one. I don't know if there are 
any others. 

Miss Woods. That is all. 

Mr. Armstrong. OK. How much did you own in Fisher Island? 
How much stock? 

Miss Woods. Well, I would have to see how many shares of stock 
it was because, I think, as I previously testified — oh, no, that is in 
another committee. I sold that and took whatever loss it is you do 
by selling it immediately. When the President sold his, I didn't 
think I should have mine. So I will get you the number of shares 
but I will have to call the office on that. 

Mr. Armstrong. Can you tell us approximately when you ac- 
quired this stock and how? 

Mr. Charles Rhyne. Senator, I realize I don't have a right 
here, as in a court to object. Is all of this personal stuff relevant? 
Ai'e all of these small little investments here relevant? 

Mr. Dash. You do have a right to raise questions when you feel 
it goes outside the scope of our resolution. 

Mr. Charles Rhyne. I just wondered if that had anything to 
do with the election of 1972? 

Mr. Dash. It relates to an inquiry the committee is making, Sen- 
ator Montoya, not with regard to Miss Woods but with regard to 
certain funds, as to tracing moneys that may or may not have been 
involved in the $100,000 contribution. There is no resolution of that, 
Mr. Rhyne. I don't want to make any suggestion there is. 

Mr. Charles Rhyne. Well this is going kind of far, to say that 
her little savings accounts and checkinir accounts have something 
to do with the $100,000. I think that is' farfetched. 

Mr. Dash. No, in connection Avith other testimony, I mean. By 
no means is there a suggestion in that question involving Miss 
Woods ill that. But it does have to do with a series other than 
some that occurred in the sale of property and shares. 



10225 

Mr. Charles Rhtxk. Are vou saying that someone has testified 
that Miss Woods had something to^do with the $100,000? 

Mr. Dash. No, I am saying to the contrary, that the question 
does not raise any inference that she had anything to do with it. 
But her relationship to it is related to the whole transaction and 
the transaction is just being traced at the present time. It may have 
no relationship when we complete the questioning. 

Mr. Thompsox. Does that just apply to Fisher Island, to that 
part of the series of questions, or are all of these others involved? 
There were several other transactions, I think, we were asking 
about. 

Miss Woods. Yes, they have asked about everything; about stocks, 
about everything 

Mr. Thompson. I am aware of the Fisher Island situation but, 
all of this other personal information. I am not aware of any con- 
nection there at all. 

Mr. Charles Ehtxe. You see I just raised the question. It seemed 
to me rather far afield from the 1972 election. 

Miss Woods. You know, my life is an open book but it seems a 
little time consuming. 

Senator Moxtoya. I want to reserve making a decision on this 
until we find out whether it is relevant, or whether it leads to any 
relevance, with respect to any funds that we have been investi- 
gating. 

Mr. Armstrong. Could you briefly tell us when and how you 
acquired the Fisher Island stock? 

Miss Woods. Yes. I acquired it when Mr. Nixon was in New York 
by loaning him at one time $9,000 — I think one was $3,000 and 
one was $6,000 — of my savings and getting again a note saying 
"with interest," which he invested into Fisher Island with the fact 
that I could have at any time either the money back or stocks. 
And I have those copies of all of that at the office, too. I am sorry. 
I didn't know we were going to go into all of my personal things 
or I would have brought them, 

Mr. Armstroxg. I would appreciate it if we could get copies of 
that. 

Mr. Charles Rhtne. I didn't understand that. 

Mr. Armstrong. I would appreciate it if we could get copies. 

Mr. Charles Rhtne. You could have what? 

Mr. Armstrox'g. I thought she was offering copies. 

Mr. Charles Rhyne. No, she is not offering copies. 

Miss Woods. No, I can tell you all of them. 

Mr. Dash. No, not copies. I understand it was just a question 
of the amounts. 

Mr. Charles Rhtne. As I say, my hearing is poor. I want to 
understand if this committee is requesting that she give them copies? 

Mr. Armstrong. Oh, I am sorry, I thought she offered it. 

Mr. Charles Rhtne. No, she did not offer. 

Mr. Armstrong. OK. Let me ask a question so I understand 
what we have on the record. You loaned Mr. Nixon and received 
a note in return for it for $3,000? 



10226 

Miss Woods. That is right, $3,000 on one occasion and $6,000 on 
one occasion. When I got out — because we felt we should not be in 
anything that might be involved with the Government, he paid 
the amount back to me, $10,000, which was giving me a gift of 
$1,000, which I don't think is too much after 23 years or 20 years 
or whatever it was at that point of work. Then that was converted 
into stock and I sold it immediately back to whatever the company 
is or Avhatever the trust is for that thing, instead of saving it. I 
don't know exactly about taxes, when you hold it a certain amount 
of time, you don't have to pay. I think it is 6 months. But, any- 
way, I sold it right aAvay. So that I lost money on it, as far as 
being able to deduct any of the taxes and things. 

Mr. Armstroxg. OK. When vou say it was converted, it was sold 
back to the corporation, Fisher Island Corp? 

Miss Woods. That is right, if that is the name of it. That is 
Avhat — I couldn't remember what it was. 

Mr. Armstrong. And that is the only stock or interest you hold 
in any business? 

Miss Woods. I have no stock in any business at all. I just have 
those little ones I just told you about. 

Mr. Armstrong. Do you own any real property? I gather you 
own a cooperative? 

Miss Woods. Well, I don't own it. I have a great big mortgage on 
it. If I live to be about 100, I will probably own it. I am hoping 
to sell it at a profit. 

Mr. Armstrong. OK. I am sorry. You mentioned a loan before 
on the apartment? 

Miss Woods. That was the downpayment on the apartment, sir. 

Mr. Armstrong. And can you tell us who the mortgage is with? 

Miss Woods. I paid to Watergate East, Inc., every month and 
they pay your interest and taxes and you pay an assessment for 
their apartment. And who they have — which things they have the 
mortgages and all of that, I do not knoAv. 

Mr. Armstrong. OK. And is there any other real property you 
own ? 

Miss Woods. No, sir. 

Mr. Armstrong. OK. Or have a partial interest in? 

Miss Woods. No partial interest; don't own anything. 

Mr. Armstrong. Since January 1, 1969, have you acquired any 
items of personal property with ^ a value in excess of $5,000? 

Miss Woods. No, sir. 

Mr. Armstrong. Do you lease any real property? 

Miss Woods. No, sir. 

Mr. Armstrong. Have you any lease interest? 

Miss Woods. No, sir. 

Mr. Armstrong. Can you tell us what personal property you own 
that is valued in excess of $1,000? 

Miss Woods. I hope my clothing all added up together, but I 
don't think that is very relevant. 

Air. Armstrong. I mean such as jewels or automobiles? 



10227 

Mr. Charles Riiyxe. Really, Senator, I think this is so far 
afield that I would say, that probing into someone's privacy 

Senator ]Moxtota. What is the relevancy of this? 

Mr. Charles Rhyxe [continuing]. Is a little farfetched. 

Mr. Dash. I think the question should be responded to. Not from 
you, jNIiss Woods, but I think :Mr. Armstrong or Mr. Lenzner should 
explain what the relevance of that question is. 

Mr. Charles Rhyxe. I would like to hear that. 

Mr. Dash. With regard to our resolution. 

Mr. Charles Rhyne. What is the relevance? 

Mr. Armstroxg. I am trying to determine whether there are any 
other assets. 

Mr. William Rhyxe. What is relevant to the assets? 

Mr. Armstroxg. We are attempting to inquire into the possible 
conversion of funds from the $100,000 that Mr. Rebozo received. 

Mr. William Rhyxe. Do you have an independent basis for 
that, other evidence, other testimony? 

Mr. Armstroxg. Just a moment, please. [Pause.] Do you want 
to answer? 

Mr. Lexzner. Well, let me ask this 

Mr. Armstroxg. Let me go on to those other questions. Let me 
move on to some other questions. If necessary, we will come back 
to this question. Since January 1, 1969, have you had any business 
or financial transactions with Mr. Rebozo? 

Miss Woods. Xo, sir, unless you call Fisher Island, which he had 
an interest in, too, but I don't know what his position was on that. 

Mr. Armstroxg. And that was only in his capacity as President 
of Fisher Island Corp.? 

Miss Woods. That is right. I didn't handle that. Mr. Ed Morgan 
handled all of that through the counsel's office. 

Senator Moxtoya. We will suspend. I have to go up and vote and 
I will be back with you in 5 minutes. 

[Recess.] 

Senator Mox'toya. Proceed. 

Mr. Armstroxg. Miss Woods, since January 1, 1969, have you 
loaned Mr. Rebozo any funds? 

Miss Woods. Xo, sir, that would really be, well. I won't even 
say it, no, sir. 

Mr. Armstroxg. Since January 1, 1969, has Mr. Rebozo ever 
loaned you any funds? 

Miss Woods. Xo, sir. 

Mr. Armstroxg. Since January 1, 1969, have you ever received 
gifts from ]Mr. Rebozo valued in excess of $1,000? 

Miss Woods. Xo, sir. Mr. Rebozo and I are very, very good 
friends but I have never received a gift from Mr. Rebozo. 

Mr. Armstroxg. Have you ever given Mr. Rebozo a gift in ex- 
cess of $1,000? 

Miss Woods. Xo, sir. I don't think I ever have given anybody a 
gift in excess of $1,000. 

Mr. Armstroxg. Since January 1, 1969, have you ever purchased 
any real property or personal property from Mr. Rebozo? 

Miss Woods. Xo, sir. 



10228 

Mr. Armstrong. Has Mr. Rebozo ever purchased any personal 
or real property from' you during; that period? 

Miss Woods. Xo, sir. A^'ell, Fisher Ishind but that wouldn't be 
from Mr. Rebozo. That was a corporation. 

Mr. Armstrong. Only in his capacity as president of the corpo- 
ration, is that correct? Mr. Rebozo was involved in the purchase 
only in his capacity as president of the corporation? 

Miss Woods. That is right. Not Mr. Rebozo but the corporation 
of Fisher Island stock. I wanted to be sure I didn't answer that 
wrong. 

Mr. Armstrong. Since January 1, 1969, has Mr. Rebozo ever fur- 
nished you with any cash? 

Miss Woods. No, sir. ^ 

Mr. Armstrong. Since January 1, 1969, have you ever furnished 
Mr. Rebozo with anv cash? 

Miss Woods. Xo. 

Mr. Armstrong. Since January 1, 1969, has Mr. Rebozo ever 
cashed a check for you in excess of $1,000? 

Miss Woods. In excess of $1,000? Xo, I may have cashed a check 
at his bank but. I don't remember writing checks for $1,000. 

Mr. Armstrong. Xothing as substantial as $1,000? 

Miss Woods. Xo. 

Mr. Ar:mstrong. Have you ever acted as Mr. Rebozo's agent, rep- 
resentative or designee in any business transaction ? 

Miss Woods. No, sir. 

Mr. Armstrong. Since January 1, 1969, have you ever had any 
business or financial transactions with President Nixon ? 

Miss Woods. Again, just Fisher Island. 

Mr. Armstrong. With the exception of that, no other ? 

Miss Woods. No other. 

Mr. Armstrong. Have you ever loaned Mr. Nixon any funds with 
the exception of Fisher Island ? 

Miss Woods. That, and a few times when he was Vice President, 
I might have loaned them a little because, again, with all of the 
expenses and not much money at that time, again, their checking 
account got awfully low. 

Mr. Armstrong. But not since January 1, 1969? 

Miss Woods. No, sir. 

Mr. Armstrong. Since January 1, 1969, has Mr. Nixon ever loaned 
you any funds ? 

Miss Woods. No, sir. 

Mr. Armstrong. Since January 1, 1969, have you ever received 
any gifts from Mr. Nixon valued in excess of $1,000 with the ex- 
ception of Fisher Island? 

Miss Woods. No, sir. 

Mr. Armstrong. Since January 1, 1969, have you given to Mr. 
Nixon or any member of his family any gifts valued in excess of 
$1,000? 

Miss Woods. No, sir. As a matter of fact, they have asked us not 
to give them any gifts. I don't give any gifts, maybe a bottle of 
cologne or something for Mrs. Nixon. 



10229 

Mr. Armstrong. But it is not that expensive of a cologne ? 

Miss Woods. Xo; it is about $6, I think. 

Mr. Armstrong. Since January 1, 1969. have you ever purchased 
any real or personal property from Mr. Nixon or any members of 
his family? 

Miss Woods. No. 

Mr. Armstrong. Since January 1. 1969. has Mr. Nixon purchased 
any real or personal property or has any member of his family 
purchased any real or personal property from you? • 

Miss Woods. From me? I didn't own any, no, sir. 

Mr, Armstrong. And has Mr. Nixon furnished you with any 
cash ? 

Miss Woods. Only petty cash in the office. 

Mr. Armstrong. Since January 1, 1969? 

Miss Woods. No, sir. 

Mr. Armstrong. In excess of $1,000, I mean? 

Miss Woods. No, sir. 

Mr. Armstrong. Have you ever furnished Mr. Nixon or any 
member of his family any cash in excess of $1,000 during that 
period ? 

Miss Woods. No, sir. 

Mr. Armstrong. Has Mr. Nixon ever cashed a check in excess of 
$1,000? 

Miss Woods. For me? 

Mr. Armstrong. Yes. 

Miss Woods. I am sorry, I didn't hear you. 

Mr. Armstrong. Has President Nixon ever cashed a check in ex- 
cess of $1,000 for you? 

Miss Woods. No, sir. 

Mr. Charles Rhtne. What were the last words? 

Miss Woods. For me. 

Mr. Armstrong. Right, for Miss Woods. 

INIiss Woods. I don't know about his own checks, but certainly 
not for me. 

Mr. Armstrong. OK. Other than your capacity as a cosignatory 
on President Nixon's checking account, have you ever acted in any 
other capacity as his representative or agent or designee in any 
business or financial transactions? 

Miss Woods. No, sir. And I would like to sort of explain the 
check-signing thing. I think you are all very much aware that 
Mr. Demarco and Mr. Kalmbach signed those before. And the rea- 
son I signed it — oh, I just remembered that I think I signed three 
the other day. One was for Trader Vic's for $342 for two rather 
large dinners they had there. I don't even remember what the 
other two were for, maybe for the Treasurer of the United States 
for the food in the house. I don't know. They were made up by 
somebody else and I signed them. But I have not been signing them, 
you know. Just right now we are in the middle of getting some- 
body to do that, because I don't want to have anything to do with 
checks and all of that. 



10230 

Mr. Armstroxg. Since Janiiarv 1, 1969, I believe you testified 
earlier that the firm of Vincent Andrews acted as a business agent 
for President Xixon for a short period. 

Miss "Woods. A short period. Well, they were — the}- handled his 
accounts in a way that they made out the checks, paid out all of 
the bills and gave him a statement at the end of each week, I be- 
lieve. From shortly after the time we went to New York, which 
was, say, 1963 until — and I don't know when Mr. Ehrlichman and 
Mr. Morgan took that account away from them, but I think it was 
in the spring of 1969, but I don't know the exact dates of that. 

Mr. Armstrong. Do you know the identity of the signatories on 
the account that Vincent Andrews maintained for President Nixon? 

Miss Woods. I don't recall those. I would have to look. 

Mr. Armstrong. Would Migs Claudia Val be one of them? 

Miss Woods. I don't know whether she could sign his. I really 
don't know whether she could sign it. She mav verv well have be- 
cause she was vice president of the company, but I could not tell 
you whether she was, you know, listed as a signatory. 

Mr. Armstrong. OK. Since January 1, 1969, have you had any 
business or financial transactions with any of the following people: 
Mr. Kalmbach, Mr. Demarco or Miss Val? 

Miss Woods. Business or financial, no, sir. 

Mr. Armstrong. All right. 

Mr. Lenzner. Just one other question : Did Mr. Rebozo ever make 
available funds for the use of or on behalf of the President or his 
family to your knowledge? 

Miss Woods. Use of the funds for the family? 

Mr. Lenzner. For the President or his family. 

Miss Woods. To my knowledge? 

Mr. William Rhyne. Make them available to her? 

Mr. Lenzner. No, to her knowledge. 

Miss Woods. To my knowledge? Let me just be sure I under- 
stand this. Did he make it available to the President or members 
of his family? Not to my knowledge. 

Mr. Lenzner. Did you ever receive on occasion from Mr. Rebozo 
certain materials that he would send through the mail to you? 

Miss Woods. What kind of materials, sir? 

Mr. Lenzner. Well, informational materials on various issues, 
public issues, policy issues. 

Miss Woods. You mean clippings? 

Mr. Lenzner. Clippings or memorandums on particular items on 
particular issues. 

Miss Woods. Issues? I can't remember his ever sending me any- 
thing on an issue. He might send me some clippings that were in 
the paper about maybe a trip of the President's which had been 
covered down there, but if you are talking about issues as 

Mr. Lenzner. Well, say the ABM question, for example? 

Miss Woods. No, sir; nothing like that. 

Mr. Lenzner. When he sent you materials with reference to trips 
in Florida or otherwise, would he identify that those items came 
from him? 



10231 

Miss Woods. Any time he sent me anything, normally, if he had 
something to write, he would just attach a little card. 

Mr. Lexzner. I see. Did he ever use the name Charles Gregory 
in communication with you? 

Miss Woods. No, sir. 

Mr. Lexzxer. Are you aware of the fact that he does use that 
name. Charles Gregory, in communicating with individuals? 

Miss Woods. Xo, sir. 

Mr. Lexzner. Do you recall Mr, Rebozo discussing th6 issue of 
the ABM and asking 

Miss Woods. What is that? 

Mr. Lexzxer. Antiballistic missiles. 

Miss Woods. I am sorry. 

Mr. AViLLiAM Rhyxe. I think w^e better start over again with 
the question. 

Miss Woods. Yes, because I didn't know what you were talking 
about. 

Mr. Lexzxer. Well, did you ever learn that Mr. Rebozo had dis- 
cussed the antiballistic missile question with people in the White 
House and that they had offered to send Dr. Kissinger to talk to 
Mr. Hughes, with regard to the antiballistic missile question? 

Miss Woods. No, sir. I am sorry, I didn't know what ABM was. 

Mr. Lexzxer. That is all right. Did you ever learn that he had 
discussed with people in the administration, the question of the 
lawsuit between the Hughes Tool Co., Mr. Hughes, and with TWA, 
the airline? 

Miss Woods. No, sir. 

Mr. Lexzxer. And I assume when you say, "no," that would also 
include any conversations you may have had with Mr. Rebozo, but 
you didn't have any such conversations? 

ISIiss Woods. I have not had any conversations. 

Mr. Lexzxer. Did you ever discuss with him the Hughes acquisi- 
tion of Air West? 

Miss Woods. No, sir. 

Mr. Lexzxer. Did you ever discuss with Mr. Rebozo the Hughes 
acquisition of the Dunes Hotel or other hotel properties in Las 
Vegas, Nev. ? 

Miss Woods. No, sir. 

Mr. Lexzxer. Did you ever learn of meetings of Mr. Richard 
Danner — well, I think you said before you did meet on at least 
one occasion — but any meetings Mr. Richard Danner had with Mr. 
Mitchell, the Attorney General, with regard to any of those issues? 

Miss Woods. No, sir. I w^ould not know anything about Mr. 
Mitchell's schedule or ]Mr. Danner's, and I had no knowledge of 
that. 

Mr. Lexzxer. Did Mr. Rebozo ever discuss the Hughes interest 
in atomic bomb testing in Nevada? 

Miss Woods. No, sir. Mr. Rebozo never discussed any of the 
Hughes interests or anything with me. 

Mr. Lexzxer. Miss Woods, did you know of any fundraising re- 
sponsibilities that Mr. Rebozo had after January 1, 1969, for polit- 
ical campaigns ? 



10232 

Miss "Woods. Xo, sii-. but I wouldn't iipcessarily. If he were a 
finance man in Florida or a State chairman. I Avouldn't know neces- 
sarily. I would — as I said before. I had nothino; to do with the fi- 
nancinfr end of it. Maurice Stans was the finance chairman. Now 
who the State chairmen Avere, I don't believe Mr. Rebozo was, but 
T had no knowledjje of that. 

]Mr. Lexzxi-:r. So your answoi- Avas that you were not aware of 
any general fundraisin<r activities that Mr. Rebozo Avas conducting, 
saA'e for the fact that he had loceived this one contribution? 

Miss AVooDS. That is rio:lit, sir. 

Mr. Lexzxer. Did he e\er advise you that he had recei\-ed other 
contributions in cash? 

Miss Woods. Xo, sir. 

Mr. Lex'zxer. Do you knoAA-'^whether the President or any mem- 
ber of the White House staff evei- i-equested Mr. Rebozo to obtain 
specific contributions from specific potential contributors? 

Miss Woods. Xo, sir; I haAT no knoAvledfje of anything like that. 

Mr. Lex'zxer. Did you learn of Mr. Rebozo's contact with A. D. 
Davis, Avho sent iji, apparenth', $50,000 in cash to Mr. Rebozo? 

Miss Woods. J^Ir. A. E. Davis? 

Mr. Lexzxer. Xo. A. D. Davis. 

Miss Woods. Xo, sir; I don't knoAv. Is Mr. Davis the man who 
brought the money to the committee? 

Mr. Dash. Xo, he is a different one. 

Miss Woods. Xo, I do not knoAv. 

Mr. Dash. Definitely a different DaA'is, that Avas Chester DaAns. 

Miss Woods. I see. That Avas the only Davis I heard of. 

Mr. Lex-^zxer. Well, this Avonld be a contribution from, as I un- 
derstand, the family that OAvns the Winn-Dixie Co. Does that re- 
fr-esh your recollection at all? 

Miss Woods. Xo. 

Mr. Armstrox'g. AVere you aAvare of any contacts or requests for 
contacts for Mi-. Rebozo to contact Mr. J. Paul Getty for con- 
tributions? 

Miss Woods. Xo, sir; not to my knoAAdedge. 

Mr. Lexzxer. May I haA^e this marked, which Ave receiA^d. I 
believe from the White House, as exhibit 2 for today. 

^fr. Dash. In fact, for the record, I believe the list that is being 
offered to be nuii-ked Avas delivered to us from INfr. Buzhardt 

Mr. Lexzxer. From Mr. Garment. 

Mr. Dash. From Mr. Garment. 

[The document i-efeii-(>d to Avas marked Woods exhibit Xo. 2 for 
identification.* I 

IVfr. Lexzxer. And for the recoid, the pages are numbered to 
123, although I haven't counted them, and the coA'er sheet is a 
letter to Mi-. Dash from Mr. Gainient dated June IS, 1973. Miss 
Woods, Avould you examine that document, not the letter but the 
document ? 

Miss Woods. Well, the document seems to be in sort of bad shape. 
You haA'e shoAvii it io a lot of people. 

*See p. 10284. 



10233 

Mr. Dash. The document in its present condition is not in the 
condition we received it. 

Miss Woods. T don't really know I could identify it unless I com- 
pared it to the one in my office because since it is not stapled, I 
would have no idea whatever pajres are there. 

Mr. Lenzxer. Well, can you identify the padres that are there, as 
pao;es of documents that vou previously had seen? 

]Miss Woods. I think vou will have to take Mr. Garment's word for 
it, that it is pre -April 7. I have seen a pre- April 7 list. ^Vhether this 
is the same one, I couldn't tell you. 

]\Ir. William Rhyxe. You don't remember the amounts? 

!^Ir. Lexzxer. Would the record reflect counsel is advising the 
witness that she does not remember the amounts? 

^fiss Woods. Well, I certainly don't remember the amounts. You 
wouldn't either if you saw 128 pages. 

INIr. William Rhyxe. Ask her if she remembers the amounts con- 
nected with this. 

Mr. Lexzxer. ]Mr. Rhyne, if you would permit me. I would like to 
conduct the interrogation. Would you look at the document, though, 
]\[iss Woods, and see if you can identify that document as a copy of 
a document that you had received prior to this at the 'Wliite House? 

Miss Woods. Sir, if you had asked me to bring my document with 
me, I would have identified it. But when it is all messed up as this 
one seems to be, I will say I have seen something like this, but I can't 
identify it as that list. 

Mr. Lexzxer. And would you look at the documents and particu- 
larly the next to the last page, the top of the page, entitled "house 
account" and can you tell us, do you recall seeing that page prior to 
this occasion? 

]\Iiss Woods. Yes, only Avhen it was brought to my attention at the 
Milk Producers Association because I did not look through any list, 
not this list, but the list that was given to me. 

]Mr. Charles Rhyxe. You mean yoin- deposition on the milk occa- 
sion? 

Miss Woods. The deposition on the ]Milk Producers in front of the 
man who became famous for playing the tape at the cocktail party. 

iNIr. Lexzxer. Do you know what the words "house account" mean ? 

Miss Woods. No ; I do not. 

Mr. Lexzxer. Do you recall from whom you received a list similar 
to this? 

]\Iiss Woods. A list similar to this, I received from Mr. Maurice 
Stans. 

Mr. Lexzxer. Do you recall approximately when you received that? 

Miss Woods. The latter part of June possibbv* . 

Mr. Lexzxer. Of 1972? 

Miss Woods. Of 1972. 

Mr. Lexzxer. And was it represented to you that this list reflected 
contributions received prior to April 7, 1972? 

Miss Woods. I assume it was, sir. 

Mr. Lexzxer. And Avho represented that to you? 

INIiss Woods. It Avould have been :Mr. Stans. Mr. Stans brought the 
list to me, sir. 



10234 

Mr. Lenzxer. And do you know where the information came from 
that is reflected on that list ? 

IVIiss Woods. Do I know of my own knowledge ? 

Mr. Lenzxer. Yes. 

Miss AVoons. Xo, sir ; I would only have to guess that it came from 
the finance committee, since the finance chairman gave it. 

Mr. Lenzner. And did Mr. Rebozo or any other individual ever 
request information from that list? 

Miss Woods. No, sir; no individual ever requested it until Com- 
mon Cause requested it. 

Senator Montota. We will be in recess for about 15 minutes. 

Mr. Dash. Well, it is now 5 minutes — do j'ou want to break for 
lunch? 

Senator IMontoya. What is tfiat ? 

]Mr. Dash. We could break for lunch now, or at 12 o'clock? 

Senator ISIontoya. I will be back in 5 minutes. Do you think you 
will finish? 

Mr. Lenzxer. Not this morning. 

Mr. Dash. Maybe you ought to come back then. 

Mr. Lex'zx^^er. We could pick up earlv in the afternoon, around 
1 :30. 

Senator Moxtoya. I will come back if you want me to. 

Mr. Dash. If you came back in 5 minutes, we would have 10 min- 
utes. 
. INIr. Lex'zner. Let's pick up this afternoon. 

Mr. Dash. OK. 

Senator ISIox'toya. Well, we will be in recess then until when? 

INIr. Dash. We will be in recess until 1 :30 unless we can make it at 
1:00. 

["NAHiereupon, at 11 :45 a.m., the committee recessed for lunch.] 

Afternoon Session 

Mr. Dash. OK. Can we take advantage of the fact we are begin- 
ning at 1, and begin at once? 

Mr. Lex'zxer. Should we note for the record this gentleman? I 
don't know who that other individual is in the room. 

Mr. Charles Rhyne. That is my nephew, Paul Rhyne, who drives 
the car. We don't have a "Wliite House car. We ride in mine so that 
explains his presence. 

Mr. Lenzxer. INIiss Woods, did you ever discuss the money that 
Mr. Rebozo received from Hughes with Donald Nixon ? 

Miss Woods. No, sir ; I never discussed it with anyone but Mr. Re- 
bozo. 

Mr. Lexzner. And the same answer, I take it, would apply for Ed- 
ward Nixon, the President's brother ? 

Miss Woods. Exactly. 

Mr. Lenzxer. And that Avould include also the return of money as 
well as the reception of it? 

Miss Woods. That is right. 

Mv. Lexzxer. Now, one area I failed to cover this morning, you 
testified that you learned from ^h: Rebozo about him receiving the 



10236 

money. ^Yi\en did you first learn that he had, in fact, kept the money 
past the election in November 1972 ? 

]\Iiss Woods. I don't suppose I gave it any thought. I didn't know 
whether he had it. I don't recall knowing he still had it. I didn't dis- 
cuss that with him. 

^Ir. Lexzner. There came a time, did there not, when you did learn 
that he had retained the funds that he had previously spoken to you 
about ? 

Miss Woods. When all of this business started in the papers and so 
forth, yes. 

Mr. Lenzner. I see. So in other words 

INIiss Woods. I mean, we didn't discuss the fact that he still had it, 
you know, in the middle of the campaign or at the end of it. We did 
not have a discussion about it, no, sir. 

Mr. Lenzner. As I understand it, between the time he advised you 
that he had received the funds and the time you read about it in the 
newspapers, you had not learned prior to the time it was in the news- 
papers that he had, in fact, retained those funds? 

Miss Woods. I don't recall hearing that he had it. This is what I 
said. We have had conversations just fleeting as they were. I didn't 
pay any attention to them, to the financial end as to do with the 1972 
election, as I don't with any campaigns. So I don't believe it was even 
discussed, so I would not have known until after that, that it was not 
put in the campaign. 

Senator Baker. Could I interrupt for a moment? That is a vote 
signal. I will be back in 3 or 4 or 5 minutes. If you want to go ahead 
or if you want to wait 

Miss Woods. We will wait. 

Mr. AViLLiAM Rhyne. I want this on the record. We had an inter- 
view scheduled for Mrs. Acker for jNIonday at 2. Is that still on? 

Mr. Armstrong. Yes. 

Mr. Lenzner. INIonday at 2? 

Mr. Armstrong. Yes, that is when we scheduled it. 

Mr. WiLEiAM Rhyne. It is not on a subpena, so there is no written 
record ? 

Mr. Armstrong. Right. ISIonday at 2. 

Mr. William Rhyne. Would that be in this room? 

Mr. Armstrong. I don't believe we have located a room. I think we 
will use 334. 

]\Ir. Dash. That or my office. Is that an executive session ? 

Mr. Armstrong. We will have a smaller group than today. 

]\Ir. AViLLiAM Rhyne, Could we establish a room now so we will 
avoid the confusion, or sometime before the end of the day, before 
the end of this session? 

Mr. Lenzner . Yes. 

Mr. William Rhyne. So that would be Monday the 25th of March 
at 2 p.m., in room G-3.34 for INlrs. Acker. 

Mr. Lenzner. Off the record. 
[Discussion off the record.] 

Mr. Lenzner. Senator Baker is back. Back on the record. I think 
it is a matter of record, the fact that Mr. Rebozo had retained the 
funds. That became a matter of public information from the news- 



10236 

papers sometime in the summer or early fall of 1973. Is that about 
the time that you remember reading about it, about the retention of 
the funds? 

Miss Woods. I really couldn't tell you what time because, as I tes- 
tified before, I rarely read the newspapers. I read little digests and 
so forth, when I have a chance. I couldn't tell you if that is when I 
became aware of it, whether it was early summer or what. 

Mr. Lenzner. But you did become aware of it from reading the 
news digests, is that what you said? 

INIiss Woods. No ; I did not say that. I said I do not normally have 
time to read the newspapers, so I am not sure that is where I got that 
or how I got it or when I knew it, actually. It just became a problem. 
That is all. 

]\Ir. Lexzxer. In otlier words, what you are saying now is that you 
have no recollection, that you did learn that he had retained the $100,- 
000— that Mr. Eebozo had retained the $100,000, but you have no 
recollection of how you learned that or when? 

Miss Woods. I don't know. I think everyone learned it at, I would 
guess, the same time. I never had any discussion about it being re- 
tained. 

Mr. Lenzxer. And nobody ever told you it had been retained prior 
to the time it was in the newspapers? 

Miss Woods. I don't recall it, sir. 

Mr. Lexzner. Well, if somebody had advised you prior to it getting 
in the newspapers, I take it that would have been significant enough 
to recall that kind of thing? 

Miss Woods. I would think so, unless it was that Mr. Rebozo might 
have casually mentioned it. I can't recall that he did. As I say, he is 
the only one that I ever discussed that with. 

Mr. Lenzner. Well, do you ever have a recollection of saying to 
Mr. Rebozo, at some point, of simply asking him "Why wasn't that 
money used for the campaign?" 

INIiss Woods. No, sir ; I never asked him that. 

Mr. Lenzner. Did he ever indicate to you why he did not turn the 
money over to the campaign? 

Miss Woods. No ; we had no such discussion. 

INIr. Lenzner. So, aside from the fact, as noted in your letter, that 
the money was to be turned over in case something happened to him, 
to the finance chairman, you did not receive any information from 
INIr. Rebozo with regard to what campaign that monev was intended 
for? 

Miss Woods. No, sir. As I thought I had tried to explain before, 
I think I was only told just so someone else knew. I had no obli- 
gation on the finance end of it at all. I di'^'^'t feel that I needed to 
ask him anything about it or anyone else. I didn't ask Maurice 
Stans anything about the money and this, that and the other thing. 
I am terribly busy on my own job. And in no campaign have I 
ever really had anything to do with the financial end. 

I don't know whether I explained myself properly or not, but 
that is Avhat I am trying to tell you, that I wouldn't ask him 
whether this was used. He didn't tell me the monev Avas there for 



10237 

the purpose of my having anything to do with it. I believe he left 
instructions for his attorney, as I stated in the letter. 

Mr. Lenzxer. Well, did he indicate to you why he told you about 
the funds in the first place? 

Miss Woods. He didn't indicate to me and I think I have told 
you or somebody before, and pardon me if it hasn't been you, but 
i think that anyone having that sum of money Avould want at least 
two or three people, maybe two, to know anyway. He and his attor- 
ney are friends. They could easily have died in maybe the same 
accident or something. And I would gather, and I am guessing, 
and I am using what I Avould do if I w^ere in his place, I would 
want someone else to be aware of this. This is what 

Mr. Lexzxer. For what purpose though? I don't understand 
why. What purpose would it serve had they both died in the same 
accident ? 

Miss Woods. The purpose might have been that I might have 
asked what happened to it. If not, somebody else might have had 
the key or the bank would have opened it, and maybe nothing. 
That is — that my feeling is that he just Avanted somebody else to 
know it was there. 

Mr. Lexzner. Did Mr. Rebozo ever advise you that at some point 
prior to the return of the funds, he, in fact, had removed the in- 
structions from the safe-deposit box as to what to do with the 
money ? 

Miss Woods. Xo, sir; I don't believe so. I am sure he didn't or I 
wouldn't have put it in this letter. 

Mr. Lexzxer. Did he tell you that he had told Mr. Wakefield of 
the existence of the funds? 

Miss Woods. I don't believe he did. I understood it was just 
instructions in the safe-deposit box. And it was my understanding, 
from whether he said it outright or my assumptions, that the in- 
structions were there. And his — being his attorney, and I don't 
know how these things work, but I suppose his attorney would 
know what was in any safe-deposit box if he had died. 

Mr. Lexzxer. So up until the time I had asked the question, you 
were not aAvare of the fact that he had taken the instructions out 
and destroyed them and put no other instructions in the box? 

Miss Woods. No, sir; I was not. 

]\Ir. Lexzxer. Miss Woods, if you could look please, for a second, 
at exhibit Xo. 2 — and Mr. Rhyne, I think that is the lengthy list — 
it is my recollection that there are certain Hughes contributions of 
about $16,000 noted in several different States: California, Texas 
and Nevada. The total amount would be, for those three contribu- 
tions, would be about $50,000. 

Mr. Charles Rhtxe. Did you say $60,000 or $16,000? 

Mr. Lexzxer. Oh, each gift. If you look under California, I think 
you will see an indication of a $16,000 gift from" Hughes there, 
approximately. It Avas $16,667. 

Miss Woods. The amounts I do not know, because I don't pay 
attention to them. There is one under California which says $16,- 
666.67. What were the other States? 



31-889 O - 74 - pt. 22 - 4 



10238 

Mr. Lp:xzxer. The other States were Texas and Nevada. 

Miss AVooDS. Texas is $16,666.67. 

Mr. Lexzxer. And I believe yon Avill find that Xevada is about 
the same. 

Miss Woods. $16,666.66. 

^Ir. Lp:xzner. Xow, the question I have, as you are going over 
this list for the purpose that it was designated for and. that is, for 
making up invitation lists 

Miss Woods. If I may stop you right there? I may not have testi- 
fied before your committee, but I have before others, that we did 
not entertain and to use this list between that June time. So I did 
not go through this. This was put away in case Ave entertained, but 
because of the campaign, we didn't use this list. 

Mr. Lex'zxer. I didn't understand that. 

Miss Woods. I am sorry. I wanted to make that clear. 

]Mr. Lex'zxer. In other words, you did not have occasion to look 
at that list at any time subsequent to June 1972. until Common 
Cause filed the lawsuit. Is that the idea? 

Miss Woods. Common Cause filed the lawsuit. As a matter of 
fact, I didn't even remember that this was pre- April 7. That is how 
little attention I paid to it. And it was just put in, you know, the 
closets in the office or one of the file drawers or somewhere. And. 
no, because again, unless we were using it for an invitation list, I 
would have no reason or desire oi' any reason to want to know how 
much everybody gave. 

Mr. Lex-^zxer. Well, just to clear this up. The point of the ques- 
tion Avas going to be — I was Avondering if you. having known that 
Mr. Rebozo had received money from the Hughes people of about 
$100,000, Avhether it ever occurred to you Avhy that Avasn't listed in 
total in tne list. 

Miss Woods. I didn't look at it in the first place and in the 
second place, this Avas prepared by INIaurice Stans. And as far as 
I know. Maurice Stans didn't know of the $100,000. Maybe he did. 
I don't knoAv. 

Mr. Lexzxer. Would you look, if you could, madam, please, 
look at the Florida listing and vou Avill note that- 



't~ 



Senator Baker. Excuse me. I have to go back to the floor very 
briefly and I Avill be right back. 

Mr. Lexzxer. I Avill liold that until you get back. 

[Recess. 1 

Mr. Lexzxer. Mv question Avas Avith regard to the California 
list? 

Miss Woods. Oh. California? 

Mr. Lexzxer. Oh. no. Florida. I am soriy. The name A. D. 
Davis does not appear on that list as a contributor. Is that accurate? 

Miss Woods. That is accurate. It is not on this list. 

Mr. Lexzxer. And Mr. Rebozo 

Miss Woods. There is a Davis. Mv. and Mrs. Robert Davis. 

Mr. Lexzxer. That is right and the amount for them is? 

Miss Woods. $1,000. 



10239 

Mr, Lexzxer. And Mr. Rebozo testified before us that Mr. A. D. 
Davis furnished him with $50,000 casli just prior to the April 7 
deadline. Can you explain, or do you knoAv why that A. D. Davis 
contribution of $50,000 is not listed on that list? 

Miss AVooDS. Xo, sir, that is something that you would have to 
ask the finance committee. I do not prepare finance committee lists, 
and never have. 

Mr. Lexzxer. And I take it you had no discussions with regard 
to that? 

Miss Woods. No discussion whatever. 

Mr, Armstrong. Miss Woods, there is one aspect of your testi- 
mony that I want to make sure I understand. If I understand it 
correctly, you have no information as to whether or not Mr. Rebozo 
retained the same funds and returned those to the Hughes Tool Co. 
that he had received in contribution other than the fact that he 
said they were the same funds? In other words, he never men- 
tioned 

Miss Woods. During the course of the time he had it? Not to my 
recollection, sir. No, I don't see why 

Mr. Armstroxg. I was just wondering if vou could help us about 
that? 

Miss Woods. No. 

Mr. Armstrox'g. Now, secondly, Mr. Lenzner asked a series of 
questions as to whether or not you had discussed the contribution, 
the Hughes contribution, with a number of people. I would like 
to ask this. It occurred to me that you may not have discussed the 
contribution, in the light of it being a received contribution, but 
you may have discussed it in the notion of its return, the fact that 
it was returned. So I would like to ask you, have you ever discussed 
the return of the contribution with General Haig, first of all? 

Miss Woods. The return of the Hughes contribution with Gen- 
eral Haig? No, sir; not to my knowledge. General Haig and I — 
I don't think he works on that sort of thing, but at least, I don't. 
I don't believe I recall ever discussing it with General Haig. 

Mr. Armstrong. What about Mr. Haldeman? 

Miss Woods. I haven't even talked with Mr. Haldeman. Wasn't 
that money just returned 

Mr. Dash. It was after he left in June of 1973. 

Miss Woods. I have not discussed it with Mr. Haldeman. 

Mr. Armstrong. Mr. Ehrlichman? 

Miss Woods. No. 

Mr. Armstrong. Mr. Wakefield? 

Miss Woods. No, sir; I haven't talked with Mr. Wakefield at all. 

Mr. Armstrox^g. The President? 

Miss Woods. No, sir. 

Mr. Armstrong. "Sh: Stephen Bull? 

Miss Woods. No, sir. 

Mr. Armstroxg. Mr. Buzhardt? 

Miss Woods. Other than that letter, no comment and no conver- 
sation with Mr. Buzhardt at all. 



10240 

Mr. Armstrong. And the occasion that you had talked to him 
about the letter, on that occasion, did you discuss the return of 
the contribution at that time? 

Miss Woods. He came over, as I explained this morning and 
previously, and sugoested that a letter of this type should be pre- 
jiared. He prepared the letter. It was done twice, as I earlier said, 
and I signed it. We had no discussion about a return. It was just 
that he had to get this ready for IRS. Who asked him for it, I 
have no information on tliat. Again I repeat 

Mr. Armstrong. So you never discussed the return with Mr. Buz- 
hardt? 

Miss Woods. No. 

Mr. Armstrong. And Avith Mr. Abplanalp? 

Miss Woods. No. 

Mr. Armstrong. And Mr. Gemmill? 

Miss Woods. No; I never had any discussion with Mr. Gemmill. 
Maybe I said hello. I am not sure that I ever said hello to him. 

Mr. Armstrong. Have you ever discussed either the receipt of 
the contribution or its return with Mr. Garment? 

Miss Woods. No. sir. 

Mr. Armstrong. Mr. Zeigler? 

Miss Woods. No, sir. 

Mr. Armstrong. Now. regarding the conversation with ]\Ir. 
Rebozo, when he first informed you that he had received the money, 
were you aAvare of campaign fundraising responsibilities that Mr. 
Rebozo had? 

Miss AVooDs. No. sir. As I testified earlier this morning. I had 
nothing to do with the financial end. I knew that — I don't know 
what year you are talking about. I don't know what year he told 
me, as I have testified. Whether he had some campaign financing 
responsibilities. I cannot tell you. I do not know. 

Mr. Armstrong. Do you have any knowledge of him ever ac- 
cepting contributions on behalf of a Presidential campaign or any 
other campaign? 

Miss Woods. From conversation. I believe he headed up some- 
thing; Cubans for Nixon in 1968. I don't know whether he headed 
it up or helped collect money to work with them. I don't have 
enough knoM'ledge to really give you the whole story, but I think 
he worked with them. 

Mr. Armstrong. And are you aware of Avhether or not Mr. Rebozo 
Avas familiar with the fundraising mechanisms of the Republican 
National Connnittee or the Committee To Re-Elect the President? 

Miss Woods. Sir, I cannot tell you what Mr. Rebozo is aware of 
and is not aAvare of. He would have to tell you that. I am not 
aware of how the Republican National Committee and the others 
perform, so I can't testifv for someone else. 

Ml-. Armstrong. You do not know then, if Mr. Rebozo worked 
Avith :Mr. Kalmbach or Mr. Stans? 

Miss Woods. I do not know, sir. You had him here 2 days and 
I think vou should have asked him that. 



10241 

IVIr. Armstrong. OK. It is not necessary to infer that we didn't, 
by the fact that we raised the questions here. Were you aware of 
a' fundraising committee, Florida Republicans for Nixon? 

Miss Woods. Xo, sir. I assumed there must have been a commit- 
tee. I guess there Avould be a committee in every State and I don't 
know what year you are talkino- about now. either. 

Mr. Armstrong. I am referring to a committee which was origi- 
nally for the 1968 campaign and lasted into 1969. 

Miss Woods. No, sir; I would have no particular awareness of 
that other than I would for any other State. No, sir. 

Mr. Armstrong. Do vou have any knowledge as to what Mr. 
Rebozo did with funds that were left-over from the 1968 campaign, 
subsequent to that election? 

Miss Woods. No, sir. 

Mr. Armstrong. Are you aware of 'Sir. Rebozo ever having given 
funds to Mr. Kalmbach for any purposes? 

Miss Woods. No, sir. 

Mr. Armstrong. Are you aware of any interest on Mr. Rebozo's 
part on the so-called Chappaquiddick incident involving Senator 
Kennedy ? 

Miss Woods. No; I am not. 

Mr. Armstrong. Are you aware of any association 

Miss Woods. Let me say not anymore than probably the rest of 
the country. I think it was quite an interesting story for everyone. 

Mr. Armstrong. Excuse me a second. [Pause.] 

Mr. Armstrong. OK. Go ahead. Thank you. 

Mr. Lackritz. When did you first meet Mr. Jack Caulfield? 

Miss Woods. I don't know the exact month. Sometime in 1968 
Mr. Jack Sherwood introduced him as a suggested person for 
security work. This was before the murder of Senator Kennedy, 
and each person had to have their own security man and Jack 
Sherwood thought he would be a good man. 

Mr. Lackritz. I see. So it was in the context of the campaign? 

Miss Woods. Yes, sir; in New York City. 

Mr. Lackritz. And were you aware that he w^as hired by Mr. 
Ehrlichman after the campaign? 

Miss Woods. I Avas aware he was hired by someone. I didn't know 
who hired him, but I knew he worked over in EOB or else in EOB 
No. 2, or something, 

Mr. Lackritz. But you said you had no knowledge as to whom 
Mr. Caulfield worked for? 

Miss Woods. I think he worked for several different people, sir. 

Mr. Lackritz. Who would those people have been? 

Miss Woods. Well, now, I must explain. Listening to his own 
testimony, he apparently reported to Mr. Dean, part of the time to 
Mr. Ehrlichman. I believe when he left the Government, he was 
working in the Treasury Department. But you know, I know Jack 
and I am fond of Jack and his wife, but I just don't know who he 
reported to. I never was in his office. 

Mr. Lackritz. I see. 

INliss Woods. Any of his offices. 



10242 

Mr. Lackritz. Were you aware of Mr. Caulfield's duties? 

Miss Woods. No, sir. 

Mr. Lackritz. Did you ever have any discussion Avith Mr. Caul- 
field concerning his specific duties in the White House? 

Miss Woods. Only at the time he mentioned that he was going 
to try to get my brother to go into some operation, which I have 
also testified that I suggested my brother not go into. 

Mr. Lackritz. jRight. We will get to that in just a minute. But 
did you have any knowledge that Mr. Caulfield had established 
an independent investigative capability in the White House? 

Miss Woods. Xo, sir. 

Mr. Lackritz, Did you have any knowledge that Mr. Caulfield 
employed Mi-. Anthony T. Ulasewicz to conduct investigations? 

Miss Woods. No, the first I^'ever heard him or saw^ him was in 
your committee. 

Mr. Lackritz. And never had met him prior to his testimony 
before the Senate Watergate Committee? 

Miss Woods. Nor prior or after. 

Mr. Lackritz. Did Mr. Caulfield ever contact you for the pur- 
pose of inquiring about any information concerning Mr. Larrv 
O'Brien? 

Miss Woods. No, sir; he never did, because I don't know^ why he 
would. I have no information on Mr. Larry O'Brien. 

Mr. Lackritz. Did Mr. Caulfield communicate with you on a 
frequent basis? 

Miss Woods. Frequent? I w-oiild say, no. If he happened to be 
over in the office he might stick his head in my door and say hello, 
but he did not communicate with me on a frequent basis. No, sir. 

Mr. Lackritz. Did he ever acknowledge to you that he was con- 
ducting any investigations on behalf of other individuals or at the 
request of other individuals in the White House? 

Miss Woods. T don't know that we Avere conducting investiga- 
tions, sir. I don't think you understand how terribly busy I am. 
I just don't sit around the White House and discuss other peoples' 
jobs with them. Nor have I ever, in the whole 23 years I have 
w'orked. We simply don't have time. There are thousands of pieces 
of mail and everything that goes through my office every day. I 
just don't sit around and gossip idly about anybody else's job. 

Mr. Lackritz. Did tliere come a time w^hen you were informed 
that Mr. Caulfield wanted to establish an independent investigative 
business outside of the White House, in the private sector? 

Miss AVooDS. I have just answered that question. Yes; I did be- 
come aw^are of that. 

Mr. Lackritz. When did you learn of that? 

Miss Woods. I have no idea. It wasn't important to me except 
that I told mv brother not to get into it. 

Mr. La('kritz. Who informed you about it? 

Miss Woods. Caulfield. 

Mv. Lackritz. Caulfield told you directly? 

Miss Woods. I believe so. 

Mr. Lackritz. AjuI why did he come to you to tell you about this 
proposal? 



10243 

Miss Woods. I suppose because he wanted to get my brother in it. 
That is my supposition. 

Mr. Lackritz. And did lie expLain to you what the operation was 

to entail? 

Miss Woods. Xo. sir. He said it was sort of — I thought it was 
sort of a PR-tvpe of thing and that my brother would-be in the 
:Midwest. And I told my brother that I thought, if he were going 
to even discuss anything with these people, he should be in charge 
of it, because he has had a lot of experience as an FBI agent and 
as sheriff of Cook County and as commissioner of Cook County, 
and I didn't think he should be working for people that I thought 
weren't — and I hate to say this because I do like Jack Caulfield — 
but who I thought would not be as bright as Joe. 

Mr. Lackritz. But as I understand it. Mr. Caulfield told you 
that this independent operation was to be a public relations op- 
eration ? 

Miss Woods. It was my understanding. We didn't go into a big 
discussion of it. 
Mr. Lackritz. Well, what were its functions supposed to be? 
Miss Woods. He didn't tell me. 

Mr. Lackritz. Did he say it was specifically for the 1972 cam- 
paign ? 

Miss Woods. Xo; I don't believe he did. 

Mr. Lackritz. Did he say this orgaiiization was to have any 
covert intelligence-gathering capacities? 

Miss Woods. Xo, sir. He just told me he was going to talk with 
my brother about some oi-ganization they wanted to set up. 

Mr. Lackritz. Did he say in what capacity he wished to employ 
your brother? 

:Miss Woods. Something about— for the Midwest and that is when 
I told my brother not to get tied in with anything with other 
people, where I tliought if he were going to get in, he should be 
in charge of it. 

Senator Baker. Let me ask a question, if I may. at that point, 
only because I happen to know JNIiss Woods' brother rather well. 
Joe was the sheriff of Cook County. His standing as a politician 
or as one knowledgeable in this general field was well known to the 
peo])le in the Midwest and ])olitical circles. 
Miss Woods. That is right. 

Senator Baker. There is nothing particularly unusual about 
someone suairestinsr thev talk with Joe Woods about that type of 
thing? 

Miss Woods. I wouldn't think there would be anything unusual. 
Senator Baker. Let me say for the record, that I know him and 
have known very well and it would not surprise me that anybody 
would try to enlist his services. 

Mr. Lackritz. I would like to have a document identified as an 
exhibit for the purposes of this section, and then I would like to 
show it to Miss Woods and ask her if she can identify it. 
Mr. Dash. I also apologize foi- its condition. 



10244 

Mr. Lackritz. I have this document, which is marked Caiilfield 
exhibit 1, tab 31,^ a 12-page document which is entitled "Operation 
Sandwedge." I Avould like to show it to Miss Woods and just ask 
her if she recognizes the document. 

Senator Baker. Do you have another copy? 

^Ir. Ciiarlp:s Ehyne. I must say, if you can read "Operation 
Sandwedge" here, you can do moi-e than I can. 

Senator Baker. Do you have another copy here? 

Miss Woods. No, I think the only time I ever saw anything on 
"Operation Sandwedge"' was either before this group on February 
20 or one of the others. No, sir. 

Mr. Lackritz. So vou are saving you have never seen it? 

Miss Woods. I have never seen it before that and somebody gave 
this at either February 20 or -one of the other committees. No, sir; 
T have never seen it before. 

Mr. Lexzxer. Did you ever have conversations with Mr. Caul- 
field with regard to the employment of your brother for the 1972 
campaign, specifically? 

Miss Woods. No, because if I were going to ask anyone to employ 
my brother. I would have talked Avith someone a little higher in 
the campaign than Caulfield. 

Mr. Lexzxer. Did you ever discuss with Mr. Caulfield the em- 
ployment of other individuals in the campaign of 1972? 

Miss Woods. Not to my knowledge, sir. And if I may go back 
to my brother, he did work in the 1972 campaign. He was the 
commissioner in Chicago and worked hard and gave speeches all 
around for the President. He didn't need to be hired. 

]\Ir. Lexzxer. And would it i-efresh your recollection if I asked 
you if vou ever had a discussion with Mr. Caulfield with regard 
to Charles Barth? 

Miss Woods. Charles Barth. I think, is with Standard Oil or 
used to be. Is that the one with Standard Oil of Indiana? 

Mr. Lexzxer. Yes. madam, I think that is right. 

Miss Woods. AVhether I ever discussed him with Jack Caulfield, 
I would have no idea. 

Mr. Lexzxer. Let me have this marked as exhibit 3 for identi- 
fication. This is a memorandum, Seiuitoi-. dated October 7, 1971. 
from Mr. Caulfield to Mr. Dean. 

[The document leferred to Avas marked Woods exhibit No. 3 for 
identification.-] 

Mr. Lexzxer. Mr. Khyne. would you like to examine exhibit 3? 

Miss Woods. Charley J^arth. I guess, worked in 1968. 

Mr. Charles Riiyxe. Yes, I have examined it. 

Mj-. Lexzxer. Looking at the document, does that refresh your 
recollection as to wliether you had a conversation with Mr. Caul- 
field, in regard to the employment of vour brother in the ballot 
security end of it, in the 1972 campaign? 

Miss Woods. With regard to tlie emplovment of mv brother? No, 
sir. 



1 See Book 21. p. 9S99. 

2 Sec p. 10339. 



10245 

Mr. Lexzxer. The employment or duties that your brother might 
assume for the 1972 campaign? 

Miss Woods. Xo, sir; I don't believe that I ever suggested he be 
given those duties. As I understand it, Charley Barth wanted to 
have those duties and I don't know wliether he got them or not. 

Mr. Lenzxer. '\^niat you are saying, you never discussed with 
either your brother or Mr. Caulfield the possibility that your brother 
would be the ballot security? 

Miss Woods. Are we talking about 1972? 

Mr. Lenzner. Yes, madam. Well, I believe the memo refers to the 
1972 campaign. 

Miss Woods. I might have talked with my brother, hoping that 
they wouldn't steal the election as they did in 1960 in Chicago, but 
I don't recall asking Mr. Caulfield to see that he was hired, no, be- 
cause even though he seems to have reported to ]Mr. Dean, I don't 
think that I would ever have talked to Jack Caulfield if I wanted my 
brother hired. 

]\Ir. Lenzxer. Well, were there discussions, in fact, with yourself 
and other people, in regard to establishing a security operation with 
a variety of capabilities to ensure that the election would not be 
stolen in Chicago or elsewhere? 

INIiss Woods. I am sure there were a lot of discussions about that. 

Mr. Lenzner. With you? 

Miss Woods. And I may have listened to some of them. If we didn't 
discuss it we would have been remiss in our duties, I think, but I do 
not believe I had a discussion with Jack Caulfield about it. 

Mr. Lenzxer. Did you ever make any recommendations to any- 
body with regard to the establishment of such a security operation? 

Miss Woods. I don't believe so. I think Charley Barth came in and 
said it ought to be started early. I remember that. 

Mr. Lex-^zxer. You do remember Mr. Barth coming in and telling 
you that? 

ISIiss Woods. That he thought they ought to start early on what- 
ever he did, which he did under Mr. Nicholas in 1968. 

Mr. Lexzner. And do you recall what year INIr. Barth may have 
told you that? 

Miss Woods. No, I don't. It may have been around this time. 

Mr. Lexzx'er. Do you recall who else was present when Mr. Barth 
told you that? 

INIiss Woods. Just Mr. Barth. He used to stop in when he was in 
town and say hello. He was my brotlier's campaign manager when 
he ran for sheriff. 

Mr. Lex-^zxer. And does that memorandum refresh your recollec- 
tion, that you did discuss with INIr. Caulfield Ihe possibility of using 
Mr. Barth in the 1972 campaign? 

Miss Woods. I may have. It doesn't really refresh it, sir. He says 
"Joe and Rose tell me" or maybe "Rose and Joe", I will have to put 
on my glasses to see which comes first. 

Mr. Lexzxer. I think you probably came first. 

Miss Woods. But whether I discussed this with Jack Caulfield, I 
am just sorry, I can't tell you whether he brought that up or not. 



10246 

Mr. Lenzxer. During those discussions with Mr. Earth and others, 
did you ever hear mention made of "black hug; capability" for the 
purpose of ensurinp: that the election not be stolen? 

Miss AVooDs. Black ba^ capability? 

Mr. Lenzxer. Yes, madam. 

]Miss Woods. No, sir. 

IMr. Lexzxer. Or did you ever hear discussions with regard to the 
penetration of nominees entourages with undercover personnel ? 

]Miss Woods. No, sir. 

Mr. Lex^zxer. Did you ever hear discussion with regard to any 
kind of surveillance? 

Miss Woods. No, sir. 

Mr. Lackritz. All right. Miss AVoods, did you ever have any dis- 
cussions Avith your brother about setting up any of those capabilities 
for the 1972 campaign? 

]\Iiss Woods. No, sir. The only discussion I would have had with 
Joe was that I hoped and prayed the ballot boxes Avould be honest. 
I did not talk about setting up specific discussions and I think, if 
any of you remember some of the articles that w^ere carried in the 
New York Herald Tribune while it was still alive, after the 1960 
election, you will find that it Avas stolen right there and that is why 
we had those discussions. I know you don't care about that, but I do. 

Mr. Lackritz. I understand your concern. Well, do you recall — 
did your brother come to Washington in the summer of 1971 to meet 
with Mr. Caulfield? 

]\Iiss Woods. You Avill have to ask my brother that. I have a hard 
time keeping track of my own schedule. 

Mr. Lackritz. But, do you recall going out to dinner with your 
brother and IMr. Caulfield and another individual to discuss the 
"SandAvedge proposal" ? 

Miss AVooDS. AVho Avas the other individual? 

Mr. Lackritz. I am not sure. 

Miss Woods. To discuss the "SandAvedge proposal"? No, sir. I have 
not discussed the "SandAvedge proposal", so I did not go out to dinner 
Avith them for the purpose of discussing any proposal, if I went to 
dinner Avith them. 

Mr. Lackritz. And you did tell your brother that you thought he 
should stay aAvay from this operation since he should be running it? 

Miss AVooDs. T said any operation Avith the people named. I didn't 
say "that operation", sir. I Avant to make sure that the record shows 
that. 

Mr. Lackritz. Could you recall the other individuals Avho Avere 
named? 

Miss AVoons. Yes. There Avas one Avho Avas Avith IRS. 

Mr. Lackritz. Is that INIr. Acree ? 

INIiss AA'^ooDs. No. 

Mr. Lackritz. Mr. Barth? 

Miss AA^OODS. IVfi-. Barth, T believe is the only other name that I 
recall. 

Mr. LACKRrrz. Do you recall Avhether Mr. Acree's name was men- 
tioned ? 
Miss AA^ooDs. Not to me. 



10247 

Mr. Lackritz. Was Mr. Ambrose's name mentioned? 

Miss Woods. No, sir. not that I recall. 

Mr. Lackritz. All rifjlit. Going- back to your relationship with Mr. 
Canlfield, had there been any discussions and specifically I am re- 
ferring to any other discussions at Christmastime, where you have 
either given to Mr. Caulfield any cash or given Mr. Caulfield cash 
on behalf of anyone? 

INIiss Woods. I have never given Mr. Caulfield any cash. 

Mr. Lackritz. All right, either from yourself or from any other 
individual ? 

INIiss Woods. No. 

Mr. Lackritz. And was INIr. Caulfield's wife employed in the 
White House? 

INIiss Woods. She was not employed Avith the White House. She 
came and volunteered her services. I would have to ask Marge Acker 
how long she was there. She was never employed in the Wliite House. 

Mr. Lackritz. And she was not paid for her services? 

Miss Woods. No, she was given a Christmas present. 

Mr. Lackritz. It was a gift of some kind? It was not money? 

Miss Woods. It might have been a little bit of money out of petty 
cash but she was not paid for her services. 

Mr. Lackritz. Well, was this cash that she was given at Christ- 
mastime ? 

Miss Woods. I believe so, I don't know. 

Mr. Lackritz. Do you have any idea where that money came from? 

INIiss Woods. I am sure it came from petty cash. 

Mr. Lackritz. Petty cash meaning what? 

INIiss Woods. Well, we have so many things we have to pick up, 
pay for, run out and buy, like maybe I think — I think most Senators, 
somebody, have things. And we send the valet out to buy maybe a 
couple of shirts for the President or a tie. AVe just don't send out 
checks. So we have a little, not too much. 

INIr. Lackritz. Do you recall how much cash INIrs. Caulfield was 
given ? 

Miss Woods. No, sir; I do not recall. 

Mr. Lackritz. Was it more than $10 or $20 ? 

Miss Woods. I would imagine, yes. I would imagine it was maybe 
$100 or $200. I don't know that,' but I would guess so because she 
had worked very hard and very faithfully. 

Mr. Lackritz. Did you give her the cash or did Mrs. Acker? 

INXiss Woods. I don't even know who gave it to her. I think it was 
in a Christmas card, but who handed it to her, I couldn't tell you 
that, sir. 

Mr. Lackritz. All right. 

Mr. Armstrong. Can you tell us what year that was ? What Christ- 
mas? 

Miss Woods. No. I would again have to check that, sir. But there 
have been a lot of Christmases since. It was probably the Christmas 
after she worked there and that is why I say I would have to check 
the months that she worked there. 

INIr. Lenzner. Did there come a time when you learned that News- 
day was preparing an article, an investigation on Mr. Rebozo? 



10248 

IMiss Woods. Did there come a time when I learned it? 

Mr. Lenzner. Yes, ma'am. 

Miss Woods, Yes; T think someone told me that. 

Mr. Lexzxer. Was that ]Mr. Rebozo who would advise you of that 
or somebody else? 

Miss Woods. I cannot recall whether INIr. Rebozo told me that or 
Marty Stram, who works for that newspaper. T don't know if that is 
his name. T think it is his name. They had a whole team of people 
doAvn there and were interviewing a lot of people. So I don't know 
whether T heard of it first from him or from one of the reporters. 

]\Ir. Lenzner. And are you aware of any investigation conducted 
by individuals at the Wliite House to determine what was going to 
be printed in that newspaper? 

Miss Woods. No, I am not. -^ 

]\Ir. Lexzner. And you are aware of any effort to determine whether 
the Kennedy Foundation w^as financing the Newsday article? 

INIiss Woods. Heavens, no, I not aware of any effort to find out 
whether they were financing it or not. 

]Mr. Lexzner. Well, did Mr. Rebozo ever suggest that to you, that 
the Kennedy Foundation was behind that article? 

Miss Woods. I don't think so. I don't recall if he did. 

Mr. Lex^zner. Do you know if any action was taken with regard 
to any of the reporters that were invoh^ed in that investigation and 
news article ? 

Miss Woods. No, sir, I do not. 

]\Ir. Lenzner. You never were aware from information received 
at the "\'V^iite House that an IRS audit was done on one of the news- 
paper reporters? 

Miss Woods. No, sir. 

Again, I must repeat that would probably, if that sort of thing 
happened, it would be so far out of any line of my duties that I would 
not have heard of it or seen of it or known about it. I have tried to 
say that over and over again. 

Mr. Lenzx'er. Well, are you saying that you never discussed IRS 
audits with any individuals at the Wliite House? 

Miss Woods. I discussed, as Dean testified. Dr. Kenneth Ryland. 
I did not really discuss it Avith him. I asked him if he, Mr. Dean, 
would give Dr. Ryland some advice as to whether he should hire 
counsel. Mr. Dean talked with him for a long time, 45 minutes or 
something, one day. I know nothing about IRS. I don't even make 
up my own taxes, small as that is, and that is my only discussion 
on IRS. 

Mr. Lenzxer. At Avhose request did you talk with Mr. Dean? 

INIiss Woods. At Dr. Ry land's. 

Mr. Lexzxer. He was in direct contact Avith you with regard to the 
IRS investigation? 

Miss Woods. No, sir. Dr. Ryland came to the office, to the Wliite 
House. Unfortunately I happen to have a bad back problem, like a 
lot of other people do, and he came doAvn to treat the President, 
Henry Kissinger, quite a few people, and he treated me. And at that 
time he said he had this problem and should he get counsel, or what 
should he do. 



10249 

And I said, I really don't know. So I called John Dean and said, 
would you just tell liim whether he needs to get counsel or what. 

Because, I again, am not an attorney. I know nothing about IRS, 
and I wasn't going to give him any false advice or let on I knew 
more than I did. 

JNIr. Lenzner. Did you request Mv. Dean contact anybody at IRS ? 

Miss Woods. I asked Mr. Dean to talk Avith Dr. Ryland. 

Mr. Lenzner. But, in addition to that, did you also ask him to 
contact anybody at the Internal Revenue Service? 

INIiss Woods. No, sir. 

]\Ir. Lenzner. Did you talk with Mr. Dean on more than one oc- 
casion about that problem? 

Miss Woods. I asked him one time, I think after, whether he had 
heard anything when Dr. Ryland came back down because he had 
not gotten any word or something. That is all. I asked if he had heard 
anything, and I think he said — I don't know whether he said it was 
at Justice or what. And that is all I know about it. 

Mr. Lenzner. Well, when you asked him if he had gotten any 
word, did you ask him specifically to inquire at the Department of 
Justice or the Internal Revenue Service with regard to the investi- 
gation ? 

]\Iiss Woods. No, sir. I think he was an attorney and would know 
where to ask. I wouldn't — if I had to start checking my own IRS 
case, I wouldn't know where to go except to the people who prepared 
my taxes. 

Mr. Lenzner. Did you ever talk with Mr. Barth or any other IRS 
employees with regard to tax audits? 

Miss Woods. No, sir. 

Mr. Lenzner. Were you aware that Mr. Barth transmitted certain 
information from the IRS to ]\Ir. Ehrlichman and other employees 
at the White House on individual tax audits? 

Miss Woods. No, sir, I was not. I never had anything to do with 
]\Ir. Ehrlichman's or anybody else's office, only my own. 

Mr. Lenzner. Did you ever become aware that there was a tax 
audit being conducted on Mr. Larry O'Brien? 

Miss Woods. No, sir. 

]Mr. Lenzner. Did Mr. Rebozo ever mention to you that he had dis- 
cussed with the President the retainer of Mr. O'Brien at the Hughes 
Tool Co.? 

Miss Woods. I don't believe so. INIr. Rebozo would not be in the 
habit of discussing with me Avhat his conversations would be with 
the President or John Ehrlichman or General Haig or anybody else. 
Again, if he talked with one person in the AVliite House about some- 
thing or if you did or anyone else, there would be no need to tell 
me, too. 

Mr. Lenzner. Did he ever tell you that he was aware of the fact 
that Mr. O'Brien had a six figure retainer from the Hughes Tool Co. 

Miss Woods. I don't believe so because I don't think I knew he did. 

Senator Baker. Could I interrupt just a minute? 

It is 5 minutes to 2 and I understand we are going to have a vote 
at 2 o'clock, Avhich is probably going to be at least the last vote of 
the day. 



10250 

Can I inquire about how much longer 3'on expect to go? 

Mr. Thompsox. Off the record. 

[Discussion off the record.] 

Mr. Lenzxer. Miss Woods, did you know an individual by the 
name of Lou Russell? 

INIiss Woons. I met him once. He came into the office to say that 
he worked on the committee — what was his committee? He was an 
investigator for the committee, which investigated — well, his com- 
mittee. "\Miat was the name of that committee ? Anyone know ? House 
Un-American Activities Committee. And he called and said that he 
was completely down and out, that he had been an alcoholic. He 
related a sad story about all of the unhappiness he had gone through 
and would I try to give him a job. And I did what I do with anyone 
else who comes in and asks few a job. I sent a memo saying that this 
man said he was now reformed, a reformed alcoholic and had not 
had a drink in I can't remember how many months or something, 
and I just forwarded that to whoever was handling personnel at that 
point. Eight now it could be Jerry Jones, but I don't know whether 
that was Fred INIalek at that time or who. 

Mr. Lexzxer. Do you recall how JNIr. Russell arrived to meet with 
you, how that was set up? 

Miss Woods. Vaguely. He wanted to see the President. And be- 
cause he had been an investigator on an old committee that the 
President had worked on and someone who Avas obviously very down 
on his luck — and I usually get that sort of case, which we can do 
nothing about — and that was the only time that I had ever seen or 
talked with Mr. Russell. 

Mr. Lexzx^er. And so you had no discussions with regard to Mr. 
Russell with any other employee at the "White House? 

Miss Woods. No, sir. Whoever I sent the memo to or called or 
just whoever was handling personnel, since there was no one I can 
hire except the three girls in my office. 

Mr. Lexzxer. And nobody specifically asked you to see this par- 
ticular individual? 

Miss Woods. I believe if I told the President that he was calling 
and calling and calling, he would ask me to see him just to talk with 
him for old times' sake, which is as I say — well, I get this all of the 
time. After the 1972 campaign and the 1968 campaign, too, I had 
some very sad people who have come in who are either too old for 
the jobs they want or not qualified and the personnel people don't 
want to talk to them, yet they have been friends and supporters over 
the years. And maybe I am sort of a soft touch or something like 
that, but I can't turn those people down. You have to talk with them 
for a few minutes and see if there is any way you can help. 

Mr. Lexzxer. And did Mr. Russell indicate what kind of job he 
wanted ? 

Miss Woods. No; I think at that time he Avanted any kind of a 
job. 

Mr. Lexzxer. Well, first let me ask you this. Do you recall Avhen 
that intei'vieAv was with him? Was it before the election of 1972? 

Miss Woods. Oh, I'm sure it hasn't been since, so it had to be before 
then. 



10251 

Mr. Lenzner. Did vou later learn that he, in fact, had been em- 
ployed by Mr. ]McCord ? 

Miss Woods. No, sir; I did not until I read in the paper that he 
was, and now I think he is dead as a matter of fact. Isn't that right? 

]Mr. Lexzxer. Did he indicate to you that he was particularly look- 
ing for a campaign job for the campaign of 1972 ? 

Miss Woods. Xo, sir. He just wanted a job. At least what he told 
me was that he wanted a job because he had really worked hard to get 
himself straightened out. I remember this because I felt so sorry for the 
man. He looked awful. 

INIr. Lexzner. Miss Woods, did you learn of an effort by the White 
House, particularly Mr. Caulfield, to determine the relationship 
between ]Mr. Larry O'Brien and an individual named Robert Maheu? 

Miss Woods. No, sir. 

Mr. Lenzner. When you talked to Mr. Russell, did he indicate 
that he had been previously employed by Mr. Robert INIaheu here 
in Washington, D.C. ? 

]\Iiss Woods. I do not have the slightest idea. He gave me some sort 
of a form that I forwarded on. Again I say, I talked with him only 
out of sympathy. I do not remember what the form said, who he 
worked for or anything. At that point he was really sort of begging 
for a job. I hate to say that because the man is dead. I have to tell 
you that. 

]\Ir. Lexzxer. Do you remember any effort on behalf of Mr. Caul- 
field or others to obtain information and investigate the circumstances 
surrounding the accident at Chappaquiddick? 

INIiss Woods. No, sir, I do not. 

]Mr. Lexzxer. You were not aware that information was coming 
in, then, from someone who was up there on behalf of the White 
House ? 

INIiss Woods. At Chappaquiddick? 

Mr. LENz>rER. Yes. 

IMiss Woods. No, sir. If they were getting that, again, it would not 
be something that would come to me. 

Mr. Lexzxer. Did you ever learn of an effort to conduct investi- 
gations on Senator Kennedy and other political and congressional 
figures by ]Mr. Caulfield or others in the ^Miite House? 

Miss Woods. No, sir. 

]Mr. Armstroxg. ISIiss Woods, were you aware of any incidents in 
which the President loaned INIr. Russell any sum of money? 

Miss Woods. No, sir. 

Mr. Lackritz. To follow up on the question that INIr. Lenzner just 
asked, I take it if you were not aware of any investigations in the 
"\Aniite House that you had no knowledge of the request to Mr. Caul- 
field that Senator Kennedy be placed under 24-hour surveillance. 

INIiss Woods. That is correct, sir. 

Mr. TiiOMPSox. Would you state whether or not the conversation 
you had with Mr, Russell was before or after the Watergate break-in ? 

jNIiss Woods. I stated that I do not remember when I talked to 
him. I sure — I would have to check with the personnel office where 
I sent the papers. INly recollection would be I would think it was 



10252 

quite a while before that. Ap:aiii. I Avoiild have to check when I had 
sent liis papers down. 

Mr. TiioMPSOx. You do not recall him mpntionin^ to you any 
relationship ho. had with James McCord ? 

Miss Woods. Sadly, he was just beggiiijj for a job at that time. I 
Avould think he did not have a job with ISIcCord. t do not know. 

Mr. Lexzxer. I would su^^est if we can, perhaps we can have the 
date of the materials referred over to the employment office added 
to the record at a later time and leave the record open for that, if 
that is agreeable with Mr. Ehyne. 

Mr. Armstrong. You mentioned previously, INIiss Woods, that it 
was not Mr. Eebozo's habit to talk to you. 

Miss Woods. I am sorry, I did not hear the start of your question. 

Mr. Armstrong. You testified previously, I believe, that it was not 
INIi-. Eebozo's habit to discuss his conversations with the President 
with you. He would not mention to you his conversations with the 
President. 

Miss Woods. That is right, sir. I think that he. like most of us — 
he is a personal friend of the President. I do not discuss my conver- 
sations with the President with anyone. I think most people do not. 
Mr. Eebozo would not discuss a conversation with the President un- 
less the President said, "Tell Eose," you know, "We ought to get so 
and so in for dinner," some such thing like that, nothing else. 

jNIr. Armstrong. If INIr. Eebozo and the President were not in the 
same town, in the same location, say the President is here and Mr. 
Eebozo is in Key Biscayne, how does he communicate with the 
President ? 

Miss Woods. He does not often communicate with him, sir. He is a 
very good friend. After a speech or something like that he calls and 
asks for me, or he might talk to Julie or Tricia or even Mrs. Nixon 
to pass on his congratulations, to say something about his speech. 
I don't handle the phone calls coming in. I would doubt Mr. Eebozo 
calls him personally very often at all. I think they see each other, 
you know, when he comes up here to go to Camp David or be at the 
house, or when the President is in Key Biscayne. I do not believe 
they have very much telephone conversation. I do not handle those 
incoming calls. 

INIr. Armstrong. Is it not true that ISIr. Eebozo usually communi- 
cates to the President through you when he calls by phone? 

Miss Woods. If he has a message to pass on, again about a speech 
or something. He does not talk that much to me except to see how 
things are going and how everybody is. It is not like a daily or a 
set conversation. 

Mr. Armstrong. Incidentally, are you aware of the presence of a 
AVhite House phone in Mr. Eebozo's office in his bank? 

^liss Woods. No, sir, I am not. 

Mr. Armstrong. Are you aware of the presence of such a phone in 
his home? 

Miss Woods. No, sir, I am not. I do not really know. Wlien I am 
in Key Biscayne, I do not believe I have been in ;Mr. Eebozo's home 
for a long time. When I go over, I am at the residence of the Presi- 
dent and Mrs. Nixon for maybe a while, and live over at the Key 



10253 

Biscayne Hotel. That, yon would have to ask, I suppose, the Tech- 
nical Service Division or the A^Hiite House operator. 

Mr. Armstroxg. AVlien you call JNIr. Rebozo, how do you reach him ? 

INIiss Woods. The same way I do everybody else. I pick up the 
phone and ask the operator to f^et him. 

Mr. Armstrong. It does not make any difference whether the 
person has a AAHiite House phone ? 

Miss Woods. No, sir. 

Mr. Armstrong. They are instructed how to reach people. 

Miss Woods. That is right. As a matter of fact, they are probably 
the best people in the world on telephones. They can find someone 
no matter where they are. Actually, it saves an awful lot of time to 
just pick up the phone and say, would you please get ISIr. Rebozo, 
or if I wanted you, as I mentioned this morning, I called up here 
to leave word, to leave messages for him and talked to Mr. Thomp- 
son. I just asked the White House operator to reach Mr. Thompson. 
I do that with everyone, simply to save my own time. That is what 
they are there for. 

Mr. Armstrong. INIiss Woods, are you aware of any income which 
the President received from January 1, 1969, to the present, which 
was not disclosed on his tax returns? 

Miss Woods. No, I do not know. I think everybody else has looked 
at the tax returns. No, sir, I'm not aware of any income he received 
which was not disclosed on his tax returns. 

Mr. Armstrong. Have you heard that there is such income? 

Miss Woods. No, I have not heard. 

Mr. Armstrong. You are quite sure of that? 

Miss Woods. I am quite sure that I have not heard that, sir. 

Mr. Armstrong. Other than the tapes that you have testified about 
in Judge Sirica's court, excluding those tapes, are there any other 
tapes, so-called recordings of Presidential conversations that you 
have listened to? 

Miss Woods. That I have listened to? 

Mr. Armstrong. Yes, ma'am. 

Miss Woods. No, sir. I have from time to time, I think I have said 
when he has dictated part of a speech and maybe there are two or 
three at a time and there are suggestions of different speech writers, 
I have not only listened but helped to type, if there are three or 
four of them that might come in, if he is working very hard, maybe 
in the middle of the night he gets ideas for a speech. 

I think your question was to just listen. My answer to that would 
be no, sir. 

Mr. Armstrong. I am assuming if it is transcribed you have to 
listen. 

Miss Woods. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Armstrong. I am not referring to dictabelts. I am referring 
to the Presidential taping system. 

Miss Woods. When he dictates — I am sorry. If you are talk- 
ing about tapes, no, sir. 

Mr. Armstrong. Of the tapes that are the product of the so-called 
Presidential taping system 

INIiss Woods. Yes. 



31-889 O - 74 - pt. 22 - 5 



10254 

Mr. Armstrong. Other than those that you have testified about in 
Judge Sirica's court, are there any other tapes that you have listened 
to? 

Miss Woods. No, sir, there are not. 

Mr. Armstrong. Have you testified tlien previous — you do not 
have to repeat your testimony about the last time that you listened 
to such a tape — since you have testified about listening to tapes, 
have you listened to a tape again? 

Miss Woods. No, because they were all done by the time I testified. 
I am sorry. 

Mr. Charles Rutne. I am assuming you are inquiring as to her 
testimony in Judge Sirica's court before the grand jury. 

Mr. Armstrong. I am excluding testimony. We are not asking 
for any repeat of testimony, either in court or before the grand jury. 
I am saying other than conversations that were testified therein, are 
there any others that she has listened to? 

Mr. Charles Rhtne. Presidential tapes recorded in the Oval 
Office of the Executive Office Building? 

Mr. Armstrong. Or any other building, but as part of that sys- 
tem. I understand there's a system on several phones; there is a 
phone in the residence and a phone in the Aspen cabin in Camp 
David that Avas also recording those conversations. That is what 
I am referring to, is the Presidential taping system. 

Mr. Charles Rhyne. I understood tliat there would be no ques- 
tions here with respect to any matter that was before the grand 
jury. Are you going into that? 

Mr. Armstrong. I am not asking about those tapes which were 
subpenaed by the Special Prosecutor. I am not even familiar with 
the present subpena, the tapes previously subpenaed that were 
turned over and about which Miss Woods testified. I am only ask- 
ing about other tapes. I am asking it in light of the fact that we 
have subpenaed a number of tapes and we have a court case pending. 

Mr. CiL\RLES RiiYNE. I would not think she Avould know what 
you have subpenaed and what you have not. 

Mr. Armstrong. I'm asking about tapes other than those that she 
testified about. 

Senator Baker. Why not start over because I am at a disad- 
vantage. 

Mr. Charles Rhyne. I think it would be a lot better if we did 
start over. 

Senator Baker. How about starting over. 

Mr. Armstrong. About the tapes from the Presidential taping 
system. 

Miss Woods. Otlier than the tapes — you are confusing me. 

Mr. Armstrong. Have you listened to any tapes from the Presi- 
dential taping system other than those tapes about which you have 
testified in Judge Sirica's court? 

Miss AYooDs. No, sir. 

Ml'. Armstrong. Have you at any time listened to a tape from 
the Presidential taping system and heard a conversation between 
Mr. Rebozo and the President? 



10255 

Miss Woods. Xo, sir. 

Mr. Lexzxer. Have yon ever had any occasion to talk to Mr. 
Rebozo Avith regard to the erasnre of the tape that yon have 
testified abont? 

Miss Woods. To talk with Mr. Rebozo abont it? 

Mr. Lexzxer. Yes. Have yon ever discussed that with Mr. Re- 
bozo ? 

Mr. Charles Riiyxe. I really understood that this hearing did 
not involve in any way any of the tapes that she had listened to. 

:Mr. Lexzxer. t am not "talking abont the tapes, Mr. Rhyne. I'm 
asking for a ves or no as to Avhether she ever discussed the question 
of the erasure of the tape with Mr. Rebozo. I am not asking for 
substantive information about the tape, and I am not going to. I 
am simply asking her if she discussed that question with Mr. 
Rebozo. 

If she says yes. I may ask her what she said. I am not going 
into the subject. 

Mr. Charles Rhyxe. She is under an order from Judge Sirica 
which prohibits her from talking abont any of the tapes that are 
pending before him in any way. Without being in contempt of 
court, there is no way she can answer your question. 

Mr. Lexzxer. Let's see if I can rephrase it. 

What I would like to know is simply yes or no at this point. Let's 
hold the other questions. 

Has Miss Woods ever discussed with Mr. Rebozo on any occasion 
the question of the erasure of the tape that Miss Woods has previ- 
ously testified about? 

I am just asking for a yes or a no on that. 

Mr. Charles Rhyxe. You are asking her to testify with respect 
to testimony that has been given to the grand jury and to Judge 
Sirica. My understanding of Judge Sirica's silence order is that 
neither she nor anyone connected with that proceeding is allowed 
to testify on the subject, or to say anything on the subject. 

Mr. Lexzxer. I am not asking what she heard. 

Let me ask this. Has there been testimony in court or before 
the grand jury with regard to conversations with Mr. Rebozo? 

Mr. CiLARLEs Rhyxe. Xo, there has not, but the silence order of 
Judge Sirica, I have been very, very careful because there have 
been so many leaks to the press from others, that we do not discuss 
it or mention it in any way, so that we are prohibited from doing it. 

Mr. Lexzxer. If it was not discussed before the grand jury, I 
cannot see how that could be a problem. I am not asking what she 
discussed before the grand jury. I am simply asking whether she 
discussed that issue at any time Avith Mr. Rebozo. 

Senator Raker. They are one and the same question. That is the 
point that I am concerned Avith at the moment. It could have been 
discussed, hypothetically, Avith ]SIr. Rebozo and also discussed before 
the grand jury. If you can get a separation of those two, that is, it 
Avas discussed Avith Mr. Rebozo, but she did not give testimony be- 
fore the gi'and jury, and that it did not iuA^olve the tapes, to the 



10256 

extent that Judg:c Sirica imposed his silence order, then I think 
your question is competent. 

Miss Woods. I am certainly willing to answer the question. 

Senator Baker, That is the simplest way. Otherwise, we are 
frointr to end up with the necessity for certifyintr it to the commit- 
tee for a ruling:. It would be much easier. 

Mr. CiiARLKs RiiTNE. I did want to, for her protection and mine, 
raise this question of the violation of Judge Sirica's silence order. 
I have no objection to her answering it. 

Senator Baker. In that respect. I wonder Avhether it would not 
be to your client's best interest if I instructed the witness to answer? 

Mr. Charles Rhtxe. Pardon? 

Senator Baker. AVould it not be in your client's best interest to 
have the record show that I instruct the witness to answer? 

]Mr. Charles Riiyxe. It is perfectly all right. There is no reluc- 
tance on her part to answer. "We are in a very delicate situation. 

Senator Baker. So she is not intentionally violating any order 
of the Judge, and if I interpose this committee's instruction to the 
witness to answer, that certainly would be taken account- of. 

Miss Woods. Your question is have I ever discussed the tape? 

Mr. Lexzxer. The erasure. 

Miss Woods. I do not call it an erasure. 

A gap — a gap, if you do not mind. I have never discussed it 
unless I made some offhand comment about some lousy cartoon in 
the newspaper or something like that. I have ncA^er discussed it as 
such Avith ^Ir. Rebozo. 

Mr. Lexzxer. May I confer with Senator Baker? 

[Discussion off the record.] 

Mr. Lexzxer. Did you ever make the statement to Mr. Rebozo, 
Miss Woods, to the effect of saying that you had erased the tape 
in question? 

Senator Baker. Before the witness answers, she may wish to 
confer with counsel, in view of her previous testimony before the 
grand jury and the silence order, or for other reasons. 

]\fr. Charles Riiyxe. I say all of this is in violation of the silence 
order, but I Avill not object to her answering it, because I think 
having raised it in this context, after stating to us that it would 
not be raised here in any Avay, it is absolutely necessary that she 
ajiswei- it. 

Senator Baker. Under those circumstances, and Senator Inouye 
agrees with me, the only thing Ave can do is protect the witness by 
instructing her to answer by authority of the committee. 

Miss Woods. Would you repeat the question? 

Mr. Lexzxer. Did you ever make the statement to Mr. Rebozo 
in effect that you had told the Pi-esident — let me Avithdraw that — 
that you had in fact erased the tape? 

Miss AVooDS. Xo, sir. T never made that statement to anyone; I 
haA'e never called it an ei-asure. If T may again put the Avord "gap" in 
there. 

Mr. Lexzxp:r. That is all the questions I have, sir. 

Thank you. Senator. 



10257 

Senator Baker, Are there any other questions? 

Mr. ScHULTz. I have one. 

Did you ever express to Mr. Rebozo your concern that you might 
have been responsible for the tape gap? 

Miss Woods. I might have expressed concern as I did in my pub- 
lic testimony, which everyone has read, that I might have been 
responsible for 4 or 41/2 minutes of it. I might have done that. 
It would not have been a discussion. 

Senator Baker. Are there other questions? 

Mr. Lackritz. I have just two quick questions. 

Miss Woods, did you liave any knowledge of any role played 
by either Mr. F. Donald Nixon or Mr. John Meier in an attempt 
by the Hughes Tool Co. to deliver a contribution of $50,000 to the 
Xixon campaign in 1968? 

Miss AVooDS. Xo, sir. 

Mr. Lackritz. Did you have any knowledge of the alleged sur- 
veillance of F. Donald Xixon during the first administration, either 
electronic or physical ? 

Miss Woods. Xo, sir. I read about that in the paper. 

Mr. Lackritz. You had no knowledge of that? 

Miss Woods. Xo knowledge at all. 

]Mr. Lackritz. Thank you. Senator. 

Senator Baker. Are there any other questions? 

Mr. Armstrong. One last one. 

Miss Woods, are you aAvarc of any instruction to any employees 
of the White House or any military aides not to record any indi- 
viduals or events on the Presidential daily diary, the documents 
which go to make up that daily diary? 

Miss Woods. Xo, sir. I think I testified to that on February 20. 
I have nothing to do in making the Presidential diary. I am in an office 
where I do not see people walk by. I Avould be unable to be the one to 
keep the log or diary or whatever it is called. So the instruction did 
not come to me because it would not be my job. 

Mr. Armstrong. You are not aware of any other instruction to 
any other person? 

Miss Woods. Xo. I am not. You say there is one, but I do not 
knoAv. 

Mr. Armstrong. You arc not aware of it. 

Miss Woods. Xo, sir. 

Senator Baker. Thank you very much. You have been very pa- 
tient, very cooperative, and we are grateful. Thank you. 

Miss Woods. Thank you. Senator. 

[Whereupon, at 2 :30 p.m., the hearing in the above-entitled mat- 
ter adjourned.] 



10258 



MATERIAL SUBMITTED FOR THE RECORD 



CM*nitS S RMYNt 
COURTS OULAHAW 
ALfRCO J TiCHC jn. 

DAVID M OlXQN 

ROBERT H CULP 
T. HAROLD SCOTT 
ABC J ROSCNBlCCT 
R COLCTTC McnCNNA 
TCRCNCe L O&OCN 
DCNIS O McHCNNA 



Rhynb & Rhyne 

400 Hill Buk oing 
WaSHINOTON, D. C. 2OO06 

(202) 347-7992 



CO* 



CABLE AOORtSS 
CHASRHVNC 



March 14, 1975 



The Honorable Sara J 
Senate Watergate Committ 
Room G-30 8 

Dirkson Senate Office Buildi 
Washington, D.C. 20510 

Dear Senator Ervins 



S-^AI J. jr.:,.,,,, , 

Ervin niirl^rrnn nr~, ' 

ittee I'JJ —-LiLhs:' 



l-'-i'"'..- , ' 



I most respectfully request that you withdraw the Subpoena 
which has apparently been issued in your name to my client Miss 
Rose Mary Woods. I make this request for the following reasons: 

1. Your Counsel, Mr. Lenzner has stated the reason for the 
Subpoena is to have Miss Woods repeat under oath the answers given 
to questions put to her by five of your lawyers on February 20, 1974. 
I attach the 80 page transcript of questions and answers plus an 
affidavit by Miss Woods attesting to the truthfulness of her answers 
on that occasion. Since her answers are now under oath, there is 
therefore no reason to have Miss Woods appear to repeat the answers 
and to require her to appear would be harrassment for no useful 
purpose. 

2. Rule 12 of your Committee has been violated by statements 
to the Press about this Subpoena. Prior to the Feburary 20, 1974 
questioning of my Client, this Rule was also violated as is shown 
by the enclosed news clippings. 

3. Mr. Scott Armstrong of your staff has stated that the reason 
for the Subpoena is Miss Woods' "memory may improve when she is re- 
quired to answer questions vinder oath," As you well recognize, this 
is a very serious matter and Miss Woods is considering appropriate 
action. 

4. According to the Press, you have fixed the time of tomorrow 
at 12:00 Noon for Miss Woods to appear before you. This time would 
prevent my Client from performing her duty of accompanying the President 
on his announced schedule for that day. My Client has most cooperatively 
answered questions by this Committee, in Court and in depositions. It 
seems that the usual courtesy extended to others has not been extended 

to her. I urge that you respect her and her duties and responsibilities 
by at least agreeing to a convenient Lime if you insist she must appear 
before you. 



10259 



The Honorable Sam J. Ervin 
March 14, 1974 
Page Two '. 

5. An examination of the transcript of the February 20, 1974 
interview indicates that Miss Woods had no knowledge of the subjects 
of questioning, beyond that reflected in her letter to Mr. Bartlett 
of IRS, dated October 18, 1973, a copy of which was forwarded to the 
Committee, staff in December, 1973. Miss Woods' answers were fully 
responsive to all questions. The questions, however, were redundant 
and continued to deal with topics of which Miss Woods has explained 
she had no knowledge. It is clear that the staff has questioned Miss 
Woods fully and that additional proposed questioning can only be 
repetitive. 

I again urge most sincerely that repetition of the information 
given by her on February 20, 19 74 would harrass Miss Woods without 
useful purpose. Such harrassment, I am confident, is not the desire 
of the members of the Committee so I repeat my request that the issu- 
ance of the Subpoena be reconsidered and recalled. 

If you reject this request, I ask additionally that you accord 
Miss Woods the courtesy you have extended to other witnesses and 
vacate the time of 12 Noon tomorrow and allow for an agreed upon time 
for her appearance before you. 

Respectfully yours. 



Charles S. Rhyne U 



CSR:hms 

Enclosures 

cc: Samuel Dash, Esquire/w/encl. 
Fred D. Thompson/w/encl . 



10260 

xMarch 14, 1974 



Mr, Charles S, Rhyne 
Rhyna & Rhyno 
400 Hill Dulldlng 
Washington, D. C. 20006 

Dear Mr, Rhyn«: 

I have received your lettor of March 14th with enclosuroa requesting 
that I withdraw the subpoena which I signed on behalf of the Committee 
for the'appoarance of Miss Rose Mary woods at an executive eeasloa 
on Friday, March 15, 1974. 

It Is my understanding that you refused to accept service of the sub- 
poena for your client and that the U.S. Marshall's office had not been 
able to serve the subpoena on Miss Woods. 

It would seem proper that before requesting any action by the Committee 
on this subpoena you should at least, have your client subm.lt to the 
lawful process of the Committee. 

Our Chief Counsel, hir. Dash Informa n^o that the staff was not able 
to co.r;rlete the questioning of Mies \ go:!:: eii-ins the two hour period 
you allowed them. Aleo, the tratiscrl;;t you sub ratted Is not an official 
transcript recognized by this Comaiitteo which u^cs official reporters 
for executive sessions of the Committee. The Co<nmlttee was unanimous 
In Its vote to subpoena Miss Woods and since It Is necessary for the 
Committee to obtain her full testimony In matters relevant to our 
resolution, under oath In executive session, I cannot In the Interest of 
the Committee's responsibilities withdraw the subpoena. 

However, we have always been willing to work with counsel for a 
witness to arrange a convenient date. Mr. Dash Informa n\e that ho 
will work out such a date with you after you have either accepted 

service on her behalf or arr?.n<;cd to h;va hjr nccept sc» vlcg. I r.iust 



10261 



Mr. Chiirlea S. Rhyno 
Margh 14, 1974 
Paqe 2 



stress however, that wo cannot postpone Miss V/ood'a appearance 
In e^iecutlve aenclon /or mora tlmn several days, clnco it la 
li-nperatlve that this Connalttoo complcta Its Itivcstlsatlon and pre- 
pare Its report. 

Sincerely, 



Sam J, Ervln, Jr. 
Chairman 



^ 



10262 



AFFIDAVIT 



u , ^ 




I, Rose Mary Woods, having been duly sworn do state 
upon oath that I have read the attached 80 pages of my 
answers to questions put by the Staff of the Senate Watergate 
Committee on February 20, 1974, and that my answers set forth 
true facts to the best of my information and belief. 




7?U^w 



Rose Mary Woods' 




Subscribed to before me thi 



is /V 



W 



day of March, 1974 



y JaLfiLAA^ 




Daphne G. dimmer 
Notary Public, D.C. 

I^ Comrtlssjon Erpbes March 31. 1377 



10263 

QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS OF ROSE MARY WOODS, 
FEBRUARY 20, 1974, 10:30 AM 

Present: Rose Mary Woods; Charles Rhyne ; William Rhyne ; Samuel Dash, 
counsel of the committee; Richard Schultz, assistant minority counsel; Don- 
ald G. Sanders, deputy minority counsel; R. Scott Armstrong, investigator, 
majority ; Terry Lenzner, assistant chief counsel ; and Marge Acker. 

Dash. I can assure you as much as humanly possible not a .word of this 
interview will be out. 

Rhtne. The reporter for the Chicago paper clearly did his story after our 
conversation a few days ago. 

Dash. I can assure you any notes that come out of this today we are going 
to pull together and put in a safe except any matters of assistance to us. 
I think it will be in your interest that we have a much more accurate state- 
ment being taken here. We will have just one copy and I will put it in my 
safe and seal it. This has nothing to do also with Judge Sirica — an interview 
with you under the rules of our Committee should not be made public. On a 
number of occasions like this meeting we had a meeting with a member of 
the White House staff — Mr. Ziegler, for example — and there has been no men- 
tion of that. We will take extra special caution. 

Rhyne. I think Miss Woods should read the statement I just gave Counsel. 
I think that ought to be in there — I have given this to them as covering the 
order of Judge Sirica, of yesterday. I don't have the order — it has been sealed — 
it is not typed up. We are not to talk to anybody about anything. 

[Copy of statement follows:] 
"February 20, 1974 

"We are under Court order as Counsel to Rose Mary Woods, that all Water- 
gate and related matters are now subjects of Grand Jury investigation and we 
and our client are not to discuss these with any person. 

"We promised to produce Rose Mary Woods and we are keeping that prom- 
ise since Mr. Dash has advised that the Senate Watergate Committee has 
voted unanimously to Subpoena her into an Executive Session before a Senator 
for interrogation if she fails or refuses to appear for this interrogation. 

"We hereby put you as lawyers and officers of the Court on Notice of the 
Court Silence Order of yesterday, and through you, the Senators who sent you 
to do this interrogation. Any violation of the Court's Silence Order through 
this interrogation is your responsibility and that of the members of the Senate 
Watergate Committee. 

"We will not make any comment on this interrogation — if you now conduct 
it — to anyone at anytime. We believe that this interrogation and the fact of its 
having taken place should be absolutely confidential. Any comment you make 
will be on your own responsibility and through you, that of the members of the 
Senate Watergate Committee." 

Dash. In order to expedite I don't want this meeting to go on too long. 

Rhyne. Can I just know who is here? 

[Sarn Dash, chief counsel; Richard Schultz, minority staff; Donald Sanders, 
minority staff; Scott Armstrong, majority staff; Terry Lenzner, majority staff.] 

Dash. I am asking Terry to ask the questions. 

Rhyne. I have no objection to anyone asking any questions at all. 

Dash. I don't feel this should be everybody a.sking a lot of questions. 

Rhyne. I certainly agree with you on that and I would like to expedite. 

Lenzner. One point I would like to mention — you perhaps are not aware of — 
we have been seeking to talk with Mrs. Acker also. 

Rhyne. I was aware of that. 

Lenzner. We don't want to do that today whereas she will obviously be 
interrogated later — will be a question of Miss Woods for background informa- 
tion — I know you are living on Virginia Avenue — how long have you lived 
there? 

Woods. Since January 20, 1969. 

Lenzner. What is your phone number at that address? 

Woods. I have two White House phones there — I give no one my private line — 
that includes anyone. 

Lenzner. Not your private line. 



10264 

Woods. I don't think anyone should have that hecause I have gotten calls 
at 2 or 3 in the morning — I work too hard to liave that — to have kooky calls — 
I don't give my number to anyone but my family. I have a White House phone 
and a signal phone. 

Lenzner. a regular C & P Phone? 

Woods. One number that is my own private number. 

Lenzner. White House numbers? 

Woods. It is an extension of the White House board — I don't know the ex- 
tension number. You pick up the phone and the operator answers. 

Lenzner. Do you use a telephone credit card? 

Woods. No I never do. 

Lenzner. When you are in San Clemente where do you usually stay? 

Woods. Different places almost each time — when we first went out there was 
a place called the Laguna Lido — I guess that was sold out and now — once in 
a while I stay at the San Clemente Inn — other times a little house close by 
for rent — just wherever you can — it depends on the season what you can get. 

Lenzner. You rent the house ^u stay in? 

Woods. Sure. 

Lenzner. What about Key Biscayne? 

Woods. Usually at the Key Biscayne Hotel or one of the villas. 

Lenzner. One of Mr. Rebozo's villas? 

Woods. As far as I know Mr. Rebozo does not have a villa — there are prob- 
ably 100 or so villas at the Hotel. 

Lenzner. You have not used Mr. Rebozo's accommodations when in Key 
Biscayne? 

Woods. No — every time I have been in Key Biscayne Mr. Rebozo has been 
using them and we have not taken up sharing the same house. 

Lenzner. He has a house I think the bank owns. Do you have a special 
phone at Camp David? 

Woods. No. 

Lenzner. Do you always stay in the same cabin? 

Woods. Not always— when it is available I stay at Dogwood which is closest — 
I have stayed in several other.s — they are all named after trees. 

Lenzner. That is OK — you don't have a special phone number? 

Woods. No — there is a signal board or Camp David switchboard. 

Lenzner. Briefly describe your duties as Executive Assistant to the President. 

Woods. I am Executive Assistant and Personal Secretary — that encompasses 
a little bit of everything and a lot of work — I have worked for him 23 years 
February 1 — the duties encompass all kinds of things— hundreds of letters 
each day I have to check to see if they are OK for his signature — he does not 
have time to check to see whether they are for somebody he knows and for 
instance if I left the staff and wrote a letter in and got a letter back addressed 
Dear Miss Woods I would be insulted. I know most of the people he knows — I 
check the letters to see that they are addressed properly — to see when it is a 
close friend — to see that the draft or final form is applicable to the subject 
matter. 

Lenzner. So all correspondence, personal and business, would be cleared 
through you? 

Woods. Personal correspondence — not if it is a Domestic Council thing or if 
it comes from NSC — those probably are taken in many times by persons 
involved into him — I do not check those — they are strictly business letters. We 
handle all picture requests — they come in to our office on 3 x 5 cards with the 
person's name who is requesting an autographed picture for someone — we 
have to keep lists of people for dinners, for after dinner entertainment, for 
church — we keep lists of Democrats for Nixon, lawyers for Nixon, doctors for 
Nixon — the President and Mrs. Nixon asked when we first went in in 1969 that 
we get as many different people from around the country as possible into the 
White House instead of the same i)eoi>le all over again — it is a thrill to go but 
it is not if you are a repeat all the tim(>. T get an awful lot of mail on my own. 

Dash. More recently I bet. 

Woods. I always have but more recently — I have gotten thousands of letters. 

Lenzner. Do you have specific political responsibilities? 

Woods. No. 

Lenzner. Responsibilities in the financial contribution area? 



10265 

Woods. No. 

Lenzner. No responsibility there at all? 

Woods. No. 

Lenzner. You have been testifying so much lately it must be confusing — I 
had imderstood that one of the lists of financial contributors was maintained 
by you. 

Woods. It was not maintained by me. I received, as I have over the years, at 
the end of a campaign or at different times — lists of contributors, athletes, stars, 
Democrats for Nixon, lawyers for Nixon, doctors for Nixon, ethnics for Nixon, 
Blacks for Nixon, etc., everybody to be considered for dinners, church and any 
other social event. I have nothing whatever to do with compiling them because 
I would have no way of knowing who they were — I have nothing to do with the 
financial end. 

Lenzner. How did you get the information on the contributions? 

Woods. When are you talking about? 

Lenzner. You kept them for 1968 and 1972 campaigns? 

Woods. We get lists after any campaign of people to be considered. 

Lenzner. Let's say 1972. 

Woods. That would be Mr. Stans, the Finance Chairman. 

Lenzner. How would the information be forwarded? 

Woods. One list may have come by messenger, Mr. Stans may have brought 
one list — how we got the copy of the one that went to GAO I don't know. 

Lenzner. Mr. Stans knew you were to be given a list so you could then have 
names for these functions? 

Woods. For those functions and he thought they were important for history 
maybe — for the records. 

Lenzner. It sounds like you got them in bits and pieces for the 1972 campaign. 

Woods. I had received one list of contributors latter part of April, probably 
sent to ofiice by messenger. As I am sure you all have read I also received one 
which was delivered to me by INIr. Stans the latter part of June which got called 
Rose Mary's baby. Then we got a list in November — from Mr. Talmadge who 
was Mr. Stan.s', I think, Administrative Assistant or something — we wanted 
some suggestions for dinners that were coming up right away. Then we got the 
big final list. 

Lenzner. After the election? 

Woods. Yes — I don't know — probably after the first of the year. 

Lenzner. The list Mr. Talmadge sent over — do you still have a copy of that 
list? 

Woods. I imagine so. 

Lenzner. Have you been able to produce that for any other bodies? 

Woods. It is one memo with a few pages attached — I have shown it to some- 
one — I have not produced it. 

Rhyne. I think you gave it to the Common Cause people. 

Woods. No — not Common Cause — they started the Rose Mary's baby talk — it 
was Rayhill. 

Dash. That is the case in New York. 

Woods. I have been questioned by so many different things — you cannot 
remember like that memo — I call it the Rayhill one. 

Lenzner. How did that list differ — we have not seen it — from the other two 
lists you got? 

Woods. We obviously must not have had the long list or we asked for it — 
the memo says something as per your conversation \¥ith Mr. Stans — I told him 
we had 3 or 4 dinners coming up — and asked whether they had some special 
suggestions. 

Lenzner. Did it show amounts? 

Woods. No it did not show the amounts — it was jiist the name and address 
and probably whether it was Mr. and Mrs. — we were having, I think, two state 
type dinners and two stag dinners. 

Lenzner. What time frame was this? 

Woods. I think it must — I am guessing now — the list was delivered In Novem- 
ber but we didn't have the dinners until after the Inauguration — I think 
February and March. 

Lenzner. Then when did you get the big list? 

Woods. I really don't know — it was not delivered to me personally. 



10266 

Lenzner. You maintain those in a file? 

Woods. They are just there — we would go through that list — particularly for 
a church list or after dinner guests or an evening at the White House — ^for 
people in Washington because we don't invite people to travel a long way to 
come for a Sunday morning or for an event wiiich does not include dinner so we 
try to get people from the Hill and people who live in town — we take a few from 
each category for each dinner. 

Lenzner. Were the lists ever updated — any new information added at any 
particular time to those lists? 

Woods. I think we may have gotten a change saying some names were left off 
or some put on — like they had included staff and they would not have been 
included as contributors — I believe that is true. 

Lenzner. Did you ever add any name or anyone on your staff add any name? 

Woods. To my knowledge no — I would have no information on that — during 
the campaign if some old friends sent a check through me I merely just sent 
them over to the Finance Committee. 

Lenzner. You never kept a record of what went through your oflSce? 

Woods. Probably there may be a copy of a record of what was forwarded. 

Lenzner. You would not have added that name to the list? 

Woods. No — that is not my business — that is the Finance Committee's busi- 
ness. 

Lenzner. Did you get information on contributors from Mr. Kalmbach? 

Woods. I don't think so. 

Lenzner. Or Mr. Sloan? 

Woods. I don't recall. 

Lenzner. Mr. Colson? 

Woods. I don't know that he would know any — he might offer as, would 
probably about 20 people in the White House, lists of suggested names for 
events — Bob Brown sent in the names of blacks — the minority people — we get 
lists from the State Department — NSC have added names, etc. 

Lenzner. You did not add those to the contributors list? 

Woods. I don't add anything to the contributors lists. 

Lenzner. It was brought to my attention that this morning Jack Anderson 
had a four column list called Alpha 4 — do you know what that refers to? 

Woods. I have never heard of it — the only list I know that I got was the one 
that was subpoenaed which they called Rose Mary's Baby — I don't recall any- 
thing with Alpha 4 — and I never read Jack Anderson. Alpha 4 — I have never 
heard the expression. 

Lenzner. Y'ou have never heard of that? 

Woods. No. 

Lenzner. Did Jack Gleason ever suggest any names of contributors during 
the 1972 election period? 

Woods. Not to my recollection. 

Lenzner. This I believe is a copy of one of the lists given to you — indicating 
Mr. Howard Hughes for 16,000 dollars. 

Woods. I could not tell you — the one list had amounts on it. 

Dash. This is a copy of the full list that we received from the White House. 

Lenzner. Can you identify that? 

Woods. I would have to look at my own list — we have some by states — I 
don't have any interest in how much anyone gives — I would have to look at my 
own list to identify this as a copy of the list as I have it— the one list Mr. 
Stans gave me was by states. 

Lenzner. One list had the amounts? 

Woods. The big book we have — that we use for our dinner selections has no 
amounts on it. 

Lenzner. What was the fir.st list used for? 

Woods. It was sent in the event we were going to entertain — but during the 
campaign months there was very little White House entertaining and so we 
did not use the early lists. 

Dash. What this is, as I understand, at our request Mr. Buzhardt at one 
point sent us a copy of the long list — the one that was identified as Rose 
Mary's baby. 

Woods. We should have that so I can see if it is from that list. 



10267 

Lenzneb. Was that list with amounts on it ever given into the hands of other 
individuals? 

Woods. Not to my knowledge. 

Lenzner. Never requested from anyone else in the White House? 

Woods. It may have gone into Mrs. Acker's hands to lock up. 

Lenzner. But not Mr. Haldeman or Mr. Ehrlichman? 

Woods. No — no one else ever asked me for it. 

Lenzner. You have supervisory responsibility for Mrs. Acker and other 
individuals? 

Woods. Two others — Mrs. Alice Nelsen and Mrs. Alice McPhillips. 

Lenzner. Did you ever have supervisory responsibility for Marge Caulfleld? 

Woods. Not supervisory — she came in and volunteered and did some work for 
us for one and a half or two months. She was putting things into alphabetical 
order onto cards from a list or from cards to a list— I don't recall which— she 
w'orked in the outer ofHce. 

Lenzner. What was the list? 

Woods. It was a financial list. 

Lenzner. Was that the April list? 

Woods. No — it was before the 1972 campaign got under way — ^very likely 
was the 1968 list — getting onto cards names which were checked — because we 
have to keep track of who was invited so they are not invited again — cards 
which show dinner, after dinner, church. 

Lenzner. That is the nature of the work? 

Woods. That is all she did — put them in alphabetical order or some sort of 
order that would make it easier to work from. 

Lenzner. Supervisory capacity over Shelley Buchanan? 

Woods. Not at the White House — she worked in the law office for a time 
when we were in New York and then I had supervisory capacity over her. 

Lenzner. Any supervisory capacity over Sally Inge? 

Woods. No. 

Lenzner. Supervisory capacity over Beverly Kaye? 

Woods. No. 

Lenzner. Supervisory capacity over Lynn Rae McClintock? 

Woods. I have never heard of her. 

Lenzner. Do you have responsibility for transcription of dictation of daily 
events dictated by the President? Would he make it a practice of his recollec- 
tions that were transcribed on a daily basis? 

Woods. No. He from time to time, for his own private, personal file does do 
some tapes. I have been in the Lincoln Sitting Room at times when he will 
remember something from a conversation and put on a dictabelt — such as Julie 
said this or that to me — those personal, private dictabelts are delivered to 
myself or Mrs. Acker and put in an envelope — maybe we get 2 or 3 at a time — 
they may be 3 weeks apart — w^e have no idea what is on them — they are his own 
personal, private things which are not transcribed — they are put in an envelope, 
sealed up and the date we received them is put on the envelope. 

Lenzner. They are kept in your file cabinets? 

Woods. They are kept in his filing cabinets. 

Lenzner. Located in your office? 

Woods. No — they are located in the White House. 

Lenzner. In a secure area? 

Woods. Yes. 

Lenzner. Can you describe that area? 

Woods. They are on the basement floor in the West Wing. 

Lenzner. Would he not dictate business matters? 

Woods. From time to time he might send in two or three dictabelts of memos 
or letters but for the most part Mrs. Acker would transcribe those and bring 
them to me — if there was a rush I would help. 

Lenzner. Mrs. Acker would be responsible for transcribing those? 

Woods. Yes. 

I^NZNER. How would you know that a dictabelt was personal rather than 
btisiness? 

Woods. He would indicate so — sometimes he would hand them directly to me 
or might tell one of the stewards that this was one to put in his personal file. 
Also, with the belts sometimes or separate from them (he saves everything) 



10268 

he saves place cards, menus — even one halloweeu we were at Camp David and 
he and Mrs. Nixon invited me to dinner and a steward put a colored mask 
on each of the three plates — I know Mrs. Nixon put hers in the waste basket 
and I did mine, but his came down to be filed — little notes from Julie — from 
Tricia, etc. and they are .sealed in an envelope and put away. 

Lenzner. Are the business dictabelts also saved or reused? 

Woods. They would be saved. 

Lenzner. Where would they be kept — with the memos or in a separate filing 
place? 

Woods. You had better ask Mrs. Acker that — I am not sure where she puts 
them. 

Lenzner. I take it also you have supervisory responsibility over the Presi- 
dent's personal and business documents — you know what files are kept and not? 

Woods. I have never been in the correspondence room or the filing room in 
the White House. I think you mean from meetings — I imderstand that is 
somewhere in the EOB and I have been going to go over there for a long time — 
the girl who used to be Trudy Brtfwn and got married is in charge of some of 
the files. 

Lenzner. Does the President on occasion ask you to set up a file on matters? 

Woods. No — he never asks me to set up a file. 

Lenzner. If the President wanted a file set up on the Howard Hughes Tool 
Company, which is what we are primarily interested in. 

Woods. I can't believe the President v,'ould ever ask anyone because I don't 
see that he would have any interest in it — it would have to be whoever was 
dealing with the company — if it was Howard Hughes Tool Company or Charles 
Rhyne, Esq. or whatever — if it was a matter or a discussion — whoever par- 
ticipated in that or had responsibility would be the one who set up a file — I 
have nothing to do with files of that nature — only for personal and private ones. 

Lenzner. That would be his own personal business, family matters? 

Woods. That is right. 

Lenzner. If the President wants to see a particular file he doesn't ask you 
to get it? 

Woods. Not unless a personal, private file. He has never asked me for other 
type files. Prior to a meeting whoever sets it up prepares a memo or an agenda 
— this is not my job — and whoever is the staff person in that meeting would 
have the responsibility, I believe, for dictating the memos and sending it to 
general files or special files or wherever they send their things. Even though 
I am Executive Assistant and Personal Secretary I don't really know who is 
in the office because I see a copy of the schedule and there is a light on my 
phone which shows someone is in his oflice — but I don't make appointments — 
I don't set up meetings — I don't know who does all that. 

Lenzner. Appointments would have been in the past by Mr. Chapin or some- 
one like that. 

Woods. Appointments would have been Mr. Chapin but final approval would 
be given by Mr. Haldeman and now by General Haig. 

Lenzner. You could set up appointments if you wanted? 

Woods. I would mention it to one of those fellows that on occasion when 
someone was in town and it would be nice if the President would shake hands 
with them — but I would not mention it to the President because I know the 
responsibility on him for appointments and responsibility on many other 
problems and do not burden him directly with requests. 

Lenzner. We were advised by one witness that there was a file on Hughes 
Tool Company — were you aware of that? 

Woods. No. 

TjEnzner. This particular witne.ss indicated he was asked to obtain it by 
either Mr. Ehrlichman or Mr. Haldeman and was told it was in your possession. 

Woods. I have never seen^ — I do not have a Hughes Tool file — I cannot 
imagine why we would have a Hughes Tool file. 

Lenzner. It was initiated at the time of the loan on Hughes Tool Co. to the 
President's brother — F. Donald Nixon. 

Woods. That would not mean the President had a file on it. 

Lenzner. I am saying a file was maintained. 

Woods. If so, I think that would have been in 1953, '55, '56 when he was 
Vice President. 



10269 

Lenzner. Our understanding was it was initiated then and tlien maintained 
witli matters relating to the President's brother with Hughes Tool Co. 

Woods. You have more information thau I do. 

Lenzner. Was there a file under F. Donald Nixon? 

Woods. I have no idea — I have never done any filing. 

Lenzner. A file on the President's brother? 

Woods. I am sure there must be a file on F. Donald Nixon. I have never seen 
it because I have never gone through the file room. 

Lenzner. It was never shown to you — never saw it on a desk? 

Woods. No — it was never shown to me — I have no reason to see a file on 
Donald Nixon. 

Lenzner. Any files maintained or correspondence relating to a fellow named 
Robert Maheu? 

Woods. No— I have not seen it. 

Lenzner. Any documents relating to Howard Hunt, Gordon Liddy, special 
plan number one? 

Woods. No — I never heard of Hunt, Liddy or special plan number one until 
you people had them before your committee — I have never seen Hunt or Ldddy 
except when Hunt appeared before your committee. 

Lenzner. Larry O'Brien — any documents or files? 

Woods. No documents or files — I have never met him. 

Lenzner. How about Mr. Rebozo — any files or documents? 

Woods. I have seen a lot of clippings lately. 

Lenzner. Any correspondence, memos, business documents? 

Woods. I have gotten letters from him asking little questions — are you talking 
about letters to the President? 

Lenzner. Letters to the President — information relating to other individuals 
on a particular matter. 

Woods. I don't particularly — I think he rarely writes the President. 

Lenzner. Does he communicate more with you than he does with the 
President? 

Woods. I don't know how often he communicates with the President — I talk 
with him by phone. 

Dash. Who opens the President's mail? 

Woods. It goes to the Mail Room and they receive thousands of letters a 
day — unless it is definitely marked — because the personnel in the mail room 
goes from one Administration to another — if they think it was for the President 
personally they might send it to me. 

Dash. A particular person who has an on-going relationship with the Presi- 
dent — would it come to you? 

Woods. It would come to me if It were marked for my attention. 

Lenzner. Most of the business documents you would not see at all — they 
would go directly to Miss Brown? 

Woods. That is right — I do not see most of the business documents. I don't 
see anything that comes out of the out box — I gather they go back to Mr. 
Kehrli or someone like that. 

Lenzner. What are the documents that you would maintain? 

Woods. Personal files. 

Lenzner. A general description. 

Woods. Dictabelts — the very last draft — not the draft — the copy he is reading 
a speech from — for a few months we keep one copy of each of the letters so if 
someone has written two or three letters — we keep what we call an x-copy bo 
if I say we just wrote this fellow yesterday we have a copy so he doesn't 
receive two within a few days of each other. 

Lenzner. Personal correspondence only. 

Woods. Personal — I mean anything that is not business — there are hundreds 
and hundreds of letters — if John Doe wrote a letter about a speech he made — 
we keep a copy of the reply — everything not tied to the Domestic Council or 
the NSC. 

Lenzner. If they include on occasion a memo or documents delating to F. 
Donald Nixon? 

Woods. I don't believe I have ever seen a memo in relation to F. Donald 
Nixon. 



31-889 O - 74 - pt. 22 - 6 



10270 

Lenzner. Anything which might reflect his continuing relationship with 
Hughes Tool Co.? 

Woods. No — I have never seen anything like that. 

Lenzner. Discu.s.sions where they miglit have arose? 

AVooDS. No — the last I heard of it was the end of the 1960 campaign when 
Mr. Kennedy hrouglit the matter up and in the 1962 campaign when Governor 
Brown used it as a major issue. 

Lenzner. Electronic surveillance conducted on him? 

Woods. No — not until I read it — was that in Jack Anderson? 

Lenzner. No — it was in the paper.s — it was not in Mr. Anderson's column. 
Would yju receive a copy of the Daily Diaries introduced in evidence In Judge 
Sirica's Court as a regular matter of procedure? 

Woods. There are two — we receive something once a week — you may have 
to ask Mrs. Acker how often — we do receive one but they might be revised four 
or five times. I believe they are what they call the abstract. 

Lenzner. From the archives. 

Did there come a time the Presidf&nt asked that certain visitors not be 
included in the daily diaries? 

Woods. No — he didn't ask me because I do not make up the schedule. 

Lenzner. I think Mr. Nesbitt testified to that in April of 1973. 

