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Full text of "President's Annual Report"

Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation 



http://archive.org/details/presidentsannua199599unse 



♦ Report 



r o m 



the P 



r e s 



dent 



rx. 



\ J J 




A 
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a 
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m 



19 9 5-1996 









A. 



♦ 



On the Cover: 

wo of Cowley's outstanding students: 

Hoffman, the 1996 KACC Outstanding 
Won-Traditional Student of the Year and 
Rowley Student of the Year. 

hbi Ray the 1996 KACC Outstanding 
ttudent Athlete of the Year. 



Dr. Pat McAtee 2 

Board of Trustees 3 

Administration 4 

Student Success 5 

Teaching Excellence 11 

Outstanding Tiger Alumni 14 

Cultural Arts 20 

Athletics 23 

Outreach Programs 27 

Business and Industry 29 

Quality Initiatives 30 

Community Involvement 31 

School-to-Work '. 32 

Resource Development- Fiscal Year 1995-1996 33 

Enrollment Analysis 34 

Financial Aid Analysis 36 

Endowment Association Donors 37 

Cowley At A Glance 39 

The Bottom Line 40 



Cowley County Community College & Area Vocational-Technical School 
125 S. Second • Arkansas City, Kansas 67005 • (316) 442-0430 • 1-800-593-2222 



This publication was produced by the Office of Public Relations, Stu Osterthun and Rex Soule. 
Photography by Fred Rindt. 



Dr. P a f 



McAfee 



The cover of this annual report has been graced by a photograph of outstanding Cowley 
students for a number of years. And this report is no exception. 

In fact, 1995-96 marked the sixth consecutive year Cowley students were awarded by the 
Kansas Association of Community Colleges. In each of the past six years, Cowley students have 
earned at least one of the four awards presented by the KACC. 

This past year, Paula Hoffman, a non-traditional student from Winfield, and Dibi Ray, a 
sophomore from Plainview, Texas, reaped KACC awards. There are 70,000 students who attend 
community colleges in Kansas, and we are proud that two of the top students got their edu- 
cation from Cowley. 

Throughout the years, Cowley County Community College and Area Vocationa 
Technical School has been blessed with quality instruction. That is truly evident in the 
fact that 34 Cowley faculty members have received Teaching Excellence awards 
by the National Institute for Staff and Organizational Development in Austin, Texas, 
the past nine years. 

The 1995-96 academic year was a special one at Cowley. Here are just a 
few highlights: 

• The Brown Center for Arts, Sciences and Technology was officially dedi- 
cated in September 1995. This magnificent facility already has been used heavily 
by the college and community, and will be increasingly utilized as a regional 
resource in the future. 

• Cowley's baseball team captured the Region VI championship and nar- 
rowly missed a berth in the National Junior College Athletic Association World 
Series. The Tigers broke several season and individual records during their 51-13 
season. 

• The college's relationship with local and area business and industry contin- 
ued to strengthen as it strived to become the center for training and retraining of 
the area workforce. 

• Full-time enrollment increased as the college continued to position itself to 
educate for the future. 

• The Southside Education Center, an outreach site in Wichita, was officially dedicated in 
February 1996. The center will provide residents of southern Sedgwick County educational 
opportunities previously not available to them. 

• And the first set of Quality Leadership Awards were presented to staff, faculty and admin- 
istrators for their hard work and dedication to making Cowley a better place for our customers. 

With all the outstanding accomplishments during the year, we still have to step back and 
realize that there is tremendous work left to be done. We want Cowley to be the very best in 
everything — from instruction to athletics. Rest assured that we will continue to work hard to con- 
tinuously improve all areas of the college. 




(Ui/mcu^ 



CCCC President 



♦ 2 



Board r u s t e e s ♦ 





Ron Godsey 

Term Expires 

1999 




\ I b e r t Bacastow 

Term Expires 

1997 



P a t t i Hunter 

Term Expires 

1999 




Terry T i d w e 
Term Expires 
1997 




ob Storbeck 
Term Expires 
1997 




Dennis Shurtz 

Term Expires 

1999 



3 ♦ 



♦ Administrative r eam 







Maggie Picking 

Vice President 

of Student Affairs 




id K e g n i e r 

Vice President 
of Business Services 




Lynn S t a 
Dean 
of Instruction 



n a k e r 





Tom S a i a 

Dean of Administration 

Director of Athletics 



Charles White 

Associate Dean 

of Vocational Education 





Conrad jimison 

Associate Dean 

of Instruction 



T e r r i Morrow 

Associate Dean 

of Development 

and College Relations 



♦ 4 



Success^ 



Hoffman and Ray: 
Tradition in academic 
excellence continues 



"Speaking at graduation is one of the biggest 
honors I Ve ever received. This is a 
tremendous honor that I'll never forget. " 

-Paula Hoffman 



"I had no idea I was even nominated. I'm real 
pleased and proud of myself. I work pretty 
hard in the classroom. " 

-Dibi Ray 




Paula Hoffman and Dibi Ray are two very different students, yet both share common ground. 
Not only did they become the first students in decades to serve as commencement 
speakers on May 4, 1996, but the pair were honored by the Kansas Association of Community 
Colleges as outstanding students. 

Hoffman from Winfield and Ray from Plainview, Texas, were honored to be selected as com- 
mencement speakers. 

"Speaking at graduation is one of the biggest honors I've ever received," said Hoffman, 
certainly no stranger to receiving awards. "This is a tremendous honor that I'll never forget." 

Hoffman has had awards come her way all year. She was named September Student of 
the Month last fall, then was named Cowley's Student of the Year at the honors and awards 
banquet April 11. Shortly thereafter she learned that she had been named the Outstanding 
Non-Traditional Student of the Year for all of Kansas by the Kansas Association of Community 
Colleges. 

"It's difficult for me to believe," Hoffman, 34, said of the KACC award. "On campus I do 
what I need to do and am committed and that doesn't make me any different than anyone else." 
Hoffman's award focused on recognizing the combination of successful academic 
accomplishments with vocational and real-life activities. 

Ray, the starting point guard for the Tiger men's basketball team, also is an award-winner. 
He was named the KACC Outstanding Student-Athlete of the Year. The awards give Cowley two 
of the top four awards presented annually by the KACC. It also marks the sixth consecutive year 
a Cowley student has captured one of the four awards. 

"I had no idea I was even nominated," said Ray, a two-time All-Jayhawk Conference East 
Division selection. "I'm real pleased and proud of myself. I work pretty hard in the classroom." 

Both Hoffman and Ray do, as their grade-point averages attest. Hoffman is a perfect 4.0; 
Ray holds a 3.66 GPA. Hoffman is a pre-physical therapy major, while Ray is studying health and 
physical education. 

Hoffman said receiving the KACC award, as well as the others, "aided my self- 

confidence. I started with goals I set to reach for myself. This shows I've accomplished 
a great deal." 

Ray always was a good student. He graduated from Plainview High 
School in 1994 with a 4.7 GPA on a 5.0 scale. 

"My mom pushed me a lot," he said of his mother Ora Harris. "The 
big thing that influenced me was she had to go back to school to get her 
teaching certificate when she was 37 or 38 years old. She had three kids 
to raise, so it wasn't real easy." 

Ray said his mother instilled good study habits in him that he has 
kept throughout Cowley. 

"I study when I'm supposed to," he said. "It's paid off. Most players 
on the team have mandatory study hall. I don't need any prodding to 
study." 

Ray will continue to be a Tiger next season, only for the University of 
Missouri. Coach Norm Stewart saw Ray play at the Jayhawk Conference all- 
star game in Arkansas City on April 14 and signed him shortly afterward. 
"It's really going to be a great opportunity," said Ray, who was third in Region VI in 
assists this past season with seven per game. "I was getting recruited by other schools, but they 
wanted to sign me right away. Coach (Mark) Nelson said wait until after the all-star game." 



5 ♦ 



♦ Student Succes 





Students of the Monti- 



Paula 
Hoffman 
Winfield, Kansas 
September 1995 




Carrie 

F r o e I i c h 

Havana, Kansas 

January 1996 





Dan Havner 

South Haven, Kansas 

October 1995 




Flo A p r a i z 

Arkansas City, Kansas 

February 1996 



Barbara 

D r o u h a r d 

Danville, Kansas 

November 1995 




Cheryl Pack 

Arkansas City, Kansas 

March 1996 




A r i e Jones 
Wichita, Kansas 
December 1995 



♦ 6 



Debbie C a r r 

Winfield, Kansas 

April 1996 



Student Succes 



Two Cowley students 
named to All-Kansas 
Academic Team 



Two students were named to the All-Kansas Academic Team. 

Paula Hoffman, a sophomore from Winfield, and Florencia Apraiz, a sophomore from 
Argentina and a 1994 graduate of Arkansas City High School, were chosen after being 
nominated by Cowley's Phi Theta Kappa academic honor society. Hoffman, a pre-physical 
therapy major, carries a 4.0 grade-point average. Apraiz, a business administration major, also 
carries a 4.0 GPA. 

All 19 Kansas community college presidents voted to engage in a collaborative initiative 
with Phi Theta Kappa, international honor society of the two-year college, to launch the first ever 
all All-Kansas Academic program. All students nominated for the All-USA Academic Team are 
named to the All-Kansas Academic Team. 

The goal for the presidents is to have 100 percent of Kansas' two-year colleges 
participating in the All-Kansas Academic Team program. 

Each college was eligible to nominate two students per campus for the USA Academic 
Team Competition and it was not necessary that a college have a chapter of Phi Theta Kappa 
to submit nominations. Nominations were sent to the PTK headquarters by Dec. 8, 1995. 

To be eligible for consideration for the All-USA Academic Team, students must have been 
nominated by the college president, must have a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.25 and must be 
eligible to graduate during the 1995-96 academic year. From the nominations received, 20 first-, 
second- and third-team members will be selected. First-team members each received a $2,500 
cash stipend and a commemorative obelisk from USA Today; be recognized during the PTK 
Presidents Breakfast at the AACC Convention in Atlanta, Ga.; and be featured in USA Today inter- 
national newspaper on April 15, 1996. 

A ceremony was held March 14, 1996 with a luncheon for all Kansas applicants with 
Governor Bill Graves in Topeka. 




Paula 

Hoffman 



F I o 
Apraiz 




♦ 



♦ Student Success 



Jeanne Carter had all but forgotten. 

The $500 literacy program grant the Cowley County Community College freshman helped 
write had been submitted, and school officials were told they would hear back in eight to 10 
weeks. 

Four or five months later, Carter received a telephone call saying that the grant had been 
approved for $450 of the $500. It was the first time a current Cowley student had been so 
involved in writing a successful grant. 

"I did some research on other grants," said Carter, a business administration major. "We 
started broad, and Mark Jarvis had given me different grants he had written." 

Jarvis, Humanities Division instructor at the college, read Carter's work. He then passed it on 
to Lu King, president of the Arkansas City Literacy Council, and Terry Eaton, GED/ABE instructor 
at Cowley. And Connie Bonfy, chief grant writer for the college, read it before it was submitted. 

"I was really excited to hear that we'd been at least partially funded," said Carter, the 
daughter of Robin and Sandy Carter of Goddard. "I had never done anything like this before." 

The grant helped the literacy council combat the problem of adult illiteracy using the 
Laubach Way to Reading Workshops. The funds helped purchase necessary books and supplies 
for sessions that were first held March 29 and 30, 1996 at Cowley. Carter received the check 
during spring break. 

Carter spent about 1 1/2 months writing the grant, which was four pages long. The criteria 
wanted Carter's background, the timeline in which the money would be used, how the money 
would be used, and a description of the problem in Arkansas 
City. 

In the grant, Carter cited statistics from the U.S. 
Department of Education that indicate at least 40 percent of 
the U.S. population is reading at a functional illiterate rate. 

Carter then outlined her solution to the problem, which 
included workshops for tutors. She presented a detailed 
timeline, then had to describe herself and her vision for a 
better community. 

"I would like to see the adults in this community who are 
unable to read be able to find effective help," Carter wrote. 
"I would also like to see these adults feel comfortable when 
they come to the campus to begin learning to read. The 
community also needs to understand the problem 
of illiteracy." 

Jarvis said Carter spent countless hours compiling her 
findings. 

"I think it's great that a student got so involved in 
something that is so worthwhile to the community," Jarvis said. 
"Jeanne really proved that students can have input and make 
a difference." 



Cowley freshman 

helps secure 

$500 literacy grant 



"I would. ..like to see these adults fee,\ 

comfortable when they come to the campus tc\ 

begin learning to read.\ 

The community also needs to understanc\ 

the problem of illiteracy. 

-Jeanne Carter 



jjjMfc 







Success^ 



first graduates from 
Cowley's Interpreter 
Training Program reflect 



Two years ago, Cowley County Community College took a chance and started a program 
to train interpreters for the deaf and hard of hearing. 

In May 1996, as the program produces its first graduates, one of the instructors and five 
students took time to reflect on those two years. 

"We all agree that we could do this for the next 10 years and still learn interpreting sign 
language and American Sign Language," said Debbie McCann of Wichita, one of four students 
who graduated May 4, 1996 from Cowley. "This program gave us a firm foundation for ASL. 
We have a better understanding of interpreter behavior and the different situations out there." 

McCann, Debbie Marlow of Derby, April Voeltz of Hutchinson, and Jeannine Schaffer of Haysville graduated May 4. Kristie Rogers of Wichita, 
the only other student who began the program two years ago, also has completed her requirements but won't finish her general course work until the 
1996-97 academic year. 

Instructor Kim Hungerford said many of the students who initially enrolled in the program had no signing skills, while a few knew the ABCs. The 
different levels presented a challenge for Hungerford and fellow Cowley instructor Tim Anderson. 

"All the students were successful and all accomplished their goals and met the requirements," said Hungerford, who is deaf. "When they go out, 
it will require a lot of practice. They've always had just me and Tim. One style. It will be different when they get into one-on-one situations in the deaf 
aommunity." 

Cowley's Interpreter Training Program is located at the Mulvane Center. It is the only program of its kind in central Kansas. Johnson County 
Community College has had a program in place for many years, and Anderson is a graduate. But the fact that Cowley started a program 
persuaded many students to take classes closer to home. 

Voeltz said when she was younger she used to baby sit for a deaf girl. She also took a sign language class in high school that sparked her 
interest. 

"I have a deaf cousin and went to all those family events for years" struggling to communicate, Schaffer said. "I didn't realize the difference 
between signing and interpreting." 

McCann said making sure both parties, hearing and non-hearing, were comfortable in any given situation took practice and patience. 

"You don't want to mislead anyone or cause any misunderstanding," McCann said. 

Beginning in the fall of 1996, McCann and Schaffer were interpreting at Wichita State University in the classroom. Both said they want to do 
one-on-one interpreting and some free-lance interpreting. 

"There is a language barrier everywhere," McCann said. "Banks, doctor's offices. In this area there is a greater demand than there are qualified 
interpreters." 

Rogers said she was seeking a four-year degree in interpreter training. Hungerford said those opportunities are few and far between, but 
discussions are being held with some current four-year schools to offer a degree completion program. 

"This experience at Cowley has been very enlightening," Rogers said. "It's more than just being able to sign with your hands. It's been a 
challenging, frustrating, and rewarding two years." 

All the students said being the guinea pigs of the program 
will undoubtedly help Cowley develop it further. 

"We see a lot of improvement with the first-year students," 
Voeltz said. "In time this program will be real strong. It will be 
there with Johnson County." 

All the students praised Hungerford and Anderson for the 
work they've done. 

"They both are really skilled," Schaffer said. "It's been 
wonderful working with them." 

All the students said the key to improving was practice. 

"You have to keep practicing," Schaffer said. "Even during 
ispring break. You sit there and interpret the television. If you don't 
■use it every day, you lose it." 




9 ♦ 



Instructors, seated from left, Kim Hungerford and Tim Anderson. Graduates standing, from left, Kristie 
Rogers, April Voeltz, Jeannine Schaffer, Debra Marlow, and Debbie McCann. 



♦ Student Success 

Cowley aeronautics students capture awards at skills contest 

Aaron Sharp of Arkansas City, Gary Lowden of Winfield and Isaac Robinson of Winfield 
received medals for placing in the top three at the Vocational Industrial Clubs of America State 
Aviation Skills Contest held in April 1996 at Cowley County Community College's Strother Field 
facility. The three Cowley students received their medals at an awards ceremony in Wichita on 
April 19. Sharp won his category, Lowden was second, and Robinson third in the contest. During 
the last week of June, Sharp traveled to Kansas City to compete in the national VICA skills cham- 
pionship. Larry Head is Cowley's aeronautics instructor. 

Cowley cosmetology students place high at VICA skills championships 

Cosmetology students earned high marks at the 1996 Kansas Vocational Industrial Clubs of 
America Skills Championships held April 17-19 at Century II in Wichita. Following is a list of stu- 
dents who competed along with their sponsors. Listed is the place, category, stylist and sponsor, 
followed by the model and their sponsor: First place, hair, Javier Macias, Winfield; sponsor, 
Ginger Triplet, Mor-Pizzaz, Winfield. Teammate Mandy Beck, Winfield, model; sponsor, Karen 
Deakins, Personal Touch, Newkirk, Okla. First place, nails, Kelly Williamson, Dexter; sponsor, 
Keith and Clif Flower, Shear Point, Winfield. Teammate Heather Piatt, Winfield, mode! for hair 
and nails; sponsor, Northwest Community Center, Arkansas City. Third place, prepared speech, 
Lynzee Perdaris, Winfield. Other students competing: Tracey Donaldson, Arkansas City, stylist; 
sponsor, Northwest Community Center. Perdaris, Winfield, stylist; sponsor, Smyer Travel Service 
and Winfield Courier. Model for hair and Perdaris' teammate, Jeni Bruce, Burrton; sponsor, 
Smyer Travel Service and Winfield Courier. Lisa Brown, Arkansas City, stylist; sponsor, Wayne 
Steadman and Winfield Floral. Model for hair and Brown's teammate, Stephanie Long, 
Haysville; sponsor, Wayne Steadman and Winfield Floral. Tammy Beach, Winfield, nail tech and 
teammate for Long; sponsor, Wayne Steadman and Winfield Floral. Cowley students competed 
against four other schools in the hair category and two others in the nails competition. In the hair 
category, students must perform a 30-minute cut on a mannequin, then do mock applications of 
color and relaxer, then finally a perm wrap. Each step is timed. Then students had to perform a 
day-time comb-out and a night-time comb-out on their live models. The performance testing was 
followed by a written test. 

Two Cowley students qualify for national Phi Beta Lambda contest 

Barbara Drouhard and Matt Rathbun qualified for the national Phi Beta Lambda business 
contest after capturing first place in several categories at the state contest held in March 1996. 
Drouhard, a sophomore from Danville, and Rathbun, a freshman from Derby, qualified for the 
national PBL contest in July in Washington, D.C. Bart Allen, Peggy Paton and Marilyn Denny, 
Business and Service Technology instructors, are club sponsors. Drouhard, who also qualified last 
year, earned first-place finishes in the two-year division in the category of Finance and in 
Information Management. She finished second overall in each category. The overall division 
includes four-year schools. This year's state contest was held at the Ramada Inn in downtown 
Wichita. Rathbun was first in the two-year division and first overall in the category Computer 
Applications. He finished first in the two-year division and second overall in Computer Concepts. 
Drouhard, Rathbun and Florencia Apraiz finished second in the two-year division and second 
overall in the Business Decision Making category. The other first-place finishes for Cowley in the 
two-year division went to the team of Jennifer Schrimsher and Ryan Van Fleet in the category 
Desktop Publishing, and to Apraiz in the category Marketing. Schrimsher and Van Fleet finished 
second overall. Van Fleet also finished third in the two-year division in the category Management. 



Student Briefs 



Cowley graduate among Hearst 
journalism winners 

Novelda Sommers, a 1994 graduate, was 
among the top 20 winners in college In-Depth 
writing in the 36th annual William Randolph 
Hearst Foundation's Journalism Awards! 
Program. Sommers, a senior at the University of 
Kansas, finished eighth in the competition and: 
earned a $500 scholarship. She is special sec-j 
tions editor for The University Daily Kansan. 
Sommers was a member of both The Cowley 
Press student newspaper and The PULSE maga- 
zine while at Cowley. She was editor of The 
PULSE for three semesters and was named Two- 
Year Magazine Journalist of the Year in 1994. 
She attended Circle High School in Towanda. 
One-hundred one undergraduate accredited 
journalism programs in colleges and universities 
across the nation participate in the Hearst! 
awards program. 

Hernandez caps state honor with 
ord 
Ryan Hernandez of Arkansas City placed 
second in the nation after competing in a 
Precision Machining competition in the post-sec- 
ondary division. Hernandez, a former student at 
Cowley County Community College, earned 
the award while competing in the 1995 United 
States Skills Championships June 26-30 in 
Kansas City, Mo. Hernandez also represented 
Kansas as a delegate voting for national officers 
of Vocational Industrial Clubs of America. 
Hernandez placed first in the state skills compe- 
tition earlier this year. The eight-hour precision 
machining technology championship tested the 
students' skills on drill presses, lathes, milling 
machines, surface grinders, print reading, numer- 
ical control, benchwork and inspection proce- 
dures. Hernandez was among 78 contestants 
who were all 1995 winners of state and local 
VICA contests at the secondary and post-sec- 
ondary levels. 

♦ 1 



Teaching Exc 



e n c e 



Three Cowley faculty 
honored as 
Master Teachers 



rom left, Dr. Pat McAfee, Gary Gackstatter, 
Michelle Schoon, Bruce Crouse, and Dr, Lynn Stalnaker. 



Three Cowley faculty members were honored at the end of the 1995-96 academic year 
with Teaching Excellence Awards. 

Michelle Schoon, Bruce Crouse and Gary Gackstatter received Master Teacher awards 
May 26-29 at the National Institute for Staff and Organizational Development in Austin, Texas. 

Schoon has taught biology in the Natural Science Division for two years. She was a part- 
time faculty member for Cowley prior to that. Crouse heads Cowley's Non-Destructive Testing 
program and just completed his fourth year at the school. Gackstatter is head of the Instrumental 
Music department and just finished his second year at Cowley. 

The three bring to 34 the number of Cowley faculty members who have received these 
national awards in the past nine years. 

In addition to the three award recipients, seven Cowley faculty and staff members made pre- 
sentations at NISOD. They are: 

• Phil Buechner, Randy Hallford and Sue Saia: Calculator-Based Lab Applications for 
Developmental Math, Algebra and Calculus. All three are instructors in the Natural Science 
Division. 

• Schoon: Sifting the Sands of Authentic Assessment: Portfolio Development and the 
Community College Instructor. 

• Chris Vollweider: Teaching Students to Read: The Other Way. Vollweider heads Cowley's 
learning skills lab located on the lower level of Renn Memorial Library. 

• Terri Morrow and Janice Stover: Big Deals in Small Places: Planning Major Campaigns 
and Special Events for Small Institutions With Little Time and Staff. Morrow is associate dean of 
development and college relations. Stover is coordinator to development. 

About 25 Cowley faculty, staff and administrators made the trip to Austin. 




♦ Teaching Excellence 



1996 NISOD 
Master Presenters 






Phil Buechner, Randy Hallford and Sue 

Master Presenters 
Calculator-Based Lab Applications for Developmental Math, Algebra and Calculus 



S a i a 




Michelle 

S c h o o n 

Master Presenter 

Sifting the Sands Of 

Authentic Assessment: 

Portfolio Development and 

the Community College 

Instructor 



Chris 

V o I I w e i d e r 

Master Presenter 

Teaching Students to Read: 

The Other Way. 





e r r i Morrow 

Janice S t o 

Master Presenters 

Big Deals in Small Places: 

Planning Major Campaigns 

and Special Events for Small Institutions 

with Little Time and Staff. 



v e r 




♦ 1 2 



e a c h i n g 



x c e 



e n c e 



Tredway, Hungerford 
announce retirements 



Richard Tredway could easily fill in for one 
of those Maytag commercials. Remember? 
They're "The Dependability People." 

For portions of the last four decades, 
Tredway has been Mr. Dependable at Cowley. 

He has served in a variety of capacities, 
including agriculture instructor, Business and 
Service Technology Division chairman, and 
interim dean of instruction. 

But retirement beckons. Tredway and fel- 
low Cowley instructor Charles Hungerford were 
honored May 7, 1996 with a reception in the 
:Earle N. Wright Community Room. 

"I've always been blessed to be surround- 
ed by people who make you look good," 
Tredway said. "Journeys aren't about begin- 
nings or ends, but what you do along the way." 

Tredway, 65, began his career at Cowley 
in 1967 as a technical agriculture instructor. He 
is the last current faculty member to be hired 
before the school became an area vocational- 
itechnical school in 1968. 

He holds bachelor's and master's degrees 
'from Kansas State University. He began his 
career in education in 1957 as the vocational 
agriculture instructor at Oxford High School. 
From there he went to Winfield High School 
.and then Cowley. 

Dr. Pat McAtee, college president, said, 
"You truly are a tremendous blessing to the col- 
lege, and I consider you a very good friend." 

Tredway is a Master Teacher Award recip- 
ient from the National Institute for Staff and 
Organizational Development in Austin, Texas. 
•'He has conducted numerous workshops and 
given countless presentations to business and 
industry. 

One of his biggest responsibilities while at 
Cowley was heading the committee to report to 
"the North Central Association, the agency that 
grants accreditation to colleges and universities. 
Through Tredway's efforts, Cowley received the 

1 3 ♦ 



maximum 10-year accreditation in 1989, 

"That was a very proud moment," Tredway said. 

Tredway, who said retirement will be spent taking care of a business, a farm and visiting 
grandchildren, credits Cowley for developing his career as an educator. 

"I had had a successful high school career and to be here to be a part of the development 
of an institution was wonderful," he said. "I got to see it grow from a small community college to 
one nationally recognized." 

Tredway said Cowley always recognized successful instructors and fostered an atmosphere 
of professional growth and development. 

His proudest moment as division chair occurred when his instructors earned Master Teacher 
awards. At the instructional level, Tredway said what made him most proud was when his students 
became successful in their field of study. 

Hungerford, 58, has been the drafting instructor at Cowley since 1985. This past year he 
was on a medical leave of absence and decided to retire for good at the end of this academic 
year. 

"It was time to quit," Hungerford said. 

He learned how to draw aboard a ship in the ocean when he was in the service. For the 
last 26 years Hungerford has been teaching drafting at the college level. Prior to coming to 
Arkansas City, he taught four years at Linn Technical College in Linn, Mo., and for 11 years at 
Monett Area Vocational-Technical School in Monett, Mo. 

Hungerford earned bachelor's and master's degrees from Southwest Missouri State 
University in Springfield. Hungerford and his wife, Ina, recently moved to Winfield. But he said as 
soon as his wife retires, they will move back to their native Springfield. 

Hungerford has seen about as many changes in drafting as Tredway has seen in agricul- 
ture. 

"Seeing it go from a traditional drafting program to computer-assisted was a big step," 
Hungerford said. "One reason why they hired me here was I knew CAD (computer-assisted draft- 
ing). We started with one unit. Now we have 15." 

Hungerford said his days teaching at Cowley have been enjoyable. 

"The joy is to see students succeed in their work," he said. 

Charlie White, associate dean of vocational education, said, "When he came we had an 
outdated program. Now it's the best-equipped lab of any school in Kansas. It ranks right at the 
top of that." 

Both Hungerford and Tredway received clocks from the college. Tredway received a 
plaque from the College Education Association. 



Left photo: Richard Tredway, right, receives an award from 
Dr. Lynn Stalnaker. Bottom photo: Charles Hungerford, 
seated, is congratulated by Charlie White. 





♦ Outstanding Tiger Alumni 



Selby Funk 



Each year the selection process for 

Outstanding Tiger Alumni gets more difficult. 

Cowley is certainly blessed with many talented 

and successful alumni. 

Three men, one each from the classes of 

1 936, 1 946, and 1 956, were chosen to be 

honored in 1996. 

They are Selby Funk '36, 

Melville Marnix '46, 

and Bill Austen '56. 

The three were honored' 

during .commencement 

exercises 

May 4, 1996.1 







♦ 1 4 



Outstanding Tiger Alumn 



Selby Funk 



Funk remembers with fondness how Arkansas City Junior College was like one big happy family. 

"Our class was small, and it was a close class coming in from high school," Funk said. "Through the years we became closer. Knowing your fel- 
ow man was important in those days. Many of those people started in kindergarten and went through junior college together. We were all interest- 
;d in each other and interested in achievement." 

Funk, born in Caney, raised in Arkansas City and who lives in suburban Atlanta, Ga., remembers the genuine interest students had for their fellow 
nan. He is proud of the fact that he was associated with such a group of caring students and instructors. 

"That was one of the great things as far as junior college was concerned," Funk said. "The staff emphasized achievement. They did not empha- 
iize 'do it or else.' " They were interested in the individual. In the student. I have a fond appreciation that our faculty was pretty devoted to seeing that 
ve achieved. 

"I was there about five years ago and I got the same feeling. It's one of the showcases of the college." 

Funk remembers the good group of players who came in to play football in the 1934 and 1935 seasons. 

"We won two games in '35 for the first time in about 29 games," Funk said. 

He was close. ACJC began the decade of the 1930s with a 6-2-1 record, and finished the decade going 6-2-1 and 7-1. But it was the six sea- 
,ons in between that weren't too successful. Funk's freshman season ended 1-5-1; his sophomore season 2-5. 

Even though the Tigers weren't big winners on the field in those years, they were honest, hard-working students who made a name for themselves. 
\fter graduating from Kansas State University in 1938, Funk held a newspaper job at The Arkansas City Traveler for about two years. 

Then came his association with Liberty Mutual Insurance Co. in 1941. 

"I got drafted in the war but stayed with Liberty Mutual after the war," Funk said. 

It was the start of a 41 -year career with the company, taking him from Boston, Mass.; to Memphis and Knoxville, Tenn.; then to Dunwoody, Ga., 
vhere he now makes his home. 

While at Liberty Mutual, Funk held a variety of positions, including divisional medical service manager covering eight Southeastern states. Funk 
.pent most of his time with the company developing workmen's compensation plans. In fact, he was appointed by then-Gov. Jimmy Carter to serve on 
he governor's special task force on worker's compensation. 

"I was kind of a pioneer in workman's compensation," Funk said. "We pushed rehabilitation quite a bit." 

Funk said paraplegics or quadriplegics were bed-fast until they died following World War II. He said Liberty Mutual worked with the medical 
xofession to improve the quality of life for those victims. 

"We're quite proud of rehabilitation and what we did back then," he said. "I practically staffed a whole hospital of nurses when I retired. Most 
:ompanies have gotten into rehabilitation now." 

Besides being active as a rehabilitation consultant to worker's compensation boards in Georgia, Florida, South Carolina, Virginia and Mississippi, 
•unk has always been active in his church and in civic affairs. He is married to the former Jean Rowland of Charleston, Miss. The couple celebrated 
heir 50th wedding anniversary on April 20. 

Funk was another pioneer of sorts at ACJC. 

"We never did have a yearbook, so Dick Hunt and I decided to push for one," Funk said. "We started the Tigerama." 

Funk's favorite classes were speech, orchestra and debate and, of course, football as an activity. 

Today he is an avid golfer and is a member of the Georgia Senior Golf Association. He plays in tournaments in Georgia and won a tournament 
i the fall of 1995. 



♦ 



♦Outstanding^ Tiger Alumni 



Melville Marnix 




♦ 1 6 



Outstanding Tiger Alumn 



Melville Marnix 

Humanness and the high quality of instruction. That's what Marnix said are among his fondest memories of "Basement University," the former 
Arkansas City Junior College. 

Marnix, an Arkansas City native who now lives in Lewiston, N.Y., had always planned to attend "juco" in Arkansas City. 

"Back in those days college money was rather tight," Marnix said. "And when you talked to people at KU (University of Kansas) and K-State 
(Kansas State University), they strongly recommended attending junior college at the time. 

"I found out much later the quality of education was just as good, often times better, than at the four-year school." 

Marnix enrolled at ACJC in the fall of 1942 and immediately joined the U.S. Army Enlisted Reserve Corps. He was called to duty in World War 
II about seven weeks into the spring semester of 1943. The war had interrupted school. 

"From then until February of 1946, Uncle Sam kept us busy," Marnix said. 

Busy, yes, but Marnix was laying the foundation for a 34-year career with Union Carbide as a chemical engineer. 

Marnix was declared essential to the U.S. Army in the training of future troops and was sent to Fort Leonard Wood, Mo., after spending time 
overseas. His complaining to his commanding officer paid off and he was discharged from the Army to go back to school. He picked up at ACJC 
//here he left off nearly three years earlier. 

Marnix said he never forgot the education he received at the two-year school. 

"The thing I remember most about it was the humanness of the staff," Marnix said. "That, coupled with high quality instruction. I have had contact 
vvith a good number of colleges as a student and as a recruiter, and I'm still impressed with Cowley." 

Three long-time ACJC staffers influenced Marnix the most. 

"Gaye Iden always had a positive attitude for people and she seemed to be able to see 10 to 15 years into the future," he said. "Paul Johnson 
was a big help to me getting my feet back on the ground after the war. The one I could always remember was my neighbor for many years, Edith 
loyce Davis. I did many chores for her as a young lad next door. We'd always stop by to see her. She could always remember everything you did 
•or her." 

After ACJC it was on to Kansas State for Marnix. He received his degree in chemical engineering from KSU in 1949 and accepted a position 
3S an instructor in the department of chemical engineering. In September 1951, Union Carbide came calling. 

"My office was a happy one for recruiters at Kansas State," he said. "I had offers from several companies. Carbide came through and I liked the 
recruiter and he made sense. What I saw at Tonawanda impressed me. They made me an offer on the spot. I never regretted it. 

"After the war I was evaluating German industry to get it going again. I talked to a lot of people at the forefront of synthetic fuels. I decided that's 
what I wanted." 

Marnix began with Union Carbide's Linde Division, Research and Engineering Laboratory in Tonawanda, NY. For the next 34 years, Marnix was 
Dn the cutting edge of science and technology in both research and engineering. Seventeen of those years were spent in engineering and research 
Tianagement. 

At the end of 1985, Marnix said goodbye to Union Carbide. And for the past 10 years he has been a self-employed consultant, a husband, 
ather, and grandfather. 

Marnix' wife is the former Shirley Gilliland, also an Arkansas City native. They soon will be married 48 years. Shirley was president of the ACJC 
:lassof 1948. 

"She's the smart one in the family," Marnix said. "I don't know what I'd have done without her." 

Marnix and his family have lived in Lewiston, N.Y., for years. The Canadian border is about a mile to the west, with Lake Ontario directly north. 

Marnix thought he wanted to stay in education, but his eyes were opened after a short time. 

"One of the things you soon find in a technical school is the professors who can really speak with authority are the ones who have gone out and 
jot some experience," he said. "Then I realized it was like talking about something you'd only seen at arm's distance. This was the right time to get 
hat industrial experience. Honestly, I got out there and got taste of application and technology and business. It wasn't hard to go to work every day." 

Through the years, Marnix has never forgotten the education he received at ACJC. And he has become an ambassador of sorts for the commu- 
hity college concept. 

"I've advised many young people as they go to universities and I tell them not to overlook community colleges," he said. 



♦ Outstanding Tiger Alumn 



William Austen 







Outstanding Tiger Alumni 



William Austen 

Austen has spent most of his life making the lives of others more pleasant. Extending a helping hand has always come natural for him. 

Like so many students who attended Arkansas City Junior College, Austen's education was interrupted. He is a 1951 graduate of Arkansas City 
High School, then was drafted into the U.S. Army where he was assigned to a military police unit. It launched his career in law enforcement. 

"This opportunity presented itself to me," said Austen, who for the past 18 years has served as chief court services officer for the 16th judicial dis- 
trict in Dodge City. "Before I started the judge encouraged me to get my degree. I've been in law enforcement ever since." 

After graduating from ACJC in 1956, Austen transferred to Emporia State. In 1976 he finished at St. Mary of the Plains in Dodge City. 

Austen, an Arkansas City native, remembers the winning tradition of Cowley basketball teams during his two years. He remembers Dan Kahler, 
the coach, and the national runner-up finish in 1953. 

"I was team manager for the college at that time," Austen said. "I wasn't much of a player. I warmed the bench for people." 

Austen said his primary goal at ACJC was to get a degree, to prepare for life after college. Little did he know then that his life would be spent 
serving others. 

"I'm basically in the probation department," Austen said of his current job. "We do a lot of investigative work for the court. The job changes every 
day. You never know what's going to come up next." 

When Austen began his duties, he was a one-man band. Now he has a staff of nine. The staff supervises both adults and juveniles on probation, 
as well as other functions under the direction of the district court judges. Austen's staff serves a six-county area of Ford, Gray, Comanche, Kiowa, Clark 
and Meade counties in southwest Kansas. 

One of the most fulfilling projects that Austen has been involved in is as attendance officer with school districts in the six-county area. 

"After school officials have exhausted all their efforts, I come in and make some changes," Austen said. "We bring the students into the court and 
let them talk to the judge directly. They are not arrested. It's a chance for the judge to talk to the students and their parents about why they aren't attend- 
ing school." 

Austen said the program, in its fourth year, has been successful. He said about 45 percent of all students in the program stay in school. He sees 
about 35 students per month, grades kindergarten through 12th grade, from all six counties. 

"Two other districts have copied and started their own program," Austen said. "We're in the running for an award for new programs developed 
in the United States. There's $10,000 involved, which would go to the district." 

Austen said some of the problems solved in the program include seating a student closer to the front of the room so he could see. 

"He was in the back of the room and they couldn't figure out what was the matter," Austen said. "Different things have come out of this and are 
shocking to administrators at the schools." 

Austen and his wife of 35 years, Jo, have three children. When he isn't spending time with them, he is heavily involved in the rodeo and has been 
for the past 20 years. 

"We have the fifth-largest rodeo in the United States," Austen said of Dodge City's summer showcase. "It's really a community deal. The rodeo 
has become so successful because of community involvement from Dodge City and the surrounding area." 



? 



9 ♦ 



♦ c 



t u r a 



Arts 



Men wore black ties. Women wore formals or fancy dresses. The food setting was elegant. 
The entertainment was crowd-pleasing. 

Just about everything went as planned Sept. 23, 1995 during dedication ceremonies of the 
Brown Center for Arts, Sciences and Technology. About 650 people attended, including college 
employees and students as well as community supporters. 

Two separate dedication ceremonies took place that evening. On the east side of the build- 
ing people gathered around to listen to the official dedication ceremonies of the sculpture work 
and the Patrick J. McAtee Plaza, named in honor of the current Cowley president. Bob Storbeck, 
then chairman of the Board of Trustees, read statements dedicating the artwork and the plaza. 

The four bronze sculptures - three together in the immediate plaza and one on a bench clos- 
er to the entrance - were made by Ann LaRose of Loveland, Colo., who was present for the cer- 
emonies. The other sculpture, the "Point of Light" by Gary Kahle of Arkansas City, sits on the south- 
east corner of the Brown Center. 

McAtee, with wife Sandy, his mother Bernice McAtee and mother-in-law and father-in-law, 
Dan and Lil Urbanek at his side, broke down in tears as he accepted the honor of having the 
plaza named after him. As a token of their appreciation, Board members presented McAtee with 
miniature versions of three of the bronze sculptures found outside the Brown Center. 

"I am deeply touched and honored," said McAtee, only the third president Cowley has ever 
had. "But none of this would have been possible, this building would not have become a reality, 
without your support." 

McAfee then honored Sid Regnier, vice president of business services, and Terri Morrow, 
associate dean of development and college relations, for their work. Regnier was project coor- 
dinator and Morrow headed the capital fund-raising campaign that generated $1.6 million. 

After a brief ribbon-cutting ceremony in which Robert Brown and Roger Brown, chairman of 
the board and president of The Home National Bank of Arkansas City participated, the crowd 
entered the building for hors d'voures, tours by Cowley's Student Ambassadors, and viewing of 
artwork in the Earle N. Wright Community Room and Gallery. 

One of the artists whose paintings was on display in the Wright Gallery was in attendance. 
Janda Allred from Salina was recognized for her work. David Young of Grand Island, Neb., 
whose small sculptures were the first purchased for the interior of the Wright Room, also attend- 
ed the dedication and was recognized for his work. 

Inside the Robert Brown Theatre, McAtee took the stage and honored the Brown family and 
The Home National Bank for their support of the project from the first day. 

"When Pat McAtee and Terri Morrow came to us and showed us the plans, we knew that 
this was going to be a magnificent facility," Roger Brown said. "We wanted to become a big 
part in seeing that this building became a reality, and here it is." 

The Browns made an initial contribution of $250,000 to become the lead donor toward the 
project. But they added another $50,000 to that to help get the balcony portion of the project 
completed. They also paid for all of the expenses during the dedication. 

At 8:30 p.m., The Lettermen, a vocal trio that originated in the early 1960s, took the stage 
for a concert that lasted two hours. Many of the group's big hits were sung, including "Put Your 
Head On My Shoulder," "Goin' Out Of My Head/Can't Take My Eyes Off Of You" and "Hurt 
So Bad." Several people in the audience also got the chance to sing with the group. 

The Lettermen - Tony Butala, Bobby Paynton and Donovan Scott Tea - have sold 20 mil- 
lion records and performed 7^000 concerts. Butala is the only original Lettermen still with the 
group. He started with Bob Engemann and Jim Pike. The group's first album, titled "A Song For 
Young Love," was recorded in 1962. That title song was written by Bill Post of Arkansas City. Post 
was recognized by Butala during the concert. 



Nearly three years 

after ground breaking, 

Brown Center dedicated 




ert A. Brown 




Roger Brown 



Former State Senator Dick Rock, right 
and Tony Butala of The Letterman. 




♦ 20 



c 



t u r o 



A r t s ♦ 



Cultural Arts Series 
expands during 1995-96 




Baxter Block 




This year marked the inaugural celebration of the expanded Cultural Arts Series. The series, 
which brought one or two events each year to the campus, burst in to full bloom in the fall of 
1995. The Lettermen opened the series by performing for the dedication of the Brown Center. 
The nostalgic evening was enjoyed by many, and some were even invited to sing along. A beau- 
tiful opening night gala reception was complimented by paintings byjanda Allred of Salina. 

Not to be outdone by the fans of the "oldies," the Cowley County Stockman's Association 
joined CCCC to co-present an evening with nationally known balladeer R.W. Hampton and the 
outlandishly witted Baxter Black. The November performance was a sell-out, with every seat full 
and shaking from laughter. Baxter and R.W. signed autographs in the Wright Gallery following 
the show, where the walls were fully outfitted with paintings and prints by nationally-lauded 
contemporary western artists, Donna Howell-Sickles, Bob Wade, and Ann Coe. Earlier in the 
month, noted Kansans-Jim Hoy, Dick Keller, and Barbara Brackman introduced a collection of 
contemporary cowboy boots (on display with the paintings), and explored the history of the 
cowboy and his boots through stories, slides, and movies of the Old West. 

The new year rang in with a special performance treat-two-time Grammy Award winning 
artists - the Paul Winter Consort. After spending a day and a half in workshops with Cowley 
music students, the Consort presented their internationally acclaimed "Solstice Journey." Cowley 
vocal students joined them on stage for part of the performance - a highlight for both students 
and audience. Following the show, one Cowley staffer remarked, "I thought I was in Houston or 
Chicago last night - now that was quality!" 

The week before spring break brought three days of county-wide activity when the Cultural 

Arts Series hosted the Deeply Rooted Chicago Dance Theatre. The dance company offered 

classes and workshops throughout Ark City and Winfield, and were joined by hundreds of 

enthusiastic participants. As a special treat, 15 young dancers (ages 4-14) joined the 

professionals on stage for a performance of "In a Child's Eye." It was the only local 

performance of the overwhelmingly special piece in their entire national tour. 

A thought-provoking environmental lecture residency by Robert F. Kennedy Jr. and 
a final exhibit - The Land - closed out the year with paintings, prints, and 
photographs by Terry Evans, James Mullen, Margaret Yates and Stan Herd. Herd, a 
Kansan who is known throughout the U.S. for his remarkable "crop art" works, and 
Charles Phillips, a nationally-known wilderness photographer, gave presentations at 
the exhibit opening. 



Paul Winter 




2 1 ♦ 



Deeply Rooted Chicago Dance Theatre 



♦ C u I t u r a 



Arts 



Robert F. Kennedy Jr., an environmental lawyer with impressive credentials, talked about 
water, land, and air, and Americans' responsibilities to keep them clean, during a speech April 
18 in the Robert A. Brown Theatre. 

Kennedy's speech was titled "Our Environmental Destiny," and concentrated on the pollution 
problems of the past and how Americans could take back control of the land. About 500 
people attended the speech. 

"I became involved in the Hudson Riverkeeper program because I saw first-hand what man 
was doing to the river," said Kennedy, who grew up with the Hudson in his backyard. "And so 
for a long time I have been very active in trying to get laws passed that prohibit corporations from 
dumping all kinds of garbage into the Hudson." 

Kennedy, the son of the late Sen. Robert F. Kennedy, is one of the most 
well-known environmental lawyers in the United States. He has a reputation as a 
resolute defender of the environment that stems from a litany of successful legal 
actions. 

Kennedy is a clinical professor and supervising attorney at the 
Environmental Litigation Clinic at Pace University Law School in New York. In 
addition, he serves as chief prosecuting attorney for the Hudson Riverkeeper 
program and senior attorney for the Natural Resources Defense Council. Earlier 
in his career he served as Assistant District Attorney in New York City, He has 
worked on several political campaigns and was state coordinator for Edward 
M. Kennedy's 1980 presidential campaign. 

Prior to his speech at Cowley, Kennedy held a press conference and ate 
dinner with about 15 Cowley students. The dinner was a free exchange of 
questions and answers. 

Some of Kennedy's successful legal actions include prosecuting gov- 
ernments and companies for polluting the Hudson River and Long Island sound; 
winning settlements for the Hudson Riverkeeper; arguing cases to expand citizen 
access to the shoreline; and suing sewage treatment plants to force compliance 
with the Clean Water Act. 

"He's a pioneer as an attorney in the area of municipal and government 
responsibility for environmental problems," said Hudson Riverkeeper John 
Cronin. 

Among Kennedy's published books are New York State Apprentice 
Falconer's Manual, New York State Department of Environmental Conservation, 
and Judge Frank M. Johnson Jr., A Biography. 

His articles have appeared in the New York Times, Atlantic Monthly, The 
Wall Street Journal, Esquire, The Village Voice, The Boston Globe, The 
Washington Post, Pace Environmental Law Review, and others. 

Kennedy is a graduate of Harvard University. He studied at the London School of 
Economics and received his law degree from the University of Virginia Law School. Following 
graduation, he attended the Pace University School of Law, where he was awarded a master's 
degree in environmental law. 

Kennedy's commitment and compassion have resulted in the Hudson River being the first 
and, unfortunately, the only such American waterway to be restored to its natural state. 

In the tradition of his family, Kennedy focuses on the mission of individual action, the unique 
American responsibility and commitment to future generations. He reminds us that "we do not 
inherit the earth from our ancestors, we borrow it from our children." 



Robert F. Kennedy Jr. 
speaks at Cowley 




♦ 22 



A t h I e 



c s ♦ 



Kenneth Hefner named 
head women's basketbal 
coach at Cowley 



Kenneth Hefner, who guided Odessa College to two national championships and eight 
conference titles, is the new head women's basketball coach. 

Hefner has been head women's coach at Odessa, a two-year school in west Texas, since 
1976. During his 20-year career at the college, Hefner compiled a 488-149 (.766 winning 
percentage) that included two undefeated regular seasons, a streak of 79 consecutive victories, 
one national runner-up finish, seven trips to the National Junior College Athletic Association 
national tournament, and eight conference championships. In all, Hefner sent more than 80 
players to upper-level four-year programs. 

Hefner was named NJCAA coach of the year after the 1985-86 season in which his team 
won the NJCAA Division I national title with a 38-0 record. His team also won the national 
championship after the 1990-91 season. 

He also has been named Region V coach of the year four times, conference coach of the 
year three times, and Converse coach of the year once. He also has coached nine All-Americans 
during his career. 

Two of his players, Twanda Wilson in 1991 and Doreatha Conwell in 1986, were named 
most valuable player of the national tournament. 

Hefner has a bachelor of arts degree in physical education and health from the University 
of Texas-Permian Basin in Odessa. 



New head women's basketball coach Ken Hefner, right, 
receives a welcome from athletic director Tom Saia. 




2 3 ♦ 



♦ Athletics 

Baseball 

Dave Burroughs' Cowley baseball team knows how to put on an encore performance. 

Coming off the most successful season in school history, the Tigers headed into 1996 with 
a lot of promise and some lofty goals. But little did they know they would still be playing in 
mid-May. 

"This is a great group of kids," said Burroughs after his team captured the Eastern 
Sub-Regional and Region VI titles. "They worked hard in the off-season to improve their strength. 
I think that's what's paid off, their work in the weight room." 

Cowley finished 51-13 after losing two straight in the Central District tournament in 
Kirkwood, Mo., against St. Louis Community College at Meramec. The Tigers lost 9-5 and 7-6. 

But it was a season to remember. Following are some notable marks established by this 
year's team: 

• Most victories in a single season: 51. 

• Most victories during a regular season: 45. 

• Most pitching victories in a single season: 10 by Chris Brown. 

• Most pitching victories in a career: 17 by Brown. 

• Most runs batted in in a single season: 69 by Kevin Paxson. 

The Tigers also finished the regular season ranked ninth in the National Junior College 
Athletic Association poll. 

The list is endless. To say this was a complete team would be the understatement of the year. 

"We've got a lot of players who love the game of baseball," Burroughs said. "That's why I 
said their off-season work really has paid off. They didn't just forget about it between May and 
August." 

The Tigers raked in several post-season honors. Burroughs was named Coach of the Year in 
thejayhawk Conference East Division. Brown was named Most Valuable Player in the Jayhawk 
East and was selected to the NJCAA All-America first team. And first baseman Paxson, third 
baseman Justin Fowler and right fielder Patrick Loving all were named to the All-Jayhawk 
Conference East first team. Paxson was selected to the NJCAA All-America third team, while 
Loving was named to the honorable mention All-America squad. Shortstop Junior Spivey, 
designated hitter Travis Hafner and relief pitcher Jim Crawford were honorable mention selections 
in the Jayhawk East. 

Cowley captured the Jayhawk East and Sub-Region titles for the second consecutive year. 



Volleyb 



a l 



Deb Nittler's volleyball team finished 11-5 in the Jayhawk Conference East Division, good 
for third place. The Lady Tigers finished the season with a 24-31 overall record. 

"The biggest core of our team is going to be back," Nittler said at the end of the 1995 
season. "Our freshmen got a lot of playing time, and with our experience, I look for big things 
next year." 

Four Lady Tigers earned All-Jayhawk East honors. Heidi Henning, a freshman from Wichita, 
was a first-team selection. Eric Gipson, a sophomore from Kansas City, Kan., and Stacey 
Winegarner, a sophomore from Wichita, earned second-team honors. Karrie O'Keeffe, a 
freshman from Wichita, was an honorable mention selection. 



Tiger athletes 
enjoy another solid year 



// was a record-setting season for Cowley's 
baseball team in 1 996, while the six other 
Tiger teams enjoyed success as well, 
both in competition and in the classroom. 
And a new sport will be arriving ■ 
beginning in the fall of 1 996: golf. 
Following is a capsule look 
at each sport during the 1 995-96 seasons: 



Softball 



With 10 freshmen, two new pitchers and a 
question mark here and there, Ed Hargrove 
wasn't sure what to expect from his softball team 
for the 1996 season. 

You might say he was pleasantly surprised. 
But in another breath, a bit disappointed. 

The Lady Tigers finished 34-18 overall, 
marking just the fourth time in the program's 
20-year history that a team won 30 games or 
more. And Cowley finished third in the Jayhawk 
Conference East with an 18-10 record. And it 
was a third-place showing at the Region VI 
tournament in May. 

This season for Hargrove, his 12th as head 
coach, was filled with ups and downs. 

"On Friday (May 3) at Region VI when we 
won all three games, that was the best we've 
played all year," Hargrove said. "Our defense 
was solid, our pitching was good, we got 
timely hitting. And we didn't play poorly on 
Saturday, it's just that the two teams we played, 
Cloud and Butler, played against us like we 
played on Friday." 

Cloud eventually won the Region VI title. 

Cowley did manage to erase some bad 
memories from the two previous Region VI 
tournaments. Early exits in 1994 and 1995 after 



♦ 2 



♦ 



going in seeded either No. 1 or No. 2 did not 
sit well with Hargrove. 

So in 1996, seeded No. 6, the Lady Tigers 
could lay back and play loosely. It showed on 
May 3 as Cowley topped defending Region VI 
champion Kansas City 5-1, shut out No. 3 
seeded Barton County 7-0, then tripped No. 2 
seeded Independence 4-3 in 11 innings. All of 
a sudden Saturday was looking pretty good. 

"We had beaten Cloud earlier in the 
season, so we knew we could do it," Hargrove 
said. 

But Cloud played near-perfect ball in a 
7-2 victory. Butler County then eliminated 
Cowley 5-2 in the second game. 

Several players earned post-season 
honors. Shortstop Kristen Mason was named to 
the first-team All-Region VI, while third baseman 
Jeri Carter earned second-team honors. Pitcher 
Nowa Parks was an honorable mention 
selection. Right fielder Sabrina Herzberg and 
Carter earned first-team All-Jayhawk 
Conference honors. Mason and Parks were 
named to the second team. And outfielder 
Mary Ann Thomason, first baseman Casey 
Minter, and second baseman Sarah Hankins 
were honorable mention selections. 

Carter was named the team's Outstanding 
Offensive Player. She hit .508, the first time 
Hargrove has ever had a player hit above .500 
with an official number of at-bats. Herzberg was 
named Outstanding Defensive Player. She 
compiled a fielding percentage of .982 and 
established a single-season record with eight 
assists, an incredible feat for an outfielder. 
Catcher Gina Templeton was named Most 
Inspirational. 

Mason was named Most Valuable Player. 
She led the team in several categories. She had 
179 at-bats, scored 55 runs, had 64 hits and 
four triples while batting .358. She also made 
121 assists from her shortstop position. 

Carter and Herzberg will return next 
season. 



Men's Tennis 

Larry Grose's men's tennis team captured another Region VI tennis crown April 26-27 in 
Overland Park. 

Cowley, fueled by five singles champions and all three doubles titles, cruised to the team 
title with 35 points. Johnson County finished second with 28. 

Richard Winter at No. 1, Camilo Velandia at No. 2, Randy Robinson at No. 3, Chris Pregler 
at No. 5, and Jeff Baker at No. 6 captured singles titles. The doubles teams of Winter and Skye 
Castle at No. 1, Velandia and Baker at No. 2, and Pregler and Robinson at No. 3 also won 
titles. 

By virtue of winning Region VI, the Tigers will travel to Corpus Christi, Texas, May 20-25 for 
the National Junior College Athletic Association national tournament. 

Cowley finished third in the nation last year, but has two national championships to its 
credit in the past seven years, winning it all in 1989 and 1991. 

Women's Tennis 

For Gary Abner, it was a learning experience. 

For his Lady Tiger tennis team, it was a disappointing end to the season. 

Cowley, competing in the Region VI Tournament in Overland Park April 26-27, was the team 
leader after the first day. But Saturday proved to be a different story as no player was able to 
find the win column on the second day. 

Cowley finished fourth in the tournament with 14 points and failed to qualify for nationals for 
the first time in years. 

"We didn't play too well the second day," Abner said. "I thought for the season we didn't 
do too badly. We had some young players who got a lot of good experience this season." 

The Lady Tigers played well on the first day of the tournament. Sarah Ramirez won her No. 
1 singles match; Jenny Page received a bye and then won her No. 2 singles match; Adriana 
Gilcreest received a bye at No. 3 singles, then won a match; Kristen Smith received a first-round 
bye, then lost at No. 4 singles; Erin Plumer won her first-round match at No. 5 singles; and Flo 
Apraiz won a match at No. 6 singles after receiving a first-round bye. 

The Tigers were equally impressive at doubles. At No. 1, Ramirez and Page defeated Pratt 
after getting a first-round bye; Gilcreest and Apraiz defeated Butler County in the first round at 
No. 2 doubles; and Smith and Plumer defeated Butler County after gaining a first-round bye at 
No. 3 doubles. 

Johnson County won the tournament with 34 points, followed by Seward with 23, Barton 
County with 22 and Cowley. 



♦ 



♦ Athletics 




Men's Basketball 

Mark Nelson's third season proved to be one of transition as the Tigers struggled to stay 
above the .500 mark for much of the season, finishing with an 18-13 overall record. The Tigers 
finished 11-5 in Jayhawk Conference East Division play, good for a third-place finish. 

Cowley reached the Region VI tournament, only to lose to Seward County in the first round, 
61-60. Twice during the season the Tigers put together four-game winning streaks. 

Post-season awards were plentiful for players. Dibi Ray, point guard, signed with the 
University of Missouri, and Hal Lewis, post player, signed with the University of Alabama at 
Birmingham. 

Ray put up some solid numbers last season, both on the court and in the classroom. He 
averaged 13 points, three rebounds and seven assists per game (third in Region VI) while 
shooting 81 percent from the free-throw line, fourth in Region VI. He ranked fifth in Region VI from 
3-point range with 44 percent shooting. He was a two-time All-Jayhawk Conference East Division 
selection. 

Twice Ray was named Cowley's Student Athlete of the Year, and he was honored by the 
Kansas Association of Community Colleges as that organization's Student Athlete of the Year in 
1995-96. Ray held a 3.66 grade-point average. 

James McVey signed to play at Youngstown State of Ohio. 

Women's Basketball 

In her third and final season as head coach of the Lady Tigers, DeAnn Craft guided Cowley 
to a 16-16 finish in a season marked by injuries. 

Cowley was unable to put together any kind of consistent numbers, but did end the regular 
season with three victories heading into the Region VI tournament. Cowley then hammered Colby 
72-49 in the first round before ending its season with a 78-63 loss to Kansas City. 

The star of the Lady Tigers was sophomore Damietta Velicica from Romania. Velicica, who 
signed a letter of intent to play at the University of Colorado, led the Lady Tigers in several 
statistical categories, including points per game (12.5), assists (4.8), steals (3.2), and blocked 
shots (34). Her 4.4 rebounds per game ranked third on a team. She shot 50 percent from the 
field for two-point field goals, and 31 percent from 3-point range. She was a 66-percent 
free-throw shooter. 

Velicica also was a first-team All-Jayhawk Conference East Division selection, and was 
named to the all-tournament team at two tournaments: the Golden Corral Classic and the Barton 
County Tournament. 

Craft left Cowley to become an assistant coach for the Richmond (Va.) Rage, one of eight 
teams in the newly-formed women's professional American Basketball League. 

Golf Added for Fall 96 

In an effort to bolster the athletic program at Cowley, golf will begin its inaugural season this 
fall. 

The sport, open to men and women, will be coached by Rex Soule, head of the Computer 
Graphix Technology program and public relations assistant. The Arkansas City Country Club will 
be the Tigers' home course. 

Soule said he plans to sign eight players to letters of intent, the limit established by the 
National Junior College Athletic Association. 



There are four designated conference tour- 
naments scheduled each year, four in the fall 
and four in the spring. Rules state teams may 
schedule 14 dates for the fall and spring com- 
bined. Soule said he wants to schedule up to six 
competitions each semester. 

"All my players are going to respect the tra- 
dition of the game," Soule said. "Their textbook 
is going to be the USGA (United States Golf 
Association) Rules of Golf. They're going to 
appreciate what golf is, and most of the players 
already know that. 

"I'll definitely stress the rules. And I want us 
to have one of the most respected teams out 
there, how we're looked at by other schools. I 
want us to have good kids and gentlemen." 

"If I can get at least four good, solid play- 
ers, which I think I have a good shot of doing, 
we're going to compete," he said. "It would be 
great to qualify for nationals the first year out. At 
this point I really don't know what the teams out 
there now are shooting." 

Strategies for golf differ greatly from team 
sports such as basketball. Soule said there defi- 
nitely is strategy involved on the golf course. 

"I will stress a lot of course management," 
he said. "Knowing where to hit the ball for the 
best shot. I'm going to stress playing smart golf. 
Play your own game. Don't worry about what 
others on your team are shooting. Just go out 
and play your own game." 

Soule said while players must have the 
physical tools to perform well, golf is "80 per- 
cent" mental. 

"Depending on the situation, there's pres- 
sure there," Soule said. "You have to learn to 
deal with what's ahead of you. Play it shot by 
shot. If you have a bad hole, forget it. Get your 
head together and go on." 

Soule played golf at Arkansas City High 
School from the fall of 1979 to the spring of 
1983. The Bulldog teams he played for quali- 
fied for the Class 5A state tournament all four 
years. 



♦ 26 



Outreach C e n f e r s ♦ 



Hundreds attend 
dedication of South Side 
Education Center 



Cowley County Community College officially joined hands Feb. 29, 1996 with two other 
institutions of higher learning as the South Side Education Center in Wichita was dedicated in 
the presence of about 250 people. 

Dr. Patrick J. McAtee, president of Cowley; Dr. Eugene Hughes, president of Wichita State 
University; and Dr. Rosemary Kirby, president of Wichita Area Technical College, each spoke 
about the partnership that has been forged between the schools. 

"What a wonderful day this is," McAtee said. "This is one we've been dreaming about for 
a long, long time. We are really going to pool our services for south-central Kansans." 

The center, located at 4501 E. 47th St. South in Wichita, is a unique educational 

partnership in this region. It combines educational offerings of Cowley, WSU and WATC under 

one roof. 

Jackie Snyder, dean of academic outreach at WSU, introduced the three college presidents and Michael C. Germann, director of 

communications and government affairs at Boeing-Wichita. She said the partnership between the three schools was proof that the needs of citizens 

were of the utmost importance. 

"This particular location allows us to reach out to areas we never could before," Snyder said. "This is the fruit of a common union." 
The South Side Education Center, a 23,000-square-foot facility, is a full service operation for all three institutions, where students can be advised, 
enroll and pay fees, in addition to taking classes. The center officially opened Oct. 23, 1995. 

Kirby, who also teaches a class for WSU, said a phrase in a chapter of her textbook rang true for the dedication ceremony. 
"It said 'times are changing' and they certainly are," Kirby said. "An all-in-one campus is extremely exciting. This shows that it can be done." 
Hughes, WSU's president since 1993, has dramatically changed the way the university does business by opening outreach centers downtown 
and in west Wichita. He said getting people to recognize what an urban university was all about was a priority. 

"We are interested in serving the entire metropolitan area and we can do that in partnerships," Hughes said. "What you see here is an example 
of that." 

Hughes said Pittsburg State University, which specializes in technical education, could become a partner as early as this fall. 
"But the big player in this whole effort is Boeing and the 15,000 employees, and our neighbor down the road in Cessna and others," Hughes 
said. "Post-secondary education is on the move in Kansas. If you give us the opportunity, we'll find a way to get it done." 

Germann said the South Side Education Center was important to his company because of the potential to train and retrain employees. 
"The things we do today are not the things we will do tomorrow," Germann said. "A person who left (Boeing) five years ago would be surprised 
today because they are not using the same skills. This is what education needs to do, to train the work force of the future." 

McAtee was delighted to be in the partnership. He said the teamwork that had taken place to make the center a reality was the result of 
directives from a number of state 
agencies. 

"The Legislature, the State 
Board of Education and the 
Department of Education implored 
us to work together cooperatively," 
McAtee said. "We're doing with 
this venture what they've asked us 
to do. We look for great things to 
happen here." 

McAtee singled out Conrad 
Jimison, associate dean of 
instruction at Cowley, and Gene 
Cole, Cowley's director of busi- 
ness and industry, for helping put 
the center together. 




2 7 ♦ 



From left, Susan Sanders, Dr. Eugene Hughes, Dr. Pat f 
Dr. Rosemary Kirby, and Michael Germann 



♦ Outreach Centers 



During the 1995-96 academic year, off-campus enrollment continued to surge, making it 
one of the most important aspects of Cowley's operation. 

