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Full text of "Presidential election, 1864 : proceedings of the National union convention held in Baltimore, Md., June 7th and 8th, 1864."

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PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION 1864 



PROCEEDINGS 



National Union Convention 



BALTIMOEE, Md., June 7th and 8th, 1864. 



REPORTED BY 



D. F. MURPHY, 

Of the Official Corps of Reporters for the U. S. Sevate. 



ISTEW YORK: 

BAKER & GODWIN, PRINTERS, 

PRINTING-HOUSE SQUARE, OPPOSITE CITY HALL. 

1864. 



( J 



PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION, 1864. 



PROCEEDINGS 



National Union Convention 



BALTIMORE, Md., Jvhh Yth and Sth, 1864. 



REPORTED BY 



. D. F. MURPHY, 

Of the Official Corps of Reporters for the U. 8. Senate. 



ls"EW YOEK: 

BAKER & GODWIN", PRINTERS, 

PRIXTING-nOUSE SQUARE, OPP. CITY HALL. 

1864. 



Digitized by tine Internet Arciiive . 
in 2010 witii funding from 
State of Indiana through the Indiana State Library 



http://www.archive.org/details/presidentialelecOOinrepu 






NATIONAL UNION CONVENTION. 



TUESDAY, June 7th, 1864. 
The National Union Convention to nominate Candidates for the 
offices of President and Vice-President of the United States, met this 
morning in the Front Street Theatre, Baltimore, Md., in response to the 
following call : 

UNION NATIONAL CONTENTION. 

The undersigned, who by original appointment, or subsequent designation 
to fill vacancies, constitute the Executive Committee created by the National 
Convention held at Chicago, on the 16th day of May, 1860, do hereby call 
upon all qualified voters who desire the unconditional maintenance of the 
Union, the supremacy of the Constitution, and the complete suppression of the 
existing rebellion, with the cause thereof, by vigorous war, and all apt and 
efficient means, to send delegates to a Convention to assemble at Baltimore, on 
Tuesday, the 7th day of June, 1864, at 13 o'clock noon, for the purpose of 
presenting candidates for the offices of President and Vice-President of the 
United States. Each State having a representation in Congress will be entitled 
to as many delegates as shall be equal to twice the number of electors to which 
such State is entitled in the Electoral College of the United States. 

EDWIN D. MORGAN, New York, Chairman. 

CHARLES J. OILMAN, Maine. 

E. H. ROLLINS, New Hampshire. 

L. BRAINT:RD, Vermont. 

J. Z. GOODRICH, Massachusetts. 

THOMAS G. TURNER, Rhode Island. 

GIDEON WELLES, Connecticut. 

DENNING DUER, New Jersey. 

EDWARD Mcpherson, Pennsylvania. 

N. B. SMTHERS, Delaware. 

J. F. WAGNER, Maryland. 

THOMAS SPOONER, Ohio. 

H. S. LANE, Indiana. 

SAIHUEL L. CASEY, Kentucky. 

E. PECK, Illinois. 

HERBERT M. HOXIE, Iowa. 

AUSTIN BLAIR, Michigan. 

CARL SCHURZ, Wisconsin. 

W. D. WASHBURN, Minnesota. 

CORNELIUS COLE, California. 

WM. A. PHILLIPS, Kansas. 

O. H. IRISH, Nebraska. 

JOS. GERHARDT, District of Columbia. 
Washington, February 32, 1864. 



%' 



A splendid band, from Fort McHenry, animated the crowded theatre 
with national airs, and the assemblage was graced by the presence of 
maiiy ladies, who were accommodated in one of the tiers of boxes. 
Major-Gen. Lew. Wallace, who is in command of the Department, 
and Staff, the Hon. John Lee Chapman, Mayor of the City, the First 
and Second Branches of the City Council, officers of the Army and 
Navy, and many other distinguished invited guests were spectators of 
the proceedings. The Delegates and Alternates were afforded fticility 
of entrance by a side door, and the arrangements for their accommoda- 
tion and for the officers of the Convention reflect credit on those gentle- 
men to whom that duty had been entrusted. The local press give 
especial credit to Messrs. Wilmot, Meyer, and Foreman, of the City 
Council Committee, and Mr. Samuel M. Evans, the Sergeant-at-Arms 
of the Convention. The newspaper press was numerously represented 
and suitably accommodated. 

The President's desk was placed on an elevated platform on the 
stage, which had been enlarged to the extent of the parquette, which 
was boarded over, thus giving ample room for all the members in the 
discharge of their duties. 

The Hon. Edwin D. Morgan, of N. Y., Chairman of the National 
Union Executive Committee, called the Convention to order at the pre- 
scribed hour, and sjDoke as follows : 

llembers of the Convention — It is a little more than eight years since it was 
resolved to form a national party to be conducted upon the principles and 
policy which had been established and maintained by those illustrious states- 
men, George "Washington and Thomas Jefferson. A Convention was held 
in PhiladeliDhia, under the shade of the trees that sun-ounded the Hall of Inde- 
pendence, and candidates — Fremont and Dayton — were chosen to uphold our 
cause. But the State of Pennsylvania gave its electoral vote to James 
Buchanan, and the election of 1856 was lost. 

Nothing daunted by defeat, it was immediately determined " to fight on 
this line," not only " all summer," [applause,] but four summers and four win- 
ters ; and in 1860 the party banner was again unfurled, with the names of 
Abraham Lincoln [applause] and Hannibal, Hamlin inscribed thereon. 
This time it was successful, but with success came rebellion ; and Tvith rebellion 
of course came war ; and war, terrible civil war, has continued with varying 
success up to nearly the period when it is necessary, under our Constitution, to 
prepare for another Presidential election. It is for this highly responsible pur- 
pose that you are to-day assembled. It is not my duty nor my purpose to 
indicate any general course of action for this Convention ; but I trust I may be 
permitted to say that, in view of the dread realities of the past, and of what is 
passing at this moment — and of the fact that the bones of our soldiers lie 
bleaching in every State of this Union, and with the knowledge of the further 
fact that this has all been caused by slavery, the party of which you, gentlemen, 
are the delegated and honored representatives, will fall short of accomplishing 
its great mission, unless, among its other resolves, it shall declare for such an 
amendment of the Constitution as wiU positively prohibit African slavery in 
the United States. [Prolonged applause, followed by three cheers.] 



In behalf of the National Committee, I now propose for temporary President 
of this Convention, Robert J. Breckinridge, of Kentucky [applause], and ap- 
point Governor Randall, of Wisconsin, and Governor King, of New York, as a 
committee to conduct the President fro tern to the chair. 

The nomination was enthusiastically concurred in : 
Dr. Breckinridge having taken the chair, amidst enthusiastic greet- 
ings, three cheers were given for the " Old War Horse of Kentucky," 
and he spoke as follows : 

Gentlemen of the Gonventimi — You cannot be more sensible than I»am, that 
the part which I have to perform here to-day is merely a matter of form ; and 
acting upon the principles of my whole life, I was Inclined, when the suggestion 
was made to me from various quarters, that it was in the mind of many mem- 
bers of the Convention to confer this distinction upon me, to earnestly decline 
to accept ; because I have never sought honors — 1 have never sought distinc- 
tion. I have been a working man, and nothing else. But certain considera- 
tions led me to change my mind. [Applause.] 

There is a class of men in the comitry, far too small for the good of the 
country — those men who merely by their example, by their pen, by their voice, 
try to do good — and ' all the more in perilous times — without regard to the 
reward that may come. It was given to many such men to underetand, by the 
distinction conferred upon one of the humblest of their class, that they were 
men whom the country would cherish, and who would not be forgotten. 

There is another motive relative to yourselves and to the country at large. 
It is good for you, it is good for every nation and every people, every State and 
everj' party, to cherish all generous impulses, to follow all noble instincts ; and 
there are none more noble, none more generous than to purge yourselves of aU 
self-seekers and betrayers, and to confer official distinctions, if it be only hi mere 
forms, upon those who are worthy to be trusted, and ask nothing more. [Ap- 
plause.] 

Now, according to my convictions of propriety, having said this, I should 
say nothing more. [Cries of " go on."] But it has been intimated to me Irom 
many quarters, and In a way which I cannot disregard, that I should disap- 
point the wishes of my friends, and perhaps the just expectations of the Con- 
vention, if I did not as briefly, and yet as precisely as I could, say somewhat 
upon the great matters which have brought us here. Therefore, In a very few. 
words, and as plainly as I can, I will endeavor to draw your attention to one 
and another of these great matters in which we are all engaged. 

In the first place, nothing can be more plain than the fact that you are here 
as the representatives of a great nation — voluntary representatives chosen with- 
out forms of law, but as really representing the feelings, the principles, and if 
you choose, the prejudices of the American people, as if it were written m laws 
and already passed by votes — for the man that you will nominate here for the 
Presidency of the United States, and ruler of a great people in a great crisis, is 
just as certain, I suppose, to become that ruler as anji;hiug under heaven is cer- 
tain before it is done. [Prolonged cheering.] And, moreover, you wiU allow 
me to say, though perhaps it is hardly strictly proper that I should — but as far 
as I know your opinions, I suppose it is just as certain now, before you utter it, 
whose name you Tvill utter, and which wiU be responded to from one end to 
the other of this nation, as it vdll be after it has been uttered and recorded by 
your Secretary. Does any man doubt that this Convention Intends to say that 
Abraham Lincoln shall be the nominee? [Great applause.] What I wish, 
however, to call your attention to, is the grandeur of the mission upon which 
you are met, and therefore the dignity and solemnity, earnestness and conscien- 



tiousness with wliich, representing one of the greatest, and certainly one of the 
first people of the world, you ought to discharge these duties. [Applause.] 

Now, besides the nomination of President and Vice-President, in regard to 
which second office I will say nothmg, because I know there is more or less 
difference of opinion among you; but, besides these nominations, you have 
other most solemn duties to perform. Tou have to organize this party thor- 
oughly throughout the United States. You have to put it in whatever form 
your wisdom wUl suggest that will unite all your wisdom, energy and determi- 
nation to gain the victory which I have already said was in our power. More 
than that, you have to lay down with clearness and precision the principles on 
which you intend to carry on this great political contest, and prosecute the war 
which i^ underneath them, and the glory of the country which lies before us if 
we succeed, — plainly, not in a double sense — briefly, not in a treatise, with the 
dignity and precision of a great people to utter, by its representatives, the 
political principles by which they intend to live, and for the sake of which 
they are willing to die. So that all men, everywhere, may understand precisely 
what we mean, and lay that farrow so deeply and clearly, that v/hile every man 
who is worthy to associate with freemen may see it and pass over it, every man 
who is unworthy, may be either unable to pass it, or may be driven far from us. 
We want none, but those who are like us to be with us. [Applause.] 

Now, among these principles, if you will allow me to say it, the first and 
most distinct is, that we do not intend to permit tliis nation to be destroyed. 
[AjDplause.] We are a nation — no doubt a peculiar one — a nation formed of 
States, and no nation except as these States form it. And these States are no 
States except as they are States in that nation. They had no more right to re- 
l^udiate the nation than the nation has to repudiate them. None of them had 
even the shadow of a right to do this, and, God helping us, we will vindicate 
that truth so that it shall never be disputed any more in this world. [Ap- 
plause.] It is a fearful alternative that is set before us, but there are great 
compensations for it. Those of you who have attended to this subject know, or 
ought to know, that fi'om the foundation of the present Government, before 
and since our present Constitution was formed, there have always been parties 
that had no faith in our Government. The men that formed it were doubtful 
of its success, and the men that opposed its formation did not desire its success. 
And I am bold to say, without detaining you on this subject, that, with all the 
outcry about our violations of the Constitution, this present living generation 
and this present Union party are more thoroughly devoted to that Constitution 
than any generation that has ever lived under it. [Applause.] While I say 
that, and solemnly believe it, and believe it is capable of the strongest jjroof, I 
may also add that it is a great error which is being propagated in our land, to 
say that our national life depends merely upon the sustaining of that Constitu- 
tion. Our fathers made it, and we love it. But if it suits us to change it, we 
can do so. [Applause.] And when it suits us to change it, we will change it. 
[Applause.] If it were torn into ten thousand pieces, the nation would be as 
much a nation as it was before the Constitution was made — a nation always, 
that declared its independence as a united peojjle, and lived as a united people 
until now — a nation independent of all particular institutions under which 
they lived, and capable of modeling them precisely as their interests require. 
We ought to have it distinctly imderstood by friends and enemies, that while 
we love that instrument we will maintain it, and will, with undoubted certainty, 
put to death friend or foe who undertakes to trample it under foot ; yet, be- 
yond a doubt, we will reserve the right to alter it to suit ourselves from time 
to time and from generation to generation. [Applause.] One more idea on 
that subject. We have incorporated in that instrument the right of revolution, 
which gives us, without a doubt, the right to change it. It never existed be- 
fore the American States, and, by the right to change, there is no need of re- 
bellion, insurrection or civil war, except upon a denial of the fundamental 



principles of all fi-ee govemments^tliat the major part must rule ; and there 
is no other method of carrying on society, except that the Avill of the majority 
shall be the vdH of the whole — or that the will of the minority shall be the 
will of the whole. So that, in one word, to deny the principles I have tried 
fo state, is to make a dogmatic assertion that the only form of government that 
is possible with perfect liberty and acknowledged by God is a pure and abso- 
lute despotism. The principles, therefore, which I am trying to state before 
you are princii^les wluch, if they be not true, freedom is impossible, and no 
government l^ut one of pure force can exist or ought to endure among men. 
But the idea which I wished to carry out, as the remedy for these troubles and 
sorrows, is this : Dreadful as they are, this fearful truth runs through the whole 
history of mankind, that, whatever else may be done to give stability to au- 
thority, whatever else may be done to give perpetuity to institutions — however 
wise, however glorious, practicable and just may be the philosophy of it — it 
has been found that the only enduring, the only imperishable cement of all 
free institutions, has been the blood of traitora. No goverment has ever been 
built upon imperishable foundations which foundations were not laid in the 
blood of traitors. It is a feai-ful truth, but we may as well avow it at once ; 
and every blow you strike, and every rebel you kill, every battle you win, dread- 
ful as it is to do it, you are adding, it may be, a year — it may be ten years — it 
may be a centurj- — it may be ten centuries to the life of the Government and 
the freedom of your children. [Great applause.] 

Now, passing over that idea — passing over many other things which it 
would be right for me to say, did the time serve, and were this the occasion, — 
let me add, you are a Union party. [Applause.] Tour origin has been referred 
to as having occmred eight years ago. In one sense it is true. But you are 
far older than that. I see before me not only primitive Republicans and prim- 
itive Abolitionists, but I see also piimitive Democrats and primitive Whigs — 
primitive Americans, and, if you wiU allow me to say so, I myself am here, who 
all my life have been in a party to myself. [Laughter and applause.] As a 
Union party I will follow you to the ends of the earth, and to the gates of 
death. [Applause.] But as an Abolition party — as a Republican party — as a 
Whig party — as a Democratic party — as an American party, I will not follow 
you one foot. [Applause.] But it is true of the mass of the American people, 
however you may divide and scatter, while this war lasts, while the country is 
in peril, while you call yourselves as you do in the call of the Convention, the 
Union party — you are for the preseiwation of the Union and the destruction of 
this rebellion, root and branch. And, in my judgment, one of the greatest 
errors that has been committed by our administration of the Federal Govern- 
ment — the Chief of which we are about to nominate for another term of office 
— one of its errors has been to believe that we have succeeded where we have 
not succeeded, and to act in a manner which is precisely as if we had succeed- 
ed. Tou wiU not, you cannot, succeed until you have utterly broken up the 
military power of these people. [Applause.] 

I will not detain you upon these incidental points, one of which has been 
made prominent in the remarks of the excellent Chairman of the National 
Committee. I do not know that I would be willing to go so far as probably 
he would. But I cordially agree with him in this — I think, considering what 
has been done about Slavery, taking the thing as it now stands, overlooking 
altogether, either in the way of condemnation or in the way of approval, any 
act that has brought us to the point where we are, but believing in my con- 
science and with all my heart?, that what has brought us where we are in the 
matter of Slavery, is the original sin and foUy pf treason and Secession, because 
you remember that the Chicago Convention itself was understood to-day, and 
I believe it virtually did explicitly say, that they would not touch Slavery in the 
States,^leaving it, therefore, altogether out of the question how we came 
where we are, on that particular point, we are prepared to go farther than the 



original Republicans themselves were prepared to go. We are prepared to 
demand not only that the whole territory of the United States shall not be 
made slave, but that the General Government of the American people shall do 
one of two things— and it appears to me that there is nothing else that can be 
done — either to use the whole power of the Government, both the war powsr 
and the peace power, to put Slavery as nearly as jDossible back where it was — 
for, although that would be a fearful state of society, it is better than anarchy ; 
or else to use the whole power of the Government, both of war and peace, and 
all the practical power that the people of the United States will give them, to 
exterminate and extinguish Slavery. [Prolonged applause.] 

I have no hesitation in saying, for myself, that if I were a pro-slavery man, 
if I believed this institution was an ordinance of God, and was given to man, 
I would unhesitatingly join those who demand that the Government should 
be put back where it was. But I am not a pro-slavery man — I never was. I 
unite myself with those who believe it is contrary to the highest interests of 
all men and of all Government, contrary to the spirit of the Christian religion, 
and incompatible with the natural rights of man. I join myself with those 
who say, away with it forever [applause] ; and I fervently pray God that the 
day may come when, throughout the whole land every man may be as free as 
you are, and as capable of enjoying regulated liberty. [Prolonged applause.] 

I will not detain you any longer. One single word you will allow me to 
say in behalf of the State from which I come, one of the smallest of the thous- 
ands of Israel. We know very well that our eleven votes are of no conse- 
quence in the Presidential election. We know very well that in our present 
imhappy condition, it is by no means certain that we are here to-day repre- 
senting the party that will cast the majority of the votes in that tmhappy 
State. I know very weM that the sentiments which I am uttering will cause 
me great odium in the State in which I was bom, which I love, where the 
bones of two generations of my ancestors and some of my children are, and 
where, veiy soon, I shall lay my own. I know very well that my colleagues 
will incur odium if they indorse what I say, and they, too, know it. But we 
have put our faces toward the way in which we intend to go, and we will go 
in it to the end. K we are to perish, we will perish in that way. AH I have 
to say to you is, help us if you can ; if you cannot, believe in your hearts that 
we have died like men. 

TEMPORARY SECRETARIES. 

Mr. N. B. Smithers, of Delaware. Mr. President : In order to 
perfect the temporary organization, I move that the following gentlemen 
be appointed temporary secretaries, viz. : George A. Shaw, of Massa- 
chusetts ; R. H. DuELL, of New York ; Rev. M. C. Briggs, of Cali- 
fornia. 

The question being put, the motion was agreed to, 

PRAYER. 

The Chairman. — It has been usual on such occasions, gentlemen, and 
it is most proper in itself, to have the blessing of God, in whom is all 
our hope, invoked, at this stage of the proceedings, upon our conduct, 
and the result of it. The Chairman of the National Committee will 
now introduce to you, therefore, the Rev. McKendree Reilet, of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church, who will lead us at the Throne of Grace. 



Mr. Reiley made a prayer in the following language : 

Oui- Fatlier whicli art in Heaven, hallowed be thy name. As taught by Thy 
Son Jesus Chiist, we recognize the filial relation in which we stand to-day ; and 
approach Thee as children approaching their parent ; and yet, at the same 
time, we recognize the fact that Thou art the Infinite God, the Governor of 
Worlds, the King of Kings, and the Lord of Lords. We appear before Thee 
to let Thy blessing rest upon these Thy sei-vants, who have here met together 
as dii-ected by the people, to ascertain and to give to them for their suffrages 
proper persons to take the positions and perform the duties of President and 
Vice President of the United States. We thank Thy holy name for this Con- 
vention, for the healthy indication it gives of the fact that we still have a 
government. Notmthstanding our nationality has been assailed, even in the 
home of its professed friends ; notwithstanding plans of treason have been 
concocted with great ingenuity, and long matm-ed ; notwithstanding the noble 
fabric built by our fathers, under Thy guidance, has been assaUed by armed 
bands, exceedingly numerous, well equipped, and well marshaled, we praise 
Thy name that, after three years of turmoil, of war, of bloodshed, and of com- 
motion, there is still the fact before us, unanswerable, that we have a govern- 
ment. We praise Thy name that, notwithstanding the s}TQj)athies of the 
world, of the other nations of the earth, have been for the most part against 
us — the sympathies at least of those high in power — we still demonstrate to 
them the fact that we have a government. We thank Thee that it holds its 
sessions in the State of Maryland, upon whose original soil stands the capital 
of the United States, but which, a short period ago, seemed so near the vortex 
of secession. We praise Thy name that this Convention holds its session in the 
city of Baltimore, from whose breezes, but a short time ago, early in the present 
struggle, the banner of our common country was exiled. We thank Thee that 
that banner floats in triumph over our State and over our city ; and we thank 
Thee that the Convention which, composed of the representatives of the peo- 
ple, is to indicate the next President and Vice-President of the United States, 
holds its session here. We pray Thee to gTant to these Thy servants wisdom, 
that they may conduct their plans all in the fear of God, anct for the promotion 
of the best purposes. May they select the right men to take the responsible 
positions that are now so interesting to us ; and grant when they have selected 
the men as candidates for those positions, that the people may come up and 
roll in an overwhelming majority that shall forever settle the question that the 
authority of the United States Government is the supreme law of the land. 
We pray Thee to let thy blessing rest upon the President of the United States, 
upon the members of his Cabinet, and upon our Congressmen, and upon all 
who are in authority. Wilt thou give to them the Avisdom that they now emi- 
nently need ; and we pray Thee to let Thy blessing rest upon our country, once 
so highly favored, but now so war-stirred, whose soil is now so blood-stained. 
Oh, do Thou lift this curtain of darkness on which we behold the angry traces 
of Thy wrath, and may the sun of peace early shine forth upon a united and 
happy nation. We pray Thee to bless our soldiers in the field and sailors on 
the ocean, and give them great success in their enterprises. May victory perch 
upon their banner, and may we, as a nation, come forth from this war purified, 
and testify in a sense such as we have never testified before to the nations of 
the earth in favor of human freedom. Grant, we beseech Thee, that when we 
shall pass through this ordeal, it shall be, while the fires of the furnace have 
not left their smell upon our garments, they have melted off the chain of the 
last slave. All of which we ask in Christ's name. Amen. 



10 
OEGANIZATION. 

The Chairman. — What is the further pleasure of the Convention 
with regard to the earliest possible permanent organization ? Divers 
committees, I find, were appointed at the last Convention, the proceed- 
ings of which I have before me. I think the next business which was 
transacted four years ago, was the calling of the States for the purpose 
of selecting a Committee to report officers for the Convention. Is it the 
will of the meeting that the States should be now called for that pur- 
pose? 

Mr. Simon Cameron, of Pennsylvania. — I move that the list of the 
States be called, and that some member of the delegation from each 
State furnish the Secretary with a list of its delegates. 
The motion, being seconded, was put and carried. 
The Chairman. — In what order shall the list be called? 
Mr. Cameron. — The Secretary has a printed list of the States, and 
he had better call them according to his roll. When the States are 
called, some delegate from each State can furnish the Secretary with a 
list of the names of the delegates from his State. 

The Chairman. — The Secretary will please proceed to call the list in 
the order mentioned. 

The Secretary. — 'The first State on the list is Maine. 
Mr. Lot M. Morrill, of Maine. — I beg to suggest that there is a 
misapprehension in regard to the motion just adopted, I think, perhaps, 
it will be impracticable to carry it into execution. 

The Chairman. — It is not in order to discuss it now. It has already 
been adopted. 

Mr. Lot M. Morrill, of Maine. — I rise to obviate the difficulty by 
a motion -which I shall submit, if the Chair will entertain it. I move to 
reconsider the vote by which the list of delegates was directed to be 
called for, with a view of submitting a motion to raise a Committee to 
receive the credentials and report a list of delegates. 
The Chairman. — That motion is in order. 

Mr. Simon Cameron, of Pennsylvania. — With great deference to the 
gentleman from Maine, I think he could not have understood my motion 
correctly, or he would not object to it. My motion was that the roll of 
States should be called over, and that, as each State was called, some 
gentleman of the delegation should present such a list of delegates as 
has been made out by the delegation. After that, of course, a Commit- 
tee will be formed from all the States for the purpose of investigating 



11 



those rolls, seeing if there are any contested seats, and deciding between 
the contestants ; or, tf there be none contested, the list will come back 
in full. That will save a great deal of time, and there can be no diffi- 
culty in carrying it out. I trust there will be no reconsideration. 

Mr. L. M. Morrill, of Maine. — I perceive that between the gentle- 
man from Pennsylvania and myself there is no difference as to the ob- 
ject to be attained. But, in a body where the delegates are unknown, 
where, possibly, some of the seats are contested, it seems to m,e utterly 
impracticable, at this time, to present a list of the delegates from the 
several States ; and my purpose is, if this vote shall be reconsidered, to 
propose that the roll of States be called, and that each delegation be 
requested to propose one name from its delegation, to constitute a Com- 
mittee on Credentials, to whom the credentials of the delegates from the 
several States shall be referred. 

Mr. Thompson Campbell, of California. — I think the course suggested 
by the gentleman from Pennsylvania is the course ordinarily pursued in 
such conventions, gnd I see no difficulty in it. When the State of Maine 
is called, I apprehend the delegation from that State Avill be prepared to 
present their, credentials. There are no self-constituted delegates in this 
Convention. They all come by authority, as representatives of the con- 
stituencies which have elected them. I apprehend, therefore, there will 
be no difficulty in carrying out the motion already adopted, and it is the 
best and speediest course of ascertaining who are the members of this 
Convention. 

The Chairman put the question on the motion to reconsider, and de- 
cided that it was agreed to, and that the question recurred on the original 
motion of Mr. Cameron. 

Mr. Simon Cameron, of Pennsylvania. — Now, Mr. President, I sub- 
mit another motion. I move that a Committee, composed of one dele- 
gate from each State, be appointed, for the purpose of receiving a list of 
delegates, and deciding who are entitled to be present. 

The Chairman. — Does the gentleman offer that as a substitute for 
the other motion ? 

Mr. S. Cameron, of Pa. — Yes, sir. 

Mr. James H. Lane, of Kansas. — Is that to apply only to States 
where there is no contest 1 

Mr. S. Cameron, of Pa. — No; I mean that it shall embrace all. 
Mr. George W. Patterson, from N. Y. — I think it is the most sim- 
ple thing in the world, when a State is called, for the chairman of the 
delegation from that State to rise in his place and send to the Chair a 
list of the delegates from that State. I cannot but think that some dele- 



12 



gate from the State of Maine has a list of all the delegates from that 
State, and if he has, he can send it to the Chair. ^Order.] 

The Chairman. — Allow me to remind the gentleman that the house 
have not only reconsidered the question to which he is speaking, but are 
considering another motion which has been substituted for it by the gen- 
tleman from Pennsylvania. 

