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jEECi::: ijit^shay. 



THE 

PRINCIPLES 



or 



GRAMMAR^'. 

BUNQ 

A. COMPENDIOUS TREATISE ON THE LANQUAaSS, 

^ ENGLISH, LATIN, GREEK, GERMAN, 
SPANISia, A^D, fRENCH. . 

fOUNDKD ON THX 

DIM UTABLS PRINCIPLE OF THE RELATION WHICH 0KB 
WORD SUSTAINS TO ANOTHER. 



Ee teongbt in • new way of arguing bj Indnetkm, and tliat gronadeil 
on otMenration and oxperienoBir-BAUB. 



BY SOLOMON I3tARRETT, JR., 



PHILOLOGIST. 



BBVI6ED EDITION. . 



CAMBRIDGE: 
METCALF AND COMPANY, 

PRINTERS TO TUB DNITBRSITT. 

1857. 







Entend according to Act of Congress, in the year 1848, by 

8. BABRETT. ^., 

In the Clerk's Office of the District Court of the United States 

Ibr the Northern District of Nev To«k 



PBIVTZO BT 

OEOBXIE C. RAND ft ATEBY. 



I. ' ^ 

ft * 



TO THB 

TOnNG UIN'8 ASSOCIATION Of TBI CITT OF ALBANT. 

KOBE UnrUL IN THK 

nPFUSION OF KNOWIEDOE, THE CULTIYATION OP INTELLECT 
AND THB IMPROVEMENT OF MORALS, 

THAN ANY OTHER INSTITUTION, 

or HUMAN ORIGIN, 
ANCIENT OR MODERN, 

THIS ESSAY, 

DESIGNED TO SIMPLEFYTHE STUDY OF THE LANGUAGES, 

FACILITATE THEIR ACQUISITION, 

BY INTRODUCING A SYSTEM OF SELF-INSTRUCTION, 

n BS8FB0TFDLLY DBDIOATED, 

BT 



ai)t ^ttt|)0r. 



ADVERTISEMENT. 



When we infonn the student of language, that " one 
word belongs to another," we have told him all that per^ 
tains to language ; for a perfect knowledge of the English, 
Greek and Latin grammars consists entirely in the abili- 
ty to give the words, in the respective languages, their 
proper relation to other words ; and ascertain the part of 
speech, from that relation; therefore, we have, together 
with a table of relations, advanced a number of Theses, 
or Propositions, which we maintain as fixed and immu- 
table truths; taken entirely /ro/;t the Languages themselves^ 
the perusal of which will advertise the scholar of the course 
pursued throughout the work. Further comment is need- 
less. 

SOLOMON BARRETT Ja. 



BARRETT'S 

ENGLISH; LATIN AND GREEK GftlHMS. 

pp 240 - in one Tolume, on fine paper and well bound. 
The CHEAPEST CLASSICAL iixnk extara. 



Dear Friend : 

Read this work attentively; and if yoa really wish to 
acquire a thorough knowledge of these languages, all you 
have to do is, to procure a copy of the work, and devote 
your leisure hours to its perusal, and you can not fail of 
acquiring such a knowledge as will enable you to use them 
with ease and accuracy for litis, instead of that rough, un- 
couth jargon obtained from the old philology of the schools. 
The concurrent testimony of seventeen thousand American 
dtizenSf including the faculties of Union, Yule, Hamilton, 
and other colleges,' (;7a^ro7i5 of the work,) within a year 
after its first publication, is an irrefragible proof of the 
claims of this system to superiority over every other extant, 
showing it to be no charlatanerie, running wild among the 
ignorant, but the most valuable treatise on language for 
the use of hustness young men, families and schools, that 
has ever issued from the press. 

This toork is never sold in a hook store; as some gentle- 
men have a greater tact for, and interest in palming ofi" 
on the community worthless old grammars, than of intro- 
ducing improvements — in crying " Great is Diana of the 
Ephssians," than in worshipping at the shrine of religion 
or reason. 



CONTENTS 

OF 

BARRETT'S GRAMMARS: 

Betng a Treatise on ike Languages, English, Latin and 
Greek : foutided on the Analytic Plan. 

PART FIRST. 

ENGLISH GRAMMAR AND LANGUAGE. 

Page. 

1. The Ten Tfareses, applicable to all languages, 5 

2. Division of the Subject, - ... 

3. A Table, exhibiting the twenty-one relations by 

which every one of the eighty thousand words 

in English can be correctly parsed, - • 10 

4. Definition of the Parts of Sneech|. • , - 11 

5. Exercises in Orthography, Syntax, Prosody, and 

Etymology, - - - - - 12 

6. A copperplate engraving, exemplifying the relation 

of the Parts of Speech and Parsing, - 18 

7. Corresponding and Exiled Conjunctions, • - 23 

8. An Unbroken Sentence Fractured into its Logical 

Subject and Predicate; subsequently into the 
Pans of Speech, and punctuated, showing that 
the sentence is formed by the union of a being 
to its own existence or action : in other words, 
that the constituents of a sentence are a nomi- 
native (or being) represented as existing, acting, 
or being acted upon, and a verb, instead of 
being as the old grammarians tell us, a colleo" 
tion of toords, • - - - 25 

0. Exercises in Parsing English Poetry, in which 
each wcrd is correctly parsed, by referring it to 
the above mentioned table (paragraph 4), by 



COKTSICTB. 3 

Pag«. 

placing the corresponding figures after each 
word, - - - - - -27 

10. A Full Explanation of the Parts of Speech, • 28 

11. Conjugation of the Verb, Am, Sum, Elfiki, in Eng- 

lish, Latin, and Greek, - - - 48 

12. Indeclinable Parts of Speech, presenting on the 

same page, and in the same line, the Adverb, 
the Preposition, and the Conjunction, in the 
three languages, and the case which each Pre- 
position governs in the Latin and Greek, - 50 

13. A Treatise on the Relation which one Phrase or 

Sentence bears to another, through the connect- 
ing influence of the Conjunction, the Pronoun, 
and the Preposition, and showing the student 
that without the use of one of these three Parts 
of Speech, no discourse could be continued 
beyond the utterance of a single sentence, - 54 

14 Of the Sections of a Sentence, containing Defini- 
tion and Division, embracing both the direct 
and circumflex course: Relation, both adjective 
and adverbial, with a full description of the sen- 
tensic, insentensic, plenary, inplenary, broken, 
unbroken, literal, and figurative, - - 58 

15. The Rules of English Syntax, • - • 63 

16. The Analysis of one hundred and ten lines of 

Milton's Paradise Lost ; also sixty lines from 
Pope's Essay on Man : every word in these one 
hundred and sixty lines of poetry, is parsed in 
full, by the abbreviations of the Parts of Speech 
and their accidents, on ten pages^ as completely 
as it could be on ttoo hundred pages^ parsed in 
the usual way^ • - - - - 66 

17. Further Exercises not Parsed by the Abbrevia* 

tions, for perfection of the student, containing 
Addison's Letter, Liberty and Slavery contrast- 
ed (in which the relation is pointed out by 
figures twenty-one in number, referring the stu- 
dent to the table of relations, (pp. 10), Webster*8 
Reply to Haines, in the IT. S. Senate, Benton's 
Speech on the Protest, in the U. S. Senate, 
Webster's Speech on the Protest, - - 76 



CONTENTS. 



Pag* 
1& Prosody, embracing Punctuation and Poetical 

Feet, concluding with the Burial of Sir John 

Moore, who fell in the Battle of Gorunna, in 

Spain, in the year 1808, • - •82 



PART SECOND. 



PEINCIPLES OF THE ETYMOLOGY AND SYNTAX OF THE LATIN 
LANGUAGE UPON THE ANALYTICAL PLAN OF ROOTS AND 
ADJUNCTS. 

1. Introduction, showing that to acquire a thorough 
knowledge of the Latin and Greek languages, 
the student must be able to separate the roots 
of all declinable words from their adjuncts ; and 
further, that he must understand the use and 
import of the adjuncts, in giving to the noun, 
pronoun and adjective, declension, gender, num- 
ber and case ; as : 
Root. 1. /. ace, sing, I Root, 2, m, ace sing. 
Pen -a -m. | De -u -m. 

And conjugation, mood, tense, number and per- 
son to the verb; as: 



Root. I.e. in, imp,, 2,pl, 

Err -a -ba -tis. 

Wander did ye. 



Prep,root, I.e. sub, p, 2s 
Con -voc -av -eri -s. 
Together called may'st 
have thou, - • 85 

2. Brief View of the Parts of Speech, embracing di- 

vision and definition, in which the relation is 
shown to be correlative ; that is, that words 
become Parts of Speech in consequence of their 
relation to a noun ; and that the Tunin receives 
its case from its relation to thern^ - - 87 

3. Bules for the Construction of Cases, - - 88 
4* A Table, exhibiting the terminations of the five 

declensions of the Latin language, - - 89 

6, Declension of Nouns, with the signification of 

their Latin cases attached, - - - 90 

6. Declension of the Latin Pronoun, - - 91 



CONTEMTS. 6 

7. Latin Verbs, show^ing the moods and tenses, per^ 
son and number, as follows : 



Pres. Imp, 


Per/. 


LVD. 

Plup. 


Put. 


Latin, — , ba, 


i 


era, 


b(i). 


English. — did, 


have. 


had, 


. shall. 



StTBJTTNCTlVE. 

Pres, Imp. Perf. Plup. Fut, 

Latin, e, a, re, eri, isse, eri. 

English, may, might, may have, might have, shall have. 

PERSON AND NUMBER. 

Singular. * Plural. 

1st. 2d. 3d. 1st. 2d. 3d. 

Latin. o,m,i, 8,(ist]',) t; I mus, ^tis, nt, 

English. I, thou, he; \ we, you, they. 

82 

8. An original table on the conjugation of the Latin 

verb, by which all verbs in the Latin tongue 
can be correctly conjugated ; and five hundred 
verbs, made irregular by the old 83'stem, are 
rendered perfectly regular in the formation of 
their conjugation, mood, tense, person and 
number by this sybtem — it being shown that the 
conjugation of the Latin verb is not always 
known by the infinitive present ; but by a con- 
jugational letter immediately preceding any of 
the above tenses. The tense -ba, is always 
preceded by either, a', c', c', or ie* to mark 
the respective conjugations to which it belongs. 
The perfect tense — i, is always preceded by 
or', u', — 3, iv*, to denote its conjugation; 
thus : 

IMPERFECT. PERFECT. 

Am -ai -ba -m, Utconj. Am -av^ -i, Ut eonj. 

Hon -«a -ba -m, 2d conj. . Dom -i«a -i, 2d eonj. 

Doo -es -ba -m, 3d conj. Vert — 3 -i, 3d eonj 

And -w4 -ba -m, Atheonj. Aud it>4 -i, Athconj. 

9. Conjugation in full, of the Latin verb Amo, 

showing that in all cases, the root, conjugation. 



6 CONTENTS. 

Page. 
tnoo'f^ tensCy number^ person and voice )f the 
verb are contained in the verb itself^ thiib. 

Root. 1 eot^. imd. imp. pi act. Root. 1 conj pau. Imi. plu, 1. 1 
Am -a -ba mu -s [ Am .a •tns, >era -m 

Love — did we, | Loved — been had I 

97 

10. A literal translation of the fourteenth, fifteenth, 

sixteenth and seventeenth verses of the fifth 
chapter of Matthew, with figures attached to th^ ■' 
. ' words to give them the English transposition, in 
which every word is perfectly analyzed and parS' 
ee^, according to the plan of roots and adjuncts. 
Here the primitive meaning of the radicals are 
given instead of the dictionary definitions; as: 
adv, con, prep, root, root, 3,o, 3,plu. root, l,f, ac,s. 
Ne -que ao -cen -d -u -nt Lueern -a -m. 
Not 4 and 1 to 6 fire 5 give 3 — they 2 a candle 7 — — . 
Transposed (by the figures placed after each 
word) it reads "And they give not fire to a candle.*' 100 

11. The Radicals of verbs, containing one hundred 

of the miscalled irregular verbs; and showing 
that they can all be arranged in their respective 
conjugations, and be rendered perfectly regular, 
thereby causing no more hindrance in the stu- 
dent's progress. - - . - 102 

12. The Rules of Syntax. - - - 105 

13. Ad Analysis of the first sixty lines of Virgil's 

^neid disposed of in such a manner as to ex- 
hibit the root of each declinable word and all 
the suffixes and afiixes required to give to the 
noun, adjective and pronoun, declension^ gender^ 
number and case ; and to the verb, voice, an> 
jugation, mood^ tense, person an4 number; 
arranged in columns, as follows: 

Root, Definition, Syntax. Etymology, 

N, G. D.A.V,ji. 

Arm. The arms, cano Arm-a, 26* (2 n. p.) a, onim, ia, a, a, ia. 

Qii. and, armaquc virum, 26 conjanction. 

Vir. the hero, cano vta-um, 26 (2 m.) vir, i, o, uiw, vir, o. 

Can. I sing, (ego) can-o,(1) arma, (3d.) a, ere, cecini, can turn. 

^ Of is, it, irous, itis, nnt. 

107 

• The figijres placed after the words refer to the rule j tho«e in pa* 
renihesi* ( ) to page 142 



CONTENTS. 7 

Pagv 

14. Reading lessons; containing: 

1. 250 lines of Virgil's JExie'id and Georgics, be- 
ing a continuation of the above, - - 121 

2. Part oQ Cicero's first oration against Cataline, 131 

3. Crucifixion of Christ, - - ' 138 

4. Paul's charge to Timotheus, - - 140 

5. Lord's Prayer, - - - 141 

6. Prayers of the Publican and Pharisee, - - 141 
l€i. An analytical Table, separating all the verbs oc- 
curring in the first t^ixiy lines of Virgil's ^neid, 
into their constituent parts according to the de- 
vice of the table described in ^ 8, part 2, 142 



PART THIRD. 

ntlNCIPLBS OF THE ETYMOLOGT AND SYNTAX OF THE GREEK 
LANGUAGE. 

1. The Greek alphabet — Greek abbreviations ; and 

exercises on the alphabet to facilitate the ac- 
quisition of the Greek letter, arranged thus: 
Agrippas de pros ton Paulon ephe. 
^Aypi^irag S^ tpog rhy IlauXov I 9 tj. 
Agrippa then unto the Paul said. 146 

2. A Table of dipthongal sounds — with signs, ac- 

cents, notm bents^ etc., - • - 147 

3. Euphony: showing how one sound, or letter is 

substituted for another, in order to avoid harsh- 
ness in pronunciation — Punctuation of the 
Greek language, . - - 148 

4. Parts of Speech — Number — Case — Declension — 

Tables of Declension — Greek Pronouns, - 149 
6, Verbs — their classifications, divisions, accidents, 

etc., etc., - - - . - 154 

6. Conjugation — ^Euphonic changes in the Greek 
• Verb — Euphony considered — Of the Root, the 

Augment, and the Termination, l(& 

7. A condensed table of the Greek verb, showing its 

augmenrs reduplications, moods, tenses, and 



8 CONTENTS. 

tho first person sing, of all the different tenses, 
together with the Euphonic changes, - - - 16G 

8, Conjugation in full or the verb TTIITn, to 

8TRIKB ; giring all the inflections, moods, tenses, 
persons, numbers, accidents, changes, etc., oc- 
curring in verbs of the first conjugation, in the 
following manner: 

Aug. red. root, tense, sing. dual, plural. 

Pres. ThtTT cj, eif, si, s7ov, s7ov, w/xsv, &c. 

Strike do I, thou, he, ye two they two, we, &c. 
Trap. i TviTT ov, Bgy s, elovj e7*jv, w/ulcv, &c. 

Was striking I, thou, he, ye two, they two, we, &c. 
Perf. TS rvfT [ * ] a, ag, a, a7ov, a7ov,afAffv, &c* 

Struck have I, thou, he, ye two, they two, we, &c. 163 

9. Second conjugation^ or verbs in MI, - - 169 
10 Greek Rules, ... - 170 
11. Analysis entire, of MAT0AIOT, Keip. /3'. In this 

the brief method of analyzation given in the 
Latin part (described under ^ 13, part 2,) is fully 
carried out in the Greek, thus bringing on the 
same page — yea in the same lime — a Testa- 
ment, Lexicon, and a Grammar — supplanting 
the necessity of a teacher, and lessening the 
burden which the student must otherwise bear. 
The following is a specimen of the device : 
Translation. Syntax. Etymology. 

N. G^ D. A. V. 
The (v.l) T-ou 'Ii^CoLi, 0, row, rw, tov, — 

When yevr^svlas 6i conjunction, indeclinable. 
Jesus ysyri&ivJog ^Ir^ff-oii 2.m o(7^, ou, ou,o&v, ou. 
Being bom. ysv-ri6-ivhs 'Irjfl'-ou iif , ivlog, &c. 171 

.2. Translation from the Greek Testament of the first 
chapter of John, into the Latin and English 
languages, being an interlinear translatioui 
showing the actual definition of each word with- 
out any transposition in their arrangement, in 
the following manner: 

*Ev, ^pyji ^^ ^o/of? *«'' koyog &c. 

In he begining was the word, and the word &c. 
In principio erat ille sermo, et sermo erat &c. 133 



C0NTBNT8. V 

Page. 
13 Paul's defeacc before Agrippa, Acts XXVI, com- 
plete, - - ... 183 

Agrippa then unto the Paul said ; It is permitted. 

Agrippa turn Paulo dixit; Permititur, 193 

14. Dives and Lazarus — Luke XVI, 19-31, in Greek 

and English, - • - - 199 

16. Matthew, XXIII, 34 — 39. A/a row W«u, kc. . - 202 

16. Matthew, XIX, 27 — 30. Tors aitw^Mg h nsVpof. 201 

17. St. Luke, XV. 1 — 7.''H(fav is iyyi^ovrgg, &c. 205 

18. Su Luke, XV. The Prodigal Son. complete ; 
eKts 6q; *AvdpWflro^ rig efp^rj SCo vhCg^ xai — 
He said and ; A man certain had two sons, and — 

Ait autem ; Homo ouidam habebat duos filios, £t — 207 
10. Romans, III. 21-26, Nuvi 6i x^?k vof^ou) - - 212 

20. Romans V. 6, 12. 18, 21, "En ydp XpKfrof, - 214 

21. O^jTog yap TiyMffidB^ b ©so; rov xo<rfi.ov. John, m. 16. 

So for loved ike God the toorld. 

Ita enim delixit Deus mundum, • -216 

22. Extracts, containing some of the most important 

texts in the New Testament: 

L Mat.zi.'^; Heb. tx, 27, 28; Rom.vi. 23. - 217 

2. Rom, viii, 6-8. To ydp ^po'vi^fMc. - •218 

3. Rom. viii, 38, 39. ngVgi(ff«iu /olp on. . 218 

4. -Rom. xiv. 10-12; Heb.ii. 9, 10, - - 219 
6. Heb. a. 15; Heb, U. 18, - - - 220 

6. Heb. vii. 26, 27; Heb. x. a-7, - - 221 

7. Heb. X, 10; Heb. xi. 24-26, - - 222 
a Heb. xii. 2, 12, 16-24, - 223-224-225-226 
9. Rom. XV. 1, 2; Gal. ii?. 22-26, 29, 31, - 226-227 

10. Gal. vi. US; Epkesians v. 14-21, - 228-229 

[TT^AII the above extracts and reading lessons, 
from 14 to 22, inclusive, are translated from the 
Greek into the English and Latin languages re- 

, spectively, in the same manner as that described 
under ^11. 

23. Matthew, chapter xiv., entire, translated from the 

Greek into the Latin, and can easily be translated 
mto English from a previous knowledge of 
Greek and Latin words and modes of speech. 



10 V ONTENTS. 

Page, 
gained by a thorough perusal of the preceding 
chapters and passages ; and a reference to the 
common English Testament for such parts as 
appear difficult or obscure. ... 230 

24 Matthew, chapter xxiv., in Greek and Latin, ar- 

ranged same as chapter xiv. — containing fifty- 
one verses. ----- 233 

25 Analytical Table, separating all the verbs occur- 

ring in the analysis of MAT0AIOT, Ke^, /3', 
into their constituent parts according to the plan 
of the table of the verb (^7.) pp. 160 ; being the 
same plan of a table adapted to Greek as that of 
the Latin, described under ^ 15, part 2, of which 
the following is an example : 
Prep, aug, root, ind. imp, Z,pl. Prep. Root. 1 Fut. 3 $. 
1. -irap -6 -ysv -ovro. 12. -^| -eXiuCe -rai. 
Around did come they Out come shall who 

Root. 3. ». ind, imp, v. app. Root. 1 Fut,3, t 

2* i(fr -I -v 13. flTOijULav -sT, 

Is he Protect shall who 

Thus giving the literal meaning of each part 
of the analyzed verh; and the grammatical sig" 
nification of its various constituents, on a plan 

ENTIRELY NEW and ORIGINAL. - - 238 

2S, The Numerals in the Greek, Latin and English, 

from oTte to thra huTidrtd. - • 240 



OPINION OF THE PKESa 



From the Mbany Academy, 
The sfstem adopted by Mr. Barrett, for teaching the principles of 
Grammar, is, in oar opinion I well calculated to promote an acquaint- 
ance with that important branch of education. 

T. ROMEYN BECK, A. M., M. D., 

Secretary of the Regents of the State of New York. 
P. BULLIONS, D D., Prof. Lang. A'bany Academy. 
S. CENTER, A. M., Prin. Albany Classical School. 
A. CRITTENTON. A. M.. Prin. Brooklyn Fem. Acad. 

Extract from a Report of ike Committu on Literature of the Legu 
lature of the Stale of New York. 
The undersigned, having examined Mr. Barrett's system of grammar » 
are of opinion that it is an improvement upon all methods neretofore 
adopted, and well calculated to facilitate the acquirement of a thorough 
knowledge of the languages on which it treats. We have also had 
the advantage of attending a public examination of his pupils, whr 
had been instructed upon this plan. Their very creditable perform- 
ances afforded the most gratifying and conclusive evidences, not onl} 
of the excellence of Mr. Barrett's theory, but of its eminence and 
mrivalled success m practice. 

LUTHER BRADISH, 
C. H. CARROLL, 
PETER GANSEVOORT, 
D.H. BISSELL, 
HENRY F. JONES. . 

The following letter from A. B. Johnson, Esq., the distinpiished 
PhUotopher, Statestnan, Financier ^ and Philologist will be read 
with interest: 

Utica, July Stk, 1846. 
Mr. Solomon Q^r&stt, Jr. 

Dear Sir — I have, perhaps too oarsorily examined your grammar, 
which' you have recently published ; but by the aid of your f>er8onal 
observations, I deem the book a valuable means of communicating noi 
simply the etymological character of words accordmg to their oramary 
use, but tha far higher knowledge of the etymological character 
which words acquire accidentally, by the manner in which they hap- 
pen to be employed in a sentence. I deem your book further useful at 
a neane of teaching the rules of syntax not simply a» arbitrary laics 



i2 OPINION OF THE PRESS. 

but as thowint^ the principles <m which the laws are foundfd, ana 
thereby enabling a reader to understand sentences that olherwisej by 
their being elliptical or involved, would be unintelligible, I have nc 
doubt, however, that before any person can employ your grammar to 
advantage^ either in the instruction of hiniself or others, be must 
understand it in tho way that you too, understand it j and this wil/ 
require some little study and reflection. Indeed, I esteem your book 
much in the same way as I esteem a useful tool or instrument, i 
knowledge of the mode of using it is indispensable to its utility, Witk 
this knowledge acquired, / believe it will communicate more of ih% 
philosophy of grammar than any other book that has fallen under mj 
observation. 

Very respectfully your ob*t serv't, 

A. B. JOHNSON 

*' Barrett's Grammar. The Principles of Grammar, being « 
compendious treatise on the lan^uag^es, English, Latin and Greek, 
founded on the immutable principles of the relation which one 
word sustains to another. By Solomon Barrett, Jr. PhUologist. 
Albany, 1849." 

Indiscriminate puffing has become such a matter of course, that an 
assurance of perfect earnvtness may not always command belief, 
Nevertheleis, in the remarks which we make concerning the work of 
which the above is the title, we claim the credit of entire candor. 
Having spent a large fraction of life in poring over lexicons, gram- 
mars, and other articles of etymological compost for fostering the 
growth of mind, we may assume to understand, to some extent, the 
merit of this class of works. All grammars have been constructed 
on false principles, or rather without reference to principle. Gramma- 
rians seem to have forgotten the evident fact, that language was a 
perfect thing antecedent to book-raaking, — which '* having no law," 
was '* a law unto itself," and as etfeotive a medium of thought in the 
days of Noah, as in the hands of a Geaenios, a Battman, or a Bul- 
lion. Their office was to explain, not make language — not to dig 
artificial ohai^els, but to survey that which mind hath worn, during 
centuries, for its own utterance. Mr. Barrett seems to have perceived 
this and adapts a different course Under his guidance the pupil forms 
his o^n grammar — having no rules except thou which the immutable 
and well-defined relations of words and the universal laws of all Ian- 
guage impose upon hinn. His system is simplicity ilsetf^ and we are 
eertain that it will save to all who nee it, (as it might have done for 
us, had it appeared a few years sooner) months of time which must 
otherwise be wasted in most irksome drudgery to no purpose 

Mr. Barrett's method of analyzing the Greek aiid Latin verbs, is 
of the highest value. With Thiersch's Tables and this work before 
him, a student must be stolid udeed, who can not master the Greek 
n a few months. This is no ^* Language without a Master" running 
grild among harmless children, — in short, no humbug: but a thing 
srhich we never expected to see — a new grammar whicn we could in 
wnscienoe oommeud. 

BENJAMIN J. TENNY, A. M., 

of the University of Vermont. 



OPINION OF THE PEES9. 13 

From the Poughkeeprie Telegraph. 

After a careful examination of this work, we are inclined to pive i( 
our hearty approval, from (be* honest convictiohs that, on many ac- 
counts, it stands unrivalled among philological works. Mr. Barrett 
seems to have been eminently successful in bis attempts to clear the 
science, of which for r-.^ny years he has been a professor, of its m^'s- 
teries, b^ introdacinfT a perfectly new plan, which exceeds anythm^ 
of the kind heretofore puolished. This system introduces the student 
at once to the language about to be studied, and, instead of requiring 
the scholar to commit scores of pages of definitions and rules, to serve 
a regular apprenticeship in the pedagogical tread mill, and to turn 
the crank or that grating machine as discordant as an old version of 
David's Psalms, in broad Scotch, at eight or ten dollars per quarter, 
gives him the ability to become his own teacher, by prebcniing on the 
same page a Vtrgil^ a Dictionary and a Grammar; tlius enabling 
him to deduce all his rules and definitions, from a praciieul analysis, 
not to be forgotten like rules >nd notee benes, acquired witliout a know 
ledge of their practical application, but which lime itself shall never 
afterwardt be able to efface from the tabUl of the memory. 

No industrious young person, of mature age, claiming to be an 
American citizen, who may wish to educate himself, instead of leaning 
against the inner walh of a college, should be without the work, as 
we are satisfied that it will save three years of useless labor in ao* 
quiring these elementary principles of language. 

From the Lantingburgh Democrat, 
Barrett's New Grammar. We have just had laid upon our 
table a new work entitled " The Principles of Grammar, being a 
Compendious Treatise on the languages, English, Latin and GreeK," 
by Solomon Barrett, Jr. 

^ This Grammar is written upon an altogether new principle of analy- 
sis, by which any word of the Greek or Latin languages maj be sepa- 
rated into regular analytical divisions, and by the addition of the 
proper prefix and terminative, be made to assume any part of speech 
required. This system of analysts is founded upon certain unvOTiable 
relations between the different parts of speech, and which are an un- 
mistakable guide to accuracy. We have been able to give this work 
but a cursory examination ; but we must say that it is the most perfect 
system of grammatical analysis with which we are acquainted, and 
we can roost cordially recommend it to the perusal of those engaged 
in philotogbal pursuits. 

FVom Oie Troy Budget. 
Barrett's Grammar. Being a compendious treatise on the 
Languages, English, Latin and Greek, on constructive princi- 
ples, formed on the immutable relation which one word holds 
to another, p. 240. 

This is a neatly executed work, prmted on good paper niiil 
well boim i, containing a wmplete analysis of tlie difiereiit lan- 
guages, on which it treat*, portrayed by the masterly hand of an 



14 pPINION OF THE PRB88. 

author wlio has personally instr jcted more than twenty thousand 
Btu dents, and devoted a life-time to the study of the languages. 
The subject is tieated in a happy lind laconic method, adapted 
to tlie capacity of a child, and at the same time worthy the 
attention of the man of science, the statesman, and the philoso- 
pher, and forming on the whole, a more useful manual for the 
use of young persons desirous of remeufing their early studies, than 
any other work we have ever seen. No young man should Ue 
without it 

The undersigned, having examined Mr. Barrett^s new system 
of Grammar, and become acquainted with his method of teach- 
ing language, highly approve of the same: being fully convinced, 
that the onlt correct method of teaching the grammar of a 
language is, from the language itself, and the most efficient method 
of fixing the etymology ajid syntax of any language on the miud^ 
is, to deduce the definitions and rules from the actual relation 
which one word has to another. 

Mr. BaiTctt's grammar, founded on constructive principles and 
without departiu^ from standard authors, (except in a few cases, 
which are evidently for the better,) teadves the student the whole 
science by induction, and reduces tlie labor *^ of several years to a 
few short and easy lessons^ In short, we would recommend Mr. 
Barrett and his grammar to tlie favorable notice of the public as 
well qualified to give instruction in the science of which he is a 
professor. 

JOHN FULLONTON, 

Professor of Languages and teacher of the 

College Class Whitestown Seminary. 

D. S. HEFFRON, Principal Whitestown Seminary. 

A. HACKLEY, Esq., Recorder of the cityof Utica. 

We, the undersigned, students in the Whitestown Seminary, 
having attended a course of lectures under the tuition of Mr. 
Barrett, say that we highly approve of his new work on the 
constructive principles of language, as also his metliod of in- 
struction, and would highly recommend both to the public, as 
the most effictent, expeditious, and useful method of teaching 
language with which we are acquainted. His method is purely 
niductive, and is wocderfiill^ calculated to fix tlie principles of 
syntax and Etymology, indelibly on the memory and render one 
sentence as easily parsed and corrected as another. We have 
most of us spent years in studying the rules of gramnibr from 
llie works of the most popular writers on Philology, and can 
attest and certify that we have acquired a more correct know- 
ledge of Syntax, Etymology and Prosody in ten lessons with 
Mr. Barrett^ than we have previously attatned. In conclusion we 
^ould say whoever maj attend his lectures or use his work, in 



OPINION OF THE PRESS. 15 

order to acquire a thorough knowledge of grammar, will nol be 
ttiMtppoiiited. 

B. F. JOHNSON, Plainfield, Otsego Co., N. Y. 

H. B. BROWN, West Winfield, N. Y. 

D. R. JOSLIN, Plainfield, Otsego, Co.,N. Y. 

ALFRED WOOD, West Winfield, N. Y. 

STEPHEN»ADAMS, Unadilla Forks, N. Y. 

JOHN G. HULL, Chelsea, Orange Co., Vt 

WATSON WALKER, West Winfield, N. Y. 

EUSHA P. LADD, New Hartford, N. Y. 

CHAUNCEY DEFENDORF, Canajoliarie, N. V 

G. C. FISH, Marcy, Oneida Co., N. Y. 

W. WENDELL, Stark, Herkimer Co., N. Y. 

HARVEY CRONK, Boonville, Oneida Co., N. Y. 

R. A. JONES, Remsen, Oneida Co., N. Y. 

DELOS SEEBER, Cannjoharie, N. Y. 

JOSEPH H. RICHARDSON, Marcy, N. Y. 

STEPHEN A. CRONK, BoonvDle, N. Y. 

Drom H/smdtn Sidney CoUege, VirginicL 

This certifies that we highly approve of Mr. Barrett's plan of 
teaching the principles of language, and after a rigid examination, 
consider him admvably well qualified to teach those principles 
with success. Our own observation and experience as instruc- 
tors, have convinced us, that philological grammar is little under- 
stood, and poorly taught in our primary schools. Nearly all the 
young men who come to this institution, have committed tlie 
grammar by rate, but understood nothing about the prlnc iples of 
the language: Mr. Barrett's method of uistructiou is well calcu- 
lated to correct this evil. 

We are pleased with another part of his plan of instruction. 
He not only communicates a knowledge of die elements of the 
language, but endeavors, also, to convey some idea of its beauty 
and harmony. The English is really an elegant and harmonious 
tongue, but by an entire neglect of its prosody and poeli^y, it is, in 
the mouths of the great mass of population, a rough, uncouth jargon. 

Mr. Barrett's book is the first of die kind which we have met 
with ; its design seems to be a uniform and logical system of in- 
struction in exercises ; as such we highly recommend it to pB> 
rents and teachers. J. P. GUSHING, President, 

PETER McVlCKAR, Prof, of Math. 
H. A. GARLAND, Prof. Ling. Gnece. 
JOHN BURWELL, Prof, of Nat. PhiL 

I concur in opinion with the faculty of Hampden Sidney, tiia 
Mr. Barrett is well qualified to teach the principles cf grammai 
and that his method is good. 

JOHN H. RICE, D. D., President, 
of the Virginia and N. Carolina Union Theological Seminary. 



16 OPINION OF THE PRESS. 

I have seen tlie system adopted by Mr. Barrett for teaching 
the principles of Lugiish grammar, and have conversed witi; 
him on the subject lam fully satislied of the utility of his plan 
and think its introduction into our schools would greatly facilitate 
the study of 'grammar, and tend to improve tlie schoW in ele- 
gant and correct composition. 

JOHN V. N. YATES, 
Late Superintendent of Common Schools of tlie State of N. Y. 

FVom the Rahway (M J,) Register, 
We have received from the author a most capital work en tided 
"Barrett's English, Latin and Greek Grammars." Mr. Barrett 
presented us with his work at the close of an interesting gram- 
matical talk we had with him which lasted above an hour. We 
had not conversed with him five* njumtes, however, before we 
found that he had fully " bottomed the subject" of grammar — 
and we must, here, in candor state that we have not yet met 
with any individual (and we have met with adepts in our time) 
who so thoroughly comprehended (at least in our view) the 
subject of grammar as does Mr. B. He is, indeed, a perfect 
grammatical enthusiast and will convey more sound philological 
information in an hour than most others can do in a year. His 
conversation and his book ai'e '* one and the same." He has the 
whole philosophy of tlie subject at his fingers' ends— and to 
those about commencing the study of grammar we would say 
by all means possess yourself of Barrett's book, with (if possible^ 
a word of grammatical counsel from the author. We shall 
recur to the subject again. 

lYom the Ulica DemocraL 
Barrett's Grammar. This is a book of some two hundred 
and forty pages, designed to simplify the study of the English, 
Latin and Greek languages. It is said to have met tlie approba- 
tion of a vast number of classical scholars, and to be worthy the 
attention of the public. The author has paid great attention to 
these depaiiments of education, and his suggestions are, therefore, 
entitled to consideration. The book is handsomely printed and 
bound. 

Drom the Ulica Gazette. 
The author has compressed into some two hundred and forty 
pages all the essentials of grammar, dictionary and reading book, 
for acquiring a knowledge of the English, Greek and Latin Ian- 
^agcs. At least so the preface says, and so we should judge as 
far as we have ability to determine. It is particularly valuable to 
tliose who may desire to burnish up their early classical acquire- 
ments, avoiding by its novelty the danger of nauseating, by the 
revival of recoUectionB of school hours and dog eared text 



OPINION OF THE PBE88. 17 

books. It ]8amodelofbrevity,<fefmf e<&reviffy«nurMurpafl8abl6 
illustraticn of the muUum in parvo. 

The difHculties usually attending the study of language, which 
^ tire and disgust so many, are to he ascribed far more to tlie im- 
proper mode of teaching than to any thing intrinsic; but il 
pursued in the manner la^d down in Professor Barrett's work, it 
becomes extremely simple, easy, and perfectly intelligible. If 
teachers will bum their grammars, and permit their students to 
study language, we think some progress will be made. 

We have long regarded the method usually pursuetl in intro- 
ducing students to the reading of ^ the dead languages," as ex- 
tremely injudicious and unphilosophical. More time is wasted 
in studying the ^^greamnar" than is necessary to make the student 
well acquauited witli the lanffuoffe — ^sufficiently so, that he shall 
be able to form a grammar for nimself. Besides, the methods 
adopted for the formation of the Latin and Greek verba are 
needlessly cumbrous, and in some respects, radically enx)neoui5. 
The student is taught rules which Brejblstj and by fbUowintf 
which he is plunged hito darkness and confusion. Etymologic^ 
analyns is not studied with perspicuity, and the scholar knows aboui 
as mv4A of (he real nature and force ^ words when he leaves coUege, 
as when he enters iL 

Rev. C. P. GROSVENOR, A. M, of Dartmouth College, 

aSc York, May 24th, 1849. 
lllr. S. Barrett, Jr., 

Bear Su- — ^Having devoted some of my leisure moments to 
the perusal of the work on language which you have recently 
published, I feel an honest assurance in giving it my hearty ap- 
proval. Your original tables of the Greek and Latin verbs I 
consider as leading features in your excellent work; and I have 
no hesitation in believing that every teacher and classical stu- 
dent will admire the plan you have cdopted to render the com- 
plex forms of Latin and Greek, plain, simple and compre- 
hensive. 

I would also advert to your method of giving to each word in 
a sentence, a connection or syntax to anoSier word in the same 
sentence, as commencing to teach grammar at the right point 

In conclusion,! feel confident in the assertion that no grammar 
eon be made that will, in point of principle, supersede the one oj 
uMch I now speak — because iJt corresponds so accxratdyf not only 
with obvious reason and plain common serse, bui also wUh the very 
nature and structure of, those languages oJ which ttis a most perfect 
exposition, and counterpart — until that structure itself shall be 
changed, which is, in regard to the Greek and Latin languages, a 
matter of impossibility. 

ELG. WHEELER, M.D. 



IS* OPINION OF THE PREK8. 

Drom the Mbany Knickerbocker, 

Teleoraphic Education. It has been Ba«[ely considered u}f 
•omeof our modern philosophers tliat one's iaeos are composed 
of something analogous to the electric fluid ; and that the months 
and years of time and study formerly approp*^Ated to education, 
were so appropriated on the same principle that tlie foot pad oi 
donlcey was considered once the most expeditious means of for* 
warding corresjiondence. Since, however, we have found tho 
means of sending news round all creation before Time shoulders 
his scythe of a morning, tlie school boy becomes impatient cf 
the years of educational drilling required heretofore to give hin: 
an ordinary education. The old plan of putting pupils into tho 
ocean at fii*st to scour the coast in search of the mouth of rivers, 
and tlien compelling them to paddle up stream against tlie cur- 
rent and rapids till tiiey find the source, is about considered as 
commencing at the wrong end. Some years ago a Yankee 
came among our Dutch population, offering to teach the English 
grammar in a inontli's time to any person of common sense, so 
that they could read and write correctly ; a class was formed 
and after going through tlie course seemed satisfied tliat the 
teacher had done all tliat he promised. Yesterday this gent pre- 
sented himself again in town after an absence of ten years, wiih 
a Uxrgt blank book bound in red moroccOj containing apparently 
several thousand subscribers* names to a graimnar he has just 
published, which, he says, will enable one to learn the languages 
so as to read them understandingly, and write tliem correctly in 
a short time. We were among the faithless, and turned to his 
subscription book to see what scholara had countenanced him by 
then: subscription, when we found the presidents and about aU 
of the professors of Union and Hamilton Colleges, besides a 
large number of others, whose literary reputation have made 
tlieir names familiar to us, had subscribed for his book. 

Among these were William H. Seward, Millard Fillmore, 
liamilton Fish, Luther Bradish, John A. Dix, Gideon Uawley, 
A. C. Flagg, T. Romeyn Heck, Peter Bullions, Alonzo Critten- 
Con, Robert Murray of Queens county, Kingston, John Van 
Buren, Silas Wright, Jr., J. V. L. Pruyn, and others, including 
nearlif all (M regents of the University of the State of AVto York, 
and more than/ue hundred graduates from the colleges. 

A few general principles, said Mr. Barrett, the gentleman 
spoken q\\ will show you how to analyse any language and un- 
derstand it; there are not so many different words in a language 
as I «?oplt imagine, but the different terminations and combina- 
tions convey the different meanings. Take, for instance, the 
word coftvocavem, said he, and separate it into its different parts 
— con-voc-av-eri-s, con is a preposition and means together, voe is 
the root of tiie word and means called, a» merely denotes the 



OPINION OF TRB PRESS. 19 

first conjugation, eri menns mayst have, and 8 aignifieaM /u low 
translate, roinrneiiciug where you )ett o(f, and you find it reads, 
ihou mayal haveeallcd togtlhn. Now vou have tile word analysed. 
%nd understand its parts, which will make a multitude oi' otiier 
words by different combinations and terminations, and each of 
tlioi»e words you can understand by knowing tlie rules by which 
they are composed, and the meaning of their pans. 

Alter this brief explanation, we were satisfied that Mr. Bar- 
rett's system of teaching language is the only one extant, calcu- 
lated to free the student from an adverse current and an eternal 
Quarantine; and waf\ him onward with a gentle tide to the 
esired haven of the most consummate knowledge of gram- 
matical erudition. 

Barrett's Grammar. I would take pleasure in adding my 
name, as a teacln^r, in recommendation of this work, were it not 
that it had ab^ady received the sanction of many men of influ- 
ence and learning. The author of these *' principles op gram- 
mar," has, evidently, investigated thoroughly the philosophy of 
language, and his work, as it respects the English and Latm, is 
the first departure from that stereotyped code of arbitrary rules 
which has constituted the dry text in our schools and colleges; 
and which has been but a poor blind guide in introducing the 
pupils to the laws of these dialects. "What the German philolo- 
gists have accomplished for the Greek, Mr. Barrett has effected 
ror the LAtin and English ; namely, to define the prindplet which 
underlie them, and with these to construct a philosophical ar- 
rangement which shall be true to the facts involved in their 
origin and growth, and to the laws of thought lie would teach 
the pupil to prosecute his study of a language as a naturalist 
would an examination of the functions of an organized being — 
a plant, or an aniinaL That, as in a tree, the root, the branch, 
or the fi-uit can sustain no separate existence nor answer a pur- 
pofese, except as united, the one to the otiier, in the unity of the 
general lite of the tree; so the noun, the verb, the adjective, &c., 
can have no separate existence or import, save as united by 
syntax mto an expression of any particular idea; and which 
relation gives to each word its name and uso. From the diction 
*^one word belongs to anothei^ as his point of (departure, he pro- 
ceeds to exhibit tho relations, and all the relations which can be 
obtained among the parts of speech, the limits of the modifica- 
tion of nouns, and of verbs, in conforming to the conditions of 
Dumber, person, gender and case, &c. ; that a word is never o 
noun or other part of speech in virtue of its separate technical 
meaning; but by having the syntax of such part of speech, and 
from the fact of its occupying a certain position in the organic 
•bode of a sentence. ABNER BENEDICT, A. M., 

Late Principal of Essex Co. Academy Yt 



20 OPINION OF THE PRESS. 

We, the undersigned having examined some of the student* 
caught by Prof. Barrett, say that they would not only bear au 
examination for common school teachers in any part of the state, 
but what is more, they would bear an examination in Granunai- 
in any college in the United States. 

JOHN F. McGERRY, 
President of Emmetsburgh College. 
SOLOMON SOUTlfwiCK, 
Ex-Regent of the University of the State of New York. 

Josepb Lancaster was the first, if I mistake not, who simpli- 
fied our common system of grammar, and rendered it more 
eas^ and comprehensive to our youth, at tlie commencement of 
their studies, but it more espe:ially belonged to yourself, to lif) 
the veil of obscurity from the old philology of the schools, and 
establish a new system, which for utility in application, and 
facility in acquisition, stands unequalled in the annals of elemen- 
tanr literature. 

Very Respectfiilly, JAMES A. MOTT 



-^«^»^VN/W>AA/N/S/N^^ 



DI?*BaTrett's new Series of Grammars, to which so many 
of our most illustrious, and highly esteemed Citizens have 
added their names in testimony of approval, has been en- 
tirely revised and corrected, is printed on paper of the best 
quality, bound in a superior style, and is one of the prettiest 
booksi now for sale in the U. S. 

It is delivered to X3r Subscribers^ ordy^ at two dollars 
and twenty*five cents per copy, payable on deliyeey. 



THESES. 



1. The Etymology of a word depends entirely 
on its Syntax, or relation to another word; 
hence a word that has no Syntax can hare no 
Etymology : i. ^., before any word becomes a 
part (of speech) of a sentence, it must be in- 
corporated into that sentence of which it is a 
part. 

2. The Case of nouns and pronouns is that 
RELATION or positiou which they have to another 
ward ; therefore, a word having no relation to 
any other word, is in no case or position what- 
ever; as, nominative, man; possessive, man's; 
objective, man. Now, the word num^ as ar- 
ranged above, is in no case^ neither is it a *^part 
of speech.*^ 

3. In translating from one langu^ to ano- 
ther, the (Syntax) relation and (Etymology) 
PART OF SPEECH, remain unchanged. 

4. That the root of a word will continue to 
have the same meaning in all languages into 
which it may be incorporated, as it had in the 
original : as, test (is,) a witness ; fer (o,) bring ; 
(at) test ; testi (mony) ; testi (fy) ; (re) fer; 
(pre)FFJi; (de)FER, &c. 

1* 



THE PRINCIPLES OF 



5. The Ancients wrote their language to be 
read from the right hand to the left^ and without 
spaces between their words; consequently, all 
Greek and Latin verbs are compounds, and 
are to be read from the right to the left; after 
having reduced them to their simple elements, 
by separating mentally or by spaces, the root, 
conjugation, mood and tense, number and 
persons. Splen-d-e-a-t is not a single word, 
to be read from left to right — flight — give — may 
— ^IT ; but this word contains five distinct pSrts, 
beginning at the right. The first is the person 
and number, (1, t,) it, (2, a,) may (3, e, 2d conj.) 
(4, d, root, d[o],) give (5, splen,) light. 

Etym. Root. Root. 2 c. Sub. pr. 3 s. Prep, Root. Inf. pr 

Verb. Splen -d-e - a - t, Trans - i • re. 
I^^» ligt^t give may it, over go to. 

Note. — The man of letters will see, at a glance, the 
soundness of the position here taken, and that since the 
languages were confounded at the tower of Babel, (or 
babble,) no method could be more eflfectual in perpetuating 
ignorance, than the common method of translating verbs, 
from the left hand to the right. 

6. Declinable words in the languages of an- 
tiquity, consist, generally, of one root and of 
several terminations : — YiD-e-a — ^in this word, 
vro is the root, and means see ; e, second con- 
jugation, and, as we have not, in English, 
four conjugations, it can not be translated ; 
and denotes indicative mood^ present tense, 
first person singular, I see. Au-av-isse-m — ^am, 
root, av, first conjugation, isse, subjunctive 
pluperfect, m, first person singular : (m) /(isse) 



ENGLISH GBAMMAR. 



miglu have (av)* (am) loved^ [Ama.] DE-u-m — 
DE, root, and means God ; u denotes that the 
root de is of the second declension^ masculine 
gender^ and m marks the accusative singular in 
all declensions, except the third declension 
neuter- 

7.. A word never becomes a noun or any 
other part of speech by being used technically^ 
or independent of its meaning; but by having 
the syntax of a noun (or other part of speech), 
astToHN is a scholar : is is a verb, them is a pro- 
noun, in which John, is and them become nouns 
by having the syntax of nouns. 

8. Detached words, as arranged in the col- 
umns of spelling books and lexicons, are no 
parts (of speech or) of a sentence, until they are 
actually used in a sentence. 

9. Every word, before it becomes a part of 
speech or sentence, and before it can be parsed, 
must be connected to not more than two, nor 
less than one other word, called the single and 
double relation. 

Note. — ^The interjection being a virtual sentence, has 
no relation, except with the vocative or case independent. 

10. A participle, before it can become a part 
of speech, must hold either a single or double 
relation to some other word ; and the moment 
this relation is given to it, the participle va- 
nishes, and the word becomes either an adjec-^ 
tive or verb; thus: 

Mr. Wright, respected by the people, was elected. 
'^ Not tnuulated, being the ooijagatioii. 



o THB PRINCIPLES OF ENGLISH GRAMMAR. 

This word respected, ia^capable of receiving /m?o 
constructions, as respected Wright, an adjec- 
tive ; Wright, who was respected, a passive verb. 
Every one can see that this word can only be 
called a participle while it remains in its un 
connected or no-part-of-speech state ; therefore 
there is no such part of speech as a participle — 
for the ^syntax) relation or connection of these 
words, oy which alone a word becomes a part oj 
speech, will immediately give them all the etv- 
mology of either the verb or adjective. 



GRAMMAR. 



GiAMMATi, der yed from rpa^^uirtvc, (Grammateus,) a 
uniter^ in its most comprehensive sense, signifies the capa* 
city or ability to v^rite a language in such a manner as will 
give to each word and phrase in the sentence, that con- 
structive relation to the other words in the same se7itC7tce, 
which the universal consent of all men using the same 
language, has assigned to them ; hut, in a more amfined 
and te^nical sense, 

Grammar is that science which presents the constructive 
principles of the language or languages of which it treats: 
cow, together, struerCy to huild ; therefore, a work which 
purports to be a "Treatise on Grammar," ought, rather to 
foint cut clearly this consteuctivb eelation, which exists 
among the words in a sentence, and by virtue of which 
they become parts of speech, than to be a mere transcript 
of definitions and rules from the grammars of antiquity ! 
which are of but little use in guiding the student in the 
structure of his sentences, or in "writing and speaking 
the language with propriety." And here let the student 
be admonished, that no person has ever yet been able to 
either speak or write correctly, who was ignorant of the 
actual relation or natural dependence which is found to ex* 
ist between the words and members of a sentence, and 
which it is the peculiar province of the grammarian to 
make clear and plain. 

Language (derived from Lingua^ the tongue,) is the 
faculty of communicating our thoughts to each other, by 
pronouncing or writing certain toords, which the universal 
consent of mankind has agreed should stand for a fixed and 
definite idea. Grammar is naturally divided into four 
parts : 

ORTHOQEAfrH?, ETYMOLOGY, SYNTAX, and PROSODY. 
LETTERS. WORDS, SENTENCES. ACCENT. 



10 THE PHINCIPLES OF 

Note, — "We shall here omit the Orthography of the English and • 
Latin, and insert the Greek Orthography in its proper place, when we 
come to speak of that language. 

Orthography is the art of expressing words by their 
appropriate letters. 

Syntax is that natural dependence which one word has 
to another word or words in the sentence, from which it 
derives its etymology, or part of speech ; for a word that 
has no syntax, 3an have no etymology ; and for that reason 
we have designedly placed Syntax before 

Etymology, which treats of the various parts of speech 
which words become, in consequence of this syntax, or re- 
lation to other words in the same sentence ; their various 
declensions and conjugations, and also of their derivations. 

Prosody treats of the laws of versification and the rules 
of punctuation. 

Note. — The syntax and etymology of a language are inseparably 
connected, and it is almost impossible to contemplate one without the 
other, thus. — An adjective is a word ioined to a noun, to express its 
quality, is an etymological definition ; but the moment you add an ex- 
ample, as white paper, you give the word white a syntax, or relation 
to paper, without which relation to paper, or some other name, it 
never could be an adjective. 

TABLE, 

EXHIBITING AU. THE RELATIONS OF W0ED8 IN ENGU8H LANGTTAOS. 

Single Relation, Cold 1 day. Adjective, belonging to ^— 

Single, Noui^- Man 2 walks. Nominative case to — — 

Man, 3 Case independent. 

Man 4 bebg killed. Case absolute. 

Man's 5 horse. Possessive case, before-— 

Saw Man, 6 Objective case, governed by— - 

To Man, 7 Objective case, governed by- 

Double, John, He 8 ia. Pronoun. 

Single, John Is. 9 Intransitive verb. 

Double, Scott Conquered 10 Mexico. Transitive verb. 

Single, Mexico Was coNqxTERED. 11 Passive verb. 

Single, Moves Slowly. 12 Adverb, qualifying ^— 

Preposition, Book Or 13 Fate. Preposition, adjective relation. 
Double, Smiles O'er 14 repose. Prc(M>sition, adverbial relation. 

Double,' Two And 15 three. Conjunction, connecting words. 

Double, He may stay Or 16 he may go. Com., connecting sentences. 
No relation. Alas. 17 Interjection, no relation. 

Single, Can 18 go. Auxiliary verb. 

Single, Kztrxmelt 19 cold. Auxiliary adjective. 

Single, Vert 20 swiftly. Auxiflkry adverb. 

Single, Almost 21 to. Auxiliary preposition. 



ENGLISH GSAUMAK. IL 

NoTB. — Evcfy one of the eighty thousand words in the English 
language, when arranged in a sentence, will take the place o(, and of 
eoivse, become the bamv: port of speech as one of the twunty-one 
words in the foregoing scale. 

From the preceding Scale, it will appear, 
that the parts of speech are eight : — Adjective, 
Noun, Pronoun,Verb, Adverb, Preposition,CoD 
junction and Interjection. 

1. An Adjective is a word having a single relation to 
and restricting the extension of, a noun ; as, a cold (1) day 
good (1) pen, &c. 

2. A Noun is the name of a person, place or thing, pro- 
vided it has one of the six relations given to the noun man 
in the preceding scale ; as, George (2) 'studies grammar (6) 
at hisfaXker^s (5) house (7), under the instruction (7) of a 
tutor (7). 

3. A Pronoxtn is a word used instead of a noun, and has 
a double relation ; as, John went to New York, where he (8) 
will remain: relation, John, he will remain. 

4. A Verb is a word expressing existence of, or action 
performed or received by, its nominative ; as John is (9) 
well; }ane studies (10) grammar; Mexico was conquerea 
(11) by Scott. This part of speech may have either a sin- 
gle or double relation. 

6. An Adverb holds a single relation to the verb, to ex« 
press the manner of existing or acting ; he Tnoves svnftly 
(12) ; John studies his lessons diligently (12). 

6. A Preposition is used to connect the phrase in which 
it occurs to a preceding noun or verb ; thereby giving to th« 
phrase an adjective or adverbial relation ; and, to govern an 
objective case, consequently it always has a double relation. 
The jessamine c?a;nftcr5 (in (13) floaver) o'cr(14)the thatch. 
The flowery jessamine clambers there. 

7. A Conjunction is a wcrd of a double relation, used 
to connect one word or sentence with another ; as, two aiid 

15) three are five ; James went to New York, but (16) his 
brother remained at home. 

8. An Interjection is a word having no relation ; as, 
alas! (17) he is gone forever! 



12 THE PRINCIPLES OF 

We now j)resent the student with the fol 
lowing exercises on the preceding part of out 
work, as a system of instruction highly im- 
portant to the student, and which will be 
found far more useful than the common me- 
thod of reviewing by questions and answers. 

METHOD. 

Orthography, * Letters. 

Syntax, Sentences. 

Etymology, Words. 

Prosody, Poetry. 

EXERCISES FOR CLASS IN THE SCHOOL ROOM. 
ORTHOGRAPHY. 

Teacher, Orthography is the art of spelling: now, give 
me the orthography of the following words : \See plate,) 

Class, (in concert.) 

The, The, the 

Midnight, Midnight, midnight 

Moon, Moon, moon 

Serenely, Serenely, serenely 

Smiles, Smiles, * smiles. 
What is spelling called ? Orthography. 

SYNTAX. 

Teacher. Give me the syntax, or relation, of the foUow- 
mg worda : 

CldsSf (in concert.) 

The, The 1 moon. 

Midnight, Midnight 1 moon, 

Moon, Moon 2 smiles, 

Smiles, moon Smiles, 9 

Serenely, smiles Serenely, 12 

Teacher. What is this natural union of one word to ano« 
ther called ? Answer^ Syntax 

Note. — For vanoas reaaons, not now necessary to give, we prefer 
that all the answers thoold be given by the class m concert or onisoii. 



ENGLISH GRAMMAE. 13 

ETYMOLOGY. 

Teacher. Noui, give me the etymology of the same 
words, as I pronounce them : 

Class, (in concert.) 

The, The, an adjective. 

Midnight, Midnight^ an adjective. 

Moon, Moan, a noun. 

Serenely, Serenely, anadverh. 

Smiles, Smiles, a verb. 

TeacJier, What is this classification of words called ? 
Class, (in concert,) answer. Etymology. 

PROSODY. 

Teacher, Now, give the prosody of the same : 
Class, (in concert.) 

The mid | night moon | se rene | ly smiles. 

Teacher. What part of grammar is that composition 
written in a regular succession of accented and unaccented 
syllables? Answer, Prosody. 

SEE PLATE — SECTION U. 

Teacher. Give me the syntax of the second section ob 
the plate. 

Class, (in oonoert.) 

O'er, Smiles, O'er 14 repose. 

Nature's, Nature's 5 repose. 

Soft, Soft 1 repose. 

Repose, O'er Bepose. 7 

Teacher. Give me the etymology of the same words. 

Class, (in concert.) 
O'er, O^er, a preposition. 

Nature's, Nature's, a noun.* 

Soft, . Soft, an adjective. 

Bepose, Repose, a noun. 

* The Instractor may use his own' judgment in calling this word a 
•otm or adjective, as the possessive e ise always has the syntax of an 
mdjeetUfs, 

2 



14 



THE PRINCIPLES OF 



SEE PLATE — Si;CTION HI. 

Teacher. Give me the syntax of the words in the Aird 
flection. 

Clan^ <m concert,) 



No, 


No 1 


cloud. 


Lowering, 


Low'ring 1 


cloud. 


Cloud, 


Claud 2 


obscures. 


Obscures, 


cloud Obscures 10 


sky. 


The, 


The 1 


sky. 


Sky, 


obscures Sky, 6 




Oi&r, The 


etymology of the same. 






Class, (in concert.) 


No, 


No, 


an adjective. 


Low'ring, 


Low'ringy 


an adjective. 


Cloud, 


Claud, 


a noun. 


Obscures, 


Obscures, 


a verb. 


The, 


The, 


an adjective. 


Sky, 


Sky, 


a noun. 



Teacher. Give me the prosody of the second and thira 
sections together. 

ClasSy (in concert.) 

O'er nat | ure's soft | re pose. 

No low* I ring cloud | ob scures | the sky. 

Teacher. Give me the syntax of this sentence : *' Steam 
boats are made use of by merchants." 

Class, (in concert.) 



Steam boats. 
Are made. 
Use, 
Of, 

ierchants. 



of 
use 

use 

is made 
by 



Steam boats, 7 
Is made, 11 
Use 2 is made. 
Of 13 steamboats. 
By 14 mqrchants. 
Merchants, 7 * 



It is. 

Of steam boats, use 



Is this sentence incorrect ? 
How will it stand \c:hen corrected ? 
is made by merchants. 

• By the above sentence, it 'will be seen, that this method of syntax, 
once attained, vnU. correct every incorrect sentence in the langaage; 
for, as soon as the syntax is given, the error appears; and just to socn 
as the error is apparent, any person oonid correct it. 



EMQLISB GBAHMAR. 



15 



Teacher. Now give me the syntax of the sentence, 


" The sun is a thousand times larger than the earth," 




Clau^ (in concert.) 


The, 


The 1 sun. 


Sun, 


Sun 2 is. 


Is, sun 


Is, 9 


A, 


A 19 thousand. 


Thousand, 


Thousand 19 times. 


Times, 


Times 19 larger. 


Larger, 


Larger 1 sun. 


Than, sun is 


Than 16 earth is. 


The, 


The 1 earth. 


Earth, 


Earth 2 is. 


Teacher. Let me have the 


etymology of the same sentence. 


«,, ^'"'' 


(in concert.) 


The, 


adjective. 


Sun, 


noun. 


A, 


verb. 


A, 


auxiliary adjective. 


Thousand, 


auxiliary adjective. 


Times, 


auxiliary adjective. 


Larger, 


adjective. 


Than, 


conjunction. 


The, 


adjective. 


Earth, 


noun. 


Much as man desires, a little will answer. 


Teacher. Syntax. 


Class, (in concert.) 


Much, 


for the Much, 7 


As, much, 


, desires, As, 8 and 6 


Man, 


Man 2 desires. 


Desires, 


man Desires 10 as. 


A, 


A 1 little. 


Little, 


Little 2 will answer. 


Will answer, 


little Will answer. 9 


TecuJier. Etymology. 


Class, (in concert.) 


Much, 


noun, object., gov'd hy for. 
rel. pron., stands for much, obj* 


As,* 



* Relative iirononn, standing frr much, governed bv detires. 



16 THE PEINCIPLES OF 

Man, noun, nom. case to desires. 

Desires, verb, transitive. 

A, adjective. 

Little, noun. 

Will answer, verb, intransitive. 

A little wilt answer for the much which man desires. 



We now present the student with an En- 
graving, representing more fully the relative 
position of words in a sentence. The first 
cut on the plate, contains this sentence: — 
" The midnight moon serenely smiles." Now, 
as this diagram represents a single tree ; so, 
themidnightmoonserenelysmiles, is only one sen- 
tence ; and, as there are several parts of the 
tree; so, also, is this sentence divided into 
several jt?ar^5; as the trunk sustains its branch- 
es, so, also, the trunk word, moon, sustains all 
the other branch words in the sentence; as 
the branches are constituted such, from the 
connection or position which they hold to the 
trunk, so, also, do the branch or dependent 
words actually become parts of speech, in 
consequence of their relation to the noun as a 
sustaining trunk. And as the body of a tree is 
constituted a trunk, from its sustaining rela- 
tion to the branches, so the noun derives its 
case entirely from that relation which it holds 
to other words; and, as the roots, trunk and 
branches must be t/nited to form a whole tree, 
60 the parts of (a) speech must be wwited to 
form a speech; and, as there could be no 
branches without a trunk, so, also, if we had 
no nouns^ (neither a creator nor a creature,) 



ENGLISH GRAMMAR. 17 

we could have no adjectives to limit, verbs to 
express the actions of, conjunctions to connect, 
prepositions^ showing relations between, or 
pronouns standing for beings which have no 
existence, any more than we could have a 
world without a God, or a part of any thing 
without a whole to which it is related. God 
never made a part without a whole : he did 
not make a part of a man, namely, the head, 
and ordain that it should be sustained from 
four to seven feet in altitude, above the 
earth, without a body to sustain or limbs to 
support it, and hold learned discussions on 
philology and its anomalies. This business 
of creating parts without a whole, of making 
parts of speech without syntax, seems to have 
devolved upon the learned grammarian. 

89?* MODE OF USING THE PLATE. 

1. The student will give the word which he 
wishes to parse, its true relation, by pronounc- 
ing it, together with the word or words with 
which it is connected. 

2. He will then place the word on the pars- 
ing table after the same fgure that is placed 
over the word, and parse it, filling the blank 
or blanks with the word or words with which 
he has previously joined it on the plate, and 
apply the rule ; fill the blanks with the word 
he is parsing, and the word or words on which 
it depends as a part of speech, and if he will 
continue these exercises untilrhe has perfectly com- 
mitted these parsing lessons to memory^ he will 
find no difiiculty in learning grammar. 

2» 



18 THE PUINCIPLES OF 

i. MiDNiGin, a 1 — is an adjective, havings a single rel»- 
tiDn to, and i>estricting the extension of . 

Rule 1. Every adjective belongs to a noun; 
as, . 

2* Moon, n — is a noun, the name of a thing, 
c — common, not applied to individuals, 
f — feminine gender, personified by smiles, 
3 — third person, spoken of, 
s — singular number; it denotes but one object, 
2 — nominative case, it precedes the verb . 

Rule 2. The nominative case precedes the 
verb ; as, . 

9« Smiles, v — is a yerb ; it denotes existence, 
r — regular ; it forms its past tense in ci, 

in — intransitive, having a single relation to , 

ind — indicative mood ; it simply indicates or declares 
pr — present tense ; it represents present time, 
3 s— 1[ 



-third person, singular J to agree with 

Rule 9. A verb agrees with its nominative 
case, in number and person; as, . 

12* Seeenelt, adv — an adverb, having a single relation 
to, and qualifying . 



Rule 12. Adverbs qualify verbs ; as, 



14. O'er,* prep — a preposition, having a double relation 

to and , and giving its phrase an 

adverbial relation to the verb . 

* ^ When the antecedent of a preposition is a verb, the phrase con- 
taining the preposition has an adverbial relation to that verb; and 
when the antecedent is a novn, the phrase which the preposition heads, 
has an adjective relation to that noun — thus: 

Moon smiles o'er nature's soft repo$e. Smiles there. 

Heaven hides the Book of Fate. Fatal hook. 

Where fatal is equivalent to " Book of Fate," and there to " O'er 
nature's soft repose ; * thus showing the relation. 



^ 



ENGLISH GRAMMAR. 19 

Relation — Book of Fate. 
13. Of, prej>— a preposition, having a double relation to 

— — and , giving its phrase an adjective 

relation to the noun . 

S« Nature's, n — is a noun; name of a thing. 
c — common ; not applied to individuals. 
n — neuter gender; it denotes neither sex. 
- 3 — third person ; spoken of. 

s — singular number; it denotes but one object. 
5 — ^possessive case ; it precedes the noun . 

Rule 5. The possessive case precedes the 
noun; as, ^'s . 

7» Bepose, n — is a noun; name of a thing, 
c — common ; not applied to individuals. 
n — neuter gender; it denotes neither sex. 
3 — third person; spoken of. 
8 — singular number; it denotes but one object. 
7 — objective case ; governed by the preposition . 

Rule 7. Prepositions govern the objective 
case ; as, . 

2» Cloitd, n — is a noun ; name of a thing. 

c — common ; not applied to individuals. 
. n — neuter gender ; it denotes neither sex. 

3-r-third person ; spoken of. 

s — singular number; it denotes but one object. 

2 — ^nom. case ; it precedes the verb ; Rule 2. 

10« Obscures, v — verb; it denotes an action performed. 

r — regular ; it forms its past tense in ed. 

tr — transitive ; having a double relation to . 

ind — ^indicative mood ; it indicates or declares. 

pr — present tense ; it represents present time. 

3 s — third person sing. ; to agree with ; Rule 9 

6. Sky, n — is a noun; name of a thing. 

c — common ; not applied to individuals. 

n — neuter gender; it denotes neither sex. 

3 — third person ; spoken of. 

8 — singular number^ it denotes but one object. 

6 — objective case, governed by the transitive verb -*. 



20 THE PR7NCIPLES OF 

Rule 6. Transitive verbs govern the objec- 
tive case ; as, . 

Relation — Mexico was conquered, 

11 Was conquered, v^ — verb; denoting action received, 
r — regular ; it forms its past tense in ed, 
pas — passive; expressing action received by its 

nominative. ^ 
ind — indicative mood ; it indicates or declares, 
imp — imperfect tense ; represents past time. 
3 s — third person singular ;. to agree with — ; Rule9 

Sentence and rdation. 

John, (went to Albany, where) he (8 & 2) ttnll remain. 

8» He, pp — is a personal pronoun, standing for and agree- 
ing with , in gender, person and number ; no- 
minative case ; it precedes the verb ; Rule 2. 

Sentence aud relation. 

Cloud obscures sky, nor tempest blows. 

16* Nor, con — is a conjunction, having a double relation 

to, and connecting the sentences, , 

nor . 

Rule 16. Conjunctions connect words and 
sentences; as, , (con.) 

17* Alas! int — is an interjection; a word having no 
relation. 

Sentence and rdatioru * 

George 2 regards 10 his lesson 6. 

3* Osoroe, n — is a noun ; name of a person, 
p — proper ; applied to individuals, 
m — masculine gender ; it denotes males. 
3 — third person ; spoken of. 
s — singular number; it denotes but one object. 
2 — ^nominative case ; it precedes the verb — ; Rtde % 



ENGLISH GRAMMAS. 2 

Sentence — He is the person whom (S & 6) I saw. 
Relation — Person whom 8 — saw whom 6. 

Sm Whom, r p — is a relative pronoun, having a double re- 
lation to person, with which it agrees in prender, 
number and person, and to saw^ by which it is 
governed ; Rule 7. 

AT7XILIAHIES. 

Sentences and relation, 

John can 18 write much 20 better on a very 19 pleasant 
day, than in a storm. 

James went almost 21 to New York. 

18. Can — is an auxiliary verb, forming the potential 

present of torite* 

19. Veky — is an auxiliary adjective, qualifying pleasant, 

20. Much — is an auxiliary adverb, and qualifies better. 
21* Almost — is an auxiliary preposition, and qualifies to, 

Euij: 18. An auxiliary holds a single rela- 
tion to its principal J as, . 



SUPPLEMENTARY PARSING. 
Sentences. 

Mary, 3 can you write a letter for me I 

Moon 9 that meets the orient sun6. 

The general A being-killed, the army was routed. 

3« Mary, f — feminine gender; it denotes females. 
2 — second person ; spoken to. 
ind — case independent. 

Rule 3. All nouns of the second person, 
are in the case independent ; as, O . 



22 THE PRINCIPLES OF 

4. General, 4 — in the case absolute, preceding the par- 
ticiple . 

Rule 4. The case absolute precedes the par- 
ticiple; as, . 

3* Moon, f — feminine gender, by personification* 
6« Sun, m — mascaline gender, by personification. 

Sentence — ^Heaven (from all creatures) liides the Book 
(of Fate.) 

1* Heaven 2 hides 10 the Book, 6 — is a transitive sen- 
tence, because it contains three sentence words. 
[Hides 2] from all creatures — is a prepositional phrase, 
having a single adverbial relation to its antece- 
dent verb . 

[Book] of Fate — is a prepositional phrase, having a 
single adjective relation to its antecedent noun. 

Sentence — Our Father, who art in heaven. 

Who 2 art 9 in heaven — is an intransitive aentence, be- 
cause it contains but tioo sentence words, having a 
single adjective relation to its 'antecedent noun , 

Sentence — ^Mr. Jones, respected (l&ll) by kis friends, 
was elected sheriff. 
Relation — Respected 1 Jones — Jones, who w«« respected. 

Respected, part — is a participle, having ttoo di^Aicict rela- 
tions by virtue of which it becomes eil^^v mn ad- 
jective or verb. 



BM0LI8H GEAMMAB. 23 

ON CORRESPONDING AND EXILED CONJUNCTIONS. 

We oflen meet with what are called " Cor- 
responding" and "Exile" conjunctions; but 
they all have the same relation that ori6 has 
in the table; thus: 

JislS the young bears seized on the repast, so 16 we snatehaoi fill. 

Now, this word as is £i corresponding conjunc- 
tion; corresponding to so, and expressing a 
comparison of equality between the two sen- 
tences, like the sign of equality (not plus nor 
minus^) in Mathematics; thus: 

JI9 as 16 bears seized repast , 

1, so 16 we snatch ml ■ 

If you wish to make as a conjunction, invert 
the terms 2 and 1, thus; 

1, So 16 we snatch onr fill, 

9, As 16 the bears seized on the rich repast. 

In all cases, one of the corresponding con- 
junctions must be exiled or thrown out of its 
proper place. These conjunctions may both 
be inserted between the two sentences, thus: 

The bears seized on the repast, so => as we Snatch our fill. 

By rendering this sentence plenary, (full J both 
conjunctions will have their proper place and 
relation : 

The bears seized on the repast, so 16 we snatch onr fill ; 

and. 

We snatch onr fill, as 16 the bears seized the repas 

In the following sentences: 

Sit Ir 16 yon wish to be a grammarian, 
1, Yon most study. 



24 THE PRINCIPLES OF 

J' is exiled from its proper place. Now, in- 
vert the sentences, thus: 

]« You miist study, 

3, If you wish to be a grammarian. 

1, A youth would boast his skill to curb iho sieodj 
And, 16 {'h as 16 he passed the j][azing thron«;.) 
2 9 The idiot Wonder they expressed, was praise. 

Now transpose, 

1, Youth would boast J Sco. 9,, And 16 3, Wonder was, &o 
Asl6 tl, he passed the gazing throng. 

Jacob went up into a mountain, and, 16 asl6 the sun rose, he wor- 
worshipped the Lord. 

Asi6 no part of English, Latin or Greek 
Grammar is of more importance, or more dif- 
ficult to acquire, thanie an actual knowledge 
of the relation of the conjunction, without 
which it is impossible, eitlierie to write oris 
punctuate correctly: therefore.ie we have ex- 
tended these remarks to great length. The 
eommon method of learning the conjunctions 
BY THE LIST ! ! iustcad of relation^ is an insult 
upon, andie degrading to, human nature. You 
will, therefore, see the necessity of first es- 
tablishing the fact, tliatie the conjunction ac- 
tually con-nects (from con, together, nectere, to 
link,) sentences, beforeie you can have any 
conception of its being a con-junction, (a con 
et jungere,) a-joiner^ogether-of-sentences. 

We have extended these remarks, as no part is more difficult. 
No part is more difficult than knowledge of this relation (is.) 
It is impossible to punctuate, either it is impossible to write. 
It is impossible. to write, or it is impossible to punctuate. 
As no part of {grammar is more difficult, therefore we have, Sto. 
Method of learning is an insult, and method of learning is degrading. 
Tou will see the necessity, &c., that the conjunction connects, Sec. 
f^i wiU sAe that the oonjunction^ &o., before you can have Any, &c. 



ENGLISH GRAMMAR. 26 

Having given the student a general view of 
the parts of speech and their relation, it is now 
proper to call his attention to the 

SENTENCE, 

which we shall present in its ancient, unhro- 
ken state, without ^aces or pointSy that we 
may afterwards, by introducing punctuation 
between the phrases^ and ^aces between the 
words, give the student, not only an idea of a 
sentence, but of the manner in which a writer 
(ypoftfMtTfos ) would proceed in forming a sentence 
and also of the use of punctuation. 

AN ANCIENT ITNBROEEN SENTENCE. 

ThemidnightMooruerenelysmUeso'erNatureaioflRepoie 
Noltno^HngCloudobscurestheSkyn&rrufflingTempittbkn^ 

By introducing a space between moon and 
serenely J we shall divide the first sentence into 
its logical subject and predicate. 

Logical tvbject. Logical predicate. 

ThemidnightMooii serenelysmileso'erNatare'ssoftRepoM. 

Here we see, that a logical subject is the nomi- 
native, together with all other words having a 
relation to it, and the logical predicate is the 
verb, and all those words which modify or 
hold a constractive dependence upon it. Now 
we will, by introducing into this sentence 
three more spaces, and a point, draw out the 
grammatical nominative and verb, and divide 
the sentence : 

Naminatioe. Verb, 

Thflmidiiight moon terenolj imiles, o^erKatiiie'MoftBapM». 
3 



26 THE PRINCIPLES OF 

The grammatical nominative is the single 
noun or pronoun preceding, (in consiruction,^ 
and having a single relation to the verb; as, 
moaw2 smiles; and the grammatical predicate 
is the single verb used to assert the existence 
or action of that nominative ; as, moon smiles.g 
Hence, words in a sentence naturally fall into 
this two-fold division: sentensic^ or those which 
form the sentence; and insentensic^ or those 
which have no sense until they are united to 
the sentensic. 

Inaentemte, The midnight serenelj o'er Nature's, Sco« 

8enten»\c, moon 2 smiles 9 

Hence, a sentence is always formed by the 
union of a being to its own existence or ac- 
tion, and is constituted by the connection of 
not more than three nor less than lu?o words; 
as, 

Moon 2 smiles 9 (9 two words.) 

Cloud 2 ohsoureslO sky 6 (10 three words.) 

Haying disposed of the first sentence, let 
us look to the second. If we introduce a 
semicolon before the conjunction nor^ we shal 
divide this compcund to simple sentences; as, 

Nolow'riDgcWQdabscQrefcthe^ ; normfihngtempestblows. 

Should we proceed further with this sen- 
tence, it would be a mere repetition of the 
first ; therefore we shall leave this task to the 
rtwdent, who, we apprehend, will have no dif- 
ficulty in dividing it into words, by the intro- 

N VTR. — Any word holdin|^ the 2d, 6th, 9th, 10th or 1 1th relation, 
(see Table of Eelauoub) oiiui be sentensio ; all others are m&entensio* 



ENGLIt^a GRAMMAK 27 

daction of spaces, and pointing out the logical 
and grammatical subject and predicate, and 
distinguishing the senteusic from the insen* 
tensic words. 



EXERCISES IN PARSING. 

[Note. — The figures placed after the words, refer to tho Table of 
BelationSf the Plate, the Parting Leuons and RulegJi 

Asl6 two\youngl bears2 inl4 wanton! mood,? 
Forthl2 issuingl&9 froml4 al neighboringl wood,7 
Came9 tvhfrel2 the! industriousl beesS hadlS stor'd.lO 
In 14 artfull cells,? their8&5 lusciousl hoard ;6 
0'erjoyed,I tbey8&2 seized, 10 \viihl4 eager! haste,? 
Luxurious! ont the! rich! repast.6 
Alarmed!! atl4 this,! the! Jittlel crew2 
About 14 tbeird&d ears,? vindictive!!^ flew.9 
The! beast8,2 unable t to sustain 10 
The! unequal! combat,6 quitIO the! plain :6 
Half-blind! withl9 •rage? andl6 mad I with 19 *pain;7 
Theii6&5 native! 8he]ter6 tbey8&2 regain ;10 
Therel2 sit,9 and 16 nowl2 discreeter! grown, !&9 
Too20 late!2 their8&5 rashness6 they8&2 bemoan ;!0 
Andl6 this! by!4 dear! experience? gain, 10 
ThatS plea8ure2 's ever!2 bought II with 14 pain.? 
So,16 whenl2 the! gilded! baits2 ofl3 vice? 
Are placed 1! beforel4 our8&:5 longing! eyes,? 
With!4 greedy 1 haste?, we8&2 snatch 10 our8&5 fill,6 
And 16 fswallow-downlO the! latent! ill:6 
Butj6 when 12 experience2 opes JO our8&5 eyes,6 
Away 12 the! fancied! pleasure2 flies.9 
It8&2 flies.9 butl6 oh!l? too20 late!2 we8&2 find, 10 
lt8&:2 leavesIO a! real! sting6 behind 14 (it.) Merrick. 

* The phrases with rage and with pain ^ have an auxiliary adject Ivt 
relation to blind and mad. 

t Beized'<m and swallow-down aie compound transitive vei^s 



28 THE FRINCIPLES OP 

PARTS OF SPEECH. 

The parts of speech are eight: Adject r;e, 
noun, pronoun, verb, adverb, preposition, con- 
junction and interjection. 

An adjective is a word holding a relation to 
a noun, and limiting its logical extension. 

Note. — ^Under this class of words are included the article, 
participle, and all other words holding the same relation to 
a noun which the word cold holds to day, in the preceding 
table. The word the, in Greek, is called the definite arli- 
rle ; being used there to define the gender of the noun 
to which it belongs; and as this adjective is always used 
In Greek Lexicons for tnal purpose, and is declinable like 
other Greek adjectives, they called it the definite 
article ; b mas., fj/cwi., ro neut,, corresponding to the Latin 
t7Zc, illa^ illudj (he, she, it). Old writers have continued 
to call it an article, although it has no such use in English 
neither does it define or ascertain what particular thing ip 
meant: the book, the zone, the man, Me table; the does 
not refer to any book, zorte, man^ or tahle, previously men- 
tioned, because the words have not been previously men- 
tioned in this paragraph. Supposing there should be but 
one hook in the room, certainly the book is of itself a very 
definite article, and cannot be made more so by prefixing 
the to point it out and show how far its signification 
extends, than it is without the : as, book ; and should there 
be tiDo books, by prefixing the no person on earth could pos- 
sibly tell which was meant by the book. The large book: 
which word enables the person addressed to understand 
which book is meant, the or large? There are two books 
on the table, a large and a small one ; the learned school' 
master commands his learned disciple to bring him the 
book, and he brings him the small one ; whereupon he 
punishea the boy for not bringing the right book. The boy 
says that he could not tell by the which book was meant. 
The learned gentleman repeats the punishment, and gets 
into a passion, calling him a blockhead for not knowing 
what book is meant, when he has defined the book by the 
ignite article the — the book means the large book. After 



ENGLISH GUAVUiAR. 29 

ihis display of icit and taleht^ the master goes home, and 
orders the girl to set the table for dinner. She asks him 
which table, (as there are three in the house — a mahogany 
table, a cherry table, and a pine table ;) the learned gen- 
tleman is surprised at the stupidity of servaitt girls, that 
do not know which particular table is meant, when he has 
defined it by the, the definite article. The master con- 
descends to modify his language, from the table, to her 
limited capacity, and says: the cherry table. The girl 
tells him that she knows which he means, and that if an 
article is a word added to a noun to ascertain which table 
is meant, as he has taught her, that the word cherry is the 
article. 

Suppose that you wish to point out a particular chair, 
which is standing in the room in which you are reading 
this dissertation, and you say: ** The chair which stands 
by the door," as there are generally more chairs than one 
in a house ; which one, is pointed out by Me, the chair, the 
(definite) chair. Suppose you say to a visitor: *' Take the 
r.hair which stands by the window," is it by th€, ox the 
qualifying phrase, which stands by the wiridow^ that he 
learns which one you mean? But, says the friend of 
soothsaying, does not the refer to some chair previously 
mentioned ? No ; because none has been ][>reviou8ly men- 
tioned. To tell the truth, you would say, that you said to 
your friend, on entering, " take the chair," without previ- 
ously mentioning any chair. 

The word article is derived from articulus, a hinge. Let 
us talk it in English. There are two hinges in the English 
language, viz: a definite hinge!! and an indefinite 
hinge!!! If the word hinge is applicable as a part of 
speech, the conjunction, preposition, and relative pronoun, 
would constitute the hinges of language, as without one of 
these hinges, or connectives, no relation could take place 
between one phrase or sentence and another, as: God 
(who) spake (by) Moses (and) the prophets. 

fn order to constitute a word an adjective, it must have 
the syntax of an adjective ; that is, it must be joined to a 
noun, and must, at all events, limit its logical extension. 
A noun without an adjective is invariably taken in its 
broadest extension, as: Man is accountable. A^rurica is a 



30 TH£ PRINCIPLES OF 

fine country. A knife is a useful article. The r<ae is 
beautiful. In these expressions, the words, man^ America^ 
knifty and ro^c, are taken in their ftroarfc*^ extension, mean- 
ing, respectively, all mankind, the whole, continent, all 
kinds of knives, and all kinds of roses. Now, if we wish 
to express a part^ we use the adjective^ and say : white 
man, (excluding the blacks,) North America, (and exclude 
the South,) &c., from which it will be readily perceived by 
the student, without dwelling longer on this point, that the 
legitimate use of an adjective is, to enable us to distinguish 
one object from another, to define them, and that any word 
which has a syntactic relation to and restricts the extension 
of a noun, hy excluding a part, is an adjective in its nature, 
whether it expresses quality or not, as : this room, (allud- 
ing to the room in which you are while reading this) ; this 
is nothing but an adjective, as it restricts the extension of 
the noun room, by excluding all other rooms on earth. A 
he goat, (excluding the female.) 

Although there are various kinds of adjectives, it will 
not be necessary to form them into distinct classes, as 
others have done, who say, " they express quality ;" be- 
cause our definition, *' restricting the extension of a noun,** 
includes within its extension every adjective in the English, 
Latin and Greek languages, (with the exception of all, 
every, and a few others, which are used to give the noun 
its broadest and emphatic extension,) therefore, a division 
of the adjective into classes, can be useful to that gram- 
marian who is yet ignorant of the real nature and use of 
this part of speech. There are two kinds of phrases which 
have the same relation to a noun that the adjective has, 
growing out of this simple fact, that they restrict the ex- 
tension of the noun, as: America, "which lies north of 
the equator,*' or, iVor^A America ; book '*of fate,** fatal 
book; *' planets (which are) roling,** or roling planets. 

See PartciplcS; Relative Pronouns, and Prepositions. 



ENGLISH GBAMMAE. 31 

COMPARISON. 

Adjectives hare three degrees ol Comparison, viz: 
Equality^ CTmparative and Superlative, besides, the posi* 
tive state. 

1. The positive state restricts the extension of the noan, 
without a direct comparison, as cold day^ sharp knife, long 
line. 

2. A comparison of equality, is effected when two nouns 
are compared by as, and as or so, and said to be of equal 
extension^ as: Jane is as tall as her sister, • 

3. The comparative degree is used to compare tun 
nouns, (not three,) and asserts, that the one to which it be- 
longs has a greater or less extension than the other, as : — 
the second line is longer than the first. 

4. The superlative degree is used to compare three or 
more names, and affirms that the noun to which it belongs 
has a greater or less extension than all others, as : the 
third is the longest line, (of the three.) 

As as, comparison of equality, affirmative, the lin'e a is 
as long as the line b; a , b . 

So as, cotAparison of equality, negative, the line a is not 
so long as the line b ; a , b . 

Positive state, 

A long line. 

Comparative, 
The second is a long er line than the first. 

Superlative^ 
The third is the long est line of the three. 

These are all the degrees mentioned by writers on Eng* 
lish giammar ; but there are in reality as many, or more 
than we have numbers to express, thus: this day is sixty 
degrees colder than yesterday ; the sun is a thousand de- 
grees (or tinr.es; larger than the earth. 



32 THE PRINCIPLES OF 

OF THE NOUN. 

A Noun is the name of a person, place, or 
thing: as, George, London, pen. But, in 
order to constitute a word a noun, it is abso- 
lutely and indispensably necessary that it 
should have ouQ of the six relations given to 
nouns on the Table of Relations. 

That is, any word having one of these six relations will 
become, in consequence of that relation, a rumn, without 
being used technically or independent of its meaning: as, 

Is2 is a yerb2 ; them2 is a pronoun2 ; theQ is a word2 of 
three letters? ; of, 2 to,2 and /or ,2 are prepositions.2 

In these examples, the words marked with figures are 
nouns, and in the same case in' which man is, opposite the 
corresponding figure on the Table of Relations, page 10. 

On the other hand, a word having neither of the six re- 
lations given to man, can never, by any possibility of con- 
struction, be a noun, although it should happen to be the 
name of a person, place, or thing; thus, the word man, 
when you give it the syntax of cold, becomes an adjective, 
in consequence of its relation : as, 

He hired a manl servant,6 
On a coldl day7. 

And if you give to this word the syntax or connection 
which conquered has, it will become the same part of 
speech, viz: a transitive verb: as, 

Scott2 coTiqueredlO Mexico .6 

The government2 i;^ill manlQ their ships6. 

The wall is extremelyld thick ; extremely, aux. adjective* 
The wall is quit el9 thick ; quite, aux. adjective. 
The wull is three feetl9 thick; three feet, aux. adjective 
The wall is very 19 thick; very, aux. adjective. 

The term anomaly means that one word has a difierent 
construction from another ; the term analogy signifies that 
words having the same syntax, relation, or construction, 



ENGLISH 6RAMMAB. 33 

masty from the necessity of that very construction, be the 
same part of speech. Wow, is the word " feet," in the 
above sentence, analogous to^ or anomalous from the other 
words in italics ? We first ask the learned grammarian to 
give us the syntax. He will agree that it holds a relation, 
as arranged in the above sentence, with thick; three feet 
thick. Let me ask the student, who may be reading these 
remarks, if he ever knew a noun comtructed with an ad- 
jective? And do words become nouns in consequence of 
that construction ? If the auxiliary adjective, (or adverb, 
as styled by old authors,) are nouns, unthaut a governing 
toordy it would form one of the greatest anomalies that 
ever existed in language. 



EXTENSION OF NOUNS. 

By extension^ we mean the number of individuals to 
which the noun can be applied ; thus : ** Man is accounta* 
ble to his Maker." Here, man is a noun, in the singular 
number, denoting but one; and yet, by its logical exten- 
sion, it includes every individual of the human race ; for 
if there were one human being that was not accountable, 
the proposition, that " Man is accountable to his Maker," 
would not be true. 

Common, {broadest extension,) 
Proper, {limited extension.) 

1. A Common Noun is one including within 
its extension, a whole raccj genus or species ; 
as, man, country, tree, animal, being. 

2. A Proper Noun is one whose extension 
is limited to a single individual, by being ap- 
propriated to one; as, George, Albany, Mo- 
hawk. 

Note. — A common noun, unaccompanied by an adjeC' 
five, is invariably taken in its broadest extension. 



34 THE PRINCIPLB8 OP 

It now* remans to be shown how a noun may be limited' 
in its extension, or prohibited from extending to the whole 
race, of which each individual is a part; and this is efiect* 
ed in three ways 

1. By appropriating to an individual a proper name. 

2. By prefixing an adjective ; and 

3. By subjoiiiing to a noun, a section of an adjectire 
relation. 

And, first, a noun may be restricted in its extension, b^ 
assigning to individuals a proper name, thus: George, Da- 
vid, John Randolph, Josephine, Florilla, Stanwix, and 
Mary, are proper names, used to point out certain individu- 
als, included in the extensive common name^ Man, 

New York, Albany, Troy, Utica, Oneida, Pennsylvania, 
Home, Syracuse, Hudson, St. Lawrence, Mohawk, Mis- 
sissippi, each restricts the extension of the more extensive 
noun, city, county , state, village and river, to an indioidu* 
alj and 

Secondly, a n6un may be restricted in its extension by 
an adjective; as, table, carving, butcher, pen, pocket, and 
butter knife, are six fractions, of which knife is the whole. 

From this view of the subject, we deduce the following 
rules : 

1. Every greater includes the less. 

2. All the parts united form a whole. 

Thirdly, a noun is restricted in its extension, by sub- 
joining a section of an adjective relation ; as, 

1. Father, (broadest extension.) 

2. Our Father, (extension limited by our,) father cf u*. 

3. Our Father who a^^t in heaven, or our heavenly father. 

4. Heaven hides the book of fate, or fatal book. 

In the third example, who art in heaven, restricts the ex- 
tension of father ; and in the fourth, the word book is re- 
stricted by the adjective section of fate. Hence, the 

Rule. No word iji a period can have any 



ENGLISH ORAMMAB. 85 

greater extension than the other words or sec- 
tions in the same sentence will give it. 



GENDER. 

Nouns have two genders: 

1. Masculine^ which is applied to mates. 

2. Feminine^ which denotes/einafc^. 

All names, except of males and females, are 
of the ne (not) t^ter (either) of the two genders, 
unless they are converted into the masculine 
or feminine gender, by personification, a figure 
of speech, by which life and action are attri- 
buted to inanimate objects; or, by some ad- 
jective, verb or pronoun, representing a gen- 
der: as, 

Gray twilight had clad all things in her sober livery. 
Sweet is the breath oi mom^ her rising sweet. 
Pleasant is the «un, when Ae spreads his orient beams. 

Twilight is personified by had dad, and gender desig* 
nated by her, 

San, masculine^ personified by spreads, designated by he 
and his. 

Twilight, her, femimne^ by personification. 

Mom, . her, do. do. 

Sun, he, masculine, do. 

There are, also, a few words, as, parent, friend, cousii^ 
elation, stranger, child, &c., of the oommcn gender. 



36 THE PRINCIPLES OF 

PERSON AND NUMBER. 

There are two persons of nouns; the second, 
when spoken tOy as, 0,3 man; and the thirds 
when spoken oj^ as man^ walks. 

Note. — On the Table of Relations, 0,3 man, is in the 
second person, and in the case independent ; whereas, the 
word man in its other five relations, is in the third person. 
So also in the Latin and Greek languages. The vocative 
case is always in the second person; but all other cases are 
in the third: nnd, in all languages, the first person is in- 
variably represented (not by a noun, but) by a prorunin. 

Nouns have two numbers; the singular^ 
which denotes but one object^ as, chair^ pen^ 
table; and, the plural^ which denotes more 
than one, as chairs, pen^, tables. 



(CASE) OR POSITION. 

The word case^ means the position which a 
noun or pronoun holds to another word in the 
sentence. 

Note. — In the Table on the scale of relations, page 10, 
it will be seen that the noun has six positions, from No. 2 
to 7 inclusive ; and it is ihi^ relation to dLnolYitx single toord 
that gives the noun a case or position ; for if it had no re- 
lation, it could have no case. 

Suppose some very learned and distinguished author 
should insert, in his learned treatise on English grammar, 
the following table : 



Singular. Plural. 

Norn. Man! Norn. Men! 

Pou. Man's ! » Post, Msn's ! ! 

Obj. Man! I Qbj, MknII! 



ENGLISH GRAMMAB. S7 

What grammarian would not see at a glance, that the word 
man has no rtlation^ and, in reality, no cast? Let me ask, 
to what verb is ihefirgt man the nominative? Nam, man! 
And what does the second mun's possest^ that it should be 
written, poss. man^s ? And is the last man in the objective 
•without a governing word, obj, man? Even the child 
might justly conclude, on examining such a display of wit 
and talent as the above learned table exhibits, should he 
be called on to decypber its meaning, that the word singt^ 
lar^ heading the first column, could mean nothing else than 
that it is singular y very singular and passing strange^ that 
a noun which has no connection to any thing in heaven 
above or the earth beneath, should, in consequence of its 
non-retatioTiy be in the nominative, possessive and objective 
case. 

Seriously, the word man, as arranged in all the gram 
«nars extant, is not even a part of speech* Let us make . 
this word ma% a part of speech, by incorporating it with a 
sentence : — ^He hired a manl servant. Here man is ccn^ 
strued with servant, and becomes an adjective, and can be 
in no case whatever ; for adjectives^ in English, have no 
case. Again : — ^They will manlO their ships. Here, man 
is not a noun, but a transitroe verb. 

Let us now, as Brown says, " use it 017* technically, and 
tty* independent of its meaning," and it will be a noun: 
Man2 walks. Here the word man is truly a noun, as we 
think, simply because it has the syntax of a noun, and not 
because it is used technically ot ifidependent of its mean- 
ing ! ap quoted above, from the learned Mr. Brown. This 
IS about as classical a reason as Mr. Hamblin, a learned 
gentleman, who some years ago, published an abridgement 
of Murrey's Grammar, gave for the definite article. The 
learned gentleman, in order to elucidate, and, at the same 
time, give erigtrudity to hisvaluahle toork, introduced into 
It this origimU sentence : ** The bee is an industrious insect.'^ 
Now, as none of his readers could tell what particular bee 
was meant by the, it being plain that bee was taken in its 
broadest extension, he accompanied the sentence with this 
learned commentary : " The is a definite article, becattsb 
it points out the signification of the noun Bee " ' 

Such classical definitions as these, quoted on this page, 
are so useful, learned, dzssical, original, and so deserving 
4 



1. 


John reads. 


2. 


John. 


3. 
4. 


John being killed. 
John's book. 


6. 


Saw John. 


6. 


To John. 



38 THE PRINCIPLES OF 

of UNDYINO FAME and ETERNAL PERPETUITY, that We hopt 

the reader will pardon us for the digression, and not accuse 
us of plagiarism, for incorporating them into this work. 



DECLENSION OF THE NOUN. 

The positions of the noun and pronoun in 
English are six : thus, 

Nominative, it precedes the verb, read% 
Case independent, after O. 
Case absolute, before the part. 
Possessive case, precedes the noun, hock 
Objective case, follows the verb, taw. 
Objective case, follows the preposition. 

Note. — Every noun and pronoun in the English lan- 
guage, when arranged in a sentence, must have (in order 
to constitute it a noun or pronoun) one of the above rela- 
tions ; hence we deduce the following 

RULES FOR THE GASES, OR POSITIONS. 

1. The nominative case precedes the verb. 

2. The independent case follows the interjection O. 

3. The absolute case precedes a participle. 

4. The possessive case precedes a noun. 

5. The objective case follows a verb ; or, 
(6. The objective case follows a) preposition. 

Note. — In reading these rules, let the word position be 
substituted for *' co^e," and it will be plain to the most 
limited capacity. The above rules can be understood and 
applied by him only who has acquired the capacity to give 
to each noun and pronoun, in a sentence, its true relation ; 
and that these rules do not apply to the position which 
words have, independent of their grammatical construction. 



ENGLISH GRAMMAR. 39 

OF THE PRONOUN. 

A Pronoun is a word used instead of the 
noun: as, the man is industrious, therefore he 
is contented. 

Note. — If, in the above definition, you read the three 
words in italics thus — (man), he is — you give to the pronoun 
he its true relation ; for all pronouns have a double rela- 
tion ; and all refer to their antecedents, for gender, person 
and number, and to another word for case ; hence, he is a 
personal pronoun, standing for, and agreeing with, man, 
(in gender, number and person,) and in the nominative 
case, because it precedes the verb is. Therefore, no word 
of a single relation can possible be a proTwun — as, every! 
man — this adjective cannot be a VBLO-Tunin, because it 
stands for no noun whatever ; hence, there can be no such 
thing as an adjective pronoun, or a promomndl adjective. 

DECLENSION OF PERSONAL FRONOTTNS. 
SINGtrLAB. 

Nominative. Possessive. Objective. 

1st person. I (write). My (pen). (To) me. 

2d person. Thou (art). Thy (book). (Saw) thee. 

3d. per. m. He (is). His (farm). (With) him. 

3d. per. f. She (went). Her (fan). (With) her. 

3d. per. n. It (is). Its (form). (Heard) it. 

PLTTRAL. 

Nominative, Possessive. Objective. 

Ist person. We (are). Our (house). (To) us. 

2d penon. Ye (go). Your (pen). (To) you. 

3d person. They (are). Their (pen). (To) them. 

OF THE RELATIVE PRONOUNS. 

The relative pronouns are : toho, which, what, that, and 
as. These words are, in both numbers and persons, with- 
cat change, except who, which is thus declined : 

Nominative. Possessive, Objective. 

Who (is, or are). Whose (temple). (To) whom. 



40 THE PRINCIPLES OP 

The words what and ag are relative pronouns of a two- 
fold case, in certain constructions : as, 

From what?, 2 is recorded ; he speaks asG, 6 he thinks ; 
from the facts? which2 are recorded ; and, he speaks the 
thoughts6 which6 he thinks. 



OF THE VERB. 

A Verb is a word used to express the exisU 
ence, or action performed or received by its 
nominative: thus, 

Nom. Existence. Nom. Action performed. Nom. Action received. 
Wood is, John splits wood. Wood is split by John. 

Wood2 is9. Is is an intransitive verb, denoting existence. 

John2 splits 10 wood. Transitive verb, denoting action 
performed, by the nominative JokTi. 

Wood2 is split 11. A passive verb, denoting action 
received, by the nominative ivood, 

OF VERBS EE6ULAR, IRREGULAR AND DEFECTIYB. 

1. A verb is regular when it forms its imperfect tense 
and perfect participle by adding d or ed, 

2. A verb is irregular, when it will not do this. 

3. And a defective verb is one that cannot be conjugated 
through all its moods. 

Regular verbs — ^walk, walked ; love, loved ; rule, ruled* 
Irregular verbs — ^run, ran ; am, was ; see, saw. 
Defective verbs are — can, may, quoth, ought, &c. 

TRANSITIVE, INTRANSITIVE AND PASSIVE. 

As all verbs, when arranged in a sentence, have the 
relation given on the scale from 9 to 11, inclusive, it will 
be easy for the student to understand the distinction be- 
tween the transitive and intransitive. All verbs have a 
nominative, but the transitive verb only has an object. 
The term tra7w(iT)ive, (from trans-Eo, tVe, ivi, itum^) will 
be more intelligible to the English scholar by translating 



ENGLISH GRAKMAR. 41 

it into English. Tram means, in English, aoer ; and it 
is a Latin verb, and means goes. Now no verb can be a 
transit (or goes over) verb,' but that which has a double 
relation to a nominative, and an objective case ; hence, all 
verbs of a double relation, in all languages^ are transitive 
verbs ; and, a 'prior a^ all verbs of a single relation are 
iN-trans-iT-ive (or not-go-over) verbs. 

Intransitive (single rel.) Transitive (double rel.) 

Man toalks, John studies grammar. 

Tempest blows. God Tnade the world. 

Trees grow. Trees bear fruit. 

John runs. John drives a horse. 

This list might be increased by inserting every verb in 
all the languages on earth ; in which case all the trans- 
itive verbs would arrange themselves under the second 
column, of the plus relation. From which it is plain that 
the only division of verbs founded on the language is to 
be traced to their single and double relation. 

1. Single relation, or intransitive. 

2. Double relation, or transitive. 

TBS RECEPTIVB OR PASSIVE VERB, 

Is one whose nominative case receives the action and is 
formed, by the union of a verb of a single relation, to one 
of a double relation : thus, 1. he was ; 2. John killed him ; 
3. he was killed by John. 

Receptive {pas.) Verb. 

Grammar was written; drum was heard; sky is ob- 
scured ; will is distracted ; letter was written ; man was 
nade ; coat has been made^ 



MOOD AND TENSE. 

Mood is the different form of the verb, to 
represent the mann3r of existing or acting. 

4* 



42 THE PRINCIPLES OF 

There are five moods. 

1. Indicative, expresses an affirmation. 

2. Imperative, expresses a command. 

3. Potentiali expresses the possibility of an action. 

4. Subjunctive, expresses a doubt. 

5. Infinitive, an unlimited action. 

The Indicative Mood indicates that its 
nominative case exists or acts; either affirm- 
atively or interrogatively; positive or nega- 
tive: as, 

Affirmative — Pos., Barrett torote a grammar. 

Neg., Barrett did not write a grammar. 

Interrogative — Pos., Will John return to-morrow ? 

Neg.ft Will not John return to-morrow ? 

The Imperative Mood is used to command 
or petition a second person; to exist or act : 
as, 

John! return to-morrow; soldiers! stand firm; God 
said, light ! be^ and light was. 

The Potential Mood denotes the possibility, 
liberty, power, will or obligation of its nomin- 
ative to exist: as, I can strike the table, but I 
will not; you may return^ if you please. 

Can strike, denotes that the act is possible ; but I will 
not (strike it), implies that no one can act against his will. 
I can strike you, but I will not that action; therefore you 
will escape with impunity. I could go to New York if I 
would. Could, denotes that the act of going is possible in 
itself, while the section, if I would, implies that no possi- 
ble existence, or action, can take place, against the will of 
him on whom its performance depends, whether of God, or 
kia creatures. 

"What we would do, we should do wheit we would,, for 



ENGLISH GEAMMAE* 43 

this %oauld changes" (and then the act is impossible). — 
Shak. Hamlet. 

All actions must be vnlUd by some mind, and as the 
will of every individual governs all his actions, so the will 
li God governs the universal whole. 

Whose body natnre is, and God the soul. 

You might speak the truth, and you should do so, but 
you f0»U.not. Therefore both the might and should, ot the 
power and obligation are defeated by the will's not en- 
forcing them. 

You will not come unto me, that you may have life. 
That is, the reason you never can have (eternal) life is, 
that you do not will it, and God cannot force you into 
heaven against your own will, and yet leave you free. 

The Subjunctiye Mood represents the un- 
certainty of the trunk, or nominative, to per- 
form a future action: as, 

If ^t rain to-morrow, I will come. If, denotes uncertain- 
ty, and (should) with to-morrow, futurity. If I (should) 
see him I will speak to him. 

The Infinitive Mood is not confined to a 
trunk or nominative, and is always preceded 
by to^ expressed or implied : as, 

To walk; to run; to fly; to write. • 



PARTICIPLE. 

The PARTiciPLEr is a certain form of the verb, 
and derives its name firom the fact that it can 
be constraed either as a verb or an adjective. 
Some writers have classed them as a distinct 
part of speech; others have more properly con- 
sidered them as a part of the verb. If the 



44 THE PRINCIPLES OP 

participle be a part of speech, where is the 
other part to which it is joined ? 

Mr. Wright, rs^pected by his friends, was elected go- 
vernor of the state of New York. Now the word respected 
is a participle because it can be construed either as an ad- 
jective or verb, in this construction, respected Wright, the 
word respected is an adjective (not a participle adjective) 
and in the following, Mr. Wright who was respected by 
his friends ;" was respected is a passive verb (not a partici 
pie passive verb), hence the word respected, in consequence 
of its being capable of receiving two constructions, is call- 
ed, while it thus remains, a participle-; but the moment it 
is construed or joined to another word, it in a moment be- 
comes either an adjective or a verb, consequently there 
cannot, properly speaking, be such a distinct part of speech 
as a participle. 



AUXILIARY VERBS 

The Auxiliary Verbs are used to form the 
moods and tenses of the verb. 

They are, have^ do, fte, shall, will, may, can, with their 
variations ; and must, which has no variation. These aux- 
iliary verbs are each confined to a certain mood or tense, 
as in the plan on page 46. By carefully studying this 
table, you can alwap ascertain the mood and tense of any 
verb. The ed termination of the past tense is a contrac- 
tion of did, the past of do, as, John walki^tt^, or John did 
walk, and always denotes the action expressed by the verb, 
to which it is prefixed, to be did, or don$, past, ox finished \ 
as, I \oyed, I ruled, I smiled, which denotes the actions of 
loving, ruling, and smiling, to be did or done actions. 

EXPOSITION AKD DEFINITION OF i.ITXILIARIES. 

We will that execution he done upon the earl. 
We will that you execute the earl. 
We will execute the earl. 



ENGLISH GRAHHAB 45 

1. We will execute the earl to-morrow; there are eyi- 
dently two actions, one of the mind, expressed by will, 
which denotes a present determination that somebody shall 
perform the other future action, denoted by execute, 

2. I will go to-morrow ; vnll denotes a present determin- 
ation of the mind, that my body shall perform a future ac- 
tion, expressed by go; to-morrow qualifies go, not will. 
Will denotes a present mental action. 60 denotes a fu- 
ture bodily action. 

3. I now will, or determine, that my body shall hereaf- 
ter go to New York, next week : Query. Does toill and go 
express but our action ? If so, which is it, present or 
future ? of the mind or body ? Am 1 to go to New York 
next week, and will it afterwards ? 

4 You ought to write to your father; ought denotes 
obligation, or duty. 

5. She may be at home ; may denotes possibility, 

6. I can strike the table ; can denotes possibility. 

7. You may go home ; may denotes liberty or permit* 
sion. 

8. I would that all men might be saved ; would denotes 
a desire, or wish of the mind. 

9. You should repent ; should denotes obligation arising 
from duty. 

10. He would not read; would denotes a resolution of 
the mind. 

11. They might and should read; might denotes that 
they had the power to perform a possible action, expressed 
hj should. 

12. May you find your friends well ; may denotes an act 
of the mind, a wish. 

13. I will not work without pay ; will denotes that my 
mind has now determined that my body shall not perform 
a future laborious action, without a reward. 

14 I will walk, will write, would speak ; the position of 
these words denotes that a present act of the mind express- 
ed by will, always preceded a future action of the body, 
denoted by the subjoined verb. 



46 THE PRINCIPLES OF 

15. John walked a mile ; e^ is a contraction of did^ and 
denotes that the action of walking is did, done, or past. 



PERSON AND NUMBER. 

By the person and number of a verb, is meant the final 
termination^ by which, in the Latin and Greek Languages, 
the first, second and third person, singular and plural, is 
pointed out. Verbs have three persons, firsts seamd and 
thirds and two numbers, singular and plural ; thus : 

Singular, Plural. 

1st person. 2d person. 3d person. Ist person. 2d person. 3d person. 
Lai, Am-Of am-a-s, am-a-< ; Bm-tk-mutf am-a-<u, am-a-nf , 
Eng, loYQ I, loYOst thou, \0Ye8 he} love u^e, loveyoti, love t^ey. 
See page 6, paragraph 6. 

From which it is plain, that the person and number, in 
Latin, is in the termination of the verb ; and in English, 
it is in the pronoun; for that part of the Latin verb print- 
ed in italic^ corresponds precisely to the English pronoun 
placed under it. We place our pronouns before the verb ; 
they after it ; for o-m, 5, t, mus^ tis and nt^ mean, in Eng- 
lish, nothing but J, thou, he, toe, you and they. 



TENSE, 

Is the division of time, into 

Present represents — 1. Present time: as, I am writing, or 
2. Present time perfected : as, I have written. 

Past represents — 1. Past time : as, I wrote, or 

2. Past time perfected-: as, I had written. 

Future represents — 1, Future time: as, I shall write, or 
2, Future time perfected : as, I shall have written 



ENGLISH ORaIIMAB* 47 

The Tenses are six: 

1 Present — denoting present time, I walk 

2 Perfect present — present time completed, I have walked. 
3L Imperfect (past)— denoting past time, I walkeef. 

4. PiiUPERFECT (past) — past time completed, I had walked. 

5. Future— denoting future time, I shall walk. 

6. FimrRE Perfect— /ttft«re time completed, I shall hate 

walked. 

THE conjugation OP VERBS. 

Moods, Tenses. Auxiliaries and Terminations, 

Indicative-^implj indioates or declares. 

PafiszFTj represents present time, I — ^, 

Pebubct, '' present time completed, I have 
Ihpebfect, " past time, I — 

Plxtpkbfsct, ^' past time ooinpleted, I had 
FxTTURX, represents futnre time, 1 shall or will — — 
FuTUBxP., " future time com., I shall or wiU have 

lmperative--^aaed for commanding, exhorting, entreating or permitting. 
Pbesekt, — t— thou or ye. 

Po^en<ia^— implies possibility, liberty, power, will or obligation. 
PiLESZNT, I may or oan — , 

Pe&fsct, I may or can have — ed, 

Impzetect, I might, could, would or should -^— , 
Plttpshfxct, I might, oould, would or should have —— ed. 

S^jtrndtve— represents an action as contingent and future. 

Prxsemt, If I , 

PsBFECT, If I have ■ 

Impertsct, If I -— H 

Plupkbrct, If I had - 

. PuTUBS, If I shall or will - 

Futube PsBrscT, If I shall or will have • 

infinitive— has no nominative case, consequently no person, 9r number. 
Pbesxitt, To — — , 

Pebfect. To have o d. 

Parfidp/e-^artakes of the nature of a verb and adjective. 
Pbesent, — iig. Perfect, e d. 

Com. Pebfsct, — ing, 



48 THE PRINCIPLES OF 



CONJUGATION. 



We here present the conjugation of the verb to he, in the 
three languages at once, that the student, while learning 
to conjugate it in English, may have a clear view of the 
same verb in the other languages. The person and num- 
ber in Latin is printed in italiCf and in the Greek it is sepa- 
rated from the root, as in the following examples. The 
Romans never nsed the pronoun {ego, iu ille,) with the verb, 
for the final termifiation is the pronoun to all intents and 
purposes, unless for the sake of emphasis. The introduc- 
tion of this practice, (as ego mm, tu es, tile est,) could 
have originated only from the most consummate ignorance 
of the real structure of the Latin language. 

COMJUGATION OF THE VERB tO he. 

Ak, Sum » or E/fbi. 
Indicative Mood, — Present Tense. 

IINOULAB. PLTTBAL. 

12 3 12 3 

Sam, e«, est. Smmit, estia, want, 

lam, t^ouart, Ac is. TFeare, yott are^ tftcy are. 

E/fbf, s7sj{9t) i<flt* i<f(>^, kf% ilifi. 

Imperfect, 

Eram, era«, era^. Eramuf, era^, «ran/, 

/Vas, ^Aott wast, A« was. TFcwere, you were, tAcywere. 

P$iifect. 

Fai, faUti, foot. Vramus, fiodsKr, fiienifi<,ere. 

rhavebeen,f/i(mhast, fte has been. TFe have, you have, fAeyhave. 

Pluperftct, 

Faeram, faera«, foeraxil. Faeramuf, foeratit , foeranl. 
/ had been, thou hadst, he had been. We had, you had, Huy had. 

Future, 

Ero. erif, erU. Eriimtf. eri^ic, eramt, 

fwillbe, tAottwiltbe,AewiUbe. TFe will be, you will be, fAcy will be 
*'E(f ^au^ M(t 1}, i€(ti)l(u. Stf 61^60^ Z<r€ar $€, §(fov 7ai« 



ENGLISH GRAMMiiR. 49 

Potential (£a<m and Greek, Svbjunctive) Mood. 
PreeerU Tense, 

mrOTTIrAB. PX.T7KAX.. 

2 3 12 3 

9^9 ne, mt. Simtu, asHs, tint, 

Imajhe, ihoumBjttfhemajhe. Wemiyhe,youmwfh6^heymtLjht 



r might he, t1umvnghM,heudght. We might, you might, <A«y might. 
Perfect, 

Faerim, foerii, faeri/. Fnerimiit, fberi<w, fherin/. 
Z may haTe thou mayst A€ may have We may y<m may tAcy may 
been. have been. been. have been, have Men. have been 

Plvperfect. 

Fmsseiii, finMet. fmsse^. Fdeseimff , foiase^. fiieiaen^. 
/ might,koii^ might, he might. We might, you might, they might. 

Foero, fnerif, fberi/. ' Fnerimut, faeantU. hiennt, 
JwillhaTO f&ou^t Ae will haveTTe will youwill fA^ywill 
been. have been. been. have been, have been. haTe baarv. 

iMPZiiATrvx Mood.— Present Tenee. 
2 3 2 3 

Eeoresfo, es<o. Es^e or eifof e, eonto. 

BetAott, let Aim be. Be ye, letfAembe. 

Vr6h€r!(f Of M 9, EifTif Stfl onfav. 

Imrnornrx Mood. 

Pres. Per/. Fut, Ind. Fut. Subj. 

Efie, foiMe, Eseeyiftanis, faisee JtitmuB, 

To be, to /Uive been. To be oiott^ to be, to have been aftout 

f)v Of. S(f$ifB at. [to be, 

Paetxciplbs. 

Future, Preunt, 

FnlUruf-a^nm, " 

About to be, Befaig. 



60 THE PRINCIPLES OF 

OF THE INDECLINABLE PARTS OF SPEEC H. 

The following tables exhibit a view of the 
indeclinable parts of speech in the Eng'ishi 
Latin and Greek languages. 

OF THE ADVERB. 

An Adverb is a word joined to and used to modify a 
verb. The following is a table of the adverbs in the 
English, Latin and Greek : 





TABLE I. 




Qre^ 


EnglidL 


Latin. 


Wi, 


where, 


ubi. 


€66t9, 


whence. 


unde. 


trt, •'^voo, 


when, 


cum, quum. 


eto, 


whence, 


und6. 


^6&h 


where. 


ubi. 


roh. 


there, 


illic. 


H6tv, 


thence. 


illinc, inde. 


ifUf 


much, 


multum. 


Mywj 


little, 


parvom. 



The above table exhibits most of the primitite adverbs ; 
their derivatives might be increased to a number of thou- 
sand. 

DEftlVATION AMD f ORMATION OF ADVERBS. 

English Adverbs, 

In English, most adverbs are derived from adjectives bv 
appending ly : as, slow^ slowly; day^ daily; universaf 
ufdvtrsaUy; guick^ quickly^ &c., dec 

Chreek Adverbs. 
In the Greek, adverbs are formed as follows: 

1. Such words as are not, strictly speakingi adverbs 
but are so called from being sometmies used :n an ad 
verbial sense. 

2. The oblique cases of nouns and pronouns : as, M 
ofMv, mver; from •Oi-oft^ ito one. 



ENGLISH GRAMMAR. i!>] 

3. The accusative of neuter adjectives: as, fpcSro, ra 
irpoira, first, &c. 

4. Verbs are sometimes used as advierbs. 

5. Adverbs are derived from prepositions. 

The following is the method of forming 
Latin Adverbs. 

1. Adverbs derived from adjectives of the third declen- 
sion, usually end in ter : as, feliciTSR, happily, from fe- 
liz, happy. Sometime in b : as, facile, easily, irom facilis, 
easy. 

2. Adverbs derived from adjectives of the first and 
second declension, generally terminate in s: as, alts, 
highly, from altus. Sometimes they end in o, um, or ter: 
as, tuto, safely, from tutus: tantuM, so much, from tantus ; 
dure, and durixER, hardly, from durus. 

3. Adjectives of the neuter gender are sometimes used 
as adverbs. 

4. Adverbs are derived from nouns, and then generally 
end in im or itus. 

5. Adverbs are deiived from participles. 



OF THE PREPOSITION. 

The Preposition is always found in eithei 
an adjective or adverbial phrase (by some de- 
nominated prepositional phrases) ; that is, it is 
so arranged as to show the relation between 
the phrase in which it occurs to the verb or 
noun in the preceding sentence, and this re 
lation is always either adjective or adverbial, 
and the phrase itself can in most cases be 
changed into an adjective or an adverb. In 
Greek, there are eighteen prepositions only ; 
in Latin, forty-seven; and in English, there 
are fifty-six. 



52 THE PRINCIPLES OF 

TABLE OF PREPOSITIONS. 

Latin, EnglUh. 

b<»fore,against,Oiy. ante, adversus, ilcc. 
lYom, a, ab, abs, AbL 

from, out, out of, e, ex, " 

before, ante, Ace 

in, in, Acc^AhL 

with, together with, cum, AbL 

ik 01 igj Accusative, in, into, in. Ace, AbL 

elvAj '* over, through, on, trans, inter, in. Ace 

among, during, 
in, with. 





Greek, 


dvTl, 


Gemttte 


ij€l. 


u 


Uot 


il « 


*P^, 


(i 


^, 


Dative. 


Cuv, 


u 



6id^ Gen. ^ Ace. 
Ay4i,Gen.Dat.4'Ac, 


through, by, per, " 
by, down, through, per, " 
with,after, bet ween cum, post, inter. 
oyer,above,beyond, super, Ace 
, round, round about circa, circum, " 
round about, of, de, AbL 




concerning 
in, on, upon, under, in, *' 
from, at, near, apud, Au 
by, upon, besides, prceter, " 
under, by, with, infra, '" 



The remaining prepositions are : 

Ad, to, at. Supra, above. 

Circiter, about. Ultra, beyond. 

Cis, citra, on this side, Absque, without. 

Contra, against. Clam, without the know- 

ledge of. 

Erga, towards. Coram, in presence, before. 

Extra, beyond, out of. Palam, with the knowledge 

of. 

Intra, within. Pr©, before, on account of. 

Juxta, near, beside. Pro, for, according to. 

Ob, for, on account of. Sine, without. 

Penes, in the power of. Tenus, as far as, up to 

Pone, behind. 

Propter, near, on accU of. In, in, on, towards, into, 

on, among. 

Seci.ndum,a.ong,acc'ding to. Sub, under, about, at,near. 



ENGLISH GRAMMAR. 63 

In the first colamn, the Latin prepositions govern the 
accusative ; in the second, the ablative, except the last 
two, which govern the accusative, or ablative, and the two 
first, which govern the accusative. 



OP CONJUNCTIONS. 

The Conjunction, as its name imports, is a 
word used to connect words and' sentences 
as, ego ET tu^ I AND thou. The conjunctions are 
represented in the following 

TABLE. 
Greek. English, Latin, 

xflUy rl, 6^f and, also, but, ac, atque, que, et,quoque 

V9 ^^h vh or, either, aut, seu, sive, ve, vel. 

xav, xainvp, fi, xoi, although, quamquam,quamvi8, etsi. 
dXXoL, (iroif, but, atqui, sed, at, autero. 

7^, at least, (no corresponding word.) 

|iiv, <2X>jilfb^v, but, truly, indeed ,vero, verum. 
|A^oi, yet, tamen, veruntamen. 

/dp, for, enim, etenim, nam, nam- 

Tvex, Sri, o^rcj^, o^pot, that, ut, uti. [que 

SjCj CjifrSf that, so that, quin, dummodo. 

euvexo, because, quia, quippe, qudd. 

si4r6p, since, indeed, quando, vero, siquidam. 

iirslj since, after that, quoniam, quum, cum. 

ap€(,oSy, therefore, ergo,proinde, quare, qua« 

Jii, ^iM'lp, wherefore, cur. [mobrem. 

A}, ' then, truly, turn, vero, deinde. 

rofwv, vO, vOv, ' therefore, ergo, quare. 
roiyapouv, emphatic, wherefore, cur, quare, quamobrem. 
•uxouv, not therefore, (no corresponding word.) 

9i,av,?av,i|v,sci,x^,a^,afxs, if, unless, si, sin, nisi. 
i7<fp) if indeed, siquidem. 



5* 



54 THE PRINCIPLES OF 

INTERJF.CTIONS. 

The Interjection is an indeclinable word 
that holds no relation with any other word 
whatever^ and is, of itself, actually a sen- 
tence : as, Adieu, I commend you to God ; it 
being a contraction into a (to) and Dieu (God); 
good bye, God be with ye, God by ye, or good bye 
ye. 

Pltiy word or phrase, used by way of exclamation, and 
in an unconnected manner, is an interjection. The old 
definition, ** that the interjection was thrown in between 
the different parts of speech," is entirely erroneous, and 
ought to be corrected ; as this word has no relation, and o( 
course is not a part of speech, but is of itself a whoLe 
speech. 



RELATION OF PHRASES. 

As we have now finished the definition of 
the Eight Parts of Speech, and spoken largely 
of the Relation, or dependence of one word on 
another, in consequence of which, words na- 
turally fall into this eight-fold division, (i. c, 
the Eight Parts of Speech ;) and shown con- 
clusively that the noun must be referred to 
some other word before it can be in any case, 
and that all other words must have a correla- 
tive relation to the noun, before they can be- 
come parts of speech; it is now proper to 
speak of the relation or dependence of Sen- 
tences and Phrases. And here let it be distincly 
understood, that the members of a period are 
connected to each other by 



ENGLISH 6BAMMAB. 66 

1. A Conjunction; 

2. A Preposition; and, 

3. A Relative Pronoun. 

A glance at the Table of Relations, page 10, 
will show that these words always have a 
double relation. Hence, without the use of 
one of these, no relation could take place be- 
tween the phrases in a sentence. 

1. OF THE RELATION OF PBEPOSITIONAL PHRASES. 

A preposition is a word used to point out the relation 
which the person, place, or thing following it has to some 
Doun or verb going before, in a preceding section ; as, Mr. 
Vf right toent to Albany. To, is a preposition, because it 
points out the relation which Albany has to went, as the 

Slace whither that motion tended, and where it terminated 
Ir. Wright went to Albany, Mr. Wright went there. 
New York is beyond Albany. 

Beyond is a preposition, showing the relative position of 
New York to Albany to be such, that in going directly 
from Utica to the latter place, you must pass the former. 

The goodness of God to mankind is very apparent,/rowi 
the abundant provision which he has made for their sub* 
sistence in this world. 

Here the prepositions, of, to, from, for, and in, show the 
following relations : 

Of shows the relation which God has to goodness, viz: 
that of a being wherein this quality exists. 

To signifies the relation which mankind have to the 
goodness of God, as the object on whom it is employed. 

From intimates that relation which the provision of God 
has made for that happiness, to be that of a cause from 
whence that appearance arises in the mind. 

For expresses the relation which " the subsistence of 
man" has to ** the unbounded provisions of God," to be 
the end to which it was directed, or the final cause or mo- 
tive with God for making that provision. 



56 THE PRINCIPLES OF 

In shows a local relation of goodness, provisions, and 
mankind to this world, as the place where they exist. 

2. OF THE UNION CF SENTENCES BY THE CONJUNCTIONS. 

A conjunction is a word used to connect the sentensic 
sections, clauses, or parts of a period, and to show the re- 
lation which they have to each other, as in this period. 

{Ql^ Notice the punctuation.) 

Julius Caesar would not disband his army, 
And return a private person to Borne, 

Because he was very sensible he should be called to an 
account for extravagant management, in the time of his 
consulship, in his province, which would have blasted his 
ambitious designs, of destroying the liberties of Rome, and 
taking the government to himself. 

The first and is a conjunction, uniting the two actions, 
expressed by the respective verbs disband and return, to a 
common nominative, Julius Cesar, and shows that Ae, who 
was unwilling to perform the first of these actions, was 
equally unwilling to perform the last ; and that the reason 
was, that he did not will that either should be done. 

Because is a conjunction, uniting the latter part of this 
period to the former, and shows the relation it has to it, 
viz: that of a cause, producing the efifect mentioned in the 
former part of the period ; for, what is affirmed in the lat- 
ter part is by the conjunction, becaus^^ represented as be- 
ing the cause, reason, or motive, which induced Caesar, 
not to will the disbanding of his army, and his private 
return to Rome; while the last arid, by connecting 
" destroying the liberty," and ^* taking the government," 
shows that he designed both. 

God will not finally let the wicked go unpunished, 
though he bear with them so far in this life, as to let them 
fare sumptuously, and go down to the grave in peace ; for 
man, in this world, is in a state of trial ; therefore, it would 
not be consistent with that intention of an all-wise God to 
punish wickedness, constantly and visibly, in this life. 

Though shows the subjoined clause to hold a construct- 
ive dependence on the former, so far as to signify nothing 
in the mind of the speaker without a regard thereto. 



ENGLISH OBAMMAR. 67 

The conjunction as unites its clause to that which goes 
Defore, and expresses its relation by deiermining the extent 
of what was indefinitely expressed in the foregoing clauses 
of the period. 

And connects " go down in peace," with " fare sumptu- 
ously," and signifies that both of these actions are per- 
mitted by the Ahnighty for the reason expressed in the 
next section. 

Fob shows that the section which it^ heads holds a con- 
structive union with the two preceding sections, and shows 
the relation to be that of a. cause or reason why he sufiTers 
them to fare sumptuously, and to die in peace. 

Thebsfobb shows that the part of the period which fol- 
lows it, is construed with all that precedes it, as its cause, 
and implies that this world, being intended as a state of 
trial, renders it impracticable for him to punish vice con- 
sistently with that design, for that would not be to try 
them, but forcing them to be good, by destroying their 
power to be otiierwise, since there can be no true virtue 
without liberty. 

A relative pronoun may be used either in a sentensic or 
insentensic section, and shows that the section in which it 
occurs sustains to the antecedent an adjective relation: 
thus. 

Our Father who art in heaven. Here the two sections, 
••who art," and "in heaven," sustain to the word Father 
an adjective relation, being equivalent in sense to " our 
Heavenly Father." Who art m heaven, restricts the word 
Father, by excluding from the extension of that word all 
earthly fathers. 
Primitive. Secondary Sections. 

God, {whOf at sundry times, aiid in divers manners, 
spake^ in times past, unto the fathers, by the 
prophets,) 
BATH, in these latter days, 

SPOKEN, unto us by his Son. 

In this example, that part of the period included in pa- 
renthesis has an adjective relation to God, and withal re- 
stricts the extension of that noun by excluding from it the 
other gods, of the Greeks, Romans, &c., and is equivalent 



5S THE PSmciPLEft OF 

to the adjective Jewish. Thus, the Jewish God hath 
spoken, dec. 

He (that belieres and is baptised,) shall be sated. 
Here the part of the sentence commencing with that, and 
included in parenthesis, sustains to the word Ae, an adjec- 
tive relation, by restricting its extension, and shows, that 
salvation is not predicted of the word he in its broadest, 
but in a limited logical extension. 

Hence, the only union which can take place between* the 
sections in a period, is efiected either by a conjunction, a 
relative pronoun, or a preposition. 



OF THE SECTION. 

A section of a sentence is a word, or an in- 
dependent collection of words, " which can 
be parsed" without referring any word in that 
section, to a word in another section: as, 

The midnight moon smiles serenely. 

D^ See the Sections aa they are formed on the Plate. 

Obdee. — 1. Primary. 2. Secondary. 

That section is of the primary order, which claims the 
first rank, and sustains the rest : as, 

Heaven hides {a) the book, (b) (primary), 

a from all creatures, (secondaiy). 
h of fate, (secondary). 

Those sections are of the secondary order, which are up- 
held by, and depend upon another section for sense : as, 
"from all creatures;'* "of fate;" "in the room." These 
secondary or branch sections can make no sense, until they 
are united to that word in the trunk, or primary, by which 
they ar^ sustained ; as, hides from all creatures ; book of 
fate , John ts 'n the room. 



BNOLISH GBAJfMAR. 69 

CoOTSB. — 1. Direct. 2. Circufnfiex. 

The course of a section is direct, when the words stand 
in their natural prose order: as, 

Law is a rule (of action.) 

Law is a rule^ a section of the primary order, direct 
course. 

Of axAixm^ a secondary section, direct course. 

The course of a section is circumflex, when the sense 
flows back, which is owing to the words not being arranged 
in their prose order : as, 

Whom3 yel ignorantly worship,2 
Him3 declare2 1 1 unto you. 

Whmt ye igriorarUly uforship, a section, secondary order, 
circumflex course, because the sense commences at the 
word ye, proceeds forward to worship, then flows back to 
whom. 

HifkS declart2 Jl ; a section, primary order, circumflex 
course. The direct course would be: 1 1 declare2 hini.3 
The words in these two sections are not only circumflex, 
but the sections are so likewise. 

Circumfiez. Whom ye ignorantly worship. Him de- 
clare L 

Direct. I declare him whom ye ignorantly worship. 

Yebilt I say unto you, bb that entereth not by the door, 
into the sheep-fold, but that dimbeth up some other way, 

IS A THIEF. 

^ Verily he is a thief. (Direct course, unbroken state.) 
Eelatiok.—- 1. Adjective. 2. AdterUal. 

The relation of a secondary, or insentensie section, b 
that dependence which it has, to some word in the prima- 
ry, for sense. 

A section has an adjective relation, when it restricts the 
extension of some noun, or pronoun, in the primary sec* 
tion: as, 

1. Jesus saw a man who wtu blind, 2 sections. 

1. Jesus saw a blind man. 1 section. 

2. Heaven hides the book {offcUe.) 2 sections. 
2. Heaven hides the fatal book. 1 section. 



60 THE PRINCIPLES OP 

He (that believes) (and is baptised) shall be saved. 
And the relatron is adverbial, when it qualifies the verb, 
oz expresses the mawMT of existing or acting : as, 

The midnight moon smiles serenely, 
O^tr Nature^s soft repose. 

The jessamine clambers (in flower) (o'er the thatch.) 3 sec- 

The flowery jessamine clambers there. 1 section. 

State. — Sentensic^ Insentensic^ Plenary, Implenary^ 
Broken, Unbroken. 

The sentensic section contains a nominative, and verb, 
or a *' sentence, trunk, and branch :" as, 

1. The moon smiles serenely. 

2. No lowering doud obscures the sky. 

3. Nor ruffling tempest blows. 

The insentensic section is one that contains no sentensic 
word: as, 

1. To church. 2. In the room. 3^ O'er Nature's soft 
repose. 

The plenary state arises from that degree of fullness, 
which admits of solution, without supplying words ; as, O . 
John [give thou (to me) an apple.] 

The implenary state arises from the want of a word, or 
words: as, 

— John, give me an apple. 

It is 9 o' clock. 

The state of a section is -broken, when another section 
intervenes between its parts : i^. 

Law (in its most comprehensive sense), is a rule. 
And varying schemes (of life) no more distract the wilL 

The unbroken state of a section, is the uninteirupted 
continuation of all its parts: as. 

Law is a rule (of action). 

Varying schemes no more distract the laboring wilL 



ENGLISH GRAHHAB. 61 

Class. — 1. Literal. 2. Figurative, 

The literal class is that which expresses the meaniDg 
according to the words (or letters) used : as, 

The midnight moon serenely shines. 
A ship sails on the seas. 

A section is figurative^ when one or more words in it 
convey a different meaning from what the woj^^litmlly 
import: as, 

I. THE HSTAPHOB. 

1. Daniel Webster is a pillab in the statA^^' . 

2. I will be unto her a wall of fire. \ 

3. Thou art my bock and my fobtbess. 

4. Thy woBD is a lamp to my feet. 

A metaphor is founded entirely on the resemblance of 
one thing to another. 

1. A statesman performs the same office in a state, that 
a jnllar does in an edifice. 

2. God is the same defence to his church, that a wall is 
to a city. 

3. He is the same defence to the righteous, as vl fortress 
or rock is to a soldier. 

n. AXXXOOET. 

An allegory is a metaphor continued, which was a fa- 
vorite memod of delivering instruction in old times: for' 
what we call fables or parables are no other than allego- 
ries; by words and actions, attributed to beasts, or inani- 
mate objects, the " dispositions of man are shadowed 
forth ;" and what we call the " moral,'" is the " unfigtfred 
sense," or meaning of the allegory. 

A hog, beholding the horse of a warrior, rushing into 
battle, says: " Fool, whither dost thou hasten? Perhans 
thou mayst die in the fight;" to whom the horse replied: 
" A knife shall take life from thee, fatted amongst mud, 
and filth, but globt shall accompany my death." 
6 



62 THE FBINCIPLBS OP 

III. C0HPARI80K. 

Is when the resemblance between two objects is ejcpresa' 
ed in form, by the word as, like, &c. 
Webster is in the state, like a pillar in an edifice. 

He is like a pillar. 

The word of God is like a light. 

rV. rXRSONIFICATION. 

Is that figure which attributes life and action to inani- 
mate objects : as, moon smiles. 

Now, as it cannot be literally true, that the moon smiles 
or laughs, since nothing but a human heme can laugh, it 
must be figuratively so. This figure is a^ founded on 
the aspect, or resemblance of one thing to another: thus 
the imagination may attribute this action to the " man in 
the moon." 

2. Majestically slow, before the breeze, 
In silent pomp, she marches on the seas. 

The above couplet is from Falconer's description of the 
ship Brittannia; She is a pro., fern, gen., represented as 
marching (not sailing). While the word majestically, at- 
tributes to the vessel the idea of majesty. An easy stretch 
of the imagination would find some resemblance between 
a queen, decorated with the robes of majesty, taking a 
wtuky and the goddess Brittania, the queen of the ocean. 



ENGLISH GRAMMAR. 63 



RULES- 



Rule 1. Every adjective belongs to a noun ; 



as, . 

Rule 2. The nominative case precedes the 
verb; as, . 

Rule 3. All nouns of the second person, 
are in the case independent; as, O . 

Rule 4. The case absolute precedes the par- 
ticiple; as, . 

Rule 6. The possessive case precedes the 
noun; as, ^'s . 

Rule 6. Transitive verbs govern the objec- 
tive case ; as, . 

Rule 7. Prepositions govern the objective 
case y as, ~"^"^~ • 

Rule 8. A pronoun has the gender, person 
and number of its noun; as, . 

Rule 9. A verb agrees with its nominative 
case, in number and person; as, . 

Rule 10. Singular nominatives connected 
by and, require a plural verb, noun and pro- 
noun; as, and . 

Rule 11. Singular nominatives connected 
by any other conjunction, require a singular 
verb; as, or ^'s. 

Rule 12. Adverbs qualify verbs; as, — - 
Rule 13. The infinitive mood is governed 



64 THE PRINCIPLES OF 

by the preceding word (in construction) ; as, 

to . 

Rule 14. Nouns or pronouns having the 

same relation are in the same case; as, ^ 

is \ 

Rule 15. Two negatives in the same sen- 
tence, neutralize each other and make an af- 
firmative; as, not t^nmindful. 

Rule 16. Conjunctions connect words and 
sentences; as, , (con.) 

Rule 17. The conjunctions if, though, except^ 
unless and whether^ govern the subjunctive 
mood only, when doubt is implied ; as, 

Rule 18. An auxiliary holds a single rela- 
tion to its principal; as, . 

Rule 19. An omission of such words as will 
not obscure the sense is admissible. 

Rule 20. A collective noun, implying unity 
requires a singular verb. 

Rule 21. But a collective noun denoting 
plurality, requires a plural verb. 

Rule 22. Sections of an adjective relation, 
must, in all cases, be placed next to the noun 
they qualify. 

Rule 23. Care must be taken to express the 
proper time by the appropriate tense. 

Rule 24. Every word in a sentence relates 
to and is parsed with another word or other 
words, in the same section. 



ENGLISH GEAHHAE. 65 

Rule 25. No word in a section can have 
any greater extension than the other words or 
sections in the same sentence will give it. 

Rule 26. Reduce every broken to an un- 
broken section, by uniting its parts. 

Rule 27. Render every implenary section 
vienary^ by supplying every implied word. 

Rule 28. Give every word in a section, and 
every section in a sentence, its true relation. 

Rule 29. Reject and expunge an unjustifia- 
ble pleinism from the section in which it oc- 
curs. 

Rule 30. Care must be taken to express the 
proper relation by appropriate prepositions. 



66 THE PRINCIPLES OP 



PARSING. 



The following extracts from Milton and 
Pope are here presented for the especial bene- 
fit of the beginner and private learner. If the 
student will make himself perfectly acquainted 
with the principles contained in this analysis 
— before leaving it — ^will find himself able to 
parse just as well without this assistant as 
with it ; for the parts of speech, and their re- 
lation to each other, occur so frequently that 
they cannot fail to make an indelible impres- 
sion on the memory, not to be forgotten, like 
rules and definitions, but which time itself 
shall never afterwards be able to efiace : 



PARADISE LOST. 



adv ▼ ir in ind imp 3 8 n o f 3 8 adv con .n o f 3 8 a 1 
Now came^ still ev'ning' on, and twilight* gray 

18 ^rep pp al non387alnon3pla virtrindplaSt 
Had in her sober liv'ry all thing^ clad.'® 

DofSa vrtr imp 3 s oon n o n 3 8 con n o n 3 8 

Silence* accompanied*" [thern] for beast* and bird," 

jpp preppij al ncnSaal prep p p non2pla 

They* to their* grassy couch, these \hirds\ to their* nests 

r ir in ind imp 3 pin a 1 a 1 n c fem 3 s 

Were sunk* all but the wakeful nightingale,**'' 

p p adv pp al non3B yirtrind imp 3 • 

ohe* all night long hei* am'rous descant* sung.'" 

o f 3 8 y r pas ind imp 3 8 adv ▼ r in ind imp 3 b n o n 3 8 
Silence* was pleased." Now glow'd* the firmament* 
pre p al non3pla7 npnS^s r pro ▼ ir tr ind imp 3 > 
With living sapphires : Hesperus' that* led'° 



ENGLISH GRAMMAR. 67 

al a 1 n:n3sTirmind imp a 1 Hesperus adv a 1 n c f 3 s 
The starry host* rode® brightest, till the moon,* 

part prep al ncn387 adv 
Rising in clouded majesty, ut length, 

al iiof38 vrtrind imp pp al n'cnSs 

Apparent queen,' unveil'd'^ her* peerless light,* 

con prep alncnSspp al nonSsvirtrind imp 
And o'er the dark^ hei* silver mantle* threw.*° 

adv n p m 3 8 adv prep npf7 al nof2s alncnSi 

When Adam* [said] thus to Eve : Fair consort,' th' hour* 

ptrepnonSsT al ncnSpluadv part prep no n3 87 
Of night, and all things* now retir'd to rest, 

V r tr ini pr 3 pla p p prep al non3 8 7 con npm38 vir trindparf 
Mind"* us* of like repose : since God* hath set^" 

all noons o n 3 s prep n o m 3 plu 7 
Laboi' and rest,* as day* and night,* to men 

a 1 day and night con al al ncnSs ncn387 
Successive : and the timely dew* of sleep, 

adv part prep al al non3B7vrtr ind pr 3 • 

Now falling with soft slumh'rous weight, inclines'^ 



p n n 3 pla a 1 n c n 3 pin adv 

ur* eye-lids.* Other creatures* all day long 



6 

vrin ind pr 3 pla a 1 a 1 creatores con a 1 rest v r tr ind pr 3 pla 
Bove* idle, unemployed, and less need*® rest.* 

'nomSt vir tr indnr 3 8 pp al non38 non387 

Man* hath*^ his* daily work* of body or of mind 

part r i>ro vrtrindprSspp ncn38 

Appointed, which* declares** hi? dignity,* 

oon a 1 non38prepnpm38 7prep al ppnon3pla 
And the regard* of Heaven on all his* ways^ ; 

adv al non3pfai al animals v r in ind pr 3 pla 
While other animals* unactive range,' 

con prop pp nendplaTnomSs virtrindprSsa 1 nonSs 
Ana 01 theii^ doings (jrod* takes"' no account,* 

adv adv al nonSs v ir tr ind fat 3 s alnonSs 

To-morrow, ere fresh morning* [shall] streak** the east* 



68 THE PRINCIPLES OF 

prep a 1 n o n 3 s 7 n o n 3 s 7 p p v ir in pot nr Ist pla 
W jth first approach of light, we* must be risen,* 

con prep pp al ncnSs vrtrinfpr 

A.nd at our* pleasant labor; to re-form'" 

al al nonSpln al nonSplual aUeys 
Yon flowV}- arbors' yonder alleys' green, 

p p n c n 3 8 prep n c n 3 a 7 prep n c n 3 pin a 1 branches 
Our walk* al noon, with branches oTergrown, 

r pro vr trind pr 3pla pp al ncnSs convrtrindprSpln 
That' moct" our scant manuring,' and require**^ 

a I n o n 3 pin oon pp vrtrinfpp al nctfS^hi 

More hands' than ours' [hands] to lop^their wanton growth' 

a 1 n n 3 pin adv con al al ncnSplu 
Those blossoms* also, and those dropping gums' . 

r pro y tr in ind 3 pla a 1 goms a 1 gums oon a 1 gams 
That' lie' bestrown, unsightly and unsmooth, 

vrtrindprSplancnSa pp yrinindprlpliiTinfj^repnonds? 
Ask'" riddance,e if wet mean to tread with ease« 

adv r pnonSa Tr tr &o non Tirm&epp y r ninf pr 

Meanwhile, as nature' wills,'' night> bids'" U8« [^ojrest.^ 

rarep r p 7 to Adaminthe 13thline]Mrep al non8s7 part 
To whom thus Eve,' [said] with perfect beauty adorn'd : 

ppnomSaeon noma the thing 6 which 6 ppyir trind pr2i 

My* authot' and disposer' what' thou' bidst^ 

al ppyrtrind rp n p m 3 a yr trindprS • goyemato 
Unargu'd P obey;" so' God' ordains." 

prep np part pp y ir trind pr 1 s «1 nombyfigiird 

W ith tnee conversing I' forget" all time ;' 

alnon3plaoon pp^ non3B al v r tr ind pr 3 pin ady 
All seasons' and tQeir" change,' all [things] please" alike, 

al alnon3B prep ncf3a7ppncn38 al 

Sweet is' the breath' of mom, her rising* [is] sweet, 

prep non 3 b7 prep al non3pla7al alncmbjflg 

With charm of earliest birds ; pleasant [is] the sun' 

ady ady pref al al acn3a7ppyirtrindpr38 
When first on this delightful land he' spreads" 



W: 



ENGLISH 6EAMHAR. 69 

pp al ncn3pla prep goy. bjr on and all n 3 n 3 s 7 
His orient beams^ on herb,- tree, fruit and flower, 

part prepnGn38 7 a 1 earth al al ncn38 
Glist'ning with dew; fragrant [wj the fertile earth' 

prep a 1 n o n 3 pla 7 con al al non39 

After soft show'rs; and sweet [is] the coming on* 

prep "al non387 al con al n o f 3 8 nom case to is 
Of grateful erening mild ; then silent night, [is] 

vep alpp al nof387 oon al alncf387 
'itn this her' solemn bird, and this fair moon, 

con 18* al alnon3pla7non387pp al nonSs? 
And these the gems of heav'n, her" starry train. 

An the words in the six following lines marked thus * are in the nomi 
native case to is, in the 7th hne below. 

con oon non3 s prepnof 3 87 adv pp yrtrindpr3 
But neither breath* of morn, when she' ascends^'' 

non387prep al non3pla7oon al ncm38 
iHx charm of earliest birds ; nor rising sun* 

prep al al ncn3s7con allne38 

On this delightful land; nor herb,* fruit,* flow'r,* 

part pr6pnon387oon nonSs prepnon3pla7 
Glist'ning with dew ; nor fragrance* after show'rs, 

con al nof3s al oon a 1 n e f 3 s 
Nor grateful evening* mild ; nor silent night* 

prep alpp al non387 con n c n 3 s prey n o f 3 s 
W ith this her solemn bird ; nor walk* by moon, 

con al non387 prep p p a 1 breath, herb,etc. 

Or glitt'ring star-light — without tnee is sweet. 

oon adv adverbial phrase v ir in ind pr 3 pla prep r pro 

But wherefDre all night long shine' these ? for whom 

al al ncn38 ady ncn3svirtrind perf 3 s n o n 3 
[is] This glorious sight,' wh'en sleep' hath shut*° all eyes.* 

governs 29 following lines 
prep r p relates to Eve v r tr ind imp 3 8 

To whom our gen!ral ancestor replied :*° 



70 THB PRINCIPLES OF 

&cf28 prep np mSsToon no mSs? al npf28iiid 
'•Daughter* or God and man, accomplish** Eve^' 

al YirtriiidprdplanonSsYT tr inf pr prep a 1 n o n 3 s? 
These have^*^ their course to finish*" round the earth, 

prop al nonds? con prep n o n 3 8 7 prep n o n 3 s 7 
By morrow ev'ning ; and trom land to land, 

prep non387 con prep non3plQ7oon al 
In order, though to nations yet unborn, 

part part p p pin set and rise both t ir in ind 3 pin 

Minist'ring light^prepar'd, they* set* and rise* 

oon a 1 n n 3 8 regain prep non387Trtrpot imp 3 • 
Lest total darkness^ should by night regain 



&, 



p al non38 oon see regain n o n 3 8 
er^old possession,* and extinguish life* 



The word fires is the nominative to all the Verbs marked t ^nd 
WHICH the objective. 

prep n o n 3 8 7con alnon3pla7r pro al alnend pin 
In nature and all things ; which* these soft fires* 

adv ▼ ir tr ind pr 3 pla oon prep al non387 
Not only enlightent but with kindly heat 

prep al non387 both ▼ r tr ind pr 3 pin 
Of various influence, fomentt and warm,t 

both V r tr ind pr 3 pin oon prep non387virtr indpr 8 pla 
Tempert or nourish,** or in part shed down" 



p al non3 8prepa 1 non8pla7r p virinindpr3pfai 
heir stellar virtue* on all kinds that grow* 



prep no f 3 8 7 part adr a 1 kinds v r tr inf to 
On earth, made hereby apter to rieceive" 

n n 3 8 prep a 1 n o m 3 s adv sap n o n 3 s 7 
Perfection* from the sun's* more potent ray. 

a 1 adv oon part prep non3B7nc387 

These Ifires] then, though unbeheld in deep of night, 

V ir in ind pr 3 pin adv oon v ir tr imp 2 8 n o m 3 plu adv 
Shine* not iit vain ; nor think," though men* were* none, 



. BlfOIiISH OSAUMAE. 71 

ooa n on3 8 vr tr potimpS sncnSpla npmBs nonSa 
That heaven* would want"* spectators,* God' want praise' . 

n c n 3 pla prep al nonSplaTyrtrindDrSpla nonSt 
Millions' of spiritual creatures walk" the earth* 

a 1 creatures adv p p oon adv p p 

(Tnseen, both when we' wake and when we' sleep. 

a 1 a 1 prep al non3B7ppnon3pliiTirtr 
All these witn ceaseless praise nis works' behold'* 

adyerbial phrase— nalways adv prep al nen3s7 

Both day and night. How often, from the steep 

prep a 1 ncn3 8 7con seehiU pp vir triodperf 1 pin 

Of echoing hill or thicket have'*^ we' heard'* 

a 1 n n 3 pla prep al al nonSs? 
Celestial voicer to the midnight air, 

a 1 voiees oon a 1 voices a 1 prep al ncn3s7 
Sole, or responsive each to others** note, 

part pp al npm 3s7 advprepnon3plu7 
Singing tneir great Creator. Oft in bands, 

ady rovir trindpr 3plnon3s al ncn3e vrtr 
While tney* keep" watch,* or nightly rounding walk,*** 

prep al non307 prep a 1 n o n 3 pla 7 

With heav'nly touch of instrumental sounas, 

prep al al bob3b part p p a o a 3 pla 
in full harmonic number join'd, tneir songsr 

vr tr indpr 3]^Bon3 8 0on8eedivideppneB3pla non3s7 
Divide** the night,* and lift'* our thoughts* to heav'n." 

adr part adverbial phrase^Hogether p p vix ind imp 3 plo 
Thus talking, hand in hand alone tney* pass'd* 

adv prep pp al non387 adv part al V2rindimp3pb 
On to their* blissful bowV — there arriv'd, both stood,* 

a 1 V ir in ind imp 3 pla prep a 1 y r tr ind imp 

Both [persons] tum'a,* and under open sky ador*d'* 

alnpm3 v ir tr ind imp 3 s allnon3s oon 

The God* that* made** both sky,* air,* earth,* and hea n,* 

* They walk their nightly roonds, like sentries on gaard 



72 THB PRINCIPLES OP 

rp b^ beheld ▼ ir tr ind imp 3 pla nof3 8 al nonSt 

Which® they* beheld,'^ the moonV resplendent globe,* 

con al nenSs pp28 ady yirtri]idpr28 non38 
And starry pole.* Thou* also raad'st" the night,* 

n c m 2 8 a 1 con pp2s aInon38 

Maker* omnipotent, and thou [modest] the day,* 

r p finished p p prep pp al ncn387 part 

Which* we' in oui* appointed work employed, 

V r tr ind perf I plu a 1 Adam and Eve al non387 
Have finish'd^° happy in our mutual help 

con al ncn3t7alncn38 prep al ppnon3s7 
And mutual love, the crown of all our bliss, 

part prep p p con al al ncn3s7 

Ordain'd by thee ; and this delicious place, 

prep p p a 1 place ady pp ncn38 yrtrindpr38 
For us too large, where thy abundance' wants*" 

n cog 3 plu con a 1 abnndance yirinindpr38 non3fl7 
Partakers,* and uncropt fallal to the ground. 

con p p 2 8 y r tr ind perf 2 8 jprep pp alalnonSs 
But thou' hast promised** from us two a race,' 

vrtr inf pr a IncnSsrp anx prep pp 7y r tr ind 1 fut St 
To filP^ the earth,* who' shall with us extol"* 

pp nonSsal goodness con adv ppyrinindprlpla 
Thy goodness* infinite, both when we' wake,* 

con ady ppTirtrindprlpIa ppnon3tncn387 
And when we' seek,** as now, tny gift* of sleep. 

Milton. 



ENGLISH GRAMMAR. 78 

POPE'S ESSAY. 

B p m 3 s prep al Bon3pIa7yirtruidpr3ff prep a o n 3 s 7 
Heaven' from all creatures hides*® the book* of fate, 

con a I n c n 3 8 part pp al ncnSs 

All but the page^ prescrib'd, their* present state :• 

nrep n u n 3 pla 7 the thing which nom3pla7 non3 
From brutes what men,* from men what spirits' know;^ 

eon r p V r tr pot imp 3 8 n c n 3 8 adv adv 
Or who' could suffer'" being* here below I 

alncm38 p p n e n 3 8 vr tr &o vir ioinf pr adv 

[if] The lamb' [which] thy* riot dooms to bleed to-day, 

T IT tr 8abj 38ppppncn38 pp both ▼ r in pot imp 3 • 

Had he'* thy' reason,* would ne* skip* ana play ?• 

part prep a 1 a 1 instant ppvrtrindpr38al non38 
Pleased to the last, he' crops** the flow'ry food,* 

oonTtrindprS 8 ncnSs ady part yir tr inf pr p pnonSt 
And licks*^ the hand* just rais'd to shed*® his* blood.* 

inter n o n 2 8 prep al non387 ady part 
Oh*' blindness* to the future ! kindly giv'n, 

oon a 1 creatore vrtrpotprnonSa part prep n p m 8 • 7 
That each may fill** the circle* mark'd by Heav'n; 

rp y ir tr ind pr 3 8 prep a 1 n c n 3 s prep n p m 3 • 7 
Wno' sees** with equal eye, as God of all, 

a 1 ncm3 8 yrinfpr oon a 1 BcmSs yirininfpr 
A hero* [to] perish,* or a sparrow* [to] fall f 

B c n 3 phi eon n e n 3 pin prep n c n 8 8 7 part 
Atoms* or systems^ into ruin huiPd, 

con adya 1 non3 sy r ininfpr oon adyalnon8t 
And now a bubble* burst,* and now a world.* 

y r in imp 3 8 ad? ady prep al non3pla7Trin imp t • 
Hope* humbly then; with trembling pinions soar;* 

* The yrord HS, is rednndant, in appoeitioniRith lamb, and repeated 
by poetical license only. The word which, nnderstood, is the real ob- 
jeetiye ease of the yerb dooms. 

7 



9 



74 THE PRmCIPLES OP 

▼ r tr imp 28al nomSs apposition con npmSsyrtr imj[ 2 8 
Wait'° the great teacher Death f and G >d* adore*^ 

a I bliss al nondsppyirtrindprSspp virtrinfpr 
What future hlisaP te' gives"^ not tnee^ to know," 

convirtrindprSs alnonSsTirinfprppncnSs ady 
But gives*® that hope* to he* thy blessing* now 

nonSsvirmindprSsal hoM al al non8t7 
Hope' springs^ eternal in the human breast ; 

n cm 3 8 adv oon adv v ir inf pr a 1 man 

Man' never is,* but always to be* blest. 

al nonSsal soo! con a 1 tonl prep n c n 3 • 7 
The soul,' uneasy, and confin'd from home, 

both V r ind pr 3 8 prepnonSs? vbinfpr 

Bests* and expatiates* in a life [tokkh is] to come,^ 

interj al al ncm38 rp al nonSs 

Lo,"^ the poor Indian !* whose untutor'd mind* 

virtrindprSsnpmSBnonSplnTsee aeet prep n o n 3 8 7 
Sees'* Ood* in clouds, or hears** him* in the wind ; 

Dp ncnSeal nonSe adv v ir tr ind imp 3 8 v ir inf pr in 
His* soul* proud science* never taught** to stray^ 

adv con al al nonSs? al ncn887 

Far as [to] the Solar Walk, or Milky Way : 

oon al nonSspreppp non387 vir trindperfSs 
Tet simple nature* to nifi^ hope has given** 

prep al al non387 al nonSs 
Behind the cloud-topt hill, a humbler heaven;* 

al al nonSe non38 prep n c n 3 pin 7 part 
Some safer world* in depth or woods embraced, 

al al non38 prep al al nonSs? 
Some happier island* in the wat'ry waste: 

adv n o eg 3 plu adv p]^ alnon38 vir tr indpr Spin 

Where slaves* once more their native land* behold,** 

a 1 n o m 3 pla V r tr ind pr 3 plu n m 3 pin V r !&d pr 8 pla 
No fiends* torment,** no Christians* thirst for gold, 

nom vrtrindpr38pp al nonSe 
To BE,* contents'* his* natural desire:* 



ENGLISH GRAMMAR. 75 

ppyrtriiidprSs alnofSsnonSsal nofSinonSi 
He* asks*** no angel's wing,* no seraph's fire ;• 

con Y ir md pr 3 8 pert prep al alnonSsT 
But thinks/® admitted to that equal sky, 

pp al nomSsTirtrindlfotSt with n o n 3 
HisP faithful dog* shall bear*® him company.® 

V ir in bnp 2 s a 1 p p oon prep ppnendsT prep no a 3 •? 
GrOy® wiser thou !* and in tny scale of sense, 

WTtr mm 2» ppnonSe prep n p m 3 e 7 
Weigh" thy* opinion® against Providence ; 

Transposition— Call that imperfection which thoa fanciest siicfa. 
Call"' imperfection® whatP thou® fanciest such ; 

V ir tr imp 2 s adv ppYirtrindpr38non3s adr n o n 3 s 
Say*® here he® gives'® too little,® there loo much,® 

prep nonSsT al non387ppttoin3 8is 
In pride, in reas'ning pride, our® error® lies ;® 

a I creatures v r tr ind p 3 pla con n o n 3 pla 7 

All quit*® theu® sphere,® and rush into the skios. 

n n 3 8 adv vrinindpr38 al al non3s7 
Pride® still is® aiming at the blest abodes ; 

n c m 3 i^a V ir pot imp 3phin&or2non3pla nfccrS 

Men* would be^ angels ;' angels® would be® gods.® 

part V ir in inf pr r 2 con n o n 3 pla 
Aspiring to be* gods,* if angels' fell,^ 

part virininfpr r2 ncmSplavrin inpr 3 pla 
Aspiring to be® angels,® men® rebel,® 

oon rp adv vrinindprSsvr tr infpr a 1 nonSphi 

And [he] wno® but wishes® to invert*® the lawc^ 

prep n p m 3 s 7 prep al npm387 

Of ORDER, sins® against th' Eternal Cause. 



76 THB PBINCIFLBS OF 

Having completed our exercises fcr the private learner, 
we here present additional exercises for practice, without 
being marked, to be used by those who prefer them — al- 
though the previous lessons should be gone over, in part, 
at least, in all cases* The words in the first piece have 
the relation pointed out by figures — and in the additional 
exercises the student will be able to make this out for him- 
self. 

LIBERTY AND SLATERY CONTRASTED. 

Part of a Letter from Italy, by Addison. 

Howl2 hftslS kiodl Heayen2 adomedlO thisl happy 1 iaDd,6 
Andl6 soatteredlO ble«8iDg86 withl4 al wa«tefiill hand;? 
Bntie what8;6 availlO her8,6 nnexhaiistedl &tore8,2 
Her8^ bloomingl moimtains2 andl6 her8,5 suimyl 8hore8,2 
Withl4 alll thel gifb7 that8,6 heiaveii2 and]5 earth2 impart^lO 

thel smiles? of 13 nature,? andl6 thel charmB? of 13 art,? 

Whilel2 proudl oppre8sion2 iiil4 her8,5 valleys? reigns^ 
Andl6 t7raimy2 usnrpslO her8,5 happyl plaiiui?6 
Thel poorl iiihabitant2 beholdslO in vain, 12 
Thel redd'ningl orange6 and 16 thatl swelUngl grain :6 
Jqylessl he2 seeslO the 1 grovingl oilsG and 16 wme6,6 
Andl6 inl4 thel myrtle'sS firagrantl shade? repines.9 
O! Liberty ,3 thouS powerS supremely 19 bright,! 
Profiisel of bliss,? andl5 firagrantl with delight I? 
Perpetoall pleasures2 inl4 thy8,5 presence? reign,9 
Andl6 smilingl plenty2 leadslO thy8j5 wanton train ,*6 
£asedl,ll of 14 her8,6 load,? 8iibjection2 grows9 morel9 light,! 
Andl6 poverty2 looks9 cheerfoll inl4 thy8,6 light.? 
Thoa8,2 makestlO thel gloomy! faoe6 of 13 nature? gay;! 

givestlO beaaty6 tol4 thel son,? andl6 pleasnre6 to!4 the! day.? 

Onl4 foreign! mountains? may thel 8an2 refinelO 
Thel grape'85 softl juice,6 and mellowlO it8,6 tol4 wine ;7 
Withl4 citron! groves? adomlO a! distant! soil ,6 
Andl6 thel fat! oUve6 sweUlO withU floods? of !3 oil.? 
We8,2 envy 10 notl2 the! warmer! olimes6 that8,21ie9 
Inl4 ten! degrees? of 13 morel9 indulgent! skies ;? 
Norl6 atl4 thel coarseness? of 13 our8,5 heaven? repine,9 
Tho'ie o'er 14 our8,5 heads? thel firozenl pleiads2 shine :9 
'Tis 8,2,9 liberty2 that8,2 orownslO thel Saxon's5 isle,6 
Ajdl6 makeslO thel barren! rocks6 andl6 the! bleak! moontainsG 
smile .9 



ENOLISM GRAMMAR. 77 

ADDITIONAL EXTRACTS FOR PARSING. 

Webster's reply to hatme. 

I shall enter on no encomium of Massachusetts — she 
needs none. There she is — ^behold her, and judge for 
yourselves. There is her history. The world nas it by 
heart. The past at least is secure. There is Boston, an^ 
Concord, and Lexington, and Bunker hill, and there they 
will remain forever. The bones of her sons, fallen in the 
great straggle for independence, now lie mingled with the 
soil of every state, from New England to Georgia, and 
there they will lie forever. And, sir, where American 
Liberty raised its first voice, and where its youth was nur- 
tured and sustained, there it still lives in the strength of its 
manhood, and full of its original spirit. If discord and dis- 
union shall wound it — if party strife and blind ambition 
shall hawk at and tear it — if folly and madness, if uneasi- 
ness under salutary and necessary restraint, shall succeed 
to separate it from that union by which alone its existence 
is made sure — in the end, by the side of that cradle in 
which its infancy was rocked, it will stretch forth its arms 
with whatever vigor it may still retain, over the friends 
who gather round it — and it will fall at last, if fall it must, 
amidst the proudest monuments of its own glory, and on 
the very spot of its origin. 



BENTON ON THE PROTEST. 

The question immediately before the senate was one of 
minor consequence ; it might be called a question of small 
import, except for the effect which the decision mi^ht have 
upon the Secretary itself. In that point of view it might 
be a question of tome moment ; for, without reference to 
individuals, it was essential to the cause of free govern- 
ments, that every department of the government, the senate 
inclusive, should so act as to preserve to itself the respect 
and confidence of the country. The immediate question 
was, upon the rejection of the president's message. It was 
7* 



"78 THB PRINCIPLES OF 

ino\ed to reject it — to reject it, not after it was considerei', 
but before it ;vas considered ! and thus to tell the Ameri- 
can people that their president shall not be heard, should 
not be allowed to plead his defence, in the presence of tlie 
body that condemned him, neither before the condemna- 
tion, nor after it ! This is the motion, and certainly no 
enemy to the senate could w^ish it to miscarry. The pre- 
sident, in the conclusion of his message, has respectfully 
requested that his defence might be entered upon the jour- 
nal of the senate — upon that same journal which contains 
the record of his conviction. This is the request of the 
president. Will the senate deny it ? Will they refuse 
this act of sheer justice and common decency ? Will they 
go further, and not only refuse to place it on the journal, 
but refuse even io suffer it to remain in the senate ? Will 
they refuse to permit it to remain on file, but send it back, 
or throw it out of doors, without condescending to reply to 
it ? for that is the exact import of the motion now made ! 
Will senators exhaust their minds, and their bodies also, 
in loading this very communication with epithets, and then 
say that it shall not be received ? Will they receive me- 
morials, resolutions, essays, from all that choose to abuse 
the president, and not receive a wotd of defence from him ? 
Will they continue the spectacle which has been present- 
ed here for three months — a daily presentation of attacks 
upon the president from alt that choose to attack him, 
young and old, boys and men — attacks echoing the very 
sound of this resolution, and which are not only received 
and filed here, but printed also, and referred to a commit- 
tee, and introduced, each one with a lauded commentary 
of set phrase ? Are the senate to receive all these, and 
yet refuse to receive from the object of all this attack one 
word of answer i * • ♦ • « 

The proceeding, he, Mr. B«, held to be an impeachment, 
without the forms of an impeachment — a conviction, with- 
out the form of a trial — a sentence of condemnation for a 
high crime and misdemeanor, against the chief magistrate 
of the republic, without evidence, without hearing, without 
defence, without the observance of a single form prescrib- 
ed for the trial of impeachments ; and this by the very tri- 
bunal which is Vound to try the formal impeachment for 
ih« same matter if duly demanded by the grand inquest 



ENtiLlSH GRAMMAR. 79 

of the nation ni their hall of representatives. This was 
th< question which the country would have to try, and in 
the trial of which, furious passion, reckless denunciation, 
bold, or even audacious assertion, will stand for nothing. 
The record ! the record ! will be the evidence which the 
country will demand. The facts ! the facts ! will be the 
data which they require ! The speeches ! the speeches * 
delivered on this floor, will be the test of the spirit and in- 
tention with which these proceedings were pursued and 
consummated. 



WEBSrER Olf THE PROTEST. 

The contest for ages has been to rescue liberty from the 
grasp of executive power. Whoever has been engaged in 
her sacred cause, from the days of the downfall of those 
great aristocracies, which had stood between the king and 
Uie people, to the time of our own independence, has strug- 
gled for the accomplishment of that single object. On the 
long list of champions of human freedom, there is not one 
name damned by the reproach of advocating the extension 
of executive authority ; on the contrary, the uniform and 
steady purpose of all such champions has been, to limit 
and restrain it To this end, the spirit of liberty, growing 
more and more enlightened, and more and more vigorous 
from 4ge to age, has been battering for centuries against 
the solid buttments of the feudal system. To this end all 
that could be gained from the imprudence, snatched from 
the weakness, or wrung from the necessities of crowned 
heads, has been carefully gathered up, secured, and 
hoarded, as the rich treasures, the very jewels of liberty. 
To this end, popular and representative right has kept up 
its warfare against prerogative, with various success; 
sometimes writing the history of a whole age in blood — 
sometimes witnessinff the martyrdoms of Sydneys and 
Bussels ; often baffled and repulsed, but still gaining, on 
the whole, and holding what it gained with a grasp which 
nothing but the complete ejttinction of its own being could 
compel it to relinquiab, • # * • 

And now* nri wtio is he so ignorant of the history of 



80 THB PRINCIPLES OF 

liberty, at home ard abroad ; who is he, yet dwelling in 
his contemplations among the principles and dogmas of the 
middle ages ; who is he, from whose bosom all original 
infusion of Ameriain spirit has become so entirely evapo- 
rated and exhaled, as that he shall put into the mouth of 
the president of the United States the doctrine that the 
defence of liberty naturally rendu to executive power, 
and is its peculiar duty ? Who is he that, generous and 
confiding towards power where it is most dangerous, and 
jealous only of those who can restrain it ? Who is he that 
reversing the order of the state, and 'upheaving the base 
would poise the political pyramid of the political system 
upon its apex ? Who is he that, overlooking with con- 
tempt the guardianship of the representatives of the peo- 
ple, and with equal contempt the higher guardianship of 
the people themselves ? Who is he that declares to us, 
through the president's lips, that the security for freedom 
rests in executive authority ? Who is he that belies the 
blood and libels the fa(ne of his own ancestors, by declar- 
ing that they^ with solemnity of form and force of manner, 
have invoked the executive power to come to the protec- 
tion of liberty ? Who is he that thus charges them with 
the insanity or recklessness of putting the lamb beneath 
the lion's paw ? No, sir ; our security is in our watchful- 
ness of executive power. * * * And when we, and 
those who come after us, have done all that we can do, and 
all that they can do, it will be well for us, and for them, 
' if some popular executive^ by the power of patronage and 
party, and the power, too, of that very popularity, shall not 
hereafter prove an over-match for all other branches of the 
government. •••*•• 
Mr. President, I have spoken freely of this protest, and 
of the doctrines which it advances ; but I have said no- 
thing which I do not believe. On these high questions of 
constitutional law, respect for my own character, as well 
as a solemn and profound sense of duty, restrains me from 

f riving utterance to a single sentiment which does not flow 
rom entire conviction. I feel that I am not wrong. I 
feel that an inborn and inbred love of constitutional liber- 
ty, and some study of our political institutions have not, on 
this occasion, misled me. But I have desired to say no- 
thing that should give pain to the chief magistrate person- 



BlfOLISH GBAMMAB. 81 

ally. I have not sought to fix arrows in his breast ; but I 
beueve him mistaken, altogether mistaken, in the senti- 
ments which he has expressed ; and I must concur with 
others in placing on the records of the senate, my disappro- 
bation of those sentiments. On a vote, which is to remain 
8o long as any proceeding of the senate shall last, and on 
a question which can never cease to be important while 
the constitution of the country endures, I have desired to 
make public my reasons. They will now be known, and 
I submit them to the judgment of the present and of after 
times. Sir, the occasion is full of interest It cannot pass 
off without leaving strong impressions on the character of 

Eublic men. A collision has taken place, which I could 
ave most anxiously wished to avoid ; it was not to be 
shunned. We have not sought this controversy; it has 
met us, and been forced upon us. In my judgment, the 
law has been disregarded, and the constitution transgress- 
ed—the fortress of liberty has been assaulted, and circum- 
stances have placed the senate in the breach ; and, altho* 
we may perish in it, I know we shall not fly from it. But 
I am fearless of conseouences. We shall hold on, sir, and 
hold out, till the people themselves come to its defence. 
We shall raise the alarm, and maintain the post, till they, 
whose right it is, shall decide whether the senate be a 
faction, wantonly resisting lawful power, or whether it be 
opposing, wi h firmness and patriotism, violations of liber- 
ty and ixroaia upon the constitution. 



THE FRINCIPLE8 OF 



PBOSODY. 

Frcm ffpos (for) w^ij (a Mong.) 

ProsoG7 consists of two parts: Punctuation — and the 
Laws of Vebsification, or Sales for writing Poetry. 

L Punctuation (d pttnc^um, a paint)^ is the art of divid- 
ing a written composition into parts, by introducing, be- 
tween the members of a period, the following characters* 
the 9 comma ; the ; semi colon ; the : colon ; and at the 
close of a period, the • period ; the ? interrogation ; the 
! exclamation ; and the — dash. 

It is impossible to lay down rules for punctuating, which 
will be free from exceptions. The following are as useful 
and perfect as any that can be given : 

General Rule. — ^Use a comma after a word of the 7th 
relation ; a semi colon before a word of the 16th relation ; 
and a period, interrogation, or exclamation, at the close of 
the sentence. [See the punctuation on the Plate.] 

HuLE 1. — Before a relative pronoun, insert a 9 as: God, 
who, at sundry times, spake unto the fathers, hath spoken. 

Rule 2. — After a noun, or pronoun, governed by a pre- 
position, insert a ^ as : At sundry times,? unto the fathers,? 
— after a noun,? or pronoun,? : O'er nature's soft repose,?. 

Rule 3. — ^Where the nominative is separated from the 
verb, by an intervening phrase, a 9 is to be inserted after 
the nominative, and before the verb, as : 

ThMmderM 9 waited from the burning aone 

9 Orotol from afar, a deu and hollow groan. 

Rule 4. — A $ is used before a conjunction, as : I will 
either bring you the book ; or send it by mail. An adjec- 
tive restricts the logical extension of a noun ; as: North 
America is not so large ; as America. 

The : is used when a comparison is made between two 
things, by using the comparative and corresponding con- 
junctions, as: As the ox goeth to the slaughter: so goetb 
the fool to the stocks. 



BN0LI8H 6EAHMAR. 83 

BuitB 5. — The • is placed at the close of a period, and 
denotes the sense to be complete, as: 

The midnight moon Berenely amiles 

O'er Natore's toft reposef 
Ko lowering olond obecuree the ikj^ nor 

Ruffling tempest blowB* [See Plate.] ' 

RuLB 6. — ^The ? is used after an interrogatory sentence ; 
the ! aAer an interjection, and exclamatory phrases ; and 
the —- denotes a rhetorical pause, as 

O death! vhere is thy — atingf O graTe* where is thy— riotoryf 

The student is refeired to the Plate on SyraaXf for a 
more full exemplification of the preceding rules. 

Peosodt (trpog A6ri) is the art of meting poetry by a regu* 
lar succession of long and short, or of accented and unac- 
cented syllables. A certain number of syllables form a 
foot. They are called feet, because it is by their aid that 
the Toice passes through them in measured time, either in 
singing or reading poetry. There are eight kinds of feet, 
four of two syllables, and four of three, as follows: 

Dissyllable. Trisyllable. 

1. A Trochee, ' 5. A Dactyl, — ' ^ 

2. An Iambus, ^ "" 6. An Amphibrach, *- — -* 

3. A Spondee,— "" 7. An Anapast, . ^ ^ — 
4 A Pyrrhic, -^^ 8. A Tribrach, ' 

Three of these are called primaiy, because whole com- 
positions can be written in them, without introducing other 
teet, yiz: Troehee^ JambuSf and Anapast. The others are 
called secondary, being used occasionally, to vary the com- 
position. 

The following verse will serve to convey an idea of the 
principles of Prosody, as given above: 

Not & dram7* wis hiardfi n5r a^finVrU nfftefi 
As his cOrsenf t5 the rfl^7p&rt w5 Aflr7ried ; 

N6t & sOlliieT iiackdrged7 his ySre2 well sMt^ 
O'lr thS grdve7 whire our A«7ro we 5t*7ried. 

* The figures divide the lines into measores, and point oat the IboC, 
•1 per above Table ;—l. Troohet; 2. Iambus: 7. Aoapaest} &o. 



S4 ENGLISH GSAMHAK. 



BURIAL OF SIR JOHN MOORE. 

Not a Jrw7»7 wasAeari,2 nor ^l fun^i2\notefi 
As his cori 37 to the rawi7p«irt we Awr7ried ; 

Not a loWdier das-charg^d^ his /ar«2well *Aot, 
O'er the graven where our Ac7ro we ^7ried. 

We 5Mr2ied him darkllj at deaH o( night ;2 
The sod^ with our 5ay7onets tur^nms ; 

By the x^m^gling moo7t2heams mi^ty tight fi 
And our Zan7tems dim2\j hurrSting. 

No uieSless cof2&n encZos'd? his hremtfi 
Nor in 5Aee^,7 nor in shroud,7 we &au9td2 him ; 

Bat he lay7 like a u'ar7rior ^a&2ing his ref 1^,7 
With his mar7tial cloak2 BLrtmndZ him. 

Pew and shorf? were the pray*ri7 we said;2 
And we jpoArc7 not a t£wi7 of iof2row ; 

But we ^ea(i7fastly gaz^dl on thefaa^ of the <2eai,7 
And we ^Y7terly thaughtl of the iTiorTrow. 

We thought fi as we ibZ71owM his nar7row ie<{,2 
And smooth* d2 down his7<m£7ly ]n721ow, 

That thefoe7 would he r»7oting o7ver his head^7 
And ice2 far B,way7 on the MZ7low. 

Lightlyl they'll ^a;A:2 of the <p»r7it that's gim; 

And o'er2 his cold ash7eB ixp3ra«<f7 him ; 
But 9io^A2ing he'll ree&,7 if they 1^7 him sleep mfl 

In a grav€7 where a £n7ton has Zaf(27 him. 

But half2 of our Aca7vy tasi2 was <2cme,2 
When the dock7 told the Am«r7 for rertr7ing; 

And we heard7 the difSiwat ra9t2dom gun^ 
That the/oe7 was nti22denly^r7ing. 

Slowljl and MeI21y we laitF? him iaumSt 
From the /cZ<f7 of his/ame7 fresh and ^o7ry ; 

We caro'iS not a Zt?ie;7 we rai$*d2 not a «foiie,7 
But 2e/^2 him aZon«7 in his gWry. 



PRINCIPLES 

OF THE 

ETYMOLOGY AND SYNTAX 

mr THs 

LATIN LANGUAGE: 

(7P0N THE ANALYTIC PLAN OF ROOT AND AD JUNG FS. 

INTRODUCTION. 

All will agree that he is a good Latin and Greek 
scholar, who has acquired a knowledge of the roots of all 
the declinable words in those languages, together with the 
adjuncts, which can be associated with each radical, and 
understands their import and use, in giving to the noun, 
pronoan and adjective, gender, number, and case — and to 
the yerb, voice, number, person, conjugation, mood, and 
tense — and has acquired a knowledge of th,e indeclinable 
parts of speech, with the ability to give every word its true 
syntax, or relation to the other word or words in the sen- 
tence, by which it is, in reality, " constituted a part of 
speech.'* 

In the following pages, we have endeavored to make 
such a disposition of some sixty lines of Virgil's ^neid, 
(and the second chapter of Matthew, from the Greek Test- 
ament,) as will combine and illustrate all these principles 
under oTie general view, and will guide the learner to a 
knowledge so desirable. 