While the opening of the Southside Education Center in Wichita was the big story, another 
occurred just down the road in Sumner County. The college located a building in downtown 
Wellington in which to lease, so pressure could be taken off Wellington High School to hold 
classes. 

"Getting a Wellington Center, an actual building, was an important step for us," said Dr. Pat 
McAfee, president. "It just allows for better access to our classes. And we plan to expand our 
offerings in Wellington." 

The Mulvane Center, however, continued to be the biggest off-campus enrollment site, 
accounting for nearly 25 percent of Cowley's total enrollment. And with the opening of the 
Southside Education Center in Wichita, the Mulvane Center has actually been positively 
effected. 

"We've felt all along that Mulvane could still grow even if we opened a center in Sedgwick 
County," McAfee said. "We feel real good about what we're doing in Mulvane and at 
Southside. But like everything else, there's always room for improvement." 

Following are some enrollment figures for off-campus sites during the 1995-96 academic 



year: 



Off-Campus and Outreach Center FTE 



Center 


Fall 1995 FTE 


Fall 1994 FTE 


Arkansas City Off Campus 


23.9 


20.6 


Boeing 


79.7 


0.0 


Caldwell 


11.2 


6.4 


Conway Springs 


12.3 


9.8 


Mulvane 


404.2 


410.5 


Oxford 


178 


22.0 


Strother Field Facility 


57.9 


62.7 


Strother Field Business & Industry 


13.5 


19.8 


We ington 


50.0 


60.0 


Wichita Area Technica College 


77 


4.5 


Winfield 


467 


52.4 


Winfield State Hospital & Training Center 


20.2 


13.9 


Other small sites combined 


23.0 


22.4 


Outreach Program Total (FTE) 


768.1 


705.0 


Center 


Spring 1996 FTE 


Spring 1995 FTE 


Argonia 


3.73 


3.20 


Arkansas City Off Campus 


25.20 


17.33 


Boeing 


76.20 


48.00 


Belle Plaine 


16.53 


2.20 


Caldwell 


9.13 


8.13 


Conway Springs 


7.33 


4.00 


Mulvane 


400.47 


406.40 


Oxford 


18.88 


21.07 


Strother Field Facility 


51.87 


56.47 


Strother Field Business & Industry 


12.60 


16.79 


Southside Education Center 


7.80 


- 


Wei ington 


61.00 


63.53 


Wichita Area Technical College 


6.73 


747 


Winfield 


69.87 


51.87 


Winfield State Hospital & Training Cente 


35.87 


12.73 


Other small sites combined 


4.13 


6.07 


Outreach Program Total (FTE) 


807.34 


725.26 



Growth of 
outreach sites continues 



"We've felt all along that Mulvane could still 

grow even if we opened a center in Sedgwick 

County. We feel real good about what we're 

doing in Mulvane and at Southside. But like 

everything else, there's always room for 

improvement. " 

-Dr. Pat McAtee 



♦ 2 



u s i n e s s 



a n 



n d 



u s 



r.y ♦ 



College's 

business and industry 

connection never stronger 



"The potential for industry to utilize the college 
is enormous,. I don't think we've even begun 
to see what we can do for each other. " 

-Gene Cole 



Gene Cole, Cowley's director of business and industry, was a busy man during the 
1995-96 academic year. He was busy laying the groundwork for what promises to be an 
exciting 1996-97. 

"We're breaking new ground with the changing business and industry climate in our region," 
said Cole, who heads Cowley's business and industry efforts from his office at Strother Field. 
"We're setting up pre-employment training programs, employee screening, and a very extensive 
retraining process for major industries in the area." 

Last year, Cowley's relationship with Boeing grew at a steady pace. The college's adviser 
at Boeing, Jeanette Oesterlin, sees hundreds of Boeing workers each month. Cole said the 
college's basic manufacturing skills and certificate programs also saw growth last year. 

Cultivating relationships. That's what Cole spent most of his time doing last year. He met 
countless times with officials from General Electric's Aircraft Engine Maintenance Center at 
Strother Field, and with those from Rubbermaid in Winfield. Those partnerships, Cole said, will 
bring about exciting new changes for the college and for the industries. 

"The potential for industry to utilize the college is enormous," Cole said. "I don't think we've 
even begun to see what we can do for each other." 

Another industry that the college has linked with is Total Petroleum. When the company 
announced in early 1996 that the plant would be closing, Cowley stepped in to develop 
training programs to help the unemployed get back into the labor force. Twenty former Total 
Petroleum employees were enrolled in an accelerated machine tool technology program 
designed to make them employable in those areas within about five months. Normally the 
machine tool program is two years. 

Bev Black, Cowley's coordinator of job training and placement, also has worked closely 
with business and industry to establish programs that benefit the employer. 

Through the years, Cowley has developed or offered programs for Gilliland Printing, Inc., 
GE, Rubbermaid, Gordon-Piatt Energy Group, the city of Arkansas City, local school districts, day 
care centers, nursing homes, special education cooperatives, KSQ Blowmolding, Social 
Rehabilitation Services, Southwestern Bell Telephone, Montgomery Elevator, Boeing, Cessna, 
Winfield State Hospital and Training Center, and the business and industry division of banks. 

"We feel we are a valuable resource to the local and area labor force," said Dr. Pat 
McAfee, college president. "That's why we put so much time and effort into establishing these 
relationships. We want Cowley County and the surrounding area to be vibrant and prosperous, 
and we'd like to be a major contributor toward that goal." 



2 9 ♦ 



♦ Q 



u o 



i t y 



a t i v e s 



Continuous quality improvement. To some, those three words mean very little. To Cowley 
employees, they mean a considerable investment of time and energy to enhance the 
performance of the college. 

Twelve Quality Initiative teams involving 40 staff members generated ideas during the 
1995-96 academic year to improve the way the college conducts its business. The purpose of 
the program is to get people involved in the school and to identify a problem and submit 
solutions. 

At a half-day inservice Aug. 16, 1996, two teams received $1,000 President's Awards and 
three received $500 awards for their work on specific projects. 

One award-winning team studied the many possibilities of using multi-media instruction in 
delivering and learning lessons. The team of Technology Applications to the Classroom 
consisted of Rex Soule, Richard Tredway, Bart Allen, and Bruce Crouse. The team worked toward 
two goals: 1 ) develop equipment needs; and 2) design processes to pilot multi-media instruction 
applications for instructional delivery. 

"We looked at three classrooms to set up multi-media instruction," said Soule, director of 
Cowley's computer graphix technology program. "These rooms would have all the equipment for 
teachers to deliver instructions to students instead of just a lecture." 

Emergency situations were the focus of the other President's Award winner, the Workplace 
Violence team, who worked to ensure that the situations will be handled correctly. The team was 
made up of Tony Crouch, June Bland, Elvin Hatfield, Bryan McChesney, and Bud Shelton. 

Teams receiving monetary awards will be able to decide how best to spend the money. 
However, it must be spent on something related to the project. Each member of the five teams 
also received a "TEAMWORK" wall plaque. 

Employees may have a chance to continue education opportunities in the areas of 
personal development, career enhancement and technical training because of the proposed 
plan of the Professional Staff Development team. Team members are Jody Arnett, Bev Black, 
JoLynne Oleson, Stu Osterthun, Peggy Paton, Wanda Shepherd, and Janice Stover. This team, 
along with two others, received $500 Quality Leadership awards. 

The two other $500 winners were the Campus-Wide Fiber Optic Connection team and the 
Student Tracking team. Fiber optic team members are Gary Detwiler, Charles McKown, Sid 
Regnier, and Mike Crow. Student Tracking team members are Bev Black, Stover, Terri Morrow, 
Forest Smith, Linda Strack, Crouse, Charlie White, and Maggie Picking 

Each team submitted a proposal which would make a difference in each or all of the 
following criteria: improve the quality of work and/or educational environment, enhance 
customer service, maintain continuity or longevity of improvement, and help meet the institutional 
mission. 

"Each team sets certain goals that follow the list of criteria and work toward accomplishing 
them," said Quality Improvement Processes instructor Wayne Short. 

Proposals will be accepted for the next Quality Initiative program until December and the 
Quality Council, comprised of administrators, faculty and staff, hope to wrap it up in the spring 
of 1997. However, many projects will be on-going. 

"With the 12 teams getting involved we have had a lot of positive feedback and are 
waiting for proposals for the '96-97 school year," said Picking, vice president of student affairs. 

The other seven teams participating in the project: Kids at Cowley, TQM Tools for the 
Natural Sciences, South Central Kansas Mathematics and Technology Conference, Social 
Science Child Care, Facilities Scheduling Process Improvement, Non-traditional Student 
Recruitment, and Role of Computerized Assessment in Outcomes. 



Quality awards presented 
to Cowley employees 



"With the 1 2 teams getting involved we have 
had a lot of positive feedback and are waiting 
for proposals for the '96-97 school year. " 
-Maggie Picking 



♦ 30 



Community 



n v o 



n. f ♦ 



County leaders meet, 
provide college 
with feedback 



"The college is blessed to hove all the 
good friends it has. Your input is valuable 
on the survey. " 

-Dr. Pat McAfee 



Cowley may be doing a good job, but it wants to improve its services to the surrounding 
area. 

And it wants people within its service area to have input. 

That's why nearly 100 county leaders met March 19, 1996 at Cowley's Arkansas City 
campus to help the college assemble its next long-range plan. Everyone who attended the 
meeting filled out a community survey. Then each table brainstormed ways Cowley could better 
serve the campus, community and service area. 

Dr. Pat McAfee, Cowley president, began the luncheon meeting by providing a quick 
overview of the college. He discussed everything from student success, the college's mission 
statement, the link with area business and industry, and how the college is funded. 

"The college is blessed to have all the good friends it has," McAtee told the group in the 
Wright Community Room. "Your input is valuable on the survey." 

The college is preparing for its next long-range plan, and feedback from Tuesday's meeting 
will be used to give the college some direction. McAtee said he was pleased with the meeting. 

"I thought it went pretty well," he said. "It was a pretty good turnout. We just wanted to let 
them know the direction we're heading and why and get some feedback from them on what they 
think we ought to be involved in." 

Questions that appeared on the community survey include: Have you ever enrolled in 
credit courses at the college? Have you used any of the college's services or facilities? Have 
you attended activities at Cowley within the past two years? Are you aware that you can com- 
plete an associate's degree at one of several off-campus sites? And, What is your opinion of 
Cowley in terms of what you expect from an institution of higher learning? 

"Whatever you'd like to tell us, we'd like to put it into the next long-range plan," McAtee told 
the group. 

Several Cowley employees helped facilitate the meeting. 

The eight people at each table then discussed and listed ways the college could improve. 
Time allowed for people from only one table to voice their suggestions. Bill Docking, president 
of Union State Bank in Arkansas City, outlined the six items. 

"Everybody at the table feels Cowley is doing a good job," he said. "But we did come up 
with some suggestions." 

Those included establishing a non-traditional dental hygiene program, an adjunct nursing 
program with South Central Kansas Regional Medical Center in Ark City, and continuing to 
pursue technical programs with ongoing training. Another focused on promoting Cowley more in 
Winfield. 

McAfee's presentation included a slide listing the number of students enrolled in current 
technical programs at Cowley. 

"I'm interested in what you think of this," he said. "We're looking to maximize our technical 
programs. We want to know what other needs could be met." 

McAtee said each of the five divisions at the college also would be asked to provide input 
for the next long-range plan. 

"We want to try to get everybody to plug into this next plan," McAtee said. 



3 1 ♦ 



♦ S c h o o 



Work 



On March 11, 1996 Secretary Robert Reich of the Department of Labor and Secretary 
Richard Riley of the Department of Education announced that 37 local partnerships had been 
chosen from throughout the United States for federal funding of more than $20 million for their 
School-to-Work systems. 

On behalf of the South Central Kansas Partnership, Dr. Pat McAtee of Cowley County 
Community College announced May 6 at Arkansas City High School that this region is one of 
those recommended to be funded for the next five years. This area is the only recipient of School- 
To-Work federal dollars in Kansas. The recommendation will bring an expected $649,000 in 
federal funds to CCCC, USD 470-Arkansas City, USD 509 South Haven, 
USD 353-Wellmgton, and USD 465-Winfield. 

The Partnership's School-To-Work plan is grounded in 10 goals which closely align with 
federal legislation. These goals will manifest themselves in a School-To-Work system which 
provides all students with work- and school-based job learning experiences and supportive 
curriculum. Based upon a solid foundation of career awareness from kindergarten through 9th 
grade, the system in south central Kansas will feature job clusters from which students will choose 
a career major by 10th grade. The job clusters include entrepreneurship/business management, 
agri-business, industry, arts, health, and public/human services. 

School-to-Work is not more teaching or another add-on to the already hectic school day. 
School-to-Work is a system-seamlessly integrating academic and vocational studies. The local 
plan increases services to students to improve matching their abilities and interests with available 
jobs and overall worker skills needed for the future. According to McAtee, "Research and 
experience has proven, this is an exciting and valuable way for students to learn." 

Two years ago, Cowley County Community College facilitators gathered together with 
school educators, industry and business leaders, parents, students and representatives of social 
and other community agencies to explore what the school-to-work initiative might mean for this 
area. 

Throughout the following months, representatives of this group met to develop a plan of 
action which will inspire all students to learn at their fullest potential and be prepared to find a 
successful career when they finish school, whether it is immediately after leaving high school or 
by going on to technical training, community college, or a university. 

The Partnership has committed to: 1 ) Recruit additional local employers to increase the 
number of work-based learning opportunities available in the region; 2) Offer technical 
assistance and/or training that may be necessary for business workplace mentors, guidance 
counselors, and teachers; 3) Provide comprehensive career awareness/guidance counseling to 
students and out-of-school youth; 4) Build challenging integrated programs of study in each 
students' selected career major; 5) Develop planned programs of job training and paid work 
experiences relevant to student career major (which, where applicable, lead to the awarding of 
a skills certificate); and 6) Create placement and follow-up services for students to assist them to 
find a job, to continue their education, or to enter a job training or apprenticeship program. 



College, area schools 

to benefit from 

School-to-Work grant 



The South Central School-To-Work Partnership 

will be overseen by a Steering Committee 

including the following members: 

David Avery 

Rubbermaid Corporation 

Donna Avery 

Cowley County Economic Development Council 

Bev Black 
SCK STW Work-based Learning Supervisor, CCCC 

Mickey Chrisler 

Winfield Chamber of Commerce 

Kathy Docherty 

General Electric Corporation 

Dr. Ron Fagan 

Wellington Schools 

Terry Cray 

City of Winfield 

Greg Kelly 

First Intermark Corporation 

Vickie Kelly 

Kansas State STW Coordinator 

Dale luce 

Union Representative IUE/AFL-CIO 

David Scraper 

Winfield Schools 

Dr. Jean Snell 

Arkansas City Schools 

Deeta Strater 

Precision Machining Corporation 

James Sutton 

South Haven Schools 

Virgil Watson 

Arkansas City Memorial Hospital 

Charles White 

SCK STW Director, CCCC 

Morris Wheeler 

General Electric Corporation 




From left, Greg Kelly, Donna Avery, 
David Avery, Terry Gray, Jim Sutton, 
Dave Scraper, Dr. Pat McAtee, 
Dr. Ron Fagan, and Bill Docking. 



♦ 32 



Resource Development 



F i 



sea 



I Y 



e a r 



9 9 5 



♦ 



Submission Q. r P nt 



Date 



itle 



Funding 
Agency 



Project 
Director 



Amount Funded Amount 

Requested 



Remarks 



8/4 



Advanced Tech. 
Education 



National Science Kevin Pennington 

Foundation 



Preliminary 



Yes 



8/4 



Advanced Tech. 
Education 



National Science Iowa State 

Foundation Consortium 



Preliminary 



Yes 



Preliminary 
Approved 

Preliminary 
Approved 



10/7 



H/7 



School-to-Work 
Local Partnerships 

School-to-Work 
Local Partnerships 



KS. Board of 
Education 



Fed. Dept of Ed. 



11/15 
11/17 



2/1 



5/15 



School-to-Work 
Curriculum Develop 

Child Care Center 



KS. Board of 
Education 



Charlie White 
Charlie White 



Dolly Bonfy 
Ark City USD 



Preliminary 



Yes Preliminary 

Approved 



$199,942 
$10,000 



Yes 



$199,942 This grant is a 5-year grant of $649,813. 

mis year. 



Yes 



10,000 



Spin-off from partnership. 



Kansas SRS 



Judy Queen 



157895 



No 



Ranked highly. Request high. Future 
Kansas funding unsure. 



Advanced Tech. 
Education 



National Science Kevin Pennington $383,400 

Foundation over 3 years 



No 



Ranked highly. Invited to resubmit in 
December. Closely linked with following 
proposal. 



2/1 


Advanced Tech. 


National Science 


Iowa State 


$750,000 


Yes 


5 year 
funding 


This is a consortium grant. Our share will 
be this amount over rive years. 


2/1 


Basic Arts 
Presenting 


Kansas Arts 
Commission 


Connie Bonfy 


$15,000 


Yes 


$14,200 


State funds shrinking due to federal cuts. 


2/1 


Training 


Ks. State KER 


General Electric 


$155,194 


Yes 


$100,000 


Will pay for CCCC training. 


2/1 


NDT Training 


Natl Science 
Foundation 


Iowa State 
Bruce Crouse 
CCCC Partnership 


300,000 


Yes 


$300,000 


Training for CCCC students and faculty 
for 2 yrs. 


2/15 


Arts Education 


Kansas Arts 
Commission 


Ellen Snell 


$3,000 


Yes 


$3,000 


Collaboration with CCCC to bring 
students to campus exhibits. 


2/15 


Drug & Alcohol 
Prevention 


City of Ark City 


Brenda Blaufuss 


$4,000 


Yes 


$2,000 




2/15 


Drug & Alcohol 
Prevention 


Cowley County 


Brenda Blaufuss 


$3,000 


Yes 


$2,000 





3/1 


Music Residency 


Mid-America 
Arts Alliance 


Connie Bonfy 


$15,000 


Yes 


$13,620 




3/15 


Digital Library 


National Science 
Foundation 


Betty Martin 


Preliminary 


Yes 


Preliminary 
Approved 


Eligible to apply for final. 


4/4 


Internet Connection 


Dept of Commerce 
TIIAP 


Charles McKown 


$249,000 


No 




Over 800 applications. 7% funded 
eligible to re-apply in March. 


4/4 


County-wide Planning 


Natl. Endow. Arts 


Connie Bonfy 


$30,000 


Pending 




Won't be decided until spring 97 


4/15 


Training 


Ks. State KER 


Montgomery 
Elevator/KONE 


$31,000 


Yes 


31,000 


will pay for CCCC training. 


5/1 


Basic ABE 


KS. Board of 
Education 


Chris Vollweider 


$50,000 


Yes 


$50,000 




5/1 


ABE Staff 
Development 


KS. Board of 
Education 


Chris Vollweider 


$4,000 


Yes 


$2,040 




5/1 


Capital Outlay 


KS. Board of 
Education 


Lynn Stalnaker 


$200,000 


Yes 


$110,000 





Kansas Enrichment 



Southwestern Bell Gary Detwiler 



$25,000 



Pending 



Requested to resubmit "as is" in October. 
Did this adding a few budget changes. 



6/1 


Gender Equity 


KS. Board of 
Education 


Director 


$35,000 


Yes 


$35,000 




6/1 


Displaced Homemakers, 

Single Parents, 

Single Pregnant Women 


KS. Board of 
Education/ 
Carl Perkins 


Judy Queen 


$40,000 


Yes 


$40,000 




6/1 


Program Improve 


Carl Perkins 


Lynn Stalnaker 


$125,277 


Yes 


$132,186 




6/17 


Digital Library 


National Science 
Foundation 


Betty Martin 

Jasper Schadd, WSU 


$239,554 


No 




Reviewed "with merit." Needed 
technical strength. Very competitive, 
but wanted the experience. 


6/17 


Tooled for School 


Corporation for 
National Service 


Mark Jarvis 


$17,000 


Yes 




Details are being worked out. 


6/21 


Challenge Grants for 
Technology in Education 


U.S. Dept. of 
Education 


Gene Snell 


$4.12 million 
between 6 partners 


No 




600 applicants, 24 awards. 
Eligible to try again. 



334 



♦ 



men 



t Ana 



y s i s 






10- Year Fall Enrollment Comparison 
Total Headcount and Total FTE 



3059 



3177 



2856 2926 




1987 



1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 



|| 
Total Headcount 



2019 2144 



10- Year Spring Enrollment Comparison 
Total Headcount and Total FTE 

3 
2682 
2257 



2898 2987 2940 



2388 




1987 1988 



990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 
Total Headcount 



i 



■ 



10- Year Summer Enrollment Comparison 
Total Headcount and Total FTE 



1073 1081 1099 106 9 




1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 
Total Headcount 



I 



I 



10- Year Fall Enrollment Comparison 
Major Outreach Centers Total FTE 






I 









1987 1988 1989 


1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 


1 995 1 996 


1 Ark City Off Campus 


I Mulvane I Oxford 


1 Strother Field 


J Wellington 


■ Winfield WSH&TC 





♦ 34 



E n 



r o 



m e 



n t A n a I y s i . ;, ♦ 



Cowley 

County 

Community 

College 

ond Area 

Vocational-Technical 

School 

has grown tremendously 

within the last ten years. 

The graphs on these 

pages represent growth 

in a variety of ways 

throughout the decade. 



10-Year Spring, Summer and Fall Enrollment Comparison 
Total Credit Hours 




i i 

1987 1988 



I I 
1989 1990 



I I I 
1991 1992 1993 






1994 



1995 



10-Year Fall Enrollment Comparison 
Male vs. Female Total Headcount 



1996 




Male 



Female 



3 5 ♦ 



♦ F 



i n a n c i a 



Aid Analysis 



Title IV Expenditures 
Total -$1,308,990.5' 




$344,485.00 



$23,376.00 



$27,252.00 



I I I 

Federal PELL Grant Federal SEOG Grant Federal Work Study 




Stafford Loans 



15,841 00 



I 
PLUS Loans 



Institutional Work Study 



Institutional Program Expenditures 
Total -$738,034.44 



536 84 




$70,500.39 



Endowment Scholarships 




Institutional Scholarships 



Percentage of Total Aid Processed 
Total - $2,047,024.95 




Cowley County 

Community College offers 

o diverse financial aid 

program tailored to the 

students in need. More 

than $2 million of total 

aid was processed 

through Cowley's 

Financial Aid office during 

the 95-96 academic 

year. Students are able 

to choose from grants, 

college work study or 

loans to meet their 

financial needs. 



Federal PELL Grant 

Institutional Scholarships 

Endowment Scholarships 

Institutional Work Study 

PLUS Loans 

Stafford Loans 

Federal Work Study 

Federal SEOG Grant 
♦ 36 



o w m e n t 



A 



s s o c 



a t i o 



o r s 



9 9 



♦ 



We would like to 
appreciation for their generous 
End' .sociation member; 

oport of Cowley's varic 



A.C.H.S. Class of 1953 

ADM Milling Company 

Air Force Aid Society 

Bart Allen 

Allen's Furniture & Carpet 

American Legion Auxiliary #18 

Joe and Eleanor Anderson 

Tracy Anderson 

Anthony Kiwanis Club 

Arkansas City Arts Council 

Arkansas City Area Chamber of Commerce 

Arkansas City Traveler 

Ark City Evening Kiwanis Club 

Ark City F.O.P. 

Ark City Mirror & Glass 

Ark City Music & Drama Club 

Ark City Tumbleweeds 

Ark Valley Distributing 

Ark Veterinary Associates - Drs. White & Yorke 

Rod and Jody Arnett 

Mr. and Mrs. Arnold Arrowood 

Dr. and Mrs. Alfredo Aucar 

Joe and Donna Avery 

Albert and Karen Bacastow 

Albert and Thelma Bacastow 

Bailly's Farm Supply 

Robert L. Bangert 

Barbour Title Company 

Mr. and Mrs. Buel Beck 

Beech Aircraft Foundation 

Mike Belenski 

Kim Benedict and Rick Gregory 

Beta Sigma Phi - City Council 

Beta Sigma Phi — Gamma Theta 

Mr. and Mrs. Jim Bernhardt 

Binney and Smith, Inc. - Winfield 

D.D. and Bev Black 

June Bland 

Philip and Brenda Blaufuss 

Myrtle Bly 

Boeing Company 

Bob and Jean Boggs 

Devon and Connie Bonfy 

Dick and Dolly Bonfy 

Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Bonnell 

Mrs. Bea Boory 

John V. Bossi 

Mr. and Mrs. Don Bowman 

Boyer Educational Trust 

Mr. and Mrs. Joe Boyle 

Marietta Brammer 

Bill and Debbie Bridges 

Brown's Office Supply 

Melburn Porter Brown 

Robert A. and Jana Brown 

Roger A. and Suzanne Brown 

Bryant Hardware 

Philip E. Buechner Jr. 

Tony and Wilda Buffo 

Don and Wanda Burkarth 

Mr. and Mrs. Darren Burroughs 

Mr. and Mrs. Dave Burroughs 

Mrs. Betty Burton 

Alphonse Caicedo 

Max and Marcia Cales 

Phil and Gloria Campbell 

Mildred Carpenter/Marie Vickers Trust 



Mr. and Mrs. Thomas E. Carr 

Col. and Mrs. Johnny Castle 

Cedar Vale Booster Club 

Cedar Vale USD #285 

Cellular One 

Mr. and Mrs. Salem H. Chaaban 

Cherokee Nation 

Mr. and Mrs. Don Cheslic 

Cheyenne & Arapahoe Tribes of Oklahoma 

Marilyn Childers 

Citizen's Scholarship Foundation 

Robert and Judy Clark 

Albert and Audine Clemente 

Ben and Irene Cleveland 

Coca-Cola Bottling Co. 

Gene and Donella Cole 

College Education Association 

Mr. and Mrs. David Colquhoun 

Clint and Brenda Combs 

Conco Inc. 

Judge and Mrs. Richard Cook 

Ms. Betty R. Cook-Peterson 

Coonrod & Associates 

Mr, and Mrs. Estel Counts 

Cowley County Livestock Assoc. 

David and Pauline Craft 

DeAnn Craft 

Dr. Lynn Cramer 

Mr. Steve Cranford 

Tony Crouch 

Bruce Crouse 

Mike and Sue Crow 

Bill and Marge Curless 

Julia A. Dailey 

D & S Retail Liquor, Wine & Spirits 

Daisy Mae's Cafe 

Jim and Rae Dale 

Kirke Dale Memorial Scholarship Trust 

Lee and Sue Darby 

Daulton Construction 

David's Electronics 

Charles S. and Verna Davis 

A, Vance Day 

Jere and Susan Dean 

Delta Dental 

Delta Kappa Gamma-Upsilon Chapter 

Marilyn Denny 

Derby USD #260 

Gary and Joy Detwiler 

Mr. and Mrs. Jasper DeVore 

Dillons Store #38 

Meredith Docking 

William R. Docking 

Dodge City Community Foundation 

Edith Dunbar 

Duncan Hog Farm - Buel Duncan 

Lyle and Terry Eaton 

Emrick's Van & Storage Co. 

Stephen and Janet English 

Doug and Dejon Ewing 

Eleanor S. Farrar 

John Farrar 

Bob and Lois Fencil 

First Baptist Church - Ark City 

First Baptist Church - Winfield 

First Presbyterian Church - Derby 

First Presbyterian Church — Winfield 



Danny and Melva Fisk 

First Community Federal Savings & Loan 

First National Bank of Winfield 

Mrs. Kathryn Foster 

Michael Foust 

Mr, and Mrs. Phil Foust 

Foster's Furniture 

Leslie Foust 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry Fox 

Curtis and Cynthia Freeland 

Jack and Ruene Gage 

Edward L. and Genevieve Goff Galle 

Mrs. Belva Gardner 

Garvey International, Inc: 

General Electric Company 

Kenton Gibbs 

Gilliland Printing, Inc. 

Ken and Bonnie Gilmore 

Ben and Taeko Givens 

Velda Gochis 

Ron and Donetta Godsey 

Mr. and Mrs. J.G. Goff 

Gordon-Embers Architects 

Gordon-Piatt Energy Group, Inc. 

Graves Drug Store #11 

Great Western Dining Inc. 

Lee Gregg 

Howard and Shirley Griffin 

Grimes Jewelers 

Steve and Cinda Grimes 

Loren and Dorothy Grimes 

Larry and Nyla Grose 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank Groves 

Phil Groves Oil Co. 

Mike Groves Oil Co. 

Frank Groves Oil Co. 

Mike and Judi Groves 

Allen and Beverly Grunder 

Halliburton Foundation 

Haltstead USD #440 

Wayne and Kay Hamilton 

Ed and Linda Hargrove 

Harvey's Fashions 

Mr. Harvey's 

Donald and Ann Hastings 

Elvin and Dixie Hatfield 

Darrell L. Hawkins 

Hawks Funeral Home 

Bill and Linda Headrick 

Norman and Phyllis Hearn 

Steve and Carol Hearne 

Cathy S. Hendricks 

Cloide and Hazel Hensley 

Allen and Sherry Herman 

Jean C. Hickman 

CD. Higby 

Bill and Jean Hill 

Dr. Sharon Hill 

John and Janice Hitchcock 

Gary Hockenbury 

Kim and Cynthia Hocker 

Marjory Hodkin 

Jim and Joyce Holloway 

Home National Bank 

Donna Howell Sickles 

Luella Hume 

Charles and Ina Hungerford 



♦ 



♦ :ndowment Association Donor 



19 9 5-1996 



Doug and Patti Hunter 

Hutchinson Electric 

INTRUST Bank 

Mr. and Mrs. Norman Iverson 

Jan's Sport Shack 

Jarvis Accounting 

Jarvis Auto Supply, Inc. 

Bob and Helen Jay 

Steve and Joi Jay 

Ronnie and Anita Jenkins 

Booker T. Jennings III 

Bernadine Jensen 

Conrad and Janet Jimison 

Jim's Total Service 

Dorothy Johnson 

Hubert and Mildred Johnston 

Mr. and Mrs. Danny Jones 

KGE 

KSOK-WKS 

Dr and Mrs. Dan Kahler 

Kansas Arts Commission 

Kansas Humanities Council 

Kansas Industrial Services, Inc. 

Kansas Orthopaedic Center 

Kaw Nation of Oklahoma 

Keefe Printing 

John and Joan Kempf 

Charles and Mary Kerr 

Oscar Kimmell 

Dr. and Mrs. Nick Kinsch 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Kinzie 

Erwin and Fern Knocke 

Mr. and Mrs. Irvin E. Kramer 

Jeff and Julie Kratt 

Imogene Leach 

Mr. and Mrs. H, Robben Ledeker 

Legleiter Video Service 

Clay lemert 

Mr. and Mrs. Gerald Lewis 

Jean C. Lough 

Herb Lungren Auto Plaza 

Chuck and Kathy Lyman 

Ronald MagLaughlin 

Mangen Chiropractic Clinic 

Bea and Rex Marsh 

Dr. and Mrs. James Marvel 

David and Theresa Maslen 

Walt and Jane Mathiasmeier 

Don and Carol Hobaugh-Maudlin 

Kenny and Pat Mauzey 

Bernice McAtee 

Dr. and Mrs Patrick J. McAtee 

Marvin and Anita Belew McCorgary 

Mr and Mrs. Eugene McCorgary 

McDonald's 

Carriasco McGilbra 

MCI Telecommunications, Inc. 

Mr and Mrs. Michael McVey 

Mid America Arts Alliance 

Midwest Electric Supply 

Midwest Recruiters Inc. 

Jim and Ann Miesner 

Max M. Miller 

Mrs. Pearl M. Miller 

Mrs. Mary Jane Mills 

Montgomery Elevator Company 

Mike and Patti Morgan 

Sue Morris 

Scott and Kathy Morris 

Otis and Terri Morrow 

H. Dianne Morrow 

Multimedia Cablevision 

Mrs B.J. Myers 



Navaho Nation 

NCO Wife's Club 

Mrs. Gwen Nelson 

Lee Nelson 

Mr. and Mrs. Mark Nelson 

Earl G. and Jo Ann Newman 

Randy and Debbie Nittler 

Jerry L. Old, M.D. 

Osage Nation 

Stu and Lois Osterthun 

Oxford Chamber of Commerce 

Oxford Community Bank 

Oxford High School 

Oxford Lodge #165 

Neal and Anna Mae Paisley 

Ms. Margaret A. Palmer 

Parman, Tanner, Soule & Jackson, CPAs 

Parman's Furniture & Carpet 

Alan and Peggy Paton 

Paton Wholesale and Vending Co 

Don and Wilda Patterson 

Dr. and Mrs. Bob Paxton 

Ed and Maggie Picking 

Porter's Hometown Brand Center 

Mr. and Mrs. Bill Post 

Post Rock Gas, Inc. 

Bill and Kelly Potter 

Potter's Auction Service 

Prairieland Transportation Inc. 

Presbyterian Manor 

Tom and Sheila Prichard 

Puritan Billiard Parlor 

Judith Queen 

Vera Ramey 

Raymond Ramirez 

Mr. and Mrs. Terry Ramsey 

Ramsey's Auto Parts 

Ranson Capital Corp. 

Jeffrey Reese 

Regency Court Inn 

Sid and Sharon Regnier 

Dr. Glen & Bonnie Remsberg 

Bill and Arleta Rice 

Fred and Donna Rindt 

Rindt-Erdman Funeral Home 

Dr. and Mrs. Nick Rogers 

Dr. Paul P. Rogers Memorial 

Rogers & Cramer, D.D.S. 

Mrs. Gail Ross 

David and Rhonda Ross 

Rotary Club of Arkansas City 

Aileene Kingsbury Rotha 

Royal Neighbors of America 

Rubbermaid-Winfield, Inc. 

Lena M. Rush Scholarship Trust 

Richard & Valerie Rush 

Sac & Fox Nation 

Mr. and Mrs. James P. Salomon 

Lora I. Samford 

Lois Sampson 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Savala 

Rick and Jodi Schoeling 

Mr. and Mrs. David Schaller 

Greg Schartz 

Larry Schwintz 

Al Sehsuvaroglu 

Dr. and Mrs. John Seitz 

Bill and JoAnn Sheldon 

E.W. Shelton 

Wanda Shepherd 

Wayne and Sandy Short 

Mr. and Mrs. Dennis Shurtz 

Joe and Mindi Shriver 



Dr. and Mrs. Bruce Smith 

Forest and Sandra Smith 

Newton C and Mary Ellen Smith 

Ralph D. Smith 

Smyer Travel Service, Inc. 

Merle Snider Motors, Inc. 

Daniel J. and Vicki Snowden 

South Haven Teachers Assoc 

Jim and Margaret Sowden 

Mr, and Mrs Roy Soule 

Rex Soule 

Mr. and Mrs. Dan Spongier 

Roger and Diane Sparks 

Danny Squires 

Dr and Mrs. Robert A Starr 

State Bank of Winfield 

State of Kansas - Board of Regents 

Leonard and Nancy Steinle 

Florence L. Stephens 

Steven Chevrolet Inc. 

Mr. and Mrs. Bob Storbeck 

Tad and Janice Stover 

Dr. and Mrs. Rod Stoy 

Gary and Linda Strack 

John and Lee Ann Sturd 

Subway Sandwiches & Salads 

Larry Swaim 

Taylor Drug 

Mr and Mrs. Tom Templeton 

Texaco Foundation 

Dave and Naoma Thompson 

Mr, and Mrs. F.L. Thurman 

Terry and Jean Tidwell 

Richard and Nancy Tredway 

Ed and Mary Turner 

Tyler Productions, Inc. 

Udall Bank of Commerce 

Udall USD #463 

Union National Bank 

Union State Bank 

United Agency 

Mr. and Mrs. Bob Viola 

Chris Vollweider 

Waldeck Oil Company 

Waldorf Riley Inc. 

Mrs. Harold Walker 

Ms. Nellora Walker 

Mr and Mrs. H.A. Walling 

Mr, and Mrs. Don Ward 

Caroline Newman Warren 

Joan Warren 

Mabel Warren 

Mr. and Mrs. Rupert Welch 

Wellington Art Association 

Wellington Soroptimist Club 

Wellington Senior High 

Charles and Pat White 

Dale B. White 

Lewis & Louise Willhire Trust 

Willis Corroon Corp. 

Winfield Iron and Metal Inc. 

V.J. Wilkins 

Ms. Mary N. Wilson 

Rodney and Priscilla Wilson 

Woods Lumber Company 

Beatrice Wright 

Kelly J. Wright 

Morgan Wright 

Mr. and Mrs. Willard A. Wright 

Dr. and Mrs. Bob Yoachim 

Zeller Motor Company, Inc. 



♦ 3 



C o 



w 



e y at 



♦ 



Mill Levy: 21.764 

Fact: 

Of the 1 9 community colleges in Kansas, 
Cowley has the 4th lowest mill levy in the state 
at 21 .764, and has the seventh highest county 
valuation of $ 1 58,723, 352. At $40 per 
credit hour for tuition and fees, Cowley boasts 
one of the lowest tuitions in the state. 



Founded: 1922 

In 1968, the College became the first school in the state to combine a traditional liberal arts 
transfer curriculum with a program of area vocational-technical school training. 

President: 

Dr. Patrick McAfee, Ph.D., became the third president of the College on July 1, 1987. 

1996 Fall Enrollment: 

1,922.66 Full-Time Equivalency 
3,287 Headcount 

Programs: 

32 Certificate and Applied Science programs 

36 Liberal Arts/Transfer programs 

Institute of Lifetime Learning - a model Senior Citizens program 

More than 100 specialized programs and seminars offered through the Institute for Lifetime 
Learning - Special Programs Office, the Displaced Homemaker/Single Parent Program, and the 
Work and Family Program. 

Specialized training for business and industry to meet their needs. In the past the College 
has developed or offered programs for Gilliland Printing, Inc., General Electric, Rubbermaid- 
Winfield, Gordon-Piatt Energy Group, Inc., the city of Arkansas City, local school districts, day 
care centers, local nursing homes, special education co-ops, KSQ Blowmolding, Social 
Rehabilitation Services, Southwestern Bell Telephone, Montgomery Elevator, Boeing-Wichita, 
Cessna, and the Business and Industry Division of Banks. 



Enrollment Figures: 



Facts, Fall 1996: 




High School 


370 


Freshmen 


1,555 


Sophomores 


813 


Special 


549 


Total Headcount 


3,287 


Total FTE 


1,922.66 



Approximately 60% of freshmen and 
sophomores enrolled in Kansas colleges are in 
community colleges. 



Current Valuation: 

Valuation in the Fall of 1996 was $158,723,352. 

Budget: 

$14,342,738 

Facilities: 

15 buildings on a nine-acre campus in the heart of downtown Arkansas City. 

Outreach Centers in Mulvane, Strother Field, Winfield, Wellington and the South Side 
Education Center, located at 4501 E. 47th Street South in Wichita, a cooperative partnership 
between Cowley County Community College, Wichita State University, and the Wichita Area 
Technical College. Courses also taught at these area high schools: Argonia, Belle Plaine, 
Caldwell, Cedar Vale, Conway Springs, Dexter, Oxford, South Haven, and Udall. 



Employees: 

126 full-time faculty, staff and administration 
310 part-time faculty, staff and students 

Endowment Association Assets: 

July 31, 1996 assets of $ 1,090,513.02 
432 Members 



394 



♦ 



Line 



ent 

$3,241,519 in 1994 taxes. $3,363,506 was levied in 1995. 

Taxes DO NOT pay for scholarships to out-of-state athletes. 

Although the College is sixth in size among the 19 community colleges 
in Kansas, the mill levy ranks 15th. 
Your Return 

$13,996,202 a year added to the local economy. For each dollar of 
local tax support received, the College returns $5.03 to the county's economy. 
That return is greater when the total picture of the state is considered. For every 
dollar spent by the state in support of community colleges, $22.43 is returned. 

$5,310,948 annual payroll, providing 126 full-time jobs and 160 
adjunct faculty positions. 

Educational opportunities for all segments of the population at less than 
half the cost of four-year colleges. Average student age is 276 years. 

A record full-time enrollment for the fall of 1996 of 1,922.66 total FTE. 

Graduates who, according to a study by the University of Kansas, suffer 
less transfer shock than any other group of transfer students. 

Customized training for more than a dozen businesses and industries. 

A significant attraction for businesses and industries considering reloca- 
tion in this area. 

Cultural, educational and athletic events which entertain audiences 
throughout this area. 

An educational institution well known for the quality of its programs in 
both liberal arts and vocational/occupational areas. 



e in the community college 
ept, let your state representative know. 

Elected Officials 

Governor Bill Graves 

Second Floor 

State Capitol 

Topeka, Kansas 66612 

Senator Greta Goodwin 
Win field, Kansas 67156 

Representative 

Joe Shriver 

Arkansas City, Kansas 67005 

Judy Showalter 
Win field, Kansas 67156 

State Board Member 

Dr. Steve E. Abrams 

Arkansas City, Kansas 67005 



Financial aid help for Cowley County Students 

For the 1 995-96 year, more than 1,000 

Cowley County students were awarded more 

than $2 million in grants, loans, scholarships 

and work-study programs. 



♦ 4 i 






Cowley County Community Col 
Arkansas City, Kans 



I e g 

a s 



A V T S 



Jrj,&> I^_H^^JU.Xl^_rj.X^JS Mi>E=>lpOJr* 




\S5lSK,'" jfl«W 



* 



■EMM? 
( Ileycc 
a iwsasc i 



f 



44/ 



. *»* 









j 






w, 



^ 






Dr. Pat McAtee 2 

Board of Trustees 3 

Administration 4 

Tribute to Bob Storbeck 5 

Student Victories 6-10 

Faculty/Staff Achievements 11-19 

Athletic Accomplishments 20-24 

Off-Campus Achievements 25-29 

Outstanding Alumni 32-35 

Industry Connection 36 

New Program 37 

Endowment Association 40-42 

Cowley At-a-Glance 43 

Bottom Line 44 



Cowley County Community College & Area Vocational-Technical School 
125 S. Second St. • Arkansas City, Kansas • 67005 • (316) 442-0430 • 1-800-593-2222 

This annual report was produced by the Office of Public Relations, Stu Osterthun and Rex Soule. Cover photograph by Christopher Tomlinson. 





"Winning isn't everything, it's the only thing." 

That phrase spoken so boldly by the late, great 
Green Bay Packers Coach Vince Lombardi says an 
awful lot about our culture today. It seems as 
though competition — whether it be for students to 
attend Cowley County Community College, or in a 
spirited game of checkers — thrives in all of us. 

It certainly was present in late May of 1997 in 
Grand Junction, Colo., in the hearts of 26 Cowley 
Tiger baseball players and their three coaches. The 
size of their hearts could not be measured during 
the National Junior College Athletic Association 
World Series. And whether they hit the ball farther, 
pitched more strikes, or stole more bases, it didn't 
matter. The Tigers, you see, brought back to 
Cowley County the national baseball champi- 
onship. 

Winning isn't everything, it's the only thing. To 
commemorate Coach Dave Burroughs and his 
1997 team, the cover of this year's President's 
Annual Report is a photograph that says it all. 
Congratulations, Tigers. You are winners! 

And let's not forget Larry Grose and his men's 
tennis team that finished third in the nation. Larry 
has done an outstanding job throughout his career 
here at Cowley. 

The 1996-97 academic year truly was a special one. Besides the baseball team winning the national cham- 
pionship, here are some other highlights: 

• Full-time enrollment reached 1,922 for the first time in school history in the fall of 1996. And the 1997 
spring semester head count of 3,376 students was a record for total students enrolled. 

• A brand new program — Debate/Forensics — took the nation by storm and performed far beyond the 
expectations of coach Tracy Frederick. Cowley's team, comprised of nearly all novice debaters, was so 
impressive that it helped Tracy earn Newcomer of the Year honors. 

• Community support for the college flourished all year and culminated in an auction held March 14 that 
raised $30,000 for a new endowed scholarship. 

• The college stepped in to offer assistance when Total Petroleum announced it was closing its Arkansas 
City refinery in September 1996. More than 20 Total employees earned a degree in six months, thanks to a 
lot of hard work by Charlie White, Dan Squires, and others. 

• On Oct. 3, 1996, Cowley, along with Zeller Motor Co. of Arkansas City, received Kansas Awards for 
Excellence. Cowley won the Performance In Quality Award and was one of only nine organizations in 
Kansas that received awards. 

• Four more instructors earned Master Teacher awards at the National Institute for Staff and 
Organizational Development in Austin, Texas. 

I could go on and on. We are so very proud of the accomplishments of our students, our faculty, and our 
staff. And we will continue to strive to become the best in all that we do. 





$ti/ mat 




Albert 

BlClSTOW 

Term Expires 1987 





Ro\ 

GODSEl 

Term Expires 1 999 



Patti 
Hi\ter 

li 




Terry 
Tidwell 

Term Expires 1997 




Denis 

Shirtz 

Term Expires 1999 





Maggie 
Picking 



Charlei 
White 




OF 




llD 

Regyier 



!1 




OF 



ES 




Conrad 
Jimisoy 




Livv 

§talyaker 

Dean of Instruction 




Terri 
Morrow 



and College Relations 



MI^LMT Or 




Bob Storbeck could talk about himself if he 
was pressed into it, but more often he would beat 
you to the punch and always ask how you were 
doing. 

Concern for his fellow man. No matter how he 
felt, or the trials and tribulations he faced, he wor- 
ried about others first. 

Storbeck, a member of Cowley's Board of 
Trustees since 1994, died Jan. 24, 1997. He was 
72. 

He was past chairman of the Board of 
Trustees, but he preferred to influence from a much 
lower profile. He was a strong supporter of the col- 
lege in every respect, and did it in a quiet, dignified 
manner. 

"I have some pictures of Bob and me," Cowley 
President Dr. Pat McAtee said as he addressed a 
faculty meeting just days after Storbeck's death. 
"He was just here. He was a true friend of mine and 
the college's. He will be sorely missed." 

Storbeck, from Winfield, had been unable to 
attend Board meetings for a few months prior to 
his death. In December 1996, fellow trustees 
Albert Bacastow Jr., Patti Hunter, Dennis Shurtz, 
Ron Godsey, and Terry Tidwell voted to honor 

Storbeck by naming the Third Street Dormitory the Robert Storbeck Dormitory. Also established in his 
name was the D. Robert Storbeck Scholarship at Cowley. 

Storbeck was born April 14, 1924 in Vassar, Kan. He graduated from Lyndon High School in 1942. 

During World War II he served in the U.S. Army as a private first class from 1943 to 1946 in the South 
Pacific in the 2018th Ordinance Maintenance unit attached to the U.S. Air Force. From 1946 to 1950 he 
served as a second lieutenant in the Reserve Officer Training Corps. 

In 1950 he graduated from the University of Kansas School of Business. He attended post graduate 
school at Indiana University and the University of Oklahoma. 

On Aug. 7, 1949 he married Helen Irene Manka. The couple had two sons, Chris of Peachtree City, Ga., 
and Scott of Decatur, Ga. Storbeck also had two sisters, Eldora Storbeck Middleton of Lyndon, and Ruby 
Storbeck Oberhelman of Topeka. All are survivors. 

Life-long service was as much a part of Storbeck's life as anything. He had a long association with 
Rotary International, and had been a member of the Winfield Rotary Club since 1954. He was president of 
the club from 1961 to 1962. In 1970-71, Storbeck served as district governor of Rotary District 569. 

In 1989, Storbeck was selected as leader of a Rotary Group Study Exchange that took he and his wife, 
as well as four young women, to the Philippines promoting "Peace and Goodwill" on a cultural and voca- 
tional mission. 

For more than 40 years, Storbeck was a member of the First United Methodist Church and held numer- 
ous positions there. There are countless other clubs and organizations where Storbeck gave community sup- 
port. 

Storbeck was a quiet role model who lived by example, never drawing attention to himself, but rather 
focusing on the needs of others. 







Mam 
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Halstead, Kansas 




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Mary Lee of Halstead and Heather Van Orden of Wichita represented Cowley on the All-USA 
Community and Junior College Academic Team for 1997. The two sophomores also were members of the 
All-Kansas Academic Team, comprised of students from each of the 19 community colleges in the state. 

"I was very surprised, totally shocked," Van Orden said upon being nominated. "I feel very honored 
since this is my last year in college." 

Van Orden graduated in May 1997 with an associate of applied science degree in interpreter training. 
She was an interpreter for the deaf at Douglass High School. 

Van Orden, the daughter of Rita and Gary Van Orden of Mulvane, had a 3.91 grade-point average. She 
became interested in interpreting for the deaf after seeing an instructor while she was in Girl Scouts. She 
took conversational sign language in the summer of 1995 and loved it. 

Van Orden worked full-time at Douglass and took classes at night. While attending Cowley's Mulvane 
Center, Van Orden has served as secretary for the Students Today Interpreters Tomorrow and was a member 
of the Student Activities Association. She is a 1994 graduate of Mulvane High School. 

Lee is a 1995 graduate of Halstead High School and majored in art. She has her sights set on a career 
in art therapy. 

"I plan to work with handicapped 
children," Lee said of her career plans. 
"Art therapy is a way for them to express 
their emotions in a non-violent atmos- 
phere. Elderly doing crafts is a form of art 
therapy. It gives people some sense of 
worth." 

Lee was Cowley's October 1996 
Student of the Month. She was an 
Orientation Ambassador, Student 
Ambassador, sat on the Art Exhibit 
Committee, was on the Social Science 
Division Advisory Board, was president 
of Phi Theta Kappa, was Student 
Government Association secretary and 
chaired the public relations, ad hoc, and 
homecoming committees, was a member 
of CC Singers, Volunteers Learning 

Through Service, was Act One publicity chair as well as house crew committee, and held work-study jobs 
in Social Science, Humanities, and the admissions office. 

The All-USA Team is sponsored by USA Today newspaper, the American Association of Community 
Colleges, and Phi Theta Kappa International Honor Society. The All-Kansas Team was honored at a lun- 
cheon Feb. 12, 1997 at the capitol in Topeka. This is the second consecutive year that the group of 38 stu- 
dents have been given statewide recognition. 

The purpose of the program is to recognize scholarly achievements of students enrolled in community, 
technical and junior colleges. For the purpose of this award, "scholar" is defined as one who excels in the 
classroom, who has the intellectual curiosity to pursue academic, career, and cultural enrichment outside the 
traditional classroom, who shows evidence of substantial development of talents in academic and technical 
education, and who has demonstrated an ability to share this development with others. 

Students must possess a cumulative grade-point average of not less than 3.25 out of a possible 4.0 in all 
credit course work taken at the college. 

Independent judges will review nominations and select a 20-member national first team. The judges will 
select another 40 nominees to comprise 20-member second and third teams. Each member of the first team 
will receive a $2,500 cash award by USA Today. The awards were presented to first-team members during 
the AACC annual convention in Anaheim, Calif, April 14. 




Heather Van Orden, Dr, Pat McAtee, Mary Lee, aid Lois Sampson 





Service to her country. That's what former Cowley student Lora Heinitz has been doing the past sever- 
al months. 

Heinitz, a sophomore from Valley Center, was not enrolled in any classes during the 1997 spring semes- 
ter, but she still had plenty to do. 

Heinitz was sworn in as Cowley's first AmeriCorps volunteer on Feb. 20, 1997. The ceremony took 
place in the Earle N. Wright Community Room on the main campus. 

AmeriCorps is a federally-funded service program that unites Americans in improving our neighbor- 
hoods. It represents America at its best, making a lasting difference while promoting the values of commu- 
nity, responsibility, and opportunity. In addition, AmeriCorps is a national service program that provides 
thousands of Americans of all ages and backgrounds with education awards in exchange for a year or two 
of community service. AmeriCorps members help meet the nation's critical needs in the areas of public safe- 
ty, education, human needs, and the environment. Through more than 400 sponsors, AmeriCorps involves 
25,000 people in results-driven community service. 

Cowley's Service Learning Central Advisory Board appointed Heinitz. She was president of Cowley's 
Volunteers Learning Through Service during the 1996 fall semester and became interested in becoming an 
AmeriCorps volunteer when Mark Jarvis was working on the grant for the program. 

"I brainstormed about this with Mark and in talking to him about it, it got me really excited about the 
whole thing," Heinitz said. 

Jarvis, Cowley's faculty adviser to the 
school's volunteer programs, said Heinitz 
has several community service duties to 
fulfill in the minimum requirement of 
1,700 hours. Her award will be $4,725 to 
go toward education. 

Heinitz' first task as an AmeriCorps mem- 
ber was to assist teachers at Roosevelt 
Elementary School in Arkansas City. 
"I worked one-on-one with several stu- 
dents to help them get their reading skills 
up with the rest of the class," Heinitz said. 
"And I listened to book reports and did 
math facts." 

She also traveled to area high schools to 
discuss community service possibilities. 
In all, Heinitz will visit 30 area high 
schools throughout the year. In February 
alone, Heinitz had contact with 1,000 stu- 
dents, through three regional conferences and five high schools. 

"It was a lot of fun," said Heinitz, an elementary education major. "I liked working with all the people." 
The college will pay about $7,600 of the matching grant for Heinitz to be an AmeriCorps member. The 
Corporation for National Service puts up about 85 percent of the fees. Jarvis said the total package for 
Heinitz, which includes health care and money for office equipment, will be about $22,000. 

Heinitz was enrolled in Leadership Ark City and went through a ropes course certification training dur- 
ing spring break. That allows her to be a trainer for any events of this type, anywhere in the nation. Ropes 
courses teach students teamwork, trust, and responsibility. 






Tracy Frederick admitted telling Cowley administrators during the summer of 1 996 not to expect much 
from her first-year debate/forensics team. She was serious. 

But a successful fall 1996 turned into an incredible spring 1997 as the team surpassed all expectations, 
captured several individual and team awards, and earned the respect of two- and four-year schools from 
across the nation. 

"It has been a phenomenal year," Frederick said. 

That could go down as the understatement of the year. Here's a list of some of the squad's most noto- 
rious accomplishments in its first year: 

• fifth in the state in Open (experienced) Division, even though Cowley had no experienced students. 

• second in the state in Novice Division behind two-time national debate champion Kansas State 
University. 

A list of individual honors: 

• Damon Young, fifth in Impromptu Speaking; honorable mention All-Kansas and honorable mention 
All-Kansas Novice Team. 

• Young, 16th in Prose Interpretation; honorable mention All-Kansas Novice Team; Young and Kara Fry, 
16th in Duo Interpretation; honorable mention All-Kansas Novice Team. 

• Heather Bollinger and Jim Nethercott, fifth in Duo Interpretation; honorable mention All-Kansas 
Team and first-team All-Kansas Novice Team. 

• Nethercott, 1 1th in Prose Interpretation; honorable mention All-Kansas Novice Team. 

• Bollinger, seventh in Dramatic Interpretation; second-team All-Kansas Novice Team. 

• Trent Pappan, 1 8th in Dramatic Interpretation. 

• Pappan and Ryan Kane, 9th in Duo Interpretation. 

• Pappan and Clayton Stacy, 14th in Duo Interpretation; honorable mention All-Kansas Novice Team. 
And to top it off, Frederick received the National Education Debate Association's New Member of the 

Year award. 

"For a squad that had no experience, the students did an incredible job," Frederick said. "I could not 
have asked for any better effort. We really turned heads at tournaments we competed in." 

And in many of those tournaments, Cowley was the lone community college. Most of the competition 
was against four-year universities with established debate/forensics programs. Cowley was not intimidated. 

"If anything I think that kind of inspired us to do better," Frederick said. "The students met each and 
every challenge head-on." 

Frederick was quick to point out that while it's nice to win, it's not important. 

"The skills the students have acquired are those that will allow them to be successful for the rest of their 
lives," she said. "Communication is the key to success. They have become effective communicators and will 
be able to accomplish any goals set for them." 








Give Ryan Hernandez a block of metal, some instructions, scratch 
paper, and a machine and you'd be surprised what he can do. 
Hernandez, a former Machine Tool Technology student at Cowley, 
put himself in a unique position as a member of the 12-person 
International Youth Skills Competition team from the United States. 
That team competed July 4-7, 1997 in St. Gallen, Switzerland, along 
with 3 1 other nations, in a biennial contest in skilled trade occupa- 
tions. It was sponsored by the International Organization for the Promotion of Vocational Training, head- 
quartered in Zurich, Switzerland. 

Participation by the U.S. comes from the Vocational Industrial Clubs of America. In 1973, then-President 
Richard Nixon recognized VICA as the official organization to represent the U.S. at the IYSC. The U.S. first 
competed in 1975. 

"I'm doing this for experience," said Hernandez, who is now a numerical control mill operator and lead 
man at Boeing-Wichita. "I just want to do the best job I can. If anything, I'm not the one with the pressure. 
I have no background or reputation to hold up. There's no extra pressure other than competing internation- 
ally." 

Hernandez, from Arkansas City, has been nothing shy of brilliant during the past three years. He is a for- 
mer Kansas VICA president and earned a number of awards during his career at Cowley. 

The road to Switzerland actually began two years ago when Hernandez won the state VICA skills contest 
in precision machining. He went to the national contest in July 1995 and finished second in the post-sec- 
ondary division. 

His scores there allowed him to try out for the international competition in September 1996 in Chicago. 
At that four-day international machine tool show, Hernandez competed on a conventional mill. In October 
he received a project in the mail. Competitors had two weeks to complete the project. Hernandez heard 
results near the end of February. 

"There were five students in the milling project and you could use any resource you could find," 
Hernandez said. "I wanted to run the project on my own. I could have programmed it on a CAD/CAM, but 
I didn't. I manually programmed it." 

Hernandez scored 1,022 points out of a possible 1,150. The top score was 1,051 points. Hernandez' com- 
bined scores from Chicago and the October project landed him a spot on the U.S. roster. 

Hernandez was the U.S. competitor in milling. Other trades contested were automotive service technolo- 
gy, auto body repair, brick masonry, car painting, computer aided drafting, cookery, electronic application, 
house wiring, ladies' hairdressing, refrigeration, and turning. Students must be under the age of 23 to com- 
pete. Hernandez is 22. 

The project Hernandez had two weeks to complete was made out of a block of aluminum. He said at the 
IYSC, competitors were given a block of steel. Work was done by a machine and a cutter. About 26 students 
competed in milling. The contest lasted eight hours per day for the four days. 

Hernandez took several weeks off work from Boeing to train for the international competition. He said 
the company was impressed with the competition. And he's been the subject of a story on Boeing Television, 
broadcast to break rooms in all of Boeing's plants. 

Hernandez credits his experience at Cowley for providing him the basic background a machinist needs. 
He praised Precision Machining, Inc., of Wellington for teaching him many techniques in milling. 

"It's a top-rated company," said Hernandez, who worked there while finishing his schooling at Cowley. 
"It wasn't until I got to Boeing that I realized how good Precision Machining really is." 

After the contest, Hernandez plans to re-enroll at Cowley to work on a pre-engineering degree. 

In 1995, the U.S. ranked 15th among nations competing. Austria, Korea, and Brazil were the top three 
nations that year. The U.S. has never had a milling student place in the competition. 



Bruce Crouse, instructor of Non-Destructive Testing, was appointed chair- 
man of the Education Division of the National Society for NDT. The appoint- 
ment came during the 1996 fall conference of the society Oct. 14 in Seattle. 

Crouse, who has headed Cowley's NDT program the past four years, will 
serve as a coordinator for high school programs, community college and tech- 
nical school programs, and university programs in NDT. 

Another part of his responsibilities will be to assist in the selection process 
those schools that are to receive grants and scholarship funds. Promoting NDT 
as a technical career also will be part of Crouse's duties as chair. 

The appointment is a two-year term. 

Crouse has been a member of the Society for NDT for 10 years. The orga- 
nization has more than 12,000 members worldwide. 




One of the biggest compliments any instructor can receive is an endorsement from a former student. 

Sixteen Cowley instructors were listed in the 1996-97 edition of Who's Who Among America's Teachers. 
It's a listing of The Best Teachers in America Selected by the Best Students. 

Educational Communications, Inc., of Lake Forest, 111., publishes the book. 

Cowley's instructors listed in the book, plus their subjects: 

Bart Allen, business management; Terry Eaton, developmental math; Gary Gackstatter, instrumental 
music; Beverly Grunder, accounting; Randy Hallford, science; Ed Hargrove, physical education/softball; 
Elvin Hatfield, police science; Larry Head, airframe and powerplant mechanics; Cathy Hendricks, social sci- 
ence; Debbie Nittler, physical education/volleyball; Peggy Paton, office technology; Judy Queen, single par- 
ent program director; Lana Sleeper, danceline; Paul Stirnaman, history/geography; and Jean Tidwell, social 
science. Sharon Hill, a former full-time Cowley instructor who is now part-time in the Humanities Division, 
also is listed. 

The only way a teacher can be included in this publication is to be nominated by one or more of his or 
her former students. The only students who are invited to select their former teachers are students who are 
listed in Who's Who Among American High School Students or The National Dean's List. This top 5 per- 
cent of the high school and college students in the United States represents a unique group of consumers of 
education, well-qualified to determine which teachers contributed most to their academic success. 

Throughout the academic year all students who have been cited for academic excellence in the two stu- 
dent publications described above are invited to select one teacher from their entire academic experience 
who "made a difference" in their education. 





Award-winning singer-songwriter Gary Gackstatter's creative juices never stop 
flowing. 

Gackstatter, Cowley's director of instrumental music, released his newest cre- 
ativity: a collection of 12 original songs, all written by him, on a compact disc 
titled "The Missing You Waltz." The CD was released in late February 1997. 
The CD was recorded Dec. 27-28, 1996 in Austin, Texas, by Merel Bergante 
at his Cribworks Studios. Final production was done at Terra Nova Digital 
Mastering by Jerry Tubbs, also in Austin. 

Bergante's extensive performing and recording experience with Loggins and 
Messina, Dan Fogelberg, Leo Kottke, and the Dirt Band, to name a few, bring 
a genuine intimacy and warmth to the acoustic instruments and voices on this 
album. 

"We go and play so many places and people say 'hey, can I get a recording of 
that.* And we don't have anything to give them," Gackstatter said. "I've been saving up. You have to put a 
lot of time and energy into it. The planning went on forever. I wanted it to be real personal, real special." 

With Gackstatter on acoustic guitar, fretless bass, vocals, keyboard, and percussion, the album has a dis- 
tinct sound all is own. Promoted as songs from the heart, songs from the land, the album also features long- 
time Arkansas City musician Tim Durham on mandolin, acoustic guitar, keyboard, and vocals, and Julie 
Rosseter, a friend of Gackstatter's from Atlanta, Ga., on viola. 
Gackstatter couldn't be more pleased with the way the album turned out. 

"To make the recording, we went down on a Thursday and I did all of my parts on Friday, vocal, guitar, 
bass, and keyboard," Gackstatter said. "Tim and Julie came down the next day and we mixed on the third 
day. It was real fast." 
Most of the songs were written in the last year. Gackstatter said he gets a lot of ideas while driving. 
"Long drives to and from gigs," he said. "A line will come into my head and a melody will come with it. 
I've got to get it down on tape as soon as I can. All of these songs, not one I sat down and said, 'OK, I'm 
going to sit down and write a song'. Almost all came from that little land of inspiration. You don't have to 
force anything to come out." 

Durham, himself a songwriter, also was happy with the album. 

"I'm pleased with it. I think it has a real kind of open, simple and clean sound to it," Durham said. "It's a 
natural sound. You can imagine people performing it right in front of you. It's definitely not over-produced 
with a whole bunch of stuff you would find in pop music. It has a particular sound to it. We tried to stay 
away from that over-produced sound and get more of a live sound, which means you capture the live per- 
formance as opposed to doing a lot of electronic junk." 
The album includes a wide variety of subject matter ranging from small Kansas towns, to lost love, to fam- 



m 




ily, to politics, each highly personal, poetic and powerful. It also includes four songs that have been select- 
ed as winners in the annual Walnut Valley Festival Songwriters competition in Winfield. 