Woods. He would get all of that material — we are so busy with our own 
things but since I don't work on the schedule there would be no need for me 
to know that. 

Lenzner. If the President came out of a meeting with Mr. Mitchell or Mr. 
Haldeman and wanted to summarize his understanding of the matter would he 
dictate that to you or Mrs. Acker? 

Woods. That is a hypothetical question — I will have to give you the same 
kind of answer — I don't recall his dictating anything out of a meeting with 
two or three individuals. 

Dash. April 15 meeting — with Mr. John Dean — I think the President indi- 
cated that tape is missing — he made some notes. 

Woods. But that is not anything that would come to us. 

Lenzner. Would you get a copy of that transcription? 

Woods. No — unless I have something to do with the matter the memo would 
not come to me — it would go to the person handling the matter — I would have 
nothing to do with the Counsel unless it involved Rose Mary Woods. 

Lenzner. On occasions the President dictated to you would you maintain 
copies of those notes? 

Woods. I don't maintain copies of those notes — I would type up or do what- 
ever it was — usually when he dictates to me it is to call someone or some- 
thing — he does not dictate many memos or letters. 

Lenzner. Going directly to the Hughes Tool Company contribiition — did you 
become acquainted with Mr. Richard Danner? 

Woods. I met him I believe in 1952 at one time in Florida but I am not 
really acquainted with him. 

Lenzner. You were with the President at the time? 

Woods. I believe it was right after he became Vice President — at that time 
he had no Secret Service — the Vice President elect, Mrs. Nixon and their two 
little girls (age 4 and 6) and I went to Florida — that is also where I met Mr. 
Rebozo who helped us with the many problems that arose. 

Lenzner. Mr. Rebozo introduced you to Mr. Danner? 

Woods. Probably— I cannot recall. 

Lenzner. Have you seen Mr. Danner since then— since 1969? 

Woods. Not to the best of my knowledge. 

Lenzner. No communication at all with him? 

Woods. No I have not. 

Lenzner. Do you know if Mr. Danner lias seen the President since 1969? 

Woods. I don't know tliat of my own knowledge— I think I read something 
in the paper about that. 

Lenzner. Were you advised Mr. Danner was the individual who introduced 
the President to Mr. Rel)ozo? 

Woods. No — I thought it was George Smathers but I don't know for sure. 

Lenzner. Do you know whether the President and Mr. Re)>ozo saw !Mr. 
Danner in July, 1970? 



10271 

Woods. No I do not. 

Lenzner. You did not meet Mr. Rebozo and Mr. Banner? 

Woods. If you are talking about July 1970, I have no recollection of it — I 
would not know Mr. Banner if he walked in. 

Lenzner. Bo you know if any check has been made of access records at the 
San Clemente compound to determine if Mr. Banner was in San Clemente in 
July of 1970? 

Woods. I don't know — I don't know who even keeps the access records in 
San Clemente. 

Lenzner. I have seen the letter you sent IRS on contribution — had Mr. 
Rebozo on any prior occasions advised you of any contributions he had 
received ? 

Woods. That is the only one he told me about and I believe it is in the letter 
that Mr. Wakefield or his attorney would have instructions. 

Lenzner. Where were you when Mr. Rebozo advised you? 

Woods. Have not the slightest idea. 

Lenzner. Anyone else present? 

Woods. I am sure no one else was present — would not believe so anyway. 

Lenzner. Bid you take any notes of that conversation? 

Woods. No. 

Lenzner. Only conversation you had with him in regard to that contribution? 

Woods. I don't recall his ever mentioning it again. 

Lenzner. He told you — can you repeat it basically as in the letter? 

Woods. As I recall it was in a safety deposit box — his attorney would have 
instructions to forward it to — I don't know whether it was chairman or finance 
chairman — I don't know why it was put in the safety deposit box — unless he 
felt it was to be held until the next campaign. 

Lenzner. How much he received? 

Woods. I think he said $100,000 but I could not stake my life on it. 

Lenzner. Telling you at one time it was $50,000? 

Woods. I have no recollection — finance things were not really my kettle of fish. 

Lenzner. Why was he telling you about this particular type of contribution 
when he had not in the past? 

Woods. I would not know — I gather in case anything happened to him he 
would want someone to be aware of it — that is my guess. 

Lenzner. Indicate that he had put instructions in the safety deposit box for 
a particular individual? 

Woods. My recollection is that they were in the safe deposit box and his 
attorney would get it — maybe he gave them direct to the attorney — but I don't 
recall — he either told me or I knew Mr. Wakefield was his attorney. 

Lenzner. You know Mr. Wakefield? 

Woods. I don't recall ever meeting him. 

Lenzner. Bid he a.sk you to advise anyone else of the existence of these 
funds? 

Woods. No he did not. 

T^NZNER. Anything happen to him give you any specific instructions? 

Woods. I suppose he said Mr. Wakefield would — I have no recollection. 

Lenzner. Bid Mr. Rebozo indicate at that time that the funds had been 
received from the Hughes Tool Company — did he indicate the source of the 
funds? 

Woods. I think he said from Hughes — I don't think he said a company — I 
don't know what he said — what exact words he used I would not recall. 

Lenzner. Bid he indicate Mr. Banner had any role in obtaining these funds? 

Woods. No he did not — did not go into a long story on it. 

Lenzner. Bid he indicate to you that he was concerned about turning the 
funds over to the campaign committee? 

Woods. No— he may have been concerned but he did not indicate to me. 

Lenzner. So the only conversation you had with him was the one that was 
indicated in the letter to IRS? 

Woods. Yes that is right — I think he just wanted someone he trusted to know 
it was there. 

Bash. He told his lawyer- — why would he have to tell you? 

Woods. I think he trusted his lawyer but I don't know how much you trust 
anyone with that much casli — I would certainly tell two people. 



10272 

Dash. Did you get the impression he wanted you to know so that the Presi- 
dent would know eventually? 

Woods. He would only know if Mr. Rebozo told him or he saw it on a list — 
I have never discussed any contributions with the President — any at all — 
again it is out of my particular field. 

Lenzner. Question would still remain if Mr. Rebozo had an unfortunate 
accident or something happened to him— then you would have to tell someone. 

Woods. I think INIr. Wakefield would have taken action but there is also the 
possibility since they are friends that they could have been in a fatal accident 
together. 

Lenzner. Ever discus.sed it with Mr. Stans or Mr. Kalmbach? 

Woods. No — never discussed it with anyone else. 

Lenzner. Information from Mr. Rebozo or anyone else about the confusion 
and conflict in the Hughes Co. involving the firing of Robert Maheu in 
December of 1970? 

Woods. I don't think we ever talked about it — I thought that was why he 
did not send the money on because they were in such turmoil. 

Lenzner. That is not an issue that surfaced in the White House? 

Woods. I never heard anything aboTit it from President Nixon or Mr. Rebozo. 

Lenzner. Did Mr. Rebozo ever relate to you a meeting he went to in New 
York in late 1968 or early 1969 for the purpose of obtaining this contribution? 

Woods. No sir — all he did was tell me it was in a safe deposit box. 

Lenzner. On this contribution did he mention F. Donald Nixon and an indi- 
vidual by the name of Johnny Maier? 

Woods. No sir. 

Ijenzner. Ever heard that name? 

Woods. I have seen it in the paper— is he not involved in this suit? 

Lenzner. Yes, he has been indicted. 

Dash. When Mr. Rebozo communicated to you about this contribution did he 
give you the impression that it might have secrecy attached to it? 

Woods. He just told me — I think he knows me enough to know that I don't 
ever discuss things like that with the President — he did not tell me not to tell 
anyone else — it wasn't even my story. 

Rhyne. I think the record should show that I did not notify White House 
Counsel or anyone that we were having this meeting — I really have no thought 
it was necessary — I suppose if there was going to be a discussion of the Presi- 
dent I should have notified them. 

Dash. I have excluded him^ — no discussions at this point to deal with the 
President or his duties. The questions we are putting are not getting into that 
area. 

Rhyne. It never occurred to me. Maybe I should have notified them. 

Lenzner. Question of impression you had gathered from newspapers on 
Hughes problems — did you have that impression the only time Mr. Rebozo 
discussed this with you? 

Woods. I have not the slightest idea — timing of the two I cannot recall. 

Lenzner. You may have had it in your mind at the time Mr. Rebozo told 
you of the problem Hughes was having? 

Woods. I really don't know. 

Lenzner. Restate the question — I take it then you cannot recall whether you 
had learned from the newspaper of the Hughes problem before Mr. Rebozo told 
you about the contribution from Hughes? 

Woods. I don't believe so but I am just guessing^ — I have no recollection. 

Lenznet. No notes or records of the conversation with Mr. Rebozo? 

Woods. No. 

Lenzner. Aware of whether Mr. Kalmbach had any role with regard to the 
Hughes contribution? 

Woods. No. 

Lenzner. Have you been present during conversations when discussions were 
held as to whether who might contribute? 

Woods. I don't recall any. 

Lenzner. So this might be a rare occurrence? 

Woods. I believe this was just Mr. Rebozo and he and Mr. Wakefield are 
personal friend.s — this is my own idea that he wanted someone to know and he 



10273 

chose me — this is my own interpretation of why he did — if I had $100,000 in 
cash I think I would tell at least two people what I wanted done with it. 

Lenzner. Aware of Mr. Kalmbach's role in fund raising in 1971 and 1972? 

Woods. I suppose I knew — I don't know that I actually knew he was fund 
raising — I knew he was working with Mr. Stans — it is so difficult because I have 
listened to testimony and read so many stories. 

Dash. You took no notes of the conversation — did you make a note for file 
on the $100,000? 

Woods. No. 

Dash. Everything you just recall that he told you that? 

Lenzner. You did not suggest to Mr. Rebozo that he advise Kalmbach or 
Stans of the contribution? 

Woods. No sir. 

Lenzner. Letter in response to an inquiry from the IRS — did they write you 
and ask for this? 

Woods. Mr. Buzhardt prepared the letter and I signed it. 

Lenzner. You gave him your recollection — he had the letter typed up. 

Woods. It may have been typed in my office — I think it was typed in my 
office — I am guessing again. 

Lenzner. Anyone else present with Mr. Buzhardt when you went over this 
with him? 

Woods. I think Mrs. Acker was — she may have typed that letter. 

Lenzner. No other official besides Mrs. Acker present? 

Woods. I don't recall anyone. 

Lenzner. Was Buzhardt coining to you at the request of IRS? 

Woods. Whether he was coming at the request of IRS I don't know — ^he 
just asked me to put this down because I gather IRS was checking on this 
matter. 

Lenzner. He didn't tell you that? 

Woods. I knew IRS was investigating Mr. Rebozo — I think most people knew 
that. 

Lenzner. When did you learn that? 

Woods. When they first went in I suppose. 

Lenzner. Rebozo advised you of that? 

Woods. Sure — it is a big problem for a man trying to run a bank to have 
an investigation — he did not make a specific call — I think we were talking and 
he said well the IRS has even moved in here^ — it was not calling to me for 
anything but passing along the information that they were there. 

Lenzner. First you knew IRS was investigating Mr. Rebozo? 

Woods. Yes. 

Lenzner. Telephonic communication between you and Mr. Rebozo? 

Woods. Yes — he does not write often. 

Lenzner. Did you advise anyone else of the investigation? 

Woods. No. 

Lenzner. Was the President aware? 

Woods. I would not have told him. 

Lenzner. Ehrlichman briefed the President on fact IRS interested in investi- 
gating Mr. Rebozo. 

Woods. I was not aware of that — that would not be anything anyone would 
feel I had to know. Mr. Rebozo just passed it on because I am sure he was 
upset as you would be. 

Lenzner. Also, because you have known him a long time and are friends. 

Woods. Yes — he is a friend. 

Lenzner. President ever say Mr. Rebozo has a problem with IRS? 

Woods. No he never discussed that with me — it would be a waste of his 
time to di.scuss it with me. 

Lenzner. How many months prior to writing this letter did Mr. Rebozo 
advise you he was under investigation? 

Woods. I have no idea — don't even know the date of that letter right now — 
I would have no recollection — if you have to do something about things you try 
to remember — but it was just a statement of fact as far as I am concerned. 

Lenzner. I lielieve sometime shortly after this letter was written you and 
the President and Mr. Rebozo had occasion to be together — did this issue ever 
come up? 



10274 

Woods. I have never heard the President and Mr. Rebozo discuss this Issue. 

Lenzner. When people .send you campaign contributions you said you turned 
them over immediately to the Finance Committee — did you receive campaign 
contributions going back as far as 1970 or 1971 that you turned over? 

Woods. I do not recall. 

Lenzner. You would have a file? 

Woods. I would have to look at the file of an individual by name — if there 
is a name — I would have to check. 

Lenzner. But when you got contributions you sent a letter? 

Woods. A letter or a memo saying I am attaching herewith something from 
so and so — it might be only $1. 

Lenzner. But you maintain a copy? 

Woods. The memo may go to that person's file — you would have to ask Mrs. 
Acker. I think during the campaign we kept a memo and then sent them to 
individual files. 

Lenzner. Cash contributions? 

Woods. No. 

Lenzner. Never — always checks? "^ 

Woods. Yes — and the way we received those checks — Clark MacGregor sent 
a letter out to some people who were writing in and feeling they were sort of 
left out of the 1972 campaign and suggesting if they wanted to do something 
to get in touch with us — and that is how some of those came back in. 

Armstrong. Did anyone outside of the White House staff ever make inquiries 
whether contributions had been received from Mr. Hughes between 1968 and 
1972— Mr. Gleason— Mr. Kalmbach? 

Woods. I do not recall. 

Armstrong. Are you familiar with Mr. James Golden? 

Woods. He used to be a Secret Service agent and he went out to California 
when we first moved out there. 

Armstrong. Have you seen him since he left the service? 

Woods. He stops in the office once in a while to say hello. 

Armstrong. Did you receive a visit from Mr. Golden while he worked for 
Hughes Tool Company? 

Woods. Yes, he came in and I remember his telling a wild story about 
Howard Hughes leaving Nevada and going to the Bahamas or wherever he 
went. 

Armstrong. A social visit? 

Woods. Sure — when he 'comes in he stops to see Shelley Buchanan and all 
the old friends — I did not have an appointment with him. 

Armstrong. Do you recall if he raised any subjects — brought up anything on 
that occasion? 

Woods. About what? 

Armstrong. With regard to the loan of Hughes Tool Company to F. Donald 
Nixon? 

Woods. I don't recall it. 

Armstrong. Do you recall him mentioning that Mr. Noah Detrich had written 
in a book published after his dismissal he had met with then Vice President 
Nixon to discuss the loan and had recommended to Vice President Nixon that 
he suggest to his brother that he withdraw the loan and this caused a furor 
at the time of the book's publication and Hiighes Tool Co. had records which 
showed Mr. Detrich not anywhere near the President (Vice President) at that 
time? 

Woods. If he mentioned it, I do not recall it. 

Armstrong. You do not recall checking through old diaries or having some- 
one check to see if Vice President Nixon was in New York or the West Coast 
at that time? 

Woods. I do not recall that. 

Armstrong. Mr. Golden asking if you were aware of money contributions 
Hughes Tool Co. had made through Mr. Maheu to campaign in 1968? 

Woods. I don't recall that— in 1968? 

Armstrong. In 1968 after the election? 

Woods. I do not recall liim asking me about that. 

Armstrong. Did you refer Mr. Golden to Mr. Glea.son — would that make sense? 



10275 

Woods. I do not recall — it does not make sense to me — I do not recall ever 
referring anvone to Jack Gleason. 

Lenzner. Were you aware from Mr. Rebozo of the fact he actually received 
two cash payments of $50,000? 

Woods. No sir — I think the figure I heard was $100,000. 

Lenzner. You did not indicate the amount in the letter— only that he had 
received a campaign contribution which he put in his safe deposit box — do 
you have a specific recollection of his telling you it was $100,000 — is that Bome- 
thing vou are assuming based on what you heard? 

Woods. I could not swear to the fact that he did— I think we have all heard 
it — I just know there was a campaign contribution. 

Lenzner. I thought maybe when you gave that to Mr. Buzhardt — you did not 
recall it as $100,000? 

Woods. I am sure I knew it at that time but Mr. Buzhardt prepared the letter. 

Lenzner. My recollection of the conversation with Mr. Rebozo was that the 
money was delivered by Mr. Banner — do you also have a recollection that 
Mr. Rebozo told you it was delivered by Mr. Danner? 

Woods. If I said that in the letter he must have told me. 

Lenzner. This letter was written after he advised you he was under IRS 
investigation? 

Woods. I don't know if it was after or not— when did they start investigating 
him — I don't remember. 

Lenzner. I think it was sometime before this. 

Woods. I thought it was around that time — I thought that was why Mr. 
Buzhardt was doing this. 

Lenzner. Had you had conversations with Mr. Rebozo with regard to the 
contribution after he advised you he was under IRS investigation? 

Woods. We did not discuss it — probably IRS asked for something. 

Lenzner. Did Mr. Rebozo request the letter? 

Woods. You will have to ask Mr. Buzhardt that. 

Lenzner. Did you send Mr. Rebozo a copy of this letter? 

Woods. I would think Mr. Buzhardt would have — I don't know because he 
was obviously handling this matter. 

Lenzner. You don't know whether you sent him a copy? 

Woods. I cannot remember — again, you will have to see if Mrs. Acker 
remembers. 

Lenzner. No further discussions with Mr. Rebozo regarding this? 

Woods. No — there would have been no further purpose. 

Lenzner. One time he told you about the contributions — second time he con- 
tacted you by telephone that he was under IRS investigation? 

Woods. He has never requested me to do anything about any of these things. 
He is a good friend — he might just call to see how everybody was — the other 
day when we got back from Florida he called to ask how Julie was — in passing 
he said the IRS is there and I know that is a problem when you are running a 
bank. 

Lenzner. You had two brief conversations with him on this? 

Woods. Probably because we had no reason to discuss it in between. 

Lenzner. Did you become aware that Mr. Rebozo had discussed the con- 
tributions with the President at some time? 

Woods. No — I did not know nor do I know now that they discussed it — the 
President is so busy that imless I happen to be present at such a discussion 
he would not say I have talked with Bebe about any subject nor would Bebe 
ever call me and say he had talked with the President about any subject he 
and the President discussed. 

Lenzner. So you have never been informed that such a discussion was had? 

Woods. No sir. 

Lenzner. At some point did you know Mr. Kenneth Gemmill began to help 
Mr. Rebozo on some aspects of his tax situation? 

Woods. I did not know of my own knowledge — and I do not know Mr. 
Gemmill. 

Lenzner. Do you know who referred Mr. Gemmill to Mr. Rebozo? 

Woods. No I do not unless possibly General Haig may have mentioned it 
to me. 

Lenzner. Context under which Haig raised that issue? 



10276 

Woods. I have no idea — I don't know how he raised it — again we have many 
conversations during a day and he may have said Mr. Gemmill is representing 
or helping Bebe out or something. 

Lenzner. Why did General Haig mention Mr. Gemmill was doing this? 

Woods. No recollection whatever. 

Lenzner. Don't recall circumstances of conversation? 

Woods. No — maybe we were going to Key Biscayne or thinking about going— 
a lot of days we have quick little snatches of conversation. 

Lenzner. Did you advise General Haig or anyone else IRS was investigating 
Mr. Rebozo? 

Woods. No sir — I am sure I did not. 

Armstrong. When did you first learn of the return of the contribution of 
Hughes Tool? 

Woods. When I saw the picture of it being put on the desk at your Com- 
mittee. 

Dash. There was no picture — there was a story in the paper. 

Woods. That was when — I have no active part in this. 

Armstrong. Was this the first time you were aware there was an issue of 
returning the money? 

Woods. I had no discussion on it — I thought it was so unusual having all 
that money put on a table. 

Armstrong. Up to the point you read the account of its return you were under 
the assimiption it was in Mr. Rebozo's care? 

Woods. No one had told me he did not have it. 

Lenzner. Do you know Mr. William Griffin — Mr. Abplanalp's attorney? 

Woods. I have met him — I do not know him — I have met him socially. 

Lenzner. Did you ever hear from Mr. Rebozo that he asked Mr. Griffin to 
consult with him? 

Woods. No — I was not aware of that. 

Lenzner. Or that Mr. Rebozo was having a difficult time returning the money ? 

Woods. No — I was not aware of that — he does not call with a lot of his 
problems — he calls a lot of times to say hello and ask about the family. 

Lenzner. Does he have a White House telephone in his residence? 

Woods. I have no idea. 

Lenzner. He gets you through the White House switchboard? 

Woods. Yes — but everyone does — whether he has a White House phone at 
home I don't know. 

Dash. When you call do you make the call yourself? 

Woods. I would ask the White House operator to get him as I would if I 
were trying to reach you or any other individual. 

Lenzner. Any recollection of he and Mr. Danner at Camp David in May of 
1973? 

Woods. No sir. 

Lenzner. Were you aware Mr. Danner and Mr. Rebozo were meeting at 
Camp David? 

Woods. No sir — may have seen that in the paper. 

Rhyne. The agreement was two hours. 

Dash. I said we would take only two hours the first time. 

Rhyne. You told me yesterday one and a half hours. 

Dash. You cannot put limit on what we ultimately need from Miss Woods. 

Rhyne. We had an agreement — two hours, it was to be two hours — if you 
are going back on your word — keep your word. 

Dash. We have to take as long as we need. 

Rhyne. Not as long as you need — you said one and a half hours. 

Dash. I had no idea how long it would take — seems to me you and Miss 
Woods would like to have — I know there are additional areas they have to go 
into. 

Rhyne. I keep my word — you keep yours. 

Dash. Question as long as you want — at this point we are doing it on an 
informal basis — if we have additional questions another time 

Woods. Just go on with the questions — let's try to finish it. Do you have any 
important questions? 

Lenzner. Let the lawyers discuss it. 



10277 

Woods. Do you have any important subjects to cover? If so, let's get on 
with them. 

Lenzner. Were you aware of the formation of the B & C Investment Company? 

Woods. Do not know about it. 

Lenzner. The transaction of Rebozo, Abplanalp and the President for the 
purchase of the San Clemente property? 

Woods. No sir. 

LiENZNER. No documents, records or files on that? 

Woods. No, I do not handle financial areas. 

Lenzner. Never discussed it with Mr. Rebozo? 

Woods. No sir — I did not know about it. 

Lenzner. Any loans from the President to Mr. Rebozo or vice/versa? 

Woods. No — I am not aware of any of them — have nothing to do with financial 
matters. 

Lenzner. That would include for the record never receiving any information 
by conversation or by documents or files? 

Woods. No the first I heard — I had no information about San Clemente that 
they had any part of it — until I read it in the paper — have never discussed it 
with either Mr. Rebozo, Mr. Abplanalp or the President. 

Lenzner. Did Mr. Rebozo ever use any part of the $100,000 he received from 
Hughes Tool Company? 

Woods. How would I have knowledge of that? 

Lenzner. He said that to you? 

Woods. He said he had never used any part of the Hughes Tool Company 
money. 

Lenzner. That would be a third conversation you had about it? 

Dash. He returned $100,000 according to his statement to the Hughes 
Company. 

Woods. I don't know how all that happened — Mr. Rebozo would have to 
testify to tliat. All I know is money was dumped on Committee table. 

Dash. I think the question was return of the money to Hughes — money was 
not returned to us. 

Woods. Of my own knowledge— I know nothing about this. 

Lenzner. At some point Mr. Rebozo said to you after he returned the money 
that it was the same given him? 

Woods. I believe it was after Mr. Davis gave the money to the Committee — 
I learned from Mr. Rebozo it was the .same uaoney he had received. 

Lenzner. Anyone else present? 

Woods. I have not the slightest idea. 

Lenzner. Personal or telephone? 

Woods. I don't know that either. 

Lenzner. Anyone at the White House questioned you as to whether — or 
indicated they had information funds were us-ed for a loan? 

Woods. No one at the White House has questioned me — but certainly have 
been questioned by everyone else in town ! 

Lenzner. When did you first meet Jack Caulfield? 

Woods. In the 1968 campaign in New York. 

Lenzner. Did somebody introduce you? 

Woods. Jack Slierwood — I think he introduced him to several people and 
recommended him as a security man. 

Lenzner. For security duties? 

Woods. To the best of my knowledge. 

Lenzner. Any other duties? 

Woods. I have no idea. 

Lenzner. Did you introduce him to anyone else? 

Woods. Probably — I would not be so rude if .someone was around to not 
introduce him. 

Lenzner. Did you introduce him to Mr. Boggs? 

Woods. I have no idea. 

Lenzner. Did the President ever furnish vou with funds to give to Mr. 
Caulfield? 

Woods. No sir. 

Lenzner. Specifically Christmas time 1970— cash? 

Woods. To give to Mr. Caulfield? 



10278 

Lenzner. Yes. 

Woods. No sir. 

Lenzner. Information or knowledge with regard to Mr. Caulfield's duties with 
Mr. Ulasewicz? 

Woods. No sir. 

Lenzner. Never .saw any of the memos? 

Woods. Never saw any of the memos — first time I heard of Mr. Ulasewicz 
was when he came before your Committee and added a light note. 

Lenzner. Ever learn from ]Mr. Caulfield or other people his plan to provide 
certain security capabilities for the Republican Party? 

Woods. He may have mentioned something he was trying to work up and 
said he might ask my brother to join and I remember telling my brother not 
to join with them unless he was in charge of it because I think my brother 
is a lot brighter than any group Jack Caulfield would have gotten together. 

Lenzner. Did you introduce Mr. Caulfield to your brother? 

Woods. I don't know — my niece worked in the campaign — she may have 
introduced him to her father — I just" don't know whether I introduced him to 
Joe or not. The Caulfield's attended my niece's wedding in Oak Park. I was 
unable to get away to attend. 

Lenzner. Did Caulfield describe in detail what his operation was going to do? 

Woods. Not to me. 

Lenzner. Did you ever see a copy of so-called Operation Sandwedge pro- 
posal? (Showed it to RMW) 

Woods. No sir I did not — no sir I have never seen this. 

Lenzner. Never met or talked to Mr. Ulasewicz to your knowledge? 

Woods. Only time I have ever seen him was when he was on television 
before your Committee. 

Lenzner. Ever receive any information of existence of wire tap on Joseph 
Kraft? 

Woods. No sir. 

Lenzner. Never heard anything on Donald Nixon wire tap? 

Woods. No sir. 

Lenzner. Did Mr. Caulfield ever furnish you with copies of any reports he 
prepared? 

Woods. No sir. 

Lenzner. You never saw any of those reports? 

Woods. No — I don't have anything to do with that end of security — have a 
lot to do with mail, pictures and mostly just plain hard work. 

Lenzner. Going back to Hiighes Tool Co. — ever become aware or receive any 
information with regard to Hughes Tool Co. anti-trust problems with Justice? 

Woods. No sir. 

Lenzner. Acquisition of Stardust, Dunes Hotels? 

Woods. No — that includes anything — I am not aware of any of the Hughes 
problems. 

I^NZNER. Excluding the papers — any information as to discussions at the 
White House? 

Woods. That would not be a duty of mine, no sir. 

Lenzner. Mr. Rebozo was a participant in conversations with people from 
Hughes Tool Co. on problems with regard to atomic testing in Nevada — ever 
di.scuss with you? 

Woods. No — this is the first I ever heard of that. 

Lenzner. Ever talk with the President or others? 

Woods. As I have just said, today is the fir.st I ever heard of the subject. 

Lenzner. Rather than go through this whole issue — fair to say yoii never saw 
any information or documents relating to Hughes Tool Company on any of 
these specific problems? 

Woods. That is a correct statement. 

Lenzner. With regard to tax audit business — ever learn IRS was investi- 
gating President's brother, F. Donald Nixon? 

Woods. No, I did not know they were. 

Lenzner. List of names related to that specific investigation — Robert Maheu 

Woods. You mentioned him a while ago. 

Lenzner. Ever see any documents or liear a conversation with regard to — 
related to — F. Donald Nixon^and — 



10279 

Woods. No. 
Lenzner. John Meier 
Woods. No. 

Lenzner. Tony Hatsis 
Woods. No. 

Lenzner. Jack Cleveland 
Woods. No. 

Lenzner. Virgil Gladieux 
Woods. No. 

Lenzner. Lloyd & Bill Hallamar 
Woods. No. 

Lenzner. Since we have such little time left let me get the priorities. Did 
you have any or have you had any business dealings with Mr. Rebozo himself? 
Woods. Wlieu? 
Lenzner. Since 1969? 

Woods. I don't know when I sold my Fisher's Island stock 

Lenzner. That was primarily it? 
Woods. That is all. 
Lenzner. You sold it to Mr. Rebozo? 

Woods. No — I got it and sold it back immediately and took a capital gains 
loss on taxes because I did not hold it for necessary length of time. The 
President sold his and I did not feel I should hold mine. 
Lenzner. Sold it back to Fisher's Island? 

Woods. Yes — whatever corporation or company handled that. 
Lenzner. Who handled the sale for you? 
Woods. Ed Morgan I believe. 

Lenzner. Mr. Wakefield — any business dealings with him? 
Woods. No. 

Lenzner. Mr. Abplanalp — any business dealings? 
Woods. No. 

Lenzner. Mr. Griffin — any business dealings? 
Woods. No business dealings — I have known Bob Abplanalp. 
Minority Counsel. Are these questions on business dealings relevant to this 
inquiry? 

Dash. These are business dealings relating to our mandate — the 1972 cam- 
paign. 

Lenzner. Mr. Kalmbach? 
Woods. Absolutely none. 
Lenzner. Mr. Caulfleld? 

Woods. No— frankly I have no business dealings with anyone. 
Dash. In all fairness — don't take an inference that anything is being sug- 
gested by questions. 

Woods. In the first place I had no business dealings. 

Dash. Don't get the wrong impression on the question — that there is any 
belief on our part that you did or not. 

Lenzner. Anyone else any questions on any of this — are you aware of any 
financial dealings between the President or members of his family with Mr. 
Haldeman? 
Woods. No sir. 

Lenzner. How about with Mr. Wakefield? 

Woods. No sir — again I must say I have nothing to do with his financial 
affairs — they were handled by a firm in New York and are now handled by 
Kalmbach-DeMarco firm. 

Lenzner. Never seen any documents with regard to these? 
Woods. Not to my recollection in all the years of his Presidency. 
Dash. Know whether kept or have seen documents with President's business 
affairs? 

Woods. I have nothing to do with his business affairs. 
Lenzner. Company used to handle accoimt was Vincent Andrews? 
Woods. That is right. 

Lenzner. Ever discussed with employee of that company any of these 
financial tran.sactions? 

Woods. No — unless I were personally involved it would be an infringement 
on their privacy and the President's for me to discuss it. 



10280 

Dash. From your statement you were not personally involved. 

Woods. No. 

Dash. You were familiar or did know Harold Titus, former U.S. Attorney? 

Woods. I met him when my brother was here as an FBI agent — Washington 
field office — Criminal Division. My brother left FBI in 1961 when Kennedy 
used them for political purpose.s during steel strike. I believe Titus was some- 
thing in the U.S. Attorney's Office then. I met him very briefly at that time. 
When Joe was here a couple of years ago we went to dinner with him. 

Dash. Did Mr. Titus ever communicate any findings of Watergate investiga- 
tion when the U.S. Attorney's Office was conducting investigation — ^principally 
Mr. Silbert and Glanzer? 

Woods. Certainly not. 

Dash. If there are any material questions I will get in touch with you Mr. 
Rhyne. 

Rhyne. We had an agreement that it would be two hours. 

Dash. I think it may be complete. 

Rhyne. I will always listen to you- Sam but we had an agreement and I Insist 
on sticking with it. 

Dash. But you never limited it when you went to the Grand Jury. 

Rhyne. I am not arguing about it. 

Dash. Two hours at one time — all I am saying if there is a material question 
I may bring it up. 

Rhyne. You can bring it up — I am going to stick with our agreement. I am not 
a part of any cover-up. 

Dash. I don't want anything to hang over. 



10281 

I, Marjori e P. Acker, certify that I was present at the questions 
and answers between Rose Mary Woods and the Senate Watergate 
Committee Staff on February 20, 1974 and that the foregoing 80' 
pages constitute a true record of the proceedings as recorded to the 
best of my ability. 



^ 



'■zs-^l-<_(2 - 



MarjorieP. Acker 
March 14, 1974 




10283 

Woods Exhibit No. 1 

October 18, 1973 



Dear Mr. Bartlett: 

You have requested my recollection of Mr. Rebozo telling me 
of the campaign contribution delivered to him by Mr. Banner. 

Mr. Rebozo told me that he had put this campaign contribution 
in a safety deposit box and further that he had given his 
attorney instructions in the event of his death that he should 
open the box and follow the instructions therein. It was my 
understanding that those instructions were to deliver the con- 
tents to the Campaign Chairman or Finance Chairman of the 
next campaign. 

I would further like to state that at no time did I ever discuss 
this matter with any other individual. 

This letter constitutes the best of my recollection of our con- 
versation. I regret to say I do not recall the date or time of 
this conversation. 

Sincerely, 



Rose Mary Woods 
Executive Assistant 
to the President 



Mr. John Bartlett 
Internal Revenue Service 
Intelligence Division 
3191 Maguire Boulevard 
Orlando, Florida 32803 



A TRUE COPY 



10284 

Woods ExraBiT No. 2 

EYES ONLY 

THE WHITE HOUSE 

WASHINGTON 



June 18, 1973 



Dear Sam: 

Enclosed is a copy of the list of pre- April 7 
contributors. I am. sending a copy to Fred Thompson 
also. 

Sincerely, 




Leonard Ga/rl 

Counsel to the President 



End. 



Mr, Samuel Dash 

Senate Select Committee on 

Presidential Campaign Activities 
Room 1418, New Senate Office Building 
Washington, D. C. 20510 



■v » 



i 1 M A'tA 



10285 



til . Uinto.i bUi'i.r 
HI ir V.OK /. i 

lio-. >-,f.'crv, Al. Tjll 



1,000 * >.■ . William Broim 

;.•:;. chn El Hirador 
bo;,„be, Arizona 



1,000 * 



t'l Dou.ild C.Mr.er, Jr. 
'■ '.vondulu Mills 
cai'ga, Al. 35150 



15,000 Mr. Eduiiind C. Converse 

7502 Cleai-water Parkway 
ScoLCsdalc, Arizona 



1,000 * 



K. Cwaltney, Jr. 
i'.id. I .ay Drive 
^,.1 .;. , City, Al. 



3,000 * Mrs. Mary C. Gardner 
6120 East 5th Street 
Tucson, Arizona 85711 



1,000 * 



Viiiis Mor£,dn 
Nu'-v I I.' Mills, Inc. 
. x.jr.„. ■ Jity, Alabam.'i 35010 



3,000 * ^^. Marion W. Isbell 41,241.07 

'S'iS Uast Van Buren Street 
vhi'tnix, Arizona 85003 



•■•ichardpon, Sr. 
ay lU ^ve 
("ity, Alabama 



3,000 * 



. Bella Luram 
1 l.jst Sth Street 
^>u, Arizona 



1,000 * 



..a J5094 



17,018.23 Mr. Frank Middleton 

30j North 3rd Avenue 
rh'^enix, Arizona 



1,000 * 



31-889 O - 74 - pt. 22 - 7 



Mr. Jack Stewart, Sr. 
7000 Mummy Mountain Road 
Scottrdale, Arizona 



1,000 * 



10286 



A'J'JVNSAS 



I 'IiFORNIA 



Mr;;. Clark M. Darton 
405 E. lIlVi Street 
El Dorado, Ark. 



1,000* 



Mrs. Gore Ti Alles 
] i;(. Wf.tli.nven Road 
.:^'i Marino, Cal. 91108 



15,000 



Mr. Jack Hatcher 4,000 

I;ox 5036 

I'jnc Bluff, Ark. 



Mr. R. A. Lile 1.000* 

1600 Tower Bldg. 
Little Rock, Arkansas 



Mr. WintUrop Rockefeller 50,000 

1720 Tower Bldg. 

Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 



Ki:iploye(s of Bank of America 
650 Soutli Spring Street 
Los Angeles, Cal. 90014 

Mr. C. J. Medberry, III 

Mr. / . W. Clausen 

Mr. Clarence H. Baumhefner 

Mr. '..'alter E. Hoadley 



Mr. & Mrs. Leigh Battson' 
136 Elm Caraino 
Bevjrly Hills, Cal. 



Ml . ' tephen Bechtel 
1 ^5 .-^c^nsonic Street 
ban hrancisco, Cal. 



10,000 T 



2,500 
2,500 
2,500 
2,500 



7,500 T 



2,000 * 



■Ir . V..1C Donald Becket 

10000 Sant.i Monica Boulevard 

..OS Angeles, Cal. 90045 



12,000 



Mr. Charles J. Benedict, Jr. 
235 West Kenneth Road 
Glr.idale, Cal. 



1,000 * 



Mr. & Mrs. B. F. Biaggini, Jr. 
One Market Street 
S'.n Francisco, Cal. 



5,000 * 



Mr. Joseph Bogdanovich 
31 Saddleback Road 
Rolling Hill.., Cal. 90274 



30,000 



Mr. & Mrs. Mark E. Bradley 

30327 Ocuanaire Drive 

Palos Verdes Feniusula, Cal. 



1,000 



Mr. U. P. Fuller Bra\.Tier 
801 California Avenue 
S.'in Francisco, Cal. 



1,000 * 



10287 



CALIFORNIA 

Krs.Georpp C Brock ( Margaret ) 
2220 Avenu • of the Stars 
Los Ange]cs, Cal. 90067 



M>-. John Burke 
1690 Alta Hur.-i Road 
I-acific Palisades, Cal. 







CALIFORNIA 








:i,33i. 


.17 


Enrployecs of Dart Industries, I 


nc. 






P. 0. Box 3157, Terminal Annex 












Los Angeles, Calif. 












Mr. Lobert T. Beattie 


5, 


,324 


.00 






Mr. ;)onaId H. Brewer 


2 


,655, 


.03 


2,000 


A 


Mr. Justin Dart 


25, 


,993, 


.37 




Mr. Franklin B. Pollack 


5. 


,611, 


.20 






Dr. Ralph Wilson, Jr. 


5, 


,155, 


.88 






Mr. R. D. Ziegler 


5, 


,786, 


,03 



50,825.51 T 



Mr. B. Gerald Cantor 
232 Nortli Canon Drive 
Beverly Hills, Cal. 90210 



10,000 



Mr. Paul L. Davies 
F. 0. Box 760 

San Jose, Calif. 



2,000 * 



Mr. Edward William Carter 
600 South Spring Street 
Los Angeles, Cal. 90014 



9,912.70 



Mr. i Mrs. Paul L. Davies, Jr. 

225 Bush Street 

Sa- Francisco, Calif. 



1,000 * 



Mr. Charles E. Cook 
15^2. East Gale Avenue 
Indj-jzry, Cal. 



12,000 



Mr. Christian deGuigne 
63f California Street 
Sa: Franciscc , Calif. 



110,797.84 



f;i . i Mrs. James V. Crawford 

14C(I Chelsea Road 

Palos Verdes Estates, Cal. 



1,000 



^lr, & Mrs. Corvin Denny 
1901 Avenue ofthe Stars 
Liis Angeles, Calif. 



5,000 * 



Lady Ruth C. Crocker 
1155 Oak Grove Avenue 
San Marino, Cal. 91108 



4,000 



Mr. i Mrs. William R. Denton 

1 Market Street 

San Francisco, Calif. 94105 



10,000 



Mrs. Roy P. Crocker 3,000 * 

."■.ii5 Highland Street 

South Pasadena, California 91030 



Mrs. Elizabeth R. Crossett 1,000 * 
1517 Locbardy Drive 
^'asadena, Cal. 



Mr. W. W. Cruttenden 1,000 * 

Pox Y 

Palra Springs, Cal. 92262 



Mr. Theodore E. Cummings 46,406.87 

911 North llillcrcst 
Beverly Hills. Cal. 90210 



Employees of Disney Productions 
500 .■■.. Buena Vista 
Burbank, Calif. 91505 

Mr. Roy E. Disney 5,876.00 

10010 Toluca Lake Avenue 

North Hollywood, Calif. 

Mr. i Mrs. William Lund 5,096.00 
355 South >!uirfleld Road 
Los Angeles, Calif. 

Mr. Ronald W. Miller 6,187.83 
500 S. Buena Vista 
Burbc-.nk, Calif. 91505 

Mr. i Mrs. John J. Truyens 10,314.67 
355 Carolwood Drive 
Los Angeles, Calif. 



34,474.50 T 



10288 



CALIFORNIA 



CALIFORNIA 



Kniployees of Disney Productions (Continued) 
Mr. E. Cardan Walker 1,500.00 
1472 Eeaudry Blvd. 
Glendale, Calif. 



Mr. William P. FIcker 
550 Ne'v^ort Center Drive 
NouTJort Beacli, Calif. 92660 



2,500 



Mr. Donn B. Tatum 
500 South Buena Vista 
Burbank, Calif. 



2,000.00 



::r. & Mrs. Leonard Firestone 100,000 
10375 Wilshire Boulevard 
Ix)S AngeUs, Calif. 90021 



Disney- Executives (Small Cks)2,000.00 



Doheny Family 35,500 T 

136 El Cainino Drive 
Beverly Hills, Calif. 

Mr. & Mrs 

Mr. & Mrs 

Mr. & Mrs 

Other 



I-ir. Reuben Fleet 
2'/ \ Kerito Place 
Palm Springs, Calif. 



92262 



Timothy Doheny 5,000 

William H. Doheny 5,000 

E. L. Doheny III 1,500 

• 24,000 



Mr. Mortimer Fleishhacker 

1 Maritime Plaza 

San Francisco, Calif. 



Mr. Jack Drovm 
Droun News Agency 
15172 Golden West Circle 
Westminster, Calif. 92683 



Mr. Jose Orudis 

408 North LasPalmas Avenue 

Los Angeles, Calif. 



Mr. Wesley I. Dumm 
Box 1650 
LaJolla, Calif. 



Mr. Fred R. Eberhardt 
788 N. Via Los Altos 
Laguna Hills, Calif. 



Mr. J. Howard Edgerton 
5670 Wilshire Boulevard 
Los Angeles, Calif. 



Mr. Benjamin Fernandez 
19913 Blackhawk Street 
Chatsworth, Calif. 



3,000 



3,000 * 



Mr. Charles K. Fletcher 1,000 * 
25,000 Broadway at 7th 

San Diego, Calif. 



Mrs. Marjorie Fluor 1,000 * 

iy20 Relict rope Drive 
2,000 * Santa Ana, Calif. 92706 



Mr. K. Owin Follis 1,000 

555 Market Street 
1,000 * San Francisco, Calif. 94120 



Mr. (. Mrs. Alan C. Furth 5,000 * 
54 Sotelo Avenue 
1,000 * Piedmont, C.-lif. 



Mr. J. Paul Getty 75,000 

37985 Pacific Coast Highway 
5,000 Mallbu, Calif. 



Mr. f. Mrs. B. Allison Gillies 1,000 * 
P. 0. Box 625 
1,000 * Rancho Santa Fe., Calif. 



10289 



rALllORMiA 



Mis. Frances Coldwyn 
lU^l North Formosa Avenue 
llolly>.'oo<l, Calif. 90046 



3,000 * Mr. William R. Hewlett 
1501 Pnge Mill Road 
falo Alto, Calif. 



18,000 



Mr. Paul Griffith 
1 900 LaGolondrino 
Alhambra, Calif, 



1,000 * Mrs. Frances Elcaine Hoffman (Mrs. H. Leslie) 
c/o Mr. Leonard I'irestone 
Arco Tower North Suite 4470 
S15 S. Flower Street 
Los Angeles, Calif. 



s Fami 1 y 

Mr. Peter E. Haas 5,000 

98 Battery Street 
San Francisco, Calif. 94111 

Mr. Walter A. Haas, Jr. 5,000 
98 Battrry Street 
San Francisco, Calif. 

Mr. Walter A. Haas, Sr. 48,557.25 

2100 Pacific Avenue 

San Francisco, Calif. 94115 

i-lr. !• Mrs. Richard N. GoldmanS ,229 . 74 

Iris Securities Company 

98 Baltery Street 

.San Francisco, Calif. 94106 



63,786.99r 



Mti. K. T. Harrison 

1170 Sacramento Street 

San Francisco, Calif. 94108 



Mr. Herbert S. Hazeltine 
Adams, Duque and Hazeltine 
523 West Sixth Street 
Ins Angeles, Calif. 90014 



Mr. Isaias VJ. Hellman 

68 Post Street 

.■^11 Francisco, Calif. 94104 



Mr. Marco F. lltllman 
45 Montgomery Street 
San Francisco, Calif. 94106 



5,282.58 



5,000 T 



2,500 * 
2,500 



25,000 



f'.r. Wayne M. Hoffman 
Chairman - Flying Tiger Corp. 
7401 World Way West 
l.os Angeles, Calif . 90009 



15,847.74 



30,000 



73 



Mr. I.. Bob Hope 
10345 Moorpark 
Ion ;. Hollj-wood, 



.1 tack Horton 
1. Box 800 
Roscicead, Calif. 



Calif. 91620 



91770 



Mr. Preston Hotchkis 
1,000 * 523 West 6th Street 

l.os Angeles, Calif. 90014 



Mr. Howard Hughes 
California 



Mr. Jacquelin Hume 
3355 Pacific Avenue 
San Francisco, Calif. 



Mr. Fred C. Jennings 
P. 0. Box 486 
Riverside, Calif. 92502 



50,000 



4,000 



1,000 * 



16,666.67 



10,000 



1,000 * 



10290 



CALIFORNIA 



Mr. Earlc M. Jorgensen 
10650 ScMith Al.incda Street 
Los Angeles. Calif. 90054 



nr. MllK-irJ W. Keith 

9841 Air;ort Boulevard Suite 930 

Lor AngcU-D. Calif. 90045 



Ht . Milton Lc-..'is 
61/ West 7th Street 
Los Angeles, Calif. 

hmployees of Litton Industries 
360 North Crescent Drive 
Los Angeles, Calif. 

Mr. & Mrs. Roy Ash 
655 Funchal Road 
Los Angeles, Calif. 



25,000 



56,606.70 



1,000 * 



86,095.71 T 



Mr. Charles B. Thornton 
320 N. Carolvood Drive 
Los Angeles, Calif. 

Mrs. Flora Thornton 
320 N. Carolviood Drive 
Los Angeles, Calif. 

Other 



20,000 



23,484.86 



24,650.85 



17,960.00 



CALIFORNLA 



Mrs. Tom May 
Beverly Hilton Hotel 
Beverly Hi' Is, Calif. 



Mr. 4 Mrs. Clcn HcDaniel 
x0445 Bell;:(iio Road 
Los Angelcy, Calif. 



Ml. Robert McLajn 
220f; Beverly Blvd. 
},o^ An^eley, Calif. 



Mr. .' Mrs. Denman K. McNear 
44 Makin Grade 
Krntfield, Calif. 



Mr. Rollin L. HcNitt 
6216 S. r.tanford Way 
Wlijltiei , Calif. 



;4rs. Judith J. Murphy 
419 Robert Lane 
Beverly Hills, Calif. 



Members of National Renderers Assn. 
P. 0. Box 1943 
Sacramento, Calif 95809 



5,000 * 



5,100 * 



7,500 



10,000 



1,000 * 



1,000 * 



24,750 73 4 



Mr. Ernest J. Loebbecke 
433 S. Spring Street 
Los Angeles, Calif. 



Mr. i Mrs. Donald Loker 
2373 Woodacre Drive 
Oceanside, Calif. 



Mr. Albert C. Martin 
Box 60147 

5th i Fifueroa Street 
Los Angeles, Calif. 90060 



1,000 * 



1,000 * 



5,008.07 



Employees of North American Rockwell 

1700 East Imperial Highway 

El Segundo, Calif. 90245 

Mr. Wallace W. Booth 1,000 
Other 97,270 



Employees of Northrop Corporation 
1800 Century Park East 
LOS Angeles, Calif. 



Mr. Fernando Oaxaca 

550 Newport Center Drive 

Newport Beach, Calif. 



98,270 T 



100,000 



1,000 



10291 



CALiFoiu;]/, 



Etaployeci of Pacific Lighting Corporation 28,000 T 
810 South Klouer Street 
Loj Angoli-:;, Calif. 90017 

Mr. Joseph R. Rensch 3,000 

Mr. Paul A. Miller 25,000 



CALIFOKUIA 



Mr. David Pacl^ard 
1501 Page Mill Road 
Palo Alto, Calif. 9^303 



51,000 lit. Thonas P. Pike 2A, 457.0-!. 

611 West Sixth .St. Suite 3352 
Los Angeles, Calif. 



hU-. William J. Pattison 
Carrett Corporation 
9851 South SepulvcJa Boulevard 
Los Angeles, Calif. 



1,000 fillsbury, Mad?tiOii, & Sutro 10,000 

Standard Oil Bldg. 
225 Bush St. 
San Francisco, Calif. 



Kr. Edwin W. Pauley 

10000 Santa Monica Boulevard 

;.rs Angeles, Calif. 



35,000 Mi. i Mrs. Robert E. Powell 2,000* 
6171 Bixby Hill Road 
Long Beach, Calif. 



William L. Pereira 
■•/ Wilshire Blvd. 
■ Angeles, Calif. 



5,500 Mi . Spelman Prentice 
25yU Jackson St. 
' fln Francisco, Calif. 



2,500* 



Mi . Robert N. Peterson 
1050 San Rafael Lane 
I'as.-.dena, Calif. 91105 



2,500 * Mr. Harold Price 

609 N. Canon Drive 
Beverly Hills, Calif. 



1,000* 



Mr. George T. Pfleger 
tmerson Electric Company 
1501 Westcliff Drive 
Newport Beach, Calif. 



A7,088.15 Mr. 6. Mrs. Walter R. Ramsaur 1,000 
166' N. Amalfi Drive 
Pacific Palisades, Calif. 



Mrs. Mary E. Pike 
535 Ocean Avenue 
Santa Monica, Calif. 



90402 



Mr. & Mrs. Thomas Reed 
3,000 * P. 0. Box 371 

San Rafael, Calif. 



5,000* 



Mr. Robert M. Pike 
) Montgomery Street 
San Francisco, Calif. 



Hope H. Renshaw 
10,000 1808 Floribunda 

Hillsborough, Calif. 



3,000* 



Mr. Robert 0. Reynolds 
10889 Wilshire Blvd. 
Los Angeles-, Calif. 



25,000 



Mrs. Don Hayden Rose 
1177 W.ivcrly Road 
San Marino, California 



3,000* 



10292 



CALIFORNIA 



CALIFORNIA 



Mr. Henry Salvatorl 
1901 Avenue of the Stars 
Los Angeles, CaliC. 



104,415.12 Mr. Robert F. Six 

Continent.il Airlines 



Los Anp.elcs International Airport 
Los Aneeles, California 90009 



15,000 



Mr. M. M. Schmidt 

^11 North Bay Front 3,000* 

Balboa IsLintl, Calif. 2,000 



5,000 T Mr. H. Russell Smith 
1458 Hillcrest Ave. 
Pasadena, Calif. 



3,000* 



Mr. Edmund Schnieders, Jr. 
1590 Stone Canyon Road 
los Angeles, Calif. 



1 000 * Mr. i Mrs. William French Smith 
1256 Oak Grove Ave. 
San Marino, Calif. 



10,000* 



Mr. & Mrs. Taft Schreiber 
il60 Tower Road 
Bevel ly Hills, Calif. 



100,000 Mrs. Keith Spaulding 
Huntington Sheraton 
Fasadena, Calif. 



1,000* 



Mr. William T. Sesnon, Jr. 

612 South Flower Street 3,000 * 

i.nr. Angeles, Calif. 2,000 



5 000 T M: . i Mr-.. William M. Spencer, Jr. 
f-OO Sumt.-.it Avenue 
Mill Valley, Calif. 



1,000* 



Mrs. Agnes M. Shuniway 

642 Siena Way 

Los Angeles, Calif. 



5 000 ^**''- • John n. Stambaugh 
45-765 Pueblo Road 
Jndian Wells, Calif. 



1,000* 



Mr. and Mrs. Forest Shumway 
1010 Wilshire Boulevard 
Los Angeles, Calif. 



5 000 Lmployces of Standard Oil of California 50,000 
:^25 Bush St. 
San Francisco, Calif. 



Mr. James M. Sink 

306 Avenlda Carlos 

Newport Beach, Calif. 92660 



2,500 



Mr. Jules Stein 
IS'iO Angclo Drive 
Beverly Hills, Calif. 



150,000 



Mrs. Julia V. Stewart 
2870 E. Californi aBlvd. 
Pasadena, Calif. 



1,000* 



!li . George R. Sturgis 
756 Via Lido Nord 
Newport Beach, Calif. 



1,000* 



Mr. Paul W. Trousdale 
650 N. Sepulveda Blvd. 
I.--- Angeles, Calif. 



3,000* 



CALirORKIA 



10293 



Mr. Holmes Tuttle 
1/(5 N. La Brca Ave. 
Los Angeles, Calif. 



25,000 



COLORADO 



!;r. & Mrs. Uilliam E. Walkup 
101 VJilshirc Blvd. 
Los Angeles, Calif. 



Mr. Hal B. Vallis 2,500* 
100 Universal City 
Universal City, Calif. 



Mr. Jack L. Warner 

1900 Avenue of the Stars 

Los Angeles, Calif. 



Mrs. Donald Washburn 
'til Avocado Ave. 
Corona del Mar, Calif. 



Mr. & Mrs. Porter Washington 
Beverly Hills, Calif. 



Mr. R. A. Watt 

Suite 1230 

1900 Avenue of the Stars 

Los Angeles, Calif. 



Jjnployces of Wells Fargo 
A64 CAlifornia St. 
San Francisco, Calif. 



Mr. Harry H. Wetzel, Jr. 

401 Via Media 

Palos Vcrdes Estates, Calif. 



5,000 



7,500 



100,000 



50,000 



5,000* 



Mr. Cortland S. Dietler 
P. 0. Box 1646 
Denver, Colorado 



1,000 * 



Mrs. Robert Donner (Margaret) 24,000 

50 Marland Road 

Colorado Springs, Colorado 80906 



Mr. and Mrs. Robert Donner, Jr, 25,000 
405 Mining Exchange Building 
Colorado Springs, Colorado 80902 



Mr. Arthur E. Johnson 
1700 Broadway, Room 2303 
Denver, Colorado 80202 



15,000 



86,568.88 



20,000 



5,000 



Mr. Lewis B. Maytag 50,000 

P. 0. Box 1206 

Colorado Springs, Colorado 80901 



Mr. C. Neil Norgren 1,000 * 

C. A. Norgren Co. 
Littleton, Colorado 



Mrs. Margaret D. Spencer 24,000 

c/o Mrs. Robert Donner 

50 Marland Road 

Colorado Springs, Colorado 80906 



Mr. John A. White 
1901 Bldg., 20th Floor 
Los Angeles, Calif. 



1,000* 



Jean C. Witter 
45 Montgomery St. 
San Francisco, Calif. 



1,000* 



10294 



CONNECTICUT 



CONNECTICUT 



Mr. Malcolm Bnldrige 
Tomlinson Road 
Woodbury, Connecticut 



1,000 * Miss Katherine Matthies 
59 West Street 
Seymour, Connecticut 06483 



1.000 * 



Mr. Robert S. Barker 

809 Oenoke Road 

New Canaan, Connecticut 06840 



1,000 * Mr. R. W. McCullough 
93 Club Road 
Riverside, Connecticut 



2,000 * 



Mrs. William H. Conrou 

Apple Lane 

Washington, Connecticut 



1,000 * Mr. Jeremiah Milbank 
Round Hill Road 
Greenwich, Connecticut 06830 



25,000 



Mr. and Mrs. Charles W. Deeds 1,000 * 

81 Stoner Drive 

West Hartford, Connecticut 



Mr. Nathan Minkowski 
Jordon International Ltd. 
New. Haven, Connecticut 



10,000 



Mr. Dwight M. Dernier 

421 Stanwich Road 

Greenwich, Connecticut 06830 



1,000 * Mr. G. H. Milliken 
Old Bedford Road 
Greenwich, Connecticut 



3,000 * 



Mr. E. Clayton Gengras 
1000 Asylum Avenue 
Hartford, Connecticut 



1,000 * Mr. J. J. Morsman, Jr. 
40 Bridle Trail 
Darien, Connecticut 



3,000 * 



Mr. H. Mansfield Horner 
105 Bloomfield Avenue 
Hartford, Connecticut 



3,000 * Mr. Milton C. Mumford 
514 Hollow Tree Road 
Darien, Connecticut 



1,000 * 



Mr. Robert P. Jensen 
475 Steamboat Road 
Greenwich, Connecticut 06830 



2,000 * Mr. S. Truman Olin, Jr. 
Box 1929 
Hartford, Connecticut 06101 



1,000 * 



Mr. L. M. Kalmbach 
Springfield Road 
Somers, Connecticut 



2,000 * Mr. Thomas Saxe, Jr. 
930 Oenoke Ridge Road 
New Canaan, Connecticut 



3,000 * 



Mr. Roger M. Keefe 
10 Corbln Drive 
Darien, Connecticut 



1,000 * Mr. Alec C. Stewart 
Lukes Wood Road 
New Canaan, Connecticut 



2. COO * 



Mr. David M. Reiser 

105 Sceloy Road 

Wilton, Connecticut 06897 



1,000 * Mr. Louis Walker 
111 Pearl Street 
Hartford, Connecticut 06103 



1,000 * 



10295 



DELAWARE 



DELAWARE 



Employees of E. I. du Pont de Nemours & Company 

Wilmington, Delaware 

Mr. Walter Carpenter, Jr. 3,000 

Mr. W. Sam Carpenter, III 6,000 

Mr. & Mrs. Joseph Dallas 2,000- 1,000* 

Mr. David Dawson 2,000 

Irenee du Pont, Jr. 3,000* 

Mr. iMrs. George P. Edmonds 5,000* 

Mr. & Mrs. Edward A. Gee 3,000 

Mr. C. H. Grecnewalt 5,000* 

Mr. George E. Holbrook 2,000 

Mr. & Mrs. Edward Kane 2,000 - 1,000* 

Mr. C. B. McCoy 4,000 

Mr. A. I, Mendolia 1,000* 

Mr. & Mrs. Irving S. Shapiro 2,000 

Mr. Hugh R. Sharp, Jr. 5,000 

Mr. & Mrs. Lester Slnness 2,000 

Mr. H. W. Swank - 2,000 

■ Other contributors 11,000 



fin nnnr "'' Charles Harrington 
60,000T ji^j^Q Nemours Bldg. 

Wilmington, Del. 



2,000* 



CJ^. 



The Honorable John U. Rollins 250,023.50 
WAlnut Green 
Owl's Nest Road 
Greenville, Delaware 



Mr. E. Carpenter II 
4072 du Pont Eldg. 
Wilmington, Delaware 



1,000* 



Mrs. Morton du Pont Carpenter 
Old mil Road 
Greenville , 
Wilmington, Delaware 



6,000 



Mr. Lanmj&t du Pont Copeland 
9012 du Pont Bldg. 
Wilmington, Delaware 



5,000 



Mrs. Henry du Pont 
P. 0. Box 3568 
Greenville, Delaware 



1,000* 



Mr. Lammot du Pont 

E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Co. 

Du Pont Bldg. 

Wilmington, Delaware 



5,000 



Honorable and Mrs. Reynolds du Pont 

Randolea 

Greenville, Delaware 



36,000 



10296 



DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA 



DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA 



Mr. Robert C. Baker 
730 - 15th Street N. W. 
Washington, D. C. 



Mr. & Mrs. Norman Bernstein 
2410 VlyoEing Avenue N. W. 
Washington, D. C. 



Mr. t Mrs. James Biddle 
2A25 Wyoming Avenue N. W. 
Washington, D. C. 20008 



Mr. Percival Brundage 
2601 Woodley Place N. W. 
Washington, D. C. 



Mr. & Mrs. Randolph Burgess 
1248 30th Street N. W. 
Washington, D. C. 



Carbide Political Union 
777 14th Street N. W. 
Was'iiington, D. C. 



Mr. & Mrs. Neil Carothers , III 
1701 Pennsylvania Avenue N.W. 
Washington, D. C. 20006 



Mr. Nehemlah M. Cohen 
2931 Albemarle St. N. W. 
1,000 * Washington, D. C. 20008 



1,000 



Mr. Robert Collier 
1625 Eye Street N. W. 
Washington, D. C. 



1,800 * 
28,274.69 



Mrs. Claire L. Chennault (Anna) 
Watergate Apartments 
2510 Virginia Avenue 
Washington, D. C. 



Mr. John Christie 

1503 Pennsylvania Avenue N. W. 

Washington, D. C. 



Mr. Emanuel Cohen 
P. 0. Box 1804 
Washington, D. C. 



Mrs. G. Bradford Cook 
500 North Capitol Street 
1,000 * Washington. D. C. 20549 



Mr. Kenneth M. Crosby 
1100 Connecticut Avenue N. W. 
1,000 * Washington, D. C. 



Major General Robert E. Eaton 
1750 K Street N. W. Suite 260 
1,000 * Washington, D. C. 20006 



Mr. William. H. G. Fitzgerald 
2305 Bancroft Place N. W. 
6,400 * Washington, D. C. 



Mr. Sumner Gerard 

O.S.A.I.D. Tunis 
30,074.69 T Agency for International Development 
Washington, D. C. 



Mr. Joseph B. Gildenbom 
5,000 xiOl 17th Street N. W. 
Washington, D. C. 20036 



5.000 



1,500 



10,000 



1,000 * 



2,000 * 



25,000 



38,867.42 



1,000 



Honorable i Mrs. Kingdon Gould, Jr. 100,000 
1725 DeSales Street N. W. 
1,000 * Washington, D. C. 20036 



5,000 



Mr. Fltzhugh Green 

3630 Prospect Street N. W. 

Washington, D. C. 20007 



8,280.83 



10297 



DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA 



DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA 



Mr. Gilbert C. Greenuay 
3123 Durabarton Avenue 
Washington, D. C. 20007 



2,500 * 



Mr. Richard Little 

815 Connecticut Avenue N. W, 

Washington, D. C. 



1,500 * 



Employees of Gulf Oil Company 
Mr. & Mrs. Claude C. Wild, 
1025 Connecticut Avenue N. 
Washington, D. C. 20036 



Mr. Annand Hammer 
Occidental Petroleum Corp. 
1701 Pennsylvania Avenue 
Washington, D. C. 20006 



Mr. Hadlai A. Hull 
2700 Virginia Avenue 
Washington, D. C. 20037 



Honorable John N. Irwin II 
2500 Virginia Avenue 
Washington, D. C. 



Mr. Joseph E. Jones 
4000 Cathedral N. W. 
Washington, D. C. 20015 



Honorable Henry Reams 
4903 Rockwood N. W. 
Washington, D. C. 20016 



Mr. Earl W. Kintner 
1815 U Street N. W. 
Washington, D. C. 



Mr, & Mrs. Ivoy Kirstein 
1725 DeSales Street N. W. 
Washington, D. C. 20036 



Mr. Gene Lauson 

4400 Hawthorne Street N. W. 

Washington, D. C. 



100,000 



Jr. 
W. 



46,000 



73 



73 



15,451.20 



50,000 



1,000 * 



1,000 * 



3,000 * 



5,000 



2,000 * 



Mr. J. Wlllard Marriott, Sr. 67,069.16 
4500 Garfield Street 
Washington, D. C. 20007 



Honorable John A. McKesson, III 1,000 * 
American Ambassador Libreville 
Department of State 
Washington, D. C. 20521 



Mr. & Mrs. Curtis B. Munson 2,000 * 

1402 31st N. W. 
Washington, D. C. 



Mr. Ralph Ochsman 1,250 

1785 Redwood Terrace 
Washington, D. C. 



Mr. Loren K. Olson 1,000 * 

■5335 Falmouth Road, N. W. 
Washington, D. C. 20016 



Mr. Joseph Ottenstein 2,000 T 

P. 0. Box 1805 1,000 * 

Washington, D. C. 20013 1,000 



Mr. Victor H. Ottenstein 2,500 

P. 0. Box 1805 
Washington, D. C. 20013 



Mr. Florenz P. Ourlsman 150,000 

5225 Wisconsin Avenue N. W. 
Washington, D. C. 



Honorable George Roraney 3,000 * 

Shoreham West 

Washington, D. C. 20008 , . .. 



Mr. Jacob Lehrman 

National Bank of Washington 

Washington, D. C. 



5,000 



10298 



DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA 



FLORIDA 



Dr. George E. Rosden 
5007 Nahant Street 
Washington, D. C. 



1,000 * Mr. Fred Bcrcns 

5555 Collins Avenue 
Miami Beach, Florida 



1,000 



Mrs. Jouett Shouse 
1916 F Street 
Washington, D. C. 20006 



3,000 * Mr. Edmund Burry 

701 SE Smith Court 

Port Lauderdale, Florida 



1,000 * 



Employees of Charles E. Smith & Co. 

1101 17th Street N. W. 

Washington, D. C. 

Mr. Robert P. Kogod 5,000 

Mr. Charles E. Smith 5,000 

Mr. Robert H. Smith 5,000 

Other contributions 40,500 



55,500 T Mr. Jose Casanova, Jr. 
450 SW 92nd Avenue 
Miami, Florida 



Mr. John Christo, Jr. 

P. 0. Box 1350 

Panama City, Florida 32401 



1,000 * 



33,400 73 



Mr. Leigh Tuvin 

1701 Pennsylvania Avenue 

Washington, D. C. 



9,000 



Mr. Aleck Courtelis 
1101 Brickell Avenue 
Miami, Florida 33131 



5,000 



Mr. David H. Ward 
3400 Reservoir Road 

Washington, D. C. 20520 



1,000 * 



Mr. Robert F. Crane 
561 Virginia Drive 
Winter Park, Florida 



1,000 



Mr. and Mrs. Robert Davis 
3664 Richmond Street 
Jacksonville, Florida 



1,000 * 



Mrs. Thomas E. Edmondson 
750 South Ocean Boulevard 
Boca Raton, Florida 33432 



3,000 * 



Mr. David Egozi 

19241 NE 20th Court 

North Miami Beach, Florida 



1,000 * 



Mr. Ralph Evinrude 

P. 0. Box 96 

Jensen Bench, Florida 



1,000 * 



10299 



FLORIDA 



FLORIDA 



Mr. Oscar Fernandez 
6080 West; 10th Avenue 
Hialeah, Florida 



1,000 * Mrs. Lucille P. Harkey 
La Gorce Island 
Miami Beach, Florida 



1,000 * 



Mr. Jose Luis Gonzalez 

323 Velarde 

Coral Gables, Florida 



1,0*0 * Mr. and Mrs. Frank McMahon 
102 Jungle Road 
Palm Beach, Florida 33180 



10.000 



Mr. Edward H. Hamm 

Beach Road 

Hobe Sound, Florida 33455 



30,000 Mr. Frank Newman 

750 South Ocean Boulevard 
Boca Raton, Florida 33432 



6,000 



Mr. R. K. Harcke 
630 De Narvaez Drive 
Sarasota, Florida 33577 



1,000 * Mr. Prime F. Osborn III 
500 Water Street 
Jacksonville, Florida 



1,000 * 



Mrs. Stranahan Holmyard 
631 Island Drive 
Palm Beach, Florida 



1,000 * Mr. Harvey T. Reid 

2904 N. Atlantic Boulevard 
Ft. Lauderdale, Florida 33308 



1,000 * 



Mr. Jay I. Kislak 
1101 Brickell Avenue 
Miami, Florida 33131 



5,000 Mr. L. C. Ringhaver 
P. 0. Box 537 
Jacksonville, Florida 



1,000 * 



Mr. Cal Kovens 

Kovens Construction Company 

1770 Bay Road 

Miami, Florida 33139 



30,000 73 Mr. Carlos Salman 

1624 SW 100th Avenue 
Miami, Florida 



1,000 * 



Mr. Lawrence Lee 
2703 Holly Point Road 
Orange Park, Florida 



Mr. Don Shepard 
1,000 4551 Franwood Drive 

DelRay Beach, Florida 



1,000 * 



Mr. Angel Lorie 
7435 SW 86th Court 
Miami, Florida 



Mr. Robert Shlaudeman 
1,000 ^ 2417 Casey Key Road 
Nokomis, Florida 



2,500 * 



Mr. Andres Machata 
Blackhawk Heating i Plumbing Co. 
& Donovan Construction Company 
616 East Atlantic Avenue 
Delray Beach, Florida 334444 



Mr. George B. Storer 
5,000 1177 Kane Concourse 
Inc. Miami Beach, Florida 



Mr. Harold W. Sweatt 

1665 Ocean Way 

Palm Beach, Florida 33480 



3,000 * 



1,000 * 



10300 



FLORIDA 



GEORGIA 



Mr. Robert Lee Turner 

300 S. Ocean Boulevard 3,000 * 

Palm Beach, Florida 33480 «,000 



7,000 T Mr. Jack Adair 
P. 0. Box 2060 
Atlanta, Georgia 30301 



1,000 * 



Mrs. Edwyna Walsh 
220 El Bravo Way 
Palm Beach, Florida 



33A80 



1,000 * Mr. Thoodore Alexander 
13')5 Hunter Street 
Atlanta, Georgia 30314 



1,000 * 



Mr. Oscar White 

28 West Flagler Street 

Miami, Florida 33130 



1,000 * Mr. Bennett Brown 
P. 0. Box 4899 
Atlanta, Georgia 30302 



1,000 * 



The Honorable & Mrs. Howard H. Callaway 3,000 

Route One 

Pine Mountain, Georgia 31822 



Dundee Mills, Inc. 

Griffin, Georgia 30223 

Mr. J. M. Cheatham 1,000 *| 
Mr. John H. Cheatham, Jr. 1,000 *| 
Mr. John T. Newton 1,000 *| 



3,000 T 



Mr. George Felker, III 

Box 32A 

Monroe, Georgia 30655 



1,000 * 



Mr. and Mrs. Robert H. Ferst 
3585 Woodhaven Road, N.W. 
Atlanta, Georgia 30305 



1,000 * 



Mr. Leon Gottlieb 
284 7 Auburn Avenue 
Columbus, Georgia 



1,000 * 



Mr. and Mrs. George T. Heery 
880 W. Peachtree, N.W. 
Atlanta, Georgia 30309 



5,000 * 



Mr. John P. Howland 
c/o Westpoint Pepperell 
West Point, Georgia 31833 



10,000 



10301 



GEORGIA 



c 






-^ ' - I-/ 7 



ird L. Kat/cel , > 



Mr. Rlch3 

P. 0. Box 4899 

Atlanta, Georgia 30302 



Mr. Mills B. Lane 
p. 0. Box A899 
Atlanta, Georgia 30302 



^o^L,^',^ I' 






Mr. and Mrs. Nathan I. Lipson' 

P. 0. Box 162 

Rome, Georgia 30161 

Mr. William S. Manning 
c/o Bibb Mfg. Company 
Box 4207 
Macon, Georgia 



1,000 * 

1,000 * 

98,120.02 

2,000 * 



ILLINOIS 

Employees of Arthur Anderson & Co. 
69 West Washington Street 
Chicago, Illinois 

Mr. Harvey Kapnick 1,000* 

Other *0."2 



Employees of. Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe 

Mr. Robert R. Bateson 2,000 

80 East Jackson Eoulevard 
Chicago, Illinois 

Mr. Robert M. Clark 2,000 

1100 Connecticut Avenue, N. W. 
Washington, D. C. 20036 



Mr. John S. Reed 

80 East Jackson Eoulevard 

Chicago, Illinois 



2,000 



41,772 T 



6,000 T 73 



Mr. Charles M. Reynolds, Jr. 
752 Lynn Circle SW 
Atlanta, Georgia 30311 



1,000 * 



Mr. Ralph A. Bard, Sr. 
650 Lake Road 
Lake Forest, 111. 



1,000* 



Mr. Richard Tift 
P. 0. Box 406 
Albany, Georgia 



1,000 * „^_ Robert Bass 

200 S. Michigan Avenue 
Chicago, Illinois 



1,800* 



HAWAII 



Mr. Robert F. Black 
Box 3203 
Honolulu, Hi. 



Mr. & Mrs. Heaton L. Hrenn 
2850 Oaliu Avenue 
Honolulu, Hi. 



IDAHO 



Mr: & Mrs. R. V; Hansbeirger 
Pi 0. Box 200 
Boise, Idaho 



1,000* 



1,000* 



Employees of A. G. Becker & Co., Inc. 
One First National Bank 
Chicago, Illinois 60607 



13,500 T 



Mr. & Mrs. P. R. Judy 
14 Country Lane 
Northfield, 111. 60093 

Other 



Mr. & Mrs. John Bent 

1350 Lake Road 

Lake Forest, Illinois 



Mr. George Boucher 
20,000 1388 N. Branch Street 
Chicago, Illinois 



7,500* 



6,000 



2,000* 



1,000* 



Mr. William C. Janss 
Suit Valley i Idaho 



2,000 * 



31-889 O - 74 - pt.22 - 8 



10302 



ILLINOIS 



ILLINOIS 



Mr. Philip D. Block, Jr. 
30 West Monroe St. 
Chicago, Illinois 60603 



10,000 Mr. Howard Davis 
613 Bruce 
Flosstnoor, Illinois 



1,200* 



Employees of Borg-Warner 
200 S. Michigan Avenue 
Chicago, Illinois 60601 

Mr. Robert S. Ingersoll 3,000* 
Mr. James Bere 2,000* 

Other 11,800 



19,800 T Mr. Jaraes R. De Pauu 

69 West Washington Street 
Chicago, Illinois 



Mr. Frank Dickey 
John Deere Road 
Molinc, Illinois 



1,000* 



2,000* 



Mr. & Mrs. David E. Bradshaw 
230 North Michigan Avenue 
Chicago, Illinois 



Mr. Roger Brown 
First National Plaza 
Chicago, Illinois 60670 



Mr. Edward E. Carlson 
President 
United Air Lines 
P. 0. Box 66100 
Chicago, Illinois 60666 



15,000 



1,000* 



Mr. Elliott Donnelley 5,000 

2223 Martin Luther King Drive 
Chicago, Illinois 60616 



Mr. & Mrs. Gaylord Donnelley 25,883.21 
2223 Martin Luther King Drive 
Chicago, Illinois 60616 



23,452.20 



Mr. Donald Erickson 
137 Sheridan Road 
Winnetka, Illinois 



1,000* 



Mr. & Mrs. James Cathcart 
123 Onwentsia Road 
Lake Forest, Illinois 



Mr. tt Mrs. Walter Erman 
2,500* 332 South Michigan Avenue 
Chicago, Illinois 



5,000* 



Mr. & Mrs. Silas Cathcart 
701 North Mayflower Road 
Lake Forest, Illinois 



Mr. Victor E. Gidwitz 
2,500* 208 South LaSalle Street 
Chicago, Illinois 



1,000* 



Mr. Donald Collier 

200 South Michigan Avenue 

Chicago, Illinois 



Mrs. Dillon Goddard 
1,200* 1110 West 3rd Street 

Sterling, Illinois 61080 



1,000* 



Mr. Curtiss E. Crippen 
1500 Sheridan Road 
Wllnettc, Illinois 



Mr. David W. Grainger 
.1,000* 1015 South Aldlne Street 
.;: Park Ridge, Illinois 



25,000 



Mr. Henry Crown 
900 Edgcmcrc Court 
Evanston, Illinois 60602 



.■.'•;-. ■ Mr. W. W. Grainger 
'.•v 50,818. 89 I 1630 Sheridan Road 

■?<Vi..^ 73 25 



25.000 



Wilmctto, Illinois 



10303 



ILLINOIS 



ILLINOIS 



Mr. C. L. Cunn 

323 North 1st Street 

De Kalb, Illinois 



1,000* 



Mr. K. Trees Hvesey 
1040 Lake Shore Drive 
Chicago, 111. 60611 



2,000* 



Mr. Bernard J. Hank 
7000 W. North Avenue 
Chicago, Illinois 60635 



1,000* 



Mr. James C. Hemphill 25,000 
c/o Goldman, Sachs & Co. 
135 S. LaSalle Street 
Chicago, Illinois 60603 



Mrs. Henrietta J. Louis and Family 
135 South LaSalle St. 
Chicago, 111. 60603 



42,033.75 T 



John J, Louis, Jr. 
Henrietta J. Louis 
Herbert J. Louis 
Michael W. Louis 



22,033.75 

10,000.00 

5,000.00 

5,000.00 



Mr. George Tim Herrmann 
175 W. Jackson Blvd. 
Chicago, Illinois 60604 



1,000* 



Mr. Fowl-er McCormick 
875 N. Michigan Avenue 
Chicago, Illinois 60611 



3,000* 



Mr. John H. Hobart 
325 W. Ohio Street 
Chicago, 111. 60610 



6,451.30 



Mr. Henry W. Meers 
30 West Monroe St. 
Chicago, Illinois 



1,000* 



Mr. Frederick G. Jaicks 
91 Graymoor Lane 
Olympia Fields, 111. 



2,500* 



Mr. Allen Menke 

200 S. Michigan Avenue 

Chicago, 111. 60604 



1,100* 



Mr. Robert I. Jones 

318 S. Bluffs Edge Drive 

Lake Forest, 111. 60045 



1,000* 



Mr. Edward F. Moore 
1040 West Erie 
Oak Park, 111. 



1,000* 



Mr. James S. Kemper, Jr. 
A750 North Sheridan Road 
Chicago, 111. 60640 



2,500* 



Mr. Paul E. Murin 
700 W. Deerpath Road 
Lake Forest, 111. 



1,000* 



Mr. Jack F. Kincannon 
1000 Lake Shore Plaza 
Chicago, Illinois 



1,000* 



Mr. Robert W. Murphy 
200 S. Michigan Avenue 
Chicago, 111. 



1,000* 



Mr. Lester B. Knight 
549 W. Randolph Street 
Chicago, Illinois 60606 



50,000 



Mr. George V. Myers 
910 S. Michigan Avenue 
Chicago, 111. 



1,000* 



Mr. John W. Leslie 
3600 W. Lake Ave. 
Clenview, 111. 60025 



3,000* 



Mr. Arthur C. Nielsen, Sr. 
2101 Howard Street 
Chicago, Illinois 60645 



30,000 



10304 



ILLINOIS 



ILLINOIS 



Mr. W. Irving Osborne, Jr. 
347 Bluffs Edge Drive 
Lake Forest, Illinois 



A 725.63 Mr. Warren P. Snyder 
1791 Howard Street 
Chicago, Illinois 60626 



1 , 000* 



Mr. & Mrs. Potter Palmer 10,070.68 

30 North Michigan Avenue 

Suite 2100 

Chicago, 111. 60602 . 

Mr. William H. Perkins, Jr. 1,000* 
310 S. Michigan Avenue 
Chicago, Illinois 

Mrs. Charles S. Potter 1,063.19 

209 Lake Shore Drive 
Chicago, Illinois 60611 



Mr. William Wood Prince 25,000 
F. H. Prince & Company, Inc. 
One First National Plaza 
Chicago, Illinois 60670 



Mr. Larry S. Prove 3,000* 

615 Laurie Lane 
Northfield, 111. 60093 



Mr. George A. Ranney 2,500* 

30 W. Monroe St. 
Chicago, 111. 60603 



Mr. G. Scribner, Jr. 1,000* 

One First National Plaza 
Chicago, Illinois 

Searle Family, G.D.Searle & Co. 

See last page of Illinois 
Employees of Sears-Roebuck & Co. 9,739.17 T 
925 Soutli lloman Avenue 
Chicago, Illinois 

Gordon M. Metcalf 4,871.94 
Arthur M. Wood 4,867.23. " 



Mr. Robert S. Solinsky 
5959 South Cicero Avenue 
Chicago, 111. 60638 



Mr. Robert F. Spindell 
135 South LaSalle Street 
Chicago, 111. 60603 



>;,ia>; ,-..*^- - - 



1,000* 



1,000* 



Employees of Standard Oil of Indiana 4,750 T 
910 South Michigan Avenue 
Chicago, Illinois 60605 

Mr. John Swearingen 2,065.03 
Mr. Robert C. Gunness 2,000.00* 
Other 684.97 



Mr. & Mrs. John Simpson 
33 North Dearborn Street 
Chicago, Illinois 



.,6,000* 



Mr. & Mrs. W. Clement Stone 
8 Mllbum Park 
Evanston, Illinois 



Mr. Robert D. Stuart, Jr. 
345 Merchandise Mart 
Chicago, Illinois 60645 



Mr. Frank L. Sulzberger 
2841 Ashland Avenue 
Chicago, Illinois 60608 



Mr. Thomas Taylor 

135 S. La Salle Street 

Chicago, 111. 60603 



Mr. & Mrs. Daniel J. Terra 
528 Roslyn Road 
Kenilworth, Illinois 60043 



Mr. Wallace Tudor 
1445 Park Avenue 
River Forest, Illinois 



2,000,000 



A, 761. 15 



2,000* 



2,500* 



250,000 



1,000* 



10305 



ILLINOIS 



INDIANA 



Mr. Emory Williams 
745 Ardslcy Road 
Winnetka, Illinois 



1,000* Mr. and Mrs. WAlter R. Beardsley 
2233 Greenleaf Boulevard 
Elkhart, Indiana 46511 



10,000 



Mr. Frank H. Uoods 
59 East Van Buron St. 
Chicago, 111. 60605 



1,000* Mr. 0. C. Carmichaol, Jr. 
302 First Bank Building 
South Bend, Indiana 46601 



19,166.47 



Searle Family 

G. D. Searle & Company 

Box 5110 

Chicago, Illinois 60680 



10,000 Mr. Carl W. Dobos 

102 Beajvoir Circle 
Anderson, Indiana 



1,122 * 



Mr. G. D. Searle 5,000 
Mr. John G. Searle 5,000 



Mr. R. A. Fink 

717 North Main Street 

Auburn, Indiana 46706 



1,000 * 



Mr. and Mrs. John Fisher 
P. 0. Box 832 
Muncie, Indiana 



1,000 * 



Mr. Ray J. Hillenbrand 
509 North Walnut Street 
Batesville, Indiana 47006 



1,000 * 



Mr. Perry W. House 
725 Oakdale Drive 
Anderson, Indiana 



1,473.25 * 



Mrs. Charles J. Lynn 
5600 Sunset Lane 
Indianapolis. Indiana 



46208 



3,000 * 



Employees of National Homes Corp. 

Earl Avenue and Wallace Street 

Lafayette, Indiana 

Mr. & Mrs. James R. Price 6,175 
Mr. Robert L. Price 6,000 
Others 37,825 



50,000 T 



Mr. N. H. Noyes 
5625 Sunset Lane 
Crow-nost, Indiana 46208 



3,000 * 



Mr. John C. Oesterle 
500 Brentwood Lane 



1,300 * 



IOWA 



10306 



LOUISIANA 



Mr. Richard C. Kautz 
R. R. 4 
Muscatine, Iowa 

KANSAS 



Mr. 4 Mrs. E. E. Garvey 
300 West Douglas 
Wichita, Kansas 



Mrs. Olive Garvey 
300 West Douglas 
Wichita, Kansas 



Mr. George M. Myers 
16A3 Sherrylee Lane 
El Dorado, Kansas 



Mr. Dwane L. Wallace 
Cessna Aircraft Company 
Wichita, Kansas 

KENTTJCKY 



Mr. & Mrs. Orin E. Atkins 
602 Amanda Drive 
Ashland, Ky. 



Mr. John Greenebaura 

614 Kentucky Home Life Bldg 

Louisville, Ky. 



Mr. Horatio Mason 

c/o Mason Hangar Company 

Lexington, Ky. 



1,000* 



1,097.11* 



1,057* 



1,000 



1,000* 



100,000 



1,000* 



Mr. Mason Eudd 2 000 

Rudd Construction Equip. Co'., Inc. 
Louisville, Ky. 



Mr. Wilson Abraham 1,000* 

2100 St. Charles Ave. 
New Orleans, La. 



Mrs. C. Greenes Cole 1,000* 
p. o. Box 745 
Houma, La. 



Mr. Frank A. Godchaux III 1,000* 
P. 0. Box 269 
Abbeville, La. 



Mr. Norman V. Kinsey 1,000* 
P. 0. Box 1738 
Shreveport, La. 



Mr. W. E. Robertson 10,000 

Suite 2840 

No. 2 Canal St. 

New Orleans, La. 



Mr. & Mrs. Sam Thomas, Jr. 5,000* 
800 N. Vienna St. 
Ruston, La. 

MAINE 



Mr. Edward Carr 1,000 * 

Box 608 
Centerville, Maine 



2,500 73 



Mrs. George E. Ladd, Jr. 1,000 * 
Wayne, Maine 04284 



Mr. Sanford F. Petts 1,000 * 

Rivea Road 

Kennebunkport, Maine 04045 



Mr. Herbert S. Tuckerman 1,000 * 
Prides Crossing 
Maine 01965 



10307 



MARYLAND 



MARYLAND 



Mrs. Alvin Aubinoe 
8000 Overhill Road 
Bethesda, Maryland 20014 



^•°°° * Mr. John H. Safer 
1ii20 Hampden Lane 
Bethesda, Maryland 



250,000 



Mr. Nathaniel J. Ely 
7300 Loch Lomond Drive 
Bethesda, Maryland 



1,000 * Honorable J. Fife Symington 100,000 
West Seminary Avenue 
Lutherville, Maryland 



Mr. Morton Funger 4 Mr. Norman Lee Funger 1,250 
3107 Brooklavm Terrace 
Chevy Chase, Mar>-land 20015 



Mrs. Newton H. White, Jr. 
3601 Greenway 
Baltimore, Maryland 



1.000 * 



Dr. and Mrs. George L. Grassmuck 
7511 Shadywood Road 
Bethesda, Maryland 20034 



1,000 * j^gg ^j^j^^g ^ Willard 
A Roland Mews 
Baltimore, Maryland 21210 



1,000 * 



Mr. E. Howard Hunt 
11120 River Road 
Potomac, Maryland 



1,000 * 



Mr. Le Baron Willard, Jr. 
300 St. Paul Place 
Baltimore, Maryland 



3,000 * 



Mrs. W. Alton Jones 

P. 0. Box 718 

Easton, Maryland 21601 



3,000 * 



Mr. Thomas S. Kleppe 
9609 Hillridge Drive 
Kensington, Maryland 20795 



1,500 * 



Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Meyerhoff 

Sun Life Building - Charles Center 

Baltimore, Maryland 21201 



104.848.48 



Mr. and Mrs. David S, 
7003 Old Cabin Lane 
Rockville, Maryland 



Pollen 



1,000 * 



Mr. Henry H. Ramirez 
10525 Famham Drive 
Bethesda, Maryland 20014 



1,000 * 



10308 



MASSACHUSETTS 



MASSACHUSETTS 



Mr. John Chase 

535 Boylston Street 

Boston, Massachusetts 



1,000* Mr. Edward A. Taft 
100 Federal Street 
Boston, Mass. 



1,000* 



Mr. Frederic Church 
89 Broad Street 
Boston, Massachusetts 



1,000* Hr. & Mrs. George R. Wallace 
470 Main Street 
Fitchburg, Mass. 



15,000* 



Mrs. William C. Cox 

The Oaks 

Cohassett, Massachusetts 



1,000* Mr. Lloyd B. Waring 
75 Federal Street 
Boston, Mass. 



10,000 



Mr. i Mrs. Henry Hall, Jr. 
154 Coolidge Hill 
Cambridge, Mass. 



1,000* Mr. Richard B. Young 
Neds Point Road 
Mattapoisett, Mass. 02739 



1,000* 



Mr. Leland J. Kalmbach 
1295 State Street 
Springfield, Mass. 01109 



2,000 



The Honorable Cabot Lodge 
275 Hale Street 
Beverly, Mass. 



1,000* 



Mr. Thomas Pappas 
323 Marsh Street 
Belmont, Mass. 



100,673.24 



Miss Amelia Peabody 
c/o Lloyd B. Waring 
75 Federal Street 
Boston, Mass. 02101 



10,000 



Mr. & Mrs. John N. Philips 
2900 Prudential Tower 
Boston, Mass. 



4,000* 



Mr. Quincy Shaw 
50 Congress Street 
Boston, Mass. 



1,000* 



Mr. Robert C. Sprague 
34 Bulkley 
Wllllamstown, Mass. 



1,000* 



10309 



MICHIGAN 



MICHIGAN 



Mr. and Mrs. James Beresford 
411 Lone Pine Road 
Bloomlield Hills, Michigan 



Employees of Chrysler Corporation 
3A1 Massachusetts Avenue 
Detroit, Michigan 48203 

John J. Riccardo 

John J. Riccardo 

Mr. Lynn A. Townsend 



Other 



16.218.59 
1,000.00 
1,500.00 
115,125.50 



Mr. William W. Crapo 

254 Touranie Road 

Crosse Pointe Farms, Michigan 



Mr. and Mrs. H. Cunningham 
210 Lowell Court 
Bloomfield ILLlls, Michigan 



Mr. Kenneth W. Cunningham 

936 Berkshire Road 

Grosse Pointe Park, Michigan 



Mr. Albert F. Davis 
1642 Pontiac Road 
Grand Rapids, Michigan 



Mr. Richard Earhart 

902 First National Building 

Ann Arbor, Michigan 



Honorable and Mrs. Max Fisher 
27751 Fairvjay Hills Drive 
Franklin, Michigan 



Mr. Benson Ford 
635 Lake Shore Road 
Grosse Point Shores, 



Mr. Henry Ford II 
The American Road 
1,000 * Dearborn, Michigan 



Employees of General Motors Corporation 
General Motors Building 
133,844.09 T Detroit, Michigan 48202 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard Gerstenberg 3,500 

Mr. Edward N. Cole 3,200 

Mr. Harold G. Warner 3,250 

Mr. Oscar Lundin 2,000 

Mr. E. M. Estes 2,200 

Mr. William L. Mitchell 2,240 

Mr. Lewell N. Mays 1,500 

Mr. Mack W. Worden 1,000 

1,000 * Mr. Robert L. Kessler 1,800 

Mr. George R. Elges 1,000 

Mr. John BEltz 1,000 

Mr. F. James McDonald 1,400 

Mr. Thomas A. Murphy 1,350 

2,000 * Mr. Frank 0. Riley 1,570 

Mr. Robert W. Decker 1.050 

Mr. Louis Bridenstine 1,000 

Mr. Joseph Godfrey 1,500 

Other contributions 20,452 



1,000 



1,000 * 



1,000 * 



125,000 73 



Mr. Dan Gerber 
455 State Street 
Fremont, Michigan 



Mr. Edward Glanz 
318 South Claretnont 
Dearborn, Michigan 



Mr. Elisha Gray 

400 Nickerson Avenue 

Benton Harbor, Michigan 



Michigan 48236 



Mrs. Edsel B. Ford 

1100 Lake Shore Road 

Crosse Point Shores, Michigan 



3,000 * 



50,000 



48236 



Mr. Reuben R. Jensen 
18500 Sheldon Road 
Northville, Michigan 



Mr. and Mrs. David W. Kendall 

75 Lake Shore Road 

Crosse Point Farms, Michigan 



Mr. Charles L. McCuon 
2 Barbour Lane 



49,776.49 



51,012 T 



1,000 * 



1,000 * 



3,000 * 



1,100 * 



1,000 * 



1,000 * 



10310 



MICHIGAN 



MINNESOTA 



Mr. George C. McKay 

25 West Michigan Avenue 

Battle Creek, Michigan 



1 000 * ^Iif- Dwaync 0. Andreas 

First Oceanic Corporation 
Sherton-Ritz Building 
Minneapolis, Minnesota 55401 



25,000 



Mr. Arthur Schupp 
«650 East State Street 
Saginaw, .Michigan 



1,000 



Mr. John Eean 

6505 Biscayne Boulevard 

Minneapolis, Minnesota 55436 



1,000 * 



Mr. Chester Schwelsinger 
307 East Court Street 
Flint, Michigan 



i.oGo 



Mr. Harold K. Bradford 
1000 Roanoke Building 
Minneapolis, Minnesota 



1,000 * 



Mr. Allan Sheldcn III 
1512 Buhl Building 
Detroit, Michigan 



3,000 * 



Mr. Charles W. Briggs 
1905 Summit Avenue 
St. Paul, Minnesota 



1,000 * 



Mr. Charles Sligh, Jr. 1,000 * 
222 River Avenue 
Holland, Michigan 49A23 



Dr. Harry A. Townsley 1,000 

1000 Berkshire Road 

Ann Arbor, Michigan 48104 



Mr. Robert C. Upton 2,500 * 
North Shore Drive 
Benton. Harbor, Michigan 



Mr. Walter Wolpin 1,000 * 

31400 Franklin Freeway 
Farmington, Michigan 48024 



Burlington Northern Voluntary Good 

Government Fund 
176 East 5th Street 
St. Paul, Minnesota 
Pres. , R. Downing 



Mr. Kenneth H. Dahlberg 
Redgate, Rt . 7 
P. 0. Box 284 
VJayzata, Minnesota 



Mr. Donald Dayton 
818 Roanoke Building 
Minneapolis, Minnesota 55402 

Stock 10,640.22 

2,660.25 * 



10,000 



7,000 



13,300.27 T 



Mr. L. H. Fisher 
1624 Edgcumbe Road 
St. Paul, Minnesota 



1,000 * 



Mr. L. B. Gehrke 

10 El Dorado Drive 

White Bear Lake, Minnesota 



1,000 



10311 



MINNESOTA 



MINNESOTA 



Mr. I. R. Hansen 
44 Evergreen Road 
St. Paul, Minnesota 



1,000 * Mr. and Mrs. Louis F. Polk, Sr. 
4570 West 77th Street 
Minneapolis, Minnesota 



25,000 



Mr. E. J. Kane 
77 Mid Oaks Lane 
St. Paul, Minnesota 



Mr. Harold J. Kinney 

3 M Center 

St. Paul, Minnesota 



Mr. Henry McKnight 
P. 0. Box 114 
Chaska, Minnesota 

Employees of Minnesota, Mining 4 Mfg. 

3 M Center 

St. Paul, Minnesota 55101 

Mr. Bert S. Cross 2,000 * 
Mr. VJ. L. McKnight 100,191.01 
Mr. Wilbur M. Bennett 6,550 
Mr. Harry Heltzer 3,000 * 
Mr. R. H. Herzog 1,000 * 
Other contributions 30,000 73 



Mr. Robert W. Mueller 
311 Woodlawn Avenue 
St. Paul, Minnesota 



Mr. John H. Myers 

P. 0. Box 3260 

St. Paul, Minneosta 55165 



Mr. Jeno F. Pauluccl 
525 Lake Avenue, South 
Duluth, Minnesota 



Mr. C. P. Pesek 

2350 West Isles Boulevard 

Minneapolis, Minnesota 55405 



Mr. Robert J. Pond 
1,000 * 5412 Stauder Circle 

Minnesota, Minnesota 55436 



Mr. Charles Rltz 
1,000 * 510 Groveland Avenue 

Minneapolis, Minnesota 55403 



Mr. James E. Stewart 
3,000 * 421 N. E. Johnson 

Minneapolis, Minnesota 

Mr. Robert H. Tucker 
142,741.01 T 3 M Center 

St. Paul, Minnesota 



1,000 * 



1,000 * 



Mr. James A. Vaughn 
510 Groveland Avenue 
Minneapolis, Minnesota 55403 



Mr. Robert L. Vincent 
5011 Bruce Avenue 
Minneapolis, Minnesota 



1,000 * 



1,000 * 



50,000 73 



1,000 * 



1,000 * 



1,000 * 



Mr. F. K. Weyerhaeuser 13,000 

W-2191 First National Bank Building 
St. Paul, Minnesota 55101 



25,000 



1,000 * 



Mr. John F. l/hltcomb 

3 M Center 

St. Paul, Minnesota 



Mr. Wheelock Whitney 

100 Dain Tower 

Minneapolis, Minnesota 55402 



1,000 * 



12,446.25 



10312 



MISSISSIPPI 



MISSOURI 



Mr. Paul V. LaCoste 

P. 0. Box 1527 

Jackson, Mississippi 39216 



Mr. and Mrs. Morris Lewis, Jr. 

1 Arbor Lane 

Indianola, Mississippi 38751 



MISSOURI 



Employees of Anheuser-Busch 
721 Pessalozzi Street 
St. Louis, Missouri 
August A. Busch, Jr. 
August A. Busch, III 
Richard A. Meyer 
Walter C. Reisinger 
Adalbert Von Gontard 



9,749.05 
15,980.22 
13,316.90 

6,657.00 
10,651.20 



1,000 * 



1,000 * 



56,35A.37 T 



Employees of McDonnell Douglas Corp. 

P. 0. Box 516 

St. Louis, Missouri 63166 



34,527.85 T 



Mr. James S. McDonnell 

P. 0. Box 516 

St. Louis, Missouri 63166 



25.670.58 



Mr. James S. McDonnell III 3,000 * 
40 Glen Eagles Drive 
St. Louis, Missouri 



Mr. Donald W. Douglas 
P. 0. Box 14526 
St. Louis, Missouri 



Employees of Monsanto Company 
900 North Lindbergh Boulevard 
St. Louis, Missouri 63166 



8,827.27 



I 



23,080 



Mr. and Mrs. Alexander J. Barket 
Civic Plaza National Bank 
Kansas City, Missouri 



25,000 



Mr. Spencer T. Clin 
7701 Forsyth Boulevard 
St. Louis, Missouri 63105 



94,513.36 



Employees of General Dynamics 

Pierce Laclede Center 

St. Louis, Missouri 63105 

Mr. David S. Lewis, Jr. 

Mr. Algie A. Ilendrix 
Mr. Hllliard W. Paige 

Mr. Gordon E. MacDonald 

Mr. Edward Lynn 

Other contributions 



Mr. Ralph B. Graham, Jr. 

1100 Hacklind Avenue 

St. Louis, Missouri 63110 



83,717.19 T 



1,000 * 
1,000 * 
1,000 * 
1,000 * 
1,000 * 
78,717.19 



1,000 * 



Mr. Tudi Pattl 

7200 Hullwood 

Kansas City, Missouri 



Mr. Howard Stamper 46,807.23 

515 Olive Street 

St. Louis, Missouri 63101 



General L. Jack Sverdrup 

Sverdrup i Parcel & Associates, Inc. 

800 North 12th Boulevard 

St. Louis, Missouri 53101 



25,000 



19,334.30 



Mrs. John S. Lehman 
10 Apple Tree Lane 
St. Louis, Missouri 



1,000 * 



Mr. James C. Thomas 

P. 0. Box 549 

St. Joseph, Missouri 



1,000 * 



Mrs. Lydia Long 

2301 S. Kings Highway 

St. Louis, Missouri 63110 



1,000 * 



Miss Martha Love 

44 Westmoreland Place 

St. Louis, Missouri 



1.000 * 



I 



10313 



MONTANA 



NEW JERSEY 



Mr. Hugh E. Palmer 
Box 1077 
BlllinRS, Montana 

NEBRASKA 



MR. Sydney Cnte 
6901 Dodge Street 
Omaha, Nebraska 



Mrs. George B. Cook 
3070 Sheridan Blvd. 
Lincoln, Nebraska 



Mr. C. W. Durham 
1329 S. 83rd Street 
Omaha, Nebraska 



Mr. Peter Kiewit 
1000 Kiewit Plaza 
Omaha, Nebraska 



Employees of Mutual of Omaha 
Dodge at 33rd Street 
Omaha, Nebraskva 

Mr. V. J. Skutt 1,000 * 
" " " 9,650 

Other 23,675 



Mr. Leo Daly 

8600 Indian Hills Drive 

Omaha, Nebraska 



Mr. Robert Daughtery 
400 N. Elmwood Road 
Omaha, Nebraska 

NEVADA 



Mr. L. Dyer 
Harrah' Club 
Reno, Nevada 



1,000 * 



Mr. James E. Burke 

5-1 George Street 

New Brunswick, New Jersey 



1,000 * 



1,250 * 



7,192.15 



10,000 



100,912 



34,325 T 



Mr. C. Suydan Cutting 2,000 * 

Bernardsville, New Jersey 07924 



The Honorable C. Douglas Dillon 36,000 
Far Hills, New Jersey 07931 



Mr. Robert J. Healy 
836 Wyoming Avenue 
Elizabeth, New Jersey 07208 



Mr. Wayne J. Holman, Jr. 

501 George Street 

New Brunswick, New Jersey 08903 



Mr. J. Seward Johnson 

1050 George Street 

New Brunswick, New Jersey 



Mr. Alexander Kasser 
159 Gates Avenue 
Montclalr, New Jersey 



Mrs. Elliott C. Laidlaw 
Meadow Lakes 43-02 
10,000 73 Hightstown, New Jersey 08520 



3,000 * 



5,000 73 



Mr. Irwin S. Gleich 
656 Westfield Avenue 
Westfield, New Jersey 07090 



Mr. Franklin B. Lincoln, Jr. 

22 Roland Drive 

Short Hills, New Jersey 07078 



Mr. Howard Hughes 
Reno, Nevada 



Mr. Richard K. Paynter, Jr. 
Box 205 
"16,666.67 Princeton, New Jersey 



2,500 * 



1,000 * 



1,500 * 



3,000 * 



1,000 * 



9,000 



1,000 * 



1,000 * 



10314 



NEW JERSEY 



Mr. Milton J. Petrle 
70 Enterprise Avenue 
Secaucus, New Jersey 



NEW rIEXICO 



Mr. & Mrs. Adrian Berryhill 
A051 Ambrosia Lake Street 
2,500 * Grants, Now Mexico 

NEW YORK 



1,000 * 



Mr. Raymond H. Reiss 1,000 * 
59 Esplanade 
Deal, New Jersey 



Mrs. Mary Roebling 1,000 * 

777 West State Street 
Trenton, New Jersey 08618 



Mr. Vincent C. Ross 1,000 

2365 Hudson Terrace 

Fort Lee, New Jersey 07024i 



Mr. Robert S. Sinn 5,000 

East Park Drive 

Mt. Laurel, New Jersey 



Mr. Herbert Allen 15,000 

Allen & Cor.pany 
30 Broad Street 
New York, New York 



Employees of American Airlines 75,000 73 

Chairman - George Spater 

633 Third Avenue 

New York, New York 10017 



Employees of Anaconda Company 5,137.50 T 

25 Broadway 

New York, N. Y. 

Mr. John M. Place 1,000 
Other 4,137.50 



Mr. Clifford Siverd 
315 Algonquin Road 
Franklin Lakes, New Jersey 



Mr. & Mrs. Theodore Ashley 
1,000 * Director - Kinney Services, 
10 Rockefeller Plaza 
New York, New York 10020 



Inc. 



137,056.31 



Mr. Robert M. Stroker 
394 Broad Street 
Newark, New Jersey 



2,000 Mr. Harris Ashton 
245 Park Avenue 
New York, New York 10017 



1,000 



Mr. George C. Thomas, Jr. 

80 Goetze Street 

Bay Head, New Jersey 08742 



1,000 * Mr. George F. Baker, 
1001 Park Avenue 
New York, New York 



Jr. 



4,610.15 



Mr. George C. Watt 
Sherman Forest Drive 
Short Hills, New Jersey 



1,000 * Mr. Theodore L. Bates 
1515 Broad 
New York, New York 10036 



1,000 * 



Mr. Foster B. Whltlock 
25 Grecnbriar Drive 
Suimnit, Hew Jersey 07901 



1,000 * Mr. William S. Beinecke 
330 Madison Avenue 
New York, New York 



1,000 



Mr. Melville M. Wilson 
Mountain View Road 
Princeton, New Jersey 



5.476.62 



Mr. 


& Mrs. Karl R. Bendetsen 


777 


Third Avenue 5 OOO 


New 


York, New York 2 500 



7,500 T 



10315 



NEW YORK 



NEW YORK 



Mr. Robert A. Bendhelm 

1430 Broadway 

New York, New York 10018 



Captain Leo V. Berger 
President - Avon Steamship Co. 
3OO0 Marcus Avenue 
Lake Success, New York 10040 



Mr. George F. Berlinger 
595 Madison Avenue 
New York, New York 



Mrs. Rhonie H. Berlinger 
20 Broad Street 
New York, New York 



Mr. Elmer Holmes Bobst 

7 East 60th Street 

New York, New York 10022 



Mr. Beverly A. Bogert 
907 Fifth Avenue 
New York, New York 



Mr. Richard I. Bonsai 
c/o Joshua L. Baily Co. 
IDA West 40th Street 
New York, New York 10018 



Mr. Fred J. Borch 
570 Lexington Avenue 
New York, New York 



15,000 73 



20,000 
Inc. 



10,000 



15,000 



100,000 



10,000 



1,000 * 



1,000 * 



Employees of Bristol-Myers • 50,000 T 

345 Park Avenue 

New York, New York 10022 

Mr. William M. Bristol III 5,000 

630 Fifth Avenue 

New York, New York 10022 

Mr. Roger Drackett 5,000 

5020 Spring Grove Avenue 
Cincinnati, Ohio 

Mr. Bruce S. Gelb 5,000 

1060 Fifth Avenue 
New York, New York 

Mr. Richard L. Gelb 10,000 

1060 Fifth Avenue 

New York, New York 10028 

Mr. Gavin K. McBain 6,000 

345 Park Avenue 

New York, New York 10022 

Mr. Clarence F. Michalis 5,000 

345 Park Avenue 

New York, New York 10022 

Mr. Frederic N. Schwartz 5,000 
630 Fifth Avenue 
New York, New York 



Mr. Frank A. Sprole 4,000 
786 Hollow Tree Ridge Road 
Darien, Connecticut 05820 



Mr. Laurence M. Gelb 
1060 Fifth Avenue 
New York, New York 



5,000 



Mrs. Beulah Boynton 
15 East 63rd Street 
New York, New York 



1,000.73 



Mr. John W. Brooks 

522 Fifth Avenue 

New York, New York 10036 



1,000 



John J. Brasino, M. D. 
105 Stevens Avenue 
Mt. Vernon, New York 



X,000 ^Ir. Hugh Bullock 
1 Hall Street 
New York, New York 



3,000 * 



10316 



NEW YORK 



NEW YORK 



Honorable Mlliam A. Burden 

820 Fifth Avenue 

New York, New York 10021 



Mr. I. W. Bumham II 
60 Broad Street 
New York, New York 



Mr, Lawrence J. Buser 
President - American Export 
20 Broadway 
New York, New York 10004 



Ambassador George H. Bush 
799 U. N. Plaza 
New York, New York 



Mr. Thomas Casey 

5 Dakota Drive 

Lake Success, New York 



97,89A.61 



2,000* 



5,000 



1,000* 



3,000* 



M 



ZZ 



t,t> 



■sC 



Employees of Cities Service .7 j'T^/ 28 000 73 
60 Wall Street "^ ' 

New York, New York 10005 



Mr. D. Stanley Corcoran 
Seville Avenue 
Rye, New York 



Mr. Gardner Cowles 
488 Madison Avenue 
New York, New York 10022 



Mr. Joseph F. Cullman, III 
Chairman - Phillip Morris, Inc. 
100 Park Avenue 
New York, New York 10017 



2,000* 



1,000* 



5,000 



Mr. Nathan Cummings 
Waldorf Towers - 28A 
100 East 50th Street 
New York, New York 10022 



Mr. Brownlee Currey, Jr. 
1040 Fifth Avenue 
New York, New York 



Mr. E. Kent Damon 

65 Country Club Drive 

Rochester, New York 



Mr. Theodore N. Danforth 

P. 0. Box 508 

Locust Valley, New York 



Mr. Jerome Dansker 
630 Fifth Avenue 
New York, New York 



Mrs. Wilhelmina Dauth 

P. 0. Box 1148 

Sag Harbor, Long Island, New York 



Mrs. Preston Davie 
71 East 71st Street 
New York, New York 



Mr. J. Morton Davis 

D. H. Blair Securities Corp. 

437 Madieon Avenue 

New York, New York 10022 



Mr. William J. Dawson, Jr. 
35 East 38th Street 
New York, New York 



44,356.28 



74,195.50 



1,000 * 



3,000 * 



1,000 * 



2,500 * 



1,000 * 



10,000 



2,000 * 



Employees of Diamond International Corp. 5,000 

733 Third Avenue 

New York, New York 10017 



10317 



NEW YORK 



NEW YORK 



Mr. & Mrs. David L. Dickenson 
125 Riverside Drive 
Binghaniton, New York 



2,000* 



Mr. Alfred Eisenpreis 
AO East 83rd Street 
New York, New York 



1,000* 



Mr. George A. Dies, Jr. 
110 Fourth Street 
Garden City, New York 



1,000* 



Mr. John Flory 
36 Dogwood Glai 
Roches tqr. New York 



3,000 



Honorable Vincent deRoulet 
635 Madison Avenue 
New York, New York 



100,000 73 72 



Mr. Thomas Ford 
680 Madison Avenue 
New York, New York 



56,000 



Mr. John F. Donahue, 
60 Broad Street 
New York, New York 



Jr. 



Mr. Joseph Donner 

115 Broadway, Room 400 

New York, New York 10006 



Mr. Charles E. Doran 
10 Hardscrabble Circle 
Artnonk, New York 10504 



Mrs. Leonard Dreyfuss 
60 East 42nd Street 
New York, New York 



1,000* 



12,000 



1,000* 



1,000* 



Mrs. Arthur Gardner 1,000* 

760 Park Avenue 

New York, New York 10021 



Mrs. Paul Gardner 1,000* 

56 Willets Road 

Westbury, Long Island, New York 11590 



Mr. Albert F. Gordon 99,873.19 

Mr. Albert H. Gordon 
10 Hanover Square 
New York, New York 



Mr. Maurice Greenberg 15,000 

President - American International Group 
102 Maiden Lane 
New York, New York 



Mrs. Taylor Dunnington 
812 Park Avenue 
New York, New York 



1,000* 



Mr. Max Greenfield 
A20 Lexington Avenue 
New York, New York 10017 



21,000 



Mr. Frederick M. Eaton 
53 Wall Street 
New York, New York 



2,000* 



31-889 O - 74 - pt. 22 



10318 



NEW YORK 



NEW YORK 



Mr. Philip Grove 
400 Madison Avenue 
Neu York, New York 



Mr. Harold Helm 
1,000 * Chemical Bank 

277 Park Avenue 
New York, New York 



6,300.04 



Mr. Floyd D. Hall 
10 Rockefeller Plaza 
New York, New York 



Mr. Edward J. Halloran 
Conduit i Foundation 
Leonard & Lafayette 
New York, New York 



1,000 * 



10,000 



Mr. Harry Hclnsley 
Hotel St. Moritz 
50-56 Central Park 
New York, New York 10019 



73 



Mr. Leonard D. Henry 
19 E. 72nd Street 
New York, New York 



12,500 



1,000 * 



Mr. John W. Hanes 3,000 * 

460 Park Avenue 

New York, New York 10022 



Mr. F. William Harder 2,000 * 

30 Broad Street 
New York, New York 



Mr. & Mrs. Richard S. Harman 5,000 * 
15 West 72nd Street 
New York, New York 



Mr. E. Roland Harriman 21,000 

59 Wall Street 

New York, New York 10005 



Employees of Haskins & Sells 2,000 * 

2 Broadway 

New York, New York 

Mr. Michael Chetkovich 



Leon Hess (and associates) 


250,000 T 


Awerada Hess Corp. 




51 West 51st Street 




New York, New York 10019 




Mr. Paul Adler 


39,000 


Mr. Bruce Baker 


9,000 


Mrs. Judie Baker 


9,000 


Mr. J. D. Callender 


12,000 


Mr. Julius Epstein 


9,000 


Mr. Leon Hess 


10,000 


Mr. i Mrs. Philip Kramer 


12,000 


Mr. Hubert W. McCollum 


42,000 


Mr. & Mrs. David I. Schafferl2,000 


Other 


96,000 



Mrs. Adair Hickman 
1 East End Avenue 
New York, New York 



Mr. & Mrs. John S. Hilson 
1 Chase Manhattan Place 
New York, New York 10005 



1,000 



5,000 



Mr. Daniel P. Hays 

South Road 

Port Washington, New York 11050 



1,000 * Mr. Joseph H. Hirshhom 
277 Park Avenue 
New York, New York 



25,000 



73 



Mrs. Anna Hopeman 
30 Douglas Road 
Rochester, New York 14610 



1,000 * 



10319 



NEW YORK 



NEW YORK 



Mr. John J. Hopkins 
179 Audobon Avenue 
Mt. Vernon, New York 



1,000 Mr. John W. Kluge 
1040 Fifth Avenue 
New York, New York 



1,000 * 



Mr. R. L. Ireland III 

Brown Brothers, Harriman i Co. 

59 Wall Street 

New York, New York 



Mr. Henry A. Ittleson 
812 Park Avenue 
New York, New York 



10,000 ^ Mr. Seymour H. Knox 3,000 * 
Marine Trust Company Bldg. 
Buffalo, New York 



Mr. William S. Lasdon 
1,000* 7 East 60th Street 
New York, N. Y. 



40,000 



Mr. J. Courtney Ivey 

70 Pine Street 

New York, New York 10005 



Mrs. William K. Laughlln 1,000 * 
1,000* P. 0. Box 1392 

Southampton, N. Y. 



Mr. Howard B. Johnson 
888 Park Avenue 
New York, New York 



Mr. Cyrus J. Lawrence 
15,000 115 Broadway 

New York, New York 



12,000 



Mr. Saul Kahan 

c/o Nathan Tannenbaum & Company 

570 - 7th Avenue 

New York, New York 



Mr. Norbert W. Keams, Sr. 
160-04 80th Street 
Howard Beach, New York 



Mr. Ralph E. Kent 

277 Park Avenue 

New York, New York 10017 



Mr. Joseph H. King 

One Chase Manhattan Plaza 

New York, New York 



Mr. George H. Lawrence 
9,000 t, Valley Road 

Bronxville, N. Y. 



1,000 * 



Mr. Lawrence F. Leeds 9,000 
20 Easton Avenue 
1,000* White Plains, N. Y. 



Mrs. Sylvia M. Leeds 
20 Easton Avenue 
1,000* White Plains, N. Y. 



9,000 



Mr. i Mrs. Sarauel Lefrak 24,930. 
97-77 Queens Blvd. 
2,000* Ridge Park, N. Y. 



Mr. John A. Kley 
Old Farm Road S 
Fleasantvllle, New York 



1,500* 



10320 



HEW YORK 



'HEW YORK 



Mr. Gustavo Levy 
Goldman, Sachs & Company 
55 Broad Street 
New York, New York 10004 



Employees of Lehman Corp. 
1 South William Street 
New York, New York 10004 

General Lucius D. Clay 1,000.00 

Stephen M. DuBrul, Jr. 1,000.00 
Frederick L. Ehrmann 75,137.29 

Frederick J. Graber 1,000.00 

F. Warren Hellman 5,152.11 

Herman H. Kahn 1,000.00 

Andrew G. Sage II 2,000.00 



70,442.84 



86.289.40 



Mr. Salem L. Lewis 
1 Wall Street 
New York, N. Y. 

Mr. Preston Long 
860 5th Avenue 
New York, N. Y. 



Mr. Alexander Luke 
120 Broadway 
New York, N. Y. 



Mr. David Luke, III 
150 East 73rd St. 
New York, N. Y. 



2,500 * 



1,000 * 



4,500 * 



2,000 * 



BBployces of Lybrand Ross Bros. & Montgomery 30,380 T 
1251 Avenue of the Americas 
New York, N. Y. 

Mr. Philip L. Defliese 1,000 * 

Other 29,380 



Mr. P. R. Hallory 
660 Madison Avenue 
Mew York, New York 



1,000 * 



Mr. E. A. G. Manton 10,000 

Chairman - American International Group, Inc. 
102 Maiden Lane 
New York, N. Y. 



Bonorable Anthony D. Marshall 
830 Park Avenue 
Mew York, N. Y. . 



48,505.44 



Employees of Martin Marietta Corp. 

277 Park Avenue 

New York, N. Y. 

Mr. Thomas G. Pownall 2,500 

Mr. George M. Bunker 5,000 

Other 2,500 



10, 000 T 



NEW YORK 



10321 



NEW YORK 



Mr. Howard W. McCall, Jr. 
20 Pine Street 
New York, N. Y. 



Mr. R. W. McCollough 
611 E. 6th Street 
New York, N. Y. 



Mr. Donald F. McCullough 
132 East 80ch Street 
New York, N. Y. 



Mr. Robert McMillan 
171 Euston Road 
Garden City, N. Y. 



1,000 



2,000 * 



2,000 * 



1,000 * 



Employees of Merrill, Lynch, Pierce 5,000 T 
Fenner & Smith 
70 Pine Street 
New York, N. Y. 

Mr. i Mrs. Donald T. Regan 5,000 * 

Box 571 

Oyster Bay, N. Y. 



Mr. Stanley R. Miller 
55 Broad Street 
New York, N. Y. 



Mr. Minot K. Milliken 
1045 Sixth Avenue 
New York, N. Y. 



Mr. Seymour Milstein 
35 Ogden Road 
Scarsdale, N. Y. 



Mr. Philip G. Mitchell 
9 The Byway 
Bronxville, New York 



Mr. John A. Morris 
Battery Park Plaza 
New York, N. Y. 



Mr. Frederick Moss 
37 Riverside Drive 
New York, N. Y. 10023 



3,000 



4,708.68 



65,000 



1,500 * 



1,000 * 



1,000 * 



Mr. Andre Meyer 
Lazard Freres i Co. 
A4 Wall Street 
Hew York, N. Y. 



Mr. Edwin C. Michaelian 
Heather Lane 
White Plains, N. Y. 

Mr. Jeremiah Mllbank, Jr. 
1133 Avenue of the Americans 
New York, N. Y. 



Mr. Paul L. Miller 
20 Exchange Place 
New York, N. Y. 



90,000 



1,000 * 



25,000 



3,000 * 



Mr. JohnA. Mulcahy 
102 Boulder Trail 
Bronxville, N. Y. 



598,558.97 



Employees of National Distillers 

99 Park Avenue 

New York, N. Y. 

Mr. John E. Bierwirth ^•°°° * 

Mr. Drummond C. Bell 1.500 * 

Mr. Jaraes H. Mclnerney 1.000 * 

Other 13.500 



Mr. B. C. Ohlandt 
111 East 57th Street 
New York, N. Y. 



18,000 T 



2,000 * 



Mr. & Mrs. John M. Olin 
460 Park Avenue 
New York, N. Y. 



