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n 



THE 



Suffolk 5n8tttute of EvcbseolOQ^ 

AND 

flatutal Ibistot^. 



PROCEEDINGS . 



or THI 



AND 

ESTABLISHED MARCH, 1848, 

FOR THE 

Collection and Publication of Information 

ON THE 

ANCIENT ARTS and MONUMENTS 

or THB 

COUNTY OF SUFFOLK. 







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CONTENTS. 



CONTENTS. 



PAGB 

Thb Condition of the Arohdbaconribs of Suffolk and 

Sudbury in thb ybar 1603 - - 1 

A Suffolk Captain of the timb of Qubbn Euzabbth. 

By Col J. H. JoBselyn - - - - 46 

SuRVBT OF Orfoud Castlb, 1600 - . •SO 

The Flint Work Inscription of Blythburqh Churoh. 

By Sir W, R. Goioers, M.D., f R.8. - - - 51 

Annual Excursion, 1901 : — 

Bury St Edmund's, Little Saxham, Risby^ IMingham^ Stow 

Hall, Wordwell, Ickworih, Little Saxham - - 59 

Excursion to Little Wenham - - - - 71 

CONVBRSAZIONB AT IpSWICH - - - - 76 

Gild of St. Peter in Bardwell. 

By Rev. Canon F. E. Warren, f.s.a. - - - 81 

Bardwell Churchwardens' Accounts. „ - -110 

Bardwell Town Wardens' Accounts. „ - - 116 

A Prb-Rbformation Village Oild. „ - - 134 

Obituary Notice of the late Lord John Hervby. 

By Sir Wm. Brampton Gurdon, m.p. - - 149 



VI 



C0KTRKT8. 



Extent of Hadlsioh Manor, 1305. 
By (the late) Lord John Hervep 

Nomina Villardm, Co. Suffolk, 1316. Bj V, B. RedHone 

Nbolithig Suffolk. By Edward R. H. Hancox 

ExcuBSiONS, 1902:— 

Otley, Hadieigh^ Keney^ Pohtead, Sox/ord, Amngtan Hall^ 
and Wenham Castle 

Otlbt * 

BoxFORD Church 

Hadleigh Church 

Hadlrigh 

Kbrsbt. The Priort 

„ The Church 

PoLBTEAD Church 

AssiNGTON CnintcH and the Hall 

Ash Booking. By Rev. M, B. Cowell 

TuDENHAM. By r. B. Redstone - 

Records of the Sudburt Archdeaconry. By V. B. Redstone. 
I. Calendar of Register Transcripts 
II. Terriers and Surveys 

Notes on Suffolk Castles. By Vincent B, Redstone 

Hauohley Castle and its Park 

Burgh Castle 

Mbttinghak College and Castle, 1562 

List of the Marine Mollusca Recorded as found in Suffolk. 
By Rev, Carleton Greene^ m.a. 



152 
173 
200 

205 
2Cq 
207 
208 
209 
216 
218 
220 
225 
228 
246 

252 
267 

301 

301 

308 

315 

320 



CONTENTS. Vll 



PAOR 



Notes on some East Suffolk Neouths. 

By Wiliiam A. Dutt .... 326 

Neouthio Suffolk. By Edward J?. H. Hancox - 335 

Uohano-British Pottbrt, near Ipswich. 

By John IShewell Carder - - - 337 

Lowestoft China Factory. By Henry C Casley - - 339 

Excursions, 1903 : — 

Needham Market^ Haughley^ Wetherden^ and Lotveato/t and 

its Neighbourhood - - - - 370 

Needham Marrjit ----- 371 

Hauohlet Church - - - - -371 

Wetherden Church - - - - -371 

Lowestoft and its Neighbouhhood - 373 



Part I. 

Officers, ii ; List op Members, iii — ijc ; Societies in Union, x ; 
Rules, xi ; Report, xii ; Balance Sheet, xiv ; Publications 
Received, xvi ; Publications, xvii — xviii - i-xviii 

Part II. 

Officers, ii ; List of Members, iii — ix ; Societies in Union, x ; 
Rules, xi ; Report, xii ; Balance Sheet, xiv ; Publications 
Received, xvi ; Publications, xvii — xviii - i-xviii 

Part IH. 

Officers, ii ; List of Members, iii — ix ; Societies in Union, x ; 
Rules, xi ; Report, xiii ; Balance Sheet, xiv ; Publicatiosn 
Received, xvi ; Publications, xvii — xviii - - i-xviii 



ILLUSTRATIONS. 



IX 



ILLUSTRATIONS. 



FAGB 

Orford Castlb .... frontispiece 

Inscription on E. Wall of Bltthburoh Church - to face 51 

Ancient British Drinking Cup. Flint Arrow-Head to face 59 

IcKUNQHAM All Saints - - - to face 63 

Cloth Weaver's House, Kersey - - - to face 149 

Suffolk Neolithic Implements - - • to face 201 

„ „ Funt - - - to face 203 

Otley Hall ----- to face 205 

„ South Wall - - - to face 207 

Old House, St. George Street, Hadleigh • - to face 209 

Old Gateway, the Place Farm, Hadleigh - - to face 211 

The Olde Guildhall, Hadleigh - - - to face 215 

Kersey Street from the Church Hill - • to face 217 

Kersey Church .... to face 219 

Old Guild Halu Stoke-by-Nayland - - to face 225 

Ashbocking Old Hall - - . - to face 231 

Old House at Ashbocking - - to face 233 



ILLUSTRATIONS. 



Abhdookino Churchl Exterior. - 

„ I2ITBRI0R 

The Hall, Haughlky Park 

East Suffolk Nboliths 

Neouthic Suffolk 

Neolithic Implemext found at Ipswich in 1902 

Romano British Pots found at Ipswich 

Lowestoft China — Blue Painted underolazb 

Lowestoft China — Enamel Painting 

Lowestoft China — Enamel Painted Tea and Coffee Service to fact 365 

Lowestoft China — Japan Patterns and Miscellaneous to fact 21^ 

Lowestoft China — Dated and Inscribed Pieces - to foot 369 





PAOI 


to fact 


236 


- to face 


239 


to fact 


267 


• to face 


326 


to fact 


335 


to fact 


336 


to fact 


338 


. to fact 


362 


- to fact 


364 



PRINTED FOR THB SOCIETY BY 

W. B. HARRISON, THB ANCIENT HOUSB PRBS8, 

IPSWICH. 



f ttffalk Institute of ^ 




Mnul lliiSiionK 



OFFICERS, MEMBERS, RULES, AND REPORT, 
1900—1901. 




ESTABLISHED 1848. 



mWIOR : W. B. HABBnOIt, AROIBiri HOOSI nMBM. 



THK U- • 

FL'DL. ;, 


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patrott 

THE MOST NOBLE THE MARgUIS OF BRISTOL, L.L. 

president. 

THE RIGHT HON. THE LORD HENNIKER, K.S.A. 

Vice«-|^te^f^ent. 

THE RIGHT HON. THE EARL CAIMXJAN. K.<;. 

THE RIGHT REV. THE LORD BISMOP OF ELV. 

THE RIGHT HON. THE EAUL OF STRADHRoKK. 

THE RIGHT HON. THE LOltD DK SAl MAKEZ 

HIS HIGHNESS PRINCE FREDERICK Dl'LEKF SIN<;H. 

SIR WILLIAM BRAMPTON ^U'KDoN. K.C.M.G. 

THE VEN. ARCHDEACON CHAPMAN. 

PROFESSOR NEWTON. M.A.. F.K.S 

REV. CANON RAVEN, D.D., F.S A. 

GERY MILNER GIBSON CULLCM, KSi^ , MA.. F.S.A. 

ROBERT JOHN PETTI WARD. Ei>Ki, 

CAPTAIN PRETYMAN. M.P. 

1}oiiorary Secretary. 

VINCENT BURROUcm REDSTONE, ES«2. 

(all THRSK GKNTLBMCK ABK KXOFFICIO MKMBKIIH OY THK (OIXCIL.) 

Blecteb Aembers of tbe Council. 

Alokrnon BROKroRD Brvan, Esq., j.p. Thk Lord John Hrkvky. 

RoBRRT Burri^ll, Esq. Rev. Svdenham H. a. Hervrt. 

Robert Clement Cablet, Esq. Rkv. Charlkh William Jonrs, m.a. 

John Shrwbll Cordrr, Esq. Miss Nina F. Layard. 

Rrv. Charles Lett Frltok, b.d. CHARLf» Pautbidck, Ehq., jcn., m.a. 

Rev. Hbnbt Habtkd. Rkv. Canon Scott, m.a. 

Xibrarian. 

Mr. E. Arnold Crack. 

Banlters. 

Messrs. Oakks, Be\'as, and Co., Bury S. EdmuntVi, 



( iii ) 



/Members of tbe Jnstttute 

Corrected to December^ 1900. 



THE SIGN * ISniCATluS THAT THE' MRUBRR IS A COMPOUNDER. 



Abbott, Goor^, 08, Berners Street* Ipswicb. 

Aldrich, Vice Admiral Pelham, ** Tempe," Wcxidbridge. 

Allen, Elliston, Ballingdon, Sudbury. 

Allen, Mrs. Katharine, Egerton Lodge, Fallowfield, Manchester. 

Almack, Henry Horn, J. p., Long Melford, Sudbury. 

'^Amherst of Hackney, The Right Hon. Lord, p.s.a., Didlington Hall, Brandon, 
Norfolk 

Andrews, Mrs. Beatrice, Higham, Bury S. Edmund's. 

Amott, John, Woodbridge. 

Barney, Miss A. £., Rattlesden, Bury S. Edmund's. 

Barnardiston, Colonel Nathaniel, J. p., d.l., The Ryes, Sudbury. 

Barrett, Edwin, 8, Queen Street, Ipswich. 

^Beaumont, George Frederick, f.s a., The Lawn, Coggeshall, Essex. 

Bedell, Rev. A. J., Surbiton House, Stowmarke.t. 

Bence, Edward Starkie, Esq., Kentwell Hall, Long Melford. 

Bensly, William Thomas, ll.o., f.s. a., Eaton, Norwich. 

Betham, Rev. Charles Jepson, m.a., Hon. Cation of Ely, Brettenham Rectory, 
Ipswich. 

Bevan, Algernon Beckford, j P., Bury S. Edmund's. 
*Biden, Charlcj* Walter, m.h.cs., The Ixidge, Cratfield, Halesworth. 

Birch, Rev. Charles George Robt*rt, ll.m., Hranca^ter Rectory, King^s Lynu. 

BisMhopp, Edward Fernley, Hasleinere, S. F2dmund's Road, Ipswich. 
"^Blakiston, R. Milburn, The Very Rev. Dean, Hadleigh Deanery. 

Bond, Mrs. W. K., Pentucket, S. Edmund's R<»ad, Ipswich. 

Booth, William Henry, Alandale, Graham Road, Ipswich. 

Bristol, Tl»e Most Noble the Marquis of, l.l., Ickworth Park, Bury S. EdmundV 

Brooke, Edward, UfFord Place, Woodbridge. 

Brooke, Walter, Lyndhurst, Woodbridge. 

Brooks, Francis Augustus, M.l)., S. Felix, FeIixKt<»we. 

Brown, Rev. Frederic Davy, Wituenham Rectory, Ipswich. 



IV LIST OF MBMBRRS, 1900. 

BurMlI, Robert. WevUer Hall, Bury S. KdmaodV 
Barton, BodimU Henry, WbMvtaMl Park, Ipevich. 
Batler, Rev. G. H., Gaceley VioArac*, Newmarket. 
Buxton, Henry £., J. P., Fritton Decoy, (vreat Yannoath. 

Cadogan, The Right Hon. the Earl, K.O., Culf(»rd Hall. Bury S. Edmund**. 

Carthew, Major Ranulphu* John, J.F., Woodbridge Abbey, Suffolk. 

Cartwright, Yen. Archdeaoon, leklingham Rectory, MildenhalL 

Caaley, Henry Clement. Claremont, 1S9, WorMibridge Road, I|M«rich. 

Caatleden, Rer. George, ii.A., Dennington Rectory, Framlingham. 

Chapman, The Yenerable Frank Robert, m.a., Archdeacon of Sudbury, The 
Almonry, Ely. 

Cheetham Trust Library, Manchester. 

Chennelle, Rev. Alfred William, B.A., LL.n., The School, Ipswich. 

Churchman, Arthur Charles, Wilbury, Norwich Road, Ipswich. 

Clare, Rev. J. B., Wenhaston Yicarage, Halesworth. 

Clark, Rev. William Frederick, S. Stephen's Rectory, Ipswich. 
*Clarke, Sir Ernest, lf.A., P.8.A., ISa, Hanover Squat e, London, W. 

Clarkson, Rev. C. B., U.A., Lawshall Rectory, Bury S. £dmund*a. 

Coates, Miss, London Road, LuwestofL 

Cobbold, John Dupuis, B.A., J.P., Holy Wells, Ipswich. 

Cobbold, Felix Thomley, m.a., j.p.. The Lodge, Felixstowe, Ipswich. 

Colchester, Y. D., 17, High Street, Ipswich. 

Connell, Rev. Archibald John Campljell. m.a., 14, Royal Crescent, Whitby. 
*Copinger, Walter Aithur, LL.n., P.8.A., r.R.8.A., Kemal Cell, Manchester. 

Corder, John Shewell, Royston House, Westerfield Road, Ipswich. 

Corry, The Hon. W. L., j.p., Edwardstone Hall, Boxford, Suffolk. 

Cotman, Thomas William, 7, Northgate Street, Ipswich. 

Cowell, Rev. Maurice Byles, m.a., Ashbocking Yicarage, Ipswich* 

Creswell, Rev. Samuel Francis, n.n.4r.iLA.B., p.r.g.8., Northrepps Rectory, Norwich. 

Crisp, Frederick Arthur, p. a. a., Inglewood House, Grove Park, Denmark Hill, 
London, S.E. 

Crisp, George Edwin, The Hall, Playford, Ipswich. 
*CroHsfield, Talbot K., 8, Stone Buildings, Lincoln's Inn, W.C. 

Cullum, Gery Milner Gibson, m.a., p.r.a., j.p., Hardwick House, Bury S. Edmund's. 

Deedes, Rev. Cecil, m.a., 2, Clifton Terrace, Brighton. 

Denman-Deane, Rev. Richard, The Rectory, Woodbridge. 

Denman-Deane, Mrs. R., The Rectory, Woodbridge. 

Doughty, Rev. Ernest George, m.a., Martlesham Rectory, Woodbridge. 

Duleep Singh, His Highness Prince Frederick, Old Buckenham Hall, Attleburgh' 

Norfolk. 
Durrant, Rev. Christopher Rawea, B.A., Freston Rectory, Ipswich. 
Du Faur, Misn, 48, Leinster Gardens, Hyde Park, W. 



LIST OF MEMBERS, 1900. V 

Earle, Joseph Sim, y.s.A., 0, KeiiRington Palace Gardens, London, W. 

Edwards, Mr. Fredk., 32, Martin Road, Ipswich. 

Eld, Rev. Francis J., Polstead Rectory, Colchenter. 
*Ely, The RiRht Rev. Lord Alwyn Compton, d.d.. Lord Bishop of, The Palace, Ely. 
^Evans, Sir John, K.C.B., n.o.L., ll.d., f.s.a., Nash Mills, Hemel Hempstead. 

Fairbrother, Miss, Syleham Hall, Harleston. 

Farrer, Rev. Edmund, F.8.A., Hinderclay Rectory, Diss. 

Feltoe, Rev. Charles Lett, B.D., The Rectory, Fomham All Saints, Bury S. 
Edmund's. 

Field, Rev. Syndey B., Patcham Rectory, Brighton. 

Fish, Frederick J., Spursholt, Park Road, Ipswich. 

Fison, E. Herbert, Stoke House, Ipswich. 

Ford, Francis, 50, Bromhouse Road, Fulham, S.W. 

Ffoulkes, T. B., 8, Burlington Road, Ipswich. 

Frere, Rev. Constantine, v. a., j.p., Hon. Canon of Norwich, Finningham Rectory, 
Stowmarket. 

^Garlick, H. Stow, u.D., 1352, Garlick Hithe, Eastern Avenue, Cincinnati, Ohio, 

U.S. A. 
Ganz, Charles, Aldeburgh, Suffolk. 
Gerish, William Blyth, Ivy Lodge, Bishop's Stortford, Herts. 

Gibson, The Venerable Richard Hudson, u.a. (Archdeacon of SufiFolk), Lound 

Rectory, Lowestoft. 
Gipps, Cyril Estcourt, 10, York Street, S. James's Square, London, S.W. 
Gooch, Sir Thomas, Henstead Hall, Wrentham. 

Gowers, Sir William Richard, Knt., M.D., F.R.S., 50, Queen Anne Street, Cavendish 
Square, London, W. 

Green, Herbert John, a.r.i.b.a., 31, Castle Meadow, Norwich. 

Green, Raymond, m.p., Netherhall, Bury S. Edmund's. 
♦Groome, William Wollaston. M.D., 3, Wyburn Villas, Surbiton Hill. 

Grosse, Miss Constance, " Ebor," Dorking, Surrey. 
''Guidon, Sir William Brarapt<3n, K o.M.o., c.b., m.p., Assingtcm Hall, Sudbury. 

Gurney, Reginald, Little Haugh, Norton. 

Haggard, H. Rider, Ditchingham House, Bungay. 

Hancox, E. R. H., "The Cottage," Nacton, I|Mwich. 

Hanson, William Bonser, 35, Olarkson Street, Ipswich. 

Harrison, Thomas, 48, High Street, IiMwich. 

Harrison, Walter Evans, The Ancient House, Ipswich. 

Haslewood, Rev. Frederick George, ll-D., d.c.l., Chislet Vicarage, Canterbury. 

Hasted, Rev. Henry, The Cottage, Nowton, Bury S. Edmund's. 

Hay ward, Alfred J., " Loudwater," Melton, Woodbridge. 

*Henniker, John Major, Lord, F.8.A., p.l.. Government House, Douglas, 
Isle of Man. 

Henniker, Hon. Mary, 4, Berkeley Street, Piccadilly, W. 
Hervey, The Lord John, Ickworth Park, Bury S. Edmund's. 



vi LIST OF MEMBKKS, 1900. 

Hervey, Rev. SydenhAin H. A., IH, Anfrel HiU. Hur>* ^. KdinundV 
Hickling, Rev. Edmund I>»v«gio\<«. m.a.. The (trot^, FnMteiid«ti. Wangforti. 
Hill, Rev. CopiDger, BuxhiiH Rect<irT. Stnwin*rket. 
•Hill, Rev. Edwin, m.a., r.c;.^.. The Kect^iry, C«kfield. h •».<»., Suffolk. 
Hoblyn, Richard Anuatrong. K 8.A., SN). AUier H<>«d. S. John • \Vf«<l. N. W. 
Hodges, Rev. George, m.a.. The Vicarage, Hury S. Edmund V 
Hopper, Rev. Edmund Charted, m.a., Sunit«>n Rectory. Hartmtiin. 
Hovenden, Robert, k. a. a. , Heathcote, P«i k • H ill R« >ad, Cn »ydon, Surrey 
HudM)n, Rev. William, m.a., f.h.a., 15 Hart field Sfjoare, Ka*tUfunie. 
Hunt, Robert, 27, London Road, I|»wtch. 
Huntingfield, Lord, He%'eningham Hall, Hale«worth. 

Iveagh, The Right Hon. Lord, 5. (tnwxencr ri.K*e, W. 

Jackaman, Henry Ma«on, J. p., 20, Burlingt«»n Uoad. Iii«wich. 

Jacob, George, Suffolk Archdeac<»nry Registry, U, Arcade Strwt, IijuwicIl 

James, Rev. C. C, Wortham Rectory, Uisn. 

Jarvis, Rev. Henry, m.a., Po»lingford Vicaragf, Clare. StifT«itk. 

JenningA, (veorge, Lagrange H<m«c, X<»wmarket. 

Jervis, White Jervis Herbert, b.a , Felik>%t<»we, I|Mwich. 

Joliffe, John H. J., Warrington Hou^Hf. IiMwich. 

Jones, Rev. An^ell, Claydon Rectory, I|MM'ich. 

Jones, Rev. Charles William, m.a., Pakenham Vicaiage, Btiiy S. Edmund's. 

Jordan, William £., m.a., King'ii College, Cambridge. 

Josselyn, John Henry, j.p., 11, Princes Street, I|»^wich. 

Kemplay, Miss, 48, Lein»<ter Gardens, Hyde Park, London, W. 
King, Herbert Dove, M.I)., m.a, 53. Friars' Street, Sudliury. 

Langdon, William John, Holgate House, Sudbury. 

•Laver, Henry, j.p., f.s.a., k.l.m.. Head Street, Colchester. 

Lawrence, The Ven. Archdeacon, M.A., Honorary Canon of Norwich. Rectory, 
Lowestoft. 

Layard, Miss Nina Frances, ** R«M»kw«n>d," Fonnereau Koad, Ip«wich. 

Layton, Rev. William Edward, m.a., f.m.a., Cuddington Vicarage, .Surrey. 

Little, Rev. Joseph RuNsell, m.a., i?tan»'f-ield Rectory, Clare, Siiffolk. 

Lowther, Hon. William, M.P., Caiiipnea Ashe, Wickham Market. 

Mason, Geoi'ge Calver, Broadwater, Belstead Road, Iiniwich. 

Maude, Rev. Arthur, Burgh Rectory, Wo<»d bridge. 
^Maude, Rev. Samuel, m.a., Hockley Vicarage, Cheluu^ford, E!»*e.\. 

Mellor, Major Alfred, j.p., The Limes, Rushmere. 

Mercer, Rev. Leslie, m.a., Hawstead Rectory, Bur}* S. Edniund'i*. 

Methold, Frederick John, K.s.a., j.p., Thi>rne Court, Shinipling, Bur>S. Ednnind'-», 
*Methold, Thomas Tindal, k.o., j.p., 7, Ashbura Place, Cromwell Road, London, S. W. 

Miller, Henry, Bosmere House, Norwich Road, Iiwwich. 



LIST OF MEMBERS, 1900. VU 

Miller, Robert Maplentone, j.p., High wood, Constitution Hill, Ipswich. 

Miller, Thomas, Fairiields, Tuddenhain Road, Ipswich. 

Monteith, Henry Campin, Stanley Hctuse, 1, Burlington Road, Ipswich. 

•Newton, Alfred, m.a., f.h a., Profe»«8or of Zoology and Comparative Anatomy, 
Magdalene College, Cambridge. 

Normandale, Rev. Thomas, b.a., Grammar School, Cavendish. 

Olorenshaw, Rev. Joseph Russell, b.a., Rattlesden, Bury S. Edmund's. 
•Osborne, Charles J., Hotel Bristol, Forty-second Street, New York City, U.S.A. 

Packard, Edward, J.P., Grove House, Bramford, Ipswich. 
Palmer, C. J., 97, Christchurch Street, Ipswich. 

Parkington, Thomas, jimior, M.I.B. (London), Leicester House, Ipswich. 
Partridge, Charles, junior, m.a., Idah, Nigeria, W. Africa. 
Peck, Mrs., 16, Carlyle Mansions, Cheyne Walk, S.W. 
Percival, Major-Genfral, J. P., Newe Houne, Pakenham, Bury S. Edmund's. 
Perry, Rev. Clement Raymond, d.d., Mickfield Rectory, Stowmarket. 
Pettiward, Robert John, m.a., j.p., Finborough Hall, Stowmarket. 
Pilkington, Rev. James Holme, m.a.. Rectory, Framlingham. 
•Powell, Edgar, 19, Connaught Street, Hyde Park, W. 
Preston, Richard, Tonbridge, Kent. 

Preston, Fleet-Surgeon Theodore J., Royal Victoria Yard, Deptford. 
Pretyman, Capt. Ernest George, M.P., J. P., Orwell Park, Ipswich. 

Quilter, Sir William Cuthbert, Bart., M.P., j.p., Bawdsey Manor, Woodbridge. 

•RAth-Merrillb, Mrs. M. E., 80, North Winner Avenue, Columbus, Ohio, U.S.A. 

Raven, Rev. John James, d.d., f.s.a.. Honorary Canon of Norwich, Fressingfield 
Vicarage, Harleston. 

Rawson, Mrs. K. M., Grove House, Maidstone Road, Rochester. 

Redstone, Vincent Burrough, Mill Hill, Woodbridge. 

Rouse, John Wm., The Firs, Woodbridge Road, Ipswich. 

Ridley, Edwin Perkins, Burwood, Westerfield Road, Iiwwich. 

Rivett-Carnac, Col. J. H., .\.i).c., c.i.k., k.s.a., Schloss Wildeck, Aargafi, 
Switzerland. 

Russell, Rev. Henry, B.D., Layham Rectory, Hadleigh. 

iSaumarez, The Ripht Honourable The Lord Jamei St. Vincent de, J. P., Shrubland 
Park, Ipswich. 

Scott. Rev. Thomas, M.A., Honorary Canon of S. Alban's, Lavenham Rectory, 
Sudbury. 

Seager, Joseph William, 6, S. Peter's Street, Ipswich. 
Spanton, William Silas, IB, Abbeygate Street, Bury S. Edmund's. 
Spencer, Rev. Arthur John, m.a.. The Vicarage, Eye. 
•Stevenson, Francis Seymour, M.P., Playford Mount, Playford, Woodbridge. 
Stradbroke, The Right Hon. the Earl of, Henhaui Hall, Wangford. 
Stuart, Major J., The Hill House, Erwarton, Ipswich. 



Viii LIST OF MEMBERS, 1900. 

Tacon, Sir Thomas Henry, j.p., Red Houie, Eye. 

Talbot, John, Plantation House, Ipswich. 

♦Tapp, W. M., LL.D., 27, South Moulton Street, Oxford Street, W. 
*Tatlock, Miss H. H., Bramfield House, Hales worth. 

Tidswell, Richard H., J.P., 49, Wilton Crescent, London, S.W. 

Todd, Rev. Horatio Lovel, Occold Rectory, Eye. 
*Tumer, Rev. George Francis, m.a., j.p., Rivers House, Russell Street, Bath. 