Gackstatter has become well-known in south-central Kansas. Not only is he director of instrumental music 
at Cowley, he also directs the Winfield Regional Symphony and the Arkansas City Community Band. His 
compositions and arrangements have been performed by wind ensembles and bands at the University of 
Kansas, Wichita State University, and Friends University, as well as many high schools. 

Currently, Gackstatter is the orchestral arranger for singer-songwriter John McCutcheon, and recently for 
Tom Chapin. 

Durham and Gackstatter have performed together for about seven years, more seriously during the last 
two years. Durham said he and Gackstatter have a mutual respect for each other's music. 

"Gary is incredibly talented," Durham said. "He can concentrate and get the job done and see it to its com- 
pletion. I was amazed how much music he put out in such a short period of time." 

Gackstatter called Rosseter, an acquaintance from Wichita State University who now plays in the Atlanta 
Symphony, the best violist he's ever worked with. Gackstatter said the team of three musicians worked well 
together. 

"My goal is to develop this side of my musicianship," he said. "I spend all my time doing community 
work. But I really love this, too. Artwork and my music have laid dormant for so long. I have made myself 
do this." 

Sam Crowl, an instructor in Cowley's Computer Graphic Arts program, did the layout and design for the 
CD cover and jacket. 




m 




Pam Doyle, Lois Sampson, Don Hastings, and Dan Squires were honored in late May 1997 as recipients 
of the Master Teacher award, presented by a renowned national organization. 

Doyle and Sampson are Humanities Division instructors, Hastings teaches in the Natural Science 
Division, and Squires in the Industrial Technology Division. 

The four honorees raise the number of Cowley faculty honored during the last 10 years to 34. The 
National Institute for Staff and Organizational Development sponsors the International Conference on 
Teaching and Leadership Excellence each year in Austin, Texas. The four instructors will be honored dur- 
ing the closing ceremonies of this year's conference on May 28. 

Doyle's primary teaching emphasis is Composition. This is her second year at Cowley. 

Sampson teaches Literature and Composition. She is completing her third year as a full-time instructor at 
the college. 

Hastings teaches biology. He has been at Cowley since May 1971. 

Squires teaches machine tool technology and has been at Cowley full-time since August 1990. 

Six other Cowley faculty and staff members are making presentations at this year's NISOD conference. 
Sue Saia, an instructor in the Natural Science Division, is making a presentation titled "College Algebra Can 
Be Fun." The major focus of her presentation will be relating college algebra concepts to "real world appli- 
cations." A special project and several other experiments and labs will be explored. These "assignments" 
will demonstrate the practical applications of such topics as graphing, functions, logarithms, logic, and prob- 
ability. 

Pat Moreland and Pam Shaw, also instructors in the Natural Science Division, will be presenting "The 
Physical Science, College Algebra Connection." The goal of the presentation is to show that mathematics is 
a tool that can be used as a guide to understand the intricate order of the world around us. Scientific study 
of the students' physical world is more meaningful when they can easily express scientific observations in 
mathematical terms. Practical activities that can be used in college algebra and physical science to connect 
math and science will be demonstrated using the TI-83 calculator and the TI calculator-based lab. 

Bryan McChesney and JoLynne Oleson, admissions counselor and support services coordinator, along 
with Bruce Crouse, nondestructive testing instructor and chairman of the Industrial Technology Division, 
will present "Building A Solid Foundation With Faculty Recruitment." The presentation will demonstrate 
how Cowley coordinates recruiting efforts between faculty and the admissions staff. Creative recruiting and 
program marketing ideas will be shared, as well as results of their teamwork approach to recruiting. 






JoLlYXE 

Olesoy 

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Admissions Counselor 



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Employees and students at Cowley may not realize how they have benefited in many ways since the fall 
of 1995, when the Quality Initiative program was implemented. 

Twelve Quality Initiative teams involving 40 staff members have been generating ideas to improve the 
way the college conducts its business. The purpose of the program is to get people involved in the school 
and to identify a problem and submit solutions. 

At a half-day inservice Aug. 16, 1996, two teams received $1,000 President's Awards and three received 
$500 awards for their work on specific projects. 

One award-winning team studied the many possibilities of using multi-media instruction in delivering and 
learning lessons. The team of Technology Applications to the Classroom consisted of Rex Soule, Richard 
Tredway, Bart Allen, and Bruce Crouse. The team worked toward two goals: 1) develop equipment needs; 
and 2) design processes to pilot multi-media instruction applications for instructional delivery. 

"We looked at three classrooms to set up multi-media instruction," said Soule, director of Cowley's com- 
puter graphix technology program. "These rooms would have all the equipment for teachers to deliver 
instructions to students instead of just a lecture." 

Emergency situations were the focus of the other President's Award winner, the Workplace Violence team, 
who worked to ensure that the situations will be handled correctly. The team was made up of Tony Crouch, 
June Bland, Elvin Hatfield, Bryan McChesney, and Bud Shelton. 

Teams receiving monetary awards were able to decide how best to spend the money. However, it must be 
spent on something related to the project. Each member of the five teams also received a "TEAMWORK" 
wall plaque. 

Employees may have a chance to continue education opportunities in the areas of personal development, 
career enhancement and technical training because of the proposed plan of the Professional Staff 
Development team. Team members are Jody Arnett, Bev Black, JoLynne Oleson, Stu Osterthun, Peggy 
Paton, Wanda Shepherd, and Janice Stover. This team, along with two others, received $500 Quality 
Leadership awards. 

The two other $500 winners were the Campus-Wide Fiber Optic Connection team and the Student 
Tracking team. Fiber optic team members are Gary Detwiler, Charles McKown, Sid Regnier, and Mike 
Crow. Student Tracking team members are Bev Black, Stover, Terri Morrow, Forest Smith, Linda Strack, 
Crouse, Charlie White, and Maggie Picking. 

Each team submitted a proposal which would make a difference in each or all of the following criteria: 
improve the quality of work and/or educational environment, enhance customer service, maintain continu- 
ity or longevity of improvement, and help meet the institutional mission. 

"Each team sets certain goals that follow the list of criteria and work toward accomplishing them," said 
Quality Improvement Processes instructor Wayne Short. 

Proposals were accepted for the next Quality Initiative program until December 1996 and the Quality 
Council, comprised of administrators, faculty and staff, hoped to wrap it up in the spring of 1997. However, 
many projects will be on-going. 

The other seven teams participating in the project: Kids at Cowley, TQM Tools for the Natural Sciences, 
South Central Kansas Mathematics and Technology Conference, Social Science Child Care, Facilities 
Scheduling Process Improvement, Non-traditional Student Recruitment, and Role of Computerized 
Assessment in Outcomes. 



P 




Twenty-three years ago, Mary Margaret Williams "retired." 

It lasted all of three months. 

"The Board of Trustees wanted me to come back and start this senior citizens program," Williams said. "I 
didn't know anything about organizing a continuing education program. But I decided it would be fun, 
something new." 

So, at the age of 63, instead of thinking about retirement, Williams was hard at work developing a suc- 
cessful enrichment program for senior citizens. Today, Cowley's Institute of Lifetime Learning is recognized 
as one of the finest programs in the region, due largely to Williams' leadership and vision. 

Time has a way of catching up with people, including Williams, an age-less wonder who has been a fix- 
ture at Cowley for 42 years. This spring, at age 86, is her last as an employee of the college. 

"You certainly are a model for us at the college to 
emulate," Conrad Jimison, associate dean of instruc- 
tion, told Williams at an end-of-the-year picnic May 8. 
"You've done an incredible job for the college and 
we're going to miss you." 

"I will not go to the rocking chair," Williams 
responded. "I don't even own one." 

Williams received a mantel clock from the college as 
a retirement gift. Dr. Pat McAtee, college president, 
spoke about Williams. 

"If I get to be your age I hope I can just get out of 
bed in the morning," he said with a laugh. "Seriously, 
I can't say enough about this lady. For someone to 
devote more than 60 years to education, that's incredi- 
ble. You have been a true delight to work with." 

Marietta Brammer, Williams' assistant at the 
Institute in Ireland Hall, and Dr. Lynn Stalnaker, dean 
of instruction, also honored Williams with words of 
kindness. 

Williams moved to Wichita in July to be closer to 
relatives. She said her emphasis in retirement will be to 
work at her church. Sitting around won't be part of her 
day. 

There is little doubt that whatever she does, she will 
make a difference. All you have to do is look at the 
growth of the Institute of Lifetime Learning to see 
what impact she has had. 

From one class of five students in 1974 to more than a dozen classes and 150 students, the Institute has 
taken on a transformation the past two decades. And Williams, although she hesitates to admit it, has been 
the catalyst for that change. 

While the number of classes has increased, the minimum age to enroll has decreased. In 1974 persons 65 
or older could enroll. Now the program is open to individuals 55 and over. 

Williams was born in Fort Scott, Kan. and spent her youth growing up in Chanute, Bonner Springs and 
Baldwin City, communities where her father served as principal, superintendent and professor of education 
at Baker University. Williams earned a bachelor's degree in math and English from Baker, then went on to 
the University of Kansas and earned a master's degree in guidance and psychology. That was in 1961. 

A great deal has happened since then, and now, Williams is taking a second shot at retirement. 

"My philosophy is that you can live longer and be healthier if you keep your mind active," Williams said. 
"That's what I based the Institute on." 






For about as long as Charlie White can remember, he used his hands to fix things. From rebuilding cars 
to tinkering in the machine shop. White loved working with equipment. 

So it came as no surprise that White would find himself as head of the technical education program at 
Cowley. He served as associate dean of vocational education since 1990, and joined the school's faculty in 
1969. 
Now, at the tender age of 57, White is retiring. He had early retirement planned for many years. 
"Early retirement was in my plans, but not expected," White said. "I started positioning myself 10 years 
ago." 

White has devoted a great deal of his life to Cowley. It began as a student in 1958. But his two-year degree 
was interrupted by a four-year stint in the Marine Corps. Before he completed his bachelor's degree at 
Pittsburg State University, White was hired as an industrial-related instructor. 

"I set up math, science, and eco- 
nomics for the technical pro- 
grams," he said. "We (Cowley) 
were the only one in the state to do 
that for 15 to 18 years." 
White later earned master's and 
educational specialist degrees, also 
from PSU. His area of the college 
has changed dramatically since he 
began. 

"Technology and the use of com- 
puters as tools has really changed," 
White said. 

Dr. Pat McAtee, college president, 
spoke fondly of White during a 
year-end picnic May 8. 
"When I came to the college 10 
years ago, we had a lot of tasks 
before us in the technical area," 
McAtee said. "I know how hard it 
is to change, but Charlie did it. 
"He's the only one I can call on about technology in that area. He can talk to those business and industry 
people and they understand." 

White, whose sense of humor always made those around him laugh, said he will remain connected to 
Cowley. 

"I do plan to do some part-time teaching for the college," he said. "And with all the training we've done 
with business and industry, I'll be involved in that." 

In the early 1980s, White became chairman of the Industrial Technology Division. He said having stu- 
dents in the technical programs two years helped foster close relationships. 

"I'm going to miss the students," he said. "There were a lot of friendships made. Down here you get to 
know the students pretty well." 

While part-time teaching will take up some of White's retirement time, he also has about a dozen rental 
homes to maintain and four antique cars to restore. Fishing also will be a big part of his retirement. 

"But the biggest thing is more time with my family," White said. "It's been a hit-and-miss thing through 
the years. Now I'll be able to pick and choose when we want to do things as a family." 




. Lynn Stalnaker and Charlie White 





At a very early age, Sue Darby was 
forced to deal with a challenge. 

Today, while challenges disguised as 
opportunities keep coming her way, she 
has her share of self-made challenges. 

"I get bored and therefore create chal- 
lenges for myself," said Darby, director of 
Cowley's Mulvane Center throughout the 
1996-97 academic year. "I couldn't teach 
composition for 27 years." 

Darby's latest challenge while at 
Cowley was completing what she'd start- 
ed about three years ago: work on a doc- 
torate at the University of Texas at Austin. She finished her course work in December 1995 and received her 
doctor of education degree on Dec. 7, 1996. 

Her decision to enter the Community College Leadership program at UT was made after being influenced 
by former Cowley Dean of Instruction Dr. Bob Paxton and from the numerous trips to Austin for the 
National Institute for Staff and Organizational Development. There she saw first-hand the potential earning 
a doctorate would give her. 

"Bob Paxton was pretty influential in that," Darby said. "He was always cultivating your talents." 

At NISOD, Darby has been a Master Presenter and the recipient of the Master Teacher award for teach- 
ing excellence. Still, she wanted more. 

"I think long term my goal is to become president of a community college," she said. "My short-term goal 
is to become a dean of students or dean of instruction. That's the next step toward becoming a president." 

Darby was born in Kansas City, Kan., but moved to California when she was 5. That same year her par- 
ents divorced. She moved back to Kansas City when she was 15 and graduated from Turner High School. 

From there she went to Emporia State University and graduated in 1970 with a bachelor's degree in 
English. She received a master's degree in communication theory from Wichita State University in 1984. 

Between the first two degrees were stops at Skyline consolidated schools, Atchison County Community 
High School, Wellington, and Winfield. She taught English, speech, and had one year as the yearbook spon- 
sor at Winfield High School, an experience she'll never forget. 

Her career at Cowley began in 1978 as a part-time English instructor. She taught college composition to 
Wellington High School students. After earning her master's degree, Darby began full-time employment at 
Cowley in 1984 as an instructor in the Humanities Division. She taught composition I, II, literature, and a 
developmental English course. 

She served as division chair from 1991 to 1996, and it was during that time that she decided to pursue 
another degree. 

"I looked at administration from the beginning," Darby said. "And I decided that if I was going to sacri- 
fice two to three years of my life, I wanted to look at other opportunities than Kansas. Texas is the best pro- 
gram in the nation." 

After completing her degree, Darby returned to Cowley to become director of the Mulvane center. With 
that came new challenges, but also a changed person. 

It was during Darby's junior year of high school that she realized a career in education was for her. 

"I was sitting in the back of my English class and my instructor had a very negative effect on me," she 
said. "I said, 'if he can do this, I can do this.' " 

And it's on to yet another challenge for Darby, this time at another community college. On July 7, 1997, 
Darby began her duties as dean of instruction at John Woods Community College in Quincy, 111. 



% 




fll 



Dave Burroughs hates to waste opportunities. That said, it's no surprise that Cowley's baseball team cap- 
tured the 1997 national title in its first trip to the World Series. 

The Tigers, who finished the season ranked 20th in the National Junior College Athletic Association poll, 
took the tournament by storm and became the darlings of Grand Junction, Colo., site of the 40th annual 
World Series. 

"We weren't the most talented team out there," Burroughs said. "But in sports, sometimes you forget to 
measure a team's heart. And these guys had the biggest hearts out there. That's what won it for us." 

Cowley, which finished 53-1 1, won five games and lost one en route to the national championship, includ- 
ing four consecutive after losing Game Two. It was a dream come true for Burroughs, in his 10th season at 
Cowley, his assistants and the players. 

"I've never come close to this, ever," said outfielder Josh McMillen. "This is really special. It's a great 
feeling." 

The Tigers were welcomed back to Arkansas City from the World Series, held May 24-31, with a state 
patrol and police escort beginning in Wellington late in the afternoon of June 2. More fans picked up the 

chartered bus in Winfield, and the 

team rolled into Ark City with 
about 350 fans awaiting in front of 
W.S. Scott Auditorium. The recep- 
tion surprised the players. 
"I thought there might be 15 or 20 
people waiting for us," said Justin 
Pirtle, pitcher. "We played in front 
of 1 1,000 fans in the championship 
game, but that doesn't compare to 
coming home to this." 
Many college and community 
members addressed the coaches 
and players, who were front and 
center stage during the celebration. 
Burroughs held the national cham- 
pionship trophy high for everyone 
to see. 




June 2. 




"It was an unbelievable experience," Burroughs said. "The community of Grand Junction was so sup- 
portive of all the teams. In the championship game, of the 10,000 or 1 1,000 people there, I think about 9,000 
were rooting for us because we came in the underdog." 

Cowley defeated Seminole State of Oklahoma 4-2 in the championship game. Cowley had clobbered 
Seminole in a fall 1996 doubleheader, then lost 9-0 and 2-1 during the spring season. And as if that weren't 
enough for revenge, some Seminole players taunted Cowley prior to the World Series finale. 

"We really didn't need that kind of incentive, but it just fueled us more," said Grant Bergman, pitcher. 

Cowley reached the 10-team World Series by defeating Hutchinson in a three-game series May 16-17. It 
was the third consecutive year Cowley was in the Region VI championship game. 

In Grand Junction, Cowley opened the tournament with a 10-7 victory over Central Florida. That was fol- 
lowed by an 11-6 defeat at the hands of Indian Hills Iowa. But then the string began. Cowley eliminated 
Wallace State of Alabama 12-8, Indian Hills 15-9, and Scottsdale, Ariz., 9-6, setting up the showdown with 
Seminole. 

Right-hander Aaron Akin was named to the NJCAA Division I Baseball All-America first team, while first 
baseman Travis Hafner was a third-team selection and was named most valuable player of the World Series. 
Burroughs was named NJCAA Coach of the Year. 

Burroughs assembled one of his best teams in 1997, a difficult task considering the 1996 Tigers amassed 
a 51-13 record and finished the regular season ranked ninth in the nation. 

"You start work for Grand Junction in August," Burroughs said. "It's hard to work on it then, and it's hard 
to work on it in February, but you've got to." 

While Cowley has been dominating this season — 33-3 in the Jayhawk Conference East Division — there 
were times when the bats went silent. Pitching, however, was impressive throughout. 

"Our pitching has carried us all year long," Burroughs said. "It carried us through the sub-region tourna- 
ment and showed flashes of brilliance." 

Cowley's top pitcher is Akin, a sophomore transfer from the University of Missouri. He mowed down hit- 
ters all season and had 102 strikeouts in 92 2/3 innings pitched with an earned-run average of 2.03. 

Akin's consistent 90-miles-per-hour fastball had pro scouts frothing at the mouth. The Manhattan, Kan., 
was the No. 12 pick in the amateur draft June 3 by the Florida Marlins. His signing bonus was reportedly 
around $1 million. 

Offensively, Hafner was a force. The sophomore from Sykeston, N.D., hit 17 homers and drove in 82 runs 
while batting .410. Pro scouts also looked at Hafner as an early draft pick, but instead he signed with the 
team that drafted him last June, the Texas Rangers. 

Burroughs said as many as 1 1 players from this year's team were draft possibilities. 



Oi 





For much of the 1996 Lady Tiger volleyball season, the first outright conference championship in 15 years 
was within grasp. 

But Highland and Johnson County had something to say about that, and those two schools tied for first 
place in the Jayhawk Conference East Division. 

Debbie Nittler's Lady Tigers, however, weren't far behind, finishing with a 15-3 conference record, good 
for third place. 

Cowley roared into the Region VI tournament with a 38-20 record, only to lose all four matches to finish 
at 38-24. Still, the 1996 team posted the most single-season victories in Nittler's 1 1 years. 

"We had a great group of kids, great sophomore leadership, and all-around good players," Nittler said. "It 
was a lot of fun coaching this bunch." 

Sophomore Elaine Fleetwood earned first-team All-Jayhawk Conference honors, while freshmen Allison 
Barse and Joanna Howell were named to the second team. Honorable mention all-conference honors went 
to sophomores Karrie O'Keeffe and Heidi Henning. Howell also was named to the All-Region VI second 
team. 

Nittler said Cowley played well in its first two matches at Region VI, taking Brown-Mackie of Salina and 
Johnson County to three games. But the following day the team was not mentally into it, Nittler said. 

Cowley's 38 victories was the most since Nittler's first team, in 1986, won 36 matches. 

Nittler loses seven sophomores off this year's club. 

FINISH SEASONS ON DISAPPOINTING NOTE 

The women's basketball team suited up six players for its first four games of the 1996-97 season. Only 
eight finished the season, making for a lonely bench. 

Still, the Lady Tigers won 20 games and finished 12-6 in the Jayhawk Conference East Division. That 
conference mark included a stellar 7-2 record at home. 

Coach Ken Hefner, in his first season, guided Cowley to a 20-12 record with a group of players assem- 
bled late in the recruiting season. Adrienne Smith (16.6), Moneeke Bowden (15.3), Zakiyyah Johnson 
(14.3), and Brandi Harris (10.8) were the team's scoring leaders. 

Mark Nelson's men's team finished with a 19-12 record and an 11-7 conference mark. Kevin Clark, who 
signed with the University of Minnesota, an NCAA Final Four team, led the Tigers in scoring, averaging 
22.6 per game. Pedro Phillips, another NCAA Division I signee with the University of Southern Mississippi, 
added 16.4 points per game. 

Both teams were 8-4 during the first semester. 

Clark and Smith were named to the All-Region VI teams for 1996-97. Clark was chosen as a top- 10 play- 
er, while Smith was named to the second team. 



Ed Hargrove liked his team's chances of winning the 1997 Region VI softball championship and a berth 
in the national tournament. 

The Lady Tigers were 31-5, ranked 10th in the nation, and the No. 1 seed in the Region VI tournament, 
all the ingredients necessary for a title run. 

But it didn't happen. In fact, Cowley wasn't around for the championship game against Johnson County, 
a team the Tigers had beaten three out of four times during the regular season. 

"Each year you go into regionals and say that if this happens and this happens, we could make it," 
Hargrove said. "I felt this team had the best shot of any in the last five or six years. We had the pitching to 
keep us in every game and had a great group of sophomores." 

Cowley shut out Hutchinson 8-0 in the first round, then lost to Dodge City 2- 1 . The Tigers came back to 
whip Barton County 10-0 before being stunned by Pratt 4-2 in eight innings. Cowley's season ended at 33- 
7. 




Cassi Vandever, a freshman from Arkansas City, was Cowley's top pitcher this spring. Entering the Region 
VI tournament, Vandever compiled a 21-3 won-loss record with an earned-run average of 0.72. She struck 
out 91 batters in 137 innings pitched. 

However, a freak knee injury hobbled her during the tournament. Hargrove said it hurt the Tigers more 
offensively than defensively. 

"She pitched well enough to win both games we lost," Hargrove said. "She's our best baserunner, so it 
(the knee injury) hurt us more that way." 

And to make matters worse, Vandever was hit by a line drive just above her left knee in the Dodge City 
game. Still, she wouldn't come off the mound. 

The Tigers still won a share of the Jayhawk Conference's East Division crown, tying Johnson County for 
that honor. Cowley finished 28-4 in the conference. 

Hargrove, who completed his 1 3th season as head coach, loses just five sophomores off this team. 

"We've got a good nucleus back and maybe the best freshman class ever coming in," Hargrove said. "And 
we've got the two All-America candidates in Cassi and Suzanne Kerr back." 

Kerr, from Derby, Kan., led Cowley in several categories, including runs (51), triples (12), home runs (9), 
runs batted in (55), and batting average (.504). Those numbers were at the end of the regular season. She 
also was named to the NJCAA Division I All-America team. Vandever made the third team. 

E NOTE 

Head Golf Coach Rex Soule knew after the 1996 fall semester that competition in the spring would be 
even tougher. And he was right. 

The Tigers, in their first season of intercollegiate golf in more than 20 years, struggled through early April. 
They had days of solid practice rounds, but really couldn't get anything going in competition. That is until 
the District III championship in North Platte, Neb., April 28-29, 1997. 

"We played our best golf of the year," Soule said of the 54-hole tournament. "We had set a goal of 960 
strokes for the tournament and we shot 943. That was 17 strokes below our goal. I was pleased with that. 
We did what we thought we needed to do, just two Nebraska schools snuck in on us and took our seventh 
place away. We knew we wouldn't beat any other Kansas schools." 

The top seven teams qualify for the national tournament in Arizona. Cowley's 943 was a distant eighth 
behind Dodge City's 903. Barton, Butler, and Kansas City finished first, second, and third. Western 
Nebraska was fourth, Johnson County fifth, and Northeast Nebraska sixth. 

Cowley's Chris Brown, a freshman, finished in 31st place at districts with a 73-80-77-230 total. Soule said 
had Brown put together three rounds like his first one, he would have been in the hunt for the individual title. 

"I know Chris was disappointed in that 80," Soule said. "But really everybody played pretty well. It was 
a good way to end the season." 

Chris Bruner put together consistent rounds of 77-78-78 for a 233 total, while Wally Waldmeier shot 81- 
77-78 for a 236 total. 

In the final Region VI individual standings, Brown finished fifth. 

Soule expects most of his team to return next year. Brown, however, will not. He's planning to transfer to 
Kansas State University to get started on a degree in engineering. 

"This first season was a learning experience for me and the players," Soule said. "We now know what to 
expect when the fall rolls around. We know what it takes to make nationals." 

Men'stennisteam FINISHES THIRD INTHE NATION 

Cowley's No. 1 singles player Richard Winter won a national championship, then he teamed with Pablo 
Mayorga at No. 1 doubles to win another title at the National Junior College Athletic Association Division 
I men's tennis championships in Corpus Christi, Texas in May 1997. 

The titles helped Cowley to a third-place national team finish with 26 points. Miami-Dade won the title 
with 38 points, followed by Collin County of Texas with 28 points. 

Cowley Head Coach Larry Grose was excited about his team's performance at nationals. 

"I said going in that I thought we were a longshot to win it," said Grose, whose Tiger teams have finished 





in the top six nationally every season since 1989. "Still, we were one of those teams that could have won it. 

"I'm extremely proud of Richard Winter and Pablo Mayorga, as well as all the guys. They played their 
guts out." 

Mayorga finished second at No. 2 singles, as did Shae Wright at No. 3 singles. Two national champi- 
onships and two runners-up were solid performances for the Tigers. 

Mayorga, a freshman from Colombia, South America, earned one of the biggest honors prior to the tour- 
nament when he was named NJCAA Player of the Year. 

"It was quite a surprise," Mayorga told The Arkansas City Traveler. "I wasn't expecting to even be men- 
tioned." 

Mayorga is Grose's first player to win the nation's highest individual award. 

Winter finished the 1997 season ranked No. 1 in the nation in the Rolex Collegiate Tennis Rankings, 
administered by the Intercollegiate Tennis Association. Mayorga earned a No. 10 ranking, while Wright, 
from Arkansas City, finished 26th in the nation. 

The doubles team of Winter and Mayorga also finished the season ranked No. 1 in the nation by Rolex. 

Since Grose took over the program in 1988, his Tigers have finished no lower than sixth in the nation (last 
year) and have two national team titles, in 1989 and 1991. 



The Lady Tiger tennis team finished third in the Region VI tournament and failed to qualify for nationals. 



Spence returns to Cowley arer two years in Colby 



He has been head women's basketball coach, assistant men's coach, head men's coach and athletic direc- 
tor, and now head women's coach again. 

Darin Spence has been one busy man during his collegiate coaching career. He returned to Cowley on 
April 1, 1997 as the new head women's basketball coach. He had been an assistant men's basketball coach 
at Cowley during the 1993-94 and 1994-95 seasons. 

"It's been real positive," said Spence, who was head men's coach and athletic director at Colby 
Community College the past two years. "I'm fortunate this has worked out." 

Darin and his wife, Andre', never sold their home they purchased in Arkansas City four years ago. 

"We were moving back regardless," Darin said. "It helps when you still know the people. I had seen most 
of the (Cowley) coaches throughout the two years. I felt like I never left, really." 

Spence inherits a team that went 20-12 last season. He has been busy recruiting and signed nine Kansas 
players in April. 

"My approach, first of all, is to build the foundation with in-state kids," Spence said. "Out of that group 
of in-state kids we hope to find some who can adjust to this level and help us." 

Spence said his teams would be "hard-working, sound, and entertaining." 

"I like to teach them how to play more than teaching plays," he said. 

Spence is in search of an assistant coach. Current assistant Mary Gleason is looking at her options of pro- 
fessional ball or graduate school. Spence said he'd like her to stay. 

"I want to get somebody who's been through it before and get the program back stable like it was when 
Linda (Hargrove) was here," Spence said. 

The Spences have three daughters, Sierra 9, Madison 8 , and Sacia 3. They are expecting another baby in 
November. 





When Dr. Pat McAtee became president of Cowley in July 1987, the college had no partnership with 
General Electric's plant at Strother Field, and was recording only 6,000 contact hours of training with busi- 
ness and industry as a whole. 

But as higher education has evolved from the traditional delivery of math, science, and computer cours- 
es, Cowley has become anything but your traditional community college. During the past decade, Cowley 
has increased the number of business and industry contact hours to nearly 200,000 annually. McAtee can- 
not overemphasize the important role Cowley plays in developing a quality workforce. 

"We've been committed to business and industry ever since I came in '87," McAtee said. "Over the last 
10 years our relationship has grown to the point where we can be pretty responsive to just about any need 
they have. They know we can respond to it and get it done." 

The college has worked in some capacity with dozens of businesses and industries in Cowley County and 
the surrounding service area. Through the years, Cowley has developed or offered programs for Gilliland 
Printing, Inc., GE, Rubbermaid, Gordon-Piatt Energy Group, the city of Arkansas City, local school districts, 
day care centers, nursing homes, special education cooperatives, KSQ Blowmolding, Social Rehabilitation 
Services, Southwestern Bell Telephone, Montgomery Elevator, Boeing, Cessna, Winfield State Hospital and 
Training Center, and the business and industry division of banks. 

Two large projects which began in early 1996 were under way during the 1996-97 academic year with 
GE's Engine Aircraft Maintenance Center and with Rubbermaid in Winfield. Gene Cole, Cowley's director 
of business and industry, said it was a case of responding to the needs of business and industry. 

"GE needed to get a process to establish some pre-employment testing and training," Cole said. "We went 
to Saturn, Detroit Diesel, and GE's plant in Kentucky to look at those types of programs." 

Then came another trip to the Dallas County Community College district in Texas to benchmark with that 
school's program already in place. 

What developed is a job profiling and pre-employment testing program for both GE and Rubbermaid. 
Cowley tests potential employees of both industries, saving time and money, and in the process improving 
the chances of hiring more qualified employees. 

West Summers, manager of human resources at Rubbermaid, said Cowley has been cooperative and quick 
to respond to Rubbermaid's needs. 

"At this point it's been a very productive relationship for Rubbermaid and for Cowley County Community 
College," Summers said. "And we're looking at expanding the relationship. We look to begin one program 
later this month and there are a couple of others on the drawing board." 

Summers said Cowley's assistance with Rubbermaid's hiring process is only a couple of months old. But 
he said the administrative assistance Cowley provides "is a real service and cost-effective for us to do it that 
way." 

"Initial indications are good," Summers said of the program. "I think we need to go at least a quarter 
before we begin to see any concrete results." 

Cole said GE's primary need has been licensed powerplant mechanics. The concept of Cowley's pre- 
employment program was to develop a pool of potential employees, pre-trained, and available as GE need- 
ed them. The result was the development of a 135-hour pre-employment training program for GE and poten- 
tial employees. 

Ed Jolley, GE training specialist, said his company's partnership with Cowley is working well. 

"I think it's a good relationship," he said. "We've benefited from Cowley. They do a lot of our classroom 
training on an as-needed basis, which frees us up to do other things. They are very quick in response to our 
needs. They've helped us in many areas." 

"Whatever industry needs, we want to be there for them," Cole said. "Flexibility is so critical." 

Cowley's employment application review for Rubbermaid includes verifying dates with previous employ- 
ers. If everything checks out, interviews are scheduled for Rubbermaid to handle. After a successful inter- 
view, applicants are run through a test, designed by Rubbermaid, administered by Cowley. One of 
Rubbermaid's objectives in all this is to decrease its employee turnover rate. 

On top of a pre-employment training facility being planned for Rubbermaid, Cowley also has developed 



®> 




a 39 credit-hour certificate program for in-house training of blowmolding technicians. And Cole said 
employees soon would be able to enter an associate's degree program in plastics technology that could trans- 
fer to Pittsburg State University. Students could then go on for a bachelor's degree in plastics technology. 

All that has been made possible through the financial support and the donation of equipment by 
Rubbermaid. The Rubbermaid certificate and associate's degree is a joint venture between Pittsburg State 
University, Phillips 66, Rubbermaid of Winfield and Centerville, Iowa, and Indian Hills Community College 
in Centerville. Rubbermaid's two seasonal products operations are located in Winfield and Centerville. 

Cole said that by the end of this year, Rubbermaid hopes to have four certificate programs in place: 
Technician I, Technician II, Blowmolding, and Quality. 

"Neither of these industries has asked for anything without paying for it," Cole said. "They have put up 
the money, paid their bills, and gotten service in return. It's been a great relationship." 

Cowley also has business and industry partnerships outside the county. Last year, Cowley's relationship 
with Boeing grew at a steady pace. The college's adviser at Boeing, Jeanette Oesterlin, sees hundreds of 
Boeing workers each month. Cole said the college's basic manufacturing skills and certificate programs also 
saw growth last year. 

Another industry that the college has linked with is Total Petroleum. When the company announced in 
early 1996 that the plant would be closing, Cowley stepped in to develop training programs to help the 
unemployed get back into the labor force. Twenty former Total Petroleum employees were enrolled in an 
accelerated machine tool technology program designed to make them employable in those areas within 
about five months. Normally the machine tool program is two years. 

And the college was prepared to assist displaced Binney & Smith employees, too. 

Cowley also has worked with Cessna, Wichita State University, and Wichita Area Technical College to 
develop training programs. 

"We understand that a big piece of our training is our whole economic service area," McAtee said. 

Cowley also has a major role in the current School-to-Work program which guides high school-age stu- 
dents who might not otherwise go to college toward a technical career. 

"For industry to remain in this county, and for us to attract new industry, we've got to have a pool of qual- 
ified workers," McAtee said. 

Cowley's Business and Industry Institute is the fastest growing arm of the college. Nearly 20 percent of 
Cowley's full-time equivalent enrollment is directly related to business and industry. 

"It's very exciting working with business and industry," McAtee said. "Things change so quickly. 
Economic development is so critical to this county and to this state. It has to be a major component of this 
institution." 




In an effort to expand services offered to area and regional business and industry, Cowley leased an 
additional 2,800 square feet at its Strother Field facility during the 1997 spring semester. 

The space, vacated by Great Scott Communications and radio station KSOK, will be the new home of 
Gene Cole, director of business and industry, and Tammy Barnaby and Tracey Williams, secretaries. In 
addition, three classrooms were constructed, including one for a computer lab. A break area for students 
also was constructed. 

A testing center was constructed in the offices vacated by Cole and Williams. The entire project began 
around April 1 . 

Since late 1995, Cowley has done extensive work with county industries, particularly in the area of pre- 
employment testing. The additional space allows the college to expand those services. 



<jST»AJ*r'T TO H12IiP 




Cowley received a $96,000 grant from Philip Morris Companies Inc. in June 1997 to launch a partnership 
with Wichita State University designed to increase the diversity and performance of future teachers. 

The three-year grant will be used to develop cooperative curriculum and course delivery at the Southside 
Education Center in Wichita, a partnership between Cowley, WSU, and Wichita Area Technical College. 

"We are very excited about this because it serves a segment of our student population that otherwise might 
not have the opportunity," said Connie Bonfy, director of institutional grants at Cowley. "Low-income and 
minority students will be targeted with this project." 

A crowd of nearly 100 gathered June 27 at the Southside Education Center in Wichita for Philip Morris' 
announcement. Dr. Pat McAfee, Cowley president; Dr. Eugene Hughes, president of WSU; and other dis- 
tinguished guests attended. U.S. Rep. Todd Tiahrt also was on hand to address the need for diversity among 
teachers. 

"Like Cowley's national championship baseball team, this grant allows Cowley and WSU to hit a home 
run for our future teachers," Tiahrt said. "This is a major step toward the recruitment of teachers from rural 
areas." 

Two students from the Wichita Public Schools' Grow Your Own Teacher program, Laquita Beachaum and 
Bruce Torres, gave brief speeches during the event. An ITV demonstration by WSU's Mike Wood also was 
held, and Edna Moore, representing the Philip Morris Companies, spoke on behalf of the company. 

"Tomorrow's Teachers: An Urban-Rural Partnership for South-Central Kansas" is part of an $800,000 
national initiative — Extending the Bridge: Community Colleges and the Road to Teaching — launched by 
Philip Morris to support collaborations between community colleges and university schools of education 
that will encourage and prepare people of color and non-traditional students to enter teaching. Philip Morris 
has awarded nine grants to institutions in eight states under the initiative. 

"Community colleges are the bridge to higher education for millions of people of color and non-tradi- 
tional students, and these institutions can play a critical role in preparing teachers for a new era of educa- 
tional excellence," said Karen Brosius, director, corporate contributions, for Philip Morris Companies Inc. 
"Philip Morris is committed to building a well-prepared and diverse teaching force capable of responding 
to the challenges of the future. We are very pleased to support this innovative partnership between Cowley 
County Community College and Wichita State University that will help identify and prepare teachers in our 
culturally diverse society." 








Faculty from Cowley and WSU will work together to design course curricula and develop block courses 
within a cooperative learning environment. Students will be able to enroll in these block courses at a vari- 
ety of locations and from the college of their choice. 

The innovative use of telecommunications in this program will encourage varied course content, lively 
presentations by remote guest instructors, and opportunities for students living in remote rural south-central 
Kansas to enroll in telecourses near their homes. Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) has been adopted for 
broad bandwidth telecommunications throughout the South Central Kansas Interactive Television Network, 
a consortium serving Cowley's main campus in Arkansas City and eight rural school worldwide. 

A pilot program of coordinated foundations curriculum at the community college level will be imple- 
mented in Year One. The curriculum is designed to build a unified learning community and enhance high- 
level learning by offering students a block of related courses that are taught concurrently. For example, a 
student may enroll in sociology, speech, and composition courses that are offered in a three-hour block of 
time, as opposed to enrolling in each of the courses individually and meeting one hour for each course. 

In Year Two, the project will focus on expanding the Year One concept to accommodate the continuation 
of established learning communities and the formation of new ones. A lower-level coordinated curriculum 
developed in cooperation with WSU will provide a "bridge" for students as they move from one stage of 
their education to the next. With WSU, Cowley will develop in Year One and implement in Year Two and 
Year Three a jointly-designed coordinated curriculum, structured the same as the independent coordinated 
curriculum piloted in Year One with three courses overlapping content. 

One of the strongest benefits of the project will be the carryover of established group bonds from Cowley 
to WSU, especially for those students seeking teaching degrees, since WSU has already adopted a success- 
ful block curriculum plan for its junior and senior education majors. 

Interactive television classrooms will be created at the Southside Center, at Cowley's Mulvane Center, and 
a second ITV classroom on Cowley's main campus. 

WSU has engaged in a number of reform efforts to increase the diversity and skill of low-income and 
minority students, especially those entering the teaching profession. One such effort includes participating 
in the "Grow Your Own Teacher" project. More than 4 1 WSU graduates are currently teaching in Wichita 
who have completed the GYOT program, and 23 are currently enrolled. 

The project will be overseen by Maggie Picking, Cowley's vice president of student affairs. 

For 40 years, the Philip Morris family of companies has been a leader in supporting educational programs. 
Through its "Teachers First" initiative, Philip Morris Companies Inc. is recognized as the leading corporate 
funder of teacher recruitment and training programs in the United States. Philip Morris believes that invest- 
ing in the recruitment, training, and support services for teachers is vital for a well-prepared and competi- 
tive future workforce. "Teachers First" sponsors model programs that diversify the teaching force and help 
train and support new teachers, as well as national leadership projects in support of teacher education 
reform. 

Philip Morris Companies Inc. has five principal operating companies: Kraft Foods, Inc.; Miller Brewing 
Company; Philip Morris Incorporated (Philip Morris U.S.A.); Philip Morris International Inc.; and Philip 
Morris Capital Corporation. 





During the 1996 fall semester, Cowley was awarded $283,828 to assist the South Central Kansas Rural 
Distance Learning Project. 

The grant, administered by the Rural Utilities Service, an agency of the United States Department of 
Agriculture, will be used to purchase new equipment that will allow Cowley to connect to the information 
superhighway. 

The RUS grant will assist the project in overcoming barriers of transportation, distance, and isolation 
which limit opportunities for interactive education and access to information resources. These barriers make 
it impossible for students and adults within the region to receive equal opportunities for educational or career 
resources when compared to those in urban areas. 

Connie Bonfy, chief grant writer at Cowley, said $1 15,000 of the money would stay at Cowley to con- 
struct two interactive television labs, one on the main campus in Arkansas City and the other at the college's 
Mulvane Center. In addition, new equipment that will assist with the distance learning will be purchased. 

"This certainly will allow us to expand our services," Bonfy said. "It will allow us to expand anywhere." 

Bonfy said the equipment will allow students to take what are called "virtual field trips" to places where 
on-site tours are not allowed. 

Southwestern Bell is contributing the technology for the project. Gary Detwiler, ITV coordinator at 
Cowley, will be the project director. 

The project will build upon an existing closed loop ITV consortium and expand it by creating new open- 
access gateways from the rest of southern Kansas to the metropolitan area of Wichita, and eventually to the 
world. The equipment will provide access to advance-level high school courses that were not affordable 
before, as well as experts from a variety of professions, and community college and university courses. 

The grant is part of $7.5 million awarded to help rural schools and health care facilities connect to the 
information superhighway. 



South-central Kansas was put on the map June 3-8, 1997 as the first Flint Hills Music Festival took place 
in Arkansas City and Winfield. 

The event, a work in progress for more than three years, featured four great concerts and music camps, 
offered something for everyone. 

"Words rarely fail me, but last weekend I found myself overwhelmed by the most magical event that I 
have ever had the honor to experience during the course of my 20-plus year career in the arts," said Connie 
Bonfy, director of arts and humanities programming for Cowley on the experience of the "Grasslands" per- 
formance and "Prairie Man" installation. 

The festival kicked off its first year with a bang by featuring the world premiere of a completely new musi- 
cal adventure written by Eugene Friesen and performed by the internationally-recognized, Grammy Award- 
winning Paul Winter Consort. Additional concerts with the red-hot quintet Cafe Noir, the beautiful duo of 
Meisenbach and Golden, and Friesen as CELLO MAN rounded out the festival performances. 

Friesen, a native Kansan, wrote "Grasslands," specially created for the Paul Winter Consort. 

"You are my heroes, without you, "Grasslands" could not happen," said Friesen, composer and two-time 
Grammy Award-winning member of the Consort. 

"Grasslands" premiered June 7 in the Flint Hills east of Arkansas City and Winfield. 

The festival also featured an installation by Kansas "crop artist," Stan Herd. Several times during the past 
six months, Herd has met with Friesen to jointly explore grasslands issues and writings. The outgrowth of 
their collaboration became Herd's "Prairie Man." Inspired by both Friesen and William Least Heat Moon's 
Prairy Erth, Herd designed the three-acre "Prairie Man" as an artistic response to a Kansas petroglyph of an 
original prairie dweller. 



© 




Cowley, along with Zeller Motor Co. of Arkansas City, received Kansas Awards for Excellence during a 
ceremony Oct. 3, 1996 at the Wichita Marriott. 

Only nine organizations in Kansas received awards. 

Cowley won the Performance In Quality Award, while Zeller won the Commitment To Excellence Award. 

Dr. Pat McAtee, Cowley president, accepted the award on behalf of Cowley's Board of Trustees and all 
college employees. 

"I gratefully and humbly accept this award and I thank business and industry in Cowley County for con- 
tinually challenging us to reach for excellence." 

Ed Zeller accepted the award for Zeller Motors. He told the audience of several hundred people that excel- 
lence comes from not him, but his whole team, which chooses excellence. 

Cowley has been involved in quality initiatives for several years. Each year, teams consisting of a cross- 
section of employees are assembled to discuss issues and concerns about specific areas of the college. Once 
teams go through the process of identifying the problem and offering solutions, a proposal is made to the 
college's Quality Council. 

Since the team approach was implemented about five years ago, Cowley has enhanced its customer ser- 
vice, both internal and external. It has improved processes in several areas of the college, and also has 
enabled Cowley to spend money more efficiently. 

Lt. Gov. Gary Sherrer, featured speaker at the ceremony, said the winners of these awards set new stan- 
dards for others. He said they showcase Kansas as a state. He said that the nine winners are further demon- 
stration that Kansas is full of excellence — excellence in product, in people, and in service. 

"Cowley is extremely proud to receive this award," McAtee said. "We still have a lot of work to do in 
some areas. But I know we're heading in the right direction." 

Awards for Excellence will be presented again next year. 



# 



More students are enrolling at Cowley County Community College than ever before. 

According to figures released by Registrar Forest Smith, Cowley's 1997 spring semester enrollment set 
records for full-time equivalency for a spring and for head count regardless of semester. 

Smith said 20th-day figures, which are reported to the state for funding purposes, indicate that Cowley's 
FTE is 1,770.3, with a total head count of 3,376. 

The previous high spring enrollment occurred in 1995 when FTE was 1,723.3. The previous high head 
count was the 3,287 enrolled last fall. 

The increase in FTE over the spring of 1996 is 4 percent, while the head count increase over last spring 
is 13 percent. Last spring Cowley's FTE was 1,691.3, with a total head count of 2,940. 

Off-campus enrollment continues to increase. Cowley has outreach centers at Strother Field, Winfield, 
Wellington, Mulvane, Wichita, and several area high schools. 




The newly-appointed executive director of the Kansas Association of Community Colleges wasn't even 
officially on the job yet, but she still got in her stops at the state's 19 community colleges. 

Sheila Frahm, former lieutenant governor and interim United States senator, was in Arkansas City Jan. 31, 
1997, the 18th stop on her whirlwind tour of the state's two-year public schools. Frahm began her duties as 
head of the KACC on Feb. 1 . 

Frahm's 2-hour, 15-minute visit to Cowley included a presentation from the college's business and indus- 
try personnel, a brief question-and-answer session, lunch, and a short tour of the Brown Center for Arts, 
Sciences and Technology. 

The business and industry presentation was aimed at Frahm in an effort to better educate her about what 
Cowley is doing with its partnerships in south-central Kansas. Frahm was told that during the last 10 years, 
Cowley has increased its business and industry training contact hours from 60,000 annually to 180,000. 

Dr. Pat McAtee, Cowley president, introduced Frahm to about 40 people who had gathered in the Earle 
N. Wright Community Room. Frahm was impressed with the growth of the college during the past decade. 

"The growth you've had in the last 10 years of contact hours with business and industry helps people take 
ownership in their community college," she said. "I'm from Colby, so I'm familiar with the impact a com- 
munity college has on its service area." 

During the question-and-answer session, Frahm was asked a variety of questions, including those on com- 
munity college governance, distance learning, and local funding. 

"I've been concerned about moving to the Board of Regents just for the sake of moving," Frahm said, 
referring to an effort that, if passed and signed by Gov. Bill Graves, would place the 19 community colleges 
under the state Board of Regents. Tm not sure that's in the best interest of everyone. I think the whole idea 
needs to be discussed thoroughly." 

Educating state legislators on the benefits of community colleges also was on Frahm's mind. 

"My hope is that when we all talk about education, all the players will be there," she said. "We need all 
165 legislators, all of the Board of Regents, and all of Steve (Abrams') colleagues on the State Board of 
Education in this room to hear the presentation." 

Frahm said each of the 19 community colleges was different and had its own specialty in how and what 
it delivers to the public. 

"We are a unique group in that no two colleges are alike in the services they offer," Frahm said. "I guess 
that's what makes community colleges so valuable to the population. What one doesn't offer, another one 
does and so on." 



One "slightly used" (105,000 miles) college presidential vehicle, going once, going twice, SOLD for 
$5,500! 

The bidding was brisk and the crowd was fun-loving and enthusiastic as support for the first "Sharin' of 
the Green" Scholarship Auction, held March 14, 1997, was overwhelming. 

More than $30,000 was netted for an endowed scholarship for Cowley students. 

Groups of friends from around the banquet room at the Regency Court Inn joined together in bidding for 
specialty dinners. One picnic for eight sold for $300. Competition also was fierce for used, but repainted, 
traffic signals that had been converted for household use. 

Original paintings and sculptures, weekend getaways, trips to California, Missouri, and Colorado, 
gourmet delights, and lots of merchandise were donated by area merchants and individuals. 

"The imagination and generosity of the donors of auction items was phenomenal," said Terri Morrow, 
associate dean of development and college relations and one of the lead organizers of the event. "The 
Endowment Association truly appreciates all of the donors and the equally generous bidders who made this 
auction such a success." 






Gail Ross and Luther Parman, fixtures in Arkansas City for decades, are this year's recipients of the 
Outstanding Tiger Alumni Award. They were honored during the 74th commencement exercises May 3, 
1997. 

Following is a closer look at each. 



:F, 



Pictures of her children, grandchildren, and 
great-grandchildren have a special place in Ross' 
home. And during the first moments of conversa- 
tion, it doesn't take long to figure out what has 
pleased Ross the most during her 88 years. 

It's her family. 

"My three kids," Gail said of sons Steve and 
David Ross and daughter Janet English, all of 
Arkansas City. "I'm just as proud of them as can 
be. But they're not just mine. They had a smart 
daddy, too." 

Gail Ross is pretty smart in her own right. She 
graduated from Arkansas City Junior College in 
1929 and later became a pharmacist in Ark City. 
Her involvement in the community and her interest 
in Cowley helped earn her one of this year's 
awards. 

"I think the college is great," said Gail, who was 
born in Riverside, Iowa, and moved to Ark City 
when she was 2. "I'm so impressed with the out- 
reach they have. And I think (college president) Pat 
McAtee has done a fine job." 

Seventy years ago this fall, she enrolled at ACJC 
as Gail Fesler. She remembers Pauline Sleeth, an 
English teacher, being a major influence on her. 

"She got me interested in writing," Gail said. 
"Anything I saw I wrote about it. After I graduated I used to send her my writings." 

Gail also remembers Kurt Galle, economics instructor and dean of the college. 

Despite those influences, Gail wasn't interested in becoming a writer or an economist. She wanted to 
become a pharmacist. In those days a student could get credit for working in a drugstore, then take the state 
board exam. She didn't want to do it that way. 

Instead, Gail enrolled in Wuester School of Pharmacy in Wichita, then took her state exam in 1934, earn- 
ing her license with one of the highest scores that year. She came back to Ark City to work for her brother, 
Walt Fesler, in the Dye and Fesler drugstore downtown. It was one of seven drugstores in Ark City at that 
time. "We worked every seventh Sunday," she said. 

In 1936 she married Kenneth Ross, who came to Ark City working for Western Union. He later worked 
for Ed Crane Insurance, Ross-Bly Insurance, then the present-day United Agency, which he served as pres- 
ident. 

And when Kenneth was drafted into World War II, Gail was there to run the business. "I tried to keep 
things going," she said. 

Gail kept many things going while playing a major role in raising the family. Steve, now president of 
United Agency, is the oldest of the three children. He graduated from Arkansas City High School in 1959. 
Janet, publicist for Unified School District No. 470, graduated in 1964, and David, a physician at the Ark 





City Clinic, graduated in 1966. It was while the children were at home that Gail found time for community 
service. 

"I was involved in the parent-teacher association and I went to all their activities," she said. 

Her service includes four years on the Arkansas City School Board at a time when Frances Willard, 
Adams, and Pershing elementary schools were built. She also became an experienced fund raiser, volun- 
teering for The American Red Cross and The Salvation Army when fund-raising was conducted the old-fash- 
ioned way: Door-to-door. She also served as co-chairman of The United Way one year. 

She served on the Planning Commission two years and also was on the County Health Board. 

"Anything I got into I got to be president of," she said with a laugh. "I guess you might say I was a patsy. 
If someone needed cookies, I'd bake them. It was tough to say no." 

After David went off to college in 1966, Gail went back to work and spent 10 years at Graves Drugstore. 
"I decided I'd rather count pills than take them," she said. 

Throughout her life, Gail has been very active at the First Presbyterian Church, where she's held numer- 
ous positions that have influenced the lives of young and old. She has served as an elder and president of 
the Presbyterian Women. 

Her involvement in civic organizations is second to none. She organized the PEO Chapter GH and was 
the group's first president; she has served on The Salvation Army Advisory Board; was a member of the 
Order of Eastern Star; and was chairman of the Alcohol and Substance Abuse Committee for seven years. 

Her service to the community and commitment to her children were just two reasons she was nominated 
for Kansas Mother of the Year in 1983, a year after Kenneth died. She was first runner-up. 

If ever there was a family woven into the fabric of a community, it's the Gail and Kenneth Ross family. 
Their philosophy was simple. 

"The children were going to go to college because we told them they were," Gail said. "They didn't know 
any different. And we went to church with them every Sunday. They all have a deep, basic faith, and the 
grandchildren do, too. We're a close family." 

Gail was an avid golfer years ago who shot in "the high 40s or low 50s" for nine holes. Today she mar- 
vels at granddaughter Allison, a junior at ACHS. 

"She hit a drive 285 yards" the other day, Gail said proudly. 

So how does Gail want to be remembered? 

"As somebody who tried to do what is right, and tried to be good to people," she said. "I don't want a big 
fuss made over me. 

"Claude St. John, the superintendent of the high school when I was there, told me I was self-effacing. I 
always wondered what that meant." 

Not drawing attention to oneself; humble; modest. St. John was right. That's definitely Gail Ross. 



m 





When Luther Parman was 12 years old, he went 
to work in the furniture store his father had pur- 
chased for $125 in 1908. What the young boy did- 
n't know was that he would follow his father's 
footsteps and make a living selling furniture. 

Luther H. Parman, the son, grew up in Arkansas 
City and became a successful businessman. He has 
always remembered where it all began. 

"I'm certainly honored by it," Parman said. "The 
college enables students to get some motivation to 
work hard the next two years. I've always said that 
it doesn't matter what classes you take, just go. 
I've heard that dozens of times." 

Arkansas City Junior College, as it was known 
when Parman graduated in 1937, has always held a 
special place in his heart. It was there where he 
acquired some business skills that would assist him 
in earning the Business of the Year award in 
Arkansas City in 1991. And it was there where he 
learned to appreciate individual attention from 
instructors. ACJC people like Sleeth, Hall, and 
Galle had a major influence on Parman. 

"One thing I was warned about was that here (at 
ACJC) the instructors will help you," Parman said. 
"If you go away, you won't get any help. That's 
true of all the big universities." 

After ACJC, Parman enrolled at the University of Chicago, where he earned a bachelor's degree in busi- 
ness in 1939. The university was one of the top 10 business schools in the nation back then, and still is today. 

With degree in hand, Parman could have gone almost anywhere. He chose to come home. 

"I came back and went to work in the store again and stayed here ever since," Parman said. 

"Dad (Luther E. Parman) and I were very close. He'd put me in charge of something and let me sweat it 
out." 

Parman, 79, learned a lot from his father, whom he labeled most influential in his life. Luther E. died in 
1973, and a year later his son bought the store from the estate. In 1974, the store became Luther Parman 
Furniture. 

The store didn't move far through the years, serving as a model of stability on the west side of the 100 
block of South Summit Street in downtown Arkansas City. As finances permitted, Parman's father purchased 
buildings at 103 S. Summit, 105 S. Summit, 109 S. Summit, and 107 S. Summit. After his father's death, 
Parman added a fifth building, 1 1 1 S. Summit. It is now where Bob Foster's Furniture is located today. 

Parman still has a desk in the store where he comes in two to three times a week. Once in business, always 
in business. Foster also got Parman his own business cards. 

Parman has a keen memory, and he chooses his words carefully. He remembers some of his early duties 
working at the store through the Depression. He also remembers some prices of furniture. 

"In those days you handled very inexpensive furniture," he said. "It was $39.50 for a three-piece bedroom 
suite. That was a standard item. I remember it was $29.85 on special at one time. I know because I had to 
make the signs for them." 

Parman remembers taking a class titled History of Period Furniture at the University of Chicago that fur- 
ther interested him in staying in the business. 





"I had a wonderful instructor and a great person next to me," he said with a chuckle. 

Still, the person Parman gained the most knowledge from was his father. 

"Dad and I understood each other," Parman said. "We could move from actual facts to hypothetical situ- 
ations. Not everybody has that relationship with their father. We were very close. He was very beneficial to 
me." 

Parman has one older sister, Joy Maurine Parman-Freeman, also a Cowley graduate. She lives in Kansas 
City, Mo. 

Since money was tight in the 1930s, it was practically a foregone conclusion that Parman would attend 
ACJC. But the benefits of the Arkansas City college were lasting to Parman. 

"I did tutoring for one course at the University of Chicago because I had already taken the course at 
ACJC," Parman said. 

Years ago, Parman was easy to find during the fall of each year. That meant hunting, particularly duck 
hunting. Once again he followed in his father's footsteps. More recently, Parman has enjoyed deer hunting. 

As a young businessman in Arkansas City, Parman was active in civic work. He is a member of Rotary 
International, is past president of the Retailers Association and the Junior Chamber of Commerce, and has 
served on the board of the Senior Chamber of Commerce. He also co-chaired Arkalalah two years. 

Parman has remained a bachelor all his life. He said he has dated, but he was more interested in building 
the business early on. 

"If you're up to here in debt," he said, placing his hand at his neck, "there isn't much time for anything 
else. Even a social life gets cut into by a business." 

As a businessman, Parman had one, simple philosophy. 

"You have to take care of your customers," he said. "If you don't help them when they need help, some- 
one else will. It's kind of like at the college. If you don't help your students, someone else will." 

Another rule Parman always followed? Home furnishings follow ladies' clothing. 

"The primary furniture buyers are the ladies of the house," Parman said. "The furnishings fit the lady of 
the house. They're there more than men are." 

It's little wonder Parman has been so successful. 



% 




The lights in Cowley's Walker Technology Building burned overtime during both the 1996 fall and 1997 
spring semesters. 

Nobody's forgotten to turn them off at night, they just burned longer, thanks to a special program devel- 
oped by the college to assist employees who lost their jobs when Total Petroleum, Inc., closed its Arkansas 
City plant. 

Eighteen former Total employees were enrolled in the Machine Tool Technology program, and three oth- 
ers were enrolled in Cowley's Drafting Technology program. All 21 former employees were instructed on 
an accelerated pace. Cowley officials condensed two years of material into about five months. Classes began 
in October and ended in May 1997. 

"This has really been a team effort on our part," said Charlie White, Cowley's retiring associate dean of 
vocational education. "We developed a special course for employees back when Rodeo Meats shut down. 
We met with Total employees and told them if they needed help, it was available to them." 

Machine Tool Technology and Drafting Technology were chosen for a couple of reasons. Employee inter- 
ests were considered, along with the fact that there is a shortage of approximately 1,300 jobs in the machine 
industry. 

"The three drafting people had that interest already," White said. "We wanted to give all the employees 
training in a field that they could find jobs." 

Six instructors — four from the college and two from business and industry — taught the classes, which 
ran from 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. and on many Saturdays. White helped teach, along with Machine Tool 
Technology Instructor Dan Squires, Drafting Technology Instructor Cliff Roderick, Total Quality Assurance 
Instructor Wayne Short, and business and industry representatives Mike Hawkins and Simon Gray. 

The Job Training Partnership Act paid the expenses of enrollment, books and some tools needed. Pat 
Moore, whose office is in Wichita, worked hard to assist with the program. JTPA funds are available to dis- 
located workers to train for a new occupation. 

Conrad Jimison, Cowley's associate dean of instruction, said having previous experience developing pro- 
grams like this helped the college act quickly. 

"The goal is to get the workers trained with the skills they need as quickly as possible," Jimison said. 
"There is a big demand for machine shop workers and there is a demand in drafting." 

Jimison said some students enrolled in Machine Tool Technology may not become machinists. 

"After taking our training, they are prime candidates for other operational jobs in a manufacturing busi- 
ness," Jimison said. "They may not walk out of here a machinist, but have the knowledge to do a lot of other 
things in a manufacturing setting." 

Jimison praised White for his work in developing the curriculum. 

"We'll do this in other areas if there is a need," Jimison said. 



m 




Cowley County Community College's Winfield Center jump-started a new Medical Intensive Care 
Technician program, which has only been in the works since September of last year. Director Slade 
Griffiths' four months of preparation has reaped its rewards as the first semester of the new program is com- 
ing to an end. 

"The program has done well so far. The students are beginning to think like paramedics, and relax more 
with the program," said Griffiths, who also serves as the instructor. Lab assistants work with Griffiths. 

During the first semester, January through May, classes met 25 hours per week. June through September, 
students will earn clinical experience by performing patient care under the guidance of a nurse or physician, 
or by going on rounds with a physician on a one-to-one basis. 

For the final three months of the program, students will work as paramedics under the guidance of certi- 
fied paramedics for a 500-hour internship. Internships will be conducted in conjunction with the Arkansas 
City Fire Department, Winfield EMS, Sedgwick County EMS, and the Butler County EMS. 

By the end of the program, students will have earned 54 credit hours and an MICT certificate. The cer- 
tificate is not the equivalent of an associate's degree or MICT certification. To obtain an associate's degree, 
students must have an additional 34 credit hours. This can be completed in two years. A basic emergency 
medical technician must complete a required 140 classroom hours. The program prepares students for the 
state board exam to become certified. 

"The program has a great ability to create critical thinkers," Griffiths said. 

According to Griffiths, the program is fast-paced and exciting. He has an intent to teach students basic 
knowledge and to help them learn how to assimilate and apply that knowledge. Griffiths doesn't use mem- 
ory lists; instead he uses games like "Jeopardy" to help students memorize more efficiently. 

As the program expands, Griffiths would like to add more classes like First Responder and Basic Life 
Support. He would also like to bring in more instructors. 

Griffiths really likes the faculty at Cowley. 

"Everyone has been really friendly and helpful so far," Griffiths said. He went on to say Cowley seems 
more like a close-knit family. 

Griffiths is from Clay Center, a small town northwest of Manhattan. He has written computer software, 
has had about 20 articles published, and has reviewed many medical textbooks. Griffiths was a training offi- 
cer for Leavenworth County EMS, and an adjunct instructor for Penn Valley Community College in Kansas 
City. Griffiths also was an examiner for the Kansas Board of EMS. 

Twenty students in the program at any one time is the maximum number. 




m 




ISltffBJLItJKiS OIV 




The college embarked on a marketing campaign in early January that was designed to set Cowley apart 
from its competition. 

As of the end of the 1996-97 fiscal year, it was doing just that. 

Nye & Associates, Inc., of Wichita began working with college employees in January to determine what 
needed to be done, how much to do, and at what cost. Gary Nye, owner of the business, met with each of 
the five instructional divisions during the 1997 spring semester, plus countless other meetings with admin- 
istrators and staff. 

The plan, which will evolve as the college's needs change, focuses on image, packaging, and sending a 
consistent message about the college. 

Nye, in working with the public relations office, suggested Cowley start promoting itself as Cowley 
College. Nye said the image that name projects encompasses all of what the college is about, from its trans- 
fer curriculum, to its technical fields, to its partnership with business and industry. 

"This is the beginning," Nye said. "This change in how we present Cowley sets you apart from the com- 
petition." 

Nye emphasized that it was not a name change, but rather a change in the way the college markets itself. 

Other proposals approved: 

• A compact disc that would be an audio viewbook of the college. It would be given to traditional-age 
prospects during high school visits and trade shows. The CD would include a variety of offices on campus 
and their function. 

• A newspaper insert, front and back, that would go into papers within Cowley's service area. One side of 
the insert is geared toward traditional-age students. The other side will attract non-traditional age students. 

• New stationary and business cards equipped with the new logo. 

• The use of post cards instead of a letter in a sealed envelope for immediate response from prospective 
students. 

The marketing committee at the college has been heavily involved in the process, and an off-shoot group 
— a public relations task force — has organized to help Cowley employees and students spread a consis- 
tent, positive message about the college. The task force's mission will be ongoing. 

"It's time that we did something like this," said Dr. Pat McAtee, college president. "Competition for stu- 
dents today is so great. We need every edge we can get. I think we're on the right track with a lot of the 
things he's presented." 

Nye & Associates have done a great deal of the creative work involved in the different projects. They will 
act as consultants once most of the major items such as logo, paper family, and advertisements are designed. 



Cowle 



LEG 



The Power of Learning 



Even though the official site visit by the North Central Association of 
Colleges and Schools isn't scheduled until October 1999, Cowley began the 
preparation process by naming a steering committee in January 1997. 