Mr. G. W. Patterson, of N. Y. — I move to amend that m.otion by 
inserting in place of it the original motion that was made, that the dele- 
gation from each State, as the States are called, furnish to the Chair a 
list of the members from that State. The State of N. Y., I believe, has 
about as many delegates as the State of Maine, and the Chairman of our 
delegation will be able, when the State of N. Y. is called, to present a 
full list of the delegates from that State, Now, Sir, I move you that, as 
the States are called, one delegate from each State furnish to the Chair a 
list of the members from that State. 

Mr. S. Cameron, of Penn. — To save time, I accept the proposition to 
amend. 

Mr. A. Brandagee, of Conn. — I have an objection, for two reasons, 
to the proposed amendment of the gentleman from N. Y. In the first 
place, it is not an amendment at all ; in the next place it is not germane 
to the resolution offered by the gentleman from Pennsylvania ; it is a 
substitute for it, and therefore not in order. I insist upon the original 
motion being put. 

Mr. G. W. Patterson, of N. Y. — The gentleman from Pennsylvania 
has withdrawn his motion, and the question now is on mine. 

The Chairman. — The Chair will state the position of the case as he 
understands it. The House passed the resolution offered by the gentle- 
man from Penna., and then reconsidered it. The effect of the reconsi- 
deration was, to leave the motion that was originally passed standing 
upon its jDassage. Thereupon the mover of the resolution, nobody object- 
ing, offered a substitute for it. Whether or not the substitute and the 
original motion were so different that the substitute could not properly 
be received, as has been suggested, I shall not now undertake to say ; 
but, under the circumstances, I decide that it was properly presented. I 
have doubts, however, whether, after that has been done, the gentleman 
from Pennsylvania, or anybody in his place, can offer again the original 
resolution for which he accepted the substitute as an amendment to it ; 
seeing, in fact, that it is not an amendment but a totally different thing. 
There is the embarrassment that I am in. 

Mr. Henry J. Raymond, of N. Y. — I desire, Mr. Chairman, simply to 
make a suggestion for the consideration of the Convention which may pos- 



13 



sibly facilitate business. We are here now simply as a mass meeting. 
We have appointed a temporary Chairman for the purpose of organizing 
that mass meeting, and converting it into a convention of delegates. The 
first thing, therefore, to be done is to decide what States have sent delegates 
here ; the next thing to be decided is what delegates they have sent ; and 
the third thing to be decided is by what authority do those delegates come 
from those States, and appear here as their representatives. It seems to me 
that is the natural order in which we are to make ourselves a convention 
instead of a mass meeting. Now, as I understand it, the motion submitted 
by the gentleman from Pennsylvania is, that we appoint a Committee 
on Credentials, Well, sir, in the first place, we have no credentials be- 
fore this body, and in the next place, we have no delegates officially known 
to this body, from whom to make up that Committee. The first thing 
to be done, it strikes me, is to call the list of States belonging to this 
Union, and, aiS each State is called, if there is any one here present who 
can say for that State that she has a delegation here, it is his business to 
rise and say so, and to present to the Chair the credentials on which that 
delegation claims seats. If there are contesting delegations from any 
State, I take it for granted that it is the duty of some one from that State 
to present the list of both claimants. Then when that has been done, a 
Committee can be appointed to examine the credentials thus-handed in. 

Mr. S. Cameron, of Penn. — Allow me to say to the gentleman from 
New York, that my original resolution was precisely what he is now 
advocating, but there were objections to it, and I withdrew it for the pur- 
pose of saving time. I offered my first resolution because I thought it 
was the quickest way of bringing the mass meeting, as the gentleman has 
called it, into a convention ; and I intended to follow it up by offering 
another resolution, that a Committee on Credentials be appointed, of one 
from each State represented here, and let that Committee examine the 
papers presented under the first resolution, and determine who ai-e en- 
titled to seats. It could all have been settled in a few minutes if my hon. 
friend from Maine had let it go ; the effect of his motion to reconsider 
has been to waste more time already than would have been occupied in 
organizing the Convention. 

Mr. H. J. Raymond, of N. Y. — I suppose the only difficulty has 
arisen from the flxct that, owing to the somewhat feeble voice of the gen- 
tlemen who made these motions, their exact tenor was not fully under- 
stood by the whole body of the Convention. If, now, the gentleman 
from Pennsylvania will renew his motion, I have no doubt, with the ex- 
planation he has made, it will be promptly acceded to ; if not, I will 
make it myself. 



14: 



Mr. S. Cameron, of Pa. — That motion is now before the house. 

Mr. H. J. Raymond, of N. Y. — That motion, as I understand it, is 
that the Secretary of this meeting call the list of States, and that, as the 
name of each State is called, some one on behalf of that State shall 
respond to it, and present the list of delegates claiming seats from that 
State, together with their credentials. 

Mr. S. Cameron, of Pa. — I have those of Pennsylvania in my hand 
now, ready to present. 

The Chairman. — The question is on the motion of the gentleman 
from Pennsylvania, as it has been just stated. 

The motion was agreed to. 

Mr. Shaw, the Secretary, proceeded to call the roll of States, and 
lists of delegates were handed in from Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, 
Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, Penn- 
sylvania, Delaware, Maryland, Kentucky, Ohio, Indiana, IMinois, Michi- 
gan, Wisconsin, Iowa, Minnesota, California, Oregon, West Virginia, 
and Kansas. 

From Missouri two lists of delegates were presented, one elected by 
the Radical Union Convention, and the other by the Unconditional Union 
Party of Missouri. 

CONTESTED SEATS. 

Mr. Thaddeus Stevens, of Penn. — I move that all contested cases 
be laid over, and that the delegates from such States shall not be entered 
on the roll until the credentials shall have been sent to a Committee on 
Credentials and reported back. 

The motion was agreed to. • 

The District of Columbia was also called, and it was announced that 
there were two sets of delegates from the District. » 

The Chairman. — All the States embraced in the call of this Conven- 
tion have been called by the Secretary. Is it the mind of the Conven- 
tion that he shall stop there, or shall he call the other States. 

Mr. Thaddeus Stevens, of Penn. — I move, Mr. Chairman, that if 
there are any representatives here from States which have not been 
called — and I understand that some of the States in secession claim to 
be represented here — they present their credentials to the Committee on 
Credentials when appointed, but that they be not called in this order. 

Mr. J. H. Lane, of Kansas. — I move to amend the motion of the 
gentleman from Pennsylvania, by directing the Secretary to proceed 
with the call of the States and Territories, with the understanding that 



15 



the credentials which may be presented shall be referred to the Commit- 
tee on Credentials. 

Mr. Thaddeus Stevens, of Penn. — I am afraid that that will be some 
recognition of the right of the States which now belong to the Southern 
Confederacy to be f-epresented here, and, of course,«to be represented in 
the Electoral College. I think we ought to march with great caution in 
this matter ; for, although I have no doubt there are many very excel- 
lent men here from such States, yet it is a question which ought to be 
settled before we commit ourselves at all, whether they are entitled to 
be represented here or not. I may as well say at this point — though, 
perhaps, it has nothing to do with this question — that, in a meeting of 
the Union Eepublican members of the House of Representatives, they 
have unanimously declared that no such States can be represented in 
Congress, or ought to be represented in the Electoral College, oz', in their 
judgment, ought to be represented here, as that would give them a right 
to be represented in the Electoral College. I do not want to have that 
question now discussed, or now decided. I have, therefore, made a mo- 
tion, which I thought would leave it open for consideration, to refer it 
all to the Committee on Credentials, who will carefully examine the 
whole question, and report to this Convention, so that the business may 
ribt now be interrupted by what may be a protracted discussion. I hope 
the gentleman from Kansas will see the propriety of this proceeding 
being taken, as it will decide nothing, but simply place the question in a 
position for adjudication hereafter. 

Mr. J, H. Lane, of Kansas. — It will be time enough to decide against 
the claims of Nevada, and Colorado, and Nebraska, who expect to 
cast electoral votes for our candidate [applause], after an examination by 
the Committee on Credentials. It will be time enough to decide against 
the free State of Arkansas, whose Senators and Representatives are knock- 
ing at the doors of Congress for admission, after consideration by the 
Committee on Credentials. It will be time enough to decide against the 
gallant Eree-State men of Louisiana [applause], who propose to elect 
Senators and Representatives so soon as they can, under their amended 
Constitution, after an examination by the Committee on Credentials. 
•These States are here with their delegates. All they ask is the poor 
boon of being ranked in the call with their sister States [applause]. They 
are willing to abide the decision of the Committee on Credentials, and 
the decision of this Convention. The State of Missouri has two sets of 
delegates here : there is a question to adjudicate, and we have received the 
credentials of both sets of delegates, and referred them to the Committee • 
on Credentials for adjudication. The delegates from Arkansas, the dele- 



16 



gates from Louisiana, the delegates from Tennessee, and the delegates 
from Nevada, Nebraska, and Colorado, have a question to be adjudicated. 
Send their credentials to the Committee on Credentials, as you have 
done in the case of the contestants from the State of Missouri. Let me 
add, the delegates frflm Nevada, Nebraska and Colorado especially, ask 
recognition here for the purpose of strengthening the State movement 
within those territories; and I hope, as a matter of policy, if not as a 
matter of justice, that you will permit their credentials to be received 
and referred to the Committee on Credentials. 

Mr. Horace Matnard, of Tenn. — I rise to say that I appear as the 
Chairman of the delegation from the State of Tennessee, sent here by the 
loyal Union portion of the population of that old State, extending as they 
do from the mountains to the banks of the Mississippi river. I presume 
that, as to the mere matter of their credentials, there can be very little 
dispute. The question for the Convention to decide is, as I understand it, 
Avhether the State of Tennessee, by her loyal, LTnion, liberty-loving popula- 
tion [applause], shall have a position and a voice in the deliberations of 
this body. As a right, we are free to concede in one sense that we have 
it not ; but this, as it has been very appropriately styled by the Chairman, 
is a voluntary representative body, not provided for either by the Con- 
stitution or the laws of our country, but growing up by established party 
usages for a period of almost one generation. Any body of men who 
choose to assemble themselves within the limits of the U. S. to designate 
candidates for the high offices of President and Vice-President, undoubt- 
edly have the right to do so, and have equally the right to say who shall 
and who shall not assemble with them. We concede that fully. We come, 
making no such claims. In another sense, and if I may be permitted to 
say, in a much larger and higher sense, they who have sent us here do 
claim that they have a right to be represented in this body of American 
citizens [applause]. What is the assemblage ? What does it pui'port 
to be 1 An assemblage of delegates representing that portion of the 
American people who are now, hj their efforts in the field, and by their 
sustaining and co-operating efforts at home, attempting to sustain the 
honor and the existence of the government against the men who are in re- 
bellious array, endeavoring to break it up and overthrow it. Assembled 
here under that symbol which typifies our common nationality, we, the 
loyal people of Tennessee, claim the right to be represented in any 
such assemblage, wherever upon this broad Continent it may be met 
[applause]. You have decorated and adorned your hall most beautifully 
•and most appropriately by that flag which is the symbol of our common 
nationality. Count, I beseech you, before you pronounce upon this ques- 



17 



tion, the stars that emblazon it [great and continued applause]. That, sir, 
is our argument ; that, sir, is our appeal. The sixteenth star in that con- 
stellation symbolizes the existence of Tennessee. And we intend, God 
helping us, and by the assistance of the loyal arms of the loyal men of 
our country, that that star shall never set. 

I do not propose, in this ]3reliminary period of the deliberations of 
the Convention, to enlarge on this topic. I rose simply for the purpose 
of entering, in behalf of those much-enduring, long-suffering men who 
sent us here, a protest that you should not pass us by, or forget or ignore 
our existence. Let me say that, for you that drink in the cool breezes 
of the Northern air, it is easy to rally to the flag to sustain the honor of 
your country ; and, if we had not melancholy evidence to the contrary, 
I should say that it was impossible that any of you should do otherwise. 
But we represent those who have stood in the very furnace of the rebel- 
lion, those who have met treason eye to eye, and face to face, and fought 
from the beginning for the support of the flag and the honor of our 
country. [Great applause.] I will not repeat the story of that people. 
It has been told many times. All I have to say is that if, after the ac- 
cumulated evidence that has been thrust upon the country, any man is 
still incredulous of the sublime, romantic patriotism of that noble 
people, I beg that he will return with me, and see for himself; let 
him put his hands into the very print of the nails, and he will have 
such demonstration as shall satisfy him. Sir, that people sent us here 
because they are interested in the great question to be decided here. 
They are interested with you in sustaining and upholding the common 
government of this country, and they have sent us here to attest, by an 
additional act, their devotion to our common country, and their desii-e to 
be reckoned among those who are ready to maintain, at every cost, our 
common honor and nationality. Their sons are dying in the field under 
the national flag. Their blood has scarcely even now dried upon the 
sand. It was spilled the other day in the defiles of Georgia, and it has 
marked all the mountain passes in Tennessee. From an humble begin- 
ning, at Mill Spring, to that glorious encounter above the very clouds, 
their blood has been shed on every field. In the name of these heroes 
we call upon you to receive us among the friends of the Union here as- 
sembled. [Great applause.] 

Mr. Hanks, of Ark. — On the western side of the Mississippi River 
is the State of Arkansas, which, although almost blotted out, has sent 
here a full delegation of true Union men. We have suffered for three 
long years ; we have been trampled down beneath the heel of despotism ; 
many of our people have been carried off" to captivity, but we are here 
2 



18 



to-day to represent true Union men, friends of the government. Within 
our limits was fought the battle of Pea Ridge. [Applause.] Having 
passed through the fiery ordeal, we come here as representing twelve 
thousand loyal men of Arkansas, who have put down that disturbing 
element which was the source of all our woes. [Applause.] We are 
here ; we claim to be a parcel of you ; and we claim that we have yet a 
star in the glorious galaxy of the American Union. 

Mr. L. H, Chandler, of Va. — Before this question is put, I desire 
to say a word in behalf of the delegation from Virginia. I wish to 
know the name of the last State or Territory that was called before the 
motion was submitted by the gentleman from Pennsylvania. 

The Secretary (Mr. Shaw). — The last name called was the District 
of Columbia. 

Mr. L. H, Chandler, of Va. — Now, I wish to know, Mr. Chairman, 
why the District of Columbia should be called, and the State of Virginia 
left out. Why, sir, the District of Columbia never can be hatched or 
piped into a State. [Laughter.] Act as you please, vote as you please, 
decide as you please here, with all respect for the District of Columbia 
— and I believe I am standing almost within speaking distance of her — 
how can she ever throw an electoral vote ? But the State of Virginia 
has contributed 25,000 men to the Union army. [Applause.] She is 
this day represented in the Senate of the United States, and, but for the 
inscrutable dispensation of Divine Providence in the death of the la- 
mented BowDEN, would be fully represented ; and she would, to-day, 
have three Representatives on the floor of the House of Representatives 
but for the feet that the Committee of Elections decided, not that she 
was not a State, but that the vote of the respective districts was not 
sufficient if scattered over the districts, or, in other words, that a suffi- 
cient jiumber of counties in each district had not voted. Is that State to 
be shut out ? The member from Pennsylvania who submitted that mo- 
tion has himself recognized the Statp of Virginia as one of the States of 
this Union. [Applause.] 

Mr. T. Stevens, of Pa. — May I ask the gentleman when I ever 
recognized Virginia, since her Ordinance of Secession, as being in the 
Union ? West Virginia, cut off from Virginia, I voted for admitting 
into the Union as an independent State, and the gentleman will do me 
the justice to say that I then declared that Virginia herself had no busi- 
ness to be considered in the Union. I was very sorry, when the gentle- 
man was himself lately an applicant for a seat in Congress, that I was 
obliged to vo^e against him, because I believed that Virginia and all 
other States in Secession — although I knew some of their men were 



19 



loyal, and although I knew there is no better Republican than the gentle- 
man to whose voice we have been listening with pleasure — all States 
which, by a regular majority of their votes, have declared themselves 
out of the Union, have no right to be recognized or represented in the' 
Union. I am sure I never admitted such a doctrine*as that. The ap- 
plause which I have heard of the principle of such recognition has alarmed 
me more for the safety of this nation than all the armies of the rebels. 
[Applause.] 

Mr. L. H. Chandler, of Va. — I will answer the gentleman from 
Pennsylvania, and will tell him how and why and when he recognized 
the State of Virginia. He admits the fact that he voted in favor of 
making West Virginia a new State. Pray, how did he do that unless he 
in the first place acknowledged Virginia as a State ? [Applause.] Sir, 
that gentleman is too well posted in regard to the Constitution not to 
know that no new State can be carved out of an old State save by the 
consent of the old State, and then Congress passes on the question ; so 
that, when the gentleman voted in favor of making West Virginia a new 
State, he either recognized the State of Virginia, or he voted for a mea- 
sure which he himself believed to be unconstitutional. 

The Chairman. — I have very great doubts whether any part of this 
discussion that is purely personal is in order. I doubt whether it is in 
order or for edification that personal C[uestions of this sort should be in- 
troduced, not germane to the issue; and, unless the House order other- 
wise, I shall hold that no part of this side-discussion is in order. 

Mr. L. H. Chandler, of Va. — Sir, there was nothing personal in- 
tended. The gentleman from Pennsylvania knows very well indeed that 
the personal relations between us have always been of the most pleasant 
character. I was simply putting the question in a strong way to the 
Convention. 

Mr. T. Stevens, of Pa. — Will the gentleman allow me one word ? 
and it is all I have to say. I did not consider the gentleman as making 
any reflection on me personally. I wish to explain, however, one diffi- 
culty which the gentleman is under. I presume he did not read the poor 
remarks which I made when West Virginia was admitted as a State of 
the Union. It was proposed to admit her upon the ground that Old Vir- 
ginia had given her consent, and that new West Virginia should come in 
Ytdth that consent. I expressly said that I hoped nobody would consider 
me so ignorant as to suppose that Virginia was divided according to the 
principles of the Constitution ; but that West Virginia, being conquered 
by our armies, according to the laws of war we had a right to do with 
the conquered territory just as we pleased [applause] ; and I voted for 



M) 



her admission, disclaiming the idea that the dis'ision was according to 
the -forms of the Constitution, but under the laws of war and the laws of 
conquest. The gentleman did not read that, or he would not have 
charged me with having admitted the existence of Old Virginia in my 
vote in regard to West Virginia. 

Mr. L. H. Chandler, of Va. — I will remove all difficulty with regard to 
the question of order. I say nothing with regard to the political action of 
the distinguished gentleman from Pennsylvania. It is enough for me to 
know that the House of Representatives and Senate, at Washington, de- 
cided in favor of admitting West Virginia, and could do it upon no other 
ground than that she was part and parcel of the State of Virginia. It is 
enough for me to know that every department of the Government, legis- 
lative, executive, and judicial, the President, with every head of each de- 
partment under him, has recognized and to this day recognizes Virginia as 
a State. The only difference between the gentleman from Pennsylvania 
and myself is, that whilst he wishes a remarkably large slice to be 
overrun by our armies before he can acknowledge that slice as a terri- 
tory, I am a little more moderate, and I ask that a slice twice as large 
as Rhode Island, and much larger than Delaware, that has been con- 
quered by our armies, and that my associates and myself here, shall 
have the simple boon granted of having their names called over side by 
side with those of the District of Columbia [laughter and applause]. It 
is a question of degree : the gentleman and I recognize the same principle. 

Mr. A. H. Reeder, of Pa. — Allow mc to ask a question ? Does the 
gentleman from Virginia contend that the delegates/ from Virginia being 
entitled to seats here, the people whom they represent would therefore 
be entitled to an electoral vote ? 

Mr. L. H. Chandler, of Va. — " Sufficient unto the day is the evil 
thereof" 

Mr. A. H. Reeder,. of Pa. — Will the gentleman allow me to finish 
my sentence 1 Because it seems to me a logical conclusion that if you 
allow the people of Virginia to participate in the selection of a candidate 
for the Presidency, you must also allow them to participate in his elec- 
tion at the polls. How, then, you can escape the reception of the votes 
of the people of the city of Richmond, I cannot understand. 

Mr. L. H. Chandler, of Va. — Calling our names here settles nothing. 
Our credentials go before the Committee ; when that Committee shall 
have reported on them it will be time enough for those of us who are 
from Virginia to give our views to this Convention in relation to that 
question. All we ask now is that our names shall be called, that our 
credentials shall be sent before the Committee ; then that question and 



21 



other questions will properly come up. And bear in mind, sir, that we 
have been very modest, we have not sent here any delegates representing 
the Eichmond congressional district [laughter]. We have only sent two 
delegates here as delegates at large, for the two senators that Virginia 
had when the present Senate assembled in December last, and three 
delegates from three congressional districts in which elections were regu- 
larly held. We offer here to give only five votes. Now, I ask, when 
the State, as I have said, has been recognized by every department of 
this Government, why we ought not at least to be called in the roll of 
States. I do not wish to say a single word that may be considered as 
going towards making a speech [laughter]. Strike out all these States, 
if you please, let them be like the lost Pleiads, seen no more below : 
only give us a fair show : that is all we ask before the Convention. 

The Chairman. — The question is on the amendment of the gentleman 
from Kansas. 

Mr. J. H. Lane, of Kansas. — My amendment is, that all the States 
havinw delegates on this floor be called, and that the credentials handed 
in be referred to the Committee on Credentials ; and that the Territories 
of Nebraska, Colorado, and Nevada, who are now engaged in organizing^ 
State governments under enabling acts from the Congress of the United 
States, whose electoral votes will be cast for our candidates for the Presi-' 
dency and Vice-Presidency, be called, and that the credentials of their 
representatives be referred to the Committee on Credentials. 

The amendment was agreed to. 

The Chairman. — The Chair wishes now to state (what he forbore to 
state during the discussion) that the calling of the District of Columbia 
was an oversight, and he would have stopped it if he had been aAvare that 
it was on the list ; and he will now give instructions to the Secretary to 
strike it out unless it be put in by an order of the House. He considers 
that it should go with the Territories, and it will not be called unless the 
House so orders. The Secretary will now call the roll of those who have 
been ordered to be called by the motion just adopted. 

The roll of the remaining States being called, delegates responded 
from Virginia, South Carolina, Florida, Louisiana, Arkansas, and Ten- 
nessee, and their credentials were ordered to be referred to the Committee 
on Credentials. Delegates responded from Nevada, Colorado, and Ne- 
braska, and their credentials received the same reference. 

The Chairman. — It now remains for the House to 'give what order 
they see fit, if any, in regard to the remaining Territories, including the 
District of Columbia. They will not be called unless by order of the 
House. . • 



22 



Mr. J. H. Lane, of Kansas. — I move that they be called, and I desire 
to state that the Chicago Convention in 1860 received the delegation 
from the Territory of Kansas, and permitted them to vote. I move that 
the remaining Territories and the District of Columbia be called, and 
that the credentials of the delegates be referred to the Committee on, 
Credentials. 

The motion was agreed to. 

The roll was called, and delegates appeared from the District of 
Columbia, and the Territories of New Mexico, Washington, Dakota, 
Idaho, Arizona, and Montana, 

EULES OF ORDER. 

Mr. J. A. J. Creswell, of Maryland. — In order to fecilitate the busi- 
ness of the body, I move that the rules of the House of Representatives 
of the United States be adopted for the government of the Convention 
so far as they may be applicable. 

The motion was agreed to. 

COMMITTEE ON CREDENTIALS. 

Mr. J. H. Lane, of Kansas. — I move now that the roll of the States 
as to whose delegates here there is no question be called, and that as each 
State is called, the delegation from that State report one member to 
compose the Committee on Credentials. I exclude from this motion 
the State of Missouri, and every State the credentials of whose delegates 
are to go before the Committee. 

The motion was agreed to. 

The roll of States was called. As each State was named, the chair- 
man of its delegation reported the name selected for the Committee on 
Credentials. The Committee was thus constituted : 

Maine B. W. Norris. 

New HamffihiTe Benjamin J. Cole. 

Vermont Edwin HAiraoND. 

Massachusetts Jajies T. Robinson. 

Bhode Island Henry H. Fay. 

Connecticut Augustus Brandagee. 

New TorTc Preston King. 

New Jersey Joseph Coult. 

Pennsylvania Andrew H. Reeder. 

Belawar* Edward G. Bradford. 

Maryland Henry H. Goldsborough. 

KentucTcy Samuel Lusk. 

OMo G. VoLNEY Dorset. 

Indiana Jesse J. Brown. 

• Illinois J. Wilson Shaeffer. 



23 



Michigan Marsh Giddings. 

Wisconsin J. B. Cassidy. 

loioa George D. Wooden. 

Minnesota M. G. Butler. 

California John Bid well, 

Oregon Hiram Smith. 

West Virginia William E. Stevenson. 

Kansas M. H. Insley. 

COMMITTEE ON ORGANIZATION. 

Mr. J. A. J. Creswell, of Md. — I move that the States just called 
be agam called, in order that one member may be designated from each 
State to constitute a Committee for the Permanent Organization of this 
body. 

The motion was agreed to. 

Mr. J. A. J. Creswell, of Md. — And I would suggest that that per- 
manent organization consist of one President, and of one Vice-President 
and one Secretary for each State. 

The Chairman. — Will the House adopt that suggestion, or leave it 
to the Committee ? 

Several Delegates. — Leave it to the Committee. 

Mr. J. A. J. Creswell, of Md. — Very well ; but let States whose 
seats are contested name members of the Committee when those con- 
tests shall be decided. [" Agreed."] 

The roll of States was called, and the following delegates were 
named as the Committee on Permanent Organization : 

Maine James Dribimond. 

New HampsMre Shepherd L. Bowers. 

Vermont Abraham B. Gardner. 

MassacTiusetts Gennerry Twitchell. 

Rhode Island John J. Reynolds. 

Connecticut Oliver H. Perry. 

NeiD Yoi'Tc - Clark B. Cochrane. 

NeiD Jersey Socrates Tuttle. 

Pennsylvania Alexander K. McClure. 

Delaware William Cummins. 

Maryland John A. J. Cresweli,. 

West Virginia John M. Boyd. 

Kentucky John A. Prall. 

Ohio Robert Sherrard, Jr. 

Indiana Jesse L. Williajms. 

Illinois J. Y. ScAMMON. 

Michigan Edwin Lawrence. 

Wisconsin J. M. Gillet. 

Iowa Frank Street. 

Minnesota Daniel Cameron. 

California William S. McMurtrie. 

Oregon Joseph Phailling. 

Kansas Mark W. Delahay. 



24 



COMMITTEE ON EESOLUTIONS. 

Mr. S. Cameron, of Pa. — I now move that the States he called over, 
and that one member be named by eaclfdelegation, those thus named 
to constitute a Committee on Platform and Resolutions, 

The motion was agreed to, and the roll being called, the following 
delegates were named as the Committee: 

Maine Josiah H. DRtrMMOND. 

New Hampshire David Cross. 

Vermont E. P. Walton. 

Massachusetts Tappan Wentwokth. 

Rhode Island Edwin Harris. 

Connecticut William T. Miner. 