Tyndal, George Herbert, Minster Place, Ely. 

Upchor, Rev. Abbot Rowland, m.a.. Rectory, Halesworth. 

Wade, Mrs., Elmsley, Yoxford. 

Wainwright, Percy F., 167, Norwich Road, Ipswich. 

Walker, Rev. Henry Ashton, M.A., Ghattishain Vicarage, Ipswich. 

*Ward, Major Harry Parker, m.a., Ohio National Guard, Worthington, Ohio, U.S. A. 

Warren, Rev. Cauon F. E., Bard well Rectory, Bury S. Edmund's. 

*Whayman, Horace W., f.r.s.a. (Ireland) ; Bexley Hall, Gambier, Knox Co., Ohio, 
U.S.A. 

White, John, 18, Brook Street, Ipswich. 

Williams, Rev. Herbert, Ufford Rectory, Woodbridge. 

Wild, Rev. Ernest John, m.a., Rattlesden Rectory, Needham Market. 

Woolsey, Rev. B., M.A., Brightwell Rectory, Ipswich. 

*Wood, A. H. E., Sudboume Hall, Orford. 

Woolnough, Frank, The Museum, Ipswich. 

Wright, Henry John, 4, Museum Street, Ipswich. 

Wyles, Rev. Walter, m.a., Coddenham Rectory, Ipswich. 

Youell, Edward Pitt, j.f.. Beacon Hill, Martlesham. 



Annual Subscriptions, 10s., DUE JANUARY 1st. Life Composition, £5. 

Persons desiroun of becoming Members are requested to send in their names and 
addresses to the Honorary Secretary. 

Should any errors, omisBions of honorary distinctions, etc., be found in the List 
of Members, it is requested that notice hereof may be given to 

VINCENT BURROUGH REDSTONE, Esq., Honorary Sceretary, 

Mill Hill, Woodbridge. 



ItiTkkkwyohxI 
PUBLIC LIBRARY 



(ix) 



ASTOI^, LLNV-.X A«0 



f>onotari? /Dembers. 

Green well, Rev. William, u.a., d.cl., F.R.S., F.8.A., Minor Cimon of Durham, 
Durham. 

Howard, Joseph Jackson, Esq., LL.D., F.B.A., Maltravers Herald Extraordinary, 
Mayfield, Orchard Road, Blackheath, S.E. 

Muskett, J. J., 11, Talbot Road, Sou^h Tottenham. 

White, Rev. Charles Harold Evelyn, F.S.A., Rampton Rectory, Cambrid{(e. 



publications. 

Copies are sent to :— 

1. Members. 

2. Honorary Members. 

8. The Secretaries of Societies in Union, including those in America. 
4. Librarians of :— 

Ipswich Museum. 

British Museum. 

Bodleian, Oxford. 

University, Cambridge. 



The Council are not answerable for any opinions put forth in this work. Each 
Contributor is alone responsible for his own remarks. 

Authors would greatly further the interests of. the Institute and save much 
unnecessary expense in the correction of proofs, if they would be g(X)d enough to 
write clearly, and on only one side of the paper. 



Jl^ocirtir$ in ^nion, 

FOR INTBRCHANGB OP PUBLICATIONS, ftc. 

Antiquaries, Society of, HiirIiii;:ton HotiHe, riccutiiltv, Loudon, W. 

Sec., W. H. St. John Hojie, tlwj., ma. 
Bed ford tt hi re. Architectural and Archa^>l<i^cal Society of. 

H<m. Sec , Rev. Jereiuifth W. Hadd«ick. h.a., 7, Wmd^iir Tennce, Bedford 
Bradford Historical and Archaeolojiicnl S4»ciety. 

Hon. Seo , John CUphain, Ejk]., C, Sunny lijuik. Sbipiey. 
Bristol and Gloncester«hire ArchaH»l»);:ical SiKiiety. 

Hon. Sec., Rev. W. Bazeley, M.A.,Tbe Society '» Library, Eastgmte, Gloac««t*' 
Cambridge Antiquarian Society. 

Hon. Sec., Thomas Din ham Atkin«on. £«q., S. Mar}**s PaaMce. Caabridc<" 
East Herta. Archjeolojrical Society. 

Hon. Sec., W. B. Geri«b, Esq., I\y Lodge, Bi*ho|/it Stnrtford. 
Essex Archucological Society 

Hon. Sec., (xeorge Frederick Beaumont, F.a.A.. The Lawn, Coggeehall* £■»■ 
Kent Archteolo^ical Society. 

Hon. Sec., George Payne, jun., K^q., f.a.a., r.L.^, The Precinct, Rochester 
Lancashire and C'hesliire HiMt»)ric Society of. 

Hon. Sec., R. D. Ratclitfe, Ei«i , M.a., k.h.a.. Royal Institution, Colquitt 
Street, Liverpool. 
Leicester Architectural and ArchfOolo«:ical Society. 

Hon. Sec., Major Freer, 10, New Street, Leicester. 
London and Middlesex A re haet ►logical Society. 

Hon. Sec., Charles Welch, E*q., k.ji.a.. Guildhjill Librar>', Londtm, E.C. 
Lincoln and Nottinghatn, Architectural and Archieological Society of. 
Counties of. 

Hon.Sec.,Rer. Arthur Maddifion, v.a., f.h.a., Librnrian, Vicar*sO>urt, Line -'r. 
Lincoln's Inn, The Hon. Society of. The Lil)rariau. 
Montgomeryshire, The Fo\vy?j Land Club. 

Hon. Sec., Thomas Simiwon Jone*i. m.a., (iungrf^ Hall, WeNhiHiol. 
Natural History Museum, Cromwell Koad, S.W. 

Librarian, B. B. \Vo<»d\vard, Kim|. 
Newcastle Society of Anti(juuries. Hon. Sec, The Castle, Newcastlr. 
Norfolk and Norwich Archteologicjd Society, Norwich. 

Hon. Sec., Leonard (i. Bolinffbroke, Knq., The Clone, Norwich. 
Northampton, Architectural .Society of the Arclnleaconry of. 

Hon. Sec, Christopher Ale.xander Markham, Ei«q., K.t*.A., 4, S. George's P'.u.o» 
NorthHmi>ton. 
Royal Archajological Institute of Great Britain, 20, Hanover Sijuare. 
London, W. 

Hon. Sec., Arthur Henry Lyell, K»q., k.k.a. 
Somersetshire Archieological and Natural History Society. 

Hon. Sec , C. J. Turner, Esq., The Cantle, Taunton. 
Surrey Archeeolo^^ical Society. 

Hon. Sees., M. S. Guiseppi, Esq., F.s.a., and Rev. T. S. Coojwr, M.a., F.^.a 
Castle Arch, Guildford 
Yorkshire Agricultural Society. 

Hon. Sec., Rev. William Haworth, 10, Bootham Terrace, York. 
Ireland. Royal Historical and Archajological Association of Ireland. 

Hon. Sec., Robert Cochrane, E«*q., h.r.i.a., Rathgar, Dublin. 
Massachusetts Historical Society, Boston, United States of America. 
Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C. 



(xi) 
RULES OF THE 

J^uffolb institute of ^r^Ita^ology and Natural liistorif. 



1. The Society shall be called the "Suffolk Institute of 
Archieology and Natural History." 

2. The object of the Institute shall be — 

1. To collect and publiHh iti formation on the Archaeolog}- and Natural 

Hintory of the District. 

2. To oppo>e and prevent, aa far as may be practicable, any injuries with 

H'nich ancient raonumenttt of every de8cription, within the diHtrict 
may be from time to time threatened, and to collect accurate 
drawings, plans, and descriptions thereof. 

3. The Institute shall consist of Ordinary and Honorary Members. 

4. Each Ordinary Member shall pay an annual Subscription of 10s.» 
to be due in advance on the 1st of January, and shall be considered 
to belong to the Institute uutil he withdraws from it by a notice in 
writing to the Secretary. A donor of £5 shall be a Life Men)ber. 

5. The OfiBcers of the lustitute shall be a President, Vice- 
Presidents, a Treasurer, and Honorary Secretary, all of whom shall be 
elected for the year at the Annual Meeting. 

6. The general management of the aff'airs and property of the 
Institute shall be vested in the Council, consisting of the OflScers, and 
of twelve Members elected from the General body of the Subscribers, to 
retire annually, but eligible for re-election. 

7. The C'ouncil shall meet to transact the ordinary business of the 
Institute, not less than three tiuies a year. They shall have power to 
make Byelaws, appoint (.'onnnittees and Local Secretaries, recommend 
Honorary Members fur election by the Annual Meeting, supply vacancies 
that may occur during the year iu their own body or nmong the officers, 
and to make arrangements for Excursions and other meetings. They 
shall also annually frame a Report aud prepare the Accounts for 
submission to the Annual Meeting. At the Meetings of the Council, 
three to be a quorum, and the Chairman to have a casting vote. 

8. The ordinary place of meeting shall be Bury St. Kdmund's, but 
it shall be in the discretion of the l.'ouncil to hold meetings at other 
places, if, and when they shall think it advisable. 

9. Each Member shall be entitled to free admission to the General 
Meetings of the Institute ; and he shall also be entitled to the use of 
the Lila-ary, and to a copy of each publication of the Institute ; but no 
copy of auy such publication shall be delivered to any member whose 
subscription is n)utre than twelve months in arrear. 

10. The Annual Meeting shall be held in the month of April or May 
in each year, or at such other time as shall be fixed upon by the Council. 

11. All papers presented to the Institute shall thereby be con- 
sidered its property, and the Council may publish the same in any way, 
and at any time, they may think proper. 



Xii ANNUAL RKPORT, 1900 — 1901. 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1000-1901. 

In presenting the Fifty -third Annual Report the Coiiucil oon|sr»tn!\' 
the members on the geiieniHy satisfactory condition of the Institii*' 
Steady work has lieen done thn>tighout the yeiir to iufonu the pul^sc 
the objects for which the Institute «tia foumled. 

Although there lias l)een no (rreut result achieved, yet more tU:: 
proofs of the interest tuken by individuul niemltem are abundant. T • 
Council desire to thank Miss Nina l^yard for the many opportuint2-« 
she has given for niembem to become ac<{uainted «ith specimeii^ 
archaeological and antiquarian interest found in her researches, and ti e 
Rev. W. E. Lay ton, Mr. C Partridge, and othent, for the literxr;. 
support given to the Iu.<)titute. 

The Annual Excursion was held the 9th of August, 1900, an :. 
but for the inclemency of the weather, was very sucoe«»f.jl 
A full account of tlie excursion ni)|)ears in Vol. x, part 3, of tL< 
Proceedings of the Institute, already placed in the hands of the meoilierb. 
The Council, however, wish here to record their thanks to the lady ani 
gentlemen (Mrs. C. Austin of Hrandeston Hall, Rev. R. Abbay of E.&r. 
Soham, Rev. \V. French of Worlingworth, Rev. E. Harry of Bad in^hau'. 
and of Mr. 8airby of Letheringhain Ablwy), for the hearty we Icon. -• 
which they extended towards their quests, and for the readiness with 
they granted permission to view the sites upon the route. 

The Council also desire to place on record the hearty thanks of th** 
Institute to the Wonjliipful Mayor and Mayoress of Bury St. Edmund '•$ 
(Mr. and Mrs. T. Shi Hi toe), for their kind hospital it}* at the soirte held 
at Moyses' Hall, Bury St Edmund's, Wednesday, 7th Nov., 1900. 

The Rev. Canon Warren of Bardwcll read an instructive paper upon 
**A pre-Reformntion Village Guild." Canon Warren has offered hi^ 
verbatim copy of the manuscript for publication, which the Council 
hope at some future date to be able to present to the members. 

The Hon. Sec. read a paper on " The Dutcii in Suffolk before the 
16th century." 

The President of the meeting read an instructive paper on "The 
destruction of man}' interesting features of our old churcheH by so-called 
Restoration." 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1900 — 1901. xiii 

Several new members were elected — The Major, Rev. A. W. Cnllis, 
Rev. Canon Hodges, Rev. F. L'Estrange Fawcett, and Mrs. C. F. 
Hawson of Rochester. 

The Woodbridge Field Club, of which Mr. Walter Brooke and 
Major K St. F. Moore are joint- Presidents, invited the inembers of the 
Suffolk Institute of Archaeology to pay a visit on Saturday, 4th Nov ^ 
1900, to the scene of recent excavations at Burgh, near Woodbridge, 
v^hich have revealed what is believed to have been a Romano-British 
Camp. In the dining-room of the Bull Hotel, there was displayed a 
collection of objects which have been found at these Burgh workings — 
objects which undoubtedly prove that it must have been a Roman 
Station of some sort, and of considerable importance. 

There were present at this meeting — Mr. G. E. Fox, F.8.A., Mr. W. 
H. St John Hope (Hon. Sec. Soc. Antiq.), and Mr. A. H. Lyell (Sec. of 
Roy. Arch. Inst), — and these gentlemen expressed to the members 
their views on the character of the work under notice. 

The Coiincil congratulate the members upon having now in their 
possession copies of the long-promised '* Suffolk Feet of Fines,'' published 
under the editorship of Mr. Walter Rye. The cost of publication 
necessitated an unusual call upon the annual income of the Institute^ 
so the Council were compelled to withdraw £50 from the Deposit 
Account at the Bank to meet the additional expense. 

The Council greatly regret the loss to the Institute incurred by the 
death of J. H. Porteous Cakes, Esq., of Nowton Court, a warm supporter 
of the Society from its earliest years. 



XIV 



BALANCE SHEKT. 



SUFFOLK INSTITUTE OF ARCHiCOLOGY. 

£ 8. d. 



1900. Receipts. 

To Balance at Bank — Deposit Account 
„ „ in Secretary's Hands 
„ Interest on Deposit Account 
„ Subscriptions ... 
„ Life Members* Subscriptions 
„ Sale of Publications 
,, Excursion Tickets 
„ Copies of Feet of Fines — W. llje 
„ Balance due to W. E. Harrison 
„ „ Secretary ... 



£ 
195 
1 



71 9 
U 



6. 


10 



4 17 



80 

10 

4 



5 16 
10 



d. 

6 
3 


3 





3 5 



I certify the above account to be correct, 
T. EDGAR MAYHEW, 
Thorofare, Ipswich, Chartered Accountant. 

16th April, 1900, 



£384 5 



BALANCE SHEET. 



XV 



BALANCE SHEET, DECEMBER 31st, 1900 

Payments. £ s. d 



1900. 

By Balance due to Bank 

„ Printing, Binding, and Postage of Vol. x, pt. 3 
„ „ „ „ Feet of Fines 

„ Lithographer — White ... ... 5 3 

„ „ Spanton ... ... 19 8 



„ Insurance 

„ Subscription to Congress of Archaeological Societies 

„ Auditor 

„ Rent (Atheneeum) ... ... ...1000 

„ Librarian — Postage and Carriage ... 4 8 



„ Binding — Fox 

„ „ and Stationery — Harrison 

„ Index to Proceedings of Essex Arch. Society 

„ East Anglian Notes and Queries 

„ History of Rattlesden 

„ Postage and Stationery — Secretary 

„ Travelling Expenses do. 

„ Excursions 
„ do. Trap Hire, &c., Garnhani 

„ Sundries 

„ Balance at Bank — Deposit Account 

„ do. do. Current Account 



1 10 
6 17 11 



£ 8. d. 

26 1 1 

51 2 8 

35 16 1 



6 12 8 

1 2 6 

1 

1 1 



10 4 8 



8 7 11 



7 


6 








5 











11 















1 

3 


3 

10 


6 
11 










5 


9 


7 


2 13 


6 








5 16 















8 


9 
16 


6 
11 






205 











18 ] 


5 










— 


223 


I 


5 



£384 6 



Xvi PUBLICATIONS RECEIVED, 1901. 



Publications Received, I90i. 

Antiquaries, Proceedings of the Society of. Vol. xviii., No. 1. 
1899—1900. 

ArchsBologia. Vol. lvii , pt. 1. 

Bradford Historical and Antiquarian Society. The Bradford Antiquary. 
Parts 1—6 inclusive, 1896—1901. Index. 

Bristol and Gloucester Arch»ological Society, Transactions. Vol. xxii., 
pt. 3, 1899; Vol. xxiii., pt. 1, 1900; pt. 2, 1901. 

Cambridge Antiquarian Society. 
Cambridge Borough Charters. 
Index to Proceedings, 1840—1897. 
Place Names of Cambridgeshire. By Prof. Skeat. 

£a8t Hertfordshire Archsoological Society, Transactions. Vol. i., pt. 2. 
1900. 

£astem Counties Magazine. Vol. i. Presented by Hon. Mary Henniker. 

Essex Archaeological Society. Index to Transactions. Vol. vi. New 

Series. Vol. viii., pt. 2. 
Ireland, Royal Society of Antiquaries. Vol. x., pt. 4. 1900. 

Lancashire and Cheshire Historical Society, Transactions. Vol. u. 
New Series. Vol. xv. 1899. 

Lincoln's Inn, Hon. Society of. Black Book, Vols. i. and ii. ; Records, 
Vols. I. and ii., 1420—1893. 

Newcaatle-on-Tyne Society of Antiquaries. Index to Proceedings of. 
Vol. IX.; 29—31, 1900 ; Original Papers, Vol. xiii., pts. 1—3, 
Vols. XIV., pts. 1 and 2, 1895—1899. 



American and ForeiKn Booka. 

Smithsonian Institute. 

American Fishes. Pt. 4. 

Hydroids. Pt 1. Plumularidn. 

Annual Report. 1898—1899. 
pt. 2. 1899—1900. 



(xvii) 



PUBLICATIONS of the 

Surrolk Instirute or jlrcbaeoloflp $ natural Ristorp. 



Member's desirous of completing their Sets of the Society's 
Publications can purchase them at the following prices: — 



Date. 



Pages. Price. <. d. 



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Partl^ 


( 




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) ■ • 




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( xviii ) 
Pigot's Hadleigh (Part 1 of Vol. III.), in oloth, complete ... 7b. 6d. 



As very few copies of several of the before-mentioned Publications 
now remain, early application should be made to the Honorary 
Secretary. 



Copies of the "Church Plate of Suffolk/' the Set in 27 Deaneries, 
complete, bound in maroon cloth, lettered at back, and stamped with 
the Society's Seal. Price 12s. Od. Single Deaneries, One Shilling. 

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PUBLICATIONS 

OF THl 

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For some ye.ira past the first four Parts of the Publications of the 
Institute (pageti 1 — 156) have been out of print, aud members have had 
considerable difficulty in completing their Sets of Volumes. At the 
suggestion of several recent sulMcribers, the Council have republished 
the scarce parts. Tlieae reprints are an exact facsimile of the originals, 
the type aud pagiuatiou agreeing in all respects, whilst the woodcuts 
and lithographs have beeu most carefully reproduced. 



Back numbers and BIndlna. 

Members desiring to complete their Parts and Volumes, or who 
would like to have their Volumes bound, with the Seal of the Institute 
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The three Parts forming Volume x., will, upon receipt, be bound 
for 48. Od. 

Other Volumes bound on the same terms. 



(1) 



^tt«0lfe |ttj8ititttte 0f 3^tchaf0l09g. 



THE CONDITION OF THE ARCHDEACONRIES 

OF SUFFOLK AND SUDBURY 

in' the year 1603. 

IN Volume vi., page 361, of the Proceedings, there is 
a paper bearing the above title, which only gives the 
Archdeaconry of Suffolk. In the Harl. MS., after 
the letter to the Archdeacons and the Archbishop's letter 
containing the questions, which he wished to have 
answered, there follows a state of the Archdeaconry of 
Sudbury, w^hich is here transcribed : for some reason the 
Suffolk Archdeaconry was done first and this left. The 
Sudbury Archdeaconry, then in the Norwich Diocese, has 
since been transferred to Ely. 



y 



1603°. Archinatus Sudburie. 
Certificatorium venerabilis viri mag^ Cuthberte Norris sacro 
theologie professoris, Archidiaconi Archinatus Sudburie in Ecclia 
Cathedriali Norwicefi per clerum infra dictum Archidiaconatum comor' 
et degefi iuxta tenerem Irarium re&endissiiS in Chro patris et Dn) DS 
Johannis Diuina prouidentia Cantuariefi Archiepi totius Anglic primatis 
et Metropolitani et de mandato reuerendi in Chro patris Di9 DiS 

B 

Vol, XI. Pabt 1. 



2 CONDITION OF THK ARCHDEACONRIKS OF 

Johannis eudnu Diuiua prouidetitia Nurwicefi Epi de et s\\\>er qiiibusdn) 
Articulis dictis Irla reuereiidissimis uiitiexitf fact' primo die Augu8ti 
Auno regiii illustrissimi et poteiitissiuii in dii^o priiicipiM et Dn) in Dofi 
Jacobi Dei gra Anglie Scotie ffrancie in Hiberuie Regis fidei Defeni &c 
prinio iinnoq3 ^^ 1603^ 

1603. DecanatuB de Thingo et Thedwastre. 

Ampton. 

Magr Willmus Noble, Hector ibidem dicit ut sequiV. 

Ae Ini. theare be comunicantes w^Mn that 8ma1l pish — xjjl, 

Ae 2m. no recusantes theare. 

Ae 3m. nor anye that doo refuse to receyve the holie comunion. 

Ae 4m. he hath but that small personage of Ampton. 

Ae 5m. no Impropriation, nor Vicar indued. 

Ae 6m. he saieth as before in the fift article. 

Ae 7m. one Mr. Thomas Coale genP is patron. 

Barton Magna. 

M**. Roger us Browninge Vicarius ibidem dicit. 

Ae Im. that theare are eight score comunicantes — clx. 

Ae 2m. et 3m. that theare are no recusantes at this present, neither 

anye that doo refuse to receyve the holie comunion. 
Ae 4m. he hath but onlye the Vicaredge of Barton. 
Ae 5m. et 6m. Harton is an Impropriation out of w^h the sayed 

Vicaredge is indued and the Vicaredge valued in the King's 

Book at x^ XV" 
Ae 7m. One Katherine Awdeley wedowe at Beare ('hurch in Essex 

lx)oth proprietory and Patron. 

Bradfylde Combusta. 

Mr. Thomas Ager rector ibidem dicit 

Ae Im. the nomber of the Coiiiunicantes theare are — Ix. 

Ae 2m. et 3m. no recusantes neither anye that refuseth to receyve 

the holye comunion. 
Ae 4m. he hath but the sayed Vicarye of burnt Bradfyld. 
Ae 5m. no Impropriation nor Vicaredge. 
Ae 6m. as before in the same fift article. 
Ae 7m. M^ Robert Cutler of Ippesw^^^^ geuV is patron. 

Bradfylde Clare. 

M''. Richardus Granditch RecP ibidem dicit. 

Ae Im. the nomber of the Coinuuicantes theare are — Ixiiij. 

Ae 2m. et 3m. no recusantes nor anye that doo not comunicate. 

Ae 4m. he hath no other Lyvinge. 

Ae 5m. et 6m. no Impropriation nor Vicaredge endowed. 

Ae 7m. S^ Robert Jermyn, Knight, patron. 



SUFFOLK AND SUDBURY IN THE YEAR 1603. 3 

Bradfjlde Georgij. 

Mr. Laiirentiiis Whetaucres Rector ibidem dicit. 

Ae Im. the noniber of the Comunicautes theare are — 159. 

Ae 2m. et 3m. uo recusantes now nor anye that refuse the Holie 

Comunion. 
Ae 4m. no other benefice. 
Ae 5m. 6m. et 7m. no Impropriation nor Vicaredge indued. The 

Patron S'. Robert Jermyn, Knight. 

Beigton. 

M*". Simo' Bailarde Rector ibidem dicit. 
Ae Im. Coinunicantes to the nomber of — 64. 
Ae 2m. et 3m. no rescusantes neither of Church nor Comunion. 
Ae 4 m. no other Benefice. 

Ae 5m. 6m. et 7m. no Impropriation nor Vicar indued. The 
King his ma**« patron. 

Barrowe. 

Mr. ReginalduB Whitfyld rector ibidem. 
Ae Im. Comunicantes to the nomber of — 190. 
Ae 2m. et 3m. no Recusantes from Church nor Coinunion. 
Ae 4m. he hath no other but Barrowe a Rectorye. 
Ae 5m. 6m. et 7m. no Impropriation nor Vicaredge S^. John 
Heigham, patron. 

Brockley. 

M"". Nicholaus Rookes, Rector i5m dicit. 
Ae Im. Coinunicantes to the nomber of — 114. 
Ae 2m. et 3m. one man a recusant and no more. 
Ae 4ra. a Rectorye and he hath no other. 

Ae 5m. 6m. et 7m. no Impropriation nor Vicaredge indued. S,. 
Robert Drurye, Knight, patron. 

Cbevington. 

M^ Augustinus Underwoodde rector ibidem dicit. 

Ae Im. the nomber of the Coinunicantes theare are — 120. 

Ae 2m. et 3m. no recusantes neither anye that refuseth the Holie 
Comunion. 

Ae 4m. he hathe but the Rectory of Chevington. 

Ae 5m. 6m. et 7m. no Impropriation there nor Vicaredge indued. 
The Ladye Kydson, wedowe, patron. 
Drinckeston. 

M''. Peterus Burrowe, Rcor ibidem dicit. 

Ae Im. Comunicantes to the nomber of — 160. 

Ae 2m. et 3m. no recusantes nor anye but doo comunicate. 

Ae 4m. 5m. 6m. et 7m. he hathe no other benefice, nor Impropria- 
tion, nor Vicaredge indued. S^ James Skidmore, knight, 
patron. 



4 CONDITION OF THE ARCHDEACONRIES OF 

ffornham Martin. 

Mr. Robert Helme, Rector ibidem dicit. 
Ae Im. theare are Comuuicantes to the nomber of — 60. 
Ae 2m. et 3m. no Recusantes of Church nor Com union. 
Ae 4m. ffornham is a Rectory, he hath no other. 
Ae 5m. 6m. et 7m. it is presentatiue, nor Impropriation, nor 
Yicaredge indued. The Ladye Kydson, wedowe, patron. 

ffornham geneyefe. 

M^. John ffrost, Rector dicit. 