Dr. Pat McAtee, president, appointed Susan Rush, director of testing and 
career services, as the chair of the steering committee. Other members: 
McAtee, Sid Regnier, Maggie Picking, Dr. Lynn Stalnaker, Terri Morrow, 
Charles McKown, Stu Osterthun, Dr. Sue Darby, Jim Miesner, Bruce Crouse, 
Paul Stirnaman, Pam Doyle, Michelle Schoon, Chris Vollweider, and Jody 
Arnett. 

In April, the team traveled to Chicago for NCA's annual convention. From 
that meeting, committee members sat down to plan strategy for the 1999 visit. 
North Central gave Cowley a special invitation to conduct a special emphasis 
study, rather than a comprehensive study, and the committee agreed to pursue 
that. 

Several sub-committees will be formed from the steering committee to con- 
duct research and gather data for the final report. 




© 








A.C.H.S. Class of 1953 

ADM Milling Company 

Gary and Bernice Adamson 

Advantage Realty 

Adventure Sports 

Air Force Aid Society 

Allen's Furniture and Carpet 

Bart Allen 

American Legion Auxiliary #18 

American Red Cross 

Joe and Eleanor Anderson 

Tracy Anderson 

Anthony Kiwanis Club 

Steven W. Archer 

Ark City Arts Council 

Ark City Chamber of Commerce 

Ark City Evening Kiwanis Club 

Ark City F.O.P. 

Arkansas City Historical Society 

Ark City Mirror & Glass 

Ark City Music & Drama Club 

Ark City Rec Commission 

Arkansas City Traveler 

Ark City Tumbleweeds 

Ark Valley Distributing 

Rod and Jody Arnett 

Mr. and Mrs. Arnold Arrowood 

Ark Vet Associates-Drs. White & Yorke 

Joe and Donna Avery 

Dr & Mrs. Alfredo Aucar 

B Four Flying, Inc. 

Albert and Karen Bacastow 

Albert and Thelma Bacastow 

Bailly's Farm Supply 

Bill Bailey 

Robert L. Bangert 

Barbour Title Company 

Mr. and Mrs. Buel Beck 

Beech Aircraft Foundation 

Beeson Optical 

Mike Belenski 

Kim Benedict & Rick Gregory 

Beta Sigma Phi — City Council 

Beta Sigma Phi — Gamma Theta 

Mr. and Mrs. Jim Bernhardt 

Billings Plumbing 

Binney and Smith, Inc. — Winfield 

Baxter Black 

D.D. and Bev Black 

June Bland 

Philip and Brenda Blaufuss 

Myrtle Bly 

Boeing Company 

Bob and Jean Boggs 

Devon and Connie Bonfy 

Dick & Dolly Bonfy 

Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Bonnell 

Mrs. Bea Boory 

John V. Bossi 

Mr. and Mrs. Don Bowman 

Boyer Educational Trust 

Mr. and Mrs. Joe Boyle 

Marietta Brammer 

Bill and Debbie Bridges 



Brown's Office Supply 

Max E. Brown 

Melburn Porter Brown 

Robert A. and Jana Brown 

Roger A. and Suzanne Brown 

Bryant Hardware 

Philip E. Buechner Jr. 

Tony and Wilda Buffo 

Burford Theatre 

Don and Wanda Burkarth 

Mr. and Mrs. Darren Burroughs 

Mr. and Mrs. Dave Burroughs 

Mrs. Betty Burton 

Buterbaugh and Handlin 

Alphonse Caicedo 

Max and Marcia Cales 

Chester Campbell 

Elsie Campbell 

Phil and Gloria Campbell 

Robert L. Campbell 

Mildred Carpenter/Marie Vickers Trust 

Carl's BBQ 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas E. Carr 

Col. and Mrs. Johnny Castle 

Cedar Vale Booster Club 

Cedar Vale USD #285 

Cellular One 

Mr. and Mrs. Salem H. Chaaban 

Cherokee Nation 

Mr. and Mrs. Don Cheslic 

Cheyenne & Arapahoe Tribes of Okla. 

Marilyn Childers 

Citizen's Scholarship Foundation 

City of Arkansas City 

Robert and Judy Clark 

Albert and Audine Clemente 

Ben and Irene Cleveland 

Coca-Cola Bottling Co. 

Coca-Cola International 

Gene and Donella Cole 

College Education Association 

Mr. and Mrs. David Colquhoun 

Clint and Brenda Combs 

Commerce Bank 

Commercial Federal Savings 

Conco Inc. 

Judge and Mrs. Richard Cook 

Ms. Betty R. Cook-Peterson 

Coonrod & Associates 

Gary Cooper 

Country Mart 

Mr. and Mrs. Estel Counts 

Cowley County Community College 

Cowley County Livestock Assoc. 

David and Pauline Craft 

DeAnn Craft 

Dr. Lynn Cramer 

Mr. Steve Cranford 

Tony Crouch 

Bruce Crouse 

Mike and Sue Crow 

Bill and Marge Curless 

D&D Equipment 

D & S Retail Liquor, Wine & Spirit 



Julia A. Dailey 

Dairy Queen of Winfield 

Daisy Mae's Cafe 

Jim and Rae Dale 

Kirke Dale Memorial Scholarship Trust 

Lee and Sue Darby 

Daulton Construction 

Darren Daulton 

Iris David 

David's Electronics 

Charles S. and Verna Davis 

Day's Monument 

A. Vance Day 

Jere and Susan Dean 

Delta Dental 

Delta Kappa Gamma-Upsilon Chapt. 

Marilyn Denny 

Derby USD #260 

Gary and Joy Detwiler 

Mrs. Jasper DeVore 

Kenny DiVall 

Meredith Docking 

Bill & Judy Docking 

Dodge City Community Foundation 

Bryne Donaldson 

Donna's Design 

Edith Dunbar 

Duncan Hog Farm — Buel Duncan 

Lee & Terry Eaton 

Elite Advertising 

Beryle Elliott 

Emrick's Van & Storage Co. 

Stephen and Janet English 

Doug and Dejon Ewing 

Eleanor S. Farrar 

John Farrar 

Harriet Fast 

Jeanne Fearnow 

Bob and Lois Fencil 

First Baptist Church — Ark City 

First Baptist Church — Winfield 

First Presbyterian Church — Derby 

First Presbyterian Church — Winf. 

Danny and Melva Fisk 

First Commun. Fed. Sav. & Loan 

First National Bank of Winfield 

Mark Flickinger 

Bob Foster Furniture 

Bud Foster Furniture 

Mrs. Kathryn Foster 

Michael Foust 

Mr. and Mrs. Phil Foust 

Leslie Foust 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry Fox 

Curtis & Cynthia Freeland 

Gary Gackstatter 

Jack and Ruene Gage 

Edward L. and Genevieve Goff Galle 

Mrs. Belva Gardner 

Garvey International, Inc. 

Gayle's Catering 

General Electric Company 

Kenton Gibbs 

Ed and Margaret Gilliland 



Gilliland Printing, Inc. 

Ken and Bonnie Gilmore 

Ben and Taeko Givens 

Gloria G's 

Velda Gochis 

Ron and Donetta Godsey 

Mr. and Mrs. J.G. Goff 

Cliff and Pam Goggans 

Gordon & Associates 

Gordon-Embers Architects 

Gordon-Piatt Energy Group, Inc. 

Graves Drug Store 

Great Scott Communications 

Great Western Dining 

Lee Gregg 

Howard and Shirley Griffin 

Grimes Jewelry 

Steve and Cinda Grimes 

Loren and Dorothy Grimes 

Grinder Man 

Larry & Nyla Grose 

Mrs. Frank Groves 

Phil Groves Oil Co. 

Mike Groves Oil Co. 

Frank Groves Oil Co. 

Mike and Judi Groves 

Allen and Beverly Grander 

Halliburton Foundation 

Haltstead USD #440 

Wayne and Kay Hamilton 

Evelyn Hamilton 

Linda Hamlin 

Linda L. Hankins 

Ed and Linda Hargrove 

Harvey's Fashions 

Mr. Harvey's 

Donald and Ann Hastings 

Elvin and Dixie Hatfield 

Cecil Hawkins 

Darrell L. Hawkins 

Hawks Funeral Home 

Bill and Linda Headrick 

Norman and Phyllis Hearn 

Steve and Carol Hearne 

Cathy S. Hendricks 

Cloide and Hazel Hensley 

Allen and Sherry Herman 

Jean C. Hickman 

CD. Higby 

Bill and Jean Hill 

Charles Hill 

Dr. Sharon Hill 

Hilltop Cleaners 

John and Janice Hitchcock 

Gary Hockenbury 

Kim & Cynthia Hocker 

Marjory Hodkin 

Jim and Joyce Holloway 

Home National Bank 

Jane Houdek 

Bill and Carol House 

Donna Howell Sickles 

Luella Hume 

Charles and Ina Hungerford 



Doug & Patti Hunter 

Hutchinson Electric 

Inn at Ventana 

INTRUST Bank 

Mr. & Mrs. Norman Iverson 

David & Sherylyn Jack 

Lyman James 

Jan's Sport Shack 

Jarvis Accounting 

Jarvis Auto Supply, Inc. 

Bob and Helen Jay 

Steve and Joi Jay 

Ronnie and Anita Jenkins 

Booker T. Jennings III 

Bernadine Jensen 

Jerry's Donut Shop 

Jim's Total Service 

Conrad & Janet Jimison 

Dorothy Johnson 

Hubert and Mildred Johnston 

Mr. and Mrs. Danny Jones 

KGE 

KSOK-WKS 

Gary Kahle 

Dr. and Mrs. Dan Kahler 

KAN-OKLA Telephone Assoc. 

Kansas Arts Commission 

Kansas Humanities Council 

Kansas Industrial Services, Inc. 

Kansas Orthopaedic Center 

Kansas State University 

Kaw Nation of Oklahoma 

Keefe Printing 

Lyle & Diana Keefe 

Diane Kelly 

John & Joan Kempf 

Charles and Mary Kerr 

Oscar Kimmell 

Kindred Jewelry 

King's Portraits 

Dr. and Mrs. Nick Kinsch 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Kinzie 

Erwin and Fern Knocke 

Mr. and Mrs. Irvin E. Kramer 

Jeff and Julie Kratt 

John T. Kroenert 

Kwik Kar Oil & Lube 

Ann LaRose 

Imogene Leach 

Mr. and Mrs. H. Robben Ledeker 

Legleiter Video Productions 

Clay Lemert 

Mr. and Mrs. Gerald Lewis 

Lions Square Lodge 

Jean Lough 

Herb Lungren Auto Plaza 

Chuck and Kathy Lyman 

MCI Telecommunications, Inc. 

Ronald MagLaughlin 

Mangen Chiropractic Clinic 

Lyle F. Maninger 

Phil and Cathy Mars 

Bea and Rex Marsh 

Betty Martin 




Dr. and Mrs. James Marvel 

David and Theresa Maslen 

Walt and Jane Mathiasmeier 

Don and Carol Hobaugh-Maudlin 

Kenny & Pat Mauzey 

May C's 

Bernice McAtee 

Dr. & Mrs. Pat McAtee 

Marvin and Anita Belew McCorgary 

Mr. and Mrs. Eugene McCorgary 

McDonald's 

Carriasco McGilbra 

Charles McKown 

Steve A. McSpadden 

Mr. and Mrs. Michael McVey 

Mega Movies 

Jack Mercer 

Mid America Arts Alliance 

Midwest Electric Supply 

Midwest Recruiters Inc. 

Jim and Ann Miesner 

Max M. Miller 

Mrs. Pearl M. Miller 

Mrs. Mary Jane Mills 

Montgomery Elevator Company 

Mike & Patti Morgan 

Sue Morris 

Scott and Kathy Morris 

Debra Morrow 

H. Dianne Morrow 

Otis & Terri Morrow 

Multimedia Cablevision 

Munson-Austin Agency 

Mrs. B.J. Myers 

Navaho Nation 

NCO Wife's Club 

Mrs. Gwen Nelson 

Lee Nelson 

Mr. and Mrs. Mark Nelson 

Earl G. and Jo Ann Newman 

Randy & Debbie Nittler 

Terry O' Keefe 

Jerry L. Old, M.D. 

Olen Medical 

On Cue 

Orscheln Farm & Home Supply 

Osage Nation 

Stu Osterthun 

Oxford Chamber of Commerce 

Oxford Community Bank 

Oxford High School 

Oxford Lodge #165 

Painted Pony 

Neal and Anna Mae Paisley 

Libby Palmer 

Ms. Margaret A. Palmer 

Parks Jewelry 

Parman's Furniture & Carpet 

Parman's North 

Parman. Tanner, Soule & Jackson 

Paton Wholesale and Vending 

Alan and Peggy Paton 

Don and Wilda Patterson 

Dr. and Mrs. Bob Paxton 



fU 





Petal 's-N-Things 

Betty R. Peterson 

Phi Beta Lambda 

Eddie & Maggie Picking 

Pine Haven Cottages 

Pizza Inn 

Pizza Hut Delivery Company 

Porter's Hometown Brand Center 

Mr. and Mrs. Bill Post 

Post Rock Gas, Inc. 

Gary Potter Auction Service 

Bill and Kelly Potter 

David & Laura Potter 

Prairieland Transportation Inc. 

Presbyterian Manor 

Tom and Sheila Prichard 

Jim and Jan Pringle 

Puritan Billiard Parlor 

Quality Water 

Judith Queen 

Rakies 

Vera Ramey 

Raymond Ramirez 

Ramsey Auto Parts 

Mr. and Mrs. Terry Ramsey 

Ranson Capital Corp. 

Jeffrey Reese 

Reedy Ford 

Regency Court Inn 

Sid & Sharon Regnier 

Dr. Glen & Bonnie Remsberg 

Bill & Arleta Rice 

Norma Rich 

John Riggs 

Rindt Erdman Funeral Home 

Fred and Donna Rindt 

Dr. Paul P. Rogers Memorial 

Rogers & Cramer, D.D.S. 

Nick & Christie Rogers 

Mrs. Gail Ross 

David and Rhonda Ross 

Rotary Club of Arkansas City 

Aileene Kingsbury Rotha 

Bill Rowe 

Royal Neighbors of America 

Rubbermaid 

Dorothy Rush Realty 

Bob and Jan Rush-Smokin' Okies 

Lena M. Rush Scholarship Trust 

Rick & Valerie Rush 

Sac & Fox Nation 

Mr. and Mrs. James P. Salomon 

Lora I. Samford 

Lois Sampson 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Savala 

Rick and Jodi Schoeling 

Mr. and Mrs. David Schaller 

Greg Schartz 

David & Karen Schmeidler 

Schuster's Lawn and Garden 

Schwan's Sales 

Shantell Schweer 

Larry Schwintz 

Al Sehsuvaroglu 



Dr. and Mrs. John Seitz 
Shear Success, Inc. 
Bill & JoAnn Sheldon 
E.W. Shelton 
Wanda Shepherd 
Sherwin Williams 
Wayne and Sandy Short 
Mr. and Mrs. Dennis Shurtz 
Joe and Mindi Shriver 
Skin Deep III Spa 
Dr. and Mrs. Bruce Smith 
Dale Smith 

Forest and Sandra Smith 
Jeff Smith 

Melvin and Dottie Smith 
Newton C. and Mary Ellen Smith 
Ralph D. Smith 
Smyer Travel Service 
Merle Snider Motors, Inc. 
Jean and Ellen Snell 
Daniel J. and Vicki Snowden 
Marth Snyder 

South Central Kansas Regional Medical 
Center 

South Haven Teachers Assoc. 
Jim and Margaret Sowden 
Mr. and Mrs. Roy Soule 
Rex Soule 

Mr. and Mrs. Dan Spangler 
Sparks Movie Store 
Sparks Music Store 
Roger and Diane Sparks 
Bill Spear 
Danny Squires 
Dr. Lynn Stalnaker 
Dr & Mrs. Robert A. Stan- 
State Bank of Winfield 
State of Kansas — Board of Regents 
Leonard and Nancy Steinle 
Florence L. Stephens 
Steven Chevrolet 
Jean Stockton 
Mr. and Mrs. Bob Storbeck 
Tad and Janice Stover 
Dr & Mrs. Rod Stoy 
Gary and Linda Strack 
John and Lee Ann Sturd 
Subway Sandwiches & Salads 
Mickey Sullivan 
Summit Antique Mall 
Sun Oil Company 
Larry Swaim 
Betty Sybrant 
Taylor Drug 
Ted Templar 

Mr. and Mrs. Tom Templeton 
Texaco Foundation 
Dave and Naoma Thompson 
Mr. and Mrs. F.L. Thurman 
Terry and Jean Tidwell 
Dan Torrence 

Richard and Nancy Tredway 
Ed and Mary Turner 
Tyler Productions, Inc. 



Udall Bank of Commerce 

Udall USD #463 

Union National Bank 

Union State Bank 

United Agency 

Donald Vannoy 

Mike and Debbie Vaughn 

Village Market 

Barry and Allison Viola 

Mr. and Mrs. Bob Viola 

Vocational Indust. Clubs of America 

Chris Vollweider 

Waldeck Oil Company 

Waldorf Riley Inc. 

Mrs. Harold Walker 

Ms. Nellora Walker 

Mr. and Mrs. H.A. Walling 

Wal-Mart 

Marc and Bob Waltrip 

Charles R. Waltrip 

Mr. and Mrs. Don Ward 

Caroline Newman Warren 

Joan Warren 

Mabel Warren 

Mr. and Mrs. Rupert Welch 

Wellington Art Association 

Wellington Soroptimist Club 

Wellington Senior High 

Wendy's of Winfield 

Bob White 

Charles and Pat White 

Dale B. White 

Wichita State University 

Lewis & Louise Willhite Trust 

Willis Corroon Corp. 

Willowbend Golf Course 

Rodney E. Wilson 

Winfield Courier 

Winfield Carpet Cleaners 

Winfield Iron and Metal Inc. 

V.J. Wilkins 

Ms. Mary N. Wilson 

Rodney and Priscilla Wilson 

Wood Chiropractic 

Woods Lumber Company 

Mae Louise Woods 

Beatrice Wright 

Kelly J. Wright 

Morgan Wright 

Mr. and Mrs. Willard A. Wright 

Dr. and Mrs. Bob Yoachim 

Elizabeth Youmans 

Zeller Motor Company, Inc. 



Founded: 1922 

In 1968, the College became the first school in the state to combine 
a traditional liberal arts transfer curriculum with a program of area 
vocational-technical school training. 

President: 

Dr. Patrick McAtee, Ph.D., became the third president of the College 
on July 1, 1987. 

1997 Spring Enrollment: 

1,770.30 Full-Time Equivalency 
3,376 Headcount (all-time record) 

Programs: 

36 Certificate and Applied Science programs 
44 Liberal Arts/Transfer programs 

Institute of Lifetime Learning — a model Senior Citizens 

program 

More than 100 specialized programs and seminars offered through 
the Institute for Lifetime Learning - Special Programs Office, the 
Displaced Homemaker/Single Parent Program, and the Work and 
Family Program. 

Specialized training for business and industry to meet their needs. In 
the past the College has developed or offered programs for Gilliland 
Printing, Inc., General Electric, Rubbermaid-Winfield, Gordon-Piatt 
Energy Group, Inc., the city of Arkansas City, local school districts, 
day care centers, local nursing homes, special education co-ops, KSQ 
Blowmolding, Social Rehabilitation Services, Southwestern Bell 
Telephone, Montgomery Elevator, Boeing-Wichita, Cessna, and the 
banking industry. 

Current Valuation: 

Valuation in the Fall of 1997 was $162,091,694. 




Mill Levy: 21.451 

Fact: 

Of the 19 community col- 
leges in Kansas, Cowley has 
the 6th lowest mill levy in the 
state at 21.451, and has the 
seventh highest county valua- 
tion of $162,091,694. At $40 
per credit hour for tuition and 
fees, Cowley boasts one of the 
lowest tuitions in the state. 



Budget: 

$14,342,738 

Facilities: 

15 buildings on a 13-acre campus in the heart of downtown Arkansas 
City. 

Outreach Centers in Mulvane, Strother Field, Winfield, Wellington 
and the South Side Education Center, located at 4501 E. 47th Street 
South in Wichita, a cooperative partnership between Cowley County 
Community College, Wichita State University, and the Wichita Area 
Technical College. Courses also taught at these area high schools: 
Argonia, Belle Plaine, Caldwell, Cedar Vale, Conway Springs, Dexter, 
Oxford, South Haven, and Udall. 

Employees: 

130 full-time faculty, staff and administration 
320 part-time faculty, staff and students 

Endowment Association Assets: 

June 30, 1997 assets of $1,163,520 
590 Members 






Enrollment Figures 



Facts, Spring 1997: 



High School 


361 


Freshmen 


1,431 


Sophomores 


875 


Special 


709 


Total Headcount 


3,376 


Total FTE 


1,770.30 



Approximately 60% of fresh- 
men and sophomores enrolled 
in Kansas colleges are in 
community colleges. 



Q| 







If you believe in the commu- 
nity college concept, let your 
state representative know. 

Elected Officials 

Governor Bill Graves 

Second Floor 

State Capitol 

Topeka, Kansas 66612 

Senator Greta Goodwin 

Winfield, Kansas 67156 

Representative 
Joe Shriver 

Arkansas City, Kansas 67005 

Judy Showalter 

Winfield, Kansas 67156 

State Board Member 
Dr. Steve E. Abrams 

Arkansas City, Kansas 67005 



Your Investment 

• $3,462,249 in 1996 taxes. $3,477,005 was levied in 1997. 

• Taxes DO NOT pay for scholarships to out-of-state athletes. 

• Although the College is sixth in size among the 19 community 
colleges in Kansas, the mill levy ranks 13th. 

Your Return 

• $13,996,202 a year added to the local economy. For each dollar 
of local tax support received, the College returns $5.03 to the 
county's economy. That return is greater when the total picture of 
the state is considered. For every dollar spent by the state in sup- 
port of community colleges, $22.43 is returned. 

• $6,196,191 annual payroll, providing 130 full-time jobs and 175 
adjunct faculty positions. 

• Educational opportunities for all segments of the population at less 
than half the cost of four-year colleges. Average student age is 
27.6 years. 

• A full-time enrollment for the spring of 1997 of 1,770.30. 

• Graduates who, according to a study by the University of Kansas, 
suffer less transfer shock than any other group of transfer students. 

• Customized training for more than a dozen businesses and indus- 
tries. 



financial aid help for 
Cowley County Students 

For the 1996-97 year, more 
than 1,000 Cowley County 
students were awarded more 
than $2 million in grants, 
loans, scholarships and work- 
study programs. 



• A significant attraction for businesses and industries considering 
relocation in this area. 

• Cultural, educational and athletic events which entertain audi- 
ences throughout this area. 

• An educational institution well known for the quality of its pro- 
grams in both liberal arts and vocational/occupational areas. 




COWLEY COUNTY COMMUNITY COLLEGE 
& AREA VOCATIONAL-TECHNICAL SCHOOL 



Tablx: or CO!¥TEIVTS 

Message From The President 2 

Board of Trustees 3 

Administrative Team 4 

Students of the Month 5 

Student Achievements 6-11 

Staff Achievements 12-15 

Staff Retirements 16-17 

Institutional Award 18 

Enrollment Report 19 

Diamond Anniversary 20 

Innovative Curriculum 21 

Endowment Campaign 22-23 

Business and Industry 24-25 

Partners in Education 26 

Institutional Grants 27 

Library Automated 28 

Institutional Success 29 

Athletics 30-35 

Endowment Association Donors 36-37 

Cowley At-a-Glance 38 

The Bottom Line 39 



On the cover: 

From left, Cowley students Ryan Kane, Jennifer Willson, Damon Young, Virgil Watson, and 
Jessica Ferree enjoy a stroll in front of the Brown Center for Arts, Sciences and Technology. 

Cowley County Community College & Area Vocational-Technical School 
125 S. Second St. • Arkansas City, Kansas • 67005 • (316) 442-0430 • 1-800-593-2222 

This annual report was produced by the Office of Public Relations, Stu Osterthun and Rex Soule. Cover photograph by Steve Rasmussen. 






Accountability. 

I can't think of another word that describes the 
task that lies ahead for higher education. Taxpayers 
demand it, and we as an institution of higher learning 
owe it to them and to ourselves to be accountable to 
all of our customers, both external and internal. 

Admittedly, we have struggled with the whole 
concept of accountability for years. We know we do 
great things. Our students transfer to four-year schools 
and earn degrees. They go on and acquire well-paying 
jobs in technical fields. We know that. 

But the difficult task is tracking our students and 
their successes, as well as examining our own process- 
es to see how we measure up. We are making strides 
to do just that, implementing a plan through our North 
Central Accreditation self study that will provide us 
with valuable information en route to improved 
accountability. 

The entire campus community will become 
involved in this process, ensuring that input is being 
received from all parts of the college. 

Organizing for the North Central process was just 
one of the highlights of the 1997-98 academic year. 
Once again, the year provided many exciting moments 
for our students, our faculty, and our entire staff. Here are just a few examples: 

• Arkansas City sophomore Austin Graves served as president of the national Vocational Industrial 
Clubs of America, truly an outstanding accomplishment. Throughout the year. Graves traveled to give 
speeches and presentations to our nation's youth, emphasizing the importance of VICA. 

• Arkansas City sophomore Damon Young served as president of the Kansas Association of 
Community College Students, an organization formed to help with dialogue between students at Kansas 
community colleges and their boards of trustees. 

• The college captured its second consecutive Kansas Award for Excellence. 

• Three people earned Master Teacher Awards, bringing the total to 37 in the last 1 1 years. 

• Humanities Division Chair and speech/drama instructor Dejon Ewing was the first recipient of the 
Endowed Chair for Teaching Excellence and Student Learning. 

• Our baseball team won an incredible second consecutive National Junior College Athletic 
Association World Series title. 

• Our Endowment Association began an aggressive fund-raising campaign to increase the amount of 
money in our Endowed Scholarship fund and to date has raised more than $600,000. 

• Our Business and Industry Institute at Strother Field expanded into a larger facility, allowing us to 
better serve our business and industry customers. 

• The college received several grants, including a Student Support Services (TRIO) grant for nearly 
$1 million through five years to assist 150 students annually. 

• Enrollment in the fall of 1997 reached an all-time high with nearly 2,100 full-time and nearly 3,900 
total students. 

• And more than 500 students received degrees in May 1998, the most ever at Cowley. 

As you can see, it was another successful year at Cowley. But as I've said in this column many times 
before, we cannot, and will not, rest on our laurels. A great deal of work lies ahead of us. 

We are proud of what we have 
accomplished, and I look forward to a 
successful 1998-99 academic year. 




*Ui/m 





Albert 
Bacastow Jr. 

Arkansas City 




Donna 
Avery 

Arkansas City 




Ron 
Godsey 

Winfield 




Patti 
Hunter 

Arkansas City 




Dennis 
Shurtz 

Arkansas City 




LaDonna 
Lanning 

Winfield 





Cowley's administrative team. Front row, from left, Dr. Joan Warren, associate dean of vocational educa- 
tion; Gene Cole, associate dean of business and industry; and Terri Morrow, associate dean of development 
and college relations. Standing, from left, Dr. Pat McAtee, president; Maggie Picking, vice president of stu- 
dent affairs; Sid Regnier, vice president of business services; Conrad Jimison, dean of instruction; TomSaia, 
dean of administration/director of athletics; and Jim Miesner, associate dean of continuing education. 




8xui>eivx® or THE Moivth 





Mark 
Shrewsberry 

Arkansas City, Kansas 

September 1997 

Student of the Year 



Damon 
Young 

Arkansas City, Kansas 
December 1997 



Cassi 
Vandever 

Arkansas City, Kansas 
October 1997 



Mark 
Thomas 

Winfield, Kansas 
November 1997 





Jill 
Hutchinson 

Arkansas City, Kansas 
February 1998 



Laetitia 
Sanders 

Arkansas City, Kansas 
March 1998 




Ryan 
Kane 

Wellington, Kansas 
January 1998 



Susan 
Day-Giger 

South Haven, Kansas 
April 1998 




&tu;o:eiwt A.ohi:e^;ei*i::e]wt« 




Cassi 
Vandever 



Cowley students among 
those honored in Topeka 

Two Cowley students were among those honored in Topeka Feb. 1 1 for their 
academic accomplishments. 

Cassi Vandever and Mark Shrewsberry, sophomores from Arkansas City, 
were among 38 students from 20 community college campuses in Kansas hon- 
ored by educators and lawmakers in Topeka. The occasion was an awards lun- 
cheon for the 1998 All-Kansas Academic Team, sponsored by the international 
headquarters of the Phi Theta Kappa honor society, the Kansas Association of 
Community College Trustees, and the Kansas Council of Community College 
Presidents. 

Several Cowley faculty and administrators were in attendance, including 
President Dr. Pat McAtee and Dean of Instruction Conrad Jimison. 

The honored students represent a wide range of backgrounds, hometowns, 
and fields of study. What they share, according to PTK Regional Director Mark 
T. Morman of Overland Park, is a common commitment to excellence in learn- 
ing. Each was selected by his or her own community college for the statewide 
academic team, and each also is a nominee for the 1998 All-USA Academic 
Team, sponsored by the national newspaper USA Today and by PTK. 

"We're proud of the vital role community colleges play in meeting the 
learning needs of Kansas, and we're proud of the way these students have distin- 
guished themselves," said Sheila Frahm, former U.S. senator and former Kansas 
lieutenant governor. "This is an exciting annual honor that recognizes the top 
students of our community colleges across the state." 

As educators, legislators, and members of the Kansas State Board of 
Education looked on, the students each received a proclamation from Gov. Bill 
Graves, a $300 educational stipend, and an academic medallion. The Kansas 
Regents universities, and other higher education institutions in the state, have 
promised to match the stipends for those who transfer after completing their 
community college studies. 

Prior to the luncheon, students went to the capitol for a tour and to meet in 
the senate chamber with Senate Majority Leader Tim Emmert, R-Independence. 

Keynote speaker for the third annual award luncheon at Topeka's Holiday Inn West/Holidome was 
Jennifer Rios of Kansas City Kansas Community College. Rios was named an All-Kansas Academic Team 
member in 1997 and went on to be selected from a field of approximately 1 ,300 top American students as 
one of the 20 All-USA Academic First-Team members. 

First-team members each received $2,500 stipends, and were featured along with second- and third- 
team members in the April 27 edition of USA Today. 




Mark 
Shrewsberry 




STUDENT A.CMIE^TEl^I^JWT* 



Head of Cowley's SGA 
elected KACCS president 

Ensuring that students attending Kansas community colleges have a voice is of utmost concern for 
Damon Young and Reed Dunn. 

Young, a sophomore at Cowley, and Dunn, a sophomore at Barton County Community College, were 
elected president and vice president of the Kansas Association of Community College Students. The 
group's elections took place during the Kansas Association of Community College Trustees annual meet- 
ing Oct. 23-24 at the Wichita Airport Hilton. 

Young, an Arkansas City native and president of Cowley's Student 
Government Association, said students decided to form an independent group 
that would keep their interests at the forefront for legislators and other decision 
makers. 

'*In September, Reed, Bill Rickenbaugh from Butler County and myself sat 
down and went through the constitution," Young said. "We proposed some sig- 
nificant changes for students." 

Dunn was president of Barton's Student Senate. 

They came up with a list of eight purposes or mission statements. 

"With those eight statements the basic theme was that we need leadership 
locally," Young said. "If we coordinate and share ideas, we'll have better 
schools. If it's working well at Barton, we can try it here and see if it works for 
us. Communication between community colleges is the main thing." 

The eight purposes are: Create an atmosphere of understanding as to the 
function and purpose of KACCS; to better define students' role in their colleges 
and KACCS; to develop leadership skills in those students who participate in 
KACCS; to increase students' knowledge about the process between educational 
organizations and the Legislature; to increase student activity and input in 

KACCS; to serve as a communication link between students of community colleges and the Legislature; 
to bridge the gap at the state level between associated student bodies of community colleges and faculty 
trustees and presidents of those community colleges; and to serve as the public forum for community col- 
lege students so they may have a chance to be heard and their concerns or interests be addressed. 

Young said as president of the student group, he would act as a clearinghouse for opinions on legisla- 
tion from the 19 community colleges. 

"We can get on-line and let people know how it's (legislation) going to affect us," Young said. 

Approximately 50 students from 12 of the 19 community colleges in Kansas attended the meeting in 
Wichita. 

"That's not bad," Young said of the turnout. "I'm looking forward to contacting the seven community 
colleges not there and getting their input and see if they want to be a part of this network." 

Other KACCS officers are Betty Pine of Barton County, secretary, and Matt French of Hutchinson, 
treasurer. Rickenbaugh has been the lead adviser for the students for many years. He will continue in that 
capacity with KACCS. 

"The bottom line is that the trustees have a voice through KACCT, the presidents have a voice 
through the President's Council, and that students need a voice, too," Young said. "And now they do." 




Damon 
Young 





Austin 
Graves 



Cowley VICA student 
elected president 
of national group 

People who know Austin Graves aren't that surprised that the Cowley student 
was elected president of the national post-secondary division of Vocational 
Industrial Clubs of America for 1997-98. 

Still, that doesn't diminish the accomplishment. 

Graves, the son of Russell Graves and Denise and Ron Aupperle, all of 
Arkansas City, was elected president of the national organization he has grown so 
fond of the past two years. His election took place during the national VICA con- 
vention June 23-27, 1997, in Kansas City, Mo. 

Graves and 13 other Cowley students attended the convention. Post-sec- 
ondary students from Cowley who attended were Graves, Angie Anstine, Becky Russell, Erica Cook, 
Michael Marvel, Justin Groene, and Chad Wharton. Secondary students attending from Cowley were 
Dusty Schalk, Alex Bergkamp, Mark Brown, Dave Dow, Nathan Lind, Nick Billings, and Curtis Nuss. 

Graves, Kansas state VICA president for more than a year, didn't go to Kansas City seeking the high- 
est office in VICA. 

"I told this committee of five people, three from the national board of directors and two present 
national officers, that all I wanted was to be a national officer," Graves said. "I told them I would accept 
any place they put me." 

Graves was so impressive during his interview that the committee decided he should run for national 
president. He defeated a student from a community college in Texas for the honor. 

Graves is quick to credit his peers. Cowley's secondary and post-secondary opening and closing cere- 
monies teams competed in Kansas City after winning state in their respective divisions. At nationals the 
post-secondary team finished fourth. The secondary team did not place, but "came a long way this year," 
Graves said. 

It wasn't until the last minute that Graves decided to run for a national office. Students must be nomi- 
nated at the state conference and approved by the state VICA director. Then they must apply. 

Graves had help from the start as all five voting delegates from Kansas were Cowley students: 
Anstine, Marvel, Groene, Cook, and Russell. 

Nominees were limited to spending no more than $250 on campaign material. Graves spent $2.63. 

"We purchased 200 sheets of paper and on my computer we made pamphlets," Graves said. "It wasn't 
Austin Graves running for national office, it was a team thing. We were the first ones to get there (at the 
convention) and the last ones to leave. 

"Each one of those people on this team has a piece of the national office. They all helped me get 
elected. It was another way for Cowley students to get involved and they really took advantage of it." 

Graves became the second national post-secondary VICA president from Kansas and also the second 
one from Cowley. Jeff Hovey was elected national president in 1988. 




Schalk elected national VP 



Cowley sophomore Dusty Schalk was elected 
vice president of the national Vocational Industrial 
Clubs of America during its summer national con- 
ference in Kansas City in late June 1998. 

Schalk has been heavily involved in the local 
and state VICA chapters and will serve a term of 
one year as national vice president. 



Fellow Cowley VICA students Carole Shoup 
and Jessica Ferree placed high at the skills com- 
petition in Kansas City. Shoup took third place in 
aviation, while Feree earned a third place in the 
prepared speech category. 

In all, 22 Cowley VICA students competed at 
nationals in Kansas City. 



Cowley Debate/Forensics squad 
competes at national tournament 

Six members of Cowley's Debate/Forensics team competed in the Phi Rho Pi National Tournament 
April 6-11 in Atlanta, Ga. 

Damon Young, Trent Pappan, Trisha Jolley, Amber Kelley, and Heather Bollinger, all of Arkansas 
City, and Ryan Kane of Wellington, represented Cowley at the tournament, which was exclusively for 
community college students. 

The trip to nationals was the culmination of a successful debate season for the students. Tracy 
Frederick, instructor, said her squad showed steady improvement throughout the year. 

And the program received notoriety recently when Young was named a National Educational Debate 
Association Ail-American. He is one of only five students nationwide to receive the award. 

"It's a catalyst from my two years of debate," Young said. "It means a great deal because I'd never 
done the activity two years ago, and now I'm considered one of the best in the country." 

The Ail-American awards usually go to college juniors and seniors. 

The award stands for the debater that represents the NEDA traditions of fairness, respect for col- 
leagues and coaches, respect for the principles of fair play in debate and in everyday life. 

"Damon is very deserving of this award," Frederick said. "He has proven himself to not only be an 
outstanding debater, but to stand up for principles that are becoming somewhat endangered in this activi- 
ty-" 

Young said that while he is proud to receive the award, it also illustrates the success of the entire 
group. 

"This definitely looks good for Mrs. Frederick," Young said. "This is only our second year in NEDA. 
Last year she won the Newcomer of the Year Award, and to have her students recognized reflects positive- 
ly on the program." 




Representing Cowley at nationals were, from left, Trent Pappan, Heather Bollinger, Trisha Jolley, Damon 
Young, Ryan Kane, and Amber Kelley. 




Drafting students apply for, 
receive Boeing internships 

Drafting Technology students at Cowley experienced a unique opportunity with Boeing Wichita. 

Six students applied for and received 10- week summer internships with Boeing, successful comple- 
tion of which almost guarantees 
them a job at the Wichita plane- 
maker upon receiving an associ- 
ate of applied science degree. 

"This speaks good of the 
school and the program," said 
Cliff Roderick, himself a former 
Boeing employee. 

Cowley was one of seven 
two-year schools in seven states 
invited to have students apply for 
the 10 internship positions. 
Roderick said he expects to know 
the outcome of the applications 
within a week or so. 

The top 10 applicants, 
regardless of school, were chosen, 
Roderick said. 

"The purpose is to get them 
job-ready and introduce them to 
Boeing." Roderick said. 

Boeing paid for the students' 
room and board, transportation if 
necessary, and put them to work 
in a 10-week situation with a 
mentor at Boeing. Also included in the package was a cultural experience of Wichita that included ball- 
games and movies. 

Students successfully completing the internship will return for their second year of school, graduate, 
then walk into a guaranteed job at Boeing, Roderick said. 

"To me, that's a fantastic opportunity for students," Roderick said. 

All applicants must be completing their first year of drafting, be working toward an AAS degree, and 
possess a 3.0 grade-point average or higher. GPAs of the six Cowley students range from 3.59 to 4.0. One 
of the Cowley students, Ryan Schwerdtfeger, is a senior at Wellington High School. He commutes daily to 
Roderick's classes. 

"It's difficult for a high school student to get through an associate's degree in two years," Roderick 
said. "He's taking some extra night classes." 

The other five applicants are Kathy Hickey of Arkansas City, Jaime McGuire of Winfield, Charles 
Weller of Arkansas City, Tony Howlett of Mulvane, and Erich Raska of Mulvane. 

Roderick said it was the first time Boeing has offered an internship specifically for students attending 
two-year schools. 

Roderick has 28 students in the drafting program, up from the eight he inherited two years ago. Three 
students graduated in December 1997, and Roderick said two were working in the field, one at Boeing and 
one at International Elevator in Arkansas City. 




Cowley drafting instructor Cliff Roderick has taken the program to new 
heights in only two years. Enrollment has more than tripled. 




STUDENT ACHIETEMEHTS 



Young earns scholarships 
to Pacific Lutheran 

Damon Young may not have to take out that 
loan he was figuring on after all. 

Young, a sophomore at Cowley, was awarded a 
financial aid package worth $23,130 to attend 
Pacific Lutheran University, a private four-year 
university in Tacoma, Wash. 

The aid includes grants from the state of 
Washington, federal grants, and five separate schol- 
arships. 

"In our society today, athletes are always 
rewarded through scholarships and things like that, 
and I didn't think it would be possible to get full 
tuition to somewhere, being in Student Government 
Association and other activities," Young said. "It's 
really rewarding to be involved in academic pur- 
suits and have it pay off." 

Young was SGA president this past year at 
Cowley, and was named December 1997 Student of 
the Month. He also was involved in several other 
clubs and organizations on campus. The Arkansas 
City native, who had a brief military career after 
high school, said Pacific Lutheran gives him a 
chance to continue being involved. 

"I checked out many schools when deciding 
upon a transfer school, but Pacific Lutheran was 
the only one that offered the wide array of activi- 
ties that I'm involved in," he said. "I look forward 
to the challenge of going and getting involved in 
those activities on their campus, just as I've done 
here at Cowley." 

Pacific Lutheran, with an enrollment of about 
4,000 students, is best known for its schools of 
communication and theatre. 

At PLU, Young will participate in debate and 
forensics, continue to work in student government, 
and volunteer his time on campus. This past year, 
Young was named a National Education Debate 
Association Ail-American, one of only five stu- 
dents nationwide to receive the award. 

Danceline squad competes 
at nationals in Florida 

A 90-second videotape helped Cowley's 
Danceline to the national competition. 

Lana Sleeper, instructor of the all-female 
dance troupe, turned in Cowley's video entry last 
December and received word that the college was 
ranked No. 1 among the nation's community col- 
leges that submitted tapes. 

The six-member Tigerette Performance Line 
competed at the national contest April 1-5, 1998, in 



Daytona Beach, Fla. The National Cheerleaders 
Association sponsored the event. 

"This is especially good for recruitment pur- 
poses," Sleeper said. "I always knew that our quali- 
ty was really good. I want to get the word out in 
the state so that other people will want to come 
here to dance." 

Six regulars and three alternates made the trip 
to Florida. The six on the Performance Line were 
Kara Kemp and Chelsea Sanderholm from 
Arkansas City, Sara Didion from Maize, Tiffany 
Molloy and Kelly Lowry from Derby, and Ashley 
Tuzicka from Wichita East. Sanderholm and Lowry 
were freshmen during the 1997-98 school year. 

The three alternates were Erin Eubank, a fresh- 
man from West Elk; Mary Egan, a freshman from 
Circle High School; and Katie McCannon, a sopho- 
more from Wichita South. 

VICA students attend 
leadership institute 

Dusty Schalk learned how to work with a large 
group of people. Becky Russell gained leadership 
skills. Angie Anstine learned new teamwork skills. 
Alex Bergkamp learned to think under pressure. 
And Austin Graves learned that it takes a diverse 
population to run the world. 

But all of the Cowley students came away 
from the Washington Leadership Institute with a 
better sense of pride and respect for their country. 
The five Cowley students were in Vocational 
Industrial Clubs of America. Their trip to 
Washington, D.C., in September 1997 was funded 
in by local businesses, the college, and themselves. 

"You have to understand the strengths and 
weaknesses of everyone on the team to make 
progress," said Graves, the president of the national 
VICA organization. "I also had the unique opportu- 
nity at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier, where I 
had the honor of laying a wreath at the tomb. Each 
year only about 30 people get to do that. I'm a 
completely different American because of that." 

The five students were among 250 who attend- 
ed from 26 states. All five are from Arkansas City 
and all are active in Cowley's VICA chapter. 
Schalk is president of the Kansas post-secondary 
group. 

"I came away with a better respect for my 
country and how to work with 50 to 60 different 
people who want to do things their own way," said 
Schalk, parliamentarian of the local VICA chapter. 
"I also gained better respect for myself. I was pres- 
ident of our chapter in Washington, and that taught 
me things I didn't know I was able to do." 








Cowley's newest Master Teachers are pictured with their medallions. From left are Sue Saia, Cliff Roderick, 
and Julie Kratt. Pictured with the three are Dr. Pat McAfee, president, left, and Conrad Jimison, dean of 
instruction. 





Saia, Kratt earn 
master's degrees 

Sue Saia and Julie Kratt both earned master's 
degrees in education in May 1998 from 
Southwestern College in Winfield. 

Saia is director of Cowley's TRIO program that 
includes federal grants the college has recently 
received. Prior to that appointment, Saia was a math 
instructor in the Natural Science Division. 

Kratt is TRIO coordinator and has served as 
assistant in the Learning Skills Lab as well as an 
instructor. 




Julie 
Kratt 




Dr. Joan 
Warren 



Jeanette 
Oesterlin 



"Should a Little Dog Leave the Porch: A 
Community College Partners With Big Business' 




Michelle 
Schoon 



Pam 
Smith 



"Integrating Service-Learning 
Into the Natural Sciences Through Research' 




Dr. Carol 
Hobaugh-Maudlin 



Chris 
Vollweider 






Bruce 
Crouse 






Don 
Williamson 



'Coordinating Outcomes in Multiple Locations" 










Mark 
Jarvis 



Lora 
Heinitz 



Damon 
Young 



"The Road Let's Travel: Building a Recruitment Team" 



Bruce Crouse also presented: 
"Pathways for Students into the 21st Century" 



Gi 



First National Bank of Winfield 
funds endowed chair at Cowley 



A generous donation by First 
National Bank of Winfield made 
it possible for Cowley to establish 
an Endowed Chair for Teaching 
Excellence and Student Learning, 
and to fund an endowed scholar- 
ship for students. 

First National pledged 
$ 1 0,000 to the college toward an 
endowed scholarship that will be 
perpetually invested. The interest 
will be used to fund student 
scholarships. 

The bank also provided 
$4,000 to fund the first two years 
of the endowed chair, which was 
awarded to Dejon Ewing, chair- 
man of the Humanities Division 
and a speech/theatre instructor. 
The presentation occurred during 




From left: Terri Morrow, associate dean of development and college 
relations; Dr. Pat McAtee, college president; Dejon Ewing, the first 
Endowed Chair recipient; Bruce Schwyhart, president and chief execu- 
tive officer of First National Bank of Winfield; and Doug Teubner, senior 
vice president in human resources and marketing for the bank. 




Cowley's inservice day in January 1998. Bruce Schwyhart, president and chief executive officer of First 
National Bank, and Doug Teubner, senior vice president in human resources and marketing, were on hand 
for the presentation. 

"I am very honored and overwhelmed," said Ewing, a full-time instructor at Cowley since fall 1989. 
"What happens inside the classroom is what really matters. I was fully prepared to clap for somebody else. 
I am very pleasantly surprised. I am very excited to be the first one. I hope it continues forever. It's a very 
worthwhile program." 

Ewing was one of six Cowley faculty nominated for the first award, a recognition program to honor 
and reward faculty who demonstrate excellence in teaching. 

Dr. Pat McAtee, college president, announced the award and presented Ewing with a plaque. 

"Aside from our parents, the teachers we've had probably have been the most influential people in our 
lives," said McAtee, himself a teacher for 10 years. "I can remember all of my teachers, their names and 
what they were like. 

"Today we are honoring one of you. We are honoring the profession and what it means to be a 
teacher." 

McAtee praised Ewing for her hard work and dedication. 

"I've been in Dejon's classroom and I know how much she engages her students in learning," he said. 

Cowley faculty, staff and administrators gave Ewing a standing ovation at the announcement, held in 
the Earle N. Wright Community Room. 

"The fact that I was nominated was an honor in itself," she said. "I'm very pleased about that. I was 
in the company of exemplary teachers." 

Terri Morrow, associate dean of development and college relations, was pleased the college was able 
to offer such a program. 

"The Endowment Association is proud to be part of this new recognition that honors outstanding fac- 
ulty," Morrow said. 

When asked to describe her classroom, Ewing paused. 

"Interactive. Fun. Lively," she said. "There's just so much feedback I get from the students, not just at 
the end of the class, but all the way through. I had a student one time say to me. 'I never miss this class 
because you never know what's going to happen.' I thought that was the best compliment. I have a lot of 
fun, a lot of enthusiasm." 



Warren goes full circle in career, 
earns doctorate from Texas 



Joan Warren wasn't keeping 




Congratulations 
Doc Warren! 




Dr. Joan Warren, right, takes a moment with Jong-time friend Debbie 
Kendrick during a reception for Warren held at the college. 



up. 

And it was that realization 
that prompted her to begin work 
on a doctorate in the spring of 
1995. 

Now you may call her Dr. 
Warren. Cowley's associate dean 
of vocational education successful- 
ly defended her dissertation in 
February and earned her educa- 
tional doctorate from the 
University of Texas at Austin. 
Warren's dissertation titled "A 
Small Rural Community College 
and A Large Industrial 
Corporation: A Customized 
Training Partnership," was developed through UT's Community College Leadership Program. Dr. William 
Moore served as chairman of Warren's dissertation. 

"I've been in vocational education all my life," said Warren, a native of Midland, Texas. "I was in it 
in high school. I worked half a day in the pharmacy at the Walgreen Super Center, and went to school half 
a day. I majored in distributive education in college, taught vocational education a couple of years, and 
now I'm back at it, which is my first love. It's like this is where I belong." 

Warren began working at Cowley in 1985 as secretary to Susan Rush, who was coordinator of the 
Work Opportunity Rural Kansas grant. She finished a master's degree in business education from Emporia 
State University in 1989, and has been responsible for numerous areas of the college since. 

She went back for another degree at the urging of then-Dean of Instruction, Dr. Bob Paxton. 

"I could see about five years after I finished my master's that I was no longer on the cutting edge," 
Warren said. "Things were moving so quickly, you've got to continually train. I didn't think my knowl- 
edge was up to date any more." 

Warren investigated Cowley's partnership with Boeing Wichita for her dissertation. 

"We knew we could do business with Boeing, but what training can an organization as small as 
Cowley possibly do for a corporation as large as Boeing?" she questioned. "Well, we can offer specialized 
training, not the huge package. I looked at the Manufacturing Business Skills Certificate program we 
formed with Boeing. We knew it was successful, but what does success mean? That is what I sought to 
find out." 

She discovered that both Cowley and Boeing benefited from the partnership. She also made some 
recommendations for change in the program. 

"My study was more qualitative than quantitative," she said. "I was dealing with people as people, 
not numbers." 

She spent the 1995-96 academic year in Austin, then interned under Cowley President Dr. Pat 
McAtee in the fall of 1996. 

Warren, the former Joan Wahlenmaier, wanted to be close to home to raise her two children. Son 
Chris is now 18, while daughter Dru is 14. 

"My roots go back in Ark City," she said. "I've visited here during Christmas and Thanksgiving all 
my life." 

Warren wants to utilize her expertise in the Industrial Technology Division for a while. 

"I've got to continually work on long-range planning," she said. 

Warren was hooded during commencement ceremonies in Austin on May 23. 



Gk 




Phil Biteclmer, left, and Don Hastings were honored during a reception 
May 6, J 998 at the college. Betty Martin, representing the College 
Education Association, presented the retiring instructors with gifts. 




Long-time instructors Hastings, 
Buechner retire after 54 years 

Don Hastings and Phil 
Buechner, mainstays in the 
Natural Science Division for a 
combined 54 years, retired in 
May. 

Give Hastings a quiet office 
with no windows and a classroom 
nearby and he was as happy as a 
lark. 

Anonymity. That may be his 
trademark. And while several 
employees never knew much 
about Hastings, the same cannot 
be said for his students. They 
loved him. 

Hastings, who turns 62 in 
September, is retiring after 27 
years of teaching at Cowley. 

"Being in the same place 27 
years and raising a family without moving them around, and getting them into successful jobs and careers, 
and also knowing that a lot of my students are successful today, that's most pleasing," said Hastings, 
whose primary load was teaching biology, anatomy and physiology, and microbiology. 

Hastings leaves behind a legacy as a very private person who cared deeply for his students. Said 
Arkansas City freshman, Laetitia Sanders, "I'm glad I had the chance to take Mr. Hastings before he 
retired. He's so good. I really have enjoyed his classes." 

Hastings was such a private person, very few people, other than colleagues in the division, knew him 
well. And that includes Cowley President Dr. Pat McAtee. 

"I had been at the college a few months (in 1987) and this guy walks past my office in the hallway," 
McAtee told an audience at a recent reception for Hastings and colleague Phil Buechner. "I said, who is 
that? It was Don. He just kind of stayed up in his office doing his thing." 

It was spring 1955, and high school graduate Phil Buechner knew where he was going and what he 
wanted to do. 

The ministry was calling, and nothing appealed more to him than doing the Lord's work. 

But the best-laid plans often change, and Buechner's did — sort of. 

He eventually did go into the seminary for a while, but teaching math became his real calling. And 
from August 1971 until now, Buechner has taught math and a few other subjects for Cowley. 

But no more. At least not on a full-time basis. The 62-year-old husband, father of three and grandfa- 
ther of nine (another is on the way) is retiring after 27 years of service to Cowley. 

"I've really enjoyed it here at Cowley," said Buechner, who for the past few years also has served as 
chairman of the Natural Science Division. "Arkansas City is a wonderful place to raise a family. And I 
have family here, my mother and sister. It's been a great life." 

Buechner never once dreaded coming to work; he just never thought he'd be in one place for 27 
years. 

"I remember the other math instructor, Larry Clark," Buechner recalls. "He and I became fast friends. 
At that point ( 1971 ) he'd been here 1 1 years. I said I couldn't imagine being anywhere that long." 

Buechner doesn't remember his entire teaching load that fall of 1971, but through the years he has 
remembered some students who have become very successful. 

"Several students have become pretty good friends," Buechner said. "A lot of that has been through 
Campus Christian Fellowship. One of the earliest ones is now a children's allergy specialist, Dr. Bill 
Marsh. His sophomore year here he was NJCAA tennis champion. His younger brother Wayne is now a 
doctor, a Ph.D. in chemistry who is heading up one of the big DuPont chemistry labs now." 



Shelton, Hynd retire 

after 28 years 

of service to Cowley 

After a combined 28 years of service to Cowley, Bud Shelton 
and Ken Hynd retired in the spring of 1998. The two men, both of 
whom worked in the maintenance and buildings and grounds depart- 
ments, were honored with a reception at the college in February. 

"I'm going to miss the people the most," said Hynd, who came 
to Cowley July 1, 1985. "Especially the gang in the department and 
everybody in the office." 

Members of both Shelton's and Hynd's families were on hand 
for the reception. 

Shelton came to Cowley in September 1982 after 25 years at 
Rodeo Meats in Arkansas City. The superintendent of buildings and 
grounds has seen many changes occur at the college in his nearly 16 
years of service. 

"We went from 750 students to 3,300," he said. "We built 
two dorms and went from the basement of Galle-Johnson Hall to 
a new Shipping and Receiving building. And, of course, we built 
the Brown Center." 

Shelton and Hynd were presented plaques and engraved 
wrist watches by Cowley President Dr. Pat McAtee and Vice 
President for Business Services Sid Regnier. Fellow employees 
signed poster-sized cards with well-wishes in their retirements. 

"The most rewarding thing has been watching young people 
come out of high school come in here and go in the direction 
they want to go and see fully matured students go on to four- 
year colleges," Shelton said. 

Shelton, 63, has a long history of service to the community 
as well as to the college. He sits on the board of trustees at 
South Central Kansas Regional Medical Center and has served 
10 years on the City Commission of Arkansas City, taking his 
turn as mayor twice. 

Shelton was born and raised on a farm just north of 
McAlester, Okla. He came to Kansas when he was 17 to visit a 
cousin and went to work in the stone company in Silverdale. 

Hynd, who has been in custodial and maintenance areas at 
the college, is originally from Newkirk, Okla. He attended 

school there and, like Shelton, went to work for Rodeo Meats. He had a 30-year career there before com- 
ing to Cowley. 

Hynd said his job also changed during his time at the college. 

"To start with I did quite a bit of custodial work," Hynd said. "But the last seven or eight years it was 
pretty much maintenance." 

Hynd has a great deal of electrical expertise and was instrumental in several remodeling projects at 
the college. 

Hynd said his wife, Wilma, had a lot of projects for him to do in his retirement. 

"I'll also do harvest and field work in the summer, and travel a bit," Hynd said. "And we like the 
(Walnut Valley) Bluegrass Festival in Winfield and a show in Shidler, Okla." 

Hynd enjoys music so much that he took beginning guitar from Gary Gackstatter, director of instru- 
mental music at Cowley. 




Ken Hynd, top photo, punches the time 
clock one last time, while Bud Shelton is 
all smiles in his Basspro cap. 



\ 




Cowley receives second 
Kansas Award for Excellence 



Cowley won a 1997 Performance in Quality 
Award in October 1997 at the Wichita 
Marriott Hotel's Grand Ballroom. 

It marked the second consecutive 
year Cowley has won a Kansas 
Award for Excellence. 

Several Cowley employees 
were on hand to hear Dr. Pat 
McAtee, college presi- 
dent, speak to the 
crowd and accept 
the award. 

"This award 
is for our work in 
and dedication to Total 
Quality 

Management/Continuous 
Improvement," McAtee said. 
"This award is a tribute to the hard 
work by all of us on behalf of 
Cowley." 

The Performance in Quality Award is 
presented to organizations that have actually 
demonstrated their commitment to and practice of 
high quality principles. 



^ifltt 



Kansas Anw5 for 'Excellence 
Recognizes 

Cowley County 
Community College 

for 
Performance m Qwa[it# 



Cowley was one of 10 organizations to win 
awards, and the only community college. 
Wayne Short, Cowley's TQM instructor, 
said the award will benefit Cowley in 
several ways. 

"It helps give the college ongoing 
incentive to bring the very 
highest quality to our pro- 
grams throughout the 
institution," Short said. 
Forty states have 
state quality 

awards. 
In order to bene- 
fit fully from the 
Kansas Award for 
Excellence process, 
Cowley requested a site visit 
by the examiners to validate the 
college's application. The site visit 
took place Oct. 30-31, 1997. The visit 
involved all Cowley employees as the 
examiners interviewed various personnel 
about their role in Cowley's quality movement. 



10- Year Fall Enrollment Comparison 
Total Headcount and Total FTE 




1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 

10-Year Spring Enrollment Comparison 
Total Headcount and Total FTE 




1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 

10- Year Summer Enrollment Comparison 
Total Headcount and Total FTE 



1998 



1.797.0 




1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 



Total Headcount 



Total FTE 



rn 



Mt. Everest survivor sends clear 
message during 75th celebration 



Beck Weathers 
almost lost his life dur- 
ing an expedition to the 
top of Mt. Everest two 
years ago. 

But he almost lost 
something more impor- 
tant to him. 

"When I got back 
home my wife told me, 
she said 'Beck, you've 
gotten yourself into a 
real mess, and I can't 
leave you like this. I'll 
see you through your 
surgeries, but then I'm 
gone.' " Weathers said. 
"I really just about blew 
it. And I would have 
understood had she left." 

As it turned out, 
Weathers, a Dallas 
pathologist, and his wife, 











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Dr. Beck Weathers signs an autograph during a reception prior to his speech. 




Peach, are still together. That, along with the doctor's survival atop Mt. Everest after twice being left for 
dead, is a miracle. 

Weathers delivered a moving speech Feb. 23 during Cowley's 75th anniversary celebration. The event 
was attended by more than 600 people in the Robert A. Brown Theatre. 

Weathers recalled the events leading up to May 10, 1996, the day a violent winter storm pounded Mt. 
Everest around 27,000 feet. It was an incredible story. 

"I am a walking dead man," he told the audience, describing himself throughout the ordeal. "But the 
fact that I would never say I love you to my wife, or hold my children again, was simply not acceptable." 

Ever since 1849, when Everest was identified as the world's tallest peak, more than 700 people have 
reached the 29,028-foot summit, and 154 have died trying. 

On May 10, 1996, a sudden blizzard swept over Mt. Everest as more than 30 climbers were descend- 
ing from the summit, preventing many from finding their way to safety. It was the worst one-day loss of 
life in Everest history. Eight people died, including three professional guides. One of the guides was Rob 
Hall, the leader of Weathers' group. 

Weathers came within an eyelash of being victim No. 9. In fact, he was among the confirmed dead on 
May 10. The 49-year-old Dallas pathologist, who had taken up mountaineering as a hobby, lay uncon- 
scious throughout the night, under the snow, in a hypothermic coma, 300 yards from his camp. A thick 
layer of ice covered his face. 

Twice he had been found by rescuers, and twice he had been left for dead. 

The key, Weathers told the audience, was simple: "I opened my eyes." 

Thoughts of his family, and the knowledge that he would never see them again unless he saved him- 
self, gave him the will to stand. He struggled his way back to camp. 

"My motivation was pretty clear to me," Weathers said in an interview with ABC News. "I could see 
my family, and I wasn't about to give up." 

Weathers' body bears permanent scars of his ordeal. He lost his nose, his right hand, and the fingers of 
his left hand to frostbite. But he never lost his hope. 




Judy 
Queen 



Paul 
Stirnaman 



Integrated studies program 
completes first semester 

Thirty-eight Cowley 
students adjusted to the 
teaching styles of three 
instructors, got used to 
sitting in class for three 
solid hours, and were 
able to blend three sepa- 
rate courses into one 
focus. 

They also learned 
something along the way. 

The students were 
part of the first 
Integrated Studies 
Program at Cowley. 
Initiated in January, stu- 
dents were enrolled in 
introduction to sociology, 
U.S. history since 1876, 

and composition II. Students were awarded one letter grade for the nine credit-hour course, which met 
from 9:10 a.m. to 12:10 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays. 

The course, titled "Heroes & Villains," relied heavily on student participation. While there was a 
great deal of writing involved, students also were able to work on group projects. The semester ended 
with 1950s projects. 

"It was different because all three classes were together," said Amber Scott, a sophomore from 
Caldwell. "It was easier in a way, but hard to please three teachers. It wasn't what I expected. It was more 
laid back, which is good. I learned more in this atmosphere. I would recommend it." 

Judy Queen taught the sociology portion, Paul Stirnaman the history part, and Pam Doyle the compo- 
sition section of the course. All three said they were pleased with the course, and even learned something 
themselves. 

"It's not perfect, but it's gone exceptionally well," said Stirnaman, a veteran Cowley Social Science 
instructor. "It exceeded my expectations." 

For the final exam, students were given three questions. They were required to write four to six pages 
on one of the questions. 

"That proves whether they've learned the material," Stirnaman said. 

Melissa Piatt, an Arkansas City freshman, said, "When I first enrolled, I had different expectations. I 
wanted out. I was scared to risk nine hours. There was different grading procedures and you had to get 
used to the way the three teachers taught. But at the end, we did some really neat presentations and had a 
lot of fun. I see more of a teacher's personality in this class." 

Integrated studies programs help students become more familiar with each other and form learning 
communities, which makes learning more enjoyable and meaningful. Stirnaman isn't sure he could have 
made the adjustment as a student working toward a bachelor's degree. 

"It's bad enough to adjust to the demands of one instructor, let alone three," he said. "I'm hoping the 
students leave with more self-confidence, that they can work in groups, and I hope they've learned more 
about our country's history and the field of sociology. And their writing skills and speaking skills, those 
are major pluses. 

"I've learned a lot, personally, from the other instructors. I've been doing this for 32 years and I 
learned you can teach an old dog new tricks." 

The nine-hour block just completed will be offered again in the 1999 spring semester. 

Additional course combinations are being examined for future integrated studies, Stirnaman said. 



m 



Endowment Campaign 2001 
increases endowed scholarships 

Cowley launched a broad-based fund-raising campaign that will increase the amount of endowed 
scholarships and compliment all areas of the campus. 

It is called Endowment Campaign 2001, and fund-raising efforts began in April 1998. The goal is to 
raise a minimum of $750,000 in celebration of the college's 75th anniversary that occurred during the 
1997-98 acade- 



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mic year. To 
date, more than 
$600,000 has 
been raised. 

While a 
major goal of 
the campaign is 
to increase the 
endowment for 
scholarships, 
the campaign 
also seeks per- 
manent funding 
for arts present- 
ing, the lecture 
series, and a 
number of spe- 
cial project 
endowments. 
Special project 
endowments are 

areas of interest that a donor may wish to earmark their gift for, such as purchases for Renn Memorial 
Library, science labs, or the music, theatre, or art departments. Donors may have a special interest in ath- 
letics, returning students programs, or the purchase and upgrade of technology. 