New TorTc Henry J. Raymond. 

New Jersey Charles R. Waugh. 

Pennsylvania Morrow B. Lowry. 

Belaicare Jacob Moore. 

Maryland Hugh Lennox Bond. 

Kentucky James Speed. 

Ohio ••.... Aaron F. Perry. 

Indiana Williaivi McKee Dunn. 

Illinois Elisha P. Ferry. 

Michigan O. D. Conger. 

Wisconsin Edward Salomon. 

Iowa . . . ., , WiLiJAM M. Stone. 

Mimiesota Warren Bristoe. 

California Thompson Campbell. 

Oregon Thomas H. Pearne. 

West Virginia Granville D. Hall. 

Kansas A. Carter Wilder. 

Mr. J. H. Lane, of Kansas. — In the hope of saving the Committee on 
Resolutions some trouble, I am directed by the delegation frona the State 
of Kansas to offer a series of resolutions, to be referred to the Commit- 
tee without reading; and I move that all resolutions relative to the 
Platform be referred to that Committee, without reading and without 
debate. 

The motion was agreed to. 

On motion of Mr. G. Bergner, of Pa., at 3 o'clock P. M. the Con- 
vention adjourned to meet at half-past seven o'clock P. M. 



EVENING SESSION. 

The Chairman called the Convention to order at 7 1-2 o'clock 
P.M. 



25 



'permanent organization. 

Mr, A. K. McClure, of Pa. — I am directed by the Committee on 
Permanent Organization to report the following list of officers : 

PRESIDENT. 

WILLIAM DENNISON, of Qfi.io. 

VICE-PRESIDENTS. 

Maine Nathan A. Fakwell. 

New Hampshire Onslow Stearns. 

Vermont ■. . . . Henry Stowell. 

Massachusetts Moses Keniball. 

Rhode Island James De Wolf Perry. 

Connecticut Henry A. Grant. 

New Torlc Lyman Tremaine. 

New Jersey William A. Newell. 

Pennsylvania William W. Eetchum. 

Delaware George Z. Tybond. 

Maryland A. C. Greene. 

Kentucky J. C. Record. 

Ohio David Tod. 

Indiana John Beahd. 

Illinois James M. Brown. 

Michigan Charles T. Gorham. 

Wisconsin John F. Potter. 

Iowa ♦. G. W. McCreary. 

Minnesota Charles M. Daily. 

California Robert Gardner. 

Oregon Frederick Charman. 

West Virginia. Chester D. Hubbard. 

Kansas F. W. Potter. 

secretaries. 

Maine , . Nahum Morrill. 

Neio Hampshire Edward Spalding. 

Vermont Horace Fairbanks. 

Massachusetts George A. Shaw. 

Bhode Island. Joel M. Spencer. 

Connecticut Samuel S. Warren. 

Netc YorJc Williaji R. Stewart. 

Neio Jersey Edward Settle. 

Pennsylvania John Stewart. 

Delaware Benjamin Burton. 

Maryland Levi E. Straughn. 

KentucJcy A. G. Hodges. 

Ohio J. C. Devin. 

Indiana John W. Ray. 

Illinois LoRENZ Brentano. 

Michigan William L. Noyss. 

Wisconsin C. C. Sholes. 



26 



Iowa G. D. Stubbs. 

Minnesota Charles Taylor. 

California James Otis. 

Oregon J. W. Souther. 

West Virginia .'. Granyille D. Hall. 

Kansas W. H. H. Lawrekce. 

The report was adopted by acclamation. 

The Chairman. — I appoint the Hon. Governor Lane, of Indiana, and 
the Hon. Mr. Grow, of. Pennsylvania, to conduct the President to the 
chair. 

Mr. Dennison was conducted to the chair by Hon. Henry S, Lane, 
of Ind., and Hon. Gakusha A. Grow, of Pennsylvania; and on taking 
the chair, addressed the Convention as follows : 

I thank you for the honor you have conferred upon me, and while I shall 
bring to the discharge of the duties of the Chair little experience in parliamen- 
tary rules, it will be my pleasure, as my duty, to spare no effort in contributing, 
to the extent of my ability, to the facilitating of the business of the Conven- 
tion, and securing such results from your deliberations as will meet the loyal 
expectations of the country. 

We meet here as representatives of the true ftiends of the Government and 
of impartial liberty — of that large portion of the people who gratefully appre- 
ciate the unmatched blessings which flow from our institutions well adminis- 
tered, and reject any form of human enslavement, not iu punishment of crime, 
as no less incompatible with the rights of humanity than mth the genius and 
tlie peaceful workings of Rei^ublican Government. [Prolonged applause.] 

In no sense do we meet as members or representatives of either of the old 
political parties which bound the people, or as the .champions of any piinciple 
o? doctrine peculiar to either. The extraordinary condition of the country 
since the outbreak of the reliellion has, from necessity, taken from the issues 
of these parties their j^ractical significance, and compelled the formation of 
substantially new political organizations ; hence the origin of the" Union party — 
if party it can be called — of which this Convention is for the purpose of its 
assembling, the accredited representative, and the only test of membership in 
which is an unreserved unconditional loyalty to the Government and the Union. 

Let me congratulate you upon the favorable auspices of your meeting. 
While the deepest anxiety is felt by all patriotic men as to the result of the 
war unjustifiably forced upon the Government by the bad, ambitious men and 
their deceived followers in the relsellious States, and the country is filled with 
distress and mourning over the loss of so many of our brave men Avho have 
fallen in battle, or died in hospitals from wounds received in defence of the 
constitutional authorities of the Government, we yet have, in what has been 
accomplisbed towards the supj)ression of the rebellion and the extinguishment 
of its cause — in the heroic deeds of our noble armies and gallant navy — in the 
renewal of the patriotism of the country that almost seemed to be paralyzed 
under the influence of our National jarosperity — in the unprecedented generosity 
of the people, awakened by the wants of the Government and the necessities of 
its defenders — much, veiy much of the highest felicitation, and for which the 
country is grateful to Almighty God. [Applause.] 

And rhay I not add to these causes of congratulation the formation of the 
political organization of which this Convention is a representative, which has 
so nobly sustained the Govemmelit in its efforts to put down the rebellion, and 
to the complete accomplishment of which its energies are consecrated; the 



27 



patriotic harmony that has marked our assemblmg and will characterize all our 
proceedings, and presenting that harmony which will display itself in the unani- 
mous nomination, for the Presidency of the United States, of the wise and good 
man whose unselfish devotion to the country, in the administration of the Gov- 
emment, has secured to him not only the admiration, but the warmest affection 
of every friend of constitutional liberty ? [Applause.] 

I need not remind you of the very gTave responsibilities that devolve upon 
you as members of this Convention. The loyal people of the countiy have 
authorized and expect you to renew on theii' part the pledge of their faith to 
support the Government, in the most vigorous prosecution of the war, to the 
complete suppression of the Rebellion, regardless of the time or the resources 
required to that end, and they equally exj^ect and call upon you to declare the 
cause and the support of the Rebellion to be Slavery, which, as well for its trea- 
sonable offences against the Government, as for its incompatibility with the. 
rights of humanity, and the permanent peace of the coimtry, must, with the 
termination of the war, and as much speedier as possible, be made to cease for- 
ever in every State and Temtory of the Union. But I must not refer to other 
subjects of interest that will challenge your attention. 

Let me repeat my thanks for your expressions of confidence in me, in having 
selected me to preside over your deliberations. [Applause.] 

The Vice-Presidents and Secretaries took their seats (xi the plat- 
form. 

ORDER OF BUSINESS. 

The President. — Gentlemen, I observed to-day that no Committee 
was appointed on the order of business. Such a Committee is indispen- 
sable, to the end that a rule may be established as to the manner of 
voting and various other questions that will have to be considered. If 
some gentleman of the Convention will be so kind as to submit a motion 
for the appointment of such a Committee, the Chair will take very great 
pleasure in submitting that motion to the Convention. 

Mr. C. Delano, of Ohio. — I had observed, sir, the failure of the 
Convention to provide a Committee to report permanent rules and an 
order of business, and was about, before the suggestion of the Chair, to 
move its appointment. Now in pursuance of that suggestion, concurring 
as I do in the necessity of complying with it, I move the appointment 
of a Committee for that purpose, consisting of one from each State, to 
be selected in the manner that the other Committees have been. 

The motion was agreed to, and the Committee was constituted as 
follows : 

Maine George K. Jewett. 

J^eio Hampshire . . .E. L. Colby. 

Vermont A. P. Hunton. 

Massachusetts Charles R. Train. 

Rhode Island George D. Cross. 



28 



Connecticut Calyin Day. 

New York Ellis H. Roberts. 

Ifew Jersey J. T. Crowell. 

Pennsylvania S. F. Wilson. 

Delaware William Cumjiins. 

Maryland Archibald Stlrlikg, Jun. 

Kentucky H. C. Burge. 

Ohw E. F. Drake. 

Indiana Cyrus L. Allen. 

Illinois LA. Powell. 

Michigan Charles D. Mitchell. 

Wisconsin Angus Cameron. 

lotca D. W. Ellis. 

Minnesota D. G. Shh^lock. 

California O. H. Bradbury. 

Oregon .' M. Hirsch. 

West Virginia D. M. Fitzgerald. 

Kansas T. M. Bowen. 



SPEECH OF REV. MR. BROWNLOW. 

The President called for reports from the Committee on Credentials 
and the Committee on Resolutions, but no response was made. 

Mr. Thaddeus Stevens, of Penn. — As it would be improper to 
transact business of any importance except what relates to the organiza- 
tion until the Committee on Credentials have reported, and in order that 
all gentlemen who may be admitted to seats may have an opportunity 
of participating in our proceedings, I move that this Convention adjourn 
until to-morrow morning at nine o'clock. 

Mr, G. W. Patterson, of New York. — I hope the gentleman will 
withdraw that motion. I understand that a gentleman who has exper- 
ienced some of the trials of Tennessee is in the house, and we shall be 
glad to hear the Rev. Mr. Brownlow [applause]. 

]\j[r. Thaddeus Stevens, of Penn. — I have^io desire to deprive the 
Convention of the pleasure of hearing so distinguished a gentleman, and 
I withdraw my motion. 

Mr. G. W. Patterson, of New York. — I move that the Rev. W. G. 
Brownlow be requested to address this Convention. 

The motion was agreed to unanimously. 

The members of the Convention rose to their feet and gave three 
cheers for " Parson Brownlow" as he advanced to the stage. 

The President. — Gentlemen of the Convention — I have the honor of 
presenting to you one who has done the country much service, who has 
been gallant and true — Parson Brownlow, of East Tennessee. [Great 
applause.] 



29 



Mr. Brownlow spoke as follows : 

GentUmm of the Convention — I assure you you liave to-night waked up tlie 
wrong passenger. I am a very sick man, ^id ought to be in my bed and not 
here. I have journeyed on, however, through great tribulation, to meet you. 
The last regular meal I took was on Saturday, upon a boat, and ui3on the Ohio 
river. I am sick — sick — and suffering — and I come forward because so enthu- 
siastically called for, to make my bow to you, and my apology for not attempt- 
ing to speak ; but, before I take my seat, I know you vnll take of me kindly 
any suggestion I may make, or any rebuke I may attempt to administer to you. 
I am one of the elder brethren — one of the old apostles. [Laughter.] I have 
heard since I came to town that you had some doubt in your minds about the 
propriety of admitting a delegation from Tennessee — a State in rebellion. I 
hope you will pause, gentlemen, before you commit so rash an act as that, and 
thereby recognize Secession. We don't recognize it in Tennessee. [Applause.] 
We deny that we are out. [Applause.] We deny that we have been out. 
[Applause.] We maintain that a minority first voted us out, and then a ma- 
jority whipped the minority out of the State with bayonets, winning over a 
portion of oiu" men to their ranks. But we are here to participate in your de- 
liberations and toils, and to share your honors. I pray you not to exclude us. 
We have a full delegation from Tennessee, a patriotic delegation, a talented 
delegation, always excepting the present speaker. [Laughter.] Our best men 
are here. We have in Tennessee, as you have in most of the Northern States, 
a Copperhead party, just beginning to come into existence. They have existed 
here a good while. I have fought the venomous reptiles for the last two years 
among you ; but they are beginning to organize m Tennessee, and I confidently 
look for them to be represented at the forthcoming Chicago Convention, to 
send up a delegation there under the nose and scent of that pink of patriotism, 
loveliness and virtue, the editor" of the Chicago Times. [Laughter.] The del- 
egation that our State sends up to you would scorn to go to the Chicago Con- 
vention ; they would decline having anything to do with the late Cleveland 
Convention. [Applause.] We are for the Baltimore-Lincoln- Arming-of-Negroes 
Convention. We are for the Convention and the party that are resolved to put 
down this wicked, this infernal Rebellion, at all hazards, and all cost of money 
and lives; and our Convention instructed us, before we left home, to advocate 
and vote for Abraham Lincoln fii'st, last and all the time. [Applause.] He 
has got his hand in ; he has learned the hang of the ropes, and we want to try 
him for a second term. Let us get along in harmony. There need be no de- 
taining this Convention for two days in discussions of various kinds, and the 
idea I suggest to you as an inducement not to exclude our delegation is, that 
we may take it into our heads, before the thing is over, to present a candidate 
from that State in rebellion for the second office in the gift of the people. 
[Applause.] We have a man down there whom it has been my good luck and 
bad fortune to fight untiringly and perseveringly for the last twenty-five years 
— Andrew Johnson. [Applause.] For the first time, in the Providence of 
God, three years ago we. got together on the same platform, and we are fight- 
ing the devil, Tom Walker and Jeft' Davis side by side. [ApiDlause.] 

I again thank you, gentlemen of the Convention — [Go on, go on.] I never 
refuse to speak when I am able to speak, and my old friend. Deacon Bross, 
knows it well. I should like to help him canvass illinois, and gouge for him 
among the Copperheads. If I w'ere able to speak and could interest you, I 
would ; but I am sick, and I must be excused. I thank you for the honor you 
have done me. ^ 

On motion, the Convention adjourned until to-morrow morning at 
ten o'clock. 



Wednesday, June 8, 1864. 
i 

The President called the Convention to order at ten o'clock A. M. 



PRAYER. , 

The Rev. M. P. Gaddis, one of the delegates from Ohio, offered the 
following prayer : 

Our Father which art in Heaven, hallowed be Thy name ; Thy kingdom 
come ; Thy will be done on earth as it is done in Heaven ; grant us this day 
our daily bread, and forgive us our trespasses as we forgive those who trespass 
against us ; lead us not into temptation ; but grant, Thou Lord of Lords, and 
King of Kings, Thou who art the Infinite God, of all right, of all ti'uth, and of 
all liberty, grant to imbue our hearts so with Thine O'^ti free Spirit as to lead 
us this moiTung in that way and manner that may confer honor upon Thy great 
name, and work out the good intended by the sovereign people of this country 
in thus assembling together in this National Convention. Hear us this morn- 
ing, O our Father, as we thank Thee for the harmony of action and unity of 
purpose that has thus far attended our sittings ; grant to let that harmony con- 
tinue. Grant to let Thy Spitit operate upon those who have been thus honor- 
ably selected to represent the wishes of a great and free people, so that the ends 
and aims of this Convention may be fully sul^served. 

Hear us this morning. Thou God of liberty, as we thank Thee for the fact 
that Thou hast ever made this land the dwelling-place of the genius of freedom 
and of liberty. Hear us as we thank Thee for the triumph that Thou didst 
give to the arms of our fathers as they broke the shackles of oppression and of 
tyranny, and erected upon these shores the light of fi'eedom and of liberty. 
Hear us, our Father, as we thank Thee for the prosperity that not only attended 
them in that hour, but in their efibrts to found here a Eepulilic whose influence 
and whose power should go down to the remotest jDeriod of coming time. 
Hear us, our Father, as we thank Thee for the prosperity that hath attended 
us financially, intellectually, morally and socially, throughout the length and 
breadth of the United States. Hear us, O our Father, as we thank Thee this 
morning for the respect that the United States of America has attained through- 
out the known world. Wherever the white sails of her commerce have been 
seen, where'er the starry banner hath been imfolded at the mast-head of our 
vessels as they have gone forth u^Don all oceans and upon all seas, that flag hath 
been honored, om' country hath been respected. 

Hear us, our Father, as we thank Thee for the many men that American 
genius 'and the genius of American institutions have developed, who have gone 
forth to fill the halls of science, the chambers of literature, the councils of the 
nation, and gone to other lands to represent not only the dignity but the power 
and the influence of republican liberty. Hear us, O our Father, as we thank 
Thee for the rapid development Thou hast given to this mere child of freedom, 
that she has gone on from the rock-bound shores of New England to the 
Western wilds, and made them to bloom and blossom as the rose, and to send the 
echoing shouts of liberty across from the Pacific waters to those who had ne'er 
known it before. Hear us, O our Father, this morning, as we bless Thee for 
the success that hath attended us even in the midst of distress. We repent 
this moiTiing of our sins ; we bow before Thy Majesty in deep contrition of 
heart; we admit Thy judgments ; but we bless Thee, our Father, that in our 
efforts to demonstrate that we were upon Thy side, Thou hast thus far crowned 






US witli success. Let this success continue, and, to that end, bless the President 
of these United States and all his constitutional advisers ; may they be men of 
clean hands and of pui'e hearts ; may they consult with the Infinite Good. Let 
Thy blessing rest upon all the plans and operations that they have devised for 
the success of our arms. 

Bless our anny and our navy, from the Commanders and Commodores down 
to the noble men that fill our ranks and tread the decks of our gallant vessels ; 
and God grant that even in the midst of their present battles, whUe thunder- 
ing at the gates of the rebel capital, to give them abundant success. And may 
the time soon come, our Father, when Americas hall be free, when the Rebellion 
shall be crushed, and when peace with its ten thousand hallowing blessings shall 
again reign from ocean to ocean and lake to gulf Hasten the hour when the 
East shall embrace the West, when the North shall again kiss the South, and 
America become indeed that nation whose God is the Lord. 

Guide us and direct us in the operations of this day, in all the deliberations 
of this Convention ; and, O God, if we . are right, grant that the nominees of 
this National Union Convention may be elected by such a majority as has never 
before been recorded in the history of our government. And Thy great name, 
Father, Son and Holy Spirit, shall have ceaseless and everlasting praises 
through a world without end, Amen. 

CHAIRMEN OF DELEGATIONS. 

•The President. — I shall be obliged to the chairmen of the several 
delegations if, as the roll of States is now called, they will rise in their 
places and announce their names; the object being that the Chairman 
may be able to distinguish, from the location of the speakers from time 
to time, the delegations to which they belong. 

The Secretary called the roll, and the chairmen of the respective 
delegations answered their names as follows : 

Maine Lot M. Moerili,. 

JVew Hampshire William Haile. 

Vermont Solomon Foot. 

Massachusetts Alexander H. Bcllock. 

Rhode Island Thomas Durfee. 

Connecticut William T. Miner. 

Neio Torlc John A. King. 

Netc Jersey William A. Newell. 

Pennsylvania Simon Cameron. 

Delaware Nathaniel B. Smithers. 

Maryland Henky W. Hoffman. "^ 

Kentucky R. K. Williajvis. 

Ohio C. Delano. 

Indiana Daniel MacE". 

Illinois R. C. Cook. 

^ Michigan Austin Blair. 

Wisconsin Alexander W. Randall. 

loica D. D. Chase. 

Minnesota John M'Kusick. 

California M. C. Beiggs. 

Oregon Thomas H. Pearne. 

West Virginia Leroy C. Kramer, 

Kansas James H. Lant;. 



•5,9 



RULES AND ORDER OF BUSINESS. 

The President. — Is the Committee on the Order of Business ready 
to report ? 

Mr. Calvin Day, of Conn. — The Committee on the Order of Busi- 
ness are prepared to report, and I ask Mr. Drake, the Secretary of the 
Committee, to read the report. 

Mr. E. F. Drake, of Ohio, proceeded to read the report as follows : 

Bule 1. Upon all subjects before the Convention, the States shall be called 
in the following order: Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, 
Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, 
Maryland, Missouri, Kentucky, Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Michigan, Wisconsin, 
Iowa, Minnesota, California, Oregon, West Vii'ginia, Kansas, and other States 
and Territories declared by the Convention entitled to representation in the 
same, shaU be called in the order in Which they are added by the Convention. 

Mr. J. H. Lane, of Kansas. — I think it is improper to 'put West 
Virginia before Kansas. We were born first. 

Mr, E. F. Drake, of Ohio. — Allow me to explain to the gentleman 
that blanks were printed for the use of the Clerk, and it was convenient 
to name the States in the order there found. 

The President. — The Chair supposes there is another reason. Kansas 
has been so gallant, and her history so full of heroic deeds, that she can- 
not be damaged, place her where you may [applause]. 

Mr. J. H. Lane, of Kansas. — In that regard Kansas claims no supe- 
riority over Western Virginia [applause]. Her children have been as 
gallant and fought as bravely as the children of any other State. It is 
a mere question of age. 

The President. — The Chair will direct the Secretary to amend the 
roll agreeably to the suggestion of the gentleman from Kansas. 

Mr. E. F. Drake, of Ohio, continued to read the report as follows : 

Rule 3. Four votes shall be cast by the delegates at large of each State, and 
each congressional district shall be entitled to two votes. The votes of each 
delegation shaU be reported by its chairman. 

Bule 3. The report of the Committee on Credentials shall be disposed of 
before the report of the Committee on Platfonn and Resolutions is acted upon, 
and the report of the Committee on Platfonn and Resolutions shall be disiDosed 
of before the Convention proceeds to ballot for candidates for President and 
Vice-President. _ ■* 

Bule 4. That when it shall be determined by this Convention what States 
and Territories are entitled to representation in this Convention, together with 
the number of votes to which they may be entitled, a majority of all the votes 
80 determined shall be requisite to nominate candidates for President and 
Vice-President. 

Bvle 5. When a majority of the delegations from any two States shall 



i 



33 



demand that a vote be recorded, the same shall be taken by States, the Secre- 
tary calling the roll of States in the order heretofore stated. 

Rule 6. In a recorded vote by States, the vote of each State shall be an- 
nounced by the chairman of the respective delegations, and in case the vote of 
any State shall be divided, the chairman shall announce the number of votes 
cast for any candidate, or for or against any proposition. 

Bule 7. That when the previous question shall be demanded by a majority 
of the delegation from any State, and the demand seconded by two or more 
States, and the call sustained by a majority of the Convention, the question 
shall then be proceeded with and disposed of according to the rules of the 
House of Representatives in similar cases. 

Bule 8. No member shall speak more than once to the same question, nor 
longer than five minutes, without the unanimous consent of the Convention. 

Bule 9. The rules of the House of Representatives shall continue to be the 
rules of this Convention, so far as they are applicable and not inconsistent with 
the foregoing rules. 

The report was adopted. 

Mr. E. F. Drake, of Ohio. — The Committee on the Order of Busi- 
ness have directed me to make this further report : 

A National Union Committee shall be appointed, to consist of one member 
from each State, Territory and District represented in this Convention. The 
roll shall be called, and the delegation from each such State, Territory and 
District shall name a person to act as a member of said committee. 

The report was adopted. 

REPORT ON CREDENTIALS. 

Mr. Preston King, of N. Y. — Mr. President, the Committee on 
Credentials, after a very patient hearing of the representations made by 
the gentlemen who have appeared and claimed seats in this Convention, 
wherever there has been a question of their right to sit, from whatever 
cause that question may have arisen, have come to conclusions which 
they report as the report of the committee to the Convention, without, 
however, entire unanimity in the committee on some points. Upon the 
main questions a large majority of the committee have agreed. There' 
will, on some points, be a minority report with the assent of the com- 
mittee and of the CoWention, by the member of the committee from 
West Va., with some one or two others joining him in it. I desired 
that our report should be regarded as the report of the committee with- 
out any minority report ; but as I differed from the committee on two 
or three points, I gave them notice (and I have their assent), that I 
should move to amend the report upon my individual responsibility as 
a member of the Convention. I will now proceed to report to the Con- 
vention the points upon which the great mass of the committee agreed : 
3 



34 



" First, the committee find that the credentials of the delegates from the 
States of Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Con- 
necticut, New York, New Jersey, Delaware, Maryland, Kentucky, Ohio, Indiana, 
Illinois, Michigan, Wisconsin, Iowa, Minnesota, California, Oregon, West Vir- 
ginia, and Kansas, as presented by the delegates, are sufiicient and satisfactory." 

That of course admits their delegations. 

" In the next place, the committee find that the certificates from Pennsylva- 
nia are all regular, with the exception of the certificate for the first district of 
that State. In that district, the certificate states that four delegates were 
elected. The district is entitled to but two. The facts were reported to the 
committee, and the committee recommend that the two having the highest 
number of votes, be admitted as delegates, and that the other two be admitted 
as alternates. 

" In the case of Missouri, the committee report and recommend that the 
delegation known as the "Radical Union Delegation," be admitted to this 
Convention. [Applause.] 

" The Committee further report, that ithe delegations from Virginia, Ten- 
nessee, Louisiana, Florida, and Arkansas, be admitted to this Convention with 
all the rights and privileges of delegates, except the right to vote. 

" The committee report respecting South Carolina, that there is not in their 
judgment, sufficient reason for the admission of the delegation which appears 
from there, and therefore recommend that the delegation appearing from that 
State, be not admitted. 

" The committee also report, that the delegations from the organized Ter- 
ritories, and from the District of Columbia, be admitted to the Convention with 
all the rights and privileges of delegates, except the right to vote." 

This, Mr. President, is the report of the committee ; and I now ask 
that, before taking any action upon it, the Convention receive the minority 
report which, by the assent of the committee, the delegate from West 
Virginia was authorized to make as such, and then I shall move my own 
proposition of amendment. 

The President. — It is moved that the minority report shall now be 
read, reserving to the chairman of the Committee on Credentials the 
privilege of moving amendments to the majority report. 

The motion was agreed to. 

Mr. W. E. Stevenson, of West Virginia. — I desire to state, Mr. 
President, that the minority report which I now present was prepared 
very hastily this morning, the committee having labored until long after 
midnight, and I have not been able to see a number of gentlemen of the 
committee who desired to be consulted in reference to it, and therefore 
I have been unable to obtain as many signatures as I designed. I will, 
however, read the report and send it to the Chair : 

" To the President of the National Union Convention : 

" The undersigned concur in the report of the majority of the Committee 
on Credentials, except that portion which proposes to exclude from the privi- 
lege of voting in the Convention the delegates from the States of Vii'ginia, 
Louisiana, Arkansas, Tennessee and Florida, and from the Territories of Col- 
orado, Nevada, New Mexico, Dakota and Montana. 



i 



35 



" Therefore, the undersigned recommend that the delegates from the States 
and Territories aforesaid shall be entitled to vote upon all questions brought 
before the Convention. * " W. E. STEVENSON, W. Va., 

"HIRAJyi SJIITH, Oregon." 