Ae Im. theare are Cornunicantes to the nomber of — 57. 

Ae 2m. et 3m. no Recusantes of Church nor coin union. 

Ae 4m. it is a Rectory e and he hath no other. 

Ae 5m. 6m. et 7m. no Impropriation nor Vicaredge endued. The 
Ladye Kydson, wedowe, patron, 
ffelsham. 

M*". Leonard us Thackivew (sic) R'cor dicit. 

Ae Im. the nomber of them that receyve the comuniou — cxxx. 

Ae 2m. et 3m. no Recusantes of Church nor coinunion. 

Ae 4m. it is a Rectory e and he hath no other. 

Ae 5m. 6m. et 7m. no Impropriation, nor Vicaredge indued. W™ 
Risbye of Thorpe Morieux, patron. 
Geddinge. 

M*". Thomas Smith, Rector dicit. 

Ae Im. theare are cornunicantes to the nomber of — xlij. 

Ae 2m et 3m. no recusantes of Cliurch nor comunion. 

Ae 4nK it is a small Rectorye, he hath no other. 

Ae 5m. 6m. et 7ni. no Impropriation nor Vicaredge indued. 
Robert Paige of Geddinge, patron. 

Hedgesett. 

M^ Robertus Bonynge R'cor dicit. 

Ae Im. Cornunicantes theare to the nomber of — cxx. 

Ae 2m. et 3m. no recusantes of nor anye but doo not cornunicate. 

Ae 4m. he bathe no other Benefice. 

Ae 5m. 6m. et 7ni. no Impropriation nor Vicar indued. Edmund 
Bacon, Esquier, patron. 
Horinnger. 

M*". Thomas Rogers, Rector ibidem dicit. 

Ae Im. Theare are Cornunicantes to the nomber of — clx. 

Ae 2m. et 3m. no Recusantes of Church nor comunion. 

Ae 4m. it is a Rectorye he hath no other. 

Ae 5m 6m. et 7m. no Impropriation nor Vicaredge indued that he 
knoweth. S' Robert Jermyn, knight, is patron. 
Halsteade. 

M^ Josephus Hall, Rector, dicit. 

Ae Im. Theare are coinunicantes to the nomber of — cl. 



SUFFOLK AND SUDBURY IN THE YEAR 1603. 5 

Ae 2m. et 3tn. one recusant from Church and comuuion. 
Ae 4m. no other benefice. 

Ae 5m. 6m. et7m. itisa Rectory e, no Impropriation or Vicaredge. 
S^ Robert Drurje, knight, patron. 

ffomham sancF. 

M^ fifranciscus Clarke, R*. dicit. 

Ae Im. Comunicantes to the nomber of — hxxij. 

Ae 2m. et 3m. no recusantes neither anye that doo not receyve the 

holie comunion. 
Ae 4m. it is a Rectorye, no Impropriation nor Vicaredge. 
Ae 5m. 6m. et 7m. as before and the Ladye Kydson, wedowe, 

patron. 

fflempton cti Hengrave. 

M^ fifranciscus Spenser, R'cor dicit. 

Ae Im. the nomber that doo receyve the holie comunion is cvij. 

Ae 2m. et 3m. fower men recusantes, twoo women recusantes, Twelf 

men that have not of long tyme recey ved the holie coin union, 

Seaven women that have not recey ved the holie Comunion 

to his knowleadge. 
Ae 4m. he hath but fflempton c& Hengrave. 
Ae 5m. 6m. et 7m. no Impropriation nor Vicaredge indued. The 

Ladye Kydson, wedowe, patron. 

Hargrave. 

M^ Richardus Pleasance, R'cor dicit. 
Ae Im. the nomber of the Comunicantes are — Ixxx. 
Ae 2m. et 3m. no recusantes of Church nor comunion. 
Ae 4m. lie hath no other Benefice. 

Ae 5m. 6m. et 7m. it is a Rectorye no Impropriation, nor Vicaredge. 
The Ladye Kydson, wedowe, patron. 

lokworth. 

M^ Williiius Wothers, Rec'. dicit. 

Ae Im. Coinunicantes to the nomber of — ciiij. 

Ae 2m. et 3m. no recusant, But theare aie v men and women 

that doo refuse to receyve the holie coinunion. 
Ae 4m. He hath but this one Rectorye whereuppon he is resident. 
Ae 5m. 6m. et 7m. no Impropriation, nor Vicaredge indued. M''. 
John Harvye, Esquier is Patron. 

Lyvermeare magna. 

M'. Johanes Ward, Rector dicit. 

Ae Im. Theare are Comunicantes — Ixxxix. 

Ae 2m. et 3m. no recusantes nor anye that refuseth to receyve the 

holie Coin union. 
Ae 4m. he hath twoo Benefices booth Rectoryes, Great Lyvermeare 

and litel Lyvermeare distant the one from the other not past 



6 CONDITION OF THE ARCHDEACONRIES OF 

half a Myle, he is a Master of Art of xviij years continuance, 
he hath dispensation under the broade Scale. Lvvermeare i 

magna valued in the Kings Booke at xt\^ xviij! i\^ and litel 
LyVtermeare at vi? xij« 1x4 ' 

Ae 5ni. Cm. et 7n). no Impropriation nor Vicaredge indued. . 

Edward ffrancis, genP, patron of litel Lvvermeare. I 

I 
Pakenham. 

M'. Will™ Holden. Vicarius iB; dicit. 

Ae Im. The nomber of Coinunicants is — cc. 

Ae 2m. et 3m. no recusantes neither unye that refuse th to receyve 
the holie coinunion. 

Ae 4m. he hathe but the Vicaredge of Piikenham. 
. Ae 5m. et 6m. it is an Impropriation \v^*» n Vicaredge indowed. The 
value of the Vicaredge in the Kings Hooke is x\* iij* iiij* 
w^out the sayed Impropriation, is valued as in the Kings 
Booke The Curate that he thinketh it is not valued theare. 

Ae 7m. S^ Robert Gardyner, knight, and the Ladye his wife patrons. 

Rushbrooke. | 

M^. Albanus Lewes, Hector dicit. i 

Ae Im. There are Coinuicantes to the uoml»er of — Ixvi. | 

Ae 2m. et 3m. no recusantes nor auye that refuseth to receyve the 

holie Comunion. 
Ae 4m. he hath but that benefice. 
Ae 5m. 6m. et 7m. it is a Rectorye presentatitie, no Impropriation, 

nor Vicaredge. S*". Robert J era)yu, knight, is patron. , 

Rougham. I 

M'. Richardus Garnett, Recto; dicit. 

Ae Im. the noml)er of Comunicautes usually is — cliiij. 

Ae 2u). et 3m. no Recusantes, nor anye that refuseth to receyve 

the holie Comunion. ! 

Ae 4m. he hath no otiier Benefice. 

Ae 5m. et 6m. it is a Rectorye presentatiue ther is neither Impro- 
priation nor Vicarage. ' 

Ae 7m. M'. Robert Drewrye, thelder, Esquier, paton. 

Ratlesden. 

M^ Richardus Wilson, Rector dicit. 

Ae Im. Theare are Comunicantes to the nomber of cccxxH® 

Ae 2m. et 3m. no recusantes nor anye that refuseth to receyve the 

holie Cotnuuion. I 

Ae 4m. he hathe no otiier benefice. j 

Ae 5m. et 6m. no Impropiiation nor Vicar indued. I 

Ae 7m. The Kinge his ma*^f is patron. j 



SUFFOLK AND SUDBURY IN THE YEAR 1603. 7 

StanDiugfylde. 

M'. Robertus Nonue, Rector ibidem dicit. 

Ae Im. Theare are Comuiiicantes to the nomber of — Ixvij. 

Ae 2m. et 3m. Theare are Seaven men recusautes and fower women 

they receyve not the Com union. 
Ae 4m. he hath no other benefice. 

Ae 5m. et 6m. it is a Rectorye, no Impropriation nor Vicaredge. 
Ae 7m. Ambrose Rookwoodde, Esquier, is patron. 

Saxham pva. 

Mr. Richarde Warde, Recto ibj dicit. 

Ae Im. The nomber of them that receyve the Com union is liij. 

Ae 2m. et 3m. no recusantes nor anye that refuseth the holie 

Com union. 
Ae 4m. he hathe but the sayed Rectorye of Saxham pva. 
Ae 5m. et 6m. no Impropriation nor Vicar indued. 
Ae 7m. Mr. Thomas Crofts, Esquier, is patron. 

Saxham magna. 

M*". Reginald us North fylde, Rector dicit. 
Ae Im. Theare are Comunicantes to the nomber of — Ixxxi. 
Ae 2m. et 3m. Theare are no recusantes w^*>in the parish. 
Ae 4m. he hath but the Rectorye of Saxham aforesayde. 
Ae 5m. et 6m. no Impropriation nor Vicarage endued. 
Ae 7m. one Mr. Morley of London, patron. 

Tostocke. 

M^ Richardus Holden, R'ctor dicit. 

Ae Im. Theare are w^ receyve the holie coinuniou — Ix. 

Ae 2m. et 3m. no recusantes anye waye touching Church or 

Sacramentes. 
Ae 4m. it is a Rectory he hathe no other Lyvinge. 
Ae 5m. et 6m. no Impropriation or Vicar indued. 
Ae 7m. John Non, genf^ is Patron. 

Thurston. 

M'. Leonard us Greaves, Vicarius dicit. 

Ae Im. The nomber of the Coinunicautes — clxx. 

Ae 2m. et 3m. no recusantes of Diuine prayer or Sacr»ment. 

Ae 4m. it is a Vicaredge. 

Ae 5m. et 6m. it is an Impropriation indued w^^ the sayed Vicaredge. 

The same Vicaredj^e valued in the Kings Book at vj^ xiij* iiij? 

the ^onage impropriate not valued to his knowledge. 
Ae 7m. the King his Ma**« is proprietorye and Robert Bright of 

London, patron of the Vicaredge. 

Tym worth. 

M*" Thomas Warren, R'cor ibidem dicit. 
(no further entry). 



8 CONDITION OF TBE ARCHDEACONRIES OF 

Westowe. 

M"*. Paulus Crane, Rector dicit. 

Ae Ini. The iiomber of theni that doo receive the Holye Corounion 

are — Ixvij. . 
Ae 2m. et 3iu. There is no recusant neither anye that do refiiae to 

receyve the holie Com union. 
Ae 4m. 5m. et 6m. it is a Rectorye, no Impropriation nor Vicaredge, 

he hath no other. 
Ae 7m. S^ John Croftes of Tuddington in Bedford Shire, is patron. 

Wulpett. 

M'. Will m us Cook, Rector dicit 

Ae Im. the uomber of Comunicantes are about — ccxl*** 

Ae 2m et 3m. Theare are no recusantes, neither anye that refuseth 

to receyve the holie Com union. 
Ae 4m. he hnthe no other Benefice. 
Ae 5m. et 6m. No Impropriation nor Vicaredge. 
Ae 7m. S' Robert Gardyner, knight, is patron. 

Wheltham magna. 

M"". Richard us Staiforde, R'cor dicit. 

Ae Im. they wS^ receyve the Com union are in nomber — Ixxx. 

Ae 2»n. et 3m. no recusautes nor anye that doo refuse the holie 

Comunion. 
Ae 4m. he hath no other Benefice. 
Ae 5m. et 6m. no Impropriation nor Vicarage. 
Ae 7m. S*" Robert Jermyn, knight, is patron. 

Wheltham pva. 

M^ Jacobus Wulvenden, R'cor dicit. 
Ae 1 articulum, theare are coinunicantes — Ixij. 
Ae 2m. et 3m. no recusant from Church or Comunion. 
Ae 4m. he hath non other Benefice then Wheltham. 
Ae 5m. 6m. et 7m. No Impropriation nor Vicaredge. S,, Rol)ert 
Jermyn, knight, patron. 

Westley et Bradley magna. 

M*". Oliuerus Philippes, Rector dicit. 

Ae Im. The nomber of the Comunicantes of Westley and of Bradley 

Magna — xlijH® 
Ae 2m. et 3m. no recusantes from Church or Coiiiunion. 
Ae 4m. he hath two Benefices being personages presentatiue distant 

the one from the other Nine Myles and not above. Westley 

valued in the King's Book ixl* and Bradley magna at xvij, he 

is a Bachelor of Diuinitie. 
Ae 5m. et 6m. No Impropriation nor Vicaredge indued. 
Ae 7m. The Ladye Kydson, wedowe, is patron, and Sr. John 

Pay ton, patron of Great Bradley. 



SUFFOLK AND SUDBURY IN THE YEAR 1603. 9 

Lackforde et Risliye. 

M*". Edwrtidiis Kyrke, Rector dicit. 

Ae Im. the nombtr of Comunicantes w^^in Lackfoid is !**• and w^^ 
ill Risbye to the iiomber of Ixxx. 

Ae 2m. et 3m. no recusantes theare, nor any that refuseth the holie 
Com union. 

Ae 4m. he hath twoo Benefices being personaiges viz. : — Lackforde 
and Risbje not a myle distant the one from the other, he is a 
master of art and a preacher, Chaplen to Lord Darcye, he 
hath a dispensation to hold them liooth accordinge to lawe : 
Lackford is valued in the King's Booke at xixV and Risbye at 
xix? 

Ae 5m. et 6m. no Impropriation nor Vicaredge the sayed twoo 
Benefices of Lackforde and Risbye are presentatiue. 

Ae 7m. The Ladye Kydson, wedowe, patron of them booth. 

Reede. 

M"". Thomas Porter, Vicarius ih^ dicit. 
Ae Im. The nomber of Coinunicsmtes are — Ixix. 
Ae 2m. et 3m. no recusantes at all 
Ae 4m. he hathe the Vicaredge of Reede and no other. 
Ae 5m. et 6m. som holdeth it to be a personage and payeth xiij* 
iiij4 in the name of a pension to Stoak Colledge now dissolued. 
Ae 7m. The Kinge his MaM« patron. 

Whepsteade et LaweshalL 

M^ Richard us Brabon, R'cor dicit. 

Ae Im. the nomber of comunicantes w***in the I xx * 

towne of Whepsteade are aboute ) ix 

and the nomber in Laweshall are xij ^^ 

Ae 2m. et 3m. theare are no recusantes in Whepsteade, but in 
Laweshall thre women recusantes and in booth parishes all 
receyved the holie comuuion then thes women only excepted. 

Ae 4m. he hath twoo personages presentatiue viz : — Whepsteade 
and Laweshalle. He is by degree a bachelor of diuintie, He 
is also Chaplen to the Lord Thesauror and he hathe accordinge 
to lawe a sufficient dispensation to reteyne them booth they 
are not distant the one from the other for they joyne. 
Whepstejide valued in his MaM® Booke xiijV iiij*! 2J4 Lawe- 
shall valued in the sayed Booke at xxl* ij^ viiij4 ob. 

Ae 5m. et 6m. no Impropriation there nor Vicaredge indued. 

Ae 7m. S' Robert Drurye, knight, patron of Whepsteade, and S^ 
Robert Lea, knight, Maior of London, patron of Laweshall. 

Nolton. 

M'. Johannes Adams, R'cor dicit. 

Ae Im. Theare are aboute the nomber of Comunicantes — Ix. 



10 CONDITION OF THE ARCHDEACONRIES OF 

Ae 2na. et 3m. no recusantes nor enye that doo refuse to recejve 

the bolie comunion. i 

Ae 4m. 5m. et 6in. He hathe but the Rector je of Noltou, no I 

Impropriation nor Vicaredge indued. 

Ae 7m. Anthonye Payne, gent is patron. | 

Hoptou. 

M'. Hogerus Wehhe, R cor. 

Ae Im. the nomber of Comunicants are — clx. j 

Ae 2m. et 3m. no recusantes there. 

Ae 4m. it is a personage present^itiue, he hatli no other. 

Ae 5m. et 6n). uon such theare. 

Ae 7m. the King's nia'^f [)atron. 

Decanatus de Bhickborne. 
Asshfilde magna. 

Mag^ Johannes Hudson, cap"."* po^" il»idem. 

Ae Im. Tlie nomber of comunicantes theare — cxxvij**® 

Ae 2m. et 3m. no recusantes of (.'liurcli nor Sacramentes. 

Ae 4m. 5m. 6ni. et 7m. it is an Impropriation, no vicaredg indued. 
He hath for serving tlie cure not past Eight or Nyne Pounds 
a yeare. M'. Nun, proprietary. 
Bard well. 

Mag*". Thomas Newcome, Vicarius dicit. 

Ae Im. Tlie nomber of coiriunicantes is ix *^ (sic) . 

Ae 2m. et 3m. no recusantes of Diuine prayer nor Sacramentes. 

Ae 4m. he hath but the Vicaredg of Bardwell. 

Ae 5m. et 6ni it is a personage impropriate to his MaH®. one George 
Sothertou of London, ffarmor, it hath ben let to for lx\* a yeare 
and so accompted wortjj. The Vicaredge is valued in the 
Kind's Hook at vij\^ 

Ae 7m. The King is patrone and proprietarye to his knowledge. 
Barnniugham. 

M^. Andreas Carter, Rco'". dicit. 

Ae Im. the nomber of coiiiunicantes theare — cxvijH® 

To the 2m. et 3m. theare are twoo jiersons, one Man and a Woman 
that doo not receyve the holie Comunion, no other recusantes 
theare. 

Ae 4m. 6iu. et 6m. he hathe no other Benefice, there is no Impro- 
priation nor Vicaredge. 

Ae 7m. the Earle of Sussex, patron. 
Bardwell Asslie. 

Mag^ Jeremias Manninge cap"."* po^'f ibm dicit. 

Ae Im. the nomber of the comunicantes is — cxxvj. 

Ae 2m. et tertium, no recusants of Church or Sacniments. 

Ae 4m. 5m. et 6m. Bardwell Asshe is an Impropriation, no 
Vicaredge indued. Richard Nun of S*. Edmund's Burye 



SUFFOLK AND SUDBORY IN THE YEAR 1603. 11 

Proprietarje, he hath for servinge of the Cure about a Njne 
or tenne pounds a Yeare, not valued in the Kinges book to 
his knowledge. 

Ae 7m. the sajed M*". Nun, proprietary is before written. 
Baruham Gregorij. 

Mr Clemens Heigham, Rco*". dicit. 

Ae Im. the noniber of the Comuuicantes are about — Ix. 

Ae 2m. et dm. no recusantes theare. 

Ae 4m. it is a personage presenbitive and he hath no other. 

Ae 5m. et 6m. non such theare. 

Ae 7m. S^ John Couster, knight, patron. 
Bard well Martinij. 

M''. Edmundus Stearne, RcOr. dicit. 

Ae Im. the nomber of Comuuicantes theare are aboute — Ixxij. 

Ae 2m. et 3m. no recusantes of aiije sort or condi^on. 

Ae 4m. it is a psonage presentatiue and hath no other. 

Ae 5m. et 6m. non such theare. 

Ae 7m. S^ John Couster, knight, patron. 
Culforde. 

Mag'. Robertus Allen, Rector dicit. 

Ae Im. the nomber of (yoiiiunicrtntes are — xx. 

Ae 2m. et 3m. no recusnnt of Diuines or sacraments. 

Ae 4m. lie hath but Ciilford, whereof he is Incumbent. 

Ae 5m. et 6m. no Impropriation nor Vicaredge. 

Ae 7m. S*" Nicholas Bacon, knight, is patron. 

Conny weston. 

M*" Thomas Smeth Rco*". iBm dicit. 

Ae Im the noml)er of Coinunicantes is — xx. 

Ae 2m. et 3m. no recusant of Diuines or sacraments. 

Ae 4m. it is a Rectorye lie hath no other Benefice. 

Ae 5m. et 6m. no Impropriation nor Vicaredge indued. 

Ae 7m. S'. Thomas Lovell, knight, is patron. 

Ewestou. 

M"", Jacobus Kerrye, Rco**. dicit. 

Ae Im. the number of the coiriunicants is — ix ". 

Ae 2m. et 3m. Twoo men and thre women recusants. Yett one of 

them receyve the holie coin union, and the rest of them doo 

not receyve. 
Ae 4m. it is a personage presentatiue, he hath no other benefice. 
Ae 5m. et 6m. no Impropriation nor Vicaredg. 
Ae 7m. S*". Robert Gardyner, knight, is patron of Eweston. 

ffakenham magnn Estharlinge. 

Mr. Henricus Rewse, Rl^ dicit. 

Ae Im. Comuuicantes to the nomber of— Ix. 



12 CONDITION OF THE ARCHDEACONRIKS OF 

Ae 2m. et 3n). uo recusautes of Church nor Sacrameutes. 

Ae 4m. He hath twoo Rectoryes or personages viz : — ffakenham 

magna in SuflT. and Est harlinge in Norf. not distant the one 

from the other not past Seaven Myles, he is a Bachelor of 

Diuinitie, he hath a facultie to reteyn them confirmed under 

the broade Seale of Englande. 
Ae 7m. the patron of ffalkenham magna is S^ Thofi Cordell of 

London, Mercer, and of Estharlinge S*". Thomas Lovell, knight. 

ifakenham valued in the Kinges Book at x\^ x? iiij4 ob. and 

Estharlinge at a x^ xix^ xi4 ob. 
Hepworth. 

M"". Richardus Sporle, Rco^ dicit 

Ae Im. the nomber of Comunicantes theare — cxxxix**^ 

Ae 2m. et 3m. no recusants of any kinde nor anye that refuseth to 

receyve the holie comunion. 
Ae 4m. Hepworth is a personage presentatiue and he hath uo other. 
Ae 5m. et 6m. no Impropriation nor Vicaredge. 
Ae 7m. S^. Robert Jermyn, knight, is patron. 
Hunston. j 

Mr. Richardus Chamberlyn, cap°^« po^^ dicit. i 

Ae Im. the nomber of Comunicantes — Ix. I 

Ae 2m. et 3m. no recusantes of Diuine prayer nor Sacrament | 

Ae 4m. 5m. et 6m. Hunston is a Donatiue, and he serveth the Cure 

theare, and his stipend is xxl^ a yeare in tithes thereof. 
Ae 7m. M^ Asshfilde, Esquier, hath the donatiue. I 

Hindercley. ^ 

M^. Antoniuus Moece, dicit. 
Ae Im. the nomber of Coinunicantes. 

(No further entry). 

Honyngton. 

Mr. Robertus Keye, cap^."« po^^ ibidem dicit. 

M*". Ewyn, Rco^. ibidem. 

Ae Im. the nomber of Comunicantes theare — ixiij. 

Ae 2m. et 3m. no recusantes anye waye. 

Ae 4m. it is a Rectory e or personage presentatiue. 

Ae 5ni. et 6m. no Impropriation nor Vicaredg. 

Ae 7m. nescit. 
Sappeston. 

Dictus Robertus Keye cap"."® po^** ibidem dicit. 

Ae im. the nomber of the Comunicantes theare — ixvij. 

Ae 2m. et 3m. no recusantes of anye condicon or sort. 

Ae 4m. he serveth booth Honington and Sappeston being ueare 
together, and the Stipendo small. 

Ae 5m. et 6m. it is an Impropriation no Vicar indued, he hath for 
his ?vice being a Bachelor of art, but vj^ yeare. 

Ae 7m. M^ Aldham, genP hath the Impropriation. 



SUFFOLK AND SUDBURY IN THE YEAR 1603. 13 

Ingham. 

Mag'^. Robertas Holte, Rco'. dicit. 

Ae Im. the noniber of comunicautes theare are — 1. 

Ae 2in. et 3m. no recusantes of anye Sort, nor anje that refuseth 

not the holye comunion. 
Ae 4m. he hath but his personage of Inghaai. 
Ae 5m. et 6m. no Impropriation nor Vicaredge. 
Ae 7m. S**. Nicholas Bacon, knight, is patron. 

Ixworth. 

M^ Edwardus Swallowe cap»*y* po^^ ibidem dicit. 

Ae Im. Theare are coinuuicantes to the nomber of — cccviij. 

Ae 2m. et 3m no Recusant of Diuiue prayer or Sacrament. 

Ae 4m. he hath but the service of the Cure theare. 

Ae 6m. et 6m. his stipende is but xl* a yeare w^^ Willm Webbo 

genP payeth him, being Proprietary e. 
He 7m. the same M'". Webbe hath the Impropriation no Vicaredge 

indued. 

Knettishall. 

M^ Thomas Wynter, Rco^ ibin dicit. 

Ae Im. the nomber of Cornunicantes are — xliiij^*® 

Ae 2m. et 3m. no recusantes of Diuine prayer or Sacrament. 

Ae 4m. he hath but that psonage of Knettishall. 

Ae 5m. et 6m. no Impropriation or Vicaredge. 

Ae 7m. M^ Charles Croft, genF, is patron. 

Lyvermeare parva. 

M^ Johannes Warde, R'cor dicit. 

Ae Im. the nomber of Coinunicautes are — Ivj. 

Ae 2m. et 3m. no recusantes of diuines or Sacrament. 

Ae 4m. he hath greate Lyvermeare and this litel Lyvermeare and 

otherwise to this Article and to the V*^ and Sixth articles he 

answereth as before in great Lyvermeare. 
Ae 7m. W™ Cooke and Thomas Chapman hath the Patronage of 

the Benefice. 

Langham. 

M'. Willmus Gosse, Rc^. dicit. 

Ae Im. the nomber of Coinunicantes are — Ixxiiij**® 

Ae 2m. et 3m. no recusants of Diuines or Sacramentes. 

Ae 4m. he hath but the personage of Langham. 

Ae 5m. et 6m. no Impropriation or Vicaredg indued. 

Ae 7m. The Kinj^e his MaH® is patron. 

Norton. 

Mag^ Nicolaus Bownde, sacrotheologie professor, Rector ibidem 

dicit. 
Ae Im. the nomber of Cornunicantes are theare — clxxx. 



14 CONDITION OF THE ARCHDEACONRIES OP 

Ae 2m. et 3qi. no recusantea of Diuine prayer or Haoramentes. 

He 4m. he hath but the peraonage of Norton. 

Ae 5m. et 6m. non such. 

Ae 7 111. S^ Hol»ert Asshfilde, knij^ht, putroii. 