100,000 



10322 



NEW YORK 



NEW YORK 



Mr. H. Bruce Palmer 
A47 East 57th Street 
New York, N. Y. 



1,000 * Prlce-Waterhousc & Company 
60 Broad Street 
Mew York, New York 10004 



102,000 T 



Hrs. Mario Pansa 1,000 

19 East 72ad Street 
New York. N. Y. 



Mr. Einil 3. Pattberg, Jr., 3,000 * 

20 Exchange Place 
Mew Zerk, N. Y. 

Mr. Herbert P.Patterson 3,000 * 
1 Chase Manhattan Place 
New York, N. Y. 



Mrs. Charles S. Payson 80,000 
748 Madison Avenue 
New York, N. Y. 



Mr. Saul Pearce 1,000 * 

230 Park Avenue 
New York, N. Y. 



Mr. Edward J. Petrillo 10,000 
969 Midland Avenue 
Yonkers, N. Y. 



Mrs. Lillian Bostwick Phipps 51,000 
245 Park Avenue 
New York, N. Y. 



Mrs. Ada Posner 
35 Walter Place 
Great Nock, N. Y. 11023 



Mr. Jules Posner 
35 Walters Place 
Great Neck, N. Y. 



9,000 



9.000 



Mr. 


Walter M. Baird 


1,000* 


Mr. 


Robert Berger, Jr. 


1,000* 


Mr. 


John C. Biegler 


1,000* 


Mr. 


Hugh Campbell 


1,000* 


Mr. 


James W. Clark 


1,000* 


Mr. 


Maurice J. Dahlem 


1,000* 


Mr. 


Verden R. Draper 


l.OOO* 


Mr. 


E. A. Erdahl 


1,000* 


Mr. 


Robert E. Field 


1,000* 


Mr. 


Thomas A. Ganner 


1,000* 


Mr. 


Henry Gunders 


1,000* 


Mr. 


Henry P. Hill 


1,000* 


Mr. 


Gerald Maxfleld 


1,000* 


Mr. 


J. J. Mclntyre 


1,000* 


Mr. 


Brendan J. Meagher 


1,000* 


Mr. 


Patrick J. Meagher 


1.000* 


Mr. 


William C. Miller 


1,000* 


Mr. 


Howard D. Murphy 


1,000* 


Mr. 


Kallman Nashner 


1.000* 


Mr. 


& Mrs. John B. O'Hara 


5,000* 


Mr. 


Edward H. Robertson 


1,000* 


Mr. 


Fred M. Rusk 


1,000* 


Mr. 


Harry Sanders 


1,000* 


Mr. 


George C. Watt 


1,000* 


Mr. 


Theodore L. Wilkinson 


1,000* 


Others 


73,000 



Mr. Willis L. M. Reese 
345 Meadowview Ave. 
Hewlett, Long Island, N. Y. 



Mr. John E. Reeves 
Reeves Bros. , Inc. 
1271 Avenue of the Americas 
New York, New York 10020 



The Honorable Stanley R. Resor 

320 Park Avenue 

New York, New York 10022 



Mr. H. Irving Pratt 1,000 * 
45 Wall Street - 9th Floor 
New York, N. Y. 



Mr. Heshulam Riklis 

Chairman of the Board & President 

Rapid American Corp. 

711 Fifth Avenue 

New York, New York 10022 



1,000* 



2,500* 



5,000 



50,000 



10323 



NEW YORK 



Mr. Julian H. Robertson, Jr. 

10 Hanover Square 

New York, New York 10005 



Rockefeller Family 
c/o Mr. George Hinman 
30 Rockefeller Plaza 
New York, New York 

Mrs. Abby R. Mauze 
Mr. & Mrs. John D. Rockefeller 
Mr. 4 Mrs. Laurence Rockefeller 
Honorable & Mrs. Nelson Rockefeller 



Mr. Donald Roon 

504 West Sullivan Street 

Clean, New York 14760 



Mr. Philip Rosen 

75 Echo Bay Drive 

New Rochelle, New York 



Mr. & Mrs. Peter B. Ruff in 
Mobil Building 
150 East 42nd Street 
New York, New York 10017 



Mr. & Mrs. Adolph Rust 

140 Broadway 

New York, New York 10005 



Mr. & Mrs. Robert Salant 
330 Fifth Avenue 
New York, New York 



Employees of Salomon Brothers 

One New York Plaza 

New York, New York 10004 

Mr. William E. Simon 



26,581.87 



200,000 T 



50,000 
50,000 
50,000 
50,000 



2,000* 



2,000* 



41,000 



20,000 



1,000* 



100,000 



NEW YORK 



Mr. Joseph Salzman 
130 East 39th Street 
New York, New York 



1,500* 



Mr. Merrill Kerby Saunders 10,000 
43 West 61st Street 
New York, New York 



Mr. & Mrs. John M. 

912 Fifth Avenue 

New York, New York 10028 



Schiff 15,000 



Mrs. Evelyn Sharp 

700 Fifth Avenue 

New York, New York 10019 



Mr. Sherwood W. Smith 
One West Main Street 
Rochester, New York 



Mr. Edward Staley 
3 Chalford Lane 
Scarsdale, New York 



16,376.96 



1,000* 



1,000* 



Mr. Foye F. Staniford, Jr. 1,000* 
901 Lexington Avenue 
New York, New York 10021 



Mr. Mike Stein 

The Bali Company 

666 Fifth Avenue 

New York, New York 10019 



Mr. Saul Steinberg 

280 Park Avenue 

New York, New York 10017 



Mr. James Steward 
160 East 65th Street 
New York, New York 



1,000 



250,000 



3,000* 



Mr. Whitney Stone 
965 Fifth Avenue 
New York, NY 



22,000 



10324 



NEW YORK 



•^ 



^1 " 



Employees of St. Regis Paper Company 19,000 T 
150 East 42nd Street 
New York, New York 

Mr. I'illiam R. Adams 1,000* 

687 Smith Ridge 

New Canaan, Connecticut 

Mr. Homer Crawford 1,000* 
1170 Fifth Avenue 
New York, New York 

Mr. Roy K. Ferguson 6,000* 
65 Mores Hill Road 
Oyster Bay, New York 

Mr. Stephen P. Kaptain 2,000* 
7 Nolen Lane 
Darlen, Connecticut 

Mr. George J. Kneeland 2,000* 
347 Parkslde Road 
Harrington Park, New Jersey 

Mr. James E. Kussman 2,000* 
33 Driftway Lane 
Darien, Connecticut 

Mr. Edward J. McMahon 2,000* 
700 East Drive 
Oradell, New Jersey 

Mr. William E. Caldwell 1,000* 

38 Turtleback Road 

New Canaan, Connecticut 

Other 2,000 



Mr. Edward 0. Sullivan 
RFD 2, Leander Lane 
Mt. Kisco, New York 



5.000* 



NEW YORK 



Mr. Juan T. Trippe 2,500* 

Pan American Building 
New York, New York 10017 



Colonel Oliver J. Troster 1,500* 

92 Franklin Avenue 
Yonkers, New York 



Mr. Frank P. Tufaro 3,000* 

35 Maplewood Road 
Bartsdale, New York 



Bnployees of U. S. Steel 18,300 T 

71 Broadway 

New York, New York 10006 

(President - Edgar B. Speer) 

Mr. Wilbert A. Walker 1,000* 
Mr. Edwin H. Gott 2,000* 
Mr. R. H. Larry 1,500* 
Mr. Robert C. Tyson 2,000* 
Other 11,800 



Mr. Max Urbahn 2,500 

521 Fifth Avenue 
New York, New York 



Mr. & Mrs. Elisha Walker, Jr. 100,000 

63 Wall Street 

New York, New York 10005 



Mr. & Mrs. DeWltt Wallace 100,000 

High Winds 

Byram Lake Road 

Ht. Kisco, New York 10549 



Mr. Leon Templesman 
529 Fifth Avenue 
New York, New York 



Mr. & Mrs. Robert V. Tishman 

1095 Park Avenue 

New York, New York 10028 



10,000 73 



5,000* 



Mr. Cornelius S. Walsh 

140 Broadway 

New York, New York 



Mr. & Mrs. Irving Warshauer 
c/o Nathan Tannenbaum & Co. 
570 - 7th Avenue 
New York, New York 



1,000* 



- 18,000 • 



10325 



NEH YORK 



NORTH CAROLINA 



Mr. H. G. Wellington, Jr. 3,000* 

Piping Rock Road 

Locust Valley, L. I., New York 



Mr. Maurice Wereblud 1,000* 

393 7 th Avenue 
New York, New York 



Burllnp.ton Industries, Inc. 10,500 T 

Box 21207 

Greensboro, North Carolina 27420 

Mr. Ely R. Callaway, Jr. 2,500 * 

Mr. Horace C. Jones 2,500 * 

Mr. William A. Klopman 1,500 * 

Mr. Charles F. Myers 2,500 * 

Mr. George L. Staff 1,500 * 



Mr. Cornelius V. Whitney 
230 Park Avenue 
New York, New York 



9,000 Mr. Hugh G. Chatham 

c/o Chatham Manufacturing Company 
Elkin, North Carolina 28621 



5,000 



Mr. Walter F. Williams 
New York, New York 



Mr. Robert Winthrop 
20 Exchange Place 
New York, New York 



1,250* Cone Mills Corporation 
1201 Maple Street 
Greensboro, North Carolina 27405 

Mr. Clarence N. Cone 2,000 

8,000 Mr. C. E. Connelly 1,500 

Mr. John E. Field 1,500 

Mr. Lewis S. Morris 2,700 



7,700 T 



Mr. Forvood Wiser 

605 Third Avenue 

New York, New Yorkl0016 



1,000* Mr. David J. Conroy 
36 Sunset Summit 
Asheville, North Carolina 



3,500 * 



Mr. John H. Wishnlck 
20 Meadow Road 
Scarsdale, New York 10583 



1,000* Mr. & Mrs. Stanley Frank 
P. 0. Box 20687 
Greensboro, North Carolina 



5,000 * 



Mr. William D. Witter 
One Battery Park Plaza 
New York, New York 



1,000 Mrs. Ann D. Frisch 

696 Grandview Drive N. E. 
Concord, North Carolina 



2,000 



Mr. John 0. Zimmennan 
Amityvllle, New York 



1,025* Mr. James G. Hanes 
P. 0. Box 1413 
Winston Salem, North Carolina 27102 



1,000 * 



Mr. Walter A. Kerr 
Route 1, Fairfield Park 
Roxboro, North Carolina 27573 



2,000 



10326 



N0RT:1 CAROLINA 



OHIO 



Mr. Frank H. Kenan 
P. O. Box 2637 
Durham, North CaroJina 



1,000 * 



Mr. Raymond Arnington 
7921 EAgle Road 
Willoughby, Ohio 



1,000 * 



Mr. James King 
3712 Arbor Way 
Charlotte, North Carolina 



2,000 



Mr. Loren M. Berry 

3170 Kettering Boulevard 

Dayton, Ohio 45101 



102,000 



Mr. Albert Laughey 2,000 

3601 Fountain Hill Ridge 
Charlotte, North Carolina 



Mr. Met R. Poston 3,550 * 

5 West Avon Parkway 

Asheville, North Carolina 28804 



Mr. G. Blddle 
Oglebay Norton Company 
The Hanna Building 
Cleveland, Ohio 44115 

Mr. Jerome Blonder 
2968 Glengary Road 
Cleveland, Ohio 



3,000 * 



2,000 * 



Mr. Claude Ramsey, Jr. 3,000 * 

9 Fairway Place, Biltmore Forest 
Asheville, North Carolina 28803 



Mrs. Glenn Donnell 
1614 South Main Street 
Findlay, Ohio 



3,000 * 



Mr. H. H. Winger, Jr. 

15 East Forest Road 

Asheville, North Carolina 28803 



1,125 * 



Employees of Ernst & Ernst 
1300 Union Commercial Building 
Cleveland, Ohio 44122 



88,000 



NORTH DAKOTA 



Mr. Leo Anderson 

P. 0. Box 1676 

Fargo, North Dakota 58102 



1,000 * 



Mr. Louis R. Fiore 
1400 Provident Tower 
Cincinnati, Ohio 45202 



Mr. Harvey Firestone, Jr. 
1225 West Market Street 
Akron, Ohio 44313 



1,000 * 



48,712.20 



Mr. Raymond C. Firestone 
1200 Firestone Parkway 
Akron, Ohio 



63,440.68 



Mr. Donald Foy 
Kettering Box 2323 
Dayton, Ohio 45429 



3,000 * 



Mr. Norman Gebhart 
4545 Southern Boulevard 
Dayton, Ohio 



1,060 * 



10327 



Employees of Goodyear Tire & Rubber Company 

1144 East Market Street 

Akron, Ohio 44316 

Mr. and Mrs. Russell DeYoung 5,000 
Other 40,000 



Mr. Alan Gressel 
Building Systems, 
3113 Prospect 
Cleveland, Ohio 



Mr. David S. Ingalls 

1560 Union Conmierce Building 

Cleveland, Ohio 44115 



45,000 T 72 20,20 



5.000 



6,000 * 



Mr. Louis F. Polk, Jr. 

Box 967 

Dayton, Ohio 45401 



Employees of Republic Steel 
Republic Building 
Cleveland, Ohio 44101 

Mr. H. L. Allen 

Mr. W. B. Boyer 

Mr. W. J. De Lancey 

Mr. E. A. Murray 

Mr. R. E. Waldo 

Mr. Thomas F. Patton 

Others 



24,211.16 



11,350 T 



1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
5,350 



Mr. Carl H. Lindner S, Mr. Robert H. Lindner 
American Financial Corporation 
One East 4th Street 
Cincinnati, Ohio 45202 

Employees of Marathon Oil Company 

539 Main Street 

Pindlay, Ohio 45840 

Mr. J. D. Anderson 1,000 * 

Mr. G. A. Clark 1,000 * 

Mr. R. M. Churchwell 1,000 * 

Mr. G. M. Donnell 2,000 

Mr. J. C. Donnell II 9,000 

Mr. J. R. Donnell 3,000 

Mr. N. G. Dumbros 1,000 * 

Mr. E. A. Graham 1,000 * 

Mr. J. H. Herring 1,000 * 

Mr. G. R. Jetton 1,000 * 

Mr. F. C. Moriarty 1,000 * 

Mr. R. E. Rhea 1,000 * 

Mr. G. R. Schoonmaker 1,000 * 

Mr. G. H. Young 6,000 

Other contributions 10,000 



Mr. James J. ^ance 
55 Public Square 
Cleveland, Ohio 44113 



Mr. Louis Nippert 

2300 Central Trust Tower 

Cincinn.Tti, Ohio 



149,968.96 



40,000 T 



1,000 * 



8,000 



Kr. and Mrs. Kent H. Smith 250,000 

Uoodstock Road 

Gates Mills, Ohio 44040 ' 



Mr. George M. Steinbrenner 100,000 

1210 Investment Plaza 
Cleveland, Ohio 44114 



Mr. Vernon Stouffer 25,000 

12700 Lake Avenue 
Lakewood, Ohio 



Miss Louise F. Tate 1,000 * 

4001 Careu Tower 
Cincinnati, Ohio 45202 



Timken Family ^£^ qOO T 

Mrs. Louise B. Timken 12,000 

The Timken Corporation 
Canton, Ohio 

Mr, and Mrs. W. R. Timken 14,000 
6551 Hill & Dalis Rd. , N.W. 
Canton, Ohio 

Mr. W. R. Timken, Jr. 8,000 

Timken Company 
1835 Deubec, S.W. 
Canton, Ohio 44706 

Mr. Ward J. Timken 5,000 

First National Bank 

Canton, Ohio 
Ms. Edith T. Toot 2321 Brentwood Road NW 5 000 
Canton, Ohio 



10328 



OREGON 

Mr. Albert C. Meyer 
440 Granite Street 
Ashland, Oregon 97520 



1,000 



OHIO 

Mr. E. Clare Weber 
13515 Sh.nkcr Boulevard 
Cleveland, Ohio 44120 



Mr. Cyrus T. Walker 
1,000 * 02484 SW Military Road 
Portland, Oregon 97219 

PENNSYLVANIA 



1,000 * 



Mr. Robert L. Weston 
3955 Euclid Avenue 
Cleveland, Ohio 



Mr. Preston Wolff and Wolff Family 
Columbus Dispatch 
Columbus, Ohio 

OKLAilOMA 

Mr. Kenneth Adams 
P. 0. Drawer A 
Bartlesvllle, Oklahoma 



Mr. B. B. Blair 

704 Atlas Life Building 

Tulsa, Oklahoma 74103 



Mr. William Brown 
1707 Elmhurst 
Oklahoma City, Okla. 



Mr. Luther T. Dulaney 
100 N. W. 44th 
Oklahoma City, Okla. 



Mrs. Claude Harmon 
2440 E. 28th Street 
Tulsa, Oklahoma, 74114 



Boployees of Phillips Petropeum 
Mr. W. W. Keeler 
1118 South Dewey Avenue 
Bartlesvllle, Oklahoma 



1,000 * 



25.000 



1,000 * 



1,000 * 



1,000 * 



1,000 * 



1,000 * 



100,009 



73 



Employees of Aluminum Company of America 
1501 Alcoa Building 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15219 

Mr. John D. Harper, Chalmaa 8,000 73 
Other 3,800 



It. General Hilton Baker 
14 Farlson Road 
Wayne, Pennsylvania 



11,800 T 



Mr. Herbert Barness 

Cold Spring Creamery Road 

Doylestown, Pennsylvania 



73 



1,000 * 



6,000 * 



Employees of Bethlehem Steel Co. 


49.002.05 


701 East Third Street 






Bethlehem, Pennsylvania 18016 




Mr. 


Edward D. Bickford 


2,500 * 




Mr. 


Ivor D. Sims 


2,500 * 




Mr. 


James H. Walker, Jr. 


1,250 • 




Mr. 


Stewart S. Cort 


2,500 * 




Mr. 


Lewis W. Foy 


2,500 * 




Mr. 


John D. Brlggs 


1,250 * 




Mr. 


Edward P. Leach 


1.250 * 




Mr. 


C. Thompson Stott 


2,500 * 




Mr. 


John O'Connell 


1,250 * 




Mr. 


F. W. West, Jr. 


1,250 * 




Mr. 


D. Blickwede 


1,250 * 




Mr. 


John C. Howard 


1,250 * 




Mr. 


Bernard Broeker 


2,500 » 




Mr. 


C. W. Ganzil 


1,250 * 




Mr. 


Albert M. Reed 


2,500 * 




Mr. 


Richard M. Hurd 


1,250 * 




Mr. 


C. William Ritterhoff 


1,250 * 




Mr. 


Francis Van Nuys 


1,250 * 




Other contributions 


17,752.05 





Mr. Ben Voth 

823 South Detroit 

Tulsa, Okla. 74120^ 



•d- 



24,048.48 



Mr. & Mrs. Charles P. Williams 
2540 East 30th Street j, 
Tulsa, Okla, 74114 i ' ", , W' 

Mr. David R. Williams, Jr. 
321 South Boston 
Tulsa, Okla 74103 






\>^' 



9,000 



8,844.82 



Mr. Robert Blough 
Blooming Grove 
Hawley, Pennsylvania 



73 



Mr. Howard Butcher 
700 Spring Mill Road 
Villanova, Pennsylvania 



Mrs. C. B. Churchman 
924 Mulrfield Road 
Bryn !lawr, Pennsylvania 



19085 



1,000 * 



38,000 



1,000 * 



10329 



PENNSYI.VANIA 



PENNSYLVANIA 



Mr. A. W. Connar 
721 - 13th Avenue 
Bethlehem, Pennsylvania 



1,250 * Mr. Richard Scaife 
Box 1138 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15230 



1,000,000 



Mr. John H. DeVitt 
5275 Wolf Road 
Erie, Pennsylvania 



1,000 * Mr. Joseph Segal 
The Franklin Hint 
Franklin Center, Pennsylvania 



13,000 



Mr. John T. Dorrance 
1543 Monk Road 
Gladwyne, Pennsylvania 



19035 



34,800 Mrs. Philip Sharpies 
Grays Lane 
Haverford, Pennsylvania 



2,000 * 



Mr. Lawrence Fenningher, Jr. 
701 East Third Street 
Bethlehera, Pennsylvania 



1,250 * Mr. and Mrs. John F. Steinman 
8 West King Street 
Lancaster, Pennsylvania 



2,000 * 



Miss Helen Clay Frick 
7200 Pennsylvania Avenue 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15208 



10,000 Mr. Clarence A. Warden, Jr. 
Cottesmore 
Haverford, Pennsylvania 



3,000 * 



Mr. Howard S. Kaltenborn 

Gateway Towers 

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15222 



1,400 * Mr. R. J. Wean, Jr. 
Scaife Road 
Sewickley, Pennsylvania 15143 



1,000 * 



Mr. Thomas B. McCabe 

Scott Plaza 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19113 

Mr. T. J. Miers 

425 North Melville Street 

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15312 



1,000 * 



1,000 * 



Mr. Howard C. Petersen 1,000 * 

Broad and Walnut Streets 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

Miss Ethel Pew 30,000 

1601 Walnut Street 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 



Employees of Westinghouse Electric 
Mr. Vern S. Atwater, President 
3 Gateway Center 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15222 

Mr. Donald C. Burnham, Chairman 

3 Gateway Center 

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15222 

Other 



Mr. Charles W. Wolf 
112 Baltimore Street 
Gettysburg, Pennsylvania 17325 



35,460 T 
2,460 



2,500 * 



30,500 



1,000 * 



Mr. W. Crocker Pew 
1608 Walnut Street 

Phll.lllclnhln. Pr■nr^cvlvsn 



30,000 



1 - 



10330 



SOUTH CAROLINA 



SOUTH CAROLINA 



Mr. Collie W. Anderson 5,000 

508 North Broad 
Clinton, South Carolina 



Mr. Hal Byrd 4,101.50 

F. 0. Box 1296 
Spartanburg, South Carolina 



Mr. J. Willis Cantey 2,500 * 

1400 Westminister Drive 
Columbia, South Carolina 



Mr. Hugh M. Chapman 2,500 * 

5033 Wittering Drive 
Colunjbia, South Carolina 



Mr. James A. Chapman, Jr. 8,400 

c/o Inman Mills 
Inman, South Carolina 



Mr. and Mrs. Hugh W. Close 24,000 * 

c/o Springs Mills, Inc. 

Fort Mill, South Carolina 29715 



Ms. Juanita Cooper 15,000 

100 Parkdale Drive 
Greenville, South Carolina 



Mr. Henry Dekker 10,000 

c/o Hoechst Fibers, Inc. 

P. 0. Box 5887 

Spartanburg, South Carolina 29301 



Mr. Frederick B. Dent 10,500 

c/o Mayfair Mills 

Arcadia, South Carolina 29320 



Mr. John M. Hamrick 3,000 * 

Box 548 

Caffney, South Carolina 29340 



Employees of Lyles, Bissett, Carlisle & Wolff 

P. 0. Box 7 , 20,000 T 

Columbia, South Carolina 

Mr. T. J. Bissett " 2,000 
Mr. W. A. Carlisle 2,000 
Mr. U. Davis Hunnicutt 2,000 
Mr. Robert T. Lyles 2,000 
Mr. William C. Lyles, Jr. 8,000 
Other 4,000 



Mr. Gordon McCabe 
89 Woodvale Avenue 
Greenville, South Carolina 



Mr. E. S. McKissick, Jr. 

c/o Alice Manufacturing Company 

Box 392 

Easley, South Carolina 29640 



Mr. Buck Mickel 

201 Boxvjood Lane 

Greenville, South Carolina 29601 



Mr. Roger Milliken 

234 South Fairview Avenue 

Spartanburg, South Carolina 



Mr. Walter S. Montgomery 
c/o Spartan Mills 
Spartanburg, South Carolina 



Mr. John S. Reaves 
710 South Petty Street 
Gaffney, South Carolina 29340 



Mr. James C. Self 

c/o Greenwood Mills 

Drawer 1017 

Greenwood, South Carolina 29646 



Ms. Gloria W. Smith 
617 North Street 
Greenwood, South Carolina 



1.000 



15.000 



3,000 * 



84,000 



20,000 



1,000 * 



18.000 



18.000 



10331 



TENNESSEE 



SOUTH CAROLINA 



Mr. Rodman T. Sprulll 

Route 3 

Laurens Highway, Box 123A 

Clinton, South Carolina 29325 



Mr. Richard C. Thomson 

614 Lyman Street 

Gaffney, South Carolina 29340 



2,000 



1,000 * 



Mr. J. Bayard Boyle 
Box 601 

Memphis, Tennessee 



Mr. Jack Bush 

RFD 4 

Dandridge, Tennessee 



Mr. Everett R. Cook 
P. Box 16092 
Memphis, Tenn. 



1,000 



2,000 * 



2,500 * 



Mr. Robert P. Timmerman 
c/o Graniteville Company 
Granlteville, South Carolina 29829 



Mr. Robert H. Vance 

c/o Clinton Mills 

Clinton, South Carolina 29325 



5,000 73 



12,000 



Dixie Yams, Inc. 
P. Box 751 

Chattanooga, Tenn. 37401 

Mr. Robert T. Davis, Jr. 3,000 
Mr. J. Burton Frierson 9,000 
Mr. A. Ward Peacock 3,000 



15,000 T 



Mr. Hubert Fisher 
P. 0. Box 16902 
Memphis, Tenn. 



2,500 * 



Mr. Frank Jones 
P. 0. Box 16902 
Memphis, Tenn. 38116 



2,500 * 



Mr. Winston Handwerker 
P. 0. Box 16902 
Memphis, Tenn. 38116 



2,500 * 



Mr. Jack C. Massey 

3rd National Bank Building 

Nashville, Tenn. 37219 



249,999.96 



Mr. Richard C. Thatcher, Jr. 
Seven Bartram Road 
Lookout Mountain, Tenn. 



4,000 * 



Wilson Family ^j\ „ 

4343 Glen Eden Drive 
Nashville, Tenn. 37205 
Mr. David K. Wilson 
Mrs. Anne Potter Wilson 



100,OOOT 



25,000 
25,000 
Mrs. Valerie Blair Potter 50,000 



10332 



TENNESSEE 



TEXAS 



Mr. Justin P. Wilson 
95 White Britige Road 
Nashville, Tenn. 



1,000 * Mrs. James H. Clement 
King Ranch 
Klngsvllle, Texas 



2,000* 



TEXAS 



Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Allen 
P. 0. Box 1212 
Houston, Texas 77001 



Mr. Robert H. Allen 

Gulf Resources & Chemical Corp. 

2125 Tenneco Building 

Houston, Texas 77002 7''3.-2i7-j 



2,000 



100,000 73 



Mr. Isaac Arnold, Jr. 
500 Jefferson Building 
Houston, Texas 



Mr. Isaac Arnold 

500 Jefferson Building 

Houston, Texas 



Mrs. Holt Atherton 

315 Westover 

San Antonio, Texas 78209 



Mr. & Mrs. Perry Bass 
45 Westover Road 
Ft. Worth, Texas 



Mr. Bernard L. Brown 
5707 Meletio Lane 
Dallas, Texas 

( 

Mr. Edgar W. Brown, Jr. ^\'^' 
P. 0. Box 400 
Orange, Texas 60670 



Mr. George R. Brown 
P. 0. Box 3 
Houston, Texas 77001 



Mr. John B. Butler 

2138 Bank of the Southwest 

Houston, Texas 77002 



■y 



10,000 



11,000 



3,000* 



20,000 73 



1,125* 



150,000 



9.958.04 



1,000* 



Mr. R. M. Collie 
Chairman, Incora Inc. 
Houston, Texas 



Mr. Earl Combest 
2020 Live Oak 
Dallas, Texas 



Mr. Eugene Constanln, Jr. 
2807 Mercantile Bank Building 
Dallas, Texas 75201 



Mr. Harry H. Cullen 
Cullen Center Bank & Trust 
Houston, Texas 



Mr. Roy H. Cullen 

Cullen Center Bank S Trust 

Houston, Texas 



Mr. Omer A. Dreiling 
1709 Christoval Road 
San Angelo, Texas 



Mr. Samuel C. Dunlap II 
420 Wiltshire Avenue 
San Antonio, Texas 



1,000 73 



1,000* 



1,000* 



10,000 



11,000 



1,000* 



1,000* 



Mr. W. E. Dyche, Jr. 1,000 

1200 Houston First Savings Building 
Houston, Texas 77002 



Mr. Harrell Edmund Chiles 
P. 0. Box 186 
Fort Worth Texas 



Mr. Hubert M. Eitel 
7118 Elmrldge Drive 
Dallas, Texas 



3,000* 



1,125* 



10333 



TEXAS 



Mr. James A. Elklns 
Vinson, Elkins, Searls i Smith 
1st City National Bank Building 
Houston, Texas 77001 



Mr. John E. Elliott 
1122 Colorado Street 
Austin, Texas 



Mr. Albert Bel Fay 
515 Houston Avenue 
Houston, Texas 77007 



15,00' 



1,000* 



30,2«1.99 



73 TEXAS 



Mr. Ernest Bel Fay 2,000* 

230A First City National Bank Building 
Houston, Texas 77002 



Mr. Herbert J. Frensley 9,759.63 T 

P. 0. Box 3 4,759.63 

Houston, Texas 5,000.00 73 



Mr. and Mrs. John A. Gillin 
1049 1 Main Place 
Dallas, Texas 75250 



Mr. Jake Hamon 
4738 Shadyuood Lane 
Dallas, Texas 75209 



Mr. William C. Marvin 
3000 1 Shell Plaza 
Houston, Texas 



Mr. Howard Hughes 
Texas 



5,000* 



25,000 73 



1,000* 



16,666.66 



Mr. Bernard G. Johnson 
5050 Westheiner 
Houston, Texas 77027 



Mr. Howard Keck 
P. 0. Box 1521 
Houston, Texas 



Mr. Baine P. Kerr 
900 Southwest Tower 
Houston, Texas 



Mr. W. S. Kilroy 

1908 First City National Bank Bldg. 

Houston, Texas 



1,500* 



10,000 



1,000* 



6,000 



Mr. Robert Kleberg 
King Ranch 
Kingsville, Texas 



Mr. and Mrs. William H. Lane 
2157 Troon Road 
Houston, Texas 



Mr. Theodore N. Law 
3701 Allen Parkway 
P. 0. Box 33A8 
Houston, Texas 77001 



Mr. Harding L. Lawrence 

Chairman of the Board and President 

Braniff Airways, Inc. 

Braniff Airway Bldg. 

Dallas, Texas 75235 



100,000 



24,000 73 14.0 



14,000 



50,000 73 



Mr. Joseph C. Hutcheson III 

2157 Troon Road 

Houston, Texas ^ 



Mr. G. Jewell, Jr. 
3000 1 Shell Plaza 
Houston, Texas 



1,000* 



1,000* 



Mr. and Mrs. J. Hugh Liedtke 
5561 Briar Drive 
Houston, Texas 77027 

and 
Mr. William C. Liedtke, Jr. 
3 Longbow Lane 
Houston, Texas 77024 



23,348.61 



31-889 O - 74 - pt. 22 - 10 



10334 



TEXAS 



TEXAS 



Mr. Louis Linenberger 
Box 670 
Bastrop, Texas 



1,000* f^r. Clint Murchison & Mr. John Hurchison 50 qqq 73 
Dallas Covboys Professional Football Team 
5738 N. Central Expressway 
Dallas, Texas 



Employees of Ling-Temco-Vought 95,250 

Box 5003 

Dallas, Texas 75222 



Mr. John T. Maglnnls 1,000* 

2157 Troon Road 
Houston, Texas 



Mr. Forbes J. Mann 1,500* 

5106 Shadywood Lane 
Dallas, Texas 



Mr. L. F. McCollum 2,000 

P. 0. Box 2081 
Houston, Texas 



Mr. James McDonald 1,500* 

1709 Victory Street 
Wichita Falls, Texas 76301 



Mr. Samuel G. Heason 2,000* 

2232 S. Plney Point 
Houston, Texas 



Mr. Gerald M. Monroe 1,000* 

120A Canterbury Court 
Arlington, Texas 



Mr. John J. Moran 101,008.23 

7920 Westpark Drive 
P. 0. Box 36329 
Houston, Texas 



Mr. Hugh Neuhaus n 574.94 

The Houston Club Bldg. 

724 Travis 

Houston, Texas 77002 



Mr. Alvln G. Padilla, Jr. j 000* 

711 Serenade 

San Antonio, Texas 



Mr. Lawrence S. Reed j 000* 

506 Bank of the SW Building 
Houston, Texas 77002 



Mr. G. L. Rowsey 1,000* 

P. 0. Box 127 

Center Point, Texas 78010 



Mr. Fayez Sarofim y 000* 

1405 First City National Bank 
Houston, Texas 



Mr. Dudley Sharp 1,000* 

109 North Post Oak Lane 
Houston, Texas 



Brigadier General Thomas P. Stafford j 500 73 

435 Bayou Drive 

El Lago, Sea Brook, Texas 77586 



Mr. Perry Stevens 1 gOO* 

P. 0. Box 341 
Fredericksburg, Texas 



Mr. Robert Mosbacher 
1300 Main Street 
Houston, Texas 77002 



24,675.00 



Mr. Peter P. Stewart 
Stewart Company 
428 Meadows Building 
Dallas, Texas 75205 



1,000 



/ 



10335 



TEXAS 



UTAH 



Employees of Texas Eastern Trans. 
P. 0. Box 2521 
Houston, Texas 77001 
(President - George F. Kirby) 



Eiaployees of Texas Instruments 
P. 0. Box W74 
Dallas, Texas 75222 

Constructive Citizenship Program 1,500 

Mr. & Mrs. Cecil Green 24,692.09 

3908 Lexington Avenue 
Dallas, Texas 75205 



Mr. Patrick E. Haggerty 13,797.91 

5455 Northbrook Drive 
Dallas, Texas 75220 

Mr. J. Eric Jonsson 26,013.16 

3300 Republic Bank 
Dallas, Texas 75201 

Mr. Eugene McDermott 26,013.17 

13500 North Central Expressway 
P.O. Box 5474 
Dallas, Texas 75222 

Mr. Mark Shepherd, Jr. 9,913.65 

5006 Middlegate Road 
Dallas, Texas 75229 



30,000 



111,949 T 



Mr. Dan O'Laurie 
P. 0. Box 666 
Moab, Utah 



2,500 * 



Mr. J. K. Wheeler 1,000 * 

330 West 21st South Street 
Salt Lake City, Utak 



TERMONT 



Hiss Mary Porter 
Corner House 
Manchester, Vermont 



1,000 73 1.0 
1,500* 



Mr. Harry C. Wiess 
2 Sunset Road 
Houston, Texas 



3,000* 



Mr. 0. S. Wyatt, Jr. 

Coastal States Gas Producing Company 
Lincoln Liberty Life Bldg. 
Houston, Texas 77002 



22,512.41 



Mr. Toddie L. Wynne 
First National Bank 
Athens , Texas 



50,000 



10336 



VIRGINIA 



WASHINGTON 



Mr.' Robert Bain 
Arlington Towers 
Arlington, Va. 



1,000* Mr.- Lawrence Arnold 
P. O. Box 3586 
Seattle, Wash. 



1,000 * 



Mr. George Cartledge, Sr. 
35 Campbell Avenue S. W. 
Roanoke, Va. 



1,000 * Mr. Norton Clapp 
1616 Norton Bldg. 
Seattle, Wash. 



2,500 * 



Mr. Raymond R. Guest 
Powhatten Plantation 
King George, Va. 



200,000 



Mr. & Mrs. R. P. 
P. O. Box 157 
Seattle Wash. 



Everard 



2,000 * 



Mr. John W. Hanes, Jr. 
P. 0. Box 64 
Great Falls, Va. 



1,000 * Mrs. David W. Gaiser 
612 Sumner Avenue 
Spokane, Washington 



1,000 * 



Mr. D. L. Jordan 
2438 Robin Hood Road 
Roanoke, Va. 



1,000 * Mr. Robert A. Schmidt 

Olympia Brewing Company 
Olympia, Washington 



1,000 



Mr. Larence Lewis, Jr. 
P. 0. Box 432 
Richmond, Va. 



100,000 Mr. Mark Smith 

415 First Avenue North 
Seattle, Washington 



4,000 



Mr. Wingate Lucas 
Box 222 
Bristol, Va. 



1,000 * Employees of Time Oil 
2737 W. Commodore Way 
Seattle, Washington 



25,000 



Mr. & Mrs. Paul Mellon 
Oak Spring 
Upperville, Va. 2,000* 



50,000 Mr. F. Tltcomb 

502 North Stadium Way 
Tacoma, Washington 



1,000 * 



Mr. and Yxtd. Richard Short 1,000 * Mr. George H. Weyerhaeuser 25,000 
P. 0. Box 933 Weyerhaeuser Company 

Virginia Beach, Va. Tacoma, Washington 



Mrs. James L. Wiley 1,000 * 
Gordonsdale Farm 
The Plains, Va. 

W. Donald Brewer 1,000 * 

9011 Old Dominion Drive 
McLean, Virginia 



10337 



WISCONSIN 



HOUSE ACCOUNT 



Mr. Victor Braun 

5481 South Packard Avenue 

Cudahy, His. 



Mr. Samuel C. Johnson 
1525 Howe Street 
Racine, Wis. 



Mr. George L. Meyer, Sr. 
1610 N. Prospect Avenue 
Milwaukee, Wise. 53202 



Mr. Robert A. Paliafito 
Box 351 
Milwaukee, Wis. 



1,000 * M.P. 

Milk Producers Association 



232,500 



4,000 * 



1,000 



30,110.68 



T.A.P.E. 

P. 0. Box 32287 

San Antonio, Texas 78216 

A.D.E.P.T. 
Springfield, Missouri 

S.P.A.C.E. 
Kentucky Trust 
508 Portland Dldg. 
Louisville, Kentucky 40202 



Mr. Lloyd Smith 1,000 * 

8415 North Pelican Lane 
Milwaukee, Wis. 

Mr. Carl E. Steiger 1,000 * 
645 Wisconsin Street 
Oshkosh, Wis. 

PUERTO RICO 



Mr. Thomas J. Bannon 
31882 Camino Capistrano 
San Juan, Puerto Rico 



1,000* 



Honorable Luis A. Ferre 

CPO Box 4487 

San Juan, Puerto Rico 



1,000* 



Rene Herandez 
106 Hato Rey 
Puerto Rico 



1,000* 



Mr. Gerardo Perez 

P. 0. Box 761 

Hato Rey, Puerto Rico 



1,000* 



Mr. Jose Luis Perez 

P. 0. Box 761 

Hato Rey, Puerto Rico 



1,000* 



10338 



FOREIGN COUNTRIES 



FOREIGN COUNTRIES 



The Honorable and Mrs. Halter A. Annenberg 
The American Embassy 250,000 

London, England 



Mr. & Mrs. Joseph C. Petrone, Jr. 
2 Avenue de Villars 
75 Paris, France 



3,000*-' 



Mr. Albert R. Broccoli 
2 South Audlcy St. 
Mayfalr, London, England 



Mr. Charles J. Politis 
10,000 3 Mltropoleos 
Athens, Greece 



2,500*. 



The Honorable Henry E. Catto, Jr. 

110 East Crockett, S. E. 25,000 

San Antonio, Texas 78205 

American Embassy 

San Salvador, El Salvador 



The Honorable Shelby C. Davis 

American Embassy 100,000 

Geneva Switzerland 



Mr. Clarence Dauphinot 

P. 0. Box N-3229 2,500* 

Nassau, Bahamas 



Mr. Nicholas Varvinoganis 
2 Karageorgl Servias Str. 
Athens T.T. 125, Greece 



15,000 



300,000- 



The Honorable Arthur K. Watson 
American Embassy 
Paris, France 

I v_ too, 00 0' 

eoui.b,Tht Hc>^.\H£.<>. K/M&DO/0^:>r. / 



c/,s^r^< '" ii-c.:? 



The Honorable Joseph T. Farland 

American Embassy 10,000 

Tehran, Iran 



The Honorable John P. Humes 
American Embassy 
Vienna, Austria 



100,000 



Mr. Spyros A. Metaxa 

Klfissia 

Athens, Greece 



10,000 



Mr. Ramon Nolan 
Philippines Sugar Industry 
North Avenue 
Queson City, Philippines 



25,000 



Mrs. C. M. Peck 
Swords Company 
Dublin, Ireland 



1,000* 



10339 



Woods Exhibit No. 3 
THE WHITE HOUSE 

WA S H I N G T O N 

October 7, I97I 



ME'I0RANDU14 FOR JOHN W. DEAN, III. 

FROM: . JACK CAULFtt^^; 

SUBJECT: BALLOT .S^i?5uRI'iy^F0R 1972 ( SUPPLg'iB IT TO 
EARLIER MH-:Q ON '72 SECURITY NEaPS) 

This is in the form of a reminder. The President has very 
strong views on this subject emanating from the '60 
campaign. 

I ara strongly recommending that Joe Woods be placed in charge 
of the nationwide effort in this, regard. Juliana has 
considerable experience in this area resulting from his in- 
volvment with Lou Nichols in '68. He can be quite helpful 
in getting Joe started. 

The President gave Joe personal instructions in this regard 
in '68 and, as I have indicated, delayed a flight out of 
Chicago in October '68 to go over the matter in detail. I 
am sure he would agree with ray recommendation. 

r 

Oil Indiana - out of Chicago) is also expert and was deeply 
involved in '68 in both ballot security and absentee ballots 
overseas. I sun sure the A.G. is fajniliar with this subject. 
He should be apprised of ir.y recommendation and the information 
(Juliana )_ that Lou Nichols dees not wish to be so involved 
this time. 

NOTE: ■ " • 

Just occured to me. Has anyone considered the potential for 
fraud vis a vis the l3 year old vote on campuses? Mardian 
might be the guy to take a hard look at that possibility! 



SATURDAY, MARCH 23, 1974 

U.S. Senate, 
Select Committee on 
Presidential Campaign Activities, 

Washington^ D.C. 

The Select Committee met, pursuant to notice, at 10:15 a.m., in 
room G-334, Eussell Senate Office Building. 

Present: Terry F. Lenzner, assistant chief counsel; Marc Lack- 
ritz, assistant majority counsel; Emily Sheketoff, research assistant. 

Mr. Lackritz. This is a continuation of an executive session that 
was begun last Saturday morning with Mr. Jack Caulfield. 

Mr. Caulfield, I would like to remind you that you are still under 
oath before the Senate Select Committee and ask your attorney if he 
has any objection to a Senator not being present in this morning's 
session ? 

Mr. Sears. No ; I do not. 

Mr. Lackritz. First, I would like to ask just a general question, 
Mr. Caulfield. Do you have an3i:hing to change or add to your 
testimony of last Saturday morning? Is there anything you would 
like to add to that ? 

TESTIMONY OF JACK CAULFIELD, ACCOMPANIED BY 
JOHN P. SEARS, COUNSEL 

Mr. Caulfield. No. 

Mr. Lackritz. I would like for you to turn to tab 31 * in the exhibit 
marked "Exhibit 1," I guess, from last Saturday, which is entitled 
"Operation Sandwedge." I would like for you to turn to page 5 again 
where you discuss the offensive capabilities of this proposal, and ask 
you again, item B, which refers to a "black bag" capability, could 
you describe again what that entailed, at least as far as you under- 
stood it? 

Mr. CAULFpLD. As I indicated last week, the intention of "B" 
under "offensive" referred to a proposal which would have allowed 
a discreet carrying of moneys in secure fashion during the primaries 
or during the campaign itself. It had come to my attention that there 
had been a significant amount of moneys that were to be transported 

• See Book 21, p. 9903. 

(10341) 



1Q342 

during the course of a given campaign, and the proposal suggested 
a security capability which would have allowed the carrying of those 
moneys to and from whatever offices might be involved in a secure 
fashion. 

Mr. Lackritz. I see, and that is the sum and substance of what a 
"black bag" capability is? 

Mr. Catjlfield. That is what my intention was in putting that 
down, and I would like to reiterate that I was never really given the 
opportunity to discuss any of the suggestions and proposals here. 

As everyone knows, Operation Sandwedge as proposed did not ever 
materialize. 

Mr. Lackritz. All right. "Who did you initially envision to be the 
partners in this operation? 

Mr. Catjlfield. If it were approved there were a number of names 
that were proposed that might participate in the proposal. I think 
further on in the memo I suggested the names of individuals that 
might be considered. Let's see, I indicate here a gentleman by the 
name of Joseph Woods, Mr. Vernon Acree. 

Mr. Lackritz. That is ISIike Acree, right ? 

Mr. Catjlfield. Yes. 

Mr. Lackritz. All right. Who else, that may not be listed there ? 

Mr. Catjlfield. I also considered, but did not put in the document, 
the possibility of a gentleman by the name of Roger Barth, who 
might have been an attorney to be connected with the proposed cor- 
poration. 

Mr. Lackritz. How about Mr. Ulasewicz? 

Mr. Catjlfield. Mr. Ulasewicz would have been considered to per- 
form investigative duties in connection with the proposal as well 
as myself. 

Mr. Lackritz. What were Mr. Ulasewicz' responsibilities going to 
be in this operation. Was he not going to head up the New York part 
of the operation? 

Mr. Cattlfteld. T am just looking for that section that refers to that. 
Mr. Ulasewicz, if he — if this thing had materialized — would have 
been considered for the area indicated "offensive" on page 5. 

Mr. Lackritz. I see, and why would Mr. Ulasewicz be considered 
for this particular responsibility? 

Mr. Catjlfield. I think it is fair to say that his background would 
have allowed him an opportunity to participate in the gathering of 
political intelligence. 

Mr. Lackritz. Because of the work he had done for you in the 
previous couple of years and his other background? 

Mr. Catjlfield. Yes ; his background in the New York City Police 
Department. 

Mr. Lackritz. On the following page, on page 6 in the bottom 
paragraph, you talk about "the offensive involvement outlined above." 
You discuss an individual that you just referred to as your source. 
You said, "my source would be charged with setting up and super- 
vising this operation." 

Mr. Catjlfield. Yes. T was referring there potentially to Mr. Ulas- 
ewicz. 



10343 

Mr. Lackritz. I see. I take it you never used Mr. Ulasewicz' name 
in any memorandums you wrote ? 

Mr. Catjlfield. No ; I did not. 

Mr. Lackritz. And when you referred to Mr. Ulasewicz in these 
memorandums, did you generally refer to him as your source? 

Mr. Cattlfield. If it were appropriate to do so; yes. 

Mr. Lackritz. All right. Now, under each of the individuals that 
you have listed later on in the memo, the first item that you have 
listed under their names is "cover." AVhat did you mean by "cover"? 
For example, for yourself, for Mr. Woods, for ISIr. Acree? 

Mr. Catjlfield. Well, if I can just comment on the document in 
its totality so that it is understood what the aim and purpose of the 
document was, as I viewed it, the thrust of the whole concept in 
actuality was to attempt to establish — and T have indicated this in 
other forums in a rather self-serving fashion, an in-place private 
detective organization which, following the campaign, would be 
ready to engage in private detective work in the private sector, and 
I viewed this document as a selling document designed to interest 
people in the concept. And the document was written primarily with 
that in mind to create interest on the part of people who might con- 
ceivably be interested in some of the proposals outlined here. It was 
written in that fashion to create interest. Now, when you get down 
to the word "cover." in effect this was part of the selling procedure 
and the implication that the whole matter was clandestine in fashion 
is unfortunate because of the way it now reads 3 years later. 

Mr. Lackritz. Do you mean to say you do not feel this was going 
to be a clandestine operation? 

Mr. Sears. I think it is fair to say that he felt he was attempting 
to get approval to set up a corporation that would do this kind of 
work, but that would not be known publicly, necessarily. The major 
function they would be performing for at least the next year or 2, 
or whatever it would have been, was in relation to security involved 
in the Republican campaign. 

Mr. Lackritz. I understand that. 

Mr, Sears. So in the sense of the word "cover" as used here, I think 
it was more in that line of thinking, that there would be no public 
announcement that this new corporation was to function as totally 
in control of the security of this organization. 

So the word "cover" here I think was probably used to indicate 
that there were substantial reasons on the parts of all of the people 
that would be involved — why they would be setting up an independent 
organization. 

Mr. Lackritz. T understand that. Mr. Sears. I guess my only ques- 
tion to Mr. Caulfield is that, in other words, it was your hope that 
this organization would be clandestine in the sense that it would not 
be a public operation in terms of its functions and personnel and 
operations? Is that correct? 

Mr. Catjlfield. Yes ; I think that is a fair description. 

Mr. Lackritz. Did you have any discussions with any of the indi- 
viduals, either named in this document or Mr. Ulasewicz or Mr. 
Barth, about settinjr up this private security ? 

Mr. Caulfield. T had discussions with Mr. Woods, Mr. Acree, Mr. 
Barth, and to a lesser degree with Mr. Ulasewicz on the concept of 



10344 

a private security entity that would function during a campaign and 
be in place to conduct business following the 1972 campaign. 

Mr. Lackrttz. Did you ever discuss this matter with Mr. Miles 
Ambrose ? 

Mr. Caulfield. I discussed the concept of a private detective agen- 
cy with INIr. Miles Ambrose, but I never discussed the concept as 
outlined in this document with Mr. Ambrose. 

Mr. Lackritz. I see. In other words, prior to this time you had 
thought about and discussed it with other indi^^duals. the formation 
of a private detective or security agency. 

Mr. Caulfield. For some time prior to the writing of this docu- 
ment I have had significant and substantial discussions with not only 
Mr. Ambrose, but with other people. This was my intent upon leaving 
the White House, to set up a private detective organization and 
flowing from those conversations and that type of thinking was, as I 
have indicated iust a few minutes ago, the concept that upon conclu- 
sion of my Federal service I would like to be associated with a 
private security organization in the private sector. And again, I 
viewed the timing of this document and the way it was written as an 
opportunity to accomplish that, and I do admit that it was highly 
self-serving in this fashion, attempting to interest the people who 
were about to ga into the 1972 campaign. 

Mr. Lackritz. Right, I understand. 

Mr. Catjlfield. OK. 

Mr. Lackritz. Let me ask you this : Did you discuss this particular 
concept with either INIr. Woods, INIr. Acree, Mr. Barth, or Mr. Ulas- 
ewicz, before you drafted this document? 

Mr. Sears. TMien you say "this particular concept," do you mean 
this document in its entirety? 

Mr. Lackritz. I mean the concept of the security entity for the 
purposes of the 1972 campaign. 

Mr. Cattlfield. Yes, I did. 

Mr. Lackritz. When did you first discuss this with any of these 
individuals? 

Mr. Caulfield. That would be very difficult for me to put a date on. 
It was just as I have indicated, there were ongoing general conver- 
sations about a security entity, the 1972 campaign, the need for 
security during the 1972 campaign and in that context prior to 
writing the document, I did discuss it. 

Mr. Lackritz. Who did you discuss it with first? Do you recall? 

Mr. Caulfield. No, I do not recall. 

Mr. Lackritz. Did vou discuss it very often with Mr. Ulasewicz? 

Mr. Caulfield. Well, I discussed it with Mr, Ulasewicz, the con- 
cept of a future private security organization in social conversation 
on a number of occasions, yes. 

Mr. Lackritz. Well, did you have a meeting with any of these in- 
dividuals to discuss this particular concept? 

Mr. Caulfield. Yes, we had one meeting some time during the 
summer of 1971 where this concept was discussed.. 

Mr. Lackritz. And who was present at this meeting? 

Mr. Caui.field. Myself, Mr. Barth, Mr. Acree, and Mr. Woods. 

Mr. Lackritz. Mr. Ulasewicz Avas not present? 



10345 

Mr. Caulfield. Mr. Ulasewicz was not present. 

Mr. Lackritz. During what part of the summer was this meeting? 
Was it toward the end of the summer, do you recall? 

Mr. Caulfield. I believe it was toward the end of the summer, 
as best I can recall. 

ISIr. Lackritz. By this time had you drafted this particular docu- 
ment entitled "Operation Sandwedge?" 

Mr. Caulfield. I am not certain whether that was drafted before 
or after. I could not put a time on when this was drafted and when 
that conversation took place. I have difficulty narrowing that down. 

Mr. Lackritz. In other words, all of the items that would have 
been mentioned in this document would have arisen in the discussion 
you had that day either as proposals or the fact that they had 
already been drafted on the document? 

Mr. Caulfield. I do not know if we ever got into those specifics. 

Mr. Sears. Were your discussions with them more in line with 
whether they would be interested in participating in something like 
this, or in line of getting suggestions from them on what to put in 
such a document? \Vhich would you say that they were? 

Mr. Caulfield. I have difficulty remembering which came first, the 
chicken or the egg. I just do not recall. I do not know the exact 
date of the document and I do not know the exact date of our meet- 
ing. I do know that we discussed the possibility of this entity going 
forward. I do know that I had some conversations with Mr. John 
Dean about it and whether or not this was already written as a 
proposal or was about to be written as a proposal at the time of the 
meeting with Mr. Barth, Mr. Acree, and Mr. Woods, I do not know. 

Mr. Lackritz. Did Mr. Acree indicate any interest in participat- 
ing in this kind of an operation ? 

Mr. Caulfield. Yes, he did and Mr. Barth did and Mr. Woods 
did, but it was all very iffy, the "iffy" being whether or not there 
was going to be interest in supporting it financially and that was 
always up in the air and eventually it came to pass that there was 
no interest on the part of the people that Mr. Dean was talking to. 

Mr. Lackritz. But you say all of these people were interested in 
joining in this kind of organization? 

Mr. Caulfield. I think it is fair to say that these people were 
interested in the concept of a private security firm being in place 
following the campaign and participating in an organization that 
would have directed itself to private security requirements during 
the course of the campaign. It was on that basis that the discussions 
took place and there was general agreement that yes, everyone was 
interested and if funding could be obtained, these people would be 
willing to participate, providing the funding was substantial enough. 

Mr. liACKRiTZ. Did you discuss where the funding was going to 
come from? 

Mr. Caulfield. It was to be assumed as proposed in the docu- 
ment that a number of corporations would retain the new corpora- 
tion and the moneys coming off those retainers would be used to 
establish the emerging corporation. 

Mr. Lackritz. In other words, some of the specific ideas in this 
document were discussed at that meeting you had with these other 
individuals, such as where funding was going to come from? 



10346 

Mr. Caulfield. Such as where funding was going to come from — 
yes. I do not know if we got into the specific details as contained in the 
proposal. 

Mr. Lackritz. How did you decide to enlist the aid of Joe Woods 
in this proposal? 

Mr. Caulfield. If this entity was to be funded in substantial 
fashion, there would have been, as I envisioned it, for the principals, 
a rather substantial salary for each of the principals, and Mr. 
Woods is the father of 11 children. He is a friend of mine. 

Mr. Lackritz. How did you meet him, Mr. Caulfield? 

Mr. Caulfield. I met him through the course of the 1968 cam- 
paign and, of course, I am a close friend of his sisters and he, as I 
understood it, he had gone into the private security field in Chicago 
and I felt if there were funding for the corporation proposal, that 
this would be an appropriate way to give him an opportunity to 
enlarge his security business out in Chicago. 

Mr. Lackritz. I see. So you broached the subject with Mr. Woods 
as a security concern primarily, is that correct? 

Mr. Caulfield. That is correct. 

Mr. Lackritz. It was never discussed as a public relations organi- 
zation, was it? 

Mr. Caulfield. Public relations organization? 

Mr. Lackritz. It was primarily a security operation, not a public 
relations operation? 

Mr. Caulfield. That is correct. 

Mr. Lackritz. Did you discuss this particular proposal with Rose 
Mary Woods? 

Mr. Caulfield. Only in the sense that I indicated, that I was 
interested in establishing a security entity, and that if I could get 
funding for it, I would be looking to offer a principal position to 
her brother. I did mention that to her. 

Mr. Lackritz. Did you explain to her what the functions of this 
security organization would possibly be in the upcoming campaign? 

Mr. Caulfield. If I did, it would only be in general terms. I do 
not recall ever going into specifics with her. 

Mr. Lackritz. Did you discuss it with her on more than one 
occasion ? 

Mr. Caulfield. Only in the sense that I think Joe Woods came 
in one time to that meeting that I just referred to and I indicated 
that we had met and were discussing the corporate proposal. 

Mr. Lackritz. What was her reaction to this proposal? Did she 
encourage it? 

Mr. Caulfield. I think she was noncommittal. It was something 
she stayed out of. 

Mr. Lackritz. Do you know if she gave any advice to her brother 
about whether or not to get involved in this? 

Mr. Caulfield. I do not know. 

Mr. Lackritz. Do you recall ever going out to dinner or lunch 
with Miss Woods and her brother to discuss the formation of a 
private security entity? 

Mr. Caulfield. I have been to Miss Woods' house with her 
brother and her sister-in-law present, but I never recall — I know 



10347 

for a fact that I never went out to lunch with the two of them 
specifically to discuss this. 

Mr. Lackritz. How frequently have you been to her house? 

Mr. Caulfield. It is difficult to say. 

Mr. Lackritz. On more than one occasion? 

Mr. Caulfield. Yes; more than one occasion. 

Mr. Lackritz. You say you have been to her house on more than 
one occasion? 

Mr. Caulfield. Yes; on a social basis. 

Mr. Lackritz. And you were present at her home with her brother 
and sister-in-law on one occasion that you recall specifically? 

Mr. Caulfield. Yes. It is possible that it came up at that time, 
but I don't believe so. I think Mr. Woods and his wife were in, just 
visiting Washington and I was invited over. 

Mr. Lackritz. When was that, do you recall? 

[Mr. Caulfield nods in the negative.] 

Mr. Lackritz. Was it at this time that Mr. Woods came in and 
met with you at your home? 

[Mr. Caulfield nods in the negative.] 

Mr. Lackritz. It definitely was not? 

Mr. Caulfield. No, I am saying I don't recall. If you are asking 
for dates in this time frame I just don't have them. I would say I 
recall being at the house and Joe Woods and his wife being there 
and I was invited over. A couple of other people were there, but I 
don't remember. 

Mr. Lackritz. You mentioned earlier that you were very good 
friends with Miss Woods. Did you see her on a frequent basis from 
the time you began working in the White House? 

Mr. Caulfield. Well, we were both employees of the White House. 
Yes; I saw her very frequently. 

Mr. Lackritz. And did she understand basically what your re- 
sponsibilities were in your job? 

Mr. Caulfield. That is a tough question. As you know I handled 
a number of matters across the board, some having to do with law 
enforcement. She knew that I worked \^ry closely with the Secret 
Service and with law enforcement matters. I think that was her 
understanding of my role. 

Mr. Lackritz. Did you ever discuss with her what kind of activ- 
ities you were responsible for, what kind of activities you were 
getting involved in? 

Mr. Caulfield. I did not get into that with Miss Woods. 

Mr. Lackritz. For example, did she have any understanding that 
you were conducting any investigations? 

Mr. Caulfield. Well, she could have made that assumption, but 
I have no recollection of discussing any specifics with her. 

Mr. Lackritz. Did she know or did you ever tell her that you 
had employed a private investigator in the private sector to carry 
out certain investigations? 

Mr. Caulfield. I have no recollection of ever mentioning that 
to her. 

Mr. Lackritz. Did you ever tell her about the fact that you had 
an individual who would get certain kinds of political information 
for you? 



10348 

Mr. Caulfield. I do not ever recall discussing — you are referring 
obviously to Mr. UlasGwicz. I don't ever recall discussing Mr. Ulase- 
wicz with Miss Woods. 

Mr. Lackritz. Did you ever go to her to ask her for information 
for the purpose of — in pursuit of an investigation that you were 
conducting ? 

Mr. Caulfield. The only thing that I can recall in that context 
was one time that was concern for the whereabouts of young 
Donald Nixon, and if I am not mistaken, I think we discussed his 
whereabouts and if I am not mistaken, Mr. Ehrlichman had asked 
if Mr. Ulasewicz could determine where young Donald Nixon was. 
And I think that she had some information indicating that he might 
have been out in California and I discussed with her the details 
that she had, so that Mr. Ulasewicz's job might be easier in locating 
young Donald Nixon. 

Mr. Lackritz. Did you explain to her the purpose for your asking 
this information? 

Mr. Caulfield. I don't understand the question. 

Mr. Lackritz Did you say, "I need this information because I 
am trying to find him and get him out of trouble," or did you tell 
her that you understood that he was in some trouble, or did you 
explain to her any of your reasons for wanting to know his where- 
abouts ? 

Mr. Caulfield. I do not recall specifically, but if Mr. Ehrlichman 
had asked me to locate young Donald Nixon and Rose Woods had 
some information as to where he might be, I would have explained 
that to her in order to more quickly get to the bottom of where he 
was and what he was doing. 

Mr. Lackritz. Did you explain to her that you had someone 
else who was going to try and go out and find him ? 

Mr. Caulfield. Yes, but I am fairly certain I did not indicate 
any who, what, when, and where. 

Mr. Lackritz. But, in other words, there was an individual that 
you did not identify — that you said you were going to have to find 
him and get him out of trouble? 

Mr. Caulfield. I am not sure I put it that way. I'm not sure in 
my mind whether I said, "I have an individual," or "I have the 
capability to make an inquiry where Donald Nixon is." You know, 
that is just a blur in my mind. 

Mr. Lackritz. But it would have been one of those kinds of 
comments. 

Mr. Caulfield. In all likelihood; yes. 

Mr. Lackritz. And I take it she was helpful on that occasion? 

Mr. Caulfield. Yes; she obviously has been very close to the 
family and would have had access to that information. 

Mr. Lackritz. During what period of time was this request to 
find young Donald Nixon? Do you recall that? 

Mr. Caulfield. I haven't the foggiest. 

Mr. Lackritz. Was it before or after you asked to monitor that 
Secret Service project — the Secret Service project involving the 
surveillance of Donald Nixon? 



10349 

Mr. Caulfield. I think it was probably after. It was the sum- 
mertime, as I recall, and my guess would be in the summer of 1971 — 
no, no; it would probably be the summer of 1970, but I don't have 
the foggiest notion of the date at this time. 

Mr. L/ACKRiTZ. Did you ever tell Miss Woods about the Secret 
Service project that you were involved in monitoring? 

Mr. Caulfield. Not that I recall. 

Mr. Lackritz. Do you have any knowledge that Miss Woods 
was aware of that project at the time it was going on? 

Mr. Caulfield. None specifically. She might have been. 

Mr. Lackritz. Did you ever get back to Miss Woods on this par- 
ticular question of young Donald Nixon ? Did you ever tell her that 
you had located him? 

Mr. Caulfield. Yes; I recall telling her that he was located 
somewhere out in the mountains of California and he was residing 
with some friends and there did not appear to be any improprieties 
involved on his part other than the fact that he was keeping com- 
pany with some young gentlemen who also resided in the area. 

Mr. Lenzner. Do you know where Rose Mary Woods got the 
mformation as to Donald Nixon's location? 

Mr. Caulfield. No, and I can only assume 

Mr. Lenzner. Well, you don't know? 

Mr. Caulfield. I don't know; no. 

Mr. Lenzner. Did she go away and come back with it or did 
she have it when you asked her? 

Mr. Caulfield. It might well be that I could only give you an 
opinion because I do not know for a fact, but it might well be that 
the whole matter of young Donald Nixon being missing, if you 
will, emanated from the family and she — it is no secret that she 
was very close to the family and it could have come down through 
Mr. Ehrlichman in that way and, as I recall him giving me the 
assignment to ascertain where he was. So it is quite possible that it 
originated with Rose Mary Woods and I went to the source in an 
attempt to see if there was more specific information available to 
make the task easier. 

Mr. Lenzner. Jack, it was fairly well known around the White 
House that you were a person who had investigative capabilities, 
is that not true? I mean it was not a secret that was maintained 
among just yourself, Mr. Dean, and Mr. Ehrlichman. Others knew 
about it. 

Mr. Caulfield. I would question that. 

Mr. Sears. I think you have to divide that into two parts. I don't 
think it was a well-known fact that Mr. Ulasewicz was 

Mr. Lenzner. No; I am saying that Jack had access to an in- 
vestigative capability. 

Mr. Sears. I think it was somewhat known. We could debate the 
use of the term "well known," but it was probably known that if 
someone wanted to have some checking done about a newspaper file 
or investigative work of that kind, it was rather simple, that Jack 
had the capability to do that. But things of that kind had to be 
cleared through either Mr. Ehrlichman or Mr. Dean, it is my 
understanding. 



31-889 O - 74 - pt. 22 - 11 



10350 

Mr. Caulfield. Yes; and it was no secret that my background 
was detective in the New York City Police Department. I would 
like to repeat, as I have repeated a number of times, that a good 
part of my activities at the White House encompassed work with 
the Federal law enforcement agencies. Now I suppose it is fair to 
say that a number of people at the White House were under the 
impression that I was engaged in law enforcement work and I think 
it is too broad a statement to say that it was very well known that 
I was engaged in investigative work. 

Mr. Lenzner. Just to cut you short. Jack, did Rose Woods ever 
ask you to conduct anything herself — pertaining to information, 
herself, at any time? 

Mr. Caulfield. I just indicated the one that comes to mind. It is 
possible that there were others, but nothing comes to mind at the 
second. 

Mr. Lenzner. Are you saying the only time you remember is 
when she requested information on the whereabouts of Donald 
Nixon ? 

Mr. Caulfield. At this moment, unless you give me 

Mr. Lenzner. No; I'm asking you for your recollection. 

Mr. Caulfield. That is my recollection. That is what comes to 
mind right off the bat. 

Mr. Lenzner. Did she hire your wife at one time? 

Mr. Caulfield. No; she didn't hire my wife. At one time she 
indicated that she had some work to do and would my wife be able 
to come in an a volunteer basis and do some work in her office. 

Mr. Lenzner. What was the nature of the work? 

Mr. Caulfield. Well, as far as I know it had to do with clerical 
work in the office. My wife indicated when she went over there 
that it was her understanding that it was to be kept confidential 
and I did not pry. But she was not hired. 

Mr. Lenzner. She got paid. 

Mr. Caulfield. Well, she received a gift at the conclusion of the 
work. She was not salaried. 

Mr. Lenzner. How much was the gift? 

Mr. Caulfield. It was a Christmas gift, as I recall, and I think 
it was $200. 

Mr. Lenzner. And did you ever on any occasion receive a gift of 
cash or some other kind of gift from Miss Woods yourself ? 

Mr. Caulfield. Me, myself? 

Mr. Lenzner. Yes. 

Mr. Caulfield. No. 

]\Ir. Lenzner. So did you receive the cash for your wife or did 
Miss Woods give it directly to your wife? 

Mr. Caulfield. I believe INIiss Woods gave it to my wife. 

Mr. Lenzner. So you never received an envelope of cash from 
Miss Woods at any time? 

Mr. Caulfield. No. 

Mr. Lenzner. And you are saying that your wife — how long did 
your wife work there ? 

Mr. Caulfield. I do not recall exactlv. It must have been a couple 
of months. I believe it was the fall of 1971 or 1970. 



10351 

Mr. Sears. Well, which was it now ? 

INIr. Caulfield. I guess it was 1970, 

]Mr. Lenzner. Are you saying now that it was your recollection 
that it was 1970? 

Mr. Caulfield. If I had to guess. 

Mr. Lenzner. I'm not asking you to guess, I'm asking you to 
remember. 

Mr. Caulfield. I don't know. 

Mr. Lenzner. You don't know when vou wife worked for Miss 
Woods? 

Mr. Caulfield. I can find out. I can check with my wife. 

Mr. Lenzner. And you don't know the nature of the work? 

Mr. Caulfield. It was clerical in nature and my wife indicated it 
was confidential and asked me not to pry and I did not pry. 

Mr. Lenzner. And you never learned what she did over there? 

Mr. Caulfield. She was putting records together, was all that I 
was able to determine. She went in and worked a couple of hours a 
day. She would go in to beat the traffic and come home before the 
traffic started. 

Mr. Sears. I believe he has stated at other forums that his feeling 
is that it was Christmastime. That's an impression I just wanted to 
add to the record. 

Mr. Caulfield. I did not pry. 

Mr. Sears. I don't think he means to convey the attitude that there 
was any reason not to pry, but he just didn't pay that much attention 
to what it was. 

Mr. Caulfield. Well it was confidential in nature and I respected 
that. 

Mr. Lenzner. "Where did Miss Woods get the money that she gave 
your wife? 

Mr. Caulfield. I don't know. 

Mr. Lackritz. Well, we have gotten a little bit afield from where 
we started originally. I would like to get back to the meeting you had 
as individuals to discuss the Sandwedge proposal, to discuss the 
formation of the security organization at your home in the late 
summer of 1971. How long was that, Mr. Caulfield? Do you re- 
member ? 

Mr. Caulfield. It was not at my home. It was at the Fairfax 
Country Club. 

Mr. IxACKRiTz. At the Fairfax Country Club? 

Mv. Caulfield. Yes. 

Mr. Lackritz. How long was the meeting at the Fairfax Country 
Club? 

Mr. Caulfield. It was just a luncheon meeting. I would say 2 
hours. 

Mr. Lackritz. Two hours, and your purpose was to find out 
whether these individuals Avere interested in joining this operation 
and possibly to get any of their ideas. 

Mr. Caulfield. That is basically what the meeting was all about; 
yes. . ■ 

Mr. Lackritz. And just to repeat, you do not know whether or 
not this document was drafted prior to this meeting or subsequent 
to this meeting? 



10352 

Mr. CAULriELD. I cannot recall. I could not even give you a date 
for the meeting. I remember it was in the summertime. I believe it 
was in the summertime. 

Mr. Lackritz. I take it then from your testimony last week that 
this document was solely your work, that you drafted it alone with- 
out any other assistance, is that correct? 

Mr. Caulfield. Other than preliminary discussions Avith Mr. Dean 
about the entire concept — he asked me to put my thoughts on paper — 
there was nobody else. 

Mr. Lackritz^ Were there any drafts of this document before it 
reached this form that your circulated to anyone? 

Mr. Caulfield. Not that I can recall. 

Mr. Lackritz. All right. After the document was drafted, did you 
show it to anyone else other than IMr. Dean ? 

]Mr. Caulfield. I remember showing it to Mr. Acree. Now, I do 
not know whether it was in draft form or this form. I can't recall. 

Mr. Lackritz. You showed it to Mr. Acree? 

Mr. Caulfield. Yes. 

Mr. Lackritz. Where was that? 

Mr. Caulfield. In my office. 

Mr. Lackritz. In the White House? 

Mr. Caulfield. Yes. 

Mr. Lackritz. Did you show it to Mr. Barth? 

Mr. Caulfield. I do not know whether I showed it to Mr. Barth 
or not. I do not recall. 

Mr. Lackritz. Did you show it to INIr. Joe Woods? 

Mr. Caulfield. I remember discussing it in my office with Mr. 
Woods. I do not recall, again, whether or not I showed this docu- 
ment to him. 

Mr. Lackritz. To refresh your recollection, did you not, in fact, 
when you were discussing it in your office with Mr. Woods, take out 
the document and have him read it while he was in your office? 

Mr. Caulfield. It's possible. 

Mr. Lackritz. But you do not recall that? 

Mr. Caulfield, I do not recall specifically. I remember Mr. Woods 
being in my office and discussing the proposal. Now whether or not 
I showed him the document, I do not know. I remember clearly 
showing it to Mr. Acree and that is all that I can testify to. 

Mr. Lackritz. ^^Hien Mr. Woods was in your office to discuss this 
proposal, this was subsequent, I take it, to the meeting you had that 
summer with the four individuals? 

Mr. Caulfield. I would say yes. 

Mr. Lackritz. So that by the time he was in your office, this docu- 
ment had, in fact, been drafted; is that correct? 

Mr. Caulfield. I would say yes. 

Mr. Lackritz. To your knowledge, did he discuss this document 
or proposal with anyone else? 

]Mr. Caulfield. I don't know. 

Mr. Lackritz. Do you recall if he called his sister Kose Mary when 
he was in your office discussing this proposal with you? 

Mr. Caulfield. I do not recall that at all. 

Mr. Lackritz. When did you show the document to Mr. Acree? 
This was after the meeting at the Fairfax Countrv Club? 



10353 

Mr. CATTLriELD. It would have been around the same time that it 
was discussed with Mr. Woods. 

Mr. Lackritz. Did you discuss the specifics in the document with 
Mr. Acree at the time you showed it to him ? 

INIr. Cahlfield. Yes; I am sure that I did. 

Mr. LACKRrrz. So you discussed the various proposals for offensive 
intelligence gathering capabilities? 

INIr. Caulfield. Yes. 

Mr. Lackritz. Did you discuss with him the "black bag" capa- 
bility? 

Mr. Caulfield. Yes ; and I think it is fair to say that any discus- 
sion of that type would have been just as I have indicated. 

Mr. Lackritz. I just wanted to know if you had discussed that 
with Mr. Acree. I take it the answer to that question is "Yes." 

IMr. Caulfield. The answer is that we discussed the document. If 
you are asking whether or not we specifically and solely focused on 
"black bag" as you describe it 

Mr. Lackritz. That was not my question, Mr. Caulfield. The only 
question was if, in the course of discussing this document 

INIr. Caulfield. I remember discussing the document with him and 
I remember no such conversation about focusing on black bag. 

INIr. Lackritz. I didn't ask you if you focused on it, Mr. Caulfield, 
and I think you answered the question before that you did discuss 
black bag capabilitv with INIr. Acree during the discussion. 

]\Ir. Caui.fteld. As I understood it; yes. 

Mr. Lackritz. Wliat was Mr. Acree's reaction to this document at 
that meeting? 

Mr. Caulfield. It would have been fine. 

Mr. Lackritz. In other words, he approved of the document and 
the proposal? 

Mr. Caulfield. Sure, as posture. 

Mr. Lackritz. Was he disappointed when the funding and ap- 
proval for this did not come through? 

Mr. Cautfteld. I do not know if he was disappointed. We were 
both hopeful. I think it is fair to characterize our reaction to the 
document — we were hopeful that we could become engaged in the 
1972 campaign and that there would be a private security entity in 
place at the end of the campaiffn. 

Mr. Lackrttz. All ri^rht. "\'\nien you discussed the document with 
Mr. Woods at the other meeting in your office, did ]Mr. Woods give 
his general approval to this? 

Mr. Caui.field. To the concept; yes. 

Mr. Lackrttz. Did vou discuss any of the specifics of the proposal 
with Mr. Woods n<^ the meetinjT in your office?' 

Mr. Caui.fteld. T do not believe so. 

Mr. Lackritz. Theii I take it the next thine: that happened with 
respect to this was that you forwarded the document on to Mr. Dean, 
is that correct? 

Mr. Caui^ield. Yes. 

Mr. Lackritz. Could you just narrate 

Mr. Sears. Could we go off the record just a second? 

Mr. Lackritz. Sure. 

[Discussion off the record.] 



10354 

Mr. Sears. IVIay we have the question afrain ? 

Mr. Lackritz. The question attain was: What happened next after 
this document was drafted and could you narrate it in some detail? 
I think it would speed up this process. "^Miat happened next to the 
proposal ? 

Mr. Caulfield. I believe that Mr. Dean — this already had been 
submitted to Mr. Dean prior to the discussions with INIr. Acree, Mr. 
Woods, and then it was just a question of determininp; whether or 
not the concept would be accepted, No. 1; and No. 2, if it would be 
funded. And from that point on it began to get very fuzzy. It 
became clear within 1 month or 2 after that the matter was not 
g^oing to be accepted and sometime toward the fall of 1971 it was 
clear that there was to be no Operation Sandwedge and no private 
security firm as postured in the document. 

Mr. Lackritz. Did Mr. Dean indicate to you who he showed the 
document to ? 

Mr. CATjLriELD. As far as I know he never indicated who he showed 
the document to. He indicated that he was discussing the document 
with certain people. It was my impression that he might have been 
discussing it with Mr. INIitchell, but I do not know that for a fact 
and I do not know for a fact if this document ever was shown to 
them. 

Mr. Lackritz. Did he indicate to you Avhy he could not get ap- 
proval for the document or proposal as postured? 

Mr. Caitlfield. Not in clear-cut terms. I think it possibly could be 
described as his attitude toward letting me know, just let it hang 
there and sooner or later it will go away. I viewed it as a delaying 
mechanism. 

Mr. Lackritz. When you finally found out that the proposal was 
not going to be approved, did you keep copies of this proposal in 
your files after that ? ^^Hiat did you do with them ? 

Mr. Caulfield. I kept a copy in my file. Mr. Dean had a copy, and 
I, subsequently — when I destroyed my papers upon leaving the 
"Wliite House, T destroyed this as well. 

Mr. Lackritz. So you destroyed all of your copies of Operation 
Sand wedge? 

INIr. Caui.field. Yes. 

Mr. Lackritz. Did you have any discussions with 

Mr. Lexzxer. Let me interrupt there for a second. As I understand 
the process at the "\^niite House — and John, you may correct me if I 
am wrong — but T have seen some documents that reflect this. "When 
you leave the "^AHiite House an inventory is made of your documents 
and your files and a decision is made as to what papers are your 
personal papers and what belongs to the President. 

Mr. Sears. I think that is the procedure, at least I cannot speak 
other than from my own experience when I was there; but T think 
that was it then. 

Mr. C*AXTLFTET-n. T received no iruidance in that area and bear in 
mind that I left the "\^niite House in March of 1072. I made the 
judgment without conferring with anybody about what papers 
would remain and which would not remain and anvthing havinjr to 
do with my investigative activities, I made the decision unilaterally 



10355 

to put them in the burn bag when I was leaving ; and that I did and 
this was amongst those documents inckided. 

Now, Mr. Dean, and I assume IMr. Ehrlichman as well, had copies 
of memos that I had written. You have them in your files here. But 
putting it in the time frame of March 1972, I just made the conscious 
decision that I was leaving and these were papers that I felt should 
not be lying around, and I did. 

INIr. Lenzxer. If Dean and Ehrlichman had copies of them, I 
don't quite understand wliy you thought it made any difference if 
you destroyed them or not, Jack. I don't understand that. 

Mr. Caulfield. As I said, not receiving any guidance, John speaks 
about a procedure that was not brought to my attention, and I just 
kept personal papers that I have had at home and brought them in 
and gave them to John. They are just personal notes, memorabilia; 
that's all I kept upon leaving the White House. And nobody asked 
me any questions about them. 

JNIr. Lexzner. Do they reflect your activities while you were in the 
White House ? 

INIr. Sears. No, they do not. 

Mr. Lenzxer. Are those personal papers? 

IMr. Caulfield. They are personal notes from people. The only 
reason I kept them is I thought they might be interesting to my 
grandchildren, strictly of a personal nature. Anything having to do 
with my work was put in the burn bag. 

Mr. Lexzner. Are there any notes that relate or refer to your work 
at the White House ? 

Mr. Caulfield. None; none at all. And again, this was done in 
March of 1972, and I received no guidance, no questions from 
anyone. 

Mr. Lackritz. All right. Mr. Caulfield. Did you have any discus- 
sions with Mr. John Buckley about this proposal to form -a private 
security organization? 

Mr. Caulfield. No. 

Mr. Lackritz. Do you know ]\Ir. Buckley? 

Mv. Caulfield. I know him by name and I think I've seen him 
in the "White House mess on a couple of occasions. 

Mr. Lackritz. Have you ever called him or spoken to him on the 
telephone ? 

Mr. Caulfield. I know he worked over at HEW. The only thing 
that comes to mind about Mr. Buckley is the conversation we had 
way back in September when you raised the issue and I gave you 
some information which you found interesting at that time. 

Mr. Lackritz. I am just curious if you knew Mr. Buckley before 
that time? 

Mr. Caui^field. I may have met him; I may have seen him. I 
recall specifically seeing him and I may have been introduced to him, 
my recollection is. at the '\^niite House mess. 

INIr. Sears. Did you ever discuss this security concept with him? 

Mr. Caui.field. This one? No. Or any security concept with him; 
no. 

Mv. Lackritz. Did you ever discuss any security concept with 
Charley Barr? 



10356 

Mr. Caulfifxd. Charles Barr I have never met nor spoken to. I 
think he is a fellow out in Chicafro who handled voting fraud, I 
think, in 1960. That's the only think I know about him. 

Mr. Lackritz. But you never spoke to Charley Barr about the 
formation of a private security corporation? 

Mr. Caulfield. I don't know Mr. Barr. I've never spoken to him. 

Mr. Lenzner. Did Rose Woods or Joe Woods ever s\i<rgest that he 
be a part of your security oiitfit? 

Mr. Caulfield. No. In the discussions with Joe Woods about a 
private security orojanization, one of the things that would have 
been considered would have been an attempt to minimize potential 
voting fraud in Illinois, and I think, if I am not mistaken. Joe 
Woods mentioned Charley Barr as havinc; been so engaged in 1960. 
That is the only thing that rings a bell with Charley Barr. 

Mr. Lexzner. Did Rose Woods recommend that Barr be hired 
or ask to plav a role in the 1972 election to avoid election fraud in 
Illinois? 

Mr. Caulfield. That doesn't rino; a bell with me. 

Mr. Lenzner. So the answer is "no"? 

Mr. Caulfield. The answer is "no." 

Mr. Lackritz. Mr. Caulfield. could you turn to tab 6 * of exhibit 1 
from last week, and the first document there is a memorandum for 
Bud Krogh from John Dean, dated July 20, 1971. 

In the middle paragraph of that memo. Dean's memo states : 
"Attached are copies of these tax returns and you will note that 
Brookings received a number of large Government contracts." 

Do you recall getting copies of these tax return forms of the 
Brookings Institution from ]\Ir. Dean? 

Mr. Sears. Could we go off the record just a second? 

FDiscussion off the record.] 

Mr. Sears. We can go back on the record. Could we have the ques- 
tion again, please? 

Mr. Caulfield. To simplify this matter here I think I will short 
circuit 

Mr. Sears. Could we have the question again, please? 

Mr. Lackritz. The question initiallv was: Did you recall obtain- 
ing copies of the Brookings Institution's tax returns? 

Mr. Caut>field. Well. I want to respond in this wav to that: 
Apparently there was an interest in the tax-exempt foundations at 
the White House and there were a number of people doing some 
work in this area. Xoav. John Dean turned over to me a series of 
papers, much of which had appeared in public print, and among 
those papers was tax information. Mv impression now is that would 
have been obtainable from the public records. 

Mr. Sears. Your thought at the time was that that would have 
been obtainable through public records. 

Mr. Caulfield. Yes. And this information was part of a large 
batch of papers having to do with the whole subject of foundations. 
Now I think, if I am not mistakeii, the memorandum here from Mr. 
Dean to Mr. Krogh is a little bit of literary license, if you will, 

* See Book 21, p. 9771. 



10357 

when he indicates, "I requested that Caulfield obtain the tax returns 
of the Brookings Institution to determine if there is anything we 
might do bv wav of turning off money." 

I think all that amounts to is me bringing to Mr. Dean's attention 
the public record information regarding Brookings that was con- 
tained in the batch of papers. 

Mr. Lackritz. Are you stating today that you did not obtain tax 
information from the Brookings Institution? 

Mr. Cauufield. I have no recollection of obtaining tax information 
regarding Brookings Institution. I do state here that there was in- 
formation contained in a series of papers regarding Brookings Insti- 
tution and their tax status. My impression was that this was public 
information and I think attachment 8 under this tab is what I am 
referring to. 

Mr. Sears. Do you mean attachment No. 8 which says, "Schedule 
A, line A"? 

Mr. Caulfield. Yes ; schedule A, line A. 

Mr. Lackritz. That is public information? 

J^Ir. Caulfield. I recall that being mixed in with the papers that 
were turned over to me by John Dean. 

Mr. Sears. Did those papers contain information on other tax- 
exempt institutions ? 

Mr. Lackritz. No; just on Brookings. 

Mr. Lexzner. AVait a second. These two sheets don't reflect any 
Government contracts to the Brookings Institution, so there must 
have been other documents that would not have been available to 
the public necessarily, that did reveal "Brookings received a number 
of large government contracts." "WHiere did that information come 
from ? 

Mr. Caulfield. As I indicated, Mr, Lenzner. there was a substantial 
amount of information contained in a pile of papers 10 inch.es high 
that people had been working on. and it was all mixed in and my job 
in connection with the memorandum that is written here as to boil 
that all down into some sort of report which would focus on the 
whole issue of tax-exempt foundations. 

Mr. Lenzner. This is beginning on pages — attachment A, Is this 
your report? The first line begins: "indicated below is an examina- 
tion of the power, influence, and activities of the Ford Foundation." 
This is a report that you wrote ? 

Mr. Caulfield. Yes: based on the material that was given to me. 

Mr. Lenzner. Given to you by whom? 

Mr. Caulfield. John Dean. 

Mr. Lenzner. "Would you say it's all public testimony? 

Mr. Caut^field. I sav whatever is in there. 

Mr. Sears. He said his impression at that time is that all of that 
was contained in public record. 

Mr. Lenzner. Did vou attempt to obtain further information 
from the IKS on the Brookings Institution or the Ford Foundation? 

Mr. Caui-field. I have no recollection of doing that. If I am not 
mistaken, all of the information contained here comes from the 
materials that were civen to me. There was a massive amount of 



10358 

material and I boiled it down to tlio three or four padres that are 
here. 

Mr. Lenznkr. If yon look at pao;e 5 

Mr. CAUi.rrELD. On what. Terry? 

Mr. L?:xzxER. On yonr report — the fourth paracrraph reads: 

Commissioner Walters, according to these same IKS powers, lias not yet 
exercised the firm leadership expected at the time of his appointment. 

Now where did you loarn tliat? From tlu^ documents that you say 
were public? 

Mr. Caijlfield. Xo; that information came from a conversation 
that I had with Uv. Barth. 

Mr. Lexzner. So you did have some discussions with ]\Ir. Barth 
in regard to these matters? 

Mr. Caulfield. Yes; I did liave a discussion witli Mr. Barth; yes. 

Mr. Sears. Can we ^io off the record a second? We can shortcut 
this, I think. 

[Discussion off the record.] 

Mr. Sears. All rifrht. Xow we can <ro back on the record. 

This kind of thino- is not somethino; tliat just arose, any interest 
that they had in the Brookings Institution. Evidently they oained 
an interest directly in the Brookino;s Institution sometime later, 
but had had one in foundations for some time. 

Mr. Lenzner. Let me ask this question, then, ]\fr. Caulfield. Did 
you ever ask Mr. Barth for any i n vest i<rat ion or information witli 
regard to the Brookings Institution? 

Mr. Caulfield. No. 

Mr. Lenzner. Now if you will look at page 5 again, in the para- 
graph directly above the paragraph I just referred to. it says, and 
these are your words : 

For example, as a result of congressional pressni'e in IDGO an audit of the 
Ford Foundation was undertaken. 

Mr. Caulfield. Wliere is that ? 

Mr. Lexzxer. Above the paragraph on Commissioner Walters. Are 
you with me? "It is still ongoing with no tangible results or progress 
seen to date. Purposeful delay seems to be the chosen bureauci-atic 
tactic." 

"NAHiere did that information come from? 

Mr. Cat'efield. In all likelihood it came from ]\Ir. B;>rth. 

Mr. Lexznek. And is it not a fact that Barth was of the opinion 
that Commissioner Waltei-s and others were not loyal to the admin- 
istration, or do you want to rephrase that in your own words? 

Mr. Caulfiei,d. Yes; I would like to. 

Mr. Lexzxer. Go ahead and rephrase it. 

Mr. Caulfiei,d. ]Mr. Barth was apparently having difficulty with 
Commissioner Walters in terms of his own position at IRS. and in 
the course of conversations, social conversations that I would have 
with Mr. Barth. he would indicate his dissatisfaction with Com- 
missioner Walters and felt that he and others under him were anti- 
administration and he made numerous comments and some of them 
are contained in the last paragra]")h on the same page that you are 
talking about which I {pioted. 



10359 

Mr. Lexzxer. When you say thoy were antiadministration, how 
was that manifested, does Barth indicate ? 

Mr. Catjt^ield. Well ; INIr. Barth was of the opinion that decisions 
were being made at IRS that were not in keeping with the aims and 
purposes of the Nixon administration. 

Mr. Lexzxer. Did that include the fact that the IRS would not do 
audits on specific people at the request of the White House ? 

Mr. Caulfield. No; that was not a part of the conversation with 
Mr. Barth. 

Mr. Lexzxer. You never discussed that with Mr. Barth on any 
occasion ? 

Mr. Caulfield, No. 

Mr. Lackritz. Let me ask you this, Mr. Caulfield. These memos 
are dated July 20 and July 27, 1971. It was shortly after the publi- 
cation of the Pentagon Papers by the New York Times. Did any 
other individual in the AAHiite House ever ask you to take action with 
respect to the Brookings Institution? 

INIr. Caulfield. Are you referring now to Mr. Colson ? 

INIr. Lackritz. I am asking you about any individual. 

Mr. Caulfield. I have already spoken to the request made to me by 
INIr. Colson at a previous meeting that we have had. and if you want 
me to discuss that, other than that specific instance, the answer is 
"No." 

Mr. Lackritz. Then could you describe Mr. Colson's request to 
you? I take it, it was about this period of time, was it not? 

Mr. Caltlfield, Well, again 

Mr. Lackritz. The summer of 1971 ? 

Mr. CAULnELD. If you want to put in the timeframe of the summer 
of 1971, I would say "Yes." 

Mr. Lackritz. W[\at happened? What did Mr. Colson ask you to 
do? 

Mr. Caulfield. Mr, Colson, during the period that we jiist indi- 
cated, called me into his office, which was a rather unusual procedure 
in and of itself, because I did not work for Mr. Colson — indicated ho 
liad had discussions with people he did not identify in the Presi- 
dential party out in San Clemente, and stated that there was a high- 
priority need to obtain papers from the office of a gentleman named 
Leslie Gelb, who apparently worked at the Brookings Institution in 
Washington. And Mr, Colson indicated that he thought that I could, 
in some fashion, obtain those papers. And I stated to Mr. Colson : 
"How do you propose that I obtain those papers?" And he made 
what I considered to bo an asinine suggestion. 

In substance, the suggestion was that the fire regulations in the 
District of Columbia could be changed to have the FBI respond to 
the scene of any fire in the District, and that if there were to be a 
fire at the Brookings Institution, that the FBI could respond and 
obtain the file in question from Mr, Leslie Gelb's office. 

Mr, Lackritz, Did ISlr, Colson suggest that you might start that 
fire? 

Mr, Caulfield, It was implied. That was tlie implication of his 
statement, and I indicated to INIr, Colson I would like to think about 
it, and hastily left the office, and literally ran into the office of Mr. 



10360 

Dean and advised him- that if he was not going to take the next 
plane out to San Clemente, I was. Because the stupidity of the sug- 
gestion defied description, in my mind, and I so advised INIr. Dean, 
and told him that if he wasn't going out, I was going to go out and 
apprise Mr. Ehrlichman, who was out there with the Presidential 
party, of the asininity of the suggestion. 

Subsequently, Mr. Dean did go out to California, and upon his 
return he advised me to forget about the matter, that it was not 
going to be pursued any further. 

Mr. LACKmTz. Did he ask you to take any other course of action 
with respect to the Brookings Institution? 

Mr. Catilfield. He said, "While I am out there, ask Mr. Ulasewicz 
to go over and check, and find out what Brookings Institution is all 
about," who is in the building; and give him a report on that, which 
I did. 

Mr. Lackritz. "WHiat was the purpose of your asking IMr, Ulase- 
wicz to provide this information ? 

Mr. CATJT.FrELD. I do not follow the question. 

^Ir. Lackrttz. Why did Mr. Dean want this information about 
who else was in the building? '\'\niat value was that to Mr. Dean? 

Mr. Catjlfield. I think Mr. Dean was just doing the same thing 
that I was doing, attempting to delay any activities on the suggestion 
until such time as it could be terminated. 

Mr. Lackritz. Did you ask Mr. Ulasewicz to. in fact, go case the 
building? 

Mr. Caulfifld. Well, I would object to the word "case" the build- 
ing. He went to the building, took note of who was in the lobby of 
the building. I assume that I asked him to get a list of all of the 
people who occupied the building, and he did that. And he came back 
and reported that it was an eiffht-story building, which housed all 
kinds of major corporations and individuals of significant status, and 
I reported that back to INIr. Dean when he returned. 

Mr. Lackritz. Then Mr. Dean told you to take no further action 
against the Brookino-s Institution ? 

Mr. Catti,ftfi.d. That's right. 

Mr. Lackritz. Did Mr. ITlasewicz write up a report for you on the 
Brookings Institution ? 

Mr. CattivFifld. No. 

Mr. Lackritz. So this information Avas communicated orally? 

Mr. CatttvFtft.d. Orally; yes. 

Mr. Lackritz. Do you have any other questions? 

FMr. Lenzner nods in the negative. 1 

Mr. Lackritz. Do von have any questions. Emily? 

FMs. Sheketoff nods in the necrative.! 

Mr. LACKRrrz. Do vou kiiov/ if Afi\ Colson asked somooue else to 
do a similar activity? 

Mr. OATTLFiKT.n. T never discussed it with ]\Tr. Colson. other than 
at a wedding, when he raised the subject and thought it was a pretty 
funny joke. 

Mr. Lackritz. "^^Hien was this wedding? 

Mr. Caulfield. This Avas in January of 1972, when Mr. Dean got 
married. 



10361 

Mr. Lenzner. I take it nobody else was present when Colson dis- 
cussed it with you on either occasion? 

Mr. Caulfield. No. 

Mr. Lackritz. As I understand your testimony, Mr. Caulfield, you 
did not specifically request any tax information about the Brookings 
Institution from Mr. Bartli or Mr. Acree ; is that correct ? 

Mr. Caulfield. I have no recollection of that. My recollection was, 
as I stated, that the infonnation was already there. 

INIr. Lackritz. Did you ever request tax information on any other 
specific individuals or foundations? 

Mr. Caulfield. Let's go off the record. 

[Discussion off the record.] 

Mr. Caulfield. On the record again. 

At other times. I was asked to make inquiry about certain tax 
matters, and I believe you have documents in your possession which 
I will be happy to discuss with you. 

Mr. Lackritz. Before Ave get into the documents, do you have any 
recollection of any of the individuals or taxpayers whose returns, or 
information from their returns, you obtained? 

Mr. Caulfield. Rephrase — just repeat the question. 

Mr. Lackritz. Do you recall any specific requests that you made to 
either Mr. Acree, INIr. Barth, or any other individuals in the IRS, 
for information from the tax returns of any individuals or organi- 
zations ? 

Mr. Sears. Well, the only problem in your question is your inclu- 
sion of the words, "from the tax returns." because I do not know. 

Mr. Lackritz. I can rephrase that, John. Do you ever recall re- 
questing any tax information about specific individuals or organiza- 
tions from any individual in the IRS? 

Mr. Caulfield. Off the record. 

fDiscussion off tlie record.] 

Mr. Sears. Could we have the question again, please? 

Mr. Lackritz. INIr. Caulfield. do you recall ever requesting tax 
information about any specific individuals or organizations from 
anyone in the IRS? 

Mr. Caulfield. I recall transmitting a request for tax information 
from Mr. Dean, period. 

Mr. Lackritz. Do you recall any of tlie specific requests that Mr. 
Dean asked you to obtain ? 

Mr. Caulfield. Yes ; I do. I recall the requests for tax information 
as to the tax status of ]Mr. John Wayne and INIr. Billy Graham. 

Mr. Lackritz. Could you turn to tab IT) * of exhibit 1 from last week? 
Can you identify that first memorandum from yourself to John 
Dean^ dated September 80, 1971 ? 

INfr. Caut.field. Yes; that is mine, ^^^es. 

INIr. Lackritz. Those are your initials? They are somewhat faded. 

Mr. Caulfield. Yes. 

^Mr. Lackritz. T take it this is your report back to Mr. Dean on 
his request for information on the status of Billy Graham's and John 
Wayne's tax retui-ns? You state in the second paragraph that a 

* See Book 21, p. 980S. 



10362 

"discreet check indicates that an anonymous telephone call may have 
initiated the audit.'' "What do j'ou mean by "discreet check"? 

Mr. CAULFiELn. Tt simply means I called ]\[r. Acree and asked him 
to discreetly determine as requested. 

Mr. Lackritz. Determination of what — how tlie audits are 
i-eq nested ? 

Air. Caulfteld. I think, if I recall correctly, the request was to 
make a determination as to Avhether or not iNIr. Billy Graham was 
being harassed by the IRS. 

Mr. Lackritz. Did jNIr. Dean say where that request had come 
from ? 

Mr. Cauuield. No; and again, I w\ant to repeat, so I make it 
more understandable to you. Very often Mr. Dean — in practically all 
the cases, Mr. Dean did not indicate where his assignments were 
coming from. 

Mr. Lackritz. I understand that. I just wanted to know specifically, 
in this case. He didn't indicate to you that the President was inter- 
ested in this case? 

Mr. Caulfield. No ; he did not. 

Mr. Lackritz. Wlien you say, "a back-door copy of the sensitive 
case report out of Atlanta has been viewed," how did you get a 
copy of that sensitive case report? 

Mr. Caulfield. INIr. Acree showed it to me. 

Mr. Lackritz. Is that normal procedure? 

Mr. Catjlfield. I don't know wdiat you might characterize as 
normal. The A^^iite House making a request in this fashion would 
probably be considered abnormal, but 

Mr. Lackritz. Did you personally, Mr. Caulfield. view any other 
sensitive case reports? 

Mr. Caulfield. No: not that T can recall. 

Mr. Lackritz. But Mr. Acree did show you a copy of this partic- 
ular case report? 

Mr. Caulfield. Yes. I don't recall specifically, but it is indicated 
here, and I will say "Yes." 

INIr. Sears. Let's be clear on this. Do you recall or not? Did you 
see this report, or did he tell you about it? 

Mr. Lackritz. Doesn't it say, l\Ir. Caulfield, "has been viewed?" 

Mr. Caulfield. I know what it says. I just can't 

Ml". Sears. Recall specifically what it is. 

Mr. Caulfield. "Whether he's editorializing here — I can't say for 
a fact whether or not there was literary license in that sentence, or 
whether or not T actually viewed it. I don't recall. 

Mr. Lackritz. Wait a minute, Mr. Caulfield. T want you to think 
back. Do you recall writing this memorandum ? 

Mr. CauTvField. Yes. 

Mr. Lackritz. Would yon write a memorandum sa\ing, "a back- 
door copy of a sensitive case report out of Atlanta has been viewed." 
if vou had not viewed it? 

Mr. Caut.field. No. It's very possible that the back-door copy had 
been viewed by Mr. Acree, and described to me over the phone, and 
that's the way I'm reporting it there. I don't say that T saw it. 



i 



10363 

Mr. Lackritz. In any case, information from a sensitive case report 
was brought to your attention by INIr. Acree. That's correct, isn't it? 

Mr. Caulfield. If Mr. Acree did, in fact 

Mr. Lackritz. Mr. Caulfield, the answer to the question is "Yes," 
isn't it? 

Mr, Sears. Yes. 

Mr. Caulfield. Well, I don't know for a fact. Off the record for a 
second, please. 

[Discussion off the record.] 

Mr. Lexzner. Let's go back on the record. 

^^Hiat does "a back-door copy" mean, Mr. Caulfield? 

Mr. Caulfield. I would interpret that to mean 

Mr. Lexzner. Well, you wrote it. AAHiat did you mean when you 
wrote it? 

Mr. Caulfield. Yes, that's what I'm saying. 

INIr. Lexzner. Go ahead and tell us what you meant when you 
wrote it. 

Mr. Caulfield. ]\Iy impression was that someone had viewed the 
sensitive case report, and reported what w^as contained on it. That's 
what I really meant by a "back-door copy." without an official, inter- 
nal IRS request. 

Mr. Lexzxer. "WHiat was Mr. Acree's position at the IRS? 

Mr. Caulfield. He was Assistant Commissioner for Inspection. 

Mr. Lexzner. And in that position, did he not have regular access 
to sensitive case reports? 

Mr. Caulfield. I am not familiar with the IRS procedures; 
whether or not he would have, officially or unofficially. I am not 
familiar with how that works. 

Mr. Lexzxer. Were you aware of whether INIr. Barth had access 
to sensitive case reports? 

Mr. Caui.field. Yes ; T was. But I hasten to add that sensitive case 
report, in all likelihood, is probably a very general procedure. I do 
know for a fact that part of INIr. Barth's duties were to keep the 
Secretary of the Treasury advised of sensitive case reports. Whether 
or not the same procedure down at the bureaucratic level is the 
same, I do not know. 

Mr. Lex^zx-^er. All I am asking, Mr. Caulfield, is. Were you aware 
that Barth had access to sensitive case reports on a regular basis? 

^Ir. Caulfield. Xow. I prefer that you would be more specific 
about sensitive case reports, because Mr. Barth had access to certain 
sensitive case reports. 

Mr. Lexzxer. "\^niich case reports did he have access to? 

INfr. Caulffeld. Api^arently. those which required that the Secre- 
tary of the Treasurv be kept ap]")rised on a monthly basis, 

Mr. Sears. INIr. Caulfield was aware of the fact that Mr. Barth — 
evidently, according to what Mv. Barth had told him in social con- 
versation, I guess — performed the function of keeping the Secretary 
of the Treasury, whoever he was, briefed on so-called sensitive case 
reports. I do not know whether — I do not think that ISfr. Caulfield 
was ever aAvare of wliat those case reports were, or who were involved 
in them. Is that correct? 

Mr. Caulfield. No. 



10364 

Mr. Lenzner. Are you saying, under oath again, that Mr. Barth 
never discussed the contents or existence of any of those case reports 
with you ? 

Mr. Catji^field. Absohitely. 

Mr. Lexzxer. Alisohitely what ? 

Mr. Caulfield. Absohitely yes. I was never aware — I never dis- 
cussed it with Mr. Barth. 

INIr. Lackritz. He just said, "By the way. Jack, one of my duties is 
to brief the Secretary of the Treasury on the sensitive case reports." 

]Mr. Caulfield. Tliat's right, precisely right, and I would not 
have the slightest notion of what individuals were contained in those 
sensitive case reports. 

Mr. Lackritz. And you would not go to Mr. Barth to seek infor- 
mation about them when you received the request from Mr. Dean? 

Mr. Catji.field. I would have referred them to Mr. Barth, since 
that was his assignment. 

Mr. Sears. Tliis was not in the framework of a request to find out 
what was in a sensitive case report. This evidently came to him as a 
request to find out whether Mr. Graham was being harassed in his 
tax affairs. 

Mr. Lenzner. And what information did you have as to what 
access Mr. Acree had to sensitive case reports? 

Mr. Caulfield. I didn't even know if he could make that determi- 
nation. He was the one I turned to at that time, considering the 
request because he was a friend of mine. 

Mr. Lackritz. ]\f r. Barth was a friend of yours too, wasn't he ? 

Mr. Caulfield. Yes. 

Mr. Sears. I think it is fair to say that Mr. Caulfield was also the 
— INIr. Acree's responsibilities were involved in making sure that the 
agents of the TBS were not indulging in their own whims about who 
thev audited and who they did not audit ; that his responsibilities 
did have more to do with makinc; sure that the ao-ency functioned on 
a credible and reliable basis. And. therefore, if anyone was being 
harassed, that mieht be something that would fall in the line of Mr. 
Acree's line of work. Is that correct? 

Mr. Caulfield. That is correct, and it just never dawned on me to 
contact Mr. Barth on a sensitive case report. 

Mr. Lexzxer. Ts Mr. Sears' descriDtion an accui'ate description of 
Avhat you perceived as your res])onsibilitios \'is-a-vis the TTRS? 

TNTr. Sears. T did not make anv description of Mr. Caulfield's 
responsibilities. T was desci-ibino- what T understood to be his under- 
standing' of INfr. Acree's responsibilities. 

Mr. Caulflkld. T would agree with that. 

Mr. Lenzner. Off the record. 

[Discussion off the record, 1 

Mr. Lenzner. iVTr. Caulfield, were you ever aAvare of anyone in the 
Wliite House receiving copies of sensitive case reports at any time? 

Mr. Caulfield. No. 

Mr. Lenzner. And your testimonv today is that at no time did 
you ever see, observe, or copy a sensitive case report yourself. 

Mr. Caulfield. That is correct. 

Mr. Lenzner. T could not hear voiir. 



10365 

Mr. Caulfield. That is correct. 

Mr. Lackrttz. All right. Mr. Caulfield, in tab 15 I would like for 
you to turn back to tlie note on White House notepaper to John W. 
Dean III from John J. Caulfield, dated October 6, 1971, a remark 
sayino;, "The Wayne complaint when viewed in the attached context, 
does not appear to be strong enough to be pursued. 

Mr. Catjlfield. Yes. 

Mr. Lackritz. Can you identify that as coming from your office? 

Mr. Caulfield. Yes. 

INIr. Lackrttz. Turning the page, the following four pages appear 
to be information from audit examinations of individuals in the en- 
tertainment industry. Did you obtain that information for Mr. Dean? 

Mr. Caut.field. Yes; T did. 

Mr. Lackritz. And where did you obtain that information? 

Mr. Caulfield. From INIr. Acree. 

ISIr. Lackritz. And how did INIr. Acree provide you with this in- 
formation ? 

Mr. Caulfield. He turned it over to me at my office. 

]Mr. Lackritz. From what kinds of material? Did he turn over 
official documents to you or did he turn over this particular memo- 
randum to you? Did you write this memorandum after receiving 
information ? 

Mr. Cal'lfield. I don't know whether I copied it or it was Avritten 
in longhand in the form that appears here. 

INIr. Lackritz. I see. And was this — did you obtain this kind of 
information from Mr. Acree on a regular basis? 

Mr. Caulfield. No. This was the only occasion that I know of that 
information of this type was ever received. 

INIr. Lackritz. And you say this information is from audit exami- 
nations of taxes of years past. Is that correct? 

]\Ir. CALT:>riELD. Yes. 

Mr. Lackritz. Turning to the third page of that attachment, there 
is a request for tax information in the middle of INIr. Ronald 
Reagan. I take it at that time INfr. Reagan was Governor of California 
still, was he not? 

Mr. Caulfield. T iruess so. 

Mr. Lackritz. Did you suggest these individuals yourself to make 
the sampling or were these suggested for you by Mr. Acree? 

Mr. Caulfield. These were selected bv Mr. Acree as T recall. 

Mr. Lackritz. Pursuant to your request? 

Mr. Caulfield. Pursuant to mv request to see whether or not — 
supportive of the request of making a determination as to whether 
or not INIr. John Wayne was being harassed. 

]\Ir. Lackritz. Was this information communicated back to Mr. 
Wavne to your knowledge ? * 

INfr. Caulfield. T have no knowledge of that. 

Mr. Lackritz. All right. Off the record for a second. 

FDiscussion off the record.] 

Mr. Lackritz. Mr. Caulfield. did vou ever obtain information from 
the tax returns of Mr. Lawrence Goldberjr? 

Mr. CAui.rTELD. Yes; T believe that T did. 

Mr. Lackritz. Do you recall how the request was initiated? 



31-889 O - 74 - pt. 22 - 12 



10366 

Mr. Caulfield. I know there is a memorandum, and I believe it is 
in your possession. It would be helpful for me in recalling just how 
that came about. 

Mr. Lackritz. If it will refresh your recollection, why do we not 
turn to tab 12 *; tlio first paao of tluit nttachmeiit is a note from John 
J. Caulfield to John W. Dean, dated September 22, 1971. Can you 
identify that? 

Mr. Caulfield. Yes. 

Mr. Lackritz. And the next page is a memorandum about Law- 
rence Goldberg. Do you recognize that as being your memorandum? 

Mr. Caulfield. Yes. 

Mr. Lackritz. Would you like to take a moment to read that to 
refresh your recollection? 

Mr. Caulfield. Yes, I have read it. 

Mr. Lackritz, All right. Could you — do you recall that Mr. Dean 
requested you to obtain this information on INIr. Goldberg? 

Mr. Caulfield. Yes. He wanted, as I recall, he wanted background 
information on INIr. Goldberg. 

Mr. Lackritz. I see. Now, in the memorandum, in the one, two, 
three, fourth short paragraph there, you say, "I am waiting for re- 
sults of an IRS check on Goldberg's financial status." 

Mr. Caulfield. Yes. 

Mr. Lackritz. What do you mean by that? 

Mr. Caulfield. I asked Mr. Acree to provide information on Mr. 
Goldberg's financial status. 

Mr. Lackritz. "V^Hiat do you mean by financial status? 

Mr. Caulfield. There was some, as I recall, in connection with the 
request there was some question as to whether or not Mr. Goldberg 
was financially sound. 

Mr. Lackritz. For the purposes of establishing his reliability for 
working in the campaign. Is that correct? 

Mr. Caut.field. That's correct. 

INTr. Lackritz. The campaign of 1972? 

INfr. Caitlfteld. That's correct. As I recall, he was about to go over 
to the Committee To Kc-Elect and there was. if I am not mistaken, 
there was an allegation that he may not have been financially sound, 
and that was one of the aims of the inquiry. 

Mr. IjAckritz. "^^Hien you say financially sound, do you mean 
solvent ? 

Mr. Caulfield. Solvent, yes. 

Mr. Lackritz. So, did you then obtain information from Mr. 
GoldberGf's tax returns to insure that he was financially solvent? 
fPanse.] Mr. Canlficld. T Avould just like to draw your attention to 
the last paragraph of A'onr inemorandum on that one page there. 
It savs. "inasmuch as Goldberor is scheduled to function in 1701 in 
the Jewish area, consideration should be given to a potential question 
of loyaltv with respect to the aims and purposes of that operation." 

Does that not indicate that the purpose of this memorandum was 
more to check on "Mr. Goldberg's political loyalty than his financial 
solvencv. and in fact, is that not the thrust of that whole 



* Spo I'.oolc 21. i>. !)7!)n. 



10367 

Mr. Caulfield. No, I wouldn't put it that way, just the way it's 
written. I think that the focus in the early part of the memorandum, 
regarding the request for financial information, was the thrust and 
focus of it, and I refer you to the first sentence of the memo which 
indicates that I had conferred with John McLaughlin. 

Mr. Lackritz. 'Wlio is John McLaughlin? 

Mr. Caulfield. He was then on the AVliite House staff and came 
from that area, if I am not mistaken. 

Mr. Lackritz. Is that Father INIcLaughlin ? 

I\Tr. Caulfield. Yes. And he referred me to Donald Wyatt, the 
U.S. marshal in Ehode Island, and I believe I had a conversation 
with him as well as a conversation with McLaughlin. I am fairly 
certain that John INIcLaughlin knew Lawrence Goldberg. 

Now. the information regarding his active participation in Jewish 
groups emanated from the inquiry. It was not the purpose of the 
inquiry, as I recall, and some of the comments, if T am not mistaken, 
that I received, both from McLaughlin and Wyatt led me to make 
the comment that I did in the last paragraph. 

So my answer to your question is that the aim and purpose of the 
inquiry was to establish whether or not Mr. Goldberg was financially 
solvent, and I followed through on that by speaking with Mr. Acree, 
and he provided the information that is contained on the last three 
pages. 

Mr. Lackritz. I see, and that information comes directly from the 
tax return of Mv. Goldberg, is that correct? 

Mr. Caulfield. Does it? 

Mr. Sears. Did you ever see INTr. Goldberg's tax return? 

Mr. Caulfield. No, I never saw it. 

Mr. Lackritz. But you were given this information? 

Mr. Caulfield. By ^Ir. Acree. And in all likelihood, I indicated to 
Mr. Acree that ]\Ir. Goldberg Avas going over to the Committee To 
Re-Elect and working in the Jewish area. 

Mr. Lackritz. Mr. Caulfield. drawing your attention — actually 
there are four pages that are tax information, as I understand it. 

Mr. Caui.field. Yes. 

Mr. Lackritz. And the second page of that tax information, does 
that item not appenr to be a Xerox of a tax return? 

Mr. Caut.field. "Wliich? 

Mr. Lackritz. Tlie second page. 

Mr. Caut.fiet^d. Yes. 

Mr. Lackritz. Tlmt is a Xerox of a tax return? 

Mr. Caut.field. Yes. 

Mr. Lackritz. And that was provided to you by Mv. Acree. is 
that correct? 

Mr. Caut.fietd. That is correct. 

Mr. Lackritz. Just tnrnin.q- back to vour mpmo which encloses this 
material, you said in your memorandum to l\fr. Dean that : 

The information postures an extremely lienvv involvemeTit in .Jewish organi- 
zational activitv. I flo not wish to raise this issue as'ain. However, in my 
diseretion, the Attorney General shoulrt be made clisoreetly aware of this. 

What did you mean by that ? 

Mr. Caulfield. I mean exactly what it says. 



10368 

Mr. Lackritz. Why did you want to have the Attorney General 
discreetly informed of this? 

Mr. Caulfield. Because the Attorney General, October 6, 1971, 
was going to be the head of the campaign, and I did not feel that 
this was necessarily a problem in any area, but other than the fact 
that the information given to me by Mr. Acree indicated a heavy 
involvement with Jewish organizations. Tn retrospect, it probably 
was a very good selection for Mr. Lawrence Goldberg to be involved 
in the Jewish area with this type of background and involvement 
with Jewish organizations. 

Mr. Lackritz. Was tliero some question of INfr. Goldberg's loyalty 
because of this heavy involvement in Jewish organizations? 

Mr. Caulfield. Only insofar as it should be — the people who were 
at the committee should be made aware of it. It does not in any way 
posture the possibility that IVIr. Goldberg would have been disloyal, 
but that it was a piece of intelligence information that they should 
be made aware of, and it came about as the result of the inquiry and 
the comments by Mr. McLaughlin and Mr. Donald Wyatt. 

Mr. Lackritz. All right, INfr. Caulfield. Did you ever make any 
requests to the Liternal Revenue Service on behalf of any other 
individual in the "Wliite House that a specific individual should be 
audited ? 

Mr. Caulfield. Mr. Dean — and again, I don't have the dates for 
you — indicated that he wanted to see if an audit could be instituted 
on an individual by the name of Greene, who was a reporter for the 
Long Island newspaper — I can't think of the name. 

Mr. Lackritz. Newsday? 

Mr. Caulfield. "NTewsday. INTr. Dean and I had a question regarding 
that request, and T indicated I would speak to Mr. Acree, with the 
view toward determining whether or not an ordered procedure might 
be instituted which would not l)o improper. 

Mr. Lackritz. Do you menu, would not be illegal ? 

Mr. Caitlfield. Yes; and I spoke to Mr. Acree on that matter, and 
he indicated that a means of accomplishing an audit sometimes was 
undortaken throuirh the — what is known ns an anonymous letter being 
written. T discussed it with l\Tr. Doan, and he indicated that I was to 
.<ro ahead and ask INIr. Acree to follow through on that procedure. 
Mr. Acree subsequontlv told me that he did. and I reported that back 
to Mr. Dean. 

Mr. Lackritz. i\fr. Acree subcequontly told you that he. in fact, 
sent an anonymous letter himself? 

Mr. Caulfield. No; he did not. He lod me to believe that an 
anonvmons letter did go out in a fashion Avhere it would not be 
considered illegal. 

Mr. Lackritz. And that ]\fr. Greene was under audit by the TT?S? 

Mr. Caulfteld. No: I don't know that for a fact. All he indicated 
is that an anonymous lettor was being sent in a fashion which would 
not be improper or illeiinl. 

Mr. Sears. Do you have any knowledge of exactly what INTr. Acree 
did. or did not do. about all of that? 

Mr. Caulfield. I have no specific knowledge about Avhat he did. 



10369 

Mv. Lackritz. Did INIr. Dean ever ask you for the results of any 
tax audit of Mr. Greene, if one occurred ? 

Mr. Caulfield. Would you repeat that, please? 

INIr. Lackritz. Did Mr. JDean ever ask you to obtain results of any 
tax audit on Mr. Robert Greene, if one occurred? 

Mr. Caulfield. The results? 

Mr. Lackritz. Yes. Did he ask you to follow up on that any 
further? 

Mr. Caulfield. No. I passed on to him what Mr. Acree told me. 

Mr. Lackritz. And INIr. Dean was 

Mr. Caulfield. Mr. Dean was satisfied with that. 

Mr. Lackritz. Did Mv. Dean make any other requests for tax audits 
of any other individuals to you? 

Mr. Caulfield. On one occasion, he asked that T bring Mr. Acree 
into his office, with the view that he w^anted to see if Mr. Acree could 
initiate audits on four individuals, three or four individuals. I am 
not sure of the number. T brought Mr. Acree into his office. Mr. Dean 
provided him with the names of four individuals, as I recall, I do 
not recall their names. INIr. Acree indicated that he would give it his 
attention. INIr. Acree and I had a conversation subsequent to that, and 
there was no action taken regarding the individuals requested. 

Mr. Sears. That you know of. 

Mr. Caulfield. That T am aware of, 

Mv. Lackritz. Who were those individuals? Do you have any 
knowledge ? 

Mr. Caulfield. T do not recall. 

Mr. Lackritz. Was this about the same timeframe as the request 
on Mr. Greene? 

Mr. Caulfield. T think it was subsequent to the request for Mr. 
Greene, but I could not give you an exact time. 

Mr. Lackritz. All right, I would like for you to tui'u to tab 10 *. 
please, of exhibit 1. The first memorandum there is a memorandum 
from you to Mi-. John W. Dean, dated September 10. Can you 
identify that memorandum. INIr. Caulfield? 

Mr. Caulfield. Yes; that is my memo. 

INIr. Lackritz. Why did you inquire into this information? Did 
Mr. Dean ask you to look into this? 

Mr. Caulfield. Yes. 

Mr. Lackritz. Could you just briefly read the memo to refresh your 
recollection on what occurred at that time? 

Mr. Caulfield. Yes. 

Mr. Lackritz. Do you recall who initiated this request in the 
White House? Did Mr. Dean tell you who asked him to look into 
the matter? 

Mr. Caulfield. No. 

Mr. Lackritz. Did you have any knowledge that Mr. Rebozo re- 
quested such an investigation? 

Mv. Caulfield. No; I have none. 

Mr. Lackritz. Did you ever discuss this matter with ]\Ir. Rebozo. 

Mr. Caulfiei,d. T had one conversation with IMi'. Rebozo, wherein 



* See Book 21, p. 9793. 



10370 

he indicated that there was an article coming up about him in News- 
day. But there was never anythin<r discussed that appears here in 
the memorandum. 

Mr. Lackritz. When was that conversation with INIr. Rebozo? 