The ingenious student will find the root (which is some- 
times a more remote one than is found in the text), placed 
in the first column ; the defimtion in the second ; while 
the syntax (showing by what word it is governed, or with 
what it agrees), occupies the third column ; leaving the 
termtnaiions, pointing out the etymology, to close the line 
8 



86 INTRODUCTION. 

The root and termination of every declinable word, in the 
text, are clearly pointed out, by the prefixes and mffixes 
being printed in Italics^ while the root appears in Roman 
Small Capitals. 

Thus we have endeavored to make the rough path easy 
and inviting to the beginner, at the commencement of his 
journey ; and to invite the man of letters again to revisit 
those literary fields, and to place in his hands something 
that shall recall those juvenile days in classic hall, free 
from religious intolerance, political villainy, and a cold and 
heartless world, and to fix the principles of this noble lan- 
guage indelibly upon the mind. 

The plan of Latin forms, originated by Mr. Grosvenor, 
is a very happy method of disposing of the tedious and pro- 
lix declensions and conjugations, which hang like an incu- 
bus over the student, and no doubt will be welcomed by the 
learner. This Table was published by Mr. Grosvenor, at 
Salem, Massachusetts, in the year 1831. Parts of the Ta 
ble have been copied into other grammars. Clinton said, 
that he who made two blades of grass grow where only 
one was known to grow before, deserved the everlasting 
gratitude of his country. And if this be true, surely he 
who has condensed to a single page the long and cumbrous 
conjugations, of some sixty or eighty pages, ought to have 
his memory perpetuated by a monument more lasting than 
brass or marble — he should live in the hearts of all friends 
of. improvement in literature. We have, in this work, 
arranged this Table in an improved form, and pre- 
pared an original Table of the Greek Verb, which will be 
found in their proper places. From this anangement, ihe 
student will be able to commence parsing at once, and will 
find on the same page — ^yea, in the same line — a Virgil, a 
Dictionary, and a Grammar, which will present to the 
eye of the scholar, all that Virgil, Cicero, Tacitus, or De- 
mosthenes could inform him about their mother tongue. 

That the person into whose hands this work may fal., 
may, by a careful and critical examination of the princi- 
ples here laid down, (which are as immutable as the 
language itself, on which they are groun'Hed,) speedily 
find himself able to read, write, and speak the language, 
with the facility and accuracy of a native Roman, or Gre 
cian is the sincere wish of THE AUTHOR. 



LATIN GRAMMAR. 



A BRIEF VIEW OF THE PARTS OF SPEECH 

The Parts of Speech in Latin are eight: 

1. Noun, Adjective, Pronoun, and Verb — declined* 

2. Adverb, Preposition, Conjunction, and Interjection— 
undedined. 

DEFINITIONS 

1. A Noun is the name of a person, place, or thing: as, 
vir, 

2. An Adjective expresses the quality or extension of 
the noun : as, vir boTtus. 

3. A Pronoun stands for the noun : as, vir qui. 

4. A Verb expresses the existence or action of the noun . 
as, vir est, 

5. An Adverb expresses the manner in which the noun 
exists : as, vir tbi est. 

6. A Preposition governs some case of a noun : as, ad 
virum. 

7. A Conjunction connects words or sentences: as, arma 
que virum. 

8. An Interjection is a virtual sentence: as, heu! 

REMABKS 

Words are called parts of speech, because they are all re- 
ferred, either directly or indirectly, to the noun; and, as 
their existence as a part of speech depends on this relation 
to the noun, so the case of a noun is merely that correlative 
I elation which the noun and pronoun have to other words 

• A declmable word contains a root, and generally one termmationj 

tS. ABM-a. CAW.O. 



38 THE PRINCIPLES OF 

m the sentence ; and although Latin nouns and pronouns 
are generally declinable, yet their case depends eritirely 
upon their syntax : as, nominative^ arm-a ; sunt ; vocative^ 
O arm-a ; accusative^ cano arm-a. 

GENDER. 

The Genders are three : — ^Masculine, denoting males ; 
feminine, denoting females ; and all others are neuter ; but 
in Latin, nouns are said to be in a certain gender by gram- 
matic comtruction — that is, the gender is determined by 
the adjective annexed: as, masculine, t^ ; feminine, a; 
neuter, urn. 

NUMBER, 

The Singular Number denotes but one ; the Plural more 
than one. 

CASE. 

The Cases are six: — Nominative, Genitive, Dative, Ac- 
cusative. Vocative, and Ablative. 

DECLENSION. 

Declension is the mode of changing the termination of 
nouns. There are five declensions, called first, second, 
third, fourth, fifth, distinguished from each other by the 
termination of the genitive singular: as, first, €b; second, 
t; third, is; fourth, t^;; fifth, et. 

Q^ The Declension and (render, on the Chart, are placed aftei 
flirery noun, adjective and pronoun: thos^ (l/Oi first declension, 
feminine gender ; (2 n. p.) , second declension, neater, plnral ; &o. 

RULES FOR THE CONSTRUCTION OF CASES. 

L The Nominative precedes the verb: as, penn-a est; 
arm-a sunt. 

2. The Genitive follows a noun, adjective, or verb ; as, 
annus mundi, 

3. The Dative is governed by verbs and adjectives: as, 
similis, perm-cB. 

4. The Accusative is governed by transitive verbs and 
prepositions, the "time how long,** and the "place to 
wktch*^; and is placed before the infinitive; as, tenec 
tftim i-m^ &c. 



LATIN 6EAMMAE. 89 

5. The Vocative is constnied with O : as, O Catalin-a. 

6. The Ablatiys is goyerned by the prepositions by^ 
withf in^ Brc.j and is used to express 4he " time tohen^** the 
' place to?ure" the *' cause, manner, means, and instru- 
ment,'* and is put absolute with a participle. 

^ TABLE OF DECLENSION. 

TTRVr SXCLXKIIOK. 

Singular. Plural, 

If. G. D. M. V. Jb. N. Q. D. Ac. V. M. 
Root, — f.-r- a, 8B, 8B, am, a/ A. 8b, annn, is, as, », isf 

BKCOKD DXCLEKSIOir. 

Root, m .Scf. — a8,er, i, o, nm, e, er, o. i, omm, ii, os, i, if . 
Root, — n.-* am, i, o,mn, mn, o. a,toram, is, a,:^ a,ti8. 

THISD DSCLENIIOV. 

Root, -^-m. St f. — — > iS| i,em, — ,e,i. es, un,ibii8,es, es,ibiis 
Root, — ^ n. — — , is, i, — t — ,©|i. a, inm,ibus, a, a,ibus 

rOVaTH DECLENSION. 

Root, m . -* us, As,iii, mn, as, u. as,anm,ibas,§iis,as,ibns§ 
Root, n.— u, u,u, a, a, a.aa,iiampbas,§aa,aa,ibasi 

FIFTH DSCUENnOK. 

Root, — f.-* es, el,el, em, es, e. e8,enim,ebas, e8,e8,ebas. 

Exceptions in gender will be learned from the Lexicon ; 
but the student should know nothing of them until he is 
familiar with the regular forms. 

FORM OF THE THIRD DECLENSION. 

Gender. I n. I m. | n. I n. I m. 1 n. I n. I m^ I in. I / 
Nom. a, I o. o. I 1. I n. I ar. I ur. I er. I or. I as. 
Geo. I atis. | onis. | otis. | lis. | nis. | aris. | oris | oris. | oris | atis 

Gender. I /". «. I /• I <»• I ^' I «• I «• I /"• I Pr.Part. 
Nom. I es, I is, o^ I as, sbs, I at, I x, I ns, 
Gen. I is, etis, itis. | is. | oms. | oris. | ssris. | itis. | cis. | ntis. 

^ * The Yooative is always like the nominative, except in the masoa- 
Une and feminine singalar, of the second declensicn. 

t In a iew words^ abut. 

1 All NeuterM have the Nominative, AMOsative, and Vocative, alik$, 
ending always in a, in the plaral. 

S In a few words, ubut. 
8^ 



90 



THB PRINCIPLES OF 



Nom. 

Peim-a, 
Pen tt, 

Penn-i 



DECLENSION OF NOUNS. 

riBST DSCLEN8IOK— FSMININX. 

Gm, Dot. Ace, Voc, 



penn-tfy 
pen 3/, 



penn-«, 
pesi to, 



penn>aiii, 
pen hold, 



penn-arttm,penn-tff, 



penn-a«. 
Pens art^ pens of, pens to, pens hold, pens 



penn-a, 
penO, 



"penn- 



€; 



SECOND DECLENSION—- MASCULINS. 



Domin-tiff. domin<t. 
Lord w, lord q/*. 



domin-o, domin-um, domin-e, 
lord to, lord $u, lord O, 



Jbl, 
penn-4. 

penn-it. 
pens tDUh> 



domin-o. 
lord with. 



Domin-t^ domin-arttm^omui.u, domin-ot, domin-t| domin-is. 
Lords are, lords of, lords to, lords tu, lords O, lords with. 



Fat-ttm, fat-i, 
Fate if, fate qf, 



SECOND DECLENSION— NEOTBR. 

fat-d, fat-ttjR, fat-um, fat-o. 

fate /or, fate AoU, fate O, fatetottA. 

Fat-a, fat-omm, fat-if, hit-a, fat-a, fat-i*. 

Fates are, fates of, fates to, fates tee, fate O, fate with. 

THUID DECIENSION— HASCUUNE. 

8enn-o, serm-onu, serm-ont, scrm-on«m, serm-o, serm-oM. 

Wordtf, word o/y word to, word ^pMJp, word 0, -word with 

Serm-onet, 8erm-oiiiaii»serm-ont6u«,serm-on«s, serm-one«, aetm-onibue 

Words ar^ words q/*, words to, words cpeoib, words 0, words iritA. 



THIRD DBCLENSION— NEOTSa. 



opdr-tf, 
orku, work of, 

Oper*a, oper-um, 
Works ar€,works of, 



opSr-t, 
work to, 



opus, opus, OpSF-6« 

work do, work 0, worktoitJk. 



oper-{6ttf, oper-a. oper-a, oper-i6««. 
works to, works tfo, works 0, works with. 



DECLENSION OV ADJECTIVES. 

Singular. Plural. 



2 M. bon-Es, 


i, o, urn, 


a, o. 


i, 


onmiy 


is, OS, 


i. 


is. 


1 F. bon-a, 


80, SB, am, 


a, A, 


»i 


arum. 


is, as, 


» 


is. 


2 N. bon-um, 


i 0, urn, 


um, 0. 


a, 


Oram, 


is, a, 


a. 


is. 



For the other declensions, the student is referred to the Table of 
Declensions and the Analysis of Virgil's .£nead, whare he will ind 
thrae hundred p aridig*xs. 



LATIN GHAMMAR. 91 

PRONOUNS. 

^ In Latin there are eighteen simple Pron<lans, the prin- 
apal of which are declined below. 

PERSONAL PRONOUNS. 

F1B8T Person—/. 
Singular. Plural. 

Jf. G. D. Je. V, M. N. G. D. jSc. V. M. . 

ego, meij'mihi, me^ — , me. nos, nottriimornostri, nobis, not, — , nobis. 

Second Pxssoir— 7Aott. 

ta, toi, tibi, te, tn, te. vos, Te8tr(imonrestri, vobis, Tos,7os,ifobi8 

Thikd Pskson— Htm«eI/« Htrulf^ Itself, 
^, sUj nbi, 86, — , se. — , sni, sibi, se, — , se. 

DEMONSTRATIVE PRONOUNS. 

Tried PE&soN-^TAif , That, Thue, Thos$. 

N. G. D. Ac. V. M. N. G. D. Ac. V. Ah. 

M. bio, bajns, bate, bnnc, — , boo. hi, bonun, bis, bos, -«, bis. 

F. bflDO, bnjns, buc, banc, — , bdc. b», baram, bis, bas, — , bis. 

jr. boe, hnjns, bnio, boo, — , boc. b8B0,honim, bis, base, — , bis. 

Jf. ille, Qlias, iUi, illom, — , illo. illi, illorum, illis, illos, — , illis. 
JF*. ilia, illius, lUi, illam,— , ilU. il]aB,inaniin, illis, illas, — , illis. 
^. illadjilliiis, illi, illud, — ^,ilIo. ilia, illorum, illis, ilia, — , illis. 

M. is, eins, eT, earn, — , eo. 11, eonim,iisorei8,eos,— ^isoreis. 
F. ea, e^ns, el, earn, — , eA. ee, earnm,ii8orcis,eas, yiisoreis. 
N. id, %vm, ei, id, — , eo. ea, eormn,iisorei8,ea, — ,ii8orelS' 

RELATIVE PRONOUNS—TFAo, Which, That, Am. 

If. q«i, ca|i]s,eii|, qaem,— , quo. qni,qnoram/iuei8,*qao8,-— ,qaeis.* 
F. qon, oopu, cat, qoam^— , qnd. qiiaB,qaaram,quei8,*quas,— /ineis.* 
N. qaod,cma8, cui, quod, — , quo. qa»,qaorum,quei8,*quflB,— ,qQeis.* 

The other pronoans are, iste^ guts, idem, istic^ aliquis, 
iiquis guitnam, quiainmie, quinam, &&. 

lite is Reclined like itle. 

Quis IS declined like qui, except that it has quid for juod. 

Idem is declined by adding deTii to the pronoun is 

hiic is declined like hie, but is wanting in some of its 
sases. 

Aliquis, iiquis, kc, are declined like quis. 

* Mora froif lently f»<t6fst. 



92 THE PBINCIPLES OF 

Quisnam and quinamj by adding Ttarn and quis to qui, 

Quicunque, by adding cunque to qui, 

MeuSy tuuSf niuSf noster, and vester, may be called ad* 
jei:tiyes. 

Nostras, vestras, and cujas, are declined like adjectiyes 
of one termination in the third declension : as, Tiostra-s, 
atiSf &c. 

f 



VERBS. 

A Verb expresses the existence or action of its nomina- 
tive ; and as all beings are represented, in every language, 
•as existing, or acting on another object, or as being acted 
upon by an agent, there are but three kinds of verbs : — 
intransitive, transitive, and passive. 

The Inteansitive Verb is defined by the syllables com- 
posing the word — m, not ; trans, (a trako,) a preposition, 
signifying over; it, (ind., pres., 3d, sing., a eo,) goes; ive, 
may : and means one whose action or existence may not 
go over to an object : as, John stands ; David runs. 

The Tbansitive Verb is one whose action {it) goes 
{trans) over to an object: as, John splits wood. 

The Passive (a patior, to suffer) Verb is one represent- 
ing action upon a passive nominative: as, Wyatt was 
hung by the sheriff; (that is, he was hung against his 
own will ;) which is only another form of the transitive. 
The same action may be represented in either form of the 
verb; as (transitive), the sheriff hung Wyatt; (passive) 
Wyatt was hung by the sheriff. ^ 

In Latin, o, i, m, s, or t, final, is the sign of an active 
verb: as, amamu-f ; and r of the passive: as, amamu-r. 

MOOD. 

The Mood expresses the manner ih which the nomina 
tive exists, acts, or is acted upon. There are four Moods: 
he Indicative, the Subjunctive, the Imperative, and the 
infinitive. 

The IrfDicATTVE simply declares that its nommative ex 



LATIN OBAMMAE. 93 

ista, acts, or is acted upon: as, John stands; Joseph 
tprites a letter ; the letter is written. The signs of this 
mood are, in the imperfect tense, ha; in the perfect, i; in 
the pluperfect, era; in the future, h. 

The Subjunctive expresses that the action or existence 
is possible or contingent: as, it may rain ; John can write; 
if John weep. The signs of this mood are : in the imper- 
fect, re; in the perfect, eri; in the pluperfect, isst.; id the 
future, er. 

The Ibcferatiye is used to command, entreat, or permit 
some person to exist or act : as, shut the door ; give us our 
daily bread. The signs of this mood are : a, e, t , to^ te, 
itej &c. 

The Infinitive expresses unlimited action : as, AMA-re, 
to love. The sign or this mood is : re or isse — it is render- 
ed to, or to have. 

TENSE. 

Tense is the division of time into present, past, and 
Juture, 

The Present Tenso represents present time : as, I love. 

The Imperfect represents past time: as, I loved. . 

The Perfect represents an action as now completed : as, 
I have loved. 

The Pluperfect represents the action as formerly done: 
as, I had loved. 

The Future represents future action: as, I shall love. 

MOODS AND TENSE. 

CTDICATIVX. SUBJUNCTIVE. 

PrJmp,Per.Plu.Fia. Pr. Imp. Per. Plu. Fut. 

— ,ba. i, era,bi. a,e, re. eri, isse, er. 

do, did, have, had, will, may, might, may hava, might have, shall have. 

PERSON AND NUMBER. 

SINOULAE. PLtraAL. 

Id Per. 2d Per. Zd Per. lit Per. 2d Per. 3d Per. 

Active, o, i, m, s, (isti,) 

I, thou, 

Passive, r, ris, re. 



t. 


muB, 


tfa, 


nt, (ere), 


he. 


we, 


you, 


they. 


tur. 


muT, 


mini, 


ntur. 



94 



PSINCIFI.BS OF 



■K ^§ s* 






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T I I TT 



_s_ Sa ss 

.• • • is 

04 £(!« &C41J 



U.TC< OBAHIUR 



95 



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s a 8.Hg«H fl a 
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■ • a-9 s s 



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1 


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w 


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S I Is 

§1 I .1 II 



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tg CO 


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r f 


<r«r >^ 


>«r ^ 






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1 « 


•* •» •» 




s ^ 


■d Id «t 






1 1 1 


1 1 


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root 
root 

root 


root 
root 




25 s 


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I i-s I i-i i 

a a-2<3 $3 <B 
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I i-rrri-* 

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11 siViVI, 






teT MiT iJ* 


fc4* IpT 


«r »ir 1 


r f 


® flT »^. 


:•< >^ 


>«r vT bT 


■T kT 


1 1 i 


: 1 


root 
root 
root 


root 
root 


s ss 


« S 



I 

I 

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£ J £ I £ 



THE PEmCIFLES OF 



te*S li-S 



^ bco.S« 



O 



.a p 



15 



-^ 5^ 1.2 P. 

l-H ^ £ §3.2: 

2 -g - b 53 1* 



- ^ 5 Sl 



^'3 o 



I 



? o oi " ^ 

.jr. 'S d -«-i O 

1' i «i £ a 






i I 

•c5 



?J 



«fl ^ p 1= 3 ;7^ 






e^-3^ 




w cj t> ;S-S 



-itii 



5 i 



LATIN CRAMMAR. 



97 



- - 2 2 fl 






Is .. 

1l lit 



I 

! 

.s 

1 



fi l-il ^ 
If Ml^l 






il 










-liif 'I ^-S gg 
« « «f3 «••« f-a "f ^ 



•si --? 



. .-5 5 



•31 

T^^ iia ^^^ *»— ife 

Ijlillllli 



•Slia'-i 



S o t 



--n~ 



•J 



I 



1^ 



•8 4i II J^l ll II 

i ^5 ^r-J g-g v-S 
S fi -^3 t^ t^ ^1 

ll II II ll H 

?l ^1 ,-| 

iliillilii 



mill 



>-r Sj-t 



I 



^ 



III 



98 THE rSINCIPLES OF 






>fi 



^•a §- 9- «e .S*' b& 

■s -a 4-^1 4^1 ^21 oi i^ 

iiiiii 11^ il rl ll •:•? 

§--§.§ J I Ii 11 '4 



«Q 







II II il^ if ^11-^ 11^ 






^■l 


3 


II 


i> 9 


11 


II 




il 


oi 



^2 






^l-?fi| 41 i| f^ f I-" 

mill ll ll i Ii 

I I ^ I s "=1 



LATIN GRAMMAR. 



99 




^ V § ^ 

04 



100 THE PRINCIPLES OF 

Imperative Mood. 
2. Ain-a-re(torj) 3. Am-a -to -r : 2. Am-a -mini, 3.Am-a -nt -or. 
Loved ye be loyed him let be ; Loved be ye, loved let them be 

Infinitive Mood, 

Pre*. Am*a -r-i, Pei/. Esse -am -a •to8, JFttf.Am^i -torn -ir -t, 
Loved to oe. To have loved been. Loved to be about to be. 

PariicipU, 
Prti. Am-& -tos^ -a, •imi| Fid. Am -and -as, -a, -um, 

Loved beiog, be, she, it. Loved to be, -he, -abe, -it. 

NoTX. — ^In tranalatmg from Latin into English, the conjngation eem 
never be rendered, beoanse we have not/otfr eorretpo/nding conjugations 
in our language; therefore the a, or &v, whioh marks this Ut oonjnga- 
tion m Latin, means nothing in Englieh. 



LATIN ANALYZATION. 

The following is an ezemplifioation of the fifth and sixth theses laid 
dovm on page o of this work. The lesson here selected is from Beza's 
Latin Testament, — ^Matthew, ohap. v., 14, 15, 16, 17; and if the 
reader does not know that the voice, conjugation, mood and tense, per- 
eon and number, of the verb : and the declension, gender, number, and 
case of nouns, pronouns, and adjectives, are, inmost cases, to be found 
in the terminations suffixed to the root ; instead of a Latin Grammar, 
he is requested to critically review the following analysis and first 
LXTKSAL translation, and acquaint himself with these first principles of 
the language. 

Olh Theflgwret placed after the English wtrds place them in the 
English order. 

pron. v.root. 2,plu. root. root. 2,m,g,s. adv. 
14 V. Vos es -tifl lux mnnd •!. Non 

Ye 1 are 2 — * light 4 the world 's. 3 Not IC 

root, root. 3 s. root. 3, f. root. 1 oonj. pas. inf. prep 

pot -es -t nrb -• occult -a -r -i Supra, 

aue 11 is9 acity 5 hidden 14 be 13 to 12 upon 7 

root, 3,f,ac,s. root, I* 

mont *e -m posit -a. 

a mountain 8 placed. 6 

Idv. adv, con, prep, root, root, 3, o, 3,plu. root, ],fao,s. con, 
Ne -que ao -cen -d -u -nt Lucern -a -m, et 
Not4andl to6 fire5 giv63 they2 acandle7 , and 8 

* In all words where the nominative is expressed, the jMrtona/ termin* 
ation of ike verb is cancelled; thus, vos e8(tis,) ye are. Now, if the 
iom. vos VI ere omitted, it would be rendered the same, es (are) tis (ye.) 



LATIN ORAliliAB. 101 

^ root, 3,c, 3,pla, root, lf,ao,8. prep, root, 2 in ao,8. con, 
pon -n -nt e -a -m sabter modi •n -m, sed 
place 10 — they9 it 11 onder 12 a mearare 13 but 14 

prep, root, root, 2, n, ac,8 con, root, root, 2,c, 3, s. 

in can -delabr -n -m; et splen -d -e -t 

in a ctfiii/e-ttick 15 — — and 16 light 19 gives 18 it 17 

root, dat, pi. root, nom,p. root, 3,pl, prep, root, 2, m, ab, s, 
omn -ibos qn -I sn -nt in dom -o. 
all 21 to20 who22 are 23 — in24 thehoti8e.25 

f6y. root, l,f, root, root, 2,oonj,8nb,p, 3,8, root, root, 1/, s. 
It "a splen -d -e -a -t lax vestr -a 
SnchS splendor 6 give 4 mayl — light 3 your 2 

prep, root, 3,m,ab,pla, conj, root, 2, o, 8ub,p, 3, pla^ 
coram homin -ibns,* at vid -e -a ' .nt 

before 7 men, 8 that 9 see 12 may 11 they 10. 

root, 2, n, pi aco, root, 2, n, pla, ace, root, 2, n, pla, aco, 
bon -a vestr -a oper -a, 

goodl4 — yoorlS — works 16 — 

root, root, sab, p, 3, pi, eon, root, 3,m, ao,s, 
glon -fio -e -nt -qae Patr -e -m 

glorioos 20 make 19 may 18 they 17 and 16 father 22 — — 

root 2,m, ac,8, root,nom,8, root,3,8, prep, root 2, n, ab, pi, 
vestr -n -m qn -i es -t m cgbI -i -s. 
your — —21 who 23 is 24 in25 heaven.26 

\7v. adv root, loonj, imp,2,pl, root, aco,8, root, inf, perf 
Ne ezistim -a -te m -e ven -isse 

Not 3 think 1 ^^ yoa 2 me 4 come 6 to have 5 

con, prep, root, 3,0, sab, p, 1,8, root, 3,f, ao,8, con, 

at die -solv -a -m leg -e -m aat 

that? nn 10 -loose 11 may9I8 thelikwl2 or 13 

prep, root, ],dec, ao, pi, adv, root, ind, perf, con, 
pro -phet -a -s: non ven -i ut 

pro .pheuH — — not 16 come 17 have 1 16 that ID 

root, l,f,ao, pla, prep, root, sabj,pr, 1,8, con, con, 

e -a -8 dis -solv -a -m, sed ut 

them23 an 21 -loose 22 may 20 119 but 24 that25 

root, l,f,ao,pln, prep, root, 2,o, sab,pr, 1,8, 

e -a -8 im -pi -e -a -m. 

them29 infaU30ffll28 may 27 1.26 

* The English signifloation of a case is cancelled in the termination 
«f a Latin noon, if a preposition expressed precede^ it; homin (sun) 
'bas(de/^or«)— coram (before) homin (men) ibos (eancelled,) 

9* 



102 



THE PRINCIPLES OF 



THE RADICALS OF VERBS. 

The following list of verbs is inserted for the student tc 
conjugate. The figures inserted after each radical will in- 
form the student to which conjugation he is to refer it on 
the table. 

The student should by all means practice on these verbs 
until he can conjugate any verb with the greatest ease, ac- 
curacy ^ hnd facility. ' 

1. Amo 

2. Mon 
3 Reffo 
4. And i 




Abscond o,3 
Acu 0,3 
Argu 0,3 
Acoend o,3 
Alo,3 
Ago,3 
Ardeo,2 
Ang e o,2 

Batao,3 
Bibo,3 

Conniv e o,2 
Ci e 0^2 
Cap 1 0,4 
Cup 1 0,4 
Cresc 0,3 
Claud o,3 
Cedo,3 
C&do,3 
Csd o,3 
Cred 0,3 
Colo, 
Cemo,3 
Cav e 0,2 

Do,l 
Dom o,l 
Doo e o,2 
Dioo,3 
Dao 0,3 



abscond 6 re,3 abscond t,3 
acu fi re,3 acu i,3 



argu d re, 
accend d rcj 
ai « re,3 
ag « ra,3 
ard h re,2 
aug 6 re,2 

bata fi re,3 
bib fi re,3 

conniv e r«,2 
ci e re,2 
oapS re,2 
cup d re,3 
cresc fi re,3 
daud S re,3 
oed « re,3 
cad d re,3 
c8Bd d re,3 
cred fi re,3 
col 6 re,3 
cem fi re,3 
cav 6 re,2 

dftre,l 
dom a re,l 
doc e re,2 
dio fi re,3 
due 6 re,3 



argu i,3 

accend i,3 

a]ui,2 

egi;3 

iwrsi^3 

auxi,3 

bata 1,3 
bib i,3 

conn iv i,4 
ci vi^3 
oepi,3 
cup iv i,4 
ere vij3 
claus 1,3 



Bii^ 
cecl di,3 
ceo idi,3 
cred Id i,3 
oolai;2 
ere vi,3 
c&vi^ 



abscond i <tt)R. 4* bide, 

acu tam,3 sharpen, 

argu tam,3 prove, 

accens Qm,3 kindle, 

al i tnm.2 nounab. 

ao tam,3 do. 

ars ajn,3 bum. 

aoQ tam|3 increase 

bata tam|3 beat, 

bib I taiii«2 drink. 

■ wink, 

ci tam,3 excite, 

cap torn ,3 take, 

cup I torn ,3 desire. 

crS tani,3 grow, 

claos um,3 close, 

oess yasxkZ yield, 

cas nm,d fall. 

c»8uin,3 cut. kill. 

cr€d X turn ,2 believe. 

coltum,3 till. 

cr$ tumy3 see, decree 

can tum,3 take care 



de di,3 dft tam,l give, 

dom a 1,2 dom i tum 4 tame, 

doo n i,2 doo tam,3 teach, 

die 81,3 (didK ) dio tam,3 say. 

doo si,3(c2«ci)duc torn 3 leadr 



L*TIV ORAMMAft. 103 



Em 0,3 emlSre,3 dm i.3 emptiim,3 boy. 

E3aa o,3 exu fi re,3 exa i^ ez6 tnm^ ondrttf . 

Edo,3 edAre^ «d i,3 S Mim,3 eat. 

Fni^,3 fnii,3 fraitoi,3 -ctns^ enjogr. 

Fac io,4 fac 9 re,3 feo i;3 (bo tam,3 make. 

Fric 0,3 frio & re, frio a 1,2 (no tmn,3 nib. 

Falgeo,2 falgere,2 fnl «i,3 ■, shine. 

Frige 0,2 frig&re,2 fri3D,3 frio tuii,3 be cold. 

Fleet 0,3 fiect6re,3 flexi,3 fleo tiim,3 bead. 

Far o^ (or d re, ..^_ ■■ be mad . 



have, 
stick. 



Hab e o,2 hab 8 re,2 hab a i^ hab I tmn, 

Hasr e 0^2 bar 9 re,2 ha 81,3 h» ■Qm,3 

Jan^ 0,3 jtmg 8 re,3 jmtz 1,3 jmio tam,3 join. 

Jioio,4 jao6Te.3 jfo 1,3 jftotam,3 throw. 

Inda o,3 inda re,3 inda 1,3 liida tmn,3 olothe. 

Labor,3 labt,3> lap 808,3 slide. 

Leg 0,3 leg«r»,3 leg 1,3 leotani,3 choose. 

Lod o,3 kd • ro,3: Itis 1,3 la 8am,3 play. 

^^^A lulJS'J l«wi,3 Jlaa*toJi,3 wash. 

ilaT«re,3 OavEtoii,! 

Horior,3 mori,3 mortaos,3 die. 

Mitto.3 mitt8re,3 mis 1,3 mi8BQm,3 send 

fifoaeo,2 XDogL8re,2 monuiJS monItam,2 advis 

Mergo,3 merg«r6,3 mer si,3 meismii,3 dip,plange. 

Ni^o,8 nnb 9 ra,3 nop si,3 nop tmii,3 veU, or many. 

Nog 0,3 ni]ig4ro,3 niBxi,3 snow. 

Nasoor,3 nasoi,3 natasj3 be bom 

Ori or,3 ori 4}3 or tas,3 rise. 

Paado,3 poD9re,3 pandi^ p«B8am,3 open. 

Pend o^ pend « re,3 pepend 1,3 pen 8am,3 haii£. 

Pong o,3 pong S re,3 popo^ 1,3 pone torn, prick. 

Poo o,3 pon ere,3 pos a i.2 pos I tum,2 place. 

Peto,3 pet8re,3 pet<vi,4 pet i torn, seek. 

Prem o,3 prem 8 re,3 press i^3 press am, press. 

Ptallo,3 |nalldre,3 psalll,3 , play on an in 

stroment. 

Pasoo,3 pasod re,3 pavi,3 ', feed. 

Plioo,! plioare,! , , fold. 

Plar^ plu«re,3 plai,3 , ram. 

Qa»r 0,3 qossr 8 re,3 qttses hr 1,4 qoflds I tam,4 seek. 

QaiMoo,8 ooieiDBre, qai»Yl,8 qai0tam,3 rest. 



104 



THE PRINCIPLES OF 



Rid e 0,2 
Rao,3 
Reg 0,3 

Stni o,3 
Sid 0,3 
Surg o,3 
String 0,3 
Sent I o,4 
St 0,1 
Sed e o,2 
Scrib 0,3 

Ind. Pke8 

Utroot. 

Ton o,l 
Ten e o,2 
Tim e o,2 
Tribu 0,3 
Tang 0,3 
Traho,3 
Tex 0,3 

Vet 0,1 
Vid e 0,2 
Vine 0,3 
Vend 0,3 
Vert 0,3 
Veh 0,3 
Viv 0,3 
Volvo,3 
Ven i o,4 
Ven e o,2 



-<a, 



-to, 



rid ere ,2 
ru fi re,3 
reg $ re,3 

strn 8 re, 3 
Bid 6 re,3 
8urg % re,3 
string 6 re,3 
sent i re, 
St ft re,] 
sed e re,2 
scrib 6 re,3 

Int. Pres. 



ton & re,l 
ten e tejl 
tim 9 re,2 
tribn 6 re ,3 
tang 6 re,3 
tran 8 re,3 
tex 8 re,3 

vet & re,l 
vid S re,2 
vino 6 re, 3 
vend 6 re,3 
vert 8 re,3 
veh a re,3 
viv « re,3 
volv « re,3 
ven i r6,4 
ven i re,4 



stmx 1,3 
sid i,3 
Burre x i,3 
strin X i,3 
sens i,3 
stet i,3 
sed i,3 
scrips i,3 

Ind. Pe&t. 

2d root. 

ton a 1,2 
ten n 1,2 
tim n 1,2 
tnbai.3 
tet i gi,3 
tra X i,3 
tezni,2 

vet n i,2 
vidi,3 
vie i,3 
vend id i,3 
vert»i,3 
vex 1,3 
vixi,3 
volv i,3 
ven 13 
venii,3 



ri siun,3 
m i tum,3 
rec tam,3 

stmo tuni,3 

snrrec tQm,3 
stric tmn, 
sen 8ani,3 
St a tiim,l 
sessnm, 
scrip tiim,3 

Supnns. 

3d root. 
ton I tmn,2 
ten torn, 3 

tribu tmn, 3 
tao tnm,3 
traotnm,3 
tex tarn ,3 

vet I tiun,2 
vi 80111,3 
vie tnm,3 
vend i tam,4 
ver 8Qm,3 
veotam,3 
vio tnni| 
vol XL tam,3 
ven tuiDyS 



langh. 

rash. 

rule. 

brnld. 

sink. 

rise. 

bind. 

feel. 

stand. 

sit. 

write. 



thunder, 
hold, 
fear, 
give, 
touch. 
. draw, 
weave. 

forbid, 
see. 
overcome. 
seU. 
torn, 
cany, 
live, 
roll, 
come, 
be sold. 



Note. — ^From the foregoing one hundred radieaUfWe have more 
thanyit^e thoutand Englith derivatives ^ — a consideration sufficient to in 
duoe tbs student to commit them perfectly to memory. 



LATTK GBAItlCAX. 106 



RULES. 

The foUcm xg are ft few Latin rales most likely to be 
used by the student : 

I. The subject of the infinitive is put in the accusative. 
2» The vocative is used in address, with or without O. 

3. Opus and tuus, signifying need^ govern the ablative. 

4. DigTuu^ wntmtui^ j^aditutt govern the abUtive. 

5. Utor^ fnioT^ fungor^ potior ^ vucor^ and digftor^ go- 
vern the ablative. 

6. Perfect participles, denoting origin^ are followed by 
the ablative of the source, without a preposition. 

7. A noun, denoting that vnth which the action of a 
verb is performed, is put in the ablative. 

8. A noun, denoting that /rom which any thing is sepa- 
ratedf is often put in the ablative, without a preposition. 

9. A noun, expressing respect wherein or the part affect' 
ed^ is put in the ablative. 

10. Verbs that govern two cases in the active voice, 
govern the latter of these in the passive. 

II. The price of a thing is put in the ablative, except 
when expressed by tbe adjectives tanti^ quanti^ pluris. 

12. The comparative degree is followed by the abla- 
tive, if qudm (than) is omitted. 

13. A substantive with a participle, whose case depends 
on no other word, is put in the ablative absolute. 

14. Adjectives of penty or want govern the g^itive or 
ablative. 

16. Some adverbs govern the genitive. 

16. Some derivative adverbs may govern the same case 
as their primitives. 

17» Nouns signifying the same thing are put by appo- 
sition in the same case. 

18. The snbj. present is often used for the imperative. 

19. The infinitive is often used as a noun. 

20. One verb governs another, as its object, in the infi 
nitive. 



106 THE PRINCIPLES OF 

21. Participles, gerands, and supines, govern the same 
cases as their verbs. 

22. The genitive of gerunds follows nouns or adjectives. 

23. After verbs expressing motion, the place where the 
motion ends, is put in the accusative, without a preposition. 

24. The subject nominative governs the verb. 

25. The verb agrees with its subject nominative in num- 
ber and person. 

26. Transitive verbs govern the accusative. 

27. One noun may govern another noun in the genitive. 

28. Adje'ctives and participles agree with their nouns in 
gender, number, and case. 

29. Conjunctions connect words or sentences. 

SO. Twenty-six prepositions govern the accusative, the 
principal of which are, oi, ante^ apud^ drcum, contra^ in- 
fra, inter^ irUra^ ob, per^ post^ prater^ propter^ mpra^ 
tranSf ultra. 

31. In and luh, denoting tendency ^ govern the accusa" 
tive ; denoting situation^ govern the ablative. 

32. Super and suiter govern both the accusative and 
ablative. 

33. Eleven prepositions govern the ablative, the princi- 
pal of which are a, ab, coram, cum, de, e, or er, pro, sine, 
terms. 

34. Many verbs compounded of the prepositions, a, ab, 
de, ex, &c., are foUowed by an ablative, governed by the 
preposition. 

35. Cause, manner, and instrument, are put in the ab- 
lative. 

36. Adverbs qualify verbs, adjectives, and adverbs. 

37. The relative pronoun must have an antecedent, 
with which it must agree in gender and person. 

38. The predicate noun is put in the same case as the 
subject, after a verb neuter or passive, when both words 
refer to the same person or thing. 

39. Verbs compounded with the prepositions, ad, ante ^ 
con, in, irUer, ob, post, pre, sub, and super, govern the 
dative. 

40. Sum, in the sense of habeo, is followed by the dative 

41. Nouns are sometimes followed by the dative. 

42. A transitive verb, governing the accusative, has a 
genitive, dative, or ablative, to express some relation. 



I 



LATIN OKAHJUB. 107 

ANALYSIS OF VffiGIL'S JENEID. 

BOOK I. 

Root l>e/lnUum, Syntax, Etymology, 

N, G. D,A.VJi. 
Arm The annsi oano Abm-Ai 26* (2ii.p.) a,ormn,is,a,a;is. 
fd. and, anna qus Timm, 29 conjnnetioii. 

vir. the herO| cano TiB-umi 26 (2 m.) vuTi r, o, wn, vir, o, 
caa« Inngi (ago) cAK>o(l)an&a|(3d.}0|ere|Ceoim;Oa]itiiia. 

0, is, it, imii8| itiS; not. 
Tw. of Troy, oris Tmoj-0, 27 (1 f.) a, «, a, am, a, A. 

qa. who, virom qtr^i yenit, 37 (m.) i, onjns, cni, em, -, o. 

prim. first, F&ni*«t qui, 28 (2 m.) ut, i, o, nm, e, o. 

a. from, a-6 oris, prep, h eaphonio letter. 

or. the shores, ah om-it, 33 (1 f.) a, s, s, am, a, A. 

», arum, is, as, », <r. 
Ital. to Italy, iTAu-am, 23 (1 f.) a, to, 8b, am, a, A. 

(at. a for. hy fate, rAT*o, 35 (2 n.) mn, i, o, nm, un, o. 

pro, fog, d^ven, PKOFUO-ti« qui, 28 (2 m.) tw , i, o, am, e, o. 

qa. and, Italiam qux litora, 29 conjimetion. 

Laiin. Lafiniaii, LAvm-a litora, (2 n.) nm, i, o, un, nm, o. 

a, orom, is, a, a, is* 
▼en. oame, qui TXN-tt, (2) (3d and 4th.) io, ire, i, torn. 

i, isit, if, imus, istis, enmt. 
fit. to the shores: uron-a .* 23 (3 n.) as, oris, ori,a8, as, oro. 

a, am, ibas, a, a^ ibos. 
molt, much, (est) mrLT-umjactatus, adrerb. 

ill. he, virom iLL>«jaotatas,(est) (m.)e,ias,i,nm,-, o. 

et. both, ST, et, corresponding conjonction. 

terr. upon the land, (b) TXRB-ts, 31 (1 f.) a, s, am, a, k, 

m, arum, is, as, », is, 
tao. was tossed, Die XACT-at'4it(3) (est,) (1st.) * or aii. 

atas som, es, sff, &o. 
et. and, terris et alto, 29 oonjonotion. 

* The figores placed after the words refer to the role— those in pa- 
' IS () to page 142. 



iOS THB PKmCIPLBS OF 

alt. on the deep, (in) alt-o, 31 (2 n.) ami i, c. tun, nm, o 
T. by the power, v-i, 35 (3 f.) u, b, -, im, is, i 

floper. of the Code, ^ suTxate, 27 (2 m.)i, (or)-«Mn, is, os, iyis. 
ssv. of crael, 28 8JEY-« Jononis, (1 f.) a, ^,m, am, a, ft. 

mem. lasting, 28 MSMon-ent iram, <3 f.) or, is, i^ em, or, e. 

Jun. of JoBOi iram JuN-onit, 27 (3 f .) o, onu, ou, onem, o, one. 
ob. on aoooont of, on iram, preposition, 

ir. anger, ob im-ajn, 30 (If.) a, », c, am, a, 4. 

Molt. Miioh,pas8a8(e8t) Mult-«, 26 (2 a. p.) a, ommi is, a, a, is. 
qu., qn. alsof et qiTO*Q,UB, «onjunotioa. 

et. and, xt qnoqne, oenjonotioik. 

bell. hy war, bxll-o, 35 (2 n.) mn, i, o, nm, am, o. 

pat. he snflered, (iUe) passits (4) (est) (3d.) ior, i, passossoa 

es, igtt somv, estis, be. 
dam. while, 36 lyuii eondevet, adv«rb. 

ooB,de. hewoakLfixmd 

(iUe) coK-]>-s^rt-<,(6)26 (3d.) o, <r«, idi, itom. 

rem, res, ret, remos, &o. 

orb. a 01^, oonderet uxb-mi, 26 (3 f.) e, is, i, cm, s, e. 

qa. and, oonderet qux inferret, 29 eoiuonotiea* 

in, fer. would bring(ille) i]f*nft«ne(6)Deos,(3d)o/<rr4,taU,lataa. 

rem, res, ret, remas, &o. 
Be. the Qods, iaferret Db-m, 26 (2 m.) as, i, o, am, as, o. 

i, Oram, is, oi, i, is. 
Lftt. iato Latim, 

inlerret Lati-o .* 39 (2 n.) am, i, o, am, am, o. 
gen. nee, 24 uwH-iU (ortam est,) (3n.) tit, eris, eiL 

as, as, ere. 
de,iBi. from which one36 un*»s (ortom est,) advert). 

Lat. the Latm, 28 LATiiri«iii genns, (2 n.)tffli,i,o,am,am,o. 
qa. and, genas qux patree, 29 eoiyanotion. 

Alban Albanian. 28 Aliah-I paties, 29 (2 m.)as^o,am,e,o. 

i, oram, is, os, i, is. 
pat. fathers, 24 PAT,rsff(QrtiMD[t,)(3m.)er,ns,ri,rem,er,e. 

fsf , ram, ribas, res, &o. 
ad, qa. and, patres AT-qux mania, 29 oonjanotion. 

alt. of lofty, 28 alt^c Romas, (1 f.) a, «, m, am, a, 4. 

the walls, 24 ii<ENx-a(orta8ant,)(2a.p.)a,oram,is,a,8Ee. 



LATIN GRAMMAR. 109 

Bom Borne. mcBma Rom-«, (1 f.) a^ a, m, am, a, A 

Mw. O Muse, (O) Mvs-a, (1 f.) a, m, m, am, a, A 

ego. to me^ memora Mi^ftt, ego, mei« wil, me, -, ma. 

eane the oanaeB CAt7i*a«, (1 f.) a, «, m, am, a. A. 

», aram, is, a«, », w. 
mesi. relate: . (ta) MXKom*a.*(7)oaasas,(lst)o,are,avi,atm&. 

a, ato, ate, anto. 
qa. li^iat, <lv-o aomine, (n.) od, oujns, coi, od, -, o. 

»im. dhnnitj, imi*ttM, Isso, (3 n.)en,iinBpiii,en,en,iiM. 

Jflsd. being offimded, lxs>o, nmnine, (2n.)nm,i,o,mii,nm,o. 
TB. or, mmilne Iceo yx qoid dolens, oonjonotioii. 

qa. iHiy, eeomidam qtr.ui, tued adverbially. 

dol. griaving^ Do-uc-fw regiiia,(3 f.)fif ,ntis4nti,ntem,SM. 

re-a ag-o^queen, asoix>a impfolerit, (1 f.) a, m, m, am, a, A. 

De. of theOoda,reguia Dx-tliii, (2 m.) lu^ i, o, mn, ns, o. 

i, (or)-tini, is, oe, i, is. 
tot. somai^, TOTeasQs, adj., plural, indeolinable. 

tdIv. to struggle with, yovr-t-re (8) oasos, (3d.)o,erf ^Tolutom. 

iri, iaae, esse, Tolatnros. 
eaa. mialbrtmies, 

Yohere CAS-ut, (4 m.) ns, ds, ui, um, ns^ a. 

ns^ iram, ibns, «t, &o. 
in^ sign, renowned, in-siox-mi vinm, (3 m.) is, is, i^ em, is, i. 

pi. iotjMttj^udgMim nsTA-ff, (3 f.) s, tb, ti, tem, s, te, 

vur. a man, impnlerit tib-imi Toltere, (2 m.) vfr, i, o, uin , vir , o. 
tot. so mai^, TOT labores, adj., phiral, indeclinable. 

ad, i, to midergo, A]>-i^e(9) (2d and 4th.} eo, tr«, ivi, itom. 

ire, ivisse, esse itoms. 
lab. hardships, adira labor-ss , (3 m.) or, oris, i, em, or, a. 

es, mn, flms, et, es, &o. 
la, pel. shall haYB oom« 

peDed^ regfaia XM-FiTXr«-ri>^,(10) (3d.)peUo.pellere,jHflt. 

poison, eron, eris, ertt, 
Taat. Somnoh, TAMT-^hnD, (1 f.) a, n, n, am, a, A. 

«, arom, b, as, bd, is. 
lie. MR (tmt,) interrogatiTa. 

Mdn. toaunds, (sint) AifXM*(t, 4. (1 f.) a, », m, am, a, A. 

SB, amm, i$, as, «, is. 

10 



]10 TUB PRINCIPLES OF 

c(b1. celestial, caEUE8T-ifrt» ammis,(3 fjis, le, i, em, k a 

ee, ium, ihu$^ ee, es, ilos 
ir. angwt »-tf (nnt?) <1 f.) a, as, », am, a, A 

tf , armn, ia, aa, », ia. 
Urb. A eity^ Ubb.« fuit, (3 f.) «, b, i, em, a, e. 

ant., qn. anoieBt, Alr^^^I^a urlba, (1 f.) a, n, ca, am, a, 4. 

fa. waa, orbs m-i-t, (11) aom, ess^,/^, fui, fuiati. 

Juitf imoa, latis, enmt. 
Tyr. Tfduk^ TTmx*i eolent, (2 m.) na, i, o, um^ e, o. 

<, cram, ia, 08, i, ML 
tan. inhabited, ooloni TXl^l^<r<(12}(qllam) (9d.}eo,ere,iii,timi. 

vi, Qiati, vit, aimna, aiatta« 

nerutt, oriMTft. 

ool. ooloBiata, coLoir-i temiefe, (2 m.) iu^ i,'Q, urn, a, o. 

H enun, ia, oa, i, la. 
Carthag.Carthaga, Cabtbag-o foiti (3 f.) o, inis, i, em, o, e. 

Ital. Italy, oontra lTAu-«ai, (!£.)«,•,», am, a« 4i* 

con. oppoaiteto, comtka Italiam, piepoaitioBk 

qn. and, Italiam ^ux Tiberinaoatia, conjunction 

Tiber. theTiberian, Tnxanr-a oatia, (2 a.) iim4*o,Qm,ntt,o« 

a, ormn, is, a, a, ia. 
long, ftroffy fait Loiros, adTerb. 

08. aooitha aontra Mn««« (2 n.) am, i, o, mn, ma, o. 

a, Qran, la, a, a, m» 
div. abooadingi nrr-ac oiIm, (3 f.) at, itia, i, am, ea, a<. 

op. in wealth, divaa or-tiai, (3 f.) a, ia, i| am, ea, e. 

ten, ibas, ea, as, ibaa. 
qa. and, dives opam «ux asperrima, conjunction, 

jrtod in the arts, armDi-ii, (2 n.) ua^ I, o, am, am, o. 

a, orum, is, a, a, tf . 
asp. most skilful, AsPXR-UM*a oibs, (1 f.) a, a, », ao^ a, L 
boU. of war: atodiis 9xuM: (2 n.) am, i, o, am, a», o. 

qa. wbiohy foMase qu-ast, (f.) a, cujus, cni, am, -, o. 

Jon. Jano, Jmv-o fartoFy (3 f.) o, onia, oni, onem, &o. 

ar. ia said, Juno Fut-f-ur, (13) (3d.) o, ferre, tali, latam. 

feror, ferns, /crittf-, Soa. 
arr. lands^ inacv Txas*if« (1 f.) a, ca, as, am, a, 4. 

«, arum, is, as, ee, w. 



LATIN GRAMMAR. Ill 

mag. more (than), ifAO-it, adTerb. 

muL all, oHK-tfrttff terris, (3 f.)vt, if ^ i, em, ia, i. es 

ium, ibofl, es, es, Vntt. 
m. one, w-am (arbem) , (1 f.) a, s, », am, a. A. 

post ,hab .being less est ^ed PosT-HAB-ii-d 8amo,(l f.) a,a,8B,am, a,tf. 
col. to have eherished 

fertor coL-ti-ifM (14) qoam, (2d, 3d.) o,ere,tH, 
eohfim. ere, vwt«, &e. 
Sam. Samoe^poethabitll 8aic-0| (2 f.) oe, i, o, urn, e, o. 

Hic. Here, (fbemnt) Hxc, adveib 

iS. ber, arma iix-um, (f.) a, tuf, i, am, -, A 

airm. arms, - AR]c-a( faenmt) (2B.p.)a,onim,iB,a,a,is. 

kb. here, fbit mc, adverb, 

eon'. chariot, cuaaus fait, (4 m.) «t, 4i, id, mn, os, a. 

fti. wae» earros ru-i-t: (15) sum, es8e,/iit. fui, fusti, 

fiUt, foimos, fnistis, &o. 
hoe. (that) this, hoc ease, (a.) hoe, hajus, hnio, hoe^ &o. 

re-a a|;-e,kxngdom, esse xsoN-vm, (2 n.) am, i, o, urn, am, o* 
Be. the goddess, Bs-a tendit, (1 f ) «, », m, am, a, ft 

gen. ef nations ,regniim OENT-tMif, (3 f.) gens, tis, i, em, ns, e. 

es, am, ilnu, es, es, &o 
e. to be, noo E-««e, (15) som, Mte, foi 

m, if, Dea tendit hoc si fata sinant, conjonction 

qa. by any means, ^ua, adverb 

fiit.afui the fates, fat-a sinant, (2 n.) am, i,o, am, am, o 

a, oram, is, a, a, is. 
nn. may permit, fata siN-a-n/, (17) (3d.) o, ere, sivi, sitom. 

sinam, as, at, amus, atis, ant, 
jam torn .new also, tendit jam txxm, adverb. 

^. both, ^UE, qne, oorresponding conjonction. 

tend. endeavors Dea TEND-{-f(18)hoc, (3d)o,ere,tetendi,tam 

tendo, is, U, imus, &o 
qa. and, tendit quE fovet, conjunction. 

for. cherishes (the 

hope) Fov.€^* ( 19) (spem .) (2d,3d ,) eo,ere,i/otnm 

eo, es, Bi. &e. 
rro,gea. A race, Pao GENi-em duoi, (5 f.)es,eT,eT,em,e8,e 

fed. hot, SEP, coiyanotion. 



112 - THE PRINCIPLES OF 

9iiim. indeed I andierat zinic, adverb 

Tro. Trojan, Trojan-o eaogidne, (2 m.) Qi^o,iimie^. 

a. from, a sangmne, prepodtioiu 

«ang blood, a ■AXGUi-nc, (3 m.) u, inis, i, em, is, t 

duo. to be detoended, »vc-i, (20) (3d.) o^ ere, zi, tmn. or, 

i, tos, sam. 
and. she had heard, 

(ilia) Auihiirat (21) (4th.) io, Ire, trt, itom. 

iveram, Weras, Uratf &o. 

fyr. Tyrian, Ttbi-os axoesi (1 f.) a, 8D, so, ami a, 4. 

«, arum, is, as, », is. 
olim. hereafter ,Yerteret cum, adyerb 

qu. whichjprogeniem qjj-m Terteret, (f.) «, cujus, oni, am, -,o. 
Tsort* would orertnm, 

qu9 ymLT'€-re4f (22) (3d.) o, <r<, i, sum. 

rem, res, ret, remus, retis, &o. 

ar. citadels, Terteret AJi-eet, (3 f.) z, ciS| oi, oem, z, ce. 

oes, cum, cibus, ces, Seo. 
JBGno. Hence, Tenturum Hmc, adTerb.. 

popul. a people, Torui^um yenturum (esse) (2m.) us, i, o, 

um, e, o. 
jate. eztensiveljiregem latz, adyerb. 

re-s ag-o ruling, zz*g«m* populum,(3 m.)z.gis,gi,^esi,z,e. 

bell. in war, bell-o, (2 n.) am, i, o, um, um, o, 

qu. and, regem late qnz snperbum, conjunction, 

superb . proud , suFXRB*ttiii populum, (2 m.) us ,i ,o ,tmi ,e ,o. 

ven would come, 

popubm TZN-hir-iiiii(23)(esse)(3d,4th)io,ire,i,te» 

ns« i, o, um, e, c 
ez, cml, to the destruction zz*cidi-o, (2 n.) um, i, o, um, um, o. 
Liby. of Libya: ezddio LnT-«| (1 f.) a, «, «, am, a, 4. 

SIC. thus, volvere sic, adverb. 

Tolv. had determined, 

parcas T0LT^.r«, (24) (3d.) o, «r«, i, volutum. 

crs, isse, volutnrus, esse. 

pare. the fates, pazg-m volvere, (1 f.) a, ae, s, am, a, 4. 

a, arum, is, at, m, i» 

* For Rza-if-a-ii/em. 



LATIN 6RAMBIAR. 113 

I. This, metnims M, (n.) id, «jiui, ei, 4d, -, ao. 

mota. CBukg, iisTa-«i«SatiinuA, (3f.)fw,tit;ti,tem,nf,e. 

▼•i. of the ancient, T«T-«rtt belM, (3 n.) m, erit, eri, us, &o. 
qa. end, meceens id qros memor belli, ooijanotion 

mem. mindftil, HBK-orSatanDa,(3f.)or,oiis,ari/Mr6m.&c. 

SatoMi Jimo, SATUBKi-a areebftt, <lf.)a,«,»)&m,a,A. 

bell. we. , mesior BXLL-i, (2 a.) mn, t, o, am, am, o. 

prim, iket, ntxK-4i (ii]»,) (1 f,) a, ae, », am, a, A. 

qa. wfaioh^ geimrat qv«atf, (a.) od, oifas, coi, od, ->, o. 

ed. at, AD^rojami preposition. 

Tro. Troy« ad Taaj-cm, (1 f.) a, m, s, am, a, A. 

pro. for, vao Argis, preposition. 

dmr dear, ca4B-4t Argis, (3 m.) as, i, o, um, e, o. 

i, onmi, is, os. :, if. 
ger. shehedowfied 

oa, QQa) OMS-sra/(S5)qiiod, (3d.)Q,ere|eff{,essam. 
eram, eras, erat, &o 
Arg. Afges, pvo Aao-iv, (2 m. p.) i, onn, is, os, i, is. 

Nee,dam.Neither jet, 

; NacBOXf adverb. 

XTiAM, ooBJunetion. 

cans, the eansas, tAVB-m e»eiderattt^(l f.)a, m, m, am, a, A. 

«, arom, is, as, n. is 
ir. af ]mraiignr/»iis« la-anim, <1 f.) a, ss, ae, am, a, ft 

0, armn, is, as, a, is. 
qs. aad^ eaium ftUBdoloree, ooijanotion. 

wmr. the oniel, sxr-i dolores, (2 m.) ns, i« o, am, e, o 

^, Oram, is, as, i, is 
del. aaiariogs. POLoa-ss eatcidaraat, (3m.)or,oris,i,em,or,e 

es, am, ibos, es, es, ibos 
ex, ead. asoaped, dalwes vx-cni-sra^a.^, (26) (dd.) o, eri, i 

eram, eras» irtiij eramus, &o. 
anim. fiNNa her mind,ex anim-o, (2 m.) as, i,o, am, e, o. 

Mm, Remainsjodioram MAK-e-(, (27) (2d, 8d.) m, ere, si, sum. 

eo, es, ff« emus, &o. 

ak. deep in her, AJ^r-d mente, (1 f.) a, ae, e. am, a. d 

men. mind, (in) utai'ie, (3 f.) s, tis. ti, tem, s. <«. 

re,poa lata op, aE-posT*iimjadioiam, (2n.)tiiit,i,o,am,Sco- 

10^ 



114 THB PRINCIPLES OF 

Jodie, the jodgmeot, JUDici-tcm nuuiet , (2 n . ) ti m,i ,o ,Qm ,aiL o 
Par. of Paris, judioiom Pabi-<{u. (3 m.) 8, dit, di, dem, a, do 
qa. and, jadictom «ux injuria, conjunction, 

spret. of h4r despised, ipasT-tf fomm, (1 f.) a, tf, e, am, a, A. 
in, jar the injary iif-jUBi.a (maaet) (1 f.) a, ae, », am, a, A. 

form. form, iiyoria roRM.tf, (If.) a, tf, ae, am, a, A. 

et. and, injuria xt genos, coqunction. 

gen. race, OBN-ict (manet) (3 n.) tit, eria eri, as, Sco. 

in, vid. the hated iims-ttm genos, (2 n.) vm, i, o, om,am, o. 

et. and gemu zt hooores, conjanotion. 

rap. of the stolen, BAPT-tOaymBdis, {2m,) us, i, o, um, e, o. 

Ganji]ied.6anjmede. ho- 

Dores GAKTKSD-tf , (3 m.) es, w, i, em, es,e. 
hon. the honora. HoxoE*<ff (manent.) (3 m.)or,oris ,i,em, or,e. 

ef, om, ibos, es, es, ibas. 
IGo. These(things,)soper Hx««, (n.) o, hijua, haio,hoc,-, bseo. 

hsBO, horum, his, hso, ->, Au. 
ad,oand. enraged, ac-ceks-a Satamia,(l f.)a, », m, am, a, A. 

super, on account of supsm his, preposition. 

jao. tossed, jactat-os Traas, (2m.) us, i, o, um, e, o. 

i, orum, is, ot, i, is. 
»q. sea, (in) xquo&.f, (3 n.) or, oris,!, or, or, s 

tot. whole, ToT-o nqiKHre, (2n.) um, i, o, am, um, o. 

Tro. Trojans, arcebat Tao-ot, (1 m.) a, so, n, am, a, A. 

n, arum, isi m, b, is. 
re, linq. remnants, aroebat, as-Liqin-M, (If. p.) as, arum, is, a«, &«. 
Daa. of the Greeks, 

reliquias DAKA-ftsi, (2 m. p.) i, (or)-t»fli, Su 

ad, qu. and, Dananm at-^ub AohilleT, ooiy'unotioa. 

in, mit. of fierce, iM-Mir-it Aohillel (3m.) is, it, i, em, is, e 

Aohil. Achilles, reliquias Achill-sI , (5 m.) es, SI , el , em, es, e 
are. drove, SatumiaABC-e^a4(28)Troas, (2)«o,ere,iii,ebam 

has, hatf bamus,&o. 
long. far, aroebat lonox, adverb 

Lat. firomLatium: (ab)LATi.o ; (2 n.) um, i, o, um, um, o. 

qu. and, aroebat ^nx (ille) errahant, oonjunctioB. 

iqult. manf, KiTLT-of annos, (2 m.) us, i, o, um, e, o 

i, orum, is, a, i, is. 



LATHI OBAMICAK. 116 

per daing, vxRaiuiM prepo«ti«i 

ana. yean* per axkob (2 m ) as, i, o,iim, e,o, 

i, onim, is. Of, i, b. 
err. tiMjwaiidai6d|(illi)xBB-a-6a-i»»t(29) (l)o, are, avi, atum. 

abam, baa, bat^bamua, 

batis, bant. 
ag« diiveo, act.< (illi.) (2 m ) os i, o, am, o, o, 

i, orun, is, os, i, is. 
Vr. bgr the Udmt pat^, (2n.)«miy t, o, wn, am, o. 

a, orom, is, a, a, u. 
mar. aeasy einnmi MAm>ie, (3 n.) e, is, i, e, e, i. ia. 

inm, ibus, ia, ia, ibus. 
omiL all, OMH-fo maria, (3n.) is, is, I, em, is, i. 

ia, iom, flms, ia, ia, ibos, 
oiro. aromid, colcum maria, preposition. 

Taut so great, TAirr-ie molis, (1 f.) a, «, », am, a, A. 

moL diffiooi^i (opus) KOL-ir (3 f.) es, u, 1, em, es, e. 

er. itwas, (opus) xmA.<(30)ooiidere,8am,e8se,fai,eram,eras, 

era4, eramns, eratis, &o. 
Bom. theBoman, RoKAH*amgentem,(lf.)a, »,«,asi,a,A. 

eon, cL to estabysk, erat, coif.]>.e.rs(31)geittem, (3) o, erf, idi, itom. 

frs, idisse, itoras esse 
gem nation, oondere oxir^cak (3f.) s, tit, ti,fem, s, to 

Tix. Searoely, dabant Viz, adverb, 

e. oat of, xoonq^eotay prepodtimi. 

oan,^e.«ght, e coN*sncT.«, (4 m.) na, ib, ni, mn, as, «. 

Stool. . of the Sicilian Siculx teUnris, (1 f.) a, <r, sb, am, a, A. 
tel. land) oonspeeta Tzixv-rit, (3 f.) s, rif, ri. rem, s, le. 
in» open, nraltam* preposition. 

alt. the sea, in althor, (2 n.) am, i, o, vm, am, o. 

f«L aaibi dabint VKL-a, (2 n.) om, i, o, am, am, o. 

a, Oram, is, a, a, is. 
d. tiiefqnread^CUi) iMi5«.fi4(82)Yela,(l&S>o,are,edi,atam. 

abem,bas, bat, abamns, 
batis, hani. 
l0t J^yfiil, un4 (illi), (2 m.) as, i, o, am, e, o. 

if oram, is, os, i, is* 
el. and, dabant XT roebant, ooaianction. 



116 THB PRINCIPLIS OF 

ipoia the foam, raebant 1PUM.4(«, (1 f.) a, « «, am, a, i. 

By anmiy is, a«| s, is. 
lal. dfthedeep^unaa sal-u, (3 m.) nl, u, i, em, lal, e. 

er. with the prow, Ji»-t, (S n.) «a, wis, i, «s, se, <. 

rn. were plowing ; (iUi)mv-e-6a.n4(33)8pi]mas ,{3)0, ere, i, itomi 

ebam, baa, bat, &o. 
qiram whea, (^m^vebat) quint, adveib- 

Jon. Jono, Juir^ (TolTebat,) (3 f.) O|0iiifl,oni,oiiem,&o. 

aten an eternal, jbtx&n-imi 'vulniu, (2 a.)«n^i, o^m ,un ^ 

■erv, Douriahiiig, ixmT-a.n^ Jnno, (3 L)n$f iiti8,ti,tem,D8,te. 

nb. within, svb peoloiia, proposition. 

her breast, sub TitcT^ar^, (3 n.) ns, oris, on, us, us, or$. 



ndn. 


Awoand, servaas tuumis. 


(3n.)tis 


,eris,eri<iif,uB,ere. 


h. tbesetbinga,(¥olvebat)H.«c, 


(ii.)oc 


, ^jos, oio, 00, -, 00. 






•0. 


onmn, ia, #c, -, is. 


OBin. 


withy ooaiee, 




prepositioiu 


a. 


herself: xnm §-«: 


tf.) 


-, aH^ettkl, se, -, sp* 


11, 


deobtere an, 




laterrogatiTa* 


figD. 


(mnst) 1, MX desistere 


, ego, J 


mei|mihi,flu,-,me. 


ia,oap. 


firomnqrindeita^ 








Ung, da nt'^mrt^ 


(««.) 


iim,i,A,«m,iaQ,a. 



de, St, desist, me DX.fli8T^rf,(34} (3) o, ire, stiti, stitom. 

wac. eottqnsred, Ticr-amaM, (1 ^f *f «»* am, a, ^ 

nee. nor, me desistere ifECmepoiae, oanjonotion. 

pot.^eeae, be able, me Po.e«s,(8i) poiSonmioiM, potni, 

Ital. from IM^, avas. 

tere l£4u^ (lQm,«,SB,«m,a«4. 

Teosr. of die IVojana, 

regem Tavca-ofiMt, (2 m.p.) i, onNii,is, os,&e 
a, vort. to tnm away, poisa A.TxaT««4V<36) regem, (8) o, srs, i, siuou 
re-aag-o. the king! avertere Rx-^-sail (Bm.) x, gis,^,gem, x, g, 
(pip* beoanaeydesisterequiFFS^tor, ooDJonotioa. 

yet. Iamfiirbiddea,(ego)Tiroor, (23) (lpa«.>er^ari,atus, sum. 
for. bgrtheihtea. PAT-it, (2n.p.)a,omm,is,&, a,is. 

Pal. PaUaa PALx-aspotcdt, (3f.6r.)M,adis,adi,&o. 

a. not, potnit mt, imarrogatifa* 

ex,w tobmfa, {>otait xx.UB<4-re(38)olassem, (3)o,<rf,ns8i,fco. 
okas, .the fleet, exnrere cLAaMia, (8/.) is, is, i, est, is, •• 



LATIN GHAMXAB. 117 

Arg. Grreeks , ckflsem Aaory-dm (2 m.) iu, i, o, nm, e, o 

i, (or)-jliit, is, 08, i, is 
ad^qn. and, exnrere 

o]a«em AT-qux rabaMrgere, ooijiiiieckm. 

ipa. them^iiibmargme iPt-oi, (nu p.) i, oram, u, o«, i, is. 

pot. ynm able, Pallas roT.«.i-^,(39) poMum, powe, pohd. oi 

obti, ut^, Qnimiu, ko. 
adbjmerg.to drown, potmt •UB.BiBBO-e*rf,(4O)ip0oe, (3)o,cre,n,8aiii. 
ponti m the deep, 

sobmergere foiit^, (2 m.) na, i, o, mn, e, o 

on. ?fone, un-Iim Ajaok, (m.) iia» ^j i» nmi 0| o. 

ob. onaccocmtof, osnozam, prepoutioa* 

noo. laalt, ob Nox-am, (1 f.) a, «, B| am, a, A. 

et. even, miiiu xt Ajaobi oonjonetion. 

ibr. the fmy, ob ruai-a#, (1 f.) a, ae. m. am, a, A. 

«, arum, is, iw, e, !«• 
Ajax. ofAjax, foriaa Aja-cw, (3m.)x, ci», oi,oem, x, oe. 
OQ. thesonofOileiisf 

Ajaoia OiLX-t/ (2m.) xu, i, o, mn, e, o. 

Ipa. She, Ips-a disjeoit, (f.) a, ins, i, am, -, A* 

Jof. of Jnpiter, ignem JoT-i«, (3 m.) Japiter, Jof9is, i, Sco. 

rap. the swift, mAPiiMfm ignem, (2 m.) ni,i,o,tim, e, o. 

jae. darting, JACUz.-a4.aqMa, (lf.)a,8B,B,am,a,A. 

e. from, xnubSms, preposition 

mib. the doiids, e imj^ibuif (3 f.) es, is, i, em, ea. e 

eS| inm, ibns, es, es, iftttt. 
ign. lightning, jaoolata iOK.<9ii| (3 m.) b, is, i, sm, is, e. 

db, jae. scattered, ipsa sis- jxc.{4, (41) ignem, (3&4)jioio,ere, 

jscijeetom. i,b,i(,&o 
qn. both, ^vxt qoe, corresponding oonjnnotion. 

rat. hb ships, ^edt XAT^et, (3 f.) b, b, i, em, b, e. 

es, mn, ibos, et, es. See. 
qn. and, diqeeit rates qi7xeTert.^fleqaora, oonjnnotion. 

e, Tert. optomed, ipsa x-TxxT.t4 (42)cDq|Qora, (3) o, ere, i, sum, 

i, isti, Uf imns, &o 
Bq. the sea, evertit x^trox-a, (3n.) or, orb, i, or, or, e 

a, nm, ibos, a, a, ibns 
vent. by the winds: ^xht.u : (2 m.) as, i, o, nm, e, o. 

S, orum, b, os. i. it. 



118 THB PBmCIPLXB OF 

lU. him, wmniit ill-miii, (m.) e, nu, i, urn, o, o 

ex, tpir. breathing oat, 

illun Ex.pia.a.fU.m, (3m.)i»,iiti8,ti,/Mi.&c. 

anuit|fiiig. from his tna^. [um, o.) 

fixed, TRAN8-FIX-0 pectore, (2n.) urn, i, o^ am. 

pect. breast, (a) MCT.or«, (3 o.) as, oris, i, as, us. ore. 

flanu flames^exinrantem FLAMK .01, (If.) a,», »,am, a, A. 

«, arnm, is, at, s, is. 
torb. in a whirlwind, (m)TT7RB-tfM, (3 m.) o, inis, i, em, o, ine. 
ooii,rap. she seised, ilia C0B.Ri7.ii.t.f (43)iQam, (4, 3, & 2)io, ere, 

tti, reptam. oi, aisti, uU^ &o. 
fK» and corripait quE inflxit, oonjonctioa. 

seop. rock, infixit scopttl-o, (2m.)as,i,o,um,e,o. 

Ml, fing. throsti Ipsa nr.rrz.{-f(44)(illam) (3) figo, ere, xi, 

otam. xi, isti, if, &o. 
aoat. on a tharp. acut-o scopalo. (2m.)as, i, 0;am, e, o. 

Ast. Bat, kfijdt Ast ego gero, conjanotion. 

ego. I, xoo gero, (f.)ej^o,meI, mihi, me,&c. 

qo. who, ego «u*« incedo, (f.)<^i cajos, cai, am, &o. 

Div. of the ged8,regina Dtr-Hm, (2 m .p . i , (or) .dm , is, &c, 

in,oed. walk, qosB in-ced.o,(45) (3) o, ere, cessi, oessam. 

0, is, it, imas, btis, &o. 
re-8 ag-o. qoeeni BK-onf-a ineedo, (1 f.) a, se, s, am, a, A. 

qa. and, regina Qtrxsoror, oonjanotion. 

Jov. of Japttar, soror Jor-tt, (3 m.) Japiter, JovU, i, em. er, e. 
et* both, XT, et, eorreeponding oonjonction. 

sor. aiater, (sum) soa-or, (3f.)or, oris, on, orem, &c. 
et. and, aoror xr eonjox, conjanction. 

oonjoDg, the wUe, <eam) coif.JT7-«, (3 o.)x, gis, gi, gem, x, ge. 
UN-d genC3, (1 f.) a, se, s, am, a, A. 
CUM gente, preposition, 

earn osir-fe, (3f.) s, tis, ti, tem, s, te. 

TOT annos, adj. ploral, hideolinable. 

per ANir.of , (2 m. p.) i, oram, is, ot, &o. 

gero BELL-a, (2 n.p.) a, oram, is, a« &o. 

ego osB-o:(46) (3) o, ere, gessi, gestom. 
0, is, it, imnsj itis, ont, 
and, ego gei x>bella et, qalsqaar; adoret, conjanction 



an. 

com. 


with. 


g««- 


race. 


tot. 


no many. 


ann. 


ywirs, 


bell. 


wan, 


ag-ores 


. eanjron: 



^ATXN OBiJDIAB. 119 

40., qa wbo, <iu.i».^VA]f adoret, ift^uBtm quern, -»o. 

mill. the diviiiit7,adoret NUM-en, (3 n.) en, inU, ini, «», &o. 

JvB. «fJimo, MmeK JiTK-omiti (8 f.) •, onisi oni, &e. 

ad, or. oan adore, quis. Ai>.OB.0.f(47)naBMB| (1) o,aro,aTi,atiii]i. 

en, et, if, eimis,&e. 
pnBter,ea. hereafter, kn* 

ponat num&^SA, adverb, 

ant. or, adoret inimen AUT imponat, conjnnctioii. 

flap, plie. flapplieatiBg, ffup.n..4s, qfuqaam, (3 e. ) «p, ieis, id , fco. 
ar . im my altara> 

hnponat AB-it, (1 f.p.) ee, amm, u, See. 

In, pon. will place, quis- [am, as, «l, auras, te. 

qoani iM-Poir«a.#(48)honoMm,(S)o,ere,8ai4taniy 
hm. « saorifioe? imponat Boire»-efli ? (3 m.) or, ens, i, cm, te. 

Tal. Suoh (things), 

▼ohitaiis TAX»-ia, (3n.p.) ia,iam, ihos, ia, See. 
flam. in ber inflamed, >XAMU-a4-o oorde,(2 n.)am, i, o, nm, mn,o. 
a. herself, .onm s-e, -,8ai,flibi,8e,-;8e. 

cnm. with, 'Cum le, prepusilion. 

De. the Goddess, Bx-aTenit, (lf.)«>», tt,am,a.l' 

oor. heart, (in) coB-ie, (3 n.) r, dis, di, dem,r, cfe. 

voty. reydyxBg, TOLVT-a.ftt , Bea, (3 f .) at, ntis, ti, tem,3ce. 

ttimb. of8torms,patriam mMB-onint, (tm.p.>i,orttm,is,os,i,i9. 
in. into, nrpattiam, preposition. 

patr. Ike ooimtry, in VAnti-am, (1 f.) a, sb, m, am, a, A. 

loo^ pKaoes, la Loc-a, <S B.p.) a, enan, iB, a, a, is. 

fiat. Ihn, rcT^loea, <2n.p.)a,onmi,is,a,a,liw 

Ar, efboiataroas^ FUK-«.ii-^i&ia Austria, (3 m.p.)eB,am,ibiu, 

aa, oB, WW* 
Aastr. winds, fiata Avsrm-it (2 m.p.) i, orom, is, os, i , ta. 

MeiL MfXu^ in JEou-am, (If.) a, m, a, am, a, A. 

vea. oama. X>ea TaN^t,(49) (4 & 3) jd, ire, i, toa. 

1, isti, it, imna, istis, ennl* 
Hlo. Hera, pranlt Hie, adfwb* 

Taat. in a vast, yast^ aatra, (2 n.) am, i, a, nm, mn, ^ 

sa^ag^yking, ax^pvemit, (3m0«,gis,gi,gem,x,g^ 

i&ol. .fifllna, iEoL.i(t prsmit, (2 m.) iiff,i,a,iim,e,a. 

ntr. cove, (in) antb-o, (2n.)mn») OyUn, iim,o. 



120 THE PRINCIPLES OF 

lact. the struggling, LUCT-a-n-f-ct ventosi 8 m.p.) es, run, ibos, 

et, eSf ibog. 
▼en. winds, premit tent.m, (2m.p.) i|0nim,i8, o«,i,ia. 
qn. and, ventos, que tempestates, conjunction. 

tem|)e8t. tempests, premit TEMPEST.a^e«, (3 f.p.)es, urn, ibus, ei, 

es, ibus. 
SOD . the sounding, 80iroB-a« tempestates; ( 1 f.p.) sb, arum, is, 

aSf 8e, is. 
impar. by anthoritji imfebi-o, (2n.) urn, i, o, am, um, o. 

preai. governs, iEolus FmsM.i.^,(60)Tentoa,(3) o,ere,e88i,e88um. 

o, is, it, imns, itis, ant. 
ac. and, premit ac fhenat conjunction, 

vino. vith chains, tixcx.-u, (2n.p.)a,orum,is,a,a,if. 

et. and. vindis XT oaroere, conjunction, 

care. in a prison, CABCSEi^, (3 m.) r, ris, ri, rem, r, e. 

freen. restrains, iEkilas FBXN.a4(5])(illo8)o,are,aYi,atttm. o,a8, 

at, amns, atis, ant. 
Ill, they, Ill-i fremunt, (m.p.)f,oram,i8,0Syi,i8. 

m, dign. mdignant, iK-DioN.a-ii./-<«illi,(3m.p.)e«,am,ibas,&c. 

magn. a great, MAON.omarmnre,(2n.)am,i,o,am.am,o. 

cum. vith, CUK murmore, preposition, 

murmur, murmur, cum utjknltjk^ (3 n.) r, ris, ri, rem, r, re. 

mon. of the ou>untain, 

murmure Mov^-it, (3 m.) s, tU, ti, tern, s, te. 

oiro. around, cnicxrM claostra, preposition, 

danstr. the banierSjCircom CLAUsrs-a, (2 n.p.) a, omm, is, a, a, is. 
frem. roar. illi FBKM>ti-ii-^.(52) (3 & 2)o, ere, ui, itum. 

o,l8,it. imus, itis, im^. 
lofty, CsLs-d aroe, (1 f.) a, sd, ib, am, a, d. 
JEolns, 8Ei>.e4.(53) (2 & 3) eo, ere, i, ssnm. 

eo, es, et, emus. Sec. 
JEov-us sedet, (2 m.) ui, i, o, urn, e, o. 
(in) Ajuc-s, (3f.)x,cis,ci,cem,z,c«. 

tenens scxvtr-o, (2n.p.) a, omm, is, a, a, is. 
TkN^n-s .£olii8,(3 m.) lu, ntis, ti,tem,Sco. 
sedet QTTX moUit, eonjunetion 

JEolus MOLL-t-f (54)ammos, (4) io, ire, ivi, itnm. 
10, is, it, imus, &e. 



Cels. 
sed. 


In (his)] 

tttS, 


iEol. 
aio. 


iEolus, 
dtadel, 


Bcepti 
ten. 
qp. 
moU. 


scepter, 
holdings 
and, 
softens. 



LATIN GRAMMAR. * ' 121 

anim minds, mollit anim^j, (2m.p.) i,c.vm,is, :«, i,m 
et. and, moillt et temperat, conjjncticn 

temper, moderates ,JEoIa8 T£MPEK.a.< (55)iras , ( 1 ) o , are, avi , atom. 

o, as, at, amiu, &c. 
ir. their anger, temperat iR-a«. (lf.p.)«, anim, is, 0$, 8B,is. 

N. Unlets, faciat Ni, adverb. 

far. he did so. (iHe) 7AC.i.a-f(56)(hsc,) (4 & 3) io, ere, feci,. 

faotom. iam, ias, iatj iamos, See. 
mar. the seas, ferant mab-m, (3n.p.) ia,ium,ibu9,ta,&c. 
ac. muL,. maria ac terras, conjunction. 

terr. the land, ferant TEBR-a«, (1 f.p.)sB,anim, is,<u,fe,i8 
qa. and, terras 41Ue caelum, eonjanction 

ccbI. heaven, ferant c(EL-ttm, (2n.p.)um.i,o,vift,am,o. 

pro/nnd.the profonnd, pao.rxnn).ttmcoelam,(2n.)mn,i,o,iini,am,o. 
quip. for, temperat quipfe ferant, adverb, 

fer. they would bear, FER-a-n^, (57) (3 Sc 1) o^ re, tali, latum. 

am, as, at, amus, atis, ant, 
rap. swift, RAPiD.{(i11i.) (2m.p.) i, omm, is, Sec. 

com. with CUM se, preposition. 

s. themselves, cum B.e, (p.)-,sai,sibi,se, -, «e 

qa. and, ferant que verrant, conjunction, 

ver. . would sweep, (illi)ysRR-a«n-#, (58) (3) o, ere, i, sum. am, 

as, at, amus, atis, ant. 
per through, per auras« prepositioii, 

aur. the air. per attr-m. (1 f.p.) e, anun, is, a«, w, is. 

fled pater omni-pot-e-ns spelunc-is ab-did-i-t atr-is, 
But the lather ommpotent caverns hid them in dark, 

Hoozaeta-e-ns; mol-emque et mon-t-es in-super alt-oe, 
This fearing; a mass and and mountains above then loftj. 

Im<pos-a-i-t; re-^em que ded-i-t, qu-i feed ere oer-to 
Placed; a king and gave, who laws by fixed 

Et prem-e.re, et laz-as sci-re*t d-a-re jussus haben-as. 
Both to restrain, and loose would know to give being commanded reins. 

Ad qu-em torn Jun-o suppl-ez h-isvoo-ibiisus-aes't; 
To whom then Juno as a suppliant these virords used: 

iBol-e. (nam-que tibi DivOm pat-er atque bcm-in-um re-z 

O .£oius, (for to thee of the Gods the father and cf men king 
Et mulc-e-re ded-it fluctus et toll-e-re vent-o,) 

Both to calm has given the waves and to raise them with the wind,) 

11 



123 TDE PRiNciPiss or 

Gen-8^ in imic*a mihi Tvrrhen-un: nnvig-a-t a(u-.i 
A nation hostile to me the iVrrhenian navigate sea, 

Di-um in Itali-am port a-ns, vict*cs que Penat-es 

Troy into Italy bearing, the conquered and household gods. 

In-cut-e vi-m vent-is, sub mers as que ob ru-e pupp-es. 

Add force to your winds, the submerged and destroy ships: 
Aut ag-e divers-OS ; et dis-jio-e corp-ora pont-o. 

Or separate them ; and scatter their bodies in the deep. 

S-u*n-t mihi bis septem prae-sta-nt.i corp-or-e Nymph-ae: 
I have fourteen . of beautiful form Nymphs: 

Qu-arum, quee form-A pulcherrim-a, De7opei*am 
or whom, who it in form most beautifulj DeTopeia 

Connubi-o jun^.am stabil-i, propri-am que dio-a-b-o ; 

Wedlock I will join to thee in firm, as thine own and will consecrats} 

Omn-es ut te cum merit-is pro lal.ibus ann>os 
All that thee with merits for sucJf years 

£x-ig-a-t. et pulch-rd fac-i-a-t te prol-e paren-t-em 

She may spend, and by a beautiful may make thee progeny parent, 
^ol-us h 8D0 coutrA: Tu-us, 6 regin-a, qn-id,opt-e8, 

iEolus these vxtrds to replied : It i$ thy, O queen, what you may 

[wish, 

£x-plor-a-re lab-or ; mihi jussa capess-e-re fa-s es-t. 

To consider business ; to me your commands to execute it belongs. 

Tu mihi, quod-cunque hoc regn i tu sceptr-a, 

Tou for me, whatsoever of this kingdom / posscstj you the scepirOi 

Jov-em que 
Jupiter and 

Concili-a-s: ta d-a-s epul-is ac-cumb-e-re Div-Om, 

Conciliate : you permit nu the feasts to recline at of the Gods, 

Nimb-orum que f{ic.i-s tempest-at-um que pot-e-nt-em. 

Of the clouds and you make me of tempests and ruler. 

H-8eo ubi dic-t-a,cav.um oon-vers-A cusp-id-eroon-t-em 

These when wordt were spoken , hollow with hit turned spear mouaidin 

Im-puUi-t in lat-us; ac vent-i, veiat agm-in-e fact-o. 
He struck on the side ; and the winds, as if a band were made, 

Qiik dat-a port-a, ru-u-n-t, et terr-as turb-in-e per-fl-a-n-t 

Where was given a passage, rush out, and the earth in a whirlwind 1 i!ow 

[c -er. 

In-cub-u-ere mar-i, tot-umque A sed-ibus im-is. 
They rest upon the sea, the whole and from depths the lowest 

UnA, Eur.us que Not-usque ru-u-n-t,creb-erqae prooell-is 

At once the east wmd both the southwind and disturb, thick and with 

[tempests. 

Afric-ns, et vast-os volv-u-n-t ad lit-or-a fljct-us. 

The southwest wind, and vast roll to the shores waves. 



LAT'N GRAIIMAK. 123 

1n.seqai-t-ur clam-or que vir-Om, »trid-or que rndrr. t-iim, 
Foiiuws the clamor both of men, the creaking and ol'corauge, 

E-np.i>u-n.t subito nub-es coslum que, di>em que, 

Soatch away suddenly the clouds sky both, light and 

Teucr-omm ex ocuUis: pont-o no-z in.cab-a-t atr-a. 
Of the Trojans from the eyes: the deep night broods upon dark. 

In-ton-u.c.re pol-i, et ^ crebr-is mic-a-t ign-ibus sth-eri 

Thundered the heavens, and with frequent glistens lightnings the air; 

Pra-sent-em que vir-is in-tent-a-n-t omn-ia mor-t-em. 

Immediate and to the men threaten all things death. 

Extempl6 iEne-ae solv.u-n-t.ur frig-or-e membr>a. 
Immediately of ^neas are loosened by the cold the members. 

In.gem.i-t, et dupl.ic-es tend-e-ns ad sid-er-a palm-as. 

He groans, and both hU stretching towards the stars hands,, 

Tal-ia vo-ce re-fer-t: O tor que quater que beat-t, 

He cries thus: O thrice and four times happy theg^ 

Que- is ante or-a patr-ura Troj.se sub mGsn.ibns alt-it, 

To whom before the faces of their fathers of l^roy under walls the lofty, 

Con-tiir-i-t oppet-e-re! o Dana-fim fort-issim-e gen-t-is 
It happ«;ned to die! O of the Greeks most brave of the race 

Tydid-o, me-ne Iliac-is oc-cumb-e-re camp-is 

Tydidus, why wot I on the Trojan to fall fields 

Non pot-n-isse? tu-A que aniro-am banc ef-fund-e-re dextr-af 
Not able? by thy and life this to pour out right handf 

8aev-us ubi ^acid-s tel-o iac-e-t Hect-or, ubi ingen-i 

Fierce where of Achilles by the weap-on lies Hector, where great 

8arped-on: ubi tot Simo-Ts cor-rep-t-a sub und-ifl 

Sarpedon liet : where so many the Simons having seized under Ut waves 

Scut-a vir-Om, gale- as que, et fort-ia corp-or-a volv-i-t. 

The shields of men, helmets and, and brave bodies rolls. 

Tal-iajact-a-nt-i strid-e-ns Aquil-on-e procell-a 

As he thus spoke, the shrieking with the north wind tempest 

Vel-um ad-vers-a fer-i-t, fluct-us que ad sid-er-a toll-i-t. 
The sail opposite strikes, the waves and to the stars raises. 

Frang-n-n-t-ur rem-i: tum pror-a a-vert-i-t, et nnd-is 

Are broken the oars: then the prow turns, and to the waves 

D-a-t lat-us: in-sequi-t-ur cumul-o prse-rupt-us aqu-ae mon-s. 
Gives Us side : follows in a heap broken of water mountain. 

H-i sumra-o in fluct-a nend-e-n-t: h-is nnd-a de-hisc-e-ns 
They the top of on the wave nang: to them the water yawning 

Terr-am inter fluct-us aper-i-t: fur-i-t sest-us aren-is. 
The earth between the waves discloses: rages the tide in the sands. 

Tr-e« Not-os ab-rept-as in sax-a lat-e-nt-ia torqu-e-t^ 

Three thtpM the south wind driven away upon the rocks bidden whirls : 



124 THE PRINCIPLES OF 

Sax-a voc-a-n-t Ital-i, medi-is qu-» in fluot-ibus i^r-as, 

These rocks call the Italians, in the midst or which are the waves Altars. 
Dors-um imman-e mar-i samm-o. Tr-es Eur-us at 

Ridge a huge the sea at the top oT. Three $Mps the east wind from 

alt-o 

the deep 

[n brevi-a et syrt-«8 mrg-e-t, miserabil-e vis-n ; 
Upon shoals and quicksands drives, a miserable sight j 

Il-lid-i-t que vad-is, at-que ^ agger-e oing-i-t aren-ss. 
Dashes into and the shallows, and with a heap binds of sand. 

(Jn-am, qa-» Ljci-os fid-om que veh-e-ba-t Oront-em, 
One, which Lydans faithful and carried Orontes, 

Ips-ius ante ocul-o* ingen-s k vert-io-e pont-oi 
His before eyes a great from above wave 

In ptipp-im fer-i-t: ex-cut-i-t-mr pron-ns que magist-er 
On the stem strikes: is struck bending aod master 

Yolv-i-t-ur in oap-n-t ; ast ill-am ter flnct-us ib-idem 

Is rolled upon hU head : and it three times the wave in the same place 

Torqu-e-t ag^en-s oiroum, et rapid-us vor-a-t ^ sequ-or-e vort-e-z. 
Whirls drivmg around, and the swift swallows in the sea whirlpool. 

Ap-par-e-n-t rar-i n.a-nt-es in surg-it-e vast-o: 
Appear a few swimming in whirlpool the vast: 

Arm-a vir-ilm, tabul-ie que et TroT-a gaz-a per nnd-as. 

The arms of the men, tablets and and Trojan treasure appear in the 

[water. 

Jam valid-am Ilion-i nav-em,jam fort-is Achat-a>; 

Now the strong of Ilioneus ship, now the ihip of brave Achates ; 

Et qn.& veot-tts Ab-as, et qn-i 

And the ship in which was borne Abas, and the ship in which was boms 

grandaev-us Aleth-es, 
Uie aged Alethes, 



Vic-i-t hiem-s: lax-is lat-er-om oompag-ibiis < 

ConquQ's the storm : through the loosened of the sides jomts all ths lihtpt 

Ac4;ip a-n-t in-imib-um imbr-em, rim-is que fatiso-n-n-t. 
Beo'i^c theCatal flood, in the seams and gape. 



LATIN GRAMMAE. 1S5 

VIRGIL'S GEORGICS 
BOOK IV. 

[The use of the hyphen in the following lines will be, 
as heretofore, to separate the root, connecting letter or let- 
ters, significant letters and terminations, from each other. 
For example, in the word squal-e-n-t-u bus : sgual is the root, 
e the medial or significant letter of the conjugation ; n de«% 
DOtes the present participle, t a connecting letter, and ibus 
the case and number termination. Coruso-an't^ — corusCy 
the root, a the medial letter of the present tense and first 
conjugation, n sign of the plural number, t sign of the 
third person. Claras^ — c/ar, the root, o the significant let- 
ter of the second declension, s terminal letter of the accu- 
sative plural in all declensions, excepting in the neuter gen- 
der. TcTT-a-OT, — terr the root, a significant letter of the 
first declension, m terminal letter of the accusative singu- 
lar, in all declensions, excepting neuters of the third. 

If the student has become familiar with the foregoing 
Tables of Terminations, he will understand these divisions 
without difficulty. They will be continued only partly 
through the reading, and then the scholar is expected to be 
able to separate the words in his mind at a glance, and thus 
be enabled, in a moment, to determine the conjugation, 
voice, mood, tense, number, person, declension, case, or 
gender of all words.] 

ProtiiiQi afri-i mell-is coBlet-i-a dcm-a 
Next of aarial honey the celestial gift 

Ez-eq-a-a-r H-anc etiam, Maecen-as, ad-spio-e pftr-t-e-m. 
IwiUdeflcribe. This also, O Mteoenas, look at part. 

Ad-mir-a-nd-a t-ibi lev-i-nm spectaoul-a re-ram, 

To be admired by thee of inconsiderable views things, 

Magn-anim-o-f que dac-e-s, tot-tiis que ord-in-e gen-t-is 
Coarageons and leaders, of a whole and in order race 

Mo-r-e-s, et stod-i-a, et popa1>o-8, et prael-i-a dica-m. 
Customs, and arts, and people, and battles I will relate. 
In ten-o-i labor: at tcna-is non glor-i-a: si qu-e-m 

On 8 low rJiii^rt tkU labor U: but low u not the glory ; if any on* 
11* 



126 THB PRINCIPLES OP 

Num-in-a la?va sii -a-n-t,aud-i-t quo voc-a-t-us Apollo. 
Divinities adverse permit, hears, and being invoked Apollo. 

Princtp i-o, sed-e-8 ap-ibus st-at-io que pet-e-iid*a. 

In the fjst place, a seat for the bees station and must be aoaght, 

Qti6 ne-que si-t vent-is ad-it-us (nam pabol-a vent-i. 

Where neither may ba for the winds an entrance (for food winds 

Fer-re dom-u-m prc-hib-e-n-t) ne-que ov-e-s hced-i que petolc-i 
To carry home prohibit) neither sheep kids and friddng 

Flor-ibus in-sult-e-n-t. ant err-a-n-s bucol-a oamp-o 
The dowers may bruise, or the grazing heifer in the field 

J)e-cat-i-a-t ro-r-e-m, et sorg-e-n-t-e-s at-ter-at herb-a-s. 
May strike off the dew, and the growing may trample plants. 

Ab-si-n-t et jRot-i sqoal-e-n-t-i-a terg-a, laeert-i 

Let be absent alao spotted (u to their nlthy baoks, lizards 

Pingu-ibus & stabol-is ; merop-o-s que, ali-se-qne volno-r-e-e. 
The fat from hives; bee-eaters and, other and fowls, 

Et man-ibos Proen-e peet-us sign-a-t-a ement-is. 

And hands the swallow mMtxkher oreast marked with bk)ody. 

Omn-t-a nam htt^ vast-a-n-t, ips-a-s-que vol-a-n-t-e-i 

All things for on e>very side they destroy, them and flying about 

Or-e fer-n-n-t, dulc-e-m nid-is im*mit*iba8 eso-a-m. 

In thetr month they bear, a$ a sweet nests to their cruel morsel. 

At liquid-i fon-t-e-s, et stagnoa vir-e-n-t-l-a mosc-o 
Bat pore foontaias, and pools green with moss, 

Ad-si-n-t et tenu-is. fbgi-e^n-s per sramin-ari-vus: 

Let be present, and a small, gliding through the grass rivulet: 

Palm-a que vestibul-am ant ingen-s oleast-er in-umbr-e-t. 

The palm tree and the threshhold or tne great wild olive let shade. 

Ut, qOum prim-a nov-i duo-e-n-t examin-a re-g-e-s 
That, when the first new will lead swarms kings 

Ver-e su-o, lud-e-t que fav-is e-miss-a iavent-ns 

In spring itself, will play and from the honeycombs sent forth young; 

Vioin-a in-vtt-e-t de-ced-e-re rip-a calor-i, 

The neighboring may invite to depart from bank the heat, 

Ob-vi-a que hospit-i-is ten-e-a-t firond-e-n-t-ibus arb-os. 

Opposite and welooHM may present Ueelf with a leafy tree. 

In medi-u-m, sen st*a-b-i-t iner-s, seu pro-flu-e-t hum-or, 
In the midst, whether will stand sluggish, or will flow water, 

Transoveri^a-s sal-io-e-s et ffrand-i*a oon-jic-e sax-a: 
^cmei willowa and urge east icckti 



LATIN GRAMMAR. 127 

PoQt'ibus ut ereb»Hs pos-sUn-t con«8ist'e-re et alas, 

Bridges tba tpon frequent they may be able to rest and their vnngg 

Pand-e-re ad S6tivn-ra lol-e-in ; si forte inor-a.n-t-e-s 

To stretch o i^. to the sammer san : if by chance them delaying 

Spars-eri-t ant prce-cep-s Neptnn-o im-mers-eri-t 

(Inall have sprinkled or the dangerous in the rain shall immerted 

Enr-iis. 

the east wind. 

H-SBo circ-mn casi-fls Tir-id-e-s, et ol-e-n-t-i-a lat6 

These aroand let there be spice trees green, and fragrant on every side 

Serpyll>a, et graviter spir-a-n-t-i-s copi-a thymbr-as 
Thyme, and powerfully of smelling abundance savory 

Flor-e-a-ts trrtgu-u-m que bib-a-n-t yiolar-i-a fon-t-e*ra 

Let flourish: the watering and let drink the beds of violets fountain. 

Ips-a autem sen oort-io-ibus tibi snt-a cava-t-is, 
These but, either bark by thee fastened with hollow 

Seu ^ lent-o fu-cri-n-t alvear-i-a vim-in-e text-a. 

Or with the bending whUh will be hives vine woven, 

August-o-8 hab-e-a-n-t ad-it-u-s : nam frig-or-e mell-a 
Narrow let have entrances ; for with cold the honey 

Cog-i-t hiems, ea>dem que cal-or Hque-fact-a remitt-i-t: 
Congeals winter, the same and heat melted returns: 

Utr-a que vi-s ap-ibus pariter met-u-e-nd-a: ne-que iU-« 
Either and force by the bees equally is feared : neither they 

Ne-quio-quam in tect-is cert-atim tenui-a cer-& 

In vain in their dvrellings assiduously small with wax 

Spirament-a lin-u-n-t, fiic-o que et flor-ibus or-a-s 
Air holes smear, wkh paint and and flowers borders 

Ex-pl-e-B-t: eol-lec-t-u-m que h*8B0 ipe-a ad mun-er-^a g]ut>en 
Fill: thaoolieoted and these very to uses gluten 

Et visc*oet PfarTg«i-8B serv-a-n-t pit> e lent-i-us Id-tt. 

Both glue and <tf Pn^gian they preserve pitoh tougher than Ida. 

Saepe etiam ef-fos-^^si ver>a es-t fiun-a) latebr^s 
Often also dug out (if true is report) in recesses 

Sub tenrA fev^re lar-e-m: pemtusque 

Under the eartk tiey hsm cherished their iionsehold ; deep and haen 

ve-per-t-» 
(sen found 

Pumio-ibue que eaiv^s. ex^^B^m que arbor-is antr.o. 

Pumice stones and m hoUom of an old «nd tree in the hollow. 



12S THE PRINCIPLES OF 

Tu tjimen et lev-i rim-os acub-il-i-a lira-o 

Do jcki notwiih&tanding with yielding leaky hives clay 

Ung-e fov-on-s circum, et rar-a-s super-in-jio-e frond-e-a. 
Daub guarding around, and thin above put on boughs. 

Neu prop*ius tect-is tax-um sin-e, ne-ve rub-e-n-te-s 
Neither near the hives the yew-tree permit, nor reddening 

Ur-e foc-o cancr-os: alt-ae nou cred-e paln-d-i: 

Burn in the fire crabs: to the deep nor trust marsh: 

Aut ubi od-or ^ coen-i grav-is, aut ubi con-cav-a pnls-u 
Or where the smell U of mire ofl&nsivei or where hoUow from a olow 

Sax- a son-a-n-t voc-is que of fen-a-a re-snlt*a-t imag-o. 

Rocks resound, of the voice and offensive rebounds image. 

Qu-od superest, ubi puls-a-m hiem-e-m sol aure-us eff-it 
Further, when repulsed winter sun the golden had driven 

Sub terr-a-s, coel-um que 8eativ-4 luce re-clas«i-t; 
Under the earth, the sky and with summer light has brightened ; 

Ill-8e continu6 salt-u-s silv-a-s que per-ap'-a-n-t, 
They immediately woods forests and wanc&r over, 

Purpureos que met-u-n-t flor-e*s, et flumin-a lib-a-n-t 
Purple and cut down flowers, and streams sip 

Summ a levies. Uinc ne-sc-i-o aa-A duloed-in-e Iset-ts 
Surface of flying. Hence I know not in wnat sport joyful 

Pro-gen*i*em nid OS que fov-e-n-t ; hino art-e rec-ent-e-s 
TheiT young nests ixA cherish ; hence with skill fresh 

Ex-cud-u-n*t cer-a-8, et mell-a * tenac-i-a flng.U'n-t. 
Form wax, and honey the tenacious make. 

Hlnc ubi jam emiss-am cave-is ad sid-er-a coeM 

Hence where now issuing/rom their hives towards the stars of heaven 

N-a-re per sesta-t-e-m liquid-a-m sos-pex-eri-s agm-en, 
To sail through the air clear you snail behold a band, 

Obscur-a-m que trah-i vent-o mir-a-b-er-e nnb-e-m j 

Dark and to be carrid by the wind you shall wonder at the dood . 

Contempl-a-tor: aqn-a-s dolc-e-s et frond-e-a semper 
Look: waters sweet and leafy always 

Tect-a pet-u-n-t: hue tu joas-o-s a-sperg-e sap-or^es. 
Dwellings they seek: here do you suitable sprinkle flavored herbs, 

Trit-a melis-phyll-a, et ceriath-» ignobil-e gram-en i 

Bruised balm-gentle, and of honey-suckle the oommon herb: 

Tinnit-us qui ci-e, et Matr-is quat-e oymbal-a ciro-om. 

Ringing and excite, and of Cybele strike the cymbals around. 



LATIN 6RAMKAR. 129 

Ijps«s con-sid*3-D-t medio-ii*t-'« sed-ilMis: ips-« 
They rest upon the iragraat places: they 

Intiai-& mo-r-e sa-o e-e-s-e in oana-bol-a oond-e-n-t. 

f amUiar mannei in their own themselves for hives will build. 

Sin autem ad pugn-a-m ex-i-tri-n-t (nam saepe du-obos 

If but to battle they shall go forth (for often two 

Reg-ibus in-cess-i-t magn-o dis6ord-i-a mot-u) 

Kings has seized upon with great discord disturbance) 

<^ontin^6 one anim-o-s vulg-i, et trepid-a-n-M-a bell-o 
Lnmediately and minds of the crowd, and eager for war 

Cord>a licet long^ prsB-scisc-e-re: nam-que mor*a,n-t-e*a 

Hearts it is permitted youlong btfore to perceive: for those delaying 

Mart*i-U8 ill-e se-r-is rauc-i can-or in-crep-a-t, et vo-z 
Warlike the brass of the harsh sound rouses, and the voice 

Aud-i-t-ur friu^-o-s sonit*u-s imit-a-t-a tub-a-rum. 
Is heard broken sounds imitating of trumpets. 

Tum trepid-ce inter s-e co-e-u-n-t, penn-is que comso- 

Then swift among themselves they ^ht, with ikieir wings and they 

a-n-t, 
glitter, 

8l>ioul-a que ex-acu-u-n-t rostr-is,apt-a^n-t que laoert-o-s, 

Stings and sharpen with their beaks, prepare and their limbs, 

£t oirc-a reg-e-m, at-que ips-a ad prsetor-i-a dens-se 
And around the king, and itself at the royal hive thick 

Misc-e-n-t-ur magnis que vpc-a-n-t damor-ibus host-e-m 

They are gathered, with great and chalenge clamor the enemy. 

Ergo, ubi ver nact-8B sud-u-m camp-o-s que pat-e-n*t*e-s 

Tiwrefore, when spring that they have foimd dear fields tuad ope 

E-rump-n-n-t port*'s, oon-curr-i-t-ur: ether-e in alt-o 

They issue from /&eir gates, it happens: air in the lofty 

F-i-t sonit-us: magn*ammixt-oB glomer-a-n-t-ur inorb-e-m, 
Is made a sound: a great mingled they are collected in circle, 

PrsB-cip-it-e-s que oad-u-n-t: non dens-i-or ^ aer-e grand*o, 
Headlong and fall: not is thicker than in the air hail, 

Neode con-cu8S>& tant-um plu-i-t il-io-e gland-is: 
Kor from the shaken does so much sfiower oak of acorns, 

Ips-i per medi-a-s aoi-e-s. in-sign-ibus 

The kings themselvej t^iiough the m'^ of the armies^ upon splendid 

al-if, 
wings, 



130 THE PSINCIPLGS OF 

In-j^ent-e-s viim-o-s aurniBt-o in pect-or-e ver8*a-n-^: 
Great minds a small in breast revolve: 

Us-qae ade6 ob*nix.i non ced.(^.re, dam pfravis -ant 

So far tUat resolute not they have yieided| ^bile t^e powerral, either 

h'O-8, 

those, 

A.ut h-o-s, ver.8.4 fug 1 vict-or d-a-re terg-a 

Or those, being changed, the dight, conqueror to give their backs 

8ub-eg-i.t. 
compelled. 

H'i mot-u-a anim-or.nm at-qne h-sec certam.in-a tant-a 

These excit3ment8 of/ Aetr minds and these contests ^ so great 

Pulv-er-is ex-igu-i jact-u com-pre.ss-a quie8c-a-n>t. 

Of dark a litUe by throvring on stopped cease. 

Verumubl ductor-e-s aci-e re-voc-av-eri-s am-b0| 

But when the leaders from the army you shall have recalled both, 

Deter-i-or qu-i vi.8-us, e-nm, ne prodig-us ob-s-i-t, 
Feebler who seems, him, lest the prodigal injure, 

Ded-e nec-i: mel-i-or vac-u.^ sin-e regn-e-t in aul-A. 
Deliver to death: the better an empty sufier to reign in hall. 

Alt-er eri.t macuUis aur-o squal-e-n-t-ibus ard-e-n-s: 
One will be spnts in gold with dirty shining: 

Pfam du-o s-u-n-t ^en-er-a; h-ic meUi-or, in-si^-is et or-e 

For tvro there arc kinds ; one the better, marked both on the coonte 
nance, 

Et nituUis dar.us squam-is: ille horrid.us alt-er 

And with bright beautiful scales: the rough other. 

De-sid-i-A, lat-a-m que trah-e-n-s in-glori-us alv-a-m. 
In sloth, broad and drawing ignoble belly. 

Ut bin.» re-^-um fac-i-e-s, ita corp-or-a pleb-is. 

As there are two of kmgs kinds, so there are two classes of the plebeians. 

Nam-que ali-ee turp-e>8 horr-e-n-t, ceu pulv-er-e ab alt-o 
For some mean disgust, as if dust from deep 

Qaum ven^t-t, et sicc-o terr-a-m spu-i-t or-e, via-t-or 

When came, and /rom hU dry on the earth spits mouth, traveller 

Arid-us: elnc-e-n-t ali-v, et ful^-or-e conrusc-a-n-t. 
The thirsty: shine some, and with brightness glitter, 

Ard-e-n-t-e-s aur-o, et par-ibus lit-a corp-or-a gntt-is. 

Glowing wiUi gold, and with like at to their spotted bodies marks. 

H-iBO pot-i-or sobol-e-s: hinccoel-i temp-or-e cert-o 

This u \he more powerful race: hence of the year time at a oertai* 



LATIN OEAHMAR. 131 

Dnlc-i-a meQ-a prem-e-* ; nco, tant-iiin 

. Sweet hooey yon will squeeze out; neither are then ^Ker things m 

dnlci-a, quant-um 
sweet, so 

£t liquid-a, et dnr-u-m Bacch-i dom-t-tur-a saf ir-em. 
And pure, and harsL of wine thai will overcome flavor. 



FIRST ORATION OF CICERO AGAINST 
CATILINE. 

Quoaaque tandem abnterOi Catilina, patient! A nostr At Qnam- 
How *ong then will yon abusei O Catilinei patience our? How 

din etiam furor iste tnus nos eludet? Qnem ad finem sese efiirenata 
long also fury this thy us evade? What to end itself unbridled 

jactahit audacia? Nihilne te noctumnm prssidium Palatii, nihU 
will carry audacity ? Do not thee the nightly guard of the Palatine, not 

arbie vigiHs, nihil timer populi, nihil coneursos 

of the city the watch, not the fear of the people, not the assembling 

bonoTum omnium, nihil hie munitissimus habendi senatum locus nihil 
good mm of all, not this most fortified of holding the senate place, not 

horum ora vultus que movemnt? Patere tna consilia 

of these the looks countenances and move ? To be exposed thy designs 

non sentis? Constrictam jam horum omnium conscientiA 

not do you perceive? grasped now these of all in the knowledge 

teneri conjurationem tuam non vides? Quid proxtmA, quid 
to be held conspiracy thy not do you see? What on the last, what on 

snperiore nocte egeris, nbi fueris, quos convocaveris, 
a former night have you done, where were you, whom have you collected, 

quid consilii ceperis, qnem nostrum igDorare arbitrarist 

what design have you formed, any one of us not to know do you think? 

O tempore! O mores! Senatus fascc intelligit, consul 

the times! O the manners! The senate these .^MngsperceiveSj the consul 

videt; hio tamen vivit. Vivit? immo vero etiam in 

sees: this man notwithstanding lives. Lives? nay indeed also into 

senatum venit. Fit publici consilii ^ particeps: 

the senate he has come. He is made of tlie public deliberation a sharer: 

notat et designat oculis ad ciedem unnmquemque nostrum. 

be marks and appomts with hU eyes to death every one of ns. 



132 THE PaiNCIPLBS OF 

Nos aatem vin fortes, satisfacere reipablicae videmnr, si istkn 
We but men brave, to do ocer daty to the republie seem , if of this iDrelcn 

furorem ac tela vitemns. Ad mortem te, Catilina, duel 
the fury and weapons we shun . To death/or the^, O Catiline, to be led 

jossu consulisjiampridemopportebat; in te cenferri 

by command of the consul , long ago it was fitting ; upon thee to be brooght 

pestem btam, quam tu innosonmes jamdiamachinaris. An 

evil for the same . which you against us all even now contrive. Did 

vero vir amplissimus, Publins Scipio, pontifez mazimus, 

indeed man ^Ast most renowned, Poblias Scipio, pontiff the highest, 

Tiberium Gracchum, mediocriter labefactantem ^statum reipublicas , 
Tiberius Gracchus, slightly disturbing the peace of the republic, 

privatus interfecit: Catilinam,CMrbem terraram ssde 

a private ttuIiouitfaZ slay: Catiline, the world, with slaaghter 

atqoe incendiis yastare cnpientem, nos consules preferemns? Nam 
and flames to lay waste desiring, we consols will bear with? For 

ilia nimis antiqua pnetereo, qu6d Cains Servilins Ahala Spnritim 

those too ancient mattert I pass over, now Cains Servilins Ahala Spnrius 

Helium , novis rebus stndentem, mana su A ocoidit . Fuit| 

Melius, new things desiring, hand with bis ovm slew. Tkeri'^ns^ 

fuit ista quondam in hAo remiblioA virtns, at viri fortes aorioribns 
there was that formerly in this republie virtne, that men brave with severei 

suppliciis civem pemiciosum, qaim aeerbismmiim hostem coercerent. 
punishments citizen the traitorous, than the fiercest enemy would pomsh. 

Habemus senatus censultnm in te, Catilina, vehemens et 

We have a decree of the senate against thee, O Catiline, powerfnl and 

grave: non deest reipnbliciB consilium, neqae auctoritas 

weighty: nor is wanting of the republic the counsel nor the anthoriQr 

hnjus ordinis: nos, nos, dice apert^, nos consules deaumus. Decrevit 
of this order: we, we, I speak openly, we consuls are wanting. Decreed 

quondam senatns ut Lucius Opimius eonsoi videret neqrdd 
formerly the senate that Lucius Opimius consul should see, nothmg 

respnblica detrimenti caperet ; nox nulla intercesut: interfectns est 
repubUo of injury should receive : night no intervened : was slain 

propter quasdam seditionum suspiciones Caius Gracchus, 

on account of certain of sedition suspicions Caius Gracchus, from. 

darissimo patre, avo, majoribus: occisusest cum 

a most renowned father, grandfather, and ancestors : was slain with hih 

liberis Marcus Fulvins, oonsularis. Simili senatus- 

diildren Marcus Fnlvius, of consular dignity . By a similar decree of the 



LATIN GRAmiAE. 13d 

eoQsiiltO) Caio Mario et Looio Yiileno^ permissa 

senate, Caioa Mariiu and Lootnt Y alenos being coruuUy was entrusted 

est respaUica: nam vniim diem postea Loeii Satumini tribam 
irith the republic : did one daj afterwards of Ladas Satomimis a tribune 

plebisy et Caii Serrilu pretoris mortem reipoblicsB 

of die people, and of Cains Servilios a prastor the death of the repnblio 

poBna. remorata est?- At noa vieesinmm jam diem pattnmr 

the paniahment hinder! Bnt we the twentieth now day suffer 

hebescere aoiem homm anetoritatis. Habemns enim hniusmo^ 
toUont the point of these of the antboritf. We have for of this kind 

senatQsoottsnltom, veromtamea inchisam in tabulis, tanqnam gladium 
a decree of the senate, nemrtheleas shnt np m tablets, t3ce a sword 

in vaginA reoonditnm: quo ex senatnaeonsnlto oonlesttm 

in U$ sheath hidden : whioh hy decree of the senate immediately 

interfectom te esse, Catilina^ convenk. VIvisi 

pot to death that yoq shonkl be, O Catiline, it was proper. Yon live: 

et Tivis non ad 4eponendsM, sed ad coafirmandam andaeiam. 
and yoa lire not for laying aside, bat for eonftrming your andaeity. 

Cnpio, patres conscripti, me esse dementem: onpio in tantis 

I Mflire^ fathers cdnscript| to be mild: mid aiUo I desire in snob 

reipabliom periculis me non dissohitnm videri: sad jam me ipse 

of the repoblio dangem not negligent to seem : bnt now myaeff, even I, 

inertis neqnitisB qneecmdemno. CaatrasantinItaU&, eontra 

for Inrinnsii remiasness and oondenm. Camps are in Italy, hottUt te 

rempnblioam, in Etmris fosunbos eoBoeata: eresoit indieasingnloa 
the repablio, in ofEtrmia the defiles oellected: increases in day each 

hoatiuitt nomeniiy eeram antem imperstorem castrsram, 

of the eneii^ the nnmberi of these bat dM commander camps, 



UW0VIB qne hostinm, intra mcema, atqoe ade6 in senato, 
Ae Jeader and of the enemy, within ikmt walls, and even in the senate, 

tideiBOS, jatesdnani attqnam qnotidie pemimem reipnblicsB molientem. 
wvsee, secret some daOymischiefto the repablio attempting. 

Site jam, Catilma, oomprehendi, si interfici jusaeroj 

ff Oee BOW, Calflme, to be seized, if to be slun I shall command ; 

erado erit Terendom mlhi, nenon hoe potids omnes 

I prarame It mil be feared for me, also thalt this it done rather aU 

booi aerite aaM,qaAm qnisqaam crodelios factom 

Ifas goed mil MOf too late by me, than ihai any one too cmel the act 



dScat. Yeramegohoo, qnod jampridem faotnmesse 

tobawoohisay. But f this whioh longago to have been dene 

12 



134 THE PBTNCIPLES OF 

oportnit, certA de caii8& nondnm addacor ^ ut faciam 

ought, a certain for reason not yet I am prevailed on if io tsl may do 

Turn deniane interficiam te, oum jam nemo tam improbos^tam perditas, 
Then finally I may slay thee, when truly no one so base, so lost, 

tam tui similis uiTeniri poterit, qui id non jure factum esse 

so thee like to be found will be able , who that this not rightly was done 

fateatur. Quamdiu quisquam erit, qui te defendere audeat, 

may declare. While any one will be, wno you to defend cay dare, 

vivos: et vivos ita, ut nuno vivis. multis meis et 

you will live: and you will live just as now you live, many by my and 

flrmis praasidiis obessus, ne commovere te contra rempublicam 

firm guards beset, so that not to move thyself against the republio 

possis. Multomm te etiam oonli et aures non sentientem, 

you may be able. Of many you also the eyes and ears not perceiving, 

npnt adhuc fecerunt, spMSCulabuntur atque custodient. Et enun 

as hitherto they have done, will watch and guard. For truly 

quid est, Catilina, quod jam amplius expectes, si neque nox 
what is xlf Catiline, which now more you can expect, if neither night 

tenebris obsourare coetus nefarios neo privata domns 

by tt« shades to hide assemblies yotcr vriokea, nor a private house 

parietibus oontinere vocem conjurationis tuae potest? si 
m t<« walls to contain the voioe conspiracy of your is able? if are 

illustrantnr, si erumpunt omnia? Muta jam 

made manifest, if burst forth to view Idl yow designs f Change now 

istammentem: mihicrede: obliviscere casdis atque incendiormn: 
this intention: me trust: forget slaughter and flames: yoa 

teneris undique: luce sunt dariora nobis tua consilia 

are hemmed in on every side: light are clearer than to us your designs 

omnia: quss etiam mecum licet recognoscas. 

all : and these things also vrith me it is proper the^ you may review. 

Heministine, me ante diem duodecimum kalendas 

Boyounotremember,iiiat I before day the twelfth the kalends of 

Novembris dioere in senatu, oertodie fore inarmis, qui 
November said in the senate, on a certain day would be in arms, whwh 

dies futurus esset ante diem sextum kalendas Novembris, Cainm 
day would be before day the oxth the kalends of November, Cains 

Aif anlium, audacias satellitem atque admlnistrum tuae? Num me 
ManUtts, audacity the satellite and assistant of your? Did me 

fefellit, Catilma, nonm6do res tanta, tam atrox, tam tncredibilis, 
deceive, O CaUline, not only an afiair so great, so atrooious, so incrediUe, 



LATm GRAMMAR. 135 



but| that which much mora is to be wondered at, the day? Said 



IffO 

idem in 6enaCa, cssdem te optimatam 

the same in the senate, the slaughter that yon of the chief members 

fontulisse in ante diem quintom kalendas Novembris, tum cum 
had conspired on before day the fifth the kalends of November, then when 

multi principes eivitatis Romd, non tarn sui conservandi, 

many principal men of the state of Rome,not so much of its being preserved 

qQimtaoramconsiliormnreprimeiidonmi oaus& profucemnt. Num 
as of yoor designs being impeded for the reason fled from. Truly 

infitiari potes te illo ipso die meis presidib, met dili^enti4 

must yoa not say that yoa on this very day by my guards, by my diligence 

circomclusom, oommovere te contra rempublicam non potuisse. 
hemmed in, to move yourself against the republic not have been able. 

cum in, di&cessu ceterorum, nostrai ' tamen, 

when you after the departure of the others, with our notwithstanding 

qui remausissemus, csede contentum te esse dicebasi 

who should have remained, slaughter content that you would be said? 

Quid? cum tute Prseneste kalendas ipsis Novembris occupaturum 
What? when safely Prseneste kalends on these of November would seized 

noctumo impetuesse confideres: sensistine, illam 

by a nocturnal assault be you trusted: have you not perceived this 

coloniam meojussu, prsesidiis, custodiis vigiliis que esse 

colony by my conmiand, by guards, keepers watchmen and to be 

mnnitamf Nihil agis, nihil moliris, nihil cogitas, 
protected? Nothing yoa do^ nothing you attempt^ nothing you contrive, 

quod ego non mMo non audiam, sed etiam non videam, plan^ 
which I not only not may hear, but also which no^ I may Fee, plainly 

que sonttam. 
and nnderstand. 



£t enim jamdia, patres consoripti, in his perioulis oonjuratioms 
For indeed so long, lathers conscript, by these dangers of conspiracy 

insidiis que versamur: sed nescio quopacto omnium 

treacheries and we are troublea ; but I know not by wnat means of all 



•»<»«■ luu, ao veteris fororis et audaoiee maturitas in nostri 
^AeMcrimos, and of long-continued fury and audacity the maturity in of our 

oonsolatas tempos empit. Qnod si ex tanto latrocineo iste 

eonsQlship the tune kas broken out. But if from so great violence thia 



136 THB FRUfCIFLBS OF 

amis tonetnr; 'videbimur fortasse an breve qnoddam tempot 

one shall be removed ; we shall seem perhaps for short some ume 

ear A et meta esserelevati: pericnlom antem residebit, et 
from care and from fear to be relieved : the danger bat vnli remain, and 

erit inclqsnm penitilis in venis atqne in visoeribus reipablxca. 
will be shut up within in the veins and in the bowda of the republic. 

Ut ssspe homines ngri moorbo gravi, oom sesta febri que 

Am often men sick disease with severe, with heat fever and 

jaotantnr. si aqnam gelidam biberint prim6 relevari 

are tossed about, if vniter oool thej shall drink at first to be relieved 

videntor; deinde mali6 gravius vehementius que afflictantnr; 
the J seem ; then much more severely acutely and they are afflicted ; 

sio hio mwbns, qui est in repoblioA, relevatus istina 
so this disease, which is in the republio, relieved of this nan 

poenA vehementius vivis reliquia ingravesoet. Quare, 

oy the puniahment, more acutely by the livmg remnants vrill increase. 

Wherefore 

Ettres oonscripti, secedant improbi secemant se a 

there oonscript, let depart the ba8e,let them separate themselves from 

bonis, miuminloomnconfipregentar, mnro denique, id 

the good, one in place let tnem be oolleoted, by a wall finally, that 

quod seepe jam dixi, secemantur a nobis, 

which often now I have spoken of, let them be separated from us, 

desmant insidiari domi skub consQi. ciroomstare 

let them cease to lie m vrait for hoase at his the consul, to stand around, 

tribunal prtetoris urbani, obsidere cum gladiis curiam, 

the tribunal praetor of the city, to beset with swords the senate-house, 

malleolos et faces ad infiammandum urbem oomparare. ^ Sit 

fiery mallets and torches for burning the city to prepare. Let it be 

denique inscriptum in fronte uniuficijus que civis, . quid de 

finally written on the forehead ofevery and citizen, what concerning 

republic A sentiat. Pollioeor hoc vobis , patres oonsor^ti, tantam 

the republio he may think. I promise this to yoa,iather8 conscript ,so much 

in nobis consnlibus fore dili^entiam, tantam - in vobis 

in us consuls that there shall be diligence, so much in you 
anotoritatem, tantam in equittbus Romanis virtutem, tantam in omnibus 
authority, so much in knights Roman braveiy, so mueh in all 
oonsensionem, at Catilina profeetione omnia patefaeta. 

agreement, that of Catiline by the departure all thinge laid open 
iUostrata, oppressa, vindicata esse videatis. Hisoe, 

^hown ')rtfc, crushed, punished to be you may see. With these i 



LATIN GBAMMAft. 137 

mumbas, Catilina, enm smmnd reipablics salute, et eumta A 
s, O CatUinei with the surest of the republic safety^ and with thy 



paste ao pemicie^ cum \ne eorum exitio, qui se 

crime and mischief, with and of those the destruction, who themseWes 

tecum omni scelere panicidio que junxerunt, profiotsoere ad 
with you in all wiokednejs parricide and nave jomed, depart to 

inpinm helium ac nefarium. Tum tu Jupiter, qui 

ttf impiais war and unhallowed Then thou, O Jupiter, who by 

nsdem quibus hste urbs auspiciis a Romulo es 

the same wnioh this city was edabluhed, auspices by Romulus wast 

oonstitutus: quem statorem hujus urbis atque imperii vere 

estaMiriied here : whom die stay of this city and empire truly 

nominamus: hunc, et hujus socios a tuis aris ceteris que 

we calls this sum, and his companions from thine altars other and 

templis, a tectis urbis ao mcenibus, a vit& fortunis 

Umples, firom the dwellings of the city and walls, from the life fortunes 

que ciyium omnium aroebis: • et omnes inimicos bonorum, hostes 
and citizens of all wilt drive away : and all the haters of the good, enemies 

patrisB, latronesItaUsB, soelerum foedere inter 

of the country, robbers of Italy, of wickedness by a compact among 

se ao nefarift societate ^ ^ conjunctos, 

themselves and in an unhallowed companionship joined together, 

SBtemis supplidis vivos mortuos que mactabis. 
with eternal punishments living dead and you will destroy. 

Note.— Xucwt Sergiut CaiUinai a Roman knight, of vicious and 
contemptible haUts, had conspired against the Roman government. 
He had leagued together all the most abandoned men, to assist hun in 
his daring undertaking. It was his design to attack the city of Rome 
" m the dead waste and middle of the night ;*' murder the consul, sena- 
tofs, and the other powerful men of the city; usurp the government, 
and establish himself as an emperor. But, by some means, the whole 
of his horrid intentions leaked out and reached the ears of Cicero, the 
then consul. Cicero immediately convened the senate ; but, strange to 
relate, the very object of their convention entered the house and took 
his seat with the other senators. No sooner, however, had he taken 
his seat, than the senators around him arose and left him, with marked 
scorn and contempt. Cicero then arose, and burst forth m the prece. 
dlig strain of elo|ttenoe. b. s. n. 

12* 



138 THB PRm:n?LB8 op 

THE CRUCIFIXION. 

MATTHiEUM.-.CAPUT 27, Carmkic 25. 

(25.) Sc respondeni, muYems popnlos dixit: Sanguis ejua 
And answering, the universal population said : BI^mI ni& 

BopjT noBi et super filios nostros. <26.) Tunc dimissit 
(be) npcn us, and on children our. Then he dismissed 

eis Barabbam: Jesnm antem, quiim flaeellllsset, tradidit 

tc them Barabbas: Jesus but, when he had soourged, he delivered 

at crucifigeretur. (27) Tunc milites prssidis, 

that he might be crucified. Then the soldiers of the governor, 

quum abduzissont Jesum in prsetorium, coefferunt 

when they might have led Jesus into the common hall, coflected 

ad eum universam cohortem. (28) Et quum exuiaseot 

unto him all the soldiers. And when they had stripped 

eum, cinsumposuerunt eichlamydemooccineam: (29) Et ooronam 
him, they arrayed him in a robe scarlet 2 And a crown 

e spinis contextam impdsuerunt ejus capiti, et arundinem in dex- 
of thorns woven they placed on his head, and a reed in right 

tram ejus: et genu ante eum summisso, illudebant ei, dicentes, 
hand lus: and the knee before him bendmg, mocked him, saying, 

Ave, rex Jndseorum. (30) Et quum inspuissent inenm,cepe> 
HaU, king of the Jews. And when they had spit on him, they 

nmtarwidinamillam, et verberabaote«pitf6J«s. (31) Et poetquam 
took reed the and beat head liis. And afler that 

illusent ei, exnenuit earn ohlamy4le, indueraBtqM 

they had mocked him, they unclothed him of the cloak| «lothod him 

vestimentis suis: et abduxenmt eum, ut eruoifigemnt 

clothes with his own: and led away him, that they might crucify 

eom: (82) Exeontes autem im'enerunt quendam (^yrenaeum, 
him: Going out and they found a certain man of Cyrcne, 

nomine Simonem ; huno angartavenmt at attollerit cruoem ejus, 
uamed Simon; him they compelled that he might bear cross iiis. 

(83) Et qc«a veoissent inlooom qui xoitor Golgotha, (quod 
And when they come to a place which is called Grolgotha, (which 

est, Calvariie lojus,) (34) Dederunt ei aoetum bibendum cum 
is, of skulls a pla -e,) They gav3 to hint vinegar to drink with 



LATIN &RJIM1KAB. 139 

feHemistnm: et ^^mim gustAseet noluit bibere. (35) Post* 
gall mized: and irhen he had tasted he voold not drink. After 

Quam aatem cracifixeront eum, partiti sunt ejas vestimenta, sortem 
tMt and they crucified him, divided his garments, lots 

jacientes; at impleretur quod dictum est a prophet^, 

casting; that might be folfilled which spoken was by tne prophet, 

Partiti sunt sibi vestimenta mea, et super vestem meam 

They divided to themsdves garments my, and above vesture my 

jecerunt sortem. (36) Et sedentes servabant eum iUic: 
they cast lots. And dawn sitting they watched him there . 

(37) Et imposuerunt super caput ejus crimen ipsius scriptum, 
And they placed over head his crime nis wntten, 

OTT02'E2TIN 'IHSOXS 'O BA2AE12 TON »IOTAAinN 
fflC EST lESUS ILLE REX lUD^ORUM. 

THIS IS JESUS THE KING OF THE JEWS. 

(38) Tunc crucifiguntur cum eo duo latrones; unusad dextram, 
Then were crucified with him two thieves ; one on the right, 

et alter adsiaistram. (39) Qui ver6 prsBteribant conviciaban- 
and the other on the left. They and who passed by reproached 

cur, moventes capita sua, (40) Et dicentes, Tu qui destruis 
(him,) moving heads their, And saying, Thou who destroyest 

templum, et triduo sedifioas, servatemetipsum: si Filius 
the temple, and in three days buildest (it,) save thyself: if the Son of 

Dei ee descendite e cruce. (41) Similiter autemetiam 
God thou art, descend from the cross. Likewise and also 

primarii sacerdotes Qludentes cum soribis et senioribas, 
the chief priests mocking him, with the scribes and elders, 

£cebant, (42) Alios servavit, seipsum non potest servare: si 
said. Others he can save, himself not he is able to save : if 

rex Israelis est, desoendat nuno e cmoe, et cre- 

the king of Israel he is, let him descend now from the cross, and we 

demns ^ ei. (43) Confidit in Deo; eruat ipsum nunc, 
will believe him. He believed in God ; let him save him now, 

ti placet ei: dixit enim, Filius Dei sum. • # • 

if it please him: he said, for the Son of God I am. • ct « 

(50) Jesus autemquumrursum cLam4sset voce magni emi. 

Jesus and when again had called voice with a loud he sent 

tat spiritum. (51) Et, ec*ce, velum templi fissum est 
forth his upiril . And. behoW, the veil of the temple rent was 



140 THE PRINCIPLES OF 

in doas i-artes, a snmmo usqne ad imum ; et terra mota 

in two parts, froii the top eren to the end; and the earth shaken 

est, et pctree fissee snnt: (52) £t monumenta aperta sunt, 
was, and rocks rent were: And the graves opened were; 

ct molta corpora sanctorum, qui dormierant, surrexerunt; (53^ 
and many bodies of the saints, who slept, arose ; 

Qui egressi e monumentis post resurrectionem ejus, introTerunt in 
Who came out of their graves after resurrection his, and went into 

sanctam urbem, et apparuerunt multis. 
the holy city, and appeared unto many. 



PAUL'S CHARGE TO TIMOTHEUS. 
Epistls II, Cap. 4. 

(1) Obtestoe Ts, igitur, e^o coram Beo, et Bomine Jesa 
Charge thee, therefore, 1 before God, and the Lord Jesus 

Chri8to,qui judicaturus est vivos et mortuus, in illustri illo suo 
Christ, who shall judge the quick and the dead, at glorious this his 

adventu et regno suo. (2) Prasdica sermonem ilium; insta 
coming and kingdom his. Preach word the; be instant 

tempestiv^ , intempestiv^ : argue , objurga , exhortare, cum omni 

in season or, out oiseason either: reprove, rebu£e, exhort, with all 

lenitate et doctrinA. (3) Nam erit tempusquumsanamdoctrinam 
lenity and doctrine. For will be time when sound doctrine 

non tolerabunt; sed auribus prurientes, ipsi sibi 

not they will endure ; but with ears itching, ttiey to themselves 

secundiL^m suas illas peculiares cupiditates coaoervabunt doctores: 
according to own their peculiar desires shall heap teachers: 

(4) Et a veritate quidem aores avertent ad 

And from the truth mdeed their ears they will turn away, unto 

fabulas ver6 divergent. (5) At tu vigQa in omnibus, per* 
fables and shall be turned. But thou watch ip. all (things,) en- 

fer imurias, opusperage evangelists, ministerii tui plenam 
dure adictions, tne work do of the evangelist, ministry, of thy full 

fidecQ facito. (6) Nam ego jam liber, et tempus mess remigrationb 
proof make. For I am now ready, and the time of my departure 

instat. (6) Certanen illnd pneclamm decertavi, onrsum 
is manifest . Fight the very famous I have fought, the race 



I 



LATIN GRAMHAE. 141 

oonsmnmaTi, fidem Ber^avi. (8) Qaod re]i(|iiam est, repo» 

I have finishM; tiie faith I have kept. Hencelorth, there k 

lita est mihi jastitia corona, qaam reddet mihi Dominiu in 
laid np for me of jofltice a crown, which will give to me the Lord in 

illo die JQStns ille judex, 
that day jnst the judge. 



MATTHJ£UM.-.Caput VI, Cakmbn 9. 

Vos, igitur, itapreoamini: PATEnnoeter qui es in oeelii, sane- 
Ts, therefore, thus pray: Fathui our who art in heaven, hal- 

tiiScetur nomen tnum : Veniat regnum tnum : Fiat voluntas tna, sioot 
lowed be name thy: Come kingdom thy: Be done will thy as 

in cobIo, (ito) etiam in terrA: Panem nostrum quotidianum da nobis, 
in heaven, (so) also on earth : Bread our daily give to us, 

hodie: £t remitte nobis debita nostra, siout et nos remittimus debito- 
to-day: And forgive us debts our, as also we forgive debt- 

ribusnostris: £t ne nos induces in tentationem, sed libera nos ab 
ors our: And not us lead into temptation, but deliver us from 

illo malo. Quia tnum est regnum et potentia, et gloria, 
all evil. For thine is the kingdom, and ue power, and the glory, 

in sicula. Amen, 
for ever. Amen. 



LUCAM^--Cafvt XVm, CAKMxir 10. 

(10) HomiiM duo asoenderont in templnm ut preoarentnr ; 
Men two ascended into the temple that they might pray; 

nnus PharisflBUS, et alter publioanns. (11) Pharisieus, con* 
one a Pharisee, and the other a publican. The Pharisee stand- 

sistens seorsim hsopreoatus est: Beus, gratias ago tibi 

ing with himself, thus prayed: O Qod, thuiks I give to thee 

quod non sim ut reliqni homines, rapaces, injusti, moechi; 
because not I may be as other men , extortioners, unjust, adulterers ; 

veletiamntistepnblicanus; (12) Jejuno bis hebdomade; decimo 
or even as this publican; I fast twice a week; I give the 

quaeonnqne possideo. (13) Publicanus autem procul 
tenth of whatever I possess. The publican and at a distance 

stansj nolebat vel oonlis in coBlum attolere ; sed percutiebat pectus 
standmg, would not his eyes to heaven lift up ; but bea oreast 

SQnm,dicens, '* i)eti«, plaeatur mihi peeeatori '" 
his, say'ng, " O Ood, f < mercifui *o ms a tinner/" 



142 THB PRJNC.PLES OF 



ANALYTICAL TABLE. 

TLe following words correspond to the figures used 31 the first part 
of the iEneid, i. e. the jinalytU, The object of this* table is to assist 
the scholar in separating words into their constituent parts, which sepa- 
ration is expressed throughoat this work by the hyphen. By a careful 
study of this, he will perceive the specific use of the various medial 
letters, terminations, &c., and will find that all these divisions have a 
particular meaning. In translaUng the verb, he will observe that the 
word is rendered backwards. 

The following abbreviations are used: 

1 p., first person ; 2 p. second person ; 3 p, third person. 

pi. plural ; where not used, singular is understood. 

{., indicative; im., imperative; in,, infinitive; tub,, subjunctive. 

pr,, present; p,, perfect. 

imp., imperfect; plup., pluperfect;/.^ future. 

pau., passive; prq>., preposition; ml,, medial letter or letters 

1.^ 2., 3., 4., denote the conjugation. 

Examples. — i^pr,, indicative present; wb.imp,, subjunotiva im- 
perfect; ml»l., medial letter, first conjugation. 

Root Ip. i.pr. Prep, rooL mb, imp. Zp. 

1. Can o. 6. In fer re t. 
Sing I. Into bring would he. 

Root. t. p. 3. Zp, Root. tm. Zp. 

2. Yen i t. 7. Memor a. 
Come has he. Relate thou. 

Root. ml. 1. i. p. pass. 3 p. Root. ml. 3, in.pr. 

3. Jact a tus e» t. 8. Volv e re. 
Tossed was he. KoU to. 

Root. i. p. pass. Zp. Prey, root, in. pr. 

4. Pas eases t. 9. Ad i re. 
Snfier ed he. To go to. 

Prep. root. ml. 3. sub. imp. 3 p. Prep, root sub. p. Zp. 
6. Con d e re t. 10. Im pul eri t. 

Together put would he. Into driveq may have she* 



LATHI IRAJIMAB. 



143 



Root, i p.Z. Zp. 

11. Fa i t. 

Was it. 

Root, ml, 2. i. p. Z.p.pl. 

12. Ten u tre. 
Held have they 

Root. i.pr.Sp.past. 

13. Fer t ur. 
Said she is. 

Root. ml. 2. in.p. 

14. Col Q isse. 
Cherished to have 

Root, i.p.3. Zp. 

15. Fn it. 
Was it. 

Root. in. pr. 

16. £ see. 
Be to. 

Root. ml. 3. iub.pr. pi. Zp, 

17. Sin a n t. 
Perndt may they. 

Root. ml.Z.i.pr. Zp. 

18. Tend i t. 
Endeavors she. 

Root. ml.2.i.pr. Zp. 

19. Fov e t. 
Cherishes she. 

Root, (n.pr.pan. 

20. Dno i. 
Descended to be. 

Root. ml. 4. i.pliip. Zp. 
81. And iv era t. 
Heard had she. 

Root. ml.Z. tub. imp. Zp. 
22. Vert e re t. 

Overturn would it. 



Root. in,/. 

23. Yen torun w«m. 
Come would. 

Root. i. p. Z.p. pi. 

24. Volv Are. 
Decreed have they. 

Root, i.plup. Zp. 

25. Gess era t. 
Carried had she. 

Pr^. root, i plup. pi, Zp. 

26. Ex cid era n t. 
From fallen had they. 

Root. ml. 2. i.pr. Zp. 

27. Man e t. 
Remains it. 

Root. ml. 2. i. imp, Z p. 

28. Arc e ba t. 
Drivmg was she. 

Root, ml, 1. i.imp. pi. Zp, 

29. Err a ba n t. 
Wander ed they. 

Root. i.iv^. Zp. 
90. E ra t. 

Was it. 

Prep. root. ml. 3. in, pr. 

31. Con d e re. 
Together pat to. 

Root. ml. 1. i.imp. pi. Zp, 

32. D a ba n t. 
Giving were they. 

Root. ml. 3. i. imp. pi. Zp, 

33. Ra e ba n t. 
Rnslung were they. 

Prep, root, ml 3. in.pr, 

34. De sist e re. 
From stay to. 



144 



Tax PRINCIPLES OF 



Root, tn.pr 

35. Po Me. 

Able to be. 

frqf. root. mi. 3. tA.jpr. 

36. A vert e re. 
From torn to. 

Root, t. pr. pasi. 

37. Vet o r. 
Forbidden I am. 

Prep. root. ml. 3. in. pr. 

38. £x m* e re. 
Ottt bum to. 

Ro&t. ml. 2. i.p. Bp. 

39. Pot a i t. 
Been able has riie. 

Prep. root. mi. 3. tn.jw. 

40. Sab merg e re. 
Under sink to. 

Prep, root. i.p. 3p 

41. Bis jec i t. 
Asunder oast has she. 

Prep. rod. i.p. Zp. 

42. £ vert i t. 
Over turned has she. 

Prep. root. ml. 2. i.p. 3 p. 

43. Cor rip n i t. 
On seized has she. 

Pr^. root, i.p, 3 p. 

44. In fix i t. 
On fastened has she. 

Pr^. root. %.pr, Ip. 

45. In ced o. 

On give plaoe I, or I watte. 

Root. i.pr.lp. 

46. Oer o. 
Carry I, 



Pr«p. root, ml. sub.pr. I. Sp. 

47. Ad or • t. 
To pray may he. 

Prep. root. ml. 3. eyh.pr. 3p. 

48. Im pon a t. 
On plaoe may he 

Root. i.p, 3 p. 

49. Ven i t. 
Come has she. 

Root. ml.Z,pr. 3p, 

50. Prem i t. 
Governs he. 

Root. ml. 1. i.pr, 3p. 

51. Fnen a t. 
Restrains he. 

Root. ml. 3. i.pr. pi. 3 j9. 

52. Frem a n t. 
Roar they. 

Root, ml.2,i.pr. 3p, 

53. Sod e t. 
Sits he. 

Root. ml.4.i.pr, 3p, 

54. MoU i t. 
Softens he. 

Root, ml.l.i,pr. 3p. 

55. Temper a t. 
Moderates he. 

Root. ml. 4. tub. pr. 3p, 

56. Fao i a t. 
Bo may he. 

Root. mi. 3. 9ub.pr.pl. Zp. 

57. Fer a n t. 
Bear can they. 

Root. ml. 3. wb.pr. pi. 3p 

58. Verr a n t. 
Sweep can they 



PRINCIPLES 

or THB 

ETYMOLOGY AND SYNTAX 

or THE 

GKEEK LANGUAGE. 



GREEK ALPHABET. 
The Greek Alphabet consists of twenty-foar letters, tie 

C^araeier. NamM, Bwmd* 

A, a. Alpha, a. 

B, /3, e, Beta, b. 
!"» 79 ff Gamma, c. 
Aj if Delta, d. 

E, f , Epsilon, ^ short. 

Z, ^, §, Zeta, z. 

H, f|, Eta, 6 long, 

e, 6f ht Theta, th. 

I, I, Iota, u 

K, X, Eappa, k. 

A, \ Lambda, 1. 

M, m Mu, m. 

N, V, Nu, n. 

K if Xi, ks (?r z« 

O, •, Omicron, 5 short 

n, i', tf, Pi, p. 

P»ffP, Rho, r. 

2, 0*, ^, Sigma, s. 

T, c, 7, Tau, t 

T, u, TJpsilon, yarn. 

♦» 9* Pti, ph, or f, 

X, y, Chi, ch. 

'J't +1 Psi, iw. 

Q, w« Omega, long. 
13 



146 THE PRIMCIFLES OF 

ABBREVIATIONS 



Characters. 


Letters for v^ieh they stafJl. 


Siuna, 


Tf 


ffrj 


St. 


*J. 


xedj 


kai, and. 


s 


•u, 


ou, not. 



NoTv. — There are many other abbreviations, bat these are m meet 
oommon use. 



EXERCISES ON THE GREEK ALPHABET. 

Agrippas de pros ton Paulon ephe: 
*A y p I ^ ^ a e 6 h «'pof 4'ov IlauXov I91)* 
Agrippa then unto the Paul said : 

*£4r I 7 p 9 v' 6 7 a I (foi *v^sp (fvaurov 

Epitrepetai soi huper seautou 
It is permitted to thee for thyself 

legei;:^ Tote ho Paulos apelogeito, 

X^yfiiv, Tors 'o IlauXof d^rfiXoyfiiro, 

to speak. Then the Paul defended himself, 

ekteinas tfin cheira. Peri pant5n 
i XT 8 i V a e T ifi V* p^fiipct. Ilfipi iravruvf 
raising the hana. Concerning all (things,) 

5n egkaloumai hupo Joudaion 

6JV lvxaXobi/j.ai ^u«'o 'lov^aiuv 

of which I am accused by (the) Jews, 



basilen Agrippa, egemai emauton 
jSaffiXau 'Avpif'^rO} i}yt)|jbflti 2fAau7ov 
O, king Agrippa, I think myesif 



makarion mellon apologeisthai, &c. 

ijbaxapiov f/b&XXuv aitoXo^fiirfdai, ^c. 

happy (that) I am about to defend tayself, &c. 

* Pronounced teen, C long. f Pantone, 5 long. 



GREEK GRAMMAR. 147 

TABLE OF DIPHTHONGAL SODJ^DS 



ai, 


like 


i 


in fire. 


as 


fTlJ^/OJ. 


«» 


like 


i 


in fine, 


as 


rC^si, 


ou, 


like 


au 


"in Paul, 


as 


a07o^« 


rj, 


like 


eu 


in feud, 


as 


svpi, 
au7oi. 


01, 


like 


oi 


in soil, 


as 


ou, 


like 


ou 


in our. 


as 


oZl6f. 


Wj 


like 


ui 


in quick o? 


we, as 


uU^, toheos. 



OTHER SIGNS, ACCENTS, ETC. 

Note. — r, before y, x, x* or f, is sounded like ng in ring, 
as a/75Xo^, (angelos,) ayxov, (angkon,) Sec. Sigma, at the 
end of a word, is written ^, otherwise (f. 

( * ) is called the rough breathing or spiritus asper ; it is 
the same as h in English, as 6 {ho), 

(" ) is called the drcumflex accent. 

( ' ) the acute accent, and ( ") is the grave. 

( * ) is the $oft breathings or spiritus lenis.* 

( I ) This character written under a vowel is called the 
subscript iota^ (t written under,) as <rcl), apx^, &c. 

In Greek, the vowels 5 and o are short ; yi and &; are long, 
and a, i^d^ are doubtful; called so because they are some- 
times short and sometimes long ; as a in -ara^-iip is always 
long, in Xaof is always short, while in "Ap^jf, it may be 
either short or long. 

( ' ) The apostrophe is written over the place of a short 
rowel, that has been cut oflT from the end of a word ; as, 
aXX* for oKKa^ xar* or xaV for xara. This is done when the 
next word commences with a vowel, and in compounds, 
when the first part ends and the last part begins with a 
vowel. Sometimes the diphthongs are elided by the poets, 
as ^o^XofA* I7U for €ojXofi.ai iyu ; and sometimes after a long 
syllable, the initial vowel is cut ofiT from the following 
word: as, w yoAs for w ^ayoAL Instead of the apostrophe 
or cutting oflT the final vowel, the concurring vowels are of- 
ten contracted : as, x^x for xou ex, xoLyd for xoj Jyu, &;c. 

* The tjnritus lenis indicates that the niriitu a$per is not used 
Every word commencing with a vowel or diphthong has a gpiritu* or 
breathing on that vowel, while the diphthong has it on the 2d letter. 



148 THE PBmciPLES OF 

EUPHONY. 

The Greeks paid the greatest attention to the smoothness 
of sound in their language ; and in this manner, it became, 
in a short time, one of the smoothest and richest languages 
on the known *earth. This, they called Euphony ; and 
from a regard to this, they carefully avoided all harshness 
of sound by concurring consonants, not easily pronounced. 
The following rules will apply to this subject. 

1. Words ending in (fi, and verbs of the third person in 
6 and I, add v to the termination, before a vowel or before a 
pause, in the same manner as we add n to a in the English 
language ; as, an ox for a ox. This is called v appended. 

2. When two successive syllables would begin with an 
aspirate or rough mute, the first is changed into its own 
smooth; thus, ^-pixo^ for ^pix^St ^p^X" ^^^ ^piyu, rpe^u) for 
dpS^CJ, &c., &c. 

3. A AT mute (ir, §, 9,) before tf, becomes -^^ (ps.) 

4. A X mute (x, y, x») before (f, becomes f , (x.) 
6. At mute (r, 6, ^,) before fj., is changed into (f. 

6. When (f would stand between two consonants it is re* 
jected ; as, XsXsi^-^ov for XsX£iir-(f-^ov, &c. 

7. When tf, by inflection, comes before tf, it is rejected. 

8. When both v and armute together are cast out before 
(T s preceding it is changed into si, into od^ and a doubtful 
^owel is lengthened ; but 17 and u remain unchanged.* 



PUNCTUATION. 
( , ) The comma denotes the shortest pause. 
( * ) The colon or semi-colon, the next shortest ; and 
( . ) The period a full stop. 

( ; ) Denotes that a question is asked, and is the same as 
(?) in English. 

• Fo: the remamder of these Roles, see page 156, on the veib 



GBBBK ORAMIUB* 149 



PAKTS OF SPEECH. 

The Parts of Speech in Greek, are eight, viz: 

1. Substantive or noun, Adjective, Article, Pronoun and 
Verb, dtdirud, 

2. Adverb, Preposition and Conjunction,* undedined. 
(Fsr th» definitions, see Latin Grammar.) 

NUMBER. 

The numbers in Greek, are three : Singular, denoting 
ant object; Dual, denoting ttoo objects, (commonly in 
pairs, as a span of horses, tne bird and its mate^ man and 
wife, &c.,) and the Plural, denoting mare than one object. 
The Dual is but little used. 

CASE. 

There are only five cases in Greek, there being no ab- 
lative ; the others are like the Latin. 

Note. — In Greek, the genitive and dative supply the 
place of the ablative. 

(For '' Bules for the oonstmoticm of Cases,** see Latin Grammar.) 



OF DECLENSION. 

Declension is the mode of changing the terminations of 
nouns, verbs, pronouns and adjc'ctives. There are three 
declensions of nouns and adjectives, in Greek, called the 
first, second and third. 

^ * The participle, which is considered by some grammarians, as a 
i^stin.t part of speech, is more properly a part of the verb. It may 
be, also, an adjective. 

The Interjection is thought by some writers to be an adverb or a 
•ptteh of itself instead of a pjrt 

6* 



150 



THE PRINCIPLES OF 



TABLE OF DECLENSION. 

FIRST DECLENSION.. 



Singular. 



Dual. 



N. G. D. A. V. N,Ay, G.D. 



Mas. 
Mas. 






Fem. a, of, 9., 



Of 



0UV. 

aiv* 
oiv* 
oiv. 



SECOND DECLENSION. 

Singular. Dual. 

N. G. D. wtf. r. N.Jl.r. GJ>. 
Mas. OS, ou, <f)f ov, s. 6J, o(v. 
NeuU ov, ou, ^, ov, -ov. co, oiv. 



^. G. i). .*. r 

Of, «rv, ai;, a^, a. 

ou, «rv, ou;, a;, a. 

ai, «rv, ftf^, oe;, a. 

ou, zSVf ai(, oc^, a. 



P/tfraZ. 

N. G. i>. j«. F. 

01, OJV, 01;, ou;, 01* 

Of OJV, oi;, a, a. 



THIRD DECLENSION. 

Singular, Dual. Plural. 

N. G.D. Ji. V. N.ji.F.G.D. N.G. D. Jt. F. 
M. 4" F. — ,*o;, I, aorav, like JV. e, wv. «;, wv, (ft, ct;, sg. 
Neuter. — ,*o;, 1, like IV. like iV. s, oiv. ot, fiv, ^1, a, a. 

RULES FOR THE ASSISTANCE OF THE STUDENT. 

1. The nominatiTe singular always ends either in a long 
rowel or v, p, ;, g and 4"* 

2. In the dual, the genitive and dative always end alike. 

3. The nominative and vocative are always alike in the 
plural, and generally in the singular. 

4. The genitive plural always ends in 6jv. 

5. The accusative plural of the masculine and feminine 
always ends in ; ; of the neuter in a. 

6. In the neuter plural, the nominative, accusative and 
vocative end in ou 

7 The dative singular is known hy having the subscript 
tcta written under it ; except where it already ends in 1. 

* The nominative terminations of this declension are nomerons. Its 
genitive singular always ends in (m, and has one syllable more than the 
nommative. 



GSEBK OBAUMAB. 151 

DBCLElfSION OF THB DBFIITITB ABTIGLB. 

Singular. Dttal. Plural. 

Mas Fenu Neid. Mas. Ftm, NeiU. Mas. Ftm. Neid. 

Nom.h, 4t ^^« ^^9 ^^, rCt. oS, a), ra. 

Gen. rou ri);, rou* rofv, roTv, roTv. ruv, rcjv, rojv. 

Z^oX. rw rij, rw. rofv, rarv, roTv. roff, raff, roi^. 

ilcc. rov r^y r^. r6, ro, ru. roi!^, ra^, ra« 

NoTB. — Ss is sometimes annexed to the article through 
all its parts, when it becomes o6sf {{», roSif &c.| this. 



PRONOUNS. 

The Pbbsoical Pbonouns, in Greek, are Iy6, I; ^C, 
thou; ou, of himself, of herself, of itself They are thus 
declined: 

iyd, L 
Singular. Dual. Plural* 

N. G. D. A. N.ji. G.V. N. O.. D. A. 

l7u,(l)fMl;,(^)f&of , (l)fii. voji or v^; vuiv or v^« ^"^s^ h^i ^^^i nv^* 

€u^thou. 

N.Q.v.ji.r. N.j.r. G.v. N.r. o. d j. 

^^ (fou, (foi, (fi, (TV. ff^Cji or (fq>^» (f^uiv or (fqxjiv. i^fM%» df&wv, Cfit^rv, dpbo^. 

iZ, ofhimsdf, ^c 
jr. G.D.ji. N.A. G,D. N. G. D. J. 

— , ou, oT, I. (f^, (ffiy. ^9^%, (f9o3v, ^^i&i, (ff&g. 

The Possessive Peonouns are declined like the noun — 
the masculine like the second declension masculine in o^; 
the feminine like nouns of the second declension, in a or 
•) ; the neuter like the neuter of the second declension, in 
n — thus : 

Masculine, og, ou, y), ov, s, ftc^ 
Femi/dne. a,ii; «» 8v; jj,^; tjv, «v ; ij, a, &c. 
Neuter. ov, ou, tf), ov, ov, &c. 



152 THE PBINC1FLB8 07 

The Definite Pronoun, aJro^, is thus declined: 

Singular. Dual. Plural. 

N. G. D. Ji. N.J. G.D. N. G. D. A. 

Mas. our-o^, -ou, -w -ov. -w, -©rv. -oi, -wv, -o%, -ou^. 

Fern., auT-1^, -^f, -5, -igv. -A, -afv. -oi, -cjv, -a?^, -ol^* 

2Ve2£^« aur-o, -oCi, -y, -o. -cil), -ofv. -A, -wv, -or^, -a* 

''AXXo^, 0^ and sxsivo^ are declined in the same manner. 

The Keflexiyb Pronouns are such as relate to the sub- 
ject of the proposition in which they stand. They are 
formed from the accusative singular of the personal pro- 
nouns, with the oblique* cases of auro^. They are JfMxurou, 
of myself^ (feavrov, of thyself , lavcou, of himself . They are 
thus declined: 

, Singular. Plural, 

G. D. A. G. D. A. 

Mas. -ou, -^, -ov* -c3v, -or(^, -ou^. 

Fenii -%, 'ji^ -ijv. -«v, •oXg^ -o^. 

Neut. -ou, -^, -0. -uvy -0?^, -ol. 

The Demonstratiyb Peonouns point out with precisions 
a person or thing already known. They are: 

t" £? 7S::\*Ms,tke latter, t^e^nu. 
ixsivo^i ixsiyri, ixstvo^ that, the former, the other. 

OZroe is thus declined: 

Singular. Dual. 

N,r. G. D. A. N.A.r. G.D. 

Masculine, ouro^, rourou, rouru, rourov. rourw, ro^roiv. 

Femimne, aUrij, rowTj^, towtj, rai5r*iv. Toura, rowrofy. 

Neuter, rouro, rourou, roury, rouro. tou^'oj, rojJroiv. 

Masculine, oZroi, roorojv, roiJfl-oif, coiJtou^. 
Feminine, aZrat, rauruv, rourai^, rowro^* 
Neuter, raura, toutcjv, reuroi^, roMro. 

* All cases, except the nominative, are called oblique 



SBEEK 6BAMMAS. 153 

**0J6 is declined Ifi^e the definite article h with the en- 
clitic 05 annexed throagh all its cases, to render it emphatic. 
*£x5fvo^ IS declined like auro^. 

The Relativb Pronoun is one that relates to a noan or 
pronoun going before it, called its antecedent. The rela- 
tive, 0^, 4, 0, toko, which, that, is declined like aJklg. It is 
made emphatic by adding the enclitic syllable ivp; as 

0(frFp, 4«'?p, 0«'£p. 

The Ionic and Doric writers and the Attic tragedians use 
the article I, f), ri, as a relative, instead of o^, ^, o. 

The compound pronoun o(rri^ is used instead of o^, as a 
relative, after neoQ, or any word in the singular, expressing 
an indefinite number ; and Idai, after the same words in 
the plural: as, rcfe otfTi^, eoery one who; ^civrsf otfoi, all 
who, &c. 

The Intehrogative Pronoun is used in asking a ques- 
tion. The interrogative rtV is thus declined.; 

Singular, Dual. PluraL 

N. G. D, A, N,A,G.D, N. G. D. A. 

M, F, rig, rivog, rm, civa. tivs, rivoiv. civff, rivwv, r^(t^, tivo^ 

Neut. Ti, Tmg, civi, tL rive, rivoiv. riva, tivwv, riVi, riva* 

The Indefinite Pronouns are such as denote persons or 
things indefinitely. They are: - 

Tts, rig, Ti, some oTie, declined like rfe, above. 

Sen-a, -a, -a, some one, such a one. 

aXX-oc, -11, -0, another, 

hspog, f«pot, hspQv, other, a different one, another. 

The indefinite rig has the grave accent on the last sylla- 
ble to distinguish it from the interrogative rig, which has 
the acute accent on the first ; the former is enclitic, the 
latter is not. 

The indefinite 6sTva, some one, of all genders, and alway 
with the article prefixed, is declined like a noun of the 
third declension. It is, however, sometimes used indecli- 
nable ; as, genitive, rw SsTva, dative, rtp SsTvou 

All words used interrogatively, are also used indefinitely, 
but generally with the accent changed. 



154 THE PBINCIPLES OP 



VERBS. 

In GrcCiC, the Transitive* verb has three forms, called 
Active, Passive and Middle. 

An Intransitive* verb is commonly without the Passive 
form. 

The Middle Voice, in Greek, represents the subject of 
>he verb as acting on itself; as ruirrofMu, / strike mysdf; 
l^a>|/afjLi]v rov fi'oJa, 1 hurt my footy&oc. 

OF MOODS. 

Mood is the mode or manner of expressing the meaning 
or signification of the verb. 

In Greek, the Moods are five, viz: — The Indicative, 
Subjunctive, Optative, Imperative and Infinitive. 

The Indicative mood is always used to express a thing 
as certain and actual ; as, ^iXsw, / love, tv^^u, I strike. 

The Subjunctive and Optative moods represent an action 
as dependent and contingent, and never actual or certain. 
Not a thing that certainly is, was or vnll be, but that may, 
can or might be or exist. The subjunctive represents this 
contingency or doubt as present^ the optative as past. 

The Imperative mood commands, exhorts, entreats and 
permits ; as, /po^s, ivrite thou, ircj, let him go, 6cc. 

The Infinitive mood expresses the sense or meaning of 
the verb in a general manner ; as, rvirrsiv, to strike. 

TENSES. 

Tense is the division of time into Present, Past and 
Future. 

Although there are, in reality, only the three above 
named tenses, yet, by certain other modifications, a variety 
of tenses may be formed : of these, in Greek, there are 
nine. They are the Present, the Imperfect, the First and 
Second Future, the First and Second Aorist, the Perfect, 
Pluperfect, and, in the Passive, the Paulo-post or Third 
Future. 

* F >r the iefliition of these terms, see Latin Grammar, p. 92. 



GREEK GRAMMAR. 155 

The Present tense represents the time now passing. 

The Imperfect^ lime gone by or past. 

The Perfect tense, time just completed. 

The Pluperfect^ time preceding the imperfect. 

The First and Second Future^ time that loill come. 

The First and Second Aorist^ any time past. 

The Paulo-post or TAj'ri Future Passive^ time that t«7/ 
come and be continued ; as, ^77; a>]^s7ai, Ae ^ Ao/Z ooTUinue 
enrolled, 

SIGNS OF THE MOODS. 

Indicative mood. There is no particular letter to denote 
this mood ; but its difference from the others may be easily 
seen by a glance at the Table of the Verb. 

Subjunctive mood, u and ri. 

Optative mood, oi, ai and ei. 

Imperative mood. 9, ov, dcj, n and ^1. 

Lifinitive mood. »v, vai, ^ai and oj. 

The Signs op the Tenses will be seen, by referring to 
the Table on the Verb, or page 158. 



OF CONJUGATION. 

Conjugation is the manner of arranging the Moods and 
Tenses of the Verb according to a certain order. 

In Greek, there are two Conjugations: the first of verbs 
in cj, the second in juli. 

The different voices, moods, tenses, numbers and per- 
sons that a verb undergoes by conjugation, may be referred 
to three heads: the Root^ the Augment^ and the Termi' 
nation. 

OF THE COGNATE MUTES AND RITLES OF CHANGE IN LETTERS 

The Motes are nine, but all are founded on three, viz.: 
ir, which is formed with the lips, x with the palate, and f 
irith the tongue. Add a slight roughness to ^ smooth, and 



156 THE PRINCIPLES OF 

you have /? middle; next, th.e rough hreathing('), and 
you have q: rough. 

E| Wiih a slight roughness, hecomes /, to which add the 
rough breathing, and you have x' ^"^i '-^ the same man- 
ner, r becomes 6 and L Y and g are called dauhh conso- 
nantSf being mere.y it and x, with (f appended. 

n mutes* K mutes. T mutes. 

Smooth r, x, r. 

Middle, jS, y, 5. 

Rsugh, 9, add (f make -4^. x> ^^^ ^ make g. ^. 

If (f is added to r mutes, the mute is dropped : thus, from 
dvCru you have dvCifut and not dvCr(fu). 

TL mutes before ft are changed into jx: as, rirvi^uu for 
r^irfMxi ; WrpijjLfjMxi for rirpiSjxai ; y^pajxfi.ou for yfypa^jxau 

K mutes before |x are changed into / ; as, ^i^T^yiuu for 

N, before a «* mute is changed into |x: as, lfji.Sarvu for 

N, before a x mute is changed into y : as, fi'l^ayxa for 

N, before the liquids, (X, |x, p,) is changed in those let- 
ters respectively : as, ^liXXiyu for tfuvXiyo, &c. 

When mutes com^ together, they must be of the same 
strength ; that is, smooth with smooth, middle with middle 
and rough with rough. Hence, when one is determined, 
the other must be made to correspond : as, ^rv^-^v for Jru^"- 
^f)v ; XiX^-ds for XiX6x-^s, &c., &c. 

Note. — The above business of Euphony, (especially the 
last rule,) is no new thing; but one which occurs in the 
English, as well as in the Greek and Latin. There are 
more changes in a great number of words, in the English 
language, than most people seem to be aware of. Take, 
for instance, the words coMect, coTTi-press, co-alesce and. 
cor-respond, in which the Latin word am, by euphonic 
changes, becomes alternately col^ com^ co^ (in which the n 
is dropped,) and cor. And why this change? Why not 
retain the original word con? Let us see. How would 
coTirltCf con-j^resSf ccm-alesce and coTi-respond sound ? Very 



GREEK GRAMMAR. 157 

rough, I must confess. Hence, these changes are intro- 
duced in the language for the express purpose of making 
that language smooth. And in the same manner the syl- 
lables m, Tie, sub, ad, and some others, are changed into a 
great Tariety of forms ; in, for instance, when used atf a 
negative, and derived from rum or ne, Latin, becomes il, ir, 
<^f igt ify (which, with d annexed, becomes dif, as in dip 
fidcnt, (2(/'-ficult, (from facilU, easy,) and some others.) 
Sub becomes sup, suf, sue, sus, &c. ; and ad becomes al, 
at, af, &CC. I thus, tTZpvulnerable, tn-competent, t7-legal, im- 
moral, t^-noble, dif-Meiit, dif'^cult. In all these cases, 
the syllable in italic, comes from in, the n being changed 
to I before L m before m, g before n, and dif before /, for 
the sake of Euphony or Sound. 

OF THE ROOT. 

The Root is that part of the verb that remains un- 
changed throughout, (except as required by the rules of 
Euphony.) 

The final letter of the root is called its characteristic, 
because the verb is denominated pure, ^nute or liquid, ac- 
cording as that letter is a vowel, mute or liquid. 

In all primary forms of the verb, the characteristic is the 
letter next to the termination, in the present indicative; 
thus, X in yj^'U, «* in rpi^tu, u in Xt/cj, v in reno), &c. 

Many yeros have a second and third root, i. e., the verb 
changes its forms in the second future and second aorist, 
and again in the perfect and pluperfect middle. The root 
of the present tense is called the first root. 

OF THE TENSB ROOT. 

The Tens9 Koot, or the Tense Sign, is that part of the 
verb that remains unchanged through the same tense.* 

Note. — In some verbs, where there is no Tense sign, 
the verb root or the termination denotes the Tense. 

* Some Authors make the Verb Root a part of the Tenn Root^ 
but this is wrong. The Verb Roct remains unchanged throcgb the 
verb, while the Tense Root throngX the tense, omy. 
14 



158 THE PBINCIPLE9 OF ^ 

TABLE OF TENSE SIGNS. 

In Mute and Pure Verbs^ the Tense Signs are in the 
Active, Passive* Middle. 

JFirst Future, (ff ^(ff ^* 

First Aorist, (fy Bf (f» 

Second Future, . . • • Cf ^^i «• 

Perfect & Pluperfect, [']orXf — , — . 

In Liquid Verbs^ the Tense Signs are, in the 

X First Future, ft dr^tf, s. 

First Aorist, — , 6. — . 

Second Future, • • • • i, fitff §• 

Pefect & Pluperfect, x, — , — . 

In the Present, Imperfect and Second Aorist, the tense 
A denoted by the terminations ; as, Present, cj, si;, £i ; srov* 
/rov ; ojxfv, sts, ovtft. Imperfect, ov, sg^ s ; erWf srnv ; oiuw, 
ITS, ov. Second Aorist, like the Imperfect. 

OF THE AUGMENT. 

The Augment is the vowel or syllable prefixed to the 
root, in the past or preterite tenses. 

The Imperfect, Pluperfect and Aorists take the augment 
in the Indicative Mood only ; so, on the Table of the Verb, 
the student should be careful not to use the augment in 
any other mood than the indicative, in the three above- 
named tenses. 

Note. — When the augment prefixes a syllable, it is 
called the syllabic augment. When it lengthens the ini* 
tial vowel, it is called the temporal augment. The first is 
used when the verb begins with a consonant, the other 
when it begins with a vowel. 

The syllabic augment is formed by prefixing s to the 
augmented tenses, as l-ru^/ci, i-nov, dx. ; the temporal, by 
lengthening o into w, a and s into f} ; as, a-^M, ^-6ov ; J-Xsu^gji 
{-Xfu^ov; oi-pcij, *^-pov; ^-puiftrda, cj-puO'O'ov, &c. 

* In this placoi the a is changed to ^ while the ( is rJnenpt, ot 
written under. 



▼ GBEEK GRAMaCAB. 15S 

The diphthongs fi and oi*, and the long vowels y and «, 
remain unchangt d by the augment. 

A number of verbs commencing with e take the augment 
in f » ; as, ?-/w, h-^oy. 

Where the verb begins with a consonant, the consonant 
is doubled before the augment of the Perfect ; as, r-u^rrw, 
r-«-cu^a ; r-iw, c-e-rixa, Ac. 

The rough mute reduplicates its own smooth; as, 9-uu, 

Verbs, compounded with prepositions^ take the aagroen; 
between the preposition and the root ; as, 4rpo(f*9epw, cpoif-^- 

OF THE TERMINATION. 

The terminations c( nsist of that part of the verb which 
immediately follows the Tense Root. 



We here present the scholar with a Table on the conju 
gation of the Greek Verb, containing all its changes; and 
by which the whole subject of Euphony will be seen, in 
the changes which the root undergoes, in being associated 
with different letters; as, also, the augment, reduplication, 
mood and tense. This> Table was prepared, on the plan of 
Professor Thiersch, of Germany, by the author's son, at 
the Rochester Collegiate Institute, in the summer of 1847, 
expressly for this work. The Table exhibits, at a glance, 
all the changes that can take place in the Greek Verb, ex- 
cept the person and number, which will be found in the 
conjugation that immediately follows. 

In the Table, the following abbreviations are used : — 
Term. Terminatons; WafU. Wanting; M. S. Mood Sign. 



160 



TEE PRINCIPLES OF 



I 






SN 



I 



S'W 



I 



s-w 



!^ ? 



I 



II 



o 

si 



^1 






3 3 



3 3 



. . o p c a c fl . . 

5 w u> At 6d ,C$ 00 00 Od •a *a 



3 3 



a c c . , 

333333ggg3 3 



§P>ed«s«ScS«SedF-^ 






OOP 



3otit{(»u»33>t{o 



11 



a c c fl 






I 






^e§e?e 



Itll 



llrirsfgit! 



I 



vuoiuiartdnpoH 



*)aeiiiitny 



'saoi^nodoj^ 






• « 






- O 






55 5 M -^ H s ^ '^ ^ 



*■ fcZ W V , " »• S3 9 W K 



O 



O4 

S 

'a 



a 

B 
bo 

J3 



o 



o 
o 



£8 



GREEK GRAMMAS. 



161 






ii 



sw 



II 3 S 3 g|| Sll 



« « 



H c 



•S'W 



I 



-i§ 



iiillliiifi 



«» «R «» I IP I IT* 



i i i i i i i i% 3 > 



8I« 






«s ^ «j «j u 

a e c s s • • 



1 



SW 



I 



II 



• «^ , *J *J «J «>• 

> ^ > > ^ 



•S'W 



. p p 



> 

I 



II 



«5 ^ •! 

e B c • 

«s<i5«:(i;gggs«s 
^ ^ ^ 



'S'W 













f^ i> »- X 
:l 5L SL 5S- 



o o o o « «o « 



14* 



162 



THB PRINCIPLES OF 



TABLE, (Continued.) 



TeDsef. 


Participle. 


Active. 1 


Pattive. 1 


Middle. 


00 


Term. 


CO 


Term. 


QO 


Term. 


Present, 




CfJV. 

^. 

^. 

uv. 
want. 




iHidvog. 
want. 
inUvtg. 
want. 

fOVOff. 

ik. 








ou 

k 

6 


want. 
want, 
want, 
want. 

fOVOf. 
fMVOf. 

want. 


Im nerfect 


First Perfect, 

Second Perfect, 

First Plunerfect, 

Second Pluperfect,... 
First Future, 


Second Future, 

Third Future,, 

First Aorist, 

Second Aorist, ...... 



Tile express design of the preceding Table, is to show 
the student, at a glance, the Mood, Tense and Voice of the. 
Verb, without the Person and Number; and a Table like 
the foregoing, is better adapted to this purpose than one 
more lengthy, over the whole of which the student is 
obliged to look before he can find the Mood oi Tense de- 
sired ; but for the betler information of those who desire 
it, we give, commencing on the next page, a full conjugation 
of the verb rC^tru, by which they can ascertain the Person 
and Number, as well as the other pai^s of any verb of the 
f.r8t conjupition. 



OBEEK OBAMMAR. 






1 

J3 



•^ >* r^ •>> •>» .t^* .>>^>»4 

o^. §^ 5^ §ja a^ a^ gjflig 

J^" 1^" y" y" c^" c^" 1^*1 f^" 



163 



§JS 







• i • i i i i 

■5 -a -3 -3 -3 









» a> 



P ^-p 



0} ^0} ^ « 5 0) 
>^ >^ >< >< 



^ I ^ 



■ a5 ,6 
^ 5pd 






o 



'^ 



§1 «- 



5 "-S 









? 



S ^a 



C3 
O 

.d 



•-« a HH » HH ^HH > I— I 31—1 






^L.^ 






^S .-3 



-a 






525 
O 



/} ^'CQ CO M CO CO CO *" "gQ 



•^ 

(< 



|. 



•I 






•eg 5 



^ 

P^ 



s 






I 1 1 1 1 -1 

S -3 p2 ^ B s 
PW - ^ P^ fa Pb4 •< 






CI 



"8 ^3 « 

f-i d ^ 



164 



THE FBINCIPLES OP 



.^ 



^-3 



i _.,- 









I 



3-S 



g. 



a 



•5 S*1 ^ 









1^' U 



o 



o 






si 



^9 



^ >% I* >» I- 



0) 



fB 1^ IB n IB 






-•^ 









y 



§ 

s 



I 



I 



5^ 



I 



^-^ 









!SS 



^^ 



^J 



S ,-H^* 



3 1-^ 3 1-7 



CO 



► 

a 



OS 

a 



u 

.cs 3i-r 

I top 



li 



GQ CQ 



! 

Is 

& 






Pk i5 t-H 






01 



1 a 

•S --, 

II 

•a *a 



* • * ^ 



g| g| 



"•a ' a 



.r 



^^^1 






CO 



d 

•a 
Ol 

s 

fa •< 



■t 

0« 



OEEEX GRAIIKAa. 165 

e* « « ^ I 1 1 1 1 1* 

■3 ^-3 J JJ J.1J 






o 







£ i i i d ^ '^^ n: !g «s 



SI S 5 § 






Q 

Q • • • • • • 

O 3 3 3 3 3 3 






\\ \\\ 
I .CI Ul 

Mo Mo -.^ «0 iJT • 

Q* M^ C4 <-• oi •-• ei ■-< e« Pm ►S "-■©»« o* « 01 



1S6 



THE PRINCIPLES Of 



^ S e 3- 3 o o o «*^ *• 

pi* «r «r . •> . •» Jo" «r dT mt «B* 

^ 1 2. i- i- 3. 3. a i- 1 



&• 

^ 



^1 *-3 



^1 



^ 



«> ^ >» ^^ >» >» to f s. 



ii 



• B ^ 4 J s J J i ? f 



9 w 
O "2 

o F- 

*-» e 

is 






I 

3 

t 



»3-«3* 

cc 

1 3-* 3- 



M 

lF-115* 



IP US' 










.13*3 



S3 



1^ 



O 
O 

2 

O 



IS 
11 



II 

g i 
^•5 






.1 



II 






11 



2 g c ^ a> p 09 






o 



•r £ 2-5-2 « 



CO "^ 



ORBBX 6EA:fKAS. 



la? 




0) es o w v >iO 

. gSSSsog 



pL| ^ PU| PU| «-l G« 



THB PRINCIPLES OF 




..2.2 



•^^s 



OBXBK ORAMMA&. 



188 



SECOND CONJUGATION, OR VERBS IN MI 

Place the root of any verb of the Second Conjugation, 
in the blank nnder " Root^^* in the following Table, and 
yoa have it conjugated. 

Note. — The significations are the same as those in the 
First Conjugation. 



ACTIYB VOICE. — ^UfDICATIYB MOOD. 



Ten$e. Jug. Root. Singtdar, 
Present, - 
Imperf. i 
2dAorist,l 



Present, - 
Imperf. I 
2d Aorist, I 



Present, - 
Imperf. i 
2d Aorist, I 



Dual. 
fu, f, (fi; 7ov, 7ov; 
V, f, ijorw;7ov, Tijv; 
Like the Imperfect 

SUBJUNGTIVfi MOOD. 

^, ?orw; 7ov, 7ov; 



Plttral, 

fMV, 7ff, #1. 
fMV, 7f, 



tf'av. 



fibsv, 7^9 tfi. 



Like the Imperfect Indicative. 
Like the Present Subjunctive. 

OPTATrVE MOOD. 

1JV, ijff, n; l7ov, ij7i|v;^ tifwv, i|7«, ij^av. 
Like the Imperfect Indicative. 
Like the Present Optative. 



CJ^OV. 



u^etv. 



IMFEBATIVB MOOD. 

Present, - — — , oi, 7w; 7oy, luv; — ^ 7f, 
Imperf. i — Like the Impeifect Indicative. 
2d Aorist, I — — , «^oroc, w ; 7wv, 7wv ; ^ — » 7f, 

PASSrVB VOICE. — ^mniCATIVB MOOD. 

Present^ * — fiuxi, tfai, 7ais 4ov; fA«4a, ^^, v7itt. 

Imperfect, f — f&ijv, ^o, 7o; stfovs ^Aigv; f^a* rtt, 7o* 

SUBJUKCnVB MOOD. 

Present, - — (Mu,9orf7,7ai; ^; fi^a, (fhf v7ai. 

Imperfect,! — «• Like the Imperfect Indicative. 

OPTATIVS MOOD. 

Present, - •— jum|v, of, 7o; ^y ^v; fM^o, ^, 7«. 
Imperfect,! — Like the Imperfect Indicative. 

IMPBSATIVE MOOD. 

Present, - — — ,rt;oroo,d'*w; tfd«r,tfd«f ; — ,^^,(flMtfteir. 
bnperfect,! — Like the Imperfect Indicative. 
15 



170 THE pamciPLBs or 

MIDDLE VOICE. — INDICATIVE MOOI 
Tenu, Jug. Root. Singular. Dual, Plural. 