Rikinghall inferior. 

M'. Johannes Smeth, Rco**. dicit. 
Ae Im. the nomber of Comuuicantes — cxxx. 
Ae 2m. et 3m. no recusantes of ditiine prayer or Sacraaientes. 
Ae 4m. it is a personage presentative, he hath no other. 
Ae 5m. 6m. et 7m. no Impropriation or Vicaredge, S^ Nicholas 
Bacon, knight, patron. 

Stowlangtoft. 

Mr. Jacobus Walles, Rco*". dicit. 

Ae Im. the nomber of Coinunicantes are — Ixxx. 

Ae 2m. et 3m. no recusant of Diuine prayer or Sacrament. 

Ae 4m. 5m. et 6m. he hath no other benefice, it is a psouage, no 

Impropriation. 
Ae 7m. Robert Asshfylde, Esquier, is patron. 

Stanton Johis. 

Mr. Henricus Dawson, R'co*". dicit. 

Ae Im. the nomber of Comunicantes — clxvj. 

Ae 2m. et 3m. no recusantes of anye sort or Condicon. 

Ae 4m. he hath but onlye the psouage of Stanton John. 

Ae 5m. et 6m. non such. 

Ae 7m. S"". Robert Jermyn, knight, is patron. 

Stanton Sctorum. 

M*". Edwardus Gallawayc, Rco*" dicit. 

Ae Im. the nomber of Coinunicantes are theare — clxiij. 

Ae 2m. et 3m. no recusantes of Diuine prayer or Sacramentes. 

Ae 4m. he hath no other Benefice, but Stanton a Rectorye. 

Ae 5m. et 6m. non such. 

Ae 7m. S*". Robert Jermyn, knight, is patron. 

Troston. 

M^ Will in us Bradstreate. Rco^. dicit. 

Ae Im. the nomber of Coinunicantes theare are — Ixxx. 

Ae 2m. et 3m. no recusantes of Diuine prayer or Sacramentes. 

Ae 4m. no other but the Rectory of Troston. 

Ae 5m. et 6m. no Impropriation, nor Vicaredge. 

Ae 7m. the Kinges Ma^* patron. 

Thelvetham ... Kellesbye. 

M^. Johannes Ponder, Rco^ dicit. 

Ae Im. the nomber of Coinunicantes theare are — clxxx. 

Ae 2m. et 3m. no recusantes of Diuine prayer or Sacramentes. 



SUFFOLK AND SUDBURY IN THK YEAR 1603. 15 

Ae 4nj. he hiith twoo Rectoryes oi* pei'sonages namelje Thelvethazn 
and Kellesbye, he is a Doctor of La we and hath a dispensation, 
confirmed hy the broad seale of England, they are distant the 
one from the other about a xxvij Myles, Thelvetham is valued 
in his Ma^«« Booke at xvjV xviiij? iiij4 and Kellesbye at xvijl* 

Ae 5m. et 6rn. no Impn»pri}ition nor Vicaredge. 

Ae 7m. Edmnnde Buckenham is patron of Thelvetham, and 
Katherine Drnrye patnm of Kellesbye. 

Thorpe iuxta Ixworthe. 

M"^. Thomas Newcome cap»."» poH* iBm dicit. 

Ae Im. the uomber of the Comunicantes — xj^® 

Ae 2m. et 3m. no recusantes of Dinines nor Sacramentes. 

Ae 4m. he hath but one. 

Ae 5m. et 6m. It is an Impropriation, no Vicaredge indued, the 
sayed Minister hath for his stipend but vjl* viiij* Charles 
Croftes, genf, of Bard well, is Proprietarye, it is not valued in 
the Kinges Bookes. 

Ae 7m. the sayed Impropriaton belongeth to his Ma*\® 

Wordwell. 

M*". Johannes Askewe, R'co*" dicit. 

Ae Im. the Comunicantes are in nomber — xxvij**® 

Ae 2m. et 3m. no recusant of Diuine prayer or Sacrament 

Ae 4m. 5m. et 6m. it is a Rectory w^out a Vicaredge, he hath no 

other. 
Ae 7m. M^ John Harvye of Ickworthe is patron. 

Wattesfylde. 

M*". Richard us Ravens, R'co^. dicit. 

Ae Im. the nomber or Comunicantes about — c. 

Ae 2m. et 3m. no recusants theare. 

Ac 4m. a personage presenttitive, he hath no other. 

Ae 5m. et 6m. non such theare. 

Ae 7m. one M*". Osborne, patron 

Weston Gaseley. 

M^ Thomas Nuce, Rcor. 

M . Robertus Amont, cap"."* po^^f dicit. 

Ae Im. the nomber of comunicantes theare — c. 

Ae 2m. et 3m. no recusants of Diuines or Sacraments. 

Ae 4m. M^ Thomas Nuce, Bachelor of Diuinite, is Vicar of Gaseley 

and parson of Weston, the one distant from the other about 

a xiiij**® Myles. 
Ae 5m. et 6m. no Impropnation of Weston, be knoweth not how 

Gaseley standeth, Weston valued at viijl* zix? 
Ae 7m. Henry Buckenham, genP, patron of Weston. 



16 CONDITION OF THE ARCHDEACONRIES OF 

Walsham le Wi Howes. 

M^ Phillippus Gooche, cap"."" poK* dicit. 

Ae Im. the nomber of Coinunicautes about — ccc. 

Ae 2m. et 3m. uo recusants of diuine prayer or Sacrament. 

Ae 4m. he hath but that S^'vice and his Stipende viijV 

Ae 5m. et 6m. it is an Impropriation not indued w^^ a Vicaredge. 

Ae 7m. he can saye notheuge. 

DecanatuB de ffordeham. 
Asshley cum Silverley. 

Mug^ Johannes Norridge, R'co'. dicit. 

Ae Im. the nomber of Coifiunicantes are — cxx*** 

Ae 2m. et 3m. no recusant of Diuine prayer or Sacrament. 

Ae 4m. he hath but this. 

Ae 5m. et 6m. Asshleye is a personage and SiWerleye a Vicaredge 
indued out of the Impropriation of Silverlye, w<^!> Vicaradge is 
united to Asshleye. He is a Master of Art by Degree of 
Schoole and a preacher. Asshlye vahied at xv^ xvij" ij4 w*^ 
Silverlye Vicaredge in the Kinge's Boake together yett distinct 
viz*. Asshleye viiij*\ and Silverley at vij^ xvij? ii? 

Ae 7m. the Lord Dudley North, patron. 

Burwell marie. 

Mag^ Thomas Banyurde, Vicarius iBm dicit. 

Ae Im. the noml>er of the Corn unicantes are aboute — ccccccM* 

Ae 2m. et 3m. no recusant of diuine prayer or sacrament. 

Ae 4m. he hath but this Vicarage. 

Ae 5m. et 6m. Dicit, that Burwell is a personage impropriate and a 
Vicaredge indued, wc|» Impropriation Dooth belonge to the 
wholl Uniuersite of Cambridge and it is worthe to the farmor 
(the Uniuersite rent being Discharged) twoo hundreth markes 
a yeare, and the same Rectorye is valued in the Kinge's 
Booke at xxxl^ odde moneye per annum, and the Vicaredge at 
xxl* and the Vicar receyveth only xxl^ a yeare, and no manner 
of tithe, out of y/^)^ he payeth y early e x\* tenthes, iijl* xij* sub- 
sidy e, xiij? iiij4 a par' to the Kinge besides procuracons and 
surchardges. ifurther he sayeth that M*". Doctor Nevell aboute 
fower years sethence behige Vice Chancellor did consider the 
portion to the Vicar was verye small, did augment the same 
to Twentie Nobles a yeare more w^?» ever sethence he hath 
receyved. Also he sayeth that theare is w*^in the sayed 
parrishe an other Impropriation called Burwell andrewe w^^ 
is nothenge in the Kinges Booke and com unto the Church of 
Burwell raarye and alloweth to the Vicar theare fyve markes 
a yeare the w^!^ Impropriation is worthe besides y early e an 
hundreth markes. 

Ae vijm. the Universitie doo always nominate twoo in the regent 
howse and the Lord North dooth alwayes present one of them. 



SUFFOLK AND SUDBURY IN THE YEAR 1603. 17 

Brandon ferrye. 

M"". Edmundns Cartwrighte, Rco^ dicit. 

Ae Im. the nomber of Comunicantes are — colxxxx. 

Ae 2m. et 3m theare is one woman recusant and no more. 

Ae 4m. 5m. et 6m. it is a personage, no Impropriation nor Vicar 

indued, he hath no other. 
Ao 7m. the Einges Mtfi^ patron. 

Barton Mylles. 

M'. Randolphus Davenport, Rco>'. dicit. 

Ae Im. the Nomber of Comunicantes — Ixx. 

Ae 2m. et 3m. no recusant of Diuine prayer or Sacramentes. 

Ae 4m. it is personage preeentatiue, and hath no other. 

Ae 5m. et 6m. no Impropriation or Yioaredge. 

Ae 7m. the King's Mefi? patron. 

Cavenham. 

M^. Johannes Sowethouse, Vicarius iBm dicit. 

Ae Im. the nomber of the Comunicantes — Ixxx. 

Ae 2m. et 3m. no recusant of Diuine prayer nor Sacraments. 

Ae 4m. 5m. et 6m. Cavenham is an Impropriation out of the w^^ 

the Vicaredge is indued, the value of the Vicaredge in the 

King's Booke is v^ y* x^ 
Ae 7m. the King his Ma^? is proprietarye and patron. 

Cheveley. 

M^ Robertus Sendall, Rector iBm dicit. 

Ae Im. the nomber of the Comunicantes are — cxx. 

Ae 2m. et 3m. no recusant of Diuine prayer or sacrament. 

Ae 4m. it is a personage and hath no other. 

Ae 5m. et 6m. no Impropriation or Vicaredge indued. 

Ae 7m. & John Cotton, knight, is patron. 

Chippenham. 

Mr. Nicolaus Allen, Vicarius dicit 

Ae Im. the nomber of the Comunicantes — cxxyjH® 

Ae 2m. et 3m. theare is one man and one woman recusant and they 

receyve not the comunion, theare is no other. 
Ae 5m. et 6m. Chippenham is a personage impropriate and indued 

w^ a Vicaredge aforesayd, and the same Vicaredge is valued 

in the King's Booke at a xj^ xij? iiij? he knoweth not the 

valuacon of the impropriate psonage. 
Ae 7m. S'. Thomas Chenard, Lord Baron, is patron. 

Cartlinge. 

M'. Willinus EUice cap°.^ po"? iBm dicit. 

Ae Im. the nomber of Comunicantes — clxxx f odd. 

Ae 2m. et 3m. theare is neither man nor woman recusant 

C 



18 CONDITION OP THE ARCHDEACONRIES OF 

To the rest he cannot t'tefie any touchinge the state of the Benefice 
but there be bowses called the peonage bowses, f M^ EUice 
the Curate hath for his sUpende fteine allowances in money 
at thappoyntmeut of the Lo: North for efye acre, f for milch 
neate f such other lyke to y« value of xzx^ or neare there 
aboute. And the Lord North or his farmers take the Come and 
glebe land yf there be any. The ^ine state thereof cannot 
be learned but the report goeth that yt is a verye good thinge. 
Downham. 

M^ Thomas Atkenson cap^.^ po^ iBm dicit. 

Ae Im. the nomber of the comunicantes are — Ixz. 

Ae 2m. et 3m. no recusant of Diuine prayer or Sacramentes. 

Ae 4m. he hath no other spiritual Lyvinge. 

Ae 5m. et 6m. it is an Impropriation, not indued w^ a Vicar, he 
hath for his stipende yearlye, xzx? of M**. Cleare and his wief 
beinge Proprietaryes. 

Ae 7 m. as before otherwise he knoweth not 

Eriswell. 

M^ Thomas Sutton, Rector dicit 

Ae Im. the nomber of the Comunicantes are — cxx. 

Ae 2m. et 3m. no recusant of Diuine prayer or Sacramentes. 

Ae 4m. Eriswell a personage preseutatiue, and hath no other. 

Ae 6m. et 6m. as before. 

Ae 7m. M^ Henrye Bedingfylde, patron. 

Elvedon. 

Mag*'. Willmus Cockman, Rco' dicit. 

Ae Im. the nomber of Comunicantes aboute — ^lxxxiiij^5 

Ae 2m. et 3m. no recusant of Diuine prayer or Sacrament. 

Ae 4m. Elvedon is a Rectorye wheare he is Incumbent and hath 

no other. 
Ae 5m. et 6m. Theare is no such. 
Ae 7m. S'' Edward Cleare, knight, is taken for the undoubted patron. 

ffordeham. 

M^ Georgius Hort, Vicarius Dicit. 

Ae Im. the nomber of Comunicantes are — ccxl*^« 

Ae 2m. et 3m. no recusant of Diuine prayer or Sacrament. 

Ae 4m. 5m. et 6m. ffordham is an Impropriation, indued w^ the 

Vicaredge, w<^ Vicaredge is valu^ in the Einge's Booke at 

tweutie markes the psonage not valued. 
Ae 7m. the master and fellowes of Jhesus Colledge in Cambridge 

are patrons of the Vicaredge. 

Heringswell. 

M^ Robertus Willan Rco'. Dicit 

Ae Im. the nomber of the Comunicantes are — ^Ixiiij^® 



SUFFOLK AND SUDBURY IN THE YEAR 1603. 19 

A% 2in. et 3m. no recusante of Diuine prayer or Sacrament. 
Ae 4m. Heringswell is a Rectorye and hath no other. 
Ae 5m. et 6m. no Impropriation nor Vicaredge indued. 
Ae 7m. S'. Stephen Soham, knight, of Loudon, patron. 

Icklingham SancV. 

M^ Thomas Boydon, Rco^ dicit. 

Ae Im. the nomber of the Comunicantes theare — ^]xxij. 

Ae 2m. et 3m. non that refuseth diuine prayer or Sacraments. 

Ae 4m. it is a personage preeentatiue, he hath no other. 

Ae 5m. et 6m. non such. 

Ae 7m. S' Arthur Capell, knight, is patron. 

Icklingham Jacobi. 

Mr. Willmus Berrye, Rcor. dicit. 

Ae Im. the nomber of Comunicantes are — Ixxxviij. 

Ae 2m. et 3m. no rescusant of Diuine prayer or Sacrament. 

Ae 4m. 5m. et 6m. it is personage presentative and no other. 

Ae 7m. Thomas Springe, Esquier, patron. 

Ixninge — ^Wurlington. 

M^ Martinus Warren, Vicarius, iBm dicit 

Ae Im. the nomber of Comunicantes theare — cc. 

Ae 2m. et 3m. no recusant of Diuine prayer or Sacrament. 

Ae 4m. he holdeth twoo Benefices viz*, the Vicaredge of Ixninge and 
the parsonage of Wurlington distant the one from the other 
not past fy ve Miles. He is a Master of art and qualified by 
the rererend father the Lorde Bishop of Elye and hath his 
dispensation for the reteyninge of them confirmed by the 
Broade Seale. The Vicaredge of Ixninge is valued in the 
Kinges Booke at twentie Markes. 

Ae 5m. et 6m. as before written, otherwise he knoweth not. 

Ae 7m. the Deane and Chapiter of Canterburye patrons of Ixninge. 

Kennett. 

M''. Griffinus Rowlande, RcC Dicit 
Ae Im. the nomber of the Comunicantes — 1. 
Ae 2m. et 3m. no recusant of Diuine prayer nor Sacrament. 
Ae 4m. 5m. et 6m. Kennett is a personage presentatiue, no Impro- 
priation, nor Vicaredge, he hath no other. 
Ae 7m. S^ John Peter, knight, patron. 

Lakenhithe. 

M**. Johannes Allen, Vicarius dicit. 

Ae Im. the nomber of Comunicantes — colxxiij^® 

Ae 2m. et 3m. no recusant of Diuine prayer or Sacrament. 

Ae 4m. no other but this Vicaredge. 



20 CONDITION OF THE ARCHDEACONRIES OF 

Ae 5m. 6m. et 7m. Lakenhithe is an Impropriation w^ the sajed 
Vicaredge indued, and belongeth to the Deane and Chapiter 
of Elye, the Vicaredge valued in the Kinges Booke at 
iiijV xvij" xj^ob. 

Ae 7m. the Deane and Chapiter of Elye proprietaryea and patronea. 
Myldenhall. 

M^ Leouardus Maiae, Yicarius dicit. 

Ae Im. the nomber of Comunicantes aboute a — md. 

Ae 2m. et 3m. no recusantes of Diuine prayer or Sacrament. 

Ae 4m. he hath but this Vicaredge. 

Ae 5m. et 6m. Myldpnhall is an Impropriation indued w^ the 
Sayed Vicaredge w^ is valued in the Kinges Booke at 
zxij^ viiij" the Impropriation not valued theare. 

Ae 7m. the King his MhH<* hath one part of the sayed Impropria- 
tion, S' Anthonye Wingfylde, knight, another part, and S' 
Henrye Warner, knight, another part^ And the same S^ Henrye 
Warner is patron of the Vicaredge. 
Newmarket marie. 

M*". Williiius Lewes, R'co' dicit. 

Ae Im. the nomber of comunicantes — clx. 

Ae 2m. et dm. no such persons theare. 

Ae 4m. he hath the sayed small psonage of Newmarket 

Ae 5m. 6m. et 7m. no Impropriation nor Vicaredge Sr. Gyles 
AUington, knight, patron. 
Newmarket Sctor*. 

M^ Willinus Ridgwell Vicarius dicit. 

One Richarde Tyrrell clerke servethe the same beinge a litel 
Chappell of ease belonginge unto Woodditton whereof the 
sayed M^ Ridgwell is also Vicar, and this Tyrrell sayeth that 
he hath but yearlye for the servinge thereof collected by the 
Inhabitants thereof, but v¥ and no tithe belonginge thereunto. 
The Articles M^ Ridgwell is to answere see them in Woodditton. 
Soham. 

M^. Humfrey Tyndall, Doctor of Diuinitie, Vicare theare saieth 

Ae Im. the nomber of Comunicantes theare — viijo. 

Ae 2 m. et dm. one gen til woman kepeinge w^ M^ Barnes in Soham 
who cam thither w^^in this halfe yeare a recusant and receyve 
not the Coinunion, all the rest doo. 

Ae 4m. he hath twoo Benefices, the Vicaredge of Soham and the 
parsonage of Wintford in the Isle of Elye, qualified by his 
degree, they are distant the one from the other not past sixe 
miles distant. 

Ae 5m. et 6m. Soham is an Impropriation indued w**^ the sayed 
Vicaredge, belonginge to Pembroke Hall in Cambridge, and 
accompted worth twoo hundreth pouudes a year more then the 
auncient rent. They are patrones of the Vicaredge w*'^ is 
valued in the King's Booke at xxxiij^ 



SUFFOLK AND SUDBURY IN THE YEAR 1603. 21 

Snaylewell. 

M^ Petrus Botterell, Rector ibidem Dicit. 

Ae Im. the nomber of Comunicantes theare — Ixrij*** 

Ae 2m. et 3m. non such theare. 

Ae 4m. it is a Rectorye presentatiue, he hath no other. 

Ae 5m. 6m. et 7m. no Impropriation nor Vicaredge, the Lord 

Bisshoppe of Elye to his knowledge, Patron. 
Tuddenham. 

M^ Jeremias Baldocke, R'co''. dicit 

Ae Im. the nomber of Comunicantes — cxx. 

Ae 2m. et 3m. no recusant of Diuine prayer or Sacrament. 

Ae 4m. he hath no other Benefice, it is a psonage. 

Ae 5m. 6m. et 7m. no Impropriation or Vicaredge. WiUm. 

Wootton, genV, Patron. 
Wnrlington. 

Mr. Marten Warren, Rco^ dicit. 

Ae Im. the nomber of the Comunicantes theare — c. 

Ae 2m. et 3m. no recusantes of Diuine prayer or Sacrament. 

Ae 5m. 6m. et vij?^ he answereth as before written for Ixninge 

addinge that Wnrlington is valued in his Ma**«» Booke at 

xix¥ jv" iiij^ ob. The Patron whereof is Margarye Warren, 

wedowe, of Snaylewell. 
Wyken. 

M^ Johannes ffawcett, cap"^.^ po^ dicit. 

Ae Im. the nomber of Comunicantes — cc. 

Ae 2m. et 3m. no recusants of prayer or Sacraments. 

Ae 4m. 5m. 6m. et 7m. It is an Impropriation to Spynner Abbeye, 

no Vicaredge indued, he hath for his Stipende but x? a yeare. 

Woodditton. 

M^ Willmus Ridgwell Vicarius iBm dicit. 

Ae Im. the nomber of Comunicantes theare and the hamblett theare 

unto lielonginge are — cccxx. 
Ae 2m. et 3m. no recusant of Diuine prayer or Sacraments. 
Ae 4m. he hath no other. 
Ae 5m. et 6m. Woodditton is an Impropriation indued w*J» the sayed 

Vicaredge, the Vicaredge valued at xijl^ xvj" iij4 in the King's 

Booke, the psonage impropriate, not valued theare. 
Ae 7ra. the ffeoffies of the late Duke of NorfiT: are patrones of the 

Vicaredge and they have the Impropriation as it is thought. 
Wangforde. 

Mr. Johannes Jacobbe, Rco^ Dicit. 

Ae Im. the nomber of Comunicantes theare — xxxviij^.® 

Ae 2m. et 3m. no recusant of Diuiae prayer or Sacrament. 

Ae 4m. it is a psonage presentatiue, he hath no other. 

Ae 5m. 6m. et 7m. no Impropriation nor Vicaredge. M^ John 

Sowethwell, Esquier, patron. 



22 CONDITION OF THE ARCHDEACX)NRI]fi3 OF 

DecanatuB de Hartismeare et Stowe. 
Bresworthe. 

Magr. Jacobus Harrison, Rco>^. dicit. 
Ae Im. the nomber of the Comunicantea are — xxxvj^ 
Ae 2m. et 3in. no recusant of Diuine prayer or Sacrament. 
Ae 4m. it is a personage presentatiue, he hath no other. 
Ae 7m. Willm Colman genP patron. 

Burgate. 

Mag^ Humfridus ffowler, Rco'. dicit 

Ae Im. the nomber of the Comunicantea are — Ixxxxij. 

Ae 2m. et 3m. no recusant of Diuine prayer or Sacrament 

Ae 4m. Burgate is a personage preseutative, and hath no other, no 

Impropriation or Vicaredge. 
Ae 5m. et 6m. et septem as before, S' Nicholas Bacon, knight, patron. 

Broome. 

Ml*. Thomas Hart, Rco^. dicit 

Ae Im. the nomber of Comunicantes theare — Ixxx. 

Ae 2m. et 3m. theare be twoo men recusantes and one woman and 
the nomber of men that doo not receyve the Comunion are 
Sixe, and the nomber of women are three, the rest all come to 
church and doo to receyve the holie comunion. 

Ae 4m. it is a personage presentatiue, he hath no other. 

Ae 5m. 6m. et 7m. non such. S^ Thomas Comwalles, knight, is 
patron. 

Cotton — Thomham magna. 

Mr. Jacob Wadesworthe, Rco^. dicit. 

Ae Im. the nomber of Coinunicantes — ex. 

Ae 2m. et 3m. no recusant of diuine prayer or Sacrament 

Ae 4m. he is person of Cotton and Thornham magna, not distant 

the one from the other past twoo or thre Miles, Cotton valued 

in the King's Book xv!? x" ij? and Great Thomham at vij? xj». 

he is a Bachelor of Diuinitie. 
Ae 5m. et 6in. no Impropriation or Vicarage. 
Ae 7m. the patron of Cotton is M''. Pretymau, genl, and of Great 

Thornham, M^ Henrye Buckenham, Esquier. 

Combes. 

M'. Milo Mosse, sacre theologie professor, Rco^ Dicit. 

Ae Im. the nomber of comunicantes theare are — ccl^5 

Ae 2m. et 3m. no recusant of Diuine prayer or Sacrament. 

Ae 4m. he hath no other Lyvinge besides and preacheth twise 

everye Sabboeth. 
Ae 5m. no Impropriation or Vicaredge. 
Ae 6m. ut Supra. 
Ae 7m. M"". Thomas Dandye, Esquier, is patron. 



SUFFOLK AND SUDBURY IN THK YEAR 1603. 23 

Creetinge petri. 

M'' Robertus Smeth, Rco''. dicit. 

Ae Im. The nomber of the Comunicantes — cxlviij**f 

Ae 2iD. et 3m. no recusant of anye sort. 

Ae 4m. it is a Rectorye or psonage and he hath no other. 

Ae 5m. et 6m. no Impropriation or Yicaredge. 

Ae 7m. M'*. John ffamlej, patron. 

Greeting Scorum. 

M''. Robertus Cottesforde, Rco'. dicit. 

Ae Im. the nomber of Comunicantes — ^Ixxij. 

Ae 2m. et 3m. no manner of recusantes. 

Ae 4m. 5m. et 6m. no such, he hath no other Benefice. 

Ae 7m. M^ Justice Clench, patron. 

Eye. 

M'. George Pearchill, Yicar Dicit. 

Ae Im. the nomber of the Comunicantes — ccccx. 

Ae 2m. et 3m. twoo women lately e com in to the towne doo refuse 
to com to the church and recevye the coniunion. 

Ae 4m. he hath but this Yicaredge. 

Ae 5m. et 6m. Eye is an Impropriation indued w^^ the sayed 
Yicaredge, yn^^ is valued in the King's Booke at xj¥ his Ma**? 
hath the Impropriation and one M^ Edward Honyweyes, 
Esquier, is farmor, the same not valued in the King's Booke 
to his knowledge. But he saieth the poore Yicaredge is 
maymed by evill customes. 

Ae 7m. the patron and proprietarye the Kinge his Ma**f 

ffenyngham. 

M''. Johannes Dobben, Rco'' dicit. 

Ae Im. the nomber of Comunicantes — Ixix. 

Ae 2m. et 3m. non such theare. 

Ae 4m. it is a personage presentatiue, he hath no other. 

Ae 5m. et 6m. no Impropriation or Yicaredge theare. 