Mr. Preston King, of New York. — I learn that since the report was 
agreed upon, leave was also granted to another gentleman of the com- 
mittee to make a minority report. I am informed since I was last up 
that the delegate from Kansas desires also to submit briefly a minority 
report. It was fairly covered in the consent of the committee to these 
gentlemen, and I therefore hope the Convention will also receive the 
report of the delegate from Kansas as a minority of the Committee on 
Credentials. 

The President. — Is it the pleasure of the Convention that a second 
minority report shall be received 1 

[Yes.] 

Mr. J. H. Lane, of Kansas. — Mr. President — Afc'the request of Mr. 
Insley, the member from Kansas on the Committee on Credentials, I 
present a minority report prepared by him, and I will read it to the 
convention: 

" The undersigned respectfully desu-es to present a minority report from the 
Committee on Credentials, of which he is a member, in relation to the admis- 
sion of the delegates from the Territories of Nebraska, Colorado and Neveda, 
to seats and votes in this Convention. Differing with the majority of the Com- 
mittee only on this point, it is fitting that I jareseut my reasons for the course 
herein urged. 

" First and foremost is the fact that the three Territories named are about 
to pass from the territorial condition of dependence on the General Govern- 
ment to that of State sovereignties, subordinate only to the supreme law and 
necessities of the nation, the i:)resent Congress having passed enabling acts, 
whereby these Territories receive a pledg^ of admission into the Federal Union, 
provided only they come clothed in the robes of fi'eedom ; and the jDcople of 
these Territories having gladly accepted the supreme condition, are even now 
engaged in the work of State organization, with a fan* prospect of completing 
the same in time to wheel into line \^ith the other loyal States, and, by voting 
for the nominees of the Union party, aid politically, as they have already 
done materially and by arms, in the establishment of the national authority, 
and securing the perpetuity of the Union. 

" Secondly, the recognition of the delegates from those Territories, by this 
Convention, will very materia^y aid the party of nationality. and freedom in 
those commimities. 

" Our interests lie with the movements now being made, under the authority 
of Congress, for their organization and admission. It is our duty, both as loyal 
men seeking the supreme good of the nation, and as members of a great party 
having that end for its primary pm-pose, to give all the aid and strength we 
legitimately may for the furtherance of that object. It is believed that the re- 
cognition of these delegates will materially benefit our cause as well as the State 
movements now pending. The loyalty of these Territories none can question. 
Nebraska has sent her citizens to the field, and fi'om Donelson to Chattanooga 



36 



their courage and sacrifices have been freely ofiBred, Colorado makes the proud 
boast of never having had a Copperhead in her Territorial Legislature. She 
has a prouder boast than this, in that campaign where her volunteers won such 
imperishable honors, saving thereby the immensely important mountain Terri- 
tories of the far West from being overrun by the Texan rebels, and securing un- 
interrupted our communications with the Pacific. 

" For Nevada, let the treasury of the Sanitary Commission speak in praise. 
Under the wise rule of Governor Nye, that distant territory is emerging as not 
only one of the richest but one of the most loyal States. 

" For these reasons, I urge the admission of these gentlemen with all the 
rights of delegates., into this Convention. Let me refer you, as a precedent for 
such action, to the course taken in relation to that State — Kansas — which I 
have the honor in part to represent here. The Kepublican Convention of 1856 
. admitted its delegates to seats and votes. It was then seeking admission into 
the Union under what was known as the Topeka constitution. Again, at Chi- 
cago, in 1860, was the same com-se adopted. Its admission was pending before 
Congress, nor was it recognized as a State until the party of freedom, under the 
lead of Abraham Liacoln, obtained power. 

" It will not do in this hour, with this precedent, with the facts before us, 
and the strong probability presented by these communities of being enabled to 
swell the vote of the next President of the United States, Abraham Liacoln, by 
the welcome addition of three members of the Electoral College, to ignore the 
claims of Nebraska, Colorado, and Nevada. 

M. H. INSLEY." 

Mr. Preston King, of New York. — Mr. President and gentlemen of 
the Convention, the paper which I read to you was the report to which 
the majority of the committee, the large majority I may say, agreed, 
and the papers which have since been read embody the conclusions to 
which the gentlemen who have made these other reports came, dissenting 
from that majority. There was scarcely any proposition upon which 
some member did not dissent. I propose, upon three propositions on 
which 1 dissented, to make a motion to amend the original report, as a 
substitute for both propositions that have come in ; and I shall move to 
amend because I determined that I would not make a minority report. 
I move, in the first place, as a substitute for the proposition of the report 
in ]^gard to the Missouri case, the following : 

" That the delegation, known as ' The Unconditional Union Delegation' 
from Missouri, be admitted as delegates with ' The Eadical Union Delegation' 
from that State, and that where the delegations agree they shall cast the vote 
to which the State is entitled, and where they do not agree the vote of the 
State shall not be cast." * 

The majority report, it will be remembered, proposes to admit the 
delegates from certain States, and the Territories and District of Colum- 
bia, without the right of voting. I propose to amend it by providing 
that all the delegates who shall be admitted to this Convention shall be 
entitled to vote, and to all the rights and privileges of delegates without 



37 



any exception, but that the District of Columbia and the Territories 
respectively shall be entitled to but two votes, and that no State, Dis- 
trict or Territory shall be allowed to cast niore votes than it has delegates 
present in the Convention, and in no case more than it is entitled to 
under the rules of the Convention. These are the amendments which I 
offer as substitutes for the propositions of the committee. 

The President. — The Chair understands that the question before the 
Convention is upon the majority report and upon such amendments to 
that report as may be proposed in their order. A minority report as 
such cannot be received. Any amendment in a minority report may be 
offered in the form of an amendment to the propositions of the majority 
report. The question is now upon the amendments offered by Mr. King, 
in the order in which he has presented them. Before the question is put 
to the Convention, however, the Chair desires to say that he has been 
informed by one of the gentlemen, belonging to the so-called Uncondi- 
tional Union Delegation of Missouri, that he desires to be heard by the 
Convention before a vote shall be taken upon the report of the com- 
mittee. If it is the pleasure of the Convention to hear him, they will 
so signify. 

The question being put, the Conv edition refused to hear the gentleman. 

Mr. C. C. Sholes, of* Wisconsin. — I ask the gentleman from New 
York to Avithdraw his amendment so that we may consider one question 
at a time. I prefer first to take the vote on admitting the delegates from 
the seceded States ; next in regard to the State of Missouri ; and next 
in regard to the Territories and the District of Columbia. I think it 
will be impracticable to consider all these three questions together. 

Mr. Preston King, of New York. — I prefer that the vote shall be 
taken together. I design to say a very few words upon the question. 
Any member of the Convention, I suppose, has a right to call for a di- 
vision of a proposition which is divisible. It is his right, and he had 
better make the call himself rather than request me to do it. 

Mr. C. C. Sholes, of Wisconsin. — In order that we may have a 
properly constituted Convention, I desire to move first that that portion 
of the report of the Committee which has been unanimously presented, 
be adopted by this Convention. 

The President.— The Chair thinks that the amendments proposed 
by the gentleman from New York are susceptible of a division. 

Mr. Preston King, of New York. — When a call is made for a di- 
vision. 

Mr. A. H. Reeder, of Pennsylvania. — I suggest to the gentleman of 
New York that he withdraw his proposition until the report of the Com- 



38 



mittee on Credentials he adopted, so far as relates to the uncontested 
seats, because, before we get through with these questions, we may have 
to call the yeas . and nays, or take a vote by States, and to do that we 
should have a Convention to vote. 

Mr. President. — Does the gentleman from New York withdraw his 
proposition for the present 1 

Mr, Preston King, of New York. — I prefer not to withdraw the 
motion, because I do not wish to lose the order in which the questions 
stand ; but, to obviate all difficulty about that, as I have a right to mod- 
ify my own motion, I move first that that portion of the report be 
adopted which relates to the uncontested seats of delegates, as reported 
by the majority of the Committee. 

The President. — ^The Chair will put the question on that motion. 

The motion was agreed to. 

Mr. Preston King, of New York. — The motion which has just been 
adopted, refers to "delegations from States which are uncontested, and 
now we come to the other questions. The majority of the Committee 
propose that the Radical Union Delegation from the State of Missouri, 
and they only shall be- admitted as the delegates of that State. I pro- 
pose to amend this clause of the report so as to read : 

" That the delegation known as ' The Unconditio»al Union Delegation ' from 
Missouri, be admitted with the delegates of ' The Radical Union Delegation,' 
and that where the delegations agree they shall cast the vote of the State, and 
where they do not agree, the vote of the State shall not be cast." 

The President. — ^The question is on the amendment just read by the 
gentleman from New York. 

Mr. Preston King, of New York. — Mr. President and gentlemen — 
I think the suggestion of this proposition is all that is required by this 
Convention. Unless its suggestion is such as meets its approbation, no 
argument can carry it there. I make the suggestion, and simply say 
that in the spirit of brotherhood and union and harmony with which we 
come together here, and in the common determination that animates us 
all to sustain one another and to strike down our common enemy and to 
strike down nobody else, I have supposed it was wisest and best to admit 
all these delegations as brethren [applause], with the powers and privi- 
* leges that pertain to other delegates. I would not adopt all the prop- 
ositions that 1 have made here, in ordinary times, and I do not propose 
that they shall be a precedent. I hope we shall never have a condition 
of affairs in this country (and I do not believe we ever shall) when things 
done now may properly be quoted as a precedent for things to be done 
then. I have stated my proposition; I will not debate it. 



Mr, A. Brakdagee, of Connecticut. — Mr. President, I was very much 
struck by the observation of the distinguished gentleman from New 
York (Mr. Raymond) yesterday, in a speech in which he evoked order 
out of chaos on this floor, in which he remarked that in the preliminary 
stages of this Convention we were a mob, a mere mass meeting, — a 
respectable mob to be sure — but so far forth as parliamentary law was 
concerned, an unorganized body ; but that the time would arrive when, 
after the report of the Committee on Credentials, this mob would 
settle down into an orderly, parliamentary, organized, deliberative assem- 
bly. Now, sir, the proposition of the distinguished Chairman of the 
Committee of which I have had the honor to be an humble member, pro- 
poses to reverse that order, and at the very moment when the mob is 
passing into a convention to resolve the convention back again into an 
unorganized mob, because it proposes to admit upon this floor not dele- 
gates but gentlemen (for they are all gentlemen, as I suppose") coming 
from States where theFederal Government sits upon its iron clads alone 
for protection, and can barely plant its foot upon the soil and territory of 
those States — States that have been in rebellion from the beginning, and 
are now, and where the arm of the Federal Government scarcely extends 
over a rood of the surface. It proposes to admit delegates here from 
Territories that have no vote, and, in my humble judgment as a member 
of the House of Representatives, will have none between now and the 
November election. 

The President. — The gentleman is not in order. The only question 
now is as to the Missouri delegation. 

Mr. A. Brandagee, of Connecticut.— ^I understand that very well, 
and I am coming right to that now. With reference to this contested 
case from Missouri, there is a right and a wrong to it. There is a dele- 
gation here duly accredited, and there is but one. It is the duty of this 
Convention to ascertain which of these contestants come here with the 
accredited credentials from some organized party association in that 
State. Now I aver, and there is not a member upon the Committee 
who, after the six hours examination we have given to this question, will 
dispute the averment, that the Radical Delegation of Missouri is the 
only delegation that represents here a party or a constituency in that 
State, or any respectable element in the National party of the country. 
[Great applause.] The Radical Delegation claiming seats here, proved 
before your Committee last evening that they represented the only Re- 
publican organization which existed at the time the Convention was 
called for sending delegates to this National Convention. There was no 
other party organization, except a rebel organization, existing in the State 



40 



of Missouri at the time when their Convention was called to nominate 
State officers and send delegates here. The Convention was called, and 
it was held at Jefferson City, the seat of Government of Missouri. That 
Convention represented eighty-five counties hi that State. Four hundred 
delegates appeared there, the largest delegate convention ever assembled, 
either in war or peace times, on the soil of Missouri. After that Con- 
vention had been called, and when every loyal man in the State of Mis- 
souri had an opportunity of sending his representatives there, and of 
having his wishes expressed, the " Clay bank " faction of the State of 
Missouri, not satisfied Avith the call, not satisfied with the anticipated 
temper of the Convention that was about to assemble, called a conven- 
tion of tbeir own. And how was the call made ? Did it proceed from 
any organization 1 Not at all. Certain gentlemen, respectable gentle- 
men, occupying high positions in the nation and in the State to be sure, 
got together and signed a subscription paper, if it may be so styled, in 
which they invited their fellow-citizens to meet at St. Louis ; and what 
sort of a convention did they hold there ? They had a convention in 
which it was stated before the Committee but five counties were repre- 
sented, and the highest claim that was made, even by the friends of that 
delegation, was that there were one hundred and forty delegates in the 
Convention, other persons stating that there were but seventy-five dele- 
gates. The question for you to-day is whether you will perpetuate this 
feud in Missouri by admitting both these sets of delegates. Do that, and 
you will perpetuate it for all time to come, just as the Democratic Con- 
vention perpetuated the feud between Mozart and Tammany. Exclude 
those who have no right to be represented here and they must come in. 

The President. — The gentleman's time is out. 

Mr. R. J. Breckinridge, of Ky. — I move to amend the amendment 
offered by the gentleman from New York, so that, instead of silencing both 
parties from Missouri when they cannot agree, they may then divide the 
vote. The gentleman who has just addressed the Convention, I under- 
stand, is from one of the extreme Northern States, Connecticut, and of 
course, therefore, all the statements of fact made by him in regard to 
this matter, are statements made at second hand. He has no personal 
knowledge of them except as they were detailed to the Committee of 
which he was a member. I also live remotely from Missouri, but a great 
deal nigher than he does. I suppose he will admit that Missouri and 
Kentucky, for good or for bad, are more alike, as well as that they are 
nigher together than either of them is nigh or like Connecticut. I there- 
fore suppose that my knowledge is as good as his, with the .greatest pos- 



41 



sible respect both for his statement of facts and his statement of infer- 
ence. I have not a particle of doubt, and say to you to-day, if I were 
in my old profession of the law, I would risk my head upon making 
twelve of you find that everything he has stated is either unfounded or 
utterly exaggerated. Any twelve of you, if put in a jury box, would 
find that the facts were not so. If you pursue the course undertaken to 
be recommended by that gentleman, you will get Missouri into a condition, 
if possible, worse than it has already been in. But, for compromise's 
sake, if you choose to admit both delegations without entering into any 
question as to whether this or that is the right one, it appears to me that, 
as it is perfectly certain that one or the other is entitled to vote, it is 
absurd in us to undertake to silence a State that is truly represented here 
by somebody, and that the proper course would be for them, if they will 
agree, to take half of the vote of the State from each delegation. I think 
this is the only way to do under the circumstances. I suppose it would 
not be strictly in order for me to discuss the difference between the 
amendment as proposed by me, and the proposition of the Committee. 
I will say one single thing more. My object is, if you let both in, not 
to silence both, but to let them divide their vote — so that we can get the 
vote of the State, for undoubtedly the State is entitled to a representation 
here by somebody. Now, Sir, this Conyenjiion is in one sense a Repub- 
lican Convention, but in a very vague sense. I took occasion to say, in 
the remarks I made yesterday, that you had every sort of party men, 
and that you had every sort of no-party men — that, in a word, we were 
all united upon the naked proposition to maintain the Union, and do it 
by whatsoever is absolutely necessary to be done in order to maintain 
that Union, and are willing to adjourn over all other questions that must 
com(iup in their course. 

Voices. — Order, order. .The gentleman's time has expired. 

Mr. R. J. Breckinridge, of Ky. — Gentlemen, I will make you a 
present of what else I should have said if I had had a chance [laughter]. 

Th^ President — The gentleman's time has expired. 

Mr. G. VoLNEY DoRSEV, of Ohio. — I wish to make a few remarks on 
this subject, and I will not occupy over five niinutes, which, by the rule 
of the Convention, is allowed to each member. I want to call attention 
to the fact that this Convention, for the purpose of deciding questions 
which could not be decided in mass convention, appointed a Committee 
on Credentials, because they knew that the facts could be better judged 
of in the quiet of a small room, before a small number of persons, than 
in a mass convention. Under the lead of the excellent Chairman of the 
Committee, the gentleman from New York, that Committee held a pro- 



42 



longed session of many hours. That Committee had brought before 
them gentlemen representing both of the contesting parties in the State 
of Missouri, and with care and deliberation they listened to the arguments 
of those contesting parties. The result drawn from the deliberations of 
that Committee, and based upon the statements made by the contesting 
parties from Missouri, this Convention has before it here this morning 
in the report of the majority ; and I beg leave to say to the Convention, 
with all respect to the Hon. Chairman, and without violating any of the 
proprieties of that Committee Room, that the very same proposition 
presented here before the Convention this morning by him, was presented 
before that Committee and voted down ; and why so 1 Is it improper, 
then, to present the same question to this Convention as a whole 1 
Most assuredly not ; but remember that this Convention entrusted to that 
Committee the care of deciding all these questions. They did decide. 
They agreed to the report of the majority. They voted down the very 
proposition which the Honorable Chairman now proposes to the Con- 
vention. 

The President. — Will Mr. Dorsey stop for a moment 1 The Chair 
did not call the gentleman to order when he referred to the proceedings 
of the Committee, in the hope that he would make a bare reference to 
them. The Chair now rules that it is not in order in a discussion in this 
Convention to refer to the proceedings of a Committee. 

Mr. G. VoLNEY Dorset, of Ohio. — Then I will not do so. I only 
intended to add to what I have said, that the committee having been 
entrusted by this Convention to decide upon this important question 
were more competent to do so than a mass convention, for they have 
listened carefully to the contestants, and the opinions presented by those 
persons who were set forward to speak as advocates of the contesting 
parties, and they have come carefully to the conclusion presented by the 
majority, and as such they feel willing to entrust the report of the ma- 
jority to the sense and to the vote of the Convention. 

Mr. S. M. Breckinridge, of Missouri. — Mr. President 

Several Members. — Not on the roll. 

Mr. S. M. Breckinridge, of Missouri. — I rise, gentlemen, not of my 
own choice 

Mr. A. Brandagee, of Connecticut. — Under what order of the Con- 
vention is the gentleman allowed to speak 1 

The President. — Under the order of the Convention adopted yes- 
terday. 

Mr. A. Brandagee, of Connecticut. — Allow me to suggest to the 
Chair that the credentials of the Missouri delegation were referred to 
the committee. 



43 



Mr. Geo. W. Curtis, of New York. — I submit that this Convention 
is at present composed only of those delegates whose seats are without 
contest, and that has been decided by a vote taken this morning. 

The President. — The Chair was of the impression that a different 
rule had been adopted yesterday under the temporary arrangement, but 
the gentleman from New York is correct, and Mr. Curtis has the floor. 

Mr. Geo. W. Curtis, of New York. — The Missouri question, Mr. 
President, is no new question, either to this Convention or to the country. 
It is a question which was almost coeval with that of the rebellion itself. 
It is a question, with the most profound deference to our eminent friend 
from Kentucky, which is well known in' its details all over this country. 
The Missouri question is a question which must be met, which must be 
settled, and no where can it be met so well, and settled so conclusively, 
as in this National Convention of Union men of the country. [Great 
applause.] Now then, sir, we yesterday appointed a committee, as the 
gentleman from Ohio has so well said, for the purpose of making all 
those inquiries of detail which it was impossible for this Convention to 
make, and we have the^ report of that committee, so far as appears 
unanimous, with the exception of my honored friend from New York, 
that the Radical delegation from Missouri shall be admitted to this floor, 
with all the privileges of voting and all the other privileges of delegates. 
[Applause.] The question of fact so far as it may be hidden from us of 
the Convention, has been settled, has been reported upon by the com- 
mittee. Now, then, we encounter the question as the Union men of the 
country, and I take my argument from the mouth of my most honored 
friend who has introduced this amendment. It is because we wish to 
strengthen the Union sentiment of this country ; it is because we wish, at , 
this moment, to cheer and encourage the brave men with bared and 
bleeding breasts who are standing firm as the radical men in Missouri, 
from the beginning have stood firm for the great cause which underlies 
this whole question. It is for that reason, sir, that I implore you, and I 
implore the Convention, to give no uncertain sound, but to let it ring out 
to Missouri, out to the Territories, back again to Maine and to the North, 
that we recognize the radicals of Missouri, who have always been true. 
I freely confess that we, of the North, have not had in our own persons 
all the bitter sufferings that all our friends in the Border States have had ; 
yet I wish this report adopted, that we may be strengthened at home, 
that at the West and in the Northwest the union sentiment may be 
strengthened, that our army all along the line, with Sherman and Grant, 
may hear no uncertain sound from us at the rear ; because, as a practical 
fact, there is not a man in this Convention who does not know that the 



44 



admission of the radical delegation from Missouri is the practical settle- 
ment of that question, and the practical adhesion of the great Union party 
of this country to the policy with which they have been identified, and 
it is for that reason that I hope, sincerely, in the name of the Union, in 
the name of liberty, and for the sake of strengthening the loyal men of 
the land, the recommendation of my eminent friend from Kentucky will 
not prevail. [Great applause.] 

Mr, Daniel' Mace, of Indiana. — In order to facilitate the organiza- 
tion, and dispose of this question, I move to lay the proposed amend- 
ment on the table. 

The President, — Is the gentleman aware that his motion, if adopted, 
carries the whole subject to the table ? 

Mr. Daniel Mace, of Indiana. — I think not, according to the rules of 
the House of Representatives. Certainly, when I was a member of that 
House, a motion to lay an amendment on the table did not carry the 
original proposition. 

The President. — The Chair understands that to be the rule, and 
must so hold. 

Mr. N. B. Smithers, of Del. — I suggest to the gentleman from Indi- 
ana to withdraw his motion and demand the previous question. 

Mr. Daniel Mace, of Ind. — I adopt that suggestion, and demand the 
previous question. 

Mr. Thaddeus Stevens, of Penn. — Do I understand that the previ- 
ous question is called on the whole proposition, or only on this amend- 
ment ? 

Mr. Daniel Mace, of Ind. — On the amendment. 

The call for the previous question was sustained. 

The President. — The question is on the amendment of the gentle- 
man from Kentucky (Mr. Breckinridge) to the amendment of the gen- 
tleman from N. Y. (Mr. P. King). 

The amendment to the amendment was rejected. 

The President. — The question before the Convention now is the 
amendment offered by Mr. King, of New York, to admit both delega- 
tions from Missouri. 

The question was put, and the amendment was rejected. 

Mr. Preston King, of New York. — A division was called on my 
proposition. I made several distinct propositions. 

The President. — The Convention will understand that a division was 
called for on the amendment offered by the gentleman from New York. 
The first amendment has now been voted upon and decided in the nega- 
tive. The question now before the House is upon the next amendment 
in the order of the division. 



45 



Mr. R. J. Breckinridge, of Kentucky. — Will the President state 
distinctly to us in what condition it leaves the original recommendation 
of the Committee in regard to the Missouri delegation ? 

The President. — The Chair was misled. He was of the impression 
that there was another amendment relating to the Missouri question, but 
it seems there is not, and therefore the question now is directly upon 
the report of the Committee directly on the Missouri question. 

Mr. R. J. Breckinridge, of Kentucky. — I wish to say one word on 
that question. 

Several Delegates. — Debate is not in order. 

The President. — Under the rule, Dr. Breckinridge, you cannot 
speak to this question. 

Mr. R. J. Breckinridge, of Kentucky. — I have not spoken to this 
question. 

The President. — The main question is now before the House. De- 
bate is out of order. The question is whether J,he Convention will agree 
to the report of the majority of the Committee in reference to the dele- 
gation from Missouri. 

Mr. R. J. Breckinridge, of Kentucky. — I submit that the previous 
question was not in force when I claimed the floor, and therefore I have 
a right to be heard. 

The President. — The Chair understands the previous question to 
have applied to the whole report. 

Mr. R. J. Breckinridge, of Kentucky. — Only to the amendment. I 
wish to say a single sentence, that is all. I do not wish to be gagged. 

The President. — There is obviously a misapprehension as to what 
is before the Convention, growing doubtless out of the confusion of the 
Chair itself. Allow me, therefore, to say, that the question now before 
the Convention is, under the operation of the previous question, upon 
that part of the report of the majority of the committee which relates to 
the Missouri case. 

Mr. Campbell Tarr, of West Virginia, called for a vote by States. 

The President. — The Secretary will proceed to call the roll of States 
on this question. 

Mr. R. J. Breckinridge, of Kentucky. — I rise to a question of order. 

Mr. Thaddeus Stevens, of Pennsylvania. — I rise, sir, to a personal 
explanation. By the rules of the House of Representatives, the present 
rules differing from what they were formerly, when the previous ques- 
tion is called on an amendment, it applies only to the amendment, and 
does not extend to the original proposition. It was for that reason, that 
when the gentleman from Indiana called for the previous question, I 



46' 



inquired of him if it was to apply only to the amendment, and I under- 
stood him to reply that it was. 

The President. — The gentleman from Pennsylvania informs the 
Chair that there has been a change in the rules of the House of Eepre- 
sentatives in regard to the effect of the previous question ; that the pre- 
vious question being called and sustained, applies only to the amend- 
ment then under consideration. 

Mr. Thaddeus Stevens, of Pennsylvania. — If so called. 

The President. — That being the rule, the previous question does not 
apply to so much of the report of the majority of the committee as 
relates to the Missouri case, and the gentleman from Kentucky is en- 
titled to the floor upon that question. 

Mr. R. J. Breckinridge, of Kentucky. — I wish to make but a single 
remark upon this question. If I understand what you are about to do, 
the vote which you will now give (and with your present temper I have 
no doubt you will give it), a delegation from a party in Missouri, whose 
main business for the past two years has been to support and sustain the 
President of the U. S., whom we are about to nominate by acclamation, 
will be refused seats here. The delegates whom you are about to admit, 
are sent here by a convention that put before the people a platform, 
which platform, as I understand the English language, put their support 
on the condition that the President of the United States will agree to 
be brow-beaten by them. I will not vote to say that any such delega- 
tion from any such party is the sole delegation from the State of Mis- 
souri. Least of all will I do it as a Union-Lincoln man, favorable to the 
Union-Lincoln cause in the State of Missouri, and I tell you here to-day, 
that if you give this vote and do this thing, you will, if you will allow a 
Presbyterian preacher to say so, come as nigh to playing the devil as 
any set of gentlemen ever did with their eyes blindfolded. 

Mr. A. Brandagee, of Connecticut. — I call for the previous question 
upon that part of the majority report which refers to the Missouri case. 

The call was sustained. 

The President. — The proposition is, that the Radical Delegates 
from Missouri be admitted as full delegates on this floor. Upon this 
question there has been a call for a vote by States, and the Secretary 
will proceed to call the roll. 

The roll was called with the following result : 

ATES. NATS. 