Present and Imperfect like Passive, through a I the Moods. 
'2d Aorist, I — fAYjv, ^O; 7o ; dov, ^ ; fjus^Ai 0'dff, v7o. 

8VBJ17NCTIVB MOOD. 

2d Aoristy i — Sooi, 9 or ^, 7af ; fAsdov, tf^ov ; fi.r^a, tf^s, uv7ou 

OPTATIVE UOOD. 

2d Aorist, i — fMjvt 0, 7o ; ^ov, ^ijv ; fjbsda, tf^6, v7o. 

DCPBBATIVE MOOD. 

2d Aorist, i — — -, ^o(ou) 0'dcj ; tf^ov, tf^uv ; — , <fh^ tf^oHfwt 



RULES, 

1. A verb must agree with its nominative in person and nc. 

2. Adjectives, participles and the article, agree with 
their nouns, in gender, number and case. 

3. Trans, verbs in the active voice govern the accusative. 

4. One noun governs another in the genitive. 

5. Intransitive verbs admit a nominative case after them. 

6. Some nouns are put absolute with a participle. 

7. Adverbs qualify verbs, adjectives and other adverbs 

8. An adjective in the neuter ffender, without a noun tc 
qualify, governs the genitive, and sometimes the dative. 

9. E/f&f and /ivofuxi, signifying property, possession or 
^ttty, govern the genitive. 

10. £/ftf, ymfuu and (^<ctpx"» taken for the Latin haheo 
to have, govern the dative. . 

11. Many verbs govern the genitive and dative. 

12. Prepositions govern the genitive, dative & accusative 

13. Participles govern the same case as their verbs. 

14. One verb governs another in the infinitive. 

15. The infinitive is often used as a noun. 

16. The cause, manner and instrument are in the dative. 

17. The relative 0; agrees with its antecedent in gender 
'•nd number. 



6REBK 6RAMXAB. 171 



ANALYSIS OF MATOAIOT, K5(p p. 

N. G. D. A. r. 
TraiaXaivm. Syntax. Etymology. 

The (r. 1) T-oo Iijtfou, 2 m. 6, rou, ry, rov. — 

when ysvf^6iv1oe 6i conjunction, Indeclinable. 

Jesas, ysr^Mog If}(f-ou, 2m. g. abs. ou^, o (T, ev, ouv, ou. 
being born 7sv-ij4-iv7o^ If}^ou, /if, gv7off, rfvn, /wo, /ij. 

in ffv prep. Bfj^Xs^fjb, Indeclinable. 

Bethlehem, ^ Bij^Xssfjb, Indeclinable, 

of the vy^s 'lou^aiaf, f. 8. fj, 7 ? ^ , 7Jf, 7i}v. — 

Jadea, BifikHik *Iou^ai-af, 1 f. a. cl, a^, ^ ctv, cu 
tn iv prep, ij/utipai;, Indeclinable, 

the days iv htf^p'OLtg, 1 f. pi. ai, ^v, aF^, o^, ai. 

of Heiod ^ifdpeus *Hpud-ou 1 m. s. ^g^ ou, $, i)v, el(^). 
the T9V €cuf0^ug 2m,s. hy 7oi7, 7^, 7ov. — 

King, hiuipoug CeufiX-^cj;, 3 m. s. «uf, :&;(, ^r, /a, su. 
behold, Uou (<fu), verb from si6u, Imper. Mood, 

wise men |&&y-oi ^aps/svovro, o i , uv, oh;, ou;, oi« 

from dt'o (lva7oX£jv prep. Indeclinable, 

the east cl^o c£va7oX-^v 1 f. pi. a(, £»v, aXgf ag^ ai, 

came (jioi/oi ^ap-^-TSv-o-vro rerb, from ^apa/ivofiAi. 

into slg *I«po0'^fjia, preposition. 

Jerusalem, s/; ^ItpotfoXufi.^, 2n. a, uv, oi;, a, a. 
Saying, (2) Afy-o-v7-s;, ft^oi, ov Is ;, wv, oCi^i, ov7a;, &c« 

where itfm IIou adverb, 

is i^T'i'V verb. 87|&?, si(;), f0'7i(v), &c. 

(he) who i c«x^«V2m. S, rov, r$, rov. — 

is to be bom I r«x-^-<fV pcurt. from nxru, &c. 
king €flufiXs-u(, 3 m. d ; , 6;^ i\ cl, 0. 

of the r-GJv *Ioudaiuv2 m. pi. ai, 7 gj v , 70er;, 7o^, — 

Jews I *Iouda(-fiv; 2 m. pl.ai, £)v, oT;, ^6^^ §u 

We hare seen zU-o-iusv d^ri^ verb, from ffiJu or BtSsi^- 
Ncyn.— For parting the verbt^ tee page 238 



173 TBS TWmCtPhEM ov 

for ^tfw yAp sUoiuv conjupctioih 

of him, iltfWpa, aur.ou, 2 m. fe, ou, $^ €»• 

tte r-ov oltfrepa, 2 m. 6, 7ou, <^ r<i», — 

star ei4o(A«v dtfr^p-a, 3 m. ^p, ^poffi <pi, ipa» <p 

in h clvaroX^ preposition, 

the r-^ dvaroT^ 1 f. it c?j^, «'?! «^f "~ 

cast, ^ elva«X.J, 1 f. ^, %» it ^9 4» 

and filiofiiv xew ^Xdofww, conjunction. 

have come (^%) ^-Xdo-fAW rerb, from ^px»M««. 

to worship •'pwr-xuv-ij-crai inf. from •'potriwu&i. 

him. «'po(fxu5i(fai, aJr-^ p. pro. m. •ff, •", V*» •*• 

Heard 'Hp^^iif (3) 'Axou-ifcv [raJlin) verb, from iow. 

when Oxoiifaf 5s conjunction. 

Herod 'HpoJ^-tif oxoutfo^, »l^, ow, ij, i)v, igorcu 

the * pa4i>jsi)€ 2 m. i, «u, T$t *■•»» - 

king j8curiX-8uf 3 m. su^, cgj^, «i to, fw 

he was troubled i-rap&x-^f f"'"^ rop&tftfw. 

and irapdxOfi wl conjunction. ^ 

nil ^otf-a U^potfoXufJuo, •'atf a, off, ?, «w, «. 

Jerusalem, •lepotfoXwfi.-a, 1 f . A, afi ?» A»» A 

^ith (AS*-" avw, preposition. 

him, M«*^ oiJt-ou, per. pro. m. o^, o if, ^, w 

and (4) Kcu conjunction. 

called together tfuv-a/-a/^ irav7aff part, from tfutAyfti. 

all tfuvaya/*^ •'avr-o^, adj. from «tv, ««^a, •'av, fte, 

the «'-«5f 'of X'^P^'i ^n^- ?'• ^•^ ^*» ^^^* T • ^ ft — 

chief priests 'apx^p-sfe 3 pi. m. «h?. «"»! •w<^«f «*^f «%• 

and ^uvayaycl>i^ xai ^wayayChy conjunction. 

scribes tfuvccyoy^i' yfHWiar-«v,3pl.m.6i, «wv, wtfs sTft •%. 

of the T-oOXaou 2 m. i, ^-ou, t$, rov, — 

people ypa(<f.a«a Xo-w* 2 m. V» o^f, ^ w, •. 

asked 'Hpw^ijc l-ww^or-f-ro from «rwvdavoftaj. 

of iriy' OMTm preposition. 

them ^ap' ovr-fiv pro. m. plu. o«, fi v, or^, wft *« 



6BSBX OBAXXAB. 



173 



wheie yiyvS^au new adrerb. 

Che 6 Xpiro^y 2 m. i, rov, «^ rov, 

Christ Xpir-o^7Svva7ai,2in« o;, ou, ^H ov, 

should be born, yswo-roi. verb, from Ttfvao 



They 

and 

said 

(to) him 

in 

Bethlehem, 

(oO the 



(5) OS «I«rov pro. m. plo. o }, ruSr, rof^, roi^^, -i* 
bl conjunction. Indeclinable. 

•S «Rr-ov Terb from 9 «%j« Defective. 



sTVov ovr.^ 2 m. 
4-.^; 'Is Jai«( 1 f. 



Judea, r% (€<r7iv) 'UiaUoLg, 1 f. 
thus T^parroi OttrJi Adr. 
for //womi 7otp ///pmrreu 



It 18 written 
by 
the 

prophet 
And 
thou 

Bethlehem, 
land 
Judea, 
not 

the least 
art 

amongst 
the 



^-7<paMr-rai 

T'ot! «'po9Vov 
S$a nrfo^^n) 1 m. 
(6)Ka; 

tf-6 bT 

7-? If. 

79 *Io^fo 

iXo^t-^ <ft> 1 f. 



kt ou, ^ ov.. 
preposition. 
Indeclinable. 

et, ttff, (f, Av A. 

conjunction, 
verb, from ^po^w. 

preposition. 
I, roC', c^, rov, — 
^ft •«. 'I, 'jv, a 
conjunction. 
^6^ tfou, ^oT, tf/, — 
Indeclinable. 
7^1 ?f» Vf ^9 ^ 






adverb. 

preposition. 
Dative. 



,&e. 



noble princes h iry^tU^fft-v 3 plu. m. 

of Judea, ^fMtf'iv 'Ltj-a 

from ^ tfou preposition. 

you ix tf-oGf pro. 2 pin. tff, tfoi;, ^of, ^ 

for ffTilp i^yj6(f9T(u conjunction. 

shau arise ^f -cXtv^f-roi verb, from i&pxHf^* 



16* 



174 THE ^EIIICIPLB8 OF 

one ruling f^/jtsv-o^ l^sXsutfsroi from ^oufjbcei 

who ^-Tif ^MfiAv^r pion. com. o^and Ttg. 

will piotect ?r«( fi^ifAflcv-fT rerb, from irorfMcfou. 

the r-ov Xa^v 2 m. ^i roCT, ru, rov, -^ 

people rrfMVfT Xtt^otf 2 m. -^, ou, ^, dv, ^ 
of me Xmv jx-oif ptonoan. iyw^ fA o u, fjboi, fii, "-^ 

the r4v *I^p«i)X 2 m. 4, rou, ru, rev, — 

Israel, «rtifAav€r 'ItTpai^X mas. Indeclinable, 

then ^xp/jSiiMrs (7) Tors, Adverb. 

Herod, *Hpwi-^ff, 4xpi^«ir» ijf, ou, ji, i)v, i|or«. 

secretly wtKiifac Xodpd, Adverb, 

having called KaXi^-a5 perfect participle, from xa>iu 
the r-oO^ fjba^o?^ 2 m. ^ ruv, r^, r o u ^, — 

wise men xotXidf^ lux^-ou^, 2 m. p. oi, uv, oi^, o u ;, ei. 
inquired *Hp6ii)p i^'Xpifita-^Sf verb, from 'oxpi/St^M 
of «mpol auruv, preposition, 

them rap«l ftur*£)v pr. m. p^ ol, r u v, roi^, rou^, «L 

the r-ov XP^*^ 2 m. (» riCr, vy, riv, ^^ 

time ^xp^uM ')(pov<w 2 m. ogv «u, ^ ov, i. 

the r-oSi (poivofiivou 2m. i, rou, vy, rov, «— 

shining Xf^* ^wvofUv^v 2 m. »?, • ts ^ ft, i. 
star, ^oivopivoCf *a4fr^*po^. 3 m. ijpy t p o ^, <p», tfpo, fp. 
and (8) Ecu ^oonjunctioB. 

having sent <^fjb^.a^ avrmtg^ pavt. from rsfMru. 

them 4'^ft4;ajsr auroOf 2 m. pL d(, 6y, otSy oCf^ 9k 
into sj( Bs^Xslfi., preposition. ' 

Bethleheoa, afc Be^Xs^fi., Indeclinable, 

he said {vurig) tt^-s verb, from s <u. 

departing* part. <opfiv^ivr.«^, (^f*^^ pvt fvomtrcpSMi 
diligently 'axpi^c3;, adverb. 

search (ifMii;) ig>arouf-a ''a verb, from Ifsro^cj, imp* 
concerning *spi iraiim prepostlion. 

the r>ou ^ouhw 2 Ik v«* to0, r^, ^-o, -^ 

child, «9pi rot^ 4v 2 b. ^, « u, y, •«, w. 



•BBBX ORAVHIK. 176 

and (when) ti ^a/rayyiikouri conjunction. 

you have found supijrtf, aurov, verb, from svpltfxo), 

bring word* • W-a7/«IX*a-W, verb, from airoayyiXw. 

to me Wa^T^iXaW fii-or, 1^, fMu, jAor, fii, -« 

hoMT Wa^^iXar^ ?«'fid( ^wv, conjunction. 

I also x^-76^ compound of xai and syc*. 

going (iyu) iyj^dv part, from ip^oftai. 

mayworship (^/u) ^pod'-xu-v-^tf-u, rerb, from «'po<rxuvf6J« 

him 4rpo0^xuv^a) aur-cjl 2 m. 0;, ou, ^, ^v. 

they'ecMKfoM:^ (9) oi 2 m. pL ^ ruv, roi*^, roi^y — 

and ^axou^ayreg 6s l«ropft/^i}0'av, conjunction. 

having heard *DPcou*0'av-r(;, part.of oxouw. 

the r-ou fia^iksug 2 m. *0y r G, <-$, rov, — 

kipg 'oxoudtevrtf PoufiKfio}^^ 3 m. «v(» ^ eo (, si, ^o, iv. 

d^arted iHropsu^^Yj-tfav Tcrb, from iropsvw. 

and iwopMs^wt xm ^po^sv conjunction. 

lo ! (((m) i^*ou imp» mood, from ii6<,)* 

the 'o Wri)p2m. 'o, roiJ, t$, rov, — 

star 'oiMp f'po^TSv, 3m. tjp, 9po^, «pi, tpo, s p« 

which Wr4p,Jjov 9v Relatire pronoun. 

they Baw (pi) tH^oM h rerb, from Mu. 

in iv 'avaroXii preposition. 

the tJ^ *avftroX^ 1 f. % f%, r^, c^, — 

east ht *avaroX-^ 1 f. f;» ^^, Pt 4* 4« 

led before Wrqp <pH^€v rerby from rpo a^u. 

them rpo^^ffv oiV-qI/^ m. o/, .«jv, oiib, ov^, 

until rpo^^w leo; adrerb. 

being come aM^ M^ part, from ffp^ofi^i. 

it stood enSro^ l^r-i} verb, from IcTr^fM. 

about I«'av6i adverb. 

where l^ri) t? adverb. 

was «r«ijrav f^ verb, fiK>m s/pu. 

the ^ r-o fUBuifov 8 n. r», rou, ru, r o, 

cbiM <aid(^v. j$v 2 n. ov, »£'« $» ^Vf ^* 



176 THE PRINCIPLES OP 

Seeing (10) 'iJovr-g^ (auroi) o v 7 ff ^ , ov7wv, outfi, ov7flt^, ovlsg 

and 6i ^apij^av Conjunction, 

the r-ov d(fTipa 2 m, &, fbui r^, rovi -— 

star 'Uovrs; ob'Wp-a 3 m. ijp* tpo^i (pi, cpo, sp 

(they) rejoiced i-x^^-tfav^ Verb, from x**P*"* 

joy (/*«''') X*P'** ^ f • a, Of, ^, olv, A, 

great fM/aX-i]v x^P<^v ^ '• 

with exceeding. (C^o^p-a ju.6^oiX«)v. Adverb. 

And (11) Kai Conjunction, 

having come (oi) i>JoV-6^ 3 m. Participle, from ip^ofuu. 
into ilg oixiav Preposition, 

the r-i)y o/xiav 1 f. 4, r^;, rji, «* i) v , ~ 

house. «i; o/xi-av If. a,a^, q^av,eL 

(they) found (oi) sS'p-ov <aiJ/oV| Verb, from eupKfxu, 

the r-o ^oidiov 2 n. ro, rou, ^y, ro, — 

child Bupw itcuSl'W 2 lu ovi ou, $« o v , ov. 

with fMTol Map/a^ Preposition. 

Mary, fMrot Mapi-of, If. e^ a^, ^ av, ou 

the <-% fAVpof If- *» r5if, «^, r^, — 

mother furdl M«]r-po^} 3 f. ^pt po^» p'9 p«^ sp. 

of it, M^po^ eiu4-*oii, 2 n. 0, oCi, u, j • 

and iXdovf^; xou ^^stfivrtg Conjunction, 

failing down (01) ^rttfovng 3 m. pi. Part, from ^i^ru. 
(they) worshipped «'po(f-e-xuv-i}-0'av, Verb, from ^potfxuvfu. 
him irpoifSKuvf^av aur-9 2 n. « qu, ^9 0. 

-and, iepo(fsx6vn(fmf Km irpoifeviyxwf Conjunction. * 

having opened(oi) Av-oi^av-rBs Part, from dvwyu. 

the r-ou( ^ijd'aupou^ 2 m. pi. , £)v, 0%, f. 

treasures ^d'aup-oO^ 2m.pl. 0(9 uv, oTj^, ou(, oi 

of them Ma»povg aur-o!)'v, 2 m. pi. u v , 0%, ou;, 

(they) gave (aCroi) «'potf^.vs7x^.v Verb, from ^ip^^pQ. 
(to) him aur-y 2 m. , ou, 9, 6 • 

gifts, ^poo'^s/xav iup-a 2 n. pL a, uv, oi^, a » a. 

gold, «'po^^f70(av yjgM^'iM 2 ro. ^, oi/« u, (fv, < 



177 

and ^^vtf-oi xoi >ij9<tfov. Conjunction* 

franidncense * Xj^av-ov^ 2 m, «;, ou^ u, ov, i 
and Xi/9avov xoi d'ftupvav Con junction. 

myirli.«'f»od'^S7xav tffwpv-ov. If. a* i}^, ^9 av, a. 
And (12) Koi Conjunction, 

being admonished xp^ifi'OMi^d^'^s; Patt from Xf^iuiri^u. 
by xar' ovap Preposition, 

a dream xar* evap Indeclinable, 

not flUaxof^/oi fiii) Adverb, 

to turn back dvet*xafjb«4/-ai Verb, from dvaxofMrro). 

unto <po^ *Hp^ji]v Preposition. 

Herod, rpv; *Hp6d.9|v 1 m. ne^ ov, j;, i}v, aoni 

by 51 b5o5» * Preposition, 

another aXX-^^ ijou 1 f «!, «i ?, jif i}y, i}. 

way ii W-ou. 2f oj, ou, 9, ov, I. 

they retired (m) 6lv-s-;(^p-t}-^-a>v Verb, from dyocxupBu. 
into ffc x^P^^ Preposition, 

the r.i)v x^fMW 1 f. • ^ ??^» ^. ''^v, — 

country W^ x^P*^* ^ ^' ''^v ^* ^» ''^^t ^' 

of them« yfipdy <i6r^v. 2*m. pi. £)v, of;, oCg. 

Having departed (13)'Av(x-x6>'p^0'atv-ruv Part. from'avAxpvcj 
however ^1 Conjunction, 

they d»ax<^^^&'Vnn ovr-Av 2 m. plu. o(, u v, oT;, ou^, 
lo! {(fv) lA-oO, Verb, from A^u. 

(an) angel ikyy8\-os (palvinu e^, oo» C[», ov, 9. 

of the Lord xopltv 2 m. «^, u, ^1 ov, t. 
appeared Sfyyty^i 9flcfv-iH--ai Verb, from faivu. 

by xar' ovap Preposition, 

a dream xftr* 9vap Indeclinable, 

(to) the r^^ldiffifip 2 m. ^, cou, r^, rov, — 

Joseph fafyfroi 'Ic^n^, Dative, proper noun, indclinable 
saying, >i/*cii)v SLyyiX^ Participle, from Xayw. 

awaking, («•«) •Eyjp-^JiV Participle, from l/fipoj. 

take * (^u) ^rapaAjafi'€ Verb, from •'apoXoft^avw 



178 


THE FRINCIPLBS OF 


the 


TO MuJio 2 n. T^, rou, ru, roy — 


chi d irapaXajSfi ^roudi-ov 2 n. ov, ou, $, ov, ow. 


and 


<atSm xou fjwjfl^ipa Conjunction. 


the 


^-^v fjuijr^pa 1 f. ^, TTj^ tJ, ctjv, — 


mother fl'apaXa^fjjL^jq-l-pa 3 f . ^p, po^,- pi, «pa, ^p. 


of it 


inripa aur-oi; 2 n. • o , o w , ^, o. 


and irapaXajSf xcci ^su/c Conjunction. 


flee 


(tfu) 9wy-6 Verb, from ^suyw. 


into 


sb ATtuhtov 2 f Preposition. 


Egypt. 


ilg AiyutT-ov 6^, ou, y, ov, s. 


and 


9wy8 xoi Tcdi Conjunction. 


be (you) 


(0*0) "^'•d-i Imperative, from (ifii. 


there 


id'di Ix-n ' • Adverb. 


tiU 


7^6i iug Adverb. 


shall 


&y «i<r6ii Auxiliary. 


I call 


(I7W) sW'U Verb, from e «'w- 


to you, 


tfintoi 0'-oi Pronoun. 0*0, 0'ou, 0*01, 0*6, — 


will be about fiAX-« Auxiliary. 


for 


9^&p Conjunction. 


Herod 


•HpWitf pfXXfii ii^, ou, Jf, 4v, iJorcL 


to seek 


|mXX5i ^iirfifv Verb, from ^ij«w. 


the 


r-o ii'ai^fov 2 n, ro, rou, ry, r^, — 


child, 


^firsfv roiJi-ov, 2 n. ov, ou, v t ® v> ®** 


to 


^•oi; 2 n. hf rou, •ry, rov, — 


destroy 


(aCrfe) ^wtft-Tsi-ff^fu Verb, from ••a«'oXucd. 


him. • 


a/teoki^ou aik-o. 2 n. ^ , ou, $ , 0. 


He 


(14) '0 wptkoifii 2 m. i, w, r^, rw, — 


however. 


t 5i Conjunction. 


aroused 


[aMs) iysp'A'Sts 3 m. Part, from iysipu. 


took up 


*o ^a^i-'Xap'S Verb, from •'apaXaft/Sovw. 


the 


r-^ ^roiSiov 2 n. An article. 


child ^apOjiPB roudi-ov 2 n. See itouSm above. 


and 


mxidiw xai fAijrepa Conjunction. 


the 


r-»\ ^tjWpa 1 f. ^, T^f, «f, «^v, — 



GREKK GRAICUAS, 






mother «'ap8Xa€a (i>v)r-lpa 3f. 
of it fiijWpa aur-ou 2 d. 

(by) night, Sia, vuxr-o^, 3 f. 
and <rap«Xa)3s xou ^w/s^^sv 
(he) departed *av-f-xwp-)]-(r-/v 
into «/^ Ai^irov 

Egypt; Aiyu*r-ov 2 

And dv6xupii(r^ (lfi)Kaf JS^v 
was (auTof ) Jf-v 

there fv 'oe-sr 

until fcj^ rfXfuv^^ 

the r-^tf cfXfurij^ 1 f. 

end ioig Ts'kBuT'/ie 1 f, 

of HerodyrsXfuri;^ *Hp(^-ov, 1 m. 
that fv 2va «'Xfip€i)d^ 

(it) might be fulfilled «'Xi)p w-^ 
which €'6 p4^ffv 2n 

was spoken t6 p-f)-4-«y 

ik^ Kupiou 

r-ou Kup/ov 2 m. 
k-j Kupiou 2 m. 

&ol «'po9i]roCf 

r-w rpo^Tou 2 m. i, r o u 
Aa rpo9^-ov 1 m. ^;, o v , 



179 

£ 



from 

the 

Lordy 

by 

the 

prophet, 

saying, 

oat of 

Egypt 



pv, p, «pa, 

u, V^» ^ • 
X r f , xW, xra, 

Conjunction. 

Verb, from 'avap^upsu. 

Preposition, 

ou, f', dvy ^. 

Conjunction. 

Verb, from sifju\ 

Adverb. 

Preposition. 

W, •«» JJ, 1JV, i|. 

Conjunction. 
Verb, from rkripwa. 
TO, row, ry, ro, — 
Participle, from pfo). 
Preposition. 
2, rou, c^, riv, — 
d^, ou, $, ^ L 
Preposition. 
ry, rov, — 



f. V, 






Xiyov-TOf rpo^^ofJ «v, V 7 ^ , ov7i, ov7a. 
if A/7^«Tou Preposition. 



iiAlyC^w 2 f 
IhaYeca]led(l7(i^) i-xoX^d'-a 
the r-ov ulov 2 m. 

Son hakBifa Mv 2 m. 

of me. ulov f«..ou. Pronoun. 

Then^aufjL^^))(16)ToW 
Herod, ^HpU-iiSf i66iU)6n 



seeing *H pw^n^, iJ-c5v 



Of, ou, ^, ov, «. 

Verb, from xoXsu. 

2, rou, r^, rov, — 

Of, ou, $, ov, i, 

iyo, f«.ou, uor, f<i, — 

Adverbt 
'nSf ou, jj, ijv, ij 
Participle, from si^«o, nom 



180 THE pamciPLEs of 

chat i^wv on in^aix^n Conjunction, 

he was mocked, ^vscai-x-^-^ Verb, from sfMrai^cj. 

by C^o* fMtywv Preposition, 

the r-wv jxa/uv 2m.pL ii, rwv, ro7f, «:3^,- 

wise men, d«'^ luvyuv 2 m. pL oi, cj v, oi^, o:^^, ot. 
was enraged «-dufi.-w-d-ii ^ Verb, from ^vfidi^. 
exceedingly ; Xiav Adverb, 

and ^^ufMJ^yi xou '(MrogsiXag Conjunction, 

having sent off Wo-r-si-X-o^, Part,, from iwor«XX«. 
killed 'airorsiXflV 'av-«r-X.f Verb, from avoiptu. 

all cavr*^ «'aj3aff 3m. 8^, cjv, 0*1, a;, tp 

the r-ftu^ «'ai3a^ 2 m. ol, rwv, roiV, r u ^, — 

young children «'0(i9-a^, 3m.pl. «f, uv, (Ti, a^, s^ 
that (were) r-ou^ (sJvaj) 2 m. pL ol, ruv, rouTi rou^, -^ 

in iy B)}^Xs£ft, Preposition. 

Bethlehem, * iv Bi}^Xslft, Indeclinable, 

and Bi]dXrifi. xou hpkig Conjunction, 

in hf hpiots Preposition, 

all «'a^-i Iploie 3 n. pL 7a uv, aifi, av7or , ?«(. 

the r-or^ ipioi^ ra, wv, to?^, ra — 

coasts jv &pi*oif 2n. pL a, £iv, oT^, ol, ou 

of it, hplotg a^r-ris^ If. 4, ?^, jj, ^v, ^. 

from 'airo dartXIs Preposition, 

two years *a«r9 Stsr^wg •!, £iv, or^, o&^Ct •<• 

and SiSTws xoti xarwipu^ Conjunction* 

under, (^(fav) xocrcjWpu, Adverb, 

according to xoeinol ^^povov Preposition, 

the r-Sv XP^^^ Article, 

time xard xp***^* ^^* ^9 ^^t ^> <^v, L 

that iipcpP(Mf$ 8-v '#5 Qu, y, ov, — 

he had enquired ij*xp^^-u«tf-9 Verb, from axpi/3ou. 

of rapa fut^wv Preposition, 

the T'^v yMyorv 01, r£iv, rof^, roOf, — 

wise men. «'apa fia/-6i)v. 2m.pl. 01, uv, oi^, ou^, •!. 



6HEEK 6KAMHAR. ISl 

Then lirXijpo^j (17) Tors AidTerb. 

was fulfilled (oi) l-fi'Xiip.cj-^-ii Verb, from v'Xtjpou. 

the thing r-o p9;^«v com. rel. ro, rou, r^, 4-0, -^ 

spoken ro p4^-e*v Participle, from pfw. 

by i>«'o *Iep9fi.iou Preposition. 

Jeremy ^6 *l£p9fi.i-ov 1 ro. r;, v , a, ay, o, 

the r-ou rpo^^ou 2 m. '0, rou, r^, rov, — 

prophet, t^9 rpo^^-po, 1 m. tjj, ou T^i iiv, a. 

saying, Xl/ovr-o^, v'po^^ou, uv, ov7of, ov7i, ov7a, wv. 

A voice (18) *«v-i) ^xou(rdii 1 t i^, ?ff, J, *jv, ij. 
in iv *PafjM Preposition. 

Bhama ^ *Pafi.a 

was heard, 9ejv4 ^-'^^-^'^-''l* Verb from cUoucj* 

lamentation Bprptag ipto6(f&n 2 m. 0^, ov, ^, ov, t. 

and 6p^os xai xXau^fto^, Conjunction, 

seeping xXav^fi.-o^ ^xoutf^i) 2 m« o; ,* oiT, y, ov, i. 

and xXov^fM^ xai Uvpfto^, Conjunction, 

wailing Mvpfii-o^ 4xou(f^i) 2m. 0^, ou, ^, ^v, L 

mnch, ff'oX.uf , j&pjM^ 2 m. C^, oT, $, vv, v. 

Sachel *Fa;^X xXRioutfa fem. Indeclinable* 

weepmg *P«x^ xXaUu-<f-a Present part, from xKouu. 
(for) the r^ Wxva 2 n. ro, rwv, ro?^, rA, — 

children xXaioutfa Wxv-a 2 n. a, wv, of^, a, a. 

of her mva a^-% fem. ^t ^^» ^ 4v, 4« 

and xXftiouo'a xai ^sXf Conjunction, 

not {^9X5 oux Adrerb. 

would *Pa;^X ^-dsX-f Verb, from ^sXcj. 

to be consoled «'ap-axX«ii-tf^-va/ Verb, from «'apaxaXfiu 
for {^sXf MM Conjunction, 

not iki ovx Adrerb. 

(they) are (auroi) 1/0*1. Verb, from Afu. 

having die£(19) T^Xsur^tfavr-o; 3m. Part, from rsXsvroflj 
however, ^ Coiijunction. 

the • r-oC 'Hp^iou 2 m. 6, roCf, rw, c^v, — 

16 



182 



THE PRINCIPLES OP 



Herod, 'Hpw3-ou, TsksvT^tfavros viSt « «» > ^ » iv, ij 

behold, (Cu) i5-ou Imperative from Ii5«. 

the angel ayys'k-'fig, ^ivsrat 2m. o^, ou, u, ov, 8. 



oftheLordoyysXo^ Kupr-ou 2 m* 

by xar' ovap 

a dream xa4' ovap 

appears ayyeXof ^ai-v-s-r-oi 

(to) the r-9 'Ifij(fi)({> 2 m. 

Joseph (pouvsrm 'lutfi)^ 

in ^v AJy6ifT(fi 

Egypt Iv A^yu^Tw 2 f, 

saying, (20) Aiy-uv ayysXo^ 3 m. 



0^9 ou, cj), ov, e. 

Preposition. 

Indeclinable. 

Verb, from ^oivu. 

}, rou, rw, rov, — 

Indeclinable. 

Preposition. 

0^, ou, b), ov, 6, 

Part., from Xjyw. 



being arisen, ((fu) 'E/gp-^-si-^, Participle from lygipw. 
take up (tfu) •'ap-A-XajS-g Imp., from flrapaX/Jtft^avw. 



If. 
3f. 
2n. 



the f-^ cmjiov 2 n< 

young child ^ouSi-ov 2 n. 

and ratSm xai fi.iiWpa 

the ^-^ fMjr^pa 

mother flrap&Xa^fi ftiiri-pa 

of it ffciiripa aur-ou 

and fl'apaXajSs xai ropeuou 

depart (tfu) «'opsu-ou 

into «fe y5jv 

the land sfe y-?v 1 f. 

of Israel, y^jv Itfpa^X, 

have died oJ rfi-dv^-a-Ci 

for •'opsuou yap rsdvijxatfi 

they 

seeking for 



ro, rou, r^, ro, — 
ov, ou, ^, ov , ov. 
Conjunction. 

%• poff> PS ^P^i *P* 
ov, ou, w, ov, s. 
Conjunction. 
Verb from «'opevofwu. 
Preposition. 

Indeclinable. 
Verb, from ^Cx«. 
Conjunction. 
o-J rsdvTjxotfj 2 m. p. o 1 , rwv, rof^, rouff, — 
^firo^v-rsg oT Participle, from ^ijrsw. 



the r-^v ^"X^v 1 f. 

life ^'nnxjvTtc ^"X-^^ ^ f" 

of the r-ou ff'ai^tou 2 n. 

young child •i'VX^ ' «'aidi*ou. 2 n. 



4» *^^i ^t «'^v, — 

ro, roff «'5, ro, — 
See ^roi^iov above. 



GREEK GQAMHAR. 183 



•inANNOT. Ke> a. 

(1) 'Ev ^9XV ?^ ^ ^oyofj ^ 5 Xoyof r;v 

( I) In (the) beginning was the Word, and the Word was 
(1) In principio erat Sermo, et Sermoerat 

fpos rov ©eov, xai Osog ?v & Xoyo^» (2) OSVoff fv 
with (the) God, and God was the Word. This ( Word) was 
apud Deum, que Deus erat ille Sermo. Hie (Sermo) erat 

9J df')Qi fl'po^ rov 050V. (3) Ilavra ^i' au- 

in (the) beginning with (the) God. All (things) by this 
in principio apud Deum. Omnia per hunc 

rw iyivSTo* xai x^p'V olvtou iyivsro ou5s 

(Word) were made ; and without him was made nothing 
(Sermonem)factar8unt; et absque eo factum -est nihil 

yeyovsv. (4) 'Ev aurw ^wij ?v xai ^ ^wig ^v ro 
that was made. In him life was, and the life was the 
quod factum- sit. In ipso Tita erat, et vita erat ilia 

(^2g tCjv 'avdpciSivcjy. (5) Kai n (pSis iv rji (fxorta 

light of the men. And the light in the darkness 

lux hominum. Et ista lux tenebris 

9afv8f, xoj ii d'xoria aJro ou xocr^XajSsv. (6) 

shinetfa, and the darkness it not comprehendetb 
lucet et tenebrcB earn non comprehenderunt 

*Eyivsro fivipUMe^g W9ra^^vo;«'apol08ou' ovojxa avr^ 

There was a man sent from God; the name of whom 

Exstitit homo missus a Deo; nomen cui 

*I&)avvv](. (7) OZr^e rjkisv slg ftaprupfav *va \MpTvpffiari 
John. He came for a witness that he might testify 

Joanne» Is yenit ad testimonium ut testaretur 



184 THB PRIIfCIPLSB OF 

itspl «£f 9wro^, iva v'ctvrs^ iei^s\t(f(*i(fi ^C 

concerning the light, that all (men) might helieve through 
de ilia luce, ut omnes crederent per 

aurou. (8) Oux ^v Ixsrvo; ro (gSi£ aXX* Tva 

him. Not he was this the light, hut (he was sent) that 

eum. Non erat ilia lux, sed (missus est) ut 

fiAprup^^ «rspi Tou^wnfe. (9)^Hv co q>w^, ro 

he might testify concerning the light. It was the light, the 
testaretur de ilia luce. (Hie) erat lux, ilia 

*aX*i^ivov, Z 9Gjr(^(i <oivra avdp&M'ov jp^ofjbffvov Big r«v xo(ffMv. 

true that lighteth all men coming into the world. 

▼eraquffiilluminatomnemhominem yenientem inmundum. 

(10) '£v ro) lotf'fi.Go 'Jv xm 'o xotffAO^ 6i* aurou ^Wo" 
In the world (he) was and the world by him was made, 
In mundo erat et mundus per eum factus est, 

KOI 'o xoiffMf aurov oi)x l^o). (11) £/^ rd i^ia i}>jds, 
and the world him not knew. Unto the his own he came, 
sed mundus eum non agnorit. Ad sua yenit, 

xai oS 7^101 aiSrov oJ «'ap^Xa)3ov. (12)''Od'M ^ 
and the his own him not receiyed. As many (as) but 
et sui eum non exceperunt. Quotquot autem 

IXajSbv ai>rov, IJajxsv aJrofjp l|ou^ioef rfxva 9«ol)i 
received him, he gaye to them power children of God 
exceperunt eum, dedit eis jus (ut) filii Dei 

to become (even) to them (that) belieye on the name of him; 
smt facti (nempe) iis (qui) credunt in nomen ejus; 

^13) 07 ouk i^ aSfMtrcjv o\tdi ix 6ekfiiMxroe ^apxog 
W^'ch not of blood nor of the will of the 
I4U1 nop ex sanguine neque ex libidine camis 



GREEK aSAMMAR. 165 

nor of the will of men, but of God were bom. 
neque ex libidine yiri, sed ex Deo geniti sunt. 

K^ 'o Xoyoff ^apf iyiver^' xau i(rxf\}fu<ftv iv ^fwv (km 
And the Word flesh became ; and dwelt among us (and 
£t ille Sermo caro factus est ; et commoratus est inter nos (ct 

we beheld the glory as of the only begotten 

spectayimus ejus gloriam ut unigeniti 

«'apa narpo^,) v'Xfipiif '^apiro^ xai *aXt)^«ia^. (15) 'I&)avvTi( 
of the Father,) full of grace and truth. . John 

a Patre,) plenis gratia ac veritatis. Joannes 

fueprupci <«pi aurouy xai xixpa/s, Xi^euv, Ouro; 

bear witness concerning him, and he cried, saying. This 
testatus est de eo, et clamavit, dicens^ Hie 

V ft ffVpy* •© Mifbi jxoo ipxofi€vos 

was (he) of whom I spoke ; he (that) after me cometh, 
erat quibus dicebam; is (qui) pone me yenit, 

IjfMTpo^^^ fMU yiywiv* Sn ^pOmg fMu ^v. (16) Kai 

prefened before me is ; for before me he was. And 

ante^positos mihi est; quia prior me erat. Et 

ix rw *\yi^iuur96 auroCf iiiuTg favTSg iXaj3ofi.sv, xou X'^P'^ 
of the fullness of him we all haye receiyed, and grace 
ex plenitudine ipsius nos omnes aceepimus, et gratiani 

*amX»pir«(. (17) "On 'o vofw^ StSLMuxfiug Wo^* 

for grace. For the law by Moses was giyen ; (but) 

pro gratil. Nam ilia lex per Mosen data est; (sed) 

che grace and the truth by Jesus Christ came, 
gratia et yeritas per Jesum Christ unj praestita est 
16* 



186 THE PRINCIPLES OF 

(18) 0eov ou5«iV Iwpaxfi ^C)nrofS' 'o liAvoysvrjg u7oj 

God no one hath seen ever; the only begotten Son. 
Deuin nemo Tidit unquam ; ille unigenitus Filius, 

*9 fiv B)g rov x^X«rov rov Ilarpo^, ixsTvog i^yriffctro, 
whd being in the bosom of the Father, he hath declared. 
qii est in sinu Patris, ille exposuit (eum.) 

/19) Eai avmi ig'lv f) fAaprvpia rov ^luawovy ors dirig-stkax 
And this is the record of the John, when sent 
Atqne hoc est testimonium Joannis, quum miseruni 

oi *Iou^aroi l| *l8poo'oXufMi)v *Up6i<s xeu Asutra;, 7va 
the Jews from Jerusalem Priests and Levites, that 
JudflBi Hierosolumis Sacerdotes et Le vitas, ut 

:p6jr^(fei}(fiv auf-ov, 2t) rig sT; (20) Keu ^fjboXoyi)(r£ 
they might ask him, Thou who art ? And he confessed 

interrogarent eum, Tu es qui? Et professus est 

xcu oux ^pv^tfaro, xcu ^/xoX^^Cev *Ori, oux f/ai iyd 'o 
and not denied, and confessed; That, not am I the 
que ne negavit, et professus est ; Ut, noo sum ego ille 

Xpirof. (21) Ka« ^p«nj<rav aucov, T*, «fv, 'HXia^ 
Christ. And they asked him, Who, therefore, Elias 

Christus. Et interrogaveruot eum. Quid, ergo, Elias 

sT (fv ; Km Xiyfi, Oux s/fw, *0 «rpo^«i*T)^ ef <fu ; 
art thou ? And he said. Not I am. The prophet art thou ? 
es tune ? Et dixit, Non sum. Propheta es tu ? 

Km d^rexpidij, OU. (22) Efcov ofv oikw, Tip W 
And he answered, No. They said then to him, Who art 
Atque respondit, Non. Dixerunt ergo ei, Quis es 

(fv; as'oxpKriv Tva 6wfA€v roTg ir^^a(fiv 

thou an answer that we may give to them (who) sent 
tu'^ respon^am ut demus is (qui) misenint 



6RIBK GRAKMAR. 187 

nfi«r rt Xiysie fl-gpi (fsavTov ; (23) "E^t], 'Eyw 

us; what sayest (thou) of thyself? He said, I (am) 
uos ' qaid dicis de teipso? Ait, (sum) 

the voice (of one) crying in the wilderness. Make straight 
vox (unius) clamantis in deserto, Gomplanate 

the way of the Lord, as said Esaias the prophet. 
viam Domini, ut dixit Esaias propheta. 

(24) Kou o7 oUrsroXfb^vof, f^av ^x ruv ^apufaluy 

And they (which) were sent, were of the Pharisees. 
Vero lis (qui) missi faerant, erant ex Pharisssis. 

{25) Kcei np^<^av aurov, xou $Tmv aiSfy, T/, 
And they asked him, and said to him, Why, 
£t interrogaverunt eam^ ac dixerunt ei, Cur, 

oSv, j3a«Ti^sI^, si (fu oCx it *o Xpiro^/ oi^^^ 

therefcve, baptizest thou, if thou not art the Christ, nor 
ergo, baptizas, si ta non es ille Christus, neque 

*H>ia(, ow« h rpo^^v^; (26)'Artxpi^ avroTg h 'Iwawtj^, 
Elias, nor the prophe' ? Answered them the John, 

Elias, neque ille prophe'. a? BespondiC iis Joannes, 

X^uv« *EyC^ I3a/^l^u h ZSa/rr itJ^og hi ufjLuiy 

>Ayingf I baptize with water; in the midst but of you 
dicens, Ego baptizo aqua ; (in) medio vcstrum 

Irnxfv Sv djubsiip oux ol6aT8» (27) AMg ig'iv, 6, 

standeth (one) whom ye not know. He (it) is, who, 

sta' (anas) quem vos non nostis. Ille (hie) est, qui, 

M(fu) jxou, Ipp^ofovo^, 0^ IfMrpotf'^v imu ^fywfv' 0? iyCt ovx sJfiJ 
after me, coming, who before me is ; I not am 

pond me,venient. qui antepositus mihi est ; ego non sum 



L88 TUB PKINC1PLB9 OF 

afioff Vva yjntui aucou «'iv Ijuiavra •'ou 

ivorthy thit I should unloose of him the latchet of the 
dignus ut solvam cujus corrigiam 

C^od^fj^arof. (28) Toura Iv Bri&al^apq, iyivsvTo «'^pav rou 
shoes. These things in Bethahara were done heyond the 
solearum. Htec in Bathahara facta sunt secus 

*Iop5avou, OflTou rjv luayyrig jSairrj^wv. (29) Tjj iiraCpiw 
Jordan, where was John baptizing. The next day 

Jordanem, ubi Joannes baptizabat. Postero die 

jSX/^6i & *l<*)aLvv7is rov 'ifid'ouv ipyo^t^ov «'po^ avrov, xcu >i^9iy 
seeth the John the Jesus coming unto him, and he said, 
videt Joannes Jesum yenientem ad se, et dixit, 

"iSs eLfjbvo^ rw @sou i a'pGJv njv ajxapriav rou 

Behold the lamb of the God that taketh away the sins of the 
Ecce agnus Dei qui tollit peccatum 

joC/xou. (30) OZr6g Itfn irspi ou iyw sSrov, 'OiriVw jxou fp;(Crai 
world. This is (he) of whom I said, After me cometh 

mundi. Hie est de quo dicebam, Pond me renit 

dvi)p Ig Sit/irpo(fAh ftou ^'^ovfv* on ^pSirig fMV 

a man which preferred before me is ; for before me he 

yir qui antepositus mihi est; quia prior me 

fjv. (31) K^'7^ ^^ V^^^ &urov, dXX' "va ^avspGJ^^ 

was. And I not knew him, but that he should be made 
erat. Et ego non noveram eum, sed ut manifestus 

ry *I(fpafi\ 6td, rouro f Xdov iyCi iv r$ ZSart 

manifest to the Israel, by which am come I with the water 

Israeli, propterea yeni ego per aqua 

iScMTTi^wv, (32) Koi lfi«pTvpticf«v *Iuavvi)^, Xiywv, "On 
baptizing. And bare record John, saying. That 

baptizans. Et testatus est Joannes, dicens, Ut 



GlEBK GRAKMAX. 189 

r^ia^uou ro nvsujxa xarapaTvw Ci^ei rspisfpav, ij^ oupavou, 
I saw the Spirit descending like a dove, from heayen, 
conspezi Spiritum descendentem quasi columbamezcoelo, 

xoi i^iawev lir* aurov. (33) Kq^'yci) oux ji6siv aurov oLXX* 
and abode above him. And I not knew him but 

etiam mansit super eum. Et ego non noveram eum sed 

(he) who sent me to baptize with water, the same unto me 
qui missit me baptizare aqua, ille mihi 

sTrsvj *£9* ov av ISjic ro Jlytviui xara^aTvov 

said, Upon whom shalt thou see the Spirit descending 

dixerat, Super quem videris Spiritum descendentem 

xeH fiivov i^* aurov, oZrog i^iv I ^a/fri^w 

and remaining on him, the same is (he) that baptizeth 
et manentem super eum, hie est qui baptizat 

hf HvsCiion &/^). (34) Kt^Y^ ^upaxoty xou fMftapruptjxa 

with Ghost Holy. And I saw, and bare record 

Spiritu Sancto. Et ego yidebam, et testor 

on ou-roff Jf'V J v)os cou ©gov. (35) T^ Jcaupiov coXiv 

that he is the Son of the God. The next day again 

ille est Filius Dei. Postero die iterum 

$l^fix€i I 'lu&yrnCf xa) ix fiuv iLaArirOv ourol; Soa. (36) Kcd 
stood the John, and of the disciples of him two. And 
stabat Joannes, et discipulis ejus duo. Et 

if*^Xi^|/aff fi^ 'l9}^o(; 4rf pMrorouvroiy Xi/fJ, "ISt h 

looking (upon) the Jesus walking, he said, Beho.d the 
intuitus Jesum ambulantem, dixit, Ecce ille 

dikvlg rou OboU. (37) Ko^ ^uCav awou oS Svo ^M&rirm 
Lamb of the God. And heard him the two disciples 

A.gnus Dei. Et audierunteum illi duo discipuli 



190 THE PRINCIPLES OF 

XaXouvf-o^, xa) ipcikov&rKfav ru> ^Iri^ov. (38) Sf ocupei^ 6^ h 
speaking, and they followed the Jesus. Turned then the 

loquentem, et sequuti sunt Jesum. Conyersus verd 

*lri(fovgj xoi ^fa(faf^svD^au4'ou^ olxoXoudouvra^, 'kiysi awoTs^ 
Jesus, and saw them following, and said unto them, 
Jesus, et yidebat eos sequentes, dicit eis, 

(39) Ti ^riTsTre ; 0\ Ss sT^ov aurw, 'PajS/Si, (o 
What seek (ye)? They and said (unto) him, Habbi, (which 
Quid qusritis ? Illi ver6 dizerunt ei, Habbi, (quod 

yJysToUf lpfjbi]vsvsvofi$vov, SidoufxakSy) «'ou p4v6is ; 

IS to say, being interpreted. Master,) where dwellest thou ^ 
dicitur, interpreters, prseceptor,) ubi moraris ? 

(40) Ai/ei aurorf,*Epx«tf^fi XOI Wffrt. ^RKAov xou 
He saith unto them, come and see. (And) they came and 

Dicit eis, yenite et videte. (Et) yenerunt ae 

sSiov 4rou (xivsr xa)4rap'aCTb)Efjb£fvavr4v4fiipav^xsfviiv* 
saw where he dwelt; and with him abode the day that; 
yiderunt ubi moraretur ; et apud enm manserunt diem ilium; 

Cjpa Si ^v &g 6sxa/rvi» (41) ^Hv 'AvSpioLg^ i 

hour for it was about the tenth. Was Andrew, the 

bora enim erat quasi * decima. Erat Andreas, 

A$6k(pog XliMvog HirpoVj sTg ^x rcjv Sua rwv dxou^&vruy «'apot 
brother Simon Peter, one of the two the hearing with 
frater Simonis Petri, unua ex duobus (qui) audierunt cum 

luavvoCi, xou 'axoXou^ijO'dcyruv ai3r^. (42) Bipitfxsi oZrog ^pSmg 
John, and followed him. Findeth he first 

Joanne, et sequuti erant eum. Inyenit hie prior 

rov ^oSbTsj^ov rov ISiov Si/xajvot, 
the brother the own Simon, 
fratrem suum Simonem 



xai 


yjysi 


aj5«i, 


and 


saith 


^unto) him. 


et 


dixit 


ei, 



GREEK GRAMMAR. 101 

ECp^jxafASv rov Metftfiav^ I iifrij |M^£pfMi\fuo|i.svovy 

We have found the Messiah, which is, being interpreted, 
Inyenimas ilium Messiam, quod est, si interpreteris, 

h Xpt^Tog. (43) Kai r/ytvysv aurov €pog rov 'IiitfolTv. 
the Christ And he brought him unto the Jesus, 

ille Christns. Et adduzit eum ad Jesum. 

*£fi.jS>i 4^0^ i^ ovfiu h 'IijifoiVy sJitSf 16 bT 2ifMJv 
Beheld and when him the Jesus, he said, Thou art Simon 
Intuitus autem eum Jesus, dixit, Tu es Simon 

i vlog *Iuva' €u xkn&iiifri Kij^o^y ^ 

the son of Jona ; thou shalt be called Cephas, which (is) 
Filius Jon&; tu yocaberis Cephas, quod (est) 

Ipfi^vsusreu, 4r^rpof. (44) Tj} i^aipm 4fiiKfi€$^ h 'If). 
by interpretation, a stone. The next day would the Je- 
si interpreteris, petra. Posterodie Toluit Je- 

ifou^ l^sXdsJv «/^ r^v FoXiXalav* xai ffdpio^i ^iXiir^'ov, xoi 
6U8 go forth into the Galilee ; and findeth Philip, and 
8U8 abire in Galilsam ; et invenit Philippum, et 

yiyu av4^i, 'AxoXov^A fMi. (45) ^Hv hi I «iXi4r«'o^ Atl 
saith to him, Follow me. Was now the Philip of 
dixit ei, Sequere me. Erat autem Philippus ex 

By^adidiy he r% le^ug 'Avdp^ou xoj n^rpou. (46) E^piVxffi 
Bethsaida, of the city of Andrew and Peter. Findeth 
Bethsaida, civitate Andres et Petri. Invenit 

Philip the Nathaniel, and saith unto him, (Him) of whom 
Philippus Nathanaelum, et dixit ei, (Ilium) de qud 

iypa^s Moxfvi^ iv «-$ vojjb^ xai ol ^'po^^ai, fdp^itfuv, 
wrote Moses m the law and the prophets, we have found, 
scripsit Moses in lege et prophets, .'nvenimus. 



192 THB PBINCIPLES OF 

IflO'ouv «-ov diro No^apsV. (47) Eai sTrsv a'Jr^ No^avai)) 
Jesus the of Nazareth. And said to him Nathaniel 

Jesus ex Nazareth. £t dixit ei Nathanael 

Ex No^ap^ SCvarai ri dyoAwi sTvcu; Aiyst o^ry 

Out of Nazareth can any good (thing) be ? Said to him 

Ex Nazaretha potest aliquid boni esse ? Dixit ei 

4>(Xi«'4ro^, *£pX^^ ^^ '^^* (^) ^^^'^ *® 'Ii}^ov^ rov Na^vai)X 
Philip, Come and see. Saw the Jesus the Nathaniel 

Philippus, Veni et Tide. Vidit Jesus Nathanaelum 

ip^^o'fi^vov «'po; fli^rov, xou \iySi «'(pj aurou, 'Ids dXrfiui 
coming unto him, and said of him, Behold indeed 
▼enientem ad se, et dixit de eo, Ecce rerd 

*hpar[KiTyie h $ S^kag oux fp. (49) A^i aJr$ Na- 
an Israelite in whom deceit not is. Said to him Na* 

Israelita in quo dolus non est. Dixit ei Na- 

^avai^X, no^fv fU yndoitxBic; 'Atfixpi^ *o *lri(fw£ 

thaniel, Whence me knowest thou ? Answered the Jesus 
thanael, ITnde me nostil Eespondit Jesus 

xou sTiesv ai}rbi, IIpo rou <fi ^fXi«'«rov ^uv^o'ai, Svra M 
and said to him, Before that thee Philip called, being under 
et dixit ei, Priusquam te Philippus yocaret,quum esses subter 

n)v (Tux^v, sTSoy <ti. (50) 'Avsxpttfi) Na4avai)X xou Xi^i 

the fig tree, I saw thee. Answered Nathaniel and said 

ficum, Videbam te. Eespondit NathanaCl et dixit 

aJfl-w, *Pa/3i8i, tfu rf •© yAhi" rw eso^* tfu bT 
unto him, Eabbi, thou art the Son of the God; thou art 
ei, Eabbi, tu es Filius Dei; tu es 

'o PouftkBvg rov 'UpaiiK. (51) 'ArexpttTj 'Iijtfou^, xai sT^rtv 

the king of the Israel. Answered Jesus, and said 

rex ille Israeli Eespondit Jesus, et dixit 



GREEK GRAMMAR 193 

to him. Because I said to tbee, I saw thee under the £g tree, 
ei, Quia dicebam tibi, Vidi te sub ficu, 

*i!(irsu9ig\ Msi^u rouronr t\tSu 

believest thou ? Greater (things) (than) these shalt thou see. 
credis? Majora istis yidebis 

(68) Kai UyB% oiVb), *Afi,4v, (£f«ii)vy Xi/u ^ftrv, *A<r* 
And he said unto him, Verily, verily, I tell you. After 
Pfieterea dixit ei, Amen, amen, dico Yobis, Ab 

apn t\f9ff^9 Tov oupavov clvs^ora, xai rou^ d^^O^ 

now thou shalt see the heavens opened, and the angels 
hoc yidebitis ccelnm apertum, et angelos 

rou 0SOU dvajSaivovro^ xoi xa/raPalvowac M rov v/ov rou 
of the God ascending and descending upon the Son of the 
Dei ascendentes et descendentes super Filium 

Man. 
Hominis. 



PAUL'S DEFENCE BEFORE AGRIPPA. 
Ilpaf 1^, Kfi9. xf'. — Acta, Cap. XXVI. — ^Acts, Chap. XXVI. 

(1) *Aypntffa^ i^ €ple rov IlauXov f^i], ^Eirirpi^srai 
Agrippa then unto (the) Paul said, (it) is permitted 
Agrippa tum Paulo dixit, permittitur 

0*01 Mp (fsawov yjysn^ T6t6 I IlauXo^ WsXoTsrro, 
to thee for thyself to speak. Then the Paul defended himself 
tibi pro teipso dicere. TuncPaulus hie defensione usus 

hcreivag r^v j^srpa. (2) Ilspi «'&wwv c5v 

extending the hand. Concerning all (tbings) of which 
est extensa manu. Super omnibus de quibus 

17 



194 THE PRI«C1PI.£S OF 

JyxaXoufjtai M 'Iou5aiwv, ^otCiX^ "AypiVflro, %^/Jkxi 
( am accused by (the) Jews, 0, kiog Agrippa, I think 
postulor a Judaeis, rex Agrippa, cogtto 

ijubaurov ^oxapiov f&^XXuv i^^irokoysMaj i^ci (fov 

myself happy (that) I am about to defend myself before you 

me beatum (quod) sim dicturus apud te 

(fijf^ffpov' (3) MaXiCra yvCitfryiy ?wa (fi ^avrow twv 
this day : Especially knowing being you in all things which 
hodie: Mazimd gnarum sciam quod te omnium quae 

(are) among Jews, manners and the customs. Therefore 
(sunt) apud Judaeos, rituum et questionum. Ideo 

Sioiuil <f6v fjboxpoduf^cj^ dxoitfai fiou. (4) T^v iih ouv 

I pray you patiently to hear me. The truly, therefoie, 

rogo te (ut) patienter audias me. Itaque vitam 

manner of life of me the from (my) youth, the from (the) 
actam meam a juventute, a 

'apx^ff yffvofi./v«jv Iv rt} Idvgi (X^u iv 'I^jpe- 

beginning which was at first in the nation of me m Jeru* 
principio quasque fuit in gente mea in Hiero- 

CoXyfAoif, l(fouft ^&vrsg o1 'lou^otTor (5) Ilpoyivwtfxovr^f fjbt 
rusalem, know all the Jews ; (That) know me 

solymis, sciunt omnes Judaei ; (Qui) noverunt me 

oivcj^sv iav 6iXu<fi jubaprvpeiv,) ^ri xara 

from the beginning (if (they) would testify,) that af^er 

a majoribus (si velint testari,) secundom 

r7)v dxpt^stfTo^v aipstfiv rug f;fi.e<r^pa^ dp9](fx€ia^i 
the most rigorous (and) strict of the our sect of religion, 
illam exquisitisiman nostras heresin religionis, 



GREEK GRAMMAS. 195 

elijA'a ii.api<f a'o^ (6) Kai viJv itr^ i\*i6t rrjg 

I lived a Pharisee. *And now for hope which the (was) 
vixisse Pliarisficum. Vero nunc ob spem 

cpof Tojg varipag iifayyeXiag yffvofxivjjf uato tov Gsov^ 

unto the fathers (of the) promise constituted by the God, 

patribas promissionis facts a Deo, 

6(rTijxa(Dcfcctive) xprvo/xsvo^' (7) EiV ^v TO ^cjJexa^uXov 
1 stand (and) am judged ; To which the twelve tribes 
sto in judicium ; Ad qnem duodecim tribus 

flpLUv ^v ixTSvla viixra xai ifUpav "karpsvov kX^i^st xaravTritfaf 
of as constantly night and day serving hope to come , 
Dostrse perpetuo nocte et die servientis sperant perventuras ; 

trept ^g IXri6of JyxaXoufAai,i3a(fi>^u*AypiVflra,uflroTGjv'Iou3a/wv« 
for which hope I am accused, O king Agrippa, by the Jews, 
de qua spe postular, rex Agrippa, a Judaeis. 

(8) Ti &<fi(fTQy xplvSTou nrap^ u/xrv, el 6 

Why incredible should (it) be judged by you, that the 
Quid incredibile judicatur apud vos, qu5d 

eeog vsxpoOg hysipn ; (9) 'Eyw fjtev ouv 

God should raise up (the) dead ? I even therefore 
Deus exchet mortuos ? (Ego) equidem statueram 

Ifucurcji, ^phg ro ovofMC *Ii}<fou rou Na^copoe/ou 

with myself, against the name of Jesus of the Nazareth 

apud adversus nomen Jesn Nazareni 

isn roXXot Ivavria ^pS^cu. (10) **0 xai 

taught many (things) hostile to practice. Which also I 
multa contraria facere. Quod etiam 

Iroi^jtfa iv 'UpotfoK^iuotg xai roXXoOff rwv dytuv Jyw 9uXaxa% 
performed in Jerusalem, and many of the saints I in prisons 
feci in Hierosolymis, et multus sanctorum ego carceribus 



196 THE PRINCIPLES OF 

confined, which from the Chief Priests, authori:y 
inclusi, a principibus Sacerdotum, potestate 

XajScjv' dvaipoujmivcjv rs ojjtuv 

having obtained; being put to death and when they 
accepta ; interimerentur et quam 

xarrpfsyxa 4'0]q)ov. (11) Kou xariL *futaji Tag ifwayoty^ie 

I gave against (them my) voice. And in all the synagogues 

tuli (ab eis) suSragium. Ac per onmes synagogas 

often punishing them, I compelled (them) to blaspheme ; 
sepe puniens ipsos, coegi ad blasphemandum ; 

exceedingly and being mad against them, I persecuted them 
sapramodum et furens ad versus eos, persequutus sum 

xoj rag i^t»i roXsi^* (12)*Ev oTg xai ropsuoftevog 

even also (to) the foreign cities. Thro' which as I passed 

etiam in ezteras civitates. Inter quae etiam proficiscens 

elg r^v AayMtfxov f&er* i^ou(fias xou k^trporrig vt^ ^rapdt 
into the Damascus with authority and commission from 
Damascum cum potestate et procuratione a 

rm Vp^fSp^uv, (13) *HfAffpa^ fted^^I^y xecrcl n^v i^ov, fiSovy 
the Chief Priests, Day at mid, in the way, I saw, 

principibus sacerdotum, Die medio, in via, vidi, 

jSotfiXsu, cCpavo^gv Mp riQv Xo/MTpov^ra rou jjXiou, 

king, from heaven above the brightness (of) the sun, 

rex, coelitus qu» superans splendorem solis, 

^rspiXofju^v jxs 9&3^ xaf roug (fuv iyMt ^opsnoiidywg 

shining around me a light, and those with me journeying. 

circumfudit me lucem, et eos cum me iterfaciebant 



GBEEK GRAMMAB. 197 

(14) naw(jv S^ Kara*S(f6vTuv ffiiuy ilg rfjv ^, 

Ail and when having fallen of us upon the earth, 
Omnes autem quam decidissemus in t^rram, 

ffxoutf'a 9C1JV19V XoXouO'av ^rpo; fM| xai yjyovffeof f jj *£> 
I heard a voice speaking unto me, and saying (in) the He* 
audivi vocem alloquentem me, ac decentum He- 

PpatSt SiOikBxrUj 2aovkf SoouX, rl ps 6iCnt8tg ; 

brew dialect, Saul, Saul, why me persecutest (thou) ? 
braica lingua, Saul, Saul, quid me persequeris ? 

<fx\T,p^ (foT ir^g xivrpa Xoxr^^siv* (15) 'EycJl Ji sfrov, 

Hard for you against (such) power to kick. I and said, 
doram tibi contra 8timuk)t ealctrare. Ego autem dixi, 

TiV ^r KCpis ; h a $i*9Vf 'E/c^ elf^i IykTou^ ov 

Who art (thou,) Lord? he and said, I am Jesus whom 
Quis es, Domini 1 ille et dixit, Ego sum Jesus quem 

&v 6t&xiic. (16) 'AXXil 'avap}4f, xeit tfrrfit M rwic *6Sa^ 

thou persecfutest But rise up, and stand'upon the feet 

persequeris Sed exsurge, et sta in pedes 

(fov^ tlgrwTo ySif fi^^ ^oi, 4rpo;(&ipfVa^dai 

sf you, for this because I have come to you, to choose 
tuos, idcirco enim apparui tibi, designarem 

you a minisCer and witness the things which thou hast seen 
ministrum ae testum turn eormn quts vidisti, 

*cjv Tt j^^ofial (for, (17) ^oipouufvo^ (fb 
the things and I will show to you« Delivering you 

turn eorum quibus apperebo tibi, Eruens te 

he rw Xaou xeu rw iivCk iig ovs vuv (ft flurcf ^XX6J« 
from the people and the heathen unto whom now you I send. 
ex hoc populo et^ gentibus ad qnod nunc te mitto. 



198 THE PRINCIPLES OF 

(18) 'Avorgai o(p6a\^it^ aurwv tqv intiS'pi'^Mi 'aflr* (fxir^vi 
To open (the) eyes of them to turn from darkness 
Ut aperias oculos coram (et) convertas (eos) a tenebris 

Big (^g, xou TT^g i^ovtfiag rou ^aram i^l 70v Bsovy ro& 

unto light, and the power of the Satan unto the God, tha* 

ad lucem, et (a) potestate Satanss ad Deum, ut 

"KoL^sTv airoug &^(fiv otfU3tpr&, xai xX^pov 

they receive to them remission of offences, and a share 

accipiant remissionem peccatorum, et sorteni 

^v Toig iyyut^fuivoig trig's! r^ sig ifii. 

among them who are sanctified by faith which (is) in me. 

inter illos sanctificatos per fidem que est in me. 

(19) "Odsv, /3a3'i\5u 'A^pMt^'a, oux i^svofi.f]v d/trsidr^g cyj 
Whence, O king Agrippa, not I was disobedient (to) the 
Unde, rex Agrippa, non fui rebellis illi 

wpttvitp ifTouflam (20) *AXXa nTg iv Aojuufxt^ ^pQruv xou 
heavenly vision. But (to) those in Damascus first and 

ciclesti apparitioni. Sed iis (qui sunt) Damasci primum et 

at Jerusalem in all and the coasts of the Judea, and 
Hierosolymis in omnes et regione Judese, et 

TQtlg ^4v8tfiv, oMrtrayy^XXojv "c^-avoenr 

(then) to the Gentiles, showing (that they) might repent 
(deinde) Gentibus, anunciavi ut resipiscerent 

xul iiti<frpi^6ty 9^1 TOY Gsov, afia rijg 

and turn unto the God, (and) worthy of the 

et converterent (se) ad Deum, convenientia 

tusravoiag Spya ^poufifovTog* {2iyEvsxoLTQCT(,)v i^s o! 'loudoToi 
repentance works do. For which me the Jews 

resipicentiffi ope :a facientes. Horum causa me Judsi 



6BEEK 6BAMMAR. 199 

0iAXajSoft£voi Iv ru Ispoi irsipuvro jia;((ipiVa(f4ai« 

have seized in the temple (and) attempted to kill (me), 
comprehensum (in) templum tentarunt interficere (me). 

(22) ^BtrixorjplaQ ouv <^oSr r^^ rapoL rou Gsou, 
Assistance therefore having obtained from the God, 
Auxilium sed nactus a Deo, 

^XP* ^ Wp^ rowrt)^ i(frtxa, fMcprvpoujxsvo^ M'lxp^ ^^ '^^^ 
to this day thus I continue testifying to small both and 
in hanc diem usque pentiti testificans parvis turn tum 

great, nothing than saying which both the prophets 
magnis, nee quicqam dicens que prophetae 

o 

IXaXt}(fav iuhX^MTun yivi^dou xet3 Mu^g 
did say should come and Moses. 
pTsedixerunt futura ac Moses. 



DIVES AND LAZAEUS— Lotb XVI. 19-31. 

A man and who was rich, and clothed (in) parple 

xot/ pCif^Wf 6dq)pajv^fiSvo^ xaA^ fifiipav >uxfMrp&}^. (20) 

and fine linen, (and) feasted by day sumptuously. 

Uruf^ a rig ^y Miuart Ao^apo^^ <^g l^^jSXijro 
A beggar and who was named Lazarus, who was thrown 

fi'po^ r6v t^Xuva aurou frXxcjfiivo^y (21) Ked ifridviiM/ 
before the gate of the other full of ulcers, And desired 

XopTflbf^iivai dflTo rwv ^j/./l6Jv rt^v < irovrwv cl^o rng rpMi^ng 
to he fed with the crumbs which fell from the table 



200 THE PRINCIPLES OF 

row fl'XouO'iou dXXa xot/ oJ xjve^ Ipp^ofxevoi dfl'^ip^oir 
(of) the rich (man,) but also the dogs came (and) licked 

Ttt fXxij auTou. (22) 'Ey/vero 6i d^'o^avsrv rov «xj;i^t¥, 
the sores of him. It came to pass and died the beggar, 

and was carried he by the angels into the bosom of the 

Abraham, died and also the rioh (man) and was buried. 

(23) Ecu ^v roj d6fi * i'rapag rou; j^doXfun); ocurou, v^ofx^ 
And in the hell he lifted the eyes of him» being 

hf fioufavtits, hp^ riv 'AjSpo^fx Aro luxxpo^sv xou Ao^apov 
in torment, seeing the Abraham at a distance and Lazarua 

iv tq7^ x6\wg auroCl>. (24) Kcd airlc q)cjv4^a; smts, TLcM-gp 
in the bosom of him. And he crying said, Father 

'A^pouxjx, iXifitfov fM, xoj r8fju)/ov Aa^apov ?va 

Abraham, have mercy on me, and send Lazarus that he 

jSou^t) ro otxpov rou SootrvMj cujtou S^oh-o;, xoj xarcc^/u^ 
may dip the tip of the finger of him in water, and cool 

njv Y>M^(f6cv fjtou* M Wovw|*ai ^ rrj (pXoyi ra»rij. 

the tongue' of me ; for I am tormented in the flame this. 

(26) i:Trs 6i *A)3pa<itjx, T^xvov, |wvi)(rtf^ai Bn d^tiKxSsg <f6 
Said and Abraham, Son, remember that received yoo 

rd *ayaAa tfw iv ry ^wj (foft^ xai Aa^ecpo^ 

the good things of yon in the life of you, and Lazarus 

ifAolu; rot xaxol, vGfv Si oSs ^apttkBiTou^ if6 
likewise the evil things, now and here he is comforted, yon 

* Literally, imteeti, the invuibU abode of the dead— doriTod from 
p75w, to tee. 



GREEK OBAMMAS. 201 

^ oSvvMfa (26) Kal M neojii roi^roif, f&ero^ i]fi.^v rm 
nnd tormen sd ; And besides all this between us and 

you a gulf very great is placed, so that they who would 

SmSrivm ivTsvAev irpo^ ^y^gt f<^ duvuvrai, fi.f]6i ol 
pass from this place to you, not can, neiiher those 

hcsT&sv itpog ^jubo^ 6ia*spZ(fiv, (27) Efrs Si, 'Ep&M-w ouv 
from that to us can pass. He said then, I pray therefore 

0*9, fi'obrsp, 7va Wf^/^f aikov 9iV f-ov orxov rou 
thee, father, that thou wilt send him to the house of the 

iftirpig f&ou* (28)*£p(6j yolp ^reWs (£^8X901}^, oru; 6iaiMtprCp7ilcu 
father of me ; I have for five brethren, that he witness 

avroTg^ hcc fi>i) xoi auroj IX^u^'iv e/^ rov rdfl'ov rourov rij^ 
to them, that not also they come into the place this of the 

/Sflctfavou. (29) Aiyei aurw 'A^pa&fi., 'Ep^outfi Mu)(fiaxcu 
toiment. Said to him Abraham, They have Moses and 

rou^ trpof^o^, ebeou(faru(fav aurcjv. (30) *0 Sb sJ^sv^O^i^ 
the prophets, let them hear them. He and said. Nay, 

rarep 'AjSpouxfb, 'aXX' ian rtg *a*i vsxpuv ff'opsud^ 
father Abraham, but if any one from the dead should go 

TTphg ouroOf, iUTav9ii<fw<ftv. (31) eT^ts Si aur$, £/ 
onto them, they would repent. He said and to him. If 

Mtj<fi(tig XOI CUV trpo^Tjr&Sv oux eUououO'iv, ouJs iav riV ^x 
Moses and the prophets not they hear, neither if any one from 

vsxpcjv *avad'rij, «'eifl'tf^(fovrai. 

the dead shooed arise, will they be persuaded. 



202 TFB pxnroiPLEs of 



MATTHEW XXffl. 34-59. 

(34) ^^a. rouroy* ISw^ iyd cUro<fr AXu' *pos C(ia^ ^'po^^oc^, xni 
Wherefore, behold, I send nnto yoa prophets, and 
Propterea, ecce, ego mitto ad vos prophetas, et 

(fo^oO^, xoei ypai^MTsTg^ xeu i^ ai)rc5v aroxrsv 

wise (men) and scribes ; and (some) of them shall ye 
sapientes (viros) et scribas ; et (nonnuUos) ex ipsis trucid* 

t7r$* xoi ifraupoi^STSf xat i^ aCruv iui<fnyCidirs 

A.\l\ and crucify, and (some) of them shall ye scourge 
abitis et crucifigetis, et (nonnuUos) ex ipsis flagellabitis 

fiv rcui (fvvayftiyaTie ^jxCv, xoj diw^€* cLiro <SksQg $}g 
in the synagogues of you, and persecute from city unto 
in conventibus vestris, et persequemini ab urbe, in 

iroXiV (36) "Orcjf i^Ajf if* vfAo^ wv' atiui Jixoiov, 
city ; That may come upon you all blood the righteous, 

urbem ; Ut yeniat super vos omnis sanguis Justus, 

ixxyy^it^Qv M ^g 9^;, oliro rov aSiMT^g "AtsK rov JixoMUy 
shed upon the earth, from the blood of Abel the righteous, 
efiusus super terram, & sanguine Abel justi, 

Hus rou aFjUboro; Zap^apiou, vUv Bapap^fov, ov 
until the blood of Zacharias, son of Barachias, whom 
usque ad sanguinem Zacharis, filii Barachie, quern 

' Jesus says this, speaking of Jerusalem ; it is a beauti- 
ful passage. 

•Literally, through tAt*— also, Proptsbsa, on account 
of these things, 

• Compound cf dflro and <friKh,>-^seni away. 

* From dwroxTfi.i/w. • From 5i6xw. • From ^pp^ojuboj* 

' Greenfield says, " I. e., aijxa -ravT^oov rtiv iixcwwv" — the 
hlood of all the just. 



IRBBX aBAKMAB. SOS 

l^ovsuff'ars fjbcrolu re J vaou xoi rou ^^lOfl'rTjpiow. (36) 'A/Jii)v 

•ye slew between the temple and the altar. Verily^ 

occidistis inter templum e( altare. Ameui 

Xiycj ifAnf, flgei raura qravra Ifl*/ n^» 

I say (unto) you, shall eome these (things) all upon the 
dico Tobis, yenient hose omnia super 

yevsav rauriiv, (37)'l8pou0'aXi)fi*/I&pou(faXi)|X, fr d^oxreiyovifa 
generation this. Jerusalem, Jerusalem, (thou) that killest 
aetatem istam. Jerusalem, Jerusalem, (tu) qui trucidas 

TW{ ^po^CLC^ xou Xi^o^oXovcfa rovg difs^TcCKiUvoug w^ig tdrnVf 
the prophets, and stonest them (that are) sent unto thee, 
prophetas, et lapidatrix^ eorum (qui sunt) missi ad te, 

x'o(faxi( ifiiktitfat, ifri<fvvwytv/sTv rot r^xva (Tou, ?v 
how often would I have gathered the children of you, in 
quoties volui congregare liberos sui, 

like manner as gathereth a hen the chickens of her under 
quemadmodum congregat galinit puUos suos sub 

rdff cripwyov, xoi oix ^dgX^tfare ; (38) 'liov, d(pisTou\ ifwv 
the wings, and not ye would ! Behold, is left (to) you 
alas, et noluistis ! Ecce, relinquetur robis 

b oTxog Cjxuv ^piffM^. (39) Aiyct) yap ^yAv, Ou fi^ 

the house of you desolate. I say for (unto) you, In no wise 

domus Testra deserta. Dico enim vobis, Nequaquaro 

u* ISv^Ti ««'' aiprty Sus av sl^if^rs, EOXoyijfJievoff 

me shall ye see after now until shall ye say, Blessed (is he) 
me videbitis ab hoc usquedum dicatis, Benedictus 

i ^pX^ff^ogl iv ^vojxori Eupiou. 
that cometh in the name of the Lord, 
qui venit in nomine Domini. 

•A stoner of them, t From dxpirtiu. t Lit, the one coming. 



204 THE PRINCIPLES OF 



MATTHEW XIX. 27-30. 

(27) Tore d^oxpMs * b ILirpos sl^sv ai3rw, •l&O, %fig% 
Then answering the Peter said (to) him, Behold, we 
Turn respondens Petrus dixit ei, Ecce, nos 

d(prpcaiLSv ^avra, xou ^xoXou^^d'ofiiv <fou* rl apa 

have forsaken all, and followed thee; what, therefore,- 
relinquimus omnia, et sequuti sumus te ; quid ergo 

8(frai iiiuv ; (28) *0 $s 'Iij(rouff sTttsv aurofff, 'AfAijv 

will there he to us ? The and Jesus said unto them, Verily 

erit nohis? Autem Jesus dixit illis, Amen 

"Kiyu ufAiv, on ujut^r^ o} cUoXoud^(favrif fjboi, ^v rji 
I say (unto) you, that ye which have followed me, in the 
dico vobis, vos qui sequuti estis me, in 

^rahyyBvstfit^y orav xoAl^ifi h u2o^ rou dv^poMTou i^i 
regeneration, when shall sit the son of the man upon the 
regeneratione, quum sederit filius hominis in 

dpovou do^^ aCrou, xaAiifs(f6s xou iiistis M SuSsxa 

throne of the glory of him, shall sit and ye upon twelve 
throno glorias sus, sedebitis etiam vos super duodecim 

^povouff, xpivovTStf rag 6Ci6sxa, ^uXa^ rou 'I(fpa^X. (29) 
thrones, judging the twelve tribes of the IsraeL 
^hronos, judicantes duodecim tribus IsraeL 

Kou ^3jg og *oufpfpc6v t oixio^, ^ WsXtpoO^, ^ aSekipSigf 
And all who have forsaken houses, or brothers, or sisters, 
Et omnis qui reliquerit domos, aut fratres, aut sorores, 

* From 'a^roxpivofAai. t From 'o^iigfu. 



GfiEBK OBAMMAB. 205 

or father, or mother, or wife, or children, oi lands, 
aut patrem, aut matrem, aut uxorem, aut liberos, aut agros, 

hsxsv Tov 6vof/£»r6V f*0Wf hecuv^Mkeufiwa X^srou, 

on account of the name of me, an hundred fold shall re- 

ob nominis mei, centuplicia accipiet, 

xoj ^cji)v a/uviov xXijpovo/j^O'si. (30) IloXXof , 6i 
ceive, and life everlasting shall mherit. Many, however 
et vitam cetemam haereditatis. Multi, autem, 

hovreu rpwroi, Itf^oroi* xoj IcT^aroi, vrpuroi. 
shall be first, last ; and last, first, 
erunt primi, ultimi; et ultimi, primi. 



ST. LUKE XV. 1-7. 

Were but coming to him all the publicans and the sinners, 
Autem accederunt ad eum omnes publicani et peccatores, 

*axo6sn ourov. (2) Eai Stsyoyyu^ov ol <tapKfouu xoj ol FpafA- 
to hear him. And murmured the Pharisees and the 
audire eum. Et murmurabant Pharisei et 

ifM/nTISf yJyoyrsSf "On o7ro^ iftapruXoO^ ^potfSi^ZTeUf xoi (fwS(fAl6^ 
Scribes, saying, That he sinners receives and (he) eats 
ScribtB, dicentes, Ut hie peccatores recipit, et edit 

afiror^. (3) EKrt 6i •'po^ aiVoug Tijv irapa- 

(with) them. He spake, nevertheless, unto them the para- 
(cum) illifl. Loquutus est, autem, ad eos para- 
18 



206 THE PRINCIPLES OF 

jSoXi)v rav<n]v, Xiyuv (4) TigaivBpo^os i^ ^fun iyon ixartf 
ble this, saying ; What man of yoa having an ban 
bolam banc, dicens ; Quis homo ex vobis babens cent*^ 

dred sheep, and if he loose one of them, not doth leavo 
um oves, et perdiderit unam ex illis, non relinquit 

<rol Jvvsvijxovrasvvea Iv rjj ^p4f^> xoi ^opsCsrou M 
the ninety nine in the wilderness, and go .after 
illas nonaginta norem in deserto, et abit ad 

<ro d^okuKogy Sug svpp a^6 ; (S) Kai 6^pCi\t j^riri^o'iv 
the lost, until he find it 1 And finding (it) he layeth ' 
perditam, usquedum inveneriteam? Etnactus (eam) imponit 

M Tovg ^iMvg ktxvrw x^'P^*' (^) ^^ MCrh 
(it) upon the shoulders of him rejoicing, And hairing- 
(eam) super humeros sues gaudens, Et veniens 

slg rov ofxov, ifiyyyjaCKst roig ^tkong xai 

come into the house, he calleth together' the friends and 

in domo (suo) conrocat . amicos et 

rot); yimvag^ Xi^wv aJroi^, 2u7X&pi]rtf fMi, Bn sSpof 

the neighbors, saying ta them, With rejoice me, for I hare 

vicinos dicens eis, Gratulamini mihi, nempe 

rh 4rp66arov fjbou ro oUroXciiXo;. (7) Aiyu ^fiJV, 
found the sheep of me that was lost. I say unto you, 

inyem ovem meam qu® perieiat. Dico Tobia, 

En oSreo X^P^ itfrtu Iv r$ odpctv^ M Ivf iftapruX^ 
that likewise joy shall be in the heaven, over one sinner 
ut etiam gaudium erit in coelo super uno peccatore 



OBBBK 6BAMMAB. 207 

(A^ravoouM-i, f/ M IvveVTpeovra^via lixai- 

tbat repenteth, (more) than over ninety nine just 
resipiscente, magis qu&m super nonaginta novem jus 

(persons), which no need have of repentance, 
lis, qui non opus habent resipiscentie. 



ST. LUKE XV. 11-32. 

(11) £7«'S 6ij *Avdp6Jiroc ric c^9 ^jo uSou^, (12) Kau sTrsv 

' He said and, A man certain had two sons, And said 

Ait autem, Homo quidam habebat duos filios, Et dixit 

I vsCursp^s aikuv r^ ^arpij Ha/rsp^ 66g jxoi to 

' the younger of them to (his) father, Father, giye to me that 
junior illorum patri. Pater, da mihi 

l«'i€a>Aov ^kipog 4% ovtfiag. Kou ^i- 

falleth (to me) the portion of the property. And he 

attinentem (ad me) "partem substantia. Et par- 

crXsv avToTg rov jSiov. (13) KaJ jULsr* etS iroXXo^ 

divided to them the living (of him.) And with not many 

titit eis illam yjtam. Et post non multos 

l^p«^ itwaywyuv S/ravra h ysdrtpos vlog liroj^f&fjtf'sv 

days collecting together all the younger son departed 
dies congestens omnibus junior filius egressus est 

tk X^pttv fMKxpav xai hsT 6n(fx6^i€9 riiy ov(fia» et^rou 
into country a distant; and there wasted ihe goods of him 
inregionemlonginquam; etillicdissipavit substantiam suam 



208 ' THE PEmCIPLBS OF 

^uv i^im/i^, (14) Aa^ixviiifavroe 6i aurov 

liying with luxurious. He had consumed but when of him 
vivendo profusd. Gonsumpsisset autem quum 

g^ods) all, there came famine a mighty in the lan4 that ; 
omnia, orta est fames valida in regione ill& ; 

cu aur^ ^p^aro t^rspsT^Aai. (15) Kai ^op$v6stg httiKKyfim 

and he began to be in want. And he went and joined 

et ipse cepit defici. Et abiens et adhssit 

kvi ruv flToXiruv r^^ X^P^ ixsiw^ • xat 
himself to one of the citizens of the country that ; and 
uni ex civibus regionis illus ; et 

firefi^/(v ourov 9/^ rou^ d/pou^ aurou fioifxsn x^^P^^f- (16)Ka< 
he sent him into the fields of him to feed .swine. And 
missit eum in agros sues pascere porcos. Et 

ifTsBuiUi ysikhou Hv xoiXiav aurou d^i ruv xspa^iuv Cjn ^6iw 
he wished to fill the belly of him with the husks that did eat 
desiderabat implere yentrem suum siliquis quas edebant 

o2 x^'iP®' * ^^ omSsis iSiiov our^. (17) EiV lourov 

the swine ; and no one did gire to him. Unto himself 

porci; et nemo dabat ei. Ad se 

81 iyj^f sUfSf Jl6<fot jxMioi Tw ^wp6g 

however coming, he said, How many servants of the father 

autem redens, ait, Quotquot mercenarii patris 

firou fr8pi<f€6vov<fiv aprcjv, iyui Si Xifi^i oUrroXXufMxi ; 
of me abound in bread, I however with want perish ? 
mei abundant panibus, ego autem fame pereol 

( 18) 'Amtfras n'opsuifofi.ai ^pog rov ^aripoi yjoVf xai ipu 
Arising I will go unto the father of me, and will say 
Surgens proficiscar ad patrem mei, et dicam 



ORSSK 6XAMMAB. S09 

auru, norspi ^fiAprov tig rov o&pavov xal 

imto him. Father, I have sinned against the heaven and 
ei, Pater, peccavi in codam et 

Iv6jfi^v (fou* (19)Kai ouxiri fl^fij c^^io^ xXf}4^vai 
in the ^ght of you ; And no more am worth/ to be called 
in conspectu sao ; £t non amplias sum dignus vocari 

vlog ftw • «'fif}(rov fU &s fva ruv luff^im 0*01;. 

the son of you ; make me as one of the servants of you. 

filius tuus ; fac me ut unum (ex) mercenariis tuis. 

^20) Koti AvoufT^ f >u0g trpog rov ^earipa laurou. ''En 
And arising, he came unto the father of him. Yet 
Et surgens, venit ad patrem ejus.Quum 

Si at)cou lAoxpav oUr^ovcioctafisvaurovi fi'anip (wrw 

however way off a great he was, saw him the father of him 

autem adhnc longd abesset, vidit eum pater ejus 

%w lif^Xayx^iV^ • >«m Spoilt M^s^sv M rov Tpa;c^XaF 
and had compassion ; and running fell upon the neck 
et misericordiam habuit ; et accurrens incidit in coUum 

aurou xoi x«r64)iXi|4'8v avrov. (21) Bltfs 6^ a2»ru ulo;, 

of him and kissed him. Said and to him the son, 

ejus et deosculatus est eum. Dixit autem ei filius, 

nortp, <|fi.apc«r tig rov oJipovw xoi iv^io'v ^ 

Father, I have sinned against the heaven and in the sight 
Pater, peccavi in cesium et in conspectu 

ifov, XOI ouxiri eJfM ofio^ xXti^ijvai v\6g (fou. 

of you, and no more am worthy to be called the son of you. 
tuo, et neque amplius sum dignus vocari filius tuus. 

(22) £r«v 6i I *af7ip *pog rwg 6ouXouf afirou,'Eg»v/7xarf 
Said but the father unto the servants of him, Bring 
Dixit autem pater ad servos sues, Aflferte 

IS* 



210 THE PRINCIPLES OF 

njy fl'co>,i5v njv vpwrijv, Kcu iv6u<fars aurov, xou im 

the robe the best, And put (it) upon him, and give 

stolam illam prsecipuam, £* induite eum, et indite 

SaaerC'KKiv $fe rnv x^^P^ aurou, kcu Cflroi^/xara elg rovg roJa^. 
a ring to the hand of him, and shoes to the feet, 
annulum in manum ejus, et soleas in pedes. 

(23) Ka4 iviyxavreg rov fMd'p^ov rov (firsurov ^uo'are, tcou 
And bring the calf the fatted (and) kill (it,) and 
Et afierrentes vitulum ilium saginatum mactate, et 

^ayovTsg Bh(ppav60fuy * (24) ''On oZrog h u!6^ fMu vffxpo^ 
eating let us be merry ; For this the son of me dead 

edentes exhilaremur ; Quia iste filius mei mortuus 

^v xoi dvi^YiffSj xou droXojXuf ^v xcu svpidti, 

was and is alive (again), and lost he was and is found, 
erat et revixit, ct perierat et inventus est. 

Kaf ^pfavro sv(ppaivs(f6au (25)^Hv &i h \i\os aurou 
And they began to be merry. Was now the son of him 
Et coeperunt sese exhilararet Erat autem filius ejus 

i flTpstfSurgpoff Jv dy^j xou Cjg ipypiuvoc ^yyitfs rj 
the elder in the field, and as coming he drew near to the 
senior in agro, et ut veniens appropinquavit 

olxicL ^xouO'e (fviMpuyvioLQ xou X^P^^* (^) ^^ «'po<fxaXso'afi6vo( 
house he heard music and dancing. And calling 
domui audivit concentum et choros. Et vocatum 

sva roJv ^oLiSuv aiirou, i^ruvAcLvSTo rl €'v\ rowra; 
one of the children of him, he asked what were these 
unum (2x) pueris ejus, interrogavit est quid essent 

(27) *0 Ss fiSrev aW$, "Ort I dSsT^g (Tou 
things?) He and said to him, That the brother of yoi 
ha)c Is autem dixit ei, Fiater tuus 



6KEEK GBAMMAR. 211 

18 come, and hath killed the father of you the calf the 
venlt, et mactavit pater taus yitulum ilium 

tfirsurov, Jr uyiaivowa aurov AriKxQsv* (28) 'Qpyfif^ij 

fatted, for safe him (he) hath received. He was angry 

saginatum, quia tutum eum recepit. Indignatus est 

8if XOI oCx ^isXsv SKfiXAsTv, *0 o7v iroir^p aurou 
and, and not would come in. The therefore father of him 
autem, et non voluit introire. Ergo pater ipsius 

l^eXdcjv 4rap6xaXsi aurov. (29) *0 6i droxpi^siV sTitb rt^ 
coming out entreated him. He but answering said to the 
egressus hortatus est eum. Ipse vero respondens dixit 

rarpi* *Idou, To^wtTa In] jouXsucj (foiy xai ohSi^^n 
father ; Behold how many years I serve thee, and at no time 
patri ; ^ Ecce tot annos servio tibi, et nunquam 

evroX^v ^ov rap^Xtfov, xai iiuai olSi^ori 

the commands of you have I transgressed, and to me never 

mandatum tuum sum transgressus, et mihi nunquam 

i6uxiig SpKj^f ha iksrSi ruv ^tkuv fMu su^pav^u. 

gavest thou a kid, that with the friends of me I might make 

dedisti hoedum, ut cum amicis meis oblectarer. 

(30.) "Org 6i ft v\6g ffov oVrogf ft kwroupayCiv 
merry. When but the son of you this, that hath devoured 
CiStm sed filius tuus iste, qui devoravit 

of you the living with harlots was come, thou hast killed 
tuam vitam cum meretricibus venit, mactftsti 

awTW rov fioifp^o/ rov (firsurov. (31) *0 Si sTrtv our^, 

for him the calf the fatted. He and said unto himf 

ei vitu!um Hum saginatum. Ipse verd dixit ei, 



212 THE PRmCIPLSS OF 

Son, thoa always with me art. and all that (is) mine, thine 
Fill, tu semper mecum es et omnia mea, tna 

ig'tv. (32.) EJ^pav^^vai, Jl, xoT yaffl/pKu Utu 

is. To rejoice, therefore, and to be glad it was meet, 

sunt. Exhilarari, vero, et gaadere opportebat, 

on h diSeKipog (fw ovrog vsxpog f v, xoi AyiCfjm • xa2 
for the brother of you this dead was, and lireth ; and 
quia frater tuus iste mortuus erat, et revixit; etiam 

cUtoXuXgj^ jf^v, xoi 6ipi6ri\ 

lost he was, and is found ! 
perierat et inventus est ! 



ROMANS in. 21-26. 

(21)NUVI ^6 X^P'^ VOfMMi StHOMfCyti 9sou 

Now but without the law the righteousness of Gfi4 is 
Nunc verd absque lege justitia Dei 

vY^av^pureu, fiAprvpoufAevi) M tw v^jmu xeu rwv 

manifested, being witnessed by the law and the 

manifesta est, testificata it lege ac 

^tpo^ryrCiV (22) Aixajo<fuvi] Si Osou 6iA ^l^rsug 

prophets ; Even the righteousness of (Jod by faith of 
prophetis ; Inqam justitia Dei per fidem 

'Iiitfou Xpifl'Tou, sJg ifcMTOQ XOI M t'&vrttf roug flritfrsoovro^ • 
Jesus Christ, unto all and upon ail that believe; 
Jesu Christi, in omnes et super omn^s qui credunt ; 

« 
o'J /olp i^n Sujufrokfi. (23) UcLvTBg ydf {ifuuxprov xoi 

no for there is difierence All for have sinned and 

Qon enim est distinctio. Omnes enim pecaverunt ao 



GRE%]^ 3RAXMAB. 213 

l<fr9^yTcu tS^s Sc^ @5ou. (24) Aixoio^fiiSvoi Jupfclv 

come short of the glory of God. Being justified freely 

deficiunter gloria Dei. Justificati gratis 

rp aurov x^P'^' ^'^ ^^ AroKjrp^Hfsug <% Iv 
by the of him grace through the redemption that (is) in 
ejus gratia per redemptionem quaa 

XpMfr^ Itl^ou* (25)**Ov ^poUsro h 0shg IXjufriipiw 
Christ Jesus : Whom hath set forth the God a propitiation 
Christo Jesu ; Quern proposuit Deus placamentum 

through the faith in the of him hlood, to declare the 
per fidem in ipsius sanguine, ad demonstrandam 

righteousness of him, for the remission of the past 
justitiam suam, per remissionem quss antecesserunt 

ci^pn}fjLarcJv, (26) 'Ev rfi dvo^^ rou 0eou, 

sins, Through the forbearance of the God, 

peccatorum, Per tolerante Dei, 

^pig ^ Msi^n r^ie SttccuoifvwiS avTou iv r$ vuv 
for to declare the righteousness of him at the present 
ad demonstrandam justitiam suam present! 

xoif)^* 61^ ro bTvm airh SixouoVf xoJ dtxatwvra. rov 
time ; that might be he just, and the justifier of him 
tempore ; ut sit ipse Justus, et justificans eum 

Ix IflifTSUS 'I^iCou. 

which belioTeth in Jesus, 
qui est ex fide ' Jesu. 



814 THE FBINCEFL2IB OF 



ROMANS V, 6-12, 18, 21. 

(6)*Eri /oLp XpKTro^, ovruv ^fiiav ouf^^/wv, xara xoup^ 
Yet for Christ, being we weak, by time 
Adhuc enim Christus,existentibus nobis infirmis, in tempore 

uir^p d(fs€Qv AriAoLvs. (7) MoXi^ y^p Mp 6ixaiou 

for the impious died. Scarcely for for righteous 

pro impiis mortuus est. Vix enim pro justo 

ri^ d/roAavsTrat * Mp /otp rw d/yaAw ^OLypt, ng 

person will one die ; for yet the good (man) possibly one 

quis moritur ; pro enim bono forsitan quia 

xai roXfi.9; a^otfavsrv. (8) 2uv/tf«)tfi H njv lowow 

even would dare to die. Commendeth but the of himself 

et audeat mori. Commendat sedillam ipaius 

el/0Mr9]v s/( ii\iJ3j6 i Ged^, on, fvi ^^xapruXuv 

love unto us the God, since, yet sinners 

charitatem in nobis Deus, quoniam, adhuc peccatoribus 

ovrcjv ^fjkuv, Xpitf'ro^ Mp 4f^v A^^olms. (9) IIoXX^ 

being we, Christ for us died. Much 

ezistentibus nobis. Christus pro nobis mortuus est. Multo 

ouv fjboXXov, ^wmu^iyiTBg vuv Iv r^ aTjf&an aurou, 
therefore more, being justified now in the blood of him, 
igitur magis, justificati nunc in sanguine ipsius, 

(r«^»j<rof«4a &' aOrou cU-i cij^ 3p7%. (10) El yAp 
we shall be saved by him from the wrath. If for 

serrabimur per ipsum ab iii* Si enim 

IX^poi Zyirzg xornXXoyijfWv t§ Ost^ 3«A w 

eneihies being we were reconciled to the God by the 
inimic* existentes reconciliati sumus Deo per 



6XEEK GRAMXAB. 215 

death of tho son of him, much more, being reconciled, 
mortem filii ejus, multo magis, reconciliati, 

^{(j^d'ofM^a h tji ^cjj] omu. (11) Ou fi^vov 

shall we be saved by the life of him. Not only (that) 

serrabimur in . vitam ipsias. Non solam 

6i* aXXdl xai xovp^oj/jb^voi hf r^ Qi^ SA rouKup/ov 

and, but also (are) glorying in the God through the Lord 

autem, sed etiam gloriantes in Deo per Dominum 

lifjbuv, 'Ii}<fou XpKfrou, ji* oS vuv n)v xaraXXa7i)v 

of us, Jesus Christ, by whom now the reconciliation 

nostrum, Jesum Christum, per quem nunc reconciliationem 

^Xa^ofMv* (12)Aiolrouro(5^«'€p ii' hi( dvi^ov ^ 
we hare received. Wherefore as by one man the 
accepimus. Propterea'sicut per unum hominum 

iiiM^ia sic ^ov xotf'fMv iltflfKASf xai 6Af^&iui^iae i^aveero^, 

sin into the world came, and by the sin the death, 

peccatum in mundum venit, et per peccatum mors, 

KOI ourw^ fife ^kvras dvSpCi^wg i ^avarog Stvjkisf I9" gE tr&vrtg 
and so upon all men the death passeth, for that all 
et sicnt in omnes homines mors pertransit, in quo omnes 

%Laprov. 
hare sinned, 
peccaverunt. 

(18) "Apa oU S)g &* IvS^ leaptwrCnuaToc slg ^kynxig Mp6yitwg 
Therefore as by one offence (came) upon all men 
Igitur sicut per uham offensam in omnes homines 

* Translate the ^ before oO— 4i oJ luhov^ &c 



316 THE PRINCIPLES OF 

stg xarobcpijxa* ouru xoj St* ivog iixoi^fAaro;, 
anto judgment; so also by one righteous (the free 
in condemnationem ; sic et per unum justitium 

sJg ^avTos dv^poMTou^ slg JixoiWiv ^u^(. 

gii% came) upon all men unto justification of life, 
in omnes homines ad justificationem vitae. 

• ••••• 

(21) "Iva &^€Sp iQouftkevtfsv ^ oLfJiapr/a Jv r^ ^avifr^, ourcj ical 
That as hath reigned the sin unto the death, so eveu 
Ut sicut regnavit peccatum in morte, ita et 

h X^P^S ^oufikButfT^ diet ifxaioo'uvi]^ $ls ^u^y 

the grace might reign through righteousness unto life 
gratia regnaret per justitiam in vitam 

atuviQVf StoL 'Iijo'ou XpKfrou rov Kxtplov ^fjbcjv. 
eternal, by Jesus Christ the Lord . of us. 
setemam, per Jesum Christum Dominum nostrum. 



Ourcj yoLp ifyai/tei/\iizv b 0£O( rov xo(ff4,ov (3(frs rov vlo9 (xurou 
So for lored the Grod the world that the son of him 
Ita enim dilexit Deus mundum ut filium ejus 

rov fi.ovoT'ev)) f^cjxfivi 7va ^Sjq I iftifnCuv €h oMp 
the only begotten he gave, that all who believe in him 
unigenitum dederit, ut omnes qui credunt in eum 

fiii oUr^Xijroi elXX' 1^ ^cj^v eCiinww 

not might perish but hare life eternal.— JoAn Hi. 16. 

non pereant sed habeant vitam sBteniam. 



6BBEK GRAMMAR. 217 



SCRIPTURE TEXTS ON DIFFERENT SUBJECTS. 

A&Irs flTpo^ lis wyrss o3 xvriQvrss xa ^S(po^Kf- 

Come unto roe all (ye) that (are) laboring and are leavy 
Venite ad me omnes qui fatigati et ooerati 

fiivof, x^Y^ avo/^(d(fu vi>Mg, 

laden, and I will give rest to you.— Matthew zi. 28. 

estisy et ego dabo requiem vobis. 

Koi xaA* * o(fov dneoxBtrat roTg t dvS^uwotg &^ol^ d^o^avsh^ 
And as it is appointed to thees men once to die, 
Et sicut statutum est hominibus semel mori 

acfu Ss rovTo x^Uftg * OCr&v & XpKfro^ aira| ^^(fsv^Bst^ 
after however the judgment ; So the Christ once offered 
post vero hoc judicium; Ita Christus serael oblatus 

sis ro fi'oXXujv dysvsyxsTv &yM^ia€ ix Ssvripov X^P'^ 
for the many to bear the sins for a second time without 
multorum attollere peccata secundo absque 

dLfiaprla^ lipBiiifSTOu roTg aurov d/ztsxSsyi^it^ois 8j( ^oynipiav. 

sin he shall appear to those looking for him unto salvation. 

peccato conspicietur eis expectantis earn ad salutem. 

Hebrews ix. 27, 28. 

Ta ydp ^/^la «^^ ^^xaprio^ d&voro;, ro ii ^dpiifiuiTov 

The for wages of the sin (is) death, the but gift of tbe 

Nam stipendia peccati mors, at donatio 

<Bsw ^wi) aiGJvio; Iv XpiO'r^ *l9]^o(/ r$ K\)pl(f) ^u^v. 
God life eternal through Christ Jesus the Lord of us. 
Dei vita sstema in Christo Jesu Domino nostro. 

Rofnans ti 23. 

* Contraction of xado^;, conjunction. 
t These men — the Priesthood of Aaron. 
19 



218 THE PRINCIPLES OP 

(6) To /otp 9p^vt)jxa rr^g (Tapxd^ davaf o;, ro is 

To be for minded of the flesh (is) death, to b out 
Nam prudentia carnis (est) mors, at 

^povfjfta rou irveufAoro^ ^&ii) xou s/p^vi]. (7) Aj^re ro 
minded of the spirit (is) life and peace. Because the 
prudentia spiriti (est) yita et pax. Propterea 

9povt)fiA ^g (fapxog ^x^pa elg 9«ov« Tu yap voja^ 

mind of flesh (is) enmity against God. To the for law 

prudentia carnis (est) inimica in Deum. Nam legi 

rou Gfiou oijx uir«f o^o'srai, oUi yap SCvareu* (8) 0\ 
of the God not is subject, neither indeed can (it) be. Those 
Dei non subjicitur, nee enim potest. Qui 

ii h (fapxi ovreg, &sZ dpiffeu o^ dCvavreu* 
but in the flesh being, God to please not can. 
at in came existentes, Deo placere non possunt. 

Ramans viiL. 6-8 

(38) IleVeid'fAai yotp o«ri cure davaTog, ours ^w^, oU« 
I am persuaded for that neither death, nor life, nor 
Persuasus sum enim ut neque mors, neque vita, neque 

ayysXoi, ours clpx«'» * ou« 6uvafWi^, wts ^vstfrwra 
angels, nor principalities, nor powers,nor things present, 
angeli, neque principatus, neque potestates, neque instantia, 

olVfi fisXX^a, (39) OvTB C4.&)fAa, ouVs ^Wof, 
nor things to come, Nor height, nor depth, 
neque futura, Neque altitude, neque profunditas 

olV« rig xrkig Iripa, Swr^tfe^tu hyJSe X"P''^^ 
nor any creature other, shall be able us to separate 
neque aliqua creatura alia, poterit nos separate 



GREEK GRAMMAR. 219 

Giro rrig dya^r^ rou 0£ou, ^r,g iv XpitfToi 'Irjefau r^ 

from the love of the God, which (is) in Christ Jesus .he 
i^ charitate Dei, quae (est) in Christo Jesu 

Kupiu vjfXOJv. 

Lord of us. — Romans viu. 38, 39. 
Domino nostro. 

(10) 2u 61 ri xpivetg tov aisX^ov tfou ; ij xai <fu 
Thou but why judgest the brother of you? or also thou 
Tu autem cur judicas fratrem tuum ? aut etiam tu 

ri i^wBsvsTg ^ovd^sX^tpov 0*00; ravrs^^olp«'apa^i](fo|X£^a 
why set at nought the brother of you ? all for shall stand 
cur pro nihilo habes fratrem tuum ? omnes enim sistemur 

Tw /S^fwtri rou XpKfroii. (11) r/ypaflrrai yap, Zw 
at the tribunal of the Christ. It is written for, (As) live 
tribunali Christi. Scriptum est enim, vivo 

lyw, Xsyfi Kupiof, oVi ^fjio' xafj^/ffi irav /o'vu, <cai 
I, saith the Lord, that to me shall bend every knee, and 
ego, dicit Dominus,ut mihi flectet omne genu, et 

ratfa yXwtf(fa Igo^Xoy Ve^'O' ''$ Bsl^, (12)*Apao?v&a0'9'o^ 
every tongu e shall confess to the G9d . So then every one 
omnis lingua confitebitur Deo. Itaque unusquisque 

iUkCiv ^€pl laurou Xoyov SC)<fsi r^ Gs^ 

of us concerning himself an account shall give to the God 
nostrum de seipso rationem reddet Deo. 

Romans xiv, 10- ^. 

(9) Tov di p^ Tt qrap' d^yyikovg ^Xa«-wfi,^ov jSXifrofWv 

The but little than (the) angels made lower we see 
nium autem breve quid pree angelis minoratum videmus 



THE PRINCIPLES OF 

*lifl<fouVf SA TO fi'o^fta rou tfavoroui Sify ' xal riiup 
Jesus, for the suffering of the death, with glory and honoi 
Jesum, propter passionem mortis, gIori& et honore 

^(fTE^avGJjx^vov, Ofi'dj^ X^P*^' ®^^ ^*^P ^Av^f ysC^r^ 

crowned, that by the grace of God for every one should 

coronatum, ut gratia Dei pro omnibus gus- 

rat ^av&rou. (lOyE^ps^fi ^olp ahrt^^ 61' ov dt 

taste death. It became for him, for whom (are) the 

taret mortem, Decebat enim eum, propter quem 

fi'^vro, xcu ^r ou rot ^avra t'oXXoO^ Mg 

all (things,) and by whom the all (things are) many sons 
omnia, et per quem omnia multos filios 

tig it^av d/yayivray tov ctp^tj^ov ^g (fttirripiag aurwv 
unto gloiy in bringing, the captain of the salvation of them 
in gloriam adducentem, auctorem salutis eorum 

6A ^oArifMuruv r^Xsiuefai. 
through sufferings to make perfect.— jETeftreu^f n. 9, 10. 
per passion es consumare. 

Koi ctflraXXaf >] courouf otfoi ^oSw ^avorou 

And that he might free those who through fear of death 
Et liberaret hos qui timore mortis 

6iSl ^avrhg rou ^v fvop^i f(fay Sorikiiag, 

luring the whole of (their) life held were in^ servitude. 

per omne vivere obnoxii erant in servituti. 

Hebrews iu 15. 

*Ev ^ ^olp cfifi'ovdffv auro^ ireipouf^eiVf 

In that for hath suffered he himself being tempted, he 

In quo en in passus est ipse tentatus, 

Sivarm roTg itstpa^o)^i.ivoic l3ori6ri<fM, 

is able them that are tempted to succor. — Hebrews tV. 18. 

potest illis tentatis auxiliari. 



GREEK GRAMMAR. 221 

(26) ToioOro^ ydi^ i^^m l^rpeirev Afi^ispiUs, E^ioct tbcaxog^ 
Such for us became high priest, holy, harmless, 
Talis enim nobis decebat pontifez, sanctus, innocens, 

oUiavro^, xs^^GjpKTfiivo^ cUro tQv AjxaprcaXuv, jcau t;>|/t}XorFpo^ 
undefiled, separate from the sinners, and higher (than) 
impollutus, segregatus ft peccatoribus, et excelsior 

ruv oupavcjv ^svofAffvo^. (27)**0( oux Sxsi xaA* 4|u^pav tiLva^njv, 

iie heavens made. Who not hath by day need, 

ccelis factus. Qui non habet quotidie necessitatem, 

wf^ep oi ipx^BpiTgj irporspov v'tip rcjv )Siuv dfibapriuv 

as those high priests, first for the his own sins 
quemadmodum pontifices, prius pro propiis peccatis 

hiflas dvoup^psiv, e^sira rQv roU Xaou» rauro 

sacrifice to offer up, then (for) those of the people ; this 
bostias ofiere, deinde populi; hoc 

yap i^oiyi<f6v iipautoL^ lauriv dvsviyxac* 

because he did once himself when he offered up. 
enim fecit semel seipsum ofierens. 

Hebrews vii. 26, 27. 

(3) 'AXX' Iv owraXg clvafjiv»j<r«ff dfwpriwv 

But in those (sacrifices) a remembrance of sins 
Sed in ipsis c^mmemoratio peccatorum 

xa<r* £viaurov. (4) ^ASCvarov yap 

(is made) every year. Impossible (it is) for 

(factum est) per singulos annos. Impossibile enim 

aT^iM roupcjv xa} rpo^cjv dapaipsTv 

(that) the blood of bulls and of goats should take away 
sanguinem taurum et hircorum auferre 

Jifuxpria^ (5) Aio siVgpxofWvo^ sfe rov x^^i^^f >Jysu 
sins* Wherefore coming into the world, he saith 

peccata. Ideo ingrediens in mundum,diTit, 

19* 



222 THE PRIMCIPLES OP 

Sacrifices and oflfering not thou wouldst, a bodjr but 
Hostiam et oblationem non Toluisti, corpus autem 

xar^fK-iVcj fi*oi. (6) *OXoxaur6j|j.ara xoi ^repi ofMipria^ 
hast thou prepared me. In burnt ofierings and for sins 
aptasti mihi. Holocautomata et pro peccato 

uux sv66xri^ag. (7) ToV« sfartv, *lSw tSxcj, 

not thou hast had pleasure. Then I said, Behold I come, 
non approbasti. Tunc dixi, Ecce venio, 

(Iv xe!pa\iii jSi^'ou yfypMerau €6pi jfiou,) 

(in the volume of the book it is written concerning me,) 
(in capite libri scriptum est de me.) 

to do, O, God, the will of thee.— JETe^. z. 3-7. 
ad faciendum, Deus, voluntatem tuam. 

*£v u dsX^jxari ^,^ia<rfiivoi iiffiiv oS ^idl r^; fi'pod'^opa^ 
In which will sanctified we are thro' the sacrifice 
In qua voluntate sanctificati sumus per oblationem 

rw (f^i^aTo^ rov 'I)]<rou XpKfrov l^o^rof. 
of the body of the Jesus Christ once. — Heb. x, 10. 
corporis Jesu Christi semel. 

(24) n/(r«-si Muxfris ^iyag yevofjLgvo^, ^pv^Caro XsYeifScu 
By faith Moses grown up being, refused to be called 
Fidi Moses grandis factus, negavit vocan 

v\og 6vya/rpog *apaw. (25) MaXXov IXo'fjLfvofc 

.he son of the daughter of Pharaoh. Rather choosing 

filius filis Pharaonis. Malis eligens 

(fuyKOXovxsMai rw Xa&l rou ©sou, fj irpo^oup^ 
to sufi!er affliction with the people of God, than for a season 
affligi cum populo Dei, qui^m temporariam 



GR^2K GRAMMAR. - 22& 

Sxsw &iMpTic t; (iiroXautfiv. (26) M««^ova irXourov )iyi|<f&fwv(ig 
to have of sin the pleasure. Greater riches esteeming 
habere peccati emolumentam. • Majores divitias aestimans 

cwv is Ajyu^ry dijtfaupwv rov Jvsi6i(r|tiv rou Xpitfrou- 

(than all) the in Egypt treasures the reproach of the Christ ; 

-figypti theaauris improperium Christi . 

(irl§Xf«V yap 9\g n^y fAMf^^^iotfiav. 
he had regard for unto the recompense.— Heft. xi. 24-26. 
aspiciebat enim in remunerationem* 

(2)'A9opwvrs^sfe rov t?^ friVwwf <ipx*I7w ^ 

Looking unto the of the faith (our) author and 
Aspicientes in • fidei auctorem et con- 

finisher Jesus, who for the set before him joy, 
summatorem Jesom, qui pro proposito sibi gaudio, 

Miustvs 0'rocupov, alffj(6vr^ xarei^pov Va^» ^v Ssltqi 

endured the cross, the shame despising, on the right hand 
sustinuit crucem, confusione contempta ad dextram 

Ti rou ^povou rou Offou Ixo^io'fiv. 
and of the throne of the Grod is set down, 
que throni Dei sedit. 

(12)Aio roLg rapstykivag ;(8rpa^ xoi rot irapaXsXvficMi 
Wherefore the which hang down hands and the feeble 
Ideo remissas manus et soluta 

Tovotra clvop^^ars 
knees lift up. 
genua erigite. 

• Transposed — it reads, •A^opwin^ $ig •itfoCr, t6v apxr^^^ 



»«i rzKsiu^'^y ^g flriVrsw^. 



224 THE PRmCIFLES OF 

rl6) M^ ris ^ropvof, ^ jS^^ijXo^, big^ifaxt 

L&st (theie be) any fornicator, or profane person, as Esau, 
Ne (sit) quis fornicator, aut prophanus, ut Esau, 

og dvri ^pCitf sug jxio^ diridors toL irpwfl-oroJcia airoi;. (17) 
who for morsel one sold the birthright of him. 
qui propter escam unam yendidit primogenita sua. 

"Itfrs yap Ets xolI fjtcrcVsn-a ^iXwv xXijpovofi.iJo'ai «tJv 
Ye knew for that also afterward wishing to inherit the 
Scitis enim ut et postea volens hsreditare 

suXa^tav, dv^eSoxnuoLtf^yi* ^rayoioLS yap vov'ov 

blessing, he was rejected ; of repentance for place 

benedictionem, reprobatus esf; poenitentis enim locum 

w'x^ eupe, xaiVep jxerd 6axpCuy ix^r^y^cfag aMj^, 

no he found, although with tears seeking it. 
non invenit, quanquam cum lachrymis exquirens earn. 

(18) Ou yap ^p^KfeXrik^^aTS ^'ijXa^wfiiv^ 

Not for are ye come unto the that might be touched 
Non enim accessistis tractibilem 

ops., xai xsxaujx^b) flrupt, xoi 7V09&), xcei 

mount, and that burned with fire, and to blackness, and 
montem, et incensuni igne, et turbinem, et 

(fxoTtf), xou ^us'XXij, (19) Kai (foLktryyog VXV* *** 

darkness, and tempest, And of a trumpet the sound, and 
calignem,et procellam, £t tubs sonum, et 

(puyji *p7fuxr<0ir, ^g oJ dxoC(favT$g «'apijT^a'avro jxij 

the voice of words, which they hearing entreated not 
vocem verborum, quam illi audientes deprecati non 

irpofl'rf^^vaj awoTg Xoyov. (20) (Ohx l9?poy 

*.o set before them the word. (Not they could endure 

propoiir eis sermon em (Non ferebant 



GREEK 6RAMMAB*. 225 

yiip ro AoufrcXX^fUvov * KAv ^pfov 

for (that) whick (was) commanded ; And if (even) a beast 

enim jui mandatus est; Et li bestia 

iiya. rou opot;, Xj^oGoXij^^^srai, ij jSoXiJi 

touch the mountain, it shall be stoned, or with a dart it 
tetigeret montem, lapidabitur, ant jaculo 

»Mwo|euMa'«rai. (21) Kou, oCrw ^oGffpov fv ro ^vra^- 

jhall be thrust through. And, so fearful was the sight 

configetur. £t, ita teiribile erat appa- 

efMvov Mu&^ sT€6Vf''Ex(po^6c sifu xai Ivrpofxo^*) (22) 

(that) Moses said, Terrified I am and (I) quake ;) 
rens(ut) Moses dixit, Exteritus sum et tremebundus ;) 

AXXcl irpoefeXifjXudars lidn opsi, xai ^6'kBt Offou 

But ye are come unto Sion mount, and to the city of God 
Sed accessistis Sion montem, et ciTitatem Dei 

^vvrosj 'lepoutfoXijfA lirovpavJy, xou fi,upioi^iv otyysXwv, 
the living, Jerusalem the heavenly, and myriads of angels, 
viventis, Hierusalem coslestem, et myriades angelorum, 

(23) navfj^upfii xoi hotkr^tftq, v'pcjroToxuv iv 

To the general assembly and church of the first born in 

Frequentiam et ecclesiam primogenitorum in 

heaven written, and to the judge Ood of all, and to the spirits 
ccelis scriptonim, et judicem Deum omnium, et spiiitus 

6txaiuv rsrffXffiufiL^vcjv, (24)Eaj Stti^ipcns v^oc 

of just (men made perfect. And covenant of the new 

justorum perfectorum, Et testament! novi 

|t£(fir7} 'Itjtfov, xoi a7fMen *pavri(ffi.ou xpsiV- 

tfae mediator o Jesus, and to the blood of sprinkling better 
mediatorem Jesum, et sangninem aspersionis prsa- 



226 THE PRINCIPLES OP 

rova XaXouvYi rapd rov *A^s\. 

things speaking before the Abel. — H^b zii, 2, 12, 16-24, 

stantiora loquenten pras Abel. 

(1) 'O^SiXofASv 61 4fui^ o1 duvaroi ra dLo'^sv^fiAra ruv 

Ought then we that (are) strong the infirmities of the 
Debemus tunc nos qui (sunt) potentes imbecillitates 

cUuv&rcJv jSflufro^Sfv, xoi fi.i) louror^ dfitfxstv. (2) *£xtt^. 

weak to bear, and not ourselves to please. Let every 

impotentum portare, et non nobis ipsis placere. Unus- 

9*0^ ^dp ^fiAJv r&) vXijefiov dpstfyciru stg to dyaAov «'po( 

one therefore of us the neighbor please for his good unto 
quisque enim nostrum proximo placeat in bonum ad 

«IX0^0|X17V. 

edification. — Romans xv. 1, 2. 
ffidificationem. 

(22) riypa^n-eu yelp w 'A^paafA 66o vloOff ^rf^' ^va 
It is written for that Abraham two sons had ; one 
Scriptum est enim ut Abraham duos filios habuit ; unum 

ix Trig ffaiSi<fxfiS9 xat Iva ix T?g i>£v6ipas. 

of these by a bond maid, and one of these by a freed woman. 

de his ancilla, et unum de his libera, 

(23)'AXX' 6 ft^v ix tt}^ irai^iVxii^, xaraL (fapxa 
But the one (that was) of the bond maid, aAer the flesh 
Etiam qui (erat) de ancilla, secundum camem 

ysyivynrai' I 6^ ix r% i>jsv6ipas 6ia 

was born ; he but (who was) of the freed woman, (was) by 
natus est ; qui autem (erat) de libera, * (erat) per 

r^g ifrayysklocg, (24) "A nva io'riv oXXijyopoufteva^ auroi 
the promise. Which things are an allegory ; these 

promissioneii. Quq sunt allegorizata ; haec 



GREEK GRAKMAS. 227 

/otp f/(fiv al Ivo diflt^^xar fi*ia fiJv eUro opou^ 2ivo2 

for are the two covenants; the one from the mount Sinai, 

enim sunt duo testamenta; unnm & monte Sina. 

sis ^ouXffiav yewQtfOj {{ri^ i<rWv 'A^ap. (25) To 

unto bondage which gendereth, which is Agar. This 

in serritatem generans, qua est Agar. 

^p'A/ap, 2iya ^po( itfm Jv rjj *Apa€i^ d^^roi^ffr 6i fji 
for Agar, Sinai mount is in the Arabia, answereth and to 
Nam Agar, Sina mons est in Arabia, respondet autem 

vuv *Ispou(faXi)fi> 6ouXffufii ji yar^ ruf 

the now Jerusalem (which) is in bondage and with the 
nunc Hierusalem (qus) servit et cum 

riKvm aC4%. (26) *H Si avu *Ispoucra>a)ffc. 

children of her. The but (which is) above Jerusalem 

filiis suis. Ilia autem (est) sublimis Hierusalem 

IXsu^ipa iifrtVf fing iifri jxV^p ^r^vrcjv 4f<'^v. 

free is, which is the mother of all of us. • • • • 
libera est, qus est mater omnium nostrum. 

(29) 'AXX* Cj(f^sp rire h xard. (fapxa yiwndsisj 

But as then he after the flesh (that was) bom, 

Sed quomodo tunc ille secundum camem genitus, 

iSlcMS rov xarol «veufiA* ouro xai vuv. 

persecuted him (bom) after the spirit ; so even (it is) now. 

persequebatur hunc secundum spiritum ; ita et (est) nunc. 
• ••••• 

(31)*Apa, dSsXipoty oux liTfxiv voidiiJV*]^ rhcvaf 

Therefore, brothers, not we are of the bond woman children, 

Nempe, fratres, non sumus ancills nati, 

dXXflL f^s i\Bvdipa€. 

but of the (ree.—GalatianM iv. 22-26, 29, 31. 
sed libers. 



THE PKIMCXPLBS OF 

(2) 'AXX^XfiJv rot jSapi] pd^raJ^srSf xoj outcj^ dviMtkvifbitfwfk 
One another's burdens bear, and so fulfil 
Alii aliorun onera portate, et ita complete 

rov vo/yiov rw Xpufrw* (3) £i ySip 6oxsT rig ervai 
the law of the Christ, If for one imagine himself to be 
legem Christie Si enim videtur quis esse 

ri, iMilihf Cjv^ laurov ^psveutanj,, (4) To 
something, nothing being, himself he deceiveth. The 
aliquid, nihil existens, seipsum animo fallit. 

6^ ^p^ov laurou ^oxifjio^sVci) fxaefro^, scai rort $lg laurov 
but work his own let prove every one, and then in himself 
At opus suum probet unusquisque, et tunc in seipsum 

aovov ro xoup^/xa f^ffi, xou oux b\s rov Irspov. . (S) 
alone rejoicing shall he have, and not in an other* 
solum gloriationem habebit, et non in alterum* 

"Exatfros yelp ro iSioy ^opriov ^a/traufeu 
Every one for the his own burden shall bear.— ffaZ. vu 
Unusquisqe enim proprium onus portabit. [2-6. 

(14) Aio Xiyei, "EyeipAi h xaAsCSuvj xai Av&s'a 

Wherefore he saith, Awake thou that sleepest, and arise 

Ideo . dicit, Surge dormiens, etezurge 

ix ruv vsxpbiv, xou l^ri^aueffi <foi 6 Xpufros^ (16) BXi- 

from the dead, and will give light to thee the Christ. See 

ii mortuis, et illuminabit te Christus. Yidete 

rsn o2iv itOe dicpi^iig ^sptiearsTrs. f<.i) i)s ou^o^oi, 
therefore that circumspectly ye walk ; not a? fools, 
itaque quomodo accurate ambuletis ; non quasi insipientes, 

dXX* C)c (To^oi* (16) 'E^aT'opoc^ojubevof rov xaipov, on al ^fii^pai 
but as wise; Redeeming the time, because the days 

sed ut sapientes ; Redimentes tenipus, quoniam dies 



GREEK GRAMMAS. 229 

ronipai eku (17) Aid tovto fi.^ yivs^^i a^povf^^ ccXXol 
evil are. Wherefore not be ye unwise, but 

mail sunt Propter hoc non estote imprudentes, sed 

ifuviivrsi Tt TO ^ikviiML To\j Kupfou. (18) KaJ fji^ 

understanding what the will of the Lord (is). And not 
intelligentes qus voluntas Domini (est). Et ne 

be ye drunk with wine, in which is excess, but be filled 
inebriamini vino, in quo est luzuria, sed implemini 

iv TLvsCfLaTr (19) AaXovvre^ kavroTg -^MKiulils xai 

with the Spirit ; Speaking to yourselves in psalms and 

Spiritu; Loquentes vobismetipsis psalmis et 

ufAvoi^y xai uSaTg ^vsufuxrocai^ * ^ovrsg xou •\A')OsAVTsg 
hymns, and songs spiritual ; singing and making melody 
hymnis, et canticis spiritualibus ; cantentes et psallentes 

hf rji icapSitf. CfMJy q-^ Kupiu* (20) E\yx»pt(fTwvrsg ^avrcrs 
in the heart of you to the Lord ; Giving thanks always 
in corde vestro Domino ; Gratias agentes semper 

Mp wvruvj iv ^vojxari rou Kupiou ^fAOJv 'If](fo{i XpKff-ou, 
for all (things), in the name of the Lord of us Jesus Christ, 
pro omnibus, in nomine Domini nostri Jesu Christi, 

T^ 8^9 xoj Uatpi • (21) 'T^oroMftfo/wvoi 

unto God and the Father ; Subjecting yourselves one 

Deo et * Patri; Subject! alii 

to another in the fear of God. — Ephesiam v. 14-2L 
aliis in timore Dei. 
20 



230 



THE PRINCIPLES OF 



[Note. — ^ThB two following Chapters from M&tthew, con bo 
easily translated into English, from a previous knowledge of the 
form of Greek and Latin words, gained by a thorough perusal 
of the preceding chapters and passages; and a reference to the 
common English Testament fi)r such parts as appear difficult or 
obsciu^. It would be adidsable, however, to refer to it as seldom 
as possible— only when necessity requires. The following will 
afford a pleasant and agreeable exercise for the smdent] 



MAT0AIOT K6(p. i5'. 

1 *£v ixsivu r^ xaip^ ^xoucfsv 
*HpuSrig h rgrpapp^j rijv dxorjv 
'Iijtfoii. 

2 Koi sT^es roTg 'gcutfiv a^rou 
OUtos i(frtv 'Iwawijf 6 Baflmtf- 
rris' olMs iiyip6ri cUro rwv vsxpwv, 
xai 6iol TOVTO a\ dwo^t^ig ivspyoU'" 
(fiv ^v avTu. 

3 *0 yAp *Hp^^tjf xpariicfagTov 
*Iuavv)]v, iSvitfsv aurov, xou S6sto iv 
(puXax^, Sia *Hpw5ia6a rfjv yuvau 
xa *iXiV«'ou rou d^sX^ou olutov. 

4*EXfiys yAp aury i 'Iwctvv^^* 
Oux IfgcfTi Coi ^p^ew auT^v. 

5 Koi ^iXciJv aurov dieoxTsTvai^ 

r>jv aurov eJj^ov. 

6 rsvstfiwv Js dyofjt^vwv rou 
'Hpwiou, (iI)p5^(faro ^ du^owjip 
ttJ^ *Hpcj^ia($o^ ^v T^ yJ(fu^ xou 
^psifs rw *Hpw(5^, 

7 'Oiev fwd* opxou wfjLoXoyijfl'sv 

8 'H 51, flrpoSi^aC^sltfa C*© rSj^ 

iflr/ flrivaxi «t)v xg^aXijv 'Iwavvou 
rou BaflTKffou, 

9 Eai iXu«'^4f} 6 pa<fiks6g. 
5idl 61 f'ou^ I'pxou^ xou Tovs (fuvav- 
KXSffiivou^, ixi>^Difs 6o&v\you. 



MATTHiEUM CAP. XIV. 

1 In illo tempore audivit 
Herodes Tetrarcna fa mam 
Jesu. 

2 Et ait pueris suis: Hie 
est Joannes Baptista: ipse 
sarrezit k mortuis, et propter 
hoc efficacisQ operantur in eo. 

3 Nam Herodes apprehen- 
dens Joannem, yinxit eum, 
et posuit in custodia, propter 
Herodiadem uxorem Fhilippi 
fratris sui. 

4 Dicebat enim ille Joannes 
Non licet tibi habere earn. 

6 Et volens ilium occidere, 
timuit turbam : quia sicut pro- 
phetam eum habebant. 

6 Natalitiis autem agendis 
Herodis, saltavit* filia Hero- 
diadis in medio, et placuit 
Herod i. 

7 Unde cum juramento 
spopondit ei dare quicquid 
postulasset. 

8 Ilia yer6 prsBinstructa & 
matresua: Da mihi, inquit, 
hie in disco caput Joannis 
Baptists. 

9 Et contristatus est lexi 
propter vero juramenta, etn* 
mul accumbentes, jussit daii 

* Du»ccd 



GREEK GRAMMAR. 



231 



10 Kai ^ifL^^Mc d^tsxifpccki^s 

11 Kai 7ivi')(6r} >j xsfpakri avri 
:Vi vivoxi, xai iJo^T] rut xopacfiu* 
xai r^yfsyxs Tr^ fit'T]^p< auc^g. 

12 Kai irpo<fs>J6yTfg o\ fux^i]- 
ra/ aurou ijpav ro (ToJfMt, xai Ida- 
^'av ai»ro* xai ^Xdov«^ dir^^ygi- 
>jav roj *It7<foD. 

13 Kou ()lxo:^(foc{: 'I^iifoD^, avs- 
')(Cipri(fsy ixsT6€v iy ••Xojoj giV Ipil- 
fiov rdirov xar' i6iav. Kai axaC- 
(favTss ol oyXoi, r^xoXoi'^ijtfav aii- 
cw ifst^ airo rwv <r6X£CiJv. 

14 Koi igsXdojv h ^Ir^tfQvg^, el6s 
coXuv op^XoV xai i^^XoLy^vKf&ri 
ic* aurou^, xoi i^Spaieevife 9-ct^ 
dppuifrovg auruv. 

15 '0>}/ia^ 6^ ysvofiivTif , flrpotf^X- 
4ov aury oi fjLo^ijrai aurou, Xiyov- 
TSg* 'EpTj^of itfriv roflro^, xoj ij 
wpa ^5^ irap^>i£V awoXotfov coOg 
lyy^g, iva aflreXjfloWfif f if Ttx^ xw- 
ttaff, a^opao'cjd'tv loLMToig, ^puiiala, 

16 *0 5i *lri<fovg sJirBv auToif, 
Ou xp^'^tv i'xpv(fiy diTBkdaiy Sots 
alToTg vy^Tg ^aysiy. 

17 OJ .(J^ Xiyootfiv aurw, Oux 

kai Juo Mvag. 

18 *0 OS sSrg' *6psW jxoi au- 

19 Koj xeXsutfof rouf o;(Xouf 
avoxXi^^vai Iri rouj X^P*"®"^' ^" 
fiuv Toug ^rivrs aprouf, xai rovg 
6C9 ^x^Cctg^ dvaOJ-^ag e]g rov 
oupavov suX^ytitfi* xai x'^kdag^ 
iSuxs roTg yM6r^aTg rovg aprovg* 
oJ 6i fjbo^roi rorif ovXoif . 

20 Kai i^cf/yoy irav«f, xoi I- 
XoprowrdijO'ttV XOI ijpav ro irepifl'- 
Cf uov ^'wv xXa<ffi.aTo;v ^w^exo. xo- 
^ivouf cXfjpsic. 



10 Et mittens decapitavit 
Joannem in custodia. 

11 Et allatum est caput ejus 
in disco, et datum est puellas: 
et attulit matri suae. 

12 Et accidentes discipuli 
ejus, tulerunt corpus^ et sep- 
elierunt illud: et yenientcs 
Dunciaverunt Jesu. 

13 Et audiens Jesus secessit 
inde in navicula in desertum 
locum privatim, et audientes 
turbae sequutae sunt eum pe« 
dibus de civitatibus. 

14 Et exiens Jesus vidit 
miiham turbam, et visceribus 
aflfectus est erga eos, et cura- 
vit aegrotos eorum. 

15 Vespere autem facto, ac- 
cesserunl ad eum discipuM 
ejus, dioentes, Solitarius est 
locus, et bora jam praeteriit: 
absolve lurbas, ut abeuntes 
in vicos, njcrceniursibi escas. 

16 At Jesus dixit eis: Non 
usum habent abire : date illis 
vos manducare. 

17 Illi autem dicunt ei : Non 
habemus hie si non quinque 
panes, et duos pisces. 

18 Tile autem ait: AfTcrte 
mihi illos hue. 

19 Et jubens turbas discum- 
bere super foena, accipiens 
quinque panes et duos pisces, 
suspiciens inc(B]um,benedix- 
it ; et frangens dedit discipu- 
lis panes : at discipuli turbis. 

20 Et manducaverunt om* 
nes, et saturati sunt, et tuler* 
tint redundans fragmentorum 
duode im cophinos plenos. 



232 



THE FBINCIFLES OF 



21 0} 6i MiovTH ^<fav avdps; 
C:(fst vcvraxKfp^iXjoi. X^P'V Tuvoi- 
KMv xoi nfoudiuiv* 

ifovg Tovs luaBrfrag aurou ^fi^vai 
sJg TO fl'Xjorov, XOI *po6i/y$n aMv 

23 Koi M(OJjitoLg roi); ox^^^> 
avi^i] ofV ^0 opo^ xar' i^tav irpo- 

24 To ^8 «'Xorov ^^1] fi.^(fov r^^ 
^aXouftr?]; ^v, )8a0'avf^ofi.6vov uv'o 
f'biv xujULorciJv* ^v ya^ fivavrio^ 6 
avs/xog. 

25 Tfirap<7j 5s 9uXaxJ r^g^ vux- 
rlg cUr^Xjfle irpo^ aJrouj i 'Iijtfou^, 
iTfipiirarGJv iqri rij; ^aXa(f0'v]^. 

26 Koi i6ivT2g aurov oi fxoc^f}- 
roi ivi ri^v 6a\iKf(fav «'6pi«'a«'ouv- 
fl-o, ifr(tpa^6ri(fav^ Xiyov«g, "Oti 
^aavrao'jxa ^(fri* xoi dvo rou 
(poQov txpa^av. 

27 £ui^6J( 51 i}JiXri<f6v auToTg 
^ 'Ii^tfouf, Xiywv, Qapifshs* iyui 

28 'Airoxw^giV 5g avT-^ o n^- 
Tpog, g/irg' topis, SI tfO sf, xs'Xsu- 
tfov /J.S irpog (fs ^Xdsrv eiri rol 
u5ara. 

29 'O 5^ sr^sv, 'EX^^. Kod 
<aTa6a^ oLiro «roiJ cXoiou b EL^rpo^, 
irepiSflrarijCsv Jati col u5aTa, sX- 
dsn/ irpof rov 'IijCoCv. 

30 BXiqrcjv ^s rov avsfiov icf^u- 
puv, g^o^^^Tj* XOI dp^afuvog xar- 
a«'ovTi^efl'dai, 8xpa|6, Xiywv, Ku- 
pfs, 0'ua'ov fiiS. 

31 Evdicjf 6^ b 'Iijifou; ixrsiya^ 
r^^ ^srpo, iirsXaSsro aOrou, xcu 
>.iyei a\)r(f^ ^O'^^yofrKfrs^ sig ri 



21 At edentes fuerant vin 
ferS quinque millia, preter 
mulieres et pueros. 

22 £t statim compulit Jesas 
discipulos 8U0S ascendere in 
naviculaiD, et pnecedere eum 
in ulteriora, dum absolveret 
turbas. 

23 Et absolyens turbas, as* 
cendit in montem privatim 
orare. Vespere autem facto, 
solus erat ibi. 

24 Verum nayicula jam me- 
dium maris erat, vezata h 
fluctibus: erat enim contra- 
rius ventus. 

25 Quarta autem vigilia 
noctis, abiit ad eos Jesus cir- 
cumambulans super mare. 

26 Et videntes eum discipuli 
super mare circumambulan- 
tem, turbati sunt, dicentes: 
Quod phantasma est, et pr» 
timore clamaverunt. 

27 Statim autem loquutus 
est eis Jesus, dicens: Gonfi- 
dite, ego sum: ne metuatis. 

28 Respond ens autem ei Pe- 
trus, dixit: Domine, si tu es, 
jube me ad te venire super 
aquas. 

29 Ipse vero ait : Veni. Et 
descendens de navicula Pe- 
trus, ambalabat super aqu am, 
venire ad Jesum. 

SO Intuitus ver5 ventum va- 
lidum, timuit: et incipiens 
demcrgi, clamavit, dicens: 
Domine, serva me. 

31 Statim ver5 Jesus ezten- 
dens manum, excepit eum, et 
ait illi : Exiguas fidei, ad quid 
dubitasti ^ 



GREEK GRAMMAS. 



233 



32 Eoi IfA^avcwv auruv els to 

33 OS Si iv ^9 «'XjotV9 ^ovr;^ 
«'po<f£)a;vT]0'av aurJ>t Xi^^ovr?^, 
*AXi54wf 0eoC v\os sT* 

34 Koi 6iarfpa<favrs^, ^>iov 
•iff cijv yijv rewvjtrapir. 

35 Koj inryyvovrss oifl-ov oi av- 
^p€( rou roTou ^xsivou, d^itfrv- 
Kav gfe oXt;v rjv v'epi^^wpov ^€i- 
inj», xttJ •'potf^syxav aic^ irav- 

36 Kai fi'ttpExaXouv aO<rov, 7va 
ftovov a^'Uvroi rou xpa^«^6ou rou 
{fiariou a^Tou* xoi o(foi t^/avro, 



32 Et ingressis illis in nayi- 
gum, quievit ventus. 

33 Qui autem in navigio, 
▼enientes adorayerunt eum, 
dicentes: VerdDeiFilius es. 

34 Et transferentes vene- 
runt in terram Gennesaret. 

35 Et cognoscentes eum viri 
I loci illius, miserunt in univer- 
Isam ciTcumviciniam illam: 

et attulerunt ei omnes maid 
affectos. 

86 Et appellabant eum, ut 
vel solflm tangerent fimbriam 
vestimenti ejus: et quotquot 
tetigerunt, preservati sunt. 



MAT0AIOT K6<p. x6'. 

1 Kou i^BhACsv h *l6(fovs iiro- 
pevsn Avrh rov 2f pou, xeu ^rpoffi^X- 
^ov ol luxAryrcu avrou i^iSsT^ai 
alrSi roLc ofxodofi.dff rou I^pov* 

2 'O 6i *l7i(fovs fffiwv al^oTs* 
Ou pyJ'^ers flrawa raura ; ajuLy,v 
>ivcj Cfxn;, ov fi.i) dipeAjj CJSe Xido^ ' 
irt \i6oVj og ov ii^rj xaToKMitfs- 
rai, I 

3 Ka^juivou $s aurou ^fi'i rou 
opovff ruy IXaicjv, ^rpoif^Xdov avru 
o{ iMiffrai xar* iJiav, Xi^ovrfff* 
EiVi f)fi*rv, irov'f raura ?<f4'ai, xai 
W f iTiifMrov rijff <y^ff nra^ov(flag, 
yeu HSff tfuvrgXffioff t-ou ai wvof ; 

4 Kai d^wptiiig I 'If}(foiJff, sf- 
*fv eajTolg* Byj^TBTS fiifrtg i^ijac 

6 IIoXXoj yof IXfiU(f ovroci i4ri v-u 

^ojutaW fwu, X^yovrsf 'Eyw eliu 6 

3Cp>r^(r, xoi voXXovff vXav^o'ovi^i. 

6 M6XX4<rsrs ^^ olxo<;siv iroXi- 

(MVff xa axoo^ iroX^jULCJv* hpofrt 



CAPUT XXI\. 

1 Et egressus Jesus ibat 
de templo: et accesserunt 
discipuli ejus ostendere ei 
eedificationes templi. 

2 At Jesus dixit illis: Non 
intuemini hec omnia ? Amen 
dico vobis, non relinquetur 
hie lapis super iapidem, qui 
non dissolvetur. 

3 Sedente autem eo super 
montem Olivarum accesse- 
runt ad eum discipuli privat- 
im, dicentes : Die nobis, quan- 
do heec erunt, et quod signum 
tuae prsesentise et consumma* 
tionis seculi ? 

4 Et respondens Jesus, 
dixit eis: Videte nequis vos 
seducat. 

5 Muhi enimyenient in no- 
mine meo, dicentes: Ego sum 
Christus: et multos seducent. 

6 Futuri estis autem audi- 
rc btlla, et rumores hello* 



234 



THE PRINCIPLES OF 



Aar dXX* ouirw itfri to ciXo^. 

f^vov, xa/ ^aCiXeia iri /SowfrXfi- 
iav* xoi' lefovrai XjfMi xoj XoifMi, 
(Oi UKffMi xara Tonto-jg. 

8 Ilavra 6s raura <ipx^ w6i- 
vuv. 

9 TgVs «'apa^u(fou<riv ttiuSis etg 

^Xl-y^lV, XOJ cUtOXrSVOUd'lV UfJA(* 

xai l0'£(fde jxitffiufi.fvoi Ciro •'avruv 
i^vuj (5ia TO ovofjia imu^ 

10 Kou rors d'xav^aXio'^^a'ovrai 
voXXo/y xoi olXX^Xou^ vapo^w- 
(foud*!, xa/ ftiJ'^irobO'iv dXX^jXou^. 

11 Koi «oXXoi >}/(u6(Mrpo9^9*ai 
iyspBritfoyrou^ xai •'Xav^tfoufl'i 
flToXXouf. 

12 Kai Jid 4-0 vXvj^uvd^voi njv 
dvofjL/av, ^^uy^tffroj ^ ayd«'ij rwv 
iroXXuv. 

13 *0 66 uirojULfiva^ eiV WXo^, 
ov<ro( o'Cfj^O'srai. 

14 Kai xijpvx^^tf^^a* roDco co 
Euayy^Xiov Tr,g ^atfiXeiaf fv 
oXij r^ uixouftsvi}, £iV jxaprJpiov 
flratfi ^-orif tdvfitfr xa/ roTS *i|6i ^•o 
riXog, 

15 "Orav ouv Wts^-g co /S^e'Xuy- 
oa 9-^^ epTjfjwotffw^, ro *p»j4iv 6id 
AaviigXrou ^poip);rot, ^o'rc.j^ iv ro- 
trw ayiw* 6 dvayivutfxutyf voeirw 

16 Tors q\ iv 4^ 'lou6a<a ^su- 
• irtAiifav g-ri ret opij. 

17 *0 M Tou JdjfjLarof, fir^ 
xara^aiviTUi apai ci ex rijf oW- 
o^ au^-ou* 

18 Kai h iv Tw d/f w, /ultj ^«'i- 
4'4'ps>Ld4'6J ^•^ 9'oj ^pou rd S/xdrta 



rum: Videte ne turbemini: 
oportet enim omnia fieri : sed 
nondum est finis. 

7 Excitabitur enim gens in 
gentem etregnuminregnum: 
et erunt fames, et pestilentiae, 
et terrsemotus secundum loca. 

8 Omnia autem heec ini- 
tium dolorum. 

9 Tunc tradent vos in trib- 
ulalionem, et Occident vos: 
et critis odio habiti ab om- 
nibus gentibus, propter no- 
men meum. 

10 Et tunc offendentur mul- 
ti: et invicem tradent, et 
odio habebunt invicem. 

11 Et multi pseudoprophetae 
excitabuntur, et seducent 
muhos. 

12 Et propter mulciplicati 
iniquitatem, refrigescet cha- 
ritas muhorum* 

13 Qui autem permanensin 
finem, hie servabitur. 

:4 Et prsedicabitur hoc E- 
vangelium regni in universa 
habitata, in testimonium om- 
nibus gentibus: et tunc ve- 
niet finis. 

15 Cum ergo videritis abomi 
nationem desolationis elTatan 
k Daniele Propheta, stuns it 
locosancto: legensintelligat . 

16 Tunc qui in Judsa fugi- 
ant ad montes. 

17 Qui super domum, non 
descendai tol ere quid de aede 
sua: 

18 Et qui in agro, non re- 
vertatur retrd toliere vestem 
8uam. 



GRBEE GRAMMAR. 



236 



19 OM Ss roug Iv yag'pt ^o^- 

20 Ilpii<fsC^6(f66 Si ha fi.ij yi' 

iy da^^aurui. 

21 *E(rTai ^olp TM-fi flXi«4/i^ fi.6- 
yaXij, o7a ou yeyovev cUr* apX'i^ 
xoiffMu fcj^ rou vuv, ou^* ou fi.^ 

22 Kai ?i JX11 ixoXo€u4Y}(rav aS 
^'poj ^xs7vaf, oux av ^(fu^i} vcufa 
(fap^« SiOL 61 rou^ JxXfxrou; xoXo- 
^cj^Voyroi a! ^juipoj ^x^n/ai. 

23 To« iav ri^ Cfi,rv si^jj* 'I- 

24 'Eypp^^Cowai yap 4'fiv^o- 
p^DKyroi xai i^^^ovpo^Sirai, xai 
^w<roi;0'i (fTjiJLfira jxeydXa xo/ rf- 
poro, (So'«'S ff'Xay^<fou, £i duvarov, 
xai rob^ ixXfxro:;^* 

25 *l6ou, iTpostpfixa Cfirv. 

26 *£dv ouv eTfl'ojtriv u/j.rv* *lJou, 
Iv tJ Ip^fxoj Ifl*?-*, fjtij IgsX^iiTg' 
i5ou, Iv ro% rofUioi^, f<»i9 fi'id'rsu- 

27 "nCflrep ydp ^ ourrpatnj l|£p- 
;^6rai ctiro otvaToXwv, xa/ (paivgrai 
Ecj^ 6\i(t\My' ourcj^ l<frai xo/ f) 
rapovo'ia v'ou ulou roU dvdp(04rou. 

28 "0*00 ydp, Idv jj rh irrwjxa, 
exsr <fuya;^^0'ovrai oi cUroi. 

29 E64lw^ ^1 jxsra Hv &Xj4/iv 
rwv ^f«p«v Ixffivwv 4 liXjof (fxofl'Kf- 
dr,<f6raf, xai ?} (ffX^vi) ou 6^0*61 ro 
^iyyot tdlr^y xeu ol oig'6pB$^B<fouV' 
rai dv'o rou oOpavdu, xai a) Juvd* 
fifi^ ruv o^pdvwv (raXsu4)7(fovrai. 

3) Kai T0T5 ^v^tfecai ^-o <ft)- 
ttiiov cou ujoH av^puirou cv coj 



19 VsB autem in utero ha* 
bentibus, et lactantibus in 
illis diebus. 

20 Orate autem ut non fiat 
fuga vestra hyeme, neque in 
Sabbato. 

21 Erit enim tunc tribulatio 
magna, qualis non fuit ab 
initio mundi, usque, modo, 
neque non fiet. 

22 Et si non contracti fais- 
sent dies illi, non esset servata 
omnes caro: propter autem 
electos contrahentur dies illi. 

23 Tunc si quis yobis dix- 
erit: Ecce hie Christus, aut 
illic : ne credite. 

24 Excitabuntur enim pseu- 
dochristi et pseudoprophetsa^ 
et dabunt signa magna et 
prodigia ita ut seducere, si 
possibile, et electos. 

25 Ecce, prsedixi vobis. 

26 Si ergo dixerint vobis: 
Ecce, in deserto est, ne exe- 
atis : ecce in conclavibus, ne 
credatis. 

27 Sicut enim fulgur exit 
ab Orientibus, et apparet us- 
que Occidentes, ita erit et 
prsBsentia filii hominis. 

28 Ubicunque enim fuerit 
cadaver, illuc congregabun- 
tur aquils. 

29 Statim autem posttribu- 
lationem dierum illorum Sol 
obscurabitur, et Luna non 
dabit lumen suum, et stellae 
cadent de cobIo, et efficacite 
coelorum concutientur. 

30 Et tunc parebit signum 
filii hominis in c(rlo: ti tunc 



236 



THS PRINCIPLES OF 



eupav^' xai tors xo4^vrai trad'ai 
a\ 9uXai rifig y?f, xai o-^owaj 
rev tlov rou oLvdp&MTou ^pp^oofvov 
IVi ruv vs^sXoJv rou c^pavou, fard 
juvoLfXFoi^ xai ($o^f iroXX%. 

31 Kai aflro5-eX«r«-oO<: 0177^^ 
airou ftfird (faXflrty/o^ ^wv^i^ fxe- 
ydXojff, xai ^iritfuvaf outf* roO^ Jx- 
A5xroO^ aurou ix r&5v r6(f<fapGJV 
dv£fi,cjv, dflr' dxpcjv oupavwv ^cjf 
dxpGJv aurc3v. 

32 'AflTo (5s r^f tfux^f ju^^frs 
r^v flfopa^oXfiv orav ^^ij 6 xXd- 
5of atr7/g yivTfTai AifaXof, xoi 
rot 9j5XXa ix<puij, yivwo^ers on 
Jyyuf ro hipog. 

33 Ourw xai UfAsr^, oracv UrflS 
«'dvra raura, yivwifkerg on iyyCg 
Jtfriv 6ir< Supaic:. 

34 'AfAT^v X^yw UfAn/, ou fjwi 
^apMjl 19 yevftt auTTj, Iwf dv 
irdvra raura y/vfrai. 

35 'O oupavof xai >? 7>j flraps- 
XeuCovrar oJ ^i Xoyoi jxou ou fxij 
irapeX^uCi. 

36 nspi 65 Trig ^iJsipag sxeiyv\g^ 
Koi rr^g wpac, ou6s/ff, oi^Sv, 0'j6s 
ol dyyeXXoi cwv oupavuv, ei /X17 6 
rarr^p jutou fxovof. 

37 "n^flTSp (Js ai ^fi^pai rif Nwc, 
ous'W^r gtfrai xai >j capouCia rou 
jlou rou dvdp(Lflrou. 

38''n(r'n'ep ydp r-tfay iv raTg »j. ^- 
pai^ rai^ irpo rou xaraxXueffAou 
^pCyyovvsg Xj' flrivovrep, yafxouvrsf 
Ktti ixyay^i^ovreg, d^pi ?^ V^P*J^ 
si(fSiX^s Nw6 giV Tijv xj^wrov* 

39 Kai oux gyvwfl'av, ^wf ?Xd6v 
xaroxXutffXo^j xoi Jpffv a^rav- 
To^' ourwff IcfTOt xai ^ «"« poutfia 
rou u]ou rou dv^pu^r-u 

40 Tors 6J > etfovro; ^v rw -''ypo'* 



plangent omnes tribas terrse, 
et videbunt filium hominis 
venientem in nubibus coeli, 
cum efficicia et gloril multa. 

31 Et legabit angelos suos 
cum tuba vocis magns^, et 
congregabunt electos ejus & 
quatuor ventis, i summis cce- 
lomm usque extrcma eorum. 

32 A ver6 ficu discite para- 
bolam: quum jam ramus ejus 
Tuerit tener, et folia germi- 
naverint, scitis quia prope 
sestas. 

33 Ita et vos, quum videntis 
baec omnia scitote quia prope 
est in januis. 

34 Amen dico vobis, non 
prseteribit generatio haec do- 
nee omnia ista fiant. 

35 Coelum et terra prreteri- 
bunt : verCim verba mea non 
proeteribunt. 

36 De autem die ilia et bora 
nemo scit, neque angeli cob- 
lorum, si non Pater meus 
solus. 

37 Sicut autem dies Noe, 
ita erit et adventus Filii ho- 
minis. 

38 Sicut enim erant in die- 
bus ante diluvium, comeden- 
tes et bibentes, nubentes et 
nuptui tradentes, usque quo 
die intra vit Noe in arcam : 

39 Et non cognoverunt do- 
nee venit diluvium, et tulit 
omnes : ita erit et prssentia 
Filii hominis. 

40 Tunc duo erui.t in asro: 



GREEK GRAMMAB. 



237 



• el; «'apaXa|i§oivsrai, xai h sT^ 
ftfieroj. 

41 Auo d\ri6ovifai iv f'u iLuXuvr 
fbia vapaXaft^avsroi, xoi fjtia 

42 TfTj^opsiTS o?v, o<ri oux oi- 
fers v'oi^ (Spa b xi^pio; ufAc3v Ip. 

43 'JSxervo ^1 9^fv^0Vsrff, on el 
^Sf b oixo^e(fir6n]; iroiqt ^uXoxa 

av, xoi oux av f7a<fs diopu^vai 
f^ oixiav ocurou. 

44 Aid rouco xoi UfiLSi^ yivsif&s 
IroifMi* on, ^ cljpa ou SoxsTrSf 6 
ulo; rov oLvdp6J«'ou Ip^srou. 

45 T(( apa i(fnv h ^Kfrog 6ou- 
>u); xcu q)povi|xo;, ov xariffTTiffsv o 
xupio; aurou Jori r^; ^epa^rsia; 
aurou, rou ^k^ovoi auror^ W^v 
rpo^i^v iv xai p^ ; 

46 Maxapio; h 6ov\og ixemg, 
ov iXdovW h xCpiog avTov eupV^* 
flfoiouwa ouroj;. 

47 'AfjMJv Xiy" '^l*'^» *" ^*' 
«'a0'i roi^ ^vap^^oviffv a(trov xoit- 
a^ri}(f6i ourov. 

48 'Edv ^i 57*13 6 xaxcj Sovkut 
§xsTvog iv rrj xapSia avrou* Xpo- 
vlt^u xt^pio; fMu ^srv. 

49 Koj apgrirai rC^rsfv rtivg 
(f\jvSw'Kov^^ i(f&ietv 6i xoi v'lvsiv 

60 "H^ei 'o xlJpio; rou ^ouXoo 
ixslvov iv 4fiip^ |i 0^ ^poifdox^, 
XOI ev (ijpa ^ oC ^fvojo'xef. 

51 Kai $iy(yroiiA}^st au«-ov, xou 
v'o fiipof aurou f<*$<rd ruv uiroxpi- 
rcjv ^i}(fsr IxiT itfrou l xXau^fto; 
xcu I Bpvyvtls rCsv ^^ovruv. 



unus assumittur, et unus re^ 
linquitar. 

41 Das molentes in mola : 
una assumetar, et una relin- 
quetur. 

42 Vifi^ilate ergo, quia nes- 
citis qua hora Dommus Tes- 
ter venit. 

43 Illud autem scitote, quo- 
niam si sciret paterfamilias 
qui custodi& fur venit, vigi- 
laret utique, et non sineret 
perfodi domum suam. 

44 Propter hoc et vos estote 
parati, quia qua hora non pu* 
talis: Filius hominis ventu- 
rus est. 

45 Quis putas est fidelis 
servus et prudens, quern con- 
stituit dominus suus super 
familiam suam, ad dandum 
illis cibum in tempore ? 

46 Beatus servus ille, quern 
veniens dominus ejus, mve 
nerit facientem sic. 

47 Amen dico vobis, quoni- 
am super omnibus substantiib 
suis constituet eum. 

48 Si autem dixerit malus 
servus ille in corde suo : Tar- 
dat dominus meus venire. 

49 Et cosperit percutere con- 
servos, edere autem et bibere 
cum ebriosis: 

50 Veniet dominus serv^ 
illius in die quo non expectat, 
et in hora qusl non scit. 

51 Et dividet eum, et par- 
tem ejus cum hypocritis po« 
net: illic erit fletus, et stridor 
dentium. 



■238 



T iS FlIMCVLBS OF 



ANALYSIS OF 3REEK VERBS— Matthew II 



Prep. jiug. Root ind,vmp. 


3 pi. Prep, Root. 1/irf. 3f. 


1, flrap s ygv owo. 


12. ^f EXfiuCs row. 


Around did come they* 


Out come shall one. 


Root, 3 8. ind, pr. 


Root. lftd.3e. 


2. hr 1 V. 


13. «'o»fjLav sF. 


Is he. 


'Protect shall who. 


Root, 1st pi. 


Jmg.Rooi,laor.ind.B9 


3. Bl6 0fJb5V. 


14. 4 xpiCo) <fs. 


See we. 


did inquire he. 


jSug, Root.UtpL 


iJoo*. 2 aor. 3 «. 


4. 4 ^>^ Ojxev. 


15. sTie s. 


Have come we. 


Say did he. 


Prep, Root, inf. 


Prep. Root. 1 aor. imp 2 jii 


5. frpo(f xvv ^<fai« 


16. sg erouf ee«. 


Before fall to. 


About inqure do ye. 


Aug, Root. Poi. ind. 1 aor 


. 3 e. Root. 2 aor. ntb. 2 pi. 


6. 6 ^'apav dij. 
Was troubled he. 


17. $vp vi rs. 


Found ye shall have. 


Jiug. Root, e.v.ind.imp 


.3$. Prep, Root. 1 aor. imp. 2 pi 


7. i •'uvdttv f fl-o. 


18. a^r ayygiX otrs. 


Did ask he. 


Back bringf word do ye. 



20 



Root, e, V. 2fut. mid, 3 «. 

8. yew S. rai. 

Bom he should be. 
Root. 2 ayr. 3 pi. 

9. £iir ov. 
Said they. 

Red. Root. Pat. inJ. per/. 3 e. 

10. y8 yptt* rat. 2 . 

Written it has been 

Root. 2dt. 

H. 6 r. 22< 

Art thou. 



Pr^. Root, (a t ) 1 aor. sub. 1 «. 

19. V'pOtf' xvv 4 (f 6J. 

Before fall may I. 
.^tiig'. Root. 1 aor. dep. 3 jd. 
i vopsu B )} tf'av. 
Depart did hey. 

Root, imper. 3 i» 

Behold thou. 
i{oo^ 2 aor, 3 jp^. 
FifJ ov. 

Seen had they. 



OKSSK 6EAMIIAE. 239 

Prep. Root. 2 aor. 3 «. Root. imp. pr. 2 §. 

S3, ff'po ryy 6 V. 35. U6 i. 

Before led it. Be thoa. 

aug^Root. 2 aor, imd. 3 «• Root, tub. 2 wr* 1 i. 

24. ^ (fr 1}. 36. «!«' w. 

Stood it. Call I. 

Root, hid. imp. 3 t. J2ool. <ni. pr,3$. ^ 

26. fi V. 37. (wXX El. 

Was it. Is about 

Avg. Root. 1 aor. imd, 3 pi. JZool. inf. pr. 

26. i x°^P ^ ^**^ ^» ^'' *"'• 

Rejoice did they. Seek to. 

Root. 2 aor. act. 3 pL Prep. Root. 1 aor. it^ 

27. 5up ov. 39, euro Xs ^ oi, 
Foand they. De stroy to. 

Pnp. Root. 1 aor. act. 3 pi. Pnp. Aug. Root. 2aor ^ . 

28. ^pwf s xuv 9) ^av. 40. irap s Xa/3 9« 
Before fall did they. Up took he. 

Prep. jSug. Root. 1 aor. 3 pi. Prep. Root. 1 aor. 3 1. 

^. •'pwr,, 11 vsyx a ». 41. av« ^up ij tf jv. 

Before did bring they. Back went he. 

Prep, Root, 1 aor. inf. Root. 3 1. 

30. ava xccfMT <f at. 42. ^ v. 
Back turn to. Was he. 

Prep, Jug, Root, 1 aor. a, 3 pi. Root, nib. 1 aor, pas. 3 «• 

31. av 9 ';^6Jp 1) (fav. 43. «'Xi|p u 6 ri. 
Back went they. Fulfilled might be it. 

RiHft. ind. pr. 3 1. fM» Aug. Root, ind. 1 aor. 1 «. 

32. 9aiv s rcu. 44. I xaXff (f a. 
Appears he. Called I. 

Prep. Root. imp. 2 aor. 2 «. Root. 1 ao^. pan. ind, 3 i. 

33. vapaXa^ s. 45. ^v94rai;( 6 t). 
Up take (do) thou. Slocked was he. 

Root, imp, 2», Aug.Root, ind.l aor.pae, 3 s 

34. 9SU7 s. 46. I ^vfii 6J ^ ji« 
Flee (do) thou. Enraged was he. 



240 PRINCIPLES OF GREEK GRAMMAR. 

Root, 2 (tor. ind. act. 3 «. Root, ind, pre*. 3 pi - 

47. av h X s. 53. ek i. 
Killed he. Are they. 

' j3i^. Root. 1 aor. ind, act, 3 s. Root. ind. pr. 3 «. mii. 

48. 4 xp(S cj (f 6» 54. ^oiv 6 roi. 

Enquired had he. Appears he. 

^ug. Root, 1 aor, ind. pas. 3 s. Prep. Root, imp, 2jior act 

49. s ^X7)p cj 6 VI , 55, qrapa XajS a. 

Fulfilled was it. Up take (do) thou. 

Aug, Root. 1 aor.ind.pas. Zi. Root. imp. pr, 2s. dep 

50. 4 xou (J* d 9). 56. vopfu ou. 

Heard was it. Depart thou. 

Aug. Root. imp. ind. Red. Root, ind, act. per/, 3 pL 

51. ^ ^sk s, 57. rs ^v^x a iSu 
did will Dead are they. 

Prep. Root. 1 aor, pass, inf. Aug, Root. 3 s. imp, ind» 

52. ^rapo xX tj dij vai. 58, ^ Xd « 



V. 



Consoled to be. Did come he. 



NUMERALS. 



1 sTs^ unu3, 17 £4'raxai(^exa, septemdecim, 

2 ^uo, duo, 18 ^xruxatdsxa, octodecim, 

3 rpsTgy tres, 19 svvsoxaidsxa, povemdecim, 

4 riiTifapsef quotuor, 20 srxotfi, viginti, 

5 flrivrsy quinque, 21 slxotft sTg, viginti unus, 

6 Ig, sex, 22 slxMfi ^uo, viginti duo, 

7 ^irroly septem, 30 rpiaxovra, triginta, 

8 ^xrw, octOy 40 r$d'(fapaxovra,quadraginta, 

9 ivvia^ novem, 50 ^rsvr^xovra, quinquaginta, 

10 SixoLj decern, 60 l^^xovrot, sexaginta, 

11 MsxcL^ undecim, 70 /^^o/x^xovra, septuaginta, 

12 SC)6sxoLf duodecim» 80 ^/^oft^xovra, octoginta, 

13 TpKfxou6sxo^ tredecim, 90 ewev^xovra, Donaginta, 

14 4'etf(rapfi0'xa(d8xa,quotuorde.lOO Ixarov, centum, 

15 neevTSxaiSexa^ quindecim^ 200 ^laxotfioi, ducenti, 

16 Ixxai^sxoc, sexdecim, 300 rpiax6(fioi, trecenti. 



PBINCIPLES 

"* Of TBI 

GERMAN, SPANISH AND FRENCH LANGUAGES. 







THB ALPHABETS. 






VatMMM, 




■Pixne. 


nnoa. 


A aa 


a» 


■A 


ah 


A 


ah 


B 95 


i*^ 


B 


bay 


B 


hay 


C dc 


ftay 


C 


thay 


C 


%ay 


D 5Db 


d^ir 


D 


day 


D 


day 


E Se 


d 


E 


& 


E 


a 


F gf 


«/ 


F 


afii 


F 


eff 


G ®0 


^aj' 


G 


hay 





zjay 


m t>\ 


hah 


H 


d<hay 


H 


au»k 


I 3i 


ie 


I 


ee 


I 


ee 


J 3i 


yot 


J 


hotta 


J 


^ 


K St\ 


kah 


K 


leak 


K 


kaw 


L 81 


d 


L 


Srlay 


L 


tU 


M Vtm 


em 


M 


drmay 


M 


em 


N 9l« 


en 


N 


drwiy 


N 


en 


Do 


9 





9 








P Dj» 


pay 


P 


foy 


P 


pay 


C £}q 


kuh 


Q 


koo 


Q 


huh 


B mx 


air 


R 


d-ray 


B 


err 


8 ®f»* 


en 


8 


d-tay 


S 


ess 


r St 


toy 


T 


toy 


T 


tay 


U Uit 


00 


U 


oo 


U 


ue 


F «» 


fow 


V 


vay 


V 


vay 


IT SB w 


van . 










X Ht ■ 


eex 


X 


d4cey 


X 


eex 


T 99 


tpsuon 


r 


eeffreeOgah 


Y 


eegvesK 


^ 3a 


tiett 


z 


thater 


Z 


Kei 


A u. 




& 


etc 


& 


efc. 


* The former of tliMe eharaoten is initial or 


mt^id; tholAttar 


•IwayiilML 










M44 



21 241 



242 THE GERMAX LANGUAGE. 

There are also^ in Spanish — ^ 

Ch Vi{Ltj) ^{Ny) Rr 

chay ailyeay anyeay air-ray 

[Note. — ^Let the student remember that the naffMhu nothing to do 
with the /yronimeui/um of a letter; no reliance will, therefore, bo 
placed on the alphabetical cognomen of a letter for its totiaJ.] 



PRONUNCIATION OF THE GERMAN. 

% — ^like a in far, 

^a — ^protracted sound of a; as bad -^aar, iht hair, 

S — ^At the commencement of syllables^ it is like b in bend; 
but at the close of a syllable, it sounds much likejp or|>6; as 
Qtlb, yellow, 

S3 1— enunciate both consonants; as Iel6t, (lehi) lives, 

E — ^before e, f, 5, 9, i, p, like ts; as ber Eirlel, the circle. 
Before a, f>, u, and the consonants, like A;; as bad Soncert, the 
concert. 

S^ (^Tsay-hah) before a, o, u, sounds like k; also at the 
commencement of a syllable, and before the consonants. After 
vowels and consonants, and before e and i, in French and 
Latin words, has a peculiar guttural sound, difficult to repre- 
sent in English. Observe the position of your tongue while 
enunciating the consonant k, in the word kind — move the 
tongue back towards the throat a little distance, force the 
breath audibly, without the intonations of the voice, through 
he aperture between the tongue and the roof of the mouth, 
and you have the sound as exactly as it can be made by a 
foreigner. This sound occurs in such words as bad Zixi^, the 
cloth; bie WXif, the milk; &c. It has the sound of sh in 
3ci^/ 1; Xti6}, ru^, &c. &c. 

S^d — ^like x; as bcr SDi^^, the ox, 

(S! — like k; as bicf, thirk. 



THE GERMAN LAKGUAGI. 248 

!D — ^ThiB letter approximates more closely to the sound of 
/ or TH. The tongue is placed against the teeth (instead of 
the roof of the mouth), a liUle above where it is placed for 
th; closing the aperture between the roof of the mouth and 
the tongue — the breath is emitted with the intonation of the 
Toice, forming the sound of the German b* 

S— long; like a in mate; as ]^abe, have: short,* like t in 
mut; as bad Snbe, die end. 

6e — ^protracted c. 

g — ^like f in from^ fovj fount j &c. 

Sf — a little heavier sound than f single. 

— ^like yk; as gut, good ; groj, great^ &o. At tb/ end of 
syllables, g has a sound similar to cA; as ber SQcg, the tcay. 
Also, sometimes in the middle of syllables; as ber SU^tn, the 
rain. 

$ — aspirates Towels, when placed before them ; as ber ^itit" 
met, the heaven. It is silent, and proloDgs the vowel, when 
placed after it; as bad 3al^r, the year; toa^Ien, to choose; bie 
U^r, the watch, ko. 

3 — long, like eiame: short, like % in pin. 

3(J)— likey; asja,y«. 

St — ^like k; as bad Ainb, the MM. 

i — ^like I; as bad iamm, the lamb. 

SK— like m; as bet SBann, the man. 

91 — ^like n ; as ntu, new. 

Slg— like ng; as Jung, young. 

D — ^long, like ^ in no; as obet: or short, like u in tub; ah 
Dp, often. 

9) — ^likej>; ns )^xt^tn, to press. 

9^ — like/; as ber |)roj)l^et, the prophet. 

£>— like ^; as Me Cual, the torment. 

* A short Towel maintains its original sound, but ii pronounced 
quicker, and a little more compressed. Vowels before double letters 
•re short, as cine Zaffc, a cup. 



244 THE GSBMAN LANaUAGX. 



9t — ^like r; as Hi ^tx^, the heart. 

(S — ^like s; as bad @al3, t^ so/^. 

(Si^ — ^like sA; as bie @d^n)e|ler, e^ mfsr. 

3>— like /; as bet Sag, (^ datf. 

In words of fotBign derivation, terminating in tum^ the ti 
is prononnced like toe; as Cont^ntHott, convention: |^— like to. 

U — ^iike oo; as ber ^vA^ the hat: short, like « in fuM; as 
ber ^unb, ^ dog, 

• 8— like /; as bOtt, from. 
90 — ^like v; as t^a^x, true. 

3E — like x; as bie 9rt, <^ axe. 

21— like i / as bet ©t^I, the ttyle. 

3 — ^like to; as jeljii, <c?i. 

% — ^like ai in^tV, or e in inen ; as bet 95t, Ae iear. 

£)— like c in A^r; as fd^on, heaviifvl,^ 

(t — similar in sound to the French tt. In English, we have 
L ) such sound. Observe the position of the lips in sajii^ 
M : with the lips remaining in this position, pronounce i long; 
dra^ the tongue slightly backward, and jou will have the de- 
sired sound. Bear in mind that this is a compressed sound : 
notice that in sabring ire, jou first enunciate oo (10), and after- 
wards I; manage so as to pronounce the e at the same moment 
with 00 (w), the tongue being drawn a little backward, and 
pressed firmly against the upper double teeth, and yon will 
encounter little difficulty in pronouncing the letter correotly. 

DIPHTHONGS. 

S(u — ^like ou; as ba^ ^auif the house, 
8H — ^like t in pine; as bet SDlai, May. 
9I9 — ^like % in pine. 

* This is as near as this sound can be represented by the English 
rowel. The sonnd is a little more open than « in A^; the tongue 
ie moved farther forward. The best way to get this sound, is ta 
Qatch it from a Germ in, or some other acquainted with it 



THE SPANISH LANGUAGS. 246 



(E(— 'like t in pine. 

S9 — ^like i ill pine, 

in — ^like oi in noise (compreued wund)^ 

Stt — ^like oi in noise (compressed sound). 

3e — ^like ee in /cc<. 

Si — ^like t in miW. 



OP THE SPANISH. 



A — ^is pronounced like oA; as la cara, ike face. 
B — ^like 5 ; as bonlto^ pretty. 

C — ^before e, i, like ih in think; as el pincel (ei peenthiol); 
ihepencU. Beibre a^ O; u^ like ^; as cn41 (kooiU), toAiicA. 
D — see German S)« 
E — ^like <S; as me (jaAj)y me. Short, like e in Aen; as 

P — ^like /; as caf^ the coffee. 

G — ^like h before Cy i; as genio (bft-nSo), genius. Before 
a, o, Uy before consonants and after all vowelsy like gmgo; 
as grande, greojt. 

H — is always silent. 

I — ^like e in me; as el vino, the wine. 

J — ^like hy in all eases; as, Jos^ (Hosay); Joseph. 

K — ^like ^; as kali, seaweed. 

L-r-like I; as el papel, the paper. 

M — ^like m; SA mafiana (manyana), to-morrovo. 

N — like n ; as no, noly no. 

— ^like o; as con gusto, with pUaswre. 

P — ^like j>; as pan, bread. 

Q — ^like k; the subsequent u is not pronounced; as que 
(kfiy), what. C is now generally used in the place of q. We 
write cuiU (kwiil), instead of quU, which. 

Br-«of^ like r in har^ far^ &c. : hard, like rr in parrar, to 
2\* 



246 THB FRKNGH I.AKGUAQB. 

eoctend. The soft sound is represented by a single r; the hard 
sound; by double rr, 

8 — ^like tin so; as sefidr (samy<$r)y tir, 

T — ^very similar to the German b } tengo^ I have. 

U — ^like oo; as su (soo), your, 

V — like v; as el vino, the totne. 

X — occurs but seldom; pronounced the same as x in 
English. 

Y — ^like ec, ory; as muy (moo-^), very; j, and. 

Z — ^like th in throne; as el Upi£ (l&peeih), the pencil 

Ch — ^pr>nounced in all cases like ch in church; as el chal^oo^ 
tki vest. 

LI — ^like ly; as bello (bailyo), heauti/ul, 

ST — ^like ny; as sefiorita (sainyoreeta), Jfin. 

Rr— see R. 



OF THE FRENCH. 

A — ^is pronounced like oA; as alezan (al-iang), hay or nrrel 
horsCy Pdris, &c. : short, like a in hat; as datte, date^ a fivxL 

B— like h; as le bal (leh b&l), the ball. 

C — ^like k before a^ o, u, l, r^t^ in the same word; aacdeul, 
calculation; clou (kloo), naily tack. Before e, %, y, like s; 
likewise, with the cedilla ( , ) under it, before a, o, «, is pro- 
nounced like s; as 9a (sah), thiSy that. 

Ch — like k; as ehlamyde, a doak. Like s4; as oa cheval, 
a horse. 

I>— -like d; as done, <Acn. 

E — [unaccented], like e in her. Often silent. See Ger- 
man 5. ^ 

6 — [accented], like <2 long; as caf<6 (coff-ay), coffee. 

h — ^like a iu am; as le p^, the father. 

6-Hsamc as ^, but longer ; as t«te, the head. 



THE FRENOH LANGUAOB. 247 

F — like /; as fer, iron. 

G-— like g; as gant (gang), glcme: like zK; as gdsir, to lie, 
he buried, 

H— like A. Often silent. 

I—like i in English; as petite (pettit), littk: diott, like t 
iupvn; as ici (isy), here. 

J — ^like $ in measure; as jamais (shama), never; jour 
(shoor)^ dc^. 

K — ^like A;; as kjnancie, quuu^. 

L — ^like I: 11 like fy or l-^tA. 

-^T 1.. 1 r ^ guttural sound, somewhat similar to ngk, 
N — ^like«.* J 

— ^like o, • 

P — ^like j> ; as pain, bread. 

Ph — like /; as phare, light-home. 

Q — ^like Spanish q; as que, that. 

R — ^like r. Silent where it terminates a word, if preceded 
by e. 

S — like s or z. Often silent. 

Sc — ^like $ before e, t, y ; before a, o, w, ?, r, like <A:. 

T — ^like t. It has also, before ta, ts, teu, urn, a sound like 
to or c; as tial, tion, tieux, &c. Often silent 

Th — ^like f, in all cases. 

U — ^like German iL 

V— like V. 

X — like kg, gz, ss, k, (before c), and z. Silent 

Y— like ee. 

Z — ^like « and s. 

DIPHTHONQS, &e. 

Ai — ^is pronounced like ai in Aatr ; also like ay in day. 
Ey — ^is pronounced like ey in prey. 
Ei — ^is pronounced like ai in hair. 

* The sound of the French n(uaU (m, n), eaa nermr be learned 
except th«| are A«ar^ repeatedly. 



248 



THE DBfilNITE AJELTICLB. 



Aj — is pronounced like ai in hair. 

M, aic; ais^ ait^ aiz, oi; like ax in haivy but longer. 

Oi — ^like toa m water : in a few wordfl; like ai in hair ; aa 
franyoisy void, affoiblir, &c. 

Au, eau; aux, eauz^ aud, auds, ao, ault, anlts^ auez, ant, 
auts, eo, OQ, 0C8, oda, oh, op, oqs, ot, 6t, ots, oth, oths, are 
each pronounced like o in no. 

le — ^like yea. 

NASALS.* 
Am, an — ^nearly like &ng ; as ambition (angbissjong), amhi' 
(I'm; ancre (angkr), anchor. 
Aim, ain, ein, em, en — nearly like short &ng. 
Om, on — nearly like ong. 
Um, un — ^nearly like ung. 





THE DEFINITE ARTICLE. 




GERMAN. 




Mas. 


snrouLAR. 
Nob. Gen. Dat Aoc 

Dcr, bc^, bent, ben* 


PLUEAL. 

Norn. Oen. Dat Aoa 

Die, ber, ben, ble. 


Fem. 


Die, ber, ber, bie. 


it a it u 


Ncut. 


X)ad, bed, bent, bad. 

SPANISH. 


u u t< u 


Fem. 


Kom. Oen. Dat Aoe. 

La, de la, & la, la.f 


Norn. Gen. Dat Am. 

las, de las, & las, las.§ 


Mas. 


El, del, al, el-t 


los, de los, & los, lo8.|| 


Neut. 


Lo, de lo, & lo, lo. 

FRENCH. 


No plural. 


Mas. 

Fnm. 


BINOULAIU 

Norn. Gen. Dat Aec 

Le, du, au, le. 

Tji. de 111., (l 1a. Ir. 


PLDEAU 

Nom. Gen. Dat Aeo. 

Les, des, aux, le». 
u a a u 



* If the m orn is followed by a rowel, it ceases to be nasal ; but 
if it precedes a consonant, or terminates a word, it is a nasal. « If it 
terminates a word, the next word commencing with a Towel, there is 
• tonnd of ti after the nasal. 

f Or, 4 la. X Or, 4 el. J Or, 4 las. || Or, 4 lot. 