Ae 7m. Edmund Cotton, genP, is patron. 

Oislingham. 

M^ Georgius Grundye, Rco^ dicit. 

Ae Im. the nomber of the Comunicantes — clxxiijH* 

Ae 2m. et 3m. no recusant of Diuine prayer or Sacrament. 

Ae 4m. it is a Rectory and he hath no other. 

Ae 5m. et 6m. no Impropriation or Yicaredge. 

Ae 7m. M^ Michael Bedingfyld, Esquier, patron. 

Melles. 

M'. Nicholaus ffanner, Rector dicit. 

Ae Im. The nomber that receyve the Coinunion — cxxxv. 



24 CONDITION OF THE ARCHDEACONRIES OF 

Ae 2m. et tertium theare be twoo woman recuaaiites and theare be 

Sixe men and fjve women that doo not reoeyre the holie 

oomunion. 
Ae 4m. Melles a personage presentatiue and he hath no other. 
Ae 5m. 6m. et 7m. no Impropriation nor Vicaredge theare and the 

Kinge his Ma^. is patron. 
Mendlesham. 

M^ Edwardus Riggea, Vicarius dicit. 

Ae Im. the nomber of the Comunicantes theare — clx. 

Ae 2m. et 3m. theare be twoo men and twoo women recuaantea w^ 

also doo not receyve the com union. 
Ae 5m. et 6m. Mendlesham is an Impropriation indued w^ the sayed 

Vioaredge, w^^ Vicaredge is valued in the King's Book at xiiij? 

the psonage impropriate, not valued to his knowledge. 
Ae 7m. M^ Knyvett of Buckingham Castel in Norf: Esqoier 

patron of the Vicaredge. 
Ocoolde. 

M^ Stephanus fireman, Rco' dicit. 

Ae Im. the nomber of the Coinunioantes — ^Ixxvj*** 

Ae 2m. et 3m. theare is one women recusant, and theare is one 

man and twoo women w<^ doo not receyve the Comunion. 
Ae 4m. it is personage presentatiue, he hath no other. 
Ae 5m. et 6m. no Impropriation nor Vicaredg. 
Ae 7m. Mr. Dassett is patron. 
OUeye. 

U^. Egidius Woode, Rector Dicit. 

Ae. Im. the nomber of comunicantes theare — ciiij?^ 

Ae 2m. et 3m. theare is one man and one woman that doo not 

receyve the holie coinunion and no more, no recusant of 

Diuiue prayer. 
Ae 4m. 5m. et 6m. it is a ^onage presentatiue and hath no other, 

no Impropriation theare nor Vicaredge. 
Ae 7m. S^ Thomas Comwalles, knight, is patron. 
Palgraue. 

M^ Elnethan Parrye, RcC dicit. 
Ae Im. the nomber of Comunicants — clzxvj^? 
Ae 2ro. et 3m. of men recusantes one Sectarye, of women non. 
Ae 4m. he hathe oulye Palgraue, beinge a Rectore or Personage 
^ presentatiue. b"*. Thomas Comwalles, knight, patron, 

'jjball superior. 
^Q*2^obertus Do we, RcC. 
Ae 2m ^^^ nomber of Comunicantes are — cxxx. 
Ae 7m S^' ^^' ^^' °'^'^* 
Redgraue cB Ba?^°^°^*« ^*^^"» ^"^^^^^ P^^^^^' 
Magr. Willmf ^^|l .. ^ ^ 

FNo further e^«Hf»^'- 
ntry|. 



SUFFOLK AND SUDBURY IN THB YEAR 1603. 25 

Risangles. 

Mr. Willmus Strade, Rcor. dicit. 
Ae Im. the nomber of Comunicantes are — xliiij**? 
Ae 2m. et 3m. no recusant theare. 
Ae 4m. a personage presentatiue, no other. 

Ae 5m. 6m. et 7m. M''. Edwarde Grympson of Bradfyld, Esquier, 
patron. 

Kidlingfyld. 

It is an Impropriation belonginge to M^ John Bedingfyld. 

Starston. 

M^ Edwardus ffenne, Rco>^. dicit. 

Ae Im. the nomber of the Comunicantes theare — Ixxxxj. 

Ae 2m. et 3m. theare is but one Man and one woman that be 

recusantes of Diuine prayer or Sacramentes. 
Ae 4m. Sturston a personage presentatiue and hath no other. 
Ae 5m. et 6m. non such. 
Ae 7m. S'. Thomas Comwalles, knight, is patron. 

Stoake Asshe. 

Mag'. Johannes Tavernor, Rec^ 

Mag**. Thomas Bingham cap«*."» pol** ibidem dicit 

Ae Im. the nomber of the Comunicantes are — Izxx. 

Ae 2m. et 3m. non such theare. 

Ae 4m. the sayed M^ John Tavernor is person of twoo Benefices 
and both personages presentatiue viz^. Disse in Norfif. and 
Stok asshe in Suff. the one distant from the other not past 
fower miles, his degree of Schoole he knoweth not. He kepeth 
uppon the other benefice Disse he was our late Sovereign her 
Ma**« Chaplen. 

Ae 5m. et 6m. no such theare. 

Ae 7m. Edmuude Buckenham, Esquier, patron. 

Thrandeston. 

Mr. Jacobus Lynge, Rco^ dicit. 

Ae Im. the nomber of Comunicantes about — c. 

Ae 2m. et 3m. one Sectarye a man recusant and no other and he 

dooth not receyve the holie comunion. 
Ae 4m. Thradeston a personage presentatiue and hath no other. 
Ae 5m. et 6m. no such theare. 
Ae 7m. S^ Thomas Cornwalles, knight, patron. 

Thomham magna. 

M'. Jacob Wadesworthe, Reo' dicit 
Ae Im. the nomber of Comuuicantes theare aboute an — c. 
Ae 2m. et 3m. no recusantes of anye sorte. 

To the rest of the Articles he answereth as before he hath sayed 
for his other Benefice of Cotton before written. 



26 CONDITION OF TBE ARCHDEACONRIES OF 

Thomham pva. 

W. Willmus Sheldrake, Rco^. dicit. 

Ae Izn. the nomber of comunicantes — xxiiij^.® 

Ae 2m. et 3ni. non such person theure. 

Ae 4m. he hath but this poore psonage. 

Ae 5m. et 6m. non theare. 

Ae 7m. Mr. Burlinham, patron, theare. 

Twayte. 

M^ Jacobus Hatton, Rcor. dicit. 

Ae Im. the nomber of Comuicantes theare — xlvij*!* 

Ae 2m. et 3m. no recusant of diuine prayer or sacrament 

Ae 4m. a personage presentatiue, he hath no other. 

Ae 5m. et 6m. non such theare. 

Ae 7m. M^ Anthonye Penninge, patron. 

Wurtham. 

M^ Johannes Symoudes, Rec^ unius Medietatis de Wurtham. 

M^ Johannes Parsley, Rco' alterius Medietatis ibidem dicuut. 

Ae Im. the nomber of the Comunicantes theare are — clxxxvj. 

Ae 2m. et 3m. no recusant of anye sort. 

Ae 5m. et 6m. non such. 

Ae 7m. S^ Anthonye ffelton, knight, is patron. 

Wetheringsott c& Brock ford. 

M^ Richardus Hacklett, Rco'' dicit. 

Ae Im. the nomber of the Comunicantes are — cc. 

Ae 2m. et 3m. theare are twoo men and their wiefes, that doc not 

receyve the com union. 
Ae 4m. it is a personage presentative, he hathe no other. 
Ae 5m. et 6m. non such. 
Ae 7m. S^ Stephan Soham, patron. 

Wyverston .. Westhorpe. 

M^ Robertus Ballarde, Rco>". dicit. 

Ae Im. the nomber of Comunicantes in Westhorpe is Ixv, ^ 

and the nomber of the Coinunicantes in Wyverston f cxxv 
are Ix, in the wholl J 

Ae 2m. et 3m. no recusantes in any of the parisshes theare except 
thre men who haue not receyved the cofnunion. 

Ae 4m. he is parson of them l)ooth, he is a master of art of xxiiij^^ 
standinge, Chaplen to the late Lord North, and hath his 
dispensation confirmed by the broad Scale, the Churches are 
not past a quarter of a Myle distance the one from the other 
and Westhorpe valued in the Kinge's Book at iiij^ xriij^ ix4 oU 
and Wyverston at vij^* xiij" ix^ ob. 

Ae 7m. S^* Nicolas Bacon, knight, is patron, of Wyverston and 
Willm Barrowe, Esquier, patron, of Westhorpe. 



SUFFOLK AND SUDBURY IN THE YEAR 1603. 27 

Wickham Skithe. 

M^ Riohardus Ussher, Vicarius dicit. 

Ae 1di. the nomber of Comunicantes — cl**? 

Ae 2m. et 3m. no recusantes of anje Sort. 

Ae 4m. he hath but this poore Vicaredg. 

Ae 5m. et 6m. it is an Impropriation indued wt^ the same Yicaredge. 

Ml*, ffreston, fisquier, proprietarye and patron. The Yicaredge 

valued in the King's Booke at y\^ xj? 
Ae 7m. he answereth as before. 

Thomdou ... Pulham. 

Magr. Hugo Castelton, Rector. 

Mr. Willinus Ropkeu cap**."« po*^ iBm dicit. 

Ae Im. the nomber of Comunicantes in Thorndon — cxlxvjti«(nc) 

Ae 2m. et 3m. theare are fower men that doo not recejve the 

Comunion, but jett frequent the church, and likewise thre 

women of the same qua! i tie. 
Ae 5m. et 6m. M^ Castelton hath twoo Benefices beinge personages 

presentatiue, viz*. Pulham in Norff. and Thorndon in Suff. 

distant the one from the other about Eightt Miles, he is a 

Bachelor of Diuinitie, Pulham valued in the King's Book at 

xxxiijf* vj* viiij4 and Thorndon at xxiiij^ xj» x4 ob. 
Ae 7m. the Kinge his Ma^? is patron of Pulham and M^ Pretteman 

of Thorndon. 

Yaxley 

Mr Egidius Polje, Vicarius, dicit. 

Ae Im. the nomber of Coinunicantes are about — c. 

Ae 2m. et 3m. theare are men recusantes Seaven, and women 

recusantes Eleaven, and theis doo not receyve the holie 

Comunion, there are no other. 
Ae 4m. he hath but this poor Yicaredge of Yaxley. 
Ae 5m. et 6m. theare is an Impropriation, indued w^ the sayed 

Yicaredge, the Yicaredge valued in his MaH® Book at vj^? vj? vj? 

the personage impropriate to his knowledge not valued theare. 
Ae 7m. his Mu^.® booth patron and proprietarye. 

Buxall. 

M^ Georgius Pickenson, Rcor. dicit. 

Ae Im. the nomber of the Comunicantes — clx**® 

Ae 2m. et 3m. no recusantes of anye sort. 

Ae 4m. it is a personage presentatiue, he hath no other. 

Ae 5m. et 6m. no such theare. 

Ae 7m. M'. Henrye Coppinger, minister, patron. 

Creatinge pva. 

Mr. Robertus Cottesforde, Rcor dicit. 

Ae Im. the nomber of the Comunicantes — Ixxij**.® 



28 OONDinOK OF THE ARCHDEAOONRIES OF 

Ae 2m. et 3in. no recusant of anye sorte. 

Ae 4m. it is a personage presentatiue, he hath no other. 

Ae 5m. et 6m. non such theare. 

Ae 7m. M^ Justice Clench, patron. 

ffinberrough magna. 

Magr. Radulphus Kenricke, Vicarius dioit 
Ae Im. the nomber of the Comunicantes theare — cxx^ 
Ae 2m. et 3m. no recusantes of Diuine prayer or Sacrament. 
Ae 4m. he hath but this Vicaredge. 

Ae 5m. et 6m. there is an Impropriation indued with the sayed 
Vicaredge w<^ Vicaredge is valued in the King's Book at 
v^ viij4 the personage impropriate not valued. 
Ae 7m. The Kinge his ma^^« is patron. 

ffinberrouf^h pva. 

M^ Thomas fiemys, cap"*)*" po"f iBm dicit 
(No further entry). 
Harleston. 

Mr. Kobertus Westley, cap'^.^'^o^f ibidem dicit. 

Ae Im. the nomber of the Comunicantes — xliiij^* 

Ae 2m et 3m. no recusantes theare anye waye. 

Ae 4m. 5m. et 6m. That Harleston is holden for an Impropriation, 
aud a Donatyve, theare is no Vicaredge indued, his stipende 
is but v^ a yeare for his service. The sayed personage impro- 
priate (if it be such a one) is valued in the Ring's Book at v¥ 
one Richarde Muskett, genf, taketh all the fruites. 

Ae 7m. theare is no other patron knowen but the sayed Muskett 
who (as before be hath answered) taketh all the profeits. 
Hawley. 

Mr. Johannes Goldinge, Vicarius dicit u 

Ae Im. the number of comunicants theare — xiij. 

Ae 2m. et 3m. no recusant of Diuine prayer or Sacrament. 

Ae 4m. he hathe no other Benefice. 

Ae 6m. et 6m. it is a personage impropriate w*^ the sayed Vicaredge 
indued w^ Vicaredge is valued in the King's Books at 
vij? xix" ij4 he never herd the personage impropriate was or 
is valued in the King's Booke. 

Ae 7ni. M^ Pretyman, wedowe, is Proprietarye. 
l^ewton. 

M^. Willmus Symondes, Vicarius dicit. xx 

Ae Im. the nomber of the comunicantes are — viij or ix 

Ae 2m. et 3m. no recusant of Diuine prayer or Sacrament. 

Ae 4m. he hath no other but this Vicaredge. 

Ae 5m et 6m. Newton is an Impropriation indued w*^ a Vicaredge, 
^ych Vicaredge is valued in the King's Book at vj? 

Ae 7m. M^ Arteat is proprietarye, and Richard Howe of Stow- 
market, genP, patron. 



SUFFOLK AND SUDBURY IN THE YEAR 1603. 29^ 

Onehowse. 

Mag*". HenricuB Godley, R'co^ dicit. 
Ae Im. the nomber of the Comunicantes — Ix. 
Ae 2m. et 3in. he hath uou such in his parrisshe. 
Ae 4m. it is a personage presentatiue, he hath no other. 
Ae 5m. et 6ra. nou such theare. 
Ae 7m. M^ John Tyndall, Esquier, patron. 
Shellande. 

M'. Johnannes Towne cap*^."" po".» dicit. 

Ae Im. the nomber of the comunicantes theare — xxzv^* 

Ae 2m. et 3m. no recusant of Diuine prayer or Sacrament. 

Ae 5m, et 6m. reported to be a Donatiue, George Turner recejveth 

the profettes and giveth for his s'vice to the curate v? a jeare. 
Ae 7m. he sayeth as before written to the 5 and 6 Articles. 
Stowe markett. 

M^ Willmus Peagrem, Vicarius iBm dicit. c 

Ae Im. the nomber of the comunicantes theare — vy. Ixxx. 

Ae 2m. et 3m. no recusant of Diuine prayer or Sacrament. 

Ae 4m. he hath no other Benefice. 

Ae 5m. et 6m. theare is an Impropriation, indued w^ the sayed 

Vicaredge, w<^^ Vicaredge is valued in the King's Booke at 

xvj? xx^ the psonage impropriate not valued in the King's 

Book to his knowledge. 
Ae 7m. M*" Richard Howe, GenF, patron and proprietarye. 

Wetherden. 

Mr Milo Sill, Kco'-. Dicit. _ 

Ae Im. the nomber of Comunicantes are — cxlvj. 

Ae 2m. et 3m. theare be wV^in that parrisshe Seauen men recusantes, 
and Sixe women recusantes, And the nomber of men theare 
Doo refuse to receyve the holie comunion is Kleuen and theare 
be Sixe women that doo refuse to receyve the holie coinunion. 

Ae 4m. he hath but the psonage of Wetherden presentatiue. 

Ae 5m. et 6m. no Impropriation, or Vicaredge. 

Ae 7m. The Kinge his Ma^5 is patron. 
Aipall. 

M^ Richardus Tayler, cap*^."* po"* ibidem dicit. 
(no further entry). 
Bacton. 

Mag'. Thomas Monck, Rco^ 

Ae Im. The nomber of comunicantes are about — cc. 

Ae 2m. et 3m. no recusant of anye Sort or condicon. 

Ae 4m. it is personage presentatiue, he hath no other, he is a 
Bachelor of Diuinitie. 

Ae 5m. et 6m. no Impropriation nor Vicaredge theare. 

Ae 7m. S'*. John Pretyman, knight, patron. 



30 CONDITION OF THE ARCHDEACONBIBS OF 

Decanatus de Clare. 
Barnardeaton. 

Mag^ Georgius Maje, Reo^ Dicit. 

Ae Im. the nomber of recusautes (nc, f comunicautes) theare— oxl^* 

Ae 2m. et 3m. no recuaantes of Diuine prayer or Sacrament. 

Ae 4m. 5m. et 6m. a Rectorye w%)ut anye Impropriation, he hatb 

no other Benefice. 
Ae 7m. the patron S^ Thomas Bamardeston, knight 

Bradleye magna ... Westleye. 

M^. GliueruB Philippes, Rcor. ibidem Dicit 
Ae Im. the nomber of Comunicantes are — Iz. 
Ae 2m. et dm. no recusant of diuice praier or Sacrament 
Ae 4m. ct vjm. ad septem articulum dicit ut prius in Westlej in 
Decanatus de Thingo et Thedwastre. 

Bradleye pva. 

Mr. Robertus Sacker, Rco''. ibm Dicit 

Ae Im. the nomber of the Coinunicantes — 1. 

Ae 2m. et dm. no recusant of Diuine prayer or Sacrament 

Ae 4m. it is a Rectorye presentatiue, he hath no other. 

Ae 5m. et 6m. non such theare. 

Ae 7m. M^ John Lehunt, Esquier, patron. 

Chedburye. 

Mag^ Michael Kynge, Rcor. Dicit 

Ae Im. the nomber of the Comunicantes are — ^xxxviij?* 

Ae 2m. et 3m. no recusant of Diuine prayer, but one man that 

dooth not receyve the com union. 
Ae 4m. it is a personage presentatiue, and he hathe no other. 
Ae 5m. et 6m. no Impropriation or Vicaredge. 
Ae 7m. S*" Robert Drurye, knight, patron. 

Cowleadge. 

M^ Georgius Hall, capellanus pc^ ibm Dicit. 

Ae Im. the nomber of the Comunicantes— cc. 

Ae 2m. et 3m. no recusant of anye sort. 

Ae 4m. it is an Impropriation w^ut anye Vicaredge, the minister 

or Curate Stipende is yearlye xx^ payed by the ffarmor of the 

Impropriation. 
Ae 7m. it belongeth unto Trinitie hall in Cambridge. 

Clare. 

M^ Willmus Colte, Vicarius dicit. 

Ae Im. the nomber of the comunicantes — ccclxxz. 

Ae 2m. et 3m. no recusant of Diuine prayer or Sacrament. 

Ae 4m. he hath but this poore Vicaredge. 



SUFFOLK AND SUDBURY IN THE YEAR 1603. 31 

Ae 5m. et 6tn. theaxe is an Impropriation indued w^ this Vicaredge, 
wc? Vicaredge is valued in the King's Book at iiijf? xvij« viiij^ 
The tithe of the Impropriation are worth yearlye to be lett 
about thre score and tenne pounds wherof the lord Bishoppe 
of Elye hath U* and Wm, Weekes hath xx^ and the poore 
Vicaredge is but worthe xxl^ a yeare. 

Ae 7m. the Patron is the Kinge his Ma*i«, the towne is one of the 
honors of the Kinge. The Chancell is almost, yea altogether 
fallen downe beinge a verie goodlye and auncient monyment 
to hold the people for the hearinge of prayer and the preach- 
inge of the Word of God. 

Debden (fDepden). 

M*". Thomas Jefferye, Rector Dicit. 

Ae Im. the nomber of Coiiiunicantes are — cc. 

Ae 2m. et 3m. no recusantes of Diuine prayer or Sacrament. 

Ae 4m. it is a personage presentatiue and hath no Vicaredge. 

Ae 5m. et 6m. no Impropriation. 

Ae 7m. John Jermyn, Esquier, patron. 

Deyenston. 

M^ Richardus Peaohie, cap°."» po^?* iBm dicit. 

Ae Im. the nomber of comunicantes are — cxiiij**® 

Ae 2m. et 3m. theare are non such w^^in that parrisshe. 

Ae 4m. 5m. et 6m. Devenston is an Impropriation and no Vicaredge 

indued, served by the Curate who hath payed him by John 

Paye for his yearlye Stipende xviij¥ 
Ae 7m. the Kinge his Ma**« proprietarye, and the sayed Paye ffarmor. 

Dalham. 

M^ Thomas Carlill, Rector iBin dicit. 

Ae Im. the nomber of the Comunicantes theare — cxx. 

Ae 2m. et 3m. he hath non such in his parrisshe. 

Ae 4m. he hathe the Rectorye of Dalham and no other. 

Ae 5m. et 6m. theare is non such. 

Ae 7m. Mr. Thomas Stutvill, Esquier is patron. 

Denham. 

M^ Robertus Prick, oap°»»» po"f ibm. 

Ae Im. the nomber of comunicantes — Ixxx. 

Ae 2m. et 3m. no recusantes of anye sort. 

Ae 4m. et 5m. et 6m. it is an Impropriation or Donatyve, no 

Vicaredge indued. 
Ae 5m. 6m. et 7m. S'^ Edward Lewkenor proprietarye, who alloweth 

to the Minister for his Stipende xxf^ a yeare. 

Gaseley ... Weston. 

M'. Thomas Nuce, Vicarius dicit 

Ae Im. the nomber of Coinunicantes theare-— ccx. 



82 CONDITION OF THE ARCHDEACONRIES OF 

Ae 2iD. et 3m. no recusant ftnye waje as touchinge Diuine prayer 

or sacrament 
Ae 4m. he hath the Vicaredge of Gaselej. and the personage of 

Weston, distant the one from the other not past xiiij Mjles. 
Ae 5m. et 6m. Gaselej is an Impropriaton to his MaH* indued w^ 

the sajed Vicaredge, w^^ Vicarage is valued in the King's Books 

at vij^ iij? iiij? and Weston at viij? xix* He is a Bachelor 

of Diuinitie 
Ae 7m. The Master and fellowes of Trinitie hall in Cambridge are 

patrones of Gaselej, and of Weston Henry Buckenham as 

before is written for Weston. 

Haverhill. 

M^ Laurentius ffayercliff, Vicarius dicit. 

Ae Im. the nomber of comunicantes theare — ceo. 

Ae 2m. et 3m. no recusant of Diuinie prayer or Sacrament. 

Ae 4m. it is a Vicaredge and he hath no other. 

Ae 5m. et 6m. it is an Impropriation indued w^ the sayed Vicaredge 
and the same Impropriation belongeth unto Thomas Bendissh, 
geni?, and one M'. ffowler of Cambridge. The Vicaredge valued 
in the King's Book at vij\* x? 

Ae 7m. M*". Thomas Cole, genf, patron of Haverhill Vicaredge. 

Hawkeden. 

Mag'. Robertus Haye, Rco'. Dicit. 

Ae Im. the nomber of the Comunicantes — cij. 

Ae 2m. et 3m. no recusant of Diuine prayer or Sacrament theare. 

Ae 4m. he hath no other. 

Ae 5m. et 6m. it is a Kectorye presentatiue, no Impropriation or 

Vicaredge. 
Ae 7m. The patron, M^ Martha Everard of Hawkedon^ wedowe. 

Hunden. 

M'. Nicholaus Whitfylde, Vicarius Dicit. 

Ae Im. the nomber of the Comunicantes — cccc. 

Ae 2m. et 3m. no recusant of prayer or Sacrament. 

Ae 4m. he hath no other. 

Ae 5m. et 6m. theare is an Impropriation indued w*** the sayed 
Vicaredge, m^^ Impropriation belongeth unto Sr Stephan 
Soham, knight, of London. The Vicaredge valued in the 
King's Book at vijl* viij» iiij<? 

Ae 7m. the Kiuge his Ma**5 patron of the Vicaredge. 

Kedington ats Ketton ... Wrattinge mag. 

MX Johannes Smeth, Rec*". dicit. xx 

Ae Im. The nomber of Comunicantes — vij. 

Ae 2m. et 3m. no recusant except one gentil woman who dooth 
not receyve the Com union uppon the earror of trausbstancion. 



SUFFOLK AND SUDBURY IN THK YBAR 1603. 33 

Ac 4m. he hath twoo personages w**» Cure namelye Ketton and 
Wrattinge magna, heinge distant the one from the other not 
past thre quarters of a Myle, he is a Bachelor of Diuinitie. 
Wrattinge magna vahied in the King's book at viijl^ and 
Ketton xvj\* viij*. vj4 ob. 

Ae 5m. et 6m. no Impropriation or Vicaredge. 

Ac 7m. he knoweth not certenlye the patrones. 
Lydgate. 

M'. Oliuerus Sarson, Rco'*. dicit xx 

Ae Im. the nomber of comunicantes thearc — vj. 

Ae 2m. no recusant of Oiuiue prayer.or Sacrament. 

Ae 4m. it is a Rector je preseutatiue, he hath no other. 

Ae 5m. et 6m. no Impropriation or Vicaredge. 

Ae 7m. S^ John Cotton, knight, patron. 
Owesden. 

M'. Thomas Turner, Rco^ dicit. 

Ae Im. the nomber of Comunicantes theare — cxviij^? 

Ae 2m. et 3m. no recusant theare of anje sorte. 

Ae 4m. it is a Rectorye presentatiue, he hath no other. 

Ae 5m. et 6m. non such theare. 

Ae 7m. the patrones, M^ Margaret t Moselej, wedowe, and Humfrey 
Moseley, £squier. 
Poelingforde. 

Magr. Willmus Johnson, Vicarius Dicit. 

Ae im. the nomber of comunicantes theare — cxi^5 

Ae 2m. et 3m. no recusant of Diuiues or Sacraments theare. 

Ae 4m. he hath but this Vicaredge. 