Funds for endowed scholarships and special project endowments are permanently invested, with only 
the earnings being used to fund scholarships. 

The campaign also provides for current projects at the college, including renovation of the student 
commons area of the Nelson Student Center and the designing of a park/greenway/sculpture garden on 
campus. 

The Home National Bank of Arkansas City is the lead donor in the campaign, having committed 
$120,000 for the Heartland Cultural Arts Series. The bank will present a check in the amount of $12,000 
each year for the next 10 years to help fund performing artists. 

There are several levels of named gift and memorial opportunities with Endowment Campaign 2001. 
In addition to gifts of cash and pledges over five years, the Endowment Association seeks deferred or 
planned gifts for Endowment Campaign 2001. Donors may designate a deferred charitable gift to the cam- 
paign through a will, charitable remainder trust, a gift of life insurance or other ways. Donors who desig- 
nate a gift to Cowley in their estate plans will be included and recognized in this campaign and every year 
as charter members of the Heritage Society. Anyone interested in becoming a part of this campaign may 
contact Terri Morrow, associate dean of development and college relations, at 1-800-593-2222 ext. 5291 
for a brochure and additional information. 

Six years ago, the "Campaign to Build a World Class Community for the 21st Century" provided 
more than $1.3 million for the construction of the Brown Center for Arts, Sciences and Technology. 
Business, industry, foundations, and hundreds of individuals came together to help construct this beautiful 
state-of-the-art facility. To date, the Endowment Association has paid the college $918,000 to help fund 
the building. 



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The Great Cowley Duck Dash at Spring Hill Farms northeast of Arkansas City was a huge success. 

Duck race proceeds benefit 
Cowley scholarship fund 

In an effort to provide more educational opportunities for Cowley students, a duck race was held. 

How do the two relate to one another? It's quite simple, really. 

The Great Cowley Duck Dash, a fun-filled afternoon in May 1998, was entertaining and beneficial to 
Cowley students seeking financial aid in the form of an endowed scholarship. 

Here's how it worked: 

Plastic ducks in many colors went on sale in March 1998 for $20 each or six for $100. The ducks 
were numbered, and corresponding tickets were given to people who purchased the ducks. At 4:30 p.m. 
May 16, Spring Hill Farms northeast of Arkansas City came alive with ducks as the race began in the nar- 
row, winding stream. The owner of the duck that crossed the finish line first received a grand prize of 
$1,500 cash. The owner? Connie Bonfy, director of institutional grants and humanities programming at 
Cowley. Other door prizes also were awarded. 

Proceeds benefit Cowley's Endowed Scholarship Fund. The goal was to raise $10,000. 

Terri Morrow, associate dean of development and college relations, said she got the idea of a duck 
race after reading a newspaper from Estes Park, Colo. The Estes Park Rotary Club holds a duck race dur- 
ing snow-melt each spring. And since there wasn't any snow melt to give the ducks a speedy start at 
Spring Hill Farms, a "current" committee was formed. 

Included in the cost of the ducks was a gourmet picnic following the race. It featured mesquite 
smoked prime rib, mesquite grilled chicken breasts, and cocktails. 

"It was great fun," Morrow said. "This is in a rotation with the auction we had last year. It gives the 
many businesses who contributed to the auction last year a break." 



\ 




Cowley expands 

Business & Industry Institute 

at Strother Field 

In mid- 1997, Cowley leased 
and remodeled the Great Scott 
Communications facility located 
at Strother Field. The Business & 
Industry Institute, located at 
Fourth and Tupper, now has three 
classrooms, three offices, and a 
reception area. Also located in the 
facility are a computer lab and a 
computer skills improvement 
learning lab. A new entrance real- 
ly gives a great appearance. 

Also located in the facility is 
the Career Center of the Kansas 
Department of Human Resources. 

"We are proud of our new 
facility and the partnership we 
have developed with business and 
industry," said Gene Cole, associ- 
ate dean of business and industry. 
"We are equally proud of our per- 
sonnel, Tracey Williams as recep- 
tionist and secretary and Tammy 
Barnaby as our coordinator of the 
learning lab and testing." 

Following is a synopsis of 
the partnering Cowley has with 
area business and industry: 

General Electric — GE con- 
tinues to be an excellent partner 
with Cowley with training for all 
employees including manuals, 

computer skills, Inspection 301, Train the Trainer, and E.H.S. GE has assisted Cowley in installing a com- 
puter learning lab. This computer lab assisted all companies to improve all types of skills. 

Cowley also supports GE in pre-employment testing and pre-employment training as needed. 

Rubbermaid — Cowley and Rubbermaid continue the partnership with the certification programs for 
Tech I. The certificate was developed to assist to improve skills of the Techs. Cowley also developed a 
"Change" course for all associates of Rubbermaid with the assistance of plant manager Sheldon Zaklow 
and human resource manager Thorn Weiss. According to Cole, this has been a major undertaking for 
Rubbermaid and the college, and we both are really happy with these results. Cowley also has classes in 
"Train the Trainer" and Interviewer training. 

Calmar — Calmar is a new industry located in the Casco facility at Winfield. Cowley has assisted 
Calmar in pre-employment testing for hiring and also will be assisting in profiling and assisting Calmar in 
establishing new pre-employment testing to be used at the Winfield location. We look forward to the new 
association, Cole said. 

Cowley College is for all business industries in the area, and we will be happy to meet with anyone to 
determine needs and assist in successful completion, Cole said. 




Gene Cole outside the newly remodeled Business & Industry Institute. 



Cowley College: Training, 
retraining area's workforce 



In the past couple of years, 
Cowley has developed short-term 
programs to help displaced work- 
ers within the county acquire new 
skills and regain employment in a 
short period of time. 

But the focus of Cowley's 
Business and Industry Institute, 
located at Tupper Street and 
Fourth Avenue at Strother Field 
Industrial Park, is to be a reliable 
resource for current business and 
industry, not only in Cowley 
County but the surrounding 
region. 

"The continuation of support 
for existing industry is what's 
critical to us," said Gene Cole, 
associate dean of business and 
industry at Cowley. "If we do our 
job right, we should see a major 
improvement in our workforce. 
And as an institution, we're com- 
mitted to that." 

Cowley has enjoyed a 
lengthy and prosperous relation- 




Wayne Short takes GE employees through some training. 



ship with General Electric's Aircraft Engine Maintenance Center. Recently, the college assisted GE in hir- 
ing between 250 and 300 people. The college conducted extensive pre-employment interviews, testing, 
and training totaling 135 clock hours. Those who successfully completed the battery of tests were then 
placed in a hiring pool for GE. 

The college and GE are hooked up with other ventures, including computer training, manuals train- 
ing, Inspection Tool 201 training, and environmental health and safety training. Cowley also has provided 
some train the trainer classes. 

"Really, it's been ongoing with GE," Cole said. 

The Learning Lab has remained a vital part of the training. There employees can come in to improve 
their skills in areas such as math or English, work at their own pace, and be assured that all results will 
remain confidential. 

Another classroom that seats around 20 is used mostly for manuals inspection and environmental 
health and safety classes. Cole said. 

"And recently we've secured two new televisions, VCRs and stands through the support of GE," Cole 
said. "And GE was a big (financial) supporter of the Learning Lab. But it's open to all industries to use." 

Cowley also has a strong partnership with Rubbermaid. 

"We have done computer training and are planning some more," Cole said. 

Approximately 60 Rubbermaid employees are enrolled in the Tech I certificate program at Cowley. 
The program was customized to meet Rubbermaid's needs. The certificate is convertible to an associate's 
degree from Cowley and to a bachelor's degree in plastics from Pittsburg State University. 

Cole said one of the biggest selling points for business and industry to work with Cowley is the col- 
lege's quick response time. 

"Because of our dedicated staff, and that includes the administration and faculty, we're able to devel- 
op course material for business and industry in a short amount of time." 



^ 



I*AjrTi*r:Ei*« ei SiDUCAXion 




Cowley's Nondestructive Testing 
aids WSU engineering students 

Cowley, Wichita State University, and Boeing Wichita teamed up to give three engineering students a 
unique educational experience. 

Three mechanical engineer- 
ing students at WSU were 
involved in a senior engineering 
project during the fall 1997 
semester that involved nonde- 
structive testing. NDT is the test- 
ing of a part without destroying 
its usefulness. The aviation indus- 
try relies heavily on NDT in its 
quality control. 

Each semester, mechanical 
engineering students at WSU are 
given project ideas. One of the 
ideas presented by Boeing last fall 
involved NDT. 

Dr. Julie A. Mathis, associate 
professor in the department of 
mechanical engineering at WSU, 
knew Bruce Crouse, Cowley's 
NDT instructor. After seeing that 
one of the projects involved NDT. 
Mathis called Crouse. 

"He's been up here doing 
seminars, so I called him and 
asked him if he was interested in 
working with us," Mathis said. "He met with Boeing people and us, gave us some information and loaned 
some equipment." 

The three students — Mike Schwartz, Sean Ormerad, and Jerod Ketchum, all from Wichita — formed 
a team that tackled the project: Locating defects in titanium castings. 

"Boeing and its subcontractors were developing a procedure for locating defects in titanium castings 
and they asked us to participate," Crouse said. "The students had to develop the knowledge of the physical 
properties of the casting, decide what defects would be in the casting, and develop a method of inspecting 
the casting that would find the defect." 

The three students did that in impressive fashion. 

"They did an extraordinary job," Mathis said. "This was something totally new to them. They had no 
prior experience. They showed a whole lot of initiative and got a handle on the problem. They used a lot 
of hands-on techniques, and traveled to Cowley County on many occasions. Their presentation and results 
were excellent. Boeing was astounded. They didn't expect these results." 

Boeing was proposing the use of titanium castings on some of its engine support structures. 

The students received the project assignment in September, then met with Boeing engineers every 
three weeks throughout the semester, supplying reports on their findings. Once the research phase was 
completed, Crouse worked with the students on the method for finding the defects. 

"I worked with them on radiography and ultrasound to prove their theory," Crouse said. 

Crouse said titanium was a difficult material to cast without defects. He said the students' findings 
would be used by Boeing to devise the best method of inspection. 

"This was the first time Cowley's been involved on a project like this," Crouse said. "We have talked 
about continuing on another advanced senior project. The partnership between WSU, Boeing, and Cowley 
was very beneficial to both schools, the students, and to Boeing." 




Bruce Crouse directs two NDT students through hands-on learning. 



Cowley receives grant 

to serve diverse population 

Cowley announced plans for the TRIO Student 
Support Services (SSS) grant which it received in 
the summer of 1997 from the U.S. Department of 
Education. 

"The purpose of this grant is to serve students 
most in need," said Vice President of Student 
Affairs, Maggie Picking. 

SSS was highly competitive among many col- 
leges and universities and amounts funded are 
directly related to the number of students served. 
Cowley is serving 150 students directly with this 
grant and hundreds more students with indirect ser- 
vices. The program for which the grant is being 
funded began Sept. 1, 1997. 

The grant will serve students at Cowley for the 
next five years, providing the school with a total of 
$920,000 during the entire grant period. 

Services are intended to target low income, 
disabled, and first-generation students. First gener- 
ation students are those whose mothers and fathers 
do not have a bachelor's degree. Students will be 
assessed within 30 days of enrolling and a person- 
alized success plan will be developed for each par- 
ticipant. Additional career and academic counseling 
will be provided for SSS students. They also will 
receive peer counseling, financial aid, and person- 
alized academic support. 

Commerce, tourism grant 
to benefit cultural arts 

Cowley announced plans in July 1997 for its 
Kansas Department of Commerce Tourism 
Division grant for $2,500. 

The funded project is titled "Cowley County: 
Visit the Kansas HeARTland" and is a joint project 
between the college and the Arkansas City and 
Winfield Convention and Visitor's Bureaus. 

According to Winfield CVB director Barbara 
Mehuron and Arkansas City CVB board member 
Connie Bonfy, "the arts are a very big part of what 
is great about our county. This grant recognizes 
that strength and provides us with funding to 
encourage travelers to celebrate the arts with us. 
There is a strong correlation between cultural 
strength and economic development — this project 
will strengthen our position in this regard as well." 

The HeARTland project is an extension of an 
ongoing relationship between the colleges, arts 
agencies, and CVBs in both communities. The 
grant paid for radio marketing in central Oklahoma 
and southwestern Missouri in the fall of 1997, near 
the time of the "Walnut Valley Festival" and 



Winfield Arts and Humanities Council's "Art in the 
Park." Additional radio marketing was targeted for 
the spring of 1998 in conjunction with the com- 
bined Cowley "Flint Hills Music Festival" and 
Arkansas City Arts Council "River Valley Arts 
Festival." 

This is the first time cultural planning will 
include the entire county. The key agencies 
involved in regional cultural plan development are 
Cowley, Southwestern, Arkansas City Arts Council, 
and Winfield Arts and Humanities Council. 

Grant provides chemistry 
equipment to college 

The Pittsburgh Conference on Analytical 
Chemistry and Applied Spectroscopy awarded 
Cowley a $5,935 grant that gave the chemistry labs 
upgraded equipment to conduct experiments. The 
award includes funding for melting point apparatus, 
an inline vacuum system, ph meters, and two spec- 
trometers. 

Students in Chemistry I and II, Organic 
Chemistry, and General Chemistry will benefit 
from the equipment, which was installed by the 
first day of classes for the fall 1997 semester. 

$1 million grant to benefit 
younger students in area 

Cowley has been awarded a $1,080,000 Talent 
Search grant from the U.S. Department of 
Education. 

Talent Search is the second Trio Grant Cowley 
has received to date. Last summer, the Student 
Support Services grant was awarded to the college. 
The third grant in the Trio program, called Upward 
Bound, will be applied for next, according to 
Connie Bonfy, director of institutional grants and 
arts programming. 

The Talent Search project will begin in the fall 
of 1998 with the hiring of staff and is expected to 
be fully operational in the spring of 1999. 

The Talent Search program identifies and 
assists individuals from disadvantaged backgrounds 
who have the potential to succeed in higher educa- 
tion. The program provides academic, career, and 
financial counseling to its participants, and encour- 
ages them to graduate from high school and contin- 
ue on to the postsecondary school of their choice. 
Talent Search also serves high school dropouts by 
encouraging them to re-enter the education system 
and complete their education. 

It is a five-year grant, with the first year to be 
funded at $190,000. 



% 



Cowley's library 
now fully automated 

From the Dewey Decimal System, to the Card Catalog, to electronic browsing. Such has been the 
evolution of the library. 

Cowley's Renn Memorial Library has joined the growing list of libraries nationwide that have gone 
automated. The system was installed in February, 1998. 

"We have taken all the traditional uses or access of the library and we have automated it or computer- 
ized it," said Betty Martin, director of Renn Memorial Library. "Instead of the traditional card catalog, we 
now have OPAC, on-line public access catalog." 

Four computers are set up in the library. Searches may be conducted by author, title, and subject, just 
as before. But the new system brings up a call number, allowing the customer to go right to the shelf to 
find the document. 

"The only difference is they don't pull out a drawer," Martin said. "And it's graphical. You point the 
arrow at an icon." 

Gaylord Information Systems of Syracuse, N.Y., produced the software called GALAXY. More than 
325 libraries of all types and sizes use GALAXY. 

Another new feature in Renn Memorial Library is bar-coding of all materials. 

"The traditional circulation where a student signs their name and address has now gone automated as 
well where we use a wand," Martin said. "All they need is their identification card and the book they're 
checking out. The bar-coding automatically checks it out to the student." 

And the system is connected to the student record data base on campus, or the management informa- 
tion system. The computer will generate overdue notices. The system also will allow library personnel as 
well as students to see their checkout history. 

And, Martin said, what used to be daily reports on library usage, etc., will now be monthly with the 
new system. 

The system is very user-friendly, Martin said. She also said that the customer base would be broad- 
ened beyond Cowley students, faculty, and staff. Currently, a few customers from the general public use 
the library. Martin would like to see that increased. 

"We're going to automatically run cards for all full-time faculty, staff and students," Martin said. 
"They'll automatically have a card printed. If they are a part-time student, adjunct faculty, or part-time 
staff, they need to come in and tell us and we'll get a card for them." 

Martin said the next step would be to get the general public cards if people desire one. 

"If the public wants a card, they can go to the public library, get their Kansas Library Card, fill out a 
form for us here, and we'll get them a card" to use at Renn, Martin said. "We'll put them in our database. 
We do want to be able to use the automated system for them as well. We do have a lot of public patrons 
and we like them to use our library." 




Teams awarded for work 
on improving processes 

Five teams of Cowley employees were pre- 
sented awards during an all-college meeting in 
October 1997 in the Earle N. Wright Community 
Room. 

The teams, comprising a cross-section of 
employees, addressed issues that warranted atten- 
tion in order to improve the process. Cowley has 
been an active participant in continuous improve- 
ment for the last five years. 

Receiving $1,000 and the President's Quality 
Award was the Site Safety and Workplace Violence 
team. Members were Tony Crouch, June Bland, 
Bryan McChesney, Elvin Hatfield, and E.W. Bud 
Shelton. During the past year, this team developed 
policy recommendations, identified shelter/meeting 
locations for the Foster building, identified addi- 
tional shelter locations for the Kirke Dale and Bob 
Storbeck dormitories, identified tornado signs, 
appointed building captains and defined their duties 
and training. 

Receiving $500 and the Quality Award was the 
Professional Staff Development team. Members 
were Janice Stover, Joycelyn Goff, Peggy Paton, 
Wanda Shepherd. JoLynne Oleson, and Stu 
Osterthun. The mission of this team during the past 
year was to assess the professional development 
needs of Cowley's staff and faculty, coordinate 
computer training for faculty and staff, and recom- 
mend a professional staff development policy. 

Three teams received certificates. They were: 
The Com2 team, comprised of David Bostwick, 
Lynne Jordan, Mark Jarvis and Crouch. 

The Revitalizing Ownership and Retention 
team made up of Beverly Grunder. Lana Sleeper, 
Julie Kratt, Joyce Holloway, Maggie Picking, Rae 
Dale, and Pat Moreland identified factors that 
influence student attrition. 

The On and Off-Campus Library Resources 
team made up of Joan Warren, Betty Martin, Susan 
Rush, and Kathy Sparks. The mission of this team 
was to evaluate and improve current library multi- 
media resources, thus increasing information acces- 
sibility for all students. 

Conoco makes donation 
to chemistry department 

Chemistry students at Cowley are now able to 
conduct advanced chemical separation in their 
experiments thanks to a $23,000 equipment dona- 
tion by Conoco-DuPont of Ponca City, Okla. 

Charles Jennings, a research technologist at 
Conoco and a pre-engineering student at Cowley, 



helped orchestrate the donation. Randal Hallford, 
Natural Science Division instructor at Cowley, also 
was instrumental in acquiring the equipment. 

"The roots of it are in the role that the college 
has played with my education," said Jennings, also 
a city commissioner in Arkansas City. "I started out 
pursuing a degree here with corporate support. My 
department manager and my team lead both recog- 
nized the immediate benefits the company was get- 
ting. Things picked up when last semester we did a 
couple of things: One, I invited Dr. Stuart Milligan 
to be the key speaker on Technology Day. 
Secondly, Cowley took the organic chemistry class 
to Conoco's research facility for a tour. That started 
getting people acquainted with each other." 

Conoco donated three research-grade gas chro- 
matographs. The instruments are used to separate 
chemical compounds. When creating a product, 
students can separate out the sample from the sol- 
vent and other extraneous materials. 

"If any faculty wish to do research, the equip- 
ment is available for that," said Hallford, one of 
two Cowley faculty members who are research 
chemists. 

The third piece of equipment will be used for 
parts. The two working pieces are valued at 
$10,000 each, while the third one is valued at 
$3,000. 

First class in Cowley's 
MICT program graduates 

Fifteen students met all of the requirements 
and received certificates as the first graduates from 
Cowley's Mobile Intensive Care Technician pro- 
gram. 

The program, held at the Winfield Center at 
Baden Square, began in January 1997. Slade 
Griffiths, instructor and head of the program, spent 
most of fall 1996 developing the curriculum and 
recruiting students. 

Following is a list of graduates: 

Cynthia K. Branscum, Winfield; Elizabeth 
Cozine, Mulvane; Ron J. Knight, Eureka; Lucas B. 
McDermott, Cedar Vale; Brad Schwintz, Winfield; 
Michael D. Snyder. Clearwater; Mark Y. Thomas, 
Winfield; Richard L. West, Wichita. 

Chris Cannon, Winfield; Teresa Davis. 
Wichita; Cindy S. LeVieux, Eureka; Douglas W. 
Riggs, Arkansas City; Don R. Smies, Wichita; 
Charles E. Stein II, Wichita; Dayne L. Voigt, 
Douglass. 

By completing Cowley's program require- 
ments, students are now eligible to take the state 
exam to become a certified paramedic. 



\ 




Dave 
Burroughs 



# 



Black and back- to-back: 

Tiger baseball better than the rest 

Head baseball Coach Dave Burroughs said something that will make the rest 
of the National Junior College Athletic Association's baseball schools shudder. 

"We (the coaches) really felt like we were grooming this team to get to 
Grand Junction next year," Burroughs said with a sheepish grin. 

So Cowley's second consecutive NJCAA World Series title, capped on the 
evening of May 30 with a 15-11 victory over San Jacinto North of Texas, is 
gravy. That's especially true when you consider the Tigers: 

• Lost 15 sophomores to graduation, including the Florida Marlins' top draft 
pick in pitcher Aaron Akin, and power-hitting Travis Hafner, the Most Valuable 
Player of the 1997 World Series. 

• Lost their top six pitchers, including 49 of the team's 53 victories in 1997. 

• Lost the bulk of their offense, including 400 hits, 325 runs, 85 doubles, 11 
triples, and 41 of the team's 61 home runs. 

Based on those numbers alone, there was no way Cowley should even be 
thinking of returning to Grand Junction to defend its title. And after a 4-6 start, a 
respectable finish in the Jayhawk Conference East Division seemed an attainable 
goal. 

But sophomore leadership took over. Led by left fielder Josh McMillen 
from Clearwater, Sam Scott from Stilwell, Lucas Hocker from Arkansas City, and Casey Eckstein from 
Enid, Okla., the transfer sophomores and first-year freshmen, a talented bunch indeed, began to come 
together as a team. 

The 1998 Tigers finished 54-9 and captured their fourth consecutive Jayhawk East title and third con- 
secutive Region VI crown. Among the accomplishments of this year's team: 

• Amassed a 29-game winning streak in mid-season. 

• Went 34-0 to win the Jayhawk East, the first time any team has ever gone unbeaten in conference 
play. 

• Won 50 of its last 53 games. 

• Set a school record for victories in a single season with 54. 

• Earned Burroughs his 400th career victory at Cowley in a 14-11 win over Brevard, N.C., in the third 
game of the World Series, and his second consecutive National Coach of the Year honor. 

• Most runs batted in during a single season, 83 by first baseman Steve Goodson, surpassing the 82 by 
Hafner set last season. 

• Most home runs in a single season, 16 by Scott, surpassing the 15 by Hafner set last season. 

• Third consecutive 50-win season. The Tigers are 158-33 in the last three seasons, a winning percent- 
age of .827. 

These Tigers, the ones being groomed for 1999, were impressive. 

"It was just incredible," said Cowley President Dr. Pat McAtee. "Overall I don't think our pitching 
was as strong as last year, but our bats were better top to bottom." 

Cowley broke the World Series record for runs scored in a five-game series with 68, breaking the old 
mark of 66. The Tigers averaged nearly 14 runs a game. 

The Tigers opened defense of its title with a 14-4 drubbing of San Jacinto on May 24. They followed 
that up with a five-inning, 18-4 pounding of Maple Woods, Mo., the team that ended the Tigers' 29-game 
winning streak on May 1. Cowley survived Brevard, N.C., 14-11 in Game Three, and what followed was a 
disastrous outing against Indian Hills, Iowa, a team Cowley split with in last year's World Series. Indian 
Hills beat Cowley 17-7 in five innings, leaving three teams in the tournament, each with one loss. 

A coin flip was held to determine who would play May 29 and who would receive a bye into the 
championship game. After two tie coin flips, Cowley Assistant Coach Darren Burroughs won the flip and 
the Tigers landed in the championship game. 

more on page 31 




It's cle ja vufor the Cowley baseball team after winning its second consecutive national title. 



From page 30 



San Jacinto whipped Indian Hills 10-2 in the elimination game to set up a rematch of the first game 
of the series. Cowley came from behind in the game and won 15-11. 

McMillen was named the tournament's MVP, while freshman Aaron Robbins of Derby earned the Big 
Stick Award with a tournament-leading .556 batting average. 

McMillen, Robbins, Eckstein, and freshman outfielder Jeff Freeman from Gladewater, Texas, were 
named to the All-Tournament Team. Freeman hit three home runs and drove in nine while scoring 10 runs 
in the series. One of his homers traveled 520 feet, hitting the top of a Ford Explorer parked far beyond the 
outfield fence. 

Burroughs, who earned his second set of golf clubs for the victory, said the second title was more sat- 
isfying. 

"It's sweeter this time around, probably because we were so young," he said. "There's been so much 
pressure on these kids this season. Now we're just going to go back to work and try to three-peat." 

San Jacinto is the only team to have accomplished that feat in the last 13 years, winning the title in 
1985, 1986, and 1987. The Gators won back-to-back titles two years later, in 1989 and 1990. Mesa 
Community College of Arizona is the only other school to win three consecutive titles, winning in 1970, 
1971, and 1972. 



% 



Lady Tigers one win shy 

of making national tournament 




Darin Spence knows what it takes to earn a trip 
to the National Junior College Athletic Association 
basketball tournament. 

He has done it twice previously with women's 
teams at Butler County Community College. 

So when his Lady Tigers went into the champi- 
onship game of the Region VI Tournament against 
Coffey ville with a 32-1 record, it was pretty clear 
what had to be done. 

But it didn't happen. 

Cowley was ice-cold shooting the ball and the 
Red Ravens turned the tables, winning 70-50 for 
the right to go to Salina and the national tourna- 
ment. 

"We made a heckuva run with all new faces 
thrown together," said Spence, in his first year back 
at Cowley and his first as the school's head 
women's coach. "The big thing that happened to us 
was our road through the tournament and the depth 
of the kids we play. We definitely had the toughest 
road with Kansas City, Independence, and 
Coffeyville. Our two guards played 45 minutes (40 
plus five in overtime) against Indy and had to turn 
around and play the next day." 

Excuses? No. Cowley did just about everything 
Spence asked until the night of March 10. Still, a 
final record of 32-2, a No. 8 national ranking, and a 
Jayhawk Conference East Division championship 
( 17-1 ) are pretty impressive statistics, given the fact 
that Spence inherited three sophomores from last 
year's team and didn't get to campus until April 1. 

"After you get past the disappointment of los- 
ing in the (Region VI) finals, which may be in a 
few weeks, I'll look back and say yeah, that was 
pretty good," Spence said. 

Cowley blistered nearly every opponent en 
route to its first conference championship since 
1989. The Lady Tigers beat their opponents by an 
average of 25 points per game. Only a 69-62 loss to 
Neosho on Jan. 28 prevented a perfect regular sea- 
son. 

"We had some challenges," said Spence, voted 
Coach of the Year in the Jayhawk East, "but we'd 
turn them into double-digit wins. Seward went 
through the (Jayhawk) West undefeated and the 
same thing happened to them. 

"I thought the league was down this year. We 
had a good group, but with 1 1 new coaches out of 
19, that's going to happen." 

The 32 victories set a single-season record, 




Darin 
Spence 



breaking the old mark of 
28 (28-4) set in 1987. It 
also was the least number 
of losses in a single sea- 
son and marked the fifth 
time in the 1 990s that 
Cowley's women have 
won at least 20 games. 

Some individual 
players also stood out. 
Three players averaged in 
double figures, led by 
sophomore Zakiyyah 
Johnson at 15.9. 
Sophomore Moneeke 
Bowden averaged 13.2, 
while Jayhawk East 
Freshman of the Year 
Ayeshia Smith averaged 13.1 points per game. 

"Some of our freshmen did some good things 
for us," Spence said. "We've got some shooters and 
our point guard back. Ayeshia is a great point 
guard." 

Spence said having a season with the freshmen 
will help those players know what is expected of 
them next season. 

"We believe in weightlifting and conditioning," 
he said. "We don't have what I call giggle basket- 
ball here. Yeah, we have a good time, but we're on 
the court to win games." 

Bowden and Smith earned All-Region VI hon- 
ors. Bowden and Johnson were named to the All- 
Jayhawk East team, while Smith, Shay Jackson, 
and Brandi Harris were honorable mention selec- 
tions. Jackson led Cowley in rebounding, while 
Harris was the fourth-leading scorer at 8.2 per 
game. 

Strong finish pleases 
men's basketball coach 

The men's basketball team won 25 games, 
including a school-record 14 in the conference, 
earned its coach his 100th victory at the school, and 
endured adversity, both on and off the court, during 
the 1997-98 season. 

Still, Coach Mark Nelson said the Tigers fell 
short of their goal. 

"We were pleased with how we finished the 

more on page 33 



From page 32 



last 10 games," the fifth-year coach said. "We were 
playing well. But 25-7 and 14-4, there's still not 
much to show for it other than the wins. We had set 
out to win the conference and the region." 

Despite finishing third in the Jayhawk 
Conference East Division and losing in the quarter- 
finals of the Region VI Tournament, the Tigers had 
an excellent season. Especially after going through 
what they did at mid-season. 

"I get a call on Dec. 26 and it's Alphah (East) 
and he says, coach, I've got some bad news," 
Nelson recalled. "I hurt my hand." 

Through the first 1 1 games, East, a sophomore 
from Greenfield, Mass., was averaging 10 points 
and helped the Tigers to a 9-2 start. But his broken 
hand required a pin and his season was put on the 
shelf. 

"Injuries are a part of a season," Nelson said. 
"I was happy with the way the guys responded." 

Just after the conference schedule began in 
January, Nelson had to dismiss one player from the 
team and help another to decide to stay on. 
Tremaine Mayeaux's redshirt was pulled to help 
plug the gaps. Nelson was pleased with Mayeaux's 
play. 

"We put ourselves in a hole by losing the first 
two conference games," Nelson said. "The first one 
we lost at home against Coffeyville (93-86) and 
then at Independence (96-82). Then we lose on a 
tip-in at Kansas City (73-72). Those first two 
games we didn't have Alphah, but we didn't have 
Tremaine, either. We ended up 12-3 with Tremaine 
in the lineup." 

The player who took a lot on his shoulders was 
Derrick Davis. The Abbeyville, Ala., sophomore 
led Cowley in points per game (17.6), rebounds 
(5.3), blocked shots (17), steals (58), assists (86) 
and average minutes played (29.7) while earning 
first-team All-Jayhawk East honors. He also was 
named to the All-Region VI team. 

"He stepped up his game down the stretch and 
had some big games for us," Nelson said. Davis 
scored 35 and 27 points in games against 
Independence, 27 and 25 in games against 
Coffeyville, and 31 against Barton County in a 76- 
69 season-ending defeat at the Region VI 
Tournament. There was just one game — Jan. 3 1 at 
Coffeyville — when Davis did not score in double 
figures. That night he had seven points. 

Nelson cited Mayeaux and Martin Palmer as 
other players who improved and played well. 

The turning point of the season. Nelson said, 
was the win on the road over Neosho on Jan. 28. 
The Tigers won that game 85-75. Neosho and 



Independence shared the Jayhawk East title with 
15-3 records. 

"Prior to that we were 5-3 in the conference 
and could have slipped way back in the pack," 
Nelson said. "Winning that game gave us a lot of 
confidence." 

The Tigers went 9-2 the rest of the way, 
including an 84-68 win over Neosho in W.S. Scott 
Auditorium on Feb. 28, the last game of the regular 
season. The win was huge for Nelson. It was No. 
100. Still, Nelson was quick to credit his two new 
assistant coaches, Craig Fletchall and Mike 
Massey, a former player of Nelson's at Cowley. 

"The thing I was most pleased with was Craig 
and Mike," Nelson said. "They've done a great job 
and have brought a lot of stability to the job. With 
guys like them you wonder how long you can keep 
them." 

Softball team falls 
just short of goal 

Head Softball Coach Ed Hargrove probably 
would trade all the records set this season for a 
Region VI title and a chance to play in the national 
fast-pitch tournament. 

But at least for another season, he's faced with 
updating the records. And there's lots of them. 
Individually, Suzanne Kerr and Cassi Vandever put 
their names on 23 Lady Tiger records. The sopho- 
more Ail-Americans also helped Cowley to the 
most victories in a single season (41) and the best 
winning percentage in back-to-back seasons (74-18 
.804) in 1997 and 1998. 

Hargrove, completing his 14th season as head 
coach, also reached a coaching milestone with his 
400th career victory. He is now 408-184, a winning 
percentage of .689. 

Still, he would have liked his team to play bet- 
ter in the Region VI tournament. 

"I felt we played pretty well except for the 
Johnson County game," said Hargrove, whose 
Tigers beat Johnson three out of four games during 
the regular season. "We had an error that busted 
that game open. And we had runners in scoring 
position three times with one or fewer outs and 
couldn't get them home." 

After winning the Jayhawk Conference East 
Division title, Cowley went 4-2 in the regional to 
finish fourth. Johnson County won the title to 
advance to the national tournament. Hargrove 
acknowledged that his team went into postseason 
play with high expectations. However, he said the 
best teams have off days once in a while. 

more on page 34 



% 



From page 33 




But nothing can diminish the seasons and/or 
careers enjoyed by Kerr and Vandever. Kerr, a first- 
team Ail-American her freshman season, virtually 
rewrote the school's offensive recordbook. Ken- 
signed a letter of intent to play this fall at Fort Hays 
State University, while Vandever will be playing at 
Emporia State University. Records tied or broken 
by the Derby outfielder: 

• Highest batting average, season: .500, ties 
with Jeri Carter in 1996. 

• Highest batting average, career: .485. 

• Most hits, season: 82 in 1998. 

• Most hits, career: 147. 

• Most runs, career: 107. 

• Most doubles, season: 10, ties with Carter 
1997, Chamice Wise 1988, Angie Dulohery 1986, 
and Kristy "Buggy" Davis 1986. 

• Most doubles, career: 1 7 

• Most triples, season: 13. 

• Most triples, career: 25. 

• Most home runs, season: 12 in 1998. 

• Most home runs, career: 2 1 . 

• Most runs batted in, season: 75 in 1998. 

• Most runs batted in, career: 133. 

• Most total bases, season: 154 in 1998. 

• Most total bases, career: 277. 

Vandever, a third-team Ail-American pitcher as 
a freshman, rewrote the school's pitching record- 
book. Records set by the Arkansas City pitcher: 

• Most wins, career: 45. 

• Best winning percentage, season: .880 (22-3) 
in 1998. 

• Best winning percentage, career: .849 (45-8). 

• Lowest earned run average, season: 0.78 in 
1997. 

• Lowest earned run average, career: 1.41. 

• Most innings pitched, career: 338. 
And Vandever holds these two offensive 

records: 

• Most sacrifices, season: 16 in 1998. 

• Most sacrifices, career: 25. 

As expected, Kerr and Vandever have earned 
several postseason awards. Both were named first- 
team All-Jayhawk East, while Kerr earned first- 
team and Vandever second-team All-Region VI. 
Kerr was the top vote-getter for outfielders in 
Region VI, so she automatically was nominated for 
All-America. 

Jackie McChristian, freshman from Ark City, 
and Jenny Wolff, freshman from Wichita, were 
named to the second-team All-Jayhawk East. 
Honorable mention honors went to freshman pitch- 
er Sandy Erickson of Clay Center and Michelle 
Ideker, a freshman third baseman from Topeka. 
Erickson was Freshman of the Year in the Jayhawk 



East, while Hargrove earned Coach of the Year 
honors. 

Erickson joined Vandever as a second-team 
All-Region VI selection, while Ideker, Wolff, and 
April Merritt, a freshman from Sand Springs, Okla., 
were honorable mention selections. 

Conspicuously absent from any postseason 
awards is Jill Hutchinson. However, the freshman 
catcher from Ark City was voted Most Valuable 
Player by her teammates. 

"That says an awful lot about Jill and what she 
means to this team," Hargrove said. 

Volleyball team sets mark 
for wins in single season 

The Lady Tiger volleyball team set a school 
single-season record for victories in 1997 with 39, 
despite losing four consecutive matches at the 
Region VI tournament to end the season. 

Cowley, 39-18-1, lost to Seward County 15-6, 
15-5; Johnson County 15-7, 15-11; Independence 
15-8, 13-15, 15-8; and Garden City 15-12, 15-7. 
Barton County defeated Seward in three sets to 
capture the tournament title. 

The 39 victories broke the single-season record 
of 38 set last season. Head coach Deb Nittler raised 
her career totals to 326-259-8 in 12 seasons at 
Cowley. 

Four Lady Tigers earned All-Jayhawk 
Conference awards. Sophomore Joanna Howell, 
injured for the final two weeks of play, was named 
to the first team, along with fellow sophomore 
Allison Barse. Freshman Kelli Wolfe was named 
second-team all-conference, while freshman 
Tiffany Davidson earned honorable mention lau- 
rels. 

Howell also was named to the second-team 
All-Region VI team. 

"I have to feel good about the season," Nittler 
said. "We started out strong, and then went through 
a slump, but we came back and finished really 
strong." 

Men's tennis team records 
another top-five finish 

After his team finished the season in a tie for 
fifth place at nationals. Head Men's Tennis Coach 
Larry Grose felt the Tigers reached their potential. 

"I always like to push some kids to the finals," 
Grose said, "but I truly think we maxed our team 
out. We couldn't push any further." 

A highly competitive field at the NJCAA 
Division II tournament in Corpus Christi, Texas, 

more on page 35 



From page 34 



only allowed Cowley 16 points to tie with Region 
VI rival Johnson County. DeKalb of Georgia won 
the title with 33 points. Collin County of Texas was 
second with 31. Jefferson College of St. Louis was 
third with 19 points, followed by Vincennes of 
Indiana with 17. 

"I only felt bad about the top-end guys losing 
early," Grose said, referring to No. 1 singles player 
Pablo Mayorga, a sophomore from Bogota, 
Colombia, and No. 2 Shae Wright, a sophomore 
from Arkansas City. "I like to see them meet that 
kind of quality opponent in the quarterfinals or 
semifinals." 

But it wasn't meant to be. And instead of get- 
ting favorable early draws, the Tigers found them- 
selves up against some of the top players in their 
flights. 

"Shae got a bye, but then he played a guy who 
made the semifinals," Grose said. "There were 12 
to 15 guys who could win any given flight." 

Three singles players and the No. 1 doubles 
team of Wright and Mayorga reached the semifi- 
nals. Matt Tunnell at No. 6, Win Bower at No. 5, 
and Seth Morgan at No. 3 all were within one 
match of reaching the finals. 

Despite the fifth-place finish, tying Cowley's 
lowest in the last 10 years, Grose was pleased with 
his team. 

"I always say that if you're in the top five 
year-in and year-out, you're in very formidable 
company," he said. 

The Tigers did, however, win another Region 
VI title, their seventh in 10 years. Also, Grose was 
named the Wilson Sporting Goods Coach of the 
Year. 

Grose said he could compile a win-at-all-costs 
team, but he doesn't want to. 

"To make our program better, I've got to go 



out and violate the international rule, which I 
refuse to do, and not choose the Kansas and 
Oklahoma kids in our service area," Grose said. "I 
feel awfully good about who we are and keeping 
with our mission statement. Sure, I could sneak 
down to Texas or Florida to get a kid, but then I've 
destroyed that commitment we've made to Kansas 
and Oklahoma kids who can play for us." 

NJCAA rules cite that teams may only carry 
two international players on scholarship. 

Women's tennis team 
can't get out of regional 

Cowley's women's tennis team did not finish 
in the top two at the Region VI tournament, and 
therefore failed to qualify for the national tourna- 
ment. 

Head Coach Andre Spence said her team 
improved throughout the season, but a general lack 
of experience proved to be too costly in the end. 

Golf team to nationals 
in second year back 

Cowley's golf team, resurrected last year after 
nearly two decades of inactivity, qualified for the 
national tournament this year after missing the cut 
in 1997. 

Coach Rex Soule's Tigers finished sixth in the 
District III tournament in Garden City in late April, 
qualifying them for a trip to Dothan, Ala., and the 
national NJCAA Division I tournament May 19-22. 

Cowley never got untracked at nationals and 
finished the four-day event in 24th place. The 
Tigers shot 334, 337, 343, and 340 for a four-day 
total 1,354. Scottsdale (Ariz.) Community College 
won the title with a 1,155. 




ErwiMvwwMErwT 1 Association 

1997-98 Donors 




Sid Achenbach 

ADM Milling Co. 

Air Force Aid Society 

Bart Allen 

Allen s Furniture & Carpet 

Alpha Tau Chapter-Delta Kappa Gamin 

Norberto Alvarez 

American Legion Auxiliary-Unit #18 

Argonia PTO Room Mothers 

Ark City Clinic, P.A. 

Ark City Country Mart. L.L.C. 

Ark City Glass Company, Inc. 

Ark City Tumbleweeds 

Ark Valley Credit Union 

Ark Valley Distributing. Inc. 

Ark Valley Physical Therapy, Inc. 

Ark Veterinary Associates 

Arkansas City Area Arts Council 

Arkansas City Chamber of Commerce 

Arkansas City First Baptist Church 

Arkansas City Music & Drama Club 

Arkansas City Rotary Club 

Arkansas City Traveler 

Rod and Jody Arnett 

Attica High School 

Attica Site Council 

Augusta Medical Complex Auxiliary 

Joe and Donna Avery 

Albert and Karen Bacastow 

Albert and Thelma Bacastow 

Barbour Title Company 

Terry Beaver 

Belle Plaine Alumni Foundation 

Belle Plaine Community Foundation 

Belle Plaine United Methodist Church 

Beta Sigma Phi-City Council 

Beta Sigma Phi-Gamma Theta Chapter 

Billings Plumbing & Bath Boutique 

Binney & Smith, Inc. 

John Bishop 

Baxter Black 

Boeing Company 

Devon and Connie Bonfy 

Dick and Dolly Bonfy 

Bea Boory 

John V. Bossi 

David Bostwick 

Boyer Educational Trust 

Marietta Brammer 

Bill and Debbie Bridges 

Melburn Porter Brown 

Robert and Jana Brown 

Roger and Suzanne Brown 

Brown s Office Supply 

Bryant Hardware & Collectables 

Philip E. Buechner Jr. 

Fred D. Bunting 

State Bank of Burden 

Burger King Corporation 

Burlington Northern Foundation 

Darren and Carolyn Burroughs 

David and Vicki Burroughs 

Business & Professional Women 

Buterbaugh & Handlin 

Phil and Gloria Campbell 

Robert L. Campbell 

Caney Valley Electric Cooperative 

Mildred Carpenter/Marie Vickers Trust 

Johnny R. Castle 

Cedar Vale Alumni Association 



Cedar Vale Booster Club 

Century 21 Advantage Realty 

Cheney Chamber of Commerce 

Cheyenne & Arapahoe Tribes of Okla. 

Marilyn D. Childers 

Chisholm Trail State Bank 

Citizen s Scholarship Foundation 

City of Arkansas City 

Robert and Judy Clark 

Todd Q. Clark 

Albert and Audine Clemente 

Ben and Irene Cleveland 

Coca-Cola Bottling Company 

Gene and Donella Cole 

Coleman Company 

Commerce Bank 

Commercial Federal Bank 

Conco. Inc. 

Cowley County Community College 

Dr. Lynn A. Cramer 

Steven L. Cranford 

Tony Crouch 

Bruce Crouse 

Marie Crow 

Mike and Sue Crow 

Bill and Marge Curless 

D & S Retail Liquor, Wine & Beer 

Daisy Mae s Cafe 

Jim and Rae Dale 

Kirke Dale Scholarship Trust 

Dave and Carol Daulton 

Ruth A. David 

Walter and Iris David 

David s Electronics & Appliance 

Dr. Lynda DeArmond 

Delta Kappa Gamma-Upsilon Chapter 

Blair G. Denny 

Marilyn Denny 

Derby First Presbyterian Church 

Gary and Joy Detwiler 

Dillons Store #38 

DiVall Retail Liquor 

Larry W. Dobbs 

Meredith Docking 

Bill and Judy Docking 

Bryne Donaldson 

Pam Doyle 

Phillip Dressen 

Edith Dunbar 

Buel Duncan 

Dusenbery & Sons Trucking 

Eastman National Bank 

Lyle and Terry Eaton 

Eggleston Educational Trust 

ElDorado First Christian Church 

Elite Advertising 

Emrick s Van & Storagae Company 

Stephen and Janet English 

Enid Orthopedic & Hand Surgery. Inc. 

Equitable Life Assurance Society 

Doug and Dejon Ewing 

Eleanor S. Farrar 

John Farrar 

Robert and Lois Fencil 

First Luthern Church of Topeka 

First National Bank of Wellington 

First National Bank of Winfield 

Craig and Patty Fletchall 

Bob Foster Furniture 

Bud Foster Furniture 



Mr. and Mrs. Phil Foust 

Leslie Lemert Foust 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry Fox 

Curtis and Cynthia Freeland 

Ebbert Eugene Funk 

Galaxie Business Equipment, Inc. 

Gambino s Pizza 

Belva Gardner 

General Electric Fund 

Ed and Margaret Gilliland 

Kenneth and Bonnie Gilmore 

Taeko Givens 

Dan and Vicky Givens 

Ron and Donetta Godsey 

Mr. and Mrs. J.G. Goff 

Cliff and Pam Goggans 

Gordon & Assoc. Architects, P.A. 

Ann Elizabeth Gordon 

Gordon Piatt Energy Group, Inc. 

Graves Drug Store 

Great Western Dining Service, Inc. 

Greendoor LaFamilia 

Greif Bros. Corporation 

Steve and Cindy Grimes 

Larry and Nyla Grose 

Michael and Judi Groves 

Phil Groves 

Allen and Beverly Grunder 

Hallmark Motor Inn 

Ed and Linda Hargrove 

Harvey s Fashions Ltd. 

Donald and Ann Hastings 

Hawks Funeral Home 

Steve and Carol Hearne 

Cathy Hendricks 

Mike Henry 

Cloide and Hazel Hensley 

Bill and Jean Hill 

Hill Top Cleaners 

John and Janice Hitchcock 

Don and Carol Hobaugh-Maudlin 

Kim and Cynthia Hocker 

Marjory J. Hodkin 

Jim and Joyce Holloway 

Home National Bank 

Charles Hopkins 

Jerry Hopper 

Bill and Carol House 

Luella Hume 

Doug and Patti Hunter 

Hutchinson Electric. Inc. 

INTRUST Bank 

Mr. and Mrs. Norman Iverson 

Jan s Sport Shack 

Jarvis Accounting & Tax Service 

Mark Jarvis 

Ronnie and Anita Jenkins 

Charles Jennings 

Booker T. Jennings III 

Bernadine Rosa Jensen 

Jerry s Donut Shop 

Conrad and Janet Jimison 

Betty Johnson 

Hubert and Mildred Johnston 

JOMA Bowling Company 

Danny and Sandy Jones 

Edward D. Jones Company 

KG&E - Western Resources 

KAN-OKLA Telephone Association 

KSOK-KWS 



Kansas Art Education Association 

Kansas Arts Commission 

Kansas Board of Regents 

Kansas Humanities Council 

Kansas Orthopaedic Center 

Kaw Nation of Oklahoma 

Keefe Printing & Office Supply 

Diane Kelly 

Ellen Kelly 

William T. Kemper Foundation 

John and Joan Kempf 

Charles and Mary Kerr 

Kickapoo Tribe of Oklahoma 

Oscar Kimmel! 

Dr. and Mrs. Nick Kinsch 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Kinzie 

Kiwanis Club of Arkansas City 

Dr. Paul A. Klaassen 

Missy Lemert Kloxin 

Erwin and Fern Knocke 

Anthony Korte 

John T. Kroenert 

L.G. Pike Construction Company 

LaDonna Lanning 

Ric and Becky Lassiter 

Legleiter Video Service 

Clay Lemert 

Marcia L. Lemert 

Donna Lester 

Mr. and Mrs. Gerald Lewis 

Sara Lewis 

Little ET s 

Local 1004 IUE-AFL-CIO 

Steve and Christi Lungren 

Scott and Rhoda MacLaughlin 

Melba Maechtlen 

Rex and Bea Marsh 

Betty Martin 

Robert R. Matthews 

Dr. and Mrs. Pat McAtee 

McDonald s 

Medicine Lodge Golf Club Inc. 

Mid America Arts Alliance 

Midwest Electric Supply, Inc. 

Jim and Ann Miesner 

Mrs. Mary Jane Mills 

Pat Moreland 

Mike and Patti Morgan 

Norman and Sue Morris 

Otis and Terri Morrow 

Multimedia Cablevision 

Mulvane Business Women 

Joe and Patty Neises 

Mrs. Gwen Nelson 

Lee Nelson 

Mr. and Mrs. Mark Nelson 

Craig Newman 

Newton First United Methodist Church 

Newton PEO Chapter LA. 

Randy and Debbie Nittler 

Nye & Associates 

Dr. Jerry L. Old 

Olen Medical Supply 

Orscheln Farm & Home Supply 

Stu Osterthun 

Oxford Community Bank 

Oxford High School 

Neal and Anna Mae Paisley 

Ada Margaret Palmer 

Papa Johns 

Parks, Inc. 

Parlour Beauty Salon 

Parman, Tanner, Soule & Jackson, CPA 



Partners in Education Foundation 

Peggy Paton 

Paton Wholesale & Vending Co. 

Don and Wilda Patterson 

Personal Finance Co., Inc. 

Betty R. Peterson 

Eddie and Maggie Picking 

Post Rock Gas, Inc. 

Gary Potter Auction Service 

Prairieland Processors, Inc. 

Presbyterian Church - USA 

Tom and Sheila Prichard 

Puritan Billiards 

Quail Ridge Golf Shop 

Quality Water Service 

Judy Queen 

Ramsey s Auto Parts, Inc. 

Ranson Capital Corportation 

Reedy Ford 

Regency Court Inn 

Sid and Sharon Regnier 

Dr. Glen and Bonnie Remsburg 

Rindt-Erdman Funeral Home 

Mark Robbins 

Clifford Roderick 

Dr. and Mrs. Nick Rogers 

Dr. and Mrs. David Ross 

Mrs. Gail Ross 

Bill Rowe 

Lena M. Rush Scholarship Trust 

Susan Rush 

Tom and Sue Saia 

Mr. and Mrs. James Salomon 

Lois Sampson 

Stan Sawyer 

Mr. and Mrs. David Schaller 

Dr. and Mrs. David Schmeidler 

Dr. and Mrs. Rick Schoeling 

Michelle Schoon 

Larry Schwintz 

Frederick Seaton 

Al Sehsuvaroglu 

Dr. and Mrs. John Seitz 

Sheldon s Pawn Shop 

E.W. Bud and Lauretta Shelton 

Gary Shepard 

Wanda Shepherd 

Henrietta M. Shingleton 

Wayne and Sandy Short 

Joe and Mindi Shriver 

Dennis and Ruthie Shurtz 

Tommy and Lana Sleeper 

Dale F. Smith 

Mr. and Mrs. Eldon Smith 

Forest and Sandra Smith 

Dr. and Mrs. Newton Smith 

Pam Smith 

Smyer Travel Service, Inc. 

Jean and Ellen Snell 

Dr. and Mrs. Daniel Snowden 

Lois A. Snyder 

Rex Soule 

Mr. and Mrs. Roy Soule 

South Haven Teacher s Association 

Southwestern College 

Jim and Margaret Sowden 

Sparkle Car Wash 

Spirit s Supper Club 

Dr. Lynn Stalnaker 

State Bank of Winfield 

Steven Chevrolet, Inc. 

Tommye Stewart 

Helen Storbeck 



Tad and Janice Stover 

John and Lee Ann Sturd 

Sumner-Cowley Electric Coop, Inc. 

Sunseekers 

Larry Swaim 

Betty Sybrant 

Linda Sybrant 

Taylor Drug 

Fred and Marilyn Taylor 

Mr. and Mrs. Tom Templeton 

The Navajo Nation 

Mr. and Mrs. F.L. Thurman 

R.D. Trammell 

Richard and Nancy Tredway 

Toni Trester 

George Trimble Scholarship Trust 

Anthony J. Trout 

Ed and Mary Turner 

Tyler Production, Inc. 

Steve and Connie Tyler 

Udall Community Auxiliary 

Udall First Baptist Church 

Udall - USD #463 

Union State Bank 

United Agency 

United Tribes-Kansas & SE Nebraska 

Stanton County - USD #452 

Sheree Utash 

Valu-Line of Kansas, Inc. 

Mr. and Mrs. Bob Viola 

Chris Vollweider 

Barbara Lemert Wagnon 

Wal-Mart Foundation 

Waldeck Oil Company 

L.L. Waldmeier 

Waldorf-Riley, Inc. 

Mrs. Harold Walker 

Mr. and Mrs. H.A. Walling 

Caroline Newman Warren 

Joan Warren 

Mabel Warren 

Dr. Aaron T. Watters 

Connie Wedel 

Mr. and Mrs. Rupert Welch 

Wellington Crusador Club 

Wellington First Christian Church 

Wellington Optimist Club 

Wellington Security State Bank 

Wellington Senior High School 

Western Resources, Inc. 

Western Wireless Corporation 

Wheatland Lodge Foundation 

Bob and Patricia White 

Dale B. White 

Wichita Center for the Arts 

Wichita High School South-USD #259 

Wichita Junior Golf Foundation 

Virginia Jane Wilkins 

Willis Corroon Corporation 

Mary Wilson 

Rodney E. Wilson 

Winfield First Baptist Church 

Winfield First United Methodist Church 

Winfield High School 

Winfield Motor Company, Inc. 

Winfield Pharmacy 

Winfield Publishing Company. Inc. 

City of Winfield 

Wood Chiropractic 

Woods Lumber of Arkansas City 

Beatrice Wright Estate 

Dr. and Mrs. Bob Yoachim 

Zeller Motor Company, Inc. 



% 



Mill Levy: 
21.598 

Fact: 

Of the 1 9 community 
colleges in Kansas, 
Cowley has the 8th 
lowest mill levy in the 
state at 21.598, and 
has the eighth highest 
county valuation of 
$159,241,914. At $41 
per credit hour for 
tuition and fees, 
Cowley boasts one of 
the lowest tuitions in 
the state. 




Enrollment 
Figures: 

Facts, 
Fall 1997: 



High School 

Freshmen 

Sophomores 

Special 

Total 

Headcount 

Total FTE 



477 

1,758 

872 

779 

3,886 

2,079.72 



Approximately 60% of 
freshmen and sopho- 
mores enrolled in 
Kansas colleges are in 
community colleges. 



Founded: 1922 

In 1968, the College became the first school in the state to combine 
a traditional liberal arts transfer curriculum with a program of area 
vocational-technical school training. 

President: 

Dr. Patrick McAtee, Ph.D., became the third president of the 
College on July 1, 1987. 

1997 Fall Enrollment: 

2,079.72 Full-Time Equivalency; 3,886 Total Headcount 

Programs: 

32 Certificate and Applied Science programs 

36 Liberal Arts/Transfer programs 

Institute of Lifetime Learning — Senior Citizens program 

More than 100 specialized programs and seminars offered through 
the Institute for Lifetime Learning — Special Programs Office, the 
Displaced Homemaker/Single Parent Program, and the Work and 
Family Program. Specialized training for business and industry to meet 
their needs. In the past the College has developed or offered programs 
for Gilliland Printing, Inc., General Electric, Rubbermaid-Winfield, 
Gordon-Piatt Energy Group, Inc., the city of Arkansas City, local school 
districts, day care centers, local nursing homes, special education co- 
ops, KSQ Blowmolding, Social Rehabilitation Services, Southwestern 
Bell Telephone, Montgomery Elevator, Boeing-Wichita, Cessna, and 
the Business and Industry Division of Banks. 

Current Valuation: 

Valuation in the Fall of 1998 was $159,241,914. 

Budget: 

$15 million 

Facilities: 

14 buildings on a 10-acre campus in the heart of downtown 
Arkansas City. Outreach Centers in Mulvane, Strother Field, Winfield, 
Wellington and Wichita, where a cooperative partnership between 
Cowley County Community College, Wichita State University, and 
Wichita Area Technical College has formed the Southside Education 
Center. Courses also taught at these area high schools: Argonia, Belle 
Plaine, Caldwell, Cedar Vale, Conway Springs, Dexter, Oxford, South 
Haven, and Udall. 

Athletics: 

Eight intercollegiate sports that compete in the Kansas Jayhawk 
Conference's East Division. Volleyball, Men's Basketball, Women's 
Basketball, Baseball, Softball, Golf, Men's Tennis, and Women's 
Tennis. The Tiger baseball team won the National Junior College 
Athletic Association World Series in 1997, going 53-11, and again in 
1998, going 54-9. Cowley became the first Kansas school to win back- 
to-back NJCAA baseball championships. 

Employees: 

140 full-time faculty, staff and administration 
557 part-time faculty, staff and students 

Endowment Association Assets: 

June 30, 1998 assets of $1,421,551 
402 Members 



If you believe in the com- 
munity college concept, let 
your state representative 
know. 

Elected Officials 

Governor 

Bill Graves 

Second Floor 
State Capitol 
Topeka. Kansas 66612 

Senator 
Greta Goodwin 

Winfield, Kansas 67156 

Representatives 
Joe Shriver 

Arkansas City, Kansas 
67005 

Judy Showalter 

Winfield, Kansas 67156 

State Board Member 
Dr. Steve E. Abrams 

Arkansas City, Kansas 
67005 



Your Investment 

• $3,477,005 in 1997 taxes. $3,439,260 in 1998 taxes. 

• Taxes DO NOT pay for scholarships to out-of-state 
athletes. 

• Although the College is sixth in size among the 19 
community colleges in Kansas. 

Your Return 

• $ 14 million a year added to the local economy. For each 
dollar of local tax support received, the College returns 
$5.03 to the county's economy. That return is greater 
when the total picture of the state is considered. For 
every dollar spent by the state in support of community 
colleges, $22.43 is returned. 

• $5,768,948 annual payroll, providing 140 full-time jobs 
and 375 adjunct faculty positions. 

• Educational opportunities for all segments of the 
population at less than half the cost of four-year colleges. 
Average student age is 27.6 years. 

• A record full-time enrollment for the fall of 1997 of 
2,079.71 total FTE. 

• Graduates who, according to a study by the University of 
Kansas, suffer less transfer shock than any other group of 
transfer students. 



Financial aid help for 
Cowley County Students 

For the 1997-98 year, more than 
1,000 Cowley County students 
were awarded more than $2 
million in grants, loans, scholar- 
ships and work-study programs. 



Customized training for more than a dozen businesses and 
industries. 

A significant attraction for businesses and industries 
considering relocation in this area. 

Cultural, educational and athletic events which entertain 
audiences throughout this area. 

An educational institution well known for the quality of 
its programs in both liberal arts and 
vocational/occupational areas. 



% 



Cowle 



Cowley County Community College 

& Area Vocational-Technical School 

125 S. Second St. • Arkansas City, KS 67005 

1-800-593-2222 • www.cowley.cc.ks.us 



flit's Atijj 



Cowley/, 




<$> 



Cowley County Community College 
An Institution that supports 

.-- 1 1 ■ 

awd encourages students 
to believe in themselves. 

Thanks for believing in me 
and my endeavors. 

Jessica Ferree 
,n 99 CCCC Graduate 



mL mm ^^^^ 



COWLEY COUNTY COMMUNITY COLLEGE 
& AREA VOCATIONAL-TECHNICAL SCHOOL 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Message from the President 2 

Board of Trustees 3 

Administrative Team 4 

Students of the Month 5 

Student Achievements 6-8 

Staff Achievements 9-12 

Campus Improvements 13 

Institutional Fund-raising 14 

Outstanding Tiger Alumni 15-16 

Enrollment 17 

New Board of Regents 18 

North Central Accreditation 19 

Y2K Compliant 20 

Institutional Grants 21 

Distance Education 22 

New Board Members 23 

Athletic Achievements 24-25 

Endowment Association Donors 1998-99 26-27 

Bottom Line '99 28 

At-a-Glance '99 29 

Cowley's Mission Statement 

Cowley College is an open access institution 

seeking to empower students with the skills necessary 

to compete and perform on a world class level. 

We are committed to providing our students 

and our community a thriving environment 

for learning excellence, personal enrichment, 

and enhanced quality of life. 



Cowley County Community College & Area Vocational-Technical School 

125 S. Second St. • Arkansas City. KS 67005 • www.cowley.cc.ks.us • 800-593-2222 • (316) 442-0430 

This annual report was produced by the Office of Public Relations, Stu Osterthun director, Kristen Martinez, assistant. 



, 




MESSAGE FROM THE PRESIDENT 



As we enter the new millennium, I want to 
extend my thanks to the citizens of Cowley 
County and south-central Kansas for their sup- 
port of our college over the last 77 years. All of 
us at the college deeply appreciate your financial support 
and your participation in our instructional programs and 
college activities. 

My 1 2th year at Cowley was truly a rewarding expe- 
rience. After much discussion and argumentation at the 
local and state level, Cowley College is now under the 
coordination of the Board of Regents. We look forward 
to this relationship and anticipate many positive changes 
for the college in the future. 

The college enjoyed much success at all levels of 
the institution during last academic year. Here are just a 
few of the highlights: 

• The college had a record enrollment for spring 
semesters, going over the 1,900 mark for the first time 
ever. 

• We made great strides toward completing the first- 
of-its-kind special emphasis self-study for the North 
Central Association of Colleges and Schools. Even 
though our NCA site visit isn't until February 2000. a 
great deal of work was done to prepare for the visit and 
our ultimate goal: reaccreditation. 

• Jessica Ferree, a young woman from Arkansas 
City who served as president of the college's Student 
Government Association, had the privilege of serving a 
six-week summer internship in the Association of 
Community College Trustees office in Washington, D.C. 

• Four instructors were honored with Teaching Excellence Awards during the annual National Institute for 
Staff and Organizational Development conference in Austin, Texas. Since 1987 there have been 41 Cowley faculty 
members so honored. 

• Laetitia Sanders, a sophomore from Arkansas City, was named Outstanding Student of Arkansas City. 
Laetitia was an outstanding student at Cowley and served as a positive role model. 

• Sid Regnier, our vice president for business services, modestly accepted the award as the 1998 Outstanding 
Chief Business Officer for Region VI. I've said it many times since I arrived at Cowley in 1987: Sid Regnier is the 
best thing that ever happened to me. He is the best business officer in the United States. Bar none! 

• An idea sparked by a past SGA came to fruition with the remodeling of the Nelson Student Center lounge 
area. "The Jungle," as the area is now known, is an attractive, inviting environment that both students and staff will 
enjoy. 

• The Endowment Association once again raised thousands of dollars during the Second Annual Great Cowley 
Duck Dash. But. as always is the case, it could not have been possible without your support. On behalf of the 
entire college community, I thank you from the bottom of my heart. 

I hope you enjoy reading this 22nd edition of the President's Report. This report reflects the hard work of all 
our employees at Cowley. We are proud of these accomplishments in 1998-99 and look forward to celebrating 
many more quality achievements in the year 2000. 




(Uit i m?a& 



I 




BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



Cowley saw many positives 
during last academic year 



The 1998-99 academic year 
was challenging, rewarding, and 
successful. And as chairman of the 
Board of Trustees during that time, I 
wanted to reflect a bit on the year. 

First and foremost, the college 
ended the year in the black finan- 
cially. Many community colleges 
are struggling financially as enroll- 
ment is declining and state funding 
is evaporating. The administration 
and staff have worked diligently to 
keep expenses at a minimum and 
still provide a quality education in a 
state-of-the-art environment. 

From the Act One play 
"Camelot" last fall to the G.E.D. 
graduation ceremony in the spring 
of 1999, Cowley achieved many 
successes. And as a board member, 
I am very proud to be a small part 
of these successes. 