DECLENSION. 249 



[HonL-^When the French article, in the iingolar, precedes 
another w^rd eommencing with a rowel or tilent A, the final rowel 
of the article ia dropped ; as Tonde, the unde^ for le oncle ; T^tnde, 
ih§ itwfy, tcir la ^tute ; Thonenr, the honour, for le honenr.] 



THE INDEFINITE ABTICLE. 
QEEMAN. 



BtEQVUM, 

Non. Oen. Dat 



Mm. (Un, etited, eUtett; einem* 

Fein, dint, dntt, einer, tint* No plural. 

Neat. Sin, eined, tintm, tin. 

SPANISH. 



Nom. Oen. Dat Aoe. 

Mas. Uii; de un^ a on, un. No plural. 

Fern. Una^ de una^ a una^ una. 



FRENCH. 



nnauuLi. 
N<nB. 0«n. Dat 



Mas. Vuj d'un, h rm, un. No plural. 

Fern. Une^ d'une^ k nne, une. 

THE FRENCH PARTITIVB.* 



Mas. 


Hon. 

D«, 


BnrouLAS. 
Gen. Dat 

de,t Ik du, 


Aoe. 

du. 


nUEAL. 

Nob. Oan. Dat 

des^ de^f k dee 


Fern. 


DoKdet, 


2idela, 


de la. 







DECLENSION. 
OERBiAN. 

The German noun is subject to oertain tenninal mutations, 
which; when they are arranged and classified, are denominated 
Declensions. Of these Declensions, some authors recognise 
eight, fiTe, or four, while many accord that there are, in fact, 
but three. 

For the sake of simplicity and brevity, we shall arrange all 
the German nouns into three separate heads or declensions — ^no 
more ; and in following out this arrangement* we shall class 

* Transltte J, lomr, of eone, &o. T ^t ** 



250 DECLENSION. 



all the singulars first in order, and afterwards the plurals, in 
their own place, on the plan of Le Bas and R^gnier. 

The Declensions are determined by their mode of termina- 
tion. 

SINOULARS. 

First Declension, — ^All nouns of this declension are either 
masculine or neuter, and make their genitive in d, ed, and end* 

Nom. Qen. Dat. A«o. 

X)er S^ixtmtlf* bed ^immeld, bem ^immtl, ben ^tmmel* 
In like manner are declined all masculine and neuter nouns 

terminating in el, em, en, er; neuter, in n, d^cn, letn, &c. &o. 
Nouns which already terminate in d, 3, gt, f , ^, take an e in 

the genitive before the d, for sake of euphony ; as 

Nom. Oen. D»t Aee. 

Dad ^ar3,t bed barged, bem ^ar3,J bad i&atj* 
Many nouns, also, take e, in this manner, when thefinallet- 
ter produces too close a sound to admit of an immediate sub- 
sequent d« These nouns are of various terminations, as follows : 
'S:>Cii Sanb, the land; bad jlinb, ike child; ber 9Rann, the 
man; ber ^ut, the hat; ber 2Cein, the iDine, &c. 

Nouns in tM^ 

Nom. Gm. Dat Aee. 

Der gunfe,§ bed gunlend, bem gunfen, ben gunfem 
Second Declension. — ^This declension comprises none but 
masculine nouns. The genitive termination is n or en* All 
the other cases of the singular and plural are like the genitive 
singular. 

Der Stnait, the hoy. 

Nom. G«ii. Dat Aoo. 

X)er ^nait, bed ^al6en, bem Stnaltn, ben Sbxaitn. 
Most of the nouns of this declension, terminating in a con- 
sonant, make their genitive in en* 

* Beaven. — [Note. — Tho German noun always commences with a 
eapital letter.] 
t The rosin. J Or, ^otge. 

I Formerly, and occaEiocally at the ppesent day, ^nfen> 



DECLENSION. 261 



Dcr fSax, thehear. 

Norn. Gen. Dat Aee. 

®er ©8r, be« Saren, kern Saten, ben Sarni. 

T^mZ Dedention. — All the nonns of this declenBion are of 

the feminine gender. It takes no inflection in the singolari 

nor does it terminate in any fixed letter. 

0rau, avjoman. 

Die %van, ber grou, bet gtau, ble grau* 

}>LURALS. 

The yarions terminations of the nominatiye plural are t, 
n, tn, end, or like the nominatiye singular. 

When the nominatiye plural ends in it, all the other cases 
are the same. 

When the nominatiye plural does not end in n, the datiye 
alone takes an n, and the genitiye and aocusatiye are like the 
nominatiye. 

No inconsiderable number of nouns change a, 0, U, and an, 
of the singular^ into a, i, vl, and an* 

Masculine and neuter nounS; of the first declension; in el, 
er, en, lien, haye their nominatiye plural like the nominatiye 
angular^ and add n for the datiye. 

Der Slblet, the eagle. 

PLUBAL. 

Nona. Gen. Dal Aoo. 

Die abler, ber abler, ben ablem, ble abler* 

S>a« ®itQtl, the seal. 

ninuL. 

Die ©iegel, ber ©ieflel, ben ©iegcl, bie ©icgel. 
The greater part of the masculine nouns of the first declen* 
sion take e, in the nominatiye^ genitiye, and accusatiye; and n, 
in the datiye plural ; as 

Der grembling, the stranger. 

PLURAL. 

DieSrembnnge,ber 3rembnnge,ben 3remblingen,ber Si^emblinge* 
Feminine and neuter nouns in ip; also take e ; as 
Dad ®e^eimni§, the secret. 

Die ® e| eimni|fe,bet® el^clmni jf c,ben® e^cimttijfen,bie ® el^eimni jfe* 
[NOTB — When ( comes between two Toweli, it is changed into ff.] 



252 DSGI.ENSION. 



A great number of nouns of the third declension in the 
singular also are declined in the same manner in the plural ; 
so also are nearly all neuter nouns^ whose initial is the particle 
ge, and whose terminative is in any letter other than t, I, or tt, 
in the nominative singular; as, singular, bad ®ef^ettf ; plural, 
bic ©efd^enfe, the gift, the gi/ts. 

Thus, also, are declined all neuter nouns terminating in 
mctttj as ©aframcnt, ©aframente, &c. There are, also, many 
neuters, whose distinctive features cannot be established. 

All such nouns of the first declension as ending properly 
in e, are often terminated by e or en ; all nouns of the second 
declension, which take e in the genitive singular, and all 
feminine nouns in el, t, ee, ie,"' form their plural by adding an 
n to the nominative singular. 

All nouns of the second declension, whose genitive ends in 
tn, as Sfir, S3aren; all feminine nouns not noticed hitherto, in 
this description of the plurals ; and especially such as termi- 
nate in ttCt), ti, ^eit, in, felt, fii^aft, ung; and those derived 
from foreign tongues; also.a number of masculine nouns, the 
nouns 93ctt, bed; ^emb, shirt; ^erj, heart; fO^x, ear; and 
nouns in or, incorporated from the Latin language; and a 
greater part of the nouns in tir, are all declined by adding en 
to the nominative singular termination. 

All masculine and neuter nouns in tl^um, as (sing.) bet 
Sleid^t^um, tJie fortune; (plu.) ble ^d^^t^umtx, the fortunes; 
(sing.) bad ^erjogtl^um, the dukedom; (plu.) bie ^erjogtljiimer, 
the dukedoms. All such neuters as have not been included in 
the preceding explication, terminating generally in a mute, or 
the letters d, jl, fd^ : as (sing.) bad Silb, the image; (plu.) ble 
©ilbcr, the images; (sing.) bad Dorf, the milage; (plu.) bie 
jDBrfer, the villages; and the following masculine nouns:— 
SofctD^t, 3)om, ®eijl, ®ott, 8eib, 9Wann, Drt, SRanb, Sormnnb, 

* With the exception of bie SKuttcr, mother; bie Zfi^ttt, dauffhUr^ 
which make their plural with the Umlaut ("0/ bie Scatter, bie ai^tei; 



DECLENSION. 



258 



93alb, SStttnt; all malce their plural in er, at the same time 
placing the Umlaut (") over the vowel or diphthong, in the last 
syllable in the word; as ®ott, ®5tter, God; "SSlann, aWanner, 
man; J^(Utd, <&aufer, house, &c. &c. 

We have been thus prolix with the German noun, in com- 
parison with the general brief style of this work, that the 
student might have no room for doubt; and for the sake of 
edmplifying in a degree the preceding pages on the German 
noun, we submit, in one general view, a table, so arranged aa 
to comprehend all the entire terminations in a body. 







2d DECL'N. 




Irt DECLENSION. 




Masculine 


Sd DECLENSION. 


HsMmliiie and Neuter Noons. 


Nouns. 


Feminine Nouns. 




N.— . 




-^ 


— 




1 


G.-(e) i 




- (e) «. 


— 


§ 


D.-(e). 




-(e)n. 


. 


A.— . 




- (t) n. 


— 




N.— «. 


— . 


— cr. 


— en. 


-(e) It. 


— (0 n. 


— e. 


1 


G.— «. 


— . 


— er* 


— en. 


— (0 «♦ 


— (e) tt. 


— e. 


D.— en. 


-c«x 


— em. 


— en. 


— CO "• 


— (e) tt. 


— ett. 




A.— e. 




— en 


— en. 


~r- (e) tt. 


- (e) n. 


— e. 



SPANISH — ^FRENCH. 

The Spanish and French nouns are indeclinable. They 
merely add an » for the plural, (a few exceptions) ; but their 
terminations never vary for the cascj which can only be deter- 
mined by the article or adjective prefixed, or by its syntactic 
relation. 

[Note. — ^The genders, in German, are three, masculine, feminine, 
and neater. In Spanish, three, but the neuter in Spanish includes 
only a few a^JectiTes, used in the sense of nonns, and not limited in 
their extension ; as lo titil, ihe ut^l; it has no pluraL In French, 
there is no neuter — ^nouns are either masculine or feminine, accord- 
ing to usage, or as the termination of the word denotes.] 
PLURALS OF NOUNS. 

Crtrman. — ^The method of forming the plural of German 

nonns has been shown in the preceding Table of Declension. 

SpaniA, — ^When the Spanish noun is terminated by a short 
22 



254 THE ABJEOTIVIS. 



vowel;* ^e plural is formed by adding an s to the termination 
of the singular; when the noun terminates in a long yowel or 
a consonant; the plural adds es to the singular terminatiye : 
e. g. first; carta, letter; cartaS; letters; ^dxe, father; padres, 
fathers: second; yerdad; truth; yerdadeS; truths; tribii, tribe; 
tribiieS; tribes. Nouns which terminate in z^ change z to ces; 
as \kpiz, peMdl; lapioes. The plural of adjectiyes is formed 
in the same manner. 

French, — ^The plural of French nouns is usually formed by 
the addition of an <; but when the noun (or adjective) ter- 
minates in Uj preceded by one or more vowelS; the plural is 
made by adding x; as beaU; beaux; also nouns ending in oZ; 
at?; not followed by e final (ale, aile); make their plural by 
ohan^ng al^ ail, into aux; as -travail; travaux; mal; maux* 
These nounS; ciel; oeil; aleul; also make their plural m x; 
cicux; yeux; ideux. These rules are abo applicable to the 
adjective. 

THE ADJECTIVE. 
GERMAN. 

When the adjective is employed as an attribute; it is inde- 
clinable; but when it occurs in a qualifying phrase as an 
epithet, it becomes declinable ; so that the same adjective is at 
one time indeclinable; at another; declinable. We say; bet 
SBater jut i% the father m good; W SWtttter gut ffl, the mother 
is good; bad Stiv!t> gut i% the chUd is good, &c. &c. But when 
it is employed as an epithet; it is declined as follows : 

1st. If the adjective immediately precedes the nouU; and is 

not itself preceded by either the article definite or indefinitCi 

or any other declinable word; it is declined thus : 
BnrouLAX. 
Noiii. Chen. Dat. Aoe. 

Mas. ®utet,t gutcd (guten), gutem, guten. 
Fem. ®ttte, guter, guter, gute. 

Neut. ®uM, gttte« (gutcn), gutcm, gated* 

* An accented vowel (d, 1 6, &c.) is lon^; unaccented, is shoH, 



THE ADJECTTVE. 288 

PLUftAL. 

Mas. Fem. Neut. (Suit, gtttcr, guten, flute* 
2d. When the adjecdve is preceded by the definite article, 
07 8om. other determinate word; it is declined as follows : 





Mas. 


Norn. 

Otttc, 


Geo. Dat Aec. 

flttten, flutm, guten. 




Fem. 


®ttte, 


flutett, fluten, flutc. 


M»3. 


Neut. ®utt, 
Fem. Neut. 


flttten, Qvdtn, flute* 
©uten, fluten^ fluten, ^uttn. 



8d. When preceded by the indefinite article, eitt, or any of 
the possessive pronouns, meitt, my; bcin, ihi/; feiit, his, her; 
Unfer, ow; tntx,your; [f^x, their; and leirt, any, it is declined 
in this wise : 

'BINQULAR. 

Nom. Ocn. Dat. Aco. 

Mas. ®utet, flutcn, fluten, fluten* 
Fem. ®ute, fluten, fluten, flute. 
Neut. Outed, flutett, fluten, fluted. 
99^ Participles are declined in the same manner. 

SPANISH — ^FaSNGH. 

The Spanish and French adjectives are indeclinable, and 
only form their plural in order to be of the same number as 
the noun to which they are attached, according to the rules 
laid down on page 253. 

The Spanish and French participles conform to the same 
rules as their adjectives. 

N. B. The adjective must be of the same gender, number, 
and case as the noun to which it is attached in all the three 
tongues. «__ 

OF THE ADJECTIVES USUALLY CALLED DEMONSTRATIVE 
PRONOUNS. 

GERMAN. 

©fefer, Mefe, kiefe«^ (hie, hsec, hoc, Lat; obtou o^fn^ rwto, 
Or.) {hx9, these ; declined like fluter. 

Sener^iene^iene^ (ille, illa,illud. Lot.; <wwf,— ^i — o, Gr.') 
that, those ; declined in the same manner. 



256 INTERROGATiyES. 



t>tt, bie, bad; used as a pronoun, instead of biefer, in imita- 
tion of the Grcok (see page 153, Or. Gram.), is thus declined: 

Nom. Gen. Dat. Aoo. 

Mas. Der, bejfen, bem, bem 

Fem. Die, bercti/. ber, bte. 
iJeut. Dad, bejfett (bep,) bem, ba«* 

PLinUL. 

Mas. Fem. Nent. S)ie, btren (berer), bencn, bie» 
S)erj[enige, this, that, those; berfelbe, the Barney are compounds. 
The first part of the words, ber, follows the declension of the 
article, while the other part follows the declension of the 
adjective. 
(Soldier, «ucA, Ukej declined like biefer* 

SPANISH. 

Este (mas.), esta (fem. sing.),*tAi8; indeclinable. 
Estos (mas.), estas (fem. plu.), these; indeclinable. 
Ese (mas.), esa (fem. sing.), that ; indeclinable. 
Esos (mas.), esas (fem. pin.), those ; indeclinable. 
Also, esto (neut. sing.), thiSy this thing, any thing; indeclinable. 
And eso, (neut. sing.), ihaty thai thing, any thing; " 
[NoTB. — ^All these adjectiveB are indeclinable, and follow the 
general role in forming their plural to agree ^with their noons.] 
FRENCH. 



Mm. 

Ce, cet. 


BiirautAK. 
Fem. 

cette. 


this; 


ces, 


FLURAl,. 

Fun. 


these. 


Celui, 


celle. 


that; 


ceux, 


celles, 


those. 


Celai-15, 


celle-15», the former; 


ceux-15i, celles-lk, thefornMr. 


Celoi-ci; 


celle-ci. 


the latter; 


ceux-ci, 


cellos-ci. 


the loiter. 




INTERROGATIVES. 








GERMAN. 






aSelc^er, 


tohOy whichy 


whai; thus declined : 






sorauLAB. 
Nom. Gen. Dat 


Aoo. 





Mas. SBeld^er, Mld^t^, i»t^tm, »el(^em 

Fem. SDrid^e, tweld^er, m^tt, mli^t^ 

Neut. SBcId^ed; t»tl^t€, toili^tm, weld^ed* 

PLURAL. 

Mas. Fom. Neut. SEelci^e, toet^cr, tot^tti, tt>eT^e^ 



PREOONJUNGTIYES. 267 

Set, vilu) 9 toa^, uihatf thus declined : 

Norn. G«ii. Dfti. Aoe. 

Mas. Fern. SBer, mejfm (toep), »em, loeit* 
Neat. ffiad, »ad* 

SPANISH. 

Qoi^d, que; who? which? &c., is declined by being placed 
after the same particles as the definite article d. 
Goal (8ing.)| ooales (pin.) both genders, which f 
Qa^ (both genders and nnmbers), what? 

IBENCH. 

Qael, quelle, quels, quelles, which ? what 9 declined by placing 
defore it the same particles that are placed before the article 
le, la. 

Qui (of both genders and numbeis), declined in the same 
manner. Quoi, w?uU; like fue. 

PREC0NJTJNCTIVE8.* 
GERMAN, 
ffield^ed, which, thai; declined same as mld^t^* 
gQai, which, what) like toa«* 
@0, v)hd, whom; indeelinable. 

TRENCH. 

En, it, them, $o; indeclinable. 

Y, it, so; relating to something before it; indeclinable. 

Le, it, &c., indeclinable. 

Ge qui, that which; thus declined : 
Nom. Ge qui, that which, Dat. Ge ^ quoi, that to which. 
Gkn. Ge dont, that of which. Ace. Ge que, tha/t which. 
[J'ai oubli4 ce dont yous me parlies, / have forgotten that 
>/ which you were tpeahing to me."] 

SPANISH. 

The pronoun cuyo is used as a preoonjunctiTe or interroga- 
dve. It always agrees with the thing possessed (not with the 
possessor), in gender, number, and case. [Whotepens are 
these f jGuyassonestasplumasf — Whose hook is this 9 jGuyo 
es est« libro f ] 

* RelatiTes. 
22* 



268 PRONOUNS. 



PRONOUNS. 
GERMAN. 

Nom. Oen. D«t Aoo. 

Sing. 3d^, 1^ tnelnef, wiy, min«, of me; mix, me, to me; tni(^, me, 
Plu.aBfr,««; ttnfer^ owr, ours; uM, us, to us; uttd, us, 

t>Vi, thou. 

Sing. Dtt, «^om; betner, t^ine, oflhee; btr, <)iec, to Aec; W^, <^c. 

Plu. ^Xfyou^ye; tyxtx, yours, of you; tui^,you, to you; tui^,you. 

ffit, fie, t^, Tie, she, it, 

Nom. Oen. Dat Aoe. 

QXfhe; feiner;A£B; i^vXfMm,tohim; H^xtthim. 
<BitfShe; i^xtXf hers; \^x, her, to her; fie, her. 
^^,tt; fcfner, t/«; i^m,tt,toit; i^n,iL 

FLinUL. 

©le, they; i^xtx, theirs; i^neit, them, to them; fie, them. 
The reflective pronoun has no nominative, and is thus 
declined : 

G«iL. Dat Aoe. 

Mas. ©einer, of one's self; fld^, to one* s self ; fld^, one^s self 
Fern. 3^tcr, of one* s self; fid^, to one's sdf; flc^, one^s self 
Nent. ©eincr, of one's self; fld^, to onc'« «c(/; fld^, one's self 

PLURAL. 

3^rcr, of iltemsdves; ficj^, to themselves; fW^, themselves, 

[Note. — The word fclbfl, or fctOer/ often added to the personal pro- 
nouns, and answers the place of our word «e{^; as id) fetbfl/ mpseff, 
&c.] 

The pronouns Tlan, one; 3emanb, «om« one; JRiemanb, no 
one, take cd in the genitive, and en in the dative and accusa- 
tive. Occasionally, also, they are used indeclinahle. 

Shoad, something ; 9Ii^td, nothing, are indeclinable. 

Stnrr, some rne; jtciner, any one, are declined like the ad- 
jcotzve, guter. 

SPANISH. 

Yo, Z 

Nom Cksn.^ Dat. ^ Aoe.^ 

M. F. Yo /; de mi,^ of m^; & mi, to me; & mi, me. 



PRONOUNS. 259 



Mas. NoS; nosotrofi, toe; de nosoiroB; o/ us; & nosotros, nos, 

to us; ^ nosotros^ nos^ us, 
Fem NosotraS; we; de nosotras, ofus;^ nosotraS; nos, to us; 

& nosostras^ nos^ im. 

Tii, thm. 
M. P. Td,* thou; de tf, of thee; d tf, te, to tfiee; & ti, te, <^ 

PLI»AL. 

Mas. Vos,* Yosotros^ yc, you; de vosotros, of you; & Tosotros, os, 
to you; & TOBOtros^ os^ you. 

Fem. Yosotrasy ye, yow; de vosotras, of you; & vosotras, os, 
to you; & Yosotras, os, you. 

]^1, he; Ella, sAe. 
Mas. ]^1, he; de ^, of him; & ^, le, se, ft> Atm ; & ^, le, lo, him. 
Fem. Ella, s^; de ella, of her; &ella,le, se, to her; &ella, la, Aer. 

FLintAL. 

Mas. Ellos, they; de ellos, of them; & eUos, les, se, to them; fi 

ellos, Ids, them. 
Fem. Ellas, they; de ellas, of them; & ellas, les, se, to them; 

& ellas, las, them. 
The reflectiYe pronoun has no nominatlYe, and is thus de- 
clined: 

Norn. Ctaa. JhL 

De rf, ofon£z 9df; & sf, se, to one'* sdf; & s^ se, one'* sdf. 
N. B. Plural is declined like singular. 

FRENCH. 

Je, moi, L 
. Je,f moi, J I; de moi, of me, my, mine; ^ moi, to me; me, 

moi, me.f 

nnsAL. 
Nous, me; de nous, ^tM, ours; ^ nous, to im; nous, us, 

* Ttiy T08, are seldom used in Spanish. Usted, (abbreviated U.) 
takes its place, except in Tery familiar conyersation. 

t Used in all cases before the Terb. 

X Used, let, After an intransitiYe verb ; as o'est moi, Uia I, for 
o'eet Je ; o'est lui, itii he, instead of c'est il ; ce sent eux, t^ m (hey, 
or, they are. 2d, After an imperative mood, if it is affirmative, in* 
stead of me ; as donnez-moi, give me ; l^ve-toi, raitt thyeeff; bat if the 
imperative is negative, it follows the general rule and takes me; as 
ne ore donnez pas do not give me ; ne te l&ve pas, do not raise up. 



260 POSSESSIVE FRONOUNS. 

Tu^ toi^ thou. 
Tviy^ toi,f thou ; de toi, of dice ; 2i toi, to thee ; te, toi,f thee, 

YoiiB, yoUf ye; de yonSi of you; k tous, to you; YdOB, you. 

J\f elle, on, hey she, one, 
Mas. S,* Ini^f he ; de lui, of htm ; h, \m, to htm; le, Ini^f him. 
Fem. Elle, she; d'eUe, of her; h elle, to her; la elle, her. 
N^cut. On, one^ they, he^ somebody y anybody ^ (indefinite — ^inde- 
clinable). 

PLURAL. 

Mas Us,* euXyf they; d'eux, of them; lenr, 2i enz, to them; 

lee, eux, (A^tn. 
Fem. Elles, they ; d!^e&,ofthem; k elles, to them; elleS; fA«m. 

The pronoun refleetiye, soi, is declined by adding the pr^ 
position d and de. 

N. B. In imitation of the German and English^ ve fire- 
qnently find m§me attached to the personalsi which we 
translate self; as moi-m^me^ mysdf Ac* 

OF THE ADJECTIVE, COMMONLY CALLED THE POSSESSIVE 
PRONOUN. 
GERMAN. 

9Reitt, my. 
SWein, my; meine«, of my; nuuiem, to my; weineii, my. 
SKeinC;my; meiner, o/" wy ; ntelner, tomy; meine, wy. 
SHeln, my; nicined, of my; mefnem, tomy; melne, my. 

rLUBAL. 

SRrfne, my; mrfnet, o/ my; nteinen, to my; wetnc, «iy. 

Unfer, itnfere (or, nnfre), ttuftr, our, own. 

©rfn, brtiic, bein, %, thime. 

ffiuer, enere (or, eure), eurr, yoier, youn. 

©eitt, fcine, fdn, Aw, A«r, t&. [Used when the 
name of the possessor is masculine or neuter]. 

^Xf i^re, i^r, Am, A«rs, iiz. [Used when the 
name of the possessor is feminine]. 

3^t, i^re, i^r, «A<nr, tA^trt. [For the plural of 
fein and i^r, and for all the three genders]. 
^ See a«'?, (note t» P- 259). f S®« ««^» (aote J, p. 269). 



POSSESSIVE PRONOUNS. 261 

When the adjective mine relates to an antecedent, or agrees 
with a noon preyiously mentioned ; as this is your hot] hui 
where is mine? the word mine is represented in Qerman by 
tttdner, meiner, mtinti, or by ber, W, bad meinige. 

Sleiner, meine, meined, mine^ thai of mine. 

Uttferer, itnfere, un\m^, ours, that of ours. 

S)er, W, bad meinige, mine, that of mine. 

^tx, W, bad ttnftige, ours, that of ours. 

3)er, bif, bad beinige, thine, that of thine. 

Der, bf e, bad eurige, yours, that of yours. 

S)er, bie, bad feinige, his, her, its. [Used if the 
name of the possessor is masculine or nenter]. 

©er, bie, bad S^xiQt^his, her its, theirs. [Used 
if the name of the possessor is feminine, or if the substantive 
for which they stand is plural]. 



SPANISH. 

Mi, my. 
Mi, my ; de mi, of my; & mi, to my; mi, & mi, my. 

PLURAL. 

Mis, my; de mis, ofmy; & mis, to my; & mis, my. 
Tu* (sing.), tus* (plu.), thy; declined as above. 
Su (sing.), sus tplu.), his, hers, its; declined as above. 
Nuestro, -a, -os, -as (mas. fern, plu.), our; " " 
Vuestro,-a,-os,-as(M.P. sing, plu.), your; " " 
Su (sing.), sus (plu.), their; " " 

The Spaniards, like the Qermans, use some of these adjec- 
tives with the definite article prefixed, thus : 
Mas. El mio, mine; del mio, of mine; al mio, to mine; el or 

al mio, mine 
Fem. La mia, mine; de la mia, of mine; & la mia, to mine; 
la or & la mia, mine. 

* In aU good society, and ordinary oonversation, the Spaniard 
makes use of de wied, cr de uaiedt, (abbreviated de 27.% instead of 
tUf tu», &o. 



POSfiESSITE raONOUNS. 



PLVILAL. 

Mas. Los mios; mine; de los mios^ of mine; & los mioS; <a 

mine; los or & los mios, mifie. 
Las mias, mine; de las mias^ of mine; & las mias, to 

mine; las or & las mias^ miTie. 
And el tujo^ la tuja, t^tn^; el sujo, la suja, hu, hen; 
el nuestrO; la nnestra, own; el yuestro^ la yuestra^ yours; el 
sujo, la BUja; ^leirs, with their plurals ; los tu jos^ las tu jas, 
thine; los sayos^ las sujas, his, hers; los naestros; las nnestras^ 
ours; los vuestros, las yuestraS; yours; los sujos; las snyaSy 
theirs, are all declined the same as el mio. 

FRENCH. 

Mon, my; ton, thy ; sop, his, hers, its; notre, ovr; yotre, 
your; leur, (AetV; are indeclinahle, and add s to form the 
plural. Mon, ton, son, though masculine, are used before 
all feminine nouns commencing with a yowel or mute A ; as, 
mon heur, my hour ; ton ignorance, thy ignorance ; son assu- 
rette, his or her (zssurance. 

Mien, mine, is declined by prefixing the definite article^ 
mienne (fem.), miens (mas. plH.)> miennes (fem. plu.) ; tien, 
thin^; sien, his, hers, its; notre (mas. and fem. sing.), notres 
(mas. and fem. plu.), our, ours; yotre (mas. and fem. ^ng.), 
votres (mas. and fem. plu.), your, yours; Idur (mas. and fem. 
sing.), leurs (mas. and fem. plu.), theirs, are all declined in the 
same manner as mien, and cannot be used in any case without 
the article. In imitation of the Qermun, these adjectiyes re- 
late to an antecedent noun, with which they agree in genderi 
number aad case. 



MOOD AND TBNBX. 268 



TABLE OF MOOD AND TENSE SIGNS. 

INDIOATIYX MOOD. 

Pnt. Imp. Per£ Plvp. Ut Tat SAYnt 

Ger. -e. tc (obe gcs l^otte ge* wevte. -en n>ei;be«\ 

gc-t 6a6en* / 
8p. -o. ba,*ia,f he,*liabia.f habifty r. habre— do. 

Fr. -r, re. ai(ioiiB,f ay*i,tii,{aL aTais, ens. er. anraL 

lei.t) 
Eng. do- *-ed. baye. had. sball. BbaUhaya. 

BUBJUNOTIVB MOOD. 
Ger. ~t. (c) te. ^aU Qis f)hHt Qt9 loerbe. like Indie. 
Sp. -o. aaey'ieee. All others like IndieatiTe. 
Fr. ^ Like Indicatiye. 

Eng-may. might may have, might have. ehalL shall hare. 

CONDITIONALS. 

Ger. wttte — «n. '' wftrbe je— t jjaben. 

8p. Isty aria,* ezla,f iiia.{ 2d, ara,* let, habria. 2d, hnbiera. 

iera,ih ie8e,f a8e.f 

Fr. rai- (io]i8,T -i^z.^} aural, aTuee, -4, 

Eng. ehonld. ehould haye. 

IMPERATIVE. 
2d. 8d. Ut 2d. 8(L 

Ger. (e). -t, en ^n wir. -t. -«tt fte. 

Sp. --a tti -e ^ -mos noso- -d tos- -en ellos. 

troB otros. 

Fr. -e. qu'il-e. -one. -er. qa'ils-nt. 

Eng. do thou, let him. let ns. do ye. let them. 

INFINITIVE. 
German. 8p«Diah. French. 

Free. -en. -ar, -er, -ir. er, ir, oir, re. tc. 

Perf. l)a(en* haber -do. ayoir. to have. 

PA&TICIPLE8. 

Fres. -enb. -^o. nt* -lag. 

Past, -t habiendo, -do. 6. -d baring. 

PERSONAL TERMINATIONS. 
Sing. Flo. Sing. Fin. Sing. Flo. 

1st e. en* o, a, e, i. mas. The personal terminations of the 
2d. ft t/ en. s, ste. is. French are nnmerons, and are 

8d. t, en* en* a, e, o. an, en. determined by the proftonn. 

•IjtOn^ng. fadOm^ng. {8d Oolong. f lit penon plvnL 

1 2d penon plunL 



264 MOOD AND TENSE. 



INFINITIVE. 

@(tn ; ser (or) estar ; Stre, to be, 

PRESENT PARTICIPLE. 

©cicnb (or) rocfcnb ; Biendo (or) estendo ; dtant, bemff. 

INDICATIVE MOOD.— PRESENT TENSE. 
Ger. 3c^ h\xi, t>\i hx^, n iff/ to'xt [xnt, i^r fcib, fie finb. 
Sp. To soy, tli eres, el, la es, nosotras somos, yosotros sois, ellos son. 
Sp. Yo estoy, it est&s, el, la esta, " estamos, '* estais, " est&n. 
Fr, Je suis, tu es, il, elle est, nous sommes, voiis dtes, ils, elles sont 
Enff, 1 am, thou art, he, she, is, we are, yoa are, they *are. 
IMPERFECT TENSE. 

3(^ war, bu n>ar(e)|l/ cv max, tote wavtn, x\)X wai(c)t, fte macen. 
Yo era, t(i eras, el era, nosotros ^ramos, Tosotros €rais, ellos eran. 
Yo estaba, id estabas, el estaba, nosotros est&bamos, Tosotros est&baiBy 

ellos estaban. 
Yo fui, id fuiste, el fu^, nosot. fuimos, vosot Ailsteis, eUos Axeron. 
"Estuve, "estuyiste, "estuvo, "estuyimos, " estuyisteis, "estuyieron. 
J'^tais, tu ^tais, il ^tait, nons €tions, yous ^tiei, ils ^talent. 
Je fas, tu fus, il fnt, nous fUmes, yous fiites, ils ftirent. 
I was, thou wast, he was, we were, you were, they were. 

PERFECT TENSE. [&c. 

SSingewcfcn,* btft (ien)c(cn,i(l9c»cfcn,f!nl) Qmefixi/xMcxt, &o., ficpnb/ 

He sido, nas sido, ha sido, hemos sido, habeis sido, nan sido. 

He estado, has estado, ha estado, hemos estado, habeis estado, hao 

estado. 
Ai ^t^, as Mt a ^t^, ayons 6i6, ayez 6t6, ont ^t^ 
Haye been, hast been, has been, haye been, haye been, haye been. 
PLUPERFECT TENSE. 

flBar9CR)cfcn,tt>Qr(«)|lAc.,n>Qr,&o., tt)arcn/&c.,warCe)t&o., toarcn/&o. 
Hube sido (or) estado, hubiste, &c., hubo, &c., hubimos, &o.y hnbls- 

teis, &c., hubieron, &c. 
Yo habia sido (or) estado, habias, &c., habia, &c., habiamos, &o. 

habiais, &o., hublan, &c. 
Ayais (or) eus 6i6, ayais, eus, &c., ayait, eut, &o., ayions, eiimes, &e 

ayiez, &o. &c. &c. 
Had been, hadst been, had been, had been, had been, had been. 
FIRST FUTURE. , 

©ertc fein, witft feiit, xoxxt U\n, werben fcin, wetbet^&c., werben^&o. 
Ser6 (estard), ser&s (^estar&s), 8er& (estarA), ser^mos (ester^mos), 

ser6is (estareis), ser An (ester&n). . 
Serai, seras, sera, serous, serez, seront. 
Shall be, shalt be, shall be, shall be, &c. &o. 
SECOND FUTURE. 

fSkxU getoefen fetn, rotrfl^ &c., mxt>, &o., totxUn, &c., xottbtt, &o., 

wcrbcH/ &c. 
Habr6 Bido,f habr&s Bido,f habr& 8ido,f habriSmos 8ido,f habr6xB 

8ido,f habr&n sido.f 
Aural 4t4, auras ^t^, aura 6t4, aurons M, aurez 6i4, auront iii, 
Shall haye, shalt haye, shall haye, shall haye, &o. &o. 

• A TCpetltlon or fha PTOwnni la nnneoMnrx. t Or Mtedlk 



EXPLANATIONS. 265 



EXPLANATION OP THE TEXT AND OF THE FIGURED 
PRONUNCIATION. 

^inc TEXT is not encumbered by too much literalism] 
and great pains have been taken to use correct expressions. 
Those words connected in a brace belong to one phrase, and 
are for the most part idiomatic expressions. All the notes to 
the references through the text — explaining expressions, etc. — 
will be found at the close of each part. The small figures are 
guides to the literal translation : thus enabling a person ao- 
qufdnted with one, to translate correctly the other three languages. 

Inasmuch as there exist certain sounds in the foreign tongues 
tiuhich we do not have in English^ the following table will be 
7eiy important to him who has no teacher. 

GERMAN. 

S^, 4 (guttural), represented in fig. pron. by OH. 

«^(likesh), " " « sh. 

SKli^ek), " « " k. 

6, *' " " oe. 

U, " " " ue. 

Sfi, a9, ei, ep, « " " i. 

%u,t\x, « " " oi. 

SPANISH 

$r, represented in figured pronunciation by ny. 
LI, " « " " ly. 

FRENCH. 

U, represented in figured pronunciation by ue. 

Eu, " " " « oe. 

The nasals " " « ng. 

Oi, oix, &c. " •* " wavj. 

J, « " " « «A. 

The accents have been arranged accord!]^ to the actual pro- 
nunciation. This (■) over a vowel denotes the vowel to be 
long; (") is short; and (^) is the bro&d accent. Where it 

was thought necessary, the word has been divided into syllablea. 

23 



CONVERSATIONS IN 
GEBXAK. SPAHISS. 



3n einem Sut^taben. 

SBie* nennen* ©(e» bicfcd*? 
Vee nSnin see diUsT 

ffi«* ljl« eitt« ©d&att)I\ 



Vee fed ut der jprise f 
Tsane dollars, 

Vdcha tTve-hAfd^hahr-heniee 

in* Sonbon" gemad^t*? 
t w LUndUn ghndOELt f 

3d6* faufte" eine» STudtoal^l* 
2sA kowftd %nd owsiodhl 

»ott* ©pl^en*, Sanbem', OTuffe* 
/il7i spitseiij h^ndemy rnUsd- 
Un«^ lins, 

StaUh^*, aBoffenjloffett", 
kdUicoSy wdUnstd/en, 
®^a»t«"; shdhls; 

rtnt)"»ott"9)ari««elnen**Sairett** 
oond/un FdrU InBn bdlUn 

der shoensten, ootid 

reid&flett« Sud^et", «a(lmir««», 
rishe-ten taQcher, kaUmirs, 

^aBen*'» ®ic« ©onnenfd^lrme*? 
Hahhen see sunensheermd f 

3d^* ^aBc" fc^r* f(!^6ne* ©onnen^ 
ikA hahbd sdre shoend sUfien^ 
f(^irine" sheermd 



Tienda depafio y de henzo. 

iComo* ae* llama** eso* f 
Admd say Ij/dhmah dso f 

Eb«'» un» chal*. 
Es oon chal, 

I Cual* es" el* preoio* f 
Quahl is d pr&dMf 

Dies* pesos*. 
Di'dtkpdsSs. 

iQue* articnlcNS* ba' comprado* 
Ka drticoolds ah comprado 

tJ> en' Londres' ? 
Oosieien LdndrHf 



He comprado^* un* sortido* 
A comprdhdo oon soortioo 

de^ encages*, cintas', mnseli- 
dd l6nc6KiSy thintdSy moosdlee- 
nas*, nds, 

zaraza'y lana merina**, 
sarasa, Idn-ah mireenah 
chales"; chaldse; 

y" de« Paris** un" cantidad^ 
i dd Pdris oon cantedad 

de*'' pafJos" y casimires'*, mny 
dd panyds i ca^simires, mwy 

liermosos" y"* muy ricos", 
ermosos 6 muy rikas, 

etc." etc.** et cetera**. 

jTiene*** U.* quitasoles*? 
Te^nd oosted kilasdHs f 

Tengo*** quitasolea* may* hep- 
Tingo kUasOlH mwy ir» 
mosQS^ mdsos 



CONVERSATIONS IN 



FBSHCH. 



SHTOLISB 



Magatm de drap9. 
Comment* ceci* s'appelle^t-il ?» 

C est« uii» schale*. 
S' oteHngshM. 

Quel* enl> est* le« prix*? 
KH dng d Ivhpretf 

Dix^ piastres'. 
Dee pifdstr. 

Qaellea* emplettes" avez'-vous* 
Kitl - Z'anff'plet dvt/ - voo 

faites* h.* Londres^ ? 
/cU ah Londrf 

J'ai achet6*'"un' assortiment* 
ZKd dshtd unff atortimdng 

de* dentelles', de rubans^, de 
duh ddngtely duh r\xebang^ duh 
mousseiines"^ moosleen, 

de calicos*, d'dtoffcs de laine*% 
duh calico^ d*etof duh Ian, 
de schales" ; duh shal; 

et« h?* Paris**, le" plus** beau» 
d ah Pdiyj luhpliie ho 

et* le plus pr^ieux" choix** 
a luh plue presjfoe thtoaw 

de draps*, de casimirs**, 
duh drah, duh casimeerf 

etc.** etc.«* eto.«* 

Tenez''»-vou8* des parasols^? 
Teny - voo ddpdrdMf 

JT* ene ai* de" trfts*- beaux* 
Zhang d d^\ trd- bd 



At a dry-goodt tlore* 
What* do* you* caU* this* 1 

It* is" a» shawl*. 

What* is" the" pri w*r 

Ten* dollars". 

What* purchases" did' you* 

make* in" London'' ? 

I* bought" an" assortment^ 

of* laces", ribbons'', muslins", 

prints*, de-laines*", shawls**; 

and*" from*" Paris**, a» lot** 

opy the*" most** beautiful"" 
and"* 

rich"" cloths*, casimeres"*, 

&c."* &o."* 

Do* you" have" paraflols* f 

I* have" some" yeiy* fine* pam- 
sols* 

2G7 



268 



GERMAN. 



iu''eincm»fc|^r»nietri9ett*»3)reifc"> 
tsoo t-nem sure net^dritihen 'prisd. 

4)aBett*ete«5tartelIe*? 
ffahbensee flanUdT 

Yah, soU ish l-nen vdchd 
jeigen*? Uikenf 

3aS rotten' glancll** 
Yahf roten flannel. * 

3^* ^abe» ttttr» weigenV 
Ish hahbd noor vise-sen, 

0, das gdnuezht nisht, 

3^* ntup' etipa«* roti^en* l^ateti'. 
7«^ moos eiwds rdten hahben. 

©le* lortrtcn' i^n* ju* einem* 
&« koQ7ien een tsoo imem 



SPANISn. 

d7 un" precio" muy» equita- 
ah oon prdtkio mwy dJcitOr 
tivo". U'VO. 

U.* bayetas* (frane- 
las)? a fife/) 



jTiene* 

Ti^ndoostedi hah-ffOtas (fr&ni^ 



Tengo^'alganas. jLe mostra- 
Tengo, (HgoonSs. La mostrah' 
r4» 4 U.« algunas^f 
T&ah U, dlgoonds f 

SI*, las de» rojo». 
See^ las dd r(^, 

No» tengo**" mas que' blancas* 
jyb tengo mds kd Udnkds, 

No*'* me' bastau**. 
No md hahsidn. 

Necesito***' algonas* rojas'. 
NethesitO dlgoonas rohas, 

Puede" U.* llevarlas** al*« 
Pwddd oosted fyd-vdrlahs Si 



garter'' Bringen*, unb' i^n*** ge* tintorero^, y» haoerlas*'** 
Firhir bringen, oond een gd- ieentordro i hdtherlahs 
favW^Mommtn^./^rhthdkomln. tefiir**. tdrnyeer. 

Da«* tourbe* ju* fojlfpietig* 
Das vxxQrdd tsoo kost^pedizh 



unb* gu* tttul^fam'' feiti', 
oond tsoo mnesdm sine. 



Es6*me costaria^"*^ demasia- 
Asdmd cdstdreeah ddmahsiahr 
do*, dOf 

y' seria*'' tambien demasiado 
i siiyah tamh/hi ddmdhsiahdo 
tedioso5'.l> ta-de-^so. 



i^*,\c wic*** ®le* c« Wuit- Muy* bien", sea' como^loqui- 
Gootj so vee see dse vuen Mwy by in, sdroK Icomo lo kee- 

ere" U.»o ird U. 



fd^ert.*3fl'fonfl*no(!^"(Ettt)a0**^"^ ^Quiere** U.« algow« 
then, lit sonst nocu etvds Kee-lrd oosted algo 



FBSNOH. XNCmSH. 

V trte»-bas« prix** at; a« veiy« low" price**. 

ah MSrbah pree. 

/^T«s^voiis* de la* flanelle* f Have* you' an j* flannels* f 
iivd^-voo duklah^flamdf 

0»ii. Vous* cn'^ montrend<>* I* have*. Shall* I* show* you^ 
We. Vooz - ang mongtrkr^ some' ? 
je*? sAuA? 

Oui*, de la* rouge*. Yes*, some* red* flannel*. 

Wi^ ^la roosA. 

Jo* n''ai* que* de la blanche*. I* have* only* white*. 
Zhuh nd kuk dH la, bkuiffsk. 

Oh*y ce*n'e8t pas mon afiSure. 0*, thaf^ will* neyer* do*. 
O; 8uh n*d pah mong a/dre, 

Je* veuz*** de la* rouge*. I* must* have* some* red*. 

Zhuh voe <r la roozh. 



Vons* n'aves* qu' k la* portei* You* can* take* it* to* a^ 
Voo n'avy k' ah lahportd 
ches* dUL 

le* teinturierV et^ la** feire* dyery,and*have»it**ool6ured**. 
hth tan(jtfiery&j & lah fdre 
teindre**. tangdr. 

Ce* serait^* trop* coiiteuz* et^ That* would* b^ too* ezpen* 
SuhtML lard cootoe d sive* 



trop ennuyeuz^ and* troublesome^ 

tro enuC'^oe. 

8oit. i A votre phusir** *• * •. Veiy* well*, just* as* you* 
Siodh. Ah vdtr pldzeer, 

Desireriet**-von8** autre* choose*. Ib^ there* any thing** 

Ddzeet^r-ya-rt^z d-tr 



270 GERMAN. SPANISH. 



toa«" ®ie" ^eute" l^abcn mB^* mas" hoy"? 
vdhs see koUd hakben moech- mds oyf 
ten**? «n.? 



^tvX^ 9li*td% meitt $crr», id^* Nada* mas* ahora«,d sefior," 
HQXid, nxx^ mine hir^ uh NahdahmSsah^dhfSatn'^orf 
bawie* 3^tten' ; ddnkd eenen ; 

altx'' id^* »nrbe* in" einigen***" graciaa***; pero^ volvere"-" 
dhher ish virdd in irnizhhi grdthee-as; pdro volvSrrd 

Zaazn^^ tolebrr" eiitfrred^en*®*"* en" poeas" dias*«. 
Tahgen veeder ine-^reshen. en pdkas di-as. 

3d^* wcrbe* Sl^nen^^ fc^r* Quedar^***' mny* agradecido* 

Ish virdd i-nen sdre Karddhrdmtoydgrdhddrthi^ 

Dcr6unben* fcln', meitt ^ttx*. &• U'. 
ferhoonden sine, mine hir. ah oosted. 

0\ ttic^t* im' ©cringflenV meitt No hay de que.e 
Of nisht im geringstln^ mine No i dd kd. 

®uten* 2:ag^ meitt" greunb". Bucn« dia'', amigo^ mio». 
Gooten tag, mine froind. Bioen di-ah, ami-gd mi^, 

®uten* ZaQ\ Buen* dia«. 

Gooten^ Tdg. Bwen di^h. 



SBonen^<Sie"mic^*cinige^i^an!od" ^Hagame ver*-« algunas' 

Volidn see mlsh i-nizhd fcalikoes Ha-gdhmd v^r algoonas 

fe^cn*' laffen*, mein ^err*? telaa pintadasV sefior"? 

sd'dn Idssen, mine lUr f tolas pintahrdas, sainyor ? 

SJlit* bem" gro^ten' SJergtiugen'* Con* muchisimo*' gusto*, 

Mit dem groesfen /ergnixezhen, Kon moochisemo goosto. 

'2Bte»iel^' ifl« ber» fxti^* ? ^-^'comovendeU.eso? g 

Vee fed ist der prise f Ah kdfnd vendd U» dso f 

Die* 9^reife' finb'* ijerfc^iebeit*, Los* precios* son* varios*, 

Dee pri'Sd siud ferjieeihn, Los prd-theros son var-e-os, 

i^rer^ Oute* entfpred^enb*'**' en razon de***!^ su^ cualidad*. 

t^^ir gueta mdq resliend. enrah-ihonddsooguaM-i-dad. 



IBENOH. KNQCiISH. 271 

ohose*®»" en ce moment" ? g else" that" you" wish" to- 
thdze cng suh momdi^ f day" ? 

Hien*^ anjourd' hui'; monsieur/ Nothing* to-day*, sir*^ I* thank' 
Ry&iigy ozhxxtrd^ wtj miUyoe, 
je* vous* zhtth voo 

remercie'; mais^ j'aurai soin you*; but7 !• will* call** in" 
rimirsi; md zKord ncaumg 

de repaaaer*^ sous peu"^*.h again" in" a** few** days**. 
duh ripdssd soo poe. 

Vous m'obligerez beaucoup*"^,l I* shall* be* much* obliged* 
Voo nCobleoBkbrd hdkoo^ 

monsieur**. ^ to* you'^, sir*, 

mui^oe. 



Oh», il n'y a pas de quoi«'*'%k 0*, not* a<? all*, sir*. 
Oj il n*ee ah pah dvh quaw^ 
monsieur^, mu^yoe. 

Bon*-jour', mon* ami*. Good* day'^, my* friend*. 

Bong zhoor, mong nammy. 

Bon*-jour*. Good* day*. 

Bong-zhoor, 

Voudriez*-vou8* bien me* faire* Will* you* let* me* look* at^ 
Voodrryd voo hyang mvhfdre f 

voir* des^ calicos*, monsieur* ? some^ prints*, sir* ? 
vwaw dd kdlikOf mit^oe / 

Avec* le* plus grand'i plaisir*. With* the* greatest* pleasure*. 
Avck Ivhjpbie grang pldzeer, 

De quel* prix* sont-ils* ? m What* is* the* price* 7 

Duh kU pree songt-v f 

Le* prix* vane*'* The* prices* are* various*, 

Lvhpree vdree 

guivant*** la'^ qualit^.n according* to* their^ quality* 

fwce-vang lah kdhli-td. 






272 OEKMAN. SPANISH. 

&ier*ip«eitt»®tu*,fe^r*f^6tt«, Aqul* esta" mia« pie»«, 

ITeer iU ine Uaekf sdre shoen, Ak-ki islah oanah pyd4hahf 

bellisima^'; bellu-imah, 

fcitt' im ®e»eBc*, unb" battft* ie tegido", muy iiodo'^ y» 

yi/te tm gorvdhd, oond dower- dd td-M-dd, mtoy lifidd, i 

aft'^ fur" nur" gtoei" ©*lfl- durable*«,por"solamente^os» 

l/?y /uer noor tgioi MU- doordble, por solah^meiUd doi 

l»gc" wnb" fed^d 5ent«*'. chelines** y" seis oentavos.** 

in(/d oond mx sents. chdinines i sd-is thentahvoi 

©Irb* er" tterHeid^en'? ^Perdcrasucolor^-*'?! 

Veerd der flrUlcken f Firdd-rah 900 kdldr f 

D*, ttcin', ic%' l^abe* V^xfi fettjl^ 0*, no«, la« he« probado* yo^ 

Oy nine, tsA hahbd een selbst 0, no, lah d pro-bahrdo^o 

geprobt*. ®ie'f6nttcii*fcc%dje^n' mismo^ Corteme*^k 

gd-prdbpL See leoenen sextsdne meeS'tno. Kdr-td-md 

ffiffen" abmejfen*'", unV i^n" in*® <fieB y seis* yaras* , y^ 

iUn dhbmessen, oond een in dee-ailh i sd-ts vdras, i 

mc{ne"aBo^ttUtt8",9lo."(3a^O envielas^* &'• mi'* casa"*^ 

mind vo-nung, nummero (JsaM) enve^d^ds ah mi cd$ah, 

42^ Paulus** called de San" Pablo** 

Uwi-ooTid-feertsig Jhwloos kdld dd San Pdb-lo 

etrftf e*7 Wldfen*. No « 42". 

strassd Mken, Noomd-ro qmht'enfak i do^ 

Sr* foO'foglcid^* gef^ltft*»etbctt*. Le»cnYiere*^ 4 U. 5^ piinto'.i 

dir sol soglUhe gdthVct virdin. Ld enve-ard ah U. aUpoont^ 

3(3^* ^aBe« mit* 3»irtt» ttnb' He*«« comprado* hao«, 

Tih hdhbd meer tsveem oond d komprah-dd i4d, 

9labeln", elnen* giitgw^ut", agujaa', dedal**, 

Nahdeln, unen Jing-er-hooi, ahgoohas, ddrdal, 

9Bad^«*^ ©d^eeren", vlvlV^ fe^r** oera*«, unas tijeraa**, 

VdXj fhdrren, oond sdre thd-rah, oonds U^her^dSf 

feinen ®tojf ju ^embeii** y** telas*» muy** finas'^, 

fUnhk staff taoo hemden e Id-lds mtoy fi-nds. 



FRENCH. XNGUSH. 27S 

Voici*'* -ane" pitee* fort* belle*, Here^ ii* a« piece^, very* 
Vtoatosi uen p^-di fir bdj 



\sh& fine', d'uQ grand usage*^, beautifol*, fine' texture*, and* 
trd fiUf i Ung grcmgd nesozA^ 

k^ deuz« cheline8>« durable*^, for** only" twO« 

ah doe shelin shillings^ 

six sola ', net.« and^ qixpenoe^* (six cents.) 

tee tolf nd. 

La couleup— pa8sera^«-t^lle«f Will* it" fade* ? 
Lah cooloeT — -passdrraJht^lT 

Oh*, non*, pen* ai* 0*, no*, I* have* tried* it* 

0, nony zKang a 

fiut r^preuve*. Donnez-m'en*^ myself.' You* may* 
fdif Cuhproev. Don-^ndrm^ ang 

seize* aunes*, measure* off* sixteen* 

et7 envoyez*-les* it** ma** yards*, and' send* it* to** 

e ang'Voyd -Id ah mah 

residence**, rue*' saint** my** residence**, No.** 42*f 

reU-ddngs me sang 

Paul**, numero** 42** St.** Paul** street*'. 

PoUy numdro karangt-dis. 

Je vais vous les envoyer de- It* shall* be* sent* imme- 
Zhuh vd voo IdrSHrngvo^d duh diately*. 
8uite*.p 9wit, 

Je* viens* de m'* acheter* du* I* have* bought^ me* 
Zhuh vydng duh m'dshtd dne 

fil*, des aiguilles*, un* d^*, some* thread* and' needles*, 
JU, dd'Z' dgwtlf ung dd, 

de la** cire**, une paire de a Hhimble**, some** beeswax**, 
cf lah ieeVf uen pdre dd 

ciseaux**; et** de^ tr^** belle*' scissors**, and** some** 
tlz^f d duh trd hd 



274 GERMAN. SPANISH. 



jefauft*. para camipas^.m 

gSrkowfL pdrah kdmfyas. 

SWein* Srut !r' ^at* elit* neued* Mi* hermano* ha* comprado* 

Mtne hrooajr hdt xne noiyes MB hrmdhnd 6h kom-jnudo 

yaax* ®amaf(i^(tt'** gcfauft*. un^par^de'^polaynas^ nuevas." 

pakr gSrmdshtn gd-kowfu oonjpdhrddpold-^iuunoo^vdi^ 

SRetttc* Xante ^af fo ebeti* Mia* tia« acaba'-^n de com 

Mnd tdhnta hdht td aben Mi-dh tMh dkHMhbOh da kdm- 

einen^ fc^Bnett^ neucn* ^ut^ prar»un»Bombrero^henno8o'y 

Unen shoenen noi-ycn Jtoot prahroantdm^rd-rOir'md^e 

mit*" eittcr" Hcinen" Blauer" nucvo*, con** una** garf oti- 

mit i-ner kli-4ten Uounir ntod-vo^ kdn oonah gatikotS* 

geber** gefauft*, »cld^e«** pe*^ ca"*" axul*" que** la*^ embeU- 

fordir gO-kowft, veiches eee kah dth-oolkd lah pnbd' 

ftup*clnc*» ft^one* STrt** jiert*'* ice*«'*» muchisimo***^"*. 

owf i-nd shoend drt UeerL i-thd moo<his-i-md, 

3^* »flTbe« mlc% ttl(i&f tDUttbern* No'serid^" sorprendido*,© si* 

Jsh vuerdd mish nufU voom^im Nd ^d-ri^ah sdr-prht-de-do si 

t»etttt* il^r**»3emttttb*»'' fclnen*" alguno**'^ la***» cortejaria*-**; 

ven eer yd^mdnd si-nen d^oo-nd lah kdr-tdrhdr-yah; 

Snttttg** mad^tc"'^; uitgettd^tet** aunque** sea**** una** don- 

dntrdg tndCBtd; oongdrdxmut ah-con-kd sdroh oonah don- 

Pc**eine**gatt3'7alte**3uttgfer* cellidueSa** «• — Perdone- 

W0 t-na ganU dltd youngftr thdifi-doo-enyah — PcT'dd-nd' 

ifl*'— 3*'* 6itte" urn ffintf(!^ulb- me»*-« — Queria**»« 

ixt — Lh bind oom ent-thoold- md — Kd-ri^h 

Igung" — id^*» mtint*^ ** i[tf^x^ decir* muy"' adelantada" 

Igung — ish mirnd sdre dOrtkeermwy ddHdnuhda 

IjOTgertttft* im*« STItcr* en« aSoa^. 

fdrgdmekt Cm d^ier. 2» dnjffis. 



TBSSOSL KNOUSH. 276 

toile pour faire des chemises^. Yery^* fine^ shirtiiig". 
twawl poor /are dd ^mi$, 

Mon* fr^re* a' achet4* one* paire' Mj^ brother* has^ bought* 
Mmg/rdre ah athty uen p&re 

de^ geutres' neuves*. a* pair* oV new* gaiters'* 

duh goeir noev. 

IUl^ tante" vient^* d'acheter* Mj^ aunt* has^ just* 
Mdh tangt vyangi (Tashid 

un* beau^ chapeau* nenf % purchased* a* beautiful' 

ung bp shap-d noe/f 

om4 d'*-« une" plume" bleue« new* hat*, with" a" littltf* 
dmd cP uen pluem Mie 

qui« W rend***** blue** plume** that** seto«* 

ke lah rdng 

trte jolie^«»**. her*y off** in** fine** style**. 

trd zhdfy, 

Je* ne» serais' point* ^tonn^, I* shouldn't*** wonder* if* 
Zhuh nuh serdpioatongt d46n-dj 

que* quelqu'* un' lui** *" some* one' were' paying* his** 

hvh keU^ ung Itoi 

fit hi cour'"^; quoiqu'** addresses** to** her**; not- 

/e lah koor; kwawk withstanding*^ 

elle**soit**surannfe**'«*q — she** is** quite*' an** old** 
d tiwaw «uer-<{n-£ — 



Bien des pardons**"** r — maid** — I** beg" pardon**— 

Bydng dd pdrd5ng — 

Jo** voulais** dire**, I** should** say**, quU^ 

Zhuh voo4d deer, 

igfe**-**. advanced in** life^. 



276 QSRMAN. SPANISH. 



3n elnen 04iict^cr(a^em ConunSatire, 



Outcn* ZaQ*, mein ^tvfi. Buenos* dias", sefior*. 

GooUn id(/, mine hir. Btod-nds dMs, sainy^. 

^a6en'®ie*3florfe*3U*»eTlaufett*? jTiene* U." vestidos* que ven- 
HOhhinseeroQk&tiooferJcowfenf T€^ti& U, vesti-dos kd vin^ 

der***? cUrT 



3a*/ntcinJE>crr*, ic%':^aBe*3lB(fe» Si*, sefior", tengo** vestidos* 

- Yah, mine hir, ish hakbd roe-kd Si, sain-ydr, ttngd visti-dds 

»on*alIctt'^(Sorte*. SBc^e^Srt*® de* todos^^ generos". ^Que* 

fUn alien sortd. Vdchd drt dd todds hendros. Kd 

t)on" fRod^ foil" id^** 3^nett*^ genero*® de" vestidos** le mos- 

/Un roek sol ish* ee-nin hJendro dd vesU-doa Id mSs* 

geiflen*'? tsikenf im^^^^^&TJ.^^J trdrdahU.t 

Sflun\ einen' fd^watjcn* gradP, Bien*, un« vestido fino*«, y 

KooUf i'nen shtodrtsen /rahk, Bi/en, oon vistidd fe-no, % 

»on fcinem 2:u^e' — ^Sc^'benle'^ negro*. Oreo* 'este**' vestido 

fun firnlm too(^d — ish dinkd nd-gro. Krd-6 istd vesUdd 

bad* ifl' am*^ mobernjlen**. de modo". 

dci8 ist dhm m^klimstin. dd modo. 



3e^t* nid^t* gang* fo* ntobern* No* es tan" de modo* ahora* 

Yitst nisht gants so mZdlm Nd is tan dd mddo ah-^^ah 

aW* ber^ U6erro(P — UBerrotfe* como* el^ saco" — ^los saoos' 

alsdemeber-rdck — ue6cr-roeA;d komd el sdkd — iSs sdkdi 



njerben*® mcl^r** fletragett**^ son*® muy de modo**»*«. 

verden mare gd-trdhrgen. sSn mwy dd mddo. 

Out*'", benn', leigen ®ic* ntir* Muy* bien", ensefieme*-* 

Gootj den, tsirken see m^r Mwy hyen, ensdin^yd-md 

einen* UBerrodP. un" saco'^. 

i-iien ueher-rdk. oon sdko. 

^ier* ijl* einct* — ^l^* benfe* bad Aqui* esta" uno» que* yiene^ 

Eeer ist i-ntr — ish denkd das Ah-ki Utah oo-nd kd ve-9nd 

cr« 3^nen'^ J>a5t»* bien & U.»P 

dre eenin pdst, hyin ah oosted. 



FBSNCH. ENGLISH. 277 

Aveeun TaiUeur. At a Tailor^iKop. 

Bonjour* ■. monsieur.* Good* morning", sir*. 

Bong-zhooTy mUs-T/oe. 

Avez^-vouB* des" habits* ifi Have* you* any* coats^ to* 
Avy - voo dd'Z'CtbS'Z'oh sell*? 
vendre*? vangdrf 

Oui*,mon8ieni*,j'ai*^des habits* Yes*, sir*, I* have* coats* of* 
Tfe, mits-yoe, zh'd dd-z-ahi 

de* toutes^ esp^*. Quelle* eveiy^ description.* What^ 
duhtoot'8-94>is. Ka 

sorte**> d'habit***** tous*7 mon- kind** of ** a^ coat** shall>* I*» 
«3r d'abi voo mong- show** you*'? 

trerai-je**-**? trirO-zhuhf 

lEh bien*,un*noir*debeaudrap*. Well*, a* broadcloth* — ^black*| 
Ehhyangfingnwaiordvh hodrd. 

Celui-I2i* me* semble' plus*« frock* — I* think' that^ is* 
S&wl-ULk muh sUngU plue-z- 

k la mode**. most** fashionable**. 

ah Idhmdd, 

Pas*antant*que*le'paleteau* — Not* quite* so* fitshionable* 
PdhrZ'd4ang kd luhjpcLUtd — 

les paleteaux* sont** now* as* the' sack* — sacks* 

Id pdUtd song 

plus d'usage*****. are** much" wom^. 

ph.e d^xiB-^zazh. 

Shbien*^, done,* faites moi Veiy* well*, then*, flhow* me* 
Eh hyang^ dongh^fat mtoaw 

voir** un* paleteau.' a* sack'. 

vwato-r-wig piUHd, 

En void*'* un*, qui* vous* Here* is* one^ — ^I* think* 
Ang vwawsy ung^ %i voo 

ri^ra'**, je* pense*. it* is' your* fit*. 

t^'^trah^ shuh pangs. 



278 GERMAN. SPANISH 

£>\ nelit; ganj unb gat nit^t^fi 0\ de ninguna manera»-*; es** 

0, niTie, gantB oond gdr ntsht, 0, da neenrgoond mdndrcih; is 

er* i^ »ieP gu* grof " — er*** »irb" demasiado'* ■ ancbo"* •, 

dre ist/ed tsoo grOse—^re veerd dd-rnds-e-ah-dd dncho, 

nie" ^tnuitn^* no me ira jamas** ".q 

nee gd-nnezhen. no md i^ah hdmds. 



^ier* ifl' eln anbern', ein Aqui* esta* unotro" — 

ffeer igt me andem^ ine An-ki estah oon-d4rd — 



Heinerer^ — ^ttcrfud^enSie'Mefen*. mas pequefio*, pniebela*»« U.* 
Mi-nh'ir-—fer80(X^€n see deesen. mdhspdJcdnyOfproo-drbdlah K 



©iefcr* ijl" Bejfcr*— ct paf t* fel^t* Es*** mejor»— va muy bien*-». 
Dee-ser ist hesser — derpdsi adre Aae mdrhor — vdh mtoy byen. 

flttt*» SQa^'' bettlen*® ®ie» i Qa^ le parece^^^ de" eao«, 

goot. Vds denken see Ka Idjpard-thd dd dsd, 

fearuJet"'", ®d^ttefber«»? sefior sastre"? 

ddmeher, shni • der f sainy^ sdstrd f 

ffir P^t a^nen*"^ feljr* gut*, Va muy bien*-«; muy* bien*, 
Aresitsti-^n sdre gooty ydhmwyhyen; micy lyen, 

m^xiiii\ 9xii^Wgl' — 9lid^te» ciertamente*. Nada" pue- 
v6hr4%sh, Pro^shtizk — nix the-^iamentd, Nahrdah pwd- 

fgnnte" Bejfer" fl^en"* da^^ir^ mejoi^. 

hoentd hesser sitsen. dah eer mdhl6r. 



9Ba«Mjl'bct»9)reU*? ^A como le vende U.? 
Vds ist der prise f Ah kGmd Id vendd oosted t 

Sr*6etra9t^ui:^rei3el§tt*DolIar«» Solamente* trece* pesos*. 

Are hHrigt noor dritsdne dollars. Sd-ah^mentd trd-tkd pdrsos. 

Dad' l|l« 8ana» Uttig*. Es*'« muy» die barato*. 

Das ist gants biHuh. Es mwy dd harahto, 

3^* »erlaufc« alfc'meinc*^lcitct' Vendo*- • todos" mis* vestidoB' 

Ish ferhoio/a affd mind 7dl-d*r Vnulo todos mis vestedds 



FRENCH. SNOLISH. 279 

OhS iion«, point* du» tout^ II* 0*, not* at» all*; it* 
Of noriffy pwniciiy </ue too. 11 

a» trop* d*ampleuif.« Cela^ is* quite' too* large" — it^ 
ah tro iVang-phar. S'lah 



ue me va pas'*^'. will" never" do". 
mih muh vahpah. 

En voici*** un autre" Here* la* another* — 
Ang vtcawst^ ung-n-otr 



plus ^troit*, essayezMe*. mnaller* — ^tiy* this*. 

phiO-z-^irwaWf essay -a -Id. 

H* va't mieux*. II sicd \i mer- That* is* better* — very* fine' 
U vah myoe. 11 syd-d-ah nutr- 

▼eille*-*.* Qu'7en"'"penseE*''- fit». What' do« jou» think" 
v&lyvh, K' ang pangsdr 

Tous", monsieur le tailleur" ? of" it**, tailor" f 
voo, musyoe luh tdl-yoer? 

ll filed h merveille*"* — k mer- Very* fine* fit*. Very* fine*, 
U syd ah mlrvdlyvh — ah nUr^ 

vielle**, en v6rit^*. C'est nn indeed.* Admirable' fit". 
vdlyuh, ang viretd. S'drtHuaig 

chef-d'oBuvre,v — on ne* eanrait" Nothing* could" sit" better", 
tkef-^o&vr — ong nvh sd^d 

rien* vous faire de mieux"»". 
ryang voo/dre dvh myoe. 

Quel* en est* le» prix* ? What* ia* the^ price* 1 

Kd ang d luh pree f 

Ce* n'est* que* treize* piastres*. It* is* only* thirteen* dollars* 
Suh n*d huh trdze pl-axtr. 

(y*est* bien k bon march^. That* is* quite* cheap*. 
Sd hyang ah hong marshd, 

Jo* vends* tous* mes* habits* I* sell* all* my* clothes* 
Zhuh vang too mdrSHibi - z- 



280 



GEBMAK. 



SPANISH. 



Wfflfl*. DiedMjPbet* 
liUig. Dees is* der 

vole-frla Idden. 

-fleer irt (?d(* gdd — m^ 

dinkd dse ist rish-tizh. 



baratismos*. Aquf^ esta' 
hardHsmos. Ak4U eskih 

la> tienda^ baratisiiiia*<^. 
lah tyenda hardtisimah. 

Aqni^ esta' su' dine^o^ 
AM-ki estdh soo di-nd-ro. 



®attj*rid^Hg«,meltt^erT»} foUten* 
Gants rishriizh, mineMr; s6Uen 

sec eer-kend etvahs mSre tsoo 



mi^n^m ga-shi/t bd-iong-end, 



jlmipareoer^ es'*" eqnitativo*. 
Ah mipdrdthir is dkUahtivd. 

8i^* seilor". Gaando^ neoe* 
Si, sdinydr. Quandd nd4he- 

sitara^' algnna^ cosa% 
setdrah dlgoanah kdsahf 

liagame el favor de darme 
hdgdmd d fahvSr dd ddmUL 



0eBtauc^en^ fo Ia|fen @ie e^ txn^ 
gdbrowcuerij so Idsin see dse oons 
tDiptt."^^ vissen. 



3^* »crbc" cd* t^un», meln^err.* 
Ish virdd dse toon, mine hir. 

Outcn" aWorgen'. 
Goof en morken. 

^(Atxi} ®ic« SeinHeibW? 
Hahen see htne-kH-der ? 

3a, id&» I)aBe» Sclnneiber* 
Ta/i, ish haJi-bd hine^kli-der 

»on* ieber» STrt* vlixV ®utc». 
/iZ» yttc?dr drt oond gaetd. 



la preferencia.**^* 
lah pre/erenthiah. 

Lo* hare*"*, seflor*. 

Buen^ dia^. 

jTiene* U." pantalones^ 1 
Tyd^a K pdntm^nJUf 

Tengo*^ pantalones'de* todas* 
Ten^o pdntdlo-nis dd tddas 

calidades" j'de todos generos'. 
kaledadis i dd todoshend^rds. 



ffiad* fotberit* ©ie» ffir* Mefce" ^Cuanto* qaiere** U.« por* 

F^A« fUrdern see fner deeses Qudnto ke-ird U. p6r 

5)aar'^ ? jxiAr f este* par' ? esto pdihr f 



©Icben* DonaT«\ 

Sccbcn doliurs. 



Siete* pesos'. 
Si-did pdrsos. 



rBXNOH. 



XNOIiaH. 



281 



k bon march^*. <5'' est* 
ah hong marshd. S'd 



le" magasin^ au bon marchd^^ 
lu\ magSzang 6 h6ng mdrshd, 

Voua voici*^ !'• argent*— 
Voo vwavssy Irarzkang — 

(y est* jnst^ — ii'est ce pas? w 
S^& zAues^ — n'd tukpakf 



cheap*. This' is* 
the» cheajp^^ rtw^. 
Here* is* the^ mone; 
I* think* that» is* right*. 



Cestbien^, monsieur*. Quand* All* rights, sir*. When* 
8d hyangj mwtyoe. Kang 



vous* ddsirerez* quelque' 
voo dd-strd-rd kdk 

ehose* de** notre" resort**, 
tk5z duh ndtr resSr, 



▼enez nous voir.**^*x 
vend noo vwator. 



you* want* any'^ thing* 
more* in** my** line**, 
give** ns** a** call**. 



^e n'y manquera^ pasj M"^ * I* shall* do* so*, sir*. 
J^vh n'd mang'kerd pah^ M, 

Bonjour**'. Good* morning. 



Ayez*-you8* des* pantalons* f Have* you* any* pantaloons*? 
Avd - voo dd pang4aIong f 

Te* tiens* toates* sorted* de* I* have* pantaloons* of* all 
Zhiih tyang toot fori duh 

pantalons*, et^ d'une grande kinds* and^ descriptions". 
pang'torlong, d d^ung grang 
yari^t^. vari-itd. 

What* do* you* ask* for* this* 
pair^? 

Seven* dollars*. 



Que* voulez-voufl*^ de* cette* 
id voold' voo ivh tet 
paired? pdrf 

Sep^i* piastres*. 
JSa po-dstr 



u* 



282 GERMAN. SPANISH. 

3)ad* ifl" a«* »irf\ Es*** demasiado**. 

Dds ist tsoofed, Es ddrtnahs-i-ddo. 

Slid^tV mnn* ©ic» bie* Oute* No*, S'*, si* se» ha de juegar* 

Nichty ven see dee gfueia No, 5r., si sd ah da hoothrgar 

te«7'» Sludged" unb*<* ben** der la« calidad* y*o de la** 

i^ tooch^ oond den dd hh kdl-^-dad i dd lah 



©d^nltt** in Sctrat^t }^\t^tn\ hechura** de*» este» pafto*. 

Kknit in bd-traCKt tsiriji, d^choo^ah dd Htdpdnyo. 

^atjcn*''' ®ie» SBcflen* gu* ter- <jTiene U.*-» chalecos* quo 

IldhJben see vestBn tsoo fer- Ti/dnd U. chaldkase kd 
faufen"? hcncfeiif vender** •? vindirf 

3a^mcit^&c^^®otIM(^*3^ncn• SI*, eefior". ^Le enBenare«-* 

Yahy mine Mr, ttol ish S-nen Se, sainyor. La eMd-nydrd 



einc' S(tlaptt)ejle»'8 aclgcn*? d U." un' chaleco» de raso»? 

'-na AtldS'Vestd td-kenf ahU,oon chald-Mddrah-sdf 

•Jlein*, fd^" tounfc^e** elne* \Jon* No*, prefereria*"* uno* 

NinCf ish vMenshd i-nd /Un No, prdfir-ir-i-ah oond 



flaflmir*. (Ed* fdngt an** 3tt* de casimirQ®. Empesa*""* &* 
kakrfiieer, Aseflngt an two dd kdsS-me^o, Empes-ah ah 



regttcn* j idj" bcn!c^ i6) gcl^c Hover*, y voy*-*® d casa**. 
rdzhnen; ish denied isJi gd-d li/over, e voy ahkahrsuli. 



nad^ ^aufe»"*^ Segcn*^©{c mir*» Enfardelad**" estos** panta- 

nfich ?iow-za. Lazhen see meer En/ahr-dd-Idd estds panta* 

|cne** Scinfleiber*« unb*' biefc" lones*« y*' este*» chaleco*^. 

yd-nd hine-kU-dcr oond densd Id-nes i istd chald-ko. 

SBeflc*' gufammcn**. ^fer^ ifl"* Aqui» esta** una" camisa®. 

, vestd tsoosammm. Heer ist AJi-ki esiah oonah kam-i-sah 

eitt^^einb"^ — ic^'^ gcbcnfe" t€^ Quiero»*'»*comprarla««"^tam- 

ine hcmd — iVi gd-denkd dse Ei-iro komprahr4ah tarn* 



auA'* gu faufcn*'^"®** — legcn** bien**. Enfardeladla'*"*° con"* 
ouf ;h Um) koir/tm — Idzhsn lyen. Enfahrdaldd-lah Icon 



FRENOH. CNGLI8H. 288 



0'» est« trop**. That* is> too« much*. 

S'a tro. 



Non*, si vous examinez'^ bien Not* when* you* consider* 
Nonff, si voo-z^ezdmind hyang 

A* quality* du7»» drap*, the* quality* of the* cloth*, 

lah kdU4d due drah, 

et** la" fagon**. and** the** make** of** theaa**. 

tt lah faxong. 

Ave«-vous*~* des gilets* k* Do* you* keep* vests* to* sell* 7 

Avy - f 00 da zhild^Hih 
vendre'f vangdrf 

Oui*, monsieur.* Vous* montre- Yes*, sir*. Shall* I* show* 
Wif musyQe. Voo mongtrdr 

rai'^-je* un^ gilet* de satin*/ you* a' satin* vest*f 
rd-zhuh ung zhild dd sdtdng f 



Non*, j'*en pr^fgrerais*** un* No*; I* would* like* a* 
NSng^ zh^ ang jprd-ferira'U ung 



de casimir*. H* commence** ii* cassimere*. It*i8*beginnin|f 
dd kcLzimeer, 11 kdrn-dngs ah 

pleuvoir* — je* vais*,! je* to* rain* — ^I* think^ I* will* 
fhe'Vwawi^-—zhvh vd, j^ttA 



pen8e'',retourner**chez moi**. return** home**. Put** me** 
pangSj rdtoamd chd mwato, 

Empaquetez** **-moi** ces** pan- up** those** pantaloons** and*5^ 
Empidcitd mwaw sd pang' 

talons*»et*5^oe**^let**. Voici**^ that** vest**. Here** is** a«* 
(along d tvh zhild, Vwawsy 

une«»chemise«». Je«*vai8*7,ije** shirt**. I** think** I«* will*^ 
uen shmis. Zhuh va^ s^uh 

pense*»,r**acheter*4galement**. purchase"* that* also**. Pu<^ 
pnngny V asha agalmang. 
Mettez^Ma* Met-d-lah 



284 



GERMAN. 



SPA27ISH. 



©Ic e«» 3U»* bem» Utrigen"** 
see ase tsoo dem uehrigen. 



los" otroB articuloe'*. 
lo8 d4r^ ahrtikoolas. 



3a,* tad" ijl» tin* fel^r* f(i^6ned« SI*, es*» 
Yahj das ist tne sdre shoenSs Si, Ss 



una* oamisa'^ her- 



©ad* i(l« tcr» 3>rcU* bicfen** 
l'127i« is< der preis deesen 
^atdbinber^? hiUs-binderT 

Der* l|l« fe^r» niebrij*— 
D^r ist sdre ne-drlzh — 

noor tsiDoelf shiltngd. 

©el^r*®ut»; Ic0Ctt**®iebiefelBe* 
sdre goot ; Idzhen see dee-sUbd 

gtt" bcm' Ubrigen". 
tsoo dem nehrizhen. 



mosisima'. mStis-i-mah, 



Cuanto* pid6 U.r* por* esta* 
Quanta pedd U. por estah 
corbata'? korhatahf 



Es*** muy" de barato*. 
Es mwy dd hdrdld, 

Solamente' doce" chelines*. 
SolanUntd ddUid cheU-nU. 

Bien** bien*^, enfiudelad**- 
B^fcUf hyen, enfahr-dSUad-' 



la* con" los^ otros articuloa*. 
la kdn Ids 64rds artikooUs. 



3n ctnen ©^u^Uben. 

3ci&* bcnfc« i^» tola* uttteti* 
Ish denied ish vil oonten 



Con un ZapaUro» 

Me propongo**'* de ir' & la 
Maprdpdngd ddeer ahlah 



In bic ©tabt' gc^en», unb* mir**» 

t» dee Stat gd-in, ooful meer 

eln" 9)aar*« ©ticfel**" faufen*. 
ine pdhr stee/d kaw/en. 

SBoHen" ©ic*« mii^*^ fcegrelten*'? 
Vdllin see misk higli-Unf 

SDMt* Serflttugcn*, mein' greunb*. 
Mil verg-rmezhen, mein/roind. 

8Bf rbett* w!t»flc^ett' obcr^fai^ren'? 

F2lrf?^» veer^d-in odir/ah-rin ? 



cindad' baja", y" de compnuf 
the-oodadhdhd, i ddkamprdlw 

un" par*» de*« betas**, 
oon jpdAr dd b6tds. 



^Qmere**U.*' venir*'conmigo**F 
KMrd U. vdrueer kSn^mi-gof 

Con* guBto*, amigo* mio*. 
JKihi goostdf dmigd mM 



^Iremofl & pie*~*, d*en i 
ErdmOs ah pe^ 6 en hocAdf 



FBENGH. SNGUSH. 285 

avec" leS" autres articles"*. it^ up^ wiih** the" rest**. 
la-z-d-tre-zartUd. 



Oni*, c'« esl^ une* trW jolie» Yes*, thal^ is* a* very« fine* 
We^ idJte nen tra zhidly shirt', 
chsmise'. ihmis. 

Qoel^ ests le' prix« de» cette* What> is* the* price« of* this* 
Kd & lah pree- dvhiet crayat'? 

crayate'? krdvdtf 

Elle* est" \k^ tr^> bon marchd* — That* ifi" very* cheap* — 
El a ahtrd hSng mdnkd — 

Douze* chelins'^, pas d'avantage*. only* twelve* shillings'. 
Dooz thUang pah d'&vdngtazh. 

Fort* bien", envelloppez'^-la* Very* well", putF that* 
Far hyangy ang-vd-ivpd-lah 

aveo* T' achat* np* with* the' rest*. 

dvik V&shdh. 



Magatm d BotUt. In a Shoe^tore, 



Je sois d'avis de descendretl* I* think' I* will* go* down* 
^ffmh 9wi d'avi duk ddsdngdr 

en Tille' pour m'*® acheter* town', and* buy* me** a** 
taig vU poor m'cuhtd 

une** paire** de** bottes**. Vou- pair** of *» boots* 
n&n pdr duh hdt. Too- 

leE**-vous** m' *■ accompagnei*' ? Will**you** accompany*' me** ? 
Id - voo nC dk-dmpdriryd f 

Avec* plaisir*, mon* ami*. With* pleasure*, my* friend*. 

Ahvik pldhzeeTy mong^nrdmi. 

trons-nous iipied*'^ ou*prendrons- Shall we* walk*, or* ride* ? 
Trong-noo ah pyd ooprangdrong- 
nousT.iture^? noovwawtoerf 



286 OSRMAN. SPANISH. 



S)\ Ittffett ©ic" nni^ gcl^cn* ; Yamos, pues, dpie**^. Porqae 

0, Ifisiti see aons gorht; Vdmos,pw&se,ahpid, Porkd 

e«« iffi nnx'' tin* ®^rltt» M no^hayWqtieyun^paao'hasta" 

dse tst noor vie shrU his nd i kd qonpdhsd dsldh 

|U*" einem" ©^ul^Iaben**". la" (primera) zapateria**^. 

tsoo i-nem shoo-lafiden, Ivh (pri-mdrdh) thdpdUri-dk, 

Se^r* Wol^I", batttt", WoDcn* mir* Muy* bien«, vamoa*-*. 

Sdre vole, ddai^ voUta veer Mwy hyen^ vdhmos, 
fleljen*. ffa-in. 



8eil8ttfia bemerft*-*, itoUd)" /ZpropositS*-*, ha* visto^ U.* 
Bi-loifizk hd^mirkt, hd-ifbdCK- Ah pro-pozirto ah veestd U. 

tetctt* ■ ©14 flejlern" Sttetib" su^^ primo* al* " teatro" 
VUln see gesUm dhend soo pri-md al tSrobrd 



3^rctt' Setter^ tm**" Sl^eater"? ayer por la sera**»?t 

d-H7i fetter im td-ak-terf akyh- por lah sdrClh t 

SlcittS id^«6cobad^tete» i^n tii^t*, No*, no* le he* visto— 

Nine^ishha-ohaGOtUdeennichty No, nd la a veesto— 

melttc*®ebattfett'l»arett'3U*fe^r* Mi* espiritu* era'' captiyado" 

mi-ndgd-ddnken vdr-en tsoosdre Mi ispe-ritoo d^rah kapUvddo 

mit** bem« ©pWe" tefc^afttflP, por" la« pie»a« 

mit dem spi-ld hdrskiftigt. por la ptdtha. 

S3* tear" eitt' fe^r* fc^oned* Era^»" una" piewt' muy* 

Ase vdr ine sdre shoenes A-rah oonah pe-drthah mwy 

®tu(!'; murbeater'^burd^^bett" agradable*; pero' interompi- 

staek ; voordd dhher doorsh den dgrddahhU ; pdro hUBr-ompi* 

Unru^eflifter" im"-" 5)arterre*« da« demasiado*, por" este» 

oon-roo-drsti/ter im pdrUr-rd da ddmoKsiddo, por estd 

jtt" oft" Utttertrod^ctt". bribon" del***" patio**. 

tsoo d/t oonter-broohen, bre-ban dd pahtM. 

3a*# et" toar' etn* fe^r* fomif^er" Si*, era*» un* bufoiiillo*-^. 

Yah, are vdr ine sdre Icomisher Si, drrah can huf-<HMfy6, 

J^amerrtb'. Jcahm^rdd. 



HUQTCfH. 



BHOLISH. 



287 



MarohonsM, il* n'y» 
Marikong^ il fCe 

a» qu'y Tm» paa* d'ici, k^ nn** 
oA ^'wi^ |MzA c2'i^9 ah ung 

magasiif 2^ soTilier**. 
magazang ah soolyir. 



0*, letf uflFwalk*j it» 
is* butf^ a" gtep» 
to*« a" Bhoe^shop^' 



Ehbien^*,don(^,allons^pied*^. Very* well", then', w^^rill^ 
Ehlyang,d<mgh^a[Umg-z-ah]py(l, go\ '^ . 



A^ propos*', avez^vous* vu* 
Ahpri^ - 2 - avoFvoo tme 

hier" soir", votre'' cousin* 
^ noavfr, votr koazang 

an**«th^tre"? 
d tSrohrtrt 

Non*, je* ne* Fy ai* point* vu. 
Nbng^ zkvh nvh Vi d pwdng vue, 

Mon* esprit* ^tait7 trop** 
]l!iong4i-(spre • t - ity tro 

occupy® de" la^r^prfeentation^. 
o^epcZ duh lah rSprdslSntdsi^ong, 

C* ^tait« nne" fer^ belle* 
S'ety-i-nen trd hel 

pito* ; mais^ trop* sonyent^ 
pi^; md trd soo-vang-t' 

mterrompue** par" ce" 
dngter-Sntpue pSr mh 

pkisant^ du**»" parterre**. 
pldrsang due pdrter. 

Oui*, il" ^tait* trte* comique*. 
Wi, U eta tra k^hrUk. 



By* the* way*, did* you* 

observe* youi* conrfn* at* 

the*« theatre" last« evening"? 

No*, I* did* not*— my* 

mind* was'' too* much* 

engrossed" with** the** play* 

It* was* a* very* fine* 

play*; but' too* frequently* 

interrupted** by** that** 

rogue** in** the** pit**. 

Tes*, he* was* a^very* oomi- 
cfiJ* fellow''. 



288 



GERMAN. 



SPANISH. 



Es yerdad***.u Pero* aqnl* 
Gants 90 ; Qber heer si7id veer Es virdad. Pdro aki 



®ana* fo»; ater* ^ier" finb* »it» 



hime ^loo-ldden, 

©ie utt3« eintreten". 
see oa?w in^'tritin. 



Sajfftt" 
Ldssin 



estamos^* delantc* de la' 
estdmos ddrlantd da hh 

Entremos*-*^ 
ErUrcirrrtos 



©om W ©le* mit* eincm* 
Sell tsh see mil t-nem 

^aax'' ©(i^ul^c" tterfe^en' ? ' 
pdlir shood versdrhi f 

9leltt*, meln ^err* ; i(i^» tterlange* 
JVin«, minehir; lA/erldng-d 
©ttefcR ««-/€/. 

SBe^e* art* t)on« ©tiefein* 
Velchd drt /Un sii-fein 

gie^ett''©ie«t)or7? \jonJtaI6d* 
tse^ see /or? f\in kalbps' 



zapateria^'". 
thapateria. 

jQuiere U.*"'*^ un* par'^ de" 
Ki-ird U, oon pdr dd 

zapatos'? 
ihdpdios 

No*, sefior*; qniero** botas*. 
iVb, sainy^ ; ke^d hdtas* 

jQue* genero" de" botas* 
Kd hendrd dd hdlas. 

le agradece & U. ma8*^?w 
Id agrdhddthd ah U. mdst 



Aow?^, yitln grdsem kdlbps/d, 

ober*« ijon ©afftan" ? 3<^" 
^fr /wn sSf'l-dnf Lh 

^a6c« efttige" fc^r" fd^5ne*» 
haJihd i-nizha sure s/ioena 

©dfPatt*' ©ttefcl", toeld^c*> i4« 
saf-e-dn stee-fdy velchd ish 

m\i^ »erfa«fen" miO«*. 
hiUig verJeowfen vill. 

2Be^e* 5rrt»Jtar6«IebeT**^aBen* 
Yelchd drt kalbpsldder hahhen 

©(C«? seef 

r 

3d^* I6al6e» fcanjBPfii^ed*, 
£h hahhd /rantsoesicheSf 



£l piel becerillo*, de becerra", 
ElpyU hetherifyd, dd hetherah^ 

(5«decordoban"? Tengo**« 
d dd kdrd^banf Tengo 

botas" de*'' cordobaii*^ mny** 
hdtas da kdrddban mtoy 

fino*", que« vendr^^-" & U. 
fe^no, kd vindrd ah Ui 



muy de barato". 
muoy dd harcUd. 



^Que*genero" de»cuerodeteme- 

Kd hendro dd kwdro dd Vtmdf 

roniene«U.«? rotydndU. 

Tengo* cuero" de temero", 
Tengo hwdro dd timdrOf 



TRENCH. 



ENGLIBH. 



289 



Cest vrai«'*.a 
S'a vrd. 



Enfin,bb 
Ang-/angy 

nous voilii*"* au** magasin* 
noo vwawlah d magazang 

^ bottes?- EntronB»-". 
ah 1st, Angtrong, 

Vous* oflfrirai-je*^ nne* 
vo(Hi - offr^Orzh'Tien 

paire' de» souliers* ? 
pdr duh tocl-yir f 

Non*, monsieur", je* ddsirerais* 
Nong^ mus^QQy zhuh ddzMrd 
des hottest ddbdt. 

Quelle^ Borte" de' bottes* 
Ea 9ort da hdt 



pr6fi§rez*»'^-rous' — en veau% 
pr&fcLrCL ' voo — ang vd. 



en vieux veau", ou*° 
ang-vyeu vo, oo 



en maroquin"? j'*" ai« de" 
ang marokang f zKd dvh 



tr^« belles*' bottes" en maro- 
trd hd hotri - ang mar-o- 

quin^, que*« ie" puis** ofl&ir" 
kang^ huh mvih ^e-n-of-reer 



Quite' BO"; but* here* we* 
are*, afc» the* shoe'^-store". 
Let* U8" enter". 
Shall* I" accommodate" you" 
with" a* pwr' of" shoes* ? 
No*, sir"; I" want" booia*. 

YHiat* kind" of" boots" 
do" you" prefer^ — calfsldn", 
kipskin*, or*^ 
morocco** ? I*" have*" 
some** very*" fine** morocco^ 
boote*", that** I«" will"* 



^ bon march^. 
ah hang marsha. 

Quelle* esp^" de" veau" avea"- 
Kel explU dvh v6 aioy- 

VOUB*? VOOf 



J'* ai* des cuirs de veaux* de 
ZKa da ktoeer dvh vd dvh 



sell"" cheap"". 

What^ kind" of* calfskin" have* 
you*? 

I* have* French* oalfskitt", 



25 



290 GERMAN. SPANISC. 

5)^ltabelp^lcr*, unb* orblndred' frances*, de Filadelfia^, y» 
FiladelfieTy oond drdinarSs franthis, da Filade//iah, € 



flar6«Tcbcr.(3(^^al6c)eittettfe^r* de algunos ordinarios\ (Ade- 
kdlbsldder. (Ish haJibd) inm sdre da dl^notord&ndrios, (AhdC* 

f^Bnen* artifeP® t)on" franjoP^ mas) otroa generos**>-de" 
^u>enen drtikel fUn frantso^si- maJuJ dtr^ hindrSs dd 

f(^em«JtaIb«Ieber*». ©otl^iii^" ternero" frances", mny* boni- 
shem kalbdddir. SoL ish temdro /ranthes mwy botii" 

3^nen^7tt,e^e«"aei0cn*"t tos«. ^Quiere U. verbs**-"' 

i - ncn vetches Ui-zhen f 08. Ki-ira IT. virlas f 



SBenn* e« 3^««tt* gcfSflij i^M Con mucho gusto*-«. 
Ven dse e-nen ga-ftUig tst. , luon moocko goosto. 

^icr* |lttt>» flc*. 3<3^* i^«t*e» |le» Aquf*estaii*». (>eo*»» que 
Ileer sind see. Ish denkd see Ah-ki estan. Krdro ka 



Werbcn'' 3^ttf«* ^txiavL^^ paffen** le"calzan muy bien.x 
verdin ^nen gd-now pdssen. Id kalthan tnwy hyen. 



©ic* fel&en" fel^r* plump* nxCt^ Me pareceii*'«y muy* groceros* 
See sd-hi sdre ploomp oond Md pdrdthin mtoy grotheHk 
grop* aui** gross ows. y* anchos*. e dnchos. 



SieHeid^t* mBgen** @(e" Qui«a* le gustarian*-^ mucbo 

Fi-HcIU rruyezhen see Kithah Id goostdriuhn moocko 

am Cicbpcn* ®af|!att*'®tlcfcL mas«« betas de maroqui'. 

ohm leebsten Safijdn-sti-fd. mdsy lotas dd mdrdhke. 

3c^* »{0- mir einigc* ©affiatt** Quiero*»* vei** algunas* de 

Ish vil mter i^izha Safyanr Ki^rC ver dlgunaJis dd 

Stiefcl tefcl^en', njcnn' ©le" er* maroqui^, eP U." le gusta''. 

8t€-/el bH-sdren^ ven see *^r- maroke se U. la goostah, 
lauBen"* lowbin. 

i^ler* i|l« eiii» fel&r* fd&Bncs* 9aax\ Aqu^esta'un" paT« muy* fino*, 

Heer ist ine sdre shoenespahry Ah-kiestaoonpahrmwyfenOj 

»eld^e«5'i<^«35tt«tt"«wter"bem" que' puedo"** vender*" & U.** 

vUchis ish e-nen oonter dem kd pwdrdd vhider ah U, 



FRENCH. ENGLISH. 291 

FraDce*, de Philadelphia*, et* Philadelphia*, aod^ 
FramjXj duh FUCuleifyah, d 

mdinc d'ordinaires^ C?'^) common.' A very* 
mdme tTordindr. (ZKd) 

untr68*4)eau"choix**de"veaux*" fine* article*® of" French^ 
ung trd - bo thwaw duh vd 

de France**. Vous*' en^ mon- calf **— flhall** I*» 
duh Drangs. Voo-z-ang tnong- ^ 



trerai"'**-je" quelques-uns** ? show*® you*' some** ? 
trerd - zliuh ktlkd-z-ung f 



S'il V0U8 plait*~*.cc If* you' please.' 

S*il voo pld. 

*Le8»voici*^. Ellc8*voufl*vont''« Here* they" are*. I* think* 
Ldw>aiDsy. EU voo vong 



je* pense*, h merveille**. they* will' fit* you* exactly** 

zhuh pangs ah mervdltfuh, 

Elles* ont* trop* ordinaires* et* They* look* very* coarse* ani' 
Elrz - ong trd drdindr d wge*. 

trop grandes*. tro grdng. 

Vou8*enpr4f(Sreriez'^,peut-^tre*, Perhaps* you* would* like* 
Voo-z-angprd/drirydf poe-trdtr, 

en F>aroquin*. morocco* better*- 

ang fpardkdng, 

Montrcz m'en de^ maroquin*, I* will* look* at* some* 
Mongtrd nCang duh niarvkang, 

je vons prie, (s*' il vous*plaft*.) morocco*, if' you* please*. 
zhuh voo pre, (s^il voo pld,) 



Envoic? • ^r«» fort* belle* Here* is* a* very* fine* pair*^ 
Ang vwawfOf uen for bel 

pair.o*, que' je* puis* vous** that' I* can* sell** you** 
par, k& zhuJipwi voo 



292 



GERMAN. 



BPANI8H 



crjlctt** yretd** tterf aufcn*" lannK menos*» de" su precio" corri- 
irsten prue vlrhavofen kdn. menos dd 900 prathid kdrry^ 

er" flnt)*^ prad^tf8c"®ttefeltt«. ente".Son*«»*n)otas*«escelente8". 
Ase sind prahiizhd ste-feln, hUd, Son hdtds cuth&entis. 



©inbred- Bcf(]&aW9t»? 
Sind ase hd-s^iedigt f 



I Son*»* ayeriadas^ ? 
Son dveriadas t 



D\ ncitt", i^* laufte* (Ic* auf fcem* 0*, no*, seflor, las* he compra- 
0, nine, ish kow/ta see ow/dem 0, no, sainyor, las d kamjpror 



auWott'^; uttb" lann* jle** 
owk-tse-on; oond kan see 

bilhzh o^d /erioosi 

»er!aufett.*« 
ferkoto/en. 

Vahs xst dBr prise f 

Slttt* sipattjig" ©^lOiitflc"* 
Noor tsxoantsig shillingd. 



do** &• la almoneda^; y* 
do ah lah alnumdrdah; i 



pnedo' venderlas**" muy de 
pwdrdo venderku mioy dd 

barato^ sin.** perdida**. 
haraJUo sin perdi-da. 

I A cuanto laa yende U. ? 
Ah guantd las vendd U, f 

Solamente* yeinte* cholines". 
SoldnUrUd vd-intd chdrU^nes 



DaeMfl" 3»ci» unb* eitt^ l^aften'^ Esded?»», dos' pesos* y» 
Das xst tswi oond ine halhen Es ddtkeer, das pdsos i 
Dollar^** doUdrs. medio', madid. 



3aS mdn ^err». 
Yah, mine hir. 

Das ist sdre hillizh, 

Heer ^st das geld. 

Otttftt^ laj", meitt J&ert", 
Gooten tag, nvine h^. 



SI*, senort 
Si sainyor. 



Eb*** muy de barato**. 
Es frnoy dd hdrdid. 

Aqai* esta* su' dinero*. 
Ah4ce estah soo dinara. 

Buen* dia", sefior". 
Btoen diah^ sainyor. 



VRVHOSL 



XRGUSH. 



298 



YeDdre*** h baa prix.M 
vcuigdr ah bahjpri. 

Oe** Bonf^ d'excellentes" bottes.*' 
Suhtong d'izildngt hot. 

Sont* elles* avarifes* ? 
Sanff-i-el - z - dvdrid f 



Ob*, non*, je» les* ai achet^s*k' 
Oy wmgy xhih lA-z^ ashtd oA 

nn encan'; ei* je* puis** lea** 
U7ig astykang; dzhuhpwi Id 



vendre*"*" & bon march^, 
vangdr ah bong manhd^ 

gODfl*^ y perdre**. 
tang-z-^ pirdr. 

Quel* en*' est* 1^ prir*? 
Kd ang d luh preef 

Sculement* vingt' cbelinE^. 
Soelmang vang shildng. 

C'est*** deux' piastres* ct* 
S'd doe pyastr d 
demi^. demy. 

Oui*y monsieui*. 
We^ mt»yoe. 



C'est*** ik tr^ bon marcb^. 
S'a-t ' ah trd hong m<ir$hd» 

Envoici*' Targenl/''. 
Ang vioawijf larzhang, 

Bonjoor* ' moadeux*. 
Bong-zboor^ musj/oe. 



Ie8s« than** prime** coet**. 
They** are*y excellent^ boottw. 
Are* they* damaged* f 
0*, no*; I* bought* them* at« 
auction'^ ; and* can* afford*^ 
to** sell** them** cheap", 
without** loosing**. 

What* i^ the* price* of* them*r 
Only* twenty* ghillingi^. 



That* ifl> two^ dollars* and* a* 
half^ 



Yes*, sir*, 

That* is* very* cheap*. 
Here* is* the^ money** 
Good* day*, six*. 



26* 



294 GERMAN. SPANISH. 

i&atftt^ ©ie* ilartojfetn* ju* »cr* jTiene* U.« patatas* que» Ten- 

Hahhen see Jcartufdn ttoo ftr* Te^nd U. pdtdias kd ven- 
taufen*? kowfen. der^f derf 

©0 »iel ©{e tootten, mein ^err*? Cuantas quiere U.«, sefior*. 

So feel see voUen, mine Mr, Qudntds k^4rd U,, sain^or. 

ffia«* prtem** @(e» baffit** ? ^Cuanto^qnierew U.'por^ellas"? 

Fflw fUrdJtm see dah-faer f Quanta ki-ird U. par dJas f 

guttftlg' ficnt^* bad* Sufd^eP. Cincuenta' oentavos* la* 

I\xmftsis^ (sents das booshel. Theen-tJioo-entah thentdvos lah 

fanega®. fandgah, 

lad* ifH a«« t)fel*. Es^ demasiado**. 

Das uttsoofed, Es ddmahsSahdo, 

Sic* fSttttCtt* Pe* in' Irgcnk* No« puede" U.* comprarlas** 

See koenin see in eerkend No pwd-dd U, k^hnprdrlS» 

rincm anbern'' Oewut^Iaben* en* ninguna'*''^ especeria^ 

l^iim andlm gO'Vuertddden en ningoonah espd^he-Ma 

ttid^t* untcr* 75"Sent««faufeii^ menos« de" 75" centavos". 

nt sht oonter 75 tse:nU koxcfen, minds da 75 thentdvos. 

Out*, ©ie' tinntn^ mir® bur(i& ben* Bien*. Puede* U.* enviarme^'* 

Goofy see koenen mcer doordi din Byen, Pwa-da U. envedrmA 

^na]bcn"cmcn"Sufd^f("bringcn'** una*<» fanega" por su mo«o" 

kncJiben i-nen booshel bringin oona fandga por soo mdtJid 

f affcn*, wcnn" c^ 3^nen" MitW\ si" quiere** ". bb 

Idssen, oin nse e-nen bd-leebt. se ki-ird. 

aCte" tl^cuer" ifl*° bet ^afe*^ ? i Cuanto** vale" el queso*" ? 
Vee to\rr ut der ksLCsd f Qudnto vahld el kdsd f 

^t%xi^ 5cnt«*. Diez* centavos". 

Tsdiie tsenis, Di-aith thentah-vos. 



®eben ©te mir*"« fecfid* 5)futtb* Dame*"* seis* libraa* de* man- 

Gd'ben see meer six p/oond Dah-md sd-is Ubrds da man* 

Cutter^ S»ei» X)«^enb" gier***-", teca^ do8» docenas* de" hue- 

^fUtteTy iswl doot-siid t-yer, tdkah, dos ddthdnHs da io4- 



ntSNOH. XN0IJ8H. 296 



ipiceru, . At a Cfroeery, 

Avei^-vons'deaFpommesdeterre* Have* you* any* potatoes* W 
Avd'Voo d^ pdm duh tir seller 
k* yendre^ f oA vangdr f 

Autant qu'il yous plaira, M.* Any* quantity' of them*, sir* 
O-tdng k'tl xxx> pld-rah, M. 

Combien les yendez-vous? What* do' you'ask* for* them* f 

Komhyang Id vang-ddrvoo f 

Cinquante" sons* le* boisseaa*. They* are* fifty* cents* per* 
Sangkang soo I'jh bioatosd* bushel*. . 

C* est* trop*^ That* is* too* high* (too much). 

S'd trb. 

Vous* ne* sauriez* les* acheter* You* cannot* buy* them* 
Noo nuh 9d-ry& IdrZ-ashtd 

d'* aucun*' ^icier* at* any* other' grocery* 

d!d^ku7ug - rU-^ts^d 

h moins* de** 75" sous**. less^ than** 75" oente**. 
oA mwawng dvh 75 soo. 

Ehbien*, envoyez'-m'* en, s'il** Well*, you* can* let* the* 
Eh hyang^ ang-voyd-m^ ang^ ^il 

vous** plait**, un* boisseau**, boy* brin^ me* up* a** 
voo pUU - uTig hwatosd, 

par votre petit garyon*.* bushel**, if** Jrou** please**. 

par votr jptty gartang, 

Quel**est**laprix**dufromage*y? What** is** cheese*' worth**? 
Kd d Ivh 'pne d\x& frcma^f 

Dix* sous*. Ten* cents*. 

Dee €00. 

Donnez-moi*"* six* livres* de* Let* me* have* six* pounds* of* 
Z>on-Rd-mtraio «ee Itor dvh 

bcurre', deux* douzainrs* butter', two* dozen* of **eggp**, 

^r, </oe doozdn 



296 



GERMAN. 



BPANISH. 



jM&nf jyfoond shinkirif ine 

p/oond aatUj drl IXbe 

Srob« toicr« 3)funb»* 2:^ce««, 
&r5(?, yicr p/oond id, 

funf «7 5>f«nt) 5?affe« «nt)» 
fixenf p/ooiul koffd, oond 

tine^ auU»« miP g)feffcr»*. 

Z?eer isi hlrlitihes shtotn^ 
fti^, Vds isl 

cfcr prise? 

ffla«* fojlet** tiefer* Sefett*? 
Vcw kostet deeser besin f 

gunf* unt gtranjlg* Sentd'. 
Fuen/ oond (xwantsig tsenU, 

ffahben see ip/elf 

WctnS mcin ^crr^ tt)(r» l^atteti* 
iVi««, tw»ic Aer, veer kSdten 

nic* toelt^e". n^ vekha. 

ffioHett* Sle« mir* elnc* lute' 
T^22en «6e meer ind tietd 

mtt» Wrif enpfcffet* fleiett* * ? 
mi< Ndkenpfeffer gd-ben ' 

?W(t' Cergnugcn". 



vo8",cinco" Hbras^de jamon**, 
voSy thXnkd librds dd hdmoTif 

y una" libra*" de*' sal", tree" 
e oonah llbrah da sdl, trif 

libras** de"* pan", cuarto" 
librds dd pdn, kwarto 

libras** de" t6*", cinco*'' libraa 
lebras dd ta, thinko libras 

de" cafe*'; y* un** poco""«o 
dd kofd; e oon pdkd 

de** pimienta^. Aqu^ esta** 
dd pimi-entah, Ahrke eUah 

escelente" puerco**. 
esilenta picerko. 



I A como le vende U. t 
Ah konid Id venda U, f 

Ocho* centavos*. 
iko OUntdvos. 

^Cuanto* vale* este* esooba*? 
Quanta vdld htd iskdbahf 

Veinte* y cinoo^ centavoeF. 
Vjfintd i thinkd thentdvos. 

^Tiene^U.'algunas* manzanas^f 
Tednd U. a/goonasmdnthdndsf 

No*, seBor", ningunas**" tengo*. 
NOf sainyoTy ningoanas tenga. 

Dame*-* TJ.« 
Dd^md If. 

algunos*^ davoA*. 
dlgooiias kldvoi. 

Con* gugto*. 
Kon goasio. 



IXENCH. ENGLISH. 297 

d'** ODufe", cin q" livres" de jam- five" potinds^' ham**, one** 
cP oe/' scng livr dvh zhan^ 

bon**,une«Uvre**de*'Bel« troiB*« p<nmd*« of*' Bait**, three** 
hongfUen Uvr dvh td^trwaw 

livres* de«* pain", quatre" loavet^ of" bread", four" 

Uvr dvh pUng, kdtr 

livres" de" ih4^, cinq"" livres pounds"* of" tea", five"'' 
Uvr duh tdy sank Uvr 

de" dlf<6", et" iin»* pen" of" coffee"; and" a"* paper" 

duh kdffdf d ung poe 

de" poivre**. Voici"**" of" pepper**. Here" ia^ 

dvhpwawvr. Vwatot^ 

d'*' excellent" coehon"(porc""). Bome'^ excellent" pork*'. 
d^exeHang koshong (pdrk). 



Combien se vend-il f gff What" is** the" price" of" 

KffmJbyang sd vang-drilf it" f 

Hnit* BOOS*. Eight* cents*. 

We MOO. 

Quel* est* leprix* de ce* halai*7 . What* b* this* broom* worth*? 
Kd d Ivh pree dvh suh hotUd T 

Vingt* cinq* sous'. Twenty*^ve* cents*. 

Vang 9aiOc too, 

Avez*-vous* desF pommes* f Have* you* any* apples* f 

Avd - voo dd p&m f 

Non*, M.*, nous* n'* en* tenons* No*, sir*, we* never* keep* 
Nong, M., noo n'ang tangnong them*, 
jamais*, zhdmd, 

Donnez*^.moi* un* pen' de* Will* you* letF me* have* a* 
Bonnd-rnvxiw ung poo ivh 

clous de girofies*. paper of* allspice*? 

kloo duh zheerojl. 

Avec* plaisir* With* pleasure*. 

Avek pldzir. 



29^ NOTES. 

GERMAN NOTES. 

• SBvf t)lft, how much. 

b The oi in this, and all other words, where printed in the 
Roman character, most be pronounced more like i than open oL 

• U, f. tt. (unb fo »clter), and so forth. 

d <Bonfl, else; noc^, more; etmad, some; (some more else). 

9li(6t im ©eringfieit, not in the least 

' Sntfprcc^enb, being answered for; taken into account 

S ®efc^aft, occupation ; affair. 

^ Of great calfs hide, (the same exp. in Spanish and French). 

SPANISH NOTES. 

a Bai/fta is the more comprehensive word; it signifies toooBen 
labric, in general. It is sanctioned by the Academy in pre- 
ference to Jkmda or/ranela. 

b It me would cost exceedingly; and would be also (tambien) 
exceedingly (domasiado) irksome. ' 

Let it be as you like it d Ahora, of present, 

e Not there is of what, or about what, (to he thankful), 

f Telas pintadas, printed doths. 

g At how much sell you this ? 

b En razon de, in reason of, i Will it lose its colour 1 

k Cut me off (ciU off for me). 1 Al punto, at the point. 

m Telas para camisas, doihsfor shirts. 

n Acaba, finishes to. o Surprised. 

P Que viene bien \k U., that goes voeU on you. 

4 It will go on me never, r If one has to judge of. 

1 Propongo, I propose — v. irr. from proponesi to propose, 
t Yesterday for (at) the evening. 

u That is true, v Bo you wish ? 
w Le agrad^sce, &c., it pleases you more. 
X Que le, &c., that they will go on very well (muy bien); 
calzar means to try on shoef. 

7 They appear to me. » Mucho mas, much more. 



NOTES. 209 

M As much as you wish, or as much as jou can desire. The 
same exp. iu French and German. 

bb You can bring (send) me up a bushel by the boy, if 
you please. 

« Poco, litde. 

FRENCH NOTES. 

a How does this call itself? b En, o/iL 

« En, some of them ; I have some of them very fine. 

d Or, (f lah, e You have but to take it, &c. 

f Soit, lei it he 90. g Or, aujourd'hui. 

h I shall have a care to pass this way again, after a little 
($ouipeu), 

i You will oblige me muc3u 

k There is not (nothing) of that (for which you may thank 
me). Exp. similar to Spanish, 

1 Plus makes the superlatiye. m Sont-ils ? are they f 

n The prices ystj /oQowing the quality, o Net, no more. 

p I am going (vats) to send them immediately (de suit). 

4 Or, une veille fille. r Or, je demand pardon. 

> Or, il est beaucoup trop gross, — ^il a trop d'ampleur, it has 
too great breadth. 

t Va, goes on. n It sits to a marvel. 

▼ It is a masterpiece, w Is it not ? 

z Come and see us. 7 I shall not fail to do so. 

I Je vais, lam going to. 

•a C'est yrai, that is true, bb At length. 

00 If it pleases you. dd Show me some of. 

00 Or, au dessous le premier prix, 

'You can send up a bushel, if it pleases you, by your 
little boy. 

98 How does it sell itself 7 



800 GERMAN. SPANISH. 

[Non. The proDimeiatton If pnrpoeelj lapprsMed in the IbUowing pages; ftr, tt 
the itadent Li tuppoeed to hare glTen mmrked attentloii to the mlae of pTonandatio& 
u laid down in the first pvt of this wark| and tohaTe aoqnired the ability to pronoanee 

® e ( b« Dmero. 

aCoffen^Sifmiiiamei'Sranlett* Quiere* U.* prestarme** dos» 
borgctt'? francos*? 

9Rlt* bcm" grogten* 8erflttfiflett\ Con* mnchisimo*" gusto*. 

3fl* biefeg' tin* I^aler* ? Es* eso" un» peso* (thaler*) ? 

3a*, melii $enr<— Diefe«» ijl*ettt* Si*, senor*. Aquello* cs* un* 
3)fennl9" (9)ennv'.)* centavo". 

$aBen* ©lc« ein* paav* 9)fttttbe^ ^T iene* U.« dos* 
teiy(ld^»,>peld^c^ ie"^ttttf(^cn" pesos esterlines* 
Io« 3tt tpcrben**^, inbem*' ©ic que" disponer*'^^ 
mlt**» folci^e Borflen*' ? y*' presteme^ J 

3^* ^ate' nld^t* elncn* ^tUtx^* Nonengo*'»unoBolo«maravedi«. 

Da«* ijl* unaitflene^m'* Eso* es» lastimoso'. 

Slennen*^ ©ie" biefed* einm* ^ Llama*-* eso* nna» dirna* 
Dime" ? (dies oentayos) ? 

3aS ttttb" Mefed" ijl* ein" 8ttltr«* Si*, y« esto» es* una" aguila" 

(diez pesos). 

Da«njl«eltt"funpa:5alerf(]^eitt"'«. Es**" un" billete" de cinco* 

pesos". 

ilontten*©te"eittc*Aro»tt"»e(]^- Puede* U." cambianne" un* 
fcin"? crown"? 

3fl* ba«» eln" wcyif^ntfd^ett* iEs*aquel«un»chcIme»Meji- 

©d^itting"? cano*? 

9lettt*5 e«« i|l» englifd^ed* ®eTb"» No*; es"* moneda" inglesa*. 

Dtc«* i|l" ein" fpanlfci^et* Dollar"* Eso* efi" un" peso" espafiol* 

iWnnen* ©le" mlr* etne' ® uinie" ^ Puede* U."cambiarme**una'' 
wed^feln"*"? guinea"? 

9letn*,^"fattn*e«tt^t"— ®elb* No*, no^ lo puedo"^. Lamone- 
ifl" bei" mir" geflettWartig*"*** da*esta"muy"esca8a''aliora** 
gaua" rar^ con" migo". 

3jl*Wefe«"rftt"8ttter Souttbor"? ^Es* este" luis" bueno"f 



FRENCH. EN0LI8H. 801 

•n irordi oorreeU/y through th« obwrranee ofthete ral«t, and by nwuu of ooatliin«l 
practioB in the preeedfaig pagM -whan fhe flgored pronnndation oeeon, it It dctuwd 
VMnnoanrj to oonilnae It (the pronundation) any ftrther.] 

Argent. Money, 

Voulez^-vooB* me* prater* deux' Will* you" lend" me* two* 
francs" ? francs" J 

Avec* le^ pins grand" plaisir*. With* the" greatest' pleasure*. 

Est*-ce lb? un» 4cu* ? Is* this" a" thaler* ? 

Oui*, monsieur'. — C" est un* Yes*, sir". — ^This"is*a" penny", 
sou". 

ALvez*-vous",sur^YOus"quelques* Have* you" a" couple* of" 

livres sterlings"^ dont" tous*" pounds" about?^ you", that^ 

d&ireriez** vous defaire*"-" you*^*want**to*"get»rid**of*" 

pour*"m'en faire un pr§t*7-« ? by*"loaning*nhem*Ho*"me«f 

Je* n'%i" pas? m§me un" sou". I* have"not"the* first" farthing". 

g*est? malheureux ". That* is" bad". 

]Bst-ce 1^ diz sous i Do* you" call" this* a" dime" f 

Oui*; et^ ceci" est* une' aigle" Tes*; and" this" is* an" eagle". 
(10 piastres). 

C'*est? un" assignat" de cinq* That* is" a" five* dollar" bill". 

piastres". 
Pouvez*-vous»changer"un*^u"? Can* you" change^ a* crown"? 

Est* ce'un'chelin"mdxicain*? Is* that* a" Mexican* shil- 
ling"? 

Non*; c'^sfderargent" anglais*. No*; it" i^ English* money". 
0'*est^ une" piastre" Espagnole*. This* is" a' Spanish* dollar". 

Pouvez*-vous" me* changer* une'^ Can* you" rive" me* change" 

guin^ ? for" a7 gumea" ? 

KTon,* je"ne" le puis* pas". L'ar- No*, I" can* not* — money* is" 

gent* me" fait debien rarest f^^ «»^' ^*^" "^«* 

r_ — , , , , just*" now**. 

visites, en ce moment*"»**.a 

Est* oe" un" bon* louis d'or* ? Is* this" a" good* louisd'or" ? 

26 



802 GERMAN. SPANISH 

ttl&cr tti^t* oB er gut 1(1, W i^ moneda" falsa*® en" el co- 

Je^t *icl» falf(i^e«" ®el^" im»« mercio**.a Esta** parece** 

Umlaufe**. Diefct** pe^t^ben- todavia^' buena*». 
no6^'^ gut*« aui^K 

©oft* betbenmi^iet^t- tn UeJer* ^^ ^'^^^ ^f**' "^^y; *\^^f,^?'?! 

* ^ , presentemente". Me** ha** 

ftttg*^ teTommen »> SJllr" ifl** dicho'^^ que las'' minas* 

eraa^^It toorben*' bie'^ aRlnen* de»California*« produican" 

in»eaIlfomleii«Iiefertt»* eine« ™»" cantidad" muy abirn- 

flrope^aRenge". dante« 

8iele* flnb* fleneigt" ju* fllaulbctt* Muchos* son* dispueatos" 4* 

ed« fel eittC auffc^neibetel-. ^^^^ JiT^^una' cLarla- 

taneria*. 

3(3^* mfld^erc«@ie"bap*e0* Wne'^ Aseguro**" & U.» qne* no' ee** 

Slttffc^neibetei' \^ ; id^» ^abe** charlataneria*. TengoW" 

aute"Se»cife**,ummeln^*Se* pruebaa" muy autenticas** 

9attt)tttttg*' att" unterjluten". para«probar"mj"asunto**. 

3(^*Bin"aupbicSe»eUful^run8* No" quiero*** argiiir"; pero^ 

nid^t" l&egierifl*, abet' id^» bin® soy"*" de*» parecer" que** 

ber*«aReittUttg"ba^"bie*»«ar- todos« los*» buscadores** de 

toffelgraber"*" bod^ ttm***** patatas** seran**" final- 

(Sttbe" ttHe** tool^l^abettbcr*" mente**-^ma8"ricos"*que"» 

feln** ttetbeii** aU** bte** los"» buscadores"' de oro^. 
®oft«» jrSbet*'. 



SRlt einem ffilttbf- Con un Ho9tdUro. 

^aben* ©le" S^wmer* ju* bet- ^Tiene* U." cuartos* de* al- 

ttilet^en"? qmler"? 

3a*, meltt J^err*, id^" l^abc* mel^- Si*, sefior*; tengo»^ mucbos*. 

rete*. SBad' fur QKmmix'' ^Que^cuartos'quiere***!!.*? 

wunfd^en" ©ic«? SBoUen** ^Quiere** U.** un*» apo- 

^^'^^^L^^^'^Z.f''''' ^^^ 'con muebles** d« 

sin ellos«" ? b 



I 



FRENCH. 



ENGLISH. 



803 



n^ hcmblC bon' — je* ne saurais 

vous* dire'. II' court* """b 
beaucoup" de fausse^" mon- 
naie". Cctte** pi^e par&it", 
cependant*', fort bonne**. 

L'or* abonde*"* en ce moment'. 



On m'a dit*^' que les^ 
mines' de<^ la Californie**^ en 
fournisscnt'* une^' grandc*' 
quantity". 



Bien des personues^ pensent*^ 

que c'est* de la' charla- 

tanerie'. 
Je* vous* assure" que* ce* n'^est' 

point^ de la charlat&nerie". 

J''ai^** des preuves" aathen- 

tiques" qui appuient*"o 
mon" assertion*'. 
Je* n''ai' point' envie* d^'argu- 
menter"; mais' je' suis* 
d'**opinion** que*' tons les" 

mineurs^'de pommes de terre*^ 
seront*", aprte|*tout*7.» 

bien'* plus" k leur aise"d 
que"* les" mincurs*'^ d'or'*. 



It' looks.' good' — P don't' 
know' — there'' is' much* 
bad*' money** in** circula- 
tion". That** looks** good*', 
however*'. 



Q old* is" getting quite* plenty' 
now'. The' mines' in' 
California*' yield** an** 
abundant*' quantity**, I** 
am*' told*' 



Many* are' inclined' to* think' 
it' a' humbug*. 

I* assure' you' that* it* is' 
no' humbug'. I' have** 
authentic** proofs** to*" 
back** my** assertion*'. 

I* am" not' desirous* of ar- 
guing'; but' I' am' of*' 
opinion** that** the" pota- 
toe**diggers**,in*'the*'end*', . 
will** be* altogether'*more" 
wealthy" than" the" gold" 



Avee un Bdte. 

Avez*-vous' des" chambres* k* 
louer' ? 

Oui*, Mr.*, j''en ai* plusieurs*. 
Quelles' chambres' vou- 
lez**-vous* (avoir**'*') ? Vou- 
lez*'-YOus** une*' chambre*' 

meubl&*'ou*'niB meubl4e='? 



With a Lmdlard. 

Have* you* any' rooms* to* 
let'? 

Yes*, sir*, I' have* several' — 
what' rooms' do* you* wish** 
to**have**? Do"you*«wi8h*' 
an*' apartment*' fumishod" 
or** unfurnished" ? 



804 GERMAN. SPAinSH. 

3(3i*Btau(ftc"moWirte'3iwi»«f*- Necesito*^ aposentos* alhajai 

doB*. 

3 ^' fann^ S ^tten^ blencn." Puedo^seryirleM fi^^ 

ter*'' ©aal**^* Bala*w». 

(Et* ifl" tttd^f fcl^r* flrof'; aBtr* No" es^ mny« anclia*, pcro* 

er' Jjapt*^ fur**^ mid^"* me** cuadra'-* bien.e 

©ie* fc^ett" bo5» l^ier* MU'^H^, U. * y^ que» hay*** todo"-' lo 

mi @ie beburfen", unb« t)a^*» due es necesario* • y» aue« 

bie"9J?5Bri*"ftftr"nettwflitb« que es necesano , y que 

atte^» 3no6d» ftnV» »oii (of) hermosos". Todoe*- 108*7 

^<^mm • inueble8«8on*»deanacaido» 

^ict* f!ttb» a»ct' Slrmfltt^Ie*'', Aqui* estan" do8» paltronas«, 

fe(]^^» ©tu^Ic', eltt" ncuer® seis" sillas^, un» nucTO^ ta- 

a:cppi(i^*^ eltt** fc^oner" ©pic* piz*»,un"espejo«hennoso", 

flcl", unb" fc^r" faubern*' y" colgaduras*' muy*» boni- 

Sor:()5n9e*7. Slud^" (inb«* an" tas*«j adeinas*«»«», estan*«* 

Itittxi^ ®cltctt»^ bcd'*^ Sta* alacenas^ &« los ambos** 

mind" ©ci^ranlc^*. lados«* de** la*" chimcnea". 

^"fS» ^ei?.^'^* **** ^'^^"^*" Hfigame^ Ter» W buartosde 

dormir^. 

ifitx^tt'^, ntfin $err», »etttt* e« Poraani*»»Befior»mieOTit3-« 

S^nen* belicbt^. i-oraqui ,Befior-,8iiegu8te". 

©It" WoUen* fcl^ctt', oB* bad* Veamos*-^, si* la» cama" esta'^ 

8ett« 8tit» ifl'; benn" ba«*® buena", porqtie* eso** es" 

ifl"ble"^auptfac^e"'»rSBentt" lo" principal****. Si" ten- 

i^*" etn" fluted*" Sctt«* l^aBe*^ ga*"'*^ una*» buena*» cama«, 

lummere" ici^** mi^ toenifl" nada«*-* mas*^ quiero""**.* 
urn* bad Ubrifle«^» 

©ie* fonncn' fld^" fctu" beffercd* No> puede" U.* tenci**e una* 

tt>ttttf(i^cn^ • mejor*. 

©ebt*** bie« ®hiBe» a«f* ble" iAbre*^f el» cuarto' en* !»• 

©traffc^ ^inaud" ? calle" ? 



FREVOH. ENGUBH. 805 

n* me faut«' des chambers* I* want^ fumiBhed' roomg.* 

nieubl^s". 

T^i *v«;3t «/.„«4 T^TT^^^^^^^ITi I* <5an* accommodate" you*. 

Je* puis" vouB* en donner.' t^, « x ■ n .r • / t« 

,.«*; ^ , Please* to" walk^ m*. !• 

Ayez la bont^ d'entrer*^. will"* show** you" the*" 

Je8 vais yous montrer*<>'** rooms**. Here" is*« the*y 

les*» chambres**. Voici***« sitting** room**. 
le*7 salon***». 

II* n''est* pas* Men* grand*; It* is" not* very* large* ; bu<^ 

mais" il'' fera*^ mon** affaire. it^ will* do" for** me". 

Vous* voyez* qu'"il y* a* tout"^ You*see" that" there* is* every" 

oe qui est neoessaire"; et" thing'' necessary"; and"that** 

que** r**ameublement*" en the** furniture** is*' very** 

est*" fort** beau**. Tons*" les*7 neat**. All*" the*' fumi- 

meubles*" sent*" d'acajou**. ture** b*" mahogany**. 

Voici*^ deusL* fauteuils*^, six" Here* are* two" arm* chairs*, 

chaises^, un" tapis** tout six" chairs'^, a" new" carpet**, 

neuf*, une** belle** glace**, a** fine** glass*"; and** very** 

et de** trte** jolis** rideaux*'; neat^ curtains*^; besides" 

ii y"* a"*, en*" outre**, des that*", there" are** cup- 

armoires** de" chaque"* c6t^ boards** on*" both** side^ 

de** la" chemin^*". of"" the«^ chimney**. 

Montrez-mo i'-' W chambres & ^*' ""^ "^ ^"^ bcdroomB*. 
coucher*. 

— . , ' ' please*. 

vous plait*-*. 

Voyons*-* 8i*le*lit"esty bon"; Let* us" see" whether* the" 

cai« c'est***" Ih le** princi- bed" is'' good*; for" that** 

pal****. Quand**j'ai***'un** is** the** main** point**. 

caa»" du** reste"-*'. for** any** thing"" elbe*'. 

Vous* ne" sauriez* en d6sirer** IVa* cannot" wish* for* a* 

un* meilleur"*'. better* one". 

La*chambre*Ionne-t-elle*'*esur* Does* the* room* look* into" 

la*ruT7? the"Btreet»? 



806 GERMAN. 6PANI8B 

9le{ttV mcin fitn\ (le* gel^t* nad^' No*, se!tor«, abre** en* el •jar- 

©efto**» 6ejfcr*. Sd^* fd^Iafc' Mucho* major*. No« quiero*» 

nl*f aerite' i>orn« ^tnauiJ", dormir^^ en^Q un** cuarto« 

wegen" bed*''*' SBagenge» que abre en la calle**, 

raffcld»^. iu ^on*i del*«-*' ruido*- 

de** lo8** coches**. 

88unfd^en>'3 @i^ We» anbem' iQuiere*-y.-ver« los-otros' 

3d^» tjermut^c" b ag* Sett* ijH Creo*** que la« cama* esta* 

flut". 3c&t' fommt ed*"*** buena*. Nada mas que del 

nur nod^" auf** ben** 9^eid** prccio.'*** jQue** quiere*'**" 

an.f^ 20a«** t^erlanfleit*" ©ie*' U.*'^ por*» los* tres"* cuar- 

fur*» bie* brel« Simmer* mlt« tos« y» la" cocina" ? 
ber«*«u(^e»? 

3(i^*^abe»ben*@aat'mirelnem" He*** siempre* alquilado* la* 

bet*** 3t»n»««" immer* fur** sala* y' uno* de» los** cuar- 

ttierjel^n*' ©(^itttngc** t)ermie*» tos** por** oatorce** chell- 

t^et*. ©ie** fotIen*« mir** fiir" nes**. U.** me*« dara***^^ 

J?r ft!^ '*"r?"l"'.C una*»guinea«<''dlaBemana^ 

?r ^"^ ftl;;;;^'^^ por«di-todo» es-^^^so. 

f'^C ^^^ c^"i'i' ^^"^"^ Por*' el- otro« cuarto** y** 

I)a« finbe id^*^ tjlel**' ®elb".b A mi parecer«,Ji eg* mucho*^ 

de dinero**. 

?' "« .*"' .W' J'^I. dad-, y donde- las'* casus" 

t|euer« sermlet^tt" werbtn'*. gon-muy^^janui-Ccoiitoau.). 

Wun', idj- tt)ia' 3^ntn' elnt* ^j^n esta. Le dare-* i U.- 

yiwp «m j^pij- uiiv^ovwv paraM poner* mi horna 

If n» auf6e.»al.ren« ju fonnen. J„^« ^ ^^ j^^ 



FRENCH. EN0IJ8H. 807 

Noa*, mocsieui*, elle" donne* No*, but"; it' looks* into* the* 

BUT* le* jardin'. ^rden'. 

Tant** mieux*^; je* n'aime"'' So* much^ the» better* — I* 

point h,* coLther" dans*" don't* like' to* sleep" in*® 

nne** chambre« W la rue*« *" ^''^°*" '^^™"' ^^"^ ^ 

nne caamP re sur la rue , ^^^^^^ ^^,, ^j^^„ ^^^^ ^^^ 

k cause du**-** bruit** des**^ the" carriages'*, 
voitures**. 

Desirez-vous*"'voir**les'autre8' Do* you* wish* to* see* the* 

chambres* ? otner'' rooms* ? 

Le* lit* me* semble* bon*. I* fanoj* the* bed* is* good*. 

Bnes'a|^tplus*pTi^ ^^£^;;t^ 

chambres« et« de la« cui- .'^^ v^/tTir"^ ^'^ 

gi^^^ ' the»*kitchen«? 

J'ai^ toujours' lou6*, 5,** qua- I* have* always* let* the* par- 

torze** cholines**; le* salon*, lour*, with' one* of* the** 

et' une* seule chambre**. rooms**, for**fourteen" shil- 

Vous**me**donnerez**»*'du*'** lings**. You** will** give*' 

tout** une** guin^e** par" me** one** guinea** a** week"* 

semaine**. Ce** n'«*est*' que** for** the** whole**— it** is*' 

sept" chelinfl** pour** r*^u- only** seven** shillings^ 

tre*» chambre** et** k*" cuis- for** the*" other** room** 

ine"'. and*' the** kitchen"'. 



A vous dire vrai,g c'%Bt beau- I* think* it* a* great* sum* of 

coup*^ d''argent*. money*. 

Gonsiderez*que*o'«e8fc*un*de8^' Consider* that* this* is* one* 

meilleurs* quartiers* de** la** of* the' best* quarters* of** 

TiUe**; 'S^le" loyer*' des *J^^" ^^^\^^!!f " ^K 

maisons-y est** forti Cher**. ^"^^"^ ^'^'^ 1^*'' ^^^*" 

Eh bien*, je* vous* donncrai*^ Well*, I* will* give* you* a* 

une* guin^'; mais bien en- guinea'; but* I* must*'* 

tendu queh j'*aurai**»** une** have** a** part" in** the** 

partie** de** la** cave**, et*' cellar**, and*' a** place** to** 

un**endroit**poui**ymettre** put** coals*" and"* wood** 

/ * > in^ 
mon cbarb'n dc terre*-* et*" 

mon br'g**. 



808 GERMAN. SPANISH. 

eiuett't)crf(^Ueparcn*-*^Ia0^ U.* un' lugar« cerrado 

6c!omm«n'. fcann*' bcnf cn*« * con« Have" k i Cuando** 

©ic" »ott" 3^rer** SBol^nung** quiere«7'« U." tomar« posh 

SejIJ*" 3tt* ncl^mett'*? esioii"de«sus»*aposeiitofl»? 

wuptwu^u yttflu ivmrnni . ^^ acortarmc' aqui^ esta* 

SWac^en @ie 2me«*^>-« bel*" nocho».Vea"U.que"todo»«« 
gttter 3clt^' surec^t'* •. ^^^ preparado « en*- £^ 

buena.*' 

®ff »of; meitt $ert\ ©ie* geraservido- Sefior.»PuedeM 
Hnnen* fo/Jru^l ommcn' al«» ^^^j^- cuando'*' lo 
c« 3^ncn*« gefamj" ifl. qmera«»" 



58'e 5t ft p U n 9 f n. Salutadonst, 

3(%* ttJUttfc^e* 3^nen» elnen* gtt- Baenas* dias* tenga*^ U*. 
ten* aRorgen*. 

SBie* l&cfint>cn** ©le» ^d^ ^eutr*? iComo* esta" U». hoy»? 

©anj* ttJC^I*, i(^ banfe' 3^ttCtt*. Muy* bien", Gracias*^. 

ffiie* ijl« 3§r» Sefinbcn* ? ^ Como* va* bu« salad* ? 

©fc* 9C»6$nIl(^*, mein ^crr*. A* mi ordinario*, SeSoi*. 

2rlau6ctt* ®lc mlr", mid^ nad^* Pennitame*'«de»preguntar*&* 

3^tcr" Oefunb^eit'^ ^u' erlun* UM^oomo esta bu salud'fn 
tigen** 

©aiiPS^tten^eitt^m^^^^ Mil gracias'-, Seilor-, No- 

nl*f gana' tuo^f- ^^V* muj' bueno». 

©aftrtit!^/ bai BctruU* nlci^" En vordad*, lo siento" ma* 

fcbr*. chisimo^ 



RENCH« ENGLISH. 809 

Cela* est' eniendu'. Vous* au- That* is" understood*. You* 

k la clef*»'^*. Quand>« pen- it«. When** do*' you" 
Bez-*'»*«vous"occuper**~"vo- mban^ to** take"* posses- 
tre"» appartement"' ? sion" of"" your* lodging"? 

I* intend" to" come* and* 



Jc^me propose. d^ ven^ ^ —" Cr.r ^^h^i. 

coucher^ ce" soir^. faites See*" that** every*" thing" 

ensorteque*--**! tout**** soit** »" «»dy" "^*' 8«"^^*'' 
pr§t**k*" temps*'. 

Fort* bien", Monsieur*. Vous* Very* well", sir". You* may" 

poaTe«' venir* qnand'-« bon ^^u "'' '^°' "' y"'*" 
il vous plaira**^**. 



Saluter, Salutations, 

Je* vousF souhaite" le* bon- I* wish" you' a* good^ mom- 
jour*** ing". 

Comment* vous" portez-"^ vous, How* do" you" do* to-day"? 
aujourd'hui*?k 

Port* bien", je vous* remercie". Quite* well", thank* you*. 

Comment* est" votre" sant^*? How* is^ your" health* ? 

Trte* bonne"— et" la voire*? Exceeding* good" ; and" 

yours* r 

Comme* k Tordinaire", Mr." As* usual," sir". 

Vous me" permittez* de* m'in- Permit* me" to" inquire* after* 
former* de* votre" sant^. your* health'. 

Merci**", monsieur* — •je*no*m3 Thank* you", sir"; I*am*not^ 
porte* pai' trte'-bien" very' well". 

J"'en suifi^, vraiment*, bien Indeed* I I" am" quite* sorry*, 
flftch^. 



810 asBMAN. sPAiasH; 

S3cim aTttttad^cffcn. Comimdo, 

Die* ®Io(fc« lautet" ivl vx* gffen'; Toca' la* campanilla" por* la 

laffen* ©ie m^^ bem Stuff <^o°^ida'i entremoB*^ y« 



comama" 



®4d* wotten' ©ir ne^men*? ^iDe que quiere U. quo lo 

sirvaf n 



SWnbffrff^^ »entt id^ bitten Unpoeo^devac5a»,silegusta»^. 
botp-*^ 

SBoHen* ®ie" einen* i:effer* ©up* ^ Quiere*^ U." sopa? ? 

pe'^? 

aBuiif(^en»©ie«®(^»eittefreif(^»? ^q^^^.;, u.« i^ pedi^zo de 

puerco* ?o 

®5r^Tr.^.^r^^l'^^*^^ i^Juiere U. qie le rirva^ 

Wefen* erbfen* ttorleflen*? ^^guisantes-f 

®Sn?er?^'''''" ^'^^"^' ^'*' <^on mucho gusto*^, Seiior«. 

ffioffen* @ie' bie* ®iite« ^aben", ^Quiere* U.« hacerme» el* 
ittir«eitt"©tiid^*»on"Wefem« favor* de» danne7»«p un" 
^albflelfti^** ^u geben' ? pedazo" de" temero** ? 

9Rit* Sergniigcii'. Con* gusto*. 

a3iittf(i^en» @tc« gett* ober* ^Quiere" U«. magro*, d» 
SKagered"? gordo«? 

gin*ffieni8-m»8elb^^^^ Un* poco» de« ambos* S^i^ 

ta bieii.q 
fteffner* ! gine" Sa jfe» S^ee** jMuchachoM una" tasa' de* i^ 
3aS ia« mein ^err»* Si**, si*, Seflor. 

gDogett*@ie» fo* guf fein' uxCt^ k&game U. el favor' de' da^ 
mir***** ba«» Srob*«» reit^cn"? me* pan*^ 

fBoffen* ©ie" etwad* t>on* biefem* ^ Quiere* U." tomar* nn pooo* 
©alat^ ncbmen'? dc» esta* insaladaF^ 



IBBNOH. ENaUBH. 811 



IHner. At Dinner, 

La* docliette* sonne* poui* i!- The* bell* rings* for* dinner* •• 
ner*. AUons^ diner.** let' ua'' go* in' and**> dine**. 



Que* gonhaitex-"^ vourfT What* will* yon* haye* T 

Du* bcenl^ s^'il vona* plait*. Some* beef*, if* yon* please*. 

Vonlcz-*vonfl^ de la sonpe'? Will* you* have* a* plate* of' 

soupy? 



D6sireK-*you8* nn morceau du Do* you* wish* for* pork*? 

cochon*? 

Vous* ofBrinu-je*~* de** ces^** Shall* I* help* you* to* some' 
pois*? oV these* peaa* ? 

S*'il voufi* platt*;Monsieur*. If* you* please*, sir*. 

Voule«*-vous* avoir* la* bont4* Will* you* have* the*kindness* 
de* me* donner'^ un** mor- to* help'^ me* to* a*® piece** 
ceau** de** ce*» vean-**lk ? of** that** veal" ? 

Avec* plaisir*. With" pleasure*. 

D63irez-*voui* du gras* on* du Do* you* wish* fat* or* lean*? 
maigre*? 



Un*]peu*derun,etderautre*^, A* little* of* both* if* you* 

s*'il vous* plalt^. please^. 

Gar9on*! une* tasse* de* th^. Waiter I* A* cup* of* tea*. 

Oui*, oui*l Monsieur*. Ay*, ay*, sir*. 

Voudriez-«vou8» bien me fiure '^^'you«be«BO«ldnd'aaJ»to» 

, pass* the* bread** this** 

passer*"* le* pain** ? way ?** 

Prendrez»-vous* un pen* de* Will* you* take* some* of* this* 

cette* salade P salad ?' 



812 NOTES. 

GERMAN NOTES. 

a ©el^t auf, goes out, 

b Now comes it but yet on the price to, (Nam it come$ to 
the price), 

I find that much gold (money). 

d The proper import of the expression is, that the statement 
is not only understood ; but agreed to, 
e Make every thing aright by good time. 

SPANISH NOTES. 

a The Market (Commerce), b Without them. 

c Cuadra bien^ please well, d I require nothing more. 

e Have, t Opens. 

g Nothing more but the price. 

h It appears to me. i One understands it so. 

k Cerrado con llave, fastened with a key. 

1 Preguntar k U., to inquire of you, 
ni How is your health ? 

n What do you desire that I should help you to ? 

Pedazo, piece, p Dar, gioe. q Would please me welL 

FRENCH NOTES, 
a Money makes rare visits to me in this moment. 
b Court, circvlatesf runs, (from the Latin curro, to nm). 
Qui appuient, which help, d At their ease, 
e Gives it ? 

f It does not agitate itself. There is nothing more to I>e 
discussed at present, but the price, 
g To tell you the truth (vrai), 
b Bien entendu que, it being well understood AaL 
i En sort que, in such a manner that. 
k How do you carry yourself to-day ? 



POLYGLOT ARRANGEMENT 



or A 



PAST OF THE GOSPEL OF ST. MATTHEW. 



THE NUMERALS. 
(Cardinal.) 



dm, 

Sbrel, 
SBier, 
Sinf, 

SBtme^n, 
&t4ntiin ({t^^itlin), 

fittHltlli^ 

fitvei hiin^er^ 
Zau(en^, 



SPAion 

unO| 

dcwy 

tres, 

qoatro, 

einco, 

seit, 

■iete, 

ocho, 

nueTe, 

diez, 

once, 

doce, 

trece, 

catorce, 

3uince, 
iez 7 •€», 
dies y siete, 
dies y ocho, 
dies 7 oaeTe, 
Tiente, 
Tiente y uno, 
treinta, 
qaarenta, 
cincaenta. 



setenta, 
ochenta, 
noTenta, 
ciento, 
ciento y xuko, 
doi ciento, 
mil, 
27 



FaisrcH. 

uii(e), 

deux, 

troia, 

qaatre, 

cinq, 

six, 

aept, 

hait. 

near, 

onxe, 

douze, 

treize, 

quatorze, 

quinze, 

seize, 

diz-sept, 

diz-huit, 

diz-neaf, 

Tiogt, 

Tingt-un, 

trente, 

quarante, 

cinqaante, 

soizante, 

Boixante-diz, 

qaatro-Tingty 

qaatre-Tingt-diz, 

cent, 

cent un, 

denz cent, 

mille 



one. 

two. 

three. 

(bar. 

fi?e. 

siz. 

seven. 

eight 

nine. 

ten. 

eleven. 

twelve. 

thirteen. 

fourteen. 

fifteen. 

sizteen. 

seventeen 

eighteen. 

nineteen. 

twenty. 

twenty-one. 

thirty. 

forty. 

fifty. 

sixty. 

seventy. 

eighty. 

nine^. 

one hundred. 

hundred and oi 

two hundred. 

one Ihottsand. 



314 



MATTHEW, CHAPTER H. 



1. ToC tf 'irjavv yev' 

rrjf 'loi;d:iiaff, €V rjfii' 
pats *Hpa>6ov Tov /3a- 
o-(Xe6>f, idov, /xayot 
dn'o cii'aroX£ir irap€' 
yivovTO (Is 'UpoaSKv- 
fia, Xtyotrrts ' 

2. noO <OTll^ 6 Tt- 

x6fis )3ii(riXeiff t«i» 
lavdai<av ; (t^ofifv yhp 
avTov TOV darepa *V 
T^ dvarcikj Koi ij\$0' 
fKP npoa-Kwrjaai avr^. 

3. 'AKovaat Sc *Hp»- 
drjs 6 fiafnXfvs erapd' 
xOtj, Koi iraaa 'itpo' 
aoKvixa fi^r* avrov* 

4. Kai wvayaySav 
irdvrai tovs 'Ap;((€p€tr 
Kai rpapfianis tov 
Ttkov^ iirvvBdvtro wap* 
avTcov irov 6 XpKrrbs 
yfirvarai. 



5. Of di tlirnv aim • 
*EU BrjdXfMfl Tijs *lov 
daias ' ovra yhp yc- 
ypairrai dta tov tt/jo- 
(jiqrov • 

6 " Kai <ri, hfjBXt' 
e/i, yrj 'lov^a, ovdapMS 
i\iiXt<rrrj et ev TOi£ 
^y€fi6(riv *Iovda • €jc 
<roZ yap cfcXcvorrat 
riyovp,fin}£^ oaris ttoi- 
IX ,v€i 'dv \a6y fiov t6v 



1. Or Jesus ^tant 
ne k Bethlehem, 
ville do Juda, au 
temps du roi H^- 
rode, voici arriver 
des sages d^Orient 
k Jerusalem, 

2. en disant: Ou 
est le roi des Juifs 
qui est ne ? car 
nous avons vu son 
etoile en Orient, et 
nous sommes venus 
I'adorer. 

3. Co que le roi 
H^rode ayant en- 
tendu, il en fut trou- 
ble, et tout Jerusa- 
lem avec lui. 

4. £t ayant assem- 
ble tous les princi- 
paux sacrificateurs, 
et les scribes du 
peuple, il s^informa 
d'eux ou le Christ 
devait naitre. 

5. Etilsluidircnt: 
A Bethlehem, ville 
de Judee ; car il est 
ainsi ^crit par un 
proph^te : 

6. Et toi, Bethle- 
hem, terra de Juda, 
tu n'es nuUement la 
plus petite entre les 
gouvcmeurs de Ju- 
da ; car de toi sorti- 
ra le Conducteur qui 



1. Now when Jo- 
sus was bom in 
Bethlehem of Ju- 
dca, in the days oi' 
Herod the king, be- 
hold, there came 
wise men from the 
east to Jerusalem, 

2. Saying, Where 
is he that is bom 
king of the Jews? 
for we have seen 
his star in the east, 
and are come to 
worship him. 

3. When Herod 
the king had heard 
these things, he was 
troubled, and all Je- 
rusalem with him. 

4. And when he 
had gathered all tho 
chief priests and 
scribes of .the peo- 
ple together, he de- 
manded of them 
where Christ should 
be bom. 

5. And they said 
unto him, In Beth- 
lehem of Judca : for 
thus it is written by 
the prophet, 

6. And thou Beth- 
lehem, in the land 
of Juda, art not the 
least among the 
princes of Juda : for 
out of thee shall 
come n Governor, 



MAITHEW, CHAPTER H. 



315 



1. T^kX 3f|us? >^f bcrcn 
iPiir ;ii'^cct}Iot);ni, tm 

rcDf^, ful)f, ^a fameii 
liclBcifcut)omTOr>r- 
.acnlante ii(n\ 3cru|'as 
km, un^ fpract)f II t 

2. ^D i|l ^cr iKu^ 

Sutcn? TOir (jabcu 
fcincn @rcru ti«ffl)cu 
im 07icr.qcn(au^i^ nub 
fln^ gefommcii, it}u 
an}u6fteii. 

3. 2)a t)a^ Dcr ffj-- 

ctfcbracf fr, uu^ init 
tljm tag gauje 3erus 
fa((m ; 

4. Uub (icg* Verfam- 
mc(u aUeJE)ct}cprirtlrr 
iiuD ©fbrifwfeljrteu 
uiicci: tern ^oU, uiit 
erforfcbte t)Ou i^iifii, 
wo et;rtthi6 folite ge^ 
borru toer^ctu 

5. Unt jle fasten 
iftm : 3« ^itijUtjtm, 
im )ii^ifcf)eii iau^c. 
3>fnu a(fo t^ebcc ge-- 
Wriebcn turci^ ten 
^ropf^etf u : 

6. Itiid bu SSrt^Ie^ 
t^ent; im jiiDifcbni ii\\\: 
^c, bi|l mit iiicbteu tie 

Om 3nba ; tciin ait0 
tir fell mir tommeu 
tcr J?cr^oji, rcr fiber 



I 



1. Y dcspues que 
hubo nacido Jesus 
en Bethlehem de 
Judea en los dias 
del Rey Herodes, 
he aqui unos Magos 
vinieron del Orien- 
te a Jerusalem. 

2. Diciendo ^ Don- 
de esta el que iia 
nacido rey de los 
Judios? Porque he- 
mos vistosu estrella 
en el Orientc, y vi- 
lli mos a JidorArlo. 

3. Y cuando el 
Rey Herodes hubo 
oido esto, turbose y 
con ^1 loda Jerusa- 
lem. 

4. Y convocados 
todos los principcs 
de los Sacerdoles 
y los Escribas del 
pueblo pregunt61es 
donde habia de na- 
cer el Christo. . 

5. Y ellos le dije- 
ron: En Bethlehem 
de Judea, porque 
asi esta escrito por 
el profeta. 

6. Y t6 Bethle- 
hem tierra de Juda, 
no eres la menor 
entre los principes 
de Jud&, porque de 
ti saldra el caudillo 
que regira a Isra^'l 



1 . At . esu nato in 
Bethlehtm Judseae, 
in diebus Herodis 
regis, ecce Magi ab 
Orientibus accesse- 
runt in Hierosoly- 
mam, dicentes : 

2. Ubi est natus 
rex Jud©orum ? vi- 
dimus enim ejus 
stellam in Orients, 
et venimus adorare 



3. Audiens autera 
Herodes rex, turba- 
tus est, et omnia 
Hierosolynia cum 
i!!o. 

4. Et congregans 
omnes priricipes Sa- 
cerdouun et Scribas 
populi, sciscitabatur 
ab CIS ubi Christus 
nasceretur. 



5. At illi dixeruiil 
ei : In Bethlehem 
Judseas : sic enim 
scriptum est per 
Prophelam : 

6. Et tu BetWe. 
hem terra Juda, nc- 
quaquam minima es 
in ducibus Juda : ex 
te enim exibit dux, 
qui re gat populum 
me I mi Isra<il. 



316 



MATTHEW, CHAPTER II. 



OBEEX. 

•l<rpai}X.*' 

Opa xoXeVof rovs fid' 
yovt^ ffKpip<»{r€ nap* 
aifTW t6v j(fi6vQv roC 
Kfxuvofjifmv d<rr(pog. 



S. Ka\ ntfi^rdt av- 

TOl'C (Is Bl7^€€ft, ft- 
TTC nop€vd€VT€S^ diCpl' 

/3<5ff l^trdaart irtpX 
Tov vaidiov • itr^p dc 
€vprjTt^ aTrayyfCKm 



9. Ol de dieovcravrcr 
rou /dao-iXetoff, tnopev' 
Srja-ay • jcac tdou, 6 
darfipj hy ti^v Ip rrj 
dvataiX^^ irporjyev aw- 
rovff, 6tt)f eX^v €(m) 
€vaiKA ov 7v ro iraibiov. 



10. 'iScJin-es dc Tou 
dartpa^ ixdpijaav x^' 
pav fuydXriv u^6hpa, 

1 \, Kai €\66vT(s els 
rrjv oUiaVf tidov ro 
iraiBiov /iera Mapias 
TTJs firjrpos avTov * km 
ir€<r6vT(s vpwrtKvvrj- 
aav avT^^ leal dvoi^av 
«•« rovs dr}(r;ivpo^s av' 



paitra mon peuple 
d'lsrael. 

7. Alors Herode, 
ayant appele en se- 
cret les sages, s'in- 
forma d'eux soi- 
gneusement du 
temps que I'etoile 
leur ^tait apparue. 

8. Et les envoyant 
a Bethlehem, il leur 
dit : Allez, et vous 
informcz soigneuse- 
ment touchant le 
petit enfant ; et 
quand vous I'aurez 
trouve, faites-le-moi 
savoir, afin que j'y 
aille aussi, et que je 
I'adore. 

9. Eux done ayant 
ouT le roi, s'en al- 
lerent ; et voici, 1'^- 
toile qu'Lls avaienl 
vue en Orient allait 
devant eux, jusqu'a 
ce qu'ello vint et 
s'arreta sur le lieu 
ou etait le petit en- 
fant. 

10. Et quand ils 
vircnt I'etoile, ils se 
rejouirent d'une fort 
grande joie. 

11. Et^tantentr^s 
dans la maison, ils 
trouv^rent le petit 
enfant avec Marie, 
sa more, lequcl ils 
adore rent, en sc 
prostcrnant en terre; 



that shall rule my 
people Israel. 

7. Then Herod, 
when he had privi- 
ly called the wise 
men, inquired of 
them diligentfy 
what time the star 
appeared. 

8. And he sent 
them to Bethlehem, 
and said, Go, and 
search diligently for 
the young child ; 
and when ye have 
found him, bring 
me word again, 
that I may come 
and worship him 
also. 

9. When they had 
heard the king, they 
departed ; and lo, 
the star, which they 
saw in the east, 
went before them, 
till it came and 
stood over where 
the young child 
was. 

10. When they 
saw the star, they 
rejoiced with ex- 
ceeding great joy. 

11. And when 
tboy were come in- 
to the house, they 
saw the young child 
with Mary his moth- 
er, and fell down, 
and worshipped 



MATTHEW, CHAPTER H. 



81T 



mein 9Jo{f 3frae( eiu 

7. 2>a frcticf Jjcro; 
tf^ tie TOcifeu ^fim* 
{ic6,un&crlevncte tnit 
S(rt^\>oni(7ncn;n)ann 
tcr ©tern rrfcbicnen 

8. Uiit wie^ fie 
grii 95eti;lr[Kn]/ xint 
fprad) : 3iel)et l)iu 
unt fcrfcbet fleigig 
ita(() t(m Siwth'm; 
KiiD meim i()r c^ fim 
ttt, fo faget eg miv 
wieter, tag id) axx(b 
fomme, unt e^ au^ 
tete. 

9. 2((t$ fie nun ten 
Sf 6nig ((e^iret (fatten, 
jof^en fie f)in. tint 
^^e^e, Der ©tern, ten 

e im Snorgenfante 
gefel?en l)attcu, ^in.a 
))ov i()nen t^in, big tag 
er (am, unt f^ant, 
then fiber, ta^ tag 
Kintfein war. 

10. Sa fie ten 
©tern fallen, wurten 
pe t)e<b erfrenet, 

11. tint ginf^en in 
tag ^ang, unt faiften 
tag Stintleiu mit 
SWaria, feiner SWut.- 
ter, nnt jielen nieter, 
unt bmtcn eg an, 
unt tl^atf n ibre &(bh: 






SPANISH. 

mi pueblo. 

7. Ent<5nce.s He- 
rodes llamados en 
secreto los Magos 
inquirio de cllos 
cuidadosamente el 
tiempo en que apa- 
reci6 la estrella. 

8. Y enviandoles 
a Bethlehem les di- 
j6 : Id,y preguntad 
con diligencia por 
el nino, y cuando 
le hubieseis hallado 
hacedmelo saber, 
paraque vaya yo 
tambien y le adore. 



9. Y habiendo 
ellos oido al Rey 
marcharonse. Y he 
aqui la estrella que 
habian visto en el 
Oriente iba delante 
de ellos hasta que 
llegando se paro 
sobre donde estaba 
el nino. 

10. Y al ver la 
estrella se regocija- 
ron con extrcmado 
gozo. 

11. Yentrandoen 
la casa hallaron al 
nino con su madre 
Maria, y postran- 
dose le adoraron, y 
abriendo sus tesoros 
le ofrecii'ron jodos 

27* 



7. Tunc Herodes 
clam vocans Magos, 
perquisivit ab eis 
tempus apparen: 8 
stellse. 



8. Et mittens eos 
in Bethlehem, dixit: 
Euntes diligenter 
explorate de puero: 
cum autem invene- 
ritis, renunciate mi- 
hi ut et ego veniens 
adorem eum. 



9. Illi autem audi- . 
entes regem, profec- 
ti sunt, et ecce, Stel- 
la quam viderant in 
Oriente, antecede- 
bat eos, usque dum 
veniens staret supri 
ubi erat puer. 



10. Videntes au- 
tem stellam, gavisi 
sunt gaudium mag- 
num valde. 

11. Et venientes 
in domum, invene- 
runt puerum cum 
Maria matre ejus. 
Et procidentes ado- 
raverunt cum, et 
a pc r ic M ' os thesauros 



818 



MATTHEW, CHAPTER II. 



r«v, irpoaijwwyKau av- 
XiPcofOV, Kal (Tfivptay, 



12. Kal xpvfjum<r0tih- 
T€S KOT Svap fi^ ava' 

di* aXkrjs 6dov av«x^' 
ptjirav tig r^jf X^P^^ 



13. *Apaxo»pTI<rdvTciv 
dc aCrmu, idov, ayyc 
Xoff Kvpiov <f>aiv€Tai 
tear* 8vap t« *Iq>o-4<^, 
Xcyooi', 'Eycp^ftff ira- 
paXafit TO iraiiiioif Kal 
TTjv ^rjT€pa avroO, Kal 
</>cirye €tff Atyvjrroi' • 
KOI ttrdt €K(i co>f aif 
€ur(o aroi peWtL yap 

'Hpa^drjt (^TJTflV TO TTQl- 

diovy Tov airoXco-ai av- 
t6. 



14. *0 dc ty€p6fU 
jraptXaffe to iratdiotf 
Koi TTjv pifTtpx avTov 
wicroff, Kol avtx'^p^' 
C€v tU Atyvmov, 

15. Kal rfv cxft c<i)r 

ci^a n\rip(a6rj to prfSfP 
inro TOV Kvpiff* dta 



VRBNCH. 

et, apres avoir de- 
ploy6 leurs tresors, 
ils lui offrirent des 
presens, savoir, de 
I'or, de I'cnccns, el 
de la myrrhe. 

12. Puis 6tant di- 
vinement avertis 
dans un songe de 
ne retoumer point 
vers Herode, lis se 
retirerent en leur 
pays par un autre 
chemin. 

13. Or, apres quails 
so furent retires, voi- 
ci, I'ange du Seign- 
eur apparut dans un 
songe 'A Joseph, et 
lui dit : Leve-toi, et 
prends le petit en- 
fant ct sa mere, et 
t'cnfuis en Egypte, 
et denieure \\ jus- 
qu'a ce que je te le 
dise ; car H6rode 
cherchera le petit 
enfant pour le faire i 
mourir. j 

14. Joseph done j 
etant reveille, prit ; 
de nuit le petit en- ; 
fant el sa mere, et I 
se retira en Egypte. | 

15. Et il de>neura 
W jusqu'a la mort 
d'llerode, afin que 
f'.i K accompli ce dont 



him : and when 
they had opened 
their treasures, they 
presented unto him 
gifts ; gold, and 
frankincense, and 
myrrh. 

12. And being 
warned of God in 
a. dream that they 
should not return to 
Herod, they depart* 
ed into their own 
country another 
way. 

13. And when 
they were depart- 
ed, behold, the an- 
gel of the Lord ap- 
pcareth to Joseph 
in a dream, saying, 
Arise, and take the 
young child and his 
motlier, and flee 
into Egj'pt, and be 
thou tiicre until 1 
bring thee word : 
for Herod will seek 
the young child to 
destroy iiim. 

14. When he 
arose, he took tl«c 
young child and his 
mother by night, 
and departed into 
Egypt: 

15. And was there 
until the leatli of 
Herod : that it 
might b«. fulfilled 



MATTHEW, CHAPTER II. 



819 



OER3Ci.K. 

$e auf/ ttiib fcbeufteu 



12. Uwb (Soft be-' 
fvi^I i^nr 11 im ^rainn; 
Dag jle fid) uicbt foU^ 
ten ipietcr ju Jg^iorc^ 
lenfcu. lint) fie iHtn 
Mtrcf) ciiKii auDcni 
5Beg wier»er in i^r 
iatiN 

13. 2)a jlf aber ^iii- 
»f9 dfjc'gcn roavfii, 
fle^C; Da (rfcbidi Drv 
Cn^cl bc^ J^errii Dem 
3ofept) im Iraum, 
uiiD fprad) : ©te^e 
auf, tiuD itimm Da^ 
^iuDtcin iiuD fcine 
!!D?uttcr in Dir, luiD 
fltct;e in Q^^pptenlanD; 
uuD Hfibe ailNt, bi^ 
i(b Dir fage ; Denn e^ 
ifl vcrt^anDcn, Dag 

(ein fucbr, DAifclbe 
umjubringcu. 

14. \ln\> er Oanb 
auf/ unD ua^m Da^ 
JCiuDlciu uuD ffine 
TOutter }u flcb, bep 
rrv 9lact)t; unD enc^. 
n)id) in Sgt^pteulanD, 

15. Unt) b(ie( allM 
bi^ ihicb Dcm ^cDe 
J^eroDi*^, auf Dag cr? 



SPANISH. 

oro e incensio, y 
mirra. 



12. Y &visados en 
sucuos que no vol- 
viesen k Herodes 
regresaron 4 su ti- 
erra, por otro ca- 
mino. 



13. Ydespuesque 
hubieron ellos par- 
tido he aqui el an- 
gel del Sefior apa- 
rece en suenos 4 
Joseph diciendo : 
Levantate y toma 
a1 nino, y & su ma- 
dre y huye k Egip- 
to, y estate alii 
hasta que yo te 
avise porque ha de 
acontecer que He- 
rodes busque al ni- 
ne para matarle. 

14. Y levantando- 
se ^l tom6 de no- 
che al nino y 4 su 
madre, y fuese d 
Egipto. 

15. Y perinaneci6 
alii hasta la muerte 
de Herodes para 



sues, obtulerunt e: 
munera, aurum, et 
thus, et royrrham. 



12. Et responsi 
secundum somni- 
urn, non reflectere 
ad Herodem, per 
aliam viam recesse- 
runt in regionem 
suam. 

13. Recessis au- 
tern ipsis, ecce an- 
gelus Domini appa* 
ret per somnium 
Joseph, dicens : Ex- 
citatus accipe pu- 
erum et matrem 
ejus, et fuge in 
iEgyptum : et esto 
ibi usque dura di- 
cam tibi. Futurus 
est enim Herodes 
quserere puerum ad 
pcrdendum eum. 



14. Is autem exci- 
tatus accepit pue- 
rum et matrem ejus 
nocte, et secessit in 
iEgyptum : 

15. Et crat ibi 
usque ad obituni 
Herodis: ut adim- 



quo se cumpliojicipleiviur (*.ic*um 



820 



MATTHEW, CHAPTER II. 



Tov frpo(f>fjTov, \iyoP' 
Tos, " *E^ klydrrav 
^/coXco-a TOP vi6u /iou." 



16. Tore 'Hpwdfjs 
iBu>v OTi fVtiralyBri xnro 
rcDV fidyoiv^ €&vfjL&3rj 
XtW, Ka\ awoartiXas 
avfiAc navras tovs 
rralBas roits (V BrjB' 
Arc/i, Kill €u ncuri rois 
6piots avTTJt^ dno di*- 
Tovs Kol KaT<aT€p<a^ 
Karii TOV xpovov hv 
rJKplpci(rt napa reSv 
Moynp. 



17. T(Jt€ €irkrip&Bfi 



FRENCH. 

le Seigneur avait 
parle par un pro- 
phete, disant : J'ai 
appele mon Fils 
hors d'Egyptc. 

16. Alors Hcrodc, 
voyant que les sages 
s'etaicnt moqu^s de 
lui, fut fort en co- 
le re, et il envoya 
tucr tous les enfans 
qui etaicnt dans 
Bethlehem, et'dans 
tout son tcrritoirc, 
dcpuis I'age de deux 
ans et au-dcssous, 
selon Ic temps dont 
il s^etait exactement 
inform^ des sages. 

17. Alors fut ac- 



t6 pTfBip wrb 'Uptfiiov ; compli cc dont avait 
TOV npo(f>riTav^ Xtyop- \ parle Jcremie le pro- 
, phete, en disant : 



TOff, 

18. " ^cjvrj €P 'Papa 
TfKOva-Brj^ Bptjvo^ Kai 
K\av3pos Kai 6dvppo£ 
iroXvSt 'Paxq^ JcXatov- 
<ra TO TtKPa airrrjs • 
Kflt ovK ijBtkt rrapa" 
KkriBrjvai^ on ovk 



19. TeXnn^croiTor ^c 
TOV 'Hp^ov, tdov, ^y- 
ytXos Kvpiov icar* opap 
<fiat»€TaL T^ laxfi^ tp 



I 18. On a oui a 
' Rama un cri, une 
[ lamentation, des 
plaintes, et un grand 
gomissement ; Ra- 
chel pleurant sos 
enfans, et n'ayant 
point voulu etre 
consolee de ce 
quails ne sont plus. 

19. Mais apres 
qu'H^rodo fut mort, 
voici, I'ange du Sei- 
gneur apparut dans 
un songo u .Ios'»ph, 



which was spoken 
of the Lord by the 
prophet, saying, 
Out of Egypt have 
I called my son. 

16. Then Herod, 
when he saw that 
he was mocked d 
the wise men, wa 
exceeding wroth, 
and sent forth, and 
slew all the chil- 
dren that were in 
Bethlehem, and in 
all the coasts there- 
of, from two years 
old and under, ac- 
cording to the timo 
which he had dili- 
gently inquired of 
the wise men. 

17. Then was ful- 
filled that which 
was spoken by Jer- 
emy the prophet, 
saying, 

18. In Rama was 
there a voice heard, 
lamentation, and 
weeping, and great 
mourning, Rachel 
weeping for her 
children, and would 
not be comforted, 
because they are 
not. 

19. But when 
Herod was dead, 
behold, an angel of 
the Lord appeareth 
in a dream to Jo- 



MATTHEW, CHAPTER n« 



821 



Jjert ixivtb ten spro^ 
ptjtttn drfagt tjat, ^er 

tea ^abc i(b meiuen 
6o^n gcrufeu. 
16. 2>a^rro&e^mm 
{ail, Hi etr t>oit ^rn 
QBeifui betrogeii war, 
»arO er fe^r joniig, 
unt fc^icfte ait^, nnt 
(US aUe Sttlt^er ju 

ttnb ait i^rrn dan^ru 
(Sreajru; ^ie ^a jwcp- 
jdfjrig uuD ^al'untcr 
mareit/ uad) Der 3(i^ 
^te rr mit gleig t>ou 
^m ^(ifeu erircnet 



17. 2)a i|l rrfaifct, 

^top^ctcu 3ctcmia, 
^et ta fpti(6t : 

18. 7(uf Dcm (Sebic 
ge tjat man ein (Se:; 
fcbrei) ^itjittt, Dirl 
tCIageue:; ^IBetiKn^ 
unb ^culentf ; 9ta^e( 
bfwciiutf i!)re Kins 
^er, unD tPoUte flcb 
niibt triflen (afTen; 
^eun e^ mar ati^ mit 
il^nrn. 

19. 2)a atfr Jjcro^ 
&f 6 gf|lorbf n war, fie? 
tC; &a cifitifn tcr 
Sngel t^c^ <0(trn tern 
3ofr):l; in* ^raiim iu 



lo que habl6 el Se- 
nor por el profeta 
diciendo : De Egip- 
to llam^ 4 mi hijo. 

16. EntdncesHe- 
rodes cuando se vi6 
burlado de los Ma- 
go9 irritose sobre 
manera, y envid, 6 
hiz6 matar a todos 
los niiios, que ha- 
bia en Bethlehem, 
y en toda su co- 
marca de dos auos 
abajo conforme al 
tiempo que 61 ha- 
bia cuida!dosamente 
inquirido de los Ma- 
gos. 

17. Entonces se 
cumpli6 lo que ha- 
bia hablado por el 
profeta Jeremias di- 
ciendo, 

18. Voz fu6 oida 
en Rami lamentos, 
y lloros y grandes 
gemidos : Raquel 
llorando sua hijos y 
no quiso ser conso- 
lada porque no ex- 
isten ya. 



19. Pero habien- 
do muerto Herodes 
he aqui un 4ngel 
del Seuor aparecio 
en sueuos u Joseph 



Domino per Pro- 
phetam, dicentem : 
Ex Egypto vocav: 
filium meum. 

16. Tunc Herodci 
videns quoniam illu- 
sus esset a Magis, 
iratus est valde : et 
mittens occidit om- 
nes pueros qui in 
Bethlehem, et om- 
nibus finibus ejus, a 
binatu et infra, 
secundum tempus 
quod perquisivit a 
MagLB. 



17. Tuncadimple- 
tum est dictum per 
Jeremiam prophe- 
tam, dicentem : 

18. Vox in Rama 
audita est, ploratus 
et ululatus et ejula- 
tus multus: Rachel 
plorans natos suos, 
et noluit cohjolari, 
quia non sunt. 



19. Desinente an- 
tem Herode, ecco 
angelus Domini se- 
cundur i somnium 
apparc Joseph in 



822 



MATTEBW, CHAPTERS H., HI. 



20. Asymp, 'Eycp- 
Btig irapaKaP^ ro 
iracdiov, Kal T^jv firj- 
ripa avTOVf Koi iro- 
ptvov tls yrjv 'icpa- 
17X • reOvrfKaai yhp 
ol fyTOVVT€9 rrjif 
^XV^ Tov naibiov, 

21. 'O dc €y€p$€\s 
9rapt\aff€ rbiraibi' 
ov» Kal rfjv iii)T€pa 
avTov, Koi TfXBtu fh 
yijv *l<rpari\, 

22. 'AKovvas be 
m *Apx€\aos j8a- 
<rtXcu€( €m TTJg 'lov- 
ialas dvTL *Hpa>bmf 
TOV irarpbs avroO, 
€<f>o^ri6rj eKfldircX- 

bfKar 6vap,dp€x^' 
prjcev eh rh /lipri 
Trjs VaXiXaiae • 

23. Kal A^ti^ir 
KaTiOKTiatv (Is ir6' 
Tiip Xtyofiemfv No- 
fa/xV, ojTwr ttXtj- 
paOj TO pr)6w dia 

T«P VpO(f}tfT&Vf OTl 

f^aC^palot kkijOri' 



A. 'Ev He Tai£ ^- 
fiepaie eKeivais na- 
payivrrai *lad»infs 



FRENCH. 

en Egypte, 

20. et lui dit : 
Leve-toi, et prends le 
petit enfant et sa mere, 
et t'en va au pays 
d'Israel ; car ceux qui 
chercbaient ^ oter la 
vie au petit enfant sont 
morts. 

21. Joseph done s'^- 
tant reveille, prit le 
petit enfant et sa mere, 
et s'en vint au paysj 
d'lsrael. j 

22. Mais quand il I 
eut appris qu'Arche- 
laiis regnait en Ju- 
dee, & la place d^He- 
rode, son pere, il oral- 
gnit d'y aller ; et etant 
divinementaverti dans 
un songe, il se retira 
en Galilee. 

23. Et y etant arriv^ 
il habita dans la ville 
appelee Nazaretb, afin 
que fat accompli ce 
qui avait 6t^ dit par les 
propb^tes : II 
appele Nazaricn. 



1. Or en ce temps- 
1^ vint Jean-Baptiste, 
precbant dans le de- 



6 /SanTiOT^f KTj' I sert de la Jud^e, 
ivfrtrav ev TJj epfj' \ 
iM^ r^f *lovdaias9 \ 

2. Kal Xeya»f, 2. ct disant : Con- 
Mcrawfirc • tjy- v(>rrisscz-vous, car le 



seph in Egypt, 

20. Saying, . Arise, 
and take the young 
cbild and bis motber, 
and go into tbc land of 
Israel : for they are 
dead which sought the 
young child's life. 

21. And he arose, 
and took the young 
child and bis mother 
and came into the land 
of Israel. 

22. But when he 
heard that Arcbelaus 
did reign in Judea in 
the room of his father 
Herod, he was afraid 
to go thither : notwith- 
standing, being warn- 
ed of God in a dream, 
he turned aside into 
the parts of Galilee : 

23. And he came and 
dwelt in a city called 
Nazaretb : tfiat it 
might be fulfilled 
which was spoken by 
the prophets, He shall 
be called a Nazarene 



1- In those days 
came John the Baptist, 
preaching -in the wil- 
derness of Judea, 



2. And saying, Re- 
pent ye : for the king- 



MATTHEW, CHAPTERS H., in. 



828 



QVRHAIt, 

20. Unb fpracfi : @te^ 
^e auf, unD nimm ta$ 
£tn^(eiu iiud fciue 
CDTuttet }u Mr, ml^ ue- 
^e t)iH in da^ kn^ Sf- 
rac( ; fU fhiD geflovbeu; 

Ubtn \U\\ttn. 

21. Unt er tlant^ auf; 
un^ na^m ^a^ £iuDUtn 
ttn& ffine SHutter ju 
(1(6/ unt) hun in ta^ 

22. Sa er aUx tjbttU, 
tag 2(rc6e(aug im jiUi- 
fc^en iante Kini.q mar, 
an6tattfetnf^SSatrr^ 
Jjerote^, fiir(6tfte er 
(1(6 ta^in }u fomm(ti. 
Itntim^^raumempftng 
er aSefe^fl vou ®ott, 
unb }og ill tie Oerter 
te^ gali((lif(t)eu iaute^, 

23. ttnt fam, mt> 
toeijnttt ill ter 6tatt, 
tie ta 6eigt SRa^arett) ; 
auf tag erfitUet murte, 
ta^ ta gefagt i\l \>on 
tern ^ropt^eten : Sr 
foQ Slajareim^ (;eigeii. 



1. 3ii ter 3eit tarn 
So^aiine^, ter 3:4ufer, 
unt pretigte in trr 
<2BfitU tc^ )iltif(6en 
iante^, 

2. Untfpra(6: ^^w- 
S9u§e/ta^<i^ mme{rei(6 



BPAHI8H. 

en Egipto. 

20. Diciendo : Le- 
vantate y toma al ni- 
no y & su madre, y 
vete 4 tierra de Isra- 
el porque muertos 
son los que atenta- 
ban 4 la vida del nino. 

21. Entonces le- 
vantandose ^1 tomo 
al nino, y a su ma- 
dre, y vinose a tierra 
de Israel. 

22. Mas habiendo 
oido que Archelao 
reynaba en Judea en 
lugar de su padre He- 
rodes temio ir all 4 y 
avisado en sueiios se 
retiro 4 tierra de Ga- 
lilea. 



23. Yvinoybabito 
en una ciudad llama- 
da Nazareth pamque 
se cumpliese lo que 
habian dicho los pro- 
fetas : Sera Uamado 
Nazareno. 



1. Yen-aquellosdi- 
as vin6 Juan el Bau- 
tista predi(»ndo en 
el desierto de Judea. 



2. Y diciendo: Ar- 
repentios porque el 



ULTIW. ■»- 

iEgypto, 
20.Dicens:Ex. 
citatus accipe pu- 
erum, et matrem 
ejus, eH^ade in 
terram Israel : 
mortui sunt enim 
quserentes ani* 
mam pueri. 

21. lUe autem 
excitatus accepit 
puerum et ma- 
trem ejus, et venit 
in terram Israel. 

22. Audiens au- 
tem quod Arche- 
laus regnare^ in 
Judsea pro Hero- 
de patre suo, ti- 
muitilloire. Ee- 
sponsus autem se* 
cundum somni- 
urn, secessit in 
partes GalilaesB. 

23. Et veniens 
commigravit in 
civitatem dictam 
Nazaret : ut im- 
pleretur dictum 
per Prophetas, 
Quod Nazoreeus 
vocabitur. 

1. In autem die- 
bus illis accedit 
Joannes Baptista, 
prsedicans in de- 
serto Judseee, 

2. Et dicens: 
Pcsnitemini, ap- 



S24 



MATTHEW, CHAPTER HI. 



YiK€ yhp Ti fiatri- 
Xffia T&u ovpavav, 

•osydf 

OV TOV TrpO<f>TIT0Vf 

"KtyovToSt " *<ii>»'^ 
6oS>vros €v tJ €prj- 
/i6>, 'ErotfAdcraTt 
TrfV obov Kvplov, 
€v$€ia£ TTOtf trc riff 
Tpifiovs avTov, 

4. Avros d( *Ifi)- 
dtnnjs €!;(€ t6 cvdv- 
fia avTov drro r/>(- 
X&v KOfirjXov, Koi 
^(UMfv bippLaTivrjv 
n€p\ lifv oot^Oy av- 
Tov • ^ dc rpo(f>ri 
avTov ^u oKpidis 
Koi /icXi ayptov, 

5. TcJrf cfrjTO- 
p€V€To irpbs avrbv 
'lipoaSkvp^, Koi 
iraa-a § 'lovda/a, 
xal TTQcra 17 ntpixoi' 
pOS TOV *lopidvoVf 

6. Kal tficmri' 
CovTO iv ra *lopid- 
vjj vn avToVf «{o- 
fjUikoyoCfi€»oi riig 
AfiapTtas avT&v, 

7. 'Id^v bi TTOX- 
\ovf T&if ^apiaai' 
9iv Kxii ^adbovKai- 
(0ir (pxontvovs iir\ 
t6 PaTTTurfM av- 
ToVf €iv€V avroiSf 
TtvvfffJLaTa ixi^vStv, 
vis vircdft^cv vfxtp 



royaume ( 
proche. 



I cieux est 



3. Car c'est ici celui 
dont il a ete parle par 
Esaie le prophetc, en 
disant: La voix de 
celui qui crie dans le 
desert est: Preparez 
le chemin du Seigneur, 
aplanissez ses sen- 
tiers. 

4. Or Jean avait son 
vetemcnt de poil de 
chameau, et une cein- 
ture de cuir autour de 
ses reins ; et son man- 
ger etait des saute- 
relles et du miel sau- 
vage. 