Ae 5m. et 6m. it is an Impropriation ij^dued w^ the sayd Vicaredge, 
w<^ Vicaredge is valued in the King's Booke at vj? a poore 
Vicaredg. The Impropriation woorth an hundreth marks a 
yeare, it dooth belonge to Mr. Thomas Goldinge, genV. 

Ae 7m. The same M^ Qoldinge, patron of the Vicaredge. 
Stradgeswell. 

M^ Clemens ffrench, Rcor. Dicit. 

Ae Im. the nomber of the Comunicantes are — cxx^? 

Ae 2m. et 3m. no recusant of anye sort. 

Ae 4m. it is a Rectorye presentatiue, he hath no other. 

Ae 5m. et 6m. no Impropriation or Vicaredge theare. 

Ae 7m. the Kinge his MaH^ Patron. 
Stanneafilde. 

M^ Johannes Rowe, Rcc. Dicit. 

Ae Im. the nomber of the comunicantes theare — cv. 

Ae 2m. et 3m. no recusant of diuine prayer or sacrament 

Ae 4m. 5m. et 6m. it is a Rectorye, w^ut anye Vicaredge, he hath 
no other. 

Ae 7m. the Kinge his Ma^? patron. 

D 



*34 CONDITION OF THE ARCHDEACONRIES OF 

Stoake iuxta Clare. 

M'. Johamies ClKjdon CHp"*}*" pc^ ib'in. Dicit. 

Ae 1 m. the uomber of comuiiicautes tbeare — ccccv. 

Ae 2m. et 3m. no recusantea, siireiuge theare are thre men and 
twoo men that receyve not the comunion. 

Ae 4m. 5m. et 6m. it is an Impropriation wt^out a Vicaredg, and 
it dooth belong to Stoak colledg, lat' dissolved and is nowe 
holden by the ladve Cheak in fee simpell, the Curate hath but 
X? yearlie stipeude, and further he saieth that he hath bad 
by auncient Inhabitanta of the sayed towne that the parrissb 
priest theare successivelye held and enioyed in thar owne 
right a certen howse called the priestes chamber adioyuinge 
unto the gat' howse of the sayed colledge and also recey ved in 
thar owne right all tithes and profettes belonging to the sayed 
Churche (tithe corne onlye excepted) untill the dissolution of 
the sayed Colledge. After the w<'^ dissolution S>^ John Cheek 
compounded wV* the parrissh priest theare, called S'. Hewwe 
for all the sayed tithes and gaue him Tenne Powndes pr. 
annum in lieu of the same. And sithence that tyme this 
sayd howse and tithes haue ben w^holden from the priestes 
and curates theare. 

Ae 7m. he answareth that he verelie thinketh that the King's 
Ma**? is the right patron of the sayed church, because the 
Deane of the sayed colledge, before and at the dissolution ded 
appoint successivelye the Ministers to serve in the sayed 
church and indued them w^ the priestes chamber and all 
manner of tithes whatsoeuer (the corne excepted \\^^ ded 
belonge unto the Q^ane), but nowe the Ladye Cheek deteyneth 
the howse and tithes aforesayed and appoynteth the curate. 
Thurlowe magna et ^va. 

M*". Johannes Smeth, Rector de Thurlowe parva et Vicarius de 
Thurlowe magna. 

Ae Im. the noniber of coinunicates in Thurlowe pva—cxij and the 
nomber of coinunicantes in Thurlowe magna — cxxxviij. 

Ae 2m. et 3m. no recusant of diuine prayer or sacrament theare. 

Ae 4m. he hath twoo Benefices, viz^ the personage of litell Thur- 
lowe and the Vicaredge of great Thurlowe w^ cure, they are 
not distant the one from the other aboue one quarter of a 
Myle, he is a Bachelor of Diuinitye, and hath a pluralitie under 
the great Seale of England, litell Thurlowe is valued in the 
King's Book at vij\* x» iiij4 ob. and Great Thurlowe at 
x\* xj" iiij? Great Thurlowe is an Impropriation and w?» the 
Vicaredge indowed, M*". Warren hath the Impropriation w^ 
is not valued in the King's Book. 

Ae 7m. the Patron of litell Thurlowe is S'' Stephan Soham, knight^ 
M^^ Warren hath the nominacon of the Place to the Vicarage 
of Great Thurlowe and the Kinge his MaH^ presenteth. 



SUFFOLK AND SUDBURY IN THE YEAR 1603. 35 

Wixoe. 

M'. Georgius Pynder, Rco«-. dicit. 

Ae Im. the number of the Comunicantes theare — V^* 

Ae 2in. et 3m. no recusantes of anye sort 

Ae 4m. he hath no other, it is a personage presentatiue. 

Ae 6m. et 6m. uon otherwise then before. 

Ae 7m. S' John Pajton, knight, patron. 

Wethersfjlde. 

M^ Isaac Marrowe, Rco^ Dicit. 

Ae Im. the nomber of comunicantes theare — cxzziij. 

Ae 2m. et 3m. no recusant of Diuine prayer or Sacrament. 

Ae 4m. it is a Rectorye presentatiue, he hath no other. 

Ae 5m. et 6m. neither Impropriation nor Vicaredge. 

Ae 7m. S' Giles AHngtou, knight, patron. 

Wrattinge magna. 

M^ Johannes Smeth, Rco^*. Dicit. 
Ae Im. the nomber of Coinunicantes — xlviij. 
Ae reliquos articulos dicit ut supra in Ketton {" saveinge he saith 
that A " — this has been scored out). 

Wrattinge pva. 

M^ Johannes Lawe, Kco^. Dicit. 

Ae Im. the nomber of the comunicantes — c. 

Ae 2m. et 3m. no recusant of any sort. 

Ae 4m. it is a Rectorye presentatiue, he hath no other. 

Ae 5m. et 6m. there is non such. 

Ae 7m. Anne Turner, genP, is patron. 

Wickambrooke. 

M'. Christoferus Best, Vicarius Dicit 

Ae Im. the nomber of the Comunicantes theare about — cccc. 

Ae 2m. et 3m. no recusantes theare of anye sort. 

Ae 4m. theare is an Impropriation w^ the sayed Vicaredge indowed. 

he hath no other but the same Vicaredg. 
Ae 5m. 6m. et 7m. it is an Impropriation, ded sometyme belonge 

to the Abbye of Stepwell in the countie of Northampton, the 

Vicaredge valued in the King's Book viijl^ vj* viij? otherwise 

he knoweth not. 

Decanatus Sudburie. 
Alpheton. 

Mag^ Randolphus Lyster, Rco^ Dicit. 

Ae Im. the nomber of the comunicantes theare — Izxxv. 

Ae 2m. et 3m. no recusant of anye sort 

Ae 4m. it is a Rectorye or personage presentatiue, he hath no other. 

Ae 5m. et 6m. theare is no Impropriation or Vicaredge. 

Ae 7m. M*^ Alington is patron. 



36 CONDITION OF THE ARCHDEACONRIES OP 

Aesington. 

Mag**. Thomas Chambers, Vicarius Dicit. 

Ae Im. the iiomber of the comunicantes theare — clxxx. 

Ae 2m. et 3m. no recusant of Diuine prayer or Sacrament. 

Ae 4m. he hath but Assington Vicaredge. 

Ae 5m. et 6m. Assington is an Impropriation w^ the sayed 
Vicaredge iudowed, w<^^ Vicaredge is valued in the King's 
Book at X? 

Ae 7m. M'. Gurdon, Esquier, proprietarye and patron. 
Aldeham. 

M>^ ffrauciscus Harrison, Rcor. Dicit 

Ae Im. the nomber of the Comunicantes are about — c. 

Ae 2m. et 3m. no recusant of anye sort. 

Ae 4m. it is a personage presentatiue, he hath no other. 

Ae 5m. et 6m. no Impropriation, but halfe the towne paye twop 
partes of their tithe to the priorye of Cowen (or Caven). 

Ae 7m. Mr. Tihiey of Shellye in Suff. is Patron. 
Aokton. 

M*". Edward us Aleston, Vicarius Dicit. xx 

Ae Im. the nomber of the Comunicantes aboute — ix. 

Ae 2m. et 3m. theare are viij men w*^? doo not receyve the 
coiiiunion and Sixe women that doo not receyve the coinunioiu 

Ae 4m. he hath but the Vicaredge of Ackton. 

Ae 5m. et 6m. theare is an Impropriation of Ackton w?^ the sayed 
Vicaredge indowed, w^?* Vicaredge is valued in the King's 
Booke at ixl* xiiij^ iiij? The proprietarye is one ffrancis ffitch 
and his wief. in Ramsden in Essex, and after his deceasse to 
one ffrances Danyell of Ackton. The psonage impropriate ta 
not valued in the King's Book to his knowledg. 

Ae 7m. ffrances Danyell in reversion is Patron. 
Brettenham. 

M**. Humfridus Monynges, Rco^ Dicit. 

Ae Im. the nomber of the Coinunicantes theare — c. 

Ae 2m. et 3m. no recusant of Diuine prayer or Sacrament. 

Ae 4m. it is a personage presentatiue, he hath no other. 

Ae 5m. et 6m. no Impropriation or Vicaredge. 

Ae 7m. the Kinge his Ma**f is Patron. 
Boxforde. 

Magr. Josephus Byrde, Rco*". 

[No further entry]. 
Byldeston. 

Mr. Thomas Care we, Rcor. Dicit 

Ae Im. the nomber of the comunicantes are aboute — ccc. 

Ae 2m. et 3m. no recusant of Diuine prayer or Sacrament. 

Ae 4m. Bildeston is a Rectorye presentatiue, and he hath no other* 

Ae 5m. et 6m. No Impropriation theare, nor Vicaredge theare, 

Ae 7m. Mr. Anton in St. Martens in London, patron. 



SUFFOLK AND SUDBURY IN THE YEAR 1603. 37 

Baen. 

Mr. Johannes Colman, Vicarius Dicit. c 

Ae Im. the nomber of the comunicantes aboute — y.xxxiii. 

Ae 2m. et 3m. no recusant theare of anje sort. 

Ae 4m. he hath no other Ljvinge then the poore Vicaredge of Buers. 

Ae 5m. et 6m. theare is an Impropriation w^ the sajed Vicaredge 
indowed -w^^ Vicaredge is valued in the King's Booke xij^ 
Tiij* The Impropriation or peonage impropriate not valued in 
the King's Booke : estemed and accompted to be worth yearlie 
Six Score pound^s. 

Ae 7m. M^ Danyell Sjdaye by a late purchasse made by Willm 
Sydaye his father of hir MaH® becom Patron of the Vicaredge 
but thir Respondent obteyned the Presentation as the gift of 
hir lAsfi^ 

Haitest cum Boxsteade. 

Mr. Thomas Cranshawe, Rco^. Dicit 

Ae Im. the nomber of the Comunicantes are — cccxx?® 

Ae 2em et 3m. no recusantes neither anye that doo refuse the 

holie coinunion. 
Ae 4m. he hath no other Lyvinge but this personage of Hartest 

cum Boxsteade. 
Ae 5m. et 6m. non otherwise then before hath sayed in thir his 

an us wares. 
Ae 7m. the King's Ma?« is patron. 

Cavendisshe cum Shimplinge thome. 

Mag''. Richardus Mason, Rco''. dicit 

Ae Im. the nomber of the comunicates in Cavendissh isl c 

aboute thre hundreth persons and in Shimplinge r iiij. Ix. 
Thome Eight score in the wholl to the nomber of ^ 

Ae 4m. he hath theis twoo Benefices namelye Caveudissh and 
Shimplinge thome, distant not past thre Myles, he is a Master 
of Artes of fortie years standinge qualified by the right 
honorable lorde Thomas late Earle of Sussex. Cavendisshe 
valued in the King's Booke at xvjf^ and Shimplinge thome 
xvijl* vij« j? 

Ae 5m. 6m. et 7m. no Impropriation or Vicaredge indowed theare. 

Comerth magna. 

M'. Thomas Harrison, Vicarius ibin Dicit. 

Ae Im. the nomber of the Comunicantes theare — c. 

Ae 2m. et 3m. no recusant of Diuine prayer or Sacrament. 

Ae 4m. he hath only this poore Vicaredge. 

Ae 5m. et 6m. There is an Impropriation indowed w^ the sayed 
Vicaredge w<^ Vicaredge is valued in the King's booke Nyne 
Powndes and yett will hardlie aford the value of xixl^ yearlie 



38 CONDITION OF THB AROHDEAGONRIBS OF 

towards the majntenanoe of the Vicar and the perBonagot 
impropriate esteemed to be Worth an hundreth poundea m 
yeare. 
Ae 7m. M^ Thomas Hajes of London is proprietarje and patron^ 
and alio wet h the Vicar som mayntenance, beinge a well 
disposed and godlie gentilman. 

Comerth pvu. 

M^ Johannes Thompson, Rco'. Dicit. 

Ae Im. the nomber of the Comunicantes are about — c. 

Ae 2m. et 3m. no recusant of Diuine prayer or Sacnimeut. 

Ae 4m. he hath but this ^sonage w<^^ is presentatiue. 

Ae 5m. et 6m. nou such theare. 

Ae 7m. Danyell Curtes genV. is patron. 

Kerseye. 

M^ Robertus Warde cap»y« po»« ilim Dicit. xx 

Ae Iro. theare are in nomber of comunicantes about — xii. 

Ae 2m. et 3m. us recusant theare of anye sort 

Ae 4m. it is an Impropriation belonginge to the King's Colledge in 

Cambridge w»out anye Vicaredge indowed, the Minister his 

Stipende x? a yeare payed by M^ Worthington ffarmer to the 

sayed CoUedg. 
Ae 5m. 6m. et 7m. the Provost and fellowes of the sayed Colledge 

are pruprietaryes. 

Chilton. 

MagT Johannes Newman, Rco^ Dicit. 

Ae Im. the nomber of the comunicantes theare — cH* 

Ae 2m. et 3m. no recusant of Diuine prayer or Sacrament. 

Ae 4m. he hath but the peraonage presentatiue. 

Ae 5m. et 6m. theare be no such theare. 

Ae 7m. M^ Dudley ifostescue, Esquier, patron. 

Gookfylde. 

M«". Johannes Knewstubbe Rco'. Dicit. 

Ac Im. the nomber of comunicantes are aboute — cclviH* 

Ae 2m. et 3m. no recusantes of anie sort. 

Ae 4m. a psonage not impropriate, he hath no other. 

Ae 5m. et 6m. non such theare. 

Ae 7m. M^ Springe, Esquier, patron. 

Elmsett et Whatfylde. 

M"". Georgius Carter Rco^ ibm Dicit. 

Ae Im. the nomber of comunicantes in Elmsett aboute Sixe^ 
Score, and in Whatfylde aboute fower Score, in the whole V co* 
to the nomber of. J 

Ae 2m. et 3m. theare are no recusantes. 



SCFFOLK AND SiaOBORY IN THE YKAR 1603. 39 

Ae 4in. he hath twoo personages w^^ cures namelye Elmsett and 
and Whatfjide, they are not above a Myle distant the one 
from the other. Elmsett is valued in the King's Booke at 
xiiij? and Whatfylde at xv¥ he is a Bachelor of Diuinitie and 
Chapleu' to the ladje Jane Wentworthe wedowe, he hath a 
dispensation from the lorde Archbishopp of Canterburje his 
grace, confirmed by the broade Seale of England. 

Ae 5m. et 6m. non such but as he hath before answared. 

Ae 7m. the Patron of Elmsett is the Chancelor of the Duchie of 
Lancaster, And the patron of Whatfylde is Robert Rolff, 
Esquier. 
Edwardeston. 

Mr. Thomas Dearslye Vicarius Dicit. 

Ae Im. the nomber of the Coinunicantes theare— ccxl**? 

Ae 2m. et 3m. no recusant of Diuiue pniyer or Sacrament. 

Ae 4m. he hath but this Vicaredge. 

Ae 5m. et 6m. theare is an Impropriation called Edwardston 
Priory e w?* the sayed Vicuredg indued. The value of the 
Vicaredg in the King's Book is iiijV ziij? iiij4 a poor Vicaredge. 

Ae 7m. M**. John Hrond, Patron. 

Eligh combusta. 

Mag"*. Johannes Bulbrooke, Vicarius Dicit. 

Ae Im. the number of the comunicants theare — dx. 

Ae 2m. et 3m. no recusant of Diuine prayer or Sacniment 

Ae 4m. it is a poore Vicaredge and he hath no other. 

Ae 5m. et 6m. it is an Impropriation indued w^ the sayed 
Vicaredge, vi^ Vicaredge is valued in the King's Book at 
viijf^ , he saieth that the pei-sonage ded take awaye the Glebe 
from it, the Impropriation l)elongeth to Mr. Anthonye Koper 
of fferningham in Kent a recusant w^^ personage impropriate 
is worth an hundreth powndes a yeare, not valued in the 
King's lx)ok and the most thar can yearlie be made of the 
Vicaredifc is xvjl* 

Ae 7m. the SHyed Mr. Koper is Patron. 
Groton. 

M^ Thomas Nicholson Rco>^. Dicit. 

Ae Im. the nomber ot the comunicantes are — ccxlH^ 

Ae 2m. et 3m. no recusantes of anye sort theare. 

Ae 4m Groton is a personage preseutatiue and he hath no other. 

Ae 5m. et 6m. no Impropriation nor Vicaredge. 

Ae 7m. John Wintroppe, gent'., patron. 

Olemisforde. 

M'. Kobertus Tynley, sacro theologie professor, KcC. ibidem 

Dicit. 

Ae Im. the nomber of comunicantes theare aboute — viij. 



40 COKDITION OF THE ARCHDEACONRIES OF 

Ae 2m. et 3ni. no recusantes theare. 

Ae 4m. he hath twoo Beuefices or peraouages w**» cure, namelje 
Duxfourth St. Peter in Cambridg Shjre and Glemisforde in 
the countie of Snff : and are distant the one from the other 
aboute xviij Myles, the personage of Glemisforde is valued in 
the King's book at zxx!^ ob. and Duxford at xx^ he is a 
Doctor of Diuinitie and holdeth them twoo personages bj a 
pluralitie or Dispensation from the lorde Archbisshoppe of 
Canterbury confirmed by the great Scale of England. 

Ae 5m. et 6m. non such theare. 

Ae 7m. the Patron of Duxford is M'. Philippe Parrys, gent, of 
Lynton in Cambridg Shire and the patron of Glemisforde is 
the lord Bisshoppe of £lye. 
Stansteade. 

M'. Uenricus Bowser, Rco^. Dicit xx 

Ae Im. the nomber of the coinunicantes theare — viij. 

Ae 2m. et 3m. no recusantes of anye sort theare 

Ae 4m. he hath but Stanstead a personage presentatiue. 

Ae 5m. et 6m. theare are non such. 

Ae 7m. M'?* Jane Aliugton, Wedowe, is Patron. 
Hecham. 

Magr. Will m us Barwicke, Rco^. Dicit. 

Ae Im. the nomber of the Coinunicantes are — cc. 

Ae 2m. et 3m. no recusant of Diuine prayer or Sacramentes. 

Ae 4ni. it is a personage presentatiue and he hath no other. 

Ae 5m. et 6m. non such theare. 

Ae 7m. the Kinge his Ma**? Patron. 
Ketilbarston. 

M^ Johannes Pricke, Rco''. Dicit. 

Ae Im. the nomber of the coinunicantes theare — Ixxv**® 

Ae 2m. et 3m. no recusantes of any sorte or condicon. 

Ae 4m. a personage presentatiue and he hath no other Benefice. 

Ae 5m. et 6m. non such theare. 

Ae 7m. Willm Appelby, genP, Patron. 
Lay ham ... liaydon. 

M*". Johannes Marrelen, Rco«". 

Ae Im. the nomber of the Comunicantes are — cxxiij*^.^ 

Ae 2ui. et 3m. no recusant theare. 

Ae 4m. he hath twoo personnges w*^ cui'e, namelye Layham and 
Kiiydon distant the one from the other not past one Myle, he 
is mnster of art of xv*^ yeares Standinge and nowe the 
uuiuersitie hath thought good to vouchsaue unto him Bachelor 
of Diuinitie. He is qualifyed by the ladye Wentworth thonger. 
Layham is valued iu the King's Book at xvjl* and Raydon at 
xiiijV 

Ae 7m. the patron of Layham is M*". Henrye Stapelton, and of 
Raydon, M^ Will in Harrowe. 



SUFFOLK AND SUDBDRY IN THE YEAR 1603. 41 

Ljusej 

M'. Willmus Vincent, cap°y« poV« dicit. 

Ae liu. the number of Cgmuuicautes theare — clx. 

Ae 2m. et 3m. no recusantes theare. 

Ae 4m. 5m 6m. et 7m. it is an Impropriation w*^ out a Vicaredg, 

and it belongeth to the King's Colledge in Cambridge. The 

Minister his Stipende is jearlie but viijl^ 

Lavenbam. 

M'. Henricus Coppinger, Rco'. Dicit, c 

Ae Im. the nomber of the comnnicantes theare — vij. xj. 

Ae 2m. et 3m. no recusantes thear of anje sort. 

Ae 4m. he hath but Lavenham beinge a personage presentatiue. 

Ae 5m. et 6m. no Impropriation or Vicaredge theare. 

Ae 7m. M*". Thomas Skjnner, patron. 

Mylden. 

M^ Johannes Whittell, Rco'. Dicit 

Ae Im. the nomber of the coniunicantes theare — xlv^« 

Ae 2ro. et 3m. theare is one woman recusant and besides her no 

other theare. 
Ae 4m. Mylden is a personage presentatiue, and he hath no other. 
Ae 5m. et 6m. non such theare. 
Ae 7m. Mr. Thomas ffeltham, of Mylden, patron. 

Melforde et Thorpe Morieux. 

M'. Willmus Gilberde, Rector Dicit. 

Ae Im. theare are coniunicantes in Melford longe to the \ o 
nomber of Jix. 

Ae the nomber of coinunicantes in Thorpe morieux — cxx. 

Ae 2m. et 3m. in Melforde there are recusantes xi. men and x. 
women remisshe. 

Ae 4m. he hath booth theis twoo personages he is a Master of art, 
Chaplen to the right honorable the Earle of Shrewseberrye, 
they are not distant the one from the other above fyve Myles, 
he hath a dispensation for the holdinge of them. Melford is 
valued in the King's Booke at xxviijH^' and Thorpe Morieux 
vidued in the King's Book at [sum not mentioned]. 

Ae 7m. he setteth not downe the patrones. 

Nedginge. 

M'. Willmus Heye, Rco'. Dicit. 

Ae Im. the nomber of coniunicantes — IH® 

Ae 2m. et 3m. no recusant of any sort theare. 

Ae 4m. a personage presentatiue and he hath no other. 

Ae 5m. et 6m. non such theare. 

Ae 7m. S^ John Heigham, knight, patron. 



42 CONDITIOK OF THE ARCHDKACONRIB3 OF 

Naughtou. 

M^ Thomas Stebben, Roo^ Dicit 

Ae Im. the nooiber of the comunioantes — Ix. 

Ae 2in. et 3m. no recusnnt theare. 

Ae 4m. he hath non other Lyviuge, it is a Rectorye. 

Ae 5m. et 6m. non snch theare. 

Ae 7m. M'. Kempe of litell Brjcett in Suff., Patron^ 

Newton. 

Mr. Henncus Boj-se Rco''. Dicit. 
Ae Im. the nomber of the Comunioantes — c. 
Ae 2m. et Sm. no reousantes of anye condicon. 
Ae 4m. it is a Rectorye presentntiue, and he hath no other. 
Ae 5m. et 6iii no Impropriation or Vicaredge theare. 
Ae 7m. M'. Willm Barrowe of Huningham in Norff., fisquier, is 
Patron. 

Stoake Neylaude. 

Mag^. Johannes Hancken, Vicarius Dicit c 

Ae Im. the nomber of the Coinunicantes theare — ix. 
Ae 2m. et 3m. theare men recusantes to the nomber of fyve and 

women recusautes to the nomber of Sixe. 
Ae 5m. et 6m. a personage impropriate w^> the sayed Yioaredg 

indiied wc^ Vicaredg is valued in the King's Book at xix¥ ho 

hath no other Lyvinge. 
Ae 7ro. Willm Manuock, Ksquier, patron and proprietarye. 

Poulsteade. 

M'. Gervis Smeth, Rco'. Dicit. 

Ae Im. the nomber of the Cofnuuicantes theare — ocxxviij**? 

Ae 2m. et 3m. no recusantes of anye sort. 

Ae 4m. it is a personage preseuttitiue and he hath no other. 

Ae 5m. et 6(n. non such theare. 

Ae 7m. John Brande, of Boxford, genP., patron. 

Preston. 

M«". Thomas Willes, Vicarius Dicit^ 

Ae Im. the nomber of the coinunicantes are — cxx. 

Ae 2m. et 3m. no recusantes theare. 

Ae 4m. he hath but the Vicaredge of Preston. 

Ae 5m. et 6m. Preston is an Impropriation w^ the sayed Vicaredge 

indowed being a poore Vicaredge and valued in the King's 

Book at vj\* vj» ob. 
Ae 7m. M'. Robert Ryce, genV\, proprietai;ye and patron. 

Somerton. 

M'. Petrus Cooke, Rco^ Dicit, 

Ae Ira. the nomber of coinunicantes theare — ^Iz. 

Ae 2m. et 3m. no recusantes of anye sort. 



SUFFOLK AND SDDBURY IN THE YEAR 1603. 43. 

Ae 4m. it is a personage presentatiue, he hath uo other. 

Ae 5m. et 6m. no such theiire. 

Ae 7m. £dward Copley, of Sowethill in Bedfordshire, patron. 
Sudburie petri et gregorij. 

M"". Johannes Harrison, cap"!» pol*? iBm Dicit. 

Ae priiS the certen nomber of the comunicantes of its parrissh] 
church of St. Gregoryes and the chappell of S*. Peter }- .. 
annexed thereunto are J •'' 

Ae 2m. et 3m. no recusantes theare. 