INIr. Caulfield. I do not recall specifically. I am ^messing it would 
have been around the same time as this memorandum was written, 
but T think it was m.ore of an accidental meotino; that we had. Either 
T raised it. or he raised it. that tliere was an article. It was common 
knowledge in the White House that there was an article coming out 
about ]Mr. Rebozo. 

jNfr. Lackritz. Did Mr. Rebozo indicate to yo\i wliat the substance 
of the article was going to be ? 

]\fr. Caulfield. He seemed to know what the substance was, and I 
was not familiar with what the article was about. 

Mr. Lackritz. Was Mv. Rebozo pleased that the article was going to 
be coming out ? 

Mr. Caulfield. No ; I don't think that Avould be a fair characteri- 
zation. 

Mr. Lackritz. What was his reaction ? Do you recall ? 

Mv. Caulfield. Concern. T guess, is the Avord. 

Mr. Lackritz. Was he upset ? 

]\Ir. Caulfield. T don't know if he was upset. I would say concerned 
is the word. 

INIr. Lackritz. Did he indicate to you that he wanted any steps 
taken to either prohibit publication of the article, or any investigation 
done into the background of the reporters compiling the information? 

Mr. Caulfield. No; he did not make that request. 

Mr. Lackritz. Did you convey INIr. Rebozo's concern to Mr. Dean? 

Mr. Caulfield. I believe that I indicated to INIr. Dean that T had 
spoken to Mr. Rebozo about the article, and indicated that he appar- 
ently knew a lot more about it than wc did. 

iNIr. Lackritz. That Mv. Rebozo knew a lot more about it than von 
did? 

INIr. Caulfield. That is right. 

Mr. Lenzxer. Did Mr. Rebozo ask you to do anything? 

Mr. Caulfield. No. Mv. Rebozo. subsequent to that conversation, 
as T recall, did have conversations with Mv. Dean on the subject, but 
I was not privy to them. 

Mr. Lenzxer. Where did you meet Mr. Rebozo on this occasion? 

Mr. Caulfield. If I am not mistaken, I bumped into him in the hall 
at the White House. 

Mr. Lenzner. At the White House? 

Mr. Caitlfield. Yes. 

INIr. Lenzxer. And how was the subject of the Newsday article 
approached? 

Mr. Caulfield. I think T might have brought it up. 

Mr. Lexzxer. And how did you first learn about it? 

Mr. Caulfield. I first learned about it from a friend of mine in New 
York, who indicated it to me in a social conversation in New York 
City. 

Mr. Lexzxer. Who was that ? 

Mr. Caulfield. It's a personal fi-iend of mine Avho is an FBI agent. 



10371 

Mr. Lexzxer. '\Miat is his name? 

Mr. Sears. If we could cover tliat in the same fasliion as 

Mr. Lexzxer. Xo; that is not acceptable any more. We have to 
have his name for the record, and we're goin^ to start checking out 
these stories now. and I Avant his name for the record so we can start 
to corroborate some of these thinofs you are telling us. So would you 
please tell us who told you about this article? 

]Mr. Caulfield. His name is Pat Henry. 

]Mr. Lexzxer. And is he presently employed by the FBI in Xew 
York? 

Mr. Caulfield. Yes. 

Mr. Lexzxer. And how was it that he furnished you this infor- 
mation? Did you request him to? 

Mr. Caulfield. Xo; I didn't request it. He brought it up in the 
course of a conversation. 

i\Ir. Lexzxer. Where did you see him ? 

Mr. Cax'lfield. Over drinks. 

Mr. Lexzxer. In Washington or Xew York? 

Mr. Caulfield. X'^ew York. 

ISIr. Lexzxer. And w^as there any specific purpose why you were 
in Xew York on that occasion? 

Mr. Caulfield. He is a personal friend that I 

Mr. Sears. Why were you in Xew York on that occasion? 

Mr. Caulfield. I don't recall. I don't even recall when it was. It 
was probably sometime prior to— obviously, sometime prior to this 
memoi-andum. 

]Mr. Lexzxer. And is the information contained in this memo- 
randum the information you received from Mi-. Henry? 

Mr. Caulfield. Well, as I recall. ^Nlr. Henry apprised me of infor- 
mation that lie l)ecame awai'e of thi-ough his sources, and I do not 
know who those sources are. And I indicated an intei-est in it. and 
to keep me appi'ised if he had any additional iiiforniation with 
respect to the article. 

Xow. who his sources are. again. I do not know, and the results 
of what he learned about tlie publication of the article are, as I indi- 
cated, hei'e in the memorandum. And. I repeat, it was on a strict 
social basis that it was first brought to my attention. I did indicate 
to him. if he had any additional information al)ont the timing of 
the article — because, as I recall, ]\Ir. Dean and appai-ently other 
members of the staff were interested as to when the ai'ticle was going 
to be — well, the series of articles were going to be published. 

Mr. Lexzxer. Had Mr. Henry asked vori. or you asked him. to see 
each other with regard to the subject, the first time you discussed it? 

Mr. Caulfield. I don't understand the question. 

Mr. Lexzxer. Had you met with him for the specific purpose of 
discussing this article? 

Ml-. Cai"i>fieli). Xo. it came up. as I indicated, in the course of a 
social luncheon that Ave had. 

Mr. Lexzxer. Prior to X^ew York? 

Mr. Caulfield. It was not specifically requested of Mr. Henry that 
he was to develop or ol>tain information of this type. He raised it — 
as I recall, he said. "There's an article; I don't know whether you 



10372 

have heard, but there is an article coming: out on Mr. Rebozo," and I 
said, "I hadn't heard," and he said. "Would you be interested if 
there's any information,'' and I said, "I sure would." And that's the 
genesis of my involvement in tliis thin<i. 

INIr. Lenzxer. So, the first time vou knew about the article was 
from Mr. Henry, of the FBI? 

Mr. Caulfiet.d. That's riirht. 

IMr. Lenzxer. And at the time you saw INIr. Henry, you had not 
previously had the conversation with Acree about running a tax 
audit on Mr. Greene? 

Mr. Caulfield. No. 

Mr. Lexzner. And that was sometime after that? 

Mr. Caulfield. Sometime after that. 

INIr. Lenzxer. Did you write a memorandum after your initial 
meeting with INIr. Henry to ]\Ir. Dean, alerting him to the fact that 
Xewsday Avas doing this? 

INIr. Caulfield. I don't know. 

Mr. Lex^^zxer. To the best of your recollection; you do not have to 
look at the documents right now. 

Mv. Caulfield. As I say. I don't know. I don't know what the time- 
frame is. 

Mr. Lex'zxer. All right. You are telling us, now, that at some 
point later. INIr. Henry came back to you. and furnished you with 
the information contained in your memorandum of September 10. 
1971. that you are looking at. and that included "a discreet look at the 
newspaper's publication calendar has been accomplished. There is 
no indication at this time that the subject series of articles will 
appear during the month of September." That information came 
from Mr. Henry? 

IVfr. Caulfield. That is correct. 

Mr. Lex'zx'er. And item B. "TTnusual and highly secretive steps 
have lieen taken to prevent the substance of the article from becoming 
known to other emplovees." That also came from Mr. Henrv. of the 
FBI? 

Mr. Caulfield. Tliat's correct. 

INIr. Lexzxer [reading] : 

A trusted member of the newspaper's staff has stated that heavy outside 
pressure is being exerted to uncover the details of the story before publica- 
tion. Tliis pressure is independent of the efforts being programmed from my 
office. 

On this sentence, did the information relating to a trusted member 
of the newspaper staff also come from Mr. Henry of the FBI? 

Mr. Caulfield. That's correct. 

Mr. Lexzxer. Do you know if the FBI connected any official 
investigation of this article? 

Mr. Caulfield. No. 

Mr. Lexzxer. Mr. Plenry did this on his own initiative — at your 
suggestion mei-ely called somebody that he knew at the newspaper? 

Mr. Caulfield. That's the best characterization of it. 

Mr. Lexzxer. What do you base that on ? Did Mr. Henry so 
advise you ? 



10373 

Mr. Caulfield. That/s right. Mr. Henry, as I recall, had friends 
at the newspaper, and my impression was that he spoke to those 
friends about the publication date of the article. 

Mr. Lexzxer. And the last sentence of that paragraph C indicates 
that the pressure that Henry spoke about was "independent of the 
efforts being programed from office,'' presumably to uncover the 
details of the story before publication. What efforts were you 
making at that time to uncover details of the story ? 

]Mr. Caulfield. I think I was doing nothing more than speaking 
to Mr. Henry, period. 

Mr. LexzWer. That's the only effort you ever made to uncover 
the details of the story before publication, Mr. Caulfield? Is that 
your answer? 

Mr. Caltlfield. Yes. 

Mr. Lenzner. And "A firm concensus has been reached with Ed 
Guthman of the Los Angeles Times who is close to this matter. It 
is alleged that he was in New York at the time of the planning 
stages of the inquiry."' Where did that information come from? 

Mr. Caiti.field. I don't know where I got that from. 

Mr. Lexzner. You're not sure you got that from Mr. Henry? 

Mr. Caulfield. I don't believe I got that from Mr. Henry. 

Mr. Lexzner. Do vou have anv recollection as to where you did 
get it? 

Mr. Caulfield. No. 

Mr. Lexzxer. That would indicate to me, sir, that you were in 
contact with at least one other individual with regard to this News- 
day problem. 

Mr. Caulfield. I think that the forthcoming Newsday article 
was a matter of constant conversation around the White House at 
that time, and I could have, in all likelihood, have picked it up in 
that fashion. I don't remembei- who — this Gutliman reference. I think, 
is conjectural on the part of people that I might have spoken to 
at that time. 

Mr. Lexzxer. Would that include Mr. Eebozo? 

Mr. Cal^lfield. No. I had one conversation with Mr. Rebozo on 
the subject, as I just described, and othei-s. 

Mr. Lexzxer. And the one conversation did not relate in any 
way to him requesting you to get investigative information ? 

Mr. Caulfield. No. As I have indicated, Mr. Dean and Mr. 
Rebozo got together following my conversation with Mr. Rebozo. 
I indicated that it sounded like an article was coming out on him, 
and my impression was that he knew about it, and any further 
conversations by Mr. Rebozo took place between him and Mr. Dean. 

Mr, Lexzxer. I take it the conversations you ovei^heard in the 
'\^niite House were subsequent to the time that Mr. Henry first 
advised you that a Newsda}^ article Avas pending? 

Mr. Caulfield. ^'es. 

Mr. Lexzxer. And item E of your memo of September 10 relates, 
"Robert Greene, leader of the investigative group, has been in both 
Washington and Florida within the past 2 weeks.'' What was the 
source of that information? 



10374 

Mr. Caulfipxd. I believe tlial conies from Mr. Henry. 

Mr. Lexzner. And do you know liow lie learned that? 

Mr. Caulfield. I assume from the same person he was talking to 
at the newspaper. 

Mr. Lenzner. Was any electronic surveillance, to youi- knowledge, 
conducted on any of the Newsday employees to obtain this infor- 
mation? 

Mr. Caulfield. I have no knowledge of that. 

Mr. Lenzner. Do you know if any physical surveillance was 
conducted ? 

Mr. Caulfield. No. The only thing on that is, I believe — off the 
record for a second. 

[Discussion oil the record.] 

Mr. Caulfield. Back on the record. I have a vague recollection 
of Mr. Dean indicating to me that the Secret Service was taking 
a look at the newsi^aper reporter team that was in Key Biscayne 
putting together this story. But I have no further specifics on it. 

Mr. Lenzner. Mr. Dean indicated it to you ? 

Mr. Caulfield. I believe so. 

Mr. Lenzner. Did you have any conversation with Mr. Boggs or 
any other employee of the Secret Service with respect to that? 

Mr. Caulfield. No. 

Mr. Lenzner. Do you remember ever getting information from 
the Secret Service ? 

JVIr. Caulfield. No. 

Mr. Lenzner. Is it conceivable — well, I withdraw that. To the 
best of your recollection, though, the information with respect to 
Greene being in Florida came from Mr. Henry and not from Dean 
— from the Secret Service? 

Mr. Caulfield. I belie^'e Mr. Henry just mentioned that his source 
had told him that Robert Greene was in Florida. 

Mr. Lenzner. Did INIr. Henry ever tell you that this whole article 
was being financed by the Kennedys or the Kennedy Fonndation? 

Mr. Caulfield. No. 

Mr. Lenzner. Did Mr. Rebozo ever so indicate to you? 

Mr. Caulfield. I think the next page here 

Mr. Lenzner. That's what I am getting at. 

Mr. Caulfield. I am just trying to recall where I got that. If 
you have no objection, I would like to look at that. 

Mr. Lenzner. Certainly. Go right ahead. 

Mr. Caulfield. Loolcing at that memorandum, I am fairly cer- 
tain that this was an allegation that had come to tlie attention of 
Mr. Dean, and I was asked to see if I could establish if this were, 
in fact, the case. 

Mr. Lenzner. When you are saying that. INIr. Caulfield. do you 
refer to the subject of the memorandum of October 4, 1071, "The 
Newsday article was certainly financed by Kennedy Foundation"? 

Mr. Caulfield. Yes. 

Mr. Lenzner. And are you saying now you believe this informa- 
tion came to you from Mi". Dean ? 

Mr. Caulfield. I believe this was an allegation that Mr. Dean 
passed on to me, and I was asked to see if I could establish whether 



1037i5 

or not that were a fact, one way or another. And my memorandum 
is self-exphanatory. 

Mr. Lexzxer. And are you saying that you never had a con- 
versation with iSIr. Rebozo where this subject came up ? 

Mr. Caulfield. I haA^e no recollection of any such conversation. 

Mr. Lenzxer. The last paragraph said, ''I would suggest, however, 

that consideration be given to an oblique Nofziger" — X-o-f-z-i-g-e-r 

— "an immediate drop vis-a-vis the Kennedys, Newsday, the Los 

Angeles Times, et ah, sort of to relate that we are aware." 

Whatdid that mean? 

Mr. Caulfield. It meant simply that consideration should be given 
as to whether or not Lyn Nofziger — Lyn Nofziger raised the ques- 
tion as to whether or not there was a — raised the question in the 

publication 

Mr. Sears. Could we go off the record for just a moment? 
[Discussion off the record.] 

Mr. Caulfield. Well, what T meant was that consideration be 
given to have Lyn Nofziger speak with friends that he had in the 
media with a view toward raising the question as to whether or not 
the Newsday article was financed by the Kennedy Foundation. 

Mr. Lexzxer. In other words, is it unfair to characterize that as 
a suggestion that might be leaked to the newspapers — that the Ken- 
nedy Foundation was behind this Newsday article ? 

Mr. CxVULFiELD. I wouldn't say leaked, but as an investigative 
lead for members of the press with whom Mr. Nofziger could 
confer. 

Mr. Lexzxer. Well, my recollection is — and it is not always per- 
fect — but the last time we discussed this memorandum, some months 
ago, you used the word "leak'" as describing what you intended to 
mean by this sentence. I'm not ffoing to argue with vou about it, 

but ^ ' . 

Mr. Caulfield. Well, leak in the sense that, looking at it today, 
I would say that, certainly, if Lyn Nofziger could come up with 
information which would substantiate the allegation, Avhich I recom- 
mended against that as a possibility, or have Mr. Nofziger speak to 
a member of the press to see whether or not this might not be 
passed on to people that he knew in the media as a question that 
a particular reporter might want to explore. 
Mr. Lex-^zx'er. Do you know if it was ever done ? 
Mr. Caulfield. I don't believe so. 

Mr. Lexzx^er. Was there any followup after this memorandum, 
to your knowledge or recollection ? 
Mr. Caulfield. Not that I I'ecall. 

Mr. Lex^zxer. Now, when you talked with Mr. Acree and INIr. 
Dean with regard to the audit on Mr. Greene, there was no ques- 
tion, I take it, that that audit was related directly to the series of 
articles that Mr. Greene was pursuing with regard to Mr. Rebozo? 
Mr. Caulfield. There was no question that Mr. Dean ordered 
me to see how an audit might be done on Mr. Greene, how it might 
be done in a way that might not be illegal. 



10376 

Mr. Lenzner. And did Mr. Dean indicate to you at that time 
that stimulation for this was because of Mr. Greene's relationship 
to the Rebozo articles? 

Mr. Caulfieij). I don't recall if he said that specifically, but it 
was certainly implied. 

Mr. Lenzner. Did you not pass that on to INIr. Acree ? 

Mr. Caulfield. T' do not recall whether or not I got into the 
specifics of the implied rationale behind the re(iuest. 

Mr. Lenzner. On September 17, 1972, you advised Mr. Lackritz 
and myself and Mr. Sears in Mr. Sears' office, that "On one occa- 
sion the question was raised of how an audit could be done on the 
guy who did the article on Bebe Rebozo from Newsday." 

is that your recollection now as to how that information came 
to you ? 

Mr. Caulfield. I think it implied that the interest in an audit 
being done on Mr. Greene stems from the forthcoming article. 

Mr. Lenzner. And did you so indicate to Mr. Acree? 

Mr. Caulfield. Again I say I don't know whether I indicated 
that to him or not. T don't recall. 

Mr. Lenzner. Did thei'e evei- come a time when a request for a 
tax audit was forwarded on to Mr. Earth? 

Mr. Caulfield. I don't recall at this moment. I don't believe so. 

Mr. Lenzner. All right. On the same day, September 17, 1073 — 
I'm sorry. It was a memo dated in oui- files September 17 but the 
meeting actually took place, or the interview, on September 11, 
1073, at approximately 4 p.m. with you, INIr. Caulfield. And you 
told us that you did lia\'e knowledge of a request for a tax audit 
which was forwarded on for Earth to do. 

Mr. Caulfield. A tax audit ? 

Mr. Lenzner. Yes. Do you have a recollection of telling lis that? 

Mr. Sears. I don't recall him telling you of any audits ever for- 
warded on to Earth to do. 

Mr. Caulfield. Neither do I. 

Mr. Lenzner. This came up immediately after you described the 
fact that Dean wanted three or four audits done, and Acree was 
brought over to explain the jirocess. And you said you did have 
knowledge of a request for a tax audit which was forwarded to 
Earth. That's from my notes. 

Mr. Caulfield. I think what you are talking about there is some 
memo that's lying ai-ound about a tax exempt organization. Aren't 
Ave talking about that? 

Mr. Sears. I don't know what it refers to. 

Mr. Caulfield. I didn't discuss a tax audit with INIr. Earth. I know 
of none. You peo])le might have showed me a memorandum which — 
and I indicated to you tliat that came from Mr. Earth. Eut I don't 
think it was a tax audit. It was information about a tax exempt 
foundation, I think, if you will check your records. 

Mr. Lenzner. You ha\e no recollection now of t<^lling us that, 
though ? 

Mr. Caulfield. Not in that context, no. I think you showed me a 
memo and I indif'ated that I got it from Mr. Earth, and it was 
not a tax audit. 



10377 

Mr. Lexzner. Let me see if I can help you out. 

Turn to tab 26*. 

First, can you identify the cover sheet on White House stationery 
dated February 4, 1972, from yourself to John Dean III? 

Mr. Caulfield. Yes. 

Mr. Lexzner. Were the attached documents prepared by you? 

Mr. Caulfield. Can I review them ? 

Mr. Sears. Which one are you referring to now? 

Mr. Lexzner. Can you identify either of them as being prepared 
by you ? 

Mr. Caulfield. I don't think the first one is mine, and the second 
one is. 

Mr. Lexzxer. Are you referi-nig to tlie second one as the memo 
from you to Mr. Dean on February 17, 1972, subject: fund for 
investigative journalism ? 

Mr. Caulfield. Yes. And I made that request of ]Mr. Barth. That 
is what I was just referring to. 

Mr. Lexzner. And did you make the request for more detailed 
information relative to these matters, as referred to in your last 
paragraph of that memorandum ? 

Mr. Caulfield. No. I think the matter just died right there. I have 
no further recollection on that. 

Mr. Lenzxer. You are saying on February 17, you wrote a memo 
telling Mr. Dean that you had made a request for more detailed 
information relative to these matters and "will be in hand on a dis- 
creet basis during the early part of next week," and that that state- 
ment was false? 

Mr. Caulfield. No. It's just that I didn't follow through on it. 

Mr. Lexzxer. You never made the request referred to in the para- 
graph ? 

IMr. Caulfield. I think I would say that many of these things — 
this is talking about February 1972 — I was out of the White House 
10 days later, OK? And if I had been there, perhaps there might 
have been a followu]:), but there was no foUownj:). Eleven days after 
this was written, I left the White House. 

IMr. Lexzxer. So vou are saying you made no effort to follow 
that up? 

Mr. Caulfield. I am saying that I have no recollection, nor do I 
believe there was anything further done on the fund for investigative 
journalism. 

Mr. Lexzx'er. Did you ever request a tax audit? 

Mr. Caulfield. No. 

Mr. Lexzxp:r. Do you know if a tax audit was ever requested on it? 

Mr. Caulfield. I have no knowledge of this, and if I recall my 
conversation with Mr. Barth. this was the information contained 
in a public document vrhich ho went and looked at which he had 
in his office. 

Mr. Lexzxer. Paragra]:>h 2 in that document says, "It has also 
been learned that the FFIJ was tlie financial medium for the financ- 



See Book 21, p. 9S77. 



10378 

ing of the My Lai massacre stories written by Seymour Hersh." 
"What was the source of that information ? 
Mr. Caulfield. That was Mr. Barth, 

Mr. Lenzner. And do you know what the source of the information 
was to him ? 

Mr. Caulfield. No — T would like to just rephrase that. It may not 
have been Mr. Barth. It may have appeared in the press, and I was 
recalling it at that time. 

Mr. Lenzner. Any other possibilities? 

Mr. Caulfield. No, that is all. 

Mr. Lenzner. Do you have any recollection of asking Mr. ITlase- 
wicz to conduct an investigation with regard to the Fund For Invest- 
igative Journalism ? 

Mr. Caulfield. I have no recollection of that. 

Mr. Lenzner. Do you have any i-ecollection of requesting INIr. 
Ulasewicz to do an investigation into tlie background of Mr. Ronald 
Ridenhour ? 

Mr. Caulfield. Who? 

Mr. Lenzner. Mr. Ridenhour. the individual that brought the de- 
tails of the My Lai incident to Mr. Hersh. 

Mr. Caulfield. Yes. It was many months prior to this memoran- 
dum and I was directed to have Mr. I"'^lasewicz interview the so-called 
My Lai principals with a view toward determining whether or not 
what they were saying publicly was, in fact, wliat they Avould say 
privately. 

Mr. Lackritz. I see. "Who directed you to conduct this investiga- 
tion? 

Mr. Caulfield. Mr. Ehrlichman. 

Mr. Lackritz. And did you direct Mr. Ulasewicz to conduct pre- 
text interviews with the principals involved in breaking the My Lai 
story ? 

Mr. Caulfield. I directed him to interview the individuals whose 
names were appearing in the paper at that time as making com- 
ments relative to the My Lai massacre, which he did. 

Mr. Lackritz. And he did these on a pretext basis? 

Mr. Caulfield. I don't know how he did it. 

Mr. Lackritz. Did he send you any memorandums from these 
interviews ? 

Mr, Caulfield. No, he reported back to me verbally. 

Mr. Lackritz. On the telephone ? 

Mr. Caulfield. Yes. 

Mr. Lackritz. Did you make any requests to Mr. T"^lasewicz to do 
anything further with respect to the Fund for Investigative Jour- 
nalism? 

Mr. Caulfield. I don't believe Mr. UlaseAvicz was invoh'ed with 
the Fund for Investigative Journalism. 

Mr. Lackritz. In your ]irevious request to Mr. Ulasewicz, did you 
ask him to interview Mr. Seymour Ilei-sh ? 

Mr. Caulfield. No; I did not. 

Mr. Lenzner. Did you ever have any discussions with Mr. Halde- 
man or receive directions fi-om Mr. Haldeman, directly or indirectly, 
dealing with tax information? 



10379 

Mr. Caulfield. No. 

Mr. Lackritz. Do you recall any occasions when you might have 
discussed any tax information with Mr. ITaldeman, Mr. Caulfield? 

Mr. Caulfield. I have never had any conversations Avith Mr. 
Haldeman on tax matters that I can recall. 

Mr. Lackritz. Do you recall telling Mr. Lenzner and myself in our 
session on September 11 that — just let me check the date on that, Mr. 
Caulfield. On September 11, do you recall telling us that occasionally 
you discussed tax information with Mr. Haldeman. 

Mr. Caulfield. No. That is totally inaccui-ate. From time to time 
there would be an inquiry or investigation that might be accom- 
plished for Mr. Haldeman, but I personally have never ever had a 
conversation with Mr. Haldeman about tax matters that I can recall. 

Mr. Lackritz. But do you recall telling us that? 

Mr. Caulfield. Frankly, I do not. 

Mr. Lackritz. And you don't recall telling us, and you are now 
saying that that information would not be accurate if you did tell us? 

Mr. Caulfield. That would not be accurate. 

Mr. Lackritz. Mr. Caulfield, can you turn to tab 18* now, please, 
in that packet labeled exhibit 1 ? 

First of all, can you identify the memorandum dated June 25, 
1071, from yourself to John Dean Til ? 

Mr. Caulfield. Yes. 

Mr. Lackritz. How did this inquiry arise initially ? 

Could you just look at that first memorandum, Mr. Caulfield? 
[Pause.] Do you i-ecall how that inquiry was initiated, Mr. Caul- 
field? Did you initiate it yourself? 

Mr. Caulfield. I do not recall specifically who initiated the inquiry 
but there was considerable interest in the film which is the subject 
of the memoi-andiun, "Millhouse: A "White Comedy." 

Mr. Lackritz. The first paragraph in your memorandum states : 
""Your attention is directed to the attached article from tlie Wash- 
ington Post."' 

Do you recall what the FBI report on DeAntonio was? That's 
capital D-e capital A-n-t-o-n-i-o. 

Mr. Sears. Can we go off the record for just a moment? 

[Discussion olT the record.] 

Mr. Caulfield. T would lilce to go on the record. All right? 

Mr. Lackritz. Yes. 

Mr. Caulfield. This film was receiving significant coverage in the 
press, and, as I recall, INIr. Dean asked me to run a name-check on 
Mr. DeAntonio, who is the producer of the film. 

Mr. Lackritz. A name-check with 

Mr. Caulfield. A name-check Avith the FBI, and also to stay on 
top of the progress of the film as it Avas covered in the neAVspaper 
stories. Noav, the first sentejice is merely forAvarding on the results 
of the FBI name-check and an article that appeared in the Wash- 
ington Post regarding the film. 

Mr. Lackritz. All right. What Avas the information contained in 
the FBI name-check? 



* See Book 21, p. !(,S2n. 



10380 

Mr. Caulfieli). This Avould bo a normal type name-check which 
the FBI ran, I mean the White House ran, on many occasions. 

Mr. Lackritz. And, (generally, wliy would the White House run 
a name-check M'ith the FBI? Was it to clear political appointees of 
some kind ? 

Mr, Cauuteld. Normally, that would be the procedure. But also 
the capability existed within Mv. Dean's office to make an FBI 
check as it was deemed advisnble, 

Mr. Lackritz. I see. Who did you ask to conduct the FBI check, 
Mr. Caulfield? 

Mr. Caulfield. I don't recall specifically, but it would have been, 
following the normal procedure, it would have been either through 
Mr. Butterfield's office — he was the contact point at the "\ATiite House 
— or possibly, since it was coming from Mr. Dean, directly to Mr. 
Bob Haynes, who Avas the T^^iite House liaison. 

Mr. Lackritz. They would send the information back to you? 

Mr. Caulfield. That information Avould be procedurally routed 
through my office and forwarded on to the requesting party. 

Mr. Lackritz. In your last paragraph there, you say : 

I recommend we watch the progress of the fihii. taking particular note 
to determine if Larry O'Brien is stupid enough to get behind it. If so. we can, 
armed with the Bureau's information, do a Nofziger job on DeAntonio and 
O'Brien. 

Wliat do you mean by doing a Nofziger job on DeAntonio and 
O'Brien? I take it that means that you Avould — well, go ahead. Why 
don't you just explain Avhat it means? 

Mr. Caulfieij). Well, obviously 

Mr. Sears. Let's go off the record just a minute. 

[Discussion off the record.] 

Mr. Caulfield. Similar to what T have stated before, if it were 
determined that Mr. O'Brien, involved as he was with the Demo- 
cratic Party, were to use this film for political purposes. Mr. Nof- 
ziger could make that known to his contacts within the media and 
attempt to gain one-upsmanship. 

Mr. Lackritz. Mr. Caulfield, as I read your sentence, "If so, we 
can, armed Avith the Bureau's infoi-mation," and your reference to 
the Bureau's information would refer to information on DeAntonio, 
or DeAntonio and O'Brien ? 

Mr. Caulfield. No, DeAntonio. 

Mr. Lackritz. And Avhat Avas this information? Do you recall that? 
I take it it AA-as derogatory. 

Mr. Caulfield. I don't recall specifically AAdiat Avas contained 
there, and T Avould haA'o difficulty speaking to it now. 

Mr. Lackritz. I take it — you used the term "Nofziger job." 

Mr. Caulfield. Nofziger job, Avhat I mean by that is let him, Lyn 
Nofziger, Avhose talents in that area Avere mucli ccreater than anyone 
else around the "\^Tiite House, he could make the best political use 
of it, if, in fact, there A\-as a political use of the film on the opposi- 
tion side. 

Mr. Lackritz. I understand that, Mr. Caulfield. 

Mr. Caitlfield. But that's Avhat T moan about tho sentence. 



10381 

Mr. Lackritz. Well, let me phrase it a different way. You say you 
are going to do a Xofziger job, whicli I take it, then, means raismg 
or mentioning this information to reporters in the news media. 

Mr. Caulfield. Possibly mentioning it to them but not neces- 
sarily- 



Mr. Lackritz. Raising questions with them, as you stated earlier. 
Mr. Caulfield. No. As I stated earlier it would be postured as a 

lead. 

Mr. Lackritz. Isn't that raising questions with reporters in the 

media, Mr. Caulfield? 

Mr. Caulfield. You characterize it, Marc, your way, and 111 char- 
acterize it mv way. 

Mr. Lackritz." I'm just referring to your prior testimony of, I 

believe, this morning. 

Mr. Caulfield. All right. 

Mr. Lenzner. Do vou remember saving that this morning? 

Mr. Caulfield. I 'think I phrased' it a little differently this morn- 
ing. I think I phrased it the way I just stated it. that it would be up 
to Mr. Nofziger to decide how the matter would be handled, and if 
he wanted to leak it to the newspapers or if he Avanted to mention it 
to a reporter who might take an interest in it as a story angle, that 
would be up to him. But it certainly was not my job. 

Mr. Lackritz. And your intention was to provide this information 
from, the Bureau to Mr. Xofziger so that he could make that connec- 
tion. Is that correct ? 

Mr. Caulfield. The suggestion was that it could be considered. 

Mr. Sears. According to this memo, it could be that Mr. O'Brien 
made political use of the film, in Mr. Caulfield's words — that's not 
contained in the memo, but that is what he has explained by his men- 
tion of Mr. O'Brien's name, not that he had any information linking 
Mr. O'Brien and Mr. DeAntonio. 

Mr. IvACKRiTz. No ; but I take it 

Mr. Lenzner. Is that true? Did you not have any information link- 
ing Mr. DeAntonio to Mr. O'Brien? 

Mr. Caulfield. No ; I liad no specific information. 

Mr. Lenzner. Did the FBI reports indicate any relationship? 

Mr. Caulfield. No. 

Mr. Lenzner. By the way, with regard to the FBI reports, when 
you got a report back on a name-check for possible employment, 
would the Bureau furnish you with the entire investigative file on 
that name-check, or would they simply send you a summary? 

Mr. Caulfield. No. I think, if I recall correctly how that worked, 
it would just be in typical FBI summary fashion, is the way I recall. 
They did not, I don't believe, turn over the file. 

Mr. Sears. The raw file. 

Mr. Caulfield. The raw file. It Avould have been just a summary 
of what their files contained. 

Mr. Lenzner. If they had negative information, that would be 
contained in the survey, though ? 

Mr. Caulfield. Not even necessarily negative information. I don't 
think. It would be whatever is contained in their files, summarized. It 
would not have to be negative. 



31-889 O - 74 - pt. 22 - 13 



10382 

Mr. Lenzner. But it would include negative information if they 
had such? 

Mr. Caulfield. Yes. 

Mr. Lackritz. And I take it you are also testifying today that on 
several occasions, at the direction of somebody else, you requested the 
Bureau to do a check on individuals, even though those individuals 
were not prospective employees of the administration ? 

Mr. Caulfield. The only one that comes to mind is this one here. 

Mr. Lackritz. So you are testifying today, under oath, that the 
only time you ever asked the Bureau to conduct a check on any indi- 
vidual who was not a prospective employee of the "White House or 
the administration was Mr. DeAntonio ? 

Mr. Sears. He's testifying that's the only one he recalls, if I under- 
stand him. Correct? 

Mr. Caulfield. That's correct. 

INIr. Lenzxer. And is it not — you would recall, would you not, if 
you had made other checks on people that were not prospective em- 
ployees of the nature of this kind of a request? 

Mr. Caulfield. Yes, I Avould recall, but the only one that I recall 
at the moment is the subject right here, Mr. DeAntonio. 

Mr. Lenzxer. And I take it you recall that because we happen to 
have a memorandum of it ? 

Mr. Caulfield. That's correct. 

Mr. Lexzxer. And do you recall the nature of the information that 
you received on INIr. DeAntonio? Did it include negative or derogatory 
information? 

Mr. Caulfield. I don't recall that. 

Mv. Sears. Can Ave go off the record for just a second? 

[Discussion off the record.] 

Mr. Lexzxer. I am suggesting that perhaps Mr. Sears and Mr. 
Caulfield would like to take a short break for lunch and use that pe- 
riod of time to i-eview the tab memorandum that we are now referring 
to, in an effort to refresh your recollection, INIr. Caulfield. 

Mr. Sears. Thank you. 

[Whereupon, at 1 p.m., the hearing in the above-entitled matter was 
recessed to reconvene at 1 :4:5 p.m. the same day.] 

Afternoox Sessiox' 

Mr. Lackritz. Mr. Caulfield, have you had a chance to review tab 
18 during the lunch break? 

Mr. Caulfield. Yes, T have. 

Mr. Lackritz. Do you recall if the informatioji received from the 
FBI Avas of a derogatory nature about Mi". DeAntonio? 

Mr. Caulfieijd. Yqs, T recall the information containing — FBI in- 
formation which indicated derogatory information. 

Mr. Sears. In Avhat regard ? 

Mr. Caulfield. In regard to the radical activities of Mr. DeAn- 
tonio. 

Mr. Lackritz. Do you mean his previous radical activities? 

Mr. Caulfield. Yes. 

Mr. Lackritz. Is this the infoi-mation to which you are referring 
in your memo of June 25, 1971 ? 



10383 

Mr. Caulfield. Yes. 

Mr. Lackritz. "Armed with the Bureau's information". 

Mr. Caulfield. That's correct. 

Mr. Lackritz. Turning to your memorandum of August 10, 1971, 
do you recognize the memo? I see there is no signature on that. Do 
you recall writing that? 

Mr. Caulfield. Yes. 

Mr. Lackritz. And in the first paragraph you state : 

As the accompanying articles indicate, tliis apparently is not the same format 
as "Millhouse: A White Comedy," which we looked into and determined sig- 
nificant derogatory information on the producer, Emile DeAntonio. 

Is this the reference to the information you received from the FBI 
on this matter? 

Mr. Caulfield. That's correct. 

Mr. Lackritz. The subject of this memo, dated August 10, 1971, 
from yourself to Mr. Dean, is a showing of the uncut film of Richard 
Nixon's 1952 Checkers speech. 

Mr. Caulfield. That's correct. 

Mr. Lackritz. Did Mr. Dean ask you to look into this matter, too ? 

Mr. Caulfield. Yes. 

Mr. Lackritz. The only other question I have about that memo, 
Mr. Caulfield, is the second to the last paragraph where you say: 

I will have someone take a look at the Washington showing of the Checkers 
Speecli once it is advertised, with a view towards determining if the showing 
is a shady money-making scheme or a politically directed attack, or both. 

Who were you going to have check out the showing? Who is the 
individual ? 

Mr. Caulfield. I believe I asked my secretary to go and view the 
film. 

Mr. Lackritz. Your secretary, being whom ? 

Mr. Caulfield. Miss Anne Dawson. 

Mr. Lackritz. And she was to make the determination? 

Mr. Caulfield. She was supposed to report back to me and I would 
make the determination. 

Mr. Lackritz. I see. And what importance was there in terms of 
the distinction betM'een a shady money-making scheme or a politically 
directed attack? In other words, was there a significance in terms of 
what your subsequent actions Avere going to be based upon the deter- 
mination ? 

Mr. Caulfield. I do not quite understand the question. 

Mr. Lackritz. As I understand your memorandum to IVIr. Dean, 
you are trying to determine whether the film is a shady money-mak- 
ing scheme or a politically directed attack. 

Mr. Caulfield. Yes. 

Mr. Lackritz. I take it there would be some difference in terms 
of your followup activity once you made that determination. In 
other words, that was an important distinction to discover, was it 
not? I do not think it is a major point. 

Mr. Caulfield. No, it is not a major point. I am not so sure that 
there was necessarily anything planned following the viewing of the 
film. The film had just come out and my source apparently was Bus- 



10384 

iness Week, and T think it would be improper to make the statement 
that there was ^oing to be anything folloAvinjo:, other than the view- 
ing of the film and makino; a'indp:ment as to what it was all about. 

Mr. Lackkttz. Do yon know if that jndirment was made? 

Mr. Sears. What 'did Miss Dawson report to you after she had 
seen the film? 

Mr. Caulfield. She reported to me her observations. 

Mr. Sears. What were they? 

Mr. Caulfield. Which in substance was that it was an uncut film 
of Richard Nixon's 1952 Checkers speech, and I recall her indicating 
that the audience was chucklino- throughout the entire speech. 

Mr. Lackritz. Did you take any subse(|uent action ? 

Mr. Caulfield. No, there Avas no subsequent action taken. 

Mr. Lackritz. Of any kind ? 

Mr. Caulfield. Of any kind. 

Mr. Lackritz. That includes inquiry into the IRS about the pro- 
ducer, or inquiry to tlie FBI on a name-check of the producer of the 
uncut version of the Checkers speech. 

Mr. Caulfield. I don't recall who the producer of the Checkers 
speech was, and I don't see it here, 

Mr. Sears. Did you make any inquiry? 

Mr. Caulfield. No, I did not. 

Mr. Lackritz. I would like you to turn to the next page, which 
is a memorandum dated October 6, 1071, from Mort Allin to Mr. 
H. R. Haldeman, and a copy to you. Do you recall seeing this memo- 
randum ? 

Mr. Caulfield. Yes, I do. 

Mr. Lackritz. Was there any action taken subsequent to this mem- 
orandum that you can recall ? 

Mr. Caulfield. [Nods in the negative.] 

Mr. Lackritz. I take it your answer is No. 

Mr. Caulfield. I don't recall any action being taken. 

Mr. Lackritz. Turn the page to the next memorandum, dated 
Octobei- 13, 1971, from yourself to John W. Dean III, the subject 
being the Millhouse film. Do you recognize that memorandum? 

Mr. Caulfield. Yes. 

Mr. Lackritz. And that is your memorandum? 

Mr. Caulfield. Yes. 

Mr. Lackritz. Could you explain what you mean there in the first 
paragraph where you say: "This matter seems to be building, "^'ou 
are reminded that a significant derogatory dossier is in the posses- 
sion of the Bureau, vis-a-vis DeAntonio.'' What do you mean by "the 
matter seems to be building? 

Mr. Caitlfield. What I meant by that was there began to appear 
in the media moi-e extensive covei-age of the filuL That is wliat I 
meant. 

Mr. Lackritz. The film Avas apparently becoming commercially 
successful ? 

Mr. Caulfield. I don't know if it was successful, but was being 
carried more extensively by the media. 

Mr. Lackritz. Was being shown widely? 

Mr. Sears. And being commented upon widely. 



10385 

Mr. Catjlfield. Commented on by the media, yes. 

Mr. Lackritz. You suggest in your second paragraph that you 
should use the information mentioned in the first paragraph at a pro- 
pitious moment. Is this the Nofziger drop that you were referring 
to earlier? 

Mr. Caulfield. Yes. 

Mr. Lackritz. And was that information used by Mr. Xofziger to 
your knowledge ? 

Mr. Caulfield. No. 

Mr. Lackritz. Did you forward any of that information to Mr. 
Nofziger ? 

Mr. Caulfield. No. 

Mr. Lackritz. I would like for you to turn the page to the October 
15, 1971, memorandum from yourself to Mr. John W. Dean III, 
and there is an attachment. I take it, it is some articles from Variety 
magazine. 

Mr. Caulfield. Yes. 

INIr. Lackritz. At that time in that memorandum that I am read- 
ing it says : 

I recommend that it is time to move on the above firm and individuals, as 
follows: (A) release of DeAntonio's FBI derogatory background to friendly 
media; and (B) discrete IRS audits of New Yorker Films, Inc., DeAntonio 
and Talbot. 

Did Mr. Dean agree with your suggestions? 

Mr. Caulfield. No ; he did not. 

Mr. Lackritz. Do you recall him specifically turning those down ? 

Mr. Caulfield. I recall sending a subsequent memorandum on Oc- 
tober 20, which again dealt with the same subject which emanated 
from Mr. TTlasewicz conducting a pretext inquiry in New York and 
following that, I made comments in the final three paragraphs. 

Mr. Lackritz. Before we get to the October 20 memorandum, Mr. 
Caulfield, and October 15, you have come to the conclusion that it is 
the time to realese the derogatory information that you have 
gathered from the FBI. Is that not correct ? 

Mr. Caulfield. I made the recommendation, yes. 

Mr. Lackritz. You also made the recommendation that discrete 
IRS audits be done of those three taxpayers, New Yorker Films, 
DeAntonio and Talbot. Is that correct ? 

Mr. Caulfield. Yes. 

Mr-. Lackritz. How were you going to do those audits ? 

Mr. Caulfield. Well, if the recommendation were agreed to, I 
would have approached Mr. Acree about them. 

Mr. liACKRiTz. Off the record. 

[Discussion off the record.] 

Mr, Lackritz. Back on the record. 

Do you have anything to add to the last response ? 

Mr. Caulfield. No. I want to comment on the 20th. 

Mr. Sears. Off the record a minute. 

[Discussion off the record.] 

Mr. Caulfield. Yes; back on the record, I would like to add the 
comment, with respect to the October 15 memorandum, that about 
this time I did receive information from Mr. Ulasewicz who was 
condi^^ting a discrete inquiry, and it was at that time that I began 



10386 

to movo off the position as rocommended in the October 15 memo- 
randum, and the memorandum of October 20 further indicates that 
I was moving away from that position. 

Mr. Lackritz. When did you ask Mr. Uhisewicz to conduct these 
inquiries? Was it about the time of your October 15 memorandum? 

Mr. Caulfield. Just prior to it, apparently. 

Mr. Lackritz. Prior to? 

Mr. Caulfield. Yes. 

Mr. Lackritz. Did vou ask him to interview DeAntonio and Tal- 
bot? 

Mr. Caulfield. No. I asked him to conduct a discrete inquiry at 
the offices of the distributor of the film. Mr. Talbot in New York. 

Mr. Lackritz. And Mr. Ulasewicz, t take it, did conduct such an 
inquiry. 

Mr. Caulfield. Yes ; he did. 

Mr. Lackritz. What information Mr. Ulasewicz provided you 
caused you to change your mind, if in fact that is what happened ? 

Mr. Caulfield. Mr. Ulasewicz — his report indicated that Mr. Tal- 
bot's operation was a very small operation and that there was some 
question as to whether the operation Avould have been as successful 
as I was being led to believe by the media coverage. 

Mr. Lackritz. In other words, you thought it was less of a prob- 
lem than you had earlier thought. 

Mr. Caulfield. Yes. 

Mr. Lackritz. Did you ever send another memorandum to Mr. 
Dean stating that you did not feel any longer that an IRS audit 
should be conducted over those three individuals ? 

Mr. Caulfield. Well, my memorandum of October 20, in the next 
to last sentence, indicates that any action taken vis-a-vis DeAntonio 
and Talbot should be weighed carefully and the final sentence says : 
"This includes my previous comments with regard to DeAntonio's 
background and our capability at IRS." 

Mr. Lackritz. I take it, though, that that paragraph is a result 
of your concern that he would make the film into a bigger operation 
than it already was. Is that true? 

Mr. Caulfield. Yes. 

Mr. Lackritz. I mean, reading the full last paragraph : 

I feel that there is potential here for this film to tal<e Are and become a 
cause celebre. At the moment, only the radical left is patronizing it. We must 
be quite careful not to be identified with any act or actions which would 
incite the interest of the general public. Resultingly, any action taken vis-a-vis 
DeAntonio or Talbot should be weighed carefully and well hidden. 

Mr. Caulfield. Yes. 

Mr. Lackritz. I take it what you are referring to are your prior 
recommendations on October 15. 

Mr. Caulfield. Wliat I was referring to was — yes. 

Mr. Lackritz. I^et me just ask you one more question about your 
memorandum on Octobei- 20, Mr. Caulfield, before Ave move on. Your 
last sentence states, "This includes my j)revious comments regarding 
DeAntonio's background and our capability at IRS." I take it you 
are referring to your capability of issuing an audit on Mr. DeAnto- 
nio at IRS. Is that correct ? 



10387 

Mr. Caulfield. This would have necessitated, if there were to be 
an audit regarding Mr. DeAntonio or Mr. Talbot, this would have 
required a decision on the part of Mr. Dean much the same, in much 
the same manner as the Greene matter. 

Mr. Lackritz. That's right. 

Mr. Caulfield. And in that context, I was referring to a capabil- 
ity at IRS. 

'Mr. Lackritz. Right. And to restate my question, your reference 
to your capability at IRS, was your capability to have an audit ini- 
tiated on these specific individuals? 

Mr. Caulfield. No. 

Mr. Sears. Off the record. 

[Discussion off the record.] 

Mr. Lackritz. Now, Mr. Caulfield, as I understand your reference 
here to your capability at IRS. that is a reference to your ability, 
and I mean by "your ability", your ability at the direction of Mr. 
Dean and possibly Mr. Ehrlichman, to have an audit, an IRS audit 
conducted on a specific taxpayer. Is that correct ? 

Mr. Caulfield. I don't like that sentence. 

Mr. Sears. Off the record. 

[Discussion off the record.] 

Mr. Lackritz. Back on the record. 

All right, Mr. Caulfield, in your own words, why don't you de- 
scribe what you mean by your capability at IRS. Are you referring 
to a specific individual in that phrase ? 

Mr. Caulfield. Is he asking a question or what ? 

Mr. Lackritz. In your own words, go ahead and describe what you 
mean in that sentence by "our capability at IRS." 

Mr. Caulfield. By that I meant the capability of conferring with 
Mr. Acree with a view toward seeing whether or not an IRS audit 
might be accomplished in a legal method without violating the law. 
That's what I meant. 

Mr. Lackritz. And I take it your reference to "our capability" 

Mr. Caulfield. And I refer again to my explanation of the Greene 
matter that we discussed here. That is exactly what I meant by capa- 
bility. 

Mr. Lackritz. I understand that. I see that your memo here is 
dated October 20, 1971, and as I recall the prior concern over Mr. 
Greene and the people from Newsday was in September and early 
October 1971. Is that correct ? 

Mr. Caulfield. That is correct. 

Mr. Lackritz. So you are referring to your capability at IRS as 
being the same capability you had on Mr. Robert Greene of News- 
day? Isn't that correct? 

jNIr. Caulfield. Yes. And if you substitute the name Acree for 
"capability'' that is what I meant, that it could be discussed with Mr. 
Acree. 

Mr. Lackritz. And that an audit could be initiated with respect 
to a particular individual, as occurred wnth respect to Mr. Greene. 

Mr. Caulfield. An audit that would not be illegal ; yes. 

Mr. Lexzner. "\\niat is a legal audit that you referred to? How 
would that be conducted ? 



10388 

Mr. Caulfield. As was explained to me by Mr. Acree, very often 
the bureaucracy would, for reasons best known to themselves, initiate 
a procedure whereby an audit would ensue, the procedure being an 
anonymous letter. This was explained to me that it was not illegal, 
and I accepted it on that basis, with specific regard to the Greene 
audit. 

Mr. Lenzner. I understand that. "SAHiat was explained to you was 
that the bureaucracy, as you say, would start the audit, and would 
they — was it also your understanding that they would generate 
the anonymous letter themselves ? 

Mr. Caulfield. Frankly, I don't know how that worked, but it 
was my understanding that it would be done that way. 

I would like to go off the record for a second. 

[Discussion off the record.] 

Mr. Lackritz. All right. Aside from that reference of yours on 
October 20, then, I take it you did not write any memorandum to 
Mr. Dean recommending that you not carry forAvard your two 
recommendations. 

Mr. Caulfield. I didn't write any memorandum. 

Mr. Lenzner. Did you have any discussion with Mr. Dean or any- 
one else Avith regard to the feasibility or possibility of having an 
IRS audit conducted on Mr. DeAntonio? 

Mr. Caulfield. No; I think from on or about this date this was 
the end of it, that Dean said it would be inadvisable and I con- 
curred. 

Mr. Lackritz. Mr. Dean came back to you and said it would be 
inadvisable ? 

Mr. Caulfield. I do not recall specifically sitting down with him 
and saying that to me, but since there were no audits conducted by 
me in connection Avith this matter, and looking at the note of Mr. 
Fielding, which is further on under this tab, it is obvious that the 
matter was dropped on or about this date. 

Mr. Lackritz. And you did not in fact request — make a request 
to Mr. Acree that an anonymous letter be sent to initiate an audit 
in this particular case? 

Mr. Lenzner. Looking at the third memo from Mr. Allin to Mr. 
Haldeman, of October 6, 1971. this was an article, I take it. which 
was sent to you. 

Mr. Caulfield. That's correct. 

Mr. Lenzner. And T take it from that, that you knew Haldeman 
was interested in this mattoi-. 

Mr. Caulfield. That is correct. 

Mr. Lenzner. And does that explain — well, let me ask this. There 
was a memo just prior to that one, Mr. Caulfield, dated August 
10, 1971. At the bottom of the page, it is fi-om you to Mr. Dean, it 
says "You might wish to so advise K.R.H., Timinons and so forth." 
H.R.H. refers to Mr. Haldeman? 

Mr. Caulfield. That's right. 

Mr. Lenzner. Did you have befoi-e that date an intimation that 
Mr. Haldeman and Mr. Timmons were interested in this subject? 

Mr. Sears. This is on the Checkei-s speech. 



10389 



Mr. Caulfield. Yes; I know, but I just Avant to 

Mr. Sears. There is nothing in here except this on the Checkers 
speech. 

Mr, Caulfield. Yes. 

Mr. Lenzner. Do you recall how you learned that or what the 
source of the information was ? 

Mr. Caulfield. My source would have been Mr. Dean. 

Mr. Sears. And what was the nature of the inquiry ? 

Mr. Caulfield. The nature of the inquiry? 

Mr. Sears. Yes ; that this describes. 

Mr. Caulfield. The nature of the inquiry was to find out what the 
uncut film of Richard Nixon's 1962 Checkers speech was about. 

Mr. Sears. And whether it had anything to do with Millhouse 
or not. 

Mr. Caulfield. And whether or not the film related to and was 
connected to "Millhouse: A White Comedy." 

Mr. Lenzner. Did you have any further communication on that 
subject with Mr. Haldeman or Mr. Timmons? 

Mr. Caulfield. No ; I did not. I never spoke to them directly on it. 

Mr. Lenzner. Do you know whether, based on this August 10 
memo, Mr. Haldeman and Mr. Timmons Avere both aware of your 
capability to conduct these kinds of inquiries? 

Mr. Caulfield. I have no way of knowing that. 

Mr. Lenzner. In other words, did Mr. Dean, when he told you 
that Haldeman and Timmons were interested, indicate that they 
had asked that you conduct an inquiry into this subject? 

INIr. Caulfield. I do not know if that took place — that conversation 
took place. I have no knowledge of that. 

Mr. Lenzner. You do not remember Mr. Dean mentioning and 
making that statement to you? 

Mr. Caulfield. No. 

Mr. Lenzner. I am concerned about one general matter, and that 
is this : Scattered throughout your memorandums, on both this sub- 
ject that we have just discussed and other subjects, are references 
made to obtaining information from the Internal Revenue Service. 
I believe in your O'Brien memo you make reference to that, and 
frankly, Mr. Caulfield, it creates the impression, when you use the 
words "capability" and "discreet Internal Revenue Service audit." 
which I think is one that you recommend in your October 15, 1971, 
memo, "discreet Internal Revenue Service audits of New Yorker 
Films, Inc., DeAntonio and Talbot," that in fact, you did have the 
capability through Mr. Acree or other people of initiating tax audits 
on specific individuals at the request of Mr. Dean and Mr. Ehrlich- 
man. Now, is that an accurate conclusion that we can draw from 
these memorandums? 

Mr. Caulfield. Well, what I meant was, I Avas reminding Mr. 
Dean that Mr. Acree and I Avould have the opportunity to discuss 
a tax matter that was of interest to the White House,' and I had 
that capability of sitting down with Mr. Acree and getting some 
advice as to how to proceed in a given area. But I hasten to add that 
other than the Greene matter, that there were no requests for audits. 

Now, I fully appreciate what appears here on paper, and you, I 



10390 

think, are right and proper in raising it as a subject. Certainly if I 
was sitting where you are. I would do the same thing, but I am 
stating here under oath that there Avere no Internal Revenue Service 
audits programed other than the reference to the Greene matter. 

Mr. Sears. That you know of. 

Mr. Caulfield. That T am aware of. 

Mr. Lenzner. T understand that, and I accept your answer to 
that extent, but what T am suggesting though is that if Mr. Dean or 
Mr. Ehrlichman or both had requested it, that you, as the conduit, 
felt that you could pass on to Mr. Acree that request for Mr. Acree 
to respond to, in terms of conducting a specific tax audit on a specific 
individual. Is that an accurate statement? 

Mr. Caulfield. Yes. 

Mr. Lexzner. And then the memorandums are suggesting that is 
one option to be considered in the inquiry that you were pursuing 
on behalf of Mr. Dean and/or Mr. Ehrlichman. 

Mr. Caulfield. If I may res])ond in my own way, what you have 
just stated is correct. However, I am fully aware of the improprieties 
of initiating audits against individuals and I think the record shoAvs 
conclusively, and will not show otherwise that the only time that an 
audit, an attempt at an audit in the legal fashion was accomplished 
was in connection Avith the Greene incident, and Avhen Mr. Dean 
sat myself and Mr. Acree doAvn on that one occasion AAdiere he di- 
rected that full audits be conducted of individuals, myself, and Mr. 
Acree both agreed that Ave Avould not do so, and there Avere no audits 
conducted of individuals, either those four or any others. 

Mr. Sears. To your knoAvledge. 

Mr. Lenzner. Off the record. 

[Discussion ofi" the record.] 

Mr. Lenzner. Is it an accurate statement to say that your per- 
ception Avas, upon request of Mr. Dean and/or Mr. Ehrlichman, to 
obtain information for an investigation of a particular individual, 
that you could, as an option, suggest to them that the Internal 
UeA'enue Service conduct a tax audit on specific individuals that they 
had designated to you ? 

Mr. Sears. In a laAvful fashion. That Avas vour understanding 
of it. 

IMr. Caulfield. In a laAvful fashion. That Avas mv understanding 
of it. 

Mr. Lenzner. And that the person you Avould, if they so directed 
you, contact to pursue a possible Internal RcA^enue Service audit 
Avas INIr. Acree. 

Mr. Caulfieij). Yes. 

Mr. Lenzner. Noav, Avould you turn to tab 17 please. Can you 
identify the first memorandum, dated October 8, 1971, from your- 
self to "Mr. Dean, subject "StcAvart L. Udall." 

Mr. Caulfield. I just noticed something. Those are not my 
initials. 

Mr. Lackritz. Are you saying that is not your handAvi-iting in 
the upper right-hand corner by your name? 

Mr. Caulfield. Those aren't my initials. 

Mr. Sears. Is it your memo? 



10301 

Mr. Caulfield. I will admit that it is my memo, but those are 
not my initials. 

Mr. Lenzner. Do you have any idea whose handwriting that is? 

Mr. Caulfeeld. It's not mine. 

Mr. Lenzner. You have no idea whose it is? 

Mr. Caulfield. No. 

Mr. Lenzner. Do you recall whether Mr. Stewart Udall was 
one of the four names that you discussed with Mr. Acree? 

Mr. Caulfield. No; I do not. As I have indicated here and else- 
where, I don't recall any of the names that Mr. Dean forwarded 
to Mr. Acree on that day. I have no recollection. 

Mr. Sears. Could we go off the record just a second? 

[Discussion off the record.] 

Mr. Lenzner. Wliy do we not get that on the record right now? 
Mr. Caulfield, Mr. Sears has indicated some background informa- 
tion to help our understanding of what perhaps may have been 
your intent with regard to the authorship of some of these memo- 
randums. And perhaps you could explain, in your own words, what 
your intent actually was, if it is accurately reflected in what counsel 
has indicated. 

Mr. Caulfield. Well, with respect to the tab having to deal with 
tax matters, I think it is important to note that at that particular 
time, Mr. Acree and I were interested in having the financial ap- 
proval of a private security organization. And, in attempting to 
show the value of JNIr. Acree participating in that undertaking, I 
did in fact make reference, not by name, but as I have indicated 
in testimony, to his abilities in the Internal Revenue Service area and 
I will let it stand at that. 

And there was a significant element of salesmanship in attempt- 
ing to show that myself and those to be involved with me, including 
Mr. Acree in the proposed security undertaking, would be a high- 
caliber investigative capability. 

Mr. Lenzner. Now, as Mr.' Sears has indicated, the Sandwedge, 
this was to support your Sandwedge proposal and hoped that it 
would get funded. Is that correct? 

Mr. Caulfield. That is correct. 

Mr. Lenzner. And the Sandwedge proposal was written and 
submitted prior to the memorandum on Internal Revenue Service 
business, beginning on September and October of 1971. Is that 
correct ? 

Mr. Caulfield. "Wliat memorandum? 

Mr. Lenzner. The Sandwedge memorandum was written prior 
to all of these memos that we have just referred to in October and 
November and September of 1971? 

Mr. Caulfield. That is correct. 

Mr. Lenzner. Can you turn to tab 81,* which is the copy of the 
Sandwedge proposal, previously identified by you. That is a descrip- 
tion by you of Mr. Acree, is it not ? And you say : "He is a strong 
Nixon loyalist and has so proved it to me personally on a number 
of occasions." 

Mr. Caulfield. Yes. 



•See Book 21, p. 9907. 



10392 

Mr. Lenzner. Now, since this was written prior to the Septem- 
ber-October, 1971. memorandums, what specific occasions were you 
referring to there? 

Mr. Caulfield. Well, in our conversations which we had socially 
between the time when I first met Mr. Acree, which was probably 
114 years prior to this being written, he had indicated to me that 
his political loyalties rested with the Nixon administration. 

Mr. Lexzxer. And how had he proven that on a number of oc- 
casions? 

Mr. Caulfield. By responding to requests that I would make of 
him which Avere not necessarily involved in the areas that we are 
discussing. I am just trying to think [pause], I am referring to 
his loyalty to the President and the Xixon administration when I 
say he personally proved it to me on a number of occasions, in 
conversations, as to his political feelings on a wide range of issues. 
He proved it to me personally in conversations. 

Mr. Lenzner. You are saying that that sentence does not mean 
that he responded to requests from you at IRS and thereby proved 
his loyalty on a number of occasions? 

Mr. Caulfield. That is what I am saving. That is correct. 

Mr. Lenzner. Are you saying you made no requests of him prior 
to the writing of Sandwedge to which he responded in such a way 
to prove his loyalty? 

Mr. Caulfield. What I am saying is, I may have asked him on 
a number of occasions for information which would be helpful in 
a given area which might not have to do with anything political, 
but might be of interest to the people with whom I was working 
in the White House staff. And that covers a broad range of activi- 
ties. 

He, having had 35 years experience in the Federal Government, 
and one has to go and speak to people and get a good judgment 
and good opinions on a broad range of questions that would come 
up, and that is what I meant by the sentence. 

Mr. Lenzner. So you are saying that on occasions you did make 
requests, prior to the writing of Sandwedge and he did respond 
affirmatively with information. 

Mr. Caulfield. Are you referring specifically to information on 
tax matters? 

Mr. Lenzner. "\^Tiat other kinds of information did he give you? 

Mr. Caulfield. As I said it could have been the Avidest range of 
information. 

Mr. Lenzner. Obtained from the files of TES? 

Mr. Caulfield. No. His knowledge of the Federal bureaucracy, 
and specifically in the law enforcement area where I Avas function- 
ing, I A^alued very highly. And T AA-as actively engaged in that area. 

For example, the intricacies of the ongoing dispute betAveen 
BNDD and Customs and the infighting that took place betAveen the 
A'-arious assistant secretaries in other departments and agency heads 
AAiis of incalculable A-alue to me in terms of Avhere people fit Avho 
Avere in the bureaucracy, Avhere people fit aa'Iio Avere in the Depart- 
ment of the TreasurA'. in terms of AA'here they stood on a pai'ticular 
issue. T think that is AA'hat comes to mind A^ery specifically. T had 
numerous couA-ersations Avith Mv. Acree in those areas. 



10393 

Mr. Lenzner. And those were the conversations which proved to 
you that he was a strong Nixon loyalist? 

Mr. Caulfield. That is correct. 

Mr. Lexzner. And you are saying, prior to the writing of Sand- 
wedge, you made no specific request of Mr. Acree for information 
from the IRS files? 

Mr. Caulfield. That is correct. 

]Mr. Lexzxer. And in paragraph 2, for his assignment, you say 
that he would be responsible for "IRS information input, financial 
investigations and liaison. Federal law enforcement" and so on. 
"WHiat exactly did you intend that to convey? 

INIr. Caulfield. I meant that to convey exactly the — previous para- 
graph explains it a bit. In the second sentence, he indicates that he 
has witnessed the financial success of Intertel and it was generally 
known that some of the leading principals in the Intertel organiza- 
tion were previously with the IRS organization. And I was con- 
veying there that the background and experience of INIr. Acree in 
the IRS area would offer a significant opportunity for the obtaining 
of information from IRS as to its bureaucratic functions. 

Mr. Lexzner. Would that include access to information from 
IRS files after Mr. Acree left IRS? 

Mr. Caulfield. Not in any unlawful way, but certainly with the 
men who had, as I indicated here, 32 years experience — in the pre- 
ceding paragraph. His wide breadth of contacts as the assistant 
commissioner of IRS, would have certainly offered any fledgling 
security entity the ability to obtain lawful IRS information, either 
on public record or he would be able to speak with individuals 
who were still functioning within the IRS. And I think it is no 
secret that this is the way much of the Federal Government's 
business is done. 

Mr. Lexzxer. With private investigative entities? 

Mr. Caulfield. With people who are previously connected with the 
Federal service and the ability to go and speak with them on mat- 
ters of private security interests. 

Mr. Lexzxer. Do you know of a specific example of that hap- 
pening when a private investigative resource has received informa- 
tion from a Federal investigative agency? 

Mr. Caulfield. I am not speaking about information obtained 
unlawfully from the files of a given organization. I am talking 
about discussing people who have previously been with the Federal 
Service. The ability to sit down and talk with them in a given area. 

Mr. Lexzx'er. For what end? 

Mr. Caulfield. For what end? 

Mr. Lexzxer. Yes. To what purpose? 

Mr. Caulfield. Very simply to get to the bottom of a specific 
inquiry. 

Mr. Lexzxer. In other words, to get information? 

Mr. Caulfield. Yes. To get information. 

Mr. Lexzxer. At the bottom of the page, the paragraph reads: 

Under the cover of the corporate entity hiring: Republican consultants to assist 
in meeting the needs of its clients, a medium for the likely required expansion 
of the covert aspects of the undertaking would be established in compart- 
mentalized fashion, thereby minimizing any threats to exposure inherent in 
a large covert operation. 



10394 

What did you mean in that paragraph? 

^Ir. Caulfip:ld. That's not even a good sentence. 

Mr. Lenzner. I'm not even sure it's a sentence. 

Mr. CaulfieIvD. Simply put. the best way I can describe it is that 
I am making the suggestion that the hiring of the principals to 
be involved should be kept as quiet as possible. 

Mr. Lenzner. Well what do the words "covert aspects" and "large 
covert operation" mean? 

Mr. Caulfielo. Covert aspects would refer to the acquiring of 
political information in as discreet a fashion as possible. I couldn't 
put it any more simply than that. 

Mr. Sears. "V^Hien you use the word "covert" is it fair to say that 
what you mean by that is that you don't tell people what you are 
doing ? 

Mr. Caulfield. I think that's a very good description. 

Mr. Lenzner. And it includes a variety of means and capa- 
bilities of obtaining information? 

Mr. Caulfield. Yes. 

Mr. Lackritz. Going back to tab 17,* Mr. Caulfield, dated Octo- 
ber 8, 1971, which is in this same period of time that we have been 
talking about with the last few questions, you state that "I have 
asked for an IRS check to support this material." "What is the 
IRS check that you requested? 

INIr. Catltefield. INIr. Sears and I discussed this during the break 
and I cannot come up with an answer for that sentence. 

Mr. Sears. Let's go off the record a minute. 

[Discussion off the record.] 

Mr. Caulfield. Could I have the question read back, please? Or 
you can ask it again? 

Mr. Sears. The question was, as I recall, what did it mean, this 
memo: "I have asked for an IRS check to support this material." 
"Wliat does that mean? 

Mr. Caulfield. What it means, as best I can recall, is that I had 
the ability to speak with Mike Acree about the Overview Corp., 
again in the same context of reminding the reader that I had this 
capability to speak with Acree, and as I recall there was nothing 
done in connection with either Mr. Stewart Udall, nor the Overview 
Corp., with respect to the IRS. 

Mr. Lenzner. Well, attached — or on the same page — there is 
some handwriting that says: "Jack, find out if Overview had any 
Federal contacts." Wliose handwriting is that? Do you know? 

INIr. Caulfield. ,Tohn Dean's, it looks like John Dean's. 

Mr. Lenzner. Did you, in fact, check with agencies to determine 
the answer to that? 

Mr. Caulfield. Yes. I did. 

Mr. Lenzner. And is your memo of October 26, 1971, to Mr. 
Dean, the result of your check? 

Mr. Caulfield. That's correct. 

Mr. Lenzner. Does that indicate that you check with five differ- 
ent agencies? 



*See Book 21, p. !)S21. 



10395 

Mr. Caulfield. That's correct. 

Mr. Lenzner, The IRS check indicates that you checked with 
Mr. Barth on that. 

Mr. Caulfield. Yes ? 

Mr. Lenzxer. So, on this occasion you worked through Mr. 
Barth, not Acree? 

Mr. Caulfield. Yes; because I thought he would have access to 
that information more readily than Mr. Acree. 

Mr. Lexzxer. Did you contact Mr. Ruckelshaus directly on the 
request with regard to EPA? 

Mr. Caulfield. Yes. 

Mr. Lenzner. And had you on other occasions received from or 
contacted Mr. Ruckelshaus for information? 

I take this they checked their files and no Government contracts 
with Overview Corp. were available? 

INIr. Caulfield. That's correct. 

Mr. Lenzxer. And do you know why Mr. Dean wanted that in- 
formation ? 

INIr. Caulfield. I don't recall now. I might have at the time, but 
I have no recollection now looking at it. 

Mr. Lexzxer. Do you recall how the inquiry into Mr. Udall was 
initiated ? 

Mr. Caulfield. No, I do not. 

Mr. Lexzxer. You don't recall at whose request it was made? 

Mr. Caulfield. The request was made of me by INIr. Dean. But 
who made the request of him, I don't know. 

Mr. Lexzxer. Is it an unfair assumption to make that if Mr. 
Udall's corporation, or the Overview Corp., had Federal contracts, 
that information was pertinent to see if those contracts could be 
eliminated? 

Mr. Caulfield. Well, I recall seeing memorandums or testimony 
by Mr. Dean that there was a desire to look into those areas with 
a view toward canceling those contracts. But I had nothing to do 
with it. 

Mr. Lexzxer. Aside from Mr. Dean's testimony, though, did you 
ever overhear a conversation or see anything in writing while you 
were at the "V^Tiite House that reflected that was the purpose of this 
kind of determination? 

Mr. Caulfield. Not while I was at the White House. I don't knoAV 
if I saw it as part of the record. It might have appeared in the 
paper. 

Mr. Lackritz. All right. INIr. Caulfield. I would like you to turn 
to tab 20.* please. The first memorandum there is dated Septem- 
ber 30, 1971. from yourself to Mr. John Dean III. Subject: Mr. 
Antonio Cortese. Are those your initials? Do you recognize that 
handwriting ? 

Mr. Caulfield. Yes. that's correct. 

Mr. Lackritz. You indicate in your second paragraph there that 
"There is no record of any income tax filing for Cortese west of the 
Mississippi. We are doing a nationwide check." What is that 
check ? — to see if there Avere anv tax returns bv INIr. Cortese ? 



♦See Book 21, p. 9847. 



10396 

Mr. Caut^field. The whole thrust of the Cortese inquiry emanated 
from his desire, apparently, to make a gift to the White House out 
in San Clemente. And the thrust of the inquiry was to ascertain 
whether or not such a gift should be accepted. And, in doing that, 
and ill i-esponding to the directive of Mr. Dean, I contacted Mr. 
Acree and the results of that background information is contained 
in the memorandum dated October 15. 

Mr. Lackritz. And that's the following memorandum in the tab? 
Is that correct? 

Mr. Caulfield. That's correct. 

Mr. Lackritz. A memorandum from yourself to Mr. Dean? 

Mr. Caulfiei.d. That's correct. 

Mr. Lackritz. Now in that paragraph labeled B, you stated: 

Cortese has been identified as the owner of an Oldsmobile agency in El 
Cerrito, Calif. His IRS returns reflect an operation loss of .$102,000 over the 
past 2 years. His net income of 1970 was $20,800. He has not been audited. 

Where did you get the information from Mr. Cortese's tax re- 
turns ? 

Mr. Caulfield. Mr. Acree obtained that information for me. 

Mr. Lackritz. Did you ask Mr. Barth to obtain this information 
for you, by any chance? 

Mr. Caulfield. No, my impression is it came from Mr. Acree. 

Mr. Lackritz. Did you ask him to look into jNIr. Cortese's tax 
returns to get this information, to the best of your recollection? 

Mr. Caulfield. I don't know if T specifically asked him to look 
into the tax returns. I requested Mr. Acree to ascertain if he could 
find out Mr. Cortese's financial status and when he reported back 
to me, he did indicate that he had passed on this information to me. 

Mr. Lackritz. He did identify it at that time as coming from 
the IRS tax returns? 

Mr. Lenzner. Did you discuss this with Vice President Agnew? 

Mr. Caulfield. No. 

Mr. Lenzner. Well, look at paragraph C, it says : 

According to the vice president, the wine storage rack has already been 
installed at San Clemente. 

Mr. Caulfield. The vice president of the firm. I don't think we're 
talking about Spiro Agnew there. 

Mr. Lenzner. You would certainly remember it if Spiro Agnew 
told you that, Avouldn't you? 

Mr. Caulfield. I certainly would. No, there Avould have been no 
reason to discuss that with the Vice President. 

Mr. Lenzner. "Wlio conducted the pretext interview at the San 
Jose offices? 

INIr. Caulfield. Mr. Acree advised that a i)rotext interview had 
been conducted — I don't know avIio conducted it. 

Mr. Lenzner. Do you mean an IRS employee of Mr. Acree's con- 
ducted that interview? Is that your understanding? 

Mr. Caulfield. Since I don't know for sure, I would assume that 
was the case, but I don't know that for a fact. 

Mr. Lenzner. Did Mr. Acree, on occasion, have IRS agents con- 
duct interviews or investigations at your request? 



10397 

Mr. Caulfield. Other than the John Wayne and Billy Graham 
inquiries, those are the only two I can think of where he would have 
called someone he knew in a particular area and asked them to 
obtain information. 

]Mr. Lexzner. Except in this particular case, you are indicating that 
he had a pretext interview conducted? 

Mr, Caulfield. He advised me that a pretext interview was con- 
ducted, yes. 

Mr. Lexzner. Can you recall any other interviews that he had 
conducted at your request? 

Mr. Caulfield. Other than the John Wayne and Billy Graham. 

Mr. Lenzner. The answer is no? 

Mr. Caulfield. No. 

Mr. Lexzner. And you had previously indicated, Mr. Caulfield, 
that Mr. Henry of the FBI furnished you some information on 
the Newsday matter and T wanted to get back to that. Did Mv. 
Henry, on any other occasion, obtain information for you with re- 
gard to any matters that you were concerned about? 

Mr. Caulfield. Not that I recall. 

Mr. Lexzxer. So Mr. Henry's activities on behalf of your inquiry 
into Newsday, were the only occasions that you received informa- 
tion from him? 

Mr. Caulfield. That's the only time I can recall having received 
information from Mr. Henry. 

Mr. Lexzner. Did you on occasion received information from 
other FBI agents? 

[Mr. Caulfield nods in the negative.] 

Mr. Lexzxer. Of a political nature? 

Mr. Sears. Any nature? 

Mr. Caulfield. I have a whole career in law enforcement. 

Mr. Lexzxer. During your employment at the White House, Mr. 
Caulfield? 

Mr. Caulfield. No. 

Mr. Lexzner. Of the kind we're talking about? 

Mr. Caulfield. No, that would be the only instance I can recall. 

Mr. Lexzxer. Did you have other contacts with other investiga- 
tive agencies, Federal investigative agencies, that you called upon 
on occasion to do the same kind of thing that you did with Mr. 
Acree at IRS, and Mr. Henry on that one occasion with regard to 
Newsday ? 

Mr. Caulfield. That would be the only instance. 

Mr. Lexzxer. You never used Mr. Boggs for that kind of an 
effort? 

ISIr. Caulfield. I don't recall using INIr. Boggs for anything of a 
political nature. 

Mr. Lexzxer, When you say political nature you are including 
the Cortese, Newsday, Millhouse, et cetera, type of 

Mr. Caulfield. That is correct. 

Mr. Sears. It might be good to state for the record that of course 
Mr. Caulfield knew all of these people and had seen them socially 
from time to time. And I do not know and I am sure that he can- 
not remember whether on social occasions, they might mention to 



31-889 O - 74 - pt.22 - 14 



10398 

him things that he might ultimately place into reports, if they bore 
some relevance on what he was doing. What he is addressing him- 
self to, I think, arc occasions on which he might have directed an 
inquiry to somebody else. 

Mr. Caulfield. That is correct. 

INIr. Lackritz, All right, Mr. Caulfield, I would like you to turn 
briefly to tab 7.* Can you identify that memo dated August 6, 1971 ? 

Mr. Caulfield. Yes. 

Mr. Lackritz. And briefly, could you summarize what occurred 
when you received this information about the individual with the 
name John Wilkes who was seen at the airport up in — I think it 
was Bangor, Maine? Can you relate to us what happened? How 
that information was brought to your attention? 

Mr. Caulfieli). This came to me from INIr. Dean. As T recall it, 
there was an individual at a rally in Maine who appeared to be 
recording the arrival of the President at that location. 

The advance people working under Mr. Ron AValker believed 
that the individual who was making the recording, I think, there 
was a car, a vehicle involved, and somebody verified the license 
plate number, felt that the individual was affiliated with ISIuskie's 
campaign headquarters, and the request from Mr. Dean was to 
verify who the individual was and whether or not he was affiliated 
with the Muskie campaign headquarters. 

Mr. Lackritz. And how did you go about determining whether 
or not the individual was affiliated with the Muskie headquarters? 

INIr. Caulfield. I asked Mv. Ulasewicz to make that determination. 

Mr. Lackritz. I'm sorry, I didn't understand your full response. 

Mr. Caulfield. T asked INIr. LTlasewicz to find out that informa- 
tion. 

Mr. Lackritz. And did you contact any agencies for information 
on this individual? [Pause.] Do you recall, Mr. Caulfield? 

]\Ir. Caulfield. I am attempting to recall whether or not I con- 
tacted a Federal agency. As best I can recall. I think there was 
some question as to whether or not the assumptions made by the 
advance people at the location as to his being involved at the INIuskie 
campaign headquarters, might have instead represented a possible 
security matter for the Secret Service and I think some of the 
information — if am not mistaken, I worked closely with the Secret 
Service on this matter in an attempt to identify who the individual 
was to ascertain if it was — if the individual was up there for politi- 
cal purposes or whether or not there might have been a potential 
security threat to the President. And I believe T had probably 
worked with the Secret Service in attempting to get to the bottom 
of it. Now, I also used Mr. Ulasewicz when the individual was 
identified with a view toward determining avIio was answering the 
])lione at ]Mr. Wilkes' residence. 

Mr. Lackritz. In other Avords, you directed Mr. TTlasewicz to 
make a pretext call? 

INIr. Cauij'ield. Yes. 

Mr. Lackritz. '\^niich you subsequently reported? 



See Book 21, p. 9783. 



10399 

Mr. Caulfikld. I think some of the information indicated here 
came from the Secret Service. 

Mr. Lackritz. Some of the information here came from the Se- 
cret Service? 

INIr. Caulfield. I think parap;raph 3; yes, paragraph 3. I think 
it is all jumbled in together, in the fashion that it is in on the paper. 

Mr. Sears. Did you get the information in the paragraph you 
refer to from the Secret Service or from INIr. Ulasewicz? 

Mr. Caulfield. No, I am pretty sure I worked with the Secret 
Service on that. Mr. Ulasewicz did not provide the information on 
paragraph 3. That would have come from the Secret Service, 

Mr. Ulasewicz did place a call to the telephone number indicated 
there. 

Mr. Lackritz. Who in the Secret Service did you obtain the infor- 
mation from ? 

INIr. Caulfield. I Avould have to guess, since it had to do with a 
security matter, I probably would have contacted the head of the 
'\Miite House detail who at that time would have been Robert 
Taylor. 

Mr. Lackritz. Mr. Tavlor was still with the "\^^lite House detail 
on August of 1971 ? 

Mr. Caulfield. I believe so, yes. 

Mr. Lackritz. Do you know when he was released? 

Mr. Caulfield. Subsequent to that time. 

Mr. Lackritz. Subsequent to that time? 

Mv. C.vuLFiELD. [Nods in the affirmatiA^e.] 

Mr. Lackritz. Let me finish this bv pointing to the memorandum 
of August 10, 1971, from Mr. John Dean to Ron C. Walker, in 
which Mr. Dean said : 

Attached is the information we were able to obtain on the man found in the 
Bangor, Maine, airport with a tape recorder by one of your advance men. 
The information is less than conclusive as to why the man was lurking around 
the airport. As you can see, however, he does not appear to have been an overt 
Muskie type ! If you would like any further information, please advise me. 

I take it from the thrust of Dean's memorandum, there were 
really two questions that were looking to be answered by Dean's 
inquiry to you. "Wliich are: AVhy the man was there in the first 
place; the second was whether he had any affiliation with the 
INIuskie campaign. Is that correct? 

Mr. Caulfield. Tliat's correct. 

Mr. Lenzxer. I think you said before that you did not seek or 
obtain any information from other people you knew in other in- 
vestigative agencies. Did you ever request specific information or 
action taken by the Department of Justice? 

Mr. Caulfield. I had a lot of dealings with the Department of 
Justice. 

Mr. Lenzner. Who was your liaison there? 

Mr. Caulfield. Well, T dealt with — well, to go back to Operation 
Intercept, I dealt with Dick Kleindienst on Operation Intercept. I 
dealt with LEAA Deputy Administrator 

Mr. Lenzner. Santarelli? 

Mr. Caulfield. I dealt with Santarelli on the sun issue. 



10400 

Mr. Lenzner. What I am asking though, aside from your overt 
capacities — ■ — 

Mr. Lackritz. The question is; Did you ever direct anyone in 
the Justice Department to do anything 

Mr. Lenzner. Or request them to do aiiytliing of the nature of the 
things that we are talking about? 

Mr. Cattlfiei.d. Not that T can recall at this moment. 

Mr. Lenzner. Did you ever ask them to conduct criminal investi- 
gation into any specific individuals or corporations? 

Mr. Caulfield. No, not that I can recall. However, if you have 
a memorandum which approaches that subject, I would be willing 
to look at it. 

Mv. Lenzner. Would you look at tab 14? * 

]Mr. Caulfield. Yos. 

Mr. Lenzner. That is a memorandum dated September 30, 1971. 
Is it from you to Mr. Dean? 

]\Ir. Caulfieed. Yes. 

Mr. Lenzner. Would you identify that as a memorandum that 
you prepared and wrote? 

Mr. Caulfieed. Tliat is correct. 

Mr. Lenzner. You had a discussion with INIr. Henry Petersen, 
it indicates. 

Mr. Caulfield. That is correct. 

Mr. Lenzner. Was he Chief of the Criminal Division at that 
time? 

Mr. Catji.field. That is correct. 

Mr. Lenzner. At whose request did you talk to him? 

Mr. Caitlfield. That was at the specific direction of INIr, Dean. 

Mr. Lenzner. Do you remember what provoked him to request 
you to do that? I might point to the subject, which says, "George 
Bell's information regarding the Virgin Islands Corp." Does that 
help you refresh your recollection as to how this got started? 

INIr. Caitlfield. If I had not reviewed the documents, I was gen- 
erally aware that there was an interest in the Virgin Islands Corp. 
because of memorandums that I had seen. And I knew that John 
Dean was working on that. 

Why he — I don't quite understand, now, why he asked me to 
call Henry Petersen, I think that was the only time I have ever 
spoken directly to Mr. Petersen while I was at the A^^iite House. 
But he directed me to speak with him, Avith a view, as I recall, 
towards making a determination as to whether or not there was 
any organized crime involvement in connection with the corporation. 
And INIr. Petersen was very, as I recall, it was just a very quick 
conversation, vei-y circimispect and 

Mr. Sears. It wasn't circumspect. 

Mr. CAiTLFiELn. Well, the matter just dropped, very frankly, with 
this one telephone call. 

Mr. Lenzner. Mr. Caulfield, is it unfair to suggest that on the 
basis of this memorandum, you were directed to see if the Depart- 
ment of Justice could make a case on the Virgin Islands Corp.? 

INIr. Caulfield. Yes. T think that would be verv unfair. 



♦See Book 21. p. 9807. 



10401 

Mr. Lenzxer. And you don't think that it suggests that in item B 
which says: 

The signs of organized crime involvement alluded to in the material sug- 
gests that the situation should and will be watched by Justice. I have passed 
on the additional article you have forwarded to Henry. You should advise Bell 
that the matter is under scrutiny by Justice. 

Does that not suggest the Department of Justice is going to re- 
view and watch this corporation to determine if, in fact, (a) there 
is any organized crime elements involved, and (b) whether there 
may be a possibility of some kind of prosecution? 

Mr. CATJLriELD. No, I would disagree with the latter part. I would 
agree with the first part, that it was brought to the attention of 
Mr. Petersen, and he indicated he would watch them. That was the 
end of it as far as I was concerned. 

INIr. Lexzner. l^Hiy was Dean and the '\A'Tiite House interested in 
the Virgin Islands Corp.? 

Mr. CAiTLrrKLD. Well, I am not privy to all of the reasons why, 
but I suspect that because it Avas the alleged involvement of a 
gentleman by the name of Mr. Kimelman in the Virgin Islands 
Corp. But I am certainly not an expert in that area. 

Mr. Lenzxer. And if my recollection serves me right, the Over- 
view Corp.'s materials indicated that Mr. Kimelman was associated 
with Mr. Udall ; is that not correct ? 

Mr. CAVLriEij). I do not know that for a fact. 

Mr. Lexzxer. Turn back to tab 17.* It indicates that — the Over- 
view Corp.'s materials indicate that Mr. Kimelman is presently 
director of a development international corporation in San Juan, 
P.R. Skipping some lines — president and director of the Virgin Islands 
Hilton, Inc., St. Thomas, Virgin Islands; chairman of the board, 
Island Block Corp., U.S. Virgin Islands. And it further indicates 
that Mr. Udall, in 1967, asked Kimelman to become his top assist- 
ant at the Department of Interior. 

Mr. Caulfield. Well, that may be. That is the first time I have 
looked over these documents. 

Mr. Lexzxer. These are documents that were attached, were they 
not. to your memorandum to ISIr. Deaii, which we have already 
discussed, on tab 17? 

]Mr. Caulfield. Yes, that is true. But my involvement in this area 
was so far removed- 

Mr. Sears. Let's go off the record a second. 

[Discussion off the record.] 

^Ir. Caulfield. OK, back on the record. 

Mr. Lexzxer. Your answer was what? 

Mr. Caulfield. I'd like to have the question reread. 

Mr. Lexzxer. "V^Hiat was the intent of your call to ]Mr. Petersen? 

Mr. Caulfield. The intent of the call was to ascertain whether 
there was any organized crime involvement with the Virgin Islands 
Corp. 

Mr. Lexzner. And what would be done with that information 
once vou received it? 



*See Book 21, p. 9826. 



10402 

Mr. Catti.fiei.d. I T/ould have turned it over to Mr. Dean. 

Mr. Lenzner. And do von know what he was intending to do 
with it? 

Mr. Caulfield. Mr. Dean is the best witness there. 

Mr. Lexzner. You don't know the answer? 

Mr. Catti^field. [Xodding neffativoly.] 

Mr. Lenzxer. Do you recall what the Howard Ross letter and 
newspaper article referred to? 

ISfr. Catjlfield. No. 

^Ir. Lenzxer. Turnino; to tab 23,* that indicates a memorandum 
of December 7, 1971, from Mr. Dean to the President. 

Mt. Cattlfield. Yes. 

Mr. Lenzneb. And if you turn to the third page, there is another 
memo indicating "Condition of George Meany." Is that memo- 
randum a memorandum that was prepared by you? 

Mr. Cattlfield. Yes. 

Mr. Lenzner. And at whose direction? 

IVIr. Caulfield. Mr. Dean's. 

Mr. Lenztster. Did Mr. Dean indicate to you at whose request 
he was conducting that investigation? 

Mr. Cattlfield. No, but I assume it was probably ISIr. Ehrlich- 
man or Mr. Haldeman. 

Mr. Lenzner. And do you recall how you obtained the informa- 
tion that you did obtain? 

Mr. Caulfield. Yes, I received it from a friend of mine. 

Mr. Lenzner, Who was that? 

Mr. Cauu'ield. Mr. James Juliano. 

Mr. Lenzner. Do you know how he got it? 

Mr. Cattlfield. I think he got it from a physician friend of his. 

Mr. Lenzner. Your memorandum indicates that Dr. Marvin 
Fuchs, who was George Meany's personal physician, was talked 
to on a very discreet basis by another physician. 

Mr. Caulfield. Yes. 

Mr. Lenzner. Was that Mr. Juliano? 

Mr. Cattlfield. Yes. 

Mr. Lenzner. And you asked him to conduct this inquiry for 
you? 

Mr. Cattlfield. Yes. 

Mr. Lenzner. Did vou furnish Mr. Juliano with anv funds for 
this? 

Mr. Caulfield. No. 

Mr. Lenzner. Wliat was Mr. Juliano doing at the time that you 
made this request? How was he employed? 

Mr. Caui^ield. Mr. Juliano has his own private consulting busi- 
ness. 

Mr. Lenzner. Were there other occasions when you asked Mr. 
Juliano to conduct similar inquiries? 

Mr. Caulfield. As T have indicated. T think, in my previous session, 
I had spoken to Mr. Juliano about 

Mr. Sears. I think it is fair to say that Mr. Caulfield had a general 
knowledge of Mr. Juliano, who he knew, without being specific, was 

♦See Book 21, p. 9868. 



10403 

familiar with that kind of people. And therefore, an investigation of 
George Meany— I think INIr. Caiilfield, it is fair to say, would have 
felt that Mr. Jnliano might even know something about all of that 
because of his business. 

Mr. Cattlfield. The reason I called IVIr. Juliano is — I think that 
he had a consultant contract with one of the labor unions, if I'm not 
mistaken, and that is the reason I took a chance and called him. 

Mr. Lenzxer. Do you have any idea why the President was inter- 
ested in getting some discreet information on the condition of George 
Meany ? 

Mr. Caui^ieij). I do not know for a fact that the President was 
interested, other than the fact that, apparently, a memorandum went 
from Dean to the President. But I don't know if the President initi- 
ated it. There was intense interest, I do recall, at that time on the part 
of many people at the White House as to the condition of Mr. Meany. 

jNIr. Lexzner. '\^nio do you remember expressing that interest ? 

Mr. Caulfield. Well 

Mr. Lex'zx^er. In addition to Mr. Dean. 

INfr. CauIjField. I believe Mr. Colson had a similar interest. 

Mr. Lex'zxer. Did he so describe it to you ? 

Mr. Caulfieed. ISTo. 

Mr. Lexzxer. How did you learn of Mr. Colson's interest? 

Mr. Caulfield. From Mr. Dean. 

Mr. Lex-zxer. Did Mr. Dean indicate what, if any, use was going 
to be put to the information you obtained? 

Mr. Caulfield. He did not. 

Mr. Lexzx'^er. Was there any followup request with regard to the 
condition of Mr. Meany? 

Mr. Caulfield. No, because I think shortly after this memorandum 
was written, Mr. Meany's general condition became public knowl- 
edge. That he did, in fact, have a heart attack and was. responding 
well. 

Mr. Lexzxer. In other words, this inquiry was conducted prior to 
the time that Mr. Meany's illness became a matter of public infor- 
mation ? 

Mr. Caulfield. No; it was public information that Mr. Meany was 
very ill. 

Mr. Lexzxer. But not public information that he had suffered a 
heart attack? 

Mr. Caui.field. I think it was generally known that he had a heart 
attack. The thrust of the inquiry was how serious was the heart 
attack. 

Mr. Lex'zx'er. Could we have read back the last three or four 
answers there? 

The Reporter [reading] : 

Mr. Lenzner. Was there any followup request with regard to the condition 
of Mr. Meany? 

Mr. Caulfield. No, because I think shortly after his memorandum was 
written. Mr. Meany's general condition become public knowledge. That he did, 
in fact, have a heart attack and was responding well. 

Mr. Lenzner. In other words, this inquiry was conducted prior to the 
time that Mr. Meany's Illness became a matter of public information? 

Mr. Caulfield. No ; it was public information that Mr. Meany was very ill. 



10404 

Mr. Lenzner. But not public information that he had suffered a heart 
attack? 

Mr. Caulfield. I think it was generally known that he had a heart attack. 
The thrust of the inquiry was how serious was the heart attack. 

Mr. Lenzner. Back on the record. 

We liave just had the record reread, whicli indicated a prior an- 
swer, Mr. Caulfield. by you, indicatin<y that after this memo was pre- 
pared it became general knowledge that Mr. Meany had in fact suf- 
fered a heart attack and that, therefore, there was no followup. 

My question to you was, "Do you recall now that the inquiry was 
to determine, (a) whether Mr. Meany was ill, and (b) whether he 
had suffered a heart attack, prior to the time that that information 
became a part of public information through the news media?" 

Mr. Caulfield. I have difficulty in responding to the question for 
the simple reason that my impression, in looking at the memorandum 
that is before me, is that it was general knowledge that Mr. INIeany 
was ill and it was generally assumed that Mr. Meany had a heart 
attack. Now, the thrust, as I recall it, looking at the material in front 
of me now, the thrust of the inquiry was to ascertain how seriously 
ill was Mr. INIeany. 

Mr. Lenzner. Why would anyone want to know that? 

ISIr. Caulfield. INIr. Meany was and is the outstanding labor leader 
in the United States. 

Mr. Lenzner. "What I am asking is, what purpose, what use would 
the White House have for information about how serious Mr. Meany's 
illness was ? Was there an effort, for example, to contact other labor 
leaders with regard to Mr. Meany's illness? 

Mr. Caulfield. I don't know that ; it is possible. 

Mr. Lenzner. So you don't know any reason why this information 
was obtained? 

Mr. Caulfield. INIy function and role was to ascertain the extent 
of INIr. Meany's physical condition. 

Mr. Lenzner. I understand what your function was, but can you 
understand the question? Do you have any knowledge of what the 
reason was for this additional knowledge being sought? 

Mr. Caulfield. No; I do not. 

Mr. Lackritz. You have mentioned before that you knew Mr. 
James Golden, is that correct? 

Mr. Caulfield. That is correct. 

Mr. Lackritz. Did you ever get any of your information on any 
of these requests from Mr. Dean or Mr. Ehrlichman by conferring 
with Mr. Golden ? 

INIr. Caulfield. INIy initial reaction to that is no, because Mr. Golden 
was affiliated, during my tenure at the White House, in 1969, 1970, 
1971, with the Tntertel organization. 

]\Ir. Lackritz. Mr. Caulfield, do you recall telling us on Septem- 
ber 11, that you used both Mr. Juliano and Mr. Golden as a source 
of information about the Hughes Tool Co. and about Mr. Larry 
O'Brien ? 

Mr. Sears. Off the record. 

FDiscussion off the record.] 

Mr. Caulfield. We can go on the record. 



10405 

I remember speaking with Mr. Golden when he would stop by the 
White House and visit Mr. Krogh's office or Mr. Morgan's office; 
and in that context, I undoubtedl}' spoke to Mr. Golden regarding 
his function and role with the Hughes Tool Co., which, as I recall, 
Mr, Golden had left Intertel and had gone to Las Vegas to assume 
the takeover of the Hughes interest in Las Vegas. So, yes, I would 
have spoken to INIr. Golden about that subject, bvit strictly in a casual, 
social conversation — how are you doing: what's happening out there 
in Las Vegas; it's all over the television with Robert Maheu and the 
Hughes Tool Co. and Intertel. So the answer to that is "yes," strictly 
on a social basis. 

Mr. Lackrttz. I see. 

INIr. Sears. Is it fair to say that you were also, if he happened to 
drop anything of interest, hoping to glean something from the con- 
versation ? 

Mr. Caulfteij). If I deemed it interesting, I probably would have 
made a mental note of it. 

Mr. Lackrttz. But you say now that you did go systematically to 
Mr. Juliano to acquire information? 

Mr. CAm.FiEi.D. I didn't say that at all. Mr. Juliano is a friend of 
mine and we launched frequently, but I did not view it as a sys- 
tematic request for information from Mr. Juliano. INIy relationship 
with Mr. Juliano is social. 

Mr. Lackrttz. So it was in the same context as your relationship 
with Mr. Golden? 

Mr. Cahlfteld. Yes. 

Mr. Lackrttz. Did you ever discuss with Mr. Golden the subject of 
political contributions from the Hughes Tool Co.? 

Mr. Catji^fteld. Never, 

Mr. Lackrttz. To any campaigns ? 

Mr. Caui.fteld. Never. 

Mr. Lackrttz. Did Mr. Golden ever mention to yoTT anything con- 
cerning the $100,000 contribution that was transferred by Mr. Rich- 
ard Danner to Mr. Rebozo in 1969 and 1970 ? 

Mr. Catjlfteld. Never. 

Mr. Lackrttz. Did Mr. Golden ever indicate to you that he was 
traveling to Florida for the pTirpose of checking out allegations aboTit 
the $100,000 contribution ? 

Mr. CatjIuFteld. Never. 

INIr. Laci^ritz. Did Mr. GoldeiT ever tell vou that he had talked 
to INIr. Rebozo aboTit the $100,000 contribution? 

Mr. Cattlfield. Never. 

Mr. Lackrttz. Or did he ever indicate to vou that he had talked 
to Rose Woods about the $100,000 contribTTtion ? 

Mr. Caih.fteld. No. 

Mr. Lackrttz. So. as I understand yoTir testimony, vott had no con- 
versations at all with Mr. Golden concerning anvthing aboTit the 
$100,000 contribution ? 

Mr. Caitlfiet.d. Absohitely not. 

Mr. Lets^zner. Did you learn of the $100,000 contribiTtion prior to 
the time it surfaced in the news media last year? 



10406 

Mr. Cattlfield. No. The first time I ever heard of it was when it 
appeared in the newspaper. 

Mr. Lenzner. Last year? 

Mr. Cattlfield. Whenever it appeared in the newspaper. 

Mr. Lenzner. And there was no inquiry to you to obtain any in- 
formation with regard to it? 

Mr. Cattlfield. Absolutely none. 

Mr. Lackritz. OK. 

Mr. Sears. Just for the record, it is fair to say, as you can tell 
from these documents, that at various times there was interest mani- 
fested in Howard Hughes, Larry O'Brien. What he is referring to 
here is that he never had any knowledge about a $100,000 contribution, 
and it is certainly possible that some of these investigations of various 
people's involvements with each other might have related to that, but 
his testimony is that he never had any knowledge of any $100,000 
contribution. 

Mr. Lackritz. I understand that. 

Mr. Lenzner. If you will look at the memos, I think you will agree 
that beginning in January 1971, there is a fairly extensive — you don't 
have to adopt the word extensive — but memorandums back and forth 
between you and Dean, and between Dean and Haldeman. You have 
already been over this with us, and you have indicated your contacts. 
^Vhat I am asking now is, what did you understand the focus and 
thrust of this effort was to be and what was behind it ? 

Mr. Caulfield. The focus and thrust of what, Terry ? 

Mr. Lenzner. The interest and relationship between Larry O'Brien 
and Robert Maheu, Hughes. "Why did you think people at the A^Hiite 
House were interested in the relations between Larry O'Brien and 
INIaheu? Do vou have any recollection of vour thoughts in regard 
to that? 

Mr. Cattlfield. Well, Larry O'Brien was the chairman of the 
Democratic National Committee ; INIr. Maheu was the individual who 
was in charge of the Hughes interest in Nevada. Mr. Maheu appar- 
ently was deeply involved in controversial matters out there in Las 
Vegas. These gentlemen were high level figures. On the surface it 
appeared there was a close interrelationship between the two. There 
was significant interest, not only amongst the people w^ho were in- 
volved in politics at the AMiite House, but in the media. There were 
nationwide television programs covering the subject, so in that con- 
text there was an ongoing interest. 

Mr. Sears. "What was your impression as to why there was any 
interest at the '\\niite House in this, that's the question. "Wliat do you 
know about all of that? 

INfr. Caulfield. I have no impressions of it other than the fact 
that O'Brien was the head of the opposition party, and that Mr. 
Maheu represented and apparently was involved in significant con- 
troversy with INTr. Howard Hughes. There was an intense interest. It 
was a matter in the public forum. I cannot respond any other way. 

Mr. Lenzner. There were a lot of matters in the public forum, 
Mr. Caulfield, and they did not ask you to investigate all of them. 
What I am asking is, were they interested in obtaining derogatory 



10407 

information on Larry O'Brien and his relationship with the Hughes 
Tool Co.? 

Mr. Caulfield. I think if such information had existed, there 
would have been that interest. 

Mr. Sears. Is it fair to say that they were trying to find out if 
there was any relation that existed between Mr. O'Brien, Mr. Maheu 
or any of the troubles that Mr. Maheu was having at that time that 
would be emban-assing to Mr. O'Brien ? 

Mr. Caulfield. I think that is a fair statement. 

Mr. Lackritz. There is something I want to clarify, Mr. Caulfield. 
You said last week, I believe, that you were a fairly regular reader 
of Mr. Jack Anderson's column, is tliat correct ? 

Mr. Caulfield. I think that's a fair statement. 

Mr. Lackritz. Do you recall reading INIr. Anderson's columns on 
a regular basis? 

Mr. Caulfield. Yes. 

Mr. Lackritz. Do you recall in August of 1971, specifically Au- 
gust 6. 1971, a column by Mr. Jack Anderson concerning an allegation 
that $100,000 of cash had been transferred by Mr. Danner to Mr. 
Bebe Rebozo? 

Mr. Caulfieij). I can only respond by saying I remember reading 
it in the newspapers. It could well be that if that's the first place it 
appeared in print, I would have read it at that time. But I don't 
recall specifically when it came to my attention. I remember reading 
it in the newspapers, and if Mr. Anderson was the first one to pub- 
lish it, then in all likelihoo<l I read it in his column. 

Mr. Lackritz. We are talking about a time difference here of 3 
years. I mean, you certainlv would be able to remember if the first 
time you heard of a $100,000 contribution was 3 years ago, as opposed 
to last year, would you not ? 

Mr. Caulfield. I think it would be very unfair for me to try to 
recall. 

Mr. Sears. If you did read in Mr. Anderson's column about any 
$100,000 goinjr from Mr. Hucfhes to Mr. Kebozo, would you have at- 
tached any significance to it at that time? 

Mr. Caulfield. No, none whatsoever. 

]\Ir. Lackritz. And you did not inquire of Mr. Rebozo about that 
matter ? 

Mr. CauTvFteld. No. I never spoke to INIr. Kebozo about anything in 
anv wav, shape or form. 

Mr. Sears. Do you always believe everything you read in Mr. 
Anderson's column ? 

Mr. Caui.fteld. I certainlv do not. 

Mr. Lackrttz. I don'<- implv bv the auestion that anyone believes 
evervthinjgr thev read in newspaper articles. 

Mr. CAUT.FTETiD. I Understand. 

Mr. Letstzner. Did vou know Mr. Richard Danner? 

Mr. CATTT,FTET,n. T think I met Mr. Danner one time; I'm not even 
sure that he's <^bp oronflpman. But during the 1968 campaign, on a 
campaiinrn s<"op, I think he came aboard the plane and I was intro- 
duced to him. 

Mr. Lenzner. Have you had any conversations with him since? 



10408 

Mr. Catjlfield. I have never spoken to him since that time. 

Mr, Lenzner. Do yon know Mr. Robert Maheu ? 

Mr. Caulfield. I have never met him or spoken with him. 

Mr, Lenzner. Did you learn shortly after he was released from the 
Hughes organization, about the time you started your investigation, 
he was subpenaed before a Los Angeles grand jury? 

Mr. Caulffeld. No. 

Mr. Lenzner. Do you recall telling us at one point, by the way, that 
people at the White House thought that Howard Hughes had every- 
thing wired in Washington, and that this was the source of concern 
for information surrounding the relationship of Hughes, O'Brien 
and Maheu? 

Mr. Caulfield. "WHiat do vou mean by wired ? 

Mr. Lenzner. Those are your words. That is what I want to know 
now. '\^niat you meant by that and where you got your information? 

Mr. Catji^field. Just repeat what you just said. 

Mr. Lenzner. You told us on September 11, 1973, that you thought 
that the people at the "WHiite House were interested in the relation- 
ship between Hughes, O'Brien and Maheu because Hughes had every- 
thing wired in Washington. 

Mr. Caulfield. Boy. 

Mr, Sears. Off the record. 

[Discussion off the record.] 

Mr. Lenzner, On the record. 

Now, I want your best recollection, if you recall telling us, Sep- 
tember of 1973, that the reason that the people at the "WHiite House 
were interested in Howard Hughes and his relationships with O'Brien 
and Maheu was because the Wiite House thought Hughes had every- 
thing wired in Washington? "Wliat is your recollection? Do you re- 
call saying that or not? 

]\fr. Caulfield. I don't recall saying it. 

Mr. Lenzner. Do you recall learning that that was the concern 
of the White House at some time? 

Mr. Caulfield, That would have been my impression. 

Mr. Lenzner. From discussions with whom ? 

Mr. Caulfield. Discussions with John Dean — well, it just would 
have been John Dean. 

Mr. Lenzner. Do you have any recollections of any discussions with 
Mr. Ehrlichman about that ? 

]\Ir. CAUIiFIELD. No. 

]\Ir. Lenzner. Were you aware of the fact that Mr. Haldeman had 
initiated the investigation through Mr. Dean at the time you were 
conducting it ? 

INfr, Sears. For the record, which investigation are you refer- 
ring to? 

Mr, Lenzner. The investigations be.(rinning in January of 1971 of 
the. relationship between Maheu and O'Brien, 

Mr, Caulfield. My impression was that ]\Ir. Dean — this is 1971, 
now — which month in 1971 ? 

Mr. Lenzner. January of 1971. 

Mr. Caitlfield. He wasn't at the White House then— yes. he was. 
I'm sorry. My impression was that he was reporting back to Mr. 
Haldeman. 



10409 

Mr. Lenzner. Did you make a request of the IRS, the FBI, and 
the CIA and other Government agencies as part of your investiga- 
tion into the relationship ? 

Mr. Caulfield. I made that recommendation. I did not conduct 

those. 

Mr. Lenzner. And to your knowledge, was information obtained 
from the IRS, the FBI, CIA and other Government agencies with 
regard to the relationship between O'Brien, Hughes and Maheu? 

Mr. Caulfield. Repeat the question, because I want to be sure 
that I respond properly. 

Mr. Lenzner. And let me make it clear that I am basing this 
on an answer you gave us, again, in September of 1973, so take 
your time. Do you recall that information was, in fact, received 
from the IRS, the FBI, the CIA and other Government agencies 
with regard to the relationship between O'Brien, Hughes and Maheu? 

Mr. Caulfield. I recall speaking with Mr. Acree about the gen- 
eral subject of O'Brien, Maheu and the Las Vegas situation. And 
I remember Mr. Acree passing on information to me regarding 
what he knew about the situation out there is Las Vegas. But as 
far as information coming from files or from the IRS or FBI or 
CIA or any agency, the answer is "No." I remember Mr. Acree 
passing on to me what he was hearing in the law-enforcement- 
intelligence community about what was occurring out in Las Vegas. 

Mr. Lenzner. Do you remember the nature of any of that? 

Mr. Caulfield. I don't recall specifically, but there may well be 
a memorandum around where I put it to paper. 

Mr. Lenzner. Let me ask you this, did you learn that- there was 
an intensive IRS audit being conducted at that time of the Hughes 
Tool Co., which included an audit of Larry O'Brien? 

Mr. Caulfield. Xo, I did not learn that. 

Mr. Lenzner. Did you, on any occasion, receive other informa- 
tion from other Government agencies with regard to this subject? 

Mr. Caulfield. No, it's possible — and again I would like to re- 
peat that this whole matter of Hughes and Maheu and Las Vegas 
was a matter of intense public interest and discussed, apparently 
discussed among the Federal agencies. I did not make any specific 
requests, nor did I receive any information from the files of the 
Federal agencies. What information I did put to paper came about 
as a result of social conversations. 

Now, Mr. Acree was one of those individuals who advised me on 
a social basis what he was hearing. 

Mr. Lenzner. You have already said that, Mr. Caulfield. What 
I am referring to, though, is a statement from our notes; on Sep- 
tember 11 you told us that information about Hughes et al. was 
requested from the Internal Rerenue office, the FBI and the CIA 
and a variety of Government agencies. And although Caulfield 
was not sure about what action had been taken as a result of the 
information that was gathered 

Mr. Caulfield. I think that is not correct. I think there is a 
document around here to support what T am saving, that it was 
recommended by me that that information should be obtained by 
those agencies; and I think if vou hunt for it, it's there. But there 



10410 

was never anything done. It was just a recommendation that I 
made to Mr. Dean. 

Mr. Lenzner. What you are saying now is that to your knowl- 
edge, information was not then systematically gathered from the 
agencies ? 

Mr. Caulfield. To my knowledge, it was not gathered. However, 
I did reconunend it. 

Mr. Lenzner. But the memos also generally refer to possible 
derogatory information that Mr. Maheu and/or Mr. O'Brien might 
have, if something was done with information on them, if I recall — 
and I am paraphrasing that. Do you recall learning whether Mr. 
O'Brien had obtained any embarrassing information on Republicans 
through his contacts with the Hughes people ? 

Mr. Caulfield. No ; I do not. 

Mr. Lenzner. Or that Mr. Maheu had ? 

Mr. Caulfield. No ; I do not. 

Mr. Sears. I think he has stated before that in conversations, I 
believe, with Mr. Juliano, he became aware that Republicans also 
had some kind of involvement with the Hughes organization. 

Mr. Caulfield. Yes; I remember extending a note of caution in 
one of the memos, saying that in view — this is a very hazardous 
area and if you push it too far you are going to wind up with 
embarras'^ment to the Republicans as well as Democrats. 

Mr. Lenzner. I don't want to belabor it; I just want to find out 
if you tied exactly that point into something that you had learned 
O'Brien knew? 

Mr. Caulfield. No, Mr, Lenzner, absolutely not. 

Mr. Lenzner. All right, the answer is "No." 

Mr. Lackritz. There were some other items that we were hoping 
to cover, but 

Mr. Caulfield. Is there anyway we can get through it? I mean, 
I am starting to slip here, and I just don't want to overtax myself. 

Mr. Lackritz. I understand that; that's why we are not going 
to continue. We are going to stop right noAv. 

Mr. Caulfield. I am talking about the whole issue. If it could 
be done today, I would rather get it out of the way once and for 
all. I do not look forward to coming back up here, very frankly. 

Mr. Lackritz. Well, quite frankly 

Mr. Sears. Could we go off the record ? 

[Discussion off the record.] 

Mr. Lackritz. Let's go back on the record. 

The session is recessed now at 4 :05. Mr. Caulfield has been testifying 
for about 5% hours. And it will be resumed at some later time by 
agreement with counsel, if that is satisfactory with counsel. 

Mr. Sears. That's satisfactory. 

Mr. Lackritz. Off the record. 

[ Discussion off the record.] 

[Whereupon, at 4:05 p.m., the hearing in the above-entitled matter 
recessed.] 



THURSDAY, MARCH 28, 1974 

U.S. Senate, 
Select Committee on 
Presidential Campaign Activities, 

W ashing ton, D.G. 

The Select Committee met, pursuant to notice, at 11:20 a.m., in 
room G-334, Dirksen Senate Office Building. 

Present: Senator INIontoya. 

Also present : Terry Leiizner, assistant chief counsel ; INIarc Lack- 
ritz, assistant counsel; Scott Armstrong, majority investigator; 
Richard Schultz, assistant minority counsel; and Emily Sheketoff, 
minority research assistant. 

Senator Montoya. Would you state your name for the record? 

Mr. Gritfin. William E. Griffin. 

Senator ]Moxtoya. Where are you from, Mr. Griffin? 

Mr. Griffin. 37 Eockland Avenue, Yonkers, N.Y. 

Senator Montota. Would you raise your right hand? 

Do you solemnly swear that the testimony you are about to give 
will be the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth, so help 
you God ? 

Mr. Griffin. I do. 

Mr. Lackritz. I want this on the record. Do you have any objec- 
tion to our continuing with the examination of ISIr. Griffin without 
the presence of a Senator? 

Mr. Ambrose. No, my client waives the requirement. 

^iv. Lackritz. OK. Mr. Griffin, would you tell us when you first 
met Mr. Bebe Rebozo? 

TESTIMONY OF WILLIAM E. GRIFFIN, ACCOMPANIED BY MILES 

AMBROSE, COUNSEL 

Mr. Griffin. Sometime, I believe in 1968. 

Mr. Lackritz. 1968? What was the occasion, do you recall? 

Mr. Griffin. I think it was a social occasion in New York. I 
don't recall exactly. 

Mr. Lackritz. Do you recall who introduced you to him? 

Mr. Griffin. I think it was probably Mr. Abplanalp. 

Mr. Lackritz. Going back to the last response, you say Mr. 
Abplanalp? 

Mr. Griffin. I believe so. 

Mr. Lackritz. When did you first meet him? 

Mr. Griffin. I think in 1961 or 1962. 

Mr. Lackritz. Do you recall the occasion which you met him? 

(10411) 



10412 

Mr. Griffin. Yes. I was representing a client who was selling his 
corporation, some property, and at the negotiations I met him. 

Mr. Lackritz. I see. And then subsequent to that meeting did you 
represent Mr. Abplanalp? 

Mr. Griffix. Yes I did. 

Mr. Lackritz. Can you describe how you came to represent him 
and what is your present status with respect to Mr. Abplanalp? 

Mr. Griffix. I'm not sure. It was either late 1962 or early 1963. 
After the transaction where I represented the seller, the then general 
counsel of Precision Valve Corp. requested that I do a little bit of 
work for the corporation since I was local in the area, which was 
Yonkers. And I did. And thereafter he suggested that I possibly 
consider being his assistant on a per diem basis and I'm not sure 
when that was. It might have been 1963. I was retained by the 
corporation as sort of an assistant counsel to the corporation on an 
independent basis. 

And either in 1964 or 1965 the then general counsel got quite sick 
and requested that I handle most of the work. I think it was in 
1965. My memory is not too good, but in that area that the then 
general counsel died and Mr. Abplanalp asked me to become, on an 
independent basis, the general counsel to his corporation. 

Mr. Lackritz. Did he ask you that after you were made an officer 
in his corporation ? 

Mr. Griffix. I was made an officer before that time. I think I 
was initially made the assistant secretary and then the general 
counsel was the secretary. And when the general counsel died, I 
was made secretary of the corporation. Now that may be wrong. 
If you Avant absolute dates, I can get them for you by looking into 
the records of the corporation. I'm just generalizing as to dates in 
these areas. 

Mr. Lackritz. Are you still presentlv an officer of the Precision 
Valve Corp.? 

Mr. Griffix'. I am still the secretary of the corporation. That is 
correct. 

Mr. Lackritz. All right, have you ever had occasion to meet the 
President ? 

Mr. Griffix. Yes. 

Mr. Lackritz. "When did you first meet the President? I mean 
President Nixon for the record to distinguish from the president 
of Precision Valve. 

IVIr. Griffix. You mean the No. 1 and the No. 2? Again we are 
going back. It was either 1965 or 1966. 

Mr. Lackritz. Do you recall the occasion when you met Mr. 
Nixon? 

Mr. Griffix. Yes, I had several lunches Avith him in New York 
City. 

Mr. Lackritz. Were you alone on those occasions or with Mr. 
Abplanalp? 

Mr. Griffin. I Avas Avith Mr. Abplanalp. 



10413 

Mr. Lackritz. And Mr. Abplanalp introduced you to the Presi- 
dent ? 

Mr. Griffin. Yes, I believe he did. 

Mr. Lackritz. Did you ever do any legal work for the President 
at that point, from 1966 through about 1968, prior to the time he 
became President? 

Mr. Griffin. No. 

Mr. Lackritz. OK, and how well did you get to know him from 
1966 through 1968 before he became President? 

Mr. Griffix. Oh, I saw him four or five times for lunch. For 
dinner, once or twice. Other than that I had basically no communi- 
cation with him other than social. 

Mr. Lackritz. Did you have any business dealings with the 
President prior to 1968? 

Mr. Griffin. No, I don't believe so. 

Can I ask you what type of business you are talking about? 

Mr. Lackritz. Well for example, were you involved in any land 
transactions with the President or involved with any other kind of 
loans ? 

Mr. Griffin. No. 

Mr. Lackritz. Any other stock transactions possibly? 

Mr. Griffin. No, specifically those questions, no. 

Mr. Lackritz. Well are there other kinds of business transactions 
in which you might have been involved with the President? 

Mr. Griffin. Not that I can recall. I know at one time he was 
looking for a house. 

Mr. Lackritz. Right. That comes later on as I understand? 

Mr. Griffin. No, it does not. 

Mr. Lackritz. "WTien did this occasion arise? 

Mr. Griffin. Oh 

Mr. Ambrose. I would say it was about 1965 or 1964, • 

Mr. Griffin. 1965, somewhere around the area there. He was 
thinking about moving into Westchester County at one point and 
several of us were looking around for homes. It was not a business 
transaction. It was strictly a friendly basis. 

Mr. Lackritz. He asked you to look for homes? 

Mr. Griffin. He didn't ask me directly. 

Mr. Lackritz. T\nio asked you? 

Mr. Griffin. I think probably Mr. Abplanalp said do I know 
of any and we may have discussed it at lunch with him a couple 
of times. He did not move up there and I did not handle any 
transactions. 

Mr. Lackritz. And there were no other occasions when he asked 
3'ou to do anything for him such as looking for a home? 

Mr. Griffin. None that I can recall, no. 

Mr. Lackritz. Now did there come a time, in the spring of 1973, 
when you received a telephone call from Mr. Eebozo? 

IVIr, Griffin. I think I received a lot of telephone calls from Mr. 
Uebozo in the spring of 1973. 



31-889 O - 74 - pt.22 - 15 



10414 

Mr. Lackritz. Specifically, do you recall receiviiifij a call from 
him in the sprinor of 1973, when he told you he had a problem he 
wanted to discuss with you? 

Mr. Griffin. Yes, I clo. 

Mr. Lackritz. When was that phone call? 

Mr. Griffin. jNIy best guess is I thought it was in late April 1973. 
I can't pinpoint the exact date or even the exact week for you. 
That is my best recollection. 

jNlr. Lackritz. Well have you reviewed your telephone records to 
determine if there are any indications on your telephone records 
of any calls to you from Mr. Rebozo or calls back from you to 
Mr. Rebozo? 

Mv. Griffin. I have reviewed my telephone calls and there are 
any number of calls to Mr. Rebozo's, but it is not unusual that I 
would call him and he would call me on many occasions. As I 
indicated before, we are also friends. 

Mr. Lackritz. I understand that. Have you brought those tele- 
phone records with you today? 

Mr. Griffin. I have. 

Mr. Lackritz. Well I would like to serve you this subpena, which 
calls for the production of telephone records and any other docu- 
ments which would reflect any contact you had with Mr. Rebozo 
during that period of time. 

Are these the telephone records produced in response to that 
subpena? 

Mr. Ambrose. May I just say this for 1 minute, please? Pursuant 
to our discussion I have here Xerox copies of the telephone records 
of INIr. Griffin's office in Yonkers, his home in Yonkers and his beach 
house in Long Beach Island, N.J., which covers a period of time. 
I also have attached to them typed takeoffs of the phone calls, 
Avhich would be to Mr. Rebozo's home or office in Key Biscayne. I 
would like veiy much if I could submit the Xerox copies of the 
telephone records and have you compare those to those which we 
have taken off and then return these to us and have them indeed 
marked for your purposes to satisfy the subpena. Would that be 
satisfactory ? 

Mr. Lackritz. That is perfectly satisfactory. 

Mr. Griffin. Let me take a look at this. 

Mr. Ambrose. That is right. It is more than one set. 

Mr. Griffin. T have done it for the period of January 1, 1973, 
through June 1973. Let me check and see if this is the A set. 

[Pause.] 

]\Ir. Lackritz. Just so there is no misunderstanding, Mr. Am- 
brose, we Avill return these to you as soon as we can be given the 
opportunity to just doublecheck these. 

Mr. Ambrose. That is right. 

Mr. Lackritz. Fine. 