5. Alors les habitans 
do Jerusalem, et de 
toute la Jud^e, et de 
tout le pays des envi- 
rons du Jourdain vin- 
rent k lui. 

6. Et ils ^taient bap- 
tises par lui au Jour- 
dain, confessant leurs 
p^ch^s. 

7. Mais voyant plu- 
sieurs des pharisiens 
et des sadduceens ve- 
nir k son bapteme, il 
leur dit : Race de vi- 
p^res, qui vous a aver- 
tis de fuir la colore a 
venir ? 



dom of heaven is at 
hand. 

3. For this is he that 
was spoken of by the 
prophet Esaias, say- 
ing, The voice of one 
crying in the wilder- 
ness, Prepare ye the 
way of the Lord, make 
his paths straight. 

4. And the same John 
had his raiment of 
camcPs hair, and a 
leathern girdle about 
his loins ; and his meat 
was locusts and wild 
honey. 



5. Then went out to 
bim Jerusalem, and 
all Judea, and all the 
region round about 
Jordan, 

6. And were baptized 
of him in Jordan, con- 
fessing their sins. 



7. But when he saw 
many of the Pharisees 
and Sadducees come 
to his baptism, he said 
unto them, O genera^ 
tion of vipers, who 
hath warned you to 
flee from the wrath to 



MATTHEW, CHAPTER IH. 



325 



men. 

3. ItnD cr i|^ bcr, \>t>\\ 

faia jufii^t bat, uub <^e^ 
fprccben : "S^ i|l fine 
©timme cinc^ ^rcM; 
grr^ in tcr TOiifk/ br- 
rfitft tfiu JSfrru ^fii 
^f.a, uui) macbft ricb- 
ti^ fcinc ©tfidc. 

4. €r abcr, 3oban« 
nrtt, battc (in ^Icto t)cu 

urn (cDcriirn ®urtcl 
urn ff inc icn^eu ; fcitic 
©peife alcr xoax ^(\u 
fcbrecfcn mib tioiltier 
^ouig. 



5. 2)a dina ju itjixx 
tjimn^ Die ©taut 3es 
nifiilnn, uuM>a6ganjf 
JfiMfcbe UnD; uno alle 
iiiiDrr ail oem 3orDan/ 

6. Unb (irgen (Icb tau- 
fcnt)ouibmiTn3orDa«; 
iniD beCaiiucen t(}re 

©lUltCU. 

7. 2(11^ er mm \)ie(c 
^Pljatificr nut ©ab^u- 
c5f r fab JU feiucr tauff 
tommcn, fpradj cr ju 
il)Mfii: 3b^^ Dttcrngc= 
}ii(bte, n>er ^at teitu 
rud) grwiefcn, feag ibt 
tnn }ut) uiftigen 3ovn 



reyno de los cielos 
esta cerca. 

3. Torque estc es 
aquel de quien hablo 
el profeta Isaias dici- 
endo : Voz del que 
claina en el desierto : 
Aparejad el camino 
del Senor, haccd dc- 
rechas sus sendas. 

4. Y el mismo Juan 
Uevaba un vcstido de 
pelos de camcllo, y 
un cinto de cuero al 
rededor de sus lomos, 
y su comida eran lan- 
gostas y miel silves- 
tre. 



5. Entonces saiio 
4 el Jerusalem, y to- 
da la Judea^ y toda la 
tierra de la comarca 
del Jordan. 

6. Y eran bautiza- 
dos por el en el Jor- 
dan confesando sus 
pecados. 

7. Mas viendo que 
muchos de los Pha- 
riseos y Saduceos ve- 
nian d su bautismo 
les dij6 ; oh genera- 
cion de viboras ! qui- 
en OS ha ensenado d 

' huir de la ira veni- 
28 



propmquavit e- 
nim regnum ccb- 
lorum. 

3. Hie cnim est 
pronunCitftus ab 
Esaia Propheta, 
dicente : Vox cla- 
mantis in de^erto: 
Expedite viam 
Domini, rcctis fa- 
cite semitas ejus. 

4. Ipse autem 
Joannes habebat 
indumentum su- 
um e pilis cameli, 
et zonam pel lice- 
am circa lumbum 
suum : esca au- 
tem ejus erat lo- 
custfie et mel sil- 
vestre. 

5. Tunc exibat 
ad eum Hieroso- 
lyma, et omnis 
Judsea, et omnis 
circum vicinia 
Jordanis. 

6. Et baptiza- 
bantur in Jordane 
ab eo, consitentes 
peccata sua. 

7. Videns autem 
multos PharissBO- 
rum et Sadducffi- 
orum venientes 
ad baptismum su- 
um, dixit eis : Ge- 
nimina vipera- 
rum, quis demon- 



826 



MATTHEW, CHAPTER lU. 



GREEK. 

ifnry€iu arr6 tijs 
fifWovoTjs Ofyyjjs ; 

8. Iloirj(raT€ oZv 
Kapnrhv d^iov t^s 
fieravoiag, 

9. Kat firj b6iTjT€ 
\tytiv ffV eavrolSf 
TlaTtpa txpfi^v t6v 
^A^padfx • Xeyci) 
yap vp^iv, on dvvo' 
rai 6 6f6ff ex t&u 
\i$a» TovTtav tyd' 
pal TtKva T^ *A- 
fipadfA* 

10. "H^fj be Ka\ 
jj d^linj irp6s rijv 
oi^av rSiv bivbpo^v 
KfiToi • iraif oZv 
hivbpov p,Ti iroiovv 
Kapnbv iLokitv^ €K' 
KdiTTfTaif Ka\ els 
irvp jSoAXcrai. 

11. '£ya> /mV 
QairrlC^ vpag cV 
udari els /irroyoi- 
av 6 bi onio'oi /tou 
€px6fifvost la-xyp6' 

T«p6t flOV CCJTIV, o5 

vTrobripara fiaard' 
aai, aMs vpas 

MiTi dyu^ Kai irupi • 

12. 05 t6 mvoy 

€V TTJ X€lp\ aVTOV, 

Koi bioKaSapitl T^v 
SKiava auTOVf Ka\ 
irvpd((i Tou (tItov 
avTov etc TTiv dno' 
O^KTjVf TO bi axV' 



FBSNCH. 



8. Faitcs done dcs 
fruits convenables & la 
repentance. 

9. Et ne presumez 
point de dire en vous- 
m ernes : Nous avons 
Abraham pour pere ; 
car je vous dis que 
Dieu peut faire naitre 
de ces pierres meme 
dcs enfans k Abra- 
ham. 

10. Or la cognee est 
de'jk mise k la racine 
des arbres ; c'est pour- 
quoi tout arbre, qui ne 
fait pomt de bon fruit, 
va etre coupe et jet^ 
au feu. 

11. Pour moi, je 
vous baptise d^eau en 
signe de repentance ; 
mais celui qui vicnt 
apres moi est plus pu- 
issant que moi, et je 
ne suis pas digne de 
porter ses souliers ; 
celui-la vous baptisera 
du Saint-Esprit et dc 
feu. 

12. II a son van en 
sa main, ct il nettoiera 
entierement son aire, 
et il assemblera son 
froment au grenicr ; 
mais il brulera la paille 
au feu qui ne s'etcint 



come ? 

8. Bring forth there- 
fore fruits meet for re- 
pentance : 

9. And think not to 
say within yourselves, 
We have Abraham to 
our father: for 1 say 
unto you, that God is 
able of these stones to 
raise up children unto 
Abraham. 

10. And now also 
the axe is laid unto 
the root of the trees : 
therefore every tree 
which bringcth not 
forth good fruit is hewn 
down, and cast into 
the fire. 

11. I indeed baptize 
you with water unto 
repentance : but he 
that cometh after me 
is mightier than 1, 
whose shoes I am not 
worthy to bear : he 
shall baptize you with 
the Holy Ghost, and 
with fire : 



12. Whose fan is in 
his hand, and he will 
thoroughly purge his 
floor, and gather his 
wheat into the garnei ; 
but he will bum up 
tlie chaff with un- 



MATTHEW, CHAPTER HT. 



827 



OERMAN. 

futriuurn ircrt»ct ? 

8. ©e()ct 311, tl)ut 
tfcfctffbatfciie gi*urt)te 

9. 3)ciifft nur uicbt, 
^ag tt)r bep rucb ircllc 
fiWn : ^iv Ijabcu Tt^ 
bral^am jum SBatcr 
3(t fagf fiid) : (^crt 
Detinacj ^fnl 2Jbva|)am 
aii6 (irfcii @rriHCii 
jfin^er ju evtvccfeti. 

10. €^ i|l fct)cu tif 
Xrt ten ^Sdumeti m t>u 
^urjfl flclfgt. ©a- 
turn, welfbcr 35aum 
iiicbt gute 3rurf)t brim 
grt, n)it^ absel^aueu 
unt in^ S^uet geiDOi*- 
ffti. 

11. 3^ taufe f ucb mit 
fIDaffV r jur SSuge ; Uf r 
abcr uacb mir fommt; 
ifl t^irhr, tcnn id), 
(em id) aud) nicfttge- 
ntigfam biit/ feine @d)iu 
^e }u rragcn ; tn w\t^ 
eitci mit (em ^eKigcn 
®ei|l iinb mic ^tntv 
taufeiu 



dera ? 

8. Producid pues 
frutos dignos dc ar- 
repcntimiento. 

9. Y no penscis en 
decir interiormente : 
A Abraham tenemos 
por padre ; porque yo 
09 digo : que podero- 
so es Dies para le- 
vantar hijos 4 Abra- 
ham aun de cstas pi- 
ed ras. 

10. Y ahora tambi- 
en ya esti puesta la 
segur a la raiz de los 
drboles. Y todo ar- 
bol que no produce 
buen fnito cortado 
sera, y echado id fu- 
ego. 

11. Yo en verdad , 
OS bautizo en agua 
para arrepentimien- 
to, mas 61 que viene 
en pos de mi, mas 
poderoso es que yo, 
cuyos zapatos no soy 
digno de llevar. El 
OS bautizard en el 
Espiritu Santo, y eh 
fuego. 

12. Su bieldo esti 
en su mano, y lim- 
piard bien la era, y 
recogera su trigo en 
la trox mas la paja 

ite fommchi ; aber (ie ' la quemar& en un fu- 
©yrcu xtixt cr t)frbrf u- ego inextinguible. 



12. Unb et ijM feine 
^orffd}aufe( in feitier 
9m\^; et mirD feine 
Jenne fegen, imb Den 
^eijen in feine @d)eU' 



stravit vobis fu- 
gere a futura ira? 

8. Facite ergo 
fructus dignos 
posnitentise. 

9. Et ne arbitre- 
mini dicere in vo- 
bis ipsis : Patrem 
habemus Abra- 
ham ; dico cnim 
vobis,quoniam po- 
test Deus de lapi- 
dibus istis suscita- 
re natos Abrahas. 

10. Jam vero et 
securis ad radi- 
cem arborum ad- 
jacet. Omnis er- 
go arbor non fa- 
cie ns fructum bo- 
num, excidhur,et 
in igncm jacitur. 

1 1 ^ Ego qui- 
dem baptize* vos 
in aqua in pOBni- 
tentiam, qui au- 
tem post me veni- 
ens, fortior me 
est : cujus non 
sum idoneus cal- 
ceamenta portarc, 
ipse vos baptiza- 
bitinSpiritusanc- 
to et igni. 

12. Cujue venti- 
labrum in nianu 
sua, et permunda- 
bit aream siiam, 
etcongrcgabit tri- 
ticum suum in 
horreum : at pa- 



328 



MATTHEW, CHAPTER III. 



fHOf KOTOKavirti fni- 

13. Tor* napayi- 
Fcrni 6 'lijcrouff diro 
Ttjs raktKaiag (ni 
Toy *lop6dvriv irp6s 
TOP *l<odwrfVt ToO 
^aiTTurBrjvM vw* 
avTov, 

14. *0 d( •loodi^ 

TOVf Xtymv, *Eyei) 
XptiiUf c^u (nro aov 
PamurBiivcUj Koi 

15. *A.noKpi6t\s 
dc 6 *Ii7<rovff ctJTf 
np6t avTov • ^A^f 
^jjpri * ovTA) y^p 
wptnov iarlv f^plv 
trXrjpiia'ai va<rap 
iiKaioavyrjv • rorc 
diil>iri<nv uvt6v, 

16. Kai fiaimv 
$€19 6 'irjaovi dyt' 
pri fvdus OTTO roil 
vdaror, koi Ibovt 
dy€f^)^6\iia'av aur^ 
oi ovpauol, Kal eidc 
TO nvtvpa rov 6€oO 
Kara^alvov oxrct 
jTipuTT^pay, Ka\ tp' 
j(op€vov €ir* avT6». 

17. KaliSou, <^(i>- 
ir^ CK rwi/ ovpaviov, 
XtyovtrayOvTos cV- 

o;'aTri;TOf, iv ^ ev- 



7KBNGU. 



point. 



13. Alors Jesus vint 
de Galilee au Jourdain 
vers Jean pour etre 
baptist par luii 



14. Mais Jean Ten 
empechait fort, en lui 
disant : J^ai besoin 
d'etre baptise par toi, 
et tu vicns vers moi I 

15. Et Jesus repon- 
dant, lui dit : Laisse- 
moi faire pour le pre- 
sent; car il nous est 
ainsi convcnable d^ac- 
complir toute justice. 
Et alors il le laissa 
faire. 

16. Et quand Jesus 
cut ete Ixiptise, il sor- 
tit incontinent hors de 
Pcau ; et voila, les 
cieux lui furent ou- 
verts, et Jean vit I'Es- 
prit do Dieu descen- 
dant cornmo une Co- 
lombo, et venant sur 
lui. 

17. Et voilk une voix 
du ciel, disant : Celui- 
ci est mon Fils bien- 
aime, en qui j'ai pris 
mon bon plaisir. 



ENGLISH. 

quenchable fire. 

13. Then cometh Je- 
sus from Galilee to 
Jordan unto John, to 
be baptized of him. 



14. But John forbade 
him, saying, 1 have 
need to be baptized of 
thee, and comest thou 
to mc ? 

15. And Jesus an- 
swering said unto him, 
Suffer it to be so now : 
for thus it becomcth us 
to fulfil all righteous^ 
ness. Then he suf- 
fered him. 



16. And Jesus, when 
he was baptized, went 
up straightway out of 
the water : and lo, the 
heavens were opened 
unto him, and he saw 
the Spirit of God de- 
scending like a dove, 
and lighting upon him: 

17. And lo, a voice 
from heaven, saying, 
This is my beloved 
Son, in whom I am 
well pleased. 



MATTHEW, CHAFTBR m. 



329 



OERXAN. 



nnt mir noigem gntet 

13. 3tt Ut Btit hm 
3cfu$ m& (SalMa an 
ten 3pr^f II ju 3ot|aii: 
nf, ^a6 er f(d) Don iljm 
.aufiru Ufgr. 



14. Tibn 3o(^(innftf 
n>e(;rece tt;m, nnt 
frtacb : 3d) tcDarf 
motjl, tag icb ijon tir 
derauft werte ; nnt tu 
fommjl }u mir ? 

15. 3fftttf aber ane- 
©ortetC; imt fpracb ju 
il^mriagjectaffofe^n; 
a(fo grbuOret e^ nn^; 
aUe (ScrcAtigtfit jn 
erfuticn. Z)a{iegrrr^ 



16. Unt ta 3cfn6 flc- 
tanft wariUeg er 6a(t 
^etauf aue( tcm ^af? 
fer ; unt ftr(;e, ta t^at 
jlcb ter ^tmmcl anf 
fti^cri^m. Unt3Dl)am 
ne^ fa^ ten (St\\l (got-- 
re ^, dUi(6 a(d etnr Ian- 
t»r ^erab fasten, unt> 
fibn il;n fommen. 

17. tint flei^C; fine 
6rimmf >om J^imme ( 
^crab fptad) : Sietf ifl 
mcin (tfber @ot)n, an 
n>e((ftfm ir( ^o^Ige- 
fAflrn ijabt. 



BPiiKISH. 



13. £nt6nces Jesus 
vin6 de Galiha al 
Jordan a encontrar a 
Juan para ser bauti- 
zado de ei. 



14. Mas Juan se 1o 
estorbaba diciendo : 
i Yo he menester ser 
bautizado de ti, y tu 
vienes 4 mi ? 

15. Y respondiendo 
Jesus le dij6 : ^ De- 
ja esto ahora porque 
asi . nos conviene 
cumplir toda justicia. 
£ot6nces condescen- 
di6. 



16. Y despues que 
Jesus fu6 bautizado, 
subio luego del agua, 
y he aqui se le abri- 
eron los cielos, y vi6 
al Espiritu de Dies 
descendiendo como 
paloma y viniendo 
sobre ^1. 

17. Y he aqui una 
voz del cielo que de- 
cia : Este es mi hijo 
muy querido, en qui- 
en tengo toda mi 
complacencia. 

28* 



learn comburetig- 
ni inextinguibili. 

13. Tunc acce- 
dit Jesus a Gali« 
Icea ad Jordanem 
ad Joanne m, bap- 
tizari ab eo. 



14. At Joannes 
prohibebat eum, 
dicens: Ego usum 
habeo a te bapti- 
zari, et tu venis 
ad me ? 

15. Respondens 
autem Jesus dixit 
ad eum, Sine in- 
terim: sic enim 
decens est no- 
bis implere om- 
nem justificatio- 
nem. Tunc di- 
mittit eum. 

16. Et baptiza- 
tus Jesus, ascen- 
ditstatimdeaqua: 
Et ecce aperti 
sunt ei csbU, evidit 
Spiritum Dei de- 
scendentum sicut 
columbam, et ve- 
nientem super 
eum. 

17. Et ecce vox 
de cffilis, dicens : 
Hie est filius me- 
ns dilectus, in quo 
complacui. 



830 



MATTHEW, CHAPTER IV. 



GSEEK. 

1. To Te 6 *Ii7- 
(Tovs dvfjx^Bfi its T^v 
€p7jfiov virb TOU 
ltV€VfiaT0St ntipaa" 
6ijvai vrro tov dta- 
/9dXov. 

^fjtepiis Tt<r<rapd' 
Kovra KQi vvtcrag 
TfaaapaKovTOf iJ<r- 
Ttpov €mLifa<r€. 

3. Kji npoatK' 
Bmv avT<^ 6 jTttpd' 
C<ov, firrtu • El vios 
€t TOV ecoO, flni 
iva ol \idoi oItoi 
aproi ytvfovrai. 

4. *0 di diroKpt' 
6(\ff titrc • TfypaiT' 
rai • Ou*c cV (ipT<fi 
fiovt^ (ri<r(Tai Sv- 
OpumoSi aXX' iiu 
trawl pf]pL<m inro' 
p€vop.€vta dia arrd' 
aaros GcoD. 

5. T6re irapakafi- 
fidpfi avTou 6 dca- 
jSoXof tls rfpf dyiau 
TToXii/, kA taTrj(Tiv 
avTov €ni TO nrtpv- 
■yiov TOV iepov, 

6. Kill X«yfi av- 
r^ • El vios (iToZ 
OfoO, pd\€ trtav' 
Tov KaToi • yeypair- 
Tai ydp^ ""Ort rolff 
dyyiXoi£ qvtov €¥- 

TfXfir.U 1t€p\ (TOV, 

Kal fn-l x^^P^^ ^' 
poZai at, fjJinoTf 
vpoa-KdylrQi vpoe 



FAENCH. 

1. Alors J^sus fut 
ommen6 par I'Esprii 
au desert, pour y etre 
tente par le diable. 



2. Et quand il eut 
jeun^ quaranle jours et 
quarante nuits, finale- 
ment il eut faim. 

3. Et le tentateur 
s'approchant, lui dit : 
Si tu es le Fils de Dieu, 
dis que ces pierres do- 
viennent des pains. 

4. Mais Jesus repon- 
dit,ctdit: II est^crit: 
L'homme nc vivra 
point de pain seule- 
ment, mais dc toute 
parole qui sort de la 
bouche de Dieu. 

5« Alors le diable le 
transporta dans la 
sainte villo, et le mit 
sur les creneaux du 
temple ; 

6. et il lui dit : Si tu 
es lo Fils de Dieu, jette- 
toi en bas ; car il est 
ecrit : II ordonnera a 
ses anges de tc porter 
en leurs mains, de peur 
que tu ne heurtes ton 
pied contrc quelque 
Merre. 



1. Then was Jesus 
led up of the Spirit 
into the wilderness, to 
be tempted of the 
devil. 

2. And when he had 
fasted forty days and 
forty nights, he was 
afterward an hungred. 

• 

3. And when the 
tempter came to him, 
he said. If thou be the 
Son of God, command 
that these stones be 
made bread. 

4. But he answered 
and said, It is written, 
Man shall not live by 
bread alone, but by 
every word that pro- 
ceedeth out of ths 
mouth of God. 

5. Then the devil 
taketh him up into the 
holy city, and setteth 
him on a pinnacle of 
the temple, 

6. And saith unto 
him. If thou be the 
Son of God, cast thy- 
self down : for it is 
written, He shall give 
his angels charge con- 
cerning thee : and in 
their hands they shall 
bear ihec up, lest &t 
any tone thou da&h 



MATTHEW, CHAPTER IV, 



831 



1. S)a »ar& Sffne^ 
DDtn (^cifl til Me Mil- 
lie gffiil)rct, auf &a<; cr 
t>on Dcm ^cufi Ucrf urbr 

tr grfafUr ^auc, ^im< 
grrtc it;u. 

3. Utt^ (cr SBrtfucbrr 
rratjiiii^m, iiiiDfprad): 
S3t|l Ml ®otrr^@o^n; 
fo fpricl), tab* ^i^f^ 
@teiuc '^roo iDcrteu. 

4. Uiit cr autwortcte, 
tuit fpract): Set t^c- 
l)ct gcfcbricbfu : 2)cr 
a>?cuf(b Ubct uid}t vom 
Srot ailctii, foiitcnt 
t>oii ctnrm jcgUcbni 
Woxt, bad tiuct) bfu 
9)?imt (Soueg gc^rt. 

5. 3)a fuljrte i^u ter 
itVL^ti mil flcb in Me 
^cilige @ra£)t, uuO f^cl- 
(ere it^ii auf tie 3inuf 
Dctf ^einpcl^, 

6. Uutfpracb^ttit^m: 
St|l Du (gom^ @ot7n; 
fo U^ Md) t^ittob ; tctiii 
eg |Ut)er gefcforicbcu : 
(Sx iDict feiueu ^ng^hi 
ubcr Mr ^ijeffijl t^uu, 
unt f(e noerteii tid) auf 
ten ^diitcn tragen, auf | 
ta^tuteineuguljuicbt 
an iiiun C3triu |lo^e|l. 



SPANISH. 

1. Entonces Jesus 
fue llevado por el 
Espiritu al desierto 
para scr tentado del 
diablo. 

2. Y habiendo ayu- 
nado quarenta dias y 
quarenta noches de- 
spues tuvo hambre. 

3. Y llegandose d 
el el tentador le dij6 : 
Si eres Hijo de Dios, 
di que estas piedras 
se hagan panes. 

4. Mas ^1 respondi- 
endo le dijo : Escri- 
to esta : no de solo 
pan vivira el hombre, 
mas de toda palabra 
que sale de la boca 
de Dios. 

5. Ent6nces le to- 
mo el diablo, le llevo 
4 la Santa Ciudad, y 
le puso sobre las al- 
menas del templo. 

6. Y le dij6 : Si 
eres Hijo de Dios 
echate de aqui abajo, 
porque escrito estd 
que te encomendara 
k sus angeles, y te 
tomaran en sus ma- 
nos paraque tu pie no 
tropieze con piedra 
algruna. 



1. Tunc Jesus 
actus est in deser- 
tum a Spiritu, 
tentari a diabolo. 



2. Et jejunans 
dies quadraginta, 
et noctes quadra- 
ginta, postremum 
esuriit. 

3. Et accidens 
ei tentator, dixit : 
Si filius es Dei, 
die ut lapides isti 
panes fiant. 

4. Tile autem re- 
spondens, dixit : 
Scriptum est,Non 
in pane solo vivet 
homo, sed in om- 
ni verbo exeunte 
per OS Dei. 

5. Tunc assu- 
mit eum diabolus 
in sanctam civi- 
tatem, et statuit 
cum super pinna- 
culum templi. 

6. Et dicit ei: 
Si filius es Dei, 
dejiceteipsumde* 
orsum. Scriptum 
est enim. Quia 

I angel is suis man- 

dabit de te, et in 

manibus tollcnt 

'tc, ne forte im- 

. pingus ad lapideni 



882 



MATTHEW, CHAPTER IV. 



\iBop 



ir6ha 



7. *E^ avrm 6 
'lijcroSff* IIdX»vy€- 
ypaTTTOif •' OCk ««• 
irtipdiTfit Kvf}iov 

8. IlaXiv tra/xx- 
\afjLfidv€i avTov 6 
did^dXos €if 6pos 

df ijcwo'cv avT^ 9rd- 
aat T^£ jSoo-iXciOf 
rov K6<rfiov, nal r^v 
dd^oy avrcoy. 

9. Kal Xcyci av- 
ry • Tavra irdvra 
aot dcAtro), cay vrc- 
cra>v irpoa'Kvvri<rijg 

flOt. 

10. T6t€ Xryet 
avrf 6 ^Ir^aovff *Y- 
irayr, 6wia<a fiov 
{raravd. Tiypvttr' 
rai yap, " Kvpiov 
TOP 6cdv (TOV itpoo-' 
Kuvffo-tis, Koi avT^ 
Ix6p<p Xarpcv<r«f." 

11. T6t€ aifiiij<rtv 
avrov 6 did^dkos • 
Ka\ tdov, ^yycXot 
frpocr^X^oi', jcal di* 
rjKdvawf avT^, . 

12. *AKowrag dc 
o 'lijcrovff ori *!«»• 
luanjr vapiMrif d» 
v€xo»p'i<r€V €*£ nji^ 
FaXiXacoy. 

13. KaL jcaraXi- 

A^i/ KartifKrjo-^u 



7. Je^us lui dit : II 
est aussi ecrit : Tu ne 
tenteras point le Seign- 
eur ton Dieu. 

8. Le diable le trans- 
porta encore sur une 
fort haute montagne, 
et lui montra tous les 
royaumes du monde 
et leur gloire; 



9. et il lui dit : Je te 
donnerai toutes ces 
choses, si, en te pros- 
temant en terre, tu 
m^adores. 

10. Mais Jesus lui 
dit: Va, Satan; caril 
est^crit: Tuadoreras 
ie Seigneur ton Dieu, 
et tu le serviras lui 
seul. 



11. Alors le diable le 
lais.sa, et voilii, les an- 
ges s^approcherent, et 
ie servirent. 

12. Or J^sus ayant 
oui dire que Jean avait 
eX& mis en prison, se 
retira en Gralil^e. 

13. Et ayant quitte 
I Nazareth, il alia de- 

meurer a Capnmaiim, 



ENOLISa. 

thy foot against a 
stone. 

7. Jesus said unto 
him, It is written again, 
Thou shalt not tempt 
the Lord thy God. 

8. Again, the devil 
taketh him up into an 
exceeding high moun- 
tain, and sheweth him» 
all the kmgdoms of 
the world, and the glo- 
ry of them, 

9. And saith unto 
him, All these things 
will I give thee, if thou 
wilt fall down and wor- 
ship me. 

10. Then said Jesus 
unto him. Get thee 
hence, Satan : for it is 
written. Thou shalt 
worship the Lord thy 
God, and him only 
shalt thou serve. 

11. Then the devil 
leaveth him, and be- 
hold, angels came and 
ministered unto him. 

12. Now when Jesus 
had heard that John 
was cast into prison, 
he departed into Gali- 
lee ; 

13. And leaving Naz- 
areth, he came and 
dwelt in Capernaum, 



MATTHEW, CHAPTER IV, 



SS3 



7. 35a fvracb 3ffu6 
jtt i^m : ^icbcnim lie- 
Brt aiicb A(fc1}rtcbni: 
2)a feU|l (&ott, Driuru 
Jjerrn, uicbt vcrfiicben. 

8. ^if^crum fTi^rcif 
i^H Der ^cufcl mtr flct) 
guf rtitcn fc^i' l}o^en 

atle SHclchf ^cr 3BeU 



9. Itiit fprac6 )u t^m: 
X)if^ alU0 will i(l) »it 
grben, fo Mi uicDcv^ 
fii(|l/ uttO mi(6 aubtf 

10. »a fpracft 3cfni5 
2UJt)m: J^cbe Did) iDeg 
t>on mir^ ®at4a ! teiiu 
r« |lf l)t .aefrbricbf n : Su 
fcJl|laiibcmiC&Dtt, J)ei= 
ncu J^cri'ii; unD il;m 
alleiu Mencii. 

11. 2>ii Detlifg i^tt 

ba ccatcu Mc ^ngr{ }u 
i^ni/ uiio i^iciueu i^m. 

12. 2)a imit 3(fu^ 
^6r(te, Daft' 3ol)annc0 
ubcrautmortct war, jo.a 
cr ill Oa^ gaUldi|i1)e 
ianb ; 

13. Unb tjfrficg bic 
©tabt Slajarctl), fam 
Uttb ipoi^iue }u Sapcr^ 



7. Y Jesus le dijo : 
tambien esta escrito : 
No tentaras al Senor 
tu Dios. 

8. De nuevo el dia- 
blo le Rubio k un 
monte muy encum- 
brado, y le mostro 
todos los reynos del 
mundo, y la gloria de 
ellos. 

9. Y le dijo : te dar^ 
todas estas cosas si 
postrado me ado- 
rares. 

10. Entonces Jesus 
le respondio : Apar- 
tate Satanas ; poVque 
escrito esta : Adora- 
r4s al Senojr tu Dios, 
y & el solo serviras. 



1 1. Entonces le de- 
jo el diablo, y he 
aqui los angeles lle- 
garon, y le Servian. 

12. Mas cuando Je- 
sus oyo que Juan es- 
taba en prision volvi- 
ose 4 Galilea. 

IS. Y d-jando d 
Nazareth, vino, y 
moro en Japhama- 



LATIN. 

pedem tuutn. 

7. Ait illi Jesv 8 ; 
Rursum scriptum 
est: Nontentabis. 
Dominum Deum 
tuum. 

8. Iterum assu- 
mit eum diabolua 
in montem excel- 
sum valde, et os- 
tendit ei omnia 
regna mundi, ol 
gloria m eorum : 

9. Et dicit ei: 
HiBC omnia tibi 
dabo, si cadens 
adoraveris me. 

10. Tunc dicit 
ei Jesus : Abi Sa- 
tana ; scriptum 
est enim, Domi- 
num Deum tuum 
adorabis, et illi 
soli servies. 

11. Tuncdimit 
tit eum diabolus : 
et ecce angeli ac- 
cesscrunt, et mi- 
nistrabant ei. 

12. Audiens au- 
tem Jesus quod 
Joannes traditus 
esset, secessit in 
GalilseuHi : 

13. Et relin. 
qucns Nazaret 
veniens commi 



S84 



MATTHEW, CHAPTER IV. 



€18 Katr€ppaovfji t^v 
wapa6akaaa-iav, €P 
opioid Zafiovkau^ Ka\ 

14. "iva ifXr}p&0^ 
t6 ptiOky bih *Hcratov 
ToO VpOffiflTOVt X«- 

15. " Trj Zafiov 
\^» Kal yrj Nr^^a- 
\t\fi, 6b6v OaKdo'arjt, 
nipav Tov 'lopdavou, 
FoXiXa/a rSiv iBvw, 

16. 'O \ah9 6 Ka- 
(Hlpucvoi €v (TKdTti, ti- 
de (l>&s p-tyat Kal Tols 
KaOr^pevots cV x^P9 
Ka\ aKiq, ^eu^arou, 0a>r 



17. \^1^6 t6t€ rip- 
(aro 6 *ltiaov8 KTfpva-- 
o-etv, Koi \€y€ip, Mc- 
TavotiT€ • fjyyiK€ yhp 
Tj ffaaiktla tw ovpa- 

18. U€pmar&v dc 
irap^ T^p 6aKaa<ra» 
rris FaXtXaiaff, cidc 
bvo adcX^ovff, Si/xo)- 
f^ roj^ Xcyd/if HOP IIc- 
Tpop, Koi *Av6p€ap 
t6p db€\(f>6p avTOVf 
PdKXoPTaf dp<f>iffXti' 
arpop els t^p Oakaxr- 
trap ' Tjaav yap dXi- 



ville maritime, sur les 
con fins de Zabulon et 
de Nephthali ; 



14. afin que fut ac- 
compli ce dont il 
avait ^te parl^ par 
Esaic le prophete, 
disant : 

15. Le pays de Za* 
bulon, et le pays de 
Nephthali, vers le 
chemin de la mer, au- 
deld dii Jourdain, la 
Galilee des Gentils ; 

16. ce peuple, qui 
6tait aasis dans les 
tenebres, a vu une 
grande lumiere ; et k 
ceux qui etaient atssis 
dans la region et dans 
Tombre de la mort la 
lumiere s'est levee. 

17. Des-lors Jesus 
commen<;a k precher, 
et i dire : Convertis- 
sez-vous, car le roy- 
aume des cieux est 
proche. 

Is. Et comme J^- 
sus marchait le long 
de la mer de Galilee, 
il vit deux fr^res, sa- 
voir Simon, qui fut 
appele Pierre, et An- 
dre, son frere, qui je- 
taient leurs filets dans 
la mer, car ils Etaient 
pecheurs. 



BNOLI8H. 

which is upon the sea- 
coast in the borders of 
Zabulon and Neph- 
thalim ; 

.14. That it might be 
fulfilled which was 
spoken by Esaias the 
prophet, saying, 

15. The land of 
Zabulon, and the land 
of Nephthalim, by the 
way of the sea, be- 
yond Jordan, Gralilee 
of the Gentiles : 

16. The people 
which sat in dark- 
ness saw great light ; 
and to them which 
sat in the region and 
shadow of death, light 
is sprung up. 

17. From that tiaiD 
Jesus began to preach 
and to say, Repent . 
for the kingdom of 
heaven is at hand. 

18. And Jesus, walk- 
ing by the sea of Gal- 
ilee, saw two breth- 
ren, Simon called Pe- 
ter, arid Andrew his 
brother, castng a net 
into the sea ; for they 
were fishers. 



MATTHEW, CHAPTER IV. 



8S5 



OXRXAN. 

navaxi, tie ba (Udt am 
^tn, an beu (8rf ii}en 
Bai^ttlon tint) gic)>^ri^a'' 
(im. 

14. Iliif H% nfxiiln 
»ftr^e, 9a^ ta gefagt ifl 
^urd) ^en ^rop^eteii 
3ffaia, ter ta fpcicftt : 

15. Sa^ iait» 3a6u' 
(on, unb ta^ Un^ 
SttftittiaUnhamWtQt 
ue STOerrtf; jenfcit tee 
Sortand; unb (ie ^rtb- 
nif(^e (Sa(iiAa/ 

16. 2)a^SBo(f,ba^in 
8in|Urni§ fag, ^ar ein 
Srcftr^ it(6r drfe^en, 
tinb (ie ta fagen am 
Orte.mib 6(batrrn te^ 
StpM^/ tennt ifl ein 
iic^t aufdfgangnt 

17. 95on ter it'it an 
fing 3efu^ an )u preoi- 
j^en, unb }u fagen: 
2(;nt aSn^r, ba^ J^im-- 
mr(reid) ijl nal^e ^etbet^ 
gefommcn. 

18. Tll^ nun ^ern^ 
an ttm gadt&ifc^en 
STOrete ding, faf^ er 
imtn SciUer, @imon, 
bet H ^eigr ^rttn^/ 
unb 2(nbtea^, feinen 
Srubet ; (te toaxfcn 
t(;re Sle^e in^ SQiecr, 
feenn jlr watcn S<f(<)^^* 



um ciudad maritima 
en los confines Od 
Zabulon, y Nephta- 
lim. 

14. Paraque se 
cumpliese lo que fue 
dicho por el profeta 
Isaias que dij6. 

15. La tierra de Za- 
bulon, y la tierra de 
Nephtaiim, camino 
del mar al otro lado 
del Jordan, Galilea 
de los Gentiles. 

16. Pueblo sentado 
en tinieblas vi6 gran 
luz y 4 los que mo- 
raban en la region y 
sombrade la muerte, 
luz les anianeci6. 



17. Desde aquel 
punto comenz6 Jesus 
d predicar y 4 decir : 
Arrepentios porque 
el reyno de los cielos 
estd cerca. 

18. Y Jesus yendo 
por la costa del mar 
de Galilea vio 4 dos 
bermanos Simon, lla- 
mado Pedro, y An- 
dres su hermano que 
echaban la red en el 
mar, pues eran Pes- 
cadores. 



gra\Jt in Caper- 
naum mariti- 
mam : in finibus 
Zabulon et Neph- 
thalim. 

14. Utadimple- 
retur pronuncia- 
tum per Isaiam 
Propbetam, di- 
centem : 

15. Terra Zabu- 
lon, et terra Neph- 
thali, viam maris 
ultra Jordanem, 
Galilsea gentium : 

16. Populus se- 
dens in tenebris, 
videns lucem 
magnam, et se- 
dentibus in regi- 
one et umbra mor- 
tis, lux orta est 
eis. 

17. Ex tunc coB- 
pit Jesus prsedica- 
re, et dicere : Pob- 
nitemini : appro- 
pinquavit enim 
regnum cselorum. 

18. Circumam- 
bulans autem Je- 
sus juxta mare 
GalilsBSB, vidit du- 
os fratres, Simo- 
nem dictum Pe- 
trum,etAndream 
franem ejus, mit- 
ten es veniculum 
in mare ; (erant 
enita piscaores.) 



836 



MATTHEW, CHAPTEK TV. 



OBBBK. I FHEMCH. 

19. Km X/yct av- ' 19- Et il leur dit . 
ToUi AeCre oTrto-oD Venez apres moi, et 



20. 02 de tlBUi 
\<f)ivT(i ra BiKTua^ 
',K6\ov0rj(ratf aurcS. 

2 1 . Kat TTpo^as 

f<ov rii/ roO Zi^fdai- 
oVf Ka\ *l»dtfVTjv rbv 
abek^bv avrovy iv 
T^ TrXoico fjL€Ta Zf^e- 
Oiuov Tov irarpoi av- 
r«i/, KarapTi^ovras 
Ta diKTva avrSnv • k<u 

22. Ol bk €VO€(OS 

d(f>(irr€s rb trXoiov 
Kai rbif naripa ou- 
tS>v, r^KoKovOtitrcw 

23. Kat 7r€pii}y€v 
oKrjy Trjv raXiXaiav 
6 ^Irjaovst dibd(TK(ov 
iv rais (rvvayayycus 
air&v, kjI Kr)pv<Ta'(av 
r^ (vayykXiov ttis 

• fiaa-iKeias^ icai $ep.i' j 
TTfvcav naaav voa-ov 
Kol naa-iip fuzXa/ctW 
iv ra> Xn^. 

2L Kal d7r^\d€v\ 
fj aKofj avTov tts oXrfv 
r^v Svptav, koi irpoo i 
TjveyKav aCr^ nap ' 
ras Toifs KaK&s «xov- 
tttf) TToiKikais voaois , 



je vous ferai pecheura 
d'hommes. 

20. Et ayant aussi- 
tot quitte leurs filets, 
ils le suivirent. 

21. Et do la etant 
all^ plus avant, il vit 
deux autres freres, 
Jacques, fils de Ze- 
b^dee, et Jean, son 
frere, dans une na- 
celle, avec Zebed^e, 
leur pere, qui rac- 
commodaient leurs fi- 
lets, et il les appela. 

22. Et ayant aussi- 
tot quitte leur nacelle 
et leur pere, ils le 
suivirent. 

23. Et Jesus allait 
par toute la Galilee, 
enseignant dans leurs 
synagogues, prechant 
I'evangile du roy- ] 
aumc, et guerissant 
toutes sortes de mala- 
dies, et toutes sortes' 
de langueurs parmi le 
peuple. ' I 

24. Et sa renom-l 
mee se re pandit par 
toute la 9yrie ; et on 
lui presentait tous 
ceux qui se portaicnt 
mal, tourment^s de 



BNOLISII. 

19. Andhesaithua 
to them. Follow me^ 
and I will make you 
fishers of men. 

20. And they 
straightway left their 
nets, and followed 
him. 

21. And going on 
from thence, he saw 
other two brethren, 
James the son of Zeb- 
edee, and John his 
brother, in a ship with 
Zebedee their father, 
mending their nets: 
and he called them. 



22. And they im- 
mediately left' the 
ship, and their father, 
and followed him. 

23. And Jesus went 
about all Galilee, 
teaching in their syn- 
agogues, and preach- 
ing the gospel of the 
kingdom, and healing 
all manner of sick- 
ness, and all manner 
of disease among the 
people. 

24. And his fame 
went throughout all 
Syria : and they 
brought unto him all 
sick people that were 
taken with divers dis- 



MATTHEW, CHAPTER IV. 



837 



19. UiiD et fptacft ju 
i()unt : golgft mir 
nacb ; tc6 ti>i(( ntc6 ju 
SD?f nfcbeu-gifcbcvu ma? 

20. SafDDeviifgfiijle 
if;re Ste^e, uno folgtcu 
t^m nacb. 

21. Unb ta er i^ou 
^atnifu lof itrr giug/ fa^ 
er jwecn anoete ^^ift-- 

6o^n 3(bf^&i/ tint 
So^annem/feiiuuSSriV 
Ux, m (Sc^ijf/ mit 
intent SBafcr ^^te^Ao, 
>ag jle i^te SdeCe flicf? 
ten ; tinb ct tief jle. 

22. Saft i)ftfif gf n fie 
ba^ 6c6iff un^ if;rfn 
^ater, tm^ fblgten i^m 
nacb. 

23. lltt^ 3cfu^ gtitg 
ttml^fr im danjen galis 
(iif(t)cn iixntt, (e^rrte 
in ben 6d)ufen/ iniD 
prebidte ba^ St^angcIU 
nm )>on tern 9lei(6, 
unb i;ei(ete alUxUr) 
eeurbe iinO if rant^eit 
im 95oIf. 

24. ItnO fein (Serfic^t 
erfc^oU in H^ ganje 
6t;tteuran^ lUxt> fie 
(rarbtrn)ui^ma((cr(eQ 
ftrante, mit manc^erfep 
6en(bcu unb final be- 



SPANISH. 

19. Y les dij6 : Se- 
guidme, y yo hare 
que seais pescadores 
de hombres. 

- 20. Y ellos dejadas 
al instante las rcdcs, 
le siguieron. 

21. Y pasando de 
alii adelante vio d 
otros dos hermanos 
Jacobo hijo de Zebe- 
deo, y su hermano 
Juan que estaban en 
un barco con su pa- 
dre Zebedeo remen- 
dando las redes, y 
les llamo. 

22. Y ellos imme- 
diatamente dejaron 
el barco, y su padre, 
y le siguieron. 

23. Y recorrio Je- 
sus toda la Galilea 
ensenando en las Si- 
nagogas de ellos, y 
predicando el Evan- 
gelio del reyno, y 
curando toda enfer- 
medad, y toda dolen- 
cia en el pueblo. 

24. Y corri6 su fa- 
ma por toda la Syria 
y le traian todos los 
enfermos atacados de 
diversos males y tor- 
mentos, y los posei- 

29 



19. Et ait illis : 
Veni'te post me, 
et faciam vos pis- 
catoreshominum. 

20. Illi nutem 
continuo dimit- 
tentes retia,secu- 
ti sunt eum. 

21. Et proce- 
dens inde, vidit 
alios duos fratres, 
Jacobum Zebe- 
daBi, et Joannem 
fratrem ejus in 
navi cum Zebe- 
dsBO patre eorum, 
resarciente*' retia 
sua : et vocavit 
eos. 

22. Illi autem 
statim dimittentes 
naviculam et pa- 
trem suum, secu- 
ti sunt eum. 

23. Etcircuibat 
totum Galilseam 
Jesus, docens in 
synagogis eorum, 
et praedicans eu- 
angelium regni, 
et sanans omnem 
morbum, et om- 
nem iniirmitatem 
in populo. 

24. Et abiit au- 
ditio ejus in totam 
Syriam, et obtu- 
lerunt ei onjnes 
male habenles, 
variis norbis, et 



MATTHEW, CHAPTERS IV., V. 



fuvovSi Koi daifiopi- 
(o^tvovst Kot (rtXrfifi- 
a(ofjJuovSt KOi irapa- 

\x/TlKOVS • Kal f$f pd' 

ir€va-€v avTovs. 

25. Kai ffKoXovdrj' 
a-av avT^ ox^oi woX- 
\o\ diro T^s FaXtXai- 
as Ka\ AeKandktas 
Ka\ *Upocro\vfJL<ay Kal 
*lovBaias^ Kal vipay 
Tov *lopdavov. 



1. *Id<S)ir d^ Toif 

tpos * Kal Kadiaav 
ros avTov, irpo<rrjX' 
6ov avT^ ol fiaOrfToi 
avTov, 

2. Kai dvoi^as t6 
ardpxi avToVf cdida* 
aKfv avTovs^ Xeyci>p, 

3. MoKapioioljiTti^- 
Xo\ TO) irv(vp.ari, or* 
avTOiv €(mv fj ^ain- 
\(ia rmv ovpavw, 

4. VLaKapLOiolirtV' 
Sovirrts, OTi avTo) 
napaickrjBqaoyTm. 

5. MaKapioiolvpa' 
iff, on avTol Kkrjpo- 

^fjjia-ovo-i T^v yijp, 

6. MaKapioi ol ir€i' 
yavTts Kal BijrcavTfi 
r^i diKatoaxfvrjv^ on 
avTol )(opTaa-$^<roV' 



diverses maladies, les 
demoniaques, Ics lu- 
natifjues, les paraly- 
ti(^jes, et il les gu6- 
rissait. 



25. Et de grandes 
troupes de peuple le 
suivirent de Galilee, 
et de D^capolis, et de 
Jerusalem, et de Ju- 
dee, et de deli le 
Jourdain. 



1. Or J^sus voyant 
tout ce peuple, mon- 
ta sur une montagne ; 
puis s^etant assis, ses 
disciples s'approche- 
rent de lui ; 

2. et ayant com- 
mence k parler, il les 
cnseignait de la sorte : 

3. Bienheureux sont 
les pauvres en esprit ; 
car le royaume des 
cieux est a eux. 

4. Bienheureux sont 
ceux qui pleurent ; 
car ils seront conso- 
les. 

5. Bienheureux sont 
les debonnaires ; car 
ils heriteront la terre. 



6. Bienheureux sont 
ceux qui sont affa- 
mes et alt^res de la 



eases and torments 
and those which were 
possessed with devils, 
and those which were 
lunatic, and those that 
had the palsy ; and he 
healed them. 
25. And there fol- 
lowed him great mul- 
titudes of people from 
Galileo, and from De- 
capolis, and from Je 
rusalem, and froni 
Judea, and from be- 
yond Jordan. 

1. And seeing the 
multitudes, he went 
up into a mountain: 
and when he was set, 
his disciples came un- 
to him. 

2. And he opened 
his mouth, and taught 
them, say in g,- 

3. Ble^ed are the 
poor in spirit : foi 
theirs is the kmgdom 
of heaven. 

4. Blessed are they 
that mourn : for they 
shall be comforted. 

5. Blessed are the 
meek : for they shal^ 
inherit the earth. 

6. Blessed are they 
which do hunger and 
thirst after righteous- 



justice ; car ils seront ness • 'nt they shall 



MATTHEW, CHAPTERS TV , V. 



^ttfitet, tie Scffijcucn, 
t>ie 9T?ourfiict)ti.^cu uuo 
tif (S?ict3tbrad)igfH ; 
un^ er macbtr (Ir alle 
gcfunO. 



25. Itnt) e^ fbf^tc it)m 
narb t)trl SBolf^ awe 

©idDteu \>ci\ 3fnifvis 
Icm, au^ ticm juMfcbrn 
Unhf, nn^ \>on jenfeit 



1. 2)a rr a6er ^a^ 
^o(t fat;, ging rr atif 
etufii I25cr.a; Ull^ fr^te 
Pcb/ uut fciue 3iingcr 
ttiitcit }U il}m. 

2. UiiO ci* ci;at frincit 
aWuuo aiif, Utjxnt fte, 
uu^ fpracb : 

3. @clig flit^; t)tc ta 
gci|llifb arm flat; temi 
t>ag ^imnulreicl) tfl it;r. 

4. 6c(tg jln&, Me ta 
(cii) tragcn ; Orirn flc 
foUfii gctr6|Ut wcrteu. 

5. ©cfig flub Me 
©anftmfttbigeu ; teiiu 
fie TOcrDcu Da^ CrDreicb 

bcfle">. 

6. @c(ig fln^, &ie Da 
l)uttgert uut M*ir|lec 
nacb ter ©crccbtigfeit ; 
ttmx jte folleu fatt wcr* 



dos del demonio y 
los lunalicos y los 
paraliticos ; y los cu- 
raba. 



25. Y le seguian 
grander multitudes 
de pueblo de Gal ilea, 
y de Decapolis y de 
Jerusalem y de Ju- 
dea, y de la otra ban- 
da del Jordan. 



1. Y viendo Jesus 
las gcntes subio a un 
monte y habiendose 
sentado llegaron a el 
sus discipulos. 

2. Y abriendo su 
boca les ensenaba di- 
ciendo. 

3. Bienaventurados 
los pobres de espiri- 
tu, porque de ellos es 
el reyno de los cielos. 

4. Bienaventurados 
los afligidos, porque 
ellos seran consola- 
dos. 

5. Bienaventurados 
los mansos, porque 
ellos recibiran en he- 
rencia la tierra. 

6. Bienaventurados 
los que tienen ham- 
bre y sed de juslicia, 
porque ellos serin 



torminibus com- 
prehensos, et dae- 
mon iEx;os,etluna- 
ticos, et paralyti- 
cos : et curavit 
eos. 

25. Et secutse 
sunt eum turbos 
multse de Galilsea, 
et Decapoli, et 
Hierosolymis, et 
Judaea, et trans 
Jordanem. 



1. Videns autem 
turbas, ascendit 
in montem : et se- 
dente eo, advene- 
runt ei discipuli 
ejus. 

2. Et aperiens 
OS suum, docebat 
eos, dicens : 

3. Beati paupe- 
res spiritu, quo- 
niam ipsorum est 
regnum cslorum. 

4. Beati lugcn- 
tes, quia ipsi con- 
solabuntur. 

5. Beati mites 
quciniam ipsi hae- 
reditabuntterrrii. 

6. Beati esuri 
entcs et sitientes 
justitiam, quoni- 
am ipsi saUira* 



340 



MATTHEW, CHAPTER V. 



QBBSK. 

roi. 

7. M<ucdpiot ol cXc- 
^fiOvtSf oTi avToi Ac- 
ijOfjO'ovTai, 

8. Mojca/uoc ol jca- 

avroi r5v 6(6v S^y- 
rat. 

9. Maicci^eoi ol cN 
pi/voiroiol, OTt avroi 
viol OeoD icXi^^^cov- 



10. Majca/Moiocdc- 

duoyiUlfOl €V€K€V di- 

muoorvyiyr, ori ahr&v 
ioTUf ^ fiaciKeia r»v 
ovpa»&v» 

11. yioKapioi iaT€ 
Stop 6v€idi<r(amv 
Vfjtas «cat duofoMri, 
ical ciTra)^! Trai' iro- 



12. Xaip€T€ Koi 
dyaXXioo-^e, ort 6 
ai<r06s vfiS>v rro\v£ 
€v Tolff ovptivois • ou- 
ro) yap edic^^av rovs 
rrpotfirrag rovs irp6 

13. 'Yfteiff eWc rh 
SKas rrjs yrjs. 'Eav 
W t6 aXat ptapavOj, 



rassasies. 

7. Bienheureux sont 
les mis^ricordieux ; 
car misericorde leur 
sera faite. 

8. Bienheureux sont 
ceux qui sont sets de 
ccBur ; car ils verront 
Dieu. 

9. Bienheureux sont 
ceux qui procurent la 
paix; car ils seront 
appel^s cnfans de 
Dieu. 

10. Bienheureux sont 
ceux qui sont perse- 
cutes pour la justice ; 
car le royaume des 
cieux est a eux. 

11. Vousserez bien- 
heureux quand on 
vous aura injuries et 
persecutes, et quand, 
k cause de moi, on 
aura dit faussemcnt 
contre vous toute 
sorte de mal. 

12. Rejouissez-vous, 
et tressaillez de joie, 
parce que votre re- 
compense est grande 
dans les cieux; car 
on a ainsi persecute 
les prophetes qui ont 
ete avant vous. 

13. Vous etes le sel 
de la terre ; mais si 
le sel perd sa saveur, 
avec quoi le salera-t- 



ENQLISH. 

be filled. 

7. Blessed are the 
merciful : for they 
shall obtain mercy. 

8. Blessed are the 
pure in heart : for 
they shall see God. 

9. Blessed are the 
peace-makers : for 
they shall be called 
the children of God. 

10. Blessed are they 
which are persecut- 
ed for righteousness^ 
sake: for theirs is the 
kingdom of heaven. 

11. Blessed are ye 
when men shall re- 
vile you, and perse- 
cute you, and shall 
say all manner of evil 
against you falsely, 
for my sake. 



12. Rejoice, and be 
exceeding glad : for 
great is your reward 
in heaven : for so 
persecuted they the 
prophets which were 
before you. 

13. Ye are the salt 
of the earth : but if 
the^'salt have lost his 
savor, wherewith shall 



MATTHEW, CHAPTER V. 



841 



7. @c(ig ftttb tic 
-Sarml7er}iA(u ; Um\ 

ieit crlaugru. 

8. ©dig jln^, Mc rcU 

te n>etOfu ®ort fcbau? 
n. 

9. ©flig jlii^ 4if 
griftfrrtigrn ; tirnn fie 
a)er^en ®om^ JCiiiOcr 
^(igen. 

10. Sengfln^ttfum 
(Sererbrigtett widen 
tetfolget irerDeu ; ^eini 



11. 6e(ig ff^b itjt, 
»eiin eucb i^ie ^eitf(6cit 
urn meiuetwidcu fcbmd? 
I^rii tinb vesfolgeu, uiib 
rreen aUcrlet) Uebel^ 
ttiber cticb, fo |le ba- 
ran Ifigru. 



12. etv^h ftbtfli(h 
itnb getrofl, c^ n)trb 
rucf) im ^iminel vootjl 
be(o^uerwetbeu. Senn 
olfo tfixbux fte t>erfo(get 
bte 0rDpf)(ren; bie ))ot 
end) gni^cfeu jlub. 

13. 3()r fe^d Da^ 
@a(} ter (Erbe. ^o 
nnn M^ 6a(} bnmin 
wirD, n'omit n>iJI man 



SPiiNIBn. 

saciados. 

7. Bienaventurados 
los misericordiosos, 
porque ellos alcanza- 
run misericordia. 

8. Bienaventurados 
los limpios de cora- 
zon, porque ellos ve- 
ran i Dios. 

9. Bienaventurados 
los pacificos, porque 
ellos serin llamados 
hijos de Dios. 

10. Bienaventura- 
dos los que padecen 
persecucion por cau- 
sa de la justicia, por- 
que de ellos es el 
reyno de los cielos. 

11. Bienaventura- 
dos sois cuando os 
maldijeren, y os per- 
siguieren, y dijeren 
todo mal de vosotros 
con falsedad por mi 
causa. 



12. Gozaos y ale- 
graos porque es gran- 
de vuestro galardon 
en los cielos, porque 
asi persiguieron a los 
profetas que fueron 
antes de vosotros. 

13. Vosotros sois 
la sal de la tierra, 
y si la sal perdiere 
su sabor ^ con 'jue sr 

29 • 



buntur. 

7. Beati miseri- 
cordes, quoniaixi 
ipsi misericordia 
afficientur. 

8. Beati mundi 
corde, quoniam 
ipsi Deum vide- 
bunt. 

9. Beati pacifi- 
ci, quoniam ipsi 
filii Dei vocabun- 
tur. 

10. Beati per- 
secutione affecti 
propter justitiajp, 
quoniam ipsorum 
est regnum caelo- 
rum. 

11. Beati estis 
quum maledixe- 
rint vos, et perse- 
quuti fuerint^ et 
dixerint omne ma- 
lum verbum ad- 
versum vos, men- 
tientes, propter 
me. 

12. Gaudete et 
exultate, quoniam 
merces vestra 
multa in cselis, sic 
enim persequuti 
sunt Prophetas 
qui ante vos. 

13. Vos estis sal 
'lerne ; si autem 
sal infatuatum sit, 
in quo salietur r 



842 



MATTHEW, CHAPTER V. 



Koi KaTa7raT€iadai 
viro Tcip difdpamnv. 

14. 'Y/i«If fOTf TO 

^cof roO Koa-fJLOv* Ov 
dvvarai ir6\i£ Kpvffij' 
vol €irav<A opovs jcci- 

J,€UT) • 

15. Oude Kalovfri 
\vxvov, KOi TiOea<nv 

IVTOV VTTO TOV fl6dl' 

Off dAX' tvrl T^p 
Xv;(i/iai', jcal Xofiirci 

16. Ovrci) Xofiyjtd- 
T(0 TO (pas vpLoiu Ifl- 
irpoaO€p t£p dvBp^- 

VaVf Oirȣ tdoMTlP 

Ifioiv ra Koka iipyaf 
Kal do£a(ra>0-i top 
uaTtpa vfimp top cV 
ToU ovpapoU. 

17. M7 pofila-rfTC 
oTi ^\Bop KaToKvaai 

TOP POfJLOP, rj TOVS 

irpo<f>fiTaf ovK ^\' 
Bop KaT<ikv<rai, dXXa 
nX-qp^dirai, 



18. 'A/i^y ydp Xc- 
ya VfjLiPt €(Ai hp ira- 
oiXBri 6 ovpuvoi koX 
il yrjf iara Iv ^ pla 
Ktpaia ov p,^ irap<X- 
6u diro Tov p6pov, ciuff 
Ai^ vovra yiprfTCLt. 



on .? II ne vaut plus 
rien qu'i fitre jete 
dehors, et foule des 
hommes. 

14. Vous 6tes la lu- 
miere du monde. 
Une ville situee sur 
une montagne ne peut 
point etre cachee. 

15. Et on n^allume 
point la lampe pour 
la mettre sous un 
boisseau, mais sur un 
chandelier, et elle 
eclaire tous ceux qui 
sont dans la maison. 

16. Ainsi, que votre 
lumiere luise devant 
les * hommes, afin 
qu'ils voient vos 
bonnes cEuvres, et 
qu'ils glorifient votre 
Pere qui estaux cieux. 

17. Ne croyez pas 
que jc sois venu ane- 
anlir la loi ou les pro- 
phetcs ; je ne suis 
pas venu les anean- 
tir, mais les accom- 
plir. 

18. Car je vous dis, 
en verit^, que jus- 1 unto you, Till heaven 
qu'^ ce que Ic ciel et : and earth pass, one 
la terre soient passes, jot or one tittle shall 
un seul iota, ou un in no wise pass from 
seul trait de lettre, n^ the law, till all be ful- 
passera point, qae | filled. 

loutes ces choses ne 



it be salted ? it is 
thenceforth good for 
nothing, but to be cast 
out, and to be trodden 
under foot of men. 

14. Ye are the light 
of the world. A city 
that is set on an hill 
cannot be hid. 

15. Neither do men 
light a candle, and 
put it under a bushel, 
but on a candlestick : 
and it giveth light un- 
to all that are in the 
house. 

16. Let your light 
so shine before men, 
that they may seo 
your good works, and 
glorify your Father 
which is in heaven. 



17. Think not that 
I am come to destroy 
the law, or the proph- 
ets : I am not come 
to destroy, but to ful- 
fil. 



18. For verily I say 



UaTTHEW, chapteb v. 



348 



OBRMAK. 

fafjeu? €5i|ljttmc6t^ 
^iufort u(t(r, ^rtul tag 
man e$ ^iuau^fct)fitrc; 
unb (a|]r c^ tie kute 
jertrftfiL 

14. aijtfepb ta^iicfet 
tit 2Bclt. Ctf mag 
tie €tal)t, tic auf ct^ 
urm S5(rge lirgr, n\(kt 
Dcrtorgcu fepiu 

15. 9}?an junbet aucb 
nidst rill iicbt an, unt 
fr(t e^ uiitcr ttucit 
©cbffffl/ foutfru auf 
ciueu icu(btct, fo Icucb- 
ret ctf trueii alien, tie 
im J^aufe j\ut. 

16. Zllfo latfet euev 
ii(bt (eucbrcu Dor ten 
Uurcn, tag jle enre gn- 
reu ^erte fet)en/ unt 
enren SBarrr im J^im- 
mr( prrifeu. 



n. 3^t fofft nicbr 
mitjutix, tag id) grf cm-- 
men bin, ta^ (8efr( 
oter tie ^ropt/eren 
anfjulifeu. 3(1) bin 
ttid)r gefommen aufju-- 
IJfeu, fcntrrn }u rtffif- 
Irn. 

16. 2);nu id) fage cud) 
mabtUfb : fB'ie tag 
J^immet unt Ctte )er? 
gct|e, Wirt ni<bt jerge^ 
l)eu ter f(ein|U a5u(b' 
fla6e, nod) Sin ^irel 
l>om ®cfcf; bi^ tag c^ 



hard salada ? No vale 
ya para nada sino 
para ser echada fue- 
ra- y pisada de los 
hombres. 

14. Vosotros sois la 
uz del mundo. Una 

ciudad situada sobre 
un monte no puede 
esconderse. 

15. Ni se enciende 
una vela para poner- 
la bajo un celemin 
sino en el candelero, 
y asi alumbra a todos 
los de la casa. 

16. Brille asi vu- 
estra luz delante de 
los hombres paraqne 
vean vuestms buenas 
obras y glorifiquen d 
vuestro Padre que 
estd en los cielos. 

17. No creais que 
yo he venido i. abro- 
gar la Ley 6 los pro- 
fetas : no he venido 
k abrogarlos sino & 
hacerlos cumplidos. 



18. Porque en ver- 
dad OS digo que an- 
tes pasaran el cielo 
y la tierra, que deje 
de pasar una jota 6 
una tilde de la Ley 
sin que todas las co- 
sas scan cumplidus. 



ad nihilum valet 
ultra, si non ejici 
foras, et concul- 
cari ab homini- 
bus. 

14. Vtsestislux 
muYidi : non po- 
test civitas ab- 
scondi supra mon- 
tem posita. 

15. Neque ac- 
cendunt lucer- 
nam, et ponunt 
eam sub medio, 
sed super cande- 
labrum, et lucet 
omnibus in domo. 

16. Sic luceat 
lux vestra coram 
hominibus, ut vi- 
deant vestra pul- 
chra opera, etglo- 
rificent Patrem 
vestrum qui in 
cselis. 

17. Ne putetis 
quod veni dissol- 
vere legem, aut 
Prophetas ; non 
veni dissolvere, 
sed adimplere. 



18. Amen quip- 
pe dico vobis, do- 
nee prsBtereat cae- 
lum et terra, jota 
unum, aut unus 
apex non preeter- 
ibit a lege, donee 
omnia fiant. 



344 



MATTHEW, CHAPTER V. 



GREEK. 

19 09 ia» oZv 
\vajj fiiav r»p cWo- 
X»I' T01T<0V T»v *Xo- 
xlaraVf km BM(u 
ovr(o Toug avBpiJi' 
TTous^ €Xax«rroff IcXiy- 

Xc/^ r^v ovpavu>v - 
tg S* iiu iroirfoj/ Koi 
Bibd^jj, o(fTOS fiiyas 
KKrjBria'erai iv rj 
/Sao-iXc/f tAv ovpa- 

20. Acyo yap 
VfuVf OTi c^v fiij irr- 
pka<r€vaji ^ biKoioav' 
inj vfjMv trXtlov r»v 
VpafifiaTtmv xal ^a- 
piaraloiVt ov firj W' 
(riXdrjTf «tff r^v /Sacri- 
Xeiay reov ovpauAv* 

21. *HKovo'ar« ort 
ippiBri Tols dpxaioiSf 
Ov <f>ov€va'€is • hi d^ 

forai Tj Kpi<r€i. 



22. 'Eytt dc X<y(k» 
V/A4V, ort irde 6 6pyi- 
(6fl€»0£ T^ ddcX0^ 
auTov tlK§, tifoxos 
tlarai t§ Kpia'€i • te 
d"* h» fiTTif Tf adcX- 
<f>^ avTOv poKa Dmo- 
Xos loTcfc ry (n;v#- 

dpi^ • iff d^ ^ iOTfi 
fimpi, tfiH>xn£ tforai 
tls rya y<«) »ap rov 



soient faites. 

19. Celui done qui 
aura viole Pun de cea 
petits commande- 
mens, ct qui aura 
cnseigne ainsi les 
hommes, sera tenu le 
plus petit au royaume 
dcs cieux ; mais celui 
qui les aura fails et 
enscign^s, sera tenu 
grand au royaume 
des cieux. 

20. Car je vous dis 
que si votre justice ne 
surpasse celle dcs 
scribes et des phari- 
siens, vous n'entrerez 
point dans le roy- 
aume dcs cieux. 



21. Vous avez en- 
tendu quHl a et^ dit 
aux anciens : Tu ne 
tucras point ; et qui 
tuera sera punissable 
par le jugement. 

22. Mais moi, je 
vous dis que qui- 
conque se met en co- 
le re sans cause cen- 
tre son frere, sera pu- 
nissable par le juge- 
ment ; et celui qui 
dira k, soc fr&re, Ra- 
cha, sera punissable 
par le conseil ; et ce- 
lui qui lui dira, Fou, 



BNOLlftH. 

19. Whosoever tliere- 
fore shall break one 
of these least com- 
mandments, and shall 
teach men so, he shall 
be called the least in 
the kingdom of heav- 
en : but whosoever 
shall do and teach 
tliem, the same shal. 
be called great in the 
kingdom of heaven. 

20. For I say unto 
you, That except your 
righteousness shal* 
exceed the righteous- 
ness of the scribes 
and Pharisees, ye 
shall in no case enter 
into the kingdom at 
heaven. 

21. Ye have heard 
that it was said by 
them of old time, 
Thou shalt not kill : 
and whosoever shall 
kill, shall be in dan- 
ger of the judgment : 

22. But I say unto 
you, That whosoever 
is angry with his 
brother without a 
cause, shall be in 
danger of the judg- 
ment : and whosoev- 
er shall say to hia 
brother, Raca, shall 
be in danger of the 
council : but whoso- 



MATTHEW, CHAPTER V« 



845 



19. ^er nun Sin^ 
Don ticfeu f (rintlca (Sr^ 
boten aufldfet, unD Ir^- 
ret hit Uiiu al\o, tcr 
iDirt Der JCIeintU l}eigeu 
tut ^tmmelreic^ ; wer 
e^ abcr t^ut un( (rt^ret, 
^er Wirt grog Ijeigcu 
im ^nnmelccic^. 



20. IDeun i(6 fagc 
Ctt(6: S^ fcQ beim eiivr 
©etccfctigfcit bflTfr, 
benn tn 6itriftgC' 
k^rtcn nub ^t^aitfAcr/ 
fo wtxhtt \t)t tti(t)t in 
H^ ^imnulreicb fom- 
meiu 

21. 3^r(;a6tgflj6rft, 
^ag}u Or 11 !U 1 ten gcfagt 
ifl: 2)nfoUtlnid)tt6D' 
ten ; wcr aber tjotet, 
ter foil te^ (Smtlate 
fc^uftid fe^n. 

22.3cbabfrfa9efttd): 
^EBcr mit fcincm SSru* 
^rr jurnet, trr t|I teg 
(gcricl)tgfct)u{Di,a; wcr 
aber }u frtuem Sruber 
fagt: SRacba, tcr ifl 
Deep SHatl)^ frkuIM.q; 
»er abcr facit : Su 
Slarr, Dec \\\ tetf IjJI? 
(ifcben ^(uerg fc^uUig. 



SPANISH. 

19. De modo que 
el que quebrantase 
uno de estos minimos 
mandamientos, y en- 
setiase asi i los hom- 
bres, serd llamado 
muy pequeno en el 
reyno de los cielos. 
Mas el que los guar- 
dare y ensenare, este 
ser4 llamado grande 
en el reyno de los 
cielos. 

20. Porque yo os 
digo que si vuestra 
justicia no fuere ma- 
yor que la de los 
Escribas y Phariseos 
no entrar^is en el 
reyno de los cielos. 



21. Oisteis que fue 
dicho d los antiguos : 
no mataras, y cual- 
quiera que matare, 
quedara obligado k 
juicio. 

22. Mas yo os digo 
que cualquiera que 
se enojare con su 
hermano, quedara 
sujeto a juicio, y cu- 
alquiera que llamare 
Raca d su hermano, 
quedari sujeto al Sy- 
nedric Mas ^1 que 
le llamare insensato 
quedara sujeto al fu- 



19. Qui ergo sol- 
vent unum man- 
datorum istorum 
minimorum, et 
docuerit sic ho- 
mines, minimus 
vocabitur in reg- 
no ceelorum : qui 
autem fecerit et 
docuerit, hie mag- 
nus vocabitur in 
regno cselorum. 

20. Dico enini 
vobis, quod si non 
abundaverit jus- 
titia vestra plus 
ScribarumetPha- 
risaeorum, non in- 
trabitis in regnum 
cselorum. 

21. Audistisquia 
pronunciatum est 
antiquis: Nonoc- 
cides : qui autem 
Occident, obnox- 
ius erit judicio. 

22. Ego autem 
dico vobis, quia 
omnis irascens 
fratri suo imme 
rito, obnoxius erit 
judicio : qui au- 
tem dixerit fratri 
suo Raca obnox- 
ius erit concessui : 
qui autem dixerit 
fatue, obnoxius 



346 



MATTHEW, CHAPTER V. 



GBBSK. 



wpis. 



23. *Ehv oZv irpooT" 

iirl TO dva-iaarfipiov, 
KqiK€i funjaOrjt, on 6 
db€\(f>6s aov Z^ft t\ 
<aT^ O'OVf 

24. ''A<fxS (K€l TO 

^»p6v (Tov, €fnrpo(r- 
Biv Tox) BvanaoTTjpl- 
ov, Koi viraytf tt/mS- 
Tov diaWdyrjOi r<^ 
db€k<f>^ (rov, Kal rd- 
T€ cX^tt>v irp6a'<f>€pt 
TO ^c»pQv <rov. * 

25. "ladt €vvo&v 
r^ dvTibiKt^ arov Ta- 
X^f i(i>s 8tov €1 cV 
rg 68^ /Acr' avrov, 
fiT^TroTc (r€ napad^ 
6 airrlbiKos r^ t^p^fji^ 
Koi 6 KpiTTjs (TC na- 
pad« r^ VTrrjp€Tif, 
Koi fir ^i;Xax7v 
fiXjjBqoTi, 



26. 'Afi^v Xry© 

aOl, OV /lA^ €$€\$U£ 

d^ff r6y taxp-Tov KO' 
bpdirrrjv. 



on 



2!7. *H«ou<raT€ %nt 
€ppi$rj Tolgdpxaiou 
Ov fUHx^io'tis • 



sera punissable par 
la gCiienne du feu. 

23. Si done tu ap- 
portes ton offrande k 
rautel, et que la il te 
souvienne quo ton 
Mro a quelque chose 
contre toi ; 

24. laisse li ton of- 
frande devant Tautel, 
et va te reconcilicr 
premie re ment avec 
ton frere ; puis viens, 
et offre ton offrande. 



25. Sois bicntot 
d'accord avec ta par- 
tie adverse, tandis quo 
tu cs en cheniin avec 
elle ; de peur que ta 
partie adverse ne te 
livre au juge, et que 
le juge ne to livre au 
sergent, et que tu ne 
sois mis en prison. 



26. En verity, je te 
dis que tu ne sortiras 
point de 1^, jusqu*^ 
ce que tu aics paye 
le dernier quadrain. 

27. Vouj avcz en- 
tendu qu^il a 6te dit 
aux ancien: : Tu ne 
commettras point 



adultere. 



ever shall say, Thou 
fool, shall be in dan- 
ger of hell-fire. 

23. Therefore, it 
tliou bring thy gift to 
the altar, and there 
rememberest that thy 
brother hath aught 
against thee, 

24. LeavQ there thy 
gift before the altar, 
and go thy way ; first 
be reconciled to thy 
brother, and then 
come and offer thy 
gift. 

25. Agree with thine 
adversary quickly, 
while thou art in the 
way with him ; lest 
at any time the ad- 
versary deliver thee 
to the judge, and the 
judge deliver thee to 
the officer, and thou 
be cast into prison. 



26. Verily, I say 
unto thee. Thou shalt 
by no means come 
out thence, till thou 
hast paid the utter- 
most farthing. 

27. Ye have heard 
that it was said by 
them of old time, 
Thou shalt not com- 
mit adultery : 



MATTHEW, CHAPTER V. 



347 



23. %>axxm, mwn tu 
brine (Sabe auf ttm 
Zltat cpff rtl, unt w'xx\\ 
allDa ringctrnt, taft* 
tein fBruter Hxoa€ wU 

24. @c US aUta t>or 
bem 2(Uar beinc ®abf; 
tmb get)( }u\)or ^iit, 
ttnb l)rrf6t)tu ti(b mic 
beinem ^J3ru&rr; nn^ 
aUhann ttmm, xmt ops 
fttt tcine (Sabc. 

25. @e9 noidfil^rts 
teiuem OTifcetfacftcr 
b(i(^ tineeil tu nod) 
be9 tl;maufbem^ege 
bifl, attf bag bicft ber 
^ibetfacber nicbt brr« 
ma(rin|l ftbtranctborte 
bem Sii<buXf unb bcr 
Sticfttet ftberaiictborre 
tid brm Stener, unb 
tbetbefl in ben XttUv 
geiborfen. 

26. 3cft fage bir: 
^al^r(i((), bu xoiv\\ 
nid^t bon banncn t^r- 
tau^ fcmmrn, bi$ bn 
aucb brn (r^rcn fetter 
bfjafjlrp. 

27. 3^r l?abt gel)6ret, 
bag }n brn 2((trn gefagt 
tfl: 2)n fo(t|Uu(bt et/e- 
brec^en. 



BPAKI8H. 

ego del infierno. 



23. Por tanto si tH 
llevares tu ofrenda 
al altar y alU te a- 
cordares que tu her- 
mano tiene algo con- 
tra ti, 

24. Deja tu ofren- 
da ante el altar y ve- 
to : reconciliate pri- 
mero con tu herma- 
no, y despues ven y 
presenta tu ofrenda. 



25. Acomodatecon 
tu adversario pron- 
tamente mientras es- 
tas con ^1 todavia en 
el camino, no sea 
que el adversario te 
entregue al Juez, y 
el Juez te entregue 
al ministro, y seas 
echado en la carcel. 



26. En verdad te 
digo que no saldrds 
de alii hasta que pa- 
gues al ultimo mara- 
vedi. 

27. Oisteis que fu^ 
dicho & los antiguos : 
No cometer&s adul- 
terio. 



LATIXr. 

erit in gehennam 
ignis. 

23. Si ergo of- 
fers munus tuum 
ad altare, et ibi 
recordatus fueris, 
quia frater tuua 
habet aliquid ad- 
versum te, 

24. Relinqueibi 
munus tuum ante 
altare, et vade, 
prius reconciliare 
fratri tuo, et tunc 
veniens offer mu- 
nus tuum. 

*25. Esto bene- 
sentiens adversa- 
rio tuo cito, dum 
es in via cum eo : 
ne forte te tradat 
adversarius judi- 
ci,et judex te tra- 
dat ministro, et in 
custodiam conji- 
ciaris. 



26. Amen dico 
tibi, non exios in- 
de, donee reddas 
novissimum qua- 
drantem. 

27. Audistisquia 
pronunciatum est 
antiquis : Non 
mcechaberis 



848 



MATTnKW, CHAPTER V. 



28. 'Eyi) d€ Xey© 

VfUVf OTl TTCr 6 /3X(- 

iroav yvvaiKa irp6s t6 
€m6ufifj(rai avrriVf 
^bri €fAOtxfV(r€V av- 
rffv €v TJ Kapdttf 
avrov. 

29. £iac6J(^daX- 
fios a-ov 6 Bf$i6s 
(rKauBaKi(€i trc, cfc- 
Xf avrhv, Koi jSoXf 
anh (Tov * <rvfi^^pcA 
ydp (Toi, ti»a dfroXi;- 
roi €v rSiv fitkav 
<rov^ kolL firj okov rb 
(T&fjM <rov P\rj0g c(f 
ycnvav. 



30. Ka\ €l i d€$id 
eov x«*/> (TKovSaXt- 
ffi (Tf, tKKo^ov av- 
r^i/, icai /3dXe d7r6 
(ToO * avfi(f>ip€i yap 
(rot, ci'a d7rdXi;ra( €v 
ray fjLekav (rov, Koi 
fi^ oXov ro oAfid 
<rov pXrfBg us yktv- 



31. *^^iefi bk Sti 
.OS tp diroKvoTj. rfjv 
yvpaiKa avrov, ddrd» 
aivrg airoardo'iov * 



32. '£yel> dc X«V« 
vfiiv, in hs £v diro- 
\virjj rrjv ^<;va<«ca av- 



28. Mais moi, je 
vous dis que qui- 
conque regarde une 
fern me pour la con- 
voiter, il a deja com- 
mis dans son coeur 
un adultere avec elle. 

29. Que si ton oeil 
droit te fait broncher, 
arrache-le, et jette-le 
loin de toi ; car il 
vaut rnieux qu'un de 
tes membres perisse, 
que si tout ton corps 
etait jete dans la g6- 
henne. 



30. Et si ta mam 
droite te fait bron- 
cher, coupe-la, et 
jette-la loin de toi; 
car il vaut mieux 
qu'un de tes mem- 
bres perisse, que si 
tout ton corps ^tait 
jetd dans la gehenne. 



31. II a et6 dit en- 
core : Si quelqu'un 
repudie sa femme, 
qu^il lui donne la let- 
tre de divorce. 

32. Mais moi, je 
vous dis que qui- 
conque aura repudie 



ENGLISH. 

28. But I say unto 
you. That whosoever 
looketh on a wonian 
to lust after her, hath 
committed adultery 
with her already in 
his heart. 

29. And if thy right 
eye offend thee, plurk 
it out, and cast it from 
thee : for it is prof- 
itable for thee that 
one of thy members 
should perish, and not 
that thy whole body 
should be cast into 
hell. 



30. And if thy right 
hand ofiend thee, cut 
it off, and cast it from 
thee : for it is prof- 
itable for thee that 
one of thy members 
should perish, and not 
that thy whole body 
should be cost into 
hell. 



31. It hath been said, 
Whosoever shall put 
away his wife, let him 
give her a writing of 
divorcement : 

32. But I say unto 
you. That whosoever 
shall put away his 



MATTHEW, CHAPTER V. 



849 



GERMAN. . 

28. 3fl)a^frfa<^eeuct)^ 
TOfr fin ®cib ajijlfs 
^ft iljrcr }u bcgftjcen, 
ter tjut fcbou rait iDr 
tie €^e grbrccbm in 
feii nn ^ctjcn. 



29. 2(fr<iert ticft aber 
brin rcAtetf Tfiigf, fo 
trig c^ an^/ nnd n)irf 
e^ Don tir. ®« ifl Mr 
beflrri Dag cine^ trtuer 
CSUeter vcrterbe, unD 
ntcbt ter gAnje kib in 
tie ^ilU gemorftn wtx- 
U. 



30. Vetgett bicft teine 
recite ^O^nt); fo i;aue jle 
ab,unbn)irf{let>onttr. 
(E5 ip tir bejfft, Dag 
eine^ Hiner (SUeter 
Derterbe, tint nic^r ter 
gaujr Uib in tie ^ille 
get^orfen v^evtc. 



31.S^iflau(6gefagt: 
TOer fifb Don feinent 
aDeibefAeitet/berfoH 
i^t geben einen &d^tu 
bebrief. 

32.3^6 abet fageeuct: 
®fr t^cb Don feineni 
2Beibefdieibet, (e^fep 



28. Yo OS digo pu- 
es que todo aquel 
que pusiere los ojos 
en una muger para 
codiciarla ya come- 
ti6 con ella adulterio 
en su corazon. 

29. y-si tu ojo de- 
recho te fuere oca- 
sion de caer, sacalo 
y arrojalo fuera de 
ti, porque mas te va- 
le que perezca uno 
de tus mi^mbros que 
no, que todo tu cuer- 
po sea arrojado al in- 
fiemo. 



30. Y si tu mano 
derecha te fuere oca- 
sion de caer cortala, 
y lanzala de ti pues 
mejor te es el que 
perezca uno de tus 
miembros que no el 
que todo tu cuerpo 
sea arrojado al infi- 
emo. 



31. Hase dicho : 
Cualquiera que repu- 
didre a su muger de- 
la carta de divorcio. 



32. Mas yo os digo 
que cualquiera que 
repudi&re & su mu 
30 



LATiy. 

28. Ego autem 
dico vol IS, quia 
omnis conspici- 
ens mulierem ad 
concupiscendum 
earn, jam moecha- 
tus est earn in cor- 
de suo. 

29. Si autem 
ocul us tuus dexter 
scandal izat te, 
erue eum, et pro- 
jice abs te ; con- 
fert enim tibi 
ut pereat unum 
raembrorum tuo- 
rum, et non totum 
corpus tuum con- 
jiciatur in gehen- 
nam. 

30. Et si dex- 
tera tua manus 
scandal izat te, ab- 
scinde earn, et 
projice abs te : 
confert enim tibi 
ut pereat unum 
membrorum tuo- 
rum, et non totum 
corpus tuum con- 
jiciatur in gehen- 
nam. 

31. Pronuncia- 
tum est autem, 
quod quicumque 
absolvent uxorem 
suam^ det ei re- 
pudium. 

32. Ego autem 
dico vobis, quia 
quicimque absol- 



350 



MATTHEW, CHAPTER V. 



OR£BK. 

roVf iFa(i€KTOi \&yov 
nopptias, iroie? av- 
Tijv fMixa<r6ai • Ka\ 
hs ihv dnoXeXvfJitinfy 



33. IlaXcv ^xovo-a- 
Tf on ippiBri Toh 
dpxaiois * OvK cVt- 
opKj)<r(is^ afroda>o'C(ff 
dc r^ Kvpl<f Toif£ 
ipKovs <rov * 

34. 'Ey^ de Xcy<» 

ovpui^, ort 6p6yos 
eWi ToO Sfou • 

35. Vlf)Tt i» r^ yrjy 
^n vTTOTrddtov €<rri 
rov TTodtf p avrov * 
fi^re f (ff 'Icpoo-c^vfui, 
OTi tr6ki£ cotI toO 
/iryaXou fiafTiKifos * 

36. Mi7re ev rj 
§Cf<l>aXj arov 6p6<rQi^ 
in ov bvvavcn fiiav 
rplxa. \rvK^v i} fU- 
Xaivav Troirjaai. 

37. *E0T» «€ 6 XcJ- 
yop vp.Stv, Nul, val ■ 
Od, otJ' ri dc TTC- 
OMTirhv TOVT<aVy cjc 
Toy irovrjpoif iurw. 

38. 'HrovcroTc ort 
tppiOtfy *0<l)$jXp6y 



sa femme, si ce n'est. 
pour cause d'adul- 
tdre, il la fait devenir 
adultere ; et qui- 
conquc se mariera a 
la femme r^pudi^e, 
commet un adultere. 

33. Vous avez aussi 
appris qu'il a 6te dit 
aux anciens : Tu ne 
parj u re ras point; mais 
tu rendras au Seign- 
eur ce que tu auras 
promis par jurement. 

34. Mais moi, je 
vous dis : Ne jurez 
en aucune mani^re ; 
ni par le ciel, car 
c'est le trone deDieu ; 

35. ni par la terre, 
car c^cst le marche- 
pied de ses pieds ; ni 
par Jerusalem, parce 
que c'est la ville du 
grand roi. 

36. Tu ne jureras 
point non plus par ta 
tete ; car tu ne peux 
faire un chevcu blanc 
ou noir. 

37. Mais que votre 
parole soit : Oui, Oui, 
Non, Non ; car ce 
qui est de plus est 
mauvais. 

38. Vous avez ap- 
pris qu'il a ete dit: 



wife, saving for the 
cause of fornication, 
causeth her to com- 
mit adultery : and 
whosoever shall mar- 
ry her th'at is divorced, 
committeth adultery. 

33. Again, ye have 
heard that it hath been 
said by them of old 
time, Thou shalt not 
forswear thyself, but 
shalt perform unto the 
Lord thine oaths : 

34. But i say unto 
you, Swear not at all : 
neither by heaven ; 
for it is God's throne : 



35. Nor by the 
earth; for it is his 
footstool: neither by 
Jerusalem; for it is 
the city of the great 
King : 

36. Neither shalt 
thou swear by thy 
head, because thou 
canst not make one 
hair white or black. 

37. But let 3'our 
communication be. 
Yea, yea ; Nay, ray : 
for whatsoever is 
more than these ccm« 
eth of evil. 

38. Ye have heard 
that it hath been said, 



MATTHEW, CHAPTER V. 



851 



%• 



> 



teiin inn Cl)fbnicb.) 
t(v macbct, b%ig fie tU 
Sl)f btict)t; miD wcr 
eiue 2ll\acfrinetmf frrt^s 
et, tcr bcict)t Die S^e. 



33. 3(ir ^aU vocittv 
gebiret/ Dag' ju Den TiU 
5en.aefagti|l: J)afol(tl 
friiiea falfcbcii SiD 
tt)uii, miD folill ®ctc 
Deiaeu SiD t;alreu. 

34.3r6a6erf43ceuc(): 
Dag i^r alUrDinge uicf)t 
fcljwSreii follt, iceDer 
6e^ Dem Jjimincf, Deiiu 
er i|l (£>etM 6(at)I ; 

35. fftoA het) Det Cr-- 
De, Dciiw f(e i|l feiiicr 
gfige @c()enK( ; nort) 
fcet> 3evufalnn, Deuu jle 
ilUtuc^drog'enStinis^ 
6(aDt. 

36. TJi\i<b foKtl Dii 
tticbc bet) Deincm J^aiip^ 
re f(t)YDireu; Dhiii Du 
t)crma<(|l uidjt eiu riui-' 
gc^ J^aar weig oDcr 
fd)n>ari }tt nudjea. 

37. Cure SleDe abcr 
fep: 3*^1*1; nrin,acia. 
TOd^ Darubcr ifl, Da« 
ifl t)om Uebe(. 



38. 3t)t i}(iibt gf^irct, 
Da$ Da ((cfagt i\\ : 2(a^' 



ger a no ser por cau- 
sa de fornicacion, 
hace que ella sea 
ad altera, y cualqui- 
era que se case con 
la divorciada comete 
adulterio. 

33. Tambien oiste- 
is que fue dicho i. los 
antiguos. No te per- 
juraras, mas cumpU- 
ras 1o que hubieres 
jurado al Senor. 

34. Masyoosdigo: 
No jureis de ninguna 
manera ni por el cie- 
lo porqu^' es el trono 
de Dios. 

35. Ni por la tierra 
porque es la peana 
de sus pies ni por 
Jerusalem porque es 
la ciudad del gran 
Rey. 

36. Ni juraras por 
tu cabeza porque no 
puedes hacer un ca- 
bello bianco 6 negro. 



37. »Mas vuestro 
hablar sea si, si ; no, 
no ; porque lo que 
excede de esto, de 
mal procede. 

38. Hab^isoidoque 
fu6 dicho ojo por ojo, 



verit uxorem su- 
am, excepta rali- 
one fomicationis, 
facit earn moB- 
chari : et qui al> 
solutam duxerit, 
adulterat. 

33. Iterum au- 
distis quia pro- 
nunciatum est an- 
tiquis : Non per- 
jurabis : reddes 
autem Domino 
juramenta tua. 

34. Ego autem 
dico vobis, noD 
jurare omnino, 
neque in cselo, 
quia thronus est 
Dei: 

35. Neque in 
terra, quia scabel- 
lum est pedum 
ejus : neque in Hi- 
erosolyma, quia 
civitas est magni 
regis : 

36. Neque in 
capite tuo jurave- 
ris, quia non po- 
tes unum capil- 
lum album aut ni- 
grum facere. 

37. Sit autem 
sermo vester, Eti- 
am, etiam, Non, 
non : quod autem 
abundans his, a 
malo est. 

38. Audistisquia 
pronunciatum oat: 



852 



MATTHEW, CHAPTER V. 



GREEK. 

AvtI 6<ti6aKfioVy Ka\ 
itJtn'a dtrrl odoiri tc • 

39. 'Eyo dc Xr/cD 

Ti^ vovTjf}^ • aXX' 
oarie (re pawla-ti «irt 
r^i' dcf tav crov o-ta- 
ydva, orpc^oy avr« 



40. Ka\ rf de'Xoy- 
ri (rot KpiBijvaiy Koi 
t6v ;(trcava (tou Xa- 



(£il pour oeil, et dent 
pour dent. 

39. Mais moi, je 
vous dis : Ne resistez 
point au mal ; mais 
si quelqu'un le frappe 
k ta joue droite, pr^- 
sente-lui aussi Tautre. 



40. Et si quelqu'un 
veut plaidcr contre 
toi, et t'oter ta robe, 

/Sciv, &<t>fs avT^ Koi I laisse-lui encore le 

r^ IfiaTiov. mantcau, 



41. Kal tariff (rr 
dyyapeva-ei fukiov €v, 
vnayi fitr* avrov 
dvo. 

42. T^ aiTovvri cr< 
dtdov • Koi r6v df\ov- 
ra djrb a-ov davci- 
o'aa-Bai /i^ aTroarpa' 

43. *Hicoucrarr on 
ipp€$rff *Aya7rfi(rtis 
rhv rrkrialov (rov^ Ka\ 
fiuTTfcrfLs t6v i^Opov 
a-ov • 



41. Et si quelqu'un 
te veut contraindre 
d'aller avec lui une 
lieue, vas-en deux. 

42. Donne a celui 
qui te demande, et ne 
te detourne point de 
'celui qui veut em- 
pruntcr de toi. 

43. Vous avez ap- 
pris qu'il a ete dit: 
Tu aimeras ton pro- 
chain, et tu hairas 
ton enncmi. 



44. 'Eyc^ dc Xeya> 

vfiiv, dyavare rovs ^ 
€xOpoifs vfi&y, rvXo- ' 
y€iT€ Tovf Karapta- 
luvovs Vfids, fcoXtffi 
woifLT€ Touff fiicrovv 
Ta£ vpds, Ka\ irpOfT* 
nt^ftrBt vTTfp T&v 
hnjptaCSprmf vp^s 



44. Mais moi, je 
vous dis : Aimez vos 
ennemis, et benissez 
ceux qui vous mau- 
dissent ; faites du bien 
a ceux qui vous ha- 
issent, et priez pour 
ceux qui vous cou- 
rent sus et vous per- 



An'eye for an eye, 
and a tooth for a 
tooth. 

39. But I say unto 
you, That ye resist 
not evil : but whoso- 
ever shall smite thee 
on thy right cheek, 
turn to him the other 
also. 

40. And if any man 
will sue thee at the 
law, and take away 
thy coat, let him have 
thy cloak also. 

41. And whosoevei 
shall compel thee to 
go a mile, go with 
him twain. 

42. Give to him that 
asketh thee, and from 
him that would bor- 
row of thee, turn not 
thou away. 

43. Ye have heard 
that it hath been said. 
Thou shalt love thy 
neighbor, and hate 
thine enemy : 

44. But 1 say unto 
you, Love your ene- 
mies, bless them that 
curse you, do good 
to them that hate you, 
anr' pray for them 
which despitefully use 
you and persecute 
you; 



MATTHEW, CHAPTER V. 



853 



{le urn Hii^t, 3«i^n um 

39. 3^aberfagefiict: 
tag tt)r nicbc wiDfvtUe' 
btn fcUt trm ItcbrI; 
fontcru fo tir jcmaiiD 
cincn @(rrid) gicbt auf 
^rtnrn rrctcru rBacfrii, 
trm birte ten autrrii 
4uc6 tar. 

40. Uitt fc fcmaut mit 
hit recbtrn mill; tint 
teinen SHocf tic^mnt; 
tern lag auc^ teu QHaH- 
ret 

41. Unt fo ti(() je> 
mant uit^ic^et eiiie 
fDt?t(e, fo gc^e mit t^m 

42. (Sieb tern, trr 
tid) 6ittec ; tint mcnte 
ttcb iiictc ))oii tnti/ ter 
tir abborgritoilL 

43. 3^c ftabt gc^orr, 
^<igd^f^}%tMl: Z)ufcUti 
teiiuii gii(t)|lru liebcu, 
Uttt triuctt gcmt ^af^ 
feu. 

44.3<^<^b(rfagecuri): 
iiebet cure grintr ; frg^ 
nrr, tie eud) flucbeu; 
t^iiC »ot)l tciteii, tir 
cud) ^aifrn ; bittrt fftc 
^te, fo rud) bcieitigen 
ttut t^crfolgeu ; 



SPANISH. 

y diente por dlente. 



39. Mas yo os digo : 
No op6ng4is resis- 
tcncia a la injuria, 
antes si alguno te hi- 
riese en la mexilla 
derecha, presentale 
la otra. 

40. Y si alguien 
quisiere ponerle piey- 
to y quitarte la tuni- 
ca, alargale tambien 
tu capa. 

41. Y si alguno te 
compeliere & una le- 
gua v6 con el dos. 

42. Al que te pidi- 
ere, dale ; y al que 
te quisiese pedir pres- 
tado, no le vuelvas 
las espaldas. 

43. Habeis oido que 
fu^dicho: Amarasd 
tu proximo, y abor- 
recerafl k tu enemi- 

go- 

44. Mas yo os digo : 
Amad 4 vuestrosene- 
migos bendecid 4 los 
que 08 maldicen : 'a- 
ced bien & los que os 
odiau, y orad por los 
que 08 calumnian y 
p^rsiguen. 



Oculum pro ocu- 
lo, et dentem pro 
dente. • 

39. Ego autem 
dico vobis, non 
obsistere malo : 
sed quicumque te 
percusserit in 
dexteram tuara 
maxillam, verte 
illi et aliam. 

40. Et volenti 
tibi judicium pa- 
rari, et tunicam 
tuam toUere, di- 
mitte ei et palli- 
um. 

41. Et quicun- 
que te angariave- 
rit milliare unum, 
vadecumilloduo. 

42. Petenti te, 
da : et volentem 
a te mutuare, ne 
avertaris. 

43. Audistisquia 
pronunciatum est, 
Diliges proximum 
tuum, et odio ha- 
bebis inimicum 
tuum. 

44. Ego autem 
dico vobis, Diligi 
te inimicos ves- 
tros, benedicite 
maledicentes vos: 
benefacite odien- 
tibus vos, et orate 
pro infestantibus 
vos et insectanti* 



30^ 



854 



MATTHBTV, CHAPTERS V., VI, 



45. "OTToif y^vTjfr&rj 
viol Tov vaTp6s vyu&v 
rov iv ovpavoiSf on 
rhv tjXiov avTov dva^ 
*cXXci tTTi irovrjpovs 
Koi ayoBovs^ kqX fip€- 
Xti tnl iiKalovs Koi 
db'jcovs. 



46. 'Ehv yhp nya- 
jT^OTjTr Tovs ayan&v 
ras VfMs^ Tiva futrOhv 

rtkmvai rb ovri iroi- 



47. Kal iikp daird- 
OTjfrOe roits ddcX- 
^vr vfiav fidtfov^ ri 
wtpiaKrhv iroulrt ; 

Axt- Kxxi ol rtX&voLi 

ivTtii iroiovcrip ; 

48. ''E(r€iT6« oZp 
vfietr rcXetoi, Sitrntp 
6 iraTtjp vfuav 6 iv 
rois ovpamns rAcu^r 

COTi. 

1. Tlpoa-ex^^ ^^ 
iXcfjtUMTvvrjv VfiStif fir 
noitiv €finpo<rB€P rmw 
dv$ponro»Vy irp6s r j 
BtaBr^vai avroU * <. 
de fUTyC) p*a6bv ovk 
?XeTf vap\ Ty irarpX 
hpmv r^ iV ro(p ov- 



FRENCH. 

secutent ; 

45. afin quo vous 
soyez les enfans de 
yotre Pere qui est aux 
cieux ; car il fait le- 
ver son soleil sur les 
m^chans ct sur les 
gens de bien, et il en- 
voie sa pluie sur les 
justes et sur les in- 
justes. 

46. Car si vous ai- 
mez seulement ceux 
qui vous aiment, 
quelle recompense en 
aurez-vous ? Les pe- 
agers me me n'en 
font-ils pas tout au- 
tant? 

47. Et si vous faites 
accueil seulement k 
vos fr^res, que faites- 
vous plus que les 
autres > Les peagers 
meme ne le font-ils 
pas aussi } 

48. Soyez done par- 
faits, com me votre 
Pere qui est aux cieux 
est parfait. 

1. Prenez garde de 
ne pas faire votre 
aumone devant les 
hommcs pour en etre 
regardes; autrement 
vous n'en recevrez 
point la recompense 
de votre Pere qui est 
a x cieux. 



45. That ye maybe 
the children of your 
Father which is in 
heaven : for he mak- 
eth his sun to rise on 
the evil and on the 
good, and sendcth 
rain on the just and 
on the unjust. 

46. For if ye love 
them which love you, 
what reward have ye } 
do not even the pub- 
licans the same ? 



47. And if ye salute 
your brethren only, 
what do ye more than 
others ? do not even 
the publicans so ? 



48. Be ye therefore 
perfect, even as your 
Father which is in 
heaven is perfect. 



L Take heed that 
ye do not your alms 
before men, to be seen 
of them : otherwise 
ye have no reward of 
your Father which is 
m heaven. 



MATTHEW, CHAPTERS V., VI. 



855 



45. 2fuf H^ itjt «\\v 

im ^tintnrl. 3)cmt rr 
(J§t fcire ©ouue aufs 
gct^ru ubcr tie ^ifru 
tutD liber bie ®utcii; 
unD (Ag't rr^vtcn fiber 
CScrecbte nn^ Uiige^ 
recbtf. 

46. Seim fo ti;c (ie-- 
bet/Meeucbliebeit/tDa^ 
iDerbec tt)r fur iot)n ^a^ 
btn ? $^im iiirbc taf' 
felbe mAi tit ibUixn ? 



47. Unb fo i^t eu(4 
nur }u euren Sr&teru 
freuHbUct) ttfut, wa^ 
ttfut it}r fontcr(ic()e$«? 
%f;uu uicbt bie BMIn^t: 
alfo? 

46. 3)arum fo((t il)r 
VolIFommrnrepi^dfeicib' 
oteeurr'SaterimJ^im' 
me( >)oUfommcu ijl. 



1. J5abt2I(6tattfcttre 
Tilmofeii/ bag i[}r bie 
iitdjt grbet t>or beu ieu- 
ecu, bag tt;r t>on ii)nen 
f)ef(t)fu tDerbct ; tl)r 
M'(«^itber^feinenio|)n 
bc9 curem Skater ini 
^tmmef. 



45. Paraque seais 
hijos de vuestro Pa- 
dre que est4 en los 
cielos el cual hace 
salir el sol sobre ma- 
les y buenos, y llue- 
ve sobre justos, 6 in- 
justos. 



46. Porque si amd- 
is 4 los que os aman, 
i que recoYnpcnsa ha- 
beis de tener ? ^ No 
hacen lo mismo aun 
los publicanos ? 



47. Y si saluddis 
solamente i. vuestros 
hermanos ^ que mas 
hace is que los otros ? 
I No hacen tambien 
lo mismo los publi- 
canos? 

48. Sed pues voso- 
tros perfectos asi 
como vuestro Padre 
que esta en los cie- 
los es perfecto. 

1. Mirad que no 
hagiis vuestra li- 
mosna delante de los 
hombres con el fin 
de ser vistos de ellos 
de otra manera no 
tendrils galardon de 
vuestro Padre que 
.' \ en los cielos. 



LATIN. 

bus vos. 
45. Ut sitis filh 
Patris vestri qui 
in cselis*, quia so- 
lem suum produ- 
cit super malos et 
bonos, et pluit su- 
per justos et in- 
justos. 



46. Si enim di« 
lexeritis diligen- 
tes vos, quaro 
merceclem habe- 
tis? nonneet pub- 
lican! idem faci* 
unt? 

47. Et si salu- 
taveritis fratres 
vestros tantum, 
quid abundans fa- 
citis ? nonne et 
publicani sic faci- 
unt? 

48. Estote ergo 
vos perfecti, sicut 
Pater vester qui 
in cffilis, perfec- 
tus est. 

1. Attend ite mi- 
sericord iam ves- 
tram non facere 
ante homines, ad 
spect^i eis : si 
autem non, mer- 
cedem non habe- 
tis apud Patrem 
vestrum qui in 



856 



MATTHEW, CHAPTER VI. 



2. ^Otop o^r votQS 

ovLKm<r]j^ tyiirptnrBiv 
(Tov^ Sxrirtp ol viro- 
KpiToi iroiovcriv iv 
rait avvayayais Ka\ 
eV raiff pvfuus^ otnur 
do^aaBSxriv viro ra>v 
a»6pwt(av. ^Aixffv 
Xcya> vplv, dirixova 
t6p pitrShv avT&y, 

3. Sov di iroiovv' 
roff iXerjpoavvriPj fi^ 
ypJtra ^ apumpd 
axnf ri voui 7 dcf ui 

4. *Otro)ff ]j crov 17 
fXf?;)txo<rvi^ ^1^ r^ 
Kpvnr^ • Jcm 6 Trcrr^p 
crov 6 /SXcVcoy cv r^ 
KpviTTm^ avrhs ano- 

5. Kn\ orap irpov 

€VXn^ OVK (OTJ &tm€p 

ol vtroKpiral^ on ^t- 
XoC<rty CI' rals crvva- 
yvyais KaX iv rats 
yfjiviais r^v irXaret- 
&p fOTvires irpoatv- 
XtvOaiy vK(i6t hp <^a- 
v&Ci Tois av6pwroi9 * 
^hpriv Xcytt vplvy 2rt 
(Sircx^'vo'i r^fr fua66p 
avT»p. 

6. Su Moray fl-fHxr- 
fvxj7» eio-fX^c fif tA 

raiUU/69 <TOV^ «ccu 
*f\ fleas r^v A pap 



2. Lors done que tu 
feras ton aumone, ne 
fais point sonncr la 
trompetle devant toi, 
comme les hypocrites 
font dans les syna- 
gogues et dans les 
rues, pour en etre ho- 
nores des hommes. 
En v^rite, je vous dis 
qu'ils reqoivent leur 
recompense. 

3. Mais quand tu 
fais ton aumone, que 
ta main gauche ne 
sache point ce que 
fait ta droite. 

4. Afin que ton au- 
mone soit dans le se- 
cret ; et ton Pere qui 
volt ce qui se fait en 
secret t'en recom- 
pensera publique- 
ment. 

5. Et quand tu prie- 
ras, ne sois point 
comme les hypo- 
crites ; car ils aimcnt 
k prier en se tenant 
debout dans les syna- 
gogues et aux coins 
des rues, afin d^etre 
vus des hommes. En 
v^rite, je vous dis 
quails reqoivcnt leur 
recompense. 

6. Mais toi, quand 
tu pries, entre dans 
ton cabinet ; et Tiyant 
fcrm^ ta porte prie 



XKOLIBH. 

2. Therefore, when 
thou doest thine alms^ 
do not sound a trum- 
pet before thee, as tho 
hypocrites do. in the 
synagogues, and in 
the streets, that they 
may have glory of 
men. Verily, I say 
unto you, They have 
their reward. 

3. But when thou 
doest alms, let not thy 
lef\ hand know what 
thy right hand doeth : 

4. That thine alms 
may be in secret: 
and thy Father, which 
seeth in secret, him- 
self shall reward thee 
openly. 

5. And when thou 
prayest, thou shall not 
be as the hypocrites 
are : for they love to 
pray standing in the 
S3magogues, and in 
the comers of the 
streets, that they may 
be seen of men. Ver- 
ily, I say unto you. 
They have theur re- 
ward. 

6. But thou, when 
thou prayest, enter 
into thy closet, and 
when thou hast shut 



MATTHEW, CHAPTER VI, 



857 



2. ^enu tu tiun %U 
inoffu ^icbtlf foUp Mi 
nicbt falffu t)or Dir yo- 
famiftt, wic tit Jjcucbs 
let t^nn tit ten @d}U: 
fen, uiiD awf tux CSaf-- 
ffH; atif ^a6 jlf toon fccii 
ifutfit AfpvtfffJt xotxf 
huu ^aljrlifl), id) 
fage eurf) : @tc ^ateu 
turrit kotiM ti^tjuu 

8. TOfnu Ml abcr 2(U- 
ttiofeu ^ifbfl, fo lag 
^eine (iiife S^mt iiirbt 
miffifn, »a^ Me recbte 
tijiit; 

4. Tinf tag teitt TiU 
tncfcn \?(rborgrit fr^; 
tiuD tf III ^atcr, Ml* in 
tatf SBerborgfiie flcljct, 
»irb tir^ tJcrgeUcu if= 
fentlicb. 

5. UnMvnintitbrtrfl, 
foKll tu uicfat fct;n wie 
MeJ5ni(l)ffr,MeDa9er- 
nr t^ebcit uiit betrn in 
ten @itu(fnr unt an 
ten Scf en auf ten (Saf- 
fen, anf tag fie t)cn ten 
ienten <|ffe^en werten. 
T3Ja5rlicb,icbf»xgecitc6: 
6ie ti^bm t^cen io^n 
ta^in. 

6. TOenn tn aber be* 
tcjl, fo ftel^e in tein 
f&mmer(ein,nntfd}(ie' 
fe tie ^^itr lu, nut 



2. Asi que cuando 
haces limosna no ha- 
gas que se toque la 
trompeta delante de 
ti, como hacen los 
hip6cntas en las si- 
nagogas, y en las cal- 
les para atraerse hon- 
ra de los hombres. 
En verdad'os digo 
que ya recibieron su 
recompensa. 

3. Mas cuando des 
limosna haz que tu 
mano izquierda, no 
sepa lo que hace tu 
derecha. 

4. Paraque tu li- 
mosna quede secreta, 
y tu Padre que ve en 
lo secrete, te premi- 
ari en publico. 



6. Y cuando ores 
no seas como los 
hip6cntas : Porque 
ellos aman el orar en 
pie en las sinagogas 
y en las esquinas de 
las calles para ser 
vistos de los hombres. 
En verdad os digo 
que ya recibien su 
recompensa. 

6. Mas td cuando 
orares entra en tu 
aposento, y cerrada 
la puerta ora a tu Pa- 



cflelis. 

2. Cum ergo fa* 
cis eleemosym ra, 
ne tuba clanxcris 
ante te, sicut hy- 
pocritEB faciunt in 
synagogis et in 
vicis, ut glorifi- 
centur ab homini- 
bus J amen dico 
vobis, excipiunt 
mercedem suam. 

3. Te autem fa- 
ciente eletmosy- 
nam, nesciat si- 
nistra tua quid fa- 
ciat dextera tua. 

4.Utsittuaelee- 
mosyna in secre- 
te : et Pater tuus 
videns in secrete, 
ipse reddet tibi in 
manifesto. 

5. Et quum ores, 
non eris sicut hy- 
pocritse : quia a- 
mant in synago- 
gis, et in angulis 
platearum stantes 
orare, ut appare- 
ant hominibus. 
Amen dico vobis, 
quod excipiunt 
mercedem suam. 

6. Tu autem 
cum ores, intra in 
cubiculum tuum, 
et claudens psti* 



858 



MATTHEW, CHAPTER VI 



irow, irpSa-tv^ai »« 
varpl a-ov t« it^ ra 
Kpvnr^' Ka\ 6iratfip 
<rov 6 fi\€irci>v iv r^ 
Kprmrmy dirodwo-ci 
iroi iif rw <t>av€p^. 
7. Tlpo<r€vx'ipfvoi 

Tf , &cnr€p oi lOuiKoi • 
boKovai yhp ^ri Iv 
ri vokvkoyia avraip 
tlfraKov(rOrj(rovTat. 

6. M^ oZv opoud' 
$iJT€ avTois • o?de yap 
6 irarrjp vpciv hv 
XP^tav 9X^X9 ^irph toC 
vpas alrria'ai avrSv, 

9. Ouro»ff oZv 

fTpoa-cvx^a-Oe vp€i£ • 

ILdT€p r]pMV 6 €V TOIS 

mpavois, iyiatrBriTm 
t6 Bvopd crov • 

10. *E\^€ro> 17 fia- 
criXeta aov • yevjjBq* 
r« rA $€\rjpd a-ovy 
0)9 €v ovpav^y Koi 
^jrt r^f y^ff. 

11. TAv SpTOV 4- 
fitti' rdv ctrcov(rtoy 
B6s ^piu (rrjptpov, 

12. Kal S<fits ripw 
rk 6<f>eiKfipaTa ^pMif, 
its Kal fipeis dtjyUpiif 
ToU 6(f}€lKeT(U5 ffp£v. 

13 Kal plj fiV- 
Ptyiqjs ffpas Ciff wet • 



ton Pere qui te voit 
dans ce lieu secret; 
et ton P^re qui te voit 
dans ce lieu secret, 
te recompensera piib- 
liquement. 

7. Or, quand vous 
priez, n*usez point de 
vaines redites,comme 
font les pa'iens ; car 
ils s'imaginent d'etre 
exauces en parlant 
beaucoup. 

8. Ne leur ressem- 
blez done point ; car 
votre P^re sait de quoi 
vous avez besoin, 
avant que vous le lui 
demandiez. 

9. Vous done priez 
ainsi: Notre Pere qui 
es aux cieux, ton nom 
soit sanctifie. 

10. Ton r^gne vi- 
enne. Ta volenti 
soit faite sur la terre 
comme au ciel. 

11. Donne-nous au- 
jourd'hui notre pain 
quotidien. 

12. Et nous quitte 
nos dettes, comme 
nous quittons aussi les 
dettes k nos debiteurs. 

13. Et ne nous in- 
duis jx)int en tenta- 
tion ; mais di^ivre- 



thy door, pray to thy 
Father which is in 
secret ; and thy Fa- 
ther, which seeth in 
secret, shall reward 
thee openly. 

7. But when ye pray, 
use not vain repeti- 
tions, as the heathen 
do : for they think 
that they shall be 
heard for their much 
speaking. 

8. Be not ye there- 
fore like unto them : 
for your Father 
knoweth what things 
ye have need of be- 
fore ye ask him. 

9. Af\er this manner 
therefore pray ye : 
Our Father which art 
in heaven. Hallowed 
be thy name. 

10. Thy kingdom 
come. Thy will be 
done in earth as it is 
in heaven. 

11. Give us this day 
our daily bread. 



12. And forgive us 
our debts, as we for- 
give our debtors. 



13. Ajid lead us not 
into temptation, but 
deliver us from evil. 



MATTHEW, CHAITKR VI, 



359 



Utt }u teinem Satcr 
im Srrborgriten ; tint 
ttin ^acer, ^rr in M^ 
95ftborc^fnefu^et,»ir^ 
t'xt^ \>ndtlun Hfent- 
(icb. 

7. Unb wcnn i^r bt^ 
Ut, foKc tt;r nictt Dirl 
pUppern, wie ^ic ^tx: 
ttn ; ^enn ]le mc^nen, 
fte wcrDftt erl)6ret, 
wcnu tie t)iele ^orte 
marten. 

8. Sarum folft i{)r 
eurt it)neu nt(bt gUid): 
tH: Cner 3Jatft wcig, 
»atf ibr beDftrfet, e^e 
^enn i^t t^n bittec 

9. !Darnm folfr i^r 
affe bften : Uufer 35a-- 
ter in ^em ^imm(( ! 
3>fin 9lame werDe gc- 
^filiget. 

10. ^ein ^ri(6 Pom^ 
tne. 2)ein ODiUe gc^ 
((be^e auf SrDen, n>ie 

11. ttnfer tigficbe^ 
Sro^ gicb uutf ^cucc. 



12. Un^ Dergieb un^ 
ttnfere 6ct)nl(en, wit 
mx unffru@(t)u(^tgern 
locrgcben. 

13. Unt f\xi}Tt m^ 
titcbt in ^erfucbung, 
foH^ern erlife viwe \)on 



SPANISH. 

dre en secreto, y tu 
Padre que ve en lo 
secreto, te recompen- 
sara en publico. 



7. Y al orar no ha- 
bl^is mucho como 
los Gentiles creyen- 
do que ban de ser 
oidos por su mucho 
hablar. 

8. No OS asemejeis 
d ellos : porque vu- 
estro Padre sabe de 
lo que teneis necesi- 
•dad antes que voso- 
tros le pid&is. 

9. Vosotros puesha- 
beis de orar asi : Pa- 
dre nuestro que estas 
en los cielos santifi- 
cado sea tu nombre. 

10. Venga el tu rey- 
no: hagase tu volun- 
tad en la tierra asi 
como en el cielo. 

11. Danos hoy nu- 
estro pan cotidiano. 



12. Y perdonanos 
nuestras deudas asi 
como nosotros perdo- 
namos d nuestro& 
deudores. 

13. Y no nos dejes 
caer en tentacion mas 
libranos de mal por- 



I.ATIN. 

um tuum, ort Pa 
trem tuum qui in 
secreto : et Pater 
tuus conspicieni? 
in secreto, reddet 
tibi in apparentL 

7. Orantes au- 
tem ne inania lo- 
quamini, sicut 
ethnici, arbitran- 
tur enim quod in 
multiloquio suo 
exaudientur. 

8. Ne igitur aa« 
similemini eis : 
novit enim Pater 
vester quorum u- 
sum habetis, ante 
vos petere eum. 

9. Sic ergo ora- 
te vos : Pater no- 
ster qui in cselis, 
sanctificetur no- 
men tuum. 

10. Adveniat 
regnum tuum. 
Fiat voluntas tua, 
sicut in cselo et in 
terra. 

11. Panem no- 
strum super sub- 
stantialem da no« 
bis hodie. 

12. Et dimitte 
nobis debita no- 
stra, sicut et nos 
dimittimus debi- 
toribus ncBtris. 

13. £t ae infe- 
ras nos in tenta- 
tionem* aed libera 



860 



MATTHEW, CHAPTER VI. 



GEEEK. 

^fuis cttA rod rrovrf- 
pov ' on crov itrnv 
fj Paa'ik€iaf Ka\ tj 
bvvafiiSt Koi fj Bo^a, 
tls Toifs atcipas ■ 

14. *Eav yap d(f)rj- 
T€ Tols difdpuinoii rh 
TrapaTTTOifMiTa avrav^ 
d<f>^a'€^ Kol vfuv 6 
fcar^p vfjL&y 6 ovpd- 

PIGS • 

15. 'E^i' bi pfl 
dipTJT€ rotff dvOpamois 
r^ itapaTrra>fuiTa av' 
r&Uf ovde 6 9rarj)p 
Vfioiv at^^crci ra vra- 
panrSfLara vfjMv. 

16. ^Orau di vrj- 
aT(vriT€f fifj yiv€aB€ 
&(nrep oi vrroKpirai^ 
aKvOptanoi • dcfiavi* 
Cova-i yap tA irp6<rci' 
ira avTcivy oirms ^a- 
v&<n Tois dvOpmrois 

Pt<rT€VOVT€S. *A/ii)|f 

Xcytt vfUPf OTt diri" 
Xovat t6v pMrQhv av- 
r£v, 

17. 2u dc vf(rT€vtov 
Skeyl^ai crov r^y jcr* 
^aX^v, KoX rh irp6a-' 
»ir6if vov y/^ac * 

18. "Oirng firl <f)a' 

PJ9 TOU dlfOp&TTOtS 

vfjcrrtv(ov<f dXKa r^ 
irarpi irov r^ Iv r^ 
Kpxmrf • Kat 6 ira' 
rfjp trov 6 pXtirau Iv. 



FRENCH. 

nous du mal. Car k 
toi est le regne, et la 
puissance, et la gloire 
a jamais. Amen. 



14. Car si vous par- 
donncz aux hommes 
leurs offenses, votre 
Pere celeste vous par- 
donnera aussi les v6- 
tres. 

15. Mais si vous ne 
pardonnez point aux 
hommes leurs • of- 
fenses, votre P^re ne 
vous pardonnera point 
non plus vos offenses. 

16. Et quand vous 
jeunerez, ne prenez 
point un air tristp, 
comme font les hypo- 
crites ; car ils se ren- 
dent tout d^faits de 
visage, afin qu^il pa- 
ra isse aux hommes 
qu'ils jeunent. En 
verity, je vous dis 
qu'ils re9oivent leur 
recompense. 

17. Mais toi, quand 
tu jeunes, oins ta tete, 
et lave ton visage ; 

18. afin qu'il ne 
paraisse point aux 
hommes que tu 
jeunes, mais k ton 
P^re qui est present 
dans ton lieu secret ; 
et ton P^re qui te voit 



For thine is the king- 
dom, and the power, 
and the glory, for ev- 
er. Amen. 



14. For if ye for- 
give men their tres- 
passes, your heavenly 
Father will also for- 
give you : 

15. But if ye for- 
give not men their 
trespasses, neither 
will your Father for- 
give your trespasses. 

16. Moreover, when 
ye fast, be not as the 
hypocrites, of a sad 
countenance : for 
they disfigure their 
faces, that they may 
appear unto men to 
fast. Verily, I say 
unto you, They have 
their reward. 



17. But thou, when 
thou fastest, anoint 
thine head, and wash 
thy face ; 

18. That thou ap- 
pear not unto men to 
fast, but unto thy Fa- 
ther, which is in se- 
cret : and thy Father, 
which seeth in secret, 
shall reward thee 



HATinEW, CHAPTBB VI. 



361 



OBBMAN. 

ttmUtbd. 2)eim brill 
\\\ Da^ §Hei(6, unb Me 
^raft, uiiD bie Jjerr* 
(icbtctt ill Siotgfcit. 
3(meit. 

14. Senn fe i^r brn 
JDlnifcbfii iljre gcl^ler 
Dergebet, fo wirb eud) 
euer t;imm(if(ber Satri: 
attc() txr^cbnu 

15. <2Do i()t a6ct ben 
a^enfcben it;te getter 
nifbt t)ergefcet, fo wirb 
eu(b euer Skater cute 
Se(|(ei: auc^ nicftt t^er- 
gcben. 

16. gODeutt it;r faflet, 
foKc i^t nicbt fauer ^u 
tjtn, nit bie ^eucbier ; 
betiit fie t>erflenen ii^re 
2(nge{lc6rer, auf bag fie 
l>or ben kutcn fcbeinen 
mtt t^rem SafUn. 
^a^rlicb, t(( fage eucb: 
6ie (fabeii i^reit io^n 
bd^iiu 



17. ^rnn ^u abtx 
fafletl, fa fa(be bctu 
J^Aupt, unb wafd^e bein 
Jlngeflc^r; 

18. 2(uf bag bu nictt 
fcbeinefl t>or ben ieuten 
mtt betiicm S^^"/ fon- 
bernt^orbetnemSDater, 
wtMtx Wrborgen ifl; 
unb be in Sparer, ber in 
ba^ SBerbrgene fle^et, 



que tuyo es el reyno, 
el poder, y la gloria 
porlossiglos. Amen. 



14. Porque si per- 
donareis a los hom- 
bres sus ofensas vu- 
estro Padre celestial 
OS perdonara tarobien 
k vosotros. 

15. Mas si no per- 
donireis i los hom- 
bres sus ofensas tam- 
poco vuestro Padre 
OS perdonara vues- 
tras ofensas. 

16. Y cuando ayu- 
neis no .os pongais 
q^ritristes coroo }os 
hip6critas, los cuales 
desiiguran sus rostros 
para hacer ver & los 
hombres que ayunan . 
£n verdad os digo 
que ya recibien su 
recompensa. 



17. Mas tu cuando 
ayunes unge tu cabe- 
za y lava tu cara. 

18. Para no hacer 
ver a los hombres 
que ayunas sino d tu 
Padre que esta en lo 
secreto y tu Padre 
que ve en lo secreto 
te recompensar4 en 

31 



LATIN. 

nosamalo. Quo- 
est 
po- 
tentia, et gloria in 
secula. Amen. 



mam tuum 
regnum, et 



14. Si enim di- 
miseritis homini- 
bus lapsus eorum, 
dimittet et vobis 
Pater vester c»- 
lestis. 

15. Si autem 
non dimiseritis 
hominibus lapsus 
ipsorum, nee Pa- 
ter vester dimittet 
lapsus vestros. 

16. Quum au- 
tem jejunatis, ne 
fiatis sicut hypo- 
critse, obtristati ; 
obscurant enim 
facies suas ; ut 
appareant homi- 
nibus jajunantes. 
Amen dico vo- 
bis, quia recipiunt 
mercedem suam.* 

17. Tu autera 
jejunans, unge tu- 
um caput, et fa- 
ciem tuam lava : 

18. Ut ne appa- 
reisis hominibus 
jejunans, sed Pa- 
tri tuo qui in se- 
creto : et Patei 
tuus videns in fie- 
creto, reddet tibi 



862 



MATTHEW, CHAPTER VI. 



ORRBK. 

19. Mrf Brja-avptCf' 
Tt vfiiv Oqaavpovi 
fffl T^ff y^s, onov 
arris KOI ^p^<ri£ d<f>a- 

w'ffi, Kdl OTTOV *X«- 

frrai diopvaaotxrif 
KOt KX.€7rrov<Ti • 

20. Orja-avplCrr*^ 
v^uv Britravpous iv 
ovpav^, onov oirrt 
affSf oike Ppciais 
axfiaviCti^ «cai mrov 
icXcWat ov diopvtT' 
ovvo-iv, ovde leXc- 

ITTOVO'll'. 

21. "Ottov y<i/) io-' 
nv 6 Btja-avpov vpMVy 
ixii ^arai Koi ^ Kap' 
bla vp€»v. 

22. *0 \vxvos TOV 

If a'C9fJMT6s (OTIV 6 

^6jXp,6s * eav o^i' 6 
6<f>da\fi6£ (TOV dirkovs 
^, o\ov TO <r<iSfui a-ov 
ifxoTtivotf Itrrm • 

23. 'Ehv bk 6 
6(f)Baikfi6f cov nowj' 
pos St S\ou t6 aSfjid 

70V €rK0T€t»6v coTat. 

Et ouif r^ <f>G^s r6 iv 
croi, a-Kdros cVti, to 
if KOTOS ir6<ro» ; 



24. Ot/dfir dv¥aT€u 
B^o-i Kvoiott dovXrv- 



FBKNCH, 

dans ton lieu secret 
te recompensera pub- 
liquement. 

19. Ne vous amas- 
sez point des tresors 
sur la terre, que los 
vers et la rouille con- 
sument, et que les 
larrons percent et de- 
robent. 

20. Mais amassez- 
vous des tresors dans 
le ciel, ou ni les vers 
ni la rouille ne con- 
sument rien, et ou les 
larrons ne percent ni 
ne derobent. 

21 . Car oil est votre 
tr^sor, l^ sera aupsi 
votre coBur. 

22. L'oeil est la lu- 
miere du corps ; si 
done ton oeil est net, 
tout ton corps sera 
^claire. 



23. Mais si ton ceil 
est mal dispose, tout 
ton corps sera t6ne- 
breux ; si done la 

|lumi6re qui est en 
toi n'est que ten^- 
bres, combien seront 
grandes les tenebres 
memes ? 

24. Nul ne peut ser- 
vir deux maitrcs ; car. 



EMOLXftH. 



openly. 



19. Lay not up for 
yourselves treasures 
upon earth, where 
moth and rust doth 
con-up it, and where 
thieves break through 
and steal : 

20. But lay up for 
yourselves treasures 
in heaven, where nei- 
ther moth nor rus 
doth corrupt, and 
where thieves do no 
break through nor 
steal. 

21. For where your 
treasure is, there wil 
your heart be also. 

22. The light of the 
body is the eye : if 
therefore thine eye be 
single, thy whole body 
shall be full of light 



23. But if thine eye 
be evil, thy whole 
body shall be full of 
darkness. If there- 
fore the light that is 
in thee be darkness, 
how great is that 
darknciss I 

24. No man can 
serve two masters : 



MATTHEW, CH&PTER VI. 



868 



OEKMAN. 



friitlicb. 

19. 3^r fofit nicij 
ntct)t Ocba^c fummclu 
auf Citfii, Da fie Mr 
SOJcttfu luiD Dci- Sleft 
frc(fni, uiiD ^a Die Tiit- 
be iiuct) gr»ibeu unD \\ttis 
Icn. 

20. ©ammcft eitcb 
abet ©cbiipc im Jjims 
mc 1/ Da fte iwDcr SD^ot- 
ten noci) 5Ho|l frcircu, 
uitD Da Die 2)iebe uicfor 
nact) grabcii/ no(<) tUt/^ 
(ciu 

21. Scim^wo eucr 
@(ba$ i]\, Da ifl aucb 
eiur Jjeri. 

22. 2)a^ 2(uge it? De^ 
Jcibe^ iifbt. <2Beun 
Deiii 2(ui(e ctnfEiIng ifl, 
fo irirDDcmgaujerieib 



23. ®fim aber Dcin 
Tluqe eiu ©(faaif t|); fo 
iDtrD Dcin g%in}cr kib 
fin|Ur fci^n. ^eiiit 
aber Da^ iidtt, Da^ tit 
btr i\\, Stn|tcnii6' i|^ 
mie grot; wtrD Dauii Die 
8iu|Uruig fclbcr fcpn ? 

24. anicinauD fattn 
)!oecn <Q(rreii Dietien; 



I 



publico. 



19. No amonton^is 
tesoros para vosotros 
en la tierra, en don- 
de la polilla y el 
orin los consumen y 
en donde los lad rones 
los desentierran y ro- 
ban. 

20. Mas amontonad 
para vosotros tesoros 
en el cielo en donde 
ni la polilla ni el 
orin los consumen, y 
en donde los ladrones 
no los desentierran 
ni roban. 

21. Porque donde 
•st4 vuestro tesoro 
alli estd tamblen vu- 
estro corazon. 

22. Luz de tu cu- 
erpo es tu pjo, por lo 
que si tu ojo fuere 
sencilio, todo tu cu- 
erpo estara lleno de 
luz. 

23. Mas si tu ojo 
fuere maligno todo 
tu cuerpo esta'a lle- 
no de tinieblas. Asi 
que si la luz que hay 
en ti es tinieblas ^ cu- 
an grandes seran las 
mismas tinieblas ? 

2^ Ningunopuede 
servir 5 dos seaores, 



LkJW 

i.i maniiesto. 



19. Ne thesau- 
rizate vobis the- 
sauros in terra, 
ubi fierugo et tinea 
exterminat, et ubi 
fures perfodiunt, 
et furantur. 

20. Thesauri za- 
te autem vobia 
thcsauros in cselo, 
ubi neque eerugo, 
neque tinea ex- 
terminat, et ubi 
fures non effodi- 
unt, nee furantur. 

21. Ubi enim 
est thesaurus ve- 
ster, ibi eritetcor 
vestrum. 

22. Lucema cor • 
poris est oculus : # 
si igitur oculua 
tuus simplex fue- 
rit, totum corpus 
tuum lucidum 
erit. 

23. Si autem 
oculus tuus malus 
fuerit, totum cor- 
pus tuum tene- 
brosum erit. Si 
ergo lumen quod 
in te, tenebrBB 
sunt, tenebns 
quantse ? 

24. Nemo po- 
test duobus dumi- 



864 



MATTHEW, CHAPTER VI. 



C&SVK. 

tiv* ^ yap t6v tua 
fiurfjo-fh "cal r6v m- 
poif ayaTT^irei • fj ivbs 
aMiirat, koi tov 
iripov Koratftpovfi' 
irwt * ov bvvaaOc 6€<^ 
iovKtvtiv KCLi fxafi' 

25. AcarovroX<yfi» 

VfiLU, fJL^ pL€pipLVaTf Tjj 

^^xS ^/***»'» ^* (fxiyr}- 
re, /cai Ti TTi^r* • fii;- 
de r^ (Tcbfiart u/i^y, 

1} V^X7 ""Xciw core 
r^ff Tpo(l)rjSf teal tA 
eofui roO Mvftaross 



26. *EfJL0\€^aT€€ts 

rh 7r€T€iva rov ovpa' 

VOVf on ov (TITfipOV- 
• CtV, Ovbt 6tpii0V<TiVy 

oM« (Twayovo'ii' c^r 
atroOriKai, Koi 6 Tra- 
r^p viiSiv 6 ovpdvios 
rpiffyti aura, Ovx 
VfJLfii paK\ov b^a^ii- 
p€T€ avTmv; 

27. T/( M ii Ifi&p 
/Afptfiv&v bvparai 
irpodBtlvai. hri r^v 
rjKiKixiv avTov vrixyv 
era; 

28. KaX jTtpl Mu' 
futros ri fitpipvart ; 
KorapAOtTf ri Kptva 
TOV dypov Twf av^d' \ 



FRENCH. 

ou il hai'ra I'un, et 
aimera I'autre ; ou il 
s'attachera a Tun, et 
meprisera ['autre ; 
vous ne pouvez servir 
Dieu et Mammon. 



25. C*est pourquoi 
je vous dis : Ne soyez 
point en souci pour 
votre vie, de ce que 
vous mangerez, et de 
ce que vous boirez; 
ni pour votre corps, 
de quoi vous serez 
vetus. La vie n'est- 
elle pas plus que la 
nourriture, et le corps 
plus que le vetement? 

26. Considerez les 
oiseaux du ciel, car 
ils ne s^ment, ni ne 
moissonnent, ni n'as- 
semblent dans des 
greniers, et ccpen- 
dant votre Pere ce- 
leste les nourrit. 
N'etes-vous pas beau- 
coup plus excellens 
qu^eux ? 

27. Et qui est celui 
d'entre vous, qui 
puisse par son souci 
ajouter une coud^e a 
sa taille ? 

28. Et pourquoi 
e ted- vous en souci du 
vfitement ? Apprenez 
comment croissent les 



BKOLISR. 

for either he will hate 
the one, and love the 
other ; or.else he will 
hold to the one, and 
despise the other. Ye 
cannot serve God and 
Mammon. 



25. Therefore I say 
unto you, Take no 
thought for your life, 
what ye shall eat, or 
what ye shall drink ; 
nor yet for your body, 
what ye shall put on. 
Is not the life more 
than meat, and the 
body than raiment ? 



26. Behold the fowls 
of the air: for they 
sow not, neither do 
they reap, nor gather 
into bams ; yet your 
heavenly Father feed- 
eth them. Are ye not 
much better than 
they? 



27. Which of you 
by taking thought can 
add one. cubit unto 
his stature ? 

28. And why take 
ye thought for rai- 
ment } Consider the 
liliesof the field, how 



MATTHEW, CHAPTER VI. 



866 



OERMAN. 

ennoebrt rr toir^ eineii 
(;a|fcu tiiiO un anient 
Iicbcn ; o^er ttixl ru 
uem anl^augeii; nub tcu 
aiiOcrn vrracbtrit. 3l)r 
fiiinct iiicbc (Sott ^te- 
nen uii^ tern Snam^ 
mon. 

25. 3>arum fa.ae id) 
eud): ©orget tticbt fur 
tun Ubcn, ira^ tl^r ef- 
feuu»^trtufruwrr^et; 
Ottd) uifbt fiir (urrii 
Uib, Y94^ tf)r ait2i(t)ru 
U)crtct. 3|l iiirb( (ae 
irbrii mcl)r, tcim bic 
6p€ifc ? tliib err Uib 
tnct)r, (cuu tU Xliu 
tuug ? 

26. 6c^ct bte Sidc( 
uurcr tern $immcl an : 
fie fieu iiicbr, j^e erntcn 
ntd}t, fte fammtitt ut(6t 
in tie 6d)eunrn, unb 
Cttcr 4imm(ifd)rr SButcr 
ui^rrc |le toct. 6epi) 
i^r teun ni(6t Did 
mc^r, tcnn jlc ? 



27, TOet t|l unter 
cud); rer feincr idu^c 
etnc SUc }uff (en m6gr, 
Ob cr gleid) tarum for- 
get? 

28. Un^ warum for^ 
gee itjv fhx tie JClei- 
tmxc^ ? 6d)auet eie ii- 
lien auf bcm gcfee, n)ie 



porque 6 aborrecera 
al uno y amara al 
otro, 6 se allegara al 
uno y menospreciard 
al otro. No pod e is 
servir d Dios y a las 
riquezas. 



25. Por esto os di- 
go : no andeis afa- 
nados por vuestra 
vida pensando que 
habeis de comer 6 
que habeis de beber, 
ni por vuestro cuer- 
poque habeis de ves- 
tir. ^No vale mas 
la vida que el alimen- 
to» y el cuerpo que 
el vestido ? 

26. Mirad las aves 
del cielo que no siem- 
bran ni siegan, ni re- 
cogen en troges, y 
vuestro Padre celes- 
tial lasalimenta ^no 
val6is pues vosotros 
mucho mas que e- 
Uas? 



27. Y quien de vo- 
sotros dandose d dis- 
currir podr4 anadir 
un codo & su estatu- 
ra? 

28. Y ^porque os 
afanais por el vesti- 
do ? Contemplad los 
lirios del campo co- 



•n» 



nis servire : aut 
enim unum ode- 
rit, et alterum di- 
liget: aut unum 
amplexabitur, el 
alterum despiciet. 
Non potestis Deo 
servire et mam- 
mons. 

25. Propter hoc 
dico vobis, ne 
anxiemini animss 
vestrse,quidman- 
ducetis, et quid 
bibatis : neque 
corpori vestro, 
quid ^ induamini. 
Nonneanimaplud 
est esca, et cor« 
pus indumento ? 

26. Inspicite in 
volatilia cseli, 
quoniam non se- 
minant, neque 
metunt, neque 
congregant in 
horrea, et Pater 
vester cajlestis 
pascit ilia. Non- 
ne vos magis ez* 
cellitis illis ? 

27. Quis autem 
ex vobis anxiatus 
potest adjicere ad 
staturam suam 
cubitum unum ^ 

28. Et circa ves- 
timentum quid 
anxiamini ? Ob- 
scrvate I'iia agri 



866 



MATTHEW, CHAPTEai VI. 



MTi* ov KtnrtJ^^ ovdi 

29. Ary«» dc ifiilv, 
&ri ovdr 2oXofA6>i/ eV 
irdffT; tJ drffo avrov 

30. Ki^r6vx^P' 
rv¥ Tov dypov <rfffi€' 
pop itrra, Kal aCptop 
m KXifiavov /3aXX<$- 
fUPoPt 6 Qf6v ovTtas 
dfiKfHtPwa-tp, ov iro\' 
X^ fiaXXov vfjMf, oXi- 
yitrurroi ; 

81. M^ o^p fir/M- 

T/ ^dya>/i€i', $ ri iri- 

X»fuda ; 



82. Jl^vra yap 
raura rA li^n; riri- 
{firti • oidc y^p ^ iro- 
r^p vfi&p 6 ovpdvtos, 

^ XPUCfft TOVT»P 

dbravroiv. 

33. Zi/mre d* it/kJ- 
TWi' r^v/9a<riXrtay tov 

OtOV, Kal TT^P blKOlO* 

0VPIIP avrov, irai rav' 
ra irdvra irpoartBfi' 

34. Mff o^p fitpi' 
funfOTirt tU nji» a0- 
•lOir* ^ y^p aCptop 



FRENCH. 

lis des champs ; ils 
ne travail lent ni ne 
filent. 

29. Cependant, je 
vous dis que Salomon 
meme, dans touts sa 
gloire, n'a pas ete ve- 
tu com me I'un d'eux. 

30. Si done Dieu 
revet ainsi Therbe des 
champs, qui est au- 
jourd'hui sur pied, et 
qui demain sera jetee 
au four, ne vous ve- 
tira-t-il pas beaucoup 
plutot, 6 gens d<; pe- 
tite foi ? 

31. Ne soyez done 
point en souci, di- 
sant : Que mange- 
rons-nous ? ou que 
boirons-nous ? ou de 
quoi serons-nous ve- 
tus? 

32. Vu que les 
paiens recherchent 
toutes ces choses ; car 
votpe Pere celeste 
connait que vous 
avez besoin de toutes 
CCS choses. 

33. Mais cherchez 
premierement le roy- 
aumc de Dieu et sa 
justice, et toutes ces 
choses vous seront 
donnees par dessus. 

34. Ne soyez done 
point en souci pour 
U Icndemair * car le 



ICMOLIBH. 

they grow ; they toil 
not, neither do llicy 
spin : 

29. And yet I say 
unto you, That even 
Solomon, in all his 
glory, was not ar- 
rayed like one of 
these. 

30. Wherefore, i. 
God so clothe the 
grass of the field, 
which to-day is, and 
to-morrow is cast into 
the oven, shall he not 
much more clothe 
you, O ye of little 
faith ? 

31. Therefore take 
no thought, saying, 
What shall we eat? 
or. What shall we 
drink ? or. Where- 
withal shall we be 
clothed ? 

32. (For after all 
these things do the 
Grcntiles seek :) (dx 
your heavenly Father 
knowcth that ye have 
need of all these 
things. 

33. But seek ye first 
the kingdom of God, 
and his righteousness, 
and all these things 
shall be added unto 
you. 

34. Tdke therefore 
no tliought for thb 
morrow: forthemoi- 



MATTHBW, CHAPTBB VI. 



867 



fit wattfen : fie arbeu 
ten tti(t)C, au(b fpinuen 
fie tticbt. 

29. 3^ fage eucft, i^ag 
attcb 6a{ctnD iit aiitx 
frincr ^crr(icf)hit nid)t 
bfWci^ft dcnxfen i|l, 
a(^ ^crfclben Ciue. . 

30. ©0 tenn ®ctt 
ba^ ®ratf auf »fm 3((= 
U oifo f(ri(et, ^a^ ^oc6 
^fute fiet}cr, mib mor^ 
gen in ten Ofen den>or' 
fen Wirt, foUte er ta^ 
ttirbt i>ic(me{)r eucb 
t^un?&i^rSC(eind(&U' 
bigen ! 

31. S>arum foHe i^r 
ntd)r fbrgen, unt fagen : 
®a0 werten wir effen ? 
^a^ werten nit trtn- 
fen? ^omit weiben 
»ir UR^ tleiteiu 

32. SlAcb fofcbem a!-' 
(en tradjten tie ^eiben. 
S>enn ener ^tmmttfcber 
SBatet wetg, tag i^t be^ 
aUe^ beturfct. 



33. 3:rad)tet am er- 
|len nad) bent IXetcbe 
(^tttt€, unb nad) fetner 
(Serid)ttgf eit ; fo mtrb 
cu(k 'ol(be^ ftUe^ ;us 
faUen. 

84. Sarnm forget 
nid)t fur ben anbern 
aScrgfu ; b^nn bcr 



mo crecen : ellos no 
trabajan, ni hilan. 

29. Y sinembargo 
OS digo que ni aun 
Salomon en medio 
de toda su gloria no 
estuvo vestido como 
uno de estos. 

30. Pues si la yer- 
ba del campo que 
hoy es y mariana es 
echada en el homo, 
Dios la viste asi ^ no 
OS vestiri mucho mas 
k vosotros hombres 
de poca £6 ? 

31. No OS afaneis 
pues diciendo que 
comeremos? 6 que 
beberemos ? 6 con 
que nos cubriremos ? 



32. (Porque los 
GSentiles buscan estas 
cosas) porque vues- 
tro Padre celestial 
sabe que teneis ne- 
cesidad de todas es- 
tas cosas. 

33. Buscad pues 
primero el reyno de 
Dios, y su justicia, y 
todas estas cosas os 
seran auadidas. 

34. Asi que no an- 
deis ?uidadosos por 
cl Ota de manana, 



LATIN. 

quomodo augen 
tur : non fatigan- 
tur, neque nent. 

29. Dico autem 
vobis, quoniara 
nee Salomon in 
omni gloria sua 
am ictus est sicut 
unum istorum. 

30. Si autem 
foenum agri hodie 
existens, et eras 
in clibanum in- 
jcctum, Deus sic 
circumomat, non 
multo magis vos, 
exigusB fidei? 

31. Ne igitur 
anxiemini, dicen- 
tes: Quid man- 
ducabimus, aut 
quid bibemus, 
aut quid circum- 
amiciemur ? 

32. Opnia enim 
hfiec gentes inqui- 
runt. Novitenim 
Pater vester cae- 
lestis quod opus 
habetis horum 
omnium. 

33. Quseriteau 
tem primum reg- 
num Dei, et jus- 
titiamejus^ethaBC 
omnia adponeo^ 
tur vobis. 

34. Ne igitur 
anxiemini in eras: 
nam cm.** r.umhit 



868 



MATTHEW, CHAPTERS VI., VH. 



I 



ENGLISH. 



fi€fHfipia€i ra 4av» , lendemain prendra ' row shall take thought 
Tijs ' apKtTou tt; rjfii' soin de ce qui le re- ' for the things of itriclf. 
pa ^ KoKia aimjs. garde : k chaque jour Sufficient unto the 
suffit sa peine. day is the evil thereof. 



1. M^ Kpivtrtf tfa 

IJUl KpidrJT€. 

2. *Ev ^ yap Kpi' 
part Kpiv€T€, Kpt6rj- 
weaSf * Kai tv ^ pi- 
Tpm p(TpfLT€f dirrtpt' 
Tpri6^(r€T<u vpiv. 



3. Ti d4 pXivris t6 
Kdp<f>os t6 rV r^ 
6<f}6(iXp^ rov adcX- 

(f>OV (TOI/, TTJV di (V 

r^ crcp 6(f)0aXp^ do- 
k6v ov Karapo€is ; 

4. *H JTWf tptls T^ 
odeX<^» ffoVf "Acptf 
cK^dXo) TO Kapffxtf 
air6 Tov 6^6aKpov 
crou; Kal IBov ff do- 
KQS €v T^ 6<pdaXpa 
cov* 

5. 'YTToic/jiTa, «ic- 
jSoXc irpcaTov T^V do' 
Kov €K TOV 6<f>6aXpov 
aoVf #cul t6t€ dia/3Xc- 
^fir <Vj3aXriv r6 

KOpffiOS €K TOV 0<f>3a\' 

pov TOV adcX^v crov. 
^6. Mi^ ddirc ri £yc- 
ov ToU Kvarlf /ii;dc 
/^aXiyrc tow papya^ 
piras vp^v e/xTpo- 



1. Ne jugez point, 
afin que vous ne soy- 
ez point juges. 

2. Car de tel juge- 
mcnt que vous juge- 
rez, vous serez juges ; 
et de telle mcsure 
que vous mesurerez, 
on vous mesurera r^- 
ciproquement 

3. Et pourquoi re- 
gardes-tu le fetu qui 
est dans Poeil de ton 1 
fr^rc, et tu ne prends 
pas garde k la poulre ^ 
qui est dans ton oeil ? 

4. Ou comment dis- , 
tu a ton frere : Per- ' 
mets que j'ote de ton \ 
oeil cc fetu, et voil^, I 
tu as une poutrc dans ' 
ton oeil ? 

5. Hypocrite, ote 
premie rement de ton 
oeil la poutre, et apres 
cela tu verras com- 
ment tu oteras le fetu ' 
de I'oeil de ton frere. ! 

6. No donnez point 
les choses saintes aux 
chiens, et ne jetez 
point vos perles de- 
vaut Ics pourceaux. 



1. Judge not, that ye 
be not judged. 

2. For with what 
judgment ye judge, 
ye shall be judged; 
and with what meas- 
ure ye mete, it shall 
be measured to you 
again. 

3. And why behold- 
cst thou the mote that 
is in thy brother's 
eye, but considerest 
not the beam that is 
in thine own eye > 

4. Or how wilt thou 
say to thy brother, 
Let me pull oui the 
motfe out of thine 
eye ; and behold, a 
beam is in thine own 
eye? 

5. Thou hypocrite, 
first cast out the beam 
out of thine own eye ; 
and then shalt tnou 
see clearly to cast out 
the mote out of thy 
brother's eye. 

6. Give not thai 
which is holy unto the 
dogs, neither cast ye 
your pearls before 
swine, lest they tra rn 



HAirnEW, CHAPTERS VI., vn. 



869 



GKRMAK 

mcr^iente ^ag ttir^ fiir 
H^ &tuu forgen. (S^ 
ift jifuug, nag eiu jrgs 
(idxr 3:ag fciue cigeuc 
^(age ^abe. 

1. SRicbtit ntc6t/auf 
bag tbr nitf^t gcric^rct 

2. 2)enii mit wcfcfccr* 
Ifij (8ctid)t il)r ricbtct, 
xttxMt \t)x gfri(l)tft 
tterbftt ; unb mit U)elfb= 
erUp ^aa^ i^r mf|fft, 
wlrD enfb geine|reii ton- 
ben. 

aODa^fle^fjlDuafccr 
ten 6plirtet in Oei- 
tic^ aSttttec 2Jugr, unb 
»ir|l nid)t gema^tr Oen 
Sathu in bcincm 2Cn^ 
9e? 

4. Obft aic barfil bu 
fagrn ^u brincm ^JBrn^ 
ber: $a(t, id) wiKt^it 
ben 6p(ttcer au^ tt'u 
nem 21nge }irt)en ? unb 
pfljf, fin 25alte ifl in 
teincm 2(nge* 

5. 3)n Jjeucfcfct, jifs 
^e am ertUn Un 9^U 
tn\ an^ bcinem 2(ugc ; 
barnarb beflc^e, n>ie tn 
ben ©ptitter autf bci* 
ne^ Sruber^ 2(uge }ic« 

6. 3l)r folle M^ J^tu 
(igt^um nicbt ten ^un- 
ten geben, unb eure 
q>et(cn foUt itjx nicbt 
toot bie 6iue loecfcn ; 



porque el dia de ma- 
nana traeri su cui- 
dado ; bastale al dia 
su proprio afan. 



1. Nojuzgueis pa- 
raque no seals juz- 
gados. 

2. Porque con el 
juicio con que juzgd- 
reis serais juzgados, 
y con la mcdida con 
que midiereis se os 
volvera d medir. 

3. Y ^ porqu6 ves 
la mota en el ojo de 
tu hermano y no 
echas de ver la viga 
que est& en tu ojo ? 

4. O ^como dices 
i. tu hermano, deja 
que saque la mota de 
tu ojo, y he aqui t6 
tienes una viga en tu 
proprio ojo ? 

5. HipS^rita, echa 
primero .a viga de 
tu ojo, y entonces 
verds claramente pa- 
ra sacar la mota del 
ojo de tu hermano. 

6. No deis lo santo 
d los perros ni eclie- 
is vuestras perlas de- 
linte de los puercos, 
no sea que las hu- 



suaipsius : suffi- 
ciens diei malitia 
sua. 



1. Ne judicate, 
ut non judicemi* 
ni. 

2. In quo enim 
judicio judicave- 
ritis, judicabimi- 
ni: et in qua 
mensura mcnsi 
fueritis, remetie- 
tur vobis. 

3. Quid autem 
intueris festucam 
quae in oculo fra- 
tris tui, at in tuo 
oculo trabem non 
animadvertis ? 

4. Aut quomodo 
dices fratri tuo: 
Sine ejiciam fe- 
stucam de oculo 
tuo, et ecce trabs 
in oculo tuo ? 

5. Hypocrita, 
ejice primum tra- 
bem de oculo tuo, 
et tunc intueberis 
ejicere festucam 
de oculo fratris 
tui. 

6. Ne detis sane 
turn canibus, ne- 
que mittatis mar- 
gar itas vcstras 
ante porcos, te 



870 



MATTHEW, CHAPTER VIT. 



irorc KaTanarrja'toa'iv 
aVTOVS €V Toig TToariv 
avTciv, Koi arpa(f>tV' 
T€s pfi^tatriv vfias. 

7. AireiTc, Koi hi' 

T€f Kal 9vpfi<Trr« * 
Kpover€f Koi dpoiyrf 
aerai vfuy. 

8. Has yhp 6 al- 
Ttfv Xapfiaifctf Koi 6 
(riToiv evpia-Kei, kal 
T^ KpovovTi avoiyTj'- 
tr€Tai, 

9. *H tU iiTTlV €$ 
Vfmv avOptanoSy hv 
ihv alrria^ 6 vi6s av- 
Tov aprou, pfi \i^u 
C7rid<»o-€( aura ; 

10. Kal €hv IxBvv 
dttcrcc avT^; 

11. "kt OVV Vfl€7St 

irovTipoi 6vT€£^ otdarf 
BSfAara dyaBa d^^vai 

tra pdWov 6 irarflp 
vpmVf 6 €v TOLS ovpa* 
voist ^&<rti dyaBa 
Toir alrovoTiif avrdv; 

12. Udvra ovv ocra 
tuf BiXryre tva irotM- 
crtv vpiu oi auBpamoi^ 
oZrta Kal vfitU ttokI- 
rr avTois • out >ff ydp 
^trrtf 6 vo/or if 'i oi 



de peur qu'ils ne le- 
foulent a leurs pieds. 
et que se retouraan 
lis nc vous dechiient. 

7. Demandez, et i 
vous sera donne ; 
cherchez, et vous 
trouverez ; heurtez, 
et il vous sera ouvert. 

8. Car quiconque 
demande, revolt ; et 
quiconque cherche, 
trouve ; et il sera ou- 
vert k celui qui 
heurte. 

9. Mais qui sera 
rhomme d'entre vous 
qui donne une pierre 
k son fils, sUl lui de- 
mande du pain ? 

10. Et s'il lui de- 
mande un poisson, lui 
donnera-t-il un ser- 
pent? 

11. Si done vous, 
qui etes mechans, sa- 
vez bien donner a vos 
enfans des choses 
bonnes-, combien'plus 
votre Pere qui est aux 
cieux, donnera-t-il des 
biens k ceux qui les 
lui demandent! 

12. Toutes les 
choses done que vous 
voulez que les 
hommes vous fassent, 
faites-les-leuraussi de 
meme, carc'est la loi 



pie them under their 
feet, and turn agaia 
and rend you. 



7. Ask, and it shall 
be' given you ; seek, 
and ye shall find ; 
knock, and it shall be 
opened unto you : 

8. For every one 
that askcth, receiv 
eth ; and he that seek- 
eth, iindeth ; and to 
him that knocketh, it 
shall be opened. 

9. Or what man is 
there of you, whom 
if his son ask bread, 
will he give him a 
stone? . 

10. Or if he ask a 

fish, will he give him 
a serpent ? 

11. If ye, then, be- 
ing evil, know how to 
give good gifts unto 
your children, how 
much more shall your 
Father which is in 
heaven • give good 
things to them that 
ask him ? 

12. Therefore all 
things whatsoever ye 
wou Id that men should 
do to you, do ye even 
so to them : for this 
is the law and tiio 



MATTHEW, CHAPTER VH. 



871 



«uf tag jle tifff(6i9fn 
nicbt }erctctru mit it)' 
rm gugcu, miD fid) 
n>enrni, un^ cucb jet- 
tetgen. 

7. a^trter, fo witb nicft 
9f geben ; fucftcr, |"d wcr* 

ail; fo miro rucb aufse^ 
tt;au. 

8. 2)fiin wet ta hit- 
ret, tcr rmpfangt; uiiD 
votx Oa fucbct, ^e1r fiiis 
tet; uuD met Da an- 
Mopfft, Dcm wirD auf- 

9. OBflcift t|! unter 
eu(6 93?fufd)fii; fo it)n 
fem ©ol;u Httft urn 
SroD, t)fr i^m ciiuu 
©teiii bictc ? 

10. Obft fo ft iftu 
bittet uin eiiun gifcb, 
bcr i^m eiwe ©cbUuge 
bietc? 

11. ©0 bcitii il)r, bie 
ibr Dodj arg fftjD, f6iu 
net beuuocb eitrea 5tiiu 
berii gute ©abcii gcs 
^eii, wte ))tehtirbr wtrD 
eitrr SBarer im J^immci 
(R\it^& .aeben beaui, oie 
i^ii btttctu 

12. 2(ae^ nun, n>a^ 
it)r woUet, ba|) eucb Dtc 
Uutt tbiiii folkn, ba$ 
tbut it)r ibiieu; Dac^ i|l 
ba£f (^efe$ uub bie ^lo- 
p^cietu 



ellen con sus pies y 
voWiendose contra 
vosotros OS despeda- 
cen. 

7. Pedit, y se OS 
dara : buscad, y ha- 
Ilareis : Hamad, y se 

05 abrira. 

8. Porque todo a- 
quel que pide r^cibe ; 
y el que busca lialla, 
y al que llama se le 
abrir4. 

9. O quien de vo- 
sotros es el hombre 

6 quien si su hijo pi- 
diere pan acaso le 
dara una piedra ? 

10. O si le pidiere 
un pez, acaso le dara 
una serpiente ? 

1 1. Si vosotros pues 
siendo nialos sabeis 
dar buenas dadivas a 
vuestros hijos ^ cuan- 
to mas vuesiro Pa- 
dre que esta en los 
cieips dara buenas 
dadivas 4 los que se 
las pidieren ? 

12. Asi que todo lo 
que quisiercis que los 
hombres hagan con 
vosotros, hacedlo asi 
vosotros tambien con 
ellos : porque esta es 



LATIN. 

forte conculcenl 
eas in pedibus su- 
is, et conversi di* 
rumpant vos. 

7. Petite, etda- 
biturvobis: quce- 
rite, et invenietis : 
pulsate, et aperie- 
tur vobis. 

8. Omnis enim 
petensaccipit : et 
quoerens invenit, 
et pulsanti iperi- 
etur. 

9. Aut quis est 
ex vobis homo, 
quem si petierit 
filius suus panem, 
nunquid lapidem 
dabit ei ? 

10. Etsipiscem 
petierit, nunquid 
serpcntem dabit 
ei? 

11. Si ergo vos 
mali existentes, 
nosti& data bona 
dare filiis vestris, 
quan o magis Pa- 
ter vester qui in 
ceelis, dabit bona 
petentibus se ? 

12. Omnia ergo 
qusBCumque vul- 
tis ut faciant vo- 
bis homines, ita 
et vos facite illis. 
H&BC enim ef*' 



872 



MATTHEW, GHAPTSR VH. 



13c Eio-cX^crc bih 
rrjt OTtvrjf Ttvkrjf • 
ort nXaTila ^ ttvXtj, 

^ dTrdyowa tls t^p 
d^eoXfcay, koi voXkoi 
tla-iv oi (l<r€p)(6fJi€P0t 
Oi avTrfs. 

14. 'Ort oTfvr^ >/ 
frvXi7, KalT€0\LfifA€inj 
17 odos Tf dndyova-a 
(h Trfv Coi'^v, xal ^Xi- 
yot €ia\if oi €vpivKov* 
Tts avT^y, 

15. npotrixtrt bi 
dn6 rw ^€vh(mpO" 
(f)tjTO¥f oiTiPtf epxov' 
rat irp6g vfjMs iy c'y- 
dvfuuri npoQaTfuVf 
t<rcid€v be €l<ri \vKot 
Stpirayes. 

16. *Air6 T&v KOp' 
irS>v avrSiv hnyv^' 
a-ea-Be avrovs. MffTi 
avWeyovaty dsrb d- 
KavOSiv oTa<f}v\^v, ^ 
dv6 rpifidXcav cvKa; 

17. OvTw irau dev- 
bpov dyaBhv Kopnow 
KaXov£ iroi€i' r6 dc 
<raiirp6p bivbpov Kap- 
irovs TToinjpoiff froiti. 

18. Ov bvpoTcu 
bivbpov dyaBhv xap' 
frovs novfipoifs noUlv, 
ovbi bevbpop aaitphp 
Kcunrovg KciXovs 9roi- 

19. Ujov bMpov pi^ 



et les prophetes. 

13. Entrez par la 
porteetroite, car c'est 
la porte large et le 
chemin spacieux qui 
m^ne ^ la perdition ; 
et il y en a beaucoup 
qui entrent par elle. 

14. Car la porte est 
etroite ; et le chemin 
est ^troit qui mene k 
la vie ; et il y en a 
peu qui le trouvent. 

15. Or gardez-vous 
des faux prophetes, 
qui viennent k vous 
en habits de brebis, 
mais qui au-dedans 
sont des loups ravis- 
sans. 

16. Vous les con- 
naitrez k leurs fruits : 
Cueille-t-on les rai- 
sins k des opines, ou 
les figues k des char- 
dons? 

17. Ainsi tout bon 
arbre fait de bons 
fruits ; mais le mau- 
vais arbre fait de 
mauvais fruits. , 

18. Le bon arbre ne 
pent point faire de 
mauvais fruits, ni le 
mauvais arbre faire 
de bons fruits. 

19. Tout arbre qui 



sKausu. 

prophets. 

13. Enter ye in at 
the strait gate ; for 
wide is the gate, and 
broad is the way, that 
leadeth to destruction, 
and many there be 
which go in thereat : 

14. Because strait is 
the gate, and narrow 
is the way, which 
leadeth unto life, and 
few there be that find 
it. 

15. Beware of false 
prophets, which come 
to you in sheep^s 
clothing, but inward- 
ly they are ravening 
wolves. 

16. Ye shall know 
them by their fruits. 
Do men gather grapes 
of thorns, or figs of 
thistles ? 

17. Even so every 
good tree bringeth 
forth good fruit ; but 
a corrupt tree bring- 
eth forth evil fruit 

18. Agoodtreecan- 
not bring forth evil 
fruit, neither can a 
corrupt tree bring 
forth good fruit. 

19. Every tree that 



MATTHBW, CHAPTER VH. 



878 



13. ©fljft fitt Mtrcb 
He rii.ae ^forte ; (ciin 
tie ^fortc t|? wnt, miD 
Ut ^eg ifl breit, ter 
jur ^er^ammut6 ab- 
fu^tet; ttHt it)rer fluD 
t^te(e, tit oarauf warn 
te(u. 

14. Unt hit spfortc 
ifi enc^e, unb tec ^c() 
ifl fcbmal, htx }um ir- 
6enfiit)rer; unh wtni* 
ge tint i^ret, tie ii;n 
^ntetu 

15. 6e^ee eurt \)or, 
t>or ten faffcben ^ro> 

ff;eten, tie in 6(t)aftf9 
(eitevn }n end) ("om^ 
men ; iuwenti^ abtt 
flntflereigenteOBilfe. 

16. Tin iijttn Srucg- 
ttn follt itjx jle erfen-- 
nem Itann man ancb 
Srauben Icfrn t>on ten 
Somen/ cter Scigen 
t)on ten I>i\}thx ? . 

17. 2I(fo ein jeg(ic6cr 
gnter ^J9anm bringet 
gute Srjirbte ; abrr ein 
fau(er ^J3aum bringet 
«rge gtftf^te. 

18. Sin gtttet 93anm 
fann nid)t arge grudite 
bringen, nnt ein fauler 
Saum hxm nid)( gute 
Stncbce bringen. 

19. Sin jeg(i(6ct 



la Ley y los Profetas. 

13. Eatrad por la 
puerta angosta, por- 
que ancha es la pu- 
erta, y espacioso el 
camino que conduce 
a la perdicioD, y mu- 
cho6 son los que en- 
tran por ella. 

14. Porque estrecha 
es la puerta, y an- 
gosto el camino que 
conduce a la vida y 
pocos son los que 
atinan con el. 

15. Guardaos de los 
falsos profetas que 
vienen d vosotros 
vestidos de pieles de 
ovejas y por dentro 
son lobos rapaces. 

16. Por sus frutos 
los conocer^is. Aca; 
so se cogen uvas de 
los espinos, 6 higos 
de los abrojos ? 

17. Asi mismo todo 
drbol bueno lleva bu- 
en fruto, y el arbol 
malo lleva mal fruto. 



18. No puede el 
drbol bueno llevar 
mal fruto, ni el dr- 
bol malo llevar fruto 
bueno. 

19. Todo drbol que 
82 



LATnr. 

Lex et Prophetso. 

13. Intrate per 
angustam portam, 
quia lata porta et 
spatiosa via du- 
cens ad perditio- 
nem,etmultisunt 
ingredientes per 
earn. 

14. Quia angus- 
ta porta, et stricta 
via ducens ad vi- 
tam, et pauci sunt 
invenientes eain. 

15.Attenditeve- 
ro a falsis pn>phe- 
tis, qui veniunt ad 
vos in indumentifl 
ovium, intrinse- 
cus autem sunt 
lupi rapaces. 

16. A fructibus 
eorum agnoscetis 
eos. Nunquidcol- 
ligunt a spinis 
uvam, aut de tri- 
bulis ficum ? 

17. Sic omnis 
arbor bona fruc 
tus bonos facit . 
at cariosa arbor 
fructus males fa- 
cit.. 

18. Non potest 
arbor bona fruc- 
tus males facere, 
neque arbor cari- 
osa fructus pul- 
chros facere. 

19. Omnis arbot 



874 



MATTHEW, CHAPTER VII. 



•BBBK. 

wotovp Kapnov KoKov 
iKK&nrrraiy Koi tls 
irvp /SdXXrroi 

20. "Apaye diro r«v 
Kapnw avT»v cVi* 
yvoMreade 'avTovs, 

21. Ov nas 6 Xc- 
yo>v pjoi, Kvpit, Kv- 

pl€, tla-€\€V(r€TCU €ls 

cvpavav • dXX^ 6 irot- 
mv TO $f\j)pa Tov 
iraTp6s fiov rov €v 
ovpavois, 

22. noXXol c;K>{;(r/ 
fUH iv (KtiPTf rg ^^- 
/M, Kypir, Kvpu, ov 
T^ (rm 6v6paTi rrpO' 
t^firfvaaptVf Koi T« 
<r^ 6v6paTt d€up6vta 
c(r/3aXo/i€v, icai t^ 
a^ 6v6fxaTi bvvdptt^ 
iroXXaf €iFOir}<Tapxv ; 



23. Kal r(^r€ 6fio- 
Xoy^iTO) avTols^ ori 
ovbeiroTc €yv<av vpas • 
anoxatptlrt air* tpov 
ol ipya^SpfPOi rfjv 
avopiav, 

24. liar oZv oaris 

dKOV€l fWV ToifS \6' 

your Tourovsj koi not' 
€4 avTOvSf 6poia<r<o 
aifTov avdpi (ppovipx^j 
tfTTis ^Ko^6prja-€ li/V 
OiKiav avTov iirl rrjv 

I^TpClP • 



ne fait point de bon 
fruit, est coup^ et je- 
t^ au feu. 

20. Vous les con- 
nattrez done k leurs 
fruits. 

21. Tous ceux qui 
medisent: Seigneur! 
Seigneur ! n'entre- 
ront pas dans le roy- 
aume des cieux ; mais 
cclui qui fait la vo- 
lonte de mon Pere 
qui est aux cieux. 

22. Plusieurs me di- 
ront en ce jour-li: 
Seigneur ! Seigneur ! 
n'avons-nous pas pro- 
ph^tise en ton nom ? 
et n^avons-nous pas 
chass6 les demons en 
ton nom ? et n'avons- 
jious pas fait plusieurs 
miracles en ton nom .? 

23. Mais je leur di- 
ra alors tout ouverte- 
ment : Je ne vous ai 
jamais reconnus ; re- 
tirez-vous de moi, 
vous qui vous adon- 
nez k riniquit6. 

24. Quiconque en- 
tend done ces paroles 
que je dis, et les met 
en pratique, je le com- 
parerai k I'homme 
prudent, qui a bati sa 
maison sur la roche ; 



ENOLI8H. 

bringeth not fortli 
good fruit is hewn 
down, and cast into 
the fire. 

20. Wherefore by 
their fruits ye shall 
know them. 

21. Not every one 
that saitb unto me, 
Lord, Lord, shall en- 
ter into the kingdom 
of heaven ; but he 
that doeth the will of 
my Father which is 
in heaven. 

22. Many will say 
to me in that day, 
Lord, Lord, have we 
not prophesied in thy 
name ? and in thy 
name have cast out 
devils ? and in thy 
name done many 
wonderful works ? 



23. And then will I 
profess unto them, I 
never knew you : de- 
part from me, ye that 
work iniquity. 



24. Therefore who- 
soever heareth these 
sayings of mine, and 
doelh them, I will 
liken him unto a wise 
man, which buUt his 
house upon a rock : 



MATTHEW, CHAPTER VH. 



876 



99aum, ^rr nicbt ^ntt 
grucfcte fcrinciet, wirD 
abciet^aueniniDiii^gcU' 
rr .qcTOorfcn. 

20. S)Anim an tt)reu 
gracbtcn foUt i^;r fie 
txitnxmx. 

21. (S^ wtxttn nicbt 
alle, ^ie }u xmx fa<)en : 

^immr(retc6 fornmen; 
foitocrn i)te Dm ^iilcn 
t^un meiiic^ S8a(cr^ 
im ^immel. 

22. (Se n>eri)cn Dide 
ni mir fa<\cn an ;enrm 
iagc: J^err, -Oerr, Ijas 
brn iDir nicbc iu Deinem 
9Iamrii gcn)ei||a,^et ? 
^abeit wir iiid)t in Dri- 
ncm giamcn 3:c«ffl 
au^l^f ttifbcn ? J^abcn 
»ir nicfet iu teincm 
Slamen \>if{c itjamx 
fict^an ? 

23. 3)aun werbe ic6 
il)nen fccrrnneu: 3(t) 
^abe cucb nod) nie cv^ 
Hwnt ; wricfocc allc t)on 
mir, i^r UebcUt)&ter. 



24. 2)arum, wcr bie-' 
fc meiue SXcte tibxtt, 
unb ti)ur fir, oeu t^cr- 
g(rid)e icb ciuem Nui^cn 
ffflmnt, Ux fcin J^an^ 
auf (ineu S(l\ui ban- 
(te. 



no lleva buen fruto, 
sera cortado y echa- 
do al fuego. 

20. Por sus frutos 
pues los conocer^is. 

21. No todo aquel 
que me dice Seuor, 
Senor, entrara en el 
reyno de los cielos, 
sino aquel que hicie- 
re la voluntad de mi 
Padre que est4 en 
los cielos. • 

I 22. Muchos me di- 
r^n en aquel dia Se- 
nor, Senor ^no he- 
mos profetizado en 

I tu norabre ? ^ y no 

: hemos en tu nombre 
lanzado demouios ? 

! ^ y hecho muchos mi- 
lagros en tu nombre ? 



23. Y ent6nces yo 
les dire claramente. 
Nunca os conoci ; 
apartaos de mi ope- 
rarios de la maldad. 



24. Por tanto todo 
aquel que oye estas 
mis palabras y las 
practica, lo compa- 
rare a un hombre 
cuerdo que ediiic6 su 
casa sobre peiia. 



non faciens fruc- 
tum pulchrum, 
exscinditur, et in 
ignem injicitur. 

20. Itaque ex 
fructibus eorum 
agnoscetis eos. 

21. Non omnis 
dicens mihi, Do- 
mine, Domine, 
intrabitinregnum 
cslorum : sed fa- 
ciens voluntatem 
Patris mei, qui in 
cselis. 

22. Multidicenl 
mihi in ilia die: 
Domine, Domine, 
nonne tuo nomi- 
ne prophetavi- 
mus, et tuo no- 
mine damonia 
ejecimus, et tuo 
nomine i fiicien* 
tias multas feci- 
mus ? 

23. Ettunccon- 
fitebor illis. Quod 
ntmquam novi 
vos; abscedite a 
me omnes ope- 
rantes iniquita- 
tem. 

24. Omnis ergo 
quicunque audit 
mea verba hsec, 
et facit ea, assi- 
miiabo ilium viro 
prudenti, qui sedi- 
ficavitdomumsu- 
am super petxam 



876 



MATTHEW, CHAPTER VII. 



25. Ka\ Korifiri ^ 
Ppox^f KOI ^\Bov ol 
rrorafwlt Koik tvvfv 
*rav ol ayf/iOi, kclL 
irpoo-fTTfo-ov rfj olicif^ 

0"€* r€$€fnXuaTo yap 
Vi Trj¥ ntrpcof. 



26. Kal nas 6 6^ 

KOViOV fJtOV TOW X<$- 

yovs TouTovt, Ka\ fifj 
KOiAv avTovSt Sftoua' 
B^a-^TM dvbpl fiMpA 
Sarig aKod6firja( rrjv 
oiidap avTov iirl t^v 

S/JLIIOV > 

27. Kal KariPfj ^ 
Ppox^t Kal ^\6op ol 
irora/Aoi, ical tirptv* 
utxv ol avifioi, Koi 
irpoa4tcoyfrav r^ oIki^ 
iKfltnjt «fal (n«r( • 
Kal fj¥ fi irrwris av- 
rijs firyaXfj, 

28. Kai lykvrro 
OT€ <rvp(ri\tafv 6 
lri<ro\it rovs \6yovs 

TovrovSf fffTrXiJo-- 
a^vTo ol G^Xoi ini 
ri} didaxj avTov • 

29. 'Hi. yhp diM- 
VKtap avToits cor i(ov 
triay tx^^* '^"^ ^^X 
&f ol ypapfiarti^. 



TBBHCH. 

25. ct lorsque la 
pluie est tombee, et 
que !es torrens sont 
venus, et que les 
vents ont souffle, et 
ont donne contre 
cette maison, elie 
n'est point tombee, 
parce qu'elle etait 
fondle sur la roche. 

26. Mais quiconque 
entend ces paroles 
que je dis, et ne les 
met point en pratique, 
sera scmblable k 
I'homme insens6, qui 
a bati sa maison sur 
le sable ; 

27. et lorsque la 
pluie est tombee, et 
que les torrens sont 
venus, et que les 
vents ont souffle, et 
ont donne centre 
cette maison, clle est 
tombee, et sa ruine 
a ^te grandc. 

28. Or il arriva que 
quand Jesus eut ache- 
ve ce discours, les 
troupes furent eton- 
necs de sa doctrine ; 



29. car il les ensei- 
gnait comme ayant 
de I'autorite, et non 
pas comrne les 
scribes. 



25. And the rain 
descended, and the 
floods came, and the 
winds blew, and beat 
8pon that house ; and 
it fell not : for it was 
founded upon a rock. 



26. And every one 
that heareth these 
sayings of mine, and 
doeth them not, shall 
be likened unto a 
foolish man, which 
built his house upon 
the sand : 

27. And the rain 
descended, and the 
floods came, and the 
winds blew, and beat 
upon that house ; and 
it fell : and great was 
the fall of it. 



28. And it came to 
pass, when Jesus had 
ended these sayings, 
the people were as- 
tonished at his doc- 
trine : 

29. For he taught 
them as one having 
authority, and not as 
the scribes. 



MATTHEW, OHAPTSB 711. 



877 



GEKMAN. 

25. 2>amuifin^(A^ 
regeii fie(, ttn^ (in (Stt 
miffcr fam, uuD tret^c- 
ten tie ^iiiDe/ unt 
flicgru an tag J^aiti^, 
(iel eg tocb nic6(, tcnn 
eg nar auf einen gelfen 
gegrinoer. 



26. lUxX> wn tiefe 
tneine 9lete ^iret; mxt 
ttjut tie nirbt/ Oet i|l 
einem ci)iri(f)ren SD^an- 
ne f^Uid), Det fein J^aug 
(Uif ten 6aut bauete. 



27. S)a nun ein ^(a(; 
vegen ftei, unt Cam ein 
(Sewdjfer, tint we^etcn 
tie ^inte, unt {lie^'cn 
an tag J^ang,tafie( eg/ 
unt t^at einen grogen 
Sail. 



28. Unt eg begab flcb/ 
ta 3efug ticfe SHete 
t)oUentetbatte,enrfe$rc 
fl(6 tag 33olf uber fei> 
ne ie^re. 



29. Senn er )>retigte 
gr«a(tig,unt nic^twi? 
tie 6(brifrg((e^rtetu 



8FAHI8H. 

25. Y descendi6 
lluvia, y vinieron ri- 
os, y soplaron vien- 
tos, y dieron con im- 
petu sobre aquella 
casa y no cay6 por- 
que cstaba cimenta- 
da sobre pena. 



26. Y todo aquel 
que oye estas mis 
palabras, y no las 
cumple, sera seme- 
jante a un hombre 
loco que edific6 su 
casa sobre arena. 



27. . Y descendio 
lluvia, y rios vinie- 
ron, y soplaron vien- 
tos, y dieron impetu- 
osamente sobre a- 
quella casa, y cay 6, 
y £u6 grande su rui- 



28. Y sucedio que 
cuando Jesus hubo 
concluido estos razo- 
namientos las gentes 
estaban pasmadas de 
su doctrina. 

29. Porque los en- 
senaba como quien 
tiene autoridad y no 
a la manera de los 
Escribas. 

32» 



LATIir. 

25. £t descen- 
dit pluvia et vene- 
runt flumina, -et 
flavefunt venti, et 
procubuerunt do- 
mui illi, et non 
cecidit : fundata 
erat enim super 
petram. 

26. Et omnia 
audiens mea ver- 
ba heec, et non 
faciens ea, assi- 
milabitur viro 
stulto, qui eedifi- 
cavit domum su- 
am super are- 
nam: 

27. Et descen- 
dit pluvia, et ve- 
nerunt flumina, et 
flaverunt venti, et 
proruerunt domiii 
illi, et cecidit, et 
fuit C81SUS illiuB 
magnus. 

28. Et factum 
est, quum con- 
summasset Jesus 
sermones hos,stu- 
pebant ilium tur- 
bse super doctrina 
ejus. 

29. Erat enim 
docens eos utauc- 
toritatem habens, 
et non sicut Scri* 



878 



MATTHBW, CHAPTER Vm. 



GRBBX. I FBBITGH. 

1. Karafiavrg dc 1. Et quand i1 fut 
avr^ iwo tov $p<ws, [ de 3cendu de la mon- 
riKoXovBrja'av avr^ tagne, de grandes 
6x^01 iroXXo^ tioupes le suivirent. 



2. KaWMXnrpdff 
IkOuvfTpoa-tKvtrti av' 

OiXjfS, tvyaatU fu ica- 
Bapiani, 

3. Ka\ cJCTf (Vac rfjv 
Xf^^f fJi^oTO avTov 
6 'Iiyowj, Xcyttv • 
OffX«, KaBapi(r6rjfn * 
%ai tvBi<as ixaOapi' 
aOtf auTov ^ X€vp€u 

4. Kal Xcyci avrf 
6 *Iff(rovs • *Opa fiij- 

vtraytf a'tavrap dcc- 
^v T^ Ifpfh 1^ 
irpoorf Vfyitr to bmpop, 
6 irpoaira^e Maatjt, 
fls yLOpTvpiov affTols. 

