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Full text of "President's Annual Report"

dent of the Year: Kelli Riedmiller 




Academic Excellence Challenge 



ack-to-Back State 



;udent Achievements 

Students of the Month 
All-Kansas Academic Team 
Mr. Cinderfella 




Queen Alalah 

iculty/Staff Achievements 

Regnier Retires after 25 years of service 
Ewing directs last show 
Governor's Arts Awards 

AVERYS NAMED OUTSTANDING TlGER AlUMNI 

Trustee named to National Board 

Picking Leaves 

NISOD Excellence Award Winners 

hletics 

Smithson returns to Cowley 
Grose wins national award 
New - Cross Country/Track & Field 
Hall of Fame Class of 2001 



ACADEMIC 

EXCELLENCE CHALLENGE 

STATE CHAMPIONS 

COWLEY COLLEGE 




Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation 



http://archive.org/details/presidentsannua200009unse 



Cowley News 

J & PRESIDENT'S REPORT 



Welcome to another edition of the 
President's Annual Report! 

The 2000-2001 academic year saw 
many tremendous accomplishments by 
the people who make Cowley such a spe- 
cial place. Our students, faculty, staff, 
and Board members work very hard 
each year to reach their goals. And as an 
institution of higher education, it is our 
job to help people succeed. It's in our 
Mission Statement, which says we are 
"committed to learning excellence and 
personal enrichment in an open access 
environment." 

As you read this report, you'll be 
impressed with the quality of people at 
Cowley and the work they do to help make this 
a thriving, dynamic institution. 

Our students excel in the classroom, on stage, on 
the fields of academic and athletic competition, and every- 
where in between. Nothing exemplifies this more than our cover story in this edition. Cowley's Academic 
Excellence Challenge team, under the guidance of Social Science Department instructor Chris Mayer, won its sec- 
ond consecutive state championship in April. 

The team of Lori Robinson of Goddard, Sean Sanborn of Cedar Vale, Nick Endicott of Arkansas City, and 
Luke Lockwood of Newkirk, Okla., competed as a team and captured the title again. We are extremely proud of 
Chris and all of the students for representing Cowley so professionally. Often, students are praised only for their 
athletic accomplishments. Winning back-to-back academic state titles is truly an amazing feat. 

Another significant student accomplishment occurred this summer when business administration major 
Rebecca McCaslin of Winfield placed third in the nation in computer applications during the 50th annual National 
Leadership Conference of Phi Beta Lambda. Her third-place finish is one of the highest ever by a Cowley student 
in the PBL competition. 

An organization is only as good as its people, and we said goodbye to two loyal employees this past academic 
year. Sid Regnier, vice president of business services, retired after a 25-year career with Cowley. And Maggie 
Picking, vice president of student affairs for nearly 13 years, left to take a job at a community college in Arkansas. 
I appreciate both Sid and Maggie for their hard work and dedication during their Cowley careers. They will be 
missed. 

During my 14 years as president of Cowley, I have had the pleasure of working with competent, caring mem- 
bers of our Board of Trustees. There could not have been a better choice for the 2001 Outstanding Tiger Alumni 
Award than Board member Donna Avery and her husband Joe. The Averys are tireless crusaders for the good of 
the community and for the future of the college. 

And finally, I'd like to offer my sincere appreciation for everyone associated with Cowley. From students, 
employees, Board members, alumni and friends, this college would not be where it is today without your tremen- 
dous support. 

Fourteen years ago, my wife Sandy and I came to Cowley with the idea of staying a couple of years. But I fell 
in love with this "stepping stone," and I'm still very much in love with it. I look forward to a great 2001-2002 aca- 
demic year. 

Sincerely, 
/ 




£J:j. ffta& 



Special Message from President Di\ Piii l s ]lu~\'LbS 



0ONTENTS 



2000-2001 



Cowley Online: www.eowleyeollege.eom 




Departments 

SB President's Message 

BJ Boar 'I'm stees 

EjS Administration 

V^ Students Month 

frKI Cowley At-a-Glance 2001 

MJ Bottom Line 2001 

Student Achievements 



PAGE 29 



o 
o 
o 
© 



Student of the Year 

Kelli Riedmiller named 
Cowley's Student of the Year 

AEC Back-to-Back State Champions 

AEC team wins state title 

for the second consecutive year 

All-Kansas Academic Team 

Mindi Russell and Amanda Barkley represent Cowley 
On All-Kansas Academic Team 

Queen Alalah LXIX 

Ark City native Shausha Lee 
crowned Queen Alalah LXIX 

Student Briefs 



Faculty/Staff 
Achievements 



© 
© 
© 



Sid Regnier retires 

More than 250 people help honor 
Regnier at retirement reception 

Dejon Ewing Exits Stage Left 

Neil Simon's "Rumors" Ewing's 

final production as director 

Donna and Joe Avery 

Averys receive 

Outstanding Tiger Alumni awards 



© 
© 
© 

© 

© 
© 



NISOD Award Winners 

Four employees receive 
NISOD Excellence Awards 



Governor's Arts Awards 

Connie Bonfy and Gary Gackstatter 
presented with Governor 's Arts Awards 

Maggie Picking Leaves 

Head of student services 
takes job in Arkansas 

Ron Godsey Elected to Board 

Board member to serve on the 
board of directors of the 

Association of Community College Trustees 

Administrators Promoted 

Five college administrators 

receive promotions from the President 

Goodrye, Doug 

Long-time art instructor 

Hunter succumbs to cancer 



General College News 



© 

© 

© 
© 



Workforce Development Center 

New "One-Stop" shop now open at Strother Field 

New Construction Marks Growth 

Groundbreaking for new dormitory and dining facility 

Record-Breaking Enrollment 

Figures show a significant increase 
in almost every enrollment category 

New Networking Technology Program 

Cowley, Ark dry and Winfield USDs 
to offer Cisco Systems training 

Those Racin' Ducks 

Annual Great Cowley Duck Dash raises record amount for fund 

Student Satisfaction 

The Noel-Levitz survey addresses 12 areas 
related to student satisfaction 

Enrollment Breakdown 

Find out where our students come from 



Athletic Achievements 



© 

© 

© 
© 



Randy Smithson Returns 

Former Cowley star returns as head coach 
of the men's basketball team 

Grose Wins Outstanding Service Award 

Men 's tennis coach Larry Grose wins Hershel Stephens Award 
for outstanding service on regional and national level 

Belknap Heads Up New Program 

Cowley adds cross country, track and field 

for men and women with Casey Belknap at the helm 

Tiger Athletic Hall-of-Fame 2001 

Six inductees honored at banquet 

Sports Briefs 




PAGE 7 



Cowley News & President's Report 2000-2001 



BOARD OF©RUSTEES 



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Cowley News & President's Report 2000-2001 3 



THE©DMINISTRATION 







Dr. Patrick J. McAtee 

President 



Conrad Jimison 

Vice President of Instruction 



Sheree Utash 

Vice President 
of Northern Campuses 



8 A 



Maggie Picking 

Vice President 
of Student Affairs 







Tom Saia 

Dean of Administration/ 
Director of Athletics 



Terri Morrow 

Dean of Development 
and College Relations 



Charles McKown 

Dean of Research 
and Technology 



Tony Crouch 

Dean of Business Services 






Marilyn Dill 


Gene Cole 


Sue Saia 


ssociate Dean of Instruction 


Associate Dean 
of Business and Industry 


Associate Dean 
of Student Services 



4 Cowley News & President's Report 2000-2001 



Student Achievements 



Top Students 



STUDENTS OFTHE©ONTH 





XZ> 




Mindi Russell 

September 2000 
Arkansas City, Kansas 



Ben Schears 

October 2000 
Emporia, Kansas 



Rhiannon Davis 

November 2000 
Tonkawa, Oklahoma 



Kelli Riedmiller 

November 2000 

Mulvane, Kansas 
Student of the Year 




Cowley News & President's Report 2000-2001 5 



Student Achievements 



Students of the Month 



Riedmiller 
named Cowley's 
Student 
of the Year 



Kelli Riedmiller, a sophomore from 
Wichita, was named Cowley's 2000-2001 
Student of the Year during the annual 
Celebration of Excellence banquet April 
19,2001. 

Riedmiller, a graduate of Mulvane 
High School and the daughter of Karen and 
Gary Riedmiller, was a liberal arts major at 
Cowley who held a 3.77 grade-point aver- 
age. Riedmiller was Cowley's December 
2000 Student of the Month and was chosen 
over seven other students of the month. 

Maggie Picking, former vice president 
of student affairs, presented Riedmiller 
with her award. 

Riedmiller came to Cowley with 
extensive community service, including 
being active in the Derby 4-H Club for 
many years. 

"I didn't know what I wanted to do" 
(after high school), Riedmiller said. "I liked 
so many things in so many different areas. 
It was hard to decide. I knew I could come 
here and get a little bit of everything. The 
community service program was awesome, 
and that's what really drew me here. 
Community service is a big part of my 
life." 

Riedmiller was president of Cowley's 
Volunteers Learning Through Service, and 
she served on the Board of Directors of 
Service Learning Central. She volunteered 
a minimum of 15 hours per week for vari- 
ous VoLTS and SLC activities. She is a 
graduate of Cowley's AmeriCorps pro- 
gram, having logged 900 hours of commu- 
nity service. She also was a resident assis- 
tant in the William R. Docking Dormitory, 
and she tutored at C-4 Elementary School 
just east of Arkansas City. Also, Riedmiller 
is involved with St. Michael Catholic 
Church in Mulvane. 




Above: Kelli Riedmiller accepts the Student of the Year Award from Vice President of 

Student Affairs Maggie Picking. 

Below: Riedmiller shows her surprise at being named Student of the Year. 



And through her involvement with 
Habitat for Humanity, Riedmiller spent Jan. 
6-12, 2001, in Rio Bravo, Mexico, building 
a house with the Methodist Mission group. 

"I'm happy because I'm doing as 
much as I can and doing a good job at it," 
Riedmiller said. "The community service 
has given me great skills for the future. 
Everything's a learning experience." 

Riedmiller graduated in May and 
planned to transfer to Kansas State 
University and major in landscape design. 

Riedmiller continues to be active in 4- 
H. She is superintendent of demonstrations 
for the Sedgwick County Fair, and assists 
the horticulture program in 4-H. 

A spiritual person, Riedmiller also was 
instrumental in starting a Bible study group 
in her dorm with about nine other women. 

And a new project through SLC has 
her excited. 

"I'm chair of the Community Garden 
Committee through SLC," she said. "The 
community garden is a place where people 
in Arkansas City can have a little piece of 
land to grow whatever they want like veg- 
etables, flowers, whatever." 



The group has ground along Mill Road 
between Kansas and Chestnut where some 
homes were destroyed by the October 1998 
flood. Outdoors is where Riedmiller enjoys 
being. 




Fm happy because I'm doing AS MUCH AS I CAN and doing a good JOB AT IT. 

- Kelli Riedmiller, Student of the Year 



6 Cowley News & President's Report 2000-2001 



Student Achievements 



AEC State Champions 



AEC team wins 
state title second 
consecutive year 



Cowley's Academic Excellence 
Challenge team did it again! 

The team of Lori Robinson, Sean 
Sanborn, Nick Endicott, and Luke 
Lockwood captured its second consecutive 
AEC State Championship April 28, 2001, 
with a 175-135 victory over Cloud County 
in the finals. 

The semifinals and finals were held in 
the Brown Center for Arts, Sciences and 
Technology on Cowley's main campus. 
The defending AEC champs automatically 
host the following year's event. 

Chris Mayer, Social Science 
Department instructor, is the team's coach. 
He said members of this year's team (all 




The Cowley Academic Excellence Challenge team accepts its state championship trophy. 
Left to right are: Luke Lockwood, Lori Rorinson, Nick Endicott, Sean Sanborn and coach 
Chris Mayer. 

but one participated last year) compliment- 
ed each other. 

"This was a phenomenal year," Mayer 
said. "The team used its experience in 
every match. They were fun to watch." 




ACADEMIC 

EXCELLENCE CHALLENGE 

STATE CHAMPIONS 

COWLEY COLLEGE 





ACADEMIC 

EXCELLENCE CHALLENGE 

STATE CHAMPIONS 

COWLEY COLLEGE 




THE TEAM USED ITS EXPERIENCE IN EVERY MATCH. THEY WERE FUN TO WATCH. 

- Chris Mayer, AEC coach 

Cowley News & President's Report 2000-2001 7 



btudent Achievements 



All-Kansas Academic Team 



Russell, Barkley 
represent Cowley 
on All-Kansas 
Academic Team 



Mindi Russell of Arkansas City and 
Amanda Barkley of Viola represented 
Cowley on the 2001 All-Kansas Academic 
Team. 

The two Cowley sophomores were 
among more than three dozen top commu- 
nity college scholars from the 19 communi- 
ty colleges in Kansas who were honored 
with a luncheon in Topeka on Feb. 14. 

The team was sponsored by the inter- 
national headquarters of Phi Theta Kappa 
international honor society, the Kansas 
Association of Community College 
Trustees and the Kansas Council of 
Community College Presidents. 

The group of 41 men and women, 
ranging in age from 19 to 44, were recog- 
nized in an annual award ceremony that 
also drew educators and lawmakers. Ray 
Taylor, executive director of the American 
Association of Community College 
Trustees, was the keynote speaker. 

"The people nominated for this award 
represent the finest students that Kansas 
community colleges have to offer," said 
Thomas C. Percy, a Hutchinson 
Community College history instructor who 
serves as Kansas region coordinator for the 
honor society. 

Each scholar was selected by his or her 
own community college for the sixth annu- 
al statewide academic team, and each also 
was a nominee for the 2001 All-USA 
Academic Team, sponsored by the newsp 
per USA Today, Phi Theta Kappa and the 
American Association of Community 
Colleges. 

Russell and Barkley were both biology 
majors. 

"The people nominated for this award 
represent the finest students that Kansas 
community colleges have to offer," said 
Thomas C. Percy, a Hutchinson 
Community College history instructor who 
serves as Kansas region coordinator for the 
honor society. 

Each scholar was selected by his or her 
own community college for the sixth annu- 
al statewide academic team, and each also 




Mindi Russell 



Amanda Barkley 



is a nominee for the 2001 All-USA 
Academic Team, sponsored by the newspa- 
per USA Today, Phi Theta Kappa and the 
American Association of Community 
Colleges. 

Each student received a proclamation 
issued by Gov. Bill Graves, an educational 
stipend, and an academic medallion. 

The Kansas Regents universities and 
Washburn University have promised to 
match the stipends with $1,000 scholar- 
ships for those who transfer after complet- 
ing their community college studies. The 
students went to the Kansas Statehouse 
prior to the luncheon, where they were 
given a tour and met lawmakers. 

"We consider this a very worthwhile 
endeavor for all of the Kansas community 
colleges to come together and celebrate the 
achievements of the state's outstanding stu- 
dents," Percy said. "These students are our 
finest not only in the academic sphere, but 
also in terms of service and citizenship." 

Phi Theta Kappa is the honor society 
for students attending community and two- 
year colleges. Membership is based on high 
grade point averages and other criteria, 
with members focusing on scholastic 
achievement and service to community and 
campus. The 41 individuals are part of a 
statewide student body of nearly 124,000 
people enrolled in credit courses at the 19 
Kansas community colleges. 

Since 1991, Phi Theta Kappa, USA 
Today and the American Association of 
Community Colleges have sponsored the 
national All-USA Academic Team 
Program. The Kansas program is an affili- 
ate, and the Kansas students are all nomi- 
nees for the national honor. 

About 500 U.S. community college 
students competed for places on the first, 
second and third national teams. First team 
members each received $2,500 stipends, 
and were featured along with second and 
third team members in the April 5 edition 



of USA Today. Team members 
were also presented with medal- 
lions. 

Names of the students will 
be placed on the society's Web 
site, www.ptk.org, and the 
Kansas group also will be 
included on 

www.hutchcc.edu/ksptk, which 
is the corresponding Kansas 
site. 

Academic Team nominees 
also will have the opportunity to apply for 
the Phi Theta Kappa Washington, D.C., 
Internship Program, with positions avail- 
able at the U.S. Department of Education, 
the National Science Foundation, 
Association of Community College 
Trustees, American Association of 
Community Colleges and Phi Beta Kappa. 
In addition, in conjunction with the 
Community College Centennial celebra- 
tion, the American Association of 
Community Colleges and Phi Theta Kappa 
have announced the Centennial Scholars 
Program. The Coca-Cola Foundation will 
present $100,000 in scholarships to 50 out- 
standing community college students to 
commemorate the 1 00th anniversary of the 
two-year college system. The 50 
Centennial Scholars received stipends of 
$2,000 each, and each institution received 
special recognition at the AACC 
Convention. 

Selection of 50 Centennial Scholars 
will be integrated into the existing process 
used for the All-USA Academic Team. The 
highest scoring All-USA applicant from 
each of the 50 states will be named a 
Centennial Scholar. Each Centennial 
Scholar represented his or her state in the 
Centennial Celebration Ceremonies at the 
AACC Convention April 4-7. 2001, in 
Chicago, 111. Colleges with Centennial 
Scholars were notified by mid-February, 
2001, and were responsible for their stu- 
dent's travel and accommodation expenses 
to the AACC Convention. 

Phi Theta Kappa's All-State Academic 
Teams Program was launched in 1994 as an 
expanded component of the program at the 
national level. More than 400 U.S. colleges 
and universities will offer more than $30 
million in college financial assistance to the 
society's members. 



8 



Coweey News & President's Report 2000-2001 



Student Achievements If 



ueen Alalah LXIX 



Ark City native 
Lee Queen Alalah 
LXIX 



History was made during the 2000 
Arkalalah Queen Coronation as Shausha 
Lee of Arkansas City became the first 
African-American to wear the crown. 

Lee, the daughter of Debra Lee, was 
chosen by the audience over four other 
Cowley sophomores as the 69th Queen 
Alalah. Allison Tweedy of Arkansas City 
was voted first runner-up during the coro- 
nation, which took place Oct. 27, 2000. 

Lee couldn't believe it when former 
Queen Alalah Shannon (Ramirez) O'Toole 
told her she was a finalist after student and 
employee voting Sept. 27-28. 

"I was really shocked," Lee said. "I 
didn't understand why she was coming to 
my house with a flower in her hand. She 
told me I was a finalist, and I said you've 
got to be joking. It's an honor and a privi- 
lege that people would vote for me." 

Lee, an elementary education major, 
ws a member of CC Singers and worked 
with the fall musical "Annie Get Your 
Gun" as a member of Act One. She also 
was Student Government Association sec- 
retary, was a member of Volunteers 
Learning Through Service, the Jungle 
Club, and was on the debate/forensics 
team. She also was a member of Campus 
Christian Fellowship. 

She is the granddaughter of Annie Lee 
of Arkansas City. A brother, Romaine 
Johnson, lives in Minnesota, and a sister, 
Lynn Johnson, lives in Oklahoma City. 

Off campus, Lee sings in the choir at 
Church of God In Christ and concentrates 
on her studies. 

She looks forward to Arkalalah each 
year. 

"I look at Arkalalah as a time for 
friends and family to come together to 
enjoy each other with all the little festivities 
going on," Lee said. "It's a good town tra- 
dition. It's something everybody looks for- 
ward to. You always see people you haven't 
seen for a long time." 

Lee, who has performed at past coro- 
nations with the Ark Highs at Arkansas 
City High School and as an usherette, said 
her favorite part about Arkalalah was the 




Shausha Lee walks down the stage after being c 
Alalah LXIX during the coronation on October 

parade performance by the Midian 
Shriners. 

"When I was a kid I always liked the 
Shriners in the bumper cars," Lee laughed. 
"I look forward to that every time. There 
was just something about little monkeys 
driving around in the street that made me 
happy. 

"For the past three years, I've baby-sat 
Amanda and Griffith Young and taken 
them to the carnival. I enjoy watching them 
have fun." 

Her love for children has her interested 
in pursuing a career in teaching or early 
childhood development. She was planning 
to transfer to Emporia State University. 

"I love kids to death," Lee said. "If it's 
helping them in the classroom, then that's 
what I do. I've always seemed to be able to 
relate to kids. I don't know if it was grow- 
ing up by myself or what. I have a lot of kid 
stuck in me. It makes me happy to work 
with them." 

Out of ACHS, Lee weighed several 
scholarship offers for her ability to throw 
the shot put and discus in track and field. 

"I wasn't scared to leave Ark City, but 
I don't think I was ready," she said. "I 



looked at Cowley as a 
place where I couldgo 
to get my basics and 
prepare for the next 
step. 

"I know I made 
the right decision. I 
have the worst time 
with algebra, and I'm 
in a class now where 
there are a smaller 
number of people so 
the teacher can work 
with you one on one. 
That benefits me. And 
I love the musicals 
that we've done in the 
theatre department." 

Lee had the role 
of "Sissy" in the fall 
1999 musical "Damn 
Yankees." 

Lee described 
herself as a "kind, car- 
ing person." 

"I would like for 
people to think of me 
as someone they can 
come to and talk to 
and trust that 1 won't tell somebody else," 
she said. "A person they can rely on. And 
I'm big on this love thing. I want to make 
everybody happy. I don't have any ene- 
mies, so I count myself blessed." 

Lee said Cowley helped her become a 
more responsible person. 

"What the teachers expect of you is 
what you're supposed to do, and if you 
don't get it done, it hangs on your shoul- 
der," Lee said. "Cowley also has shown me 
that there are a lot of people who can help 
you as long as you ask them. I do appreci- 
ate Cowley." 

Lee cited Mary Young, Amanda and 
Griffith's mother and an instructor at 
ACHS, as the most influential person in her 
life. 

"Ever since high school, she's helped 
me write papers," Lee said. "I have very 
bad grammar. She's done a lot. I was in her 
group called Reflections, an improvisation- 
al group that discusses what teenagers face. 
She's taken a lot of time to help me with 
my family. She shows in her own way she 
loves me. It makes me feel special that 
somebody cares that much about me." 



rowned Queen 
27, 2000. 



Cowley News & President's Report 2000-2001 



Student Achievements 



Student Briefs 



Stites captures 
Mr. Cinderfella 
title 



Blake Stites, a freshman from Prescott, 
Kan., captured the title of Mr. Cinderfella 
during the 13th annual contest held April 
26, 2001, in the Robert Brown Theatre 
inside the Brown Center for Arts, Sciences 
and Technology. 

Amy Shaw, 22, Miss Kansas 2000, 
served as emcee for the evening. The Derby 
native was a senior at Wichita State 
University planning a career in physical 
therapy. 

Act One sponsored the event. 

Shaw's platform is mentoring, and 
feels we must "help pave the way" to suc- 
cess through mentoring. Shaw was 
involved in Big Sisters for two years 
through the Big Brothers and Sisters 
Organization. She also was a Golden Girl 
for WSU baseball, and participated in New 
Friends (Mentoring Organization) for one 
year. 

Since the first Mr. Cinderfella Pageant 
in 1989, Miss Kansas has hosted the con- 
test. Dejon Ewing, Humanities Department 
chair and organizer of the event, said, 
"Cinderfella has always been one event 
Miss Kansas looks forward to going to the 
most." 

Sixteen male Cowley students were 
entered in the contest and competed in 
beach or leisurewear, talent, and evening- 
wear. 

The house was packed, and I think 
everyone had a really good time," Ewing 
said. 



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Blake Stites gets a kiss from Amy Shaw, 
Miss Kansas 2000, after being crowned Mr. 
Cinderfella 2001. 



Six students 
qualify for 
national Phi Beta 

Lambda 
conference 



Six business students qualified for a 
national conference after placing at the 
50th Annual State Conference for Phi Beta 
Lambda in Salina March 4-6, 2001. 

Lori Robinson of Goddard, Lachelle 
Orman of Arkansas City, Rebecca 
McCaslin of Winfield, Amber Anstine of 
Geuda Springs, Darci Klick of Arkansas 
City, and Elizabeth Keown of Caldwell 
qualified to attend the national PBL confer- 
ence in Orlando, Fla., July 4-7, 2001. At 
that national conference, McCaslin placed 
third in computer applications, one of the 
highest finishes at nationals ever by a 
Cowley PBL student. She is an accounting 
major at Cowley. 

Anstine's first-place award in the 
Parliamentary Procedure competition at 
state qualified her to be the Parliamentarian 
for the state of Kansas in 2001-2002. 

Eight other Cowley students received 
recognition at the state awards luncheon for 
second- to fifth-place finishers. Beverly 
Grunder, Business and Service Technology 
Department chair, is the group's sponsor. 



Seven other schools competed. They 
were Friends University, Emporia State 
University, Central Christian College of 
McPherson, Highland Community College, 
Colby Community College, Labette 
Community College, and Butler County 
Community College. 

IT students 
hear Boeing 
presentation, 
place at skills 
Olympics 

Industrial Technology students were 
given a demonstration by employees of 
Boeing Wichita in early May 2001 on the 
company's state-of-the-art measurement 
systems. 

Also, Wade Pappan of Arkansas City 
placed third in the annual Kansas 
Vocational Industrial Clubs of America 
Skills Olympics held in Wichita. Pappan, a 
Welding Technology student, graduated 
May 12 with an associate of applied sci- 
ence degree. 

Boeing employees traveled to 
Arkansas City for the demonstration. The 
first was a FARO arm, a portable coordi- 
nate measuring machine. Once referenced, 
or locked down, the machine is capable of 
producing a three-dimensional print of 
whatever is within its reach. The print is 
workbench size. Workers are able to pro- 
gram the machine, touch the part several 
times, and the image appears on screen. 

The second demonstration was of the 
photogrammetry system. By placing reflec- 
tive dots all over the unknown part, the 
camera will reference itself based on a mas- 
ter dot configuration and produce a print. It 
is only limited by the worker's imagina- 
tion. Boeing is currently restoring a B-29 
bomber from World War II, and are pro- 
ducing prints from this camera. The com- 
puter compiles the photos (light reflection 
speed and angles), does the math, and pro- 
duces a print. 

In addition to prints, the machine can 
produce statistical data to perform quality 
assurance work. It also can be used to find 
trouble spots in assembly, and it facilitates 
hardware interchangeably. 



10 Cowley News & President's Report 2000-2001 



Student Achievements 



Student Briefs 



Lisa Spoon gave the FARO demon- 
stration, while Glen Cork demonstrated the 
photogrammetry system. 

Harper native 
awarded McAtee 
Scholarship 

Mason Powell, a freshman theatre 
major from Harper, was awarded a $1,000 
Patrick J. McAtee Scholarship at Cowley. 

Powell, a graduate of South Barber 
High School in Kiowa, was awarded the 
scholarship on April 19, 2001, during the 
college's annual Celebration of Excellence 
banquet. 

Powell will receive $500 for the fall 
2001 semester and another $500 for the 
spring 2002 term. Powell played the role of 
Charlie Davenport in the fall 2000 musical 
"Annie Get Your Gun," then secured the 
role of Lenny Ganz in the spring play 
"Rumors." 

"Mason has definitely earned this 
scholarship," said Dejon Ewing, 
Humanities Department chair and speech 
and drama instructor. "He did a wonderful 
job his first year." 

The scholarship was established in 
1995 and gives priority to students major- 
ing in theatre, with secondary consideration 
going to education majors. 

Returning 
Student 
Organization 
raises funds for 
needy in Ark City 

A fundraiser by Cowley's Returning 
Student Organization helped two needy 
Arkansas City families Thanksgiving 2000. 

More than $175 was raised during a 
two-week period as the group sold candy 



bars and chances to win a Philips CD Radio 
Cassette Recorder. David McCracken was 
the winner of the recorder. 

The names of two families in Arkansas 
City were supplied to RSO by The 
Salvation Army of Arkansas City. A 
Thanksgiving dinner was paid for by RSO 
for two Ark City families, with the remain- 
der of the funds going toward the Angel 
Tree that was placed inside Wal-Mart for 
the Christmas season. 

David Mosconi, president of RSO, 
said the 25-member organization wanted to 
help the needy during the holiday season. 

"We threw around some ideas and 
decided to help some families out," he said. 
"We have 25 members in RSO. It was a 
good group effort." 

Tables were set up inside Galle- 
Johnson Hall, the Brown Center for Arts, 
Sciences and Technology, and The Jungle 
inside the Nelson Student Center. Some 
members also approached people of the 
community for donations. 

Five students 
presented $1,000 
scholarships to 
WSU 



Five students were awarded $1,000 
scholarships each from the W. Frank 
Barton School of Business at Wichita State 
University on March 15 in a classroom in 
the Ken" Business Technology Building on 
Cowley's main campus. 

It marked the eighth consecutive year 
that WSU's business school awarded schol- 
arships to Cowley students transferring in, 
and brought the total number of Cowley 
students awarded by the school to 44. 

Dr. John Beehler, dean of the school, 
and Diane Coleman, director of student 
records and advising for the school, were 
on hand for the event. 

The 2001 award winners were 
Nicholas Fielden of Derby, Nyla 



Prasankongsinh of Wichita, Lori Robinson 
of Goddard, Robin Peri of Winfield, and 
Chaitali Patel of Winfield. Fielden and Peri 
were accounting majors, while 
Prasankongsinh and Robinson were busi- 
ness administration majors, and Patel was a 
computer science major. Robinson plans to 
switch to accounting at WSU. 

The students were winners of the 
Center for Management and Development 
scholarships. The award is $500 per semes- 
ter and is renewable for the following year, 
providing the students meet certain criteria, 
which includes maintaining a minimum 
academic credit hour load and maintaining 
a certain grade-point average. The students 
also must declare a major in one of the 
areas of the school of business. 

Beverly Grunder, chair of the Business 
and Service Technology Division at 
Cowley, said she was pleased with the part- 
nership Cowley had with the business 
school at WSU. 

"It's been great for our business stu- 
dents and it's been great for WSU," 
Grunder said. 

Cowley students who transfer into the 
W. Frank Barton School of Business are 
assigned an adviser at WSU. That adviser 
also works with the student's Cowley 
adviser. The purpose, Grunder said, is to 
ensure that all credit hours taken at Cowley 
transfer to WSU. 

In order to be considered for the schol- 
arship, Cowley students had to have a min- 
imum 3.0 GPA, apply to WSU, major in an 
area of business, graduate from Cowley, 
and enroll in a minimum of 12 credit hours 
at WSU. 

The Barton School of Business is the 
largest business school in Kansas. Graham 
said accounting and business administra- 
tion are the two most popular majors. 



Cowley News & President's Report 2000-2001 1] 



Faculty/Staff Achievements 



Sid Regnier Retires 



More than 250 
people help honor 
Regnier at 
retirement 
reception 



Surrounded by family, friends and co- 
workers, Sid Regnier was honored during a 
reception Sept. 21, 2000, in the Earle N. 
Wright Community Room. 

Regnier, Cowley's vice president of 
business services and a native of Fairbury, 
Neb., retired Oct. 3 after 26 years of serv- 
ice to the institution. 

Dr. Pat McAtee, president of the col- 
lege, served as emcee during the reception, 
which was highlighted by naming the new 
college bookstore after Regnier. From now 
on, the college's bookstore at 207 W. Fifth 
Ave. will be known as the Sid L. Regnier 
Bookstore. 

It was a fitting tribute to a man who 
has meant so much to Cowley and to the 
community. 

"The college wanted to give back to 
you something special for all that you have 
done for us," McAtee said. "You have left 
your stamp of professionalism on virtually 
every inch of this campus. You have over- 
seen construction of nearly every building 
here on the main campus as well as our out- 
reach centers. The new bookstore, which 
we moved into just last month (August 
2000) is the final completed construction 
project, and it exemplifies the creativity 
and innovation of your vision for Cowley. 
As our campus has grown, you have saved 
and restored many beautiful and historic 
pieces of buildings past. You have utilized 
pillars, fixtures, and ornaments to be incor- 
porated on our campus both outside and 
inside the new structures. 

"Your extensive "hard hat" experience 
is only a fraction of the many ways that you 
have enhanced Cowley County 
Community College. 

"Sid, on behalf of the trustees of 
Cowley County Community College, and 
the Facilities Naming Committee, it is with 
great pride and pleasure that we dedicate 
the college bookstore with respect and love 
to you for your 26 years of service to the 



college. You are a gentleman with many 
talents and a big heart." 

McAtee and several of the speakers on 
the program were overcome with emotion, 
recalling stories involving Regnier, who 
thanked everyone in attendance. 

"I wish I could go around to each table 
and visit with you, because you've all been 
teachers," he said. "I've learned so much 
from each of you." 

Regnier, who enjoys playing golf, was 
presented with a set of clubs from the col- 
lege, along with a travel certificate and 
other gifts. College employees wrote in a 
book of memories compiled by several co- 
workers. 

Toward the end of the reception, 
Regnier asked everyone to stand and sing 
one of his favorite tunes from his church. 
Redeemer Lutheran, in Arkansas City. The 
song is titled "Brothers And Sisters In 
Christ," written by Terry Dittmer, a 
Lutheran minister. 



Leaving his mark: 

Sid Regnier celebrated his retirement 
with the college community on 
September 21, 2001. 

^^ffl> Sid receives loving words and a kiss 
from his mother luella. 

Another hug and kiss from his 
■ ™ Sharon. 

Cowley president Pat McAtee 
s Sid on the impact he has had on the 
;e and its employees. 

The Regnier family. 
Thr Cowley Singers serenade 
ra the tune "Hey, Big Spender." 

Sid remarks on his career at 



THANK YOU, SID! 



JS& 









if- 



Oxcb 



i4 




12 Cowley News & President's Report 2000-2001 



Faculty/Staff Achievements 



Ewing Exits Stage Left 



Neil Simon's 
'Rumors' Ewing' s 
final production 
as director 



Her directing career began with a Neil 
Simon play, and it ended with a Neil Simon 
play. 

Dejon Ewing, who began her teaching 
career in 1972 at Arkansas City High 
School on the same soil she teaches now, 
directed her 26th and final production at 
Cowley March 1-3, 2001, with Neil 
Simon's "Rumors." The Act One drama 
students performed the comedy on the 
stage of the Robert Brown Theatre. 

Ewing began her theatrical directing 
career with Simon's "Barefoot In The 
Park" at ACHS. She took over the theatre 
department there in 1973 and taught at the 
school until 1977. It was in the old high 
school where the Brown Center for Arts, 
Sciences and Technology stands today. She 
remembers her first day at ACHS as if it 
were yesterday. 

"My first day of teaching was my 
birthday, Aug. 28," Ewing recalls. "I was 
standing out in the hallway watching the 
students go by and I got more and more 
nervous. I got so nervous I rushed to the 
bathroom and threw up. When I got to 
class, I went through my lesson plan for the 
entire week and gave them a tour of the 
stage, all in one hour. I talked so fast. The 
next day I asked the students if they got 
anything that I had said the day before. 
Later, they told me they'd never heard any- 
one talk so fast." 

"Rumors" is a farce with five male and 
five female actors. The story goes like this: 

Four couples are at the townhouse of a 
deputy New York City mayor and his wife 
to celebrate their 10th wedding anniver- 
sary. The party never begins because the 
host has shot himself in the head (it's only 
a flesh wound) and his wife is missing. His 
lawyer's cover-up gets progressively more 
difficult to sustain as the other guests arrive 
and nobody can remember who has been 



told what about whom. Doors slam and 
hilarity abounds as the couples get more 
and more crazed. 

"It's very funny, very fast-paced with a 
lot of witty dialogue and lots of door slam- 
ming," Ewing said. "This eclectic group of 
people get together to create humor, and 
there's a surprise ending." 

"The cast was very young with only 
two real experienced actors," Ewing said. 
"But they can be so proud of what they did. 
I thought the performance was excellent." 

Ewing said Cowley's reputation for 
having a renowned theatre department was 
a credit to the students. 

"They don't even realize how good 
they are," Ewing said. 

Ewing's first production at Cowley 
was "Butterflies Are Free." She said there 
were more than a few butterflies when the 
curtain was raised for the final time March 
3. 

"I made it through," Ewing said. "It 
was an emotional time, that's for 
sure." 




Ewing, chair of the 
Humanities Department, plans to focus 
on teaching. A former student of Ewing's, 
the former Debbie Capps, now Debbie 
Layton, takes over as director. 

Ewing, whose husband is Doug 
Ewing, graduated from Northern -^ 
Oklahoma College in Tonkawa, 
where she was reared. She transferred to 
Northwestern Oklahoma State 
University in Alva, where she earned 
undergraduate and graduate degrees in 
speech and theatre education. 

In conjunction with her final produc- 
tion, Ewing organized an Act One reunion. 
More than 200 former Cowley students 
came back to honor Ewing and reminisce 
about their days in Cowley productions, as 
well as Mr. Cinderfella contests. 

Following the final performance of 
"Rumors," the Act One alumni gathered in 
the Brown Theatre. Many students took the 
microphone and shared personal stories 
about their experiences with Ewing. Many 



laughed, but a few were teary-eyed. Dr. Pat 
McAtee, college president, also paid tribute 
to Ewing, saying that she helped make 
Cowley's theatre program one of the best 
around. 

The reunion then moved to the Earle 
N. Wright Community Room, where stu- 
dents, spouses, and friends visited, took 
pictures, and signed a book for Ewing. 

Ewing said she had received several 
thoughtful e-mails from former students 
who couldn't make it to the reunion, but 
who wanted to share their feelings about 
Cowley and their experience in theatre. 

"When you have former students say 
those things about you and the program and 
their memories of Cowley, that's what it's 
all about," Ewing said. "It 
really makes me proud to 
think that I may have 
had an impact on 
their lives. I've thor- 
oughly enjoyed my 
career as a director. 
The memories will 
last for the rest of 
my life." 




Finding it hard to give up directing, Ewing 
directs dinner traffic at the act one 
Reunion held in her honor. 



I MADE IT THROUGH. It WAS AN EMOTIONAL TIME, THAT'S FOR SURE. 

- Dejon Ewing 

Cowley News & President's Report 2000-2001 13 



Faculty/Staff Achievements 



Donna and Joe Avery 



Averys receive 
Outstanding Tiger 
Alumni award 



Donna and Joe Avery have put new 
meaning into the phrase "giving back to the 
community." 

Some people talk about it, but the 
Averys put community service into prac- 
tice. It's something they don't think twice 
about. It's always been a part of their lives. 

To anyone who knows them, the 
Averys are examples of tremendous integri- 
ty, strong Christian values, and lifelong 
commitment. And they do it all in a quiet, 
unassuming manner without any fanfare or 
publicity. 

The Averys, who celebrated their 51st 
wedding anniversary last September, 
received the 2001 Outstanding Tiger 
Alumni Award. The award was presented 
during the 78th Commencement exercises 
May 12 in W.S. Scott Auditorium. 

"We're both overwhelmed, and it came 
completely unexpected," Donna said. 
"We're really proud of this award." 

The couple has supported a variety of 
causes throughout their lives, including 
projects at the college, their church, and an 
organization near and dear to their hearts: 
American Field Service. The Averys have 
enjoyed hosting six students throughout 
their 30-year involvement with the pro- 
gram, which brings students from foreign 
nations to the United States to attend 
school. In fact, the Averys were the first 
family in Arkansas City to host an AFS stu- 
dent. 

"That experience has had a great affect 
on our entire family," Donna said. "It's 
made us a lot more open to other cultures." 

Since Morena Nieto lived with the 
Averys during the 1970-71 school year, 
several students have felt right at home in 
Ark City. Two years later, Nieto's sister 
came to live with the Averys, although she 
was not part of the AFS program. And just 




two years ago. Donna and Joe hosted 
Nieto's daughter, Fer. The Nietos live in 
Ecuador. 

"It's helped us stay young," Donna 
said. "We feel we have a family in South 
America with Morena and her four daugh- 
ters." 

Career in public eye 
and the silent partner 

Donna came with her parents to 
Arkansas City in 1930 when she was three 
months old. She graduated from Arkansas 
City High School in 1948, two years after 
Joe. That same year. Donna enrolled at 
Arkansas City Junior College and worked 
at Newman's Department Store at the same 
time. Eventually, she became A.L. 
Newman's secretary. She was office man- 



ager for Prudential Insurance for 1 1/2 
years, working until she started wearing 
maternity clothes at four months pregnant. 
The year was 1951. 

It was clear that college would have to 
wait. After having the couple's four chil- 
dren in six-and-a-half years, and staying 
home for 15 years. Donna went to work for 
labor lawyer Dick Rock. 

"I can truly say that that was my col- 
lege education," Avery said. "I worked for 
him and later Mike Smith for 15 years." 

Joe was production manager at New 
Era Mill from 1949 to 1968, and later went 
to work for Rodeo Meats as personnel man- 
ager. 

Joe's support and encouragement 
helped Donna's career take off. She became 
the first female director of the Arkansas 
City Area Chamber of Commerce, serving 



We're both overwhelmed, and it came completely unexpected. 

- Donna Avery 



14 Cowley News & President's Report 2000-2001 



from 1979 to 1992. Instead of retiring, she 
became manager of Strother Field Airport 
and Industrial Park. On Dec. 31, 2000, 
Donna officially retired from that position. 

Joe: Solid as a rock 

Donna and Joe Avery compliment each 
other in so many ways. Donna will be the 
first to tell you that she owes her success as 
a businesswoman to her husband. 

"He's my rock," Donna said. "I may 
have been out in the public eye more, but 
the only reason was his support. It makes a 
huge difference. People don't come here (to 
the Avery house) for my food, it's Joe's. 
They want to know if he's cooking." 

Joe was hand picked by the late Gwen 
Nelson, longtime president of the college, 
to serve on the first Human Relations 
Council in Ark City. He played in the pep 
band while at ACJC, and for close to 10 
years after he and Donna were married. His 
playing career with the city band spanned 
four decades, and he managed the group for 
15 years. 

Joe graduated from ACJC in 1948. He 
took every business course the college 
offered, ending up with a third year of class 
work. After graduating from the college, 
Joe went to work at New Era Mill for 75 
cents an hour. 

College important 
to community, area 

Both Donna and Joe are proud to be 
associated with the college. Joe is on the 
Board of Directors of the College 
Endowment Association. Donna was re- 
elected to another four-year term as a mem- 



u 



ber of Cowley's Board of Trustees in April. 
Both said the college was vital to the com- 
munity and to south-central Kansas. 

"It's an integral part of our past and an 
important part of Ark City," Joe said. "It's 
growing into a world-class college." 

The Averys, whose children attended 
Cowley, can only imagine what the area 
would be like without the college. 

"The college has been an important 
part of my working career at the Chamber 
and Strother Field," Donna said. 
"Personally, it's been a part of our past, our 
children's lives, and three grandchildren 
have taken classes there." 

"It's a part of our personal, education- 
al, social, and business lives," Joe added. 

Donna is on the executive board of the 
Kansas Association of Community College 
Trustees, and is in her second appointment 
on the Future Initiatives Committee of the 
19 community colleges in the state. She 
said the college has been a welcome "con- 
stant" in Ark City. 

"The one thing I discovered as I com- 
pleted my first year as a trustee was that 
number one, there is not a better communi- 
ty college in the state of Kansas, and num- 
ber two, there is no better administration 
and faculty in the state," Donna said. "I 
have said for the last 10 years that Cowley 
is the best thing Cowley County had to 
offer for business and industry recruitment 
and retention. That observation comes from 
the work I've done. I can't imagine what 
the community would be like without the 
college." 



Community service and 
family 

Donna has been a member of the 
Arkansas City and Winfield Chambers of 
Commerce, Arkansas City Rotary Club, 
Cowley County Economic Development 
Agency, president of her PEO chapter, 
Leadership Cowley County, and has 
chaired the Arkansas City Chamber's 
Transportation Committee. The Averys are 
members of the First United Methodist 
Church, where Joe is on staff parish and 
both have served on church council. 

Donna also was the only female ever 
to serve as president of the Kansas 
Association of Airports. She is a Paul 
Harris Fellow, an award sponsored by 
Rotary International. She also was a mem- 
ber of the American Association of Airport 
Executives. 

Donna and Joe also are extremely 
proud of their four children. Pat White is an 
accountant married to Bob White, president 
and CEO of Garvey International and a past 
recipient of the Outstanding Tiger Alumni 
Award; Pam Archer teaches first grade and 
Reading Recovery at Irving Elementary 
School in Winfield and is married to Steve 
Archer, director of administration for the 
city of Arkansas City; Lea McBride is a 
court reporter married to a troop command- 
er with the Oklahoma Highway Patrol; and 
David is a financial analyst at Newell- 
Rubbermaid who is married to Kathy, who 
graduated in January from Wichita Area 
Technical College's Practical Nursing 
Program. WATC's classes were taught at 
Cowley. Donna and Joe also have nine 
grandchildren, one great-grandchild, and 
another on the way. 



It's [the college] an integral part of our past and an •>•> 

IMPORTANT PART OF ArK ClTY. It's GROWING INTO A WORLD-CLASS COLLEGE. 



- Joe Avery 
Cowley News & President's Report 2000-2001 15 



Faculty/Staff Achievements 



Special Awards 



Four employees 
receive NISOD 
Excellence Awards 



Four employees received Excellence 
Awards at a community college conference 
in May 2001 in Austin, Texas. 



LeArta Watkins, Bryan McChesney, 
Chris Mayer, and Bob Moffatt were the 
2000-2001 recipients of the award, spon- 
sored by the National Institute for Staff and 
Organizational Development. The awards 
were presented during the annual confer- 
ence, May 27-30. 

Watkins is the college's director of dis- 
tance learning and lives in Derby. 
McChesney is coordinator of interactive 
television and technology specialist and 



lives north of Winfield. Mayer is a Social 
Science instructor and sponsors the two- 
time state champion Academic Excellence 
Challenge team. Mayer lives in Wichita. 
And Moffatt is the Welding Technology 
instructor. He lives in Arkansas City. 

The four recipients bring to 50 the 
number of Cowley employees who have 
received this award during the past 14 
years. 





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LeArta Watkins 



Bryan McChesney 



Chris Mayer 




Bob Moffatt 



Bonfy, 
Gackstatter 
presented 
Governor's Arts 
Awards 



Connie Bonfy and Gary Gackstatter 
accepted Governor's Arts Awards April 10, 
200 1 , in a ceremony at Century II Concert 
Hall in Wichita. 

Bonfy, director of institutional grants 
and arts programming, received the award 
for being an arts advocate. She was hon- 
ored for her work with the Arkansas City 
Arts Council and her role in creating Ark 
City's annual PrairieFest celebration. 



Gackstatter, director of instrumental 
music, is conductor of the Winfield 
Regional Symphony and accepted the 
award on behalf of the symphony. The 
symphony was awarded as an arts organi- 
zation. 

International opera star Samuel 
Ramey, a Colby native, gave a concert after 
receiving the Kansas Arts Commission's 
Distinguished Artist Award. 




Gary Gackstatter 



l6 Cowley News & President's Report 2000-2001 




Faculty/Staff Achievements |j 



icking Leaves 



Head of student 
services takes job 
in Arkansas 



Since November 1988, students could 
be heard saying the simple statement, "I'm 
here to see Maggie." 

But that's all changed. 

Maggie Picking, Cowley's vice presi- 
dent of student affairs — surrogate mother, 
mentor, counselor, and leader — left the col- 
lege after nearly 1 3 years as head of the stu- 
dent services department. Her last day was 
June 29, 2001. 

Picking, a Hays native who holds 
bachelor's and master's degrees from Fort 
Hays State University, became the vice 
president of student services at Garland 
County Community College in Hot 
Springs, Ark. She said the timing was right. 

"It's an exciting time for them because 
they're merging with the technical school 
up the mountain," Picking said. "I'll be 
developing a plan for student services relat- 
ed to the merger." 

Garland County's enrollment is similar 
to Cowley's, and both schools have federal 
TRIO grants. But there are differences. 
Garland does not have athletics or on-cam- 
pus housing, and it resides in a resort com- 
munity of about 33,000. 

"I'm very excited about the opportuni- 
ty, and so is my family," Picking said. 
Maggie and husband Eddie have three chil- 
dren: Willie 17, Rebecca 7, and Jonny 4. 

After receiving her bachelor's degree 
in 1981 in psychology and communica- 
tions, Picking worked two years for Kansas 
Wesleyan in Salina as an admissions coun- 
selor. From there she went to Colby 
Community College, where she was stu- 
dent government sponsor for one year, 
behavioral sciences instructor for seven 
months, and associate director of admis- 
sions for four years. From May to 
November 1988, Picking was assistant 



administrator for the 
Kansas Regents Network 
in Manhattan. 

She then became 
assessment/placement 
coordinator for Cowley 
in November 1988. In 
August 1989, Picking 
was named director of 
admissions, and in July 
1990, dean of students. 
She has had her current 
title since June 1995. 

Picking said she 
never wanted to be presi- 
dent of a college. Rather, 
student services are her 
passion. 

"I've always liked 
admissions," she said. 
"I've always seen student 
services as a support to 
the classroom instructor. 
There is so much learn- 
ing outside the class- 
room, and student services personnel have 
so many opportunities to pass along life- 
long skills to students they might not get in 
the classroom. I think that's very exciting." 

Some of Picking's major accomplish- 
ments at Cowley include securing the col- 
lege's first TRIO grant in 1997, establish- 
ing a more comprehensive tutoring pro- 
gram, developing an overall admissions 
plan, cutting the school's loan default rate 
from 35 percent to 14 percent without sac- 
rificing enrollment, helping to develop the 
Early Academic Warning System, assisting 
with the advisor's handbook, taking a 
major role in the reaccredidation process, 
and seeing the college's on-campus hous- 
ing grow. 

"This job has allowed me, in situations 
with students, to be more empathetic with 
students," she said. "Not to enable them, 
but to help them grow. I've learned not to 
take things personal. I think my own self- 
esteem has grown." 




Picking admitted she'd miss the rela- 
tionships she's cultivated during her time at 
Cowley. 

"All of the people, the support, the 
bonds, relationships and contacts I've 
made, not only at the college but within the 
community, have taken time," Picking said. 
"I'm going to miss them the most." 

But Picking said the staff she leaves 
behind is solid. 

"We have such competent people 
working in student services," she said. 
"These people are so good at what they 
do." 



This job has allowed me to be more empathetic with students. •>*) 

Not to enable them, but to help them grow. I think my own self-esteem has grown. 

- Maggie Picking 
Cowley News & President's Report 2000-2001 17 



Faculty/Staff Achievements 



College Leaders 



Board member 
elected to 
national office 



Ron Godsey, in his second term as a 
member of Cowley's Board of Trustees, 
was elected to serve on the board of direc- 
tors of the Association of Community 
College Trustees. 

Godsey, of Winfield, was elected in 
October 2000 during the ACCT's national 
convention in Nashville. Tenn. He was 
elected to a three-year term, and is eligible 
for another three years in the next election. 

'Tin thrilled," said Godsey, first elect- 
ed to Cowley's Board in 1995. "It's my 
first time on a national board. I'll be look- 
ing for input from people in the communi- 
ty to carry that on to the national level." 

It is the first time a Cowley Board 
member has been elected to the ACCT 
Board of Directors. 

Godsey was elected from the Western 
Region caucus, which is comprised of 
Kansas, Colorado, Montana, Nebraska, 
New Mexico, North Dakota, Oklahoma, 
South Dakota, Texas, Wyoming, Alberta, 
Manitoba, the Northwest Territory, the 
Nunabut Territory, and Saskatchewan. 
Twenty-five members comprise the Board. 

Godsey, who won re-election to 
Cowley's Board in 1999, is Cowley's dele- 
gate to the national convention. One Board 
member from the Western Region is then 
elected to the overall Board. 

"I was approached to see if I'd like to 
run from the Western Region and I said 
sure," Godsey said. "They expected some 
other nominations but didn't get any." 

ACCT is comprised of approximately 
7,000 trustees in the United States, Canada, 
and Puerto Rico. The ACCT is made up of 
five regions, and each region has three 
Board members. At-large Board members 
fill the remaining seats. 

Godsey said he'll serve on the Finance 
Committee of ACCT. 

"Obviously, we now have a voice on a 
national level," he said. "And I think that 
will be very important as there are a lot of 
issues facing community colleges today." 



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Ron Godsey 




Administrators 

receive 

promotions 



Five college administrators were pro- 
moted by President Dr. Pat McAtee and 
approved by the college's Board of 
Trustees during the 2000-2001 academic 
year. 

Conrad Jimison was promoted to vice 
president of instruction from dean of 
instruction; Terri Morrow was promoted to 
dean of development and college relations 
from associate dean of development and 
college relations; Charles McKown was 
promoted to dean of research and technol- 
ogy from director of computer services; 
and Tony Crouch was promoted to associ- 
ate dean of business services from director 
of financial records. In the fall of 2000, 
Crouch was promoted again to dean of 
business services. In another promotion, 
Sheree Utash was named vice president of 
northern campuses. She had been the col- 
lege's associate dean of northern campus- 
es. 

Jimison has been at Cowley 30 years 
and has held numerous positions, including 
that of a faculty member. Morrow has been 
at the college 10 years and is head of the 
school's fund-raising arm, the Endowment 
Association. McKown has been at Cowley 
eight years and is in charge of computer 
services. Crouch has been a Cowley 
employee six years, all in the Business 
Office. Utash joined the college as director 
of educational programming at the 
Southside Education Center in Wichita in 
April 1996. 

McKown also was elected to his third 
term as president of the POISE User's 
Group, an organization representing the 
interests of nearly 250 colleges and univer- 
sities in the United States and Canada 
using administrative software products 
developed by Campus America of 
Knoxville, Tenn. In the 21 -year history of 
the organization, McKown is the only per- 
son to be elected more than once. 



l8 Cowley News & President's Report 2000-2001 



General College News 



Cancer claims Hunter 



Long-time Cowley 
art instructor 
loses battle with 
cancer 



Doug Hunter, an art instructor at 
Cowley since 1979, died Jan. 6, 2001, at his 
home in Arkansas City. He was 52. A pri- 
vate family service was held on Jan. 10, 
and a celebration of his life was held Jan. 
12 in the Robert Brown Theatre inside the 
Brown Center at the college. 

Hunter was born March 28, 1948, in 
Junction City. He was the son of Donald 
and Virginia Blanchard Hunter. He was 
reared and attended schools in Council 
Grove. During the Vietnam War, he served 
in the U.S. Army, and later the Kansas 
Army National Guard until being honor- 
ably discharged. 

He received his bachelor of arts degree 
from Southwestern College in Winfield and 
a master of art education degree from 
Wichita State University. 

From 1973 to 1976, he served as art 
instructor, head track coach, head women's 
basketball coach and assistant football 
coach at Cedar Vale High School. During 
this time, he also was the art instructor, 
head volleyball and track coach at Dexter 
High School. He operated Hunter Ceramics 
in Winfield for three years. In 1979, he 
began working at Cowley County 
Community College, where he was an art 
instructor until his death. 

Also at Cowley, he handled athletic 
recruiting from 1979 to 1985, was an assis- 
tant baseball coach in 1985, and head coach 
of the women's softball team from 1980 to 
1984. Hunter's 1984 softball team, which 
finished with a 23-15 record, won the 
Region VI Tournament and qualified for 
nationals. That same year, the Lady Tigers 
were ranked fourth in the nation, the high- 
est ranking in the history of Cowley soft- 
ball. Hunter was 55-63 during his five sea- 
sons. 

He also served as assistant track coach 
at Southwestern from 1988 to 1996. 

Hunter received numerous awards dur- 
ing his career, including being recognized 
in 1998 in "Who's Who in America," and 




earning the Master Teacher Award from the 
National Institute for Staff and 
Organizational Development at the 
University of Texas in 1995. He was named 
Outstanding Teacher in Education in 1980, 
1981, 1984, 1985, 1987 and 1989, received 
the Outstanding Leadership Award from 
the Kansas Art Education Association in 



1997, and was named softball 
Coach of the Year in 1 984 by the 
Kansas Jayhawk Community 
College Conference. 

He was a member of the 
Kansas National Education 
Association and the Veterans of 
Foreign Wars. 

He lived in the Dexter area 
for several years until moving to 
Arkansas City in the late 1980s. 
He married Patricia Tieperman on 
July 22, 1986, in Arkansas City. 

Survivors include his wife, 
Patti, of the home; one daughter, 
Ashlee Hunter of the home; two 
stepdaughters, Lindsay Sunder- 
land of New Bern, N.C., and 
Tricia Morgan of the home; his 
parents of Alamo, Texas; one 
brother, Gary Hunter, of Fort 
Collins, Colo.; and two stepgrand- 
children. Chase Sunderland and 
Jayden Sunderland. 

An Art Scholarship Fund has 
been established at Cowley, as well as a 
memorial fund with the Make-A-Wish 
Foundation of Kansas. Contributions may 
be made through the funeral home. 
Arrangements were under the direction of 
the Hawks Funeral Home, Arkansas City. 




Doug Hunter 

1948-2001 



Cowley News & President's Report 2000-2001 1Q 



General College News 



Workforce Development Center 



Workforce 
Development 
Center off and 
running: at 
Strother Field 



In an effort to assist the labor force of 
Cowley County, the college has partnered 
with more than a dozen other agencies to 
form a Workforce Development Center. 

The center, located at Fourth and 
Tupper at the Strother Field Airport and 
Industrial Park between Arkansas City and 
Winfield, is designed to be a one-stop shop 
for a variety of services. The center began 
operating in fall 2000, and nearly all of the 
partnering agencies were on board by the 
start of 2001. 

Gene Cole, Cowley's associate dean of 
business and industry, was instrumental in 
getting the project partners together and 
getting the center open. Rebecca Scott was 
hired in spring 2001 as director of the cen- 
ter. 




One-stop partners in service 
include the following: 

Kansas Department of Human 
Resources — Employment Service, 
including six computers in the career 
center; Workforce Investment Act 
Training; Veterans; Unemployment 
Insurance. 

The city of Wichita — Welfare to 
Work, Workforce Investment Act 
Training, CSBG Funded 
Employment, Career Development 
Center, Adult Dislocated Worker. 

The American Red Cross — Senior 
Work Experience Program. 

Social and Rehabilitation 
Services — Vocational Rehabilitation. 

SER Corporation, Wichita — 

Migrant and Seasonal Farmworker. 

Mid-America All-Indian Center, 
Wichita — Native American. 

Mid-Cap., Inc., El Dorado— CSBG 

Funded Employment. 

Flint Hills Job Corps Center, 
Wichita — Job Corps. 

Cowley County Community 
College — Adult Basic Education, 
School-to-Careers, Secondary and 
Postsecondary. 

Cowley County Mental Health 
Center — Special Needs. 

Twin Rivers Developmental 
Support — Special Needs. 



Also, Internet-ready computers are 
available to the workforce to help people 
find jobs. Log on at www, kansas-joblink, com. 
Kansas Job Link is a program that helps 
Kansans find jobs (both first jobs and bet- 
ter jobs) efficiently and quickly. It connects 
Kansas employers with eager, motivated 
applicants who have made the personal 
decision to improve themselves through 
work and better jobs. It also is a valuable 
resource for job-seekers, employers, work- 
force development professionals, or anyone 




else looking for up-to-date employment 
information for their communities. 

The college can provide, among other 
services, customized training for business 
and industry, safety training, Zenger-Miller 
courses, computer training, introduction to 
change, CPR/First Aid training, sexual 
harassment/EEOC compliance, tech math, 
blueprint reading, reading for comprehen- 
sion, teamwork, leadership/supervisory 
skills, statistical process control, industrial 
measurement, hand tool basics, environ- 
mental health and safety, general plastics, 
Spanish, welding, and an associate degree 
program in Industrial Trade and 
Supervision Management, Aviation 
Maintenance Technology, and Plastics. 

Satellite computer locations are the 
Arkansas City Chamber of Commerce, 
Winfield Chamber of Commerce, and the 
Wellington Chamber of Commerce. 

Several different classroom sizes have 
been designed to meet various needs. All 
training rooms are fully equipped. The 
small classroom can accommodate 15-20 
people, while the large one can hold 21-60 
people. The computer lab has 16 training 
stations, plus an instructor station with pro- 
jection equipment. The lab is equipped 
with IBM compatible Dell computers that 
are Internet ready. 

Also available is a board conference 
room that seats 12. It is available for those 
who may need to use the facility to conduci 
a meeting or interviews away from theii 
place of business. 



20 Cowley News & President's Report 2000-2001 



General College News 



Growth Continues 



Groundbreaking 
for new dorm, 
dining room 



A chilly wind blew out of the north as 
members of the Board of Trustees and 
administration, along with architects, 
staffed shovels and broke ground Nov. 20, 
2000, for two new facilities. 

Construction on a 72-bed dormitory 
and a new dining facility began in 
November 2000. Both buildings were 
expected to be completed in time for fall 
2001 classes. 

The new dormitory, located on the 
northwest corner of the intersection of 
Fifth Avenue and Fourth Street, has a brick 
exterior that blends well with existing cam- 
pus facilities. The building includes a com- 
puter/study room on each floor, and one 
new feature. While Cowley's three other 
dorms have bathroom facilities where two 
roommates share it with two other suitem- 
ates, the new dorm has a bathroom in each 
room. The building also is able to expand 
for future growth. 

The new dining room, located on the 
southeast corner of the same intersection, 
includes seating for approximately 260 
people. It also has a smaller dining room 
on the southeast corner. One major change 
from the cafeteria inside the Nelson 
Student Center is that students enter a 
smaller room off the larger dining area to 
get their food. The large area is for dining 
only. A patio also was being constructed on 
the west side of the building. 

Both buildings were financed through 
revenue bonds, meaning proceeds generat- 
ed by the facilities will be used to pay for 
them. 




Board members, administrators, and architects turn over the shovels on the site of the new 
dintng hall. 




The west entrance to the new dining hall. 







The front view of the new dormitory. 



Cowley News & President's Report 2000-2001 21 



General College News 



Growth Continues 



Fall, spring 
enrollments set 
records 



Cowley's fall 2000 and spring 2001 
enrollments increased significantly in near- 
ly every category, according to figures 
released by Registrar Forest Smith. 

Cowley's full-time equivalency 
enrollment for the fall was 2,383.83, com- 
pared to 2,097.7 at the same time in 1999. 
That's a whopping 13.5 percent increase. 
On-campus day enrollment was up from 
879 in 1999 to 953 in the fall of 2000, 
while on-campus night classes increased 
from 97 in 1999 to 115 in fall 2000. Off- 
campus enrollment saw the biggest 
increase, jumping 22 percent, from 1,054 
in the fall of 1999 to 1,285 in 2000. 

The most noticeable increase in FTE 
occurred at Cowley's Southside Education 
Center in Wichita. In fall 1999, Southside's 
FTE stood at 442.7. In 2000, Southside had 
an FTE of 63 1 .96, a 43 percent increase. 

Enrollment at the Mulvane Center 
jumped 10 percent from fall 1999, while 
enrollment at the Winfield Center nearly 
doubled, going from 31.07 FTE in 1999 to 
59.53 in fall 2000. 

Total head count, which is comprised 
of everyone taking classes from Cowley, 
was 3,837, compared to fall 1999's count 
of 3,473. 

The college experienced a 7-percent 
increase in enrollment for the spring 2001 
semester. 

FTE was 2,236.35, compared to 
2,095.11 in spring 2000. The total number 
of students taking classes at Cowley in 
spring 2001 also increased, from 3,585 in 
2000 to 3,772 in 2001 , an increase of 5 per- 
cent. 

The largest growth occurred at the 
Southside Center, which saw an increase of 
29 percent from spring 2000 to spring 
2001. Southside's FTE was at 645.5 in 
spring 2001. 



Cowley, two USDs, 

offering 

networking 

technology 

program 



Cowley and two unified school dis- 
tricts from the county worked together to 
offer a new program that was expected to 
help fill the high-tech labor shortage that in 
recent years has grown to more than a mil- 
lion jobs in the United States. 

Cowley, Unified School District No. 
470 Arkansas City, and USD 465 Winfield 
each will offer computer networking tech- 
nology courses beginning in the fall of 
2001. The program was developed by 
Cisco Systems Inc. to train individuals for 
computer network installation, support, 
design, and maintenance. 

The program has two levels: a four- 
semester program and an eight-semester 
program. Once students complete the cur- 
riculum of the four-semester program, they 
can take the exam to become a Cisco 
Certified Network Associate. The exam is a 
networking-industry test administered by 
independent agencies. The exam is essen- 
tial in landing a networking job with a 
national-average starting salary of $40,000. 
After students complete the eight-semester 
program, they are eligible to take the Cisco 
Certified Network Professional exam. 

Four courses have been approved by 
the Kansas Board of Regents (for Cowley) 
and the Kansas State Board of Education 
(for Arkansas City and Winfield). 



Internetworking Fundamentals will be 
offered this fall, followed by Router 
Technologies in spring 2002, Routing and 
Switching in fall 2002, and 
Internetworking Protocols in spring 2003. 
Four additional courses are expected to be 
approved in the future. 

Cisco-trained instructors will teach 
classes at Cowley, Arkansas City High 
School and Winfield High School. 
Coursework will be taught in a classroom, 
although students also may work online 
from home to review coursework and take 
exams. The course is designed to be taught 
over two full school years. Students can 
begin the program as high school juniors, 
seniors, or as adults. 

Cowley will become a Cisco Training 
Academy. Wichita Area Technical College 
will be the regional academy, where 
instructors will receive their training. 

Cisco created the Networking 
Academy to meet an increasing demand for 
qualified workers in the information tech- 
nology field. In 1993, the company initiat- 
ed a program to design practical, cost- 
effective networks for schools. Many 
schools didn't have the knowledge to main- 
tain their own computer networks, so the 
company designed a program to teach 
school administrators how to troubleshoot 
networking equipment. The result was the 
Cisco Networking Academy Program, 
which as of year-end 2000, has grown to 
more than 5,700 Networking Academies in 
50 U.S. states and more than 100 countries. 

Larry Schwintz, Bart Allen, and 
JoLynne Oleson, all instructors in the 
Business and Service Technology 
Department, have trained during the sum- 
mer of 2001, and will teach the courses for 
Cowley. 



See Related Graphic 
on page 25 



22 Cowlfs News & President's Report 2000-2001 



General College News 



Annual Duck Dash 



Annual Great 
Cowley Duck Dash 
raises record 
amount for fund 



Approximately $12,000 was raised for 
the Endowed Scholarship Fund during the 
annual Great Cowley Duck Dash held May 
19 at Spring Hill Farms northeast of 
Arkansas City. 

Despite overcast, threatening skies, 
more than 350 people attended the event, 
held at the home of Bob and Carolyn 
Langenwalter. 

Good Time Productions of Arkansas 
City was the business that won the 
Duckerating contest with its mailbox duck. 

Debbie Tucker of Winfield won the 
$1,000 cash prize for winning the final 
race. Diane Kelly of Grainola, Okla., coor- 
dinator to the dean of development and 
college relations at Cowley, won the 
night's stay at Willowbend in Wichita. 

Board of Trustee member Ron Godsey 
of Winfield called the 10 heat races, then 
yielded the microphone to Dr. Pat McAtee, 
college president, who called the day's 
final two races. 

Great Western Dining, the college's 
food service, provided a gourmet picnic of 
mesquite smoked prime rib and chicken 
breasts. 




Spectators watch the excitement as the ducks race down the stream. 





Another heat begins; 



Waiting for the ducks at the finish line. 





The winning decorated duck created by Good Time Productions. 



The race is on; 



Cowley News & President's Report 2000-2001 23 



General College News 



Student Satisfaction 



Noel-Levitz Student Satisfaction Survey 



This survey contained 12 areas that were addressed related to student satisfaction. Each area was evaluated on two respects, impor- 
tance to the student and satisfaction of the student. National norms for each area are included in the results. Cowley scored above the 
national norms on all items in all areas. The following chart is the summary of the results. 



6 



4 



o 




College Met 
Expectations 



Overall 
Satisfaction 



Enroll at 
Cowley Again 



1 



Cowley College Average 



□ 



National Group Average 



24 Cowley News & President's Report 2000-2001 



General College News 



Enrollment Breakdown 




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Cowley News & President's Report 2000-2001 25 



Athletic Achievements 



Smithson Returns 



Smithson named 
Cowley's new head 
men's basketball 
coach 



Randy Smithson, who led Butler 
County to two national runner-up finishes 
and coached four seasons at Wichita State 
University, was named the new head men's 
basketball coach at Cowley on March 30, 
2001. 

Smithson replaces Mark Nelson, a for- 
mer Smithson assistant at Butler, who 
resigned March 26 after eight seasons as 
the Tigers' head coach. 

"I appreciate the opportunity to come 
back to Kansas," Smithson told a press 
conference audience of about 100 Cowley 
employees, students, and boosters. "I told 
coach (Tom) Saia and Dr. (Pat) McAtee 
that the best days for my family and for my 
career were in a community college sys- 
tem." 

Smithson praised Nelson for the job he 
did at Cowley. 

"Mark Nelson did a great job, and I 
have the utmost respect for him," Smithson 
said. "Everybody wants to get to the next 
step. We've got to get deeper into the play- 
offs, and I can't think of a better place to 
get that accomplished." 

The last time Cowley's men's basket- 
ball team won Region VI was during the 
1956-57 season in which Coach Dan 
Kahler led the Tigers to a 28-8 overall 
record, a Jayhawk Conference Western 
Division title, and an eighth-place finish at 
the national tournament. 

Smithson becomes the 16th coach in 
the history of Cowley men's basketball. 

Smithson compiled an impressive 300- 
80 record in 1 1 seasons at Butler, including 
back-to-back runner-up finishes at the 
national tournament in 1992 and 1993. He 
wasn't nearly as successful at WSU, where 
he had a 55-62 record in four seasons. He 
resigned at the end of the 1999-2000 sea- 
son. 

Smithson is no stranger to Cowley ath- 
letics. He played for Coach Jerry Mullen 
during the 1978-79 season in which 
Cowley went 25-5, after transferring from 




Randy Smithson receives a Cowley jacket from Athletic Director Tom Saia during the 

PRESS CONFERENCE ANNOUNCING SmITHSON AS THE NEW MEn's BASKETRALL COACH. 



Illinois State. He then transferred to WSU. 

Smithson said he was excited to be 
reunited with Brian Jackson, Cowley men's 
assistant coach, and a former player of 
Smithson's at Butler. 

"When I moved to Florida, I thought 
my kids would run to the beach and hug the 
palm trees," Smithson said. "But they can't 
wait to get away from the palm trees. My 
family is elated to be coming back to 
Kansas." 

Smithson said Cowley had several 
quality players returning. Mixed with some 
good recruits, the Tigers may go farther in 
postseason play immediately, Smithson 
said. 



"I believe we're going to do it," he 
said. "It will depend on how fast these guys 
want to get in and go to the next level. 
There's no reason we can't make dreams a 
reality next year. I'd love to get to 
Hutchinson next year." 

Smithson said the feeling reaching the 
junior college final four in Hutchinson was 
no different than at the NCAA Division I . 
level. 

"There's nothing like it," he said. "It's | 
exciting. It's an incredible feeling." 




Smithson answers questions from one of the many Wichita 
television stations that covered the press conference. 



26 Cowley News & President's Report 2000-2001 



Athletic Achievements 



Grose wins award 



Grose receives 
prestigious 
Hershel Stephens 
service award 



Larry Grose, head men's tennis coach, 
was presented the Hershel Stephens Award 
for outstanding service to the game at the 
regional and national levels. 

Grose was presented the award during 
the annual banquet prior to the National 
Junior College Athletic Association's 
national men's tournament May 13-18, 
2001, in Tyler, Texas. 

Grose, who completed his 14th season 
as head coach at Cowley, was one of about 
eight coaches nominated for the award. 
Nominees must meet the following criteria 
to be eligible: 

• They must be employed by the same 
institution for 10 years or more. 

• They must have taken a team to the 
national tournament three times or 
more. 

• And they must have served on region- 
al or national committees throughout 
their career. 

Grose has served on the regional and 
national ranking committee, and for the last 
three years, he has been chairman of the 
National Awards Committee, a position 
he's also held at the regional level. 

"The award was voted on by coaches, 
and that's what's special to me," Grose 
said. "Getting this prestigious award from 
your peers is a great feeling." 

Grose has taken a full squad to nation- 
als in all but two seasons at Cowley. He 
also has two NJCAA Division II national 
championships, 1989 and 1991. 




u 



< 






>$yj 




vam 



THE AWARD WAS VOTED ON BY COACHES, AND THAT'S WHAT'S 



•>•> 



SPECIAL TO ME. GETTING THIS PRESTIGIOUS AWARD FROM YOUR PEERS IS A GREAT FEELING. 

- Lam' Grose 



Cowley News & President's Report 2000-2001 27 



Athletic Achievements 



Belknap leads new sports 



Cowley adds cross 
country, track and 
field for men, 
women 



Starting a college athletic program 
from the ground up isn't exactly all fun and 
games. Just ask Casey Belknap. 

Belknap was hired by Cowley in late 
2000 as head coach of a brand-new pro- 
gram — or six, to be exact — as the college 
continues to look for activities for its stu- 
dents. 

Belknap, a 1994 graduate of Circle 
High School in Towanda, has had a busy 
eight months. Most of his time has been 
spent scouting high school athletes in 
Kansas as he prepares to field the first 
men's and women's cross country teams in 
Cowley history. Those same athletes will 
compete in men's and women's indoor 
track and men's and women's outdoor 
track. 

"There's a lot more to it than I even 
imagined," said Belknap, no stranger to the 
sports he now heads. "There's just so much 
paperwork that needs to be done, and every 
institution is different on what they want 
done and when." 

Belknap and his wife, Kenda, are 
expecting their first child in November, 
right around the time of the National Junior 
College Athletic Association champi- 
onships in Lansing, Mich. 

Prior to joining Cowley, Belknap was 
assistant cross country and track coach at 
Butler County Community College in El 
Dorado for 1 1/2 years. Although he only 
ran track two years at Circle, Belknap went 
to Butler and became a standout, helping 
the Grizzlies to the 1995 national cross 
country championship. On the track, he 
specialized in the 800 and 1500 meters and 
was named an athletic and academic Ail- 
American his sophomore year. He ran a 
personal-best 4:17 mile at Butler. 

After two years at Butler, Belknap 
transferred to Bethany College and helped 
rebuild the programs in Lindsborg. He 
qualified for the National Association of 
Intercollegiate Athletics meet in cross 
country, and indoor and outdoor track. He 
was named All-Kansas Collegiate Athletic- 




Casey Belknap 

Conference (KCAC) his junior and senior 
years in cross country. His best 800-meter 
time was 1:54. 

Belknap said his first cross country 
team, made up of 10 men and seven 
women, is solid. 

"I think we can expect a top-three fin- 
ish in the Jayhawk East," Belknap said. "I 
don't think that's too much to ask." 

Seven schools in the Jayhawk East 
now field cross country teams. 

Both rosters are loaded with Kansas 
student-athletes. 

"That's the basis of our whole team," 
Belknap said. "You need to go out and get 
good in-state kids, and you can usually 
push your program to the national level 
with three or four out-of-staters. That will 
be our goal from this year on out." 

Cowley has not fielded a track team 
since it had a women's program in the early 
1970s. 

The Tigers will compete seven times in 
cross country in fall 2001, beginning Sept. 
1 at the Wichita State University Gold 
Classic in Wichita. 

All seven meets were out of town, but 
Belknap said he was working on getting a 
home meet for fall 2002. 

"I'd like to host a meet next fall," he 
said. "I think Camp Horizon or Camp 
Quaker Haven would be ideal courses." 

Arkansas City High School has held 
cross country meets in those two locations 
near Arkansas City in years past. 

Belknap said training won't be a prob- 
lem, even without a designated home 
course. 



"We'll train a lot on the outskirts of 
town," he said. "We'll do a lot of dirt roads. 
And I'm hoping to do grass loops at Carver 
Park." 

Belknap said training would be a com- 
bination of long distances and speed work. 

"A typical week of training mileage- 
wise would be to start out in the low 30s for 
the men's side and build up to 60 miles a 
week," Belknap said. "We'll mix that with 
distance runs and some interval training on 
grass. Our national meet is on a very hilly 
course, so we'll hit the hills once or twice a 
week during conditioning." 

College women run five kilometers, or 
3.1 miles, while men run eight kilometers, 
or five miles. 

Belknap said even he'll be testing the 
waters with the new program. 

"This first year, I really don't know 
what to expect from the freshmen," he said. 
"I'd like to instill good training habits with 
them. Since all the kids are freshmen, it 
will be an interesting year. Looking into 
their second year, I'll expect them to be 
even better, maybe even a conference title. 
We have good talent this year. Transfer that 
into their sophomore season and they could 
be incredible." 

Belknap said keys to a successful team 
are some of the same for other sports. 

"It's a little difficult because it's such 
an individual sport," Belknap said. "But if 
you can get the kids to bond together and 
get a feel for each other, that's vital. We had 
good chemistry at Butler and had a mix of 
international and American kids. I think 
that helped the American kids grow 
because they saw the international kids get 
to another level. And the international kids 
saw what it took academically and social- 

ly" 

At each meet except the Region VI 
championships and nationals, Cowley will 
be running against two- and four-year 
schools. 

As of July 2001, Belknap had signed 
27 men and 25 women for his track squads. 

"I'm just trying to sell them on the fact 
that Cowley is a good place and that we'd 
take care of them," he said. "They'd also 
have a good chance to go on to a four-year 
school and run." 

Ryan Manning has been hired to assist 
Belknap in each of the programs. 



28 Cowley News & President's Report 2000-2001 



Second Tiger 
Athletic Hall of 
Fame class 
inducted 



Six people with close ties to Cowley 
athletics, including one posthumously, 
were inducted into the Tiger Athletic Hall 
of Fame on Feb. 17,2001. 

The class is comprised of former ath- 
letes and Cowley's first athletic director. 
Induction ceremonies were held at halftime 
of the men's basketball game against 
Independence. 

Inductees in the Class of 2001: Don 
Ward, Loye Sparks, Ray Potter, Pam 
Mattingly, all former athletes still living; 
and Orville Gregory, the school's first ath- 
letic director. Being inducted posthumous- 
ly was the late Louis "Rabbit" Weller, a 
standout football player in the 1920s. 

Feb. 17, which also was Cowley's 
Homecoming, included several activities 
for the inductees. At noon, a luncheon was 
held in the Earle N. Wright Community 
Room inside the Brown Center. At 3:30 
p.m., the group was given a tour of the 
main campus. A "meet-and-greet" session 
was held from 5-6 p.m. in the foyer of W.S. 
Scott Auditorium. The women's basketball 
game against Independence began at 6 
p.m., and the group was officially inducted 
at halftime of the men's game. 

In 2000, 10 former athletes and coach- 
es were inducted into the Hall's first class. 

Following is a capsule look at each of 
the 2001 inductees: 



Don Ward 

Don Ward was an All-American foot- 
ball player for ACJC in 1959-1960. He 
sarned all-conference and was named the 
Tigers' team captain. 

Ward enjoyed a lengthy career in com- 
munity involvement, including the cham- 
Der of commerce, Mason Oil Co., member 
}f the Crime Stoppers organization, spon- 
or of youth programs through Mason Oil, 
ind he directed General Electric 's Aircraft 
3ngine Maintenance Center's community 
nvolvement. 



Athletic Achievements 



Hall of Fame 2001 




Don Ward 

Ward worked 33 years for GE, includ- 
ing the position of plant manager at 
Strother Field's AEMC from 1992 to 1995. 

He has owned Mason Oil Co. in 
Arkansas City since 1973. 

He has been president and general 
manager of AAR Corp., an aircraft refur- 
bishing company with 600 employees in 
Oklahoma City, since 1995. 

Ward lives in Edmond, Okla. 



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Loye Sparks 

Loye Sparks 

Loye Sparks enjoyed an outstanding 
basketball career at ACJC, including being 
named an All-American in 1961. That same 
year, Sparks tied Del Heidebrecht's single- 
game scoring record at the college with a 
49-point outburst against Pratt on Feb. 21, 
1961. In that same game, Sparks estab- 
lished the college's all-time single-game 
record for field goals with 22. 



Sparks also was a two-time All- 
Jayhawk Conference selection (1959-1961 ) 
and played in the North vs. South All- 
American Game. 

From ACJC, Sparks earned a scholar- 
ship to play basketball for the University of 
Kansas from 1961-1963. 

In 1 964, Sparks went to work for Santa 
Fe Railroad. He held various jobs before 
retiring from the company in 1 996 as man- 
ager of information system services. 

He served as a deacon for six years at 
Northland Christian Church, an elder for 
six years at the same church, co-chaired 
ACTS long-range planning, and has 
coached little league baseball and basket- 
ball and won a state championship and 
went on to the world series. 

Sparks is a 1980 graduate of the 
Institute of Business Economics and 
Management at the University of Southern 
California. 

He and his wife Roberta have been 
married 38 years. They have four children, 
all of whom went on to college on basket- 
ball scholarships, including Kelly and Kris 
at Cowley County Community College. He 
and his wife also have seven grandchildren. 

Sparks lives in Topeka, Kan. 




Ray Potter 



Ray Potter 



Ray Potter is one of the most prolific 
scorers in Cowley men's basketball history. 

An All-American in 1953, Potter ranks 
sixth all-time in career scoring with 1,145 
points during his career, which spanned 
from 1951-1953. His 666 points during the 
1952-1953 season ranks sixth among 



Cowley News & President's Report 2000-2001 



29 



Athletic Achievements 



Hall of Fame 2001 



school single-season scorers. He also holds 
the record for best scoring average during a 
two-year career at 21.2. 

Potter also had the distinction of play- 
ing on ACJC's national runner-up basket- 
ball team of 1953. He was co-captain of 
that team. 

Potter, who lives in Winfield, has 
served as director of the alumni association 
in 1974 and was a member of the Rotary 
Club and chamber of commerce during the 
1970s. 

He owns and operates Wellington 
Steakhouse and Motel. 




Pamela Mattingly 



that qualified for nationals in Catonsville, 
Md., in 1978-1979. 

She served as assistant softball coach 
in 1986 when the Tigers won the Jayhawk 
East and Region VI championships. 

Mattingly is assistant manager with 
Barbeques Galore, America's largest chain 
of barbecue stores. 




Pamela Mattingly 

Pam Mattingly played basketball, vol- 
leyball, and softball at Cowley, excelling at 
basketball. 

Mattingly, who lives in San Antonio, 
Texas, was a star athlete from 1978-1980. 

She was the first female Ail-American 
at Cowley, earning the distinction in bas- 
ketball in 1980. She was All-Region VI in 
1979 and 1980, and held numerous school 
records until the last few seasons. The list: 

Most career field goals 257; most 
career free throws 340; most career total 
points 654; highest career average 13.1; 
most field goals in one season 273; most 
free throws in one season 93; most points in 
a season 439; and most free throws in a sin- 
gle game 10. Mattingly also scored a game- 
high 29 points in the National Junior 
College Athletic Association All-Star 
Game, breaking the record. 

During her two-year career at Cowley, 
Mattingly also earned All-Region VI in 
volleyball and was a member of the team 

30 Cowley News & President's Report 2000-2001 



Orville Gregory 



Orville Gregory 

Orville Gregory of Shawnee Mission, 
Kan., has a long, storied athletic career. He 
was Cowley's first athletic director (1947 
to 1969). He served as director of Region 
VI for 16 years and founded the NJCAA 
women's basketball tournament. He man- 
aged the Pan Am Games in Mexico City, 
and has been a member of the U.S. 
Olympic Committee. He also is a former 
member of the NCAA's Track & Field 
Rules Committee, and of the NCAA 
Collegiate Directors Committee. In 1978, 
he received the NJCAA Certificate of 
Service for outstanding service in the field 
of athletic administration. 




Louis "Rabbit" Weller 

Louis "Rabbit" j 
Weller I 

Louis Weller owns eight school 
records in football as he was a star for 
ACJC in 1925 and 1926. 

The records: Most points scored in a 
career 190; most points scored in one sea 
son 103; most points scored in one game 
27; most points scored in one quarter 20; 
most touchdowns in a career 28; most 
touchdowns in one season 15; most touch- 
downs in one game 4; most touchdowns in 
one quarter 3. 



Jl! 



Athletic Achievements 



Sports Briefs 



Burroughs, 
Hargrove earn 
500th coaching 
victories 

Head baseball coach Dave Burroughs 
and head softball coach Ed Hargrove each 
recorded their 500th career victories during 
the 2001 season. Both teams qualified for 
the national tournament. Burroughs just 
completed his 14th season with the Tigers, 
while Hargrove finished his 17th season. 
Dr. Pat McAtee, president of Cowley, pre- 
sented the two coaches with a plaque com- 
memorating their coaching milestone. 

Athletic seasons 
successful once 
again 



There may not have been as many con- 
ference championships during the 2000- 
2001 athletic seasons as the preceding year, 
but the Tigers fielded competitive teams in 
just about every sport. And in late 2000, the 
Tigers even added a couple of intercolle- 
giate sports in men's and women's cross 
country and men's and women's track and 
field. 

Following is a capsule look at each 
sport. They are listed alphabetically. 

Baseball 

After a 3-0 start in the Alpine Bank 
Junior College World Series in Grand 
Junction, Colo., the Tiger baseball team 
looked like the team to beat. 

Cowley, which had captured its sev- 
enth consecutive Jayhawk Conference 
Eastern Division title during the regular 
season, was the only unbeaten team left in 
the tournament after games of May 30. 

But North Central Texas, a program in 
its 10th year, had other ideas as the Lions 
stopped Cowley's streak by winning con- 
secutive games from the Tigers, 5-3 and 8- 



6, ending Cowley's season at 49-16. The 
Tigers finished third in the NJCAA World 
Series. 

Three Tigers were named to the All- 
Tournament Team: John Urick, Ryan Bell, 
and Justin Glenn. Head Coach Dave 
Burroughs was presented the Homa 
Thomas sportsmanship award. 

Cowley's Wes Detwiler, a left-handed 
pitcher, was named NJCAA Player of the 
Year for 2001 by the American Baseball 
Coaches Association. Detwiler, a sopho- 
more from Wentzville, Mo., compiled a 
1.90 earned-run average in 92 1/3 innings. 
At the World Series, Detwiler pitched 17 
innings and had a 3.7 1 ERA, striking out 1 2 
and walking three. 

Detwiler also earned first-team All- 
Jayhawk East honors, along with team- 
mates Cory VonTungeln at shortstop (also 
co-most valuable player of the year), 
Dustin Smith at catcher, Urick at first, and 
Bell in the outfield. Honorable mention 
selections were Gabe Luttrell, J.J. Morris, 
and Brad Lovell. 

Men's Basketball 

After winning seven consecutive con- 
ference games, the Tigers dropped two 
straight — at home against Independence 
and on the road at Coffeyville — to effec- 
tively drop them from any chance at anoth- 
er league title. 

Cowley finished fourth in the Jayhawk 
East with a 13-5 record. The Tigers were 
23-8 overall in Mark Nelson's final season, 
losing to Hutchinson in W.S. Scott 
Auditorium 69-50 in the first round of the 
Region VI Tournament. 

Sophomores Richard Wilson and Mike 
Hayes earned All-Jayhawk Conference 
honors: Hayes first team; Wilson second 
team. 

Women's 
Basketball 

Cowley's run of three consecutive 17- 
1 Jayhawk East seasons came to an end as 
the Tigers finished 13-5 in the league (third 
place) and 24-7 overall. 



The 2000-2001 season likely will go 
down in coach Darin Spence's books as the 
"what if season. What if Trinetta Moore 
and Amanda Barkley don't get injured? 
What if Tariqah Miller has the season she's 
capable of having? What if? 

As it turned out, Barkley never played, 
blowing her knee out in preseason work- 
outs. Moore played in just a handful of 
games before succumbing to a knee injury, 
lost for the season. And Miller? She was 
dismissed from the team near mid-season. 

Despite all of that adversity — Spence 
and assistant Matt Cole figured they had a 
team that could finish in the top five nation- 
ally — Cowley remained competitive until 
the end. At one point, the Tigers were 10-3 
in the conference. The season ended with a 
74-70 loss to Pratt in the first round of the 
Region VI Tournament in W.S. Scott 
Auditorium. 

Freshmen April Banks and Stephanie 
Shanline earned second-team All-Jayhawk 
East honors. 

Golf 

Two players qualified for the NJCAA 
Division II National Tournament in College 
Station, Texas. 

Brook Shurtz shot 81-72-77-83 for a 
four-day total of 313, tying him for 75th 
place, while Jay Stultz shot 79-75-79-84 
for a four-day total of 317, tying him for 
86th place. The tournament was held May 
28 to June 1,2001. 