Mr. Ambrose. And so the record is clear on it; the reason, of 
course, that we are concerned about it is that a number of other 
calls on there obviously related to Mr. Griffin's legal business, and 
I think that would be priveleged communications. 

Mr. Lenzner. Obviously. 



10415 
Mr. Griffin. One other comment- 



Mr. Lenzner. Why don't you first mark that? 

Mr. Lackritz. Fine. 

]\Ir. Griffix. One other comment. On the taped sheet for the 
month of ^lay 1973, my beacli liouse phone — and I don't believe 
T was at the beach at all — but my wife could not find the bill. So 
I can't— well, she is still looking "for it, and I do not believe I was 
at the beach all month, and I don't think any phone calls were made 
from that number, but it indicates nothing on our transcript con- 
cerning the month of May. 

Mr. Lackritz. That is May of 1973? 

Mr. Griffin. May of 1973, that is correct. 

Mr. Lackritz. Why don't we have the six typed sheets marked as 
exhibit A for the purposes of this executive session, and the copies 
of the telephone records turned over to us by Mr. GriiRn marked as 
exhibit B, which will be returned to Mr. Griffui just as soon as we 
compare exhibit A with exhibit B? 

[The documents referred to were marked exhibits 1 and 2 for 
identification only and can be found in the files of the committee.] 

Mr. Lackritz. All right, and I Avould like to make a copy of the 
subpena served on Mr. Griffin today marked as exhibit 3 for today's 
executive session. 

[The document referred to was marked Griffin exhibit No. 3 for 
identification.*] 

Mr. Ambrose. Would this be an appropriate time — excuse me, but 
would this be an appropriate time to go over some of the other things? 

]Mr. Lackritz. That is exactly right. All right. Well, INIr. Griffin, 
have you brought with you any other documents related or called for 
by the subpena, specifically travel records, or hotel vouchers or any- 
thing else called for? 

INIr. Griffin. Do you want to say it? 

Mr. Ambrose. Xo, you say it. 

Mr. Griffin. The only thing I was advised of orally to bring was 
three things : One was my telephone records ; second, a check of any 
travel that I may have made during the period we are talking 
about — and I did receive another telephone call, I think from Mr. 
Ambrose, and I guess it was from Mr. Ambrose concerning the ques- 
tion of the officers and directors of Precision Valve Corp. and their 
subsidiaries — that is the third thing that I brought with me. 

Mr. Lackritz. Those three items? 

Mr. Griffin. Yes. 

I have not been advised up to this point that any and all documents 
that I may have had concerning Charles G. Rebozo should have been 
brought with me, nor Avas I advised to bring travel vouchers, checks, 
check stubs, airline tickets, credit charges, or vouchers which reflect 
contact with Mr. Charles G. Rebozo. 

]Mr. Lackritz. Just to clarify for the record, I believe we asked 
you in our last interview informally if you would check back through 
your records to try to pin down the time in the spring of 1973 when 
you were first contacted, and when you had your discussions with Mr. 



*See p. 10476. 



10416 

Rebozo concernino; the money. I believe the subpena refers to any 
other documentary evidence which would relate to that transaction. 

That is whv it is limited solely from the period of January 1 of 
1973 to June of 1973. 

Mr. Griffix. Between January 1, 1973, and June 30, 1973, I had 
other transactions with jNIr. Rebozo, but did not involve the question 
of the $100,000, and that is what I thouo:ht this was going to be re- 
stricted to, and I didn't even bother going through my records. 

Just to give you an example, there has been a great deal of com- 
munication between Mr. Rebozo and myself, as Mr. Abplanalp's at- 
torney in the B & C Investment Co. I understood those things I did 
not have to bring, and the only thing we were going to discuss under 
oath today was the question of the $100,000, 

That is what I was prepared to discuss, and that is what I brought, 
over. 

jNIr. Lackritz. As I believe I indicated to Mr. Ambrose over the 
telephone, and as I believe I indicated when I first contacted you, 
what we were going to do, was to go back concerning the money and 
any possible uses the money would have been put to; and possible 
uses would involve some of these other transactions, 

]\Ir. Griffix. INIaybe if I said to you now on the record that there 
is no memorandum, no written documents, there are no written let- 
ters, there is nothing anywhere in my office concerning anything that 
I did involving the return of the $100,000, or that would help in 
pinpointing the exact dates that I testified to before, other than what 
I have told you I have brought with me; it would help. 

As to the telephone records 

Mr. Lackritz. Let me, just so we don't get into a problem with 
this, and I don't think there will be, state now, if such transactions 
arise in the context of the questioning here at this session, there may 
be a request to you to go back and to go to the records on some of 
the specific transactions. And I take it you would be willing at some 
future time to produce those records if so requested by the committee? 

Mr. Ambrose. And if they relate to the subject of this particular 
inquiry. 

Mr, Lackritz, That is right. 

Mr, Ambrose, I think that is fair enough, 

Mr, Griffin, INIay the record also show that it is my understanding 
that the committee has subpenaed all of my personal checks and 
records. At least I have been told that is the case. 

So I did not bring my checks, nor was I asked to, 

INIr, Lackritz, Fine, 

Mr. Griffix. If I could continue ? 

Mr, Lackritz, Sure. 

Mr. Griffix. I want to add that I was very upset and very em- 
barrassed to find that the comuiittee had subpenaed my mother's and 
father's telephone records in Fort Lauderdale, They received a call 
from the telephone company. And I have a very sick father, and 
they got very upset about it, and I could not understand why they 
did it. And I recjuested Mr. Ambrose to contact you about it. 

In fact, I discussed it with you personally on the phone. 



10417 

Mr. Lackritz. I was going to say as soon as I found out about 
that, I believe I called you personally. And for the record at this 
time, I would like to have the letter that Avas sent to Mr. Griffin, 
senior, and the letter sent by Senator Ervin to the telephone com- 
pany withdrawing the subpena, made exhibits for today's executive 
session. So that there is no misunderstanding, that was a purely 
clerical error and a confusion over your names, and there was, ob- 
viously, no malice or harm intended. 

Mr. Griffix. I want to thank you for sending the letter. 

INIr. Lackritz. OK. 

[The documents referred to were marked Griffin exhibit No. 4, for 
identification.*] 

Mr. Lackritz. Getting back to the subpena, did you bring any 
travel records with you today that reflect any trips that you made to 
meet with Mr. Kebozo in the spring of 1973? 

]VIr. Griffix. I have made notes for myself, because I didn't realize 
that you were going to subpena the records themselves, but I can 
testify orally as to when I made certain trips to Florida, not neces- 
sarily totally to see Mv. Rebozo. 

Mr. Lackritz. I understand that. All right. 

So you are saying you do not have the actual records today ? 

Mr. Griffix. Yes, T do not have the actual records today. 

Mr. Lackritz. All right, you do not have the actual records. If it 
becomes necessary to produce the actual records, which reflect what 
you are about to "tell us, T take it you have no objection to producing 
those records'^ 

]\Ir. Ambrose. I think there might be some difficulty, because a 
number of them were by private aircraft, and it might necessitate 
us subpenaing the logs of the private aircrafts. So again, if we can 
get a satisfactory means of reproducing the log in question for the 
day in question, that would help. ... 

iSIr. Lexzxer. ^Yhy don't we just go ahead orally and see if it is 
necessary to go further? 

Mr. Ambrose. It is a complicated procedure. 

Mr. Lackritz. Mr. Griffin, could you go ahead and describe for us 
the occasions in which you traveled to Florida from January 1, 1973, 
to June 30, 1973, from the items you brought with you? 

Mr. Griffix. The items I brought with me relate to the period of 
time where I thought I first received an inquiry concerning the 
$100,000, which I believed to be either the last week in April or the 
first week in May. Therefore, I didn't go back and check my records 
for January, February, ^March, but I did check them for ^May and 
June. 

Mr. Lackritz. April, May, and June? 

Mr. Griffin. For April, May, and June, yes; and I believe that 
in the latter part of April, audi am not sure, I believe it was in the 
last 10 days of April. I thought I traveled to Miami by commercial 
airliner to see INIr. Rebozo. I don't know what day it was, and I 
cannot find the ticket. 



*See p. 10479. 



10418 

As I told you the last time T was here, on one or two occasions 
I paid cash for the tickets because I didn't bring my charge card 
and so forth. 

I also traveled to Miami on the 3d of May of 1973 by commer- 
cial airliner, and I did, I believe, see INIr. Rebozo on that occasion. 

Mr. Lackritz. All ri^ht. Let's just stop there for a second. 

You say you traveled to Miami in the last week of April? 

Mr. Griffix. I believe so. 

INIr. Lackritz. Do you have any records at all ? Do you have a 
diary entry showing you went to Miami at the time? 

Mr. Griffin. No. 

INIr. Lackritz. Do you recall on that occasion, did you stay at the 
Key Biscayne Hotel? 

]Mr. Griffix. No, I did not, I am sure I didn't because the only 
time I stayed there was from, I guess it was from maybe the 18th or 
19th of ]\Iay for about a week, which was my anniversary. Maybe 
some time I may have stayed there one night, but I don't recall. 

Mr. Lackritz. AVell, do you recall, did you write any checks to 
the Key Biscayne Hotel? 

JNIr. Griffix. Yes, I wrote checks to Key Biscayne Hotel. I wrote 
a check at one point as a deposit for reserving some rooms. I am 
sure you have that check. 

I wrote some other checks, I think, to pay the bills when we were 
down there. It was for two or three couples, and we were down there 
for 4 or 5 days. And I think I paid the bills totally with my checks, 

]\Ir. Lackritz. Well, do you recall, when you wrote the check for 
the deposit at the end of April, were you there at the Key Biscayne 
Hotel ? 

Mr. Griffix. No, I don't believe I was. I think I sent it by mail. 

]Mr. Lackritz. And that was to reserve your rooms for later on 
in May ? 

M^r. Griffix. That was to reserve a villa down there, I believe. If 
you would show me the check, I could tell you. 

Mr. Lackritz. That is the top check. And I would like to have 
this marked as exhibit 5. 

[The document referred to was marked Griffin exhibit No. 5 for 
identification.*] 

Mr. Griffix. I believe this check, dated April 3 of 1973 in the 
amount of $100, is 

Mr. Lackritz. It is April 30. 

Mr. Griffix. I don't have my glasses. I believe that was a deposit 
for our reservations in May. 

Mr. Lackritz. And you believe you sent this check? 

Mr. Griffin. To my best recollection, I believe I mailed it to them. 

Mr. Lackritz. Now, how were you able to determine that you 
traveled to Miami in the last week of April? 

Mr. Griffin. As I said before, my best recollection is I thought 
T did. I checked my American Express cards, I have checked the 
billings, and 1 couldn't find anything. I checked the tickets in the 
office, M'hich I usually put in my out box, and I couldn't find anything. 

*See p. 10481. 



10419 

But I have a feeling that I did go down in late April. It is just my 
best recollection. 

Mr. Lackritz. Do you recall the purpose of that meeting? 

]\Ir. Griffix. I thought that was the first meeting with Mr. Rebozo. 
It may not have been, but I thought it was. 

Mr. Lackritz. In other words, the first meeting you have had with 
Mr. Rebozo to discuss the possible return of the money would have 
been in late April, the last week in April? 

]\Ir. GRirriN. I think so. It may have been INIay 3. It is just a gut 
feeling that I had that I went down very late in April, but I can't 
find anything to verify that. 

Mr. Lackritz. All right. When you pay for the airline ticket, you 
say you either pay in cash or you charge it to your American Ex- 
press account? 

jNIr. Griffix. There are various ways that I go and various ways 
it gets paid. On a few occasions, I have gone down to take a flight 
and not had my credit card, and I have paid cash to go down. That 
is very infrequent. 

On most occasions, when I am traveling in a hurry, I generally 
go down with my American Express card. On other occassions, when 
I am traveling on behalf of a business client, sometimes the business 
client provides me with the check. 

Mr. Lackritz. Do you recall which commercial airline you flew 
down in the last week of April on? 

Mr. Griffix. No, I don't. 

Mr. Lackritz. Well, you would have presumably flown from La 
Guardia ? 

Mr. Griffix. Hopefully. I always try and go La Guardia^ because 
it is only 30 minutes from my home, but if I can't, I go Kennedy. 

Mr. Lackritz. But you haven't been able to locate that ticket? 

ISIr. Griffix. No. I have not. 

Mr. Lackritz. And the next trip you were able to pin down was 
May 3? 

Mr. Griffix. ISIay 3, that is correct. 

Mr. Lackritz. How did you go down? 

INIr. Griffix. I went commercial. 

Mr. Lackritz. Do you have the ticket from that? 

Mr. Griffix. I don't have it with me. 

INIr. Lackritz. In other words, you still have a copy of the ticket 
showing you went down on INIay 3 ? 

Mr. Griffix. Yes, I had some secretaries dig through. I don't 
know who paid for the ticket. It may have been myself and it may 
have been the clients. I don't know. But it was on May 3, and I left 
at 9 :55 a.m. 

]Mr. Lackritz. Do you recall which airlines you traveled on on 
that occassion? 

INIr. Griffix. I don't. 

Mr. Lackritz. Would you be able to produce that ticket or a copy 
of the ticket for us? 

Mr. Griffix. I should be able to. 

Mr. Lackritz. OK. I would like to request at this time you produce 
that as soon as possible. 



10420 

jNIr. Lenzxer. You say you departed La Guardia at 9:55 a.m.? 

Mr. Griffix. I think it was La Guardia. I am almost positive I 
have that ticket. 

Mr. Lexzxer. And do you have any indication when you returned 
on that trip? 

Mr. Griffix. To New York? 

]Mr. Lexzxer. Yes, left Miami. 

Mr. Griffix. When I left Miami? I left Miami that afternoon. 

Mr. Lexzxer. That afternoon? What time was that? 

]\Ir. Griffix. Oh, I would guess — my best recollection is that I 
drove from INIiami to Fort Lauderdale in late afternoon. 

Mr. Lackritz. And why did you drive from ]Miami to Fort 
Lauderdale ? 

Mr. Griffix. Because I was going to Walkers Key late in the 
afternoon, and the plane that was taking me to Walkers Key was at 
the Fort Lauderdale Airport, and possibly because I wanted to see 
my mother. She doesn't keep a diary either. 

]Mr. Lackritz. No, and I wasn't asking about that. 

All right. So that you were only in Miami for a short period of 
time. Do you recall meeting with ]\Ir. Rebozo on that occasion? 

Mr. Griffix. I believe I did. 

Mr. Lackritz. Now, we will get back to these specific meetings. 
"When was the next time you traveled to Miami? 

Mr. Griffin. Are you talking about — can we distinguish ? You are 
talking about me going to Key Biscayne ? 

INIr. Lackritz. Well, are there other occasions when you traveled to 
Miami and did not go to Key Biscayne ? 

Mr. Griffix. There are. 

Mr. Lackritz. On those occasions, did you meet or talk to Mr. 
Rebozo when you were down there? 

]Mr. Griffix. Gee, I may have. 

Mr. Lackritz. You may have? Can we just go through all the 
times you w^ent to Florida then? 

Mr. Griffix. Well, I was in and out of Florida for 4 days from 
May 3 through May 7. When I say in and out of Florida, I am 
talking about from Fort Lauderdale to ]Miami to Key Biscayne to 
Walkers Key, back to Fort Lauderdale, back to Walkers Key, and 
things like that; traveling back and forth. 

Mr. Lackritz. So it is primarily travel between Miami and Fort 
Lauderdale and Walkers Key and back? 

Mr. Griffix. Correct. 

Mr. Lackritz. And then, when was the next time you traveled to 
Florida? 

Mr. Griffin. 16th of ^lay. 

Mr. Lackritz. OK. And how did you travel on that occasion? 

Mr. Griffix. Commercial. 

Mr. Lackritz. And when did you leave New York? 

Mr. Griffix. 16th of May. 

Mr. Lackritz. I mean what time ? Do you have the ticket on that ? 

INIr. Griffix. I probably do. It was my wife and I and another 
couple leaving. 

Mr. Lackritz. And this was the trip to celebrate your anniversary? 



10421 

Mr. Griffin. That is correct. 

Mr. Lackritz. OK. AVhere did you stay on that occasion? 

lilr. Griffix. One nijrht, I believe I stayed at the Yankee Clipper 
Hotel in Fort Lauderdale, and one night I spent at the Walkers Key 
Club in the Bahamas, and I believe the rest of the time I spent at the 
Key Biscayne Hotel. 

Mr. Lackritz. And was your wife Avith you throughout this period 
of time? 

Mr. Griffix. Yes, she was. 

INIr. Lackritz. And when did you return to New York? 

Mr. Griffin. I returned on the 22d of ISIay. 

Mr. Lackritz. By commercial? 

Mr. Griffin. By commercial. 

INIr. Lackritz. All right, then when was the next occasion that you 
traveled to Florida? 

Mr. Griffin. I traveled to Florida on the 25th of jSIay. 

Mr. Lackritz. And for what purpose was that trip? 

]Mr. Griffin. It was, again, I was down there for a couple of days, 
and I believe I did see Mr. Rebozo during that period of time. 

Mr. Lackritz. How long were you there on that occasion? 

Mr. Griffin. I was down there— I arrived on the 25th of May and 
I returned on the 28th of May. 

]Mr. Lenzner. Mr. Griffin, did you have any chance to review — 
first, do you keep time charts that would reflect what business you 
conducted in Miami or in the Florida area? 

Mr. Griffin. No. 

Mr. Lenzner. You don't? 

Mr. Griffin. No. 

]\Ir. Lenzner. And did you keep any time record with regard to 
the time you spent with INIr. Rebozo on the matter of the $100,000? 

Mr. Griffin. I did not. 

Mr. Lenzner. So that you have tried, I take it then, but cannot 
recreate, for example, what hours you spent when you were in Florida 
on particular business matters? 

jSIr. Griffin. No, I combined a lot of things. As you know and as 
I have explained to you before, I am a friend of Mr. Rebozo. And 
when I see him, it is not necessarily business. We may go out to 
dinner or lunch, or I may even see him someplace else, or we may 
be going some place. 

I also represent several corporations that have major interests in 
Florida and in the Bahamas, and it is very difficult to go back and 
try to determine what hours were spent on what. 

Mr. Lenzner. And you don't have time records that would reflect 
that? 

INIr. Griffin. We started time records in the office this year, be- 
cause we think we under-billed last year. 

Mr. Lackritz. All right. The last trip that you described, you 
returned to New York on the 28th of JNIay by commercial plane ? 

Mr. Griffin. Not by commercial plane, by private jet. 

Mr. Lackritz. Whose jet was that? 

INIr. Griffin. That jet was owned by a corporation called Pre- 
cision Airlines, Inc. 



10422 

Mr. Lackiutz, Is that a subsidiary of Precision Valve? 

Mr. Griffin. Yes, it is. 

Mr. Lackritz. Did INIr. Rebozo travel back with you on that oc- 
casion ? 

Mr. Griffin. I don't believe that he did. 

Mr. Lackritz. What is the name of the plane? 

Mr. Griffin. You mean the number of it ? There is no name. 

Mr. Lackritz. The number? 

Mr. Griffin. X-777PV. 

Mr. Lackritz. N-7T7TV? 

Mr. Griffin. No, PV. P as in Peter. 

Mr. Lackritz. Where is the plane normally kept? 

Mr. Griffin. At Tupperburough. 

Mr. Lackritz. Where? 

Mr. Griffin. Tupperburough, New Jersey. 

Mr. Lackritz. All right. When Avas the next time you traveled to 
Florida during that period? 

Mr. Griffin. Up to and including June 30, I don't believe I 
traveled. 

Mr. Lackritz. That was your last trip? 

Mr. Griffin. I believe so. 

Mr. Lackritz. Are you refreshing your recollection from a list in 
front of you? 

Mr. Griffin. I am refreshing my recollection from notes that I 
have made. 

Mr. Lackritz. Are those typed notes? 

Mr. Griffin. Part of them are typed, part are handwritten. 

Mr. Lackritz. Could I just see a copy of those handwritten notes 
to see if there is anything else on there? 

JNIr. Ambrose. Well, we will submit one to you, but he has some 
personal things in addition, which I don't think will be appropriate. 
We will be glad to submit a copy of this without the personal notes 
on it 

Mr. Griffin. These are all of my flights. 

Mr. Ambrose. These involve other flights besides the Key Biscayne 
flights. 

INIr. Griffin. And other clients. 

Mr. Lackritz. In other words, that is all of your travel? 

Mr. Griffin. That is correct. It is not the travel just to Florida; 
it is all of my travel. 

Mr. Lackritz. Did any of those other trips indicate travel which 
was designed to meet with Mr. Rebozo in other cities? For example, 
if you met with INIr. Rebozo in Washington during that period of 
time, do those records indicate trips such as that? 

Mr. Griffin. Let me just take a look. 

Mr. LACKRrrz. Or any representative of ~Mv. Rebozo? 

Mr. Griffin. I believe one of them does, and that was on June 11 
of 1973. 

Mr. Lackritz. All riglit. Where was that from? 

]Mr. Griffin. That was from White Plains, N.Y., to Saranac Lake 
and back the following morning. 

INIr. Lackritz. And did you meet Mr. Rebozo at Saranac Lake ? 



10423 

Mr. Griffin. Mr. Rebozo was with me on that plane. 

Mr. Lackritz. How did you travel on that occasion? 

Mr. Griffin. I went from White Plains to Saranac on a Grumman 
Goose Sea Plane, and I returned the following morning from Sara- 
nac Neck to White Plains on a private jet; the same jet I referred 
to before. 

INIr. Lackritz. OK. 'NAHiose plane is the Grumman Goose that you 
described ? 

Mr. Griffin. That plane, I believe, is also owned by the same 
corporation. 

Mr. Lackritz. Precision Aircraft? 

Mr. Griffin. Yes. 

Mr. Lackritz. Do you have the registration number of that plane? 

Mr. Griffin. No, T don't. T can get it for you if want it. 

Mr. Lenzner. We would like that submitted for the record. 

Mr. Lackritz. Sure. Can you submit that for the record as soon as 
possible after this session? 

]Mr. Ambrose. Wait until I just get this down, the registration 
number of the Grumman Goose. 

Mr. Lackritz. That Mr. Rebozo and Mr. Griffin traveled up to 
Saranac Lake on June 11 of 1973. 

Mr. Griffin. And back the following morning; came back by jet 
rather than the Goose. 

Mr. Lenzner. And Mr. Rebozo was with you to Saranac Lake 
and returned? 

Mr. Griffin. Yes, he was. 

Mr. Lenzner. Was anyone else present? 

Mr, Griffin. Mr. Abplanalp. 

Mr. Lenzner. And all three were together going and returning? 

INIr. Griffin. I think, if I am not mistaken, we also had a Mrs. 
Stennis aboard who was the pilot's wife. 

Mr. Lackritz. And not related to the Senator? 

Mr. Griffin. I'm sorry? 

Mr. Lackritz. I said not related to the Senator in any way? 

Mr. Griffin. No, sir. 

Mr. Lackritz. To the best of your knowledge anyway. 

All right. Do any of the other trips that you have in front of you 
reflect any contact or meeting with INIr. Rebozo? 

Mr. Griffin. Let me just review it for a moment to make sure. 
[Pause.] OK. It is possible, but I really don't know tnat, but he 
might have been on the INIallard, it is a Grumman ISIallard that takes 
us back and forth from Florida to the Bahamas. I can't tell you 
whether that is the case or not, but that would be on possibly the 
3d or 4th of May, but I don't know. It could possibly be on the 7th of 
ISIay. Again, I don't know. And it could possibly be on the 25th of 
May, but I am not certain. 

Once in a while, he may fly out just overnight. 

]Mr. Lackritz. All right. ' Do you have any way to determine 
whether or not ]\Ir. Rebozo was on this flight? 

Mr. Griffin. Probably the easiest way for me to check would be 
to call him up, call up Mr. Rebozo and ask him. 

Mr. Lackritz. Well, do you have any records? 



10424 

Mr. Griffix. I personally did not keep any records. 

Mr, Lackritz. Well, would the Grumman Mallard have? 

]Mr. Griffix. Rif>-ht, that is Avhei-e I could check for you initially, 
but I think I could also check with ]Mr. Rebozo. I just don't know. 

Mr. Lackritz. And the Grumman jNIallard is also owned by Pre- 
cision Aircraft? 

Mr. Griffix. That is oAvned by Precision Valve Corp itself. I'm 
not absolutely sure on the ownerships. Basically the three planes 
that we are talkino; about are owned by the Precision complex, but 
as to what corporation each of them are in, I am not totally sure. 

If it is very relevant to you, I can find it out. 

Mr. Lackritz. Do vou happen to have the registration number of 
the Mallard? 

Mr. Griffix'. I don't have it with me, and I can't recall it. 

Mr. Lackritz. OK. Could you find that out and submit it later on 
for the record. 

Mr. Griffix'. Yes. 

INIr. Lackritz. Now, that would complete the travel from April 
through June of 1973 of the occasions when you met with INlr. Rebozo ? 

Mr. Griffix. To the best of my recollection, and my secretaries 
are digging into my files. 

JNlr. Lackritz. All right. Do you have any questions? 

Mr. Griffix. Let me add also I did meet w4th ]Mr. Rebozo on an- 
other occasion, and of course, that was at the inaugural. 

Mr. Lackritz, Right, but that is back in January of 1973? 

jMr. Griffix. That is right. 

Mr. Lackritz. Now, just while we are on the subpena, you say you 
also brought with you copies of the subsidaries and directors of 
Precision Valve; is that correct? 

Mv. Griffix'. I did bring them with me, yes. 

ISIr. Lackritz. Those are not specifically mentioned in the subpena, 
so I am asking you at this time, would you like to voluntarily turn 
them over to the committee pursuant to the request of the committee ? 

Mr. Ambrose. Well, I have the same question I raised with you or 
^liss DeOreo of your staff on the phone, I am not sure I know the 
relevance of the corporate structure of Precision Valve into this 
inquiry. 

You know, if you can really say there is some relevance to it, I 
would be glad to consult with him. I don't want to be in a position 
of waiving any rights we might have during the course of the in- 
quiry here today about any legal privilege which would exist be- 
tw^een Mr. Griffin and Precision Valve and various subsidiaries, and 
Mr. Abplanalp, 

And I don't want to be in a position by just submitting these — 
not that they are almost a mattei- of i)ublic record, I guess — but I 
don't want to do it in that form (hiring this hearing for that reason. 
And so, unless you have some overwhelming desire for it, I would 
just as soon forgo it at this time. 

Mr. Armstkoxc;. Off' the record. 

I Discussion off' the record.] 

INIr. Armstroxg. ]3ack on the record. 



10425 

INIr. Griffix. "\Miy don't you get into the phone records first, and 
let's get that out of the way ? 

INIr. Armstrong. There is a quick question here, Avhich will allow 
INIr. Lackritz to continue, and then I can look at this for a second. 

On the May 16 through 22 trip, when you were down there for 
your anniversary, did you see Mr. Rebozo on that occasion? 

Mr. Griffin. Yes, several times. 

Mr. Armstrong. OK. Secondly, on the occasion of the trip in late 
April, do you have any recollection where you stayed down there? 

Mr. Griffin. This is the one that is the most hazy. And as I said, 
I can't find any flight records commercially. I thought it was one 
of those trips I went down and back in a matter of 4 or 5 hours. 
That is my best recollection of it, and I will be dammed if I can find 
anything on it at the moment, but that is the best I can do for you 
right now. 

Mr. Armstrong. You don't recall staying overnight? 

Mr. Griffin. I do not. 

Mr. Armstrong. Were there any other occasions during that period 
when you would have stayed at the Yankee Clipper? 

Mr. Griffin. There might have been. 

Mr. Armstrong. You mentioned the one night, 

Mr. Griffin. I spent a night at the Yankee Clipper the day we 
arrived in Fort Lauderdale with my wife and with another couple, 
Mr. and INIrs. Richard Hammer. We stayed up on the sixth floor, and 
I know I paid the bills for it some time in June. 

Mr. Lenzner. Just looking for a second here, you have a copy of 
the phone bills. Could you just look at those for a moment, and I 
have one or two questions I would like to ask you? 

Without identifying a specific number, there are a number of phone 
calls I see here to a Washington, D.C., number. Would you tell us 
whether any of those calls relate in any way directly or indirectly 
to the discussions you had with JNlr. Rebozo with regard to the 
$100,000 ? 

Mr. Griffin. They do not, and can I go back on that? 

Specifically, where are you talking about? Let's do it that way. 

INIr. Lenzner. Fine. If you start with January 11, is that the one 
you have? 

]Mr. Griffin. No. Let me say for the record, this is not my only 
phone. 

]Mr. Lackritz. I understand that. 

Mr. Lenzner. Yes, and I am just trying to ascertain if these are 
calls to regular clients. I don't want the clients identified, but if they 
are calls relating directly or indirectly to the $100,000, we might save 
some time by seeing how they fit into the chronological pattern. 

Washington, D.C., January 11, 448-3300; and let's see. Ai. other 
number is 298-9030, which appears to be called fairly frequently. 

]Mr. Griffin. That is a law office. 

:Mr. Lenzner. Does not relate to the $100,000 ? 

Mr. Griffin. No. 

INIr. Lenzner. 447-93 

Mr. Griffin. Sir, where are you? 

Mr. Lenzner. That would be — let's see. Where is that? 



10426 

AVell, on Jaiinary 10, there is a call to 447-9348. 

Mr. Griffix. In Washington again? 

Mr. Lenzner. Yes, sir, January 10. 

Mr. Griffix. Is that the Treasury ? 

Mr. Ambrose. No, 964 is the Treasury. 

INIr. Griffin. I don't know, but I am sure 

Mr. Ambrose. Well, it could be — oh, no. It is not. 

Mr. Griffix. No, but if it is important, I could find out. 

Mr. Lex'zner. No. 

Mr. Griffix'. I don't know, Terry. The only possibility wati if 
]Mr. Eebozo might have been in Washington, I might have called iiim 
in Washington. 

Mr. Lex'zxer. And these would be hotel numbers then, I take it? 

Mr. Griffix". I don't really recall any. 

Mr. Lenzner. There is a call on Januarv 16 to 447-9334 and 
965-2300. 

Mr. Griffin. You are talking about Washington? 

Mr. Lexzx'er. Yes, January 16. 

Mr. Griffix. I don't know. 

Mr. Lexzxer. And January 17 to Alexandria, Va., 703-960^349. 

Mr. Griffix'. No, that is a personal friend. 

Mr. Lenzner. All right. January 27, 456-1414? 

Mr. Griffix'. January 26? 

Mr. Lexzxer. No, January 27. 

Mr. Griffix. 202-456-1414? That is the White House. 

Mr. Lenzner. Do you recall who you would have called on that 
occasion ? 

Mr. Griffix'. No. 

Mr. Lenzner. Did you ever call anvbody other than ]\Ir. Rebozo at 
the White House? 

Mr. Griffix'. Oh yes. 

Mr. Lenzner. There is a 964-2788 number some place here 

Mr. Ambrose. That is the Treasury. 

Mr. Lenzner. Who would that be to? 

Mr. Ambrose. Not to Mr. Rebozo. 

Mr. Lenzner. I mean, did it relate to this? 

Mr. Griffin. No, it related to another client. 

Mr. Lenzner. 296-4035. 

Mr. Griffix'. Give me the date. 

Mr. Lenzner. Well, that would have been June 5. 

Mr. Griffin. You got these records anyway. 

Mr. Lenzner. Huh ? 

Mr. Griffix'. I said you got these records anyway there. 

INlr. Lenzner. No, no, this is from looking at them. I wrote these 
down just now as a matter of fact. 

Mr. Ambrose. June 5 ? 

Mr. Lenzxer. Yes. 

Mr. Griffix. 202-296^035? 

Mr. Lexzxer. Right. 

Mr. Griffin. I don't know. 

JMr. Lexzxer. And I also noticed when I went through these that 
on — let's see — oh, yes. Would you look at April 3d? And you have 
checked on April 3d one call to 305-361-5731. 



10427 

It is on the prior sheet probably, lower left. 
Mr. Griffix. April 3d? 

Mr. Lexzner. You have one call checked to ]Miami, Fla. That is 
]\Ir. Kebozo's call. And then below it, the same time, a call to 305- 
361-5431, which is exactly the same number except the 7 is made 
into a 4. 

Mr. Griffix. I don't know. If it is important, Terry, I can find 
out for you. It might have been the same number. They may have 
made a mistake. I don't know. 

I could call the number and find out who it is. 
]Mr. Lexzxer. And on the same date you called two numbers in 
Washington. Well, you called the White House in Washington and 
you called 739-4481. 

Would either of those calls be related in anv way to the subject 
of the $100,000? 

Mr. Griffix. I doubt it very much. If INIr. Eebozo was in Wash- 
ington, I might have telephoned him, but I doubt it. I think this is 
too early anyway. I think my first communication with Mr. Rebozo 
concerning any of this was in late April. 

Mr. Lexzxer. Well, if you called Mr. Rebozo in Florida on at 
least one occasion on that date, who would you have called at the 
White House on the same date ? 

INIr. Griffin. I have no idea. I talked to a number of people in 
the Wliite House. 

I think this is earlier than the initial communication I had. 

Mr. Lexzxer. All right. Now 

Mr. Ambrose. Excuse me just one second, please? 
[Discussion off the record.] 

INIr. Griffix. ]\Laybe we should put this on the record, that up to 
a certain point, and that point was the day that the New York Times 
story broke concerning my handling of the $100,000, I don^t believe 
I spoke to anyone on any occasion other than Mr. Rebozo concerning 
the $100,000. But I did on that date as you know. 

Mr. Lackritz. Now let's go back to your first contact with Mr. 
Rebozo about this matter. You say you place it now in late April to 
the best of your recollection? 

]Mr. Griffix. That is to the best of my recollection. 
Mr. Lackritz. And you say you do this primarily because of 
intuition ? 

Mr. Griffix. That is what I thought it was. 

Mr. Lackritz. Have you had any discussions with Mr. Rebozo 
about when he first brought the subject to your attention? 
Mr. Griffix. I have not. 

Mr. Lackritz. You have had no discussions with anyone repre- 
senting ]Mr. Rebozo about when you first talked to him about that 
subject? 

ISIr. Griffix. I have not specifically on the subject itself. 
Mr. Lackritz. Or when you first talked to him about the subject? 
Mr. Griffix. I talked to no one else about it. 

Mr. Lackritz. All right, but since that time, for example, in the 
last few months, have you discussed with anyone, when the matter 
first came out? 



10428 

Mr. Grtffix. I'm sorry? 

Mr. Lackritz. Well, has anyone helped you in your recollection 
to place it in late April? 

Mr. Griffix. No one has helped me in my recollections. No, it is 
just to the best of my recollection. I haven't asked ]Mr. Rebozo as to 
the specific date he is talking about. He may be talking about an- 
other date. I don't know. But I did not discuss it with him and I 
haven't discussed any testimony' with him concerning this. 

As I said, I am very hazy, but I have an intuition that it was in 
that period of time. I, in fact, called some of the airlines as to 
whether or not there were any tickets issued in my name, to see if I 
could find it. I can't find the ticket. The first ticket I could find was 
a commercial ticket on the 3d of INIay. 

Mr. Lackritz. All right, well did jNIr. Rebozo call you before you 
travelled down there? 

Mr. Griffin. I believe he did. He may not have called me that day. 
I think what happened was that he asked me whether I was going 
to be in Florida within a short period of time, and if I were, he 
wanted to discuss something with me of importance to him ; ask my 
advice on something. 

]\Ir. Lackritz. Did he indicate to you at that time what the specific 
problem was? 

Mr. Griffin. No, he didn't. 

Mr. Lackritz. He just said that he had a specific problem he wanted 
to discuss with you? 

Mr. Griffin. Yes, he wanted to discuss it with me; that I was a 
lawyer and he wanted to discuss it Avith me as a lawyer. 

Mr. Lat^kritz. Did he indicate the problem had anything to do 
with the IRS? 

Mr. Griffin. He indicated nothing except there was a problem he 
would like to discuss Avith me. 

Mr. Lackritz. Do you recall whether this call from Mr. Rebozo 
Avas prior to INIay 1st? I'm just trying to think of any Avay we could 
possibly refresh your recollection about events going on at that time. 
Was it prior, for example, to the time Avhen Mr. Dean and Mr. 
Ehrlichnum and Mr. Haldeman resigned from the "N^Hiite House? Do 
you recall that time? 

Mr. Griffin. A^Hiat date Avas that? 

Mr. Lackritz. That Avould haA^e been about April 30th as I recall. 

Mr. Griffin. I don't knoAv. 

]Mr. Lackritz. Does that jog anything? 

Mr. Griffin. No, it doesn't. 

INIr. Lackritz. And hoAv long a conversation did you have with 
Mr. Rebozo on that occasion? 

Mr. Griffin. Gee, I don't recall. I don't nk it Avas A^ery long but 
I don't recall the time elements on it. I .- knoAv. I Avould assume 
you could get them from INIr. Rebozo's telephone records because 
they give you times. I just don't recall. I have indicated to you that 
I talked to Mr. Rebozo a great deal. Either he calls me or I call him 
or I am at some place Avhere he is talking to somebody else and I 
chat Avith him and in some areas it is a buddy-buddy relationship. 



10429 

Mr. Lackritz. Well, did you indicate to him that you were going 
to be in Florida in the near future after he called you? 

Mr. Griffin. My best recollection was I didn't think I was going 
to be, but that I would come down and chat with him if it was im- 
portant enough and I think that is what I did. 

Mr. Lackritz. Did he agree to that suggestion, that it was very 
important? 

]\Ir. Griffin. He indicated that it was, you know, something as 
far as he Avas concerned that w^as important. He wanted to discuss 
it with me as soon as possible, to get my advice on it, yes. 

Mr. Lackritz. So then what happened next? 

Mr. Griffin. You mean after the telephone conversation^. 

Mr. Lackritz. Yes. 

Mr. Griffin. As I say, I'm not sure I came down in the latter 
part of April or if it was May 3, which I could verify, but I had a 
meeting with Mr. Rebozo. 

Mr. Lackritz. Could you describe what you discussed at that 
meeting, what he said to you, what you said to him? 

]Mr. Griffin. I can't recall specifically the conversation but in 
General he advised me what the problem was and that was that he 
did have $100,000 in cash in a safe deposit box at the Key Biscayne 
bank and that it was given to him — and he didn't recall the exact 
dates — but he indicated he thought part of it was given in 1969 
and part of it was given in 1970. He said it is the exact money that 
was given to me and that he had some inquiry — and I'm not sure 
whether the inquiry was from the Internal Revenue Service or 
whether the inquiry was from the Hughes case or the Maheu case, 
but apparently some governmental agency had made inquiry of 
him concerning it and he wanted to know what to do. 

Mr. Lackritz. I see. Did he tell you who had delivered the money 
to him? 

Mr. Griffin. I don't believe we got into that. 

Mr. Lackritz. Did he tell you what the purpose of the money 
was when he received it? 

Mr. Griffin. Xo, he didn't. 

Mr. Lackritz. Did he say it was to be used for campaigns ? 

Mr. Griffin. I think I probably implied that, that I don't think 
we — well, I tried to avoid the discussion of the specifics of the mat- 
ter until I could digest the matter and I did not Avant to get into it 
at that point — any of the details. The problem was that he had the 
money on hand at that point and Avhat should he do with it. That 
was the problem he gave me. 

Mr. Lenzner. Well, did he tell you specifically that a govern- 
mental agency had contacted him about the money? 

Mr. Griffin. I don't recall Avhether he said to me that it Avas the 
Internal Revenue Service or it A\-as some investigators on the Maheu 
case. My best recollection is I think he may have said something 
about the Internal Revenue Service, but I can't recall. I was not 
interested at that point as to AA-ho contacted him concerning the 
money. The problem that he gave me AA-as that he had the money 
and AA'hat should he do Avith it, what Avas my best advice in that 
area. 



31-889 O - 74 - pt. 22 - 16 



10430 

Ml'. Lackritz. Did ho toll yon if anyone else was aware that he 
had the money? 

Mr. Griffix. I don't believe he did. 

Mr. Lackritz. Did he tell you you were the only other individual 
who knew about the money at that time? 

Mr. Griffix. He did not. 

Mr. Lackritz. Did he indicate that he had met as yet with any 
representatives of any Federal ajjencies to discuss the money at 
that time? 

Mr. Griffix. I don't knoAv whether he said he Avas ^oinp: to meet 
with them or he had met Avitli them. It was either one or the other; 
either had just met or was about to meet and I believe it was the 
Internal Revenue Service from the west coast office or the Nevada 
office. Tliat is why I thou^jht it had something to do with the 
Maheii case. 

Mr. Lackritz. Did he indicate to you that he discussed this mat- 
ter Avith the President. 

Mr. Griffix. He did not. 

Mr. Lackritz. Did you ask him if he discussed the matter with 
the President? 

Mr. Griffix. I did not. 

Mr. Lackritz. All right, did he tell you if he used any of the 
money at any time for any purpose? 

Mr. Griffix. Ho told me very specifically that the money that 
Avas in the safe deposit box Avas the identical bills that he had 
received and there had been no change AvhatsoeA^er in it. As a mat- 
ter of fact, he did say to me it seemed a shame that the $100,000 
could not have been iuA^ested to obtain some interest on it. It was 
sitting in the safe deposit box. But he Avas very specific concerning 
the question of the identical bills. 

Mr. Lackritz. Did he indicate to you that the bills had been re- 
moved from (he safe deposit box at any time for any purpose? 

Mr. Griffix. I don't believe so. I don't think Ave discussed it. 

Mr. Lackritz. Did he indicate to you or did you ask him if he 
had used any portion of the money that he had been given for 
any purpose? 

Mr. Griffix. Xo, because I think he covered that by saying to me 
that all of the money he had received Avere the identical bills and 
Avas in the safe deposit box and that they Avere the identical bills 
received and the exact amount of monev ho had roceiA-ed. I think 
they Avere talking about a $50,000 and $50,000 for a total of $100,000 
that he had received in tAA^o payments. 

Mr. Lexzxkr. One thing T AA'onder about. If he had indicated, 
Mr. Griffin, that it Avas a ponding contact Avith. the Internal Revenue 
Service, Avould that not have defined the issue more substantially 
than if it had just been an incjuiry from say the Maheu suit? 

Mr. Grip^fix. Xo, I doji't belieA'e, Mr. Lenzner, Avhen I said in- 
quiry for the Maheu suit, I meant a governmental agency inquiry. 

Mr. Lexzxer. I see, so it Avas your understanding right from the 
bogiiHiing that it Avas a governmental interest in the $100,000? 

Mr. Griffix. It was my understanding that there either had 
been communication oi- there Avas about to be communication Avith 



10431 

^Ir. Rebozo concernino; these funds, and that he was asking my 
advice as to what should be done with them now. They were still 
in his vault. He said they were the identical bills and that he was 
seeking legal advice from me concerning their disposal at this time. 

Mr. ArmstroxCx. Did ^Ir. Rebozo indicate what the contents of 
the safe deposit box was beyond the bills themselves? 

Mr. Griffin. He did not.' I did not go into the safe deposit box, 
and I don't know, 

Mr. Armstrong. Did you make any inquiry as to whether or not 
the funds at any time had been commingled? 

Mr. Griffin. As I just said a minute ago, he advised me that 
there was the $100,000 and there was the $100,000 only, that they 
were the identical bills he received, and that they were in that safe 
deposit box. I didn't make any inquiry as to whether they were 
commingled or not with any other funds. 

Mr. Lackritz. All right, did he advise you that he had consulted 
with any other individuals at the time that he first mentioned this 
to you? 

Mr, Griffin, Xo. he didn't. 

Mr. Lackritz. Did you ask if he consulted with anyone else? 

Mr. Griffin. Xo, I don't believe I did. 

Mr. Lackritz. Did you ask him who else was aware that he still 
had the money? 

Mr. Griffin. Xo, I didn't. 

INIr. Lackritz. And he asked you specifically what should he do 
at that point? 

Mr. Griffin. He said that he had the $100,000 and it was in cash, 
there Avas this inquiry or he had seen or was about to see either 
the Revenue agents or some governmental body or person, and 
what were the problems, and AA'hat should he do with the $100,000, 

He wasn't going to deny he had it, and he asked my advice on 
that fairly broad subject." and that is basically the extent of the 
conversation. 

Mr. Lackritz. How long a meeting did you have with Mr. 
Rebozo ? 

Mr, Griffin. I think it was a couple of hours. 

Mr. Lackritz. Where was it ? 

Mr. Griffin. I believe it was at his office at the Key Biscayne 
bank. It could have been at his home, but I believe it was at the 
bank. 

Mr. Lackritz. Do you recall anyone else being present at any 
time during your discussion ? 

Mr. Griffin, Xo one else was present, 

Mr. Lackritz. Did anyone bring any coffee or anything like that 
to you? 

Mr. Griffin, I can't recall. 

Mr, Lackritz. Did he indicate to you that he had told Rose 
Mary Woods about the contribution on that occasion? 

Mr. Griffin. I don't believe he did, no. 

Mr. Lackritz. All i-ight, what was your advice to him during 
this conversation? 



10432 

Mr. Griffin. I didn't jrivc any advice, as I recall it, on this con- 
versation. The problem was presented at that time to me. And as I 
saw it, there was more than one problem involved. And I believe 
I told him that T really wanted to do some research on the prob- 
lem or the problems. I raised, I believe, at that time areas where I 
thougfht there was some problems other than just the fact that ho 
had the $100,000. 

Mr. Lackritz. And what were those areas of problems? 

Mr. Griffin. I believe I raised the problem of unreported in- 
come ; I believe I raised the problem of possible gift ; I believe I 
raised the problem of the campaign statutes, the election statutes; 
I think T raised the problem as to whether or not he might have 
been or was an officer of any committee raising funds. Those were 
the areas I tliink that I 

Mr. Lackritz. Did he ask you to do any research for him in these 
areas ? 

Mr. Griffin. Xo, I said I would. I told him I thought there 
could be some problem areas thei-e. but that I would need some time 
to really think about it and that I would myself do some research 
to see if T couldn't answer those questions in my own mind as to 
whether or not he had other problems. 

Mr. Lackritz. Well, he told vou, I take it, that he received the 
money in 1969 or 1970? 

Mr. Griffin. His recollection at that point was hazy. He Avasn't 
sure whether he received it in 1969 or 1970. He thought that he 
had received some of it in 1969, and he thought that he had received 
some of it in 1970. I didn't get to the specific dates. 

Mr. Lackritz. Well, did you ask him why he hadn't used the 
money ? 

Mr. Griffin. I don't recall that I did. I was trying to limit this 
to the problem that he was presenting. I was not trying to create 
any additional problems. And the problem he presented to me, I 
Avas trying to ansAver. 

Mr. Lackritz. Did you find it at all unusual or strange that 
someone would keep $100,000 in cash in a safe deposit box? 

Mr. GriFFiN. I don't Avant to categorize it as strange. 

Mr. Lenzner. Let me ask you this. You did discuss the unre- 
ported income, and T take at one point on that Avould be the length 
of time it was held. Did you at that time discuss Avhy and did ^Ir. 
Rebozo explain AA-hy he had held the money for at that point it 
AA-ould have been almost 8 years even if he had receiA^ed it in 1970? 

Mr. Griffin. I don't recall Avhethei- I discussed that or not and 
I raised the problem because of uniepoi'tod income, because more 
than 1 year had passed from Avhen he told me he had received the 
money, and T Avas afi-aid that an issue might be created both 
civilly and criminally concerning the unreported income problem 
of having received funds, and not having them reported, in excess 
of 1 year. 4 months, and 15 days. And that is Avhy I raised the 
problem. 

Mr. Lenzner. Exactly. Rut Avouldn't it be important to determine 
Avhat tlie recipient's position Avas and why he held those funds? 



10433 

Mr. Griffix. Yes, but I frankly did not want to get into some 
of these other problems. It was a sensitive area. He asked me advice 
specifically on what he should do. He wasn't talking about what 
he did do, why he did it. He was talking about what he should do 
now. And that was really the issue that I was centering on, and I 
didn't get into the specifics at that time as to why he did it or 
anything else. It had been done. 

Mr. Lenzxer. Did you do any research on the unreported income 
area? 

Mr. Griffix. Yes, I did. 

Mr. Lexzxer. "Would it not have been helpful to have known 
though, in order to focus your research, exactly what the recipient's 
i:)osition was as to why he held it that long? 

Mr. Griffix. It wouldn't be pertinent to what I was looking up 
at that point. 

Mr. Lexzxer. What were you looking up? 

Mr. Griffix. I was looking up as to whether or not there was 
any possible criminal statute that might affect him concerning the 
holding of those funds. 

Mr. Lexzxer. Regardless of the reason he held it? 

Mr. Griffix. You always get into an intent situation when you 
are talking about the criminal law, but I was doing a general 
private research program so that I could basically advise him, after 
I had done it, as to those issues 1 considered in my own mind. I 
Avas doing that research. I was doing that research on my own. 

Mr. Lexzxer. You also discussed with him a problem that might 
liave arisen with regard to the campaign statutes? 

Mr. Griffix. Yes. 

Mr. Lexzxer. And do you recall what specifically you may have 
discussed with regard to that? 

Mr. Griffix. Yes. I specifically discussed or mentioned the fact 
that if he were an officer or a designee of a committee that had 
received funds, there are reporting requirements, there are statutes 
which require you to turn that over to the designated officer in 
certain periods of time and so forth and so on. And I reviewed 
both of those statutes; the old one and the new one as well. 

Mr. Lexzxer. Did he indicate at that time whether he had re- 
ported the reception of the contribution? 

Mr. Griffix. I don't believe he did. Reported it to w^hom? 

Mr. Lexzxer. To the appropriate people under your description 
of your understanding of what the statute required. 

Mr. Griffix. I don't believe he had reported it, but I am not 
absolutely sure of that and I don't know whether I got into that. 
As I said, I was taking these problems myself and reviewing them 
to come up with what I considered to be proper advice. 

Mr. Ambrose. Would this be an appropriate time for me to take 
a 5-minute recess and make a telephone call? 

Mr. Lexzxer. Why don't we take a rest and come back? 

[Brief recess.] 

Mr. Lexzxer. Back on the record. 



10434 

I think we were discussing what discussion you had with regard 
to tlie possible viohitions of campaign statutes. 

Mr. Griffix. Are we on the record? 

Mr. Lenzxer. Yes. Can von go alioad and describe those, Mr. 
Cxriffin ? 

Mr. Griffix. I just said to him on that first occasion that since 
he did receive this money, tliere might be conceivably a problem 
involving Federal statutes concerning the receipt of campaign 
funds, both as to the old statute and the new statute, which came 
into existence in 1972. I just raised it as a potential problem. We 
never discussed it. I said I would check it out myself. 

Mr. Lexzxer. Well did you discuss Avhether Mr. Rebozo had in 
fact reported it to any appropriate campaign committee? 

Mr. Griffix. I don't recall discussing it. We might have. And I 
just don't believe he had reported it to any campaign committee. 

Mr. Lexzxer. Going back, did you also describe the difference 
betAveen the civil and criminal tax problems that might arise? 

Mr. Griffix. Xo, all I did was raise the issue of the possibility 
that there would be — there should be consideration or research 
done on both the civil and criminal aspects of this. 

Mr. Lexzxer. Did vou indicate to him the length of time might 
be one factor with regard to the tax problem; the length of time 
he held the funds? 

Mr. Griffix. I might have because I was discussing the question 
of not reporting — the possibility of not reporting the income as 
being an issue and that has to do with the time element. 

Mr. Lexzxer. And you were familiar, I take it from your own 
private practice, with the length of time. You didn't have to do 
any research on that? In other words you have that 

Mr. Griffix. Oh, I had general knowledge of the subject and we 
were talking about money received in either 1969 or 1970 and this 
conversation took place in late April or early May of 1973 so there 
obviously was a time problem. 

Mr. Lenzxer. Did you so indicate to Mr. Rebozo on that problem ? 

Mr. Griffix. I indicated the unreported income problem and 
several other problems, even a gift problem. Even if they had said 
to him — and I didn't get into this — but if they had said this was a 
gift to you, there was some responsibility concerning gift taxes and 
so on and so forth. 

Mr. Lexzxer. Did you ask Mr. Rebozo if he had reported the 
reception of the funds' on any of his tax returns? 

Mr. Griffix. T may have or T may have assumed he didn't. 

Mr. Lexzxer. Did he indicate that he had not reported the re- 
ception of the funds to anybody or on his tax returns? 

^Ir. Griffix. I think he indicated to me that he didn't report the 
receipt of the funds on his tax returns. I think I may have asked 
that question. I am not sure. 

Mr. Armstroxg. Incidentally, in that regard, does this help you 
recall the time in terms of how close it was to his having filed his 
taxes and Avhether or not he applied for an extension? 

Mr. Griffix. You mean April IHtli? Xo, it doesn't. 



10435 

Mr. Armstrong. You don't recall him saying anything like, 
"AVell, I have my taxes for this year, should I report it"? 

Mr. Griffix. No, it was not a very detailed discussion in any 
manner, shape or form concerning these issues in detail. What I 
was doing was raising possible issues concerning the potential 
problems and that really I was going to go back and research some 
of these issues myself so that I could provide him with what I 
considered the best advice he should have at the time. 

Mr. Armstroxg. Did you ask him if he had taken the automatic 
extension on his tax returns? 

Mr. Griffix. Xo, I didn't get into his tax returns to that extent 
at all. 

Mr. Lex'zxer. Was there any discussion about whether he had 
or had not reported the reception of the funds to anybody else after 
he received them ? 

Mr. Griffix. I don't think I got into that. When we were talk- 
ing about the question of committee reporting, I think I may have 
asked him whether or not he discussed this with any committee 
and I think he said he did not, but I don't want to hang my life 
on the question of whether he did or did not discuss it. I was 
attempting to raise — solely to raise issues — I wasn't attempting to 
get the background of the issues — so that I might give him what 
I considered to be my best advice as to what he should do in May 
of 1973. 

Mr. Armstrong. Did you give him any examples as to the types 
of individuals that he might have reported it to? 

Mr. Griffix. Xo, I Avas raising the general issue only and more 
for my own sake. This is a conversation that took place in the course 
of maybe 2 hours. I was not about to give him advice on certain 
issues without first knowing what the hell I was talking about. I 
just raised the issues in this very general conversation. 

]Mr. Lexzxer. Well, were you aware at the time, of any signifi- 
cance attached to it in the Internal Revenue context of whether 
he had or had not notified anybody else of the reception of the 
funds? 

Mr. Griffix. Xo. I wasn't. 

Mr. Lexzxer. Did you later become aware of that factor? 

Mr. Griffix. Only to the extent of what I read in the newspapers 
concerning that possibility and I really have not gotten involved 
or read up to any great extent concerning this case at all. 

Mr. Lexzxer. I take it what you are saying is that on your first 
discussion with Mr. Rebozo he did not indicate to you at any time 
that he had in fact discussed the reception of the funds with any- 
body prior to the time he talked with you about it? 

Mr. Griffix. He didn't say he had and he didn't say he hadn't. 
I assumed that he probably had, I am not his only advisor. I am 
not his only lawyer. I just assumed that he had, but I didn't 
ask him. 

Mr. Lenzner. You say you are not his only lawyer. Had you 
represented him on any prior occasion? 

Mr. Griffix. I represented Mr. Rebozo in the B & C Investment 
Co. transaction, yes. 



10436 

Mr. Lexzxer. I see. 

Mr. Lackkitz. You said there were some problems arising from 
the reporting of campaign funds? 

Mr. GuiFFix. I said I thought there might be a problem in that 
area. 

Mr. Lackritz. Did Mr. Rebozo indicate to you which campaigns 
these funds were supposed to be for? 

Mr. Grip^fix. I don't believe he did. He indicated to me the 
dates he thought he received them. 

Mr. Lackritz. And he indicated to you also that thev were 
campaign funds? He rnust have indicated something to you. 

Mr. Griffix. He indicated in a general way that the money was 
for, you know, for the purposes of politics and campaigns. I as- 
sumed—I did not get into it— I assumed what he was talking about, 
and he did not say it to me, that what he was talking about was 
the Presidential campaigns. 

Mr. Lackritz. But he did not tell you specifically the Presiden- 
tial campaigns? 

Mr. Griffix. I did not ask. 

Mr. Lackritz. And you said he said something about the money 
Avas to be used for politics? 

Mr. Griffix. Let me correct myself. I'm talking about political 
campaigns when I say "politics" and I assumed what he was talk- 
ing about was the President's political campaign. 

Mr. Lackritz. But he used the plural at the time he discussed 
this with you? 

Mr. Griffix. Xo, I don't say he did, no. If I said that, it is 
wi-ong. I can't tell you exactly what he said. I wasn't paying that 
nnich attention to our conversations, except trving to analvze what 
the problem was and trying to analvze what 'issues might be pre- 
sented, so I could give him the advice I thought he needed. 

"Mr. Lackritz. You also indicated that he stated that the money 
m the safe deposit box was the identical money that he had re- 
ceived from Mr. Danner, is that correct? 

Mr. Griffix. I don't know whether he said to me that he had 
received it from Mr. Danner or not, but he did specifically say to 
me, I recall very vividly because he repeated it on several occasions, 
that It was the identical money and he was glad that he hadn't 
even put the money in some bank to accumulate interest on so that 
he could now return the identical money. 

Mr. Lackritz. Well, did he indicate to you the money was kept 
in tlie same form in which he received it? 

Mr. Griffix. Yes, he did, in $100 bills. He indicated the money 
was ni $100 bills and these were the same $100 bills. 

Mr. Lackritz. Did he indicate the $100 bills were kept in the 
same packets that he had received? 

Mr. Griffix. Xo, I don t believe we got into the question of 
whether it Avas the same packet or not. 

Mr. Lackritz. Did he mention to you or did you ask him whether 
lie had altoied the form in which the money Avas stored at any 
time during the prior ?> or 4 years? 



10437 

Mr. Griffin. What? 

Mr. Lackritz. In other words, if he had changed the wrappers? 

Mr. Griffix. Xo, I don't think we got into that. 

Mr. Lackritz. So he did not indicate to you that he had changed 
the wrappers, is that correct? 

Mr. Griffin. I don't believe so. Again, to go back to the point, 
I Avas concentrating more on what the issues were in my mind. 

Mr. Lackritz. Did he indicate to you that he had changed en- 
velopes in which he kept the money? 

Mr. Griffix. I don't believe he did. I read it somewhere I think. 

Mr. Lackritz. But Mr. Eebozo did not mention it to you on that 
occasion ? 

Mr. Griffix. He may have but my recollection 

Mr. Lackritz. But you don't recall it? 

Mr. Griffix. I don't recall it, no. He did specifically say — and 
he was talking about the $100,000— and he did say that they were 
the identical bills, that it was all in $100 bills and it was the iden- 
tical $100 bills that he had received in 1969 and 1970. 

Mr. Lexzxer. Did he say that it was from the Hughes organiza- 
tion? 

Mr. Griffix. I believe he did; either Hughes organization or 
some representative from the Hughes organization or somebody 
being an intermediary with the Hughes organization. I don't re- 
call him saying who delivered the money to him, but Hughes' name 
did come up. 

Mr. Armstrong. Did you ask or did he indicate on whose behalf 
he was acting as an agent ; whether or not he was acting as an agent 
for the Hughes people or for the campaign? 

Mr. Griffix. Xo, we didn't discuss the question of agency. 

Mr. Armstroxg. At all? I mean, even to the extent of whether 
he had received the money or he was holding it on someone else's 
behalf? 

Mr. Griffix. Xo, we didn't discuss the question of what his role 
was legally in this as an agent of anyone. We just didn't. 

Again, I was concentrating on and laising certain issues only for 
the purpose of raising the issues and hoping that I could go back 
and do some research and give him the best advice. I don't recall 
the question of discussing it in any detail with him; whether he 
was Hughes' agent or anybody else's agent. 

Mr. Armstroxg. You mentioned before that you had asked him 
whether or not he had reported it to any officers or designees — 
well, you asked him if he was an officer of designee of any cam- 
paign ? 

Mr. Griffix. Yes, I did. 

Mr. Armstrong. At that time or prior did he indicate he was? 

Mr. Griffix. He indicated to me, I believe, that he was not. 

Mr. Armstroxg. That he had been? 

Mr. Griffix. I think he indicated that he had not been, but I don't 
recall. I raised that for the purpose in my own mind of the possible 
issue concerning the statute itself, when you do become an officer, there 
are certain duties and responsibilities as an officer of these committees, 



10438 

which you are fully aware of, and that is why I think I asked the 
question. 

Mr. Armstrong. OK. forgive me for what 

Mr. Griffin. I may have asked it specifically as to whether or 
not he was in fact an officer of the Ke-Elect Committee or not. 

Mr. Armstrong. And he indicated he was not an officer or desig- 
nee 'i 

Mr. Griffin. He indicated to me he was not a designated officer 
of that committee. 

Mr. Armstrong. Forgive me for what may sound like a layman's 
question, but wouldn't the question of agency in such a transaction 
be a crucial one foi- determining what his legal responsibilities 
were ? 

Mr. Griffin. Xot in my opinion at that time, no. 

Mr. Armstrong. Well wouldn't it in fact be important to deter- 
mine whether or not he had been designated an agent of the Hughes 
Tool Co. to at some later point to give this money to whatever 
campaign would be appropriate? 

Mr. Griffin. I didn't raise the question with him or in my own 
mind at that point concerning agency. 

Mr. Armstrong. Did you raise it at any time? 

Mr. Griffin. I don't believe I did. I didn't raise or answer all 
of these questions either Avhen I gave him advice. 

Mr. Armstrong. So you never got any answer to that question? 

Mr. Griffin. I don't think I asked the question. 

Mr. Armstrong, But he never gave you any information which 
led you to draw a conclusion? 

Mr. Griffin. I don't recall him giving me any information con- 
cernhig agency structure. I don't think I asked any questions con- 
cerning it. 

Mr. Lackritz. Did you keep anj- notes from your meeting on 
that occasion? 

Ml-. Griffin. No notes. 

Mr. Lackritz. Did you make any notes at any time from any 
of your conversations with Mr. Rebozo? 

Mr. Griffin. I don't believe I did. I mav have had a scratch 
note maybe but I don't believe I did. 

Ml". Lackritz. But nothing that vou would have kept in a case 
file. 

Mr. Griffin. That is correct. 

Mr. Lackritz. Did you open up a file on Mr. Rebozo's problems? 

Mr. (jRiFFiN. On this problem? 

Mr. Lackritz. Yes. 

Mr. Griffin. Xo sir. 

Mr. Lackritz. What did you do following this meeting? 

Mr. Grip^fin. T did personal research on some of the questions I 
had raised in my own mind. 

^ Mr. Lackritz. And specifically did you go back to Xew York or 
Fort Lauderdale to do legal research there? 

iMr. Griffin. I believe I did it in Xew York. I'm positive I did 
it in Xew York. And after T had done my research and checked 
it out I had another meeting Avith him. 



10439 

Mr. LxVCKRiTZ. You had another meeting with Mr. Rebozo? 

Mr. Griffin. Yes. 

Mr. Lackritz. And do you recall when that second meeting would 
have been? 

Mr. Griffix. That might have been the May 3d meeting when I 
went down on May 3d. It is hard to pinpoint exactly when. I dis- 
cussed it with him four or five times. I discussed it with him on 
any number of occasions on the telephone. 

Mr. Lackritz. But to the best of your recollection the second 
meeting was about May 3d ? 

Mr. Griffix. Well, from my travel records, it indicates that I 
went to Key Biscayne on the 3d of May. I just think that is maybe 
the time that I did it. I also saw him the other times I indicated. 
I saw him at least twice when I was down there on vacation con- 
cerning this problem. 

Mr. Lackritz. And what advice did you give Mr. Rebozo at this 
meeting Avas about May 3d ? 

Mr. Griffin. I believe it was at the bank. 

Mr. Lackritz. In Mr. Rebozo's office? 

Mr. Griffin. Yes. 

Mr. Lackritz. At what time of day was it? 

Mr. Griffix. Gee, I don't recall. 

Mr. Lackritz. How long a meeting was the second meeting? 

Mr. Griffix\ It was — I think it was an hour or maybe a little bit 
more. Part of the meeting when I met him I discussed other sub- 
jects other than this. One leads into the other, so I don't know how 
long we discussed this specific problem, but I did come down to him 
with what I considered to be very specific advice, and I recommended 
very strongly to him to take it. 

Mr. Lackritz. "WTiat was your advice on that occasion? 

INIr. Griffix. ]My advice basically to him was that I thought he 
should immediately obtain an independent individual, who could 
act on his behalf to: One, count the money, to identify the bills 
specifically, to verify where they are, how much was there, have that 
fully documented, and then to as soon as possible thereafter return 
the funds from wherever he got them, to the person he received 
them from, and receive a receipt from that person and to do it just 
as soon as possible. 

Mr. Lackritz. How did you form the basis of these recommenda- 
tions ? 

INIr. Griffin. As I say, I researched many of the problems, and I 
felt that this was the way that he should go concerning the funds. 
They belong to the person who gave them to him. I thought for his 
own protection he should have somebody totally independent verify 
what he said was so concerning the bills, and I felt that for his best 
interests that he should get the funds back to where they came from, 
thus avoiding a lot of potential problems. 

Mr. Lackritz. All right. By the time of this second meeting, had 
Mr. Rebozo met with any officials of any Federal agencies; in other 
words, in the interim between the first meeting and the second? 

Mr. Griffin. You are talking about the Internal Revenue Service ? 

Mr. Lackritz. Yes. 



10440 

]\Ir. Griffix. He may have. I don't know. He mifrht have. I think 
you could probably check with him or the Internal Revenue Service 
to find out when they met. 

My discussion on that date was very specific, and it was a specific 
discussion as to what I recommended. And I was rather strong in 
my recommendations to him. And I was 2iot about to discuss in 
general what the issues were or why or wherefor. I just said, I think, 
after my research and thinking about it, this should be done. 

And I am sure we got into discussions of other matters as well. 

Mr. Lackritz. What was Mr. Rebozo's response to your sugges- 
tions? 

Mr. Griffix. He thought it was a good idea. 

Mr. Lackritz. Did he ask your advice as to who the individual 
would be? 

Mr. Griffix. If I am not mistaken, he said to me could I act. 

Mr. Lackritz. In other words, he asked you ? 

Mr. Griffix. Me, he said: "Do you think you could act as that 
individual?" And I said I didn't think so; I was not the person, the 
type of person, I was thinking about. 

I was very closely connected with Mr. Robert Abplanalp, connected 
with many of the things that were going on, and the fact that I 
would do this would be tainted with partisanship on my part. I 
suggested to him a totally independent individual. I didn't sug- 
gest any names to him, but I declined that invitation to be that 
individual. 

Mr. Lackritz. And he didn't suggest anyone else? 

Mr. Griffix. Xo, he didn't suggest anyone. 

Mr. Lackritz. But you w^ere clear, INIr. Rebozo did ask you to be 
that individual? 

ISIr. Griffix. I believe he did. It was in the form of — more of 
"How about you doing it" or something to that nature. 

INIr. ArmstroxCx. Did he solicit any suggestions? 

Mr. Griffin. For names ? I don't believe he did. It is hard to recall 
whether he did. I knoAV I didn't suggest anyone. 

Mr. Lackritz. During that second meeting with ^Ir. Rebozo, did 
you ask him or did he tell you any more details of the storage of 
this money or the receipt of the contribution ? 

Mr. Griffix. No, as I said, it was more of a meeting for me to go 
in and tell him what my advice was for him and that I had, you 
know, gone over many of the problems and I was not going to 
discuss the pros and cons of each of those issues, but that for the 
best interest, for his best interest my advice was what I told you. 

Mr. Lexzxer. Well, did you discuss what you had discovered 
with regard to the civil and criminal tax problems? 

Mr. Griffin. I did not. 

Mr. Lexzxer. Did you discuss further with him the campaign 
reporting problem ? 

Mr. Griffin. I did not. 

Mr. Lexzxer. Or the gift tax problem ? 

Mr. Griffix. I did not. 

Mr. Lexzxer. Did INIr. Rebozo ask? He obviously was concerned 
about those areas, I would think— I mean, you explained those prob- 
lems the first time. 



10441 

Mr. Griffix. I raised them only as possible issues for my con- 
sideration concernino; advice that I mi<2;ht give him. In my own mind 
I felt that the advice I was giving to him wonld help solve a lot of 
those problems without getting specifically with him as to why they 
would. 

]Mr. Lexzxer. Which of the problems would that have solved, the 
return of the money? 

jNIr, Griffix. Well, again in my mind I think they certainly 
■would have solved the gift problem and the unreported income prob- 
lem, and I thought they would also solve the question of whether he 
received, as an officer of a campaign, certain funds. And since it was 
the identical funds that Ave were talking about 

Mr. Lexzxer. Did you advise him that the immediate return of the 
funds could solve or resolve these problems? 

Mr. Griffix. I didn't say they would resolve the problems. I just 
said that I thought for his best interests, my best advice would be 
to return the funds as soon as possible to the person he got them 
from. 

]Mr. Lexzxer. He didn't say to you, "Bill, what about those other 
problems, what is my liability on tax"? 

Mr. Griffix. Xo. as a matter of fact, I assumed, without him saying 
it, he was getting other advice from other areas. And I did not want 
to get involved with a discussion of specific issues on those avenues. 

Mr. Lexzxer. Why w^as that ? 

]Mr. Griffix. Because he was only asking me what he should do at 
that point. I know he had accountants, and I know he had other 
lawyers, and the issues were not raised as far as I knew by the 
Internal Revenue Service. 

Mr. Lexzxer. Off the record. 

[Discussion held off the record.] 

Mr. Lexzxer. Back on the record. "WTiere were we? 

["Whereupon the reporter read back the previous question and 
answer.] 

Mr. Lexzxer. ]Mr. Griffin, did you discuss any other options with 
]\Ir. Rebozo with regard to what to do with the funds ? 

Mr. Griffix. I did not. 

ISIr. Lexzxer. Did you consider any other options and terms of 
turning the funds over to the campaign ? 

Mr. Griffix. I thought about, you know, a lot of them, but 
basically this was in my opinion the best advice for him at that time, 
and that is what I gave him. And I didn't really go into all of the 
rest of the stuff with him in any manner, shape, or form. 

ISIr. Lexzxer. Did he ask of you, as to how he should deal with the 
Internal Revenue Service? 

IVIr. Griffix. He did not. 

Mr. Lexzxer. Did you discuss the question of disclosure to the 
Internal Revenue Service with him? 

Mr. Griffix. I didn't discuss disclosure with him. 

Mr. Lexzxer. You didn't discuss the Internal Revenue Service 
with him ? 

Mr. Griffix. Only to the extent, as I testified before, that they were 
either coming in or had been in to see him concerning these funds. 



10442 

Mr. Lexzner. But that was the first meeting? 

Mr. Griffix. I believe so. 

Mr. Lexzner. Rut I am talkino: about the secoud. 

Mr. Griffin. I don't know whether he discussed at the second 
meeting whether the Internal Revenue Service was cominj]^ in or had 
come in. At some point I knew they had come in, but I didn't discuss 
that issue with him. 

Mr. Lexzner. Did you give him any advice on whether he should 
notify anybody that he was /loing to return the funds? 

Mr. Griffin. No, I advised him, as I told you, to get an indepen- 
dent individual that could act as his intermediary concerning the 
funds — he would have to advise tluit person — and to follow basically 
what I had recommended to him in those areas. 

INIr. Lenzner. Did you ask him whether he had in fact discussed 
this matter with anybody else? 

Mr. Griffin. I don't believe I did. 

Mr. Lenzner. And did he volunteer any information in that 
regard ? 

JNIr. Griffin. Xot at that time. 

Mr. Lenzner. Did he at a later time? 

Mr. Griffin. At a later time, yes. 

]Mr. Lenzner. Well, was there a discussion as to whose money 
actually it was at that period of time ? 

]Mr. Griffin. There Avas a general discussion, and I just under- 
stood it to mean that it was the Hughes money in general terms. And 
I don't believe I discussed with him as to who the person was who 
gave him the funds. I read someplace, I guess, it was Mr. Danner. 

Mr. Lenzner. Well now, at the second meeting, you were still not 
aware as to Avhich campaign the funds were designated for ? 

]\Ir. Griffin. I wasn't and did not discuss it. I only gave him the 
advice, which I thought Avas the best advice at that time for him. I 
didn't get into the other issues. I didn't Avant to. 

Mr. Lenzner. Did he ever suggest to you that he Avanted to use 
those funds for future congressional or other campaigns? 

INIr. Griffin. I don't believe Ave discussed the question of the use of 
the funds. We Avere discussing the basic issue as to Avhat he should 
do Avith them at that time, and my best advice A\-as to return them 
under the terms and the conditions as I outlined to him. 

Mr. Lenzner. I Avas Avondering though, since you didn't know 
which campaign the funds Avere targeted for, Avhy Avasn't it a viable 
option to give the funds used by Mr. Rebozo for, say, that 1974 
congressional campaign? 

Mr. Griffin. I just presumed in my OAvn mind that when any 
funds Avere given to ]Mr. Rebozo, they AA'ere probably giA^en for the 
purpose of the Presidential campaign. That is a presumption on my 
part. 

Ml'. Lenzner. But you have no hesitation in saying there was no 
discussion on that subject at all? 

Mr. Griffin. I don't belicA^c there Avas any discussion on that sub- 
ject. I did not Avant to get into these subjects. I Avas trying to con- 
centrate on a specific issue and trying to give him advice on that 
specific issue. 



10443 

]Mr. Lexzxer. And what yon are saying is that on the first occa- 
sion, when you discussed this with ]NIr. Eebozo, you raised three 
rather serious problems for him. 

INIr. Griffin. No, I was not raising problems. I was raising issues. 
It might be a problem. 

Mr. Lexzner. Exactly. 

Mr. Griffix. And it was a general discussion. I had just received 
the problem at that point, and my initial reaction was that these are 
the areas that there may be problems in; these are the issues, you 
know, that I will take a peek at, and there were conceivably more, 
but I couldn't think of them at that point. 

Mr. Lexzxer. But my point is after raising those, after suggesting 
those possible issues, on the second occasion that you talked with Mr. 
Rebozo, none of these specific issues were discussed? 

Mr. Griffix. I went down specifically to give him advice as to 
what he should do. I didn't go down to give him advice as to my 
research concerning the issues. I thought what he should do was 
return the funds. 

]\Ir. Lexzxer. The answer was no, there was no discussion ? 

Mr. Griffix. I don't recall any discussion on those points. 

Mr. Lexzxer. And he didn't ask about any of them? 

Mr. Griffix^ I said I had researched several of these issues in my 
own mind, and I had thought about other things, but it was me as 
a lawyer doing my own research. And after I researched these things, 
that was my conclusion as to what he should do. 

INIr. Armstroxg. Did ]Mr. Rebozo indicate any options that he 
thought were available to him? 

Mr. Griffix. Xo, I think he wanted to return the money. I think 
when we discussed it, I think he was very much in accord, and I 
think it was probably in his own mind to indicate it anyway. 

Mr. Armstrong. Well, had he suggested that before you mentioned 
it? 

Mr. GRirFix\ JNlight have. 

Mr. Armstroxg. Had he suggested that he felt he had any other 
options ? 

Mr. Griffix. Xot that I know of. 

Mr. Armstroxg. Was it a question of just finding out if that 
option would basically solve his problems? 

Mr. Griffix. I don't know if it was a question of solving problems 
or not, because it was a question of him asking me advice in this 
area, and he may have said, "Yes," you know, "I want to return the 
funds." I don't recall whether he said it or not. I know when I did 
discuss it with him, he was in full agreement that that is what he 
thought he should do. 

Mr. Armstroxg. Well, did he indicate or did you ask him whether 
or not there was any reason to believe these funds already belonged 
to the campaign or belonged to some individual? 

Mr. Griffix. Xo, we didn't get into that specific discussion of it. 
This was not a very long discussion. This was really — I Avas really 
coming down to give him some suggestions, and I gave him strong 
advice. 



10444 

]\Ir. Armstrong. I^iit aou gave him strong advice ■without knowing 
what the money was for, whose money it was or what his role in the 
transaction was? 

Mr. Griffix. I generally knew, as I told yon, there was indication 
that it was Hughes' money. I did not want to get into it and avoided 
specifically the discussion of any of the specifics that took place prior 
to that time. I just didn't want to get into it. He was asking me 
advice as to what he should do then, and that is the advice that I 
gave him. That is the best advice I thought I could come up with at 
that point. 

]Mr. Lexzxer. Did you tell him specifically — well, you mentioned 
before that you mentioned you had done research. Did you tell him 
you had done research on the criminal tax problems? 

Mr, Griffix. Xo. again I raised possible problems with him, pos- 
sible issues the first time. And that was raising the issues after 
hearing this for the first time, all Avithin say 1 or 2 hours. And I just 
said "I Avill start checking out some of these problems on my own 
and I Avill come back and jrive vou the advice I think vou should 
take." 

]Mr. Lenzxer. So you didn't indicate that you had done research 
into specific areas? 

Mr. Griffix'. I indicated that I had done research into areas, but 
I did not discuss in detail the research I had done. I said, "I have 
done research in various areas and this is the advice I think you 
should take. 

Mr. Lenzxer. And did he say "Will that take care of my gift tax 
problem" ? 

Mr. Griffix'. No, we didn't specifically discuss this. 

INIr. Ambrose. Can I raise a little objection at this point? I think 
we have been all over this at least 7,000 different ways and I really 
think we are getting to the point of needless repetition. I think it has 
really gotten a little beyond the pale and could almost characterize 
it as attempting, Mr. Lenzner, if you will excuse the expression, of 
trying to put Mr. Rebozo's words in Mr. Griffin's mouth. And I think 
really you got the point. I think he has testified very clearly that 
certain considerations came to him. And when he first heard the stor}^, 
he checked a fcAv things out and he told him the best advice under 
the circumstances is to give the money back. It has been asked 400 
different ways, very cleverly and very artfully and so on, but the 
answer is still the same. 

Mr. Lexzxer. I Avouldn't say it Avas done cleverly. We are not 
trying to be cleA^er; just trying to get some information. 

Mr. Ambrose. I know but I think, really, ]Mr. Griffin is here volun- 
tarily. I think really if you have a specific question about some other 
aspects of it, I think we ought to go on to something else. I just 
suggest Ave get this thing moving. 

Mr. Lexzxer. Well, let me suggest on the record that I am only 
trying to ascertain, since ]N[r. Griffin did raise three issues AA'ith his 
client, it just seems to me that those three issues should be of some 
concern to the client in later discussion but apparently they Averen't. 
On the other hand, Mr. Griffin did indicate that he did mention to 
Mr. liebozo that he had done research in those three areas and it might 



10445 

seem logical that the client, being concerned about those three areas, 
might inquire into the possibilities. 

Mr. AiNrBROSE. You use the Avord "might" five times in that state- 
ment. Anything might be. The fact of the matter is that he said that 
he did the following set of circumstances and that is all there is to it. 

jSIr. Lexzxer. We will save time if I pose the question and then if 
you want to direct your client not to answer the question, that is fine, 
but the question is — and I am not trying to put the words of Mr. 
Rebozo into your mouth — but I am asJking do you recall Mr. Rebozo 
asking you whether he had, after your research, any liabilities in the 
three areas that you had previously discussed Avith him? 

]\Ir. Griffix. I don't recall any such conversations and I don't recall 
discussing the question of liability in the areas prior to—not prior to, 
discussing at all, concerning the advice I was going to give him as to 
what he should do now. All I was interested in and the only issue 
that I had centered upon was Avhat advice can I give him. 

]Mr. Lexzxer. Xo. all I am asking now, Mr. Griffin, is simply this. 
Did Mr. Rebozo to your recollection ask, as a result of your research, 
did he have a problem in any of the three areas that you had previ- 
ously testified to, to the best of your recollection? 

Mr. Griffix. Xo. to my recollection, no, he didn't. 

Mr. Lexzxer. All riglit, simple question and a simple answer. 

Mr. Lackritz. ^Nlr. Griffin, let's cover something different. You 
advised Mr. Rebozo that he should have an independent individual 
identify the bills, is that correct ? 

Mr. Griffix. I thought he should have an independent individual 
come in and not only identify the bills, count the bills, identify them, 
and in effect be the intermediary for the transfer of the bills back 
to the individual from whence they came. 

;Mr. Lackritz. Well, by that did you want him to identify that 
those were the same bills' that had been in there 4 years previously? 

Mr. Griffix. Xo, I wanted him to identify each bill. I wanted him 
to look at the bill, record the bill, and take a serial number of every 
bill. 

INIr. Lackritz. Why did you w^ant him to do that ? 

Mr. Griffix. So that they could be identified. If there was any 
identification of the bills that were given by the Hughes organization, 
this would indicate that they Avere the same bills. It w^ould also 
indicate by serial number on the bills what dates the bills Avere issued. 

JNIr. Lackritz. And by finding out what dates the bills Avere issued 
you thought that you might be able to shoAv that it was the same 
money ? 

]Mr. Griffix. It is an indication that it might be the same money, 
yes, because if they Avere serial numbers that Avere not posted by the 
Treasury Department, you knoAv prior to the date he said he received 
them, then it Avould indicate that they Avere not the same bills. But 
if they did, it Avould indicate that they Avere. 

Mr.' Lackritz. Well did you do any* research on your oAvn to deter- 
mine hoAv to identify this money ? 

Mr. Griffix. No, not at all. 

INIr. Lackritz. Did you call anyone in the Federal Reserve ? 



31-889 O - 74 - pt. 22 - 17 



10446 

Mr. Griffix. Did not. He indicated to me they were the identical 
bills, they were $100 bills and there was x number of them. I said 
"All rio;ht, take every serial nunilM>r of the bills, have this independ- 
ent person do that, and record them and when you retuin the bills, 
when the independent returns the bills, I want that person who 
receives them to si^n for them so that he can indicate that he has 
received these bills." 

I thought there would be a problem in identific ation of the bills. 

Mr. Lackritz. What do you mean by a problem ? 

Mr. Griffix. That somebody might claim it was not the same 
money. 

Mr. Lackritz. And you felt that this identification procedure 
would insure they couldn't ? 

Mr. Griffin. I felt it was one way to help prove that they were. 

Mr. Lexzxer. Do you know if any research was done by anybody 
to determine if the bills in Mr. Rebozo's possession had been issued 
prior to or subsequent to the time he said he received them? 

Mr. Griffix. I don't know. And I did not do it nor do I know of 
anybody who did. I assume you people did when you got the money 
back. 

Mr. Lex-zx'er. That is a fair assumption. 

Mr. Armstroxg. Off the record. 

[Discussion off the record.] 

^Ir. Lackritz. Following this second meeting with jNIr. Rebozo, 
Avhen w^as your next contact with him concerning the money? 

Mr. Griffix. It might have been by telephone. I was at this point 
insisting to him that he should do this as soon as possible. 

Mr. Lackritz. And at your insistence did you want him to return 
the money to the same individual from whom he had received it? 

JNIr. Griffin. Yes. 

Mr. Lackritz. And did he indicate to you following the second 
meeting, that he was in fact in contact with this individual to return 
the money ? 

]Mr. Griffix. He indicated to me he was in contact with Mr. 
Danner. 

Mr. Lackritz. And did he tell you 

Mr. Griffix. I didn't verify or know whether that was the indi- 
vidual who gave him the money. I just assumed it was. 

INIr. Lackritz. Did you ask him if Mv. Danner were willing to take 
the money back or did he tell you that jNlr. Danner was willing to 
take the money back? 

Mr. Griffix. T am trying to think of the time span. 

I Avas calling him to verify whether or not he had contacted 
Danner and whether or not this meeting would be set up and transfer 
the money back to Danner, because I thought the sooner the better. 

Mr. Lackritz. Why the urgency, Mr. (xrifRn ? 

l\Ir. Griffix. To get it out of his hands and have it independently 
counted so that he could remove this problem and remove the bills 
from his own bank and his own personal possession. 

]\fr. Lackritz. But T take it there was some pressing need to do it 
(juickly ? 

Mr. Griffix. Xo, T just recommended that he do it immediately. 
My legal advice was to do it as soon as possible. And he said to me 



,10447 

he had contacted Danner on several occasions and was having dif- 
ficulty getting Danner to meet with him to return the bills. And I 
called him on several occasions and asked "Have you done it yet" 
and I went to see him at the bank when I was down there on a 
couple of occasions. 

]\Ir. Lackritz. These were when j^ou were down there for your 
vacation with your wife ? 

Mr. Griffix. Yes, and we discussed it and he said that he was 
trying to get Danner, trying to get him in and was making a lot of 
calls and Danner apparently was avoiding this to some extent and 
that at some time, I understood, Mr. Chester Davis got into the 
picture. I don't know exactly how but 

Mr. Lexzner. Your telephone records show that you called — that 
somebody I should say called Mr. Rebozo's office on May 4, the day 
after your meeting of May 3. 

Mr. Griffix. Yes. 

Mr. Lexzxer. I understood you to say you were in the Miami area 
from ]May 3 to May 7. 

INIr. Griffix. Right. 

Mr. Lexzxer. Would that have been a call placed by you ? 

Mr. Griffin. It may have been a call by my secretary to me. 

Mr. Lexzxer. At Mr. Rebozo's office ? 

Mr. Griffin. Or looking for me ; trying to find me every once in a 
while. 

Mr. Lexzxer. You have no recollection though of whether you 
talked to Mr. Rebozo on that particular phone call ? 

Mr. Griffix. No. 

Mr. Lexzxer. There is also a call on that same day to 215, Phila- 
delphia, 491-0594. Do you know what that call relates to? 

Mr. Griffix. "What date was that? 

;Mr. Lexzxer. Same day, ^lay 4. You don't know whether that is 
Mr. Gemmill's office? 

Mr. Griffix. I don't know. 

Mr. Lexzxer. Did you have occasion to call Mr. Gemmill on or 
about that date ? 

INIr. Griffix. No, I don't believe so. I don't think so. May 4 was 
that? 

Mr. Lexzxer. Yes sir. And then back-to-back calls on May 8 and 
May 9 to ]Miami to jNlr. Rebozo's number. 

Mr. Griffix. That may have been my office looking for me. 

Mr. Lexzxer. You returned on May 7, did you not ? 

Mr. Griffix. What date are you talking about ? 

Mr. Lexzxer. May 8 and ]\Iay 9 and ]May 10 also. 

Mr. Griffix. That is probably my calls to him. 

Mr. Lexzner. And do you think those reflected an effort by you to 
determine whether he has taken any steps to return the funds ? 

]Mr. Griffix. I can't really tell you whether they were or weren't. 
I just don't know. 

Mr. Lexzxer. You have no recollection of what the specific nature 
of those calls were ? 

Mr. Griffin. No, I don't but it was after I had returned. 
Mr. Lexzxer. Right. 



10448 

Mr. Lackrttz. So dnrinji mid-^ray throu<rh late May you found 
out from Ml'. Rebozo tliat he liad beoii unsuccessful in persuading 
Mr. Danner to take the money back ? 

iNIr. Griffin. Durinfj that period I was pushinp; him as a lawyer 
and as a friend to i-eturu these funds and I had called him on several 
occasions about ''Had he contacted" and ''Had it been done." And he 
indicated to me that he was having some difficulty ; that he had con- 
tacted Danner. in fact, he got him on a golf course once. Banner's 
secretarv rano; him on a jrolf course to find out where he was and he 
was having some difficulty with Danner in luuing Danner meet with 
him concerning the return of these funds to Danner. 

yir. Lackritz. Did Mr. Rebozo ever tell you he had met personally 
with Mr. Danner in Washington to request him to take the money 
back? 

ISIr. Griffix. Gee, he might have. I don't know if he told me or he 
didn't or I read it. 

Mr. Lackritz. Do you recall what he said to you when he told you 
about that ? 

Mr. Griffix. No, I don't. I was attempting to make sure that he 
got Danner and Danner came down or he met Danner and he gave the 
money back to Danner and he got a receipt for it, as I indicated. And 
he indicated to mo he was having difficulty in getting Danner to do 
that and he may have indicated to me that he even met Danner at 
some point in Washington to try to do that. 

Mv. Lackritz. Did he tell you during this period that he talked to 
the President? 

Mr. Griffix. Xo he didn't, 

INIr. Lackritz. About this matter? 

]Mr. Griffix. Xo he didn't. 

'Sir. Lackritz. Did you ask him if he had spoken to the President 
about this matter? 

INIr. Griffix. I didn't. 

Mr. Lackritz. Did he indicate to you he had met with both the 
President and Mr. Danner on ]May 20? 

Mr. Griffix. Xo, he didn't. 

]\Ir. Lackritz. Did Mr. Abplanalp indicate to you that Mr. Danner 
and Sir. Rebozo had met witli him on any occasion in late INIay? 

Sir. Griffix. Only recently. I don't know whether I either read it 
or somebody said, but Abplanalj) did not indicate to me. I think I 
load it someplace. 

Mr. Lackritz. All right, so I take it then you were not present at 
any mooting around Slay 18, 19. 20 in "Washington, D.C., with Mr. 
Al)planalp, ^Ir. Danner, and ]Mr. Rebozo? 

Sir. Griffix. Xo, I wasn't. I was in Key Biscayne. 

It is 1073 vou Avore talking about? 

Mr. Lackritz. Yes. All right, did you have any discussions with 
any of those individuals about the substance of that meeting? 

Sir. Griffin. Xo. 

Mr. Lackritz. Did there come a time later on in May when you 
found out that INIr. Rebozo was in consultation with any other 
attorneys ? 

]Mr. Griffix. Yes. 



10449 

Mr. Lackritz. Could you relate the circumstances of that to us, 
please ? 

Mr. Griffix. I don't know the exact time, and I don't know 
whether it was late May or early June. I don't know exactly when it 
was, but Mr. Rebozo had advised me that he had consulted with Mr, 
Kenneth Gemmill in Philadelphia and that Mr. Gemmill in effect 
Avas handling; this matter on behalf of Mr. Rebozo and was going to 
act as the independent intermediary for the purposes of transferring 
the funds back to ]Mr. Banner or the Hughes organization where it 
came from. 

Mr. Lackritz. Did ]Mr. Rebozo tell you how he had gotten Mr. 
Gemmill's name? 

Mr. Griffix. No, he didn't. 

Mr. Lackritz. Did you ask him ? 

Mr. Griffix. Xo, I had never heard the name before. 

INIr. Lackritz. Well, did you make any inquiry about why he had 
gone to someone else after you had given him advice ? 

]Mr. Griffix. Absolutely not. Xo, I assumed that he went to a lot 
of people for advice. I don't speak from on high. 

Mr. Lackritz. Did jNIr. Rebozo tell you Avhat Mr. Gemmill's advice 
to him was? 

Mr. Griffix. I think he may have. I think he said something to the 
effect that he had chatted with him and he had basically given him 
the same advice as I had. 

]Mr. Lackritz. Did Mr. Rebozo indicate to you that Mr. Gemmill 
was in touch with individuals from the Hughes Tool Co. ? 

INIr. Griffix. I don't believe so, but I assumed he was. 

Mr. Lackritz. Did ]\Ir. Rebozo at this time still want you to take 
the money back to the Hughes Tool Co. ? 

Mr. Griffix. Xo. 

]\Ir. Lackritz. I see. Did he describe to you if he had been success- 
ful in contacting jNIr. Danner to have Mr. Danner take the money 
back? 

Mr. Griffix. In one of the conversations, I think he did indicate to 
me that ]Mr. Gemmill was acting on his behalf and was in contact 
with the Hughes organization for the purpose of returning the funds. 
I don't know how, when, or who he was in contact with. And I had 
heard later that ]\ir. Davis got involved in this. 

Mr. Lackritz. But Mr. Rebozo didn't explain to you how he had 
come to ]Mr. Gemmill in the first place ? 

Mr. Griffix. Xo, he didn't. 

Mr. Lackritz. Did you ever make any inquiry to anyone else about 
who jNIr. Gemmill was or how Mr. Rebozo got in touch with him ? 

Mr. Griffix. Xo, I made no inquiry. At some future time, I found 
out a little bit about ]\Ir. Gemmill, and I met him. 

Mr. Lackritz. During this period of time up to early June, did 
Mr. Rebozo indicate to you at any time that anyone else was aware 
of the delivery of the money and of the storage of the funds in the 
safe deposit box ? 

Mr. Griffix. I don't recall whether he did or not specifically. 

Mr. Lackritz. Has INIr. Rebozo ever indicated to you that anyone 
else was aware of the money ? 



10450 

^[r. Grtfftx. Xo. T think T ivixd wlioro tlio press reported that he 
had notified Rose MaiT Woods. 

Mr. Lackritz. But has Mr. Rebozo ever told you that? 

INIr. Griffix. I don't believe so. 

Mr. Lackritz. OK. and has INIr. Rebozo ever told yon about any 
other individuals aside from ^Ir. (Temniill that he has consulted 
concerning the advisability of returnin*:; the money? 

Mr. Griffix. I don't believe so. 

]\rr. Lackritz. "Well, specifically, did Mr. Rebozo ever advise you 
that he had consulted with General Haig about the advisability of 
returninfr the money? 

Mr. Griffix. Xo. 

]\rr. Lackritz. Did he ever indicate he had consulted with Thomas 
Wakefield about the advisability of returninfr the money? 

INIr. Griffix. Xo, and I Avas under the impression, at least when I 
talked to him, that ^Nfr. Wakefield didn't know anythino; about it, 
I really wasn't sure. I know Mr. Wakefield was his personal attorney. 
I didn't ask. 

]Mr. Lackritz. Did ]Mr. Rebozo indicate to you that he had con- 
sulted with ]\rr. Leonard Garment about the return of the money? 

]\Ir. Griffix. Xo. 

Mr. Lackritz. Did he indicate to you that he had consulted with 
Fred Buzhardt about the return of the money? 

INIr. Griffix". Xo. 

Mr. Lackritz. Did he indicate that he had consulted with Herbert 
Kalmbach about the return of the money? 

Mr. Griffix. He mi^ht have. 

Mr. Lackritz. Do you recall what he said ? 

yir. Griffix. Xo. T am just tryin<x to recall. 

I don't know whether he mentioned it to me, but I think somebody 
mentioned it to me that ]Mr. Rebozo may have contacted ]Mr. Kalm- 
bach, but I don't know whether it was Mr. Rebozo who said that to 
me. I can't recall exactly. 

Mr. Lackritz. Well, do you recall who mentioned it to you? 

Mr. Griffix. Xo, I don't. Again, I may have read it. I don't recall 
]\fr. Rebozo discussing Avith me, discussing this w^ith anybody, not 
that T asked him. 

INIr. Lexzxer. Can we take a short recess? 

[Brief recess.] 

Mr. Lackritz. Back on the record. Xow, before we had gone off 
the record, ^Nlr. Griffin, you indicated that someone mentioned to you 
that Mr. Reliozo had talked with INfr. Kalmbach about the return of 
the money. Have you refreshed your recollection about that? 

]Mr. Griffix. I can't recall who said it to me or Avhether I read it 
in the neAvspapers. 

]\rr. Lackritz. Was it ]Mr. Abplanalp? 

Mr. Griffix. Xo, it Avasn't. 

Mr. Lackritz. Do you recall talking to ]Mr. Abplanalp Avhen you 
Avere doAvn in Florida Avith your Avife on your vacation? 

Mr. Amrrose. Wait. T Avant to make sure — you mean about this 
particular problem? 



10451 

Mr. Lackritz. Well, tulkiii^ with Mr. Abplanalp first, and then if 
he talked about this specific problem. 

INIr. Ambrosp:. Well, the only problem with this is that I don't want 
to open np again the opportunity for privileged communications 
between lawyer and client in this area. So you understand my 
objection ? 

^Ir. Lackritz. I understand your objection, and I have no problem 
with your objection. I only wanted to find out if, in fact, you talked 
to Mr. Abplanalp during the time you wei-e in Florida — from May 
16 to May 22? 

]Mr. Griffix. Yes. 

Mr. Lackritz. And did vou discuss with him anything concerning 
the $100,000 contribution ? ' 

Mr. Griffin. Xo. 

jNIr. Lackritz. Did you discuss with him the meeting that he had 
had with Mr. Danner and INIr. Rebozo? 

Mr. Griffin. Xo. 

Mr. Lackritz. Did you discuss with him the trip that Messrs. 
Danner, Rebozo, and Abplanalp took on or about May 19 ? 

Mr. Griffin. Xo. 

]Mr. Lackritz. Xo ; you did not ? 

Mr. Griffin. Xo; I did not. 

INIr. Lackritz. And you do not recall Mr. Abplanalp telling you 
that possibly ]Mr. Rebozo had made contact with Kalmbach? 

Mr. Griffin. Xo. 

Mr. Lenzner. Did you ever know the substance of the conversations 
between Rebozo and Kalmbach ? 

Mr. Griffin. Xo. 

]\Ir. Lenzner. You said before you had an impression that Wake- 
field didn't know about the money. Did you gain that ipipression 
from Mr. Rebozo at the first meeting? 

Mr. Griffin. I think the only reason I said that was because he 
consulted with me about it and ^Ir. Wakefield Avas his personal 
lawyer, but he wanted to consult with somebody outside of his per- 
sonal family. 

]Mr. Lenzner. But he didn't so state it specifically ? 

Mr. Griffin. Xo; he didn't. 

]Mr. Lenzner. Did he describe whether Wakefield had any role at 
all with regard to the funds? 

]\Ir. Ambrose. Any what? 

Mr. Lenzner. Any role. R-o-l-e. 

Mr. Griffin. I don't believe he did. I might have read something 
in the newspapers or something concerning that, but I don't believe 
we discussed that. 

INIr. Lackritz. All right, did Mr. Rebozo indicate to you that he had 
discussed the possible return of the funds with Mr. Chapman Rose? 

]\Ir. Griffin. Xo; he didn't. 

Mr. Lackritz. Did he indicate he had discussed it with Mr. Hank 
Meyer? 

]Mr. Griffin. Xo. 

]Mr. Lackritz. Did he indicate he had discussed the $100,000 with 
Mr. Warren Davis, his accountant? 



10452 

Mr. Griffix. I don't believe he discussed with me that he had 
discussed it -vvitli anybody up to a certain point. 

Is jNIr. Davis liis accountant down in Florida? 

Mv. Lackritz. Yes; so the record is clear, he had never indicated 
to you that he had ever discussed the $100,000 with the President? 

]\rr. Griffix. That is correct. 

Mr. Lackritz. Xow, did you subsequently learn that ]\Ir. Rebozo 
went to Philadelphia to meet with Mr. Gemmill? 

Mr. Griffix. Yes. 

Mr. Lackritz. Did Mr. Rebozo call you to tell you this or did Mr. 
Gemmill ? 

]\Ir. Griffix. I don't believe it took place that way. 

INIr. Lackritz. And this was the occasion I take it when Mr. Gem- 
mill gave the same advice to ]\Ir. Rebozo that you had given him? 

Mr. Griffix. I have no idea what date you are talking about. 

Mr. Lackritz. Early June of 1973. 

]Mr. Griffin. No. 

Mr. Lackritz. Around June 8, 1973. 

]Mr. Griffix^. Xo. 

Mr. Lackritz. Did Mr. Rebozo ever indicate to you that he was 
going to return the actual money to IMr. Danner on any specific day ? 

jNIr. Griffix. No; I think my best recollection is that I had 
received a call and I think it was from Mr. Rebozo, indicating that he 
had consulted with and had retained jNIr. Gemmill to represent him in 
this matter and that Mr. Gemmill was going to, in effect, return the 
funds to the people in the Hughes organization to whom — I don't 
know whether you could say ]Mr. Danner or jNIr. Davis, but somebody 
in the Hughes organization. But I did receive a communication from 
Mr. Rebozo telling me that he had consulted with ]Mr. Gemmilh 

]Mr. Lackritz. Did Mr. Rebozo indicate to you that he was going to 
physically bring the funds with him to Philadelphia when he was 
going to meet with ]Mr. Gemmill? 

Mr. Griffix. No. 

Mr. Lackritz Did he tell you he w^as going to come to New York 
following his meeting with Mr. Gemmill to request a meeting with 
you and Mr. Abplanalp? 

Mr. Griffix. Are you talking about June 19? 

Mr. Lackritz. About that time ; yes. 

Mr. Griffix. I don't know whether I received a call or Mr. Ab- 
planalp received a call or Avho received a call, but we were advised or 
we knew that Mr. Rebozo was coming to New York that day and that 
he arranged to have dinner with him. Usually when he is in New 
York, he will call Mr. Abplanalp. When ]\lr. Abplanalp is in Florida, 
he will call ]Mr. Rebozo. They are very good friends. They have lunch 
together and dinner together. 

And if he was coming to New York, he would advise him of that. 

Mr. Lackritz. Did he indicate to you prior to the 19th that he 
was going to accomplish the return of the funds on that date? 

]Mr. Griffix. I don't believe so. I think I don't believe I learned he 
was stopping in Philadelphia on that day until I met him in New 
York that day. 



10453 

Mr. Lackritz. Did he indicate to you at any time that he had 
opened the safe deposit box and had the funds counted and identified 
with Mr. AVakefield, Margaret Barker, and ]\lr. Whitaker of the FBI? 

]Mr. Griffix. Xo. 

]Mr. Lackritz. Did you ever learn about that ? 

jMr. Griffix. Yes. 

Mr. Lackritz. From whom? 

]Mr. Griffix. I think from ttie newspapers. 

INIr. Lackritz. But Mr. Rebozo never told you that ? 

INIr. Griffix. We never got into that discussion. 

]Mr. Lackritz. All right, could you describe where you met with 
Mr. Rebozo on the 19th of June, what time of day it was, what 
happened ? 

Mr. Griffix. I think it was midafternoon. I don't know, but just 
after lunch. I am not sure if we knew whether he came into La 
Guardia or into Westchester County. I just don't recall but I met 
him either — it was either at Precision Valve Corporation's plant or 
Bob's home. I think maybe Bob had sent a car to pick him up. I 
don't know. And he pulled me aside and advised me that he had been 
in Philadelphia at that point and that there was a meeting scheduled 
that day between Mr. Gemmill and a representative of the Hughes 
organization, who that was, I don't recall him saying and that they 
were supposed to have turned over the money on that day but that 
the meeting did not come off and that he had the money with him. 

Mr. Lackritz. Now where did he meet you? 

]Mr. Griffix'. I'm not sure w^hether it was at Precision Valve 
Corporation's plant, which is in Yonkers, or whether it was at Mr. 
Abplanalp's house or Avhere it was or whether the car took him or 

Mr. Lexzxer. Did he come in your company plane? 

Mr. Griffix'. I don't believe so. I don't know. 

INIr. Lackritz. Mr. Griffin, do you recall telling us on January 8 
that you met him in front of the bank ? 

]Mr. Griffix. We were in front of the bank, and we drove over to 
the bank because we were in a new building, and we asked him 
whether or not he wanted to see the building. And I had indicated to 
you in the past that I had called him on many, many occasions to pick 
his brain to find out about how he does his banking. We had this 
new bank, and I was trying to pick his brain to some extent, and Bob 
asked him whether he wanted to see the new building, which ^ye had 
just completed, and we did go over. I don't know whether it was 
the three of us or the two of us, and we did go into the bank. 

]\Ir. Lackritz. Now, when did INIr. Rebozo tell you that he had still 
had the funds with him ? 

Mr. Griffix. Just after he arrived. 

Mr. Lackritz. Just after he arrived? 

Mr. Griffix'. Yes. 

Mr. Lackritz. Was INIr. Abplanalp present at that time? 

INIr. Griffix^. No, he was not. 

Mr. Lackritz. Was anybody else present at that time? 

INIr. Griffin. When you say present, you mean privy to the con- 
versation ? 

Mr. Lackritz. Or in the immediate area ? 



10454 

Mr. Griffix. Xo. he discussed that with me privately. He either 
called me aside or something. 

"Sir. Lackritz. When did he actually give you the funds? 

Mr. Griffix. At that time, we either went back to the limousine, 
which he had come in on. and I believe I transferred it to my brief- 
case or in front of the bank. He liad a little — well, it wasn't an 
attache case, it was like an overnight case to keep a shirt and tie and 
a change of underwear and some papers in it. 

:Mr. Lackritz. And $100,000 in cash ? 

Mr. Grifix. And a package; yes, sir. 

Mr. Lackritz. I see. When he gave it to you, did you give him any 
receipt ? 

Mr. Griffix. No. 

INlr. Lackritz. Did he ask for any receipt or any acknowledgement ? 

Mr. Griffix'. No. 

Mr. Lackritz. If you had been so reluctant before to be the indi- 
vidual who was going to return the money because of your association 
with Mr. Abplanalp, what caused you to change your mind? 

Mr. Griffix'. I was very reluctant at that time, too. 

Mr. Lackritz. But you changed your mind? 

Mr. Griffix. I didn't change my mind. He indicated to me they 
wore supposed to liave this meeting and it didn't come off, and he did 
have all of this money with him, and he was going back to Miami 
and the meeting was going to be rescheduled either the following day 
or couple of days later in New York, and it would be a lot easier if 
he could store the funds in my safe deposit box or I could hold them 
for a day or two and then deliver them in New York rather than 
have him carry the funds from New York to Florida. Florida to New 
York, and so forth and so on. And he, you know, asked me whether 
I would please do this for him, and I very, very reluctantly said OK. 

Mr. Lackritz So you took the funds from him ? 

]Mr. Griffix'. I took the package from him. 

Mr. Lackritz. You took the package from him, and at any time 
did you open the package to verify the presence of the money? 

Mr. Griffix'. I did not. 

ISIr. Lackritz. What did you do with the package after you received 
it? 

Mr. Griffin. Put it right in my safe deposit box. 

Mr. Lackritz. Was anyone present when you did that? 

JNIr. Griffix-. No. 

Mr. Lackritz. Did you sign the access card when you went into 
the box? 

Mr. Griffix. I did. 

Mr. Lackritz. What time of day was that? 

Mr. Griffix*. In the afternoon. 

]Mr. Lackritz. The bank Avas still open Avhen you went in? 

Mr. Griffix*. Yes, I believe it w'as. 

Mr. Lackritz. I believe this had to occur at the bank? 

Mr. Griffix*. It did occur at the bank. 

Mr. Lackritz. JNIr. Abplanalp was present with you and Mr. Rebozo 
at the bank? 



10455 

Mr. Griffin. He was present at the bank. He was showing Mr. 
Rebozo the downstairs of the bank and upstairs. I took my briefcase 
in and signed to open my box, and pnt my box in and joined them. 

Mr. Lackritz. Did you tell Mr. Abplanalp w^here you were going 
when you left the bank ? 

JNIr. Griffix. No. 

Mr. Lackritz. Did you explain to them when you went back? 

Mr. Griffix. No, I did not. 

Mr. Lackritz. Did he ask you '? 

Mr. Griffix. No. 

Mr. Lexzner. Was anyone else present? 

Mr. Griffix. I don't believe so, but some members — I believe the 
vice president of the bank was showing them around. 

Mr. Lexzxer. I mean when Mr. Rebozo was discussing the meeting 
in Philadelphia. 

Mr. Griffix. No, he pulled me aside to discuss it with me privately. 
No one was privy to that conversation. 

Mr. Lexzxer. Mr. Abplanalp was in the area but did not overhear 
the conversation ? 

Mr. Griffin. He may have been in the area, but he was not privy 
to the conversation. 

Mr. Lexzxer. Well, did anybody else observe Mr. Rebozo handing 
you the package? 

Mr. Griffix. No, I don't believe so. 

Mr. Lackritz. What was the package ? What did the package look 
like? 

Mr. Griffin. It looked to me like a large yellow manila envelope 
that was folded over and scotch-taped, bulky. 

Mr. Lenzxer. Were there any markings on it ? 

Mr. Griffix. Frankly, I thought there was, but I never really 
looked at it. You see, I took the package, I put it in my attache case, 
and when I brought it into the bank, I opened my safe deposit box, 
I took it out, put it in the box, and closed the box. 

Mr. Lenzxer. You made no markings on it either? 

Mr. Griffix. I made no markings at all. 

Mr. Armstroxg. Could you tell us what size box you have? 

Mr. Griffin. A large — what size? 

Mr. Armstrong. Like this [indicating]. 

Mr. Armstrong. The safe deposit box? 

Mr. Griffin. I don't know. It is a $50 box, whatever that is. 

Mr. Armstrong. Can we get copies of the access record, the sig- 
nature cards, to that box ? 

Mr. Griffin. I think you can do it by subpenaing the bank. 

Mr. Armstrong. I think we did, but I don't believe we got them. 

Mr. Lenzner. Do you have those with you? 

Mr. Griffin. No. 

Mr. Armstrong. I think in that case, we've got to get copies, be- 
cause the originals can't be removed from the bank. But you have no 
objection to that ? 

Mr. Ambrose. For that 1 day? 

Mr. Armstrong. Pardon? 

Mr. Ambrose. For that day or the 2 days in question ? 



10456 

Mr. Armstrong. We would like to ^et all access records. 

Mr. Lexzner. I think they are all on one sheet. 

Ms. Sheketoff. Yes. 

Mr. Griffin. No, they are not. 

Mr. Ambrose. Are you saying you want all of the access records 
for his safe deposit box from whatever period of time ? 

Mr. Armstrong. From January 1 of 1973 to 

Mr. Griffin. "Wliat does that have to do with this issue, this specific 
issue ? 

Mr. Armstrong. Well, those are the records we would like. 

Mr. Lackritz. Well, let's put it this way. The reason we need the 
access records during that period of time is to confirm what Mr. 
Griffiii is telling us here today and to do that we are just asking for 
the records of around that period of time for access. It is just an 
access record of when you went in and came out of the box. I don't 
think the matters concern anything privileged. 

Mr. Ambrose. I would like to suggest that JNIr. Griffin would be 
perfectly willing to attempt to get copies of the access records for 
the days in question, which would substantiate his answer, his testi- 
mony here, but that any other days or any other period of time before 
or after, not within the scope of this investigation, then if you wish 
to get that, I think you have to do it by subpena. 

Mr. Armstrong. Can you tell us the box number? 

Mr. Griffin. No, but I can provide it to you. 

Mr. Armstrong. Can you tell us about how long you had the box ? 

Mr. Griffin. I think since the bank opened, since they put in safe 
deposit boxes. 

Mr. Armstrong. Wliich would be? 

Mr. Griffin. The bank opened in May of 1972. 

Mr. Lenzner. Can we hold that question? 

Mr. Lackritz. All right, did you do anything with the funds from 
the time you received them until you were told to take them to the 
bank or wherever? 

Mr. Griffin. No. 

Mr. Lackritz. No? 

Mr. Griffin. No. 

Mr. Lackritz. Did you have any contact, telephonic or otherwise, 
with Mr. Rebozo once you placed the funds in your safe deposit box ? 

]Mr. Griffin. Yes. 

Mr. Lackritz. Can you describe that? 

Mr. Griffin. I called him a couple of days later, 4 days later or 
5 days later, and I said I hadn't received any word from Mr. Gem- 
mill and that I was still holding the funds, that I would like to get 
rid of them. 

Mr. Lackritz. What did INIr. Eebozo tell you then ? What did Mr. 
Rebozo tell you at that time? 

Mr. Griffin. I think he said he might be calling Mr. Gemmill. 

Mr. Lackritz. And then did you receive a subsequent message from 
Mr. Rebozo? 

Mr. Griffin. I received a message from Mr. Gemmill. 

Mr. Lackritz. When was that ? 

Mr. Griffin. I think — do you have a calendar ? It might have been 
about the 23d, 24th, 25tli, in that area, calling me and introducing 



10457 

himself to me over the phone and telling me who he was and advising 
me that he knew I did have these funds and that he had arranged a 
meeting in New York and could I attend that meeting and deliver 
the package. 

Mr. Lackritz. And did you agree to do that? 

Mr. Griffin. I did. 

Mr. Lackritz. And what day was that meeting supposed to occur? 

Mr. Griffin. The 26th or 27th I think. You have that. 

Mr. Lackritz. All right, so on the 27tli of June 

Mr. Griffin. Is that the date? Was that the 27th? 

Mr. Lenzner. Yes. 

Mr. Lackritz. You removed the funds from the safe deposit and 
traveled to New York City with it ? 

Mr. Griffin. Yes; I did. 

Mr. Lackritz. And how was ]Mr. Gemmill to know you and how 
were you to recognize Mr. Gemmill ? 

Mr. Griffin. We had not met each other. I had arranged an 
identification with INIr. Gemmill and that identification was that he 
was to produce for me either the original or a xerox copy of a list 
of the bills, which I believe was on Mr. Rebozo's stationery, and that 
he was to show that to me as his identification that he was Mr. 
Gemmill. 

Mr. Lackritz. Was there a cover letter to Mr. Davis from Mr. 
Rebozo that described these bills ? 

Mr. Griffin. I don't know. There may have been, but he did show 
me a list of it and it had the serial numbers. 

Mr. Lackritz. Can I have this marked as exhibit 6? This is a 
letter dated June 22, 1973, to Mr. Chester Davis. It is a xerox copy 
of a carbon of a letter. 

[The document referred to was marked Griffin exhibit No. 6 for 
identification.*] 

Mr. Lackritz. Mr. Griffin, I ask you if you can identify that letter? 
Have you seen it before ? 

Mr. Griffin. I can't identify it for you as being a letter that I saw 
that day, but it may have been. 

Mr. Lackritz. Was the letter you saw that day a similar form to 
this? 

Mr. Griffin. I was really looking for the list of the bills and 
the serial numbers on Mr. Rebozo's possessive stationery. 

Mr. Lackritz. All right, then you turned the money over to 
Mr. Gemmill at that time? 

Mr. Griffin. Turned the package over to him. 

Mr. Lackritz, Did you stay in Washington? 

Mr. Griffin. I did not. 

Mr. Lackritz. And how long were you in the bank ? 

]\Ir. Griffin. Maybe 10 minutes. 

Mr. Lackritz. This is the Marine Midland Bank, is that correct? 

Mr. Griffin. I believe so. 

Mr. Lackritz. Who else was present at that time? 

*See p. 10483. 



10458 

]Mr. Griffin. Another individual who I was introduced to when I 
came in, who I really didn't pay mucli attention to at the introduc- 
tion, who I later found out was Mr. Glaeser. 

Mr. Lackritz. Mr. Walter Glaeser. 

Mr. Griffin. Yes; that is the name that I was introduced to. 

Mr. Lackritz. Now, after you returned the money to Mr. Gem- 
mill did you have any other occasion to see the money or to partici- 
pate in any investigation into the money specifically directing your 
attention to October 10, 1973 ? 

Mr. Griffin. October 10, 1973 ? 

Mr. Lackritz. Do you recall meeting with Mr. Gemmill at the 
offices of the Marine Midland Bank to pull the money out of the safe 
deposit box to have it photographed ? 

Mr. Griffin. No; I didn't. 

Mr. Lackritz. Didn't ? 

Mr. Griffin. No. You know, I met with Mr. Gemmill on one other 
occasion but it had nothing to do with this. 

Mr. Lenzner. That was B. & C. in New York ? 

Mr. Lackritz. All right, did you have anything else to do with 
the money after you returned it on the 27th ? 

Mr. Griffin. No; what I think I probably did after that was, I 
called Mr. Rebozo and said that I had delivered the package. I had 
never seen any money. I delivered the package to Mr. Gemmill at 
the Marine Midland Bank. 

Mr. Lenzner. Telephone records indicate a call to Mr. Rebozo's 
number on the 27th of June. 

Mr. Griffin. That may have been the call. 

Mr. Lenzner. Precedinii: that call on 



Mr. Armstrong. Did you call anyone else 

Mr. Griffin. I don't believe so. 

Mr. Armstrong [continuing]. And advise them of that? 

Mr. Griffin. No, no one else. I testified before, that I had not 
discussed this or talked to anyone concerning it up to this point. 

Mr. Lenzner. Just preceding that phone call, there is a phone call 
to Philadelphia : 215-568-1600. 

Mr. Griffin. Where? 

Mr. Lenzner. June 27. Would that have been to Mr. Gemmill ? 

Mr. Griffin. I don't know. Do you have Mr. Genmiill's phone 
number there? 

Mr Armstrong. That is his office phone. 

Mr. Griffin. Is it? 

Mr. Armstrong. Yes. 

Mr. Griffin. You are talking about June? Where is that? 

Mr. Armstrong. June. Here we are. 

Mr. Lackritz. Let the record show I am leaving. 

Mr. Griffin. I may have. 

Mr. Lenzner. Do you have a recollection of calling Mr. Gemmill 
and discussing anything with him on that occasion ? 

Mr. Griffin. No, I don't. I may have called him that day. I don't 
recall. 

Mr. Lenzner. Wliat purpose was the call ? 



10459 

Mr. Griffix. We had a very brief discussion at the bank concerning 
his law firm and some of my classmates that were working in the law 
firm, his law firm I am talking about, in Philadelphia, but I don't 
recall the sum and substance, and I don't know if I made that call. 

My secretary may have made it looking for me. I don't know. I 
don't think she knew where I was either. I may have mentioned to 
her that I was going to meet with ]\Ir. Gemmill. I just don't know. 

Mr. Armstrong. Well, what time was the meeting at the bank? 

IMr. Greffix. It was in early afternoon. I think it was 1 o'clock. 
The bank was open, but I don't have any recollection. 

Mr. Armstroxg. "WTiere did you call JNIr. Rebozo from ? 

Mr. Griffin. I think my office. I don't know if I did it that day 
or the next day or he called me. 

Mr. Lexzxer. There is a call on June 27 to his number in Miami. 

Mr. Griffin. That might have been. I know I did place a call to 
tell him that I had done what he had requested. 

Mr. Lexzxer. And shortly before you called Mr. Rebozo's number, 
you called the "White House. 

Mr. Ambrose. Wait a minute. I think you want to rephrase the 
question. There is a call listed to the White House, in other words. 
It doesn't necessarily mean he made the call, that Mr. Griffin made 
the call. 

Mr. Lexzxer. Well, do you have a recollection of making that call ? 

ISIr. Griffix. No, I see a couple of calls. 

Mr. Lexzxer. Do you have a recollection of making any of those 
calls? 

Mr. Griffix. No, I may have been looking for Mr. Rebozo. I don't 
recall. I have talked to the White House on many occasions on many 
things, but I don't recall. 

Mr. Armstroxg. Well, this was the day the money was. returned. 
Wouldn't that help place it in time ? 

Mr. Griffin. As I say, Mr. Rebozo may have been there. I don't 
really recall. 