5. ElatXBovTt d€ 
Tf *lrjtrov els Kmrep- 
mo^fi, wpoarfkOw 
aitr^ iKaT6vTapxos 
jFopaKokSiP avTOVy 

6. Kal \fyci>v^ Kv' 
ptf , 6 irais ftou /Sc- 
Skfjrai iv TJ oiKi^ 
vapaKvriichsj d€iv&£ 
OaaapiC^fji€vo£. 

7. Kal Xryci avr^ 
*Ii7(roir* 'Eyo) A- 



2. Et voici, un l^- 
preux vint et se pro- 
sterna devant lui, en 
lui disant : Seigneur, 
si tu veux, tu peux 
me rendre net. 

3. Et Jesus etendant 
la main, le toucha, en 
disant: Je le veux, 
sois net; et inconti- 
nent sa l4pre fut gu^- 
rie. 

4. Puis J^sus lui dit: 
Prends garde de ne le 
dire k personne; mais 
va, et te montre au 
sacrificateur, et offre 
le don que Moise a 
ordonne,afin que cela 
leur serve de temoi- 
gnage. 

5. Et quand Jesus 
fut entr^ dans Caper- 
naiim, un centenier 
vint a lui, le priant, 



6. et disant: Sei- 
gneur, mon serviteur 
est paralytique dans 
ma maison, et il souf- 
fre extremement 

7. J^sus luidit: J*i- 
rai, et je le gu^rirai. 



BNOLIBS. 

1. When he was 
come down from the 
mountain, great mul- 
titudes followed him. 

2. And behold, there 
came a leper and wor- 
shipped him, saying. 
Lord, if thou wilt, 
thou canst make me 
clean. 

3. And Jesus put 
forth his hand, and 
touched him, saying, 
I will ; be thou clean. 
And immediately his 
leprosy was cleansed. 

4. And Jesus saith 
unto him. See thoa 
tell no man; but go 
thy way, show thyself 
to the priest, and offer 
the gift that Moses 
commanded, for a tes- 
timony unto them. 

5. And when Jesus 
was entered into Ca- 
pernaum, there came 
unto him a centurion, 
beseeching him, 

6. And saying, Lord, 
my servant lieth at 
home sick of the pal- 
sy, grievously tor- 
mented. 

7. And Jeaus saiii 
unto him, I will come 



IfATl'llJilW, CHAPTER Tin. 



879 



1. t>a €t abtv t)om 



2. ttn^ iitijt, tin 2(u^; 
f^^i^cr Cum, tin( brtrtr 

l^ii an, ttiio fprarl): 

tmn\\ ^tt mt(( wo^I 
reini.qeii. 

3. Uiid 3eftttf (Irecftf 
ftine Jjaii^ autf, rftl^r^ 
re tl^n an, uiiD fprarb : 
3(b milltf rbun ; fr^ ^e.- 
tetuigct. ^lt^ alfobafo 
»aro er toon fciucm 
2(u^fa( rein. 

4. ltn^ 3ffutf fpracfc 
)tt ti^in : 6ic^e }u, fo^- 
ge e^ nieniiiiio; fom 
tern ge^e l^m, uiid }rU 
ge tid) ^em spriefler, 
ttnb opfpte bie ®abe, 
bieanofe^befoJ)(enbat, 
)u einrm Beuguig nbtv 

5. 2)aa6fr3efutfeiMs 
ging )u Capernaum, 
erat etn J^auptmanu 
}tt ii)m, Ut bae it^u, 



6. Unb fprad) : J^rrr, 
metn jtnecbt (tegc )u 
J^aufe, unb i|! gicbtbrft? 
cbig, nub l^at groge 
Cuar. 



3efntf fpraA jn 
3cb wi\l totm 



1. Y cuando hubo 
dcscendido del monte 
le seguian muchas 
gentes. 

2. Y he aquf vin6 
un leproso, y le ado- 
raba diciendo Seiior, 
81 tu quieres puedes 
limpiarme. 

3. Y estendiendo 
Jesus la mano le to- 
co diciendo : Quie- 
ro, se Iimpio, 6 in- 
mediatamente quedo 
Iimpio de su lepra. 

4. Ent6nces Jesus 
le dij6 : Mira no lo 
digas a nadie mas ve, 
presentate al Sacer- 
dote, y ofrece el don 
que Moyses orden6 
en testimonio a ellos. 



5. Y habiendo en- 
trado Jesus en Ca- 
pharaaum se Ueg6 & 
^1 un centurion ro« 
gandole. 

6. Y diciendo : Se- 
nor, mi criado estd 
postrado en cama 
paralitico reciamente 
atormentado. 

7. Y Jesus le dijo : 
Yo ire y le sanar^. 



LATIH. 

1. Descendcute 
autcm eo de mon- 
te, secutte sunt 
eum turbsB mul- 
tse. 

2. Et ecce le- 
prosus veniens, 
adorabat eum, di« 
cens: Domine,8i 
velis, efficax ea 
me mundare. 

3. Etextencena 
manum, tctisit 
eum Jesus, di* 
cens : Volo, mun- 
dare. Et confes- 
tim mundata est 
ejus lepra. 

4: Et ait illi Je- 
sus : Vide, nemi- 
ni dixeris : sed 
abi, teipsum os- 
tende sacerdoti, 
et offer munus 
quod preecepit 
Moyses, in testi- 
monium illis. 

5. Introeunte au- 
tem Jesu in Ca- 
pernaum, acces- 
sit ad eum Cen- 
turio, appellans 
eum, 

6. Et dicena : 
Domine, puer 
meus jacet in do- 
mo paralyticus, 
vehementer dig* 
cruciatus. 

7. Etait illiJe 
sus : Ego venicna 



680 



MATTIIEW. CHAPTER Yin. 



OBBBK. 

^9 $€pan€wr9» o^- 
t6w. 

8. Kai airoKpt$€\s 

6 sKaT6vTapx^^ ^^ ' 
Kvpi€y oi/K flfil Ua- 
v6s tva fxov vn6 r^p 

dXXa fju&vov tliri Ad- 

mus fuw. 

9. Kaiyapiy^av 
$p€nr6s €i/x( V7r& <£• 

iiuanhv arpariwras * 
Kal Xeyo» rovro), iro* 
ptvBriTi, Kol inptv€- 
rai* ical aXX^, <]p- 
Xov, ical ZpxfTM * 
leal r^ dovX^ fMn/^ 



10. 'Aicovo'ar dc 6 
*Ii7<rovf« iBavfjLSurtf 
Koi cifl'c roir axoXov- 
Bovauf Afirjv Xryco 
v/AU^, ovdc cV r^ *I<r' 
pafj/K Toa-avrrip irt' 
OTUf eZpov, 

11. Ary«» dc v/ttcy, 
or& iroXXol dir6 ova- 
roXtfV ical dviTfAav rj- 
(oucrcy fcal dvaicXt^^- 
ffOVToifxtriL Afipaiifi 
KM *Io-a^ ical *Ia- 
K«j9 cV TJ /3a<riXcif 
r&y ovpap&i^ * 

12 01 dff v2ol r$r 



jr&BNCH. 



8. Mais le centenier 
lui r^pondit : Sei- 
gneur, jc ne suis pas 
digue que tu entres 
sous moQ toit; mais 
dis seulement la pa- 
role, el mon serviteur 
sera gueri. 

9. Car moi-meme, 
qui suis un homroe 
constitue sous la puis- 
sance d^autrui, j^ai 
sous moi des gens de 
guerre, et je dis d 
I'un : Va, et il va ; et 
&un autre: Viens, et 
il vieat; et k mon 
serviteur: Fais cela, 
et il le fait 

10. Ce que J^sus 
ayant entendu, il s'^en 
etonna, et dit k ceux 
qui le suivaient : En 
v^rite, je vous dis que 
je n*QX pas trouve, 
ir.eme en Israel, une 
si grande foi. 

11. Maisje vous dis 
que plusieurs vien- 
dront d'Orient et 
d^Occident, et seront 
k table dans le roy- 
aume des cieux, avec 
Abraham, Isaac et 
Jacob. 

12. £t les enfans du 



BNOU8H. 

and heal him. 

8. The centuricm 
answered and said. 
Lord, I am not wor- 
thy that thou should- 
est come under my 
roof : but speak the 
word only, and my 
servant shall be 
healed. 

9. For I am a man 
under authority, hav- 
ing soldiers under 
me : and I say to this 
man. Go, and he go* 
eth; and to another. 
Come, and he cometh; 
and to my servant. 
Do this and he doeth 
it 



10. When Jesua 
heard it,he marvelled, 
and said to them that 
followed. Verily I say 
unto you, I have not 
found so great faith^ 
no, not in Israel. 

11. And I say unto 
you, That many shall 
come from the east 
and west, and shall 
sit down with Abra- 
ham, and Isaac, and 
Jacob, in the kingdom 
of heaven : 

12. Butthecbildxea 



MATTHEW, CHAPTER VTIl. 



S81 



OBHJIAH 

men, titiD t^n gefunt 

8. S)rr J^aiiptmann 
ttntworeetf, wu^ fprad) : 
^crr, id) bitt nicbr 
totxtt}, tag Dii tnitrr 
ttieiu X)a(t) grl)f|l ; fciir 
tmt fpricf) nuir eiii 
®ort, fo with rociii 
Kuec^t grfttno. 

9. a)fnn tfft tin fin 
aWrnftt>, tain tn 
ObrigCrir uiitere^an, 
mid tjAbt unttv mir 
*rirg«5fiiccfcte ; bod) 
»f nn id) fagc jn einera : 
®r^e tiin, fo gel^rt 
ft ; nnb }nm anbern : 
*omm tjn, fo fommt 
ir ; nuD gn meinrm 
Knedste: ^^ueda^/fo 
ttjnt rv^. 

10. 2)a batf 3ffntf 
Mrctf, tjfrwunterte er 
fid), unb fprud) }u dr^ 
nrn, tir itijn nad)fo(g' 
ten : TOabrlid), id) fa* 
gf rud), fold)rn (SUu- 
ben ^|abe id) tu 3frael 
nifbt gefuuDem 

11.2(brrid)fageeucb: 
93ie(e mcrtcn fommen 
Dom aWorgen unt Dom 
2(benb, unt mic Ttbta^ 
bam unb 3faaf unb 
3^ifob im J&immelreid) 
fltien. 



12. 2(6er bie Stinbet 



BPAKI8H. 



8. Ent6nces el cen- 
turion le respondi6 
diciendo: Sen or yo 
no soy digno de que 
entres debajo de mi 
techo, mas di sola- 
mente la palabra, y 
sanar4 mi criado. 

9. Porque yo tam- 
bien soy hombre su- 
jeto & la autoridad de 
otro, y tengo & mis 
ordenes soldados, y 
digo 4 este : Ve y 
va ; y al otro ven, y 
viene : y d mi cria- 
do : haz esto, y lo 
hace. 



10. Al oir Jesus se 
maravilio y dij6 d 
los que le seguian : 
En verdad os digo 
que no he hallado U 
tan grande, no, ni en 
Israel. 

11. Y OS digo que 
vendran muchos de 
oriente, y de occi- 
dente, y se sentardn 
con Abraham, 6 
Isaac y Jacob en el 
rsvno de los cielos. 



12. Yloshijos del 



LATXH. 

corabo eum. 

8. Et respon- 
dens Centurio ait: 
Domine, non sum 
idoneus ut meum 
sub tectum intres: 
sed tantum die 
verbum, et sana- 
bitur puer meus. 

9. Etenim ego 
homo sum sub 
auctoritatem, ha- 
bens sub meip- 
sum milites : et' 
dico hiiic* Vade, 
et vadit: et alii, 
Veni, et venit : et 
servo meo, Fac 
hoc, et facit. 



10. Audiensau- 
tem Jesus, mira- 
tus est : et ait se- 
quentibus: Amen 
dico vobis, neque 
in Israel tantam 
fidem inveni. 

11. Dico autem 
vobis, quod multi 
ab orientibus et 
occidentibus ve- 
nient, et recum- 
bent cum A bra* 
ham, et Isaac, et 
Jacob in regno 
cffilorum. 

12. Filii autem 



882 



ICATTHEW, CHAPTER VTL 



(Toirai tit t6 (TK&ros 

toTCu 6 KkavBfihf Koi 
6 ppvyfios r&v 6d6v 

13. Kal f^Tfv 6 
*lri(rovt r^ inarov' 
rdpXf ' wrayf , Koi 
&s Marofaus ytvrf' 
Orjfrn troi, Kal XaBri 
6 nats avTov iv tJ 

14 Yia\ M^p 6 

nirpov, Hdt t!j» Iff p- 
0€phv anrrov fftpXrj' 
ft€vr]v Koi irvp€tr<roV' 

15. Kal fjyltOTO lijs 
Xf^p^s avTTJs^ Koi d- 
(fitJKev avTTiv 6 irvpc- 

T6g • KOI ffytp6lj^ KOI 

dtfjK6pti a^T^. 

16. 'O^iW d€ y*- 
yofAtvrjs 7rpoo7i»r/KaM 

wcXKovs • Koi e^fia' 
\e rh irmfiara X<^ 
y<p, «cal frdvras roifs 
KOK&t txovras 4Bt' 
pdfrev<r€v, 

17. "(hr&t vkrjpcf 
$S T* h^^v dik 'H- 
crarov rov npo<pfirov, 
\fyovTos • " A.vt6s 
rhf axr6€V€las rip&v 
fXafit, jcai Tat v6<rovs 
•SdoTaa€tV 



royaume seront jetes 
dans les t^nebres de 
dehors, ou il y aura 
des pleurs et des 
grincemens de dents. 

13. AloTS J6sus dit 
au centenier : Va, et 
qu'il te soit fait selon 
que tu as cm. Et k 
rheure m6me son 
servileur fut gu^ri. 



14. Puis J^sus 4tant 
venu dans la maison 
de Pierre, vit la belle- 
m^re de Pierre qui 
6tait au lit, et qui 
avait la fievre. 

15. Et lui ayant tou- 
che la main, la fievre 
la quitta : puis elle se 
leva, et les servit. 

16. Et le soir ^tant 
venu, on lui presenta 
plusieurs demoni- 
aques, desquels il 
chassa par sa parole 
les esprits malins, et 
gu^rit tous ceux qui 
se portaient mal ; 

17. afin que fut ac- 
compli ce dont il avait 
^te parM par EsaYe 
le pf ophite, en di- 
sant: II a pris nos 
langueurs, et a porte 
nos maladies. 



BHOLI8H. 

of the kingdom shaO 
be cast out into out- 
er darkness : there 
shall be weeping and 
gnashing of teeUi. 

13. And Jesus said 
unto the centurion, 
Go thy way ; and as 
thou hast- believed, so 
be it done unto thee. 
And his servant was 
healed in the self* 
same hour. 

14. And when Jesus 
was come into Peter's 
house, he saw his 
wife's mother laid, 
and sick of a fever 

15. And he touched 
her hand, and the fe- 
ver left her : and she 
arose, and ministered 
unto them. 

16. When the even 
was come, they 
brought unto him 
many that were pos- 
sessed with devils . 
and he cast out the 
spirits with his word, 
and healed all that 
were sick : 

17. That it might 
be fulfil.ed which was 
spoken by Esaias the 
prophet, saying, Him- 
self took our infirmi- 
ties and bare our sick 



MATCHB^y OHARSB VIII. 



888 



ttxsiLur. 

>e^ Strict^ »et^enau^s 
geflogcn in ^ie iu^erfle 
SinfUrnig tiinaue, ta 
n»tr^ fepu J^mUn unt 

13. Ull^3eftt^fpra(6 
jtt tern J^auptmaime : 
(Se^e i;in, Div gefcbcf^e, 
ix>ie ^u gcglaubet ^a|l. 
Unt frin Knec^t n>ar^ 
gefun^ }tt ^erfcfbisen 

14. Uiib 3efu^ fam 
in ^etti J^au^, unb 
fo^C; tag feine &ibmp 
grtmutter (ag, unt ^at^ 

15. S)* stiff et iftre 
J^anb an, un^ ^M Si^ 
bert)etlir6fle. ttnbfte 
flant auf/ itnt tienete 
i^nen. 

16. Tim 2(6enD abet 
6ta(6ten fie t)ie(e S9e« 
felfeneju i^m; unt et 
etieb tie Seiflet m^ 
mie Gotten, nnt macb- 
te^aUetUo Ktanfe ge^ 
funb. 



17. auf tag etfaaet 
ttftrte/ tatf gefagt ifl 
turcb ten ^top^eten 
3efaia, tet ta fprirtt : 
(Sv tjat unfcte &<bxoa<b* 
^eitaufflcbgenommen; 
unt unfete 6eucbe ^at 



BPANI8H. 

reyno serdn echados 
4 las tinieblas esteri- 
ores. Alii ser4 el 
llanto y el crugir de 
dientes. 

13. Y Jesus dij6 al 
centurion : Y6 y co- 
mo creiste asi te sea 
hecho. Y fue'sano 
el siervo en aquella 
hora. 



14. Y habiendo 
llegado Jesus 4 la 
casa de Pedro yi6 & 
su suegra postrada 
en cama, y con iie- 
bre. 

15. Y toc6 su ma- 
no, y la fiebre la dejd, 
y levantose, y los 
servia. 

16. Y yenida la tar- 
de le trajeron mu- 
chos endemoniados, 
y con su palabra lan- 
zaba los espiritus, y 
cur6 4 todos los do- 
lientes. 



17. Para que se 
curopliese lo que fu^ 
dicho por el profeti 
Isaias, cuando dij6 
El mismo tom6 nu- 
estras enfermedades, 
y carg6 con nuestras 



regniejicienturio 
tenebras exterio- 
res: ibi erit fle» 
tus, et fremitua 
dentium. 

13. Et dixit Je 
sus Centurioni : 
Abi, et sicut cre- 
didisti, fiat tibL 
Et sanatus est 
puer ejus in hora 
Ula. 

14. Et ingressus 
Jesus in domum 
Petri, yidit so- 
crum ejus jacen- 
tem et febrici- 
tantem : 

15. Et tetigit 
manum ejus, et 
dimisit eam fe- 
bris : et surrexit, 
et ministrabat eis. 

16. Vespere au- 
tem facto, obtu- 
lerunt ei dsBmoni- 
acos multos, et 
ejiciebat spiritus 
verbo et omnes 
male habentea sa» 
nabat: 

17. Utadimple- 
retur dictum per 
Isaiam Prophe- 
tam, dicentem : 
Ipse iafirmitates 
nostras accepit,et 
segrotationes por- 



884 



M ATTHBW. CHAPTB& Vltl. 



18. *lbi,p di 6 I17- 
irovs iroWoifs Sx^ovs 
irtpX avT^iff c^ccXcv- 
a-fv ajTtXdtiy tts t6 
V€pa», 

19. Kal frpoa-ik* 
6av rTf TpofiftaTfVSy 
€iir€u avTta • Aida- 
iTKaXf, "aKoKovBqa'fo 
trot oTTov €av atrip' 

20. Kal X^yei av- 
r$ 6 'Ii7<ro0ff • Al 

dk&K€Kf? (fiOi>\€OVS 
Z^Onxri^ Koi TO. V€Ttl- 

va Tov ovpavov Kara' 

rou duBptimov ovk 
?;^ci iroO rfjy Kt^a" 
Xfju ic\i»if, 

21. "Ertpos bir&v 
pLaBjirSiv avTQv (ijrty 
avT^ * Kvptc iviTpt' 
^6v ftoi npwrov 
aTTcX^ctp, Koi Bdyftcu 
r6v iraripa fiov, 

22. 'O de 'Ifjtrovs 
riTTcv avT^ • *Ako' 
\ovdit fioi, Jtal a<f)€f 
Tovs vtupous Bdyltai 

Toif9 €aVT&V P€KpOVS. 

23. Kal <)zi3dm 
avT^ (Is t6 irXaiiopt 
^KoXov&tio'av avT^ ol 
fioBrjral avrov. 

24. Kai idov, o-cto'- 
11^9 lUyas iyiv9T0 



18. Or Jesus voyant 
autour de lul de 
grandes troupes, com- 
manda de passer k 
I'autre rivage. 

19. Et un scribe 
s^approchant, lui dit : 
Maitre, je te suivrai 
partout ou tu iras. 



20. Et J^susluidit: 
Les renards ont des 
tanieres, et les oi- 
seaux du ciel ont des 
nids ; mais le Fils de 
rhomme n^a pas ou 
il puisse reposer sa 
tate. 

21. Puis un autre de 
ses disciples lui dit : 
Seigneur, permets- 
moi d'aller premiere- 
ment ensevelir mon 
p^re. 

22. EtJ^susluidit: 
Suis-moi, et laisse les 
morts ensevelir leurs 
morts. 

23. Et quand il fut 
entre dans la nacelle, 
ses disciples le sui- 
virent. 

24. Et, Yoici, il s*e- 
leva sur la mer une si 



18. Now when Je- 
sus saw great multi 
tudes about him, he 
gave commandment 
to depart unto the 
other side. 

19. And a certain 
scribe came, and said 
unto him. Master, I 
will follow thee 
whithersoever thou 
goest. 

20. And Jesus saith 
unto him, The. foxes 
have holes, and the 
birds of the air have 
nests ; but the Son of 
man hath not where 
to lay his head. 



21. And another of 
his disciples said un« 
to him. Lord, suffer 
me first to go and 
bury my father. 



22. But Jesus said 
unto him, Follow me; 
and let the dead bury 
their dead. 

23' And when he 
was entered into a 
ship, his disciples fol- 
lowed him. 

24. And behold, 
there arose a great 



MATTHEW, CHAPTEE Vm. 



885 



mmaMAX, 



18. UitD t>a 3ffu^ \>'ut 

gjolfe urn p(^ fa^f, 

'^ief er ^imUet jritfcit 



19. ttnb e^ ttat ju 
t^m ein @cbriftgrrr^r« 
rer, &ct fpracfe §u i^m : 
aWeifler, ic^ witt tit 
fbtsett/ wo Du ^tngc^cf?. 

20. Seftttf fagte ju 

6cn CSrubru/ uiib t^ic 
ajJ9c( imtet Dem ^'m- 
met ^aSeninefler; abet 
te^ ancnfcdm @o^n 
^at \\i<bt, ta ec feiii 
^iiupt ^inlese. 

21. tlii^ ein anterer 
itnter feineu 3ftu,qertt 
fpracft JU i^m : Jjei-r, 
etiaube mir, M^ ub 
^tngei^f/ unb }ut)oc 
metnen 33ater begrabe. 

22. aber 3efu« fpracd 
}tt il^m : g[0(ge ^ti mir, 
ttnb (agbU^o^teni(rre 
3:otten begrabetu 

23. ttnb er ttat in ba^ 
6(6if/ unb feme 3ftn« 
get folgten i^m. 



S4. Unb fte^e; ba er< 
^ob jlc^ em grof e^ Urn 



SPANISH. 

dolencias. 

18. Mas como vie- 
se Jesus muchas gen- 
tes al rededor de si, 
ordeno pasar 4 la 
otra parte del lago. 

19. Y ilegandcMse & 
^l un Escriba le dijo : 
Maestro te seguire 
adonde quiera que 
fueres. 

20. Y Jesus le dij6 
las zorras tienen ma- 
drigueras y las aves 
del cielo nidos, mas 
el Hijo del hombre 
no tiene donde recli- 
nar su cabeza. 



21. Y otro de sus 
discipulos le dij6 : 
Se£lor permite que 
primero vaya y enti- 
erre k mi padre. 



22. Mas Jesus le 
dijo : sigueme y de- 
ja que los muertos 
entierren 4 sus mu- 
ertos. 

23. Y habiendo ^1 
entrado en un barco 
le siguieron sus flUs- 
cipulos. 

24. Y he aqui se 
levanto una tempes- 

33 



uvit. 

18. Videns an- 
te m Jesus multas 
turbas circum se, 
jussit abire in ul- 
terius. 

19. Etaccedens 
unus Scriba, ait 
illi: Magister, se** 
quar te quocum* 
que ieris. 

20. Et dicit ei 
Jesus : Vulpes fo- 
veas habent, et 
volucres cseli urn- 
bracula : Filius 
autem hominis 
non habet ubi ca- 
put reclinet. 

21. Alius autem 
discipulorum ejus 
ait illi : Domine, 
permitte mihi pri- 
mum abire, et se- 
pelire patrem me- 
um. 

22. At Jesus ait 
illi : Sequere me, 
et dimitte mortu- 
OS sepelire sues 
mortuos. 

23. Et ascen- 
dente eo in navi- 
culam, secuti sunt 
eura discipuli e- 
jus. 

24. Et ecce mo* 
tus magnus fuc- 



886 



MATTHEW, CHAPrER Vm. 



6BBEK. 

iy rfj 6a\da-aTif &<rr€ 
r6 irkoiop KaXvnrc- 
wBai vir6 twv KUfxa- 
rmv ' avrbg dc ixd' 
Btvbt, 

25. Ka\ TT/KKreX- 
66vT€s ol puBrfToi 
ttUTOV rfydpap avroVf 
\(yovT«t * KvpUy o-tt- 
trov ifJMSy ojroXXv- 
fieda. 

26. Kal Xeyet av- 

Tols • Ti dctXoi ffOTCi , 

Aty($}ruiTOi ; Tore 
iy(p$€lf iinrifuftrt ' 
nits dvifUHS Koi r§ 
BaXdaoTf • Ka\ cyeyc- 
ro yaX^vi; fteyakfi, 

27. Ot' dc ^y^/>o»- 
iToi iBavfAacav, Xc- 
yowfff • IloraircJs 

ffOTil/ O^Of, OTA Kul 

ol S»€fJuoi jcat 7 ^a- ' 
Xairo-a viraxovovaii' , 



avr^ 
28. 



Ka\ 



t\B6vTi I 
avrf tU TO vipap els ' 

yco^Mov, viTTfvnja'av 
avT^ bvo daifMuiio- 

t»v €^fpx6p€P0i, x«- 
^TTol Xtay, &0TC /iJ7 
axyfiP Tiph irape\- 

Beiu dta T^s 6dov 

iKtivrjs* 



FBBMCH. 

grande tempete, que 
la nacelle etait con- 
verte de flots ; et Je- 
sus dormait. 

25. Et «es disciples 
vinrent, et I'eveille- 
rent, en lui disant : 
Seigneur, sauve-nous, 
nous p^rissons! 

26. E: 11 leur dit: 
Pourquoi avez-vous 
peur, gens de petite 
foi ? Alors s'etant 
leve, il parla forte- 
raent aux vents et a 
la roer, et il se fit un 
grand calme. 

27. Et les gens qui 
^taient l^ s'en eton- 
ne rent, etdi rent: Qui 
est celui-ci que les 
vents meme et la mer 
lui obeissent ? 

28. Et quand il fut 
pass^ k I'autre c6t6, 
dans le pays des Grer- 
geseniens, deux de- 
moniaques ^tant sor- 
tis des sepulcres vin- 
rent le rencontrer ; et 
ils 6taient si dange- 
reux que personne ne 
pouvait passer par ce 
chemin-la. 



29. Kai Idoit txpa- 29. Et, voici, ils 
iav, \fyovr€S' Tl sVcri^rent^endisant: 
miiv Kai a-otf ^lijaoO Qu'y a-t-il entro nous 



svousa. 

tempest in the aea, 
insomuch that the 
ship was coVei^d with 
the waves : but he ' 
was asleep. 

25. And his disci- 
ples came to him, and 
awoke him, saying. 
Lord^ save us : we 
perish. 

26. And he saith 
unto them, Why are 
ye fearful, O ye of 
little faith ? Then he 
arose, and rebuked 
the winds and the 
sea; and there was 
a great calm. 

27. But the men 
marvelled, saying, 
What manner of man 
is this, that even the 
winds and the seii 
obey him ! 

28. And when he 
was come to the othei 
side, into the country 
of the Grcrgesenes, 
there met him two 
possessed with devils, 
coming out of the 
rom bs, cxcee d ing 
fierce, so that no man 
might pass by tliat 
way. 

29! And behold,th€y 
cried out, sa ;ing. 
What have wo .o do 



HATTHBW, OHAPTBR VHI. 



887 



GERMAN. 

^eflfim tm Wlttv, al\o, 
i)ag*iurt) M^ ©cbifflfin 
mir vlDfllfii ^f^fcft 
t9ar^ ; m\^ cr fcbUef. 

25. Utt^ Die 3ftuA(r 
triuru gu t{)m/ unD 
ipccftrn il}u atif, ll^^ 
fprafbftt: Jjcrr, lyilf 
UU0, u>ir t>cr^rcbcn! 

26. J>a fiiAte rr ;|u 
tf)iirit : 3f)r ^[ciu<|(«iii.- 
b^acu, w%iriim rri;D tt)r 
fo fHrdjtfam ? Ull^ 
tialt^ aiif, uiib bfOro^' 
l^erc ^cn ^in^ tnt^ &a^ 

fUllf. 

27. Sir aWfufctrn 
abcr t)frn>un^crtf u fid), 
unD fpr%i(t(a : ^B3%i0 i{i 
^a^ fiir etn 9)?aun, tai^ 
itim ISjinb uitD SERcrr 
gcI;orfam i|l ? 

28. Ifiib rr fatn ;fii-- 
feit Dc^ WUfcte, ill tir 
®egfll^ tcr (Bfr^aefc- 
ttcr. S>a liffcu it)m 
entjif^ru jwrcit 'JSefcfs 
fnir, ^tr Pamrn au^ Dm 
^oorru^rabenir tmb 
ttarcM ffl?r f^rimmig, 
alfO/ ba^' uirmand Die- 
frlbe ©tnige wauDchi 
fonnre. 

29. Unb {lc()f, 0^ 
fcfcrieeu unb fprackcn : 
lidi 3rfu, ^ll @ot}n 



tad tan grande en el 
mar que las olas cu- 
brian el barco. Y el 
dormia. 

25. Y Uegandose & 
^1 BUS discipulos le 
dispertaron diciendo: 
Sen or, salvanos que 
perecemos. 

26. Y el les dijo : 
^ Que temeis 6 hom- 
bres de poca fe ? Y 
levantandose repren- 
dio a los vientos y a 
la mar y sigui6se 
gran bonanza. 

27. Y los hombres 
se maravillaron y 
decian : ^ Quieu es 
este que hasta ios 
vientos, y el mar le 
obedecen ? 

28. Y cuando Je- 
sus hubo pasado & 
la otra parte del la- 
go en el pais de los 
Gergesenos vinieron 
k su encuentro dos 
endemomados que 
salian de los sepul- 
cros de tal manera 
fieros que nadie po- 
dia pasar por aquel 
camino. 

29. Y he aqui que 
empezaron 4 dar gri- 
tos diciendo i que te- 



LATIV. 

tus est in man, 
ita ut naviculam 
operiri sub flucti- 
bus : ipse vero 
dormiebat. 

25. Etacceden* 
tes discipuli ejus, 
suscitaverunt e- 
um, dicentes : Do- 
mine, salva no6« 
perimus. 

26. Etdiciteis: 
Quid timidi estis, 
exigusB fidei ? 
Tuncsurgensim- 
peravit ventis et 
mari, et facta est 
tranquillitas mag- 
na. 

27. At homines 
mirati sunt, di- 
centes : Qualis 
est hie, quia et 
venti et mare obe- 
diunt ei ? 

28. Et venienti 
l^^si in ulterius in 
regionem Gerge- 
senorum, occur- 
rerunt ei duo dee- 
moniaci de monu- 
mentis exeuntes, 
saevi nimis, ita ut 
non yalere quen- 
quam transire oer 
viam illam. 

29. Et ecc-e cla 
maverunt, dicen- 
tes: Quid nobif 



S88 



MATTHEW) CHAPTER Vm. 



OBBVS. 



vUtcv Qeovi IjXOes 
ftdc frp6 Kaipw Pa* 



30. *Hy dc fULKpilV 

31. Ol BidaifMvts 
vaptKoKow avrhvt 
Xryoi^f r • El tK^ak- 
\€tt ^fJMs, iiriTptyjrov 
^ttur arrtKBtlv fls 
rijv aytKrfv t&v ;(04- 
po>y. 

32. Kai €ifrcv av- 
roif • 'YiraycT*. 01 
d^ t^iKB6vT€s aTT^X- 
<?oi» €if T^i* ayffXi7y 
rS»iV\<M.p<Av. Kal 2dov, 
&pp,r)frt irao'a ^ ay/- 
Xi; r&y x°^P^*^ Kara 

TOV KprfflPOV €lg rffv 

OaKatrcaVf ical ott/- 
tfovov cVroiff vdao'CF. 

33. 0/ df ^OCTKOtf. 

rcff t<j)vyov, Ka\ airtX' 
66mti tls T^iv frdXfp, 
diTTyyrtXay vraira, 
Kai ra rSn^ dai/iOM- 



3^. Kal fdov, fraera 
>/ ntSXif i^\6tv rip 
(rvyairn7(riv r^ 'li;* 
yoS • Kal 2d<$i^r9 ov- 



FBBHCH. 

et toi, Jesus, Fils de 
Dieu? Es-tu venu 
ici nous tourmenter 
avant le temps } 

30. Or, il y avait un 
peu loin d'eux un 
grand troupeau de 
pourceaux qui pais- 
sait. 

31. Et les demons 
le priaient, en disant : 
Si tu nous jettes de- 
hors, permets-nbus 
do nous en aller dans 
ce troupeau de pour- 
ceaux. 

32. Et il leur dit: 
AUez. Et eux ^tant 
sortis, s'en all^rent 
dans le troupeau de 
pourceaux ; et, voilk, 
tout ce troupeau de 
pourceaux se preci- 
pita dans la mer, et 
ils moururent dans 
les eaux. 

33. Et ceux qui les 
gardaient s^enfuirent, 
et etant venus dans la 
ville, ils racont^rent 
toutcs CCS choscs, et 
ce qui etait arrive aux 
demon iaques. 

34. Et voiR, toute 
la vUle alia au-devant 
de Ji^sus; et Payant 
vu \ii le pri^rerit de 
ST retirer d« leur 



BNOUSB. 

with thee, Jesus, thoo 
Son of God? art thou 
come hither to tor- 
ment us before the 
time ? 

30. And there was 
a good way off from 
them an herd of mary 
swine, feeding. 

31. So the devils 
besought him, saying 
If thou cast us out, 
suffer us to go away 
into the herd of 
swine. 

32. And he said un- 
to them, Go. And 
when they were come 
out, they went into 
the herd of swine : 
and behold, the whole 
herd of swine ran vio- 
lently down a steep 
place into the sea, 
and perished in the 
waters. 

33. And they that 
kept them fled, and 
went their ways into 
the city, and told ev- 
ery thing ; and what 
was befallen to the 
possessed of the dev- 
ils. 

34. And behold, the 
whole city came out 
to meet Jesus: and 
when they saw him, 
they besought him 



MATTHEW. CHAPTER VIII. 



QMBMAX, 

mittiv in tt)iiu? aSifl 
tu i)ccgefommfn tiu^ 
lu qudlnt/ e^e torn c^ 
Betr t|l ? 

30. (£^ war aber frr- 
tie Dcti i^ueii eine gro|je 
J^certe @due an tn 

81. 2)A battxx itin Die 
Seufd, uiiD fpradjeu : 
^illfl (It uii^ anetvtu 
ben, fo erUube un^ in 
hit s^mtt @&ue )u 
fa^rcn. 

32. ttttb cr fpracb: 
gubrett^in. 3>afntixux 
ju aud, unD fu^teit in 
hit ^ttxtt 61u€.. Uiib 
()rt)e/ ^ie 9An}e ^eerde 
&&nt lUtrite flcb mic 
rtiirttt 6tunn in ba^ 
IDteer, unb erfofitn im 
SBatrcr. 



33. Unb bie bitten 
fcijtn, unb diugen tjin 
m bie 6cabr, uno fag' 
ttn ha^ alle^, unb xoit 
i^ mit Un aSefefTcuen 
ergaugen n»ar. 



34. llnbfie^e,baging 
bie gan}e 6catc ^erau^ 
3ffu eutgegen. Unh ha 
fie itin fat)etsi; ftaten fl" 
tbiif bag cr ten it}uv 



SPANISH. 

nemos que ver con- 
tigo Jesus Hijo de 
Dios ? ^ Has venido 
aca a atormentarnos 
antes de tiempo ? 

30. Y lejosdeellos 
estaba paciendo una 
gran piara de puer- 
cos. 

31. Y los demonios 
1e rogaron diciendo : 
Si nos echas de aqui 
permitenos que vay- 
an\ps a aquella pidra 
de pueicos. 

32. Y el les dij6, 
Id. Y habiendo ellos 
salido se fueron k la 
piara de los puercos. 
Y he aqui que toda 
la piara de los puer- 
cos se precipito en la 
mar por un despena- 
dero, y perecieron en 
las aguas. 

33. Y los que los 
guardaban huyeron 
y se fueron 4 la ciu- 
dad, y lo contaron 
todo con lo que ha- 
bia acontecido d los 
endemoniados. 



et tibi, Jesu fill 
Dei? VenistihuG 
ante tempus tor* 
quere nos ? 

30. Erat autem 
longe ab illis grez 
porcorum multo« 
rum pascens. 

31. Verum dsB- 
mones appella* 
bant eum, dicen- 
tes : Si ejicis nos, 
permitte nobis 
abire in gregem 
porcorum. 

32. Et ait illis, 
Abite. lUi autem 
exeuntes abierunt 
in gregem porco- 
rum. Et ecce ir- 
ruit totus grex 
porcorum per 
preeceps in mare, 
et mortui sunt in 
aquis. 

33. Pastores au- 
tem .f\]gerunt, et 
venientes in civi* 
tatem, nunciave* 
runt omnia, et ilia 
qusB dsmoniaco* 
rum. 



34. Y he aqui qye 
toda la ciodad sali6 
d encontrar a Jesus, 
y al verle le rogaron ' videntes eum, ro 
qu^ se fucse de sus gabant ut traosi 

33* 



34. Et ecce tota 
civitas exiit in oc« 
pursum Jesu. E 



890 



MATTHEW, CHAPTER UU 



OBBBX. 

6pi»p avm¥. 

1. Kal ifiPits c2r 
n& irXoTov, dun€pa- 
a-€, KoH ^XBtv €U Ti)y 

2. KaHdov, frpoo'c- 
ffitpop avT^ irapaXv- 
riKov tfVi Kklinft 3c- 
PkiifjJvov * xal 2dtt>p 
4 'Iiyo-owff T^y niartv 
alrwf, crTTc r^ ira- 
9aXtrr(x^ • Boperct 

tX AfAopriai ow. 

3. Kal IM, Ti»€s 
T&v rpofifiorttiv tl' 
wov €¥ iavToU • O^- 

4. Kat Id^v 6 'I17- 

avTunf, €iirtp* 'ImotI 
Vfifls hfOufKiaBt iro- 
n/p& cy racff kapblais 

5. Tiycip€aTii» tw- 

*hf\i€»vrai <roi ai 
dfidpTiai' ^ flvftif* 
'Ey€tpai KM Kfpard' 
ici; 

6. 'Iw «* c»5rr, 

vi6t Tov dyfipwnv 
M T^s yrjs d<f>Uvai 
ifiofyrias * r<Srf X«yci 
'f iraoaXvT xA * *E- 



TBBMOH. 



pays 



. 1. Alore, ^tant en- 
tr4 dans la nacelle, 
il jrepassa la mer, et 
vint en sa ville, 

2. Et, void, on lui 
pr^senta un paraly- 
tique couch^ dans un 
lit. Et Jesus voyant 
leur foi, dit au para- 
lytique : Aie bon 
Courage, mon fiU 1 
tes p^ch^s te sont 
pardonn^s. 

3. Et, voici, 
quelques-uns des 
scribes disaient en 
eux-memes : Celui- 
ci blaspheme. 

4. Mais Jesus, con-, 
naissant leurs pen- 
s^es, leur dit : Pour- 
quoi pcnsez-vous du 
mal dans vos cogurs ? 

5. Car lequel est le 
plus ais^, ou de dire : 
Tes p^ches te sont 
pardonnes ; ou de 
dire : Leve-toi, et 
marc he ? 

6. Or, afin que vous 
sachiez que le Fils 
de rhomme a le pou- 
voir sur la terre de 
pardonnerles p^ches, 
il dit afors au paifily- 



XirOLUH. 

that he would depot 
out of their coasts, 

1. And he entered 
into a ship, and passed 
over, and came into 
his own city. 

2. And behold, they 
brought to him a man 
sick of the palsy, ly- 
ing on a bed : and 
Jesus, seeing their 
faith, said unto the 
sick of the palsy, Son, 
be of good cheer; thy 
sms be forgiven thee. 

3. And behold, cer- 
tain of the stcribes said 
within themselves. 
This man blasphem- 
eth. 

4. And Jesus, know- 
ing their thoughts, 
said. Wherefore Sink 
ye evil in your hearts? 



5. For whether is 
easier to say. Thy 
sins be forgiven thee ; 
or to say, Arise, and 
walk? 

6. But that ye may 
know that tlie Son of 
man hath power on 
earth to forgive sins, 
(then saith he to the 
sick of the palsy«) 



MATTHBW, CHAPTJSft IX. 



891 



<9rni}t wtiibm moUre. 



1. 3>a ttat er in H^ 
6cl)i|f, ttu^ ^^r mu 
Orr -^ciikber, uu^ tarn 
in fetne 6raor. 

2. lfnl>fle^M>abrart-' 
mi fie in i^m etncn 
(8icbtbr&cbigen, (er 
lag auf etnem 9Setre. 
»a nun 3efntf t^ren 
(S(auben fat), fpracb er 
}n trm (St(bt6rn((}t« 
gen: ©e9 getrofl, mein 
@o^n, beine GftnOen 
flno (ir )>ergeben. 

3. Un( jlel^e, etftcte 
nurer ten (Scbrifrae.- 

Ce^rrenfpracbenke^fict 
feibil: 2)tefrr U|Urt 
®crt. 

4. S)aa6er3efu^i^re 
(Sebanfen fat}, fprad) 
et: CSBarum beutet t()r 
fe Vrge^ in enren ^er- 
)en? 

5. ^20e((be^ i|l fet(6'' 
ter, }nfagen: S>ir|lnt 
beine 6finben t^erge^ 
btn ; oter jn agen : 
6cet)e auf, unl »an« 
Me? 

6. Vuf bag t^ a6er 
wtffet, tag bef 3)?enf(b' 
en 6dl^n SRacbr babe 
auf (Erten/ tie 6ftn- 
ben }n t)ergeben, fpracb 
er }n tern (?icbtbrucbi> 



tirminos. 



1. Y entrando en 
un barco pas6 & la 
otra ribera, y vino 4 
su ciudad. 

2. Y he ciqui le tra- 
jeron un paralitico 
postrado en un lecho, 
y viendo Jesus la fS 
de ellos dijo al para- 
litico: Ten confian- 
za, hijo, tus pecados 
te son perdonados. 



3. Y he aqu( algu- 
nos de los Escribas 
decian para consigo: 
Este blasfema. 

4. Y viendo Jesus 
sus pensamientos dij6 
^ porqu^ pensdis mal 
en vuestros corazo- 
nes? 

5. ^Cual cosa es 
mas facil decir per- 
donados te son tus 
pecados, 6 decir le- 
vantate y anda ? 

6. Pues paraque s^- 
pais que el Hijo del 
hombre tiene potes- 
tad en la tierra de 
perdonar pecados, 
levantate (dij6 el en- 



I.AT1V. 

ret a finibut eo- 
nim. 

1. Et ascendens 
in naviculam, tra- 
jecit, et venit in 
propriam civita- 
tem. 

2. Et ecce ofie- 
rebant ei paraly- 
ticum in lecto ja- 
centem : et vi- 
dens Jesus fidem 
illorum, dixit pa* 
ralytico: Confide 
fili, , remittuntur 
tibi peccata tua. 

3. Et ecce qui 
dam Scribarum 
dixerunt in seip- 
sis : Hie blasphe 
mat. 

4. EtvidensJe 
sus cogitationes 
eorum, dixit, Ut 
quid vos cogitatis - 
mala in cordibus 
vestris ? 

5. Quid enim 
est facilius, di- 
cere : Dimittun- 
tur tibi peccata 
an dicere, Eri- 
gere, et ambula ? 

6. Ut autem sci- 
atis quod auctori- 
tatem Jisibet Fill- 
us hominis in ter- 
ra remittere pec- 
cata : tunc alt 



392 



MATTHEW, CHAPTER IZ. 



KXhnjPy Kai virayt tls 
t6u oU6» aov, 

7. Kai €ytpO€U, 

dirTJ\6€V €ls TOV ol" 

KOV avTov, 

8. *l^VTt£ dc oi 

o;^XoA €6avfJMaav, nai 
M$€ura» t6v Qfhvy 
t6v d6irra €(ov<ria» 
rouLVTrfif rcis aifOpti* 
inns. 

9. Kai irapayci>p 6 
*lfliTovs €KeW«Vt cidcy 
Mpomov Ka6rffjL€Pov 
im t6 rik&vtovt 
iiarBcuov Xr/^/icvoy • 
KciiXeyti avT^, *A«o-* 
Xov^cc fU)i. Kai ova- 
orar, ^KoXovBrjartv 

10. Km€y€V€Toav- 
Tov dvaK€ifi€vov iv 
TJ Oiicia, «ai IdoVf 
iroXXoi r(Xa>yai koX 
dfjuipToaiKoi fXB6vT€ty 
avvai^KfivTO ry *Ij;- 
cov Kol TOIS fioBti' 
TW avrov. 

11. Kai lddwT€Sol 
^opuroMMt mwop rdis 
fjuiOriTtusavTOv' Aia- 
tI intra Twv rcXttywr 
icol ^^utpruiKAv to^i- 
ci o tMffKoKot tf- 



tique : L^ve-toi, 

charge ton lit, et t^en 
va en ta maison, 

7. Et il se leva, et 
s^en alia en sa mal 
son. 

8. Cc que Ics troupes 
ayant vu, elles s'en 
^tonnerent, et elles 
glorifierent Dieu de 
cc qu^il avait donn^ 
une telle puissance 
aux hommes. 

9. Puis J^sus pas- 
sant plus avant, vit 
un horn me, nomme 
Matthieu, assis au Vieu 
du p^age, et il lui dit : 
Suis-moi, et il sc le- 
va, et le suivit. 



10. Et comnre Je- 
sus etait k table dans 
la maison de Mat- 
thieu, voici, plusieurs 
peagers, et des gens 
de mauvaise vie, qui 
^taient, venus I^, se 
mirent k table avec 
J^sus et ses disciples. 

11. Ce que les pha- 
risiens ayant vu, ils 
dirent JL ses disciples : 
Pourquoi votre mai- 
tre mange-t-il avec 
des p^a^^rs et des 
gens de mauvaise 
vie^ 



SKOLISH. 

Arise, take up Hay 
bed, and go unto 
thine house. 

7. And he arose, 
and departed to his 
house. 

8. But when th 
multitude saw it, the\ 
marvelled, and glori- 
fied God, which had 
given such power un* 
to men. 

9. And as Jesus 
passed forth from 
thence, he saw a man 
named Matthew, sit- 
ting at the receipt of 
custom : and he saith 
unto him, Follow me. 
And he arose, and 
followed him. 

10. And it came to 
pass, as Jesus sat at 
meat in tlie house, 
behold, many publi- 
cans and sinners 
came and sat down 
with him and his dis- 



11. And when the 
Phs^isecs saw it, they 
said unto his disci- 
ples. Why eateta 
your Master with pub" 
iicans and sinners ? 



MATTSXW, CHAPTSB IX. 



sn 



(etit Sett aitf, ttlt^ se-- 

7. ttno ft flanb auf, 
nn^ gtng V^t^ 

8. 2)a ta^ SBcff ba^ 

fl(6/ uuD frte^ (Sett, 
ttv fc((be 97?ac6t reti 
aRenfc()rn gegeben l^at. 



9 Itn^ M 3efu^ t>ctt 
^allnen gtng/ fa^ er et« 
nen SWcnfcien am Soil 
fl(ett, ^rr ^ieg anar- 
t^&tttf, un^ fptac6 ju 
t^m:9[^I})emtr. Un^ rr 
(lattD auf, un^ foigte 



10. Ull^ c^ besab ft(b, 
^a er }u ^ifrbr fag im 
Jjanfe, jtclje, ta fameu 
l>i(le 3iHiirr unO Gftn- 
rrt/iinDfagftt julifcbe 
mtt 3ffn un^ fciimi 
3ftugrrit. 



11. Da batf biefp^a- 
rificr fa^en/ fpradjni 
jte ji: ff iiiftt 3ikn>(rru : 

per mit 3i'l«ertt tint 
eiku^err ? 



t6nces al paralitico) 
toma tu lecho, y vete 
a tu ca^. 

7. Y levant6se y 86 
fue & su casa. 

8. Y cuando le vie- 
ron las gentes se ma- 
ravillaron y glorifica- 
ron & Dios, por ha- 
ber dado tal potestad 
k lo9 hombres. 

9. Y pasando ade- 
l&nte de alli Jesus 
vio & un hombre que 
estaba sentado en 
d6nde se recibian los 
tributos, el cual se 
Uamaba Matheo, y 
le dijo : Sigueme, y 
el Ievant6s6 y le si- 
gui6. 

10. Y acaeci6 que 
estando Jesus senta- 
do i. la mesa en la 
casa, he aqu( vinie- 
ron muchos publici- 
nos y pecadores, y 
se> sentaron d comer 
con el y sus discipu- 
los. 

11. Y al verlo los 
Phariseos dijeron & 
sus discipulos ^ por- 
qu^ yuestro Maestro 
come con publicanos 
y pecadores ? 



LATIir. 

paralytico : E- 
rectus telle tuum 
lectum, et abi in 
domum tuam. 

7. Et erectus 
abiit in domum 
suam. 

8. Videntes au- 
tem turbee, timu- 
erunt, et glorifi- 
caverunt Deum, 
dantem auctorita- 
tem talem homi- 
nibus. 

9. Et prseteri- 
ens Jesus inde, 
vidit hominem se- 
dentem in telonio*, 
MatthsBum dic- 
tum : et ait illi : 
Sequere me : et 
surgens sequutus 
est eum. 

10. Et factum 
est eo discum- 
bente in domo, et 
ecce multi publi- 
cani et peccatores 
venientes, dis- 
cumbebant cum 
Jesu, et discipu- 
lis ejus. 

11. Et videntes 
Pharissei dicebant 
discipulis ejus : 
Quare cum pub 
licanis et pecca 
toribus manducat 
Magister vester? 



894 



MATTHEW, CHAPTER IX. 



12. *0 d€ JJiTOVt 

^ovanSf eurcv av- 
TOig • Ov xP^Loof Z" 
Xovtriv ol ifrxyomtt 
uir/x»0, dXh? ol ica- 
t»s €xoyr€£. 

13. llop€vO€»Tes di 
lidBrrt Ti ivriv • *E- 
\toif 6«\oiy Ka\ ov 
Bvaiaw ov yap i^X- 
Boif KoKfirai diKaiovs, 
aVX^ Afiaprcsikovs tls 
li/eravouuf. 



14. T^e npoo-ip' 
Xovrai avT^ ol ftoBfi' 
Ta\ 'loKivpov, Xfyor- 
r€S* Atari ^fi€is koX 
ol ^^apuralot yi/orn;- 
OfAtV TToXXciy ol dc 
ftaSiiTal crov ov mj- 
VTfvova-i ; 

15. Ka\ tltrev av- 
roc; 6 *lria'0Vf Mfj 
dwavTM 01 viol TOV 
wfiiftavos vtvBtbf^ 
€<p oa-ov firr {tvT»v 
€aTtv 6 wpxftlos ; 
cXrvcrovroi Ac ^fjjpai 
Srasf dirap6j air ov- 

•rcoy 6 pvfi<f>loSf koI 
t6t€ ytj<rr€V(rovTtv, 



16. O^d^lff de fiTi- 
/SoXXci rrripXrjfJLa pa • 
tow ayva^ov «r 
'fi^rtea TTaXaiA' atpw 



12. Mais Jesus IV 
yant entendu, leur 
dit : Ceux qui sont 
en sante n^ont pas be- 
som de medecin, mais 
ceux qui se portent 
mal. 

13. Mais allez, et 
apprenez ce que 
veulent dire ces pa- 
roles : Je veux mise- 
ricorde, et non pas 
sacrifice ; car je ne 
suis pas venu pour 
appeler a la repen- 
tance les justes, mais 
les p^cheurs. * | 

14. Alors les disci- 1 
pies de Jean vinrent 
a lui, et lui dirent : 
Pourquoi nous et les 
pharisiens jeunons- 
nous souvent, et tes 
disciples ne jeunent 
point ? 

15. Et Jesus leur r^- 
pondit : Les gens de 
la chambre du nou- 
veau man6 peuvent- 
ils s^afHlger pendant 
que le nouveau ma- 
ri6 est avec eux.^ 
Mais les jours vien- 
dront que le nouveau 
marie leur sera ote, 
et c'est alprs quHls 
jeuner^nt. 

16. Aussi personne 
ne met une pi^ce de 
drap neuf k un vieux 
habit ; car ce qui eat 



SK0U8H. 

12. But when Jesus 
heard that, he said 
unto them, They that 
be whole need not a 
physician, but they 
that are sick. 

13. But go ye an 
learn what that mean 
eth, I will have mer- 
cy, and not sacrifice : 
for I am not come to 
call the righteous, but 
sinners to repentance. 



14. Then came to 
him the disciples of 
John, saying. Why do 
we and the Pharisees 
fast oft, but thy dis- 
ciples fast not ? 



15. And Jesus said 
unto them, Can the 
children of the bride- 
chamber mourn, as 
long as the bride- 
groom is with them ? 
but the days will 
come when the bride- 
groom shall be taken 
from them, and then 
shall they fast 

16. No man putteth 
a piece of new cloth 
unto an old garment : 
for that which is put 



MATTHEW, GHAPTBR JX. 



895 



12. 2)a tad 3efud 
i)bxtt , fpracb er }U il)' 
nen: .2)ie ©tartcii U^ 
^ixfmueTHxiMxiidit, 
fonbern tie Xxmttix. 



13. (Se^ft a6er ^in, 
unt iernet/ wad tad 

flefallen an 25armt;m 
{igteit, unb tiic^r am 
Opfcr. 3cb frill gefom- 
men, tie @iYuter }ur 
Sttge gu rnfen, nnt 
nicbt tie grommen. 

14. 3ntef ramen tie 
Sunger 3o^anntd }u 
itixn, nnt f}>cac6c^i : 
^arnm faf!en toir nnt 
tie q)l)arifdfc fo \)iel, 
ttntteine3&ndetfa(len 
ni(tr? 

15. Sefttd fprac^ jn 
i^ncn : ^ie finnen 
tie ^0(b}eirleute hit 
era^en, fo Im^t ter 
Sv&uti.qam U\) i^nen 
ifl ? Q^d u»irt afrcr tie 
^eir tommen, ta^ tcr 
Srdntigam ton if^nen 
$enommen n)trt; aid- 
tann werten t^e fatten. 



16. giiemant flicfet 
ein a(ted ^(eit mit ei- 
uem Uppen ton nenem 
%U(b ; tenn tei: iappe 



12. Mas oyendolo 
Jesus les dij6 : no 
tienen los que estan 
sanos necesidad de 
medico, sino los que 
estan enfennos. 

13. Id pues^ y a- 
prended lo que sig< 
nifica : Misericordia 
quiero, y no sacriii< 
cio, porque no he 
venido a Uamar los 
justos sino los peca- 
dores & arrepentimi- 
ento. 

14. A esta sazon 
vinieron i eMos dis- 
cipulos de Juan di- 
ciendole ^ porqu^ 
nosotros y los Phari- 
seos ayunamos con 
frequencia, y tus dis- 
cipulos no ayunan ? 

15. Y Jesus les di- 
j6 i pueden acaso los 
que estan de bodas 
andar afligidos mien- 
tras el esposo estd 
con ellos ? Mas ven- 
drdn dias en que el 
esposo les sera quita- 
do ; y entdnces ayu- 
nar&n. 



16. Nddie echa re- 
miendo de pane re- 
cio en vestido viejo, 
porque el tal remien- 



LATIV. 

12. At Jesus au- 
diens, ait illis : 
Non usum habent 
valentes mMco, 
sed male haben- 
tes. 

13. Euntes au- 
tem discite quid 
est, Misericord!- 
am volo, et non 
sacriHcium. Non 
enim veni vocaie 
justos, sed pecca- 
tores ad poeniten- 
tiam. 

14. Tunc ade- 
unt eum discipuli 
' Joannis, dicentcs: 
Quare nos et Pha- 
rissei jejunamus 
frequenter, disci- 
puli autem tui non 
jejunant ? 

15. Et ait illis 
Jesus, . Nunquid 
possunt filii spon- 
si lugere quam- 
diu cum illis est 
sponsus ? Veni- 
ent autem dies, 
quum auferetur 
ab eis sponsus, et 
tunc jejimabunt 



16. Nemo au- 
tem injicit mjec* 
tionem panni ru- 
dis in vestimen 



896 



MATTHEW, CHAPTER IX* 



Tov dfr6 rov Ifiarlout 
yiveroi, 

17. Ovdc /SoXXov- 
rtv oluov piow €ts 

dtTKOVS TToiXaiovs * fl 
bi firjyff priyvvvrai 
ol cio-Koi, Ka\ 6 olvos 
(KXftTai^ Koi ol doTKol 
dnokovvrai * dWa 
paX\ov<nv clvov yfov 
tig da-Kovs Kotifous, 
na\ dfAj(f>6T€pa tnnh 
nipovvTeu. 

18. TaOra avrov 
\a\ovvTos avToist 
Idov, apx!^v i\$»p 
irpoortKvuei avT^, Xc- 
yav • *Ort rf Bvydrrjp 
/lov dim cTcXeuny- 
(T^v * dXXd iXBav^ 
iirlBfS rrfp x^^P^ ^^^ 
in avT^Vf Ka\ fycc- 
rai. 

19. Ka\ iytpQiis 6 
Ifjaovs ffKo\ovBi}(r€v 

avT^, K(u ol fia6fjTal 
avTov, 

20. Ka\ Idt)^, yw^ 
alfAoppoovo'a da>deica 
trrjf wpoa-t\6ov<ra 
imitrB^v^ rjyffoto rov 
Kpofnribov rov J/ao- 
r40w airov • 

21. ^JSXcyt ykp (V 
2^«»uai rov Ipariav 



mis pour remplir, em- 
porte de Phabit, et la 
d^chlrure en est plus 
grande. 

17. On ne met pas 
non plus le vin noii- 
veau dans de vieux 
vaisseaux; autre ment 
les vaisseaux se rom- 
pent, et le vin se re- 
pand, et les vaisseaux 
perissent ; mais on 
met le vin nouveau 
dans des vaisseaux 
neufs, et Tun et Tau- 
tre se conservent. 

18. Comme il leur 
disait ces choses, voi- 
ci venir un seigneur 
qui so prostema de- 
vant lui, en lui di- 
sant : Ma fille est de- 
j^ morte ; mais vicns, 
et pose ta main sur 
elle, et elle vivra. 

19. Et J^sus s'^tant 
leve, le suivit avec 
ses disciples. 

20. Et, voici, une 
femme travaillee 
d^une perte de sang 
depuis douze ans, vint 
par derri^re, et tou- 
cha le bord de son 
vfitement. 

21. Car elle disait 
en elle-meme : Si 
seulement je touche 



EirOLlSH. 

in to fill it up taketb 
from the garment, 
and the rent is made 
worse. 

17. Neither do men 
put new wine into old 
bottles : else tJie bot- 
tles break, and the 
wine runneth out, and 
the bottles perish : but 
they put new wine 
into new bottles, 'and 
both are preserved. 



18. While he spake 
thesQ things unto 
them, behold, there 
came a certain ruler, 
and worshipped him, 
saying, My daughter 
is even now dead: 
but come and lay thy 
hand upon her, and 
she shall live. 

19. And Jesus arose, 
and followed him, and 
so did his disciples. 

20. (And behold, a 
woman, which waa 
diseased with an issue 
of blood twelve yean, 
came behind him, and 
touched the hem of 
his garment 

21. For she saJ 
within herself. If I 
may but touch hif 



MATTHEW, CHAPTER IX. 



897 



OBSMAir. 



reifr ^ocft roituv t)om 
XUiU, un^ btv 9tt§ 
»tr^ Arget 



17. vaim faffet aitcb 
nirtr aWoil in aire 
@d^ldtt(1)e ; atiOertf Die 
6(t(4ttf6e jerreigen, 
ttH^ Ut 3)?otl tDtrt 
f^etfcbfitter, tmi> Die 
@(6[du(be tommeti urn: 
fcttDeVtt man faflVt 
SRofl in itcue &<biiM^ 
<kt, fc wrDeu flf bepDe 
miteinanbet be(|aUrn. 

18. S)a er fofcfie ^ mit 
i(Hini tebete, jlel^f, Da 
tdmmObertlenetncr, 
mib ftr( t)or it^m nie- 
be r, Uttb fpracb : Jjerr, 
meine ^ocfttrr \\l |r$r 
fle|!ot6en ; abet f cwm, 
Mttb (eae beine J^anb 
auf pe fo wirb fie le^ 
benbig. 

19. Unb 3efu^ flanb 
auf, tinb f^fgte i^m 
ttacb, unb feiiie Sanger. 

20. Uttb flel)e, ein 
qOBeib; bdtf jt»Mf 3a^^- 
re belt 99(uegang ge^ 
fjabt, rrac t>on l^ineen 

gi, unb tft^tere feine^ 
(etbe^ 6anm an. 

21. 3>enn jle f)>ra(6 
6e9|l(«fe(btl: an5(6te 
((( nnr fetn SU'^ or 



do se lleva parte del 
mismo vestido, y la 
rotura se hace peor. 



17. Ni tampoco 
echan vino nuevo en 
odres viejos. De 
otra suerte se rom- 
pen los odres y el 
vino se derrama, y 
se pierden los odres 
Mas echan el vino 
nuevo en odres nue- 
vos, y asi se conser- 
va lo uno y los otros. 

18. Mientras el les 
estaba diciendo estas 
cosas he aqui vino 
un cierto hombre 
principal, y le adoro 
diciendo: Senor mi 
hija acaba de morir, 
pero ven, pon tu ma- 
no sobre ella y vivi- 
ra. 

19. Y levantandose 
Jesus le fu6 siguien- 
do con sus discipu- 
los. 

20. Y he aqui una 
muger que hacia 
doce aKos que pade- 
cia un fiujo de san- 
cre, llegandose por 
detras le toc6 la orla 
de su vestido. 

21. Porque decia 
ella entre si : si yo 
puedo tocar tan sola- 

34 



LATIir. 

turn vetus : aufert 
enim plenitudi- 
nem ejus a vesti- 
mento, et pejor 
scissura fit. 

17. Neque mit- 
tunt vinum no- 
vum in utres ve- 
teres : si autem 
minus, rumpun- 
tur utres, et vi- 
num efiiuit, et 
utres pereunt : 
sed mittunt vi- 
num novum in u- 
tres novos, et am- 
bo conservantur. 

18. Hbbc illo lo*. 
quente eis, ecce 
princeps veniens, 
adoratiit eum di- 
cens : Quod filia 
mea modo de- 
functa est : sed 
veniens impone 
manum tuam su- 
per eam et vivet. 

19. Et surgena 
Jesus sequebatur 
eum, et discipuli 
ejus. 

20. Et ecce mu- 
lier sanguiflua 
duodecim annis, 
accedens retro, 
tetigit fimbriam 
vestimenti ejus. 

21. Dicebat e- 
nim in seip^sa : 

i tantum tetige- 



898 



MATTHEW, CHAPTER IX. 



QKBBK. 

22. o dc *ln(rw9 

avT^v, cfirc • Gd/xrrt 
BvyoTtp • 4 iriWiff 

GTOU GTcVcDlCf ffC. Kal 

^aiiOrf ^ yvvfj ajr6 
riji &f}as (Ktitnjs, 



23. Kal A^dbv <S 
'li^crovff «4£ r^i' ohci- 

aV TOV 3ip\WT0£^ KUi 

id«»y ro^^ avXi7ra(, 

PoVfJMVOV, 

24. Aryci ovrotff* 
'Aya;^«9pcirc • ov yip 
dirtduv€ t6 Kopdiriov^ 
aWa Ka$€vd€i, Ka\ 
ftarrycX«av avroO. 

25. 'Ore W «*fc. 

cX^o>v €KparriiTf r^s 
X^ip^ff avr^ff, xal 
Vy^P^I ^^ KopdiTittv. 

26. Kal rf$X^cv 
^ <^7fU7 avn; c^r oXi^y 

27. Kal TTOpdyovn 
€Kft$ev rf 'li7<rov, 
i7«coXou^i;Grav avr^ 
dvo rvt^Xoi, Kpd(ov» 
rcr, ical XcyoiTcr • 



FBEMCH. 

son vetement, je se- 
rai gu^rie. 
22. Et J^sus s'etant 
reioume, et la regar- 
dant, lui dit : Aie bon 
Lcourage, ma fille ! ta 
, foi t'a sauvee. Et 
dans ce moment la 
femme fut gu^rie. 



23. Or quand J^sus 
fut arrive k la maison 
de ce seigneur, et 
qu'il eut vu les joueurs 
d^instrumens, et une 
troupe de gens qui 
faisait un grand bruit, 

24. il leur dit : Re- 
tirez-vous, car la 
jeune fillc n'est pas 
morte, mais elle dort ; 
et ils se moquaient de 
lui. 

25. Apr^s done 
qu^on eut fait sortir 
toute cette troupe, il 
cntra, et prit la main 
de la jeune fille, et 
elle 8c leva. 

26. Et le bruit s^en 
r^ pandit par tout ce 
pays-l&. . 

27. Et comme Je- 
sus passait plus loin, 
deux aveugles le sui- 
virent, en criant et 
disant : Fils de David, 
aie p'ti^ de nous ! 



garment, I shall be 
whole. 

22. But Jesus turned 
him about ; and when . 
he saw her, he said, 
Daughter, be of good 
comfort : thy faith 
Wh made thee 
whole. And the wo- 
man was made whole 
from that hour.) 

23. And when Jesus 
came into the ruler's 
house, and saw the 
minstrels and the peo- 
ple making a noise, 



24. He said untc 
them. Give place : fcf 
the maid is not dead, 
but slecpeth. And 
they laughed him to 
scorn. 

25. But when the 
people were put forth, 
he went in, and took 
her by the hand, and 
the maid arose. 

26. And the fame 
hereof went abroad 
into all that land. 

27. And when Jesus 
departed thence, two 
blind men followed 
him, crying, and say- 
ine. Thou son of I)a- 
via, have mercy on 
us. 



MATTHEV, CHAPTER IZ. 



899 



tiitivui, fa iDurbe id) 
grfunb. 

22. 2)a wau^rr flcb 
3ffug urn, uiib fat> jlc, 
liub fprarl): ©ci) gfs 
trojl mfiiie 5ocbtfr, 
bfiii ®(aitbr ^at Mr ^^: 

tDarb firfuub ju terfrls 
bigen 6tuiite. 

23. Un^ al^ er in te^ 
Obcr|!ru J^aii^ fam, 
uuD faf) tit q>friffr 
1IU& ba^ (Selftmrael i>t^ 



24. ©jMract nr }u 
tt;iiru : ^SSetcber, tenn 
bag 0}?AaM(iii t)l iiirbt 
rcDt, foutrrii (g fcblAft. 
ttuD fie t)rrl4(f)rrii itjiu 

25. 2((g aber bag 
93olPaug.aetriebcuwar, 
ging er biueiii, uiib er^ 
grif f(e bei) ber i^anb ; 
bii ilAiib ^A^ 97?&gbleiii 
auf. 

26. ttitb bteg (S(xMt 
erfcboU in batfclbige 
gan^e ianb. 

27. Unbba3efugt>on 
bannm meiter giug, 
foigceu il)m iween 
®lin^e nad)/ bie ffbries 
en nub fpradsen : Zicb 
bu 6ot)n Z)avtbg, er< 
barme bid) uufcr ! 



mente su vestido, 
ser6 Sana. 
22. Y volviendcse 
Jesus y viendola la 
dij6 ; ten confianza 
hija, tu fe te ha sol- 
vado. Y qued6 la 
muger sana desde 
aqueila hora. 



23. Ycuandolleg6 
Jesus a casa de aquel 
hombre principal, y 
vi6 los tauedores de 
flautas y It Kt gente 
que hacian ruido. 

24. Dijoles : Reti- 
raos, pues la mucha- 
cha no estd muerta 
sino que duerme. Y 
hacian burla de el. 

25. Y echada que 
fue la gente fuera, 
entro : y la tomo de 
la mano, y la mucha- 
cha se levant6. 

26. Y corrio la fa- 
ma de esto por toda 
aqueila tierra. 

27. Y cuando par- 
ti6 Jesus de aquel 
lugar le siguieron 
dos ciegos gritando 
y diciendo : Hijo de 
David ten miseric6r- 
dia de losotros. 



ro vestimentura 
ejus, servabor. 

22. At Jesus 
conversus, et vi- 
dens earn, dixit : 
Confide ill ia, fides 
tua servavit te. 
Et servata est 
mulicr ab hora 
ilia. 

23. Et veniens 
Jesus in domum 
Principis, et vi- 
dens tibicines et 
turbam tumultu- 
antem, 

24. Dicit illis: 
Recedite : non 
enim mortua est 
puella, sed dor- 
mit. Et deride- 
bant eum. 

25. Quum vero 
ejecta esset turba, 
ingressus appre- 
hendit manum 
ejus, et surrcxit 
puella. 

26. Et txiit fa- 
ma hsec 'n uni- 
versam terram 
illam. 

27. E» transe- 
unte inde Jesu, 
sequuti sunt eum 
duo c£eci, da- 
mantes, et dicen- 
tes: Miserere no- 
stri fili David. 



400 



MATTHEW, CHAPTER IZ. 



28. '£XAWc d< 
mIs n)v oUiatft npoo-* 
^\0ov avT^ ol TV 
(fiKolf Koi Xryci av- 
TOif 6 *lr}(rois • 11*- 
oreverc iiri dwofuu 
TovTo votSfoxu; A«- 
yovtruf avT^f "Sal 
Kvptc. 

29. T(frc ^oro 
rcw' 6^<ikimv av- 
Twv, Xryotv * Karck 
r^i' mtrriv v/i^y yc- 
ytj6fjT» v/iiv. 

VQ» avT&v ol 6<f>Bak'- 
ftol * ical iveppifirj" 
own avToU 6 *Ii;- 
Tovff, Xcywir • OpoTf 

31. 0{d^€£cX^Jp- 
Tfff du<l>fffua'av avT6v 

€V 3X^7 tJ yj €K€[lfU, 



32. AimSir ^c c^ 
tpXOfi(y(av^ Idov, 
npoarjvtyKop avr^ 
SvBpcairov icox^ir dot- 

fAOViC6fl€VOV • 

33. KaliKfiXfiBh' 
rot Tov daifioviov^ 
fkakrjatv 6 K0i<f>6g* 
KoX tSavfiaa-av ol 
^;(Xoi, \iyo9T€t • *Oti 
ovdcTTorc i(f>dinf ov- 

34 0{ d«' »ap*- 



VKEHOH. 

2a £t quand il fut 
arriy^ dans la maison, 
ces aveugles vinrent 
i lui, ct il leur dit : 
Croyez-vous que je 
puisse faire ce que 
vous me demandez ? 
lis lui rcpondirent : 
Qui, vraiment. Sei- 
gneur. 

29. Alors il toucha 
leurs yeux, en disant: 
Qu^il vous soit fait 
selon votre foi. 

30. St leurs yeux 
furent ouverts ; et Je- 
sus leur d^fendit avec 
menaces, disant : Prc- 
nez garde que per- 
sonne ne le sache. 

31. Mais eux etant 
partis, r^pandirent sa 
renommee dans tout 
ce pays-]^. , 

32. Et comma ils 
sortaient, voici, on lui 
pr^senta un homme 
muet et d^moniaquc. 



33. Et quand led^- 
mon eut ^te chasse 
dehors, le muet par- 
la ; et les troupes s'en 
etonn^rent, en disant : 
II ne s'est jamais rien 
vu de semblablo en 
Israel. 

34. Mais les phari- 



SKQUSH. 

28. And when \m 
was come into the 
house, the blind men 
came to him : and Je- 
sus saith unto them, 
Believe ye that I am 
able to do this ? They 
said unto him, Yea, 
Lord. 

29. Then touched 
he their eyes, saying. 
According to your 
faith be it unto you. 

30. And their eyes 
were opened ; and 
Jesus straitly charged 
them, saymg, See 
that no man know it 

31. But they, when 
they were departed, 
spread abroad his 
fame in all that coun- 
try. 

32. As they went 
out, behold, they 
brought to him a 
dumb man possessed 
with a devil. 

33. And when the 
devil was cast out, 
the dumb spake : and 
the multitudes mar- 
velled, saying, It was 
never so seen in In- 
rael. 

34. But the Phari- 



MATTHEW, CHAPTER IX. 



40! 



28. ttn^ ta tt ^rim 
tarn, tratcit tie Slim 
ten jtt il)m. Uiit 3^' 
fiiff fprad) }u il)nen : 
(Slaubrr t^r, tag id) 
ru(f)fo(fbetf tbimfaiin? 
3>affractjeujlt}ttt^m: 
•Oerr, jo. 



29.5)arfi()rereeri^re 
2Cn.qru an, tint fpracb : 
Sud) f)efd)et)e nad^ fu-- 
rrm (glaubeii. 

80. Unh 'tijvt Timtn 
leurteii .AeSffnct. Viixt> 
3ffu« bctroftrte fie, 
unt fprad) : ©rbrt jii, 
bag ct$ nirmant erfa^rr. 

31. 2(6rr fie <)in^eti 
au^, tiut mad)teu it)u 
rud)t6ar in trmfelbisen 
ganjen imh^, 

32. Sa nnn tirfe war- 
ren ^inau0 ftetcmmrn, 
jle^e, ta bracbcrn fie }u 
i^m einrn 50lenfd)fn, 
trr vac |lnmm nnt be- 
fflRn. 

33. Unb ba ber ten- 
fe( war au^grtrirben, 
rebrte ber 6tumme. 
Unb H^ ^Dlf t)(rn>nm 
berte jlrij, nnb fprad) : 
@old)e^ i|t uocb nie in 
3frae( erfe^eu worbcn. 

34. Ttber bie ^f>ari- 



SPANISH., I LATIN. 

28. Y llegadodla] 28. Venienti au- 
casa los ciegos vinie- tem in domurn, 
ron 4 el. Y Jesus accesserunt ad 
les dijo ^ Creels que eum cseci. Et 
puedo hacer esto ? dicit eis Jesus : 
EIIos digeron • Si, ' Creditisquod pos- 
Senor. sum hoc facere? 

Dicunt ei : Uu- 
que Domine. 



29. Ent6nces les 
toco los ojos dicien- 
do : Segun vuestra 
£6 asi OS sea hecho. 

30. Y fueron abier- 
tos sus ojos, y Jesus 
les encargo estrecha- 
mente diciendo : nii- 
rad que nadie lo se- 
pa. 

31. Mas habiendo 
ellos salido de alii 
divulgaron su fama 
por toda aquella ti- 
erra. 

32. Y al salir ellos, 
he aqui le trajeron 
un hombre mudo po- 
seido del demonio. 



33. Y lanzado fue- 
ra el demonio el mu- 
do hablo, y las gen- 
tes maravilladas de- 
ci'an : nunca se vi6 
tal cosa en Israel. 



34. Mo 
34» 



los Phari- 



29. Tunc teti- 
git oculos eorum, 
dicens : Secun- 
dum fidem ve- 
stram fiat vobis. 

30. Et aperti 
sunt eorum oculi : 
etcomminatusesl 
illis Jesus, di- 
cens : Videte ne 
quis sciat : 

31. Illi autem 
exeuntes diffama- 
verunt eum in 
tota terra ilia. 

32. Illis autem 
egressis, ecce ob- 
tulerunt ei homi- 
nem mutum dae- 
moniacum. 

33. Et ejecto 
assmonio, locutus 
est mutus, et mi- 
ratae sunt turbce, 
dicentes, Nun- 
quam appaniit sic 
in Israel. 

34. Pharisseiau* 



402 



MATTIIEW, CHAPTERS IX., X. 



adioi Tkryop * *E» 
r^ ApxovTi tSv doi- 
fioviotv iicffoKKei ra 

35. Kai irtpirjytv 
6 *hjavvs ras TrdXctr 
iraa'ag Koi ras Kafuzt^ 
diddiTKiov cv Toit oi;- 
vaytayais avr»v, xal 
Kfipva-O'tav t6 cvoyyf- 
\to¥ TTJs jSacriXeiar, 
Kal B€pmr€v<a» vatroif 
v6<rov Koi vcurav fta- 
XoKiaif cy r^ Xay. 

36. 'ldol>y dc rolts 
Bx^ovs^ iaifkayxifi' 
adrj ir€p\ a^&u^ ori 
f<rav cjcXfXv/iCPOi Koi 
ippififuvoi m(r€\ vp6' 
pctra fiij txovra ttm- 
fUva. 

37. T<$r€ Xeyci roiff 
fiaStjTois avTov* 'O 
fwy 0rpurii6g iroXw, 
c2 dc Cjpydroi 3X/yo» • 



38. Ar^^i;rc oi^v 
roO Kvpiov roO ^e- 
pto'/ioO, ^oDff 6K/3aX- 
^27 ipyarag tls n&y 
6€purfi6v avTOv. 

1. Kal ir/NMrxoXc- 
adfjuevog roifs d<»dc- 
xa fia$r)TiiS avroO, 
^<o/ccy avrxr cfov- 
^/av Kara frvf Vfiarcoy 
4icaS6prm¥, Aart ^k- 



siens disaient : II 
chasse les demons 
par le prince des de- 
mons. 

35. Or J^sus allait 
dans toutes les viUes 
et dans les bourgades, 
enseignant dans leurs 
synagogues, et pre- 
chant r^vangile du 
royaume, et gueris- 
sant toutes sortes de 
maladies, et toutes 
sortes d^firmit^s 
parmi le peuple. 

36. Et voyant les 
troupes, 11 en fut 6mu 
de compassion, parce 
quMls etaient disper- 
ses et errans comme 
des brebis qui n^ont 
point de pasteur. 

37. Et il dit k scs 
disciples : Certes la 
moisson est grande, 
mais il y a peu d'ou- 
vriers. 

38. Priez done le 
seigneur de la mois- 
son, qu'il envoie des 
ouvriers en sa mois- 
son. 

1. AloTs J^sus a- 
yant appele ses douze 
disciples, leur donna 
puissance sur les 
esprits immondes 
pour les ^hasser hors 



sees said. He casteth 
out devils, through 
the prince of the 
devils. 

35. And Jesus went 
about all the citien 
and villages, teachinf ' 
in their synagoguef 
and preaching tlv 
gospel of the king 
dom, and healing ev 
ery sickness, and ev- 
ery disease among 
the people. 

36. But when he saw 
the multitudes, he was 
moved with compas* 
sion on them, because 
they fainted, and were 
scattered abroad, as 
sheep having no shep- 
herd. 

37. Then saith he 
unto his disciples, 
The harvest truly is " 
plenteous, but the la- 
borers are few. 

38. Pray ye there- 
fore the Lord of the 
harvest, that he will 
send forth laborers 
into his harvest. 

1. And when he had 
called' unto him hia 
twelve disciples, he 
gave them power 
against unclean spir- 
its, to cast them out, 



MATTHEW, CHAPTERS IX., X. 



40^ 



hit btc 3:eufe( au^ tux(b 

35. l\nt> 3eftt^ gtng 
um^er in allc 6tdbre 
unb 3)?arfte, UtjitU iu 
it^ren @c6u(eu, nub 
preDtgre bad St)Ande(i:^ 
urn )>on btta SKetcb/ 
unb ^rtlrre aOerle^ 
6eu(6e, uitb alUrfep 
Sroitt^eit im 33o(t. 



86. Uno ta er ba^ 
So((fa^,|ammertei()n 
bctfelbtdctt; brnu jle 
waxtn t)erf((ma(t)t(t 
itnb jerflteurt, n)te tie 
6(6afe, bie tcincn ^ir- 
tm ^aben. 

37. S)ii fpracb ec }u 
feiuen 3&ngern: Die 
(Stntt \\\ gtof, abrr 
menige flnb bcr 2(i:bet« 
eet. 

86. Sarum bittet ben 
Jjctrn ber Crnre, bag 
et Htbtittt in feine 
Srnte fenbe. 



1. Unb et tief fetne 
i»ejf Sanger jn pet, 
nnb gab i^nen SRacbt 
ftber bieunfanbern ®ei< 
fler, M% fie btefelben 
•lu^tviebrn, uur ^eilc- 



flPAKISH. 

seos decian : por me- 
dio del principe de 
los demonios echa 
fu^ra los dem6nios. 
35. Y Jesus iba re- 
corriendo todas* las 
ciudades y villas en- 
senando en sus sina- 
gogas y predicando 
el Evangelio del rey- 
no, curando toda en- 
fermedad y toda do- 
l^ncia en el pueblo. 



36. Y al ver aque- 
Has gentes tuvo com- 
pasion de ellas, por- 
que estaban abatidas 
y desparramadas co- 
mo ovejas sin pastor. 



37. £nt6nces dij6 
a sus. discipulos: 
Verdaderamente la 
mies es copi6sa ; 
mas los trabajadores 
son pocos. 

38.r Rogad pues al 
SeSor que envie tra- 
bajadores k su mies. 



1. Ent6nces Ua- 
mando 4 si sus doce 
discipulos les di6 po- 
testad sobre los espi- 
ritus inmundos para 
lanzarlos fuera, y cu< 



temdicebant: In 
principe dsemoni- 
orum ejicit ds- 
mones. 

35. Et circumi 
bat Jesus civitates 
omnes, et castel- 
la, docens in sy 
nagogis eorum, et 
preedicans euan- 
gelium regni, et 
curans omnem 
languorem, et 
omnem infirmita* 
tern in populo. 

36. Videns au- 
tem turbas, mi- 
sertus est de.eis, 
quia erant vexati, 
et dispersi sicut 
oves non haben- 
tes pastorem. 

37. Time dicit 
discipulis suis : 
Messis quidem 
multa, operarii 
autem pauci. 

38. Supplicate 
ergo domino mes- 
sis, ut emlttat o» 
perarios in mea* 
sem suam. 

1. Et advocans 
duodecim disci* 
pulos sues, dedit 
illis potestatem 
spirituumimmun- 
dorum, ut ejicere 



40 i 



MATTHEW, CHAPTER Z. 



OBBBC 

fidXl f IV avrii, Koi 
6€p€artv€tp viurcof v6' 
<ro» Koi nwrav /loAa- 
Ktav. 
2. TAv dc deodfxa 

Hard icrri ravra • 
ir/Noror, 2ifuav 6 Xf- , 

y6pAV09 UtTpOf, Koi 

avTov • *ldK»(iof 6 ^ 
*l»dvtfrjs 6 adffX^ff 



rSBWCH. 

des poss^d^s, et pour 
guerir toutes sortes 
de maladies, et toutes 
sortes d'infirmites. 
2. Et ce sont ici les 
Doms des douze ap6- 
ties : Lie premier 
est Simon, nomme 
Pierre, et Andre, son 
fr^re ; Jacques, fils 
de Zebedee, et Jfean, 
son frere ; 



3*Philippe et Bar- 
thelemi ; Thomas, et 
Matthieu, le peager ; 
Jacques, fils d^Al- 
ph^e, et Lebb^e, sur- 
nomm6 Thadd6e ; 



3. ^iXtfnror, Koi 
BcLpBokofxaios * •6«- 
fiar, Kal MarBaios 6 

TOV *AX^iov, nai 
Af^^aiOff 6 ttrikkfi' 
4eiff Baddatos • 

4. 2(/itty 6 KoMi- 
Mn;^, Ka\ *Iovdar 6 

5. Tovrovi row ^»- 
bfKa aTTccFTfiXffy 6 
Ii/o-ovff, vapayyftkcLS 
airrotf, Xcyoiif ■ Els 
6b6v iOif^y /i^ dn-eX- 

^afiaptirAv fjjj c2(r- 
tX^ijr* • 

6. TLop€V€<rBt hi 
fuXkop vp6£ rh irp6' 
fiara rck afroXa>X($ra 
oUov 'icrpr^X. 

7. UoptX 6fl€POl dc 

ttfipi{r<r€Tt Xivoyrts- serez partis, p?(^chez, 



4. Simon Canane- 
en, et Judas Iscariot, 
qui n)eme le trahit. 

5. J^sus envoya ces 
douze, et leur com- 
manda, en disant : 
N'allez point vers les 
Gentils, et n'entrez 
point dans aucune 
ville des Samaritains ; 



6. mais plut6t allez 
vers les brebis per- 
dues de la maison 
d^Israel. 

7. Et quand vous 



BVOLISH. 

and to heal all man* 
ner of sickness, and 
all manner of disease. 

2. Now the names 
of the twelve apostles 
are these : The first, 
Simon, who is called 
Peter, and Andrew, 
his brother ; James 
the son of Zebedee, 
and John his brother ; 



3. Philip, and Bar- 
tholomew ; Thomas, 
and Matthew the pub- 
lican ; James the son 
of Alpheus, and Leb- 
beus, whose surname 
was Thaddeus ; 

4. Simon the Cana- 
anite, and Judas Is- 
cariot, who also be- 
trayed him. 

5. These twelve Je- 
sus sent forth, and 
commanded them, 
saying. Go not into 
the way of the Gen- 
tiles, and into any 
city of the Samari- 
tans enter ye not. 

6. But go rather to 
the lost sheep of the 
house of Israel. 

7. And as ye go, 
preach, saying. The 



HATIHBW. CHAPTER Z. 



405 



tmb a((erlc9 Kranf^ett. 



2. S>ie Stamen abet 
m gtDMf 2(|>o|U( {Inb 
biefe: 2>er jfr|le &'u 
men, genauiu 0e(ru^ ; 
unh Untxza^, feiit Sru- 
(er ; 3atobu$, 3^t^^« 

^anne^, fcin VSvnUx ; 



3. ^t)i(ippu^; mib 

niAtf; uiio aRatcbiu^; 
ber BiUiier ; 3af o6ii$, 

11^/ mir (em 3unamcu 
l^aobdu0 ; 

4. 6imon ton ^am ; 
uitt 3ubatf 3f(6artott^, 
oe(cbe( it;u t)ertU((^. 

5. 2)ufe {toMffantte 
3cfu^, gcbot i^nen mh 
fptacb : (Se^K nicbc 
iUtfberJ9eioen6(rage, 
nno }ie^e( nicbc in ter 
@amaritrr @tat)te; 



6. &onUxn gebet ^in 
u ben t)er(ornen 6cbas 

n autf beta ^aufe 3f« 
rae(. 

7. (Sei^et aUt unb 
yrebidet/ nnb f|>recbet : 



s 



BPANIgH. 



rar toda enfermedad 
y toda dolencia. 



2. Y lo6 nombres 
de los doce Ap6sto- 
les son estos : el pri- 
mero Simon llamado 
Pedro y Andres su 
hermano, Jacobo hijo 
de Zebedeo, y Juan 
su hermano. 



3. Felipe y Barto- 
lome: TomasyMa- 
theo el publicano: 
Jacobo bijo de Alfeo, 
y Lebeo por sobre 
nombre Thadeo. 



4. Simon el Cana- 
neo, y Judas Iscari- 
otes el mismo que le 
entrego. 

5. Estos doce envio 
Jesus y les mando 
diciendo : no and^is 
por camino de Gen- 
tiles ni entr^is en ci- 
udad alguna de los 
Samaritanos. 



6. Mas id antes 4 
las ovejas perdidas 
de la casa de Israel : 

7. Id, y predicad 
diciendo : el reyno 



XATIV. 

eos, et curare 
omnem languo- 
rem, et omnem 
infirmitatem. 

2. Duodecim au- 
tem Apostolorum 
nomina sunt hsec : 
Primus, Simon 
dictus Petrus, et 
Andreas frater 
ejus, Jacobus Ze- 
bedsei, et Joannes 
frater ejus. 

3. Philippus et 
Bartholomeeus : 
Thomas et Mat- 
thffius publicanus: 
Jacobus Alphsei, 
et LebbsBus cog- 
nominatus Thad- 
deeus : 

4. Simon Cha- 
nanites, et Judas 
Iscariotes, qui et 
tradens eum. 

5. Hos duode- 
cim legavit Jesus, 
denuncians eis, 
dicens: In viam 
gentium ne abie- 
ritis, et in civita- 
tem Samaritano- 
rum me intrave- 
ritis. 

6. Ite autem ma- 
gis ad oves perdi* 
tas domus Israel. 

7. Euntes au- 
tem preedicate, di- 



406 



MATTHEW, CHAPTER X 



8. *A(rBevovtfTas $€- 

KaBapl(€T€^ vtKpovs 
iy€ip€T€y daifjL6¥ia 
€K^aX\€T€ ' d^peau 
Aa/3cT€, htoptkif ho' 



9. Mi) KTrfo-rffrSf 
Xpvabv, p.rjdi Apyv- 

TCIS C^ltaS VpMV * 

10. M^ nrfpav €is 
6d6iff prjdi dvo \tTOi' 
vas, fii^dc wro^ripara, 
fu/dc pd^dovs ' d(u>£ 
yap 6 ipydrrfv ttjs 
Tpo<f)jjs aVTOV liTTlV,- 



11. E?f 41^ V hv 
vSkw ri K^p,rjv fia«X- 

if avT^ a(i6s ioTi • 



12. 'EXtrtpx6fxievoi 
8€ (U T^v olKiav, 
cunrdo'aa'Bt avr^v. 

13. Ka\ iav pxv j 
^ oiKia a(ia, iXBha 
7 ^Ip^vtf vpS>v iir* 

wp^ff v/ia« C9ri(rr7>a- 



FRBNOH. 

en disant: Le roy- 
aume des cieux est 
proche. 

8. Guerissez les ma- 
lades, rendez nets les 
lepreux, ressuscitez 
les morts, chassez les 
demons hors des pos- 
s^des ; vous Tavez re- 
^u gratuitement, don- 
nez-le gratuitement. 

9. Ne faites provi- 
sion ni d'or, ni d'ar- 
gent, ni de monnaie 
dans vos ceinturcs ; 

10. ni de sac pour 
le voyage, ni de deux 
robes, ni de souliers, 
ni de baton ; car I'ou- 
vrier est digne de sa 
nburriture. 



11. Et dans quelque 
ville ou bourgade que 
vous entriez, infor- 
mez-vous qui y est 
digne de vous loger ; 
et demeurez chez lui 
jusqu'^ ce que vous 
partiez de l^. 

12. Et quand vous 
entrerezdans queique 
maison, saluez-la. 

13. Et SI cette mai- 
son en est digne, que 
votre paix vienne sur 
elle ; mais si elle n^en 
est pas digne, que vo- 
tre paix retouf) k 
voc?. 



BN0LI8IL 

khgdcm of heaves 
is at hand. 

8. Heal the sick, 
cleanse the lepers, 
raise the dead, cast 
out devils : freely ye 
have received, freely 
give. 



9. Provide neither 
gold, nor silver, nor 
brass, in your purses ; 

10. Nor scrip for 
your journey, neither 
two coats, neither 
shoes, nor yet staves : 
for the workman ia 
worthy of his meat 



11. And into what- 
soever city or town 
ye shall ^ter, inquire 
who in it is worthy; 
and there abide till 
ye go thence. 



12. And when ye 
come into an house 
salute it. 

13. And if the house 
b^ worthy, let your 
peace come upon it : 
but if it be not wor- 
thy, let your peace 
return ;'o you. 



MATTHEW, CHAPTSB X. 



40T 



OESMAN. 

na^r t^erbci; gefommen. 

8. 9Dlac6et tie Sfrans 
feu A'fuut, teiiitgrt bir 
^lucsfaeigrn, wrcfet t^ir 
SoDtrii auf, treibrt Die 
Scufrl autf. Umfontl 
t;abt i^t e^ empfaitdeii/ 
umfontl 9e6t c^ aurb. 

9. 3()r foKt nicbt 
(^o(o, noc^ 6tlb(r, 
nod) ^r} in curen ®&r« 
tef u tiahm ; 

10. 2Cucf)tctne%af(be 
2ur Wtifjitivt, axi(b 
nicbt}n>eru9li(fe,friue 
6ctjul)e, aucft feincu 
@Cfcf en. 3)tm\ tin 
TixbtiM tfl feiuet 
6peife mttti, 

11. Too if>r ttber in 
eine 6tatt ooer ^arft 
det;et/ Da ethmDigct 
end); o6 jeni&nD tarui: 
nen fr^^ Der e^ toertt) 
ill ; uuD bet; temfrlbcn 
bleibet; bi^ i^t t)on 
btinnen )iei}ec. 

12. Too il;r aber in 
ein Qawi ge^rt, fo ^th 
get Dajfflbige. 

13. Unb fo e^ balfrf- 
b'w 4^u^ n^ertt; i|^ 
wirD ener griebe auf 
fie bmmen. . 31* '^ 
abcr nici)t mrt^; fo 
wirb flcb ener gri'^^ 
H'ieDer }u eud) toenbeu 



SPANISH. 

de los cielott esti cer- 
ca. 

8. Curad enferraos, 
limpiad leprosos, re- 
sucitad muertos, lan- 
zad demonios : de 
valde recibisteis, dad 
de valde. 



9. No llev^is oro ni 
plata ni cobre en vu- 
estras bolsas. 

10. Ni alfoija para 
el camino, ni dos tii- 
nicas, ni zapatos, ni 
baston ; porque el 
trabajador, digno es 
de su alimento : 



11. Mas eh cual- 
quiera ciudad 6 aldea 
donde entrareis, in- 
formaos de quien hay 
en ella, que sea dig- 
no ; y morad alli 
hasta que salgais. 

1?.^Y al entrar en 
la casa saludadla. 

13. Y si la casa fu- 
ere digna, vuestra 
paz vendrd sobre 
elia^ mas si no fuere 
digna vuestra paz se 
volvera a vosotros. 



I 



LATIN. 

centes: Qulaap« 
propinquavit reg- 
num caelorum. 
8. Infirmos cu- 
rate, leprosos 
mundate, mortu- 
OS suscitate da 
mones ejicite : 
gratis accepistis, 
gratis date. 

9.Neposaideatis 
aurum, neque ar- 
gentum,neque8es 
in zonis vestris : 

10. Non peram 
in viam, neque 
duas tunicas, ne- 
que calceamenta, 
neque virgam : 
dignus enim ope- 
rarius alimento 
suo est. 

11. In quam- 
cunque auterri ci- 
vitatem aut ca- 
stellum intraveri- 
tis, interrogate 
quis in ea dignus 
sit : et ibi manete 
donee exeatis. 

12. Intrantes au- 
■tem in domum, 
salutate earn. 

13. Et si qui- 
demfueritdomus, 
digna, ingredia- 
tur pax vestra su- 
per eam : si au- 
tem non fuerit dig- 
na, pax vestra ad 
vos convertatur. 



ADVERTISEMENT 



THE INTERNATIONAL DICTIONARY. 



The followiug pages, prepared for the convenience of the mer- 
chant, the man of business, and the mechanic, may not be 
deemed altogether unimportant by the scholar or learned ama- 
teur, as a book of etymological reference. 

Every one must have observed the unusual emigration to our 
shores of Germans, Spaniards and French. Coming into daily 
intercourse with these foreigners, the merchant, more especially, 
will find this little work vastly beneficial to him; and will regard 
it as an ihdispensable auxiliary in the transaction of business. 
The more recent discoveries of gold have induced on extraordi- 
nary influx of the inhabitants of all nations, more especially of 
Spain, France and Germany; and it is strange that no attempt 
has hitherto been made to produce a work of this kind, the im- 
mense benefit of wliich must be perceived by the most casual 
observer. 

The compiler did not deem it necessary to include all the words 
in these languages, as, in many mstances, after the primitive 
radical is given, it would be a superlative waste of space to add 
the derivations which follow according to fixed rules, and are, 
consequently, obvious to every one. 

Hoping that these few pages will serve to fill a void hitherto 
seriously felt in the commercial and literary world, the compiler 
offers them to a generous pubKc, trusting that Ihey will be re- 
ceived with the same spirit of kindness which has guided the 
writer in the compilation of the work, and which has ever been 
the characteiistic of the American people. 



INTERNATIONAL 

COMMERCIAL DICTIONARY, 

^ Vit frhui]^ auir "^tiM Wiattit 

or THB 

ENGLISH, GERMAN, SPANISH AND FRENCH 

LANGUAGES, 

WXZH KAVT or fllSXR BlBXTAnW, 

IfUrnALLT TRANSLATED INTO EACH OTHER. 

OOKPILD nOM RA19AB]> AUnOBO^ 

By B. S. BARRETT. 



BUFFALO: 
a. B. JIWITI A 00., BZBRBOXTPXBSiiei ICAIN ST. 
35 



EXPLANATION OP ABBREVIATIONS 

VSSSD m THB DICnONABY. 



5. Bubstftntiye. 
V. verb. 
a4f. adJectlTe. 
adv, adrerb. 
prqf, preposition. 
cor^\ cozgonction. 



nU. inteijeciion. 
m. mascnline, 
/. feminine. 
fi. nenier. 
m./. mascnline or 
feminine. 



Xntond oocordiiig to Act of OongreM, in the jew 18S7, 

Bt B. 8. BABBBTT, 

Inthedttk*! Offloeof theDistrkt Ooort of the United 8tatee,feff the Northern IHstiict 

of New York. 



niTEBNATIOKAL DIOnONABT. 



411 



Spanibb. 



Abaft» 

Abandon, 

Abase, 

Abasement, 

Abash, 

Abate, 

Abatement, 

Abbey, 

ASbreviate, 

Abbreviation, 

Abbreviator, 

Abdicate, 

Abdication, 

Abdomen, 

Abduct, 

Aberration, 

Abet, (assist,) 

Abettor, 

Abhor, 

Abhorrence, 

Abhorrent, 

Abhorrer, 

Abide, 

Abiding place. 

Ability, 

Abject^ 

Abjection, 

Abjure, 

Abjuration, 

Ablation, 

Able, 

Able-bodied, 

Ablution, 

Aboard, 

Abode, 

Abolish, 

Abolition, 



TUNOB. 

De la proue. 



Gkbhut. , 

Nach dem hint- En popa, 

ertheile, 

Verlassen, Abandonar, Abandonner. 

Niederlassen, Abatir, Humilier, 

Erniedrigung,/. Abatimiento^ m. Abaissement, m. 



Beschamen, 

Vermindem, 

Abnahme,/ 

Kloster, n. 

Abkilrzen, 

Abkiirzung,/, 

Abkiirzcr, m, 

Aufgeben, 

Abdankung,/. 

Unterleib, m, 

Abziehen, 



Avergonzar, 
Minorar, 
Rebaxa, /. 
Abadia,/. 
Abreviar, 
Compendio, m. 



Rendre honteux. 
Diminuer. 
Diminution, /. 
Courent, m, 
Abr6ger. 
Abr^viation, /. 



Abreviador, m, Abr^mteur, tn» 

Abdicar, Abdiquer. 

Abdicacion,/ Abdication,/. 

Abdomen, m. Abdomen, m. 

Tirar, (una cosa Oter, separer. 
dh otra), 

Aberration,/ 
Supporter, 
Promoteur, m, 
Abhorrer. 



Abweichung, / Aberacion,/ 

Helfen, Apoyar, 

Anstifler, m, Faut(V, m. 

Verabscheuen, Aborrecer, 

Abscheu, m. Aborrecimiento, Detestation, / 

Verabscheuend, Ueno de horror, Pleine d'horreur. 

Verabscheuer,»i.Aborrecedor, m, Celuiquiabhone 

Bleiben, Habitar, sufi-ir, Demeurer. 

Wohnort, m, Habitacion, / Demeure, / 

Vermogen, n. Potencia,/ Pouvoir, m, 

Wegwerfen, v. B^pulsar, v. vil, Rebute, v., ab- 

niedrig, adj, adj. ject, vil, adj, 

Niedertrachtig- Bazeza,vileza,/ Abjection,/ 

keit, / 
Abschworen, Abjurar, Abjurer. 

Abschworung^/Abjuracion, / Serment, m. 
Wegnahme,/ Quite, m. Ablation,/ 

Geschickt, Capaz, habil. Capable. 

Stark, riistig, Forzudo, Robuste. 

Abwaschen, n. Ablution, / Ablution, / 
An Bord, A' bordo, *A bord. 

Aufenthalt, 9». Domicilio, m. Demeure,/ 
Abschaffen, Abolir, Abolir. 

Abachaflfung, / Abolicion, / Abolition, / 



412 



INTBBNATIONAL DIOnONABT. 



ABO. 

Abominable, 

AbommatioQ, 

Aboftion, 

Abortive, 

Abound, 

About> 

Above, 

Abridge, 

Abridgement^ 

Abrupt, 



Abscind, 
Abscond, 
Absence, 
Absent;^ 



Absolute, 

Absolution, 

Absolve, 

Absorb, 

Abstain, 

Abstemious, 

Abstinence, 

Abstract, 

Abstruse, 

Absurd, 

Absurdity, 

Abundance, 

Abundant, 

Abuse, 

Abuser, 

Abusive, 

Abyss, 

Academic, 

Academy, 



Gbbxah. 

Abscbeulicb, 
Abscbeu, m. 
Fehlgeburt,/. 
Unzeitig, 
Ueberfluss ha- 

ben, 
Urn, im, an, In^ 
Ueber, obeni, 
Abkurzen, 
Abkiirzung,/. 
Abgebrocben, 
Geschwiir, n. 
Abschneiden, 
Verbergen, 
Abwesenheit, /. 
Abwesend* adj. 

entfemen, v. 

Unumschr&nkty 

Lossprecbung, /• 

Lossprechen, 

Verscblucken, 

Sich enthalten, 

Enthaltsam, 

Entbaltsam- 

keit,/. 
Abzieben, v. ab- 

gezogen, adj. 
Verdeckt, 
Ungereimt, 
Albemheit, /. 
Ueberfluss, m, 
Ueberflussig, 
Mi8sbrauch,«.m. 
misbrauchen, v, 
Verfiihrer, m. 
Missbraucbend, 
Abgrund, m. 
Akademiscb, 
Akademie,/. 
Hingehen, 



SPiLXisa. Frxrch. 

Abominable, Abominable. 
Odio, m. Halne, /. 

Aborto^ m. Abortion,/ 

Abortivo, inutil, Abortif,-ye, 
Abundar, Abonder. 



Cerca, 

Encima, sobre, 
Abreviar, 
Compendio^ m. 
Quebrado^ 
Absceso^ m. 
Cortar, 
Esconderse, 
Ausencia,/. 
Ausente, adj. 
ausentarse, v. 

Absoluto^ 

Absolucion,/. 

Absolver, 

Absorver, 

Abstenerse, 

Abstemio, 

Abstinenciay/. 

Abstraer, v. 

abstracto, adj. 
Abstruso, 
Absurdo, 
Absurdidad,/. 
AbundancLi,/. 
Abundantc, 
Abuso, m. abu- 

Bar, v. 
El que abusa, 
Abusivo, 
Abbmo, m. 
Academioo, 
Academia,/. 
Acceder, 



Autour de. 
Sur, au desus de. 
Abr^r. 
Abr£gement, m. 
Soudain^-e. 
Abces, tru 
Ketrancber. 
Se cacber. 
Absence,/. 
Absent, eloign^^ 

adj. s'absen- 

t6r de, V. 
AbsoIu,-e, libre. 
Absolution,/. 
Absoudre de. 
Absorber. 
Se priver de. 
Absteme, sobre. 
Abstinence,/ 

Abstraire, v. 

abstrai^ adj. 
Abstrus,t^e. 
Absurde. 
InconCTuit^/ 
Abondance,/ 
Abondant 
Abu% 8. m. 

abuser, v. 
Abuseur, m. 
Injurieux,-se. 
Abime, m. 
Academique. 
Academie,/ 
AccSder. 



INTBBNATIOKAL DIOTIONABT- 



413 



Aoa 
Accelerate, 
Acceleration, 

Accent,. 

Accentuation, 
Accept, 
Acceptable, 
Acceptance, 



Accessible, 
Accessory, 
Accident, 
Accipient, 
Acclamation, 
Acclivity, 
Accommodate, 
Accommoda- 
tion, 
Accompani- 
ment, 
Accompany, 
Accomplice, 
Accomplish, 
Accomplish- 
ment, 
Accord, 8, 

Accord, >. 
Accordance, 

Accordingly, 
Accost, 
Account, f. 
Account, V, 
Accountant, 
Account-book, 



Oerkik. 

Beschleunigen, 
Beschleunig- 

ung,/. 
Accent, s. m. 

accentuiren, v, 
Tonsetzung,/. 
Annnehmen, 
Annehmlich, 
Annahme,/ 
Zugang, m, 
Zuganglich, 
Beigefiigt, 
Zufall, Vorfall,wi- 
Empfanger, m. 
Zuruf, 771. 
Steilheit,/ 
Schlichten, 
Anpassung,/. 

Begleitung,/. 

Begleiten, 
Mitschuldige, m. 
Erfullen, 
Vollendung,/. 

Uebereinstimm- 

ung, $./. 
Versohnen,- v. 
Uebereinstimm- 

^ng./. 
Nach, gem^s, 
Antreten, 
Rechnung, «./. 
Bechnen, v, 
Rechner, m, 
Rechnungsbuch, 



Spanish. VsKroa. 

Acelerar, Acc£l£rer. 

Aceleracion,/. Acceleration,/. 



Acento, *. m. 

acentuar, v, 
Acentuacion, f, 
Aceptar, 
Aceptable, 
Aceptacton, /. 
Acceso, m. 
Accesibic, 
C<Smplice, 
Accidente, m. 
Recibidor, m, 
Acclamacion,/. 
Cuesta ariba, /. 
Surtir, 
Adaptacion, /• 

Aeompanami- 

ento, m. 
Acompanar, 
Cdropllce, m. 
Efectuar, 
Complemeuto,m. 

Acuerda, $./, 



Accent, s, m, 

prononcer, v. 
Accentuation, f, 
Accepter. 
Acceptable. 
Acceptation, /. 
Acces, 771. 
Accessible. 
Complice. 
Accident, m, 
R&ipient, m. 
Acclamation, /. 
Elevation,/ 
Accommoder. 
Accommode- 

ment, m. 
Accompagne- 

ment, m, 
Accompagner. 
Complice, m.f. 
Accomplir. 
Accomplisse- 

ment, m. 
Accord, 8. m. 



Acordar,t;. Accorder, v. 

Oonformidad,/. Conformity, / 



Accumulate, Aufh&ufen, 
Accomulation, Anhaufung,/. 



Segun, 
Samdar, 
Cuenta, «./. 
Tener, contar, v. 
Contador, Jti. 
Libro (tn) de 

cuentas, 
Acumular, 
Acumuladon,/. 



35* 



Selon. 

Accoster, saluer 

Comple, 8,m. 

Expliquer, v, 

Compteur, wi. 

livre (771) de 
comptes. 

Amasser. 

Accumula- 
tion, /. 



iU 



IirrEBlTATIONA.Ii DICTIOJTABT. 



AOC. 


Okrxav. 


SPAinsn. 


JhunroB. 


Accuracy, 


Genauigkeit,/. 


Cuidado, m. 


Pr&ision,/. 


Accurate, 


Genau, 


Exdx;to, 


Exact,-e. 


Accurse, 


Verfluchen, 


Maldecir, 


Maudire. 


Accusation; 


Anklage,/. 


Acusacion,/. 


Accusation, / 


Accuse, 


Anklagen, 


Acusar, 


Accuser. 


Accuser, 


Anklager, in. 


Acusador, m. 


Accusateur,- 
trice, m./. 


Accustom, 


G^ewohnen, 


Acostumbrar, 


Accoutumer. 


Accustomed, 


Gewohnt, 


Freqiiente,[to,m. Coutumier,-e. 


Acervation, 


Aufhaufung,/. 


Amontonamien 


- Entassement, m. 


Ache, 8. 


• Pein, «./. 


Dolor continua- 
do, 8. m. 


'Fein,/, mal, «.?/i. 


Ache, V. 


Schmerzen, v. 


Doler, v. 


Avoir mal, v. 


Achieve, 


Ausfuhren, 


Executar, 


Executer. 


Achievement, 


Ausfiihrung, /. Execucion, /, 


Exploit^ 771. 


Acid, 


Sauer, 


Acido, 


Acide, piquant 


Acidity, 


Saure,/. 


Agrura,/. 


AciditS,/. 


Acknowledge, 


Erkennen, 


Eleconocer, 


Gonfesser. 


Acknowledg- 


Anerkennung,/. Reconocimien- 


Avcu, 771. con- 


ment, 




to, 771. 


cession,/ 


Acme, 


Gipfel, 171. 


El ultimo pun- 


La plus haute 






to, f7l. 


pointe,/ 


Acquaint, 


Bekanntmachen 


, Imponer, 


Informer. 


Acquaintance, Bekannt8chaft,/.Conocimiento,m.Connaissance, /. 


Acquiesce, 


Einwilligen, 


Allanarse, 


Acqmesc^r. 


Acquire, 


Erwerben, 


Adquirir, 


Acquerir. 


Acquisition, 


Erwcrbung,/. 


Adquisicion,/. 


Acquis, 771. 


Acquit, 


Freimachen, 


Libertar, 


D6charger. 


Acquittal, 


Lossprech- 


Absolucion,/. 


Absolution, / 




ung,/, [des,>». 




Acre, 


Morgen Lan- 


Acre, m. 


Acre,/ 


Across, 


Kreuzweise, 


De travfa. 


h travers. 


Act,*. 


Verhand- 


Hecho, *. m. 


Acte, «. 771. 




lung, »./• 




. 


Act, V. 


Handein, u. 


Hacer, v. 


Agir, jour, v. 


Action, 


Handlung, /. 


Accion, hecho,f7i. Action,/. 


Actively, 


Thatig, 


Activo, 


Actif, ve. 


Actor, 


Schauspieler,ni. 


Agente, actor,f7i. Acteur, m. 


Actress, 


Schauspieler- 


Comedian ta,/. 


Actrice, come- 




ln,f. 




dienne, / 


Actual, 


WirkUch, 


Actual, 


Actuel, rfeL 



INTERNATIONAL DICTION ABY. 



415 



ACT. 

Actuate, 

Acute, 

Adage, 

Adamant, 

Adapt, 

Add, 

Addict, 

Addition, 

Address, v. 

Address, s. 

Adept, 

Adequate, 

Adhere, 

Adherent, 

Adhesion, 

Adieu, 

Adjacent, 

Adjourn, 

Adjournment, 

Adjure, 

Adjutant, 

Admmister, 
Administra- 
tion, 
Administrator, 
Admiration, 
Admire, 
Admission, 
Admit, 
Admonish, 
Adopt, 

Adoption, 

Adoration, 
Adore, 
Adorn, 
Adomation, 



OniKAV. 


Spanuh. 


Frbkob. 


Treiben, 


Mover, 


Pousser, exciter. 


Spitzig, schar^ 


Affudo, 
Adagio, m. 


Adage, m. 


Sprichwort, n. 


Diamant, m. 


Diamante, m. 


Adamant, m. 


Anpassen, 


Adaptar, 


Adapter. 


Hinzuthun, 


AHadar, 


Ajouter. 


Widmen, 


Dedicar, 


S' appliquer L 


Hinzusetzen, n. 


Adicion,/. 


Addition,/ 


Anrieden, v. 


Hablar, v. 


Addresser, v. 


Verwendung,«./. Recurso (m) 


Addresse, s.f. 


[dige,m. 


verbal. 




Eunstverst&n- 


Adepto, m. 


Adepte, wi. 


Angemessen, 


Adequado, 


Adequat,-a 


Anhangen, 
Anhangend, 


Pegarse, 
Adnerente, 


Adherer. 
Adherent 


Anhangen, n. 


Adhesion,/. 


Adhesion, / 


Lebewohl! 


6Di06, 


Adieu. 


Anliegend, 


Adyacente, 
Diferir, 


Adjacent 


Aussetzen, 


Ajourner. 


Aufschub, m. 


Suspension,/. 


Ajoumement, m. 


Beschwdren, 


Juramentar, 


Adjurer. 


Adjutant, m. 


Ayudante 
major, m. 


Adjutant, m. 


Verwalten, 


Administrar, 


Administrer. 


Verwaltung,/. 


Administra- 


Administra- 




cion,/. • 


tion,/ 


Verwalter, m. 


Admini8trador,m Administrateur. 


Bewundemng,/. Admiracion,/ 


Admiration,/ 


Bewundem, 


Admirar, 


Admirer. 


Zulassung,/ 


Admission,/. 


Admission,/ 


Zdassen, 


Admitir, 


Admettre. 


Erinnem, 


Amonestar, 


Avertir. 


An Kindes Statt Adoptar, 


Adopter. 


annehmen. 






Annahme, an 


Adopcion,/. 


Adoption,/ 


Kindes Statt,/. 




Anbetung,/. 


Adoracton,/ 


Adoration,/ 


Anbeten, 


Adorar, 


Adorer. 


Zderen, 


Adomar, 


Decorer, 


Schmuck, m. 


Laaccion(/.) 
de adomar. 


Decoration,/ 



416 



IWrEHNATrONAL DIOnOITABT. 



ADV 


Qntiuir. 


SpARisn. 


Fxnroa. 


Advance, 


Vorriicken, 


Avanzar, [to, m. Avancer, 


Advancement, Fortschritt, m. 


Adelantamien- 


Avancement, m. 


Advantage, 


Vortheil m. 


Ventaja, /. 


A vantage, w. 


Advent, 


Advent, m. 


Adviento, m. 


Avent, m. 


Adventure, $. 


Abenteuer,*. »k 


Aventura, 8,f, 


Aventure, *./. 


Adventure, v. 


Wagen, v. 


Aventurar, v. 


Aventurer, v. 


Adverb, 


Nebenwort, n. 


Adverbio, m» 


Adverbe, m. 


Advert, 


Acbtung geber 


1, Atender, 


Observer. 


Advertise, 


Benachrichtigen, Avii-sar, 


Averlir. 


Advertisement, Nachricbt, /. 


Noticia,/. 


Avertissement 


Advertiser, 


Anzei^er, m. 


Advisador, m. 


Avertisseur, m. 


Advice, 


Nachncht,/. 


Consejo, m. 


Conseil, avis, m. 


Advise, 


Rathen, 


Conejar, 


Conseillen 


Advocate, 8, 


Advocat, 8. m. 


Abogado, 8,in. 


Avocat-e, «. m./. 


Advocate, v. 


Vertheidigen, v 


. ' Abogar, v. 


Defender, v» 


Affable, 


GFesprachig, 


Afable, 


Affable. 


Affinity, 


VersChwager- 
ung,/. 


Afinidad,/. 


Affinity/. 


Affix, 


BeifUgen, 


Anexar, 


Joindre k 


Afflict, 


Aengstigen, 


Afligir, 


Affliger. 


Affliction, 


Leiden, n. 


Afliccion,/ 


AflSiction,/. 


Affront, «. 


Angriff^ *. m. 


Afrenta, «./ 


Affront, «.m. 


Affront, V. 


Angreisen, v. 


Encarar, v. 


Affronter, v. 


Afoot, 


Zu Fusze, 


A' pie, 


^A pied. 


Afraid, 


Furchtsam, 


Amedrentado^ 


Affray& 


After, 


Nach, 


Despues, 


Apr^s. 


Again, 


Wieder, 


Otravez, 


Encore. 


Against, 


^Tider, gegen. 


Contra, 


Contre. 


Age, 


Alter, n. 


Edad,/ 


Steele, age, in* 


Agents 


Agent, 71%. 
8chwerer,[ung,, 


Operativo> m. 


Agent, »t. 


Aggravate, 


/"Agravar, 


Aggraver. 


Aggravation, 


Verschliiiimer- 


Agravacion,/. 


Aggravation,/ 


Aggrieve, 


Kranken, 


Apesadumbrar, 


Vexer. 


Agitate, 


Bewegen, 
Unwalt, m. 


Agitar, 


Agiter 


Agitator, 


Timon, m. 


Agitateor, m. 


Ago, 


Vorbei, 


Pasado, 


Depuis. 


Agonize, 


Peinigen, 


Estar agoQiando, Agoniser. 


Agony, 


Pein,/ [men, 


Agonia,/. 


Agonie, peine, y. 


Agree, 


Uebereinstim- 


Concordar, 


S'accorder. 


Agreeable, 


Gem&8z, 


Conveniente, 


Plaisant,*e. 


Agreed! 


Toppl richtigl 


Establecidol 


Fioil D'aocord! 



INTEBNATIONAL DIOTIONABT. 



417 



AGB. 

Agreement^ 

Agriculture, 

Alarm, s. 
Alarm, v. 
Alas, 
Album, 
Alcohol, 

Alderman, 

Ale, 

Algebra, 

Al&e, 

Aliment, 

Alimony, 

Alive, 

All, 

Allay, 

Allow, 

AHovance, 

Allspice, 

Allusion, 

Almighty, 

Almost, 

Alms, 

Aloes, 

Aloft^ 

Alone, 

Along, 

Already, 

Also, 

Alter, 

Alteration, 

Although^ 

Alum, 

Always, 

Amaze, 

Ambassador, 

Ambiguity, 



GiucAir. 

Uebereinstim- 

mung,/. 
Landbau, m. 
Lust,/. 
Larm, 8, m. 
Larm blassen, v, 
Ach, weh ! 
Stammbuch, n. 
RecUficirter 

Weingeist,m. 
Rathsherr, nu 

tBier, n. 
lopftes 
Algebra,/. 
Gleich, 
Nahrung, / 
Unterhcdt, m. 
Lebendig, 
All, aller, jeder, 
Lefflren, 
£rlauben, 
Erlaubnisz, / 
Piment, m. 
Anspielung,/, 
Allmachtig, 
Fast, beinahe, 
Almosen, n. 
Aloe,/ 
Hoch, uber, 
Allein, 
Langs, 
Bereits, 
EbenfaJls, 
Aendem, 
Ver&nderung,/ 
Obgleich, 
Ahiun,ffk 
*Immer, stets, 
Erschrecken, 
Gesandte, m. 
Zweideudgkeit^. 



Spamise. 

Concordia,/ 



Accord, m. 



Agricultura,/ Agricxdture,/ 
Ayre, Zefiro, m. Air, m. brise,/ 
Alarma, «./ Alarme, «./• 



Alarmar, v. 
Ay! 

Librito, m. 
Alcohol, m. 



Alarmer, v. 

Album, m. 
Alcohol, m. 



Senador 6 mag- Alderman, m. 
istrador, m. 



Cerveza,/ 

Algebra,/ 

Descender, 

AHmento, m, 

AUmentos, m. 

Vivo, viviento, 

Todo, 

Liffar, 

Admitar, 

Permission, / 

Pimento, m. 

Indirecta, f. 

Omnipotente, 

Cad, 

limosna,/ 

Aloe, 6 Unalo, m, Alo^s, m, 

Arriba, En haut 

Solo^ solamente, Seul,-e. 

A' lo largo, De long. 

A' la hora esta, Ddja. 

Tambien, 



Aile,/ 

Algebra,/ 

Pareillement 

Aliment, m. 

Pension, / 

Vivant,-e. 

Toutj-e, chaque. 

AlUer. 

Admettre. 

Indulgence,/ 

]fipice,/ 

Allusion,/ 

Tout-puissant. 

Presque. 

Aum6ne,/ 



Alterar, 

Alteracion,/ 

Aunque, 

Alumbre, m. 

Siempre, 

Aterrar, 

Embazador, m. 



Ausd. 

Changer. 

Alteration,/ 

Quoique. 

lAlum, nu 

.Toujours. 

jAttonner. 

(Ambassadeur,m. 



Ambiguedad,/ lAmbiguite,/ 



418 



IKTKBNATIONAI, DIOTIONABT. 



AMB. 


GnxAX. 


Spaaibb. 


VkBTCB* 


Ambition, 


Ehrgeiz, m. 


Ambicion,/. 


Ambition,/ 


Ambitious, 


Ehrgeizig, 


Ambicioso, 


Ambitieux,/ 


Amiable, 


LiebenswOrdig, 


Amable, 


Almable. 


Amicablp, 


Freundschast- 

lich. 
Mitten in, 


Amigable, 


Doux,-ce. 


Amid, 


Entre, 


Parmi, entre. 


Among, 


Unter, zwischen, Entre^ 


Parmi, dans. 


Amount, s. 


Bctrag, 8. m. 


Importe, 8. m. 


Somme,/. 


Amount, v. 


Betragen, v. 


Retirar, v. 


Se monter, r. 


Amuse, 


Unterhalten, 


• Entre tener. 


Amuser. 


Amusement, 


Unterhaltung, /. Diversion,/. 


Amusement, m. 


Analogy, 


Analogic,/. 


Analogia,/ 


Analogic,/ 


Analyze, 


Auslasen, 


Analiza)-, 


Analyser. 


Anatomy, 


Zergliederung- 


Anatomia,/. 


Anatomic,/ 




skunst,/ 




# 


Anchor, 


Anker, *. m. 


Ancla, «./• 


Ancre, s.f. . 


Ancient, 


Vor alters, 


Antiquo^ 


Ancienne. 


And, 


Und, 


7f 


Et 


Angel, 


Engel, m. 


Angel, m. 


AngCjiw. 
Collre,/ 


Anger, 


Zorn, m. 


Colera,/. 


Animal, 


Thier, n. 


Animal, m. 


Animal, m. 


Annex, 


Bebiigen, 


Anezar, 


Annezer-^. 


Annihilate, 


Vemichten, 


Aniqu^ar, 


An£antir. 


Annuity, 


Yehrgeld, «. 


Renta,/. 


Annuity,/ 


Another, 


Ein anderer. 


Otro, 


Autre. 


Answer, 


Antwort, «./. 


Respuesta, 8./. Mponse, «./. 


Antagonist, 


Gegner, m. 


Antagonista, m 


» Antagoniste, m. 


Antemeridian, Yormitt&gig, 




Avant midi. 


Antichrist, 


Antichrist, m. 


Antechristo, m 


. Antichrist, m. 


Antiquarian, 




Antiquario, m. 


Antiquaire, m./ 


Antiquity, 


ner, tft» 
Alter, n. 


Antiguedad,/. 


Antiquite,/ 


Anvil, 


AmboBS, m. 


Yunque, m. 


Enclume,/ 


Any, 


Jeder, jede, 


Qualquier, 


Quelque. i 


Apology, 


Schutzspruch,m. Apologia,/. 


Apologie,/ 


Apostate, 


Abtrunnige, 


Apostata, 


Apostat 


Apostle, 


Apostel, 171. 
Kleidung,/. 


Apostol, m. 


Ap6tre, m. 


Apparel, 


Trage, m. 


Habillement, m. 


Appear, 


Erscheinen, 


Aperecer, 


Piiraltre. 


Applaud, 


Beifall geben, 


Aplaudir, 


Applaudir.[meiit 


Applause, 


Beifiili, m. 


AplauBo, m. 


Applaudisse- 



INTERNATIONAL DIOTIONABT. 



419 



APP. 

Apple, 

Application, 

Apply, 

Appoint, 

Appointment, 

Apprentice, 

Approve, 

April, 

Apron, 

Aqueduct, 

Arbitrary, 

Arbitrate, 

Arcade, 

Arch, 

Architect, • 

Argue, 

Argument^ 

Arise, 

Aristocracy, 

Aiithmetician, 

Arithmetic, 

Arm, 

Army, 

Around, 

Arrange, 

Arrest, 

Arrival, 

Arrive, 

Arrow, 

Arson, 

Art^ 

Artery, 

Artful, 

Article, 

Artillery, 

Artist, 

As, 

Ascent, 

Afihes, 

Aside, 

Ask, 



Angapfel, nu 

Anwendung,/. 

Auslegen, 

Bestimmen, 

Bestimmung,/. 

Lehrling, m. 

Billigen, 

Apni, m. 

Schurze,/. 

Wasserleitung»/. Aqueducto, m. 

Willknrlich, Arbitrario, 



SPAinsH. 

Manzana,/. 
Aplication, /. 
Aplicar, 
Se&alar, 
Estipulacion, / 
Aprendiz, m. 
Gustar, 
Abril, m. 
Devantal, m. 



Entscheiden, 
Bogengang, m, 
Bogen, m. 
Baumeister, m, 
Disputiren, 
Bewds, m. 
Aufsteigen, 
Aristokratie,/ 
Bechenmeister, 



Arbitrar, 
Boveda,/ 
Arco, m. 
Arquitecto, m. 
Bazonar, 
Argumento^ ffu 
Levantarse, 
Aristocr^cia,/. 
Arithm£tico, rru 



Rechenkunst,/. Arithmfetica,/. 

Arm, m. Brazo, m. 

Armee,/ Exercito, m. 

Rings, herum. Circa, 

Orduen, [men, Colocar, 
in Beschlagneh- Prender, 

Ankunft, /. Arribo, m, 

Ankommen^ Arribar, 

Pfeil, m. Flecha,/. 

Mordbrennerei, El delito^ m. 



Eunst^ list, /. 
Pulsader,/. 
EiLntslicb, 
Artikel, m. 
Artilleiie,/. 
Eiinstler, m, 
Als, da, sofem^ 
Aufeteigen, n, 
Asche,/. 
Beiseite, 



Urn etwas bitten, Pedir, 



Arte, cautela,/. 
Arteria, f. 
Artificioso^ 
Articulo, m. 
ArtiUeria, /. 
Artista, m 
Como^ 
Subida,/ 
Ceniza,/. 
41ado^ 



Pomme, /. 
Application, /• 
S'appliquer a. 
Appointer. 
Appointment, m. 
Apprentice, m./. 
Approver. 
Avril, nu 
Tabli^r, m. 
Aqueduc, m. 
Arbitraire. 
Arbitrer. 
Arcade,/, 
Arche,/. 
Architect, m. 
Raisoner. 
Ar^ment, m. 
Se lever. 
Aristocratic,/. 
Arithm£ticien,m. 
AHthmitique, / 
Bras, 911. 
Arm^e,/ 
Autour de. 
Arranger. 
Arr^ter. 
Arriv^e, /. 
Arriver a. 
Fleche,/. 
Arson,/, [don. 
Art, m. profea- 
Art^re,/, 
Rus4,-e.' 
Article, m. 
Artillerie,/ 
Artbte, m, 
gresque, comme. 
£l£vation,/ 
Cindres,/. 
^A cbiAj k part 
Demander. 



420 



IHTKBirATtOKAI. DIOnOITABT. 



ASL. 


OiBiuir. 


Spahish. 


FKorcB. 


Asleep, 


Schlasend, 


Durmiendo^ 


En dormi. 


Aspire, 


Streben, 


Aspirar, 


Aspirer k. 


Ass, ^ 


Esel, m. eselin,/. Asno, m. 


Ane, m. anosse^ 


Assassin, 


Menchelmorder 


, Assassator, m. 


AB8assin,-e, m./. 


Assassinate, 


Verratherischer 


Asesinar, 


Assassiner. 




weiseermorden 


1) 




Assault, 


Angrifi^ 8. m. an 


- Asalto^ «. m. ac- Assaut, s. nu at- 




greisen, v. 


ometer, e. 


taquer, v. 


Assembly, 


Bersammlang, / Asamblea, /• 


Assembl^e,/ 


Assertion, 


Behauptung,/ 


Asercion,/. 


Assertion,/. 


Assess, 


Beschatzen, 


Carcar, 


Taxer. 


Assessment, 


Schatzung,/. 


Derechos, 971. 


Taxation,/ 


Assessor, 


Beistzer, m. 


Asesor,77i, 


Assesseur, m. 


Assign, 


Anweisen, 


Asignar, 


Assigner. 


Assignation, 


Anweisung, /. 


Asignacion,/. 


Assignation,/ 


Assignee, 


Curator (m.) de 
masse, 


Podatorio, m. 


D6put6, m. 


Assignment, 


Anweisung, /. 


Seilalamiento,m. Consignation,/. 


Assist, 


Beistehen, 


Asistir, 


Assister, aider. 


Assistance, 


Beistand, m. 


Asistencia, / 


Assistance,/. 


Assistant, 


Gehtllfe, m. 


Asistente, m. 


Auxiliaire, fiL 


Associate, 


Theilnehmer, 8. 


Socio, 8, m. 


Associ^-e, fiL / 




»».begleiten,« 


. asociar, v. 


associer, t^. 


Assort, 


Mit waaren ver 


- Colocar, 


Assortir. 




sehen. 


[glada. 


Assortment, 


Sortiment, n. 


Colecion,/ arre 


i- Assortiment, in. 


Assure, 


Vereichern, 


Asegurar, 


Assurer. 
Etonner. 


Astonish, 


Erschrecken, 


Asombrar, 


Afitonishment, Besttirzung,/. 


Pasmo, m. 


£tonnement, m. 


At, - - - 


Zu, an, bei, &c. 


A', aL 


Au, k la, Bur, deo. 


Atheism, 


Qottesleugnung, Ateismo, m. 


Ath£isme, m. 


Atheist, 


Gk>tte8leugner,m. Ateista, at6o, m. Ath^iste, m./» 


Atlas, 


Landkarten- 

Bftrnmlnng, f. 


Atlas, f». 


Atlas, m. 


Atmosphere, 


Dunstkreis, m. 


Atmosfera,/. 


Atmosphere,/ 


Atone, 


Ausgleichen, 


Ezpiar, accordar, Expier. 


Atonement, 


Vergtitung,/. 
Verhaften, 


Concordia,/. 


Expiation,/. 


Attach, 


Prender, 


Attacher, Uer. 


Attachment, 


Verhaftneh- 


Amistad,/. 


AttachementyffM. 


Attack, 


mung,/. 
Angrif^ «• m. 


Ataque, 9. nu 


Attaque, «./ 



nmCBITATIOKAI. DIOnONAXT. 



421 



ATT. 


tiUUCAK. 


Spahus. 


VUNOH. 


Attempt, 


Yersuch, 9, m. 


Ataque, «. m, in 


1- Essaj, «. m. tent- 




versuchen, v. 


tentar, v. 


er, V, 


Attend, 


Aufmerken, 


Atender, servir, 


» Acompagner. 


Attendanoe, 


Aufwartung,/. 


Corte, m. 


Service, nu 


Attendant, 


Aufwarter, m. 


£1 que atiende, Compagnon, «. 


Attention, 


Aufmerksam* 


Atendon,/ 


Attention,/. 


Attest, 


Bezeugen, 


Atestiguar, 


Attester. 


Attorney, 


Bevolbnachtigte, Procurador, m. 


Avou£, m. 


Attract, 


Anziehen, 


Atraer, 


Attirer, inviter. 


Auction, 


Auction,/. 


Almoneda,/. 


Encan, m. 


Auctioneer, 


Auctionator, m. 


Pregonero, nu 


Vendeur nu a 






de almonedi^ 


I'ench^re. 


Audible, 


Horbar, 


Audible, 


Haut> chair,-e. 


Audience, 


Audienz,/. 


Audiencia,/. 


Audience,/ 


Aunt, 


Muhme,Tante, / Tia, /. 


Tante,/ 


Author, 


Urheber, m. 


Autor, m. 


Auteur, m. 


Authority, 


Ansehen, n. 


Autoridad,/. 


AutoritiS,/ 


Authorize, 


Bevollmachtigen, Autorizar, 


Autoriser. 


Autograph, 


Unterschrift,/. 


Autographo^ m. 


Autograph, m. 


Autumn, 


Herbst, m. 


OtoiLo, m. 


Automne, m,f. 


Avenue^ 


AUee,/ 


Entrada,/. 


Avenue,/ 


Ayerage, 


Frohndieii8t,m. 


Averia,/. 


Average, m. 


Arert, 


Abwenden, 


Desviar, 


Detoumer. 


Avocation, 


Beru^iik 


La accion (/.) de Emploi, wi. pro- 






blamar. 


fession,/ 


Awake, 


Aufwachen, ir. 


Despartar,v. dea- Eveiller, v. 




wach, a^. 


pierto^ a^. 


eveille,a. 


Away, 


Weg, fort. 


Ausente, 


Absenty-e. 


Awful, 


Ehrwiirdiff, 
Pfrieme,/ 


Tremendo, 


Sublime. 


Awl, 


Lesna,/. 


Alene,/ 


Ax, 


Axt, f. [/. Segur, haoha, / 


Hache, cognfe,/ 


Axle, 


Axe, (am wagen) Eze, n. 


Essieu^x, m. 


Azur^ 


Himmelblau, 


Azul,clara 


Azur, bleu. 



B. 

Babe, Singling, m. Infante, m. Enfant, m. 

Bachelor, Junggeselle, nu Solterob nu Bachelier, nu 

Bock, Bticken, «. nu zu*Espalda,«/ n^n* I^os, «. m. secoa« 

roiten, v^ atr a caballo^v. der, v. 



36 



423 



INTERNATIONAL DIOTIONAEY. 



BAG. 

Bacon, 

Bad, 

Bridge, 

Bag, 

Bailifl^ 

Bake, 

Balance, 

Ball, 
Balloon, 

Ballot, 

Balm, 

Bane, 

Banish, 

Banishment^ 

Bank, 

Banner, 
Baptism, 
Baptize, 
Bar, 

Barbarian, 
Barbarous, 
Barber, 
Bare, 

Bargain, 

Bark, 

Bam, 

Barrel, 

Barren, 

Barter, 

Base, 

Bashful, 
Basket, 



GKnxAir. Spanish. FrhiiOH. 

Speck, m, Tocino, m. Lard, m, 

Krank, schlecht, Mai, malo, Mauvais,-e. 

Zeichen, n. Divisa, /. Marque, m. 

Sack, m. Saco, m. Sac, m. poche,/. 

Landvogt, m, Alguacil, m. Bailli, m. 
Backen, Cocer, en homo. Boulanger. 

Wage, 9. /. or- Balaaca, «./. ba- Balance, *. /. pe- 

wagen, v, laucear, v. «er, v. 

Ball, m. Kugel,/ Bola, bala, / Balle, /. 
Lustball, TIL Bola (/.) de co- Ballon, m. 

lumna. 
Wahlkugelchen. Balota, a. /. 
<.m. ballotiren,v. lotar, y. 
Balsam, m, Balsamo, m. 

Gift, n. Veneno, tw. 

Verbannen, Bcstarrary 

Verbannung,/ Destierro, m. 
Banco^ w. 



Ufer, n. damm, 

m, Geldbank,/. 
Pannier, lu Bandera,/. 
Taufe, /. Bautismo, m. 

Taufen, Bautizar, 



ba-Ballotte,9./.bal- 
lotter, V. 
Baume, m. 
Poison, m. 
Bannir. 

Bannissement,»i. 
Bord, rivage, m, 

banque,/. 
Banniere,/. 
Bapteme,/ 
Baptisen 



Stange, «./. sper- Palenque, 9. m. Barre, 5./. bar- 
ren, V. atrancar,v. \nu rer, v. 

Barbar, m. Hombrebarbaro, Barbare, m, 

Grausam, Barbaro, Sauvage. 

Barbier, m. Barbero, m. Barbier, m. 

Blosz, adj. ent- Desnudo, adj, l^vto^adj, depoa- 
bloszen, v. desnudar, v, iller, v. 

Handel, s, m, Ajuste, 8, m, pac- Marche, 9,Tn, bar- 
handeln, v. tar, v, gulgner, v. 

Baumrinde, 8, /. Barco, 8. m, la- Barque, 5. / a- 



bellen, v. drar,v. 

Scheune,/. Granero, nu 

Tasz,7i. Tonne, /. Barril, husp, w. 



Unfruchtbar, 
Tausch, 8, m. 
Niedrig, ad}, 
bass, 8, m, 
Schamhaft, 
Korb, m. 



Esteril, 
Trafico, 8, m. 



boyer, v. 
Grange,/ 
Baril, tonneau,9it. 
Sterile. 
Troc, s. m. 



Baxo, adj, fondo» Bas,-se, a€^. baB, 

«• m. 8. nu 

Yergonzoso, Modeste, timide. 
Cesta, canasta,/ Ponier, m. 



DTTBRirATIONAL mCXIONABT. 



423 



BAS. 

Bason, basin, 


OXKMAIf. 

Becken, n. 


Spanish. 
Jofayna,/. 


Bass, 


Bass, m. 


Esparto, to. 


Bat, 


Fledermaus,/. 


Giirrote, to. 


Bath, n. baUie, Bad, n. Bahung, Bafio, 8,m. bailir, 


V. 


«'./ baden, v 


V. 


Battery, 


Angrifif, m. 


Bnteria,/. 


Battle, 


Schlacht,/. 


Bataila,/. 


Bayonet, 


Bajonnet, n. [i 


t. Bayoneta, /. 


Beach, 


Strand, m, Ufer, Costa. /. 


Beacon, 


Tiarmzeichen, i 


1. Valiza,/. 


Beak, 


Schnabel, m. 


Pico, TO. 


Beam, 


Balken,Strahl,m. Viga,/ rayo, m. 
Bar, «. TO. tragen, Oso, 9. m, llevar 


Bear, 




V. 


alguna cosa,v. 


Beard, 


Bart, m. 


Barba,/ 


Beast, 


Thier, n. 


Bestia,/. 


Beau, 


Stutzer, TO. 


CabalJero, to. 


Beautiful, 


Schon, 


Hermoso, 


Beauty, 


Schdnheit,/. 


Hermosura,/. 


Because, 


Darum, weil. 


Porque, 


Beck, 


Wink, s. TO. 


Cabecco, s. to. 


Become, 


Werden, 


Hacerse, 


Bed, 


Bett, n. 


Cama,/. [locos, 


Bedlam, 


ToUhaus, n. 


Casa (/.) de 


Bee, 


Biene,/. 


Abeja,/. 


Beech, 


Buche,/. 


Haya,/. 


Beef, 


Rindfleisch, n. 


Vaca,/. 


Beer, 


Bier, fk 


Cerveza,/. 


Beet^ 


Mbe,/ 


Acelga,/. 


Befriend, 


Begunstigen, 


Favorecer, i 


Beget. 


Zeugen, 
Bettler, n. 


Engendrar, 


Beggar, 


Meudigo, m. . 


Begin, 


Anfangen, 


Empezar, 


Beginning, 


Anfan^, n. 
Beneiden, 


Principio, to. 


Begrudge, 
Behave, 


Envidiar, 


Sich betragen, 


Proceder, 


Behavior, 


Betragen, n. 


Modal, nu 


Behead, 


Enthauptcn, 


Degoilar, 


Behind, 


Hinter, [Siehe I Detras, atras, 


Behold, 


Ansehen, v. 


Ver, V. he I i?it 


Being, tf. 


Dasein, fi. 


Existencia,/. 



Fkjkmoh. 

BassiUf to. 

Basse, f. 

Mnssue, crosse,/. 

Bain, «. in, se 
baigner, v. 

Batterie, f, 

Bataille,/. 

Baionnette, /. 

Bord, rivage, m. 

Pbare, to. 

Bee, TO. [to. 

Poutre,/ rayon, 

Ours, I, to: por- 
ter, v. • ^■ 

Barbe, /. [to. 

B^te, /. animal, 

Petit maltre, to. 

Beau, bel, belle. 

Beaut6, /. 

Parce que. 

Signe *. /. 

Convenir, ^ 

Lit, TO. 

Petites malsons. 

Abeille, /. 

H^tre, TO. 

Boeuf,TO. 

Bi^re,/. 

Bette, poirfe,/. 

Supporter, 

Engendrer. 

Mendiant,-e,TO.yi 

Commencer. 

Commencement. 

Nier, envier. 

Se conduire. 

Deportment, to. 

Decapiter. 

Deriere, npres. 

Voir, V. Vuicil 

£)tre, TO. 



421 



INTEBNATIONAL DICnONABT. 



BBL. 

Belch, 

Belie, 

Belief 

Believe, 

Bell, 

Bellow, 

Bellows, 

Belly, 

Belong, 

Below, 

Belt, 

Bench, 

Bend, 

Beneath, 

Benefit, 

Bequeath, 

Bereave, 

Berry, 

Beseech, 

Beset, 

Beside, 

Besiege, 

Best, 

Bestow, 

Bet, 

Betide, 

Betray, 

Betroth, 

Better, 

Between, 

Bewitch, 

Beyond, 

Bible, 

Bid, 

Bidding, s. 

Big, 

Bigaaiy, 

Bigot, 

Bile, 

Bilge, 

Bilious, 



Odjur. 
Riilpsen, 
Beliigen, 
Glaube, m. 
Giaul)en, 
Glocke,/ 
BrlilJen, 
BlasebaJg, 91. 
Bauch, m. 
Betreffen, 
Unter, unten, 
Gehenk, fi. 
Bank,/, [gen v. 
Biegung,/ bie- 
Unter, 

Wohlthat,*./ 
Yermachen, 
Berauben, 
Beerc,/. 
Bitten, flehen, 
Besetzen, 
Auszer, neben, 
Belagem, 
Beste, 
Schenken, 
Wette, «./, 
Begegnen, 
Verrathen, 
Verloben, 
Besser, 
Zwischen, 
Beheren, 
Ueber, jenseits, 
Bibel,/. 
Entbieten, 
Befehl, m> 
Dick, kuhn, 
Bigamie,/. 
Scheinheilige, m, 
Beule,Galle,/. 
Leek werden, 
Gallenhafifc, 



Spahuil 

Regoldar, 

Contrahacer, 

Creencia,/. 

Creer, 

Campana,/. ' 

Bramar, 

Fuelles, vk 

Vientre, m. 

Perteneccr, 

Debazo, abaxo^ 

Carrea,/. 

Banco,m. [var,tr. 

Comba,/. encor- 

Abaxo, 

Beneficio, s. m, 

Mandar, 

Despojar, 

Baya,/. 

Suplicar, 

Sitiar, aoosar, 

Cerca, ademas, 

Sitiar, 

Mejor, 

Dar, conferir. 

Apuesta, a./ 

Sucedar, 

Ezponer, 

Desposor, 

£1 mejor, 

Entr^ 

Encantar, 

Mas alia, 

Biblia,/. 

Pedir, mandar, 

Orden, m.f, 

Grande, 

Bigamia, /. 

Partidario^ m. 

Bilis, colera,/. 

Hacer agua. 

Bilioso^ 



Roter, vomir. 

Contredire. 

Croyance, foi»/- 

Croire. 

Cloche,/. 

Beugler. 

SoufBet, m. 

Ventre, m* 

Appartenir. 

Au dessous do. 

Ceinturon, n. 

Banc,!?!. 

Pli, 8. m, plier, v. 

Sous. 

BiendEUt, «. m. 

Legtier &. 

Depouiller. 

Baie,/. 

Prier, conjurer* 



'A c6t6 de* 



Meilleur,-6. 

Donner. 

Gageure, /. 

Arriver. 

Trahir. 

f'iancer. 

Meilleur,-e. 

Entre. 

Enchanter. 

Au del& de. 

Bible, m. 

Proposer. 

Commande* / 

Gros, large. 

Bigamie,/. 

Bigot,-e, m./. 

Bile,/. cIou,m. 

Coder. 

Bilieux-se. 



INTERNATIONAL DICTIONABT. 



425 



BIL. 

BUI, 

BUlow, 

Bin, 

Bind, 

Binder, 

Biped, 

Birch, 

Bird, 

Birth, 

Biscait, 

Bishop, 

Bit, 

Bite, 

Bitter, 

Black, 

Black-lead, 

Blacksmith, 

Bladder, 

Blade, 

Blame, 

Blameless, 

Blanket, 

Blaspheme, 

Blasphemer, 

Blast, 

Blaze, 

Bleach, 

Bleacherj, 

Bleat, 

Bleed, 

Blemish, 

Blend, 

Bless, 

BUnd, 

Blindness, 

Bliss, 

Blister, 

Bloat, 



OnucAX. Spahuh. Frencb. 

Schnabel, Bill, /. Pico {m) de ava. Bee, billet, m. 
Woge, Welle,/. Oleadji, /. Vague, /. 

Hasten, m. Lade, Despensa,/ CoBre, m. 
Binden, Atar, [m. Enchainer. 

Binder, tru Enquademador, Relieur, lieur, nk 

Thier, n. Animal de dos Bipede, m. 



Birke, Rathe,/ Abedul, m. Bouleau,-x, m, 

Vogel, m, Ave, m. Oisseaux-x, m, 

Geburt,/. Nacimiento, m, Naissance,/. 

Zwieback, m. Gallcta,/. Biscuit, m. 

Bischof, m. Obispo^ m. £v6que, m, 

Bissen, m. Stfick, Bocado,77i. Morceau,-x, m. 

Beiszen,kranken, Morder, Mofdre, pincer. 

Bitter, Amargo, Amer,-e. 

Murrisch, Negro, obscuro, Noir, sombre. 

Reisz-blei, n. Lapiz-plomo, m. Minedeplomb,/. 

Grobschmicd, m. Herrero, m. Forgeron. m. 

Blase,/. Vexiga,/ [mo, Vessie, enflure,/ 

Blattchen, n. Pala (/) dere- Lame, tige,/ 



Tadel, «. m. Calpa,/ 
IJntadelhaft, Inocente, 
WolleneDecke,/ Manta,/ 
Gott last em, Blasfemar, 
Gotteslasterer,n. Blasfemo, m, 
Windstoss,^. m, Kublo, 8, m. 
flamme, s.f. 

Flammen, v. 
Bleichen, 
Bleich, f. 
Bloken, «. n. v. 



Bluten, 
Makel, 8. m. 
Besttdeln, 
Segnen, 
Blind, falsch, 
Blindkeit,/ 
Seligkeit, / 
Blatter, «./. 
Aufblasen, 
36* 



Llama, s./ bril- 

lar, V. 
Blanquear, 
Blanqueria, / 
Balido, 8. m, 

balar, v, 
Sangrar, 
Tacha, 8,f. 
Mezelar, 
Bendecir, 
Ciego, 

Ceguedad,/. 
Gloria,/ 
Vexiga, 5./ 
Hincbar, 



Bl&me, crime, m. 
Innocent,-e. 
Couverture / 
Blasphemer. 
Blasphemateur. 
Bouif^e, 8, m, 
Flamme, *./ 

allumer, v. 
Blancher. 
Blancbisserie,/ 
B^lement, 8. m, 

b61er, v. 
Saigner. 
Tache, 8, / 
M61er. 
B6nir, loucr. 
Aveugle. 
Aveuglement, m* 
Beatitude,/ 
V&icule, 8./. 
S'enfler,gonfler. 



426 



INTERNATIONAL DICrnONABY. 



BLO. 

Blocks 

Blood, 

Blood-thirsty, 

Bloom, 

Blot, 

Blotch, 

Blotting-paper, 

Blow, 

Blue, 

Bluff, 

Blunder, 

Blunt, 

Blur, 
Blush, 

Bluster, 
Board, 
Boarder, 
Boast, 

Boat, 

Bobbin, 

Bodice, 

Bodkin, 

Bodj, 

Bog, 

Bohea, 

Boil, 

Boisterous, 

Boiler, 

Bold, 

Bombard, 

Bond, 

Bondage, 

Bone, 

Bonfire, 



Okhmaiv. Spavxsb. 

Block, Klotz, m. Zoquete, 9. m. 
Blut, n. Sangre, m. 

BlutdiirsUg, [v. Sanguinario^ 
Bluthe,». bluhen, Flor,«./.enchar,9 
Klecks, 9, m. Borron, 9. m. 
Blatter,/. Boncha, /. 

Loschpapier, n. Teleta,/. 
Stosz,m.wehen,tr Gk>lpe,«. 8oplar,tr. 
Blau, Azul, 

Grob, Agreste, 

Schnitzer, 5. m. Desatino, 9. m. 



Stumpf, adj, 

abstumpfen, v. 
Ellecks, 8, m: 



Lerdo, adj. em- 

botar, V. 
Borron, 9* m. 



Schamrothe, «./. Chapa, «./. 
errothen, v. hacer rozo, v. 



Ruido, «. m. 
Tabla, f,/ 
Mes, aEo, 971. 
Jactancia, «./. 
jactar, «• 



Sturm, «. m. 
Brett, n.Ko6t,/. 
Kostg&nger, m. 
Prahlerei, «./. 

prahlen, v. 
Boot, n, Fahre,/. Bote, », 
Schnur, Spule,/. Bolillo^ m. 
Schnurbrust,/. Corsfi, m. 
Haarnadel, /• Punzon, m» 
Leib, Korper,m. Cuerpo, m. 
Sumpf,Morast,m Pantaoo, m. 



Theebuh, m. 
Eochen, 
Sturmiscb, 
Sieder, m. 
Kuhn, frech, 
Bombardiren, 



Especie de t£,m. 

Hervir, 

Barrascoso, 

Cooedor, m, 

Intrepido, 

Bombardear, 



Bonnet, 

Book, 

Boom, 



Band,/i.Strtck,m. Grillo, n. 
Enechtschaft,/. Cautiverio^ m, 
Enochen, nu Hueso, m, 
Freudenfeuer, ft. Fuego {m^ do 

regocijo. 
Damenhut, m. Bonete» m. 
Buch, n, Libro^rA. 

Querstangie,/; Botalon, m. 



FBsarca. 
Bloc, 9. m. 
Sang, m. 
Sanguinaire, 
Fieur,*.fieurir, »♦ 
Tache, 5./. 
Pustule, [lard,fg» 
Papier brouil- 
Coup,«.souffler,v. 
Bleu, d'azur. 
Rude, fier,-e. 
Erreur, 8,f, 
l^moussi, adj, 

^mousser, v. 
Tache,*./. 
Rongeur, «./. 

rougir, v. 
Fracas, «. m. 
Planche,^./. 
Pensionnaire, flib 
Parade, «./. 

ranter, v. 
Bateau,-!, m. 
Bobine,/. 
Corset, m. 
Poin9on, in. 
Corps,hommeyn8. 
Marais, m, 
Th4-bou, m, 
Bouillir. 
Violent,-6. 
Bouilloire,/ 
Hardif-e, rude. 
Bombardier. 
Lien^ m. 
Captivity,/. 
Os, m. arr6te, f. 
Feu (m) de joia 
[«. 
Bonnet, chapeaVi 
livre, fn> 
Borne, perchai / 



nmBBKATtOK-AL DIGmOKABlT. 



437 



BOO. 

Boon, 

Boot, 

Booty, 

Boro, 

Borough, 

Borrow, 

Bosom, 



Botanical, 

Botanist, 

Botany, 

Botch, 

Both, 

Bottle, 

Bottom, 

Bough, 

Bound, 

Boundless, 

Bounty, 

Bow, 

Bow, (bo.) 

Bowels, • 

Bow], 

Box, 

Boy, 

Brace, 

Brad, 
Brag, 
Bi 
Braii 

Brain, 

Brake, 

Bran, 

Branch, 

Brand, 

Bran^, 

Braster, 



Gabe,«.Iustig,a(9^. 
Btiefel, m. 
Beute,/. Raub, 
Geboren, 
Marktflecken, m. 
Borgen, 
Busen, m. 
Buckel, /. 
Botanisch, 
Botaniker, m. 
Krauterkunde,/. 
Flickwerk,«.n. 
Beide, 
Flasche,/. 
Grund,Boden,ni. 
Ast, m. 
Sprung, m. 

pralTen, v. 
Grenzenlos, 
Pramie,/. 
Bug, s.m, 

beigen, v. 
Bogen, m. 
Eingeweinde, n. 
Becken, s. n. 
Btichse,/. 
KQabe,Junge,97i. 
Band, s. n, 

schnUren, v. 
^a^el, m. 
Pranlen, 
Prohler, m, 
Flechte, »./. 

flechten, if, 
Gehim, n. 
Farnkraut, n. 
Eleie,/. 
Zweig, s. m. 
Brand, s. m. 
Branntwein, m. 
Eohlpfismne,/. 



BfAxnau. 

Dadiva, 8, alegre, 
Ganancia,/ 
Botin, m, 
Nacido, 
Ciudad, /. 
Tomar fiado, 
Seno, m. 
Clavo, m. 
Botanico, 
Botanists, m. 
Botaoica,/. 
Roncha, s.f. 
Ambos, los dos, 
Botelia,/. 
Fondo, nu 
Brazos de arbol, 
limite, s.m. des- 

lindar, v. 
Illimitado, 
Generosidad,/. 
Reverencia, / 

encorrar, v. 
Arco, m. 
Intestines, m. 
Taza,*./. 
Box, m. caxa, /. 
Muchacho, nilLo, 
Abrazadera,t./. 

bracear, v. 
Clavo^ f». 
Jactarse, 
Fanfiantni, m. 
Tren2a,*./.tren- 

zar, V. 
Celebro^ frk 
HelechsU, m. 
Salvado, nu 
Rama, s./. 
Tizon, 8. m. 
Aguardiente,m. 
Latonero^ m. 



Fkbsob. 

Presenty^.bon, «• 
Botte,/. 
Butin, pillage, m, 

Bourg, m. 

Emprunten 

Sein, 971. 

Bosse, /. 

Botanique. 

Botaniste, fit./. 

Botanique, /. 

Enflure, f./. 

TouB deux. 

Bouteille, /. 

Fond, m, 

Branche, /. 

Limite, *./. Knit- 
ter, v. 

IlUmit^, [ti,/. 

Bont6, genirod- 

Salut, m. cour- 
ber, V. 

Arc, archet, m. 

Entrailll^/. 

Bassin, s^m. 

Buis, m. caisse,/. 

GarQon, »i. 

Paire,«./.lier,v. 

Clou, sans t^te. 
Vanter. 
Bravache, m* 
Noeud, «.m»treB- 

ser, v. 
Oeryeau-x, m. 
Buisson, m* [f9l 
Son, bran de son, 
Branche, «./. 
Tison, «. m. 
Brandevin, ffi* 
Brasier, nu 



428 



INTEEITATIONAL DICTIONABT. 



BRA. 



Brat, 

Bravado, 

Brave, 

Bravery, 

Bray, 

Bread, 

Breadth, 

Break, 

Breakfast, 

Breast, 

Breath, 

Breathe, 

Brevity, 

Brew, 

Brewer, 

Brewery, 

Bribe, 

Brick, 

Brickie, 

Bridal, 

Bride, 

Bridge, 

Bridle, 

Brier, 

Brig, 

Brigade, 

Bright, 

Brim, 

Brimstone, 

Brindle, 

Brine, 

Bring, 

Brink, 

Bristle, 

Broach, 

Broad, 

Brogan, 

Broker, 

Brook, 

Broom, 



QXBMAX. SPAHIBH. 

Eupfer, n. Bronce, m,. Aindn, m. 

Kind, n. Balg,m. Rapaz, prole, m. Petit marmot, ;»• 



Groszprahlerei,/. Bravata,/. 



Tapfer, 
Prahlerei,/. 
Schallen, 
Brod, n. 
Breite,/. 
Brechen, 
Friihst&ck, n. 
Brust,/. 
Athem, m, 
Athmen, 
Ktirze,/ 
Brauen, 
Brauer, m. 
Brauhaus, n. 
G^schenk, s. n, 
Ziegelstein, m, 
Zerorechlich, 
Brautlich, 
Braut, /. 
Briicke,/. 
Zaum, m. 
Stauch, m. 
Brigg, m. 
Brigade, /. 
HeS, klar, 
Band, m. 
Schwefel, m» 
Schecke, 
Salzwasser, n. 
Brinffen, 
Rano^ m. 
Borste, «./ 
Bratspies, s, m. 
Breit, grosz, 
Holzschuh, m. 
Makler, m^ 
Bach, 8, r/L 



Bravo^ 
Pompa,/. 
Majar, 
Pan, m, 
Anchura,/ 
Bomper, 
AlmuerzQ, nu 
Pecho, m. 
Aliento, m, 
Alentar, 
Brevidad,/. 
Hacer licores, 
Cervecero, m. 
Cerveceria,/. 
Cohecho,*./. 
Ladrillo, m. 
Qaebradizo, 
Kupcial, 
Novia,/. 
Puente, m. 



Bravade,/. 
Brave, 
Courage, -m. 
Broyer, v. 
Pain, m. 
Largeur, / 
Rompre, casser. 
Ddjetkner, 8, m.9. 
Poi trine,/. 
Haleine,/. 
Respirer. 
Brevet^,/. 
Brasser. 
Brasseur, m. 
Brasserie,/. 
Present, nu 
Brique,/. 
Fragile. 
Nuptial,-e. 
Spouse,/. 
Pont,chevalet,fn. 



Brida,/.freno>,m. Bride,/, frein, m. 



Zarzo, iru 
Bergantin, m. 
Brigada,/. 
Claro, 
Borde, m. 



Ronce,/. 

Brigantin,/ 

Brigade,/. 

Brilliant^-c. 

Bord,extr6mit^ 



Azufre, m» [res, Soufre,/. 
Veriedad de colo* Tavelure, tache. 



Salmuera, /. 
Uevar, traer, 
Orilla,/ 
Cerda, f./. 
Espeto, 8. nu 
Ancho, claro, 
Zapato, nu 
Corredor, m. 
Arroyo, *. nk 



Pfriemenkraat,n. Escobera,/ 



Saumure, mer,/ 
Apporter. 
Bord, m. 
Soie,*./ 
Broche, «./ 
Large, gro8,-«e, 
Soulier, m. 
Courtier, i». 
Ruisseau-x, 8, m. 
Gen^t, ballaii m. 



mTBBNATtONAL DIOTIONAST. 



429 



BB<X 

Broth, 

Brother, 
Brotherly, 

BfOWD, 

Bruise, 
Brush, 

Brute, 

Bubble, 

Bud, 

Budget, 

Buffalo, 

Buffet, 

Buffix>n, 

Bug, 

Buggjr, 

Bugle, 

Build, 

Bulk, 

Bull, 

Bulled 

BuUy, 

Bumper, 

Bunch, 

Bundle^ 

Buag, 

Buoy, 

Buoyant^ 

Bur, 

Burdock, 

Burden, 

Burgamot, 

Bureau, 

Burglar, 

Bum, 

Burst, 

Bury, 

Bush, 

Busheli 

BusUe, 



OBUfAV. 

FleischbrUhe,/. 
Bruder, m. 
Bruderlich, 
Braun, 
Schlagen, v. 
Burste, «./. 

biirstcn, v, 
Vieh, *. n. 
Wasser-blase,/. 
Knospe, $.f. 
Ranzen, nu 
Bliffel, m. 
Schlagen, 
Possenreiszer, m. 
Wanze,/. 
Einspanner, fw. 
Waldhom, n. 
Bauen, 
Elumpen, m. 
Stier, m, 
Kugel,/. 
Kuppler, s. m. 
Voiles Glas, n. 
Bund,Bundel,n. 
Bund,n. 
Spund, tn, 
Boje, / 
Bebend, 
Klette,/. 
Klette,/. 
Last,/. 

Bergamotte,/. 
SchreibtiBoh, m. 
Dieb^ m. 
Brand, 8, m, 

brennen, v. 
Bersten, 
Yergraben, 
Busch, m. 
Bcheffel, m. 
Ger&usch, 8» »• 



SVAHXBH. FlUOH. 

Caldo, m. Freze, m. 

Hermano, m. Bouillon, m. 

Fraternal, Fratemel,-le. 

BrunO| Brun,-e« 

Contusion, «./ Contusion, s.f, 

Bnua, «./. Brosse, «./. 
aoepLllar, tr. brosser, v. 

Bruto^ 8> m. Brute, «. /. 

Burbuja, «./. Bouteille, «./. 

Pimpolla, «./. Bouton, «. m. 

Talego portitil, Petit sac, m, 

BdfaTo, m. Buffle, m. 

Combatir, Souffleter. 

Bufon, m. Bouffon. 

Chinche, m, Punaise, /. 
Especie de carro, Voiture,/. 

Cometa, /. Cor de cha8S0,fii. 



Edificar, 

Tamano, m, 

Toro, m, 

Bala de metal, 

Espadachin, m. 

Copa,lleno, 

Nudo^ racimo^ wl Bosse,/. 

Atado, lio, m* Paquet, m, 

B<Hidon, m. 



B&tir. 
Grandeur. 
Taureau, m, 
Balle/.boulet,ni^ 
Tapa^eur, m, 
Rasade,/ 



Boya,/. 
Boyante, nu 
Cadillo, m. 
Bardana,/. 
Carga, 



Bon don, riK 
Bou6^, /. 
Flottant,-e. 
Bardane,/. 
Glouteron, )n. 
Fardeau,-x, m. 



Pera bergomota, Bergamote, /• 
Escritorio, in. Bureau,-!, m. 
Bobador, m, Yoleur, m. 
Quemadura,^./. Briilure,*./.brii- 
ler, V. 

Crever. 

Enterrer. 

Buisson, m, 

Boisseau,-x, m. 

Bruit, m» 



tr. 



quemar, 
Reventar, 
Enterrar, 
Arbusto^ m. 
Fancga,/. 
Bullicio, «. m. 



430 



INTERNATIONAL DICTIONABT. 



BUS. 

Busy, 

But, 
But, 

Batcher, 

Butchery, 
Butter, 
Buttery, 
Button, 

Buttress, 

Buy, 

Buyer, 

Bye (good,) 



Geschaftig, adj, 
beschafiigen, v. 

Aber, nur, als. 

Ende, s. n, an- 
grenzen, v. 

Fleischer, s. m, 
schlachten, v, 

Fleischbank,/. 

Butter,/ 

Speisekammer/. 

Enop( s» m. zu- 
knbpfen, v. 

Stiitze,/. 

Eaufen, 

K&ufer, m. 

Duroh, von, zu, 

Lebe wohl, 



Spaiobd* 

Ocupado, adj. 

ocupar, V. 
Ezcepto, 
Limite, cabo,9.m. 

hincharse, v, 
Camicero, s. m. 

matar, v. 
Camiceria, /. 
Manteca,/. 
MantecoBO, m. 
Boton, 8. nu 

abotonar, v, 
Estribo, m, 
Comprar, 
Comprador, m, 
Por, 
aDios, 



Fmnrov. 

Actif,-ve, adj. oe^ 

•uper, V, 
Mais. 
Bout, s. m, heur- 

ter, V. 
Boucher, »• m. 

egorger, v, 
Boucherie,/. 
Beurre, m. 
D^pense, /. 
Bouton, s, m. 

boutanner, v. 
Arc-boutant, m. 
Acheter. 
Acheteur-se,m/. 
Par, de, 4, au, 
Adieu. 



Cabbage, 

Cabin, 

Cabinet, 

Cable, 

Cadet, 

Cage, 

Cake, 

Calash, 

Calculate, 

Calculation, 

Caldron, 

Calender, 

Calf, 

Calico, 

Call, 

Calm, 

Calomel, 

Calumny, 

Cambric, 



Eohl, m. 
Cabinet, n. 
Cabinet, ru 
Ankertau, n. 
Cadet, m. 
Vogelbauer,«.»?». 

Qinspenen, t;. 
Kuchen, m. 
Ealesche, /. 
Ausrechnen, 
Berechnung,/. 
Eochtopf, m. 
Ealender, m, 
Ealb, n. 
Eattun, m. 
Nennen, 
Windstille, *./. 

ruhig, adj. 
Calomel, n. 
Verleumdung,/. 
Eammertuch, n. 



Berza,/. 
Cabana,/. 
Oabinete, nk 
Cable, m. 
Cadete, m. 
Jaula, 8.f. en- 

jaular, v. 
Bollo^m. 
Calesa,/ 
Calcular, 
Calculacion,/. 
Caldera,/ 
CalandHa,/ 
Pontorrilla,/ 
Calicad,/ 
Llamar, 
Calmo, 9. m. 

tranquilo, adj, 
Mercurio dulce, 
Catumnia, / 
Batista,/ 



Chou,-x, [/ 
Petite chambre, 
Cabinet, m. 
Cable, m. 
Cade^fn. 
Cage,«./ encft- 

ger, V. 
Ghiteau-z, m, 
Caieche./ 
Calculer. 
Calcul, m. 
Chaudron, nu 
Calandre,/ 
Veau-x, m. 
Indienne,/ 
Appeler. 
Calme, 9. m. eal- 

me, adj. 
Calomel, m. 
Calomnie,/ 
Batiste,/ 



ISTTEBXATIONAL DICTTONABT. 



431 



GAM. 

Camel, 

Camomile^ 

Camp, 

Campaign, 

Camphor, 

Canal, 

Canary-bird, 

Cancel, 

Cancer, 

Candid, 

Candidate, 

Candle, 

Candle-snuffer, 

Candlestick, 

Candor, 

Cannibal, 

Cannon, 

Canon, 

Canopy, 

Cant, 

Canter, 

Canto, 
Canvass, 

Canvasser, 

Cap, 

Capable, 

Capacity, 

Cape, 

Capit-al,-ol, 

Captam, 

Captivate, 

Captivity, 

Car, 

Carcass, 

Card, 



OnacAir. Spahxsh. 

Eameel, n. Camello, 971. 

Eamille, /. Monzanilla, /. 

Lager, s, n. cam- Campo, s. m, 
piren, v, acampar, v, 

Feldzug,m. Campaila,/. 
Kampfer, m. Alcanfor, nu 
Canal, m. Canal, m. 

Cananenvogel,m Canario, m. 
Ausstreichen, Cancelar, 



£jreb8,m. 
Weisz, 
Candidat, m. 
Licht, n, 
licbtputze, / 

Leuchter, m. 
Biederkeit,/. 
Eannibal, nk 
Eanone,/. 
Eanon, m. 



Cancer, m. 
Candido, 
Candidato, m. 
Candela,/. 



Chameau,-x, m. 
CamomilJe, /. 
Camp, 8. m. 

camper, v, 
Campagne,/. 
(?ampbre, m, 
Canal,-aux, m. 
Serin, m,f. 
Canceller. 
Cancre, m, 
BIanc,-he. 
Candidat, m. 
Cbandelle,/. 



Tragbimmel, m. Dosel, m. 
Heachelei,^./. Gerigonza, «./. 
. winfein, v. 
Pasz, 9. m. 

galopiren, v. 
Gesang, m. Canto, m. 



DespabiladeraSj/Moucheur (m)de 

cbandelle. 
Candelero, m. Chandelier, m. 
Candor, m. Candeur, /. 

Canibal, m, ^ria, Canibale, m. 
Canon de artdle- Canon, m. 
Canon, m. Canon,8tatute,fn. 

~ Dais, pavilion, m. 

Argot, 9, m. jar- 

ahnonedear, v» gonner, v, 
Galope, 8. m. Galop, s. m. 

galopear, t;. galopear, v. 



Cannevas, *, nu Lona, *./. solici- 
' prufen,v.[ler,m, tar, v. 
Stimmensamm- Solicitador, m. 



Chanty m. 
Canevas, s. m. 
solliciter, v. 
Solliciteur, ttl 



Miitze, Haube,/, Gorro, m. Gorra, Chapeau, m. 



Fahig, tiichtig, 
Umfang, m, 
Eragen, nt 
Hauptstadt,^./. 
peinlich, adj. 
Hauptmann,m. 



Capaz, 
Capacidad,/. 
Cabo, m. 
Capitolio, 8, m. 
capital, adj, 
Capitan, m. 



Einnehmen, [/. Cautivar, 
GefiEmgenschaft, Cautiverio, m. 
Earren, m, Carreta,/ 

TodterEorper,m Res muerta,/. 
Earte, /. Nay pe, m. 



Capable. 
Capacity/. 
Collet, m. 
Chapiteau-x,«.m. * 
* capital,-e, adj. 
Capitaine, rm 
Captiver. 
Captivity/- 
Charrette,/. 
Carcasse, /• 
Carte, curdo,/ 



432 



IHTEBirATIONAI. DtCnOITABT. 



OAR. 




8PJLKI8B. 


Princb. 


Cardinal, 


Cardinal, s. vu 


Cardinal, 8. m. 


Cardinal, 5. is^ 




vornebmst, adj 


cardinal, (ufj. 


cardinal,-e, adj* 


Care, 


SorgejVorsicbtj/Cuidado, m. 


Soin, m. 


Careful, 


Besorgt, 


CuidadosQ, 


Soigneux,-se. 


Careless, 


^Nachl^ig, 


Descuidado, 


Negligent,-e, 


Caress, 


Liebkosen, 


Acariciar, 


Caresscr. 


Cargo, 


Schiflfeladung,/. Carga,/. 


Cargaison,/. 


Carmine, 


Carrain, m. 


CamuD, in. 


Rouge, carmin-e. 


Carnage, 


Blutbad, n. 


Carnioeiia,^ 


Carnage, f». 


Carol, 


Lied, 8. n. aia^ 


Villancico, 8, m. 


Chanson joy- 




gen,v. 


cantar^ v. 


euse, «./. chan- 
ter, V. 


Carpenter, 




, Carpintero^ an. 


Charpentiery m^ 


Carpet, 


Teppich, m. [m. 


Tapete de mesa, 


, Tapis, m. 


Carriage, 


Fuhre,/.Wagen, Porte, Coche,m.Voiture,/. [ten 


Carry, 


Tragen, ftihren, 


Llevar, 


Porter, tranawr- 


Cart 


Earren,m. 


Carro^carromato, Charrette,/ 


Carve, 


Graben, 


Grabar, . 


Coupen 


Case, 


Futteral, n. 


Estado, m. [te. Boite,/. [tantsi. 


Cash, 


BaaresGeld, 


Dinero conayfcaDr 


Argent comptr 


Cashier, 


Cassirer, nu 


Cazero,nL 


Caissier, m. 


Cask, 


Fasz, «. HeU»,m. Barril, m. 


Tonneau,-x, «. 


Casl^ 


Werfen, 


Tirar, mudar. 


Jeter, lancer. 


Castle, 


Schloss, n. [n. 
Biber, Biberhul 


Castillo, m. 


Chateau,-x, m. 


Castor, 


^ Castor, m. 


Castor, m. 


Cat, 


Katze,/ 


Cato, m. 


Chat,7n. 


Cataract, 


Wasserfall, ». 


Cascada,/. 


Chute (/.)d'eau. 


Catch, 


Fangen, 


Coger, 


Saisir, prendre. 


Cathedral, 


Domkirche, /. 


Catedral,/. 


Cath&lrale,/. 


Catholic, 


Katholik, ». m. 


Catolico, 8. m. 


Catholique, sjtl 




katholisch,6U^ 


. cat4$lioo, cK^'. 


catholique, adj. 


Cattle, 


Rindvieh, n. 


Ganado, m. 


Betail, m. Betes. 


^ Cause, 


Ursache,*./. 


Causa, f./. 


Cause,/ cau* 




verursachenyV. 


causar, v. 


ser, V. 


Caution, 


'Vorsicht,*./. 


Cautela,f./. 


Prudence,*./. 




warnen, v. 


prevenir, ir» 


arertir, v. 


Carem, 


Hohle,/. 


Cavema,/. 


Caveme, / 


Cedar, 


Ceder,/. 


Cedro, m. 


C^dre, m. 


Celebrate, 


Feiem, 


Celebrar, 


C616brer. 


Celebration, 


Feier,/. 


Celebracion,/ 


Celebration,/ 


Celestial, 


Himmliwchy 


Celestial, 


Celeste. 



IKTEBNATIONAIi DIOTIONABY. 



433 



GEL. 

Cellar, 

Cent* 

Centinel, 

Centre, 

Century, 

Ceremony, 

Certain, 

Certificate, 

Certifjr, 

Ceasation, 

Chafi^ 

Chab, 

Chair, 

Chalk, 

Chamber, 

Chance, 

Chancellor, 

Chancery, 

Change, 

Chap, 

Chape), 

Character, 

Charcoal, 

Charge^ 

Charity, 
Charm, 

Charmer, 

Chart, 

Charter,' 

Chase, 

Chaste, 

Chastity, 

Chattel, 

Cheap, 

Cheat, 

Check, 



GlRMAir. 

Keller, m. 
Hundert, n. 
Schildwache, /. 
Mittelpunkt, m, 
Jahrhundert, n. 
Ceremonie,/ 
Gewisz, 

Bescheinigung/. 
Vergewissem, 
Sdllstand, m. 
Spreu,/. 
Kette,/ 
Sitz, Stuhl, m. 
Ereide,/.Ealk,m. 
Kammer,/. 
ZufaU,/. 
Eanzler, m. 
Kanzlei,/. 
Wechseln,v.Ver- 
finderung, «./. 
Mau],9.8palten,v. 
Capelle,/ 
Schriftzug, ni, 
Holzkohle,/. 
Ladung, «./. 

laden, v. 
Gutmftthigkeit/. 
Zauber, s. m. 

bezaubern, v, 
Zauberer, m. 
Seekarte,/. 
Urkunde,/. 
Jadg,«/. Jagen,i; 
Keusch, 
Keusehheit,/. 
Vermbgen, n, 
Wohlfeil, 
Betrug, s, m. 

betriigen, v. 
Einhalt, s, m. 

hemmen, v. 
37 



SPAinBB. 

S4$tan0) m. 
Ciento, m. 
Centinela, m. 
Centro, m. 
Centnria, / 
Ceremonia,/ 
Cierto, certain, 
Certificacion, /. 
Certificar, 
Cesacion,/. 
Zurron, m. 
Cadena,/ 
SiUa,/. 
Greda, /. 
Camara,/. 
Fortuna,/ 
Canciller, m. 
Cancilleria,/. 
Mudar, v. mu- 

danza, 8,f, 
Grieta,«./rajar,tr. 
Capilla,/. 
Caracter, m. 
Carbon, m. 
Cargo, s. m. 

encargar, v, 
Caridad,/. 
Eucanto, «. m. 

encantar, v. 
Encantador, m. 
Carta denavigar, 
Privilegio, fn. 
Caza,9./. cazar,tf . 
Casto^ puro, 
Castidad,/. \m. 
Bienes muebies, 
Barato, 
Trapa,«./. 

engaHar, v. 
Rechazo, «. m. 

reprimir, t;. 



VRXiroH. 
Cave,/cellier,fn. 
Cent,9n. 
Sentinelle,/. 
Centre, m. 
Centur,-ie, /. 
C£rdmonie, /. 
Certain,-e. 
Certificat, til 
Certifier. 
Cessation,/. 
Paille,/. 
Chalne, /. 
Chaise, /. 
Craie, mame,/. 
Chambre,/. 
Hasard, m. 
ChanceUer, m, 
Chancelleri^,/. 
Changer, v. 
changement,9.m. 
Fente,^.fendre,v 
ChapeUe, /. 
Caractere,m. [m. 
Charbon de hois. 
Charge, s.f, 

charger, v, 
Charite,/. 
Charm, 8. m, 

charmer, v, 
Enchanteur, m. 
Carte marine,/. 
Titre, m, [ser,v. 
Chasse,9./. chas- 
Chaste, fidele. 
Chastetd,/. 
Biens, m. 
^A bon march& 
Tromperie, s.f. 

tromper, v. 
Obstacle, 8. m. 

arretter, v. 



434 



INTERNATIONAL DICTIONARY. 



OHl. 

Cheek, 

Cheese, 

Chemistry, 

Chesnuty 

Chess, 

Chest, . 

Chew, 

Chicken, 

Chief, 

Child, 
Chill, 

Chimney, 

Chin, 

Chip, 

Chisel, 

Chocolatei 
Choice, 

Choose, 
Chord, 

Christ, 

Christian, 

Christmas, 

Church, 

Churn, 

Chemist, 

Cider, 

Cinnamon, 

Circle, 

Circulate, 

Circulation, 
Circumcise, 
Circumcision, 



GiRiCAir. 