Softball 

Coach Ed Hargrove's team earned the 
right to compete in the national tournament 
for the first time since 1986. Cowley 
played well at nationals, losing 3-0 to Gulf 
Coast of Panama City, Fla., and 2-1 to 
Navarro of Texas. Cowley finished the sea- 
son with a 42-6 record. 

In the opening game, Cowley pitcher 
Lindsey Davis' only mistake was one pitch 
in the first inning, resulting in a 3-0 lead by 
Gulf Coast on a three-run home run. 
However, she pitched well enough the rest 
of the way. 



Cowley News & President's Report 2000-2001 31 



Athletic Achievements 



Sports Briefs 



In the second game, the Lady Tigers 
saw their 1-0 lead evaporate in the sixth 
inning as Navarro tied the game 1-1. Then, 
in the seventh inning, Navarro won the 
contest. 

Davis, the daughter of former Cowley 
volleyball coach Deb Nittler, was named 
the College Female Athlete of the Year by 
the Greater Wichita Area Sports 
Commission. She was named a third-team 
All- American after going 22-5 with a 0.72 
earned-run average. She also struck out 253 
hitters during the 2001 season, helping her 
shatter the Cowley career record. Davis' 
record now stands at 531. She was an All- 
Jayhawk Conference Eastern Division 
player and All-Region VI for the second 
time. 

Men's Tennis 

For the first time since 1988, the men's 
tennis team, as a whole, did not qualify for 
the national tournament. No. 1 singles 
player Tom Murray did, however, but lost 
his first-round match in Tyler, Texas, May 
13-18. Murray was the champion at No. 1 
singles in Region VI. 

Head coach Larry Grose had a string 
of 12 consecutive trips to nationals as a 
team snapped. 

Women's Tennis 

Behind a runnerup finish by Allison 
Tweedy at No. 3 singles, the Lady Tiger 
finished sixth at the national tournament 
May 6- 1 1 in Tucson, Ariz. It was the team's 
highest finish since a sixth place in 1994. 

Tweedy 's play earned her All- America 
honors. 

Cowley, which finished second in the 
Region VI Tournament, had a regional 
champion at No. 1 singles in freshman 
Donata Majauskaite. 



Volleyball 



It's probably not the way Lady Tiger 
coach Deb Nittler wanted it to end. 

Nittler was completing her 15th and 
final season as Cowley's head volleyball 
coach as the Lady Tigers went 1-2 in the 



Region VI Tournament in Shawnee 
Mission, Kan., to finish the 2000 season 
with a 22-23 record. 

"I have a lot of mixed feelings," said 
Nittler, who resigned in October 2000 to 
devote more time as an instructor and chair 
of the Social Science Department. "It's 
hard to change after 23 years." 

Nittler was referring to the six years 
she taught in Unified School District No. 
470 and the 1 7 she has in at Cowley. Nittler 
fell just short of the 400-win plateau, end- 
ing with a career record of 392 wins, 342 
losses, and eight ties. Nittler's best season 
as head coach was her first, 1986, when 
Cowley went 36-16-1 to finish in a three- 
way tie for first place in the Jayhawk 
Conference's Eastern Division. This sea- 
son, Cowley finished fourth with a 6-3 
record behind Kansas City, Johnson 
County, and Neosho County. 

Seward County and Barton County 
will represent Region VI at the national 
tournament. 

Three of Nittler's players earned All- 
Jayhawk East honors. Megan Houk, a 
freshman from Valley Center, earned sec- 
ond-team all-conference, while Jade 
Shriver, a sophomore from Arkansas City, 
and Breann Roach, a sophomore from 
Valley Center, were named honorable men- 
tion. 

Nittler said she was proud of her final 
team. 

"I couldn't have asked for a better 
bunch of young ladies to work with this 
year," she said. "It was really enjoyable." 

Replacing Nittler as head coach is 
Joanna Howell, a former player of Nittler's 
from Attica, Kan. Howell finished her 
degree at Wichita State University. She 
played for Nittler in the 1 996 and 1997 sea- 
sons and earned All-Region VI and All- 
Jayhawk East honors both seasons. 



Facts & Figures 
from 2000-2001: 



The number of career victories 
reached by baseball Coach Dave 
Burroughs and softball Coach Ed 
Hargrove. All 1,000 victories have 
been recorded at Cowley. 



The number of games the baseball 
team won to start the Alpine Bank 
College World Series, the Tigers' 
final placing in the series (third), and 
the number of trips to Grand 
Junction in the last five years. 



'"■?) >~ <;fj~ 



The number of opposing batters who 
struck out against sophomore softball 
pitcher Lindsey Davis during the 
2001 season. Combined with her 
totals from her freshman season, 
Davis finished her Cowley career 
with a record 531 Ks. 



The number of All- Americans from 
the 2001 women's tennis team. 
Sophomore Allison Tweedy of 
Arkansas City finished second at 
No. 3 singles to earn the honor. 



The number of career victories for 
volleyball Coach Deb Nittler, who 
stepped down as coach of the Lady 
Tigers after the 2000 season. Nittler's 
career record, all at Cowley, was 
392-342. 



The number of season-ending knee 
injuries suffered by the Lady Tiger 
basketball team. Amanda Barkley 
went down even before the season 
began, and Trinetta Moore, making a 
comeback of sorts, played just a few 
games before injuring her knee. 



16 



The number of former Cowley ath- 
letes and coaches inducted into the 
Tiger Athletic Hall of Fame during 
the past two years. 



32 Cowley News & President's Report 2000-2001 



COWLEY AT-A-©LANCE 2001 

Cowley County Community College 
and Area Vocational-Technical School 



4 

V 



Cowle 



Mill Levy : 16.997 

Fact: 

Of the 19 community col- 
leges in Kansas, Cowley 
has the 6th lowest mill 
levy in the state at 16.997, 
and has the sixth highest 
county valuation of 
$183,692,750. At $48 per 
credit hour for tuition and 
fees, Cowley boasts one of 
the lowest tuitions in 
Kansas. 



Enrollment Figures: 

Facts, Spring 2001: 

High School 467 

Freshmen 1,557 

Sophomores 1,092 

Special 656 
Total 

Headcount 3,772 

Total FTE 2,236 

Approximately 60% of 
freshmen and sophomores 
enrolled in Kansas col- 
leges are in community 
colleges. 



Assessed Valuation: 



Fall 2001: 
Budget: 



$183,692,750 

$19.5 million 
(2001-2002) 



Founded: 1922 

In 1968, the College became the first school in the state to combine a traditional lib- 
eral ARTS TRANSFER CURRICULUM WITH A PROGRAM OF AREA VOCATIONAL-TECHNICAL SCHOOL TRAINING. 

President: 

Dr. Patrick McAtee, Ph.D., became the third president of the College on July i, 1987. 



2000 Fall Enrollment: 

2,356 Full-Time Equivalency (record) 
3,837 Total Headcount 



2001 Spring Enrollment: 

2,236 FTE (Record for spring) 
3,772 Total Headcount 



Programs: 

33 Certificate and Applied Science programs 
42 Liberal Arts/Transfer programs 

More than 100 specialized programs and seminars offered through the Institute for 
Lifetime Learning. 

Specialized training for business and industry to meet their needs. In the past the 
College has developed or offered programs for General Electric, Rubbermaid-Winfield, 
Gordon-Piatt Energy Group, Inc., the city of Arkansas City, the city of Winfield, Future 
Beef Operations, local school districts, day care centers, local nursing homes, special edu- 
cation co-ops, KSQ Blowmolding, Social Rehabilitation Services, Southwestern Bell 
Telephone, Selcom, Boeing-Wichita, Cessna, and the Business and Industry Division of Banks. 

Facilities: 

17 buildings on a 10-acre campus in the heart of downtown arkansas clty. two new facil- 
ities—a dormitory and a dining hall— opened for the start of the fall 2001 semester. 

Outreach Centers in Mulvane, Strother Field, Winfield, Wellington and Wichita, where 
a cooperative partnership between cowley, wlchita state university, and wlchita area 
Technical College has formed the Southside Education Center. Courses also taught at these 
area high schools: Argonia, Belle Plaine, Burden, Caldwell, Cedar Vale, Conway Springs, 
Dexter, Oxford, South Haven, and Udall. 

Athletics: 

Twelve intercollegiate sports that compete in the Kansas Jayhawk Conference's East 
Division. Men's Cross Country, Women's Cross Country, Volleyball, Men's Basketball, 
Women's Basketball, Baseball, Softball, Golf, Men's Tennis, Women's Tennis, Men's Track 
and Field, and Women's Track and Field. 
Jayhawk Conference Eastern Division Crowns in 2000-2001: 

• Baseball 49-16 (seventh consecutive title, 29-7 in the East) (Sophomore pitcher Wes 
Detwiler named NJCAA Division I Player of the Year by the American Baseball 
Coaches Association) 

District or Region VI crowns in 2000-2001: 

• Baseball (went 3-2 to finish third in the NJCAA World Series) 

• Softball (went 4-0 to win District E of Region VI; qualified for nationals. Finished 
season with 42-6 record) 

Employees: 

170 full-time faculty, staff and administration 
445 part-time faculty, staff and students 

Cowley News & President's Report 2000-2001 33 



THE©OTTOM LINE 2001 

Cowley County Community College 
and Area Vocational-Technical School 




Cowle 



Your Investment 

• $3,723,718 IN I999 TAXES. $3,506,103 IN 2000 TAXES. 

• Taxes DO NOT pay for scholarships to out-of-state athletes. 

• The College is fourth in size among the 19 community colleges in 
Kansas, behind Johnson County Community College, Kansas City 
Community College, and Butler County Community College. 

Your Return 

• $14 million a year added to the local economy. For each dollar of 
local tax support received, the College returns $5.03 to the coun- 
ty's economy. That return is greater when the total picture of the 

STATE IS CONSIDERED. For EVERY DOLLAR SPENT BY THE STATE IN SUPPORT 

of community colleges, $22-43 is returned. 

• $8,256,962 annual payroll, providing i7o full-time jobs and 445 
adjunct faculty, staff, and student positions. 

• Educational opportunities for all segments of the population at less 
than half the cost of four-year colleges. average student age is 

31.6 YEARS. 

• More than 1,100 Cowley County students received more than $2 mil- 
lion IN GRANTS, LOANS, SCHOLARSHIPS AND WORK-STUDY PROGRAM DOLLARS 
DURING THE 2000-2001 ACADEMIC YEAR. 

• A RECORD FULL-TIME ENROLLMENT FOR THE SPRING OF 2001 OF 2,236 TOTAL 
FTE. 

• Graduates who, according to a study by the University of Kansas, 
suffer less transfer shock than any other group of transfer stu- 
DENTS. 

• Customized training for more than a dozen businesses and industries. 

• a significant attraction for businesses and industries considering 
relocation in this area. 

• Cultural, educational and athletic events which entertain audiences 
throughout this area. 

• An EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTION WELL KNOWN FOR THE QUALITY OF ITS PRO- 
GRAMS IN BOTH LIBERAL ARTS AND VOCATIONAL/OCCUPATIONAL AREAS. 

34 Cowley News & President's Report 2000-2001 



Elected Officials 

Governor 
Bill Graves 
Second Floor 
State Capitol 
Topeka, Kansas 66612 

State Senator 
Greta Goodwin 
Winfield, Kansas 67156 

State Representatives 

Joe Shriver 

Arkansas City, Kansas 67005 

Judy Showalter 
Winfield, Kansas 67156 

State Board of Regents 
700 SW Harrison 
Topeka, KS 66603-3716 

Board of Trustees 

Donna Avery, Arkansas City 
Albert Bacastow Jr., 

Arkansas City 
Lee Gregg Jr., Arkansas City 
Ron Godsey, Winfield 
LaDonna Lanning, Winfield 
Virgil Watson Jr., 

Arkansas City 

Cowley 
Administration 

Dr. Patrick J. McAtee President 

Sheree Utash VF Northern Campuses 

Conrad Jimison VF of Instruction 

Terri Morrow Dean of Development 

and College Relations 
Tony Crouch . . . Dean of Business Services 

Charles McKown Dean of Research 

and Technology 
To in Saia Dean of Administration/ 

Director of Athletics 

Marilyn Dill . . . Assoc. Dean of Curriculum 

and Assessment 

Sue Saia . . Assoc. Dean of Student Services 

Gene Cole Assoc. Dean of 

Business & Industry 



w 



Cowley County Community College and Area Vocational-Technical School 

125 S. Second Street • Arkansas City, Kansas 67005 

1-800-593-2222 



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Dining Centfer 
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EATING IN COMFORT: 

Patrick J. McAtee Dining Center After years in cramped 
quarters, the college completed a new spacious, modern dining 
center, naming it after the current college president 14 

STUDENT OF THE Y EAR: 

Maggie Campbell In her two years at Cowley, Campbell 
became one of the school's most popular and honored students. 
Her accomplishments are impressive 5 

OUTSTANDING TIGER ALUMNI: 

Bob White A 1969 Cowley graduate. White's love for 
accounting and business catapulted him to chairman and CEO of 
Garvey International, Inc 1 3 



THE COWLEY PRESIDENT'S REPORT is printed once yearly and is produced by the office of Public Relations, 
Stu Osterthun. director, and Rex Soule, publications designer. Reproduction in whole or in part without written permis- 
sion is prohibited For comments or questions, please send an e-mail to osterthun @cowleyedu or soule@cowleyedu 



LEADERSHIP: 

WELCOME: Dr. Put McAtee 2 

LEADERSHIP: The Board of Trustees 
and College Administration 3 

STUDENT ACHIEVEMENTS: 

TOP STUDENTS: The Students of the 
Month for 2001-2002 4 

BLAKE STITES: The Prescott 

sophomore was selected Outstanding 
Student of Arkansas City 6 

Two Cowley 
students attend honors luncheon in 
Topeka 6 

BOEING INTERNSHIP: Bailey Sey- 
more lands the only drafting summer 
internship at Boeing Wichita 7 

The CC Singers 
performed at the Branson National 
College Show Choir Invitational ....8 




Jtt 

PRACTICE, PRACTICE, PRACTICE: 

Concert Choir to perform at world- 
famous Carnegie Hall in NYC 8 

FACULTY/STAFF ACHIEVEMENTS: 

NiSOD EXCELLENCE: Marlys 
Cervantes and Todd Shepherd 
receive Master Teacher Awards ... I 

ENDOWED CHAIR: Connie Donatelli 
receives third Endowed Chair for 
Teaching Excellence and Student 
Learning 10 

McATEE HONORED BY FHSU: Dr. Pat 
McAtee receives Fort Hays State's 
highest alumni honor I I 

GOOD-BYE COWLEY: Three employ- 
ees retire after year's end 12 

GRUNDER TOP ADVISOR: State Phi 
Beta Lambda awards Beverly 
Grunder with State Advisor of the 
Year 12 

FACILITIES: 




)RE BEDS: The Fifth Avenue 
Dormitory opens for Fall 2001 .... I 5 

OPEN FOR BUSINESS: The Workforce 
Development Center holds grand 
opening on September 14 I 5 

BOEING AT SOUTHSIDE: Wichita's 
aircraft giant moves in 16 

$350,000: College receives largest 
single donation in its history 17 



18 



COWLEY BRIEFS: 
SPORTS: 



t (hose inducted into 
NJCAA Tennis Hall of Fame 20 



SPORTS BRIEFS: 



17 



ENROLLMENT STATISTICS 9 

ENDOWMENT ASSOCIATION 24 

COWLEY AT A GLANCE 2002 26 

COWLEY BOTTOM LINE 2002 27 



COWLEY COLLEGE TIMES, 2001-2002 



SPECIAL MESSAGE FROM DR. PAT M C ATEE, COWLEY PRESIDENT 




WELCOME 



Welcome to another edition of The 
President's Annual Report. 

The 2001-2002 academic year was 
filled with individual and team accom- 
plishments, growth and expansion of the 
main campus, and overall student enroll- 
ment. It was truly an exciting year to be a 
Cowley Tiger! Here are some highlights: 

First, Cowley's commitment to local 
taxpayers was never more evident than 
when the Board of Trustees approved a 
substantial decrease in the mill levy during 
its August 2001 meeting. As a result, the 
college requested $384,000 less in local 
tax dollars. The 16.997 final mill levy for 
the 2001-2002 academic year was just 
slightly above the level during my first 
year at the college. 

Two new facilities were opened on the 
main campus in time for the 2001 fall 
semester, a 72-bed dormitory that houses 
females, and a much-needed dining center, 
of which I am deeply honored to have it 
bear my name. 

The college, and particularly Associ- 
ate Dean of Business and Industry Gene 
Cole, was instrumental in opening the 
Cowley College Workforce Development 
Center at Strother Field Airport and Indus- 



trial Park north of Arkansas City. The Sep- 
tember 2001 open house was the culmina- 
tion of many hours of work in pulling all 
the partners together to make the center a 
reality. 

Another facility, this one at our South- 
side Education Center in Wichita, held an 
open house in October. Boeing Wichita 
officially opened the Southside Education 
Center Boeing Education, Training, and 
College Partnership. This ensures a lasting 
relationship between the college and Boe- 
ing. 

Many great athletic accomplishments 
were celebrated throughout the year. The 
women's basketball team under Head 
Coach Darin Spence won its fourth Jay- 
hawk Conference Eastern Division title in 
the last five years; the baseball team, under 
Head Coach Dave Burroughs, won its 
eighth consecutive Jayhawk East title and 
qualified for the National Junior College 
Athletic Association World Series for the 
fourth time in six years; and the women's 
tennis team, under Head Coach Andre 
Spence, won the Region VI Tournament 
and finished third at the national tourna- 
ment, the highest finish ever for a Cowley 
women's tennis team. 



Individual awards also were present- 
ed. Director of Vocal Music, Connie 
Donatelli, was named the third Endowed 
Chair for Teaching Excellence and Student 
Learning in January 2002. Men's tennis 
Coach Larry Grose was inducted into the 
National Men's Tennis Hall of Fame in 
May 2002. And one of our distinguished 
alumni. Bob White, chairman and chief 
executive officer of Garvey International, 
Inc., was presented the 2002 Outstanding 
Tiger Alumni Award during commence- 
ment in May. 

These are just some of the highlights 
from the 2001-2002 academic year, my 
15th as president. Please take a few min- 
utes to read this report. In doing so, you'll 
better understand Cowley's role within the 
communities it serves, and the enormous 
talent its people possess. 

/ J Sincerely, 

ffet /matt. 

Dr. Patrick J. McAtee 



COWLEY COLLEGE TIMES, 2001-2002 



_ 1 



L E A D E R S 11 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 









ADMINISTRATION 







Dr. Patrick J. 

McAtee 




Conrad 
Jimison 

Vice President 
of Instruction 





Dean of Admifiistratio: 
Director of Athletics 



^V&k |'"*^H . fe' : 




^M m 

m & m 


Terri 
Morrow 

Dean of Development 
and College Relations 


Charles 
McKown 

Dean of Research 
and Technology 




Tony 
Crouch 



Dean of Business Sc 





u 


Marilyn 
Dill 

Associate Dean of 
Curriculum & Assessment 



: : :;¥^^W 


m 


K 




- 1 


4 J 




Gene 
Cole 


Ass 
Busi 


ociale Dean of 
less & Industry 



COWLEY COLLEGE TIMES, 2001-2002 



S T U D E N T A C II IEVEMENTS 



STUDENTS OF THE MONTH 




Joel Arnold 

September 2001 
Kingman, KS. 
Elementary Education 




Megan Houk 

October 2001 
Valley Center, KS. 
Psychology 




Maggie Campbell 

November 2001 
Cedar Vale, KS. 
Elementary Education 




Mindy Brown 

December 2001 

Wichita, KS. 

Business Administration 



Blake Stites 

January 2002 

Prescott, KS. 

Machine & Tool Technology 




Amanda Krueger 

February 2002 

Winfield, KS. 

Theatre 




Chantal Sanders 

March 2002 

Arkansas City, KS. 

Art 




Heather Benoit 

April 2002 

Winfield, KS. 

Journalism 




COWLEY COLLEGE TIMES, 2001-2002 



S T li I) ]■: N 



I r, V F. M i< N 




Campbell caps two-year 
career by being named 
Student of the Year 



JUGGLING: 

Maggie Campbell kept 
busy during her two 
years at Cowley. 

r Lady Tiger Basket- 
ball, Queen Alalah LXX, 
Homecoming Queen, 
and Student of the Year. 



Maggie Campbell, a soph- 
omore from Cedar Vale, was 
named Cowley's Student of 
the Year during the annual Cel- 
ebration of Excellence banquet 
April 23, 2002, in the Earle N. 
Wright Community Room. 

Campbell was chosen 
from the pool of eight Students 
of the Month throughout the 
2001-2002 academic year. Sue 
Saia, dean of student life, pre- 
sented Campbell with the 
award. More than 220 people 
attended the banquet. 



Campbell, who was 
named the November 2001 
Student of the Month, has had 
a successful two years at Cow- 
ley. The daughter of Karen and 
Michael Campbell of Cedar 
Vale became just the second 
student not from Arkansas 
City to be crowned Queen 
Alalah in October 2001. 

And in April 2002, Camp- 
bell was a finalist for the Out- 
standing Student of Arkansas 
City Award presented by the 
city of Arkansas City. Cowley 



student Blake Stites, a sopho- 
more from Prescott, won that 
award. 

Campbell, an elementary 
education major, held a 4.0 
grade-point average, was a 
member of the Jayhawk Con- 
ference Eastern Division 
champion Lady Tiger basket- 
ball team, was a Student 
Ambassador, was a member of 
Phi Theta Kappa, was 
involved in Campus Christian 
Fellowship, and was an Honor 
Graduate, meaning she was in 



the top 10 percent of Cowley's 
spring graduating class of 
approximately 560 students. 

Campbell also was 
crowned Homecoming Queen 
in February 2002, and 
appeared in a 30-second tele- 
vision commercial promoting 
the college. 



COWLEY COLLEGE TIMES, 2001-2002 



S T U I) E N T A C II I E V I \l E N T S 



Stites named Outstanding 
Student of Arkansas City 




Blake Stites, a May 2002 
graduate, was selected as the 
Outstanding Student of 
Arkansas City for the 2001- 
2002 academic year. 



The award, sponsored by 
the city of Arkansas City and 
chosen by a group of city offi- 
cials and business leaders, was 
presented at a banquet April 1 5 
in the Earle N. Wright Com- 
munity Room inside the 
Brown Center for Arts, Sci- 
ences and Technology on 
Cowley's main campus. 

Three students from Cow- 
ley, Arkansas City High 
School, and Arkansas City 
Middle School are chosen as 
finalists from a larger pool of 
students. Stites, Jennifer 
Fahrbach, and Maggie Camp- 
bell were Cowley's students 
nominated for the award. 



Each student nominated 
was interviewed by the com- 
mittee, which was comprised 
of 8-10 people. The students 
were asked a variety of ques- 
tions designed to give the 
committee an insight into their 
personality and their life. 

Stites, the son of Sue and 
Owen Stites of Prescott, was a 
machine and tool technology 
major at Cowley. 

He played major roles in 
Cowley's fall musicals and 
spring plays. He was a mem- 
ber of Act One drama club, 
served as reporter for Industri- 
al Technology's Vocational 
Industrial Clubs of America 
chapter, competed in forensics, 
was inducted in fall 2001 into 
Mu Alpha Theta, was on the 
National Dean's List, was 
nominated for Who's Who 
Among Students in American 



Junior Colleges, and was pres- 
ident of Phi Theta Kappa. 

He also participated in the 
college's annual lip-sync con- 
test Puttin' on the Hits, and 
was crowned Mr. CinderFella 
2001. Stites also was named 
January 2002 Student of the 
Month. 

Stites, who transferred 
hours from Fort Scott Commu- 
nity College, completed his 
Cowley course work with a 4.0 
grade-point average. He 
played the role of Chris in 
Cowley's spring play "All My 
Sons." He plans to transfer to 
Pittsburg State University and 
major in manufacturing engi- 
neering. 



Houk, Arnold represented Cowley at 
Phi Theta Kappa honors luncheon 



Megan Houk and Joel 
Arnold represented Cowley on 
Feb. 13, 2002, during the sev- 
enth annual Phi Theta Kappa 
honors luncheon in Topeka. 

Houk and Arnold were 
among 40 community college 
scholars from Kansas who 
were honored for their aca- 
demic accomplishments. The 
luncheon was held at the Holi- 
day Inn West/Holidome in 
conjunction with February's 
Kansas Board of Regents 
meeting. 




Houk, the daughter of 
Cindi Houk and Loren Houk, 
was named October 2001 Stu- 
dent of the Month at Cowley. 
She played for the Lady Tiger 



volleyball team two years, 
served as president of the Stu- 
dent Government Association 
during the fall 2001 semester, 
and was a member of PTK. 
She served Cowley as a Stu- 
dent Ambassador, and she was 
a finalist for the title of Queen 
Alalah last fall. She is a gradu- 
ate of Valley Center High 
School. This semester, Houk is 
enrolled at Washburn Univer- 
sity. She majored in psycholo- 
gy at Cowley. 




Arnold, a sophomore ele- 
mentary education major, 
graduated in December 2001. 
He was September 2001 Stu- 
dent of the Month. He was a 
member of PTK, Act One 



drama club, and Campus 
Christian Fellowship. He is the 
son of Therese and Stephan 
Arnold. He has had parts in 
Cowley musicals, and last 
spring was first runner-up in 
the annual Mr. Cinderfella 
Pageant. Besides his involve- 
ment on campus, Arnold also 
tutored for the special educa- 
tion classroom at Jefferson 
Elementary School in 
Arkansas City, and tutored 
grades 1-3 at Sacred Heart 
Catholic School, also in 
Arkansas City. He has served 
as assistant director for his 
church's high school youth 
group in Kingman, and has 
taught Sunday school to fifth- 
and sixth-graders. He also ded- 
icated time to visit residents of 
Medicalodge East in Arkansas 
City, and Park West Senior 
Plaza in Wichita. He graduated 
from Bishop Carroll High 
School in Wichita. 

During the 2002 spring 
semester, Arnold went to New 
Mexico to conduct missionary 
work on an Indian reservation. 
In fall 2002, he planned to 
enroll at Emporia State Uni- 
versity to continue work 



toward a bachelor's degree in 
elementary education. 

The 40 students represent- 
ed 36 communities. The schol- 
ars were named to the 2002 
All-Kansas Academic Team, 
sponsored by the international 
headquarters of Phi Theta 
Kappa international honor 
society, the Kansas Associa- 
tion of Community College 
Trustees, and the Kansas 
Council of Community Col- 
lege Presidents. 

Phi Theta Kappa is the 
honor society for students 
attending community and two- 
year colleges. Membership is 
based on high grade-point 
averages and other criteria, 
with members focusing on 
scholastic achievement and 
service to community and 
campus. The 40 individuals 
are part of a statewide student 
body of nearly 1 24,000 people 
enrolled in credit courses at 
the 19 Kansas community col- 
leges. 



COWFEY COLLEGE TIMES, 2001-2002 



S T I I) E N T AC II I E V E MEM S 




Seymore lands summer 
internship at Boeing 



With the number of 2002 
summer internships drastically 
cut at Boeing Wichita, the 
competition for the 10- week 
job suddenly got stiffer for 
Cowley students. 

But Bailey Seymore, a 
freshman pre-engineering and 
drafting technology major 
from Mulvane, was selected 
for the one open summer 
internship in Boeing's drafting 
area. She was chosen from a 
pool of applicants from seven 
colleges and universities. Two 
other Cowley students also 
applied. 

"I'm really excited," said 
Seymore, who holds a 3.85 
grade-point average. "Randy 
Perry at Boeing told me that 
only one student would be 
chosen, and that this summer, 
only the best of the best would 
be working." 

Perry works in engineer- 
ing human resource analysis 
and allocation department in 



the Wichita division. He also 
conducted the student inter- 
views. 

"Bailey will be doing 
CAD drafting as directed by a 
mentor," Perry said. "She will 
be going on campus tours and 
will be in several training ses- 
sions that will give an 
overview of the Boeing 
process." 

Seymore's internship ran 
from May 24 through Aug. 1. 
She earned $13.75 an hour. 

Most summers, Boeing 
hires as many as 90 interns. 
But the recession forced the 
company to cut that number to 
20 throughout the Wichita 
facility, and just one in its 
drafting and engineering areas. 

Seymore applied for the 
internship in December 2001 
and interviewed for the job in 
February 2002. She learned in 
March she had been chosen. 

"Bailey was selected for 
her excellent GPA, completed 



course work, and the fact that 
she is currently a part-time 
draftsperson practicing her 
drafting skills," Perry said. 

Seymore is a member of 
the design team at Strother 
Manufacturing at Strother 
Field Industrial Park. She also 
has years of experience in 
drafting. 

"I took a drafting class my 
freshman year of high school 
and stayed with it," she said. 
"Math has always been some- 
thing I've liked." 

Cliff Roderick, drafting 
technology instructor at Cow- 
ley, said any of Cowley's three 
students who applied would 
have done well at Boeing. 

"I feel pretty good that it 
was one of our students," Rod- 
erick said. "Any of the three 
would have been good stu- 
dents. Bailey will be a good 
representative for us." 

Seymore plans to return to 
Cowley to finish an associate's 



BEST OF THE BEST: 

1531 ley 36ymoF6 snaggec 
the only open summer 
internship in Boeing's 
drafting area, beating 
out applicants from 
seven colleges and 
universities. 



degree, then transfer to a four- 
year school to study architec- 
tural or mechanical engineer- 
ing. 

Seymore received the 
Conco, Inc., scholarship to 
attend Cowley, one of the 
biggest reasons she is in Rod- 
erick's program. She also took 
an advanced computer-aided 
drafting class from Roderick 
while she was a senior at 
MHS. 

"Cliff has a great pro- 
gram," Seymore said. "He's a 
great teacher, and he cares a lot 
about students as people." 

Perry said Boeing was 
pleased with Cowley's draft- 
ing program. 

"Over the past six or 
seven years, Cowley's CAD 
program has made several 
advances in the strength of its 
students," Perry said. "We 
have had several very good 
students hired here at Boeing 
Wichita who are doing well 
within their peer group, and 
this does speak highly of Cliff 
and his program." 



COWLEY COLLEGE TIMES, 2001-2002 



STUDENT 



.1 l H 1 t I 



u L \ 1 S 



CC Singers perform at 
show choir festival 



The CC Singers show 
choir performed April 5 and 6 
at the 2002 Branson National 
College Show Choir Invita- 
tional. 

Connie Donatelli, direc- 
tor of vocal music, was 
pleased her group received the 
invitation to perform. 

"It was a great opportuni- 
ty for my students to perform 
at a different venue than 
they're used to," Donatelli 
said. "The students did a fan- 
tastic job. I'm really proud of 
the way they performed." 

The group arrived in 
Branson April 4. The show 
choir invitational was part of 
the Branson Jubilee National 
Music Festival. The CC 
Singers held an exhibition 
performance on April 5 and 
performed the morning of 
April 6. Their performance 
was followed by a clinic. 




Concert Choir to perform 
in famous Carnegie Hall 



Even as the 2001-2002 
academic year was drawing to 
a close, the vocal music 
department was making plans 
for a big trip in 2003. 

The Concert Choir, under 
the direction of Connie 
Donatelli, has accepted an 
invitation to perform in 
Carnegie Hall in New York 
City. The trip is being planned 
for April 24-28, 2003. 

Because of the quality and 
high level of musicianship 
demonstrated by the choral 
department at Cowley, and the 
exceptional recommendation 
given by Maestro Rod Walker 
of Kansas State University, the 
Cowley Concert Choir has 
been invited to participate in a 
performance of Randall 



Thompson's "Testament of 
Freedom," a symphonic work 
written for orchestra and cho- 
rus. The performance will take 
place April 27, 2003, in 
Carnegie Hall in New York 
City. 

The Concert Choir will 
join five to six other outstand- 
ing ensembles, for a total cho- 
rus of 150-175, selected from 
throughout North America for 
a five-day/four-night residen- 
cy from April 24-28, 2003, 
culminating in a performance 
in Carnegie Hall accompanied 
by the New England Sym- 
phonic Ensemble, Maestro 
Rod Walker, conductor. 

"This is quite an honor for 
the choir and for the college," 
said Dr. Pat McAtee, Cowley 



president. "And it should be a 
wonderful experience for our 
young people who attend." 

Donatelli, Cowley's direc- 
tor of vocal music, said she 
was honored to be invited to 
perform at the famous venue. 

"My students work so 
hard each year," she said. "We 



have put together very talented 
groups throughout the years 
here. I'm really looking for- 
ward to taking the group to 
New York and performing on 
the ultimate stage, Carnegie 
Hall." 




COWLEY COLLEGE TIMES, 2001-2002 



E N H I. L M E M T 




COWLEY COLLEGE TIMES, 2001-2002 



F A C I L T \ / S T A F F A C H 1 E V E M E .\ T S 



Cervantes, 
Shepherd receive 
Excellence 
Awards at NISOD 




Marlys Cervantes and 
Todd Shepherd, full-time fac- 
ulty members, received the 
Excellence Award from the 
National Institute for Staff and 
Organizational Development 
in Austin, Texas, May 26-29, 
2002. 

NISOD is one of the 
largest community college 
conferences in the world and 
attracts more than 2,000 par- 
ticipants each year. 




Cervantes, a Humanities 
Department instructor, has 
been with Cowley since 
August 2000. Shepherd, a 
Social Science Department 
instructor and chairman of the 
department, has been with 
Cowley since August 1999. 

Since 1987, Cowley has 
seen 52 faculty and staff mem- 
bers receive the NISOD 
Excellence Award. 




Vocal music 
director named 
third Endowed 
Chair 



Dobbs, left, marketing 
tor of CornerBan 1 ' 
ants Connie Dona 
the Endowe 
;aching Ex 
tudent Le 




Connie Donatelli, director 
of vocal music, was honored 
Jan. 15, 2002, as the third 
Endowed Chair for Teaching 
Excellence and Student Learn- 
ing at Cowley. 

Conrad Jimison, vice 
president of instruction, made 
the announcement at an inser- 
vice meeting in the Earle N. 
Wright Community Room. 
Jana Dobbs, director of mar- 
keting at Corner Bank, pre- 
sented Donatelli with a plaque. 
Donatelli is the former Connie 
Wedel. 

"Em awestruck," Don- 
atelli said after receiving a 
standing ovation from her 
peers. "Em just blown away 
by this honor. This is unbeliev- 
able." 

Donatelli received $ 1 ,000 
for professional development 
and a $3,000 cash stipend to 
be used during the two years. 

The Endowed Chair for 
Teaching Excellence and Stu- 
dent Learning was established 
in 1998 and is sponsored by 
Corner Bank of Winfield and 
Arkansas City. Dejon Ewing, 
Humanities Department Chair, 
was the first recipient. 
Michelle Schoon, Natural Sci- 
ence Department Chair, was 
the second. 



Nominees are selected 
based on classroom teaching 
innovation, how involved they 
are with student activities and 
academic advising, and other 
aspects of the college, includ- 
ing involvement with commit- 
tees. 

Donatelli first came to 
Cowley in 1992. She left Cow- 
ley in the mid-1990s to pursue 
a master's degree at Kansas 
State University. She came 
back to Cowley in July 1997. 

She has been active in 
vocal music education in 
Kansas for more than 2 1 years. 
Before coming to Cowley, she 
taught middle and high school 
vocal music at Holton, Rem- 
ington, Circle, and Winfield 
unified school districts. Her 
groups have performed for 
many statewide organizations 
as well as being featured at 
several national conventions. 
She often is asked to judge 
vocal contests and has been a 
featured guest director for var- 
ious vocal festivals throughout 
the state. 

In 1994, Donatelli was 
presented a Master Teacher 
Award by the National Insti- 
tute for Staff and Organiza- 
tional Development at Austin, 
Texas. 



10 



COWLEY COLLEGE TIMES, 2001-2002 



- ^ 



V \(\ L T 1 / S T A F F 



C II 1 K V F. M K \ 



President receives FHSU's 



highest alumni honor 



Dr. Patrick J. McAtee, 
president of Cowley, was hon- 
ored with Fort Hays State Uni- 
versity's highest alumni honor, 
the Alumni Achievement 
Award, at a social and banquet 
Oct. 5, 2001, as part of the uni- 
versity's Homecoming activi- 
ties from Oct. 4-7. 

The Alumni Achievement 
Award, established in 1959, 
recognizes graduates who 
have made outstanding, 
unselfish contributions in serv- 
ice to community, state or 
nation, both as citizens in their 
chosen careers and through 
philanthropy. 

McAtee was one of four 
alumni honored in 2001 with 
the FHSU Alumni Associa- 
tion's Alumni Achievement 
Award. 

McAtee has built an out- 
standing record of accomplish- 
ment in Kansas education 
since graduating from FHSU 
in 1965 with a bachelor of arts 
in speech and theatre and in 
1970 with a master of science 
in speech communication. 

"Dr. McAtee is truly a 
visionary," wrote Donna J. 
Avery, former chairman of 
Cowley's Board of Trustees. 
"His special talents include an 
extraordinary ability to create 
and then to lead others to 
embrace a shared vision for 
the future." 

McAtee taught speech, 
debate and drama at Hays 
High School from 1965-69, 
which included coaching the 
debate team, forensics team 
and directing plays and musi- 
cals. 

After earning his master's 
degree, he went to Barton 
County Community College, 
Great Bend, where he stayed 
for 17 years. During those 
years he progressed from 
instructor of speech communi- 
cation through director of 
community services, assistant 
dean of instruction, dean of 
instruction and, finally, to vice 
president. 




Along the way he also 
earned a doctorate in 1982 
from Kansas State University 
in adult and occupational edu- 
cation. He was honored by 
KSU as an adjunct professor 
from 1982-87, when he moved 
to Arkansas City to become 
president of Cowley. 

The college has prospered 
under his leadership. It has 
grown from a full-time equiva- 
lent enrollment of 800 in 1987 
to more than 2,600 today. 



The college has won sev- 
eral awards for excellence. 
They include the 1992 and 
1994 Quantum Leaps Toward 
Excellence awards from the 
National Institute for Staff and 
Organizational Development 
(NISOD); the Outstanding 
Business Industry Partnership 
Award from the Kansas Cham- 
ber of Commerce in 1993; the 
Kansas Award for Excellence 
Level II in 1997 and again in 
1998; and, in 1999, the KAE's 
highest award, Level III. 



Among the physical 
growth experienced by Cow- 
ley during his tenure as presi- 
dent were the additions of two 
campuses in the northern part 
of the college's area, the 
Brown Center for Arts, Sci- 
ences and Technology, a ship- 
ping and receiving building, 
two residence halls, and a new 
dining center which bears his 
name. 

He and his wife, Sandy, 
have two sons, Dan and Darin. 



COWLEY COLLEGE TIMES, 2001-2002 



F A C II L T Y / S T 



E V E M E N T S 



Three employees retire at 
end of academic year 



Three Cowley employees 
bid adieu to their careers with 
the college at the end of the 
2001-2002 academic year. 

Marilyn Dill, associate 
dean of curriculum and assess- 
ment; Wayne Short, an instruc- 
tor in the Business and Service 
Technology Department; and 
Tom Berding, an instructor in 
the Industrial Technology 
Department, retired. 

Dill began her Cowley 
career on Aug. 1, 1988, as an 
instructor in the Business and 
Service Technology Depart- 
ment. She spent many years on 
the main campus, then took on 
the responsibility of teaching 
classes at Boeing in Wichita. A 
few years ago, she was named 
associate dean of curriculum 
and assessment. Dill and her 
husband, Gary, moved to 
Hobbs, N.M., where Gary 
became the new president of 
the College of the Southwest. 

Short retired after nearly 
10 years at Cowley. Previous- 
ly, he had a lengthy career with 
General Electric. 

Short's expertise was pri- 
marily as a facilitator and 
teacher of the principles of 
quality management. Like 
Dill, Short spent a consider- 
able amount of time teaching 
classes at Boeing. 

In his retirement, Short 
plans to be heavily involved 
with Habitat for Humanity. 
The group is working on its 
second home in Arkansas City. 

Berding taught the indus- 
trial technology related cours- 
es within the department. 
Those included applied eco- 
nomics, technical mathemat- 
ics, technical physics, and 
industrial materials. 

Berding, a native of 
Cincinnati, Ohio, was working 
for General Electric's Evan- 
dale, Ohio, plant when the 
company transferred him to 
GE's Strother Field facility in 
1974. 

Berding began full-time 
employment at Cowley in Jan- 
uary 1998. 





Wayne Short receives a commemorative Habitat for Humanity 
house from Beverly Grunder, chair of the Business and Service 
Technology Department. 




Grunder named 
state PBL 
Advisor of Year 




Beverly Grunder, advisor 
for Cowley's Phi Beta Lamb- 
da chapter for the past four 
years, was selected as Out- 
standing State Advisor of the 
Year during the state confer- 
ence Feb. 28 and March 1, 
2002, in Salina. 

"I was very surprised, 
flattered, and very honored," 
Grunder said of the award. "It 
makes you feel like you're 
successful working with stu- 
dents and that you can relate 
to the students." 

Grunder began working 
at Cowley in 1990 as an 
instructor in the Business and 
Service Technology Depart- 
ment. She became chair of 
that department in 1997. 

She holds a master's 
degree in liberal arts from 
Southwestern College and a 
bachelor's degree in business 
administration, also from 
Southwestern. Prior to work- 
ing at Cowley, Grunder was a 
stay-at-home mother. 

Under Grunder's leader- 
ship, Cowley's PBL chapter 
has grown from seven stu- 
dents~in 1998 to 26 today. Her 
students nominated the Pratt 
area native for the state advi- 
sor award. 

Grunder is teaching 24 
credit hours of accounting, 
everything from fundamentals 
to managerial. She also serves 
as academic advisor to 45 
Cowley students. 

She also was honored at 
the national conference in 
Nashville, Tenn., June 23-27, 
2002. 



12 



COWEEA COEEEGE TIMES. 2001-2002 



I.! T S T A N 



s c K 



A I. U M N I 



'69 graduate receives 
Outstanding Tiger Alumni Award 



Bob White's interests are 
as vast as a Kansas sunset. 

From accounting princi- 
ples to corporate acquisitions, 
finance to health care facili- 
ties, there are few topics in 
which White cannot speak 
with authority. 

His personality mirrors 
the company that he has been 
affiliated since 1969 and that 
he purchased in 1996. Garvey 
International, Inc., is a diversi- 
fied marine, feed, material 
handling and horticulture com- 
pany based in St. Charles, 111. 
White is chairman and chief 
executive officer. 

White, a 1969 graduate of 
Cowley, is the 2002 recipient 
of the Outstanding Tiger 
Alumni Award. White was 
honored during Cowley's 79th 
commencement ceremony at 
May 11, 2002 in W.S. Scott 
Auditorium. 

"I am very humbled and 
surprised at the award," White 
said. "It was something that 
never crossed my mind. I'm 
very appreciative. It's heart- 
warming to be recognized like 
that, particularly by the college 
in your home town." 

White, the son of CM. 
and Gladys White of Arkansas 
City, may not be in the posi- 
tion he's in today had it not 
been for an attraction to the 
woman he married, having 
worked with his father-in-law, 
and for answering a help want- 
ed ad Garvey placed at the 
New Era Mill. 

While taking classes at 
Cowley, White worked at New 
Era. Joe Avery told him about 
the job at Garvey. 

"That's what really got me 
the job with Garvey," he said. 
"They saw what I did here at 
New Era in the office." 

White credits Catharine 
Goehring, Cowley accounting 
instructor from 1966 to 1974, 
as having "a tremendous influ- 
ence on me." 

Accounting, and its rela- 
tionship to business, always 




has intrigued White. Since the 
seventh grade, he knew he 
wanted to be an accountant. 

"I remember going to a 
display and picking out an 
accounting brochure and 
thinking that it was interest- 
ing," White said. "So I went to 
Parmans (now Parman Tanner 
Soule & Jackson CPA) and 
thought this is something I'd 
like to do. I remember telling 
someone later that if engineer 
had started with an 'A' I would 
have become an engineer. I 
picked up the first brochure I 
saw and liked it." 

White has come a long 
way since joining Garvey dur- 
ing the summer of 1969. He 
joined the holding company in 
1975, moved to Chicago in 
1977, and six years later 
became president. In 1996, he 
bought the company from the 
Garvey family. 

White earned bachelor's 
(1971) and master's degrees 
(1976) from Wichita State 
University, and delivered 
WSU's commencement 

address in December 2001. 

Today, White oversees 
Garvey's operations in com- 
modity trading, feed process- 
ing, export trading, barge 



fleeting and switching servic- 
es, dredging and marine con- 
struction services, bulk storage 
and handling, and landscape 
mulch and soil mixes. The 
company has seen tremendous 
growth during the past year. 

"Our bottom line is up 50 
percent over 2001," White 
said. 

White is a strong support- 
er of strategic planning, having 
made numerous presentations 
around the nation on the sub- 
ject. He has a great deal of 
experience in diversification 
and acquiring companies. In 
1979, he began a railcar leas- 
ing company called Interail. It 
eventually ranked as the ninth 
largest railcar leasing opera- 
tion of its kind in the country, 
controlling more than 6,000 
cars. The company sold it in 
1996. Garvey's presence in the 
marine industry comes from 
five acquisitions in a two-year 
period. 

White also had a major 
presence in the grain industry, 
owning Garvey Grain in 
Wichita, which operated the 
largest elevator in the world 
until 1996. Most recently, Gar- 
vey International is building a 
presence in the horticulture 
industry with the acquisition 
of HPc. 

"All of our businesses are 
niche businesses," White said. 
"We look where we can grow 
and expand." 

White, whose daughter 
Julie works for the company, 
said he doesn't get involved in 
the day-to-day operation of 
Garvey International. 

"I concentrate on growth, 
where my expertise is," he 
said. "I also want to stay in 
contact with our major cus- 
tomers. I have very good peo- 
ple who run the day-to-day 
operation." 

In 1996, WSU named 
White a Distinguished Alum- 
nus. He sits on the WSU 
National Advisory Council to 
the Endowment Association as 



well as the National Advisory 
Council to the Barton School 
of Business. 

White also remains con- 
nected to Cowley, having con- 
tributed to capital campaigns 
through the years. Recently, he 
made a $10,000 contribution 
to the W.S. Scott Auditorium 
renovation project. 

"I have a lot of fond mem- 
ories of the auditorium," 
White said. "A lot of music 
and athletic events. My wife 
and I both have ties to the 
building." 

White remembers one 
particular day he was practic- 
ing music in the auditorium. 

"The whole percussion 
line was tossed out of the 
orchestra," he said. "That was 
probably the only time that 
ever happened. We were doing 
things we weren't supposed to 
be doing." 

White and his wife spend 
the winter months in Scotts- 
dale, Ariz. He said he has no 
plans to retire. 

"I have a lot of hobbies," 
said White, 52. "If I sold the 
company today, I'd have no 
trouble keeping busy. With my 
daughter in the company, it 
won't be long before she runs 
the horticulture business by 
herself." 

White donates 5 percent 
of his corporate earnings to 
charities. And when a decision 
is made regarding contribu- 
tions, White involves his fami- 
ly. He has established a board 
consisting of himself, wife Pat. 
son Chris, daughter Julie, and 
most recently Patty White. 
Chris' wife. 



COWLEY COLLEGE TIMES, 2001-2002 



13 



F A C 1 L I T 1 E S 



Dining center named after McAtee 




Some people can keep a 
secret at Cowley. 

No more than 20 people 
had known for months the man 
whose name would be placed 
on the new dining facility at 
the college. 

An emotional Dr. Pat 
McAtee sat in disbelief as 
Board of Trustee Chair Lee 
Gregg Jr. read off a list of 
McAtee's accomplishments 
during his 14-year tenure at 
Cowley. And once McAtee 
composed himself enough to 
say a few words, he was obvi- 
ously overcome with surprise. 

"This is a tremendous 
honor for me," McAtee said 
before an Endowment Associ- 
ation Banquet audience of 
more than 200 people on Oct. 
16, 2001. "This is especially 
rewarding to me because, as 
many of you know, my mom 
and dad were in the restaurant 



business for many years. To 
have this facility named after 
me is very special." 

And with that, the Patrick 
J. McAtee Dining Center offi- 
cially was dedicated. 

"We think we have been 
able to keep this dedication a 
secret, until now," Gregg said. 

McAtee then said a few 
words. Besides his wife Sandy, 
Danny, one of McAtee's two 
sons, also was in attendance, 
as was one brother, Lew and 
wife Cindy. 

Following McAtee's 

remarks, Gregg gave recogni- 
tion to many individuals who 
were instrumental in the build- 
ing of the new facility, and the 
new dormitory. Those includ- 
ed Sid Regnier, former vice 
president of business services; 
Tony Crouch, dean of business 
services; David Herlocker, 
architect with Gordon & Asso- 



ciates of Winfield; Conco, 
Inc., the genera] contractor 
from Wichita; MSI of Wichita, 
the mechanical contractor; and 
Zeigler Electric of Wichita, the 
electrical contractor. Also, 
Cowley's buildings and 
grounds department was cited 
for its work in getting the 
facility ready for the fall 
semester. 

A celebration park is in 
the development stage through 
the south doors of the Patrick 
J. McAtee Dining Center. 
Sculpture artist Gary Kahle of 
Arkansas City has crafted a 
stainless steel sculpture of 
Cowley's logo. 

Following the banquet, a 
concert by world-renown 
banjo player Bela Fleck and 
bassist Edgar Meyer was held 
in the Robert Brown Theatre. 



ighlights from 
■cAtee's career at 



The college has grown 
from a full-time equivalent 
enrollment of 800 to more 
than 2,500 today. 

Off-campus sites in the 
college's northern service 
area, including Wichita and 
Mulvane, have been estab- 
lished under his leadership. 

On the main campus, 
facilities he has seen 
become reality include the 
Brown Center for Arts, Sci- 
ences and Technology; the 
Shipping and Receiving 
building; two residence 
halls; and the dining center. 

He has been the driving 
force behind the college's 
increase in business and 
industry training hours 
from 6,500 a year when he 
arrived, to more than 
200,000 hours today. 

During his tenure, the col- 
lege has received several 
awards for excellence, 
including Quantum Leap 
Toward Excellence awards 
in 1992 and 1994 from the 
National Institute for Staff 
and Organizational Devel- 
opment in Austin, Texas; 
the Outstanding Business & 
Industry Partnership Award 
from the Kansas Chamber 
of Commerce in 1993; the 
Kansas Award for Excel- 
lence Level II in 1997 and 
1998, and KAE's highest 
award. Level III, in 1999. 

He has placed the college 
in unique partnerships with 
business and industry, 
including the formation of a 
model air-frame and power- 
plant technology program 
for General Electric, and a 
manufacturing technology 
program for Boeing. 

Presented with Fort Hays 
State University's highest 
alumni honor, the Alumni 
Achievement Award, on 
Oct. 5, 2001. 






14 



COWLEY COLLEGE TIMES, 2001-2002 



F AC] L J T I K S 



New dormitory opens 
for 72 students 



A new 72-bed dormitory 
on the northwest corner of 
Fifth Avenue and Fourth Street 
was open and ready for occu- 
pancy in time for the 200 1 fall 
semester. 

The Fifth Avenue Dormi- 
tory, which is what it is being 
referred to until a permanent 
name has been chosen, is the 
fourth residence hall on the 
main campus and gives Cow- 
ley on-campus housing for 
approximately 330 students. 

The new dormitory has all 
of the amenities of the three 



other dorms, with one twist: 
Each room has its own bath- 
room. In Cowley's first three 
dorms, roommates shared a 
bathroom with two other suite- 
mates. 

All of the dormitories 
have carpeting, mini blinds, 
sinks outside of the regular 
bathroom, and high-speed 
Internet and cable TV connec- 
tions. They also are equipped 
with a computer lab and laun- 
dry room. 

Females are housed in the 
Fifth Avenue Dormitory. 




Workforce Development Center 
holds open house 




Even after a terrible 
tragedy, Cowley's Workforce 
Development Center still 
found a way to celebrate. 

Just three days following 
the terrorist attacks on New 
York City and Washington, 
D.C., college officials official- 
ly opened the doors to its 
Workforce Development Cen- 



ter at Strother Field. The Sept. 
14, 2001, celebration began 
with a moment of silence, a 
prayer, and the pledge of alle- 
giance for the victims in New 
York City and Washington 
D.C. 

Many people who support 
or are involved in the Work- 
force Development Center 



came to listen to the three fea- 
tured speakers. Gene Cole, 
associate dean of business and 
industry, introduced each 
speaker. 

Cowley President Dr. Pat 
McAtee, Secretary of the 
Department of Human 
Resources Richard Beyer, and 
Chairman of the Workforce 
Alliance David Norris all 
spoke during the afternoon 
open house. All expressed sup- 
port for the present and future 
development of the Workforce 
Development Center. 

The center, located at 
Strother Field Airport and 
Industrial Park, was designed 
to be a one-stop shop for the 
workforce of Cowley County. 
Among the agencies located in 
the center is the Kansas 
Employment Office. Workers 
can search the Internet for 
jobs, undergo testing for a cer- 
tain occupation, and also 
receive training for an existing 
job. 

The center also has placed 
Internet-ready computers in 



the Arkansas City, Winfield, 
and Wellington chambers of 
commerce to also assist work- 
ers in their job search. 

Rebecca Scott served as 
director of the center at the 
time of the open house. She 
said the center's agencies 
came together to serve Cowley 
County's labor force in a 
unique way. 

"People have looked at 
our center as a model in the 
state of Kansas," she said. 

A ribbon-cutting ceremo- 
ny was held prior to a tour of 
the facility. 

Cole was instrumental in 
getting the partners within the 
center working together. 

"It has taken time to get 
all of the details worked out, 
but I think the center will be a 
great benefit to Cowley Coun- 
ty." Cole said. "I'm real 
pleased with the number of 
agencies we have out here and 
the services we can offer." 



COWLEY COLLEGE TIMES, 2001-2002 



15 



A C i L 1 



Boeing's move to 

Southside Education Center official 



Boeing-Wichita's move 
into the Southside Education 
Center in south Wichita, of 
which Cowley is a partner, was 
officially completed Oct. 1 1 , 
2001, with a ribbon-cutting 
and open house. 

About 100 people, includ- 
ing representatives of the 
Southside partnership, Boeing, 
and other organizations, were 
on hand as the Southside Edu- 
cation Center Boeing Educa- 
tion, Training, and College 
Partnership officially opened. 

The SSEC, located at 
4501 E. 47th St. South, is a 
partnership of Cowley, Wichi- 
ta State University, and Wichi- 
ta Area Technical College. The 
center officially opened in fall 
1995, and Cowley's FTE has 
since grown from two to more 
than 1 ,000 today. 

"Boeing's very pleased to 
have the opportunity to 
strengthen our educational 
partnership and serve the 
needs of our employees with 
WSU, WATC and CCCC 
under one roof," said Jeff 
Turner, Boeing Wichita's vice 
president-general manager. 
"Having these resources near- 
by to help our employees fur- 
ther their education is vital to 
our future success as a compa- 
ny." 

WSU President Dr. Don 
Beggs, Cowley President Dr. 
Pat McAtee, and WATC Presi- 
dent Camille Kluge also spoke 
during the afternoon ceremo- 
ny. 

"On behalf of Wichita 
State University, I want to 
thank Boeing for being an 
organization that pushes uni- 
versities into doing things," 
Beggs said. "And to Pat McA- 
tee, our partnership with Cow- 
ley in terms of what this com- 
munity college has done to 
reach out has been tremen- 
dous. As a university, we're 
thrilled to be a part of this." 

"This is a proud moment 
in education today," McAtee 
said. "We would not be here if 




not for Jeff Turner and his 
employees, and if not for Don 
and his beliefs in the partner- 
ship, and for Camille." 

Cowley Vice President of 
Northern Campuses Sheree 
Utash said it was nice to see 
the collaborative efforts of so 
many partners become a reali- 
ty- 

"This is a unique relation- 
ship — perhaps the most unique 
in the country — where a com- 
pany has moved into an educa- 
tional facility and is in a part- 
nership with those institutions 
of higher education to provide 
the education training needed 
in the work force. 

"We're pleased to be 
involved in providing a wide 
range of classes that are need- 
ed to meet the needs of stu- 
dents and Boeing." 

Twenty new larger class- 
rooms have been added to the 



facility and are used for class- 
es by partners in the consor- 
tium. With the recent expan- 
sion, Southside now occupies 
the second floor of the build- 
ing, and provides classes for 
about 3,500 students enrolled 
there. 

Approximately 20 percent 
of the students at the Southside 
Center are Boeing employees. 
About 1,000 employees have 
graduated with an advanced 
two-year or four-year degree 
since on-site college partner- 
ship education services were 
implemented in 1995. Last 
year, nearly 200 employees 
graduated with a degree. 

Among the more than 400 
classes offered at the site are 
General Education Diploma 
(GED), manufacturing and 
graduate courses. 

Turner said the Southside 
partnership offered another 



source of learning for his 
employees. 

"Through my jobs at Boe- 
ing, I've run into incredibly 
smart people," he said. "They 
are tremendously successful, 
smart people, but a lot of them 
have no formal education. 
Now people have the opportu- 
nity to go back to school who 
are already doing tremendous 
things." 

Turner said Southside was 
a true model for partnerships. 

"Like any great endeavor, 
it gets done when everyone 
has ownership." Turner said. 
"This is a milestone for us, and 
we did it, not on our own, but 
together. I'm proud to be a part 
of it." 



16 



COWLEY COLLEGE TIMES, 2001-2002 



College receives 
$350,000 gift 




The college has been des- 
ignated to receive a $350,000 
gift from the Daisy E. and Paul 
H. Brown Charitable Trust. 
The gift is being made to assist 
with the construction of a new 
classroom and student success 
center. 

The Browns had strong 
ties to Arkansas City and the 
surrounding area. They spent 
their married lives living in 
Arkansas City, where they 
reared two children, Esther 
Giffin and Max Brown, both 
of whom now live in the 
Kansas City area. 

According to the family, 
the Browns were good work- 
ing people who were careful 
with their money and their 
lifestyle. It surprised them that 
they were able to accumulate 
so much money. 

Daisy, whose maiden 
name was Webb, graduated 
from Arkansas City High 
School and Arkansas City 
Junior College, the latter in 
1949. She received a bache- 
lor's degree from Southwest- 



ern College, and was a career 
teacher, having taught in one- 
room country schoolhouses, 
and later in schools in 
Arkansas City and Wichita. 

Daisy and Paul met when 
he was working in Arkansas 
City as a mechanic for the 
Ford dealership. After World 
War II, he worked as an 
inspector for Boeing in Wichi- 
ta. As an inspector, he prided 
himself in never having "lost a 
test pilot." 

Paul's education was 
gained mainly through on-the- 
job training. He was a self- 
taught person who loved 
learning. 

Paul died in 1994 and 
Daisy died in 1997. 

The $350,000 gift is the 
largest single donation in 
Cowley's 79-year history. 

The Daisy E. and Paul H. 
Brown Charitable Trust also 
has provided funds for 
improvements to Pershing 
Park and Paris Park, both in 
Arkansas City. 




New Classroom Building - Northwest View 




New Classroom Building - First Floor 



,JV L— 




New Classroom Building - Second Floor 



COWLEY COLLEGE TIMES, 2001-2002 



17 



C W L E Y - 1 N - B R I E F 



Board decreases mill levy 
nearly $400,000 

The college's Board of 
Trustees approved a $19.5 mil- 
lion budget for the 2001-2002 
academic year, and delivered 
some good news to Cowley 
County taxpayers in the 
process. 

The Board, at its regular 
monthly meeting Aug. 13, 
2001, approved 4-0 the budget 
based on in-state enrollments 
of 75,000 credit hours, a state 
operating grant of $6.7 mil- 
lion, and an estimated assessed 
valuation for Cowley County 
of $183,692,750. 

All of those figures com- 
bined equates to less tax dol- 
lars requested from the county. 
The college's mill levy for the 
2001-2002 academic year was 
16.997, a 2.97 mill decrease 
from the final 2000-2001 levy. 
The tax dollars requested were 
$383,790 less than last year. 
Last year's levy of 19.967 also 
was a large decrease from the 
1999-2000 levy. Combined, 

Cowley has saved county 
taxpayers nearly $700,000 
during the last two years. 

"This is near the level it 
was when I came here," said 
Dr. Pat McAtee, president of 
the college since July 1987. 
"It's nice to be able to do this 
for the taxpayers of Cowley 
County." 

Recent mill levy history 
for the college: 

•2001-2002 final levy 16.997 

• 2000-2001 final levy 19.967 

• 1999-2000 final levy 22.762 

• 1998-1999 final levy 21.858 

• 1997-1998 final levy 21.441 

• 1996-1997 final levy 21.751 

Enrollment at all-time high 
during 200 1 -2002 

More students enrolled at 
Cowley during the 2001-2002 
academic year than ever 
before as full-time and total 
headcount enrollment at the 
college set records for the fall 
2001 and spring 2002 semes- 
ters. 

Full-time equivalent 

enrollment on the 20th day of 
classes for fall 2001 was 
2,488.04, compared to 
2,355.96 on the 20th day of 
fall 2000. That represents a 6- 
percent increase. Total head- 



count, which is every student 
taking classes at the college, 
increased from 3,837 last fall 
to 4,044. It marked the first 
time Cowley surpassed the 
4,000 mark in total students. 

As has been the pattern 
for the past several semesters, 
the Southside Education Cen- 
ter in Wichita experienced the 
largest growth. Southside's 
FTE increased 30 percent from 
fall 2000 and is now at 855.71 . 
Online class enrollment nearly 
doubled from last fall, indicat- 
ing that more students are 
choosing to take courses in a 
non-traditional method. 

Another large increase in 
enrollment occurred at the col- 
lege's Strother Field facility, 
specifically in the Aviation 
Maintenance Technology pro- 
gram. It saw a jump of 33 per- 
cent this fall. 

Students from 51 Kansas 
counties, 1 9 states, and 22 for- 
eign countries comprised 
Cowley's fall semester enroll- 
ment. 

It was the same story in 
spring 2002. Full-time and 
total student enrollment was at 
an all-time high with 2,604 
full-time students and 4,309 
total, both records for a spring 
semester and overall. The pre- 
vious enrollment record for 
both full-time equivalency and 
total headcount occurred in 
fall 2001. 

The numbers represent a 
16-percent increase in FTE 
and 14-percent jump in the 
total number of students. 

Driving those figures up 
significantly was the South- 
side Center. Its spring 2001 
FTE was 645. In spring 2002, 
it was 1,015, a whopping 57- 
percent increase. 

Another area of growth 
for Cowley was its online 
course offerings. In spring 
2001, online enrollment stood 
at 24. In spring 2002, it was 
71, a 190-percent growth. 

The number of first-time 
students labeled freshmen 
increased significantly, from 
1,557 in spring 2001 to 2,034 
in spring 2002, an increase of 
31 percent. 

Off-campus and on-line 
enrollment combined saw a 
30-percent jump from spring 
2001. Cowley's total number 
of credit hours increased 16 



percent from spring 2001 and 
now stands at 39,065. 

Another area of signifi- 
cant growth for Cowley was 
its international student enroll- 
ment. In spring 2001 there 
were 36 students enrolled from 
foreign countries. In spring 
2002, Cowley had an interna- 
tional student enrollment of 
1 1 8 students, an increase of 
228 percent. 

Member of Cowley's custodial 
staff remembered 

Neal Eugene Sherwood 
Jr., 58, and a 1963 graduate of 
Cowley, died Nov. 6, 2001, at 
Wesley Medical Center in 
Wichita after a brief illness. 




Sherwood had been a 
member of Cowley's custodial 
staff since June 20, 1988. His 
most recent responsibility was 
taking care of W.S. Scott Audi- 
torium. 

Athletic Director Tom 
Saia always called Sherwood 
"Neal Bob," and he said the 
easy-going man would be 
missed. 

"I really liked ol' Neal," 
Saia said. "He was a great per- 
son to work with and to be 
around. This place won't be 
the same without him." 

Sherwood was born June 
28, 1943, the son of Neal E. 
and Edith (Hockenbury) Sher- 
wood, in Arkansas City. He 
was reared in Silverdale, and 
attended Arkansas City High 
School, graduating in 1961. 

On June 17, 1967, he mar- 
ried Gloria Hernandez, and the 
couple made their home in 
Arkansas City. Sherwood 
worked for Rodeo Meats and 
Binney & Smith prior to com- 
ing to the college. 

Survivors are his wife of 
Arkansas City; one son, Jody 
E. Sherwood of Whiteman Air 
Force Base in Missouri; one 



daughter, Shawna K. Allison 
of Arkansas City; his father, 
Neal E. Sherwood Sr. of Bran- 
son, Mo.; one sister, Carol L. 
Tate of Rossville, Ga.; and six 
grandchildren. 

He was preceded in death 
by his mother. 

A memorial was estab- 
lished to Cowley's general 
scholarship fund. 

College awarded five-year 
Title III grant 

A $1.75 million grant 
from the federal government, 
awarded to Cowley in late 
summer 2001, is expected to 
have a major impact strength- 
ening the institution through 
faculty development, technol- 
ogy, and expanded student 
services. 

Cowley was awarded a 
Title III grant, which will be 
funded during a five-year peri- 
od at $350,000 per year. Only 
37 total grants were awarded 
nationwide. Connie Bonfy, 
director of institutional grants 
and arts and humanities pro- 
gramming at the college, will 
serve as coordinator of the 
grant. 

"This grant is an opportu- 
nity to spend needed time 
refining new systems and 
ideas we have been wanting to 
implement," Bonfy said. "It is 
an exciting time in the growth 
of our institution." 

The plan encompasses 
two basic activities: student 
success and institutional man- 
agement. Cowley personnel 
will begin by researching 
proven practices, which may 
include visiting other colleges 
with successful Title III grants. 

The second step is the 
development stage, when 
equipment for technology can 
be purchased and curriculum 
and services developed. 

The third step will include 
piloting new developments, 
including offering direct serv- 
ices to students. Each piloted 
component will be reviewed in 
an evaluation stage, and modi- 
fied as needed. The final step 
is to pilot any modifications 
that were made. 

The college has identified 
areas in which the grant would 

continued on page 19 



18 



COWLEY COLLEGE TIMES, 2001-2002 



€ W L E Y - 1 N - B H 1 ! : ; r 



continued from page 1 8 

provide much-needed funds. 
Those include the purchase of 
equipment, the creation of a 
student success center, devel- 
oping a more comprehensive 
student retention program, 
more streamlined computer- 
ized services and manage- 
ment, and faculty develop- 
ment. 

Cowley's five institution- 
al goals are the basis of the 
Title III plan. 

College T-shirt sales helped 
disaster relief efforts 

Sales of T-shirts sporting 
Cowley's logo, with an Amer- 
ican flag waving in the back- 
ground, raised more than 
$1,000 toward disaster relief 
efforts in New York City, 
Washington, D.C., and Penn- 
sylvania. 

Shannon O'Toole, coordi- 
nator of bookstore services at 
Cowley, said 269 shirts were 
sold, totaling $1,062.55 
toward the relief fund. 

The shirts are white with 
the college logo and the red, 
white, and blue American flag 
placed in the background. 




Each shirt sold for $10.54, 
and O'Toole said all proceeds 
from the sale of the shirt — 
nearly $4 each — went to a 
relief fund. 

Employees, students, and 
anyone from the community 
was welcome to order a shirt, 
which came in all sizes. 

The bookstore also made 
available static window decals 
for display in homes, offices, 
or cars. They featured the 
American flag with the words 
"September 11, 2001 We Will 
Remember." The decals were 
compliments of the Sid L. 
Regnier Bookstore. 

Rex Soule, graphic artist 
in the Public Relations office, 
designed the T-shirts. 



Duck Dash raises more than 
$ 1 2,000 for scholarships 

The Fifth Annual Great 
Cowley Duck Dash was held 
May 18, 2002, and raised 
more than $12,000 for the 
Endowed Scholarship Fund. 

Bob and Carolyn Langen- 
walter once again hosted the 
event at their Spring Hill Farm 
northeast of Arkansas City. 

The winner of the overall 
duck race was Shirley Tram- 
mel, who won $1,070 (one of 
the heats plus the finals). Bob 
Foster won the Duck Squat 
Contest and won $500. Brad 
Carson won a $50 gift certifi- 
cate to The Pepper Mill restau- 
rant for having the winning 
duck in the loser's race. Good 
Time Productions won a $50 
gift certificate to The Pepper 
Mill for winning the corporate 
Duckerating Contest. 

Dozens of door prizes 
were awarded. More than 400 
people attended the festivities, 
which included a gourmet pic- 
nic of mesquite smoked prime 
rib and chicken breasts provid- 
ed by Great Western Dining, 
the college's food service. 



DASH FOR CASH: 
Participants cheer on 
their ducks during a W tv<#f£ 



i •■* 



heat. 




tiraS-^ 




THE WINNER 



ted top spot in 




COWLEY COLLEGE TIMES, 2001-2002 



19 



W: II I E V E M E NTS 



Tennis coach Grose inducted into 
NJCAA Men's Tennis Hall of Fame 




Larry Grose, who has 
taken his men's tennis team to 
the National Junior College 
Athletic Association Tourna- 
ment 1 3 out of 1 5 seasons, was 
inducted into the NJCAA 
Men's Tennis Hall of Fame 
during a banquet May 12, 
2002, at Collin County Com- 
munity College in Piano, 
Texas. 



Grose, who completed his 
15th season as head coach of 
the Tigers, joins former long- 
time Cowley coach and 
instructor Mike Watters in the 
Hall of Fame. Watters was 
inducted in 2000. 

Glen Moser, head tennis 
coach at Johnson County 
Community College, nominat- 
ed Grose for the award and 
presented him at the banquet. 
The event was held prior to the 
start of the 2002 national tour- 
nament. 

The Tigers finished in a 
tie for seventh place with 25 
points. Josh Cobble, a fresh- 
man from Duncan, Okla., fin- 
ished runner-up at No. 5 sin- 
gles, earning him All-America 
status. 

Grose has led the Tigers to 
two Division II national cham- 



pionships, in 1989 and 1991. 
Both years he was named 
NJCAA Coach of the Year. He 
also has led Cowley to nine 
Region VI titles, two runner- 
up finishes, and coached 28 
All-Americans. He served as 
national awards chairman 
from 1998-2001. 

"I am extremely honored 
and humble to accept this 
award," Grose said. "It makes 
me feel good to be recognized 
by my peers. I have thorough- 
ly enjoyed my years coaching 
tennis." 

Grose was a two-time 
state doubles champion at 
Arkansas City High School, 
compiling an impressive 53-2 
record with doubles partner 
John Guyot. That effort helped 
the Bulldogs to two regional 
and two state titles. 



At the collegiate level, 
Grose played two years at 
Wichita State University and 
two years at Oklahoma State 
University, where he reached 
the finals of the Big Eight 
Conference No. 2 doubles his 
junior year and at No. 1 dou- 
bles his senior year. He fin- 
ished runner-up both times. 

Grose holds a bachelor's 
degree in business administra- 
tion from Oklahoma State. 



Volleyball team 
finishes fourth in 
district 



The Lady Tiger volleyball 
team wrapped up its 2001 sea- 
son on Nov. 3 at the District 
Tournament in Shawnee. 

Cowley won its first two 
matches, defeating Pratt and 
Independence, but then lost its 
next two, to Neosho and Gar- 
den City. The 2-2 finish gave 
Cowley fourth place in the 
District. Cowley's season 
ended with a 21-20-3 record. 

Four players earned post- 
season awards. Sophomore 
Megan Houk and freshman 
Natalie Wheaton were named 
first-team All-Jayhawk Con- 
ference Eastern Division, 
while freshman Karissa 
Thomas was named to the sec- 
ond team, and sophomore 
Kassie Hargrove was an hon- 
orable mention selection. 

"It feels good to have a 
season under my belt," first- 
year coach Joanna Howell 
said. "Overall, we had a great 



season. It was a great learning 
experience for the girls and 
me. We have a lot to work on 
to get ready for next season." 

Houk, from Valley Center, 
said the team showed 
improvement. 

"Throughout the season, 
we became stronger as a 
team," Houk said. "Toward the 
end, we knew how everyone 
played and what to expect 
from each individual." 

Cross country 
teams finish just out 
of top 10 

Cowley cross country 
Coach Casey Belknap and his 
men's and women's teams had 
their sights set on top- 10 fin- 
ishes at the National Junior 
College Athletic Association 
championships in Lansing, 
Mich., Nov. 10,2001. 

The Tigers just missed. 

Cowley's women finished 
11th overall, while the men 
took 12th at nationals, Cow- 
ley's first trip ever in the sport. 



"Overall, it was a good 
stepping stone," Belknap said. 
"You've got to start some- 
where, and to finish 11th and 
1 2th in the nation isn't too bad. 
Kevin (McDougal), Dijana 
(Kojic), and Jonelle (Contr- 
eras) ran very well for the 
national level of competition. 
And Kanetria (Royal) showed 
improvement again. 

"Top 10 was our goal, so 
we still have some places and 
things to get done." 

Kojic was 28th overall in 
20 minutes, 42 seconds over 
the 5-kilometer (three-mile) 
race. McDougal finished 34th 
for the men in 27:36 over the 
8-kilometer (five-mile) course. 

Women's Team Scores: 
Ricks (Idaho) 30; Utah Valley 
State 72; Central Arizona 98; 
Butler County 104; El Paso 
Community College 169; 
Yavapai College (Arizona) 
178; Pima Community Col- 
lege (Arizona) 181; Dodge 
City 212; Barton County 228; 
New Mexico Junior College 
240; COWLEY 267. 

Cowley Individuals: 

Dijana Kojic 28th, 20:42; 



Jonelle Contreras 49th, 22:08 
Kanetria Royal 62nd, 23:20 
Kristin Watson 63rd, 23:37 
Nicole Lee 65th, 23:58. 

Men's Team Scores: 
Ricks (Idaho) 67; Central Ari- 
zona 71; Barton County 105; 
North Idaho 127; South Plains 
(Texas) 142; Utah Valley State 
160; Butler County 162; 
Dodge City 173; Pima (Ari- 
zona) 202; El Paso 271; 
Hagerstown (Maryland) 275; 
COWLEY 315; Neosho Coun- 
ty 376. 

Cowley Individuals 

Kevin McDougal 34th, 27:36 
Richard Brammer 60th, 29:13 
Chris Schuetz 68th, 29:27 
Travis Blackburn 76th, 30:04 
Bobby Goodman 77th, 31:17. 

Smithson's first 
team takes second 
in Jayhawk East 

After the Jan. 5, 2002, 
game at high-flying Cof- 
feyville, which Cowley lost 
78-65, Randy Smithson's 
Tigers were 4-9 overall and 0- 



20 



COWLEY COLLEGE TIMES, 2001-2002 



E T I C A C H I K V I- :\1 K \ T 



1 in the Jayhawk Conference 
Eastern Division. 

It was a rough first couple 
of months for the Tigers and 
Smithson, who was hired in 
March 2001. 

But in typical Smithson 
fashion, the Tigers improved 
as the season wore on. They 
improved so much that they 
finished a solid second in the 
Jayhawk East with a 13-5 
record. Cowley ended the sea- 
son with an 18-14 overall 
mark. 

After that conference- 
opening loss at Coffeyville, 
Cowley won 10 of its next 12 
games. In the post season, the 
Tigers defeated Colby 80-77 
and lost to Hutchinson 70-56. 

Raymond Anthony, a 
freshman guard from Aurora, 
111., set two school records 
with 12 3-point field goals in 
the game and nine 3-point 
field goals in one half during 
an 87-56 victory at Allen 
County on Jan. 12, 2002. 
Anthony's 3-point outburst (he 
finished 9-for-12) enabled him 
to also make the Cowley sin- 
gle-game scoring charts. His 
39 points tied him for sixth 
place on the all-time list. 

Anthony and sophomore 
Gary Jackson led the Tigers in 
scoring with averages of 14 
and 13 points, respectively. 
Anthony was a first-team All- 
Jayhawk East selection, while 
Jackson was named to the 
third team. 

It's another Jayhawk 
East title for Spence, 
Lady Tigers 

How dare they pick the 
Lady Tiger basketball team to 
finish anywhere but first. 

But that's exactly what 
happened entering the 2001- 
2002 season. Cowley was 
picked by league coaches to 
finish second behind Cof- 
feyville. 

What actually happened 
was no surprise, really. Cow- 
ley went 17-1 — again — and 
ran away with its fourth Jay- 
hawk East title in the past five 
seasons. All four East titles 
have been won with 17-1 
records. Coach Darin Spence's 



club finished the 2001-2002 
season with a 28-4 overall 
record. 

Cowley blasted Colby 82- 
41 in the first round of the 
Region VI Playoffs, then lost a 
58-55 decision to Butler Coun- 
ty in the opening game at Sali- 
na. 

There was some irony to 
the Lady Tigers' season. Their 
lone conference loss was a 61- 
55 setback at Fort Scott on Jan. 
19, 2002. Just one month later, 
on Feb. 20, Cowley set a 
defensive record for a half by 
allowing the Lady Greyhounds 
just seven first-half points in a 
59-35 blowout. 

Spence always has 
preached solid defense, and 
the 2001-2002 season was no 
exception. Cowley finished 
third in the nation in points 
allowed per game at 47.313. 
The team was 23rd nationally 
in 3-point field goal percent- 
age at 33 percent. Cowley was 
17th nationally in team field 
goal percentage at 47. Its 
offensive average of 75.4 
points per game ranked 2 1 st in 
the nation. Individually, April 
Banks was 14th nationally in 
steals with 3.375 per game, 
while Crystal Ashley was 22nd 
in the nation in field goal per- 
centage at 58.12. 

Sophomore Trecha 

Kennedy was named Co-Most 
Valuable Player in the Jay- 
hawk East. She was one of the 
leading scorers for the Lady 
Tigers at 12 points per game. 
She also earned First-Team 
All-Jayhawk East honors. 
Teammates Stephanie Shan- 
line, Autumn Nichols, and 
Banks all earned Second-Team 
All-Jayhawk East. Nichols 
also was named Freshman of 
the Year in the East. Banks 
also averaged 12 points per 
game. 

Lee becomes 
Cowley's first 
Ail-American in 
indoor track 



Shausha Lee of Arkansas 
City became Cowley's first 
All-American in indoor track 
with a fourth-place finish in 



the weight throw at the 
NJCAA Indoor Track & Field 
Championships March 1-2, 
2002, in Manhattan. Lee threw 
48 feet, 8 inches for fourth 
place. The top six individual 
places earn All-America sta- 
tus. 

Lee helped the Cowley 
women to an 1 8th-place finish 
at nationals. 

In the 400-meter run, 
Dijana Kojic finished seventh 
with a time of 59.5 1 . However, 
her preliminary time of 58.93 
was a personal best. 

Lee and Chelsea Michael 
also competed in the shot put, 
but neither placed very high. 
Lee was 13th with a throw of 
36-8 1/4, while Michael was 
14th with a toss of 35-9 1/2. 

On the men's side, Kevin 
McDougal placed seventh in 
the 800-meter run, just inches 
away from All-American, in 
1 :58.08. And in the pentathlon, 
Brian "Zach" Duran was 
eighth with 3,075 points. 

Cowley's men's team fin- 
ished in a tie for 28th place. 

"I'm really pleased with 
our first national indoor track 
performance," coach Casey 
Belknap said. "Almost every- 
body improved their times and 
distances. This gives us a real 
good start for the outdoor track 
season." 

Men's tennis player 
Cobble first male All- 
American since 1997 

Josh Cobble, a freshman 
from Duncan, Okla., lost 7-6, 
7-6 in the finals of No. 5 sin- 
gles at the National Junior 
College Athletic Association 
Division II Tournament May 
13-17, 2002, in Piano, Texas. 

Despite losing in the 
championship, Cobble earned 
All-America status, the first 
Cowley men's tennis player to 
do so since 1997. Cobble's 
performance helped the Tigers 
gain a tie for seventh place at 
nationals. Cowley scored 25 
points. 

Cowley joined two other 
Region VI teams — Barton 
County and Johnson County — 
at nationals. Barton finished in 
a tie for second with 36 points. 



while Johnson was 10th with 
20 points. 

Cowley coach Larry 
Grose said he was pleased 
with Cobble's performance. 

"He (Cobble) had his 
opponent beaten," Grose said. 
"But Josh played hard. He 
fought hard. I'm very proud of 
him and the way he hung in 
there throughout the tourna- 
ment." 

Other Cowley players 
competing in the tournament 
were Aaron Paajanen, Ignacio 
Melus, Dean Clower, Sean 
Margulis, Nick Wessling, and 
Tim Frick. 



Women's tennis 
team earns highest 
finish ever at 
nationals 



Cowley's No. 1 doubles 
team of Donata Majauskaite 
and Suzanne Fry lost a third- 
set tiebreaker 11-9 to the team 
from Temple Junior College in 
the finals at the national tour- 
nament in College Station, 
Texas, but their performance 
helped the Lady Tigers to a 
third-place finish nationally. 

Majauskaite and Fry 
earned All-America status for 
reaching the finals. Cowley's 
34 points enabled it to finish 
third, the highest placing ever 
by a Cowley women's tennis 
team at nationals. 

"I'm really proud of the 
girls," coach Andre' Spence 
said. "They had a great tourna- 
ment." 

Majauskaite and Fry, the 
third-seeded No. 1 doubles 
team in the tournament, 
reached the finals by winning 
three matches and receiving a 
first-round bye. In the finals, 
the Cowley duo lost 7-6, 5-7, 
11-9 in what Spence termed "a 
nail biter." 

Other Cowley players 
competing at nationals were 
Jennifer Hocker, Hatti Pringle, 
Amy Stredney, Amber-Dawn 
Curtis, and Angela Piatt. 



COWLEY COLLEGE TIMES, 2001-2002 



21 



t i c 



A C H I E \ E M E N T 



Golfers finish in top 
40 at nationals 

All three Cowley golfers 
who qualified for the National 
Junior College Athletic Asso- 
ciation Division II tournament 
in Phoenix, Ariz., May 21-24, 
2002, finished among the top 
40 individuals. 

Nathan Coats, a freshman 
from Ponca City, was tied for 
the lead after the first round of 
play. He finished in a tie for 
28th place with a four-day 
total of 296, eight strokes over 
par. Teammates Louie Girardi, 
also a freshman from Ponca 
City, and Chris King, a sopho- 
more from Winfield, tied for 
39th place at 299. 

All three players finished 
higher than any previous Cow- 
ley golfer at the national tour- 
nament. The previous highest 
finish was Brad Lunsford of 
Medicine Lodge in 2000, 
when he finished in a tie for 
54th place. 

"I was extremely pleased 
with the way the guys played," 
said Rex Soule, coach. "None 
of the three shot a round in the 
80s the entire tournament. And 
these three gentlemen repre- 
sented our institution in the 
highest possible manner." 

The four-day tournament 

was played at Palm Valley 

Country Club in Phoenix. 

Coats: 71-77-76-72-296 

Girardi: 74-72-77-76-299 

King: 76-73-77-73-299 

Young Softball 
team falls short of 
national berth 

A pair of losses to Dodge 
City, including a 5-3 decision 
in 10 innings in the champi- 
onship game of the Region VI 
Tournament, ended the Lady 
Tiger softball team's 2002 sea- 
son. 

With eight freshmen in 
the starting lineup this season, 
coach Ed Hargrove is looking 
ahead to next season, when a 
veteran group will take the 
field. 

"1 thought we played well 
for a group of younger play- 
ers," he said. "They won 43 



games, which is just one shy of 
the school record." 

Cowley finished with a 
43-14 record, including 16-2 
in the Jayhawk Conference 
Eastern Division. That was 
good for second place behind 
Johnson County. Cowley split 
with Johnson on April 27. But 
a split at Labette back on April 
2 was the difference. 

The following records 
were set during the 2002 sea- 
son: Most runs scored in a sea- 
son — 56 by Jackie McColpin; 
most doubles in a season — 16 
by Brandi Webb; most doubles 
in a career — 24 by Webb 
(2001-2002); most consecu- 
tive strikeouts by a pitcher 
during a game — 9 by Danielle 
Beran on May 5 against Dodge 
City; and most consecutive 
home wins — 28 from 2001- 
2002. 

Region VI Tournament 
results from Two Rivers Youth 
Complex in Wichita: Cowley 
8, Seward 0; Cowley 12, 
Neosho 5; Dodge City 4, Cow- 
ley 3; Cowley 12, Garden City 
0; Dodge City 5, Cowley 3(10 
innings). 

Several Lady Tigers 
earned post-season awards. 
Webb (second base), 

McColpin (outfield), and 
Beran (utility player) earned 
first-team All-Jayhawk East. 
Danielle Vanderhoof (catcher), 
Emily Simmons (outfield), 
and Candice Wilburn (pitcher) 
earned second-team All-Jay- 
hawk East. Honorable mention 
selections were Michelle 
Ramos, Melissa Bean, and J.J. 
McVay. 

Four Tiger track 
athletes earn 
All-America status at 
nationals 



Four members of the 
Cowley County Community 
College men's track and field 
team earned All-American 
honors during the NJCAA 
championships May 17-18, 
2002, in Odessa, Texas. 

Marcello Dunning 

became a two-time All-Ameri- 
can as he finished seventh in 
the 800-meter run in 1 minute. 



55 seconds. He also anchored 
the men's 4x800-meter relay, 
which finished eighth in 
7:59.5. Relay teammates 
Kevin McDougal, Josh 
Spence, and Chris Schuetz 
also earned All-American sta- 
tus. 

The top eight finishers in 
each event earn All-America 
status. A Coaches All-Ameri- 
can team also is selected 
among the top eight American 
finishers. 

Casey Belknap, head 
coach of the Tigers, was 
pleased with the men's per- 
formances. 

"The men's team had a 
really good meet," Belknap 
said. "Kevin McDougal had a 
tough draw as he ran the 4x8, 
then 45 minutes later he had 
the prelims of the 1500 
meters." 

McDougal was 14th in the 
preliminary race in 4:20.83. 

The Tiger men's team tied 
for 29th place at nationals with 
three team points. Barton 
County from the Jayhawk 
West swept the men's and 
women's divisions. 

The three Cowley women 
who competed at nationals 
didn't fare as well as the men. 
Dijana Kojic was 16th in the 
400-meter dash in 1:01.59. 

"That was Dijana's first 
race since she pulled her ham- 
string," Belknap said. "That 
was a good time for being off a 
month." 

Crystal Ashley, a member 
of Cowley's basketball team 
who joined the track team late 
in the season, was 14th in the 
triple jump at 34-1 1/4. She 
fouled twice. 

And in the women's 
javelin throw, Rachel Reida 
was 10th with a throw of 1 17- 
10. 

Belknap, with his first 
season now completed, said he 
and his athletes were looking 
forward to next season. 

"I think we did some real- 
ly good things," he said. "The 
men's team really came on, 
which was an improvement of 
how they were during the 
indoor season. They had a 
good meet at regionals and 
that carried over to the nation- 
al championships. The kids are 
excited and ready to come 



back. They had their eyes 
opened quite a bit during the 
indoor season and know what 
they need to do at this level to 
compete. They went home 
pretty motivated." 

Baseball team 
captures eighth 
consecutive 
conference crown, 
earns spot in World 
Series 

If the Tiger baseball team 
had an Achilles heel during the 
2002 season, it probably was 
pitching. 

That was never more evi- 
dent than during its two games 
at the National Junior College 
Athletic Association World 
Series in Grand Junction, 
Colo. The Tigers, who hadn't 
given up more than nine runs 
since May 3, yielded 15 twice 
in consecutive losses at the 
Series. 

"I think we took this team 
probably as far as it could go," 
said head coach Dave Bur- 
roughs. "We played well when 
we had to during the regular 
season. But when we got to 
Grand Junction, we just froze. 

"The media asked me 
after our second loss out there 
what happened, and I told 
them I really didn't know. 
Sometimes, things like this 
happen." 

Despite exiting from the 
national tournament earlier 
than expected, Cowley did 
capture an amazing eighth 
consecutive Jayhawk Confer- 
ence Eastern Division title, the 
Eastern Sub-Regional crown, 
and the Region VI Tourna- 
ment, no small tasks. 

"Our pitching was spotty 
at times all season." Burroughs 
said. "But we won some 
games that we had to win 
down the stretch. We just saw 
some better hitters out there (at 
the Series). Plus, we made so 
many mistakes. We made 
more mistakes in two games 
than we had all season." 