Mr. Lexzxer. Well, do you have a recollection of trying to meet 
somebody at the White House other than Mr. Rebozo on June 27 ? 

Mr. Griffix. No, but I could check to see whether or not I was 
working on other things at that point. I don't really recall. 

Mr. Lexzxer. Do you have a recollection of calling other indi- 
viduals at the White House on other occasions ? 

Mr. Griffix. I call a lot of people at the White House. 

Mr. Lex'zxer. l^^io do you call usually? 

Mr. Ambrose. Well again, unless there is some relevance to this 
particular inquiry, do you have somebody specifically you would like 
to ask him? 

Mr. Lexzxer. Well, I don't know who he talks to. I want to find 
that out. 

Mr. Ambrose. He might talk to any number of people. 

Mr. Lexzxer. Do you represent other people who are employed or 
were employed at the "Wliite House in an attorney-client relationship ? 

Mr. Griffix. No. 

Mr. Lexzxer. Well then, my question 



10460 

Mr. Griffin. No, but T do call on occasion to set up tours for 
various people. I do call on occasion for minor things, for Mr. Ab- 
planalp for this, that, and the other things. 

Mr. Lenzner. Well, who do you call on those occasions? 

Mr. Griffin. Oh, I might call Mr. Ferrell, for example, who 
handles the tours and things like that. I have talked to a lot of 
people, a lot of areas in the "W^iite House. 

Mr. Lenzner. Well, have you had occasion to call Mr. Ehrlichman? 

Mr. Griffin. No. 

Mr. Lenzner. Have you had occasion to call Mr. Haldeman? 

Mr. Griffin. During this period ? 

Mr. Ambrose. Well, I think the record should indicate 

Mr. Griffin. No. 

Mr. Lhnzner, No. 

Mr. Ambrose [continuing]. That they were both gone. 

]\fer. Lenzner. I said have you had occasion to call Mr. Ehrlichman ? 

Mr. Griffin. During what period of time? 

Mr. Lenzner. January 1 of 1973 to April 30, 19Y3. 

Mr. Griffin. No. 

Mr. Lenzner. Well, you certainly weren't calling the White House 
to arrange a tour on June 27, were you ? 

Mr. Griffin. I don't know what I was calling them for. I just don't 
know. I may have been looking for Mr. Rebozo. That switchboard is 
a pretty accurate switchboard, and they can usually hunt people 
down, and he may have been in Washington and he may not. I think 
if he were in Washington or around Washington, I would probably 
call the switchboard to find out whether they knew where he was. 

Mr. Armstrong. Other than Mr. Ferrell, who else would you have 
called at the Wliite House? 

Mr. Griffin. Oh, I might call Mr. Buchanan. I know him and his 
wife. And I am trying to think. I talk to Ron Ziegler on many occa- 
sions. Specifically, if you want to ask me specifically ? 

Mr. Lenzner. "What about General Haig, Mr. Garment, Mr. Buz- 
hardt? 

Mr. Griffin. No. 

Mr. Armstrong. Anyone in the counsel's office? 

Mr. Griffin. You are talking about during this period? 

Mr. Lenzner. Yes. 

Mr. Griffin. I don't know. I have talked to Mr. Garment and I 
have talked to — who else did you say ? 

Mr. Lenzner. General Haig. 

Mr. Griffin. No ; I don't think I have ever talked to General Haig. 

Mr. Lenzner. Fred Buzhardt ? 

Mr. Griffin. I don't think I have ever talked to Mr. Buzhardt but 
T have talked to Mr. Garment and several other people in the White 
House when they were preparing the disclosure on the tax returns 
because the B. & C. Investment Company was quite deeply involved 
in those and I talked to many people during that time. 

Mr. Lenzner. Do you have any recollection of calling Mr. Garment 
with regard to the return of the $100,000? 

Mr. Griffin. No. 

Mr. Lenzner. Did you call the President"? 



10461 

Mr. Griffin. No ; I did not. 

Mr. Lenzxer. And advise him that the money had been returned ? 

Mr. Griffin. No ; I did not. 

Mr. Armstrong. Miss Woods ? 

Mr. Griffin. No; I did not. There are also occasions when some- 
body is looking for a job and something like that and I may have 
called. I don't really know. 

Do you know where Mr. Rebozo was that day by any chance? 

Mr. Armstrong. I believe he was in Key Biscayne. 

Mr. Griffin. I might have tried through that switchboard. I don't 
know. 

Mr. Lenzner. Have you ever discussed the existence of the $100,000 
with Mr. Buchanan ? 

Mr. Griffin. No ; I have never discussed the $100,000 with anyone 
employed at the "White House. 

Mr. Lenzner. Now have you had any discussions since June 27 with 
Mr. Eebozo with regard to the funds? 

Mr. Griffin. I told you I called him in — I don't know whether it 
was on the 27th— to advise him that I had delivered the funds to 
Mr. Gemmill. 

INIr. Lenzner. And did he have any response and request any other 
information ? 

Mr. Griffin. He said, "Thank you." 

Mr. Lenzner. Have you talked to him since that occasion? 

Mr. Griffin. .Yes ; on a number of occasions. 

Mr. Lenzner. And has the subject of the $100,000 ever arisen? 

Mr. Griffin. Several occasions. 

Mr. Lenzner. Do you know approximately when the first occasion 
was after you returned the funds ? 

Mr. Griffin. No; these are more social calls than anything else, 
about all of the flack over — about all of the nonsense that was going 
on over it, that people were accusing him it wasn't the same funds 
and things like that that happened in the newspapers. 

Mr. Lenzner. Did he ever tell you he had been interviewed by the 
Internal Revenue Service? 

Mr. Griffin. Yes ; at some point he did. 

Mr. Lenzner. Did he ever tell you what the substance of the 
inquiry was? 

Mr. Griffin. Are you talking about the Hughes case? 

Mr. Lenzner. Yes. 

Mr. Griffin. He said the inquiry was concerning the $100,000. 

Mr. Lenzner. And did he go over the questions that were asked 
and the answers given ? 

Mr. Griffin. No ; he didn't. 

Mr. Lenzner. Did he ask you for any further advice and counsel ? 

Mr. Griffin. No ; he didn't. 

Mr. Lenzner. You say you discussed with him on several occasions 
since the return of the funds? 

Mr. Griffin. Yes ; and over a certain period of time, because after 
the $100,000 story was in the newspapers, he was getting a great deal 
of flack and he was getting a lot of adverse publicity and he was 



31-889 O - 74 - pt. 22 - 18 



10462 

naturally upset about it. And it was social calls. It wasn't really any 
advice calls. 

Mr. Lenzner. Did he ever tell you that Mr. Banner's testimony 
appeared to conflict with his in several respects ? 

Mr, Griffin. No. 

Mr. Lenzner. Did he ever indicate to you that he had learned that 
Mr. Cox, that ISIr. Cox's office at that time was also beginning an 
investigation of him and the $100,000 ? 

Mr. Griffin. He may have. I don't recall that he did or he didn't 
but I think he may have. 

Mr. Lenzner. And did he also tell you that Cox had arranged to 
obtain disclosure from the Internal Revenue Service with regard to 
their investigation? 

Mr. Griffin. No. 

Mr, Lenzner. Do you recall exactly what he did say about the Cox 
investigation ? 

Mr. Griffin. No; I just know it was more of a general conversa- 
tion because Mr. Cox was also investigating something else that I 
was representing — that I was representing a client on and we had 
discussed with Mr. Cox's agents other matters. 

Mr. Lenzner. Did you, on occasion, discuss with Mr. Cox — his 
investigation, or with anybody in Cox's office — his investigation of 
Rebozo and the Hughes money ? 

Mr. Griffin. No ; I never discussed it. 

Mr. Lenzner. And I take it this conversation that you had with 
him on the several occasions was some time between June 27, 1973, and 
January 1, 1974? 

Mr, Griffin, There are a lot of phone calls between Mr. Rebozo 
and myself, either initiated by him or me or switched over to me 
after he had talked to Mr. Abplanalp or somebody and on a lot of 
occasions we have discussed it, more so since it has been made a public 
issue, but before it was public. 

Mr. Lenzner. Well, when was the last time you talked to him 
about this ? 

Mr. Griffin. Gee, I don't know. It might have been a month ago ; 
more in a joking manner than anything else. 

Mr. Lenzner. Well have you talked with him since his interview 
last week ? 

Mr. Griffin. No. 

Mr. Armstrong. Have you ever discussed with him the substance 
of his interview with us? 

Mr. Griffin. No ; I just knew he was, you know, coming down or 
coming up for interviews. And last week it was in the newspapers. 
I haven't chatted with him in, I think, sometime before he came up 
here was the last time I chatted with him and that was not on the 
subject of the money. This was on another subject, 

Mr. Lenzner, Did you advise him that you had been interviewed 
by the committee ? 

Mr. Griffin, Yes. 

Mr. Lenzner. Did you relate to him the questions that were asked 
and the answers given? 



10463 

Mr. GRirnisr. No; I didn't go into it. Just that I was down here 
and it had been x number of hours and, in effect, I just discussed in 
general terms, that one of the major subjects that was discussed was 
the return of the $100,000 and that I gave you all of the information 
I had. 

Mr. Lenzner. Did he ask what you had said ? 

Mr. Griffin. No ; he didn't. 

Mr. Lenzner. And you didn't tell him? 

Mr. Griffin. It wasn't important to either he or I. I just said I 
was down here. 

Mr. Lenzner. Then the answer is "No"? 

Mr. Griffin. The answer is no to what ? 

Mr. Lenzner. You did not discuss with Mr. Rebozo the substance 
of your discussions with us ? 

Mr. Griffin. Specifically "No." I just said that there were discus- 
sions and that one of the major issues that was discussed was the 
return of the $100,000. 

And I also discussed prior to that time, the first time we were down 
here, and there was no discussion basically about that issue at that 
point. That was more involved with the B. & C. Investment Co., 
which he was a part. And I didn't go into great detail of what was 
discussed. 

Mr. Armstrong. How soon after our meeting with you on January 
8, 1974, would you have discussed that with Mr. Rebozo ? 

Mr. Griffin. I don't know. Might have been right after. Was that 
the first time or the second time ? 

Mr. Armstrong. That was the second time we talked with you. 

Mr. Griffin. That was in New York? 

Mr. Armstrong. That was in New York, right. 

Mr. Griffin. I don't know. It might have been the next day or 
might have been 2 days later. I don't recall exactly when it was but 
if it were anything, it was a general conversation. 

Mr. Armstrong. Would that have been in person or telephonic? 

Mr. Griffin. Probably it would be by telephone. 

Mr. Armstrong. Would you have discussed any other issues at that 
time ? 

Mr. Griffin. I was discussing other matters with him at that time 
but they were business matters I was handling because we had dis- 
cussed the B. & C. Investment Co., the B. & C. transfer. And as you 
know, Mr. Abplanalp and ]\Ir. Rebozo own property in Key Biscayne 
which my office basically handles. 

Mr. Lenzner. Off the record. 
[Discussion held off the record.] 

Mr. Lenzner. We will take a half hour lunch break. 
[Whereupon at 2 :45 p.m., the hearing in the above-entitled matter 
adjourned to reconvene at 3 :30 p.m.] 

Afternoon Session 

Mr. Lenzner. Let's get back on the record. I should say again this 
is a continuation of the executive session begun this morning and the 
witness, Mr. Griffin, is still under oath. 



10464 

Mr. Griffin, did Mr. Rebozo, subsequent to the return of the funds, 
ever advise you of specific individuals who were being interviewed 
with regard to the investigation ? 

Mr. Griffix. I don't believe so. 

Mr. Lenzner. Did he advise you as to what the results of the IRS 
investigation were of him? 

Mr, Griffin. No. 

Mr. Lenzner. No? 

Mr. Griffin. No. 

Mr. Lenzner. Now I want to go back for just a second. You previ- 
ously described a trip on June 11, I believe it was of 1973, on a plane 
to Saranac Lake with Mr. Rebozo and Mr. Abplanalp. 

Mr. Griffin. Yes sir. Let me check my date. [Pause] Yes. 

Mr. Lenzner. Do you recall approximately what time you left 
White Plains Airport ? 

Mr. Griffin. About 5 :30. 

Mr. Lenzner. P.M.? 

Mr. Griffin. Correct. 

Mr. Lenzner. And how was that trip arranged ? I mean what was 
the purpose of the trip ? 

Mr. Griffin. Just a pleasure trip up to Mr. Abplanalp's house up 
there. 

Mr. Lenzner. In Saranac Lake? 

Mr. Griffin. It is in Tupper Lake. He has a — I don't know what 
you call it. 

Mr. Ambrose. Fishing lodge. 

Mr. Griffin. Like a lodge on Tupper Lake. 

Mr. Lenzner. And you do know who invited Mr. Rebozo to come 
along ? 

Mr. Griffin. I am sure Mr. Abplanalp did. 

Mr. Lenzner. You didn't? 

Mr. Griffin. I didn't. 

Mr. Lenzner. Did you know he was going to come before you 
arrived ? 

Mr. Griffin. I may have been told that day or, you know, these 
things generally happen fairly quick. If Mr. Rebozo is in town he 
calls Mr. Abplanalp and usually calls me because he knows we are 
old friends and we go out. I think Mr. Abplanalp wanted to show 
him the lodge up at Tupper Lake and the Goose was available and 
we flew up that night. 

Mr. Lenzner. Did Mr. Rebozo discuss with you the $100,000 con- 
tribution on that trip ? 

Mr. Griffin. On a very, very brief conversation that he had not 
returned — that he had not gotten the funds to Mr. Gemmill yet and 
Mr. Gemmill had not arranged a meeting. That was a conversation 
that took all of 2 minutes. 

Mr. Lenzner. And where did that conversation take place ? 

Mr. Griffin. It took place in White Plains. Oh, I'm sorry, it took 
place at the Westchester County Airport. 

Mr. Lenzner. And I take it Mr. Abplanalp was not present during 
that conversation ? 



10465 

Mr. Griffin. He was in the vicinity but not present. I think, Terry, 
if I can, maybe it will shorten this if I said this. As I said before 
and I am going to say it again, I discussed the question of the 
$100,000 with no one other than ISIr. Kebozo until the date it appeared 
in the New York Times, and I forget what date that was but it was 
months after, with no one. 

]Mr. Lenzner. Did Mr. Rebozo indicate to you on that occasion that 
he had seen Mr. Gemmill that day ? 

Mr. Griffin. I don't recall. 

Mr. Lenzner. Were you aware of the fact that Mr. Rebozo flew in 
from Philadelphia that day? 

Mr. Griffin. Yes, I was. 

Mr. Lenzner. And are you aware of the fact that he had met with 
Mr. Gemmill in Philadelphia ? 

Mr. Griffin. I don't know whether I was aware of it or not. I 
knew he came in from Philadelphia that day. 

Mr. Lenzner. Did Mr. Rebozo make any phone calls to your knowl- 
edge from Tupper Lake ? 

Mr. Griffin. I don't know whether he made any phone calls or 
not. I know he was on the phone up there. I don't know. 

Mr. Lenzner. Do you know who he was attempting to contact? 

Mr. Griffin. No. 

Mr. Lenzner. Did he advise you he was going to try to contact 
Mr. Danner? 

Mr. Griffin. No, he was on the phone up there. I don't know who 
he was talking to nor did I ask. They were outside cooking steaks. 

Mr. Lenzner. Is there something called Alex's Continental Inn in 
Tupper Lake ? 

Mr. Griffin. Not that I know of. 

Mr. Armstrong. What is the date of that ? 

Mr. Griffin. You don't know Tupper Lake. 

Mr. Lenzner. Oh, I'm sorry then. 

Do you know the number of Mr. Abplanalp's phone up there? Is 
it area code 518-359-33884? No, wait 'til I check that. 

Mr. Griffin. I don't know if that is the number of it but the 
area code is 518. 

Mr. Armstrong. Well, you mentioned previously, Mr. Griflin, 
you were aware that Mr. Rebozo had been trying to reach Mr. 
Danner and had at one occasion reached him on a golf course. 

Mr. Griffin. I thought he had reached him on more than one 
occasion. 

Mr. Armstrong. Do you recall when he mentioned this to you? 
Were any of the events contemporaneous? 

Mr. Griffin. I can't remember. 

Mr. Armstrong. Do you recall when you were up at the lake if 
that was during the period he was trying to reach Mr. Danner? 

Mr. Griffin. I don't know. I didn't inquire. 

Mr. Armstrong. And he didn't remark to you that he had, in fact, 
reached Mr. Danner while he was at the lake? 

Mr. Griffin. That he had while he was at the lake? 

Mr. Armstrong. Right. 

Mr. Griffin. No, he didn't say. 



10466 

Mr. Armstrong. Now did you return the next day? 

Mr. Griffin. 8 a.m. 

Mr. Armstrong. And where did Mr. Rebozo go from there? 

Mr. Griffin. I don't know. I think we got dropped off at West- 
chester and I think I may have driven him to La Guardia, but I 
don't know. 

Mr. Armstrong. Do you recall any occasions on which Mr. Ab- 
planalp and Mr. Rebozo were together that you were aware of sub- 
sequent to that time? 

Mr. Griffin. In relationship to this $100,000 ? Is that what we are 
talking about? 

Mr. Armstrong. No, I am asking if they have been together. 

Mr. Griffin. They have been together a lot of times. I couldn't 
tell you whether it was 1 or 100 times. 

Mr. Armstrong. You don't recall the next occasion after that ? 

Mr. Griffin. I don't know what the next occasion was. 

Mr. Armstrong. Can you tell us when Mr. Abplanalp — that the 
$100,000 

Mr. Ambrose. Wait a minute. Here we go again. I think this has 
been answered. It certainly was answered in January 8th a number 
of times and it has been answered here today a number of times. 
Mr. Griffin has rather clearly and unequivocally stated that Mr. 
Abplanalp learned of it the first time when it appeared, some months 
thereafter, in the New York Times. 

Mr. Armstrong. I am asking when. 

Mr. Ambrose. The date that it appeared in the New York Times, 
whatever that date is. 

Mr. Armstrong. And on that occasion how did you learn that he 
learned about it? 

Mr. Griffin. He called me up and said he read it in the papers. 
I went over this before. 

Mr. Armstrong. I don't believe you have been over it on the record 
previously. We haven't been over it today. 

And can you tell us what ensued in that discussion ? 

Mr. Griffin. He just called me up at 8 o'clock in the morning and 
said "Read page such and such in the New York Times" and I 
pulled it out and I read it. And he said: "Is that you?" And I said 
"I am afraid it is, yes." And he said: "Oh, Jesus Christ" or some- 
thing to that effect. So I said : "Well, I will come over and give you 
a briefing on what it was all about" which I did. 

Mr. Armstrong. And what was said during that briefing? 

Mr. Ambrose. Wait a minute, now. I think that the question of 
what he and Mr. Abplanalp had discussed is now within the purview 
of legal privilege that exists between this lawyer and his client, Mr. 
Abplanalp. 

Mr. Armstrong. I didn't know Mr. Abplanalp was involved in the 
$100,000 transaction. I thought he wasn't involved. 

Mr. Ambrose. I am not in a position to make any judgment and 
obviously you are not in any position to make a judgment. The ques- 
tion is that the conversations between Mr. Abplanalp and Mr. Griffin 
aren't the proper subject of this inquiry and it is a violation of the 



10467 

legal privilege between attorney-client in my judgment. If he wants 
to answer it, all right, but I am putting that caveat. 

Mr. Lenzner. Were you discussing this with Mr. Abplanalp in 
regard to your position as his attorney ? 

Mr. Griffin. In what sense? 

Mr. Lenzner. AVell, were you giving him any counsel or advice? 

Mr. Griffin. No. 

Mr. Lenzner. And I take it he was mainly interested because you 
were a friend of his and you worked for him? 

Mr. Griffin. No, just as I told you once before, I was in a fairly 
difficult position. 

Mr. Lenzner. I understand that. 

Mr. Griffin. Representing Mr. Abplanalp and representing Mr. 
Rebozo on a mater which no one else knew of, including Mr. 
Abplanalp. 

Mr. Lenzner. I understand. 

Mr. Griffin. And therefore, I was somewhat in the middle in 
discussing it with Mr. Rebozo. And even though I may have been in 
the presence that evening with both of them, my major client was 
Mr. Abplanalp so it put me in a difficult position. 

And I just went to explain to him what my position was in this 
matter; that I was representing Mr. Rebozo, I could not discuss it, 
didn't want to, and I didn't think he wanted to hear it anyway. 

And that was the first time Mr. Abplanalp heard about it. 

Mr. Lenzner. Did he give you any advice at that time? 

Mr. GRirriN. No. 

Mr. Lenzner. Go ahead. 

Mr, Armstrong. Subsequent to that have you had any additional 
discussions with Mr. Abplanalp regarding the $100,000 ? 

Mr. Griffin. I have had discussions with a thousand people con- 
cerning the $100,000 since it appeared in the paper, nothing of any 
substance at all, just more of a joke or a cutting remark there, you 
know, a political remark or nonpolitical remark. 

Mr. Armstrong. Have you ever been present when Mr. Abplanalp 
and Mr. Rebozo discussed it? 

Mr. Griffin. No. 

Mr. Armstrong. To your knowledge, have they ever discussed it? 

Mr. Griffin. I don't know. 

Mr. Lenzner. After it appeared in the paper were you briefed by 
counsel at the White House or people at the White House? 

Mr. Griffin. No, I have never had any discussion with any people 
in the Wliite House concerning this. 

Mr. Lenzner. Just so I can get the record straight, and your coun- 
sel properly has pointed out that you have indicated that before you 
discussed it with Mr. Abplanalp, you hadn't discussed it with anybody 
but Mr. Rebozo. Then after it appeared in the newspapers 

Mr. Griffin. I still didn't discuss it. 

Mr. Lenzner. So the only people you ever discussed it with were 
Rebozo ? 

Mr. Griffin. You mean in the strict sense of the word as to exactly 
what took place ? I discussed it only with Mr. Rebozo and I discussed 
it with you people. 



10468 

In a joking fashion everybody has discussed it with me. When it 
appeared in the newspaper, they pinned it on my law office door. 

Mr. Armstkoxg. I want to make sure that I understand it for 
clarity of the record. 

The first time you discussed the $100,000 contribution, regardless 
of your role, with Mr. Abplanalp was after he read it in the paper? 
Was that the first time ? 

Mr. Griffin. The first time I discussed the question of the 
$100,000, I didn't discuss it as a contribution or the package I deliv- 
ered, was the day I read it in the New York Times. 

Mr. Armstrong. And you never had any prior discussion with Mr. 
Abplanalp regarding any aspect of the $100,000 regardless of your 
role in it? 

Mr. Griffin. That is correct. 

Mr. Armstrong. So that during the 3 or 4 prior months that there 
was press speculation about this $100,000 and Mr. Abplanalp's 
close friend Mr. Rebozo was involved with your business partner, 
there was no discussion between you and Mr. Abplanalp regarding 
that $100,000? 

Mr. Griffin. I have said that twice, all right? 

Mr. Armstrong. OK, I just wanted to make sure. I find it hard to 
believe. 

Mr. Ambrose. Is that all permissible on the record too, these char- 
acterizations ? 

Mr. Armstrong. That is ofl the record. 

_Mr. Ambrose. I see. I would like to leave it on the record if you 
don't mind. 

Mr. Armstrong. Fine with me. 

Mr. Ambrose. I might also add, if there are any more character- 
izations, I am going to advise Mr. Griffin to withdraw. 

Mr. Armstrong. I think I should point out that the remark was 
responsive to Mr. Griffin's expression of 

Mr. Ambrose. I don't know Avhy you are entitled to make char- 
acterizations of a witness' testimony on the record. 

Mr. Lenzner. Go ahead. Anything else? 

Mr. Armstrong. Well, there are other things I want to come back 
to. 

Mr. Lenzner. Go ahead. 

Mr. Armstrong. Mr. Griffin, we have exhausted — we have pretty 
well exhausted the occasions between the time when Mr. Rebozo 
first sought advice from you on this subject and the time — excuse 
me 

Mr. Ambrose. I was talking to my client. 

Mr. Armstrong. Are you finished? 

Mr. Ambrose. Yes. 

Mr. Akmstrong [continuing]. And the time the money was 
returned. 

Are there instances you are aware of that we have not discussed 
today ? 

Mr. Griffin. Give me the question again. 



10469 

Mr. Armstroxg. The question is, between the time when Mr. Rebozo 
first sought your advice on the $100,000 and the time the money was 
returned, I gather we have exhausted the instances you had discus- 
sions with him in that intervaL Is that correct? 

Mr. Griffix. I believe we have. 

Mr. Armstroxg. During the time you went back and conducted 
research on the questions, can you tell us specifically what research 
you conducted and what the sources and materials were you con- 
sulted ? 

Mr. Gritfix. No, I can't recall. That w^as the law library, con- 
sulted statutes, consulted the Internal Revenue Code and the cases 
under it, and I consulted the Federal law and I consulted some 
State laws. I can't tell you what I consulted. I can't give you cita- 
tions and I can't tell you what cases I read. I made no notes. 

Mr. Armstrox^g. AA-'ill you tell us how much time was spent ? 

Mr. Griffix-^. Oh, maylje 6 or 8 hours or something like that. 

Mr. Armstrox'g. And this was just on one occasion between the 
first and second meeting with Mr. Rebozo? 

Mr. Griffix. I did this research on more than one occasion. On 
several occasions. 

Mr. Armstroxg. Did any of it take place after the second meeting 
with Mr. Rebozo ? 

Mr. Griffix'. I don't recall. 

Mr. Armstroxg. Well, when you left the second meeting with Mr. 
Rebozo, were there any unresolved questions? 

Mr. Griffix. Between he and I ? I don't believe so. I gave him the 
advice and asked him to take it. 

Mr. Armstroxg. OK. Now, can you characterize the conclusions 
that your research led you to draw regarding the three questions, 
the three areas? 

Mr. Griffix. No, I can't. 

Mr. Armstrox^g. Well, could you summarize for us why you ad- 
vised Mr. Rebozo to return the money? 

Mr. Griffix. No. 

Mr. Armstroxg. You don't recall ? 

Mr. GRIFFIX^ I have testified to this before and I told you why. I 
had done my research on all of the points and I gave him the best 
advice possible, that I thought was possible. 

Mr. Armstroxg. At any time during Mr. Rebozo's initial conver- 
sations with you did he advise you that there were instructions to any 
individual as to what to do in case of his death — -with, the money? 

Mr. Griffix. I don't believe so, no. You mean concerning his 
estate ? 

Mr. Armstroxg. No, concerning the $100,000. 

Mr. Griffix. No. 

INIr. Armstroxg. And did you ask him, did you inquire or did he 
tell you whether or not there were any documents that would have 
indicated or had any bearing on the ownership of the money? 

Mr. Griffix. I don't think I asked that and I don't think he said. 

Mr. Armstrong. Did you make any inquiry as to whether or not 
there was any evidence that Mr. Rebozo had to support his state- 



10470 

ment that the money had been given to him as a campaign contri- 
bution ? 

Mr. Griffin. I made no inquiry whatsoever. 

Mr. Armstrong. Did he offer any evidence ? 

Mr. Griffin. I didn't ask him any. 

Mr. Armstrong. But did he offer any ? 

Mr. Griffin. Not that I know of. 

Mr. Armstrong. Incidentally, on the occasion of your first trip 
down there, do you recall how you went from the airport to the bank 
in Key Biscayne ? 

Mr. Griffin. Probably by cab. 

Mr. Armstrong. OK, but you would not have retained a receipt 
from that? I am just trying to see if there is another way of pin- 
pointing. 

Mr. Griffin. No. 

Mr. Armstrong. Now during your interview with us on January 
8, 1974, you stated that some time in November — and I believe we 
subsequently placed it as November 27, 1972 — that Mr. Rebozo re- 
ceived a loan from Hudson Valley National Bank. 

Mr. Ambrose. Well, I am going to object at this time. 

Mr. Armstrong. I didn't ask a question. Go ahead and object 
though. 

Mr. Ambrose. Well, finish your question. You are getting into an 
area I am going to object to the line of questioning. 

Mr. Armstrong. From the documents you have supplied, however, 
it appears as though Mr. Rebozo also received a loan from Precision 
Valve and this loan was then assigned to the Hudson Bank. Can you 
explain to us the circumstances that led to the loaning of $225,- 
000 

Mr. Ambrose. I am going to object to any inquiry along this line. 
First of all, it is not what Mr. Lackritz informed me would be the 
subject matter, and second, there is no relevance to the transfer of 
funds and the subject of this inquiry and Mr. Griffin is, of course, 
not prepared to discuss anything in this area. 

Mr. Lenzner. Let's see if we can lay a foundation for the rele- 
vancy of this. 

Mr. Griffin, did Mr. Rebozo ever discuss with you his need for 
cash at any time ? 

Mr. Griffin. The only thing that I was asked to come down here 
for, requested to come down here for, to testify to, was my part in 
the $100,000 transaction. That is the only thing I got prepared to 
discuss. 

Mr. Lenzner. What I am asking now, and let me put the perti- 
nence on the record, so we understand what the pertinency is, the 
pertinency is, if Mr. Rebozo did not have the $100,000 in 'the safe 
deposit box, what I am asking is, did he ever, on any occasion after, 
say November of 1972 request cash of you in a large amount ? 

Mr. Ambrose. I would object for a variety of reasons Mr. Lenzner, 
the first, and of course, the foremost, is the way you phrased the ques- 
tion "If Mr. Rebozo did not have the money". I don't think it is 
possible for Mr. Griffin to answer hypothetical questions based on 



10471 

that kind of situation whatsoever. I would just advise him not to 
answer it. I don't think it is germane and furthermore, unless he 
desires to overrule counsel, I would suggest he not answer the ques- 
tion. I would advise him so and, of course, if you think it is germane 
enough and you want to terminate the hearing and have some Sena- 
tor decide on it, it is all right with me. _ 

Mr. Lenzner. What I am suggesting is that the relevancy is if 
Mr. Rebozo was seeking cash to replenish the funds, it is not neces- 
sarily that Mr. Griffin knows that he was seeking it to replenish 
those funds. He simply could have gone to Mr. Griffin and asked 
him for cash in a large amount of money either through a loan from 
Precision Valve or from some other cash that Mr. Griffin might 
have been able to furnish him. 

Mr. Ambrose. Again I suggest the matter is as speculative a line 
of inquiry as I think I have ever heard and there is no way I am 
going to let Mr. Griffin be allowed to be dragged into that line of 
questioning unless I know of how germane it is and why it is. It is 
so abstract that it verges on the absurd. 

Mr. Lenzner. So you are saying that you will not allow your client 
to answer the question of whether Mr. Rebozo asked him if he could 
furnish him with a large amount of cash after November of 1972? 

Mr. Ambrose. No, I am not and you are now trying to characterize 
my objection. 

Mr. Lenzner. Well that was the original question. 

Mr. Ambrose. The question relates to a series of events which we 
are not prepared to answer, and which all happened prior to the 
time of the events we are here to testify today. If you have some 
evidence whether ISIr. Rebozo transferred the funds or played hanky- 
panky with the $100,000, this is not the witness to lay it on. You 
must do it some place else. Not here. 

Mr. Lenzner. Well if Mr. Rebozo sought the money from Mr. 
Mr. Griffin, is certainly is appropriate to ask Mr. Griffin that. 

Mr. Ambrose. If you have evidence there was a loan from either 
Precision Valve or Hudson Valley Bank to Mr. Rebozo, you are per- 
fectly able to ask Mr. Rebozo or any other officers of the bank but 
this is not the occasion. If you want to call Mr. Griffin back upon 
some other occasion and make this the point of the inquiry, I will 
be glad to consider that at that time. 

Mr. Lenzner. Let me ask Mr. Griffin, did Mr. Rebozo, after No- 
vember of 1972, ever request of you, cash or funds in the amount of 
$100,000 or more? 

Mr. Ambrose. I direct you not to answer the question. 

Mr. Griffin. It is outside the scope of the inquiry as directed by 
you people to me today and my counsel has told me not to answer it 
and I am not going to answer it today. 

Mr. Lenzner. And all I am suggesting to you, Mr. Griffin, is it 
could bear directly on and it does bear directly on the question of 
the $100,000 that was contributed, that was paid to Mr. Rebozo by 
the Hughes people. 

Mr. Griffin. Can we go off the record ? 

[Discussion off the record.] 

Mr. Lenzner. Back on the record. 



10472 

Mr. Griffin. No, let's stay off the record. 

[Discussion off the record.] 

Mr. Armstrong. Back on the record. Mr. Griffin, are you ac- 
quainted with Mr. Jack Davis or Mr. James Crosby of Resorts In- 
ternational ? 

Mr. Griffin. Yes. 

Mr. Armstrong. And have you ever had any discussions regarding, 
with either Mr. Davis or Mr. Crosby or been a party to any dis- 
cussions regarding the acquisition of Pan American Airlines stock 
by Resorts International ? 

Mr. Ambrose. I object to the line of inquiry as being totally 
irrelevant. I direct my client not to answer under any circumstances. 
It is beyond the scope of the agreement made with counsel for this 
committee as to this inquiry. 

Are you going to ask him next when did he stop beating his wife ? 

Mr. Armstrong. No, sir. 

Mr. Lenzner. Emily, do you have anything else on the $100,000. 

Ms. Sheketoff. I just have one question about your safe deposit 
box. Do you have more than one at the Hudson Valley Bank ? 

Mr. Griffin. I have only one. 

Ms. Sheketoff. And you said it is a $50 box ? 

Mr. Griffin. I think it is the largest box they have. 

Mr. Lenzner. Dick? 

Mr. Schultz. Yes, just one question, Mr. Griffin. Would you say 
that the fact that you did not discuss with Mr. Abplanalp the $100,- 
000 and returning of this money and your discussions with Mr. Re- 
bozo would in fact be your usual handling of your clients, that is, 
keeping confidential any clients' matters ? 

Mr. Griffin. Absolutely. I consider it a duty not to discuss it with 
anybody else. 

Mr. Schultz. This was not an unusual occurrence then? Would 
you say that it is your practice that you do not discuss clients' 
matters with other people? 

Mr. Griffin. Absolutely. 

Mr. Schultz. Thank you. 

Mr. Lenzner. Well, I appreciate and understand your concerns 
about not getting into areas that you weren't advised you were going 
to get into. I was not aware of Mr. Lackritz's conversations with 
Mr. Ambrose or yourself. 

Just for the record, so we won't waste a lot of time asking about 
a lot of other questions about the B. & C. Investment Co. Now, any 
of these other areas that you feel are outside the scope of what you 
are prepared to or have been asked to or requested to testify to today, 
let's get this straight. And I also would say that I think that it is 
inappropriate the members of the committee — or any member of this 
committee to indicate on the record, any indication frankly of belief or 
unbelief or disbelief on the witness' testimony. That it is something 
for the Senators to draw their own conclusions on, based on the in- 
formation and not for us to determine. I will say that I will ob- 
viously want to pursue these areas and I suppose we will have an 
opportunity to have a Senator or the chairman revieAv the record 



10473 

and get some clearance on the relevancy of the questions and the 
credibility of them. 

I will tell you this. Obviously the question of the replenishing 
of the funds — if that is an area that you continue to object to re- 
sponding to questions on — is something that we have gone into with 
other witnesses. 

Mr. Ambrose. Is it a question, Mr. Lenzner, of funds having been 
replenished or the possibility ? 

Mr. Lenzner. It is a question of whether Mr. Rebozo ever sought 
from other individuals funds that may have been used. 

Mr. Ambrose. So it is a possibility, not a fact? 

Mr. Lenzner. It may become a fact. If enough people were asked, 
I suppose you can create some evidence on that. 

Mr. Griffin. May I make a comment ? 

Mr. Lenzner. Sure. 

Mr. Griffin. On every occasion that any member of this commit- 
tee or any investigator called me concerning information in any area, 
I have told the information gladly so that we could find out exactly 
what did take place. 

Concerning my coming down too, I was told by Mr. Lackritz 
through Mr. Ambrose that we were only going to discuss one specific 
area and that is the area of my role in the return of the $100,000. 

Mr. Lenzner. I understand that. 

Mr. Griffin. And I did not get prepared in any way to discuss 
anything else, but I would be glad to discuss other matters if you 
advise me and give me sufficient time to be prepared and I will come 
back voluntarily. 

Mr. Lenzner. I think it is fair to say you have on prior occasions 
discussed some of these other areas with us and, as you have noticed, 
if you want to be prepared for that, I think it only reasonable and 
fair. 

Do you want to say something else for the record ? 

Mr. Ambrose. Yes, I would just like to get back the telephone 
sheets that we gave you that Mr. Armstrong has. 

Mr. Armstrong, We will have to go through those. 

Mr. Ambrose. My agreement is that it was to be done here today. 
Now if there is anything else 

Mr. Armstrong. That wasn't the agreement. 

Mr. Ambrose. That was my agreement with Mr. Lackritz. Now if 
you want something else — and you got them already, haven't you? 

Mr. Lenzner. No. 

Mr. Ambrose. You don't have these subpenaed? Then I suggest 
you subpena them. 

You got them for every other client of Mr. Griffin's. It is precisely 
for that reason that we had the agreement with Mr. Lackritz and 
with Miss DeOreo. And it would be hardly appropriate for this 
committee, absent some showing of absolute necessity, to inquire 
into the legal relationships and the client relationships of Mr. 
Griffin. 

Mr. Lenzner. I agree. I am not interested in Mr. Griffin's legal 
relationships. All I am interested in is having an opportunity to 
take the list you have extracted and verify it against the records. 



10474 

Mr. Ambrose. Now it is now 5 minutes of 4. You and Mr. Arm- 
strong and Mr. Lackritz have been looking at these lists, since 11 
o'clock this morning, of approximately 25 or 30 telephone calls that 
were taken off the list and are on these pieces of paper, 

Mr. Lenzner. We have also found at least one phone call that 
appears to be a phone call that was not on the list. 

Mr. Ambrose. That may be. I am not arguing that. All I am say- 
ing is if you wish to take them for the purpose of having them 
extracted, I wish you would do it now and then return it to us. It 
will take 5 minutes. 

Mr. Lenzner. It may take longer than 5 minutes but it won't take 
an hour I can tell you. 

Mr. Griffin. I would want it done here. And if you want those 
records, those things, then I suggest you subpena them. 

Mr. Lenzner. No, I don't want the names or numbers of any of 
your other clients, Mr. Griffin. All I want is a chance to double 
check. 

Mr. Gmffin. As I understand the agreement we had, the agree- 
ment was — I would bring them down and have them typed for 
you and give you a list of those numbers that you could, at the time 
I gave it to you, compare it and that you would return immediately, 
those telephone records to me. That is my understanding of the 
agreement. 

Mr. Lenzner. I think we will also make a record of the phone 
calls to 202-456-1414 since that is obviously the White House number 
and doesn't reflect any confidential information. 

Mr. Griffin. And I was not asked for that. 

Mr. Lenzner. I understand that. 

Mr. Griffin. But if you want, I can supply you with a list of all 
of the telephone calls called to that number as well under the same 
list, but I do not want my law office telephone records pulled here 
unless you validly subpena them. 

Mr. Ambrose. And this subpena, of course, does not cover those, 
nor should it obviously. So if you will give them back to us, then if 
you have some problems with it, we will be glad to arrange — and as 
a matter of fact, what I will do in order to accommodate the com- 
mittee and the staff, I will keep a set of the records in my office which 
is located a relatively short distance from here, and any member 
of your staff can come down tomorrow and take off those numbers 
which relate to Mr. Rebozo, which Mr. Griffin has testified to, so I 
guess you are entitled to take the White House calls off it. He testi- 
fied he may have looked for Mr. Rebozo through the White House 
switchboard. So we will obviously give that, Terry, but I think it 
should be done in my office, rather than under those circumstances. 

Mr. Lenzner. Exactly. Off the record. 

[Off the record discussion] 

Mr. Lenzner. And I want this on the record. 

We will adjourn until Tuesday. 

Mr. Ambrose. I will be unable to be here Tuesday. 

Mr. Armstrong. Any time Tuesday ? 

Mr. Ambrose. Any time Tuesday or Wednesday of next week I 
will be unable to be here. 



1047i5 

Mr. Lenzner. How about April 4, which is Thursday ? 

Mr, Ambrose. I don't have my calendar with me, but I know Tues- 
day and Wednesday of next week is impossible, I am going to 
object to it so if you want to make your record 

Mr, Lenzner. I do, Mr. Ambrose has indicated he is unavailable 
either the 2d or 3d of April so we will adjourn the subpena until 
April 4th at 10 a.m. 

ISIr, Ambrose, Now I want to state for the record that I object to 
the adjournment of the subpena in view of the fact that it is clear 
from the examination here that the subject of this inquiry, to say 
the least, has been exhausted and if there are new matters which 
are to be taken up by the committee, and they may well be appro- 
priate, I think it would behoove the committee to issue a new sub- 
pena for Mr, Griffin. I am also pointing out for the record at this 
time, that I do not have my calendar available and I do not know 
anything about my availability on April 4th. Is that the date you 
set, April 4th? 

I might also point out that the subpena, which was issued today, 
requests materials, which were never discussed in our prior discus- 
sions, which are at least three in number with counsel for the com- 
mittee, 

Mr, Lenzner, Of course, we will accommodate Mr, Ambrose. If he 
finds he has a conflict on the 4th, we can, by agreement, set another 
date, if he finds on his calendar he is unable on that date. I do want 
to tell you both though on the record that there is at least one ques- 
tion that we will pursue and I think it is a crucial question and that 
is whether Mr. Rebozo sought cash or funds of some kind from Mr. 
Griffin subsequent to November of 1972. And I know that, I suspect 
that Mr. Griffin won't have any trouble in answering that. 

Mr. Griffin. It is not a question of not answering the. question 
today. As you know, I was not prepared to answer the question today. 

Mr, Lenzner. I understand that. O.K, 

[Whereupon at 4:10 p.m. the committee recessed to reconvene at 
10 a.m., Thursday, April 4, 1974.] 



10476 

Griffin Exhibit No. 8 

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA 

Congrc£fg of tfie Winittti States 



To WJLLIAM. E .. .GRIEf IN . 



_ _ , ©retting: 

pursuant to lawful authonty, YOU ARE HEREBY COMMANDED to 
appear before the SEJ^ATE SELECT COMMITTEE O^" PRESIDENTIAL 

CAMPAIG.V ACTIVITIES of the Senate of the United States, on 

_ _..March_28 , _?57_4 _^ at ..yiP? o'clock ..?.:.. in., 

at their committee room .GrJ.08_...New Senate Office 

then and there to testify what you may know relative to the subject 

matters under consideration by said committee. 




J^ereof fail not, as you will answer your default under the pains and pen- 
alties in such cases made and provided. 

To _ t^\(U^ 
to serve and return. 

©iben under my hand, by order of the committee, this 

28th. day of .Maich , in the year of our 

Lord one thousand nine hundred and .S.e:y.fiD.ty.Ti.0.yi... 

.___^*?l5Jh.._.^?^^ 

Chairman, Senate Select Committee ak Presidential 
Campaign Activities. 



10477 

And bring with you pursuant to Senate Resolution 60, 93d Congress, 
1st Session the following: 



Any and all documents and records and copies thereof including 
but not limited to memoranda of meetings and conversations, 
travel vouchers , checks, check stubs, airline tickets, credit 
charges, telephone records and vouchers wliich reflect contact 
with Charles G. Rebozo from January 1, 1973 until June 30, 1973. 



31-889 O - 74 - pt. 22 - 19 



10478 



M^ J:i , .4 



I made service of the within suhpena 
by ... 



1*1/ OCfl/H^D KJJ 



the within-named 

Gr 



.0)^4!^*^ 




., at 



at \.\?.....f..y.. o'clock ,..P..*m., on 



ivJC^.-.4!;^^ aay 

^^A/^...'. .^. ;..y 



Signed 



y)UM,A 




u.t. GOVKNMtNT pmNTiNo oprici 22-esi-h 



10479 



Griffin Exhibit No. 4 



SAM J. CRVIH. JR., N.C.. CHAmMAN 
HOWARD H. BAKER. JR^ TENN. VICE CHAJHUAM 



HERMAN C TALMAOCE. CA. 
DAM1EL K. INOure. HAWAII 
JOSEPH M. MO^r^OrA. N. MCX. 



CnWARO J. GURNCY. FLA. 
LOWEt-t. P. WeiCXER. JR^ 



BAMUru DASH 

CHIEF COUNSEU AND STAFF DlRiXTOa 

FReO O. THOMPSON 

MIMORITT COUNSEL 

RUFUS U. CDMISTEM 

DEPUTY COUKSCI. 



3Cn:rfcb ^fctles ^cnaig 

SELECT COMMITTEE ON 

PRESIDEhrriAL CAMPAIGN ACTIVITIES 

(mjRsoAhrr to s. Rta. w. wo congress) 

Washington. D.C. 20510 



March 21, 1974 



Mr. WilUam Griffin, Sr. 

6401 N.W. 29th Street ■ 

Fort Lauderdale, Florida 

Dear Mr. Griffin: 

It has come to my attention that during the course 
of our investigation your telephone records were mistakenly 
subpoenaed. This resulted from confusion on the part of 
our staff because of the identity of your name with that of 
your son. 

We have notified the telephone company that they 
need not comply with the subpoena . I deeply regret any 
concern that this may liave caused you and wish to assure 
you that neither you nor your telephone records are of any 
interest to our investigation. 



Sincerely, 



^a^t'^ 2f^/>^^'v^ JV. 



Sam J. Ervin, Jr. 
Chairman 



10480 



DAMICL K. INiOUYC, XAWAII 
JOSCPM M. MOMTOVA. N. Ml 



LX>wci-i. r. wcicMcn, jr., comm. 



• AMUU. DASH 

CHlK/- COUNSCL At40 STATF OIM&CTOM 

FMCO O. THOMP-SON 

Mlr«0«llTT COUMSSL 

OCPUTY COUMCEU 



'^CnUcb ^£a{cs -^ertalc 

SELECT COMMITTEE ON 

PRESIDENTIAU CAMPAIGN ACTIVITIES 

(njnsuAMT ro s. ncs. m, no concmcss) 

Washington. D.C. ZOStO 



March 22, 19 74 



Mr. W. Kenneth Lindhorst 

American Telephone and Telegraph Company 

2000 L Street, N.W. 

Washington, D. C. 20036 

Dear Mr. Lindhorst: 

This letter is to inform you that the Select Committee's 
subpoena for the telephone records of William E. Griffin, 
dated March 19, 1974, was mistakenly issued because of 
a confusion in names^ ..We, therefore, withdraw this sub- 
poena. ' "v"' . ■ : - ,;'^-v %:■■': ' 



Thank you for attending to this matter. 
Sincerely, ' 




Sam J. Ervin, Jr. 
Chairman 



10481 



Griffin Exhibit No. 5 



■W>I.!J»M r_ (iKlFFV* 
ITTt'tl-Vn AT UA« 



fe\ro. :<A, ^ . .^-.- ^^-^ -<^^--=^ 



I m'-'furs 



-•C^ /-■• 










^rjudno 10000/ 



^.v-y*«"*" 



V<II.IJ\M E. (.HlinX 

ATll.K\r-l AT I \^ 



Tarkce Clipper Hotel 



Two Hundred ElKhtcen and -JS/lOO 

K..K . 




»«C'D«0»4 VAi.i.CT 
NAT10^«AL BANK 



c' 



«:oc'i 1-iJS ic>: v-trrrT.iue i- .-. 



."00000 :' :.i'.ii,* . 






J \»II.IJ VM V. i.KIIPIN 

• *•*' •*•'! IH t:K>*%f-W%1 

• |i'«w'i'i'.il..»- Key Blscayoe Hotel and Villas 

if :/. ■: . ■ 

,• Eljbt ihicdred. Tmentj-three and 93 'lOO ----------- 

j ::::=:r\'r' - <,. . <'^^'^] > / 



' i i-iJS !;■•: 



J) 

' t-COLV i- tV! i"* 



3 OS i 

Jure 27 |<» 73 -'j I 
S 823,93 I : 

|),„, ,|., I 

I 



10482 



* . 












-■ •? ''.'V 






■"^^^ 



PI 



1 ■• . 






IX. *1K tu ^ 



.L, 



. 2 ri\a lit ^.^ 



9 

•at 



^«"«»*BSSXttlC3ESC?22I71C3Ei£EaSKCSslS3f:Sa2S* 



U22LrSBB5::3«S£CEMadvta> a^ 






O. 

-,-> 












^%^. 




10483 

Griffin Exhibit No. 6 

June 22, 1973 

. Chester Dav1s» Esqiifre 

Dear Mr. Davis: 

Sorae time ago Mr. Richard Danner delivered tuo packages to me which 

purported to contain a total of $100,090.00. Tha packages wre delivered 

several racmths apart and the contents v;erc to be utilized for campaign 

purposes. 

As ticse progressed it becaae apparent to ne that these funds should 

not be so utilized, I therefore ara enclosing the identical bills chich 

were delivered to ise in the two packages. "Hiese funds have been In 

a safe deposit box at all tiises since I received t*ier. 

The bills have been identified and all serial nuribers are recorded on 

the attached pages. Upon actual count it turned out that there 

vers 1.001 $100.00 bills. 

Will you please sign a copy of this letter Indicating your receipt 

of these bills and forward It to ne? 

Yours truly 



MONDAY, APRIL 1, 1974 

U.S. Senate, 
Select Committee on 
Presidential Campaign AcTtviTiES, 

Washington^ D.C. 

The Select Committee met, pursuant to notice, at 11 :35 a.m. in 
room G-334, Dirksen Senate Office Building. 

Present : Senators Ervin and Baker. 

Also present : Terry F. Lenzner, assistant chief counsel ; Richard L. 
Schultz, assistant minority counsel; Carmine Bellino, chief investi- 
gator; Scott Armstrong and Lee Sheehy, investigators; Emily Sheke- 
toff, research assistant. 

Senator Baker [presiding]. Would you stand up please, and hold up 
your right hand ? 

Do you solemnly swear that the testimony you are about to give will 
be the truth, the whole ti-uth, and nothing but the truth, so help you 
God? 

Ms. MoNcouRT. I do. 

Senator Baker. Counsel may proceed. 

Mr. Greer. Senator, before we start, I would like to make a state- 
ment for the record. Ms. Moncourt has a gum problem and has 
some difficulty in talking, plus she is of French origin and has an ac- 
cent; and so if anyone does not imderstand her answers, I wish that 
they would say so, especially the reporter, so that we have an ac- 
curate transcript of the proceedings. 

The Reporter. Yes, sir. 

Senator Baker. Thank you. 

Mr. Arivistrong. Incidentally, if you'd like to take a break at any 
time, just please say so. 

Ms. Moncourt, would you please state your full name and home 
address for the record ? 

TESTIMONY OF NICOLE MONCOURT, ACCOMPANIED BY ALAN G. 

GREER, COUNSEL 

Ms. Moncourt. Nicole, N-i-c-o-l-e, Moncourt, M-o-n-c-o-u-r-t, 2761 
Southwest 34th Place. 

Mr. Armstrong. Miami ? 

Ms. Moncourt. Miami. 

Mr. Armstrong. And your home phone ? 

Mr. Greer. Ms. Moncourt prefers not to give out her home phone. 
It is unlisted. She may be reached through our office at any time. 

Mr. Armstrong. OK. And your present occupation ? 

Ms. Moncourt. Bookkeeper. 

Mr. Armstrong. And your employer ? 

(10485) 



10486 

Ms. MoNcoTJRT. Mr. Charles G. Eebozo. 

Mr. Armstrong. And how long have you been employed by Mr. 
Rebozo ? 

Ms. MoNCOURT. Four years. 

Mr. Armstrong. And can you give us an approximate date when you 
began? 

Ms. MoNCouRT. In April of 1970. 

Mr. Armstrong. x4.nd what is your office address ? 

Ms. MoNCouRT. 95 West Mclntyre. 

Mr. Armstrong. Is that the Key Biscayne Bank & Trust Co. ? 

Ms. MoNCOURT. Key Biscayne. 

Mr. Armstrong. And how were you previously employed ? 

Ms. MoNCOURT. How was I ? 

Mr. Armstrong. Yes. 

Ms. MoNCOTJRT. You mean by whom ? 

Mr. Armstrong. In what capacif v, bv whom ? 

Ms. MoNcouRT. National Car Rental. 

Mr. Armstrong. And in what capacity ? 

Ms. MoNCOURT. As supervisor of the data processing department. 

Mr. Armstrong. Could you give us or indicate your present duties 
for Mr. Rebozo. J 

Ms. MoNcoTJRT. I keep his books. " 

Mr. Armstrong. And could you tell us if that includes any duties for 
the bank itself ? 

Ms. Moncourt. Yes. I do the payroll for the bank. 

Mr. Armstrong. And in addition to Mr. Rebozo's personal books, 
you also keep the books for the corporations of which he is a principal ? 

Ms. MONCOTTRT. Yes. f 

Mr. Armstrong. And do you do any personal work for Mr. Rebozo, 
correspondence or file ? 

Ms. Moncourt. Occasionally. I do all of his filing, not the corre- 
spondence. ^ 

Mr. Armstrong. And could you tell us, when you say, "all of his 
filings," you refer to all of his personal filing ? 

Ms. Moncourt. Anything in his out-basket. 

Mr. Armstrong. Does Mr. Rebozo maintain a file entitled or related 
to F. Donald Nixon ? 

Ms. Moncourt. You asked me that question the last time, but I 
was mistaken. We do not have a file on Donald Nixon. I was thinking 
of the file on Donald Rebozo, and Donald, you know, just misled 
me. I was nervous. 

Mr. Armstrong. Do you have a file on James Golden ? 

Ms. Moncourt. Yes. 

Mr. Armstrong. And do you recall the last time you filed or entered 
anything into that file ? d 

iVIs. Moncourt. Oh, no. It must have been 1970 or so. 

Mr. Armstrong. And have you typed any correspondence recently 
related to Mr. Golden ? 

Ms. Moncourt. No. 

Mr. Armstrong. I believe on the last occasion we spoke in Mr. 
Greer's office, you said you had typed a letter recently — am I mis- 
taken — that you typed a letter to Mr. Golden recently ? 



i 



10487 

Ms. MoNcouRT. I didn't say that. 

Mr. Greer. My personal notes of the interview don't reflect that 
statement. 

Mr. Armstrong. OK. Have you typed or filed any correspondence 
or any summaries or documents related to the contribution received 
from Mr. Howard Hughes ? 

Ms. MONCOURT. No. 

Mr. Armstrong. The so-called $100,000 contribution ? 

Ms. MoNCOURT. No. 

Mr. Lenzner. Just going back for a second, Scott, you say that you 
originally did say that you had a file on F. Donald Nixon, but you 
had that confused with something else. 

Ms. MoNcouRT. Yes. I had it confused with Donald Rebozo. 

Mr. Armstrong. Who is Donald Rebozo ? 

Ms. MoNcouRT. He is a nephew of Mr. Rebozo. 

Mr. Lenzner. And did you take an opportunity to go back through 
your files, after your interview, to determine whether you had or 
did not have 

Ms. MoNcouRT. Yes, I did, because I was not sure when the inter- 
view was over. You know, I went back to the file. I was trying to re- 
member what had been asked of me, and then I noticed that there was 
not a file on Donald Nixon. There was a file on Donald Rebozo. 

Mr. Lenzner. And did you have a discussion with anybody else with 
regard to the existence or nonexistence of a file on F. Donald Nixon ? 

Ms. MONCOTJRT. No. 

Mr. Greer. Senator, I'm not trying to restrict the questioning in 
any way, but I would like to request that we have one line of ques- 
tioning from one person and then someone else, rather than having 
this jumping back and forth. I think it is easier on the witness. 

Senator Baker. Well, I don't know what practice you followed in 
the past, but whatever seems to be reasonably sought after -by the 
witness can be controlling, I suppose. What I am after is to get as 
fast a sequence of testimony as we can. 

Mr. Lenzner. I understand that. Senator. I only intended to jump 
in if there was something we skipped over too quickly. 

Senator Baker. OK. Why don't we agree on this, if there is no dis- 
sent from it, that Mr. Armstrong can finish his line of questioning, 
and then Mr. Lenzner can do whatever loose ends picking-up you 
want to do, and that way she can direct her attention to a single in- 
quiry at a time. I think that is the way we would do it, ii it were in 
a lawsuit, so why don't we follow that unless it interferes with any 
thoughts you have, Terry. 

Mr. Greer. We would agree with that. 

Mr. Armstrong. Ms. Moncourt, are you aware of any correspondence 
files which Mr. Rebozo maintains with any members of the White 
House staff or former members of the White House staff ? 

Ms. Moncourt. No. 

Mr. Armstrong. Do you recall if there is a correspondence file with 
Mr. Ehrlichman ? 

Ms. Moncourt. No. 

Mr. Armstrong. Or a correspondence file with the President ? 

Ms. Moncourt. Nothing that I have seen. 



10488 

Mr. Armstrong. Do you recall a correspondence file with Mr. 
Danner ? 

Ms. MoNCOURT. There was one, yes, which you have had, I think. 

Mr. Armstrong. Yes, ma'am. Were there any other correspondence 
files related to Hughes Tool Co. that you are aware of ? 

Ms. MoNCOURT. No. 

Mr. Armstrong. Was there a correspondence file with Mr. Kalm- 
bach? 

Ms. MoNCOURT. No. 

Mr. Armstrong. Was there a correspondence file with Mr. Jack 
Gleason ? 

Ms. MoNCouRT, No ; you asked me that before. 

Mr. Armstrong. Or with Mr. Stans, Maurice Stans ? 

Ms. MoNCOURT. No. 

Mr. Armstrong. Was there a correspondence file with Senator 
Smathers ? 

Ms. MoNcouRT. Yes ; there is one. 

Mr. Armstrong. And is there a correspondence file with Rose Mary 
Woods? 

Ms. MoNCOURT. No. 

Mr. Armstrong. Or with Claudia Vail ? 
Ms. MoNCOURT. Wlio? 
Mr. Armstrong. Claudia Vail. 
Ms. MoNCOURT. I never heard of her. 
Mr. Armstrong. Vincent Andrews ? 
Ms. MoNcoiTRT. [Nods in the negative.] 

Mr. Armstrong. And is there any correspondence file related to 
Edward Nixon? 

Ms. MoN(X)URT. To whom ? 

Mr. Armstrong. Edward Nixon. 

Ms. MONCOURT. No. 

Mr. Armstrong. Or Donald A. Nixon, as opposed to F. Donald 
Nixon ? 

Ms. Mon(X)Urt. That was the file I was mistaken about. There is 
no file on Nixon. 

Mr. Armstrong. This is Donald A. Nixon, is the President's nephew, 
as opposed to F. Donald Nixon, is the President's brother. There is 
no file ? 

Ms. Moncourt. No. 

Mr. Armstrong. Now, have you also done bookkeeping on Mr. 
Rebozo's behalf for any campaign committees ? 

Ms. Moncourt. Yes; I handled the account of the Committee To 
Re-Elect the President. 

Mr. Armstrong. The Finance Committee To Re-Elect the President 
for the 1972 campaign ? 

Ms. MoNcx)URT. Yes ; we had that. 

Mr. Armstrong. Any other campaign committees ? 

Ms. MoNCX)URT. No. 

Mr. Armstrong. And to your knowledge, were there any other cam- 
paign committees that were in existence fi-om the period January 1 
or from the time you came in April 1970 to the present ? 



. 10489 

Ms. MONCOURT. No. 

Mr. Armstrong. There are no open accounts that Mr. Kebozo 
maintains ? 

Ms. MoNcouRT. Not to my knowledge ; no. 

Mr. Armstrong. Do you have any duties you perform for Mr. 
Wakefield? 

Ms. MoNCouRT. No ; not that I know of. 

Mr. Armstrong. Aiid are there any duties you perform for the 
President ? 

Ms. Moncourt. I make the mortgage payments on the Key Biscayne 
properties and pay some house bills. 

Mr. Armstrong. By house bills, you're referring to utilities ? 

Ms. Moncourt. Yes ; utilities, fuels, this sort, maintenance. 

Mr. Armstrong. And how are these bills approved ? 

Ms. Moncourt. They are approved — the people from GSA bring me 
the bills, and I just go ahead and pay them. 

Mr. Armstrong. And are these paid from the President's private 
account ? 

Ms. Moncourt, Yes. 

Mr. Armstrong. Do you have power of signature on that account ? 

Ms. Moncourt. No, sir. 

Mr. Armstrong. Are they paid with a cashier's check ? 

Ms. Moncourt. They are paid by cashier's check, and an advice of 
charge against the account. 

Mr. Armstrong. And who receives the advice of charge ? 

Ms. Moncourt. I send that — I send it to Mr. DeMarco's office in 
California. 

[Discussion off the record.] 

Mr. Armstrong. Back on the record. 

Ms. Moncourt, are you aware of any destruction or removal of 
records from Mr, Rebozo's files ? 

Ms. Moncourt. No. 

Mr. Armstrong. And can you tell us what names and in what cir- 
cumstances Mr. Rebozo would use a name other than his own for 
business or financial purposes ? 

Ms. Moncourt. You asked me that the last time. 

Mr. Greer. Nicky, for your information, they're allowed to ask 
you the same questions over again. The purpose of this is to get sworn 
testimony that would be an official part of the record. So just because 
they are repeating questions, that's permissible and there's no problem. 

Ms. Moncourt. OK. Yes, he does ; sometim_es under my name. 

Mr. Armstrong. Under what circumstances would that occur? 

Ms. Moncourt. Different things that he wishes to buy and not have 
his name associated with, because of publicity and endorsement. 

Mr. Armstrong. We're talking about the acquisition of personal 
property ? 

Ms. Moncourt. Yes ; there are things that he wishes to buy. 

Mr. Greer. Why don't you give examples, Nicky ? 

Ms. Moncourt. Well, gifts and gadgets, yon know, little small 
things. 



10490 

Mr. Armstrong. Anything in excess in the value of $200 ? 

Ms. MoNCouRT. No ; it never has. 

Mr. Armstrong. I'm sorry. Go ahead. 

Ms. MoNcouRT. And then he also buys under the name of C. Gregory 
for the same purposes, and he buys stocks and bonds in his sister's 
name, Mrs. Anita Reynolds. There is a legal agreement to that effect. 

Mr. Armstrong. And have you ever known Mr. Rebozo to use the 
name Gregory in anything other than for the acquisition of personal 
property ? 

[Ms. Moncourt nods in the negative.] 

Mr. Armstrong. And never for property in excess of $200 ? 

Ms. Moncourt. No ; not even in excess of $100. 

Mr. Armstrong. Since January 1, 1969, to your knowledge, first of 
all have you had any business transactions — business or financial trans- 
actions with Mr. Rebozo ? 

Ms. Moncourt. No ; I didn't even know him, never. 

Mr. Armstrong. With the exception of the fact that you acted as an 
employee. 

Ms. Moncourt. I was not working for him in 1969. 

Mr. Armstrong. But from January 1969 to the present ? 

Ms. Moncourt. No ; I didn't even know who he was until I started 
to work for him. 

Mr. Armstrong. All right. From April 1970 to the present, have 
you had any business or financial transactions with Mr. Rebozo other 
than in your capacity as an employee ? 

Ms. Moncourt. You mean I, myself ? 

Mr. Armstrong. Yes. 

Ms. Moncourt. No. 

Mr. Armstrong. Now, to your knowledge, since January 1, 1969, 
has Mr. Rebozo had any business or financial transactions with the 
President ? 

Ms. Moncourt. 1969 ? To my knowledge, the only thing that hap- 
pened in 1969 is when Mr. Nixon had to sell back his stock in Fishers 
Island. 

Mr. Armstrong. Since that time ? 

Ms. Moncourt. Since that time — would you repeat the question 
again ? 

Mr. Armstrong. Since the occasion on which the President sold his 
Fishers Island stock back to the corporation, of which Mr. Rebozo is 
president, has Mr. Rebozo had any business or financial transactions 
with Mr. Nixon ? 

Ms. Moncourt. No ; not Mr. Rebozo. No. 

Mr. Armstrong. Now, has Mr. Rebozo ever borix)wed money from 
President Nixon ? 

Ms. Moncourt. Yes ; he does on occasion. 

Mr. Armstrong. Can you give me the occasions that that has 
occurred ? 

Ms. Moncourt. Well, one of them is he borrowed $10,000 wlien he 
bought the Maryland house. 

Mr. Armstrong. And when would that be ? 

Ms. Moncourt. That would be in 1973. I dont remember that date 
exactly. It was last year sometime when he bought the 



10491 

Mr. Armstrong. The loan was in 1973. I believe the house was pur- 
chased in November of 1972, but the loan occurred in 1973 ? 

Ms. MoNcouRT. No; I must be mistaken. I dont remember these 
exact dates. 

Mr. Armstrong. Was the loan now, at the time of the purchase of 
the house ? 

Ms. MoNCOuRT. Yes. 

Mr. Armstrong. What was the purpose of that loan ? 

Ms. Moncourt. The down payment I think on the contract of sale. 

Mr. Armstrong. And the amount of the loan was $10,000 ? 

[Ms. Moncourt nods in the affirmative.] 

Mr. Armstrong. And do you recall when that was paid back? 

Ms. Moncourt. I know it was paid back in Augnst, I think. 

Mr. Armstrong. And do you recall the interest rate ? 

Ms. Moncourt. There was no interest rate. It was just a personal 
loan. 

Mr. Armstrong. And was there any collateral or security? 

Ms. Moncourt. No. I'm sure. 

Mr. Armstrong. And to your knowledge were there any other loans 
between the President and Mr. Rebozo? 

Ms. Moncourt. No. 

Mr. Armstrong. Do you have any questions on that transaction, 
Carmine ? 

Senator Baker. Carmine, before you go ahead, counsel for the wit- 
ness suggested that we have one lawyer at a time ask questions. Which 
I indicated was a reasonable request. 

Mr. Akmstrong. Well, that's fine with us, but I'm afraid that we're 
going to end up repeating the question areas. 

Senator Baker. I think that's the way it would be done, if you were 
trying a lawsuit. Why don't you go ahead and finish yours or 
whatever ? 

Mr. Greer. Senator, if it would expedite things, I would be happy if 
at the end of the particular line of questioning, if someone else had 
related questions. What I would object to is jumping back and forth 
within one sequence. 

Senator Baker. Well, whatever suits you. 

Mr. Greer. That would be fine. Anything to expedite the entire 
proceeding. 

Senator Baker. You're willing then for Mr. Bellino to go ahead? 

Mr. Greer. Assuming Mr. Armstrong has finished this line of 
questioning. 

Mr. Bellino. In connection with any expenditures or payments by 
Mr. Rebozo on behalf of President Nixon, woidd you pay the various 
electric bills and water bills that had to do with 500 Bay Lane ? 

Ms. Moncourt. Yes. 

Mr. Greer. Senator, I would object to that as repetition of prior 
testimony and questions ; and I would like to avoid that. She's already 
testified that she paid those bills in response 'to Mr. Armstrong's 
question. 

Senator Baker. I think that happened, Carmine, before you came in. 

Mr. Lenzner. Although we didn't get a specificity of what kinds of 
bills they were or which house or houses they were paid on behalf of. 



10492 

and I think that is what Carmine is getting at. I don't think we dis- 
cussed 500 Bay Lane prior to this. 

Mr. Greer. Well, again, procedurally I would be happy to have at 
the end of a particular segment of questioning, everyone who has other 
questions on that segment; but now we are jumping back into a seg- 
ment that was much prior to what we are into now. 

Mr. Lenzner. Well, I understood Senator Baker's ruling, I have 
got some questions going back to some other things. I thought we were . 
supposed to wait until the line was finished. 

Senator Baker. OK. Let me tell you what we're going to do. The 
Chair rules the best way to handle this dilemma is for one attorney to 
finish the line of questioning, and then we'll move on to another one. 

Mr. Greer. Fine. 

Mr. Armstrong. OK. Ms. Moncourt, are you aware of any instances 
in which the President has acted as a cosignator or guarantor in any 
business or financial transactions for Mr. Rebozo? 

Ms. Moncourt. For Mr. Eebozo, no. 

Mr. Armstrong. And any instances in which Mr. Rebozo has acted 
as cosignator or guarantor in any business or financial transactions on 
behalf of the President ? 

Ms. Moncourt. No. 

Mr. Armstrong. And are you aware of any instances in which 
Mr. Rebozo provided collateral security for any business or financial 
transaction of the President's ? 

Ms. Moncourt. No. 

Mr. Armstrong. Or where the President had provided any collateral 
or security for any business or financial transaction of Mr. Rebozo? 

Ms. Moncourt. No. 

Mr. Armstrong. Are you aware of any instance in which Mr. Rebozo 
has acted as the agent, representative, or designee of the President in 
any business or financial transaction ? 

Ms. Moncourt. No. 

Mr. Armstrong. Now, does Mr. Rebozo from time to time pay bills 
on behalf of the President ? 

Ms. Moncourt. No ; none other than the ones I pay. 

Mr. Armstrong. But none out of his personal account ? 

Ms. Moncourt. Not to my knowledge. 

Mr. Armstrong. And are you aware of him ever having been reim- 
bursed by the President for having paid personal expenses of the 
President ? 

Ms. Moncourt. I do not recall any such instance. 

Mr. Armstrong. Are you aware of any instances in which the 
President and Mr. Rebozo have exchanged, or one party has purchased 
property, personal or real property from the other? 

Ms. Moncourt. No, other than the San Clemente B. & C. 

Mr. Armstrong. B. & C. Investment Co. ? 

Ms. Moncourt. Yes. 

Mr. Armstrong. And when did you firet become aware of the B. & C. 
Investment Co. ? 

Ms. Moncourt. When it was first started. 

Mr. Armstrong. And you maintained the books for the company? 

Ms. Moncourt. Not the books, no. 



10493 

Mr. Armstrong. Do you maintain any records related to B. & C. 
Investment Co. ? 

Ms. MoNcouRT. No. There was a schedule of payments, and I just 
made the payments to the B. & C. account whenever it was due. 

Mr. Armstrong. And those were made from Mr. Rebozo's personal 
account ? 

Ms. MoNcouRT. Right. 

Mr. Armstrong. And to your knowledge then, has Mr. Rebozo made 
any gifts to the President valued in excess of $100 since January 1, 
1969? 

Ms. MoNcouRT. Not to my knowledge, no. 

Mr. Armstrong. And to your knowledge, has the President made 
any gifts to Mr. Rebozo valued in excess of $100 ? 

Ms. MoNcouRT. [Nods in the negative.] 

Mr. Lenzner. Let's get an answer on the record. 

Mr. Greer. You have to answer out loud, Nicole. You have to answer. 
The answer to the last question would have been "no." 

Ms. MoNCOURT. No. 

Mr. Armstrong. And are you aware of any instances in which Mr. 
Rebozo provided to the President any quantity of cash totaling over 
$500? 

Ms. MoNCOURT. No. 

Mr. Armstrong. Or any instances where the President has provided 
Mr. Rebozo any quantity of cash in excess of $500 ? 

Ms. Moncourt. None other than that $10,000 loan. 

Mr. Armstrong. Was that in the form of a check or was it in cash ? 

Ms. Moncourt. I believe the money was withdrawn from the Presi- 
dent's account. 

Mr. Armstrong. And the transfer was made then by cashier's check 
or by transfer? 

Ms. Moncourt. An advice of charge. 

Mr. Armstrong. And the deposit was made in IMr. Rebozo's account ? 

Ms. Moncourt. To Mr. Rebozo's account. 

Mr. Armstrong. And to your knowledge, has Mr. Rebozo ever cashed 
a personal check for the President in excess of $500 ? 

Ms. Moncourt. No. 

Mr. Armstrong. Or has the President cashed a personal check for 
Mr. Rebozo in excess of $500 ? 

Ms. Moncourt. No. 

Mr. Armstrong. Now, are you aware — since January 1, 1969 — are 
you aware of any business or financial transactions between Mr. Rebozo 
and Mr. F. Donald Nixon? 

Ms. Moncourt. No. 

Mr. Armstrong. Are you aware of any instances in which Mr. 
F. Donald Nixon has borrowed money from Mr. Rebozo? 

Ms. Moncourt. No. 

Mr. Armstrong. Or when Mr. Rebozo has borrowed money from 
Mr. F. Donald Nixon ? 

Ms. Moncourt. No. 

Mr. Armstrong. And to your knowledge has Mr. F. Donald Nixon — 
has Mr. Rebozo ever acted as a cosignator or guarantor in any business 
or financial transaction for Mr. F. Donald Nixon? 

Ms. Moncourt. No. 



31-889 O - 74 - pt. 22 - 20 



10494 

Mr. Armstrong. To your knowledge, has Mr. Rebozo ever provided 
any collateral or security for any business or financial transaction for 
Mr. F. Donald Nixon ? 

Ms. MONCOURT. No. 

Mr. Armstrong. Do you know if Mr, Rebozo has ever acted as the 
agent, representative, or designee in any business or financial trans- 
action for Mr. F. Donald Nixon ? 

Ms. MoNCOURT. No. 

Mr. Armstrong. Do you know if Mr. Rebozo has ever sold or ex- 
changed any real or personal property of F. Donald Nixon? 

Ms. MoNCOURT. No. 

Mr. Armstrong. Or whether he has purchased any real or personal 
property from F. Donald Nixon ? 

Ms. MoNCOURT. No. 

Mr. Armstrong. And are you aware whether Mr. Rebozo has ever 
made any gifts valued in excess of $100 to F. Donald Nixon ? 

Ms. MoNCOURT. No. 

Senator Baker. Let me interrupt for a minute. The questions are : 
Do you know or are you aware ? and the answer is "no." Do I interpret 
that to mean "no", she does not know, or "no", those things did not 
happen ? 

Ms. MoNCouRT, As far as I know that did not happen, because it 
would have come to my desk, I am sure. 

Senator Baker. Thank you. 

Mr. Armstrong. Has Mr. Rebozo ever provided any quantity of 
cash totaling over $500 to Mr. F. Donald Nixon ? 

Ms. MoNCOURT. No. 

Mr. Armstrong. And do you know if Mr. Rebozo has ever cashed 
a check on behalf of F. Donald Nixon? 

Ms. Moncourt. No. 

Mr. Armstrong. Are you aware of any business or financial trans- 
actions between Rose Mary Woods and Mr. Rebozo? 

Ms. Moncourt. No, I am not. 

Mr. Armstrong. Are you aware of any instances in which Rose 
Mary Woods has borrowed money from Mr. Rebozo ? 

Ms. Moncourt. No. 

Mr. Armstrong. Do you know if Mr. Rebozo ever acted as a co- 
signator or guarantor in any business or financial transaction with Ms. 
Woods? 

Ms. Moncourt. No. 

Mr. Greer. Let me interrupt here. I take it that your "no answers" 
are the same response that you would have given to the Senator's prior 
question, just for the record ? 

Ms. Moncourt. Yes. 

Mr. Armstrong. Has Mr. Rebozo ever provided any collateral or 
security for any business or financial transaction for Ms. Woods ? 

Ms. Moncourt. No. 

Mr. Armstrong. Has Mr. Rebozo ever acted as the agent, repre- 
sentative, or designee, in any business or financial transactions for 
Ms. Woods? 

Ms. Moncourt. No. 

Mr. Armstrong. And has Mr. Rebozo ever sold or exchanged any 
real or personal property with Ms. Woods ? 



10495 

Ms. MoNcouRT. No. She had some stocks also in Fishers Island, but 
we bought that back at the same time we bought the Nixon stocks. 

Mr. Armstrong. And that was sold back at the same time that 
President Nixon redeemed his stock ? 

Ms. MoNCOuRT. Yes. 

Mr. Armstrong. And are you aware of any gifts by Mr. Kebozo 
valued in excess of $100 to Ms. Woods ? 

Ms. MONCOURT. No. 

Mr. Armstrong. Has Mr. Rebozo ever provided a quantity of cash 
in excess of $500 to Ms. Woods ? 

Ms. MoNCOURT. No. 

Mr. Armstrong. And has Mr. Rebozo ever cashed a check in excess 
of $500 for Ms. Woods? 

Ms. MoNCOURT. No. 

Mr. Armstrong. Excuse me. Has Mr. Rebozo ever bought any 
personal or real property for Ms. Woods ? 

Ms. MoNCOURT. No. 

Mr. Armstrong. Has Mr. Rebozo had any business or financial 
transactions since January 1, 1969, with Mr. Richard Danner? 

Ms. MoNCouRT. Not to my knowledge. 

Mr. Armstrong. Has Mr. Rebozo ever borrowed any money from 
Mr. Richard Danner ? 

Ms. MoNCOURT. There was one exchange, I think of $1,000. 

Mr. Armstrong. When you say an exchange of $1,000, can you 
elaborate ? 

Ms. MoNCouRT. I think Mr. Rebozo borrowed $1,000 from Mr. Dan- 
ner and paid it back the next day by check ? 

Mr. Armstrong. Do you know what the circmnstances of that loan 
were? 

Ms. MoNcouRT. No, I do not. 

Mr. Armstrong. And do you know where that occurred ? 

Ms. MoNCouRT. That was in 1969. I know about it even though I 
was not working there at the time, because I just happened to come 
across it, that's all. 

Mr. AjtMSTRONG. Do you know where that occurred, where the trans- 
action took place ? 

Ms. MoNCouRT. I do not recall the date. 

Mr. Armstrong. I'm sorry, where ? 

Ms. MoNCouRT. Where ? 

Mr. Armstrong. IVhere. 

Ms. MoNcouRT. Well, if Mr. Rebozo signed the check, he would 
have signed the check from Miami. 

Mr. Armstrong. But other than that one instance, you're not aware 
of Mr. Rebozo having borrowed any money from Mr. Danner ? 

Ms, Moncourt. No. 

Mr. Armstrong. Are you aware of Mr. Danner ever borrowing any 
money from Mr. Rebozo ? 

Ms. Moncourt. No. 

Mr. Armstrong. And has Mr. Rebozo ever acted as a cosignator or 
guarantor in any business or financial transaction ? 

Ms. Moncourt. No, not to my knowledge. 

Mr. Armstrong. From Mr. Danner? 

Ms. Moncourt. No. 



10496 

Mr. Armstrong. And has Mr. Danner ever acted as a cosignator or 
guarantor in any business or financial transaction for Mr. Rebozo ? 

Ms. MoNcouRT. Not to my knowledge, no. 

Mr. Arivistrong. And has Mr. Rebozo ever provided any collateral 
or security for any business or financial transactions with Mr. Danner ? 

Ms. MoNcouRT. Not that I know of. 

Mr. Armstrong. Has Mr. Danner provided any collateral or secur- 
ity for any business or financial transaction for Mr. Rebozo? 

Ms. MoNcouRT. Not to my knowledge. 

Mr. Armstrong. Has Mr. Rebozo ever acted as the agent, repre- 
sentative, or designee, in any business or financial transaction for Mr. 
Danner ? 

Ms. Moncourt. Not since I have been here. 

Mr. Armstrong. Are you aware of any instance, prior to when you 
knew him, when he did ? 

Ms. MONCOTJRT. No. 

Mr. Armstrong. Has Mr. Danner ever acted as the agent, repre- 
sentative, or designee of Mr. Rebozo in any business or financial trans- 
action ? 

Ms. Moncourt. Not to my knowledge. 

Mr. Armstrong. Has Mr. Rebozo ever sold or exchanged any real or 
personal property to or with Mr. Danner ? 

Ms. Moncourt. Not to my knowledge. 

Mr. Armstrong. And has Mr. Danner sold any real or personal 
property to Mr. Rebozo ? 

Ms. Moncourt. Not to my knowledge. 

Mr. Armstrong. Has Mr. Rebozo made any gifts to Mr. Danner 
valued in excess of $100 ? 

Ms. Moncourt. Not my knowledge. 

Mr. Armstrong. And has Mr. Danner made any gifts valued in 
excess of $100 to Mr. Rebozo ? 

Ms. Moncourt. Not to my knowledge. 

Mr. Armstrong. Are you aware of any instance when Mr. Rebozo 
has paid any bills on behalf of Mr. Danner ? 

Ms. Moncourt. Not to my knowledge, no. 

Mr. Armstrong. Or where Mr. Danner has paid bills on behalf of 
Mr. Rebozo ? 

Ms. Moncourt. No. 

Mr. Armstrong. Has Mr. Rebozo ever furnished Mr. Danner with 
any quantity of cash totaling over $500 ? 

Ms. Moncourt. Not to my knowledge. 

Mr. Armstrong. And has Mr. Danner ever provided Mr. Rebozo 
with any quantity of cash in excess of $500 ? 

Ms. Moncourt. Except in that one instance. 

Mr. Armstrong. Except the instance ? 

Ms. Moncourt. That $1,000 exchange. 

Mr. Armstrong. And do you have any personal knowledge of the 
$100,000 contribution? 

Ms. Moncourt. No. I knew nothing about that. 

Mr. Armstrong. But there's no other instance you are aware of, 
that Mr. Rebozo was provided with any quantity of cash by Mr. 
Danner ? 



10497 

Ms. MoNcoTjRT. No. 

Mr. Armstrong. And has Mr. Kebozo ever cashed a check in ex- 
cess of $500 for Mr. Danner ? 

Ms. MoNcouRT. Not to my knowledge. 

Mr. Arivistrong. And has Mr. Danner ever cashed a check that you 
are aware of for Mr. Rebozo ? 

Ms. MONCOURT. No. 

Mr. Armstrong. Has Mr. Rebozo had any financial or business 
transactions with Mr. Abplanalp or Mr. Griffin since January 1, 1969 ? 

Ms. MoNcouRT. B. & C. Investment Co. 

Mr. Armstrong. Any others? 

Ms. Moncourt. There is one lot that they own together on Crandon 
Boulevard. 

Mr. Armstrong. This is Mr. Abplanalp and Mr. Rebozo? Any other 
instances ? 

Ms. Moncourt. No. 

Mr. Armstrong. Has Mr. Rebozo ever borrowed money from either 
Mr. Abplanalp or Mr. Griffin? 

Ms. Moncourt. Not that I know of . 

Mr. Armstrong. Or for any corporation or bank which Mr. Griffin 
or Mr. Abplanalp had an interest ? 

Ms. Moncourt. Hudson Valley Bank, two notes, one of $200,000 
and one of $25,000. 

Mr. Armstrong. Now, was that a loan from the Hudson Valley 
Bank to Mr. Rebozo ? 

Ms. Moncourt. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Armstrong. Are you aware of any loans of Mr. Rebozo where 
Mr. Rebozo borrowed money from Precision Valve Corp. ? 

Ms. Moncourt. No. 

Mr. Armstrong. Can you identify that check ? 

Ms. Moncourt. No, I have never seen that check. 

Mr. Lenzner. You'd better have that marked as an exhibit. 

Mr. Armstrong. Exhibit 1 today is a check from Precision Valve 
Corp., Yonkers, N.Y., for $225,000 to the Florida National Bank, Mi- 
ami, Fla., credit account Key Biscayne Bank, Charles G. Rebozo, dated 
November 27, 1972, No. 45189. 

[The document referred to was marked Moncourt exhibit No. 1, 
for identification.*] 

Mr. Armstrong. Can you tell us the purpose of the loan that took 
place in November 1972 ? 

Ms. Moncourt. I can't 

Mr. Greer. Which loan are you talking about? 

Mr. Armstrong. I'm talking about the loan from Mr. Abplanalp to 
Mr. Rebozo. 

Mr. Greer. We're talking about the loan from the Hudson Valley 
Bank. 

Mr. Armstrong. Excuse me. From the Hudson Valley Bank to Mr. 
Rebozo. 

Ms. Moncourt. I don't recall. 

Mr. Armstrong. Do you recall any other loan in the same amount, 
$225,000? 



►See p. 10538. 



10498 

Ms. MoNCOURT. Yes. You know, the way Mr. Rebozo borrows money 
occasionally to exercise preemptive rights or to buy bank stock or to 
buy a piece of property; so it's hard to recall which time. 

Mr. Armstrong. Is there any other transaction of $225,000 ? 

Ms. MoNCOURT. There has been loans of $225,000. 

Mr. Armstrong. Do you recall one from the Palmetto Bank & 
Trust Co.? 

Ms. MoNcouRT. Yes. There was one from the Palmetto Bank & 
Trust. 

Mr. Armstrong. Can you tell us when that would have been ? 

Ms. Moncourt. Right offhand I don't recall. Probably 1972, maybe. 

Mr. Armstrong. Have you had an opportunity to check that? I 
believe on the last occasion we spoke, you indicated you thought it 
happened in April 1973. 

Ms. MoNcouRT. Yes. I think it was in April of 1972. 

Mr. Armstrong. 1972 or 1973? 

Ms. Moncourt. 1972. 1 couldn't swear to it. 

Mr. Armstrong. Can you tell us the purpose of that loan ? 

Ms. Moncourt. Well, that is usually the time at which the bank 
stock — the preemptive rights are exercised. 

Mr. Armstrong, So that would be a loan to allow Mr. Rebozo to 
acquire more stock in Key Biscayne Bank & Trust Co. ? 

Ms. Moncourt. Right. 

Mr. Armstrong. And are there any other $225,000 loans you are 
familiar with that you recall ? 

Ms. Moncourt. Not that I remember, no. 

Mr. Armstrong. Has Mr. Abplanalp or Mr. Griffin ever borrowed 
money from Mr. Rebozo ? 

Ms. Moncourt. Not to my knowledge. 

Mr. Armstrong. And has Mr. Rebozo ever acted as cosignator or 
guarantor in any business or financial transaction ? 

Ms. Moncourt. Not to my knowledge. 

Mr. Armstrong. Of Mr. Abplanalp and Mr. Griifin ? 

Ms. Moncourt. Not to my knowledge. 

Mr. Armstrong. Has Mr. Abplanalp or Mr. Griffin ever acted as 
cosignator or guarantor in any business or financial transaction for 
Mr. Rebozo ? 

Ms. Moncourt. Not that I know of. 

Mr. Armstrong. Either in their capacity individually or as officers 
of Precision Valve Corp. or some other corporation ? 

Ms. Moncourt. Not to my knowledge. 

Mr. Armstrong. And has Mr. Rebozo ever provided collateral or 
security for any business or financial transaction with Mr. Abplanalp 
or Mr. Griffin ? 

Ms. Moncourt. Not to my knowledge, no. 

Mr. Armstrong. Have they ever provided Mr. Griffin and Mr. 
Abplanalp — ever provided any collateral or security for any business 
or financial transaction for Mr. Rebozo ? 

Ms. Moncourt. Not to my knowledge. 

Mr. Armstrong. And has Mr. Rebozo ever acted as the agent, rep- 
resentative, or designee, for Mr. Griffin or Mr. Abplanalp in any busi- 
ness or financial transaction ? 



10499 

Ms. MoNCouRT. Not to my knowledge. 

Mr. Armstroxg. Has he ever purchased property on their behalf ? 
Ms. MoNcouRT. Not to my knowledge. 

Mr. Armstrong. And have they ever acted as his agent, representa- 
tive, or designee, in any business or financial transaction 2 

Ms. MoNCOURT. No. 

Mr. Armsrtong. Now, Mr. Griffin does represent Mr. Rebozo in the 
B. & C. Investment Corp., is that correct ? 

Ms. MoNcouRT. Yes, he represents him in B. & C. 

Mr. Armstrong. Does Mr. Griffin represent Mr. Rebozo in any other 
matters, to your knowledge ? 

Ms. MoNcouRT. No, not to my knowledge. 

Mr. Armstrong. Has Mr. Rebozo sold or exchanged any real or 
personal property to or with Mr. Abplanalp and Mr. Griffin — or Mr. 
Griffin? 

Ms. Moncourt. Not since I have been working. 

Mr. Armstrong. And prior to that time, are you aware of any ? 

Ms. MoNcouRT. I wouldn't have any knowledge. 

Mr. Armstrong. Has Mr. Abplanalp and Mr. Griffin sold or 
exchanged any real or pereonal property with Mr. Rebozo ? 

Ms. MoNCouRT. Not to my knowledge. 

Mr. Armstrong. Has Mr. Rebozo made any gifts to Mr. Abplanalp 
or Mr. Griffin valued in excess of $100, that you are aware ? 

Ms. MoNcouRT. No, sir. 

Mr. Armstrong. And has Mr. Griffin or Mr. Abplanalp or any cor- 
poration or bank with which they are affiliated, given any gifts to Mr. 
Rebozo valued in excess of $100 ? 

Ms. MoNCouRT. No, not that I know of. 

Mr. Armstrong. Has Mr. Rebozo ever provided any quantity of 
cash totaling over $500 to Mr. Abplanalp or Mr. Griffin ? 

Ms. Moncourt. Not to my knowledge. 

Mr. Armstrong. And have they ever provided Mr. Rebozo any quan- 
tity of cash totaling over $500 ? 

Ms. Moncourt. Not to my knowledge. 

Mr. Armstrong. To Mr. Rebozo. And have Mr. Abplanalp or Mr. 
Griffin ever cashed a check in excess of $500 for Mr. Rebozo ? 

Ms. Moncourt. Not to my knowledge. 

Mr. Armstrong. And has Mr. Rebozo ever cashed a check for Mr. 
Abplanalp or Mr. Griffin valued in excess of $500 

Ms. Moncourt. Not to my knowledge. 

Mr. Armstrong. Are you aware of any business or financial connec- 
tions between Mr. Rebozo and Mr. Edward Nixon ? 

Ms. Moncourt. No. 

Mr. Armstrong. And has Mr. Rebozo ever provided Mr. Edward 
Nixon with any quantity of cash ? 

Ms. Moncourt. No. 

Mr. Armstrong. Has Mr. Rebozo ever asked you to gather or to take 
part in the gathering of any quantity of cash ? 

Ms. Moncourt. No. 

Mr. Armstrong. For him. Has he ever asked you to cash any large 
checks for cash ? 

Ms. Moncourt. No. 



10500 

Mr. Armstrong. Do you have power of signature for Mr. Rebozo 
in any bank accounts ? 

Ms. MoNcouRT. No, I do not. 

Mr. Armstrong. Are you the cosignator on any 

Ms. MoN(x>URT. I am cosignature on one company, Biscayne Insur- 
ance Agency. 

Mr. Armstrong. The Biscayne Insurance Agency? 

Ms. MoNcouRT. Yes. 

Mr. Armstrong. You are oosignature with Mr. Rebozo ? 

Ms. MoNcouRT. No. I am cosignature with Mr. Harrison. 

Mr. Armstrong. Does Mr. Rebozo have any interest in the Biscayne 
Insurance Co. ? 

Ms. MoNcouRT. Yes. It is a commission basis we send to an insurance 
agency. 

Mr. Armstrong. Does Mr. Rebozo own the agency or any portion of 
the agency ? 

Ms. MoNcouRT. Not that I know of. I know that we get a commis- 
sion ; books are set up for these commissions. And Mr. Warren Davis 
keeps those books. It's either a partnership or 

Mr. Armstrong. I'm sorry. Mr. Rebozo is a partner ? 

Ms. MoNcoTJRT. As far as getting commission ; yes. 

Mr. Armstrong. And receives a commission from the Biscayne 
Insurance Co. ? 

Ms. Moncourt. Yes. 

Mr. Armstrong. And Mr. Harrison is the president of the company ? 

Ms. Moncourt. Yes. I believe so. I wouldn't swear to it. 

Mr. Armstrong. And Mr. Harrison's first name is ? 

Ms. Moncourt. It begins with "R". I don^ remember. I'm sorry. 

Mr. Armstrong. Is the business located in Key Biscayne ? 

Ms, Moncourt. No ; it is not in Key Biscayne. 

Mr. Armstrong. Can you tell us where it is located ? 

Ms. Moncourt. Mr. Warren Davis handles those books. 

Mr. Armstrong. You don't know the location of the company ? 

Ms. Moncourt. I am sorry. I am drawing a blank. I have the letter- 
head in front of me and I can't read it. 

Mr. Armstrong. Could it be provided at a later time ? 

Mr. Greer. [Nods in the affirmative.] 

Mr. Armstrong. Now, has Mr. Rebozo asked you to act as his agent, 
representative, or designee, in any business or financial transactions? 

Ms. Moncourt. No. 

Senator Baker. Scott, I think if we're coming back at 1, we'd better 
quit. We'll adjourn now until 1. 

[Whereupon, the hearing in the above-entitled matter was recessed 
at 12 :20 p.m., to be reconvened the same day at 1 p.m.] 

Afternoon Session 

Mr. Greer. For the record, it appears that the Senator — I under- 
stand Senator Ervin who was scheduled to be here has been delayed 
by proceedings on the Senate floor. We are agreeable to going ahead 
with the questioning, preserving all objections to be ruled on by which- 
ever Senator shall arrive at a later time, assuming that the question 
does not become totally objectionable. If that should happen, we shall 



10501 

simply stop the proceedings and await the arrival of a Senator. But, 
I am sure it won't. 

Mr. Armstrong. OK. Ms. Moncourt, since the last time we spoke, 
you have had undoubtedly an opportunity to reflect on the testimony 
provided to us at that time. Is there anything you would like to add to 
what you've told us previously, or is there anything you would like to 
clarify ? 

Ms. MoNCOURT. Not anything that I could think of. 

Mr. Greer. Let me object to that question in that Ms. Moncourt has 
never previously given testimony. She has been interviewed by rnem- 
bers of the majority staff and has answered some of their questions, 
but has never given testimony of any nature. 

Mr. Armstrong. There is nothing that you would like to add or 
clarify ? 

Ms. Moncourt. [Nods in the negative.] 

Mr. Schtjltz. Scott, I might like to add at this point, has Ms. Mon- 
court been provided with a summary of the statements that she made ? 
I think it was earlier mentioned that Mike Hershman had offered to 
furnish such a copy. When you're asking whether she wants to clarify 
something, she may not know what it is you wrote down or whatever 
it is. 

Mr. Greer. The answer is that Ms. ]\Ioncourt has not been provided 
with any resume of any interviews. Thank you for the clarification. 

Mr. Armstrong. All right. We will use the questions to clarify the 
points. 

Ms. Moncourt, to your knowledge has anyone ever acted as 
Mr. Rebozo's agent, representative, or designee, in any business or 
financial transactions? 

Ms. Moncourt. No. 

Mr. Greer. Other than the situations which she has already.testified 
to. 

[Senator Ervin enters the room.] 

Mr. Greer. We had — not knowing how long you were going to be. 
Senator, I agreed to go ahead with the testimony. 

Senator Ervin [presiding] . That is all right. 

Mr. Armstrong. Ms. Moncouit, are you aware of any safety deposit 
boxes which Mr. Rebozo maintains ? 

Ms. Moncourt. Yes. 

Mr. Armstrong. And can you tell us which safety deposit boxes 
those are? 

Ms. Moncourt. The number you mean ? 

Mr. Armstrong. Yes. 

Ms. Moncourt. I know there are a 224, 225, 222, I believe. 

Mr. Armstrong. And can you tell us the purpose of each of those 
boxes, for what purpose they are maintained ? 

Ms. Moncourt. He keeps personal papers in them and stocks. 

Mr. Armstrong. Are there any other boxes besides those three? 

Ms. Moncourt. Not that I recall, no. 

Mr. Armstrong. Now, the box — are you familiar with the cosigna- 
tures of the boxes, who the cosigners are ? 

Ms. Moncourt. On one of them — I couldn't tell you which one; 
I don't know exactly — it is he and his sister, Caroline Rebozo, and one 



10502 

of them he is the only cosigner; and one of them he is cosigner with 
Mr. Wakefield. 

Mr. Aemstrong, I'm sorry. The second one is who? 

Ms. MoNcouRT. On the second one ? On one of them he is the only 
signer. 

Mr, Armstrong. And do you know what he keeps in the box in 
which he is the only signer ? 

Ms. MoNcouRT. No ; I do not. 

Mr. Armstrong. Have you ever had access to any of those boxes? 

Ms. MoNcouRT. No, sir. 

Mr. Armstrong. Are you aware of a box 633 ? That is a box that 
we showed 

Ms. MoNcouRT. Yes ; there was a box 633. 

Mr. Armstrong. OK. We show that a box which Mr. Kebozo is the 
cosigner with his sister, Caroline. 

Ms. MoNGOuRT. Yes. 

Mr. Armstrong. And that was opened on the date that box 225 was 
closed. 

Ms. MoNcouRT. That's right. 

Mr. Armstrong. Do you have any knowledge as to why box 225 
was closed ? 

Ms. MoNcouRT. No ; 225 actually is not Mr. Kebozo's, his personal. 
It is Key Biscayne Bank. 

Mr. Armstrong. Well, I believe, just so the record is correct, you 
are talking about the director's box ? 

Ms. MoNCOURT. Yes ; I think so. 

Mr. Armstrong. We show that as box 222 from the records provided 
us. 

Ms. MoNcouRT. Well, that may be. I don't recall. 

Mr. Armstrong. But you've never had access to any of those boxes 
yourself ? 

Ms. MoNCOURT. No. 

Mr. Armstrong. And you've never seen the contents of any of 
those boxes ? 

Ms. MoNcouRT. One of those — I was helping Mr. Rebozo make an 
inventory of the stocks that he was holding. 

Mr. Armstrong. And which box was that ? 

Ms. MoNcouRT. I don't recall the number of the box. 

Mr. Armstrong. Do you recall if it was one to which there was a 
cosignator ? 

Ms. MoNCOTJRT. No ; I do not recall. 

Mr. Armstrong. Do you recall approximately when that was? 

Ms. MoNcouRT. Sometime last year, but I couldn't pinpoint the date. 

Mr. Armstrong. Do you recall if there were any other contents other 
than stocks ? 

Ms. MoNCOURT. No. 

Mr. Armstrong. Do you recall the size of the box ? 

Ms. MoNcouRT. It was a vei-y good-sized box. 

Mr. Armstrong. By "good sized," could you give us an indication? 

Ms. MoNGOURT. I don't know [indicating]. 

Mr. Armstrong. Is that the depth of the box ? 

Mr. Greer. You're estimating depth or width ? 



10503 

Ms. MoNCOTJRT. Depth. 

Mr. Greer. Are you saying about 18 inches ? 

Ms. MoNcouRT. Yes ; 18 inches is what [motioning] , about this. 

Mr. Arimstrong. What would the front dimensions be, the height 
and width, do you recall ? 

Ms. MoNcouRT. I'm not very good at American dimensions, but the; 
front of the box would be about that size [indicating]. 

Mr. Armstrong. Well, I'm sorry. When you say that size, you are 
indicating ? 

Ms. MoNcouRT. The width, you know, facing. 

Mr. Armstrong. About 4 inches, this width ? 

Ms. MoNcouRT. No; about this long [indicating]. 

Mr. Armstrong. About? inches? 

Ms. MoNcouRT. Yes ; about 7 to 10 inches. 

Mr. Armstrong. Thank you. Do you know if you signed the access 
card on the occasion you went to that box ? 

Ms. Moncotjrt. On that occasion, I do not know whether I signed 
the access card or not. 

Mr. Armstrong. And did there appear to be any envelopes other 
than stock in there, anything that was 

Ms. Moncotjrt. Not that I saw. 

Mr. Armstrong. And was the box emptied out? Did you see the 
complete contents of the box ? 

Ms. MoNCOuRT. No ; I did not see the complete contents of that box. 

Mr. Armstrong. Did you inventory the stocks in the vault or in 
some other location ? 

Ms. MoNcouRT. I went in the vault with Mr. Eebozo, and we took 
the envelopes in which the stocks were and inventoried it out in his 
office. 

Mr. Armstrong. So the only thing that was removed from the box 
were envelopes containing stock certificates ? 

Ms. MoNcouRT. And the manila envelopes in which I had, myself, 
put in those stocks. 

Mr. Armstrong. And that is the only occasion in which you entered 
the box or saw the contents of the box ? 

Ms. MoNcouRT. Yes. 

Mr. Armstrong. Now, can you describe the envelopes to us that 
the stocks were contained in ? 

Ms. Moncotjrt. In just plain manila-type envelopes with clasps. 

Mr. Armstrong. Are these bearer stocks, or how were these stocks 
made out? 

Ms. MoNcouRT. The stocks are in Mrs. Anita Reynolds' name. 

Mr. Armstrong. And were there any instinictions on the stocks on 
the envelope ? 

Ms. Moncourt. No. 

Mr. Armstrong. And you don't know that anyone else had access 
to this box or not ? 

Ms. Moncourt. No. 

Mr. Armstrong. Now, just prior to our break for lunch you testified 
that you recalled a loan for $225,000 in, you believe, it was April of 
1972, from the Palmetto Bank & Trust Co., is that correct? 

Ms. Moncourt. Yes. 



10504 

Mr. Armstrong. Is Palmetto Bank & Trust Co., is that in Miami or 
the Miami area? 

Ms. MoNCouRT. No ; it is outside of the Miami area. It is in Palmetto, 
Fla. 

Mr. Armstrong. That is a town in Florida ? 

Ms. MoNcouRT. Yes. 

Mr. Armstrong. Has IVIr. Rebozo had any other business or financial 
transactions with the Palmetto Bank & Trust Co. ? 

Ms, MoNcouRT. Not to my knowledge ; no. 

Mr. Armstrong. Does he maintain an account there ? 

Ms. MoNCOURT. No. 

Mr. Armstrong. Do you know, is there any individual that Mr. Re- 
bozo deals with principally at that bank ? 

Ms. Moncourt. I am trying to recall the name of the president of 
the bank. I forget his name. I have spoken to him a couple of times, 
but I forget his name. 

Mr. Armstrong. Are you aware of who has a controlling interest in 
that bank? 

Ms. Moncourt. I do not know. 

Mr. Armstrong. Now, just to refer back briefly to the $225,000 loan 
from the Hudson Valley National Bank, in order to refresh your 
recollection, do you recall if that might have been for the purpose of 
purchasing property for Mr. Abplanalp ? 

Ms. Moncourt. No; I don't think so. I think it was preemptive 
rights. 

Mr. Armstrong. For the bank stock ? 

Ms. Moncourt. Either for Fishers Island or for the bank stock. 
I don't recall. 

Mr. Armstrong. And do you recall what happened to the proceeds 
of that loan ? 

Ms. Moncourt. Well, the proceeds would have gone to either Fishers 
Island or the Key Biscayne Bank. 

Mr. Armstrong. Would they have gone into Mr. Rebozo's personal 
accoimt first ? 

Ms. Moncourt. Yes ; it would go to his account and be transferred 
to the bank in payments for the stocks, or else it might have been that 
the cashiers would take it directly and give credit to the bank. 

Mr. Armstrong. Excuse me, give credit to the bank ? 

Ms. Moncourt. Yes. 

Mr. Armstrong. I'm afraid I don't follow. 

Ms. Moncourt. Well, if money is borrowed from one bank to an- 
other, it may not go through his account. It may go directly to the 
bank, to the bank's credit. 

Mr. Armstrong. This would be in the case, if it were preemptive 
rights for bank stocks ? 

Ms. Moncourt. It has happened that it wouldn't pass through his 
account. It would go directly to the bank. 

Mr, Armstrong. Do you recall if at approximately the same time 
that this $225,000 loan, or these two loans, one for $200,000 and one for 
$25,000 came through from the Hudson Valley Bank, do you recall 
if there was any other transaction with the Hudson Valley Bank for 
$225,000? 



10505 

Ms. MoNcouRT. Not to my knowledge. 

Mr. Armstrong. Do you recall an instance in which Mr. Rebozo 
returned $225,000 within a very short time later to the Hudson Valley 
National Bank ? 

Ms. MoNCOURT. No. 

Mr. Armstrong. Now, has Mr. Rebozo received any loans, to your 
knowledge, in order to assist him in making payments with the B. & C. 
Investment Co. ? 

Ms. MoNCouRT. He may well liave, I don't recall. 

Mr. Armstrong. Do you know if he ever used his interest in the 
B. & C. Investment Co. as collateral and security for any business or 
financial transaction? 

Ms. MoNCOURT. No. 

Mr. Armstrong. Do you know if Mr. Rebozo has ever used cash as 
collateral for a loan ? 

Ms. MoNCouRT. No; he never has. He uses stocks and bonds. 

Mr. Armstrong. Has he ever used property ? 

Ms. MoNcouRT. For mortgage loans ; yes. 

Mr. Armstrong. But independently of mortgages, he's never used 
property as collateral for any loan ? 

Ms. MoNCOURT. No. 

Mr. Armstrong. And has he ever used any other personal property ? 

Ms. MoNCouRT. Only mortgage loans. 

Mr. Armstrong. Now, can you describe for us the location of Mr. 
Robozo's bank accounts that he maintains ? 

Ms. MoNCOTJRT. The location of his bank accounts? 

Mr. Armstrong. AVhat banks, and if you can, the number or titles 
of his accounts. 

Ms. MoNCOURT. He has an account at the Key Biscay ne Bank, of 
course. 

Mr. Armstrong. That is in his name ? 

Ms. MoNcouRT. Yes ; all of the accounts are in his name. One at Man- 
ufacturers Hanover. 

Mr. Armstrong. Yes. 

Ms. Moncourt. And there was one at First National Bank of 
Miami — Savings — but that is closed. 

Mr. Armstrong. And during what period was that open ? 

Ms. Moncourt. Miami Springs? 

Mr. Armstrong. Yes. 

Ms. MoNcx)iiRT. 1971-72. 

Mr. Armstrong. Any others ? 

Ms. Moncourt. No ; there are a couple of savings accounts. 

Mr. Armstrong. Can you tell us where those are ? 

Ms. Moncourt. There is one at the Key Biscayne Bank. 

Mr. Armstrong. Yes. 

Ms. Moncourt. And there is one in Key West. 

Mr. Armstrong. What bank would that be in ? 

Ms. Moncourt. That is in the First Federal Savings & Loan of 
Key West. 

Mr. Armstrong. And those are both still open? 

Ms. Moncourt. Yes. 

Mr. Armstrong. And all of these accounts are in Mr. Rebozo s 
name? 



10506 

Ms. MoNcouRT. No ; the one in Key West was Monroe Land Title 
Co. 

Mr. Armstrong. Are you aware of any other accounts in which 
Mr. Rebozo is a signator? Well, I would assume he is a signator at the 
Key Bisoayne & Trust account ? 

Ms. MoNCouRT. I don't know whether he is or not. He is a signator 
on Fishers Island and his own personal businesses. 

Mr. Armstrong. The corporations in which he is an officer? 

Ms. MoNCOURT. I beg your pardon ? 

Mr. Armstrong. You mean the corporations in which Mr. Eebozo 
is an officer ? 

Ms. Moncourt. Yes. 

Mr. Armstrong. And does he have any other accounts in which he 
is a signator or cosignator in the name of anyone else ? 

Ms. Moncourt. No. 

Mr. Armstrong. Does he have an account, the Thomas H. Wake- 
field special account ? 

Ms. Moncourt. There was one, but I don't know whether he was a 
signature on that. I think he was. 

Mr. Armstrong. OK. On the last occasion we spoke, you indicated 
to us that the money in the Thomas H. Wakefield special account was 
for Mr. Rebozo's, his personal funds which had reimbursed him for 
campaigix expenditures he had made. 

Ms. Moncourt. Yes ; I explained to you that I found the account. I 
didn't even know it was there. 

Mr. Armstrong. Can you tell us how you learned that they were 
for personal expenditures ? 

Ms. Moncourt. When I found the account, I asked him what it 
was, and he told me that it was money that was due to him from the 
1968 campaign. 

Senator Ervin. May I ask a question ? You were his secretary ? 

Ms. Moncourt. I am his bookkeeper. 

Senator Ervin. His bookkeeper? Didn't you keep records, his per- 
sonal records? 

Ms. Moncourt. Yes, sir. 

Senator Ervin. Did you keep personal records of his disburse- 
ments ? 

Ms. Moncourt. Yes, sir. 

Senator Ervin. Well, you said something about finding his account. 

Ms. Moncourt. Well, the thing is, that account was an inactive 
account, and what happened is that I started to work for Mr. Rebozo 
in 1970, and in 1972 I had been ill with the flu, and when I came ba«k 
to work there were 12 checks missing from Mr. Rebozo's personal ac- 
count. And I then took an inventory of all of the checkbooks that I 
had in my charge, and that is when I found that particular one, be- 
cause I had never had occasion to use it. 

Senator Ervin. What was the total of those 12 checks ? 

Ms. Moncourt. The total ? 

Senator Ervin. Yes. 

Ms. Moncourt. No. 

Senator Ervin. Blank checks? 

Ms. Moncourt. They were blank checks that were missing. 



10507 

Senator Ervin. That was in 1972 ? 

Ms. MoNCoxjRT. Yes, sir. 

Senator Ervin. And he told you they were for 

Ms. MoNCouRT. No; the 12 checks were from his own personal 
account. 

Senator Ervin. 'And he told you they were campaign f imds ? 

Ms. MoNCOURT. No ; that is not the same account. 

Senator Ervin. Oh, I didn't understand you. 

Mr. Armstrong. What you were explaining was that on the oc- 
casion when you discovered the 12 checks were missing, you also dis- 
covered he had another checkbook you hadn't realized previously, but 
the checks were not taken from that checkbook ? 

Ms. Moncourt. No. 

Mr. Armstrong. And were those 12 checks cashed ? 

Ms. Moncourt. No ; I put a "stop payment" on them immediately, 
and I advised Mr. Rebozo that the 12 checks were missing. 

Mr. Lenzner. Did they ever turn up ? 

Ms. Moncourt. They never did turn up. We never found out whether 
there was a printer's error or whether somebody stole the checks and 
never used them. We don't know. He did call the FBI to have the 
preceding and following checks fingerprinted to see if we could find 
out who had taken them, but we never did find out. 

Mr. Armstrong. Do you know who he spoke with at the FBI ? 

Ms. Moncourt. Mr. Whitaker, I think. ]\Ir. Martin came in, I think, 
and wanted to have my fingerprints also to exclude them, because my 
fingerprints would be on these checkbooks of course. 

Mr. Armstrong. Did Mr. Whitaker also come to the bank ? 

Ms. Moncourt. I don't recall whether Mr. Whitaker came in or 
not. I think it was Mr. Martin. 

Mr. Armstrong. Did you have any other discussions with the FBI, 
other than on one occasion ? 

Ms. Moncourt. No ; other than on those missing checks. 

Mr. Armstrong. Were you aware of any report that they made about 
the missing checks ? 

Ms. Moncourt. No. 

Mr. Armstrong. Well, when did you first become aware that the 
12 checks were missing ? 

Ms. Moncourt. I had been laid up with the flu for 2 weeks — ^it was 
in February of 1972 — and I started writing checks out of Mr. Rebozo's 
checkbook, and then when I flipped the stub page, I noted that the 
numbers were not in sequence, and so I went back and looked and 
there were 12 numbers missing. 

Mr. Armstrong. And did you ask Mr. Rebozo if anyone else had 
access to the checkbook ? 

Ms. Moncourt. Yes ; I did ask him, and no one but his sister would 
have had access to the checkbooks because — she took over when I was 
ill, he called her so that I wouldn't get too far behind in my job. 

Mr. Armstrong. And did Mr. Rebozo indicate that no one had any 
reason to be into the checkbook ? 

Ms. Moncourt. He was absolutely flabbergasted. He asked me what 
I had done about it, and I told him I had put a stop payment on the 
checks, and I called the printers, and that's it. 



10508 

Mr. Armstroxg. When you went to work for Mr. Rebozo in April of 
1970, at that time did he turn over all of his books and records and 
accounts and the checkbooks to you ? 

Ms. MoNcouRT. Yes ; most of them. 

Mr. Armstrong. So that at that time they turned over the Thomas H. 
Wakefield special account ? 

Ms. MoNcouRT. Yes ; it was in my cabinet. 

Mr. Armstrong. And do you recall when you first raised with Mr. 
Rebozo the question of what the account was for ? 

Ms. IMoNcouRT. Well, the first time I raised the question was be- 
cause of the stolen checks, you know. 

Mr. Armstrong. When you first received it, you never raised the 
question ? 

Ms. Moncourt. No, because I hadn't gone through everything and 
because it was an inactive account, I had never had any occasion to 
handle it. 

Mr. Armstrong. And did Mr. Reibozo indicate why he had an ac- 
count in that name when you asked him that question ? 

Ms. Moncourt. I did not ask him. He just said that he had forgotten 
that it was there. 

Mr. Armstrong. So other than Mr. Rebozo telling you that the 
money was his personal money, you have no independent knowledge 
of that, is that correct ? You have no records or anything to indicate — 
you have no receipts of reimbursements ? 

Ms. Moncourt. No ; no. 

Mr. Lenzner. If I could just get one thing clear for the record, Ms. 
Moncourt. Wlien you looked at the checkbook, did you find that there 
were 12 checks physically missing out of the book? I didn't under- 
stand that. 

Ms. Moncourt. This checkbook, his personal checkbook, you know, 
his own, like yours or mine for instance, is in a three-ring binder, and 
you have three checks per page with stubs on the left, you know. So 
when I flipped over to write the next check, I found that the se- 
quence — there was a gap in the sequence. 

Mr. Lenzner. Well, what I am asking : Was there a stub for the check 
on the left? 

Ms. Moncourt. No ; there were no stubs. The whole thing was miss- 
ing ; stubs and checks. 

Mr. Lenzner. So there was just a physical gap, but there was no 
paper for about 12 checks ? 

Ms. Moncourt. Right. 

Mr. Lenzner. And you have no recollection of ever receiving checks 
coming in with those numbers ? 

Ms. Moncourt. They have never come through. 

Mr. Lenzner. Thank you. 

Mr. Armstrong. Now, have you had any conversations, or partici- 
pated in any conversations, or heard any conversations relating to how 
the large bills, the $100 bills, how there point of origin in time of orig- 
inal issue could be placed ? Have you had any conversations ? 

Ms. Moncourt. No. 

Mr. Armstrong. Have you ever heard any conversations at the 
bank? 

Ms. Moncourt. No. 



10509 

Mr. Armstrong. Where, how, from serial numbers, bills can be trans- 
ferred, any conversations ? 

Ms. MONCOURT. No. 

Mr. Armstrong. Have you ever had any conversations ? 

Ms. MONCOTJRT. No. 

Mr. Armstrong. Have you ever heard any and have you ever had 
any conversations with anyone at the Federal Reserve bank ? • 

Ms. MoNCOTJRT. No. 

Mr. Armstrong. Are you aware of anyone at the bank who has ? 

Ms. MoNCOURT. I should assume the cashier of the bank. 

Mr. Armstrong. That would be Mr. Sullivan ? 

Ms. MoNCOURT. That would be Mr. Tucker. 

Mr. Armstrong. Mr. Tucker? Can you tell us — ^you said you keep 
Mr. Rebozo's personal records and that includes his personal financial 
records ? 

Ms. MoNCOuRT. Yes. 

Mr. Armstrong. Is that correct ? 

Ms. MoNcouRT. Yes. 

Mr. Armstrong. And would that include his receipts for all bills 
that he receives and so forth ? 

Ms. MoNCOTiRT. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Armstrong. And that would include charge receipts as well as 
cash receipts he would receive ? 

Ms. MoNCouRT. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Armstrong. And Mr. Rebozo, does he regularly give you the 
receipts when he takes a trip ? 

Ms. Moncourt. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Armstrong. The airfare and so forth ? 

Ms. Moncourt. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Armstrong. And how do you keep and report any receipts from 
his different business trips or personal trips ? 

Ms. Moncourt. Well, what do you mean ? 

Mr. Armstrong. Well, what records do you keep of those, beyond 
when you first receive the receipt of the trip ? In other words, do you 
make any other entry from that to a set of books ? 

Ms. Moncourt. No; I just — I don't keep a set of books on Mr. 
Rebozo. I just turn his checkbooks over to the accountant every year. 
And I just record on the stub what I am paying, you know. 

Mr. Armstrong. And how do you differentiate between business 
and personal expenditure Mr. Rebozo perhaps made from cash on 
hand? 

Ms. Moncourt. Well, generally, he will tell me, you know, if it is a 
business expenditure or if it is personal. 

Mr. Armstrong. And this would include receipts for meetings where 
he would come to Washington from San Clemente to meet with the 
President ? 

Ms. Moncourt. Yes. 

Mr. Armstrong. Are they usually recorded as business or personal 
expenditures ? 

Ms. Moncourt. They are personal. 

Mr. Armstrong. OK, do you recall any instances where he did not 
keep the receipts from those trips ? 



31-889 O - 74 - pt.22 - 21 



1051Q 

Ms. MoNcouRT. Sometimes he gets his own ticket and will fail to give 
me a receipt or a copy of the airline ticket, you know, and I usually 
have to call the airline and get the ticket number, see what time he 
went, what I am paying for actually. 

Mr. Armstrong. But, do you always get that information in order 
to verify it? 

Ms. MoNcouRT. I usually can verify it ; yes. 

Mr. Armstrong. Do you recall any instances in which there was 
any expenditure you could not verify, relating to a trip such as that ? 

Ms. MoNCOURT. No. 

Mr. Armstrong. This morning we discussed names which Mr. 
Rebozo used for business or personal reasons. Are there any other 
names besides the three; he sometimes used your name, sometimes 
Mr. Reynolds' name, and also Charles Gregory. Now, were there 
any other names ? 

Ms. MoNCOURT. No. 

Mr. Armstrong. Do you recall if he ever used Richard Rebozo ? 

Ms. MONCOTJRT. No. 

Mr. Armstrong. And we also discussed the fact that one of the 
things you handled was the President's mortgage bills for his 
property ? 

Ms. MoNCOTJRT. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Armstrong. On 500 Bay Lane ? 

Ms. MoNCOTiTtT. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Armstrong. And also, the utility bills. 

Ms. MoNCOURT. Some of the utility bills. 

Mr. Armstrong. Now, are you aware — does that money also come 
directly out of the accomit in the form of a cashier's check ? 

Ms. Moncotjrt. Yes, sir, I make out a cashier's check and, you know, 
that would be charged against the account. 

Mr. Armstrong. OK. Have you ever used or been given cash by 
Mr. Rebozo or anyone else to make pajnnents on behalf of the 
President ? 

Ms. MoNcouRT. No, sir. 

Mr. Armstrong. And, to your knowledge, has Mr. Rebozo ever paid 
any bills on behalf of the President ? 

Ms. MoNcouRT. Not to my knowledge. 

Mr. Armstrong. OK. Has Mr. Rebozo ever been a member of a 
partnership with President Nixon ? 

Ms. MoNcouRT. No, sir. 

Mr. Armstrong. With either F. Donald Nixon or Edward Nixon ? 

Ms. MoNCOURT. No, sir. 

Mr. Armstrong. And other than the B. & C. Investment Corp., 
the investment company, has Mr. Rebozo ever been a partner with Mr. 
Abplanalp ? 