Wange,/. 
Kase, m, 
Chemie,/. 
Kastnnie, /. 
Schachspiel, n, 
Kiste, Lade,/. 
Kauen, 
Kiichlein, 
Erste, 8, m. 

oberst, adj. 
Kind, n. 
Froet, 8. m. kalt 

machen, v. 
Kamin, n. 
Kinn, n. 
Span, s, m. 

schneiden, v. 
Meissel, 9, m. 

meizeln, v. 
Chocolate,/. 
•Wahl, «./. aua- 

erlesen, adj, 
Wahlen, 
Saite,/. mit Sai- 
ten beziehen,v. 
Christua, m, 
Christ, m. 
Weichnachten,n« 
Kirche, /. 
Butterfass, «. n. 

schutteln, v. 
Scheideklinstler, 
Aepfclwein, m. 
Zimmt, m. 
Zirkel, Kreis, m. 
In Umlauf brin- 

gen, [lauf, m. 
Umlauf, Kreis- 
Beschneiden, 
Bcschncidung,/. 



SpAinsH. 

Carrillo, m, 
Queso, m. 
Quimica,/. 
Castana,j^dre2, 
Juego(m)de axe- 
Area,/. 
Mascar, 
Polluelo, m. 
Pnncipal, adj. 
Xefe, 8. m. 
Infante, m. [v. 
Frio,«.m.enfriar, 

Chimenea, /. 
Barba,/ 
Brizna, «./. 

astillar, v. 
Escoplo, 8, nu 

eacoplear, v. 
Chocolate, m. 
Elecion, «./. es- 

cogido, adj. 
Escoger, 
Cuerda, «./. en- 

cordar, v. 
Christo, 971. 
Ghristiano, I9|. 
Navidad,/. • ^ 
Iglesia,/. 
Mantequera, «•/. 

agitar, v. 
Quimico, m. 
Sidra,/. 
Canele,/. 
Circulo, circo, wu 
Cercar, 



Frxvch. 

Joue,/ 
Fromage, m* 
Chimie, / 
Chataigne,/. 
£checo, m. [«. 
Caisse,/. co&e, 
Macher. ^m. 
Poulet, poussm, 
Chef, 8. m, 

principal, adj. 
Enfant, m./. 
Froid,>«. m. 

glaccr, V. 
CheminjSe,/. 
Menton, 7». 
Copeau,-it, 8. m. 

liacher v. 
Cisseau-x, 8. nu 

ciseler, v. 
Chocolat, m. 
CboLx, 8. m, 

Choisi,-e, ac^'. 
Choisir. 
Corde^./.mon- 

ter, V, 
Christ, m, 
Chr£ten,-ne,m./ 
Noel, m. 

Baratte, j/f. 
baratM-, v. 
ChimistJ i/i. 
Cidre, 97f[ 
Cinnamome, iu 
Cercle, m. 
Curculer. 



Circumference, Umkreis, fju 



Circulacion, /. Circulation, / 

Circuncidar, Circoncire. 

Circuncision,/. Circoncision,/. 

Circunferencii^ Circonference,/ 



IHTBRNATtONAL DIOTIOWABT. 



436 



/ 



GIB. 

CHrcnmnaTi- 

gate, 
Circumstance, 
Circumstantuil, 
Circus, 
Cistern, 
Cite, 
City, 
CitizeOt 
Civil, 
Civilize, 
Claim, > 

Clap, - 
Clarify, 
Claap,' 

Class, 

Classical, 

Clatter, 

Clause, 

Claw, 
Clay, 
Clean, 

Clear, 



'le?ll 
ilevei 
!limaA, 
!Iimb,| 



Cl^ 

Clerl 

Clevel 

Climai 

Climb,! 

Clinch, 

CHng, 

Clip, 

Cloak, 

Clock, 

Close, 

Closet, 



OXRMA!T> 

Umschifien, 

Umstand, m. 
Zufal%, 

Circus, m. [m. 
Wasserbehalter, 
Vorladen, 
Stadt,/. 
•Barger, m. 
Burgerlich, 
Qesittet machen, 
Anspruch, «. m. 

*^ machen, v. 
Klappern,^ 
Abkikren, 
Haken, 9. m, 

zuhaken, v. 
Cksse,/ 
Classich, 
Gerassel, 9. n, 

eanken, v, 
RedesaCz, m, [v. 
Klaue,/ kratzen, 
Tbon, Lehm, m. 
Rein, glatt, adj, 

reinigen, v. 
Hell, klar, adj. 
^^einigen, ». 
Geistlichkeit, /. 
GeistUche, m. 
Geschickt, 
Klima, n. 
Elimmen, 
Befestigen, 
Anhangen, 
Abschneiden, 
Mantel, m. 
Schlaguhr,/. 
Zumachen, v. 
▼erborgen, adj, 
Cabinet, n. 



Sfahibb. 

Navegar al rede- 
dor, 
Circunstancia,/ 
Accidental, 
Circo, 971. 
Cisterna»/. 
Ciler a juicio, 
Ciudad,/ 
Ciudadano, m. 
Civil, 
Civil izar, 
Demanda, «./. 

demandar, v. 
Batir, 
Clarificar, 
Broche, ». m. 

abrochar, v, 
Clase,/. 
Clasico, 
Resonancia, 8,f. 

reson^r, v. 
Clausula, [rar,t^. 
Garra,*./.de8gar- 
Arcilla,/. 
Limpio, adj. lim- 

piar, V. 
Claro, adj. clari- 

ficar, V. 
Clero^ m. 
Clerigo, m. 
Diestro, 
Clima,/ 
Subir, 
Empufiar, 
Colgar, 
Abrazar, 
Capa,/. 
Reloz, m. 
Cerrar, v. 

do, adj. 
Eetrete, m. 



cerra- 



Navitruer autour 

de? 
Circonstance, f» 
Accidentel,-le. 
Circque, m. 
Citerne, /. 
Citer. 

Villc, citfi,/. 
Citoyen,-ne,/.9». 
Civil,-e. 
Civiliser. 
Demande, 9. f. 

Demander, v. 
Batir, ciaqiier. 
Clarifier. 
Agrafe, 8. f, 

agrafer, v. 
Classe,/. 
Classique. 
Choc, 8. m. faire 

du bruit, v. 
Clause,/ 
Griife, gratter,v. 
Argille,/. 
Popre, adj. net- 

toyer, v. 
Claire, adj. 

£claircir, v. 
Clerg6, m, 
Clerc, m. 
Habile. 
Cliraat, m. 
Grimper sur, 
Empoigner. 
Se tener k. 
Embrasser. 
Manteau,-z, nL 
Horloge,/. 
Fermer, v. en- 

ierme, adj» 
Cabinet, m. 



436 



INTERKATIOXAL DIOTIOKAST. 



OLO. 

Cloth, 
Clothe, 
Clothes^ 
Clothier, 

Cloud, 
Clo7e, ^ 
Clown, 
Club, 
Cluster, 

Coach, 

Coal, 

CoaliUoD, 

Coarse, 

Coat, 

Coax, 

Cobble, 

Cobbler, 

Cock, 

Code, 

Coffee, 

Coffin, 

Co^ent^ 

Coin, 

Coincide, 

Coincidence, 

Cold, 

Collar, 

Collect^ 

Collection, 

Collector, 

College, 

Collegian, 

Colle^ate, 

Collision, 

Colonel, 

Colony, 

Colt, 



Ge&max. 

Zeug,m. Tuch, n, 
Bekleiden, 
Kleidung, /. 
Tuchhandler, m, 

Wolke,/. 
Kloben, m. 
Qrobian, nu 
Keule, /. 
Schwarm, s, m, 

h^usen, v. 
Kutsche,/. 
Kohle,/ 
Vereinigung,/. 
Gtrohj roh, 
Koch, m. Fell n. 
Schmeicheln, 
Fllcken, 
Pfuscher, m. 
Hahn, m, 
Gesetzbuch, n. 
Kaffee, m. 
Sarg,»i. Bute,/. 
Dringend, 
Ecke,/. Keil,m. 
Zusammentref- 

fen, [/. 

Zusammenkunfl, 
Kalte, kalt, adj, 
Halsband, n. 
Sammeln, 
Sammlung,/. 
Sammler, m. 
Collegium, n. 
Student, m. 



Spaxisb. 

PaBo, m, 
Vestir, 
Vestidos, m. 
Fabrikante (m) 

de pa&os, 
Nube,/. 
Clavo, m. 
Patau, m. 
Clava,/. 
Racimo, «. m. 

apinar, v. 
Coche, nu 
Fuego, m. 
Union,/. 
Baste, 
Cassaca,/. 
Lisonjear, 
Chapuceor, 
Chapucero, »j. 
Gallo, m. 
Libro, m, 
Caf6, TO. 
Ataud, m. 
Convincente, 
Moneda,/. 
Coinddir, 

Coincidencia,/. 
Frio,«.TO. frio,ac§'. 
Collera, / 
Congregar, 
Colecion,/. 
Colector, to, 
Colegio, to. 
Colegial, m. 



CoUe^ialisch, Colegial, 

Collision,/. Colision, /• 

Oberste, to. Coronel, m. 

Kolonie, /. Colonia, /. 

Hcngstfilllen, n. Potro, to. 



Toile,/ drap, nu 
Habiller. 
Habillement, to. 
Drapier, to. 

Nue,/ nuage,TO. 
Clou de girofle,TO 
Pajsan, to. 
Massne, / 
Amas, 8, TO. 

amasser, v. 
Carosse to. 
Charbon, to. 
Coalition, /. 
Grossier. 
Habit, TO. 
Flatter. 
Saveter. 
Savetier, to. 
Coq, TO. 
Code, TO. 
Ca£g,TO. 
Biere,/. 

Convainquant,-e. 
Monnaie,/. 
Coincider. 

Coincidence,/ 
Froid,froid,-e,a4f 
Collier, to.^" 
Eamasser. 
Collection,/. 
CoUecteur, m. 
Coll%e, TO. 
Membre to. d'un 

Coll(%e. 
Coll£gial,-e. 
Choc, TO. 
Colonel, TO. 
Colonic,/ 
Poulain, to. 



INTERNATIONAL DIOTIONABY. 



437 



COL. 

Column, 

Comb, 

Combat, 

Combine, 

Come, 

Comedian, 

Comedy, 

Comet, 

Comfort, 

Comforter, 

Comical, 

Command, 

Commander, 
Command- 
ment, 
Commence, 
Comment, v. 

Comment, n. 

Commentator, 

Commerce, 

Commercial, 

Commission, 

Commit, 

Committee, 

Comnflon, 

Commotion, 

Communica- 

tlDn, 
Communion, 
Community, 
Compact, 

Companion, 
Company, 
Compare, 
Comparison, 



Columne,/. Columna,/. 
Eamm, m. Peyne, m. 

Eampf,«.m. strei- Combate, 9. m. 
ten, V. combalir, v, 

Verbinden, Combinar, 

Kommen, Venir, 

Schauspieler, m. Comediante, m. 
Lustspiel, n. Comedia,/. 
Comet, m. Cometa,^ 

Trost, 8. m. trds- Confortacion,.^./. 



ten, V. 
Trdster, m. 
Possierlich, 
Befehl, <• m, 

befchlen, v. 



confortar, v. 
Consolador, m, 
Comico, 
Mando, ». m, 

mandar, v. 



Befehlsbaber, m. Comandante,m. 
Hochste Ge- Mandato, m. 



wait, /. 
Beginnen, 
Bemerkungen 

macben, 
Anmerkung,/. 
Ausleger, m. 
Gewerbe, n. 
Merkantisch, 
Auftrag, m. 



Comenzar, 
Comentar, 

Comento, m. 
Comentador, m. 
Comercio, m, 
Comercial, 
Comision, /. 
Uebergeben, [m, Cometer, 
engerAusscbusz, Junta(/)decom- 
misionados,m. 
G^mein, Comun, [m. 

Bewegung,/. Levantamiento, 
Mittbeil ung, /. Com unicacion, /. 



Gemeinschaft,/. 
Gemeinde, 
Betrag, 9. m, 
Gedrungen,(z<(^'. 
GeBeItscbafter,m 
Zunft,/ 
Vergleichen, 
Vergleichung,/. 
37* 



Comunidad, /. 
Comunidad, / 
Facto, 9. m, com- 

pacto, adj, 
Compaiiero, m, 
CompaSia,/ 
Comparar, 
Comparacion,/ 



Febxch. 

Colonne, /. 

Peigne, m. 

Combat, <. m. 
combattre, v. 

Joindre. 

Venir. [-ne, m./. 

Commedien, 

Com6die,/. 

Comete,/. 

Sccours, 9, m. 
consoler, v. 

Consolateur, m. 

Comique. 

Odre, ».m., com- 
mimder, v. 

Comndandant, m. 

Command- 
ment m. 

Commences 

Commenter. 

Commentaire, m. 
Coramentatour. 
Commerce, m, 
Commercial,-e. 
Commission,/. 
Conficr k, 
Comit6, m. 

Commun,-e. 

£meute,/r 

Communica- 
tion, / 

Communion,^ 

Communaute. 

Facte, 9, m, 
compact, ad}. 

Compagnon, m. 

Compagnie,/. 

Comparer. 

Comparaison,/ 



438 



INTBBNATIONAL DIOTIONART. 



GOSf. 

Compass, 

Compel, 

Compete, 

Compile, 

Complain, 

Complainant, 

Complaint, 

Complement, 

Complete, 

Complexion, 
Complicate, 



Qmbmax, Spaiiuh. 

Compass, <• tn. Circulo^ 9, m, 
einschliessen, v. circuir, v. 
Zwingen, Compeler, 

Concumren,[gen Disputar, 
Zusammentra- Compilar, 
Beklogen, Quejarse, 



EJager, m. 
Klage,/. 
Erffanzung,/. 
YoTlenden, v. 

vollstandig, adj, 
Ansehen, n. 
Verwickeln, v. 

verwickelt,flM(^'. 



Querellante, m. 
Qaeja./. 
Complcmenlo,m. 
Completar, v, 
'completo^ adj» 
Complexo, m, 
Complicar, v. 
complicado,a(^' 



Compliment, Compliment, <.n. CampIimiento,m. 



Comply, 

Compose, 

Composition, 

Compositor, 

Comprise, 

Compulsion, 

Compute, 

Comrade, 

Conceal, 

Conceit, 

Conceive, 

Conception, 

Concern, 

Concert, 

Condse, 

Conclude, 

Conclusion, 

Concord, 

Conoouise, 

Concur, 

Concurrence, 

Condemn, 
Condemnation, 



grtissen, v. cumplimentar,v. 
Einwilligcn,[zen, Cumplir, 
Zusammenset- Componer, 



Schreibart,/. 
Setzer, m* 
Begreifen, 
Zwang> m. 
Rechnen, 
Camerad, m. 
Yerhehlen, 
Gedanke, m. 
Fassen, 



Composicion,/. 
Compositor, m, 
Comprehender, 
Compulsion,/. 
Computar, 
Camarada,/. 
Callar, 

Concepcion,/. 
[m, Concebir, 



Begriff, Yorsatz, Concepcion,/. 
Sorge, «./. Negocia, *./. 



betreffen, v. 
Concert, n. 
Gedrungen, 
Schlieszen, 
Schluss, m, 
Eintr cht,/. 



concernir, v. 
Concierto, m* 
Conciso, 
Concluir, 
Conclusion,/. 
Concordia,/. 



Zulauf, m. [men, Concurso, m. 
Uebereinstim- Concurrir, 
Uebereinstimm- Concurrenda,/ 

ung,/. 
Yerdammen, Condenar, 
Yerdammung,/ Condenauon. f 



Tour, s, m. 

entourer, v. 
Forcer. 
Concourir. 
Compiler. 
Deplorer. [»7l/I 
Complaignant,-e. 
Plainte,/. 
Perfection,/ 
Acomplir, v, 

compIet,-e,a(f;. 
Complexion,/. 
Compliquer, v. 
complique,-e,a<^*. 
Compliment, m. 
complimenter, v. 
Condescendrc a. • 
Composer. 
Composition,/ 
Compositeur, m. 
Contenir. 
Contrainte,/. 
Compter. 
Camarade, m,f, 
Celer, cacher. * 
Imagination, /. 
ConcevoLr. 
Conception. 
Affaire, «./. cou- 

cerner, v. 
Concert, m. 
Concis,-e. 
Conclure. 
Conclusion,/. 
Concorde,/. 
Concour% m. 
Concurir. 
Concours, m. 

Condamner. 



INTERNATIONAL DIOTIONABT. 



489 



OON. 

Condense, 
Condition, 
Conduct, 

Conductor, 

Confectionery, 

Confer, 

Confess, 

Confession, 

Confide, 

Confidence, 

Confine, 

Confinement, 
Confirm, 
Conflagration, 
Conflict^ 

Conform, 

Confuse, 

Confusion, 

Congratulate, 

Congi'egation, 

Congress, 

Conjecture, 

Conjugal, 

Conjugate, 

Conjugation, 

Conjunction, 

Conjure, 

Conjurer, 

Connect, 

Connexion, 

Connive, 

Conquer, 

Conquest, 

Conscious, 

Consent, 

Consequence, 



Onucijr. Spa-Hisii. 

Verdichten, Condensar, 

Zustand, m. Condicion, /. 

Geleit, «. n. fuh- Conducta, <,/. 
ren, v, condudr, v. 

Fiihrer, m. [/. Conductor, m. 

ZuckerMckerei, Confiteria,/ 



Vergleichen, 
Bekennen, 
Zeugniss, n. 
Vertrauen, 
Vertrauen, m. 



Conferenciar, 

Confesar, 

Confesion,/ 

Confiar, 

Confianza,/. 



Grenze, s. f, an- Confin, s. m. 

grenzen, v. confinar, v. 

Verhaft, /. Prision, /. 

Best£ltigen, Confirmar, 

Feuersbrunst,/ Conflagracion, /. 
£[ampf,9.m. kam- Conflicto, 9, m, 

pfen, V. luchar, v. 

Sich richten, Conformar, 
Verwirren, Confundir, 

Verwirrung,/. Confusion,/. 
Gliick wunschen Congratular, 
Versammlunff,/. Agregado, m. 
Congress, in.[i9./ Congreso, m. 
Muthmaszung, Conjectura, «. /. 
. muthmaszen,v, . conjecturar, v. 
Ehelich, Conjugal, 

Conjugiren, Juntar, 
Yerbindung, /. Conj uncion, /. 
Bindewort, n. Conjuncion, fi, 
Beschwdren, Conjuror, 
Beschworer, m. Conjurador, m. 
Verbinden, [«i. Juntar, 
Zusammenhang, Connexion,/. 
Winken, Guinar el ojo, 

Besiegen, Conquistar, 

Eroberung,/. Conquista,/ 
Bewttszt, Consabido, [#. m, 

Einwillignng, s.f» Consentimieuto, 

einwilligen, v. conaentir, if. 
Einfloss, m. Consequencia, / 



Frkxob. 

Condenser. 
Condition, /. 
Conduit, «./. 

mener, v, 
Conducteur, m. 
Laboratoire, m, 
Conf^rer. 
Confesser,/ 
Confession, 
Se fier. 
Confiance,/. 
Boume,«.n.confi- 
ner,v. [ment,m. 
Emprisonne- 
Confirmer, 
Incendie,/. 
Combat, «• nu 

lutter, V. 
Conformer. 
M^ler. 
Confusion,/ 
Congratuler. 
Congregation, / 
Congr6s, m. 
Conjecture, *./ 

conjecturer, v. 
Conjugal,-e. 
Unir, marier. 
Conjugaison,/. 
Conjunction,/ 
Conjurer. 
Enchanteur, m. 
Joindre. 
Connexion,/ 
Conniver. 
Conqu6rir. 
Conqu^te,/ 
Sensible, [«. m. 
Consentement, 

consentir, v. 
Consequence, / 



440 



mTBBNATIOKAIi XXCnONABT. 



CON. 

Conservative, 

Consider, 

Consideration, 

Consist^ 

Consistenti 

Consolatbn, 

Console* 

Conspiracy, 

Conspire, 

Constable, 

Constant, 

Constitute, 

ConstttutioD, 

Constrain, 

Constraint, 

Construct, 

Constructor, 

Construction^ 

Consult, 

Consume, 

Consumption, 

Contact, 

Contain, 

Contempt, 

Contend, 

Content, 

Contentment, 
Contest^ 

Continent, 
Contiuoal, 
Continue, 
Contract, 

Contradict, 
Contradiction, 
Contrary, 
Contrast, 

, Contribute, 



Okrxav. 

Erhaltend, 

Betrachten, 

Ueberlegung^/. 

Bestehen, 

Dicht, fest, 

Trost, m. 

Trosten, 



Frxrch. 

Conservativo, Pr&ervati^-re. 
Considerar, Consid^rer. 
Consideracion,/. Consideration,/. 



Consistir, Consister. 

Consistente, Conforme. 

Consolacion,/. Consolation,/ 

Consolar, Consoler. 

Versch worung,/ Conspiracion, /. Conspiration, / 
Verschworen, Conspirar, ^llonspirer. 

Hascher, m. Alguacil, m. Conn^table, 
Stondhaft, Constante, Con8tant,-e. 

Ausmachcn, [/. Constituir, Constituer. 

Staatsveriassung Constitudon, /. Constitution,/. 
Zwingen, Constrefiir, [m. Contraindre. 

Zwang, fn« Constreiiimiento Contrainte,/. 

Erricbten, Construir, Construire. 

Erbauer, m. Arquitecto, m. BSttisseur, fit. 
Erbauung,/ Construcdon, /.Construction,/ 



urn Rath fragen, Consultarse, 
Yerzehren, Consumir, 



Verbrauch, m. 
Beruhning,/ 
Enthalten, 
Verachtung,/ 
Streiten, 
Befriedtgen, v. 
Zufrieden, a. 



Consumo, m. 
Contactor m. 
Contener, 
Disprecio, m. 
Contender, 
Contentar, v. 
contento, adj. 



Consulter. 
Consumer. 
ConsomptioD,/ 
Contact, 7ik 
Contenir. 
M£pris, m. 
Disputcr. 
Contentir,v. con- 
tent,-e, a. 



Zufriedenheit, /I Contentamiento^ Satisfaction,/ 
Streit, 9. fft,strei- Contienda, <. / Contestation, «/. 

ten, V. contestar, v, disputer, v. 

feste Land, n. Continente, m. Continent, m. 
Ununterbrochen Continuo, Continual,-le. 

Sortsetzen, Continuar, Pursuivre. 

Yertrag, «• m. Contrato, 8. m. Contrat, «. m. se 

verkurzen, v. contratar, v. contractor, v. 
Widersprecheo, Contradecir, Contredire. 
Widerspruch, m, Contradiccion, / Contradiction, / 
Zuwider, gegen, Contrario, Controire. 

Abstich, 8, m, Contraste, «. m. Contraste, «. nu 

abstechen, v. contraatar, v. contraster, v. 
Beitragen, Contribuir, Contribuer. 



IHTBSNATIONAL DICTIONABT. 



441 



CX)N. 

Cantribution, 
Contriyance, 
Contriye, 
Control, 

Controversy, 

Convalescence, 

Convalescent^ 

Convene, 

Convenience, 

Convenient, 

Convent, 

Convention, 

Conversation, 

Converse, 

Conversion, 

Convert, 

Convey, 

Conveyance, 

Convict, 

Conviction, 

Convince, 

Cook, 



OlKJIAH. 



Sparxis. 



VRxircH. 



Steuer,/. Cooperacion,/. Contribution,/. 

Erfindung,/ Idea, /. Invention,/. 

Erfinden, Idear, Inventer. 

Gewalt, «./. be- Contra-Iista, «./, Contr61e, s, m. 



Cool, 

Cooper, 
Copartner, 
Copartnership, 
Cope, 

Copious, 

Copy, 

Coquette, 

Coral, 
Cord, 
Core, 
Cork, 



herrschen, v, reprimer, v, controler, v, 
Streit,m. Controversia,/ Dispute,/. 

Genesung, / Convaleccncia, / Convalescence,/. 
Genesend, Convaleciente, Convalescent,-e« 

Yorladen, Convocar, Assembler. 

Schicklichkeit,/. Conveniencia, / Aise,/. 
Schicklich, Conveniente, Convenable. 

Elo6ter,n. Convento, m. Couvent, m. 

Yersammlung,/. ConVencion,/. Convention,/. 
Gesprach,n. Convercion,/. Conversation,/. 
Umgang haben, Conversat, Converset 

Umkehrung,/ Conversion,/ Conversion,/. 
Bekehrter, «. m. Converso, 8. m. Proselyte s. m, 

bekebren, ti. convertir, v, convertir,v. 
Fiihren, tragen, Transporter," ' Transporter. 
Wefffubren, n. Conduccion,/. Transport, »». 
Verbrecber, n^m, Convicto, 8, m, Forgat, «. fffc re- 

wigerlegen, v. convencer,v. futer, v. 
Ueberf ubrung,/ Conviccion, /. Conviction, / 
Ueberzeugen, Convencer, Convaincre. 

Eocb, m. kochin, Cocinero, 9, m. Cuisinier, 8, m, 

8,f, kocben, v. cocinar, v. cuisiuer, v. 

Ealtsinnig, a(^'. Fresco, adj, en- Frais, cvlme^adj. 

erkalten, v. friar, v. rafralcbir, v. 

KUper, m, Tonelero, m. Tonnelier, m. 

Tbeilhaber, m. Comp^iero, nt. Associ6,-e, m./ 
GK^nossenscbaft,/^ Compania, /. Association,/ 
Decke, «./. k&m- Capa («./.) plu- Calotte, s. /. 

pfen, V. vial, cubrir, v, s'opposer, ^ v. 

H&ufig, Copiose, Copieux,-se. 

Abschrift,/. Copia,/ Copie, example/. 

Coquette, / . Dama presumida Coquette, /. 

de bermosa, / 
Koralle,/. Coral, 97k Corail,-aux, m. 

Seil, », Strick, m. Cuerda,/. Corde, / 

Greibs, Kern, m. Corazon, m. Coeur, m, 
Korkbaum, m. Alcomoque, m. Li6ge, m. 



442 



INTEBNATIONAL DTOTIONARY. 



COR. 

Com, 

Corner, 

Cornic^^.,.^, 

Corporaicrtr,...;,, 

Corporation, 

Corporeal, 

Corps, 

Corpse, 

Correct, 

Correction, 
Correspond, 

Correspond- 
ence, 
Correspondent^ 
Corrode, 
Corrosive, 
Corrupt, 

Corruption, 
Cosmetic, 

Cost, 
Costive, 

Cot, _., 

Cotton, 

Couch, 

Cough, 

Council, 

Counsesl^.. 

Count, 

Countenance, 

Counter, 
Counterfeit, 



OKRHAir. 

Korn, n, 
Winkel, nu 
E^rniess, n. 
Corporal, m. 
Gemeine, /. 
Korperlich, 



Spanish. 

Grano, m, 
Angulo, w». 
Cornica,/. 
Caporal, m. 
Cabildo, m. 
Corporeo, 



Truppencorps, n. Cuerpo, m. 
Leichnam, m. Cadaver, m. 
Verbessem, v. Corregir, v, cor- 

yerbessertyO^^*. recto, adj, 
Verbesserung,/. Correccion, /. 
Uebereinstim- Correspcmder, ' 



men, 
Briefwechse],m 
[m. 
Correspondent, 
Zernagen, 
Zerfressend, 
Verderben, tf. 

verfault, adj. 
Faulniss,/. 



Corresponden- 
cia,/. [m. 

Correspondiente, 

Corroer, 

Corrosivo^ 

Corromper, v, 
corrompido, a, 

Corrupcion, /. 



Yerschonerungs- Cosmetico, m. 
mitte1,;i.[ten,v. [tar, v. 

Kosten, s.f, kos- Coste, «. m, cos- 

Yerstopft, Estrenido de 

cererpo, 

Htitte,/, Cabana,/. 

Baumwollen, /. Algodon, m. 

Euhebett,[ten, v, Silla poltrona,/ 

Husten,«.m.,hus- Tos, «./. toser, v. 

Rathsversamm- Condlio, m. 
lung,/. 

UeberleguDg,s./. Consejo, «. m» 
rathen, v. aconsejar, v. 

Rechnen, v, Contar, v. con- 
Graf, «. fTi. de, «. m. 

Gunst, 8.f. billi- Semblante, «. m, 
gen, v. sostener, t^. 

Zahlpfennig, m. Contador, m. 

Nachmachen, V. Contrahacer, v, 
nacbgemacht^o. contnihecho,a 



• FRBlfCfD. 

Bl£, grain, m. 
Angle, c(Nn, in» 
Cornicbe,/ 
Corpora],-aiix, in 
Communaut^, /. 
Corporel,-le. 
Corps, m. [m. 
Corps, cadavre, 
Corriger, v, cor- 

rect,-e, adj. 
Correction,/. 
Correspondre. 

Correspond- 
ence, /. \fn. 
Correspondant, 
Corroder. 
Corrosifi-ve. 
Corrompre, r. 
corrompu,-e, a* 
Corruption,/. 
Cosmetique, nu 
[coiiter, v. 
D£pense, «./. 
Constip6,-e. 

Cabane,/ 
Coton, m. 
Lit, m. [ser, «. 
Toux, «. / tous- 
Concile, m. 

Conseil, «. m. 

conseiller, v. 
Compter, v.com- 

pte, 9. m. 
Contenance, «./. 

favoriser,v.[i?i. 
Jeton, Comptoii^ 
Contrefmre. v, 

forg4,-e, od^'. 



IZTTEBITATIONAL DiOnONABY. 



448 



oou. 
Counterpaoe, 
Oountiyi 
County, 
Courage, 
Course, 
Court, 
Courtship, 

Couan, 

Covenant, 

Cover, 

Covetous, 

Cow, 

Coward, 

Cozen, 

Crack, 

Cradle, 

Crafii, 

Crafty, 

Crag, 

Cramp, 

Crank, 
Crape, 
Crash, 

Cravat, 
Crave, 

Crawl, 

Crazy, 

Cream, 

Create, 

Creation, 

Crcatcx-, 

Creature, 

Credible, 

Credit, 

Creditor, 



Onuujr. 

Bettdecke,/. 
Landschaft, /• 
Grafschaft,/. 
Muth, m. 
Lauf, Gang, m, 
Ho( Yorhoit ^ 
Gun8tlewer-« 

bung, /. 
y etter, m. 
Vertrag, nk 
Decke, «•/. 

'decken, v. 
Begierig, 
Kiih,/. 
Memme,/. 
BetrUgoDi 
Spalte, 8.f. 

platzen, v. 
Wiege,/. [be^a. Cuna,/. 
Kunst,/. Gewer- Arte, m. 
listig, J[sen,'m» Astuto, 
Klippe,/Fel- ^ 
Kamp^ B. m. 

drticken, v. 
Kurbel,/. 
Krepp> tn. 
Gekrach, a* n. 

krachen, v. 



pRxifca. 
Courte-pointe,/. 
Pay8,m.contr6e^ 
Camt6,district,97i. 
Courage, m. 
Course,/. 
Cour,/. 
Galanterie,/. 

Cou8in,-e, m./. 

Contrat, m. 

Convert, 8. m, 
couvrir, V, 

Avide. f 

Vache,/. 

L4che, m. 

Tromper. 

Fente, «. m. 
fendre, v, 

Berceau,-z, m» 

Metier, m. 

AdroiVe. [m. 
DespeSadero,m. Kocher escrap^ 
La&a, «./. Crampon, s, m, 

laiiar, V. [rol, cramponner,v. 
Hierro (m,) de fa- Levier, m. 
Crespon, m. Crfepe, m, 
EstaUido, 8. m, Craquement,9.m« 



Spahub. 

Colcha,/. 

Condado, tn. 
Corage, nu 
Corrida, /• 
Corte, m, 
Corte, m, 

Primo, m, 
Contrato, m. 
Cubierta, «./• 

cubrir, v. 
Codicioso^ 
Vaca,/. 
Cobarde, m. 
EngaSar, 
Salto, 8. nk 

hender, v. 



Halsbinde,/. 

Bitten, 

Elriechen, 

Gebrechlich, 

Rahm, m, 

Erschaffen, 

Bchopfung,/. 



romper, v. 
Corbata, /. 
Rogar, 
Arrastrar, . 
Quebrantado, 
Crema,/. 
Crear, 
Creadon, /. 



Schopfer, m. [n. Criador, m, 
Gescbop^ Thier, Criatura,/. 
Glaubwiirdig, Creible, 
Glaube, «. m, Credito, «• m. 

glauben, v, creer, v. 
Glaubige, nk Acreedor, m. 



craqueter, v, 
Cravate,/, 
Implorer. 
Ramper. 
Casse,-e, foUe. 
Cr§me,/. 
Cr&r. 
Creation,/. 
Createur, m. 
Cr&ture,/ 
Croyable. 
Foi,5./.Croirer. 

Crfancier,-e,m./ 



444 



INTEBNATrOKAL DIOnONABT. 



CRB. 

Credulous, 
Creed, 

Creek, 

Creep, 

Crew, 

Crime, 

Criminal, 

Cripple, 

Critic, 

Criticise, 

Criticism, 

Croak, 

Crockery, 

Crocodile, 

Crook, 

Crooked, 
Crop, 

Cross, 
Croup, 
Crow, 

Crowd, 

Crown, 

Crucifixion, 

Crucify, 

Cruel, 

Cruise, 

Crush, 

Crust, 
Cry, 

Crystal, 
Cuckoo, 



amcAir. 

Leichtglaubig, 
Glaubensbe- 
* kenntniss, n. 
Kleine Bucht,/. 
Schleichen, 
Schiffsvolk, n. 
Verbrechen, n, 
Verbrecher, «.to. 

pexnlich, adj. 
Eriippel, s. m, 
verstUmmeln, v. 
Kritiker, m. 
Beurtheilen, ' 
Beurtheilung,/. 
Quaken, 
Topferwaare,/. 
Crocodile, «. 
Haken, s. m. 

krummsein, v. 
Scbief, knimm, 
Krop^ m. 
Ereuz, s, n. 

kreuzen, v. 
Braune,/ 
Erahe, «./. 

krahen, v, 
Haufe, 9. 971. 

drangen, v. 
Krone, s.f, 

kronen, v, 
Ereuzigung,/. 
Kreuzigen, 
Grausam, [en, v. 
Krug,«.m. kreuz- 
Stoss, s, m. 

quetschen, v. 
BLHiste,/. 
Geschrei, a* n. 

schreien, v. 
Krystall, nu 
Kuckttk, m. 



Spahob. 

Cr^dulo, 
Credo, m, 

Cala,/. 
Arrastrar, 
Quadrilla,/. 
Crimen, nu 
Reo, 8, m, 

. criminal, adj, 
Coxo, s. m. 

derrenger, v, 
Critico, fn. 
Criticar, 
Critica,/. 
Croazar^ 
Vidriado, m. 
Cocodrilo, m. 
Gkmcho, 9. m. 

incorvar, v, 
Corvb, 

Buohe de ava, m. 
tiruz, 8./, 

atravesar, v. 
Obispillo, m. 
Barra, «./. 
cantar el gallo,v. 
Caterva, *./. 

amontonar, v. 
Corona, *./. 

coronar, v. 
Crucifixion,/. 
Crucificar, 
Cruel, [zar, tr. 
Xicara, «./.cra- 
Colision, a./, 

apretar, v. 
Costra, /. 
Alarido, 9» m. 

gritar, f^« 
Cristal,97i. 
Cuclillo, m. 



Fkhtob. 
Cr6dule. 
Confession, /. 

de foL 
Petite baie,/ 
BAmper, trainer. 
Bande, /. 
Crime, m. 
.Criminel,-le,'.9.m. 
criminal,-le,ad;. 
Estropi^-e,9.7/i^, 

estropier, v. 
Critique, m-f. 
Critiquer. 
Critique,/. 
Croasser. 
Poterie,/ 
Crocodile, nu 
Croc, 9. m. 

courber, v. 
Courb^-e. 
R&olte,/. 
Croix, «./. 

croiser, v« 
Croupe,/. 
Corneille, «./. 

coqueliner, v. 
Foule, «. /. 

presser, v. 
Couronne, «•/. 

couronner, v, 
Crucifiemen^ nu 
Crucifier. 
Cruet-le. [ser, ». 
Course, 5./.croi- 
Choc, 8. m. 

presser, «. 
Croute,/. 
Cri, 9. nu 

crier, V. 
Cristal, m, 
Coucou, IR. 



nrrEBNATIONAL DIOTIONABT. 



445 



cua 
Cucumber, 
Cue, 
Culprit, 
Cultivate, 
Cultivation, 
Cunning, 
Cup, 
Cupidity, 
Curate, 
Curb, 

Curd, 

Curdle, 

Cure, 

Curiod^, 

Curious, 

Currant, 

Currency, 

Current, 

Cuny, 
Curse, 

Curtain^ 

Curve, 

Cushion, 

Custody, 

Custom, 

Customaiy, 

Customer, 

Cut, 

Cutlas^ 

Cutler, 

Cylinder, 

Cypress, 

Czar, 



QUMAM. 

Gurke,/. 
Queue,/. 
Verbrecher, m, 
Ausbiiden, 
Ausbildung, /. 
Erfahren, 
Becber, m, 
Be^erde,Lust,/. 
PfarrgehUlfe, m. 
Emkette,«./.im 
Zaume ha]ten,v. 
Qdark, m. [en, 
Gerinnen mach- 
Heilung, s.f, 

curu%n, V. 
Seltenheit,/. 
Neugierig, 
Eorinthe,/. 
Courantgeld, n, 
Strom, 8, m. ' 
umlaufend, adj, 
G&rben, 
Flucb, 9. m. 

fluchen, v, 
Vorhang, a. m. 

umb&ngen, v. 
Erumme, «•/. 

kriimmen, v. 
Eissen, fi. 
Verhaft, m. 
Gebraucb,Zo]l,9?& 
Gebrauchiicb, 
Eunde, in. 
Scbnitt, «. m. 

scbneiden, v. 
Hirscbfanger,rm. 
Messerscbmied, 
Walze,/. 
Cypresse,/. 
Czar, m. 

S8 



SpAmB. 

Cohombro, m. 

Cola,/ 

Beo acusado, m. 

Cultivar, 

Cultura,/ 

Sabio, eiperto^ 

Copa,/ 

Concupicencia,/ 

Tcniente decura, 

Barbada, s,f. 

refrenar, v. 
Cuajada, / 
Cuajarse, 
Cura, *•/ 

curar, v. 
Curiosidad,/ 
Curioso, 
Grosellero, m. 
Circuladon,/ 
Arroyo, 8. m. 

corriente, adj. 
Curtir pieles, 
Maldicion, «./ 

maldecir, v, 
Cortina, «./ 

rodear, v, 
Corva, 8.f. 

encorvar, v. 
Cozin, m. 
Custodia,/ [m. 
Costumbre, Uso, 
Usual, 

Parroquiano^ m. 
Corte, 8. m, 

cortar, v. 
Espada, ancba,/ 
Cuchillero, m» 
Cilindro, m, 
Cipros, fit. 
Zar, fik 



• /. 



Fbsvoh. 

Concombre, m. 
Queue,/ 
Accu8£,-e, wi./ 
Cultiver. 
Culture,/ 
Adroit|-e. 
Coupe, tassc 
Cupiditd,/ 
Cur6, m, 
Gourmette, s,/, 

gourmer, v. 
Lait caille, m. 
Cailler. 
Bemede, 8, nu 

gu&rir, V. 
Curiosity,/ 
Curieux,-se. 
Gadelle,/ 
Circulation,/ 
Courant, 8, m. 

courant,-e, adj, 
Corroyer. 
Malediction, 8*m, 

maudire, v. 
Bideau,-x, 8. m. 
enfermer, v. 
Courbure, *./ 

courber, v. 
Coussin, m. 
Garde,/ |/. 
Coutume, mode, 
Habituel,-le. 
Chaland, m. 
Morceau,m. tran- 
che,«./couper,v. 
Coutelas, m. 
Coutelier, nu 
Cylindre, m. 
Cypres, flfc 
Czar, ffi. 



446 



INTEKNATIONAL DIOTIONABY. 



BAG. 



QXMMAW, 



Spaxue. 



FBurcs. 



Dagger, 

Daily, 

Dainty, 

Dairy, 

Daisy, 

Dale, 

Dally, 

Dam, 

Damage, 

Dame, 
Damn, 
Damp, 

Damsel, 
Dance, 

Dandelion, 

Danger, 

Dangerous, 

Dare, 

Dark, 

Darken, 
Darling, 

Dam, 
Dart, 

Dasb, 

Date, 

Daub, 

Daughter, 

Dawn, 



Dolch, m» 
TagUch, 
Leckerhafj^ 
Hollanderei, /. 
G^nseblume, /. 
Thai, n. 
Tandeln, 
Damm, 9. m, 

dammen, v. 
Schade,«m.Scba- 

den zufugen, v, 
Dame, Frau,/. 
Yerdammen, 
Kebel, <• m. 

feucbt, adj. 
Madchen,/. 
Tanz, f . m, 

tanzen, v. 
Lowenzahm, m. 
Gefabr,/. 
Gefahrlich, 
Diirfen, 
Dunkel, adj. 

Dunkelheit,^./. 
Verdunkeln, 
liebling, s. m. 

tbeuer, adj. 
Stopfen, 
Wurfspiess, 8. n 

werfen, v. 
Schlag, m. 

scblagen, v. 
Dattel, 8.f. 

datiren, v. 
Bescbmieren, 
Tocbter,/. 
Dammerung, $.f. 

tagen, v. 



D. 

Daga,/. 
Diario, 
Delicado, 
Oficina, /. 
Margarita,/. 
C^ada, /. 
Bobear, 
Presa, «./. 

repressar, v. 
Didlo, n. dafiar,v. 

Dama,/. 
Condenar, 
Niebla, s.f. 

Humedo, adj. 
Damisela,/. 
Danza, a.f. 

baylar, v. 
Diente de le6n, 
Peligro, m. 
Peligroso, 
Osar, 

ObscttTO, adj. 
obscuridad, «./. 
Obscuieoer, 
Predilecto, a. m, 

querido, adj. 
Surcir, 
Dardo, s. m. 

lanzar, v. 
Cboque, s. m. 

arrojar, v. 
Data,«./. 
ponar la data, v, 
Pintor rear, 
Hija,/. 
Alba, «./. 

amanecer, v. 



Poignard, m. 
Journalier,-e, 
£xqui9,-e. 
Laiterie,/. 
Marguerite,/. 
Vallon, m. 
Badiner. 
Digue, «./. 

enfermer, v, 
, Dommage, s, m. 
endomager, v. 
Dame,/. 
Damner. 
HumiditI, «./, 

humide,a. [/ 
Jeune damoiselie 
Danse, s.f. 

danser, v. 
Dent de lion,/. 
Danger, m. 
Dangereux,-se. 
Oser. 
Obscur,-e, adj. 

tenebres, s,f. 
Obscurcir.' 
Favori, a, m, 

aime^e, adj. 
Rentraire. 
Dard, 9. m. 

lancer, tr. 
Gboc,m.barre,«/. 

jailler, v. 
Date, «./. 

dater, v. 
Barbouiller. 
FiUe,/ 
Point, 6. m. 

poindre,v. 



INTEBNATIOKAL DIOTIONAKT. 



447 



DAY. 

Day, to-day, 

Deacon, 

Dead, 

Deaf, 

Deafen, 

Deal, 

Dealer, 

Dealing, 

Dear, 

Death, 

Debate, 

Debility, 

Debt, 

Debtor, 

Decanter, 

Decay, 

Decease, 

Deceit, 

Deceive, 

Deceiver, 

December, 

Decent, 

Decide, 

Decision, 

Deck, 

Declare, 

Decline, 

Decorate, 

Decorum, 

Decree, 

Dedicate, 

DedicaUon, 

Deduce, 

Deduct, 

Deduction, 



QiRXAir. 

Tag, m, heute, 
Diaconus, m. 
Todt, 
Dumpf, 
Taub macben, 
Theil, 8, m. 

austheilen, v, 
Kartengeber, m. 
Handel, m. 
Lieb, 
Tod, w. 
Streit, s, m. 

disputiren, v. 
Schwachheit,/. 
Schuld,/ 
Schuldner, m. 
Flasche,/. 
Verfallen, v. 

Verfall, «. m, 
Absterben, s. n. 

sterben, v, 
Betrug. m, 
Betriigen, 
Verfuhrer, m. 
December, m. 
ZUchtig, 
Entscheiden, 
Entscheidung,/. 
Verdeck, «. n, 

verdecken, v. 
Erklaren, 
Abweicben, 
Verzieren, 
Anst^ndigkeit,/. 
Bescbluss, s. m, 

beschlieszen, v. 
Zueignen, 
Zueignung, /. 
Herleiten, 
Abzieben, 
Abzug, m. 



SPAinsH. 

Dia, m. ahora, 
Diacono, m. 
Muerto, 
Sordo, 
Ensordar, 
Trato, «. m. 

distribuir, v. 
Interventor, wi. 
Modo de obrar,m. 
Querido, 
Muerte, /. 
Debate, «. m. 

debatir, v. 
Debilidad,/. 
Deuda,/. 
Deudor, m. 
Botella,/. 
Tisica, *./ 

decaer, v. 
Muerte, a./. 

morir, v. 
Engaiio, m. 
Enganar, 
Engafiador, m. 
Diciembre, m. 
Decente, 
Decidir, 
Decision,/. 
Cubierta, «./. 

Cubrir, v. 
Declarar, 
Declinar, 
Decorar, 
Decoro, m. 
Decreto, «. m. 

decretar, v. 
Dedicar, 
Dedicacion,/. 
Deducir, 
Deducir, 
Deduoion,/, 



FSENCH. 

Jour,wi. aujourd, 
Diacre, m. [huL 
Mort,-e. 
Sourd,-e. 
Assourdir. 
Partie, *./. 

trafiquer, v. 
Merchand,-e, m. 
Commerce, m. 
Cher,-e, 
Mort,/. 
D6bat, «. m. 

debattre, v. 
Debility, /. 
Dette,/ [m./. 
D6biteur,-trice, 
Flacon, m, 
D6clin, «. m. 

decliner, v. 
Dfices, «. Tw. 
d6c6der, v. 
Fraude, /. 
Tromper. [m./. 
Trompeur,-se, 
D6cembre, m. 
D6cenfc,-e. 
Decider. 
Decision,/. 
Tillac, B, nu 

couvrir, v. 
Declarer. 
D&;hoir,decliner 
D6corer, omer. 
D6corum, m. 
Dfcret, 8, m. 

d&jerner, v. 
D6dier. 
D6dicace, /. 
D^duire. 
D^duire. 
Consequence,/ 



448 



INTBRNATIOITA.L DICTIONAJBT, 



TTXVJ 


• 


• 


DEE. 


Oerman. Spanub. 


Frsvcb. 


Deed, 


That, Handlunff, AccioUjhazana,/ Action,/. 


Deep, 


Tief, dunkel,a($'. Profondo, adj. 


Profond,-e, adj. 




Meer, <. n. Pielago, «. m. 


Mer, *./ 


Deer, 


Rothwild, n. Ciervo, nu 


Cerf, nk 


Deface, 


Entstellen, Borrar, 


D^truire. 


Defame, 


Verleumden, Disfamar, 


Diffamer. 


Default, 


Fehler, m. Omision, / 


Defaut 


Defeat, 


Vernichtung, «/. Derrota, «./ 


Difaite, n. 




schlagen, v. derrotar, v. 


defaire, v. 


Defect, 


Gebrechen, ». Defecto, m. 


D6faut,m. 


Defence, 


Vertheidigung/. Defensa,/. 


Defense,/. 


Defend, 


Yertheidigen, Defender, 


D^fendre. 


Defendant, 


Vertheidiger, m. El que defiende, D^fendcur, m. 


Defer, 


Aufschieben, Defiirer, 


Diflferer. 


Define, 


Bestimmen, Dcfinir, 


Dcfinir. 


Definition, 


Erklarung, /. Definicion, /, 
Verunstalten, Desformar, 


D^finitbn,/. 


Deform, 


D^figurer. 


Deformity, 


Ungestaltheit,/. Deformidad,/. 


Diflformite./. 


Defray, 


Auslegen, Costear, 


Defrayer. 


Defunct, 


Verstorben, Defunto, 


D^funct,-e. 


Defy, 


Herausfordem, Desafier, 


Dfifier. 


Degenerate, 


Ausarten, v. Degenerar, v. 


D6ffen6rer, v. 




ausgeartet, adj. degenerante, c 
Herabsetzung,/. Degradacion,/. 


Degradation, 


Degradation,/. 


Degrade, 


Herabsetzen, Degradar, 


Deader. 


Degree, 


Stufe,/. Grad,w. Grado, m. 


Drade, degrd, m 


Deign, 


Wlirdigen, Dignarse, 


Daigner. 


Deist, 


Deist, m. • Deista, m. 


D6st€, m. 


Deity, 


Gottheit, [heit,/. Deidad,/. 


D6it6,/ 


Dejection, 


Niedergesclagen Melancholia,/. 


Abattement, m. 


Delay, 


Aufschub, 8. m. Dilacion, «./. 


D^lai, <• m. 




verzogem, v. dilatar, »• 

Abgeor£iete,«m. Delegado, #. m. 

versenden, v. delegar, v. 


tarder, v. 


Delegate, 


D£l%u£, s. m. 




dei^uer, v. 


Deliberate, 


Ueberlegen, Deliberar, 


D61ib6rer. 


Deliberation, 


Ueberlegung, /. Deliberacion, /. 


Dtiib^rataon,/. 


Delicacy, 


Zartheit, /. Delicadeza,/. 


D^Ucatesse,/. 


Delicate, 


Sein, zart, Delicado, 


Delicat,-e. 


Delicious, 


Hochst, Delicioso, 


Charmant,-a 


Delight, 


Vergntigen, 9. n. Delicia, «./. 


D^lice, 8. m. 




crg6tzen, v. deley tar, v. 


plaire, v. 



INTERNATIONAL DICTIONARY. 



449 



DEL. 

Delightful, 

DeliDquenty 

Delirium, 

Deliver, 

Deliverance, 

Delude, 

Deluge, 

DelQsioD, 
Demand, 

Democracy, 

Democrat, 

Demolish, 

Demon, 

Demonstrate, 

Dempnstration, 

Den, 

Denial, 

Denomination, 

Denote, 

Denounce, 

Dense, 

Dentist, 

Deny, 

Depart, 

Daparture, 

Depend, 

Dependence, 

Dependent, 

Deplorable, 

Deplore, 

Deponent, 

Deposit, 

Depot, 

Deprave, 

Depravity, 

Depredation, 

Depress, 

Depression, 



GsKiuir. 

Angenehm, 

Verbrecher, m, 

Wahnsinn, m, 

Befreien, 

Befreiung,/, 

Tauschen, 

Sundfluth,«./. 

uberfluthen, v. 
Betnig, m, 
Forderung, *./. 

fordern, v. 
Demokratie,/. 
Demokrat, m. 
Niederreiszen, 
Geist, Teufel, m. 
Erweisen, 
Beweis^ m. 
Hohle, Grube,/. 
Verneinung,/ 
Benennung,/! 
Bezeichnen^ 
Anklindigen, 
Dicht, fest, 
Zahnarzt, m, 
Leugnen, 
Weggehen, 
Abreise,/.Tod,f» 
Herabhlin^en, 
Abhangigkeit,/. 
Abhangig, [dig, 
Beklagenswiir- 
Beklagen,[ge,m. 
Beeidigte Zeu- 
P£and, s, n. 

niederlegen, v» 
Depot,Magazin,n 
Verderben, 
Verdorbenheit,/. 
Pliinderung,/. 
Niederdrucken, 
(Jnterdruckung, 

3S* 



gPAiosa. 

Delicioso,' 
Deliqiiente, m, 
Delirio, m, 
Dar, entregar, 
Entrega,/ 
Enganar, 
Deluvio, s, m, 
deluviar, v. 



Frxnch. 

Agrdable. [m./* 
Delinquant,-e, 
D£Iire, m. 
D6livrer. 
Livraison,/. 
Tromper. 
Deluge, s. m. 
submerger, v. 



Dolo^7n.Uusion,/. Fourberie,/. 
Demands, «./. Demande, s.f. 



demandar, v, 
Democracia, /. 
Democratico, m. 
Demoler, 
Demonio, m. 
Demonstrar, 



demander, v. 
Democratic,/. 
Democrat, «i. 
Demolir. 
D6mon, m. 
Demons trer. 



Demonstracion,/D6monstration,/ 
Cavema,/ Caverne, /, 

Denegacion,/. D6ni, refus, m. 
Denominacion,/. Denomination,/ 



Denotar, 
Denunciar, 
Denso, 
Dentbtia, m. 
Negar, 
Partir, 
Partida,/ 
Pender, 
Dcpendencia,/. 
Dependiente, 
Deplorable, 
Deplorar, 
Deponente, m. 
Deposito, 9. m. 
depositar, v. 



D6noter. 
Denoncer. 
Dense. 
Dentiste, 971. 
Nier. 

Sortir, partir. 
Depart, m. 
D^pendre. 
Dependance,/. 
D6pendante. 
Deplorable. 
D^plorer. 
D^posant, m. 
Depot, s, m. 
deposer, v. 



Depot, posito, m. Dep6t, m 



Depravar, 
Depravacion, /. 
Depredacion,/. 
Comprimir, 
Compresion, /. 



Depraver. 

Corruption,/. 

Depredation,/. 

Deprimer. 

Depression,/ 



450 



INTBBKATIONAL DIOTIONAEY. 



DEP. 

Deprive, 

Depute, 

Deputy, 

Derange, 

Deride, 

Derision, 

Derive, 

Descant, 

Descend, 

Descendant, 

Describe, 

Description, 

Desert, 

Deserter 
Deserve, 
Design, 

Desire, 



Desist, 

Desk, 

Despair, 

Despatch, 

Desperate, 

Despise, 

Despite, 

Despond, 

Despot, 

Despotism, 

Destination, 

Destine, 

Destitute, 

Destroy, 

Destruction, 

Detach, 



GlEHAN. 

Berauben, 
Abordnen, 
Abgeordnete,f?i. 
Stdren, 
Verlachen, 
Spott, m, 
HeHeiten, 
Discant, 8, nu 

trillern, v. 
Sich senken, 
Abkominiing,m. 
Beschreiben, 
Beschreibung,/. 
Wtiste,/. verlas- 

sen, V. 
Abtriinniger, m. 
Verdienen, 
Plan, 8, m. 

entwerfen, v. 
Verlangen, *. n. 

wunschen, v. 
Wiinschend, 
Abstechen, 
Schreibepult, n. 
Verzweiflung,*/. 

verzweifeln, v, 
Bericht, 8. m. 

abschicken, v, 
Verzweifelt, 
Verachten, 
Hasz, s.m, zum 
Trotz, prep, 
Vei-zagen, 
De8pot,m.[walt/. 
Willkurliche Ge- 
Bestimmung, /. 
Verhangnisz, n, 
Yerlassen, 
Zerstoren, 
Vemichtung, / 
Absondern, 



SVAXZSB. 

Privar, 
Deputar, 
Deputado, m, 
Desarreglar, 
Burlar, 
Irrision,/. 
Derivar, 
Discante, 8. m. 
discantar, v. 
Descender, 



Priver. 
D^puten 
Depute, nu 
D6ranger. 
RaUler. 
Derision. 
Dferiver. 
Discours, 8. m. 
harangruer, v. 
D&cendre. [tn./. 



Descendiente, m. D£3cendant,-e, 



Describir, 

Descripcion,^ 

Desierto,<.m. 

desertar, v. 
Desertor, m, 
Mercer, 
Designio, 8. m. 

designar, v. 
Deseo, 8. m. 

desear, v. 
Deseoso, 
Desisdr, 
Escritorio, m. 



D6crire. 
D&cription,/ 
D&er^ s. nk 

deserter, v. 
Deserteur, m. 
M6riter. 
Dessein, 8» m, 

designer, v, 
D&ir, m. d£* 

sirer, v, 
D6sireux,-se. 
Se d6sister de. 
Pupitre, m. 



Desconfianza, 8./. D^spoir, 8. m. 

desesperar, v, d£sesp£rer, v. 
Despacho, s, m. Expedition, «./. 

despachar, v. d^pecher, v. 
Desesperado, D£sesper6,-e. 
Despreciar, M^priser. 

Despecho, 8, m. Malice, s.f. 
a pesarde, jpr«p. malgre, prep» 



Desconfiar, 
D6spota, m. 
Despotismo, m, 
Destinacion,/. 
Destinoy m. 
Destitudo, 
Destruir, 
DestruccioD,/ 
Separar, 



Desesp^rer. 

Despote, m. 

Despotisme, m. 

Destination,/. 

Destin^e,/. 

D61ai8s6,-e* 

D6truire. 

Destruction,/, 

Detacher. 



INTEBNATI02iAL DICTIONABT. 



451 



DST. 

Detachment, 

Detain, 

Detect^ 

Detection, 

Deter, 

Determination, 

Determine, 

Detest, 

Dethrone, 

Detract, 

Detraction, 

Detriment, 

Detrimental, 

Develop, 

Deviate, 

Devil, 

Dew, 

Diamond, 

Diaper, 

Diary, 

Dice, 

Dictate, 

Dictionary, 

Die, 

Differ, 

Difference, 

Different, 

Di£Scult, 

Difficulty, 

Dig/ " 

Digest, 

Digestion, 

Dignify, 

Dignity, 

Diligent, 

Dim, 

Dimple, 

Din, 

Dine, 

Dinner, 

Diocese, 



GkSXAK. SPAllXSIf. FUNOH. 

Detachement,n. Destacamento^m. D6tachement,i?t. 
Vorenthalten, Retener, D£tenir. 

Aufdecken, Descabrir, Dfcouvrir. 

Entdeckung, /. Avcriguacion,/. D&ouverte,/. 
Abschrecken, Dasanimar, D^tourner. 

Entscheidung,/. Determinacion,/. Determination,/. 



Beschlieszen, Determinar, 
Verabscheuen, Detestar, 
Entthronen, Destronar, 
Abziehen, Detractar, 

Verleumdung,/. Detraccion,/. 



Schade, n. 
Nachtheilig, 
EnthuUen, 
Abweichen, 
Teufel, m, 
Thau, m. 
Diamant, m. 
Serviette,/. 
Tagebuch, n. 
Wurfel, m. 
Dictiren, 
Worterbuch, n 
Sterben, 



Detrimento, m, 
Perjudicial, 
Desenvolver, 
Desviarse, 
Diablo, m. 
Bocio, m. 
Diamante, m. 
ServiDeta,/, 
Diario, m. 
Dados, m. 
Dictar, 

Diccionario, m* 
Morir, 



Abweichen, [/. Diferenciarse, 
Verschiedenheit, Diferencia,/. 
Unterschieden, Diferente, 
Schwierig, Dificil, 

Sch wierigkeit, /. Dificultad, /. 
Graben, Dohren, Cavar, 
Verdauen, Digerir, 

Verdauung, /. Digestion, /• 



Ehren, 
Wttrde, /. 
Fleiaziff, 
Dunkel, 
Griibchen, n, 
Schall, m. 



Dignificar, 
Dignidad,/. 
Dihgente, 
Obscuro, 
Hoyo, m. 



Determiner. 

D6tester. 

D^troner. 

Medire. 

Detraction,/. 

Detriment, m. 

Prejudiciable. 

Developper. 

S'eioigner. 

Diable, m. 

Rossee,/. 

Diamant, m. 

Linge ouvre, m. 

Jounial,-auz, m. 

Dieter. 

Dictionnaire, m. 

Mourir. 

Diffgrer. 

Difference,/. 

Different,-e. 

Difficile. 

DifficuUe,/. 

Creuser. 

Digerer. 

Digestion,/. 

Elever k. 

Di^ite,/. 

Diligent,-e. 

Obscur,-e. 

Fossette,/. 



zu Mittag essen, Dar de comer, 
Mittagsmahl, n. Comida,/. 
Eirchsprengel,??!^ Diocesis,/. 



Ruido violento^m Bruit, m. 
Diner. 
Dine, 771. 
Diocese, 971. 



452 



INTEEITATIONAL DIOTIOIfABT, 



DIP. 

Dip, 


GXEXAN. 

Eintanken, 


Diploma, 


Urkunde,/. 


Dire, 


Graszlicb, 


Direct, 


Gerade, adj. 




richten, v. 


Dirge, 


Elagelied, n. 


Dirk, 


Dolcb, m. 


Dirt, 


Koth, Dreck, m. 


Dirty, 


Schmutzig, 


Disable, 


Entkraften, 


Disadvantage, 


Nachtheii, m. 


Disagree, 


Nicht Uberein- 




stimmen, 


Disagreeable, 


Unp&szUch, 


Disappear, 


Verschwinden, 


Disappoint, 


Vereitein, 


Disappoint- 


Vereitelung,/. 


ment, 




Disaster, 


Unstern, m. 


Disband, 


Abdanken, 


Discard, 


Verstoszon, 


Discern, 


Unterscheiden, 


D'ischarge, 


Entladung, «./. 




entladen, v. 


Disciple, 


Schuler, m. 


Disconsolate, 


TrostloB, 


Discord, 


Missklang, 9, m. 




misslingen, v. 


Discount, 


Abzug, «. m. 




discontiren, v. 


Discourage, 


Mutblosmachen, 


Discouragement Abschreckung^. 


Discourse, 


Unterredung,s.yi 




sprechen, v« 
Aufdecken, 


Discover, 


Discovery, 


Entdeckung, /. 


Discrete, 


Getrennt, 


Discretion, 


Besonnenheit, / 


Disdain, 


Verachtung, «•/ 




verschmahen, v. 


Disease, 


Krankhcit,/ 



Sfaribh. 

Mojar, Plonger. 

Diploma, /. Diplome, m. 

Horrendo, Terrible. 

Directo, adj, Direct,-e, cdj. 

dirigir, v. [/. dinger, v, 
Cancionlugubre, Chant funebre,m 
Especie de daga, Poignard, m. 
Cieno, m. Boue,/. 

Baxo, Crotte,-e. 

Inhabilitar, Affaiblir. 

Menosoabo, m. Desavantage, m, 
Disconvenir, Disconvenir. 



Contrario, 
Desaparecer, 
Frustrar, 
Ghasco, fn. 

Desastre, m. 
Descartar, 
Descartar, 
Discernir, 
Descarga, «./. 

descargar, v. 
Discipulo, m. 
DesconBolado^ 
Discordia, «./. 

discordar, v, 
Descuento, 8»fa> 

descontar, v. 
Desalentar, 
Desali&ito, / 
Discurso, «. m. 

conversar, v. 
Descubrir, [nu 
Descubrimiento, 
Discreto, 
Discrecion,/. 
Desden^ «. ta. 

desdenar, v» 
Mai, m. 



Desagr£ablc. 
Disparaitre. 
Frustrer,. 
Contretemps, m, 

D&astre, m. 
Casser. 
Ecarter. 
Discerner, voir, 
Ddcharge, «./ 

decharger,v. 
Disciple, m. 
Inconsolable. 
Discorde, «./ 

discorder, v. 
Rabais, i* nu 

escompter, v. 
D6courager. [m, 
D6couragement, 
Discours, s. m. 

discourir, v. 
R6v6ler. 
D6couverte,/ 
Discret,-e. 
Discretion,/ 
Dedain, «. m. 

d^daigner, v, 
Maladie, / 



INTSSNATIONAL DIOnONABT. 



453 



Dia. 
Disembark, 
Disgrace, 

Disgraceful, 
Disguise, 

Disgust, 

Dish, 

Dishonorable, 

DisLaherit, 

Disinterested, 

Disjoin, 

Dislike, 

D&locate, 
Dislodge, 
Dismay 
Dismay, 

Dismiss, 

Disobectience, 

Disobey, 

Disorder, 

Dispatch, 

Dispel, 
Display, 

Displeasure, 

Disposal, 

Dispose, 

Disposition, 

Dispute, 

Disregard, 



Dissemble, 

Dissipate, 

Dissipated, 



OUIUM. Spahibb. 

Ausschiffen, Desembarcar, 
Ungunst,«/.aus- Ignominia, «./. 
6er6anst6etzen,t7. desgraciar, v, 
Schimpflich, Vergoiizoso, 
Yerkleidung, s.f. Disfraz, «. m. 
verkleiden, v. disfrazar, v. 
Eckel, m. Disgusto, m. 



Schossel,/, 

Sch&ndlich, 

Enterben, 

Uneigennutzig, 

Trennen, 

Miszfallen, s. n. 



Fueate, plato,m 

Deshonroso, 

Desheredar, 

Disinteresado, 

Desunir, 

Aversion, «/per 



nicht mogen, v. sona desaprobar, 
Yerenken, Dislocar, 

Verlegen, Desalojar, 

Elend, Triste, 

Schrecken, s. m, Desmayo, 8, m. 



Dcspedir, 
Disobediencia,/ 
Deobadecer, 
Desdrden, m. 
Despacho, 8. m, 

despachar, v. 
Esparcir, 
Ostentacion, 8,/. 

ostentar, v. 



erschrecken,!;. 
Entlassen, 
Ungehorsam, m. 
Ungehorsamen, 
Unordnung,/. 
Bericht, «. m. 

abschicken, v, 
Zerstreuen, 
Schau,^./. 

auskramen, v. 
MissvergDugen,!! Desplacer, m. 
Anordaung,/. Disposicion,/. 
Anordnen, 
EinrichtuDg,/. 
Streit, 8. m. 

disputiren, v. 
Vernachl&sig- 
ung, «./. ver- 
nachlassigen, v. 
Verbergen, 
Zerstreuen, 
Liederh'ch, 
Auflosung,/. 



ler, 
Disposicion,/. 
Disputa, 8./i 

disputar, v. 
Desatencion, «./. 

desatender, v. 

Disimular, 
Desparramar, 
Desparrama, 
Disolucion,/. 



Tbkngh. 

D6barquer. 
Honte, «./. 

d&honorer, v. 
D&honorant,-e. 
D£guiser. 

Plat,«i»ecuelle^. 

Dishonorable. 

D&b6riter. 

Desint6ress^-e. 

D^joinder. 

D6go^t, 8. nu 

desapprouyer,v. 
Disloquer. . 
Dfiloger. 
Triste. 
Terreur, «•/. 

epouvanter, v. 
Cong6dir. 
D&obeissance,/ 
D&obfrlr. 
D&ordre, m. 
Expedition, «./. 

d^pr^cher, v. 
Chasser. 
Montre, 8.f. 

dfeployer, v. 
D6plaisir, m. 
Disposition, /, 
Disposer. 
Disposition,/. 
Dispute, *./. 

disputer, v, 
Indiflference, »./ 

nfegliger, v. 

Feindre. 
Dissiper. 
Dissip6. 
Dissolution,/. 



454 



nrraRNATIONAL DIOTIONART. 



DIS. 


OiaMAN. 


SPAinsa. 


Frxnoh. 


Dissolve, 


Auflosen, 


Disolver, 


Dissoudre. 


Distance, 


Feme,/ 


Distancia, / 


Distance,/. 


Distant, 


Entfemt. 


Distante, 


Distant,-e. 


Distemper, 


Krankheit,/. 


Mai, m. 


Maladie,/ 


Distil, 


Destilliren, 


Distilar, 


Distiller. 


Distillery, 


Brennhaiis, n. 


Distilatorio, m. 


Distilerie, / 


Distinct, 


Unterschieden, 


Distinto, 


Distinct^-e. 


Distinguish, 


Auszeichnen, 


Distinguir, 


Distinguer. 


District, 


Bezirk, m. 


Distrito, m. 


District) m. 


Disturb, 


Storen, 


Perturber, 


Interrompre. 


Disunion, 


Trennung,/. 


Desunion, /• 


Desunion,/ 


Ditch, 


Graben, m. 


.Zanga,;. 


Foss^m. 


Ditto, 


Desgleichen, 


Dicho, 


Le m^me. 


Diversion, 


Zeitverti^ib, m. 


Diversion, / 


Diversion,/ 


Divide, 


Theilen, 


Dividir, 


Diviser. 


Divine, 


Wahrsagen, v. 


Adivinar, v. 


Diviner, v. 




gottlicb, adj. 


divino, adj. 


divin,-e, adj. 


Divinity, 


Gottheit,/. 


Divinidad,/ 


Divinet^/ 


Division, 


Theilung,/.[ «./. Division,/. 


Division,/ 


Divorce, 


Ehescheidung, 


Divorcio, 8. m. 


Divorce, 8. m. 




Ehe auflosen,t 


. divorciar, v. 


divorcer, v. 


Dizzy, 


Schwindelig, 
Thun, machen. 


Vertiginoso, 


E'cervel4-e. 


Do, 


Hacer, 


Faire. 


Dock, 


Doche,/Kreuz,nMazlo, dique,«n 


. Queue, plante,/ 


Doctor, 


Doctor, Arzt, m. 


Doctor, m. 


Docteur, m. 


Dodge, 


Herumziehen, 


Trampear, 


Biaiser. 


Dog, 


Hund, m. 


Perro, m. 


Ohien, m. 


Dogma, 
Dollar, 


Lehrsatz, m. 
Thaler, m. 


Dogma, jn, 
Dolera,/ 


Dogme, m. 
Piastre,/ 


Dome, 


Dom, m. 


Casa,/ 


Votite/.d6me,in, 


Domestic, 


Hauslich, 


Dom£stico, 


Domestique. 


Doom, 


Schicksal, «. n. 


Sentencia, s. /. 


Sentence, «./ 




beschlieszen, v 


. sentenciar, v^ 


juger, V. 


Door, 


Thiir,/ [m 


.Puerta,/ 


Porte,/ 


Dose, 


Gabe,/ Antheil, Dosis,/ 


Dose,/ 


Dot, 


Punkt, m. 


Tilde, m. 


Point) m. 


Double, 


Doppelt, adj. 


Doble, adj. 


Double, adj. 




verdoppeln, v. 


doblar, v. 


doubler, v. 


Doubt, 


Zwcifeln, t. m. 


Duda, 8./. 


Doute, 8. m. 




zweifeln, v. 


dudar, v. 


douter, v. 


Dough, 


Teig, m. 


Masa,/ 


Pite,/ 



INTEKNATIONAL DICTIONABY. 



455 



DOT. 

Dove, 

Dower, 

Down, 

Dozen, 

Draft, 

Drag, 

Dragoon, 
Drain, 

Dram, 

Drama, 

Draw, 

Dray, 

Dread, 

Dream, 

Dreary, 



GXRMAir. 



Spaxub. 



FUSCH. 



Drift, 

Drink, 

Drive, 

Driver, 

Drop, 

Dross, 

Drove, 

Drover, 

Drown, 

Drug, 

Druggist, 

Dry, 

Duck, 
Due, 



Taube,/. Palomo, m. Colombe,/. 

Brautschatz, m. Dote, m. Dot,/. donaire,m. 

Flaumfeder, «./. Plumon, $, m. Duvet, 8, m. 

nieder, prep. abaxo, prep, en bas, prep, 

Dutzend, n. [m. Docena,/. Douzaine, 
Tratte,/. Abzug, Ocupado altriar, Billet, desein, m. 

Zug^netz, s. n. CarretiUa, *./, Drague, «./. 

Ziehen, v. arrastrar, v. trainer, v. 

Dragoner, m. Dragon, m. Dragon, m. 
Graben, 8, m, Desaguadero,«9n. Tranchle, 8,f, 

abieiten, v, escurrir, v. saigner, v. 

Schluck, Dracma,/. Dragme,/. 

Schauspiel, n. Poema, /. Drame, m, 

Ziehen, Tirar, chupar, Tirer, dessmer. 
Schleife,/. Treno, m. 



Schrecken, 9. m. Miedo, 8. m. 
8ehrftirchten,v. temer, v. 



Traum, 8. m. 

traumen, v, 
Traurig, 
Eleider, 8, n. 

putzen, V. 



Sueiio, «. m. 
sofiar, V, 



Charette,/. 
Peur, 8.jf. 

craindre, v, 
Songe, 8, m, 

songer, v. 



Trieb, m, Ziel,«.n, Impulso, «. m. 

auf haufcn, v. impeler, v. 
Trank, «. ot. Bebida, #. /. 

trinken, v. beber, v. 

Treiben, Impeler, 

Fuhrmann, [«.m. Empujador, m. 
Perle,/.Tropfen, Gota, «./. 

ausgieszen, v. destilar, v, [les, 
Schlacke,/. ~ • • 
Heerde,/. 
Viehhirt, f». 
Ertranken, 
Arznei, /. 
Droguist, m. 
Trocken, a(^\ 

trocknen, v, 
Ente,/. 
Recht ,«• n» 



Triste, espantofio, Triste,affiroyable. 
Yestido, s, m. Habit, «. m. 
vestfap, V, 



habiller, v. 
But,monceau,5m. 

pousser, v. 
Boisson, «./. 

boire, v. 
Chasser de. [m. 
Chassoir, cocher, 
Goutte,d/.laisser 

, -. ^ , tomber, v. 

Escoria de meta- Ecume,/. 
Manada,/. Troupeau,-x, m. 

Empujador, m. Bouvier, m. 



Noier, 
Drogue, /, 
Droguiste, m. 
S^che, adj. 
s^cher, v. 
Canard, m. 
Dd, «. m. 
gebiihrend, adj. exactamente, adj. due, adj. 



Ahogar, 
Droga,/. 
Droguero, m. 
Arido, adj. 
secar, v. 
A'nade, m,f. 
Debido, 8. m. 



456 



Hn^EBWATIONAI. DIOTIONABT. 



DUS. 

Duel, 

Duke, 

Dull, 

Dumb, 

Dun, 



Dust, 

Dutch, 

Duty, 
Dwell, 
Dwelling, 
Dye, 

Dysentery, 



OmcAif. 

Bweikampf, m. 
Herzog, nu 
Dunun, stumpf, 
Stumni) 
Gl&ubiger, «. m. 

mahnen, v. 

dunkel, adj. 
Staub, s, m, 

bestauben, v. 
Hollander, 8, m, 
hoUandish, adj. 
Pflicht, Wache/ 
Wohnen, 
Wohnung,/ 
Farbe, n. 

farben, v, 
BotheBulir,/. 



Spabue. 

Duelo, m. 
Duque, m. 
Lerdo, 
Mudo» 
Seto, 8, m. 

executar, v. 

bruno, adj. 
Polvo, 8, m. 

despolvorear, v, 
Holandes, 8. m. 

& adi. [m. 
Deber,impuesto, 
Habitar, 
Habitacion,/. 
Tinte, 8. m. 

tetdr, V. 
Disenteria,/. 



Fbxhch. 

Duel, m. 
Due, m. 
£mou8s4'e. 
Muet,-te. 
Crfeincier, s. m, 

importuner, v, 

brun, adj, 
Poufiere, «./. 

nettojer, v. 
Hollan(iais,-c, 

8.nu <b adj. 
Devoir,f7L taze,/. 
Habiter. 
Demeure,/. 
Temte, 8.f. 

teihdre, v. 
Dysenterie,/ 



E. 



Eacb, 

Eager, 

Eagle, 

Ear, 

Early, 

Earn, 

Earth, 

Ease, 

East, 

Easy, 

Eat, 

Eclipse, 

Economy, 

Eddy, 

Edge, 

Edging, 

Edifice, 

Editor, 

Educate, 

Education, 



Jeder, 

Bauer, heftig, 
Adler, m. 
Ohr, Geh6r,n, 
Fruh, zeitig, 
Erwerben, 
Erde,/. 
Musse,/. 
Osten, m. 
Ruhig, 



Finstemiss,^./. 
yerdunkeln,v. 
Wirthschaft,/. 
Wirbel, m. 
Scharfe,/. 
Einfassung,/ 
G^b&ude, 91. 
Herausgeber, m. 
Erziehen, 
Erziehung,/. 



Qualquier, 
Ansioso, 
Aguila,/. 
Oreja,/. 
Tempranp, 
Ganer, 
Tierra,/. 
Quietud, /. 
Oriente, m. 
Facil, 
Comer, 
Eclipse, 8. m. 
eclipsar, v. 
Economia,/. 
Kemolino, n». 
Filo, m. punta,/. 
Orla, Orilla,/. 
Edificio, m. 
Editor, ffk 
Educar, 
Education,/, 



Ghacun,-e. 
V€hfement,-e. 
Aigle, jw./. 
Oreille,/. 
De bon heure. 
Gagner. [m. 
Terre,/. Globe, 
Aise,/. repos, »?a. 
Est, Onent, m. 
Aisd,-e, facile. 
Manger, 
Eclipse, 8./. 
^ £clipser, v. 
Economic,/ 
Mascaret, nu 
Tronchant, m. 
gordure,/. 
Edifice, ffk 
£diteur^ in. 
Instruire. 
Education,/ 



INTEKNATIONAL DIOnOHABT. 



457 



SEL. 

Eel, 
Effect, 

Effort, 

Egg, 

Either, 



Elate, 
Elbow, 
Elect, 
Election, 
Elective, 
Elector, 
Electricity, 
Elegant, 
Elegy, 
Element, 
Elevate, 
Elevation, 
Elevator, 
Elocution, 
Elogy,-ghim, 
JElope, 
Else, 
Elude, 
Elusion, 
Emacukte, 
Emanate, 
Emanation, 
Emancipate, 
Emancipation, 
Emarginate, 
Embarras, 
Embarrass- 
• ment. 
Embassador, 
Embers, 
Emblem, 
Embrace, 

Embroil, 



Oesmait. 

Aal,m. 

Wirkung, s, f, 
bewimn, v. 

Anstrengung,/. 

Ei, n. [den, 

Einer von bei- 

Yerfliessen, 

Aufblahen, 

Elbogen, m. 

Wahfen, 

Erwablung,/. 

Wahlend, 

W^blmann, m. 
Elektricitat,/. 

Geschmackvoll, 

Trauergedicht,n. 

Element, n. 

Erhohen, 

Erhohung,/. 

Heber, m, 

Vortrag, m. 

Lobrede,/. 

Entlaufen, 

Anders, sonst, 

Abwenden, 

Ausflucht,/. 

Reinigen, 

Herrilhren, 

Ausfluss, m. 

Befreien, 

Freimachung,/. 

Ausranden, 

Venvirren, 

Verwirrung,/. 



Spaiosb. Fuhoe.. 

Anguila,/. Anguille,/. 

Efecto, 9. m, Effet, s, m. 

efectuar, . effectuer, v. 

Esfuerzo,/. Effort, m. 
Huezo(in)deave, (Euf^ m. 

Qualquiera, L'un ou I'autre. 



Pasar, 

Engreir, 

Codo, m.. 

Elegir, 

Elecion,^ 

Elect! vo. 

Elector, m. 

Electricidad,/. 

Elegante, 

Elegia,/. 

Elemento, m. 

Elevar, 

Elevacion,/ 

Elevador, m, 

Elocucion,/. 

Elogio, m. 

Escapar, 

Otro^ 

Eludir, 

Escapatoria,/. 

QuitarmanchaSy 

Emanar, 

Emanacion,/. 



Se passer. 
Fier,-e. 
Coude, m. 
Elire, choisir. 
Election,/. 
Elecdf,-ve. 
Electeur, m. • 
Electricite,/ 
^16gant,-e. 
E16gie,/. 
Element, m. 
Exacter. 
Elevation,/. 
El^vateur, m. 
Elocution,/. 
Eloge, m. 
S'enfuir. 
Autre. 
Eluder. 
Artifice, m. 
Emaculer. 
Emaner. 
Imanation,/. 



■ ■jiiiniiavw/ix, J • MuucujciMv^u, j 

Emancipar,/ Emanciper. 
Emancipacion,/ Emancipation,/ 
Quitarla margen,£marger. 
Embarazar, Embarrasser. 
Embarazo, m, Embarrs, rn. 



Qesandte, m. f/Embaxador, m, 
Gliihende Asciie, Rescoldo, m, 
Sinnbild, n. Emblema,/ 
Umarmungff./ Abrazo,«. m. 
umarmen, v, abrazar, v. 
Verwirren, EmbroUar, 

39 



Ambassadeur,m. 
Cendreschaudea 
Embl^me, m. 
Embrassement, 
embrasser, v. 
Brouiiler. 



458 



mTBRNATIONAL DICTIONARY. 



SMB. 

Emersion, 

Emetic, 

Emigrant, 

Emission, 

Emperor, 

Employ, 

Employ ment» 

Empress, 

Empty, 

Enable, 

Enact, 

En^lmel, 

Enclose, 

Encourage, 

Encrease, 

Encroach, 

Encyclopedia, 

End, 

Endear, 
Endeavor, 

Endorse, 

Endure, 

Enemy, 

Energy, 

Enforce, 

Engage, 

Engagement, 

Engine, 

Engineer, 

English, 

Engraft, 

Engrave, 

Enigma, 

Enjoy, 

Enjoyment, 

Enough, 

Enquire, 



aERMAir. Spanisb. 

Sichtbar werden. Emersion, 
Brechmittel, n. Em^tico, m. 
Auswanderer,m. El que emigra, 
Aussendung, EmisioB,/. 
Kaiser, m, Emperador, m, 

Beschaftigen, Emplear, 
Geschaft, n. Empleo, m. ^ 
Kaiserin, /. E mperatriz,/. 

Leer, adj. aus- Vaciar, v. 

leeren, v. vacio, (idj» 

In Stand setzeii, Habilitar, 
Verrichten, Estabiecer, 
Emailliren, Esmaltar, 

Einhangen, Cercar, 

Errauthigen, Animar, 
Wachsthum, e.n, Aumento, s, m,, 

wachsen, v. aumentar, v. 

Eingriff thun, Userpar, 
Encyklop&die,/ Enciclopedia^/ 
Ende, $, n. Fin, s, m. aca- 

endigen, v, bar, v, 

Werth machen, Encarecer, 
Bestreben, «. n. Esfuerzo, «. nu 



. ^'ersuchen, v, 
Indos^ren, 
Aushalten, 
Feind, m. 
Thatigkeit,/. 
Verstarken, 
Verpflichten, 



esforzarse, t^. 
Rotular, 
Aguantar, 
Enemigo^ m. 
Energia,/. 
Esforzar, 
Empefiar, 



FftKROH. 

Emersion, /. 
j^medque. 
ifimigrere, m,/, 
]^ mission,/. 
Empereur, m. 
Employer. 
Emploi, fTL 
Emperatrice,/. 
Vide, adj. 
vider, v, 
HabiUter. 
Ordonner. 
Emailler. 
Clorre. 
Encourager. 
Augmenter. 



Empieter. 
Encyclop^die,^^ 
Bout, 8. m. 

finir, V. 
Ooncilierramiti£. 
Effort, 8. m. 

B'effi)rcer, v. 
Endosser. 
Endurer. 
Enemi,-e, fn,/i 
Energie,/ 
Affermir. 
[m. Engager. 



Verpflichtung, /. Empefiamiento, Engagement, m* 

Maschine,/. Ingenio, m. Machme,/ 

Ingenieur, m. Ingeniero^ m. Ingenieur, m. 

Englische, Ingles,. Anglais. 

Einpfropfen, Atar, Greffer. 

Eingraben, Grabar, Grayer. 

Bathsel, n. Enigma, /. Enigme, /. 

Geniessen, Qozar, Jouir. 

Genuss, m. Gozo^ m. Jouissance,/; 

Genug, Bastante, Suffisance, asses. 

UntersucheD, Inqoirir, Demander. 



nrrBSNATioiTAL mcrnoirABT. 



4S9 



BNR. 




Spamiso. 


Fuvoib 


Enrage, 


Aufbringen, 


Infurecer, 


Irriter. 


Enrich, 


Bereichern, 


Enriquecer, 


Enrichir. 


Enrol, 


Einschreiben, 


Alistar, 


Enr61er. 


Enshrine, 


Einschlie&en, 


Guardar como 
reliquia, 
. Bandera,/. 


Enchasscr. 


Ensign, 


Kennzeichen, n 


Signal, m. 


Enslave, 


Zum Sclaven 
machen, 


Esclavizar, 


Assujettin 


Ensnare, 


Verstricken, 


Entrampar, 


Surprendre. 


Entangle, 


Verwickeln, 


Enredar, 


Embarrasser. 


Enter, 


Eintreten, 


Entrar, 


Entrer. 


Enthusiasm, 


Begeisterung,/. Entusiasmo, f». 


Enthousiasme,i?i 


Enthusiast, 


Schwarmer, m. 


Entusiasta, m. 


Enthousiaste,!?!. 


Entice, 


Anlocken, 


Haligar, 
Titular, 


Inciter. 


Entitle, 


Betitein, 


Intituler. 


Entrance, 


Eingang, s. m. 


Entrada, s.f. 


Entree, s.f. . 




entztlcken, v, 


absortar, v. 


extasier, v. 


Entrap, 


Verstricken, 


Entrampar, 


Attraper. 


Entreat, 


Behandeln, 


Rogar, 


Bolliciter. 


Entry, 


Einfuhr,/. 


Entrada,/. 


Passage, m. 


Enumerate, 


Aufz&hlen, 


Enumerar, 


DSnombrer. 


Envelope, 


Umschlag, m. 


Envolvedero,m 


. Enveloppe,/ 


Epaulet, 


Epaulett, n. 


Charretera (/.) Epaulette,/ 






al hombro, 




Epidemical, 


Einheimisch, 


Epidemial, 


£pid6mique. 


Episcopal, 


Bischdflich, 


Episcopal, 


Episcopal,-e. 


EpisUe, 


Brief, m. 


Epistola,/ 


Epltre,/ 


Epoch, 


Zeitabschnitt, fTkEpoca,/ 


Epoque,/ 


Equal, 


Gleich, 


Igual, 


Egal,.e. 


Equality, 


Gleicheit,/. 


Igualdad,/. 


EgaUt6. 


Equinox, 


Tag- und Nacht- Equinoccio^ m. 


Equinoxe, m. 




gleiche,/. 




# 


Equivocal, 


Zweideut^, 


EquivocR, 


Equivoque. 


Era, 


Aera,/ 


Era,/ 


fire, fipoque,/ 


Erase, 


Abkratzen, 


Raer, 


Effacer. 


Erasement^ 


Vertilgung,/. 




Rature,/ 


Err, 


Erren, 


Vagar, 


Errer. 


Erroneous, 


Herumirrend, 


Errante, 


Erron6,-e. 


Error,. 


Irrthum, m. 


Error, m. 


Erreur,/ 


Erudite^ 


Unterrichlet, 


Erudito, 


Erudit,-e. 
Erudiuoq,/ 


Erudition, 


Golehrsamkei^/. Erudicion, /• 



4S0 


INTERNATIONAL DIOTIONABT. 


ESP. 


OXRHAIV. 


Spahish. 


Fkknoh. 


Escape, 


Davon laufen, 


Huir, 


Eviter. 


Espouse, 


Verloben, 


Desponsarse, 


Promettre. 


Esquire, 


Schildknapp, m, Escudero^ m. 


Ecuyer, m. 


Essence, 


Wesen, n. 


Esencia, /. 


Essence,/. 


Essential, 


Wesentlich, 


Esencial, 


Essentiel,-le. 


Estiite, 


Zustand, m. 


Estado, m. 


£tat,m. 


Esteem, 


Schatzen, 


Estimar, 


Priser,Regarder. 


Estima-te,-tion, Schatzung,/. 


Estimacion,/. 


^upputation,/ 


Eternal, 


Ewig, 


Eterno, 


4te»el,-le. 


Eternity, 


Ewigkeit,/. 


Etemidad,/. 


EtemitI,/. 


Ether, 


Aether, m. 


Eter, m,' 


||ther, nt. 


Ethics, 


Sittenlehre, 


Etica,/. 


Ethique,/. 


Etiquette, 


Hofsitte,/. 


Botulo^ m. 


Etiquette,/ 


Evangelist, 


Evangelist m. 


Evangelista, m. 


l^vangfeliste, m. 


Evasion, 


Ausflucht,/. 


Evasion,/. 


Evasion, /. 


Even, 


Eben, glatte. 


Llano, 


Egal,-e, 


Evening, 


Abend,/. 


Vespertino, m. 


8oir,»». 


Event, 


Vorfall, m. 


Evento, m. 


Evfoement, nk 


Ever, 


Jemals, [/ Siempre, 


Toujours. 


Everlasting, 


Immerwabrend^ 


, Eterno, 


||temal,-le. 


Evidence, 


Beweis, m. 


Evidencia,/. 


Evidence,/ 


Evil, 


Uebel, *. n. 


Maldad,^./. 


Mai, s, m. 




bose, adj. 


malo» adj. 


mauvais,-e,(Ui^*. 


Evolve, 


Entwickeln, 


Desenvolver, 


Deplier. 


Evolution, 


Entwickelung,/. Desplegadnra, /. Evolution,/. 


Exact, 


Eintreiben, 


Exlger, 
Exftltar, 


Exiger. 


Exalt, 


Erheben, 


Eleven 


Examination, 


Priifung,/. 


Ex^minacion,/. 


Examen, m. 


Examine, 


Priifen, 


Ex&minar, 


Exammer. . 


Examiner, 


Untersucher, m 


Ex4minador, m. Examinateur^ m. 


Exceed, 


Ueberschreiten, 


Exceder, 


Exceder. 


Exceeding, 


Uebermassig, 


Excesivoy 


Excessif,-ve. 


Excel, 


Uebertreflfen, 


Sobresalir, 


Exceller, 


Excellence, 


Vortrefflichkeit/Excelencia, /. 


Excellence,/. 


Excellent, 


Hervorragend, 


Excelente, 


Excellent,-e. 


Except, 


Ausnehmen, 


Exceptuar, 


Exceptor. • 


Excess, 


Uebermass, n. 


Exceso, m. 


Exces, m. 


Exchange, 


Austauschen, 


Gambiar, 


Echanger. 


Excise, 


Accise, 


Excisa, 


Imp6t, m. 


Excite, 


Erregen, 


Excitar, 


Exciter. 


Excitement, 


Anregung,/. 


Estimulo, m. 


Motif, m. 



INTEBNATIONAL DIOnONABY. 



461 



EXa GUXAX. 8PA5UK. 

Exclaim, Ausnifen, Exclamar, 

Exclamation, Ausraf, m, ^ Ezclamacioo,/. 

Exclude, Ausscbliessen, Excluir, 
Exclasion,[cate AusschliessuDg./Exclusion, /. 

Excommoni- Ausschliessen, Excomulgar, 

Excursion, Ausfiug, m. Excursion,/. 

Excuse, Entschuldigen, Excusar, 

Execute, Yollziehen, ExecUtar, 

Executer,-or, VoUzieher, m. Executor, m. 

Execution, Ausfuhrunff,/. Execucion,/. 

Executive, Yollziehend, Executivo, 

Exempt, Ausnehmen, Ex^ntar, 

Exemption, Befreiung,/. Exencion,/. 

Exert, Aeussern, Esforzar, 

Exertion, Anstrengung,/. Esfuerzo, m. 

Exhale, Ausdunsten, Exhalar, 

Exhibit, Dorbieten, Exbibir, 

Exhort, Ermahnen, Exhortar, 

Exhortation, Ermahnung,/. Exhortacion,/. 

Exile, Verbannung,*./Exilio, «. m. 

yerbennen, v. desterrar, v. 

Exist, 8ein, Exlstir, 

Existence, Dasein, n. Existencia,/. 

Expect, Erwarten, Esperar, 

Expectation, Erwartung, /. £xpectacion, /. 

Expedience, Schicklichkei t, /. Aptitud, /. 

Expedite, Erleichtern, Expedir, 

Expedition, Schnelligkeit, /. Expedicion, /. 

Expel, Wegtreiben, Expel6r, 

Expence, Ausgabe,/. Expensa,/. 

Expensive, Theuer, Pr6digo, 

Experience, Erfahrung, «./. Experencia, «./. Experience, s.f. 

erfahren, V. experimentar,ty. experimenter, 9 

Experiment, Yersuch, «. m. Experimento,«.i7).Expcrienoe, «./ 

versuchen, v, experimentar,v. _experimenter,v 

Expiate, Abbiissen, Expiar, 

Expiation, Bussung,/. Expiacion, /. 

Expiration, Aushauchen, fu Expiracion,/. 

Expire, Aushauchen, Expirar, 

Explain, Erklaren, Explanar, 

Explanation, Erklarung,/. Explanacion,/. 
39* 



Fkbvcb. 
Crier. 

Clameur,/. 
Exclure, 
Exclusion,/, 
Excommunier. 
Excursion,/. 
Excuser. 
Ex6cuter. [tn./, 
Ex6cuteur,-trice 
Execution,/ 
Ex6cutif;-ve. 
Exempter. 
Exemption,/ 
Faire des efforts. 
Effort, nt. 
Exhaler 
Exhiber. 
Exhorter. 
Exhortation,/. 
Exil,«.m. exiler,v. 

Exister. 

Existence,/ 

Attendre. 

Expectation,/ 

Expedient, m, 

Faciliter. 

Expedition,/ 

Chaster. 

Dfepense,/ 

Dfepcnsier,-e. 



Expier. 

Expiation,/ 

Expiration,/ 

Mourir. 

Expliquer. 

Explication,/ 



462 



INTEBNATIONAL DICTIOKART. 



EXP. 

Explicit, 

Explode, 

Explore, 

Export, 

Exportation, 

Expose, 

Exposure, 

Express, 

Expression, 

Exquisite, 

Extend, 

Extension, 

Extensive, 

Exterminate, 

Extermination, 

Extinct, 

Extort, 

Extract, 

Extravagant, 
Extreme, 
Eye, 
Eye-sight, 



Gmuir. 
Ausdrticklicb, 
Auspochen, 
Erforschen, 
Ausfiihren, 
Ausfuhr, /. 
Aussetzen, 
Darlegung,/. 
Express, s» tn. 

ausdrticken, v, 
Ausdruck, m. 
Auserlesen, 
Ausdehnen, 



Spaoxsk. 

Explicito^ 

Da];grita, 

Explorar, 

Extraer, 

Extraccion,/. 

Exponer, 



Tuircs. 

Explicite. 

8iffler. 

Explorer. 

Exporter. 

Exportation, /* 

Dfecouvrir. 



Manifestacion,/. Exposition,/. 
Expreso, ». m. Expres, 8. nu 

representar, v, 
Expresion,/, 
Exquisite, 



Extender, 



Ausdehnung, /. E xtension, /. 



*Extenso, 
Exterminar, 



Ausgedehnt, 

Ausrotten, 

Ausrottung,/. 

Ausgeloscht, 

Abzwingen, 

Ausziehen, 8,n.v. Extracto, «. m. 

extraer, v. 
Ausschweifend, Extraragante, 
Ausserst, hQchst^Extremo, 
Auge, n. Ojo, m, 

Sehvermogen, «. Yista, /. 



expnmer, v. 

Expression,/ 

Exquis,-e. 

Etendre. 

Extension,/ 

Etendu,-e. 

Exterminer. 
E xterminacion, /Extermination, / 
Extinto^ [sion, £teint,-e. 
Cometer extor- Extorquer. 

Extraire, v. ex- 
trait, 8. m. 

Extravagant^-e. 

Extreme. 

GSil, yeox, m. 

Vue,/ 



P. 

Fable, Pabel,/ Fabnla, / Fable,/ 

Face, Gesicbt, 71. Cara, / Face,/ visage,9R. 

Fact, Thatsache,/ Hecho, m. Fait, m. 

Faction, Aufrubr, m. Faccion, / Faction, / 

Factory, Factorei, / Facloria, / Factorerie, / 

Fade, Verschwinden, Marcbitar, Faner. 

Foil, .Fehlen, Perecer, Manquer. [m. 

Failure, Mangel, #». Falta, / Faute,/d6fautc, 

Faint, Verschwinden, Languido^ Languissant,-e, 

Fair, Schon, Hermcso, Beau. 

Faith, Glaube,TO.' Fe, / Foi, / [«./ 

Fall, Fallen, v. Fall,<.fra»Caer, v. caido,««/Tomber,v. chute 

False, Falsch, Falso^ Faux,-sse. 

Ftfme, Qerlicht, n. Fama, / Benom, m. 



INTEENATIONAL DICTIONARY. 



463 



EAU. 

Family, 
Fan, 

Fancy, 

Far, 

Farewellt 

Farm, 

Farmer, 

Kashioo, 

Fast, 

Fat, 

Fate, 

Father, 

Fear, 

February, 

Female, 

Fence, 

Ferry, 

Fever, 

Few, 

Fiddle, 

Field, • 

Fights 

Fill, 

Find, 

Fine, 

Finger, 

Fire, 

First, 

Fish, 

Five, 

Fix, 

Flag, 

Flame, 

Flesh, 

Flock, 

Flood, 



GnucAS. Spahish. 

Familie,gattuDg/Familia, /. 
, Facher, s. m. Abanico^ «. m, 

facheln, v. 
Einbildung,/ 
Weit, 
Abschied, 9, nu 

lebewohl.U'n^. 
Pachtgttt, n. 
Pachter, w. 



abanicar, v. 
Fantasia, /. 
Lejos, 
Despedida, 8, /. 

4 dies! ifU, 
Heredad, /. 
Arrendatario, m. 



Form, gestalt, /. Forma, / [ar, v. 
Fest, a. fasten, v.Firme,a4^'. ay un 



Gordo, 
Fato, m. 
Padre, m. 
Miedo, 8, m, te- 

mer, v. % 
Febrero, m. 
Hembra,/[ro,m 



Fet^ plump, 
Schicksal, n, 
Vater, m. 
Furcht, «./. 

fiirchten, v. 
Februar, m. 
Weib, n. 
Vertheidigung^ Defensa,/.~repa- 



Fahre,/ 
Reber, n. 
Wenig, 
Geige, /. 
Feld, n. 
Gefecht, 8. n. 
fechten, v. 
Fiillen, 
Finden, 
Fein, 

Finger, m. 
Feuer, «. 
Erste, erstlioh, 
Fisch, m. 
Fun^ 

Befestigen, 
Flagge, /. 
Flamme, /. 
Fleisch, n. 
Heerde, 8. /. 

sich sammeln,v. 
Fluth,/. 



Barco, m. 
Fiebre, nk 
Poco, 
Violin, m, 
Campo, 
BatalLa, «./. pe- 

lear, v. 
Llenar, 
Encontrar, 
Fino, 
Dedo, m. 
Fuegp,in. 
Primero, 
Pez, m, 
Cmco, 
Fixar, 

Espedana,/. 
Llama, /. 
Came, m. 
Manada, 8./. 

con^garse, v. 
DiluYio, m. 



Famille, /. 
^ventail, 8, m, 

6venter, v, 
Fantaisie, /• 
Loin. 
Adieu,-x, 8, m, 

adieu! int. 
Ferme,/. 
Fermier,-e, m./, 
Fa9on, mode,/. 
Ferme,a.je<!inerv. 
Gras. 
Destin, m, 
Pere, m. 
Crainte, *./. 

ci'aindi'e, v. 
F6vrier. 

Femelle. [m. 
Garde, /. .enclose 
Bateau, m, 
Fievre,/. 
Peu. 

Violon, m. 
Champ, m. 
Combat, 8, m, 

combattre, u 
Remplir. 
Trouver. 
Fin,-e, 8ubti],-e. 
Boigt, m. 
Feu,-x, m. 
Premier,-e. 
Poisson, i»» 
Cinq. 
Fixer. 

Pavilion, m» 
Flamme,/. 
Chair,/ 
Troupeau,-x,^.9?i. 

concounr, v. 
Deluge, flux,m. 



464: 



INTEENATIONAL DICTIONARY. 



FLO. 

Floor, 

Flour, 

Flower, 

Fluid, 

Fly, 

Foam, 

Fob, 

Fog, 

Follow, 

Food, 

Fool, 

Foot, 

For, 

Forbid, 

Forehead, 

Foreign, 

Foreigner, 

Forget, 

Fork, 

Form, 

Fort, 

Fortune, 

Four, 

Fox, 

Fraction, 

Fracture, 

Frame, 

Fraud, 

Free, 

Freeze, 

French, , 

Fresh, 

Friend, 

Fright, 

Fringe, 
Frolic, 
From, 



Okkxah. 

Fuszboden, m, 
Feine Mehl, n. 
Blume, /. 
Fliissigkeit,/. 
Fliege, *./. 

fliegen, v. 
Schaum, s. m* 

sch&umen, v. 
Tasche,/. 
Dicker Nebel,f7a, 
Folgen, 
Speise,/. 
Thor, Narr, nu 
Fusz, m. 
Fiir, 

Yerbvten, 
Slim,/. 
Fremd, 
Auslander, m» 
Vergessen, 
Gabel,/. 
Form,/. 
Festung,/ 
Gliick, n. 
Vier, 
Fuchs, nk 
Bruch, m. 
Bruch, f. m, 

brechen, v. 
Gebaude, n. 
Betrug, m, 
Frei, 
Fiieren, 
Franzosich, 
Frisch, 
Freund, m. 
Schrcck, «. m. 

erschrecken, v. 
Franse,/. 
Scherz, tn, 
Vor, von, aus, 



Bpaiobh. 

Pavimento, nu 
Harina,/ 
Flor,/ 
Suco, m* 
Mosca, 5./. 

volar, V. 
Espuma, s.f. 

espumar, v. 
Faltnquera,/. 
Niebla,/ 
Seguirse, 
Alimento, m. 
Bobo, Idiota, m. 
Pie, w. 
Por, 

Prohibir, 
Frente, m. 
Eztrangero, f7i. 
Extrangero, m, 
Olvidar, 
Tenedor, m. 
Forma,/. 
Fuerte, m. 
Fortuna,/. 
Quatro, 

Rapo6a,zorra,/ 
Fraccion,/. 
Fractura, *./. 

quebrar, t^. 
Fabrica,/. 
Fraude, f». 
Libre, 
Helai^e, 
Frances, 
Fresco, 
Amigo, m. 
Susto, s, m. 

Espantar, v. 
Franja,/ 
Fantasia, /. 
Despues, 



¥mmbcs» 

Plancher, m. 
Farine,/ 
Fleur,/ 
Fluide, m. 
Mouche, 8,/* 

voler, V. 
Ecume,/. 

^umer, v, 
Gousset, m. 
Brouillard, ffi. 
Suivre. 
Nourriture,/ 
Simple,m. foii,m« 
Pied, pi^ m» 
Pour. 
D4fendre. 
Front, m» 
£tranger,-e. 
Etranger,-e. m./ 
Oublier. 
Fourche,/ 
Forme,/. 
Fort,m. 
Fortufte,/. 
Quatre. 

Renard,-e, m,f. 
Fraction,/. 
Fracture,/, 

casser, v. 
Structure,/ 
Fraude,/ 
Libre. 
Geler. 
Fran^ais. 
Frais. 

Ami,-e, wl/ 
Frageur, •./ 

effrayer, v, 
Frange,/ 
Boutade,/ 
De, 4, aux, d*. 



INTEfiNATIONAL DIOTIONABT. 



465 



T£0. 

Fronts 
Frost, 
Frown, 

Fruit, 
Fiy, 

Full. 
Fun, 
Fury, 
Future, 



Gab, 

Gable, 

Gain, 

Gallon, 
Gallows, 
•Gamble, 
Gambler, 
Game, 
Gammon, 
Garden, 
Garret, 
Garter, 
Gaze, 

Gem, 

Gender, 

Generous, 

Genius, 

Genteel, 

Gentle, 

Gentleman, 

Geography, 

German, 

Get, 

Ghost, 



GZKMAN. 

Stirn,/.Gesicht,n 
Frost, Reif, [«./. 
GerunzelteStirn, 

finster ausse- 
Frucht,/. [hen,v. 
Fischbrut,*./ 

rosten, v. 
Voll, ^ [m. 
Scherz, Hintere, 
Raserei,/. 
Zukunft, 9.f. 

klinftig, adj. 



Bchnattem, 
Giebel, m, 
Gewinn, 9. m. 

gewinnen, v. 
Gdlone,/. 
Galgen, m, 
Hoch spielen. 
Spieler, m. 
Spiel, n, 
Schinken, m, 
Gbrten, m, 
Dachstube,/, 
Hosenband, n. 
Angafifen, 8» ». 

starren, v. 
Edelstein,' m. 
Geschleoht, n. 
Grossmiithig, 
Schutzgeist, m* 
Arfjg, ^iD, 
Vornehm,h6flich 
Herr, [ung,/. 
Erdbeschreib- 
Deutsche, 
Erhalten, 
Gcist, m. 



Spasuh. 


Frxnch. 


Frente, m. 


Front, m. 


Helada,/. 


Gel6e,/. 


Cefto, 8. m. 


Froncement,«,m, 


cefiar, v. 


se refrogner.v. 


Fruto, m. 


Fruit, m. 


Enxambre, s. m 


. Frai, 8, m. 


freir, v. 


frire, v. 


Lleno, 


Plein,-e. [m. 


Diversion,/. 


Divertissement, 


Furor, m. 


Furie, fureur, /. 


Futuro, 8, m. 


Futur,-e, «, »». 


& adj. 


<& ac^'. 


a. 

Mentir, 


Babiller. 


Pared apiilada,/Tolt, m. 


Ganancia, s.f. 


Gain, «. m. 


ganar, v, 
Gmon, m. 


eagner, v. 
Gallon, m. 


Horca,/. 


Gibet, m. 


Jugarenexcessc 
Tabur,.w. 


), Jouer. 


■ Filou, m. 


Juego, m. 


R6cr6ation,/, 


Jamon, m. 


Jambon, m. 


Huerta,/. 


JardiD, m. 


Guardilla,/. 


Galetas, m. 



Cenogil, m, [s. /, Jarre tiere, /• 
Contemplacion, Regard, 8, m. 

ojear, v. [/. regarder,v. [/. 
Piedra, preciosa, Pierre pr&ieuse, 
E specie, /. Genre, ?« . 

Generoso, G6n6reux,-8e. 

Genio, m. G6nie, m. 

Urbano, Poli,-e, £I£gant. 

Suave, Doux,-ce. 

Gehtilhombre,m. Monsieur. 
Geografia, / Geographic, /. 
Aleman, Allemond. 

Grangear, Gagner. 

Alma racional,/. Esprit, m. 



466 



nrrEBiTATioirAi. diotionabt. 



OIV. 


QnucAV. 


Spaiosh. 


Fekwch. 


Gift, 


Gabe,/. 


Don, m. 


Don, present, m. 


Gin, 


Schlinge,/. 


Trampa,/. 


Trebuchet, m. 


Girl, 


Madchen, n. • 


Doncillita,/. 


Fille,/ 


Give, 


Geben, 


Dar, donar. 


Donner. 


Glad, 


Heiter, [m 


. Alegre, 


Content,-e. 


Glass, 


Glas, n. Spiegel, Vidrio, m. 


Verre,m. Glace,/ 


Globe, 


Kugel,/. 


Globo, m. 


Globe,w.8pherejf 


Gloom, 


Dunkelheit,/. 


Opacidad,/. 
Gloria,/. 


ObscuritS,/ 


Glory, 


Rubra, Preis,«i. 


Gloire,/ . 


Glutton, 


Vielfrass, m. 


Gloton, m. 


Glouton,-ne, m/. 


Go, 


Scbeu, 


Andar, ir. 


AUer. 


God, 


Gott, m. 


Dios,m. 


Dieu, m. 


Gold, 


Gold, «. 


Oro, aureo, m. 


Or, in. 


Gooa, 


Gut, Wohl, 


Bueno^ 


Bon,-ne. 


Govern, 


Regieren, 


Gobemar, 


Qoyerner, 


Governor, 


Beherrscher, m. 


Gobemador, m. 


Gouvemeur, m. 


Grace, 


Anmuth,/. 


Gracia, /. 


Qrkcejf. 


Grain, 


Kom, n. 


Grano, m. 


Grain, bl^ nu 


Grand, 


Gross, 


Grande, 


Gnind,-e. 


Grape, 


Weinbeere,/. 


Uva,/ 


Raisin, m. 


Grass, 


Gras,n. 


Yerba,/. 


Herbe,/ 


Grasshopper, 


Grashupfer, m. 


Langostino, m. 


Sauterelle,/. 


Grave, 


Grab, s, n. 


Sepultura, «./. 


Tombeau, s, m.- 




feierlich, adj. 


Grave, adj. 


8erieux,-8e, adj. 


Gravel, 


Eies,m. 


Cascajo, m. 


Gravier, m.. 


Gray, 


Grau, 


Gris, 


Gri8,-e. 


Great, 


Gross, 


Grande, 


Grand,-e. 


Greece, 


Griechenland, n 


t. Grecia,/ . 


Grecque,/ 


Greek, 


Griechisch, 


Greco, 


Grec. 


Green, 


Gran, 


Verde, 


Vert 


Grind, 


Reiben, 


Moler, a'awJer, 


Moudre. 


Grist, • 


Kom, MeU, n. 


MoUenda,/. 


Monture,/ 


Grocer, 


GewUrzkramer, 


Especiero, m. 


Epicier^e, «!•/. 


Grocery, 


Kramcrwaare,/. Especieria,/. 


Epecerie,/. 


Ground, 


Grund, m. 


Tierra,/. 


Terre,/. 


Grow, 


Wachsen, 


Crecer, 


Croltre. 


Grove, 


Hain, m. 


Arboleda, 


Bocage, m. 


Gudgeon, 


Griindlich, m. 


Gobio, m. 


Goujon, m. 


Guest, 


Gast, m. 


Hu6sped, m. 


Convife, m. 


Guide, 


Fiihrer, s. m. 


Guia, s. m. 


Guide, 8. tn. 




leiten, v. 


Guiax, V, 


conduire, v. 



VStrBSaHXTlOTKAL MOnOKABY. 



467 



GUI. 

Guinea, 


Guinee,/. 


Gulf, 


Meerbasen,ffi. 


Gun, 


Geschtitz, n. 


Habit, 


Zustand, m. 


Hair, 


Haar, n. 


Half, 


Halfte, 8.f. 




halb, adj. 


Hall, 


Saal, m. 


Ham, 


Schenkel, m. 


Hammer, 


Hammer, 8, m. 




hammern, v. 


Hand, 


Hand, Faust,/. 


Handle, 


Hanhabe, s.f. 




benihren, v. 


Handmmd, 


Magd,/. 


Handsaw, 


Handskge,/. 


Handsome, 


Bequem, schon. 


Hang, 


Hangen, 


Happen, 


£Kch ereignen, 


Happy, 


Glucklic^ 


Harbor, 


Hafen, m. 


Hard, 


Hart, heftig. 


Hardship, 


Ungemach, n. 


Hark! 


Horch! 


Harm, 


Unrecht, n. 


Harmless, 


Unschadlich, 


Harness, 


Hamisch, m. 


Harp, 


Harfe,/ 


Harpoon, 


Harpune,/, 


Hart, 


Hirsch, m. 


Harvest, 


Ernte,«./. 




emten. 


Haste, 


Eile, 8.f. 




eilen, v. 


Hat, 


Hut,wi. 


Hatchet, 


Beil, n. 


Hate, 


Hass, 8. m. 




hoflsen, v. 



Spanish. Frxhcr. 

Guinea, /. Guinde, /. 

Gulfo, m. Golfe, m, 

A^SLff. Fusil,m. Fusil, m. 



Estado^ m. 
Pelo, m» 
Mitad, 8.f. 

medio, adj. 
Salon, 971. 
Corva,/. 
Martillo, «. m. 

martillar, v, 
Mano, m. 
Mango, 8, m. 
. Palpar, t». 
DonceUa, /. 
Sierra de mano, 
Hermoso, 
Colgar, 
Acontecer, 
Feliz, 

Albergue, m. 
Duro, 
Injuria,/. 
He! Dyes! 
Maldad,/ 
Sencillo, 
Guarniciones,/. 
Arpa,/. 
Arpon, m, 
Ciervo, m. 
Agosta, 8. m. 

recoger, v, 
Priesa, «./. 

acelerar, v. 
Sombrero, m. 
Destral, m. 
Odio, 8, m, 

detestar, v. 



Habitude, / 
Cheveu,-x, nu 
Moiti6,«./. 

demi,-e, adj» 
Palais, m, 
Jambon, m. 
Marteau,-x, 8, m, 

marteler, v. 
Main,/. 
Anse, 8,f. 

manier, v. 
Servante,/. 
Scie (/.) a main. 
Beau,bel, belle. 
Pendre. 
Venir. 
Heureux. 
Eefuge,haTre,m. 
Dur,-e. 
Duretg,/. 
Ecoute ! 

Mal,Dammage,f7». 
Innocent,-e. 
Harnais, m, 
Harpe,/. 
Harpon, tiu 
Cerf, m, 
Moisson,/ 

moissonner, v, 
H&te, 8. m. 

' hater, v. 

Chapeau,-x, m, * 

Hachette,/ 

Haine, 8./. 

hair, V. 



468 



INTERNATIONAL DIOTIONABT. 



HAT. 

Hatter, 

Have, 

Haven, 

Hawk, 

Hay, 

He, 

Head, 

Heal, 

Health, 

Healthy, 

Heap, 

Hear, 
Heart, 
Hearth, 
Heat, 

Heavy, 

Hedge, 

Heel, 

Heifer, 

Heir, 

Heiress, 

Hell, 

Help, 

Helve, 

Hemp, 

Hen, 

Hence, 

Henpeck, 

Her, 

Herb, 

Here, 

Heretic, 

Hermit, 

Hero, 

Hesitate, 

Hew, 

Hide, 



^ GmcAir. 

Hutmacher, m. 

Haben, 

Hafen, m. 

Falke, m. 

Hen, n. 

Er, derjenige, 

Haupt, fi. 

Heilen, 

Gesundheit,/. 

Gesund, 

Haufe, «. m. 

haufen, v. 
Horen, 
Herz, n. 
Herd, m» 
Hitze, •./. 

erhitzen, v. 
Schwer, 
Hecke,/. 
Ferse,/. 
Junge Euh,/. 
Erbe, m» 
Erbin,/. 
HoUe,/ 
Hiilfe^*./. 

helfen, v, 
Stiel, m. 
Hanf, m. 
Henne,/. 
Von hier, 
Schurigeln, 
Sie, 

Kraut, n. 
Hier, 
Eetzer, m. 
Einsiedler, m. 
Held, m. 
Anstossen, 
Hauen, 
Haut, *./. 

Terstecken, v* 



SPAinBlL 

Sombrerero, nu 
Traer, haber, 
Puerto, m, 
Halcon, m, 
Heno^ m. 
El, 

Cabeza,/. 
Gurar, 
Salud,/. 
Sano^ 
Monton, ^. m. 

amontonar, t^. 
Oir, 

Corazon, m. 
Hogar, fn. 
Galor, 8, m. 

calentar, v. 
Grave, 
Seto, m. 
Talon, m. 
Vaquilla,/ 
Hcredero, m, 
Heredera,/, 
Infiemo, m. 
Ayuda, «./. 

ayudar, v. 
Destral, m, 
Gafiamo, m. 
Gallina,/. 
De aqui, [mugar, 
Dominadar de la 
De ella, su, 
Yerba,/. 
Aqui, 
Herege, m, 
Ermitaflo, m. 
Heroe, m. 
Dudor, 
Tnjar, 
Guero, «. tn, 

esconder, v. 



FSIROB. 

Ghapelier, m. 
Avoir. 
Havre, in. 
Faugon, m. 
Foin, m; 
II, lui. 
T6te,/. 
Gudrir. 
Santfe,/. 
Sain,-e, 
Amas, B» m. 

entasser, v.. 
Entendre. 
Goeur, m. 
itre, m. 
Ghaleur, 5./. 

chauffer, v. 
Pesant,-e. 
Haie,/. 
TaloD, m. 
Gbnisse, /. 
Heritier, m. 
Heritiere, /. 
Enfer, m. . 
Aide,*./. aider,r. 

[cognfe. 
Manche(m.)d*u- 
Ghanvre, rru [ne. 
Poule,/. 
Loin d'ici[femme 
Gouvemerparsa 
EUe, la, luL 
Hebe,/. 
Ici. 

Heretique,!!*./. 
Hermite, m. 
Heroe, m. 
H4siter. 
Hacher. 
Peau,-x, »./. 

cacher, v. 



INTEKNATIONAL UICTIONAET. 



469 



IIIQ. 


Oermax. 


SPAXiafl. 


FftEVCH. 


High, 


Hoch, stolz, 


Alto, 


Haut,-e. 


Hill, 


Hugel, m. 


Collado, m. 


Colline,/. 


Hinder, 


Hindern, 


Itnpedir, 


Emp5cher. 


Hinge, 


Haspe, / 


Gozne, 


Gond, pivot, nu 


Hint, 


Wink, 8, m. einen Indirecta, «./. 


Suggestion, s.f. 




Wink geben, v 


apuntar, v. 


insinuer, v. 


Hip, 


Hagebutte, /, 


Cadera,/. 


Hanche,/. 


Hire, 


Meithen, [ber, m, Alquilar, 


Louer, engager. 


Historian, 


Ge8chichtsschrei.Historiador, nu 


Plistorien, m. 


Histoiy, 


Geschichte,/. 


Historia,/. 


Histoire,/. 


Hit, 


Schlagen, 


Golpear, 


Frapper. 
Se demener. 


mush, 


Sich schicben, 


Saltar, 


Hive, 


Bienenstock, m. 


, Colmena,/. 


Ruche,/. 


Hoax, 


Erdichtung,/. 


Enga&o, m. 


Charlatanerie,/. 


Hobby, 


Klepper, fiu 


Sacre, hobin, m 


. Hobereau,-x, m. 


Hoe, 


Haue, «./ 


Azada, 8,f. 


Houe, 8,f. 




hacken, v. 


cavar, v. 


houer, v. 


Hog, 


Schwein, n. 


Puereo, i». 


Cochon, m. 


Ho^h, 


Sehweinisch, 


Porcuno, 


Gourmand,-e. 


Halten, 8,n,&i 


K Tener, v. 


Tenir, v. 






agarro, 8, m. 


prise, »./. 


Hole, 


Loch, 7L 


Agujero, m. 


Creux, m. 


Holy, 


HeCig, 


Santo, 


Saint,-e. 


Home, 


Haus,«. 


Casa propria,/. 


Demeure, /. 


Homely, 


Nicht verfeinert, Liso, 


Grossier. [passer. 
Pierre (/.) k re- 


Hone, 


Wetzstein, m. 


Piedra,/. 


Honest, 


Anstandig, 


Honrado, 


Honfete. 


Honesty, 


Ehrlichkeit,/. 


Honestidad,/. 


Henfetetg,/ 


Honey, 


Honig, 771. 


Miel,m. [mugei 


-. Miel, m. 


Hood, 


Haube,Kappe,/. Caperuza (/J d 


e Chaperon, m. 


Hoof, 


Huf, nu Klaue,/. Pesuna, /. 


Sabot, m. 


Hook, 


Haken,».w. <fei 


;. Garabato, «. m. 


Croc, 8. m. 






enganchar, v, 


accrocher, v. 


Hoop, 


Reif, 8, m. bin- 


Aro, 8. m. 


Cerceau,-x, 8, m. 




den, v» 


cercar, v. 


lier, V, 


Hop, 


Hiipfen, 8. n, 
Hopfen, V. 


Salto, 8, m. 


Houblon, 8, nu 




saltar, v. 


sauter, v. 


Hope, 


Hoflfnung, «./. 


Experanza, »./. Esp^rance, 8.f. 




hoffen, V, 


esperar, v. 


esperer, v. 


Hopper, 


Hupfer, m. 


Saltador, m. 


Saut6ur,-se,m./. 


Horn, 


Horn. «. 


Cuerno, m. 


Come,/. 



40 



470 



INTERNATIONAL DICTIONABY. 



HOR. 

Horror, 

Horse, 

Horticulture, 

Hospital, 

Hospitality, 

Host, 

Hostile, 

IJostility, 

Hostler, 

Hot, 

Hotel, 

Hour, 

House, 

Hover, 

How, 

However, 

Howl, 

Howsoever, 

Hug, 

Huge, 

Hull, 

Hum, 

Human, 
Humane, 
Humanity, 
Humble, 

Humbug, 

HumiliatioD, 

Humorous, 

Humor, 

Hump, 

Hundred, 

Hunger, 

Hungry, 

Hunt, 

Hunter, 

Hurricane, 



0£SXAK. fiPAinSH. 

Schauder, m. Horror, m, 
Pferd, n, Caballo, m. 

Gartenbau, m. Jardineria, /. 
Krankenhaus, n. Hospital, m, 
Gastfreih eit, /. Hospitalid ad, /. 
Wirth, m, Hueste,patron,m 

Feindlich, Hostil, 

Feindseligkeit,/. Hostiiidad, /. 
Stallknecht, m. Mozo(m)de paja. 



Heisz, eifrig, 
Gasthofi m. 
Stunde,/ 
Haus, n. 
Schweben, 
Wie, 
Dennoch, 
Heulen, 
Doch, jedoch, 



Calido, caliente, 

Posada, fonda,/. 

Hora,/. 

Casa, /. 

Colgar, 

Como, [sea, 

Como quiera que 

AuUar, 

Anque, 



Umarmung, «./. Abrazo, s, m, 
umormen, v, abrazar, v, 
Ungeheuer, Vasto, 
Hulse, Schale,/. Cascara,/ 
Summen, «. n. Zumbido, s. m. 

summen, v, zumbar, v, 

Menschlich, Humano, 
Leutselig, Humano, 

Menschlichkeitj/Humanidad, /. 
Demiitbig, a<^'. Humilde, adj, 
erniedrigen, v, humillar, v, 
Betrug, m. Trampa, /. 

Erniedrigung,/. Humillacion,/. 
Launiscb» Grutesco, 

Feuchtigkeit,/. Humor, genio,»i. 



Buckel, m, 
Hundert, n. 
Hunger, m, 
Hungerig, 



Giba, joroba,/. 
Ciento, m. 
Hambre, m. 
Hambricnto, 



Jagen, verfolgen, Montear, segnir, 
Jager, m. Montero, m. 

Oncan, m. Huracan, m. 



French. 
Horreur,/. 
Cheval,-aux, m, 
Jardinage, m, 
H6pital,-aux, m. 
Hospitalite,/. 
H6te,7w. hostie,/. 
Hostile. 
Hostility/. 
Valet, m, 
Chaud, ardent. 
H6tel, m, 
Heure,/ 
Maison,/. 
R6der autour. 
Comment. 
Copendant. 
Hurler. 

Quoique. [s.m, 
Embarassement, 

embrasser, v. 
Grand, vaste, 
Casse,/. 
Bruit sourd, 9, m. 

murmurer, v. 
Mortel. 
Bon, tendre, 
Humanit6,/. 
Bas, adj, humi- 

lier, V, 
Charlatanene,^; 
Humiliation,/! 
Plaisant. 
Humeur,/. 
Bosse,/ 
Cent,m 
Faim,/. 
Affam6. 
Chereher. 
Chasseur, m, 
Ouragan, m. 



INTBBNATIONAI. DIOTIOKABT. 



471 



HUR. 


QSBMAS. 


Spanuk. 


FEiaroH. 


Hurry, 


Eile, 8,f. 


Precipitacion,*. 


f.mia,8./. 




eilen, v. 


atropellar, v. 


hater, v. 


Hurt, 


Verletzung, «./. Mai, s.m. 


Dommage, s. m* 




verwunden,v. 


dailar, a. 


nuire ^, v. 


Husband, 


Ehemann, m. 


Marido, m. 


Mari, m. 


Hush, 


Still! intstH' 


Chiton! int. 


Chut! int. 




len, V. 


apaciguar, v. 


calmer, v« 


Husk, 


Hulse, «./. 


Cascara, *./. 


Cosse, *./. 




aushiilsen, v. 


descascarar, \ 


}f. cosser, v. 


Hut, 


Hiitte, /. 


Choza,/ 


Hutte,cabane,/. 


Huzza, 


Heisa, int. 


Vivalt^ 


Vive! int. faire 




zurufen, v. 


vitorear, v. 


des crb, v. 


Hydrogen, 


Wasserstofl^ m. 


Hidroceno, m. 
Hidrofobia,/. 


Hydrogen, m. 


Hydrophobia, 


Wasserscheu, /. 


Hydrophobie, JL 


Hymn, 


Lobgesang, w. 


Himno, m. 


Hymne,/. 


Hypocrisy, 


Heuchelei,/. 


Hypocresia,/ 


Hypocrisie,/. 


Hypocrite, 


Heuchler, m. 


Hiprocrita, 7n. 


Hypocrite, m.f. 


Hypothesis, 


Hypothese,/. 


Hipotesis,/. 


Hypethese,/, 


Hyssoj), 


Isop, m, [den,/. Hisopo,7?».[tericc 


), Hyssope,/. 


Hysterics, 


Mutterbeschwer. Parasismo his- 


Vapeurs,/. pZ. 


I, 


Icb, 


I. 


Je. 


Ice, 


Eis, m. 


Velo, m. 


Glace,/ 


Icicle, 


Eiszapfen, m. 


Cerrion, nu 


Glagon, m. 


Isinglass, 


Hausenblase,/ 


Colpaez, m. 


Colle de poisson. 


Idea, 


Idee,/.BegriflF,w. Idea,/. 


Idfe,/ 


Identical, 


Einerlei, 


Identico, 


Identique. 


Identify, 


Indenti6ciren,[/ Identificar, 


Identifier. 


Idiom, 


Spracheigenheit, Idioma,/. 


Idiome, m. 


Idiot, 


Duramkopf, m. 


Idiota, m. 


Imbecille, m. f. 


Idle, 


Muszig, 


Ocioso, 


Pare8seux,-se. 


Idol, 


Gotzenbild, n. 


Idolo, m. 


Idole,/ 


l^ 


Wenn, wofem. 


Si, aunque. 


Si, pourvu que. 


Ignominious, 


Schimpflicb, 


Ignominioso, 


Ignominieux,-se. 


Ignorance, 


Unwissenheit,/ Ignorancia, 


Ignorance,/ 


Ignorant, 


Unwissend, 


Ignorante, 
Malo, enfermo. 


Ignorant,-e. 
Manvais,-e. 


Uebel, bose. 


Illegal, 


Gesetzwidrig, 


Ilegal, 


IDicite. 


Illegible, 


Unleserlich, 


Ilegible, 


Point lisible. 



472 



lirrEKNATIONAL DICTIOKABT. 



ILL. 


GnXAK. 


Spasuh. 


Vrskch. 


Illegitimate, 


Unehrlich, 


Uegitimo, 


Ill^getime. 


Illiterate, 


Ungelehrt, 


Indocto, 


Ignorant, rude, 
^.MaUdie,/. 


Illness, 


Bosheit,/. 


Mal,m,maldad,j 


Illumerine, 


Erleuchten, 


Iluminar, 


Illuminer. 


Illumination, 


Erleuchtung,/. 


Iluminacion,/. 


Illumination,/ 


illustrate, 


Erhellen, 


Ilustrar, 


lUustrer. 


illustration. 


Erklarung,/. 


Ilustracion,/. 


Explication,/. 


Illustrious, 


Edel, beriihmt, 


Ilustre, 


lUustre. 


Image, 


6ild,Ebenbild,7] 


.Imagen,/. 


Image, statue,/ 


Imaginary, 


Eingebildet, 


Imaginario, 


Imaginaire. 


Imagination, 


Einbildung,/. 


Imaginacion,/. 


Invagination,/ 


Imagine, 


Ersinnen, 


Imaginar, 


Ima^ner. 


Imbue, 


Eintauchen, 


Tinturar, 


Imbiber. 


I(nitatc, 


Nachahmen, 


Imitar, 


Imiter. 


Imitation, 


Nachahmung,/ 


Imitacion, /. 


Imitation,/ 


Imitator, 


Nachahmer, w. 


Imitiidor, m. 


Imitateur, m. 


Immaterial, 


Unkorperlich, 


Inmaterial, 


Immat6riel. 


Immediate,-!/ 


, Unmittelbar,a((/ 


. Immediato, adj. 


Immediat,-e, adj. 




sogleich, ado» 


&adv. 


sur r instantjflrfr. 


Immense,-itj, 


Unermcszlich,- 


Immens-o, 


IIlimitd,infinit^,/ 




keit,/. 


-idad,/. 




Immerse, 


Eintauchen, 


Sumerffir, 


Plongur. 


Immersion, 


Untertauchung/lnmei-slon, /. 


Immersion,/ 


Immigrate, 


Einwandern, 


Transmigrar, 


Iramigrer. 


Immolate, 


Opfcrn, 


Inmolar, 


Immoler. 


Immoral, 


Unsittlich, 


Depravado, 


Immoral,-e. 


Immortal, 


Unsterblich, 


Inmortal, 


Immortel,-le. 


Immovable, 


Unbeweglich, 


Inmoble, 


Immobile. 


Immutable, 


Unverandcrlich, 


Inmutable, 


Immuable. 


Imp, 


Teufelchen, n. 


Hijo, diablillo,»;i 


\. Diablotin, m. 


Impair, 


Vcrmindern, 


Empeorar, 


Altfirer. 


Impart, 


Mittheilen, 


Dar, conceder, 


Accorder. 


Impartial, 


Unparteiisch, 


Imparcial, 


Impartial,-le. 


Impatience, 


Ungeduld,/. 


Impaciencia, /. 


Impatience,/ 


Impatient, 


Ungeduldig, 


Impaciente, 


Impatient,-e. 


Impeach, 


Anklagen, 


Estorbar, 


Accuser. 


Impede, 


Verhindern, 


Empedir, 


Empecher. 


Impediment, 


Hindemisz, n. 


Impedimento,ffi. Obstacle, wi. 


Impenitent, 


Unbuszfertig, 


Impenitente, 


Impenitent,-e. 


Imperative, 


Befehlend, 


Imperativo, 


Impfiratif. 


Imperfect, 


Unvollkommen, 


Imperfecto, 


Imparfait 



INTERNATIONAL DICTIONARY. 



473 



IMP. 



ImperfectioDi 



mperial, 

mpersona), 

mpertinence, 

mpertinent, 

mpetuosity, 

inpetuous, 

mpiety, 

mpious, 

mplore, 

mply, 

mpolite, 

mport, 

mportant, 
mportation, 
m porter, 
mpose, 
mposttioD, 



mpossible, 

mpoeter, 

mpress, 

mpression, . 

mproper, 

mpropriety, 

mprove, 

mprovement, 

mprudence, 

mprudeot, 

mpudence, 

mpudent, 

mpulse,-ive, 

mpute, 

n» 

naction, 

nactivc, 

nadequate, 

nanimate, 

naugurate, 



Gbkiuii. 

UnvoUkommen- 

teit,/. 
Eaiserlich, 
UnpcrsoQlichy 
Anmaszung,/. 
Unstatthaft^ 
Ungestiim, m. 
Heftig, 

Gottlosigkeit,/. 
Gottlos, 
Anfiehen, 
Einwlckeln, 
Unhoflicby 
Inlialt, 8»m» 

einf iihren, v, 
Wichtig, 
Einfuhr,/. 
Importcur, m. 
Auflegeu, 
Auflegung,/. 



Sparuh. 



Frkhoh. 



Imperfeccion,/. Imperfection,/. 



Imperial, 

Impersonal, 

Impertinencia,/. 

Impertinente, 

Impetuosidad,/. 

Violento, 

Impiedad,/. 

Impio, 

Implorar, 

Implicar, 

Desortes, 

Tendencia, «./. 

entrar, v. 
Importante, 
Importacion,/ 
Iroportador, m. 
Iinponer, 
Imposicion,/. 



Unmdglichkeit, /Imposibilidad, /. 
Unmoglich, Impossible, 
Betriiger, m. Impostor, m. 
Eindrucken, Imprimir, 
Eindruck, m. Impresion,/. 
Unscbicklich, Impropio, 
Unpaszlichkeit,/Impropiedad, /. 
Verbessem, Mejorar, 
Verbesserung, /. Mejora, /. 
Unvoreichtigkeit Imprudencia, /. 
Unvorsichtig, Imprudente, 
Unverscbamtheit Impudencia, /. 
Unverscb&mt, Impudico, 
Antricb,{»i.)end,Impuls-o,(m)-ivo 
Zurecbncn, Imputar, 

lu, an, zu, bei, En, 
Unthathigkeit,/. Inaccion,/. ^ad, 
Untbathig, [sen, Falto de activi- 
Nicht angemes- Inadequado, 
Uubeseelt, Inanimc, 

Einweihen, Inauguracion, 

40* 



Imperial. 

Impersonncl. 

Impertinence, /. 

Impertinent. 

Impetuosite,/. 

Impltueux. 

Impietd, /. 

Impio. 

Implorer. 

Impliquer. 

Impo]i,-e. 

Importance, *./. 

importer, v, 
Important,-e. 
Importation,/. 
Iraporteur, m, 
Imposer. 
Imposition,/ 
Impossibilit6,/ 
Impossible. 
Imposteur. 
Imprimer. 
Impression,/. 
Impropre. 
Impropriete, / 
Avancer. 
Avancement, m, 
Indescrfetion, /. 
Imprudent,-e. 
Impudence, / 
Impudent,-e. 
Moti^ m. 
Imputer. 
En, dans. 
Inaction,/ 
Inactif,-ve. 
Disproportionni. 
Inanim& 
Installer, 



47i 



INTERNATIONAL DICTIONAR'i. 



INC. 

Incapable, 
Incapacity, 
Incense, 

Incentive, 

Incessant, 

Inch, 

Incident, 

Incivility, 

Inclination, 

Incline, 

Include, 

Income, 

Incommode, 

Incomparable, 

1 ncompatible, 

J nconceivable, 

] nconsistcnt. 

Inconstant, 

Incorporate, 

Incorporation, 

Incorrect, 

Incorrigible, 

Incorrupt, 

Incorruptible, 

Increase, 

Incur, 
Indebt,-ed, 
Indecent, 
Indecision, 

Indeed, 

Indelicacy, 

Indemnify, 

Indemnity, 

Indenture, 

Independence, 

Independent, 

Index, 

Indian, 



Gkrman. 

Unfahig, 
Unfahigkeit, /. 
Weihrauch, s.m, 

rauchern, v. 
Antrieb, m. 
Unaufhorlich, 
ZoU, m, 
Zufall, m. 
Unhoflichkeit,/. 
Neigung,/. 
Neigen, lenken, 
Einschlleszen, 
Einkommen. n. 
Beliistigen, 
Unvergleichlich, 
Unvertraglich, 
Unbegreiflich, 
Unvereinbar, 
Unbestandig, 
Einverleiben, 
Einverleibung,/. 
Unrichtig, 
Unbesserlich, 
Unverdorben, 
Unverweslich, 
Zunahme, «./. 

wachsen, v. 
Einfallen, 
Verpflichte-n,-t, 
Unanstiindig, 
Unentschlossen- 

heit,/. 
Wirklich, 
Unzartheit,/. 
Schadlos halten, 
Scbadloshaltung 
Vertrag, m. [/. 
Unabhangigkeit, 
Unabhangig, 
Anzeiger, m. 
Indian, {m,) -ish, 



Spakish. 

Incapaz, 
Incapacidad,/ 
Incienso, s, m. 

exasperar, v. 
Incentivo, m, 
Incesante, 
Pulgada,/. 
Incidente, m, 
Incivilidad,/. 
Inclinacion,/. 
Inclinar, 
Incluir, 
R«nta,/. 
Incomodar, 
Incomparable, 
Incompatible, 
Inconceptible, 
Inconsistente, 
Inconstante, 
Incorporar, 
Incorporacion, /• 
Defectuoso, 
Incorregible, 
Incorrupto, 
Incorruptible, 
Aumento, s, m. 

acrecentar, v, 
Incurrir, [do, 
Obligar, adeuda- 
Indecente, 
Indecision,/. 



Frxnch. 

Incapable. 
Incapacity,/. 
Encens, s, m. 

in iter, v, [itl 
Aiguillon, motif, 
Incessant,-e. 
Pouce, m. 
Incident, m, 
Incivilit6, / 
Inclination,/ 
Inclinir. 
Comprendre. 
Revenu, m. 
Incommoder. 
Incomparable. 
Incompatible. 
Inconcevable. 
Inconsequent 
Volage. 
Incorporer. 
Incorporation, / 
Incorrect 
Incorrigible. 
Pur,-e. 
Incurruptible. 
Augmentation, 
«./ croltre, v. 
Encourir. 
Endett-er,-e. 
Indecent,-^. 
Indecision,/ 



Verdaderamente En veritfe. 
Groseria, / Indelicatesse, / 

Indemnizar, Indemniser. 
Indemnidad,[da, Indemnity,/ 
Escritura denta- Contrat, m. 
Independencia,/ Independance, / 
Independente, Independant,-e. 
Indice, m. Index, m. 

Indian, m. china, Indien,(nt.)-ne. 



INTERNATIONAL DICTIONARY. 



475 



Indicate, 

Indifferent^ 

Indigestion, 

Indignation, 

Indigo, - 

Indiscreet, 

liuiisputable, 

Individual, 

Ifidividually, 

Individuality, 

Induce, 

Indulge, 

Indulgence, 

Industrious, 

Industry, 

Inevitable, 

Infamous, 

Infant, 

Infect, 

Infer, 

Inferior, 

Infernal^ 

Infest, 

Infidel, 

Infinite, 

Infirm, 

Inflame, 

Inflammation, 

Inflict, 

Inform, 

Information, 

Ingenious, 

Ingenuity, 

Ingenuous, 

Ingratitude, 

Inhabit, 

Inherit, 

Inheritance, 

Inhuman, 



OXILXAN. 

Anzeigen, 

Gleichgultig, 

Unverdaulich- 

keit,/ 
Unwille, m. 
Indigo, m. 
Unbedachtsam, 
Unstreitig, 
Individuum, m, 
Personlich, 
Einzelheit,/. 
Lei ten, 

Befriedigen, v. 
Befriedigung,/. 
Fl(;iszig, 
Fleisz, m. 
Unvermeidlich, 
Ehrlos, 
Kind, n. 
Anstecken, 
Herbeifiihren, 
Untergebene, s. 
m,f. unter, adj, 
Hollisch, 
Beunruhigen, 
Unglaubige, m. 
Unendlich, 
Kranklich, 
Anzunden, 
Entziindung,/ 
Zufiigen, 
Unterrichten, 
Unterricht, m. 
Sinnreich, 
Scharfsinn, m. 
Freimuthig, 



Spaiobh. 

Indicar, 

Indiferente, 

Indigestion,/. 

Indignacion, / 
Indigo, m, 
Indiscreto, 
Indisputable, 
Individuo, m. 
Individual, 



F&WCH. 

Indiquer. 

Indifferent, 

Indigestion,/. 

Indignation,/. 
Indigo, m. 
Indiscret,-e. 
Indisputable. 
Individu, m. 
Individ uel,-le. 



Indi vidualidad, /Individuality, /. 



Inducir, 
Favorecer, v. 
Ihdulgencia,/. 
Industrioso, 
Industria, /. 
Inevitable, 
In fame. 
Infante, m. 
Infectar, 
Iriferir, 
Inferior, s, m, 

<k adj. 
Infernal, . 
Infestar, 
Infia, a. 
Infinito, 
Enfermo, 
Inflamar, 
Inflamacion,/ 
Castigar, 
Informar, 
Informacion,/. 
Ingenioso, 
Ingeniosidad,/ 
Ingenuo, 



Undankbarkeit,/ Ingratitud, /. 
Bewohnen, Habitar, 

Erben, Heredar, 

Erbrecht, 71. Herencia,/ 
Unmenschlich, Inhuman©, 



Persuader, v. 

Tolerer, v. 

Indulgence,/ 

Industrieux,-se. 

Industrie,/ 

Inevitable. 

Inf&mc. 

Infant, m./ 

Infecter. 

Inferer. 

Inferieur,-e, 8. m. 

/ & adj. 
Infernal,- e. 
Infester. 
Infidele, m, / 
Infini,-e. 
Faible, infirme. 
Enflammer. 
Inflammation,/ 
Infligir. 
Informer. 
Information, / 
Ingenieux,-se. 
Esprit, m. 
Ingenu,-e, franr 
Ingratitude,/ 
Habiter. 
H^riter. 
Heritage, m, 
Inhumain,-e. 



476 



nrrKENATIONAl DIOnONARY. 



INI. 


OttSMJLS. 


Spawiss. 


Frbxcq. 


Iniquity, 


Sunde, Bosheit^^Injusticia, /. 


IniquitS,/ 


Initial, 


Anfanglich, 


Inicial, 


Initial,-e. 


Initiate, 


EinfQhren, 


Iniciar, 


Initier. 


Injection, 


Eingebung,/. 
Verletzen, 


Inyeccion,/. 


Injection,/ 


Injure, 


Injuriar, 


Nuire L 


Injuiy, 
Ink, 


Nachtheil, m. 


Injuria,/ 


Dommage, m. 
Encre,/ 


Dinte,/. 


Tinta,/ 


Inn, 


Wirthshaus, n. 


Posada, / 


H6tellerie,/ 


Innocen-ce,-ti 


Anschuld,(/)-ig, Inocen-cia,(/)- 


te Innocen,-ce/ -t. 


Inquest, 


Nachforschung/Inquisicion, /. 


Enqu6tc,/ 


Inquire, 


Erkundigen, 


Inquirir, 


Demande. 


Insane, 


Uusinnnig, 


Insano, 


Fou, foUe. 


. Insect, 


Insect, n. 


Insecto, m. 


Insecte, nu 


Insert, 


Einschalten, 


Insenr, 


Insurer. 


Insight, 


Einsicht,/. 


Conocimiento,TO, Connaissance,/ 


Insignificant, 


Unbedeutend, 


Frivolo, 


Insignificiant,-e. 


Insinuate, 


Beibringen, 


Insinuar, 


Insinuar. 


Insist, 


Stehen, 


Insistir, 


Pcrsister. 


Insolence,-t, 


Trotz,(m.)-ig, 


Insolen-cia(/)- 


te Insolen,-ce,(/)-t. 


Inspect, 


Besichtigen,. 


Reconocer, 


Inspecter. 


Inspire, 


Einathmen, 


Inspirar, 


Inspirer. 


Instance, 


Ansuchen, n. 


Instancia, / 


Instance,/ 


Instant, 


Augenblick, m. 


Instante, m. 


Instant, ttl 


Instead, 


Statt< 


In lugar de, 


Au lieu de. 


Instinct, 


Nasurtrieb, m. 


Instinto, m. 


Instinct, m. 


Institute, 


Gesetz, s. n. 


Institute, 8, m. 


Institut, «• m. 




einsetzen, v. 


instituir, v. 


instituer, v. 


Institution, 


Verordnung,/. 


Institucion,/ 


Institution,/ 


Instruct, 


Unterrichten, 


Instruir, 


Instruire. 


Instrument, 


Werkzeug, 


Instrumento, m 


. Instrument, m. 


Insult, 


Beleidigung, «./. Insulto, 8, m. 


Insulte, «./ 




verspotten, v. 


insultar, v. 


insulter, v. 


Insure, 


Versichern, 


Asegurar, 


Assurer. 


Intellect,-ual, 


yei'Stand,(m)-ig, Entendimiento,^. Intellect,(m)-uel. 






m. intelecto,a(( 


f. 


Intend, 


Ausstrecken, 


Intentar, 


Proposer. 


Intense, 


Gespannt, 
Starke,/ 


Intenso, 


Intense. 


Intensity, 


Exceso, m. 


Intensity / 


Intention, 


Spannung,/ 


Intencion,/ 


Dessein, m. 


Interest, 


Interesse, *. n. 


Interfe, s, m. 


Int^r^t, *. nK 




betheiligen, v 


interesar, v. 


int^resser, v. 



UrrKBMATIONAL OIOTIONABT. 



m 



INT. 


OEascAN. 


SPAinsB. 


Frencb. 


Interesting, 


Anziehend, 


Interesant, 


Intercssant,-e. 


Interfere, 


Sich streifen, 


Entremeterse, 


S'interposer. 


Interior, 


Innerlich,[kunft, Interior, 


Interieur,-e. 


Interjection, 


Dazwischen- 


Inteijeccion,/. 


Interjection,/. 


Intermission, 


Unterlassung,/ 


! Intermision, /. 


Intermission,/ 


Interrupt, 
Interval, 


Trcnnen, 


Rumpido, 


Int^rrompre. 


Zwishenraum, ni 


t. Intervalo, m. 


Tnter\'alle, m. 


Interveiw, 


Zusammenkunft, Vista formal, /. 


Entrevue,/. 


Intimate, 


Innere(w[/j5uvei 


-Intimo, adj. 


Intime, adj. 




stehen geben,t 


K insinuar, v. 


in timer, v. 


Into, 


Hinem, 


Dentro, 


Dans, entre. 


Intoxicate, 


Berauschen, 


Embriagar, 


Enivrer. 


Intrepid, 


Unerschrocken, 


Intr^pido, 


Intrepide. 


Intricate, 


Verworren, 


Intrincado, 


Embarrass6,-e. 


Intrigue, 


Verwickelung,/. Manejo, m. 


Intrigue,/. 


Introduce, 


Einfiihren, 


Introducir, 


Introduire. 


Intrude, 


Eindringen, 


Introducirse, 


So fourrer. 


Invade, 


Einfallen, 


Invadir, 


Enviihir. 


Invalid, 


Invalide, s. m. 


Invalido, 5. m* 


Envalide, s. m. 




kraftlos, adj. 


& adj. 


&; adj. 


Invent,-ion, 


Erfind-en,-ung,/Invent,-ar,-o, m. 


Invent-er,-ion,/ 


Inviolate, 


Unverletzt, 


Inviolado, 


Inviole,-e. 


Invisible, 


Unsichtbar, 


Invisible, 


Invisible. 


Invitation, 


Einladung,/ 


Convite, m. 


Invitiition, / 


Iron, 


Fessel,/.' 


Hierro, m. 


Fer, m. 


Iron}', 


Spottrede,/. 


Ironia,/. 


Ironie,/ 


Irresistible, 


Unwiderstehlich, Irresistible, 


Irr&istible. 


Irritable, 


Reizen, 


Irritar, 


Irriter. 


Island, 


Insel,/ 


Isla,/. 


Ile,ile,/ 


Issue, 


Ausgang, «. m. 


Salida, s.f. 


Issue, «./ 




auslaufen, v. 


salir, V. 


sortir, v. 


Isthmus, 


Erdenge, /. 


Istmo, 


Isthme, m. 


It, 


Es, 


Ello, lo, 


Le, ce, il, cllc. 


Itch, 


Kratze, «./. 


Sarna, «./. 


Gale, 5./ 




jucken, v. 


picar, V. 


d^maoger, v 


luelf. 


Selbst, sich. 


Mismo, 


Soim6me. 


Ivory, • 


Elfenbein, n. 


Marfil, m. 


Ivoire, m. 


Ivy, 


Epheu, m. 


Yedra,/. 


Lierre, m. 


Jabber, 


Plaudern, 


J. 

Charlar, 


Jabotter. 



478 



INTERNATIONAL DIOTIONABT. 



JAC. 

Jacket, 
Jail, 

Januaiy, 
Jar, 

Jaundice, 
Jaw, jaws, 
Jealous, 
Jelly, 
Jest, 

Jewel, 
Job, 
Join, 
Joint, 

Jolly, 
Jolt, 

Journal, 
Journey, 
Joy, 
Judge, 

Judgment, 

Jug, 

July, 

Jump, 

Jline, 

Jury, 

Just, 

Justice, 

Justify, 

Juvenile, 



Gkrmah. 

Jacke,/. 
Gefangniss, n. 
Januar, m. 
Knarren, 8, n. 

klappem, v, 
Gelbsucht,/. 
Einnbacken, m, 
EifersUchtig, 
Gallerte,/ 
Spass, 8. m, 

spassen, v. 
Juwele,/. 
Arbeit,/. 
Verbinden, 
Gelenk, «. n. 
verbunden,a((^'. 
Frohlicb, 
Stoss, 8. m. 

stossen, v. 
Tagebuch, n. 
Reise,/. 
Freude,/. 
Bicbter, 8, m. 

ricbten, v. 
Gcricbt,n. 
Krug, rfi» 
Julius, nu 
Springen, 
Junius, m» 
Gescbwomen,m. 
Gericht, eben, 
Gerecbti^keit,/. 
Hecbtfertigen, 
Ju endlicb, 



Spahish. 

Xaqueta, /. 
Carcel,/ 
Enero, nu 
Jarro, 8. m. 

refiir, v. 
Ictericia,/. 
Quixada,/. 
Zeloso, 
Jalea,/. 
Obanze, 8./. 

bufonearse, v. 



Jaquette,/. 
Prison,/. 
Janvier, m 
Cboc, 9. m 

d6tonner, v. 
Jaunisse, /. [/. 
M&cboire,boacbe 
Jaloux,-se. 
Gel6e,/. 
Bon mot, «. m, 

badiner, v. 



Piedra preciosa/ Bijou,-x, m. 
Negozuclo, m. Petit ouvrage,m. 
Juntar, Joindre. 

Gozne, s. m, par- Jdnture, *./. 
ticipante, adj, commun,-e,a4p- 



Alegre, 


Plaisant,-e. 


Traqueo, 8, m. 


Cabot, 8. m. 


traquear, v. 


caboter, v. 


Diario, m. 


Joumal,-aux, m. 


Jornada,/. 


Voyage, m. 


Alegria,/. 


Joie,/ plai8ir,«k 


Juez, 8, m. 


Juge, 8. m. 


juzgar, V. 


juger, V. 


Juicio, VL 


Jugement, m. 


Jarro, f». 


Broc,m.crucbe,/ 


Julio, m. 


Juillet, m. 


Saltar, 


Sauter. 


JuniOjfTi. rdo8,»! 
Junta(/)dejura 


kJuin, m. 


- Jur6s, m. pL 


Justo, 


Juste, justement 


Justicia,/ 


Justice,/ 


Justificar, 


Justifier. 


Juvenil, 


Jeune. 



Keel, 
Keen, 
Keep, 
Keeper, 



Kiel, Kegel, tn. 
Scbarf, strenge, 
Halten, 
Aufseber, m. 



Quilla,/ Quille,/ 

Afilado, agudo^ Aigu,-e. 

Tencr, cuidar, Tenir, retiner. 

Tenedor, m. Garde, ra. 



INTEENATIONAL DIOTIONABT. 



479 



KSQ. 

Keg, 

Kernel, 

Kettle, 

Key, 

Kick, 

Kid, 

Kidnap, 

Kidney, 

KiU, 

Kiln, 

Kin, 

Kind, 

Kindnesa, 
King, 
Kingdom, 
Kiss, 

Kitchen, 

Knacl[, 

Knave, 

Knead, 

Knee, 

Knife, 

Knit, 

Knob, 

Knock, 

Knot, 

Know, 



OsRMAir. Spasuii. 

Fasscben, n. Barrica,/. 
Kern,m.Drase,/AJmendra,/, 

Kessel, fn. Caldera,/. 

Schliissel, m. Llave, clave,/. 

Fusstritt, 9, m, Puntapie, 8, m. 

treten, v. patear, v, 

Ziegenlamm, n. Cabrito, m. 

Steblen, Hurtar nilios, 

Niere, /. Ri&on, m, 

Todten, Martar, 

Ofen, m. Horno> m. 
Verwandscbaft/Conexion, /. 

Art, s,f, Genero, *. m. 

giitig, adj. benevolo, cuij, 

Gtitigkeit,/. Benevolencia,/. 

Konig, m. Bey, m. 

Konigreicb, n: Beyno, m. 



Koss, 8.nu 
klissen, v. 
Kticbe,/. 
Handgrifi^ fn. 



Beso, 8, m. 
besar, v. 
Cocina,/. 
Cbuckeria,/. 



Bube, Schelmm. Bribon, m. 



Kneten, 
Knie, n. 
Messer, n. 
Stricken, 
Knopf, m, 
Klopfen, 



Amasar, 
Bodila, cnrva,/! 
Cuchillo, m, 
Enlazar, 
Prominencia,/, 
Colidir, tocar, 



Knoten, Ast, m. Nudo, lazo, m. 
Wissen, kennen, Conocer, 



Fbxrcb. 

Caque,/. [/. 
Amande, graine, 
Chaudiere, /. 
Clef,/ quai, m. 
Ruade, *. / 

ruer, v, 
Chevreaii,-x, m. 
Enlever, voler. 
Rognon, m. 
Tuer. [x, m. 
Four, fourneau,- 
Alli6,-e,.m./ 
Genre, 8, m. 

bon, adj, 
Bont6,/ 
Roi, m. 
Royaume, m. 
Baiser, 8. m. 

&v. 
Cuisine,/ 
Adresse,/ 
Frifon, m. 
Petrir. 
Genoii,-x, m. 
Couteau,-x, m, 
Tricoter, lier, 
Bosse, / 
Frapper. 
Noeud, m. [tre. 
Savoir, Connal- 



Label, 
Labor, 

Lace, 

Lack, 

Lad, 



Zettel, m, 
Arbeit, »./ 

arbeiten, v. 
Schnnr, 8,f, 

schnuren, v. 
Mangel, 8, m, 

bedlirfen, v. 



Esquela,/ 
Trabajo, labor, 

8, m, trabajar, v, 
Lazo, 8. m, 

abrochar, v, 
Falta,*./ . 

carecer, v. 



Knabe, Junge nu Mozallon, m. 



Ecriteau,-x, m. 
Travail, 8, m. 

travailler, v, 
Lacet,s.m.lacer,v 

Besoin, 8, m. 

manqner de, v 
Gar^on, m. 



4S0 



nn^BNATIONAL DICTIONARY. 



LAD. 

Ladder, 

Lady, 

Lamb, 

Lame, 

Lament, 

Lamp, 

Lance, 

Land, 

Landlord, 

Landscape, 

Language, 

Lantern, 

Lap, 

Lapse, 

Lard, 

Large, 

Lark, 

Lash, 



Last, 
Latch, 

Late, 

Latent, 
Lath, 

Lathe, 
Latin, 

Laugh, 

Launch, 

Laurel, 

Law, 

Lawn, 

Lawyer, 

Lay, 



German. 

Leiter, /. 
Dame,/. 
Lamm, n. 
Lahm, 
Wehklage, s,f. 

klagen, v, 
Lampe,/. [nen, v. 
Lanze, »./. stech- 
Land, 

Gutsbesitzer, m. 
Landschaft, /. 
Sprache, / 
Lanterne, / 
Lappechen, n. 
Fall, Verfall, m. 
Speck, m. 
Grass, weit, 
Lerche, /. 
Hieb, «. m. 

pcitschen, v, 
Madschen, n. 
Leisten,s.m.[ad;. 
wahren,t;.letzte, 
Klinke, s.f. 

zuklinken, v. 
Spat, letzt, 
Verborgen, 
Latte, 8.f, mit [v. 
Latten versehen, 
Drechselbank, /. 
Latein, s. n. 

lateinisch, adj. 
Lachen, s. n. 

verlachen, v. 
Fortlassen, 
Lorbeer, m. 
Gesetz, Recht, n, 
Grasplatz, m, 
Ilechtgelehrte,wi 
Lage,«/.legen,v. 



Spakish. 

Escala,/. 
Sefiora, ledi,/. 
Cordero, m, 
Lisiado, 
Lamento, s. m, 

lamentar, i;. 
Lampara/[trar,v 
Lanza,*./, pene- 
Terreno, pais, m, 
Hu^sped, m. 
Pais, region, w. 
Lengna,/. 
Linterna, /. 
Faldas,/.jp/. 
Caida,/ [puerco, 
Manteca (/.) de 
Grande, ancho, 
Alondra,/. 
Latigazo, 8, m. 

azotar, v, 
Doncella, /. 
Horma, a./, du- 
rar v.ultimo adj, 
Aldeba, s,/. cer- 
rarconaldebav. 
Tardio, tarde, 
Escondido, 
Lata,/ liston a.m, 
, ponar listas, v. 
Torno, m. [adj.- 
Latin, 9. m. latino, 



Fkbxch. 

Echelle,/ [/. 
Dame,demoiselle 
Agneau,-x, 9n. 
Estropic, 
Plainte, s.f, 

lamentre, v. 
Lampe,/ [v. 
Lance,/».percer 
Terre,/pays, m. 
Proprietaire, m. 
Paysage, m. [m. 
Langue/langage 
Lanterne, / 
Giron m. \m. 
Laps 6coulement 
Lard, m. 
Large, grand, 
Alouette/[terv. 
Coup«.w. fouet- 

Fillette, / 
Laste, s. m. durer 

V. dernier, adj, 
Loquet, s. m, 

fermer, v, 
Tard,-e, lent,-e. 
Cache,-e, secret 
Latter/, latter V. 

Tour, rru \adj. 
Latin, «.m. latino 



Lavadero, s. m, Ris, *. m. rire, v 

mofar, v. 
Botar al agua, 
Laurel guindo,m. 
Ley, /derecho,»i 
Linon, prado, m. 
Abogado, m. 
Lechos, 8. m. 



poner, 



S'elancer, lancer. 
Laurier, m. 
Loi,/ droit, m. 
Plaine,/Jinon,f». 
Avocat, m. [«./ 
Gouche,chanson, 
pondre, v. 



INTERNATIONAL DICTIONAKT. 



481 



LAZ. 


Qkemax. 


Lazy, 


Faul, langsam, 


Lead, 


Blei, 9,Tu leiten,v. 


Leaf; 


Blalt, n. 


League, 


Bundniss, *. n. 




verbinden, v. 


Leak, 


Spalte, s.f. 




dui-chlassen, v. 


Lean, 


Mager, adj. 




lehnen, v. 


Leap, 


Sprung, 8, m. 




springen, v. 


Learn, 


Lernen, 


Lease, 


Pachtzeit,*./. 




verpachten, v. 


Least, 


Kleinste, adj. 




Atom, 8. m. 


Leather, 


Leder, n. 


Leave, 


Abschied, 8. m. 




lassen, v. 


Lecture, 


Lesen, «. n. 




unterrichten, v. 


Ledger, 


Hauptbuch, n. 


Left, 


Link, 


Leg. 


Bein, n. Keule,/. 


Legacy, 


Vermachtniss, n. 


Legislature, 


Qesetzgebende 




Macht,/. 


Lemon, 


Limonie,/. 


Lend, 


Leihen, borgen. 


Length, 


Lange, Dauer,/. 


Lent, 


Fastenzeit,/. 


Leopard, 


Leopard, m. 


Less, 


Kleiner, 


Lesson, 


Lehre,/. Text,w. 


Let, 


Lassen, 


Letter, 


Schrift,/.Brief,m. 


Lettuce, 


LaUish, m. 


Level, 


Flache, *./. 




gleich, adj. 
Hebel, m. 


Lever, 




41 



Spaxish. 

Perezoso, tardo, 
Plomo, 8. m. 

conducir, v. 
Hoja,/. 
Liga, *./. 

confederarse,v. 
Obertura, *./. 

derramarse, v, 
Magro, adj. 

luclinarse, v. 
Sal to, 8. m. 

sal tar, v. 
Aprender, [t.m. 
Arreudimiento, 

arrondar, v. 
Miniomo, 8. m. 

& adj. 
Cuero, w. 
Licencia, «./. 

dexar, v. 
Discurso, s, m. 

instruir, v. 
Libro, mayor, m. 
Siniestro, 
Piernay. pie, m. 
Legado, iru 
Legisladura,/. 

Limon, tn, 
Prestar, 
Longitud,/. 
Quaresma, /. 
Leopardo, m. 
Menor,menos, m. 
Leccion,/. 
Conceder, dexar, 
Letra, carta,/. 
Lechuga,/. 
Llano, s. m. 
igualar, v. 
Palanca, /. 



Fkbxcel 

Paresseux,-se. 
Plombe, 8. m. 

guider, v, 
Feuille,/. 
Ligue, 8. f. 

se liguer, v. 
Fente, 8.f. 

s'ecouler, v. 
Maigre, adj. 

s'appuyer, v. 
Saut, 8. m. 

saillir, v. 
Apprendre. 
Bail, 8. m. 

louer, V. 
Moindre, moins, 

8. m. ^ adj. 
Cuir,wi.peau,-x^. 
Cong6, 8. w. 
.quitter, v. 
Lecture, 8,f, 
instruire, v. \m, 
Livre de compte. 
Gauche. 
Jambe, /. 
Legs, m. 
Leijislature, /. 

Limon, tn. 
Pr6ter. 

Longuer,dur6e,/. 
Car6me, m. 
Leopard, m. 
Moins, m, 
Le^on,/ 
Louer, laisser. 
Lettre,/. 
Laitue, /. 
Niveau,-!, 8. m. 

aplanir, v. 
L6Yier,m.barre/. 



482 



INTEENATIONAL DICTIONARY. 



GsBXAir. 
Lligner, m. 
Freiheit,/. 
Bibliothek,/. 
Erlaubniss, s./. 

gestatten, v. 
Schlag, 8, m, 

lecken, v. 
Deckel, wi. 
Lauge, Luge, s.f. 

liigen, v. 
Liegen, schlafen, 
Leben, n. 
Heben, s, n. 

aufheben, v. 
Licht,«7i.loschen, 

v.Licbt, adj. 
Light,of weight Leicht, hurtig, 



LIA. 

Liar, 
Liberty, 
Library, 
License, 

Lick, 

Lid, 

Lie, (falsely,) 

Lie, (down,) 

Life, 
Lift, 

Light, 



Like, 

Likeness, 

Lily, 

Limb, 

Lime, 

Limit, 

Line, 

linen, 

Lion, 

Lip, 

Liquid, 

Listen, 

Literature, 

Little, 

Live, 

Lo! 

Load, 



Gefallen, v. 

gleich, adj. 
-Gleichniss, n. 
Lilie,/. 

Qlie(l,n.Rand,m. 
Leim, Kalb, m. 
Grenze, *./. 

begrenzen, v. 
Linie, s.f. 

liniren, v. 
Leinwand, 8. f. 

leinen, adj. 
Lowe, m, 
Lippe,/. 
Fliissigkeit, 8./. 

fliissig, adj. 
Lauschen, 
Literatur, /, 
Weinigkeit, «./. 

wenig, adj. 
Leben, wohnen, 
Siehe 1 
Ladung, 8./. 

laden, v. 



Spasisb. 

Embustero, m. 
Libertad,/. 
Libreria,/. 
Licensia, 8./. 
*licenciar, v. 
Chupa, *./. 

lamar, v. [m. 
Tapa,/. parpado, 
Mentira, 8. /. 

mentir, v. 
Consistir, 
Vida,/. 
Alzamiento, 8,m 

alzar, v. 
Luz, «./. enccn- 
dar,v. claro, adj, 
Ligero, leve, 
Gustar, v. 

semejante, adj, 
Semejanza,/. 
Lirio, 

Miembro, m. 
Cal, m. 
Lf mite, 8. m, 

limitar, v, 
Linea, *./. for- 

rar, v. 
lienzo, lino, 8M, 

de lienzo, €uij. 
Leon, m, 
Labio, tn. 
Licor, *. fw. 

liquido, adj. 
Escuchar, 
Literatura,/. 
Poso, 8. m. 

escaso, adj. 
Vivir, subfiistir, 
H£aqu(l 
Carga, *./. 

cargar, v. 



Menteur,-se,m;/I 
Libert^/. 
Bibliotheque,/. 
License, «./ 

autoriser, v. 
Coup, 8. m. 

lecher, v. 
Couvercle, m. 
Mensonge, s, m. 

mentir, v. 
RecUner,coucher. 
Vie, existence,/. 
Effort, *. m. 

6Iever, v, 
Lumiere,»./.allu- 
mer,v. clair,<u^'. 
Leger,-e. 
Aimer, v. 

semblable, adj. 
Ressemblance,/. 
Lis, m. 
Membre, m. 
Chaux,/. 
Borne, 8. f. 

limiter, t^. 
Ligne, «./. 

doubler, v. 
Toile, 8./. 

de linge, adj. 
Lion, fTk 
Levre,/. 
Liqueur,*./. 

liquidc, adj. 
Ecouter. 
Littirature,/. 
Peu, 8. m. 

petit,-te, adj. 
Vivre, demeurer. 
Void! voil^l 
Fardeau,-r, 8.nL 

charger, v. 



INTEBKATIOKAI, DICTIONABT. 



483 



LOA. OXRMAK. SPA5ISH. 

Loaf, (Bread,) Laib,m.Broad,ff», Pan, m. 
Loan, Darleben, ». Pr&tarmo, m. 

Local, Oertlich, Local, 

Lock, Schloss, *. n. *Cerraja, *./. 

verwickeln, v. cerrar, v. 
Locket, Schlosschen, m. Broche, m. 

Locust, Heuschrecke,/. Langosta,/. 

Lodge, Loge, *. / 

wohnen, v. 
Log, Klotz, m. 

Logic, Logick,/. 

Loin, Lende,/. 

Loiter, Zaudem, 

Lone,-ly, Einsam, 

Long, Verlangen, v, 

lang, adj. 
Longitude, Lange,/. 
Loo^ Blick, «. m. 

sehen, v. 
Loop, / Schlinge, «./. 

* schniiren, v. 
Loose, |Los, locker. 

Loosen, fl^machen, 

Ijord, FHerr, Lord, m. 

Lose, Verspielen, 

Loss, Verlust, nu 

Lot, Loos, n. 

Loud,-ly, Laut, 

Love, Liebe, «./. 

lieben,v. \adj 



Low, 

Luck, 

Lumber, 

Lump, 

Lunatic, 

Lungs, 

Luscious,-ly, 

Lust^ 

Lustre, 
Lye, 



Alogimiento,«.m. 

alogar, v, 
LeHo, m, 
Logica,/ 
Lomo, f». 
Haraganear, 
Solitario, 
Antojarse, v, 
largo, adj, 
Longitud,/. 
Aspecto,9. m. 

mirar, v. 
Ojal, 5. fw. 
parar, v. 
Suelto, floxo, 
Desunirse, 
SeSor, Dios, m. 
Perder, 
Pferdida,/. 
Suerte, lote, 
Ruidoso, 
Amor, s. m. 
amar, v, 
Brullen,v.niedrig Mugir,v.baxo,a(9, 
QlUck, n. Acaso, 8uceso,m. 

Geriill, n. Armotaste, m. 

Klumpen, m. Pedazo, m, 
Mondsiicbtige,m. Lunatico, [m.pl. 
Lunge,/. Bofes, pulmones, 

Ueberstiss, Meloso, delicioso, 

Lust, 8.f. Deseo, m, 

begebren, v, 



Glanz, m, 
Lauge,/. 



gustar, V, 
Lustro, m, 
Lexia, /. 



Pain, m, 
Pr6t, m, 
LocaJ[,-e. 
Serrure, 8./, 

fermer, v. 
Agrafe,/. 
Sauterelle,/. 
Loge, 8./. 

loger, V. 
Bdche,/ 
Logique,/ 
Longe, queue,/. 
Tarder. 
Solitaire. 
D&irer, v» 

long,-ne, adj. 
Longitude,/. 
Regard, s, m. 

regarder, v, 
Ganse, »./. 

fermer, v. 
L&ohe. 

D61ier, d^tacter. 
Seigneur, m. 
Perdre. 
Perte, /. 
Lot, sorte, m, ^' 
Haut, 
Amour, s, m, 

aimer, v. « 
Mugir,v.bas,a(§'. 
Hasard, m. 
Gros bagage, m. 
Morceau,-x, m. 
Lunatique, m, 
Poumons, m.pL 
Doux,-ce. 
Convoitise, «./ 

convoiter, v. 
Lustre, iolat, m. 
Lessive,/. 



484 



INTERNATIONAL DIOTIONABT. 



MAO. 



Machine, 

Machinist, 

Mad,-Iy, 

Madam, 

Madder, 

Magazine, 

Magic,-al,-ly, 

Magistrate, 

Magnanimous, 

Magnet,-ism, 

Magnificence, 

Magnify, 

Mahogany, 

Maid, 

Mail, 

Maim, 
Main, 

Majesty, 
Major, 

Majority, 
Make, 
Maker, 
Malady, 

Male, 

Malice, 
Mall, 

Malt, 

Mamma, 

Man, 

Manage, 

Manager, 

Mane, 

Manger, 



Q2SMAX. 



Bpj 



M. 



Maschine, /. 
Mechaniker, m. 
Wahnsinnig, 
Madam, /. 
Krapp, 171. 
Magazin, n. 
ZauberkuDst,^./. 

magisch, adj. 
Obrigkeit,/. 
Grossmiithig, 
Magnet,-ismus,m 
Grosse,Pracht,/. 
Vergrossern, 
Mahagonyholz,TO 
Jungfer,/. 
Panzer, 8. m. 

bepanzern, v, 
Verstiimraeln, 
Haupttheil, 8, m. 
vornehmste,a4/. 
Majestat,/ 
Major, s, m. 

grosser, adj, 
Melirheit,/. 
Machen, 
Verfertiger, w. 
Krankheit, /. 
Mannoben, «. p^ 

mannlich, adj, 
Bosheit, /. 
Schlag, 8, m. 

schlagen, v. 
Malz, n. 
Mamma,/. 
Mensch,Mann,m. 
Verwalten, 
Verwalter, m. 
Mahne,/ 
Krippe,/. 



Maquina, /. 
M^quinista, m. 
Distraido, loco, 
Sefiora,Madama, 
Rubia, /. 
Magacen, m, 
Magia, «./. 

magico, adj. 
Magistrado, m. 
Magnanimo, 
Piedra iman,/. 
Magnificencia,/. 
Magnificar, 
Caoba, 
Doncella, /. 
Mala, s.jf. 

mallar, v. 
Mutilar, 
Oceano, 8. m. 

mayor, adj. 
Magestad, /. 
Sargento mayor, 
s,m, mayor, adj. 
Pluralidad,/. 
Hacer, fabricar, 
Hacedor, m. 
Enfermedad, /. 
Macho, 8. m. 

masculino, adj. 
Malicia, /. 
Mallo, 8. m. 

palearjV. [da,/ 
Cebada prepara- 
Mama,/ [m. 
Hombre, criaclo, 
Manejar, 
Adminisirador,m 
Grin, clin,/ 
Pesebre, m. 



Suxaoom 



Machine, / 
Machiniste, m. 
Furieux,-se. 
Madame, / 
Garance,/. 
Magasin, m. 
Magie, «./. 

magique, adj. 
Magistral, m. 
Magnanime. 
Aimant, 8. m. 
Magnificence, /. 
Exagerer. 
Acajou,-x, m. 
Fille, vierge,/ 
Malle, poste, s.f. 

armar,poster,v. 
Miitiler, eslopier. 
Ocean, j. m. 

principal, adj. 
Mijestc,/ 
Mi^or, 8, m. 

plus grand,a<(/. 
Majorite,/ 
Faire, produire. 
False ur, m. 
Maladie, / 
Male, 8. 77k 

& adj. 
Malice, / 
Mail let, 8. m. 

battre, v. 
Dreche./ 
Maman,/ [m, 
Homme, servant. 
Manager. 
Dirccteur, m. 
Criniere,/ 
Mangeoire, m. 



DrrBKNATIONAL DIOTIONABY, 



485 



MAN. 

Manhood, 
Manifeet, 

Mankind, 

Manner, 
Mantle, 

Manu&ctarer, 
Manufacture, 

Manufactory, 
Manure, 

Manuscript, 

Many, 

Map, 

Mar, 

Marble, 

March, 

Mare, 

Margin, 

Marine, 

Mark, 

Market, 

Marriage, 

Marrow, 

Marry, 

Marsh, 

Marshal, 

Martyr, 

Marvel, 



Menschheit, / 
Ofifenbaren, v, 

offenbar, adj 
Menschenge- 

schlecht, n. 
Art, Manier,/. 
Tauftucb, «. n. 

bedecken, v. 
Anfuhrer, m, 
Fabricat, s, n. 

verfertigen, v. 
Manufactur,/. 
Diinger, *. m» 

anbauen, v. 
Handschrift,/. 
Viele, mancher, 
Landkarte, «./. 

zeichnen, v. 
Flecken, s, m. 

verderben, v. 
Marmor, s, m. 

marmom, adj, 
Marz,Mar8ch,£m. 

marscbiren, v. 
Stute,/. Alp,»*. 
Rand, m. 
Seesoldat, 9. m, 
zurSee gehorig,a 
Marke, *./. 

merken, v. 
Markt, Handei,m 
£he, Heirath,/. 
Fett, Mark, tu 
Heirathen, 
Moras t, Sumpf,m. 
Marschall, 8. m. 

ordnen, v, 
Martyrer, 8. m. 

qu&len, v. 
Wunder, *. n. 
fiicb wundern,!;. 

41 



Bpavxsh. 
Masculinidad,/. 
Manifesto, cuij, 

manifestar, t^. 
JEl genero hu- 

mano, m. [m. 
Manera,/. modo, 
Manto, a, m. 

cubrir, V, 
Artesano, m. 
Manufactura, «/. 

fabricar, v. 
Fabrica,/ 
Abono, 8, m. 

abonar, v, 
Manuscrito, m. 
Mucho, 
Mapa, «./. 

delinear, v. 
Mancha, <./. 

injuriar, v. 
Marmol, 8. m. 

marmdreo, <idj, 
Marzo, 8. m, 

marchar, v. 
Yegua,/. 
Margen, m, 
Marina, <./. 

marino, adj. 
Marca, *./. 

marcar, v, 
Mercado, m, 
Maridage, m. 
Tuetano, m, 
Casarse^ 
Pantano, m. 
Mariscal, 8, m. 

ordenar, v. 
Martir, 8. m. 

martirizar, v, 
Maravilia, «./. 

maravill.ir, v. 



FftlROB. 

Virilitfi,/. 
Manifester, v, 

6vident,-e, adj. 
Genre huniain,n. 

Maniere, /. 
Manteau,-x, m. 

Manufacturier, in 
Manufacture, »./. 

fabriquer, v. 
Fabrique, /. 
Engrais, s, m, 

fumer, v, 
Manuscrit, m. 
Beaucoup de. 
Carte, 8. f, faire 

une carte, v. 
Dommage, 8, m» 

gfi.tcr, v. 
Marbre, s, m. 

marbr6,-e, adj, 
Mars,m. marche, 
8,f. marcher, v. 
Cavale,/. 
Marge, 8,f, 
Marine, s,f, 

raarin,-e, adj. 
Marque, »./. 

marquer, v, 
Marche, m. 
Manage, m, 
Moelle,/. 
Marier, 6pouser. 
Marois, m, 
Mar&^hal, 8, m. 

ranger, v, 
Martyr,-e,*. m,/. 

martyriser, v. 
Merveille, «./. 

s'6tonner, v. 



486 



INTERNATIONAL DICTIONARY. 



MAS. 

Masculiae, 
Mask, 

Mason, 
Mass, 

Mast, 
Master, 

Mat, 

Match, 

Mate, 

Mathematician, 
Mathematics, 
Matter, 
May, 

Mayor, 

Me, 

Meal, 

Meadow, 

Mean, 

Measles, 
Measure, 

Meat, 

Mechanic, 

Mechanism^ 

Medal, 

Meddle, 

Medicine, 

Mellow, 

Melody, 
Melon, 
Melt, 
Member, 



OXRMAlf. 