Cowley opened the 2002 
Alpine Bank World Series 
against John A. Logan College 



22 



COWLEY COLLEGE TIMES. 2001-2002 



i (. 



\ E \l F, N T S 



of Illinois. The Tigers gave 
starting pitcher Jeff Moye a 3- 
lead after the first inning, but 
Logan battled back with two 
in the second and a huge eight- 
run third, highlighted by a pair 
of home runs. 

After Logan added a run 
in the top of the fifth to take an 
11-3 lead, Cowley exploded 
for five runs in the bottom half 
of the inning, four on J.R. 
DiMercurio's grand slam 
home run. Logan maintained 
an 11-8 lead until Cowley got 
a run in the bottom of the 
eighth to trail by just two 
going into the ninth inning. 

"We should have won that 
game," Burroughs said. "We 
trailed 11-9, we were right 
there. Then we let it get away 
from us in the ninth." 

Logan scored four times 
in the top of the ninth, includ- 
ing a solo home run by Kyle 
Maddux, his second homer of 
the game. Cowley failed to 
score in the bottom half of the 
inning. 

San Jacinto North of 
Texas jumped on the Tigers 
early on Sunday, May 26, 
scoring two in the first, three 
in the second, one in the third, 
two in the fourth, and one in 
the fifth to take a 9-4 lead. The 
Gators added six in the top of 
the eighth, and the game ended 
after Cowley failed to score in 
the bottom of the inning on the 
10-run rule. 

The Tigers, who finished 
with a 43-16 record, had other 
bright moments during the 
season. Ail-American first 
baseman John Urick broke 
Travis Hafner's single-season 
record for home runs on May 9 
during a 6-2 victory over 
Labette. Hafner's record was 
18. Urick finished with 20. 
DiMercurio was right behind 
with 19, while Scott Campbell 
hit 15. 

Despite winning the con- 
ference for the eighth straight 
season, only two Tigers were 
named first-team All-Jayhawk 
East. Urick was named Most 
Valuable Player, while Camp- 
bell earned Freshman of the 
Year honors. Campbell is an 
outfielder. Honorable mention 
all-conference selections were 
Andy Mayfield, Rusty Ryal, 
Jeff Brusto, Craig Frydendall, 
and DiMercurio. 



Urick selected to All- 
America first team 

John Urick, who helped 
Cowley's baseball team to the 
2002 National Junior College 
Athletic Association World 
Series, was named to the First- 
Team All-America Team. 

Urick, a sophomore from 
Blue Springs, Mo., was chosen 
as an infielder as part of the 
12-player first team. Urick, 
who played first base, pitched, 
and was used as a designated 
hitter during the Tigers' 2002 
season, is the grandson of for- 
mer Major League Baseball 
manager Whitey Herzog. 

Cowley coach Dave Bur- 
roughs said Urick was a leader 
and would be missed. 

"I wish he was coming 
back," Burroughs said. "I'm 
happy for him and proud of 
him." 

Urick batted .400 with 75 
runs, 78 hits and 73 runs bat- 
ted in. The Most Valuable 
Player in the Jayhawk Confer- 
ence Eastern Division also 
established a Cowley single- 
season record for home runs 
with 20, breaking the previous 
mark of 18 set by AAA Okla- 
homa City's Travis Hafner in 
1998. 

Besides his bat. the 6- 
foot-3, 210-pound lefthander 
also was effective as a pitcher, 
going 4-1 with a 3.10 earned- 
run average. He started six 
games for the Tigers during 
the regular season. 

Urick becomes the sixth 
All-American in Cowley base- 
ball history and the fourth 
first-team selection. He has 
signed to play at Oklahoma 
State University next year. 

Urick was a major reason 
for the Tigers capturing their 
eighth consecutive Jayhawk 
East title. Cowley finished the 
season with a 43-16 record, 
qualifying for its fourth World 
Series in six years. As a fresh- 
man, Urick batted .384 with 
81 hits, including 14 home 
runs. He was a 19th-round 
choice of the Los Angeles 
Dodgers in the 2001 draft. 



Cowley Danceline 
competes in Florida, 
just misses finals 



Cowley's Tigerette 

Danceline just missed qualify- 
ing for the Division II finals 
during competition at the 
National Dance Alliance Col- 
lege Nationals held April 4-7, 
2002, in Daytona Beach, Fla. 

The Tigerettes missed 
qualifying for the Division II 
finals by a slim .07 of a point. 
However, the team placed sec- 
ond among the community 
colleges competing. 

Community college 

results: McLennan Communi- 
ty College of Texas, Cowley, 
Barton County, El Camino of 
California, Eastern State of 
Oklahoma, and Columbus 
Community College of Ohio. 



The following young 
ladies made the trip: Sopho- 
mores-Jennifer Cox of Rose 
Hill. Tiffany Miller of New- 
ton, Jennifer Sanderholm of 
Arkansas City, Lyndsey 
Schulte of Mulvane, and Jessi- 
ca Watts of Cottonwood Falls. 
Freshmen-Mandy Abplanalp 
of Arkansas City, Erin Brown 
of Wellington, Kristin Dealy 
of Wichita, Laura Gore of 
Bentley, Jessica Lowry of 
Derby, Crystal May of 
Wellington, Sarah Stevens of 
Derby, and Lindsey Swaney of 
Derby. 

Lindsay Sanderholm is 
the Danceline coach. 



W.S. SCOTT AUDITORIUM RENOVATION: A capital campaign to 
raise money for the renovation of W.S. Scott Auditorium's 
lobby kicked off in 200 1 . New restrooms, concession stand 
and ticket booth, plus a Tiger Athletic Hall of Fame room, are 
just some of the items to be included in the project. 




W.S. Scott Auditorium Lobby Renovation Elevation 




W.S. Scott Auditorium Lobby Renovation Floor Plan 



COWLEY COLLEGE TIMES, 2001-2002 



■i:\ 



E NDOWMENT A S S C I A T 1 N 



We gratefully acknowledge the 
following donors who have 
contributed to the Endowment 
Association, Tiger Booster Club, 
and the Heartland Art Series 



Aspen Traders Ltd. 

Mr. And Mrs. Sid Achenbach 

ADM Milling Co. 

Advanced Orthopaedic Association 

Bart and Heather Allen 

Allen's Furniture and Carpet 

American Concrete 

American Legion Auxiliary Unit #18 

Joe and Eleanor Anderson 

David W. Andreas 

Eric Andreas 

Warren D. Andreas 

Larry J. Anstine 

Steven and Pam Archer 

Ark City Clinic 

Ark City Country Mart 

Ark City Glass Company 

Ark City Tire and Auto, Inc. 

Ark City Tumbleweeds 

Ark Valley Physical Therapy, Inc. 

Ark Veterinary Associates 

Arkansas City Area Arts Council 

Arkansas City Music and Drama Club 

Arkansas City Chamber of Commerce 

Arkansas City Rotary Club 

Arkansas City Traveler 

Rod and Jody Arnett 

Frankie G. Arnold 

Association of Performing Arts 

Bill and Dana Atwell 

Joe and Donna Avery 

Albert and Karen Bacastow 

Paul and Nikki Baker 

J.J. Banks 

Lucien and Judith Barbour 

Barbour Title Company 

BamesCo, Inc. 

Tom Barth 

Barton Energy, LLC 

Becker Tire Company 

Gary Belknap 

Tom and Myrtle Berding 

Beta Sigma Phi - City Council 

Beta Sigma Phi - Gamma Theta 

Mr. and Mrs. Dan Biddle 

Billings Plumbing and Bath 

John and Lisa Bishop 

BJ's Auto 

Roger and Carol Black 

The Boeing Company 

Bonavia Family Trust 

Dick and Dolly Bonfy 

Bea Boory 

Helen Born 

David and Trina Bostwick 

Boyer Educational Trust 

Steve and Vonda Brecheisen 

Max and Mary Brown 

Melburn Porter Brown 

Robert and Jana Brown 

Roger and Suzanne Brown 

Brown's, Inc. 

Bryant Hardware and Collectables 

Thomas and Brenda Bucher 

Karen J. Bullard 

Fred and Carol Bunting 



Darren and Carolyn Burroughs 

David and Vicky Burroughs 

Betty M. Burton 

Kenny and Janet Buss 

Buterbaugh and Handlin Insurance 

Caldwell Compounding Pharmacy 

Michael and Karen Campbell 

Mark and Penny Carnevale 

Carpenter and Vickers Scholarship Trust 

Brad and Sue Carson 

Century 21 Advantage Realty 

Jose and Marlys Cervantes 

Chamber Music of America 

Don and Velma Cheslic 

City of Arkansas City 

City of Winfield 

Judy Clark 

Russell and Patty Clark 

Steven and Nancy Clark 

Class of 1951 

Clay Blair Family Foundation 

Albert and Audine Clemente 

John and Chris Clemente 

Marc and Raquel Clements 

Client Business Services 

Coca-Cola Bottling Company 

Gene and Donella Cole 

Commerce Bank 

Commercial Federal Bank 

Conco, Inc. 

CornerBank 

Cowley County Economic Agency 

Cox Communications 

Dr. Lynn A. Cramer 

Mr. and Mrs. Steven L. Cranford 

Tony and Vicki Crouch 

Bruce and Amy Crouse 

Mike and Sue Crow 

D&D Equipment, Inc. 

D&S Retail Liquor 

Jim and Rae Dale 

Kirke Dale Scholarship Trust 

Dave and Carol Daulton 

Ruth A. David and Stanley Dains 

Walter and Iris David 

Charles and Verna Davis 

Larry and Cynthia Davis 

Dr. Lynda B. DeArmond 

Dan and Lin Deener 

Gail DeVore 

Nancy DeVore 

Dr. Gary and Marilyn Dill 

Dillons Store #38 

DiVall Retail Liquor 

Bill and Judy Docking 

Meredith Docking 

Donna's Designs 

Ron and Pam Doyle 

Ron Dubach 

Lyle and Terry Eaton 

Melodee S. Eby 

Alisyn Edwards 

Elite Advertising 

Sarah Emrick 

Stephen and Janet English 

Ernst-Spencer, Inc. 

EVP, Inc. 

Doug and Dejon Ewing 

Exxon Education Foundation 

David and Jennifer Faust 

Robert and Lois Fencil 

Pam Fleming 

Bob and Jo Lynn Foster 

Foster's Furniture of Ark City 

Curt and Cynthia Freeland 



Future Beef Operations 

Gallaways, LLC 

Gambino's Pizza 

Belva Gardner 

Don and Esther Giffin 

Kenneth and Bonnie Gilmore 

Dan and Vicki Givens 

Ron and Donetta Godsey 

J.G. and Doris Goff 

Good Time Productions, Inc. 

Gordon and Associates 

Gordon-Piatt Energy Group, Inc. 

Graves Drug Store 

Great Western Dining 

Gregg and Simmons, CPAs 

Mr. and Mrs. Lee Gregg Jr. 

Greif Brothers Corporation 

Slade and Terri Griffiths 

Grimes Jewelers, Inc. 

Larry and Nyla Grose 

Betty Jane Groves 

Mike and Judi Groves 

Phil and Joyce Groves 

Allen and Beverly Grunder 

Halliburton Foundation 

Ron and Sheila Hammock 

Ed and Linda Hargrove 

Dean and DeAnna Harp 

Jafar and Jacqualin Hashemi 

Scott Haywood 

Bill and Linda Headrick 

Delbert and Janet Heidebrecht 

Cathy Hendricks 

Stan Herd 

Mrs. William Hill 

John and Janet Hitchcock 

Gary Hockenbury 

Kim and Cynthia Hocker 

Marjory Hodkin 

Jim and Joyce Holloway 

Angela Holmes 

Paul and Donna Homan 

Home National Bank 

Bill and Carol House 

Luella Hume 

Hutchinson Electric, Inc. 

Don Hutley 

Rex and Denise Irwin 

Joline Iverson 

Vernell Jackson 

Jan's Sport Shack 

Mark and Lora Jarvis 

Steve and Joi Jay 

Jeff Watson Insurance 

Jerry's Donut Shop 

Conrad and Janet Jimison 

Craig S. Johnson 

Richard and Kelly Johnson 

Hubert and Mildred Johnston 

Danny and Sandra Jones 

Mark and Stefani Jones 

Lynne Gusheloff-Jordan 

Dan and Violet Kahler 

Kansas Arts Commission 

Richard and Kay Kautz 

Marvin and Linda Keasling 

Greg and Diana Kelley 

Paul and Diane Kelly 

Ellen L. Kelly 

John and Jean Kelly 

Michael and Claudia Kelly 

Kempf Liquor Store 

Robert and Elizabeth Keown 

Mary Jane Kerr 

Oscar Kimmell 



24 



COWLEY COLLEGE TIMES, 2001-2002 



N I) W M E N T ASSOC! A T 1 N 



Dr. and Mrs. Nick Kinsch 

Charles and Darlene Kinzie 

Marty and Jacinda Kinzie 

Dr. Paul and Lisa Klaassen 

Anthony and Mary Korte 

Irvin and Viola Kramer 

Joseph and Jan Krisik 

Harold and Mary Lake 

Robert and Carolyn Langenwalter 

LaDonna Lanning 

Ric and Becky Lassiter 

Mr. and Mrs. Don Lawing 

Scott and Deborah Layton 

Harry and Wilma Ledeker 

Clay Lemert Family 

Rick and Karen Lewis 

LM Consultants 

Local 1004 IUE-AFL-CIO 

Long and Neises CPA's Chtd. 

J.C. and Donna Louderback 

Jon and Dianna Lough 

Steve and Christi Lungren 

Dr. Rodger and Melba Maechtlen 

Jerry B. Malone 

Mangen Chiropractic Clinic 

Jerry W. Martin 

Lane and Shannon Massey 

Kenny and Pat Mauzey 

Sonny and Edna Maynard 

Mr. and Mrs. Daniel McAtee 

Mr. and Mrs. Darrin McAtee 

Dr. and Mrs. Patrick J. McAtee 

Mary Jane Mills 

Marvin and Anita McCorgary 

Mr. and Mrs. John Mehuron 

Merle Snider Motors, Inc. 

Mid America Arts Alliance 

Midwest Electric Supply 

Mike Groves Oil, Inc. 

Robert and Olive Milner 

James and Wilma Mitchell 

Robert A. Moffatt 

Norman and Sue Morris 

D.J. Morrow and Dr. Carl Ingram 

Dianne Morrow 

Otis and Terri Morrow 

Ramon and Sally Murguia 

Margery L. Nagel 

Ron and Janice Neagle 

Margaret Neal 

Joe and Patty Neises 

Luella Nelson 

Dr. Nathan and Amy Niles 

Randy and Deb Nittler 

CM. Nugen Memorial 

Jason and Shannon O'Toole 

Dr. Jerry and Kristi Old 

Fred and Tonya Olenberger 

Optimist Club of America 

Larry and Barbara Orman 

Stu and Stephanie Osterthun 

Neal and Anna Paisley 

Ada Margaret Palmer 

Parlour Beauty Salon 

Parman, Tanner, Soule and Jackson CPA's 

Paton Wholesale and Vending 

Mark and Debra Paton 

Don and Wilda Patterson 

Suzanne Patterson 

Roy and Linda Pepper 

Philip and Mary Ann Phillips 

J.W. and Paula Plush 

Potter Auction Service 

Gary and Ginger Potter 

Potter's Liquor Store 



Thomas and Sheila Prichard 

Jim and Jan Pringle 

Dr. and Mrs. Doug Proctor 

Sara B. Prothe 

Puritan Billiards 

Quality Water Service 

Judy Queen 

Robert and Jacque Ramirez 

Ramona Munsell and Associates 

Ramsey's Auto Parts, Inc. 

James and Sylvia Reed 

Reedy Ford 

Sid and Sharon Regnier 

Dr. Glen and Bonnie Remsberg 

Gail K. Rhoton 

Rindt-Erdman Funeral Home 

Edna Roberts 

Mary A. Robison 

Cliff and Carol Roderick 

Rogers and Lanning 

Dr. Paul N. Rogers 

Dr. David and Rhonda Ross 

Mrs. Gail Ross 

Steve and Melinda Ross 

Rubbermaid-Winfield, Inc. 

Dorothy Rush Realty 

Rick and Val Rush 

S and Y Industries, Inc. 

Tom and Sue Saia 

Jim and Deb Salomon 

Samford-Stover Agency 

Dan and Lois Sampson 

Sandlian Realty 

Mr. and Mrs. Dave Schaller 

Dr. David and Karen Schmeidler 

Schmidt Jewelers 

Tom and Charlotte Schmidt 

Dr. Rick and Jodi Schoeling 

Larry Schwintz 

Al Sehsuvaroglu 

Selcom. USA. Inc. 

Opal Julia Shaffer 

Paul and Marilynn Shanline 

Brian and Kristi Shaw 

Robert and Karmen Shaw 

Sheldon's Pawn Shop 

E.W. "Bud" and Lauretta Shelton 

Lance Shepard 

Wanda Shepherd 

Sheppard Foundation 

Wayne and Sandy Short 

Joe and Mindi Shriver 

Joseph and Jean Simmons 

Dale and Isobel Smith 

Eldon and MayBelle Smith 

Forest and Sandra Smith 

Dr. Libby Smith 

Mrs. Newton C. Smith 

Randy and Pam Smith 

Smyer Travel Service, Inc. 

Dr. Jean and Ellen Snell 

Dr. Daniel and Vicki Snowden 

Sonic Drive-in 

Maxine Soule 

Rex Soule 

Southwestern College 

Jim and Margaret Sowden 

Mark and Rebecca Speck 

Darin and Andre Spence 

Dannie H. Spence 

David and Debrah Stancoff 

Starlyn Venus State Farm Insurance 

Mrs. Audra Stark 

State Bank of Winfield 

Stauffer Community Foundation 



Mike and Marisa Steiner 

Steven Chevrolet, Inc. 

Helen Storbeck 

Tad and Janice Stover 

Lawrence and Martha Lallman Stover 

Dr. Rod and Trisha Stoy 

Strother Field Commission 

Keith and Marcia Stultz 

John and Lee Ann Sturd 

Summit Auto World 

Larry Swaim 

Ronald and Patsy Sweeley 

Sweetland-Hinson Equipment, Inc. 

Betty Sybrant 

Jim and Donna Sybrant 

Linda Sybrant 

Taylor Drug 

Danny and Rhenda Torrence 

Michael and Cheryl Townsley 

Debra S. Travis 

Ann A. Trechak 

Richard and Nancy Tredway 

Trust Company of Kansas 

Marvin Tucker 

Turn of the Century Enterprises 

Eddie and Mary Turner 

Two Rivers Co-op 

Steve and Connie Tyler 

Thomas Tyler 

Tyler Production, Inc. 

Unified School District #470 

Union State Bank 

United Agency 

Universal Steel Buildings 

David and Sheree Utash 

Donald Vannoy 

Chris Vollweider 

Dr. Janice G. Voss 

Waldorf-Riley, Inc. 

James and Loretta Waldroupe 

Caroline Newman Warren 

Randall and LeArta Watkins 

Dr. Aaron and Jayne Watters 

Webber Land Company 

Vivian A. Webber 

Deuane and Virginia Wells 

Lewis and Cynthia Wesson 

Westar Energy Foundation 

Westlake Ace Hardware 

Bob and Patricia White 

Marvin C. White 

Virginia J. Wilkins 

Gary and Peggy Williams 

Mary N. Wilson 

Rodney and Priscilla Wilson 

Winfield Arts and Humanities 

Winfield Chiropractic Office 

Winfield Consumer Products 

Winfield USD 465 Foundation 

WinnerCo, Inc. 

Karen L. Wixson 

Woods Lumber of Arkansas City 

Dr. Robert and Susan Yoachim 

Mr. and Mrs. Ed Zeller 

Zeller Motor Co. Inc. 

Edward D. Zimmerman 



COWLEY COLLEGE TIMES, 2001-2002 



\\ Lt l 



e <; i: 



At A Glance 2002 



Mill Levy: 16.997 

Fact: 

Of the 1 9 community 
colleges in Kansas, Cowley has 
the 6th lowest mill levy in the 
state at 1 6.997, and has the 
sixth highest county valuation 
of $207,991,780. At $53 per 
credit hour for tuition and fees, 
Cowley boasts one of the low- 
est tuitions in Kansas. 



Enrollment Figures: 

Facts, Spring 2002: 

High School 498 

Freshmen 2,034 

Sophomores 1,198 

Special 579 

Total Headcount 4,044 

Total FTE 2,488 

Approximately 60% of freshmen 
and sophomores enrolled in 
Kansas colleges are in communi- 
ty colleges. 



Assessed Valuation: 

Fall 2002: 

$207,991,780 

Budget: 

$20.5 million 
(2002-2003) 




Founded: 1922 

In 1968, the College became the first school in the state to combine a traditional lib- ' 
eral arts transfer curriculum with a program of area vocational-technical school training. 

President: 

Dr. Patrick McAtee, Ph.D., became the third president of the College on July 1, 1987. 



2001 Fall Enrollment: 

2,488 Full-Time Equivalency (fall record) 
4,034 Total Headcount 

Programs: 



2002 Spring Enrollment: 

2,604 FTE (Record for spring) 
4,309 Total Headcount 



33 Certificate and Applied Science programs 
42 Liberal Arts/Transfer programs 

More than 100 specialized programs and seminars offered through the Institute for 
Lifetime Learning. 

Specialized training for business and industry to meet their needs. In the past the Col- 
lege has developed or offered programs for General Electric, Rubbermaid-Winfield, the 
city of Arkansas City, the city of Winfield, Future Beef Operations, local school districts, 
day care centers, local nursing homes, special education co-ops, KSQ Blowmolding, Wit- 
tur, Social Rehabilitation Services, Southwestern Bell Telephone, Selcom, Boeing- Wichi- 
ta, Cessna, and the Business and Industry Division of Banks. 

Facilities: 

17 buildings on a 10-acre campus in the heart of downtown Arkansas City. 

Outreach Centers in Mulvane, Strother Field, Winfield, Wellington and Wichita, 
where a cooperative partnership between Cowley, Wichita State University, and Wichita 
Area Technical College has formed the Southside Education Center. Courses also taught 
at these area high schools: Argonia, Belle Plaine, Burden, Caldwell, Cedar Vale, Conway 
Springs, Dexter, Oxford, South Haven, and Udall. 

Athletics: 

Twelve intercollegiate sports that compete in the Kansas Jayhawk Conference's East 
Division. Men's Cross Country, Women's Cross Country, Volleyball, Men's Basketball, 
Women's Basketball, Baseball, Softball, Golf, Men's Tennis, Women's Tennis, Men's 
Track and Field, and Women's Track and Field. 

Jayhawk Conference Eastern Division Crowns in 2001-2002: 

• Baseball 43-16 (eighth consecutive title, 28-8 in the East) 
(Sophomore first baseman John Urick named to NJCAA Division I All- 
America Team) 

• Women's Basketball 28-4 (fourth title in five seasons, 17-1 in the East) 
District or Region VI crowns in 2001-2002: 

• Baseball (won Eastern Sub-Regional and Region VI tournaments; qualified 
for NJCAA Division I World Series for fourth time in six years) 

• Women's Tennis (won Region VI championship; placed third in NJCAA 
Division II National Tournament, highest national finish ever) 

• Golf (won District III Tournament, qualifying three individuals for the 
NJCAA Division II nationals; all three finished in the top 40) 



Employees: 

170 full-time faculty, staff and administration 
445 part-time faculty, staff and students 



26 



COWLEY COLLEGE TIMES, 2001-2002 



C \x 



\ C I, L F G 



Bottom Line 2002 



Your Investment 

• $3,506,103 in 2000 taxes; $3,140,487 in 2001 taxes. 

• Taxes DO NOT pay for scholarships to out-of-state athletes. 

• The College is fourth in size among the 19 community colleges in 
Kansas, behind Johnson County Community College, Kansas City 
Community College, and Butler County Community College. 

Your Return 

• $16 million a year added to the local economy. For each dollar of 
local tax support received, the College returns $5.03 to the coun- 
ty's economy. That return is greater when the total picture of the 
state is considered. For every dollar spent by the state in support 
of community colleges, $22.43 is returned. 

• $9.3 million annual payroll, providing 170 full-time jobs and 445 
adjunct faculty, staff, and student positions. 

• Educational opportunities for all segments of the population at 
less than half the cost of four-year colleges. Average student age 
is 31.6 years. 

• More than 1 ,000 Cowley County students received more than 
$1.5 million in grants, loans, scholarships and work-study pro- 
gram dollars during the 2001-2002 academic year. 

• A record full-time enrollment for the spring of 2002 of 2,604 total 
FTE. 

• Graduates who, according to a study by the University of Kansas, 
suffer less transfer shock than any other group of transfer stu- 
dents. 

• Customized training for more than a dozen businesses and indus- 
tries. 

• A significant attraction for businesses and industries considering 
relocation in this area. 

• Cultural, educational and athletic events which entertain audi- 
ences throughout this area. 

• An educational institution well known for the quality of its pro- 
grams in both liberal arts and vocational/occupational areas. 



Elected Officials 
Governor 

Bill Graves 
Second Floor 
State Capitol 
Topeka. Kansas 66612 

State Senator 

Greta Goodwin 
Winfield, Kansas 67156 

State Representatives 

Joe Shriver 

Arkansas City, Kansas 67005 

Judy Showalter 
Winfield, Kansas 67156 

State Board of Regents 

700 SW Harrison 
Topeka, KS 66603-3716 

Board of Trustees 

Donna Avery, Arkansas City 
Albert Bacastow Jr., Arkansas City 
Lee Gregg Jr., Arkansas City 
Ron Godsey, Winfield 
LaDonna Lanning, Winfield 
Virgil Watson Jr., Arkansas City 

Cowley Administration 

Dr. Patrick J. McAtee President 

Sheree Utash Vice President 

Academic/Student Affairs 

Conrad Jimison Vice President 

of Administration 

Terri Morrow . . Dean of Development 

and College Relations 

Tony Crouch Dean of Business 

Services 

Charles McKown . . Dean of Research 

and Technology 

Pam Doyle . Dean of Student Learning 

Sue Saia Dean of Student Life 

Sarah Wesbrooks . . . Dean of Northern 

Campuses 

Gene Cole Associate Dean 

of Business & Industry 

Paul Jackson Associate Dean 

of Curriculum and Assessment 
Tom Saia Director of Athletics 



COWLEY COLLEGE TIMES, 200 1-2002 



27 






COWLEY COLLEGE 



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Cowle 





ley County Community College & Area Vocational-Technical School 
125 S. Second Street * Arkansas City, Kansas 67005 

1-800-593-2222 



Concert Choir Performs at Carnegie Hall 



Cowle 



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2002-2003 President's Report 



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30 Years 



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Wynton Marsalis 
Jazz Legend 



PAGE 22 



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STORIES ABOUT COWLEY COUNTY COMMUNITY COLLEGE 2002-2003 ACADEMIC YEAR 

11 rro 




[ features ] 



5 Student of the Year 

Julie Cleveland was named Student of the Year 

6 Tim Frick Captures Title of Mr. CinderFella 

He also won the "Want to Take Him Home" Award 

6 PBL Student Places Seventh at Nationals 

Wesley Nellis excelled in Human Resource Management 



7 Ark City's Top Student 

Sarah Pritchard of Augusta named Outstanding Student 



Find out more at 

www.cowley.edu 



7 PTK All-Kansas Academic Team 

Candice Dickinson and Harold Bos III represented Cowley 

8 Cosmetology Skills Olympics 

Students claim first-place awards 

9 Queen Alalah LXXI 

Hope Oestmann crowned during Arkalalah celebration 

10 Paul Stirnaman Award 

Larry Schwintz became the first receipeint of award named in honor of long-time instructor 

11 Retirement of a Salesman, an Instructor, 
and a Secretary 

Gene Cole. Judy Queen and Linda Keasling retire 

14 MICT Receives National Accreditation 

Committee on Accreditation of Educational Programs validates program 

14 Russian Education Delegation Visits in March 

Visit was part of the U.S. Congress-sponsored Open World Program 

15 College Names, Dedicates Three Facilities 

Ben Cleveland, A.F. "Tony" Buffo and Oscar Kimmell were honored for their service 

19 '7 1 Grad Named 2003 Outstanding Tiger Alumnus 

Carol McAdoo Rehme honored during the college's 80th commencement exercises 

21 College Celebrates 80 Years 

Richard Picciotto. Wynton Marsalis part of anniversary celebration 

26 The 'Silver Fox' Coach Dan Kahler Honored 

Dan Kahler Court in W.S. Scott Auditorium was dedicated on November 12 

27 Spence Moves On, Smith Takes Over 

Women's basketball sees a change in leadership 

28 Men's Tennis Captures National Academic Title 

The team finished the season with a cumulative 3.47 grade-point average 

29 Six Inducted into Tiger Athletic Hall of Fame 

The Class of 2003 was honored during celebrations on February 1 









[ departments ] 

2 Welcome 

3 College Leadership 

4 Students of the Month 
13 NISOD Awards 

22 Cowley Briefs 
25 Enrollment Graph 
30 Sports Wrap-ups 
32 Endowment Donors 

35 Bottom Line 2003 

36 Cowley At-A-Glance 2003 



THE COWLEY PRESIDENTS REPORT is printed once yearly and is produced by the office of 
Public Relations, Stu Osterthun, director, and Rex Soule, publications designer. Reproduction in 
whole or in part without written permission is prohibited. For comments or questions, please send 
an e-mail to osterthun@cowley.edu or soule@cowley.edu. 



Cowley County Community College and Area Vocational-Technical School is committed to a policy of non-discrimination involving equal access to education and employment opportunity to all regardless of 
sex, race, age, religion, color, national origin, handicap or veteran status. This administration further extends its commitment to fulfilling and implementing the federal, state and local laws and regulations as 
specified in Title IX, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act and the Americans with Disabilities Act. 

1 



WELCOME 




On behalf of the college's Board of 
Trustees, its faculty, staff and fellow admin- 
istrators, welcome to the President's Annual 
Report, covering the 2002-2003 academic 
year. 

And what a year it was, my 16th as 
president of this great institution. I can truly 
say that our students, faculty, staff, and 
alumni made it memorable through their 
outstanding achievements. 

What also made the academic year spe- 
cial was the celebration of our 80th anniver- 
sary as a community college. Eighty years! 
This past year was a significant milestone in 
the history of the college. What began on 
Sept. 11, 1922, with 58 students has devel- 
oped into one of the finest community col- 
leges in the state of Kansas. It was a vision 
of a group of Arkansas City High School 
students that gave us our humble begin- 
nings as Arkansas City Junior College. To 
that effort, we are eternally grateful. 

Our students made us very proud 
throughout the academic year, particularly 
when Sarah Pritchard, a freshman from 
Augusta. Kan., was named Outstanding 
Student of Arkansas City. And to have near- 
ly 60 students in our Concert Choir sing 
their hearts out in famed Carnegie Hall in 



New York City was very special. Julie 
Cleveland, our Student of the Year from 
Arkansas City, did a fantastic job during her 
speech at Commencement. 

The faculty and staff also did some 
amazing things during the year. Larry 
Schwintz was the first recipient of the Paul 
Stirnaman Award; Slade Griffiths worked 
hard to get the Mobile Intensive Care 
Technician program fully accredited; and 
Leslie Berryhill, Denise Beach, and Dr. 
Libby Smith were presented Excellence 
Awards from the National Institute for Staff 
and Organizational Development in Austin, 
Texas. 

This past year was huge in terms of cul- 
tural arts events held here. Richard 
Picciotto, the highest ranking New York 
City firefighter on the scene of the World 
Trade Center disaster, told his story of 
courage and heroism on that dark, dark day. 
Several musicians graced the Robert Brown 
Theatre stage, including R.W. Hampton, 
George Winston, Barbara Higbie, and 
arguably the greatest jazz musician of his 
generation, Wynton Marsalis. 

Three men near and dear to the college 
were honored by having campus facilities 
named after them. The A.F. Tony Buffo 



Plaza, the Oscar Kimmell Dormitory, and 
the Ben Cleveland Wellness Center were 
officially dedicated in the spring. 

In athletics, our women's cross country 
team won the Jayhawk Conference Eastern 
Division title in just its second season, 
while the women's basketball team won its 
fifth conference championship in the last 
six years. The men's and women's tennis 
teams and softball teams all qualified for 
nationals, and all earned places in the top 
10. 

Enrollment continued on an upward 
trend, setting records in fall 2002 and spring 
2003. 

We have so many things to be thankful 
for here at Cowley. I am thankful for my 
fellow administrators, our staff and faculty, 
our wonderful students, parents, and all of 
our great supporters who believe strongly in 
what we're doing. We make mistakes, but 
we try to learn from them. 

I hope you enjoy this recap of the 2002- 
2003 academic year. After reading it, I think 
you'll see why I am so proud to be 
Cowley's president. 

Sincerely. 

Dr. Patrick J. McAtee 



COLLEGE 



BOARD OF 

Trustees 




/ 





f 

) 

Donna Albert 

AVERY 



Ron 



Lee 



LaDonna 



Virgil 



COLLEGE 



Wk Ha ME ^BPE-' Vhw ^BSHi ^B *s& ^HF H 




Dr. Patrick J. 

President 



Sheree 

Vice President of 

Academic/Student 

Affairs 



Tony 

Vice President of 
Business Services 



Conrad 

Vice President of 
Administration 



Pam 

Dean of 
Student Learning 



Terri 

Dean of Development 
and College Relations 




Sue 



Sarah 



Charles 



Paul 



Tom 



Dean of 


Dean of 


Dean of 


Associate Dean of 


Director of 


Student Life 


Northern Campuses 


Research and 
Technology 


Curriculum and 
Assessment 


Athletics 



STUDENTS 



ITH 




Rochelle 

September 2002 

Arkansas City, KS 

Journalism 



Tim 

October 2002 

Ponca City, OK 

Business Administration 



Julie 

November 2002 

Arkansas City, KS 

Liberal Arts 



Andrew 

WALKER 

December 2002 

Prague, OK 

Computer Graphic Arts 




Josh 

January 2003 

Duncan, OK 

Pre-Law 



Kyle 

February 2003 

Overland Park, KS 

Pre-Medicine 



Candice 

March 2003 

Arkansas City, KS 

Mathematics 



Bren 
LEETE 

April 2003 

Rose Hill, KS 

Atmospheric Science 



STUDENT 



November 

Student of Month named 

Student of the Year 

Julie Cleveland, Student Government 
Association president and November 2002 
Student of the Month, was named Student 
of the Year during the annual Celebration of 
Excellence banquet April 15, 2003. 

Cleveland, the daughter of Helen 
Thilsted and Rick Cleveland, was a sopho- 
more liberal arts major who maintained a 
4.0 grade-point average. She was proud to 
receive the award in November and the top 
award in April. 

"It is a great honor to be considered for 
Student of the Month, let alone be chosen," 
she said. "It's a great honor to be in that cat- 
egory with all of the other students. As for 
being named Student of the Year, I never 
expected that. I just tried to do my best all 
year long." 

Cleveland, an Arkansas City High 
School graduate, was a busy student at 
Cowley. Besides holding the highest stu- 
dent office, she also was a member of 
Campus Christian Fellowship, Act One 
drama club, the concert choir, and she was a 
Student Ambassador. In October 2002, she 
was first runner-up for Queen Alalah, and 
was nominated for the Jack Kent Cooke 
Scholarship. 

"As for being named Student 

of the Year, I never expect- 
ed that. I just tried to do my 
best all year long." 

She also was a member of the cast of 
the fall 2002 musical, "42nd Street," and 
held a role in the spring 2003 play, "Crimes 
of the Heart." She held a part-time job at 
STAGE in Arkansas City, and was the 
work-study on campus for the Social 
Science Department and the Student Life 
office. She also was a resident assistant in 
the Oscar Kimmell Dormitory. To say she 
was involved would be an understatement. 

She said, a student of the month "is 
somebody who goes the extra mile. 
Somebody who does their very, very best 
all the time. Not everybody can do it all the 




Z l - 



Dean of Student Life Sue Saia congratulates Julie Cleveland during the 
Honors and Awards banquet April 15, 2003. 




time, and I feel really, really bad when I 
don't." 

Cleveland, who planned to transfer to 
either Kansas State University or the 
University of Colorado to study child psy- 
chology, said serving as SGA president was 
a learning experience. 

"I've learned you can do some things 
that will work and some that won't," she 
said. "If you do too many things, it gets 
really busy and you won't be able to do 
those activities as well as if you did a few. 
I've learned to space activities better so that 
I can devote more time to them." 

With Cleveland's lead- 
ership, SGA tried several 
new student activities dur- 
ing the fall 2002 semester. 
Her goal at the outset was 
to increase the number of 
students participating. For 
the most part, she did that. 
In spring 2003, she 
helped introduce flag football. 
Homecoming also was a success. It didn't 
hurt that she was crowned Homecoming 
Queen. Andrew Walker was crowned King. 
Cleveland also worked with school 
officials to extend the Wellness Center 
hours. 

Cleveland has two older sisters, Jobie 
Nudo, 27, who lives in Ponca City, and 
Jennifer Cleveland, 23, of Arkansas City. 
Younger brother Ben, 15, is a sophomore at 
ACHS. Julie is the granddaughter of Bill 
and Wanda O'Dell of Enid, Okla., and Irene 
and the late Ben Cleveland of Arkansas 



City. Her great-grandmother is Jennie Mae 
Cleveland of Bartlesville, Okla. 

Cleveland was born in the Philippines 
while her parents were part of Conservative 
Baptist International. Cleveland said the 
family lived four years in the Philippines, 
then four years in the states, then back to the 
Philippines. She attended preschool in 
Arkansas City when younger brother Ben 
was born. Then it was back to the 
Philippines, where she and the rest of the 
family became trilingual, speaking English, 
Tagalog (the main dialect in the 
Philippines), and Ilocano. 

At ACHS, Cleveland was a shy girl 
who was easily intimidated. 

"I've matured a lot since then." she 
said. "My freshman year, 1 wouldn't talk to 
people unless I was talked to. People 
always told me later that they thought I was 
stuck up. I'd say no, I was just shy. Now, 
I'm a little more outgoing. I'm still shy at 
times, but I'm better at it." 

Her decision to enroll at Cowley came 
at the last minute. 

"I didn't decide until two weeks before 
(high school) graduation," she said. "Mrs. 
(Mary) Young called Mrs. (Dejon) Ewing to 
get me a tryout for theatre." 

Cleveland read lines from the Female 
Version of the Odd Couple, and earned a 
scholarship. 

"Cowley has been such a good experi- 
ence," she said. "Everyone is so nice. The 
atmosphere is just pleasant. The staff, facul- 
ty and all the students, you're just really 
welcomed here." 



CD I 2002-2003 PRESIDENT'S REPORT 



Frick captures 
coveted title of 
Mr. CinderFella 



Tim Frick, a sophomore on the men's 
tennis team, was crowned Mr. CinderFella 
during the annual event held May 8, 2003, 
in the Robert Brown Theatre. 

Besides being named the overall win- 
ner, Frick also won the "Want to Take Him 
Home" Award. 

Sophomore Schulyer Thomas won the 
Beach/Leisurewear category. Winner of the 



Talent category was freshman Devin 
Woods. Sophomore Derek Kellermann cap- 
tured the Eveningwear category. 

Trent James won the "Best Eyes" cate- 
gory, while Tory Alexander won for "Best 
Smile." "Mr. Personality" went to Jake 
Moss. 

Jeremy Smith was named first runner- 
up. Second runner-up was Mike Brock, fol- 
lowed by Mike Dome and Kellermann. 

Miss Kansas 2002, Jeanne Anne 
Schroeder, served as emcee of the event. 

Other contestants: Frank Eddy, Ryan 
Julius, James Akers, Mike Gamache, Dane 
Carpenter, Will Sellers and Iggy Mwela. 




Tim Frick during the eveningwear 
portion of Mr. CinderFella. 



Cowley PBL student 
places seventh at 
national contest 

Wesley Nellis, a sophomore business 
management major, took seventh place in 
the Human Resource Management test dur- 
ing the national Phi Beta Lambda 
Leadership Conference June 29-July 3 in 
Dallas. 

Nellis, from Arkansas City, was one of 
12 Cowley students who attended the 
national conference. Beverly Grunder, chair 
of the Business and Service Technology 
Department and PBL advisor, accompanied 
the students. 

Other Cowley students who attended 
and the event in which they competed: 

Gail Ballew, Wichita, Desktop 
Publishing; Holly Beaty, Arkansas City, 
Word Processing; Richard Brammer, 
Winfield, Computer Concepts; Carthon 
Diggs, Wichita, Public Speaking; Stephanie 
Hann, Sedan, Hospitality Management; 
Andrea Larkins, Rose Hill, Computer 
Applications; Russell Lowden, Arkansas 
City, Business Law; Hollie Meeker, 
Wellington, Business Principles; Angela 
Naasz, Winfield, Desktop Publishing; 
Angela Root, Winfield, Impromptu 
Speaking; and Chelsea Scott, Wellington, 
Computer Applications. 



This year's conference theme was 
"Soaring to New Heights in Business." 
More than 2,500 post-secondary students 
from across the United States attended the 
conference. 

Students qualify to compete at the 
national conference after placing first or 
second at the state conference in the desig- 
nated event. 




Nellis placed seventh after taking the 
one-hour written objective test, which 
included questions on human resource plan- 
ning, recruiting and selection, compensa- 
tion and benefits, training and development, 
labor and management relations, legal and 



regulatory issues and organizational devel- 
opment. 

Cowley's PBL chapter was recognized 
as a Gold Seal Chapter for the state of 
Kansas. This award recognizes outstanding 
local chapters that have actively participat- 
ed in projects and programs identified with 
the goals of PBL. 

Diggs, a sophomore business adminis- 
tration major, was chosen from an audition 
video submitted prior to the conference to 
perform the National Anthem during the 
opening general session on June 29. 

Grunder has seen the local chapter con- 
tinue to grow since it was reactivated five 
years ago. Cowley's chapter had 27 mem- 
bers this past year, and the college has had 
a national award winner each of the past 
three years. 

"It has been exciting to see the local 
chapter of Phi Beta Lambda grow," 
Grunder said. "The professional leadership 
and citizenship skills students can obtain 
through PBL membership makes for a very 
successful school-to-career transition. It is a 
pleasure working with these students." 

PBL is the largest organization of col- 
lege students interested in business and 
business-related fields in the world. Local 
chapters are chartered by the national PBL 
association. PBL's mission is to bring busi- 
ness and education together in a positive 
working relationship through innovative 
leadership and career development pro- 
grams. 



STUDENT ACHIEVEMENTS 




Augusta native named 
Ark City's top student 



Sarah Pritchard of Augusta, a freshman 
communications major, was named 
Outstanding Student of Arkansas City for 
2003 during a banquet held in April in 
honor of all nine finalists. 

Pritchard, who also was a member of 
Cowley's softball team, was chosen among 
more than 70 students who were nominated 



for the award. The Outstanding Student of 
Arkansas City award is presented to a stu- 
dent from either Arkansas City Middle 
School, Arkansas City High School, or 
Cowley. 

Pritchard's award marked the second 
consecutive year that a Cowley student was 
so honored. 

Students are nominated for the award 
by instructors or staff members from their 
respective schools. All students nominated 
are recognized and awarded certificates by 
the city of Arkansas City. That ceremony 
took place March 31 in the Brown Center 
on the Cowley campus. 

From the initial field of more than 70 
nominations, nine students were chosen, 
three from each school. Those nine, along 
with their families, were honored at a ban- 
quet April 7 in the Brown Center. 

Besides softball, where she played out- 
field, Pritchard was a member of Campus 
Christian Fellowship, played intramural 
volleyball and softball, and served as a ref- 
eree for intramural volleyball. 

Pritchard also was nominated to 
receive a Student of the Month award at 
Cowley. The person who nominated 
Pritchard said, "Sarah presents herself well 
on a daily basis. She is respectful of the 



teacher and other students. She is outgoing 
and conversational before class with other 
students and, probably most importantly, 
she tries to help other students improve, and 
thus get more out of class, by offering hon- 
est yet diplomatic feedback on their writing 
assignments." 

At Augusta High School, Pritchard was 
a member of the National Honor Society 
three years, served as vice president of 
Students Against Destructive Decisions two 
years, served as Huddle Leader in FCA, 
was a member of the Spanish Club four 
years, served on the prom committee, was a 
Special Olympics volunteer, and played 
softball, volleyball, and golf, and served as 
boys 1 basketball manager. 

She also was a Kansas Honor Scholar, 
a member of the Kansas All-State FCA 
team, was an Academic Oriole four years, 
was valedictorian of her senior class, and 
was an all-conference outfielder three 
years. 

She is the daughter of Don and Julie 
Pritchard. 



Cambridge, Ark City 
students represent 
college on Phi Theta 
Kappa All-Kansas 
Academic Team 



Candice R. Dickinson of Arkansas City 
and Harold M. Bos III of Cambridge were 
the Cowley students chosen for the 2003 
All-Kansas Academic Team. 

Dickinson, a math major, and Bos, a 
pre-pharmacy major, were among 37 com- 
munity college scholars honored Feb. 19, 
2003, during the Eighth Annual Phi Theta 
Kappa Honors Luncheon at the Holiday Inn 
West/Holidome in Topeka. The luncheon 
was held in conjunction with the Kansas 
Board of Regents monthly meeting. 



Dickinson, 20, was a sophomore who 
graduated from Hays High School. Bos, 19, 
was a sophomore who graduated from 
Central of Burden High School. 

The 2003 All-Kansas Academic Team 
was sponsored by the international head- 
quarters of PTK international honor society, 
the Kansas Association of Community 
College Trustees, and the Kansas Council 
of Community College Presidents. 

The group of men and women was rec- 
ognized in an annual award ceremony that 
also drew educators and lawmakers. 

"We consider this a very worthwhile 
endeavor for all of the Kansas community 
colleges to come together and celebrate the 
achievements of the state's outstanding stu- 
dents," said Thomas Percy, a Hutchinson 
Community College history instructor who 
serves as Kansas Region Coordinator for 
the honor society. "These students are our 
finest, not only in the academic sphere, but 
also in terms of service and citizenship." 



Each scholar was selected by his or her 
own community college for the eighth 
annual statewide academic team, and each 
scholar also was a nominee for the 2003 
All-USA Academic Team, sponsored by the 
newspaper USA Today, PTK and the 
American Association of Community 
Colleges. 




Harold ML 



Candice R. 



7 



CD I 2002-2003 PRESIDENT'S REPORT 



Concert Choir has 
experience of a 
lifetime: Carnegie Hall 



Nearly 60 students of Connie 
Donatelli 's Concert Choir did something in 
late April 2003 that they'll never forget: 
Perform in Carnegie Hall in New York City. 

Comprised of mostly current (2002- 
2003) students and some alumni, the 
Concert Choir finished a three-day residen- 
cy in New York with a performance in 
Carnegie Hall on the afternoon of April 27, 
2003. In Donatelli's words, the trip "was 
amazing." 

"Words can't really express the impact 
of what we experienced, the magnitude of 
it," she said. "I do know that it was a life- 
changing experience for everyone 
involved." 

Donatelli, Cowley's director of vocal 
music, received an invitation to bring her 
choir to New York from Rod Walker, direc- 
tor of the Kansas State University choir. 
Walker served as guest conductor during 
the April 27 performance. 

"What's really exciting is it was con- 
sidered a residency," said Donatelli, who 
has worked at Cowley nine years. "We 
spent two days rehearsing from 8:30 until 
noon. The kids got to see a big-time atmos- 
phere and what that feels like." 

Donatelli was making her first trip to 
the famous venue. Many of Cowley's stu- 
dents had never flown before. It was an 
opportunity of a lifetime. 

Cowley's Concert Choir sang along- 
side KSU's Choir and Chorale, Emporia 
High School's Choir, and the Denton 
(Texas) High School Choir. 

The 280-member choir performed 
"Testament of Freedom," written by 




Randall Thompson. The group will be 
accompanied by the New England 
Symphony. 

Donatelli and her choir's accompanist, 
Steve Butler, actually sang with the large 
choir at Carnegie Hall. Donatelli was a stu- 
dent of Walker's while she earned her mas- 
ter's degree from KSU. 

"The piece was about 30 minutes long, 
and the text are the words of Thomas 
Jefferson," Donatelli said. "It's called A 
Setting of Four Passages from the writings 
of Thomas Jefferson." 

The piece first was performed in 1943. 

"It's a very patriotic work," Donatelli 
said. "It couldn't come at a more perfect 
time. We traveled there during a difficult 
time for our nation. And we traveled to New 



York to perform a work that celebrates 
America. It was very appropriate." 

Cowley's entourage left Arkansas City 
on April 24 and returned April 28. The per- 
formance was 2 p.m. April 27. Following 
the concert, all 280 students were guests 
aboard the "Spirit of America" cruise ship. 
It cruised around the Statue of Liberty and 
New York Harbor and included a meal and 
dancing. 

One of the highlights of the trip, 
Donatelli said, was visiting Ground Zero, 
the large hole in the ground where the 
World Trade Center once stood. 

"We sang down there, and many people 
stopped to listen," Donatelli said. "It was a 
very moving experience." 



Cosmetology students place high at Skills Olympics 



Students in the Cosmetology program 
helped the college take first place in the 
Kansas Skills USA Vocational Industrial 
Clubs of America Cosmetology competi- 
tion April 3-4, 2003, in Wichita. 

Traci Anderson, contestant, and Josie 
Wakefield, model, took first place in 



Cosmetology, and Elizabeth Amezcua, con- 
testant, and Hillary Gardner, model, took 
first place in Nail Care. Ursula Brinkman, 
contestant, and Kacie VanDegrift, model, 
were second in Nail Care. 

Winners in each category advanced to 
the National VICA Skills Olympics in June. 



Amezcua and Gardner finished sixth in the 
nation, while Anderson worked alone at 
nationals and placed 15th. 



8 



STUDENT ACHIEVEMENTS 



Student from 
Newkirk crowned 
Queen Alalah LXXI 

Hope Oestmann grew up on the family 
farm just five miles south of Arkansas City, 
in extreme northern Kay County. 

She participated in 4-H and helped out 
on the farm, but that doesn't mean she's a 
farm girl. 

She was in a dress the night of Oct. 25, 
2002, and was crowned Queen Alalah 
LXXI in front of a packed house inside 
W.S. Scott Auditorium. 

Oestmann, the daughter of Ruth Ann 
and Gerell Oestmann of Newkirk, Okla., 
was an art major. She was a member of the 
Lady Tiger softball team two years, held a 
work-study job in the Financial Aid office, 
and worked part-time at Maurice's in Ponca 
City. 

Her father farms and works for the soil 
conservation service office in Newkirk. Her 
mother is an abstractor for Security Abstract 
in Newkirk. 

Oestmann was at softball practice 
when Cowley Arkalalah Committee Chair 
Shannon O'Toole delivered the customary 
rose and the news that she was a finalist. 

"I was really surprised," Oestmann 
said. "I saw her pull up at practice, but I fig- 
ured someone else got it. This means I have 
to dress up." 

Oestmann is more used to the rough 
and tumble world of fast-pitch softball than 
all of the things expected of Queen Alalah 
candidates. Still, she said the experience 
was fun. 

"I used to come to Arkalalah all the 
time when I was little," she said, "but never 
to the coronation. When I was younger, the 
parade was fun, then I grew into liking the 
carnival. Now, it's the food and all of the 
people." 

Oestmann described herself as laid 
back and easy going. She said she liked 
being around people, but she wasn't into 
public speaking. 

Oestmann was a utility player for the 
Lady Tiger softball team as a freshman. She 
pitched some, was a backup at second base, 
and saw some action as an outfielder. Her 
sophomore season, she played second base. 




Hope Oestmann takes her victory stroll after being crowned Queen Alalah 
LXXI during the Arkalalah Coronation in W.S. Scott Auditorium. 



It was softball that helped Oestmann 
decide to attend Cowley. 

"I had a choice to make between 
Cowley and NOC (Northern Oklahoma 
College)," Oestmann said. "I knew 
Cowley's softball program was better, and I 
was dating a guy from here. And it's closer 
to home. I live a mile into Oklahoma." 

Oestmann also knew several Cowley 
players after playing on a travel team from 
here. 

"I played for Larry Anstine, and he 
always wanted me to come here," she said. 

Oestmann was happy with her choice 
of schools. 

"I've liked it," she said. "It's made me 
feel at home. Last year I was in the dorms, 
but this year I'm living at home. All of the 
people are really friendly and treat you 
well. And I've learned a lot, including how 
to study on my own." 

Oestmann participated in intramurals, 
is into collectibles, particularly Boyd's 
Bears, and likes spending time with family 
and friends. And when she has time, she 
likes to paint. 

"My mom always painted when I was 
little, shirts and saws, and wooden chairs," 
Oestmann said. "I always helped her out on 
that. I always doodle anyway in class. In 
high school, I got into art. I'd like to go into 



interior design, but I like art, too. It's kind 
of a leisure thing. I like to paint in my spare 
time." 

Oestmann has an oil painting of a 
nature scene, but she said she prefers water- 
colors. 

"I like flowers and nature scenes," she 
said. "I'm not into painting people." 

Oestmann said if further study in inte- 
rior design doesn't work out, she'd like to 
study radiology. 

"I'm kind of undecided right now," she 
said. "It's between interior design and 
becoming a radiology technician. I think 
radiology would be a lot of fun because 
you'll see people, and it won't be the same 
job every day. And you're always taking x- 
rays, but different types. And you can 
always move up from technician." 

Oestmann credited her mother as being 
most influential in her life, because "she's 
always worked hard for what she has. She's 
been a positive influence." 

Oestmann said she had become more 
responsible since graduating from Newkirk 
High School. 

"I've grown up a lot," she said. "I work 
two jobs now, and trying to juggle that with 
softball and school work is a load some- 
times." 



FACULTY 



TEACHING 



Business Technology 
instructor receives 
first Stirnaman 
teaching award 

Larry Schwintz, who began teaching 
at Cowley in 1977, became the first recipi- 
ent of the Paul Stirnaman Memorial Award 
for Teaching Excellence. 

Schwintz was presented the award, 
sponsored by the College Education 
Association, by Chris Mayer, Social 
Science Department instructor. The presen- 
tation took place during the first day of fall 
in-service for Cowley employees Aug. 13, 
2002. 

"Having known Paul and his love for 
education, and his love for students, and 
his expectation of excellence and not 
accepting anything but excellence, this is 
kind of a humbling experience," Schwintz 
said of the award. "It gets to you." 

Stirnaman, a long-time Social Science 
Department instructor and strong supporter 
of the CEA, died June 16, 2000, after a 
lengthy illness. 

The CEA presented Schwintz with the 
first award "for outstanding teaching, long 
service, and loyal support of the CEA." 

"I knew the award existed," Schwintz 
said, "but I was unaware that 1 would be 
chosen." 

Schwintz came to Cowley in 1977 to 
teach classes in the agriculture program. 
Prior to that he taught 14 years of high 
school, seven at Prairie View near Fort 
Scott, and seven at Winfield High School. 

In 1992, Schwintz was one of several 
Cowley faculty members who received the 
Master Teacher Award from the National 
Institute for Staff and Organizational 
Development in Austin, Texas. The follow- 
ing year, Schwintz was a Master Presenter 
at the same NISOD conference. 




Larry Schwintz, left, receives the Stirnaman Award from Social 
Science instructor Chris Mayer. 



He also has been named Cowley's 
Master Teacher, received an award from 
the Tiger Booster Club in 2001, and has 
been recognized as a Microsoft Mentor by 
the Microsoft Corporation. He also has 
received a Gold Award from the Vocational 
Association Teacher of Teachers. 

"I now have eight or nine former stu- 
dents who are teachers of agriculture in 
Kansas," Schwintz said. 

Schwintz has been a steady, reliable 
faculty member who has been asked to 
take on several new challenges through the 
years. 

"Introduction to microcomputers was 
my idea for my ag students," he said. 
"Business people liked what I was doing, 
and they said to remove the ag references 
and make them business references. I said 
sure. It evolved from that DOS environ- 
ment to a Windows environment, and from 
an elective course to a required course." 

And in fall 2001, Schwintz joined two 
other Business Tech faculty in teaching the 
CISCO Networking program. Schwintz 
also traveled to Boeing in Wichita for two 



years, training employees on a variety of 
software. 

Schwintz, 62, said he admired 
Stirnaman for the type of instructor he 
was. 

"Paul always said you can't be a pro- 
fessional and not be a member of your pro- 
fessional organization," Schwintz said. 
"The CEA is not a union. It is concerned 
with education." 



10 



FACULTY ACHIEVEMENTS 



Retirement of a 
salesman: Cole plans to 
make his post-work 
years special 



You know what they say about a good 
salesperson: Selling ice to Eskimos would 
be a piece of cake. 

Gene Cole would have them buying it 
like there's no tomorrow. 

Cole, associate dean of business and 
industry at Cowley and a major "salesman" 
for economic development in Cowley and 
Barton counties during his career, retired 
Oct. 31, 2002, after 11 1/2 years at the col- 
lege. 

"I just think the timing is right," said 
Cole, who started working for Cowley in 
July 1991. "I want to enjoy all of Cowley's 
sports and be supportive, because I love 
sports." 

Cole also loves people. It's the relation- 
ships he's cultivated through the years that 
have enhanced his ability to promote and 
sell. One of Cole's first jobs was in sales. 

"I worked for Sheneman's Meat 
Market in route sales and behind the count- 
er," said Cole, a 1955 graduate of Winfield 
High School. "Then one day they told me to 
go down to the kill floor. I saw an animal 
get hit right between the eyes, with tears 
rolling down its face, and I turned around 
and hung up my apron. I wasn't going to do 
that any more." 

That experience also exposed Cole's 
sensitive side, another characteristic that 
has aided him throughout his career. 

Nor did it hurt his personal life. Cole 
married his high school sweetheart, Donella 
French, in 1957. They have four children — 
Denise, Lisa, Diane, and Mike — and eight 
grandchildren. 

In 1962, after jobs with Jarvis Auto in 
Winfield and Jap Hurst Ford in Augusta as 
service manager, parts manager and sales 
manager, Cole and his wife moved to Great 
Bend with their two young daughters. Gene 
worked for three car dealerships before 
quite possibly discovering what he does 
best: Promote. 

From 1967 to 1976, Cole worked for 
the Great Bend Economic Development 




Commission, and had a major hand in 
bringing 1,500 jobs to the community in 
Fuller Brush, Ruskin Manufacturing, 
American Trailer, and the expansion of sev- 
eral existing industries. It was during that 
time when he met Dr. Patrick J. McAtee, 
current Cowley president, who was work- 
ing for Barton County Community College. 

"He (McAtee) was 
an instructor when I first 
met him," Cole said. 

The Coles were 
active in the community 
while raising four young 
children. In 1972, Gene 
received the Young 
American Award from the 
Business and Professional 
Women's Association. A year later, he was 
the recipient of the Distinguished Service 
Award from the Great Bend Jaycees, and 
the Greater Great Bend Award from the 
Golden Belt Kiwanis Club. 

Following his nine-year tenure at the 
commission, Cole partnered with Jim 
McCullough of Manhattan and developed 
Southwind Properties, a 115-acre housing 
development in Great Bend. The venture 
was successful until high interest rates of 
the late 1970s and early 1980s hit. 

"I had an old-timer tell me once that 
you leave when you're winning, not when 
someone tells you to," Cole said. 

Cole soon got out of the housing devel- 
opment business and went to work for Great 
Plains Equipment in Great Bend. He was 



sales manager in charge of the company's 
five stores in Kansas. John Deere was the 
company's primary line of equipment. 

"I covered the whole state," Cole said. 

Murphy Tractor eventually purchased 
Great Plains, and the company wanted Cole 
to move to its Wichita office. He said 
thanks, but no thanks. 

In 1984, he hooked up with McAtee 
and former Barton County President Dr. 
Jimmie Downing, and Cole became 
Barton's director of business and industry. 
Cole seemed to be a natural fit, given his 
relationships in the past. 

After McAtee became president of 
Cowley in July 1987, Cole left Barton five 
months later to become sales manager for a 
company that sold medical sterilizers. Four 
years later, he was reunited with his old 
friend. Dr. Pat McAtee. 

In spring 1991, just before he became 
director of business and industry at Cowley, 
Cole suffered a heart attack. It gave him a 
greater appreciation for life, and since then 
he's tried to live each day to its fullest. 

"I read obituaries of people who were 
55, 60, 65 years old," Cole said. "I want to 
retire and enjoy the years I have left." 



"I had an old-timer tell me 

once that you leave when 
you're winning, not when 

someone telis you to." 



Cole has enjoyed great success during 
his working life. He said the economic 
development job he had in Great Bend, and 
his time at Cowley, rank as most satisfying. 

"We were successful out in Great 
Bend," he said. "When you're winning, it's 
always fun. It was exciting to be able to 
help the community. 

"And I have to say that coming to 
Cowley was one of the best moves I ever 
made. It came at a time when I needed it." 

Cole said he's grateful for the support 
shown by Cowley's Board of Trustees, 
administrators and staff toward his work 
with business and industry. 

"They've been very open to what 
we've needed to do," Cole said. 

(continued on page 12) 



11 



CD I 2002-2003 PRESIDENT'S REPORT 



While at Cowley, Cole: 

• Helped organize the first Tiger Booster 
Club Blitz Drive in 1993, a one-day 
fundraising activity to generate funds 
for athletic scholarships. The drive 
continues today. 

• Helped develop pre-employment train- 
ing during General Electric 's expan- 
sion at Strother Field. 

• Researched and found a location for 
the Southside Education Center in 
Wichita, which has grown from a few 
full-time students to more than 1,100 
today. 

• Helped the college partner with Boeing 
to establish the Manufacturing Skills 
program. Boeing and Cowley have a 
strong partnership today. 

• Worked diligently to pull together sev- 
eral partners to form the Cowley 
College Workforce Development 
Center at Strother Field. The center 
was formally dedicated in September 
2001. 



• Has worked with dozens of area indus- 
tries to develop employee training and 
assist displaced workers. 
Cole said working with McAtee has 
been rewarding. 

"Pat has been awesome," Cole said. 
"He's so open to your ideas; he's a vision- 
ary. He never stood in my way to accom- 
plish anything. Along with being a great 
person to work with, he's been a great 
friend. He always had faith that I could get 
the job done. His support has been the most 
critical part of our relationship." 

In retirement, the 65-year-old Winfield 
native won't sit idle during his time away 
from a "real" job. Cole said he plans to 
spend time with children and grandchildren, 
catch up on his "honey-do" list from the last 
five years, and work part-time on special 
assignments for the college. He also plans 
to continue serving on the board of directors 
of the Cowley County Economic 
Development Agency. 



"I really enjoy supporting CCEDA, and 
I'm proud of the college for stepping up and 
making the commitment to economic 
development of this county," he said. 

Looking back, Cole acknowledges the 
support he's received from his wife. Now, 
he said, it's his turn. 

"She allowed me to do so many differ- 
ent things," he said. "While I was in eco- 
nomic development, she was raising our 
children. 

"My career's been all about building 
relationships and trust. And never compro- 
mise your integrity. No one does things by 
themselves. If you develop contacts and 
trust in people, they are willing to help." 



Instructor, secretary 
retire from Cowley 

Judy Queen and Linda Keasling are 
excited about sleeping in, spending time 
with grandchildren, and doing all of the 
things they want to do when they want to do 
them. 

The two Cowley employees retired at 
the end of May 2003. 

Queen was an instructor in the col- 
lege's Social Science Department, while 
Keasling was secretary in the Industrial 
Technology Department. A retirement 
reception was held May 7, 2003, in the 
Earle N. Wright Community Room and 
Gallery inside the Brown Center. 

Queen, who lives in Ponca City, has 
been a Cowley employee since 1987. She 
has been a full-time Social Science instruc- 
tor since 1996. Her early years at the col- 
lege were spent working with the Single 
Parent/Displaced Homemaker and 
Balancing Work and Family grant pro- 
grams. She was a member of the faculty at 
Northern Oklahoma College in Tonkawa 
when Dr. Carol Hobaugh-Maudlin called 
her about the grants at Cowley. 

Queen seemed to be the perfect choice 

12 




Judy Queen, left, and Linda Keasling 
both will miss Cowley. 

for working with single parents and dis- 
placed homemakers in trying to get them 
back in school and back on their feet. Why? 
Because after staying home to raise her 
three children, Queen went to college for 
the first time. She was 32 years old. She 
went to NOC for three years, then trans- 
ferred to Oklahoma State University and 
earned a bachelor's degree in home eco- 
nomics. She earned a master's degree in 
1986 just prior to coming to Cowley. 



Not until her children were older did 
she realize she could teach. An introvert by 
nature. Queen realized the importance of 
teaching and the relationships she'd build 
throughout the years. 

"I was a first-generation higher educa- 
tion graduate, so it took me a while to real- 
ize I could do it," she said. "I had a high 
school teacher tell me that I ought to 
become a teacher, but that was the furthest 
thing from my mind." 

When she first arrived at Cowley, 
Queen spent three-fourths of her time work- 
ing for the grant programs. The remainder 
of her time was spent teaching one or two 
classes in the Social Science Department. 

As a full-time instructor, Queen taught 
developmental psychology, nutrition, edu- 
cation in American society, sociology, and 
the different child care classes the college 
offers. It was a diverse schedule, and one 
that Queen enjoyed. 

"I have enjoyed the students, and they 
are the ones I'll miss most," Queen said. 
"You always have a few you get extra close 
to. They almost become your own kids. In 
the single parent program, we went through 
so much together." 

(continued on page 13) 



FACULTY ACHIEVEMENTS 



Queen is a two-time survivor of breast 
cancer, and some day hopes to do volunteer 
work in a support role. 

"Someone who's been there can tell 
someone going through it exactly what 
they're going to feel," said Queen, who has 
been cancer- free since early 1986. "It's an 
emotional train ride you're on. If the person 
you're talking to has been there, it's a lot 
easier to deal with." 

On March 4, 1998, Queen was dealt 
another personal blow. Her husband of 
more than 38 years lost his battle with colon 
cancer. 

"I was going to quit (Cowley) and take 
care of him when he got sick," Queen said. 
"But he (Jerry) wouldn't hear of it. Cowley 
was, in many respects, my salvation 
through all of that. Everybody was so 
good." 

Jerry Queen was a Southern Baptist 
minister. 

In May 1994, Judy presented a session 
at the National Institute for Staff and 
Organizational Development in Austin, 
Texas. A year later, she received the Region 
VII Exemplary Program Award for a maga- 
zine story in which she shared her teaching 
tips in the classroom. The article appeared 
in the Association for Career and Technical 
Education magazine titled "Techniques." 

In retirement. Queen plans to spend 
time with her six grandchildren, do some 
traveling and, just like her home economics 



background, get back into sewing and oil 
painting. She may even come back and take 
some painting lessons from Cowley art 
instructor Mark Flickinger. 

"I'm going to enjoy not having to get 
up early, and no grading papers on week- 
ends," Queen said. 

Keasling, IT Department secretary 
since 1996, wasn't even looking for a job 
when she was hired. She had been scouring 
the want ads for her sister-in-law. IT facul- 
ty have been thrilled she took the job. 

"We're really going to miss you," 
department chair Bruce Crouse told 
Keasling during the reception. "You have 
come up with so many ideas that turned into 
successes. I'm not sure what we're going to 
do." 

Keasling knew a lot about Cowley 
prior to 1996. As an employee of the 
Winfield State Hospital & Training Center, 
one of Keasling's jobs was secretary of the 
hospital's nursing education and staff devel- 
opment areas. That's when she worked with 
college officials such as Tony Buffo, Walt 
Mathiasmeier, and Conrad Jimison. 
Keasling helped set up courses hospital 
employees could take at Cowley. 

Keasling started work at WSH&TC on 
Dec. 1, 1965. It was the first job she ever 
had. Prior to 1965, Keasling was a stay-at- 
home mother of two. 

"I went to work to put my kids through 
college, and I did just that," she said. 



Keasling grew up at Dexter, but gradu- 
ated high school in Winfield. On Aug. 2, 
1954, she married Marvin Keasling. Marvin 
retired three years ago from the Cowley 
County Road Crew. 

The Keaslings collect antique tractors 
and have been members of the Kansas and 
Oklahoma Steam and Gas Engine 
Association for many years. Linda served 
as the organization's secretary for 15 years, 
and she's getting ready to volunteer her 
time once again. 

She volunteered to organize Good Ole 
Days, an event for youth sponsored by the 
association. The event is scheduled for 
October. 

"I don't want to be real, real busy," 
Keasling said of her retirement. "I like to 
garden and work with my flowers. And I 
like to go camping." 

Keasling said her mother always want- 
ed her to become a teacher. 

"I always wanted to be a secretary," she 
said. "I had no desire to change vocations." 

Keasling said she's enjoyed the past 
seven years at Cowley. 

"I'm going to miss these guys down 
here (in the IT Department)," she said. 
"And some of the students you get real 
attached to. Many have come back to see 
me. What's been good about these guys is 
that they give you credit for what you do. I 
don't know what I'll do come August. " 



Three Instructors receive Excellence Awards at NIS( 



Leslie Berryhill, Denise Beach and Libby Smith, full-time faculty members, received the ""'•#' 

Excellence Award from the National Institute for Staff and Organizational Development in rfc^^^T^l!|IiP^1|,| 
Austin, Texas, May 25-28, 2003. NISOD is one of the largest community college confer- M^^^^^0^^^ 
ences in the world and attracts more than 2,000 participants each year. Since 1987, Cowley \? : 'f^*- -^ b:l!i> 'I .$?§*''* " 
has seen 55 faculty and staff members receive the NISOD Excellence Award. 




It- 



Leslie Berryhill, left, Denise Beach, 
middle, and Libby Smith 



13 



CD I 2002-2003 PRESIDENT'S REPORT 



Cowley's MICT program 
receives national 
accreditation 

Cowley's Mobile Intensive Care 
Technician program received official 
accreditation by the Committee on 
Accreditation of Educational Programs for 
the EMS Programs during the 2003 spring 
semester. 

Slade Griffiths, director of EMS educa- 
tion, said he's known for years that his pro- 
gram was solid. The accreditation validates 
that fact. 

"It's extra validation if someone comes 
in and checks your program," Griffiths said. 
"It was a lot of work, but it's worth it." 
Cowley's program is housed in the Winfield 
Center at 1406 E. Eighth St., Stevenson 
Hall in Baden Square. 

Griffiths, who started Cowley's pro- 
gram seven years ago, said the program has 
two goals. The first is to produce compe- 
tent, entry-level MICTs to serve in career 
and volunteer positions in the United States. 
The second goal is to possess adequate 



resources to provide effective EMS educa- 
tion by implementing and utilizing appro- 
priate practices while meeting the needs of 
the communities of interest. 

Cowley's program, long recognized as 
one of the best of its kind in the region, is 
one of only four accredited programs in the 
state. 

"We started the process a couple of 
years ago," Griffiths said. "The site visit 
was last summer." 

A two-person team, one from Texas 
and one from Ohio, spent two days with 
Griffiths and Lead MICT Instructor Cindy 
Branscum, going through the program with 
a fine-tooth comb. Griffiths received offi- 
cial notification on April 10. 

The accreditation is for three years ini- 
tially. If the program passes an evaluation at 
that time, accreditation would be for five 
years. 

Dr. Pat McAfee, Cowley president, 
praised Griffiths for his work in getting the 
program started and for what the program is 
doing today. 

"One of the best things that ever hap- 
pened to us was getting Slade Griffiths to 



come here," McAtee said. "His program is 
without question first class. His graduates 
are qualified. Getting the program was one 
of the best things we've ever done for this 
county." 

Virgil Watson Jr., a former member of 
Cowley's Board of Trustees, echoed 
McAtee. 

"Cowley is known for having one of 
the best EMT and MICT programs in 
Kansas, if not the nation," Watson said. 

New classes begin each January. 
Griffiths described the three phases of 
MICT education. 

"There's the didactic session, which 
includes the classroom, laboratory, some 
hospital clinical work, and EMS ride-along; 
there's the hospital clinical session, which 
is 40 hours per week by itself, on top of 
class work; and there's the field internship, 
where students intern with an MICT for 36 
to 52 hours per week on top of class," 
Griffiths said. 

Graduates from Griffiths' program who 
take the national registry exam have a 100- 
percent pass rate at the MICT level. 



Russian education 
delegation visits 
college in March 

A delegation of top Russian regional 
and municipal education officials spent 
about half the day March 11, 2003, at 
Cowley as part of the U.S. Congress-spon- 
sored Open World Program. 

The Russian group was hosted by the 
Rotary Club of Winfield. 

After a campus tour in the morning, the 
Russians sat down to lunch with several 
Cowley administrators. Following lunch, 
the group toured the college's Industrial 
Technology Department. 

The group exchanged information 
about higher education in America and in 
Russia through interpreters, one of whom 
lives in Wichita. 

Managed by the Center for Russian 
Leadership Development, an independent 
agency located in the Library of Congress, 
Open World enables emerging Russian 
leaders to work with their U.S. counterparts 
and experience how American democratic 

14 



and economical institutions operate at the 
local level. Open World is the only 
exchange program housed in the U.S. leg- 
islative branch. 

The five-person Russian team that vis- 
ited south-central Kansas was comprised of 
the deputy head of the education depart- 
ment of the Jewish Autonomous Region (in 
the Russian Far east, bordering China); the 
head of the department of education for the 
city of Samara (in southern European 
Russia); the deputy head of the education 
department for the city of Penza (in south- 
central European Russia); and the head of 
the office of education for a district in the 
Moscow Region. Russia's ongoing educa- 
tion reforms in such areas as curriculum 
development and teacher training made the 
group's Kansas visit especially timely. 

The Center for Russian Leadership 
Development awarded a 2002 grant to 
Rotary International to administer this and 
similar exchanges in 2002 and 2003. Rotary 
has played a major role in hosting Open 
World participants since the program began 
in 1999. 

Open World aims to build mutual 
understanding between the United States 




and the Russian Federation and to work 
with Russia's leaders as they implement 
democratic and economic reforms. 
Librarian of Congress and Russia scholar 
James H. Billington, whose vision of bring- 
ing young Russian leaders to the United 
States inspired Congress to create Open 
World, chairs the board of trustees that gov- 
erns the program. 

More than 6,000 Open World visitors 
from all 89 Russian regions have been host- 
ed in all 50 states since the program began 
in 1999. Delegates are drawn from a wide 
range of political parties and ethnic groups, 
and in 2002, more than 50 percent were 
women. Through the program, Russia's 
emerging leaders experience American- 
style democracy in action as well as 
American community and cultural life. 



FACILITIES 



HONORING 



College names, 
dedicates three main- 
campus facilities 

Three men who helped shape the lives 
of hundreds of students as well as the col- 
lege in general were honored May 1, 2003, 
by having facilities on the main campus 
named in their honor. 

Ben Cleveland, A.F. "Tony" Buffo and 
Oscar Kimmell were honored during a ded- 
ication ceremony and reception held just 
outside the Patrick J. McAtee Dining 
Center. 

Cleveland's widow, Irene, accepted the 
honor of having the Ben Cleveland 
Wellness Center named for her late hus- 
band. Buffo and his family were on hand to 
accept his plaque, and the A.F. 'Tony" 
Buffo Plaza was named for him. And 
Kimmell and his family were present as the 
college named its newest residence hall the 
Oscar Kimmell Dormitory. 

Following is a closer look at the three 
men. 

Ben Cleveland 

Ben Cleveland's work ethic and per- 
sonal values helped shape the lives of 
everyone who knew him. His impact on stu- 
dents, players and co-workers at the college 
is immeasurable. 

"Ben would be very proud that the col- 
lege would recognize him with such an 
honor," Irene said. "He would be humble 
and in a way embarrassed. He never tooted 
his own horn, and when others praised him, 
he would be embarrassed, yet down inside 
so very, very proud that others thought so 
highly of him. I think he would feel much 
like when I surprised him with a football 
reunion." 

Cleveland's 34-year career at Cowley 
ended on July 30, 1994, with a surprise 




A crowd gathers at the newly named A.F. 'Tony 7 ' Buffo Plaza for the dedica- 
tions of the Ben Cleveland Wellness Center and the Oscar Kimmell Dormitory. 



retirement party and football reunion all in 
one. 

Cleveland coached Cowley's football 
team from 1960 to 1977. His teams won 79 
games during that span, and two of his 
teams, the 1962 and 1972 squads, were 
ranked in the top 15 in the nation. 

Several former players shared their 
thoughts on Cleveland. 

"What I remember most about Ben was 
his calm and honest approach in dealing 
with his athletes," said Ray D. Harding, 
quarterback on the 1969 team. "The number 
of interceptions I threw should have turned 
him prematurely gray in 1969." 

Bill Hackathorn, quarterback on the 
1971 team, said, "Good guys don't always 
come in last. Gentlemen can be winners, 
and it's much more fun." 

Ed Hargrove, Cowley's head softball 
coach, played offensive right tackle for 
Cleveland in 1965 and 1966. 

"Other than my dad, Ben was probably 
the most honest and sincere man I have ever 
known," Hargrove said. 

(continued on page 16) 

15 




Ben Cleveland 



retirement party in his honor. Irene, along 
with Ben's best friends and a few former 
players, pulled off the ultimate surprise 



CD I 2002-2003 PRESIDENT'S REPORT 



Football wasn't the only sport 
Cleveland coached at Cowley. He was head 
baseball coach from 1968 to 1983, head 
track coach from 1960 to 1967, head tennis 
coach in the 1960s, and assistant basketball 
coach from 1960 to 1975. 

Cleveland received many honors dur- 
ing his career, but one of the biggest came 
six years after he retired. He was one of the 
original 10 members inducted into the Tiger 
Athletic Hall of Fame on Feb. 26, 2000. 

Cleveland was chosen as Teacher of the 
Year at Cowley for the 1986-87 academic 
year, and also received a recognition plaque 
for long-time commitment to student ath- 
letes at Cowley. His community involve- 
ment was extensive. He was a member of 
Lions Club International for 40 years, was a 
member of the Arkansas City Residential 
Rehabilitation Council, the Arkansas City 
Camp Fire Board, the First United 
Methodist Church, and the International 
Gideon's Cowley Camp. 

When Cleveland died on Jan. 15, 2002, 
at age 69, Cowley and the Arkansas City 
community lost a great friend. "Benny," as 
he was known, had a storied career in edu- 
cation, first at the high school level, then at 
Cowley. The Oklahoma native and his wife 
moved to Arkansas City in 1954. After six 
years of teaching and coaching at Arkansas 
City High School, Cleveland worked for 
Cowley. 

Hargrove, who also was an assistant 
football coach with Cleveland from 1973- 
75, remembers Cleveland's attention to 
detail. 

"We would do something in practice, 
and if he wasn't totally satisfied with it, 
we'd stay for hours," Hargrove said. 
"Benny always said, if it was worth doing, 
it was worth doing right." 

In all the years Hargrove played and 
worked with Cleveland, he never heard a 
bad word out of his mouth. 

"Sometimes, guys conspired to make 
Benny cuss, and he never would," Hargrove 
said. "In the two years I played and three 
years I coached with him, I never heard him 
cuss. He was calm, cool, and collected in 
bad times." 

Ben's family also is very proud of their 
father and grandfather. They said Ben was a 
very loyal person who dedicated his life to 
serving the college. "He loved Ark City and 
the college very much," they said. 

16 



Irene remembers the long hours Ben 
used to put in to prepare for another football 
season. Following an eight-hour day, Ben 
would head to the practice field to make 
sure it was in top shape. Sometimes, Ben 
wouldn't get home until two or three in the 
morning. 

"He would always say, T just have to 
finish this and then I'll be home,' " the fam- 
ily recalled. About an hour later, he would 
be home. 

Cleveland was born Jan. 16, 1932 in 
Dewey, Okla. After graduating high school, 
he played football four years at 
Northeastern Oklahoma State University in 
Tahlequah. He also played for the Bob May 
Builders semi-professional baseball team. 
On May 6, 1951, he married Irene M. 
Webber in Dewey, and the couple lived in 
Tahlequah until Ben graduated. 

After graduation, the Clevelands 
moved to Arkansas City. At Cowley, known 
then as Arkansas City Junior College, 
Cleveland's carpentry classes built more 
than 30 homes in Arkansas City. 

"Whatever it be, coaching, teaching or 
as an administrator, whatever it took to get 
the job done and get it done right, he would 
do," the family wrote in a prepared state- 
ment. "Most of what Ben did went unno- 
ticed, but today this is a just reward for his 
deep love and dedication to Cowley. 

"He always taught that a person should 
concern themselves with three areas of life. 
First, spiritual wellness; second, mental 
wellness; and third, physical wellness. 
Thus, today it is fitting that the college 
chose the wellness center to be named after 
him. We cannot find words to thank you for 
this honor." 



A.F. "Tony" Buffo 

Tony Buffo was passionate about 
teaching. Ask any of his former students, 
and they'd probably tell you that he instilled 
in them a foundation for a strong work 
ethic, respect for their fellow student, and 
the desire to do what's right. 

Buffo prepared students for real-life 
experiences, real jobs that paid real money. 
And many of his former students never have 
forgotten the impact Buffo had on their lives. 

Buffo was a long-time teacher for 
Unified School District No. 470 in 
Arkansas City, and later an administrator 




A.F. "Tony" Buffo 

for Cowley. Buffo, 80, said the honor made 
him proud. 

"It makes me feel great for someone to 
recognize the things that went on," he said. 
"My best remembrance is not of a single 
happening, but something that was accom- 
plished for the students and staff of the col- 
lege." 

It was in the mid-1960s, and Buffo 
already had worked nearly 20 years for 
USD 470 as a junior high (middle school) 
and high school teacher and as director of 
industrial-vocational education. The college 
was going through some major changes at 
that time, and Buffo soon found himself in 
the middle of them. 

On Nov. 9, 1965, Cowley County vot- 
ers passed, by a 1,520-vote margin, a meas- 
ure that would create a complete, independ- 
ent community college district that encom- 
passed the entire area of Cowley County. 
Thus, began Cowley County Community 
College and Vocational-Technical School, 
in compliance with the acts passed in 1963 
and 1965. 

However, the USD 470 Board of 
Education still acted in a dual capacity by 
also serving as trustees of the college. 
Complete fiscal and administrative inde- 
pendence did not become effective until 
July 1, 1967, when a separate Board of 
Trustees, elected by the citizens of Cowley 
County, assumed full control. 

(continued on page 17) 



FACILITIES DEDICATION 



"A lot of blood, sweat and tears went 
into that," Buffo said. 

In 1966, the college hired Buffo to 
become dean of vocational-technical educa- 
tion and director of the area vocational- 
technical school, a position he held until 
1970. From 1970 to 1973, Buffo served as 
dean of general education and occupational 
education. And from 1973 until his retire- 
ment in 1985, Buffo served as dean of 
instruction. 

Buffo had considerable expertise in 
vocational education. In fact, he was 
brought to Washington, D.C., by then- 
President Lyndon Johnson as a consultant to 
a presidential commission charged with 
studying and recommending changes to the 
advisory committee responsible for devel- 
oping the new Vocational Education Act of 
1968. He was one of only eight vocational 
education directors from across the U.S. 
selected for this duty in June 1967. 

"That was an interesting experience to 
have," Buffo said. 

Buffo traveled the nation getting all of 
the information he could about vocational 
education. 

"Another thing I remember is the con- 
tacts I made and the people I came to know 
on a statewide and nationwide basis," Buffo 
said. 

Vocational education always was in 
Buffo's blood. After he earned bachelor's 
and master's degrees from what is now 
Pittsburg State University, Buffo was hired 
in 1947 to teach in USD 470. He served 
many years as the printing instructor at the 
high school and college. 

He said teaching was a joy. 

"Most of the students we had turned 
out to be terrific people," Buffo said. "Time 
after time I'd receive letters from students, 
or they'd stop in to see me. So many of 
them went on to become printers." 

The print shop was located in the base- 
ment of the old junior high school that sat 
on the northeast corner of Third Street and 
Washington Avenue. 

Fred Menefee, a 1950 graduate of 
ACHS and 1952 graduate of the college, 
holds Buffo in highest regard. 

"I can name 50 outstanding professors 
and teachers that I had, and Tony is right up 
there among the very top," said Menefee, 
who is retired and living in Wichita. "He's 
that type of person. What I learned from 



that man helped me in my writing career. I 
eventually did a lot of industrial type 
movies and film work. All of that writing I 
learned I have used time and time again in 
everything else I have ever done." 

Menefee was in his second year of the 
printing sequence at ACHS when Buffo 
began teaching in the district. Menefee said 
Buffo's influence on students was leg- 
endary. 

"He brought attitudes to the classroom 
that very few teachers ever even envision," 
Menefee said. "He even got the guys who 
sat on the back row involved. I think it start- 
ed out with laying the challenges to us and 
seeing if we could handle it. He set some 
pretty high goals." 

Menefee, who went on to earn a degree 
from Wichita State University, worked for 
McCormick-Armstrong in Wichita for 30 
years. 

"I think he influenced every kid he ever 
taught," Menefee said. "Several of his stu- 
dents went on to become teachers." 

Buffo had such an influence on 
Menefee that the former student dedicated a 
restored intertype press to Buffo. The press, 
which was the last generation of linotype 
presses, sits in the Peabody Printing 
Museum in Peabody. The museum is a col- 
lection of hot type equipment dating from 
1870 to 1920. The intertype was dedicated 
in Buffo's honor about four years ago. 

"We had an inscription made and put it 
on the front of the machine where the oper- 
ator would be sitting," Menefee said. 

While Menefee spoke highly of his for- 
mer mentor, Buffo also praised his former 
students. 

"The caliber of students we had was 
terrific," Buffo said. "It was hard to dupli- 
cate." 

Buffo said his role as dean of instruc- 
tion at Cowley "gave me a chance to widen 
my horizons and work with people in the 
general education field and students in tech- 
nical areas." 

Buffo and his wife, Wilda, have been 
married 43 years. They met at USD 470. 
Tony already was an instructor when Wilda 
was hired in 1953. She taught third- and 
fourth-graders from 1953 to 1960. Shortly 
afterward, it was time to start a family. The 
Buffos have two children, Paula and Bob. 
Paula is a registered nurse and a certified 
emergency room technician in Bartlesville, 



Okla. Bob is an operations manager at 
Boeing. The Buffos have four grandchil- 
dren. 

Buffo, a U.S. Navy veteran, was com- 
munity service minded. Among his volun- 
teer activities were terms on the Arkansas 
City Chamber of Commerce Board of 
Directors, as a counselor for the Boy Scouts 
of America, as president of the Arkansas 
City Rotary Club, and on its board of direc- 
tors. He also did consulting work for the 
Kansas State Association of Commerce and 
Industry, was on the American Legion 
Boys' State Committee, and received the 
Community Leaders of America Award in 
1974. 

Wilda said her husband lived and 
breathed Cowley. 

"The college was always his business, 
his life," Wilda said. "He took care of things 
at the college as if they belonged to him." 

After Buffo retired from Cowley in 
1985, he and Wilda traveled extensively. 
That included a return trip to Italy and other 
European countries. Tony's parents were 
from northern Italy. 

Tony said Cowley always would be 
near and dear to his family. 

"It's the best bargain in the country," he 
said, "both in terms of courses offered as 
well as the savings in tuition. 

"This is a terrific honor that was nei- 
ther sought nor expected." 

Oscar Kimmell 

Oscar Kimmell would just as soon live 
the rest of his life in complete anonymity. 

He'll continue to be the kind, thought- 
ful, loving, giving person he's been for 86 
years. There's no question about that. 

It's KimmeH's modest nature that 
rarely allows him to be in the spotlight. 
He's so modest that he even declined a 
nomination for a community award spon- 
sored by a local bank. 

"That would have been too much pub- 
licity," Kimmell said. 

He's received numerous awards 
throughout the years, and the one Cowley 
presented is special. 

"It's unbelievable, just unbelievable," 
Kimmell said. "I didn't think anything like 
this would ever happen. There are other 
people who deserve it more than I do." 

(continued on page 18) 



17 



CD I 2002-2003 PRESIDENT'S REPORT 



Kimmell's service to Arkansas City is 
legendary. He was made a lifetime member 
of The Salvation Army Advisory Board on 
June 15, 1992. He received the Harry Long 
Award for service in 1980. He co-founded 
the Ark City Chamber of Commerce 
Ambassadors, a group of retired business- 
men; and has served on the boards of The 
Salvation Army and American Red Cross. 