Maine 14 — 

New Hampshire 10 — 

Vermont 10 — 



47 



Massachusetts 24 — 

Rhode Island 8 — 

Connecticut 12 — 

New York '. . . 66 — 

New Jersey 14 — 

Pennsylvania 49 3 

Delaware 6 — 

Maryland 14 — 

Kentucky 21 1 

Ohio 42 — 

Indiana 26 — 

Illinois 32 — 

Michigan 16 — 

Wisconsin 16 — 

Iowa 16 — 

Minnesota 8 — 

California 10 — 

Oregon 6 — 

West Virginia 10 — 

Kansas 6 — 

440 4 

The President. — The result is to admit the Radical Delegation from 
Missouri as the full delegation from that State. [Vociferous applause.] 
The next question is on the amendment offered by the gentleman from 
New York, in regard to the other States and Territories, which he will 
read: 

Mr. Preston King, of New York. — The proposition was divided on 
the call of some gentlemen. This is the next clause which I propose : 

" That the delegates admitted to this Convention from Virginia, Tennessee, 
Louisiana, Florida and Arkansas, and from all the organized Territories and 
the District of Columbia, shall be allowed all the privileges of delegates, in- 
cluding the right to vote ; but that the Territories and the District of Colum- 
bia shall be allowed two votes only ; and that no State or Territory shall be 
allowed to cast more votes than it has delegates present, or more than it would 
be entitled to under the rules of the Convention." 

Mr. Thaddeus Stevens, of Pennsylvania. — I understand that propo- 
sition to embrace all the amendments the . gentleman from New York 
has to ofter. Am I right ? 

Mr. Preston King, of New York, — Yes, sir. 

Mr. Thaddeus Stevens, of Pennsylvania. — Then the question comes 
between that and the majority report, and I believe we are pretty much 
disposed to sustain the Committee all the way through. I call, there- 
fore, for the previous question on the whole subject. 

Mr. C. Walborn, of Pennsylvania. — I desire to say a word at this 
stage. 



48 



Mr, Thaddecs Stevens, of Pennsylvania. — It is out of order, I have 
called for the previous question, 

Mr. C, Walborn, of Pennsylvania, — Do I understand that I cannot 
make a remark at this time ? 

Mr. Thaddeus Stevens, of Pennsylvania, — It is not in order. 

Mr. C, Walborn, of Pennsylvania, — May I not ask to have the call 
withdrawn ? 

The President, — The Chair will state the question. The majority 
report recommends that the delegates from the several States and Terri- 
tories named shall be admitted with the rights of delegates, except that 
they shall not be allowed to vote. The amendment proposes to add to 
those privileges that of voting. Upon this question the previous ques- 
tion has been called, which, if sustained, will bring the Convention to a 
vote directly upon the amendment offered by the gentlemen from New 
York, 

The call for the previous question was sustained. 

The President. — The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from New York. 

The question was put and the amendment was rejected. 

Several delegates called for a vote by States. 

Mr. A. H. Reeder, of Pennsylvania. — The call is too late. 

The President. — The question before the Convention now is upon 
the original report of the committee. 

Several Delegates, — We want to know if Tennessee and Louisiana 
are included in this vote. 

The President, — I must ask the gentleman from New York to read 
the portion of the report. 

Mr. Preston King, of New York. — All the clauses of the majority 
report have been agreed to, except the following : 

" That the delegations from Virginia, Tennessee, Louisiana, Florida, and 
Arkansas, be admitted with all the rights and privileges of delegates to this 
Convention, except the right to vote. That the delegation asking admission 
from South Carolina be not admitted to the Convention. That the delegations 
from the organized Territories,. and from the District of Columbia, be admitted 
to the Convention with all the rights and privileges of delegates, except the 
right to vote." 

Mr. J. H. Laxe, of Kansas. — I ask for a division of the question. 

The President. — I understood the call of the gentleman from Penn- 
sylvania for the previous question to apply to all the matters relating to 
this subject. 

Mr. Thaddeus Stevens, of Pennsylvania, — Precisely. 



49 



The President. — This debate is not in order. 

Mr. J. H. Lane, of Kansas. — I do not propose to debate, but I rise 
to a'question of privilege. I ask for the division of the question, so that 
there may be a separate vote taken on the admission of Tennessee, Ar- 
kansas and Louisiana, and on the admission of Nevada, Nebraska and 
Colorado. 

The President. — The Chair rules that under the call of the previous 
question a division is not in order, but the Convention is brought to a 
direct vote on the entire question. 

Mr. J. H. Lane, of Kansas. — I appeal from the decision of tlie Chair. 
I appeal to every parliamentarian in this body if the decision is not an 
error. The previous question brings the House to a direct vote upon 
the question, but the proposition before the House is divisible at any 
period before the vote is taken. [" That's right."] 

The President. — The Chair has no pride of opinion to consult on this 
question. The only object of the Chair is to conform to the rules 
adopted by the Convention. The Chair hasmade this decision because 
he thinks it is right. The Chair has no objection to tlte appeal. But if 
there be any parliamentarian in the Convention who can speak A^om his 
knowledge of parliamentary law as applicable to this Convention, acting 
under the rules of the House of Representatives, the Chair v,' ill be very 
glad to hear his explanation, and to correct the decision, if it be wrong. 

Mr. J. H. Lane, of Kansas. — I understand that Mr. Grow, wbo was for 
some years Speaker of the House of Representatives, is here, and I am 
perfectly willing to take his opinion on this question. 

The President. — If the Chair is wrong, he will be happy to be cor- 
rected by Mr. Grow. 

Mr. G. A. Grow, of Pennsylvania. — I will state to the Chair that, 
during the last Congress, the rules of the House of Representatives were 
amended so as to allow the division of' a question at any time before a 
vote. Previous to that time, the decision must have been demanded 
before the call of the previous, question was sustained, or it could not 
be divided. 

The President. — The Chair very cheerfully accepts the suggestion 
of the late Speaker of the House of Representatives, and therefore enter- 
tains the call of the gentleman from Kansas for a division of the ques- 
tion ; but as the House is acting under the previous question, there can, 
of course, be no debate. 

Mr. J. H. Lane, of Kansas. — The course of the Senate is that a Sen- 
ator rises in his place and asks for a separate vote on any particular por- 
tion of a question which is capable of division. I now ask that the ques- 
4 



50 



tion may be taken on the general report, reserving a separate vote upon 
the States and Territories I have named. 

The President, — Does the gentleman propose to take a separate vote 
on each State and Territory 1 

Mr, J. H. Lane, of Kansas. — All I want is a separate vote as to Ten- 
nessee, Louisiana and Arkansas, and as to Nebraska, Coloi'ado and Ne- 
vada, 

The President. — Does the gentleman propose that there shall be a 
vote taken on each? 

Mr. J. H. Lane, of Kansas. — No ; but let the question be taken sep- 
arately. These three States stand in the same relation, as I understand. 
At the suggestion of my friends, I will ask fOr a separate vote first on 
the States of .Tennessee, Louisiana and Arkansas, I will then ask for a 
separate vote upon the Territories that are organizing State governments, 
namely, Nevada, Nebraska and Colorado, and I desire to have the vote 
in each case taken by States, 

The President, — The question then will be first in regard to the 
States of Arkansas, Tennessee and Louisiana, and upon that question a 
call is made for a vote by States. 

Mr, C, M. Allen, of Indiana, — I ask for a further division of the 
question, so that the vote shall first be taken upon Tennessee separately. 

The President, — The Chair will entertain that division. The ques- 
tion now before the Convention is in regard to Tennessee. 

Mr. George William Curtis, of New York, — Do I understand that 
the question now to be submitted is whether the delegation from Tennes- 
see shall be admitted to this floor with all the privileges of delegates, 
including the right to vote ? 

Mr, J. H. Lane, of Kansas. — Certainly. 

Several Delegates. — No, no. 

Mr. George William Curtis, of New York. — I ask the Chair if that 
is the question. 

The President. — The Chair has already stated that the report of the 
majority of the Committee, as he is instructed by the Chairman of that 
Committee, is that the Tennessee delegates be admitted without the 
right to vote, but with all other rights ; and so of these other States. 

Mr. E. F. Drake, of Ohio. — The question before us was on agreeing 
to the report of the majority of the Committee, which excluded the dele- 
gations from these several States from voting. To that the gentleman 
from New York moved an amendment that the State and Territorial 
delegates be allowed to vote. Upon that question a vote was taken, 
and the result was announced by the Chair, pending which a division 



51 



was demanded. The Chair ruled the division to be out of order, and 
afterwards reversed the decision. The question as it now stands is upon 
voting on the amendment of the gentleman from New York in reference 
to the State of Tennessee separately. 

The President. — Do I understand the gentleman from Kansas 
aright, that he did not propose to allow the delegates to vote 1 I under- 
stood him to move a division of the question upon these several States 
and Territories, leaving them in the condition reported by the Commit- 
tee, that is to say, that their delegates should not be entitled to vote. 

Mr. J. H. Lane, of Kansas. — The Chairman of the Committee moved 
an amendment to give the delegates from several States and Territories 
the right to vote. That question is pending. When the gentleman from 
Pennsylvania moved the previous question, I asked for a division of the 
proposition, and, as I understand, if themotion that I have made prevails, 
it gives to the State of Tennessee, the State of Louisiana and the State 
of Arkansas, and the Territories of Nebraska, Colorado and Nevada, a 
delegation here with a right to vote. 

The President. — The motion of the gentleman .from Kansas is that 
this division shall be upon the amendment offered by the gentleman from 
New York, the effect of which, if carried, will be to give a vote to each 
of the delegates named by him. Upon this question a vote by States 
has been called. Those in favor of admitting the delegation from Ten- 
nessee upon this- floor with a right to vote, will say " aye," and those 
who are opposed to it will say " no." The Secretary will proceed to 
call the roll. 

The roll was called, with the following result : 



Maine 3 11 

New Hampshire — 10 

Vermont 2 8 

Massachusetts — 24 

Rhode Island 2 6 

Connecticut 10 2 

New York 66 — 

New Jersey 14 — 

Pennsylvania 31 21 

Delaware 1 4 

Maryland 1 13 

Missoiui 19 3 

Kentucky 4 18 

Ohio 42 — 

Indiana 24 2 

Illinois , . 32 — 

Michigan 2 14 

Wisconsin 15 1 



52 



Iowa 9 ........ 7 

Minnesota 1 7 

California 10 — 

Oregon 6 — 

West Virginia 10 — 

Kansas 6 — 

310 151 

[New York at first voted 48 ayes, 18 noes; Missouri 4 ayes, 16 noes; In- 
diana 18 ayes, 8 noes ; Illinois 32 noes, and California 8 ayes, 2 noes, but changed 
their votes before the result was announced, as above stated.] 

The President. — The amendment of the gentleman from Kansas has 
been agreed to, and now the question before the Convention is upon the 
proposition as amended to admit the delegates from Tennessee with the 
right to vote. 

The motion was agreed to, amid deafening applause. 

The President. — ^The Chair will now ask the chairman of the dele- 
gation from Tennessee to advise the Chair of the number and the names 
of the delegates from that State to be entered on the roll. 

Mr, Horace Maynard, of Tennessee. — The number of delegates 
present from the State at large and the several districts, some of which 
are represented by a single delegate only, is fifteen. I might give the 
reason for that particular number, but it would not inform the Conven- 
tion or the President. The fact is, that there is that number of delegates 
present. Mr. President, I am instructed by this delegation to express 
to the Convention their profound sense of gratitude for this expression of 
confidence in the patriotism, the loyalty and the devotion to country of 
our constituents at home [applause], to whose breasts this vote will 
carry a joy second only to that of a great victory upon the field of arms. 
[Great applause.] 

The President, — ^The Chair understands the chairman of the dele- 
o-ation from Tennessee to report that there are fifteen delegates present 
from that State. The chairman will please send their names on paper 
to the Secretary, that they may be enrolled. 

Mr. Horace Maynard, of Tennessee. — Certainly. 

Mr. A. H. Reeder, of Penn. — May I inquire of the gentleman from 
Tennessee whether they represent fifteen congressional districts ? 

The President, — Each district has two delegates, the gentleman is 

aware. 

Mr. A. H. Reeder, of Penn. — I am aware of that, but I desire to 
know how many congressional districts they represent. 

Mr. Horace Maynard, of Tennessee. — A portion of them repre- 
sent the State at large, and the remainder represent the several districts 



53 



into which the State is divided. One district has one representative, and 
the others have two. Tlie reason for this peculiar number is well 
known. The State of Tennessee in tlie electoral college would be en- 
titled, if admitted to the college, to ten votes, two for her senators and 
eight for her representatives in Congress. That would entitle her to 
twenty votes here if her delegation was full. A portion of the present 
delegation were elected to represent the State at large, another portion 
to represent the several districts, and one district is represented by but 
a single delegate. The district in which •! myself reside, I representing 
the State at large, is represented in the person of my friend, the Rev. 
Dr. Brownlow. [Applause.] These facts will be presented to the 
Secretary of the Convention, so that the matter may be perfectly under- 
stood. 

The President. — The question now is upon the admission, 

Mr. C. Delano, of Ohio. — I rise to make an inquiry, through the 
Chair, of the gentleman from Kansas, and it is whether he is not willing 
now, after the expression of opinion that he has had from the Conven- 
tion, to withdraw his proposition for a further division, and permit us to 
come to a settlement of this question by a single vote. 

Mr. J. H. Lane, of Kansas. — I was on my feet to make that very 
suggestion. We have admitted Tennessee without a State organization. 
Louisiana and Arkansas have free State organizations, and I was about 
to move, and I will move, with the approbation of the Convention, that 
Arkansas and Louisiana be admitted by acclamation. 

The President. — The motion is not in order, except by the universal 
consent of the Convention. 

Several Delegates objected. 

Mr. Thaddeus Stevens, of Pennsylvania. — I call for a vote by 
States on this question. 

The President. — The Chair will state the question. The motion is 
that the delegates from Arkansas and Louisiana be admitted to this 
Convention with the full rights of delegates, including- the right to vote, 
upon which the gentleman from Pennsylvania calls for a vote by States. 
Is that call seconded ? [Yes.] The roll will be called, and those in 
favor of admitting the delegates from Arkansas and Louisiana, with the 
full rights of delegates, including the right to vote, will say " aye," and 
those who are against it will say " no." 

The vote was taken, with the following result : 



54 



AYES,, NOES. 

Maine ...;... 3* 11 

New HampsMre » — 10 

Vermont 5 5 

Massachusetts — 24 

Rhode Island 1 7 

Connecticut 10 3 

New York 61 3 

New Jersey 14 — 

Pennsylvania 5 47 

Delaware — 5 

Maryland 1 13 

Missouri 17 5 

Tennessee 15 — 

Kentucky 12 10 

Ohio 42 — 

Indiana 22 4 

Illinois 32 — 

Michigan 10. 6 

Wisconsin 15 1' 

Iowa 14 .... 3 

Minnesota — 8 

California 6 4 

Oregon 6 — 

West Virginia 10 — 

Kansas 6 — 

Total 307 167 



The amiouncement of the result was received with great applause. 

The President. — The Chair will now request the chairmen of the 
delegations from the States of Arkansas and Louisiana to furnish the 
Secretary with a list and number of the delegation from those two States. 

Mr. A- H. Reeder, of Pennsylvania. — I suggest, also, that they 
furnish a list of the congressional districts represented. 

The President. — The Chair should first put the question on the 
motion as amended, the amendment only having been adopted. ' The 
motion as amended is, that the delegates from Arkansas and Louisiana 
be admitted with the right to vote. 

The motion was agreed to. 

The President. — The next question before the Convention relates to 
the Territories of Nebraska, Colorado and Nevada ; and it is moved 
that the delegates present from those three Territories be admitted to all 
the rights of delegates in this Convention, including the right to vote. 

Mr. J. H. Lane, of Kansas. — These three Territories are in course 
of organization as States, and will cast their votes for the nominees of 
this Convention at the November election. The day of election for the 
State organization in those Territories is fixed for the second Tuesday 
of September. 



65 



Mr. Thaddeus Stevens, of Pennsylvania. — I call the gentleman to 
order. He knows that we are acting under the previous question. 

The President. — The motion is to admit the delegates from these 
three Territories, with the right to vote. 

The motion was agreed to. 

The President. — The question now before the Convention is on the 
remaining portion of the majority report. 

Mr. J. Y. ScAMMON, of Illinois. — I wish to know what, in the report, 
is done with Virginia and South Carolina. 

The President. — The chairman of the committee will read the report 
in regard to that matter. 

Mr. Preston King, of New York. — The parts of the majority report 
which have not been acted upon, and have not been covered by the 
amendments made, propose to admit the delegates from Virginia and 
Florida without the right to vote, and to reject the delegates from South 
Carolina. It also admits the delegates from all the organized Territories, 
without the right to vote. 

Mr. Campbell .Tarr, of West Virginia. — I move that the report be 
amended by allowing the delegates from the State of Virginia to vote. 
Virginia has been put upon the back seat ; and when delegates have 
been admitted from the other States, and even from Territories, I think 
she is certainly entitled to a place in the list. 

Mr. J. A. J. Creswell, of Maryland. — I rise to a point of order. I 
make the point that the call for the previous question having been sus- 
tained, the amendment is not in order. 

The President. — The point of order is well taken. 

Mr. Thaddeus Stevens, of Pennsylvania. — I move to reconsider the 
vote ordering the previous question, so as to allow amendments to be 
made. I think all ought now to come in alike. I move, therefore, to 
recojjsider the vote ordering the previous question. 

The motion to reconsider was not agreed to. 

Mr. C. M. Allen, of Indiana. — What disposition does the report 
make of New Mexico and the District of Columbia? 

Mr. Preston King, of New York. — It admits their delegates to the 
Convention, with all the privileges of delegates, except that of voting. 

Mr. E. D. Smith, of South Carolina.— I ask, as chairman of the del- 
egation sent here from South Car'olina, whether or not it is in order for 
that delegation to be heard in favor of the claims of that State here, and 
whether it is not in order to make a motion to amend the report of the 
Committee which rejects those delegates from the floor altogether. I 
wish to know whether I may not be allowed to advocate the right of 



56 



that delegation to appear before this Convention to sit upon the floor 
without the privilege of voting, the same as the District of Columbia? 

The President. — The Chair will inform the gentleman that, under 
the operation of the previous question, such a motion is out of order. 
The question before the Convention now is, as stated by the Chair, 
the adoption of the report of the majority of the Committee, as 
amended. 

The report was adopted. 

Mr, M. B. LowRY, of Pennsylvania, addressed the Chair, and was 
recognized. 

Mr. Campbell Tarr, of West Virginia. — I wish to know where the 
State of Virginia stands in this Convention ? 

The President. — Precisely where the Committee reported that it 
should stand. The delegates are admitted without the right to vote. 

Mr. Campbell Tarr, of West Virginia. — I move a reconsideration. 
I demand that the State of Virginia shall have a right to vote on this 
floor. 

The President. — ^The gentleman is not in order. Mr. Lowrt, of 
Pennsylvania, is entitled to the floor. 

Mr, M. B. Lowry, of Pennsylvania. — I rise to inquire how many 
delegates are reported as coming from Nebraska, and who they are. I 
am told that there are two sets of delegates from that Territory. 

The President. — The chairman of the delegation from Nebraska has 
not yet reported the list of delegates. He will please send his list to 
the Chair, as will the chairmen of the other territorial delegations. 

Mr. J. F. Hanks, of Arkansas. — My origin was in New York, but I 
have lived in Arkansas for twenty-seven years, and I claim that we have 
a right to be taken to the bosom and under the protection of the Stars 
and Stripes. We thank the Convention for having admitted us to seats. 

Mr. J. H. Lane, of Kansas. — I move that the Committee on Evolu- 
tions be called upon to make their report. 

Mr. A. Brandagee, of Connecticut. — Do I understand that the report 
of the Committee on Credentials has been adopted ? 

The President. — It has been adopted as amended. 

Mr. J. J. Stewart, of Maryland. — As one who voted for the adop- 
tion of that report for the j^rpose of moving a reconsideration, I now 
rise to make that motion, and I will state my reason for so doing. Ar- 
kansas, Louisiana and Tennessee have been admitted, but Virginia has 
been excluded. ("Order," "order.") 

The President. — The gentleman is not in order. The gentleman 
from Kansas has made a motion calling for the report of the Committee 



57 



on Resolutions. The Chair rules that to be in order, and the question 
is on that motion. 

The motion was agreed to. 

EESOLUTIONS. 

Mr. Henry J. Raymond, of New York. — I am instructed by the 
Committee on Resolutions and Platform to present for the consideration 
and action of this Convention the following series of resolutions : 

1. Besohed, That it is the highest duty of every American citizen to maintain 
against all their enemies the integrity of the Union and the paramount authority 
of the Constitution and laws of the United States ; and that, laying aside all 
differences of political opinion, we pledge om'selves, as Union men, animated 
by a common sentiment and aiming at a common object, to do everything in 
our power to aid the Government in quelling by force of arms the Rebellion now 
raging against its authority, and in bringing to the punishment due to their 
crimes the Rebels and traitors an'ayed against it. [Prolonged apijlause.] 

2. Resolved, That we approve the determination of the Government of the 
United States not to compromise with Rebels, or to offer them any terms of 
peace, except such as may be based upon an unconditional surrender of their 
hostility and a return to their just allegiance to the Constitution and laws of 
the United States, and that we caU upon the Government to maintain this po- 
sition, and to prosecute the war with the utmost possible vigor to the complete 
supiDression of the Rebellion, in fuU reliance upon the self-sacrificing patri- 
otism, the heroic valor and the undying devotion of the American people to 
their cotmtry and its free institutions. [Applause.] 

3. Resolved, That as Slavery was the cause, and now constitutes the strength, 
of this Rebellion, and as it must be, always and everywhere, hostile to the prin- 
ciples of Republican Government, justice and the National safety demand its utter 
and complete extirpation from the soil of the Republic [applause] : — and that, 
while we uphold and maintain the acts and proclamations by which the Govern- 
ment, in its own defence, has aimed a death-blow at this gigantic evil, we are in 
favor, furthermore, of such an amendment to the Constitution, to be made by the 
people in conformity with its provisions, as shall terminate and forever prohibit 
the existence of Slavery within the limits or the jurisdiction of the United 
States. [Tremendous applause, the delegates rising and waving their hats.] 

4. Resolved, That the thanks of the American people are due to the soldiers 
and sailors of the Army and Navy [applause], who have periled their lives in de- 
fence of their country and in vindication of the honor of its flag ; that the nation 
owes to them some permanent recognition of their patriotism and their valor, 
and ample and permanent provision for those of their survivors who have re- 
ceived disabling and honorable woimds in the service of the country ; and that 
the memories of those who have fallen in its defence shall be held in grateful 
and everlasting remembrance. [Loud applause and cheers.] 

5'. Resolved, That we approve and applaud the practical wisdom, the un- 
selfish patriotism and the tmswerving fidelity to the Constitution and the prin- 
ciples of American liberty, with which Abraham Lencoln has discharged, 
under circumstances of unparalleled difficulty, the great duties and responsi- 
bilities of the Presidential office ; that we approve and endorse, as demanded 
by the emergency and essential to the preservation of the nation and as within 
the provisions of the Constitution, the measures and acts which he has adopted 
to defend the nation against its open and secret foes : that we approve, espec- 
ially, the Proclamation of Emancipation, and the employment as Union sol- 



68 



diers of men heretofore held in slavery [applause] ; and that we have full 
confidence in his determination to carry these and all other Constitutional 
measures, essential to the salvation of the country into full and complete effect. 
[Vociferous applause.] 

6. Resolved^ That we deem it essential to the general welfare that harmony 
should prevail in the National Councils, and we regard as worthy of public 
confidence and official trust those only who cordially endorse the principles pro- 
claimed in these resolutions, and which should characterize the administration 
of the Government. [Applause.] 

7. Resolved., That the Government owes to all men employed in its annies, 
without regard to distinction of color, the full protection of the laws of war — 
[applause] — and that any violation of these laws, or of the usages of civilized na- 
tions in time of war, by the Rebels now in arms, should be made the subject of 
prompt and full redress. [Prolonged applause.] 

8. Resolved, That foreign immigration, which in the past has added so much 
to the wealth, development of resources and increase of power to this nation, 
the asylum of the oppressed of all nations, should be fostered and encouraged 
by a liberal and just policy. [Applause.] 

9. Resolved. That we are in favor of the speedy construction of the Railroad 
to the Pacific coast. [Applause.] 

10. Resolved, That the National faith, pledged for the redemption of the 
public debt, must be kept inviolate, and that for this purpose we recommend 
economy and rigid responsibility in the public expenditures, and a vigorous 
and just system of j;axation ; and that it is the duty of every loyal State to sus- 
tain the credit and promote the use of the National currency. [Applause.] 

11. Resolved, That we approve the position taken by the Government that 
the people of the United States can never regard with indifference the attempt 
of any European Power to overthrow by force or to supplant by fraud the in- 
stitutions of any Republican Government on the Western Continent — [prolonged 
applause] — and that they mil view with extreme jealousy, as menacing to the 
peace and independence of their own country, the efforts of any such power to 
obtain new footholds for Monarchial Governments, sustained by foreign mili- 
tary force, in near proximity to the United States. [Long-continued applause.] 



Mm. C. S, Bushnell, of Connecticut. — Those resolutions are their 
own argument. I move their adoption by acclamation. 
The motion was agreed to, amid entlfiisiastic applause. 



NOMINATION OF PRESIDENT. 

Mr. C. Delano, of Ohio. — I move that this Convention now proceed 
to the nomination of candidates for President and Vice-President of the 
United States. [Great applause.] 

Mr. Simon Cameron, of Pennsylvania. — I move, as a substitute for 
the motion of the gentleman from Ohio, the following : 

" Resolved, That Abkaham Lincoln, of Illinois [great applause], be declared 
the choice of the Union, party for the President, and Hannibal, Hamlin, of 
Maine, be the candidate for Vice-President of the same party." 

[" No," " no."] , 



59 



Mr. J. A. J. Creswell, of Maryland. — I call for a division. 

Mr. William M. Stone, of Iowa. — I ask, sir, if I cannot submit a 
motion to amend the resolution, not the substitute of the gentleman from 
Pennsylvania, but the original resolution ? 

The President. — The gentleman from Pennsylvania has offered this 
as a substitute for the motion of the gentleman from Ohio. 

Mr. William M. Stone, of Iowa. — I move to lay it upon the table. 

The President put the question on the motion to lay upon the table 
and declared that it was agreed to. 

Mr. Thaddeus Stevens, of Pennsylvania, and others called for a vote 
by States. 

Mr. B. C. Cook, of Illinois. — I move that Abraham Lincoln, of Illi- 
nois, be declared the choice of this Convention. [Great applause.] 

Mr. Wm. M. Stone, of Iowa. — I insist on my motion. 

The President. — The gentleman from Iowa moved that the resolu- 
tion offered by the gentleman from Pennsylvania be laid upon the table. 
That motion was put to the House, and declared to be carried ; and the 
Chair then recognized Mr. Cook, of Illinois, as having the floor. 

Mr. Thaddeus Stevens, of Penn. — I called for a vote by States be- 
fore the result was declared. 

The President. — The Chair did not hear the gentleman from Penn- 
sylvania. 