Mannlich, 
Maske, s,f, 

verraummen, v, 
Maurer, m, 
Masse,Menge,«/. 

haufen, v, 
Mastbaum, m. 
Meister, s, m, 

beherrschen, v. 
Matte, *./ 

verflechten, ». 
Lunte,/. Docht, 
»m.vergleiclien,t;. 
Gefahrte, «. m. 

verbinden, v, 
Mathematiker,wi. 
Mathematik, /. 
Stoff,m. Sache,/. 
Mai, 8, m, mo- 
gen, V, 
Biirgermeister,m 
Mich, mir. 
Me hi, n, 

Weise,/.Meth,m. 
Niedrig, mittel,a. 

mcinen, v. 
Masem,//?/. 
Masstab, s. m, 

ermessen, v, 
Fleisch, n. 
Handwerker, m. 
Mechanism us, m, 
Schaustiick, n. 
Mischen, 
Arzenei, /. 
Weich, adj, 
weich machen,v. 
Melodic,/. 
Melon e,/, 
Schmelzen, 
Giied, Stuck, n. 



Spaxisb. 

Masculino, 
Mascara, «./. 

enmascarar,v. 
Albanll, m. 
Masa, s.f, 

espesar, v» 
A'rbol, palo, m. 
Maestro, s, m. 

sujetar, v, 
Estera, «./. 

esterar, v. 
Mecho, s, m. 

igualar, v. 
Consorts, 8. m, 

casar, v, 
Matematico, m. 
Matematica, /. 
Materia,/. 
Mayo, 8. m. 

poder, V, 
Corregidor, m. 
Me, 

Comida, / 
Pradero,prado,m 
Baxo, ipediano,^. 
hacer animo, v, 
Sarampion, m» 
Medida, *./ 

medir, v. 
Came, vianda,/. 
Mecanico, m. 
Mecanismo, m, 
Medalla,/. 
Mediar, 
Medecina,/. 
Madura, adj, 

sazonar, v. 
Melodia, /. 
Melon, m. 
Disolver, 
Miembro, m. 



Frsnch. 

Masculin,-e. 
Masque, 8. m, 

masquer, v. 
Magon, m. 
Masse, s.f. 

amasser, v. 
M&t, m, faine,/. 
Maltre, 8. m, 

surmonter, v, 
Natte, «./. 

natter, v. 
Mcche, 8.f, 

6galer, v. 
Compagnon,«ffi/'. 

^galer, v, [m. 
Mathematicien, 
Math6matiqucs^ 
Matiere, /. 
Mai, 8, m, pou- 

voir, V, 
Mai re; m. 
Moi, me. 
Ropas,m.farine/. 
Prairie, /. 
Bas, moyen, adj. 

vouloir, V. 
Rougeoie, /. 
M6sure, s.f, 

mesurer, v. 
Viande,/. 
Artisan, m, 
M^canisme, m. 
Medaille,/. 
Se meler de. 
M^decinc,/ 
Mur,-e, adj. 

amollir, v, 
M61odie, f. 
Melon, 971. 
Fond re. 
Membre, ffu 



INTBRXATIONAL DICTIONARY. 



487 



HEM. 

Membrane, 
Memory, • 
Mend, 
Mention, 

Merchant, 
Mercury, 
Mercy, 
Merit, 

Merry, 
Mess, 

Message, 

Messenger, 

Messiah, 

Messieurs, 

Metal, 

Meteor, 

Method, 

Middle, 

Micrht, 

Miid, 

Mile, 

Military, 

Milk, 

Mill, 

Miller, 

Milliner, 

Million, 

Mind, 

Mine, 

Mineral, 
Minister, 

Minori 



QsUfiLX. 

Hautchen, n. 
Gedachtniss, n. 
Bessern, 
Erwahnung, s,f, 

erwahnen, v. 
Kaufmann, m. 
Quecksilber, n, 
Verzeihung,/. 
Verdienst, *. n, 

verdienen, v. 
Lustig, lebhafc, 
Gericht, 8, fi. 

speisen, v. 
Botschaft,/. 
Bote, m. 
Messias, m. 
Die Herrn, m, pi, 
Metall, m. [/., 
Luftei-scheinung, 
Mcthode, Weise, 
Mitte,/ 
Macht,/. 
Sanft, mild, 
Meile, /. [». m, 
Soldatensjand, 
kriegerisch, adj» 
Milch, 8, /. 

melken, v. 
Miihle, j. 
Miiller, m. 
Putzhandlerin,/. 
Million,/ 
Gemiith, s. n. 

merken, v, 
Grube, «./. 

mein, adj. 
Mineral, n. 
Minister, 8, nu 

darreichen, v, 
Unmiindige, «.m. 

kleiner, adj. 



Spaxish. 

Membrana,/. 
Memoria,/. 
Reparar, 
Mencion, *./. 

mqncionar, v. 
Comerciante, to. 
Mercurio, m. 
Misericordia, /. 
Merito, s. fn. 

merecer, v. 
Risueno, alegre, 
Ran c ho, s, m. 

hacer, rancho,v. 
Mensage, m. 
Mensagero, m. 
Mesias, Cristo,m. 
Senorcs, m. pi. 
,Metal, TO. 
,Meteoro, m. 
Metodo, TO. 
Medio, m. 
Poder, m. 
Indulgente, 
Milla,/. 
Soldadesca, 8.f. 

militar, adj, 
Leche, 8.f. 

ordefiar, v. 
Molino, m. 
Molinero, m. 
Modista,/ 
Mi Hon, m. 
Mente, s.f. 

atender, v. 
Mina, «. /. 

mio, adj. 
Mineral, m. 
Ministro, 8. m. 

ministrar, v. 
Menor, s. m, 

(& adj. 



Fiu:fCH. 

Membrane,/. 
Memoire,/ 
Re pare r. 
Mention, s./, 

mention er, v. 
Marchand,-e,m/. 
Mercure, m, [/. 
Piiie,mis6ricord* 
Merile, 8. m, 

mciiter, v. 
Plaisant,-e. 

MetS, 8. 771. 

manger, v. 
Message, w. 
Courrier, to. 
Messie, Christ,TO. 
Messieui-s, m.pL 
MeUil,-aux, to. 
Meteore, to. 
Methode,/ 
Milieu, TO. mi-,/, 
Pouvir,TO.force,/ 
Doux,-ce. 
Mille, rn, 
Milice, 8. f. 

militaire, adj. 
Lait, 8, m. 

traire, v, 
Moulin, TO. 
Meunier, to. 

Million, TO. 
Esprit, 8, TO. 

remarquer, v. 
Mine, 8,f. 

le mien, adj, 
Mineral,-aux, to. 
Minister, *. to. 

administrer, v. 
Mincur,-e, «.m./ 

& adj. 



488 



INTERNATIONAL DIOTIONABT. 



mN. 

Mint, 
Minute, 

Miracle, 

Mire, 

Mirth, 

Misanthropy, 

Miscarry, 

Mischief, 

Miscreant, 

Miser, 

Miserable, 

Misery, 

Misfortune, 

Miss, 



Mission, 
Missionary, 
Mist, 
Mistake, 

Mstress, 

Mite, 

Mix, 

Mixture, 

Mob, 

Mock, 

Mode, 
Model, 

Moderate, 

Modern, 

Modest, 

Modesty, 

Modulate, 

Moist, 

Moisten, 



GXRMAir. 

Munze, «./. 
Minute, «./. 

genau, adj, 
Wunder, n. 
Schlamm, s, m, 
Frohlichkeit,/. 



BPAiasB. 

Menta, 8,f, 
Minuto, 8, m. 

menudo, adj. 
Milagro, m. 
Cieno,9. 9n. 
Alegria,/. 



FSSXOH. 

Menthe, s.f. 
Minute, s.f, 

petit,-e, adj. 
Miracle, m. 
Boue, 8./. 
Gaiet6,/. 



Menschenhass,m Misanthropia,/. Misanlhropie,/. 



Misslingen, 
Ungliick, n. 
Unglaubige, m 
Qeizhals, nu 
Elend, 
Trubsal,/. 
Ungliick, n. 
Fraulein, s, n, 

nussen, v. 
Geworfen, 
Sendung,/. 
Missionar, mi 
Nebel, m. 
Irrthum, 8, nL 

irren, v. 
Frau,/. 



Abortar, Avorter, 

Dano, mal, m. Malheur, rn. 
Religionario, [to, M^creant, m, 
Hombre ayarien- Avare, nuf. 



Miserable, 
Miseria,/. 
Desgracia,/. 
Leilorita, «./. 

echar, v. 
Arrojadizo, m, 
Mision,/. 
Misionero^ m. 



Miserable. 
Misere,/. 
Infortune,/. 
Demoiselle, «./. 

manquer, v. 
Missive,/. 
Mission,/ 
Missionaire, m. 



Niebla,mollina,/Brouillard, m. 
Equivocacion,^./. Erreur, *./. 



errar, v. 
Ama, seilora,/. 



Milbe/.Heller,m. Mitad, cresa,/ 



Mischen, 
Mischung,/. 
Pobel, 8, m. 

einhiillen, v. 
Gespott, 8. «. 

verspotten, v. 



Mezclar^ 

Mixtura,/. 

Canalla, «./. 
tumuUuar, v. 

Mofa, *./ mo- 
far, V. 



Art, Zufalligkeit, Modo, m, 
Masstab, 8, m. Modelo, «. m. 



abformen, v, 
Massigen, t;. 

massig, adj. 
Neu, modisch, 
Bescheiden, 

Bescheidenheit/Modestia,/. 
Moduliren, Modular, 



modelar, v. 
Moderar, v, 

moderado, adj, 
Modemo, 
Modesto, 



errer, v. 
Maltresse,/. 
Charan^on, nu 
M61er. 
Melange, nu 
Foule,*./. 

insulter, t^. 
Raillerie,«./ 

moquer, v. 
Mode, fagon, /. 
Modele, «. nu 

mouler, v, 
Mod6rer, v. 

mod^r6,-e, adj. 
Moderne. 
Modeste. 
Modestie,/. 
Moduler. 



Feucht, Humedo,xugoso, Humide, moite. 

Anfeuchten, Humedecer, Mouiller. 



KfTBBNATIONAL DIGTIONART. 



489 



MOI. 


Qesluax. 


Moisture, 


Nasse,/. 


Molest, 


Belastigcn, 


Moment, 


Augenblick, m. 


Monarch, 


Monarch, m. 


Monarchy, 


Monarchic, /. 


Monastery, 


Kloster, n. 


Monday, 


Montiig, m. 


Money, 


Geld, n. 


Monk, 


Monch, m. 


Monkey, 


Affe, MauJaffe,m 


Monotonous^ 


Eintonig, 


Monster, 


Ungeheuer, n. 


Month, 


Monat, m. 


MoDument, 


Denkmal, n. 


Mood, 


Art,/ modus,OT. 


Moon, 


Mond,' m. 


Mop, 


Wise h lap pen,sm. 




abwischen, v. 


Moral, 


Lehre, s, /. 




moraIisch,ac//. 


Morality, 


Sittlichkeit,/. 


More, 


Mehr, grosser, 


Morning, 


Morgen, m. 


Morrow, to- 


Morgende Tag, 


MorseL 


Bissen, m. 


Mortal, 


Sterbiiche,- m. 


Mortar, 


M6rser,Mortei,m 


Mortgage, 


Unterpfand, s. n. 




verpfanden, v. 


Mortify, 


Todten, kasteien, 


Moss, 


Moos, n. Sump^ 


lilost, 


Meist, meisten. 


Mother, 


Mutter,/. 


Motion, 


Bewegung,/. 


Motive, 


Bewegrund, 8,m, 




bewegen, adj. 


Motto, 


Wahlspruch, m. 


Mould, 


StoflF, Fleck, s.m. 




formen, v. 


Mount, 


Hiigel, 8, m. 




steigen, v. 



Spanish. 
Humedad, / 
Molestar, 
Momento, m. 
Monarca, m, 
Monarquia, / 
Monasterio, m, 
Lunes, m, 
Moneda, / 
Monge, m. 
Mono,m. mona,/ 
Monotono, 
Monstruo, m. 
Mes, m, 
Monumento, m, 
Mocio, m. 
Luna./ 
Aljofifa, «./. 

limpiar, v. 
Moralidad, «./. 

moral, adj, 
Etica, / 
Mas, 

Manana, dias,/ 
Mau.ina, 
Bocado, m. 
Mortal, m. 
Mortero, ;». 
Hipoteca, s, / 

hipotecar, v, 
Mortificar, 
Moho, musgo, m. 
Lo or los mas, 
Mad re,/ 
Movimiento, m. 
Motivo, 8, m. 

ic aJj, 
Mote, m. 
Moho, 8, m. 

enmohecerse, v, 
Monte, 8, m. 

montar, v. 



Frbuch. 
Moiteur, / 
Molester. 
Moment, m. 
Monarque, roi, m. 
Monarchic, / 
Couvent, m, 
Lundi, m. 
Argent, 7/1. 
Moine, m. 
Singe, guenon,/ 
Monotone. 
Monstre, m. 
Mois, m. 
Monument, m. 
Humeur,/ 
Lune,/ 
Torchon, «. m, 

frotter, v. 
Morale, s.f, 

mora I, -e, adj, 
Moralite,/ 
Plus, davantage. 
Matin, m. 
Deniain. 
Morceau,-x, m, 
Murtel, m, 
Mortier, ciment, 
Hypotheque,*./ 
hypothequer, v. 
Mortilier. 
Mousse, / 
Le, la plus. 
Mere, lie, ^ 
Mouvement, m. 
Motif, 8. m. mo- 

teur,-trice, adj. 
Devise,/ 
Moule, *. m. 

mouler, v. 
Mont, 8. m. 

monter, v. 



490 



INTERNATIONAL DICTIONAET. 



MOn. 

Mountain, 

Mourn, 

Mouse, 

Mouth, 

Move, 

Mow, 

Much, 

Mucous, 

Mud, 

Muff, 

Muffle, 

Mug, 

Mule, 

Multiply, 

Mumps, 

Murder, 

Murmur, 

Muse, 

Museum, 

Music, 

Musician, 

Musk, 

Musket, 

Muslin, 

Must, 

Mustard, 

Muster, 

Mute, 

Mutiny, 

Mutter, 
Mutton, 
Mutual, 
Muzzle, 

My, 



QiRMAir. Spanish. 

Berg, m. Montano, m. 

Trauern, Lamentar, 

Maus, /. Raton, m. rata,/ 

Mund,m. Maul,n. Boca, entrada,/. 
Bewegen, leiten, Mover, 
Schoppen, 8, m. Camara, s.f. 



mahen, v, 
Viel, sehr, 
Schleimig, 
Schlamm, m* 
Muff, m. 
Bedecken, 

Krug, Becher,m. Jarro, m, 
MauTthier, m. Mulo, m, 
Vermehren, 
Braune,/. 
Mord, 8. m. 

ermorden, v, 



guadafiar, v. 
Mucho, 
Mocoso, 
Cieno, lodo, m, 
Manguito, m. 
Emboyar, 



Multiplicar, 
Murria,/. * 
Asesinato,^. m. 
asesinar, v. 



Gemurmel, 8, n. Murmurio, 8. m, 
murmein, v, murmurar, v. 

Muse, 8,/. Musa, *./. 

nacbdenken, v, meditar, v. 



Museum, n. 
Musik,/. 
Musicant, m, 
Bisam, m. 
Flinte,/. 
Musselin, m. 



Musco, nu 
Mdsica,/. 
Mdsico,m. 
Musco, m, 
Mosquete, m. 
Musulina,/. 



Muss,scbimmeln.Estar obligado^ 



Senf, m, 
Mustern, 
Stumme, 8* m, 
stumm, adj, 
Aufrubr, «. m. 



Mostazo, m. 
Juntarse ez£rcito 
Mttdo, 8. m, 

& adj. 
Motin, 8, m. 



sicb emporen,v. nmotinarse, t^. 
Murren, GruSir, 

Hammelfleiscb,n Camero, nu 
Gegenseitig, Mutual, 
Scbnauze, <./. Boca, «./. poner 

schnuppern, V. boca, v. 
Mein, meine. Mi, mio. 



FUNCH. 

Montagne,/ 
Pleurer,deplorer. 
Souris,/ 
Bouche,gueule3/ 
Mouvoir, agiter. 
Moue, 8,f, 

faucher, v. 
Beaucoup. 
Glaireux,-se. 
Bourbe, boue,/ 
Mancbon, m. 
Affubler. 
Godet, pot, m. 
Mule,/.mulet,m. 
Multiplier. 
Esquinancie, f. 
Meurtre, 8. m, 

tuer, V, 
Murmure, 8, m. 

murmurer, tr. 
Muse, 8,/. 

mediter, v. 
Museum, m. 
Musique,/. 
Musicien,-ne,m/. 
Muse, m. 
Mousquet, m, 
Mousseline, /. 
Faloir, devoir. 
Moutarde, /. 
Assembler. 
Muet,-te,«. m./. 

& adj. 
Sedition,*./. 

66 mutiner, v. 
Marmotter. 
Mouton, m, 
Mutuel,-le. 
Mufle, 8. m. 

emmuseler, v. 
Mon, ma, mes, 



INTEBNATIONAL DICTIONABY. 



491 



MTB. 



Myrtle, 

Myself 

Mysterious, 

Mystery, 

Mythology, 



OlRMAir. 

Mjrrte,/ 
Mich, mir, 
Verwickeh, 
G^heimniss, n. 
Fabellehre,/ 



Bpamisb. 

Mirto, m. 
Yo mismo^ 
Misteiioso, 
Misterio, m. 
Mitologia,/ 



Myrte, m. 
Moi,-m6me, me. 
My8terieux,-se. 
Mystere, m. 
Mythologie,/. 



N. 



NmI, 

Naked, 
Name, 

Napkin, 

Narrative, 

Narrow, 

Nation, 

Native, 

Natural, 

Nature, 

Naught, 

Nausea, 

Naval, 

Navigate, 

Navy, 

Nay. 

Near, 

Neat, 

Necessary, 

Necessity, 

Neck, 

Nectar, 

Need, 

Needle, 
Negative, 

Neglect, 



Nagel, 8» m. 

annageln, v. 
Nackt, bios, 
Name, s, m. 

nennen,v. 
Serviette, /. 
Erzahlung,/. 
Enge, 
Nation,/. 
Erzeugnisa, s, n, 

natUrlich, adj, 
Eingeborne, 
Natur,/. 
Nichts, n. 
Ekel,m.[stehend, 
Aus Schiffen be 
Beschiffen, 
Flotte,/. 
Nein, sogar, 
Nahe, 
Nett, 

Nothwendig, [/. 
Nothwendigkeit, 
Nacken, Hals,9n. 
Nektar, m. 
Mangel, 8, m. 
nothighaben, v. 
Nadel, /. Zeiger, 
Verneinung, *./. 
veroeinend,aG^*. 
Vemachlassig- 
ung/.verachtenv 



Una,t./. clavar,v. 

Desnudo, 
Nombre, s» m, 

nombar, v, 
Servilleta,/ 
Narrativa,/. 
Angosto, 
Nacion,/. 
Natural, s, m. 

nativo, adj. 
Natural, 
Naturaleza, /. 
Nada,/. 
Nausea,/. 
Naval, 
Navegar, 
Armada, /. 
No, aun, 
Cerca^ 

Hermoso, neto, 
Nccesario, 
Necesidad, /. 
Cuello, m. 
Nectar, m. 
Pobreza, «./. 

career, v. 
Aguja,/. 
Negativa, «./. 

negativo, adj, 
Olvido, 8. m, 

descuidar, v. 



Clou, ongle, m, 

clouer, V. 
Nu, nue. 
Nom, 8. m, 

nommer, v. 
Serviette, /. 
Narration,/ 
£troit, court,-e. 
Nation,/peuple. 
Natit-ve, 8, wi./ 

& adj, 
Naturel,-le. 
Nature, /. 
Eien, m. 
Dfigout, m, 
Naval,-e. 
Naviguer. 
Flotte, Marine^. 
Non, m6me. 
Proche, pr^s. 
Propre, pur,-e. 
Ndcessaire. 
N6cessit6,/ 
Cou, m. gorge,/ 
Nectar, m, 
Besoin, 8, m. 

manquer, v. 
Aiffuille,/ 
N^ative, *./ 
negatif,-ve, adj. 
Ne^igence,*./ 

negliger, v. 



492 



INTERNATIONAL DICTIONARY. 



NEG. 

Negligent, 

Negro, 

Neighbor, 

Neighborhood, 

Neither, 

Nephew, 

Nerve, 

Nervous, 

Nest, 

Net, 

Neuter, 

Never, 

Nevertheless, 

New, 

News, 

Next, 

Nib, 

Nice, 

Niece, 

Nigh, 

Night, 

Nightingale, 

Nine, 

Nineteen, 

Ninety, 

Ninth, 

Nitre, 

No, 

Noble, 

Nobody, 
Nod, 

Noise, 

Noisy, 

Nominate, 

Nomination, 

None, 

Nonsense, 

Noon, 



Gkrman. 



SPAinsn. 



Nachlassig, Negligente, Negligent,-e. 

Neger, m, Negro,Etiope,m.Negre, m. 

Nachbar, m, Vecino, m, Voicin,-e, m./. 

Nachbarschaft,/! Vecindad,/. VoicinHge, m, 

Weder, noch, Ni, ninguno, Ni, non plus, 

Neffe, Enkel, m, Sobrino, m. Neveu,-x, m. 

Nerve, s, m,f, Nervio, s. m. Nerf, $, m, 
st&rken, v. eiierviar, v, exciter, v, 

Nervig, kraftvoll, Nervioso, Nerveux,-se. 

Nest,7i.kasten,ni. !Nido, m, Nid, m. 

Netz, n. Neto, m, red,/. Filet, rets, m. 

Neutral, sachlich Neutral, Neutre. 

Niemals, kein, Nunca, jamas, Jamais. 

Dennoch, No obstante que, Neanmoins. 

Neu, frisch, Nuevo, fresco, Nouveau, frais. 

Neuigkeit,/! Noticias,/. |>Zi Nouvelle,/, 

Nachst, folgend. Immediate, Prochain,-e. 

Schnabel, m. Pico, m. Bee, bout, nu 

Delicado, fino, ExacL 

Sobrina,/. Niece,/. 

Cerca, Voicin,-e,pres dc 



Fein, zart, 

Nichte,/. 

Nahe, 

Nacht,/. 

Nachtigall,/ 

Neun, 

Neunzebn, 

Neunzig, 

Neunte, 

Salpeter, m. 



Koche,/. [f7i.Nuit,/! soir, »». 
Paxaro, nocturne Rossignol, m. 
Nueve, Neuf. 

Dies ye nueve, Dix,-neuf. [dix. 



Noventa, 
Nono, 
Nitro, fw. 



Nein, nicht, kein, No, ningun,-o, 
Adelige, 8, m. Noble, s. m. 



edel, adj, 
Niemand, 
Wink, s, fii, 

winken, v. 
Larmen, m. 
GerauschvolJ, 
Nennen, 
Nennung, /. 
Keiner, kelne, 
Unsinn, m. 
Mittag, m. 



ilustrc, adj. 
Nadie, 
Cabecco, 8, m. 

cebecear, v. 



Quatre,-vingt,- 
Neuvieme, 
Nitre, m, 
Non, aucun,-e. 
Noble, «. m, 

& adj, 
Personne,(-ne.) 
Signe, 8.m, bran- 
ler le tete, v. 



Sonido, ruido, m. Bruit, eclat, m. 
Ruidoso^ Bruyant,-e. 

Nombrar, [m. Nommer,choisir. 
Nombramiento, Nomination,/. 
Nadie, ninguno, Aucun. 
Disparate, TO. Abeurditfe,/. 
Mediodia,/. Midi, m. 



nrrEBNATIONAL DIOnONAST. 



493 



NOB. 


GCRMAir. Spaxish. 


FRurcH. 


Nor, 


Auch nicht, Ni, 


Ni, ne. 


North, 


Nord, s, m, Norte, s. m, sep 


1- Nord,5.TO.septeu- 




nordlich, adj. tentrional,a<^'. 


trional,-e, adj. 


Nose, 


Nase,/. Nariz,/. 


Nez, m, ' 


Not, 


Nicht, No, 


Non, pas, point 
TabelHon, m. 


Notary, 


Notarius, m, Notario, m. 


Notch, 


Kerbe, 8, f, ein- Muesca, s.f. 


Coche, 8./. 




kerben, v. muescar, v. 


entailJer, v. 


Note, 


Erlauterung,5./.Nota, *./. 


Note, 8./. 




merken, v, observar, v. 


noter, v. 


Nothing, 


Nichts, n. Nada,/. 


Rem, n£anr, m. 


Notice, 


Kenntniss, «. /. Noticia, «./. 


Connaissance,«/. 




bemerken, tf. notar, v. 


faire savoir v 


Notion, [ing, Begrifl^ m, Nocion,/. 


Notion, idee,/. 


Notwithstand 


• Ungeachtet, No obstante, 


MalgrS. 


Noun, 


Nennwort, «. Nombreo, m, 


Nom, m. 


Nourish, 


Nahren, Nutrir, 


Nourrir. 


Novel, 


Erzahlung, «./. Novel, adj. 
neu, adj. novela, s.f. 


Nouvelle, s.f. 




nouveau, adj. 


Novelty, 


Neuheit, /. Novedad, /. 


Nouveaut^,/ 


Now, 


Nun, 80 eben, Ahora, 


Maintenant 


Nowhere, 


Nirgends, En ninguna parte Nulle part 


Nucleus, 


Kern, m. Nucleo, m. • 


Nucleus, m. 


Numb, 


Erstarrend, Entorpecido, 


Engourdi,-e, 


Number, 


Zahl, s.f. zahlen, N&mero, s. m. 


Nombre, 8. m. 




V. numerar, v. 


compter, v. 


Numeral, 


Zififer,t/.zueinerNumero, 8. m. 


Numero, 8. m. 




zahlgehorig, a. numeral, adj 


. numeral, adj. 


Numeration, 


Zahlen, n. Numeracion,/. 


Numeration, /. 


Numerous, 


Zahlreich, Numeroso, 


Nombreux,-se, 


Nun, 


Nonne, /. [andte Monja, /. [m. Nonne, /. 


Nuncio, 


Papstliche ges- Nuncio, enviado, Nonce,envoy6,m. 


Nunnery, 


Nonnenklo8ter,n Gonvento, m. 


Monastere, m. 


Nurse, 


Amme, 8.f. nah- Enfermera, 8. / Nourrice, 8. f. 




ren, v. alimentar, v. 


nournr, v. 


Nurseiy, 


Saugen ».pflege/Plantel,«i. 


Nourisson, m. 


Nut, 


Nuss,/ Nuez,/. 


Noix, noisette,/ 


Nutmeg, 


Muskatennuss,/. Nuez moscada/. Muscade, / 


Nutriment, 


Nahruns, /, Nutriment©, m. 
Nahrend, Nutritivo, 


Aliment, 8. m. 


Nutritious, 


Nutritif,-ve. 


Nymph, 


Nymphe,/. Ninfa, dama,/. 


Nymphe, / 



42 



494 



INTERNATIONAL DICTIONABT. 



0. 


GxsMAir. 


SPijnSH, 


Fewob. 


0! 


01 acb! 


o. 

0! . • 


01 ha! 


Oak, 


Eiche,/. 


Iloble,m.encinft/*. Ch^ne, m. 


Oar, 


Erz, Ruder, n. 


Kemo, m. 


Rame,/. 


Oat, 


Hafer, m. 


Avena,/. 


Avoine,/ 


Oath, 


Eid, Schwur, m. Juramento, m. 


Serment, m. 


Obedience, 


Gehorsam, m. 


Obediencia, /. 


Ob^issance, /. 


Obey, 


Gehorchen, 


Obedecer, 


Ob&r. 


Object, 


Zweck, s, m. 


Objecto, *. m. 


Objet, a. m. ob- 




einwenden v 


objectar, r. 


jecter, v. 


Objection, 


Einwurf, m. 


Oposicion,/. 


Objection,/. 


Obligation, 


Verpflichtung/. Obligacion, /. 


Obligation,/. 


Oblige, 


Verpflichten, 


Obligar, 


Obliger. 
Oub i, m. 


Oblinon, 


Vergessenheit/. Olvido, m. 


Obnoxious, 


Unterworfen, 


Expuesto, 


Sujet,-te. 


Obscure, 


Verdunkeln, v. 


Obscurecer, v. 


Obscurcir, v, ob- 




dunkel, adj. 


obscuro, adj. 


scur,-e, adj. 


Observation, 


Observanz,/ 


Observacion, /. 


Observation,/. 


Observatory, 


Sternwarte,/. 


Observatorio, m 


I. Observatoire, m. 


Observe, 


Beobachten, 


Observar, notar. Observer. 


Obstacle, 


Hinderniss, n. 


Obstaculo, m. 


Obstacle, m. 


Obstinate, 


Halsstarrig, 


Ohstinado, 


Opini&tre. 


Obstruct, 


Vorstopfen, 


Obstruir, 


Obstruer. 


Obtain, 


Erhalten, haben 


, Obtener, ganar, 


Obtenir. [dent-e. 


Obvious, 


Ausgesetzt, 


Obvio, 


Ouvert,-e, evi- 


Occasion, 


Gelegenheit, s.f. Ocasion, »./. 


Occasion,»/.pn>- 




veranlassen, t 


^ ocasionar, v. 


duire, v. 


Occupation, 


Besitz, m. 


Ocupacion,/. 


Occupation,/ 


Occupy, 


Einnehmen, . 


Ocupar, 


Occuper, tener. 


Occur, 


Vorkoraraen, 


Ocurrir, 


Arriver. 


Occurrence, 


Ereigniss, n. 


Ocurrencia, / 


Evenement^ m. 


Ocean, 


Weltmeer, n. 


Oceano, m. 


Oc6an,m.mer/ 


Ochre, 


Ocher, m. 


Ocre, m. 


Ocre, / 


Octave, 


Octave,/. 


Octavo, m. 


Octave,/. 


October, 


October, m. 


Octubre, m. 


Octobre, m, 


Odd, 


Ungleich, 


Impar, 


Impair,-a 


Oddity, 


Ungleichheit, /. Sin'gularidad, /. Singulant^,/, 


Ode, 


Ode,/. 


Oda,/ 


Ode,/ 


Odious, 


Verhasst, 


Odioso, 


Odieux,-8e. 



INTERNATIONAL DICTIONAET. 



495 



ODO. 

Odor, 

Of. 

OflF, 

Offence, 

Offend, 

Offer, 

Office, 

Officer, 

Officiate, 

Often, 

Oil, 

Ointment, 

Old, 

Olive, 

Omission, 

Omit, 

On, 

Once, 

One, 

Onion, 

Only, 

Open, 

Opera, 

Operate, 

Operation! 

Opinion, 

Opium, 

Opponent, 

Opportunity, 

Oppose, 

Opposite, 

Opposition, 

Oppress, 

Oppression, 

Or, 

Oration, 

Orator, 



OlRMAX. SPAinSB. VUNOB. 

(Jeruch, m, Fragrancia. /. Odeur, /. [en. 

Von, aus,vor, an, De, k, [pente. De, du, de ]a,de8 
Fort, weg, von, Muy lejos, de re- De loin de. \m, 
Beleidigiing, /. Ofensa, /. delito, Offense,/.affront, 
Angreifen, Ofender, Offenser. 

Antrag, «. m, Oferta, *./. af- Offre,»./.offrir,v. 

darbeiten, v. recer, v. 
Amt, u.Dienst,fn Oficio, m. Bureau,-x, m. 

Offizicr, Beamte Oficial, m. Officier, m. 

Darreichen, Oficiar, Officier. 

Oft, oftmals, Freqiientemente Souvent 
Oel, s. n. olen,w. Aceyte, s. m, un- Huile, *./ 
tar, V. huiler, v, 

Salbe,/. Unguento, wi. Onguent, m. 

Alt, verbraucht. Viejo, anciano, Vieux, vieil, dgi 
Olive./.Oelbaum Olivo, moreno,m Olive, /. 
Unterlossung, /. Omission, /. Omission, /. 
Auslassen, Omitir, Omettre. [suite. 

An, auf, in, bei, Sobre, encima, Sur, ^, au, de 
Einmai, vormal, Una vez, Une fois. 

Ein, eine, man, Un, uno, una, Un, une. 
Zwiebel,/. CeboUa,/. Oignon, «i. 

Eiuzig, allein, Unnico, solo, Seul, unique. 
Oeffnen, v. offen Enseilar, v. Ouvert,-e, adj. 

adj. abierto adj. ouvrir, v. 

Oper, /. Opera,/. Op6ra, m. 

Wirken, operiren Obrar, operar, Op6rer. [f. 

Wirkung,/. Operacion, f. Operation, action 
Huf^m. mcinung Opinion,/. Opinion,/. 

Opium, n. Opio, m. Opium, m, 

Gegner, «m.Wid- Antagonista, sm. Opposant, 8. m. 

erstreitend, ad opuesto, adj. -e adj. 
Gelegenheit,/. Oportunidad,/. Opportunity,/ 
Sich widersetzen Oponer, resistir, Opposer, resister* 
Gegenubcr, Opuesto,adverso Oppos§,vii5-i-vi8, 



Gogensatz, m. Oposicion,/ 
Unterdrucken, ^ Oprimir, 
Bedriickung, / Opresibn, /. 
Oder, ehe, O', antes, 

Rede, /. Oracion, /. 

Bedner, m. Orador, m. 



Opposition,/ 
Opprimir. 
Oppression, / 
Ou, autremdnt. 
Discours,/ 
Orateur, m. 



496 



INTERNATIONAI. PICTIONART. 



ORB. 

Orbit, 
Orchard, 
Orchestra, 
Order, 

Ore, 

Organ, 

Organize, 

Origin, 

Original, 

Originate, 

Ornament, 

Orphan, 
Orthography, 

Ostrich, 

Other, 

Otherwise, 

Otter, 

Ought, 

Ounce, 

Our, 

Ours, 

Ourselves, 

Out, 

Outbreak, 

Outcast, 

Outer, 

Outgrow, 

Outlaw, 

Outlet, 

Outline, 

Outrage^ 

Outset, 

Outside, 

Oven, 

Over, 

Overcome, 



OKRMAir. fiPAIOSH. 

Kreis m. Bahn,/. Orbita,/ 
Obstgarten, m. Huerto, m, 
Orchester, n. 
Ordnung, «./. 

ordnen, v. 
Erz, Metall, n. 
Werkzeug, n. 
Einrichten, 
Ursprung, w. 
Urspriinglich, 
Hervorbringen, 
Zicrde, «./. 

verzieren, v. 
Waise, «i./. 



Orquestra,/. 
Orden,».»i./. 
ordenar, v. 
Mineral, nL 
O'rgano^ m. 
Or^nizar, 
Orl^en, m. 
Original, 
Originar, 



Frekcb. 
Orbite, m. 
Verger, m. 
Orchestre, m. 
Ordre, ». m. 

ordonner, v. 
Mineral, nu [nu 
Oi^ane, orgue, 
Organiser, 
Ongine,/. 
Original, [ver, 
Provenir, deri- 



Rechtschrei- 

bung,/. 
Strauss, m, 
Andere, 
Anders, sonst, 
Fischotter,/. 
Soil, muss, 
Unze, /. 
Unser, 
Unser, 



Omamento s. m. Omement, s. m. 

omamentar v. decorer, v. 
Hu6rfano, m, Orphelin,-e,ni.y! 
Ortografia, /. Ortbographie, /. 



Avestruz, m. Autruche,/. 

Otro, Autre. 

De otra mantra, Autrement 

Nutra, nutria,/. Loutre,/. 

Deber, Devoir, falloir. 

Onzskff, Once,/. 

Nuestro, Notre, nos.[nous. 

Lenuestro, Le, la n6tre; h 
Wir, wir selbst, Nosotros mismos Nous-m6mes, - 
A us, hinaus, Fuera, afuera, Ilors, de, du. 
Ausbruch, m. Erupcion,/. Eruption,/. 
Verstossene, «.m. Desterrado s, m, Bannc, s. m^ jet- 
verbannt, v, tirar fuera, v. ter dehors, v. 
Aeussere, Exterior, De dehors, 

Ueberwachsen, Sobrecrecer, Devenir grand. 
Geachtete, «. m. Proscripto, *. m. Proscrit, s, m, 
achten, v. proscribir, v. proscrire, v, 

Ausgang, m. \m. Salida, /. Issue, /. 

Umriss, Abnss, Contomo, m. Contour, m. 
Beleidigung, /. Ultrage, m. Outrage, m. 
Anfang, m. Principio, m. Sortie,/. 
Aussenseite,/. Exterior, m, Ext^rieur, m. 
Ofen,Backofen m Homo, m. Four, m, 

Ueber, durch, Sobre, encima, Sur, au-dessus. 
Uebersteigen, Veneer, Surmonter, 



INTERNATIONAL DIOnONABT. 



497 



OVB. 


GUtKAK. 


Bpamuk. 




Overdo, 


Uebertreiben, 


Exceder, 


Exceder. 


Overflow, 


Uuberfleissen, 


Inundar, robasar.Dfeborder. 


Overhear, 


Ueberhdrren, 


Entreoir, 


Entendre par 
hazard, [aer. 


Overlook, 


Uebersehen, 


Rever, recorrer, 


Surveiller, pas- 


Overrate, 


Zu hock schatzen Encarecer, 


Surfaire. 


Overreach, 


Ueberragen, 


Sobresalir, 


Se fouler. 


Overrun, 


Ueberlaufen, 


Cubrir, rebosar 


, Envahir. 


Oversee, 


Uebersehen, 


Inspeccionar, 


Surveiller. 


Overseer, 


Aufeelier, m. 


Sobrestante, m. 


Inspecteur, m. 


Oversight, 


Aufaicht,/. 


Yerro, m, [ta, Inspection, / 


Overt, 


Ausserlich, 


Abierto, indirec- Ouvert. 


Overtake, 


Einholen, 


Alcanzar, 


Attraper. 


Overthrow, 


Umsturz, s, m. 


Trastorno, s. m. 


Renversement, 




umwerfen, v 


trastomar, v. 


*.m.renver8er,if. 


Overtop, 


Hervorragen, 


Elevarse sobre 


S'elever audes- 






otra cosa. 


sus de. 


Overture, 


Oeffnung,/. 


Abertura, /• 


Ouverture,/. 


Overturn 


Unlsturzen, 


Subvertir, 


Bouleverser. 


Overwhelm, 


Niederdrucken, 


Abrumar, 


Accabler. 


Owe, 


Verdanken, 


Deber, 


Devoir, 


Owl, 


Eule,/. 


Lechuza,/. [adj. Hibou,-x, m. 


Own, 


Anerkennen, v. 


Poseer, v. propio, Posseder, v. 




eigen, adj. 




propre, adj. 


0^ 


Ochs, m. 


Buey, vacuno, ro. Boeuf, m. 


Oyer, 


Verhdr, n. 


Tribunal, m. 


Cour,/. 


Ojes, 


Hdrt! bolkl 


Escuchad! 


Ecoutez! 


Ojster, 


Auster,/. 


Ostra,/. 


Hultre,/. 


Pace, 


Schritt,«.f7».ein 


P. 

■ Paso^ 8. m. 


Amble, 8. m. 




hergehen, v. 


pasear, v. 


aller le pas, v. 


Pacify, 


Benibigen, 


Pacificar, 


Pacifii£r,apai8er. 


Pack, 


Ballen, s, m. 


Lio^ 8. m. 


Balle,*./ 




packen,v. 


enfardelar, v. 


empaqueter, v. 


Package, 


Packeeug, n. 


Fardo, m. 


Paquet, m. 


Packet, 


Bl&ndelchen, ru 


Paquete, m. 


Paquet, m. 


Pad, 


Weg, 9, m. 


Senda, «./. 


Bourlet, «. m. 




ebenen, v. [n 


saltear, v. 


rembourrer, v. 


Padlock, 


Vorlegeschloea, 

43* 


Candado, m. 


Cadenas, m. 



498 



INTERNATIONAL DIOTIONAEY. 



PAQ. 

Pagan, 
Page, 

Pail, 
Pain, 

Paint, 

Painter, 

Painting, 

Pair, 

Palace, 

Palate, 

Pale, 

Palette, 

Pall, 

Palm, 

Pamphlet, 

Pan, 

Panel, 

Pang, 

Panic, 

Pant, 

Pantaloons, 

Pantomime^ 

Pantiy, 

Papa, 

Paper, 

Parade, 

Paragraph, 
Parallel, 

Parasol, 

Parcel, 

Pardon, 

Parent, 



QXBMAN. 

Heide,-nzsch, m. 
Page, 8, m. 

paginiren, v. 
Eimer, m. 
Strafe, «./. 

austrengen, v. 
Farbe, s.f. 

malen, v, 
Maler, m. 
Malerei,/.[ren». 
Paar, 8, n. paa- 
Palast, m, 
Gaumen, m, 
Blass, bleich, 
Farbenbret, n. 
Leichentach,«ii. 

bekleiden, v, 
Palme, a, /. 

betasten, v, 
Flugschrift,/. 
Pfanne^/. 
Feld, n. 
Pein, Qual,/. 
Schrecken, m. 
Klopfen, 
Pantalons, m. pL 
Geberdenspieln, 
Brodschrank, m. 
Papa, Vater, m. 
Papier, n. 
Geprange,«.n.in 
parade bringen,v. 
Abschnitt, m. 
Parallelkreis5m. 
gleichlaufend a. 
Sonnenschirm,m 
Stuck,fi.Menge/. 
Erlassung, «./. 

verzeihen, v. 

yater,m. Mutter, 

/. Aeltem pL 



Spanish. 
Pagano, ?»• 
Page,».m. 

foliar, V, 
Colodra,/. 
Pena, s,/, 

affligir, v. 
Afeyto, 8. m, 

afeytarse, t^., 
Pintor, m. 
Pintura,/. [v. 
Par«.m.parearse 
Palacio, m. 
Paladar, «». fdo, 
Palido,descorori- 
Paleto. /. 
Manto real, 8. m, 

exhalarse, v. 
Palmo, 8,/, 

manejar, tr. 
Papelon, m. 
Payla,/. 
Entrepafio^ 
Angustia,/. 
Panico, nu 
Palpitar, 
Pantalon, m, 
Pantomimo, m. 
Despensa,/. 
Papa, m. 
Papel, m. 
Parada, *./. 

ezhibir, v. 
Parrafo, wi. 
Paralelo, 8,m.& 

adj. 
Parasol, m. 
Paquete, m. 
Perdon,«.m.per- 

donar, i^. 
Padre, 6 mndre, 

m./ 



Frxhcb. 
Pai'en,-ne, m./. 
PagOjAm./. [es,v. 
marquerlespag- 
Seau,-x, ?»• 
Pein, »./. 

affligir, v. 
Peinture, »./. 

peindre, v. 
Peintre, m. 
Peinture, / [v. 
Paire, 9./.assortir 
Palais, m. 
Palais, m. 
P&le, bl6me.[tre. 
Palette/depein- 
Pallium, 8. m. 

affaiblir, v, 
Palme,*./. 

escamoter, v. 
Pamphlet, m, 
Terrine,/. 
Panneau,-x, m. 
Angoisse,/. [/. 
Terreurpanlque, 
Palpiter. 
Pantalon, m. 
Pantomime, ?«. 
Panterie, /. 
Papa, m. 
Papier, ttu 
Parade,*./. [». 
aller en parde, 
Paragraphe, w. 
Parallele, «. m. 

Parasol, m. 
Parcelle,/. 
Pardon, *. m. 

pardonner, v. 
Pcre, m. mere/ 

parens, m.j0/. 



INTEBNATIONAL DICTIONABY. 



499 



PAR. 

Parish, 

Park, 

Parliament, 

Parlor, 

Parody, 

Parole, 

Parrot, 

Pany, 

Parson, 

Part, 

Partake, 

Partial, 

Particular, 

Partner, 

Partnership, 

Partridge, 

Party, 

Pass, 



Passenger, 
Passion, 
Passover, 
Past, 

Pastor, 
Pasture, 

Patch, 

Patent, 

Path, 

Pathetic, 

Pathos, 

Patience, 

Patient, 

Patriot, 

Patron, 



OiRXAir. Bpakisu. 

Gemeinde, /. Parroquia, /. 
Park, m. Parque, m. 

Parlemcnt, n. Parlamento, m. 
Sprachzimmer, n Parlatorio, m. 
Parodie, /. [n. Parodia, /. 
Wort,Ehrenwort Palabra, /. 



Papagei, m, 
Abwehren, 
Pfarrer, m, 
Theil, «. m, ab- 

sondern, v, 
Theilen, 
Parteiisch, 
Sonderbar, 



Papagayo, m, 
"^ jrimir, 
Parroco, m. 



FftiKcn. 
Paroisse,/ 
Pare, m. 
Parlement, m. 
Salon, m, 
Parodie,/ 
Parole, /. 
Perroquet, m. 
Paser, 6viteo. 
Cur6, ministre m 



Parte, s. m, par- Partie, 8. /. 



tir, V. separer, v. 

Participar, Partager. 

Parcial, Partiel,-le. 

Particular, Particulier,-e, 

Theilnehmer, m, Companero, m. Associ6,-e, w./. 
Genosse nschaft/ C ompafiia, /. Association, /. 
Rebhuhn, n. Perdiz,/. Perdrix,/. 

Partei,/. Spiel n. Partido, m. Parti, m. partie,/ 
Wcg, *. m, ver- Paso, a. m, D&roit, s. m. 

gehen, v.* pasar, v. passer, v. 

Ausweg, m. Pasage, w. Passage, m. 

Passagier, m. Pasagero, m, Passager,-e, m.f. 
Leidenschaft, /. Pasion,/.enojo.w Passion, /. 
Osterfest^ n. Pascua,/. P^ue,/. 

Vergangenheit, Lo pasado, 8, m. Pass6, »/. <fe adj, 

*./. uber, adj, pasado, tuij, 
Hirt, Pfarrer, w. Pastor, m. Pasteur, m. 

Weide, «./. wei- Pastura, «/. pas- P^ture,/. 

den, V. tar, v, paturer, v. 

Lappen,.«. m. Remiendo, s, m. Piece, »,/. ra- 

ausbessern, v, remendar, v, pieceter, v. 
Patent, a. n, of- Patente 8, m, & Patente, s.f. pa- 

fentUch, adj. adj, tent,-e, adj. 

Pfad, w. Senda,/. Sentier, m. 

Nachdrucklich, Pathetico, Touchant,-e. 

Leidenschaft,/. Pato, pathos, m. Pathos, m. 
Geduld,/ Paciencia/ Patience,/ 

Gkduldigrfreund Paoiente, Patient,-e, 

Vaterlands- Patriota, m. Patriote, m.f. 
Gonner, i». Patron, m. Patron, m. 



500 



INTERNATIONAL DICTIONART. 



PAT. 

Pattern, 
Pause, 

Pawn, 

Pay, 

Pea, 

Peace, 

Peach, 

Peacock, 

Peahen, 

Peak, 

Peal, 

Pear, 
Pearl, 
Peasant, 
Peck, 

Pectoral, 

Peculiar, 

Pedal, 

Peddle, 

Pedlar, 

Peel, 

Peep, 

Peer, 
Peg, 

Pen, 

Pencil, 

Pendulum, 

Penetrate, 

Peninsula, 

Penitent, 

Penny, 

Pension, 



GsBMAir. Spakibh Fkutch. 

Muster, n. Modelo, m. Echatillon, m. 

Pause, 8,/, pau-Pausa, *./. pau- Pause, »./. 



siren, v, sar, v. 

Pfiind, *. n. ver-Prenda, «./. 
pfanden, v. empeSLar, v. 



Bezahlung s. f, 
bezahlen, v. 

Erbse,/. 

Friede, m. 

Pfirsiche, /. 

Pfauhahn, m. 

Pfauhenne, /. 

Gipfel, s, m, 
krslnkeln, v. 



Paga, s,f, 

pagar, v. 
Guisante, m. 
Faz,f. 

Melocoton, m. 
Pavo, real, m, 
Pava real, /. 
Cima, »./. par- 

ecer flaco, v. 



Schall, 8. m. be- Estruendo, 8. m. 



tauben, v, 
Birae, /. 
Perle,/. 
Bauer, m. 
Viertel, 8. ru 

picken, v, 
Brustmittel, 



agitar.v. 
Pera,/. 
Perla,/. 
PatOD, nu 



pnuser, v. 

Gage, 8, m. en- 
gager, V. 

Paye, »./. 
payer, v. 

Pois,»i. 

Paix,/. reposm. 

Peche,/. 

Paon, m, 

Paonne,yi 

Pic, 8, m. avoir, 
Tair malade,v. 

Carillon, 8, m. 
£tourdir, v. 

Poire,/, 

Perle,/. 

Paysan,-ne, m./ 



Tres celemimes, Picotin, 8. m. 
8,m. picotear, v. 



becqueter, v. 
Pectoral, Pectoral,-e. 

Eigen, besonder. Peculiar, Particulier,-e. 

Trittbrett, Pedal CaHo^ m. [oleras, PWal,/ 
T&ndein, Ocuparse en fri- Baguenauder. 

Hausirer,m.r5. /. Buhonero, m. Colporteur, m* 
Schalen,v. Rinde Corteza, /. Pelure,/. ■ 

Blick, 8, m. Asomo, 8. m. (Eillade, 8,f, 

gucken, v, asomar, t;. [m. paraitre, v, 

Gleiche, m. Par, compallero, Egal,-aux, m. 
Pflock, 8. m. Clavija, 8,f. Cheville, *./. 

anpflocken, v. clavar, v, cheviller, t^. 

Feder, / [m. Pluma, jaula, /. Plume,/ parc,»» 
Pinsel, Reissttft, Lapiz, pincel, m. Crayon, m. 



Pendul, n. 
Durchdringen, 
Halbinsel,/ • 
Bussfertig, 
Pfennig, m. 
Kofitgeld, n. 



PenduTo, m, 

Penetrar, 

Peninsula,/. 

Penitente, 

Penique, m. 

Pension,/. 



Pcndule, m. 
P6n6trer,percer, 
P6ninsule, / 
Penitent,-e. 
Sou, sol, m. 
Pension,/. 



INTBRNATIONAL DIOTIONABT. 



601 



PBO. 

People, 

Pepper, 

Perceive, 

Perch, 

Percussion, 
Perfect, 

Perfection, 
Perforin, 
Performance, 
Perfume, 

Perhaps, 

Peril, 

Period, 

Perish, 

Perjure, 

Perjury, 

Permanent, 

Permission, 

Permit, 

Pernicious, 

Perpendicular, 

Perpetual, 

Pei-pler, 

Persevere, 

Person, 

Persuade, 

Peruse, 

Pest, 

Pester, 

i'estilence, 

i'et. 

Petition, 

Petrify, 

Petticoat, 

Pew, 



GllUCAK. 

Volk, *. n. be- 
volkern, v, 

Pfeffer, m. 

Empfinden, 

Stange, s.f. 
aufsitzen, v. 



BPAiriBH. 

Pueblo, 8. m. 

poblar, V, 
Pimiento, m. 
Percibir, 
Perca, «./. pon- 
erse en perca,v. 



Erschutterung,y. Percussion, /. 
Vollenden, v. Perficionar, ». 

vollkommen, a. perfecto, adj, 
Vollkommenheit Perfeccion, /. 
Verrichten, Executar, 

Vollfubrung, /. Accion, /. 
Woblgeruch,ww. Perfume, s, ?n. 
rauchem, v. perfumar, v. 
Vielleicht, Qui2a, 



Gefahr,/. 
Kreislauf, m, 
Umkommen, 



Peligro, m. 
Periodo, fin, wi. 
Perecer, acabar. 



Falsch schworen Perjurar, 
Meineid, m, Perjurio, m. 



Fortdauernd, 

Erlaubniss,/. 

Erlauben, 

Verderblich, 

Senkrechfe, 



Permanente, 

Permision,/. 

Permitir, 

Pemicioso, 

Perpendicular, 



Immerwahrend, Perpetuo, 
Verwirren, Perturbar, 



Ausdauern, 

Person,/. 

Ueberreden, 

Durchlesen, 

Pest,/. 



Perseverar, 
Persona, /. 
Persuasir, 
Leer, observar, 
Peste,/. 



Fiillen, qu^en, Moler, molestar. 
Pest,/. Pestilencia, /. 

Anwandlung, / Enojo, enfado, m, 
Bitte, s,f, Peticion, «./. 

bitten, v, suplicar, v. 

Versteinern, Petrificar, 
Unterrock, Guardapies, m. 

Kirchenstuhl, m, Asiento {m,) en 
una iglesia. 



FKKSrCB. 

Peuple, 3. m, 

peupler, v, 
Poivre, m. 
Apercevoir. 
Percbe, s.f. 

percher, v. 
Percussion, /. 
Parfair, v. par- 

faii,-e, adj. 
Perfection,/. 
Accomplir. 
Execution,/, 
Parfum, s. m, 

parfumer, v. 
Peut,-elre. 
Peril, danger, m. 
P6riode, point,m. 
Perir, mourir. 
Parjurer. 
Parjure, m. 
Permanent,-e. 
Permission, /. 
Permettre. 
Pernicieux,-se. 
Perpendiculaire. 
Perpetuel, 
Pourmenter. 
Pers6v6rer. 
Personne,/. 
Persuader. 
Lire, examiner. 
Peste,/. 
Harceler. 
Pestilence,/. 
D6pit, m. 
Petition, «./ 

prier. v. 
P^trifier. [m. 
Jupe, / cotillon, 
Banc(7».)d' 6gli- 

se. 



502 



INTERNATIONAL DIOTIONAET. 



PEW. 

Pewter, 

Phenomenon, 

Philanthropy, 

Philogy, 

Philosopher, 

Philosophy, 

Phlebotomy, 

Physic, 

Physician, 
Pick, 

Pickle, 

Picture, 

Pie, 
Piece, 

Pier, 

Pierce, 

Piety, 

Pig, 
Pigeon, 
Pike, 
Pile, 

Pilgrim, 

Pill, 

Pillar, 

Pillow, 

Pilot, 

Pin, 

Pincers, 
Pinch, 

Pink, 

Pint, 



OlEMlX. 

Zinn, nJ 
Erschanung,/. 
Menschenliebey. 
Sprachkunde, /. 
Philosoph, m. 
Philosophic,/. 
Aderlassen, n, 
Arzencikunde,«/I 

heilen, v, 
Arzt, m. 
Spitzeisen, s. n, 

picken, v. 
Pokel, *• m. 

einpokeln, v. 
GemsUde, s, n. 

malen, v. 
Paste te,/. 
Stuck, s, n. 

passen, v, 
Pfeiler, m. 
Durchstechen, 
Frommigkeit, /. 
Ferkel, Schwein, 
Taube,/. 
Spitze, Pike,/. 
Pfahl, 8, m, 

auf haufen, v. 
Pilger, m. 
Pille,/. 
Pfeiler, m. 
Eopkissen, n. 
Steuermann,<.m. 

steuern, v. 
Nagel, »./. 

austecken, v, 
Klauen,/. 
Druck, 8, tiL 

kneipen, v. 
Nelke,«./. 

blinzen, v. 
Nosel, n. 



Spakisb. 

Peltre, m. 
Fenomeno, m. 
Filantropia,/ 
Filologia,/. 
Fiidsofo, m, 
Filosofia,/ 
Flebotomia,/. 
Medicina, s.fi 

purgar, v. 
Medico, m. 
Pico, 8, m, 

escogar, v. 
Salmuera, «./. 

escabechar, v. 
Pictura, *./. 

figurar, v. 
Pastel, m. 
Bemiendo, 8. m, 
remendar,zf.[te, 
Estribo de puen- 
Penetrar, 
Piedad,/. 
Lechon, m. 
Pal mo, m. 
Lucio, m. pica,/. 
Estaca, 8. /. 

amentonar, v. 
Perigrinante, fn, 
Pildora,/. 
CoIuna,/.pilar,f?i. 
Almohada,/. 
Piloto, 8,ffi. guiar 

un navio, v, 
Olfiler, 8, m. 

encerrar, v« 
Pinzas,/. 
Pellizco, «. m, 

pellizcaT) V. 
Chave* «. m. 

ojetear, v« 
Pinta,/. 



Fexvch^ 

Etain, m. 
Phenomena, m. 
Philantropie, / 
Philologie,/. 
PhUosophc, m. 
Philosophic, /. 
Phl^boiomie,/. 
M^decine, »./. 

m^deciner, v. 
Medecin, m. 
Pic, «.f?i. 

choisir, v, 
Saumure, «./• 

saler, v. 
Tableau, 8. m, 

peindre, v, 
P&te, TO. pie,/. 
Piece, *./. 

joindre, v, 
M61e, 2^ jet&,/ 
Percer. 

PietS,/. [to. 
Gochon,saumon, 
Pigeon, m. 
Brochet^ to. 
Pieu, ». TO. 

empiler, v. 
P61enn,-e,TO./. 
Pilule,/. 
Pilier, to. 
Oreiller, to. 
Pilote, 8. TO. 

piloter, V. 
Epingle,*./ 

joindre, v. 
Tenailles,/.p/. 
Pinc€e, «./. 

presser, v. 
Pinauc, «./• 

decouper, v. 
Pinte,/. 



IHTEBNATIONAL DIOTIONAST. 



503 



MN. 


OmifAN. 


Pious, 


FromoQ, zartlich. 


Pipe, 


Pfeife, «./. 




pfeifen, v. 


Pirate, 


Seerauber, w*. 


Pistol, 


Pistole,/. 


V Pit, 
^ Pitch, 


Grube,/. 


Pecb, *. n. 




verpiehen, v. 


Pitcher, 


Krug, 771. 
Mark, 71. Kraft,/ 


Pith, 


Pity^ 


Mitleiden, «. n. 




bemitleiden,v. 


Pirot, 


Zapfen, m. 


Place, 


Platz,r. m. 


- 


anstellen, v. 


Plague, 


Plage,*./ 
plagen, v. 


Plam, 


Ebene,*./eben,a 




au8gleichen,v. 


Plamtifl^ 


Klager, it*. 


Plan, 


Plan, «. ffi. 




entwerfen, v. 


Plane, 


Flache,/Hobel, 


m 


«. m« ebenen, v. 


Planet, 


Planet, m. 


Plank, 


Plank,*./ die- 


^ 


len, V, 


Plant, 


Pflanze, a./ 


Plantation, 


pflanzen, t;. 
Pflanzung,/ 


Planter, 


Pflanzer, m. 


Plaster, 


Pflaster, «. ». 




tuncben, v. 


POate, 


Platte, *./ 




plattiren, v. 


Platform, 


Qrundriss, m. 


Play, 


Spiel, *. n. 




spielen, v. 


' Plead, 


Vorscbiitzen, \ 


Please, 


Gefallen, 


Pleasure, 


Vergnugen, n. 



Spabish. 
Pio, piadoso^ 
Pipa, »./ 

graznar, v. 
Pirata, m, 
Pistola,/ 
Hoyo, abismo,m. 
Pez, grado, s. m. 

fixar, V. 
Cantaro, m. 
Tu£tano, m. 
Misericordia, *./ 
compadecer, v. 
Espigon, m. 
Lugar, n. 

colocar, v. 
Peste, «./ 

atormentar, v. 
Llano, *. m. a. 

Uanar, v. 
Demandado, m. 
Plan, *. m. 

trazar, v. 
Piano, 9. m. 

allanar, v, 
Planeta, m, 
Fablon, *. m. 

entablar, v. 
Planta, «./ 

plantar, v. 
Plantacion,/ 
Plantador, m. 
Yeso, «. »i. 

enyesar, v. 
Plata,*./ 

plancbear, v. 
Platforma, / 
Jugeo, *. m. 

jugar, V. 
Disculpar, 
Compfacer, 
Gusto, placer, m. 



VuircB. 

Pieujc,-se, pie. 
Pipe,*./crier,v. 

Pirate, w. 
Pistolet,'m. [m. 
Fo88e,/parterre, 
Poix, «./ 

poisser, v. 
Crucbe,/ 
Moelle,/ 
Piti6,«./ 

plaindre, v. 

Pivot, 171. 

Lieu, *./ 

placer, v. 
Tourment, *. m. 

vexer, v, 
Plain,-e,*./ &a 

aplaner, v. 
Plaignant,-e. 
Dessein, *. m. 

tracer, v, 
Plan,rabot, *.m. 

raboter, v. 
Planete,/ 
Plancbe, *./ 

plancb£ier, v. 
Plante, *./ 
planter, v. 
Plantation,/ 
Planteur, m. 
Pl&tre, *. m. 

pl&trer, v. 
Assiette, *./ 

plaquer, t^. 
Plateforme,/ 
Jeu,-x, *. m. 

jouer, V. 
Plaider. 
Plaire. 
Plaisir, m. 



604 



INTERNATIONAL DIOTIONAEY. 



PLE. 

Pledge, 

Plenty, 
Plight, 

Plot, 

Plough, 

Pluck, 

Plug, 

Plum, 
Plumb, 

Plume, 

Plunder, 

Plunge, 

Plural, 

Pocket, 

Pod, 

Poem, 

Poet, 

Poetry, 

Point, 

Poison, 

Poker, 
Pole, 
Police, 
Polish, 

Polite, 
Politician, 



QOMAS, 

Pfand, 9, n. 

verpfanden, v. 
FUlle,/. 
Zustand, s, m. 

flechten, v, 
Platz, 9. m. 

vorhaben, v, 
Pflug, 8, m, 

pfltigen, V, 
Zug, 8, m. 

pfliicken, v. 
Stbpsel, 8, m, 

verstopfen, v, 
Pflaume,/. 
Blei, 8. n. 

senkrecht, adj, 
Feder,*./. 

rupfen, v. 
Beute, «./ 

plUndem, v. 
Sprung, «. m. 

tauchen, v. 
Plural, mehr, 
Zusetzen, 
Tasche, «./. 

einstecken, v, 
Htilse, Schale,/ 
Gedicht, n. 
Dichter, in, 
Dichtkanst, / 
Punkt, 8. m, 

zuspitzen, v. 
Gift, 8, n, 

vergiften, v, 
Schureisen, n, 
Pol, Pfahl, m. 
Polizei,/. 
Glatte, 5./. 

glatten, v. 
Geschliffen, 
Politiker, m. 



Spanuo. 

Prenda,*./ 

empeiiar, v, 
Copia,demasfa/. 
Estado, 8. m, 

empcnar, v. 
Enredo, 8, m, 

urdir, v. 
Arado, 8. m. 

arar, v. 
Asadura, 8.f, 

arrancar, v. 
Tapon, 8, m, 

tapar, v. 
Ciruela, /. 
Plomada, 8./, 

plomo, adj. 
Pluma, 8.f, 

adorn ar, v, 
Botin, s, m» 

saquear, v. 
Enmersion, 8,f. 

sumerzir, v. 
Plural, 
Trabajar, 
Bolsilio, 8. m, 

embolsar, v, 
Vayna, / 
Poema, m. 
Poeta, m, 
Poetica, poesia^. 
Punta, *./ 

apuntar, v. 
Veneno, s, m, 

enveneriar, v, 
Hurgon, m. 
Polo, palo, m, 
Policia,/ 
Pulimento, 8. m* 

pulir, V. 
Pulido, 
Politico, m. 



Frutob. 

G^age, 8, m. 

engager, v, 
Abondance,/. 

Etat, 8, 77U 

engager, v. 
Complot, s, m. 

comploter, v. 
Charrue, s.f. 

labourer, v. 
Fressure^/leflfort, 
8,m, anarcher,v. 
Bouchon, 8, m, 

chevillei;,v. 
Prune,/. 
Plomb, 8, m, 

k plomb, adj. 
Plume, «./. 

plumer, v. 
Pillage, 8. m. 

piller, V. 
Plongeon, 8. m. 

plonger, v. 
Pluriel,-le. 
Travail! er. 
Poche, «./. 

empocher, tr. 
Casse, capsule^. 
Poeme, m. 
Poete, m. 
Podsie,/. 
Pointe, 8.f. 
pointer, v. 
Poison, 8. m. 

empoisonner, v. 
Fourgon, m. 
P61e,m.perche,/. 
Police,/. 
Poli,9.m.polir,v. 

Poli,-e. 
Politique, m. 



mrrSBNATIOKAL DIOnOKAKT, 



505 



POL. 




Spamuh* 


VUHOB. ' 


Politics, 


Politik,/. 


Politica,/. ' 


Politique,/ 


Pollute, 


Beflecken, 


Ensuciar, 


Polluer. 


Pomp, 


Gepraage, n. 


Pompa,/. 


Pompe. 


Pond, 


Teich, TO. 


Pantano, to. 


Etang, TO. 


Ponder, 


Erwagen, 


Ponderar, 


Peser. 


Poor, 


Arm, gering. 


Pobre, 


Pauvre. 


Pope, 


Papst, TO. 


Papa, TO. 


Pape, TO. 


Poplar, 


Pappel,/. 


Alamo, TO. 


Peuplier, to. 


Poppy, 
Popular, 


Mohn, TO. 


Adormidera,/. 


Pavot, TO. 


Volksmassig, 


Popular, 
Poblacion,/. 


Populaire. 


Population, 


Bev6lkerung,/ 


Population,/ 


Porcelain, 


Porzelan, n. [r 


I. Porcelana,/ 


Porcelaine,/ 


Pork, 


Schweinefleisch, Puerco, to. 


Pore, cochon, to. 


Port, 


Hafen, Anstand, Puerto, to. [m 


. Port, havre, to. 


Porter, 


TrSger, Porler,TO Portero, porter. 


Porteur,bi6re,TO. 


Portfolio, 


Brief tasche,/. 


Cartera,/ 


Porte feuille, to. 


Portrait, 


Bildniss, n. 


Retrato, to. 


Portrait, to. 


Podtion, 


Stellung,/. 


Posicion,/ 


Position,/ 


Possess, 


Besitzen, 


Poseer, 


Possdder. 


Possession, 


Besitz, TO. 


Posesion,/ 


Possession,/ 


Possible, 


MSglich, 


Posible,-mente, 


Possible. 


Post, 


Pfoste,/. 


Posta,/ puesto, Poste,/ 


Postage, 


Porto, iu 


Porte de carta, 


Port de lettre. 


Postpone, 


Hintansetzen, 


Posponer, 
Posdata,/ 


E«mettre. 


Postscript, 


Nachschrift,/. 


Postcrit, TO. 


Posture, 


Zustand, to. 


Postura/.sitio,TO. Posture^/ 


Pot, . 


Topt Krug, TO. 


Marmita, oUa,/ Pot, to. 


Potage, 


Suppe,/. 


Potage, caldo, to Potage, to. 


Potash, 


Pottasche,/. 


Sosa, potasa,/ 


Potasse,/ 


Potato, 


Kartoffel,/. 


Pataca,/ [/Patate,/ 


Poultry, 


Federvieb, n. 


Avea dom&ticas. Volaille, / 


Pound, 


Pfund, 8, n. 


Libra, *./ 


Livre, / enclos; 




pfanden, v. 


encarrar, v. 


s. TO. broyer, v. 


Pour, 


Giessen, 


Infundir, 


Verser. 


Poverty, 


Armutb,/. 


Pobreza,/ 


Pauvret^/ 


Powder, 


Pulver, n. 


Polvo, to. 


Poudre,/ 


Power, 


Kraft,/ 


Poder, TO. 


Pouvoir, TO. 


Practice, 


Praktik, a./. 


PracUca, s.f. 


Pratique, ff./ 




ausuben, v. 


practicar, v, 
;. Celebridad,^./ 


pratiquer, v. 


Prmse, 


Lob,n.Prei8,*.wi 


Louange,*./ 




loben, V. 

43 


aplaudir, v. 


louer, V. 



506 



nrrEBNATIONAL DICnONABT. 



PRA. 


Obmah. 


Spanish. 


Frskob. 


Pray, 


Bitten, 


Orar, 


Prier. 


Prayer, 


Gebet, n. 


Oracion,/. . 


Priere,/. 


Preach, 


Predigen, 


Predicar, 


Pr^cher. 


Precede, 


Vorher gehen. 


Anteceder, 


Preceder. 


Precious, 


Kostbar, 


Precioso, 


Precieux,>se. 


Predict, 


Vorhersagen, 


Predecir, 


Pr6dire. 


Preface, 


Vorrede,/. 


Prefacion,/. 


Preface,/. 


Prefer, 


Yorziehen. 


Preferir, 


Preferer. 


Pregnant, 


Schwanger, 


Prenada, 


Enciente. 


Prejudice, 


Vorurtbeil, n. 


Prejuicio, m. 


Prejudice, nk 


Prepare, 


Vorbereiter, 


Preparar, 


Preparer. 


Prescribe, 


Vorschreiben, 


Prescribir, 


Pr&cru^ 


Presence, 


Gegenwart,/. 


Presencia, / 


Pr&ence,/. 


Prfisentj 


Geschenk, s, n. 


Presente, s. in. 


Present, 8. m. 




sorg&Itig, adj 


'. & adj. 


pr6sent,-e, adj. 


Present, 


Darstellen, v. 


Presentar, v. 


Presenter, v. 


Preserve, 


Verwahren, 


Preservar, 


Pr&erver. 


President, 


Vorsteber, m. . 


Presidente, m. 


Pr&ident, m. 


Press, 


Presse, «./. 


Prensa, s/f. 


Presse, s.f. 




pressen, v. 


aprensar, v. 


presser, v. 


Presume, 


Yermutben, 


Presumir, 


Prisumer. 


Presumption, 
Pretend, 


Yermuthung,/ 


Presumcion,/ 


Promotion, ^ 
Prfitendre. 


Yorgeben, 


Aparentar, 


Pretty, 


ArUg. 


Undo, 


Jolli,-e. 


Prevail, 


Beweffen, 
Zuvo]±ommen, 


Prevalecer, 


Prfivaloir. 


Prevent, 


Prevenir, 


Prfivemr. 


Price, 


Preis, m. 


Predo, m. 


Prix, m. 


Prick, 


Stechen. 


Punzar, 


Piquer. 


Pride, 


Stolz, m. 


Orgullo, m. 


Orgueil, nu 


Priest, 


Priester, m. 


Sacerdote, m. 


Prfetre, m, 


Prince, 


Fiirst, Prina, m. 


Principe, m. 


Prince, m. 


Princess, 


Prinzessin,/. 


Princesa,/. 


Princesse,/. 


Principal, 


Oberbaupt, 8. i^ 


. Principal, 8, m. 


Principal, 8, w. 




vorstiglich, ad) 


f. adj. 


— e, adj. 


Principle, 


Urstoss, f/i. 


Principle, m. 


Principe, m. 


Print, 


Druchen, 


Imprimir, 


Imprimer. 


Prison, 


Gefangniss, n. 


Prision,/. 


Prison,/. 


Prisoner, 


Gefangene, m. 


PresOjW. 


Prisonnier, m. 


Private, 


Geheim, 


Secreto^ 


Priv«,c 


Privilege, 


Yorrecht, n. 


Privilegio, fw. 


Privilege, m. 



INTEBNATIONAL DICTIONABT. 



607 



PKI. 

Privy, 

Prize, 

Probable, 
Problem, 
Proceed, 
Procure, 
Produce, 

Product, 

Profane, 

Profess, 

Profession, 

Professor, 

Profit, 

Profound, 
Progress, 

Prohibit, 
Project, 

Promise, 

Prompt, 

Pronounce, 

Pronunciation, 

Proof; 

Property, 

Prophet, 

Proportion, 

Propose, 

Proscribe, 

PrQse, 

Prospect, 

Prosper, 

Prosperity, 

Prostitute, 



Qmhmax. 

Abtritt, 8, m. 

heimlich, adj. 
Fang, s. m. 

scbatzen, v, 
Wahrscheinlich, 
Aufgabe,/. 
Entspringcn, 
Verwalten, 
Ertrag, 8, to. 

vorbingen, v. 
Erzeugniss, n. 
Ungeweiht, 
Bekennen, 
Bekenntniss, n. 
Professor, m. 
Gewin, 8, m. 

gewinnen, v, 
Tie( grundlich, 
Fortschritt, m. 

fortgehen, v, 
Verhindem, 
Eutwurf, 8. m. 

schleudem, v. 
Versprechen, 

8, n. ds V. 
Vorsagen, v. 

bereit, adj,. 
Aussprechen, 
Aussprache,/. 
Versuch, m. 
Eigenthum, n. 
Prophet, m. 
Verbal tniss, n. 
Vorschlagen, 
Aechten, 
Prosa,/.[sicht,/. 
Blick, m, Aus- 
Qedeihen, 
Wohlstand, m. 
Hure, 8,f. 

schanden, v. 



Bparub. 
Privada, 8.f. 

privado, adj. 
Premio, «. m. 

apreciar, v. 
Probable, 
Problema,/ 
Proceder, 
Procurar, 
Producto, 8. m. 

producir, v, 
Producto, in. 
Profano, [ar, 
Prefesar, decW 
Profcsion,/. 
Profesor, m. • 
Ganancia, «./. 

ganar, v. 
Profundo, 
Progreso, 8, m. 

progresar, v, 
Prohibir, 
Proyecto, «. m. 

anojar, v, 
Promesa, n, 

prometer, v. 
Incitar, v, 

pronto, adj, 
Pronunciar, 
Pronunciacion,/. 
Prueba,/. 
Propriedad, /. 
Profeta, m. 
Proporcion,/. 
Proponer, 
Proscribir, 
Prosa,/. 
Perspectiva,/. 
Prosperar, 
Prosperidad,/. 
Prbstituta,^./ 

prostituir, v. 



Vrbtos. 

Priv6, 8, m. - 

secret,-e, adj, 
Priae,»/.priser,v. 

Probable. 
Probl^me, m, 
Proceder. 
Procurer. 
Produit, 8, m, 

produire, v. 
Rapport, m. 
Profane. 
Professer. 
Profession,/. 
Professeur, m. 
Profit, 8. m.. 

avantager, v. 
Profond,-e. 
Progres, 8, m. 

avancer, v, 
Prohiber. 
Dessein, 8, m. 

projeter, v, 
Promesse, *./. 

paomettre, v. 
Exciter, v. 

prompt-e, adj. 
Prononcer. 
Prononciation, /. 
Preuve, /. 
Bien, m^ 
Proph^te, m. 
Proportion, /. 
Proposer. 
Proscrire. 
Prose,/, [rue,/. 
Perspective, 
Pro8per6r. 
Prospiriti,/. 
Prostitute, «./. 

prosUtuer, v. 



508 



IirrERNiL'nONAL DICTIONARY. 



PKO. 

Protect, 
Protest, 

Protestant, 

Proud, 

Prove, 

Provide, 

Province, 

Provision, 

Provoke, 

Prow, 

Proxy, 

Pry. 

Psalm, 
Pshaw, 
Public, 

Publisb, 

Padding, 

Puff, 

Pull, 

Pullet, 

Pulse, 

Pulverize, 

Punuce, 

Pump, 

Punch, 

Punctual, 

Punctuation, 

Punish, 

Pupil, 

Purchase, 

Purge, 

Purple, 
Purpose, 



GjEBMAS. 8PA2IUB. 

Schiitzen, Proteger, 

Einrede, 8, /. Protests, 9. /. 

betheueren, v. ' protestar, v. 
Protestant, s. m, Protestante,«.»i. 

— ^isch, adj, <fe adj, 

Stolz, ktlhn, Orgulloso, 
Beweisen, Probar, 



Vorhersehen, 
Provinz,/. 
Vorsicht, /. 
Erregen, 
Vordertheil (n) Proa, 

des Scbiffes. 
Anwalt, tn, 
Spahen, 



Proveer, 
Provincia, /, 
Provision, 
Provocar, 



Psalm, m. 



Procuracion,/. 
Espiar, 
Salmo, m. 
Pshal, 
Publico, 8. m; V, 



Puh! pfui! 
Publikum, s. n, 
offentlich, adj. 
Herausgeben, Publicar, 
Kloss,m.Wurst,/Pudin, m. [v, 
Blasen, «. m. v. \y, Bufido,« m.soplar 
Zug, 8, m. Ziehen, Tiron,«.m. tirar,v. 



Huhnchen, n. 
Puis, m. 
Pulvern, 
Bimstcin, m. 
Pumpe, 8, f, 

pumpen, v, 
Punsch, 8, m. 

bohren, v. 
Piinktlich, 



Polla,/. 
Pulso, f». 
Pulverizar, 
Piedra pomez,/. 
Bompa, 5./. 

sonsacar, v, 
Punzon, 8. m. 

punzar, v. 
Punctual, 



Interpunction,/ Punctuacion,/. 
Bestrafen, Castigar, 

Augapfel, Pupila, nifia, / 

Erwerbung, «. /. Compra, «./. 
kaufen, v. comprar, v. 

Abfuhrungsmit- Purga, «./, 
tel,9n.abf1ihren,v. pugar, v. 
Purpur, m, Purpureo, m. 
Absicht, /. Intencion, /• 



Punch. 
Proteger. 
Prot^t, 8. m. 

protester, v. 
Protestant,-e, 

8, m,f, h adj» 
0rgueilleuz,-8e. 
Eprouver. 
Foumir. 
Province, /. 
Proviaon. 
Provoquer. 
Proue, /. 

D«put6,/. 
Fureter,/ 
Pseaume, m. 
Nargue! fil 
Public, 8, m, 

— que, adj. 
Publier. 

Pouding,in.[fir,v. 
Bouff6e,*./bouf- 
Coup,».m.tirer,v. 
Poulette,/. 
Pouls, m. 
Pulveriser. 
Pierre ponce,/. 
Pompe, *./ 

pomper, v. 
PoinQon, 8. fn. 

percer, v. 
Ponctuel. 
Ponctuation,/. 
Punir, ch&tier. 
Prunelle,/. 
Achat, 8. m, 

acheter, v. 
Purgatif, 5. fTL 

purger, v. 
Pourpre,/. 
Intention,/. 



INTKBKATIONAL DICnOlTABT. 



809 



PUS. 



Purse, 
Push, 
Put, 
Pyramid, 



GxRiav. 
Beutel, m. 
Stossen, 
Setzen, stellen, 
Xjramide,/. 



SPAlfXBB. 



Bolsa,/. 
Empujar, 
Poner, 
Piramide,/. 



Bouwe,/. 
Pousser. 
Meitre. 
Pyramide,/. 



Quack* 

Quadrant, 
Quail, 

Quaker, 

Qualify, 

Quality, 

Quantity, 

Quarrel, 

Quarry, 

Quart, 

Quarter, 

Quaver, 

Queen, 

Queer, 

Quell, 

Quench, 

Question, 

Quick, 
Quiet, 

Quill, 

Quince, 

Quire, 

Quirk, 

Quit, 

Quite, 

Quiver, 



Prahler, a, m. 

quaken, v. 
Viertel, n. 
Wachtel, *./. 

ermatten, v, 
Quaker, m, 
Berichtigen, 



Charlatan, s. nu 
charlatanear, v. 
Quadrante, m, 
Codorniz, «•/. 
temblar, v. 
QuakarO) m. 
Calificar, 



Beschauenheit,/. Calidad, /. 
Menge, Anzahl,/Cantidad, /. 



Zank, 9, m. 

zanken, v, 
Viereck, s. ». 

brechen, v. 
Yiertelmass, n. 
Viertel, n. 
Triller, nu 
Eonigin,/. 
Wunderlich, 
Dampfen, 
Loschen, 
Frage, *./. 

fragen, v, 
Lebendig, 
Beruhigen, v. 

ruhi^, adj. 
Federkiel, m. 
Quittc,/ 



Quimera, «./. 

pelear, v. 
Presa, *,/. 

hacerpresa^if. 
Azumbre, m. 
Quarto, m. 
Semicorchea,/. 
Reyna,/. 
Extrailo, 
Apretar, 
Extinguir, 
Question, 8.f. 

inquirir, v. 
Vivo, vivient6» 
Aquietar, v. 

quieto^ adj, 
CaSon, m, 
MembrillerOi m» 



Buch Papier, n. Coro, m, [/. 
Stich, m. Pulla, ezpreaion, 

Losmachen, Abandonar, 
Ganz, durchaus, Completameute, 
Kdcher, », m. Carcaz, s.f. 

zittem, V. temblar, v. 

43» 



Charlatan, «. m. 

charlataner, v. 
Quart, m, 
Caille, »./ 

branler, v, 
Quaker,-esse,m/'. 
Modifier. 
Quality,/. 
Quantity/. 
Querelle, «./. 

quereller, v. 
Carreau, 8, m» 

faire curie, v» 
Quarte,/. 
Quartier, m. 
Croche,/. 
Reine,/. 

Bizarre, Strange. 
Apaiser. 
j^teindrc. 
Question, 8,f, 

demander, v. 
Vif,-ve, agile. 
Calmer, v. 

tranquille, adj. 
Plume,/. 
Coing, m. 
Main de papier,/. 
Brocard, fn. 
Quitter. 
Tout-ii-fait 
Carquois, «. nu 

frissonner, v. 



)10 



INTERNATIONAL MOTIONAET. 



QUO. GUMAK. Spahish. Frxmch. 

Quoit, Wurfspiel, n. Herron, m. Palet, m. 

Quotation, Aufuruog,/. Citacion,/. Citation,/ 

Quote, Anfuhren,citiren Gitar, Citer. 

Quoth, Sagt, sagte. Dixe, digo, dixo, Dit. 



Rabbit, 

Babble, 

Race, 

Rack, 

Radish, 

Raffle, 

Raft, 

Rafter, 

Rag, 

Rage, 

Rail, 

Rain, 

Rainbow, 
Raise, 
Raisin, 
Rake, 

Rally, 
Ram, 
Range, 

Rank, 

Ransom, 

Rap, 

Rapid, 
Rare, 
Rascal, 
Rash, 



Kaninchen, vt. 
Pobel, m. 
Wurzel,/. [m. 
Folter,/.spanner 
Radieschen, n. 
Paschspie), 8. n. 

paschen, v. 
Flosse,/. 
Dachsparren, m. 
Lumpen, m. 
Wuth,/. 
Riegel, m, 
Regen, «. m. 

regnen, v. 
Regenbogen, m. 
Aufheben, 
Rosine, /. 
Rechen, 8.m. he- 

rumstobern, v, 
Verspotten, 
Widder, m. 
Reihe, a./, ord- 

nen, v. 
Ordnung, s./. 

sich reihen, ». 
Losegeld *. n. 

ausldsen, v. 
Schlag, 8. m. 

schlagen, v. 
Ausserst, 
Dfinn, selten, 
Schurke, m, 
Uebereilt, adj. 

Rasch, 8. m. 



Conejo, m. Lapin, m. 

Poblacho, m. Canaille,/. 
Raza,/genero,m Race, famille,/ 
Tormento, m. Torture,/ 
Rabano^ m. Rave,/ 
Rifa, «./ iifar,v. Rafle, *./ rafler, 

V. 



Balsa,/ 
Cabrio, nu 
Trapo, m. 
Rabia, ira,/ 
Baranda, / 
Lluvia, *./ 
Hover, V. 



Radeau,-x, m. 
Solive, / 
Chiflfon, 971. 
Fureur,/ 
Barriere,/ 
Pluie, »./pleu- 
voir, r. 



Arco celeste, m, Arc-en-ciel, m. 
Levantar, Lever. 

Pasa,/ Raisin see, m. 

Rastro, «. wl re- Racloir, ». m. 
buscar, v. rateler, v, 

Reunir, [m. Rallien 

Morueco^ ariete, B^lier, m. 
Fila, «./. orde- Rang^e, s./ 



nar, v. 
Lozano, 9. m. 

colocar, v. 
Rescate, «. m. 

rescatar, v. 
Golpe, *. m. to- 

car, V. 
Rapido, 
Raro, 
Belitre, m. 
Arrojado, adj. 

humor, 8, m. 



ranger, v. 
Rang, 8. m. 

ranger, v. 
Ran^on, *./ 

racheter, v. 
Tape, «./ taper, 

Rapide. 
Rare. 
BfilUre, m, 
T^m^raire, adj» 
Eruption «./ 



INTEENAHONAL DIOTIONAEY. 



611 



RAS. 

Rasor, 

Raspberry, 

Rasp, 

Rate, 

Rather, 

Rational, 

Ravel, 

Raw, 

Ray, 

Reach, 

Read, 

Ready, 

Real, 

Realm, 

Ream, 

Reap, 

Rear, 

ReasoD, 
Rebel, 

Rebuke, 

Receive, 

Recipe, 

Recite, . 

Reckon, 

Recognise, 

Recollect, 

Recommend, 

Reconcile, 

Record, 

Recover, 
Recruit, 

Rectify, 
Red, 



Scheermesser,m. 
Himbeere, /. 
Raspel, a./, ras- 

peln, v. 
Antheil, s, m. 

schatzen, v. 
Vielmehr, 
Verniinftig, 
Verwickeln, 
Roh, neu, 
Strahl,6Ianz, m. 
Raum, s, m, 

reichen, v. 
Lesen, 
Bereit, 
Wirklich, 
Konigreich, n. 
Riess, n. 
Ernten, 
Nachtrab, *. m, 

heben, v, 
Vernunft, /. 
Aufriihrer, s. m. 
6ichempdren,v. 
Tadel, s. m. 

tadeln, v. 
Empfangen, 
Recept, n. 
Erzdlhen, 
Rechnen, 
Erkennen, 
Zurtickbringen, 
Empfehlen, 
Aussohnen, 
Urkunde, »./. 

urzahlen, v. 
Befreien, 
Recrutirung, «./ 

emeuem, v, 
Verbessern, 
Roth, n» 



Spaiobh. 

Navaja, /. 
Frambuesca, /. 
Escofina, s.f, 

raspar, v, 
Tasa, *./. tasar, 

V. [bien, 

Mejor gana,mas 
Racional, 
Euredar, 
Crudo, nuevo, 
Rayo, m. 
Alcance «./. 

alcanzar, v. 
Leer, 

Listo, pronto, 
Real, verdadero, 
Reyno, m, 
Resma, /. 
Segar, 
Retaguardia, s.f, 

alzar, v, 
Razon,/. 
Rebelde, s, m, 

rebelarse, v. 
Reprehension, s. 

/. rega&ar, v. 
Recibir, 
Recipe, m, 
Recitar, 
Contar, 
Reconocer, 
Acordarse, 
Recomendar, 
Reconciliar, 
Registro, s. m, 

reoistrar, v, 
Recohrar, 
Recluta, s.f. re- 

clutar, V, 
Rectificar, 
Roxo, fn. 



Fbekch. 

Rasoir, m. 
Framboise, /. 
R4pe, s. /. r&per 

V. 

Taux, *. m. es- 

limer, v, 
Plut6t. 
Raisonnable. 
Effiler. 
Cru,-e. 

Rayon, w.raie,/. 
Port6e, «./. at- 

teindre, v. 
Lire. 
Pr6t,-e. 
R6el,-le. 
Royaume, m, 
Rame,/. 
Moissonner. 
Derniere classe, 

«./. {lever, v. 
Raison,/. 
Rebelle, s, m. re- 

beller, v. 
Reproche, s. m, 

reprendre, v, 
Recevoir. 
R6cip^ m. 
Reciter. 
Compter. 
Reconnaitre. 
Ressouvenir. 
Recommander. 
Reconcilier. 
Registre, s.m. 

enregistrer, v. 
Recouvrer. 
Recrue, */. ren- 

forcer, v. 
Rectifier. 
Rouge, m. 



512 



INTERNA TIONAI, DIOTIONABY. 



RED. 

Redeem, 

Redeemer^ 

Redress, 

Reduce, 

Reed, 

Reel 

Reeve, 

Refer, 

Reference, 

Refine, 

Reflect, 

Reform, 

Refrain, 
Refuge, 
Refuse, 
Regard, 

Regret, 

Regular, 
Regulate, 
Rehearse, 
Reign, 

Rein, 

Reins, 

Reject, 

Rejoice, 

Rejoin, 

Relapse, 

Relate, 
Relation, 
Relative, 
Release, 

Relent, 
Relic, 



Gbrvah. 

Loskaufen, 
Erlosser, m. 
Hulfe, n. verbes- 

sem, V. 
Zuriickbringen, 
Robr, n. Flote/. 
Haspel, 8. m. 

haspeln, v, 
Schultheiss, m, 
Verweisen, 
Verweisung, /. 
Reinigen, 
Zuruckwerfen, 
Umgestaltung, *. 
/. umandern,v. 
Zuruckhalten, 
Zuflucht,/. 
Verweigem, 
Ansicht, «./. an- 

sehen, v. 
Bedauern, «. n. 

bereuen, v. 
Regelmassig, 
Ordnen, 
Wiederholen, 
Reich, *. n, herr- 

scben^ v. 
Zugel, m. 
Nieren, /. pL 
Verwerfen, 
Erfreuen, 
Erwiedern, 
Riickfall, «. m. 

zurtickfallen, v. 
Erzahlen, 
Beziebung,^^ 
Bezielicb^ 
Quittung, «./. 

loslassen, v. 
Nacbgeben, 
Ueberbleibsel, n. 



SPAinaB. 
R4dimir, 
Salvador, 
Emienda, 8.f, 

emendar^ v, 
Reducir, 
CaSa,/. 
Aspa, *./ 

aspar, v, 
Mayordomo, m. 
Referir, 
Relacion, /. 
Refinar, 
Reflectar, 
Reforma, «./. re- 

formar, v. 
Refrenar, 
Refugio, m, 
Repulsar, 
Miramiento, s.m, 

estimar, v. 
Pena, s.f. sen- 

tir, V, 
Regular, 
Regular, 
Repetir, 
Soberania, «./. 

reynar, v. 
Rienda,/. 
RiHones, m. pL 
Desecbarj 
Regocijarse, 
Volver, 
Recaida, «./. re- 

caer, tr. 
Relatar, 
Relacion,/. 
Relativo, 
Soltura, 8, f. ^ 

descargiu-, «. 
Relentecer, 
Reliquia, /. 



Frzitch. 

Racbeter. 
R^dempteur, m. 
Remede, s, m. 

redresser, v. 
Reduire. [m. 
Cbalumeau,-x, 
D£vidoir, 8, m. 

divider, v, 
Facteur, m. 
R6f4rer. 
Renvoi, m, 
Raffiner. 
R6fl&:hir. 
R^forme, *./. re- 
former, V, 
S'emp^cber. 
Refuge, m. 
Refuser. 
Egard, 8, m. re- 

garder, v. 
Regret, *. m. re- 

gretter, v. 
R%idier. 
Regler. 
R6peter. 
Regne, «.in.r%- 

ner, v. 
R6ne,/. 
Reins, m. pL 
Rejeter. 
R£jouir. 
Rejoindre. 
Recbute, «./. re- 

tomber, v, 
Raconter. 
Reration,[Iatifl^a. 
Parente e,m/.re- 
Dfecbarge, «./. 

rel&cber, tr. 
Oeder. 
Relique, /. 



UTTEBKATIONAL DIOTIONAET. 



518 



•RieT^ 


OKRlCAir. 


Spamue. 


Peihch. 


Relieve, 


Erleichtem, 


Relevar, 


Soulager. 


Keligion, 


Gottesfurcht,/. 


Religion, /. 


Religion,/. 


Eelish, 


Geschmack, a.m 


I. Saynete, 8. m. 


Goiit, 8, m. 




billigen, v. 


saborear, v. 


goiiter, V. 


Reluctance, 


Widerwille, m. 


.Repugnancia,/. Repugnance,/. 


Rely, 


Sich verlassen. 


Confiar, 


Se fier a. 


Remain, 


Bleiben, 


Quedar, 


Demeurer. 


Remark, 


Anmerkung, s.f. Reparo, 8, m. nc 


)- Remarque, »./. 




bemerken, v. 


tar, V. 


remarquer, v. 


Remedy, 


Heilmittel, n. 


Remedio, m. 


Remede, m. 


Remember, 


Gedenken, 


Acordarsc, 


Souvenir. 


Remit, 


Zuruckschicken 


, Relaxer, reraiiii 


', Remettre. 


Remonstrate, 


Vorstellen, 


Representar, fw; 


fc. Remontrer. 


Remorse, 


Gewissensbi3S,m Remordimiento, 


, Remords, m. 


Remote, 


Entfert, 


Remoto, 


Distant,-e. 


Etemove, 


Versetzen, 


Remover, 


Dfeplacer. 


Remunerate, 


Belobnen, 


Remunerar, 


Remunerer. 


Rend, 


Reissen, 


Lacerar, 


Dfichirer. 


Renew, 


Erneuen, 


Renovar, 


Renouveler. 


Renounce, 


Verlaugnen, 


Renunciar, 


Renoncer. 


Rent^ 


Riss, 8. m. 


Renta,*./. 


Revenu, s, m. 




zerreissen, v. 


arrendar, v. 


louer, V. 


Renown, 


Ruf, jw. 


Renombre, m. 


Renom, m. 


Repair, 


Ausbesserung,«/Reparo, s, m. 


Reparation, «./. 




ersetzcn, v. 


reparar, v. 


r^parer, v. 


Repast, 


Mahlzeit,/ 


Refrigerio^ m. 


Repas, m. 


Repeal, 


Aufhebung, 8,f, Revocacion, a. f 


! Revocation, «./. 




zuriickrufen, v 


'. abrogar, v. 


r^voquer, v. 


Repeat, 


Wiederholen, 


Repetir, 


R6p6ter. 


Repel, 


Zuriick stossen, 


Repeler, 


Repousser. 


Repent, 


Busse tbun, 


Arrepentirse, 


Se repentir. 


Reply, 


Erwiederung,*/. Replica, «./. 


Repartie, «./. 




antworten, v. 


replicar, v. 


repliquer, v. 


Represent, 


Vorstellen, 


Representar, 


Reprfeenter. 


Repress, 


Unterdriicken, 


Sojuzgar, 


Rfiprimer. 


Reprieve, 


• Frist, s.f. 


Dilacion, 8,/. 


Repit, 8. m. 




fristen, v. 


suspender, v. 


suspendre, v. 


Reproof, 


Vorwurf; m. 


Improperip, m. 


R6primande,/. 


Reprove, 


Tadeln,[Thier,«. Culpar, 


R^primander. 


Reptile, 


Kriechende 


Reptil, 


Reptile, m. 


Republic, 


Freistaat, m. 


Republica,/. 


R^publique,/. 



514 



INTESN^TIONAI. DIOTIONABT. 



RBP. 


Gbuux. 


Repulse, 


Abweisung,*./ 




zurucktreiben,v. 


Beputution, 


Ruf, m. 


Bequest, 


Bitte, $.f. 




bitten, v. 


Require, 


Verlangen, 


Rescue, 


Befreiung, «./. 




befreien, v. 


Resemble, 


Gleichen, 


Resign, 


Entsagen, 


Resist, 


Widerstehen, 


Resolute, 


Entschlossen, 


Resolution, 


Auflbsung, /. 


Resolve, 


Auflosen, 


Resort, 


Besuch, 9. m. 




Bichbegeben,v. 


Respect, 


Biicksicht, «./. 




hinsehen, v. 


Respire, 


Athmen, 


Rest, 


Ruhe, 8. /. 


. 


ruhen, v. 


Restore, 


Wieder geben. 


Restrain, 


Einbalten, 


Restrict, 


Einscbranken, 


Result, 


Folge, *./. 




folgen, V. 


Resurrection, 


Auferstebung,/. 


ReUul, 


KleinbandeU*''^* 




zerlegen, v. 


Retain, 


Bebalten, 


Retire, 


Wegzieben, 


Retreat, 


Riickzug, «./. 




sicb ilUcbten, v. 


Return, 


Riickkehr,*./. er- 




wiedern, v, [«.». 
LarmendeGelag, 


Revel, 




Bcbmausen, v. 


Revenge, 


Racbe, s,f. 




racben, v. 


Revenue, 


Einkommen, n. 


Reverberate, 


Zuriickscblagen, 



Sparibh. 

Repulsa, «./. 

repulsar, v. 
Reputacion,/. 
Peticion, *./. 

rogar, v. 
Requerir, 
Libramiento,<.fn. 

librar, v. 
Asemejar, 
Resignar, 
Resistir, v. 
Resuelto, 
Resolucion,/. 
Resolver, 
Concurso,^. m. 

recurrir, v, 
Bespecto, 8, nu 

mirar, v. 
Bespirar, 
Bcposo, 8. m. 

reposar, v. 
Bestituir, 
Bestringir, 
Bestringir, 
Besulta, «./. 

resultar, v. 
BeEurrecion,/. 
Beventa, «./. 

revendar, v. 
Betener, 
Betirarse, 
Betiro, 8. nu 

retirarse, v, 
Betomo, 8» m, 

retornar, V. . 
Borracbera, «./. 

retraer, v. 
Yenganza, *./. 

vengar, ». 
Benta,/. 
Becbazar, 



FUXCH. 

Bebuffade, <•/. 

rebuter, v. 
Beputation, /. 
Bequ^te, s.f. 

requerir, v. 
Bequerir. 
Delivrance, *./. 

sauver, v. 
Besembler. 
B&igner. 
B6sbter, 4. 
B4solu,-e. 
B&olution, /. 
B£soudre^ 
Bessort, «. m. 

aller, v, 
Bespect, 8. m. 

respecter, v. 
Bespirer. 
Bepos, 8.m. 



rei 



T, V. 



nose] 
Bestttuer. 
Betenir. 
limiter. 
B&ultat, 8, m. 

r&ulter, v. 
B&urrection,/ 
Detail, 8. m. 

d6tailler,v. 
Betenir. 
Betirer. 
Betraite, «./. 

reculer, v. 
Betour, 8. nu 

retoumer, ». 
Dibaucbe, «./. 

se rSjourir, v. 
Vengeance, «./. 

venger, v, 
Bevenu, m, 
Bfiverbirer* 



imnSBNATIONAL DIOTIONABT. 



615 



SKY. 



Obriiav. 



Revere^ 


Verehren, 


Reverenciar, 


ReyereDdy 


Ebrwurdig, 


Reverendo^ 


Reverse, 


Revers, s, nu 


Contrario, 8. m. 




umkehren, v, 


revocar, tf. 


Reyerie, 


Traumerei,/. 


Murria,/. 


Review, 


Uebersicht, a./. Revista, *./• 




zuriick gehen,v. rever, v. 


RevUe, 


Schmahen, 


Ultrajar, 


Revise, 


Durchsehen, 


Rever, 


Revive, 


Wiederaufleben Revivrr, 


RevolatioDy 


Umwalzung,/. 


Revolucion,/. 


Revolve, 


Umwalzen, 


Revolver, 


Rhetoric 


Redekunst,/. 


R6torica,/. 


Rheum, 


Schnupfen,m. 


Reuma,/. 


Rheumatismf 


Schnupfenfieber, Reumadsmo^m. 


Rhubarb, 


Rhabarber, m. 


Ruibarbo, nu 


Rhyme, 


Reim,^.m. 


Rima,*./. 




reimen, v. 


consonar, v. 


Rib, 


Rippe,/. 


CostiUa,/. 


Ribbon, 


Band, n. 


Cinta, colonia,/. 


Rice, 


Reis, m. Weise,/. Arroz, m. 


Rich, 


Reich, prachtig, 


1 Rico, opulento, 


Rid, 


Erretten, 


librar. 


Ride, 


Ritt, «. m. 


Transito, 8i m. 




reiten, v. 


cabalgar, v. 


Ridge, 


Riickgrat, n. 


Espinazo, in. 


Ridicule, 


Spott, 8. m. 


Ridiculez, «./. 




verspotten, v. 
Gewehr, «. «. 


ridiculizar, v. 


Rifle, 


Arcabuz, a. m. 




rauben, v. 


robar, v. 


Rights 


Recht, *. n, 


Justicia, 8./. 




& adj. 


justo, adj. 


Rim, 


Rand, m. 


Canto, Bordo,m. 


Rind, 


Rinde,/ 


Corteza,/. 


Ring, 


Rinff, Kreis, m. 


Anillo,circulo,m. 


Ripe, 


Maduro, 


Rise, 


Erheben, 


Levantarse, 


Risk, 


Wagniss, s, fu 


Peligro, *. m. 




wagen, v. 


arriesgar, v» 


Rival, 


Nebenbuhler,«»i Rival, s.m. 




Wetteifern, v. 


competu*, 1^. 



Frbtob. 

R6v6rcr. 
R4v6rend. 
Revers, s. m. 

renverser, v. 
Reverie,/. 
Revue,*./. 

revoir, v. 
Injurier. 
Reviser. 
Ranimer. 
Revolution, /. 
Toumer. 
Rh^torique,/. 
Rhume, m. 
Rhumatisme, m. 
Rhubarbe,/. 
Rime, «./. 

rimer, v. 
C6te,/. 
Ruban, m. 
Riz, m. 
Riche,-e. 
Delivrer. 
Promenade, «./. 

aller, v. 
Sommet, m. 
Ridicule, 8. m. 

ridiculiser, v. 
Fusil, 8. m. 

piller, V, 
Raison, 8.f. 

juste, culj* 
Bord, m. 
Ecorce,/. 
Anneau,-x, m. 

Se lever. 
Risque, 8. m, 

risquer, v. 
Rival, 8. m. 

rivaUser, v. 



516 



INTEENATIONAL DIOTIOITAEY. 



RIT. 

River, 
Rivet, 
Road, 
Roar, 

Roast, 

Rob, 

Robin, 

Rock, 

Rocket, 

Rod, 

Rogue, 

BoU, 

Romance, 

Rood, 

Roo^ 

Room» 

Roost, 

Root, 

Rope, 

Rose, 

Rosemary, 

Rosin, 

Rot, 

Rough, 
Round, 

Rouse, 

Route, 

Rove, 

Rover, 

Row, 

Rub, 

Rudder, 

Rude, 

Rudiment, 

Rug, 



Obucah. Bpahibe. 

Fluss, m, Rio, m. 

Niet, n. Roblon, m. 

Strasse,Rhede,/. Camino, m. 
Brlillen, «, n. k v. Rugido, 9. m, 

rugir, V. 
Braten, Asar, 

Rauben, [m. Robar, 
KlippeJ^. Felsen, Pechicolorado,m 
Rothkehlchen,n. Roca,/. 
Rackete,/. Cohete, m. 

Ruthe, /. \m. Varilla, caSa,/. 
, Schalk, Schurke, Yillano, ttu 
RoUe, «./. Rodador, 8, m. 

rollen, v, volver, v, 

Roman, m. ..Romance, m, 
Ruthe,/. Pdrtica,/. 

Dach, n. Decke/. Tejado, m. 
Raum, Platz, m, Lugar, m. 
Schlaf, 8, m, Alcandara, 8,f. 

wohnen, v. descansar en, v. 
Wurzel, /. Raiz, /. 

Seil,fi. Strick, m, Cuerda, soga,/. 
Rose,/. Rosa,/ 

Rosmarin, m, Romero, m. 



Harz, n. 
Faule, «./. 

faulen, v, 
Rauh, roh, 
Riinde, «./. 

rund, adj. 
Aufwecken, 
Weg, m. 



Trementina,/. 
Nomi&a, 8,f. 

pudrir, v, 
A'spero, 
Circulo, 8. m, 

redondo, adj, 
Despertar, 
Ruta/rumbo,9n. 



Herumstreifen,/ Vagar, 
Rauber, m. Tunante, m. 

Reihe,9/.rudem, Hilera,9./. remar, 
V. Larmen,«.9n.v. bogar,v. 
Reiben, Estregar, 

fiteuemider, n. Timon, m. 
Ungebildet, Rudo, 
Grundlage, /. Rudimento, m. 
Orobe Fries, m. Pafio Burdo, m. 



Fbutch. 

Fleuve, m. 
Rivet, m. 
Chemin, m. 
Rugissement,9m. 

rugir, V. 
R6tir. 
D6rober. 
Rouge,-gorge,m. 
Rocher, m, 
Roquette,/. 
Perche, verge,/ 
Espi^gle, TiLf, 
Rouleau, 8, m. 

rouler, v, 
Roman, m. 
Perche, / 
Tolt, comble, m. 
Chambre, / 
Juchoir, 8, m, 

percher, v, 
Racine,/ 
Corde, / 
Rose,/. 
Romarin, m, 
R&ine,/ 
Tac, *. m. 

pourrir, v. 
Rude, impoli,-e. 
Rond, 8. m. -e. 

adj, 
R6veiller. 
Route,/ 
R6der, errer. 
R6deur, m. 
Rang, 8, m. 

ramer, v. 
Frotter. 
Gouvemail, m. 
Gro8sier,-e. 
Rudimens,m./>^. 
Bure,/barbet«m. 



DITESNATIOKAI. DIOTIOITABT. 



617 



RUI. 


Obrmak. 


Spavub. 


rSKiCH. 


Ruini 


Einsturz, 8. m. 


Ruina, «./. 


Ruine,*./ 




einsturzen, v. 


arruinar, v. 


miner, v. 


Rule, 


Regel, 8,/. 


Mando, «. m. 


Regie, «./ 




regeln, v. 


gobemar, v. 


r6gler, v. 


Rum, 


Rum, m. 


Rum, m. 


Rum, m. 


Rump, 


Rumpf, m. 


RabadUla,/. 


Croupion, nu 


Run, 


Rennen, laufen, 


Correr, pasar, 


Courir, coder. 


Rush, 


Binse,*./. 


Junco, 8. m. 


Jonc, *. m. 




stiirzen, v. 


arrojarse, v. 


se lancer, v. 


Rust, 


Rost, 8. m. 


Orin, 8» m. 


Rouille, *./ 




rosten, v. 


enmohecer, i 


;. rouiller, v. 


Rut, 


Brunft,/. 


Brama, rodada,/. Rut, m. 


Rath, 


Mitleiden, ». [«. Compasion,/. 


Piti£,tendresse/ 


Rye, 


Roggen,f7t.Kom 


, Centeno, m. 


Seigle, m. 


Sabbath, 


Sabbath, m. 


Sabado, m. 


Sabbat, m. 


Sabre, 


Sabel,m. 


Sable, m. 


Sabre, m. 


Sack, 


Sack, Sect, m. 


Saco, m. saca,/. Sac, m. 


Sacrament, 


Eid, m. 


Sacramento, m. 


Sacrement, m. 


Sacred, 


Heilig, 


Sagrado, 


Sacr6,-e. 


Sacrifice, 


Opfern, «. n. 


Sacrificio^ «. m. 


Sacrifice, s. m. 




&v. 


sacrificar, v. 


sacrifier, v. 


Sad, 


Dunkel, 


Triste, 


Triste. 


Saddle, 


Sattel, nu 


Silla,/. 


Selle,/ 


Safe, 


Sicher, 


Seguro, 


Sauf. 


Saffron, 


Safran, wi. 


Azafran, m. 


Safran, m^ 


Sage, 


Salbei, *./. 


Salvio, 8. m. 


Sauge, a./ 




weise, adj. 


sabio, ac^. 


prudent,-e, adj. 


Sago, 
Sail, 


Sago, m, 
Segel, *. n. 


Sagui, m. 
Vela,*./ 


Sagou, w. 
Voile,*./ 




segeln, v. 


navegar, t^. 


naviguer, v. 


SaQor, 


Matrose, 77k 


Marinero, m* 


Matelot, m. 


Saint, 


Heilig;e, «• m. 
hedig, oc^'. 


Santo, 8, m. 


Saint,-e, 8. m,/. 




& adj. 


& adj. 


Sake, 


Ursache,/. 


Causa,/. 


Egard,9n. 
Sdade,/ 


Salad, 


Salat, m. 


Ensalada,/ 


Salary, 


Besoldung,/. 


Salario, m. 


Salaire, m. 


Sale, 


Verkau^ m. 

44 


Venta,/ 


Vente,/.encan,wi 



618 



nnPEKNATIONAL DIOTIONABT. 



SAL. ^ 


QnxAir. 


Bpanibh. 


FRnroH. 


Salivate, 


Den Speichel- 
fluss haben, 


Salivar, 


Faire saliver. 


Salmon, 


Lachs, 7/1. 


Salmon, m. 


Saumor, m. 


Saloon, 


Grosse Saal, m. 


Salon, m. 


Salon, m. 


Salt, 


Salz, 8. n. 


Sal, s.f. 


Sel, s, m. 




salzen, v. 


salar, v. 


saler, v. 


Salute, 


Grtissen, 8. n. 


Salutacion, «./. 


Salut, 8. m. 




& V. 


saludar, v. 


salner, v. 


Salvation, 


Seligmachung,/ Salvacion,/. 


Salut, fTi. 


Salve, 


Salbe,/. 


Emplasto, m. 


Onguent, m. 


Salver, 


Pr&8entirteller,m Salvilla,/. 


Plateau,-x, m. 


Same, 


Der selbe. 


Mismo, 


M^me, 


Sample, 


Bespiel, n. 


Muestra,/. 


^chantillon,/ 


Sanction, 


Gesetz, *. n. 


Ratificacion, «./. Sanction, «./. 




Banctioniren, i 


f, m ratificar, v. 


ratifier, v. 


Sand, 


Sand,* m. 


Arena,/. 


Sable, m. 


Sap, 


Saft, Splint, m. 


Suco, xugo, m. 


Seve,/aubier, m 


Sash, 


Sch&rpe,/. 


Banda, ventana 


Ceinture,/ 




Scbeibfenster,7] 


I. corrediza,/. 


chassis, m. 


Satan, 


Satan, m. 


Santanas, m. 


Satan, m. 


Satin, 


Atlass, m. 


Raso, m. 


Satin, m. 


Satisfy, 


Sattigen, 


Satisfacer, 


Satisfaire. 


Saturday, 


Sonnabend, m. 


Sabado, m. 


Samedi, m. 


Sauce, 


Bniche,/. 


Salsa,/ 


Sauce, / 


Saucer, 


Untertasse,/. 


Salsera,/ 


Soucoupe,/ 


Saucy, 


Unverschamt, 


Dcscarado, 


Inso]ent,-e. 


Sausage, 


Wurst,/. 


Salchicha,/ 


Saudsse, / 


Save. 


Sparen, v. 


Salvar, v. 


Sauver, v. 




ausser, adv. 


salvo, adv. 


except^ cuiv. 


Savor, 


Geschmack, m. 


Sabor, olor, m. 


Saveur, m. 


Saw, 


Sage, *./. 


Sierra, s. / 


Scie,«./ 




sagen, v. 


serrar, v. 


scier, v. 


Say, 


Sagen, 


Decir, 


Dire. 


ScaflFold, 


Gerttst, n. 


Tablado, m. 


^chafaud, nu 


Scale, 


Wage, 8. f. 


Balanza, *. / 


Balance, «./. 




wagen, v. 


escalar, v. 


esaladar, v. 


Scarce, 


Sparlich, adj. 


Escaso, adj. 


Rare, adj. 




kaum, adv. 


apenas, adv. 


k peine, adv. 


Scare, 


Scheuchen, 


Espantar, 


-Effrayer. 


Scarf, 


Scbarpe,/. 


Trena,/ 


ficharpe,/ 


Scene, 


Buhne, Scene,/. Escena,/. 


Scene ,/ 



nrrBBNATIOITAL DIOTIONAST. 



519 



SCJB. 

Scepter, 


OXRMAV. 

Zepter, n. 


Scholar, 


Schiller, ttl 


School, 


Schule,/. 


Science, 


Wissenschaft, /. 


Scissors, 


Schere,/. 


Scorn, 


Spott, 8. m. 


Scot, 


spotten, V, 




Rechnung,/. 


Scotch, 


Schnitt, 8, m. 




Bchneiden, adj. 


Scour, 


Scheueren, 


Scrap, 


Bisschen, n. 


Scrape, 


Schaben, 


Scratch, 


Riss, 8. m. 




kratzen, v. • 


Scream, 


Schrei, 8. m. 




kreischen, v. 


Screw, 


Schraube, «./. 




schrauben, v. 


Scripture, 


Bibel,/ 


Scrub, 


Schuern, 


Scruple, 


Skrupel, 8. m. 




Anstossen, v. 


Scull, 


Hirnschale,/. 


Scythe, 


Sense,/. 


Sea, • 


See,w./. 


Seal, 


Siegel, 8. n. 




siegeln, v. 


Seam, 


Naht, Fuge,/. 


Search, 


Forechen, 


Season, 


Jahreszeit*./. 




wiirzen, v. 


Seat, 


Sitz, 8. m. 




setzen, v. 


Second, 


Secunde, «./. 




zweite, €Ldj. 


Secret, 


€k;heimniss, 8, n. 




geheim, adj. 
Schreiber, m. 


Secretary, 


Sect, 


Secte,/. 


See, 


Sehen, 



Spavus. 

Cetro, m. 
Escolar, m. 
Escuela,/. 
Ciencia, /. 
Tixera,/ 
Desden, 8, m, 

despreciar, v, 
Escorte, m, 
Escoces, 

8. m. & adj. 
Fregar, 
Migajn,/. 
Raer, 
Rasgu&o, 8. m. 

rascar, v. 
Grito, 8. m. 

chillar, v. 
Tornillo, 8. m. 

torcer, v. 
Escritura, /. 
Estregar, 
Escrupu]o,9. f». 

escrupulizar,!;. 
Craneo, m. 
GuadaSla,/. 
Mar, m.f. 
Sello, 8. m. 

seJlar, v. 
Oostura, / 
Exm&minar, 
Sazon, 8.f. 

sazonar, v. 
Asiento, 8. m. 

sentar, v. 
Padrino, 8. m. 

segundo,'a((;. 
Secrete, 

8. m. adj. 
Secretario, m. 
Secta,/. 
Ver, 



FUHOH. . 

Sceptre, m. 
£colier,-e, m.f. 
ficole,/. 
Science, /. 
Ciseaux, m. pL 
M6pris, 8. m. 
^ m6priser, v. 
Ecot, m. 



^ 8.m.& adj. 
Ecurer. 

Morceau,-!, m. 
Gratter. 
Egratigneur, 8.f. 

raturer, v. 
Cri, 8. m. 

crier, v. 
Vis, 8./. 

visser, v. 
Ecriture,/. 
Frotter. 
Scrupule, 8. m. 

h&iter, v. 
Cr&ne, m. 
Faucille,/. 
Mer,/. 
Sceau,-x, 8. m. 

sceller, t;. 
Couture,/. 
Ohercher. 
Saiaon, «./ 

assaisonner, v. 
Si£ge, 8. tn. 

asseoir, v. 
Second,-e, 

8, nu & adj. 
Secret, 8. m. 

8ecret,-e, adj. 
Secretaire, m. 
Secte,/. 
Voir. 



520 



INTEBNATIONAI* DIOTIONABT. 



SES. 

Seed, 

Seek, 

Seem, 

Seize, 

Seldom, 

Select, 

Self, 

Sell, 

Senate, 

Send, 

Sense, 

Sentence, 

Sentinel, 

Separate, 

September, 

Sepulchre, 

Sergeant, 

Sermon, 

Servant, 

Serve, 

Service, 

Set, 

Settle, 

Seven, 

Seventeen, 

Sew, 

Sex, 

Sexton, 

Shade, 

Shaft, 
Shake, 
Shame, 

Shape, 

Share, 



QESItAJI 

Same,f». Soat,/. 

Sacher, 

Schcinen, 

Ergreifen, 

Selten, 

Auswd,hlen, v. 

auserlesen,(i4^'. 

Selbst, sich, 

Verkaufen, 

Senat, m. 

Senden, 

Verstand, nu 

Richterspruch, 

Schildwache,/. 

Trennen, v. 

getrennt, adj. 
September, m. 
Orabmal, n. [m. 
Gereichtsdiener, 
Predigt,/ 
Diener, m. 

Magd,/. 
Dienen, niitzen, 
Dienst, Gruss, m. 
Setzen, 
Festsetzen, 
Sieben, 
Siebzehn, 
Ablassen,nahen, 
Gerschlccht, n. 
Kiister, wj. 
Schattcn, s, m. 

shattiren, v. 
Schaft, m. 
Schuttein, 
Scham, «./. 

schanden, v. 
Geatalt, *./. 

bilden, v, 
Theil, «. m. 

theilcn, v. • 



Spasuu. 

Semilla, /. 
Buscar, 
Parecer, 
Asir, agarrar, 
Karamente, 
Elegir, v. 

selecto, adj, 
Mismo, 
Vender, 
Senada» m. 
Despachar, 
Sentido, m. 
Sentencia,/. 
Centinela, /. 
Separar, v. 

separado, adj, 
Septiembre, ♦». 
Sepulcro, m, 
Sargento, m. 
Sermon, m. 
Criado, m. 

criada, f, 
Servir, 
Servicio, m. 
Poner, plantar, 
Sosegar, 
Siete, 

J3ie^ y siete, 
Coser, 
Sex6, m. 
Sepulturero, m. 
Sombra, «./« 

obscarecer, v, 
Flecha,/. 
Sacudir, vacilar, 
Vergiienza,*./. 
avergonzar, v. 
Forma, «./. 

formar, v. 
Porcion, 8,f. 

participar, v. 



Frshob. 

Semence,/. 
Chercher. 
Sembler, 
Saisir. 
Rare men t. 
Choisir, v, ' 

choisi,-e, adj. 
M^me, propre. 
Vendre. 
Senat, m. 
Envoyer. 
Sens, tn. 
Sentence,/ 
Sentinelie,/ 
Sfeparer, v, 

8epare,-e, adjm 
Septembre, m. 
S6pulcre, m. 
Sergent, m. 
Sermon, m. 
Domes tique, 

m,f. 
Servir. 
Service, m. 
Poser, 
l^tablir. 
Sept 
Diz-sept. 
Coudre. 
Sexe, m. 
Fossoyeur, m. 
Ombre, »./. 

ombrager, v. 
Fleche,/. 
3ranler. 
Honte, «./. 

fmre honte, v» 
Forme,«./. 

former, v. 
Portion, *./. 

partager, v. 



INTSRNATIOKAL DIOTIONABT. 



621 



BHA. 

Sharp, 

Sharpen, 

Shave, 

Shawl, 

She, 

Shear, 

Sheath, 

Shed, 

Sheep, 
Sheet, 

8he]f, 
Shell, 

Shelter, 

Shine, 

Shingle, 

Ship, 

Shirt, 

Shock, 

Shoe, 

Shoot, 

Shop, 

Shore, 

Short, 

Shorten, 

Shot, 

Shoulder, 

Shout, 

Shove, 

Shovel, 



Qmuir. 

Scharf, hart, Agudo, acre, 
Scharfen, Afilar, 

Scheren, [fel,/. Rapar, 
Shawl,m. Schau- Chal, m. 



Fbutob. 

Aigu,-e. 

Aiguiser. 

Raser. 

Sdhale, m. 

Elle. 

Cisailles, s. /. pL 

tondre, t^. 
Qalne, s, f. 

engalner, v. 



Sie, Ella, 

Schere, 8, f. Tizeras, *./. pi. 

Bcheren, v. atusar,if. 

Scheide, *./. Vayna, «./. 

einstecken, v, envaynar,. tr. 
Schuppen, s. m. Cobertizo, s, m. Hangar, s. m: 

vergiessen, v, verier, v. [/. r^pandre, v. 
Schaf, n. veja, papanatas Brebis, /. 

Bettluch, n. Sabana, Linceul, m. 

BogenPapier,fn. escota,/. feuille,/. 

Bret, n. Sims, m. Baxio, banco, m. Table tte,/ 
Muschel, «./. Cascara, «./. flcaille, «./. 

sch&len, v. descascarar, v. icosser, v, 

Bedeckung, *. /. Quarida, f . /. Couvert, 8, m. 



decken, v, 
Scheinen, 
Schindel,/. 
SchifT, n. 
Hemd, n. 
Stoss, 8. m. an- 

fallen, v. 



guarecer, v. cacher, v, 
Lucir, feclairer, luire. 

Ripia, tablita,/. 6ardeau,-x, m. 
Nave,/, baxel, m Navire, m. 
Camisa,/. Chemise,/. 

Cheque, f.m. sa- Choc, 8, m. cho- 



cudir, V, 



quer, 



Schuh, 8. m. be- Zapato, 8. m, cal- Soulier, 8. m. 
schlagen, v. zar, v. chausser, v, 

Tiro, 8, m, des- 

pedir, v. 
Tienda,/. 
Costa, tierra,/. 
Corto^ 



Schuss, 8, m, 

schiessen, v. 
Laden, m. 
Gestade, n. 
Kurz, knapp, 
Yerktirzen, [n. Acortar, 
Schuss, m.Schrot Tiro, m. 
Schulter,/ Hombro, 



Jet, 8, m. lancer, 

V. 

Boutique,/. 

C6te, / rivage m 

Court,-e,£troit,-e 

Abrfcger. 

Boulet,f».ba]le^ 

£paule,/. 



Jauchzen, «.n.& Aclamacion, «./. Cri, 8, m.crier,v. 

V, exclamar, v. 

Schub, 8. m. Empellon, «. nu Coup, 8. m. 

schieben, v, empujar, v. pousser, v. 

Schaufel, «./. Pala, «./. tras- Pelle, «./ ram- 

schaufeln, v. palar, v, asser, v. 

44* 



522 



IXTBRNA'nONAL DICTIONARY. 



sao. 
Show, 

Shower, 
Shriek, 

Shroud, 

Shrub, 

Shut, 

Sick, 

Side, 

Sieve, 

Sift, 

Sigh, 

Sight, 

Sign, 

Signature, 

Signify, 

Silence, 

Silent, 

Silk, 

Silver, 

Sin, 

Since, 

Sing, 

Single, 

Sink, 

Sir, 

Sirloin, 

Sister, 

Sit, 

Six, 

Sixteen, 

Sixty, 



Skate, 

Skeleton^ 
Ski£^ 



GXRMJlH. 

Schau, «./. 

seigen, v, 
Regenschauer,m 
Schrei, s. m. 

kreischen, v» 
Obdach, n. 
Stande,/. 
Zumachen, 
Krank, 
Seite,/. 

Sieb, n. Korb,fn. 
Seiben, priifen, 
Seufzer, s.m, 

seufzen, v, 
Gesicht,».[nen,v. 
Zeichen,«.n.zeich 
Unterschrift,/. 
Anzeigen, 
Stillschweigen, n 
Still, geheim, 
Seide,/ 
Silber, «. n. sil- 

bem, adj, 
Sunde, 8, /. 

sundigen, v. 
Seit, weil, da, 
Siugen, 
Einzeln, 
Sinken, senken, 
Herr, Mann, m. 
Lendenbratcn,m 
Schwester,/. 
Sitzen, 
Sechs, 
Sechzehn, 
Sechzig, [n. 
GrOsse,/. Mass, 
Schlittschuh, s. 

^' laufen, v. 
Gerippe, n. 
Elahn, m. 



SPAiruH. 

Expectaculo^ «. 

m.dexar ver,v. 
Lluvia,/. 
GritOj 8. m. gri- 

tar, V. 
Cubierta,/. 
Arbusto, nu 
Cerrar, 
Malo, ahito, 
Cofitado, m. 
Cedado, m. 
Cernar, 
Suspiro, 8. m. 

suspirar, v. 
Vista,/, flar, v. 
Sefial, m. Seoa- 
Signatura, /. 
Significar, 
Silencio, m. 
Silencioso, 
Seda,/. 
Plata, 8.f. de 
' plata, adj, 
Pecado, 8. m. 

pecar, v, 
Y& que,despne8, 
Cantar, 
Solo, unos 
Hundirse, 
Sefior, wl. 
Sirloin, m. 
Hermana,/. 
Asentarse, 
Seis, 

Diez y seis, 
Sesenta, 
Tamano, m. 
Lixa, 8./, pasar 

sobre lixas, v. 
Esqueleto, m, 
Esquifada,/. 



Spectacle, s. nu 

montrer, v, 
Ond6e,/ 
Haut cri, 8, m. 

Jeter descris,v 
Linceul, m, 
Arbrisseau,-x,m. 
Fermer. 
Malade. 
C6t6, m. 
Sas, tamis, m. 
Sasser. 
Soupir, 8, m. 

Boupirer, v. 
Yxie,/, yeux, m. 
Signe,m.sigiier,v 
Signature,/. 
Signifier. 
Silence, m. 
Silencieux. 
Sole,/. 
Argent, *. m» 

argentin,-e,ac^*. 
P6ch6, 8. m. 

picher, V. 
Depuis, puisquo. 
Chanter. 
Seul,-e. 
S'enfonccr. 
Monsieur, m. 
Sirloin, m. 
Soeur,/. 
Asseoir. 
Six. 
Seize. 
Soixante. 
Taille,/. calilTre, 
Padn,9.m. coorir 

de patin, v, 
Squelette, m. 
Esquif, m. 



[ffk 



INTERNATIONAL DICTIONABY. 



528 



BKI. 

Skill, 
Skin, 

Skirt, 

Sky, 
Slab, 
Siack, 

Slander, 

Slate, 
Slave, 
Sleep, 

Sleeve, 

Slender, 

SUce, 

Slide, 

Slight^ 

Slip, 

Slipper, 

Sloop, 

Slope, • 

Slow, 
Sluice, 

Small, 
Smart, 

Smell, 

Smile, 

Smith, 
Smoke, 

Smooth, 
Smother, 



QsxMAxr. Spavub. 

Geschicklichkeit Habilidad, /. 



Haat, «./. 2u- 

heilen, v, 
Grenze, f./. 

einfassen, v, 
Himmel, m. 
Platte,/. 
Loschen, ik 

schlaff, <idj, 
Schande, «./. • 

beliigen, v, 
Schiefer, m, 
Sclave, m. 
Schlaf, 8. m. 

schlafen, 9. 
Aermal, m. 
Schlank, 
Schnitz, 8. m. 
zerschneiden,v. 
Ausgleiten, 
Klein, gering, 
Ausgleiten, 
Pantoflfel, m, 
Schaluppe,/. 
Abhang, «. m, 

Benken, v, 
Langsam, spat, 
Schleuse, «./. 



Pellejo, $. m. de- 

sollar, V. 
Falda, «./. oril- 

lar, V, 
Cielo, tn. 
Charco, m. 
Afloxar, v. flozo, 

€tdj* 
Calumnia, *:/. 

calumninr, v. 
Pizarra, /. 
Esclavo, m. 
Sueilo, s.m, dor- 

mir, V. 
Manga,/. 
Delgado, 
Rebanada, s. /. 

rebanar, v» 
Deslizar, 
Pequefio, 
Resbalar, 
Chinela,/ 
Balandra,/ 
8. m» 



Klein, 
Schmerz, 8,m. 

schmerzen, v. 
Geruch, 9. m* 

reichen, v. 
LlchelOyt. n. <fe v. Sonrisa, 8. /. 
sonreirse, v, 



sesgar, t;. 
Tardio, lento, 
Compuerta, 8, /. 

cortar, v. 
Pequefio, corto^ 
Escorzor, s, m. 

escocerse, v. 
Olfato^ 8, m. 

oler, v. 



Schmied, m. 
Bauch, 8. m. 
rauchen, v. 
Glatt, ebenen, 
Dampfen, 



Foijador, m. 
Homo^ 8. fik hn- 

mear, v, 
Liso, igual, 
Ahogaf, 



Frxxch. 

Adresse,/. 
Peau,-x, 8. m. 

peler, v, 
Basque, «./. bor* 

der, V. 
Ciel, cieux, m, 
G&chis,m.dosse^ 
L&cher, v. 14che, 

adj. 
Calomnie, *./. 

m6dire, v. 
Ardoise, /. 
Esclave, m.f, 
Sommeil, s, m. 

dormier, v. 
Manche,/. 
D6li£,-e, faible. 
Tranche, *. /. 

trancher, v. 
Glisser. 
L6ger,-e. 
Couler. 
Pantoufle,/. 
Sloup, m, 
Pente, «,/. pen- 

cher, V, 
Lent,-e, lourd,-e. 
Eel use, «./. d6- 

bonder, v. 
Petit,-e. 
Cuisson, «./. 

cuite, v» 
Odeur, 8. /. sen- 

tir, V. 
Souris, 8. m. 

sourire, v. 
Forgeron, m. 
Fum6e, s.f. 

fumer, v. 
Uni,-e, doux,-ce. 
Etouffer. 



521 



INTEBNATIONAL BIOTIONAEY. 



SMU. 

Smut, 

Snag, 

Snail, . 

Snake, 

Snap, 

Snare, 

Snatch, 

Sneer, 
Snore, 
Snow, 

Snuff, 

Snuffers, 

Snug, 

So, 

Soak, 

Soap, 

Soar, 

Sob, 

Sober, 

Social, 

Society, 

Socket, 

Sod, 

Sodder, 

Soft, 

Soften, 

Soil, 

Soldier, 
Sole, 

Solemn, 

Solicit, 

Solicitor, 

Solid, 

Some, 

Somebody, 

Something, 



GXRMAir. 

Schmutz, m. 

Hocker, tn. 

Schnecke,/. 

Schlange, /• 

Schnappen, 

Schlinge,/. 

Bissclien,«.;i. 

schnappen, v. 
Sdeheln, 
Sauern, 
Schnee, #. m, 

schneien, v. 
Schnupftabak, 8. 
m.schnauben,v. 
Lichtputze, /. 
Bequem, dicht, ^ 
So, also, wofem*, 
Einweichen, 
Seife,/. 
Sich erheben, 
Schluchzen, 
Nuchtern, 
Gesellig, 
Gesellschaft,/. 
DiUe,/. 
Rasen, m. 
Lothen, 
Weich, zart, 
Erweichen, 
Boden, m. Land, 
«.n. besudeln,!;. 
Soldat, tn. 
Sohle, «,/. 

einzig, adj. 
Feierlich, 
Erregen, 
Procurator, m. 
Fest, gediegen, 
. Einige, 
Jemand, 
Etwasj 



Bpamuh. 

Tiznon, m. 

Dentadura,/. 

Caracola,/. 

Culebra,/. 

Romper, 

Trampa,/. 



Fekkcb. 

Noirceur, /. 
Surdent,/! 
Sima9on, m, 
Couleuvre, /. 
Briser. 
Piige, filet, m. 



Arrebati&a, #./.Happ£e, #./. at* 



arrebatar, v. 
Burlarse, 
RoDcar, 
Nieve, s.f. 

nevar, v. 



traper, 
Ricaner. 
Konfler. 
Neige, s,f. 

neiger, v. 



Polvo, #. m. oler, Tabac, «. m, 

V, reniffler, v. 

Despabiladeras^Mouchettes,/.^/. 
Abngado, Serr£,-e. 

A&£, mismo, tal, Ainsi, si, aussL 



Remojarse, 
Xabon, m. 
Remontarse, 
Suspirar, 
Sobrio, 
Social, 
Sociedad,/. 
Gallon, 171. ' 
G&ped, m. 
Soldar, 
Blando, flozo, 
Ablandar, 
Mancha, s.f, 

ensuciar, v. 
Soldado, TTL 
Planta del pie, 

«./. solo, adj, 
Solemne, grave, Solemnel,-le, 
Importunar, Soliciter 
Procurador, m, 
Solido, 
Algo, 
Alguien, 
Alguna, cosa, 



Tremper. 

Savon, nu 

S'Sever. 

Sangloter. 

Sobre. 

Social,-e. 

Soci^tlS,/. 

Bobeche,/. 

Gazon, m. 

Souder. 

Mou, mol,-le. 

Amollir. 

Terrain, 8, m. 

saler, v. 
Soldat, m. 
Plante du pied, 
8,f. 6eul,-e, adj 



Procureur, m. 
Solide. 
Quelque. 
Quelqu'un. 
Quelque chose. 



INTABNATIONAL DICTIONABT. 



525 



sou. 
SomeUmes, 
Son, 
Song, 
Soon, 
Soot, 
Soothe, 
Sore, 

Sorrow, 
Sort, 

Sol, 

Soul, 

Sound, 

Soup, 
Sour, 
Souse, 

South, 

Sow, 

Space, 

Spade, 



Spare, 

Spark, 

Spasm, 
Spavin, 
Speak, 
Spear, 

Special, 
Species, 
Specimen, 
Speck, 



OlKMilN. 

Zuweilen, 
Sohn, m, 
Gesang, m. 
Bald, soglelch, 
Russ,m. 
Besanftigen, 
Wunde, «. /. 

wund, adj. 
-Eummer, m. 
Art,Gattung,«/. 

sondern, v, 
Thor, m. 
Seele,/. 
Ton, s, m. bla- 
sen, V, fest, adj, 
Suppe,/. 
Sauep» 
Pokelbriihe, s.f. 

tauchen, v. 
Suden, «. m, 
. siidlich/ adj, 
Sau, s.f. saen, v, 

Baum, 8, m. her> 

urns trei fen, v. 
Spaten, m, 
Spanne, *./. 

spannen, v, 
Sparen, v. 

sparsam, adj. 
Funke, s. m. 

funkeln, ^i. 
Krampf, m« 
Spath, m. 
Sprechen, 
Spies, 8. nu 

spiessen, v. 
Besonder, 
Vorstellung,/. 
Probe,/. 
Fleck, m. 



Sparisb. 

Algunas veces, 
Hijo varon, m. 
Cancion,/. 
Presto, luego, 
Hollin, m. 
Adular, 
Herida, *./ 
tierno, adj. 



Quelquefois. 
Fils, m. 
Chansonj^/, 
Vlte, t6t. 
'Suie,/. 

Flatter, apaiser. 
Ulcere, «. m* 
tendre, adj. 



Pesar, dolor, m, Tristesse,/ 

Suerte, s.f, Sorte, s.f, 

ordenar, v. assortir, v, 

Zote, m. Ivrogne, sot, m. 

Alma,/. Ame,/. 

Sonda, «./. son- Son,*.»i.8onner,v 
dar,v.8ano,a((^'. sain,-e, adj. 



Sopa,/. 
Agrio, 
Salmuera, s.f. 

escabecher, v. 
Sud, s. m. 
meredional, adj. 
Pucrca, s.f. 
• sembrar, v. 
Espacio, s. m. 



Soupe,/. 
Sur,-e, acide. 
Saumure, s.f. 

saucer, v. . 
Sud, s, m, 

du midi, adj. 
Truie, »./. 

semer, v. 
Espace, s. m. 



dar espacio, v. donner espace,v. 
Lay a, azada,/ Beche,/. 
Palmo,«.m.medirEmpan, s. m. 
mesurer, v. 
Epargner, v. 
^ maigre, adj. 
Etincelle, «./. 
6tinceller, v, 
Espasmo, pasroo, Spasme, m. 
Esparavau, m. j^parvin, m, 
Hablar, ~~ 



apalmos, v. 
Ahorrar, v. 

escaso, adj. 
Centella,*./. 

chispear, v. 



Lanza, s.f. 
brotar, v. 
Especial, 
Especie,/. 
Esp^cimen, m. 
Mancha, /. 



Parler. 
Lance, s.f 

tuer, V. 
Sp£cial,-le. 
Espece, / 
Modele, 7n. 
Petite tache,/. 



526 



INTERNATIONAL DICTIONARY. 



SPE. 

Spectacle, 

Spectacles, 

Speculfite., 

Speech, 

Speed, 

Spell, 

Spend, 
Sphere, 
Spice, 
Spike, 

Spill, 

Spin, 

Spindle, 

Spine, 

Spirit, 

Spit, 

Spite, 

Spleen, 

Splice, 

Splint, 

Split, 

Spoil, 

Spoke, 

Sponge, 

Sponsor, 

Spool, 

Spoon, 

Sport, 

Spot, 

Spout, 

Sprain, 

Spray, 
Spread, 



0BHX4V. 

' Schauspiel, n. 
Brille,/. 
Betrachten, 
Rede,/, 
fiile, «./. 

eilen, V. [*.m. 
Zauberspruch, 

buchstabiren, v. 
Aufwenden, 
Kugel,/. 
Gewurz, n. 
Nagel, 8, m. 

nageln, v. 
Verschutten, 
Spinnen, rennen, 
Spindel, /. 
Kiickgrat, n. 
Athem, Gcist^m. 
Anspiessen, 
Verdruss, 8. m. 

kranken, v, 
Milz,/. 

Zusammenfugen 
Splitter, m. 
Spalten, 
VerwUsten, 
Speiche,/. 
Schwamm, m, 
Taufzeuge, m. 
Spule,/. 
Loffel, 711. 
Spiel, 8. n, 

spielen, v. 
Platz, 8, in» 

flecken, v. 
Rohre, «./. 

spritzen, v, 
Verrenkung, *./. 

verrenken, v, 
Reb, n. 
Ausbreiten, 



SpunsH. Frxkch. 

JBspectaculo, m. Spectacle, m, . 
Anteojos, m. Lunettes,/.^/. 
Especular, Speculer. 

Habia, oracion,/. Parole, / 
Presura, «. /. H&te, *. /. 

prosperar, v. h&ter, v, 
Hechizo, 8, m, Charme, 8. m. 

deletrear, v. 6peler, v. 
Gastar, D^penser. 

Esfera,/. . [/.Sphere,/. 
Especia, migaja, Epice,/ 
Clavo largo, 8. m. Long clou, 8. m. 



afianzar, v, 
Derramar, 
Hilar, 
Huso, m. 
Espinazo, m. 
Aliento, m. 
Espetar, 
Rencor, 8, m, 

dar pesar, v, 
Bazo, m. 
Hacer costura, 

Tablita, astilla,/. Pelisse, £chi 
Hender, rajar, Fendre. 
Despojar, Voler, g&ter^ 

Rayo delarueda Rais (m)de roue. 



clouer, V. 
Verser. 
Filer. 

Fuseau,-x, m. 
£pine(/.)du dos. 
Esprit, m. 
Cracfaer. 
Depit, 8. m. 

d^piter, v. 
Rate, colere,/. 
]|pi8ser. [/. 



Esponja,/. 
Fiador, m. 
Carrete, m. 
Cuchara,/. 
Jue^ 8, m. 

diyertir, v. 
Borron, «. 171. 

, abigarrar, v, 
Cano, «. m. 

chorrear, v. 
Torcedura, «./. 

estirar, v, 
Ramito, m. 



Eponge,/. 
Parrain, m, 
Bobine,/. 
Cuiller,/ 
Jeu, 9. m, 

6gayer, r. 
Tacne, «./. 

tacher, v, 
Goulot, 8. m, 

saillir, v, 
Foulure, »./. 

fouler, V. 
Ecume,/. 



Tender, alargar, Etendre, 



INTERNATIONAL DICTIONARY. 



527 



SPB. 

Spring, . 

Springtime, 

Sprinkle, 

Sprout, 

Spruce, 
Spur, 

Spurious, 

Spy, 

Spy-glass, 
Squall, 

Square, 

Squeeze, 

Squint, 

Squire, 

Squirrel, 

Stab, 

Stable, 

Stack, 

Staff, 

Stag, 

Stage, 

Stagger, 

Stain, 

Stair,-s, 
Stake, 
Stalk, 
Stamp, 

Stand, 

Standard, 



Sprung, s, m, 

springen, v. 
Friihlinff, m. 
Sprinkeln, 
Sprossling, 8, m, 

sprossen, v, 
Sauber, 
Sporn, 8. m, 

anspornen, v, 
Unacht, 
Spaher, 8, m. 

spahen, v, 
Fernglas, n. 
Windstoss, 8, m, 

schreien, v, 
Viereck, #. n, 

yiereckig, adj, 
Driicken, 
Schielen, [m. 
Squire, Gefahrte, 
£ichh5mchen,n. 
Stich, 8. m. 

stechen, v. 
Stall, 8, m. 

fest, adj, 
Schober, 8, m, 

auf haufen, v, 
StJib, Stock, nu 
Hirscb, w, 
Geriist, n. 
Taumeln, 
Flecken, 8,m. 

beflecken, v. 
Stufe, Treppe,/. 
Pfabl, Aussatz, 
Stangel, m. 
Stampel, 8. m. 

stampfen, v. 
Stand, 8. m. 

stehen, v» 
Fabne,/. 



Spaiobh. 

Salto, 8, m, 

brotar, v. 
Prima vera,/. 
Rociar, 
Vastago, s, m. 

brotar, v. 
Lin do, pruche, 
Espuela, 8.f, 

espolear, v, 
Espurio, m. 
Esp{a, 8./, 

espiar, v. 
Catalejo, m. 
CbillidO) 8. f». 

chiUer, v. 
Quadro, «. m. 

quadrar, v, 
Apretar, 
Ladear la vista, 
Hidalgo, m. 
ArdiUa,/ 
Punaiada, 8, m, 

herir, v. 
Establo, 8, m, 

estable, adj. 
Niara, «./. 

hacinar, v. 
Baculo, m, 
Ciervo, m. 
Diligencia,/. 
Desmayarse, 
Mancha, «./. 

mancbar, v. 
Escalon, m. 
Estaca,/. 
Tallo, m. 
Cuno, 8, m, 

patear, v. 
Estante, 8. m. 

estar en pie, v, 
Estandarte, m. 



Fksrcd. 

Ressort, «. m, 

sauter, v, 
Prin temps, m, 
Epandre. 
Rejeton, 8. m, 

croitre, V. 
Leste, propre. 
Eperon, 8, m. 

dperonner, v, 
Faux,-sse. 
Espion,-ne, 
8, m,/, ^piei:, V. 
Telescope, m. 
Rafale, «./• 

criailler, v, 
Carr6, «./. 

6quarrir, v, 
Serrer. 
■ILjOucher. 
Ecuyer, m. 
Ecureuil, m, 
Coup, 8. m. 

poignarder, r. 
£curie, 8./. 

stable, adj. 
Tas, 8. m. mettre 

en las, v. 
B&ton, nu 
Ccrf, m. 
Relais, m, 
Chanceler. 
Tache, «./. 

tacber, v. 
Degr6, 6tage, m, 
Pieu,-x, enjeu,-x. 
Tige, /. 
Pingon, 8» m. 

empreindre, v. 
Gu^ridon, pause, 
«./., demurer, v. 
£tendard. 



528 



nrrEBNATIONAL DICTIONABT. 



8TA. 




SPAinsB. 




SUple, 


Stapel, m. 


Emporio^ m. 


Etape,/r6gl6,-e, 




festgesetzt, adj, establecido, a({ 


N adj. 


Star, 


Stern, m. 


Estrella,/. 


Etoile,/. astre,m. 


Starch, 


Starke, *./. 


Almidon, s. m. 


Amidoii, 8. m. 




siarkeu, v. 


almidonar, v. 


empeaer, i^. 


Stare, 


Staar, 8. m. 


Mirada,«./clayar Regard, s. m. 




Btarren, v. 


la vista, v. 


regarder, v. 


Starts 


Ruck, s, m. 


Sobresato, 8. m 


. Saillie,*./. 




auffaliren, v» 


Bobresaltarse, i 


'. lancer, v, ^ 


Starve, 


Verliungern, 


Acabar, 


Etre affam6. 


State, 


Staat,Zustand,m£stado, m. 


]^tat,m. 


Station, 


Stillstand, m. 


Postura,/. 


Station/.poste,7n 


Statue, 


Bildsaule,/. 


Estatua,/. 


Statute,/. 


Stature, 


LeibesgrOsse, /. Estatura, /. 


Stature, /. 


Statute, 


Landesgesetz, n 


I. Estatuto, m. 


Statut, m. 


Staye^ 


Stab, s. m. 


Duela,*./. 


Douves, 8.f. 




zerschlagen, t 


^ astillar, v. 


d6molir, v. 


Stay, 


Sttitze, «./. 


Estancia, «./. 


S6jour, 8, m» 




bleiben, v. 


quedar, v. 


demeurer, v. 


Stead, 


Stelle,/. 


Lugar, m. 


Place,/lieu,-x,»». 


Steady, 


Standhaft, 


Firme, fixo^ 


Ferme. 


Steak, 


Fleischschnitte, 


/'Torrezno, m. 


Tranche, /. 


Steal, 


Stehlen, 


Hurtar, robar. 


Voler. 


Steam, 


Dampf,Dunst,97i 


k Vaho, vapar, [Ic 
Caballo de rega 


>, Vapeur, /. 


Steed, 


Ross, n. Hengstj 


- Counter, m. 


Steel, 


StaHw. 


Acero, rru 


Acier, m. 


Steep, 


Eintauchen, v. 


Escarpado, adj. 


Tremper, v. 




jahe, adj. 


empapar, v. 


escarp6,-e, adj. 


Steeple, 


Kirch tburm, m. 


Toi:re,/. 


Clocher, nu 


Steer, . 


Stier, 8. m. 


Novilio, 8, m. 


Bouvillon, 8, m. 




steuem, v. 


gobernar, v. 


gouvemer, v. 


Stem, 


Stamm, m. 


Vastago,OT. 


Tige,/. 


Step, 


Schritt, 8, m. 


Paso,^. m. 


Pas, 6. m. 




schreiten, v. 


andar, v. 


aller, v. 


Stew, 


Fischbchalter, 


Estufa, 8./. 


Etang, 8. m. 




8,m, dampfen,t) 


estofar, v. 


^tuver, V. 


Stick, 


Stock, 8. m. 


Palo, 8, m, 


BItton, 8. nu 




stecken, v. 


pegar, v. 


attacher, v. 


Stiff, 


Stcif, 


Tieso, . 


R«de. 


StUl, 


Still,a*'.8tiUen,t 


^ Quieto,a4;. seal- Calme, adj. cal- 



noch, adv, lar,t;.todavia,a<ft^. mer,v.encore,aJ; 



INTERNATIONAL DICTIONARY. 



529 



STI. 

Sting, 

Stir, 

Stirrup, 
Stitch, 

Stock, 

Stocking, 

Stomach, 

Stone, 

Stool, 

Stoop, 

Stop, 

Stopper,-ple, 

Store, 

Storm, 

Story, 

Stout, 

Stove, 

Straight, 

Straighten, 

Strain, 

Strange, 

Stranger, 

Strap, 

Straw, 

Stray, 

Streak, 

Stream, 

Street, 

Strength, 

Strengthen, 

Strike, 

String, 

Stripe, 



Gekuan. 



f 8. m. 

stehen, v. 
Larm, 8, m, 

bewegen, w. 
Steigbiigel, rru 
Stich, 8, m. 

stcchen, v. 
Stock, Stamm,ni. 
Strumpf, ni, 
Magen, m. 
Stein, Kern, m. 
Stuhl, m. 
Biicken, s. n. 

sich biicken, v. 
Halt, 8, m. 

stopfen, V. 
Stopsel, m. 
Menge,/. 
Sturm, 8, m, 

stiirmen, v. 
G^eschichte,/. 
Hartnackig, 
Ofen, m. 
Gerade,sog1eich, 
Gerade machen, 
Ton, m, Weise, 

8,f, pressen, v. 
Fremd, 
Fremde, m, 
Riemen, m. 
Stroh, n. 
Irre gehen, 
Strick, m. 
Strom, Lauf, m. 
Strasse,/. 
Starke, Macht,/. 
Starken, 
Streichen, 
Schnur, /. 
Streifen, 

8, m. 6s V, 
45 



Spaiobh. 
Aguijon, 8, m. 

aguijonear, v, 
Movimiento, 8, m, 

mover, v, 
Estribo, m. 
Puntada, «./. 

coser, V. 
Tronco, m. 
Media, /. 
Estomago, m, 
Piedra,/. 
Camara,/. 
Decadencia, «./. 

encovarse, v, 
Parada, 8./, 

impedir, v. 
Tapon, m, 
Copia,/. 
Tempe8tad,>./. 

asaltar, v. 
Relacion,/. 
Fornido, 
Estufa,/. 
Derecho, 
Enderezar, 
Raza,/. tono,9.m, 

colar, V. 
Eztrano, 
Extrangero, m, 
Correa,/. 

Errar, 
Raya,/. 
Arroyo, m. 
CaUe,/. 
Fuerza,/. 
Fortalecer, 
Herir, golpear. 
Cordon, wi. 
Linea, s.f, 
rayar, v. 



Frxhoh. 

Aiguillon, 8. m. 
^ percer, v. 
Emotion, t./. 
, mouvoir, v, 
Etrier, m. 
Point, «. m. 

coudre, v, 
Tronc, m. tige,/. 
Bas, m, 
Estomac, m, 
Pierre,/. 
Tabouret, m. 
Inclination, 8,/. 

s'abaisser, v. 
Pause, «./• 

arr^ter, v. 
Bouchon, m, 
Magasin, m. 
Temp^te, «./. 

temp^ter, v. 
Histoire,/. 
Fort,-e. 
Serre, chaude. 
l5troit,-e. 
Dresser. 
Entose^/^air, 8.m. 

dresser, v, 
ifetrange. 
Etranger, m. 
Bande de cuir,/. 
Paille,/ 
S'foarter. 
Raie, /. 
Courant, m. 
Rue,/. 
Force,/. 
Fortifier. 
Battre, frapper. 
Cordon. 
Raie, «./. 

rayer, v. 



530 



INTERNATIONAL DICTIONABY. 



STB. 

Strive, 
Stroke, 
Strong, 
Struggle, 

Study, 

Stufi^ 

Stump, 

Stupid, 

Stupor, 

Sty, 

Style, 

Subject, 

Subjection, 

Subjoin, 

Sublime, 

Submit, 

Subpoena, 

Subscribe, 

Substtmce, 

Subtract, 

Suburb, 

Succeed, 

Succesi}, 

Such, 

Suck, 

Sudden, 

Sue, 

Suffer, 

Sufficient, 

Sugar, 

Suit, 

Sulphur, 

Sum, 

Summer, 

Summon, 

Sun, 



QnxAir. 

Streben, 
Streich, m. 
Stark, 
Kampf, 8, m, 

kampfen, v. 
Streben, , 

a. n, & V, 
Stoff, «. m. 

stopfen, V, 
Stumpf, m. 
Dumm, 
Staunen, n, 
Schwrinestall,m. 
Giiffel, m. 
Unlerthan, «. m. 
unterwerfen, v. 
Unterwerfung,/. 
Beifiigen, 
Hoch, 

Niederlassen, 
Vorladung, /. 
Unterschreiben, 
Wesen, n, 
Abziehen, 
Vorstadt,/. 
Folgen, [folg, m. 
Gliicklicbe Er- 
Solcher, solche, 
Saugen, 
Plotzlich, 
Ansuchen, 
Leiden, 
Hinlanglich, 
Zuckor, m, 
Folge, 8.f. 

passcn, V. 
Schwefel, m. 
Summe,/. 
Sommer, m, 
Vorladen, 
Sonne,/. 



Spanuq. 

Esforzarse, 
Golpc, m, 
Fuerte, 
Esfuerzo, 9. m. 

luchar, v, 
E studio, s. m, 

estudiar, v. 
Estofa, s.f. 

benchir, v, 
Tronco, m. 
Esttipido, 
Atontamiento,m. 
Pocilga,/. 
Estilo, m, 
Sujeto, s. m. 

sujctar, V. 
Sujecion, /. 
SobreaSadir, 
Sublime, 
Someter, 
Comparendo, m. 
Subscriber, 
Substancia, /. 
Subtraer, 
8uburbio, m, 
Suceder, 
Suceso, m, 
Tal, igual, 
Chuper, 
Repentino, 
Procesar, 
Sufiir, 
Suficiente, 
Azdcar, m. 
Juego, s, m. 

adaptar, v, 
Azufre, m, 
Suma,/. 
Verano, m, 
Citar, 
Sol, m. 



Frknco. 

F&cher. [/ 

Coup,97i.touche9 
Fort,-e. 
Effort, 8. nu 

Lutter, V. 
iltude, «./. 
^ ^tudier, v, 
Etoffe,«./. 

gorger, v. 
Tronc, m. 
Stupide. 

Stupeur,/. [/. 
Etable a cocbons 
Style, titre, m, 
Sujet, 8. m. 

soumettre, v. 
Suj^tion, /. 
Joindrc, ajouter. 
Sublime. 
Soumettre. 
Assignation. 
Souscrirc. 
Substance,/. 
Soustraire, 6ter. 
Fauxboug, m. 
R^ussir, siuvre. 
Succes, m. 
Telle, pareil,-le. 
Sucer. 

Soudain,-e. [der. 
Supplier, deman- 
Souffrir. [sez. 
Suffisant,-e, as> 
Sucre, i». 
Suite, 8,/, 

convenir, v. 
Soufre, m, 
Somme, / 
]^t£, m. 
Citer. 
Soleil, m. 



nrrEKNATIOKAL DICTIONABY. 



531 



BUN. 


Okkman. 


Sunday, 


Sontag, m. 


Supper, 


Abendessen, n. 


Supply, 


Erganzen, 


Support, 


StUUe, 8, /. 




ertragen, v. 


suppose, 


Einbilden, 


Supreme, 


Hochst, 


Sure, 


Sicher, gewiss, 


Surface, 


Oberfldche, /. 


Surgeon, 


Wundarzt, m. 


Surname, 


Zunamc, m. 


Surprise, 


Erstauncn, s, n. 




verwirren, v. 


Surrender, 


Uebergabe, 8, /. 




iibergeben, v. 


Surrogate, 


Stellverlreter,wi. 


Surround, 


Umgeben, 


Survey, 


Uebersehen, 


Suspect, 


Argwohnen, 
Aufhangen, 


Suspend, 


Suspicion, 


Verdacht, m. 


Swallow, 


Keple, *./. 




vei-schlucken,r. 


Swamp, 


Sutnpf, m. 


Sward, 


Schwarte,/. 


Swarm, 


Schwarm, m. 


Sway, 


Schwenken, s. n. 




regiercn, v. 


Swear, 


Schworen, 


Sweat, 


Schweiss, 8. m. 




schwitzon, v. 


Sweep, 


Streifen, 


Sweet, 


Siiss, angenehm. 


Swell, 


Aufschwellen, 


Swift, 


Schnell, 


Swill, 


Sptilicht, m. 


Swim, 


Schwimmen, 


Swing, 


Schwung, 8, m. 




schwingen, v. 


Switch, 


Gerte, /. 


Swoon, 


Ohnmacht,/ 



Bpakuh. 

Domingo, m. 
Cena,/ 
Suplir, 
Sosten, 8. m. 

sostener, v, 
Suponer, 
Supremo, 
Cierto, 
Superficie,/. 
Cirujano, m, 
Apellido, m. 
Sorpresa, 8,f. 

sorpreliender,v. 
Rendicion, j./. 

entregar, v. 
Subrogndo, m. 
Circundar, 
Medir, apeir, 
Sospechar, 
Suspender, 
Sospecha, /. 
Tragazon, «./ 

tragar, v. 
Patano^m. [tierra 
Sobrefaz(/)dela 
Enxambre, m, 
Poder, 8. Tju 

empufiar, v, 
Jurar, 
Sudor, 8. m. 

sudar, v. 
Barrer, 
Dulce, 
Hincharse, 
Veloz, 
Tragazo, m, 
Nadar, 
Balanceo, 8, m, 

balancear, v, 
Varilla,/ 
Desmayo, m. 



fEXircR. 

Dimanche, nu 
Souper, m. 
Remplir. 
Support, 8. m. 

soutenir, v. 
Supposer. 
Supreme. 
S(ir,-e,certain,-e. 
Surface, / 
Cbirurgien, m. 
Surnom, m. 
Surprise, 8./. 

Burprendre, ». 
Reddition, «./ 

livrer, v. 
D^legu6, m. 
Environ ner, 
Considferer, 
Soup^onner, 
Suspendre. 
Soup^on, nt, 
Hirondelle/gouf- 
fre,«.m. avaier,v. 
Marais, m, 
Pelouse, /. 
Essaim, m, 
Pouvoir, 8, m. 

gouverner, »• 
Jurer. 
Sueur, 8.f. 

suer, V. 
Balayer. 
Doux,-ce. 
Enfler, gonfler. 
Vlte, agile. 
Lavage, m. 
Nager. 
Cours, 9. m. 

secouer, v. 
Houssine,/. 
Pamoison,/. 



532 



INTEBJIATIONAI, DICTIONABT. 



BWO. 


Gkrman. Bpakish. 


Frekcb. 


Sword, 


Schwcrt, n. Espada, /. 


^p6e,/. 


Syllable, 


Sylbe,/ Silaba,/. 


Syllable, /. 


Sjlph, 


Luftgeist, m. Silfo, m. 


Sylphide,/. 


Symbol, 


Sinnbild, fi. Simbolo, m. 


Symbole, m. 


Sympathy, 


Mitleidenheit,/. Simpatia,/ 


Syropathie,/. 


Symptom, 


Merkmal, n. Sintoma, /. 


Sympt6me, m. 


Syringe, 


Rohre,/. Xeringa,/. 


Seringue, /. 


Syrup, 


Syrup, fw. Xarabe,/. 


Sirop, jn. 


System, 


Lehrgebaude, n, Sistema,/. 


Systeme, m. 



T. 



Tabernacle, 

Table, 

Tack, 

Tackle, 

TaO, 

Tailor, 

Take, 

Tale, 

Talent, 

Talk, 

Tall, . 
Tallow, 
Tame, 

Tan, 

Tap, 

Taper, 

Tar, 

Tart, 

Task, 

Tassel, 

Taste, 



Gezelt, fi. 
Tafel,/. 
Stift, 8. m, 

anheften, v. 
Pfeil, m. 
Schwanz, m, 
Schneider,fn.[en, 
Nehmeii,ergreif- 
Erzahlung,/. 
Anlage,/ 
Gcsprach, 8. n. 

reden, v. 
Lang, tapfer, 
Talg, m. 
Zahm, adj. 

zahmen, v. 
Lobe, 8./. mit 

Lobe gerben, v. 
Zapfen, s, m. 

anzapfen, v. 
Wachskerze, «./. 
spitz zulaufen,v. 
Theer, m. 
Forte,/. 
Tagewerk, n, 
Quaste,/ 
Gescbmack, s.m. 

schmecken, v. 



Tabernaculo, m. Tabernacle, m. 
Mesa,/. Table,/ 

Tachuela^/T)ordo Petit clou, «. m. 
s, m. atar, v, coudre, virer, v. 
Aparejos, m. Cordages, m. pi. 
Cola,/. Queue,/. 

Sastre, m, Tailleur, m. 

Tomar, aceptar. Prendre. 
Cucnto, m, Conte, rapport,f» 
Talento, m. Talent, m. 



Habla, «./. 

bablar, v. 
Alto, 
Sebo, nu 
Manso, adj, 

domar, v. 



Conversation, &/. 

Parler, v. 
Haut,-e. 
Suif, m. 
Domestique, adj. 

adoucir, v. 



Corteza (/) en 


Tan, 8. m. 


polro,s.curtir,v 


. tanner, r. 


Toque, 8. m. 


Tape, 8./. 


tocar, V. 


taper, v. 


Hacba decera,«/l Flambeau,-x,«m. 


rematarenpunto, terminer en 


Alquitran, m. 


Goudron. [polnte 


Tarta,/ 


Tarte/.aigre,a4;« 


Tarea,/ 


TAcee,/ 


Borla,/ 


Gland de8oie,m. 


Gusto, 8. m. 


Godt, 9. m. 


gustar, V. 


goiitcr, V. 



INTERNATIONAL DICTIONABY. 



533 



TAV. 

Tavern, 
Tax, 

Tea, 
* Teach, 
Teacher, 
Team, 

Tear, 

Teeth, 

TeU, 

Temper, 

Temperance, 

Temperature, 

Tempest, 

Temple, 

Tempt, 

Ten, 

Tenant, 

Tender, 

Tent, 
Term, 

Terrible, 

Terrify, 

Terror, 

Test, 

Testament, 

Testify, 

Testimony, 

Text, 

Texture, 

Than, 

Thank, 

That, 

Thatch, 



OlRMAir. Spaiosil 

Weinscheuko, /. Tarberna,/. 



Tadel, s. tn, 

tadeln, v. 
Thee, m, 
Lehren, 
Lehrer, m 
Gespann, s, n. 

anschirren, v. 
Thrane, «./. 

zerreissen, v, 
Zahne, m. pL 
Sagen, 
Mittelweg, 8. m. 

mischen, v. 
M&ssigkeit, /. 



Impuesto, 8, m. 

impucar, v, 
T6, m. cha,/. 
Instruir, 
Ensenador, 
Yuntas(/)deca- 
ballas, «. parir,v. 
Lagriroa, s./, 

ara&ar, v. 
Dientes, m. pi, 
Proferir, 
Temple, s, m. 

tempiar, v, 
Templan2a,/.[m, 



Beschaffenheit^. Temperamento, 
Sturm, fju Tampestad,/ 



Tempel, nu 
Reizen, 
Zehn, 
Pachter, 

Bewohner, m. 



Tempk), m. 
Tentar, 
Diez, 

Arrendador, 
residente, m. 



Achtung, 8/. an- Aferta, «./. ofre- 
bieten,v.zart»a£(^'. cer, v, tierno^adj, 
Zelt, n. Pabellon, m, 

Grenze, Frist, «./. Termino, *. m. 



nennen, v. 
Ftirchterlich, 
Erschrecken, 
Schrecken, m. 
Priifung,/. 



nombrar, v. 
Terrible, 
Aterrar, 
Miedo, m, 
Copela,/. 



Letzte Wille, m. Testamento, m. 



Bezenffen, 
Zeugniss, n. 
Text,f». 
Gewehe, n. 
Als, 

Danken, 
Welcher, der, 



Testificar, 
Testimonio, m. 
Texto, iw. 
Texedura,/. 
Que, 

Agradecer, 
Aquel, saquello. 



Dachstroh«n.mitTecho, 8. m. 
Stroh decken,v. techar, v. 



4->* 



Frxrch. 

Taveme,/. 
Taxe, «./. 

taxer, v. 
Th6, m. 
Enseigner/ 
Precepteur. 
Attelage, «. m. 

attcler, v, 
Larme, 8,f. 

d^chirer, v. 
Dents,/ p/. 
Dire. 
Humeur, «./. 

temp^rer, v. 
Temperance,/. 
Temperature, / 
Temp6te,/ [/. 
Temple,m.tempe 
Tenter. 
Dix. 
Locataire, tenan* 

cier,-e, m./ 
Offre,*/.oflfrir,tr. 

tendre, adj, 
Tente,/ 
Terme, «. m, 

appeler, v. 
Terrible. 
Terri6er. 
Terreur,/ [f, 
Test,m. epreuve, 
Testament, m. 
T^moigner. 
T6moignage, m, * 
Texte, m. 
Tissu,7n.tissure/. 
Que, de. 
Remercier. 
Ce, cet, cctte, 
Chaume,«m.cou- 
vrirdechaume,t;. 



534 



INTERNATIONAL DICTIONARY. 



THA. 

Thaw, 

The, 

Theatre, 

Theft, 

Their, 

Them, 

Theme, 

Themselves, 

Then, 

Thence, 

Theology, 

Theorem, 

Theory, 

There, 

They, 

Thick, 

Thiet 

Thigh, 

Thimble, 

Thin, 

Thine, 

Thing, 

Think, 

Third, 

Thirst, 

Thirteen, 

Thirty, 

This, 

Thistle, 

Thorough, 

Those, 

Thou, 

Though, 

Thought, 

Thousand, 

Thrash, 

Thread, 

Threat,-en, 



OxRXAir. 

Thauwetter, s.n, 
thauen, v. 

Der, die, das, 

Schaubuhme, /. 

Diebstahl, m. 

Ihr, ihre, 

8ie, ihnen, 

Aufgabe,/. 

Sie selbst, 

Dann, daftials, 

Von da, [heit,/. 

Gottesgelehrt- 

Sehrsatz, m. 

Betrachtung, /. 

Da, dort, 

Sie, 

Dich, 

Dieb, R§,uber,m. 

Lende, /. 

Fingerhut, rru 

DUnn, lichf^ 

Dein, 

Din^, n. 

Denken, 

Dritte, 

Durst, 9. m, 
dursten, v. 

Dreitzehn, 

Dreissig, 

Dieser, diese, 

Distel,/. 

Durch, ganzlich, 

Diejenigen, jene, 

Du, 

Obschon,freilicb, 

Gedanke, m. 

Tausend, 

Dreschen, 

Faden, m. 

Drohung, s.f, 
drohen, v. 



Spakxbb. 


Fkemch. 


Bland ura, s.f. 


D6gel, 8. m, d6- 


dechelarse, i 


V, gelar, v. 


EI, la, lo, 


Le, la, les, V. 


Teatro, m. 


Th64tre, m. 


Hurto, m. 


La rein, m. 


Su, do ellos. 


Leur, leurs. 


Los, las, ellos, 


Leur, euz,'elles. 


Tema,/. 


Theme, m. 


Ellos mismoB, 


Eux-m^mes, 


Entonces, luego, Alors, ensuite. 


Desde all6, 


Par consequent 


Teologia,/. 


Th6ologie,/. 


Teorema,/, 


Th&re'me, m. 


Teoria,/. 


Th6orie,/. 


Allf, all^ 


L^, en cela. 


Ellos, ellas, 


Ills, elles, ceux. 


Espeso, 
Ladron, m. 


Epais,se. 


Voleur,-se, «./ 


Muslo, m. 


Cuissp,/ 


Dedal, m. 


D€,m. 


Delgado, 


Mince. 


Tuyo^ 


Tien, tienne. 


Casa,/. 


Chose,/. 


Pensar, 


Penser. 


Percero, 


Troisieme. 


Sed,»./. de- 
sear beber, v 


Soit s.f. aroir 


soif^ V. 


Trece, 


Treize. 


Treinta, 


Trente, trentam. 


Este, esto, esta, 


Ce, cet, cette. 


Cardo silvestre, 


Chardon, m. 


Entero, 


Entier,-e. 


Aguellos, 


Ces,ceux,celle8. 


Tfi. 


Tu, toi. [tant 


Annque, que. 


Quoique, pour- 


Pensaniiento^ m. Pens6e, / 


Mil, . 


Mille, mUlier. 


Apalear, 


Battre, rossen 


Hilo, m. 


Til, m. 


Amenza, #./. 


Menace, s. m. 


amenazer, ». 


menacer, v. 



INTEENATIONAL DICTIONARY. 



535 



THB. 

Three, 
Thrill, 
Thrive, 
Throat, 
''Throb, 

Throne, 

Through, 

Throw, 

Thumb, 

Thunder, 

Thursday, 

Thus, 

Thy, 

Thyself, 

Ticket, 

Tide, 

Tie,. 

Tight, 



Tlgt 

Tin, 



Timber, 

Time, 

Tin, 

Title, 

To, 

Toast, 

Tobacco, 
Toe, 

Together, 
Toil, 

Toll, 

Tomb, 
Ton, tun, 
Tone, 
Tongue, 



QXRMAH. 

Drei, 
Bohren, 
Gkdeihen, 
Schlund, m. 



gPAinsa. 

Tres, 
Taladrar, 
Medrar, 
Garganta, /. 



Klopfen,9.n.d?2^.Latido, 8. m. la- 
tir, V. 



Thron, m. 
Durch, 
Werfen, 
Daumen, m. 
Donner, «. m. 
donnern^ v. 
Donnerstag, m. 
So, also, 
Dein, deine, 



Trono, m. 
Por, 
Tirar, 
Pulgar, tn, 
Trueno, *. m. 

tronar, v, 
Jueves, m. [do, Jcudi, m. 
Asi, de cste mo- Ainsi, 



FRtsroB. 

Trois. 
Percer. 
Prosperer. 
Gorge,/ 
Palpitation, s.f. 

palpiter, v, 
Tr6ne, m, [de. 
Par, au travere 
Jeter. 
Pouce, m. 
Tonnerre, *. m. 

tonner, v. 



Td, 



Du selbst, dich, Ti mismo, 



Ton, ta, tes. 
Toi-raeme. 
Billet, m, 
Maree,/ 
Lien, 8, m. lier, 

V. 

Serr6,-e. 



Hasta, j9r^. cul- Jusqu'4, prep. 



Zettel, m. Bolete,/. 

Zeit,/. Estacion,/. 

Knoten, 8, nu Nudo, s.m. anu- 

binden, v, dar, v. 

Knapp, derb, Tirante, 
Bis, prep, adt- 

ern, v. tivar, v. cultiver, v.[pL 

Banholz, n.. [fi.Madero, m. Bois,i7i.poutres^. 
Zeit,/. Tonmass Tiempo, m. Temps, m. 
Zinn, n. Estailo, m. Etain, m. 

Titel, tn. Titulo, i». Titre, m, 

Zu, um, in. A', al, hasta, ^A, au, de, pour. 

Gresundheit, «•/ Tastada, e.f. tos- R6tie, «./ r6tir, 

rosten, v. tar, v. v. 

Tabak, m, Tobaco, m. Tabac, m. 

Zehe, / Dedo, del pie, m, Orteil, m. 



Zusammen, Juntamente, 
Netz, ». ». bear- Trabajo, «. i». 



beiten, v. 
Zoll, «. f». lau- 

ten, V, 
Grab, n. 
Tonne,/. 
Ton, SchaU, m. 



trabajar, v. 
Alcabola, s./. 

sonar, v. 
Tumba,/ 
Tonclada,/ 



Ensemble. 
Travail, «.m. tra- 

vailler, v. 
P^age, «.m. son 

ner, v. 
Tombeau,-x. 
Tonneau,-x, m. 



Tono, sonido^ m. Ton, m. voix,/ 



Zung6,8prache,/Lengua,/ Langne. 



536 



INTEENATIOHAL DICTIONAEY. 



TOO. 


GBKKAir. gPAinSB. 


Frkncb. 


Too, 


Zu sehr, auch, Tambien, 


Trop, aussi. 


Tooth, 


Zahn, m. Diente, m. (/. Dent,/. 


Top, 


Gipfel, m. Crima,/.cumbraHaut, m. cune^. 


Torment, 


Pein, *. /. peini- Tormento, s. m 


. Tourment, 8, m. 




gen, V. atormentar, v. tourmenter, v/ 


Torture, 


Folter, «./. fol- Tortura, «./. 


Torture, 8./. 




tern, v, atormentar, i 


f. harrasser, v. 


Touch, 


Qefiihl, 8. n. fiih- ConUicto, *. m. 


Touche, 8./, 




len, V. tocar, v. 


toucher, v. 


Tov, 


Werg, 8. n. Estopa, «./. 


Etoupes, 8./. pi. 




schleppen, v. remolcar, v. 


touer, V. 


Toward, 


Lenksam, Hacia, cerca. 


Envers, vers. 


Towel, 


Handtuch, n. Toalla,/. 


Essuie-main, m. 


Tower, 


Thurm, 8. m. Torre, »./. ele- 


Tour, 8.f. s'ele- 




hoch iliegen,v. varse, v. 


ver, v. 


Town, 


Stadt,/. Plaza,/. 


Ville,/ 

Babiole,/. i 


Toy, 


Tand, m. Chucheria,/. 


Trace, 


Spur/.Pfad, s.m. Rastro, 8. m. tra- Trace, «./. tra- 




verfolgen, v. zar, v. 


cer, r. 


Track, 


Geleise, n. [m. Vestigio, m. 


Vestige, m. 


Tract, 


Strefikc,/ Gang, Trecho, m. 


Region,/ 


Trade, 


Handel, 8. m. Trato, 8, m. ne- 


Trafic, «. w. 




handeln, v. gociar, v. 


traSqiier, v. 


Tradesman, 


Handwerker, m. Artesano, i». 


Marchand, m. 


Train, 


Schweif, m. Treta,/. 


Suite,/. train,m. 


Transact, 


Unterhandeln, Manejar, 


Transiger. 


Transaction, 


Unterhandlung/Transaccion, /. 


Transaction,/. 


Translate, 


Versetzen, Trasladar, 


Traduire. 


Transport, 


Frachtshiff, s. n. RaptO) 8. m. 


Transport, #. m. 




fortschaffeu, v. transportar, i 


;. transporter, ». 


Transpose, 


Versitzen, Trasponer, 


Transposer. 


Trap, 


Falle, Klappe,/. Trampa,velada,/Trappe,pi%e,m. 


Trash, 


Unrath, m. Heces, m. 


Rebut, m. 


Travel, 


Reise, «./ Viage, 8. m. 


Voyage, «. «». 




reisen, v. viajar, v. 


voyager, v. 


Tray, 


Mulde,/ Artesa,/. 


Baquet, 


Treason, 


Verratherei,/ Trmcion,/ 


Trahison,/ 


Treasure, 


Schatz, «. w. Teroro, ». m. 


Trfesor, 8. m. 




auf haufen, v. atesorar, v. 


amasser, e. 


Treat, 


Schmaus, 8, m. Trato, 8. m. 


R%al, 8. m. 




behandeln, v. tratar, v. 


traiter, ». 



INTEBNATIOKAL DIOTIONABT. 



537 



TRE. 

Treaty, 
Tree, 
Tremble, 
Trespass, 

Trial, 

Triangle, 

Tribe, 

Trick, 

Trifle, 

Trim, 

Triumph, 

Troop-8, 

Trouble, 

Trousers, 

Trowell, 

Truant, 

True, 

Trumpet, 

Trunk, 

Trust, 

Trustee, 

Truth, 

Try, 

Tub, 

Tube, 



Tug, 

Tulip, 
Tumble, 

Tumbler, 



QlRMAN. 

Vertrag, m. 
Baum, m. 
Zittern, 
Vergehen, 8. ft, 

iibertreten, v. 
Probe, /. 
Dreieck, n. 
Zunft,/. 
Knifi^ m. 
EUeinigkeit, s.f. 

tandeln, v. 
Schwanken, if. 

schon, adj, 
Sieg, 8. m, 

triumphiren, v, 
Haufe, m, 

Truppen,/.^/. 
Unruhe, «./. 

bemuhen, v, 
Lange weite Ho- 
Kelle,/. [sen, 
MussiggSngcr, 
8jn. miissigjflfcj^'. 
Wahr, acht, 
Trompete,/. 
Rumpf, Baum- 

eUimm, m. 
Glaube, 8. m. 

trancn, v, 
Vorraund, m. 
Wahrheit,/. 
Untersuchen, 
Tonne, Bute, / 
Rohre,/. 
Dienstag, m. 
Siiehen, 

8. n. k V, 
Tulpe,/ 
Fall, 8, m, 

neiderfallen, v, 
Gaukler, m. 



Spanisb. Frktch. 

Tratado, rru Trait6, m, 
A'rbol, m. Arbre, m. 

Tremblar, Trembler. 

Transgresion,«./. Oflfense, 8.f, 

transgredir, v. transgresser, v. 
Prueba, /. Epreve, /. 

Triangulo, m. Triangle, m. 
Tribu, m. [m.Tribu, race,/. 
EngaSo, chasco, Ruse, /. tour, m, 
Bagatela, s.f. Bagatelle, «./. 

tontear, v. badiner, v, 

Aparejar, v, Garnir, v, " 

ataviado, adj, propre, adj, 
Triunfo, 8, m, Triomphe, 8. m, 

triunfar v, triomphe r, v, 

Tropa, /. Troup, 

cucrpo, m, forces,/. 

Inquietud, 8. /. Touble, 8, m, 

enturbiar, v, troubler, v, 
Calzones, Chausses, /. pi, 

Trulla,/ . Truelle,/. 
Ociaso, Tiuand.-e, 

«. m. <k adj, «. w./. & adj, 
Verdadero, Vrai,-e. 

Trompeta, /• Trompette, /• 
Tonco, Tronc, 

trompo, m, ' coffre, m, 
Fiado, 8,m, Confiance, 8,f, 

confiar, v, [m. conBer ^, v, 
Fidei-comisano, Curateur, m. 
Verdad, / Vrai, m. v6rit^/. 

E xa.minar,t€ntar Essay er. \m. 
Tina, /. Cuvier, baquet, 

Tubo, caSon, m. Tube, m. 
Mattes, m. Mardi, m. 

Tirada, 8,f. Effort, s, m, 

arranchar, v, tirailler, v. 



Tulipa,/. 
Caida, «./. 

caer, v, 
Vaso, 



I