Oscar Kimmell 

Kimmell also received the Silver 
Beaver award for Scouting, the highest 
award for service to boyhood given to vol- 
unteer scouters. And on June 5, 1990, 
Kimmell was one of 150 Kansans who 
received a Governor and First Lady 
Volunteer Award created by then-Gov. Mike 
Hayden. 

His service to the college also is 
impressive. He served one four-year term 
on the college's Board of Trustees from 
1979 until 1983, and served on the College 
Endowment Association from 1979 until 
2002. A staunch supporter of the college, 
Kimmell can be seen at nearly all home ath- 
letic contests, regardless of the sport. When 
he was younger, he and former Cowley 
president, the late Dr. Gwen Nelson, would 
attend most of Cowley's road basketball 
games. 



To meet the man, you'd never know 
about all of the contributions he has made. 

"(Service) is really an important part of 
your life," Kimmell said. "And people who 
don't do it are missing so much." 

Kimmell was born and reared on a 
farm west of Ark City. One day he graduat- 
ed from Arkansas City High School in 
1936, and the next day he went to work for 
his uncle, Roy Neer, at Osage Gas & 
Electric Company. His beginning wage was 
75 cents a day. 

Roy and Ralph Neer had started the 
company in 1934. In 1940, Roy purchased 
Ralph's interest in the business, and in 
1941, Kimmell bought one-fourth interest 
in the company. In 1942, he purchased 
another quarter interest and owned 50 per- 
cent of the company. 

Osage Electric sold the first automatic 
washer in Ark City, a Bendix, as well as the 
first window and commercial air condition- 
ers. Electrical wiring and appliance repair 
comprised much of the company's business. 
Later, the company purchased a neon plant 
from a man in Blackwell, Okla. A butane 
business also was added, and in 1950, after 
Roy Neer's passing, Kimmell sold his inter- 
est to Roy's widow, Ollie, and her daughter, 
Betty Patterson. 

It was during that same year that 
Kimmell was hired to open and manage a 
new Sears store in Arkansas City. He retired 
in 1980 after 30 years of service. 

Kimmell retired at age 62 and has 
never regretted it for a minute. A large por- 
tion of his service to Arkansas City has 
occurred since 1980. 

"The year I retired it was hot," 
Kimmell said. "And being connected with 
The Salvation Army, I knew there were a 
number of elderly people who didn't have 
fans. So I ran an ad in The Traveler." 

The ad requested fans people were 
willing to donate. Kimmell would repair the 
fans and give them to The Salvation Army, 
which in turn distributed them to needy 
people. 

"My backyard was full of fans," 
Kimmell said of his house at 909 N. 
Seventh St., his home for the past 59 years. 
"I'd work until midnight getting those fans 
out." 



If Kimmell had one thing to do over in 
his life, he would go to college. 

"I always regretted that I didn't go to 
college," he said. "I had a heckuva time get- 
ting through high school because of 
finances." 

Kimmell said his uncle was one of the 
most influential people in his life. 

"He was always talking to me about 
staying in school and working," Kimmell 
said. "And Harry Gibson, the chamber of 
commerce manager who worked for me, 
was a very good man." 

Through the years, Kimmell also has 
been committed to his church. He has been 
a member of Central Christian Church for 
more than 50 years and has served as dea- 
con and youth sponsor. 

He is dedicated to the Boy Scouts, 
serving as the Assistant District 
Commissioner, and was presented the 
Distinguished Service Award, the 
Arrowhead Award, and the Silver Beaver. 
Kimmell also has served on the board of the 
Northwest Community Center and AC 
Industries. 

And last, but certainly not least, 
Kimmell has been committed to his family. 
He was first married in 1939, but only a 
year later, his wife Ramona died. In 1941, 
Kimmell remarried, and it was a union that 
lasted 54 years. His wife Mary died in 1995. 
He has a son Tom, two grandchildren, and 
one great grand-child. 

"Going on our family vacations was 
the highlight of our time," Kimmell said. 
"One year I borrowed money so we could 
go. Family time was very important." 

And so is the college and the commu- 
nity. 

"Having the dorm named after me 
means so much," Kimmell said. "It's hard 
to put into words. It shows that the college 
has appreciated what little I have done. It 
should serve the students real well. I'd 
rather have my name on a dorm than any- 
thing else. The students are what's impor- 
tant." 



18 



OUTSTANDING ALUMNI 



'71 graduate named 
2003 Outstanding 
Tiger Alumnus 



She's a writer, an editor, a storyteller, a 
speaker, and recently became a grandmoth- 
er for the first time. 

Now, Carol McAdoo Rehme can put 
another credential beside her name. 

Cowley honored the 1971 graduate 
with its 2003 Outstanding Tiger Alumnus 
Award, presented during the college's 80th 
commencement exercises May 10, 2003, in 
W.S. Scott Auditorium. 

"This is such a thrill and a surprise," 
said Rehme, who lives in Loveland, Colo., 
with her husband Norman. "When I 
received the call, first of all I was humbled. 
But thrill came real quick on its heels." 

Carol, an Arkansas City native, writes 
prolifically for the inspirational market. She 
has six stories in the highly competitive 
Chicken Soup for the Soul books, and 
recently took on the responsibility of man- 
aging editor for Chicken Soup for the 
Bride's Soul. 

"It's really a fun and uplifting book to 
do," Carol said. 

As managing editor of the book, a job 
she took in fall 2002, Carol helps screen the 
thousands of stories that are submitted. As 
the stories are selected for the book, Carol 
rewrites and edits. 

"It's a challenge because you want to 
keep the integrity of the writer," she said. 
"It's a thrill because people are writing from 
their inner heart." 

The book, targeted for release in 2004, 
will contain 101 stories, just like all of the 
Chicken Soup books. 

Carol has had a hand in several 
Chicken Soup books. She has sold 100 sto- 
ries for anthologies, and recently was desig- 
nated as one of Chicken Soup for the Soul's 
most prolific authors. She's in a dozen of 
their books, sometimes with several stories 
in the same book. In fall 2002, Carol was 
honored by Chicken Soup for the Soul co- 
founders Jack Canfield and Mark Victor 
Hanson by having her name appear on the 
cover of Chicken Soup for the Christian 
Woman's Soul. 

"My stories are all non-fiction," she 
said. "And they're not necessarily about my 
personal life. I often will research some- 




Carol McAdoo Rehme is surrounded by the many books of which she has 
contributed stories. 



thing and write about it. I also collect stories 
from other people." 

She is the primary contributor to two 
hardbound gift collections, "An Angel By 
Your Side" and "Whispers from Heaven for 
the Christmas Spirit." Other stories were 
published in "Tea-Time Stories for 
Mothers" and "Heart-Stirring Stories of 
Love." Still more will appear in several of 
the upcoming "God Allows U-Turns" vol- 
umes. In the magazine market, Carol has 
free-lanced for both adult and children's 
publications. 

While writing takes up what little free 
time Carol has, her primary activity 
involves directing and developing program- 
ming through Vintage Voices, Inc., a non- 
profit organization she founded. Carol has 
been busy writing grants and performing 
programs in 13 elder care facilities each 
month in northern Colorado. She performs 
for adult daycare centers, assisted living, 
and long-term nursing care facilities. She 
received the No. 1 grant from the Colorado 
Council on the Arts for 2003 to continue 
working with those facilities. 

"That was humbling," Carol said of 
receiving the grant. "But it feels like they're 
recognizing not only a need, but the art 
forms that go into it. It endorses and vali- 
dates it. 



"I perform a lot of what I write and 
publish. I take in interdisciplinary programs 
that are thematic and incorporate music, 
story, reminisce, creative movement, and 
tactile stimulants and try to offer a quality 
program to one of the under- served seg- 
ments of communities. It's one of my 
favorite things to do." 

Carol's performances are funded by the 
grants she writes. 

"I have a real passion for this," she 
said. "I wanted to find something to do with 
my life that I was as passionate about as 
raising children, and I've achieved that." 

And now she's a grandmother. 

"I'm way too young for this," she said. 
"This is probably the most exciting title I've 
ever earned." 

Carol grew up in Arkansas City and 
was a writer almost from the beginning. At 
age 8, she was the scribe for her Bluebird 
Troop and had stories printed in the paper. 
"I loved seeing my name in print," she said. 
And her ninth-grade English teacher, 
Geneva Maag, wrote on the top of a book 
report on Uncle Tom's Cabin, "You are a 
writer." 

After editing student newspapers at 
Arkansas City High School, Cowley, and 
then Wichita State University, where she 

(continued on page 20) 

19 



CD I 2002-2003 PRESIDENT'S REPORT 



earned a bachelor's degree majoring in 
journalism and minoring in speech and 
sociology, Carol went a different direction 
with her writing. But not until after she 
spent the next 25 years of her life raising 
four children. 

"I thought writing translated to journal- 
ism," she said. "Truly, I much prefer this 
creative non-fiction, where I found my 
niche. You can get very literary. There's 
more room for metaphor and imagery and 
those sorts of things. I've evolved with 
this." 

Carol immerses herself in anything she 
attempts. That was evident when she fin- 
ished her course work at Cowley in three 
semesters, in December 1970, and then 
WSU in 1972. She gave up full and half 
scholarships to two other schools to 
attend Cowley. Her time at Cowley 
left a lasting impression. 

"When I went over to register, 
Mary Margaret Williams hired me 
on the spot to work in the regis- (11 
trar's office," Carol said. "Working 
with her was just a delight. My two biggest 
cheerleaders were (then college president) 
Gwen Nelson and dean (W.S.) Scott. Those 
three probably influenced me the most as 
far as educators there." 

Carol also remembers taking organ les- 
sons from Fostine Moncrief. 

"I use music a lot in my programs," she 
said. "I remember her emphasizing to me 
that if you make a mistake, you just keep 
going. As a performer and a writer, you just 
keep going, keep trying." 

And in speech teacher J. P. De well's 
class, Carol learned another valuable piece 
of information. 

"For the first time, I recognized that 
storytelling could be an art form," she said. 
"I learned that from him, and that gave me 
confidence to perform." 

And Cowley journalism instructor Tom 
Newton, whom the students called "Fig," 
"taught me what good writing is, and that it 
can really stoke the fire of feeling. With that 
combination of writing and storytelling, 
there's nothing else quite like it. It's the 
heart of the human experience." 

Carol never has forgotten where she 
came from. 

"Our beginnings are what make us who 
we are," she said. "I have my entire life, 
from as long as I can remember, been 



encouraged to write, reach out and achieve. 
Every teacher and faculty member and 
administrator at Cowley encouraged me to 
do that." 

After graduating from WSU, Carol 
came back to Arkansas City to work for 
Gilliland Publishing. She and Norman, 
whom she'd met at WSU, were married a 
year later. Norman was a 
photographer/reporter for KAKE-TV in 
Wichita. 

Carol's journalism career began with 
Penny Power. She later worked for a brand- 
new weekly started by KAKE called The 
Wichita Sun. It folded after two years, and 
it was time for Carol to become a mother. 

"I had four children in six years," Carol 
said of Kyle, Katrina, Kayla, and Koy. "I 



storytelling could be 
art form." 



always wanted to grow up and be a stay-at- 
home mother, and I got to do it. I was one 
of the fortunate few who got to do that." 

In 1977, Norman took a job with the 
ABC affiliate in Denver, and the family 
moved to Loveland. About 15 years ago, 
Carol started looking into the future, realiz- 
ing that her four children would leave the 
nest at about the same rate they entered: 
quickly. 

"I started free-lance writing," she said. 
"I'd done journalism-type work all those 
years. Public relations work for the church, 
newsletters for the school. So I decided to 
toy around with submitting my work." 

She wrote children's stories for maga- 
zines, an occasional item for the local news- 
paper, and entered poetry contests. 

"When I got a rejection, I assumed they 
didn't know what a hot commodity they had 
in their hands," Carol said with a laugh. 
"So, I'd send the story to someone else. I 
got published because I was so persistent." 

Today, Carol has more than enough 
work to keep her busy. As if she needed 
more to do, she recently signed a contract to 
write advertorials for a major pharmaceuti- 
cal company. 

"That's exciting," she said. "I've done 
that one other time. It stretches me in a dif- 
ferent direction. I'm thrilled to keep doing 



more of what I'm doing. My passion is still 
working with the elder care and doing the 
stories. I glean so much of my writing mate- 
rials from programs and vintage people. It's 
a phenomenal experience to spend that 
much time with them. 

"People have to remember that they 
have so much to offer. That's probably the 
most immediate and exciting thing I'm 
working on." 

But, there's more. 

"Norman and I are partnering on a 
book," Carol said. "We're getting closer. 
We're looking for a publisher. He's 
(Norman) a master photographer. I have 13 
years of journaling, quotes and vignettes 
and stories from my experiences with the 
elderly. We think it's going to work into a 
powerful book. And it's fun to work 
together." 

And still another project Carol 
is working on is writing her own 
book. It's a memoir with the work- 
ing title "From the Ground Up." The 
book is half finished and already has 
won two writing awards. 

"I've published about 1 1 excerpts from 
it," she said. "I just need to finish it and try 
to get it published. I have high hopes." 

Carol won the Paul Gillette Writing 
Competition for the Pike's Peak Writing 
Conference, and captured the prestigious 
Top Hand Award from the Colorado 
Authors League for the first chapter of the 
book. 

The book is an inspirational story about 
how Carol dealt with the tragic accident that 
left her oldest son Kyle critically injured. 
Kyle, who was in Los Angeles on mission- 
ary work, was hit by a drunk driver in LA 
four years ago. He was on life support and 
had to learn how to walk again for the sec- 
ond time as an adult (he was badly burned 
in an electrical accident when he was in 
high school). Kyle survived and now runs 
his own business. The book covers the first 
three months of the accident. 

"I filled three journals" when the acci- 
dent happened, Carol said. "That's very 
unlike me. But I had learned from his first 
accident. There's nothing like trauma to 
throw details out of your mind." 

She said her life was "braided togeth- 
er" through the combination of research, 
writing, and speaking. 



CELEBRATING 

80 Years 



FDNY battalion 
commander tells 
harrowing story 
of survival 

Richard Picciotto was certain he was 
going to die. With the mindset that his life 
was about to end, he prayed. He prayed that 
God would make it quick; that he wouldn't 
have to suffer. 

But Picciotto's life was spared, along 
with about 14 other people who were in a 
stairwell near the sixth floor of the North 
Tower of the World Trade Center when it 
collapsed Sept. 11,2001. 

Picciotto, the highest ranking firefight- 
er still in the building that day, told his story 
of desperation, hope, courage, and survival 
to more than 600 people Oct. 29, 2002, dur- 
ing one of the college's 80th Anniversary 
celebrations. The event, held in the Robert 
Brown Theatre on the main campus, was 
free. 

Picciotto, a native New Yorker with the 
typical brogue, took the audience through 
his day on Sept. 11, 2001, when terrorists 
flew two planes into the twin towers of the 
World Trade Center, one into the Pentagon 
in Washington, D.C., and one that was 
crashed in a field in rural Pennsylvania. 

"It's a day I'll never, ever forget," 
Picciotto said, supplementing his talk with a 
pictorial slide show. "They (terrorists) tried 
to change our way of life. They took a shot 
at us, a cheap shot. But you know what they 
did? They made this nation even more unit- 
ed than ever before." 

The 29-year veteran of the Fire 
Department of New York said when Ladder 
1 1, one of his companies, was called to the 
World Trade Center, his thoughts immedi- 
ately rushed back to 1993. That was the 
year terrorists set off a bomb in a lower- 
level parking garage at the WTC, causing 
extensive damage. 





COLLEGE MILESTONES 




Hi J$ 'fH 


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Richard Picciotto, right, autographs his best selling book "Last Man Down" 
following his talk in the Robert Brown Theatre on October 29, 2002. 



"The news people were saying initially 
that it (Sept. 11, 2001) was an accident," 
Picciotto said. "I never thought that. My gut 
feeling was that it was no accident. I felt we 
were being deliberately attacked." 

Picciotto, who mingled during a 75- 
minute reception in the Earle N. Wright 
Community Room prior to his presentation, 
and also autographed his book following his 
talk, described the chaos in lower 
Manhattan that fateful day. 

"When we were going in, we had to 
look up because people literally had thrown 
themselves out of the building and were 
falling," he said. 

Picciotto, 51, and a group of 20 fire- 
men started up flights of stairs, reaching the 
35th floor. Suddenly, a tremendous noise 
engulfed everyone in the North Tower. 

"The building shook, and the sound 
came down from above and literally rushed 
right through us," he said. "We had no idea 
what it was." 

It was the collapse of the South Tower. 
Now, more than an hour after the North 
Tower had been struck, time was becoming 
a factor if the remaining people in the build- 
ing were to escape. As Picciotto wrote in his 
book, if the South Tower came down, so 
could the North Tower. 

"I finally made radio contact outside, 
and they told me the South Tower went 
down and that we had to get out of there," 



Picciotto said. "So all of a sudden, instead 
of a rescue mission, it was a mission to get 
out of the building. It was a very difficult 
decision I had to make, to tell firefighters to 
stop going up searching for people, but to 
start going down and to get out of the build- 
ing." 

Picciotto and several firefighters slow- 
ly made their way down. It was particularly 
slow going as two of three available stair- 
wells were blocked. Along the way, 
Picciotto and his crew assisted a black 
woman named Josephine Harris. Picciotto 
described her as a large woman, which 
made it difficult to take her down stairs 
quickly. 

But Josephine, dictating the pace, prob- 
ably saved Picciotto's life and the lives of 
the small crew with him. 

"There's no doubt about it," he said. "If 
she goes faster, we get out of the building 
and are crushed by falling debris outside. If 
she goes slower, we're up several floors and 
who knows what would have happened. It's 
nothing short of a miracle that I'm alive 
today." 

When Picciotto and the group reached 
the stairwell between the seventh and sixth 
floors, they heard the noise. 

"All of a sudden there was this tremen- 
dously loud noise, and the building shook 

(continued on page 22) 

21 



CD I 2002-2003 PRESIDENT'S REPORT 



even more than it did earlier," Picciotto 
said. "People said they could hear the tow- 
ers collapse 15 miles away. We were inside 
the building, so you can imagine how loud 
it was." 

Silence overcame the site. Picciotto 
thought he was dead. Then he began to 
breathe. He called out to the group not to 
move. Using his flashlight that was 
strapped to his jacket, Picciotto began to see 
what had happened. The North Tower had 
collapsed. 

Buried in mounds of rubble, but alive, 
Picciotto made radio contact with the out- 
side once more. An estimated four to five 
hours later, he and the rest of his crew, 
including "Josephine the Angel," climbed 
to safety out of the twisted wreckage that 
once was a stairwell. 

Picciotto suffered burns to his eyes and 
a broken shoulder, relatively minor injuries. 
The day still haunts him. 

"I didn't sleep for two months," he 
said. "I still don't sleep well. The noise, the 
debris, the fire, the devastation was so over- 
whelming, I can't even describe it." 

At the urging of his company, Picciotto 
did undergo counseling. 

Now, as co-author of the New York 
Times best-selling book "Last Man Down," 
Picciotto travels the nation telling his story 
of hope and survival. 

"In the couple of months following 
nine-11, I was going to an awful lot of 
funerals," he said. "Other firemen kept 
telling me that I should write a book about 
what happened to me. They told me that my 
story was actually something positive that 
came from it all. 

"So I filled two legal notepads. Then I 
filled 12 cassette tapes dictating my 
thoughts. I had more than enough to write a 
book." 

Publishers in England jumped at the 
chance to purchase the rights to Picciotto 's 
book. 

"Publishers here in the United States 
were hesitant at first to do a book," he said. 
"Eventually, they came around, too." 

Picciotto and co-author Daniel Paisner 
worked hours and hours putting the notes 
and tapes into a coherent order. The result 
was a book that was on the New York Times 
best seller list for eight weeks. 

"The publisher wants me to write a 
sequel," Picciotto said. "I'm not ready to do 
that yet. They want it to be more of a book 

22 



about being a firefighter. That's what I actu- 
ally wanted to do once I retired, was go 
around to fire departments and talk about 
my experiences. Then nine-11 happened." 



Jazz phenom Marsalis 
performs during 
celebration 



Wynton Marsalis, one of the most rec- 
ognizable jazz musicians and trumpeters of 
his generation, performed with the Wynton 
Marsalis Septet March 12, 2003, in the 
sold-out Robert Brown Theatre. 




Connie Bonfy, director of institutional 
grants and arts programming at the college, 
said Marsalis' appearance had been a long 
time coming. 

"We have been working toward this 
concert with Wynton for nearly seven years, 
soon after the opening of the Brown 
Center," Bonfy said. "Marsalis is an out- 
standing performer, and his commitment to 
arts education is unparalleled." 

Marsalis has been described as one of 
the world's top classical trumpeters, as a big 
band leader in the tradition of Duke 
Ellington, as a brilliant composer, as a 
devoted advocate for the Arts and as a tire- 
less and inspiring educator. His life is a por- 
trait of discipline, dedication, sacrifice and 
accomplishment. 

On the night of March 12, he did not 
disappoint. The group took just a couple of 
20-minute breaks during the 2 1/2-hour set. 
Marsalis and the other members of the band 
wowed the crowd with their raw talent. 



The sound of Marsalis' band is inspired 
by the basic principles of democracy. What 
you hear in a great jazz band, according to 
Marsalis, is the sound of democracy. 

"The jazz band, like our democracy, 
works best when participation is shaped by 
intelligent communication," he said. 

This intelligent, hard swinging inter- 
play has made Marsalis' bands the favorite 
among jazz musicians and audiences world- 
wide. In the smallest of towns Marsalis is 
received warmly and enthusiastically. The 
connection is the music, which mimics our 
valued way of life. 

College receives grant 
for equipment at 
Wichita campus 

A congressional award of nearly 
$250,000 was given to the college in April 
2003 for improvements at the Southside 
Education Center in Wichita. 

Sheree Utash, vice president for aca- 
demic and student affairs, said the $248,375 
would be used for equipment at Southside, 
located at 4501 E. 47th St. South. 

"We plan to develop a stand-alone 
(computer) network for Cowley, remodel 
our interactive television classroom, and 
place media centers and SmartBoards in 
each of our classrooms," Utash said. "The 
media centers will consist of a computer 
work station with Internet capabilities, and 
a projector." 

Utash said she expected the network 
and ITV classrooms to be completed by 
August 2003. Equipment should be 
installed in all of Cowley's 12-14 class- 
rooms at Southside by fall 2004. 

Congress set aside $10 million to 
appropriate to secondary schools across the 
United States. Utash said Cowley received 
the grant from the U.S. Department of 
Education because the college had demon- 
strated innovative approaches to student 
learning. 

"Our local congressmen were influen- 
tial in getting us the money," Utash said. 

Southside is a partnership between 
Cowley, Wichita State University, and 
Wichita Area Technical College. 



COWLEY IN BRIEF 



Fall 2002, spring 2003 
enrollments set records 



Fall 2002 and spring 2003 enrollment 
at the college showed dramatic increases 
and set records for the respective semesters. 

Full-time enrollment in fall 2002 
increased 19 percent over fall 2001, from 
2,488 to 2,958 on the 20th day of classes. At 
one point in early September, more than 
3,000 students were enrolled full time. 
Overall head count increased 15 percent 
over fall 2001, from 4,044 to 4,656. 

Once again, the largest increase 
occurred at the Southside Education Center 
in Wichita, a partnership between Cowley, 
Wichita Area Technical College and 
Wichita State University. Southside 's full- 
time enrollment jumped from 856 in fall 

2001 to 1,159 in fall 2002, a whopping 35 
percent. Enrollment at the other northern 
campus, the Mulvane Center, increased 15 
percent, from 252 full-time equivalency to 
289. 

Other significant increases occurred at 
the Wellington Center (24 percent), in 
Cowley's evening enrollment (15 percent), 
and its overall main campus enrollment (6 
percent). The college's online class offer- 
ings jumped 214 percent, from 37 students 
to 116. 

An enrollment breakdown by Cowley 
County community: 

Arkansas City 589, Winfield 376, 
Udall 41, Burden 29, Dexter 17, Geuda 
Springs 5, Cedar Vale 3, Maple City 3, 
Atlanta 2, Cambridge 2, Oxford 2, Rock 2. 

Enrollment from the top 10 counties in 
Kansas: 

Sedgwick 2,313; Cowley 1,071; 
Sumner 726; Butler 130; Chautauqua 36; 
Harvey 17; Harper 16; Elk 7; Johnson 6; 
Crawford, Montgomery, Reno 5 each. 

This fall, Cowley has students enrolled 
from 18 states. Also, there are 139 interna- 
tional students enrolled from 37 countries. 
Kenya and Tanzania lead the way with 53 
and 33 students. 

Full-time equivalency (FTE) for the 
spring 2003 semester jumped 11.5 percent 
from a year ago and is now 2,903, com- 
pared to 2,604 a year ago. Total headcount, 
every student who takes classes from the 
college, rose 7 percent, from 4,309 in spring 

2002 to 4,609 this spring. 



Once again, the largest increase 
occurred at Southside, where FTE increased 
25 percent, from 1,015 in spring 2002 to 
1,267 in spring 2003. Another area of sig- 
nificant increase occurred with the college's 
online enrollment. It jumped a whopping 74 
percent, from 71.5 FTE in spring 2002 to 
125 in spring 2003. 

The total number of credit hours being 
taken this spring also jumped 1 1 percent 
from a year ago. The college is generating 
43,516.5 credit hours in spring 2003. 

Some other statistics from the report 
reflect the state of the economy. Enrollment 
by men and women ages 22-24 increased 26 
percent, while the number of students ages 
25-29 increased 20 percent from a year ago. 
The enrollment of students ages 50-64 
increased 23 percent, and the figure for stu- 
dents ages 20-2 1 grew 9 percent. 

Other spring enrollment data: 

Cowley County communities: 
Arkansas City 558, Winfield 344, Udall 39, 
Burden 25, Dexter 14, Atlanta 7, Geuda 
Springs 6, Cambridge 4, Oxford 4, Cedar 
Vale 3, Maple City 3, Rock 1. 

Top counties in Kansas: Sedgwick 
2,397, Cowley 1,008, Sumner 690, Butler 
116, Chautauqua 22, Harvey 22, Kingman 
13, Harper 10. 

By state: Kansas 4,357, Oklahoma 73, 
Missouri 8, Florida 4, California 3, Georgia 
3, Colorado 2, Illinois 2, Texas 2, Arkansas 
1, Indiana 1, Kentucky 1, Minnesota 1, 
Montana 1, North Carolina 1, South Dakota 
1, Wisconsin 1. 

Top foreign countries: Kenya 56, 
Tanzania 32, Nigeria 12, Zimbabwe 6, 
Tasmania 5, Taiwan 4. 



College's impact 
on area economy 
documented in study 



For the past 80 years, the feeling 
among supporters of the college has been 
that the institution has been, is, and will 
continue to be a huge asset to the city of 
Arkansas City, Cowley County, and sur- 
rounding areas. 

An economic impact study completed 
in fall 2002 proves that theory to be true. 



Ccbenefits, Inc., established in 
February 2000 in cooperation with the 
Association of Community College 
Trustees, conducted the report. CCbenefits 
analyzes the economic impacts generated 
by individual community and technical col- 
leges and by statewide systems. 

Charles McKown, dean of research and 
technology, said the study, which measured 
the impact Cowley's main campus has on 
the county, revealed what many people 
have thought for years. 

"Everything in the report looks very 
positive," McKown said. "It's nice to have 
an outside group validate what we claim." 

Some figures from the study: 

• Cowley accounts for $53.6 million of 
annual earnings in the Cowley County 
economy. Those earnings are equal to 
roughly 2,239 jobs. The earnings and 
job effects break down as follows: 

• The college pays $6.8 million in direct 

faculty and staff wages and salaries 
each year, and generates an additional 
$47 million annually in wages and 
salaries off campus. 

• The college generates $159.3 million of 

annual sales in Cowley County. 

• Taxpayers see a real return of 8.2 per- 
cent on their annual investments in the 
college and recover all investments in 
12.9 years. 

• Students enjoy an attractive 20 percent 
annual return on their investment of 
time and money — for every $1 the stu- 
dent invests in Cowley, he or she will 
receive a cumulative $7.60 in higher 
future earnings over the next 30 years. 
The payback period is 7.6 years. 

• The state of Kansas benefits from 
improved health, reduced crime, and 
reduced welfare and unemployment, 
saving the public some $800,000 per 
year. 

Ccbenefits, based in Moscow, Idaho, 
seeks to answer the following questions in 
its study: What is the role of the communi- 
ty colleges in the local or state economy, 
and do the benefits outweigh the costs? The 
information is sought by state and local leg- 
islators, private donors, overseeing agen- 
cies, and others who fund the colleges as 
well as by local chambers of commerce, 
city councils, and local economic develop- 
ment groups. 



23 



CD I 2002-2003 PRESIDENT'S REPORT 




■■ •■'^-; 



Artist Anij Indigo, left, watches Student Government Association President Julie Cleveland and Cowley President Dr. 
Pat McAtee get ready to cut the ribbon during the dedication of a new Tiger sculpture in October 2002. The Tiger is 
located on the southeast corner of Ga lie- Johnson Hall on the main campus. 
Below left: The Tiger is lifted in a harness from a flatbed trailer. 




College's administrative team saw changes 



The college made some changes to its administrative team prior to the start of the 2002 fall semester. Sheree Utash, vice president of 
northern campuses, was promoted to vice president of academic and student affairs. Conrad Jimison, vice president of instruction, became 
the vice president of administration. Sarah Wesbrooks, director of northern campuses, was promoted to dean of northern campuses. And 
Paul Jackson was hired as the new associate dean of curriculum and assessment. 

24 



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25 



'SILVER FOX' 



Court where he enjoyed 
great success as coach 
named in his honor 

Dan Kahler, the winningest men's bas- 
ketball coach in Cowley history, now has a 
permanent spot in the building he so dearly 
loves. 

Kahler, who guided the Tigers to four 
appearances at the national tournament in 
seven seasons, was honored on "Dan 
Kahler Night" Nov. 12, 2002. The ceremo- 
ny dedicating the Dan Kahler Court took 
place prior to the men's basketball game 
against Southwestern College's junior var- 
sity. 

"I'm so very honored to have the Scott 
Auditorium court named after me," Kahler 
said. "This means a great deal to me. 
Cowley will always have a special place in 
my heart." 

Cowley Athletic Director Tom Saia 
said Kahler was a logical choice when the 
committee met to name the court. 

"He was in the first (Tiger Athletic) 
Hall of Fame class, and he's the one who 
helped expand the Hall of Fame," Saia said. 
Kahler has made significant monetary con- 
tributions to help get the Hall of Fame start- 
ed. The first class was in February 2000. 

"He was a great coach, a great motiva- 
tor, and a great teacher," Saia said. "And the 
things he's done away from the game are 
amazing." 

Kahler, known as the "Silver Fox," had 
a stellar coaching career at Cowley, then 
known as Arkansas City Junior College. His 
1952-53 team went 29-5, won conference 
and Region VI titles, and finished second in 
the national tournament. The following sea- 
son, Kahler's Tigers went 24-5, won con- 



ference and region crowns, and finished 
seventh in the nation. The 1954-55 squad 
went 25-8, won the region and finished 
third at nationals. And his 1956-57 team 
finished 28-8, won the Western Division of 
the Jayhawk Conference, won the regional, 
and placed eighth at nationals. 

His 170-49 record in seven seasons (a 
.776 winning percentage) is the best among 
men's basketball coaches at Cowley. He 
also coached 13 Ail-Americans. 

"The thing that amazes me is he still 
can relate to today's student athletes," Saia 
said. "It's a great honor for me to call him a 
friend. It's an honor for me to be associated 
with him. And to be able to name the court 
after him is just great." 

Kahler has won numerous accolades 
for his work in education. Most recently, he 
served as a graduate school professor at the 
University of Missouri-Kansas City. Oct. 4, 
1996, was proclaimed as "DK Day" in Clay 
County, Missouri. That same year, he had 
the North Kansas City Schools Education 
Foundation name its grants "The Dan 
Kahler Teacher Grants." He received the 
"Missouri Mentor" award in 1995 for influ- 
encing more than 8,000 beginning teachers 
as keynote speaker of the Missouri 
Beginning Teacher Conference. He was the 
first recipient of the Maxey Dupree Award, 
better known as the "Kindest Kansas 
Citiari" in 1991, and he won the Greater 
Kansas City Teacher of the Year award in 
1988. 

Closer to Cowley County, Kahler 
earned 15 letters at Southwestern College 
and was inducted into SWC's Athletic Hall 
of Fame in 1993. He played for the United 
States in the fall of 1950 in the first-ever 
World Championship Basketball 

Tournament in Buenos Aires, Argentina. 
And he capped his Southwestern playing 




College president Dr. Pat McAtee, 
left, and athletic director Tom Saia, 
present Dr. Dan Kahler with a plaque 
dedicating the floor of W.S. Scott 
Auditorium in his honor. 



career as an All-American in football and 
basketball and playing in Madison Square 
Garden in the East- West All-Star Game. 

He has served on numerous boards and 
is a Youth Friend in the North Kansas City 
School District. He helped open Oak Park 
High School in 1965. 

Following his coaching career at 
ACJC, Kahler became principal at Arkansas 
City High School in 1959. He moved to 
Lawrence in 1963 and served as principal 
two years. While in Lawrence, he served as 
analyst and interviewer for the University 
of Kansas Sports Network for more than a 
decade in football and basketball and at the 
KU Relays. 

Kahler resides in Kansas City, Mo., 
with his wife, Violet. 







£ 



26 



SPORTS NEWS 



Spence takes job at 
New Mexico State 



Darin Spence, who guided the Lady 
Tiger basketball team to five Jayhawk 
Conference Eastern Division titles in six 
years, became the head women's coach at 
NCAA Division I New Mexico State 
University in Las Cruces. 

"Cowley's been good to me and my 
family," Spence said. "What we had here 
was special. I appreciate all of the support 
me, my family, and our program received 
during my time here." 

Spence compiled a 171-26 overall 
record in six seasons at Cowley (.868 win- 
ning percentage) and a 97-11 (.898) confer- 
ence record. Cowley finished the 2002- 
2003 season with a 28-6 overall record, 16- 
2 in the East. The Lady Tigers reached the 
championship game of the Region VI 
Tournament, only to lose to Garden City 85- 
81. 

Spence also earned Coach of the Year 
honors in the Jayhawk East this past season, 




the fourth time he's 
won that award in 
six seasons. 

Throughout his 
community college 
coaching career, 
which includes five 
seasons as head 
women's coach at 
Butler County, 

Spence has an overall record of 321-82 
(.796). 

Spence also ranks second on Cowley's 
all-time women's basketball coaching lists 
with 197 games, second only to Linda 
Hargrove's 428. Spence also ranks second 
behind Hargrove in career victories at 
Cowley with 171. Hargrove won 316 
games. But Spence leaves as the all-time 
winningest women's basketball coach in 
Cowley history with a winning percentage 
of .868. 

Darin isn't the only Spence Cowley 
lost. Darin's wife, Andre, served as head 
women's tennis coach and also worked in 
the college's Wellness Center. 



"I'm losing a heckuva women's coach, 
but Andre, too," Saia said. "I'm very happy 
for them, but sad for us." 

Andre finished her seventh season as 
women's tennis coach at Cowley. She guid- 
ed the Lady Tigers to their highest finish 
ever at nationals in 2002 as the team fin- 
ished third at the NJCAA Division II 
Tournament. The team finished sixth in 
2001 and eighth in 2000. 

Darin Spence first arrived at Cowley in 
1993 and served as assistant coach to then 
head men's coach Mark Nelson. After two 
seasons, he left Cowley to become athletic 
director and head men's basketball coach at 
Colby Community College from 1995- 
1997. He came back to Cowley as head 
women's coach in the summer of 1997. 

New Mexico State finished 16-12 dur- 
ing the 2002-2003 season, including a 10-5 
mark in the Sun Belt Conference. One of 
Spence 's former players at Cowley, Jenia 
Dimitrova, played for New Mexico State 
from 2000-2002. 



Smith new head 
women's basketball 
coach 

Stephanie Smith, who guided Wabash 
Valley (111.) College to a fifth-place finish at 
the 2003 National Junior College Athletic 
Association women's basketball tourna- 
ment, was introduced April 23, 2003, as the 
new head women's coach. 

Cowley Athletic Director Tom Saia 
introduced Smith. 

"I'm really excited to be here," Smith 
said. "At Wabash, we had to build a pro- 
gram. Coming in here on coach Spence 's 
heels, he did such a good job. There are 
good players and good people, and we want 
to please everybody on campus." 

Smith had been the head coach at 
Wabash since 1991. During those 12 sea- 
sons, she had a 100-percent graduation rate 
of her players. 

Her teams have won at least 20 games 
per season for the last eight years, and 
Wabash won Great Rivers Athletic 
Conference championships the last three 
seasons. Wabash also finished being ranked 




in the top 15 in the 

nation the last three 

seasons. In 2001, 

Wabash finished the 

season with a 30-2 

record and a No. 10 

national ranking. In 

2002, the team was 

28-6 and ranked 

15th nationally. 

Smith told the gathering of about 30 

people in the lobby of W.S. Scott 

Auditorium that her team's style of play 

includes tough defense. 

"I preach defense," she said. "We'll use 
a lot of man-to-man, and occasionally go 
half-court. Offensively, there will be a lot of 
fast breaks, some quick hitters and we'll 
shoot some threes (three-point shots)." 

Smith brings an impressive resume to 
Cowley. In 2003, she was named the 
Russell Athletic/Women's Basketball 
Coaches Association Coach of the Year, and 
her team received the Alberta Lee Cox 
National Sportsmanship Award at the 
national tournament in Salina. Heading into 
the 2002-2003 season, Wabash was presea- 
son ranked No. 2 in NJCAA Division I. Her 



team also qualified for the national tourna- 
ment in 2002, finishing 12th. 

Smith was named District Coach of the 
Year in 2002 and 2003, Region XXIV 
Coach of the Year in 2002 and 2003, and 
conference Coach of the Year in 2001. 
2002, and 2003. In 2002, the Illinois 
Basketball Coaches Association named 
Smith the Coach of the Year. 

She had two WBCA/Kodak Ail- 
Americans this past season in first-team 
selections Nina Stone and Yelena 
Leuchanka. And during the last three sea- 
sons, Smith has coached four NJCAA Ail- 
Americans. 

"I'm really excited to recruit Kansas," 
she said. 

The Mt. Vernon, Ky., native holds a 
bachelor's degree from Campbellsville 
(Ky.) College and a master's degree from 
Oakland City (Ind.) University. Her mas- 
ter's degree is in education. 

She becomes the eighth head women's 
basketball coach in Cowley history. 



27 



CD I 2002-2003 PRESIDENT'S REPORT 



Men's tennis team 
captures academic 
national title 



Led by Distinguished Academic Ail- 
American Tim Frick, the men's tennis team 
captured the 2003 Academic National 
Championship with a cumulative 3.47 
grade-point average. 

Larry Grose's team was one of seven 
Cowley teams to finish in the top five in the 
nation academically during the 2002-2003 
school year. 

Frick, who was a sophomore from 
Shawnee, Okla., had a 3.91 GPA to lead the 
team. Six other Cowley student-athletes 
also were named Distinguished Academic 
Ail-Americans. They are Shelby Bruey 
from Caldwell. 4.0 GPA, volleyball; Brad 
Smith from Maize, 3.95 GPA, baseball; 
Kelle Stinson from Winfield, 3.87 GPA, 
women's tennis; Dijana Kojic from Bosnia, 
3.86 GPA, cross country and track; Suzanne 
Fry from Arkansas City, 3.85 GPA, 



women's tennis; and Emily Simmons from 
Larned, 3.81 GPA, softball. 

Kyle Harken from Leawood, 3.78 
GPA, baseball; Tiffany Taylor from Edna, 
3.74 GPA, softball; and Josh Cobble from 
Duncan, Okla., 3.75 GPA, men's tennis, 
were named Academic All-Americans. 

While the Tiger men's tennis team was 
capturing the academic national title, the 
following Cowley sports teams finished in 
the top five nationally: Women's tennis, 
second, 3.67 GPA; women's indoor track, 
second, 3.14 GPA; men's cross country, 
fourth, 3.13 GPA; men's golf, fourth, 3.22 
GPA; women's cross country, fifth, 3.14 
GPA; and softball, tied for fifth, 3.45 GPA. 

The women's basketball team was 
sixth nationally with a 3.47 cumulative 
GPA, while the women's outdoor track 
team finished tied for eighth with a 3.06 
GPA, and the volleyball team tied for 13th 
with a cumulative 3.39 GPA. 

Tom Saia, Cowley's director of athlet- 
ics, said the results speak for themselves. 

"Our coaches do an excellent job of 
making sure our athletes take care of busi- 




Men's tennis coach Larry Grose was named 2003 Coach of the Year 
by Wilson/Intercollegiate Tennis Association. 



ness in the classroom," Saia said. "That's 
what the students are here for first. It's so 
important to get an education first, then 
make awesome contributions on the field." 

Bruce Watson, ADA compliance offi- 
cer and minority student counselor, moni- 
tors the academic progress of each student 
athlete. If a student misses class or falls 
behind, Watson notifies the coach. 
Together, potential problems are worked 
out before the student gets into trouble aca- 
demically. 

This is the second academic national 
title for Grose, who is entering his 17th sea- 
son at Cowley. 

"It's really part of our recruiting 
process" in men's tennis, Grose said. "We 
make it a priority to go to class. If one of my 
players misses class, he doesn't practice. 
And if you don't practice, you don't play." 

Grose said each fall, he talks to his 
players about the importance of making 
good grades. 

"I try to set the expectations of the stu- 
dent-athletes higher," he said. "In my team 
meeting, I show them the plaques we've 
won and tell them that we want those kinds 
of awards for our program and for them- 
selves, too." 

Grose said his program is set up to 
allow student-athletes to succeed, both in 
the classroom and on the court. 

"We have a reasonable program that 
allows the athlete to rest and go to the 
library and get studying done," Grose said. 
"It's not an eat, sleep, breathe and live ten- 
nis type of situation." 



28 



SPORTS NEWS 



Six inducted into Tiger 
Athletic Hall of Fame 



Jim Clay fought back tears as he talked 
about his father. Bill Clay, during the Tiger 
Athletic Hall of Fame luncheon. 

Jim Clay introduced his father as a 
member of the Tiger Athletic Hall of Fame 
Class of 2003. 

"He never missed one of my games," 
the younger Clay told the audience of 
approximately 80 people. "My dad never 
liked to talk about his accomplishments. 
That's just the type of person he is." 

The eldest Clay was joined by Jim 
Carter, Barb Rausch Littell, Jerry Mullen, 
the late Dr. Gwen Nelson, and John 
Woodworth as the latest members added to 
the class. The Hall of Famers and their fam- 
ilies were the guests of honor at an inductee 
luncheon Feb. 1, 2003. Then, at halftime of 
the men's basketball game against Fort 
Scott that night, they were formally induct- 
ed. The six inductees bring the total number 
in the Hall of Fame to 28. 

Carter, who lives in Lubbock, Texas, 
was introduced by Cowley head men's ten- 
nis coach Larry Grose. Carter played tennis 
and basketball at Arkansas City Junior 
College from 1955-1957. He was the state 
doubles champion in 1956 and won the 
state singles title a year later. He transferred 
to Wichita State University and was singles 
and doubles runner-up in the Missouri 
Valley Conference in 1958 and singles and 
doubles champion in 1959. After a stint in 
the Army, he graduated from WSU in 1966. 
For more than 20 years, he has been head 
tennis coach at Coronado High School in 
Lubbock, Texas. The Texas Tennis Coaches 
Association named him Coach of the Year 
in 1988 and 2000, and he was inducted into 
that organization's Hall of Fame in 1992. 

Nelson was honored by Cowley Vice 
President of Administration Conrad 
Jimison, who started at the college the same 
year as Nelson, 1968. Nelson's grand- 
daughter, Cindy Lu Nelson, attended the 
banquet on behalf of her grandfather. Gwen 
Nelson became the college's second presi- 
dent on July 1, 1968. During his presidency, 
he steered the college toward long-range 
planning and the construction of several 
buildings, including the Nelson Student 
Center, named for Gwen and his wife Lu. 




The Class of 2003 - l-r, Jim Carter; Cindy Lu Nelson, granddaughter of Gwen 
Nelson; John Woodworth; Barb Rausch Littell; Bill Clay; and Jerry Mullen. 



The Nelsons were staunch supporters of 
Tiger athletics and could be seen in the 
stands of home and road games. He retired 
in 1987, and died on July 12, 1993. Many at 
the banquet told stories of Dr. Nelson relat- 
ed to his support for athletics. 

Steve Moore introduced John 
Woodworth, who played basketball, foot- 
ball, and baseball at Cowley. He was first- 
team all-conference in basketball (1969- 
70), football ( 1969), and was named to the 
all-district tournament first team as a short- 
stop (1970). He transferred to Fort Hays 
State and was a three-time all-district wide 
receiver and a two-time National 
Association for Intercollegiate Athletics 
All-American. In 1990, he was inducted 
into the university's Tiger Hall of Fame. 
From 1973-75, he was as a teacher and 
coach at Arkansas City High School. He 
lives in Grand Junction, Colo., with his 
wife, the former Sue Adams. 

Kelly Snyder, the daughter of Hall of 
Famer Loye Sparks, introduced Barb 
Rausch Littell, her former roommate and 
teammate. Rausch Littell played basketball 
and volleyball for Cowley from 1980-1982. 
After a standout freshman basketball season 
in which she set three school records, she 
was named to the All-America team as a 
sophomore and played in the NJCAA East- 
West All-Star Game. She finished her 
Cowley career with three school records, 
one of which still stands: Most free throws 
in a career (197). She is tied for 10th on the 
all-time career scoring chart with 771 
points. As a sophomore volleyball player, 
she helped Cowley win the conference and 



finish 10th in the nation. She lives in 
Liberal, Kan., with her husband Jim, head 
women's basketball coach at Seward 
County. 

Bill Clay played tennis and basketball 
in 1948 and 1949. He was the state singles 
and doubles champion in 1948, and state 
singles champion in 1949. He was named 
first-team All-Region VI in basketball in 
1949 and played basketball for the 
University of Colorado in 1950 and 1951. 
In 1953, he participated in AAU ball in 
Parsons. At ACJC, he was president of the 
student council, and was selected to crown 
Queen Alalah XVII during Arkalalah. He 
was in the Army from 1951-53. His last 
assignment was as company commander. 
He lives in Grand Rapids, Mich. 

Head men's basketball coach Randy 
Smithson introduced his former coach, 
Jerry Mullen. Mullen served as head men's 
basketball coach at Cowley from 1973- 
1979. He compiled a 107-67 (.615) record 
in six seasons. During the 1977-78 season, 
he guided the Tigers to the Jayhawk 
Conference Eastern Division title. Cowley 
was nationally ranked during his final two 
seasons in which the Tigers went 24-6 
(1977-78) and 25-5 (1978-79). He is presi- 
dent of Mullen's Sports Enterprises, Inc., a 
nationwide basketball scouting service. He 
also runs high-profile summer basketball 
camps. He lives in Olathe, Kan. 



29 



CD I 2002-2003 PRESIDENT'S REPORT 



SPORTS 



Volleyball 



Joanna Howell's Lady Tiger volleyball 
team reached the 30-victory mark, the first 
time that had been done since Deb Nittler's 
1997 squad went 39-22-1. 

Also, Cowley finished second in the 
Jayhawk Conference Eastern Division with 
an 8-1 record, one of the highest finishes in 
the conference in recent memory. 

"We had a great season," said Howell, 
who became Joanna Pryor in July 2003. 
"And we have a lot to build on. I'm looking 
forward to the future. All of our freshmen 
are coming back, and it's an awesome 
group. They'll bring us a lot of experience. 
In pressure situations, when it comes down 
to winning the conference or beating a good 
team, we'll have the girls to do it." 

Cowley ended its season Nov. 9-10 in 
Hutchinson at the Region VI Tournament. 
Seward defeated the Lady Tigers 21-30, 22- 
30, 30-27, 20-30. It was only the ninth 
match all season in which Seward lost a 
game. Cowley then came back and lost to 
Garden City 23-30, 21-30, 30-28, 20-30. 

Four Lady Tigers earned All-Jayhawk 
Conference Eastern Division honors. 
Heather Grubbs and Lynsey Maclnnis were 
named to the first team, while Natalie 
Wheaton and Karissa Thomas earned sec- 
ond-team honors. Grubbs, Maclnnis, and 
Thomas also were named to the Second- 
Team All-District M team. 



Cross Country 



Casey Belknap's cross country teams 
turned 2 years old in 2002, but they com- 
peted like seasoned veterans. Sophomore 
Kevin McDougal, who is now running for 
Wichita State University, became an All- 
American, finishing seventh overall, lead- 
ing the men's team to a sixth-place finish at 
the National Junior College Athletic 
Association championships Nov. 9 at South 
Plains Community College in Levelland, 
Texas. 

McDougal, from Kearney, Mo., was 
the fourth American to finish the 8-kilome- 
ter race. His time was 27 minutes, 49 sec- 

30 



onds on a flat course made much more dif- 
ficult by a 40-mile-per-hour wind. 

The Lady Tigers also cracked the top 
10 as a team, finishing ninth. Belknap was 
pleased with the outcome. 

"The men turned in a great perform- 
ance," he said. "For us to finish sixth in the 
country was a little above my expectation. 
We had been ranked eighth and ninth all 
year long. They came out and ran great." 

McDougal, the Tigers' No. 1 runner all 
season, broke away from his pack with 
about a mile-and-a-half to go to secure his 
seventh-place finish. He was 34th at nation- 
als as a freshman. 

"Kevin ran a great race," Belknap said. 
"He's led us all season and Saturday was no 
exception. I'm really pleased with all the 
guys. They came to compete, and good 
things happened to them." 

McDougal and Jake Conley earned All- 
Jayhawk East honors, while McDougal also 
earned All-Region VI honors. Ruth 
Kinyanjui, Dijana Kojic (now at the 
University of Nebraska), Jonelle Contreras 
and Chelsey Hanzlick all earned All- 
Jayhawk East honors. Kinyanjui, Kojic and 
Contreras were named All-Region VI. 



Indoor Track 



Golf 



Sophomore Louie Girardi was the lone 
qualifier for the NJCAA Division II nation- 
al tournament in Phoenix, Ariz. He finished 
a disappointing 111th place, shooting 81- 
82-82-75 for a four-day total of 320. He 
won the District III Tournament at Quail 
Ridge Golf Course in Winfield, shooting 
71-72-79 for a 222 total. Girardi finished 
the Jayhawk Conference standings in 15th 
place with 7.5 total points. That earned him 
a spot on the All-Jayhawk Conference Third 
Team. 

The 2002-2003 season was the last for 
coach Rex Soule, who resigned at the end of 
the season. Nathan Pryor was hired as his 
replacement. 



Josephat Boit won the national title in 
the 5,000-meter run, and he placed second 
in two other events, helping the men's team 
to a 1 2th-place finish at the NJCAA Indoor 
Track Championships in Manhattan in 
March. The women's team finished 11th in 
the nation. 

Boit missed winning the 3,000-meter 
run and the mile by less than two seconds. 

"He ran well; he ran so smart," Cowley 
coach Casey Belknap said. "We kind of 
knew nobody could touch him in the 5,000. 
He shut down with a lap to go. We tried to 
save him for the 3-k and mile because that's 
where his best competition was going to 
be." 

And it was. Boit battled Butler 
County's Simon Ngata in both races. In the 
3,000, Boit was second in 8 minutes, 29.56 
seconds, just .66 of a second behind Ngata. 
And in the mile, Boit was second with a 
time of 4:11.86, just 1.21 seconds behind 
Ngata. Boit won the 5,000 with a time of 
14:47.77. 

"The 3,000 was a dead sprint for the 
last 350 meters," Belknap said. "Simon was 
fresh for the 3,000. Boit had run the 5,000 
two hours earlier. Boit ran a great 3-k." 

Boit scored 26 of Cowley's 31 points 
and earned Ail-American in all three events. 
Kyle Ellis earned a Coaches Ail-American 
honor in the pole vault as he was among the 
top six Americans in the event. 

Several athletes earned Academic All- 
America status. They are Dijana Kojic, 
Rachel Harper, Chelsey Hanzlick, Ruth 
Kinyanjui, Nathan Newby, Jesse Palmer, 
Jake Conley, Travis Blackburn, Josh 
Spence, and Sarah Graves. 

Women's Basketball 

Darin Spence ended his Cowley coach- 
ing career with his fifth Jayhawk 
Conference Eastern Division title in six sea- 
sons. The Lady Tigers finished 28-6 overall, 
16-2 in the East, and played in the Region 
VI championship game, losing to Garden 
City 85-81. 



SPORTS NEWS 



Sophomore Crystal Ashley was named 
Player of the Year in the East, while Spence 
was named Coach of the Year. Sophomores 
Rikki Hall, Aubrie Hallman and Autumn 
Nichols earned All-Region VI honors, 
while Nichols and Ashley were named first- 
team all-conference and Hall was named to 
the second team. 

Hallman penciled her name into the 
record book with a 30-point performance 
against Fort Scott on Feb. 1, 2003. That 
placed her in a tie for 10th place on 
Cowley's all-time single-game scoring 
charts. 

The 2002-2003 season got off to a 
rough start for the program and for the col- 
lege when newly-hired volunteer assistant 
Tara Patterson was killed in a one-vehicle 
accident on Oct. 10, 2002. The car she was 
driving slid off the side of the road and 
struck a tree. She was 23. 

Men's Basketball 

In just his second season at the helm, 
coach Randy Smithson guided the Tigers to 
the championship game of the Region VI 
Tournament, losing 81-71 to Coffeyville. 
The Tigers also finished second in the 
Jayhawk East standings with a 13-5 record, 
22-12 overall. 

Sophomore forward Amani Daanish 
earned All-Region VI honors, while sopho- 
mores Francis Koffi and Raymond 
Anthony, and freshman Francis Cuyler, all 
were named to the All-Jayhawk East Third 
Team. 



Baseball 



The law of averages finally caught up 
with coach Dave Burroughs' Tigers. For the 
first time since 1994, someone other than 
Cowley won the Jayhawk East. 

The Tigers struggled through most of 
the season and finished with a 36-22 overall 
record, 24-12 in the league. Despite those 
numbers, Cowley still won the Eastern Sub- 
Regional and put itself in position to get to 
Grand Junction. Cowley lost its first game, 
3-2 to Seward, and still battled back to face 



Neosho in the championship, losing 9-4. 
The Tigers would have had to beat the 
Panthers twice. 

Two Tigers were named to the All- 
Region VI team, shortstop Rusty Ryal and 
pitcher Josh Wahpepah. Wahpepah also was 
named Freshman of the Year in the East 
while making the All-Jayhawk East first 
team. He was joined by teammates Ryal and 
designated hitter Clay Blevins on the first 
team. Conner Tinkler was named 
Honorable Mention all-conference. Blevins 
was a unanimous choice in the all-confer- 
ence voting. 



Men's Tennis 



The men's tennis team finished sixth at 
the NJCAA Division II Tournament in 
Piano, Texas. The Tigers scored 27 points. 
Jeff Stone at No. 4 singles and the No. 3 
doubles team of Josh Cobble and Tim Frick 
reached the semifinals, but did not advance 
to the championship of their flights. Still, 
coach Larry Grose was pleased with his 
team's play. 

"I'm very pleased," he said. "We just 
couldn't be happier with the way it turned 
out." 

Women's Tennis 

The No. 3 doubles team of Kelle 
Stinson and Jackie Gilmore took first place 
at the NJCAA Division II Tournament May 
5-9, 2003, in College Station, Texas. 

The victory gives Stinson and Gilmore 
first-team All- American honors as well. 

Teammate Suzanne Fry became a two- 
time All-American after she finished second 
in the nation at No. 2 singles. 

As a team, the Lady Tigers finished 
sixth with 25 1/2 points, just two points 
behind fifth-place Mesa. 

"Every one of my players reached a 
bracket final, and that's never happened," 
Cowley coach Andre Spence said. "I'm real 
pleased." 



Outdoor Track & Field 

Freshman Jennifer Goldsmith finished 
second in the javelin to lead the women's 
track and field team to a 15th-place finish at 
the NJCAA national meet May 9-10, 2003, 
in Levelland, Texas. 

The women scored 15 points. The 
Tiger men's team also finished in the top 
20, coming in 16th with 12 1/2 points. 

Goldsmith, a transfer from Pittsburg 
State University in January, set a personal 
record while at Cowley with a throw of 137 
feet 7 inches. The Cheney, Kan., product 
had thrown 138-2 in high school. 

Teammate Rachel Reida finished fifth 
with a throw of 125-0. 

Cowley's only other point producer for 
the women was the 4x800-meter relay team 
of Ruth Kinyanjui, Chelsey Hanzlick, 
Rachel Harper and Dijana Kojic. The team 
finished sixth with a time of 10 minutes, 
14.66 seconds. 

On the men's side, Brandon Banda fin- 
ished third in the decathlon with more than 
6,000 points, nearly 1,500 more than he 
scored at the Region Vl/Jayhawk 
Conference meet. 

Kyle Ellis finished sixth in the pole 
vault, clearing a personal-best height of 15- 
9 3/4. Banda was eighth in the event at 15- 
3 3/4. Both athletes earned NJCAA 
Coaches All-American honors. The top four 
relays and top eight individuals, after taking 
out international athletes, earn Coaches All- 
American awards. 

The men's 4x800-meter relay team of 
Alcante Louischarles, Karl Brown, Jake 
Conley and Kevin McDougal finished 
eighth in 8:04.91, earning the four-some the 
Coaches All-American honor. McDougal 
earned another Coaches All-American 
award with his 4:26.65 time in the 1,500- 
meter run, good for 13th place overall. 
Shawn Strickland didn't score any points 
for the Tigers with his 12th-place finish in 
the javelin, but he did earn a Coaches All- 
American award. 



31 



CD I 2002-2003 PRESIDENT'S REPORT 



Softball 



Ed Hargrove's softball team set several 
records during the 2003 season and finished 
ninth at the NJCAA Division I Tournament 
in Clermont, Fla. Cowley lost 2-1 on May 
16, 2003, to Midland College of Texas, 
eliminating it from play. 

Cowley, which defeated Briarcliffe 
College of New York 4-1 and lost to 
Seminole State of Oklahoma 2-1 on May 
1 5, jumped out to a quick 1 -0 lead in the top 
of the first inning without the benefit of a 
hit. Cowley's first two batters, Emily 
Simmons and Jessica Milligan, walked. A 
wild pitch sent them to second and third 
with no outs. J.J. McVay hit a ground ball to 
the hole at short, scoring Simmons. 
However, Milligan thought the ball had 
gone through, and she took off for third. 
Midland's shortstop had backhanded the 
ball, and Milligan was caught in a rundown 
for the first out. 



Cowley's fourth- and fifth-place hitters 
in the lineup made outs to end the inning. 

"A hit there and we go up 2-0 right off 
the bat," Hargrove said. "In the second 
inning, we had a couple of runners, but we 
just couldn't get a hit." 

Midland tied the game 1 - 1 with a run in 
the bottom of the first off Cowley ace 
Candice Wilburn. Wilburn allowed six hits 
and struck out three while taking just her 
third loss this season. She ends with a 33-3 
record and was named to the NJCAA All- 
America Second Team, while teammate 
McVay was a Third-Team All-America 
selection. 

"Candice 's three losses were 2-0 to 
Neosho in the regionals and 2-1 and 2-1 
down here," Hargrove said. "She ended this 
season with 298 strikeouts. I really wanted 
her to get 300." 

That strikeout total is a single-season 
record at Cowley. Wilburn's 33 victories 
also set a single-season mark, and her 53 



career victories also set a mark. Lindsey 
Davis had held those records. 

Hargrove said goodbye to nine sopho- 
mores, the winningest group ever at Cowley 
with 96 victories in two seasons. Cowley 
finished this season with a 53-10-1 mark. 

All-Region VI/District E: First Team — 
Wilburn, pitcher; McVay, shortstop; 
Danielle Vanderhoof, Mulvane, sophomore 
catcher; second team — Emily Simmons, 
Larned, sophomore outfield; Jessica 
Milligan, Lafayette, Colo., sophomore third 
base; honorable mention — Nicole 
Ringwall, Rose Hill, freshman second base; 
Lacy Anstine, Arkansas City, sophomore 
designated hitter. 

All-Jayhawk East: First Team — 
Wilburn (Most Valuable Player), pitcher; 
Ringwall, second base; McVay, shortstop; 
Simmons, outfield; second team — 
Vanderhoof, catcher; Milligan, third base; 
Lindsey Roby, Cashion, Okla., freshman 
pitcher. 



We gratefully acknowledge the following donors 
who have contributed to the Endowment Association, Tiger Booster Club, 

and the Heartland Arts Series 



Mr. and Mrs. Sid Achenbach 

Roxie Aguilar 

Bart and Heather Allen 

Mia Allen 

Rod and Jody Arnett 

Frankie G. Arnold 

Aspen Traders Ltd. 

ADM Milling Co. 

Advanced Orthopaedic Association 

Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Aldridge 

Allen's Furniture and Carpet 

American Legion Auxiliary Unit #1! 

Joe and Eleanor Anderson 

David W. Andreas 

Warren Andreas 

Von E. Anneler, Jr. 

Annie Foundation 

Gary and Betty Anstine 

L. Duane Anstine 

Larry and Rose Anstine 

Caroline S. Applegate 

Steve and Pam Archer 

Ark City Country Mart 

Ark City Glass Company 

Ark City Tumbleweeds 

Ark Valley Distributing 

Ark Valley Physical Therapy 



Arkansas City Area Arts Council 

Arkansas City Chamber of Commerce 

Arkansas City Rotary Club 

Joe and Donna Avery 

Warren L. Baber 

Albert and Karen Bacastow 

Jack and Diane Bacastow 

Lucien and Judith Barbour 

Barbour Title Company 

Larry Barnes 

BarnesCo, Inc. 

Buel Beck 

Casey Belknap 

Gary Belknap 

Robert J. Berne 

Beta Sigma Phi-City Council 

Chris and Kim Biddle 

Donald M. Billings 

Billings Plumbing and Bath 

BJ's Auto 

Roger and Carol Black 

Marjory Leland Blackstock 

Emily Bonavia 

Ralph and Mary Ann Bonnell 

Dick and Dolly Bonfy 

Dave and Trina Bostwick 

Daniel J. Bowker 



Boyer Educational Trust 

Vonda Brecheisen 

Melburn Porter Brown 

Robert and Jana Brown 

Roger and Suzanne Brown 

Brown's Office Supply 

C.T and Terry Bryant 

A.F and Wilda Buffo 

Karen Bullard 

Darren and Carolyn Burroughs 

Dave and Vicki Burroughs 

Betty M. Burton 

Kenny and Janet Buss 

Buterbaugh and Handlin Insurance 

Mr. and Mrs. Brett Butler 

Mark and Penny Carnevale 

Carpenter and Vickers Trust 

Brad and Sue Carson 

John P. Cary 

Century 21 Advantage Realty 

Jos? and Marlys Cervantes 

Steve and Jo Ann Chance 

Don and Velma Cheslic 

City of Arkansas City 

City of Winfield 

Judy Clark 

Russell and Patty Clark 



32 



ENDOWMENT ASSOCIATION 



Class of 1951 

Client Business Services 

Coca-Cola Bottling Co. 

E. Welch Cole 

Gene and Donella Cole 

Commerce Bank - El Dorado 

Commercial Federal Bank 

Conco, Inc. 

CornerBank 

CETA - Cowley County Economic 

Development Agency 

Cowley County Livestock Association 

Cox Communications 

CPBM Employee Fund 

Dr. Lynn A. Cramer 

Mr. and Mrs. Steve Cranford 

Tony and Vicki Crouch 

Bruce and Amy Crouse 

Mike and Sue Crow 

W.D. Crow 

D & S Retail Liquor 

Jim and Rae Dale 

Kirke Dale Trust 

Lillian A. Damewood 

Dave and Carol Daulton 

Ruth A. David and Stanley Dains 

Walt and Iris David 

Charles and Verna Davis 

Cynthia Davis 

Robin C. Delp 

Gail deVore 

Nancy DeVore 

James and Vicky Dewell 

John B. Dziedzic 

Dillons Store #38 

DiVall Retail Liquor 

John and Connie Donatelli 

Donna's Designs 

Barbara Dornhoffer 

David Dornhoffer 

Gary L. Dowler 

Ron and Pam Doyle 

Diana Sue Duncan 

Lyle and Terry Eaton 

Edward D. Jones Company 

Elite Advertising 

Beryle L. Elliott 

Stephen and Janet English 

Doug and Dejon Ewing 

Mr. and Mrs. Karl E. Faidley 

David and Jennifer Faust 

Robert and Lois Fencil 

First Intermark Corporation 

Marc H. Folladori 

Bob and Jo Lynn Foster 

Foster's Furniture of Ark City 

Loraine Frank 

Curt and Cynthia Freeland 

Joan Fuhrman 

Future Beef Operations 

Galaxie Business Equipment 

Galaxy Tool Corporation 

Gallaways, LLC 



Gambino's Pizza 

Ed and Margaret Gilliland 

Kenneth and Bonnie Gilmore 

Mark Girardi 

Dan and Vicki Givens 

Ron and Donetta Godsey 

J.G. and Doris Goff 

Good Time Productions, Inc. 

Gordon and Associates 

Graves Drug Store 

Gary Grayum 

Great Western Dining, Inc. 

Gregg and Simmons, CPAs 

Grief Brothers Corp. 

Slade and Terri Griffiths 

Mr. and Mrs. Leonard J. Groene 

David and Lisa Grose 

Larry and Nyla Grose 

Betty Jane Groves 

Jean Ann Groves 

Michael and Judi Groves 

Phil and Joyce Groves 

Allen and Beverly Grunder 

Roger and Lynn Gubichuk 

Lynne Gushelhoff-Jordan 

Evelyn Hamilton 

Wayne and Kay Hamilton 

Mr. and Mrs. Lloyd Hanahan 

Linda L. Hankins 

Ed and Linda Hargrove 

Dean and DeAnna Harp 

Bill and Linda Headrick 

Mr. and Mrs. Steve Hearne 

Mr. and Mrs. James Hendershot 

Cathy Hendricks 

Donald L. Heflin 

Daniel C. Hill 

Mrs. William Hill 

John and Janet Hitchcock 

Jean M. Hite 

Gary G. Hockenbury 

Kim and Cynthia Hocker 

Michael Holland 

Richard and Melissa Hollister 

Angela Holmes 

Paul and Donna Homan 

Home National Bank 

Leota F. Honn 

Patty Houk 

Bill and Carol House 

Kathy Howell 

Luella Hume 

Hutchinson Electric, Inc. 

Ronnie and Teri Hutchinson 

Dr. Carl and D.J. Ingram 

Rex and Denise Irwin 

Joline Iverson 

Brian Jackson 

Elliott Jackson 

Vernell Jackson 

Jan's Sport Shack 

Jarvis Accounting 

Steve and Joi Jay 



Jerry's Donut Shop 

Conrad and Janet Jimison 

Craig and Suzanne Johnson 

Richard and Kelly Johnson 

Mr. and Mrs. Hubert L. Johnston 

Danny and Sandy Jones 

Mark and Stefani Jones 

Gary and Frieda Kahle 

Dr. and Mrs. Dan A. Kahler 

Kansas Arts Commission 

Marvin and Linda Keasling 

Greg and Diana Kelley 

Ellen L. Kelly 

Mr. and Mrs. John P. Kelly 

Michael and Claudia Kelly 

Paul and Diane Kelly 

Delbert Kemp 

John and Joan Kempf 

Kempf Liquor Store 

Robert and Elizabeth Keown 

Mary Jane Kerr 

Oscar Kimmell 

Dr. and Mrs. Nick Kinsch 

Charles and Darlene Kinzie 

Howard and Dorothy McFarland Kivet 

Dr. Paul and Lisa Klaassen 

Mr. and Mrs. Warren Koeller 

Irvin and Viola Kramer 

Conneye Kraus 

Joseph and Jan Krisik 

Michael D. Lafferty 

Harold and Mary Lake 

Bob and Carolyn Langenwalter 

Scott and Deborah Layton 

Robben and Wilma Ledeker 

Clay Lemert 

Donna Lester 

Sarah Lewis 

Literacy Council 

LM Consultants 

Local 1004 IUE-AFL-CIO 

Phillip M. Logan 

Long & Neises CPAs Chartered 

J.C. and Donna Louderback 

Jonathan D. Lough 

Scott and Rhoda MacLaughlin 

Dr. Roger and Melba Maechtlen 

Mangen Chiropractic Clinic 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Marney 

Scott Marney 

Mathew J. Murray 

Lane and Shannon Massey 

Pat and Kenny Mauzey 

Sonny and Edna Maynard 

Mr. and Mrs. Darrin P. McAtee 

Dr. and Mrs. Patrick J. McAtee 

McCluggage, VanSickle and Perry 

Marvin and Anita Belew McCorgary 

Lon "Andy" McFayden 

Charles McKown 

Gina McKown 

Billy Means 

John Richard Mehuron 



33 



CD I 2002-2003 PRESIDENT'S REPORT 



Fred and Margot Menefee 

Merle Snider Motors, Inc. 

Mid America Arts Alliance 

Mike Groves Oil, Inc. 

Freda W. Miller 

Dr. Max M. Miller 

Robert and Olive Milner 

James and Wilma Mitchell 

Robert Moffatt 

Virginia James Moller 

Steve Moore 

Norman and Sue Morris 

Dianne Morrow 

Otis and Terri Morrow 

Mullen's Sports Enterprises 

Ramona Munsell 

National Endowment for the Arts 

Ron and Janice Neagle 

Margaret Neal 

Melinda Neal 

Joe and Patty Neises 

Luella Nelson 

Mrs. Harry E. Newman in Memory of 

Harry E. Newman 

Dr. Nathan and Amy Niles 

Beverly A. Nittler 

Randy and Deb Nittler 

Elizabeth Northcutt Estate 

CM. Nugen Estate 

Jason and Shannon O Toole 

Willie Oates 

John C. Ogren 

Olen Medical Supply 

Fred and Tonya Olenberger 

Optimist Club of Arkansas City 

Larry Orman 

Stu and Stephanie Osterthun 

Neal and Anna Paisley 

Ada Margaret Palmer 

David and Sally Palmer 

Merrill Parker 

Mark and Debra Paton 

Paton Wholesale & Vending 

PBA Architects, PA. 

Philip and Mary Ann Phillips 

J.W. and Paula Plush 

William H. "Bill" Post 

Potter's Liquor Store 

David Potter 

Powers Associates 

Thomas and Sheila Prichard 

Jim and Jan Pringle 

Dr. and Mrs. Doug Proctor 

Sara B. Prothe 

Puritan Billiards 

Quail Ridge Golf Shop 

Quality Water Service 

Judy Queen 

Ramsey's Auto Parts, Inc 

Bob and Kendra Shively Redford 

Connie Reed 

Mr. and Mrs. Jim Reed 

Reedy Ford 

34 



Regency Court Inn 

Sid and Sharon Regnier 

Dr. Glen and Bonnie Remsberg 

Rindt-Erdman Funeral Home 

Rob Carroll's Sandblasting 

Mike and Lynette Robe 

Bryce and Val Roderick 

Cliff and Carolyn Roderick 

Rogers and Lanning 

Dr. David and Rhonda Ross 

Gary Rowe 

Rush Realty 

S and Y Industries 

Tom and Sue Saia 

Jim and Deb Salomon 

Samford-Stover Agency 

Dan and Lois Sampson 

Aaron and Lindsay Sanderholm 

Mr. and Mrs. Dave Schaller 

Dr. David and Karen Schmeidler 

Schmidt Jewelers 

Tom and Charlotte Schmidt 

Schneider Construction Co 

Scott and Michelle Schoon 

Colleen Schulz 

Larry Schwintz 

Kevin D. Seal 

Sears Dealer Store 

David and Callie Seaton 

Mr. and Mrs. Al Sehsuvaroglu 

Brian and Kristi Shaw 

Robert J. Shaw 

Sheldon's Pawn Shop 

Paul K. Shelite 

Shear Success, Inc. 

E.W. "Bud" and Lauretta Shelton 

Lance Shepard 

Wanda Shepherd 

Sheppard Foundation 

Sheridan Realty Associates 

Wayne and Sandy Short 

Joe and Mindi Shriver 

Joseph H. Simmons 

Vonda Simpson 

Oren and Donna Skiles 

Dale and Isobel Smith 

Forrest and Sandra Smith 

Justin C. Smith 

Dr. Libby Smith 

Randy and Pam Smith 

Rex A. Smith 

Randy and Shauna Smithson 

Dr. Jean and Ellen Snell 

Dr. Dan and Vicki Snowden 

Snyder Clinic Foundation 

Morgan Sommers 

Sonic Drive-in 

Maxine L. Soule 

Danny H. Spence 

Darin and Andre' Spence 

Starlyn Venus State Farm Insurance 

State Bank of Winfield 

H. Wayne and Diane Steadham 



Helen Storbeck 

Strother Field Commission 

Tad and Janice Stover 

Keith and Marcia Stultz 

Summit Auto World 

Larry Swaim 

Ronald and Patsy Sweeley 

Frank W. Sweet 

Sweetland-Hinson Equipment 

Betty Sybrant 

Jim and Donna Sybrant 

Linda L. Sybrant 

Taylor Drug 

Fred and Marilyn Taylor 

The Added Touch 

The Boeing Company 

The Caballero 

F.L. Thurman 

Michael and Cheryl Townsley 

Richard and Nancy Tredway 

Trust Company of Kansas 

Marvin Tucker 

Turn-of-the-Century-Enterprises 

Eddie and Mary Turner 

Leonard and Ruth Turner 

Two Rivers Cooperative 

Tom and Joan Tyler 

USD 470 

Union State Bank 

United Agency 

Universal Steel Buildings 

David and Sheree Utash 

Donald Vannoy 

June Vasey 

Deborah Vaughn 

Chris Vollweider 

Dr. and Mrs. John Voth 

Waldorf-Riley, Inc. 

James and Loretta Waldroupe 

Caroline Warren 

Rebecca Warren 

Robert D. Warrender 

Randall and LeArta Watkins 

Bruce Watson 

Dr. Robert J. Watson 

Dr. and Mrs. Aaron T. Watters 

Webber Land Company 

Webb-Brown Charitable Trust 

Western Resources Foundation 

Westlake Ace Hardware 

Bob and Patricia White 

Virginia Jane Wilkins 

Gary and Peg Williams 

Mary Ruth Wineinger 

Winfield Chiropractic Office 

Winfield Consumer Products 



BOTTOM LINE 



Your Investment 



$3,128,525 in 2001-02 taxes; $3,522,702 in 2002-03 taxes. For every dollar 
appropriated by state and local government, the college's spending alone gen- 
erated $1.42 in wages and salaries in Cowley County. 

For every dollar appropriated by the state and local government in fiscal 
2002, student earnings will increase by an average of $0.82 per year, every 
year through the rest of their working lives. Likewise, for every state dollar 
appropriated, Cowley County will see social savings of $0.13 per year, every 
year (reduced incarceration and health care expenditures, reduced expendi- 
tures on unemployment and welfare, and reduced absenteeism). 

The College is third in size among the 19 community colleges in Kansas, 
behind Johnson County Community College and Butler County Community 
College. 



Your Return 



Cowley had operating expenses of $ 1 1 .9 million in fiscal 2002, and spent $9.6 
million (81 percent) of this in Cowley County to purchase supplies and pay 
wages and salaries. 

$9 million annual payroll, providing 189 full-time jobs and 239 adjunct fac- 
ulty and staff positions. For every $1 the college pays in wages and salaries, 
there is another $0.31 in wages and salaries generated off-campus in the 
Cowley County economy — this is the commonly known multiplier effect. 

Customized training for more than a dozen businesses and industries, prima- 
rily through the Cowley College Workforce Development Center at Strother 
Field Industrial Park. 

A significant attraction for businesses and industries considering relocation in 
this area. College skills embodied in the present-day workforce increase the 
output of industries in the Cowley County economy, where the former stu- 
dents are employed, by $83.63 million. 

Skills gained from the college by current and former students increase wages 
and salaries in Cowley County by $25.5 million directly, and by another $19.3 
million indirectly in fiscal 2002. 

Of the 2,054 credit and non-credit students who attended the college in fiscal 
2002, 67 percent were employed full- or part-time while attending. Sixty per- 
cent of the students stay in the region and contribute to the local economy 
after they leave the college. 

After leaving the college, the average Cowley student will spend 40 years in 
the workforce. The student who leaves with a two-year college degree will 
earn $372,799 more than someone with just a high school diploma or GED. 

During the next 40 years in the workforce, the average Cowley student's dis- 
counted lifetime earnings will increase $7.60 for every education dollar 
invested (in the form of tuition, fees, books, and foregone earnings from 
employment). 



Elected Officials 

Governor 

Kathleen Sebelius 
Second Floor 
State Capitol 
Topeka, Kansas 66612 

State Senator 

Greta Goodwin 
Winfield, Kansas 67156 

State Representatives 

Joe Shriver 

Arkansas City, Kansas 67005 

Judy Showalter 
Winfield, Kansas 67156 

State Board of Regents 

Reggie Robinson 

President and Chief Executive Officer 

700 SW Harrison 

Topeka, KS 66603-3716 

Board of Trustees 

Donna Avery, Arkansas City 
Albert Bacastow Jr., Arkansas City 
Lee Gregg Jr., Arkansas City 
Ron Godsey, Winfield 
LaDonna Lanning, Winfield 
Mark Paton, Arkansas City 

Cowley's Administrative Team 

Dr. Patrick J. McAtee President 

Sheree Utash Vice President 

Academic/Student Affairs 

Tony Crouch Vice President 

of Business Services 

Conrad Jimison . Vice President 

of Administration 

Pam Doyle . . Dean of Student Learning 

Terri Morrow . . . Dean of Development 

and College Relations 

Sue Saia Dean of Student Life 

Sarah Wesbrooks. Dean of N. Campuses 

Charles McKown . . . Dean of Research 

and Technology 

Paul Jackson Associate Dean 

of Curriculum and Assessment 

Stu Osterthun Director 

of Public Relations 
Tom Saia . Director of Athletics 



35 



AT-A-GLANCE 



Mill Levy History: 



2003-2004 


17.628 


2002-2003 


. 17.627 


2001-2002 


16.936 


2000-2001 


19.967 


1999-2000 


22.762 


1998-1999 


21.858 



Tuition & Fees 2003-2004: 

Kansas Residents: 

$63 per credit hour 

(Cowley County residents 

receive a $5 per hour tuition waiver) 

Oklahoma Residents: 

$96 per credit hour 

Other Out-of-State: 

$117 per credit hour 

International Students: 

$156 per credit hour 



Founded: 1922 

In 1968, the College became the first school in the state to combine a traditional liberal 
arts transfer curriculum with a program of area vocational-technical school training. 

President: 

Dr. Patrick McAtee became the third president of the College on July 1, 1987. 



2003 Spring Enrollment: 

2,903 Full-Time Equivalency (Spring record) 
4,609 Total Headcount (Spring record) 



2003 Fall Enrollment: 

2,488 FTE (Fall record) 
4,044 Total Headcount 



Programs: 



33 Certificate and Applied Science programs 
42 Liberal Arts/Transfer programs 

More than 100 specialized programs and seminars offered through the Institute for 
Lifetime Learning, a program for men and women age 50 and older. Specialized training 
for business and industry to meet their needs. In the past the college has developed or 
offered programs for General Electric, Rubbermaid-Winfield, the city of Arkansas City, the 
city of Winfield, local school districts, day care centers, local nursing homes, special 
education co-ops, KSQ Blowmolding, Social Rehabilitation Services, Southwestern Bell 
Telephone, Wittur Inc., Boeing-Wichita, Cessna, the business and industry division of 
banks, and many others. 



Facilities: 



Enrollment Figures: 




Facts, Spring 2003: 




High School 


461 


Freshmen 


. . 2,362 


Sophomores * . '. 


1,590 


Special 


196 


Total Headcount 


. . . . 4,609 


Total FTE 


. . . . 2,903 


Southside Center 


... . 1,267 


Main campus 


993 


Mulvane Center 


252 


Online 


125 



17 buildings on a 10-acre campus in the heart of downtown Arkansas City. 

Outreach Centers in Mulvane, Strother Field, Winfield, Wellington and Wichita, where 
a cooperative partnership between Cowley, Wichita State University, and Wichita Area 
Technical College has formed the Southside Education Center. Courses also taught at these 
area high schools: Argonia, Belle Plaine, Burden, Caldwell, Cedar Vale, Conway Springs, 
Dexter, Oxford, South Haven, and Udall. 



Athletics: 



Fourteen intercollegiate sports that compete in the Kansas Jayhawk Community 
College Conference's East Division. Men's Cross Country, Women's Cross Country, 
Volleyball, Men's Basketball, Women's Basketball, Women's Indoor Track, Men's Indoor 
Track, Baseball, Softball, Golf, Men's Tennis, Women's Tennis, Men's Outdoor Track and 
Field, and Women's Outdoor Track and Field. 

Jayhawk Conference Eastern Division Team Titles in 2002-2003: 

• Women's cross country (in only its second year of the program) 

• Women's basketball (its fifth title in the last six seasons) 



Assessed Valuation 
for Cowley County: 

Fall 2003: 

$203,608,608 



College Budget: 

$23 million (2003-2004) 



36 



National Championships in 2002-2003: 

• Men's tennis team, Academic National Champions, 3.47 GPA 

• Josephat Boit, 5,000-meter national indoor champion 

• Women's tennis. No. 3 doubles team of Jackie Gilmore and Kelle Stinson 

District or Region VI crowns in 2002-2003: 

• Softball (went 5-1 to win District E of Region VI; qualified for nationals. Finished 
season with 53-10-1 record; ninth-place at nationals) 

Employees: 

189 full-time faculty, staff and administration; 239 part-time faculty and staff 











U.S. POSTAGE 


















Non-Profit Organization 
Arkansas City, Kansas 








PERMIT No. 14 




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Arkansas City, KS 67005 



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2003-2004 President's Report 




ir.cowll 3u 

Jueen Alalah LXXII 

landace Salas 

■th Endowed Chair Awarded 

'am Smith 

>utstanding Tiger Alumnus 

Varren Koeller 

tviation Tech Center 

)pened in January 






Student of the Year 

Rebekah Krusemark 



lew Track Facility Dedicated 



• 




2003-2004 President's Report 






Student Outstanding 

Accomplishments Tiger Alumni 



Student of the Year 
Rebekah Krusemark . 

AEC Team Finishes 
Second in State 



Cowley Math & Science Club 
Human-i-Tees Project 6 

Phi Beta Lambda Students 

Score Well at State 7 

Mr. Cinderfella Devon Woods 7 

Project Lifesaver 8 



Entrepreneur Warren Koeller 15 

College News 

Groundbreaking and Renovation . .17 

College one of Fastest 

Growing in U.S 18 

Oklahoma Tuition Decreased 18 

Record Setting Enrollment 19 

Technical Classes 

Now Offered at Mulvane 20 



Cowley Press Named Best 
Two-Year Newspaper in State 



g Noel-Levitz Survey Results. 



20 



PTK All-Kansas Team 

Cowley Representatives 9 

Queen Alalah LXXII 

Candace Salas 10 



Former Students at WSU 
Have Higher GPAs 



10 



Faculty/Staff 
Accomplishments 

Fourth Endowed Chair 

Pam Smith 11 

Employees Honored for Service. ... 12 

Computer Software 

Assists Chemistry Students 12 

Paul Stirnaman Award Winner 

Uwe Conrad 13 

Sue Morris Retires after 25 years ... 14 



Workforce Development Center 
Receives Second Excellence Award . 21 

Tiger Logo Copyrighted 21 

Aviation Program 

Expanded to Wichita 22 

Tommy Emmanuel 

Performs to Packed House. . . 22 



Athletic 
Accomplishments 

Saia Inducted into NJCAA 

Football Hall of Fame 23 

2004 Tiger Athletic 

Hall of fame Inductees 24 

New Track Dedicated 26 

Student- Athlete Awards 27 



Departments 



Welcome 



College Leadership. 



Students of the Month . 



Sports Wrapups 



Endowment Donors . 



Bottom Line 2004 



Cowley At-a-Glance 2004 




THE COWLEY PRESIDENT'S REPORT is printed once yearly and is produced by the office of Public Relations, Sru Osterthun, director, and Rex Soule, publications designer. Reproduction in whole or in part 
without written permission is prohibited. For comments or questions, please send an e-mail to osterthun@cowley.edu or soule@cowley.edu. 



Notice of Non-Discrimination 

Cowley County Community Colleges and Area Vocational-Technical School is committed to a policy of non-discrimination involving equal access to education and employment opportunity to all regardless of 
sex, race, -: : ,.: , r <i . lL . , - , - status. This administration further extends Its oommttmen! to fulfilling and imDle^: -I .state and local laws and regulations .-;s 

specified in i itle IX. Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act and the Americans with Disabilities Act. 11 you desire special needs or support services, contact the ADA Coordinator at I -800-593-2222. 






WELCOME from the President 



Welcome to the 2003-2004 edi- 
tion of The President's 
Annual Report. 

I'm very proud to tell you that the 
past academic year was one filled with 
many outstanding student accomplish- 
ments, faculty and staff awards, and 
growth and improvement in many 
areas of the college. 

Our students never cease to amaze 
me. Some are just naturally gifted 
individuals who achieve at the highest 
level and aspire to be highly-skilled 
professionals in their chosen career. 
Others sacrifice time with their fami- 
lies to gain new skills or finish a 
degree to become more employable in 
today's competitive job market. 

Cowley's goal is to take care of its 
students, regardless of their place in 
life. Sometimes we fail, and for that I 
apologize. But I can tell you that 
Cowley employees want every student 
to experience success. How that suc- 
cess is measured depends on the indi- 
vidual. 

Rebekah Krusemark from Winfield 
is our 2003-2004 Student of the Year. 
What a talented and gifted young 
woman! The computer graphic arts 
major was a member of six campus 
organizations and played in the Jazz 
Band, Concert Band, and the Winfield 
City Band. She also found time to vol- 
unteer for an after school program at 
the Denton Art Center, all the while 
maintaining a 3.8 grade-point average. 

A significant testimony to our facul- 
ty occurred when Wichita State 
University released its Report on 
Transfer Students from Cowley 
County Community College in fall 
2003. Cowley students who trans- 




ferred to WSU had higher GPAs than 
all other WSU students. Male students 
who transferred from Cowley had a 
cumulative 3.123 GPA, compared to 
2.925 for all other WSU male students. 
Female students from Cowley had a 
cumulative 3.280 GPA, compared to 
3.127 for all other WSU female stu- 
dents. Overall, Cowley students had a 
higher cumulative GPA, 3.221 to 3.041, 
than other WSU students. 

Natural Science Department 
Instructor Pam Smith was selected as 
the fourth recipient of the Endowed 
Chair for Teaching Excellence and 
Student Learning, and she secured a 
grant to purchase some much-needed 
software for the science curriculum. 

In fall 2003, Community College 
Week listed Cowley among the fastest 
growing community colleges in the 
nation. The college has grown signifi- 
cantly during my 17 years as presi- 
dent, and we've been able to manage 
that growth quite well. 

The Aviation Maintenance 
Technology program expanded into 
Wichita, enrollment continued to set 



records, and we broke ground on two 
building projects, the renovation of the 
south lobby of W.S. Scott Auditorium, 
and the construction of a new class- 
room building. 

This report includes many other 
wonderful highlights from the past 
year. I invite you to read through it 
carefully. It is my hope that it will give 
you a better understanding of what 
Cowley is all about and the direction 
we're heading. 

On behalf of our Board of Trustees, 
my fellow administrators, our faculty, 
staff and students, I want to thank you 
for your support of Cowley County 
Community College. It means a great 
deal to me. The college has always 
been a viable entity within Arkansas 
City, Cowley County, and south-cen- 
tral Kansas. We will do our very best 
to keep it that way. 

/-, Sincerely, 

Patrick J. McAfee, Ph.D. 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES and Administration 



Board of Trustees 




r 
i i 

Donna Albert 

Avery Bacastow Jr. 