Mr, Thaddeus Stevens, of Penn. — I supposed so, for there was a 
universal yell everywhere. 

Mr. William M. Stone, of Iowa. — I have not yet yielded the floor. 

The President. — Does the gentleman from Pennsylvania insist upon 
a call of the States, upon the motion of the gentleman from Iowa to lay 
upon the table the resolution of the other gentleman from Pennsylvania 
(Mr. Cameron) ? 

Mr. Thaddeus Stevens, of Penn. — I do, sir. 

Several Delegates. — It is too late. 

The President. — The gentleman from Pennsylvania informs the Chair 
that, before the motion was put to the* Convention, he called for a vote 
by States. 

Mr. Thaddeus Stevens, of Penn. — Before it was announced. 

The President. — The call was made before the vote was announced, 
but not before the question was "put. Under the rules, as I understand, 
before the announcement of a vote upon a proposition, a delegate has a 
right to call for a vote -by States ; and that being so, the Convention will 
now vote upon the adoption of the substitute offered by the gentleman 
from Pennsylvania. 



60 



Mr. J. A. J. Creswell, of Maryland. — I call for a division of the 
question on the substitute. 

The President. — That is not now in order, because the question be- 
fore the Convention is, shall the resolution offered by General Cameron 
be laid upon the table ? and upon that question a vote by States is called. 

Mr. R. J. Breckinridge, of Kentucky. — I wish to make a motion 
covering the whole subject, if I may be allowed one moment to do so. 
I wish to move to lay all these resolutions on the table for the purpose 
of declaring by acclamation that Abraham . Lincoln is our choice for 
President of the United States. [Tremendous applause.] 

Mr. J. H. Lane, of Kansas. — I appeal to the gentleman from Penn- 
sylvania, General Cameron, with the consent of the Convention, to with- 
draw his resolution. It places us in a very awkward predicament indeed. 
I do hope that he, consulting the best interests of the country, will with- 
draw his resolution, and let us vote upon the motion made by the gentle- 
man from Iowa. [Applause.] 

Mr. Simon Cameron, of Penn. — Allow me to say a word to the gen- 
tleman from Kansas. If he thinks it is injurious to the best interests of 
the country for me to persist in my resolution, I will now agree, to save 
all this trouble, to withdraw my proposition. [Applause.] 

Mr. J. H. Lane, of Kansas. — Now give us " Old Abe." [Great 
cheering.] 

The President. — The motion of the gentleman from Pennsylvania 
being withdrawn, Mr. Cook, of Illinois, is entitled to the floor. 

Mr. Simon Cameron, of Penn. — I beg pardon, I am not done. I 
was about to say that I would withdraw my resolution and move, instead 
of it, that this Convention nominate by acclamation Abraham Lincoln 
for the second term. [Vociferous applause.] 

Mr. Wm. M. Stone, of Iowa. — I do not want the gentleman to cheat 
me out of my motion. [Laughter.] 

The President. — General Cameron withdraws his resolution upon 
condition. The Chair cannot recognize the right of the gentleman to 
withdraw upon condition. 

Several Delegates. — Let General Cameron withdraw it imcondi- 
tionally. 

The President. — It must be an absolute withdrawal, or not at all. 
I^oes the gentleman withdraw his resolution 1 

Mr. Simon Cameron, of Penn. — 1 modify my resolution in the way 
I have suggested. 

Mr. William M. Stone, of Iowa. — Is the substitute of the gentleman 
from Pennsylvania withdrawn 1 



61 



The President. — The gentleman from Pennsylvania has not answered 
the question of the Chair. 

Mr. Simon Cameron, of Penn. — I say my resolution is not withdrawn 
but modified. 

The President. — The Chair does not recognize that as being within 
the rules. The resolution offered by the gentleman from Pennsylvania 
not being withdrawn, it is before the House, and a vote by States has 
been called for upon it. 

Mr. Henry J. Eaymond, of New York. — I understand, sir, that the 
motion now before the Convention is that substituted by the gentleman 
from Pennsylvania (Mr, S. Cameron) for the one which he offered a little 
while ago, but afterwards withdrew ; and that motion is, that Abraham 
Lincoln be nominated by acclamation as our candidate for President. 
Now, sir, on that point I desire to say one word. I take it for granted, 
and I believe, that there is no man in this Convention, no matter from 
what State he may come, who will not, however the vote may be taken, 
whether by acclamation, by a call of States, or by a call of individual 
delegates, give his vote in just that way. It cannot, therefore, be from 
any apprehension as to the result of the vote, that this particular way of 
taking it is proposed. Hence we must look to other considerations in 
deciding how we shall take it. Sir, I desire to submit one consideration 
to this Convention. It is very well known that attempts have been 
made, though I believe without success, to convey the impression that 
the nomination of Abraham Lincoln is to be rushed through this Con- 
vention by some demonstration that will not allow the exercise of indi- 
vidual opinion. Is it wise, under these circumstances, to take a vote by 
acclamation, which cannot possibly change the result, which can add no 
weight whatever to it, but which may give rise to misconstruction 1 I 
suggest, therefore (and I shall move as a substitute a resolution embody- 
ing my vieAv), that the wisest course would be to aHow the roll of States 
represented in this Convention to be called, and let every delegation 
declare its vote, and I believe there will be a unanimous vote from every 
delegation precisely to the sajne effect. [Great applause.] I think "the 
moral effect of that vote will be greater than one taken originally by 
acclamation. It can be reinforced, as it will be reinforced in this Con- 
vention and throughout the country, by the loud acclamations of the 
American people. [Renewed applause.] Now, sir, I move as a substi- 
tute for the motion of the gentleman from Pennsylvania, that the roll of 
States be called, and that each delegation be called upon to name its 
candidate for President of the United States, 



62 



Mr. E. M. Madden, of New York. — And upon that resolution I call 
for the previous question. 

Mr. Simon Cameron, of Penn — I desire to accept the suggestion of 
the gentleman from New York (Mr. Raymond). 

Mr. B. C. Cook, of Illinois. — Mr. President, the State of Illinois 
again presents to the loyal people of this Nation, for President of the 
United States, Abraham Lincoln, God bless him. [Great applause.] 

Mr. Wm. M. Stone, of Iowa, — In the name of the great West, I de- 
mand that the roll be called. ^ 

The President. — The gentleman from Ohio moved that this Conven- 
tion proceed to the nomination of candidates for President and Vice- 
President. Thereupon a resolution was offered by the gentleman from 
Pennsylvania, which has been discussed, and upon- that the gentleman 
from New York moves that we proceed to the nomination of a candi- 
date for President alone, I ask the gentleman from Ohio whether he 
accepts that as a substitute for his motion, 

Mr, Wm. M. Stone, of Iowa. — The gentleman from Iowa, you mean. 

Mr, C. Delano, of Ohio. — Allow me a word of explanation. It was 
with a full comprehension of the necessity of having an expression of 
opinion in favor of Abraham Lincoln, in order that there should be no 
misapprehension, no claim that he had been nominated by clamor, and 
that public sentiment had been suppressed, as has been suggested by the 
gentleman from New York, that I desired to have the nomination made in 
the mode indicated by my motion. No man desires his nomination more 
than I. I assisted in it in a small majority in my own delegation four 
years ago. I thank God for the privilege. I now accept the resolution 
offered by the gentleman from New York as a substitute fof mine, for 
that accomplishes the object I have in view, and then I shall be glad to 
see gentlemen express their opinions by acclamation until their throats 
are sore. 

The President. — The question before the Convention is on the motion 
that we proceed to the nomination of a candidate for President by the 
call of States, 

Mr, W. M, Stone, of Iowa. — I submitted a motion to lay on the 
table the substitute of the gentleman from Pennsylvania, and that mo- 
tion has been adopted. 

Mr. J, H, Lane, of Kansas, — Give us a little magnanimity. Stone, 
and let us vote. 

Mr, W, M, Stone, of Iowa. — Then I moved that Abraham Lincoln, 
of Illinois, be declared the nominee by acclamation, [" Vote, vote,"] 
I accept the amendment of Mr, Raymond, of New York, and in the name 



63 



of the Great West, I again demand that the roll shall be called. [Ap- 
plause.] 

Mr. Thompson Campbell, of California. — I rise, sir, to second the 
nomination made by tfie hon. gentleman from Illinois. Coming as I do 
from one of the most distant States of this Union, of Avhich it can be 
said in truth that there is no more intensely or uncompromisingly loyal 
State, considering that she is the golden link in that mysterious chain 
by which the various parts of this great nation are bound together in 
indissoluble bonds which never can be separated by rebellion's hands — 
[" Vote, vote."] — I ask to be allowed to say but half a dozen words. In 
the name of the great constituency which sent us here, I second the nom- 
ination of the present President of the United States, and I feel assured 
that, under 'his lead, we shall go on triumphantly to victory, and conquer 
peace. 

The President. — The question is on the resolution offered by the 
gentleman from New York (Mr. Raymond). 

The resolution was agreed to. 

The President. — The roll will now be called by the Secretary. 

The Secretary proceeded to call the roll, and as each State was called, 
responses were made by the Chairmen of the respective Delegations as 
follows : 

Maine. — Maine casts her entire vote for Abraham Lincoln, of 
Illinois. — 14 votes. 

New Hampshire. — New Hampshire, the Granite State, in her con- 
vention on the 6th day of January last, unanimously passed a resolu- 
tion, nominating Abraham Lincoln for re-election as President of the 
United States. New Hampshire to-day, by her delegates, casts her 
ten votes, first and last, for Abraham Lincoln, of Illinois. 

Vermont. — The Green Mountain State casts her small but entire vote 
of ten for Abraham Lincoln, of Illinois. 

Massachusetts. — Massachusetts gives her entire vote, twenty -four, 
to Abraham Lincoln. 

Rhode Island. — Rhode Island casts her entire eight votes for Abra- 
ham Lincoln. 

Connecticut. — Connecticut gives her twelve votes to that pure and 
patriotic statesman, Abraham Lincoln, of Illinois. 

New York. — New York casts sixty-six votes, her entire vote, for 
Abraham Lincoln, of Illinois, for President of the United States. . 

New Jersey. — New Jersey gives fourteen votes for Abraham Lin- 
coln. 



64 

Pennsylvania. — Pennsylvania gives her entire vote, fifty-two, for 
Abraham Lincoln, " nigger" troops, and all. [Laughter.] 

Delaware. — Delaware gives her vote, six, for Abraham Lincoln. 

Maryland. — Maryland casts fourteen votes for Abraham Lincoln, of 
Illinois. 

Louisiana. — Louisiana gives her fourteen votes for Abraham Lincoln. 

Arkansas. — Arkansas casts all her votes, ten, for Abraham Lincoln. 

Missouri. — Mr. J. F. Hume. — Missouri comes into this Convention 
purified by its action, and her delegates will support the nominees made 
here, and do the utmost in our power to secure for them the electoral 
vote of the State. It is but right and proper, however, that I should 
state that, in the convention Avhich designated us as delegates to this 
Convention, we were instructed, and we cannot, upon the first ballot, 
give our votes in unanimity with those who have already cast their votes . 
[" Order," " order."] 

Mr. J. H. Lane, of Kansas. — I appeal to the Convention to hear 
Missouri. 

The President. — The gentleman from Missouri is not in order unless 
by -consent of the House. 

Mr. J. H. Lane, of Kansas. — I move that consent be given. 

The motion was agreed to unanimously. 

Mr. J. F. Hume, of Missouri. — It is a matter of much regret that 
we now differ from the Convention which has been so kind to the Radi- 
cals of Missouri ; but we come here instructed. We represent those 
who are behind us at home, and we recognize the right of instruction, and 
intend to obey our instructions ; but in doing so, we declare emphatically 
that we are with the Union party of this Nation, and we intena to fight 
the battle through with it, and assist in carrying its banner to victory in 
the end, and we will support your nominees, be they who they may. 
[Great applause.] I will read the resolution adopted by the convention 
which sent us here : 

" That we extend our heartfelt thanks to the soldiers of Missoui'i, who have 
been, and are now, baring their breasts to the storm of battle for the preserva- 
tion of our free institutions. That we hail them as the practical Radicals of 
the Nation, whose arguments are invincible, and whose policy for putting down 
the rebellion is first in importance and efi"ectiveness." 

Mr. President — In the spirit of that resolution, I cast the twenty-two 
votes of Missouri for the man who stands at the head of the fighting 
Radicals of the Nation, Ulysses S. Grant. 

The calling of the roll was continued as follows : 

Tennessee. — The convention that sent us here instructed us to say 



65 



that, in their opinion, the election by the American people to the office 
of President of any other man than he who now fills the Executive Chair, 
would be regarded both at home and abroad as a concession of something 
to the Rebellion, and instructed us, by all means in our power, to secure 
the nomination of Abraham Lincoln, and I now give him the fifteen votes 
of Tennessee. [Applause.] • 

Kentucky. — Kentucky casts her twenty-two votes for Abraham Lin- 
coln, and will ratify that nomination in November. [Great applause.] 

Ohio. — Ohio gives her forty-two votes for " Old Abe " for President. 

Indiana. — Indiana casts her twenty-six votes for Abraham Lincoln, 

Illinois. — Illinois gives thirty-two votes for Abraham Lindbln. 

Michigan. — Michigan gives sixteen votes for Abraham Lincoln. 

Wisconsin. — Wisconsin casts sixteen votes for Abraham Lincoln, of 
Illinois. 

Iowa. — Iowa casts sixteen votes for Abraham Lincoln. 

Minnesota. — Minnesota casts eight votes for Abraham Lincoln. 

California. — California casts ten votes, all for Abraham Lincoln. 

Oregon. — Oregon casts six votes, all of them, first, last and all the 
time for Abraham Lincoln, of Illinois. 

Kansas.— -Radical Kansas casts her six votes for " Honest Old Abe." 

West Virginia. — West Virginia remembers her friends. She casts 
her ten votes in this Convention, the entire vote of the State of West 
Virginia, representing almost the entire loyal vote of the State, for Abra- 
ham Lincoln. [Applause.] 

Nebraska. — Nebraska has one man in her delegation who was never 
a Lincoln man, but who belongs to that proud party called the War 
Union Democrats, and I am requested by that delegate to say, that he 
submits to the Convention, and I give the six votes of Nebraska for 
Abraham Lincoln, whom we regard as the second saviour of the world. 
[Applause.] 

Colorado. — Colorado casts her six votes for Abraham Lincoln. 

Nevada. — Nevada gives six votes for Abraham Lincoln, of Illinois. 

The President. — The call of the States and Territories has now been 
completed. » 

Mr. J. F. Hume, of Missouri. — The vote has not been announced, 
but I wish to make a motion now, without waiting for the announcement, 
inasmuch as it is well understood what the result of the ballot just given 
is. I move that the nomination of Abraham Lincoln, of Illinoi^bfe de- 
clared unanimous. [Applause.] ; ., ''''^^^. *= 

Several Delegates. — Change your votes. ^* 

Mr. J. r. Hume, of Missouri. — Our vote was given under instruc- 
tions, and therefore I do not know that we can change it. 
5 



66 



Tlie President. — The gentleman's motion is not in order until the 
vote shall have been announced. 

The Secretary proceeded to announce the vote as follows : 

Lincoln. GBAasrr, 

Maine , 14 — 

New Hampsliire ; . . . . 10 — 

Vermont 10 — 

Massachusetts 24 — 

Rhode Island 8 — 

Connecticut 13 — 

New York 66 — 

New Jersey 14 — 

Pennsylvania 53 — 

Delaware 6 .... — 

Maryland 14 — 

Louisiana 14 ........ — 

Arkansas 10 — 

Missouri — 23 

Tennessee 15 — 

Kentucky 23 .... — 

Ohio 42 — 

Indiana 26 — 

Illinois 32 .... — 

Michigan 16 ........ — 

Wisconsin 16 — 

Iowa 16 .... — 

Minnesota 8 — 

California r 7 — 

Oregon 6 — 

"West Virginia 10 — 

Kansas 6 ........ — 

Nebraska 6 ........ — 

Colorado 6 — 

Nevada .... 6 — 

Total.. 484 23 

The President. — ^The total number of votes cast is 506, of which 
484 have been cast for Abraham Lincoln, and 22 for Ulysses S. Grant. 
[Great Applause.] 

Mr. J. F. Hume, of Missouri. — I now move that the nomination of 
Abraham Lincoln be declared unanimous ; and I do not care whether 
the vote of Missouri is changed or not. 

Several Delegates. — -Change the vote. 

Mr. J. F. Hume. — I am authorized now to change the vote of Mis- 
souri to Abraham Lincoln, of Illinois. [Great Applause.] 

"vThe SECiiSaEARiES announced that the vote was unanimous — 506 for 
■graham Lincoln. 

■ >»The;iflA^c|ftes and the audience simultaneously rose to their feet, and 
greeted the announcement with vociferous applause. The band struck up 
" Hail Columbia" and " Yankee Doodle," which were rapturously received. 



67 



The President. — Gentlemen of the Convention — Althono-hit is unnec- 
essary after what has taken place, yet, as a part of my duty, I an- 
nounce the unanimous nomination of Abraham Lincoln for the next 
Presidency, for the term commencing on the 4th of March next. [Great 
applause.] 

Mr. W. M. Stone, of Iowa. — I move that we now proceed to vote 
for a candidate for Vice-President by the call of the States. 

Mr. Leonard Sweat, of Illinois. — I am requested on behalf of the 
delegation from Illinois, to return to this Convention their thanks for the 
honor conferred upon our State, in the nomination of Abraham Lincoln, 
We thank these delegates, we thank their constituents, we thank all 
men of all parties, who have contributed to this result. In 1860, when 
the Convention at Chicago, from the illustrious list of statesmen there 
presented, selected Mr. Lincoln as the standard-bearer for that great 
struggle 

Mr. William A. Dart, of New" York. — I object to the gentleman 
locating Mr. Lincoln in Illinois. He belongs to the Union. 

The President. — The Chair thinks the point is well taken. 

Mr. Leonard Sweat, of Illinois. — I confess that the point is well 
taken, and also the word was taken out of my mouth which I was about 
saying. I was going to say that we felt, then, that Mr. Lincoln was our 
citizen ; but when we gave him, then, to the country, we felt that our 
claims upon him were relieved ; and now, more than ever, we feel that 
this Convention, in re-nominating him, has nominated not especially the 
child of Illinois, but the favored child of this great nation. [Great 
Applause.] I will not detain this Convention by remarks, but I Avish to 
say that we rejoice at the unanimity displayed in the selection of a 
man whom we know to lie honest and faithful, and M^ho was reared and 
has lived in our State. We do not forget the honor, and we shall not 
cease to be grateful for it; and we shall manifest that gratitude not 
by prolonged words, but by doing, in reference to the great struggle 
still pending, what we have done in the past. We have put one hundred 
and seventy regiments into the field, and if this war shall last four years 
more, we wall evidence our zeal by putting in as many more, if neces- 
sary. I again return the thanks of Illinois to the Convention. 

NEWS FKOM THE ARMY. 

The President. — Gentlemen, I will ask your attention to the reading 
of a despatch, which I have just received, addressed lo me by the Secre- 
tary of War. 

The despatch was read as follows : 



68 



"Wah Department^ 

" June 8, 1864.— 1.30 p.m. 

" A despatcli from Mr. Dana, at General Grant's headquarters, dated last 
night at 8.30 p.m., announces a victoiy by General Hunter over the rebels be- 
yond Staunton, and that the rebel General Jones was killed on the battle-field. 
The despatch is as follows : 

" ' Richmond Examiner of to-day speaks of the defeat of General W. E. 
Jones by General Hunter, twelve miles beyond Staunton, Va. General Jones 
was killed on the field. His successor retired to Waynesboro, and now holds 
the mountains between Charlottesville and Staunton. The paper further states 
that no hospital stores were captm-ed by Hunter.' 

" Another despatch announces that our forces occupy Staunton. 

" Hunter's victory, and that om- troops occupy Staunton, is confirmed by 
the following despatch, just received from General Butler : 

" ' All is quiet on my line. Richmond papers of June 7 give intelligence of 
a fight at Mount Crawford between General Hunter and General Jones, in 
which Hunter was victorious, and Jones, rebel commander, was killed. Staun- 
ton was afterwards occupied by the Union forces. The fighting was on 
Sunday.' 

"EDWIN M. STANTON, 
• " Secretary of War." 

The reading of the despatch was followed by great cheering. 



OREGON ELECTION. 

Mr. T. H. Pearne, of Oregon. — Mr. President, I have just received, 
as Chairman of the Delegation from Oregon, a despatch from that State, 
in reference to the General State Election which was held on the day 
before yesterday. This despatch informs me that she has gone largely 
for the Union. [Applause.] The Union majority, in my own county, is 
six hundred. Last election it was less than three hundred. It is the 
first gun of the campaign. [Great Applausa] 

NOMINATION FOR VICE-PRESIDENT. 

The President. — The question before the Convention is the motion 
of the gentleman from Iowa, to proceed to the nomination of a candidate 
for the Vice-Presidency of the United States. 

Mr. R. r. Andrews, of New York. — I move that the rule relative to 
debate, which was adopted by this House, be so far amended as to allow 
each gentleman presenting a candidate for Vice-President to have twenty 
minutes to present the merits of his claims. [" No," " no."] 

Mr. A. H. Reeper, of Penn. — I move that that motion be laid on the 
table. 

The motion to lay on the table was agreed to. 



69 



Mr. C. M. Allen, of Indiana. — Is it now in order to make nomina- 
tions for the Vice-Presidency ? • 

The President. — It is. 

Mr. C. M. Allen, of Indiana. — Indiana presents the name of Andrew 
Johnson, of the State of Tennessee. [Great applause.] 

Mr. W. M, Stone, of Iowa. — The State of Iowa seconds the nomi- 
nation of Indiana. [Great applause.] 

Mr, Simon Cameron, of Penn. — I am instructed by the State of 
Pennsylvania to present the name of Plannibal Hamlin for Vice-Presi- 
dent. [Great applause.] 

Mr. Er. K. Williams, of Ky. — Kentucky nominates General L. II. 
Rousseau. [Applause.] 

Mr. Lyman Tremaine, of New York. — In behalf of a portion of the 
New York delegation, I nominate Daniel S. Dickinson. [Great ap- 
plause.] 

Mr. Horace Maynard, of Tennessee. — Mr. President, sve but rep- 
resent the sentiment of those who sent here the delegation from Ten- 
nessee, when we announce that if no one else had made the nomination 
of Andrew Johnson, which is now before the Convention, it would have 
been our duty to make it by one of our own delegation. That citizen, 
known, honored, distinguished, has been presented to this Convention 
for the second place in the gift of the American people. It needs not 
that I should add words of commendation of him here. From the time 
he rose in the Senate of the United States, where he then was, on the 
17th of December, 1860, and met the leaders of treason face to face, 
and denounced them there, and declared that the laws of the country 
must and should be enforced, for which he was hanged in effigy in the 
city of Memphis, in his own State, by the hands of a negro slave, and 
burned in effigy, I know not in how many more places throughout that 
portion of the country — from that time, or during the residue of that 
session of Senate until he returned to Tennessee, after the firing upon Fort 
Sumter, when he was mobbed in the city of Lynchburg in Virginia, on 
through the memorable canvass that followed in Tennessee, till he passed 
through Cumberland Gap on his way north to invoke the aid of the 
Government for his people ; his position of determined and undying 
hostility to this Rebellion that now ravages the land has been so well 
known that it is a part of the household knowledge of every loyal fam- 
ily in the country. [Great applause.] Of his sentiments on the questions 
that now agitate the public mind, and his present attitude before the 
country, it is equally unnecessary for me to speak. He himself has 
spoken in words unmistakable, not only in his own State, fi'om Memphis 
on all the way to Knoxville ; not once, but repeatedly ; not in a corner, but 



70 



before thousands of our own citizens and persons assembled fi-om other 
portions of the Stite, and from other States ; but he has spoken, also, in 
the capital of the Nation, spoken, also, in this city, spoken, also, I know, 
not in how many State capitals throughout the entire country. His 
opinions are upon record; they are known and read of all men. I have 
only to say in addition upon that point, that when he sees your resolu- 
tions that you have adopted here by acclamation, he will respond to 
them as containing his sentiments, and I pledge myself by all that I • 
have to pledge before such an assemblage as this, that whether he be 
elected to this high place, or whether he retire to private life, he will 
adhere to those sentiments, and to the doctrines of those resolutions as 
long as his reason remains unimpaired, and as long as breath is given 
him by his God. [Great applause.] 

Mr. Lyman Tremaine, of New York. — Gentlemen of the Convention 
— In behalf of a portion of the New York delegation, I beg your indul- 
gence while I submit a few considerations in favor of the nomination of 
Daniel S. Dickinson of New York. I have no time to answer the ques- 
tion who is Daniel S. Dickinson, and what are his claims to recogfnition 
in a National Union Convention. Although an adopted son of New 
York, he is a native of New England, of that same New England which, 
thank God, is not yet out of the Union [applause], but is represented 
to-day on the floor of this Convention by representatives engaged in the 
great work for which her sons are pouring out their life on the field of 
battle. Daniel S, Dickinson, by force of his own talents, without the 
aid of wealth or influential friends, has worked his way up to an honor- 
able and prominent position, having held the best offices within the gift 
of the people of New York. He has been our Lieutenant-Governor, 
our Attorney-General, our Senator for six years in the Senate of the 
United States. 

The question, then, comes back — Is Daniel S. Dickinson popular in 
this State of New York, that can cast thirty-three electoral votes for the 
nominees of this Convention ? On that subject let me submit a single 
statement of fact. In 1861 a Union Convention was called in the State 
of New York, which nominated Daniel S. Dickinson for the first office 
then before the people, the office of Attorney-General, almost by acclama- 
tion ; and that nomination was sustained, by a majority of over one hun- 
dred thousand votes, at the ballot-box, Daniel S. Dickinson leading the 
ticket and receiving a majority of one hundred and eight thousand votes. 
[Applause.] Has anything occurred since to change that popularity 1 
If fidelity to the nominations and principles of the party which elected 
him, if an undying zeal in the cause of the Union, if to plead with no un- 
certain sound wherever his services wef e required in favor of the Union 



and against the wicked Rebellion, has weakened his popularity, then, and 
only under those circumstances, is Daniel S. Dickinson less able to carry 
the State of New York to-day by one hundred thousand majority than 
he was in 1861. Nay, more ; since that time the soldiers of New York 
have been allowed to vote, and I venture to express the opinion here 
to-day, that with Lincoln and Dickinson as our standard-bearers, we can 
give to the nominees of this Convention more than one hundred thousand 
majority in New York at the next election. I ask for Daniel S, Dickin- 
son a recognition as the representative of the War Democracy, who have 
joined their fortunes with the Union party. [Great Applause.] It was 
well said by the temporary and by the permanent Chairman that we 
meet not here as Republicans. If we do, I have no place in this Conven- 
tion. I have been a life-long Democrat ; but, like Daniel S. Dickinson, 
when the first gun was fired on Sumter, I felt that I should have been 
false to my revolutionary ancestry (for although I differed with Massa- 
chusetts on political questions, I should have been false to my paternal 
grandfather, a soldier of the Revolution, whose bones lie buried beneath 
the soil of Massachusetts) if I could have hesitated to cast partizan ties 
to the breeze, and rally around the flag of the Union for the preservation 
of the Government. [Great Appla«se.] Daniel S. Dickinson has cast 
all partizan prejudices to the wind. He has received the storm of obloquy, 
and abuse more than has been showered upon any one by the friends of 
Jeff. Davis, and the murderous, traitorous crew who have rallied 
around him. I ask that he be recognized by this Convention, not for 
himself — he makes no claim — when his name was spontaneously sug- 
gested, he withdrew from attending at this Convention as a delegate 

The President. — The gentleman's time is out. 