Ae 5m. et 6m. Theare is an Impropriation called the Colledge 
whereunto belongeth a church called St. Gregory e and a 
Chappell about some twoo Stones cast from the other w<^ is 
called S^. Peter's chappell. The Church in tymes past was 
the personage of S*. Gregorye (but of what value in the 
King's Booke wee know not). Afterwards that personage 
Howso liecam a Colledge of priests enlarged in the buildinge 
(as is comonlye reported) by Symonde Sudburye Archbisslioppe 
of Canterburye. The present proprietary e is Mr. Edwarde 
Paston in the Countie of Norff., Esquier, whose Auncestors 
cam into it by letters patten tes from the Kinge at the Disso- 
lution. The Impropriation is not indowed w*> anye Vicaredge 
to our knowledge, but is served by a Curate who also has no 
certen Stifieude allowed bim from the proprietary e for servinge 
of that church and Chappell by himselfe and an other Minister, 
but what the farnior on lye pleaseth for to giue, and yett the 
yearlie Hent of that Impropriation to the Proprietarye is 
fower Score and Eleven poundes, besides the Rent of som 
other Howses belonginge unto it in the same towne. The 
proprietarye of that same Colledge hath likewise certen 
farmes belonginge unto it, and next adioyninge to Sudburye, 
the wc^ at this daye yelde him yearlie Rent thre hundreth 
Poundes and upwards reservinge still to himselfe goodlye 
wooddes, from the saved Impropriation the proprietary es his 
predecessors haue soldo awaye aboute thre huudreth poundes^ 
in yearlie rentes more. 

Ae 7m. he saieth as before addeinge that he is a master of art 
about twentye yeares standinge, Curate and preacher of SK 
Gregorye's church and S*. Peter's Chappell in Sudburye. 

Seameare. 

M''. Arthurus Gale, Rco''. ibidem Dicit. 

Ae Im. the nomber of the Comunicantes theare — Ixx. 

Ae 2m. et 3m. no recusantes theare. 

Ae 4ro. it is a personage presentatiue, and he hath no other. 

Ae 5m. et 6m. non such theare. 

Ae 7m. S^ John Heigham, knight, is patron. 



44 CONDITION OF TBB ARCHDEACONRIES OF 

Sudburje 8c5riim. 

M'. Willmns Strutt, Vicuriiis Dicit. xx 

Ae Im. the nomber of the oomuuicantes theare — xiiij. 

Ae 2m. et Sm. no recusant of auje condicou. 

Ae 4m. he hath this poore Vicaredge valued in the King's Book at 
iiij? and an other small thinge called litell Hennye w^in a 
Myle distant valued in the King's Book at iijV and for hia 
tithe in Sudburye all saintes he wold gladie have a Stipende 
of v^ a yeare. It is an Impropriation belonginge unto S^. 
Thomas Eden, knight, who is proprietarye and hath the best 
profett. 

Wiston. 

Mr. Johannes Legrice, Rco'. Dicit. xx 

Ae Im. the nomber of this Comunicantes theare. — xiiij. 

Ae 2m. et dm. no recusantes at all. 

Ae 4m. he hath no other lyvinge. 

Ae 5m. et 6m. non such theare, saveinge he saieth that theare be 

diners lands belonginge to the church of Wiston w^ are more 

in value then his tithes. 
Ae 7m. the patron is the King's Ma^ 

Wattesham. 

M^ Thomas Brames, cap")" poM* Dicit. 

Ae Im. the nomber of the comunicantes theare — Ixxx. 

Ae 2m. et 3m. no recusantes theare of anye sort. 

Ae 4m. 5m. et 6m. it is an Impropriation belonginge unto the 
priorye of Brycett w®^ nowe the Provost and fellowes of the 
King's College in Cambridge hath and the sayed M^ Bramys 
is thir farmer, and payeth unto them yearlie xvj\^ farme, 
besides the servinge of the cure, w^ the same Mr. Bramys 
performes. 

Waldingfylde pva. 

M^ Robertus Welche, capny* po"f iBm Dicit. 

Ae Im. the nomber of the Comunicantes theare — clxxxxiij**^ 

Ae 2m. et 3m. no recusantes of anye sorte. 

Ae 4m. 5m. et 6m. it is an Impropriation indued as he thinketh 
with a Vicaredge valued in the King's book at xV He hath aU 
the Vicaredge tithes for his s^vioe'and Stipende w^ cometh 
unto xiiijl^ at the uttermost and he hath no other thinge. 

Ae 7m. the lorde Bisshoppe of £lye patron and proprietarye. 

Waldingfylde magna. 

M^ Thomas Lovell, Rco^. ibidem Dicit 
Ae Im. the nomber of comunicantes theare — cclxxxxiiij^f 
Ae 2m. et 3m. Theare is one man and one woman recusantes and 
no other. 



SUFFOLK AND SUDBURY IN THE YEAR 1603. 45 

Ae 4m. it is a personage presentatiue, he hath no other. 
Ae 5m. 6m. et 7m. M^ Samuell Colman is patron. 



Villa de Buria Sancti Edmundi. 

Parochia beate Marie virginis ibidem. 

Mag'. Johannes Irwell cap'^)" parrochialis ibidem Dicit. 

Ae Im. the nomber of the comunicantes wWn \ © 

that parrisshe are aboute / M.ccccxl**? 

Ae 2m. et 3 m. theare are recusautes of Diuine prayer and Sacra- 
mentes twoo men and twoo women. 

Ae 4m. I am not beneficed, and have no other spiritual lyvinge 
this his s'^uice of St. Marye's parrisshe in Burye. 

Ae 5m. 6m. et 7m. he saith and soe doeth Mr. Christopher Bulwar, 
Minister and Curate of S^. James parrisshe in Burye afore 
sayed : That the sayed Towne of Berrye consisteth of twoo 
parrisshes viz* : — St. Maryes and St. James, and the ly vinges 
or personages of them booth is one, sometyroe belonginge to 
the Abbott of Berrye, who then founded the Ministers of the 
sayed Churches. Now it is Impropriate to the Kinge as it is 
sayed indued w*^ a Vicaredge but served with Curates aa 
aforesayed, w<^^ sayed Curate have usuallye received from 
the proprietarye the Kinge by his awditor the some of fower 
poundes Nyne Shillings and vd. each year to be diuided 
betweene them, untill this last halfe year v>^}^ was then 
deteyned and yett is. And the personage (w*:^ payeth 
nothinge) of the sayed Towne by comon Estimacon is worth 
yearlie Eight Score poundes and better w^^ hath ben and is 
demised at a small rent vizt. xxviijl* by yeare or theare 
aboute and further they saye they haue no other spirituall 
mayntenance for their s'uice in such a great congregation, 
but only the benevolence of the parrisshiiers w<:^ is sometymes 
more and sometymes lesse accordinge as their afections shall 
moue them to give or not to giue. Haueinge no lawe to 
counsel them w^ maketh it to be booth small and uncertain. 

Parochia Sancti Jacobi. 

Mag'. Christoferus Bulwer, cap*^.^ parrochialis ibidem Dicit. 

Ae Im. the nomber of the coinunicantes w*^in thelD 

parrisshe of St. James are aboute /mccxxx^* 

Ae 2m. et tertuim articulos Dicit that theare are w^^in the same 
parrisshe of S^ James Seaven men recusantes and Eight 
women and theis doo not receyve the holie comunion, theare 
is also an other that seldome cometh to church and never 
receyveth the coinunion. 



46 CONDITION OF THE ARCHDKACONRIES OF 

Ae 4m. he is not l>eneficed nor hath anje other spirituall Ljvioge 

then the cure of S*. James aforesayeti. 
Ae 5m. et ceteros alios he giveth his aunswear in such manner 

and foriue as is before sett donne. 



In Quohum omfi et singulorum premissor' fidem et estima' Nos Archinas 
predictus Sigillum offici& in par' appefi frr. Dat octavo die menais 
Augusti anno Dfi Millmo sexcentissimo tertio Regni yiri 
illustrissimi ac potentissimi in chro principis et DtQ in Dm Jacoln 
dei gratia Anglie Scotie ffrancie et Hibeniie Regis fidei defeni dec 
anno primo. 

Et ego Thomas Peade, senior, Nor- 
wicensis Diocelf Notarius publicus 
auctoritate sufficient constitus, oliva 
premisff omnibus et singulis dam 
sicut premittitum per Dm Archina- 
tur habitis et factis vigore Irarium 
revereudissiH in chro patris et Dfi 
DiQ Johannis Diuina provideutia 
Cantuaria' Archiepi' totius Anglie 
primatis et Metropolitaui Nee non 
reuerendi in chro patris et Di9 Dfi 
Johannis eadem Diuina prouidentia 
Norwicefi Rpl mandato dicto Dno 
Archino direct? prsul supra scribentur 
presens personaliter interpe' £a<^ 
omnia et singula sic fieri scini et 
audini. Ideo has presentes Iras 
certificatras (manu mea propria 
fideliter scriptas) exinde conferi ac 
subscn^. Signo<^ nomine et cogno- 

_ — -' I mine meis solitis et computis signam 

""-^ ^ gnn ni fl. V mti. t ^Cn f»S X ^ ^ in fidem et testimonium omfi et 

Singula' promissor* rogatus et requi- 
sibus. 




47 



A SUFFOLK CAPTAIN 
OF THE TIME OF QUEEN ELIZABETH. 

By Colonel J. H. Josselyn. 

In the " Visitation of Suffolk, made by John Raven, 
Richmond Herald, in 1612, and delivered into the Office 
of Arms, 1621," is the following pedigree : — 

"Chbbton of Mildsnball. 

" Arms : Gules, three bars wavy per barry wavy Or and Ermine* 
OTer all a saltire of the 6rst. 

" Crest : A dexter gauntlet fesse ways proper holding a sword erect 
argent, hilt or, on the blade a man's head proper couped, with a scroll 
beneath the head with the motto, ' Ex merito.' 

"Robert Chestou of Mildenhall, co. Suff., mar. Agnes, da. of ... . 
Smyth of Bury St. Edmund's, and had issue — William, son and heir ; 
Anne, wife to Thomas Pope of Mildenhall. 

"William Chestou of Mildenhall, son and heir to Robert, mar. 
Mary, da. of Symon Stokes of Burrow Green, co. Cambr., and had 
issae— Richard, son and heir; John, second son; Thomas, third son; 
[here follow the femnle issue!. 

"Captain Thomas Cheston of Mildenhall, Esq., the third son of 

William, mar. Jane, da. of Richard Anger, of co. Cambr., and by 

her had issue — Richard, son and heir ; Thomas, second son ; Rose, and 
Jane." 

In an ancient MS. in my possession headed '' Extracts 
out of Mr. Reyce's Breviary of Suffolk in the hands of 
John Anstis, Esqr., Garter King at Arms, 1728," is the 



48 A SUFFOLK CAPTAIN 

following account of the valorous and skilful career of 
this Captain Thomas Cheston : — 

"Of Martial Men .... 

"The next that cometh to my remembrance is Mr. Thomas Chestou 
a man not long since living, lK>rn about Mjldenhall in Suffolk, descended 
tho' of mean yet honest parentage, who having an extraordinary spirit 
above his birth & education wherewith he being no ways content for- 
sooke both Father & Mother & unknown to 'em both betook himself to 
martial adventures in foreigi) regions where he pro6ted so much that in 
a few years, both for discretion understanding and valour above his age, 
he became employed in many good places and services, wherein I am 
the bolder because I have seen the several writings warrants and com- 
missions authorising him in his several places charges & employments 
of all which particularly I have here taken the summary notes ft dates 
as here doe follow. 

*' Robert Earl of Leicester Baron of Denbigh &c Lieutenant and 
Captain General of Q. Elizabeth of all her army and military forces 
employed in the defence aud government general of the united provinces 
of the Low countrys by his letters patents dated at the Hage the 3rd of 
February 1585 appointed Captain Cheston to the leading of 150 footmen 
in those wars under her Matie. 

" Robert Leicester Lieutenant of Q. Elizabeth and Captain General 
of all her forces in the united provinces by the counsel of State 
appointeth Thomas Cheston Marshal of the Camp Provost of the 
company of 25 horses and 25 harquiboursers, to enter into all villages^ 
towns, and all ways and roads to punish and doe justice of all Brygands, 
thieves. Robbers <kc. under the broad seal, the patents written all in 
french and dated at the Hage the 17 of September 1586. 

" By other letters patents in french dated at Amem the 8th day of 
May 1586 Thomas Cheston was appointed Scout master to place all 
watches Sentinels &o in and about trenches and camps at any time 
throughout the army. 

" Roger Ld North Lieutenant of Cambridgeshire by letters from 
the privy Counsel appointeth Captain Thomas Cheston to have the 
charge, viewing, mustering and training of all the foot bands, with the 
allowance of Armor, Muster master «fec. dated at Catlyng the 17 of 
September 1595. 

" By Ires of y« Generals Essex and C. Howard dated at London 
the 27 of March 1596 Captain Cheston had authority to muster 
assemble and leavie 100 men within the County of Cambridge and Ely 
for her highnesse present service to conduct 'em to Harwich, from 
whence with all expedition to be transported to Plimmouth. 

" A.nd last of all the said Captain Thomas Cheston for his good 
service in Ireland his great valour and desert in bringing in the head of 



OF THE TIME OP QUEEN ELIZABETH. 49 

that Arch-Traitor of Ireland the Earl of Desmond, that ever renowned 
Q. Elizabeth commanded these arms in this sort to be granted to the 
sd Captain Thomas Cheston. 

"Barry wavye of 10 pieces, gules, or and ermyn, above all a Saltier 
gules, and to the crest upon a helm on a wreath gules or and ermyn an 
arm or gauntlet for the right hand holding a sword upright and 
thereon a man's head cut off all proper with this motto — Ex nierito. 

" See the original picture of this Captain in the hands of Peter le 
Neve Norroy King of Arms with these arms on the side thereof in 
compleat armor at his house at Great Wichingham in Norfolk 1720. 

" There are divers other Letters patents appointing the sd 
Captain Cheston to several services which I omit, because tedious and 
unnecessary." 

From internal indications the " Breviary of Suffolk " 
seems to have been written by Ryee in the reign of 
James ii. The full title of the MS. is " The Breviary 
of Suffolk or a plain and familiar description of the 
County, the people, the Inhabitants, the customs, 
the division political and ecclesiastical, the Benefices, 
houses of Religion, with all their several valuations, the 
chiefest men of learning as Divines, Privy Councellors, 
Martial men and navigators of former times with sundry 
other things of memorable note and observation within 
this County of Suffolk" and a note in a different hand 
states " the original is in the Library of John Anstis, 
Esqr., Garter." 

Robert Ryce or Ryece was of Preston, Suffolk, and a 
famous Antiquary of his day. 

The arms, crest and motto of Cheston, above given, 
are used by Charles Cheston, now of London, solicitor, (a 
son-in-law of the late Mr. Edward Packard of Ipswich), 
and by members of his family, but I do not know with 
any certainty whether or how they trace lineal descent 
from the sturdy Elizabethan Captain. 



£ 



(50) 



SURVEY OF ORFORD CASTLE, 1600. 

The thanks of the membera of the Institute are due to A. H. £. 
Wood, Esq., of Sudbourne Hall, for granting permission to illustrate 
this number of the Proceedings, with a view of Orford Castle as it 
stood in 1600. The Survey of the Castle* from which the print is 
taken was made for Sir Michael Stanhope, by the well-known carto- 
grapher, J. Norden (1548—1625). 

This fact speaks for the accuracy of the details of the picture, 
which gives the appearance of the Castle when the encompassing walls 
were standing. It is the earliest survey of the Castle known to he in 
existence. The beacon is represented burning, as a signal for mariners 
passing or entering the port. 

Norden was engaged by Sir Michael St^mhope to make the survey 
of all his landsf in Suffolk, recently grunted to liini by Queen Klizalieth, 
and which extended over nearly the wliole district lyiug l)etween the 
Deben at Wilford Bridge and the sea at Orford Ness. The survey is 
comprised in two large folio volumes of vellum (21* x 15'), containing 
twenty-eight maps and plans of villages, fields, heaths, and sea coast. 
The whole series of coloured illustrations is valuable to historians 
and topographers of the present day, for from them may l)e gathered 
many facts, which bring to light the early division of the fields, and 
mark the use made of certain hills and landmarks long since 
obliterated. 

The production is equal to the surveys of Cornwall, Surrey, 
Middlesex, and Hertfordshire, made by the same author. Several 
county-maps, upon a large scale, appear with his name in the sixth 
edition of Camden's Brit^innia, Londou, 1607, folio; also in Speed, 1611. 
The Dictionary of National Biography does not mention any survey 
made by Norden in Suffolk. 

* Privy Couucil Order dated Hampton Court, 27 Jan., 1593, declaring " To all 
Lieutenants, etc., of Counties " that ** the bearer, John Norden, gent., was authorised 
and appointed by her Majesty to travail through England and Wales to make more 
perfect deiicriptions, ciiarts, and maps." (His. Mss. Comm. 7th Rep., p. 540 b.) 

t An ample and trew descriptiO and Survey of the Mannors, Lordsliips, Townes, 
and Parishes of Stavertun, Eyke. Bromswall, Wantesden, Chelsforde, Sudbum. 
Oreford, and Duningworth, v^t. parcell of Tunstall in the G<iuntie of Suffolk, parcel! 
of the Lands of the right worshipful Sir Michael Stanhope, Knight, IGOO." 






^] 





t 1 

INSCRIPTION ON E. WALL of BLYTHBUUGH CHURCH. 



(51) 



THE FLINT-WORK INSCRIPTION ON 
BLYTHBURGH CHURCH. 

By Sir W. R. Gowers, m.d., f.r.s. 

The remarkable flint- work inscription across the epd 
of Blythburgh Church, beneath the east window, seems to 
have baffled attempts to interpret it. That which I now 
present was made about ten years ago, and communicated 
privately to several friends. An imperfect account of it 
is given in the Transactions for 1894, in the course of a 
description of an excursion to Blythburgh.* No other 
explanation has since been brought forward. I therefore 
think it well to submit to East Anglian archsBologists the 
grounds on which that interpretation is based. If correct, 
it teaches some instructive lessons. The inscription must 
be regarded as a very striking example of a rare class. 
From the known history of the church its date must be 
1460—80. 

Of the illustrations, the first figure of the Plate presents 
a photograph, taken about 1878, before the partial restora- 
tion of the church, at a time when the lower part of the 
east window was bricked up, and when shrubs flourished 
within the north aisle. The other figures are from later 
photographs, the outliqes of the elements given in the 
text have been carefully drawn from the letters themselves 
and from large sized photographs. 

The inscription is of remarkable ingenuity and artistic 
character, and, in nature and character combined, is prob- 
ably unique. It consists of fifteen elements, each being 
an almost square stone, bearing a design in thejiighest 
style of the flint-work decoration common in the fifteenth 
century. In this, as is well known, the surface of the 

* I do not remember authorihin^ it, and have only late'y discovered its prejcnce. 



52 



THE FLINT-WORK INSCRIPTION ON 




1 2 3 4 5 6 

stone is lowered half an inch or more, except in the design 
to be presented. Over the lowered areas pieces of flint 
are cemented in a kind of rough mosaic work. These 
constitute a dark back-ground against which the stone 
stands out in contrast, white against black. It is remark- 
able how enduring these designs have been, for the most 
part. Unfortunately the disintegrating influence of 
weather, rain and frost, tends in time to loosen the flints. 
Thus, many of those in this inscription have fallen away, 
especially of the crowns surmounting the letters. Unless 
the process is arrested by the recementing of every loose 
flint, the inscription must, in time, disappear. The 
periodical attention would cost little, and would save it 
from further destruction. Many lost flints might indeed 
be replaced with security, since the outlines of the stone 
design are often distinct. Some slight degree of restora- 
tion might thus be effected. 

Of the stones, that at each end is occupied by a 
simple ornamental design. The middle stone is blank, 
unworked. Probably it was left to the last, and the work 
intended on it was prevented by some unknown cause. 
Thus, there remain six stones in each side, each occupied 
by a letter or a monogram, and each surmounted by a 
crown. The style of the letters is that which is called 
" Lombardic." 

The last element of the first half. No. 6, gives the 
key to the nature of the inscription. It is the letter T,* 
in the round shape of the style, and within it is a shield. 

* There is not the slightest doubt about the letter, but it ia as well to mention 
that Gardner (History of Dunwich, &c., 1745), curiously mistook it for a V. He 
made some other mistakes regarding the church, evidently due to hante in obsen'ation. 



BLYTHBURGH CHURCH. 



53 




This contains four round holes, all formerly, and some 
still, filled with flint, which have the positions of the 
circles in the well-known Pater-Filius shield-symbol of the 
Trinity. This is found, without the words, on many fonts 
and porches in the district, and is to be seen, with the 
words, in the glass of one of the north windows of this 
church, and also on the rood-screen at Southwold. 

The shield makes it certain that the T was intended 
for Trinitas. The church was dedicated to the Holy 
Trinity. The element before the T, No. 5, is St., a Lojn- 
bardic S with a small t intersected ; is obviously intended 
for Sanctae. Sanctse Trinitatis, on a church dedicated to 
the Holy Trinity, leaves no doubt as to the dedicational 
nature of the inscription. 

It has been objected that " Sanct." would have been 
indicated by Sc and not by St. But S'te and S'torum were 
used almost as frequently as S'c in the ** Inquisiones 
Nonarum" (1292, but completed 1340). In it the name 
of each of the five churches in Dunwich is thus indicated. 
In the Valor Ecclesiasticus (1530) the St had become so 
familiar that it is frequently given with the apostrophe in 
the wrong place, St*i instead of S*ti. S alone is also met 
with on old inscriptions. The objection thus has not much 
weight. 

To turn to the beginning. We have in 1 and 2 the 
letters A and N. These may be taken to indicate Ad 
Nomina, but the justification for this assumption may be 
conveniently postponed. 

In 3 we have the monogram ** I S," met with else- 
where as indicating Jesus, or here Jesu. It is followed by 
B, — Beati. Beatus is the adjective almost constantly 



54 THK FLINT-WORK INSCRIPTION ON 

associated with the name of Jesus. Thus the first half 
will read — 

Ad Nomina Jcsu Beati Sanctae Trinitatis. 

It was not uncommon in such inscriptions for the 
name of Jesus or Mary to be associated with the proper 
dedicational name, and even to precede this. Attention 
was specially drawn to the fact by Pegge,* who gives as 
an example the inscription on the church of Hawkesworth, 
Notts., dedicated to All Saints : "In Honorem Domini 
Jesu et Beate Marie et Omnium Sanctorum." 

After the middle blank stone, No. 7 presents the 
well-known monogram of Mary, which contains all the 
letters of MARiA.t It is met with on the buttresses here, 
and at Southwold. Moreover (a fact of special signifi- 
cance), the same monogram appears within this church, 
on a shield projecting from the last easterly pillar between 
the nave and the south aisle. It is known that at this 
end of the aisle was a chapel dedicated to the Virgin. On 
the shield also the monogram is surmounted by a crown. 

The corresponding chapel at the end of the north 
aisle is known to have been dedicated to St. Anne, the 
mother of the Virgin. On the last pillar between the 
nave and the north aisle, at a spot corresponding to that 
at which there is the shield and monogram of the Virgin ^ 
is a place from which something of similar size has been 
broken off. We can scarcely doubt that it was a shield 
bearing an indication of St. Anne. 

Hence, it is significant that, after No. 8 of the 
inscription (another St, similar to that in the first half, 
which must have a like meaning), we have in No. 9 the 
letter A. Considering the important position given to St. 
Anne in the church, since to no other saint besides the 

* PegffOi ** Sylloge of Inscriptions relative to the Erection of Our English 
Churches. Nichol's Topographica Britannica, Vol. vi., No. XLI., p. 87. 

t It is curious to trace the development of the monogram, regge (p. 23) girea 
from Postling, Kent, an inscription in which the A and R are blended much as in the 
monogram, tne M is separate and so is the E, while the I is represented by a small 
stroke in tne lower part of the R. 



BLYTHBDRGH CHURCH. 55 

Virgin and St. Anne was a chapel dedicated, it is reasonable 
to regard the letter as referring to her. Moreover, if the 
letter is compared with Nos. 1 and 2 of the inscription, 
which are certainly A and N, it will be seen that the base 
of the left side of the lettef is carried forward as it is in 
the N. It is difficult to resist the conclusion that this is 
meant for a combination of A and N, which would furnish 
all the letters of the word Anna, just as No. 7 contains 
all the letters of the word Maria. 

No. 10 is the letter H. Passing this for a moment, 
we have in No. 1 1 the letter K. Since the inscription is 
obviously an indication of Latin words, this can only be 
a proper, name. St. Eatherine was often associated with 
St. Anne ; a window in the church is recorded to have 
l)orne her image, and it seems reasonable to regard her 
name as indicated. Indeed it is difficult to suggest any 
other meaning of this. 

No. 12 is the letter R. In a will, dated 1442, quoted 
by Gardner, the chancel was spoken of as proposed to be 
rebuilt.* The letter may thus be interpreted ** Re-sedifi- 
catus" or " Re-constructus," "Cancellus" being understood. 
" Re-8edificatus " is, strange to say, much less common in 
such relation, than is " reconstructus." 

To return to No. 10, the letter H. There are few 
saints whose name begin with this letter, only three or 
four, and in not one of these can the slightest recorded 
association with Blythburgh church be traced, or can a 
connection be conjectured. It seems, therefore, reasonable 
to interpret it as the word Honore or Honorem, so frequent 
in dedicational inscriptions, and to associate it with at 
least the last two saints indicated. 

It may be a matter of opinion whether the monogram 
of the Virgin should be regarded as belonging to the first 
or to the second part of the inscription, whether it is 

* Hist Dnnwicb, etc., p. 12S, " Lego fabricsB Cancelli Koclesia de Blythborough 
si Yoluerint iUnm de novo fabricare, 10 marc." A similar exprenion oocun in other 
wills. 



56 THE FLINT- WORK INSCRIPTION ON 

associated with Beati Jesu and Sanctse Trinitatis, or with 
SaDctarum Annae et Katharinae. The point is not impor- 
tant, but I think other similar inscriptions countenance 
the former view.* 

Thus, the whole inscription may be interpreted as 
indicating — " Ad Nomina Jesu Beati SanctSB Trinitatis 
(Beatse) Marias et in Honorem Sanctarum Annas et 
Katherinae (hie cancellus) Reconstructus." The initial 
** ad " may, however, be regarded as related also to 
" honorem." 