Ron 
Godsey 



Lee 
Gregg Jr. 



College Administration 




Dr. Patrick J. 
McAtee 

President 




Vice President of 
Academic and 
Student Affairs 




Crouch 

Vice President of 
Business Services 




Conrad 
Jimison 

Vice President of 
Administration 



aton 




>oyie 

Dean of 
Student Learning 







McKown 

Dean of 

Research and 

Technology 




Terri 
Morrow 

Dean of 

Development & 

College Relations 




Sue 
Saia 

Dean of 
Student Life 




Wesbrooks 

Northern 
Campuses 




Tom 
Saia 

Director of 
Athletics 



■ 



STUDENT! Achievements 




Sarah 
ritch< 



Pntchard 

September 2003 

Augusta, KS 
Communications 




Rachel 
Warren 

October 2003 

Geuda Springs, KS 

Pre-Medicme 




Maclnnis 

November 2003 

Weyburn, 

Saskatchewan, 

Canada 

Pre-Medicine 



Rebekarr 
Krusemark 

December 2003 

Winfield, KS 

Computer Graphic 

Arts 



JMik 



M. 



-1 > 



Com 



January 2u04 

Rogers, AR 

Communications 




& 



fathan 
arkley 

February 2004 

Wellington, KS 

Psychology 




Sarah 
Area 

March 2004 

Havensville, KS 

Secondary 

Education 



ten 5 

April 2004 

Arkansas City, KS 

Business 

Administration 






jt 



STUDENT Achievements 




STUDENT of the Year 



Rebekah Krusemark was named 
Cowley County Community 
College's Student of the Year 
Tuesday night during the annual 
Celebration of Excellence, the honors 
and awards banquet held in the Earle 
N. Wright Community Room inside 
the Brown Center. 

Krusemark, a Winfield native, was 
Cowley's December Student of the 
Month. She is the daughter of Nancy 
and David Krusemark. She is a sopho- 
more computer graphic arts major 
who is a member of the Art Club, 
Chess Club, Math & Science Club, 
Campus Christian Fellowship, Phi 
Theta Kappa, and Mu Alpha Theta. 
She's also a member of the Jazz Band, 
Concert Band, and the Winfield City 
Band. She serves as librarian for the 
Winfield City Band and is an Art Club 
volunteer for an after school program 
at the Denton Art Center. 

She has 
been list- 
ed on 
the 



National Dean's List, received the 
Silver Key award from the Scholastic 
Art Show and Competition in 2002, 
and took second place in Cowley's 
first Hutzbah Awards, sponsored last 
year by the Art Club. She attends 
Cowley on an instrumental music 
scholarship, an Arkansas City Area 
Arts Council scholarship, and a St. 
John's Alumni Scholarship. 

She plans to transfer to Concordia 
University in Seward, Neb. 

For being named Student of the 
Year, Krusemark received a bouquet 
of $1 bills, prepared by Vicki Crouch, 
dorm manager and manager of the 
Tiger Deli. 

Krusemark was honored numerous 
times Tuesday night. She was award- 
ed for her contributions to the Art 
Club, Chess Club, Math & Science 
Club, and as a Student of the Month. 

Other Cowley Students of the Month 
who were eligible for the Student of 
the Year award were Sarah Pritchard 
of Augusta; Rachel Warren of Geuda 
Springs; Lynsey Maclnnis of Weyburn, 
Saskatchewan, Canada; Jake Conley of 
Rogers, Ark.; Nathan Markley of 
Wellington; Sarah Area of Havensville; 
and Lucas Goff of Arkansas City. 

Awards were presented to students 
who participate in 16 clubs and organ- 
izations. Top awards went to: 
Jonathan Paxson, 
Argonia, for 
Act One I 








Arkansas City, Golden Shovel Award 
for the Art Club; Chris Craft, Caldwell, 
Chess Club; Megan O'Neill, Milton, 
Debate/ Forensics; Toni Carlson, 
Arkansas City, Journalism Club 
(Student Publications); Zeb Wilson, 
South Haven, Peers Advocating 
Wellness for Students; Jessica Whitson, 
Oxford, Phi Beta Lambda; Charlotte 
Hulsey, Arkansas City, Phi Theta 
Kappa; Shayla McDonald, Arkansas 
City, Student Ambassador of the Year; 
Megan Whitehead, Arkansas City, 
Student Government Association; 
Devin Woods, Manhattan, Vocal 
Music; and A.J. Ybarra, Wellington, 
Volunteers Learning Through Service. 



'.' 




At 



Sue Saia, left, dean of student life, presents Rebekah Krusemaric with a bouquetof$1 biDs for bekig named the 2003-2004 Student of the Year. 



■ 



STUDENT 1 Achievements 



AEC team finishes 
second in state 

The Academic Excellence 
Challenge team took second 
place in the statewide AEC 
Finals Tournament April 30 and May 
1, 2004, at Allen County Community 
College in Iola. 

Cowley went 4-2 during the two-day 
tournament. The team recorded wins 
over Pratt 75-70, Garden City 150-80, 
Pratt 100-40, and Fort Scott 220-50. 
Cowley dropped a 95-80 decision to 
Cloud County in Round 2, and a 140- 
45 decision to Cloud in Round 6. 

Cowley AEC team members for 
2003-2004: Chris Craft of Caldwell, 



Andrew McCown of Wichita 
(Southeast High School), Jenny 
Tevington of Mayfield (Campus High 
School), and Bary Tevington of 
Mayfield. Cowley AEC alumnae 
Bethany Kennedy and Nick Endicott 
volunteered their time as assistant 
coaches. 

Cowley's AEC team is coached by 
Social Science Department Instructor 
Chris Mayer. 

"I'd like to thank Natural Science 
Department instructors Greg Nichols 
and Scott Layton for helping the team 
prepare by participating in weekly 
practice sessions over the course of 
this semester," Mayer said in the 



spring. "Their contributions are no 
small part of Cowley AEC's final 
standing. Many thanks also to the 
numerous faculty, staff and students 
who encouraged and supported the 
team through the competition." 

AEC is the classic question-and- 
answer "scholar's bowl" academic 
competition for two-year colleges in 
Kansas. Since 1999, Cowley AEC 
teams have consistently won their way 
into the finals, and have not placed 
lower than fifth over all since 2000. 
Cowley AEC teams were state champi- 
ons in 2000 and 2001. The 2002-2003 
team placed third. 



Cowley JUlath & Science 
Club project has world- 
wide impact 

Saving 2,000 square feet of threat- 
ened forest land in Brazil might 
not seem like a big deal, but it is 
to Cowley Math & Science Club stu- 
dents. 

For the past seven years, the student 
organization has chosen to work with 
Human-i-Tees, an educational 
fundraiser, primarily because it is 
widely recognized for its commitment 
to environmental education and 
preservation and for incorporating 
social responsibility into its work. 

In fall 2001, Human-i-Tees unveiled 
its Tees for Trees program. Since its 
introduction, partnerships with organ- 
izations such as Cowley's Math & 
Science Club have preserved more 
than 2,100 acres of forest in the Jaguar 
Ecological Reserve located in Brazil's 
Pantanal. 

Greg Nichols, Math & Science Club 
sponsor, said he was proud of the stu- 
dents' efforts. 

"This is my first year doing this, and 
it's pretty cool," said Nichols, a math 
instructor in the Natural Science 
Department. "I don't think the stu- 
dents realize the impact they are hav- 
ing on the world in which we live." 



Cowley students raised nearly 
$1,400 during the 2003-2004 academic 
year, which allowed Human-I-Tees 
and the Focus Conservation Fund to 
preserve 2,050 square feet of forest. 
About $500 came back to the club and 
was used to pay for field trips, social 
activities and refreshments at club 
meetings. 

Nichols credited Pam Smith, a col- 
league in the Natural Science 
Department, for keeping students 
involved in the fundraiser throughout 
the years. 

A.J. Ybarra was the top seller in the 
club, followed closely by Rebekah 
Krusemark and Holly Leach. 

Nichols said the Amazon Rainforest 
was depleting at such a rapid pace 
that it would continue to have a nega- 
tive effect on the environment around 
the world. 

"That forest provides a lot of oxy- 
gen, and if the rainforests are deplet- 
ed, the carbon dioxide increases, and 
that contributes to global warming," 
Nichols said. "A lot of schools and 
organizations around the country are 
involved in this project. Hopefully, we 
will help in the preservation of forest 
area the size of a neighborhood or 
even a small town with continued sup- 
port." 



Nichols said it was important for 
young people to realize that their 
effort impacts the entire world. 

"Anytime you can get young kids to 
think beyond their own circumstances, 
to think outside the box and what 
impacts you on a day-to-day basis, 
that's part of the whole college experi- 
ence," Nichols said. "You grow up 
and finally realize that we're all con- 
nected." 

Sales of Human-I-Tee products took 
place during an eight-week period 
from October 2003 to early December 
2003. Nichols said many students sold 
the products to people outside the col- 
lege. 

"This community (Arkansas City) 
has been great in support of this proj- 
ect," he said. 



STUDENT Achievements 



■ 



Cowley Phi Beta 
Lambda students score 
well at state contest 

Thirteen students in the college's 
Phi Beta Lambda chapter 
brought home six first-place fin- 
ishes at the annual State Leadership 
Conference and Competition held 
March 4-5, 2004, in Salina. 

Cowley competed against students 
from Central College of McPherson, 
Colby Community College, Friends 
University, Emporia State University, 
Kansas State University and Labette 
Community College. The events con- 
sisted of written tests, computer appli- 
cation tests, and job interviews. 
Cowley's first-place finishers: 
Marni Erb, Mulvane freshman, 
Computer Applications; Jessica 
Whitson, Oxford sophomore, 
Accounting Principles and Business 



Communications; Chelsea Scott, 
Wellington sophomore, Word 
Processing; and Russell Lowden, 
Arkansas City sophomore, Business 
Principles and Quantitative Methods. 

Second-place finishes: 

Lori Aikins, Winfield sophomore, 
Job Interview; Amber Reuber, West 
Elk freshman, Computer Applications. 

Third-place finishes: 

Erb, Human Resource Management; 
Lindsey Patton, Wellington freshman, 
Information Management; Scott, 
Quantitative Methods; Lowden, 
Computer Concepts and Economics. 

Aikins, Erb, Patton, Scott, and 
Reuber majored in business adminis- 
tration. Whitson and Lowden were 
accounting majors. 

Angela Root, Winfield sophomore, 
served as the vice president on the 
Kansas State Board of Officers. 



Beverly Grunder, the organization's 
adviser, was named the Kansas PBL 
Adviser of the Year for 2002-2003. It 
was the second time Grunder received 
the award in the last three years. 
Students make nominations for the 
adviser award, and the winner is cho- 
sen by the Kansas State Board of 
Officers. 

"Phi Beta Lambda offers the stu- 
dents a way to build their confidence 
and leadership skills," Grunder said. 
"It is always a joy to see the students 
grow and mature through this pro- 
gram." 




Woods earns coveted 
JUlr. Cinderfella title 

Devin Woods, a sophomore 
music major from Manhattan, 
was chosen from a group of 16 
male students as Mr. Cinderfella dur- 
ing the annual pageant May 6, 2004. 



Woods was crowned by Miss 
Kansas, Angelea Busby, and will reign 
for one year. Jasper McDuffus first 
runner-up, Trent James took second 
runner-up, Colgan James third runner- 
up, and Mark Gubichuk fourth run- 
ner-up. 



Woods was a member of the CC 
Singers and Cowley Concert Choir. 






STUDEN1 f Achievements 



AC businesses join 
Cowley students, staff 
on lif esaver of a 
project 

Project Lifesavers is on its way, 
literally. 

Jason Parson, a Cowley County 
Community College sophomore and 
member of the U.S. Army National 
Guard stationed in Iraq, formally 
requested that Lifesavers and ink pens 
be sent. 

College students and personnel 
obliged. 

Cathy Hendricks, a Social Science 
Department instructor and one of 
Parson's former teachers, was deter- 
mined to fulfill his request. With the 



help of students, faculty, staff, and 
stores within Arkansas City, Parson's 
request has been granted. 

Hendricks sent more than 150 letters 
for the 443rd Transportation Division. 
Cowley student, John Irving, con- 
tributed 30 letters. Many students, fac- 
ulty, and staff also wrote letters. 

This project accumulated more than 
100 pounds of candy. The Arkansas 
City Country Mart donated 70 bags of 
Lifesavers. Phi Theta Kappa and Wal- 
Mart donated $20 worth of candy. 
Graves Drug Store donated $5 worth 
of candy, while Dillons donated nine 
pounds. 

Cowley Students Kayla Strange and 
Doug Dillner were responsible for col- 
lecting the donations around town. 



They played a major role in the suc- 
cess of the project. 

Other donations included 150 ink 
pens provided by the college's Public 
Relations office, and Business and 
Service Technology instructor Larry 
Schwintz and Social Science 
Department Secretary Wanda 
Shepherd donated disposable digital 
cameras. The college paid for the 
postage. 

In a most recent e-mail from Parson 
to Hendricks, Parson wrote, "The only 
thing I can say is how good the people 
at Cowley make a person feel." 



Cowley Press best 
two-year newspaper in 
Kansas 

The staff of The Cowley Press stu- 
dent newspaper was awarded 
the All-Kansas Award at the 
Kansas Associated Collegiate Press 
contest in Wichita April 18-19, 2004. 

The award goes to the best collegiate 
newspaper among two-year colleges 
in Kansas for the 2003-2004 school 
year. 

Staff members competed in several 
individual categories, including ad 
design, photography, sports, news, 
column and feature writing, headline 
writing, multimedia storytelling, 
design and special sections. 

Winners: Toni Carlson, second run- 
ner-up Journalist of the Year; Erica 
Lavallee, first place column writing; 



Thomas Noah, first and third place 
sports column writing; Carlson, sec- 
ond place front page design; Sara 
Rosenkrance, second place feature 
photography; The Cowley Press staff, 
second and third place special sec- 
tions; Sarah Pritchard, third place 
sports news writing; staff, third place 
multimedia storytelling. 



There also were 14 honorable men- 
tions received for Cowley entries. 

David Bostwick, Humanities 
Department instructor, is the faculty 
advisor to The Cowley Press. 



All-Kansas 



IN COLUQIATT JOURNALISM 



KACP 





K \\N \\ 




v . . M i \ri i» 




« KM M.IVtl 




PRISS 


* 









The Cowley Press 

A NCtMM a#*«s 

Co*»«<*y County C<N"*»wu*lty Co®#©# 
Apnl n. 2004 



STUDENT Achievements 



Roberts, Warren 
represent Cowley on 
PTK All-Kansas team 

Lisa Roberts and Rachel Warren, 
graduates of Arkansas City High 
School, have been chosen to rep- 
resent Cowley on the All-Kansas 
Academic Team sponsored by Phi 
Theta Kappa. 

The two were among 44 students 
from Kansas community colleges who 
were honored at the Ninth Annual 
PTK Honors Luncheon Feb. 18 at the 
Holiday Inn West/Holidome in 
Topeka. Students were chosen by 
meeting certain criteria, including the 
degree of academic classes taken, cam- 
pus involvement, a 4.0 grade-point 
average, and writing several essays. A 
recommendation from a faculty mem- 
ber also was to be considered for this 
honor. 

Todd Shepherd, Cowley's faculty 
PTK sponsor, said he was looking for 
students who stood out in the crowd 
academically. 

"From the recommendation from the 
faculty, these are two top-notch stu- 
dents," Shepherd said. "I'm proud to 
see both of these students recognized 
for their high academic achievements." 

Roberts is the daughter of Kenneth 
and Janet Roberts. She is involved in 
the Math and Science Club, Mu Alpha 
Theta, and PTK. 

When asked how it felt to be repre- 
senting Cowley and PTK, Roberts said, 
"Overall, I think it's nice to be recog- 
nized for all our hard work. It's nice 
that the teachers nominate and that 
they have faith in me." 

Roberts is a finance major who plans 
to attend Oklahoma State University 
in the fall. 

Warren, the daughter of Tom and 
JoLynn Warren, also is involved in Mu 
Alpha Theta, PTK, and the Math and 
Science Club. She also is a Student 
Ambassador for the college. 




Lisa Roberts 

"It's a big honor and a big responsi- 
bility to represent our school at such 
an event," Warren said. 

Warren is a pre-medicine major who 
plans to attend the University of 
Kansas in the fall. 

Not only are both women being 
honored, they each will receive a 
proclamation issued by Gov. Kathleen 
Sebelius, an educational scholarship of 
$300, and an academic medallion. 

One of the benefits of membership 
in PTK, the national honor society for 
two-year colleges, is scholarship 
money. Each year, between $3 million 
and $5 million in scholarships is given 
away to PTK members nationwide. 
Traditionally, Kansas Board of Regents 
universities and Washburn University 
have provided scholarships in the 
amount of $1,000 for the All-Kansas 
Team recipients who transfer to their 
institutions. 

Each scholar also is a nominee for 
the 2004 All-USA Academic Team, 
sponsored by USA Today newspaper, 
PTK, and the American Association of 
Community Colleges. 




Rachel Warren 

To become a member of PTK, a stu- 
dent must achieve and maintain a 
minimum 3.25 GPA and carry 12 cred- 
it hours a semester. They also must 
receive three recommendations from 
full-time instructors. 

Members of PTK are high-caliber 
students and exhibit the qualities that 
can make them the leaders of tomor- 
row. It has been said that PTK is more 
than just a club; it is an honor to be a 
member. 

"This opportunity opens up doors 
and it looks good on transcripts," 
Roberts said. 

Community college students nation- 
wide compete for places on the first, 
second and third All-USA teams, each 
team comprising 20 spots. First-team 
members each receive a $2,500 
stipend, and will be featured along 
with second- and third-team members 
in an April issue of USA Today. Team 
members also are presented with 
medallions. Names of the students will 
be placed on the society's web site, 
www.ptk.org. 



STUDENT Achievements 



Shawnee, Okla. r native 
crowned Queen Alalah 
LXXII 



Candace Salas was so sure she 
wouldn't be crowned Queen 
Alalah that she went dancing at 
Graham Central Station in Wichita the 
night before the Queen's Coronation. 

Salas, a sophomore pre-pharmacy 
major, was crowned Queen Alalah 
LXXII Oct. 24, 2003, at Cowley. 

Chelsea Bland, a sophomore from 
Ponca City, Okla., was runner-up. 

"Since I wasn't expecting it, I was 
like 'let's get this show on the road 
and eat some pizza'," Salas said. "My 
eyes started to water when they called 
my name. I was in complete shock." 

Salas, one of five finalists chosen by 
Cowley students and employees in 
balloting two weeks ago, was the win- 
ner after voting by the Coronation 
audience. 

Salas said several people 
approached her during the Saturday 
parade expressing their well wishes. 

"A lot of people came up to me an 4 
told me I did a wonderful job," Salas 
said. "I had a lot of fun. I was very 
surprised at how much the community 
gets involved with Arkalalah." 



Salas' crowning capped a big night 
during Arkansas City's annual fall fes- 
tival, Arkalalah. The queens and 19 
visiting queens from surrounding 
communities were guests at the 
Queen's Banquet held earlier Friday 
evening. 

Then, "River Side Story," a play on 
the Broadway musical "West Side 
Story," was the theme for the Queen's 
Coronation, held for the first time in 
the Robert Brown Theatre inside the 
Brown Center for Arts, Sciences and 
Technology. Nineteen former Queen 
Alalahs were on hand for the festivi- 
ties, including the first Queen Alalah, 
Dorothy Moore Harbaugh. 

"I'm 92 years old and I can't imagine 
I'm still here," said Harbaugh, who 
lives in Enid, Okla. "I was thrilled to 
death to be crowned the first Queen 
Alalah." 

Salas, 20, was an active Cowley stu- 
dent. She was captain of the Tigerette 
Danceline, was a member of the Math 
and Science Club, Campus Christian 
Fellowship, and she played Powder 
Puff intramural football. She also held 
a part-time job at Graves Drugstore in 
Arkansas City. 

Salas is the daughter of Terry and 
Steve Salas of Shawnee. She expressed 




her gratitude toward many who sup- 
ported her. 

"I got tremendous support from my 
Danceline teammates, from the people 
at Graves, and from my foster parents, 
Matt and Roxanna James," Salas said. 
"I feel awesome." 

Dr. David Ross served as master of 
ceremonies at the Coronation. 
Entertainment was provided by 
Cowley's CC Singers, the Coronation 
Dance Company, the Arkansas City 
High School Jazz Band, the Ark High 
Singers, and the Cowley Tigerettes. 
Ross also was named Arkalalah Grand 
Marshal in 2003. 



Former Cowley 
students at W5U have 
higher GPAs 

For the second consecutive year, 
Cowley students who transferred 
to Wichita State University had 
higher cumulative grade-point aver- 
ages than all other WSU students, 
according to a report on transfer stu- 
dents provided by the Office of the 
Registrar at WSU. 

In the fall 2003 report, which was 
made on Dec. 29, male students who 
transferred from Cowley had a cumu- 
lative 3.123 GPA, compared to 2.925 
for all other WSU male students. 
Female students from Cowley had a 
cumulative 3.280 GPA, compared to 



3.127 for all other WSU female stu- 
dents. Overall, Cowley students had a 
higher cumulative GPA, 3.221 to 3.041, 
than other WSU students. 

The fall 2002 report showed similar 
results: Cowley males transferring to 
WSU, 3.115 GPA; all other WSU males, 
2.910 GPA; Cowley females transfer- 
ring to WSU, 3.256 GPA; all other 
WSU females, 3.117 GPA; all Cowley 
students transferring to WSU, 3.205 
GPA; all other WSU students, 3.029 
GPA. 

The report is extensive and provides 
grade-point averages by each WSU 
college, and within the college by sex 
and classification. 

In the December 2003 report, the 
GPA for male students who trans- 



ferred from Cowley to WSU with 
enough hours to classify them as 
freshmen had the largest margin over 
all other WSU freshmen counterparts, 
3.111 to 2.564. The largest difference 
among females transferring from 
Cowley and all other WSU females 
occurred in the junior class, where 
Cowley students had a cumulative 
3.269 GPA, compared to 3.094 for 
WSU juniors who were female. 

"The report speaks well for our fac- 
ulty," said Dr. Pat McAfee, Cowley 
president. "It also speaks to the fact 
that our college is a good place to tran- 
sition from high school to the four- 
year university. And once we get stu- 
dents here who plan to transfer, we 
prepare them well." 



10 



_ 



FACULTY/STAFF Achievements 



ENDOWED Chair #4 



Pam Smith, a Natural Science 
Department instructor, was pre- 
sented the Endowed Chair for 
Teaching Excellence and Student 
Learning Jan. 20, 2004, during an 
inservice meeting in the Brown Center. 

Smith, in her eighth year at Cowley, 
was selected for the award from a field 
of six nominees. The five others are 
David Bostwick, Humanities; Marlys 
Cervantes, Humanities; Beverly 
Grunder, Business and Service 
Technology; Jafar Hashemi, Natural 
Sciences; and Todd Shepherd, Social 
Sciences. All six candidates received 
gifts. 

Dr. Pat McAtee, Cowley president, 
introduced Smith as the 2004-2006 
recipient. 

"Pam demonstrates leadership both 
in and out of the classroom," McAtee 
said. "She is a valuable member of a 
team as her contributions are always 
offered with what is good for the col- 
lege and our students as her focal 
point." 

Smith expressed gratitude toward 
her colleagues at Cowley. 

"This award is as much yours as it is 
mine," she said. "I can not tell you 
enough how grateful I am for all you 
did for my daughter (Charlotte 
Hulsey) during her two years here. As 
many of you know, she didn't have a 
lot of direction in life, and that was a 
concern of mine. She wanted to go to 
Kansas State her freshman year, but I 
was able to discourage her from doing 
that, and she came to Cowley. Because 
of all of you, she became a successful 
student." 

Smith teaches all levels of chemistry 
at the college, and was instrumental in 
the remodeling of the chemistry lab on 
the main campus. She is involved in a 
Title III grant pilot program integrat- 
ing the use of technology in her class- 
room. Most recently, she received a 
$1,000 grant from the National 
Computational Science Institute. The 



money was used to purchase software 
to enable chemistry students to build 
molecules on computer. 

In 1999, Smith received a Master 
Teacher award from the National 
Institute for Staff and Organizational 
Development in Austin, Texas. On 
campus, she is president of the College 
Education Association, has been a 
sponsor for the Math and Science Club 
and Mu Alpha Theta (a national math- 
ematics honor society) for the past five 
years, chairs the Site Safety team, and 
serves on many other committees and 
teams at the college. 

Smith's professional organizations 
include being an active member of the 
Kansas College Chemistry Teachers 
Association and as a member of the 2- 
Year College Chemistry Consortium. 

McAtee read a few statements made 
by students concerning Smith. 

"I just wanted to thank you for 
being such a wonderful instructor 
these last two years. You have been 
very good at explaining chemistry and 
have actually made me enjoy the sub- 
ject much more than before I came to 
Cowley. Your endless optimism has 
made me regret having to have a new 
instructor next year. I will miss being 
in your class." 

Another student wrote, "Thank you 
so much for all your help and support 
while I was ill. It means a lot to me to 
know that someone cares about me 
doing well in school. I want you to 
know that I have decided 
to go to 
Emporia 
State 
next 




environmental biology. I am now 
excited about school because of you." 

The Endowed Chair for Teaching 
Excellence and Student Learning was 
established in 1998 and is sponsored 
by Corner Bank of Winfield and 
Arkansas City. Jana Dobbs, senior vice 
president for relationship manage- 
ment, and Joyce McArtor, vice presi- 
dent and manager of the Corner Bank 
branch in Arkansas City, presented 
Smith with a check for $2,000. Smith 
will receive another check for $2,000 
next year. Award recipients are to use 
$1,000 of the award for professional 
development. The remaining $3,000 is 
a cash stipend. 

Connie Donatelli, Cowley's director 
of vocal music and the 2002-2004 
Endowed Chair, spoke briefly about 
what the award meant to her. 

Candidates for the award must sub- 
mit recommendation letters from a 
colleague, their department chair, a 
student, and from Sheree Utash, vice 
president of academic and student 
affairs. Other requirements include 
peer observation, an explanation of 
their teaching philosophies, and 
answering a series of questions relat- 
ing to teaching. Candidates are 
reviewed by an internal committee 
and an external committee. 




Sheree Utash, vke president of academic and student affairs, left, and Dr. Rat McAtee, colege 
president, pose with Ram Smith, Natural Science Deparbnent instructor ami tlie fourth Endowed 
Chair for leaching Excellence and Student Learning. 



11 



■ 



FACULTY/STAFF Achievements 



Fifteen employees 
honored for years 
of service 



Fifteen full-time employees were 
honored Feb. 24, 2004, during a 
celebration for their years of 
service to the college. 

A Celebration of Appreciation was 
held in the Earle N. Wright 
Community Room inside the Brown 
Center for Arts, Sciences and 
Technology on the main campus. 

Dr. Pat McAfee, president, presented 
gifts to the 15 employees and said a lit- 
tle bit about each one present. 

Employees are honored for continu- 
ous service of five years, 10 years, 15 



years, 20 years, 25 years, 30 years, 35 
years and so on. As of last year, 90 of 
the college's 190 full-time employees 
had been with the college for five or 
more years. 

Employees who were honored: 

35 years: Conrad Jimison, Vice 
President of Administration. 

25 years: Libby Palmer, 
Administrative Assistant to President. 

20 years: Ed Hargrove, Head 
Softball Coach. 

15 years: Larry Grose, Men's Tennis 
Coach and Dejon Ewing, Department 
Chair, Humanities. 

10 years: Bruce Watson, ADA 
Compliance Officer; Rex Soule, 
Publications Designer; and Bryan 



McChesney, Coordinator of ITV, 
Technology Specialist. 

5 years: Robert Wood, Dorm 
Manager/ Assistant Track Coach; 
Karolee Weller, Natural Science 
Instructor; LeArta Watkins, Director of 
Distance Learning; Loretta Waldroupe, 
Math Specialist for IMPACT; Chris 
Mayer, Social Science Instructor; Todd 
Ray, Maintenance Technician; and 
DeAnna Harp, Financial Aid Clerk. 

Gifts employees could select from 
were key rings, letter openers, brass 
and leather coasters, Nappa leather bi- 
fold wallets, Le Petit clocks, brass 
paperweights and clocks, and brass 
business card holders. 



Computer software 
assists chemistry 
students 



Chemistry students are now able 
to build molecules on comput- 
er, thanks to a grant secured by 
Natural Science Department Instructor 
Pam Smith. 

"Instead of making several different 
chemical compounds and testing them 
to see what works, students can build 
molecules on computer and test their 
properties, how they will react arid so 
forth," Smith said. "This is cutting 
edge in the field of chemistry." 

The software is not meant to replace 
the work students conduct in wet labs. 
Rather, it is a supplement to the typi- 
cal lab experiments. 

Smith was able to attend a week- 
long conference at San Jose (Calif.) 
State University in July 2003 titled 
"Computational Chemistry for 
Chemistry Educators." The National 
Computational Science Institute spon- 
sored the conference, and Cowley's 
Title III grant program paid for 
Smith's attendance. 

Smith was the lone community col- 
lege instructor among the 40-50 who 
attended workshops last summer, and 




Pam Smith 



she was one of only six people to be 
awarded $1,000 grants to help pur- 
chase the software. Cowley matched 
the grant to purchase the software 
package. 

Smith, in her eighth year at Cowley 
during the 2003-2004 academic year, 
said the computer work students do 
also would save the college money in 
chemical expense and be safer for the 
students. 



Smith said the NCSI wanted to put 
the software into the hands of chem- 
istry instructors and chemists. She said 
the average chemist would be able to 
use the software. 

"It's not just for theoretical chemists, 
but people in research and industry 
can use it, too," she said. 

The grant stipulates that the soft- 
ware be used during the fall and 
spring semesters, and that recipients 
give a report in May about its impact 
on student learning, among other 
things. 

Students in Chemistry I and II and 
Organic Chemistry I and II were the 
first to use the software. 

"It has the potential to be used in all 
of our chemistry classes," Smith said. 

"This is a significant change in 
chemistry education," Smith said. "By 
using computational software, the stu- 
dents can visualize the molecules and 
properties of them, and they'll have a 
deeper understanding of chemistry. 
Also, we hope that when they transfer 
to a university, they'll be well pre- 
pared." 



FACULTY/STAFF Achievements 



Math instructor 
presented Stirnaman 
award 



Uwe Conrad, a math instructor 
at the Southside Education 
Center in Wichita, was the sec- 
ond recipient of the Paul Stirnaman 
Memorial Award for Teaching 
Excellence. 

Conrad received the award during 
an inservice session Aug. 19, 2003. The 
first recipient, Larry Schwintz, pre- 
sented Conrad with the award, which 
is sponsored by the College Education 
Association. 

"First of all, I'd like to thank every- 
one involved for this award," Conrad 
said. "I was more than surprised. I just 
never think of myself as award materi- 
al, especially among so many col- 
leagues doing so many exciting things. 
Receiving an award for teaching excel- 
lence from one's pears has to be the 
ultimate 'pat on the back' for a 
teacher." 

Conrad has taught full-time at 
Cowley since January 2000. He teaches 
trigonometry, statistics, calculus B & E, 
calculus I and calculus III, all at the 
Southside Center. 

He holds master's and bachelor's 
degrees from Middle Tennessee State 
University. It was there that he got his 
start in teaching, as a graduate teach- 
ing assistant. That developed into a 
full-time job, one that he held since 
1991. 

Conrad remembers when he first 
applied for a part-time teaching posi- 
tion at Cowley. 

"I told (vice president of academic 
and student affairs) Sheree (Utash) 
that I have never had a bad day in the 
classroom," Conrad said. "I'll teach 
any class, any time, anywhere." 

Conrad said he strives to make his 
classes interesting. 

"The educational experience should 
be an enjoyable one; it always is for 
me," he said. "I do my best to provide 
my students with a memorable, excit- 
ing, and productive time in my class- 
room. 



KAMATYC 



Kansas Mathematical 



ofTwo-Yc 




"I know that most students probably 
do not look forward to spending time 
in a math class. Hopefully, I can 
reduce their stress and anxiety by pro- 
viding a variety of support materials 
and resources designed to help them 
understand, learn, and succeed. I 
never teach the same class twice." 

Conrad said he also seeks to 
improve himself each day he sets foot 
into the classroom. 

"Change is good," he said. "There is 
always room for improvement. I 
attend as many conferences and work- 
shops as possible. There is a lot of 
exciting work being done, and pio- 
neered, in mathematics education. I 
think just staying current is the first 
step to falling behind." 

Conrad said he hopes to have an 
impact on students' lives, not just 
today but later in life. 

"I hope to provide students with an 
education that is not just relevant to 
the present, but also as an investment 
in their future," Conrad said. "Success 
is learned. I don't know how many 
students have told me that if they can 
succeed in a math class, they can do 
anything." 



The award is named for Paul 
Stirnaman, a long-time Social Science 
Department instructor and strong sup- 
porter of the CEA who died June 16, 
2000, after a lengthy illness. 

"I hope to prove myself worthy of 
this honor in the future," Conrad said. 
"Receiving this award will represent a 
milestone in my teaching career and 
will be hard to top." 



Conrad president-elect 
of math association 

In early October 2003, Uwe Conrad 
was elected president of the Kansas 
Mathematical Association of Two- 
Year Colleges. He will begin his term 
in 2005. 






FACULTY/STAFF Achievements 



Morris retires after 
more than 25 years 

After working for four registrars 
and assisting thousands of stu- 
dents, Sue Morris decided it 
was time to say goodbye. 

Morris retired May 28, 2004, after 
more than 25 years of service. A recep- 
tion was held in her honor on May 27. 
The 62-year-old Morris, whose hus- 
band Norman is a retired conductor 
for Burlington Northern-Santa Fe 
Railroad, said Cowley had been her 
second home. 

"I will miss it," she said, "but not 
being here at 7 in the morning. I am 
not a morning person." 

Morris was referring to Cowley's 
summer hours of 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. 
Monday through Thursday that run 
June and July. 

Morris retired from a career that 
began in Cowley's athletic depart- 
ment. Former business officer Sid 
Regnier contacted Morris in 1973 and 
asked her to fill in for the athletic sec- 
retary for about three weeks, and she 
did. About five years later, Morris was 
called back to the college when 
William "Bill" Scott's secretary was on 
maternity leave. It was October 1978, 
and Morris worked six weeks. About a 
month later, Morris was asked to work 
for Scott again, this time for three 
months. 

"I was basically doing the job full 
time," Morris said. 

On May 1, 1979, Morris officially 
began working full time at the college 
as purchasing clerk in the business 
office for Regnier. "He was a great 
man to work for," Morris said. 

Before long, Morris was working for 
Scott, who became the acting registrar. 
But it didn't take long before then- 
president Dr. Gwen Nelson reassigned 
Scott. 

"I loved working for him, and I 
wanted to go with him," Morris said. 
"But the administration thought I 
should stay in the registrar's office." 

In came Walt Mathiasmeier, whom 
Morris worked for until 1985. That's 




Wanda Shepherd, left, and Uirry Schwartz took over the shoulder of Sue Morris as she looks at 
her retirement cake. 



when A.F. "Tony" Buffo retired, and 
Nelson promoted Mathiasmeier to 
dean of instruction and Conrad 
Jimison to registrar. 

Morris worked for Jimison three 
years until current registrar, Forest 
Smith, replaced Jimison on July 1, 
1988. 

Tasks within the registrar's office 
have remained similar throughout the 
years, while technology has not. 

"We didn't have computers in those 
early years," Morris said. "State 
reports had to be typed. It took about 
three weeks to do it. We had the old 
key punch system." 

Processing transcripts, recording 
grades, making sure reports to the 
state are accurate, and other duties 
have occupied Morris' time through- 
out the years. Technology has changed 
dramatically, and so has the college's 
enrollment. In 1979, Cowley's full-time 
enrollment was 737. Today, FTE 
stands at more than 3,000. 

Morris, who celebrated her 45-year 
reunion with her Arkansas City High 
School classmates during the summer, 
never attended college. Out of high 
school, she worked as a secretary for 



an insurance company now known as 
United Agency. After three years, she 
decided to stay home to get her three 
children, Todd 41, Brian 38, and 
Jennifer Potter 34, into school. She 
worked from home for Gilliland 
Printing, and had a three-month stint 
as a secretary at Viola Industries. 

In retirement, Morris said she wasn't 
sure what she would do. Activities 
involving her nine grandchildren and 
one great-grandchild will be on the 
calendar, along with a few other 
things. 

"I like to read," she said. "Best-sell- 
ers and mysteries. I also play pinochle 
in a card club. And I enjoy my flow- 
ers." 

Morris described herself as a "very 
loyal" employee. 

"A lot of my work ethic came from 
Mr. Scott," Morris said. "He was big 
on loyalty." 

Morris said she'd mostly miss the 
people she's come to know and work 
with throughout the years. 

"There are various people you come 
in contact with," she said. "I'll miss 
the students and faculty. I know I'll 
miss it." 



14 





Extraordinary 

entrepreneur: 

1960 graduate named 

Outstanding Tiger 

Alumnus 

The year was 1956, and Warren 
Koeller didn't have a clue. He 
had just graduated from 
Arkansas City High School, and he 
had no idea what he wanted to do. 

The United States Army gave him 
two years to think about it as it made 
good on its draft notice, even though 
the nation was between conflicts in 
Korea and Vietnam. 

In January 1959, Koeller enrolled at 
Arkansas City Junior College. Thanks 
to caring instructors, Koeller began to 
find some direction. Perhaps even 
more importantly, Koeller was told he 
was good at something, accounting. 

That early introduction to account- 
ing would lay the foundation of a suc- 
cessful career as a businessman and 
entrepreneur. It also helped land him 
the 2004 Outstanding Tiger Alumnus 
Award. He was presented the award 
at the morning commencement exer- 
cise May 8, 2004, in the Robert Brown 
Theatre inside the Brown Center. 

"Galle-Johnson Hall was all that was 
here when I went to school," Koeller 
said. "It's amazing to me how much 
this place has changed and grown." 

Koeller's first exposure to account- 
ing as a student at the college sparked 
a spirit deep down inside him. 

"After the first accounting course 
with Barney Getto, I enrolled in the 
second, and Barney came to me and 
told me I was good at this," Koeller 
said. "I said yeah, I notice other stu- 
dents come to me for advice. He asked 
if I'd ever thought of becoming a CPA. 
I said, what's that. He instilled interest 
in me. I checked out the CPA profes- 
sion, and it was very good. You could 
do a lot of things with it. I thought 
maybe that's what I should do." 



OUTSTANDING Tiger Alumni 



Success 





Dr. Rat McAtee presents Warren Koeller with 
the OutstaiKfng Tiger Ahannus Award for 



Koeller, who owns one company 
and is president of another, went on to 
major in accounting at Wichita 
University, graduating in 1963. He 
passed the Certified Public Accountant 
exam in September 1965, and was well 
on his way to understanding the finan- 
cial side of business. That knowledge 
helped fuel Koeller's entrepreneurial 
spirit as he built companies from the 
ground up, and turned one on the 
brink of bankruptcy into a huge suc- 
cess. 

Getto and ACJC printing instructor 
Tony Buffo influenced Koeller's 
future. 

"I look back at my life, and Tony 
probably did more to motivate me to 
be a good student and leader than 
anyone else," Koeller said. "When I 
met Tony in junior high, I didn't have 
a clue. I didn't get that much direction 
or discipline at home. Buffo instilled 
direction in me that no one ever had. I 
became totally enthralled with print- 
ing." 

But there was a problem: Koeller 
was colorblind. 

"I realized that I was very creative, 
and he (Buffo) was such a good 
instructor," Koeller said. "My first 
career path took me into printing as a 
profession. I wanted to be a teacher 



and a professional printer. But since I 
was totally colorblind, I came to the 
conclusion that this wasn't going to 
work. I knew all my life that I was that 
way. It was the first time I recognized 
I couldn't do something." 

After ACJC, WU instructor Fran 
Jabara took Koeller under his wing. 

"He said he was going to make 
something out of me," Koeller 
recalled. "Fran was a consultant to the 
Lear family when the Learjet was just 
an idea. Fran would bring a lot of that 
back to the classroom. One day, he 
was saying something to us about the 
Learjet. I put my hand up and said 
that's the dumbest idea I've ever 
heard. Nobody's going to buy a busi- 
ness jet for $500,000. Now, that same 
$500,000 business jet goes for $1.2 (mil- 
lion) on the market, if you can find 
one." 

So, Koeller was wrong. Learjet, of 
course, went on to become a large, 
successful corporation. And Koeller? 
That very well could have been the 
last time he was wrong about any- 
thing. 

He was a practicing CPA for Arthur 
Andersen in the Kansas City area until 
1970, when he grew tired of traveling 
and moving his wife, the former Lynn 
Cyrus of Ark City, and his family. It 
was during his last five years with 
Andersen, in its newly-created admin- 
istrative services division, where 
Koeller's creative wheels really started 
turning. 

"Computers were just becoming 
affordable in the business communi- 
ty," Koeller said. "I did programming 
and systems design work. The 
demand for that skill was really some- 
thing. There was no education avail- 
able. I just picked up a book and read 
it." 

As a self-taught computer network 
administrator and programmer, 
Koeller was on his way to bigger and 
better opportunities. He left Arthur 



15 



OUTSTANDING Tiger Alumni 



Anderson to become executive vice 
president of 3M Business Products, 
covering Kansas and Missouri. During 
that time, he got the notion to install a 
multi-user workstation system within 
the business. It became one of the first 
computer networks. 

"This was prior to IBM or anybody 
else getting into that," Koeller said. 
"At the same time, I felt this system 
could handle telephone modems. Why 
not put phone modems on this and 
offer the real estate community a way 
to access real estate online?" 

Why not? Koeller developed the sys- 
tem, offered it to realtors in the Kansas 
City area, and business took off. 

"At that point, my only goal was to 
bring in enough money to pay for the 
system," he said. "Low and behold, 
the phones started ringing immediate- 
ly, and I was overwhelmed with 
demand for the system in other cities." 

Koeller was ready to do his own 
thing. He and a programmer formed 
Realty Information Systems Company, 
now known as RISCO. It didn't take 
long before more employees were 
hired. Within years, the company's 
13,000 square-foot facility was too 
small, and it was replaced by a 34,000 
square-foot building. 

"By the time we outgrew that, we 
had 200 employees," Koeller said. 

Koeller sold the company in March 
2000 at the very height of the dot-com 
craze. Two men from Indianapolis, 
who had a lot of money to throw 
Koeller's way, bought the company. 
The very next day after Koeller closed 
the sale, the dot-com market crashed. 

"These guys had raised a bunch of 
venture capital money, and they had 
an idea for a new product to tie into 
what I was doing," Koeller said. "I 
was not at all interested in selling the 
company. But these guys had more 
money than they had sense." 

The new owners never got a second 
round of financing, and within 10 
months, they were broke. 

But Koeller had kept the real estate 
out of the deal. He sold the company 
for cash and took a long-term employ- 
ment contract, "which basically said I 
don't have to do anything." 



Back in the early 1990s, Koeller start- 
ed a manufacturing division within his 
company that built lock boxes realtors 
use when they list a house. His com- 
pany manufactured the mechanical 
and electronic device. 

"It started in 1995, but it was a hard 
sell," Koeller said. "It was so revolu- 
tionary, it took years to take off." 

The idea eventually caught on, big 
time, and Koeller's company turned 
large profits. The lock box uses an 
infrared transmitter. When a realtor 
uses the electronic key, information 
from the box, including the identity of 
the realtor, the company, and the time 
and date the house was shown, is 
transferred. 

"All of that was sold originally to 
the guys from Indianapolis," Koeller 
said. "But when they went broke, a 
bankruptcy judge stepped in and sold 
the company in two pieces. One was 
the MLS (Multi-Listing Service) divi- 
sion, which sold to Fidelity National, a 
huge company that owns nearly all 
title insurance companies in the U.S. 

"The second, the lock box manufac- 
turing business, was sold to General 
Electric. That part of it is so easy and 
stress-free, I chose to take my employ- 
ment contract with it. That's all I do is 
run a company that manufactures elec- 
tronic lock boxes." 

Koeller said it had been a profitable 
year for his company, having rented 
nearly 100,000 lock boxes and 20,000 
electronic keys to realtors in all parts 
of the nation. Realtors who use the 
boxes pay Koeller's company $10 a 
month for six years. Koeller said his 
company recently installed boxes in 
Salt Lake City, where there are 7,000 
realtors. 

As if the lock box company wasn't 
enough, Koeller has added another 
company to his portfolio. Koeller res- 
cued Kantronics of Lawrence a couple 
of years ago from financial disaster 
and has high hopes for the manufac- 
turer of wireless data controllers. 

"This company supplied all of the 
data transfer to the Mir space station 
for seven years and it worked flaw- 
lessly," Koeller said. "But nobody's 
heard of the company." 

It's a company with seven employ- 
ees and about $1 million in annual 



sales. Much like his other business 
ventures, Koeller said the company 
needed to make the product an all-in- 
one plug-and-play unit. 

"Engineers started on the develop- 
ment cycle, we got FCC (Federal 
Communications Commission) 
approval two months ago, and we're 
about to install it on a school bus sys- 
tem," Koeller said. 

The system will track school buses 
so parents can go to a web site and 
actually see on a map where the bus is 
located and which direction it is going. 
The system works with global posi- 
tioning satellites, and Koeller's box 
converts the signal to data and trans- 
mits it to radio waves to a central site. 
From there, it is uploaded to the web 
where parents can see the bus route. 

"It's just now starting to take off," 
Koeller said. "I'm really excited about 
it. This could be really, really big." 

Just about everything Koeller does is 
big, and he owes it all to his account- 
ing background. 

"The background I gained in my 
accounting career has been invalu- 
able," he said. "I can't imagine run- 
ning a business and not knowing the 
accounting end of it as well as I do. It 
gives me an edge." 

Koeller is often asked why he has so 
many irons in the fire at age 65. To 
Koeller, the answer is simple. 

"I do it because it's fun," he said. 
"Some of my friends are retired and 
don't do anything. I enjoy it. This is 
my latest venture, and it's going to 
work." 

When Koeller isn't at the office, he 
and Lynn spend time with their chil- 
dren and grandchildren, play a lot of 
golf, and travel. 

"I'm a firm believer in keeping 
active," he said. 

Koeller also finds time to tool 
around in his Boxster S Porsche, the 
ninth Porsche he's owned in the last 35 
years. 

"I've always had to have the best car 
I could get my hands on," Koeller 
said. 

Despite Koeller's penchant for sports 
cars, he's never gotten a speeding tick- 
et, or any other ticket for that matter. 

Kind of surprising for a man who's 
constantly on the go. 



COLLEGE News 



CONTINUED Growth 




Groundbreaking 
ceremony held for 
renovation, new 
construction 

A groundbreaking ceremony for 
two projects that had been on 
hold for more than a year took 
place Feb. 24, 2004, on Cowley's main 
campus. 

Ground was broken by all six mem- 
bers of Cowley's Board of Trustees 
and President Dr. Pat McAtee in front 
of W.S. Scott Auditorium and at the 
site of a new classroom building. Both 
projects, the renovation of the south 
lobby of W.S. Scott Auditorium, and 
the new construction, had been 
planned nearly two years ago. 
However, uncertainty in state funding 
prompted college officials to postpone 
construction a year. 

About 50 people turned out as 
Board members and McAtee turned 
over shovels of dirt in front of W.S. 
Scott Auditorium, a building con- 
structed in 1936 as a Public Works 
Administration project through the 
federal government, and at the site of 
the new building on the southeast cor- 
ner of Third Street and Washington 
Avenue. 

"It will be a nice renovation, and 
also provide handicap accessibility 
and better offices and meeting rooms," 




Summer 2004 was a busy one for the area dvectty south of W5. Scott Auditorium as workers 
constructed a new lobby and enhance. 



McAtee said of the W.S. Scott 
Auditorium project. 

The $1.2 million project begin imme- 
diately following the Cowley men's 
and women's basketball teams com- 
pleted their home games on the sched- 
ule. The project's deadline was around 
Labor Day. 

Features of the renovation include 
enlarged men's and women's rest- 
rooms, a new ticket booth and conces- 
sion stand, new trophy cases, a new 
Tiger Athletic Hall of Fame room, and 
an elevator that will take patrons to 
the second floor of the arena. 




Because of the construction on the 
building, the 81st commencement was 
held in two ceremonies inside the 
Brown Center. Students graduating 
with associate of arts degrees partici- 
pated in a 10 a.m. ceremony May 8, 
and students graduating with associ- 
ate of applied science, associate of sci- 
ence, associate of general studies and 
the college certificate participated in a 
2 p.m. ceremony. Both commence- 
ments were held in the Robert Brown 
Theatre inside the Brown Center. 

The $3.1 million Webb-Brown class- 
room building will house the Business 
and Service Technology Department. 
It is scheduled to be completed in 
summer 2005. The Daisy E. and Paul 
H. Brown Charitable Trust made a 
$350,000 gift toward the building, the 
largest single gift in the history of the 
college. 

"I'd like to thank all of the people 
who have supported this project," 
McAtee said. "We look forward to 
having the Webb Brown Classroom 
building." 



Board of Trustees, from left, Albert Bacastow Jr., Lee Gregg Jr., MaikPaton, Donna Avery, Ron 
Godsey, and LaDoma Laming along with President Dr. Rat McAtee, break ground for the 
Webb-Brown Academic Center on the main campus h Arkansas City. 



M 



■ 




bHMmSmI 





COLLEGE News 



Cowley one of fastest 
growing community 
colleges in U.S. 

An analysis of U.S. Department of 
Education data indicates what many 
people in south-central Kansas have 
known for years: Cowley is one of the 
fastest growing community colleges in 
the nation. 

In its Dec. 8, 2003, edition, 
Community College Week listed 
Cowley as the 33rd fastest growing 
public two-year college in the country 
among schools with a student enroll- 
ment between 2,500 and 4,999 stu- 
dents. 

According to the data, Cowley's 
enrollment increased 13.4 percent in 
total students, from 4,106 in fall 2001 
to 4,656 in fall 2002. However, if 20th- 
day enrollment figures were used, 
Cowley increased 15 percent during 
the same period, from 4,044 students 
in fall 2001 to 4,656. That would have 
placed Cowley 24th on the list. 

Whatever the number, Cowley Vice 
President for Academic and Student 
Affairs, Sheree Utash, said several fac- 
tors contributed to the large increase 
and subsequent recognition. 

"For several years, the Southside 
Education Center has had an impact 
on our growth," Utash said. "And late- 



ly, the development of our online 
classes and our whole distance learn- 
ing also has increased." 

Online full-time enrollment has 
increased from just 15 FTE in fall 2000 
to 150 FTE in fall 2003. Online saw a 
whopping 302 percent increase from 
fall 2002. Spring 2004 FTE for online 
classes was 188. 

The Southside Education Center in 
Wichita has seen large enrollment 
increases since officially opening in 
fall 1995. In fall 2003, Southside had a 
full-time enrollment of 1,296, up 12 
percent from fall 2002. 

"We have the ability to increase 
enrollment even more at Southside 
and in our distance education pro- 
grams," Utash said. "Those are two 
areas we can look at for continued 
future growth." 

Enrollment on Cowley's main cam- 
pus in Arkansas City increased 6 per- 
cent from fall 2001 to fall 2002, and 
another 3 percent from fall 2002 to fall 
2003. 

"I think that's directly attributed to 
the quality of the instruction in the 
classroom, the quality of programs 
and the quality of student life we're 
offering our students," Utash said. 

The economy, Utash said, also has 
played a role in Cowley's enrollment 
increase, primarily in fall 2002. 



"We had more laid off workers at 
that point in time than this fall," she 
said. 

Cowley also has seen a significant 
increase in the number of international 
students. Utash said the college went 
from 45 international students in fall 
2002 to 91 the following fall semester. 
And those figures don't include many 
guest international students from 
Wichita State University and Butler 
County Community College. 

"We have a combination of so many 
things working well in so many 
places, and that really contributes to 
the overall success of growing," Utash 
said. 

But with growth comes challenges. 

"We're really being proactive to 
meet the challenges that are an out- 
come of growth," she said. 

Utash praised Cowley employees for 
contributing to the school's distinction 
as one of the fastest growing commu- 
nity colleges in the nation. 

"To be spotlighted like this speaks 
very, very highly of our faculty and of 
our staff," Utash said. "The size of our 
classes and our faculty involvement 
with our students makes us grow. The 
way our staff displays customer serv- 
ice and puts our students first in all 
areas speaks highly of everybody's 
efforts at Cowley." 






Board decreases 
tuition for Oklahoma 
residents 



Oklahoma residents who enroll 
at Cowley beginning with the 
fall 2004 semester will be 
charged the same tuition and fee rate 
as Kansas residents, Cowley's Board of 
Trustees approved March 15, 2004, at 
its regular monthly meeting. 

The Board approved the following 
five tuition rates for the 2004-2005 aca- 
demic year: Cowley County residents 



$42 tuition plus $18 fees for $60 total; 
all other Kansas residents $47 tuition 
plus $18 fees for $65 total; Oklahoma 
residents $47 tuition plus $18 fees for 
$65 total; all other out-of-state resi- 
dents $99 tuition plus $18 fees for $117 
total; and international students $148 
tuition plus $18 fees for $166 total. 

In effect, tuition was increased $2 
per credit hour for Cowley County 
and all other Kansas residents, $10 per 
credit hour for international students, 
and kept the same for all other out-of- 
state residents. Tuition for Oklahoma 



residents was reduced $31 per credit 
hour. Student fees will remain 
unchanged at $18 per credit hour. 

"We're bringing them (Oklahoma 
residents) in line with our in-state 
rate," said Dr. Pat McAtee, Cowley 
president. 

In spring 2004, an enrollment report 
by Registrar Forest Smith indicated 
that 57 students were enrolled at 
Cowley who resided in Oklahoma. 
That number was expected to increase 
dramatically for the fall 2004 semester. 



ii 



COLLEGE News 



■ 



Full-time enrollment 
set records during 
academic year 

Full-time equivalent enrollment at 
the college set records in both the 
fall and spring semesters during 
the 2003-2004 academic year. 

For the first time in the 80-year his- 
tory of the college, full-time enroll- 
ment surpassed the 3,000 mark in fall 
2003. According to figures released by 
the Registrar's Office, full-time equiva- 
lency was 3,095 on the 20th day of 
classes, Sept. 17, 2003, a 5-percent 
increase over fall 2002. 

The largest single gain occurred on 
Cowley's main campus, where there 
were 33 percent more full-time stu- 
dents than in fall 2002. The main cam- 
pus FTE was 1,121, compared to 1,088 
in 2002. 

The college's major off-campus site, 
the Southside Education Center in 
Wichita, continued its growth, increas- 
ing 12 percent from fall 2002. There 
were 1,296 full-time students at the 
center, compared to 1,159 in fall 2002. 

The largest overall gain occurred 
with the college's online Internet class- 
es. FTE soared 302 percent, from 116 in 
fall 2002 to 151 in 2003. 

Spring 2004 enrollment figures also 
indicated a record for the college. 

While total headcount decreased 2 
percent, FTE increased 5 percent from 
spring 2003. Main-campus FTE 
increased 2 percent, while the 
Southside Center saw a 5-percent 
increase from spring 2003. The largest 
overall gain occurred with the col- 
lege's Internet classes, which jumped 
50 percent from spring 2003. 
Enrollment in technical classes jumped 
19 percent from spring 2003, due 
largely to the opening of the Aviation 
Tech Center in Wichita. 



Fall 2003 numbers: 

In Cowley County, 501 students 
were enrolled from Arkansas City, 313 
from Winfield, and 41 from Udall. 

Most of Cowley's students enrolled 
in fall 2003 were from Sedgwick 
County (2,556), followed by Cowley 
County (920) and Sumner County 
(588). 

Kansas was by far the state with the 
highest number of students attending 
Cowley with 4,375. It was followed by 
Oklahoma (71) and Texas (11). 

Kenya topped the list of foreign 
countries with 37 international stu- 
dents enrolled at Cowley. Nigeria was 
next with 15, followed by Tanzania 
with 12. 

By city in Cowley County: Arkansas 
City 501, Winfield 313, Udall 41, 
Burden 21, Dexter 18, Cambridge 5, 
Rock 5, Atlanta 4, Oxford 4, Cedar 
Vale 3, Maple City 3, Geuda Springs 2. 

By county in Kansas: Sedgwick 
2,556; Cowley 920; Sumner 588; Butler 
102; Chautauqua 38; Harvey 17; 
Harper 14; Reno 14; Kingman 13; 
Johnson 11; Montgomery 10; Elk 9; 
Shawnee 8. 

By states: Kansas 4,375; Oklahoma 
71; Texas 11; Florida 9; Colorado 5; 
Arkansas 3; South Dakota 3; 
Minnesota 2; Missouri 2; Georgia 1; 
Illinois 1; Indiana 1; Kentucky 1; 
Louisiana 1; Michigan 1; Montana 1; 
New Hampshire 1; Ohio 1. 

By foreign country: Kenya 37, 
Nigeria 15, Tanzania 12, Pakistan 7, 
Zimbabwe 7, Tasmania 6, Brazil 4, 
Congo 3, Bangladesh 2, Bulgaria 2, 
Canada 2, Ghana 2, Malaysia 2, 
Bahamas 1, Ecuador 1, Guinea 1, 
Indonesia 1, Norway 1, Syria 1, 
Thailand 1, Toga 1, United Kingdom 1, 
Venezuela 1, Republic of Vietnam 1. 



Spring 2004 numbers: 

In Cowley County, 479 students 
were enrolled from Arkansas City, 313 
from Winfield, and 30 from Udall. 

Most of Cowley's students enrolled 
in spring 2004 were from Sedgwick 
County (2,532), followed by Cowley 
County (881) and Sumner County 
(613). 

Kansas was by far the state with the 
highest number of students attending 
Cowley with 4,312. It was followed by 
Oklahoma (57) and Texas (9). 

By city in Cowley County: Arkansas 
City 479, Winfield 313, Udall 30, 
Dexter 18, Burden 17, Cambridge 5, 
Rock 5, Atlanta 4, Oxford 4, Maple 
City 3, Cedar Vale 2, Geuda Springs 1. 

By county in Kansas: Sedgwick 
2,532; Cowley 881; Sumner 613; Butler 
102; Chautauqua 31; Harvey 21; 
Harper 13; Kingman 11. 

By states: Kansas 4,312; Oklahoma 
57; Texas 9; Florida 8; Colorado 4; 
Missouri 4; South Dakota 4; Arkansas 
3; Illinois 2; Nebraska 2; California 1; 
Georgia 1; Indiana 1; Michigan 1; 
Montana 1; New Hampshire 1; Ohio 1. 

By foreign country: Kenya 23, 
Tanzania 13, Pakistan 11, Nigeria 8, 
Zimbabwe 7, Malaysia 4, Tasmania 4, 
Brazil 3, Canada 2, Thailand 2, 
Venezuela 2, Bahamas 1, Bangladesh 1, 
Bulgaria 1, Congo 1, Croatia 1, 
Ecuador 1, Ghana 1, India 1, Indonesia 
1, Israel 1, Laos 1, Mexico 1, Norway 1, 
Singapore 1, Toga 1, Republic of 
Vietnam 1. 






19 



COLLEGE News 



Cowley offers technical 
classes at Mulvane 
Center 



The college reached out to area 
high schools and adults by offer- 
ing classes in automotive, 
machine tool and welding technology 
at the Mulvane Center beginning in 
fall 2004. 

High school and adult students in 
Mulvane, Derby, Rose Hill and the 
surrounding areas enrolled in courses 
within the three programs, which have 
been taught almost exclusively on the 
main campus. 

Classes, which began Aug. 19, will 
be taught from noon to 2:50 p.m. 
Monday through Friday at the 
Mulvane Center, 201 W. Main St. 
Students will be taking block related 
classes such as blueprint reading, tech- 
nical math, and interpersonal commu- 
nications on Wednesdays, Thursdays 
and Fridays. Classes related to their 
specific program would be taught 
Mondays and Tuesdays. Courses will 
be taught in five-week blocks. Dual 
credit (high school and college) is 
available for high school students. 

Bruce Crouse, chairman of Cowley's 
Industrial Technology Department, 
said high school students needed tech- 
nical training in these areas. 



"We would like to offer students in 
our northern service area an opportu- 
nity to take technical classes," Crouse 
said. "With the rising cost of equip- 
ment and the increased demand for 
technical skills, many high schools 
simply can't afford to offer all pro- 
grams. 

"We have the equipment and the 
established programs, and we feel it's 
important to reach out to high school 
students. The college sees high schools 
in its service area as having very good, 
but limited, vocational programs. It 
gets back to the high cost of technolo- 
gy, and many high schools have dis- 
continued the more financially 
demanding vocational programs." 

Crouse said all technical fields were 
becoming more advanced, thus 
demanding more from institutions 
that train students. 

"In automotive, students need to 
understand electronics and diagnos- 
tics," he said. "Machine tool is becom- 
ing more sophisticated, requiring com- 
puter programming abilities. It's more 
than just putting a part in a machine 
and turning some knobs. The knowl- 
edge base is increasing, and will con- 
tinue to increase for technical stu- 
dents." 

Crouse said an aging workforce, in 
which large numbers were expected to 



retire soon, made training that much 
more important. 

"The baby boomers are retiring 
early," Crouse said. "We see a need 
out there because all industry studies 
indicate there will be a shortage of 
qualified technicians in the next 10 
years." Technical occupations today 
require specialized training. 

Crouse said there were a number of 
adult students also seeking a vocation- 
al skill. 

"Many of them are driving to 
Arkansas City now," he said. "This 
program at the Mulvane Center will 
assist those students by reducing their 
travel time by a year." 

Students would drive to Arkansas 
City for the second year of the pro- 
gram. Successful completion of the 
two-year program would yield the 
student a college certificate. Students 
successfully completing an additional 
semester would be candidates for an 
associate of applied science degree. 

Crouse said graduates from 
Cowley's technical programs were in 
high demand. 

"Our placement rates are very high," 
he said. "The demand for our gradu- 
ates on campus has exceeded the sup- 
ply." 



Noel-Levitz survey 
adds to college's 
strengths 



Nearly 1,000 Cowley students 
surveyed during the spring 
2004 semester rated their level 
of satisfaction with various college 
services higher than the national aver- 
age. 

Sheree Utash, Cowley's vice presi- 
dent of academic and student affairs, 
and Pam Doyle, Cowley's dean of stu- 
dent learning, gave a report on the 
2004 Noel-Levitz Student Satisfaction 
Inventory to members of the college's 



Board of Trustees in June. Noel-Levitz 
is a consultation firm Cowley uses to 
assist with enrollment management 
issues, including student recruitment 
and retention. 

All identified strengths from the 
2003 survey also appeared as strengths 
in the 2004 survey of 910 students, half 
on the main campus in Arkansas City 
and half at the college's Southside 
Education Center in Wichita. New 
strengths that appeared when the sur- 
vey was given in February were 
"There is a good variety of courses 
provided on this campus," and "It is 
an enjoyable experience to be a stu- 
dent on this campus." 



"This survey will give us some guid- 
ance and direction for the next few 
years, particularly in student services," 
Utash said. "Even though we scored 
above the national average, we still 
want to get better, because there are 
priorities that need to be addressed." 

Academic advising and the academ- 
ic early alert warning system are just 
two items Utash said would be looked 
at as a result of the survey. 

"The survey provides us with areas 
to work on so that we can come up 
with retention plans for various 
responsive actions," Doyle said. 



9f) 



| 



COLLEGE News 



Workforce 
Development Center 
receives second 
excellence award 

The Cowley College Workforce 
Development Center at Strother 
Field was presented its second 
Kansas Award for Excellence during a 
banquet held in Wichita in fall 2003. 

The center, located at Strother Field 
Airport and Industrial Park, was 
among 34 Kansas businesses and 
organizations honored at the eighth 
annual KAE banquet. The Workforce 
Development Center received a 2003 
Commitment to Excellence Award. It 
is the first of three levels of recognition 
under the statewide program. It 
received a Level I award in 2002. 

Shannon Massey serves as director 
of the center. 

The center, which opened in fall 
2000, offers various services to assist 
the area labor force. Those include 
career planning, exploring the job mar- 
ket, job application techniques, resume 
writing, interview skills, networking, 
and how to make the right first 
impression. 

KAE's Commitment to Excellence 
Award is presented to organizations 
that demonstrate a serious commit- 
ment to the use of quality principles. 



College copyright! 
Tigerlogo 



The Tiger logo adopted in 2002 is 
now a registered copyrighted 
mark. 
A Certificate of Registration has 
been filed with the Register of 
Copyrights in Washington, D.C. There 
are no renewal requirements, and the 
copyright is recognized and enforce- 
able in most industrialized countries 
throughout the world under the 
Universal Copyright Protection 
Convention of 1971. The Certificate of 
Registration became effective Dec. 5, 
2003. 




Cowley College 



WO 



ate. 



CE 



DEVELOPMENT CENTER 




Shannon JWIassey, cfcector off the Wo r kforce D e v e lopm e nt Center, and Dane GaBart, executive 
dfrector of business and mdusny. 



The award recognizes organizations 
that are in the early stages of applying 
the principles of the Malcolm Baldrige 
National Quality Award. 

The KAE program annually recog- 
nizes companies from across the state 
that have used the Malcolm Baldrige 
Criteria for Performance. For more 
than 15 years, thousands of U.S. 
organizations have used the Baldrige 
Criteria to increase efficiency and 
improve the quality of their products 
and services. 

The award program is managed by 
the Kansas Award for Excellence 
Foundation, a non-profit organization 



In July 2002 the college began the 
process of registering the logo as a 
protected trademark. While the col- 
lege's Athletic Department is seen as a 
primary user of the mark, along with 
the Sid Regnier Bookstore, other col- 
lege departments and areas are 
allowed to use the mark. 

Copying the mark by sources out- 
side the college without written per- 
mission of the college is strictly pro- 
hibited. In early 2003, the college's 
administration made the decision not 
to sell the mark to outside vendors for 
the purpose of making a profit. The 
only entity allowed to sell merchan- 
dise with the mark is the college's 
bookstore. 



located in Topeka. The Foundation is 
the Kansas Affiliate of the Malcolm 
Baldrige National Quality Award 
Program, a division of the National 
Institute of Standards and Technology. 

Cowley received the Kansas 
Excellence Award, the highest level of 
recognition by KAE, in 1999. It 
received Level II awards in 1997 and 
1998. 




Students in one of Denise Irwin's 
Computer Graphic Arts classes 
worked on new tiger logo designs in 
spring 2002. A handful of designs 
were presented to the college's 
Administrative Council. The council 
then recommended some modifica- 
tions to a mark, and Irwin made the 
final design. 



21 



■ 



COLLEGE News 



Cowley expands 
aviation program to 
Wichita 



The college has a long history of 
responding quickly to the needs 
of business and industry, 
i On Jan. 26, 2004, it embarked on 
another training venture when classes 
began at the Aviation Tech Center in 
Wichita. 

Spearheaded by the Kansas 
Technical Training Initiative, the 
Aviation Tech Center, operated by 
Cowley, began offering daytime and 
nighttime classes in Power Plant. The 
sessions ran congruently so that work- 
ers whose shifts change at their jobs 
still would be able to take classes. 

The center's ultimate goal is simple: 
To create an aviation training corridor 
in south-central Kansas that would go 
from Hutchinson, through El Dorado, 
to Independence, and back to 
Arkansas City and back to Wichita. 



The college is hoping to create a corri- 
dor in that area to train aviation tech- 
nicians. 

Cowley has taught airframe and 
power plant classes at its Strother 
Field facility for many years. More 
than 70 students were enrolled for the 
Jan. 26 opening of the Aviation Tech 
Center at 7603 E. Pawnee in Wichita. 

Pete Gustaf, executive director of 
KTTI, said the center's potential was 
virtually infinite. 

"I think it will be a regional center of 
aviation training," Gustaf said. 
"Hopefully, we can draw students in 
from neighboring states and give them 
the opportunity to receive world-class 
aviation technical training that can 
meet the demands of the aviation 
employers in our area." 

A ribbon-cutting ceremony was held 
Feb. 4 at the center and featured Lt. 
Gov. John Moore and several digni- 
taries from Wichita and Sedgwick 
County. 



The Aviation Tech Center is an 
open-entry, open-exit system where 
students can enroll at any time. Once a 
student takes all 11 classes, they 
would have completed the powerplant 
session. 

Wichita aircraft manufacturers 
Boeing, Cessna, Raytheon and 
Bombardier have donated more than 
$600,000 worth of equipment to the 
center. The four, along with the city of 
Wichita, the Sedgwick County 
Commission and Unified School 
District 259, helped form the private 
non-profit KTTI to prepare for future 
workforce needs. Due to projected crit- 
ical needs in aviation, the first phase is 
the implementation of a world-class 
aviation maintenance school. 

The program at the Aviation Tech 
Center is fast-paced and can be com- 
pleted in 18 months. Credits apply 
toward an associate of applied science 
degree from Cowley. Financial aid is 
available. 



Guitar player 
extraordinaire, 
symphony entertain 
packed house 



He has been labeled one of the 
greatest guitar players on the 
planet, and on March 9, 2004, 
about 800 lucky ticket-holders got to 
see him in person. 

Tommy Emmanuel, a huge celebrity 
in his native Australia and in Europe, 
performed with the Winfield Regional 
Symphony in the Robert Brown 
Theatre inside the Brown Center on 
the main campus. Gary Gackstatter, 
Cowley's director of instrumental 
music, directs the WRS. 

Emmanuel is becoming a star in the 
United States. One glance at the acco- 
lades bestowed upon him by other 
guitar greats, and it's easy to see why 
he has become so popular. The late 
Chet Atkins had this recollection of 
Emmanuel: 



"Tommy appeared at the Chet 
Atkins Appreciation Society 
Convention a few years ago and 
brought the house down. People have 
been talking about him ever since, and 
his fame is spreading. He's about the 
only guitarist I've heard who can 
come close to what Lenny (Breau) did 
with harmonics, and he's got a style all 
his own. I think he's probably the 
greatest finger-picker in the world 
today. He's inventive, fearless and has 
a flawless sense of rhythm. He's a 
great showman, too. You can't watch 
Tommy perform and not feel happy." 

Emmanuel did not disappoint on 
March 9. His command of music was 
evident to audience members and to 
those fortunate to play with him. One 
of those people was Dave Bostwick, 
Humanities Department instructor 
and a member of Five Man Trio, 
whose other members are Gackstatter 
and Social Science Department 
Instructor Chris Mayer. 



"He was awesome," Bostwick said. 
"He's one of a kind, that's for sure. It 
was a great honor to play with him." 

The year 2001 was one of tremen- 
dous growth for Emmanuel, both in 
audience attendance and musical col- 
laboration, all over the world. After 
his appearance at the closing cere- 
monies of the Sydney Olympic Games, 
and his debut at the Walnut Valley 
Festival in Winfield in late 2000, every- 
one wanted to know who this mysteri- 
ous Australian guitar virtuoso was. 

Emmanuel is a household name in 
his native Australia. His music and his 
life have become part of Australian 
legend. Through hard work and end- 
less tours, he has earned a success 
unequalled by any instrumental artist 
ever in Australia. With four platinum 
and three gold albums and many 
awards, he sets the standard for others 
to emulate. 



oo 



ATHLETIC Achievements 




FOREVER A Coach 




AD Saia inducted 
into NJCAA Football 
Hall of Fame 

Having coached four Jayhawk 
Conference champions and six 
community college bowl 
games, Cowley Athletic Director Tom 
Saia was selected for induction into 
the National Junior College Athletic 
Association Football Hall of Fame. 

Induction was to take place Sept. 25, 
2004. 

Saia, a graduate of Pittsburg Colgan 
High School, knew ever since his 
sophomore year in high school that 
coaching football was what he wanted 
to do. However, he never dreamed of 
achieving such a prestigious honor. 

"My high school football coach 
(Frank Crespino) motivated me to 
realize that this is what I wanted to do 
with my life," Saia said. "Former 
Coffeyville football coach Dick Foster, 
who I started my college coaching 
career with, molded me into a college 
coach. I got this award because of Dick 
Foster." 

Saia's former players and coaches 
were the ones who nominated him for 
the NJCAA Football Hall of Fame. 

"Being nominated was pretty emo- 
tional for me," Saia said. "That was 
enough right there. I have been sur- 
rounded by great people who got me 
to the point where I am today. It does- 
n't get any better than this. To be 
selected by your peers is pretty spe- 
cial." 

Saia served eight years as a head 
coach in the Jayhawk Conference and 
spent another four years as an assis- 
tant. His teams played in six bowl 
games, winning four, and he had an 
undefeated season with Coffeyville in 
1980, capped with a victory in the Beef 
Empire Bowl in Garden City and a No. 
2 national ranking. 

Out of the 12 years he spent as a 
football coach at the junior college 




Tom Saia 

level, eight of his teams were ranked 
in the top 15. On top of the undefeated 
season he was a part of in 1980, his 
1989 and 1993 Butler County teams 
finished just four and eight points 
away from playing for a national title. 
The 1989 team finished seventh in the 
nation, and the 1993 team finished 
fifth. 

His success translated into Jayhawk 
Conference Coach of the Year awards 
in 1986 and 1994. 

Saia also coached 16 players who 
went on to careers playing profession- 
al football. Kwammi Lassiter of the 
San Diego Chargers is in his 10th year 
in the National Football League, and 
played for Saia at Butler. Former play- 
ers Dave Thomas and Dean Hamel 
were part of Super Bowl winning 
teams as Thomas won a Super Bowl 
with the Dallas Cowboys and New 
York Giants, and Hamel won the 
Super Bowl with the Washington 
Redskins. 

Saia also coached Nebraska 
Heisman Trophy winner Mike Rozier 



while serving as an assistant at 
Coffeyville in 1980. His teams also 
produced several academic Ail- 
Americans through the years. 

Six individuals who either played or 
coached under Saia are head coaches 
or assistant football coaches in the 
Jayhawk Conference. Four more are 
coaching universities, one of which is 
his son, Bryce Saia, who serves as an 
assistant/ defensive coach at Southern 
Illinois University. Several other for- 
mer players or coaches of Saia's are 
now retired. 

Saia, Cowley's athletic director since 
1994, coached at Coffeyville, Butler, 
Hutchinson and Independence. He 
also served as assistant football coach 
at Pittsburg State University in 1976. 

Along with his tremendous success 
as a college coach, Saia also had great 
success at Erie, Louisburg and 
Coffeyville Field Kindley high schools. 
His first coaching job came at Erie, 
where he led the team to the state 
playoffs. He also led Louisburg to the 
state playoffs before heading to 
Coffeyville and leading the Golden 
Tornado to a conference title. 

All total, Saia spent 21 years coach- 
ing football at the high school and col- 
legiate levels. He has a career record of 
88 wins, 59 losses, and one tie as a 
head coach. The teams that Saia served 
as a head coach or assistant coach had 
a record of 126 wins, 77 losses, and 
one tie in his 21 seasons. 

Saia and his wife, Sue, dean of stu- 
dent life at Cowley, have three other 
children: Boomer, Tommy and 
Courtney. 



23 



V 



ATHLETIC Achievements 




buductees into the Tiger Athletic HaH of Fame in 2004 are, from left, Maty Ifeir (on behalf <rf her late husbaml Dr. C 
Jack King, Doyle Gilstrap, and Jerry Boyce. 



Tiger Athletic Hall of 
Fame gains five new 
members 



Five new members were inducted 
into the Tiger Athletic Hall of 
Fame Feb. 7, 2004, at halftime of 
the men's basketball game vs. Johnson 
County in W.S. Scott Auditorium/ Dan 
Kahler Court. 



The new members are Kermit 
McMurry (basketball), Jack King (bas- 
ketball), Jerry Boyce (football), Doyle 
Gilstrap (football, basketball, track), 
and Dr. Charles Kerr (Cowley board 
member). Mary Kerr, Charles' widow, 
accepted the induction on her hus- 
band's behalf. 

McMurry played basketball at 
Cowley from 1963-1965, while King 
played basketball at the school from 



1951-1953. Boyce coached the Tiger 
football team from 1977-79, and served 
as the school's athletic director from 
1977-1981. Gilstrap was a three-sport 
athlete for Cowley from 1947-49, and 
Kerr served on the school's Board of 
Trustees from 1971-1993. 

The addition of the new members 
raises the Tiger Athletic Hall of Fame 
class to 33. Its first class induction was 
in 2000. 



I 



ATHLETIC Achievements 



SPORTS WRAPUPS 
Baseball 

Fighting its way through the loser's 
bracket, the Tiger baseball team won 
four games in a row, including two 
wins in its last at-bat, before having its 
season come to an end with an 8-5 loss 
to Seward County in the champi- 
onship round of the Region VI 
Tournament played at Wichita's 
Lawrence-Dumont Stadium May 20- 
23, 2004. 

Despite falling short of their goal to 
qualify for the NJCAA World Series, 
the Tigers put together another stellar 
season under the guidance of head 
coach Dave Burroughs. 

Cowley finished the season with a 
record of 43-19, and continued its 
dominance in the Jayhawk Conference 
Eastern Division as it captured the 
conference title for the ninth time in 
the last 10 years. 

Men's and Women's 
Tennis 

Led by its six sophomores, the men's 
team finished sixth at the NJCAA 
Division II National Tournament May 
10-15, 2004, in Piano, Texas. 

The sixth-place finish at nationals 
marked the 15th time the Tigers have 
placed in the top 10 at the national 
tournament in coach Larry Grose's 17 
years at the school. 

At the Region VI Tournament in 
Wichita April 16-17, Cowley's Jeff 
Stone (No. 3 singles), Darren Cobble 
(No. 5 singles), and Collin Torrence 
(No. 6 singles) each won Region VI 
titles, while the doubles team of 
Cobble and Tin Hinst captured the 
Region VI title at No. 2 doubles. 

With only one sophomore and just 
six on the women's roster, the team 
surpassed expectations in Rebecca 
Meyer's first season as coach as the 
Lady Tigers placed sixth at the NJCAA 
Division II National Tournament held 
in College Station, Texas, May 2-7, 
2004. 

Cowley advanced to the national 
tournament by winning the Region VI 



title. The Lady Tigers recorded four 
first-place finishes, two seconds, two 
thirds, and one fourth as they finished 
four points better than second-place 
Johnson County in winning the 
regional. 

Cowley's Jill Hocker received sec- 
ond-team Ail-American honors by 
placing runner-up in No. 2 singles at 
the national tournament. 

Softball 

Despite losing three players to sea- 
son-ending knee injuries throughout 
the 2003-2004 season, the team won 
the Jayhawk Conference Eastern 
Division title with a record of 16-2, 
and finished with an overall record of 
44-16. 

The Lady Tigers advanced to the 
championship round of the Region VI 
Tournament before having their sea- 
son come to an end with a 2-0 loss to 
Neosho County. Still, Cowley man- 
aged to win 40 or more games for the 
seventh straight season under the 
guidance of head coach Ed Hargrove. 

Sophomore pitcher Linzee Roby set 
the school record for wins (34) and 
innings pitched (243 1/3) during the 
season, while freshman catcher Ashley 
Dunkelberger blasted a school-record 
three home runs in a 16-6 win over 
Highland Community College on 
April 6, 2004. 

Men's and Women's 
Tfrack & Field 

Completing one of its most success- 
ful seasons in school history, the men's 
outdoor team placed 10th at the 
NJCAA National Outdoor 
Championships held in Levelland, 
Texas. 

Cowley sophomores Kyle Ellis and 
Josephat Boit were named NJCAA Ail- 
Americans in two events. Ellis placed 
third in the pole vault and javelin, and 
Boit finished third in the 1,500- and 
5,000-meter runs. Brandon Banda was 
named a Coaches Association Ail- 
American in both the decathlon and 
pole vault. 

The Tigers also won the Jayhawk 



Conference Eastern Division title for 
the second straight year, and had 
seven individual champions at the 
conference meet. 

Shorthanded in numbers, the team 
still managed to put together a solid 
season as it finished second in the 
Jayhawk Conference Eastern Division 
and 17th at the NJCAA National 
Outdoor Championships. 

The Lady Tigers had four individual 
champions at the conference meet, and 
had six athletes qualify for the national 
meet. Cowley freshman Shonda Kelley 
and sophomore Jennifer Goldsmith 
nearly earned NJCAA All- American 
honors in the javelin as they placed 
fourth and fifth, respectively. Both 
Kelley and Goldsmith earned Coaches 
Association All- American honors for 
their performances. 

Golf 

The young team gained a wealth of 
experience during the 2003-2004 sea- 
son. 

The team, which featured just one 
sophomore in Jimmy Ginal, finished 
eighth in the Jayhawk Conference. The 
Tigers had their season come to an end 
at the District III Championships held 
at Cedar Brook Golf Course in Iola 
May 2-4, 2004. 

Cowley freshman Trent Macy (82- 
84-77 — 243) missed qualifying for 
nationals by just three strokes as he 
finished with a three-round score of 
243. Macy finished seventh at the tour- 
nament. 

Men's Basketball 

The run in postseason play stopped 
just one game after the Tigers won 
their home game in the first round of 
the Region VI Tournament. 

The Cowley men dropped a 68-60 
decision to Barton County on March 7, 
2004, to end the season with a 23-9 
record. 

Cowley was unable to stop Barton 
County's JP Batista, a 6-9, 260-pound 
sophomore from Olinda PE, Brazil. He 
made all 17 of his free-throw attempts 
and finished with 29 points and nine 



■ 



ATHLETIC Achievements 



jrebounds to help Barton County hold 
off the Tigers. 

The game was close throughout as 
the lead changed hands eight times in 
I the first half before the Cougars settled 
for a 34-33 half time lead. 

Cowley said goodbye to five sopho- 
mores: Brandon Kelley, Francis 
Cuyler, Mark Mathew, Alex Elam and 
I Valentino Hart. Cuyler' s 583 points 
scored this season rank as the 12th 
most in school history. 

Women's Basketball 

The women lost 83-72 to Colby on 
March 6., 2004, bringing a close to the 
Lady Tigers' season with a 23-9 
record. 

Down by as many as 18 points in the 
first half and 15 at halftime, Cowley 
battled hard in the second half but 
never regained the lead against Colby. 
The Lady Tigers got to within five 
points, 60-55, with 9:15 left to play. 
Colby hit 31 of 34 free-throw attempts 
for an impressive 91 percent. 

Sophomore Ariana Scales led 
Cowley with 21 points, but made just 
8-26 shots from the floor. Scales did 
manage to hit three three-pointers, and 
break Sabrina Whittler's school record 
for three-pointers in a season with 75. 



She also finished the season with a 
school-record 654 points and 255 field 
goals. 

The Lady Tigers lost seven sopho- 
mores: Devin Reed, Vanessa Fiske, 
LaShelle Parker, Scales, Ebony 
Haliburton, Ashley Stinson and Brandi 
Lewis. 

Volleyball 

Just two weeks after defeating 
Garden City in three games, the 
Cowley volleyball team was beaten by 
the Lady Broncbusters in three games 
in the first-round of the District M 
playoffs Nov. 2, 2003, at W.S. Scott 
Auditorium/ Dan Kahler Court. 
Cowley suffered through a tough hit- 
ting night and lost to Garden City by 
scores of 18-30, 26-30, 15-30. 

With the loss, Cowley ends the sea- 
son with a 21-11 record. Despite the 
loss, the Lady Tigers had a solid sea- 
son as they finished in a tie for second 
in the Jayhawk East with a record of 7- 
2, and finished with more than 20 
wins for the 14th straight season. 

"There were times we could have 
played better, but overall we had a 
good year," Pryor said. 



Men's and Women's 
Cross Country 

Josephat Boit's second-place finish 
helped the men's cross country team 
to a third-place finish at the National 
Junior College Athletic Association 
national meet held Nov. 8, 2003, at 
Rim Rock Farm near Lawrence. 

The Lady Tigers also ran to a top-10 
team finish, enabling Cowley's cross 
country teams to their best showings 
in the three-year history of the pro- 
gram. 

Boit, Cowley's leader all season, was 
second with a time of 25 minutes, 21.3 
seconds over the five-mile course. That 
earned him a spot on the All- America 
first team. Teammate Jake Conley 
(11th in 26:55.3) earned Honorable 
Mention All- America, while Tim 
Marshall (21st in 27:34.1) earned a spot 
on the Coaches Association All- 
America team. Cowley's men finished 
with 80 team points. The women had 
234. 

Ruth Kinyanjui, plagued by injuries 
late in the season, put in a gutty per- 
formance and finished 25th in 20:52 
over the 3.1-mile course. Rachel 
Harper earned a 34th-place finish in 
21:28.1. 




Members of Cowley's Board oflhatees, ac fcu aiisbation, and c ontracto r re pr o s c ntanves cut the ribbon Oct 2% 2003, on the new trade and field 

complex at 223 E. Pierce on the south edge of Arkansas CHy.l\hme«>us spectator came out to attend the cere 

meter oval track with a state-of-the-art electronic timing systenv a cfsau/hamnier throwing area, two long jump pits, tiwopote 

areas, a place for the high jump, and a field that can be used for soccer or footbafl games n the future, tt also has bleadier seating for 250 sp 

tors, along with a concession standV restrooms, and a storage space for tfiebad<aiKJfieldequipnienLBuDcungof the facilHy began m July 2002 and 

was virtually completed in January 2003. 



26 



ATHLETIC Achievements 



Pritchard, Conley cap 
Cowley careers with 
student-athlete 
awards 



Sarah Pritchard of Augusta and 
Jake Conley of Rogers, Ark., were 
named Female and Male Student- 
Athletes of the Year May 10, 2004, dur- 
ing the annual athletic banquet. 

Nearly 400 people attended the ban- 
quet, which was held at the Agri- 
Business Building in Arkansas City. 
The banquet featured a dinner and a 
chance to hear the Tiger coaches speak 
about their teams' seasons. 

Pritchard, a sophomore, was a mem- 
ber of the Lady Tigers' softball team. 
Conley, also a sophomore, ran cross 
country and track and field for the 
Tigers. Pritchard plans to transfer to 
Kansas State University and major in 
public relations. Conley is headed to 
Harding University in Searcy, Ark., to 
continue his career in cross country 
and track. Conley also received the 
Most Improved Male award for 
Cowley's cross country team. 

No awards were presented for men's 
tennis as the team and coach Larry 
Grose were competing at the national 
tournament in Piano, Texas. 

Awards presented: 

WOMEN'S BASKETBALL 

• Most Improved Player — Kara 
Pridey 

• Outstanding Freshman — Marina 
Car an 

• Hustle Award — Vanessa Fiske 

• Coaches Award — Ebony 
Haliburton 

WOMEN'S TENNIS 

• Team Captain — Jill Hocker 

• Outstanding Freshman — Jenny 
Crank 

• Most Improved Player — Krystin 
Kewley 

• Coaches Award — Stacia 
Whittecar. 




Sarah Prikhaid and Jake Gontey were named Student-Athletes of the Year for 2003-2004. 



SOFTBALL 

• Most Inspirational — Adrianne 
Braddy, Jessica Milligan. 

• Outstanding Defensive Player — 
Jamie Amerine, Amanda Stanley. 

• Outstanding Offensive Player — 
Nicole Ringwall. 

• Most Valuable Player — Linzee 
Roby. 

MEN'S BASKETBALL 

• Outstanding Freshman — Xavier 
Burnette 

• Most Improved Player — Avery 
Burrell 

TIGERETTES 

• Most Improved — Analesa 
Reynolds 

• Most Spirited — Candace Salas 

• Best performer — Lisa 
Kuchenbecker 

• Coaches Award — Salas and 
Chafonn Ricks 

CHEERLEADING 

• Most Improved — Mandy Ratzloff 

• Most Spirited — Kim West 

• Best All- Around — Ashley 
Hendershot, Mike Lindal 



CROSS COUNTRY 

• Most Valuable Female — Rachel 
Harper 

• Most Valuable Male — Josephat 
Boit 

• Most Improved Female — Sarah 
Hasenbank 

• Most Improved Male — Jake 
Conley 

TRACK AND FIELD 

• Most Valuable Track Female — 
Ruth Kinyanjui 

• Most Valuable Track Male — 
Josephat Boit 

• Most Valuable Field Female — 
Michaela Magallan 

• Most Valuable Field Male - Kyle 
Ellis/ Brandon Banda 

• Most Improved Track Female — 
Shonda Kelley 

• Most Improved Track Male — 
Corey McCoy 

STUDENT ATHLETES OF THE YEAR 

• Male — Jake Conley 

• Female — Sarah Pritchard 



27 



ENDOWMENT Association 



Annual Report 
for Endowment 
Association 
2003-2004 

We are extremely grateful for the 
generosity of the individuals, corpora- 
i ! tions, businesses and foundations list- 
1 ed in this report. The following gifts 
were made between July 1, 2003, and 
: June 30, 2004. The total cash income to 
the Endowment Association for the 
fiscal year was $642,000. In addition, 
another $98,000 was raised by the 
Tiger Booster Club. Our current cam- 
paigns to renovate W.S. Scott 
Auditorium and construct the Webb- 
Brown Academic Center have pledges 
of an additional $560,500. Your sup- 
port of Cowley students and the 
Cowley College family is greatly 
appreciated! 