Although the baseball team did 
not win a third consecutive national 
championship, it did capture a fifth- 
straight Jayhawk East title. Tiger 




Donna Avery 
Arkansas City 




athletics continue to be competitive 
and exciting to watch. Each student 
athlete gave their best. That is all 
you can ask of a person. Cowley 
continues to produce extraordinary 
students who excel academically. 
We are very proud of all those who 
represented Cowley at the state and 
national levels. 

Another event which was an 
honor to attend was the G.E.D. 





Albert Bacastow Jr. 
Arkansas City 



graduation ceremony. These stu- 
dents deserve an extra pat on the 
back for overcoming many hard- 
ships to attain their GED. The 
enthusiasm from those attending 
was heartwarming and emotional, 
and you knew this was a dream 
come true for each graduate. 

In closing, the year was full of 
excitement, and many students 
accomplished more than they ever 
dreamed they could. This is not 
only from their self-initiative, but 
also from the encouragement and 
mentoring from all the instructors 
and staff at Cowley. 

Cowley is a progressive and 
proud community college, and our 
No. 1 goal is to provide our students 
with the skills they need to strive in 
the future, no matter what their 
vocation. 

I eagerly anticipate what's in 
store for the next academic year. 

Ron Godsey, Winfield 
Chairman of the Board 




LaDonna Lanning 
Winfield 




Patti Hunter 
Arkansas City 



Dennis Shurtz 
Arkansas Citv 



I 




ADMINISTRATIVE TEAM 




Dr. Pat McAtee 
President 




Sid Regnier 

Vice President 

of Business Services 




Maggie Picking 

Vice President 

of Student Affairs 




Conrad Jimison 
Dean of Instruction 



Tom Saia 

Dean of Administration 

Director of Athletics 



Dr. Joan Warren 

Associate Dean 

of Vocational Education 



Jim Miesner 

Associate Dean 

of Continuing Education 




Gene Cole 

Associate Dean 

of Business & Industry 




Terri Morrow 

Associate Dean 

of Development & 

College Relations 




Sheree Utash 

Associate Dean 

of North Campuses 



, 




STUDENTS OF THE MONTH 




Jessica Ferree 

Arkansas City, Kansas 

September 1998 

Student of the Year 1998-99 




Tracy Doile 

El Dorado, Kansas 

October 1998 



Nancy Jolley 

Arkansas City, Kansas 

November 1998 



Piper Ewing 

Arkansas City, Kansas 

December 1998 




Laetitia Sanders 

Arkansas City, Kansas 

January 1999 



Bryan Root 

Winfield, Kansas 

February 1999 



Amanda Anstine 

Arkansas City, Kansas 

March 1999 



Will Tate 

Manhattan, Kansas 

April 1999 



I 




STUDENT ACHIEVEMENTS 



Cowley graduate chosen 
for Washington internship 



* 



May graduate Jessica Ferree 
was one of only two students nation- 
wide to be chosen for a summer 
internship with the Association of 
Community College Trustees in 
Washington, D.C. 

Ferree, the daughter of Anne 
and Charles Stark of Arkansas City 
and Jim and Sherri Ferree of Craig, 
Colo., was selected to intern at the 
ACCT Board Services Office for six 
weeks. That office works with com- 
munity college governing boards in 
their chief executive officer search 
and selection process. 

"It was great and wonderful and 
I learned a lot," Ferree said. 

Ferree created a survey, contact- 
ed retired community college presi- 
dents, updated databases, met with 
Kansas Sens. Pat Roberts and Sam 
Brownback, and worked in the 
Public Policy branch of the office, 
among other duties. 

Prior to being selected. Ferree 
was less than optimistic she would 
land the job. 

"I really didn't think my 
chances were very good," said 
Ferree, who majored in communica- 
tions. "But one night I just could not 
go to sleep. It was killing me, and I 
decided I couldn't pass up an oppor- 
tunity to at least try for it." 

Ferree typed her required 500- 
word essay at midnight, mailed it the 
next day, and got the phone call 
weeks later. 

Orientation for the internship 
was June 20. Ferree's work ran 
through July 30. 

Nineteen interns from across the 
nation were in Washington, D.C, at 
the same time, assisting various 



"On a personal note, I've grown 
up in Arkansas City and the experi- 
ences have been limited. Seeing and 
working in Washington, D.C, was a 
tremendous learning experience for 
me. It should be a huge benefit." 

Jessica Ferree 
Class of '99 




offices through the Washington, 
D.C, Internship Program. The pro- 
gram is sponsored by Phi Theta 
Kappa, the international honor socie- 
ty for community colleges. 
Accommodations for all 19 interns is 
the Jacqueline Bouvier Kennedy 
Onassis Hall at George Washington 
University. 

Ferree was invited to apply for 
the internships after being named to 
the All-Kansas PTK Academic Team 
for 1999. Nancy Jolley of Arkansas 
City was Cowley's other student 
selected to the team. 

Students were asked to submit a 
500-word essay on why they felt the 
internship could further their aca- 
demic and professional goals. 

"I was picky when I wrote my 
essay," Ferree said. "That (ACCT) 
was the only association I was inter- 
ested in. I wanted to work with the 
trustees because I dealt with a lot of 
those issues as SGA president." 

Students interested in a career in 
business administration, public rela- 
tions, human resources or training 
and development were given prefer- 
ence by the ACCT, Ferree. who is 
enrolled at the University of 



Oklahoma, is carrying a double 
major at OU in human resource man- 
agement and communications. 

"Fd really like to work in educa- 
tion at some point," she said. "Maybe 
this will spark some interest in which 
direction I want to go." 

On the final day of the intern- 
ship, Ferree and the 18 other students 
made individual presentations on 
what they learned and how the expe- 
rience will benefit them in the future. 

"On a personal note, I've grown 
up in Arkansas City and the experi- 
ences have been limited," Ferree 
said. "Seeing and working in 
Washington. D.C, was a tremendous 
learning experience for me. It should 
be a huge benefit." 

Ferree received a $600 stipend 
from ACCT Cowley provided some 
financial assistance, Ferree said. 

Other PTK summer internships 
were with the National Science 
Foundation, the U.S. Department of 
Education, the National Association 
of Counties, the United States 
Information Agency. Phi Beta Kappa 
Honor Society, the American 
Association of Community Colleges, 
and with USA Today newspaper. 




STUDENT ACHIEVEMENTS 



Sanders named Outstanding 



Student of Arkansas 



By Kristen Martinez 



Public Relations Office 

Laetitia Sanders, the daughter of 
Margaret and Donald Sanders of 
Arkansas City, was named the 
Outstanding Student of Arkansas 
City for 1999. 

Sanders, who graduated from 
Cowley in May 1999, was extremely 
involved in her two years. She was 
the secretary of Phi Theta Kappa, a 
Student Ambassador, a member of 
the Student Affairs Committee and 
the women's tennis team. She also 
was involved in Cowley's "Adopt-A- 
Player" program, served as a work- 
study for the Athletic Department, 
and worked part-time for Commerce 
Bank in Winfield. While participat- 
ing in many activities, she also main- 
tained a 3.95 grade-point average. 

She was named Student of the 
Month in March of 1998 and January 
of 1999, the first Cowley student to 
win the honor twice during their 
career. She also was Homecoming 
Queen in 1 998, a Queen Alalah final- 



ist in 1997, and September 1998 
Student-Athlete of the Month. 
Sanders has been named to Who's 
Who Among Students in American 
Junior Colleges and is on the 
National Dean's List. 

Sanders said she feels well-pre- 
pared to take the next step toward a 
bachelor's degree. She is attending 
Oklahoma State University and play- 
ing tennis while majoring in comput- 
er information systems. 

Maggie Picking, vice president 
of student affairs, knows Sanders 
well. 

"She is a great kid," Picking 
said. "She had great grades. She was 
and is one of the best. She comes 
from a great family with very sup- 
portive parents. I am really going to 
miss her. She always had a smile on 
her face . . . always. She will be good 
at anything that she decides to do." 

Faculty and support staff recom- 
mend names to the city of Arkansas 
City to be considered for the award. 
The hi eh school and middle school 




Laetitia Sanders 

also submit names. All nominees are 
interviewed. From the interviews, 
three semi-finalists are selected from 
each school. Finally, one of the semi- 
finalists is selected as the 
Outstanding Student of Arkansas 
City, by the Outstanding Student 
Committee. 

The last time a Cowley student 
received the award was in 1997 
when Austin Graves of Arkansas 
City won. 



, 




STUDENT ACHIEVEMENTS 



Queen Alalah LXVII 




Jill Hutchinson of Arkansas City was crowned Queen Alalah 
LXVII during the annual Queen's Coronation on Oct. 30, 
1998. Her activities included being a two-year starter for the 
Cowley Lady Tiger softball team. 



Shoup second nationally 
in VICA Skills contest 



Y 




Carroll Shoup of Arkansas City took sec- 
ond place in the Post-Secondary Division of 
the Aviation Maintenance Technology contest 
during the 35th annual Skills USA 
Championships held July 2, 1999, in Kansas 
City, Mo. 

Shoup was among the approximately 
3,800 outstanding technical students who 
joined in the excitement of hands-on competi- 
tion in 68 different trade, technical, and lead- 
ership fields. 



Working against the clock and each 
other, the participants proved their expertise 
in job skills occupations such as electronics, 
technical drafting, precision machining, med- 
ical assisting, and culinary arts. There also 
were competitions in leadership skills, such as 
extemporaneous speaking and conducting 
meetings by parliamentary procedures. 

VICA is the national organization for 
students in trade, industrial, technical and 
health occupations education. 



STAFF ACHIEVEMENTS 



Master Teachers 1999 




Four Cowley faculty earned Master Teacher awards during the annual National Institute for Staff and 
Organizational Development conference in Austin, Texas, in May 1999. They are, back row from left, Slade 
Griffiths and David Bostwick. Front row, from left, are Pam Smith and Pat Moreland. With the four fac- 
ulty members are Dr. Pat McAtee, president, far right, and Conrad Jimison, dean of instruction, far left. 
Cowley's total number of Master Teacher award recipients since 1987 is 41. 



, 




STAFF ACHIEVEMENTS 



National business organization 
honors Regnier as top officer 



HH 



Modesty always has been a 
trademark of Sid Regnier. 

So when Cowley's vice presi- 
dent of business services was 
named the 1998 Outstanding Chief 
Business Officer for Region VI, he 
didn't say too much. And he told 
very few people. 

He is honored, but he is taking 
it in stride. 

"I'm overwhelmed." Regnier 
said. "I have no idea how many 
were nominated from our region. 
I've been attending the national 
business officers association for a lot 
of years, and I have a lot of friends. 
A lot of them are business officers at 
institutions much bigger than 
Cowley. They have the same issues I 
do, just on a larger scale, and I won- 
der why they weren't picked." 

Community College Business 
Officers Region VI is comprised of 
Kansas, Missouri, and Oklahoma. 
Regnier was recognized as Region 
VI's Outstanding Chief Business 
Officer at the CCBO International 
Conference, Nov. 14-17. 1998. in 
Santa Fe, N.M. Regnier was one of 
1 1 business officers nationwide 
selected for regional honors. 
Selection is based on the officer's 
effectiveness in carrying out respon- 
sibilities, participation in institution- 
al strategic planning, professional 
involvement in state and national 
associations, and contributions to 
the community. 

Regnier, 59. and a native of 
Fairbury. Neb., came to Cowley in 
July 1974 as business manager. Prior 
to that he worked for Southeast 
Community College in Fairbury, 
from 1967-74, the same place he 
earned an associate's degree. 

In January 1966, Regnier grad- 
uated from the University of 
Nebraska-Kearney, then Kearney 
State College, with a bachelor's 
degree in business education. He 




"The people I've worked with — 
all the faculty, staff, administrators, 
the Boards of Trustees, the city peo- 
ple, the county — the list is endless, 
have been most rewarding. I am far 
more concerned about them and 
what they do than I am about me and 

what I do." 

Sid Regnier 
Vice President of Business Services 



spent the spring semester of 1966 
teaching business courses at 
Nebraska City High School. From 
there, Regnier went to Scott City, 
Kan., as the office education and 
distributive education coordinator. 

While at Fairbury, Regnier 
taught business and economics from 
1967 to December 1969. In January 
1970, he became the school's first 
business manager. Regnier also was 
Southeast's continuing education 
coordinator, golf coach for 2 1/2 
years (teams never lost a match), 
and assistant football coach. 

As with so many careers, tech- 
nology has changed the way Regnier 
does his job. 

"Computerization, the tele- 
phone system going from analog to 
digital, it's all changed so much," he 
said. "It's been exciting to go 
through." 

Regnier and wife Sharon have 
been married 38 years. They have 
three children: Doug in Houston, 
Texas; Jodi in Big Spring, Texas; 
and David, a fellow Cowley employ- 
ee, in Arkansas City. The Regniers 
also have eight grandchildren. 
Regnier's mother Luella, still resides 
in Fairbury. 

Regnier's regard for his fellow 
man has earned him great respect 
among his colleagues and co-work- 



ers. 



with — all the faculty, staff, adminis- 
trators, the Boards of Trustees, the 
city people, the county — the list is 
endless, have been most rewarding," 
Regnier said. "I am far more con- 
cerned about them and what they do 
than I am about me and what I do." 

That self-less attitude is dis- 
played through Regnier's work, and 
his community service. It includes 
being a member of the board of 
directors for the Ark City Arts 
Council, a past member and chair of 
the former Arkansas City Memorial 
Hospital Board of Directors, and as 
a member of Redeemer Evangelical 
Lutheran Church in Arkansas City. 

At Cowley, Regnier has been 
instrumental in keeping the school 
fiscally sound throughout the years. 
He has been a leader in defining the 
college's mission and developing the 
strategic planning process. Through 
Regnier's leadership, Cowley has 
the fifth-lowest mill levy and the 
seventh-lowest tuition rate among 
the 19 community colleges in 
Kansas. 

In his valuable spare time, 
Regnier enjoys volunteering and 
spending time with family. 

"I used to play golf," he said 
with a laugh. "I have a 1958 Ford 
retractable that my wife and I enjoy 
going out in the evenings and put- 
ting the top down." 



'The people I've worked 



STAFF ACHIEVEMENTS 




Betty Martin, left, and Dr. Carol Hobaugh-Maudlin combined to give Cowley more 
than 49 years of service. A reception was held in May 1999 in their honor. 

Hobaugh-Maudlin, Martin retire 



With nearly a half-century of experience between 
them, teaching and directing the library at Cowley, Dr. 
Carol Hobaugh-Maudlin and Betty Martin said good- 
bye. A reception was held in May 1999. 

The two have been cornerstones at Cowley since the 
early to mid-1970s. 

Hobaugh-Maudlin, 62, grew up near South Haven 
and graduated from high school there in 1955. From 
there she headed to Emporia State to begin work on a 
bachelor's degree in business and home economics. But 
she was quickly derailed after being told she was less 
than an adequate typist. 

In 1972, she completed her bachelor's degree from 
Southwestern College. It was in education, with an 
emphasis in family and consumer science. In August of 
that same year, she arrived at Cowley. 

A master's degree from Wichita State University 
followed in 1978. It was in curriculum and instruction, 
with an emphasis on human growth and development. 
Hobaugh-Maudlin always has been one to ask why not, 
rather than why, so she pursued a doctorate at Oklahoma 
State University. She accomplished that task in May 
1993. She has served as chair of the Social Science 
Department at Cowley ever since. 

The mother of four children and seven grandchil- 
dren (another is on the way), Hobaugh-Maudlin endured 



the death of her first husband to raise her family. Her 
four children are Connie McGehan, Don Hobaugh, 
Keith Hobaugh, and Debbie Ray, all Cowley graduates. 
It's easy to see. then, that she will miss her contact with 
her students. 

"I'll miss the students and the funny things that hap- 
pen in class," she said. "It's amazing what you see from 
the front of the room." 

A male student nearly fell from his chair as he sat 
sleeping — and snoring. 

"I went over to his desk and put my foot next to his 
on the floor and nudged him," Hobaugh-Maudlin recalls. 
"He was a big guy, about 6-foot-5, and he jumped up in 
that chair. I decided I'd better not do that to someone so 
much bigger than me." 

One of her biggest challenges as an educator was 
the assignment of teaching U.S. History Since 1865. 

"I hated history," Hobaugh-Maudlin said. 

But she got through it, thanks to a book written by 
her great-great grandfather, telling the story of how he 
settled in Sumner County. 

"I still see two people who were in that class, and 
they tell me that was the best history class they had ever 
had," Hobaugh-Maudlin said. 

Hobaugh-Maudlin and her husband, Don, plan to 



See Retirement, Page 12 W 



Hn 



STAFF ACHIEVEMENTS 



A new way to market Cowley 

CD-ROM project unique approach to recruiting 



When Stu Osterthun, Cowley's 
director of public relations, popped 
in a sample CD-ROM from a college 
on the East Coast, there was just one 
thing on his mind: Cowley had to 
have one, too. 

But the cost, he figured, would 
be too high for the college to justify. 

He was wrong. 

After approaching Jason 
Bennett, owner of Jason Bennett 
Productions of Tulsa, Okla., about 
creating a marketing CD-ROM for 
Cowley, the only question in the 
minds of Osterthun and the adminis- 
tration was, when do we start. 

"I felt that this was an opportu- 
nity to separate Cowley from its 
competition," Osterthun said. "It's a 
pretty unique idea. I was looking for 
something like this to compliment 
the rest of our marketing efforts." 



Bennett, who produced the CD 
that first got Cowley's attention, 
signed on to do the project in 
February. Once fall arrived, the CD 
was ready to go. Admissions repre- 
sentatives will make the CD avail- 
able to all high school guidance 
counselors in the area, plus any stu- 
dent who has access to a computer 
with a CD-ROM drive. 

"I can't sit here and promise 
you that enrollment will increase 
because of this CD," Osterthun said. 
"But I do know that it is something a 
little different from what prospective 
students are used to seeing." 

The college still maintains its 
website, and plans to dump some of 
the materials from the CD onto the 
site. Also, a printed viewbook still is 
being used, along with program 
brochures and the usual forms of 



advertising. 

The college was able to do the 
project, which included three trips 
by Bennett and his staff to Arkansas 
City and outreach centers, 2,000 
CDs, three radio commercials, six 
television commercials, and all of 
the production time, for an amount 
that didn't break any department's 
budget. 

"I'm very happy with the way it 
turned out," Osterthun said. "I'm 
anxious to hear feedback from 
prospective students, most of which 
will choose Cowley, hopefully." 

The CD has five basic areas stu- 
dents can view. They are the college 
catalog, a viewbook, a campus tour, 
application instructions, and forms 
that can be printed. 

Portions of the CD will be 
placed on the college's website. 



i 



Retirement 

from page 11 




travel and spend time with grandchildren. But Carol 
isn't quite finished with the classroom. She'll be teach- 
ing a class at Boeing in Wichita this summer. 

Ever since Betty Martin was a youngster, she's 
wanted to be a librarian. And after serving as a public 
librarian in Texas, Ohio, Missouri, and Kansas, Martin 
and her late husband, Jim, settled in Arkansas City in 
August 1976. Jim taught related courses in the Industrial 
Technology Department; Betty was hired as director of 
Renn Memorial Library. 

Betty is a third-generation educator, following in 
the footsteps of her parents and grandmother, who hap- 
pened to be on the faculty at Joplin Junior College in 
Missouri. That's where Betty, at age 1 7, began her career 
in higher education. The college is now known as 
Missouri Southern State College. 

She earned a bachelor's degree from Pittsburg State 
in 1957 and a master's degree from PSU in 1976. She 
conducted graduate work in the library at Emporia State 
University as well. 

Higher education libraries, like most other depart- 
ments on campus, have changed enormously since 
Martin came aboard in the mid-1970s. 

"An obvious change is the use of computers." 



Martin said. "But I think it's the students who have 
become so much more sophisticated in their knowledge 
that they bring to the library, in what they know and 
expect." 

Martin always has prided herself in being student- 
oriented. She'll miss them the most. 

"I'm going to miss my contacts with the students 
and the whole educational atmosphere," Martin said. 
"I've been in it all my life." 

Changes in the delivery methods of faculty through 
the years also has kept Martin adjusting. 

"I've worked a lot more with faculty to meet their 
needs professionally," she said. "The profession has 
changed so much." 

Martin has two daughters, Sara and Lori, and two 
grandsons. Sara became a fourth-generation educator in 
the family and recently completed 15 years in Unified 
School District No. 465 in Winfield. 

Martin's three sisters and one brother also are edu- 
cators. Her oldest sister has been a kindergarten teacher 
for 37 years, while other sisters are in Denver and 
Louisville, Ky. Her brother has been on the staff at KU 
for 30 years. 

Travel also is in Martin's plans during retirement. 

"I'm booked up until the first of the year," she said, 
"then I'll see what my options are. It will be what I want 
to do, not what I have to do." 






CAMPUS IMPROVEMENTS 




The student lounge inside the Nelson Student Center has been named "The Jungle." 

Nelson Student Center remodeled 



After more than a year of plan- 
ning and preparation, the remodeling 
of the student lounge inside the 
Nelson Student Center was complet- 
ed in time for the fall 1999 semester. 
Actual construction began June 1 . 

Terri Morrow, associate dean of 
development and college relations, 
said three private donors funded the 
nearly $75,000 project. Part of an 
estate gift from the late Bea Wright, 
a donation by the Stauffer 
Foundation and The Arkansas City 
Traveler, and a gift from Clay 
Lemert provided all of the necessary 
funds for the project. 

"We hope it will be a fun place 
for students to come and study, meet 
with friends or to catch up on their 
favorite soap opera." Morrow said. 

Architect for the project was 
Charles Thoma of Arkansas City. 
Paul Schneider Construction of 
Arkansas City was the primary con- 
tractor for the project. He used sev- 
eral local sub-contractors for a vari- 
ety of jobs. 

More than a year ago, the 



Student Government Association at 
the college brought the idea of mod- 
ernizing the lounge to fellow stu- 
dents and to the administration. 
Damon Young of Arkansas City, then 
SGA president, spearheaded the stu- 
dents' efforts. SGA surveyed hun- 
dreds of students, asking what they 
wanted in a lounge. 

"They were very creative." 
Morrow said of the students' ideas. 
"They were very interested in creat- 
ing a fun, friendly place to gather." 

Art student Tiffany Todd from 
Oxford constructed and painted a 
rendition of what the project might 
look like. College officials showed 
the model to prospective donors as 
well as the architect. 

A project committee was 
formed and chaired by Maggie 
Picking, vice president of student 
affairs at Cowley. Once the commit- 
tee agreed on an overall plan, con- 
struction began. 

One of the biggest changes to 
the area was the removal of a wall 
separating the old lounge from the 



game room. With that wall gone, the 
area looks roomier and inviting. 

Six restaurant-style booths with 
tiffany lighting have been installed 
on the east wall, and a big-screen tel- 
evision will sit in the southwest cor- 
ner of the room. A snack bar also is 
being built. The room also will have 
couches and chairs as well as card 
tables and chairs. 

"Hopefully there will be a cof- 
fee set-up of some kind," Morrow 
said. She added that vending 
machines with juice, water and other 
beverages also will be in the room. 

Work by Cowley art students 
will be displayed on the north wall, 
while permanent artwork and photo- 
graphs will be on the east wall near 
the booths. 

"This project wouldn't have 
been possible without the generosity 
of the three donors," Morrow said. 
"We are extremely grateful. And 
we're proud that this idea from the 
students has become a reality." 

Dedication ceremonies were 
held Sept. 9. 




INSTITUTIONAL FUND-RAISING 



Second Annual Great Cowley 
Duck Dash a smashing success 

Corporate sponsors demonstrated 
their aquatic skills, people cheered for 
small, plastic ducks, the food was out- 
standing and the atmosphere . . . Well, you 
just had to be there. 

On May 15, 1999, the Second Annual 
Great Cowley Duck Dash was held at 
Spring Hill Farms northeast of Arkansas 
City. The land is owned by Carolyn and 
Robert Langenwalter. It offers the perfect 
setting for duck races, fellowship, and a 
gourmet picnic. 

The event raised nearly $11,000. 
That money will go to the Endowed 
Scholarship Fund at the college. 

Terri Morrow, associate dean of 
development and college relations, was 
pleased with the turnout and the amount 
raised. 

"People are just amazing," Morrow 
said of donors to the college. "I can't say 
enough about the generosity of hundreds 
of individuals and businesses. The 
College Endowment Association has been 
blessed with so much support. Fd like to 
thank everyone who helped make this 
event such a tremendous success." 

Ducks were $20 each or six for $ 1 00. 
Those who purchased ducks were 
assigned numbers, which were written on 
the bottom of small, colored plastic 
ducks. Several heats of ducks were 
dumped into a small stream at Spring Hill 
Farms. The winners of each race then 
raced one last time to determine the win- 
ner. 

Jim Wheatcroft of Winfield was the 
owner of the winning duck. He won 
$1,500 cash for winning. 

A gourmet picnic of smoked prime rib and all the trimmings was held following the race. 

An added twist this year was a spirited competition between businesses. About a dozen entries competed in the 
corporate races. Allen's Furniture and Carpet of Arkansas City had the winning duck and received the traveling 
"Dashing Drake Award." Long & Neises CPAs of Winfield captured the Duckorating Contest. 

Corporate sponsor Jim Sybrant had water up to his neck as he tried to maneuver his duck. And Allen Herman of 
Allen's Furniture and Carpet also displayed his water skills. 

"I think everybody had a great time," Morrow said. "There were a lot of creative ducks in the corporate race. It 
was nice to see the businesses take the race so seriously, and yet still have fun with it." 




Numbered plastic ducks make their way down the stream at Spring 
Hill Farm during the Second Annual Great Cowley Duck Dash. 



OUTSTANDING TIGER ALUMNI 




Outstanding Tiger Alumni for 1999 were Rod Elder, left, and Logan McCabe. 

Grads from '72, '38 honored by college 



Rod Elder and Logan McCabe were honored May 8, 
1999, as recipients of the Outstanding Tiger Alumni 
Award. They were honored during commencement exer- 
cises in W.S. Scott Auditorium. 

Summer Olympic appointment 
highlight for '72 grad Elder 

He admits he lacked focus his first time at Cowley 
College, but things have turned out nicely for Rod Elder. 

The 1972 graduate of Cowley has spent his career as 
an architect, designing schools and accommodating the 
disabled. His experience ensuring that structures meet 
Americans with Disabilities Act requirements earned 
him an appointment to the Paralympic Games in Atlanta 
in 1996. 

"1 didn't know what I was doing when I went to 
Cowley," Elder said. "I hadn't planned well." 

Elder graduated from Arkansas City High School in 
1966 and enrolled at Cowley that same year. He attend- 
ed for two years but had no direction, so he enlisted in 
the U.S. Navy in 1968. He saw active duty until 1971 and 
went into the Naval Reserves. He went back to Cowley 
in the fall of 1971. 

"I had less than a stellar performance those first two 
years at Cowley," Elder said. "There's a lot of kids right 
out of high school who don't know what they want, and 
that's the way I was." 



During his second stint at Cowley, Elder remembers 
accounting instructor Catherine Goehring fondly. 

"I failed her accounting class the first time (in 
1966)," Elder said. "I didn't do any work. I came back 
and took her class again and got an A. She was a super 
lady. I don't think she ever knew that I thought of her that 
way." 

Elder earned a bachelor's degree in architecture in 
1977 from Kansas State University, and a bachelor's in 
construction from KSU a year later. During that time he 
was inducted into Sigma Lambda Chi, the construction 
science honorary society. He had finally figured out 
which direction to take. 

His appointment to work with the Paralympic 
Committee in Atlanta was a result of his experience in 
the Navy. 

"I had been commanding officer of a Navy con- 
struction battalion in Louisiana and they (Olympic 
Committee) were looking for a Naval Reserve com- 
mander with construction management experience and 
accessibility experience," Elder said. "There were only 
two or three of us with that combination, and they select- 
ed me to fill the job in Atlanta." 

His orders forced him to miss 1 8 months of work at 
his job in Topeka as architect for the Kansas Department 
of Education. But Elder said it was an interesting assign- 
ment. 

See Alumni, Page 16 




OUTSTANDING TIGER ALUMNI 



I 




Alumni 

from page 15 

"Initially it was supposed to be a position assisting 
the Olympic Committee and the Paralympic Committee 
with accessibility issues," he said. "But it got to the point 
where the Olympic Committee was far enough along that 
they felt they didn't need the service any more. The 
Paralympic Committee needed the assistance." 

Today. Elder realizes his appointment to Atlanta 
would not have materialized had it not been for his mili- 
tary background. 

His responsibilities with the Navy have limited his 
community involvement. Still, Elder does what he can. 
He served as a youth baseball coach for six years and was 
on the board of directors for the Youth Baseball 
Association of Topeka for two years. He also volunteered 
as a coach for youth bowlers at Gage Center Bowl in 
Topeka. 

Elder's experience as an architect took him from a 
firm in Harlingen, Texas, to Salina, and to Wichita. In the 
late 1970s, when he worked in Texas, the company was 
one of the largest school architectural firms in the state. 
In Wichita, Elder worked for what is now PBA 
Architects, a firm that primarily designs schools. He left 
there in 1986 to become architect for the State 
Department of Education. 

McCabe revolutionized 
laundry business 

Logan McCabe never dreamed he'd one day patent a 
machine that would change the way large linen supply 
companies do business. 

But he did. 

McCabe, a 1938 graduate, has enjoyed much suc- 
cess since moving to Lubbock. Texas in 1949. Now he 
can add another honor to his list of accomplishments. 

McCabe. who was 81 on May 19, literally stumbled 
onto the laundry scene. The owner of a building McCabe 
was renting for his wholesale magazine distributing busi- 
ness approached him one day. 

"How'd you like to be in the laundry business?" 
McCabe recalls being asked. "I told him I didn't know 
anything about it." 

But he would learn quickly, because not long after 
that conversation, the home office for magazine distrib- 
uting in Dallas called. 

"I got one of those notices from Dallas that I hadn't 
done something right," McCabe said. "I wrote my letter 
of resignation and went in with a partner in the laundry 
business." 

Primarily, the company had military contracts, pick- 
ing up sheets for U.S. Air Force bases in Texas and New 
Mexico. The company was picking up, washing, and tak- 
ing back a million sheets annually, McCabe said. It was 



a lot of work, work that could be lessened with the cor- 
rect machine. 

"I decided if I could reduce the labor where the 
sheets were ironed, and so forth, I could control that bid 
with the military," McCabe said. 

The result was the McCabe Spreader-Feeder, a 
machine he had patented in 1966. 

"It was the only one in the world when I invented it," 
McCabe said. "We went through a drastic modification 
in the late 60s or early 70s and we repatented it." 

McCabe's customers included large linen supply 
companies to those that rented linens. Military bases as 
well as the Veteran's Administration purchased most of 
the machines. McCabe had more than 200 machines 
built. The purchase price was $12,000 delivered and 
installed. 

"I had my own transport and I delivered (machines) 
all over the United States and some to Alaska. Germany, 
and Japan," he said. "I had a patent in seven foreign 
countries, but not Japan. You couldn't get a patent there." 

Logan McCabe was born and raised on a farm five 
miles northwest of Geuda Springs, one of five children of 
Marion Douglas McCabe and the former Ruth Quinn. 
McCabe was the only one of his siblings to attend col- 
lege. He studied psychology at ACJC. 

"I knew I wanted to go to college, and I had to work 
while I went to school," he said. "I drove the bus that 
hauled football and basketball players, the band, track 
teams to different places. I got maybe $5 a week. But it 
took care of my tuition." 

After graduating from ACJC, McCabe went right to 
work for MS News Co. of Wichita, a wholesale magazine 
distributing company. 

"I worked for them until the manager wanted me to 
cheat, so I told my dad," McCabe said. "And that was all 
that job amounted to." 

American News Co. heard McCabe was available, 
so the company hired him. He worked there until he 
entered the U.S. Army in 1942, where he served as a mil- 
itary police officer. Somewhere along the line, McCabe 
switched to the U.S. Air Force, serving most of his time 
in Panama. He was a staff sergeant in the Air Force. 

Once back from the service, McCabe was trans- 
ferred by American News Co. from Wichita to Houston, 
where he worked for the next 18 months. 

In 1940. McCabe married Louise Vandever, who 
attended ACJC in 1937. The couple will be married 59 
years on Nov. 10. Logan remembers the courtship well. 

"She had a job and had a car, too." McCabe said of 
Louise. "You talk about up-town. She was making $10 a 
week and took out a dime for Social Security. She taught 
me how to dance. I didn't know one foot from the other." 

The McCabes grew to become quite a team. They 
raised three children, Doug 49, Stan 46, and Marianne 
40. Stan has taken over running the company. 

"My son's machine makes mine look like a horse 
and buggy," McCabe said. "It's still No. 1 in the world." 



ENROLLMENT 



Full-time enrollment sets mark 

More than 1 ,900 FTE recorded in Spring 1 999 



The college set a full-time equivalency enrollment 
record for spring semesters with more than 1,900 stu- 
dents in spring 1999, according to figures released by 
registrar Forest Smith. 

Smith's 20th-day report from Feb. 15, 1999, the 
official reporting day to the state for budgeting purposes, 
indicated that 1,912.77 students were enrolled full-time. 
It was the first time ever Cowley surpassed the 1.900 
FTE mark for a spring semester. 

"Our continued effort to provide classes for business 
and industry and to provide classes on a schedule that 
meets the needs of our students has had an impact," said 
Conrad Jimison, Cowley's dean of instruction. "That and 
our new methods of delivery." 

In the fall of 1998, the college began offering tele- 
courses to students, where they could either tape classes 
via KPTS Channel 8 or rent the course tapes. More than 
100 students enrolled. In the spring of 1999, that number 
swelled to nearly 170. 

"It's important to offer classes when and where stu- 
dents can access them," Jimison said. 



While on-campus enrollment for the spring was 
slightly down, off-campus was up 6 percent. The 
Southside Education Center in Wichita was up 26 per- 
cent from spring 1998 and has seen significant enroll- 
ment increases since its first spring of 1996 when just 
7.80 FTE were enrolled. 

Another boost came from Cowley's partnership with 
Wolf Creek and Flint Hills Technical College in 
Emporia. Cowley taught nondestructive testing courses 
there and had 24.4 FTE in spring 1999. That program 
began in the fall of 1998. 

The spring statistics indicated that Cowley had 
589.5 more credit hours than it did in the spring of 1998. 

Other statistics from Smith's report: 

• There were 975 Cowley County residents regis- 
tered for classes at the college in spring 1999. 

• Forty-six counties in Kansas, 15 other states, and 
12 foreign countries were represented in the student 
body. 

• 17 students from foreign countries were enrolled. 



Briefly Speaking 



New Microsoft NT instructor hired 

By Kristen Martinez 

Public Relations Office 

A new program to train people to become certified 
Microsoft NT instructors began in November 1998 at the 
Southside Education Center in Wichita. 

Charles Myers was hired to teach the new Microsoft 
NT program at the center. The first 1 1 -month program 
was scheduled to wrap up in October 1999. 

According to Myers, students enjoy the time off that 
a one-week-on, one-week-off class schedule allows. The 
program is concentrated training, but it is expanding to 
other areas, according to Conrad Jimison, dean of 
instruction. 

Out of the 500 students who signed up, approxi- 
mately 180 students were enrolled in fall 1999. More stu- 
dents signed up than the college could accommodate. Of 
the six classes offered, the school asks for a commitment 
in at least four. After completing all six classes, a student 
will earn a certificate from Cowley. The classes also 
count for 15 hours toward an associate's degree in com- 
puter information systems. When a student completes the 
program, he or she is qualified to set up and maintain 
Microsoft-based networks. 

According to Myers, this program teaches life- 



changing skills. This is a course that can be taken right 
out of high school, and most of the students would not be 
attending college otherwise. Adults who already have a 
career can come back to school to change their career. In 
fact, three of Myers' students completed their master's 
degrees with him, but are now changing their careers 
later in life. 

This program is being taught all over the country at 
two- and four-year schools and in some high schools. 
The decision to add this program was made by the insti- 
tution after requests from business and industry. 

"There was definitely a perceived need for this train- 
ing in our area. We are filling a need, a niche in the mar- 
ket that needs filled," Jimison said. 

This program has become extremely popular. 
According to Myers, at one Midwest college, where pre- 
enrollment is not allowed, students start forming a line to 
enroll at three in the morning. 

"The job outlook is huge; there are 1 ,300.000 jobs 
open with a shortage of qualified workers." Myers said. 

This program will draw a lot of students to Cowley 
who would probably not otherwise be attending college, 
because of the specific nature of the program, he said. 
Myers said that he does not anticipate any slow-down in 
the interest in the program. 




NEW BOARD OF REGENTS 



Board of Regents takes over 
higher education coordination 



Bv Kristen Martinez 



Public Relations Office 

A piece of legislation naming the Kansas Board of 
Regents as the coordinating body for all institutions of 
higher learning in the state passed in 1999. The Board 
now is in charge of coordinating universities, colleges, 
community colleges, and vocational-technical schools. 

According to Sid Regnier, vice president of business 
services at Cowley, this change will benefit all the 
Kansas institutions of higher learning. This change 
should eliminate duplication and make the transition 
from high school to college and from community col- 
leges to four-year universities much smoother. 

Dr. Pat McAtee, president of the college, agrees. 

"I feel very optimistic about the new system," he 
said. "I think that ultimately the students will get a better 
deal. I also feel that this will be beneficial to the state of 
Kansas. I think that this change will help to hold higher 
education more responsible and accountable." 

This change in coordination should not cause any 
major, noticeable changes to the students, McAtee said. 
One of the standards that universities will be judged on 
is the core indicators. When the students show success in 
these areas of importance, the school can receive more 
funding. Schools will be rewarded on how well they 
work for the citizenry. 

"Of course, we will see some short-term frustra- 
tions, and we will have to work out the kinks and tweak 
the system," McAtee said. "But we can learn from what's 
working." 

There is a new nine-member board. Three of the 
members will make up a coordinating council, three for 
community colleges and vocational-technical schools, 
and three for four-year universities. 

"I think that the change to place all of higher educa- 
tion under one coordinating body will be good," McAtee 
said. "I am very optimistic. This change will make com- 
munity colleges and vocational-technical schools a legit- 
imate player in higher education. We will be able to bet- 



ter articulate between colleges, communication, and 
research. 

"Now universities, community colleges, and voca- 
tional-technical schools will be able to share ideas and 
resources. We will all start rubbing shoulders and take 
from the best of the best. We can learn from the things 
that universities do well and they can, in turn, learn from 
the things that community colleges do well, such as serve 
the people better and respond to the people's needs. This 
change should make us all better; we will be working in 
the same direction for what is best for the students." 

According to McAtee, the overall fears that accom- 
pany this change are that the universities will see com- 
munity colleges as "junior" colleges, just preparing stu- 
dents to transfer to universities. A second fear is that 
community colleges will lose their ability to respond to 
the needs of the community and industry. 

A funding bill also is being sent to the Legislature 
for approval. The current funding set up is not favorable 
to community colleges, especially Cowley. Some of the 
things that are now a part of the funding have been over- 
looked, but the state is working on changes. The way the 
new suggested bill is designed, more state funding will 
become available; however, it will not be available until 
the fall of 2000. 

According to Regnier, Cowley is supportive of the 
changes made to the funding bill. These changes not only 
will be beneficial to Cowley, but also to taxpayers. This 
funding will help offset the funding paid by the counties 
and offer property tax relief to Cowley County residents. 

As of right now, the county pays $24 per credit hour, 
and the state also pays $24 per credit hour. If the bill 
passes, in fall of 2000 the county will pay $16 and the 
state $32, eventually lowering the county's contribution 
to nothing by increasing the state's contribution by $8 
per year over four years. The amount of funding would 
be $2.4 million over four years, meaning $600,000 per 
year. 



H9 



NORTH CENTRAL ACCREDITATION 



College applies for reaccreditation 

NCA site visit set for February 2000 



By Kristen Martinez 



Public Relations Office 

Nearly two years ago, Cowley 
became the first community college 
in the nation to be asked to conduct a 
special emphasis self-study toward 
reaccreditation. 

And as the 1998-99 academic 
year drew to a close, the college was 
inching closer to having completed 
that study. 

The purpose of the North 
Central Association of Colleges and 
Schools Self-Study is to get Cowley 
reaccredited for the next 10 years. 
Cowley was first accredited in 1975 
and its last 10-year accreditation was 
in 1989. 

The purpose of the self-study is 
not only to be reaccredited but it also 
serves as a self-improvement process 
for the college, according to 
Michelle Schoon, biology instructor 
and Natural Science Department 
chair. 

According to Connie Bonfy, 
director of institutional grants and 
humanities programming, Cowley is 
progressing very well with the work 
for the study. Bonfy was chosen to 
be the lead writer of the report. She 
said a final draft was expected to be 
ready for the printer by Nov. 1 , 1999. 
It likely will be sent to NCA in mid- 
November. 

Cowley's special study centers 
on total quality management and 
continuous improvement. For years, 
business and industry has used the 
practice to improve products and 
services. Cowley began TQM/CI 
training and practices in 1990. 

Cowley's study, Bonfy said. 



"By being the first school presenting this topic, we will 
serve as a model for other two- and four-year schools that do 
self-assessments. This is something that is totally new; it is 
an honor for Cowley." 

Connie Bonfy 
Director of Institutional Grants & Humanities Programming 



likely will help NCA shift its think- 
ing from traditional self-studies to 
those that are more beneficial to the 
institutions. 

"By being the first school pre- 
senting this topic, we will serve as a 
model for other two- and four-year 
schools that do self-assessments," 
Bonfy said. "This is something that 
is totally new; it is an honor for 
Cowley." 

The team that is writing the 
study began collecting data nearly 
two years ago. It finished the first 
phase in May 1999. 

After the Feb. 7-9. 2000. site 
visit, the Self-Study Report and the 
Team Report will be reviewed by a 
Reader's Panel and/or by a Review 
Committee that meets with represen- 
tatives of the institution and the 
team. Then a decision about the 
accreditation will be made by the 
Commission. 

Some required, general infor- 
mation is being integrated into the 
May draft, Bonfy said. Also, the col- 
lege is beginning the annual assess- 
ment process. 

"Before the site visit, we still 
have to collect the reference material 
used to write the paper," Bonfy said. 



According to the "Accreditation 
of Higher Education Institutions: An 
Overview," there are five criteria for 
accreditation. They are: 

Criterion 1: The institution has 
clear and publicly stated purposes 
consistent with its mission and 
appropriate to an institute of higher 
education. 

Criterion 2: The institution has 
effectively organized the human, 
financial, and physical resources 
necessary to accomplish its purpos- 
es. 

Criterion 3: The institution is 
accomplishing its educational and 
other purposes. 

Criterion 4: The institution can 
continue to accomplish its purposes 
and strengthen its educational effec- 
tiveness. 

Criterion 5: The institution 
demonstrates integrity in its prac- 
tices and relationships. 

The North Central Association 
also assesses such characteristics as 
governance and administration, 
financial condition, admissions and 
student personnel processes, institu- 
tional resources, and relationships 
with outside communities. 



H9 



Y2K COMPLIANT 



College anticipates no problems 
when new millennium arrives 



When Saturday, Jan. 1, 2000 arrives, Charles 
McKown will be at his computer, further testing all of the 
data changes he and his staff have made to Cowley's sys- 
tem. 

McKown, director of computer services, said he and 
his staff have been working to get the college Y2K com- 
pliant since early 1997. The nearly two-year process 
wrapped up just before Christmas 1998. 

"The problem with Y2K is not that the changes are 
difficult, it's just that there are so many of them that have 
to be made." said McKown, in his eighth year at the col- 
lege. "There are tens of thousands of programming 
changes that need to be made. It's inevitable that some- 
thing is going to get missed. But it only takes a couple of 
seconds to fix it." 

The reason for the Y2K problem dates back to the 
1970s. McKown said that when computers were first 
being built and when databases were becoming popular, 
people did everything they could to squeeze out as many 
digits as possible. Thus, the six-digit year-month-day 
sequence was born. 

"It was just the way human beings used to write 
dates." McKown said. "And if they could save some 
space by eliminating two digits, they did it. Today, it's 
hard to fathom trying to eliminate two digits. We don't 
even worry about that. 

"In 1982, the company I worked for sold a comput- 
er that had 4K of memory and two nine-inch floppy 
drives and it sold for $30,000. Memory and disk space 
was so expensive." 

Since computers read dates as numbers, when the 
year 2000 arrives, the machines would treat the 00 digit 
as if it were the year 1900, not the year 2000. Computers 
that have been brought up to compliance will make room 
for two more digits, thus recognizing that the year 2000 



is larger than the year 1999. 

McKown said the process is time consuming. 

"You have to restructure your database to make 
room for the two extra digits." he said. "They are all fixed 
lengths. And now you're asking it to squeeze two char- 
acters into the middle. All of your reports are going to be 
wider. You have to transfer all of the data out of the old 
structure and into the new structure." 

McKown spent many weekends at the college doing 
just that. For instance, each major database function at 
the college would take an entire weekend to transfer. 

"I came in and got the computer working on it," he said. 

Date-based calculations, McKown said, are the com- 
puter functions most critical for the change. Anything 
life-threatening, obviously, but also the banking industry 
uses date-based calculations extensively. 

"If we miss one, the report won't be lost, it will just 
look different," McKown said. "For instance, in our tran- 
script printing program, if we missed changing it, the 
transcript report would show a student's most recent 
semester attended, rather than the oldest one. Most of the 
ones we're going to know whether we missed them." 

McKown has conducted live tests of the databases. 

"I don't anticipate any serious problems here or any 
other place in the world," McKown said. "I'm not going 
to take any vacation around Christmas, but we're going 
to be OK at the college." 

On the mother board of a computer rests a basic 
input-output system chip. If a BIOS chip is not upgrad- 
ed, the computer will shut down when it turns over to 00. 

"The computer only works on a certain date range, 
and when it gets to the year 2000, that's out of its realm," 
McKown said. "There is a patch to update the BIOS chip 
so that the computer has enough smarts to not shut 
down." 



Briefly Speaking 



i 




Improvements made 
to Southside Center 

The remodeling project that began at the Southside 
Education Center during the 1998-1999 school year fin- 
ished for the fall of 1999. 

Expansion included the addition of 1 1 new class- 
rooms and two MCSE (Microsoft Certification Systems 
Engineer) labs. Southside also expanded the number of 
computers in the learning labs from 10 to 18, which was 
necessary to accommodate the 130 students enrolled in 
the learning labs during the fall of 1999. 

Enrollment during the fall of 1999 was at a record 



high of 445 full-time equivalencies in 122 classes. The 
enrollment for the fall of 1998 was 322 FTE and the 
spring of 1999 was 348 FTE. 

Southside also added some new positions, including 
Charles Myers, director of computer technical education, 
and Mia Allen, instructor for computer and business 
technology. There also were two notable promotions: 
Sarah Wesbrooks became the Cowley's coordinator at 
Southside, and Sheree Utash was promoted to associate 
dean of northern campuses and director of the Southside 
Education Center. 

The MCSE program was added, and an A Plus Plus 
certification program from Microsoft will be added soon. 



INSTITUTIONAL GRANTS 



College receives third TRIO grant 



By Kristen Martinez 



Public Relations Office 

Cowley received its third federal 
Trio grant last year in the Upward 
Bound program. 

Upward Bound is part of a four- 
year, $800,000 grant to provide 
intensive services to juniors and sen- 
iors in high school. Career develop- 
ment, tutoring, college preparatory 
skills, and much more will be 
offered. 

The heart of the program is to 
help potentially successful students 
who are at-risk for not going to col- 
lege go to college because of disabil- 
ity, low income, etc. According to 
Connie Bonfy, director of institu- 
tional grants, Cowley's goal is to 
provide the tools necessary for stu- 
dents to become more successful, 
improve their grade-point average. 



complete high school, and attend 
post-secondary schooling. 

This program offers life skills, 
not just remediation. Summer camp, 
cultural events, visits to a variety of 
campuses, special speakers, and 
other events that these students 
would not otherwise have the oppor- 
tunity to participate in will be avail- 
able. 

According to Maggie Picking, 
vice president of student affairs, hir- 
ing of staff was to take place in early 
fall 1999. Before hiring of staff can 
begin, Cowley will have an opportu- 
nity to revise its objectives and per- 
sonnel, because it did not receive the 
exact amount of funding it request- 
ed. 

Upward Bound was expected to 
begin sometime during the fall 1999 
semester. Students may be enrolled 



Briefly Speaking 



by mid-year, Picking said. 

Upward Bound has the capacity 
to enroll between 40 and 50 students. 
Selection of students is based upon 
objective criteria that includes 
grades, financial need, and participa- 
tion from siblings in other Trio grant 
programs. Interviews and more 
extensive work will take place after 
the initial phase. 

The first of the Trio grants 
Cowley received was Student 
Support Services, which is the col- 
lege's College Access, Retention and 
Excellence program. The second 
grant funded was Talent Search, 
which enrolls 600 students. The 40 
or 50 students that enroll in Upward 
Bound will have the same amount of 
funding available to them as the 600 
Talent Search students, so the pro- 
gram will be more intensive. 



Alvin Ailey, 'Christmas Carol,' 
Three Dog Night entertain 

Legendary rock group "Three Dog Night," the 
Nebraska Theatre Caravan's "A Christmas Carol," and 
the renowned Alvin Ailey Repertory Ensemble high- 
lighted the 1998-99 cultural arts offerings at the college. 

Three Dog Night, one of the hottest rock bands of 
the late 1960s and early '70s, entertained on Oct. 31, 
1998, in W.S. Scott Auditorium before a packed house. 

The Nebraska Theatre Caravan performed 'A 
Christmas Carol" before a sold-out audience in the 
Robert A. Brown Theatre on Dec. 1, 1998. 

The Alvin Ailey Repertory Ensemble performed in 
the Robert Brown Theatre on April 20, 1999. The per- 
formance was part of Cowley's Heartland Arts Series. 

The Ailey Ensemble is well-known throughout the 
world for innovative American dance. The Ensemble was 
created in 1974 by Mr. Ailey to help the most talented 
students in the Ailey school make the leap from 
studio to stage. It is considered one of the most out- 
standing components of the Alvin Ailey American Dance 
Center. 

The 1999 tour and New York season will highlight 
a company premier: "Nightscape," an evocative and 
graceful work that captures the beauty of a bird's life. 



The Repertory Ensemble features a diverse selec- 
tion of works by distinctive artists, ranging from Chinese 
choreographer, Shen Wei's highly theatrical "Last 
Montage" to Tony Award winner Lar Lubovitch' hypnot- 
ic and rigorous "Marimba." The company also per- 
formed a major Ailey work called "Escapades," a love 
story set to a score by jazz legend. Max Roach. 

Since its inception, the Ensemble has won critical 
praise for its national tours and residencies at major uni- 
versities. Jennifer Dunning of the New York Times 
describe their performance this way, "By now the vibran- 
cy and accomplished dancing of the Alvin Ailey 
Repertory Ensemble should come as no surprise. But the 
the group outdid itself in a performance that stood out for 
its artistry and sophistication." 

In addition to the full performance April 20, the 
Repertory Ensemble gave a free school show for USD 
470 students and to young area dancers on April 19. 

The Ailey performance residency was sponsored by 
Mid-America Arts Alliance, which is a nonprofit region- 
al arts organization assisted by the National Endowment 
for the Arts, its six partner state agencies and private con- 
tributions. The Heartland Arts Series also is underwrit- 
ten by the Home National Bank and the Kansas Arts 
Commission, a state agency. 




DISTANCE EDUCATION 




Nancy Jolley and son Kris enjoy the convenience of taking college courses in a comfortable environ- 
ment — their home. Both enrolled in the same telecourse during the spring 1999 semester. 

Telecourses an alternative form of delivery 



By Kristen Martinez 



Public Relations Office 

Telecourses, a new method of course delivery, are 
gaining popularity at Cowley. 

The classes are broadcast on KPTS Channel 8 in the 
early morning hours, so most students tape the classes. 
Also, tapes are available in the library and the outreach 
centers. Students must meet with the instructor five to 
seven times during the semester. There are a number of 
times that are necessary to meet state requirements. 

The cost per credit hour is $55. This includes fees 
and tuition, but does not include textbooks or other mate- 
rial. 

One hundred and twenty students were enrolled in 
the fall of 1998 and 160 students in the spring of 1999. 
There were seven classes offered in the fall and spring 
semesters. Three were offered in the summer. 

Students who took telecourses during 1998-99 were 
overwhelmingly women ages 30-45, working, and/or 
stay at home mothers, according to statistics compiled by 



LeArta Watkins, director of distance learning. 

Many of the students need just three more hours to 
fill the requirements for a scholarship or a Pell grant. 
This type of learning environment works well for some 
students, Watkins said. This method of teaching offers a 
convenient way for some students to work. It fits into 
their busy schedules and offers much scheduling flexibil- 
ity. 

According to surveys conducted by Watkins, most of 
the students enjoyed this type of learning environment. 
Some of the students even suggested other classes they 
would like to see offered. There were very few with- 
drawals from the courses. 

"We must be doing something right," Watkins said. 
"I see many familiar faces and names. Some of the stu- 
dents take more than one class at a time." 

Of the seven classes offered for the Spring of 2000, 
three are returning classes: sociology, intermediate alge- 
bra, and literature. The four new classes are manage- 
ment, ethics, geography, and speech. 



I 




NEW BOARD MEMBERS 



Gregg, Watson elected to Board 

Godsey elected to second term 



Name: Ron Godsey. Age: 50. 

Hometown: Independence, Kan. Has lived in 
Winfield, Kan., for 35 years. 

Education: Cowley County Community College 
(1979). 

Personal: Married to wife Donetta for 31 years this 
fall. Daughters Kelli 29, and Gina 23 and four grandchil- 
dren. Kelli and Gina both graduated from Cowley. 

Employment: Currently staff accountant at William 
Newton Memorial Hospital, Winfield. 

Background: Moved to Winfield in 1964. His father 
worked for Safeway and he was transferred to the 
Winfield store when Ron was a junior in high school. 
Ron began work at William Newton Memorial Hospital 
in 1 973 in the store room as a clerk. 

Community Service: Has been heavily involved 
throughout his adult life. Currently serves as chairman of 
the Board of Trustees at Cowley. He also is president of 
Healthcare Financial Management Association, the 
Sunflower Chapter. He is a former president of The 
United Way in Winfield and has been a member of 
Rotary, the Winfield Chamber of Commerce, and 
Winfield Optimists. 

Decision to Re-file: "I felt I've learned a lot the first 
term. I'm starting to get the hang of things and would 
like another four years. And it's payback. Cowley's given 
me a lot, and I'd like to give back to the college and all 
the great people down here. It's a quality institution." 

Name: Lee Gregg Jr. Age: 5 1 . 

Hometown: Arkansas City, Kan. 

Education: Emporia State University ( 1974, bache- 
lor of science degree in accounting. Certificate work in 
personal financial planning at Wichita State University. 

Personal: Married to wife Susan for 28 years in 
May. Daughter Diana 22, son David 15. 

Employment: Gregg & Simmons Chartered, certi- 
fied public accountants and financial planners. Ark City. 

Background: Vietnam veteran. Served four years in 
the U.S. Navy. Has owned his own business in Arkansas 
City since 1976. 

Community Service: Served eight years on the City 
Commission of Arkansas City (mayor twice); served on 
the Strother Field Commission six years (chairman 
once); on the Ark City Industries Board of Directors; 
member of Rotary; involved in economic development in 
Cowley County as a facilitator of the Cowley County 
Economic Development Agency steering committee. 

Decision to File: "I was encouraged by two other 
Board members to consider filing. Having been out of 
public office for nearly six years now, I kind of missed 
having involvement in public service. The college looked 
like an excellent opportunity. It is a college organization 




Gregg 



Watson 



that really has done extremely well in recent years. It 
looked like an opportunity for me to provide some pub- 
lic service to that institution." 

Name: Virgil Watson Jr. Age: 46. 

Hometown: Arkansas City, Kan. 

Education: Cowley County Community College 
( 1972), University of Kansas ( 1974, bachelor of science 
in education). University of Kansas (1976, master's 
degree in public health and administration). 

Personal: Was married to wife Jacqueline for 27 
years. She died in June 1999. Daughters Camela 26. 
Angela 25, and Shawna 23, son Virgil Watson III 20. One 
grandchild, Monet Sue Gabriel Watson 3. 

Employment: Currently serves as administrator of 
Sumner County Hospital District 1 in Caldwell, a posi- 
tion he's held since May 1996. 

Background: Earned a scholarship out of Arkansas 
City High School in 1970 to play basketball at Cowley, 
where he was in the Black Student Establishment. 

Earned a masters in public and health administration 
from KU. After an internship at Arkansas City Memorial 
Hospital, he remained at the hospital, now known as 
South Central Kansas Regional Medical Center, until 
1985. After three years in another position, he went back 
to ACMH as director of human resources. 

Community Service: Has worked with the National 
Association for the Advancement of Colored People 
when it was in operation in Arkansas City, has served as 
secretary for the Human Relations Council, was secre- 
tary for the Northwest Community Center board, has 
worked with the educational committee for the Church of 
God in Christ, and is currently on the Caldwell Area 
Hospital and Health Foundation Board of Directors. 

Decision to File: "I think I always get inspired the 
same time we have our Martin Luther King Celebration. 
He was an activist and involved in community affairs. To 
help make changes and make your community grow and 
prosper, you have to be active. I can't preach, I can't sing. 
But I have a gift in working with people in providing 
organizations leadership." 




ATHLETIC ACHIEVEMENTS 



From Philadelphia to Kansas 

Smith becomes Cowley's first female basketball All-American in 10 years 



, 




Ayeshia Smith didn't know what she was getting 
herself into. 

She grew up in Philadelphia, and saw herself con- 
tinuing her basketball career at a university close to 
home. 

Then she came to Kansas for a visit. 

"(Former players) Moneeke (Bowden) and Brandi 
(Harris) made it real comfortable when I was here visit- 
ing," Smith said. "They didn't lie to me at all. They told 
me there wasn't a whole lot to do, but that the Jayhawk 
Conference had a good reputation." 

Bowden and Harris were a pair of California prod- 
ucts Cowley head women's coach Darin Spence inherit- 
ed for the 1997-98 season. They both came from metro- 
politan areas to rural Kansas to play basketball at 
Cowley. They both helped Smith make the transition 
from the big city to the slower pace of Arkansas City. 

Smith averaged 17 points and 7 assists per game as 
a high school player for Merion Mercy Academy. She's 
the school's all-time leading scorer. 

During the 1998-99 season. Smith was outstanding, 
earning All-Jayhawk Conference and All-Region VI hon- 
ors for the 29-4 Lady Tigers. Her post-season accolades 
were capped when she was named a third-team All- 
American by the National Junior College Athletic 
Association, becoming the first female basketball player 
at Cowley to earn All-America honors since Shannon 
Russell in 1989. 

But Smith, the eldest daughter of Dorothy Smith and 
John Smith, is most proud of another accomplishment. 

"I was on the Dean's Honor Roll last semester (fall 
1998) with a 3.8 grade-point average," said Smith, a 
communications major. "I've never gotten four As and a 
B before. Maybe in grade school. I'm really happy about 
that 3.8." 

It's especially gratifying since Smith fell short of the 
minimum SAT score needed to be admitted to some four- 
year schools back East. Even though Cowley wasn't in 
her initial plans, she's glad it all worked out. 

"A lot of colleges were interested in me," she said. "I 
had two boxes full of mail. But I didn't make my SAT 
scores. I really didn't want to go to a junior college, and 
this (Cowley) came up two to three weeks before school 
started. It's been a good thing." 

Simply put. Smith was a winner at Cowley. She 
helped the Lady Tigers to a 32-2 record and No. 8 nation- 
al ranking as a freshman. During 1998-99, Smith helped 
Cowley to a 29-4 record and its second consecutive 
Jayhawk Conference East Division title. Spence is grate- 
ful for Smith's contributions to his program. 




Ayeshia Smith became Cowley's first female All- 
American basketball player since 1989. 

"The most important thing is she came in with me in 
my first recruiting class here and helped us put this pro- 
gram back on the national level," Spence said. "We fin- 
ished number eight last year and number 20 this year 
(1998-99). She's helped put Cowley back to the forefront 
in women's basketball where it belongs." 

Smith was sought by Houston, South Alabama, 
Colorado State, and Hartford before settling with the 
University of Southern California. Spence says Smith is 
a good fit for USC's program. 

"They've got a good team back and they needed 
someone to run the show for them like we did here," 
Spence said. "At that level, she'll be more of a true point 
guard. Here, she was more into scoring. USC's program 
is traditionally one of the richest in the country. They 
have more players in the WNBA than any other college 
program." 

Smith credits coaches Spence and assistant Todd Q. 
Clark for molding her into the player she has become. 

"They had to deal with me my first year," Smith 
said. "I wasn't used to the intense conditioning. They got 
me through it and it paid off. 

"Cowley has changed my overall outlook toward 
patience, studying, and my attitude." 

Smith will leave Cowley with her name etched into 
the recordbooks. She scored 996 career points to place 
her third on Cowley's all-time charts. She averaged 16 
points per game last season. 



ATHLETIC ACHIEVEMENTS 



Baseball 

Overall record — 39-2 1 . 
Conference record — 27-7. 
All-Conference players — 

Pitcher Ray Leyba was named 
Freshman of the Year. He was joined 
on the first team by Tyler Bodin, 
Jason Patty, Clint Stoy, and Steve 
Jennings. Honorable mention honors 
went to Aaron Robbins, Jeff 
Freeman, and Matt Rutledge. 

Highlights — The Tigers cap- 
tured their fifth consecutive Jayhawk 
Conference East Division title. 

Basketball, Men's 

Overall record — 16-16. 
Conference record — 1 2-6. 
All-Conference players — 

Danai Young was named to the third 
team. 

Highlights — Young and 
Martin Palmer made Cowley's sin- 
gle-game scoring charts. Palmer 
scored 36 points on Feb. 27, 1999, 
against Kansas City to tie him for 
19th on the all-time list, while Young 
scored 35 points on Dec. 9, 1998, 
against Pratt to tie him for 20th 
place. 

Basketball, Women's 

Overall record — 29-4. 
Conference record — 17-1. 
All-Conference players — 

Ayeshia Smith earned first-team 
honors, as did teammate Trinetta 
Moore. Petra Hoffman was named to 
the second team. 

All-Region VI players — 
Smith, Moore, and Hoffman. 

All-America players — Smith 



earned third-team All-American 
honors. 

Highlights — Darin Spence's 
Lady Tigers won their second con- 
secutive Jayhawk Conference East 
Division title. Spence's team is 61-6 
during the last two seasons. Smith, 
who earned third-team All-America 
honors and is now a point guard for 
the University of Southern 
California, ended her Cowley career 
as the third all-time leading scorer 
with 996 points. 

Golf 

Highlights — Rex Soule's 
Tigers finished sixth in the Jayhawk 
Conference and competed in the 
District III Tournament in Pueblo. 
Colo. The Tigers failed in their bid to 
qualify for the national tournament 
in Dothan, Ala., for a second consec- 
utive season. 

Softball 

Overall record 13-12. 

Conference record — 29-3. 
All-Conference players — 

Sandy Erickson was named the 
league's most valuable player. 
Joining her on the All-Jayhawk first 
team were Jill Hutchinson, Jackie 
McChristian, Michelle Ideker, and 
Lindsay Meng. Second-team honors 
went to April Merritt, Jenny Wolff, 
and Kim DeRoin. 

All-Region VI players — 
Erickson and Merritt earned first- 
team honors. Hutchinson. Ideker. 
Meng, and McChristian were named 
to the second team. Wolff earned 
honorable mention honors. 



Highlights — Coach Ed 
Hargrove earned coach of the year 
honors in the Jayhawk East as his 
team set a school single-season 
record for victories with 43. The 
Lady Tigers' 29 conference victories 
in a single season also established a 
record. 

Tennis, Men's 

Highlights — The Tigers fin- 
ished tied for sixth at the national 
tournament with 1 3 points. It was the 
Tigers' 11th consecutive national 
tournament appearance under Larry 
Grose. 