Mr. R, F. Andrews, of New York. — I move that the gentleman be 
allowed to proceed ten minutes longer. 

The motion was not agreed to. 

Mr. N. B. Smithers, of Delaware. — I move that we proceed to call 
the roll, and on that motion I call for the previous question. 

The call for the previous question was sustained, and the motion was 
agreed to. 

The Secretary proceeded to call the roll, and, as each State was 
called, the Chairman of the Delegation responded. The responses were 
as follows : 

Maine. — Maine casts her entire vote for Hannibal Hamlin — 14. 

New Hampshire. — New Hampshire gives one vote for Andrew John- 
son, of Tennessee ; two votes for Benjamin F. Butler, of Massachusetts ; 
three votes for Daniel S. Dickinson, of New York ; and four votes for 
Hannibal Hamlin, of Maine. 



72 



Vermont. — Vermont gives a divided vote for Vice-President, as fol- 
lows : for Hannibal Hamlin, two votes; for Daniel S. Dickinson, one 
vote ; for Benjamin E, Butler, two votes ; for Andrew Johnson, five votes. 

Massachusetts. — Massachusetts gives for Benjamin F. Butler, two 
votes ; for Joseph Holt, two votes ; for Hannibal Hamlin, three votes ; 
and for Daniel S. Dickinson, seventeen votes. 

Ehode Island. — Rhode Island gives three votes for Hannibal Hamlin, 
two votes for Ambrose E. Burnside, two votes for Benjamin E. Butler, 
and one vote for Daniel S. Dickinson. 

Connecticut. — Connecticut gives her twelve votes solid for Andrew 
Johnson, of Tennessee. 

New York. — New York casts for Andrew Johnson, thirty-two votes ; 
for Daniel S. Dickinson, twenty-eight votes ; and for Hannibal Hamlin, 
six votes. 

New Jersey. — New Jersey casts twelve votes for Daniel S. Dickin- 
son, and two for Andrew Johnson. 

Pennsylvania. — Pennsylvania casts her fifty-two votes for Hannibal 
Hamlin. 

Delaware. — Delaware throws six votes for Daniel S. Dickinson. 

Maryland. — Maryland gives eleven votes for Daniel S. Dickinson, 
two votes for Andrew Johnson, and one vote for Hannibal Hamlin. 

. Louisiana. — Louisiana gives seven votes for Andrew Johnson, and 
seven votes for Daniel S. Dickinson. 

Arkansas. — Arkansas gives ten votes for Andrew Johnson. 

Missouri. — Missouri gives two votes for Andrew Johnson, and twenty 
for Benjamin E. Butler. 

Tennessee. — Tennessee gives fifteen votes for Andrew Johnson. 

Kentucky. — Kentucky casts twenty-one votes for Lovell H. Rous- 
seau, and one for David Tod, of Ohio. 

Ohio. — Ohio casts her forty-two votes for Andrew Johnson, of Ten- 
nessee. 

Indiana. — Indiana gives twenty-six votes for Andrew Johnson. 

Illinois. — Illinois casts thirty-two votes for Hannibal Hamlin. 

Michigan. — Michigan gives her sixteen votes for Hannibal Hamlin, 

Wisconsin. — Wisconsin gives four votes for Hannibal Hamlin, two 
for Andrew Johnson, and ten for Daniel S. Dickinson. 

Iowa. — Iowa gives sixteen votes for Andrew Johnson. 

Minnesota. — Minnesota gives three votes for Daniel S. Dickinson, 
and five votes for Hannibal Hamlin. 

California. — California casts five votes for Hannibal Hamlin, and 
five for Andrew Johnson. 



^3 



Oregon. — Oregon casts six votes for Schuyler Colfax. 

Kansas. — Kansas gives two votes for Hannibal Hamlin, two for 
Daniel S. Dickinson, and two for Andrew Johnson. 

West Virginia. — West Virginia casts her ten votes for Andrew 
Johnson. 

Nebraska. — Nebraska gives one vote for Preston King, of New 
York ; one for Hannibal Hamlin ; one for Daniel S. Dickinson, aixl three 
for Andrew Johnson. 

Colorado. — Colorado gives her six votes for Daniel S. Dickinson. 

Nevada. — Nevada casts six votes for Andrew Johnson. 

The President. — The call of the roll is completed. 

The result of the ballot as it stood when the call was completed was 
as follows : 





i 


M 

<! 


1 

M 


P5 
P 

pq 


m 
m 

1 


Q 

M 

'A 
<A 
P 


< 












'A 

M 


Maine 


"i 

5 

'is" 

33 

3 

"'s' 

7 
10 

3 
15 

'43' 
26 

3 

16 

'5 

"io" 
3 
3 


14 
4 
3 
3 
3 

"e* 
'53' 
"i 

'33' 

16 
4 

"5 

5 

'3' 
1 


















New Hampshire . . . 
Vermont 


3 

1 

17 

"1 


3 
2 

3 
2 


























Massachusetts 








3 






Rhode Island 




3 








Connecticut . ...... 










New York 


38 
13 














New Jersey 

Pennsylvania 

Delaware 






























6 
11 

7 
















Maryland 
















Louisiana 
















Arkansas 
















Missouri 


30 














Tennessee 














Kentucky 

Ohio 






31 








1 












Indiana . . . 


















Illinois 


















Michigan 

W isconsin . . 


















10 


































3 
















California . 


























6 








West Virginia 
















3 
1 
6 
















Nebraska 

Colorado 














1 












































300 


150 


108 


38 


31 


3 6 


3 


1 


1 



u 



While the Secretaries were computing the vote, the following pro- 
ceedings took place : 

Mr. R. K. Williams, of Ky. — Kentucky asks leave to change her 
vote by casting twenty-one for Andrew Johnson, instead of for General 
Rousseau. [Applause.] 

Mr. T. H. Pearne, of Oregon. — After consultation, the delegates 
from Oregon wish to change their votes, and cast the six votes of that 
State for Andy Johnson. [Applause.] 

Mr. J. H. Lane, of Kansas. — I desire to change the vote of Kansas, 
and east it solid for Andrew Johnson, of Tennessee. [Applause.] 

Mr. Simon Cameron, of Penn. — I am directed by the Pennsylvania 
delegation to change her vote, and give her fifty -two votes for Andrew 
Johnson. [Great applause.] 

Mr. William A. Newell, of New Jersey. — I desire to record the 
whole vote of New Jersey for Andrew Johnson, of Tennessee. [Ap- 
plause.] 

Mr. L. M. Morrill, of Maine. — Maine desires to change her vote, 
and cast her entire vote for Andrew Johnson, of Tennessee. [Great 
applause.] 

Mr. Thompson Campbell, of California. — California changes her vote, 
and casts ten unanimously for Andrew Johnson. [Applause.] 

Mr. William Haile, of N. H. — New Hampshire changes her entire 
vote of ten to Andrew Johnson. [Applause.] 

Mr. C. Bullitt, of Louisiana. — Louisiana directs me to cast. her en- 
tire vote of fourteen for Andrew Johnson. [Applause.] 

Mr. S. Foot, of Vermont. — I am directed by the delegation from the 
Green Mountain State to follow the lead of the State of Maine, which 
surrenders her own son for Andrew Johnson. Vermont casts her entire 
vote for the noblest Roman in the country, Andrew Johnson, of Ten- 
nessee. [Great applause.] 

Mr. H. W. Hoffman, of Maryland. — Maryland casts her fourteen 
votes for Andrew Johnson. [Applause.] 

Mr. A. H. Bullock, of Massachusetts. — Massachusetts desires to 
change her vote so that it may stand three for Daniel S. Dickinson, and 
twenty-one for Andrew Johnson. [Applause.] 

Mr. B. C, Cook, of Illinois. — Illinois changes her vote of thirty-two 
to Andrew Johnson. [Great applause.] 

Mr. M. B. Smithers, of Delaware. — Delaware casts her six votes 
for Andrew Johnson. [Applause.] 

Mr. J. F. Hume, of Missouri. Missouri changes her vote, and casts 
her entire twenty-two votes for Andrew Johnson. [Great applause.] 



76 



Mr. T. DuRFEE, of Rhode Island. — Rhode IsLaud wishes to change 
her vote so that it shall stand seven for Andrew Johnson and one for 
Daniel S. Dickinson. [Applause.] 

Mr. John A. King, of New York. — New York desires to make her 
vote unanimous. She casts sixty-six votes for Andrew Johnson, of Ten- 
nessee. [Great applause.] 

The delegates from Colorado and Nebraska also changed their votes 
to Andrew Johnson. 

Mr, A. Blair, of Michigan. — The delegation from Michigan change 
their vote to Andrew Johnson. [Applause.] 

The various corrections having been made, the result of the balloting 
was announced as follows : 





Johnson. 


Dickinson. Hamlin. Tod 


Maine 


14 




New HampsMre . . 
Vermont 


10 
10 






Massachusetts .... 


21 


3 




Khode Island 


7 


1 




Connecticut 


13 






New York 


66 

14 

52 

6 






New Jersey 

Pennsylvania 

Delaware 




Maryland 

Louisiana 


14 
14 






Arkansas 


10 
22 






Missouri 




Tennessee 


15 
21 

42 






Kentucky 

Ohio 




Indiana 


26 






Illinois 


33 






Michigan 


16 






Wisconsin 


2 

16 


10 4 




Iowa 




Minnesota 




3 5 




California 


io 






Oregon 


6 
10 






West Virginia 




Kansas 


6 






Nebraska 


6 


* 




Colorado 


6 






Nevada 


6 







494 



17 



The President. — Gentlemen of the Convention — Andrew Johnson 
having received a majority of all the votes, is declared duly nominated 
as the candidate of the National Union Party for the Vice-Presidency. 
[Tremendous applause.] 



76 



Mr. Lyman Tremaine, of New York. — I move that the nomination 
of Mr. Johnson be made unanimous. 

The motion was agreed to unanimously, amid great enthusiasm. 

NATIONAL COMMITTEE. 

Mr. J, H. Lane, of Kansas. — I now move that the list of States be 
called over, and as they are called, that the chairmen of the respective 
delegations name one member from each State to constitute the National 
Committee : 

The motion was agreed to. 

The roll was called, and the following gentlemen were named to con- 
stitute the Committee: 

Maine Samttel F. Herset. 

New Hampshire John B. Clarke. 

Vermont Abraham B. Gardner. 

Massachusetts William Claflin. ^ 

Rhode Island. Thomas G. Turner. 

Connecticut N. D. Sperry. 

Neio Torh Henry J. Raymond. 

New Jersey Marcus L. Ward. 

Pennsylvania S. A. Purviance. 

Delaware Nathaniel B. Smithers. 

Maryland H. W. Hoffman. 

Florida Calvin L. Robinson. 

Louisiana Cuthbert Bullitt. 

ArTcansas James M. Johnston. 

Missouri S. H. Boyd. 

Tennessee Joseph S. Fowler. 

Kentucky R. K. Williams. 

Ohio G. B. Senter. 

Indiana J. D. Defrees. 

Illinois Burt C. Cook. 

Michigan Marsh Giddings. 

Wisconsin S. Judd. 

Iowa D. B. Stubbs. 

California James Otis. 

Minnesota Thomas Simpson. 

Oregon Erasmus D. Shattuck. 

West Virginia A. W. Campbell. 

Kansas James H. Lane. 

Colorado Jerome P. Chaffee. 

Nebraska W. H. H. Waters. 

Nevada H. D. Morgan. 

Dalcotah G. M. Bintsiey. 

Utah John W. Kerr. 

Washington A. A. Denny. 

Idaho .'William H. Wallace. 

Arizona James S. Turner. 

Montana N. P. Lankford. 

New Mexico ; . John S. W atts. 

Dist. of Columbia J. J. Coombs. 



7T 



RIGHT OF TERRITORIES TO VOTE. 

Mr. Francisco Perea, of New Mexico. — I ask the unanimous con- 
sent of the Convention to allow the delegates from New Mexico to record 
their votes for President and Vice-President of the United States, 
The President. — The motion is not in order. 

Mr. Francisco Perea, of New Mexico. — I ask the unanimous con- 
sent of the Convention. 

Mr. J. S. Watts, of New Mexico. — I move that the remaining orga- 
nized Territories of the United States, which have sent delegates to this 
Convention, be now called, and that their delegates be permitted to re- 
cord their votes for President and Vice-President of the United States. 
We are ready to pour out our life-blood in carrying your glorious 
heaven-born banner wherever the honor of our country requires it to be 
carried. We feel as patriotic and as much disposed to sustain it as any 
other portion of the country, and I hope that we shall not be denied the 
privileges which have been granted to other sister Territories upon this 
floor. I want an opportunity to record our votes for Abraham Lincoln 
and Andrew Johnson. 

Mr. J. II. Lane, of Kansas. — I move to amend the motion of the 
gentleman from New Mexico, by including South Carolina and the Dis- 
trict of Columbia. [" Oh, no."] 

Mr. J. S. Watts, of New Mexico. — I object to that. Sir, I think the 
gentleman from Kansas should not make that motion. His State has 
been built up by our trade. We take $2,000,000 worth of produce from 
the State of Kansas into New Mexico ; and I hope he will not turn his 
back upon us when we ask the privilege of being heard on this floor. 

Mr. J. H. Lane, of Kansas. — I desire to state that there is a delega- 
tion here from South Carolina, and one from Florida, and one from Vir- 
ginia, and one from the District of Columbia. They represent loyal 
men. This is a small boon to extend to them, the privilege of recording 
their votes, after they have been at the expense of traveling, at a good 
deal of exposure, this great distance. It seems to me that this small 
boon should be extended not only to the Territory of New Mexico, but 
to all those States which are wrestling, as Kansas wrestled at an early 
day, to overthrow the accursed institution of human slavery. 

Mr. Francisco Perea, of New ]\Iexico. — The question, I understand, 
is on the motion of my Colleague, which is, that all the Territories which 
have not already voted be allowed to record their votes on the ques- 
tion of the Presidency and the Vice-Presidency. 

The President. — The gentleman from Kansas has moved to amend 



that motion by including Virginia, South Carolina and Florida, and the 
District of Columbia. 

Mr. E. M. Madden, of New York. — I call for a division, so that we 
may take the question on the motion to admit New Mexico alone. 

Mr, J. S. Watts, of New Mexico. — I hope my friend from Kansas 
will do me the favor to withdraw his amendment, and present it as a 
separate proposition, if he desires to have it voted upon. In the name 
of justice and in the name of right, do not embarrass so small an act of 
justice as I propose, with any other considerations. There has never 
been any question about the loyalty of New Mexico. 

The President.^ — It is always an unpleasant duty to the Chair not to 
respond to the generous and patriotic promptings of gentlemen who may 
submit motions to be entertained by the Convention ; but the Chair regards 
the propriety of this motion as being so questionable, that he will ask the 
advice of the Convention before he entertains the motion. The Conven- 
tion will bear in mind that when it was full, some hours since, it deter- 
mined by its recorded vote that the Territories and the States embraced 
within the motion and the amendment now pending should not be allowed 
to cast votes in this body. The Convention will also bear in mind that 
the Presidency and Vice-Presidency have been voted upon, and Abraham 
Lincoln and Andrew Johnson have been declared the unanimous nomi- 
nees of this Convention. That has gone over the wires to the farthest 
extent of the country. It is now proposed, with the Convention very 
much thinned out, to allow other votes to come in, which may change 
the unanimity of this Convention in regard to the candidates that have 
been nominated ; and I therefore ask the advice of the Convention Be- 
fore' I put the motion. I do not want the Convention to vote down a 
proposition such as that submitted by the gentleman from New Mexico, 
which appeals to the heart of every member present as it will appeal to 
the country. 

Mr. J. H. Lane, of Kansas. — The question of pfopriety suggested 
by the Chair strikes me with a great deal of force, and therefore I will, 
so far as I am concerned, withdraw my amendment. 

Mr. A. W. Randall, of Wisconsin. — I do not understand how we 
can proceed any further with this question, unless we re-consider the 
previous action of the Convention. 

Mr. J. S. Watts, of New Mexico. — The unanimous consent of the 
House can permit the remaining Territories^to be called, and record 
their votes. 

Mr. T. H. Pearne, of Oregon. — I move that the delegates from New 
Mexico be allowed to record their votes for Abraham Lincoln and 
Andrew Johnson. 



79 



Mr. J. S. Watts, of New Mexico. — I accept the amendment, 

Mr. T. E. Cochrane, of Penn. — It seems to me impossible that that 
motion should be entertained. It is in direct conflict with the solemn 
vote of the Convention taken to-day by States. 

The President. — The Chair will not entertain the motion unless by 
unanimous consent. 

S^eral delegates objected. 

The President. — The Chair is compelled very reluctantly to over- 
rule the motion of the gentleman from New Mexico. 

Mr. E. Delafield Smith, of New York. — I move that the Secretaries 
receive any communications that these various delegations may see fit to 
make, showing their sentiments in favor of the nomination of Lincoln 
and Johnson, in order that those communications may go on the minutes. 

The motion was agreed to. 

COMMITTEE TO WAIT ON NOMINEES. 

Mr. C. S. BasHNELL, of Conf. — I move that the President of this 
Convention be authorized to select one from each State as a Committee 
to inform President Lincoln and Andrew Johnson of their nomi- 
nation. 

Mr. George W: Curtis, of New York. — I move to amend the mo- 
tion by providing that the roll of the" Convention be now called, and 
that each State, by the chairman of its delegation, name a member of 
that Committee. 

The amendment was adopted, and the motion as amended was 
agreed to. 

Mr. J. H. Lane, of Kansas. — Before the roll is called, I move that 
the President of the Convention shall be Chairman of that Committee, 
and I will put the motion myself. 

The motion was agreed to unanimously. 

The President. — The Chair is under very great obligations to the 
Convention for this expression of their kindness. The roll will now be 
called for the purpose of naming members of the Committee. 

The roll was called, and the following gentlemen were named to con= 
stitute the Committee : 



Maine Josiah H. Drtj^tmond. 

New Hampshire Thomas E. Sawyer. 

Vermont B. Barlow. 

Massachusetts A. H. Bullock. 

Rhode Island A. M. Campbex,l. 



80 



Connecticut C. S. Bushnell. 

New TorTc George Wm. Curtis. 

New Jersey William A. Newell. 

Pennsylvania Henry Johnson. 

Delaware N. B. Smithers. 

Maryland W. L. W. Seabrook. 

Louisiana . .'. A. A. Atocha. 

Arkansas Val. Dell. 

Missouri John F. Hume. 

Tennessee M. M. Bryan. 

Kentucky G. W. Haight. 

OTiio E. P. Ptfpe. 

Indiana, Cyrus M. Allen. 

Illinois . - W. Bushnell. 

Michigan L. P. Alexander. 

Wisconsin A. W. Randall. 

loica Peter Valinda. 

California John Bidwell. 

Oregon Thomas H. Pearne. 

West Virginia Leroy Kramer. 

Kansas A. C. Wilder. 

Nebraska A. S. Paddock. 

Colorado • John A. Nye. 

Nevada * . T. Winter. 



THANKS TO THE OFFICERS. 

Mr. John A. King, of New York. — I beg leave, sir, in behalf of this 
Convention, to tender the thanks of its members to the President and 
other officers for their able and continued services in behalf of the Con- 
vention ; and I do it with the more pleasure as there has been nothing 
which has occurred among us to mar its harmony or to make it other- 
wise than unanimous and honorable to the gentlemen who are here. I 
therefore make that motion. 

The Vice-President (Mr. W. A. Newell) put the question on the 
resolution of thanks, and it was unanimously agreed to. 

PUBLICATION OF PEOCEEDINGS. 

On the motion of Mr. W. J. Grow, of New York, it was ordered 
that the proceedings of the Convention be published in pamphlet form, 
under the direction of the officers. 

Mr. T. H. Pearne, of Oregon. — I move that the Secretary be in- 
structed to send a copy of the pamphlet to each member of the Con- 
vention, 

Mr. J. W. Ray, of Indiana. — I would suggest, as one of the Secre- 
taries, that the result of that would be to require the Secretary to pay 
two cents postage for the privilege of accommodating each member. 

The motion was agreed to. 



81 



ADDITIONAL MEMBERS OF COMMITTEES. 

» 
Mr. J, J, Reddick, of Nebraska. — At the time the Comniittees on 

Credentials and on Resolutions were appointed, the Territory of Nebras- 
ka had not been admitted with the right to vote, and therefore was not 
represented on the Committee. I therefore suggest that the Secretary 
be directed to add to those Committees the following names 

Mr. J. Y. ScAMMON, of Illinois, — Do not let us make ourselves ridic- 
ulous by saying here, at the end of this Convention, things that are not 
true. If we comply with the request that has just been made, we shall 
insert on our record what we all know is not true ; and the motion is not 
in order. 

The Vice-President (Mr. Newell). — In the opinion of the Chair, 
the motion cannot be entertained. 

INVITATIONS, &c. 

The Pkesident read a letter from Mrs. Almira Lincoln Phelps, pre- 
senting to the Convention a copy of her book — " Our Country " — for 
each of the States, to be deposited in the State libraries. 

They were received with the thanks of the Convention, and distributed 
to the different chairmen of the delegations. 

An invitation was received to visit Patterson Park Hospital, where 
over one thousand wounded men, representing all the States of the 
Union, will be gratified to meet their delegates. 

Mr. G. W. Curtis, of New York. — I move that the thanks of the 
Convention be returned to the officers who have sent the invitation, and 
that the delegates will, if possible, avail themselves of it. 

The motion was agreed to. 

THANKS TO CITY COUNCILS. 

Mr. A. B. Butler, of Ohio. — I move that the thanks of this Conven- 
tion be tendered to the City Councils of Baltimore for having prepared 
and provided this room for the use of the Convention. 

The motion was agreed to unanimously. 

ADJOURNMENT SINE DIE. 

Several delegates moved that the Convention adjourn sine die. 
The President. — Gentlemen of the Convention : There is no further 
business for the Convention, except for me, on behalf of the officers of 
6 



82 



the Convention, as well as for myself, to tender their thanks and my 
thanks for the very kind resolution offered by the gentleman from New 
York, and for the very kind treatment the Chair has received from the 
Convention during its sitting. I ventured to predict, in the few remarks 
that I had the honor to make on taking the Chair, that the proceedings 
of this Convention would be marked with the greatest harmony. That 
prediction has been fulfilled, and that s|)irit of harmony which has pre- 
vailed and been the leading characteristic of the Union organization 
since its first inception, has been illustrated by the acts and the conduct 
of this Convention to-day. 

I congratulate you, gentlemen of the Convention, upon these auspi- 
cious results. I congratulate you upon what you have done in present- 
ing to the country two such men as Abraham Lincoln and Andrew 
Johnson for the two highest offices within the gift of the people. I con- 
gratulate you upon the news received to-day, showing that our "armies 
are making steady progress towards the suppression of this Rebellion. I 
congratulate you upon all the indications of the future so far as it pleases 
Providence to make those indications known to us. 

Now, gentlemen, having returned you the thanks of the officers of 
the Convention and my own, nothing remains to be done on my part 
except to express my earnest wish and sincere prajer that it may suit 
the purposes of Providence to take you all safely to your homes to meet 
your families in health and prosperity, and your constituents approving, 
.as I have no doubt they will approve, the acts of this Convention. 

The Convention now stands adjourned sine die. 



LIST OF DELEGATES. 



MAINE. 

Delegates at Large. ' P. 0. Address. 

K A. FarweU Rockland. 

S. F. Hersey Bangor. 

John H. Bui'leigh South. Berwick. 

James Drummond Bath. 

Delegates. P. 0. Address. 
w j J. H. Drummond Portland. 

\ Thomas Quimby Biddeford. 

2 S Lot M. Morrill Augusta. 

) Nahum Morrill Auburn. 

o 5 B. W. Norris .^kowhegan. 

\ Joseph Clarke Waldboro. 

A S Geo. K. Jewett Bangor. 

I E. G. Dxmn Aroostook. 

f. 3 Wm. McGUvery Searsport. 

) L. L. Wadsworth Pembroke. 



Alternates. 



Alternates. 



NEW HAMPSHIRE. 

Delegates at Large. P. 0. Address 

Onslow Stems Concord. 

Wm. Haile Hinsdale. 

John B. Clarke Manchester, 

Thomas C. Sawyer Dover. 

Delegates. P. 0. Address. 

., 5 Joseph B. Adams Portsmouth. 

^ I B. J. Cole Lake Village. 

t, S Edward Spaulding Nashua. 

"^ I David Cross Manchester. 

n \ Shepard L. Bowers Newport. 

■ ( E. L. Colby Lancaster, 



Alternates. 



Altemat-es. 

D. H. Buffimi. 
A. T. Joy. 

Chas. P. Danforth. 
J. B. Perkins. 

E. L. Goddard. 
T. P. Cheney. 



VERMONT, 

Delegates at Large. P. 0. Address. Alternates. 

Solomon Foot Rutland. T. W. Park. 

E. P. Walton Montpelier. Moses Kettridge. 

A. P. Himton Bethel. A. Stoddard. 

Carolus Noyes . ." Burlington. W. C. Smith. 



84: 



Delegates. P. 0. Address. 
Edwin Hammond Middlebury. 

A. B. Gardner Bennington. 

Horace Faii-banks St. Jolinsbury. 

B. AV. Bartholemew - . . Washington. 

Bradley Barlow St. Albans. 

Henry StoweU Cambridge. 



Alternates, 
Bela Hawe. 
Henry C. Dwiglit. 
S. P. Flagg. 
Artemus Cusbman. 
Jed. P. Ladd. 
James Simpson. 



^1 

3| 
4] 

6 j 

1 

10 I 



MASSACHUSETTS. 

Delegates at Large. P. 0. Address. 

Alexander H. Bullock Worcester. 

William Claflin Newton. 

John A. Andrew Boston. 

James T, Robinson North Adams. 

Delegates. P. 0. Address. 

Geo. Marston Barnstable. 

J. Bourne, Jr New Bedford. 

B. W. Harris East Bridgwater. 

H. A. Scudder Dorchester. 

Geo. A. Shaw Boston. 

Ginery Twichell Brookline. 