Benefits to students and the commu- 
nity include academic scholarships, 
enhancements to our beautiful cam- 
puses, textbooks and supplies from the 
Sid Regnier Bookstore, books and 
resource materials for Renn Memorial 
Library, art supplies for the budding 
artist, opportunities to attend world- 
class cultural events, enhancements to 
programs, and many activities for stu- 
dents to become involved. Your efforts 
continue to make Cowley College one 
of the top community colleges in the 
nation! 

Endowment 

Association 

Board of Directors 

Mr. Joe Avery 

Mr. Dick Bonfy 

Mr. Kenny Buss 

Mr. Bill Docking 

Mr. Steve English 

Mr. Curt Freeland 

Mrs. Cynthia Hocker 

Mr. Bill House 

Ms. LaDonna Lanning 

Mrs. Joyce McArtor 

Mrs. Patty Neises 

Mr. Jim Salomon 

Mr. Bruce Schwyhart 

Mrs. Helen Storbeck 

Dr. Pat McAfee 

Mrs. Terri Morrow 

Mrs. Diane Kelly 



The following scholarships have 
been endowed with Cowley College to 
help students achieve their education- 
al and life goals. Donors may establish 
an endowed scholarship over several 
years, and may designate a certain 
program that they would like to 
enhance. An endowed scholarship is a 
permanent way to recognize friends, 
loved ones or a special teacher or men- 
tor. 

Endowed Scholarships 

Warren Andreas Scholarship 
Ark City Clinic Scholarship 
Barkley Family Scholarship 
Linda Barnes Memorial Scholarship 
Dorothy M. Bishop Memorial Music 

Scholarship 
Mildred Carpenter/ Marie Vickers 

Memorial Scholarship 
Gene and Donella Cole Scholarship 
Commercial Federal Bank Scholarship 
Conco, Inc. Drafting Scholarship 
CornerBank Scholarship 
Henrietta Courtright Scholarship 
Kirke Dale Memorial Scholarship 
Edith and Harry Darby Scholarship 
Walter and Iris David Scholarship 
Edith Joyce Davis Scholarship 
John M. DeVore Memorial Scholarship 
Lyle and Terry Eaton Scholarship 
Stephen A. and Janet R. English 

Scholarship 
E.A. Funk Scholarship 
Gordon-Piatt Energy Group 

Scholarship 
Jerre L. Gottlob Scholarship 
Brian Groves Memorial Golf 

Scholarship 
Delbert W. Harader Memorial 

Scholarship 
Herrin Family Scholarship 
Mary Hobart Hutchinson Scholarship 
Hocker Baseball Scholarship 
Conrad and Janet Jimison Scholarship 
Paul and Dorothy Johnson Memorial 

Scholarship 
Kansas Grain and Feed Dealers 

Scholarship 
John and Olive Kappler Memorial 

Scholarship 
Greg and Diana Kelley Scholarship 
Jim Kelly Memorial Scholarship 
Dr. Charles D. Kerr Memorial 

Scholarship 
C.F. Knedler Scholarship 
Harold and Mary Lake Scholarship 
Robert Lawson Memorial Scholarship 
Clay and Betty Lemert Scholarship 
Jean C. Lough Memorial Arts 

Scholarship 
Roma Marrs Memorial Scholarship 
Patrick J. McAfee Scholarship 
Fostine Moncrief Memorial 

Scholarship 



Claude and Helen Morrow Memorial 

Scholarship 
Craig Newman Memorial Scholarship 
Earl Newman Memorial Golf 

Scholarship 
Gertrude Newman Memorial 

Scholarship 
Jean Newman Memorial Scholarship 
Jo Ann Scott Newman Scholarship 
North Campuses Prime Time Faculty 

Scholarship 
Elizabeth Northcutt Memorial 

Scholarship 
Office Education Scholarship 
Luther H. Par man Business 

Scholarship 
Paton Wholesale and Vending 

Scholarship 
Tom L. and Sheila C. Prichard 

Scholarship 
Sid and Sharon Regnier Scholarship 
Returning Student Organization 

Scholarship 
John Robertson Memorial Scholarship 
Rodeo Key Club Scholarship 
Rotary Club of Ark City/ Newt and 

Mary Ellen Smith Scholarship 
Eunice Thompson Palmer Schnitzer 

Scholarship 
Bedi N. Sehsuvaroglu Memorial 

Scholarship 
E.W. "Bud" and Lauretta Shelton 

Scholarship 
Dale F. and Isobel S. Smith Science 

Scholarship 
Deborah B. Smith Memorial 

Scholarship 
Newt and Mary Ellen Smith 

Scholarship 
Dan C. Stark Memorial Scholarship 
D. Robert and Helen I. Storbeck 

Scholarship 
Lawrence and Martha Lallman Stover 

Scholarship 
George Sybrant Memorial Scholarship 
Betty Todd Memorial Scholarship 
Pat Lawson Tyler Memorial 

Scholarship 
Wayne and Nila Tyler Memorial 

Scholarship 
Union State Bank Scholarship 
United Agency Scholarship 
Caroline Newman Warren Ladies 

Tennis Scholarship 
Barbara Weston Memorial Pre- 

Nursing Scholarship 
Robert M. and Patricia S. White 

Scholarship 
Bea Wright Memorial Scholarship 
Zeller Motor Company Scholarship 






ENDOWMENT Association 



The following individuals and 
organizations have made annual gifts 
to the college over a long period of 
time. We deeply appreciate their sup- 
port. 

Long-Term Scholarships 
Funded Annually 

American Legion Auxiliary Post 18 
Arkansas City Area Arts Council 
Ark City Tumbleweeds 
Beta Sigma Phi - Mary Brannon 

Nursing Scholarship 
Boeing/ Cowley Matching Scholarship 
Boyer Educational Trust 
Curt Cranford Scholarship 
Cowley Hall of Fame Scholarship 
Rotary Club of Arkansas City 
Jack Selan Memorial Scholarship 
Captola Yust Scholarship 

Foundation Gifts 

July 1, 2003 - June 30, 2004 

President's Society 
($10,000 and up) 

Paul H. Brown and Daisy E. Brown Fund 
Max and Mary Brown 
Esther Brown and Don Giffin 

Estate of Craig Newman 

Conco, Inc. (In Kind) 

Home National Bank 

Kansas Arts Commission 

Warren Koeller 

Union State Bank 

Benefactor ($5,000-$9,999) 

Boyer Educational Trust 

Carpenter & Vickers Trust 

Kirke W. Dale Memorial Trust 

Lyle and Terry Eaton 

Great Western Dining (In Kind) 

Harold and Mary Lake 

Lakewynds Property Sales 

Artie L. Metcalf 

Mid America Arts Alliance 

Jo Ann Scott Newman 

Luther Parman 

Paton Wholesale and Vending 

Builder ($1,000-54,999) 

Andreas Family 

Ark City Tumbleweeds 

Arkansas City Area Arts Council 

Larry Barnes 

BarnesCo 

Donald Billings 

W.B. Spear Memorial Scholarship 

Melvin Burns 

Russell and Patty Clark 

Coca-Cola Bottling Co. of Winfield 

Conco, Inc. 

CornerBank 

Ruth A. David 

William R. and Judy Docking 



Stephen A. and Janet R. English 

Galaxie Business Equipment 

General Electric Fund 

Gordon and Associates Architects 

Jean Ann Groves 

Bill and Carol House 

Rex and Denise Irwin 

(Visiting Artists Series) 
Conrad and Janet Jimison 
Dan A. and Violet Kahler 
Greg and Diana Kelley 
Lakewynds Property Sales 
Otis and Terri Morrow 
Thomas L. and Sheila Prichard 
Ramona Munsell & Associates 
Jim and Deb Salomon 
Schneider Construction 
Selami A. Sehsuvaroglu 
Helen I. Storbeck 
The Boeing Company 
Barbara Thompson 
Richard and Nancy Tredway 
Thomas Tyler 
United Agency 
David and Sheree Utash 
Western Resources Foundation 
Winfield Iron and Metal 

Investor ($500-5999) 

American Legion Auxiliary Post 18 - 
Margaret Weston Memorial 
Scholarship 

Steve and Pam Archer 

Kenny and Janet Buss 

Richard Colquhoun Golf Scholarship 

Steven L. Cranford 

Elite Advertising 

Cecil B. Hawkins 

Ellen L. Kelly 

Mary J. Kerr 

Sarah Lewis 

Sid and Sharon Regnier 

Carol D. Rehme 

Dr. Nick and Christie Rogers 

Tom and Sue Saia 

Michael and Cheryl Townsley 

Winfield Publishing Company 

Captola Yust 

Hall of Honor ($100-5499) 

ADM Milling 

Mia Allen 

Allen's Furniture and Carpet 

American Legion Auxiliary - Post 18 

Stan Andeel 

Joe and Eleanor Anderson 

Ark City Country Mart 

Ark City Chamber of Commerce 

Arkansas City Rotary Club 

Rod and Jody Arnett 

Frankie Arnold 

Warren Baber 

Albert and Karen Bacastow 

Mike and Mary Beatty 

Becker Tire, Inc. 



Mr. and Mrs. Fred Berry, Jr. 

Beta Sigma Phi - City Council 

Connie Bonfy 

Dick and Dolly Bonfy 

Helen Born 

Dave and Trina Bostwick 

Harold Brady 

Roger A. and Suzanne Brown 

Betty M. Burton 

Buterbaugh & Handlin 

Brett and Catherine Butler 

Carl's BBQ 

Jose and Marlys Cervantes 

City of Arkansas City 

Joe and Nel Clark 

Judy Clark 

Albert and Audine Clemente 

Cloister Homeowners Association 

Gene and Donella Cole 

Commerce Bank of El Dorado 

Cowley County Community College 

Mr. and Mrs. Eugene Cramer 

Dr. Lynn A. Cramer 

Tony and Vicki Crouch 

Bruce and Amy Crouse 

Mike and Susan Crow 

Lillian Damewood 

James P. Dewell Family 

DiVall Retail Liquor 

John and Connie Donatelli 

Ronald and Pam Doyle 

Bob and Sara Dunne 

Dixon L. Dyer 

Beryle L. Elliott 

Doug and Dejon Ewing 

Mr. and Mrs. Karl E. Faidley 

Robert B. and Lois Fencil 

Foster's Furniture of Arkansas City 

J.L. Foust 

Michael B. Foust 

Curt and Cindy Freeland 

Galaxie Tool Corporation 

Gambino's Pizza 

Maura Geist 

Robert Geist 

Ed and Margaret Gilliland 

Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Gilmore 

Ron and Donetta Godsey 

J.G. and Doris Goff 

Kern and Bette Gordon 

Graves Drug Store 

Gregg and Simmons CPAs 

Mr. and Mrs. Slade Griffiths 

Allen and Beverly Grunder 

Ronald Reuben Guilinger Memorial 

Richard Haddock 

Ed Hargrove 

Donald L. Heflin 

Jean Hill 

Kim and Cynthia Hocker 

Jimmie and Joyce Holloway 

Angela Holmes 

Paul and Donna Homan 

Luella Hume 

Dr. Carl and Debra J. Ingram 



29 



ENDOWMENT Association 



Joline Iverson 

Jarvis Accounting and Tax Service 
Ronnie and Anita Jenkins 
Hubert and Mildred Johnston 
Danny and Sandy Jones 
I Herlynda G. Jordan 
Gary and Frieda Kahle 
Paul and Diane Kelly 
Mr. and Mrs. John P. Kelly 
Mr. and Mrs. Michael J. Kelly 
Kempf Liquor Store 
Oscar Kimmell 
Jack King 
C.E. Kloxin 

Mr. and Mrs. Irv Kramer 
Bob and Carolyn Langenwalter 
Scott and Deborah Layton 
Robben and Wilma Ledeker 
Beverly M. Lewis 
Rusty Lincoln 
LM Consultants 
Long and Neises CPAs 
J.C. and Donna Louderback 
Scott and Rhoda MacLaughlin 
Dr. Rodger and Melba Maechtlen 
John A. Maier 
Lane and Shannon Massey 
Kenny and Pat Mauzey 
Mr. and Mrs. Sonny Maynard 
Steve and Joyce McArtor 
Mr. and Mrs. Darin P. McAtee 
Dr. Pat and Sandy McAtee 
Charles McKown 
Calvin McMillan 
Amy McWhirt and Terry Quiett 
Fred and Margot Menefee 
Merle Snider Motors 
Mike Groves Oil, Inc. 
Bob and Olive Milner 
James O. and Wilma Mitchell 
Bob Moffatt 

Norman and Sue Morris 
Dianne Morrow 
Ron and Janice Neagle 
Margaret Neal 
Dr. Nathan and Amy Niles 
Beverly A. Nittler 
Randy and Debbie Nittler 
Rick and Gay Norris 
Olen Medical Supply 
Fred and Tonya Olenberger 
Stu and Stephanie Osterthun 
Jason and Shannon O'Toole 
Libby Palmer 
Palmer Interiors 
Roy and Linda Pepper 
Potter's Liquor Store 
Quail Ridge Golf Shop 
Reedy Ford 
Richard Reeves 
Wayne Robinson 
Rogers and Lanning 
Dr. David and Rhonda Ross 
Christi L. Rudiger 
S and Y Industries, Inc. 
Salon 909 



Dan and Lois A. Sampson 

Mr. and Mrs. Tom Schmidt 

Larry C. Schwintz 

Dave and Callie Seaton 

Brian and Kristi Shaw 

Wanda Shepherd 

Wayne and Sandy Short 

Joe and Mindi Shriver 

Dale and Isobel Smith 

Forest and Sandra Smith 

Mary Smith 

Randy and Pam Smith 

Dr. Dan and Vicki Snowden 

Sonic Drive-In 

Southwestern College 

William and Becky Spear 

H. Wayne Steadham 

Mike and Marisa Steiner 

Ruth L. Steiner 

Tad and Janice Stover 

Strother Field Commission 

Larry Swaim 

Sweetland Hinson Equipment, Inc. 

Betty Sybrant 

Jim and Donna Sybrant 

Linda Sybrant 

Taylor Drug 

The Caballero 

F.L. Thurman 

Michael and Cheryl Townsley 

Trust Company of Kansas 

Turn-of-the-Century Enterprises 

Ed and Mary Turner 

Two Rivers Co-op 

Chris Vollweider 

Gordon and Janice G. Voss 

Ken and Louise Wagnon 

Loretta Waldroupe 

LeArta R. Watkins 

Webber Land Company 

Deuane and Virginia Wells 

Wendy's Old Fashioned Hamburgers 

of Winfield 
Sarah Wesbrooks 
Don and Lucy West 
Virginia J. Wilkins 
Gary and Peggy Williams 
Mary Wineinger 
Winfield Chiropractic 
Winfield Consumer Products 
Sandra Woodworth 
Ed and Karen Zeller 

Friend (S1-S99) 

Hobart Ammerman 

Gene and Tyler Anstine 

Ark Veterinary Association 

Joe Baker 

Robert Baptista 

Mr. and Mrs. Lucien Barber 

Mr. and Mrs. Zachary Barnes 

Cliff Bazil 

Buel Beck 

David Beltz 

Mr. and Mrs. Dan Biddle 

Mr. and Mrs. Ralph E. Bonnell 



George and Leo Bronson 

Hannelore Brown 

Jo A. Chance 

Daniel and Linda Chindamo 

John and Chris Clemente 

Eleanor Clinton 

Miriam Clouse 

ConocoPhillips 

Dave and Carol Daulton 

Chuck and Jeanne Dumenil 

Aaron Duryea 

Fred and Debbie Erdman 

Casey A. Eubank 

Robert M. and Jo Lynn Foster 

Joseph and Kathleen Foust 

Leslie Foust 

Dan Freeman 

Dan and Vicki L. Givens 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard L. Graves 

Norma C. Greever 

Carolyn E. Grier 

Mr. and Mrs. Leonard Groene 

Mike and Judi Groves 

Phil and Joyce Groves 

Evelyn M. Hamilton 

Elvin and Dixie Hatfield 

Rock Headrick 

Eric Hilding 

Steven Hill 

Richard and Melissa K. Hollister 

Ronnie and Terri Hutchinson 

Mark and Lora Jarvis 

Mark and Stefani Jones 

Mr. and Mrs. Mike Keltner 

Dean and Cheryl Kennedy 

Phyllis Kinsch 

Nancy Lasseter 

Mildred B. Lawson 

Sue Lawson 

Michael D. Ledy 

Donna F. Lester 

Lemenar and Virginia Linnell 

Stu and Betsy Luder 

Ellen Maninger 

Lyle F. Maninger 

Jim and Judy McCall 

Mr. and Mrs. Marty McCorgary 

Amber McCorkle 

Theresa McCoy 

Anthony McCullough 

Gary and Pat McCutcheon 

Patrick McDonald 

Andy McFayden 

P.J. and Lisa McGovern 

Robert McGregor 

Gina McKown 

Carl and Phyllis Macy Mills 

Virginia Moller 

Madeline Morgan 

Diana Morton 

Gerald and Sydney Mullett 

Heather Munson 

Mark and Melinda Neal 

Beverly Nittler 

David Norris 

Tami Norwood 



A 30 



ENDOWMENT Association 




More than 400 people attended the Seventh Annual Great Cowley Duck Dash May 15, 2004, at Sprmg HOI Farnis northeast of AHtansas C%. Once 
agam, the event was held under beautiful skies at the home of Bob and Carolyn l^ngenwalter. Exating duck taces, great door prizes, and a goutmet 
meal of meaqulte prime rib and chicken breast were al part of the festivities. More tnan $26^)00 was raised duhngllie event, with ptoceedsgoa^ 
to the Bidowed Scholarship Rmd at the coiege. 



John C. Ogren 

Pat and Kathy O'Shaughnessy 

David and Sally Palmer 

Mark and Deb Paton 

Betty Peterson 

Barry and Barcley Pierce 

Angela Plummer 

Julie Priest 

Connie Reed 

Mr. and Mrs. James H. Reed 

Bill and Arleta Rice 

Mr. and Mrs. Cliff Roderick 

Rush Realty 

Mr. and Mrs. Travis F. Say 

Scott and Michelle Schoon 

Collen Schulz 

Clyde and Barbara Shellenberger 

J. Michael and Bonnie Smith 

Marshall Smith 

Richard D. Smith 

Dr. Jean and Ellen Snell 

Robert M. Sneller 

Maxine L. Soule 

David C. Stone 

Mike and Leann Stout 

Strother Field Commission 



Stacey L. Swear ingen 

Judy Teague 

Gene A. Thompkins 

D.H. and Doris Thompson 

Mr. and Mrs. Dave Thompson 

Herbert L. Thompson 

Kathie Thurman 

Tom and Christie Triplett 

Donald Vannoy 

Stoney K. Vining 

Patricia Waltman 

Robert Watson 

Roy Wittenborn 

Chuck and Sandy Woodin 

Morgan Wright 

Zeller Motor Company 

Tiger Booster Club 

Super Booster ($2,500 or more) 

Great Western Dining/ CCCC 
Home National Bank 
Paton Wholesale & Vending 
Jim and Deb Salomon 



Orange & Black Club 
($1,000-52,499) 

Ark City Glass Co. 

Client Business Services, Inc. 

CornerBank 

Orthopaedic Sports Medicine 

United Agency 

Union State Bank 

Zeller Motor Co., Inc. 

Bengal Club ($5005999) 

Ark City Country Mart 
Ark Valley Distributing, Inc. 
Dan Bowker 
Brown's, Inc. 

Central Plains Book Manufacturing 
Coca-Cola Bottling Co. 
Cowley County Economic 
Development Agency 
Elite Advertising 
Foster's Furniture of Ark City 
Jan's Sport Shack 
Dr. and Mrs. Nicholas L. Kinsch 
Dr. Pat and Sandy McAtee 
Rindt-Erdman Funeral Home 



31 



■ 



ENDOWMENT Association 



Tiger Club ($300-$499) 

Jeri and Sid Achenbach 

Century 21 Advantage Realty 

Gene and Donella Cole 

Galaxie Business Equipment 

Gambino's Pizza 

Ron and Donetta Godsey 

Graves Drug Store #11 

Ed Hargrove 

DeAnna Harp 

Conrad Jimison 

K.E. Miller Engineer 

Murray and Diane Mathew 

Merle Snider Motors, Inc. 

Otis and Terri Morrow 

Roger Pridey 

Ramsey's Auto Parts, Inc. 

Tom and Sue Saia 

Mr. and Mrs. Bill Sheldon 

Sonic Drive-In 

David and Debra S. Travis 

Turn-of-the-Century Enterprises 

David and Sheree Utash 

Waldorf-Riley, Inc. 

Winfield Consumer Products, Inc. 

Woods Lumber of Arkansas City 

Dr. Bob and Sue Yoachim 

Century Club (S150-S299) 

ADM Milling 
American Concrete 
David W. Andreas 
Larry and Rose Anstine 
Steve and Pam Archer 
Ark Valley Credit Union 
Albert and Karen Bacastow 
BarnesCo, Inc. 
Buel D. Beck 
Mel Brown Sr. 
David Burroughs 
Bill and Beth Bussa 
Terry D. Cassiday 
Jose and Marlys Cervantes 
City of Winfield 
Tony and Vicki Crouch 
Bruce and Amy Crouse 
D & S Retail Liquor 
Dave and Carol Daulton 
Virginia Donaldson 
Ronald and Pam Doyle 
Buel R. Duncan 
Steve and Janet English 
David and Jennifer Faust 
First Intermark Corporation 
Curt and Cindy Freeland 
Gallaways, LLC 
Greendoor Lafamilia 
Phil and Joyce Groves 
Allen and Beverly Grunder 
Ed and Linda Hargrove 
Hawks Funeral Home 
Bill and Linda Headrick 
Mr. and Mrs. Steve Hearne 
Jim and Marge Hendershot 
Daniel and Janell Hill 



John and Janice Hitchcock 

Gary Hockenbury 

Richard and Melissa K. Hollister 

Hutchinson Electric, Inc. 

Elliott and Martha Jackson 

Jerry's Daylight Donut Shop 

Jim s Total Service 

Hubert and Mildred Johnston 

Bob and Elizabeth J. Keown 

Mary J. Kerr 

Oscar Kimmell 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles O. Kinzie 

Kline Motors 

Local 1004 IUE-AFL-CIO 

Lane and Shannon Massey 

Richard and Barbara Mehuron 

Mike Groves Oil, Inc. 

Mike Morgan 

Newell Rubbermaid 

Dr. Nathan and Amy Niles 

Randy and Debbie Nittler 

Optimist Club of Arkansas City 

Neal and Anna Mae Paisley 

Sally and David Palmer 

Merrill Parker 
Parman, Tanner, Soule & Jackson 
Mark Phillips 
Philip E. Phillips 
J.W. and Paula Plush 
Puritan Billiard Parlor 
Bill and Pam Ramsey 
James and Sylvia Reed 
Reedy Ford 

Bud Riley Heat and Air 
Bryce and Val Roderick 
Dr. Nick and Christie Rogers 
Steve Russell 
Samford-Stover Agency 
Mr. and Mrs. David M. Schaller 
Schmidt Jewelers 
Larry Schwintz 
Sears Dealer Store 
Dr. John and Julie Seitz 
Dr. and Mrs. Robert A. Starr 
State Bank of Winfield 
Ronald and Patsy Sweeley 
Taylor Drug 

Turn of the Century Enterprises 
Universal Steel Buildings 
Johnny M. Walker 
Westlake Ace Hardware 
Winfield Motor Co., Inc. 
Robert and Jill Wood 

Cowley Friend ($75-5149) 

Mia Allen 

Ark Valley Physical Therapy 

Ark Veterinary Associates 

Frankie Arnold 

Automatic Coin Machine Co. 

Joe and Donna Avery 

Mr. and Mrs. Jack Baird 

Harold G. Barse 

Chris and Kim Biddle 

Billings Plumbing and Bath 



Marshall and Doris Brentlinger 

Mr. and Mrs. Darrel Burroughs 

Darren and Carolyn Burroughs 

Buterbaugh & Handlin 

Joe and Connie Carder 

Mr. and Mrs. David Colquhoun 

Conco, Inc. 

Cowley County Broadcasting 

Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Czapfinski 

Rick DeMoss 

Dillons Store #38 

Donna's Designs 

John and Lynn Dziedzic 

Edward D. Jones Company 

Emrick's Van & Storage Co. 

Barbara L. Farley 

Rob Fields 

Mr. and Mrs. Dave Galliart 

Belva Gardner 

Gary Grayum 

Greendoor Lafamilia 

Mr. and Mrs. Roger Gubichuk 

Elvin and Dixie Hatfield 

Cathy Hendricks 

Jesse Hocker 

Tom Hollingsworth 

Michael Holland 

Tom Hollingsworth 

Image Quest 

Brian and Heather Jackson 

Mr. and Mrs. Vernell Jackson 

Danny and Sandy Jones 

Keefe Printing 

Kindred Jewelry 

Midwest Electric Supply 

Steve and Joi Jay 

Kindred Jewelry 

Mr. and Mrs. Irvin Kramer 

Ken and Judy Kraus 

Kuhn Mechanical 

Lion's Club of Arkansas City 

J.C. and Donna Louderback 

Stu and Betsy Luder 

Scott and Rhoda MacLaughlin 

Dr. Jerry and Debbie Mangen 

Tommy E. Mason 

Kenny and Pat Mauzey 

McCluggage, VanSickle & Perry 

Gary and Pat McCutcheon 

McDonald's Used Books 

Jack and Sherry McVey 

Billy Means 

Meiers Tax Accounting Service 

Rich Morgan 

Sue and Norman Morris 

Mr. Goodcents 

Neives' Mexican Restaurant 

PBA Architects 

Alan and Susan Paton 

Powers Roofing and Siding 

Nathan and Joanna L. Pryor 

Quality Water Service 

Bill E. Ramsey 

Bryce and Val Roderick 

Rogers and Lanning 



A 32 



H 



ENDOWMENT Association 



Steve Russell 

Brian and Kristi Shaw 

Shear Success, Inc. 

Wanda Shepherd 

Mr. and Mrs. Dennis K. Shurtz 

Gary G. Sigle 

Smith & Oakes Engineers 

Randy and Pam Smith 

South Kansas Screen Printing 

Starlyn Venus State Farm Insurance 

Ron L. Steiner 

Larry Swaim 

Michael D. Videgar 

Chris Vollweider 

Loretta R. Waldroupe 

H.A. Walling 

Walnut Valley Lanes 

Bruce and Tamra Watson 

James Watson 

Dr. Aaron T. Watters 

Sarah L. Wesbrooks 

Ginger D Williams 

Gary and Peggy Williams 

Charlee W. Wilson 

Wilson Oil Company 

Gene and Cindy J. Young 

Cowley Legacy Club 

Cowley Legacy Club members are 
employees, endowment board mem- 
bers and trustees of Cowley College 
who donate generously to scholar- 
ships, programs, athletics, and build- 
ing campaigns. Their dedication and 
commitment to making Cowley a 
great place to learn, work and play is 
greatly appreciated! 

Paul and Roxie Aguilar 

Mia Allen 

Rod and Jody Arnett 

Frankie Arnold 

Joe and Donna Avery 

Albert and Karen Bacastow 

Cliff Bazil 

Buel Beck 

Chris and Kim Biddle 

Connie Bonfy 

Dick and Dolly Bonfy 

Dave and Trina Bostwick 

Darren and Carolyn Burroughs 

David and Vicki Burroughs 

Kenny and Janet Buss 



Brett and Catherine Butler 

Jose and Marlys Cervantes 

Tony and Vicki Crouch 

Bruce and Amy Crouse 

Mike and Susan Crow 

William R. and Judy Docking 

John and Connie Donatelli 

Ronald and Pam Doyle 

Steve and Janet English 

Casey A. Eubank 

Doug and Dejon Ewing 

Curt and Cindy Freeland 

Ron and Donetta Godsey 

Gary Grayum 

Lee and Sue Gregg 

David and Lisa Grose 

Allen and Beverly Grunder 

Ed and Linda Hargrove 

Dean and DeAnna Harp 

Elvin and Dixie Hatfield 

Cathy Hendricks 

Kim and Cynthia Hocker 

Richard and Melissa Hollister 

Jimmie and Joyce Holloway 

Angela Holmes 

Bill and Carol House 

Ronnie and Terri Hutchinson 

Brian and Heather Jackson 

Paul E. Jackson 

Mark and Lora Jarvis 

Conrad and Janet Jimison 

Mark and Stefani Jones 

Herlynda G. Jordan 

Kay Kautz 

Ellen L. Kelly 

Paul and Diane Kelly 

Bob and Elizabeth Keown 

LaDonna Lanning 

Scott and Deborah Layton 

Scott and Rhoda MacLaughlin 

Dr. Rodger and Melba Maechtlen 

Tommy E. Mason 

Lane and Shannon Massey 

Kenny and Pat Mauzey 

Steve and Joyce McArtor 

Dr. Pat and Sandy McAfee 

Andy McFayden 

Charles McKown 

Gina McKown 

Jack and Sherry McVey 

Richard and Barbara Mehuron 

Bob Moffatt 

Norman and Sue Morris 

Otis and Terri Morrow 



Greg and Patty Mugler 

Ron and Janice Neagle 

Margaret Neal 

Mark and Melinda Neal 

Joe and Patty Neises 

Beverly Nittler 

Randy and Debbie Nittler 

Rick and Gay Norris 

Stu and Stephanie Osterthun 

Jason and Shannon O'Toole 

David and Sally Palmer 

Mark and Deb Paton 

Bill and Julie Perdue 

Nathan and Joanna Pryor 

Cliff and Carol Roderick 

Bryce and Val Roderick 

Tom and Sue Saia 

Jim and Deb Salomon 

Dan and Lois Sampson 

Scott and Michelle Schoon 

Bruce and Debra Schwyhart 

Larry C. Schwintz 

Brian and Kristi Shaw 

Wanda Shepherd 

Joe and Mindi Shriver 

Forest and Sandra Smith 

Libby Smith 

Randy and Pam Smith 

Randy and Shauna Smithson 

H. Wayne and Diane Steadham 

Helen Storbeck 

Tad and Janice Stover 

Morgan Sommers 

Larry Swaim 

Chris Vollweider 

Loretta Waldroupe 

Randy and LeArta Watkins 

Bruce and Tamra Watson 

Sarah Wesbrooks 

Lewis and Cynthia Wesson 

Gary and Peggy Williams 

Robert and Jill Wood 

David and Sheree Utash 

Dr. Bob and Sue Yoachim 

Gene and Cindy Young 

This report is generated from the 
Alumni and Development Office at 
Cowley College. We have tried to be 
as accurate as possible, but if you dis- 
cern mistakes of any kind, please let 
us know so that they may be correct- 
ed. Contact us at 1-800-593-2222 Ext. 
5291 or Ext. 5237. 



33 




COWLEY COLLEGE Data 




BOTTOM Line 



Elected Officials 

Governor 

Kathleen Sebelius 

Second Floor 

State Capitol 

Topeka, Kansas 66612 

State Senator 
Greta Goodwin 
Winfield, Kansas 67156 

State Representatives 

Kasha Kelley 

Arkansas City, Kansas 67005 

Judy Showalter 
Winfield, Kansas 67156 

State Board of Regents 

Reggie Robinson 

President & Chief Executive Officer 

700 SW Harrison 

Topeka, KS 66603-3716 

Board of Trustees 

Donna Avery, Arkansas City 
Albert Bacastow Jr., Arkansas City 
Lee Gregg Jr., Arkansas City 
Ron Godsey, Winfield 
LaDonna Lanning, Winfield 
Mark Paton, Arkansas City 

Cowley's 
Administrative Team 

Dr. Patrick J. McAtee . . President 

Sheree Utash Vice President 

Academic/Student Affairs 

Tony Crouch Vice President 

of Business Services 

Conrad Jimison . . . Vice President 

of Administration 

Pam Doyle Dean of 

Student Learning 

Terri Morrow. Dean of 

Development and College 

Relations 

Sue Saia . . . Dean of Student Life 

Sarah Wesbrooks Dean of 

Northern Campuses 

Charles McKown Dean of 

Research and Technology 

Stu Osterthun Director of 

Public Relations 
Tom Saia. . . . Director of Athletics 



Your Investment 

• $3,362,132 in 2004-05 taxes. $3,597,132 in 2003-04 taxes. For every dollar 
appropriated by state and local government, the college's spending alone 
generated $1.42 in wages and salaries in Cowley County. 

• For every dollar appropriated by the state and local government in fiscal 
2002, student earnings will increase by an average of $0.82 per year, every 
year through the rest of their working lives. Likewise, for every state dollar 
appropriated, Cowley County will see social savings of $0.13 per year, every 
year (reduced incarceration and health care expenditures, reduced expendi- 
tures on unemployment and welfare, and reduced absenteeism). 

• The College is third in size among the 19 community colleges in Kansas, 
behind Johnson County Community College and Butler Community College. 

Your Return 

• Cowley had operating expenses of $11.9 million in fiscal 2002, and spent $9.6 
million (81 percent) of this in Cowley County to purchase supplies and pay 
wages and salaries. 

• $9 million annual payroll, providing 189 full-time jobs and 239 adjunct faculty 
and staff positions. For every $1 the college pays in wages and salaries, there 
is another $0.31 in wages and salaries generated off -campus in the Cowley 
County economy — this is the commonly known multiplier effect. 

• Customized training for more than a dozen businesses and industries, prima- 
rily through the Cowley College Workforce Development Center at Strother 
Field Industrial Park. 

• A significant attraction for businesses and industries considering relocation in 
this area. College skills embodied in the present-day workforce increase the 
output of industries in the Cowley County economy, where the former stu- 
dents are employed, by $83.63 million. 

• Skills gained from the college by current and former students increase wages 
and salaries in Cowley County by $25.5 million directly, and by another $19.3 
million indirectly in fiscal 2002. 

• Of the 2,054 credit and non-credit students who attended the college in fiscal 
2002, 67 percent were employed full- or part-time while attending. Sixty per- 
cent of the students stay in the region and contribute to the local economy 
after they leave the college. 

• After leaving the college, the average Cowley student will spend 40 years in 
the workforce. The student who leaves with a two-year college degree will 
earn $372,799 more than someone with just a high school diploma or GED. 

• During the next 40 years in the workforce, the average Cowley student's dis- 
counted lifetime earnings will increase $7.60 for every education dollar 
invested (in the form of tuition, fees, books, and foregone earnings from 
employment). 



Jl 34 



COWLEY COLLEGE Data 



At A Glance 




Founded: 1922 

In 1968, the College became the first school in the state to combine a traditional 
liberal arts transfer curriculum with a program of area vocational-technical school 
training. 

President: 

Dr. Patrick McAfee became the third president of the College on July 1, 1987. 



2003 Fall Enrollment: 

2,488 Full-Time Equivalency (Fall record) 
4,044 Total Headcount 



2004 Spring Enrollment: 

3,045 FTE (Spring record) 
4,507 Total Headcount 



Programs: 

33 Certificate and Applied Science programs 
42 Liberal Arts/ Transfer programs 

More than 100 specialized programs and seminars offered through the Institute 
for Lifetime Learning, a program for men and women age 50 and older. 
Specialized training for business and industry to meet their needs. In the past the 
college has developed or offered programs for General Electric, Rubbermaid- 
Winfield, the city of Arkansas City, the city of Winfield, local school districts, day 
care centers, local nursing homes, special education co-ops, KSQ Blowmolding, 
Social Rehabilitation Services, Southwestern Bell Telephone, Wittur Inc., Boeing- 
Wichita, Cessna, the business and industry division of banks, and many others. 

Facilities: 

17 buildings on a 10-acre campus in the heart of downtown Arkansas City. 

Outreach Centers in Mulvane, Winfield, Wellington and two in Wichita, includ- 
ing the Aviation Tech Center, opened in January 2004. Courses also taught at 
these area high schools: Argonia, Belle Plaine, Burden, Caldwell, Cedar Vale, 
Conway Springs, Dexter, Oxford, South Haven, and Udall. 

Athletics: 

Fourteen intercollegiate sports that compete in the Kansas Jayhawk Community 
College Conference's East Division. Men's Cross Country, Women's Cross 
Country, Volleyball, Men's Basketball, Women's Basketball, Women's Indoor 
Track, Men's Indoor Track, Baseball, Softball, Golf, Men's Tennis, Women's 
Tennis, Men's Outdoor Track and Field, and Women's Outdoor Track and Field. 

Jayhawk Conference Eastern Division Team Titles in 2003-2004: 

• Baseball (its ninth title in the last 10 seasons) 

• Softball (its fifth title in the last eight seasons) 

• Men's Cross Country 

• Men's Outdoor Track & Field 

National Championships in 2003-2004: 

• Men's Tennis, Spring 2004 Academic Team of the Year, 3.46 GPA 

• Kyle Ellis, Indoor National Champion in the Pole Vault 

Region VI crowns in 2003-2004: 

• Women's Tennis 



Employees: 

203 full-time faculty, staff and administration; 239 part-time faculty and staff 



Mill Levy History* 

2004-2005 17.561 

2003-2004 17.561 

2002-2003 17.627 

2001-2002 16.936 

2000-2001 19.967 

1999-2000 22.762 

Tuition & Fees 
2004-2005: 

Kansas Residents: 
$65 per credit hour 

(Cowley County residents receive a 
$5 per hour tuition waiver) 

Oklahoma Residents: 
$65 per credit hour 

Other Out-of-State: 
$117 per credit hour 

International Students: 
$166 per credit hour 



Enrollment Figures: 
Facts, Spring 2004: 





. . . 412 
2,263 




. 1,681 

. . . 151 

4,507 


Total FTE 


. 3,045 




. 1,329 




. 1,009 
. . . 188 




. . . 161 



Assessed Valuation 
for Cowley County: 

Fall 2004: 
$191,452,007 

College Budget: 
$24.8 million (2004-2005) 



35 




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Cowley County 
Community College 

& Area Vocational-Technical School 

125 S. Second Street 
Arkansas City, Kansas 67005 



620.442.0430 



THE PRESIDENTS ANNUAL REPORT 




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2008-2009 





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THE NEW TEAMS SCORE! 



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President's Report 
2007 - 08 




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Cowley College is award winning academic and vocational programs, 
career changing academic excellence, state of the art theatre, music and 
tine arts and national champion athletics. Our college began in a 
basement of a high school 85 years ago. Since then we have become 
magnetic athletics, soaring performance arts and an institution of quality 
and innovative higher education. We're proud of our heritage and we're 
excited about our future. 




Founded: 1922 

In 1968, the College became the first school in the state to combine a 
traditional liberal arts transfer curriculum with a program of area voca- 
tional-technical school training. 

President: 

Dr. Patrick McAfee became the third president of the College on July 1, 

1987. 

2005 Fall and 2006 Spring Enrollment: 
More than 3,000 Full-Time Equivalency 
More than 4,500 Total Headcount 

Programs: 

68 majors and degree possibilities 
30 clubs and organizations 

More than 100 specialized programs and seminars offered through the 
Cowley Golden Tigers, a program for men and women age 50 and older. 
Specialized training for business and industry to meet their needs. In the 
past the college has developed or offered programs for General Electric, 
Rubbermaid-Wintield, the city of Arkansas City, the city of Winfield, 
local school districts, day care centers, local nursing homes, special 
education co-ops, KSQ Blowmolding, Social Rehabilitation Services, 
Southwestern Bell Telephone, Wittur Inc., Boeing-Wichita, Cessna, the 
business and industry division of banks, and many others. 

Facilities: 

19 buildings on a 10-acre campus in the heart of downtown Arkansas 

City. 

Outreach Centers in Mulvane, Strother Field, Winfield, and Wichita. 

Courses also taught at these area high schools: Argonia, Belle Plaine, 

Burden, Caldwell, Cedar Vale, Conway Springs, Dexter, Oxford, South 

Haven, Udall, and Wellington. 



THE PRESIDENT'S ANNUAL REPORT 





Welcome to the 2007-08 edition of the President's Annual Report. 

I'm very proud to tell you that the past academic year was one filled with many outstanding student accomplishments, 
faculty and staff awards, and growth and improvement in many areas of the college. 

Our students never cease to amaze me. Some are just naturally gifted individuals who achieve at the highest level and aspire 
to be highly skilled professionals in their chosen career. Others sacrifice time with their families to gain new skills or finish a 
degree to become more employable in today's competitive job market. 

Cowley's goal is to take care of its students, regardless of their place in life. Sometimes we fail, and for that I apologize. But, 
I can tell you that Cowley employees want every student to experience success. How that success is measured depends on the 
individual. 

Alex Gottlob from Wintield is our 2006-07 Student of the Year. What a smart and driven young man! The business admin- 
istration major was a member of three campus organizations. At the National Leadership Conference in Nashville, TN. this 
past June, he became the first Cowley student to place first at the national level as he placed first in Job Interview. He also 
found time to continue running his own business, Gottlob Lawn and Landscape. 

Humanities Department Instructor Marlys Cervantes was selected as the fifth recipient of the Endowed Chair for Teaching 
Excellence and Student Learning. 

Community College Week listed Cowley as one of the top-100 associate degree producers. The college has grown signifi- 
cantly during my 20 years as president. 

Our Center for Technical Excellence in Winfield allow provides state of the art training facilities and laboratories to 
increase business and industry development county wide. We will teach a series of courses with the Manufacturing Busi- 
ness Skills certificate program, and launch our new Mechatronics program, which will give students skills on how to repair 
automated systems. 

This report includes many other wonderful highlights from the past year. 1 invite you to read through it carefully. It is my 
hope that it will give you a better understanding of what Cowley is all about and the direction we're heading. 
On behalf of our Board of Trustees, my fellow administrators, our faculty, staff and students, I want to thank you for your 
support of Cowley County Community College. It means a great deal to me. The college has always been a viable entity 
within Arkansas City, Cowley County, and south-central Kansas. We will do our very best to keep it that way. 

Sincerely, 



(fed/ mcu£r 

Patrick I. McAtee, Ph.D. 




Patrick J. McAtee, Ph.D. 




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CORE VALUES 

Cowley County Community College and Area Vocational-Technical School is dedicated to the continual 
pursuit of excellence by embracing our Core Values, the fundamental principles that guide our actions. 

People 

* We emphasize the importance of human relationships, diversity, and a sense of community. 

* We provide student-centered instruction. 

* We provide a safe, learning environment where joy, humor, and teamwork are embraced. 

* We encourage open communication and the sharing of ideas. 

Leadership 

* We provide a positive atmosphere that fosters personal and professional growth. 

* We empower students and employees to be innovative and visionary. 

* We are an ethical leader in the field of education. 

Integrity 

* We regard honesty, trust, and respect as essential principles in our academic, personal and 

professional standards. 

Accountability 

* Our students will receive a quality education. 

* The College will provide students the opportunity to take an active role in their success. 

* All employees are responsible and committed to excellence. 

* We are accountable to the community to educate students and to sustain and improve society 




THE PRESIDENTS ANNUAL REPORT 




Ato/ 



2008-2009 



COLLEGE 
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THE NEW TEAMS SCORE! 



MISSION STATEMENT 

Cowley College and Area Vocational-Technical School is committed to learning 
excellence and personal enrichment in an open access environment. 



STATEMENT OF INSTITUTIONAL 
PURPOSE 

We are committed to maintaining a quality institution by meeting and exceeding the 
expectations of customers through the following: 

Academic and Personal Enrichment: 

The college will provide accessible curricula in an environment that promotes indi- 
vidual growth and personal enrichment. 

Support Services: 

The college will facilitate academic growth and the development of life skills. 

Community Development: 

The college will foster development of the community through public service pro- 
grams and partnerships with business and industry. 

Fiscal Soundness: 

The college will secure financial support from various resources and maintain a 
financially stable institution. 

Ethics: 

The college will emphasize a sense of fairness, citizenship, and tolerance for the views 
of others. 







Who We Serve 

Spring 2006 Semester Enrollment by location 

Arkansas City 1,486 

SSEC 2,346 

Virtual Campus 967 

Mulvane Bloomenshine 477 

Aviation Tech Center 154 

Wellington 116 

Winfield Ill 

Mulvane IT 88 

Percentage by Gender 

Male 41% 

Female 59% 

Percentage by Ethnic Group 

Black/Non-Hispanic 6.8% 

Native American 1.0% 

Asian 4.0% 

Hispanic 4.5% 

Caucasian 81% 

Other 2.7% 



Percentage by Age 

Under 18 1.0% 

19-22 years old 47.5% 

23-29 years old 21.7% 

3049 years old 21.6% 

50 and over 3.8% 

2006-07 Enrollment Data 

Annual Unduplicated Headcount 6,992 

Headcount Fall 2005 5,244 

Headcount Spring 2006 4,960 

Full-time Equivalent Students Fall 2005 .3,193 

FTE Students Spring 2006 3,021 

International Student Enrollment 83 




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THE PRESIDENTS ANNUAL REPORT 




C 





2008-2009 





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Your Return on Investment 



Expenditures by Source 
2006-07 (unaudited) 

Instruction 

Academic Support 

Student Services 

Institutional Support 

Operations ck 

Maintenance 

Grants 

Transfers 

Total 

Revenues by Source 
2006-07 

Student Sources 
Federal Sources 
State Sources 
County Sources 
Local Sources 
Other Sources 
Total 



$8,680, 684 
$679,035 
$3,035,021 
$2,407,553 

$3,962,924 
$275,811 
$25,000 
$19,066,028 



$5,738,164 

$190,940 

$8,117,400 

$252,345 

$4,106,124 

$621,836 

$19,026,809 



45.53% 
3.56% 
15.92% 
12.63% 

20.79% 
1.45% 
0.13% 
100.0% 



30.16% 

1.00% 

42.66% 

1.33% 

21.58% 

3.27% 

100.0% 



THE NEW TEAMS SCORE! 




Impact to Local Taxpayers 

College, employee and student spending in Cowley County 

"Roll-over" effect of direct spending in county (multiplier = 1.6) 

State/local taxes received in 2005-06 

(including property & motor vehicle taxes) 

Net Return to Taxpayers 

(based on direct spending only) 

Net Return to Taxpayers 

(including roll-over effect) 

Dollar-for-dollar return 

(based on direct spending only) 

Dollar-for-dollar return 

(including roll-over effect) 

(Does not include economic impact of student tuition and fees, visitors 
& increased productivity through a better educated workforce.) 

• Fifth lowest mill levy at 18.595 mills. 

• One of Cowley County's largest employers. 



. . 








Student Return on Investment 



Your Investment 

$3,128,525 in 2001-02 taxes; $3,522,702 in 2002-03 taxes. For 
every dollar appropriated by state and local government, the college's 
spending alone generated $1.42 in wages and salaries in Cowley County. 

• For every dollar appropriated by the state and local government 
in fiscal 2002, student earnings will increase by an average of $0.82 per 
year, every year through the rest of their working lives. Likewise, for every 
state dollar appropriated, Cowley County will see social savings of $0.13 
per year, every year (reduced incarceration and health care expenditures, 
reduced expenditures on unemployment and welfare, and reduced absen- 
teeism). 

• The College is third in size among the 19 community colleges 
in Kansas, behind Johnson County Community College and Butler 
County Community College. 

Your Return 

• Cowley had operating expenses of $11.9 million in fiscal 2002, 
and spent $9.6 million (81 percent) of this in Cowley County to purchase 
supplies and pay wages and salaries. 

• $9 million annual payroll, providing 189 full-time jobs and 
239 adjunct faculty and staff positions. For every $1 the college pays in 
wages and salaries, there is another $0.31 in wages and salaries generated 
off-campus in the Cowley County economy— this is the commonly known 
multiplier effect. 

• Customized training for more than a dozen businesses and in- 
dustries, primarily through the Cowley College Workforce Development 
Center at Strother Field Industrial Park. 



• A significant attraction for businesses and industries consider- 
ing relocation in this area. College skills embodied in the present-day 
workforce increase the output of industries in the Cowley County 
economy, where the former students are employed, by $83.63 million. 

• Skills gained from the college by current and former students 
increase wages and salaries in Cowley County by $25.5 million directly, 
and by another $19.3 million indirectly in fiscal 2002. 

• Of the 2,054 credit and non-credit students who attended the 
college in fiscal 2002, 67 percent were employed full- or part-time while 
attending. Sixty percent of the students stay in the region and contribute 
to the local economy after they leave the college. 

• After leaving the college, the average Cowley student will spend 
40 years in the workforce. The student who leaves with a two-year college 
degree will earn $372,799 more than someone with just a high school 
diploma or GED. 

• During the next 40 years in the workforce, the average Cowley 
student's discounted lifetime earnings will increase $7.60 for every educa- 
tion dollar invested (in the form of tuition, fees, books, and foregone 
earnings from employment). 



THE PRESIDENTS ANNUAL REPORT 




C 



LLEGE 



2008-2009 



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Foundation Balance Sheet 



ASSETS 




Total Cash and Investments 


$3,233,944 


Pledges Receivable 


$161,486 


Capitalized Assets 


$48,590 


Total Assets 


$3,444,020 


LIABILITIES AND NET ASSETS 




Total Current Liabilities 


$48,591 


Total Long-Term Liabilities 


$112,895 


Total Liabilities 


$161,486 


NET ASSETS 




Unrestricted 


$350,409 


Temporarily Restricted 


$596,271 


Permanently Restricted 


$1,903,164 


College Owned 


$432,690 


Total Net Assets 


$3,282,534 


Total Liabilities and Net Assets 


$3,444,020 






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Key Performance Indicators 

Cowley relies upon a set of Key Performance Indicators to assess the col- 
lege's effectiveness and to demonstrate accountability to its stakeholders. 
This abbreviated report provides an overview of Cowley's performance in 
key areas over the past year. 

To expand partnerships with other educational institutions, governmen- 
tal agencies, and business and industry. 

At least five new partnerships will be established each year. 

The partners for 2006 included Wichita State University's "Education 
2+2" program; an Associate Degree in Nursing Program with Pratt 
Community College; a business Administration Degree with Friends Uni- 
versity; shared facilities with Mulvane USD 263; and an entrepreneurship 
program with Home National Bank. 

Number of course sections offered in conjunction with Cowley partner 
will increase. 

46 new course sections were offered in conjunction with Cowley part- 



Number of students enrolled in course sections offered in conjunction 
with any Cowley partner will increase. 

335 students enrolled in classes as a result of new partnerships. 

To improve the success of students in the core skills of reading, writing, 
and mathematics. 

Number of students exceeding the national average in reading, writing, 
and mathematics on the Collegiate Assessment of Academic Proficiency 
(CAAP) will increase from 2005. 



270 students exceeded the national average in reading compared to 203 

in 2005. 

262 students exceeded the national average in writing compared to 183 

in 2005. 

365 students exceeded the national average in mathematics compared to 

229 in 2005. 

To increase the "performance gap" on the Noel Levitz Student Satisfac- 
tion Survey. 

Six of the 14 measurements of student satisfaction showed directional 
improvement. 

To expand Cowley's industrial technology training in aviation airframe 
and powerplant maintenance, automotive technology, machine tool 
technology, and welding. 

To increase the number of courses taught in industrial technology disci- 
plines. 

431 sections of courses offered as compared to 262 in 2005. 
Number of students enrolled in industrial technology courses will 
increase. 

580 students enrolled as compared to 321 in 2005. 

Number of students who successfully complete an FAA airframe or pow- 
erplant certification will increase. 

95 students received their FAA airframe or powerplant certification as 
compared to 15 students in 2005. 



THE PRESIDENT'S ANNUAL REPORT 





Looking Ahead 



At Cowley ours is a story built from the ground up, full of courage, and 
the confidence that comes with success through risk-taking. Our students 
are explorers on a transforming journey and we are an institution driven 
by quality and dedicated to engaging its students and communities in 
unique learning experiences that expand their minds and spirits. We are 
dedicated to student success and as they become transformed so too do 
we. Find The Noise from within!!! 

As we take the next steps in our journey we are excited about our con- 
tinuing partnerships with area universities, colleges, community colleges 
and industry designed to build a world class workforce for area employ- 
ers. We look forward to new partnerships to build academic opportuni- 
ties to enhance transfer and articulation in our arts and sciences degree 
programs for our students. New or enhanced programs in Mechatronics, 
Interior Design, Avionics, Leadership, Office Technologies, Computer 
Help Desk, Entrepreneurship, Medical Transcription and Coding and 
the expansion of our Mobile Intensive Care Technician program will 
afford our students a variety of career and academic options in high 
demand high wage occupations. And our efforts in delivering a service 
learning program for all Cowley students will cultivate a spirit of giving 
hack to the benefit of our communities. 



Last, we have identified five areas of focus for the institution for the next 
year 

Improve Student Learning Outcomes; Communication Skills, 

Computation Skills, Critical Thinking and Problem Solving, 

Technology Skills, Community Skills and Interpersonal Skills. 

Enhance teaching, learning and student engagement both in 

and out of the classroom. 

Respond to area employer demands and provide support for 

community workforce development. 

Expand visibility of the college through enhanced marketing 

efforts. 

Expand resources through entrepreneurial endeavors. 







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{— j OSCJSl ^OCOQnitiOnS Highlights of faculty, student and staff accomplishments over the last year. 



* Bruce Crouse — The department chair of career and technical educa- 
tion at Cowley College, was named the Kansas Council on Workforce 
Education (KWCE) 2007 Award Winner for Excellence in Teaching 

* Todd Shepherd — Instructor/chair of Cowley College's Social Science 
Department, became the sixth recipient of the Paul Stirnaman Memorial 
Award for Teaching Excellence. 

* Chansi Long — Journalist of the Year for two-year newspapers. 

* Cowley Press — Students received eight first place awards at the spring 
conference of the Kansas Associated Collegiate Press. 

* Phi Beta Lambda — Four first place student awards at 56th annual 
State Leadership Conference in Salina. 

* Emilie Magnus — 2006 national winner of the Diversified Crop 
Production - Placement Proficiency award program at the 79th National 
FFA Convention in Indianapolis, Ind. 

* Trevor Whitsitt, Sarah Richardson, Heather Bailes, and 

Nathan Holcomb — Named to the American Choral Directors Associa- 
tion Two-Year College National Honor Choir. 

* Pam Smith — Recipient of the Paul Stirnaman Memorial Award for 
Teaching Excellence. 

* Victoria Ukaoma — Arkansas City Student of the Year. 

* Alex Gottlob — Cowley College Student of the Year. 

* Tom Mason, Chris Cannon, JoLynne Stalnaker — Received Excellence 
Awards from the National Institute tor Staff and Organizational Develop- 



ment in Austin, Texas. 

* Lisa Roberts — Received Outstanding New Community Builder award 
for 2006 from the Winfield Area Chamber of Commerce. 

* Tiffany Hutchinson, Alyssa Showman, Shaye Waple — Selected to All 
Kansas Academic Team. 

* Academic Excellence Challenge team — Won the regional tournament. 

* Automotive technology program in Mulvane — received certification 
from the National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation and 
the National Institute for Automotive Service Excellence. 

* Ed Hargrove — Inducted into National Junior College Athletic Associa- 
tion Hall of Fame. 

* Volleyball — Captured the Kansas Jayhawk Conference Eastern Division 
title and District M championship. Finished third at NJCAA Division II 
National Championships in Scottsdale, Ariz. 

* Women's Indoor Track — Kansas Jayhawk Conference Eastern Division 
champions and Region VI champions. Finished third at NJCAA National 
Indoor Track Championships in Lubbock, Texas. 

* Mark Phillips — Women's Indoor Track Coach of the Year. 

* Tamara McMillan — National champion in the weight throw at the 
NJCAA National Indoor Championships. 

* Women's Outdoor Track — Kansas Jayhawk Conference Eastern Divi- 
sion champions and Region VI champions. Finished third at NJCAA 
National Outdoor Track and Field Championships in Coffeyville. 



THE PRESIDENTS ANNUAL REPORT 






2008-2009 



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THE NEW TEAMS SCORE! 



* Kelsey Poljansek — Women's Field Athlete of the Meet at the NJCAA 
National Outdoor Track and Field Championships. National champion 
in the shot put and discus. 

* Men's Outdoor Track — Kansas Jayhawk Conference Eastern Division 
champions and Region VI champions. Finished third at NJCAA National 
Outdoor Track and Field Championships in Coffeyville. 

* Daniel Maina — National champion in the 3,000-meter steeplechase at 
the NJCAA National Outdoor Track and Field Championships. 

* Adam Wolkins — National champion in the javelin at the NJCAA 
National Outdoor Track and Field Championships. 

* Men's Cross Country — Kansas Jayhawk Conference Eastern Divi- 
sion champions. Finished fifth at the NJCAA Division I National Cross 
Country Championships in El Paso, Texas. 

* Women's cross country — Finished fourth at the NJCAA Division I 
National Cross Country Championships in El Paso, Texas. 

* Softball — Kansas Jayhawk Conference Eastern Division champions. 

* Baseball — Kansas Jayhawk Conference Eastern Division champions 
and Region VI champions. Competed at JUCO World Series in Grand 
Junction, Colo. 

* Dave Burroughs — Kansas Jayhawk Conference Eastern Division Base- 
ball Coach of the Year. 

* Mike Dabbs — Kansas Jayhawk Conference Eastern Division Baseball 
Player of the Year. 

* Women's tennis — Region VI Champions. Finished fourth at NJCAA 
Women's Tennis National Tournament in Tucson, Ariz. 




J.C. Louderback, a 1954 graduate ot Arkansas City Junior College, was 
selected as the recipient of the 2007 Outstanding Tiger Alumni Award. 
At ACJC, he was a state doubles champion and captain of the tennis team. 
In football, he was the team captain and named the squad's Most Inspira- 
tional Player, along with being named an all-conference quarterback. He was 
also the captain of the basketball team, which finished second in the nation 
in the 1952-53 season. 

After graduating from Southwestern College in 1957, he coached the 
Cowley men's tennis team to state championships in 1957, 1958, and 1959; 
and led the Tigers to a national runner-up finish in 1958. He was a Master 
Teacher for Unified School District 470 in 1984, and served as math in- 
structor and boy's tennis coach for Arkansas City High School for 36 years 
winning Kansas State team titles in 1989, 1990, and 1991. He was inducted 
into the Southwestern College Athletic Hall ot Fame in 1994, was inducted 
into the Kansas Coaches Hall of Fame for tennis in 1997, and was inducted 
into the Missouri Valley Tennis Association Hall of Fame in 1998. He was 
induced into the first class of the Tiger Athletic Hall of Fame in 2000. 
He also had a brief four-year stint as ACHS head basketball coach and girls 
tennis coach, and served as an assistant football coach at ACHS for 22 years. 
Louderback was voted national high school regional tennis coach of the year 
twice and Kansas state high school tennis coach of the year four times. 





Cowle 



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The Cowley College Endowment Association would like to thank the following for their contributions. 



Foundation Gifts July 1, 2006 

- June 30, 2007 

President's Society ($10,000 

- $49,999) 

Title III Matching Program 
Home National Bank 
Don and Peggy Shanks 
Helen Storheck 
Union State Bank 

Benefactor ($5,000 -$9,999) 
Boyer Educational Trust 
Carpenter 6k Vickers Trust 
Kirke W. Dale Trust 
William Funk 

Great Western Dining (In Kind) 
Kansas Arts Commission 
Paton Wholesale and Vending 

Builder ($1,000 -$4,999) 

Andreas Family 

Ark City Rotary Club 

Ark City Tumbleweeds 

Russell Bishop 

Martha Brandenburg 

Conco, Inc. 

CornerBank 

Marvin Daniel 

DCP Midstream Matching Gifts 

Program 

Bill and Judy Docking 

Beryle Elliott 

Bruce Endorf 



Stephen A. and Janet R. English 

Rowland Funk 

Galaxie Business Equipment 

Gordon and Associates Architects 

Bill and Carol House 

Dan Kahler 

Sarah Lewis 

Dr. Pat and Sandy McAtee 

Mid America Arts Alliance 

Otis and Terri Morrow 

Joe and Patty Neises 

JoAnn Newman 

Brian and Cindy Sanderholm 

James and Janet Sanderholm 

Daniel Stark 

Jack and Gail Stark 

Florence Stephens 

Richard and Nancy Tredway 

Charles Trenary 

United Agency 

David and Sheree Utash 

Investor ($500 - $999) 

American Legion Auxiliary Post 

18 

Scott Branine 

Karen Caroe 

Charles Chapman 

Ron and Pam Doyle 

Casey Eubank 

Curt and Cindy Freeland 

Allen and Beverly Grunder 

General Electric 



Bill and Linda Headrick 
Rex and Denise Irwin 
Ellen Kelly 
Mary Kerr 

Kiwanis Club of Arkansas City 
Beverly Lewis 
Local 1004 IUE-AFL-CIO 
John Maier 

Marvin and Anita McCorgary 
Dr. Nick and Christie Rogers 
Soroptimist 

Southwest Plains Regional Ser- 
vice Center 
Betty Sybrant 

TCK Trust 6k Financial Advisors 
Sarah Wesbrooks 
Westar Energy 

Winfield Publishing Co. Inc. 
Captola Yust 

Hall of Honor ($100 -$499) 

Abbey Eye Care 
Sid and Jerri Achenbach 
Robert and Helen Adams 
ADM Milling Company 
Sydney Alexander 
Alterra Sterling House 
Hobart and Gail Ammerman 
Joe and Eleanor Anderson 
Steve and Pam Archer 
Ark City High School 
Ark Veterinary Associates 
Arkansas City Chamber of Com- 



merce 

Arkansas City Traveler 

Rod and Jody Arnett 

Frankie Arnold 

Joe and Donna Avery 

Max and Nancy Ayers 

B Four Flying, Inc. 

Warren Baber 

Albert and Karen Bacastow 

Jack Bacastow 

William Bailey 

Larry Bartelson 

Clifford Bazil 

Buel Beck 

Becker Tire Company 

Beta Sigma Phi - City Council 

Dick and Dolly Bonfy 

Helen Born 

John and Julie Bossi 

David and Trina Bostwick 

Doug Boxberger 

Roger and Suzanne Brown 

Ken and Janet Buss 

Buterbaugh 6k Handlin 

Brett and Cathy Butler 

Chris Cannon 

Eunice Cassiday 

Tisha Catlin 

Center for Emergency Medicine 

of Western Pennsylvania 

Jose and Marlys Cervantes 

Jan Chapman 

City of Arkansas City 

Joseph and Nel Clark 



Judy Clark 

Albert and Audine Clemente 

John and Chris Clemente 

Gene and Donella Cole 

Father Francis Cox 

Tony and Vicki Crouch 

Bruce and Amy Crouse 

Mike and Sue Crow 

Melvin and Betty Current 

Kenneth and Beth Czaplinski 

D 6k D Farm Equipment, Inc. 

Jim and Rae Dale 

Lillian Damewood 

Gary Damewood 

Verna Davis 

Danny and Lin Deener 

Robin Delp 

J. P. and Vicky Dewell 

Iris Dittmann 

DiVall Retail Liquor 

John and Connie Donatelli 

Olin and Marcy Dovel 

Terry Dubach 

Dixon Dyer 

Early Bird Lions Club 

Karl Eason 

Elite Advertising 

EMC Insurance Companies 

Emprise Bank 

Anne Erhart 

Doug and Dejon Ewing 

Karl and Dorothy Faidley 

Barbara Farley 

Robert and Robin Fencil 



THE PRESIDENTS ANNUAL REPORT 





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THE NEW TEAMS SCORE! 



Dennis and Karone Finger 

First Intermark Corporation 

First United Methodist Church 

Genesis Class 

Richard Foote 

Aubrey and Barbara Foster 

Foster's Furniture 

Frederick Freeman 

Jim and Marvis Gacidie 

Galaxy Tool Corporation 

Gambino's Pizza 

Ed and Margaret Gilliland 

Mike and Bonnie Givens 

Sears - Winfield 

J.G. and Doris Goff 

Kern and Bette Gordon 

Brett Gottlob 

Graves Drug No. 11 

Gregg &. Simmons, CPA's 

Bill and Dorothy Griffith 

Slade and Terri Griffiths 

Jeffery and Kathi Grossenbacher 

Michael and Judi Groves 

Richard Haddock 

Dayna Hammel 

Linda Hankins 

Ed and Linda Hargrove 

Tiffany Hatfield 

Cecil Hawkins 

Rock and Ann Headrick 

Steve and Carol Hearne 

Donald Hetlin 

Jorge Hernandez 

Jean Hill 

Kim and Cynthia Hocker 

Richard and Melissa Hollister 



Jimmie and Joyce Holloway 
Paul and Donna Homan 
Mary Hunt 

Ronnie and Terri Hutchinson 
Aaron and Amanda Iverson 
Joline Iverson 
Steve and Joi Jay 
JD Liquor Store 
Ronnie and Anita Jenkins 
Shirley Jester 

Conrad and Janet Jimison 
Hubert and Mildred Johnston 
Allan Jones 

Danny and Sandra Jones 
Mary Stanton Jones 
Gary and Wilma Jones 
Herlvnda Jordan 
Gary and Freida Kahle 
Kay Kautz 
Warren Kelley 
Mr. and Mrs. John Kelly 
Paul and Diane Kelly 
Kay Kennedy 
Mr. and Mrs. Jack King 
Kline Motors 
Erwin and Fern Knocke 
Dr. Juri and Susan Kolts 
Mary Korte 
Jeff and Julie Kratt 
L.G. Pike Construction Company 
Harold and Mary Lake 
LaDonna Lanning 
James Largent 

Robben and Wilma Ledeker 
Legacy, A Regional Community- 
Foundation 



Richard Leu 

LM Consultants 

Long &. Neises CPA's 

J.C. and Donna Louderback 

Lyondell 

Scott and Rhoda MacLaughlin 

Dr. Rodger and Melba Maechtlen 

Lyle Maninger 

Zack and Beverly Manuszak 

Larry Marshall 

Patricia Martin 

Lane and Shannon Massey 

Kenny and Pat Mauzey 

Clarence Maxwell 

Diane Mayfield 

Mr. and Mrs. Sonny Maynard 

Mr. and Mrs. Darin McAfee 

Lew and Cindy McAfee 

Theresa McCoy 

Charles McKown 

Amy McWhirt and Terry Quiett 

Fred and Margot Menefee 

Betty Metheny 

Albert Miller 

Robert and Olive Milner 

James and Wilma Mitchell 

Robert Moffatt 

Valerie Morris 

Scott and Heather Munson 

Munson Insurance Agency, Inc. 

Janice Neagle 

Margaret Neal 

Luella Nelson 

Dr. Richard and Marlys Nelson 

Lance and Tamara Niles 

Dr. Nathan and Amy Niles 



Robert and Bonnie Niles 

Randy and Debbie Nittler 

Tim and Susan Norton 

Tami Norwood 

Dr. Jerry and Kristi Old 

Fred and Tonya Olenberger 

Jason and Shannon O'Toole 

Julia O'Toole 

Orbie Overly 

Elizabeth L. Palmer 

Roy and Linda Pepper 

Philip Phillips 

Pilgrim Rest Baptist Church 

Arthetta Polly 

Potter's Liquor Store 

Pratt Liberty Middle School 

Bradley and Barbara Priest 

Jim and Jan Pringle 

Joseph Prochaska 

RAG Motors 

Jim Rairdon 

Jim and Karon Ramirez 

Richard Raney 

Randall Ray 

Bob Redford 

Bill Reedy 

Dick and Judy Reedy 

Reedy Ford 

Joan Reep 

Gerald Reeves 

Sidney and Sharon Regnier 

Bill and Arleta Rice 

Arnold Ridder 

Mark Ridder 

Rindt Erdman Funeral Home 

Lisa Roberts 



Wayne Robinson 

Rogers 6k Lanning 

Dr. David and Rhonda Ross 

RPPG, Inc. 

Rush Realty 

S and Y Industries, Inc. 

Tom and Sue Saia 

Samtord-Stover Agency 

Dan and Lois Sampson 

Peggy Santiago 

Gus and LeAnna Sauzek 

Tom Schmidt 

Schmidt Jewelers 

Larry and Wanda Schwintz 

David and Rebecca Scott 

David and Callie Seaton 

Connie Shanks 

Brian and Kristi Shaw 

Matthew Sheets 

Sharon Shelton 

Wayne and Sandy Short 

Sonic Drive-In Cowley County, 

Inc. 

Joe and Mindi Shriver 

Jean Slaven 

Dale Smith 

Mary Smith 

Randy and Pam Smith 

Roy Smith 

Dr. Daniel and Vicki Snowden 

Robert Somers 

Bill and Becky Spear 

Ken Spurgeon 

E. Wayne Stalnaker 

Lynn and JoLynne Stalnaker 

State Farm Insurance 





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Joseph Stewart 

David Stone 

Lawrence and Martha Lallman 

Stover 

Tad and Janice Stover 

John and LeeAnn Sturd 

Larry Swaim 

James and Donna Sybrant 

Linda Sybrant 

Taylor Drug 

The Ridge 

The Samuel Roberts Noble 

Foundation 

Charlotte Thompson 

Willard and Barbara Thompson 

F. L. and Arlene Thurman 

Turn-of-the-Century Enterprises 

Eddie and Mary Turner 

Angela Turney 

Robert and Gwen Tyler 

Universal Steel Buildings 

USD 470 

Elaine Venters 

Allison Viola 

Chris Vollweidet 

Irvin and Pat Wahlenmaier 

Donald Wald 

David Walker 

Walnut Valley Title 

Washburn University 

Randall and LeArta Watkins 

Dick Watson 

Webber Land Company 

Karolee Weller 

Deuane and Virginia Wells 

James Weston 



Wichita State University Dance 
Team 

Vance Wiley 
V.J. Wilkins 
Peggy Williams 
Gerald Wilson 
Mary Wineinger 
Wintield Chiropractic 
Wintield Consumer Products, 
Inc. 

Wintield Correctional Facility-In- 
mate Benefit Fund 
Morgan Wright 
Willard Wright 
Michael Young 
Ed and Karen Zeller 
Zeller Motor Company 
Jerry Ziegler 
Kenneth and Jann Ziegler 

Friend (Under $100) 

Adams PTO 

Leo and Joleen Alexander 

Lois Allen 

Thomas and Anne Allen 

Wayne and Pat Ammerman 

Larry and Rose Anstine 

Anstine Family Partnership 

Nick and Nadine Anzelmo 

Caroline Applegate 

Marty and Whitney Baker 

Zachary and Lori Barnes 

Kenneth Bamhart 

Tom and Lynnette Barnthouse 

Thomas and Janet Barrel 



Judith Baxter 

Donald and Mary Frances Beck- 

elhimer 

Glenn and Vivian Bell 

Michael and Kathy Bellis 

Don and Margaret Bennett 

Leslie Berryhill 

Ron Blevins 

Nicholas Blick 

Ralph and Mary Bonnell 

Anna Borror 

Thomas and Norma Bossi 

Darlene Bracewell 

John and Celine Brazle 

Vicki Brei 

Angela Brown 

Ronald and Anne Burgess 

Mary Burkhardt 

Jane Campbell 

John Caty 

S.R. and Jo Chance 

Don and Velma Cheslic 

Jack and Elaine Christie 

Hazel Christy 

Ernie and Freda Cink 

Kitten Circle 

Glenn and Nancy Clarkson 

Class of 1954 

Class of 1981 

Class of Wifani 

Earl Clayton, Jr. 

Miriam Clouse 

Stan and Melissa Cochran 

Brenda Coffey 

David and Dawn Colquhoun 

Kevin and Brenda Colwell 



David and Jodi Combs 

Conoco Phillips 

Billy and Kathy Cook 

Albert and Janell Craig 

Eddie and Janis Crittenden 

Eric Crittenden 

Roy Thomas and Joni Curl 

Naoma Cushenbery 

Gilbert and Joyce Daniel 

Roy Danks 

David Daulton Sr. 

Carl Davis 

Judith Day 

William Dee 

Thomas and Elizabeth Dempsey 

Harry Diamond 

Samantha Doffing 

Barbara Dornhoffer 

Judith Drongoski 

Buel Duncan 

Ted and Darlene Eckstein 

Sharon Eggen 

Carey Eskridge Lybarger 

James and Myra Estep 

D. Evans 

Charles and Carol Faulkner 

Michael Fell 

Betty Joe Fisher 

Phyllis Jean Fleischauer 

Lance and Karen Foreman 

Marjorie Frankenbery 

Kenneth Franklin 

Floyd Fry 

Garden Plain High School 

Ronal and Charlotte Gee 

Connie George 



Thomas Gillock 

Kenneth Gilmore 

Dean and Elains Gilstrap 

Paula Glasser 

Doug and Celi Goff 

Jim and Peggy Graber 

Joe and Ann Gray 

Jim and Anita Green 

Leonard Groene 

Amy Grose 

Diane Guyot 

Hazel Hadicke 

Leslie Hadorn 

Keith and Louise Hanshaw 

Larry Hargrove 

B.E. and B.J. Harris 

Donald Hastings 

Daniel and Rosalie Hatfield 

Tom Haynes 

Dawna Headrick 

Margaret Hearne 

Marge Hendershot 

Gary and Deborah Herndon 

John Hitchcock 

Gary Hockenbury 

Angela Holmes 

David and Alana Holt 

Diana Holtke 

Home National Bank Heritage 

Club 

Jane Houdek 

Richard and Deanna Houser 

Rodney Hover 

Rosie Howell 

Nette Hudson 

Vern Hull 



THE PRESIDENTS ANNUAL REPORT 





2008-2009 



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THE NEW TEAMS SCORE! 



Jackson and Mary Hummingbird 

Donald and Barbara Hunt 

Walter and Alice Hunt 

V. K. Hutchison 

IBM International Foundation 

Marlene Ingram 

Rod and Karen Iverson 

Mr. and Mrs. Elliott Jackson 

Jamie Jackson 

Jackson - Hunter, LLC 

Betty Johnson 

Roy Jones 

Tom Junkins 

Kadau and Son Construction 

James and Jo Karlin 

Ralph and Janice Keefe 

Buddy and Peggy Kendrick 

Janet Kennedy 

Charles Kinzie 

James Kirkbride 

Barbara Krout 

Richard and JoRita Krout 

James and Lisa Kuecker 

Doug and Nancy Lasseter 

James and Juanita Lazelle 

Adam Learning 

Donna Lester 

Lemenar and Virginia Linnell 

Richard and Joyce Littrell 

Chansi Long 

Donna Long 

Robert and Barbara Loop 

Allie Loquist-Damewood 

Stuart Luder 

Betty Lunkwicz 

Wade Magnus 



Robert and Suzann Mangan 
Ellen Maninger 
Phyllis Markley 
Rex and Ella Marsh 
Kelly Marshall 
Frank Martin 
Scott and Jeanne Martin 
Steve and Joyce McArtor 
Barbara McCartney 
Bryan and Lisa McChensey 
Tom and Donni McClaflin 
Jim and Sherrilyn McConnell 
Martin and Ava McCorgary 
Patrick McDonald 
Andy McFayden 
Ed McGowan 

Robert and Nancy McGregor 

Dorothy McKeever 

Diane McKinney 

Gina McKown 

Patricia McMains 

Mark McNeil 

Clarence and Carol Milbourn 

James and Janice Miller 

Jim Miller 

Russell and Pennie Miller 

Marie Millett 

Ernest Moore 

Madeline Morgan 

Mary Morris 

Greg and Patricia Mugler 

Linda Mullins 

Dennis and Joyce Myers 

Mark and Melinda Neal 

Tom and Betty Neptune 

Nathan Newby 



Jason and April Nittler 

Donald Nobiling 

Patrick and Marilyn O'Hara 

Victor and Judith Olmstead 

Anna Paisley 

James Palmer 

Mildred Palmer 

Jon Parman 

Parman, Tanner, Soule &. Jacks 

Tom Parmley 

Jo Ann Parsons 

Alan Paton 

Mark and Debra Paton 

Virginia Peacock 

Delma Pearson 

Bill and Julie Perdue 

Valerie Perkins 

Barry and Barcley Pierce 

David Pittser 

Terri Pressnall 

Jean Prothro 

Nathan and Joanna Pryor 

Larry and Barbara Rademann 

Gilbert and Linda Rahn 

Neewannah Ramsey 

Sherri Ramsey 

Mott and Delois Randle 

James Reed 

Phillip Reinking 

Arky Reyes 

Ronald Rhoton 

Jerry Rich 

Beth Richardson 

Mark and Yvonne Richardson 

Brittany Richerson 

Kathy Riddle 



Rose Ann Riley 
Fred Rindt 
William Roberson 
Val Roderick 
David Rogers 
Terry Ronan 
Steve and Melinda Ross 
Bill Rowe 
on Gary Rowe 

Bedford and Dorothy Rush 

Rex Rush 

Robert Rush 

Marlene Ryan 

George Salmon 

Connie Schaefer 

Dwaine and Virginia Schimmel 

Virgil and Tharan Schmidt 

Scott and Michelle Schoon 

Maurine Schroeder 

Mark and Barbara Scram 

John and Julie Seitz 

Tamela Shaw 

Shear Success 

Sheldon's Pawn Shop 

Betty Shurts 

Oren and Donna Skiles 

Skyline Schools 

Nikki Slaven 

Forest and Sandra Smith 

Marshall Smith 

May Belle Smith 

Ramona Smith 

Jean and Ellen Snell 

Gene Snyder 

Kurt Solomon 

Herb and Janet Sparks 



Ralph Speer 
lone Spence 

David and Debra Stanley 
Robert Starr D.D.S. 
Darel and Donna Sterner 
John and Linda Stewart 
William and Velma Stewart 
Bill and Shelly Stinson 
Barbara Stone 
David and Lois Stone 
Mickey Sullivan 

L. E. and Billie Swanson 
Myrna Swanson 

Ronald Sweely 

Leland and Nancy Sweetwood 

Chris Taylor 

Colleen Taylor 

Michael and Tara Taylor 

Helen Templeton 

The Boutique 

Herbert Thompson 

Maurice and Charlotte Thomson 

Rita Thurber 

James Topper 

Krystal Trimmer 

James and Martha Turner 

Ryan Turner 

Twin Rivers Developmental 

Services 

USD #326 Logan Schools 

Michael and Jan Van Hoomissen 

Donald Vannoy 

Deborah Vaughn 

H. M. and Annavee Villers 

Lynn Vorak 

Loretta Waldroupe 





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Robert Watson 

George Weekley 

Feme Welles 

Debra Wells 

Ray and Merylene Wentworth 

Cathy Wilcox 

Arlis and Martha Wilson 

Carol Wilson 

Janet Wilson 

Roy Wittenborn 

Gary Wolff 

Sand ra Woodworth 

Tiffany Wright 

Robert and Sue Yoachim 

Beatrice Young 

Thomas and Peggy Zerger 

Bruce and Debbie Zimmerman 

TIGER BOOSTER CLUB 

Super Boosters ($2,500 or more 
Great Western Dining/CCCC 
Home National Bank 
Orthopedic &c Sports Medicine 
Cypress LLC 



Salzman Concrete, Inc. 
Union State Bank 

Orange ck Black Club ($1,000 

- $2,499) 

Ark City Glass Co. 

CornerBank 

Jeff Hoge Concrete LLC 

Paton Wholesale and Vending 

Co. 

Linked Agency 



Bengal Club ($500 - $999) 

Ark Valley Distributing, Inc. 

Coca-Cola Bottling Co. 

Cowley County Development 

Services 

Elite Advertising 

Jan's Sport Shack 

Dr. Nicholas L. Kinsch 

Dr. Pat and Sandy McAfee 

Dennis and Marcia Muncy 

Rindt-Erclman Funeral Home 

David and Sheree Utash 

Tiger Club ($300 -$499) 

Leroy and Kristie Alsup 
Ark Veterinary Associates 
Barton Energy, LLC 
Darren and Carolyn Burroughs 

) Todd Clark 

Gene and Donella Cole 
Foster's Furniture, Inc. 

atGalaxie Business Equipment 
Ron and Donetta Godsey 
Allen and Beverly Grunder 
Dean and DeAnna Harp 
Elliott Jackson 

Vernell and Celestine Jackson 
Matthew and Roxanna James 
Conrad and Janet Jimison 
KCOK, Inc. 
KMB Enterprises LLC 
Larry Langstrom 
Otis and Terri Morrow 
Nathan and Amy Niles 



Lance and Tamara Niles 

Nick and Christie Rogers 

Tom and Sue Saia 

Schmidt Jewelers 

Sheldon's Pawn Shop 

Sonic Drive-In Cowley County 

Inc. 

Dr. Rod and Trisha Stoy 

Topline Steel Buildings 

Waldorf-Riley, Inc. 

Wintield Consumer Products, 

Inc. 

Woods Lumber of Arkansas City 

Dr. Bob and Sue Yoachim 

Zeller Motor Co. 

Cowley Friend ($175 -$299) 

Sid and Jerri Achenbach 

ADM Milling Co. 

Jim and Paula Aldrich 

David Andreas 

Gary Anstine 

Larry and Rose Anstine 

Robert Anstine 

Steve and Pam Archer 

Albert and Karen Bacastow 

Marshall and Doris Brentlinger 

Browns, Inc. 

Vernon Buffington 

David and Vicki Burroughs 

Jeff Carter 

Terry Cassiday 

Jose and Marlys Cervantes 

Don and Velma Cheslic 

CityofWinfield 



Tony and Vicki Crouch 

Bruce and Amy Crouse 

CWA Local 86004 

Davis Auto Center, LLC 

DiVall Retail Liquor 

Ron and Pam Doyle 

Edward Jones 

David and Jennifer Faust 

Curt and Cindy Freeland 

Kenneth Gilmore 

Ed and Linda Hargrove 

Glen and Sue Harris 

Hawks Funeral Home 

Ben and Leslie Head 

Bill and Linda Headrick 

John and Janice Hitchcock 

Rex and Denise Irwin 

Brian Jackson 

Steve and Joi Jay 

Jerry's Donut Shop 

Hubert and Mildred Johnston 

Kan-Pak LLC 

Mary Kerr 

Charles and Darlene Kinzie 

Joseph Krisik 

L.G. Pike Construction Co. 

J.C. and Donna Louderback 

Mangen Chiropractic Clinic 

Jay and Carrie Mapel 

Richard and Barbara Mehuron 

Midwest Electric Supply, Inc. 

Munson Insurance Agency, Inc. 

Randy and Debbie Nittler 

Optimist Club of Arkansas City 

Neal and Anna Paisley 

David and Sally Palmer 



Marcy Peroo 
Mark Phillips 

Philip and Mary Ann Phillips 
Puritan Billiards 
James and Sylvia Reed 
Rob Carroll's Sandblasting/Paint- 
ing 

David and Deborah Schaller 
Larry and Wanda Schwintz 
Russell and Judith Secrest 
John and Julie Seitz 
Don and Peggy Shanks 
John and Denise Showman 
Pamela Smith 
John and LeeAnn Sturd 
Ronald and Patsy Sweely 
Taylor Drug 

Turn-ot-the-Century Enterprises 
Twin Rivers Developmental 
Support 

Two Rivers Co-Op 
Universal Steel Buildings 
Joseph and Mary Jane Vaclavek 
Mike and Vicki Webb 
Peggy Williams 
Wintield Motor Co. 
Robert and Jill Wood 

Century Club ($100 -$174) 
Abbey Eye Care 
Ark City Country Mart 
Ark Hospitality, Inc. 
Ark Valley Credit Union 
Ark Valley Physical Therapy, Inc. 
Arkansas City Lion's Club 
Arkansas City Traveler 



THE PRESIDENTS ANNUAL REPORT 






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2008-2009 






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THE NEW TEAMS SCORE! 



Frank Arnold 

Kent and Barbara Booher 

David and Trina Bostwick 

Scott and Yvonne Branine 

Melburn Brown 

Bud's Heat and Air 

Mary Burroughs 

Joe and Connie Carder 

Tisha Catlin 

Collision 2 Custom 

Conco, Inc. 

Jim and Rae Dale 

David and Carol Daulton 

Bryan Dennett 
Virginia Donaldson 

Charles Dow 
Judith Drongoski 

Terry Eaton 

Barbara Farley 

First Intermark Corporation 

Graves Drug No. 11 

Great Plains Television, Inc. 

Phillip Groves 

Cathy Hendricks 

Gary Hockenbury 

Richard and Melissa Hollister 

Hutchinson Electric, Inc. 

Ellen Kelly 

Kline Motors 

KUHN Mechanical, Inc. 

Rick and Sandi Lorn- 
Stuart and Betsy Luder 

Scott and Rhoda MacLaughlin 

Tom Mason 

Lane and Shannon Massey 

McCluggage, VanSickle &l Perry 



Ronald and Carolyn McKeaigg 

Charles McKown 

Meiers Tax Accounting Service 

Trayla Mitchell 

Steve and Suzanne Moore 

Marty and Lori Moulton 

Greg and Patty Mugler 

Steve O'Hair 

Jason and Shannon O'Toole 

Elizabeth Palmer 

Michael Patrick 

Delbert Peters 

Lonn and Darlene Poage 

Powers Roofing and Siding Co. 

Quality Auto Sales 

Robert and Jacque Ramirez 

Bill and Pamela Ramsey 

Jehren Raney 

Reedy Ford 

Sidney and Sharon Regnier 

Arky Reyez 

Ruppelius Fine Jewelers 

Samford-Stover Agency 

Mike and Maria Sanderholm 

Steve and Laura Sandman 

SBC Foundation 

Brian and Kristi Shaw 

Shear Success, Inc. 

Ellen Showman 

Joe and Mindi Shriver 

Robert and Janice Sneller 

Lynn and JoLynne Stalnaker 

State Bank of Winfield 

State Farm Insurance - Starlyn 

Venus 

State Farm Insurance - Mike 



Dobson 

Ron Steiner 

Tad and Janice Stover 

Suttles Transmissions, LLC 

Paul and Lee Tabor 

Tamoil 

The Focused Image 

Rita Thurber 

Ryan and Cassie Turner 

Chris Vollweider 

Alden Walling 

Donald and Dee Ann Ward 

Sarah Wesbrooks 

Winfield Chiropractic Office 

Friend (Under $100) 

Rod and Jody Arnett 

Michael Baker 

Harold and Allison Barse 

Buel Beck 

Chris and Kim Biddle 

Lester Wade Boyd 

Jeff Carter 

Vesta Carter 

Todd Clark 

Katrina Colwell 

Kenneth and Beth Czaplinski 

Cynthia Davis 

Lindsey Davis 

Robert and Patricia Dill 

Lisha Dunlap 

Doug and Dejon Ewing 

Mark Farris 

Jeff Fluty 

Fritzler Body Shop 

Jim and Marvis Gaddie 



Belva Gardner 

Dan and Vicki Givens 

Greendoor Lafamilia 

David and Lisa Grose 

Roger Gubichuk 

Ed and Linda Hargrove 

Sharon Hephner 

Jimmie and Joyce Holloway 

Matthew and Roxanna James 

Jim's Total Service 

Abbey Keiswetter 

Douglas and Amy Lawson 

Marcus Adler Insurance Agency, 

Inc. 

Patrick McDonald 

John Moore 

Scott and Heather Munson 

Mark and Melinda Neal 

Dr. Richard and Marlys Nelson 

Jason and April Nittler 

Olen Medical Supply 

Alan and Susan Paton 

Don Piros 

Roger and Joanne Pridey 

Dick and Judy Reedy 

Val Roderick 

Lois Sampson 

Aaron and Lindsay Sanderholm 

Scott and Michelle Schoon 

Tye Smyer 

Dr. Daniel and Vicki Snowden 

Mark Speck 

Larry Swaim 

Traver's, Inc. 