Tennis, Women's 

Highlights — Andre' Spence's 
Lady Tigers possessed more overall 
talent than a year ago, but still 
missed out on a trip to the national 
tournament after finishing a distant 
third at the Region VI Tournament. 
Cowley scored 18 points at the tour- 
nament and got a runnerup finish 
from Melissa Collogan at No. 1 sin- 
gles. 

Volleyball 

Overall record — 24-28. 
Conference record — 13-5. 
All-Conference players — 

Megan Quilty. Kellie Wolfe. 
Miranda Harris, Selena Shippy. 
Tiffany Davidson. 

All-Region VI players — 
Quilty. 

Highlights — The Lady Tigers 
finished third in the Jayhawk East 
behind Johnson County and Kansas 
City. 



, 




ENDOWMENT ASSOCIATION 1998-99 DONORS 




Mr. and Mrs. Sid Achenbach 

ADM Milling Co. 

Bart Allen 

Allen's Furniture & Carpet 

Dr. and Mrs. Norberto Alvarez 

American Business Women's Association 

American General Finance, Inc. 

American Legion Auxiliary Unit #18 

Andreas & Muret. L.L.P. 

Warren D. Andreas 

Mildred Andrews Memorial Scholarship 

Annie Foundation 

Steven W. Archer 

Ark City Clinic, P.A. 

Ark City Country Mart, LLC. 

Ark City Glass Company, Inc. 

Ark City Tumbleweeds 

Ark Valley Credit Union 

Ark Valley Physical Therapy Inc. 

Ark Veterinary Associates 

Arkansas City Area Arts Council 

Arkansas City Chamber of Commerce 

Arkansas City Music & Drama Club 

Arkansas City Rotary Club 

Arkansas City Traveler 

Rod and Jody Arnett 

Joe and Donna Avery 

Albert Bacastow Sr. 

Albert and Karen Bacastow 

Theresa Baldi 

Lucien Barbour 

Barbour Title Company 

Becker Tire Company 

Belle Plaine Community Foundation 

Belle Plaine United Methodist Church 

James and Judith Bernhardt 

Beta Sigma Phi-City Council 

Beta Sigma Phi-Gamma Theta Chapter 

Billings Plumbing & Bath Boutique 

John W. and Lisa Bishop 

Leon R. Blass 

Blockbuster Video 

The Boeing Company 

Mr. and Mrs. Bob Boggs 

Dane Bonfy 

Devon and Connie Bonfy 

Dick and Dolly Bonfy 

Bea Boory 

David Bostwick 

Boyer Educational Trust 

Marietta Brammer 

Bill and Debbie Bridges 

Melburn Porter Brown 

Robert and Jana Brown 

Roger and Suzanne Brown 

Brown's Office Supply 

Bryant Hardware and Collectables 

Fred and Carol Bunting 

Darren and Carolyn Burroughs 

David and Vicki Burroughs 

Business & Professional Women 

Buterbaugh & Handlin 

Jim Byers 

Caldwell High School Alumni Association 

Caldwell Lions Club 

Phil and Gloria Campbell 

Robert L. Campbell 

Carpenter & Vickers Trust 

Earl D. Carter 

Catholic Community of Wellington 

Cedar Vale Booster Club 

Central States Orthopedic Specialist 

Century 2 1 Advantage Realty 

Don and Velma Cheslic 

Marilyn D. Childers 



Citizen's Scholarship Foundation 

City of Arkansas City 

Todd Q. Clark 

Bill Clayton 

Albert and Audine Clemente 

Ben and Irene Cleveland 

Gene and Donella Cole 

Commerce Bank 

Commercial Federal Bank 

Conco, Inc. 

Conoco. Inc. 

Anthony Conrad 

Cowley County Community College 

Francis Cox 

Dr. Lynn A. Cramer 

Steven L. Cranford 

Harold R. Crawford 

Tony Crouch 

Bruce Crouse 

Mike and Sue Crow 

D & S Retail Liquor. Wine & Beer 

Daisy Mae's Cafe 

Jim and Rae Dale 

Kirke Dale Scholarship Trust 

Dane G. Hansen Foundation 

Roger A. Darst 

Ruth A. David 

Walter and Iris David 

David's Electronics & Appliance 

Dr. Lynda B. DeArmond 

Dan and Lin Deener 

Delta Kappa Gamma-Upsilon Chapter 

Marilyn Denny 

Derby First Presbyterian Church 

Derby Kiwanis Club 

Derby-NEA/Oaklawn Area Breakfast 

Dillons Store #38 

DiVall Retail Liquor 

William and Judy Docking 

Meredith Docking 

Donna's Designs, Inc. 

Pam Doyle 

Terry D. Dubach 

Dug Out Club 

Mr. and Mrs. C.T Dumenil 

Buel R. Duncan 

Diana Sue Duncan 

Dustin Pfannenstiel Memorial Scholarship 

Lyle and Terry Eaton 

Edward D. Jones Company 

Eggleston Educational Trust 

Elite Advertising 

Barbara Elkins 

Christine E. Elliott 

Stephen and Janet English 

Enterprise Communications Company 

Equitable Life Assurance Society 

Doug and Dejon Ewing 

Eleanor S. Farrar 

John S. Farrar 

David G. Faust 

Robert and Lois Fencil 

First Baptist Church of Ark City 

First National Bank of Winfield 

Flint Hills Girl Scout Council 

Foster's Furniture, Inc. 

J. Leslie Foust 

Mr. and Mrs. Phillip Foust 

Curtis and Cynthia Freeland 

Ronald R. Froese 

Tim and Karen Fuchs 

Ebbert Eugene Funk 

Galaxie Business Equipment. Inc. 

Gambino's Pizza 

General Electric Fund 



General Federation of Women's Clubs of Kansas 
Ed and Margaret Gilliland 
Kenneth and Bonnie Gilmore 
Dan and Vicky Givens 
Taeko Givens 
Ron and Donetta Godsey 
Mr. and Mrs. J.G. Goff 
Cliff and Pam Goggans 
Gordon & Assoc. Architects, P.A. 
Gordon Piatt Energy Group. Inc. 
Grace United Methodist Church 
Grasshopper Trust 
Graves Drug Store 
KayLynn Gray 
Great Western Dining. Inc. 
Lee A. Gregg Jr. 
Greif Bros. Corporation 
Steve and Cindy Grimes 
Larry and Nyla Grose 
Michael and Jndi Groves 
Phil and Joyce Groves 
Allen and Beverly Grunder 
Hallmark Motor Inn 
Ed and Linda Hargrove 
Steve and Carol Hearne 
Cloide and Hazel Hensley 
Mr. and Mrs. Allen Herman 
Hilary File Memorial Scholarship 
Bill and Jean Hill 
John and Janice Hitchcock 
Don and Carol Hobaugh-Maudlin 
Kim and Cynthia Hocker 
Marjory Hodkin 
Michael B. Holland 
Jim and Joyce Holloway 
Dr. Angela Holmes 
Home National Bank 
Mr. and Mrs. Charles Hopkins 
Bill and Carol House 
Luella Hume 
Douglas and Patti Hunter 
Harold Hutchens 

Hutchinson Community Foundation 
Hutchinson Electric, Inc. 
Mr. and Mrs. Norman Iverson 
Jan's Sport Shack 
Jarboe Scholarship 
Jarvis Accounting & Tax Service 
Mark Jarvis 

Ronnie and Anita Jenkins 
Jerry's Donut Shop 
Conrad and Janet Jimison 
Hubert and Mildred Johnston 
Danny and Sandy Jones 
Mark and Stefani Jones 
KAN-OKLA Telephone Association 
KG&E — Western Resources 
KSOK/KAZY 
Kansas Arts Commission 
Kansas Board of Regents 
Kansas Humanities Council 
Kappa Kappa Iota-Alpha Iota Chapter 
Kay Dawn Kautz 
Marvin and Linda Keasling 
Keefe Printing & Office Supply 
Ellen L. Kelly 
James E. Kelly 
Duane Ken- 
Mary Kerr 
Oscar Kimmell 
Dr. and Mrs. Nick Kinsch 
Dr. Paul A. Klaassen 
Missy Kloxin 
Anthony and Mary Korte 
Jeff and Julie Kratt 



ENDOWMENT ASSOCIATION 1998-99 DONORS 



Joseph and Jan Krisik 

Kwik Kar 

LaDonna L. Lanning 

Ric and Becky Lassiter 

Clay Lemert 

Marcia L. Lemert 

Donna Lester 

Warren L. Lewis 

Lila Wallace — Reader's Digest Fund 

Lindly TV & Appliance. Inc. 

Local 1004 IUE-AFL-CIO 

Long & Neises CPA's Chartered 

Mr. and Mrs. J.C. Louderback 

Jonathan and Dianna Lough 

Scott and Rhoda MacLaughlin 

Rodger and Melba Maechtlen 

Jerry B. Malone 

Dick and Marilyn Marrs 

Rex and Bea Marsh 

Tom Mast 

Daniel T. McAtee 

Dr. and Mrs. Patrick McAtee 

McDonald's 

Dan and Sue McGowan 

Gina McKown 

Merle Snider Motors, Inc. 

Mid America Arts Alliance 

Mid Atlantic Arts Foundation 

Mid-America Lumbermens Association 

Midwest Electric Supply, Inc. 

Mr. and Mrs. Jim Miesner 

Dr. Max Miller 

Mary Jane Mills 

Olive Milner 

Mr. Robert A. Moffatt 

Monsanto Fund 

Patricia L. Moreland 

Norman and Sue Morris 

Otis and Terri Morrow 

Multimedia Cablevision 

Munson-Austin Agency 

National Endowment for the Arts 

The Navajo Nation 

Navajo Public Schools 

Margaret Neal 

Joe and Patty Neises 

Lee Nelson 

Luella Nelson 

Newkirk O.E.A. Education Association 

Craig Newman 

Ninnescah Manor, Inc. 

Randy and Debbie Nittler 

Jason and Shannon O'Toole 

Peter and Jeanette Oesterlin 

Dr. and Mrs. Jerry L. Old 

Orscheln Farm & Home Supply 

The Osage Nation 

Stu Osterthun 

Our Lady of Guadalupe Alter Society 

Oxford Community Bank 

Oxford High School 

Oxford Lions Club 

Neal and Anna Mae Paisley 

Ada Margaret Palmer 

Terry L. Pameticky 

Parks, Inc. 

Parman, Tanner, Soule & Jackson, CPA 

Peggy Paton 

Paton Wholesale & Vending Co. 

Don and Wilda Patterson 

Billy J. Patty 

Personal Finance Co.. Inc. 

Philip E. Phillips 

Eddie and Maggie Picking 

Ponca Tribe of Oklahoma 



Post Rock Gas, Inc. 

Potter's Liquor Store 

Thomas L. Prichard, CPA 

Jim and Jan Pringle 

Puritan Billiards 

Quail Ridge Golf Shop 

Quality Auto Sales 

Jim and Karon Ramirez 

Ramona Munsell & Associates 

Ramsey's Auto Parts, Inc. 

Ranson Capital Corp. 

Raytheon Matching Gifts 

Reedy Ford 

Regency Court Inn 

Sidney and Sharon Regnier 

Dr. and Mrs. Glen Remsberg 

Returning Student Organization 

David Rhoades 

Rindt-Erdman Funeral Home 

Marvin and Wilma Roady 

Paul N. Rogers, D.D.S., PA. 

Dr. and Mrs. David Ross 

Mrs. Gail Ross 

Steve and Melinda Ross 

Rubbermaid-Winfield, Inc. 

S and Y Industries. Inc. 

Tom and Sue Saia 

Mr. and Mrs. James Salomon 

Dan and Lois Sampson 

Santa Clara Unified School District 

Dr. Stan Sawyer 

Mr. and Mrs. David Schaller 

Dr. and Mrs. David Schmeidler 

Roger and Deb Schmidt 

Dr. and Mrs. Rick Schoeling 

Michelle Schoon 

Larry Schwintz 

Frederick D. Seaton 

Sedan Alumni Association 

Al Sehsuvaroglu 

Dr. and Mrs. John Seitz 

Seminole Drug 

Robert J. Shaw 

Sheldon's Pawn Shop 

E.W. "Bud" and Lauretta Shelton 

Wanda Shepherd 

The Sheppard Foundation 

Mr. and Mrs. Loyal Shields III 

Henrietta M. Shingleton 

Wayne and Sandy Short 

Joe and Mindi Shriver 

Dale and Isobel Smith 

Eldon and MayBelle Smith 

Forest and Sandra Smith 

Smith Machine Works, Inc. 

Dr. and Mrs. Newton C. Smith 

R. Randy and Pamela Smith 

Smyer Travel Service, Inc. 

Jean and Ellen Snell 

Dr. and Mrs. Daniel Snowden 

Rex Soule 

Mr. and Mrs. Roy Soule 

South Central Kansas Chapter— KSCPA 

South Haven Teacher's Association 

Southwestern Bell Foundation 

Jim and Margaret Sowden 

Sparkle Car Wash 

Sparks Music Store 

Rose Spurrier Scholarship Fund 

St. John's College Alumni Association., Inc. 

Mrs. Audra Stark 

State Bank of Winfield 

Stauffer Community Foundation 

Mr. and Mrs. James Steinbacher 

Kent C. Steiner 



Mike and Marisa Steiner 

Helen Storbeck 

Dennis and Joanna Stover 

Tad and Janice Stover 

Lawrence and Martha Stover 

Dr. and Mrs. Rod Stoy 

Ken and Carol Strobel 

Doug Suddock 

Summit Auto World 

Sumner-Cowley Electric Coop. Inc. 

Larry Swaim 

Betty Syb'rant 

Linda L. Sybrant 

System Design Consultants Inc. 

Taylor Drug 

Fred and Marilyn Taylor 

Dave and Naomi Thompson 

Mr. and Mrs. EL. Thurman 

Topeka Jazz Workshop, Inc. 

Richard and Nancy Tredway 

George Trimble Scholarship Trust 

The Trust Company of Kansas 

Two Rivers Co-Op 

Tyler Production Inc. 

Steve and Connie Tyler 

Union State Bank 

United Agency 

United Transportation Union 

United Tribes of KS & SE Nebraska 

Universal Steel Buildings 

USD #331— Kingman 

USD #470— Arkansas City 

David and Sheree Utash 

Valley Co-Op, Inc. 

Valu-Line 

Mr. and Mrs. Bob Viola 

Chris Vollweider 

Barbara Wagnon 

Waldeck Oil Co. 

Waldorf-Riley, Inc. 

James and Loretta Waldroupe 

Caroline Newman Warren 

Dr. Joan Warren 

Mabel Warren 

Randall and LeArta Watkins 

Dr. Aaron T. Watters 

Webber Land Company 

Connie Wedel 

Wellington Chapter ET P.E.O. 

Wellington First Christian Church 

Wellington Senior High School 

The Wheat State Telephone Co., Inc. 

Bob and Patricia White 

Dale B. White 

Wichita 1st United Methodist Church 

Virginia Jane Wilkins 

Willis Corroon Corp. 

Mary N. Wilson 

Rodney and Priscilla Wilson 

Winfield Chiropractic Office 

Winfield Consumer Products. Inc. 

Winfield First Baptist Church 

Winfield First Presbyterian Church 

Winfield First United Methodist Church 

Winfield Motor Co.. Inc. 

Winfield Pharmacy 

Winfield Publishing Co., Inc. 

Wood Chiropractic 

Woods Lumber of Arkansas City 

Beatrice Wright Estate 

Bob and Sue Yoachim 

Mr. and Mrs. Paul Young 

Youth Entrepreneurs of Kansas 

Zeller Motor Company. Inc. 




<i 



£ Cowle 



y 



Bottom Line '99 

COWLEY COUNTY COMMUNITY COLLEGE 
& AREA VOCATIONAL-TECHNICAL SCHOOL 



If you believe in the 
community college 
concept, let your state 
representative know. 

Elected Officials 

Governor 

Bill Graves 

Second Floor 

State Capitol 

Topeka, Kansas 66612 

Senator 
Greta Goodwin 
Winfield, Kansas 67156 

Representatives 
Joe Shriver 
Arkansas City, Kansas 
67005 

Judy Showalter 
Winfield, Kansas 67156 

State Board Member 
Dr. Steve E. Abrams 
Arkansas City, Kansas 
67005 



Financial aid help for 
Cowley County Students 

For the 1999-2000 year, 
more than 1,000 Cowley 
County students were 
awarded more than 
$2 million in grants, 
loans, scholarships and 
work-study programs. 



* 




Your Investment 

• $3,477,005 in 1997 taxes. $3,439,260 in 1998 taxes. 

• Taxes DO NOT pay for scholarships to out-of-state athletes. 

• The College is fifth in size among the 19 community colleges in 
Kansas. 

Your Return 

• $14 million a year added to the local economy. For each dollar 
of local tax support received, the College returns $5.03 to the 
county's economy. That return is greater when the total picture 
of the state is considered. For every dollar spent by the state in 
support of community colleges, $22.43 is returned. 

• $5,768,948 annual payroll, providing 140 full-time jobs and 557 

adjunct faculty positions. 

• Educational opportunities for all segments of the population at 
less than half the cost of four-year colleges. Average student 
age is 31.6 years. 

• A record full-time enrollment for the fall of 1999 of 2,097.7 
total FTE. 

• Graduates who, according to a study by the University of 
Kansas, suffer less transfer shock than any other group of 
transfer students. 

• Customized training for more than a dozen businesses and 
industries. 

• A significant attraction for businesses and industries 
considering relocation in this area. 

• Cultural, educational and athletic events which entertain 
audiences throughout this area. 

• An educational institution well known for the quality of its 
programs in both liberal arts and vocational/occupational 
areas. 

Honors & Awards 

• In the fall of 1999, Cowley was presented the Kansas Excellence 
Award, the highest award presented to organizations by the 
Kansas Award for Excellence Foundation. The Level III award 
was presented to the college during the fourth annual banquet 
in Overland Park on Oct. 19, 1999. 



(^ Cowle 



y 



At-a-Glance '99 

COWLEY COUNTY COMMUNITY COLLEGE 
& AREA VOCATIONAL-TECHNICAL SCHOOL 



Mill Levy: 22.847 

Fact 

Of the 19 community 
colleges in Kansas, 
Cowley has the 7th 
lowest mill levy in the 
state at 22.847, and 
has the eighth highest 
county valuation of 
$162,157,352. At $42 
per credit hour for 
tuition and fees, 
Cowley boasts one of 
the lowest tuitions in 
the state. 



Enrollment Figures: 

Facts, Fall 1999: 

High School 404 

Freshmen 1,661 

Sophomores 901 

Special 507 

Total Headcount .3,473 
Total FTE 2,097.7 

Approximately 60% of 
freshmen and sopho- 
mores enrolled in 
Kansas colleges are in 
community colleges. 



Current Valuation: 

Fall of 1999 - 

$162,157,352 

Budget: 

$16.2 million 

Employees: 

140 full-time faculty, staff 
and administration 

557 part-time faculty, staff 
and students 



Founded: 1922 

In 1968, the College became the first school in the state to combine a 
traditional liberal arts transfer curriculum with a program of area 
vocational-technical school training. 

President: 

Dr. Patrick McAtee, Ph.D., became the third president of the College on 
July 1, 1987. 

1999 Fall Enrollment: 1999 Spring Enrollment: 

2,097.7 Full-Time Equivalency (record) 1,912.77 FTE (Record for 

spring) 

3,473 Total Headcount 3,398 Total Headcount 

Programs: 

33 Certificate and Applied Science programs 

42 Liberal Arts/Transfer programs 

Institute of Lifetime Learning - a model Senior Citizens program 

More than 100 specialized programs and seminars offered through the 
Institute for Lifetime Learning - Special Programs Office, the Displaced 
Homemaker/Single Parent Program, and the Work and Family Program. 

Specialized training for business and industry to meet their needs. In 
the past the College has developed or offered programs for Cilliland 
Printing, Inc., General Electric, Rubbermaid-Winfield, Gordon-Piatt Energy 
Group, Inc., the city of Arkansas City, local school districts, day care centers, 
local nursing homes, special education co-ops, KSQ Blow/molding, Social 
Rehabilitation Services, Southwestern Bell Telephone, Montgomery 
Elevator, Boeing-Wichita, Cessna, and the Business and Industry Division of 
Banks. 

Facilities: 

14 buildings on a 10-acre campus in the heart of downtown Arkansas 
City. 

Outreach Centers in Mulvane, Strother Field, Winf ield, Wellington and 
Wichita, where a cooperative partnership between Cowley County 
Community College, Wichita State University, and Wichita Area Technical 
College has formed the Southside Education Center. Courses also taught at 
these area high schools: Argonia, Belle Plaine, Caldwell, Cedar Vale, 
Conway Springs, Dexter, Oxford, South Haven, and Udall. 

Athletics: 

Eight intercollegiate sports that compete in the Kansas Jayhawk 
Conference's East Division. Volleyball, Men's Basketball, Women's 
Basketball, Baseball, Softball, Golf, Men's Tennis, and Women's Tennis. 

The Tiger baseball team won its fifth consecutive Jayhawk Conference 
Eastern Division crown in 1999, going 27-7. The Tigers won the National 
Junior College Athletic Association World Series in 1997, going 53-11, and 
again in 1998, going 54-9, becoming the first Kansas school to win back-to- 
back IMJCAA baseball championships. 



Endowment Association Assets: 

June 30, 1999 assets of $1,736,615 
449 Members 



* 




I 




, 




Cowle 



COWLEY COUNTY COMMUNITY COLLEGE 

& AREA VOCATIONAL-TECHNICAL SCHOOL 

125 S. Second St., Arkansas City, KS 67005 

www.cowley.cc.ks.us • 800-593-2222 



President's Annual 



vmz 




Student 
of the Year 

Amanda Anstine 



Students: 

AGO wins state championship 
Collegiate Press Awards 



Students of the Month 

faculty: 

Hatfield wins national award 
Schoon named Endowed Chair 
Master Teachers 
Gagejloreland, Eaton Retire 

athletics: 

Tiger Athletic Hall of Fame 

College Hews: 

College passes MA Rearrreditation 
Record Enrollments 



Nelson Student Center - The Jungle 
Bookstore -Keiud Improved 




2j 

? 



Hello, and welcome to 
another edition of The 
President's Annual 
Report, an informative 
piece that documents the pre- 
vious academic year. 

The 1999-2000 year for 
Cowley was filled with many 
noteworthy accomplishments, 
as you'll read about in this 
issue. Not only did the college 
continue to succeed as an insti- 
tution of higher education, but 
its students, faculty and staff 
also earned awards and made 
significant contributions to the 
organization. 

Certainly, a highlight aca- 
demically occurred in April 
when the Academic Excellence 
Challenge team, under the out- 
standing leadership of sponsor 
Chris Mayer, captured the first 
AEC state championship in 
school history, rallying from 
the loser's bracket for a 
remarkable finish. That effort 
personified Cowley's entire 
year. 

Sophomore Amanda 
Anstine, who served as our 
Student Government 
Association president, graces 
the cover of this issue. Like so 
many outstanding students 
before her, Amanda excelled in 
the classroom and in every 
activity she was involved. 

An organization is only as 
good as its people. With that in 
mind, our Staff Development 
Team implemented an 
Employee Recognition 
Program, and 72 employees 
were honored for at least five 
years of continuous service to 
Cowley during a reception in 
March. 



Dr. Patrick -I. ilrUee 

Message 
from Ihe 
President 

"An organization 
is only as good 
as its people." 




The college itself was rec- 
ognized in October 1999 when 
it received the Kansas 
Excellence Award, Level III, 
the highest award presented 
by the Kansas Excellence 
Award Foundation. And in 
February, we hosted three 
evaluators representing the 
North Central Association of 
Colleges and Schools during a 



three-day site visit. And I'm 
pleased to report that the col- 
lege received the maximum 10- 
year reaccreditation from NCA. 

While enrollment in fall 
1999 and spring 2000 set all- 
time records, Cowley also con- 
tinued to grow physically. A 
new bookstore was built from 
the ground up in only about 
three months, and a Workforce 
Development Center at 
Strother Field became a reality 
when our existing Business 
and Industry Institute building 
was remodeled. 

And last, but certainly not 
least, our athletic teams 
enjoyed much success during 
the past year. Both basketball 
teams, baseball and softball 
teams captured Jayhawk 
Conference Eastern Division 
titles, and both tennis teams 
and the golf team qualified for 
nationals. And so did our 
Tigerette Danceline. 

As you can see, we truly 
are blessed here at Cowley. So 
sit back, relax, and enjoy read- 
ing about the many wonderful 
things that took place at 
Cowley last year. And rest 
assured that we will try even 
harder next year to be the 
best community college in all 
the land. 

Sincerely, 

Dr. Patrick J. McAtee 

President 




President's Inniial llrpurt 1S99-2000 I 



The President's Annual 




Amanda Anstine, 
Student of the Year 



Retirement: Terry Eaton, 
Ruene Gage and Pat Moreland 
say good-bye to Cowley. 



The Cowley Academic 

Excellence Challenge team 

wins the state championship. 



Cowley employees honored 
for years of service. 




17 



1999-2000 outstanding 
faculty/staff achievements. 




Kansas Associated 
Collegiate Press Awards 



Master Teacher awards 
from the National Institute 
for Staff and Organizational 
Development. 




i 




Five Cowley students receive 
$1,000 scholarships from 
Wichita State University. 




North Central Association 
site visit team recommends ti 
college be reaccredited. 



11 



Michelle Schoon, biology 

instructor and Natural 

Science Department chair, 

named Endowed Chair for 

Teaching Excellence and 

Student Learning. 




Students perform well at 
state VICA Skills Olympics. 






Cowley receives top 

award from the 

Kansas Award 

for Excellence. 




K 



12 



Two Cowley students named to 
All-Kansas Academic Team. 

2 Cowley College 19S9-2000 



Elvin Hatfield, head of the 
criminal justice program, 
named Dickie Workwear's 
American Worker of the Year. 




College bookstore redeaux. 




A unique partnership: 

the Workforce Development Center. 




Cowley accepted into the 
Microsoft Certification and 
Mentoring program. 





Artists in residence 
get to know Cowley County. 



Departments 

1 Message from the President 

n Board of Trustees 

5 Administrative Team 

6 Students of the Month 
Enrollment Chart 





Fall, Spring semesters 
bring record enrollment. 




Tiger Athletic Hall of Fame inductees. 

Ml, 






1999-2000 outstanding 
athletic achievements. 

This annual report was 

produced by the Office of Public Relations, 

Stu Osterthun, director, 

Rex Soule, graphic artist. 



Endowment Association Donors 
Cowley at a Glance 

The Bottom Line 



Cowley's Mission statement 

Cowley College is an open access 
institution seeking to empower students 
with the skills necessary to compete and 
perform on a world class level. We are 
committed to providing our students 
and our community a thriving environ- 
ment for learning excellence, personal 
enrichment, and enhanced quality of life. 



Presidents Annunl Report 1999-2000 



&<2 



&*2 




Board off trustees 



Donna Auerg 
Albert Bacaslow dr 
Ron Bodseg 



Lee Gregg dr. 

LaDonna Lanning 
If irgil Watson dr 









a limhliillw 1390-2000 



Yhe Administrative f cam 

Seated left to right: 

Sheree Utash, Associate Dean of North Campuses 
Stu Osterthun, Director of Public Relations 
Maggie Picking, Vice President of Student Affairs 
Gene Cole, Associate Dean of Business and Industry 



Standing, left to right: 

Tom Saia, Dean of Administration/Director of Athletics 

Conrad Jimison, Vice President of Instruction 

Terri Morrow, Dean of Development and College Relations 

Marilyn Dill, Associate Dean of Instruction 

Patrick McAtee, President 

Charles McKown, Dean of Research and Technology 

Sid Regnier, Vice President of Business Services 

Tony Crouch, Associate Dean of Business Services 



so 




2000 



■z-. 



5^ 




I'l I iilli'!!i' 1999-2000 



Student off the Year 




Amanda Anstine, a computer science and 
math major from Geuda Springs, was 
presented the Outstanding Student of 
the Year Award on April 12, 2000, 
during Cowley's annual Honors & Awards 
Banquet in the Earle N. Wright Community 
Room. 



e© 



r© 
r© 



Approximately 180 people 
attended the event, which 
highlighted students' academic 
and extracurricular accom- 
plishments during the 1999- 
2000 academic year. 

Anstine, the daughter of 
Betty and Gary Anstine, was 
president of the Student 
Government Association at 
Cowley last year, and was a 
member of Phi Theta Kappa, 
was a Student Ambassador, 
and has maintained a 4.0 
grade-point average each 
semester. She also was a mem- 
ber of the college's Peers 
Advocating Wellness for 
Students, and held a student 
position on the Quality 
Leadership Council and 
Student Affairs Committee. 



She also was a member of the 
North American Limousine Jr. 
Association. 

Anstine is a big sister in 
the Big Brothers/Big Sisters of 
Cowley County, served as a vol- 
unteer freshman volleyball 
coach at Arkansas City High 
School, and is a member of 
Sacred Heart Catholic Church 
in Ark City. 

She and fellow student 
Scott Keltner of Medicine 
Lodge were Cowley's represen- 
tatives on the All-Kansas 
Academic Team for 2000. 

Maggie Picking, vice presi- 
dent of student affairs at 
Cowley, praised Anstine for her 
leadership and involvement. 

"She's always smiling, has 
a friendly hello, or just asks 



how you are doing when you 
see her on campus," Picking 
said. "She's been a true asset 
to our campus as a student and 
is someone who will always 
remember her educational 
goals began at Cowley College." 

Anstine received several 
awards during the banquet. 
Besides being named Student 
of the year, she was awarded 
for being named March 
Student of the Month for the 
second consecutive year. She 
also received an honor cord for 
being an Honor Graduate, and 
received awards for being a 
Student Ambassador and for 
serving as SGA president. 



President's Annual Report 1999-2000 



IH Team 



Captures state championship 



tec 



as 

ST 
^5 



Chris Mayer, the 
Social Science 
Department 
instructor at 
Cowley College with 
the intriguing 
accent, was confi- 
dent from the out- 
set. 




llrmlirrs of Hir II I Stale I liaiiipiiiiisliii) Team 
Luke Lockwood, iiimlly sponsor Chris Bayer. 



rl Dai id Barclay, Lnri Kiibinsnn, Scan Sanbon 



c_ 



But what his Academic 
Excellence Challenge team of 
four students proceeded to 
accomplish during the two-day 
state tournament was beyond 
even his expectations. 

Cowley's AEC team won 
the state championship in 
April 2000 for the first time in 
school history. 

"To be perfectly honest, it 
was more than I ever expect- 
ed," said Mayer, in his second 
year as a member of Cowley's 
faculty. "I knew they would do 
well. I knew they would place. 
But when they took it all, 
maybe we all were a little sur- 
prised." 

Cowley's team of Sean 
Sanborn, freshman from Cedar 
Vale; David Barclay, sophomore 
from Arkansas City; Luke 
Lockwood, freshman from 
Newkirk; and Lori Robinson, 



freshman from Goddard, com- 
peted April 14-15 at Cloud 
County Community College in 
Concordia. On Friday, Cowley 
beat Independence, Kansas 
City, and Colby. Based upon its 
performance at regionals three 
weeks ago, and the point totals 
from the semifinals, Cowley 
was the sixth seed heading 
into Saturday's finals. 

On Saturday, Cowley lost 
to defending champion Cloud 
305-85, but rallied to whip 
Allen County 195-65 to elimi- 
nate the team from Iola in the 
double-elimination tournament. 
Cowley then prevailed in suc- 
cessive rounds over Barton 
County, Independence again, 
and Johnson County. Moving 
back into the winner's bracket, 
Cowley had its rematch with 
Cloud, winning twice, 135-110 
and 125-75, to seize the state 



title. Mayer sensed his team 
was ready to win it. 

"It was pretty obvious 
halfway through that first 
round who was going to win," 
Mayer said. "It was clear they 
wanted it. Their stamina is 
what blows me away. On 
Saturday, they played 10 
rounds back to back, at about 
30 minutes per round. They 
only seemed to get stronger as 
we went along." 

Mayer said the team used 
balance all year to score, which 
also helped it bring home the 
traveling trophy and the 2000 
winner's cup. Cowley also has 
the honor of hosting the next 
AEC state semifinals and finals 
in April 2001. 

The students split the 
$2,000 prize money that goes 
to the winning team. 



eiliilli'iic 1SSS-2000 



Jewspaper Students 



Earn High Honors 



Three members of the Cowley student 
newspaper, the Cowley Press, earned 
first-place awards at the 2000 Kansas 
Associated Collegiate Press Conference 
held at the Wichita Airport Hilton on April 
14-15, 2000. 



Megan Carter, a sophomore 
from Augusta, won first place 
in editorial writing for a piece 
about the college's name: 
Cowley College vs. Cowley 
County Community College. 

This is the second year in 
a row that a Cowley student 
has won first place in editorial 
writing. 

The judge's critique of 
Carter's article was that "this 
article goes to the heart of an 
issue facing two-year schools 
across the U.S., identification, 
and how one school is handling 
it. (Carter) uses research and 
examples to make her case. 
Very good effort." 

Chad Dester, from 
Herington, took first and sec- 
ond place for entries in feature 
photography for the college 
magazine, the Pulse. The win- 
ning picture was a shot of 
freshman Kristin Rice study- 
ing in her dorm room. 

Kristen Martinez-Widener, 
a sophomore from Oxford, 
earned first place in news writ- 
ing for her story on online 
textbook prices. 



"This is the first time since 
I've been here that anyone 
from Cowley has won first 
place in news writing," Dave 
Bostwick, newspaper and mag- 
azine sponsor, said. "This is a 
pretty heavily entered catego- 
ry, so it was pretty exciting 
that one of our students won 
first place. The story actually 
started out as a project for the 
news reporting class, and we 
decided to use it for the 
paper." 

The entire newspaper staff 
earned first place for interior 
page design and an accompa- 
nying story about the evolu- 
tion of the college's web page. 

Although Tricia Morgan, a 
freshman from Arkansas City, 
didn't win any first-place 
awards, she did earn second 
place, third place and honor- 
able mention for her entries in 
event photography for maga- 
zine. She also placed with some 
other pictures. According to 
Bostwick, she "won a ton of 
certificates." 



The Cowley Press also 
earned a Gold Medalist award. 
Cowley competed against the 
other 40 member institutions 
in the KACP conference, 
including community colleges, 
four-year private colleges and 
four-year public colleges. 

"The quality across the 
board is really strong," 
Bostwick said. "Almost all of 
the colleges competed this 
year." 

More than one college can 
earn the gold medal award, 
which is presented to those 
publications earning 925 out of 
1000 points. Each publication 
is given a total number of 
points out of the possible 
points. Publications are scored 
on coverage, writing/editing, 
reporting, sports, features, 
opinions, photography, 
layout/design, graphics, head- 
lines, cutlines, art/cartoons and 
advertising. Of the gold medal- 
ists, one publication is chosen 
for the All-Kansas Award, 
which is regarded by the 
judges as the "Best of Show." 
The top winner for 2000 was 
Johnson County Community 
College. 

The Cowley Press also 
earned a silver medal last year 
and won the gold medal two 
years ago. Bostwick was 
appointed KACP secretary for 
the 2000-2001 academic year. 



s« 



re 






Pffsidenfs Annual Rpparl 1939-2000 '! 



Five (tolev Students reieive 



si oou iwsu scholarships 



C3»Q 



a<2 



a*5 





Pictured (1 tor): Dr. Gerald 
Gnitaain, Jeremy Lankten. Beverlf 

Grander Jep Carter, ramy 

Sheets, lliainii' Coleman. Ilollie 

liiiliiiinn-iiiiilliiiiiiidiiliiiliiinls. 



Five Cowley College students were awarded $1,000 scholarships 
each from the W. Frank Barton School of Business at Wichita 
State University. The ceremony took place April 6 in a class- 
room in the Kerr Business Technology Building on Cowley's 
main campus in Arkansas City. 



^n 



It marks the seventh con- 
secutive year that WSU's busi- 
ness school has awarded schol- 
arships to Cowley students 
transferring in. 

Dr. Gerald Graham, dean 
of the school, and Diane 
Coleman, director of student 
records and advising for the 
school, were on hand for the 
event. 

The 2000 award winners 
are Hollie Rohmeyer of 
Goddard, Tammy Sheets of 
Douglass, Amanda Richards of 
Winfield, Jeremy Lankten of 
Winfield, and Megan Carter of 
Augusta. Carter and Lankten 
plan to major in business 
administration, while Richards, 
Sheets, and Rohmeyer all plan 
to major in accounting. 

The students are winners 
of the Center for Management 
and Development scholarships. 
The award is $500 per semes- 



ter and is renewable for the 
following year, providing the 
students meet certain criteria, 
which includes maintaining a 
minimum academic credit hour 
load and maintaining a certain 
grade-point average. The stu- 
dents also must declare a 
major in one of the areas of 
the school of business. 

Beverly Grunder, chair of 
the Business and Service 
Technology Division at Cowley, 
said she was pleased with the 
partnership Cowley had with 
the business school at WSU. 

"It's been great for our 
business students and it's been 
great for WSU," Grunder said. 

Cowley students who trans- 
fer into the W. Frank Barton 
School of Business are assigned 
an adviser at WSU. That advis- 
er also works with the stu- 
dent's Cowley adviser. The pur- 
pose, Grunder said, is to ensure 



that all credit hours taken at 
Cowley transfer to WSU. 

In order to be considered 
for the scholarship, Cowley stu- 
dents had to have a minimum 
3.0 GPA, apply to WSU, major 
in an area of business, gradu- 
ate from Cowley, and enroll in 
a minimum of 12 credit hours 
at WSU. 

Graham is happy CMD 
money is available to use for 
student scholarships. 

"We want to recruit the 
best students at community 
colleges," he said. "We told the 
colleges that we will provide 
scholarship funds if you select 
the students. This has been one 
of the most successful things 
we've done." 

The Barton School of 
Business is the largest business 
school in Kansas. Graham said 
accounting and business 
administration are the two 
most popular majors. 



lOliiuli'iliilli'oi' 1999-2000 



Students perform well ai 



state men skills Olympics 



Cowley College Vocational Industrial 
Clubs of America students enjoyed 
success during the Kansas VICA Skills 
Olympics April 5-7, 2000, at Wichita 
Area Technical College and Century II. 



Representing Industrial 
Technology VICA, the team of 
James Walker, Stacy Schalk, 
Tiffany Ramsey, Melissa Carter, 
Kayleen Metzinger, John Miller 
and Luke Yount placed first in 
the Opening and Closing 
Ceremony category, while 
Walker placed first in welding. 
Walker is from Olathe, Schalk 
and Metzinger are from 
Arkansas City, Ramsey and 
Carter are from Winfield, 
Miller is from Cambridge, and 
Yount is from Overland Park. 

Representing Cosmetology 
VICA, Dru Givens and her 
model Jana Horsch earned first 
place in the cosmetology divi- 
sion. Givens is from Arkansas 
City, while Horsch is from 
Goddard. At nationals, the duo 
placed sixth. 

Three Cowley Aviation 
Maintenance Technology stu- 
dents received their medals in 
Wichita after taking the state 
skills test on April 1 at 
Cowley's aviation center at 
Strother Field. They are Jerry 
Stover, Burden, first place; 
Bruce Stiffler, Valley Center, 
second place; and Ashley 



Ingram, Winfield, third place. 
Seven students, all from 
Cowley, took the six skills com- 
petition and the one written 
exam. The contest took approx- 
imately six hours to complete. 
Stover now qualifies for the 
national competition in June. 

Approximately 800 stu- 
dents representing VICA chap- 
ters all over Kansas competed 
in Wichita. Winners in each 
division qualified for the 
National VICA Conference 
June 27-30 in Kansas City, Mo. 
Walker, by earning two firsts 
in Wichita, competed in weld- 
ing at nationals. A replacement 
will be found for him on the 
Opening and Closing Ceremony 
team. 

"During the competition, 
you go straight from the open- 
ing ceremony to the closing 
ceremony," Walker explained. 

Walker, president of 
Cowley's IT VICA chapter, took 
a written test as well as a 
physical skills test in welding. 

All Cowley students com- 
peted in the postsecondary 
division. 



Bob Moffatt, welding tech- 
nology instructor at Cowley 
and co-IT VICA sponsor, said 
he was pleased with the way 
students competed. 

"I'm proud that number 
one, the students went and 
competed," Moffatt said. "I feel 
the students were pretty well- 
prepared in most areas. I hope 
the students use it as a learn- 
ing experience and get some- 
thing from the pressures of 
competition." 

Moffatt was proud of the 
Opening and Closing Ceremony 
team and of Walker for his 
preparation. He said the OCC 
team practiced "30 hours plus" 
to get ready for the competi- 
tion. 

Schalk is vice president of 
the local IT VICA chapter, 
Ramsey is secretary, Carter is 
treasurer, Metzinger is 
reporter, Miller is parliamen- 
tarian, and Yount is student 
advisor. 

Approximately 20 stu- 
dents—some in the secondary 
division— represented Cowley's 
IT VICA chapter. 

In cosmetology, Givens 
took a written test, did a hair- 
cut and style on a mannequin, 
then did a daytime and 
evening style on Horsch for 
her competition. Ten teams 
competed in the division. 



&<5 



J>5 



President Inniiiil Rrport 1S9S-2000 



Ittiil'iinlfiMiiilrillsiliiiiii'illii 



nll-Hansas Academic Team 







Two Cowley students were among 
the community college 
scholars honored 
Feb. 16, 2000 in 
Topeka as part of the 
2000 All-Kansas 
Academic Team. 



Amanda Anstine, sopho- 
more from Geuda Springs 
(Arkansas City High School), 
and Scott Keltner, sophomore 
from Medicine Lodge, repre- 
sented Cowley on the team, 
sponsored by the international 
headquarters of the Phi Theta 
Kappa international honor soci- 
ety, the Kansas Association of 
Community College Trustees, 
and the Kansas Council of 
Community College Presidents. 

Kansas Attorney General 
Carla Stovall saluted the stu- 
dents during a noon luncheon. 

The 42 men and women, 
ranging in age from 18 to 49, 
include not only traditional-age 
college students, but also a sin- 
gle mother of two who re- 
entered school after 13 years, a 



native of war-torn Bosnia- 
Herzegovina, a professional 
auctioneer, and a man who 
serves as a coach for disadvan- 
taged baseball players. 

The students were recog- 
nized in an annual award cere- 
mony that also draws educa- 
tors and lawmakers each year. 
Stovall served as keynote 
speaker. 

"The people nominated for 
this award represent the finest 
students that Kansas communi- 
ty colleges have to offer," said 
Thomas C. Percy, a Hutchinson 
Community College history 
instructor who serves as 
Kansas region coordinator for 
the honor society. 

Each was selected by his 
or her own community college 



for the fifth annual statewide 
academic team, and each is also 
a nominee for the 2000-year 
All-USA Academic Team, spon- 
sored by the newspaper USA 
Today, and by Phi Theta 
Kappa. 

Each student received a 
proclamation issued by Gov. 
Bill Graves, an educational 
stipend, and an academic 
medallion. 

The Kansas Regents uni- 
versities and Washburn 
University have promised to 
match the stipends with $1,000 
scholarships for those who 
transfer after completing their 
community college studies. The 
students went to the Kansas 
Statehouse prior to the lunch- 
eon, where they were given a 
tour and met lawmakers. 



12 



1399-2000 



Outstanding ■ Student 



nchieuemenfs 




tudents in Phi Beta Lambda, 
practical nursing, and science 
excelled during the 1999-2000 
academic year. 



four Cowley PBL 
studeofs qualify for 
nationals in long 
Beach 

Four students qualified for 
national competition after par- 
ticipating in the 49th Annual 
Kansas Phi Beta Lambda State 
Leadership Conference. 

Laurie Baukol, a sopho- 
more from Minot, N.D., placed 
in five events, but only partici- 
pated in economics at nation- 
als. Abby Martin, a sophomore 
from Winfield, earned first 
place in parliamentary proce- 
dure, qualifying her for nation- 
als. Pamela Hann, a sophomore 
from Sedan, qualified in human 
resource management, and 
Larry Thimesch, a sophomore 
from Nashville, Kan., competed 
in marketing. Hann served as 
1999-2000 state PBL president. 

The students qualified to 
compete at the 2000 National 



Leadership Conference, July 
13-16 in Long Beach, Calif. No 
one placed at nationals. 

Erin Pauly, a freshman 
from Conway Springs, and 
Brenda Robinson, a freshman 
from Winfield, also competed 
at the state conference, which 
took place in Salina Feb. 27-29. 

According to Beverly 
Grunder, PBL adviser and 
accounting instructor, the pur- 
pose of the conference is "to 
prepare students for successful 
careers in business." 

Grunder also added that 
she was very proud of her stu- 
dents and that they had a fun 
time in both Salina and Long 
Beach. The Cowley team won 
the Spirit Award for its enthu- 
siastic participation during the 
state conference. 

Sixty-five students from 
seven schools competed at the 
conference. The two four-year 



colleges were Emporia State 
University and Friends 
University. The five communi- 
ty colleges that participated 
were Cowley, Colby, Labette, 
Butler, and Highland. Only the 
top two individuals in each 
event qualify to compete at 
nationals. 

The students raised money 
for the state conference by 
selling candy-grams and 
Halloween ghosts. They also 
raffled off a $100 Wal-Mart 
gift card to earn money for 
nationals. 

Student receiues 
natinnal award 

Cowley sophomore Chad 
Stuchlik was honored as the 
recipient of the Undergraduate 
Award for Achievement in 
Organic Chemistry sponsored 
by the American Chemical 
Society and Joint Polymer 



President's Annual Report 1999-2000 



lliil\liiniliii!!M Hili'iil 



nchieuemenfs 



Education Committee (POLY- 
ED). The award was presented 
in spring 2000. 

Cowley Natural Science 
Instructor Pam Smith nominat 
ed Stuchlik for this award, 
which is for outstanding stu- 
dents in their sophomore and 
junior years in chemistry. 

"He has an exceptional tal- 
ent in organic chemistry," 
Smith said. "He's one of the 
best organic chemistry stu- 
dents that I have seen. He's 
really impressive; I don't think 
he even knows how good he is. 
He's a very modest person and 
a very hard worker. He's very 
self-motivated. He's outstand- 
ing in that aspect." 

In order to be eligible for 
this award, the student must 
demonstrate outstanding 
achievement in a two-semester 
organic chemistry course and 
maintain a 3.8 grade-point 
average. The institutions nomi- 
nating students could not be a 
Ph.D.-granting institution. 

Stuchlik, a pre-pharmacy 
major from Newton, trans- 
ferred to the University of 
Kansas to complete the Pharm 
D. program, a six-year doctor- 
ate of pharmacy degree. 

Stuchlik was presented a 
certificate by Smith during the 
annual Celebration of 
Excellence banquet at the col- 
lege in April. 



LPN students 
qualify fur natiunal 
cumpetitiun in dune 

Six students in the 
Practical Nursing Program at 
Wichita Area Technical College 
qualified to compete at the 
national leadership conference 
in Cleveland, Ohio, in June. 

The students, who are tak- 
ing WATC's program at Cowley 
College in Arkansas City, com- 
peted in the Health Occupation 
Students of America national 
leadership conference June 17- 
22. They qualified after com- 
peting at the state conference 
in Emporia on April 11-12. 

Students who traveled to 
Cleveland are Becky Bowman, 
Kassia LeClair, Kathy Hale and 
Cammy Boone, all of Arkansas 
City, Karri Adamson of 
Winfield and Summer 
Filtingberger of Cedar Vale. 
Instructor Lela Goatley accom- 
panied the students. 






The students competed in 
a variety of health events, 
including medical spelling, 
medical terminology, creative 
problem solving, community 
awareness, CPR, medical math- 
ematics, and others. 

The students also raised 
money to help pay for the trip. 
A car wash and bake sale was 
planned for April 22 at 
Orscheln Farm & Home Supply 
in Arkansas City. 

All of the students are 
working in a health field in the 
area, and all graduated from 
the program in June. 




1U 



m 1S9S-2000 



Cowley Employees Honored for 



Years off Service 



College employees 
received recognition 
for their years of 
service to 
Cowley through an 
Employee 
Recognition 
Program celebra- 
tion hosted by the 
Staff Development team. 







It took place March 9 in 
the Earle N. Wright 
Community Room inside the 
Brown Center for Arts, 
Sciences, and Technology. 

According to Janice 
Neagle, director of human 
resources, Cowley President Dr. 
Pat McAfee and the 
Administrative Council decided 
Cowley needed to recognize 
employees for their years of 
service. The Staff Development 
team came up with the idea for 
the celebration and worked out 
the details through about a 
year, Neagle said. 

To be eligible to receive 
the award, an employee must 
have maintained a full-time 
position for five or more calen- 
dar years. All eligible Cowley 
main campus and outreach cen- 
ter employees were honored. 



Neagle also said that 
Cowley would like to make this 
an annual event to be held 
every spring for employees cel- 
ebrating a fifth, 10th, 15th 
anniversaries, and so on. 

Thirty-four employees of 
five to nine years were given 
the opportunity to choose from 
a paperweight, a key ring, 
lapel pin, or pendant necklace. 
The 17 who have worked 10 to 
14 years could choose between 
a letter opener, business card 
holder, a candlestick, or ear- 
rings. 

There were nine employees 
who have served 15 to 19 
years. They chose either a 
clock, wallet, or coaster set. 

The nine employees who 
have served the college 20 to 
24 years were given the option 
of a brass paperweight with 



clock or a pocket knife. Sid 
Regnier, vice president of busi- 
ness services, and Elvin 
Hatfield, police science instruc- 
tor, both 25-year employees, 
chose brass candlesticks for 
their gift. 

Cowley's longest full-time 
employee, Conrad Jimison, vice 
president of instruction, chose 
a brass and leather coaster set 
for his 30 years of service. 

The following is a com- 
plete list of Cowley employees 
honored at the celebration. 
Their actual years of service is 
in parentheses: 



Turn the page 
for the list of 
employees and 
years of seruice. 



President's Annnal Report 1SSS-2000 15 



I'iiuIn hpliiym IIiiiiiiitiI Inr 



Vears off Scruicc 



toe 



Hue to nine years: 

Connie Bonfy (5) 
Kim Carwile (5) 
Tony Crouch (5) 
Gary Gackstatter (5) 
Rita VanOrden (5) 
Jody Arnett (5) 
Pam Doyle (5) 
Jeanette Oesterlin (5) 
Lois Sampson (5) 
Michelle Schoon (5) 
Robert Reed (6) 
Rex Soule (6) 
Bryan McChesney (6) 
Mark Nelson (6) 
Bruce Watson (6) 
Wayne Short (7) 
Greg Schartz (7) 
Cathy Hendricks (7) 
Rae Dale (7) 
Stu Osterthun (7) 
Charles McKown (7) 
Bruce Crouse (7) 
Janice Stover (8) 
Mark Jarvis (8) 
Bart Allen (8) 
Gene Cole (8) 
Sally Palmer (9) 
Mindi Shriver (9) 
Terri Morrow (9) 
Dan Squires (9) 
Bev Grunder (9) 
Marcia Cales (9) 



To be eligible to 

receive the 

award, an 

employee must 

have maintained 

a full-time 

position for five 

or more calendar 

years. 

All eligible 

Cowley main 

campus and 

outreach center 

employees were 

honored. 



lO to m years: 

JoLynne Oleson (10) 
Lynne Jordan (10) 
Darren Burroughs (10) 
Tammy Barnaby (10) 
Maggie Picking (11) 
Dejon Ewing (11) 
Marilyn Dill (11) 
David Regnier (11) 
Neal Sherwood (11) 
Larry Grose (11) 
Judy Queen (12) 
Dr.PatMcAtee(12) 
Dave Burroughs (12) 
Kelly Johnson (12) 
Paul Stirnaman (13) 
Martha Schartz (13) 
Ruene Gage (13) 

15 to 19 years: 

Larry Swaim (15) 
Debbie Bridges (15) 
Deb Nittler (15) 
Ed Hargrove (16) 
Ben LeClair (17) 
Joyce Holloway (17) 
Peg Williams (17) 
Chris Vollweider (18) 
Mike Crow (19) 

20 to 24 years: 

Sue Morris (20) 
Terry Eaton (20) 
Joycelyn Goff (20) 
Doug Hunter (20) 
Terri Hutchinson (20) 
Libby Palmer (21) 
Larry Schwintz (22) 
Wanda Shepherd (24) 
Forest Smith (24) 
Pat Mauzey (24) 

25 to 23 years: 

Sid Regnier (25) 
Elvin Hatfield (25) 



16 ('onlejTollege 1999-2000 



30 to 35 years: 

Conrad Jimison (30) 



Master teachers 



Five college 
employees were 
named Master 
Teachers and 
received awards dur- 
ing a national com- 
munity college con- 
ference in Austin, 
Texas, in late May. 




II In r) llr. I'm McAtee, President, I lathi Wricks. Hainc Siiiirl. JaniiT Slow Smll llai laughlin 
Pal Mauzey, I iiiiniil Jimison, Vice Prrsiilnil ill Inslriii linn. 



&^5 



Cathy Hendricks, Pat 
Mauzey, Janice Stover, Scott 
MacLaughlin, and Wayne Short 
are this year's recipients from 
Cowley. The five award-win- 
ners bring the total of Cowley 
faculty and staff who have 
received this award in the past 
13 years to 46. 

The National Institute for 
Staff and Organizational 
Development is an annual con- 
ference sponsored by the 
Community College Leadership 
Program at the University of 
Texas-Austin. The 22nd Annual 



International Conference on 
Teaching Excellence was held 
May 28-31. 

Hendricks, a Social Science 
instructor, has been at Cowley 
since the fall of 1992. 
Hendricks teaches psychology 
and sociology. 

Mauzey, instructor and 
head of the college's 
Cosmetology Department, has 
been at Cowley for 24 years. 
Her department is located on 
the lower level of Ireland Hall. 

Stover, Cowley's director of 
continuing education, has been 



at Cowley for eight years. Prior 
to her current position, Stover 
served as coordinator to devel- 
opment and college relations. 

MacLaughlin, Cowley's 
director of technical theatre, 
teaches speech and stagecraft. 
He has been at Cowley for four 
years. 

Short, instructor in the 
college's Quality Improvement 
Process area, teaches industrial 
related courses such as blue- 
print reading, and also total 
quality assurance. He began his 
Cowley career in January 1993. 



President's inniial Reporl 1S99-2000 i; 




Srllllllll lll'I'IIIIH'S MTIIIIll 



9/J 



m 



■z— 



5/J 



o^ 



■2^ 




Endowwed Chair 



ichelle Schoon, biology instructor and Natural Science 
Department chair, was honored in late January as the second 
Endowed Chair for Teaching Excellence and Student Learning 
at Cowley. 



Conrad Jimison, vice presi- 
dent of instruction, made the 
announcement at an inservice 
meeting in January. Bruce 
Schwyhart, president and chief 
executive officer of First 
National Bank in Winfield, pre- 
sented Schoon with a plaque 
and a monetary gift. 

"I was very surprised and 
honored because we have a lot 
of outstanding instructors here 
at Cowley," Schoon said. 

Schoon received $1,000 for 
professional development and a 
$3,000 cash stipend to be used 
during the two years. She 
plans to use the money to focus 
on things that help the college 
and the students. Schoon also 
plans to use some of the money 
to help pay for the expenses of 
attending conferences outside 
of the area. 

"I would like to focus on 
different ways of presenting 
material in the classroom," 
Schoon said. "I am working on 
updating the faculty evalua- 
tion system. I would like to 
look around at other colleges 
to see how they do things. 




llii lii'llr Srliiiiiii. uilh |iliii|iii\ is lliiiikril lii Ji'ir lli'iin. left, anil Urine Sih 

liislriiiliiiiiliiiii'iiil.liiiiisiiiiisiiiiilirriolii. 



"It's a good award. The 
idea behind it is good. It's a 
good feeling just to be nomi- 
nated for this award." 

Connie Wedel, vocal music 
instructor, and Lois Sampson, 
humanities instructor, also 
were nominated for the award. 

The Endowed Chair for 
Teaching Excellence and 
Student Learning was estab- 
lished in 1998 and is sponsored 
by First National Bank of 
Winfield. Dejon Ewing, 



Humanities Department Chair, 
was the first recipient. 

Nominees are selected 
based on classroom teaching 
innovation, how involved they 
are with student activities and 
academic advising, and other 
aspects of the college, includ- 
ing involvement with commit- 
tees. 



18 Cowley College 1SS9-2000 



Hi iii lliii field, Criminal Justice instructor 



Worker of the Year Award 




ver since Jeanne Davis set foot on 
Cowley's campus, she knew Elvin 
Hatfield was a special instructor. 




^ 



CD 



a>»5 



r© 



So for Hatfield, who heads 
Cowley's criminal justice pro- 
gram, to be named Dickie 
Workwear's American Worker 
of the Year award for Kansas 
was no surprise to Davis. 

"He's a great role model 
and a big influence on his stu- 
dents," said Davis, 28, from 
Winfield. "He's always there 
for the students when they 
need someone to talk to. He 
gives advice to them when 
they need it. He treats all stu- 
dents with respect and dignity. 
He doesn't' criticize. And he's 
well-known in the criminal jus- 
tice field. That's one of the rea- 
sons why I took this program. 
I heard they had a great pro- 
gram at Cowley." 

Davis is the one mostly 
responsible for Hatfield's 
award. The sophomore criminal 
justice major received an e- 
mail during the first week of 
August 1999 soliciting nomina- 
tions for Worker of the Year. 
One click of the mouse and she 
landed at the Dickie Workwear 



online site. The directions were 
simple: In 75 words or less, 
explain why this person 
deserves to be named Worker 
of the Year. Deadline for sub- 
mission was Aug. 13. 

"I don't know if they got 
my e-mail address from anoth- 
er site I visit or what," Davis 
said. 

Davis can't remember her 
exact essay. She didn't even 
keep a copy. But the folks at 
Dickie Workwear were so 
impressed, they selected 
Hatfield as the Kansas recipi- 
ent. He was chosen from a pool 
of thousands of nominees. 

"I don't go in for awards," 
said Hatfield, who began work- 
ing at Cowley in 1974. "I like it 
when the program is recog- 
nized more than the individual. 

"I had no previous knowl- 
edge of this. I thought it was a 
hoax, one of those telephone 
calls when you win a prize 'if. 
I was sitting there waiting for 
the shoe to drop." 



Hatfield, who received the 
award notification on Aug. 31, 
received a check for $250, a 
$200 gift certificate, a watch, a 
jacket, and a plaque. Davis is 
thrilled her instructor is an 
award winner. 

"With only 75 words to 
write the essay, it was kind of 
hard," she said. "I had to cut 
out a lot of stuff. He has had a 
major influence on me." 

Davis, a 1989 graduate of 
Winfield High School, graduat- 
ed in December. She hopes to 
be a road deputy, perhaps with 
the Cowley County Sheriffs 
Department. 

Hatfield is modest when he 
speaks of the award. 

"I think there's millions of 
deserving people throughout 
the United States who have 
given their heart and soul to 
their jobs," he said. "And they 
go unrecognized doing out- 
standing jobs." 



<ro 



I'miili'iii's liimiiil llcnorl 1999-2000 



Retirement calls on three employees 



So Long to Cowley 



CO 



Terry Eaton, 
Ruene Gage, 
and Pat 
Moreland 
decided that the 
year 2000 was the 
perfect time to 
retire. 




I pin Minn. It'll, ri'li'hrali's licr ivtimiii'iil u 



Eaton, coordinator of 
Cowley's Adult Basic 
Education, General Education 
Development and English as a 
Second Language programs, 
retired in June after 20 years 
of service to the college. Gage, 
bookstore manager for 14 
years, retired in April. And 
Moreland, Natural Science 
Department instructor, retired 
in May after four years at the 
college. 

lorry Eaton 

Terry Eaton began her 
working career at Cowley in 
1980. Twenty-five years earli- 
er, she graduated from the col- 
lege, known then as Arkansas 
City Junior College. During her 



20-year Cowley career, she 
touched hundreds of students 
with her genuine concern for 
their wellbeing and success. 

"This is home," Eaton told 
The Cowley Press during an 
interview. "Leaving is the 
hardest thing I've had to do." 

Eaton worked closely with 
Cowley's international student 
population, and even took some 
of them into her home to stay. 
She was instrumental in help- 
ing those students adjust to 
American culture. 

She also had a huge hand 
in helping students acquire 
their GED. In fact, she wit- 
nessed 100 students receive 
their GED during a graduation 
ceremony in June. 



Chris Vollweider, who 
worked alongside Eaton on the 
lower level of Renn Memorial 
Library for many years, said 
Eaton made a difference in the 
lives of so many people, stu- 
dents and co-workers. 

"She has done so much and 
is such a modest person," 
Vollweider said. 

Eaton's work with the 
GED and ABE programs didn't 
go unnoticed as she received 
the Kansas Adult Educator 
award in 1994. The award is 
given to an individual who has 
accomplished outstanding work 
in the field of adult education. 

In 1995, Eaton and hus- 
band Lyle were honored by the 
college as Outstanding Tiger 



1393-2000 




Good-bye, bookstore! tae Gage, right, shares the spotlight with her 
l'alinei\ left, and llailrnivltkinsnn. 



e assistants, lliriain 



Alumni. That same year, Eaton 
received the prestigious Harry 
Long Award, presented by The 
Salvation Army, for her work 
with many community pro- 
grams. 

Eaton also is a local histo- 
rian and frequently gives pre- 
sentations to civic clubs about 
the history of Arkansas City 
and Cowley County. And she 
knows as much about the col- 
lege as anyone. 

"My whole life revolves 
around my work at Cowley," 
she said. 

Ruciic Gage 

The thought of being able 
to relax and do some traveling 
helped persuade Ruene Gage to 
retire. She turned over the 
duties of bookstore manager to 
Shannon O'Toole in the spring. 
Her last day on the job was 
April 14. 

"It was a pleasure and an 
experience working in the 
bookstore, and I will miss the 
students and my fellow 
employees," Gage said. 



When Gage arrived at 
Cowley, the enrollment was 500 
to 600 students. Now, the col- 
lege has nearly 2,400 students 



coming in for coffee from time 
to time." 

A reception for Gage was 
held March 30 in The Jungle, 
the newly-remodeled student 
lounge inside the Nelson 
Student Center. 

Pat Moreland 

Pat Moreland spent 21 
years as a math instructor for 
grades 7-12 at South Haven 
Public School. And after four 
years at Cowley, she decided it 
was time to leave education 
altogether. 

"My husband has been 
retired for a few months, so I 
thought it was time to join 
him," Moreland said. "We plan 




Pal llorclanri, tell, accepts a rriimnriii oil! from I annul Jimison, lire President of Instruction. 



full-time and almost 4,000 
total. Another adjustment for 
Gage was the addition of off- 
campus sites, specifically the 
Southside Education Center in 
Wichita and a center in 
Mulvane. Books had to be 
delivered to those sites as well. 
"I'm going to miss the cof- 
fee breaks and catching up on 
everything," Gage said. "But 
that's one thing I'll be doing is 



to do a lot of traveling." 

Although Moreland didn't 
spend a great deal of her 
teaching career at Cowley, the 
college still holds a special 
place in her heart. 

"I will never forget you 
all," Moreland said during a 
retirement reception for her 
and Terry Eaton. "I've thor- 
oughly enjoyed working here. I 
will miss you all." 






President's Annual Report 1999-2000 21 



Illllsliimliii!! liiriilli Mall 



achievements 



on 



Cowley receiues 
national grant 

Cowley received two more 
high-end, advanced computer 
systems through the National 
Science Foundation grant, 
according to Bruce Crouse, 
chairman of the Industrial 
Technology Department. The 
computers will be used by the 
radiographic testing class to 
run a simulator of an x-ray 
tube. 

Radiographic 
testing is part of 
the non-destruc- 
tive evaluation 
program that is 
in its eighth 
year at Cowley. 

Cowley, Iowa 
State University and communi- 
ty colleges in Nebraska, Iowa 
and Minnesota, are working 
together to complete a radi- 
ographic training manual to be 
used at other community col- 
leges throughout the United 
States. The manual contains 
10 lessons and a teacher's 
guide on radiographic testing. 