Ms. Moncotjrt. Not to my knowledge ; no. 

Mr. Armstrong. Is there any partnership arrangement relating to 
the President that Mr. Abplanalp and Mr. Rebozo own adjacent to 
the bank? 

Ms. MoNCOURT. Partnership arrangement ? 

Mr. Armstrong. Right. 

Ms. MoNcouRT. They own the lot together. 



10511 

Mr. Armstrong. Is there a partnership agreement, a formal part- 
nership agreement, that relates to that property? 

Ms. MoNcouRT. I haven't seen one. 

Mr. Armstrong. Do you each own a 50-percent interest in that? 

Ms. MoNCOURT. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Armstrong. And to your knowledge, they both have the same 
amount of equity in the property ? 

Ms. MoNCOURT. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Armstrong. I have a few more questions, but Mr. Bellino has 
some intervening questions he wanted to get to. 

Mr. Belling. Ms. Moncourt, as I understand it, you began to work 
for Mr. Rebozo in April of 1970 ? 

Ms. Moncourt. That is right. 

Mr. Belling. Who preceded you? Who was doing your work 
before ? 

Ms. Moncourt. I don't know. There was one girl who stayed there 
only 1 month and I don't recall her name and who was there before, 
I don't recall. 

Mr. Bellino. You don't recall her name ? 

Ms. Moncourt. No. 

Mr. Bellino. Could you supply the name, could you get the name 
and supply it later ? 

Ms. Moncourt. I could get it from the records. 

Mr. Belling. Did you do the bookkeeping for Cocolobo Cay, Inc. ? 

Ms. Moncourt. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Bellino. And Monroe Land Title ? 

Ms. Moncourt. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Belling. Did Monroe Land Title pay your salary? 

Ms. Moncourt. Yes, sir, the majority of my salary. 

Mr. Belling. Did you ever get any other salary besides what you 
were paid from Monroe Land ? 

Ms. Moncourt. Yes ; I get a salary from the bank. 

Mr. Belling. From whom ? 

Ms. Moncourt. From the Key Biscayne Bank. 

Mr. Belling. The Key Biscayne Bank would also pay? 

Ms. Moncourt. Yes, sir, 

Mr. Belling. Wash-Well, Inc. — you kept the books for that ? 

Ms. Moncourt. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Belling. Cocolobo Corp. ? 

Ms. Moncourt. Not Cocolobo Corp.; no. 

Mr. Belling. Who kept those records? 

Ms. Moncourt. I don't know who kept those records. 

Mr. Belling. Cocolobo Corp. ? 

Ms. Moncourt. No — oh, I did. 

Mr. Belling. Cocolobo Corp. ? 

Ms. Moncourt. Yes ; because that one closed. It was sold I think. 
Cocolobo was sold in 1971. 

Mr. Belling. How about Mutual Acceptance Corp. ? 

Ms. Moncourt. I have those books too. 

Mr. Belling. The Island Ferry Corp. ? 

Ms. Moncourt. There are no books on that. That is all part of 
Fishers Island. 



10512 

Mr. Belling. These records, what would they consist of ? Would it 
be a cashbook, a cash journal ? 

Ms. MoNcouRT. Yes ; cash receipts book. 

Mr. Belling. Cash disbursements books ? 

Ms. MoNCGURT. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Belling. That is in addition to your check stubs ? 

Ms. Mgncgurt. That is right. 

Mr. Belling. And you would have a general ledger, too, for 

Ms. MoNGOuiiT. That is right. 

Mr. Belling [continuing] . For each of these companies ? 

Ms. Mgncgurt. No; it is all part of Fishers Island. 

Mr. Belling. I don't get your answer. All of these companies, like 
Monroe Land and 

Ms. Mgncgurt. No ; not Monroe, but Island Ferry, Terminal Island. 

Mr. Belling. Terminal Island ? 

Ms. Mgncgurt. Yes. 

Mr. Belling. Let's get this straight. That is part of Fishers Island? 
Harbor Terminals is part of Fishers Island ? 

Ms. Mgncgurt. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Belling. Biscayne Insurance, you say Mr. Davis kept those 
records ? 

Ms. Mgncgurt. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Belling. And Island Ferry Service is part of Fishers Island, 
too? 

Ms. Mgncgurt. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Belling. And you also kept the general ledger ? 

Ms. Mgncgurt. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Belling. Did you keep a separate general ledger for Mr. Rebozo 
himself ? 

Ms. Mgncgurt. No ; I don't keep any books for Mr. Rebozo. I just 
keep 

Mr. Belling. Just barest company books ? 

Ms. Mgncgurt. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Belling. When you made up a financial statement, you usually 
made it up at one time ? 

Ms. Mgncgurt. September 1. 

Mr. Belling. Of each year ? 

Ms. Mgncgurt. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Belling. And what records would you use to make that up, 
to get that information together ? 

Ms. Mgncgurt. The information that I have on the loans, what is 
due to him, names, et cetera. 

Mr. Belling. I'm sorry, would you repeat that? 

Ms. Mgncgurt. The information I have on these loans, what is due 
to him. 

Mr. Belling. Did you have a ledger card for each loan ? 

Ms. Mgncgurt. I have my records, my files on 

Mr. Belling. You had files, in other words on each loan, so when- 
ever you made a payment, you made a note of it so you knew what the 
balance was at the end of the year when you made up the financial 
statement ? 

Ms. Mgncgurt. Yes, sir. 



10513 

Mr. Belling. Did that include every individual that Mr. Eebozo 
borrowed any money from ? 

Ms. MONCOURT. No. 

Mr. Belling. Wliat is that again ? 

Ms. MoNCGURT. I lumped it usually. 

Mr. Belling. You lumped it up ? 

Ms. Mgncgurt. Yes. 

Mr. Belling. Well, how did you keep records on, say, whether there 
was a loan to Margaret Barker ? 

Ms. Mgncgurt. There is — that would be a personal note. 

Mr. Belling. Would the loan you had with Mary Willard — is that 
all lumped up ? 

Ms. Mgncgtjrt. Mary Willard ? I think I never have paid anything 
to Mary Willard since I have been there. That was before I came in. 

Mr. Belling. How about Donald Burtost? 

Ms. Mgncgurt. That was closed also. 

Mr. Belling. These were closed from the time you were there? 

Ms. Mgncgurt. Yes, sir, because I never made any interest pay- 
ment to him either. 

Mr. Belling. Paula McMurry ? 

Ms. Mgncgurt. Yes. 

Mr. Belling. That was closed too ? 

Ms. Mgncgurt. No ; it is not. Mrs. McMurry is deceased and it went 
to a niece, I think. 

Mr. Belling. I didn't get that. Was it open when you were there? 
Were you making payments on that and did you have a card for 
it? 

Ms. Mgncgurt. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Belling. A separate card ? 

Ms. Mgncgurt. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Belling. And Edward Martina ? 

Ms. Mgncgurt. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Belling. The same way? 

Ms. Mgncgurt. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Belling. And William Baraket, that $100,000 loan, the same 
way? 

Ms. Mgncgurt. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Belling. Do you recall the $100,000 loan that he received from 
the Key Biscayne Bank, I believe in 1970 ? 

Ms. Mgncgurt. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Belling. What happened to the money that he received from 
the bank ? 

Ms. Mgncgurt. Well, this was a consolidation. 

Mr. Belling. It was what ? 

Ms. Mgncgurt. A consolidation of other loans and renewal. 

Mr. Belling. He paid off other loans ? 

Ms. Mgncgurt. Yes; paid off other loans. 'What he did, he had four 
different loans, and he lumped them all in one sum and it amoun'ted to 
$100,000. 

Mr. Belling. And apparently just paid off the other loans and then 
he had one loan of $100,000 ? 

Ms. Mgncgurt. Right. 

Mr. Belling. Did you have a card also for Senator Smathers? 



10514 

Ms. MoNCOURT. No ; I didn't. I did not. We don^ 

Mr. Belling. You paid him interest in 1971, 1 believe, did you not? 

Ms. MoNcouRT. I don't recall if I did. 

Mr. Belling. You don't recall paying him interest? 

Ms. MoNCGURT. In 1971 ? No. 

Mr. Belling. Was there any real estate transaction that Mr. Rebozo 
had with Senator Smathers ? 

Ms. Mgncgurt. I think that there was, Mr. Rebozo owed Mr. 
Smathers, and I think they exchanged it for a piece of land to 

Mr. Belling. Would you give us the details of that ? 

Ms. Mgncgurt. I couldn't without being sure, you know. 

Mr. Belling. Well, when did you first know of that ? 

Ms. Mgncgurt. Through the accountant. 

Mr. Belling. When ? 

Ms. Mgncgurt. By the accountant ? 

Mr. Belling. When? 

Ms. Mgncgurt. It was recently, because I had to look it up. 

Mr. Belling. Was it within the past week ? 

Ms. Mgncgurt. Yes ; it was within the past week. 

Mr. Belling. You hadn't heard about it before ? 

Ms. Mgncgurt. No ; I didn't know about it, and I called the account- 
ant and I asked him and he explained it to me. 

Mr. Belling. Senator, the various records that she has helped make 
up — the financial statement — are pertinent to us because we want to, 
for one thing, to see wheither in paying off of any loans, wheithier any 
funds were cash funds or where the funds came from. We don^ have 
all of those records. All we were given were bank statements and 
canceled checks. Would we not be entitled to have the rest of these 
records so that we could examine them ? 

Mr. Greer. Senator, this situation has been thrashed out between 
Mr. Frates and Mr. Dash when they were up here 2 weeks ago, where 
there was an agreement reached between the parties as to what records 
should be produced. I think this is an attempt on the staff's part and 
Mr. Bellino's part to go around Mr. Dash's back after Mr. Dash has 
made an agreement. 

Mr. Lenzner. If I could clarify the record ? I have discussed these 
specific issues with Mr. Dash, because at pages 309 and 331 of the 
record, there is a discussion with Mr. Rebozo with regard to what 
documents were used to make up Mr. Rebozo's financial statement and 
it is my understanding that Mr. Dasli agrees that those documents that 
were used, the ones that were referred to by Mr. Rebozo, should be 
made available to us and I don't believe Mr. Dash has ever indicated 
that we did not want ■ 

Mr. Greer. Well, I think Mr. Dash could be here to make his posi- 
tion clear as to what the agreement was. Now, I again think this is the 
staff trying to go around behind Mr. Dash's back. And, I would 
like 

Mr. Lenzner. I just said we talked to Mr. Dash. 

Mr. Belling. Senator, that isn't just for him to say that. I am raising 
a question here. 

Senator Ervin. Well, I don^ know the relevancy of the things. I 
can't follow all of the papers at the Key Biscayne Bank and all of the 
documents because I am not familiar with them. 



10515 

Mr. Greer. That is correct, sir. And we are here on a simple inter- 
rogation of Ms. Moncourt. I think that any documents the staff wants, 
that they can discuss it with Mr. Dash and we will be happy to deal 
with Mr. Dash on this subject. I think if there is going to be any sus- 
tained discussion of this issue here, that Mr. Dash ought to be present, 
because it is the bank's understanding and Mr. Rebozo's understanding 
that they have reached an agreement with chief counsel as to what 
documents will and won't be produced. 

Senator Ervin. I don't know what the understanding is, so I agree 
that Mr. Dash ought to be here. 

Mr. Greer. I would suggest we go ahead with the interrogation and 
get into what records should be produced later, since I understand 
Your Honor is on a short time limit. 

Mr. Belling. Ms. Moncourt, in July of 1970, Mr. Rebozo received 
$5,000 from El Central Commercial CuBano. Now, do you possibly 
recall getting a, loan or advance of money from that company ? 

Ms. Moncourt. I think it was sold at that time. 

Mr. Belling. What is that ? 

Ms. Moncourt. I think it was sold at that time. 

Mr. Belling. You think it was what ? 

Mr. Greer. Sold. 

Mr. Armstrong. Sold. 

Mr. Belling. Sold ? It was sold in April — not in July of 1970. 

Ms. Moncourt. Mr. Bellino, I couldn't swear as to any dates at all, 
because I don't recall. I handle too much. I cannot recall every single 
transaction, you know. 

Mr. Beli.ino. You believe that the money that came out of El Cen- 
tral Commercial — to your best recollection, you believe that the busi- 
ness had b^n sold and was giving the money to Rebozo ? 

Ms. Moncourt. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Belling. And Wash-Well, Inc., was there any money put in 
there, other than what came from the business it was doing ? 

Ms. Moncourt. No, sir. Other than the fact that it was sold. 

Mr. Belling. Now, where would they get the money to pay so much 
more to Rebozo than what they were earning? 

Ms. Moncourt. The company owed him money at that time. He had 
put in a lot of his own money in Wash -Well, Inc. 

Mr. Armstrong. Can you repeat a little louder ? 

Ms. Moncourt. Mr. Rebozo had advanced a lot of money to Wash- 
Well, Inc. 

Mr. Greer. Mr. Bellino, if you are having trouble hearing, why don't 
you trade seats with Mr. Rebozo, because the court reporter is having 
trouble hearing Ms. Moncourt and Ms. Moncourt has a low voice and 
it would probably be easier if you are talking across — directly across 
from each other. 

Mr. Belling. I am asking whether any money that went into Wash- 
Well, Inc. — was there any money that went into Wash-Well, Inc., 
other than from the business they were doing ? 

Ms. Moncourt. As I said, Mr. Rebozo made loans to the business. 

Mr. Belling. And then would get the money back ? 

Ms. Moncourt. Pardon? 

Mr. Belling. And where would the money come from when Mr. Re- 
bozo was paid back, if the company wasn't earning sufficient money ? 



10516 

Ms. MoNcouRT. Well, the company was earning sufficient money. 

Mr. Belling. It was ? 

Ms. MoNcouRT, Yes. 

Mr. Belong. And Monroe Land Title, the same ? 

Ms. Mgncx)urt. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Beli.ino. You mentioned that you weren't sure whether you 
signed an access card to a safe-deposit box when you had access to it? 

Ms. Mgncgurt. I never had access to any safe-deposit boxes. 

Mr. Belling. Wasn't that one of the questions you asked, Mr. 
Armstrong? 

Mr. Greer. Ms. Monoourt testified that she had no access to any of 
the safe-deposit boxes. 

Mr. Armstrong. But she was present alt one time. 

Mr. Greer. She was present when one box was opened to count 
stock. 

Mr. Belling. At the time you were present, do you recall definitely 
whether you signed the card or not ? 

Ms. Mgncgurt. No, sir ; I did not. 

Mr. Belling. And you were only there once? 

Ms. Mgncgurt. That is right. 

Mr. Belling. When you were questioned last time by Mr. Arm- 
strong, you said that you first learned of the $100,000 from Hughes 
to Rebozo from the newspapers ? 

Ms. Mgncgurt, That is right. 

Mr. Belling. Do you recall what article that was? 

Ms. Mgncgurt. That was last year. 

Mr. Belling. Last year ? 

Ms. Mgncgurt. Yes. 

Mr. Belling. You didn't know before then about it ? 

Ms. Mgncgurt. No, sir. 

Mr. Belling. You hadn't read it in the newspapers before that ? 

Ms. Mgncgurt. No, sir. 

Mr. Belling. Now, just one thing I would like to get correct. In 
your last interview, you mentioned that you turned over the Daimer 
file, at least the memorandum says that you turned it over to me. Had 
I seen you at any time before today ? 

Ms. Mgncgurt. No, I said it had been given to you. I didn't say that 
I turned it over. 

Mr. Belling. I see. The memorandum says it was given to me. 

Mr. Greer. That is the problem, Mr. Bellino, of your investigators 
making their notes of what was said, and their interpretation of what 
was said. Now, I don't think you can hold Ms. Moncourt respon- 
sible 

Mr. Belling. I just wanted to get that clear. 

Mr. Greer. Right, but you keep trying to cross-examine, based on 
your intei-p rotation of the investigator's notes. 

Senator Ervin. I believe he asked a very simple question, whether 
she turned it over to him. 

Mr. Belling. What bank acounts did Mr. Rebozo have in the Key 
Biscayne Bank besides his main checking account? 

Ms. Mgncgurt. What bank accounts did he have? 

Mr. Belling. Personal. 



10517 

Ms. MoNcouRT. He has an account for the Ocean Reef Villa. 

Mr. Belling. And what else? 

Ms. MoNconRT. An account for the Maryland House. 

Mr. Belling. "Wliat House? 

Ms. Mgncgurt. Maryland House. 

Mr. Belling. And an account for the Key Biscayne Bank building? 

Ms. Mgncgurt. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Belling. Any other accounts ? 

Ms. Mgncgurt. Mutual Acceptance. 

Mr. Belling. And INIonroe Land Title, also ? 

Ms. Mgncgurt. Monroe Land and Title. 

Mr. Belling. Wash- Well, Inc. ? 

Ms. Mgncgurt. Wash-Well is dissolved now. 

Mr. Belling. Did he have a savings account ? 

Ms. Mgncgurt. At the Key Biscayne Bank ? He has one, yes. 

Mr. Belling. Do you remember when that was opened? 

Ms. Mgncgurt. Yes, I opened that myself in 1972. 

Mr. Belling. Was that opened with the amount of $9,000 ? 

Ms. Mgncgurt. Yes, sir, I believe it was. 

Mr. Belling. Any other bank accounts ? 

Ms. Mgncgurt. "VVhat do you mean ? 

Mr. Belling. Any other bank accounts that Rebozo had in the Key 
Biscayne Bank. 

Ms. Mgncgurt. Central Coin Laundry. 

Mr. Belling. What else? 

Ms. Mgncgurt. Let's see, Fishers Island. 

Mr. Belling. A shopping center ? 

Ms. Mgncgurt. No, not a shopping center. And that is all. 

Mr. Belling. Did he have an account in the Florida National Bank 
in Key West, not Miami now ? 

Ms. Mgncgurt. Yes, Monroe Land Title does. 

Mr. Belling. INIonroe Land Title? That is another one that Monroe 
Land Title has besides what you mentioned before ? 

Mr. Greer. Mr. Bellino, all of these questions have been gone over 
before, once before, when we identified all of the banks, the Monroe 
Land Title and 

Mr. Armstrong. Only the savings accounts. We didn't get a listing 
of other accounts that Mr. Rebozo had. 

Mr. Belling. Did he have any other accounts outside Key Biscayne 
beside what you mentioned today ? 

Ms. Mgncgurt. There is Monroe Land Title. That has three accounts 
in Key West plus a savings account. 

Mr. Belling. Does he have any other savings accounts besides the 
one you have just mentioned and the one in the Key Biscayne Bank? 

Ms. Mgncgurt. There is one at Gi-eater Miami Federal' Savings & 
Loan. 

Mr. Belling. Greater Miami Federal Savings & Loan has a small 
account ? 

Ms. Mgncgurt. Right. 

Mr. Belling. And the others ? 

Ms. Mgncgurt. The othei-s have small accounts also. 

Mr. Belling. Any other accounts ? 



10518 
!Ms. MoNCOURT. No, sir. Other than — 



Mr. Greer. Other than the ones you have already testified to. 

Ms. MoNcouRT. Rifjht. 

Mr. Bellixo. That is all I have. 

Senator Ervik. Do vou know anything about the $100,000 Hughes 
fund? ^ i 

Ms. IMoxcoiiRT. The what ? 

Senator Ervin. Do you know anything whatever about the $100,000 
fund that INIr. Rebozo obtained from the Hughes interests ? 

Ms. MoNCOURT. No ; I knew nothing about it. 

Senator Er\t;n. You kept no records pertaining to that fund ? j 

Ms. MoxcouRT. No, sir. I didn't even know about it. 1 

Senator Ervin. And you have no j)ersonal knowledge whether any 
such fund did or did not exist? 

JSIs. MoNcoTiRT. I had no knowledge whatsoever. 

Senator Ervin. And the first time you heard anything about it was 
in 1973? 

Ms. MoNCouRT. Yes, sir. 

Senator Ervin. ^Vhen you read it in the newspapers? 

Ms. IMoNcouRT. Right. 

Mr. Armstrong. Ms. Moncourt, were you aware from the time you 
came to work for the Key Biscayne Bank & Trust Co. and for Mr. 
Rebozo, whether or not Mr. Rebozo received any political contributions 
during that period of time ? 

Ms. Moncourt. No, sir, there was none. 

Mr. Armstrong. OK. You did keep books on one ? 

Ms. Moncourt. Yes; in 1972, the Committee To Re-Elect the 
President. 

Mr. Armstrong. And those were funds that Mr. Rebozo received on 
behalf of the Committee To Re-Elect the President? 

Ms. Moncourt. Yes. 

Mr. Armstrong. Other than what was reported in that account, were 
you aware of him receiving Siny other contributions? 

Ms. Moncourt. No, sir. 

Mr. Armstrong. Were you aware he received a contribution from 
Mr. A. D.Davis? 

Ms. Moncourt. No, sir. 

Mr. Armstrong. Is Mr. A. D. Davis — does he have any business or 
financial transactions with INIr. Rebozo and with the bank? 

Ms. Moncourt. Not to my knowledge. 

Mr. Armstrong. Any transactions wdth the Key Biscayne Bank & 
Trust Co. ? 

Ms. Moncourt. Davis? No. 

Mr. Armstrong. What about Mr. Murchinson ? 

Ms. Moncourt. No. 

Mr. Armstrong. Mr. Cal Covens ? 

Ms. Moncourt. No, sir. 

Mr. Armstrong. The Winn-Dixie Corp. ? 

Ms. Moncourt. They may have an account with us at the bank, yes. 

Mr. Armstrong. But you are not aware of any business or financial 
transactions they had with Mr. Rebozo ? 

Ms. Moncourt. No, sir. 



1 



10519 

Mr. Aj?mstrong. What about any financial contributions that came 
from Senator Smathers or through Senator Smathers ? 

Ms. MoNcouRT. I never saw any. 

Mr. Armstrong. What about from Mr. Getty — Mr. J. Paul Getty ? 

Ms. MoNcouRT. No, sir. 

Mr. Armstrong. Does he have any business or financial transactions 
with Mr. Rebozo ? 

Ms. MoNcouRT. No, sir. 

Mr. Armstrong. In the correspondence files you maintain, are there 
any correspondence you may have seen that were typed ? Do you recall 
any letters at all to Mr. A. D. Davis ? 

Ms. MoNcouRT. No, sir. 

Mr. Armstrong. Any letters at all to Cal Covens ? 

Ms. MoNCOuRT. No, sir. 

Mr. Armstrong. And you mentioned before that there was corre- 
spondence to Senator Smathers. Do you recall — first, is that correct? 

Ms. Moncourt. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Armstrong. Do you recall if any of this had to do with the 
$100,000 contribution ? 

Ms. MoncouRT. Nothing to that effect. 

Mr. Armstrong. Had it anything to do with political contributions 
at all? 

Ms. MoNCX)TJRT. No. 

Mr. Armstrong. With Hughes Tool Co. ? 

Ms. Moncourt. No, sir. 

Mr. Armstrong. With Mr. Richard Danner ? 

Ms. Moncourt. No, sir. 

Mr. Armstrong. And do you recall if there was any correspond- 
ence, if there was a correspondence file relating to Mr. J. Paul Getty ? 

Ms. Moncourt. No, sir. 

Mr. Armstrong. Or any correspondence relating to Mr. Getty ? Not 
just a file, but any correspondence ? 

Ms. Moncourt. No, sir ; I haven't seen any. 

Mr. Armstrong. Now, I previously asked if you had seen any corre- 
spondence relating to the Hughes' $100,000 contribution, and you said 
you had not. Do you ever recall seeing a memorandum that was writ- 
ten for the records by Mr. Rebozo, showing his best understanding 
of that transaction ? 

Ms. Moncourt. No, sir. 

Mr. Lenzner. Ms. Moncourt, when did you first learn that the IRS, 
the Internal Revenue Service sought to interview Mr. Rebozo? 

Ms. Moncourt. Wlien did I fii-st learn ? 

Mr. Lenzner. Yes ma'am. 

Ms. Moncourt. In June — in July of 1973. 

Mr. Lenzner. In July of 1973 ? 

Ms. Moncourt. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Lenzner. And how did you learn of that, ma'am ? 

Ms. Moncourt. I was advised by the accountant that the IRS was 
investigating Mr. Rebozo and I was given the name of two agents 
and was told they would come and see me. 

Mr. Lenzner. And you say Mr. Davis first advised you ? 

Ms. Moncourt. Yes. 



10520 

Mr. Lenzner. But, Mr. Rebozo liad not discussed that with you 
prior to that time ? 

Ms. MoNcouRT. Well, he had discussed it, but I didn't have any 
names, yon know, he told me that he was under investigation by the 
IRS and that they would be coming down to check the books and the 
records and that I should cooperate with them. 

Mr. Lenzner. And so, sometime before Mr. Davis talked to you, Mr. 
Rebozo had indicated that the IRS was coming down ? 

Ms. Moncourt. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Lenzner. And do you recall when Mr. Rebozo first mentioned 
it to you ? 

Ms. Moncourt. Not the exact date. 

Mr. Lenzner. Approximately. 

Ms. Moncourt. It was in early July 1973. 

Mr. Lenzner. But you didn't have any knowledge that the IRS was 
interested in interviewing or talking with Mr. Rebozo until July 1973 ? 

Ms. Moncourt. That is right. 

Mr. Lenzner. And did Mr. Rebozo indicate to you exactly what the 
IRS was going to be interested in, what areas ? 

Ms. Moncourt. No, sir. 

Mr. Lenzner. Did he give you any advice or counsel on what to do 
when they came ? 

Ms. Moncourt. No, sir. 

Mr. Lenzner. And how did you know what to furnish the IRS 
when they came to talk to you ? 

Ms. MoNcouBT. I gave them what they asked for. 

Mr. Belling. Ask her what she gave. 

Mr. Lenzner. Do you recall 

Ms. Moncourt. They asked for everything. 

Mr. Greer. Senator, I would object. You've got a cross line of ques- 
tioning going here. I think there should be one person questioning the 
witness. 

Mr. Armstrong. I believe Mr. Bellino was whispering in my ear. 

Mr. Greer. It is such a loud whisper, it comes across as a question. 

Senator Ervin. I understand Mr. Bellino has not his perfect hear- 
ing and sometimes people that don't have perfect hearing whisper 
louder than you and myself do. 

Mr. Greer. I understand that. Senator, but it is hard for the witness. 

Senator ER^^N. It is hard for the witness and it is hard for counsel 
to follow. So whisper as lightly as you can. 

Mr. Lenzner. Did he ask for specific books and records of corpora- 
tions that Mr. Bellino has asked you about ? 

Ms. Moncourt. Specific books ? No, they asked for everything that 
liad anything to do with his returns. 

Mr. Lenzner. So did you furnish 

Ms. Moncourt. I furnished them with eveiything they asked for. 

Mr. Lenzner. So you furnished them with the files of the Fishers 
Island Corp. 

Ms. Moncourt. Yes, Fishers Island, Monroe Land Title, Wash- 
Well, Inc., and his personal books, everything. 

Mr. Lenzner. Did you also furnish them with cashier's checks. 

Ms. Moncourt. Yes, sir. Tliey went through all of the cashier's 
checks from the period, from the" years of 1970, 1971, and 1972. 



10521 

Mr. Lenzner. Did they make copies of those records ? 

Ms. MoNcouRT. I don't know whether they did or not. I know they 
took numerous notes, though. 

Mr. Lenzner. Did they go back — 'how far did they go intx) the rec- 
ords in terms of time ? 

Ms. MoNcouRT. 1970, 1971, and 1972. 

Mr. Lenzner. They did not pursue 1969 or 1973 ? 

Ms. MoNCOimT. No, sir, that would be next year. 

Mr. Lenzner. And they didn't ask for anything though for those 2 
years? 

Ms. MoNcouRT. No, sir. 

Mr. Lenzner. Now, you said that some!body asked you to check up 
on Senator Smathers' loan. Who asked you to do that ? 

Ms. MoNCOURT. Well, it came up from our conversation last week. 

Mr. Greer. Asa result of Mr. Dash's phone call. 

Mr. Lenzner. It wasn't Mr. Rebozo's counsel that asked you to do 
that? 

Ms. MoNcouRT. It was not Mr. Rebozo's counsel who asked me to do 
that. 

Senator Ervin. Oh, yes. 

Mr, Lenzner. Yes, I understand. It was not Mr. Reibozo that asked 
you to look up the Smathers' loan either ? 

Ms. MONCOURT. No. 

Mr. Lenzner. Do you know if Mr. Rebozo has had any financial 
transactions with either Mr. Colson, Mr. Haldeman, or Mr. 
Ehrlichman ? 

Ms. MoNcouRT. No, sir, none. 

Mr. Lenzner. Do you know if there are any correspondence to any 
of those gentlemen ? 

Ms. MoNCOURT. No, sir. 

Mr. Lenzner. Was there any relevant telephonic contact with any of 
those gentlemen and Mr. Rebozo ? 

Ms. MoNcouRT. No, sir. 

Mr. Lenzner. Now, did Mr. Rebozo — now, are you aware of any 
communications or information with regard to Mr. Rebozo and Air 
West Co. ? 

Ms. MoNCouRT. None, sir. 

Mr. Lenzner. Are you aware of any information or communication 
that Mr. Rebozo had with regard to atomic bomb testing in Nevada? 

Ms. MoNCouRT. No, sir. 

Mr. Lenzner. Are you aware of any information or contact or 
communication that Mr. Rebozo had with a law suit involving TWA 
and Howard Hughes ? 

Ms. MoNcouRT. No, sir. 

Mr. Lenzner. Do you know if Mr. Rebozo knows any of the major 
principals in Trans World Airlines Co. ? 

Ms. MoNCouRT. No, sir. 

Mr. Lenzner. Have you ever seen any correspondence or financial 
transactions involving TWA ? 

Ms. MoNcouRT. No, sir. He may have books on TWA stock 

Mr. Lenzner. I mean aside from purchasing stock. 

Ms. MoNCOURT. No. 



10522 

Mr. Lenzner. Have you ever seen on occasion any instructions to 
Mr. Wakefield with regard to business matters left in any of Mr. 
Rebozo's safe-deposit boxes ? 

Ms. MoNCOTJRT. No, sir. 

Mr. Lenzner. Do you know if any such existed ? 

Ms. MoNcouRT. No, sir. 

Mr. Greer. You don't know? Is your answer to the last question 
that nothing existed or that no, you don't know? 

Ms. MoNcouRT. I don't know if any existed. 

Mr. Greer. Excuse me, Senator, but I thought the answer should 
be clarified. 

Senator Ervin. I think you did well to clarify that, because it might 
be interpreted in either one of two ways. The way I understood it was 
she had no knowledge, but it was very unclear. 

Mr. Lenzner. You have not seen any such instructions ? 

Ms. MoNcouRT. I have never seen any. 

Mr. Lenzner. And you have not heard or become aware of any such 
instructions ? 

Ms. MoNCouRT. No, sir. 

Mr. Lenzner. Did you ever learn of what would happen to the 
stocks and other items in Mr. Rebozo's safe-deposit boxes if he became 
deceased ? 

Ms. MoNcouRT. Well, Mr. Wakefield, I understood, would be his 
executor. 

Mr. Lenzner. And who did you learn that from ? 

Ms. MoNCouRT. Because at one time, Mr. Wakefield handed me some 
forms with which to prepare Mr. Rebozo's will, but I never did do it. 

Mr. Lenzner. The will was never prepared ? 

Ms. MoNCOURT. I mean I never did fill it out, you know. 

Mr. Lenzner. What were you supposed to fill out ? 

Ms. MoNCORT. Well, his holdings and, you know, whatever would 
be part of his will. 

Mr. Lenzner. And when was this ? 

Ms. MoNcouRT. Oh, that was 1971. 

Mr. T^enzner. And this was in preparation for Mr. Rebozo's will ? 

Ms. MoNcouRT. That is right. 

Mr. Lenzner. That Mr. Wakefield was preparing ? 

Ms. MoNcouRT. Right. 

Mr. Lenzner. And as far as you know, you are saying that those 
items were not prepared for Mr. Rebozo's will ? 

Ms. MoNcouRT. They were not prepared by me. 

Mr. Lenzner. Do you know if anybody else prepared them ? 

Ms. MoNcouRT. No; I don't know who prepared them. 

Mr. Lenzner. Do you know if a will exists for Mr. Rebozo ? 

Ms. MoNcouRT. No ; I do not know. 

Mr. Lenzner. And did Mr. Wakefield tell you in 1971 that he was 
to be the executor of Mr. Rebozo's estate ? 

Ms. MoNcouRT. Well, he didn't tell me, but since he was preparing 
the will and he was Mr. Rebozo's attorney, I concluded. 

Mr. Lenzner. That is an assumption on your part ? 

Ms. MoNcouRT. That is an assumption. 

Mr. Lenzner. Do you know for a fact whether Mr. Wakefield hnd 
any duties or responsibilities on Mr. Rebozo's possible death? 



10523 

Ms. MoNCOURT. I don't know for a fact ; no. 

Mr. Lenzner. Well, could you just excuse me for 1 second? [Pause.] 
Have you ever had access to the so-called "Director's Box" of the Key 
Biscayne Bank ? 

Ms. MoNCouRT. No, sir. 

Mr. Lenzner. I take it you only saw the contents of one box once ? 

Ms. MoNCOURT. That is right. 

Mr. Lenzner. When you inventoried the stocks? 

Ms. MoNcouRT. That is right. 

Mr. Lenzner. Did you see any cash in that box ? 

Ms. MoNcouRT. No, sir. 

Mr. Lenzner. Do you know if Mr. Rebozo keeps cash in any of the 
safe-deposit boxes ? 

Ms. MoNCOURT. No, he didn't. 

Mr. Greer. Terry, could I ask you to slow your questioning down. 
You are running them so close together, I can't follow them and I don't 
think the witness can. 

Mr. Lenzner. Do you know if Mr. Rebozo has ever kept cash in 
any of his safe-deposit boxes ? 

Ms. MoNcouRT. No, sir. 

Mr. Lenzner. Do you know what Mr. Rebozo does with his pay 
when he receives it from the bank? 

Ms. MoNCOURT. Sometimes he deposits it in part and sometimes he 
keeps it all. 

Mr. Lenzner. Are you aware of any deposit to the President's ac- 
count in the Key Biscayne Bank by Mr. Rebozo of over $1,000, ex- 
cept for the $10,000 that you have already testified about? 

Ms. MoNcouRT. No, sir. 

Mr. Lenzner. And when you inventoried the stocks, I take it you 
did not see in that same safe-deposit box a will for Mr. Rebozo ? 

Ms. MoNcouRT. No, sir. 

Mr. Lenzner. I believe that is all I have at this time. 

Mr. Armstrong. Ms. Moncourt — could you tell us — 

Mr. Greer. Excuse me, let me interject here — I would like to object 
to Mr. Lenzner's characterization of Ms. Moncourt's prior testimony 
as to anything that would constitute an inventory of the box. 

Mr. Lenzner. I meant — well, let me clarify that. 

Mr. Greer. Ms. Moncourt never inventoried a box on behalf of Mr. 
Rebozo. She has previously testified that she was present when certain 
stocks were taken out of the box and she helped inventory those 
stocks. 

Senator Er\^n. She didn't make it clear whether she took the stocks 
out of the box or whether Mr. Rebozo did. 

Ms. Moncourt. No, Mr. Rebozo took the stocks. 
Senator Ervin. I think his quastion was : Did you see anything in 
the box other than the manila envelopes, that you later found the stocks 
had been stored in ? 

Ms. Moncourt. No, sir. 

Mr. Schultz. Well, did you look in the box ? 

Ms. Moncourt. Yes, sir, I was right there on top of it. 

Mr. Lenzner. And when the stocks were taken out, was there any- 
thing else in the box ? 



10524 

Ms. MoNCOTjRT. There were other manila envelopes, yes. 

Mr. Lenzner. There were othei-s ? 

Ms. MoNConRT. Yes. 

Mr. Lenzner. And can you describe what those envelopes looked 
like? 

Ms. MoNcouRT. I do not know the contents of the envelopes. 

Mr. Lenzner. Well, were they all just bank envelopes? 

Mr. Greer. I don't think she understands. 

Mr. Lenzner. Did the envelopes have any writing on them to indi- 
cate the contents? 

Ms. Moncourt. I don't recall. 

Mr. Lenzner. Do you recall how many envelopes ? 

Ms. Moncourt. Well, I know that the stock envelopes had writing on 
them, because I had, myself, typed the contents of the envelopes, you 
know, and I had made a photostatic copy of it, which I attached to 
the envelopes so that we would know what the contents of the envelopes 
were. 

Senator Ervin. You mean, you made those 

Ms. MoNCOtJRT. I made a list of the stock certificates. 

Senator ER\^N [continuing]. And fastened them to the envelopes? 

Ms. Moncourt. Right. 

Senator Ervin. So they wouldn't have to go back to the envelopes to 
find out what the contents were? 

Ms. Moncourt. Right. 

Mr. Lenzner. And did you make a photocopy, did you say, of the 
list of the stocks ? 

Ms. Moncourt. Yes; and I gave a copy — and I gave the original 
to Mr. Rebozo and I attached the photocopy to the manila envelopes. 

Mr. Lenzner. And was there anything besides a listing of the stocks 
on the material that you attached to the envelopes ? 

Ms. Moncourt. No, sir. 

Mr. Lenzner. Were there any instructions to anybody as to what 
to do with the stocks ? 

Ms. Moncourt. No, sir. 

Mr. Lenzner. Do you know, of your own knowledge, if Mr. Rebozo 
was deceased, who would receive the benefit of those stocks? 

Ms. Moncoukt. No, sir. 

Mr. Lenzner. Do you remember approximately how many other 
envelopes were in the box after the stocks were taken out ? 

Ms. Moncourt. No, sir. 

Mr. Lenzner. Were there more than one ? 

Ms. Moncourt. It is, you know, a hard question because I was mostly 
looking for the stocks. I wasn't lookmg for anything else. I don't 
know what else, or how many, or — but there were other things in the 
box, yes. I don't know what they were. 

Mr. Lenzner. Do you recall — was there anything besides manila 
envelopes in the box after the stocks were taken out ? 

Ms. Moncoukt. No. 

Mr. Lenzner. Was anybody else present during this ? 

Ms. Moncourt. Just Mr. Rebozo and myself. 

Mr. Lenzner. And do you know what occasioned the taking of the 
stocks out of the box? Do you know why Mr. Rebozo wanted to do 
that at that time? 



10525 

Ms. MoNCOURT. Yes; we were — he was planning on selling some 
of the stocks and I had to go back to the stock history to see if, you 
know, if we were going to lose or gain; when the stock was bought 
and what price we had paid for it and what the current price was. 

Mr. Lenzner. Well, did you not have a book or record of that 
information ? 

Ms. MoNcouRT. Yes. 

Mr. Lexzner. Wliat was the purpose of going into the stocks them- 
selves ? 

Ms. MoNOOuRT. Well, he wanted to decide, to see how many shares of 
stock he was going to sell, you know. 

Mr. Lenzner. Well, did you not have a record elsewhere of how- 
many shares he held ? 

Ms. MoNCouRT. Yes; I had a file on Basch & Waist on and I keep 
a record when we buy a stock, the price we pay for it, whether we 
bought it on a margin or whether we paid in full for it, and some- 
times, when we sell a stock, we have to decide whether it is beneficial 
to us ; to decide the best way of selling it. 

Mr. Lenzner. I understand that, Ms. Moncourt, and I don't want 
to belabor this, but what was the purpose of then going into the box 
to look at the stock, if you already had that information in the files ? 

Ms. Moncourt. Because he was trying to make up his mind which 
ones he was going to sell. And, since we were buying and selling quite 
often, if we paid cash for a stock, we may or not have received the 
certificates yet. So, we wanted to see which ones we actually had on 
hand. 

Mr. Lenzner. Well, do you keep a record when the stocks come in 
or when you received them ? 

Ms. Moncourt. I do now, I didn't do so then. 

Mr. Lenzner. Off the record. 

[Discussion off the record.] 

Mr. Lenzner. Back on the record. Ms. Moncourt, on this stock 
business — and perhaps you may have answered this — but was this in 
1971, that you went in with Mr. Rebozo and looked at the stocks? 

Ms. Moncourt. No; I don't actually recall it. It may have been 1972 
or the early part of 1973. I can't actually remember the date. 

Mr. Lenzner. Did you date the list when you made the list out, did 
you put a date on it ? 

Ms. Moncourt. No ; I just listed the stock certificate numbers and 
the amount of shares. 

Mr. Lenzner. Did Mr. Rebozo sell any shares immediately after 
that? 

Ms. Moncourt. Well, they were in and out so 

Mr. Lenzner. My question was; I understood you to say that the 
purpose of going in the box was to sell some stock ? 

Ms. Moncourt. Yes. 

Mr. Lenzner. Now, did Mr. Rebozo, after this incident, sell some 
stock? 

Ms. Moncourt. I think so ; yes. That was the purpose. 

Mr. Lenzner. Excuse me ? 

Ms. Moncourt. That was the purpose. 

Mr. Lenzner. Do you recall approximately how much he sold ? 



31-889 O - 74 - pt. 22 - 22 



10506 

Ms. MoNcouRT. No; I don't. I really don't recall, because we go 
through this — because we buy stocks maybe every 8 months, or every 
6 months. It keeps going on all of the time, so I don't remember 
specifically. 

Mr. Lenzner. Do you recall what companv the shares were that 
he sold? 

Ms. MoNcouRT. Well, we w^ere holding some throughout the year. 
We held some Pan American stock. United Airlines, National 
Airlines. 

Mr. Lenzner. Do you recall specifically? I don't just want to know 
Mr. Rebozo's folio. I want to know if you recall specifically what 
stock he sold after you went into the box ? 

Ms. MoNCouRT. Not specifically ; no. 

Mr. Lenzner. Do you have any idea or recollection as to what trans- 
action he may have needed the proceeds of the sales of the shares? 

Ms. MoNcouRT. I don't recall ; no. 

Mr. Lenzner. And vou think noAv it could have been late 1972 or 
early 1973? 

Ms. MoNcouRT. Could be ; yes. 

Mr. Lenzner. Do you have any way to refresh your recollection as 
to exactly when you went in with Mr. Rebozo to look at the shares ? 

Ms. MoNCOURT. Possibly, I could reconstruct it from the Basch 
& Walston statements. 

Mr. Lenzner. That would indicate then that you had some trans- 
actions with Basch and Co. immediately after or shortly after? 

Ms. Moncourt. Right. 

Mr. Lenzner. Is that correct? Do you recall which transactions 
from Basch you might have had at that time ? 

Ms. IMoNcouRT. As I said, Mr. Lenzner, we were in and out and we 
have transactions throughout the year. 

Mr. Lenzner. Do you know if you signed in for the safe-deposit box 
on the card ? 

Ms. Moncourt. No, sir, I did not sign in for the safe-deposit box. 

Mr. Lenzner. Do you know if Mr. Rebozo did on that occasion ? 

Ms. Moncourt. I do not recall whether he did or not. 

Mr. Armstrong. Do you recall any transactions in April of 1971, 
where Mr. Rebozo deposited $50,000 cashier's check to his account? 

Ms. Moncourt. That was — yes ; that was a loan from the Key Bis- 
cayne Bank. 

Mr. Armstrong. That would have been the proceeds of the loan from 
the bank ? 

Ms. Moncourt. Yes. 

Mr. Armstrong. OK, this was in fact April 15, which w^ould be tax 
day to help you place it. 

Ms. Moncourt. Possibly, yes. 

Mr. Armstrong. Do you recall any other purpose you might have re- 
ceived that $50,000 cashiers' check from or what that would be the 
proceeds from, other than that ? 

Ms. Moncourt. No, sir. 

Mr. Armstrong. Do you know if Mr. Rebozo has any foreign bank 
accounts ? 

Ms. Moncourt. No, sir. 



105271 

Mr. Armstrong. Do you know if he has any safe-deposit boxes or any 
foreign safe- deposit boxes ? 

Ms. MoNcouRT. No, sir. 

Mr. Armstrong. Does he have any interest in any nondomestic cor- 
porations, any foreign corporations ? 

Ms. MoNCouRT. No, sir. 

Mr. Armstrong. And does he have any interest or bank accounts 
or assets that have not been disclosed to the Internal Revenue Service ? 

Ms. MoNcoTJRT. No, sir. 

Mr. Armstrong. Now, on his travel records and other records, such 
as phone billings, how long do you maintain these records ? 

Ms. MoNCOURT. The retention period is 3 years, I think. 

Mr. Armstrong. Do you destroy I'^cords ? 

Ms. MoNCouRT. Every year, I throw away 1 year. 

Mr. Armstrong. So you would have destroyed by now the 1971 
records? 

Ms. MoNcouRT. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Armstrong. And when would you have destroyed those? 

Ms. MoNCOTJRT. At the beginning of this year. 

Mr. Armstrong. At the beginning of 1974? 

Ms. MoNCouRT. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Armstrong. You would have destroyed the 1971 records ? Now, 
were any records retained because they were under subpena at that 
time? 

Ms. MoNCOURT. Evidently those under subpena, you have. 

Mr. Armstrong. I am including Mr. Rebozo's travel records and 
so forth, the receipts. 

Ms. MoN COURT. I gave you everything that I had. 

Mr. Armstrong. Well, what records were destroyed for 1971 ? 

Ms. MoNCOURT. We destroyed telephone bills and bills — you know, 
like Florida Power & Light bills and the sort of thing that you don't 
have to keep. 

Mr. Armstrong. But, the 1972 bills are intact ? 

Ms. MoNCouRT. The 1972 bills are still intact. 

Mr. Lenzner. Did you receive any instructions with regard to the 
destruction of the 1971 records ? 

Ms. MoNCOURT. No, sir. 

Mr. Lenzner. How did you know which records you could destroy 
and whicli ones you couldn't destroy ? 

Ms. MoNCOURT. Well, by the law of retention. Some of course, we 
don't have to keep more than 3 years, you kn6w, you would need fan- 
tastic storage, if you had to keep everything. 

Mr. Lenzner. Did you destroy any correspondence ? 

Ms. MoNCouRT. No, sir. 

Mr. Lenzner. Did you destroy any receipts ? 

Ms. MoNCouRT. No, sir. 

Mr. Lenzner. And did vou destroy anv travel records, any airline 
tickets? 

Ms. MoNCOURT. No, sir ; I didn't destroy anything. 

Mr. Lenzner. I thought you said that you did destroy, that you 
did throw away some records? 

Ms. MoNCOURT. Yes; some records, you just don't need to keep be- 
cause, you know, you would need too many files to keep. 



10528 

Mr. Lenzner. Did you show the records to anybody before you 
threw them away ? 

Ms. MoNCouRT. No, sir, 

Mr. AitMSTRONG. Let me make sure I understand. On the phone 
records, for example 

Mr. Greer. Gentlemen, I really would request that one interrogator 
pursue one line of questioning. I think it is very difficult for the wit- 
ness to bounce back and forth between individual interrogators, and 
I think it is not fair and would object to the procedure. 

Senator Ervin. I would hope that each interrogator would exhaust 
their questions before another one takes over. 

Kr. Lenzner. We try to do that as much as possible, Senator, ex- 
cept when we come up with an answer that we didn't expect. 

Mr. Armstrong. I will try to be exhaustive. Regarding the destruc- 
tion of records and let us take, as an example, phone bills, did you 
have anyone, if those records were under subpena, see if they could be 
destroyed ? 

Ms. JVIoncourt. No, sir. 

Mr. Armstrong. So, you just destroyed what you would normally 
destroy ? 

Ms. MoNCOURT. It was automatic. 

Mr. Armstrong. So, it would not be normal to destroy Mr. Rebozo's 
personal receipts, anyway ? 

Ms. MoNCOURT. I beg your pardon ? 

Mr. Armstrong. It would not be normal to destroy his travel re- 
ceipts, anyway. 

Ms. MoNcoTJRT. What do you mean ? 

Mr. Armstrong. In other words, you would not normally destroy 
them? 

Ms. MoNcouRT. I would ? 

Mr. Armstrong. That is the question. Is there some reason that 
you didn't destroy those too ? 

Ms. MoNCOURT. Because I didn't get around to it. That is why. 

Mr. Armstrong. Did you destroy phone records from all of the 
different phones — he retains his home phones ? 

Ms. MoNcouRT. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Armstrong. The bank phones ? 

Ms. Moncourt. No ; the bank does that themselves. It is automatic. 

Mr. Armstrong. Now, does the bank have an auditor named Jack 
Brown? 

Ms. Moncourt. Yes^ sir. 

Mr. Armstrong. Is that someone who is on the bank payroll ? 

Ms. Moncourt. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Armstrong. And can you tell me where his office is located? 

Ms. Moncourt. In the Key Biscayne Bank. 

Mr. Armstrong. It is in the bank ? 

Ms. Moncourt. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Armstrong. Is he a full-time employee of the bank ? 

Ms. Moncourt. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Armstrong. And to your knowledge, has he ever removed or 
changed locks on safe-deposit boxes ? 

Ms. Moncourt. No, sir. He has nothing to do with that. He is not 
an officer of the bank. He is an auditor. 



10529 

Mr. Armstrong. Are you aware of who does change the locks on 
safe-deposit boxes ? 

Ms. MoNCOURT. Mr. Diebold. 

Mr. Armstrong. And do you pay bills to Diebold on behalf 

Ms. MoNCOTJRT. Not personally, the bank would. 

Mr. Armstrong. I take it you don't handle those bills yourself? 

Ms. MoNcouRT. No, sir. 

Mr. Armstrong. Have you ever paid any extra fees to Mr. Brown 
for any services, other than his normal auditing services ? 

Ms. MoNcoTJRT. No, sir. 

Mr. Armstrong. OK. Now, in the Fishers Island, we discussed in the 
interview we had in Key Biscayne the Fishers Island stock trans- 
action, when the President redeemed his stock from the Fishers Island 
Corp. You mentioned the money which was used to redeem the Presi- 
dent's stock had come from an option to buy property, which had been 
forfeited ? Is that correct ? 

Ms. MoNCouRT. That is correct. 

Mr. Armstrong. And did that money come from Con Dev Corp.? 

Ms. MoNCouRT. I think it was Con Dev. I don't recall exactly. 

Mr. Armstrong. Are you familiar with who the principals are in 
Con Dev? 

Ms. MoNcoTJRT. No, sir. 

Mr. Armstrong. Do you know if Mr. William Rebozo is in any way 
involved with the Con Dev Corp. ? 

Ms. MoNCOURT. No. 

Mr. Armstrong. Do you know if Mr. Charles G. Rebozo has any 
business or financial transactions with Mr. William Rebozo ? 

Ms. MoNCOURT. No, sir ; not to my knowledge. 

Mr. Armstrong. Are you aware of any that William Rebozo does 
have with Fishers Island ? 

Ms. MoNcouRT. He does with Fishers Island. 

Mr. Armstrong. Did you tell us what those are ? 

Ms. MoNcouRT. I beg your pardon ? 

Mr. Armstrong. Can you tell us what those transactions would be? 

Ms. Moncourt. Well, there is a corporation, which was formed for 
the development of Fishers Island. 

Mr. Armstrong. And what is that corporation ? 

Ms. Moncourt. It is called Fishers Island Development, FID. 

Mr. Armstrong. And is ]\Ir. William Rebozo — now, does he hold 
an interest in that or is he an officer ? 

Ms. Moncourt. I do not know. 

Mr. Armstrong. Is he paid by them ? 

Ms. Moncourt. I do not knoAv. 

Mr. Armstrong. Well, what is Mr. Rebozo's interest in Fishers 
Island Development Corp. ? 

Ms. MoNcoi^RT. I just don't know. I really don't know. 

Mr. Armstrong. I am sorry ? 

Mr. Greer. She said she didn't know. 

Ms. Moncourt. I don't know. 

Mr. Armstrong. I thought my original question was, what interest, 
if any, he had to do with Fishers Island? And I thought that part of 
the answer had something to do with Fishers Island Development 
Corp. I must have misunderstood a prior question. 



10580 

Mr. Greer. "Well, you are asking them so fast you are running them 
right together. I would request that you give the witness time. 

Mr. Armstrong. I will ask them again, then. 

Mr. Greer. If you will start back and go slowly and give the witness 
a chance to think, rather than nmning your questions together, we 
might get a more coherent sequence of i-esponses. 

^Ir, Armstrong. Does Mr. William Rebozo have any interest in the 
Fishers Island Cor|3. ? 

Ms. JNIoNcouRT. In the Fishei-s Island Corp. ? Not to my knowledge. 

Mr. Armstrong. OK. Has JNIr. William Rebozo — does he have any 
interest or has he ever received any compensation from any corpora- 
tion that Mr. Charles Rebozo has an interest in ? 

Ms. MoNcoTjRT. No, sir. 

INIr. Armstrong. Has he ever received any gifts from Mr. Charles 
Rebozo ? 

Ms. MoNCOtJRT. No. 

Mr. Armstrong. Has Mr. William Rebozo ever received any gifts 
from Charles Rebozo? 

Ms. MoNCOURT. No, sir. 

Mr. Greer. By Charles you are referring to C. G. ? 

Senator Ervin. Do you mean that, "no," he has not, or do you mean 
that you don't know ? 

Ms. MoNcouRT. I don't know. 

Senator Ervin. I just wanted to clarify that for the record. 

Mr. Greer. Thank you, Senator. 

Mr. Armstrong. Has he received any large quantities of cash that 
you are aware of ? 

Ms. Moncourt. Not to my knowledge ; no, sir. 

Mr. Armstrong. Can I ask what your rate of compensation is from 
the Key Biscayne Bank & Trust Co. presently ? 

Ms. Moncourt. You mean what I earn ? 

Mr. Armstrong. Yes, ma'am. 

Ms. Moncourt. Isn't that somewhat private ? 

Mr. Armstrong. I would like an answer to the question. 

Senator Ervin. Well, how is that material ? 

Mr. Greer. I would object to that. 

Senator Ervin. I mean how is it 

Mr. Armstrong. Senator, we are inquiring into- 



Senator Ervin. I think you can ask it, if it is material. How is it 
material ? 

Mr. Armstrong. Let me ask it a different way. Has there been any 
increase in your rate of compensation within the last 18 months, from 
either the Key Biscayne Bank & Trust Co. or the Monroe or any other? 

Ms. Moncourt. I get wage raises when everyone else does. 

Mr. Armstrong. Can you tell us the percentages of those wage 
raises or the amount of raises? 

Mr, Greer. I would object. I think you can ask her if she has 
received any unusual compensation or anything out of the ordinary. 

Senator Ervin. I tend to agree with counsel. I don't think it is 
material on whether she gets $100 a day or whether she gets $200 a 
day or if she gets $1,000 a month. 

Ms. Moncourt. Well, I have not received anything unusual. 



10531 

Senator Ervin. I think if she got something unusual, that might 
throw some light on it. 

Mr. Armstrong. You have not received any unusual increases? 

Ms. MoNCOURT. Nothing that nobody else doesn't get. 

Mr. Armstrong. Can j'ou tell us if anyone, other than yourself, is 
presently paying your legal fees ? 

Mr. Greer. I would object to that question strenuously. I don't think 
it has any bearing on this proceeding and I think it is confidential 
between a client and attorney as to how the fees are paid. 

Mr. Armstrong. Senator, can we have a conference ? We have done 
a little research on this question. 

Senator Ervin. OK. 

Mr. Armstrong. Off the record. 

[Discussion off the record.] 

Mr. Greer. Senator, I want this discussion on the record. 

Senator Ervin. OK. I don't know what her answer will be. If Mr. 
Rebozo is taking care of counsel's fees, I think that is relevant to show, 
as we say, in North Carolina, to show the relationship of the witness 
to the party of the cause. For whatever it is worth, I think she ought 
to frankly state that. If somebody else is paying her counsel fees. 

Mr. Greer. Well, at least under the law of Florida, that is a totally 
privileged subject. 

Senator Ervin. Well, if it is a conversation between her and her 
lawyer, that would be privileged, but a conversation between some 
third party that tells her that he will pay the lawyer's fees, would not 
be privileged, as I see it. 

Mr. Lenzner. That is correct. 

Mr. Armstrong. Can I restate the question. Senator ? 

Senator Ervin. Yes. 

Mr. Armstrong. Can you tell us if Mr. Charles G. Rebozo is paying 
your legal fees ? 

Ms. MoNCOURT. I am not — ^I haven't done anything. I am not under 
questioning. 

Mr. Greer. If you can answer that last question, go ahead. 

Ms. MoNcouRT. If, he would be. 

Mr. Armstrong. He is paying your legal fees ? 

Ms. MoNCOuRT. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Armstrong. And can you tell us what discussions you have had 
with him on that subject ? 

Ms. MoNcouRT. None whatsoever. 

Mr. Armstrong. And so you did not learn that from him, from Mr. 
Rebozo ? 

Ms. MoNCOURT, No. 

Mr. Greer. And for the record, I would like to have it noted that 
this witness is here only in her capacity as an employee of Mr. Rebozo 
and of the bank. 

Mr. Armstrong. Are you aware of whether or not Mr. Rebozo is 
paying the legal fees of any other individual ? 

Ms. MoNCouRT. No, sir. 

Mr. Armstrong. Off the record. 

[Discussion off the record.] 



10532 

Mr. Lenzner. Back on the record. I just have one or two other ques- 
tions. How did you learn for the first time that Mr. Rebozo was going 
to pay your legal fees ? 

Ms. MoNCOURT. I didn't learn anything. I just assumed he would, 
because I'm not under question. I mean, why should I hire a lawyer? 

Mr. Lenzner. I understand that, ma'am. AVell, let me ask you this. 
How is it that you came in contact with your present counsel? 

Ms. MoNcouRT. When I was first subpenaed, I mean, not subpenaed, 
but interrogated. 

Mr. Greer. For the record, we will make it very clear that our firm 
has been Avorking with. Mr. Rebozo's and the bank's throughout this 
matter. I think that should clear up any questions and terminate this 
line of questioning. I think it is entirely improper. 

Mr. Lenzner. Can we also stipulate that you and your firm rep- 
resent each and every bank employee that the committee has sought 
to question ? 

Mr. Greer. I think we can so stipulate. 

Mr. Lenzner. Anything else. If we can turn now, very quickly 

Mr. Armstrong. Including former employees ? 

Mr. Greer. I can't stipulate as to that, because I understand that 
you gentlemen have been all over the State of South Florida, knocking 
on people's doors at all hours of the night, employing highly unusual 
tactics. You have staked out banks and other people's residences and 
I don't know who you attempted to interview, so I can stipulate that 
we have represented every person that you have attempted to contact. 

Mr. Lenzner. That is a totally inaccurate statement. I want to state 
for the record, I find it irresponsible for any lawyer to make a mis- 
representation on the record like that. 

Mr. Greer. Mr. Lenzner, just a second. Would you like actual, 
physical proof 

Senator Ervin. I believe I will strike all of this, both his statement 
and yours, too. I don't think yours is relevant, Mr. Lenzner, or yours 
either, because it is either hearsay or else you have been missing an 
awful lot of sleep. 

Mr. Lenzner. I think we could spend some time, since you are 
present, resolving some of the remaining questions on documentation 
that the committee has asked for, tliat I understand that Mr. Dash 
himself has recently requested and which has not been made available. 

Mr. Greer. Senator, we have requested that Mr. Dash be here. 

Senator Ervin. Yes; I would suggest that, because I don't know 
just what the agreement was. 

Mr. Armstrong. I believe Mr. Greer was present when Mr. Dash 
designated Mr. Lenzner to finish the discussion. 

Mr. Lenzner. That is correct. 

Mr. Armstrong. Is that not correct ? 

Mr. Greer. All agreements have been made only with Mr. Dash. 
And the agreements we have made are on the record. I suggest that 
we get Mr. Dash present for this, now. I would respectfully request 
of the Senator for Mr. Dash to be present. I feel that the staff is at- 
tempting to go behind Mr. Dash's back and get records other than what 
Mr. Dash and we have agreed to and I am not prepared to discuss it. 

Senator Ervin. I certainly don't know what the agreement was, 
because I wasn't present and I haven't been furnished any written 



10533 

copies about that matter, and I would suggest to get Mr. Dash in 
to see if you can iron it out. Meanwhile, I'd better go over there and 
vote. And if you have any disagreement about what the agreement was, 
after having Mv. Dash here, let me know and I will come back and 
try to iron it out. 

Mr, Greer. Thank you. Senator. 

[Recess.] 

Mr. Armstrong. Put this on the record. 

Mr. Greer. I want to state that I will not have anything to do with 
Mr. Armstrong or Mr. Bellino. I am extremely upset at the powerplay 
Mr. Bellino and Mr. Armstrong, and IMr. Lenzner attempted to pull 
in reference to the production of documents. It is entirely outside of 
the agreement we had with Mr. Dash. I think it is reprehensible and 
totally and entirely unprofessional. 

Mr. Lenzner. Let me say for the record, that at the break for 
lunch, Mr. Dash indicated to Mr. Greer he was designating me to con- 
tinue the negotiations with regard to the further compliance with pre- 
viously furnished subpenas and pursuant to our prior discussions with 
Mr. Frates, when Mr. Rebozo was up here a week ago, and it was 
clearly our understanding, and it was clearly Mr. Dash's agreement 
and understanding, that there was no disagreement at that time, that 
we were going to continue to discuss, this afternoon the items that Mr. 
Greer had j^reviously been advised on pursuant to phone calls of last 
week and which records have not been produced today. 

The purpose of this session at this time is to indicate from the execu- 
tive session transcript of Mr. Rebozo the specific items that we are 
seeking, in addition to the ones that have been furnished to date. 

Mr. Greer. To make the record clear, that is not what I was refer- 
ring to. I was referring to the transactions during the interrogation 
of Ms. Moncourt. where you gentlemen sought to have the gentleman 
rule, that is Senator Ervin, on the total outstanding subpenas. which 
agreement had been prior reached as to those items that would be pro- 
duced and what additional information the committee would give to us 
to assist us in producing additional items. That is exactly what I am 
objecting to. 

Mr. Lenzner. Well, the record will speak for itself on that. 

Mr. Greer. And I find you gentlemen entirely and totally repre- 
hensible in this proceeding. 

Now, let me say that certain documents have already been produced 
to INIr. Dash, for which I have had a receipt, consisting of apparently 
a good portion of what was asked of me last Thursday. The remaining 
documents, I either didn't have time to get or it is not clear to me what 
is being asked for. 

Now, I would ask you gentlemen to show me, on the record, what 
the agreement was as to production of documents and I will make 
every attempt to get tliose items. 

Mr. Lenzner. We are referring to page 323 of the executive session 
of March 21, 1974. 

Mr. Greer. Do you have a copy of the transcript, so I may read it? 

Mr. Lenzner. Mr. Greer, I will give it to you in a second, if you 
will just bear with me. I want to make sure there are no misstatements 
again on the record from this. 

The question was — and this is on page 325 — we were asking about 
the Florida, Nixon-for-President committee account and Mr, Frates 



10534 

said : "Mr. Armstrong, I disagree with you. Tf we have not" — meaning 
if we have not produced those — "they will be available. I think I 
have a clear recollection of your having them, but we will make them 
available." 

Now, would you look at those, Mr. Greer, so there will be no mis- 
understanding of those kinds of issues. 

Mr. Greer. Apparently, Mr. I^nzner is reading from lines 22 
through 25 of page 324, and then he jumps to page 325, where there is 
a lot of intervening discussion. Excuse me while I read the entire 
proceeding. [Pause.] All right, gentlemen, I understand what you 
want on Nixon-f or- President records. What is the next one? 

Mr. Lenzner. Well, is there any question about compliance with 
that request, in view of Mr. Frates' commitment ? 

Mr. Greer. The record speaks for itself and I will discuss the matter 
with Frates and let you know his answer. What is the next item ? 

Mr. Lenzner. What you are saying now for the record is that 

Mr. Greer. What I am saying for the record is just what I have 
said. 

Mr. Lenzner. Can I finish ? 

Mr. Greer. No, I will not have my statement characterized. Now, 
what is the next item ? 

Mr. Lenzner. I want it clear for the record at this time, you are 
not saying that you will supply us with those records; the Florida 
Nixon-f or-President account ? 

Mr. Greer. I am saying, the record speaks for itself. I wasn't here. 
I will discuss the matter with Mr. Frates. Now, what is the next item ? 

Mr. Lenzner. If you will turn to page 336, there is a discussion with 
regard to CCC, with regard to $74,500 and on page 337 — and we will 
give you adequate time to digest that material first. [Pause.] This is 
the same transcript of March 21, 1974. 

Mr. Greer. All right. I understand what you are seeking on the 
$74,500. 

Mr. Lenzner. And I think — isn't there a reference also there to a 
sale of a shopping center ? 

Mr. Greer. No, there is a reference to $74,500 received from CCC 
and the response thereto, which is on the record. 

Mr. ArmstronCx. We were m 

Mr. Lenzner. Let me see the transcript for a moment. " 

Mr. Greer. What is the next item ? 

Mr. Lenzner. Page 339 — and am I correct, and if not, I would like 
to clarify it for the record — but, did Mr. Dash, when he talked to you 
last week, not discuss each of these items on the telephone? 

Mr. Greer. For the record, Mr. Dash gave me a general idea of what 
he was after. PTe gave us page citations to a record which we did not 
have in front of us. The matter was discussed late Thursday evening. 
I was out of town — no actually, in town, but heavily involved in an- 
other matter on Thursday, Friday, and Saturday and Sunday. 

Mr. Lenzner. The question was very simple. Did Mr. Dash specifi- 
cally request the items we are now reviewing? 

Mr. Greer. Not with specificity. 

Mr. Lenzner. On page 339 there is a reference made to interest pay- 
ments made to Senator Smathers. 

Mr. Greer. Gentlemen, I don't understand what you are seeking in 
this one. 



10535i 

Mr. Lexzner. The details and documents of the interest payment 
to Senator Smathers of $13,875 and how payment was made. 

Mr. Belling. Source of the payment. 

Mr. Greer. Wliat is the next item ? 

Mr. Armstrong. Page 340. 

Mr. Greer. Terry, I will not discuss this with Mr. Armstrong or 
Mr. Bellino. I will discuss it with you. That was the agreement with 
Sam. Now sit down. 

Mr. Lenzner. Wait a minute. I don't mind you requesting anything, 
but don't start giving orders around here. 

Mr. Greer. What is the next item ? 

Mr. Lenzner. Just don't tell me to sit down. 

Mr. Greer. What is the next item ? 

Mr. Lenzner. Just wait a second. 

Mr. Greer. Would you note that Mr. Lenzner left the meeting at 
3 :29 and is back. 

Mr. Armstrong. And is back at 3 :30. 

Mr. ScHULTz. I would like to make a statement on the record here. 
This morning, in the interview of Ms. Moncourt, the question was 
addressed to Senator Baker, whether or not the executive session testi- 
mony concerning these documents would be made available to Mr. 
Greer, and I think that Senator Baker said that he felt the committee 
would be most receptive to this request. I would suggest we terminate 
this at this time. I think it is patently unfair to have counsel go through 
page by page and try to pick out of context the items that the 
committee is seeking. Let's wait mitil he gdts that and let thean have the 
transcript and then they can sit down and go over that. 

Mr. Lenzner. I would suggest to you, Mr. Schultz, that would un- 
duly delay our request for compliance with previously issued subpenas 
and with the understanding Mr. Frates had with Mr. Dash. So if you 
don't mind, you may leave if you like, but I would like to continue 
this. 

Mr. Schultz. If he wants to make some notes on what you are re- 
questing, that is fine, but I think it is a waste of time. 

Mr. Greer. I agree with you completely, but in a spirit of co- 
operation, w^hich this portion of the staff has not reciprocated, I will 
go through these items one at a time. What is the next item ? 

Mr. Lenzner. The next item is on page 340, complete records on 
unsecured loans for 1969. 

Mr. Greer. All right, gentlemen, where is the agreement referred 
to in the record for production ? There are statements by Mr. Rebozo 
that he has the documents, but I see no agreement that he wovdd 
produce them. 

Mr. Lenzner. And at the bottom of page 340, Mr. Rebozo said : 

Well, I am investing all the time ; if you want to continue the same procedure, 
we will do it, and I don't commingle any funds of any kind. 

And then on page 341 : "But I have copies of all those notes and 
names of all of them and it goes way, way back." 

Mr. Greer. May I see that again ? 

Mr. Lenzner. Yes; just one second. Now, in addition the under- 
standing with Mr. Frates — and Mr. Greer was not present for this 
session— was that Mr. Rebozo was going to go through a series of 
documents and attempt to clarify and clear up questions he had in 



10536 

his mind on his analysis of the documents that had been ^ven to him, 
and in that way attempt to focus specific questions that Mr. Rebozo 
could answer and, if he could not answer, he would then, according 
to our understanding with Mr. Frates, furnish specific documents that 
lay behind the transactions that were being inquired into. 

Mr. Greer. May I see the page again ? 

Mr. Lenzner. I just want to see if there are any additional state- 
ments by anybody that was there at the time that would also help you, 
Mr. Greer. 

If you will look at page 345, which is again a continuation of Mr. 
Rebozo's inquiry, Mr. Dash making a general declaratory statement : 
"For these purposes, we're noting things that we're going to get 
additional records to show." In any event, here is the transcript. 

Mr. Greer. Taken in context, this entire matter is not an agreement 
to produce the items. First, the question is asked by Mr. Bellino: 

On your financial statements, you include always an it«m, notes payable to 
others; unsecured. From 69 on, they range from $108,350 to $171,215. What's 
the source of that information? Do you have some records? 

And then Mr. Rebozo answers. 

Mr. Lenzner. I have no objection if you want to make this page a 
part of the record so that we don't repeat it all, I have no objection. 
We will simply furnish a Xerox copy to the reporter later. 

Mr. Greer. Yes. As I said, Mr. Bellino asked : "What is the source 
of that information? Do you have some records?" And Mr. Rebozo 
replies that yes, he has records. And then he goes on and states: 
"Now, when I sold 'the business, I contacted them all — meaning the 
investors — I wanted to pay it off, and every one of them asked me 
if I could invest it in something else for them. I said, 'Well, I'm 
investing all the time; if you want to continue the same procedure, 
we'll do it and I don't commingle any funds of any kind.' " 

So he is talking clearly about the investors there. Now, at this point, 
I do not construe that as an agreement, however, I will check and 
find out if Mr. Rebozo is willing to produce these documents. 

Mr. Lenzner. Page 345, the details of the $100,000 loan from Key 
Biscayne Bank. 

Mr. Greer. That was provided today. 

Mr. Lenzner. Well, the question I believe in the transcript was 
about the proceeds of the loan. 

Mr. Greer. The records as to the proceeds, where they went and 
how they were paid back, were provided today. 

Mr. Lenzner. Well, we will review that. I don't accept that state- 
ment as being accurate, but we will review that. 

Mr. Greer. What is the next item ? 

Mr. Lenzner. The next item, Mr. Greer, is Greater Miami — Greater 
Savings and Loan, which refers back to page 316 and has not been 
provided as yet. 

Mr. Greer. No ; it hasn't. 

Mr. Lenzner. We are in agreement on that. I think we have some 
discussion, and I believe it is in the record, and we are trying to find 
the specific page numlber, but we had some discussion that the cer- 
tificates of deposit, that previously were shown to Mr. Schultz and 
Mr. Thompson, but have not been shown to other members of the 



10537 

staff, that Mr. Frates had indicated no objection to also furnishing us 
copies of those. 

Mr. Greer. Presidential certificates of deposit ? 

Mr. Lenzner. Yes. 

Mr. Greer. That wasn't discussed with me by Mr. Dash. 

Mr. Lenzner. All right, I don't believe it was discussed by you 
with Mr. Dash. 

Mr. Greer. But I w^ould like the page reference. 

Mr. Lenzner. Yes ; but in addition I think there has been testimony 
today with regard to a correspondence file relating to James Golden 
and I would make a request for that. Then turn to pages 309 and 
331 

Mr. Greer. Well, let's get things that are already agreed to before 
you get into new items. 

Mr. Lenzner. But I want to make sure you make a note of that. 
Turn to pages 309 and 331, which refer to certain documents and 
records which were used to prepare the financial statements of Mr. 
Rebozo. And I don't believe, for the record, that Mr. Dash has made 
a specific request for those prior to this time. I'm not sure about that. 

Mr. Greer. Anything of that nature, I request Mr, Dash call me 
and I will discuss those with him. 

Mr. Lenzner. Scott, an}i:hing else ? 

Mr. Armstrong. Telephone records. 

Mr. Lenzner. Did you also say, Mr. Greer, that the First National 
Bank had 'been provided or had not been provided. 

Mr, Greer. We weren't asked. Oh, you mean the First National 
Bank of Miami. First National Bank of Miami Springs has been 
provided. You've got to identify which First National you are talking 
about. We have umpteen thousands of them in Florida. 

Mr. Lenzner. Now, the only other item that remains outstanding — 
well, I won't say the only other item, but one other item is the telephone 
records. 

Mr. Greer. There was agreement prior to this that we will be given 
specific lists of lists of numbers, reducing the prior request to a 
manageable amount. As soon as we wull get that, we wall look into it, 

Mr. Armstrong. I believe we indicated we would provide the 
numbers. I don't think we said that we would provide them in the form 
of a list. 

Mr. Greer. I suggest you talk to Mr. Dash about that. He and I 
have discussed it and he has reiterated the prior agreement of his 
understanding and mine. I think he can give you guidance on that. 
Gentlemen, if there are no other items 

Mr. Lenzner. I want to get the page record on those C. D.'s. The 
discussion on that was on page 327, but it starts on pages 326, 327, and 
328, And, I think to shorten it a bit, if you look on page 327, Mr. Greer, 
Mr. Frates says: "This is a matter that has been discussed fully in 
the newspapers and if you don't have them, we certainly will give 
you them." 

Mr. Greer. OK. As to the correspondence and any other documents 
and the telephone, which have been discussed, I suggest you discuss it 
with Mr. Dash and let- him contact me. 

Mr. Lenzner. That closes the record for today. 

[Whereupon, at 3 :20 p.m., the committee was recessed, subject to the 
call of the Chair.] 



10538 



MoNCOURT Exhibit No. 1 







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i^d<.5l8W 'M) 21 JrO'iaOiTVO 1-00060- ao;*- . . /OO 2 2 500000/^'- 




WEDNESDAY, APRIL 10, 1974 

U.S. Senate, 
Select Committee on 
Presidential Campaign Activities, 

Washington^ D.C. 

The Select Committee met, pursuant to notice, at 4 :30 p.m., in room 
G-334, Dirksen Senate Office Building, Senator Sam Ervin, Jr., 
chairman. 

Present : Senators Ervin and Weicker. 

Also present: Terry Lenzner, assistant chief counsel; Scott Arm- 
strong, investigator ; Richard L. Schultz, assistant minority counsel ; 
Emily Sheketoff, research assistant. 

Senator Ervin. Fred, maybe we had better both stand up. Do 
you swear that the evidence that you shall give to the Senate Select 
Committee on Presidential Campaign Activities will be the truth, the 
whole truth and nothing but the truth, so help you Grod ? 

Mr. BuzHARDT. I do. 

Mr. Lenzner. Thank you Senator. 

TESTIMONY OF J. FREDERICK BUZHARDT 

Mr. BuzHARDT. I would like to say that I would like to' request 
under rule 30 a copy of the transcript. 

Senator Ervin. We sort of allow folks to correct the transcript, 
but we do not give custody of it to them. 

Mr. BuzHARDT. I thought that under rule 30 it said that a transcript 
will be provided to the witness at his request at the committee's 
expense. 

Mr. Lenzner. If the committee so votes, but it is at the discretion 
of the committee, I think, Mr. Chairman. 

Senator Ervin. Yes. 

Mr. Lenzner. Mr. Buzhardt, when did you first join the White 
House staff ? 

INIr. Buzhardt, I was detailed to work at the White House in May 
of 1973. 

Mr. Lenzner. Do you remember what specific date ? 

Mr. Buzhardt. I think about May the 11th. 

Mr. Lenzner. AVhat was your title then, sir? 

Mr. Buzhardt. Special counsel. I was also general counsel for the 
Department of Defense. 

(10539) 



10540 

Mr, Lenzner. Who requested you to be detailed there? 

Mr. BuzHARDT, The President. 

Mr. Lenzxer. As part of those duties did there come a time when 
you learned of a transmittal of $100,000 to Mr. C. G. Rebozo? 

Mr. BuzHARDT. Not as a part of those duties, I think. I do not 
recall where I first heard of it, whether it was in the newspapei- 
or where I had heard it. 

Mr. Lenzner. Do you have any recollection of any individual 
speaking to you with regard to the $100,000 contribution from 
Hughes ? 

Mr. BuzHARDT. I do not know where I first heard it. 

Mr. Lenzner. Do you have recollection of discussions after you 
did learn of it with other individuals at the White House? 

Mr. BuzHARDT. Vaguely, yes. 

Mr. Lenzner. Do you recall when they started, when those dis- 
cussions began ? 

Mr. BuzHARDT. No, I do not. 

Mr. Lenzner. You have no recollection at all ? 

Mr, BuzHARDT. No, not as to the time, no. 

Mr. Lenzner. Did you learn of the Hughes transmittal of funds 
to Mr. Eebozo prior to the time that you were detailed to the White 
House staff? 

Mr. BuZHARDT. No. 

Mr. Lenzner. Do you recall any discussions with any specific 
individuals at the White House with regard to the contribution? 

Mr. BuzHARDT. Do you mean who the individuals were ? 

Mr. Lenzner. Yes. 

Mr. BuzHARDT. Yes. 

Mr. Lenzner. Could you describe first of all who they were ? 

Mr. BuzHARDT. Mr. Garment. 

Mr. Lenzner. Anybody else ? 

Mr. BuzHARDT. I do not recall anyone else. There may have been. 

Mr. Lenzner. When did you speak with Mr, Garment, approxi- 
mately ? 

Mr. BuzHARDT. I do not recall when it was. 

Mr. Lenzner. Can you tell us what the substance of the conversa- 
tion was with Mr. Garment ? 

Mr. BuzHARDT. No, I cannot. 

Mr. Lenzner. Do you maintain a log or diary of any kind that 
reflects meetings or discussions that you have had? 

Mr. BuzHARDT. No, I do not. 

Mr. Lenzner. Do you maintain any telephone records that would 
reflect telephonic communications ? 

Mr. BuzHARDT. No, I do not. 

Mr. Lenzner. Did you have more than one discussion with Mr. 
Garment, to your recollection ? 

Mr. BuzHARDT. I may have. 

Mr. Lenzner. And you recall none of the substance or subject mat- 
ter of those discussions? 

Mr. BuzHARDT. Yes, I recall those discussions, but I recall gen- 
erally the subject of the discussions. But they were as co-counsel 
and within the attorney-client privilege, I think. I believe that 
they are. 



10541 

Mr. Lenzner. Representing whom, sir ? 

Mr. BuzHARDT. Eepresenting the President. 

Mr. Lenzner. Are you saying now Mr. Garment, representing the 
President, spoke to you, representing the President, as co-counsels 
with regard to the Hughes-Rebozo contribution ? 

Mr. BuzHARDT. We both function as counsel. I do not recall 
whether — we both function as counsel, and all of our discussions 
were within that relationship. 

Mr. Lenzner. But are you saying now ? I thought you said before 
that your discussions with regard to the Hughes-Rebozo contribu- 
tions were not as a part of your duties as White House counsel. Do 
you want to correct that or do I have a misunderstanding ? 

Mr. BuzHARDT. I think you misundei-stood what I said. I said I 
clid not know if I first learned of them in my function as counsel. 
I do not — I may have first learned in the newspaper. I do not know 
where I first heard of them. 

Mr. Lenzner. Was Mr. Garment seeking any advice or counsel 
from you with regard to the discussion you had with him? 

Mr. BuzHARDT. That is my recollection, yes. 

Mr. Lenzner. For the President ? 

Mr. BuzHARDT. I really do not know whether he was seeking it 
for the President or seeking it with reference to himself and what 
he should advise. 

Mr. Lenzner. Advise the President? 

Mr. BuzHARDT. Yes. I do not recall for what purpose he was seek- 
ing the advice. 

Mr. Lenzner. If you do not recall for what purpose he was 
seeking the advice, Mr. Chairman, I would suggest that the witness' 
answer indicates that he was not seeking advice on behalf of the 
President. 

Senator Ervin. It would indicate that to me, also, unless he was 
a lawyer for Mr. Garment and the attorney- client relationship existed 
between ^Ir. Garment and him. 

Mr. Lenzner. Was Mr. Garment your client for the purpose of this 
discussion ? 

Mr. BuzHARDT. No. Mr. Garment and I were fellow counsel for 
the President. 

Mr. Lenzner. And you are saying that this discussion was held 
solely for the purpose of advice and counsel as to the President? 

Mr. BuziiARDT. Xo. Mr. Garment sought my advice and he did not 
tell me what was the specific purpose of the advice. 

Mr. Lenzner. Well, from the nature of the advice, was it clear to 
you that it was advice being sought on behalf of the President or 
on behalf of the President's friend. Mr. Rebozo ? 

Mr. BuzHARDT. It was not on behalf of the President's friend. 

Mr. Lenzner. Mr. Rebozo ? 

Mr. BuZHARDT. No. 

Mr. Lenzner. Was he seeking legal advice from you ? 
Mr. BuzHARDT. Yes. 

Mr. Lenzner. And was the legal advice he was seeking with regard 
to issues or problems that were related to President Nixon? 
Mr. BuziiARDT. It could have been. 
Mr. Lenzner. But you do not know ? 

31-880 O - 74 - pi. 22 - 23 



10543 

Mr. BuzHARDT. I do not know. 

Mr. Lenzner. Now did Mr. Garment and other people talk to you 
on a variety of issues and matters on a daily basis? 

Mr. BuziiARDT. Yes. 

Mr. Lenzner. And do they all relate to advice and counsel, legal 
advice and counsel on behalf of the President? 

Mr. BrzHARDT. The overwhelmine: majority of them. yes. 

Mr. Lenzner. But on occasion Mr. Garment and others do speak 
to you on issues that do not relate to your duties as counsel to the 
President, is that not correct ? 

Mr. BuzHARDT. That is quite correct. 

Mr. Lenzner. Did you discuss with Mr. Garment last week, his 
meeting with members of this committee ? 

Mr. BuzHARDT. The fact that he was coming ? 

Mr. Lenzner. Yes. 

Mr. BuzHARDT. Yes. 

Mr. Lenzner. Did you give him any advice or counsel at that 
time ? 

• Mr. BuZHARDT. No. 

Mr. Lenzner. Did he advise you that he was going to discuss with 
us, discussions that he had with you and other people with regard 
to the Hughes-Rebozo contribution ? 

Mr. BuzHARDT. He advised me that he was notified that that was 
the subject you wished to discuss. 

Mr. Lenzner. Did you object to him coming and discussing those 
issues with us ? 

Mr. BuzHARDT. [Nods in the negative.] Did I object to him? 

Mr. Lenzner. Yes. 

Mr. BuZHARDT. No. 

Mr. Lenzner. Did you suggest to him or advise him that he 
should interpose the attorney-client privilege? 

Mr. BuziiARDT. No, I did not. 

Mr. Lenzner. Did you discuss with him, after the conversation 
we had with Mr. Garment, the substance of our meeting with him? 

Mr. BuzHARDT. I think he mentioned the fact that he came up, 
but I do not think that I discussed with him what the subject of 
the discussions were. 

Mr. Lenzner. After the discussion, I am talking about now. 

Mr. BuziiARDT. No. I do not think — a passing comment at the 
most that he was here and was questioned about the Kebozo money. 

Mr. Lenzner. Did he not advise you that lie had told us that he 
had discussions with you Avith regard to the Hughes-Rebozo con- 
tribution ? 

Mr. BuziiARDT. I do not recall him saying that. He may have. 

Mr. Lenzner. Can you describe for Senator Ervin's benefit, in any 
more detail, the nature of the advice that INTr. Garment was seeking 
on this occasion that you say is protected by the attorney-client 
privilege ? 

Mr. BuziiARDT. It had to do with whether or not the counsel for 
the President could provide advice to private persons, legal advice. 

Mr. Lenzner. Excuse me. 

Mr. BuziiARDT. Legal advice. 



10543 

Mr. Lenzxer. And did he indicate at whose request he was making 
this inquiry ? 

j\Ir. BuzHARDT. No, he did not. 

Mr. Lenzner. Was Mr. Rebozo's name mentioned ? 

Mr. BuzHARDT. Possibly. It probably was. 

Mr. Lenzner. Senator, if the question was, "Could White House 
counsel advise private parties?" as Mr. Buzhardt now says was the 
nature of the discussion, I do not see how that possibly relates to 
legal advice or the representation of the President. 

Senator Ervin. I agree with you. 

Mr. Lenzner. I would request then that the Chair direct 

Senator Ervin. Did not INIr. Garment discuss with you the question 
that the IRS was investigating Rebozo about this gift from the 
Hughes interests ? 

Mr. Buzhardt. He may have at one point. I do not recall ever 
discussing any IRS investigation with Mr. G-arment. I did with 
someone else, but not with Mr. Garment that I recall. 

Senator Ervin. Well, as a matter of fact, were you not consulted 
as to how Rebozo should handle this matter with the IRS? 

Mr. Buzhardt. I do not recall it being in the context of IRS at 
all. Senator. 

Senator Ervin. Well, did they discuss with you the advisability 
of Rebozo getting the tax authority to look after this situation ? 

Mr. Buzhardt. I do not know whether it was a tax lawyer or 
some other kind of laAvyer, Senator. The question that we discussed 
had to do with what were the limitations on people on the Govern- 
ment payroll. 

Senator Ervin. There is a law against a person on the Government 
payroll acting as legal adviser to some outsider, is there not? 

Mr. Buzhardt. I do not know if there is a law, but it is not 
appropriate. 

Senator Ervin. It is practiced. 

Mr. Buzhardt. It is not appropriate. 

Senator Ervin. Yes. Can you remember anything about what 
Garment talked to you about, about Rebozo? 

Mr. Buzhardt. Yes. I recall that he mentioned the subject in the 
context of whether we could — whether it would be appropriate for 
Government counsel to advise a private party. To the best of my 
recollection it was in the context of Mr. Rebozo. 

Senator Ervin. That certainly did not involve any confidential 
communication with any attorney-client relationship, did it? 

Mr. Buzhardt. It could have. Senator, it could have. 

Senator Ervin. I do not see how it could have. 

Mr. Buzhardt. It depends upon who he was seeking the advice 
for. 

Mr. Lenzner. He did not tell you at any time who he was seeking 
the advice for? 

Mr. Buzhardt. No, not to my recollection. 

Mr. Lenzner. And he did not tell you who the private parties 
were ? 

Mr. Buzhardt. He might have mentioned Mr. Rebozo. I do not 
recall that he specifically did, but it is my impression that he did. At 
least I connect it now in mv mind with Mr. Rebozo. 



10544 

Mr. Lenzner. Mr. Chairman, I would suggest that we now get 
a full explanation of what Mr. Garment said to Mr. Buzhardt at the 
time they had that conversation. 

Senator Ervin. I would like to hear it. I cannot see how it would 
affect any attorney-client relationship with the President. 

Mr. Buzhardt. Will the Chair make an explicit ruling? 

Senator ER%aK. I will make an explicit ruling that it is now cov- 
ered — any client relationship between you and the President. 

Mr. Buzhardt. Thank you, Mr. Chairman. 

Mr. Lenzner. Thank you, Mr. Chairman. 

Mr. Buzhardt. Mr. Garment, at some point, I do not remember 
Avhen, but to the best of my recollection, it was in connection with Mr. 
Rebozo, mentioned that there was ,a problem and a question of 
whether he, Mr. Garment, could advise the party directly. I gathered 
the impression that there was at least a question of whether he could 
discuss a matter with a private citizen, the problem of the private 
citizen. And I advised him that in my opinion that would not be 
proper and should not be done. 

That was the context of the discussion. 

Mr. Lenzner. Go ahead. 

Mr. Buzhardt. There may have been discussion of whoever it is 
on the outside has to get a private lawyer. 

[Senator Ervin leaves the hearing room.] 

[Senator Weicker enters the hearing room.] 

Mr. Lenzner. Did you ever have any discussions with regard to the 
possible use of money received by Mr. Relx)zo prior to the news media 
disclosures of this last weekend ? 

Mr. Buzhardt. No, not to my recollection. 

Mr. Lenzner. Did you ever learn prior to the news media dis- 
closures of the allegations or information regarding the possible use 
of the money received by Mr. Rebozo ? 

Mr. Buzhardt. Yes, I did. The afternoon before Mr. Garment told 
me that he had a call from a reporter — I do not know which one. It 
sticks in my mind from the Washington Post — ^who asked him or 
told him that he was writing a story on the subject and asked him 
did he know anything about it. 

Mr. Lenzner. And did Mr. Garment provide you with any infor- 
mation of his own at that time ? 

Mr. Buzhardt. No, he said he did not know any information to 
provide. 

Mr. Lenzner. Had you had any discussions with anybody else with 
regard to the possible use of the funds prior to that ? 

Mr. Buzhardt. No. 

Mr. Lenzner. Have you had any discussions with anyone subse- 
quent ? 

Mr. Buzhardt. Yes. 

Mr. Lenzner. Can you tell us who you discussed that with? 

Mr. Buzhardt. I do not recall, but I am sure that I discussed it 
because I read the newspaper articles and it was a general topic 
of conversation. I do not recall with whom, but I am sure that I 
must have. 

Mr. Lenzner. We are talking only about the beginning of this 
week. 



1054.5 

Mr. BuzHARDT. Yes. 

Mr, Lenzner. And you do not have any recollection today, Wednes- 
day, who you may have discussed that with Sunday or Monday? 

Mr. BuzHARDT. No, probably someone in the office. 

Mr. Lenzner. But you cannot indicate specifically who? 

Mr. BuzHARDT. I may have discussed it — I just do not recall who 
I may have discussed it with. I may have discussed it with Mr. 
Grarment. 

Mr. Lenzner. When you say you may have, do you have any spe- 
cific recollection of that ? 

ISIr. BuzHARDT. I have no specific recollection, but I have probably 
seen him once or twice since then. 

Mr. Lenzner. Do you have any specific recollection of discussing 
it with anyone since Sunday or Monday ? 

Mr. BuzHARDT. Yes, I have a specific recollection of discussing it 
with several people. I know I expressed an opinion about it and 
I recall the opinion and recall expressing it, but I do not recall 
with whom. 

Mr. Lenzner. Did you attempt to obtain any further information 
on the validity of the newspaper article? 

Mr. BuzHARDT. I do not think I did personally. I might have. I 
might have asked questions if I didn't know anything about it. 
But I read in the paper that there were denials. 

Mr. Lenzner. Did you take any steps to determine whether the 
information was correct or not ? 

Mr. BuZHARDT. No. 

Mr. Lenzner. You asked no one to check it out for you ? 

Mr. BuzHARDT. I may have asked people questions, did they know 
or did anyone know, but I do not recall specifically. I wouldn't do it 
in an official way. I do not recall any. I may have. I don't recall who 
all I talked to on it. 

Mr. Lenzner. Don't recall who all you talked to? 

Mr. BuzHARDT. No, I don't ref^all who I talked to on it. I could 
have talked to any number of people. 

Mr. Lenzner. Did you become aware or learn of anyone else at- 
tempting to ascertain the accuracy of the news report? 

Mr. Btjzhardt. I do not know how to interpret your question. I am 
sure we discussed it. I may have asked someone, do you know or do 
you think somebody got money, or I may have asked someone, do 
you know if someone got money. I do not recall. 

Mr. Lenzner. I am asking, sir, if you aware of anyone attempting 
to determine from other sources whether the information that Mr. 
Rebozo furnished the funds to Miss Woods and F. Donald Nixon 
was accurate or not ? 

Mr. BuzHARDT. I personnally called Mr. Donald Nixon's attorney 
and told him the story, Avhat was in it. I think on Monday I talked 
to Mr. EdAvard Nixon myself and told him that he was included in 
the story so he would know, and I am sure I discussed it with people 
on the staff. But I did not attempt to — it does not really concern me. 
It certainly was not a part of my official duty to find out. 

Mr. Lenzner. And you certainly were not doing it as counsel for 
the President. 

Mr. BuzHARDT. What? 



10546 

Mr. Lenzner. Making these discussions. 

Mr. BuzHARDT. No one has asked me to find out anything about it. 
Mr. Lenzner. I take it you have had no discussions with the Presi- 
dent with regard to the subject. 

Mr. BuZHARDT. No. 

Senator Wetgker. Who instructed you to call Donald Nixon and 
Edward Nixon ? 

Mr. BuzHARDT. No one instructed me. I called them on my own. 

Senator Weicker. On your own initiative ? 

Mr. BuziiARDT. That is correct. I quite frequently notify them 
when there are stories in the press. 

Mr. Lenzner. You say you quite frequently notify 

Mr. BuzHARDT. Well, not frequently, but if I see something I think 
they ought to know regarding them, I will pick up the phone and 
call one of them or their attorney and tell them that it is in the press. 

Mr. Lenzner. You have had prior discussions then with Mr. Stan- 
ley McKiernan ? 

Mr. BuzHARDT. I know Mr. McKiernan. 

Mr. Lenzner. How long have you known him ? 

Mr. BuzHARDT. Within the last year I have known him. 

Mr. Lenzner. When did you call Mr. McKiernan ? 

Mr. BuzHARDT. I do not recall when the story came out. Within 
the last week, I suppose, because I think the story came out within I 
the last week. 

Mr. Lenzner. You just testified a few minutes ago that Mr. Gar- 
ment received a call from a newspaper reporter the day before the 
story came out. Was it after that that you called Mr. McKiernan? 

Mr. BuzHARDT. It was after the newspaper story was published 
that I talked to Mr. McKiernan. 

Mr. Lenzner. Was it the same day the story came out? 

Mr. BuzHARDT. I do not recall, Mr. lenzner. It could have been. 
It could have been the next day. 

Mr. Lenzner. And what did Mr. McKiernan say to you? 

Mr. Btjzhardt. He said he would look into it. He did not know 
anything about it, as I recall. 

Mr. Lenzner. Did you read him the story ? 

Mr. BuzHARDT. No, I just told him generally there was such a 
story, and generally what it said, that he had received money from 
Mr. Rebozo. 

Mr. Lenzner. Do you recall where Mr. McKiernan was when you 
talked with him ? 

Mr. BuziiARDT. I really don't know. He was either at home or in 
the office. He was in California, I understood. 

Mr. Lenzner. Did you know for a fact that he was in California? 

Mr. BuziiARDT. No. My secretary placed the call, but I assumed 
that he was. You know, that is where he lives and works. 

Mr. Lenzner. Do you recall whether it was on the weekend or dur- 
ing a weekday ? 

Mr. BuziiARDT. No. 

Mr. Lenzner. Does your secretary work on the weekends? 

Mr. BuziiARDT. Yes. 

Mr. Lenzner. "\'\niat is her name, sir? 

Mr. BuzHARDT. I have several. 



i 



i 



10547 

Mr. Lenzner. 'Which one placed the call to Mr. McKiernan? 

Mr. BuziiARDT. I do not recall. 

Mr. Lenzner. You have no recollection of which secretary placed 
the call to Mr. McKiernan ? 

Mr. BtjZhardt. No, I sure don't. 

Mr. Lenzner. It's only 4 or 5 days ago, if that. 

Mr. BuzHARDT. I do not recall, Mr. Lenzner. I talk on approxi- 
mately 100 phone calls a day. I don't have any idea. 

Mr. Lenzner. I take it Mr. McKiernan did not deny the story then 
on the basis of the fact that he was aware of. He said he would 
check into it. 

Mr. BuzHARDT. That he would check into it? He said it was incon- 
ceivable to him, but he would ask. 

Mr. Lenzner. And did you hear from him after he checked into 
it? 

Mr. BuzHARDT. Yes, I think — I am not sure. Mr. McKiernan told 
me he was leaving foi- Honolulu or somewhere and I am not sure 
whether he called me back or not. He may have. Somebody else in 
the office may have. I was aware that somebody issued a statement, 
I don't remember who, with a denial. 

Mr. Lenzner. Did they read the statement to you before it was 
issued ? 

Mr. BuziiARDT. No, sir, 

Mr. Lenzner. Did Mr. McKiernan ? 

Mr. BuzHARDT. I have never read the statement. I still do not know 
what was said. I read something in the press about it. 

Mr. Lenzner. Did you ask Mr. McKiernan about whether either of 
his clients had been interrogated with regard to the subject? 

Mr. BuZHARDT. No. 

Mr. Lenzner. That was not of concern to you ? 

Mr. BuziiARDT. No. 

Mr. Lenzner. Did you make a report on your conversation with 
Mr. McKiernan to anybody ? 

Mr. BuziiARDT. No. I did not make a report. I might have men- 
tioned it in a conversation to someone, but I did not make a report 
on it. 

Mr. Lenzner. Do you recall who you mentioned it to ? 

Mr. BuZHARDT. No. 

Mr. Lenzner. Did you discuss it with the President? 

Mr. BuZHARDT. No. 

Mr. Lenzner. Did you discuss it with General Haig? 
Mr. BuziiARDT. I do not recall. I may have. 
Mr. Lenzner. Did you discuss it with Mr. Ziegler? 
Mr. BuziiARDT. Don't think so. I don't recall doing it. 
Mr. Lenzner. You say you may have talked about it with Greneral 
Haig. 

Mr. BuziiARDT. I may have. 

Mr. Lenzner. But you have no specific recollection of that ? 

Mr. BuZHARDT. No. 

Mr. Lenzner. Did you seek to furnish that information to the 
President from someone else? 

Mr. BuzHARDT. What information ? 



10548 

Mr. Lenzner. The information that you had talked with Mr. Mc- 
Kiernan and advised him about the story. 

Mr. BUZHARDT. No. 

Mr. Lexzner. When you learned of the story from Mr. Garment, 
did you seek to furnish that information to the President? 

Mr. BuZHARDT. No. 

Mr. Lenzxer. You did not think that that was information the 
President ought to know about ? 

Mr. BuzHARDT. It was not within my responsibility to make sure 
he know about it. It was a call from a reporter about what he said 
he purported to write and Mr. Garment happened to mention it when 
we met at somebody else's office. 

Mr. Lenzner. Whose office was that ? 

Mr. BuziiARDT. Mr. St. Clair's office. 

Mr. Lenzner. Was Mr. St. Clair present during that discussion 
about the newspaper article? 

Mr. BuzHARDT. About the call from the reporter ? 

Mr. Lexzner. Yes. 

Mr. BuzHARDT. Yes. 

Mr. Lexzner. Was anyone else present ? 

Mr. Btizhardt. I don't recall. There may have been. 

Mr. Lexzxer. Did Mr. St. Clair react in any way to the story? 

Mr. BuzHARDT. Did he react ? 

Mr. Lexzxer. Yes. Did he seek other information with regard to 
the story ? 

Mr. BuzHARDT. Not that I am aware of. 

Let me tell you what Mr. Garment said. He said, look, I got a crazy 
call from a reporter. He may have said what reporter, which is not 
unusual where we work, and told what the repoiter had told him. 
That was just about the size of it. 

Mr. Lexzner. Which was what ? 

Mr. BuzHARDT. It was a passing comment. 

Mr. Lexzxer. "Wliat was the story as you knew it then? 

Mr. BuzHARDT. As I recall, it was a story that Mr. Rebozo had 
paid money out of his $100,000 account to Rose Woods and Donald 
Nixon, that the reporter said he was going to write such a story. 

Mr. Lexzxer. Was there any discussion with regard to how the 
"\Aniite House — what responses the White House wanted to make with 
regard to that story ? 

Mr. BuZHARDT. No. 

Mr. Lexzxer. That was never discussed? 

Mr, BrzirARDT. No, there is no response required from the White 
House, or I don't consider so, 

Mr. Lexzner. Going back to that convereation with Mr. Garment 
in Mr. St. Clair's office, did Mr. Garment indicate whether the in- 
quirv from the reporter reflected that other individuals might have 
received funds from the $100,000? 

Mr. BuzHARDT. No. 

Mr. Lenzner. No other names were mentioned? 

Mr. BuZHARDT. No. 

Mr. Lenzner. You say that you also called Mr. McKiernan. Did 
you make any notes of that conversation? 
Mr. Buziiardt. No. 



10549 

Mr. Lenzner. Are you saying also that you have or do not have a 
recollection as to whether Mr. McKiernan called you back? 

Mr, BuzHARDT. I do not even have a recollection of whether I 
talked to McKiernan; I may have. After that he may have called 
me back or I talked to him on something else, I do not know. 

Mr. Lenzner. You say you might have talked to him ? 

Mr. BuzHARDT. I may have talked to him subsequently, but I do 
not recall. 

Mr. Lenzner. You say vou may have talked to him on something 
else? 

Mr. BuzHARDT. Possibly. 

Mr. Lenzner. Do you recall what that other subject was? 

Mr. BuZHARDT. No. 

Mr. Lenzner. Have you had any correspondence with Mr. Mc- 
Kiernan ? 

Mr. BuZHARDT. No. 

Mr. Lenzner. Did you learn from Mr. McKiernan what the posi- 
tion of his client was with regard to these stories? 

Mr. BuZHARDT. No. 

Mr. Lenzner. Did you attempt to learn from Mr. McKiernan 
whether his client, Mr. F. Donald Nixon, received any part of the 
$100,000? 

Mr. BuzHARDT. No. 

Mr. Lenzner. Do you know if anyone in the White House did 
attempt to learn whether Mr. F. Donald Nixon ever received a part 
or whole of the $100,000 ? 

Mr. BuzHARDT. No. someone might have learned that. He made a 
statement in the press, as I mentioned before. I read his statement 
in the press or reference to his statement. 

Mr. Lenzner. But aside from his statement in the press, you know 
of no effort by any individual to ascertain 

Mr. BuzHARDT. I know of none, Mr. Lenzner. 

INIr. Lenzner. Just so I can finish the sentence for the record. 

The question was, Mr. Buzhardt knows of no effort by any indi- 
vidual to obtain information as to whether Mr. F. Donald Nixon 
did in fact receive part of the $100,000. 

Mr. BuziiARDT. May I elaborate, Mr. Lenzner ? 

Mr. Lenzner. Certainly. 

Mr. Buzhardt. No one I talked to in the White House took the 
story seriously enough that T know of to bother to ask. 

Mr. Lenzner. At any time, including up until the time that you 
came over today ? 

Mr. Buzhardt. That is correct, or to worry particularly about it. 

Mr. Lenzner. Was there any effort made to determine whether the 
allega-tions that Mr. Kalmbach had so testified to that, was there 
any effort to find out if that was true ? 

INIr. Buzhardt. Not that I know of. 

Mr. Lenzner. And you are saying, again, that it was not considered 
serious enough to warrant a determination or an attempt to determine 
whether that statement was true as to Mr. Kalmbach 's testimony? 

INIr. Buzhardt. No. I said I knew of no one who tried to find from 
Mr. Kalmbach or anyone else if it were true, if he had so testified. 



105SO 

I do not know of anyone who called him or called you, the commit- 
tee, the Special Prosecutor or called anybody else to find out. 

Mr. Lenzner. Well, did you receive any inquiries from Mr. Rebozo 
at the White House, to your knowledge, with regard to this story ? 

Mr. BuzHARDT. iSTo, I did not. 

Mr. Lenzxer. Aside from whether you personally did or did not, 
did you learn from other people, from either being part of conversa- 
tions or seeing memorandums ? 

Mr. BuZHARDT. No. 

Mr. Lenzner. Now, you say that there came a time when you did 
call Mr. Edward Nixon. 

Mr. BuzHARDT. Yes. 

Mr. Lenzner. When was that ? 

Mr. BuzHARDT. I do not recall the day, but it seems it must have 
been about Monday. I remember that there were two stories, which 
for the first time to my knowledge included Mr. Edward Nixon in 
the story. 

I called ]\Ir. Edward Nixon and told him that there were stories 
that included allegations that he, too, had received money from Mr. 
Rebozo. 

Mr. Lenzner. And when did you first learn that there were such 
allegations ? 

Mr. BuziiARDT. When I read them in the paper. 

Mr. Lenzner. No one advised you of that prior to the time they 
were in the newspaper ? 

Mr. BuzHARDT. I never heard Mr. Edward Nixon's name mentioned 
prior to, I guess it must have been, Monday, I saw two stories with 
him in them. 

Mr. Lenzner. And what was Mr. Edward Nixon's reaction when 
you called him ? 

Mr. Buzhardt. He said, thank you for letting me know. 

Mr. Lenzner. Go ahead. 

Mr. Buzhardt. He said he had never received any money from Mr. 
Rebozo and he said he might make a statement, he might not. He said, 
I have not seen the newspapers. I don't generally read them. 

Mr. Lenzner. Did you inquire further as to whether he had re- 
ceived funds from a different source or organization that might have 
originat/cd with Mr. Rebozo ? 

Mr. Buzhardt. I did not even inquire if he had received money 
from Mr. Rebozo. 

Mr. Lenzner. That was not a concern to you ? 

Mr. Buzhardt. No, not to me directly. I thought he should know 
that there was a newspaper story to that effect, but it was certainly 
not my business to ask him one way or the other. 

Mr. Lenzner. Did he ask you to take any action of your own? 

Mr. Buzhardt. No. 

Mr. Lenzner. Did you ask him to take any further action? 

Mr. Buzhardt. No. 

Mr. Lenzner. Did anyone request or suggest that you make that 
phone call ? 

Mr. Buzhardt. No. 

Mr. Lenzner. Did you advise anyone that Mr. EdAvard Nixon 
denied receiving funds from Mr. Rebozo ? 



105^1 

Mr. BuzHARDT, I did not advise anybody. I might have told some- 
body. 

Mr. Lenzner. Well, who did you tell? 

Mr. BuzHARDT. Well, I don't recall. 

]Mr. Lenzner. We are talkins; about Monday of this week, now, 
after you talked to the President's brother. 

Mr. BuzHARDT. That's right. That's right. And I only say that be- 
cause I don't remember telling anyone, but I very well could have 
l)ecause I have talked to a number of people. The subject may have 
come up. It was not of any business concern of mine, but I may have 
even told my wife. I don't think so, but I may have. 

Mr. Lenzner. Do you remember having any discussions with Gen- 
eral Haig with regard to the subject after you talked with Mr. Ed- 
ward Nixon ? 

Mr. BuzHARDT. Not specifically. I may have. I talk with General 
Haig quite frequently on a broad number of subjects. I may have 
mentioned this one. It is quite possible. 

Mr. Lenzner. But you are saying now — today is Wednesday — ^you 
are saying that you have no i-ecollection now at all of whether you 
did or did not speak with General Haig on Monday or after Monday 
with regard to the Hughes $100,000 ? 

Mr. BuzHARDT. I may well have, but I don't have any specific 
recollection of discussing that subject matter as such or any particu- 
lar thing about that subject matter. 

Mr. Lenzner. With General Haig or anybody else ? 

Mr. BuZHARDT. No. 

Senator Weicker. Did you indicate that you had talked to Donald 
Nixon ? 

Mr. BuzHARDT. I do not think I indicated. Senator. I think I did, 
but I am not sure — I don't think the subject came up. I have talked 
with Donald Nixon over the weekend. I had a telephone call from 
him. 

Senator Weicker. What did he say relative to the money? Did 
he say the same thing Edward Nixon said, that he did not receive 
any? 

Mr. BuzHARDT. I am not sure he even said that to me. I think this 
was after his statement was already in the press, and T do not even 
remember specifically when it was. And he may have said, "Did you 
see my statement" or "did you know about it," or something like 
that. But I do not recall the subject of the phone call. 

Senator Weicker. Did you talk to Rose Woods? 

Mr. BuzHARDT. No, sir. 

Senator Weicker. Did anyone else talk to Rose Woods that was 
brought to your attention ? 

Mr. BuziiARDT. I don't know. Senator. Not to my knowledge. No 
one has talked to me about talking to Rose Woods. 

Mr. Lenzner. Are you saying — I did not fully understand your 
response to Senator Weicker's question. 

You are saying F. Donald Nixon did call you over the weekend? 

Mr. BuzHARDT. I don't remember whether it was over the weekend 
or the first part of this week. I have talked to him recently within 
the past few days. I do not recall. 



10552 

Mr. Lenzner. Did you recall where he was when he talked to 
you? 

Mr. BuziiARDT. I assume he was at home, but I don't know. It was 
apparently a long distance call. I thought it was. 

Mr. Lenzxer. Did you take any notes from that phone call? 

Mr. BUZHARDT. No. 

Mr. Lenzner. Did you report the subject of that phone call to any- 
one else ? 

Mr. BuZHARDT. No. 

Mr. Lenzner. Can you relate to us the substance and nature of the 
phone call, what he said to you and what you said to him? 

Mr. BuzHARDT. No, I can probably come up with the subject. The 
subject generally was that he was sick and fed up with newspaper 
stories and that he was going to start having some press conferences. 

Mr. Lenzner. And did he describe what he was going to say in 
the press conferences ? 

Mr. BuzHARDT. No, he did not describe what he was going to say, 
just the fact that he Avas. 

Mr. Lenzner. Was the idea to blast the newspapers because of the 
irresponsible stories ? 

Mr. BuzHARDT. Generally. Generally, yes. He said he was sitting 
down trying to put it all together and take into account all of the 
past misstatements. 

Senator Weicker. As I understand it, when did this story first 
appear ? On Saturday ? Sunday ? 

Ms. Sheketofe. Saturday morning. 

Mr. Lenzner. Saturday morning. 

Senator Weicker. And on Saturday morning, is this when you read 
the story ? 

Mr. BuzTiARDT. Yes, but I knew about it the afternoon before. Sen- 
ator Weicker. At least I had heard about the subject matter the 
afternoon before. 

Senator Weicker. From Mr. Garment, who had gotten a call from 
the reporter ? 

Mr. BuzHARDT. That is right, or he so told me. 

Senator Weicker. And am I correct — and you use your own words 
if I am mistaken — ^that from the time that Mr. Garment first received 
word of the story to now, when you are sitting down with us, that 
the subject matter of that story has not been considered of sufficient 
importance by yourself or those associated with you to in any way 
conduct a formal inquiry ? 

Mr. BuzHARDT. Senator Weicker, I do not know about anybody 
else, but no one has asked me to do such a thing, nor have I assumed 
the responsibility to do such a thing. 

Senator AVeicker. Noi- do you know of such a thing, is that correct? 

Mr. BuzHARDT. Nor do I know of one. 

Senator Weicker. But I repeat my question only because I have 
a distinct recollection that from the testimony you have given here 
in the past few minutes, that you rather categorize this whole story 
as not being sufficiently important in anybody's mind to do anything, 
is that right? 

Mr. BiTZTiARDT. No, Senator. I would more characterize it as not 
being within my sphere of responsibility. 



Senator Weicker. Well, you met with Mr. G-arment and Mr. St. 
Clair, at which time the story was discussed. Is that correct? 

Mr. BuzHARDT. Senator, the meeting, so there will be no misunder- 
standing, I was meeting with Mr. St. Clair. We were standing in 
the open room. Mr. Garment passed by, stuck his head in and chatted 
for a few minutes, not particularly on business or anything, and 
mentioned this in the course of the conversation and left. I think I 
left shortly after he did. I was discussing an entirely different matter 
with Mr. St. Clair. 

I do not think I gave the thing a second thought until at least the 
next day when I read the story. 

Senator Weicker. How would you characterize that story. You 
don't think as an attorney that it was of sufficient importance to 
entail some kind of inquiry ? 

Mr. Buzhardt. Not within my responsibility, Senator Weicker. 

Senator Weicker. Whose responsibilities ? 

Mr. Buzhardt. The attorneys for the parties involved, I presume, 
or the parties involved. But certainly not 

Senator Weicker. Certainly not any of the attorneys in the White 
House ? 

Mr. Buzhardt, No. So that you understand, I think that we have 
got quite an explicit record on this. The White House counsel do not 
even represent members of the "Wliite House staff, and that has been 
a matter of some focus of attention. We make it quite clear. 

Senator Weicker. But apparently you do feel some sort of an obli- 
gation to contact the individuals or some of the individuals who are 
involved in the story to let them know that the story had appeared. 

Mr. Buzhardt. I frequently do that. Senator Weicker, not because 
it is any part of my official duty, but as a matter of courtesy. I know 
both Mr. Donald iSTixon and Mr. Edward Nixon and their counsel, 
and if I think there is a story on the east coast that they inay not 
have seen or some matter which has arisen which I think they pos- 
sibly would be well-advised to be aware of, they are 4 hours behind 
our time here and I have from time to time picked up a phone to let 
them know that such and such a story was running. 

Senator Weicker. And would you say that was really, aside from 
whatever remarks you made to various and sundry individuals, that 
that really would be the only act that you engaged in relative to the 
principals in that story ? 

Mr. Buzhardt. That is it. Senator Weicker. Anything else I ex- 
pressed was possibly a personal opinion about the matter, and cer- 
tainly not an official one and certainly not in any official capacity. 

Mr. Lexzner. Just following up on Senator Weicker's questions, 
were you aware of or did you learn of any inquiry from the President 
with regard to the validity of the stories associated with hi: two 
brothers and his secretary receiving funds ? 

Mr. Buzhardt. At the first part of the story I didn't even know of 
but one brother 

Mr. Lenzxer. I'm asking you any time? 

Mr. Buzhardt. No. 

Mr. Lexzner. And are you aware of any attempt to make a report 
to the President with regard to the allegations concerning the receipt 
of funds by the President's secretary and his two brothers? 



10554 

Mr. BuziTARDT. No, the President wouldn't go through me to talk 
to his seci*etary, Mr. I^.nzner. 

Mr. Lenzner. I am not suggesting he would go through you. I'm 
asking if you learned of or l^ecame aware of such a report? 

Mr. BuziiARDT. I do not know. I don't even know if the President 
ever talked to his secretary. I have no idea about the matter. 

Mr. Lexzxer. That is not the question. The question is did you 
ever become aware of or learn of an effort to obtain a report or in- 
formation for the President as to the allegations that his secretary 
and his two brothers received funds from the $100,000 that Mr. 
Rebozo received ? 

Mr. BuziTARDT. No. 

Mr. Lenzner. You know of no such attempt to furnish information 
to the President on that story ? 

Mr. BuziiARDT. No. Somebody may well have told the President or 
not told the President. He may have already known. I don't know. 

Mr. Lenzner. But you don't know of conversations with indi- 
viduals at the A^Hiite House that would bear on your answer? To 
your knowledge, it never happened? No effort to your knowledge 
was ever made to advise the President with regard to this matter? 

Mr. BuziiARDT. I do not know. 

Mr. Lenzner. I am asking to your knowledge. 

Mr. BuzHARDT. To my knowledge I know of no inquiry by the 
President in the first place as to the truth or falsity of the story. But 
that does not mean it did or did not happen from my standpoint. 

Mr. Lenzner. I asked first about the inquiry. Do you know of any 
efforts to report to the President or furnish him with information 
with regard to the story ? 

Mr. BuziTARDT. No. As I have said, on the staff — there was consid- 
erable discussion of tlie story among the staff. Wliether anybody re- 
ported those conversations to the President, I have no idea. Or 
whether he ever asked, I have no idea. 

Mr. Lenzner. Going back to your conversation with Mr. F. Don- 
ald Nixon, you are now saying Mr. Nixon advised you when you 
called him that he was planning on holding a press conference or 
press conferences, did you give him any advice or counsel at that 
time with regard to that ? 

Mr. BuziTARDT. No, sir, I did not. 

Mr. Lenzner. Did you advise anybody that Mr. F. Donald Nixon 
was going to hold such press conferences ? 

Mr. BuziiARDT. Yes, I probably mentioned it. 

Mr. Lenzner. To whom, sir? 

Mr. BuziTARDT. I don't recall specifically. I could have told Mr. 
St. Clair. T could have told General Haig. I did not consider it a 
A'ei-y startling revelation. 

Mr. Lenzner. T take it, though, that it was of some concern, was 
it not, that Mr. F. Donald Nixon might hold a series of press con- 
ferences ? 

Mr. BuziTARDT. It is of no concern to me. 

Mr. Lenzner. Did you think it was of concern to other people in 
the White House, the IPresident himself? 

Mr. BuziTARDT. No. 

Mr. Lenzner. You did not? 



10555( 

Mr. BuziiARDT. I did not. 

Mr. Lenzner. 'VVlio has responsibilty at the present time for the 
issues relating to the President's brothers, to your knowledge? 

Mr. BuziiARDT. I do not know. I do not know that anybody has the 
'-esponsibilty, assignod responsibility. I suppose I talk to the brothers 
about as much as anyone. 

Mr. Lenzner. Has the President asked you to sort of keep in touch 
with his brothers with regard to any issues that might relate to 
them? 

Mr. BuzHARDT. No, not specifically. I am sure that he is aware 
that I do talk to them. I have made arrangements when they come 
to town and want to see the President. Frequently I have told the 
President when they were coming and set up the appointments, this 
kind of thing. 

Mr. Lenzner. Have you had discussion with the President that 
would indicate to the President that you were in fact reviewing 
issues with his brothers that related to them? 

IVIr. BuzHARDT. I may have discussed issues relating to the brothers 
with the President. I am sure that he is aware that I talk to the 
brothers. 

Mr. Lenzner. What is your assumption based on, Mr. Buzhardt, 
besides the fact that you arrange for their travel meetings with the 
President? 

Mr. Buzhardt. I did not say that I arrange for their travel, Mr. 
Lenzner. I said that frequently when they are coming to town or 
going to be in town or going to attend something at the White House 
or come to the White House, that I would be the one that they would 
tell of their movements. 

Mr. Lenzner. How do they know to advise you of that ? 

Mr. Buzhardt. I don't know that they know to advise me of that. 

Mr. Lenzner. But you say they do advise you. 

Mr. Buzhardt. They do frequently. I assume on other occasions 
they talk to other people. I am certainly not the only one they talk 
to. 

Mr. Lenzner. Has the President or any other individual requested 
that you maintain liaison and review of issues relating to the Presi- 
dent's brothers ? 

Mr. Buzhardt. No, not generally. 

Mr. Lenzner. Specifically. 

Mr. Buzhardt. On some specific matters he may have from time 
to time. 

Mr. Lenzner. Wliich specific matters are you referring to? 

Mr. Buzhardt. I do not recall. 

Mr. Lenzner. Have you attended meetings between the President 
and his brothers ? 

Mr. Buzhardt. No. 

Mr. Lenzner. Have you discussed with the President's brothers 
on prior occasions issues that relate to them? 

Mr. Buzhardt. Yes. 