Larry and Joetta Wood 



The following individuals and 
organizations have made annual 
gifts to the college over a long 
period of time. We deeply ap- 
preciate their support. 

Long Term Scholarships Funded 

Annually 

American Legion Auxiliary Post 

18 

Ark City Tumbleweeds 

Beta Sigma Phi - Mary Brannon 

Nursing Scholarship 

Boyer Educational Trust 

Cowley Hall of Fame Scholarship 

J. P. Dewell Family Scholarship 

Irwin Art and Design Fund 

Rotary Club of Arkansas City 

Richard E. Tredway Scholarship 

Captola Yust Scholarship 

This report is generated from the 
Alumni and Development Office 
at Cowley College. We have tried 
to be as accurate as possible, but 
if you discern mistakes of any 
kind, please let us know so that 
they may be corrected. 

Contact us at (1-800-593-2222 x 
5291 or x 5319) 






tn 9° H 

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COXA/LEV 

125 South 2nd Street 
Arkansas City, KS 67005 



THE PRESIDENTS ANNUAL REPORT 







2008-2009 



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THE NEW TEAMS SCORE! 




www.cowley.edu 




■WICHITA 
LOCATIONS 




NEW DORMITORY 

CENTRAL AVENUE 



ELIZABETH 
SMITH 

UDENT OF THE YEAR 



THE PRESIDENTS ANNUAL 




2. OVERVIEW 

3. Dr. McAtee 

4. Administration 

5. Board of Trustees 

6. Core Values 

7. Accreditation 

8. Outstanding Tiger 
Alumni 

9. Bronze Scholar/ 
Students of the Month 

10. Central Avenue 
Dormitory 



1 1. Endowed Chair 

12. Athletic Hall of 
Fame 

13. Stirnaman Award/ 
Students Honored 

1 4. McKown Receives 
Awards 

15. IMISOD Excellence 
Awards 

16. National PBL Con- 
ference 

1 7. Years of Service 

18. Student of the Year 



1 9. Eastside Center/ 
Westside Center 

20-21. Athletic Round- 
up 

22. Who We Serve 

23-25. Boosters and 
Sponsors 

26. Soccer Programs/ 
NISOD Excellence 
Awards 

27. NATYCAA Cup/ 
CAAP Test 



2 | report 



Welcome to the 2008-09 edition of 

■dent's Annual Report 




I 



'm very proud to tell you that the past 
academic year was one filled with many 
outstanding student accomplishments, 
faculty and staff awards, and growth and 
improvement in many areas of the college. 
Our students never cease to amaze me. 
Some are just naturally gifted individuals 
who achieve at the highest level and aspire 
to be highly skilled professionals in their 
chosen career. Others sacrifice time with 
their families to gain new skills or finish 
a degree to become more employable in 
today's competitive job market. 



is to take care 
of its students, 
regardless of 
their place in 



Sometimes we fail, and for that I apolo- 
gize. But, I can tell you that Cowley em- 
ployees want every student to experience 
success. How that success is measured 
depends on the individual. 
Elizabeth Smith from Rock is our 2008- 
09 Student of the Year. What a smart and 
driven young woman! The accounting ma- 
jor was the top student in the Business, 
Computer and Information Technology 
Department, the Phi Beta Lambda orga- 
nization, and was a recipient of a Student 
Activities ABCD (Above and Beyond the 
Call of Duty) Award. 
Natural Science Department Instructor 
Scott Layton was selected as the sixth re- 
cipient of the Endowed Chair for Teach- 
ing Excellence and Student Learning. 
The college has grown significantly during 
my 23 years as president. We have opened 
two Centers in Wichita since May, 2008, 
and have also added a new dormitory on 
our main campus in Arkansas City. 
The college also added men and women's 
soccer programs during the 2008-09 
academic year. 




This report includes many other wonderful highlights from the past year. I invite you 
to read through it carefully. It is my hope that it will give you a better understanding of 
what Cowley is all about and the direction we're heading. 

On behalf of our Board of Trustees, my fellow administrators, our faculty, staff and 
students, I want to thank you for your support of Cowley County Community College. 
It means a great deal to me. The college has always been a viable entity within Arkansas 
City, Cowley County, and south-central Kansas. We will do our very best to keep it that 
way. 

Sincerely, 

Patrick J. McAtee, Ph.D. 



fedj/ mot 



report | 3 




Tom Saia 

Athletic Director 



Charles McKown 

Vice President 
of Research and Technology 



Sue Saia 

Vice President 
of Student Affairs 



4 | report 




Ron Godsey 



Mark Paton 



Albert Bacastow, Jr. 



Shurtz returns to Cowley College 
Board of Trustees 

A- 

L Vfter a 10-year hiatus, Dennis K. Shurtz is once again a member of the Cowley College Board of Trustees. Along with Shurtz, 

incumbents Donna Avery and Albert Bacastow, Jr. were re-elected to the board. 

Avery was top vote-getter in the local elections. Shurtz was second, while Bacastow, Jr. was third. 

Avery is in her 11th year on the Board and has served as Board Chair two times, while Bacastow, Jr. has served on the Board for the 

past 21 years and has been Board Chair four times. Shurtz served as a member of the Board from 1991 to 1999 and was Board Chair 

once during his pair of four-year terms. 

Cowley College president Dr. Patrick J. McAtee is looking forward to working with all three individuals. 

"I am delighted to have the opportunity to work again with Albert Bacastow, Jr., who was president of the original Board that hired 

me in 1987," McAtee said. "1 am also delighted to work with Donna Avery, and look forward to working again with Dennis Shurtz, 

who was a valuable Board member when he was previously on the Board." 

Other members of the Board are, Mark Paton, Ron Godsey, and Lee Gregg, Jr. 

report | 5 



CORE VALUES 



Cowley County Community College and Area Vocational-Technical School is dedicated to the continual pursuit of excellence by 
embracing our Core Values, the fundamental principles that guide our actions. 

People 

* We emphasize the importance of human relationships, diversity, and a sense of community. 

* We provide student-centered instruction. 

* We provide a safe, learning environment where joy, humor, and teamwork are embraced. 

* We encourage open communication and the sharing of ideas. 

Leadership 

* We provide a positive atmosphere that fosters personal and professional growth. 

* We empower students and employees to be innovative and visionary. 

* We are an ethical leader in the field of education. 




We regard honesty, trust, and respect as essential principles in our academic, personal and professional standards. 



Accountability 

* Our students will receive a quality education. 



* The College will provide students the opportunity to take an active role in their success. 

* All employees are responsible and committed to excellence. 

* We are accountable to the community to educate students and to sustain and improve society. 



MISSIO N STATEMENT 



Cowley College and Area Vocational-Technical School is committed to learning excellence and personal enrichment in an open 
access environment. 



ST ATEM ENT OF INSTITUTIONAL PURPOSE 

We are committed to maintaining a quality institution by meeting and exceeding the expectations of customers through the 
following: 



Academic and 
Personal Enrichment: 

The college will provide accessible cur- 
ricula in an environment that promotes 
individual growth and personal enrich- 
ment. 



Community 
Development: 

The college will foster development of 
the community through public service 
programs and partnerships with business 
and industry. 



Support Services: Fiscal Soundness: 

1 he college will facilitate academic growth ~, 
and the development of life skills. 



6 | report 



ollege will secure financial support 
from various resources and maintain a 
financially stable institution. 



Ethics: 

The college will emphasize a sense of 
fairness, citizenship, and tolerance for the 
views of others. 




Cowley College receives 
r eaff irmation of accreditation 

C 



'owley County Community College 
recently received reaffirmation of accredi- 
tation from The Higher Learning Com- 
mission of the North Central Association 
of College's and Schools. 
"Having accredited reaffirmation by the 
North Central Association of Colleges 
and Schools is a credit to all the hard 
working employees at Cowley College," 
Cowley College president Dr. Patrick J. 
McAtee said. 

AQIP Reaffirmation of Accreditation 
reviews are scheduled seven years in ad- 
vance, when an institution first joins the 
Academic Quality Improvement Program 
(AQIP) or when an institution already 
participating in AQIP is reaffirmed via 
the AQIP Reaffirmation of Accreditation 
process. 

Cowley County Community College and 
Area Vocational-Technical School was first 
accredited by the Commission in April, 
1975, (having been admitted to Candi- 
dacy for Accreditation in July, 1973). 
The institution was admitted to AQIP on 
October 3, 2001, and became an AQIP 
institution in 2002. Cowley College 
participated in its second Strategy Forum 
from March 6-9, 2007. 
Since admission to AQIP, the institution 
has officially declared and attempted eight 
individual Action Projects, four are listed 
as current and four are listed as retired 
(listing of documented AQIP Action 
Projects). Cowley has provided AQIP 
with Annual Updates of ongoing Action 
Projects and received Annual Feedback 
Reports on each project. 
The institution provided its Systems 
Portfolio for review in June, 2006, and 
received a Systems Appraisal Feedback 
Report on September 29, 2006. The next 
Systems Portfolio is due in November, 
2009. 

AQIP conducted a Quality Checkup visit 
to the institution on April 25-27, 2007, 
and provided a report of the findings of 
the visiting team following the visit. 
The Quality Checkup team that conduct- 
ed a site visit to the institution examined 
evidence provided by the institution of 
its compliance with the Commission's 



federal compliance program. The Quality 
Checkup site visit team concluded that 
the institution presented acceptable 
evidence that it complies with all Com- 
mission and AQIP expectations. 
In establishing four AQIP Action Projects 
(Provide Quality Education to Students 
at All Academic Levels, Plan and Imple- 
ment an Employee Professional Develop- 
ment/Mentoring Program, Review and 
Improve the Strategic Planning Process, 
and Improve the Systematic Tracking and 
Measuring of Institutional Effectiveness) 
in its first years in AQIP, Cowley County 
Community College has indicated its 
commitment to the AQIP criteria and its 
responsiveness to Commission concerns 
regarding its future institutional strategies. 
Cowley County Community College has 
continued this commitment by develop- 
ing and implementing four additional 
AQIP Action Projects (Cultural Diversity, 
Integrating Institutional Data into the 
Strategic Planning Process, Student Trans- 
fer/Career Development, and Assuring 
Consistency and Quality in Online Deliv- 
ery) that are related to concerns raised by 
the Systems Appraisal Team. 
Cowley College's AQIP Steering Com- 
mittee was very diligent in keeping up on 
the action projects. Cowley College vice 
president of academic affairs, Slade Grif- 
fiths, said it is a rigorous process to gain 
accreditation. 

"Overall, they were very pleased with 
what they saw," Griffiths said. "This really 
brings validity to our community college." 
Cowley College has found this process 
to be beneficial to its progress and look 
forward to working with The Higher 
Learning Commission of the North Cen- 
tral Association of College's and Schools 
on its next Systems Portfolio. 
Cowley County Community College 
and Area Vocational-Technical School is 
a public, non-for-profit institution that 
offers associate degrees and pre-associate 
certificate programs for primarily rural 
counties in south-central Kansas and the 
Metropolitan Wichita area (two cam- 
puses and seven sites located in Wichita, 
Mulvane, Winfield, and Arkansas City). 



In addition, there are 1 5 course locations, 
including Ponca City, Oklahoma. Cowley 
College maintains multiple partnerships 
with other community colleges, technical 
colleges and major state universities in its 
area. 

Instruction is offered through a variety of 
systems including the traditional semester- 
based classroom, online hybrid courses, 
telecourses, and web-based courses. 
Courses designed to address specific 
local industry and community needs are 
offered as requested by the appropriate 
constituency. 

The organization operates with integrity 
to ensure the fulfillment of its mission 
through structures and processes that 
involve the board, administration, faculty, 
staff, and students. 

The organization's allocation of resources 
and its processes for evaluation and plan- 
ning demonstrate its capacity to fulfill its 
mission, improve the quality of its educa- 
tion, and respond to future challenges 
and opportunities. 

The year of the college's next reaffirma- 
tion of accreditation will be 2015-16. 




Steven Archer named Outstanding 
Ti ger A lumni for 2009 



C. 



'ontinuing a family tradition, Steven 
Archer, City Manager for Arkansas City, 
was recently named the recipient of Cow- 
ley College's Outstanding Tiger Alumni 
Award for 2009. Archer joins his in- 
laws, Donna and the late Joe Avery, and 
brother-in-law, Boh White, as recipients of 
the Award. 

Archer is the son of Jack and Nina Ar- 
cher. He was born in Winfield and raised 
in Arkansas City. He graduated from 
Arkansas City High School in 1970. After 
graduating from ACHS, Archer spent two 
years in the military, with one of those 
years being spent in Vietnam. After a two- 
year stint in the military, Archer returned 
to Arkansas City and married Pam Avery 
in March of 1972. He then started taking 
classes at Cowley College in the fall. 




At Cowley, Archer participated in all of 
the school's musicals and plays. He recalls 
fondly the instruction he received from 
the head of the school's Drama Depart- 
ment. He also enjoyed the instruction 
he received from Dr. DuChateau, who 
taught history and social science at the 
school. 

"Some of the math and science classes I 
took at Cowley helped me become very 
detailed," Archer said. "My involvement 
in the drama program helped me get out 
in front of people and be able to speak in 
public." 

He received an Associate of Arts degree 
from Cowley College in 1974 and then 
enrolled at Kansas State University. Al- 
ready receiving funding as part of the GI 
Bill, Archer received additional funding 
by joining Kansas State's Army ROTC 
program. He earned a Bachelor of Science 
degree from Kansas State in 1977 and 
went on to apply for and was selected for 
a position as an engineering officer in 
the United States Army. To fulfill his 
commitment to the Army, Archer 
and his wife spent three years 
stationed in Germany. 
When his commitment was up 
he took additional training and 
as he put it "The next thing 
you know I am in the Army 
until 1987". During this 
time, he was stationed in Vir- 
ginia, Germany, Maryland, 
and Arkansas, where he spent 
three years teaching at the 
University of Arkansas-Fayette- 
ville Army ROTC program, and 
finally Louisiana as a construc- 
tion project manager with the 
Ft. Worth District Army Corp of 
Engineers. 

Following his time in the 

Army, he served as 
an engi- 



repor 





neering officer in the United States Air 
Force from 1987 until his retirement in 
1995. He finished his time in the military 
working at McConnell Air Force Base in 
Wichita. It was during this time that Ar- 
cher got to know Curt Freeland, who was 
then the City Manager of Arkansas City. 
After speaking with Freeland, he realized 
a lot of what he was doing as an engineer- 
ing officer related to work done in local 
government. 

"What I was doing then tied into being 
a City Manager, so I decided to pursue a 
career in that area," Archer said. 
He continued his education while at 
McConnell and received his Master's in 
Business in 1993. 

Archer began his career in local govern- 
ment management when he was appoint- 
ed City Manager of St. Marys, Kansas, 
where he worked until 1998. He left his 
position in St. Marys to return home to 
Arkansas City and serve as the Director 
of Administration. He held that position 
until being appointed City Manager in 
June, 2008. 

"I really enjoy local government and the 
challenges you face," Archer said. "It's 
nice to be back in my home town and be 
able to help local people." 
In his role as City Manager, Archer has 
worked on numerous projects, includ- 
ing the Kansas and Summit intersection 
improvement project, the new hospital, 
the railroad cwerpass project on Kansas 
Avenue and the sales tax initiatives for the 
hospital and street improvements. 
Archer and his wife, Pam, a 1972 Cowley 
Alumnus, have a daughter, Dana Wilson 
of Arkansas City. They also have two 
grandchildren, A.J. and Jordan. Archer 
is humbled to be recognized as this year's 
Outstanding Tiger Alumni and is proud 
to be held in the same esteem as some of 
his family members. 
"Being from Arkansas City and Cow- 
ley County it is fantastic to receive this 
honor," Archer said. "I never 
dreamed when I was attending 
Cowley that this would hap- 
pen. It really touches me to 
be named the Outstanding 
Tiger Alumni." 



Cowley student named Coca-Cola 
Bronze Scholar 

H. 



.aving been named a member of the 
Kansas All-State Academic Team, Cowley 
College student Tina Wohlford (pictured 
far right) earned another prestigious 
honor by being named a 2009 Coca-Cola 
Bronze Scholar. 

The Coca-Cola Scholar program is spon- 
sored by the Coca-Cola Scholars Founda- 
tion and is administered by Phi Theta 
Kappa Honor Society. 
As a Bronze Scholar, Wohlford will be 
provided with a certificate, bronze medal- 
lion, and a check for $1,000. 
Wohlford was a student at Cowley's Mud- 
vane center and was active in Phi Theta 
Kappa, the Math and Science Club, and 
the Book Club. She was one of the top 
150 students (top 50 are gold scholars, 
next 50 are silver scholars and next 50 are 
bronze) out of two candidates nominated 
from every campus of every community 
college in the nation. 



"I was only eligible because of my being 
a member of PTK," Wohlford said. 'I am 
honored to be a part of PTK. Nancy Ayers 
(pictured far left) and Melinda Neal have 
been incredible mentors to me." 
Selection as a Coca-Cola Scholar was 
based on scores earned in the All-USA 
Academic Team competition. Gold, Silver 
and Bronze Scholars were listed in a spe- 
cial section of USA TODAY on April 6. 
Cowley College PTK co-sponsor, Nancy 
Ayers, was happy to see Wohlford be 
named a Bronze Scholar. 
"Tina has been very active in Phi Theta 
Kappa since her induction in the Fall of 
2007," Ayers said. "She serves as the Vice 
President of Service for our chapter and 
has been instrumental in our recycling 
efforts, which is one of her passions. 
She was one of the driving forces of our 
Mulvane group and just a wonderful 
person to work with. I'm really going to 
miss her." 





Sarah Smith 

September 2008 




Andy Petz 

October 2008 



roHHHHHHW 



Willy Lucero 

November 2008 



Lauren McGuigan 

December 2008 





Emily Crain 

January 2009 



Boomer Saia 

February 2009 



Elizabeth Smith 

March 2009 




Darci Mann 

April 2009 

report | 9 




fter nearly one year of construction, 
Cowley College's new Central Avenue 
Dormitory opened in August, 2008. 
The three-story, 104-bed dormitory is 
located at 102 South Fifth Street. The 
building becomes the fifth dormitory on 
the Arkansas City campus. 
Conco Construction served as the general 
contractor for the new dorm. Winfield 
Plumbing and Heating were the mechani- 
cal contractors, Ziegler Electric in Wichita 
served as the electrical contractors, while 
David Herlocker of Gordon and Associ- 
ates was the architect for the project. 
"I think it went really smooth for a project 
with a short time line," Cowley College 
Executive Vice President of Business 
Services Tony Crouch said. "We really 
challenged Conco on the time line and 
they got us there." 

Crouch praised the work of Conco Con- 
struction project manager Luke Kunkel, 
project superintendent Tom McDonough, 
and David Herlocker. 
"Those three were instrumental in the 
process and the final product," Crouch 



said. "I have worked with Tom and David 
before and they have never let us down." 
The other dormitories on the Arkansas 
City campus are, the Oscar Kimmel 
dorm, Kirke W. Dale dorm, William R. 
Docking dorm, and the D. Robert Stor- 
beck dorm. 

"Every time we have built a dorm we have 
learned a little bit more about what the 
students need," Crouch said. "Hopefully, 
this dorm is a culmination of the things 
we have learned over the years. Having it 
completed feels really good." 




10 | report 



Layton named Cowley College's 
sixt h Endowed Chair 

I ) eing named the recipient of the Paul 
Stirnaman Memorial Award for Teaching 
Excellence during Cowley College's Back 
to School In-Service in August, 2008, 
Scott Layton, Cowley College Natural 
Science Department Instructor, could not 
believe his ears when he heard his name 
called as the school's Endowed Chair dur- 
ing the school's In-Service in January. 
"I knew I was nominated, but I was totally 
shocked to hear I was the new Endowed 
Chair," Layton said. "To be considered 
amongst what I consider to be a very 

'This is per- 
haps the most 
meaningful 
award! I have 



talented group of instructors at the col- 
lege is amazing. This is perhaps the most 
meaningful award I have ever received." 
As an instructor in the natural science de- 
partment, Layton is responsible for teach- 
ing microbiology and biology classes. He 
received bachelors and masters degrees 
from Oklahoma State University. 
Thanks to the generous support of Cor- 
nerBank, Layton will receive $2,000 a year 
for each of the next two years. A total of 
$500 each year will be used for continu- 
ing education, while the other $1,500 is 
Layton's to use however he would like. 
Layton plans to use the money to either 
attend a conference or pursue a summer 
internship at a laboratory or university in 
the hopes of implementing some of the 
things he learns into his classroom. 
CornerBank vice president/branch man- 
ager Joyce McArtor was on hand to honor 
Layton as was Cowley College's director 
of Alumni and Endowment, Shannon 
Massey. 

With Layton being the sixth recipient of 
the award, CornerBank has now donated 
$24,000 to the endowed chairs. Former 
endowed chair recipients are, Dejon Ew- 
ing, Michelle Schoon, Connie Donatelli, 




Pam Smith, and Marlys Cervantes. 
"Those are all highly respected teachers 
on campus," Layton said. 
Layton, who serves as Cowley College's 
Math and Science Club co-sponsor and 
was listed in the Who's Who Among 
American Teachers in the 2005-06 and 
2006-07 academic years and the Who's 
Who in North American Colleges and 
Universities in 2008-09, was named the 
Teacher of the Year at Stillwater Junior 
High School in 2001. 
He began teaching at Cowley in 2002 and 
is a member of the Cowley Education As- 
sociation, KNEA, and NEA. 
Layton said his success is in part because 
of the people he surrounds himself with. 
"I have had a lot of help along the way," 
Layton said. "Several people have had a 
hand in my success, including my wife 



(Debbie) and people in my department. 
Pictured: Layton receives congratulate 
from Cowley College vice preside; 
academic affairs, Slade Griffiths/ 





hree new members inducted into 



figer Athletic Hall of Fame 



recognizing alumni wno nave added 
to the rich and honored tradition of Cow- 
ley College athletics, three new members 
were inducted into the Tiger Athletic Hall 
of Fame on Jan. 31. 
The new members are W.G. "Bunt" 
Speer, Josh McMillen, and Ed Hargrove. 
The inductees attended a social in Cow- 
ley College's Earle N. Wright Community 
Room. They then spoke at the Hall of 
Fame luncheon in the Wright Room, 
and concluded their weekend by being 
recognized at halftime of Cowley's men's 
basketball game versus Highland Commu- 
nity College on Jan. 31. 
The late W.G. "Bunt" Speer coached foot- 
ball, basketball, track and field, and golf 
at ACJC. He coached the football team 
from 1946-1954. With ACJC not playing 
football during the 1943-1945 seasons 
due to World War II, Speer coached the 
team to a record of 6-3 in its return to the 
gridiron. 

Speer also led the ACJC men's basketball 
team to a record of 69-61, while serving as 
coach from 1946-1952. Along with coach- 
ing football and basketball, Speer coached 
the ACJC track and field team from 1952- 
54 and the ACJC golf team during the 

12 | report 



1961 season. His son, Ralph, accepted the 
award on behalf of his father. 
McMillen played baseball at Cowley Col- 
lege during the 1997 and 1998 seasons. 
He was a member of the Tigers' back-to- 
back JUCO World Series winning clubs 
and was named the Most Valuable Player 
of the 1998 JUCO World Series. 
McMillen transferred to Cowley from 
Kansas State University and had a stel- 
lar career for the Tigers. The outfielder 
displayed his versatility by batting cleanup 
his freshman year and then batting lead- 
off as a sophomore. 

His solid play earned him All-Conference 
and All-Region baseball honors as he 
helped Cowley to a 34-0 conference mark 
in 1998. He also excelled in the classroom 
and has gone on to become a teacher and 
coach. 

After Cowley, he went on to play two 
years of baseball at the University of 
North Carolina at Charlotte. 
Hargrove is the winningest coach in 
Cowley College sports history and is the 
active wins leader among NJCAA Softball 
coaches. He has won 917 games as head 
coach of the Lady Tiger softball team, 
and captured 16 Jayhawk East Conference 



Championships. 
He also has led Cowley to six Region VI 
Championships and five appearances at 
the NJCAA National Softball Tourna- 
ment. His teams in 2005 and 2006 placed 
fourth at the national tournament, while 
the 2009 team placed fifth. 
Hargrove has been named Jayhawk East 
Coach of the Year seven times, while also 
helping the Lady Tiger softball team win 
six NJCAA National Academic Team of 
the Year awards. 

In 2007, he was inducted into the NJ- 
CAA Softball Hall of Fame, and received 
the Greater Wichita Area Sports Commis- 
sion "Outstanding Achievement Award". 
Hargrove, an outstanding athlete, played 
football at Cowley County Community 
Junior College during the 1965 and 1966 
seasons and graduated from the school 
in 1967. He was an all-conference right 
tackle for the Tiger football team. 
He went on to receive a baseball scholar- 
ship to Fort Hays State University, where 
he saw playing time at first base and third 
base for the top-20 ranked baseball team. 
Pictured: Ralph Speer, Josh McMillen, 
and Ed Hargrove. 



Natural Science instructor 
receives Stirnaman Award 



vJcott Layton, Natural Science Depart- 
ment instructor, became the seventh 
recipient of the Paul Stirnaman Memorial 
Award for Teaching Excellence. 
Layton received the award during Cowley 
College's Back to School In-Service held 
Aug. 13, 2008 in the Earle N. Wright 
Community Room. 
"Scott is very deserving of this award," 
Cowley College vice president of aca- 
demic affairs Slade Griffiths said. "He 
exemplifies all of the high ideals of the 
faculty." 

The award is named for Paul Stirnaman, 
a long-time Social Science Department 
instructor and strong supporter of the 
College Education Association. He died 
June 16, 2000, following a lengthy illness. 
As an instructor in the natural science de- 
partment, Layton is responsible for teach- 
ing microbiology and biology classes. He 
received bachelors and masters degrees 
from Oklahoma State University. 
"I am humbled to be recognized by my 



peers," Layton said. "I hold the people 
that were nominated for the award in the 
highest regard." 

Layton, who enjoys the success stories that 
come about through education, serves as 
Cowley College's Math and Science Club 
co-sponsor and was listed in the Who's 
Who Among American Teachers in the 
2005-06 and 2006-07 academic years. He 
was also named the Teacher of the Year at 
Stillwater Junior High School in 2001. 
"Scott is extremely knowledgeable, a great 
teacher, and is willing to help students 
reach their goals," Griffiths said. 
He has taught at Cowley for the past eight 
years. 

"I really enjoy the people I get to work 
with," Layton said. "I also have a great 
degree of freedom in what I can teach and 
introduce into the classroom." 
Layton is a member of the Cowley Educa- 
tion Association, KNEA, and NEA. He 
and his wife, Debbie, have a daughter, 
Anisa 6. 





Cowley students honored at 
luncheon in Topeka 



JL our Cowley College students were 
honored at a luncheon in Topeka for 
being named to the Kansas All-State 
Academic Team. 

Representing Cowley College were, 
Candice Bliss and Emily Crain from the 
Arkansas City campus, and Keoki Waipa 
and Tina Wohlford from the Mulvane 
center. 

A total of 48 students from 20 Kansas 
community colleges were recognized at 
the luncheon. In recognition of their 
honor each member of the Kansas All- 
State Academic Team received an honor- 
ary medallion and certificate, state-wide 
recognition through the media, a stipend 
to be used at the institution of his/her 
choice, and a $1,000 scholarship for those 
who enroll at: Emporia State University, 
Fort Hays State University, Kansas State 



University, Kansas University, Pittsburg 
State University, Washburn University, 
and Wichita State University. 
Other colleges, such as Bethel College, 
Kansas Wesleyan University, Mid America 
Nazarene University, and Tabor College, 
will provide generous scholarships to the 
nominees. 

Dr. Richard Burke, Dodge City Commu- 
nity College president, and Community 
College Council of Presidents, gave the 
welcome address and closing comments. 
Ms. Tammy Fuentez, Kansas Director 
of Phi Theta Kappa, introduced each 
recipient, who received their medal and 
certificate from their college president. 
Cowley College president, Dr. Patrick J. 
McAtee, and Board of Trustee members, 
Ron Godsey, Mark Patton, and Donna 
Avery attended the luncheon, as did Sue 



Saia, vice president of student affairs. 
Cowley College students were joined by 
PTK sponsors Melinda Neal and Nancy 



Ayers 




McKown receives two awards at 
co nfere nce in Texas 




H 



.aving shown tremendous leadership 
and dedication to his profession, Charles 
McKown, Cowley College vice president 
of Research and Technology, recently 
received a pair of awards at the annual 
South Central POISE Users Group Con- 
ference in Addison, Texas. 
McKown was presented with a "Libby" 
Award and a Poise Users Group (PUG) 
Service Award. 

The Poise Users Group Service Award 
goes to individuals who have shown 
tremendous leadership coupled with lon- 
gevity of service to PUG. Loren Morris, 
director of Information Technology Ser- 
vices at Hutchinson Community College, 
who is the current president of PUG, 
presented the award to McKown. 
"Charles McKown has dedicated his 
time and effort to the Poise Users Group 
(PUG) over the last 22 years," Morris said. 
"Charles' leadership was extremely valu- 
able during the difficult times of transi- 
tion when the POISE product changed 
ownership." 
McKown maintained the office of presi- 



dent for PUG at three different times, 
and has presented numerous sessions at 
user conferences. He continues his service 
today as a member of the PUG board and 
as the PUG treasurer. 
"Quite frankly, the POISE product 
wouldn't be what it is today without the 
influence of Charles McKown," Morris 
said. 

McKown thinks highly of the POISE 
product. 

"I am convinced that POISE is the best 
administrative software out there," 
McKown said. "The POISE product was 
developed in the late 1970's, yet they have 
managed to keep it modern and tied into 
the web." 

The "Libby" Award, was named after Eliz- 
abeth "Libby" Annulis, former director of 
Information Technology at the University 
of Arkansas at Monticello. Annulis, who 
was the first person to receive the award, 
which was previously known as the South 
Central Poise Users Group Distinguished 
Service Award, passed away on March 15, 
2009. 
McKown is only the 11th recipient of the 



award in the past 31 years. 
"When you are recognized by your peers 
it is always very special," McKown said. 
Randy Thomas and Tom Rudolph, 
co-owners of ESP (Educational Systems 
Products), which is the college's support 
company based out of Tulsa, look at 
individuals that pushed POISE products 
on their campus and helped the product 
grow. They said there were several worthy 
candidates, but McKown stood out from 
the rest of the group. 

"We are honored to recognize Charles, he 
has been an outstanding person to work 
with," Thomas said. 

When McKown was hired at Cowley Col- 
lege's main campus in Arkansas City in 
June, 1992, the college had a total of 30 
computers. The college now has close to 
1 ,000 computers in use. 




14 | report 



Dale, Dr. Hashemi receive IMIS 
Excellence Awards in Austin 

D, 



• ]§ 



ue to their stellar work and dedica- 
tion to the teaching profession, Cowley 
College instructors Rae Dale and Dr. 
Jarar Hashemi received Excellence Awards 
from the National Institute for Staff and 
Organizational Development in Austin, 
Texas in May. 

Dale, an academic advisor and Office 
Technology, Computer, and Business 
instructor at Cowley College, and Dr. 
Hashemi, a Physics, Mathematics, Engi- 
neering and Physical Science instructor 
at the college's Arkansas City campus 
and Mulvane center, received the awards 
during NISOD's annual International 
Conference on Teaching and Leadership 
Excellence May 24-27. 
Dale worked for Charles Thoma Archi- 
tecture and Engineering in Arkansas City 
from 1974-1990. While working there, Mr. 
Thoma convinced Dale to return to school 
and complete her bachelor's degree. 
She took his advice and received an 
associate's degree from Cowley County 
Community College in 1987, and a 
bachelor's degree from Southwestern Col- 
lege in 1989. She didn't stop there, as she 
received a Master's of Education degree 
from Southwestern College in 1994- 
Dale began working at Cowley College as 
an adjunct instructor in 
1990 and became a full- 
time instructor at the 
college in 1992. 
Prior to becoming a 
full-time instructor at 
Cowley College, Dale 
did some substitute 
teaching for USD 470 
and was also a long-term 
substitute at Caldwell 
High School. 
Once she started work- 
ing at the college she 
realized this is where she 
wanted to be. 
"The best part of the job 
is being in the classroom 
and working directly 
with students," Dale 
said. "I enjoy the wide 
diversity of our students, 



not just culturally, but the difference in 
age as well." 

She also enjoys conducting non-credit 
Business and Industry software training. 
Dale was named to the Who's Who 
Among America's Teachers in 2005-06. 
She is a member of the National Educa- 
tion Association, Kansas National Educa- 
tion Association, and College Education 
Association. 

Being named a recipient of the Excellence 
Award from NISOD is something she is 
proud of. 

"In the hallway ot Webb-Brown there are 
photos of past Master Teacher recipients, 
so I get to see the faces of many excellent 
faculty members," Dale said. "It is a great 
honor to join them on the wall. I feel 
Cowley has outstanding faculty and it is a 
privilege to work with them." 
With computer applications constantly 
coming out with new versions, Dale finds 
there is more to learn each semester. 
"With the constant change things never 
get old," Dale said. "I especially like seeing 
a student come in a little apprehensive, 
thinking they can't do it, and then real- 
izing they can be successful." 
Slade Griffiths, Cowley College vice presi- 
dent of academic affairs, was happy to see 
Dale receive recognition from NISOD. 



"Rae Dale is deserving of the NISOD 
Master Teacher honor because she engages 
the students in the classroom by using 
practices that facilitate learning," Griffiths 
said. "She is a content expert and has 
been very willing to develop new programs 
and participate in employee professional 
development by providing many classes." 
Dr. Hashemi began employment as a full- 
time Physics and Physical Science instruc- 
tor at Cowley College in 1999. He has 
spent a total of 18 years as an instructor. 
"I have always enjoyed helping other 
people and covering subjects I like," Hash- 
emi said. 

He currently teaches Engineering Physics 
Part II and General Physics Part II at the 
college's Mulvane center and Arkansas 
City campus. He also teaches Physical Sci- 
ence and Statics. 

Prior to coming to Cowley College, Dr. 
Hashemi was an instructor at the Univer- 
sity of Oklahoma, St. Gregory University, 
and Butler Community College. He also 
served as a Senior Systems Engineer at 
Boeing, and was an Operation Research 
Analyst at Tinker Air Force Base. 
"Dr. Hashemi worked for many years as 
an engineer and, in the classroom, his 
love for engineering and student learning 
is evident," Griffiths said. "He is clearly 
Continued on page 26 




report | 15 




adership Conference 



JL articipating in the Kansas Phi Beta 
Lambda 58th annual State Leadership 
Conference at Colby Community College 
on February 26-27, seven of Cowley Col- 
lege's nine PBL students in attendance 
qualified to attend the National PBL 
Leadership Conference in Anaheim, CA 
June 20-21 




Beverly Grunder, Cowley College PBL 
advisor was proud of the PBL member's 
accomplishments. 

"It is a privilege serving as the Cowley 
College PBL advisor and having the 
opportunity to work with the students," 
Grunder said. "I am so proud of them 
and their accomplishments. They repre- 
sent Cowley College well especially when 
they are competing against students from 
four-year colleges and universities." 
Students that attended the PBL National 
Leadership Conference were: Melissa 
Barr, Richard Gould, Janessa Gould, 
Phuong Huynh, Crystal McGuire, Mary 
Misasi, and Elizabeth Smith. 
Cowley College student's awards from the 
State Leadership Conference include: 
Elizabeth Smith, Rock, KS - Sophomore 

1st - Accounting Principles 

1st - Database Design and Application 

1st - Web Site Development 
Crystal McGuire, Wichita, KS - Sopho- 
more 

2nd - Business Communications 
Richard Gould, Douglas, KS - Sopho- 
more 

1st - Human Resource Management 



2nd - Computer Concepts 

2nd - Help Desk 

Melissa Barr, Arkansas City, KS - Sopho- 
more 

1st - International Business 

2nd - Cyber Security 
Brandi Berntsen, Conway Spring, KS - 
Freshman 

2nd - Word Processing 
Team of Mary Misasi, Winfield, KS - 
Freshman and Phuong Huynh, Wichita, 
KS - Freshman 

1st - Hospitality Management 

2nd - Small Business Management Plan 
Other colleges participating at the 58th 
annual State Leadership Conference 
were: Butler Community College, Central 
Christian College at McPherson, Colby 
Community College, Emporia State Uni- 
versity, Kansas State University, Labette 
Community College, and Washburn 
University. 




Cowley honors 22 employees for 
■s of service 




T 



wenty-two Cowley College employees 
were honored for their years of service 
during a recognition ceremony in the 
Earle N. Wright Community Room 
inside the Brown Center. 
Employees were honored in five-year 
increments. 

Awards are presented annually to employ- 
ees who have worked five, 10, 15, 20, 25, 
30, 35 consecutive years. 
This year's award recipients: 
30 years: Libhy Palmer, administrative as- 
sistant to the president/Board clerk. 
25 years: Ed Hargrove, head Softball 
coach. 

20 years: Dejon Ewing, Humanities De- 
partment instructor. 

15 years: Bryan McChesney, coordinator, 
ITV/Technology specialist; Bruce Wat- 
son, coordinator, athletic/community/ 
minority counselor. 
10 years: Deanna Harp, financial aid 
specialist; Todd Ray, maintenance super- 



visor; Loretta Waldroupe, math specialist, 
student support services; Lindsay Sand- 
erholm, danceline head coach/Aerobics 
instructor; Chris Mayer, Social Science 
Department instructor; Karolee Weller, 
Natural Science Department instructor. 
5 years: Ben Schears, director of Interna- 
tional Student Services; Roxanna James, 
IMPACT administrative secretary; Mark 
Phillips, head track and field coach/assis- 
tant cross country coach; Amy McWhirt, 
Humanities faculty; David Hays, Natural 
Science Department instructor; April Nit- 
tler, Social Science Department instruc- 
tor; Sandy Randel, director of Career 
and Technical Education and Workforce 
Development; Syd Alexander, bus driver/ 
groundskeeper; Robert Richards, custodi- 
an; Rama Peroo, director of institutional 
communications and public relations; 
Clinton Marlow, director of computer 
services. 



Pictured: Karolee Weller, Loretta Wal- 
droupe, Lindsay Sanderholm, Chris 
Mayer, and Deanna Harp. 




report 



Elizabeth Smith named Student of 
the Yea 



TJ 

.L .Laving served as the class valedic- 
torian at Udall High School in 2007, 
Elizabeth Smith has enjoyed similar 
academic success at Cowley College. The 
sophomore from Rock was named the 
school's Student of the Year for the 2008- 
09 academic year. 

Smith, daughter of Larry and Sheila 
Smith, was an accounting major. Grand- 
parents are Patricia and the late Gene 
Prichard of Douglass, and Neoma and the 
late Golden Arlie Smith of Dustin, Okla. 
She has a brother, Brian 24, and a sister, 
Tabitha 21. 

In high school, along with being named 
valedictorian, Smith was a member of the 
National Honor Society as well as Career 
and Community Leaders of America and 
Future Business Leaders of America. She 
also served as class treasurer her junior 
and senior years at the school. 
The decision to attend Cowley was not 
a tough one as her sister, Tabitha, and 
brother, Brian had each earned associate 
degrees from the school. 



"At Cowley you are not just a number, I 
liked the small class sizes and the number 
of classes offered," Smith said. 
At Cowley, Smith was president of Phi 
Beta Lambda and State Treasurer for 
PBL. She was also active in Math and Sci- 
ence Club, Mu Alpha Theta, PTK, AEC, 
Media Club, Film Club, Act One, and 
the Young Democrats. She also served as 
a SGA representative for PBL, and was 
a Cowley Tutor and Cowley Captain. 
She was also named the school's March 
Student of the Month. 
At the Kansas Phi Beta Lambda 58th 
annual State Leadership Conference at 
Colby Community College on February 
26-27, Smith took home three first place 
awards. She enjoyed the experience of be- 
ing in PBL and working with PBL advisor 
Bev Grunder. 

18 | report 




"It has been really fun getting to meet dif- 
ferent people from around the state, and 
getting an opportunity to go to nationals 
and meet people from around the world," 
Smith said. "Bev is a wonderful person to 
be around, she is always happy and makes 
the best of every situation." 
Smith had a 4.0 grade point average at 
Cowley College. In fact, she has never 
made any grade other than an "A" since 
she began her schooling. 
This driven student took 22 credit hours 
the spring semester and graduated from 
Cowley with 84 credit hours. 
"I want to get a feel for all different types 
of classes," Smith said. 
In her free time, Smith enjoys read- 
ing and spending time with family and 
friends. She considers her mother, Sheila, 
to be the most influential person in her 
life. 

"My mom has always encouraged me and 
believes I can do anything I set my mind 



to," Smith said. 

After Cowley, Elizabeth transferred to 
Southwestern College to dual major in 
accounting and business administration. 
She hopes to one day become a manage- 
rial accountant and work with CEO's of 
companies to decide what is best tor their 
company. 

She enjoyed her time at Cowley. 
"I'm glad I came here, the faculty, staff, 
and students are so nice," Smith said. 
"It's a wonderful environment to be in." 




Cowley opens enrollment center 

in Fact Wichita 



W 

VV ith online classes serving as the 
fastest growing portion of Cowley Col- 
lege, the college's Eastside Center opened 
in May, 2008 and is located at 4900 E. 
Pawnee, Suite 106 and 108, in Wichita. 
Online education is growing in response 
to the needs of people who may not he 
in a traditional situation for attending 
college because of work, family, or other 
obligations, as well as the "traditional" 
student who is more versed in the elec- 
tronic age. 

The Eastside Center offers different 
modes of learning so a student can select 
the courses that best fit their schedule 
and location. Students can choose from 



online classes, online hybrids, video 
hybrids, interactive television (ITV), and 
online continuing education courses. 
To find out more information about the 



Eastside Center call 316-683-601 3 or 
e-mail eastside@cowley.edu. 




Cowley College opens Westside 
Center in Wichita 



G 



'ontinuing to draw a large per- 
centage of students from the north 
part of its service area and Sedgwick 
County, Cowley College opened a new 
center on the west side of Wichita on 
June 3, 2009. 

The center, which is called the Cowley 
College Westside Center, is located at 
8821 West 21 Street, Suite 400. The 
building, which is 3,000 square feet, is 
on the southwest corner of Tyler and 
21st Street. 

The Westside Center has two employ- 
ees on hand to help students enroll for 
online courses and provide financial 
aid information and information 
about courses offered at the Cowley 
College campuses. They will also 
conduct Asset Testing and provide 
workshops based upon what the need 
in a certain area may be. 
Cowley College president, Dr. Patrick 
J. McAtee, felt there was a need for the 
college to be visible on the west side of 
Wichita. 

"We felt we needed to do a better job 
of communicating with that segment 



of our service area and reach out to those 
students interested in Cowley," McAtee 
said. "Whether a student is wanting to 
take classes online or at one of our other 
locations, we can keep them informed on 
programs and services we offer." 
The college's Eastside Center opened 
on the east side of Wichita last June and 
has online and hybrid course offerings. 
The Eastside Center is located at 4900 E. 
Pawnee, Suite 106. 
With the opening of its Westside Center, 



Cowley College will have two locations 
in Wichita, two in Mulvane, and two in 
Winfield to go along with its main cam- 
pus in Arkansas City. 
"It will be interesting to track the contacts 
made from the Westside Center and see 
where those students ultimately end up at 
Cowley," McAtee said. 
To find out more information about the 
Westside Center call 316-722-2787 or 
e-mail westside@cowley.edu. 




report | 19 



Athletic Roundup 



BASEBALL 

Qualifying for the JUCO World Series in 
Grand Junction, Co., the Cowley College 
baseball team finished another stellar 
season with a record of 48-15. The Tigers, 
winners of its third straight Jayhawk Con- 
ference Eastern Division title, also won 
the Region VI title for the second time in 
the past three years. 

At the JUCO World Series, Cowley won 
its opening game over Seminole State 
College (11-8) before losing its next two 
games to Santa Fe Community College 
(10-9) and Spartanburg Methodist College 
(10-7). 

Cowley head coach Dave Burroughs was 
named the Jayhawk East Coach of the 
Year for the third straight season and 
Zach Cargill was named the Jayhawk East 
Freshman of the Year. 

SOFTBALL 

Finishing just one win shy of a school-re- 
cord for victories in a season, the Cowley 
College softball team ended the 2009 
season with a record of 52-7. 
The Lady Tigers captured their sixth 
straight Jayhawk East title and advanced 
to the NJCAA Division II National 
Championships for the fifth time this 
decade. 

Cowley went 3-2 at the national tourna- 
ment and finished in a tie for fifth place 
with Iowa Central. 
Cowley head coach Ed Hargrove was 
named the Jayhawk East Coach of the 
Year for the seventh time in his 25 sea- 
sons at the school. For the third year in 
a row Cowley had the conference's Most 
Valuable Player and the Freshman of the 
Year. Sophomore pitcher Jacey Juden was 
named the conference's Most Valuable 
Player for the second consecutive year, 
while pitcher Ashley Spencer was named 
the Freshman of the Year. Both players 
were named first-team all-conference and 
all-region. 

MEN'S TENNIS 

With only one sophomore on its roster, 
the Cowley College men's tennis team 
put together a solid season as they fin- 
ished third in the region and earned the 
right to compete at the NJCAA National 
Tennis Tournament in Piano, Texas. 
At the national tournament, sophomore 
Boomer Saia and freshman Roger White 
advanced to the semifinals of No. 3 
doubles, while Lloyd Bruce-Burgess ad- 
vanced to the semifinals of No. 1 singles 
before losing. 

20 | report 



The Tiger men's tennis team placed ninth 
at the national tournament and head into 
next season with high expectations. 

WOMEN'S TENNIS 

Winning five of six singles titles and all 
three doubles titles at the Region VI 
Tennis Tournament, the Cowley College 
women's tennis team captured the region 
title in dominating fashion. 
The Lady Tigers got wins from each of its 
singles and doubles players as they placed 
eighth at the NJCAA National Tennis 
Tournament in Tucson, AZ. 
The future is bright for the Lady Tiger 
tennis team as they will return each of its 
singles and doubles players next season. 

MEN'S TRACK 

Continuing its impressive showings in the 
Jayhawk Conference, the Cowley College 
outdoor men's track and field team cap- 
tured its third straight Jayhawk East title. 
The Cowley men had nine conference 
champions. Rolando Vasquez was the 
conference champion in the 1,500-meter 
run and was a member of the conference 
winning 4x800-meter relay team. 
David Phillips, Brice Irving, and T.J. 
Mapp teamed with Vasquez to place first 
in the conference in the 4x800-meter relay 
with a time of 7:50.42. 
Johnny Purvis was the conference cham- 
pion in the 5,000-meter run, and Isbek 
Salinas was the conference champion 
in the 3,000-meter steeplechase. Other 
Cowley men that were named conference 
champions were, Jory Custar (800-meter 
run), Mac Griffith (decathlon), and Justin 
Viewins (400-meter dash). Viewins' time 
of 47.98 in the 400-meter dash broke his 
own school-record. 

The Tigers went on to place 21st at the 
NJCAA Outdoor Track and Field Cham- 
pionships. Mac Griffith (decathlon) and 
Rolando Vasquez (1,500-meter run) were 
named Coaches Association All-Ameri- 
cans. The 4x800-meter relay team of Brice 
Irving, T.J. Mapp, Justin Ross, and Jory 
Custar also earned Coaches Association 
All-American honors. 

WOMEN'S TRACK 

The Lady Tiger outdoor track and field 
team had another successful season as 
they placed second in the Jayhawk East 
and 19th at the NJCAA Outdoor Track 
and Field Championships. 
Cowley's Katie Gillmore was the confer- 
ence and region champion in the pole 
vault as she cleared 11-2 l A in the event. 



Freshman Cecilia Burley was the confer- 
ence champion in the 5,000 and 10,000- 
meter runs, while Marvia Lewin (800-me- 
ter run) and Jessica McLeod (1,500-meter 
runs) were other conference champions 
for the Lady Tigers. 

Cowley's 4x800-meter relay team of Bri- 
anna Byers, Lewin, McLeod, and Jessica 
Dyer also won conference in its event. 
Gillmore just missed being the national 
champion in the pole vault and ended 
up placing fourth in the pole vault at the 
national meet. For her efforts, Gillmore 
was named a Coaches Association Ail- 
American. 

The Lady Tigers' 4x800-meter relay team 
of Jessica McLeod, Brianna Byers, Marvia 
Lewin and Jessica Dyer also did well as 
they placed sixth at the national meet. 

MEN'S BASKETBALL 

Capturing its second straight Jayhawk 
Conference Eastern Division title, the 
Cowley College men's basketball team 
finished with a record of 29-5. 
The 29 wins ties for the second most in 
school-history as the 1952-53 Tiger basket- 
ball team also finished 29-5. Last season's 
team holds the school-record for wins in a 
season with 31. 

The Tigers had their season come to an 
end in the Region VI title game for the 
second straight year as they suffered a 66- 
56 loss to Garden City. 
Jack Crowder became only the eighth 
Cowley player to score more than 1,000 
points in his career as he amassed 1,026 
points in his two years at the school. 
Crowder's 685 points this season were the 
sixth most points scored in a single season 
in school-history. 

Cowley will say goodbye to sophomores 
Jack Crowder and Mike Atwater. The 
sophomores were a part of the most wins 
by the Tiger basketball team over any two- 
year span. 

Tommy DeSalme takes over as head coach 
of the Tigers heading into the 2009-10 
season. DeSalme spent the previous two 
seasons at Independence Community 
College, where he led the Pirates to a 
record of 45-19 overall and 29-7 in the Jay- 
hawk Conference Eastern Division. 

WOMEN'S BASKETBALL 

The Cowley College women's basketball 
team showed a kit of character as they 
came back from a 3-4 start to conference 
play to finish 14-4 in the Jayhawk East. 
The Lady Tigers won 12 games in a 
row before having its season come to 



an end with a 65-51 loss to Hutchinson 
Community College in the Region VI 
Tournament. Hutchinson would go on to 
represent the Jayhawk Conference at the 
national tournament. 
Cowley finished the season with a record 
of 24-8. The six sophomores on the team 
helped Cowley win 45 games over the 
past two seasons. 

Elena Yankova finished her two-year 
career as the Lady Tigers third all-time 
leading scorer as she amassed 997 career 
points. Her 536 points scored this season 
were the ninth most scored in a single 
season at Cowley. 

Behe Holloway's 457 points scored this 
season were the 19th most in a single-sea- 
son at Cowley and her 672 points scored 
over the past two seasons are the 20th 
most points scored in a career. 
Gahhie Curtis finished her two years at 
Cowley with 787 points, which ranks 10th 
on the Lady Tigers all-time scoring list. 

MEN'S INDOOR TRACK 

Wrapping up a successful indoor season, 
the Cowley College men's indoor track 
and field team captured its third straight 
conference title and capped the year by 
placing ninth at the NJCAA National 
Indoor held in Lubbock, Texas. 
At the national meet, Cowley was led by 
its 4x800-meter relay team, which placed 
second and earned NJCAA All-American 
honors. The relay team, made up of 
David Phillips, T.J. Mapp, Jory Custar, 
and Rolando Vasquez, finished with a 
school-record time of 7:48.76. 
Sophomore Johnny Purvis also had a 
stellar meet as he earned Coaches Associa- 
tion All-American honors in the 3,000 
and 5,000-meter runs. Purvis placed 10th 
in the 3,000, and was the first United 
States born finisher in the 5,000-meter 
run as he placed fourth in the event. 
Despite battling illness, freshman Dustin 
Mettler managed to place 10th in the 
5,000-meter run and take home Coaches 
Association All-American honors. 
The distance medley relay team of Mapp, 
Justin Viewins, Custar, and Vasquez, 
placed fourth and earned Coaches As- 
sociation All-American honors. 

WOMEN'S INDOOR TRACK 

Getting the most out of its small, but tal- 
ented squad, the Cowley College women's 
track and field team placed second in 
the conference and finished 10th at the 
NJCAA National Indoor held in Lub- 
bock, Texas. 

Cowley freshman Cecilia Burley had 
a terrific meet as she earned Coaches 
Association All-American honors in the 



3,000 and 5,000-meter runs. Burley was 
the second United States born finisher 
in both events. She also was a part of the 
4x800-meter relay team that placed third 
and broke the school-record with a time 
of 9:46.32. 

Running with Burley as part of the 4x800- 
meter relay team were, Jessica McLeod, 
Brianna Byers, and Marvia Lewin. 
Byers also ran well in the 800-meter run 
as she placed seventh with a time of 
2:25.31 and earned Coaches Association 
All-American honors. 
Freshman Katie Gillmore capped her stel- 
lar indoor season by placing fourth in the 
pole vault (11-2 l A) and earned Coaches 
Association All-American honors. 

VOLLEYBALL 

The Cowley College volleyball team 
finished unbeaten in the Jayhawk Confer- 
ence as they captured its third conference 
title in the last four years. The Lady Tigers 
also won the District Tournament for the 
fourth consecutive season and finished 
fifth at the NJCAA Division II National 
Championships held in Wisconsin Dells, 
Wis. 

Sophomore outside hitter Lucia Cizmaro- 
va was a first-team all-conference selection 
for the second consecutive year. Sopho- 
more middle hitter Victoria Green also 
garnered first-team all-conference honors. 
While, freshman setter Sarah Eldridge 
received honorable mention recognition, 
Cowley reached the 30-win plateau for the 
fourth straight season as they ended the 
year with a record of 30-6. 

MEN'S CROSS COUNTRY 

The Tiger men's cross country team cap- 
tured its third straight Jayhawk Confer- 
ence Eastern Division title as well as its 
second straight Region VI championship. 
The men capped its stellar season by plac- 
ing fourth out of 33 teams at the NJCAA 
Cross Country National Championships. 
Tiger sophomore Jonathan Cherono 
was the individual conference champion 
and placed third in the region. He also 
finished fifth at nationals and earned 
NJCAA All-American honors. 
Fellow Tigers Johnny Purvis, Dustin Met- 
tler, and Justin Cacaro earned NJCAA 
Coaches Association All-American 
honors for finishing amongst the top-25 
American runners at the national meet. 
Cherono leaves Cowley as the second fast- 
est runner in the program's history, while 
Purvis ranks as the fifth fastest runner 
and top-American runner the Tigers have 
ever had. 



WOMEN'S CROSS COUNTRY 

The Lady Tigers finished second in the 
Jayhawk Conference Eastern Division, 
third in Region VI, and 10th out of 3 3 
teams at the NJCAA Cross Country Na- 
tional Championships. Freshman Cecilia 
Burley placed 22nd out of 246 runners 
at the national meet and earned Coaches 
Association All-American honors. 
For guiding the Lady Tigers to an impres- 
sive finish, Cowley head cross country 
coach Vince DeGrado was named Region 
VI Women's Cross Country Co-Coach of 
the Year. 

WOMEN'S SOCCER 

The Lady Tigers' first season was an over- 
whelming success as Cowley won eight 
games and finished seventh out of 12 
teams in the Jayhawk Conference. Cowley 
finished its inaugural season with a record 
of 8-9 overall. 

All 1 3 Lady Tigers on the squad were 
freshman. Amber Hernandez had an 
amazing first season as she finished with 
26 goals, which was good for the 10th 
most goals in the nation. Carol Rodrigues 
also had a strong freshman season as she 
finished with eight goals and a team-high 
18 assists. 

Goalkeeper Carly Budd allowed an aver- 
age of fewer than three goals per game, 
while Allyson Duda, Brittany Griffin, Ka- 
tie Ybarra, and Brittany Newbolt provided 
solid defense throughout the season. 

MEN'S SOCCER 

On a team with only one sophomore, the 
Tigers had a sold first season as they fin- 
ished ahead of three teams in the Jayhawk 
Conference and qualified for the Region 
VI playoffs in the program's first year of 
existence. 

Cowley finished its inaugural season with 
a record of 4-11-2. 

Tiger freshman Keegan Cornelius had 
a solid first season as he finished with a 
team-high 12 goals to go along with five 
assists. Nick Sobba also played well and 
finished with eight goals and a team-best 
10 assists. 

Orlando Colina and Austin Sackett pro- 
vided solid defense for the Tigers, while 
Blake Anderson and Mark Vargas each 
fared well in goal. 




report | 21 



Who We Serve Foundation 

Balance Sheet 



Spring 2009 Semester Enrollment by location 




Arkansas City 


975 


Virtual Campus 


1,391 


Mulvane Bloomenshine 


763 


SSEC 


172 


Winfield 


132 


Mulvane IT 


105 


Wellington 


14 


Percentage by Gender 




Male 


38% 


Female 


62% 


Percentage by Ethnic Group 




Black/Non-H ispanic 


8.0% 


Native American 


1.2% 


Asian 


3.4% 


Hispanic 


4.7% 


Caucasian 


82.1% 


Other 


0.6% 


Percentage by Age 




Under 18 


12.97% 


19-22 years old 


42.21% 


23-29 years old 


21.04% 


30-49 years old 


21.04% 


50 and over 


2.91% 


2008-09 Enrollment Data 




Annual Unduplicated Headcount 


4,753 


Headcount Fall 2008 


3,584 


Headcount Spring 2009 


3,369 


Full-time Equivalent Students Fall 2008 


2,362.87 


FTE Students Spring 2009 


2,286.47 


International Student Enrollment 


67 



Total Cash and Investments 


$3,619,150 


Pledges Receivable 


$98,670 


Capitalized Assets 


$48,590 


Total Assets 


$3,766,410 


LIABILITIES AND NET ASSETS 




Total Liabilities 


$99,057 


NET ASSETS 




Unrestricted 


$358,576 


Temporarily Restricted 


$740,767 


Permanently Restricted 


$2,568,010 


Total Liabilities and Net Assets 


$3,766,410 



Your Return on Investment 



Expenditures by Source 






2008-09 (unaudited) 






Instruction 


$6,862,090 


40% 


Academic Support 


$602,648 


3% 


Student Services 


$1,290,184 


7% 


Athletics 


$1,836,925 


11% 


Institutional Support 


$2,665,364 


15% 


Operations & 






Maintenance 


$3,728,316 


22% 


Grants 


$312,200 


2% 


Transfers 


$35,000 


0% 


Total 


$19,066,028 


100.0% 


Revenues by Source 






2008-09 






Student Sources 


$4,551,713 


24% 


State Sources 


$8,143,176 


43% 


Grants 


$371,676 


2% 


Local Sources 


$5,371,982 


29% 


Other Sources 


$351,786 


2% 


Total 


$19,026,809 


100.0% 


22 | report 







Impact to Local Taxpayers 

College, employee and student spending in Cowley County 
"Roll-over" effect of direct spending in county (multiplier = 1.6) 
State/local taxes received in 2008-09 (including property 6k mo- 
tor vehicle taxes) 
Net Return to Taxpayers 
(based on direct spending only) 
Net Return to Taxpayers 
(including roll-over effect) 
Dollar-for-dollar return 
(based on direct spending only) 
Dollar-for-dollar return 
(including roll-over effect) 

(Does not include economic impact of student tuition and fees, 
visitors 6k. increased productivity through a better educated 
workforce.) 

•Seventh lowest mill levy at 19.976 mills. 

•One of Cowley County's largest employers with over 173 full- 
time and 181 part-time employees. 



^^/t&^tttew^t £f (JryiT&iirf&r^ 



SPONSORS 



£, g HALL OF HONOR ($ 100- 



PRESIDENT'S SOCIETY 

($10,000-$49,999) 

Mildred and the late Hubert 

Johnston 

Powder Valley, Inc. 

Benefactor ($5,000-$9,999) 
Boyer Educational Trust 
Estate of Helen M Finch 
Great Western Dining 
Jacob and Laura Hocker 
Kim and Cynthia Hocker 
Joe and Patty Neises 
Pa ton Wholesale ck Vending 
Co. 

BUILDER ($l,000-$4,999) 

Ark City Tumbleweeds 

Carpenter & Vickers Trust 

Account 

CornerBank 

Kirke Dale Scholarship Trust 

Marvin Daniel 

Jacqueline Deal 

Bill and Judy Docking 

Bill and Dorothy Funk 

Slade and Terri Griffiths 

John and Janice Hitchcock 

Ellen Kelly 

Carolyn Managan 

Marvin and Anita McCorgary 

Shayla McDonald 

Rash McReynolds Foundation 

Fred and Margot Menefee 

Mid America Arts Alliance 

Fred and Donna Rindt 

Nan Schaper 

Paul Schneider Construction 

Soroptimist 

Jack and Gail Stark 

Florence Stephens 

Larry Swaim 

The late Betty Sybrant 

Charles Trenary 

Union State Bank 

Robert Warrender Memorial 

Trust 

INVESTOR ($500-$999) 

Chris and Mandy Cannon 

Allen and Beverly Grunder 

Elliott Jackson 

Conrad and Janet Jimison 

Mary Kerr 

John Maier 

Charles McKown 

New Life Worship Center 

TCK Trust &. Financial Advi- 



HALL OF HONOR ($ 100- 

$499) 

Abbey Eye Care 

ADM Milling Co. 

Allen Ala 

Sydney and Cathy Alexander 

La Donna Alford 

Bart and Heather Allen 

Alterra Sterling House 

American Legion Auxiliary 

Unit #18 

Hobart and Gail Ammerman 

David Andreas 

Larry and Rose Anstine 

Steve and Pam Archer 

Ark City Glass Company, Inc. 

Ark Veterinary Associates 

Arkansas City Traveler 

Rod and Jody Arnett 

Frank Arnold 

Alfredo Aucar 

The late Joe and Donna Avery 

Max and Nancy Ayers 

B Four Flying, Inc. 

Albert and Karen Bacastow 

John and Carla Barnard 

Gene Bayless 

Bluestem Bed and Breakfast, 

LLC 

Dick and Dolly Bonfy 

John and Julie Bossi 

Charlotte Brown 

Buterbaugh & Handlin 

Jose and Marlys Cervantes 

City of Arkansas City 

Joseph and Nel Clark 

Judy Clark 

Albert and Audine Clemente 

John and Chris Clemente 

Gene and Donella Cole 

Father Francis Cox 

Tony and Vicki Crouch 

Bruce and Amy Crouse 

D C Riders, L.L.C. 

Jim and Rae Dale 

DebandRex Advertising 

Robin Delp 

Diana Dicken 

DiVall Retail Liquor 

John and Connie Donatelli 

Elite Advertising 

Stephen and the late Janet 

English 

Doug and Dejon Ewing 

Karl and Dorothy Faidley 

Robert and Robin Fencil 

Larry and Rebecca Findley 

Dennis and Karone Finger 

First Baptist Church of Ark 

City 

First Intermark Corporation 

Thomas Fisher 



Foster's Furniture, Inc. 
Curt and Cindy Freeland 
Rowland and Margaret Funk 
Jim and Marvis Gaddie 
General Electric 
Ed and Margaret Gilliland 
Dean and Elaine Gilstrap 
Godsey Enterprises 
Gordon & Assoc. Architects, 
PA. 

Gottlob Lawn ck Landscape 
LLC 

Graves Drug No 1 1 
Great Plains Quality Manage- 
ment 

Gregg & Simmons, CPAs 
Bill and Dorothy Griffith 
Grinder Man 
David and Lisa Grose 
Mike Groves Oil, Inc 
James and Sharon Hand 
Ed and Linda Hargrove 
Rock and Ann Headrick 
Health Inventures 
Steve and Carol Hearne 
Donald and Cindy Heflin 
Jean Hill 
Jean Hite 

Richard and Melissa Hollister 
Jimmie and Joyce Holloway 
Home National Bank 
Dan and Jill Hunter 
Ronnie and Terri Hutchinson 
Warren and Marjorie Isom 
Aaron Iverson 

Matthew and Roxanna James 
Sharon Jarvis 
JD Liquor Store 
Shirley Jester 
Lynne Jordan 
John Kelly 

Jeff and Janet Kennedy 
Tommy and Arthetta Kimmell 
Mr. and Mrs. Jack King 
Erv and Fern Knocke 
Dr. Juri and Susan Kolts 
Mary Korte 
Irvin Kramer 
Harold and Mary Lake 
LaDonna Lanning 
Judy Lawson 

Robben and Wilma Ledeker 
Legacy, A Regional Commu- 
nity Foundation 
Martha Linsner 
Long & Neises CPAS Chtd 
J.C. and Donna Louderback 
Scott and Rhoda MacLaughlin 
Dr. Rodger and Melba Maech- 
tlen 
Zak and Beverly Manuszak 



Lane and Shannon Massey 

Clarence Maxwell 

Darin and Millie McAtee 

Dr. Pat and Sandy McAtee 

Steve and Beth McCann 

Sherie McMahon 

Amy McWhirt and Terry 

Quiett 

Albert and Doris Miller 

Shawn Miller 

Bill and Alice Mills 

Carl Mills and Phyllis Macy- 

Mills 

Robert and Olive Milner 

James and Wilma Mitchell 

Bob Moffatt 

Otis and Terri Morrow 

Munson Insurance Agency, 

Inc. 

Janice Neagle 

Margaret Neal 

Mark and Melinda Neal 

Dennis Needham 

Dr. Richard and Marlys 

Nelson 

Lu Nelson 

Faye Nemoir 

Dr. Nathan and Amy Niles 

Lance and Tamara Niles 

Jason and April Nittler 

Randy and Debbie Nittler 

Greg and Tami Norwood 

Fred and Tonya Olenberger 

Jason and Shannon O'Toole 

Elizabeth Palmer 

Tom Parmley 

Patriot Exploration LLC 

Roy and Linda Pepper 

Larry and Carlla Pike 

Potter's Liquor Store 

Presbyterian Manor 

Lester Priest 

Jim and Jan Pringle 

Bob and Kendra Redtord 

Reedy Ford 

Sidney Regnier 

Bill and Arleta Rice 

The Ridge Restaurant 

Rindt-Erdman Funeral Home 

Dr. Nick and Christie Rogers 

Drs. Scott and Nicole Rogers 

Dr. David and Rhonda Ross 

RPPG, Inc. 

Richard and Darlene Ruch 

S and Y Industries, Inc. 

Tom and Sue Saia 

Dan and Lois Sampson 

Benjamin and Rachel Schears 

Dr. David and Karen Schmei- 

dler 

Tom and Charlotte Schmidt 

report | 23 



Schmidt Jewelers 
Scott and Michelle Schoon 
Larry and Wanda Schwintz 
Tim and Amy Scott 
Brian and Kristi Shaw 
The late Wayne and Sandy 
Short 

Joe and Mindi Shriver 
Isobel Smith 
Randy and Pam Smith 
Roy Smith 
Jean and Ellen Snell 
Sonic Drive-In 
Tad and Janice Stover 
James and Donna Sybrant 
Linda Sybrant 
Taylor Drug 
The North End 
Bill and Barbara Thompson 
F.L. and Arlene Thurman 
Topline Steel Buildings 
Richard and Nancy Tredway 
Turn of the Century Enter- 
prises 

Robert and Gwen Tyler 
Ultimate Martial Arts, LLC 
United Agency 
Bill and Trish Wagner 
Walnut Valley Title 
Webber Land Company 
Joe and Karolee Weller 
Deuane and Virginia Wells 
V.J. Wilkins 
Charlee Wilson 
Wintield Consumer Products, 
Inc. 

Wintield Chiropractic Office 
Morgan Wright 
Dr. Robert and Sue Yoachim 
Daniel and Nanci Young 
Ed and Karen Zeller 

FRIEND (Under $100) 

Sid and Jerri Achenbach 

Ace Construction & Interior 

Design LLC 

Leo and Joleen Alexander 

Robert Anstine 

Nick and Alyce Anzelmo 

Jack and Jeanne Baird 

Troy and Heather Barker 

Phillip Barkett 

Zachary and Lori Barnes 

Tom and Lynnette Barnthouse 

Clark Bastian 

Audie Baughman 

William and Sandra Baum- 

gartner 

John and Gerry Bazil 

Marjorie Benjamin 

Don and Peggy Bennett 

Bever Dye Foundation 

Sara Bly 

24 | report 



Ralph and Mary Bonnell 
Thomas and Norma Bossi 
Jim Bradley 

Eugene and Dorothy Brink- 
man 

Janis Bunker 
Fred and Carol Bunting 
Judith Caprez 
S. R. and Jo Chance 
Marcia Childers 
Marilyn Childers 
Glenn and Nancy Clarkson 
Bill Clay 

Clint and Brenda Combs 
Community National Bank 
ConocoPhillips 
Margaret Cox 
Betty Current 
David Czaplinski 
David and Carol Daulton 
Verna Davis 
Dan and Lin Deener 
Bonnie Drake 
Jerry and Peggy Drennan 
Terry Eaton 
Curtis and Gail Eitel 
Betty Feak 
Sally Forrest 

Aubrey and Barbara Foster 
Belva Gardner 

Charles and Dorothy Gerber 
Michael and Cindy Giessel 
David and Dixie Givens 
Marilyn Glynn 
Doug and Celi Goff 
Great Plains Communications 
Howard Griffin 
Leonard and Rogene Groene 
Brett and Amy Grose 
Mary Ann Hale 
J. Fred Hambright 
Rex and Siri Harrell 
Donald and Martha Hastings 
Lori Heasty 
Martin Helget 
Ron and Becky Holt 
Vern Hull 

Rod and Karen Iverson 
Steve and Joi Jay 
Gary and Freida Kahle 
Buddy and Peggy Kendrick 
Kay Kennedy 

Howard and Dorothy Kivett 
David Knapp 
Jeff and Julie Kratt 
Nancy Kuehler 
Dwayne and Annette Lager- 
strom 

The late James and Imogene 
Leach 

Donna Lester 
L.R. and Virginia Linnell 
Lloyd Lisk 
Georre Lovell 



Shirley Malone 

Ellen Maninger 

Phillip Marrs 

Richard Marrs 

Martha Washington Unit 

Cathi Maynard 

Russell and Sylvia McAlister 

Bryan and Lisa McChesney 

Tom and Donni McClaflin 

Cecil McGaugh 

Gina McKown 

Marvin McLaughlin 

Michael and Cathy Mora 

Norman and Sue Morris 

Greg and Patricia Mugler 

Jerry and Virginia Munson 

Scott and Heather Munson 

Jeff and Peggy Musson 

Norman and Nancy Nellis 

Billie Nelson 

Tom and Betty Neptune 

Keith and Bonnie Nulik 

Alan and Susan Paton 

B ill i lee Paton 

Mark and Debra Paton 

Bill and Julie Perdue 

Andrea Peterson 

Philip and Mary Ann Phillips 

Dolly Pittman 

David and Camille Pond 

John and Linda Postelwait 

Jim and Karon Ramirez 

Don Randall 

James and Sylvia Reed 

Dick and Judy Reedy 

Deane Richardson 

Mark and Yvonne Richardson 

George Rohleder 

Steve and Melinda Ross 

Bill Rowe 

Robert Rush 

Rush Realty 

Salina Surgical Hospital Cheer 

Committee 

Kay Sands 

Aralee Scothern 

Ronald Setzkorn 

Sheldon's Shop 

Bernard and Pauline Smith 

Mary Smith 

May Belle Smith 

Dr. Daniel and Vicki Snowden 

Robert Somers 

Karen Sparks 

Kim Stephen 

Dennis and Tammy Strange 

John and LeeAnn Sturd 

James and Mary Topper 

Charles Turner 

Donald and Fran Vannoy 

Loretta Waldroupe 

Jay and Nancy Warren 

Shirley Webb 

Dorothy Weston 



Pamela White 

Steve and Tracey Williams 

Roy and Aileen Wittenborn 

Chris and Jana Wooderson 

Mary Zanovich 

Zeller Motor Co. Inc. 



BOOSTERS 

SUPER BOOSTERS 
($2,500 OR MORE) 
Orthopaedic 6k Sports Med 
Rusty Eck Ford 

Great Western Dining/CCCC 
Ark City Glass Co. 
James Schaefer 
Home National Bank 
Union State Bank 

ORANGE AND BLACK 
CLUB 

($l,000-$2,499) 

Rubbermaid Home Products 

Joan Eck 

Bob Foster's Furniture 

Elite Advertising 

Pizza Hut 

Coca Cola Bottling Co. 

Kinsch, Dr. Nick D.D.S. 

Legleiter Video Productions 

Ark Valley Dist 

KSOK 

Dr. Nathan 6k Amy Niles 

Dentistry 

Paton Wholesale 6k Vending 

General Electric 

Zeller Motor Co. 

United Agency 

Corner Bank 

Rindt-Erdman Funeral Home 

BENGAL CLUB 

($500-$999) 

K.C. Pawn Shop 

Steve Eck 

Ron 6k Donetta Godsey 

Pat 6k Sandy McAtee 

Tom 6k Sue Saia 

Duncan Farms 

TIGER CLUB 

($300-$499) 

Leroy Alsup 

JenStine Oil Co. 

Dan Bowker 

Darren 6k Carolyn Burroughs 

Dave 6k Vickie Burroughs 

Rob Carroll Sandblasting 6k 

Paint 

Todd 6k Candy Clark 

Josh 6k Rashelle Cobble 

Gene 6k Donella Cole 



Waldorf Riley 

Mid West Electric Supply 

Doug Goff 

Mike Groves 

Beverly Grunder 

Bill & Linda Headrick 

John &. Janice Hitchcock 

Elliott 6k Martha Jackson 

Steve 6k Joi Jay 

Conrad 6k Janet Jimison 

Kuhn Mechanical 

Woods Lumber Company 

Alan 6k Carol Lytle 

Shannon 6k Lane Massey 

Terri 6k Otis Morrow 

Jan's Sport Shack 

Mark 6k Naomi Phillips 

Schmidt Jewelers 

Mr. 6k Mrs. Bill Sheldon 

Winfield Consumer 

David 6k Tracy Trent 

Sonic 

Dr. Bob 6k Sue Yoachim 

COWLEY FRIEND 

($175-$299) 

Abbey Eye Care 

Jerri and Sid Achenbach 

Bob 6k Pat Anstine 

Larry 6k Rose Anstine 

Steve 6k Pam Archer 

Mr. 6k Mrs. Albert Bacastow 

Puritan Billiard Parlor 

Jane Blasi 

Kent 6k Barbara Booher 

Allen, Gibbs 6k Houlik, L.C. 

Marshall 6k Doris Brenrlinger 

Don 6k Sharon Buell 

Darrel 6k Mary Burroughs 

Leroy 6k Sheri Call 

Marlys 6k Jose Cervantes 

Don 6k Velma Cheslic 

Country Mart 

Chris 6k John Clemente 

Edward D. Jones 6k Co. 

Tony 6k Vicki Crouch 

Bruce 6k Amy Crouse 

Kenneth 6k Beth Czaplinski 

Dave 6k Carol Daulton 

Vince DeGrado III 

Divall Liquor 

Brown's Office Supply 

David 6k Jennifer Faust 

Ken 6k Bonnie Gilmore 

ADM Milling 

Slade 6k Terri Griffiths 

Mr. 6k Mrs. Ed Hargrove 

Westlake Ace Hardware 

Melissa 6k Richard Hollister 

Mildred Johnston 

Two Rivers Coop 

Mary Kerr 

Mr. 6k Mrs. Charles Kinzie 



J 6k J Wholesale Sports 
Mr. 6k Mrs. J.C. Louderback 
Jay 6k Carrie Mapel 
Twin Rivers Dev. Support 
Turn of the Century Enter- 
prise 

Danny 6k Judy Mitchell 
Don 6k Sharon Moore 
Scott 6k Kathy Morris 
Munson Insurance Agency 
Shayla McDonald 
Sally 6k David Palmer 
Bill 6k Julie Perdue 
Delbert 6k Deloris Peters 
Pfaff Chevrolet 
Joe 6k Mary Ann Phillips 
L.G. Pike Construction Co. 
Winfield Motors 
Alumni Bar 6k Grill 
James 6k Sylvia Reed 
Mike 6k Sharon Robinson 
Nick 6k Christie Rogers, DDS. 
Paul N. Rogers, DDS, PA 
Mr. David 6k Deborah 
Schaller 

Larry 6k Wanda Schwintz 
Don 6k Peggy Shanks 
Success 

Ark City Chamber of Com- 
merce 

Pam 6k Randy Smith 
Merle Snider GM Center 
Samford Stover Agency 
Dane 6k Alycia Straight 
Ron 6k Jennie Straight 
John 6k Lee Ann Sturd 
Ronnie 6k Patsy Sweely 
Taylor Drug 
Watkins Family Dentistry 

CENTURY CLUB ($100- 

$174) 

Wayne Ammerman 

Larry Anderson 

Mr. David Andreas 

Super 8 Motel 

Frank Arnold 

Mr. 6k Mrs. Joe Avery 

Heather 6k Troy Barker 

Larry 6k Tammy Bartelson 

Mel Brown SR. 

Brock 6k Jessica Buckingham 

Scott Camien 

Connie 6k Joe Carder 

Kipp T Clark 

Keith 6k Nancy Cole 

Katrina Colwell 

Sid 6k Helen Colwell 

D 6k S Auto Supply 

Rae 6k Jim Dale 

Dr. Bryan Dennett 

State Farm Insurance 

Virginia Donaldson 



Judy Drongoski 
Terry Eaton 
Mike 6k Therese Fluty 
Galaxie Business 6k Equip. 
Ark Valley Credit Union 
Larry Hargrove 
Carol 6k Steve Hearne 
Traver's Furniture 6k Carpet 
Gary Hockenbury 
Ray 6k Kathy Howell 
Ellen Kelly 
Stu 6k Betsy Luder 
Great Plains Quality Manage- 
ment 

Scott 6k Rhoda MacLaughlin 
Ronald 6k Carolyn McKeaigg 
Charles McKown 
Meiers Tax Accounting 
Ark Valley Physical Therapy 
Soccer Zone 
Patty 6k Greg Mugler 
Shelter Insurance 
Jason 6k Shannon O'Toole 
Sherwin Williams 
Libby Palmer 
Sandra Parks 
Rama Peroo 
Graves Drug #11 
City of Winfield 
Roger 6k Joanne Pridey 
Joanna 6k Nathan Pryor 
Mr. 6k Mrs. Sid Regnier 
Arky 6k Eva Reyez 
Bud Riley Heat 6k Air 
Ruppelius Fine Jewelers 
Dick 6k Patricia Schumacher 
Ark City Traveler 
Kristi 6k Brian Shaw 
Mindi 6k Joe Shriver 
Fit Zone 

Dr. Dan 6k Vicki Snowden 
Justin 6k Emily Sparks 
Ron Steiner 

Judy 6k Roger Sternberger 
Janice 6k Tid Stover 
Brylee Sturd 
Winfield Chiropractic 
Collision 2 Custom 
Mike 6k Suzanne Unruh 
State Farm Insurance 
Chris Vollweider 
City of Arkansas City 
Bruce Watson 
Rev. James Watson 
Karolee 6k Joe Weller 
Sunflower Screen printing 
Peggy Williams 

OTHER DONORS 

Marcus Adler 
Jody 6k Rod Arnett 
Buel D. Beck 
Shane 6k Lori Broyles 



Day's Monument Co. 

Jeff Fluty 

Marvis 6k Jim Gaddie 

Belva Gardner 

Double Eagle Fire Arm Inc. 

Lisa 6k David Grose 

Ashley Hale 

Lynne Jordan 

La Fiesta 

Beverly 6k Zac Manuszak 

Daisy Mae's Cafe 

Jim's Total Service 

Scott 6k Heather Munson 

Melinda 6k Mark Neal 

April 6k Jason Nittler 

Mark 6k Nanette Potter 

Greendoor LaFamilia 

Reedy Ford Inc. 

A Break From Reality 

Larry Swaim 

Joe's Barber Shop 

Roger White 

Paul 6k Jodi Wilson 



The Cowley 

College 

Endowment 

Association 

would like 

to thank 

you! 




report | 25 



Soccer programs take to the field 



I ,-",'■: It months after deciding to 
form men and women's soccer teams 
at Cowley College, the squads par- 
ticipated in their inaugural seasons. 
Not long after announcing the 
decision to add the soccer programs, 
Cowley athletic director Tom Saia 
went searching for a head coach. He 
found that person in Roberto Dos 
Santos, who had spent the previous 
seven seasons as the head men's soc- 
cer coach at Southwestern College in 
Winfield. 

The opportunity to lead the new soc- 
cer programs at Cowley excited Dos 
Santos, however, he also knew there 
would he challenges. 
"It was overwhelming at first because 
we got started late in the recruiting 
season," Dos Santos said. "However, 
once we got started, we were able 
to identify some talented players. 
Overall, we were able to recruit some 
talented athletes." 

The Tigers' signed 19 men and 13 women 
to round out the squads. 
"The kids we recruited liked the idea of 
the challenge involved in starting a new 
program," Dos Santos said. 
Helping Dos Santos with the recruiting 
process was Dane Straight, who spent 
the previous four seasons as the head 
men and women's soccer coach at Cloud 
County Community College. Straight will 
head into the 2009 season as the women's 
head soccer coach and men's assistant 
coach. 

Dos Santos and Straight were team- 
mates at Bethany College and helped the 
Swedes capture the KCAC title in 1993. 
"It's exciting to be a part of a new pro- 
gram and to have so much support from 
the school," Straight said. "We have got 
a great set up and have the facilities to 
compete." 

The soccer teams play their home games 
at the Tiger Track and Field/Soccer 
complex, located at 223 Pierce in Arkan- 
sas City. There are 12 women's soccer 
programs and 1 1 men's soccer programs 
in the Jayhawk Conference. 
Johnson County and Barton County 
are considered among the top teams on 
the men's side, while Johnson County, 
Butler, and Hutchinson are contenders 

26 | report 




on the women's side. 

"We know we are underdogs, but we hope 
to outwork and outwit our opponents," 
Dos Santos said. 

Dos Santos and Straight worked extreme- 
ly hard to get things ready for the Tigers' 
inaugural soccer season. 
"We have had overwhelming support 
from the college and the community," 
Dos Santos said. "This has helped get us 
on the right track and has given us extra 
stamina to keep on working hard." 
The Tiger soccer teams had successful 
first seasons as the women's team won 
eight games and the men's team pulled 
off four victories. Both squads qualified 
to compete at the Region VI Playoffs in 
their first year of existence and are hoping 
for even more success in the upcoming 
season. 




Dale, Dr. Hashemi 
receive NISOD 
Excellence Awards in 
Austin (continued) 

deserving of the NISOD Master Teacher 
designation." 

Dr. Hashemi received his Master's degree 
(1967) and his Ph.D. (1970) from the 
University of Oklahoma. He was named 
an Outstanding Educator ot America 
while teaching at St. Gregory University 
in 1974, and is a member of the Ameri- 
can Association of Physics Teachers, the 
National Audubon Society, and SIGMA 
Xl-the Scientific Research Society. 
He has had his work published in several 
respected publications. 
"I was greatly honored because a panel of 
experts review the work thoroughly before 
deciding to publish it," Dr. Hashemi said. 
He feels fortunate to be named a recipient 
of the Excellence Award from NISOD. 
"I was surprised and greatly honored," Dr. 
Hashemi said. "All the faculty at Cowley 
are well deserving and are doing a great 
job." 



Cowley College finishes fourth in 
NAT YCAA Cup standings 

C 



'ontinuing to achieve greatness in 
its athletic programs, Cowley College re- 
cently finished fourth in the NATYCAA 
(National Alliance of Two-Year College 
Athletic Administrators) Cup standings, 
which recognizes excellence in two-year 
college athletics. 

For the second time in the past three 
years, Cowley finished as the top junior 
college athletic program in the state of 
Kansas based on the standings. 
Iowa Central Community College won 
the NJCAA Scholarship Division, scoring 
158.5 points. Monroe (N.Y.) Community 
College was second with 149.5 points, 
Rend Lake (IL) Community College was 
third with 124.5 points, while Cowley 
finished fourth with 121.5 points. 
"It is a great honor to finish in the top- 
five and be the best in Kansas," Cowley 
athletic director Tom Saia said. "Our goal 
every year is to win this. Our coaches 
and athletes have set the standard for the 
future." 
Cowley finished ninth in the NATYCAA 



Cup standings in 2008 and second in 
2007. 

The NATYCAA Cup program began in 
2004 and was previously sponsored by 
Pepsi. This program recognizes excellence 
in two-year college athletics based on suc- 
cess in championship competition. 
Points for the NATYCAA Cup are calcu- 
lated based on each colleges finish at NJ- 
CAA Tournaments. Each first place finish 
is worth 20 points, second place 19, third 
18, and so on. Total scores for both men's 
and women's programs are combined for 
their total score. 

In the fall, the Lady Tiger volleyball team 
placed fifth at the national tournament. 
While, the Cowley men's cross country 
team placed fourth and the women's team 
finished tenth nationally. 
This spring, the Tiger baseball team 
placed in the top- 10 at the JUCO World 
Series, while the Lady Tiger softball team 
finished fifth at the NJCAA Division II 
national tournament. 
The Tiger men's indoor track and field 



team placed ninth, while the women's 

indoor track and field team placed tenth 

at the national meet. Cowley's women 

and men's outdoor track and field teams 

placed 19th and 21st, respectively. 

Cowley's tennis teams also had successful 

seasons as the men's team placed ninth 

and the women's team finished eighth 

nationally. 

Also performing well, but coming up just 

short of qualifying for nationals were the 

Tiger basketball and soccer teams. 

The Tiger men's basketball team won 29 

games and advanced to the Region VI 

title game before losing. While, the Lady 

Tiger basketball team won 24 games and 

advanced to the second-round of the 

Region VI Tournament. 

The Cowley soccer teams each qualified 

for the Region VI Tournament in its 

inaugural seasons. 

Saia is already looking forward to the 

2009-10 athletic seasons. 

"I look for another great year in all of our 

athletic programs," Saia said. 



Cowley students exceeding the 

on CAAP test 




W, 



ith Collegiate Assess- 
ment of Academic Profi- 
ciency (CAAP) scores being 
an important part of Cowley 
College's Performance Agree- 
ment with the Kansas Board 
of Regents, Cowley students 
are scoring above the national 
average on all three tests. 
Although graduating groups in 
summer and fall could change 
the data, Cowley is currently 
ahead of schedule in the read- 
ing, writing, and mathematics 
tests, based on targets and 
directional improvement. 
Cowley implemented the 
policy in 2005 that all stu- 
dents seeking an AA, AS, or 
AGS degree take the CAAP 
test offered by ACT during 



average 



their final semester prior to 
graduation. The CAAP test is 
a nationally recognized mea- 
surement of outcomes in core 
subject areas. 

Cowley students' scores on 
the CAAP test have risen from 
this time last year and gone up 
each year since they began the 
CAAP assessment. 
The most drastic improvement 
so far has come in the area of 
writing as Cowley was nearly 
10 percent above the target on 
the Performance Agreement. 
Cowley has also been strongly 
above average in the percent- 
age of students exceeding the 
national average in mathemat- 
ics, and above average in 
reading. 
"This is an indication of both 



student learning and faculty 
success in their teaching in 
the classroom," Cowley vice 
president of academic affairs 
Slade Griffiths said. 
The test is not only taken by 
community college students, 
it is taken by students at all 
colleges, including four-year 
universities. 

According to Charles McK- 
own, vice president of research 
and technology, the CAAP 
test would catch schools if they 
were making classes easier for 
students to pass just so they 
could graduate the students. 
"This validates our curriculum 
to some extent and proves we 
did not water it down just to 
get them through it," McKown 
said. "It is pretty impressive in 



my opinion. 

Here is the Spring 2009 

CAAP data: 

READING 

156 of 251 Cowley students 

tested exceeded the national 

average. This is 62.1%. Target 

on performance agreement is 

60.0%. 

WRITING 

163 of 251 Cowley students 

tested exceeded the national 

average. This is 64.9%. Target 

on performance agreement is 

55.0%. 

MATHEMATICS 

190 of 251 Cowley students 

tested exceeded the national 

average. This is 75.7%. Target 

on performance agreement is 

72.5%. 

report | 27 




[LSS7 



www. cowley. edu/cc 

125 South 2nd Street, P.O. Box 1 147 
Arkansas City. KS B7D05 



Nonprofit Org. 