F. B. Fay Chelsea. 

R. I. Burbank Boston. 

S. H. Phillips Salem. 

J. G. Hurd Amesbury. 

G. W. Cochran Methueu. 

G. 0. Brastow Somerville. 

C. R. Train Framingham. 

T. Wentworth Lowell. 

A. C. Mayhew Mlford. 

C. Adams, Jr N. Brookfield. 

C. G. Stevens Clinton. 

Chas. A. Stevens Ware. 

Henry Alexander, Jr Springfield. 

A. J. Waterman Lenox. 



Alternates. 
William Whiting. 
Julius Rockwell. 
Moses Kimball. 
Jonathan E. Field. 

Alternates. 
C. P. Swift. 
Foster Hooper. 

B. F. White. 
Caleb Swan. 
Albert J. Wright. 
Geo. S. Hale. 

E. F. Porter. 
Isaac F. Morse. 
Edwin Waldon. 
H. B. Smith. 

F. M. Stone. 
N. B. Bryant. 
J. C. Ayer. 

G. S. Boutwell. 

C. D. Wheeler. 
F. W. Bird. 
Henry James. 
A. H. Merriam. 
R. W. Kellogg. 
Henry Chickering. 



RHODE ISLAND. 

Delegates at Large. P. 0. Address. Alternates. 

Thomas Durfee Providence. 

Joel M. Spencer Coventry. 

Edward Harris Cmnberland. 

Asa M. Gammell WaiTcn. 

Delegates. P. 0. Address. Alteniates. 

. j Jas. DeWolf Perry Bristol. 

/ Henry H. Fay Newport. 

g j G. D. Cross Westerly. 

'^ \ John J. Reynolds North Kingston. 



85 



CONNECTICUT. 

Delegates at Large. P. 0. Address. 

Joseph R. Hawley Hartford. 

Augustus Brandagee New London. 

C. S. Bushnell New Haven. 

Wm. T. JMinor Stamford. 

Delegates. P. 0. Address. 
-^ i H. A. Grant Endfield. 

\ Jasper H. Bolton Stafford. 

A Oryille H. Piatt Meriden. 

\ Samuel L. Warner IVIiddletown. 

g i G. W. Phillips Putnam. 

) James Lloyd Green Norwich. 

. 3 Oliver H. Perry Southport. 

) W. W. Welch Norfolk. 



Alternates. 



Alternates, 



NEW YORK. 

Delegates at Large. P. 0. Address. Alternates. 

Hemy J. Raymond New York. Geo. Babcock. 

Daniel S. Dickinson Bmghamton. J. S. T. Stranahan. 

Lyman Tremaine . . . » Albany. Thomas HiUhouse. 

Preston King Ogdensburgh. Noah Davis. 

Delegates. P. 0. Address. Alternates. 

-, S Greo. Wm. Curtis North Shore. Geo. Huntington. 

\ John A. King Jamaica. F. A. Potts. 

c, \ Charles L. Benedict Brooklyn. Henry Hill. 

" ) A. M. Bliss " Wm.'M. Thomas. 

g i W. A. Cobb " George Ricard. 

/ Anthony F. Campbell " John Cashow. 

. i J. B. Taylor N. Y. O. W. Brennan. 

\ Sheridan Shook " B. F. Weymouth. 

g \ David Miller " Reuben C. Mills. 

\ Sapford L. Macomber " John L. Seymour. 

o S Simeon Draper " Hugh Gardner. 

/ John Keyser " H. Van Schaick. 

„ i W. E. Duryea " John Lalor. 

\ R. F. Andrews " Lewis J. Kirke. 

j;. ] T. R. Mm-phy " R. Busteed. 

I Wm. R. Stewart " J. D. Ottiwell. • 

q j Abram Wakemau " James E. Coulter. 

1 Amor J. Williamson " Ira A. Allen. 

jQ j W. H. Robertson Katonah. S. D. Gifford. 

I John W. Ferdon Piermont. A. Rider. 

^-I ] William J. Groo Monticello. David Clements. 

I E. M. Madden Middletown. Ezra Fanington. 

-jo] John Cadman Chatham Four Comers. John S. Ray. 

1 John B. Dutcher Pawling. R. Peck. 

^ „ ] WUliam Masten Kingston. Wm. S. Kenyon. 

^^ ] Reuben Coffin Catskill. John S. Donnelly. 

^ , j Geo. Wolford Albany. Alexander Greer' 

■^* 1 Clark B. Cochrane " Hobart Krum, 



86 



15 j 
10 j 
17 j 
18] 
l.j 
20 ] 

-J 

22 -I 
2S j 

24 j 

25 j 

26 j 
27] 
28 I 
29] 

so] 

31 i 



Behgates. P. 0. Address. Alternates. 

Aschel C. Geer Troy. J. Thomas Davis. 

John T. Masters Greenwich. Dennis P. Ney. 

Geo. W. Palmer Plattsburgh. Byron Pond. 

W. W. Rockwell Saratoga Springs. Orlando Kellogg. 

W. S. Dickinson Bangor. Hiram Horton. 

W. A. Dart • Potsdam. C. T. Hurlburd. 

Charles Stanford Schenectady. H. Baker. 

A. H. Ayer Fort Plain. J. S. Landon. 

L. J. Walworth. D. H. Clark. 

R. S. Hughston Delhi. Harman Bennett. 

J. O. Donnell Lowville. E. A. Brown. 

H. M. Burch Little Falls. A. H. Prescott. 

EUis H. Roberts Utica. D. B. Danforth. 

Samuel Campbell " J. S. Avery. 

L. H. Conklin. Mexico. H. K. W. Bruce. 

Charles L. Kennedy MorrisviUe, Haiwey Palmer. 

T. B. Fitch Syracuse. D. McCarthy. 

R. H. Duell CortlandviHe. C. T. Longstreet. 

S. B. Gavitt Lyons. S. K. Williams. 

Wm. Burroughs Seneca Falls. J. K. Webster. 

M. H. Lawrence Penn Yan. S. H. Torrey. 

W. H. Smith Canandaigua. Geo. N. Wilson. 

M. M. Cass Watkins. Geo. W. Schuyler. 

W. S. Lincoln Newark Valleai Geo. Bartlett. 

AsherTyler Elmira. G. G. Harrower. 

E. D. Loveridge Cuba. A. B. HuU. 

Dan. H. Cole Albion. H. H. Sperry. 

John Van Voorhies Rochester. A. M. Ives. 

Harry Wilbur Batavia. A. W. Haskell. 

Hiram Gardner Lockport. M. C. Richardson. 

Rufus Wheeler Buffalo. Jacob Beyer. 

O. J. Green " J. B. Youngs. 

Henry Van Aemum Frankluiville. John Manley. 

Geo. W. Patterson Westfield. O. E. Jones. 



KEW JERSEY. 



Delegates at Large. P. 0. Address. 

Wm. A. Newell Allentown. 

Marcus L. Ward Newark. 

Joseph T. Crowell Rah way. 

James M. ScoveU Camden. 

■ Delegates. P. 0. Address. 
-| j Edward Bettle Camden. 

\ T. Pauldmg Pittsgrove, Salem Co. 

i) j W. F. Brown .... Point Pleasant, Ocean Co. 

" ] S. A. Dobbins Mount HoUy. 

P 3 John J. Blair Belvidere. 

'"* / A. D. Hope Somerville. 

. j Joseph Coult Newton. 

( Socrates Tuttle Paterson. 

f. \ Charles R. Waugh Newark. 

"^ ( Benj. G. Clark Jersey City. 



Alternates. 
G. D. Homer. 
Benj. Buckley. 
John Chetwood. 
P. C. Brink. 

Alternates. 
Joseph L. Reeve. 
J. F. Leaming. 

D. L. Wilbur. 
A. B. Dayton. 
Moses F. Webb. 

E. R. Bullock. 
C. H. Voorhees. 
Richard Speer. 
Walter Rutherford. 
Cornelius Walsh. 



87 



PENlSrSYLVANIA. 

Delegates at Large. P. 0. Address. 

Simon Cameron Harrisburg. 

A. K. McClure Chambersburg. 

"W. W. Ketchum Wilkesbarre. 

M. B. Lowry Erie. 

Delegates. P. 0. Address. 

-, j A. B. Slonaker . . .Philadelpliia. 

^ \ Eliot Ward " 

2 \ Peter C. EUmaker " 

'^ ) John Holmes " 

g 3 J. M. Fox " 

• I William Andrews " 

^S C. A. Walborn « 

I Cbarles Thompson. 
^ ] Stephen H. Phillips. 
^ I J. G. Hurd. 

« \ Daniel O. Hitner Norristown. 

I John H. Oliver Allentown. 

„ \ William E. Barber. 

) H. Jones Brooke Media. 

Q ] Levi B. Smith Reading. 

I Edward Brooke Birdsboro. 

Thaddeus Stevens Lancaster. 

Thomas E. Franklin " 

^ ^ , James H. Campbell ." Pottsville. 

G. Dawson Coleman Lebanon. 

^ ^ 1 Andrew H. Reeder Easton. 

William Lilly Mauch Chmik. 

^c) S Galusha A. Grow Glenwood. 

^'^ I F. T. Atherton WUkesbarre. 

j„ ( B. F. PoweU -. Towanda. 

"* / P. John Bloomsburg. 

^ / j George Bergner Harrisburg. 

( John B. Packer Smibury. 

^ p. 3 Thomas E. Cochran York. 

I Levi Kayifiman Mechanicsbm-gh. 

^ P ] John Stewart Chambersbm-gh. 

^^ } Edward ScuU Somerset. 

^„ yR.B. Wigton Hmitingdon. 

^ J. E. Chandler Johnstown. 

^ Q j Henry Johnson Murray, Lvcoming Co. 

^^ I S. F. Wilson Wellesboro', Tioga Co. 

^ „ 3 Joseph Henderson Brookville. 

1 William Benson Erie. 

n „ 3 David V. Derrickson Meadville. 

"" / L. J. Rogers Franklin. 

„^ ] Wm. R. Spear Blairsville, Ind. Co. 

'^ 1 Cyrus P. Markle West Newton. 

„„ ] A. M. Brown Pittsburg. 

'^'^ ) Wm. B. Negley " 

.^^ 3 S. A. Purviance " 

"''^ I A. Reynolds Kittaning. 

n. 3 Jas. A J. Buchanan Waynesboro'. 

( W. W. Irvia New Brighton. 



Alternates. 



Alternates. 
James Gillingham. 
John M. Butler. 
John Thompson. 
Isaac Colesburj\ 
John G. Clothier. 
Amos Knight. 
Henry Carey Lea. 
Geo. S. Keyser. 



Wm. Mintzer. 
E. J. More. 

Joshua P. Eyre. 
W. M. Beard. 
Wm. Trexler, 



David E. SmaU. 
A. K. Rheem. 
E. G. Fahnestock. 
Geo. W. Rupp. 



5f 



DELAWARE. 

Delegates. P. 0. Address. Alternates. 

Edward G. Bradford "Wilmington. 

George Z. Tybout .Red Lion, N. C. Co. 

William Cummins Smyrna, Kent Co. 

Nathaniel B. Smitliers Dover, Kent Co. 

Jacob Moore Georgetown, Sussex. 

Benjamin Bmlon. ..... . J^lillsboro', Sussex. 

MARYLAND. 

Delegates at Large. P. 0. Address. Alternates. 

H. H. Goldsborough Easton. 

Hem7 W. Hoffinan Baltimore. 

John A. J. CresweU Elkton. 

Albert C. Green Frostburg. 

Delegates. ■ P. 0. Address. Alternates. 

W. J. Leonard Berlin. 

L. E. Staughn Cambridge. 

Joseph J. Stewart Towsontown. 

E. M. Allen Darlington. 

Archibald Sterling Baltimore. 

Hugh L.Bond " 

Frederick A. Schley Frederick. 

Isaac Nesbitt Hagerstown. 

John C. Holland Catonsville. 

W. L. W. Seabrook Annapolis. 



7\ 



omo. 

Delegates at Large. P. 0. Address. 

Wm. Dennison Columbus. 

David Tod Toungstown. 

Columbus Delano Mt. Vernon. 

G. Vohiey Dorsey Columbus. 

Delegates. P. 0. Address. 

M. A. Jacobi Cincinnati. 

A. F. Perry '. " 

S. F. Caiy " 

M. P. Gaddis " 

Geo. R. Sage Lebanon. 

L. Dimham Eaton. 

W. A. Weston Greenville. 

E. P. Fyffe Urbana. 

J. D. Clark Van Wert. 

C. Parmenter Lima. 

Chambers Baird Georgetown. 

W. R. Smith Hillsborough. 

E. F. Drake Xenia. 

A. B. Buttles Columbus. 

P. B. Cole Marysville. 

H, 0. Hedges Mansfield. 



Alternates. 
D. D. Shiyrock. 
G. B. Senter. 
D. S. Shorter. 
Joseph Landon. 

Alternates. 



J. O. Baum. 
L. A. Han-is. 
Warren Munger, Jr. 



W. T. Bascom. 
A. Toland, 



89 



-I 
is] 

"] 

18 5 



19 



Delegates. P. 0. Address. Alternates. 

L. Q. Rawson Fremont. C. Foster. 

L. G. Harkness Norwalk. — Sanders. 

Geo. William Perrysburgh. 

D. W. H. Howard Wauseon. 

Geo. A. "Waller Portsmouth. 

Wm. Ellison West Union. 

John A. Hunter Lancaster. 

Daniel Kilgore Waverly. 

John 0. Devin Mt. Vernon. 

E. E. Evans Zanesville. 

Smith Orr Wooster. 

H. G. Blake Medma. 

Jos. Kessinger Athens. 

Ed. Archbold. , Woodsfield. 

Chas. Hare Caldwell. 

Isaac Morton Cambridge. 

L. W. Potter New Lisbon. Kent Jarvis. 

Robert Sherrard SteubenviUe. J. H. Tripp. 

W. H. Upson Akron. John Johnson. 

D. R. Tilden Cleveland. Peter Thatcher. 

M. C. Canfield Chardon. 

F. Kinsman Warren. 



1 

2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 
10 
11 



INDIANA. 

Delegates at Large. P. 0. Address. 

Daniel Mace Lafayette. 

James L. Yater Versailles. 

John Beard Crawfordsville. 

Isaac Jenkinson Fort Wayne. 

Delegates. P. 0. Address. 

L. Q. De Bruler Rockport. 

C. M. Allen Vincennes. 

Jesse J. Brown New Albany. 

H. Woodbury Leavenworth. 

W. M. Dunn Madison. 

Geo. A. Buskirk Bloomington. 

Wilson Morrow. 

John Ferris Lawi'enceburg. 

Miles Mm-phy Newcastle. 

Benj. F. Miller Liberty. 

John W. Ray Indianapolis. 

Levi Ritter Danville. 

Dr. Stevenson Green Castle. 

Ezra Reed Terra Haute. 

\ D. P. Vinton Lafayette. 

I Lewis B. Simms Delphi. 

!J. M. Reynolds St. Joseph. 
D. R. Bearss .' Peru. 
Isaac Jenkinson Fort Wayne. 
James S. Collins Columbia City. 

^ John L. Wilson Blufton. 

I Daniel L. Brown Noblesville. 



Alternates. 
Victor Bisch. 
John E. Mann. 

C. H. Mason. 

D. W. La FoUett. 
T. M. Adams. 
Smith Vawter. 
W. A. CuUen. 
James Berkshire. 
Silas Colgrove. 
John F. Kibby. 
P. Foley. 

J. B. McFadden. 
J. M. Hinkle. 
D. C. Stankard. 



J. D. Turner. 
J. M. Justice. 
W. M. Clap. 
C. W. Chapman. 
J. M. Haynes. 
T. C. Phillips. 



90 



IOWA. 
Delegates at Large. P. 0, Address. Alternates. 

W. M. Stone Des Moines. J. H. Rotherock. 

J. T. Clark New Oregon. J. R. Needham. 

Francis Springer .Wapello. J. W. BeU. 

D. D. Chase Webster City. Benj. Crabbe. 

Delegates. P. 0. Address. Alternates. 

-, j G. W. McCrarey Keokuk. A. H. C. Scott. 

( D. P. Stubbs Fairfield. G. W. Edwards. 

g \ D. W. Ellis , Clinton. Chas. Oberman. 

'^ I John S. Stacy Anamosa. John W. Earl. 

o 3 J- S. Woodward Independence. J. M. Brayton. 

I G. Kemdt Dutlanbnrg. J. Nicholas. 

. j D. G. Worden Signory. J. N. Allen. 

I J. M. Henchick Ottawa. N. Udell. 

g \ Cole Noel Adel. J. Street. 

I Frank Street Council Blutf. Charles Henton. 

g ] G. M. Woodbury Marshaltown. F. G. Woodruff, 

I P. Melendy Onawa. A. Olener. 



ILLINOIS. 
Delegates at Large. P. 0. Address. 

B. C. Cook Ottawa. 

Leonard Swett Bloomington. 

J. A. Powell Peoria. 

A. H. Burley. 

Delegates. ■ P. 0. Address. 

-< ^ J. Y. Scammon Chicago. 

I Lorenz Brentano Chicago. 

2 \ Geo. S. Bangs Aurora. 

( E. P. Ferry Waukegan. 

o \ J. W. ShafiFer Freeport. 

1 James McCoy Fulton City. 

, \ Harrison Dills. 

I Solon Burroughs. 
;^ 3 H. F. Royce. 

\ Clark E. Carr '. Princeton. 

„ j Joseph L. Braden. 
" ) W. Bushnell. 
», j G. W. Reeves, 
James Cone. 
R. H. FeU. 
J. M. Brown. 
„ J W. A. Grimshaw. 
^ tW.B. Green. 
^ ^ ] J. L. Morrison. 
" / J. T. Alexander. 
-.. j W. H. Robinson. 
^M D. T. M. Sams. 
^ o j John Thomas. 
^"^ j William Copp. 
^ o j L. Rhodes. 

/ Monis P. Brown. 



Alternates. 
G. W. Gage. 
John E. Rosette. 
Chas. Atkinson. 
Isaac Miller. 

Alternates. 

C. N. Holden. 
E. S. Isham. 

D. B. James. 
J. S. Hildreth. 
Joseph Utley. 
Henry A. MiUs. 
James Stark. 
Robert Moir. 
W. S. Wiley. 
Geo. Henderson. 
J. P. Southworth, 

E. A. Lake. 

John Cunningham. 
J. Bold. 
R. D. Cassell. 
J. T. Jenkins. 

A. E. Babcock. 
W. K. Ray. 

B. Sammons. 
David Pearson. 
J. W- Welshear. 
S. P. Tufts. 

A. W. Metcalf. 
John Stehr. 
J. C. Barbour. 
John Wheeler. 



91 



MnTOESOTA. 

Delegates at Large. P. 0. Address. 

Thos. Simpson Winona. 

W. G. Butler Clear Water. 

Daniel Cameron La Crescent. 

Charles M. Daily St. Paul. 

Delegates. P. 0. Address. 

\ Charles Taylor Faribault. 

) John McCusick Stillwater. 

( D. G. Shillock New Ulm. 

/ Warren Bristol Red Win^. 



Alternates. 
Thos. N. Armstrong. 
Z. M. Mitchell. 
Geo. F. Potter. 
Andrew R. Kieffer. 

Alternates. 
George Watson. 
R. Blakely. 
E. B. Freeman. . 
Eli Robinson. 



Delegates at La/rge. 

J. H. Lane 

A. H. Insley. 

A. C. Wilder 

F. W. Potter. 

Delegates. 
T. M. Bowen. 
M, W. Delahey. 



KANSAS. 

P. 0. Address. 
Lawrence. 



. Lawrence. 



Alternates. 



Alternates. 



mCHIGAN. 

Delegates at Large. P. 0. Address. 

Austin Blair , Jackson. 

Marsh Giddings Kalamazoo. 

Neil Gray Romeo. 

C. W. Clisbee Blumfield. 

Delegates. P. 0. Address. 

H. Kiefer Detroit. 

Wm. R. Noyes Detroit. 

L. P. Alexander Buchannan. 

J. H. Kelsey Three Rivers. 

C. T. Gorham Marshall. 

E. Lawrence Ann Arbor. 

Osmond Tower Ionia. 

W. I. Corn well Newaygo. 

Charles Draper Pontiac. 

O. D. Conger Port Huron. 

J. B. Walker Flint. 

R. Sheldon , Houg-hton. 



Alternates. 
Emmons Buell. 
PeiTy Hannah. 
Perley Bills. 

D. C. Gage. 

Alternqtes. 
W. R. Noyes. 

E. Dorsch. 

B. F. Frankenberg. 
D. Monroe. 
Eugene Pringle. 
Henry A. Shaw. 
James A. Sweezey. 
A. X. Carey. 
J. P. Bingham. 
James Tm'iill. 
D. G. Slafter. 
J. W. Edwards. 



WISCONSIN. 

Delegates at Large. P. 0. Address. Alternates. 

Edward Saloman Milwaukie. O. H. Waldo. 

A. W. RandaU Washington, D. C. A. G. G. Darwin. 

Angus Cameron La Crosse. Carson Graham. 

Stoddard Judd Fox Lake. E. H. Galloway. 



92 



Delegates. P. 0. Address. Alternates. 

John F. Potter Montreal, Canada. E. M. Danforth. 

C. C. Sclioles Kenosha. J. M. Bundy. 

J. F. Moak. Yfatertown. J. M. Bingham. 

J. B. Cassoday Janesville. S. J. Todd. 

S. S. Wilkinson Baraboo. W. E. Beach. 

J. A. Bingham Monroe. J. H. Vivian. 

L. H. Carey Sheboygan. L. Frost. 

J. M. Gillet Fon Du Lac. G. S. Graves. 

P. Sawyer Oshkosh. C. B. Goodwin. 

M. L. Kimball Berlin. H. Briggs. 

L. E. Webb. C. B. Cox. 

C. C. Pope Black River Falls. G. E. Foster. 



MISSOUKI. 

Delegates at Large. P. 0. Address. 

Chauncey I. Filley St. Louis. 

Benj. F. Loan St. Joseph. 

C. P. Drake St. Louis. 

J. F. Benjamin St. Louis. 

Delegates. P. 0. Address. 

George K. Budd St. Louis. 

J. W. Parish St. Louis. 

John F. Hume St. Louis. 

H. T. Blow St. Louis. 

A. M. Jackson. 
James Lindsay. 

S. H. Boyd Springfield. 

John B. Clark, Jr Jefferson City, 

J. W. McCltu-g. 

A. C. Widdecombe Boonville. 

R. T. Van Horn Kansas City. 

A. Holcomb Kansas City. 

J. A. G. Barker St. Joseph. 

A. J. Holland Savannah. 

A. L. Gilstrap Macon City. 

C. H. Howe Macon City. 

Wallis Lovelace. 
I. J. Staubler. 



Alternates. 



Alternates. 
George Babcock. 
Enos Clark. 

D. Q. Gale. 
A. Valle. 
James Lindsay. 
G. W. Wheeler. 
J. B. Clark, Jr. 
S. H. Boyd. 

J. T. Mack. 

F. Cooley. 
George Smith. 
J. S. K. Hayward. 

E. A. Katzer. 
M. L. Harrigher. 
J. H. Ellis. 

W. B. Adams. 
J. H. Wadsworth. 



KENTUCKY. 

Delegates at Large. P. 0. Address. 

R. J. Breckimidge Danville. 

Samuel Lusk. 

R. K. Williams .Mayfield. 

F. Bristow Elkton. 

Delegates. P. 0. Address. 

S L. Anderson Paducah. 

\ J. Bollinger Paducah. 

j William Davenport. 
\ H. C. Burges. 



Alternates. 
S. F. Swope. ' 
George Dewny. 
Lucien Anderson. 
James Weir. 

Alternates. 
J. W. Finney. 
Col. Henry. 
C. Maxwell. 
Q. C. Shanks. 



93 



M 



Delegates. P. 0. Address. Alternates. 

George D. Blakely Bowling Green. Joseph R. Glover. 

J. W. Calvert Bowling Green. Richard Vance. 

George White Elizabethtown. J. M. Fiddler. 

R. L. Wintersmith. T. Q. Walker. 

A. B. Temple. R. Ayres. 

James Speed Louisville. Edwin Biyaut. 

Green Clay Smith Covington. C. A. Preston. 

Willi.im Tiimble. J. C. Recard. 

J. A. Prall Paris. S. S. Goodloe. 

A. G. Hodges .' Frankfort. Milton Stevenson. 

J. W. Coperton. J. G. Pond. 

W. B. Andei-son. W. H. Randall. 

D. E. Roberts. P. S. Layton. 

J. J. Anderson. . John Seaton. 



CALIFORNIA. 

Delegates at Large. P. 0. Address. Alternates. 

Thompson Campbell San Francisco. 

John Biclwell Chico. David Mahoney. 

M. C. Briggs Sacramento City. Samuel Brannan. 

A. S. RandaU .Albion, N. T. John S. Newell. 

Delegates. P. 0. Address. Alterriates. 

j James Otis San Francisco. W. H. Culver. 

I W. S. McMurtiy San Jose. A. P. Jourdan. 

j O. H. Bradbury Janestovm. C. P. Huntington. 

( William Ritter Sacramento City. C. C. Rynerson. 

3 Nathan Coombs Sacramento City. A. G. Snyder. 

] Robert Gardner Sacramento City. A, W. Thompson. 



OREGON. 



Delegates at Large. P. 0. Address. 

T. H. Peame Portland. 

Hiram Smith Harrisburg. 

F. A. CliaiTQan Oregon City. 

Josiah Failing Portland. 

J. W. Southworth Corvalla. 

M. Hirsch Salem. 



Note. 
There are no alter- 
nates elected fi'om this 
State, and all of the 
delegates are elected at 
large, there being but 
one district in the State. 



NEBRASKA. 

Delegates at Large. P. 0. Addr'ess. 

John I. Redick Omaha City. 

B. F. Lushbaugh Omaha City. 

D. H. Wheeler Plattsmouth. 

W. H. H. Waters Nebraska City. 

A. S. Paddock Omaha City. 

S. G. Dailey Brownsville. 



94: 



DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA. 

Delegates at Large. P. 0. Address. 

Lewis Clephane Washington. 

J. R. Elyans Washington. 



Joseph J. Coombs. 
Noble D. Lamer. 



Contestants. 



Alternates. 
William P. Wood. 
Henry Ulke. 



Asbnry Lloyd. 
Joseph F. Hodgson.: 



Delegate at Large. 
William E. Gleason. 



DAKOTAH. 



Alternate. 
George M. Pinney. 



COLORADO. 

Delegates at Large. P. 0. 

John A. Nye. Denver City. 

S. S. Curtis Denver City. 

S. H. Ebert Denver City. 

J. B. Chaffee Central City. 

Edward Brown Central City. 



Alternates. 



NEW MEXICO. 

Delegates at Large. P. 0. Address. 

Francisco Perea Taos. 

John S. Watts Santa Fe. 

Joshua Jones, Jr Port Union. 



Alternates. 



WASHINGTON. 

Delegate at Large. P. 0. Address. 

Hugh A. Goldsborough . . Washington, D. C. 



Alternate. 



1 1. ^OO' 



t