The training manual will 
be used in conjunction with the 
computer simulator. Through 
practice on the simulator, stu- 
dents will gain a better under- 
standing of radiography before 




they actually perform on x-ray 
tubes. The simulator helps stu- 
dents to create a radiographic 
image in a short amount of 
time. Students can easily see 
what mistakes they are making 
and what they are doing well. 
The simulator will enable 
colleges to save time and 
money. They can save money 
on film, repair and replace- 
ment of x-ray tubes, and chem- 
ical costs. Many of the early 
mistakes can be eliminated by 
practicing on the simulator, 
which is 98 percent accurate (a 
representation of the x-ray 
systems used at Cowley). 

Cowley associate 
dean chnsen to 
participate in 
Leaders 2000 
program 

Marilyn Dill, long-time 
business instructor and current 
associate dean of instruction, 
has been chosen to participate 
in the National Institute for 
Leadership Development, 
Leaders 2000 program, an 
international program for 
administrators and faculty in 
higher education. 

This year-long program, 
designed to enhance the skills 
participants need to assume 




major decision-making roles in 
their institutions, includes 
institutional practice in super- 
visory and human relations 
skills, planning and budgeting, 
and organizational transforma- 
tion as well as discussions with 
national experts on the issues 
confronting higher education 
during the next decade. 

During the 
program, Dill 
will be mentored 
by Dr. Patrick J. 
McAtee, Cowley 
president, to 
work on projects 
that will aid 
Cowley and fos- 
ter individual professional 
growth. 

Leaders 2000 participants 
are chosen for their profession- 
al abilities, their interests in 
advancement in higher educa- 
tion, and the quality of their 
proposed projects. 

The NILD is international- 
ly recognized by colleges, uni- 
versities and businesses for its 
visionary programs that pro- 
duce leaders who effectively 
challenge assumptions, elimi- 
nate barriers and create new 
pathways to successful solu- 
tions. 



ili'il'iiHi'ite 19SS-2000 



North Central Association site visit team recommends 



College Reaccrediffation 



A three-person site visit team represent- 
ing the North Central Association of 
Colleges and Schools completed its stay 
in Arkansas City and said it would 
recommend full reaccreditation for Cowley. 



Dr. Charlotte Lee, Dr. 
Jerrilyn Brewer, and Dr. David 
Trites spent Feb. 7-9 at Cowley 
in a series of meetings that 
involved a cross-section of 
employees, the Board of 
Trustees, and community mem- 
bers. 

During the exit interview 
with approximately 70 Cowley 
employees on Feb. 9, the team 
said it was impressed with the 
college and that it would rec- 
ommend full reaccreditation to 
the Commission on Institutions 
of Higher Education with NCA. 

"You should feel good 
about what you're doing," said 
Lee, president of Terra State 
Community College in 
Fremont, Ohio, and the team's 
lead evaluator. "A second visit 
was scheduled in the next 18- 
20 months. But we are recom- 
mending that the next visit be 
in 48-60 months, or 2002-2003 
and 2003-2004. We feel you 
have done such wonderful pio- 
neering work. We want to give 
you time to collect more data 
and be able to show full 



deployment of that data. 
Eighteen months is not viable. 

"Therefore, we are recom- 
mending full affirmation to 
the commission, with the next 
comprehensive site visit to 
occur in 2009 to 2010. You are 
way out on the leading edge of 
continuous quality improve- 
ment." 

About two years ago, NCA 
invited Cowley to conduct a 
special emphasis self-study for 
reaccreditation, one that com- 
bined the college's work with 
the Kansas Award for 
Excellence and the Malcolm 
Baldrige National Quality 
Award criteria. Only a couple 
other colleges and universities 
in the nation had conducted 
such a study, based on quality 
performance measures, which 
makes Cowley's study a model 
for other institutions of higher 
learning. 

Cowley's study, titled 
"Embracing Quality: A Self- 
Assessment for the New 
Millennium— Cowley, NCA, and 
Baldrige," contains the seven 



Baldrige categories and what 
the college is doing in each 
toward continuous quality 
improvement. 

Brewer, evaluation and 
continuous improvement super- 
visor at Western Wisconsin 
Technical College in LaCrosse, 
presented strengths in each of 
the categories. Lee presented 
areas for improvement, and 
Trites, student services coordi- 
nator at Alexandria Technical 
College in Alexandria, Minn., 
presented what the team called 
"food for thought," professional 
advice that included some col- 
leges in which Cowley might 
consider benchmarking. 

Dr. Pat McAtee, Cowley 
president, thanked the team 
for its work. He also thanked 
employees of the college. 

"It has been a long journey 
and one that is not finished," 
McAtee said. "But I think after 
going through this study, 
we're heading in the right 
direction. You all (employees) 
should feel very proud of what 
you have accomplished." 

Michelle Schoon, chairper- 
son and instructor in the 
Natural Science Department, 
served as the chair of Cowley's 
17-member North Central 
Steering Committee. 

A celebration reception for 
Cowley employees was held in 
the Earle N. Wright 
Community Room. 






President's Inmiiil lieiwri 1399-2000 



ku;ij'ii'ini 



lop Leuel Recognition 






a*5 



Three Cowley County businesses 
received awards in October 1999 dur- 
ing the fourth annual Kansas Award 
for Excellence Foundation banquet in 
Overland Park. 



Cowley College and South 
Central Kansas Regional 
Medical Center each were pre- 
sented Kansas Excellence 
Awards (Level III), the highest 
level of recognition presented 
to Kansas organizations. 

Kelly Management 
Services of Strother Field was 
presented with a Performance 
in Quality Award (Level III). 

Dr. Pat McAtee, president 
of Cowley College, accepted the 
award on behalf of the college. 
Webster Russell, chief execu- 
tive officer of SCKRMC, 
accepted the award on behalf 
of the hospital. And Bev Black 
accepted the award on behalf 
of Kelly Management Services. 

Five organizations received 
Level III awards Tuesday 
night, nine received Level II 
awards, and four earned Level 
I awards. The banquet was 
held at the Marriott Hotel in 
Overland Park. 

Level III award-winners 
were allowed to say a few 
words upon accepting the 
award. 






^ — I — - _.. . _ I i!jiii!MiMi'»L^ ,. : , jii«ipiui_i_i : .. _ jmmwvm^ 










! 1999 Kansas excellence Award 1 

| j l ow lev t/o'iialy ' osnrauaitv < ■ [ 



"Fd like to thank Jim 
Miesner, who is now dean of 
instruction at Fort Scott 
Community College, for all of 
his work in getting us to this 
point," McAtee said. "And I'd 
like to thank our KAE examin- 
ers Michelle Schoon and Tony 



Crouch, and Maggie Picking, 
head of our Quality Leadership 
Council." 

About a dozen Cowley 
employees made the trip to 
Kansas City. 

McAtee praised college 
employees for their commit- 
ment to quality. 



24 liMhliillw 1393-2000 




£9 



liinir llannn. I'iir left, representing ilir kansas Excellence Foundation, poses uilli 
lie college in November M. Ilr. I'm McAtee is standing in back, Ithiii row, from 
In I. -huh Inii'M. Jon i' llnllimai. iiml imii I nun li. 



embers iii Hie llualili Lradmhiii I mini il iliiniii! a celebration lirlil al 
li. are Maggie I'ii king, Beverh iirundrr. Ilii licflr Si Ilium ihnldiiig trn- 



<td 



"This award doesn't come 
around all the time," he said. 
"This was our goal and we 
achieved it. Now we want to 
keep improving on what we're 
doing." 

Cowley previously received 
three Level II awards. 

Cowley became the first 
institution of higher education 
in Kansas to capture the 
Kansas Excellence Award. 

"I'm very proud of our 
organization and it's commit- 
ment to quality and improve- 
ment," McAtee said of the col- 
lege. "We've been at this for a 
while. It's very gratifying to 
receive this award." 

Mark Shapiro, represent- 
ing the Malcolm Baldrige 



National Quality Award 
Program, was a special guest 
Tuesday night. Featured speak- 
er was Barnett Helzberg Jr., 
former CEO of Helzberg 
Diamonds. 

Helzberg gave several 
anecdotes relating to the com- 
pany and how it was eventual- 
ly purchased by Berkshire 
Hathaway, billionaire Warren 
Buffet's company in Omaha, 
Neb., in 1995. He also relayed 
some advice from his years of 
experience in business. 

"The customer is not num- 
ber one, your associates are 
number one," Helzberg said. 
"Relationships, relationships, 
relationships. I loved my associ- 
ates." 



So much, in fact, that 
Helzberg shared a portion of 
the money received after the 
sale to Buffett with his 
employees. 

He presented three ques- 
tions that should be posed to a 
company's customers: 

"One, what am I doing you 
like? Two. What am I doing 
you don't like? And three. 
What are we not doing you 
would like?" Helzberg said. 

"Companies getting awards 
tonight are setting standards 
for everybody else," he said. 

McAtee, a member of the 
KAE Board of Directors, is 
chairman of that board for 
2000. 



President's 



il 1S99-2000 : J 



mill tat I'lilliili' in \i'ii I in In 



cowwleg Bookstore 



TS 



Sid Regnier has 
been involved 
in the construc- 
tion of many 
new facilities at 
Cowley, but few 
projects went from 
the ground up more 
quickly than the col- 
lege's new bookstore. 




iimiiaiifllii'hi.sli'rliiiililiiiylniiiiiki'i 



nhiuiniiiiiiksliirr. 



Located at 207 W. Fifth 
Ave., the bookstore opened to 
the public on Aug. 14. A grand 
opening ribbon-cutting ceremo- 
ny took place Aug. 17. 

Regnier, Cowley's vice 
president of business services, 
was given the go-ahead to pur- 
sue a new bookstore early in 
2000. On April 17, the west 
building of the three pur- 
chased from Bob Foster years 
ago was torn down, making 
way for the new bookstore. 

Conco, Inc., of Wichita was 
the primary contractor for the 
project. The electrical contrac- 
tor was Ziegler Electric of 
Wichita, while the plumbing 
and heating contractor was 
Winfield Plumbing and 
Heating. Moorman Glass of 
Arkansas City was hired to do 
the glasswork. 

"I am extremely pleased," 



Regnier said. "What was amaz- 
ing was that the construction 
didn't take very long, and also 
the cooperation and enthusi- 
asm of the contractors for the 
project. They all bought into 
the project and enjoyed doing 
something different." 

What made the $300,000 
project unique was the blend 
of items from former buildings 
with new construction. 
Following is a list of items 
saved through the years, refur- 
bished, and now placed in the 
new bookstore: 

• Round globe light fix- 
tures were removed from the 
second and third floors of the 
205 W Fifth Ave. building and 
retrofitted with 26-watt flores- 
cent bulbs. 

• The metal ceiling was the 
original metal ceiling located 
in the 207 W Fifth Ave. build- 



ing. It was removed, and Rob 
Carroll Sandblasting and 
Painting cleaned and primed 
the tiles before they were rein- 
stalled. The ceiling layout was 
reconfigured since there were 
three different patterns of tile. 

• The ceiling fan is a 
Westinghouse fan that was on 
the upper level of the IOOF 
Hall at 201 W. Fifth Ave., now 
the college's Wellness Center. 
The fan was lubricated and 
cleaned before installation. 

• The four sconce lights 
mounted on the interior of the 
bookstore were copper fixtures 
removed from the 1923 
Arkansas City High School 
building that sat where the 
Brown Center for Arts, 
Sciences and Technology is 
today. The same is for the two 
copper fixtures on the exterior 
entrance to the bookstore. The 



1 1 iillw 1399-2000 



fixtures were refinished, 
rewired, and reinstalled. 

• The interior doors to the 
manager's office, the restroom, 
and the fitting room are interi- 
or doors from Ireland Hall, 
ACHS built in 1890. The doors 
had to be reworked and refin- 
ished. There are no nails in 
these doors; they are held 
together by wooden dowels. 

• The interior stone wall is 
the original limestone wall that 
was common to buildings at 
205 and 207 W. Fifth Ave. The 
wall was power-washed, then 
sprayed with three coats of 
sealer. The wood strips were 
used as nailing strips to attach 
wall coverings. The holes in the 
wall toward the south end is 
where wood floor joists were 
inserted for a mezzanine level 
floor in the original building. 

• The counter top on the 
coffee bar is made of slate 
chalkboards from the 1911, 
1919, and 1923 school build- 
ings that the college removed 
prior to the demolition of the 
buildings. The back side of the 
chalkboards was used, since 
they have a texture to them 
contrary to the usual smooth 
face of the chalkboards. 

• The two green and white 
globe fixtures hanging over 
the interior entrance to the 
bookstore were globes that 
were found in the 207 W. Fifth 
Ave. building prior to demoli- 
tion. 

• The six metal pillars that 
highlight the interior windows 
and entrance were from the 
front of the 207 W. Fifth Ave. 
building and were removed 
prior to demolition. They were 
reworked bv L.G. Pike 



Construction Co. and installed 
in the interior for decoration. 
These beams originally held up 
some of the stone work of the 
front of the 207 W. Fifth Ave. 
building. The Danks Foundry 
of Arkansas City made the pil- 
lars. 

• The railing on the upper 
display is a section of the rail- 
ing that was in the 207 W. 
Fifth Ave. building on the mez- 
zanine level. 

• A decorative fireplace 
was in the corner of an office 
in Ireland Hall. It was sand- 
blasted and painted. 

• Eight 12-inch by 12-inch 
ceiling tiles, painted green, will 
be mounted on the exterior 
flat stones above the entrance 
to the bookstore; four on the 
north side and four on the 
west side. Regnier said they 
are being added for decoration. 

Regnier also located an 
old-time Coca-Cola machine 
that dispenses the small bot- 
tles. That, too, he said, ties the 
building to the past. 

Old photographs of various 
college activities also are on 
display in the bookstore. 
Included is a photograph of the 
original Board of Trustees, a 
picture of prom held in W.S. 
Scott Auditorium, a pep rally 
from the 1950s, and a shot of 
an old science lab likely from 
one of the three buildings 
where the Brown Center is 
located today. 

Regnier, who assisted 
Conco by laying nine stones on 
the project, said the new store 
is roughly 2 1/2 times the size 
of the current store, located in 
the Nelson Student Center. The 
store has a reading area and 



three computers with Internet 
access. And there's another 
important improvement to the 
process. 

"We've added bar coding 
on all merchandise and books, 
so that buying and selling 
books will be a lot easier," 
Regnier said. "We'll have two 
checkout lines when it's busy." 

The software also allows 
customers to purchase books 
and merchandise via the col- 
lege's web site. Visitors can 
access Cowley's web site at 
www.cowleycollege.com. 

Regnier said the project 
was one of the most enjoyable 
he's ever been involved. 

"It's really been fun," he 
said. "To utilize things from 
several buildings that have a 
relationship with Cowley 
County Community College, 
it's a dream. It ties in beauti- 
fully with the Carnegie 
Library, the Brown Center, 
and the other Foster buildings 
and on down Fifth Avenue." 

Regnier said he purposely 
saved certain items from 
buildings prior to demolition, 
just in case. 

"I used to flea market, and 
I just like unusual things," he 
said. "The exterior lights and 
the sconce lights are very 
ornate and unusual, and I 
saved them, never really know- 
ing what we'd use them for. 
People who went to school here 
in the 1930s, 40s, and 50s can 
come back here, see some of 
the things, and remember. I 
think the building really 
turned out well." 



^r? 



President's Innual Report 1999-2000 



Hiirkfiirri 1 llniiiipiiii'iil Iriilrr 



Unique Partnership 






CO 



A unique partnership for the 21st century 
began to take shape during the 1999- 
2000 academic year, one that eventual- 
ly will serve the labor force of Cowley 
County and surrounding area. 



It's called the Workforce 
Development Center, and it's 
located in the same building as 
Cowley's Business and Industry 
Institute at Strother Field 
Industrial Park, halfway 
between Arkansas City and 
Winfield on U.S. Highway 77. 

The center, one of only a 
few of its kind in Kansas, joins 
a multitude of services under- 
one roof. Remodeling of the 
building began around March 
1 and was completed in about 
three months. A few services 
became available in late sum- 
mer 2000, and Gene Cole, 
Cowley's associate dean of busi- 
ness and industry, said he 
expected all of the agencies to 
be in the building by the first 
of the year. 

"We've been working to 
pull all of these agencies 
together," Cole said. "Job 
Service is in place, and I expect 
another five partners to be in 
by mid-October. We should be 
totally up and running around 
January 1." 



The Workforce 
Development Center is com- 
prised of 18 mandated part- 
ners by the Workforce 
Investment Act, plus the cham- 
bers of commerce in Arkansas 
City, Winfield, and Wellington. 
The chambers of commerce 
eventually will have computer 
links that can place job orders, 
serve job seekers, handle 
unemployment compensation, 
and other services provided by 
the Workforce Development 
Center. Cowley's Business and 
Industry Institute also is locat- 
ed in the building. 

Following is a list of man- 
dated partners: 
WIA-Adults 
WIA— Dislocated Workers 
WIA-Youth 
WIA-Job Corps 
WIA— Migrant and Seasonal 

Farmworkers 
WIA— Native American Grantee 
WIA— Veteran's Workforce Programs 
Employment Security— Wagner 
Peyser 



Employment Security- 
Unemployment Insurance 

Employment Security-NAFTA/TAA 

Employment Security- 
Special Veteran's Services 

Adult Education & Literacy 
(Cowley College) 

Carl Perkins Act/Post Secondary 
(Cowley College) 

Vocational Rehabilitation 

(Social and Rehabilitation 
Services) 

Welfare-to-Work (City of Wichita) 

Senior Community Service 

Employment Program 
(Red Cross) 

Housing and Urban Development 

Employment and Training 
Programs 

Community Service Block Grant 

Employment and Training 
Activities 

Cole said the building was 
remodeled so that each agency 
shared resources, such as the 
computer learning lab, the two 
classrooms, the computer lab, 
break room and restrooms. 

"Everything is common," 
Cole said of the facility. "There 
are places where you have sep- 
arate doors for different agen- 
cies within the building. But 
not here. We have a common 
reception area, and every 
phone call gets answered." 



28!onhliilN' 1839-2000 



lowlej accepted into the 



Microsoft Meotor Program 



In spring 2000, Cowley was accepted into the Microsoft Mentor 
Program, which is designed to assist colleges and universities 
with faculty development by providing opportunities for faculty 
to develop and enhance their computer usage skills. Its goal is 
the enhancement of teaching and learning through the use of tech- 
nology. 



Charles Myers, former 
director of technical computer 
education, believes everyone 
from the instructors to the 
students will benefit from this 
program. He feels the college 
will benefit from the free soft- 
ware and the students from 
the increase in technology in 
the classroom. 

"I'm interested in bring- 
ing technology into the class- 
room, more than just the 
Internet," he said. "There's not 
really a lot of training out 
there for instructors to learn 
how to do that. 

"When the college imple- 
ments (the program), we'll 
have the capability of using 
this technology without any 
additional cost in one of the 
(college's) labs with up to 30 
computers." 

As a host institution for 
the Microsoft Mentor Program, 



Cowley offered a two-day train- 
ing workshop May 19-20 for 
college instructors interested 
in participating in this pro- 
gram. Six other Kansas col- 
leges participated in the pro- 
gram: Hutchinson Community 
College, Wichita Area Technical 
College, Newman University, 
Wichita State, Butler County 
Community College, and 
Webster University. 

The focus was on the use 
of the Microsoft Office 2000 
Suite for efficiently managing 
classes, enhancing the educa- 
tional experience, and on the 
development and management 
of online classes. This training 
event was instructed by a 
Microsoft-supplied trainer. 

The role of a Microsoft 
Mentor is to provide training 
to at least 20 faculty peers, 
using the software and train- 
ing tools provided by 



Microsoft. Mentors receive 
ongoing training materials, 
information, access to a private 
community website, and special 
discounts from program part- 
ners. 

Each participant in the 
Mentor Lab Workshop received 
a training binder that contains 
the course training materials 
for all available workshops, 
additional training materials, a 
personal copy of Office 2000 
and FrontPage 2000 Academic 
Edition, a training license 
enabling them to concurrently 
use up to 30 copies of Office 
2000 and FrontPage 2000 in a 
training laboratory for the 
duration of their appointment 
as a Microsoft Mentor, and a 
certificate of appreciation, suit- 
able for framing. 



S«9 



re 



r/- 



Prrsiili'iih liimiiil Report 1999-2000 



Artists in residence set to know 



Cowley county 




ill Botzow grew 
up in New 
York and lives 
in Vermont. 



,2£s He's traveled to other 

^ parts of the nation, but he's 

^_ never spent any considerable 

=E amount of time in Kansas. 
'gj Until spring 2000. 

.2 Botzow and fellow artist 

-= Meg Cottam conducted an 

artist-in-residency program in 
Cowley County as part of 
Artists & Communities: 
America Creates for the 
Millennium. It is an official 
project of the White House 
Millennium Council. Cowley 
County was the only site in 
Kansas chosen for this project. 
Botzow, a sculptor, began his 
time in the county in late 
March. His residency continued 
through PrairieFest, which 
ended June 4, and was to 
encompass six weeks in the 
fall. 

Botzow was pleased with 
the project. 

"It's going phenomenally," 
he said during an interview in 
the downtown storefront in 
Arkansas City. "The opportuni- 
ties are so vast and so huge to 
do community work in the 




lliil /ikv iiniHIi'!! Till liim uilli "I'rairii 1 Itiillii." 



county. It's impossible to satis- 
fy all the good things to be 
done. This is a good catalyst 
for possibilities. There's so 
much to celebrate here." 

Helping Cowley County cit- 
izens connect with their envi- 
ronment and appreciate what's 
here is one focus of the project 
Botzow was involved. He esti- 
mates that he drove nearly 
every county road, and has 
observed and taken notes on 
what he's seen. 

Botzow and Cottam, a 
movement artist, set up store- 
fronts in Arkansas City (119 
W. Fifth Ave.) and in Winfield 
(Southwestern College's down- 
town center on Ninth Avenue) 
to allow passersby to see the 
work they've done and to come 
in and tell their story. Cottam 
was in the county the first 
three weeks and returned for 
PrairieFest. 



Botzow spent a great deal 
of time collecting stories from 
county citizens. He begun a 
collection of the stories, along 
with photographs of the people 
and some of the places they 
talk about, and posted them on 
one wall in the Arkansas City 
storefront. 

"The legacy of the project 
will be that book and documen- 
tation of the final perform- 
ance." 

Botzow said the project 
received a positive greeting. 

"Once they understand it, 
they embrace it," he said. 
"There's a natural modesty 
about being involved at first. 
But many people have come 
forward with a recollection of 
places that mean something to 
them. 



30 Cowley Co 



1S9S-2000 



Cowley represents Kansas in Arts Program 



Continental Harmony 



The college is the lone venue in Kansas 
to be a recipient of Continental 
Harmony, a millennium program of 
the American Composers Forum and 
the National Endowment for the Arts. 



Cowley has selected 
Eugene Friesen of the Paul 
Winter Consort to create new 
music for the Continental 
Harmony project, which was 
scheduled to begin in October 
2000. 

Friesen and 49 other com- 
posers were chosen from an 
unparalleled group of candi- 
dates (more than 750 applica- 
tions, from more than 350 
applicants, were received). 
Continental Harmony partici- 
pants—including host commu- 
nities, composers and perform- 
ers—will create music for pre- 
miere performances through- 
out 2000. 

As the first 50-state com- 
missioning project in the U.S. 
History and as an official 



White House Millennium 
Council associate partner, 
Continental Harmony will be 
documented by the Library of 
Congress. Cowley is the only 
recipient of this partnership 
with American Composers 
Forum in the entire state of 
Kansas. 

"Each of the composer can- 
didates displayed extraordi- 
nary talent," said Connie 
Bonfy, Cowley's director of 
institutional grants and 
humanities programming. "But 
Eugene Friesen was uniquely 
qualified to join our 
Continental Harmony project." 

Friesen's past works 
include another commissioning 
project for the college in part- 
nership with the Salina Art 



and Humanities Commission 
which premiered at Arkansas 
City/Winfield PrairieFest in 
1997, and was titled 
"Grasslands Symphony." The 
Continental Harmony project 
also will be written for sym- 
phony, chorus and the Paul 
Winter Consort and will be 
based upon "Prairie, a poem by 
Carl Sandburg and premiered 
on June 2, 2000. 

The Continental Harmony 
work will be expanded and 
premiered as a full-length sym- 
phony on June 2, 2001. Friesen 
is a Grammy Award winner for 
the Consort's CD, "Spanish 
Angel," which features his 
composition by the same title. 

Friesen lives in Vermont 
with his wife and children. 



r© 



S£ 



Presidents Annual Report 1339-2000 



lilll.S|ll'ill!!Nl , llll , \ll , l'\ 



Record Enrollment 



U) 



Enrollment dur- 
ing the 1999- 
2000 academic 
year was high- 
er than ever before, 
according to 20th- 
day figures released 
by Registrar Forest 
Smith. 













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3000 - 
2500 


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2000 


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1500 
























1000 
























500 

II 

























FTE 



Spring Fall 



Spring 
19 



Spring Fall Spring Fall Spring 



Smith's report for fall 
1999 indicated that there were 
2,097.70 full-time equivalent 
students at the college, 120.42 
FTE more than the fall of 
1998, for an increase of about 
6 percent. The previous record 
FTE semester occurred in the 
fall of 1997 when 2,079.72 FTE 
were recorded. 

The college also set a 
record for on-campus enroll- 
ment in the fall with 1,043 stu- 
dents. That's 4 percent more 
than the fall of 1998. 

Off-campus enrollment 
increased 8 percent over the 
fall of 1998. 

The surge in on-campus 
enrollment filled Cowley's 



three dormitories and forced 
storage space to be cleaned 
and used for classroom space. 

In spring 2000, there were 
2,095.11 FTE, compared to 
1,912.77 in spring 1999. 

Some other statistics in 
Smith's fall report: 

■ There were 1,415 full- 
time and 2,058 part-time stu- 
dents enrolled in the fall of 
2000. Of that total number, 
404 were high school students, 
1,661 were freshmen, 901 were 
sophomores, and 507 were in 
the special category. That 
includes business and industry 
training. 

• The Southside Education 
Center in Wichita continues to 



be the fastest-growing site for 
the college. In the fall of 2000, 
Southside's FTE stood at 
442.70, a 45-percent increase 
over the fall of 1998. 

• There were 904 Cowley 
County residents registered for 
classes in the fall of 2000, 
including 510 from Arkansas 
City and 297 from Winfield. 

• Students representing 50 
Kansas counties were enrolled 
for fall 2000. Also, students 
from 14 states and 10 foreign 
countries were enrolled. 



32 loulev I'oIIpsi* 1SS0-2000 



Tiger Athletic 



Hall off fame inductees 




en former Cowley Tiger athletes and coaches, all of whom 
excelled on and off the playing field, comprise the Class of 
2000, the first of the newly-founded Tiger Athletic Hall of 
Fame. 




Hal! of hi iiir inductees: I limn left) Sonny )l;miiii 
Louderbaik, James Jones, linila Barpve. -I 



Induction ceremonies were 
held at halftime of the men's 
homecoming basketball game 
Feb. 26, 2000 in W.S. Scott 
Auditorium. 

The class of 2000: Ben 
Cleveland, former coach and 
instructor; Linda Hargrove, 
former athlete, coach, and 
director of admissions; Del 
Heidebrecht, former athlete 
and coach; James Jones, former 
athlete, Dan Kahler, former 
coach; J.C Louderback, former 
athlete; Sonny Maynard, for- 
mer athlete; Berklie Perico, for- 
mer athlete; Jim Reed, former 
athlete; and Johnny Rembert, 
former athlete. 

All 10 honorees attended 
the day's activities, which 
included a tour of the campus, 
a meeting with the coaching 



Del Heidebrecht, Jim Heed. Berklie Perico, J.l 

ItemhiTl. Han kahler anil Hen (let eland. 



staff and some athletes, and 
some reminiscing in W.S. Scott 
Auditorium. 

A commemorative plaque 
is on permanent display in the 
foyer of W.S. Scott Auditorium. 

The idea to initiate a Tiger 
Athletic Hall of Fame came 
from Athletic Director Tom 
Saia. 

"Other schools have this, 
and there is so much athletic 
history at Cowley that these 
people need to be recognized," 
Saia said. "People need to hear 
their stories." 

An eight-member hall of 
fame committee, which was 
comprised of college and com- 
munity people, met in October 
1999 to begin collecting names 
for possible induction in the 
first class. Committee members 



came up with an original list 
of 75 names. In December, that 
list was narrowed to 10. 

"We wanted this first class 
to be pretty big to kick it all 
off," Saia said. "Believe me, 
there are many, many former 
athletes and coaches deserving 
of this honor." 

To be eligible, an athlete 
who played at Cowley must 
have spent 10 years away from 
the school. But once coaches, 
administrators or faculty mem- 
bers leave Cowley, they auto- 
matically become eligible. 

Saia said the committee 
looked at citizenship as well as 
what the person did while at 
Cowley. 

"This needed to be done 
years ago, but we're doing it 
now, and I'm thrilled about it," 
Saia said. "I can't wait to hear 
their stories. This will be a 
great addition to our home- 
coming activities." 






re 



I'mideiih \ 1 1 1 1 r , . 1 1 1;, imt i 1399-2000 :|:l 



Athletic Excellence 



K5 




owley's Athletic Department had a very 
busy year, and a successful one, too. 



ess 



G<5 



&0 



Following is a capsule look 
at each sport for the 1999- 
2000 academic year. 

Mens basketball 

Head Coach Mark Nelson 
assembled one of the most tal- 
ented teams in his seven-year 
tenure at Cowley, and the 
Tigers responded, grabbing a 
share of the Jayhawk 
Conference's Eastern Division 
title with Independence and 
Neosho. 

Cowley, picked third in the 
preseason coaches poll, finished 
15-3 in the conference and 26- 
6 overall. The Tigers lost to 
Hutchinson 95-86 in the quar- 
terfinals of Region VI. 

Nelson, who finished with 
his third 25-plus wins season, 
was named Coach of the Year 
in the East. 

"It's more of a reflection of 
what the team did," said 
Nelson, who improved to 82-34 
in seven seasons in the confer- 
ence, 143-78 overall. "I think of 
it as a team award for winning 
the conference and being the 



No. 1 seed at the tournament." 

Sophomore Tyree Harris 
was named a first-team All- 
Jayhawk East selection, while 
teammate Danai Young, also a 
sophomore, was named to the 
third team. Harris also was 
named to the honorable men- 
tion team of Region VI. 

Young has signed with the 
University of Nebraska, while 
Harris is headed to Bethune- 
Cookman College in Daytona 
Beach, Fla. Sophomores James 
O'Brien and Jeff McMillin have 
signed to play at Friends 
University in Wichita, and 
sophomore Chris Ireland is 
headed to the University of 
North Florida. Freshman Nick 
Biby from Winfield is skipping 
his sophomore season at 
Cowley and has transferred to 
Rockhurst in Kansas City. 

Women's basketball 

If ever there was a year 
for Darin Spence to be named 
Coach of the Year, it was this 
past season. 



Spence, who completed his 
third season as Cowley's head 
women's basketball coach, per- 
formed nothing short of a mir- 
acle as the Lady Tigers cap- 
tured their third consecutive 
Jayhawk East title and a No. 
11 national ranking. 

Why? Spence and assistant 
Coach Todd Q. Clark, who has 
since left to become an assis- 
tant at the University of 
Texas-San Antonio, had assem- 
bled what they believed to be a 
top-five national team. The 
team was being built around 
returning sophomore Trinetta 
Moore, 6-2. And along with 
highly-touted freshman guard 
Brandie Russia and solid in- 
state talent, the Lady Tigers 
were destined to be the team 
to beat. 

Moore and Russia never 
played, citing personal reasons. 
And to top that off, two in- 
state players Spence was 
counting on went down with 
knee injuries. 

However, Cowley still had 
talent, it's just that every 



34 



College 1SSS-2000 



game the players would have 
to step up and play to their 
potential. In most cases, they 
did. 

Cowley went 17-1 for the 
third straight year to share 
the Jayhawk East title with 
Independence. And the Lady 
Tigers finished the season with 
an overall record of 30-3. They 
led the nation in team defense 
for the second consecutive year 
and maintained a team grade- 
point average of 3.4. 

"It was an interesting year 
to say the least," said Spence, 
now 51-3 in the league and 91- 
9 in his three seasons at 
Cowley. "The players really 
played through a lot of adver- 
sity at the start of the season." 

Spence, whose team was 
picked to finish second in the 
East, was named Coach of the 
Year. Tariqah Miller was named 
Freshman of the Year, and 
joined teammate Jenia 
Dimitrova on the All-Jayhawk 
East first team. Sophomore 
Petra Hofmann was named to 
the second team. Hofmann and 
Miller earned second-team All- 
Region VI honors, while 
Dimitrova was an honorable 
mention selection. 

All four graduating sopho- 
mores have signed to play at 
four-year schools. Hofmann 
with Florida State University, 
Dimitrova with New Mexico 



State University, Cindy Bates 
with Southeast Missouri State 
University, and Crystal 
Sheddan with Bethel. 

Baseball 

The Tigers rolled into the 
Eastern Sub-Regional 
Tournament at Allen County 
May 11-13 with their sixth 
consecutive Jayhawk 
Conference Eastern Division 
title under their belt and a top 
seeding in the tournament. 

After beating 
Independence 9-8 in the open- 
ing game, Cowley dropped a 7- 
2 decision to Allen. However, 
the Tigers battled back the 
hard way-through the loser's 
bracket-to meet Allen again in 
the championship game. The 
Red Devils scored seven runs 
in the eighth and ninth 
innings combined to wipe out a 
7-2 Cowley lead and win 9-7. 

The Tigers finished the 
season with a 42-18 overall 
record, including a 28-8 mark 
in Jayhawk East play. Despite 
failing to reach the Region VI 
Tournament for the second 
consecutive season, it was a 
good year for the Tigers. 

"We got about as much out 
of those kids as you could get," 
head coach Dave Burroughs 
said. "We played five games in 
48 hours. We just ran out of 
gas." 



Early in the season, Cowley 
was 11-11 overall and 3-3 in 
the conference. The Tigers fin- 
ished the regular season win- 
ning 27 of their last 32 games, 
including 25 of 30 in the con- 
ference. 

Post-season awards found 
their way to several Tigers. 
Ryan Bell was named 
Freshman of the Year in the 
Jayhawk East, while Bell (out- 
field), Clint Stoy (third base), 
Nick Green (pitcher), and Steve 
Haines (pitcher) all earned All- 
Jayhawk East honors. 
Honorable mention players 
from Cowley were Dustin 
Smith, Brock Buckingham, and 
Justin Glenn. 

Stoy, Haines, and Bell all 
earned All-Region VI honors. 

Burroughs, who completed 
his 13th season at Cowley, is 
now just 18 victories from the 
coveted 500-win plateau. He is 
now 482-211 at Cowley, a win- 
ning percentage of .696. 

"I'm not one to make 
excuses," he said. "We lost. We 
got beat. If we can keep every- 
one we've got coming back 
next year, and nobody touches 
our recruits, we'll have a good 
club next season." 

The Tigers lost freshman 
Lawrence Alexander of 
Chandler, Okla. The center 
fielder signed with the 
Philadelphia Phillies. 



&»5 



OS 



President's Annual Rpporl 1993-2000 .1.1 



a«5 



Cowley's Eastern Sub- 
Regional results: Cowley 9, 
Independence 8; Allen 7, 
Cowley 2; Cowley 6, Kansas 
City 1; Cowley 3, Neosho 0; 
Cowley 3, Johnson 2; Allen 9, 
Cowley 7. 

Softball 

The Lady Tigers won their 
fourth consecutive Jayhawk 
Conference Eastern Division 
championship and were poised 
to make their first trip to 
nationals since 1986. 

But Dodge City had other 
ideas. Dodge won a pair of 1-0 
decisions over Cowley in the 
Region VI/District Tournament 
to end Cowley's season at 44- 
10. 

The 44 victories were a 
single-season record. Cowley 
finished the conference season 
with a 29-3 record. In Coach 
Ed Hargrove's 16 seasons, 
Cowley has won or shared 10 
Jayhawk East titles. 

Cowley entered postseason 
play as the top seed and won 
its first two games, 10-2 over 
Coffeyville and 14-0 over 
Neosho. But on the second day 
of the tournament, the bats 
fell silent. A 5-4 come-from- 
behind win over Pratt was 
sandwiched between the 1-0 
losses to Dodge. 

"It's hard to explain how 
one day we can score 24 runs 
on 26 hits, and the next day 
score five runs and get eight 
hits," said Hargrove, who is 
now just five victories away 
from 500 for his career. "I real- 
ly think after we hit the grand 



slam home run against Neosho, 
our hitters were trying to hit 
home runs." 

In 22 innings of play on 
the second day of the two-day 
tournament, Cowley was held 
scoreless for 21 innings and 
had just five hits in those 21 
innings. In one inning against 
Pratt, the Lady Tigers scored 
five runs on seven hits. 

"It was still a good season," 
Hargrove said. "The most wins 
ever. That's what I tried to 
stress to the players when it 
was all over. We came up a 
game short of where we 
intended to be. But they go 
into the record books for most 
wins ever and most wins for 
the sophomores. It was the 
best back-to-back seasons 
ever." 

Cowley was 43-12 last sea- 
son. 

Freshman Lindsey Davis of 
Arkansas City was the work 
horse on the mound. She set 
five school pitching records: 
Most wins in a single season 
(29), Best winning percentage 
in a season (.906), Most strike- 
outs in a season (278) and 
career (278), and Lowest bat- 
ting average against in a sea- 
son (.142). Davis' 278 strike- 
outs shattered the single-sea- 
son mark of 167 by Sandy 
Erickson last year. 

Kristi Stotts was the 
team's leading hitter with a 
.442 average. Balie Walkup 
wasn't far behind at .406. 

Cowley loses just two 
starters, Dena Boiler and 
Crystal Hiltzman. 



Named to the All-Region 
VI/District teams: First team, 
Davis, Boiler, Darci Hutchinson. 
Second team, Stotts, Ky 
Shaklee, Shannon Reed. 
Honorable mention, Lindsey 
Kendrick, Jessica Sheridan. 

Golf 

The Tiger golf team strug- 
gled through most of the sea- 
son but managed to qualify 
three for the NJCAA Division 
II national tournament at the 
Texas A&M University Golf 
Course June 5-9 in College 
Station, Texas. 

Aaron Hill, a freshman 
from Ponca City; Brad 
Lunsford, a freshman from 
Medicine Lodge; and Adam 
Tyner, a sophomore from 
Council Grove, all qualified for 
nationals. Lunsford tied for 
54th place at nationals, while 
Tyner tied for 62nd and Hill 
tied for 84th 

Cowley won the district 
tournament at Quail Ridge 
Golf Course in Winfield April 
24-25. Hill placed second, 
Lunsford third, and Tyner 
fourth. The top five individuals 
qualify for nationals. 

Cowley finished seventh in 
the Jayhawk Conference, which 
divides its season into fall and 
spring. The Tigers had been in 
a position to take sixth. But 
two eighth-place finishes in 
their last two tournaments 
sent the Tigers to eighth. 

Individually, Hill finished 
in a tie for 14th in the confer- 
ence with 14.5 points, earning 
him a spot on the All-Jayhawk 



36 



<!i 19SS-2000 



Conference's third team. Clark 
Blankenship finished in a tie 
for 26th place with one point. 

Men's tennis 

The men's tennis team fin- 
ished in the top five nationally 
for the 11th time in the past 
12 seasons with a fifth-place 
finish at the National Junior 
College Athletic Association 
national tournament in Tyler, 
Texas. 

Cowley scored 25 points, 
just a half-point out of fourth 
place. Georgia Perimeter won 
the national title with 51 
points, followed by Tyler 47, 
Collin County 32, and 
Vincennes 25.5. Cowley was fol- 
lowed by Abraham Baldwin 
Agricultural College 24.5, and 
Johnson County 23. 

No Cowley player reached 
the finals. However, No. 6 sin- 
gles player Ashley Parker 
reached the semifinals, and the 
No. 1 doubles team of Mitch 
Aston and Tom Murray upset 
the No. 2 seed from Vincennes 
in the quarterfinals to reach 
the semifinals. 

Parker lost 6-4, 4-6, 6-4 in 
his semifinal round match, 
while Aston and Murray won 
their quarterfinal match at No. 
1 doubles 6-4, 7-6, 6-3. 

The No. 2 doubles team of 
Walt Williams and Matt 
Prouatt played the No. 1 seed 
in the quarterfinals and lost a 
tough three-setter, 5-7, 7-6, 6-0 
against Tyler. 

Cowley Coach Larry Grose, 
who never has finished lower 
than sixth at nationals (1999), 



was pleased with the way his 
players responded. 

"We try to adhere to the 
international (player) rule of 
two and finish fifth in the 
nation," Grose said. "Georgia 
Perimeter wins the national 
championship with all six play- 
ers being international. I feel 
bad for our players who work 
so hard to get to nationals, but 
they hardly have a chance 
when teams like Georgia 
Perimeter load up on interna- 
tional players." 

The Tigers qualified for 
nationals for the 12th consecu- 
tive season after winning 
Region VI with 32 points. 
Cowley crowned champions at 
No. 3 singles (Aston of Abilene, 
Texas), No. 5 singles (Long Vu 
of Putnam City, Okla.), No. 6 
singles (Parker of Moore, 
Okla.), No. 1 doubles (Aston 
and Murray of England) and at 
No. 2 doubles (Williams of 
Enid, Okla., and Prouatt of 
Australia). 

Former Cowley coach Mike 
Watters was inducted into the 
NJCAA Tennis Coaches Hall of 
Fame at a banquet on May 15. 
Grose was his presenter. 

Women s fennis 

The Lady Tiger tennis 
team set out to get to the 
national tournament in Tucson, 
Ariz. Not only did it reach that 
goal, it also earned a spot in 
the top 10. 

Cowley, with a blend of 
experience and new faces alike, 
earned an eighth-place finish 
at nationals. The No. 3 doubles 



team of Airily Roths of 
Wellington and Janie 
Abplanalp of Arkansas City 
turned in the top finish. The 
duo lost a heart-breaking 
three-setter to the No. 1 seed 
from Collin County, 6-3, 0-6, 4- 
6. 

"The girls really competed 
well," head coach Andre Spence 
said. "I'm so proud of them. I 
can't say enough about this 
team and their determination." 

By finishing second, Roths 
and Abplanalp earned Second- 
Team All-America status. 

Cowley qualified for 
nationals for the first time 
since 1995, when it finished 
11th in the nation. The Lady 
Tigers captured the Region VI 
championship behind the 
strength of three victories. 
Roths, playing No. 5 singles, 
won her flight, as did Lindsey 
Semple at No. 6 singles. Roths 
and Abplanalp then teamed for 
the championship at No. 3 dou- 
bles. 



5*^ 



PS 



5*5 



President's Annual liepnrl 1999-2000 



1SS9-2000 Donors 



Mr. and Mrs. Sid Achenbach 

ADM Milling Co 

Bart Allen 

Allen's Furniture & Carpet 

American Business Women's Association 

American Composers Forum 

American Legion Auxiliary Unit #18 

Joe and Eleanor Anderson 

Andreas & Muret, L.L. P. 

Mr. and Mrs. David W. Andreas 

Mr. and Mrs. Warren D. Andreas 

Annie Foundation 

Mr. and Mrs. Steven Archer 

Ark City Clinic, P.A. 

Ark City Country Mart, L.L.C. 

Ark City Glass Company, Inc. 

Ark City Tumbleweeds 

Ark Veterinary Associates 

Arkansas City Area Arts Council 

Arkansas City Chamber of Commerce 

Arkansas City Music and Drama Club 

Arkansas City Rotary Club 

Arkansas City Traveler 

Rod and Jody Arnett 

Joe and Donna Avery 

Albert and Karen Bacastow 

Mr. and Mrs. Lucien Barbour 

Barbour Title Company 

Tom Barth 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert L. Bates 

Becker Tire Company 

Belle Plaine Alumni Scholarship 

Belle Plaine Community Foundation 

Kim Benedict and Rick Gregory 

Mr and Mrs. Tom Berding 

Mr. and Mrs. James Bernhardt 

Beta Sigma Phi - Alpha Theta 

Beta Sigma Phi - City Council 

Roger Biby 

Billings Plumbing & Bath Boutique 

Mr. and Mrs. John W. Bishop 

The Boeing Company Charitable Trust 

Devon and Connie Bonfy 

Dick and Dolly Bonfy 

Boogaarts-Concordia 

Bea Boory 

Mr. and Mrs. David Bostwick 

Boyer Educational Trust 

Roger and Marietta Brammer 

William and Debra Bridges 

Gary and Earline Brown 

Melburn Porter Brown 

Dr. and Mrs. Robert A. Brown 

Robert and Jana Brown 

Roger and Suzanne Brown 

Brown's Office Supply, Inc. 

Bryant Hardware and Collectibles 

Mikel and Jennifer Buffington 

Karen J. Bullard 

Fred and Carol Bunting 

State Bank of Burden 

Darren and Carolyn Burroughs 

Dave and Vickie Burroughs 

Betty M. Burton 

Business & Professional Women 

Buterbaugh & Handlin 

Caldwell High School 

Carpenter and Vickers Scholarship Trust 

Cedar Vale Alumni Association 

Cedar Vale Booster Club 

Cedar Vale USD #265 

Century 21 Advantage Realty 

Chamber Music America, Inc. 

Enid Marie Chandler 

Charles Harrison Mason Foundation 

Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma 

Mr. and Mrs. Don Cheslic 

Chickasaw Nation 



Marilyn Childers 

Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma 

Citizen Potawatomi Nation 

Citizen's Scholarship Foundation 

City of Arkansas City 

City of Winfield, Kansas 

Claflin Community Scholarship 

Todd Clark 

Clearwater High School 

Ben and Irene Cleveland 

Coca Cola Bottling Co 

Coffeyville Community College 

Gene and Donella Cole 

David and Dawn Colquhoun 

Commerce Bank 

Commercial Federal Bank 

Conco, Inc. 

Anthony Conrad 

Fred Conz Scholarship Trust 

Cox Communications 

Mr. and Mrs. Steven L. Cranford 

Mr. and Mrs. Tony Crouch 

Mr. and Mrs. Bruce Grouse 

Mr. and Mrs. Mike Crow 

Harold R. Crawford 

D& D Equipment, Inc. 

D&S Retail Liquor 

Dairy Queen - Ark City 

Daisy Mae's Cafe 

Kirke Dale Scholarship Trust 

David and Carol Daulton 

Ruth A. David 

Walter and Iris David 

Dr. Lynda B. DeArmond 

Charles and Verna Davis 

Dan and Lin Deener 

Curtis Dick 

Kirk Day 

Derby Area Community Educ. Foundation 

Dr. Gary and Marilyn Dill 

John M. Dillard 

Dillons Store #38 

DiVall Retail Liquor 

Bill and Judy Docking 

Meredith Docking 

Bryne and Diane Donaldson 

Donna's Designs, Inc. 

Douglass Lions Club 

Ron and Pam Doyle 

Mr. and Mrs. Bill Drennan 

Buel Duncan 

Diana Sue Duncan 

Lyle and Terry Eaton 

Ecumenical Fellowship 

Edward D. Jones Company 

Eggleston Educational Trust 

Elfun Society 

Emrick's Van & Storage Company 

Stephen and Janet English 

Equitable Life Assurance Society 

Eudora Booster Club 

Mr. and Mrs. Doug Ewing 

Troy and Kim Ebert 

Mrs. Eleanor Farrar 

Mr. John Farrar 

David G. Faust 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert B. Fencil 

First Baptist Church of Ark City 

First National Bank of Winfield 

First United Methodist Church 

Craig Fletchall 

Ron and Lindy Folks 

Foster's Furniture, Inc. 

J. Leslie Foust 

Mr. and Mrs. Curtis Freeland 

Tim and Karen Fuchs 

Ebbert Eugene Funk, Deceased 

Future Beef Operations, Inc. 



Galaxie Business Equipment, Inc. 

Gallaways, LLC 

Gambino's Pizza 

Garden City Community College 

Gayle's Catering 

General Electric Co. 

Ed and Margaret Gilliland 

Kenneth and Bonnie Gilmore 

Dan and Vicki Givens 

Ron and Donetta Godsev 

J.G. and Doris Goff 

Gordon & Assoc. Architects, P.A. 

Gordon Piatt Energy Group, Inc. 

Graves Drug Store 

Great Western Dining, Inc. 

Gregg & Simmons, CPA's 

Grief Bros. Corporation 

Grimes Jewelers, Inc. 

Larry and Nyla Grose 

Mike Groves Oil, Inc. 

Mike and Judi Groves 

Phillip and Joyce Groves 

Allen and Beverly Grander 

Roger Gubichuk 

Wayne and Kay Hamilton 

Ed and Linda Hargrove 

Hawks Funeral Home 

Haysville ABWA 

Steve and Carol Hearne 

Cloide and Hazel Hensley 

Ernestine Herrin 

Hesston College 

Harriett Hickman 

Bill and Jean Hill 

John and Janice Hitchcock 

Kim and Cynthia Hocker 

Marjory Hodkin 

Michael B. Holland 

Jim and Joyce Holloway 

Angela Holmes 

Home National Bank 

Bill and Carol House 

Hughey Imaging Systems 

Hugoton Knights of Columbus 

Luella Hume 

Hutchinson Electric, Inc. 

Iowa Tribe of Oklahoma 

Mrs. Norman Iverson 

Jan's Sport Shack 

Jarvis Accounting & Tax Service 

Jarvis Auto Supply, Inc. 

Mark Jarvis 

Booker Jennings III 

Charles and Delphia Jennings 

Jerry's Donut Shop 

Conrad and Janet Jimison 

Dorothy Johnson Estate 

Suzanne L. Johnson 

Hubert and Mildred Johnston 

Danny and Sandy Jones 

Mark and Stefani Jones 

Kansas Arts Commission 

Kansas Board of Regents 

Kansas YABA, Inc. 

Kay Kautz 

Marvin and Linda Keasling 

Greg and Diana Kelley 

Paul and Diane Kelly 

Ellen L. Kelly 

John and Joan Kempf 

Mary Jane Kerr 

Oscar Kimmell 

Dr. and Mrs. Nick Kinsch 

Charles 0. Kinzie 

Dr. and Mrs. Paul A. Klaassen 

Clay Elizabeth "Missy" Kloxin 

Anthony and Mary Korte 

Mr. and Mrs. Irvin E. Kramer 



38 



mi 1SSS-2000 



I'iih lei Mm nii'iil tssmiiil inn 



1999-2000 Donors 



Joseph S. Krisik 
Harold and Mary Lake 
LaDonna L. Lanning 

Ranelle Lang 

Bob and Carolyn Langenwalter 

Robert J. Langhofer 

Ric and Becky Lassiter 

Clinton E. Lawson 

Mildred Lawson 

Clay Lemert 

Mareia L. Lemert 

Lila Wallace-Reader's Digest Foundation 

Local 1004 IUE-AFL-CIO 

Long & Neises CPA's Chartered 

Mr. and Mrs. J.C. Louderback 

Jon and Diana Lough 

Randall Lundberg 

Scott and Rhoda MacLaughlin 

Rodger and Melba Maechtlen 

Magnum Mini Storage 

Marine Corps Scholarship Foundation 

Tom Mast 

Kenny and Pat Mauzey 

Steven and Joyce McArtor 

Mr. and Mrs. Daniel T. McAtee 

Dr. and Mrs. Patrick McAtee 

McCluggage, VanSickle & Perry 

Douglas T. McCulloch 

McDonalds's 

Charles McKown 

Gina McKown 

McPherson First United Methodist 

Medicalodges, Inc. 

Louis J. Medvene 

Mid America Arts Foundation 

Midwest Electric Supply, Inc. 

Jim and Betty Milliron 

Mary Jane Mills 

Robert and Olive Milner 

James 0. Mitchell 

Bob Moffatt 

Patricia L. Moreland 

Norman and Sue Morris 

Deb Morrow Carl 

Otis and Terri Morrow 

Morton Enterprises, Inc. 

Multimedia Cablevision 

Jim and Lyn Munson 

National Endowment for the Arts 

Navajo Nation 

Ron and Janice Neagle 

Margaret Neal 

Joe and Patty Neises 

Lee Nelson 

Luella Nelson 

Mark and Sherry Nelson 

Newkirk O.E.A. Education Association 

Craig Newman, Deceased 

Nathan C. Niles 

Randy and Debbie Nittler 

Jan A. Nittler 

Jason and Shannon O'Toole 

Jeanette A. Oesterlin 

Dr. and Mrs. Jerry Old 

Olen Medical Supply 

Stu Osterthun 

Oxford Community Bank 

Oxford High School 

Neal Paisley 

Ada Margaret Palmer 

Terry L. Pameticky 

Parman, Tanner, Soule & Jackson, CPA 

Paton Wholesale & Vending Co 

Mark Patrick 

Don and Wilda Patterson 

PEO Sisterhood Chapter DH 

Bill and Julie Perdue 

Alan Pettigrew 



Philip Ed Phillips 

Eddie and Maggie Picking 

L.G. Pike Construction Co. 

Don Piros 

Potter Auction Service 

Premier Alfalfa 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas L. Prichard 

Jim and Jan Pringle 

Puritan Billiards 

Quality Auto Sales 

Judy Queen 

Ramsey's Auto Parts, Inc. 

Richard H. Raney 

Reedy Ford 

Sid and Sharon Regnier 

Reimer Photography, Ltd. 

Dr. and Mrs. Glen S. Remsberg 

Rev. Guy Rendoff 

Karen Reynolds Trust 

Mr. and Mrs. David Rhoades 

Rindt Erdman Funeral Home 

Hugh D. Riordan 

Mr. and Mrs. Cliff Roderick 

Dr. David and Rhonda Ross 

Mrs. Gail Ross 

Steve and Melinda Ross 

Rubbermaid - Winfield, Inc. 

Rotary Scholarship Pageant 

Rush Scholarship Trust 

S and Y Industries, Inc. 

Tom and Sue Saia 

Scott and Michelle Schoon 

Mr. and Mrs. James P. Salomon 

Lois Sampson 

Sarver Charitable Trust 

Dr. and Mrs. David A. Schmeidler 

Deb Schmidt 

Schmidt Jewelers 

Dr. and Mrs. Rick D. Schoeling 

Scholarship Program Adm, Inc. 

Larry Schwintz 

Frederick and Callie Seaton 

Mr. and Mrs. Selami Ahmet Sehsuvaroglu 

Seminole Drug 

Opal Julia Shaffer 

Robert J. Shaw 

Shea Vision Associates 

Sheldon's Pawn Shop 

E.W. (Bud) and Lauretta Shelton 

Wanda Shepherd 

Neal Sherwood 

Loyal Sheilds III 

Wayne and Sandy Short 

Joe and Mindi Shriver 

Dale and Isobel Smith 

Eldon and MayBelle Smith 

Mr. and Mrs. Forest Smith 

Mrs. Newton C. Smith 

Pam Smith 

Smyer Travel Service, Inc. 

Jean and Ellen Snell 

Merle Snider Motors 

Rex Soule 

Mr. and Mrs. Roy L. Soule 

Southwestern College 

Jim and Margaret Sowden 

Mr. and Mrs. Roger Sparks 

Spurrier Scholarship Fund 

Ms. Audra Stark 

State Bank of Conway Springs 

State Bank of Winfield 

Stauffer Community Foundation 

Steven Chevrolet, Inc. 

Georgia Y. Stevens 

Helen Storbeck 

Mr. and Mrs. Dennis Stover 

Tad and Janice Stover 

Lawrence and Martha Stover 



Dr. and Mrs. Rod Stoy 

Ken Strobel 

Strother Field Airport Industrial Park 

Randy G. Strothman 

Mr. and Mrs. John M. Sturd 

Summit Auto World 

Sumner-Cowley Electric Co-Op 

Larry Swaim 

Ronald and Patsy Sweely 

Betty Sybrant 

Mr. and Mrs. James E. Sybrant 

Linda L. Sybrant 

James L. Tadtman 

Taylor Drug 

Fred and Marilyn Taylor 

Richard and Nancy Tredway 

George Trimble Scholarship Trust 

Anthony J. Trout 

Trust Company of Kansas 

Two Rivers Co-Op 

Tyler Production, Inc. 

Steve and Connie Tyler 

Thomas Tyler 

Udall First Baptist Church 

Unified School District #470 

Union State Bank 

United Agency 

United Tribes'of KS and SE Nebraska 

Universal Steel Buildings 

USD #470 - Arkansas City 

David and Sheree Utash 

Valley Center Hornet Boosters 

Chris Vollweider 

Barbara Thompson 

Waldeck Oil Co. 

Waldinger Corporation 

Waldorf-Riley, Inc. 

James and Loretta Waldroupe 

Caroline Newman Warren 

Mabel Warren 

Randall and LeArta Watkins 

Dr. Aaron T. Watters 

Webber Land Company 

Connie Sue Wedel 

Wellington First Christian Church 

Wellington Senior High School 

Wellington's Steak House 

Western Resources, Inc. 

Westlake Ace Hardware 

Bob and Patricia White 

Dale B. White 

Wichita First United Methodist Church 

Virginia Jane Wilkins 

Williams Natural Gas Company 

Peggy Williams 

Willis Corroon Corp. 

Jeffrey F. Wilson 

Mary N. Wilson 

Rodney and Priscilla Wilson 

Wilson Oil Company 

Winfield Chiropractic Office 

Winfield First Presbyterian Church 

Winfield Pharmacy 

WinnerCo, Inc. 

Wood Chiropractic 

Woods Lumber of Arkansas City 

Bea Wright Estate 

Dr. and Mrs. Robert Yoachim 

Zeller Motor Co., Inc. 



President's Annual Report 1999 2000 :!!i 



Cowle? Mem 



hi n Glance 2000 



Mill Levy : 
20.053 

fact: 

Of the 19 community col- 
leges in Kansas, Cowley has 
the 8th lowest mill levy in 
the state at 20.053, and has 
the seventh highest county 
valuation of $174,845,466. 
At $45 per credit hour for 
tuition and fees, Cowley 
boasts one of the lowest 
tuitions in the state. 



Enrollment 




figures: 




Facts, Fall 2000. 


High School 


468 


Freshmen 


1,789 


Sophomores 


1,049 


Special 


531 


Total Headcount 


3,837 


Total FTE 


2,355.96 


Approximately 60% of fresh- 


men and sophomores 


enrolled in Kansas colleges 


are in community colleges. 



Assessed 
Valuation: 




Fall 2000: 


$174,845,466 


Dudget: 




2000-2001: 


$18 million 



Founded: 1922 

In 1968, the College became the first school in the state to combine a traditional liberal arts 
transfer curriculum with a program of area vocational-technical school training. 

President: 

Dr. Patrick McAfee, Ph.D., became the third president of the College on July 1, 1987. 



2000 Spring 
Enrollment: 

2,095.11 FTE 

(Record for spring) 

3,585 Total Headcount 



Fall 
Enrollment 

2,355.96 Full-Time 
Equivalency (record) 
3,837 Total Headcount 



no 



1099-2000 



Programs: 

33 Certificate and Applied Science programs 

42 Liberal Arts/Transfer programs 

Institute of Lifetime Learning - a model Senior Citizens program 

More than 100 specialized programs and seminars offered through the Institute for Lifetime 
Learning — Special Programs Office, the Displaced Homemaker Single Parent Program, and the 
Work and Family Program. 

Specialized training for business and industry to meet their needs. In the past the college has 
developed or offered programs for General Electric, Rubbermaid- Winfield, Gordon-Piatt Energy 
Group. Inc., the city of Arkansas City, local school districts, day care centers, local nursing homes, 
special education co-ops, KSQ Blowmolding, Social Rehabilitation Services, Southwestern Bell 
Telephone, KONE Elevator, Boeing-Wichita. Cessna, and the Business and Industry Division of Banks. 

Facilities: 

14 buildings on a 10-acre campus in the heart of downtown Arkansas City. 

Outreach Centers in Mulvane, Strother Field, Winfield, Wellington and Wichita, where a coop- 
erative partnership between Cowley County Community College, Wichita State University, and 
Wichita Area Technical College has formed the Southside Education Center. Courses also taught at 
these area high schools: Argonia, Belle Plaine, Burden, Caldwell, Cedar Vale, Conway Springs, Dexter, 
Oxford, South Haven, and Udall. 

athletics: 

Eight intercollegiate sports that compete in the Kansas Jayhawk Conference's East Division. 
Volleyball, Men's Basketball, Women's Basketball, Baseball, Softball, Golf, Men's Tennis, and Women's 
Tennis. In fall 2001, Cowley will field men's and women's cross country and men's and women's track 
and field teams. 

■layhauik conference Eastern nioisioo crowns io 1S99-2000: 

• Baseball 42-18 (sixth consecutive title) 

• Men's Basketball 26-0 

• Women's Basketball 30-3 (third consecutive title) 

• Softball 44-10 (fourth consecutive title) 

District or Region in crowns in 1999-2000: 

■ Men's Tennis 

■ Women's Tennis 
•Golf 

Employees: 

167 full-time faculty, staff and administration 
290 part-time faculty 

Endowment association Assets: 

June 30, 2000 assets of $1,869,319.39 
460 Members 



dm In I iillw 



Bonom Line 2000 



Vour inuestmenff 

• $3,439,260 in 1998 taxes. $3,723,718 in 1999 taxes. 

Taxes DO NOT pay for scholarships to out-of-state athletes. 
The College is fifth in size among the 19 community 
colleges in Kansas. 

Vour Return 

$14 million a year added to the local economy. For each 
dollar of local tax support received, the College returns 
$5.03 to the county's economy. That return is greater 
when the total picture of the state is considered. For 
every dollar spent by the state in support of community 
colleges, $22.43 is returned. 

$7,555,189 annual payroll, providing 167 full-time jobs and 
290 part-time faculty. 

Educational opportunities for all segments of the popula- 
tion at less than half the cost of four-year colleges. 
Average student age is 31.6 years. 
A record full-time enrollment for the fall of 2000 of 
2,355.96 total FTE. 

Graduates who, according to a study by the University of 
Kansas, suffer less transfer shock than any other group of 
transfer students. 

Customized training for more than a dozen businesses and 
industries. 

A significant attraction for businesses and industries con- 
sidering relocation in this area. 
Cultural, educational and athletic events which entertain 
audiences throughout this area. 

An educational institution well known for the quality of its 
programs in both liberal arts and vocational/occupational 
areas. 

Honors £ Awards 

In the fall of 1999, Cowley was presented the Kansas 
Excellence Award, the highest award presented to organi- 
zations by the Kansas Award for Excellence Foundation. 
The Level III award was presented to the college during 
the fourth annual banquet in Overland Park on Oct. 19, 
1999. 

In February 2000, Cowley was recommended to receive the 
maximum 10-year accreditation by the North Central 
Association of Colleges and Schools, following a three-day 
NCA site visit. 



If you believe in the commu- 
nity college concept, let your 
state representative know. 

Elected otficials 
Gouernor 

Bill Graves 
Second Floor 
State Capitol 
Topeka, Kansas 66612 

Senator 

Greta Goodwin 
Winfield, Kansas 67156 

Representatives 

Joe Shriver 
Arkansas City, Kansas 
67005 

Judy Showalter 
Winfield, Kansas 67156 

State Board off 
Regents 

Joe Birmingham 

Deputy Executive Director 

700 SW Harrison 

Suite 1410 

Topeka, KS 66603-3716 

financial aid help 
for Cowley cuunty 
Students 

For the 1999-2000 year, 
more than 1,000 Cowley 
County students were 
awarded more than $2 mil- 
lion in grants, loans, scholar- 
ships and work-study pro- 
grams. 



President's Innual licporl 1939-2000 




llil 




dCowle 



? 

Cowley County Community College & Area 1 oral ional -Tei Imii ill School 
125 S. Second St., Arkansas City, Kansas 67005 
1- 



iLiiir.i ilmiuim. 3 it ^ 

S?oudien