U.S. Postage 

PAID 

Wichita, KS 
Permit No. 23 



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JA/ichita - Westside~Center (offers online courses and advising) - 316.722.278> 
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Mulvane - Career and Technical Education Center 
Winfield - Allied Health Center - 620H 




THE PRESIDENTS ANNUAL REPORT 




COLLEG 




i 



2009-2010 




i 



STUDENT OF THE YEAR 



TIGER ATHLETICS 

SECOND IN NATYCAA CUP STANDINGS 




www.cowley.edi 



THE PRESIDENTS ANNUAL 




2. OVERVIEW 



1 0. Physics Lab 



18. Student of the Year 



3. Dr. McAtee 

4. Administration 

5. Board of Trustees 

6. Core Values 

7. Accreditation 

8. Outstanding Tiger 
Alumni 

9. New Century Scholar/ 
Students of the Month 

2 | report 



1 1 . Paul Stirnaman 
Award 



19. Student of the Year/ 
NATYCAA 



1 2. Athletic Hall of Fame 20-2 1 . Athletic Roundup 



13. Enrollment 

14. 2+2 Partnership 

15. NISOD Excellence 
Awards 

1 6. Endowed Chair 

1 7. Years of Service 



22. Who We Serve/ 
Budget 

23-25. Boosters 

26. Award of Excellence/ 
Hall of Fame 

27. Outstanding Tiger 
Alumni/ New Century 
Scholar/ Donation 



Welcome to the 2009-10 edition of 
the President's Annual Report 

I 



'm very proud to tell you that the past 
academic year was one filled with many 
outstanding student accomplishments, 
faculty and staff awards, and growth and 
improvement in many areas of the college. 
Our students never cease to amaze me. 
Some are just naturally gifted individuals 
who achieve at the highest level and aspire 
to be highly skilled professionals in their 
chosen career. Others sacrifice time with 
their families to gain new skills or finish 
a degree to become more employable in 
today's competitive job market. 

"Cowley's goal 
is to take care 
of its students, 
regardless of 
their place in 
life/' 

Sometimes we fail, and for that I apolo- 
gize. But, I can tell you that Cowley em- 
ployees want every student to experience 
success. How that success is measured 
depends on the individual. 
Ali Nittler from Arkansas City is our 
2009-10 Student of the Year. What a 
smart and driven young woman! The 
accounting major was the school's Sep- 
tember Student of the Month and was 
crowned Queen Alalah LXXV1II. 
Director of Academic Preparation for the 
Humanities Department, Amy McWhirt, 
was selected as the seventh recipient of 
the Endowed Chair for Teaching Excel- 
lence and Student Learning. While, 
Natural Science Department Instructor 
Greg Nichols was the recipient of the Paul 
Stirnaman Memorial Award for Teaching 
Excellence. 

The college has grown significantly during 
my 24 years as president. We have opened 
two Centers in Wichita since May, 2008, 
and have also added a new dormitory on 
our main campus in Arkansas City. 
The college also added men and women's 




soccer programs during the 2008-09 academic year. 

This report includes many other wonderful highlights from the past year. I invite you 

to read through it carefully. It is my hope that it will give you a better understanding of 

what Cowley is all about and the direction we're heading. 

On behalf of our Board of Trustees, my fellow administrators, our faculty, staff and 

students, I want to thank you for your support of Cowley County Community College. 

It means a great deal to me. The college has always been a viable entity within Arkansas 

City, Cowley County, and south-central Kansas. We will do our very best to keep it that 

way. 



Sincerely, 



(fait, fteatir 



Patrick J. McAtee, Ph.D 



report | 3 



9 9 





Tony Crouch 

Executive Vice President 
of Business Services 




Tom Saia 

Athletic Director 



Charles McKown 

Vice President 
of Research and Technology 



Sue Saia 

Vice President 
of Student Affairs 



4 | report 



j 



&£fr**&\ 0fr V *"£€&/&&& 




Lee Gregg, Jr. 





Ron Godsey 



Mark Paton 



Albert Bacastow, Jr. 



Bacastow, Jr. named Chairman of 
Board of Trustees 



lbert Bacastow, Jr. was named the 
Chairman of Cowley College's Board 
of Trustee's during the school's regular 
monthly meeting held Monday, July 19 in 
the McAtee Dining Center. 
Bacastow, Jr. has served the majority of 
the past 25 years on the college's Board 
of Trustees. He graduated from Arkansas 
City High School and is a 1965 graduate 
of Arkansas City Junior College (now 
Cowley College). Bacastow, Jr. went on to 
receive a business administration degree 
from Southwestern College. He is a re- 



tired Winfield postmaster and will begin 
his fourth term as Chairman of the Board 
of Trustees. 

Officers elected for the upcoming year: 
Chairman, Albert Bacastow, Jr.; vice chair- 
man, Lee Gregg, Jr.; Kansas Association 
of Community College Trustees voting 
delegate, Donna Avery; Association of 
Community College Trustees voting del- 
egate, Ron Godsey; Board representative 
for professional negotiations and to open 
bids received for college purchases, Mark 
Paton; trustee designated as the Board 
representative to the College Endowment 



Association, Dennis K. Shurtz. 
The Board also appointed Libby Palmer 
as clerk of the Board, Tony Crouch as 
treasurer of the Board, and David An- 
dreas as Board attorney. 
The Board designated RCB Bank, Union 
State Bank, CornerBank, Sunflower 
Bank/Wichita, and Carson Bank in 
Mulvane as official depositories. The 
Board also designated the Arkansas City 
Traveler and Winfield Daily Courier tor 
publication of official notices, and kept 
the Board meeting time at 6:15 p.m. on 
the third Monday of every month. 

report | 5 



CORE VALUES 



Cowley County Community College and Area Vocational-Technical School is dedicated to the continual pursuit of excellence by 
embracing our Core Values, the fundamental principles that guide our actions. 

People 

* We emphasize the importance of human relationships, diversity, and a sense of community. 

* We provide student-centered instruction. 

* We provide a safe, learning environment where joy, humor, and teamwork are embraced. 

* We encourage open communication and the sharing of ideas. 

Leadership 

* We provide a positive atmosphere that fosters personal and professional growth. 

* We empower students and employees to be innovative and visionary. 

* We are an ethical leader in the field of education. 

Integrity 

* We regard honesty, trust, and respect as essential principles in our academic, personal and professional standards. 

Accountability 

* Our students will receive a quality education. 

* The College will provide students the opportunity to take an active role in their success. 

* All employees are responsible and committed to excellence. 

* We are accountable to the community to educate students and to sustain and improve society. 



MISSI ON STATEMENT 



Cowley College and Area Vocational-Technical School is committed to learning excellence and personal enrichment in an open 
access environment. 



■EMEIMT OF INSTITUTIONAL PURPOSE 

We are committed to maintaining a quality institution by meeting and exceeding the expectations of customers through the 
following: 



Academic and 
Personal Enrichment: 

The college will provide accessible cur- 
ricula in an environment that promotes 
individual growth and personal enrich- 
ment. 



Support Services: 



Community 
Development: 

The college will foster development of 
the community through public service 
programs and partnerships with business 
and industry. 



Fiscal Soundness: 



The college will facilitate academic growth ~, ,, .,, . , 

. . . , 1 he college will secure financial support 

and the development of life skills. 



6 | report 



from various resources and maintain a 
financially stable institution. 



Ethics: 

The college will emphasize a sense of 
fairness, citizenship, and tolerance for the 
views of others. 




Cowley gains accreditation to 
off er f ull online degrees 



T 



hanks to the efforts of numerous 
individuals and departments, Cowley 
College has become one of only a few 
community colleges in the state of Kansas 
to gain accreditation to offer full online 
degrees. 

"This was really a team effort, it took a lot 
of different steps and people to make this 
a reality," Slade Griffiths, Cowley College 
vice president of academic affairs said. 
"This provides external validation and 
credibility to our online programs." 
The college gained online degree accredi- 
tation through the Higher Learning Com- 
mission of the North Central Association 
of Colleges and Schools. 
"Now that we have been accredited by 
North Central for a full online degree 
program it will allow us to more effec- 



tively serve this segment of our student 
population," Cowley College president 
Dr. Patrick J. McAtee said. "We are 
delighted North Central recognizes that 
we have a quality online program and 
has confidence in Cowley to offer a full 
associates degree." 

Online classes make educational opportu- 
nities available no matter where a person 
lives or how busy they may be. 
"This will allow students an opportunity 
to enter higher education and earn a 
degree on their own timeline," Griffiths 
said. 

Griffiths, who was actively involved in 
helping the college gain accreditation to 
offer full online degrees, praised the work 
done by several Cowley employees, includ- 
ing that of the AQ1P 6 team as well as 



Tiffany Sowa, Chris Cannon, Julie Rora- 
baugh, Eddie Andreo, Charles McKown, 
Clinton Marlow, and Ben Schears. 
The college will continue to develop ad- 
ditional online degrees and will look into 
entering into the online technical educa- 
tion field as well. Cowley will also begin 
advertising the opportunity to earn online 
degrees both nationally and internation- 
ally. 

"Students can earn a degree without hav- 
ing to ever step foot on campus," Charles 
McKown, Cowley College vice president 
of research and technology said. 
For more information about the online 
degree programs that Cowley College has 
to offer, contact an admissions representa- 
tive at 620-441-5594. 




Mildred Johnston named 

Outstanding Tiger Alumnus 

R. 



recognized for her many contribu- 
tions to Cowley College and her service 
to the community, Mildred (Milly) John- 
ston was recently named the recipient of 
the Outstanding Tiger Alumnus Award 
for 2010. 

Johnston moved to Arkansas City from 
Clearwater in 1944. She went on to grad- 
uate from Ark City High School in 1945 
and Ark City Junior College in 1947. 
Back when Johnston attended ACJC, the 
college was housed in the basement of 
Arkansas City High School. During that 
time, Johnston was among the individuals 
that handed out flyers with information 
talking about getting the college moved 
out of the basement of the high school. 
A few years later that would become a 
reality when the school moved to its cur- 
rent location of 125 South Second St. in 
Arkansas City. 

Johnston went on to do substitute teach- 
ing for USD 470 for more than 10 years 
thanks to the education she received at 
ACJC. 

"When I think of being listed as an 
Outstanding Alumnus it is kind of over- 
whelming," Johnston said. 
She married Hubert Johnston in 1947. 
They had three children: Nan Schaper, 
Olathe; Kay Thomas, Edmond, OK; and 
Gevan Johnston, who is deceased. Hubert 
passed away in 2007. 

All three of her children received degrees 
from Cowley College and were active at 
the school. Hubert also took classes at the 
college in 1959. 

"My husband (Hubert) and I have always 
supported the college, it meant a lot for 
our kids to go here," Johnston said. 
Mildred and Hubert received the Cow- 
ley County Community College Tiger 
Booster Club Award in 2000. The couple 
attended numerous Cowley College base- 
ball and softball games, and even went to 
Grand Junction, Colo, on two different 
occasions to cheer on the Tiger baseball 
team at the JUCO World Series. 
Now, Johnston can be seen at each of the 
Tigers' home basketball games. 
Thanks to a generous donation to the 
college's Endowment Association, the 
8 | report 




Mildred Johnston, Class of 1947, is always eager to lend a helping hand. 



Hubert and Mildred Johnston Endowed 

Fund was started in February 2009. 

"I am so proud of the school," Johnston 

said. 

Johnston began volunteering at Medi- 

calodge East where her mother, Marie 

Freese, was a resident. Since then she has 

volunteered at numerous organizations. 

"I am so glad I started doing volunteer 

work, I am happy to help out," Johnston 

said. 

Johnston has been a volunteer for the 

American Cancer Society for 29 years. 

During that time, she has been a certified 

Reach to Recovery volunteer and touched 



the lives of many newly diagnosed breast 
cancer patients. She also assisted with the 
Relay for Life event for 10 years. 
She has been a member of the American 
Legion Auxiliary for 66 years; the Ark 
City Tennis Association for 35 years, 
serving several years as treasurer; the 
SCKRMC Auxiliary for 23 years, serving 
as gift shop manager; and as a volunteer , 
at Medicalodge East for 23 years. 
She has previously been a volunteer for 
the American Red Cross, making lap 
robes and assisting with the blood drives. 

Continued on page 27 



Aubrey Lyman named a 
New Century Scholar 

A 



the top-scoring student (based on 
scores received in the All-USA competi- 
tion) from the state of Kansas, Cowley 
College sophomore Aubrey Lyman was 
selected as a New Century Scholar. 
Lyman received a $2,000 stipend and was 
recognized at the American Association of 
Community Colleges Convention, April 
17-19, in Seattle, Washington. 
The New Century Scholars program is 
sponsored annually by the American 
Association of Community Colleges, The 
Coca-Cola Foundation, the Coca-Cola 
Scholars Foundation, and Phi Theta 
Kappa. 

At Cowley, Lyman was involved in Phi 
Theta Kappa, KNEA (Kansas National 
Education Association), PAWS (Peers Ad- 
vocating Wellness for Students), was the 
president of ACES (Academic Civic 
Continued on page 27 




Aubrey Lyman is presented a certificate from Cowley College president 
Patrick J. McAfee after being selected as a New Century Scholar. 




fotr/ewfo if^£/i& ^/f£€wwfi< 






Ali Nittler 

September 2009 



Ashley Spencer 

October 2009 



Phuong Huynh 

November 2009 



Robin Ray 

December 2009 







Jamie Blackim 

January 2010 



Christine Logan 

February 2010 



Aaron Brooks 

March 2010 



B.J. Misialek 

April 2010 

report | 9 






II 



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\AM 



Ffo 



AN 



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cs lab remodel completed 



T, 



he physics lab project at Cowley Col- 
lege was completed in December, 2009. 
The remodel provides new work stations 
for students, including sinks and natural 
gas. It also added storage and an emer- 
gency shower. 

More than $61,000 was raised to help 
fund the project, while ARRA funds were 
used to finish the project. 
"The improvement is huge, it will be obvi- 
ous to the students what has been done," 
said Tony Crouch, Cowley College's ex- 
ecutive vice president of business services. 
"Now this is a physics lab!" 



As part of the project, some plumbing 
work at the west end of Galle-Johnson 
needed to be done. The plumbing work 
allowed the restrooms at the band room 
entrance to once again be functional. 
Conco Construction did work on the 
project as did Winfield Plumbing and 
Graham Electric. 

"Those guys were great to work with as 
always," Crouch said. 
Students put the physics lab to good use 
in the spring semester. 




10 | report 



Nichols receives Stirnaman Award 

In his 11th year as an instructor in 
Cowley College's Natural Science 
Department, Greg Nichols continues to 
challenge his students to be the best they 
can be. His dedication to his profession 
did not go unnoticed as he was awarded 
the Paul Stirnaman Memorial Award for 
Teaching Excellence during Cowley Col- 
lege's Back to School In-Service held Aug. 
13, 2009 in the Earle N. Wright Commu- 
nity Room. 

Along with teaching math classes at Cow- 
ley, Nichols is the president of the Cowley 
Education Association and is a sponsor 
for the college's Academic Excellence 
Challenge team. 



MM 



my peers 
recognize my 
dedication 
to the 
profession," 

"Greg is deserving of this award because 
of his active involvement and leadership 
in CEA (Cowley Education Association) 
as president," Cowley College vice presi- 
dent of academic affairs Slade Griffiths 
said. "He truly cares about faculty and 
student learning and I am pleased to see 
him receive this award." 
The award is named for Paul Stirnaman, 
a long-time Social Science Department 
instructor and strong supporter of the 
College Education Association. He died 
June 16, 2000, following a lengthy illness. 
In past years, Nichols has served as a 
sponsor for the Math and Science Club 
and Campus Christian Fellowship. He 
began working at Cowley the final year 
that Stirnaman taught at the school. 
"All of the people that knew Paul knew 
how extremely dedicated he was to his 
students and fellow faculty members," 
Nichols said. "It's a great honor, to win 
this award means my peers recognize my 
dedication to the profession. I put my 
heart and soul into my teaching. There 
are a lot of deserving instructors that I 
strive to be like." 

Nichols received his bachelors degree 
from the University of Oklahoma and 




Greg Nichols, Natural Science Department instuctor, was named the 
recipient of the Paul Stirnaman Memorial Award for Teaching Excellence. 



earned a masters degree in mathematics 
from Emporia State University. 
He has high expectations for his students 
as he wants them to have an easy transi- 
tion when they leave Cowley. 
"I take pride in seeing my former students 
go on to be successful," Nichols said. "I 
try to prepare students for what they will 
encounter when they leave here." 
Prior to coming to Cowley, Nichols was 
an adjunct instructor at Butler Commu- 
nity College. He also taught two years at 
El Dorado High School and one year at 
Ness City High School. 
He and his wife, Melissa, have three chil- 
dren, Samantha 16, Isaac 12, and Gabriel 
five months. 




xy; 



TT 



th class inducted into Tiger 
hlftk Hall of Fame _ 




Pictured from left, Tim Shartahan, Harold Barse (accepted the award for Francis Browning Pipestem), 
Kristi "Buggy" (Davis) Loney, and Dave Burroughs. 



H. 



.all of Fame inductees recognized 
for their contributions to Cowley College 
athletics, Dave Burroughs, Tim Shana- 
han, Kristi "Buggy" (Davis) Loney and 
Francis Browning Pipestem were inducted 
into the Tiger Athletic Hall of Fame on 
February 6. Pipestem was inducted into 
the Tiger Athletic Hall of Fame posthu- 
mously. 

The new inductees were treated to a 
social gathering Friday night in the 
college's Earle N. Wright Community 
Room as well as a luncheon on Saturday. 
The induction ceremony took place at 
half time of the Tiger men's basketball 
game against Independence Community 
College. 

The Tiger Athletic Hall of Fame began in 
2000 and currently has 57 members. 
Burroughs is the second winningest coach 
in Cowley College sports history. He 
helped guide the Tiger baseball team to 
back-to-back J U CO World Series titles in 
1997 and 1998, and has won 868 games 
in 22 seasons as head coach. 
The Cowley College baseball team has 
captured three of the last four Jayhawk 
East titles and 1 3 of the past 16 confer- 
ence championships. Burroughs' teams 

12 | report 



have qualified for two of the last four 
JUCO World Series tournament's played 
in Grand Junction, CO as he has been 
named the Jayhawk East coach of the year 
three of the past four seasons. 
Shanahan was an All-American member 
of the Cowley College men's tennis team, 
which won the school's first national 
championship in 1989. He also teamed 
to win the NJCAA doubles title in 1989. 
As a sophomore at Cowley, Shanahan 
helped the Tiger tennis team place third 
nationally. 

He went on to earn All-Conference hon- 
ors while playing tennis at Oklahoma City 
University. Following graduation from 
OCU, Shanahan went on to become a 
highly successful women's tennis coach 
at the school. He was named the Sooner 
Athletic Conference Coach of the Year/ 
NAIA Region 6 Coach of the Year from 
1994-2002. He was also named the ITA/ 
Wilson NAIA Women's National Coach 
of the Year in 1996 and 1999. 
Shanahan has been the head tennis 
professional at Greens Country Club in 
Oklahoma City since 2003. 
Loney was the first dominant player in 
the softball program's successful history. 



She was a two-time All-Conference and 
All-Region VI performer at Cowley. Dur- 
ing the 1986 season, Loney led the nation 
in wins (28) and helped the Lady Tigers 
win the Region VI championship. Cowley 
went 55-16 in her two years at the school 
and captured back-to-back conference 
titles. 

Her 28 victories in 1986 stood as a school- 
record for 14 years, while Loney's 39 
career wins was the most in the program's 
history until 1998, and her 218 strikeouts 
remained a school-record until 1999. 
She has since worked in the Critical Care 
Unit at Wichita's Wesley Medical Center, 
and is currently working as a registered 
nurse at the South Central Kansas Re- 
gional Medical Center in Arkansas City. 
Pipestem was an All-American offensive 
and defensive tackle for the Arkansas City 
Junior College football team during the 
1961 season. He played on two success- 
ful teams, which were coached by fellow 
Tiger Athletic Hall of Fame inductee, Ben 
Cleveland. 

ACJC went 7-4 during the 1961 season 
and did even better in Pipestem's second 
year at the school as the Tigers went 8-3 
Continued on page 26 



Cowley College surpasses last 
year's total enrollment 



N, 



early two weeks prior to the start of 
the fall semester and Cowley College had 
already passed last year's total of students 
enrolled. Compared to last year on Aug. 
6, each one of Cowley's Centers has seen 
an increase in enrollment. 
The total FTE (full time equivalency) 
for the college on Aug. 6, 2010 stood at 
2,778, an increase of 409 FTE from this 
same date a year ago. 
"I'm excited to see such strong enroll- 
ment numbers for the fall semester," Ben 
Schears, Executive Director of Enroll- 
ment and Outreach Centers at Cowley 
College, said. "The advisors at each of 
our locations have been tremendously 
busy getting students enrolled in classes, 
financial aid has been working hard to 
help the students with funding to pay for 
classes, and our student life office has 
been spending countless days this sum- 
mer providing small group orientations 



to the new students. All across campus 
everyone has been pitching in to get ready 
for the fall semester." 

The largest increase is seen in the college's 
on-line enrollment. Last year at this time 
there were a total of 650 FTE, while this 
year, there is nearly 900 FTE. 
The college's Bloomenshine Center in 
Mulvane has almost 100 more FTE (584- 
491) from this time last year, while the 
school's Allied Health Center in Winfield 
already has more FTE (56) than they have 
ever had. 

On the main campus in Arkansas City, 
enrollment was already at 1,146 and on 
pace for one of the largest on campus en- 
rollments in school history. Also, all five 
dormitories are tilled to capacity. Howev- 
er, students can be put on a waiting list in 
the event a dorm room becomes available. 
The addition of two enrollment centers in 
Wichita over the past couple of years has 
helped the college become more visible 
and has given potential students a way to 
find out more about the school. 



This, along with planned extended enroll- 
ment hours in the admissions office, 
played a large role in the boost in enroll- 
ment. 

"It's been exciting to see the energy and 
cooperation from across the college as we 
gear up for this coming semester," Schears 
said. 

Along with the college's main campus in 
Arkansas City, Cowley has two centers 
in Mulvane, two enrollment centers in 
Wichita, and its Allied Health Center in 
Winfield. To find out more information 
on how to enroll go to www.cowley.edu or 
call (620) 442-0430 to speak to an admis- 
sions representative. 





report | 13 



partnership with Kansas 
University developed 




I 



n the fall of 2009, Cowley College 
established a new 2+2 partnership with 
Kansas State University. This partnership 
allows students at Cowley to earn their 
associate degrees at the school and then 
transfer credits to complete a Kansas State 
bachelor's degree through distance educa- 
tion without leaving their community. 
Cowley College became one of the first 
schools in the south central Kansas area 
to develop a 2+2 partnership with K-State. 
"KState is pleased to establish this part- 
nership with Cowley County Community 
College," said Sue C. Maes, dean of con- 
tinuing education at K-State. "Through 
the partnership, we can enhance the 
services, access and opportunity that 
both the community college and K-State 
can provide for Kansans to complete 
their bachelor's degrees in south central 
Kansas." 

Signing the 2+2 agreements between Cow- 
ley College and Kansas State University 

14 | report 



will allow students to complete a Bachelor 
of Science degree in General Business 
or a Bachelor of Science in Technology 
Management. 

The five programs at Cowley College 
included in the agreement are: Account- 
ing, Business Administration, Computer 
Forensics, Web Design and Criminal 
Justice. 

"This is a great opportunity for the 
students at Cowley College," said Beverly 
Grunder, Chair of Cowley College's 
Business, Computer and Information 
Technology Department/Director of Busi- 
ness and Industry. "It provides another 
avenue for them to complete their educa- 
tion without having to leave the area. We 
appreciate the opportunity to work with 
K-State University on this endeavor." 
Those pictured are, front row from left, 
Sue C. Maes, Dean of Continuing Educa- 
tion, K-State; Cowley College President 
Dr. Patrick J. McAtee; and Beverly 
Grunder, Department Chair, Business, 



Computer, and Information Technology/ 
Director of Business and Industry. And 
back row, from left, Don Von Bergen, 
Department Head of Arts, Science, and 
Business, K-State at Salina; Jennifer Pfort- 
miller, Affiliate Site Manager, K-State; 
Bethany Stewart, instructor in Cowley 
College's Business/Computer and Infor- 
mation Technology Department; Slade 
Griffiths, Cowley College Vice President 
of Academic Affairs; Sarah Mathews, Ac- 
counting instructor; Rae Dale, Business 
Technology instructor; and Ron Jackson, 
Program Coordinator, K-State. 




Hays, Nichols honored at NISOD 
international Conference 

Re 



.ecognized for their outstanding ac- 
complishments in the field of higher edu- 
cation, Cowley College instructors David 
Hays and Greg Nichols recently received 
Excellence Awards from the National 
Institute for Staff and Organizational 
Development in Austin, Texas during 
the annual International Conference on 
Teaching and Leadership Excellence held 
May 30-June 2. 

Nichols, who recently finished his 11th 
year as a mathematics instructor in the 
Natural Science Department, also serves 
as a sponsor for the college's Academic 
Excellence Challenge Team, which tied 
for second place at the state competition. 
While, Hays has spent the past seven 
years as a mathematics instructor in the 
Natural Science Department and served 
as a sponsor for the Chess Club. 
Cowley College vice president of aca- 
demic affairs, Slade Griffiths, praised the 
work done by Nichols and Hays. 
"Both Greg and David have been very 
strong teachers at the college," Griffiths 



said. "Greg is a great instructor that does 
a good job helping the students learn. 
David is also a wonderful teacher that has 
devoted his life to helping students." 
Nichols was unable to attend the confer- 
ence due to his wife, Melissa, recently 
giving birth to the couple's fourth child. 
Joining Hays at the conference were Slade 
Griffiths; Natural Science Department 
Chair, Michelle Schoon; Humanities 
Department instructor, Amy McWhirt; 
Career and Technical Education Depart- 
ment Chair, Bob Moffatt; director of 
journalism, Meg Smith; and Humanities 
Department Chair, Marlys Cervantes. 
Smith and Cervantes served as present- 
ers at the conference. The title of their 
presentation was "Crossing Over Inter- 
disciplinary options for higher education 
classrooms." 

"They did a phenomenal job," Griffiths 
said. "This will help other colleges start 
new programs that we have found to be 
very successful here at Cowley." 
Smith and Cervantes were already doing 
a cross curricular assignment with creative 



writing and digital photography so it 
seemed like the perfect fit at the right 
time. 

"Putting the presentation together helped 
us to find ways to perfect what we are 
already working on in the classroom," 
Smith said. "Doing the research showed 
something we had already discovered: 
cross curricular, interdisciplinary and 
critical thinking not only go together, 
but they also compliment the learning 
process." 

The conference had hundreds of breakout 
sessions, which made it easy for those 
attending to find something they were 
interested in learning about. 
"I think everyone walked away more moti- 
vated and with a greater understanding of 
where we are, and where we need to be," 
Griffiths said. 

The event was capped by an awards cer- 
emony where the NISOD recipients were 
honored. 




David Hays 



Greg Nichols 




report | 15 



McWhirt named Cowley College's 
E n dowed Chair 







Pictured, from left, Slade Griffiths, vice president of academic affairs, Amy McWhirt, Cowley College's Director of 
Academic Preparation for the Humanities Department, and Community Bank president Joyce McArtor. 



Re 



recognized for her dedication to 
the teaching profession, Amy McWhirt, 
Cowley College's Director of Academic 
Preparation for the Humanities Depart- 
ment, was named the school's Endowed 
Chair during the school's In-Service held 
Aug. 12 in the Earle N. Wright Commu- 
nity Room. 

McWhirt has spent the past seven years 
at Cowley. As the Director of Academic 
Preparation, she is responsible for ensur- 
ing that the curriculum the school uses in 
their developmental English courses is the 
most effective for students. 
As Endowed Chair, McWhirt plans to 
seek out innovative practices for trans- 
forming language instruction. The mod- 
ern language student is mostly focused on 
being able to use language in real-life to 
accomplish tasks. McWhirt is interested 
in learning more about best practices 
in this area, and bringing those ideas to 
Cowley, so that she can help students bet- 
ter reach their learning goals. 
"Amy is very deserving of this honor," vice 

16 | report 



president of academic affairs, Slade Grif- 
fiths said. "What has always impressed 
me about her was her ability to bring new 
teaching theories into the classroom in an 
attempt to increase student learning. She 
is truly dedicated to her students and the 
college; I am proud to work with her." 
McWhirt has been a presenter at the 
N1SOD and NADE conferences, and has 
served on several committees at Cowley 
including: The Retention Team, Advise- 
ment Team, Orientation Team, Develop- 
mental Advising Sub-Committee, AQIP 
2-Measuring Institutional Effectiveness, 
AQIP 7-Honoring Cultural Diversity, 
and Student Success Team. She currently 
serves as a member of the AQIP Steer- 
ing Committee and chair of the AQIP 
Category 1 writing team. 
She also serves as an academic advisor 
and serves 10 to 15 students each semes- 
ter. 

"I feel very honored to be named En- 
dowed Chair," McWhirt said. "I have 
been very fortunate in my life to have 
been taught and mentored by excep- 
tional educators, most of whom are/were 



current or former teachers in Cowley 
County. I have always attempted to model 
my own teaching as a living legacy to 
them. This honor is really their honor." 
She has been the recipient of the Nation- 
al Security Exchange Program Grant to 
study in Mexico, and is currently pursu- 
ing a Master of Arts in Teaching English 
to Speakers of Other Languages/ Applied 
Linguistics degree. 

Thanks to the generous support of Cor- 
nerBank, McWhirt will receive $2,000 
a year for each of the next two years. A 
total of $500 will be used for professional 
development, while the other $1,500 is a 
cash stipend. 

"I want to thank CornerBank for their 
support of teachers and education," 
McWhirt said. "This award will allow 
me to bring innovative ideas and prac- 
tices back to Cowley and directly impact 
students-which is a wonderful way to help 
strengthen the knowledge base of our 
community." 



Cowley honors 26 employees for 
ears of service 




T 

JL v 



wenty-six Cowley College employees 
were honored for their years of service 
during a recognition ceremony in the 
Earle N. Wright Community Room 
inside the Brown Center. 
Employees were honored in five-year 
increments. 

Awards are presented annually to employ- 
ees who have worked five, 10, 15, 20, 25, 
30, 35 consecutive years. 
This year's award recipients: 
*35 years: Elvin Hatfield, Business Tech- 
nology Department instructor. 
*30 years: Joycelyn Goff, accounting co- 
ordinator; Terri Hutchinson, admissions 
secretary. 

*25 years: Deb Nittler, Social Science 
Department instructor; Larry Swaim, 
purchasing coordinator. 
*20 years: Tammy Barnaby, freight and 
supplies specialist; Darren Burroughs, 
assistant baseball coach; Marcia Cales, 
Natural Science Department secretary. 



*15 years: Jody Arnett, administrative 
assistant to the Vice President of Business 
Service; Tony Crouch, Executive Vice 
President of Business Service; Lois Samp- 
son, Humanities Department instructor; 
Michelle Schoon, Natural Science Depart- 
ment Chair. 

*10 years: Heather Allen, Director of 
Organizational Learning and Academic 
Advising; Mark Britton, registrar; Jafar 
Hashemi, Natural Science Department 
instructor; Rhoda MacLaughlin, Director 
of Library Services; Bev Manuszak, Stu- 
dent Support Services Counselor; Greg 
Nichols, Natural Science Department 
instructor; Todd Shepherd, Social Sci- 
ence Department Chair; Roy Reynolds, 
Student Life counselor. 
*5 years: Todd Clark, head women's 
basketball coach; Carl Garison, mainte- 
nance technician; Julie Kratt, Humanities 
Department instructor; Donni McClaflin, 
telephone receptionist; Jamison Rhoads, 
technical director of theater; Kathy Witte, 
accounts payable specialist. 




report 



Ali Nittler named 2009- 2010 
Cowley College Student of the Yea 

w 

V V hat a year it was for Cowley Col- 
lege sophomore Ali Nittler. Having been 
named the school's September Student 
of the Month and being crowned Queen 
Alalah LXXVIII, Nittler capped off her 
school year by being named Cowley 
College's Student of the Year during 
the school's annual Honors and Awards 
Ceremony held in the Earle N. Wright 
Community Room. 
Nittler, along with the school's other 
Student of the Month selections, were up 
for the prestigious honor of Student of 
the Year. 

"Any of the eight of us would have been 
more than deserving to get the award," 
Nittler said. "It was nice to be among 
a very elite group of students and I am 
very gracious to have been selected as the 
Student of the Year." 
A representative from each department 
at Cowley College honored students that 
have excelled during the 2009-10 academ- 
ic year during the ceremony. 
"We want to honor the students and the 

"Cowley has 
provided me 
with a very 
good base to 
build myself 
upon/' 




Recognized for her outstanding work in the classroom, Ali Nittler was 
presented a gift from Cowley College president Dr. Patrick J. McAtee after 
being named the school's Student of the Year. 

as a Tutor. Along with her other jobs, Nit- 



teachers that have helped the students 
reach their goals," Cowley College presi- 
dent Dr. Patrick J. McAtee said during the 
ceremony. 

Nittler, a business administration major 
from Arkansas City, was involved in Phi 
Theta Kappa, and actively participated 
in intramurals and other campus activi- 
ties. She was a Cowley Captain, Student 
Ambassador, Cowley Tutor and SGA 
Secretary. 

She worked two part time jobs and 
carried a full class schedule while main- 
taining a 4.0 grade point average. She is 
employed at K' an D' Pharmacy and also 



tier plans to work part time this summer 
at the Arkansas City Recreation Commis- 
sion. 

Nittler plans to transfer to Wichita 
State University in order to receive her 
bachelor's degree in Accounting. Nittler 
recently was nominated to be a Student 
Ambassador at WSU. 
"I have had a great experience at Cowley 
and am ready to go on to WSU," Nittler 
said. "Cowley has provided me with a very 
good base to build myself upon." 
Nittler grew up well connected to Cowley 
College as her mother, Deb, was the head 
volleyball coach at Cowley from 1986- 
2000 and holds the school-record for 
most career wins (389). Deb also served as 
an assistant women's basketball coach for 
five seasons during the 1980's. The head 
coach of the Tiger women's basketball 
team during those years was Deb's sister 
and Ali's aunt, Linda Hargrove, who is 



the program's all-time winningest coach 
with 316 wins. Hargrove also won 292 
games as head volleyball coach at Cowley 
prior to Deb taking over as head coach in 
1986. 

Nittler's uncle, and Linda's husband, Ed 
Hargrove, is the winningest coach in Cow- 
ley sports history, and his 947 wins rank 
him first in the nation on the National 
Junior College Athletic Association's wins 
list of active softball coaches. Hargrove 
was an all-conference football player at 
Cowley and graduated from the school in 
1967. 

She also has an aunt, Bev Manuszak, 
which serves as a Student Support 
Services counselor at Cowley. While, her 
cousin, April Nittler, is an instructor in 
the college's Natural Science Department. 
Nittler's mother, Deb, also served as 
assistant athletic director at Cowley and 
is currently an instructor in the Social 
Continued on page 19 



18 | report 



(continued) 



Science Department. Deb graduated 

from Cowley in 1975 and was involved in 

basketball, volleyball, track, tennis, SGA, 

and cheerleading while a student at the 

school. 

Award recipients: 

* Academic Excellence Challenge — 
Aaron Brooks, Stefny Cabrera, Jacob 
Fletcher, Richard Gould, and Marcus 
Whitson. 

* Kansas All State Academic Team — 
Phuong Huynh, Aubrey Lyman, Gregory 
Anderson, and Rebecca Johnson. 

* Student Ambassadors — Callie 
Barnett, Jamie Blackim, Erin Burroughs, 
Allie Crow, Mitch Hoover, Clinton Neal, 
Dayton Rodrigues, Dange' Sanders, Jory 
Custar, Titus Massey, Ashley Spencer, 
Will McKown, Chelsi Smades, Mary Jane 
Roberts, Alicia Rayl, Robin Ray, Allison 
Nittler, Cassidy Jordan, Samantha Thi- 
erne, Judy Marks, Jaclyn Blazer, and Kale 
Hamm. 

* Outstanding Student Ambassadors — 
Jory Custar and Allie Crow. 

* Student Ambassador of the Year — 
Mary Jane Roberts 

*Resident Assistants —Katie Gillmore, 
Cassidy Jordan, Tyler Hancock, Justin 
Kirchoff, Jeffrey Wejman, Jamie Blackim, 



Judy Marks, Jessica Dyer, and Mitch 
Hoover. 

* Student Government Association 
— Samantha Thieme, Jeffrey Wejman, 
Allison Nittler, and Mitch Hoover. 

* Cowley Tutors — Christine Logan 

* Derek Burroughs Award — Shane 
Parsons 

* Academic Civic Engagement through 
Service — Kiley Andes 

*Act One Drama Club — Clinton Haas 
and Mitch Hoover 

*Art and Design Club — Janet Hamil- 
ton and Landon Schmidt 

*Students Honoring All Diverse Eth- 
nicities — Phuong Hyunh 

* Fellowship of Christian Athletes — 
Jamie Blackim 

*Chess Club — Sarah Montgomery 
*College Republicans — Richard Gould 
*Creative Claws — Joanna Carson and 
Jessica Dyer 

*Film Club - Mitchell Wright 
Tnstrumental Music — Jeremiah John- 
son and Mitchell Wright 

* Kansas National Educators Associa- 
tion — Wrylie Finkle 

* Math & Science Club — Robin Ray 
*Media Club — Carly Budd, Chris 

Bales, and Richard Gould 

* Multicultural Scholars Program — 



Virdiana Sanchez and Falisha Scott 

* Peers Advocating Wellness for 
Students — Katie Gillmore and Jamie 
Blackim 

*Phi Beta Lambda — Phuong Huynh 
and Janessa Gould 

*Phi Theta Kappa — Robin Ray, 
Phuong Huynh, and Sarah Montgomery 

*Phi Theta Kappa (Mulvane) — Rebecca 
Johnson and Irona Cliver 

^Skills USA - Brandon May *Vocal 
Music — Jessica Latham 

*Allied Health Department — Saman- 
tha Troyer 

* Business, Computer and Informa- 
tion Technology Department — Phuong 
Huynh 

*Career and Technical Education 
Department — Brandon May 

*Humanities Department — Jessica 
Dyer 

*Natural Science Department — Mea- 
gan Mason 

*Social Science Department — John 
Kuffler 

*Students of the Month — AH Nittler, 
Ashley Spencer, Phuong Huynh, Robin 
Ray, Jamie Blackim, Christine Logan, 
Aaron Brooks, and B.J. Misialek. 

* Student of the Year — Ali Nittler 



Tiger athletics finish impressive 
second out of 350 schools in 
NATYCAA Cup standings 



D, 



emonstrating the incredible success 
of Cowley College athletics, the school re- 
cently finished in a tie for second among 
350 community college athletic programs 
in the NATYCAA (National Alliance of 
Two Year College Athletic Administra- 
tors) Cup standings. 
The Tigers, who tied for second with 
Monroe (NY) Community College, fin- 
ished only behind Iowa Central Commu- 
nity College in the standings and will be 
awarded $2,000 along with a trophy. 
"This is a great tribute to our coaches and 
student athletes," Cowley College athletic 
director Tom Saia said. "It also speaks 
highly about our athletic department 



that we are able to compete on a national 
level." 

The NATYCAA Cup program began in 
2004 and recognizes excellence in two- 
year college athletics based on success in 
championship competition. 
Points for the NATYCAA Cup are calcu- 
lated based on each colleges finish at NJ- 
CAA Tournaments. Each first place finish 
is worth 20 points, second place 19, third 
18, and so on. Total scores for both men's 
and women's programs are combined for 
their total score. 

During the 2009-2010 season, Cowley 
College sports teams combined for nine 
national tournament appearances, eight 
conference championships, and five 



Region VI crowns. 

Out of the nine national tournament 
appearances, the Tigers had six top-five 
finishes, including the volleyball team 
finishing as the national runner-up. 
"We are well known in the NJCAA, 
which is great for our college and the 
community," Saia said. "It's nice to be 
recognized as the top community college 
athletic program in the state of Kansas." 
This marks the second time Cowley has 
finished as the runner-up in the NATY- 
CAA Cup standings, while the Tigers 
have garnered several top- 10 finishes dur- 
ing Saia's successful reign as the school's 
athletic director. 



report | 19 



Athletic Roundup 



Men's Track 

Making last year's 21st place national finish a 
thing of the past, the Cowley College men's 
track and field team placed sixth out of 26 
teams at the NJCAA Outdoor Track and Field 
Championships in Hutchinson. 
Vondrell Harris capped his stellar sophomore 
season by finishing as the national runner-up 
in the high jump (7-0 Vi) and earned NJCAA 
second-team All-American honors. 
Sophomore Jory Custar broke the school 
record in the 800-meter prelims (1:51.73), 
while Mac Griffith eclipsed the school record 
in the decathlon (6,577 points) Both Custar 
and Griffith earned Coaches Association Ail- 
American honors for their efforts. 
The Tigers' 4x800-meter relay team of Dane 
Dewitt, T.J. Mapp, David Phillips, and Brice 
Irving ran incredible splits and finished third 
with a time of 7:44.90. The runners were 
named NJCAA Honorable Mention Ail- 
Americans. 

The large group of sophomores helped Cowley 
run its streak of indoor and outdoor confer- 
ence titles to four years in a row, and led the 
squad to an 1 1th place national finish indoors 
and the sixth place finish during the outdoor 
season. 

Women's Track 

Breaking five school records and having seven 
athletes earn NJCAA All-American honors, 
the Cowley College women's track and field 
team finished fifth at the NJCAA Outdoor 
Track and Field Championships in Hutchin- 
son. 

The Lady Tigers' fifth place finish was the 
second highest in the program's history, 
behind only the 2007 squad's third place 
finish. Cowley finished as conference and 
region champions during both the indoor and 
outdoor seasons and garnered a pair of top-five 
national finishes. 

After finishing as individual national champi- 
ons during the indoor season, Cowley sopho- 
mores Katie Gillmore and Robin Ray were 
national runner-ups at the outdoor national 
championships. Gillmore broke her own 
school record in the pole vault as she cleared 
12-7 Vi in the event. 

While, Ray (37:25.88) finished a little more 
than eight seconds behind Colby Commu- 
nity College's Scarla Nero (37:17.66) in the 
10,000-meter run despite breaking the school 
record in the event. 

Fellow sophomore Cecilia Burley joined Gill- 
more and Ray as second-team All-Americans 
by placing second in the 5,000-meter run with 
a time of 18:59.71. 

Richelle Farley capped her freshman season 
by breaking school records in the high jump 
(5-3 14) and 100-meter hurdles (14.53) at the 
national meet. 



20 | report 



Men's Tennis 

Recording its highest national finish since 
2004, when the team was competing at the 
NJCAA Division III level, the Cowley College 
men's tennis team placed sixth at the NJCAA 
Division I Men's National Tennis Champion- 
ship in Piano, Texas. 

Advancing to the title match at No. 3 singles, 
Cowley sophomore Roger White had his magi- 
cal run come to an end with a 1-6, 0-6 loss to 
Vincennes University's Simon Honegger. 
White, who came to Cowley from England, 
had a stellar performance at the national 
tournament, as he also teamed with Alex 
Dickson to advance to the quarterfinals of No. 
3 doubles. By making it to the championship 
match at No. 3 singles, White was named a 
second-team All-American. 
Cowley got region titles from Lloyd Bruce- 
Burgess at No. 1 singles, Roger White at No. 3 
singles, and Alex Dickson at No. 6 singles. 
Cowley will lose White, Bruce-Burgess, Renato 
Mendes and Felipe Pimenta to graduation. 
The Tigers will hope Joan Vails and Alex 
Dickson can build off their experience at the 
national tournament and serve as leaders on 
next season's team. 

Fellow freshman Tom Gibaud also gained 
valuable experience during the season and ac- 
companied the team on its trip to nationals. 

Women's Tennis 

Showing they are one of the top tennis 
programs in the nation, the Cowley College 
women's tennis team finished fourth out of 
31 teams at the NJCAA Division I National 
Championship held in Tucson, AZ. 
The fourth place finish tied for the second 
highest finish in the program's history, behind 
only the 2002 squad's third place finish, which 
was achieved while playing at the NJCAA Divi- 
sion III level. 

At the national tournament, Cowley was led 
by its top-two singles players, Adrijana Pavlovic 
and Jessica Montemayor, as both players ad- 
vanced to the semifinals before losing. 
Montemayor also teamed with Brittney Laner 
to advance to the semifinals at No. 2 doubles 
before being eliminated by a doubles team 
from Tyler. 

Led by its seven sophomores, Cowley made it 
back-to-back Region VI titles by finishing well 
ahead of second place Johnson County at the 
region tournament. 

Adrijana Pavlovic, Jamie Blackim, Natalia 
Medina, and Brittney Laner repeated as region 
champions in singles play. While, Wrylie 
Finkle made up for a three-set defeat in the 
finals of last year's tournament by defeating 
Johnson County's Sydney Ramsey 7-6 (4), 0-6, 
6-2 in the finals of No. 5 singles. 
Pavlovic and Blackim went on to finish as 
region champions at No. 1 doubles, and 
Montemayor and Laner took home the title at 
No. 2 doubles. 



Baseball 

Losing a pair of heart breakers to Hutchinson 
and Seward County at the Region VI Tourna- 
ment in Wichita, the Cowley College baseball 
team had its season come to an abrupt end. 
After beating Seward County 10-1 in its open- 
ing game in Wichita, the Tigers had to battle 
Seward again as Cowley lost 5-4 in 13 innings 
to Hutchinson and the Saints beat Butler 2-1 
in 12 innings. 

Cowley had 18 hits in the win over Seward 
County, but managed just three hits in a 5-4 
loss in the rematch. 

Cowley had won 18 of its previous 20 games 
prior to the pair of one-run defeats to close 
out its season. The Tigers finished the year 
with a record of 39-16 overall and were one 
game behind conference champion Johnson 
County in the Jayhawk East with a conference 
mark of 29-7. 

Cowley had five players named first-team 
all-conference and two more named to the 
second-team. Six of the Tigers' seven all-conter- 
ence selections were sophomores. 
Freshman Aaron Rea, a second-team all-confer- 
ence selection, highlights the list of returning 
players for the Tigers. Rea batted .348 and led 
the team in RBI's (66), while finishing second 
in home runs (seven), doubles (15), and runs 
scored (63). 

Sophomore Zach Cargill went 11-1 on the sea- 
son and finished his Tiger career with a record 
of 19-2 on the mound. 

Softball 

Advancing to the Region VI title game for 
the 11th year in a row, the Cowley College 
Softball team had its bid for a return trip to 
the national tournament come to an end with 
a 9-4 loss to Highland. 

After going just 11-9 in its first 20 games, Cow- 
ley finished the season with a record of 38-12. 
Cowley will have to make up for the loss of 
conference MVP Ashley Spencer, who finished 
the season with a record of 29-7 and an earned 
run average of 1.70. Spencer went 53-8 during 
her two years at the school. 
Cowley will also say goodbye to all-conference 
performers Alysha Poteat and Taylor Cantil- 
lon. Poteat batted .365 and led the team in 
home runs (10) and RBI's (47), while Cantil- 
lon was third on the team in batting average 
(.369), home runs (six) and RBI's (36). 
Outfielder Sarah Hocker rounds out the group 
of sophomores and batted .275 with 18 RBI's. 
The Lady Tigers will return its No. 2 pitcher in 
McLeod (9-4, 2.36 ERA) as well as its top two 
hitters in Bri Akers (.449 average) and Alyssa 
Allison (.370 average). Cuthbertson also had 
a solid freshman season and was second on 
the team in doubles (12), home runs (8), and 
RBI's (46). 

Continued on page 21 



(continued) 



Volleyball 

The Lady Tiger volleyball team went five 
games with Illinois Central College before los- 
ing in the championship match of the NJCAA 
Division II National Championships played in 
Wisconsin Dells, WI. The second place finish 
matches the program's highest ever finish 
at the national tournament. Cowley ended 
the season with a record of 32-5 and had the 
highest winning percentage (86.5%) in the 
program's history. 

Along with the national runner-up finish, 
Jenifer Bahner led the Lady Tigers to confer- 
ence and region titles in her first season as 
head coach. 

Freshmen Roslandy Acosta and Elena Ber- 
roteran were named to the All-Tournament 
team at the national championships. Acosta 
was also named the Most Valuable Player and 
Freshman of the Year in the Jayhawk Confer- 
ence Eastern Division. 
Sophomore libero Michelle O'Dell was also 
named a First-Team all-conference selection, 
while Berroteran received honorable mention 
all-conference recognition. 
The Lady Tigers will say goodbye to sopho- 
mores Michelle O'Dell, Sarah Eldridge, and 
Keshia Clark. But, Cowley will return nine 
players from its national runner-up squad. 

Men's Cross Country 

Landing three runners on the list of Coaches 
Association All-Americans, the Cowley Col- 
lege men's cross country team capped another 
stellar season by placing fifth out of 31 teams 
at the NJCAA Division I National Champion- 
ships held in Peoria, IL. 
Sophomore Dustin Mettler, the conference 
champion in the Jayhawk East, led Cowley by 
placing 25th with a time of 26:25 at the na- 
tional meet. Joining Mettler as Coaches Asso- 
ciation All-Americans were, sophomores Brice 
Irving (26:29) and Phillip Banowetz (26:39), 
who placed 26th and 33rd, respectively. 
Coaches Association All-American honors 
are bestowed to the top-25 American born 
runners. 

Cowley will lose Mettler, Banowetz, Irving, 
Cianin Kuril, and Isbek Sailnas to gradua- 
tion. The sophomores helped Cowley capture 
its fourth straight conference title and add 
another top-five national finish to the school's 
list of accomplishments. 
Freshmen Tyson Christensen and Josh Gracia 
each ran well at nationals and will return to 
lead the Tigers next season. 

Women's Cross Country 

With Robin Ray capping a brilliant season by 
being named an NJCAA All-American, and 
two other Lady Tiger runners earning Coaches 
Association All-American honors, the Cowley 
College women's cross country team placed 
fourth out of 35 teams at the NJCAA Division 



I National Championships held in Peoria, IL. 
The fourth place finish tied the program's 
highest ever national finish as Cowley also 
placed fourth in 2006. 

Ray was the first American to finish the race 
as she placed seventh with a time of 18:20. Ray 
has left her mark on the Cowley program as 
her time of 18:20 was the second fastest time 
in school history. 

Sophomore Cecilia Burley placed 21st with 
a time of 19:07. Burley's time was the sixth 
fastest in the program's history as she earned 
Coaches Association All-American honors. 
Freshman Leigh Ann Omarkhail also earned 
Coaches Association All-American honors as 
she placed among the top-25 American born 
runners. 

Cowley will say goodbye to Marvia Lewin, 
Jessica Dyer, Ray and Burley. However, 
Omarkhail, Val Bland, Bailey Hawkins and 
Elly Adamson will return next season with 
the experience of having competed well at 
nationals. 

Men's Basketball 

The Cowley College men's basketball team 
captured its third straight Jayhawk Confer- 
ence Eastern Division title as they finished 
the 2009-2010 season with a record of 21-11 
overall and 14-4 in the conference. 
Having guided the Cowley College men's bas- 
ketball team to the Jayhawk Conference East- 
ern Division title in his first year at the school, 
head coach Tommy DeSalme was named the 
Jayhawk East Coach of the Year. 
The Tigers' success was even more impressive 
considering they had only two sophomores on 
the roster. 

DeSalme was not the only Tiger recognized 
for their outstanding season as Cowley's Tyrus 
McGee was also named the Jayhawk East 
Freshman of the Year and an All-Region selec- 
tion. McGee averaged a team-best 16.6 points 
and 5.3 rebounds. Over the last nine games of 
the season, McGee averaged 22.1 points and 
6.6 rebounds per game, and shot 57 percent 
(34-of-60) from three-point range. 
Fellow freshman Dominick Cornelius was 
also recognized as he was named an honorable 
mention all-conference selection. Cornelius, a 
6-foot-4 guard/forward from Tulsa, OK, aver- 
aged 10.6 points and 4.1 rebounds. He is also 
considered to be the Tigers best defender. 

Women's Basketball 

Finishing in a tie for third place in the Jay- 
hawk Conference Eastern Division, the Cow- 
ley College women's basketball team finished 
the 2009-2010 season with a record of 21-11 
overall and 12-6 in the conference. 
Sophomore Gianna Woods had a big season 
for the Lady Tigers as she led the team in scor- 
ing (15.6 points) and rebounding (7.8 boards). 
Woods was named first-team all-conference 
and second-team all-region. Fellow sophomore 
Kaneesha Lee was named honorable mention 
all-conference after averaging 10.2 points and 



7.3 rebounds. 

The Lady Tigers will return a talented team as 

they lost just four players to graduation. 

Men's Soccer 

The Tigers made strides in the second year of 
the program as they won two more games than 
a year ago and finished higher in the confer- 
ence standings. 

Cowley came back from a rough start to the 
season to win six of its final 10 games and end 
the year with a record of 6-9-1. 
Cowley will say goodbye to sophomores, Blake 
Anderson, Austin Sacket, Marko Bukva, 
Orlando Colina, Dayton Rodrigues, Joao Bac- 
chi, Ivenns Martinez, Chase Turney, Keegan 
Cornelius, and Nick Sobba. 
The sophomores played a major role in help- 
ing the Tigers reach the Region VI playoffs in 
each of the program's first two seasons. 
Freshman defender Matheus Daniel was 
recognized as a second-team all-conference 
performer. Along with Daniel, Cowley had 
four players receive honorable mention Kansas 
Jayhawk Community College Conference 
recognition. 

Those honored were, sophomore forward 
Keegan Cornelius, freshman forward Ivenns 
Martinez, sophomore midfielder Joao Bacchi, 
and freshman defender Nathan Modesto. 

Women's Soccer 

The Lady Tiger soccer team had another 
strong showing in its second season despite 
playing without all-conference midfielder 
Carol Rodrigues and stalwart defender Ana 
Borjas for the majority of the season due to 
injury. 

Cowley finished the season with a record of 
9-8. The eight sophomores that have been a 
part of each of the program's first two seasons, 
leave with a record of 17-17 overall and two 
Region VI playoff appearances. 
Sophomores were Amber Hernandez, Brittany 
Griffin, Amara Saucedo, Viri Sanchez, Ciara 
Corboy, Brittany Newbolt, Katie Ybarra, and 
Ana Borjas. 

Scoring the seventh most goals in NJCAA 
Division I women's soccer, Amber Hernandez 
was named a first-team Kansas Jayhawk Com- 
munity College Conference women's soccer 
selection for the second consecutive year. 
Hernandez finished the season with 29 goals 
and nine assists in 17 games, and ended her 
Tiger career with 55 goals and 12 assists in 34 
games. 

Cowley's Ciara Corboy, Brittany Newbolt, 
and Sadie Hull received honorable mention 
all-conference recognition. 




report | 21 



Who We Serve 

Spring 2010 Semester Enrollment by location 

Arkansas City 1453 

Virtual Center 2157 

Mulvane Bloomenshine 967 

SSEC 2 

Winfield 156 

Mulvane IT 100 

Wellington 29 

Percentage by Gender 

Male 38% 

Female 62% 

Percentage by Ethnic Group 

Black/Non-Hispanic 7.97% 

Native American 1.13% 

Asian 2.89% 

Hispanic 4.83% 

Caucasian 78.48% 

Other 4.64% 

Percentage by Age 

Under 18 6.80% 

19-22 years old 44.26% 

23-29 years old 21.15% 

30-49 years old 23.75% 

50 and over 4-04% 

2009-2010 Enrollment Data 

Annual Unduplicated Headcount 5357 

Headcount Fall 2009 3986 

Headcount Spring 2010 4076 

Full-time Equivalent Students Fall 2009 2655.67 

FTE Students Spring 2010 2677.93 

International Student Enrollment 81 

Your Return 
on Investment 

Expenditures by Source 
2009-2010 (unaudited) 

Instruction $7,065,341 41% 

Academic Support $580,465 3% 

Student Services $1,283,900 7% 

Athletics $1,855,306 11% 

Institutional Support $2,666,734 15% 
Operations 6k 

Maintenance $3,568,490 21% 

Grants $264,607 2% 

Transfers $25,000 0% 

Total $17,391,843 100.0% 



Foundation 
Balance Sheet 



Revenues by Source 






2009-2010 






Student Sources 


$5,738,164 


30.16% 


Federal Sources 


$190,940 


1.00% 


State Sources 


$8,117,400 


42.66% 


County Sources 


$252,345 


1.33% 


Local Sources 


$4,106,124 


21.58% 


Other Sources 


$621,836 


3.27% 


Total 


$19,026,809 


100.0% 


22 | report 







ASSETS 




Total Cash and Investments 


$3,277,187 


Pledges Receivable 


$6,035 


Capitalized Assets 


$48,590 


Total Assets 


$3,331,812 


LIABILITIES AND NET ASSETS 




Total Liabilities 


$6,381 


NET ASSETS 




Unrestricted 


$636,273 


Temporarily Restricted 


$610,657 


Permanently Restricted 


$2,078,501 


Total Liabilities and Net Assets 


$3,331,812 



Board approves 20 1 0-20 1 1 
budget that includes fewer tax 
dollars 

Cowley's Board of Trustees delivered some good news to local 
taxpayers Monday, Aug. 9 at its regular monthly meeting. 

The Board unanimously approved the 2010-2011 budget for 
the college that is seeking fewer tax dollars than the previous year. 
Therefore, the projected mill levy of 19.998 is down from the 
2009-2010 levy of 20.226. The final mill levy won't be set until 
the final valuation for Cowley County is calculated. 
"I am tickled with us being able to lower the mill levy," Board of 
Trustees Chairman Albert Bacastow, Jr. said. 
The college's budget approved Aug. 9 is based on in-state 
enrollments of 73,900 credit hours, a state operating grant of 
$6,488,117, and a county valuation of $211,418,414, which is a 
little more than $2 million less than last year. 
The college's total budget for 2010-2011 is $29,484,374 mil- 
lion. It is seeking $4,227,987 in tax support. The college sought 
$4,257,072 in tax support in 2008-2009, and $4,275,040 in 
2009-2010. 

Also, during the meeting, Slade Griffiths, vice president of 
academic affairs, provided the Board with an outreach update. 
Griffiths informed the Board that the college's Mulvane Center 
and online enrollment is higher than it has ever been. 
Cowley College president, Dr. Patrick J. McAtee, also stated that 
enrollment at the school's main campus in Arkansas City is the 
highest it has been in five years. 

"Everyone has done an outstanding job," McAtee said. 
As of Aug. 9, total enrollment at Cowley College's Centers is up 
440 FTE (2,871 to 2,431) from this time last year. 
"Enrollment is off the charts," Sue Saia, vice president of student 
affairs said. "I want to recognize Ben Schears, the work he has 
done in the Admissions Department has been unbelievable." 



SPONSORS 




<r<^ 



€*&*£;£&?*£ 



PRESIDENT'S SOCIETY 

($10,000-$49,999) 

Mildred and the late Hubert 

Johnston 

Powder Valley, Inc. 

BENEFACTOR 

($5,000-$9,999) 
Boyer Educational Trust 
Estate of Helen M Finch 
Great Western Dining 
Jacob and Laura Hocker 
Kim and Cynthia Hocker 
Joe and Patty Neises 
Paton Wholesale & Vending 
Co. 



BUILDER ($1,000-14,999) 

Ark City Tumbleweeds 

Carpenter 6k Vickers Trust 

Account 

CornerBank 

Kirke Dale Scholarship Trust 

Marvin Daniel 

Jacqueline Deal 

Bill and Judy Docking 

Bill and Dorothy Funk 

Slade and Terri Griffiths 

John and Janice Hitchcock 

Ellen Kelly 

Carolyn Managan 

Marvin and Anita McCorgary 

Shayla McDonald 

Rash McReynolds Foundation 

Fred and Margot Menefee 

Mid America Arts Alliance 

Fred and Donna Rindt 

Nan Schaper 

Paul Schneider Construction 

Soroptimist 

Jack and Gail Stark 

Florence Stephens 

Larry Swaim 

The late Betty Sybrant 

Charles Trenary 

Union State Bank 

Robert Warrender Memorial 

Trust 



INVESTOR ($500-$999) 

Chris and Mandy Cannon 

Allen and Beverly Grunder 

Elliott Jackson 

Conrad and Janet Jimison 

Mary Kerr 

John Maier 

Charles McKown 

New Life Worship Center 



TCK Trust & Financial Advi- 
sors 

HALL OF HONOR ($100- 
$499) 

Abbey Eye Care 

ADM Milling Co. 

Allen Ala 

Sydney and Cathy Alexander 

La Donna Alford 

Bart and Heather Allen 

Alterra Sterling House 

American Legion Auxiliary 

Unit #18 

Hobart and Gail Ammerman 

David Andreas 

Larry and Rose Anstine 

Steve and Pam Archer 

Ark City Glass Company, Inc. 

Ark Veterinary Associates 

Arkansas City Traveler 

Rod and Jody Arnett 

Frank Arnold 

Alfredo Aucar 

The late Joe and Donna Avery 

Max and Nancy Ayers 

B Four Flying, Inc. 

Albert and Karen Bacastow 

John and Carla Barnard 

Gene Bayless 

Bluestem Bed and Breakfast, 

LLC 

Dick and Dolly Bonfy 

John and Julie Bossi 

Charlotte Brown 

Buterbaugh & Handlin 

Jose and Marlys Cervantes 

City of Arkansas City 

Joseph and Nel Clark 

Judy Clark 

Albert and Audine Clemente 

John and Chris Clemente 

Gene and Donella Cole 

Father Francis Cox 

Tony and Vicki Crouch 

Bruce and Amy Crouse 

D C Riders, LLC. 

Jim and Rae Dale 

DebandRex Advertising 

Robin Delp 

Diana Dicken 

DiVall Retail Liquor 

John and Connie Donatelli 

Elite Advertising 

Stephen and the late Janet 

English 

Doug and Dejon Ewing 

Karl and Dorothy Faidley 

Robert and Robin Fencil 

Larry and Rebecca Findley 

Dennis and Karone Finger 

First Baptist Church of Ark 



City 

First Intermark Corporation 
Thomas Fisher 
Foster's Furniture, Inc. 
Curt and Cindy Freeland 
Rowland and Margaret Funk 
Jim and Marvis Gaddie 
General Electric 
Ed and Margaret Gilliland 
Dean and Elaine Gilstrap 
Godsey Enterprises 
Gordon 6k Assoc. Architects, 
PA. 

Gottlob Lawn & Landscape 
LLC 

Graves Drug No 1 1 
Great Plains Quality Manage- 
ment 

Gregg & Simmons, CPAs 
Bill and Dorothy Griffith 
Grinder Man 
David and Lisa Grose 
Mike Groves Oil, Inc 
James and Sharon Hand 
Ed and Linda Hargrove 
Rock and Ann Headrick 
Health Inventures 
Steve and Carol Hearne 
Donald and Cindy Heflin 
Jean Hill 
Jean Hite 

Richard and Melissa Hollister 
Jimmie and Joyce Holloway 
Home National Bank 
Dan and Jill Hunter 
Ronnie and Terri Hutchinson 
Warren and Marjorie Isom 
Aaron Iverson 

Matthew and Roxanna James 
Sharon Jarvis 
JD Liquor Store 
Shirley Jester 
Lynne Jordan 
John Kelly 

Jeff and Janet Kennedy 
Tommy and Arthetta Kimmell 
Mr. and Mrs. Jack King 
Erv and Fern Knocke 
Dr. Juri and Susan Kolts 
Mary Korte 
Irvin Kramer 
Harold and Mary Lake 
LaDonna Lanning 
Judy Lawson 

Robben and Wilma Ledeker 
Legacy, A Regional Commu- 
nity Foundation 
Martha Linsner 
Long & Neises CPAS Chtd 
J.C. and Donna Louderback 
Scott and Rhoda MacLaughlin 



Dr. Rodger and Melba Maech- 

tlen 

Zak and Beverly Manuszak 

Lane and Shannon Massey 

Clarence Maxwell 

Darin and Millie McAfee 

Dr. Pat and Sandy McAfee 

Steve and Beth McCann 

Sherie McMahon 

Amy McWhirt and Terry 

Quiett 

Albert and Doris Miller 

Shawn Miller 

Bill and Alice Mills 

Carl Mills and Phyllis Macy- 

Mills 

Robert and Olive Milner 

James and Wilma Mitchell 

Bob Moffatt 

Otis and Terri Morrow 

Munson Insurance Agency, 

Inc. 

Janice Neagle 

Margaret Neal 

Mark and Melinda Neal 

Dennis Needham 

Dr. Richard and Marlys 

Nelson 

Lu Nelson 

Faye Nemoir 

Dr. Nathan and Amy Niles 

Lance and Tamara N iles 

Jason and April Nittler 

Randy and Debbie Nittler 

Greg and Tami Norwood 

Fred and Tonya Olenberger 

Jason and Shannon O'Toole 

Elizabeth Palmer 

Tom Parmley 

Patriot Exploration LLC 

Roy and Linda Pepper 

Larry and Carlla Pike 

Potter's Liquor Store 

Presbyterian Manor 

Lester Priest 

Jim and Jan Pringle 

Bob and Kendra Redford 

Reedy Ford 

Sidney Regnier 

Bill and Arleta Rice 

The Ridge Restaurant 

Rindt-Erdman Funeral Home 

Dr. Nick and Christie Rogers 

Drs. Scott and Nicole Rogers 

Dr. David and Rhonda Ross 

RPPG, Inc. 

Richard and Darlene Ruch 

S and Y Industries, Inc. 

Tom and Sue Saia 

Dan and Lois Sampson 

Benjamin and Rachel Schears 

report | 23 



Dr. David and Karen Schmei- 
dler 

Tom and Charlotte Schmidt 
Schmidt Jewelers 
Scott and Michelle Schoon 
Larry and Wanda Schwintz 
Tim and Amy Scott 
Brian and Kristi Shaw 
The late Wayne and Sandy 
Short 

Joe and Mindi Shriver 
Isobel Smith 
Randy and Pam Smith 
Roy Smith 
Jean and Ellen Snell 
Sonic Drive-In 
Tad and Janice Stover 
James and Donna Syhrant 
Linda Syhrant 
Taylor Drug 
The North End 
Bill and Barbara Thompson 
F.L. and Arlene Thurman 
Topline Steel Buildings 
Richard and Nancy Tredway 
Turn of the Century Enter- 
prises 

Robert and Gwen Tyler 
Ultimate Martial Arts, LLC 
U*nited Agency 
Bill and Trish Wagner 
Walnut Valley Title 
Webber Land Company 
Joe and Karolee Weller 
Deuane and Virginia Wells 
V.J. Wilkins 
Charlee Wilson 
Wintield Consumer Products, 
Inc. 

Wintield Chiropractic Office 
Morgan Wright 
Dr. Robert and Sue Yoachim 
Daniel and Nanci Young 
Ed and Karen Zeller 



FRIEND (Under $100) 

Sid and Jerri Achenbach 

Ace Construction & Interior 

Design LLC 

Leo and Joleen Alexander 

Robert Anstine 

Nick and Alyce Anzelmo 

Jack and Jeanne Baird 

Troy and Heather Barker 

Phillip Barkett 

Zachary and Lori Barnes 

Tom and Lynnette Barnthouse 

Clark Bastian 

Audie Baughman 

William and Sandra Baum- 

gartner 

John and Gerry Bazil 

Marjorie Benjamin 

24 | report 



Don and Peggy Bennett 
Bever Dye Foundation 
Sara Bly 

Ralph and Mary Bonnell 
Thomas and Norma Bossi 
Jim Bradley 

Eugene and Dorothy Brink- 
man 

Janis Bunker 
Fred and Carol Bunting 
Judith Caprez 
S. R. and Jo Chance 
Marcia Childers 
Marilyn Childers 
Glenn and Nancy Clarkson 
Bill Clay 

Clint and Brenda Combs 
Community National Bank 
ConocoPhillips 
Margaret Cox 
Betty Current 
David Czaplinski 
David and Carol Daulton 
Verna Davis 
Dan and Lin Deener 
Bonnie Drake 
Jerry and Peggy Drennan 
Terry Eaton 
Curtis and Gail Eitel 
Betty Feak 
Sally Forrest 

Aubrey and Barbara Foster 
Belva Gardner 
Charles and Dorothy Gerber 
Michael and Cindy Giessel 
David and Dixie Givens 
Marilyn Glynn 
Doug and Celi Goff 
Great Plains Communications 
Howard Gritfin 
Leonard and Rogene Groene 
Brett and Amy Grose 
Mary Ann Hale 
J. Fred Hambright 
Rex and Siri Harrell 
Donald and Martha Hastings 
Lori Heasty 
Martin Helget 
Ron and Becky Holt 
Vern Hull 

Rod and Karen Iverson 
Steve and Joi Jay 
Gary and Freida Kahle 
Buddy and Peggy Kendrick 
Kay Kennedy 

Howard and Dorothy Kivett 
David Knapp 
Jeff and Julie Kratt 
Nancy Kuehler 
Dwayne and Annette Lager- 
strom 

The late James and Imogene 
Leach 
Donna Lester 



L.R. and Virginia Linnell 

Lloyd Lisk 

George Lovell 

Shirley Malone 

Ellen Maninger 

Phillip Marrs 

Richard Marrs 

Martha Washington Unit 

Cathi Maynard 

Russell and Sylvia McAlister 

Bryan and Lisa McChesney 

Tom and Donni McClaflin 

Cecil McGaugh 

Gina McKown 

Marvin McLaughlin 

Michael and Cathy Mora 

Norman and Sue Morris 

Greg and Patricia Mugler 

Jerry and Virginia Munson 

Scott and Heather Munson 

Jeff and Peggy Musson 

Norman and Nancy Nellis 

Billie Nelson 

Tom and Betty Neptune 

Keith and Bonnie Nulik 

Alan and Susan Paton 

Billilee Paton 

Mark and Debra Paton 

Bill and Julie Perdue 

Andrea Peterson 

Philip and Mary Ann Phillips 

Dolly Pittman 

David and Camille Pond 

John and Linda Postelwait 

Jim and Karon Ramirez 

Don Randall 

James and Sylvia Reed 

Dick and Judy Reedy 

Deane Richardson 

Mark and Yvonne Richardson 

George Rohleder 

Steve and Melinda Ross 

Bill Rowe 

Robert Rush 

Rush Realty 

Salina Surgical Hospital Cheer 

Committee 

Kay Sands 

Aralee Scothern 

Ronald Setzkorn 

Sheldon's Shop 

Bernard and Pauline Smith 

Mary Smith 

May Belle Smith 

Dr. Daniel and Vicki Snowclen 

Robert Somers 

Karen Sparks 

Kim Stephen 

Dennis and Tammy Strange 

John and LeeAnn Sturd 

James and Mary Topper 

Charles Turner 

Donald and Fran Vannoy 

Loretta Waldroupe 



Jay and Nancy Warren 

Shirley Webb 

Dorothy Weston 

Pamela White 

Steve and Tracey Williams 

Roy and Aileen Wittenborn 

Chris and J ana Wooderson 

Mary Zanovich 

Zeller Motor Co. Inc. 

BOOSTERS 

SUPER BOOSTERS 
($2,500 OR MORE) 
Orthopaedic &. Sports Med 
Great Western Dining/CCCC 
Ark City Glass Co. 
James Schaefer 
Home National Bank 
Dr. Phillip Hagan 



ORANGE AND BLACK 

CLUB 

($l,000-$2,499) 

Rubbermaid Home Products 

Union State Bank 

Bob Foster's Furniture 

Elite Advertising 

Pizza Hut 

Coca Cola Bottling Co. 

Kinsch, Dr. Nick D.D.S. 

Legleiter Video Productions 

Ark Valley Dist 

KSOK 

Dr. Nathan &l Amy Niles 

Dentistry 

Paton Wholesale & Vending 

General Electric 

Zeller Motor Co. 

United Agency 

Corner Bank 

Rindt-Erdman Funeral Home 



BENGAL CLUB 

($500-$999) 

K.C. Pawn Shop 

Ron 6k Donetta Godsey 

Pat & Sandy McAtee 

Tom & Sue Saia 

Duncan Farms 



TIGER CLUB 

($300-$499) 

Leroy Alsup 

JenStine Oil Co. 

Dan Bowker 

Darren 6k Carolyn Burroughs 

Dave 6k Vickie Burroughs 

Mr. 6k Mrs. Albert Bacastow 

Munson Insurance Agency 

Lance 6k Tamara Niles 



Merle Snider GM Center 

Tim & Susan Ybarra 

Tom & Judy DeSalme 

El Maguey 

Rob Carroll Sandblasting & 

Paint 

Todd 6k Candy Clark 

Josh 6k Rashelle Cobble 

Gene <Sl Donella Cole 

Waldorf Riley 

Mid West Electric Supply 

Doug Goff 

Mike Groves 

Beverly Grunder 

Bill 6k Linda Headrick 

John 6k Janice Hitchcock 

Elliott 6k Martha Jackson 

Steve 6k Joi Jay 

Conrad 6k Janet Jimison 

Kuhn Mechanical 

Woods Lumber Company 

Alan 6k Carol Lytle 

Shannon 6k Lane Massey 

Terri 6k Otis Morrow 

Jan's Sport Shack 

Mark 6k Naomi Phillips 

Schmidt Jewelers 

Mr. 6k Mrs. Bill Sheldon 

Winfield Consumer 

David 6k Tracy Trent 

Sonic 

Dr. Bob 6k Sue Yoachim 



COWLEY FRIEND 

($175-$299) 

Abbey Eye Care 

Jerri and Sid Achenbach 

Bob 6k Pat Anstine 

Larry 6k Rose Anstine 

Steve 6k Pam Archer 

Puritan Billiard Parlor 

Raymond James Financial 

Services 

Lyman Bowling 

Kent 6k Barbara Booher 

Marshall 6k Doris Brentlinger 

Don 6k Sharon Buell 

Darrel 6k Mary Burroughs 

Leroy 6k Sheri Call 

Marlys 6k Jose Cervantes 

Don 6k Velma Cheslic 

Deb and Rex Advertising 

Roberto 6k Kirsten Dos Santos 

Soccer Zone 

Ron 6k Tracy Hirst 

Fulsom Brothers 

Neives Mexican Restaurant 

Country Mart 

Chris 6k John Clemente 

Tony 6k Vicki Crouch 

Bruce 6k Amy Crouse 

Kenneth 6k Beth Czaplinski 

Dave 6k Carol Daulton 



Vince DeGrado III 
Divall Liquor 
Brown's Office Supply 
David 6k Jennifer Faust 
Ken 6k Bonnie Gilmore 
ADM Milling 
Slade 6k Terri Griffiths 
Mr. 6k Mrs. Ed Hargrove 
Westlake Ace Hardware 
Melissa 6k Richard Hollister 
Mildred Johnston 
Two Rivers Coop 
Mary Kerr 

Mr. 6k Mrs. Charles Kinzie 
Mr. 6k Mrs. J.C. Louderback 
Jay 6k Carrie Mapel 
Twin Rivers Dev. Support 
Turn of the Century Enter- 
prise 

Danny 6k Judy Mitchell 
Don 6k Sharon Moore 
Scott 6k Kathy Morris 
Munson Insurance Agency 
Shayla McDonald 
Sally 6k David Palmer 
Bill 6k Julie Perdue 
Delbert 6k Deloris Peters 
Joe 6k Mary Ann Phillips 
L.G. Pike Construction Co. 
Winfield Motors 
Alumni Bar 6k Grill 
James 6k Sylvia Reed 
Nick 6k Christie Rogers, DDS. 
Paul N. Rogers, DDS, PA 
Mr. David 6k Deborah 
Schaller 

Larry 6k Wanda Schwintz 
Don 6k Peggy Shanks 
Shear Success 

Ark City Chamber of Com- 
merce 

Pam 6k Randy Smith 
Samford Stover Agency 
Dane 6k Alycia Straight 
Ron 6k Jennie Straight 
John 6k Lee Ann Sturd 
Ronnie 6k Patsy Sweely 
Taylor Drug 
Watkins Family Dentistry 



CENTURY CLUB ($100- 

$174) 

Wayne Ammerman 

Larry Anderson 

Mr. David Andreas 

Frank Arnold 

Mr. 6k Mrs. Joe Avery 

Tyson 6k Jenifer Bahner 

Aaron 6k Tasha Bucher 

Best Western Atrium Gardens 

Heather 6k Troy Barker 

Larry 6k Tammy Bartelson 

Mel Brown SR. 



Brock 6k Jessica Buckingham 
Bud Riley Heat 6k Air 
Scott Camien 
Connie 6k Joe Carder 
Kipp T Clark 
Keith 6k Nancy Cole 
Katrina Colwell 
Sid 6k Helen Colwell 
D 6k S Auto Supply 
Rae 6k Jim Dale 
Dr. Bryan Dennett 
State Farm Insurance 
Tommy DeSalme 
Glen 6k Sandra Davis 
Virginia Donaldson 
Terry Eaton 
Mike 6k Therese Fluty 
Galaxie Business 6k Equip. 
Ark Valley Credit Union 
Marvis Gaddie 
Larry Hargrove 
Carol 6k Steve Hearne 
Cathy Hendricks 
Traver's Furniture 6k Carpet 
Gary Hockenbury 
Donnie Jackson 
Jarvis Accounting 
Neal Jensen 
Dane Kelly 
Ellen Kelly 

Kevin 6k Sharon Kelly 
Jeff 6k Janet Kennedy 
Stu 6k Betsy Luder 
Great Plains Quality Manage- 
ment 

Scott 6k Rhocla MacLaughlin 
Ronald 6k Carolyn McKeaigg 
Charles McKown 
Meiers Tax Accounting 
Scott 6k Heather Munson 
Ark Valley Physical Therapy 
Patty 6k Greg Mugler 
Shelter Insurance 
Jason 6k Shannon O'Toole 
Sherwin Williams 
Premier Open MRI 
Potters Liquor Store 
Plant Maintenance Services 
David 6k Lillie Pankaskie 
Sandra Parks 
Rama Peroo 
Delbert Peters 
Graves Drug # 1 1 
City of Winfield 
Roger 6k Joanne Pridey 
Arky 6k Eva Reyez 
Tan Ten 

Ark City Traveler 
Kristi 6k Brian Shaw 
Don 6k Peggy Shanks 
Mindi 6k Joe Shriver 
Anthony Shavies 
Fit Zone 
Dr. Dan 6k Vicki Snowden 



Ron Steiner 

Judy 6k Roger Sternberger 

Janice 6k Tad Stover 

Super 8 Motel 

Winfield Chiropractic 

Collision 2 Custom 

Mike 6k Suzanne Unruh 

Jay 6k Nancy Warren 

Gary Wilson 

City of Arkansas City 

Karolee 6k Joe Weller 

Sunflower Screen printing 

Peggy Williams 

John 6k Gerry Zawacki 

Kline Motors 



OTHER DONORS 

Marcus Acller 

Jody 6k Rod Arnett 

Kim 6k Candy Bahner 

Shane 6k Lori Broyles 

Michelle Brewster 

Jack Crumbliss 

Day's Monument Co. 

Jeff Fluty 

Jeff 6k Rikki Hettenbach 

David 6k Karen Horseman 

Belva Gardner 

Lisa 6k David Grose 

Ashley Hale 

Lynne Jordan 

La Fiesta 

Daisy Mae's Cafe 

Melinda 6k Mark Neal 

April 6k Jason Nittler 

Hope Ortiz 

Reedy Ford Inc. 

Christine Storm 

Larry Swaim 

Joe's Barber Shop 

Roger White 

Ark City Dental 

The Cowley 

College 

Endowment 

Association 

would like 

to thank 

you! 

report | 25 




Saia receives Bryce Roderick 
Aitfacdof Excellence 

T) 

A. Vecognized for the work he does 
beyond his normal duties as Cowley 
College's athletic director, Tom Saia, was 
awarded the Bryce Roderick Award of 
Excellence. 

The award is based on maintaining high 
quality athletic programs and the dedica- 
tion and contribution of time and effort 
in NJCAA Region VI regular and champi- 
onship events. 

Saia received a traveling trophy, which 
has his name engraved. Saia is the third 
recipient of the award and follows former 
Garden City Community College athletic 
director, Vic Trilli, and Highland Com- 
munity College AD, Greg Delzeit. 
Roderick, who serves as the commissioner 
of the Jayhawk Conference, received the 
George E. Killian Award of Excellence 
in 2006, which is given to individuals 
dedicated to the ideals of volunteerism, 
achievement, service, leadership and ex- 
cellence. Roderick was the first women's 
director to receive the prestigious award. 
Roderick began awarding the Bryce 
Roderick Award of Excellence in 2007 
as a way to recognize the outstanding 
work done by the athletic directors in the 
Jayhawk Conference. 
"Tom has done so much for the confer- 
ence and the region, besides his role as 
athletic director he is always willing to 
help out the region directors," Roderick 
said. 

Along with his duties as athletic director, 
Saia also served as a Region VI director 
with Roderick during his 14 years at Cow- 
ley. Under Saia's guidance, the school 
hosted regional competitions during the 
fall and spring semesters. 
Saia was humbled to be named the recipi- 
ent of the award. 

"It is an honor to receive this award be- 
cause it has Bryce's name on it," Saia said. 
"I will cherish this award because of what 
Bryce (Roderick) stands for." 
Cowley College's athletic programs have 
flourished under Saia as the school has 
won two JUCO World Series titles in 
baseball, and has won numerous confer- 
ence and region titles, as well as accumu- 
lated a number of top-10 finishes at the 



Jayhawk Conference Commisioner Bryce Roderick presents Cowley College 
Athletic Director Tom V. Saia with a plaque in honor of his being named the 
recipient of the Bryce Roderick Award of Excellence. 

national tournaments. 



Cowley College recently finished second 
in the NATYCAA (National Alliance of 
Two-Year College Athletic Administrators) 
Cup standings, which recognizes excel- 
lence in two-year college athletics. 
For the third time in the past four years, 
Cowley finished as the top junior college 
athletic program in the state o{ Kansas 
based on the standings. 
Prior to coming to Cowley, Saia spent 12 
years as a football coach at the junior col- 
lege level. Eight of his teams were ranked 
in the top-15. His teams played in six 
bowl games, winning four. He was an as- 
sistant coach at Coffeyville in 1980 when 
the team went undefeated and capped the 
season with a victory in the Beef Empire 
Bowl in Garden City, finishing No. 2 in 
the nation. 

Saia coached at Coffeyville, Butler, 
Hutchinson and Independence and was 
inducted into the NJCAA Football Hall 
of Fame in 2004. 

He and his wife, Sue, have four children, 
Bryce 38, Boomer 21, Tommy 17, and 
Courtney 15. 



1 1th class inducted 
into Tiger Athletic 
Hall ofFame 
(continued) 

and finished as conference co-champs. Af- 
ter graduating from ACJC he played two 
years of football at Northwestern Okla- 
homa State University and was offered 
tryouts with several NFL teams. 
Pipestem instead went on to become a 
noted attorney, judge and lecturer who 
was a committed and compassionate life- 
time advocate for Native Americans. He 
has a Wellness Center named after him in 
Red Rock, OK. 



26 | report 



tt , 



I 




Mildred Johnston named 
Outstanding Tiger Alumnus (con- 
tinued) 



She also served as a volunteer 
answering phones for Safe 
Homes for five years and at 
the Ark City Senior Center 
for six years. She also volun- 
teers at the Kansas Veterans 
Home in Winfield, furnishing 
cookies and helping veterans 
during the Christmas season. 
She has been a member of 
the First United Methodist 
Church in Arkansas City since 
1944, where she is a member 
of the seekers class and UMW, 
and serves on the services 
and mission groups. She also 
volunteers her time at the 
Saint Paul Methodist Church 
in Arkansas City with their 
Share Meal that is served once 
a week and is also a member 
of the Cowley College Golden 
Tigers. 

Shannon Massey, Cowley 
College's Executive Director 
of Alumni and Development, 
was happy to present Johnston 
with this year's Outstanding 
Tiger Alumnus Award. 
"Milly is such a kind, generous 
woman," Massey said. "She 
is very giving of her time for 
many organizations in Ark 
City. Milly and Hubert have 
supported Cowley College 
with many financial gifts over 
the years and her gift last year 
of $25,000 to the Endowment 
Association and $2,000 to the 
Tiger Hall of Fame Fund was 
amazing and very much ap- 
preciated. She's a great friend 
to Cowley College and very 
much deserves this award." 
Her three children, Nan 
Schaper, Kay Thomas, and 
Gevan Johnston were all very 
active at Cowley. Nan attend- 
ed Cowley from 1970-1972 
and served as a work-study 
in the admissions office. She 
also was the Student Govern- 
ment president and named 
Basketball Queen in 1972. She 
played tennis at Cowley and 



was the runner-up for Queen 
Alalah in 1971. 
Kay attended Cowley from 
1972-1974 and served as a 
work-study in the school's 
Agri-Business Office. She 
played tennis at Cowley and 
was one of the leaders on the 
team. She was also a cheer- 
leader and was named Queen 
Alalah and the school's Basket- 
ball Queen in 1973. 
Both Nan and Kay went on 
to earn bachelor degrees from 
Oklahoma State University. 
Gevan attended Cowley 
during the 1977-78 academic 
year and played tennis at 
the school. After going into 
the military, he returned to 
Cowley and earned a degree in 
Non-Destructive Testing and 
Air Frame and Powerplant 
in 1995. Sadly, Gevan passed 
away in 2006. 
Gevan's daughter, and 
Johnston's granddaughter, 
Shirley Leftwich, also attended 
Cowley and graduated from 
the school in 2007. At Cowley, 
she was active in the Theatre 
Department and was a work- 
study in the business office. 
In July 2009 Johnston was 
named the recipient of the 
Community Cornerstone 
Award, which recognizes the 
time and effort of volunteers 
dedicated to serving people 
and enhancing the quality of 
life in Cowley County. 
Although the college has 
changed since she was a 
student, Johnston has enjoyed 
watching the school grow. 
"I am happy to hear of all the 
great things that are going on 
at the college," Johnston said. 
"All of the graduates of the 
college really seem to enjoy 
their time at the school." 



Aubrey Lyman named a 

New Century Scholar (continued) 

Engagement through Service), the president of the Cowley 
College Young Democrats, and was a representative for clubs in 
SGA. 

The elementary major from Wichita had to write an essay as 
part of the contest. Lyman's essay was over the clothing drive she 
helped put together last semester at Cowley. 
Lyman, who was also named to the Kansas All-State Academic 
Team, thanks in part to her excellent work as a PTK member 
at Cowley, was thrilled to learn she was named a New Century 
Scholar. 

"When 1 heard the news I started jumping up and down with 
my dorm mates with excitement and called my parents at 11 
o'clock at night to tell them the news," Lyman said. 
She credits PTK sponsors Melinda Neal and Nancy Ayers with 
helping her receive this award. 

"Melinda and Nancy are both amazing, I love them to death," 
Lyman said. "Miss Neal has been a great help with the All-Kan- 
sas team stuff." 

Hall of Fame 
Fund receives 
$25,000 donation 

Having been friends since the eighth grade, Steve Farris sur- 
prised his pal, Tom V. Saia, with a check for $25,000 to go 
towards the Cowley College Tiger Athletic Hall of Fame. Farris 
made the donation in Saia's honor prior to the Tiger Skins/ 
Brian Groves Memorial Golf Tournament Saturday, Aug. 7 at 
the Arkansas City Country Club. 

"This gift is in recognition to your outstanding contribution 
to and achievements at Cowley County Community College," 
Farris said. 

Saia, who played football with Farris at Pittsburg-Colgan High 
School, considers Farris to be one of his best friends. 
"He is the closest thing I have got to a brother," Saia said. "He 
has always been there for me if I ever needed anything." 
Farris, a former three-year starting linebacker for Oklahoma 
State University, is now a successful businessman in Houston, 
Texas. After spending the week in Cairo, Egypt, Farris flew 
home to Houston Thursday night. He then left Friday for 
Arkansas City, so he could support his good friend at the annual 
fundraiser golf tournament. 

Saia, who has built Cowley College's athletics into one of the 
top junior college programs in the nation, as evidenced by the 
school's second place finish in the NATYCAA Cup standings, 
wants to see the Tiger Hall of Fame continue to prosper. 
Started in 2000, there are currently 57 members in the Tiger 
Athletic Hall of Fame. 

"This donation really helps a lot and gets us closer to our goal of 
having $100,000 in the Hall of Fame fund," Saia said. 
Anyone wishing to contribute to the Tiger Athletic Hall of Fame 
should contact the Cowley College Athletic Department at 620- 
441-5268 or 620-441-5246. 

report | 27 




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