Mr. Lenzner. And do you recall any of those issues ? 

Mr. Buzhardt. No. I have seen them on many occasions. 

Mr. Lenzner. You do not recall any single issue that you ever 
discussed with them? 



10556 

Mr. BuzHARDT. No. I am sure we have discussed any number of 
matters. 

Mr. Lenzxer. But you recall no specific one right now ? 

Mr. BuzHARin'. No. 

Mr. Lenzxer. Did you ever discuss with F. Donald Nixon or Ed- 
ward Nixon their possible receipt of funds from the Hughes Tool 
Co.? 

Mr. BuzHARDT. No, not to my recollection. 

Mr. Lenzxer. Did you ever discuss with them F. Donald Nixon's 
relationship with any employees or individuals connected or related 
to the Hughes Tool Co. or Howard Hughes ? 

Mr. BuzHARDT. Discuss, no. I may have heard Mr. Donald Nixon 
express opinions on some of them. I am not sure I even know who 
they all are. I think he expressed an opinion about one of them the 
last time I talked to him. 

Mr. Lenzner. Do you mean the last time you talked with him 
telephonically ? 

Mr. BuzHARDT. [Nods in the affirmative.] 

Mr. Lenzner. Is that right, sir ? 

Mr. BuzHARDT. That is right. 

Mr. Lenzner. Who is that, Mr. Buzhardt? 

Mr. Buzhardt. A Mr. Meier, to the best of my recollection. 

Mr. Lenzner. Do you recall how Mr. Meier's name came up in 
your telephone conversation ? 

Mr. Buzhardt. I think Mr. Nixon said he was going to straighten 
out all of the allegations of this guy Meier. 

Mr. Lenzner. So I take it 

Mr. Buzhardt. You know, it was in that context, and I could not 
even be sure, but I think IVIr, Meier's name was mentioned. 

Mr. Lenzner. So you recall now, that on at least one occasion, dis- 
cussions with Mr. F. Donald Nixon with regard to an employee of the 
Hughes Tool Co. or Howard Hughes? 

Mr. Buzhardt. I don't even know that Mr. Meier is an employee 
of the Hughes Tool Co. I am aware that he has made allegations 
about Mr. Nixon because he said so, and I think you mentioned him 
to me once, or Mr. Dash. 

Mr. Lenzner. Do you recall any other issues that you have dis- 
cussed with Mr. F. Donald Nixon on your prior conversations? 

Mr. Buzhardt. No, but there have been a wide range of them. We 
have had many conversations. 

Mr. Lenzner. But you do not recall any of the issues ? 

Mr. BuzHARDi'. No. 

Mr. Lenzner. I am sorry, sir. I did not hear your answer. 

Mr. Buzhardt. No. 

Mr. Lenzner. After you were advised thit Mr. F. Donald Nixon 
was going to hold press conferences, did you speak to General Haig 
with regard to that ? 

Mr. Buzhardt. I may have. I do not r^ecall specifically telling him. 
I may have, I may not have. 

Mr. Lenzner. Did you seek to furnish that information to the 
President directly or indirectly ? 

Mr. Buzhardt. No. 



1055f7 

Mr. Lenzner. You did not. think that that would be an issue that 
the President should be aware of ? 

Mr. BuziiARDT. Well, what I think — I don't see that there is rele- 
vance, Senator Weicker, what I think, one way or another as to my 
motivations, and I object to the question. It is not a question of 
fact. 

Senator Weicker. Restate the question, Terry. 

Mr. Lenzner. Yes, sir. 

Have you on prior occasions sought to furnish the President di- 
rectly or indirectly with information you have obtained from your 
conversations with F. Donald Nixon? 

Mr. BuzHARDT. I may have discussed it with the President, mat- 
tei-s relating to his brothers which I had previously discussed with 
the brothers. I do not specifically recall any, but I may well have. 

Mr. Lenzner. You say now that you cannot specifically recall 
though, which issue if any, you may have discussed with the Presi- 
dent regarding his brothers, but you did discuss such issues with the 
President? 

Mr. BuziiARDT. I said I may have discussed such issues with him. 
I do not specifically recall any such but I am sure that I do not recall 
nearly all of the issues and matters that I have discussed with the 
President. 

Mr. Lenzner. Do you have any recollection of the two brother's 
names coming up when you were talking with President Nixon at 
any time ? 

Mr. BuziiARDT. No, I do not specifically recall it but it may well 
have come up. 

Mr. ScHULTz. You are confining that, are you not, Terry, to the 
span of time concerned with the Presidential campaign of 1972? 

Mr. Lenzner. At any time subsequent to the time that you became 
associated with the White House. Assume that in all the questions. 

Has it not been a general concern in the White House witJi regard 
to Mr. F. Donald Nixon's contacts and communications with the press 
generally ? 

Mr. BuzHARDT. Mr. Tvenzner, I would not attempt to answer what 
has been a general concern in the White House. 

Mr. Lenzner. Well, since you have been there. 

Mr. BuzHARDT. I could not answer what has been a general con- 
cern in the AVhite House ever since I have been there. The White 
House is a very large place. 

Mr. Lenzner. In other words, let me ask you this. Has anyone 
ever discussed with you at the WTiite House their concern about Mr. 
F. Donald Nixon's statements to the press in the past or in the 
future ? 

Mr. BuzHARDT, It is quite possible that somebody has discussed 
with me Mr. Donald Nixon's statements in the press. However I do 
not specifically recall any. I do not specifically recall many statements 
he has made to the press. 

Mr. Lenzner. What is your answer ? Is your answer that somebody 
did or did not discuss that question ? 

Mr. BuziiARDT. I may very well have but I don't recall. I answered 
the question. 



31-889 O - 74 - pt. 22 - 24 



10568 

Mr, Lenzner. Do you know if anyone — after you learned of the 
fact that INIr. Donald Nixon was ^oing to hold some press confer- 
ences — do you know if anyone tried to discuss that issue with 
Mr. Nixon ? 

Mr. BuzHARDT. No, I do not. 

Mr. Lenzner. When was the last time that you spoke with Mr. 
Rebozo ? 

Mr. Buzhardt. I don't recall. I haven't spoken with him many 
times in my life and I don't recall when it was. And it was probably — 
I think I saw Mr. Rebozo, it must have been in October. 

Mr. Lenzner. October of 1973? 

Mr. Btjzhardt. At a dinner — we were at the same dinner, I think 
in October of 1973 and I may have talked to him at that time. I think 
two or three times in my life I have talked to ]Mr. Rebozo. Maybe not 
thait many times on the telephone. 

Senator Wp:icker. Terry, unfortunately I have got to go. Do you 
have a couple of questions to wind up ? 

Mr. Lenzner. Thank you. Senator. 

Have you ever seen any files, reports, or documents relating to F. 
Donald Nixon in the Wliite House ? 

Mr. Buzhardt. ISIr. Tjenzner, I couldn't tell you. I may have, I may 
not have. It would seem reasonable I have seen his name in docu- 
ments, I suspect, but I don't recall any specifically. 

Mr. Lenzner. Do you know of any files or have you learned of any 
files that are maintained specifically on the subject of F. Donald 
Nixon ? 

Mr. Buzhardt. No, sir. 

Mr. Lenzner. Did you ever learn or hear in the White House that 
Miss Rose Mary Woods maintained such a file? 

Mr. Buzhardt. No, sir. I think you, Mr. Dash, Mr. Thompson, as 
you recall, visited in my office 

Mr. Lenzner. We did request a file of that nature. 

Mr. Buzhardt. And you did request a number of files so I would 
have heard your request for that file. 

Mr. Lenzner. And you have searched for that file or have you not ? 

Mr. Buzhardt. I've searched for some of them. I have searched in 
some places. I certainly have not searched Miss Woods' files or the 
President's files. 

. Mr. Lenzner. In your search did you ever come upon a file that 
related to F. Donald Nixon ? 

Mr. Buzhardt. No. I may have found files that had his name in 
them or something said about him. I do not specifically recall any, 
but I have, as you might gather, handled a wide variety of files. 

Mr. Lenzner. Have you ever seen any investigative reports relating 
to F.Donald Nixon? 

Mr. Buzhardt. Investigative reports? 

Mr. Lenzner. Yes. Coming from the Internal Revenue Service or 
the FBI? 

Mr. Buzhardt. I believe I have, I believe I have. I don't know if 
you would call it an investigative report but I have seen something. 

Mr. Lenzner. Can you describe for Senator Weicker the nature of 
that report ? 



10559 

Mr. BuzHARDT. No. I saw something related to the matter of wire- 
taps. I am not even sure that I read it but I think that I saw it. 

Mr. Lexzxer. Do you recall when you saw the item? 

Mr. Btjzhardt. Some time last fall. I do not remember when. 

Mr. Lenzner. Were they wiretap logs ? 

Mr. BuzHARDT. They may have been. It may have been a letter. I 
am not even sure what type of document it was, but I have a vague 
r.ecolleotion that there was something I saw from the Treasury De- 
partment about wiretaps. Whether or not it was an investigative 
report, I could not even tell at the time. 

I did not read it. But I may have — I am not sure I must have seen 
one. 

Mr. Lenzner. Do you remember where you saw it? 

Mr. BuziiARDT. Yes, I think it was brought to my office by some- 
body from Treasury but I do not recall who it was. 

Mr. Lenzner. And you say you did not read it? 

Mr. BuzHARDT. No, I did not read it. 

Mr. Lenzner. Do you recall what purpose it was that it was 
brought to you ? 

Mr. BuzHARDT. There was a discussion about wiretaps on F. Donald 
Nixon and in some way it related thereto. 

Senator AVetcker. Terry, I think that 

Mr. Lenzner. Can I ask one more question ? 

Senator Wetcker. Sure. 

Mr. Lenzner. That will be it. Do you know of any effort by you or 
any other individual to det-ermine whether Mr. Kalmbach did, in fact, 
testify with regard to the stories that have come out in newspapers, 
that you have already spoken about? 

Mr. BrrzHARDT. Let me say it depends on what you call efforts. I 
have talked to several people in passing — ^not a specific effort to find 
out — ^but I have talked to several people in passing and I probably 
have asked the question : "Did you have any idea where the report 
came from?" 

Now, whether you call that an effort to find out or idle curiosity I 
do not know. I have listened to a lot of speculation about where the 
story came from. Mostly about you, INIr. Lenzner. I have heard sev- 
eral people say that surely it came out of Mr. Lenzner or Mr. Arm- 
strong. 

Mr. Lenzner. Who suggested that ? 

Mr. BuzHARDT. Several people. 

Mr. Lenzner. Do you remember who ? 

Mr. BuzHARDT. It was attributed by one party that I talked to to 
]Nrr. Daniel Schorr. 

Mr. Lenzner. I am just trying to find out who has identified us. 

Mr. BuziiARDT, I don't even remember who it was and it was prob- 
ably somebody at a party on Saturday night, as I recall, and I must 
have talked to at least 150 people. 

One of the reasons I have troubles is it was a general topic of con- 
versation. Everyone seemed to bring this up to me last Saturday- 
night at the so-called Counter-Gridiron. 

INIr, Lenzner. Do you know of any effort in the White House — 
we'll get back to that subject some other time — ^but did you ever then 



10560 

know of any effort to determine whether Mr, Kalmbach did in fact 
testify with regard to the stories that came out in the newspapers ? 

Mr. BUZHARDT. No. 

Mr. Lenzner. Do you know of any effort to have Mr. Kalmbach or 
his counsel called ? 

Mr. BuzHARDT. No. I am aware that when I talked to Mr. McKier- 
nan he said, "I may talk to Mr. Kalmbach." I believe he did, he may 
have, so I do not know whether he did or not. If he did, I sure don't 
know what was said. 

Mr. Lenzner. Do you know if Mr. Rebozo attempted to talk to Mr. 
Kalmbach ? 

Mr. Buzhardt. I have no idea. 

Mr. Lenzner. Did you have any discussions with Mr. Frates — Mr. 
Rebozo's attorney ? 

Mr. Buzhardt. No, I have not talked to him. 

Mr. Lenzner. Do you know Mr. Frates ? 

Mr. Buzhardt. I think I have talked to him on the phone. I know 
I have talked to him on the phone^I'm pretty sure. It might have 
been one of those other lawyers, but I think it was Mr. Frates. I have 
talked to one of Mr. Rebozo's lawyers. 

Mr. Lenzner. Senator, I think we'd better wind it up. I would like 
to recess this, Senator, if [ can, and have Mr. Buzhardt come back 
on some future date. 

Senator Weicker. All, right, so ordered. 

Mr. Lenzner. Thank you, Senator. 

Senator Weicker. Thank you. 

[Whereupon, at 6 :10 p.m., the committee recessed to reconvene at 
10 a.m. on May 7, 1974.] 



THURSDAY, APRIL 11, 1974 

U.S. Senate, 
Select Committee on 
Presidential Campaign Activities, 

Washington^ D.O. 

The Select Committee met, pursuant to notice, at 2:15 p.m., in room 
G-334, Dirksen Senate Office Building. 

Present : Senator Talmadge. 

Also present: Terry Lenzner, assistant chief counsel; Richard L. 
Schultz, assistant minority counsel ; Scott Armstrong and Lee Shechy, 
investigators ; Emily Sheketoff , research assistant. 

Senator Talmadge. Do you solemnly swear that the evidence that 
you shall give the Select Committee on Presidential Campaign Activi- 
ties for the year 1972 will be the truth, the whole truth, and nothing 
but the truth, so help you God ? 

Mr. Davis. I do. 

Senator Talmadge. Thank you, sir, and you may be seated. 

Mr. Lenzner. If you would like to take a break at any time to rest 
or consult, please advise us ; or if you want tea or water, please let us 
know. 

Mr. Armstrong. Mr. Davis, would you be kind enough to state your 
full name and address for the record, please ? 

TESTIMONY OF A. D. DAVIS, ACCOMPANIED BY 
ALAN COLE, COUNSEL 

Mr. Da\^s. a. Darius Davis. The residence address ? 

Mr. Armstrong. Yes. 

Mr. Davis. 700 Old Grove Manor, Jacksonville, Fla. 

Mr. Armstrong. And your home phone there, sir ? 

Mr. Davis. 396-4825. 

Mr. Armstrong. Thank you. Can you tell us your occupation, sir? 

Mr. Davis. I am vice chairman of the board of Winn-Dixie Stores, 
Inc. 

Mr. Armstrong. Can you describe the business of Winn-Dixie Corp. ? 

Senator Talmadge. Excuse me. I have got to go vote. I will be right 
back. 

Mr. Cole. I would like to request that we proceed only in the 
presence of the Senator, if we may. 

Senator Talmadge. I will be back as soon as I vote. 

Mr. Lenzner. Counsel has requested that we not proceed until 
Senator Talmadge or another Senator returns, and we will comply 
with that request under our rules. 

[Senator Talmadge leaves the hearing room.] 

(10561) 



10562 

Mr. Cole. While we are waiting: for the Senator I would also like 
to request that we in due course be given the opportunity to get a 
transcript of the proceedings. 

Mr, Lenzner. Under our imles you can come in and review the 
transcript at your convenience, and you can also request that a copy be 
made available to you, and the committee would vote on that. It is in 
the committee's discretion, but we can transmit that request to the 
committee. 

Mr. Cole. I would like to make that request. 

Mr. Lexzner. It has been noted, and we will transmit it to the full 
committee. 

[Senator Talmadge enters the hearing room.] 

Senator Talmadge. You may proceed. 

Mr. Armstrong. Mr. Davis, can you describe the nature of Winn- 
Dixie's business generally ? 

Mr. Davis. We operate stores throughout the southeast^ — super- 
market-type food stores. We started Avith one store in the Miami area 
with my father and four brothers in 1925, and we are a publicly owned 
company. We have about 37,000 stockholders and about 970 stores, 
which gives us 40 stockholders per store. We sell general food products 
that are sold in the supermarket with some nonfoods. 

Mr. Armstrong. All right, sir. Are there any subsidiaries of the 
Winn-Dixie Corp. — any wholly owned subsidiaries? 

Mr. Davis. Yes ; there are many subsidiaries. We are in some types 
of manufacturing that are subsidiaries. 

Mr. Armstrong. Are you the officer in any other corporations ? 

Mr. Davis. Yes ; I am an officer in various subsidiary corporations. 
I would not know which ones. 

Mr. Armstrong. Would it be inconvenient to just get a listing of 
those for the record at a later time ? 

Mr. Davis. Yes ; I can give you that. 

Mr. Armstrong. From January 1, 1969, have you had any respon- 
sibility in any Presidential political campaigns — any campaign re- 
sponsibilities whatsoever? 

Mr. Davis. What year ? 

Mr. Armstrong. January 1, 1969, through the 1972 campaign, No- 
vember 4, 1972. 

Mr. Davis. The only responsibility I had was in making a contribu- 
tion in 1972. 

Mr. Armstrong. All right. Can you tell us to which campaign you 
made a contribution in 1972, sir? 

Mr. Davis. That was for the reelection of President Nixon in the 
1972 campaign. 

Mr. Armstrong. Can you tell us when you made that contribution, 
sir? 

Mr. Davis. I made that contribution on April 5, 1972. 

Mr. Armstrong. And to whom did you make it ? 

Mr. Davis. To Mr. Bebe Rebozo. 

Mr. Armstrong. Can you tell us the amount of that contribution and 
the form? 

Mr. Davis. Well, I am a little reticent to discuss the amount due to 
the fact that things that go on in these hearings are not exactly always 



1Q563 

private. They become public information. At the end of this investiga- 
tion you folks will publish a report and a substantial amount of money 
like this publicized, in my view, sets you up, or your family up, or 
your grandchildren up for some of these terrorists for kidnaping or 
other type of terrorist activities. 

Mr. Cole. Can I interrupt, Mr. Davis ? Let me interrupt for a mo- 
ment. Mr. Davis has no reluctance to advise the committee of the facts. 
His concern is only that by advising the committee it will get into the 
press, not necessarily as a leak from an executive session, but possibly 
hereafter when executive session testimony is made public or your 
report is issued. Is there some way we can give you this information 
and not get it publicized ? That is the problem. 

Mr. Lexzner. Senator, one thought I have is we might want to, at 
your discretion, order the transcript sealed. 

Senator Talmadge. I might say that I warned general counsel and 
all the staff about the matter that you have raised here, and they have 
assured me that it will be kept and locked and restricted to very few 
members of the staff. And I hope that that is true because we have had 
far too many leaks from this committee to date. But insofar as I know, 
we have had no leaks thus far about the amount of contributions that 
individuals have contributed. 

Mr. Cole. Is there some way, Senator, that perhaps we can protect 
against the release of the specific amount when you write your report 
or if and when this testimony 

Senator Talmadge. As far as I know that amount will never be made 
public in any way. Counselor, do you anticipate that it will be ? 

Mr. Lexzner. Of course, it is always possible. Senator. Frankly, we 
have already had some testimony in regard to the specific transaction, 
so we already have some figures in the record. 

Now, we do not know if those figures will be the same as those Mr. 
Davis gives us or not. What I would suggest this time. Senator, is that 
you order this transcript sealed and maintained in a sealed condition 
in either your office safe or Mr. Dash's safe ; and at such time as we 
review the facts, if they are pertinent to our report and to our legisla- 
tive mandate, we review them with you and with the chairman and 
others, and also give Mr. Cole and Mr. Davis an opportunity — if we 
decide to make a recommendation that they be in the report and made 
public. 

And I cannot anticipate one way or another on it at this point. But 
we should give them an opportunity to argue before the committee at 
that time or give Mr. Cole an opportunity to come before us. 

Mr. Cole. That would be satisfactory. We are concerned here only 
with the safety and well-being of these' private people. It has nothing 
to do with the area of concern of the committee. 

Mr. Lexzner. I can appreciate that. 

Senator Talmadge. It is the ruling of the Chair that this transcript 
will be kept sealed in the safe of Mr. Dash and not made public with- 
out consultation with me and Mr. Cole. 

Mr. Cole. Thank you very much. 

Mr. Lenzner. And Senator, I might also ask you to direct staff, in- 
cluding myself, that the information not be disseminated in typewrit- 
ten form ; and if anybody wants access to it, they can ask Mr. Dash for 
it. 



10564 

Mr. Talmadge. So directed. 

Mr. Cole. All right. Now you can go on, and with that assurance, Mr. 
Davis, I think perhaps you can have your protection. 

Mr. Davis. What was your question ? 

Mr. Armstrong. The amount and form of the contribution, sir ? 

Mr. Davis. The amount, I assume, was $50,000. I did not count it. 

Mr. Armstroxg. And this was in cash, sir ? 

Mr. Davis. It was in currency. 

Mr. Armstrong. In what denomination of bills, do you recall ? 

Mr. Davis. My share was in $100 bills. 

Mr. Armstrong. I do not mean to go into laborious detail, but when 
you say $50,000, you did not count it — was there a certain number of 
packets represented to be $10,000 each ? 

Mr. Davis. My brother, J. E., gave me what was supposed to be 
$25,000, 1 went to the bank and cashed a check for $25,000 and got it in 
$100 bills, and I put it in the same envelope where J. E.'s money was, 
which was a manila envelope about the size of that folder [indicating] . 
I immediately took it to Miami. 

Mr. Armstrong. That is an 11 by 8 folder, approximately, sir? 

Mr. Davis. Letterhead size. 

Mr. Armstrong. Letterhead size. And can you tell us where the 
contribution took place — iwhere you gave the money to Mr. Eebozo? 

Mr. Davis. Well, I will have to lead up to that. I had been trying to 
reach Mr. Rebozo to make an appointment with him. We had dis- 
cussed on the telephone the fact that we were desirous of making a 
contribution, and it took us about 10 days to get together because he 
was either off with the President on long weekend trips or I was not 
availaJble. 

So we finally were able to nail an appointment down for April 5, 
and he said he would meet me somewhere near the airport if that suited 
me, since I was flying down. And we met at the Kings Inn Hotel, which 
is near the airport in Miami, in the bar at about 4 in the afternoon, 
between 4 and 5 o'clock. At that time we discussed the matter, and I 
delivered the money to him then. 

Mr. Armstrong. Could you describe for us the discussion you had 
with Mr. Rebozo on that occasion ? 

Mr. Davis, Well, I discussed with him that J. E. and I felt rather 
strongly that Nixon had done a good job in the previous 4 years, and 
we were very alarmed about the prospects of McGovern and those who 
were with him becoming President of the United States. 

We had been lifetime Democrats, but we felt this time we could not 
go the Democratic route. We had no ax to grind with the Govern- 
ment ; we had no problems pending. But we felt that the country was 
in good hands with Nixon, 

We have a large stake in this country because it has been good to us, 
starting with one store and having the organization that we have today. 
And we thought we would like to make a contribution. 

Senator Talmadge, Exch :', me. There is another vote. 

Mr. Cole. All right, sir. 

[Recess.] 

Mr. Armstrong. Can you go ahead, Mr. Davis? Was there anything 
else in the conversation ? 



10565 

Mr. Davis. No ; I do not think so. Do you mean when I gave him the 
money ? 

Mr. Armstrong. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Davis. Yes. There was some mention made that I assumed that 
this money would be divided up among 10 or more committtees for the 
reelection of Nixon ; that we did not want to put any strings on where 
it could be spent. It could be spent wherever they felt they needed it, 
and that they would have no trouble dividing it up. 

Mr. Armstrong. When you say 10 or more committees, did you 
discuss a particular purpose, why it would be distributed among 
several committees? 

Mr. Davis. For one thing we wanted it spread out where it would 
do the most good, and we wanted it to be in $5,000 quantities, more or 
less, to each committee. 

Mr. Armstrong. Did Mr. Rebozo make any comments himself in the 
course of the conversation ? 

Mr. Davis. He said he was sure that that would be no problem. 

Mr. Armstrong. Did he mention anything else regarding the con- 
tribution ? 

Mr. Davis. I do not recall anything. 

Mr. Armstrong. Did he mention having discussed it with anyone else 
on a prior occasion or that he would discuss it subsequently with any- 
one else ? 

Mr. Davis. I think he mentioned that he had talked with my brother, 
J. E., before I got there, and he had talked with me, too, on the 
telephone. 

Mr. Armstrong. OK. Did he indicate that he had just spoken with 
the President regarding the contribution, or that he would speak to 
the President? 

Mr. Davis. He indicated that he would, yes. 

Mr. Armstrong. Did he indicate any particular locations or com- 
mittees or give any indication of how he would designate where the 
money would go, other than assuring you that it would go to at least 
10 committees? 

Mr. Davis. He did not. 

Mr. Armstrong. Were you aware of any significance of the timing 
of the contribution prior to any deadlines ? 

Mr. Davis. Yes. We were aware that on April 7 the reporting — ^the 
new law went into effect, and being Democrats we were not anxious 
to have any publicity about the donation — not just because we are 
Democrats, but because it would have caused us to be called on by 
many, many other people. 

Mr. Armstrong. Did you discuss that fact, incidentally, with 
Mr. Rebozo — that it was an anonymous contribution and you preferred 
it that way ? Was there any discussion along those lines ? 

Mr. Davis. Yes. 

Mr. Armstrong. Do you recall what he said in response to that? 

Mr. Davis. Only that he said there was no problem. 

Mr. Lenzner. Excuse me, Mr. Davis. I want to make sure it is clear 
on the record, for your own sake, too. I take it that when Mr. Arm- 
strong referred to "anonymous," you mean you did not want it pub- 
lished in any list at any time — to become public knowledge to people 
generally ; is that correct, sir. 



1056a 

Mr. Davis. That is correct, sir. 

Mr. Lenzner. But 1 assume you have no objection to having people 
in the Committee To Ee-Elect the President or the President himi-^elf 
to be aware of the fact that you had provided these f mids. That was 
not the problem. The problem was the public. 

Mr. Davis. No, that was not the problem. 

Mr. Armstrong. Just to make sure the record just before the last 
recess is clear, you mentioned the $50,000 was comprised of $25,000 in 
currency which Mr. J, E. Davis had given you. Do you recall the 
denominations of that contribution ? 

Mr. Davis. He just told me there was $25,000 in the envelope. I did 
not count it. 

Mr. Armstrok g. And the rest of it was as the result of a personal 
check that you had cashed for $25,000 and was in the denomination of 
$100 bills. 

Mr. Davis. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Armstrong. Could you tell us what bank that check was cashed 
at, do you recall ? 

Mr. Davis. That check was my check No. 4509, written on the 
Atlantic National Bank of Jacksonville to cash at the Bamett Bank on 
April 5, 1972. 

Mr. Armstrong. And the Bamett Bank is also in Jacksonville ? 

Mr. Davis. The Barnett Bank is not far from my office. 

Mr. Armstrong. Which is in 

Mr. Davis. Jacksonville. 

Mr. Lenzner. We appreciate your bringing that information with 
you, Mr. Davis. 

Mr. Davis. The check 

Mr. Lenzner. I say, we appreciate your providing us with that 
information. 

Mr. Cole. If I can save you people some problems, it was by over- 
sight that we failed 'to bring the check, and we would be happy to 
supply you with a copy of it, so you do not have to go subpenaing 
bank records. 

Mr. Lenzner. We will submit it for the record, then. Thank you. 

Mr. Armstrong. So the contribution itself was a personal contribu- 
tion — actually two personal contributions of $25,000 each from your- 
self and Mr. J. E. Davis. 

Mr. Davis. Personal funds. 

Mr. Armstrong. Personal funds. Were you aware of any other — did 
you make any other contributions to the Presidential campaign of 
1972? 

Mr. Davis, Nixon? 

Mr. Armstrong. To any of the Presidential campaigns, sir? 

Mr. Davis. Not to my knowledge. 

Mr. Armstrong. Are you aware if Mr. J. E. Davis did? 

Mr. Davis. Not to my knowledge. 

Mr, Armstrong. Or any of the other officers of the Winn-Dixie 
Corp. ? 

Mr. Davis. Not to my knowledge. 

Mr. Armstrong. That includes President Nixon's campaign as well 
as any other Presidential campaigns. 

Mr. Davis. Yes. 



10567 

Mr. Armstrong. All right. Subsequent to your discussion with Mr. 
Rebozo on April 5, 1972, did you then return to Jacksonville and did 
Mr. Rebozo indicate where he was returning — I am soriy. That is two 
questions. Did you then return to Jacksonville, sir? 

Mr. Davis. After I finished talking with liim? 

Mr. Armstrong. Yes. 

Mr. Davis. I did. 

Mr. Armstrong. Did he indicate where he was going — Mr. Rebozo ? 

Mr. Davis. Back to his office, I assiuned. 

Mr. Armstrong. Did you have any subsequent discussions with him 
regarding campaign contributions? 

Mr. Davis. I talked with him a few weeks ago. I believe he called to 
tell me that he had been questioned here, and they questioned him about 
our contributions. 

Mr. Armstrong. Did he indicate what his testimony had been at 
that time? 

Mr. Davis. He indicated that he said that it was purported to be 
$50,000. 

Mr. Armstrong. OK. Were there any other details that he offered 
as to what his testimony was at that time? 

Mr. Davis. No, there were none. 

Mr. Armstrong. Can you tell us what your response was during that 
phone call? 

Mr, Davis. I think I said something like, "Oh, hell." 

Mr. Armstrong. Other than that, sir? 

Mr. Davis. Well, I told him that you folks were calling me and that 
I would probably have to testify on the same thing. 

Mr. Armstrong. Did you discuss any other details of what your 
testimony would be at that time? 

Mr. Davis. No, I did not. 

Mr. Armstrong. And did you discuss with him — was tliere any 
discussion of whether or not you would retain counsel — with Mr. 
Rebozo ? 

Mr. Davis. No, not with him. He seemed to have his own troubles. 

Mr. Armstrong. One detail I neglected to get about the form in 
which you gave the money — the envelope itself that the money was in, 
which you described as approximately 8 by 11 or letterhead size, was 
that marked in any way ? Was there any distinguishing characteristic ? 

[Mr. Davis nods in the negative.] 

Mr. Armstrong. It did not have a return address or anything? 

Mr. Davis. It was a plain envelope. 

Mr. Armstrong. Do you recall if it was sealed oi' anything? 

Mr. Davis. It was sealed. 

Mr. Armstrong. Was it opened during the time 

Mr. Davis. It was not. 

Mr. Armstrong [continuing]. You were with Mr. Rebozo? 

[Mr. Davis nods in the negative.] 

Mr. Armstrong. Incidentally, in Mr. Rebozo's telephone conversa- 
tion with you a few weeks ago, did he indicate whether or not he had 
opened that package? 

Mr. Davis. No; he did not, 

Mr. Armstrong. He did not indicate one way or another whether 
he had opened it? 



10568 

Mr. Davis. No. 

Mr. Armstrong. Prior to April 5, 1972, you mentioned you had had 
a telephone conversation with Mr. Rebozo about 10 days prior. Can you 
describe for us that telephone conversation — what took place at that 
time? 

Mr. Davis. This was an effort to set up an appointment with him 
to bring the contribution to him — ^to try to set up a date on which 
we would both be available. 

Mr. Armstrong. Was Mr. Rebozo aware at that time of the size of 
the contribution? 

Mr. Davis. No ; he did not know how much. 

Mr. Armstrong. So his first indication of the size was on April 5 
when you delivered it to him? 

Mr. Davis. That is correct. 

Mr. Armstrong. Then you had a subsequent conversation with him 
shortly before April 5 to arrange that — to finalize that date. 

Mr. Davis. Yes. 

Mr. Armstrong. Do you recall when the possibility of a contribu- 
tion was first raised and by whom? 

Mr. Davis. Well, my brother J. E. and I probably discussed this, I 
would say in Febmary, that we thought we should make a contribution. 

Mr. Armstrong. Do you recall if you discussed the size of the con- 
tribution at that time? 

Mr. Davis. Yes; we discussed that to some extent. 

Mr. Armstrong. And arrived at the figure? 

Mr. Davis. Arrived at the $50,000. 

Mr. Armstrong. Do you know if prior to that time either you or 
Mr. J. E. Davis had any contact with Mr. Rebozo or any other repre- 
sentative of the campaign ? 

Mr. Davis. Prior to February? 

Mr. Armstrong. Prior to February 1972 with the purpose of solicit- 
ing contributions. 

Mr. Davis. I am guessing on this date, but I would say before Feb- 
ruary we did not have; no. 

Mr. Armstrong. Subsequent to your conversation in February, did 
you have — what contact did you have Avith Mr. Rebozo or any other 
representative of the campaign? 

Mr. Davis. None that I remember, until I saw him. 

Mr. Armstrong. So the first time that you alerted Mr. Rebozo that 
there was a campaign contribution coming was that call 10 days prior 
to April 5 ? 

Mr. Davis. Yes. 

Mr. Armstrong. Now, you mentioned — it was perhaps a little 
unclear — that you thought that your brother had had a conversation 
with Mr. Rebo/o; that Mr. Rebozo had mentioned having a conver- 
sation with your brother prior to the April 5 meeting. Do you recall 
approximately when that was and what the substance of that would 
liave been? 

Mr. Davis. That would have been the proposal that we wanted to 
make a contribution and that I would be coming to see him shortly. 

Mr. Armstrong. And that would have been initiated by Mr. J. E. 
Davis? 



1056,9 

Mr. Davis. That particular thing would have been, yes. 

Mr. Armstrong. As opposed to Mr. Rebozo coming to him and 
soliciting a contribution? 

Mr. Davis. Yes ; that is right. 

Mr. Armstrong. Do you recall when that was in time ? That would 
have been prior to your phone call which was about 10 days before 
April 5 ? 

Mr. Davis. I do not recall the time and place. 

Mr. Armstrong. But it would have been the first contact with Mr. 
Rebozo ? 

Mr. DA\as. Yes; I would think the first contact. However, Mr. 
Rebozo is our banker. We do not just have a contact with him on politi- 
cal campaigns. Our store in Key Biscayne banks with Mr. Rebozo, 
so he is a long-time family friend. So there is no way for me to say 
that we did not have talks with him about other things. 

Mr. Armstrong. Can you tell us when you first met Mr. Rebozo ? 

Mr. Davis. I met Mr. Rebozo — J. E. knew Mr. Rebozo before I did. 
As a matter of fact, Mr. Rebozo went to high school with J. E.'s wife 
in Miami. I would think I met Mr. Rebozo in 1971 sometime. I do not 
recall having met him before that time. It is possible that I did, but I 
never lived in Miami very much ; and of course, J. E. did live in Miami. 

Mr. Armstrong. Do you recall the occasion of that meeting? 

Mr. Cole. Which meeting? 

Mr. Armstrong. 1971, sir. 

Mr. Davis. No; I do not recall it. Maybe I dropped by the bank to 
see how our account was doing or something. 

Mr. Armstrong. Now, the account that you maintain at the bank, 
is that just for the store at Key Biscayne? There are no corporate ac- 
counts there? 

Mr. Davis. That is a corporate account. 

Mr. Armstrong. But not for the corporate office itself? 

Mr. Daves. No. This is a branch store account. 

Mr. Armstrong. Do you have any personal accounts, either your- 
self or your brothers — do you have any personal accounts? 

Mr. Davis. I do not, and I have no knowledge of my brothers having 
any. 

Mr. Armstrong. Have you had any business or financial transactions 
with Mr. Rebozo, other than the campaign contribution? 

Mr. Davis. Those are the only ones. 

Mr. Armstrong. To your knowledge, has Mr, Rebozo borrowed any 
money from the Winn-Dixie Corp. or any of its subsidiaries? 

Mr. Davis. He has not. 

Mr. Armstrong. Has Mr. Rebozo had any financial or business 
transactions with the Winn-Dixie or any of its subsidiaries, other than 
the one we have discussed ? 

Mr. Davis. No ; not to my knowledge. I hope he trades with us. 

Mr. Cole. He buys his groceries. He does not get them free like 
somebody else I once read about. 

Mr. Davis. No. 

Mr. Armstrong. Regarding the compaign contribution 

Mr. Davis. Oh, there is one more thing. Mr. Rebozo had — we did 
talk to him on occasion. It could have been before 1971, because we 



10570 

had a store in Key Biscayne that burned, and we were having a very 
difficult time getting our landlord to rebuild it. We did ask him for 
some help with that landlord in rebuilding the store. The thing went 
on for a year or more. That might not have been me or J. E., but it 
would have been some of our men in charge of the operations in that 
area. 

Mr. Armstrong. OK. In that case, you and Mr. J. E. Davis would 
have been acting as representatives of the Winn-Dixie Corp. as of- 
ficers, and Mr. liebozo would have been acting as the banker in the 
area. 

Mr. Davis. As our banker trying to help us get the store back so 
he could have an account back again. 

Mr. Armstrong. All right. Did you have any discussions with any- 
one else regarding this campaign contribution prior to this occasion ? 

Mr. Davis. I do not recall any, other than J. E. and I. 

Mr. Armstrong. You never discussed it with any representatives or 
agents of Mr. Rebozo ? 

Mr. Davis. No ; I did not. 

Mr. Armstrong. Can you tell us how you decided to give the con- 
tribution to Mr. Rebozo, as opposed to some other representative of 
the campaign ? 

Mr. Davis. Well, Mr. Rebozo, being our banker and being a friend 
of ours and a man we trusted — we felt like he was a proper channel 
to use. 

Mr. Armstrong. Had you used that channel on any prior occasions 
for campaign contributions ? 

Mr. Cole. I am going to object to this on the ground that, as I under- 
stand it, the scope of the committee's inquiry is to the Presidential 
campaign of 1972, and I heard you when you asked about January 1, 
1969, and I thought that that was a fair question because it ran to the 
forthcoming campaign. And if you limit it to that, I think the witness 
should answer. But if you are going to go beyond that, I ask you, does 
that not go beyond the scope of the committee's jurisdiction? 

Senator Talmadge. Do you wish to comment ? 

Mr. Lenzner. I think, Senator, the best way to answer this is to say 
that we have information that apparently there was a prior contribu- 
tion that allegedly went to Mr. Rebozo, but was held over from the 
1968 campaign, and funds were utilized — actually transmitted to Mr. 
Kalmbach for Mr. Ulasewicz' use and Mr. Caulfield's use, a subject 
which had been testified to before this committee. That would be the 
pertinent part of it — the derivation of those funds which ultimately 
ended up in the Ulasewicz account in Newport Beach, Calif. 

Senator Talmadge. Let me see if I understand your argument. Now, 
there is some evidence that Mr. Davis made a campaign contribution 
in 1968 and it was held by Mr. Rebozo for 4 years and then went into 
the fund that was utilized by Mr. Ulasewicz in the year 1972. Is that 
your contention ? 

Mr. Lenzner. Our understanding. Senator, is that it was not entirely 
held over for 4 years. Our understanding is that a part of those funds 
were transmitted in 1969 to Mr, Kalmbach, according to Mr. Kalm- 
bach, pursuant to discussions with Mr. Rebozo that the money was to 
be used in a special trust account. Mr. Kalmbach retained, under 



10571 

Mr. Haldeman's directions, for the Caulfield-Ulasewicz activities. The 
rest of it, as I understand it, was retained until 1972, and was con- 
verted in June, I believe it was — shortly after June 17, as a matter of 
fact just about a week or two after that — converted for Mr. Rebozo's 
use. 

Senator Talmadge. Repeat your question, now, and then let us hear 
the counsel's objection. 

Mr. Armstroxg. Can you tell us if there was prior use of that 
channel — the way the question was phrased — whether Mr. Rebozo 
had been contacted previously 

Senator Talmadge. Your question is, as I take it, whether or not 
Mr. Davis made a prior contribution to the $50,000 that he delivered 
for him and his brother. 

Mr. Lenzner. Through Mr. Rebozo, not any other contributions. 
Just solely any contacts through Mr. Rebozo. We're not interested in 
anybody else. 

Mr. Cole. But I understood your question to go to prior to 1972. 

Mr. Armstrong. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Cole. I think there is something wrong with the way you have 
restated your question. 

Mr. Armstrong. Can I restate it again ? Maybe I can get it clearer. 

Mr. Cole. Why don't you. 

Mr. Armstrong. Prior to April 5, 1972, did you transmit any funds 
to Mr. Rebozo for the purposes of a campaign contribution? 

Mr. Cole. My position is, Senator, that that is a perfectly fair 
question if it has a cutoff in time back to January 1, 1969, which is 
when the period after the 1968 election would have commenced, because 
as I understand this committee's jurisdiction, it runs to the 1972 cam- 
paign and not to the 1968 campaign, and consequently if the question 
that is being asked is limited to anything in the 1972 campaign, that is, 
any kind of a contribution from January 1, 1969, I have no objection. 
If it goes to 1968 and before, I do have an objection, and having heard 
the gentleman from the staff try to explain why they are looking at 
it, I think that I understand their problem, and I think that this is a 
question that might properly be directed toward Mr. Rebozo and 
Mr. Ulasewicz, and so forth. 

But if — and I am not now saying that the Davises did or did not 
give any money prior to that time— but if they did, they certainly had 
no expectation that it was going to be held and used 4 years later for 
other purposes. If they gave a contribution in 1968 or 1964, it was 
designated for those campaigns, and it was not desig^iated for being 
held over for 4 years later. In other words, it is not their problem what 
happened. It is the problem of these other people. 

Mr. Lenzner. I wonder if maybe we could ask some foundation 
questions. Senator, and see if we can establish a proper foundation ? 

Senator Talmadge. I will reserve niling on it, then, if you want to 
proceed. I concur with Mr. Cole's view that this investigation is limited 
to the campaign year 1972. Unless you can tie them together with sonie 
factual causes there, I am inclined to think that counsel's objection is 
valid. 

Mr. Lenzner. All right, sir. Let me go back to the contribution which 
was previously discussed with regard to April 5, 1972. 



10572 

Mr. Davis, did Mr. Rebozo furnish you with a receipt for the funds 
which you turned over to him on that date ? 

Mr. Davis. He did not. 

Mr. Lenzner. Did he furnish you with any evidence of any kind 
that would reflect his receipt of those funds from you ^ 

Mr. Davis. No, he did not. 

Mr. Lenzner. Did there come a time after April 5, 1972, that your 
contribution was acknowledged by anybody formally or inf omially 'i 

Mr. Davis. To my disappomtment, it was not. 

Mr. Lenzner. What you are saying, then, sir, is that you never 
received a thank-you letter or an aclaiowledgement letter from the 
Finance Committee To Re-Elect the President, the President, or any- 
one representing him? 

Mr. Davis. Well, we could have received a letter from the Republican 
organisation thanking us for our contributions, yes ; but not mention- 
ing any amount. We could have received a letter from the Republican 
National Committee thanking us for our suppoit. I do not have any 
direct recall about that, but 1 do think that we did get a letter within 
a short length of time, 60 days maybe, thanking us for our help. And 
we assumed that it was with regard to this. 

Mr. Lenzner. You say you do have a specific recollection of receiving 
such a letter? 

Mr. Davis. Yes ; I do. 

Mr. Lenzner. Do you recall who sent that letter to you ? 

Mr. Davis. No; I do not even remember who it was signed by. 

Mr. Lenzner. You do not recall whether it was from Mr. Stans ? 

Mr. Davis. No ; I do not. I don't even know whether I still have the 
letter or not. 

Mr. Lenzner. And you say it was from the Republican National 
Committee ? 

Mr. Davis. Yes ; that is my memory of the letterhead. 

Mr. Lenzner. So it was not from the Finance Committee To Re- 
Elect the President or the Committee To Re-Elect the President? 

Mr. Davis. I really do not remember. 

Mr. Lenzner. Do you know if your brothers got such a letter also ? 
Was this addressed to you solely or to your brothers ? 

Mr. Davis. I do not know. 
Mr. Lenzner. Did you furnish any funds to the Republican Na- 
tional Committee in addition to the funds that you have already testi- 
fied about? 

Mr. Davis. I did not. 

Mr. Lenzner. Do you know how the funds you did transmit were 
transmitted to the campaign ? 

Mr. Davis. I do not. 

Mr. Lenzner. Do you know if the funds you furnished were trans- 
mitted to the campaign, of your own knowledge ? 

Mr. Davis. I would bet my life on it. 

Mr. Lenzner. But you have no independent information ? 

Mr. Davis. No. 

Mr. Lenzner. Can you tell us why you are so confident that the 
funds were, in fact, transmitted to the campaign ? 

Mr. Davis. You either trust a man or you do not trust a man. I do 
trust Bebe Rebozo. 



10573 

Mr. Lenzner. And what do you base that on ? 

Mr, Davis. Trust, faith. 

Mr. Lenzxer. From your prior experience with him ? 

Mr. Davis. Yes: our dealings with him. 

Mr. Cole, These dealings that you are talking about are the deal- 
ings in his bank. 

Mr. Davis. In his bank. But we do trust the man. 

Senator Taljiadge. It is a fair conclusion you would not give him 
$50,000, had you not tiiisted him, is it not ? 

Mr. Da\t[S, Very much so, especially in currency. 

Mr. Lenzner. Do you have any information or knowledge as to 
whether the funds you furnished Mr. Rebozo in the past for any pur- 
pose have ever been diverted by him to a diffeient purpose other than 
the one^ you designated it for? 

Mr. Da\t[s. I have no knowledge of any such thing. 

Mr. Lenzner. Did you ever have any discussions with INIr. Rebozo 
with regard to his obtaining the funds for the use of the President 
other tlian as political contributions ? 

Mr. Da\^s. I did not. 

Mr. Lenzner. And the same question, have you had discussions 
with Mr. Rebozo — for him to obtain funds for the use of other indi- 
viduals besides the President? 

Mr. Davis. I did not. 

Mr. Lenzner. Do you have a relative by the name of Mr. Robert 
Davis? 

Mr. Davis. Yes, it is my son — Robert D. Davis. 

Mr. Lenzner. 3664 Richmond Street, Jacksonville? 

Mr. Davis. Yes, that is my son. 

Mr. Lenzner. Are you aware whether he contributed to the 1972 
Presidential campaign for President Nixon ? 

Mr. Davis. He is a pretty labid Republican — or he was — so he may 
have. 

Mr. Lenzner. Do you know if he received an acknowledgement of 
his contribution ? 

Mr. Davis. I do not. 

Mr. Lenzner. Excuse me one second, sir. [Pause.] Mr. Davis, 
you spoke before of your assurance and confidence that the funds 
transmitted by Mr. Rebozo would go to the campaign. Can I ask you, 
sir, generally, was that confidence based on any experience that you 
had had prior to April 5, 1972, with regard to political contributions? 

Mr. Davis. No. it was not. 

Mr. Lenzner. So you based it solely on your business experiences 
with ISIr. Rebozo? 

Mr. Davis. [Nods in the affirmative.] And our regard for him, 
and our dealings with him in the past, in the bank and so forth — 
riofht. We felt sure that he would not keep the money for himself. 

Mr. Lenzner. Senator, I guess there are two points here. One is 
that the list of pre-April 7, 1972, contributors does not reflect the 
contribution from Mr. A. D. Davis or Mr. J. E. Davis of any amount, 
although it does reflect $1,000 received from, I guess, your son, Mr. 
Robert Davis. And in \de\v of the fact that we have some evidence 
that Mr. Rebozo did divert the 1968 campaign funds, apparently, 



31-889 O - 74 - pt. 22 - 25 



10574 

also received from Mr. Davis, we think that that is significant and 
relevant to determine whether Mr. Ilebozo had designated Mr. Davis, 
although Mr. Davis may not have known about it, as a person whose 
funds could be used or diverted out of the regular chamiels for 
political contributions and used in some other way. And that is really 
what we are getting at. 

Senator Talmadge. How does that relate to this ? The witness has 
admitted that he contributed $50,000 on his own behalf and on behalf 
of his brother to Bebe Kebozo on April 5. If that was not reported, 
how does that relate to Davis? 

Mr. Lenzner. Well, because if Mr. Kebozo had taken a contribution 
from Mr. Davis in 1968 and if we can ascertain that from Mr. Davis, 
and having ascert-ained from some records that Mr. liebozo in fact 
diverted funds from Mr. Davis in 1968, it would show, for one 
thing, that when he went to see Mr. Davis on April 5, 1972, his inten- 
tion was not to transmit the funds for political uses, but to do some- 
thing similar to what he had done with the 1968 funds from the same 
contributor. 

Mr. Armstrong. The "his" refers to Mr. Rebozo's intentions, not 
Mr. Davis' intentions. 

Mr. Lenzner. Exactly. 

Senator Talmadge. Do you have any comment on that ? 

Mr. Cole. I am just surprised. Senator, because it seems to me 
that this was a problem that goes to what Mr, Rebozo may have done 
or may not have done. But the question of whether or not Mr. Davis 
or his brother may have made a contribution to the 1968 campaign, 
it seems to me, is completely outside the scope of this committee's 
inquiry. I think it may be within the scope to inquire of Mr. Rebozo 
what he may have done with money, but I do not think that there 
is any jurisdiction in this committee, as I read the resolution, to be 
inquiring of a citizen as to whether or not they made campaign con- 
tributions in 1968, 1964, or 1960, no matter what Mr. Rebozo did 
with the money. 

Senator Talmadge. It seems to me, Mr. Lenzner, that counsel's 
objection is valid, and I think you could go into Mr. Rebozo's inquiry 
at length on that. But I do not think Mr. Davis would be competent 
to testify as to what pattern Mr. Rebozo had in this thing. 

Mr. Lenzner. Well, we would not pursue that, except to deter- 
mine for the record whether or not — I will not even ask the sum at 
this time, if the chairman feels it is not appropriate — but just a yes 
or no answer — whether Mr. Davis, in fact, did contribute funds 
through Mr. Rebozo in 1968. I am not asking for a specific amount 
at this time. 

Senator Talmadge. And the counsel objects to that question on 
the grounds that it is outside of the purview of the resolution? 

Mr. Cole. Right ; on the grounds of whether anybody made a con- 
tribution in 1968 is outside the scope of the investigation, although 
it may well be that it is within the scope of the investigation to find 
out what Mr. Rebozo may have done with money, but not whether 
anyone made a contribution to the 1968 campaign. I think that is 
what is outside the scope of the committee's jurisdiction. 

Mr. Schultz. Senator, I might say that I think Mr. Lenzner is 
trying to be eminently fair in his description of the testimony the 



10575 

committee lias had, though I really do not share his use of the word 
"divert," though it is reasonable. It is reasonable because there is 
some testimony of the handling of such money, but to continually refer 
and use the term "divert," I am not so sure adequately or really 
clearly describes the testimony. But there is some testimony in ques- 
tion before the committee. 

Mr. Lenzner. To some extent I suppose that we are trying to 
obtain a record to detei'miue tlie accuracy to some extent of what 
Mr. Kebozo has testified to and what he might testify to in the future. 
I think we have in the past. Senator, particularly with the Kalmbach 
situation, when their funds have been determined to have been used 
for activities that the committee has investigated — Caulfield, Ulase- 
wicz, some of the other [>olitical-intelligence-gathering apparatus — 
that the committee has obtained some evidence and allowed it in as 
to the origin and derivation of the funds that were used to support 
those kinds of activities. 

I agree that we are not seeking information — we are not allowed to — 
^\■ith regard to the 1968 campaign, except as it extends to these activi- 
ties that we have been investigating. We are not on a general search 
for 1968 contributors, and I would restrict my questions simply to — 
at least at this time, and if it becomes pertinent we could pursue it, 
perhaps at a later session — but simply to establish for the record 
whether IVIr. Rebozo was used as a conduit. As far as Mr. Davis knows 
the money went to the campaign. 

All 1 want to do is establish the fact that ]Mr. Rebozo did receive 
some funds in 1968 which we feel did not go to the campaign, and 
when he showed on April 5, 1972, that he had exactly that same ir^ten- 
tion in mind. 

Senator Talmadge. ITnless there is a causal connection there and 
comisel objects, I would have to rule that you cannot go into 1968 con- 
tributions at this time. I do not know what connection there may be. 
But counsel has objected to going into a 1968 campaign, and our resolu- 
tion restricts us to the year 1972. 

Mr. Lenzner. I think you have stated, Mr. Davis, that you did not 
discuss with Mr. Rebozo the obtaining of cash for any other purpose 
other than political contributions. 

Is that an accurate statement ? 

Mr. Davis. That is correct. 

Mr. Ar]mstrong. Incidentally, regarding the April 5, 1972, contri- 
bution, was there any discussion with Mr. Rebozo by either yourself or 
Mr. J. E. Davis regarding the form of the contribution, whether it 
should be in cash or check ? 

Mr. Davis. No, that was our choice. 

Mr. Armstrong. Was there any reason for making that choice on 
your part ? 

Mr. Davis. I think I have answered that a while ago. 

Mr. Cole. I think he testified that he and his brother wanted to keep 
this as anonymous as possible so that they would not be embarrassed 
with their Democratic friends and their names would not appear so 
that people would hear about it. That was his testimony. 

Mr. Armstrong. I understand that. I thought the testimony was to 
the point of why the contribution was made prior to April 7. 1 did not 
realize — well, let me ask you the question this way, then, sir. 



10576 

Was it your intention that individuals working for the campaign 
committee themselves, who might see the name on the check, would not 
know the source of the contribution ? 

Mr. Davis. Well, there was another reason for giving it in cash. It 
was our understanding that this money would be distributed to the 
various committees, and we could not make checks to all of these dif- 
ferent committees. We did not know where the committees were. But 
we understood this would be distributed to 10 or 12 committees, and 
this would be a simpler thing to do in cash than it would be in checks, 
because we did not have the names of the committees to put on them. 

Mr. Arjvistrong. Was any request made for the names of the 
committees ? 

Mr. Davis. No, there wasn't. 

Mr. Lenzner. Mr. Cole, if I could request that if Mr. Davis still has 
in his possession the letter that he referred to 

Mr. Cole. I must say that is the first I ever heard of it, this letter 
from the Republican committee. 

Mr. Davis. Would you make a note of that ? 

You have something else ? 

Mr. Cole. I have two other things. 

Mr. Davis. I will see if it can be found. 

Mr. Armstrong. Mr. Davis, in the past on any other occasions — and 
I am not concerned about which occasions — that you have made cam- 
paign contributions, have you received receipts or acknowledgments 
for those campaign contributions, regardless of what campaign? 

Were you accustomed to receiving receipts or aclaiowledgments ? 

Mr. Davis. No, we were not. 

Mr. Armstrong. Even in the case where cash contributions were 
made? 

Was it customary to make contributions in cash ? 

Mr. Davis. It generally was. Maybe a phone call, or a thank you in 
person. 

Mr. Armstrong. Were there any other instances in which there were 
no acknowledgment by the candidate ? 

Senator Talmadge. Excuse me. I have got to go vote. 

[Recess.] 

Senator Talmadge. You may proceed, gentlemen. 

Mr. Armstrong. Do you recall any other occasions where the can- 
didate himself, or a direct representative of the candidate, did not 
acknowledge in some way, either personally or by phone call or by 
letter, the receipt of the contribution ? 

Mr. Davis. Are you speaking of President Nixon ? 

Mr. Armstrong. I am speaking of any political contributions of 
any type. I am not concerned about which contributions, but in your 
experience in the past, have there ever been political contributions you 
made when you received absolutely no acknowledgment ? 

Mr. Davis. Yes ; I think that is true. 

Mr. Armstrong. Has that ever happened before, in any campaign 
you have contributed to, on behalf of President Nixon ? 

Mr. Davis. Not that I recall. 

Mr. Armstrong. Between November 6, 1968, which I believe was the 
day after the 1968 election, through January 1, 1969, did you make any 



10577 

contribution to any of President Nixon's reelection campaigns? I 
acknowledge that a contribution during tha.t period might have been 
intended as a 1968 contribution, but subsequent to the 1968 election, 
such as I believe it has been ruled in the past, to be within the scope of 
the committee. 

Mr. Cole. Do you understand the question ? 

Mr. Armstrong. Between November 

Mr. Cole. I think what Mr. Armstrong is asking you is, we were 
using a date before of January 1, 1969, as a cutoff, and he is going back 
to November 

Mr. Armstrong [continuing]. November 6, 1968. 

Mr. Cole. Which is after the 1968 election. 

Mr. Armstrong. Yes. 

Mr. Cole. I'm taking your word for it. In any event, sometime 
after the November 1968 election, did you make a contribution ? 

Mr. Davis. Did I make a contribution ? 

Mr. Cole. Yes. 

Mr. Davis. I do not recall any. 

Mr. Armstrong. Are you aware of any contribution that any of 
your brothers made during that period ? 

Mr. Davis. I am not. 

Mr. Armstrong. Mr. Davis, I would like to show you a column, the 
"Washington Merry-Go-Round, by Jack Anderson, dated Wednesday, 
January 23, 1974, which puT-ports to discuss the fact that Mr. Anderson 
had learned — 

From sources that have been 100 percent reliable in the past, we have now 
learned that other fat cats delivered cash for Mr. Nixon through his Florida 
friend. No written receipts, apparently, were given our sources to say that the 
President usually would acknowledge the contributions by phoning the con- 
tributors and thanking them. 

At this point, we have been able to locate and identify only one of the cash 
contributions positively. This is a $10,000 check from the Davis brothers, who 
founded the Winn-Dixie supermarkets chain. An intermediary, after cheeking 
with Rebozo, said that he had acknowledged receipt of the $10,000 from the 
Davises. and collecting other cash contributions during the 1968 campaign (J. E. 
Davis, the Winn-Dixie chairman, failed to return our calls) . 

Can we have this marked as exhibit 1 ? 

Mr. Cole. As I read the exhibit, it relates to the 1968 campaign. 
My objection continues to stand, Senator, but if the staff wants to 
have it marked, I have no obje-ction to having it marked. 

Mr. Armstrong. All right. I believe it is our position that it is un- 
clear whether the reference that is made, the contribution, the $10,000 
from the Davises, is for the 1968 campaign. It does occur in the same 
sentence which said, "accepting the $10,000 from the Davises and 
collecting other contributions during the 1968 campaign." 

Senator Talmadge. If there is no objection, it will be admitted into 
evidence at this point. 

[\\niereupon, the document referred to was marked A. D. Davis 
exhibit No. 1.*] 

Mr. Armstrong. Let me show you that, Mr. Davis, just to give you 
an opportvmity to peruse it. 

Mr. Davis. I've got a better copy than that. You can hardly read 
that. 

Mr. Lenzner. I might say, Senator, for the record, while Mr. Davis 
is reading that, we were not aware of this contribution either, until 



* See p. 10590. 



1Q578 

we read it in Mr. Anderson's column. So the record can reflect we 
didn't have any responsibility for that article. 

Mr. Davis. I object to being called a fat cat. [Laughter] . 

Can you sustain that ? 

Mr. Cole. That's all right, no objection. 

Mr. Davis. Any questions on this ? 

Mr. Armstrong. Yes. Do you recall seeing that column contempora- 
neous with this publication ? 

Mr. Davis. Yes. 

Mr. ARMSTRONG. Do you recall if you discussed that with anyone 
at that time, or subsequently ? 

Mr. Cole. I can tell you he discussed it with me, because of the copy 
he's got in his hand. 

Mr. Armstrong. Aside from counsel ? 

Mr. Davis. I discussed it with my brother, J. E. Are we going to 
get into 1968 ? 

Mr. Cole. I am going to object if you are going to ask him anything 
about his contributions in 1968, as I did before and I think the Chair 
sustained us. I have not objected to the introduction of the column 
into evidence as an exhibit, but if your question is to go through this 
route, back to where the Chair has foreclosed you, I certainly will 
object. 

Mr. Armstrong. First of all, I do not believe that it is clear to us 
that it makes reference to a 1968 contribution. 

Mr. Cole. This is why I am not objecting. 

Mr. Armstrong. It could be referring to a 1972 contribution. 

Mr. Cole. If this is something that goes to anything beyond the 1968 
campaign, I think you should answer it. He's not asking about 1968. 
I know you are confused, because this appears to relate to 1968. Dis- 
regard the column. His question is, was there any contribution made 
after the 1968 campaign of a $10,000 gift, I guess, to Rebozo ? 

Mr. Davis. After 1968 ? 

Mr. Cole. After the 1968 election, which would have been some time 
in November of 1968. 

Mr. Davis. Not to my knowledge. 

Mr. Armstrong. Thank you for that question. 

Mr. Cole. I am trying hard. 

Mr. Armstrong. My question was going to be, can you tell us what 
discussions you had with Mr. J. E. Davis regarding this column ? 

Mr. Davis. This is 1968 ? 

Mr. Cole. Yes, I object, if this is the purpose of your question. This 
goes to the 1968 campaign. I move, Senator, that the ruling that the 
Chair made before holds to this, that this seems to be relating to a 
contribution of the 1968 campaign. I think what Mr. Armstrong is 
trying to do is to go through the back door and try to get something 
he was foreclosed from getting in the front door. 

Senator Talmadge. Any comment? 

Mr. Armstrong. We are attempting, Mr. Chairman, in this case, 
to determine whether or not Mr. Davis' representations about his faith 
in Mr. Rebozo were at any time shaken, and whethei- or not there was 
any effort made on the part of either Mr. A. D. Davis or J. E. Davis 



10579 

to ascertain from Mr. Rebozo, or anyone else, whether in fact the 
campaign contributions had been properly handled and reported. 

Senator Talmadge. I do not think you can go into the 1968 cam- 
paign, and that does seem to be related to it, 

Mr. Lenzner. Because we did not know — I guess, until Mr. Davis 
indicated that the column referred to an actual 1968 contribution — we 
did not know the answer to that question. But, in any event, can we ask 
the question that Mr. Armstrong is suggesting, and that is, whether 
tliere was any inquiry made with regard to the 1972 campaign be- 
cause of this i]] formation that became public ? 

Senator Talj>iadge. State your question, then. I did not get it. 

Mr. Akmsteong. Well, Mr. Davis, have you or Mr. J. E. Davis had 
any occasion to inquire of Mr. Rebozo as to the handling and record- 
ing, proper handling and recording, of campaign funds ? 

Mr. Davis. We have not. 

Mr. Armstrong. And have you received, from Mr. Rebozo or any- 
one else, any reassurances that the campaign funds — in this case, the 
1972 campaign funds — were in fact properly received and recorded? 

Mr. Davis. We have not. 

Mr. Armstrong. Excuse me, can we go off the record ? 

[Discussion off the record.] 

Mr. Armstrong. Mr. Davis, have you or any of your brothers, to 
your knowledge, made any contribution to the Florida Nixon for 
President Committee? 

Mr. Cole. For the 1972 campaign. 

Mr. Davis. Not to my knowledge. 

Mr. Armstrong. During the calendar year 1968 or 1969, did you 
make any contribution to the Florida Nixon for President Committee ? 

Mr. Cole. I think the ruling of the Chair effectively cuts that 1968 
to November of 1968 and forward. 

Mr. Armstrong. Some of the money contributed prior to November 
1968 was used in the 1972 campaign. There is a prior ruling by Chair- 
man Ervin on the relevance of inquiring as to the activities of that 
particular campaign committee. 

Mr. Cole. Well, I don't know anything about Chairman Ervin's 
ruling, but I think, consistent with the ruling that was made today 
by Senator Talmadge, whether it is the Florida Nixon campaign, or 
whether it is Bebe Rebozo, if they hold it over from a 1968 campaign, 
I do not think that Mr. Davis should be inquired of concerning con- 
tributions in the 1968 campaign. So I am going to continue to object. 
If you want to ask about the Florida for Nixon campaign, beginning 
after the November 1968 election, I have no objection to the question. 
It is only prior to that. I think that this committee has to have a cut- 
off, and as I understand it, the cutoff is the 1972 campaign, and that 
begins after the 1968 election. 

1 do not know anything about Senator Ervin's ruling, but I cer- 
tainly know that Senator Talmadge's ruling was today. 

Mr. Armstrong. Senator, other than our representation that in the 
past we have been allowed to make inquiries into the Florida Nixon 
|or President Committee activities, as a result of the use of those cam- 
paign funds in the 1972 campaign 

Senator Talmadge. What is your question, now ? 



10580 

Mr. Armstrong. My question is, whether or not Mr. Davis or any 
of his brothere, to his knowledge, liave made any contribution during 
the calendar year 1968 or 1969 to the Florida Nixon for President 
Committee ? 

Mr. Cole. And my objection is that if that question is intended to 
go prior to November 6, 1968, it is in violation of the ruling that you 
made earlier today. Senator Talmadge, for the very same reasons. 

Senator Talmadge. How do you hope to tie that up, Mr. Arm- 
strong ? What has that got to do with the Presidential election of 1972 
insofar as Davis is concerned ? 

Mr. Ajoistrong. The question goes to whether or not Mr. Rebozo, 
or any representative of the Florida Nixon for President Committee, 
would have had reason, based on past experience, to believe that Mr. 
Davis would make a cash contribution and would not inquire as to its 
use, and that some use could be made of it resulting from the anonymity 
of the donor, which would be other than a typical campaign use, other 
than for typical campaign purposes. 

Senator Talmadge. I don't see the connection between that and the 
1972 campaign. If Rebozo is under inquiry, I think it would be. 

Mr. Armstrong. All right. We will move on. 

Mr. Lenzner. Let's go back a second to April 1972, Mr. Davis. You 
said that Mr. Rebozo said that he would speak to the President about 
the contribution. Is that correct, sir ? 

Mr. Davis. He would what ? 

Mr. Lenzner. He would speak to the President about the 
contribution. 

Mr. Davis. Yes. 

Mr. Lenzner. Did he ever advise you as to whether he had or had 
not spoken to the President ? 

Mr. Davis. I never inquired. 

Mr. Lenzner. And he never advised you of that ? 

Mr. Davis. No. 

Mr. Lenzner. Did you ever speak with the President with regard 
to the contribution ? 

Mr. Davis. I did not. 

Mr. Lenzner. Have you, on occasion, since January 1969, had occa- 
sion to communicate with President Nixon directly on any matter? 

Mr. Davis. I have not. I have never met him. 

Mr. Lenzner. You have given us the source of your contribution, 
sir, and we appreciate that. Do you know the source of your brother's 
contribution, how he obtained the funds? 

Mr. Davis. I do not. I assume he got them just like I did. 

Mr. Lenzner. Excuse me, sir ? 

Mr. Davis. I assume he got them just like I did. 

Mr. Lenznei^. When Mr. Rebozo discussed the contribution with 
you, did he specify what the nature of the currency ought to be ? Did 
he indicate in any way whether it should be $100 bills or anything 
of that kind? 

Mr. Davis. He did not request that it be currency. 

Mr. Lenzner. But did he make a request ? Did he have any discus- 
sion with you at all with regard to that ? 

Mr. Davis. No. As far as he knew, it would have been a check. 



10581 

Mr. Lenzner. And you discussed, for the first time with him, how 
the money would be divided up when you were at, I think you said, the 
King's Inn. Is that correct? 

Mr. Davis. That is correct. 

ISIr. Lenzner. \Mio raised the subject of how the money would be 
divided up ? 

Mr. Davis. I raised the subject. 

Mr. Lenzner. And do you recall what you said, what Mr. Rebozo 
said to 3^ou when you raised that issue ? 

Mr. Davis. If j'ou will read what I said a while ago, it would cover 
it. I don't think I could repeat the thing exactly. It's in the record, I 
think. 

Mr. Cole. Yes. 

Mr. Lenzner. Do you have anything to add to that ? I think what 
you basically said was, you wanted it divided up, and he said that 
could be done among some committees. Is that all he said? 

Mr. Davis. He said he had no problem. 

Mr. Lenzner. Was anyone else present at that conversation beside 
yourself ? 

Mr. Davis. There was not. 

Mr. Lenzner. I think you also said — you made reference to telling 
Mr. Rebozo the thing about no strings attached. I think that was 
your words. Can you explain what you meant by that? 

Mr. Davis. Those arc not my words. 

Mr. Lenzner. Were those Mr. Rebozo's words ? 

Mr. Davis. I said that we had no ax to grind. 

Mr. Lenzner. Well, the record may not reflect this, but I wrote 
down the words, "no strings attached", from that discussion. You do 
not recall saying that, though ? 

Mr. Davis. I think I said we did not have an ax to grind,- that we 
wanted good government. 

Mr. Lenzner. And no specific issues of any kind were discussed at 
that conversation ? 

Mr. Davis. There were not. 

Mr. Lenzner. Do you have any idea, Mr. Davis, with regard to this 
list, which was obtained by the conunittee and has been identified as a 
list of the Finance Committee To Re-Elect the President, of contribu- 
tors prior to April 7, 1972, why your contribution, in your name and 
your brother's name, would not he, on that list ? 

Mr. Cole. I'm going to let him answer, but I think it's a terriblj^ un- 
fair question. He didn't make up the list, he's never seen the list, he 
doesn't know who is on the list. But go ahead. 

Mr. Davis. I have no knowledge of the list. 

Mr. Lenzner. Did you ever request that your name not be placed on 
such a list ? 

ISIr. Davis. I didn't know there was such a list coming out. 

Mr. Lenzner. So the answer is no ? 

Mr. Davis. The answer is no. 

Mr. Armstrong. Mr. Davis, are you acquainted with Mr. Richard 
Danner ? 

Mr. Davis. Yes, I know Mr. Danner. 

Mr. Armstrong. Can you tell us when you first met Mr. Danner ; in 
what context do you know him ? 



10582 

Mr. Davis. Well, Mr. Danner used to have an automobile agency in 
Vero Beach. He was campaign manager for George Smathers when 
Smathers beat Pepper, and exactly what day I met Mr. Danner I 
would not be able to tell you. But I have known him for a number of 
years. 

Mr. Armstrong. Can you give us just an approximation? 

Mr. Davis. Wlien did Smathers beat Pepper ? 

Senator Talmadge. It must have l>een 1948 or thereabouts. 

Mr. DA^^s. That would have been the time I met Mr. Danner for the 
first time. 

Mr. Armstrong. Have you ever had any business or financial trans- 
actions wdth Mr. Danner ? 

Mr. Davis. I have not. We may have bought an automobile from him 
when he was an automobile dealer. 

Mr. Armstrong. But with the exception of that ? 

Mr. Davts. Personally, no. 

Mr, Armstrong. Has the Winn-Dixie Corp. ? 

Mr. Davis. No, not to my knowledge. 

Mr. AuMSTRONG. Have you ever discussed campaign contributions 
with Mr. Danner ? 

Mr. Davis. I have not. 

Mr. Armstrong. And has Mr. Danner ever sought to solicit a 
campaign contribution from you or your brothers ? 

Mr. Davis. He has not. 

Mr. Armstrong. Are you acquainted with former Senator George 
Smathers ? 

Mr. Davis. Yes, I am. 

Mr. Armstrong. Can you tell us how long you have known Senator 
Smathers ? 

Mr. Davis. Probably 30 years. 

Mr. Armstrong. And since January 1, 1969, have you discussed any 
Presidential campaign contributions with Senator Smathers? 

Mr. Davis. I have not. 

Mr. Armstrong. Or, to your knowledge, have any of your brothers ? 

Mr. Davis. Not to my knowledge. 

Mr. Lenzner. Just one question with regard to Mr. Danner. Did 
Mr. Danner ever discuss with you any of the issues relating to his 
employment at the Hughes Tool Co. ? 

Mr. Davis. No, I did not know he was going to go to work for 
Hughes until after it happened. 

Mr. Lenzner. He did not seek any advice or counsel from you on that 
question ? 

Mr. Davis. He may have asked me about it. I would think the answer 
to that would be no. 

Mr. Lenzner. Prior to the news media stories on Mr, Danner's con- 
tribution, or transmittal of funds to Mr. liebozo in the amount of 
$100,000, had you become aware of that ? 

Mr. Davis. I had not. 

Mr. Lenzner. Have you had any discussions with Mr. Danner or 
Mr. Rebozo with regard to that contribution from Mr. Hughes ? 

Mr. Davis. I have not. 

Mr. Lenzner. Did Mr. Danner ever represent you, or your brothers, 
or the Winn-Dixie Corp. in any financial transactions ? 



10583 

Mr. Davis. Not to my knowledge. 

]Mr. Lenzner. Are you a\\are whether Mr. Banner ever sought to 
represent, or did represent, you or your brothers and Winn-Dixie with 
regard to the purchase and acquisition of any property in Las Vegas, 
Nev. ? 

Mr. Davis. No. Did he represent anyone with regard to the pur- 
chase 

]Mr, Lenzner. Of property in Las Vegas, Nev. ? 

ISIr. Cole. I want to make sure you understand the question. As I 
understand it, you asked him whether Mr. Danner has ever represented 
Mr. Davis or his brothers or tlie Winn-Dixie Co. in the purchase of 
property in Las Vegas, real estate in Las Vegas ? 

Mr. Lenzner. In an attempt to purchase property. 

Mr. Davis. He has not represented us. 

Mr. Lenzner. Did the Winn-Dixie Co., or yourself, or your brothers 
ever seek to purchase the Tropicana ? 

ISIr. Davis. I have talked with the owners of the Tropicana on two 
or three occasions, and never came to any results. 

Mr. Lenzner. Well, was Mr. Danner 

Senator Tai.madge. Excuse me. I have got to go vote. 

[Recess.] 

Senator Talmadge. You may proceed, Mr. Armstrong. 

Mr. Armstrong. Was Mr. Danner a party to those conversations at 
the time ? 

Mr. Davis. I had discussed with Mr. Danner the possibility of him 
managing this property if it was purchased, but the purchase never 
culminated. So that was the end of the deal. 

Mr. Armstrong. Did he take part in the negotiations himself? 

Mr. Davis. Whether he sat in on one of those or not, I cannot re- 
member. He might have. We were trying to get an option but -we were 
not able to get the option, and I'm very happy we didn't. 

JSIr. Armstrong. Can you place this in time ? 

Mr. Davis. This was me personally ; this was not Winn-Dixie. 

Mr. Armstrong. Can you place this in time for us ? 

Mr. Davis. Oh, the fall of — the spring or fall of 1967. 

Mr. Armstrong. Oh, OK. 

Mr. Cole. Well, without the range of your inquiry. 

Mr. Davis. It was the fall of 1967. 

Mr. Armstrong. Was there any subsequent occasion after January 1, 
1969, in which you negotiated or looked into the possibility of acquir- 
ing property in Las Vegas? 

Mr. Da\is. No. 

Mr. Armstrong. Since January 1, 1969, has the Winn-Dixie Corp., 
or any subsidiary of it, done any business with the U.S. Government 
in any way as a supplier? 

Mr. Cole. What was the date ? 

Mr. Armstrong. January 1, 1969. 

Mr. Davis. Not to my knowledge, sir. It could have been isolated 
cases where a Coast Guard boat might have come in and bought some- 
thing at his store. 

Mr. Armstrong. No contracts or ongoing service agreements or any- 
thing else ? 

Mr. Davis. No. 



10584 

Mr. Armstroncx. Since January 1, 1969, has the Winn-Dixie Co., or 
any of its subsidiaries, or either yourself or any of your three brothers, 
been the subject of any investigation by any agency or department of 
the U.S. Government ? 

Mr. Cole. Since January 1, 1969 ? 

Mr. Davis. Oh, we have had wage-hour investigations of the com- 
pany. They practically go on continuously. 

Mr. Armstrong. I gather that is a common problem in the retail 
food business. 

Mr. Davis. Yes. I do not know whether it involved investigations or 
not, but wc have had suits on equal employment — blacks against 
whites, and so forth. I dou't suppose that would be an investigation. 
That's just a lawsuit, isn't it ? 

Mr. Armstrong. Any other investigations ? 

Mr. Davis. The Internal Revenue audits us every year, if you call 
that an investigation. 

Mr. Armstrong. To your knowledge, have they ever conducted a 
criminal investigation, the criminal section of the Internal Revenue 
Service ? 

Mr. Davis. [Nods in the negative.] 

Mr. Armstrong. The Securities and Exchange Commission since 
that time, January 1, 1969 ? 

Mr. Davis. I have never had any problem with the Securities and 
Exchange Commission. 

Mr. Armstrong. Or any other Federal regulatory agency ? 

Mr. Davis. [Nods in the negative.] 

Mr. Armstrong. Of those three you mentioned, the wage and hour 
investigations, the suits on equal employment and the IRS audits, 
have you ever discussed any of those matters with Mr. Charles G. 
Rebozo, Bebe Rebozo ? 

Mr. Davis. I have not. 

Mr. Armstrong. Have you ever discussed those with Mr. Danner? 

Mr. Davis. I have not. 

Mr. Armstrong. Have you ever discussed those with any repre- 
sentative of the present administration since January 1, 1969? 

Mr. Davis. No. 

Mr. Armstrong. Other, of course, than in the context of the investi- 
gation itself ? 

Mr. Davis. No, I have not. 

Mr. Armstrong. OK. Since January 1, 1969, have you ever had any 
business or financial transactions with President Richard Nixon? 

Mr. Davis. I have not. 

Mr. Armstrong. Has the Winn-Dixie Corp., or any of your brothers, 
to your knowledge, since January 1, 1969, had any business or finan- 
cial transactions with President Richard Nixon ? 

Mr. Davis. Not to my knowledge. 

Mr. Armstrong. And since January 1, 1969, have you had any busi- 
ness or financial transactions with Mr. Charles G. Rebozo? 

Mr. Cole. Other than those he has testified to ? 

Mr. Armstrong. Other than the campaign contribution and the use 
of Key Biscayne Bank & Trust Co. by your local store ? 

Mr. Davis. And the assistance in getting the store built? 

Mr. Armstrong. Yes, sir. 



10585 

Mr. Daatcs. He may be part owner of that store. I am not sure about 
that. But other than that, no. 

Mr. Araistrong. You are not sure if he is part owner? 

Mr. Davis. No, I am not. 

Mr. Ahmstrong. Can you indicate some way we could check whether 
or not he is part owner ? 

Mr. Davis. Ask him. 

Mr. Cole. We could check that, can't we ? 

Mr. Davis. Sure. 

Mr. Cole. We'll check it for you. 

Mr. Armstrong. Thank you very much. 

I would like to just ask a couple of questions in the area of business 
or financial transactions, just to see if any of them recall anything. I 
am not disputing Mr. Davis' testimony. 

Since January 1, 1969, have you or the Winn-Dixie Corp. ever 
borrowed money from Mr. Rebozo or any corporation in which he has 
a proprietary interest? 

Mr. Davis. We have not. 

Mr. Armstrong. Other, I gather, than the possibility of having bor- 
rowed from the Key Biscayne Bank & Trust Co. for the rebuilding 
of the store ? 

Mr. Davis. No. The store building is not owned by us. The store 
building is owned by an independent investor. 

Mr. Cole. And that is what you meant earlier, did you not, when you 
said he might be a part owner of that store ? 

Mr. Davis. Ye«. 

Mr. Cole. I think that is important. He has no part of W^' Jixie. 

Mr. Davis. No ; he might be part owner of the store whici w& rent 
from somebody. 

Mr. Armstrong. And the corporation you rent the store space from 
is not the corporation in which you have an interest? 

Mr. DAv^s. No. 

Mr. Armstrong. Can you give us the name of that corporation, if 
you can recall it ? 

Mr. Davis. Wliat do you mean, who owns the store? 

Mr. Armstrong. The corporation that owns the store in Key 
Biscayne. 

Mr. Cole. With whom do you have your lease? We can drop, then, 
I suppose, your question about whether he is a part owner, because 
really it is not our business to know that. 

Mr. Armstrong. If you could help us with it, I would appreciate it. 

Mr. Cole. Do you want to know from whom we lease, and if we 
know if Mr. Rebozo is a part of that o]>eration ? 

Mr. Armstrong. Since January 1, 1969, has Mr. Rebozo or any cor- 
poration in which he has a proprietary interest acted as a cosignator 
or guarantor, in any business or financial transactions for either your- 
self, your brothers, or the Winn-Dixie Corp. ? 

Mr. DA^^s. He has not. 

Mr. Armstrong. Since Januai-y 1, 1969, has Mr. Rebozo provided, 
or any corporation in which he has a proprietary interest, including 
his bank, provided collateral or security for any business or financial 
transaction with yourself, your brothers, or Winn-Dixie? 

Mr. Davis. He has not. 



10586 

Mr. Armstrong. Since January 1969, has Mr. Rebozo ever acted, or 
any corporation or agent, representative or designee of Mr. Rebozo's 
acted as your agent, representative or designee in any business or finan- 
cial transaction, or the agent, representative or designee of the Winn- 
Dixie Corj). or your brothei-s? 

Mr. Davis. He has not, unless he had something to do with getting 
the man to build us the store. 

Mr. Armstrong. OK, at the Key Biscayne store. 

Now, since January 1, 1969, has Mr. Rebozo or any corporation in 
which he has a proprietary interest sold or exchanged any real or 
personal property to you or your brothers or the Winn-Dixie Corp. ? 

Mr. Davis. They have not. 

Mr. Armstrong. Since January 1, 1969, has Mr. Rebozo or any cor- 
poration in which he has a proprietary interest made any gifts to you, 
your brothers or the Winn-Dixie Co. valued in excess of $100 ? 

Mr. Davis. Not to my knowledge. 

Mr. Armstrong. Since January 1, 1969, has Mr. Rebozo or any 
agent, representative, employee of any corporation in which he has a 
proprietary interest asked you, your brothers, or the Winn-Dixie 
Corp. to provide him with any quantity of cash in $100 bills ? 

Mr. Davis. No, he has not. 

Mr. Armstrong. That is not to be confused with a. contribution. 

Mr. Davis. This is not the contribution you are talking about? 

Mr. Armstrong. No. On that occasion, I gathered it was your idea to 
provide it in $100 bills anyway. 

[Mr. Davis nods in the affirmative.] 

Mr. Armstrong. Since January 1, 1969, have you provided to Mr. 
Rebozo, any quantity of cash over $500 or have your brothers or the 
Winn-Dixie Corp., other than the campaign contribution on April 5, 
1972?' 

Mr. Davis. We have not. 

Mr. Armstrong. Has Mr. Rebozo or any corporation in which he has 
a proprietary interest, since January 1, 1969, cashed a check for you, 
your brothers, or the AVinn-Dixie Corp. in excess of $500? 

Mr. Davis. They have not. 

Mr. Armstrong. Since January 1, 1969, has Mr. Rebozo 

Mr. CoiJE. Can I stop you there for a minute? 

Mr. Armstrong. Sure. 

Mr. Cole. That question and answer, I take it, was not intended to 
cover possible transactions between the Winn-Dixie store in Key 
Biscayne and the bank. Technically, that might have happened — you 
don't mean that ? 

Mr. Armstrong. I do not mean that, as long as we are referring to 
the local store. 

But no corporate transactions for the entire Winn-Dixie Corp.? 

Mr. Davis. Not to my knowledge. 

Mr. Armstrong. Since January 1, 1969, has Mr. Rebozo or any cor- 
poration in which he has a proprietary interest borrowed money from 
you, your brothers or the Winn-Dixie Corp. ? 

Mr. Daa^s. Not to my knowledge. 

Mr. Armstrong. Since January 1, 1969, have you, your brothers or 
the AVinn-Dixie Corp. acted as the cosignatore or guarantore on any 



10587 

business or financial transactions for Mr. Rebozo or any corporation 
in which he has a proprietary interest ? 

Mr. Davis. Not to my knowledge. 

Mr. Armstrong. Since January 1, 1969, have you, your brothers or 
the Winn-Dixie Corp. provided any collateral or security for any 
business or financial transaction involving Mr. Rebozo or any cor- 
poration in which he has a proprietary interest? 

Mr. Davis. Not to my knowledge. 

Mr. Armstrong. OK. Since January 1, 1969, have you, your brothers, 
or the Winn-Dixie Corp., acted as the agent, representative, or desig- 
nee of Mr. Rebozo or any corporation in which he has a proprietary 
interest in any business or financial transaction ? 

Mr. Davis. Not to my knowledge. 

Mr. Armstrong. Since January 1, 1969, have you bought from Mr. 
Rebozo — you, your brothers, or the Winn-Dixie Corp. — purchased 
from Mr. Rebozo any real or personal property ? 

Mr. Davis. Not to my knowledge. 

Mr. Armstrong. And have you, since January 1, 1969, have you, 
your brothers, or the Winn-Dixie Corp. given Mr. Rebozo any gifts 
valued in excess of $100 ? 

Mr. Davis. Not to my knowledge. 

Mr. Armstrong. Since January 1, 1969, has Mr. Rebozo at any time, 
or any agent or representative or designee of a corporation in which 
Mr. Rebozo has a proprietary interest, provided you, your brothers, or 
the Winn-Dixie Corp. with any quantity of cash ? 

Mr. Davis. Not to my knowledge. 

Mr. Armstrong. Returning to the April 5, 1972 contribution, prior 
to that contribution do you recall any contact that you or Mr. J. E. 
Davis had with the State finance chairman for the Nixon for President 
Committee ? 

Mr. Davis. I do not. 

Mr. Armstrong. Do you recall anyone else soliciting a campaign 
contribution from you during the 1972 campaign in which you in- 
dicated to them you preferred to give the contribution to Mr. Rebozo, 
or that you had already given it to Mr. Rebozo ? 

Mr. Davis. I do not recall any such instance. 

Mr. Armstrong. OK. Is it likely that if someone had approached you 
about a campaign contribution for the Republicans for President 
Nixon's campaign in 1972 — had solicited you — you would have re- 
called it, given the fact that you are a life-long Democrat, and I gather 
had made a very explicit decision to make a contribution to the Nixon 
campaign ? 

Mr. Davis. Your question is ? 

Mr. Armstrong. If it is not, in fact, likely that you would have 
recalled such a solicitation by anyone during 

Mr. Davis. I might not have. They might have called on the phone 
and I might has forgotten about it. 

Mr. Armstrong. Is it possible you might have advised someone 
during the 1972 campaign, when they were in the process of soliciting 
you for a contribution to the President's campaign, that you had in 
the past made contributions through Mr. Rebozo and that you would 
make them through Mr. Rebozo again if you so chose to make them ? 



10588 

Mr. Davis. I do not think so. 

Mr. Lenzner. Mr. Davis, do you even Icnow who the State finance 
chairman for President Nixon's campaign was? 

Mr. Davis. I do not. 

Mr. Lenzner. I want to make clear for the record, as far as you're 
concerned, your intention clearly was that your contribution would go 
for the President's reelection for 1972, no question about that. 

Mr. Davis. That is correct. 

Mr. Lenzner. And the same, I take it, would go for your brother? 

Mr. Davis. That is correct. 

Mr. Lenzner. And your brother never indicated to you any dis- 
cussions that he had with Mr. Rebozo that the funds would be used 
for any other purpose other than the President's reelection ? 

Mr. Davis. That is correct. 

Mr. Lenzner. Obviously, I am taking this next question from some 
other information we have received, Mr. Davis. I hope you will under- 
stand it. 

Do you or your brothers take into consideration, in setting your 
salaries, the political contributions that you are going to make ? 

Mr. Davis. We do not draw a salary. We have not drawn a salary, 
I don't think, ever. We have been set up on a formula as a percentage 
of the net. No net, no pay. And our salaries are not the same for all 
four. I am somewhat less active than I was. I used to be president, 
and then I was chairman of the executive committee. So I am not as 
active as I was, and my percentage of the profit is about an 8 to 1 
percent before tax. 

Mr. Cole. In short, the answer to your question is no. 

Mr. Lenzner. In other words, you don't even get a salary ? 

Mr. Cole. He gets compensation, but it's based on a formula. 

Mr. Lenzner. But it is set by standard formula that you do not 
effect and cannot effect ? 

Mr. Davis. That is true. 

Mr. Lenzner. Thank you very much, Mr. Davis. 

Mr. Armstrong. Have you ever been reimbursed by the corporation 
or any subsidiaries of the corporation for any financial contribution 
that you have made ? 

Mr. Davis. I have not. 

Mr. Armstrong. Have you ever considered any of the political con- 
tributions that you have made as business expenses and so reported 
them to any individuals ? 

Mr. Cole. Again, you're talking about January 1, 1969 forward? 

Mr. Lenzner. Yes. 

Mr. Armstrong. Yes. 

Mr. Davis. Have I considered them as what? 

Mr. Lenzner. Business expenses. 

Mr. Davis. I realized if I was not connected with Winn-Dixie I 
would not be making them, but they were not a business expense. No, 
they were personal expenses. 

Mr. Armstrong. They were never treated as business expenses ? 

Mr. Davis. No. 

Mr. Armstrong. We have no further questions at this time. 

Thank you very much. 



10589 

Mr. Cole. Mr. Chairman, before we adjourn, I believe I may have 
made this request, either off the record or when you were out of the 
room. But in any event, I want to repeat that Mr. Davis would like 
very much to have a transcript of his testimony with the consent and 
permission of the committee, and we would like to request you to 
obtain that from the committee. 

Senator Talmadge. I think we have done that in the past, have we 
not, Mr. Lenzner? 

Mr. Lenzner. Yes, Senator, we have. I don't think there will be a 
problem. 

Senator Talmadge. I suggest, then, that we make a copy available 
to Mr. Davis and Mr. Cole. 

Mr. Lenzner. I think it will be subject to a vote. What we usually do 
is have a vote in executive session or 

Senator Taliviadge. I remember yesterday they polled me. Some lady 
on the committee — I have forgotten which lawyer — wanted a copy of 
the testimony, and I voted aye. I assume it is common practice. 

Mr. Lenzner. It is. Senator, and it has been unanimous in almost 
every vote. 

Senator Talmadge. I think that will be done. 

Mr. Cole. Thank you. 

Senator Talmadge. Thank you. 

Mr. Lenzner. Thank you. 

[Whereupon, at 4 :4:5 p.m., the hearing in the above-entitled matter 
was adjourned.] 



31-889 O - 74 - pt. 22 - 26 



10590 



A. D. Davis Exhibit No. 1 




MONDAY, APRIL 15, 1974 

U.S. Senate, 
Select Committee on 
Presidential Campaign Activities, 

Washington^ D.C. 

The Select Committee met, pursuant to notice, at 12:08 p.m., at 
the International Airport, Los Angeles, Calif., Senator Daniel K. 
Inouye, presiding. 

Senator Inouye. Do you swear that the testimony you are about 
to give is the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth, 
so help you God ? 

The Witness. I do. 

Senator Inouye. Would you state your name and address. 

The Witness. Edward C. Nixon, 1609 175th Street, SW., Lynn- 
wood, Wash. 98036. 

[WTiereupon, the deposition recessed, to reconvene at 2 p.m. at the 
Occidental Center, Los Angeles, Calif.] 

DEPOSITION OF EDWARD C. NIXON, ACCOMPANIED BY MEYER 
BLATT AND STANLEY McKIERNAN, COUNSEL 

[Examination by Mr. Lenzner.] 

This is the continuation of an executive session that began at 
approximately 12 o'clock, California time, with Senator Inouye 
swearing in the witness. 

Mr. Nixon, I would like to say that we appreciate your coming 
down for this session. You have been sworn and I want to empha- 
size that we consider this to be an important session for us. We 
hope that we can obtain information and clarify the record in a 
number of areas that you are, I am sure, familiar with. 

Now, as a result, I emphasize that I hope you take your time 
in responding. If you want to at any time consult with either of 
your attorneys, Mr. McKiernan or Dr. Blatt, please do so and 
we will give you ample opportunity to counsel with them, because 
we do want to emphasize that this is something we just want to 
get a final, clear record on. 

Q. I^t me ask you this, sir : Have you at any time received cash or 
funds or a check from Mr. Charles G. Rebozo ? 

A. No. 

Q. Have you ever received a loan from Mr. Rebozo ? 

A. No. 

Q. Have you ever received anything of monetary value from 
Mr. Rebozo, in excess of $100 ? 

A. No. 

(10591) 



10592 

Q. Has Mr. Rebozo ever provided collateral to you for a loan? 

A. No. 

Q. Has Mr. Rebozo ever purchased anv property on your behalf? 

A. No. 

Q. Has Mr. Rebozo ever purchased any stock on your behalf at 
any time ? 

A. No. 

Q. Have you seen the news media story on Mr. Kalmbach's 
testimony before our committee ? 

A. No. 

Q. Do you have any statement — You haven't seen them ? 

A. No. I don't read papers. 

Q. Well, have you had any discussions with any individuals save 
for your counsel with regard to Mr. Kalmbach's alleged statements 
to the committee with regard to 

A. Yes. 

Q. And can you describe who those individuals were ? 

A. Yes. I called my brother Don. I don't remember what date 
it was, but — where are we — this week, last week — sometime last 
week? 

Mr. McKiERNAN. Must have been. I left on Sunday. The story 
broke originally with Donald only being a recipient, that is, not 
you. And after I left, then the story mentioned you, I think, so 
it must have been Monday or Tuesday of last week. 

The Witness. Yes, that is 

Mr. McKiERNAN. Close. 

Mr. Lenzner. I mean the beginning of that week, that would have 
been ; I am sorry. 

A. Yes. He told me that there had been — a story had appeared, 
and he's the newspaper reader. He read that Mr. Kalmbach had 
mentioned his name and Rose Mary Wood's, and then later there 
was something on the television suggesting that I was involved in 
this. 

So he told me that he had issued a statement denying any in- 
volvement in it, and I wished to coincide in that statement kind of 
denial, so I called an editor, a friend of mine up there in my area 
whose paper I used to read, but he understands why I don't have 
it in my house. And he took my statement to the press. 

Q. And did you say you called your brother Don ? 

A. I called him, just called him to — as I usually do about once 
a week to see how he is doing, how he is feeling, and so forth. 

We talk about anything that happens to be on our mind at the 
time. I was unaware of anything like this when I talked to him. 
And he knew that I was \maware, because he knows I don't have 
papers in the house. 

Q. Now, again, save your counsel, did you discuss it with any 
other individuals besides Mr. F. Donald Nixon ? 

Mr. Blatt. Can I discuss what the relevancy of whether he dis- 
cussed a particular newspaper account with anybody is ? 

Mr. Lenzner. Well, we think it is relevant to determine what 
discussions were had and what other information this witness or 
other witnesses may have obtained from other individuals. 



10593 

Mr. Blatt. I am sorry. Say that again. 

Mr. Lenzner. We think it is relevant to determine whether this 
witness or other witnesses obtained information from other indi- 
viduals that might be of use to the committee. 

Mr. Blatt. Relative to the story ? 

Mr. Lenzner. Well, relative to the facts that may lie behind 
the story. 

Mr. Blatt. Well, as I understand it, the inquiry is related to 
the story, the newspaper story arrived at and the facts which 
were the basis of the newspaper story. I can't see the relevance, 
you know, of whether he discussed the newspaper story with anyone 
else or, you know, I think that there might be some relevancy as 
to some of the facts which may have been recorded in there. 

The Witness. I discussed with my counsel 

Mr. Lenzner. No, other than counsel. I don't want to hear 
about 

The Witness. No. 

Mr. Lenzner. I am not going to inquire into discussions with 
counsel. I am interested in whether you discussed it with any other 
individuals aside from F. Donald Nixon and maybe your wife. 

A. Within the family. 

Q. But nobody employed at the White House ? 

Mr. Blatt. A^Hiat would be the significance of that ? 

Mr. Lenzner. Well, let me suggest, Mr. Blatt, if I can, that if 
we are going to have a continuing series of objections, I would be 
glad to try to respond to them, but we feel that it is significant, 
it is relevant. 

We came out here, frankly, to save bringing Mr. Nixon and his 
brother into Washington 

Mr. Blatt. Yes. 

Mr. Lenzner. For their convenience. If you are going to have 
objections that need to be ruled on by the committee, we can 
always have the question certified to the committee and have them 
come in to respond at a later time. 

But I think it would be easier if I just went ahead and asked 
the questions. If you have serious objections, that is another matter. 

Mr. Blatt. Yes, I do. I will tell you, I have some serious ob- 
jections. I would like to have that deferred. If you would reserve 
those, perhaps you can get on with it. There may be other objections 
we have, and perhaps we can resolve them in confidence rather than 
one at a time. 

Mr. Lenzner. No, I want to pursue this line of inquiry, because 
it is significant to find out what conversations Mr. Nixon had with 
any individuals, particularly at the White House. 

Mr. Blatt. I would like to discuss this with Mr. McKiernan. 

Mr. Lenzner. All right. 

[Recess.] 

Mr. Lenzner. Let me state for the record we do feel this is 
important. It is not a question of certifying, it is a question of 
having the witness come into Washington to be directed to answer 
the question, but let me say for the record that we have — I think 
it must be clear, as part of our investigation we have been investi- 



10594 

gating a number of White House employees with regard to their 
effecting not only tlie original Watergate investigation, but the 
continuing Watergate investigation, and I can say with some accu- 
racy that we have already had under oath White House employees 
with regard to what actions they took after the story broke in the 
newspapers, so it has already been deemed to be relevant to our 
investigation, and it goes to the question of possible obstruction of 
justice by White House employees, the decisions and actions of 
White House employees may be taking with regard to this matter 
and other matters. 

Mr. Blatt. Jvet me talk to Eddie a minute. Off the record. 
[Recess.] 

Mr. Lenzner. Have you had discussions with other individuals 
besides your brother, F. Donald Nixon, save counsel, discussions 
related to the alleged statement by Mr. Kalmbach that you received 
funds from Mr. Rebozo for campaign contributions ? 

A. All right. With respect to counsel, I had a call 

Mr. Blatt. You are not required to relate discussions with counsel. 
He is talking about others than counsel. 

Mr. Lenzner. I don't mean Mr. McKiernan or Dr. Blatt. 

A. I misunderstood what you meant by that, because I had a 
call from Mr. Buzhardt at the White House asking me if I had 
heard, and I had only just gotten it from Don, and very sketchily, 
so he asked if I had made any statement to the press, and I told 
him no, because I hadn't heard or I hadn't read it in the press, but 
I told him that I thought I would, and indeed I did, make a state- 
ment, because I have avoided the press almost consistently, except 
whcie they arc just out-and-out lies regarding mo, and then I tend 
to deny them every time they make them, but he did not ask me 
anything except whether or not I was aware of the stories that were 
coming out back there, because the Washington Post had them ap- 
parently before anybody else, and I told him no, I wasn't, except 
Don had mentioned the story that had appeared out here. 

Q. Did he ask you any facts with regard to the allegations in 
the newspaper story, as to whether they were true or false ? 

A. No. What facts are there ? 

Q. I mean did he question you as to the facts as alleged in the 
story, if they were true or false, to your knowledge ? 

A. Did he allege that they were true or false ? 

Q. No. Did he ask you whether they were true or false? In other 
words, did he ask you for your position as to whether the story, 
the facts in the story were true or false ? 

A. No. The way he put it was, "Everybody seems to have responded 
to the initial story that came out, but now they are beginning to 
mention you in newspaper reports, and you may not have heard 
of those," but he was wondering if I had any intention of respond- 
ing to them, and I told him I thought I would. 

Q. So the answer is "no," he did not ask you — he did not ask 
you whether the facts were true or false ? 

A. He did not ask me — he didn't talk about facts, because there 
are none. 

Mr. Blatt. I think what he means, Ed, I think the question he's 
asking, is there any truth to the story. Is that correct, Terry? 



10595 



Mr. Lenzner. Did Buzhardt 

Mr. Blatt. les, did Buzhardt ask you "Is there any truth to 
the story?" 

The Witness. No, I don't think he had to. I can't remember the 
framework of how the question all started. No. In fact, in remem- 
bering the conversation of a telephone call such as that — I think 
you have it — I can't say that he asked me if there were facts that 
were true or false or if I was involved. I think he assumed that 
I was not and wondered if I had been reading about these crazy 
stories and how I intended to respond to them, if at all. That was 
the extent of it. 

Mr. Lenzner. So the answer would be "no," he didn't ask you 
the way Mr. Blatt put it ? 

A. I can't allow you to put those words in my mouth. 

Mr. Blatt. Well, Ed, I guess what he is looking for is this : You 
and Buzhardt are talking. Buzhardt says, you know, "You see that 
paper?" "Yes." He says, "Did Buzhardt say, 'Is there any truth to 
to that story,' " or Avords to that effect ? That's the question that 
he's asking. 

The Witness. No. 

Mr. Blatt. What's that ? 

The Witness. No. 

Mr. Blatt. All right. 

Mr. Lenzner. Did Buzhardt indicate whether anybody had di- 
rected him to call you ? 

A. No. 

Q. Did he indicate whether he had discussed the stories and the 
facts underlying them with any other individuals besides yourself? 

A. Did he indicate if he had discussed the facts 

Q. Or the stories that had come out. 

A. No. 

Q. Was that your only conversation with Mr. Buzhardt ? 

A. Yes. Was that my only conversation with 

Q. With regard to this. 

A. Eight. 

Q. Have you discussed it with any other employees or represen- 
tatives of the White House ? 

A. No. 

Mr. Lenzner. Scott? 

[Examination by Mr. Armstrong.] 

Q. I would like to get a little more background information. We 
had previously — you have already given us your Seattle address 
for the record. How long have you been at that address ? 

A. Since July 9, 1967. 

Q. And could you give us your home phone ? 

A. No. You have it. The Washington Post has it, so you must 
have it. 

Mr. Lenzner. The Washington Post has it ? 

The Witness. The Washington Post does, but it is not listed, 
and it becomes a very sensitive point with my family, so I don't 
have a phone, as far as you are concerned. 

Mr. Armstrong. Other than the one unlisted phone, do you have 
any other phones ? 



10596 

A. Yes, I have two unlisted phones in my home. 

Q. And have you had the same numbers since you moved into 
that house? 

A. No — yes, the first number, but the second one has been changed. 

Q. Can you tell us how many times that number has been changed 
since you lived there. 

A. Once. 

Mr. Lenznek. As far as I know, we don't have the home number. 
I hope you ask the question, if you will, just for our own informa- 
tion. 

The Witness. Well, you are entitled to it. 

Mr. BLA'rr. Can I ask what you want that phone number for, 
because it really has been a source of a great deal of harassment? 
I think that perhaps we can provide you with whatever information 
that would give you or give you a means of getting in touch with 
him. 

The Witness. Let me give you an example of what I mean. I 
received a call from Bob Muse on my telephone number at home. 
It is a recorder phone, a record-a-phone, memory phone, whatever 
you want to call it, rented from General Telephone at $7.40 a 
month. 

It gives a message and it says what it is and requests a message. 
All callers are screened in that fashion. The second or third message 
following the call from Bob Muse — not Muse, no. Miss DeOreo, 
Mary DeOreo — was a call from the Washington Post on the same 
number, and that kind of foUowup is a little too fast. 

Mr. Lenzner. Well, I don't think there is any connection. At 
least, I hope there isn't. 

The Witness. I believe there is. I have seen other examples of it. 

Mr. Ijenzner. I frankly wasn't aware that we had your number. 

The Witness. Mary DeOreo has it. 

Mr. Lenzner. Go ahead, sir. 

The Witness. I don't repeat it to anybody. 

Mr. Armstrong. Do you have a business phone in addition to the 
two Washington 

A. No. 

Q. Do you have a business address presently other than your home? 

A. No. . . 

Q. Can you give us tlie address where you stayed in New York 
during 1972, New York City ? 

A. I didn't stay there in i072. 

Q. I am sorry. I thought you were employed at one point in an 
office in New York during the 1972 campaign. Is that incorrect? 

A. That is incorrect. 

Q. Have you had any other addresses other than the Seattle 
address in 1968 ? 

A. My family stayed in Seattle and I stayed in Washington in 
1972 at 2020 F Street, NW., apartment 211. 

Q. Can you tell us what phone you had there. Do you recall 
that? 

A. No, I can't remember that number. 

Q. Is that something you could provide us? 



10597 

A. I couldn't. I mean, C. & P. probably could. 

Q. The phone was listed in your name ? 

A. Yes. If I could remember that, I would be glad to give it 
to you. 

Q. Can you tell us what bank accounts you have had since 1968, 
checking accounts first. 

A. Virginia National Bank and the California — ^the Bank of Cali- 
fornia. OK, now, the Virginia National Bank was originally the 
Commonwealth Bank, Arlington, Va. Its name was changed with 
some kind of merger and it became Virginia National Bank be- 
tween 1968 and 1972. 

The Bank of California, National Association, is in Seattle, and 
I believe there is only one office in Washington State. I know there 
is another one in Tacoma, but it is primarily a California bank, 
California. 

Q. Your account is with the Seattle office ? 

A. Yes. 

Q. Can you tell us what periods you had these accounts ? 

A. They have been simultaneously. 

Q. Since? 

A. The Virginia Bank was an account we had — oh, I moved back 
there, lived in Washington, D.C., from Arlington, Va. from 1964 
to 1967, so that is when we had the Commonwealth and Virginia 
National Bank. 

Q. And that account is still open ? 

A. Still open. We don't use it. I use it when I am in the East. 
I am not there now. 

Q. And the Bank of California? 

A. I had that opened in 1960, closed the account in 1964 when 
we moved East, reopened it in 1967 when we moved back to the 
Seattle area. 

Q. And it remains open ? 

A. Yes. 

Q. And both those are in your name ? 

A. Yes. 

Q. Any others? 

A. No checking accounts. 

Q. Any savings accounts ? 

A. Yes. Washington Mutual Savings. That's Seattle. We had a 
small savings account in the local bank in Lynnwood, and I can't 
remember the name of it because we changed it. Old National Bank — 
Old National Bank is its present name. We had an account active 
there. It is dormant. I think we would still have it, but it is not 
used. Security National Bank, that is what it was, or the Security 
Bank of Lynnwood. Savings banks, that's it. Savings accounts. 

Q. Lynnwood is in Washington State also ? 

A. Yes. That is my home city, hometown. 

Q. OK. Do you have any certificates of deposit? 

A. No. No, passbook savings is all we have. 

Q. You have had none since January 1, 1969? Certificates of 
deposit, I am talking about. 

A. No, never have, I don't believe. 



10598 

Q. Safety deposit boxes since January 1, 1969 ? 

A. No, I haven't. 

Q. And have you had access to any during that period of time 
as signatory ? 

A. We had access involved at the Bank of America, the Whittier 
branch, while I worked there in 1973, but not in 1972. You are 
talking about 1968 to 1972? 

Q. That 

A. This is the last project I had in California, and that was 
strictly for storage, a storage area. 

Q. That was United Bank of California ? 

A. No, Bank of America 

Q. Bank of America. 

A. Whittier branch. 

Q, And any credit union accounts ? 

A. Washington Employees — no, Washington School Employees 
Credit Union, primarily my wife's account. I don't know what she 
has in it. 

Q. Do you know what branch that is ? 

A. That is just the Seattle branch, just one office. 

Q. Loan accounts since January 1, 1969? 

A. Bank of California. 

Q. That is also the Seattle branch ? 

A. Yes. Oh, the Continental — Continental, Inc., is where we have 
our home mortgage, first and second mortgage there, since 1967. 

Q. That is also Seattle ? 

A. Yes. I don't think I have any other financial accounts — 1968 
campaign, what was the name of that bank? I had an account with 
Irving Trust in New York. 

Q. Do you remember which branch ? 

A. Irving Trust. I don't know. Up there close to the headquar- 
ters. I lived there in 1968. 

Q. Any foreign bank accounts ? 

A. No. 

Q. Can you tell what loans you have had since January 1, 1969? 

Mr. Blatt. Isn't it 

The Witness. The IRS went through that rather thoroughly 
with a 2-day field audit, and you are welcomed to look at that if 
you like, but I can't remember it. I pulled it all out of passbook 
savings and we did a deposit analysis, 

Mr. McKiERNAN. Off the record. 

[Discussion off the record.] 

[Testimony of a personal or financial nature relative to the witness 
and others has been deleted.] 

Mr. Armstrong. Other than your home in Seattle, do you own any 
other real property ? 

A. No. 

Q. And you presently own— since January 1, 1969, have you 
owned any stocks or bonds ? 

A. Yes. I have had— well, I presently have 100 shares of A.T.&T., 
which I started purchasing in 1963, as an employee of the Bell 
System, and I completed 100 shares, rounded out by buying 26 



10509 

additional shares in 1972, I believe, and that was from savings to 
pay for that. 

I also took $1,000 from savings and invested in Rocket Research, 
made a short-term capital gain, buying Health Industries, made 
a short-term capital loss, all of which came out to be a short-term 
capital loss. 

Q. How much Health Industries stock was that ? 

A. A hundred shares. I still have it, worthless. 

Q. What year did you purchase the Rocket Research stock? 

A. 1972? Yes, 1972. 

Q. And Health Industries? 

A. All that was transacted in 1972. 

Q. Any other stocks ? 

A. A hundred — no, 200 shares of Oceanographic Funds, which I 
purchased while I was a director of Oceanographic, Oceanographic 
Mutual Funds, which is now part of the Steadman Fund. 

Q. And what was the purchase price of that stock — approxi- 
mately ? 

A. $6.85 per share. It's still in that neighborhood and has been. 

Mr. Blatt. Somewhere around 1,300, 1,400 ? 

The Witness. Yes. 

Mr. Armstrong. And that was what year ? 

A. 1970, 1 believe. 

Mr. Lenzner. Do you have a broker, Mr. Nixon, that you dealt 
with locally ? 

The Witness. I dealt with what was Walston & Co., a fellow 
Naval officer in the Reserves by the name of Wally Adams, and I 
believe he is still there in the same location, although the name 
has changed a couple of times since then. 

Mr. Lenzner. That's a Seattle office ? 

The Witness. Yes. 

Mr. Armstrong. You said Walston & Co. ? 

A. Walston & Co. when that was transacted, yes. 

Q. Any other stock ? 

A. I think that's all I have ever invested in securities. 

Q. Did you ever receive stock or bonds as consideration in lieu 
of fees ? 

A. No. I have warrants to purchase shares in J-Tec Associates, 
Cedar Rapids, Iowa. I have warrants to purchase 5,000 shares. 

Q. At what? 

A. At $2.50 a share. 

Q. $2.50 per share? 

A. Right. 

Q. When was that warrant issued? 

A. That was offered to me as an inducement to serve on the board 
of directors. I have still not exercised the warrant because — I will 
leave the reason out. I may yet. 

Q. What year would that have been offered ? 

A. 1971, 1 believe. 

Q. Any other warrants or other options ? 

A. I think that's all. Am I forgetting anything? 

Mr. McKiERNAN. I don't remember anything else, Edward, at all. 
I think you have covered it pretty well. 



10600 

[Testimony of a personal or financial nature relative to the witness 
and otliers has been deleted.] 

Mr. Lenzner. Before we leave the stock area, did you hold any 
shares in Separation and Recovery Systems, Inc. ? 

A. Some shares of SRS, as we called it, were offered to me, 
that thing that I received, but I, in turn, sent it back through 
Mr. McKiernan, and I never held it per se. 

Mr. Lenzner. You never were an owner of any shares ? 

The Witness. No. 

Mr. Armstrong. And can you tell us since January 1, 1969, what 
accountants you have had ? 

A. None. 

Q. Have you had any business advisers ? 

A. Oh, I have consulted friends, but nobody for a fee. Mainly 
because the questions didn't get that involved. 

Q. Now, since January 1, 1969, can you tell us what employers 
you have had or for what groups you have consulted or received 
fees or any other consideration ? 

A. OK. January 1, 1969, through the year 1969? Oceanographic 
Fund was a consultancy until December of 1970, and then I became 
a director and served as both a director and a consultant to the 
fund until April of 1971, I believe, and for the benefit of this 
particular committee and the interests of legislation, I was then — 
I then resigned from the Oceanographic Fund in order to take the 
newsworthy atmosphere surrounding my name away from the fund 
and the difficulties they were confronted with. 

Q. When did you begin with Oceanographic Fund ? 

A. I believe it was the summer of 1969. Following the campaign 
of 1968, I worked on the transition committee into the spring, and 
eventually was offered a position which I later turned down for 
reasons that weren't apparent when I first considered it. 

Q. That was a position with the U.S. Government, was it ? 

A. Yes. 

Q. Can you tell us your rate of compensation with the transition 
committee ? 

A. It continued straight through from 1968 — no. It was $1,500 
a month. 

Q. And with the Oceanographic Fund ? 

A. That was $1,000 a month. However, the transition committee 
ended in March or April, and there was a month or two Avhen I 
didn't have any consultancies. Of course, all this time my wife 
was teaching school, and she still is, which is the only reason we 
are surviving, despite you people. 

Q. A thousand dollars per month for the Oceanographic Fund 
continued up until your resignation, and that was constant ? 

A. Until April of 1971. 

[Examination by Mr. Lenzner.] 

Q. Was the payor on the transition committee — was that the 
campaign committee or was that 

A. No, the campaign committee ended in November of 1968 and 
it became then the Presidential Transition Committee. I believe 



10601 

that's the way it was called all the way through, as far as my 
compensation went, until it ended. 

Q. And what was the source of the funds that they used to 
furnish payment ? 

A. I have no idea. I am not sure. It was the transition committee 
after a point, but I think that's what it was all the way through. 

Q. But the checks that you received were from an organization 
called the transition committee, or were you paid in cash ? 

A. No, no, checks. I never received cash. 

Q. And they were something called the transition — I mean it was 
a check which said the payor was the transition committee ? 

A. Yes, at least part of them were. I think all of them were. 
The Kepublican National Committee didn't pay me, I don't think, 
although I did some things for them. 

Q. Were there any checks from individuals or entities other than 
the Republican Transition Committee or the President's Transition 
Committee ? 

A. No, not in 1969. All right, now where are we? 

Mr. Armstrong. April 1971. 

The Witness. Well, before that there were some directors' fees 
of $50 per directors' meeting at J- Tec Associates, about three of 
those a year. 

Mr. Armstrong. And then that would cover what period ? 

A. I am trying to think when that began with J -Tec. I think it 
was 1971 and continues up until the present. That is the only 
board of directors that I presently serve on. Let's see. J-Tec. 

The Witness. There were periods — Oh, Soladyne. 

Mr. Armstrong. How do you spell Soladyne ? 

A. S-o-l-a-d-y-n-e, a one-time consultancy on marketing effort on 
one of our products. Soladyne is a San Diego Company. Let's see. 
Soladyne. J-Tec. 

Q. What was the period for Soladyne, 1971 ? 

A. That was it. 

Q. And what was the fee that one time ? 

A. It was for $150 a day, I believe, for 12 days. Something like 
that. It is on the IRS thing, but I can't remember the amount 
it was. A combination of expenses and consultancy, which is the 
total. The rate was $150 a day. Then J-Tec, I did some short-term 
work for them at a Marine Technology Society meeting in Wash- 
ington, D.C. That was 1970. Maybe J-Tec was earlier than 1971. 
I — the dates escape me. I don't know if I can pin them down any 
better than this, but 1970 or 1971, J-Tec, for the duration of a 
conference, and I think they paid at the rate of $100 a day or 
something like that. 

J-Tec — again at J-Tec, short-term on a marketing program in — 
when was that ? Oh, that's after. That's after 1972, 1973. 

At any rate, 1972 — OK. Now we get to the area of the Richard 
Nixon Foundation. My consultancy there was commenced in De- 
cember 1971. No, sorry, December 1970, continued through January 
of 1972, 14 months at $1,500 a month. After which I joined the 
Committee To Re-Elect at the same time. Let's see. J-Tec. No, 



10602 

starting in February, the first of February was when I joined the 
Committee To Re-Elect, and the rate of compensation there was 
$2,500 a month. 

Q. And that lasted until ? 

A. Until November 15 of 1971. 

Q. 1972. 

A. 1972. 

Q. And subsequently? 

A. Subsequent to 1972? 

Q. To the Committee To Re-Elect. 

A. I worked with the Richard Nixon Foundation in 1973 for 
91/^ months, finished the project there or started it, or at least put 
it into such shape as it could function, the National Archives. 

Q. That is at the same rate of comx^ensation as previously ? 

A. Yes. 

Q. And subsequent to that? 

A. The J-Tec meetings, the Navy Reserve duty, and that is it. 

Q. Oh, you are a Navy Reserve officer throughout this period? 

A. Yes. 

Q. Holding the rank of ? 

A. Commander. 

Mr. Armstrong. Do you want to go back over anything? Let's 
go off the record. 

[Discussion off the record.] 

[Examination by Mr. Lenzner.] 

Q. On the transition committee, who was the head of that tran- 
sition committee? Was there a finance director on that? 

A. I don't remember who had that. After the campaign, it was — 
it went into a nebulous thing that rotated between New York and 
Washington, getting all those files. My job Avas mainly in New 
York to finish oft' the mail files that we had up there and get 
set up in the WJiite House. But who was it? Because Maury Stans 
had it during the campaign, but then he was nominated as a — 
Secretary of Commerce. I really don't know. I don't remember 
who it was. 

Q. Were you reporting to anybody specifically, or was it that 
you were just operating to finish off your part of the task ? 

A. I had my own assignment, as much as I did in 1972; set 
your objectives, let the manager know where you are going, which 
we did before the campaign was over. We knew what we had to do. 

Q. And you received compensation from the transition committee 
until what date? I didn't get that. 

A. I don't remember. It's into the spring of 1970 

Q. Of 1969? 

A. Of 1969, rather. 

Q. Do you know if Mr. Rebozo had any relationship at all to 
the transition committee ? 

A. I don't believe so ; not that I know of. 

Q. You don't know if he supplied or furnished any funds to 
the transition committee that might have ultimately ended up with 
you receiving them ? 

A. I don't know of anything. 



10603 

Q, Similarly, does Mr. Rebozo have any relationship, to your 
knowledge, to the Richard Nixon Foundation ? 

A. No; he is not a trustee; he is not — he has not been inter- 
viewed yet by any office. He probably will be some day, but he 
has no f unctionaiy position that I know of. 

Q. Do you know if he furnished any funds for the running of 
the foundation? 

A. I have no idea. 

Q. Have you had any discussions with Mr. Rebozo with regard 
to your work with the foundation ? 

A. No. 

Q. Did you have any discussions with Mr. Rebozo with regard 
to your work with the transition committee and/or the compen- 
sation ? 

A. No; in fact, I have had very little conversation with Mr. 
Rebozo. I have sat in on a couple of meetings with him in — in the 
1968 campaign, but he was not involved. He was just there as a 
sort of a host, and the political pros were — were giving views, 
and I was there to give the flavor of the mail. 

So, I saw him only briefly in there. During the course of the 
campaign, I think I saw him down in Miami on three different 
occasions when he made a speech; or called him on the phone. But 
very little conversation with him. He is mainly a confidant of my 
brother, but I don't know him well at all. 

Mr. Lenzner. That is all. 

[Examination by Mr. Armstrong.] 

Q. Can you describe for us, if you will, your duties with the 
Richard Nixon Foundation ? 

A. All right. In 1970, when we began, as far as I was — my 
work went, we were — we set out on two objectives: First, to study 
the existing Presidential libraries, the programs they had 'in public 
displays in archival records, so forth; and, second, to uiidertake 
an oral history of the early years of the President's life from 1913 
to 1945 — or 1946, the prepolitical years. 

That was gotten underway. Whittier College was commissioned 
to conduct the oral history. I