Before considering the two first letters, A and N, 
which have been left to the last, it is important to direct 
attention to the curious confirmation of this interpretation 
which is afforded by the character of the crown over each 
element. 

If the crowns are compared a marked difference will 
be seen between them. The forms of one or two cannot 
be distinctly discerned in the photographs in consequence 
of the loss of the flints and the weathering of the unpro- 
tected stone, but they can be discerned, by careful observa- 
tion, to be as shown in the outline. If the forms of the 
crowns over 1, 2, 4, 5, 8, 10, and 12, are compared with 
those over 3, 7, and 11 (see illustration), it will be seen 
that the former are simple, the latter elaborate "fleur- 
de-lys" crowns, with one exception (No. 9). Wherever 
the details of the crowns can be perceived, the elaborate 
crowns are over the elements which, in this interpretation, 
are assumed to indicate proper names, and the simple 
crowns over the "common parts of speech." The differ- 
ence, in spite of the one exception, may be regarded as 
some confirmation of the interpretation here given. 

The assumption that the letters A N mean Ad Nomina 
will, I know be a difficulty to archaeologists, in spite of the 

* The letter H has been thought to indicate a munificent donor to the church* 
named Hopton, whone arms are at tne end of the chancel seats. The same interpretation 
regards the monogram for Jesus as meaning Sir John Swillington. This of course 
involves a totally different character of the inscription from that of which the evidence 
is given abiive. Moreover, unfortunntel^, there never was a Sir John Swillington, 
the name John was unknown in that family. 



BLYTHBDRGH CHURCH. 57 

harmoDy of the words with those which might be used in 
the present day. I have not found any actual precedent, 
but I think the conspicuous artistic originality displayed 
in this inscription warrants us in dealing with it as a new 
problem, to be considered without slavish dependence on 
precedent. Yet we have inscriptions w^hich bring us not 
far from that which is assumed. '* In honorem " is employed 
almost as frequently as in "in honore." Before the 
accusative, "in" has almost the sense of "ad." We 

meet also with " in nomine sancti " We also meet 

with "ad gloriam Dei," and "ad laudem," as in "ad 
laudem Dei et Omnium Sanctorum istam cancellam de 
novo construxit."* Moreover, at Ropsley, Notts., 1380, 
we have " Ista coluna ad h'm St. Michi's et nome factoris 
Thom Little de Corby." The transition from these to " ad 
nomiua " does not seem abrupt. In the last example we 
have " ad " with the accusative, the abbreviated "honorem." 
From " in honore," " in honorem," " in nomine," and " ad 
honorem," to " ad nomina " is not violent. The indication 
afforded by the comparatively plain character of their 
crowns, that these two letters do not indicate proper names, 
has also weight, but confirmation seems hardly needed. 

To those who object to this interpretation, the request 
may reasonably be made to furnish a better one. For my 
own part, while I am confident of its at least approximate 
correctness, I am less concerned with this, than interested 
in the reason why, if correct, the inscription has hitherto 
been an unsolved problem. Even the great Parker, who 
famished a note on Blythburgh to the " Churches of 
Suffolk," makes no suggestion as to its meaning (probably 
from want of time to study it), while the latest historian 
of Suffolk, Canon Raven, dismisses the inscription as a 
•'riddle." 

The subjects of archaeology for the most part need 
and receive the mental culture termed " literary." But 
now and then they are of a nature that needs some 

* DartoD, Yorka., 1577, Pefcge, loo. cit., p. 90. 



58 THE FLINT-WORK INSCRIPTION ON BLYTHBUR6H CHURCH. 

measure of the methods of science. Precedcut is dominant 
in archaeology ; the fact is ignored that all things have a 
begipuning, and that now and then originality comes into 
play to a degree that baffles the methods of precedent, 
and furnishes a problem which can only be solved by 
dealing with it as a new thing, to be considered d^ 7iovo, 
and only afterwards compared with that which has been 
before. Such, it seems to me, is the Blythburgh inscription. 



Note. — I venture to hope that this paper may excite auflBcient 
interest in the Inscription to promote an attempt to preserve it. If it 
falls in this, it will at least effect a record which may be useful to those 
who, in time to come, look with sorrow at the stones from which it haa 
disappeared. ' 



€0 LITTLK SAXHAM — RISBY. 

Church, stRnding nt the junction of four cross-roads — to Barrow, Burj', 
Chevington and Hisby. This structure is in au excel leu t state of 
preservation, and some interesting particulars lay ready to hand for 
the information of all visitors. The date of the building is about 1 120 ; 
it has a round tower, beariug some resemblance to the work at Norwich 
Castle ; the walls are of enormous thickness, and the details of the 
interior, in which there are some fine monuments, would repay the 
carefully study of archaeologists. The vicar (Rev. H. L. Kiluer) wrote 
to express regret at his inability to join the excursion. The Rev. A. J. 
Bedell informed the party that in an adjoining fen there were to be 
found many rare marsh flowers and grasses, including the sundew 
{Drosera rotundiflora). Upon this temptation to go botauisiug the 
hon. secretary " set his foot," with good humour, but decision. 

The next stage traversed the high road lietween Bury and New- 
market, and ended at Risby Church, where the genial rector (Rev. E. 
Symonds) was in waiting at the lych gate. One of the first features 
to which he drew attention were some frescoes, circa 1380, on the north 
wall, which have been recently uncovered. He also pointed out two 
arches which curiously illustrate the transition from one style of archi- 
tecture to another, and one of the low windows. It is most proUxble that 
these open windows were used for the purpose of ventilation in churches 
(especially near the chancel), where the smoke from buniing torches, 
candles, and incense accumulated. The Paston Letters (Vol. ii., p. 226) 
show that it was necessary to t«ike out iron frames from the church 
w indows to effect this ventilation at the time of funeral ceremonies. 

A most interesting paten, circa, 1680, was here brought to the 
notice of the visitors. The arms appear to denote that it was presented 
to the church by Gylbert Denes and Elizabeth his wife. The following 
note on the Denes or Dennis family of Holcombe Buruell, co. Devon 
(Harl. MB. 1091, fo. 107), may afford some clue as to the donor. 

Thomaa Dennis =(2) Elizabeth, da. of Hakyn Hache, 
of Holcombe | of VVoUey, co. Devon. 

Thomas Dennis = Joan, da. and h. to Philip Loveday, of Suffolk, 
of Hol combe. { 
j 
Richard Dennis = .... da. and coh. to . . . Hennell. 

Gilbnrt Denes = Elizabeth . . . . 
Arms of Dennis, erm. 3 bills or Danish battle axes, gules. 

The church of Hisby, dedicated to St. Giles, is representative, in 
its architecture and ornamentation, of four different periods. 

The round tower, with its flint work laid in regular course in deep 
beds of mortar, belongs to an early period, the date of which must be 
left to the conjectures of antiquarians. It is built iu three stages. 
The upper stage has two tiers of circular-arched windows believed to be 



RISBY CHURCH. 61 

perforations of a later date than that of the erection of the tower. In 
the middle stnge three original loops, now filled up, are to be seen, the 
small arches of these loops beiug each formed of a single stone. In 
the baseuieut is a window of the 14th century. The height of the 
tower is 46 ft., the inner diameter being 11 ft. 4 in. 

The next period is represented by a circular Norman arch in the 
tower, and a chancel arch sharply pointed and ornamented on the 
chuncel side with a border of indented semi-circles and billets. It ia 
supported on half columns with square-capitals, the soffits of which are 
plain on the chancel side, but ornamented on about two-thirds of their 
surfaces — one the zig zag, tlie other with foliage. The masonry of both 
these arches is wide-jointed. 

A lancet window remains in the north wall of the nave. 

The third stage in the evolution of the present building dates from 
the early part of the 14th century, when the chancel was built, and the 
windows towards the etist end assumed a more enriched form of tracery. 
They were filled with painted glass, of which the relics were collected from 
all the windows by Mrs. Alderson between 1840 and 1850, and pieced 
together by her with great skill and industry to fill the east window, 
and the eastern window of the south chancel wall. The frescoes, of 
which traces remain on the north wall of the nave, are also probably of 
the early part of the 14th century when the church underwent the 
changes referred to above. 

The fourth period of activity in connection with the building of 
the church was in the reign of Henry vi., and subsequent to the year 
1435. In that year a commission against the executors of Mr. 
Bnmbergh, a deceased rector, relating to dilapidations of the church, 
its chancel, books, ornaments, parsonage, walls, buildings, and closes, 
WHS issued from the Diocesan Registry at Norwich. The octagonal font,, 
which is almost identical with that at Stoke-by-Nayland, probably 
belongs to this period, as also the carved and painted screen. The 
porch was also probably added at this time. 

On each side of the screen are two large niches handsomely adorned 
and painted. 

There is a piscina in the window of the south wall of the nave 
nearest to the chancel. 

The ornamental carving of some of the old benches is much 
admired. 

There are three bells in the tower bearing the following inscriptions : 

1 Virginis egregie vocor C'ampami Marice. 

2 John Draper made me 1617. 

3 Mentis Edmundi simus a crimine mundi. 

With H parting vote of thanks to the Rector, the company brought 
their stay to an unwilling but necessary termination. 

The third stopping-place was Icklingham. It was a long drive to 



62 ICKLINGHAM CHURCH. 

this parish, the way thereto being for some distance along cross-roads 
which command a grand view of the heath lands Ijing towards Milden- 
hall and Brandon — open stretches of arid country crossed by the ancient 
Jcenhild weg. On reaching the end of this stage, and entering the 
church of All Saints — which presents a solid and substantial appearance 
externally — the visitors looked around in blank amazement. The 
interior is an extraordinary picture of neglect and desolation. There 
are gaps in the root ; the whitewashed walls are anything but white and 
clean ; the nave is partly filled in with the ugliest square pew ever seen, 
and along part of the western eud there is a rotigh gallery of unpainted 
wood, approached by a ladder. It was soon explained, however, that 
there is another church in the parish, so that All Saints is not required 
for public worship, the rector (Veii. Archdeacon Cartwright) read the 
following interesting extracts from a report made to the Society for the 
Protection of Ancient Buildings ; — 

" With the exception of the porch, which is Perpendicular in style, 
the church may be descnb<«d as a building built in the Decorated style, 
although as a matter of fact we know, by the existence of two blocked 
Norman windows in the north wall of the nave, that that wall of the 
nave is Norman, and it seems probable that the walls of the chancel 
are also Norman. The reason for l)elieving this is that when the ground 
plan is drawn to scale on paper, it becomes obvious that the nave and 
chancel together, and without the other parts of the building, form the 
ground plan of a typical Norman chucrh. The whole of the Decorated 
work is of a fine type, and the village must have been prosperous in 
the 1 4th century, for the work is rich — the south aisle especially so, as 
shown by the two beautiful niches at the east end on either side of 
where the altar stood, and also by the beautiful stone carved cornices 
which run the whole length under the eaves of the south wall and 
below the wall plates of both the north and south walls on the inside. 
The windows are very fine, but unfortunately the east window has the 
whole of its head filled in solid. The stained glass which remains is 
also very good. It is worth noting that the fine western tower never 
had a staircase. All the original roofs have g3ne. The method of 
plaiting the reeds on the underaide of the thatching, so as to avoid the 
use of wood battens, is interesting. The tile paving, a large quantity 
of which remains in the chancel, and fnigments in other parts of the 
church, is of an unusual description. Similar paving may be found at 
Ely and St. Alban's Cathedrals, and also at Hertford. One of the tiles 
has the representation of an architectural canopy, from the desijrn of 
which we know that this pavement is also 14th century work. There 
are six or eight different patterns formed by the shapes of these tiles, 
and many have ornamental patterns on them. The chancel screen, 
which is Perpendicular in style, has had its upper portion cut away 
It is somewhat unusual in having a very large oak sill, which measures 




C/3 



5 
< 
I 
C 

z 



ICKLINGHAM CHURCH. 63 

about 1 1 inches square, and this taken right across the passage-way and 
provided with a step to it, the pavement of the chancel being level with 
that of the nave. There are a large number of 14th century oak 
benches remaining. The ends have tine carved poppy-heads, and the 
ends of some are remarkable on account of their being very little over 
an inch thick.'' 

An animated discussion followed upon the reading of this paper, 
and the opinion was generally expressed that a church, which must at 
one time have been so beautiful, ought certainly to be preserved. The 
tiles,* and the stained glass in the windows, are objects of paramount 
interest. 

lu the rectory gardens at Icklingham, a large tent was put up, and 
an excellent luncheon was in readiness. The Yen. Archdeacon 
Cartwright presided, and all the business done was to take it lor granted 
that the following new members, who wished to join, were elected : — 
Lord Iveagh, Elvedon Hall ; Mr. J. Wood, Hengrnve Hall ; Mr. Thos. 
B. Ffoulkes, Burlington Koad, Ipswich; the Uev. K. and Mrs. Denuiaii- 
Dean, Woodbridge ; Mr. A. J. Hayward, Melton; the Ven. Archdeacon 
Cartwright, of Icklingham ; Mr. C. J. E. Sparks, Bury St. Edmund's ; 
Fleet-Surgeon Theodore J. Preston, Deptfbrd ; Mr. Elliston Allen, 
Balliugdon, Sudbur}' ; Miss A. E. Barney, Uattlesden ; Major J. Stuart, 
Hill House, Erwarton ; lie v. Canon Warren, Bard well ; and Mr. F. B. 
Capon, Manuingtree. 

Mr. Redstone followed with a brief history of Icklingham — a 
parish in which many Romano-British and Saxon antiquities have been 
discovered. The sites of these memorials of the past were shown uu a 
carefully-prepared map, and striking specimens were seen in the rectory 
grounds in the form of two huge stone coffins. It may be added here, 
too, that on the road from Ick worth Park to Saxham, there came under 
observation the site of Little Saxham Hall, and that a plan of the house 
and premises was distributed by kind permission of the editor of the 
Parish Registers, the Rev. S. H. A. Hervey. The hon. secretary's paper 
on Icklingham was a fascinating story of old times and manners. Mr. 
H. C. Cosley proposed a vote of thanks to the Ven. Archdeacon, and 
this acknowledgment of his kindness was passed with applause. 

After luncheun, the party were driven across the heath to West Stow 
Hall Prince Frederick Duleep Singh, who had been present during the 
visit to Icklingham All Saints, gave a description of this famous old 
house, and of the families who have lived there. His Highness pointed 
out that the ancient portions now standing are the gate-house, a covered 
arcade or cloister, and the north side of the existing farm-house. The 
more interesting portion is a room over the gate-house, where a spirited, 

* " In the Ifttter church (All Saints, Icklingham), within thn railn of the Com- 
mankni Table, and about the Chancel, U a conuderable quantity of Komau bricks 
that were ploughed up in the neighbouring ^eld . . . . " (ExcursionB through Suffolk, 
1613). 



64 STOW HALL — WORDWKLL CHURCH. 

though somewhat rough distempered drawing of a hunting scene, &c. 
(Proceedings, Vol. ii., p. 150), still remains on the walls. The Prince 
added that he inquired about ghosts, and the reply of the good person 
who lived there was that people did say the place was haunted, and 
that at night the bowl was in the habit of dancing about in the sink. 
On the motion of the Rev. R. Hill of Cocktield, a vote of thanks was 
passed to the Prince for his kindness in rending the paper. The jouruej 
wtis once more resumed, and the next halt was called at Word well 
Church, 

The Rev. A. H. Peniberton delivered a brief address on this small 
eatly Norman Church (All Saints), consisting of nave and presbytery 
separated by a low deep Norman arch. The length of the church is 
only 33 ft, and it has sittings for less than fifty people. The north and 
south doorways are of the same type as the chancel arch, and have over 
each of them a quaint tympanum. Mr. C. E. Keyser, F.8.A., who has 
devoted much time to the study of tympana, writes: — "The only 
examples I know in the Eastern Counties are those at St. Nicholas, 
Ipswich, and Wordwell. There may be a Scandinavian influence in 
these sculptures, but my experience with regard to the early sculptures 
and paintings has enabled me as a rule to give some more simple 
derivation. The two animals on either side of the tree represent the 
not uncommon subject of the animals feeding off the tree of knowledge, 
of which the best example is to be found at Dinton, co. Buckingham. 
The other is more singular and less clear. I have heard it explained as 
an illustration of the Sacrament of Marriage, but it struck me it might 
be the popular legend of Edward the Confessor and the pilgrim. The 
sculptures are rude, but not necessarily earlier than 1130." An 
exactly similar figure to those on the south tympanum is sculptured on 
the east capital of the pillar supporting the north tympanum. This 
fact denotes that the two are coeval in workmanship. The church was 
used as a granary before 1827, in which year it was restored. An 
ancient well was at the same time discovered in the churchyard. 

At this juncture it was announced that a proposed visit to All 
Saints' Church, at Fornham, roust be abandoned by those who wished 
to reach home in good time, and the incumbent (Rev. C. L. Feltoe) 
acceded with good grace to the curtailment of the programme. 

No undue disparagement of what had heretofore been seen is 
conveyed in the statement that after all, the best was left to the last. 
On the way back to Bury, a stop was made at Hengrave Hall, where 
the company received a warm welcome from Mr. and Mrs. J. Wood, the 
present owners of this historic country seat. The first greetings 
between host and visitors were exchanged at the agreeable function of 
afternoon tea, which was served from tables set out in the gardens, and 
laden with fruit and other delicacies. A general meeting was then held 
before the entrance, and Mr. Wood read an extremely interesting paper, 
which showed that he had studied the history of the old house with 



ICKWORTH. 65 

much enthusiasm, and that he is restoring it with the utmost care. 
The general outlines of the history of Hengrave Hall are well-known. 
From the hall, Mr. Wood proceeded to the church, of which he also 
gave a detailed description, and those who remembered the edifice, in 
times not far distant, when everything had fallen into dilapidation, 
were delighted to see how beautifully it had been preserved. It must 
be sufficient to add that this property has fallen into the hands of a 
gentlemen of taste and archseological knowledge, and that it is now 
better worth seeing than ever, as one of the striking historic places of 
the county. A hearty vote of thanks, moved by Mr. R. Burrell, was 
ftocorded to Mr. and Mrs. J. Wood for their kind hospitality. Mr. J. 
Wood has recently become a member of the Institute. 

Before separating the company were photographed in a group by 
Mr. H. Jarman, of Abbeygate Street, Bury St Edmund's. Most of the 
party returned home by trains due out of Bury aliout six o'clock, but 
lome remained to visit Fomham All Saints. 

ICKWORTH. 
Bt Rev. Stdbnhah A. H. Hervet. 

About 100 years before the Norman Conquest, Bishop Theodred 
bequeathed his land at Ickworth to Bury Abbey. Soon after the 
Norman conquest, by an exchange of lands, the Abbey became possessed 
of Elvedon, and the owner of Elvedon became possessed of Ick worth. 
The new owners took the name of De Ickworth, and continued there for 
about eight generations. They died out about 1430. The ownership 
of Ickworth was then in dispute amongst several claimants, and was 
awarded by the arbitrators to Sir William Drury of Rougham. His 
cousin, Henry Drury, somehow became possessed of it, whose daughter 
and heiress was Jane. Jane married (1) Thomas Hervey, (2) Sir William 
Carew. Her first husband lies we know not where, her second in St. 
Mary's church at Bury. Jane Hervey, alias Carew, died before her 
mother, whose will was proved in 1476, and, therefore, never came into 
possession of Ickworth ; but her son, William Hervey, did in due 
course, and Ickworth is still in the possession of his lineal descendant, 
fietween the two there have gone by eleven generations of men, four 
centuries and a quarter of years. 

These twenty-three generations, viz. eight of De Ickworths, two of 
Dmrys, thirteen of Herveys, have between them had three succcessivo 
mansion houses. The first mansion house stood to the east of the churchy 
within a stone's throw of it The foundations remain underground, 
and a dry summer reveals them, as night reveals the stars. Here and 
there a hewn stone or a brick may be seen working its way to the 
BuHace. Strange to say in this county of moats, there is no vestige 
of a moat. Possibly the brow of the hill made one unnecessary. In 
this original mansion we may safely imagine to have resided the eight 

P 



66 ICKWORTH. 

generations of De Ickworths, two of Drurys, and four of Hervejs. 
The fourth Hervey would have been John Hervey, who died there very 
poor in 1630. Possibly the poverty of John Hervey was the primarj 
cause of the house being allowed to decay, and the troublous times that 
came shortly afterwards increased what had already been begun. Sir 
William, the son and successor of John, resided at Ick worth only 
occasionally. Between 1650 and his death in 1660, we see him going 
there occasionally for a few days on matters of business. He had a 
house in Bury and a house in London, and, after his marriage in 1642 
with Lady Penelope Gage, he resided at Hengrave. His son and 
successor, John, had office at court, and I don't think ever came near 
Suffolk except to be buried there. Dying in 1680 he left Ick worth hall 
to his widow for her life. Her widowhood seems to have been spent 
abroad. She died in Holland in 1700, So that for seventy years the 
mansion was practically deserted. In 1665 it wtis apparently occupied 
as a farm house. Edward Baythome was the tenant, who li^id married 
Lady Penelope Gage's maid. The decay which may have beguu owing to 
the poverty of the John Hervey who died iu 1630, must have increased 
through the troublous times of the civil war, and through the seventy 
years of more or less desertion. But we are not left entirely to our 
imagination to know how it was faring. Sir Gervase filwes, as he 
passed through Ick worth on his way from Denston to Bury during the 
latter part of the 17th century, noticed the waste that was going ou ia 
the estate. And a contemporary legal document speaks of the tiles 
as falling off by loads every day, and the plank floors rotting away. So 
it is no wonder that when John Hervey, afterwards first Earl of Bristol, 
came into possession of Ickworth on the death of his aunt in 1700, he 
found the original mansion a ruin and he levelled it with the grouud. 

And now begins the second mansion house. Being determined to 
live at Ickworth he fitted up a farm house there as a temporary abode. 
This is the house now known as Ickworth Lodge. Sir John Vanbrugh, 
the architect of Blenheim, came and a site was chosen and a plan 
prepared for a new mansion house, but it was never built, and Ickworth 
Lodge remained the mansion house for 130 years, viz., till 1830. 

And now begins the third mansion house. In 1792 Frederick 
Hervey, fourth Earl of Bristol and Bishop of Derry, beguu the building 
of an enormous new house. The Rev. Joseph Sandys, an Irish clergy- 
man, was put at Ickworth to superintend the work. Lord Bristol 
himself could never have seen more than the foundations, as he went 
abroad iu 1793, and stayed there till his death in 1803. In 1830 the 
building was sufficiently advanced to be habitable, and Lord Bristol, 
the son of the Bishop, moved into it. 

So much for the three mansions. The church has an Early English 
east window, triple lancet, and a good Decorated piscina on the north 
side of the nave. There are no monuments of any sort except flat 
stones. This under the circumstances is most unusual and creditable, 



ICKWORTH. 67 

but whether accidentally or desiguedlj so I know not. The village has 
<»>mpletely disappeared. The rectory house stood near the church till 
about 1700, when it was burnt down. The Bishop of Norwich in 1712 
issued a faculty exempting the rector from rebuilding it and allowing 
such materials as were left to be applied to the repairs of Chedburgh 
rectory. At the same time the rectories of Ickworth and Chedburgh 
were united. The object of all this is obvious. John Hervey had just 
come into possession, and was re-creating the park, and it was desirable 
to get the rectory out of the way. Parson's pond still remains to tell 
where the parson once abode. Ickworth was united to Horringer in 
1852, having been a few years earlier separated from Chedburgh. 

Of former rectors, Robert Butts was Bishop first of Norwich, then 
of Ely, dying in 1748. Thomas Knowles, who died in 1802, and Henry 
Hasted, who died in 1852, have both left theological works to tell of 
their attainments. Lord Arthur Hervey was Bishop of Bath and Wells 
till his death in 1894. 

This is a rough chronological list of the portraits at Ickworth, more 
or less complete. The dat« is the date of death. The name in ( ) is 
the lady's maiden name. If the Institute would get a list of portraits 
from every house in the county, great or small, a useful work would be 
done. 

Sir Nicholas Hervey, 1532. 

Francis Hervey of Witham, 1601. 
[Sir William Hervey, 1660. 
-I Susan (Jermyn), his first wife, 1638. 
^Lady Penelope Gage, his second wife, 1661. 

John Hervey, eldest son of Sir William, 1679. 3 portraits. Lely. 

William Hervey, friend of Cowley, 1642. 2 portraits. 
/Sir Thomas Hervey, 1694. 
\ Isabella (May) his wife, 1686. 
/Sir Humphry May, 1630. C. Jansen. 
\Judith (Poley), Lady May. 1661. 

Baptist May, 1698. Lely. 

Henry Jermyn, Earl of St. Albans, 1683. 

Mary (Hervey), wife of Sir Edward Gage, 1654. 
rSir Robert Carr of Sleaford, 1682. 
t Isabella (Bennet), Lady Carr, 1696. 
J Henry, first Duke of Grafton, 1690. 

j Isabella (Bennet), Duchess of Grafton, afterwards wife of Sir 
^ Thomas Hanmer, 1723. 
rSir Thomas Felton of Playford, 1709. Lely. 
\Lady Elizabeth (Howard) Felton. Lely. 
fJohn Hervey, first Earl of Bristol, 1751. 4 portraits. 
1 Isabella (Carr), his first wife, 1693. 
^Elisabeth (Felton), his second wife, 1741. 2 portraits. 



68 LITTLE SAXHAM. 

Garr, Lord Hervey, 1723. 

Isabella Carr Hervey, a child, 1711. 
J John, Lord Hervey, 1743. 4 portraits. 
\Mary (Lepel) his wife, 1768. 3 portraits. 

Hon. Felton Hervey, a dead infant, 1710. 

Hon. Thomas Hervey, m.p. for Bury, 1775. 

Hon. William Hervey, B.N., 1776. Hudson. 

Hon. Felton Hervey, m.p. for Bury, 1773. 

Lady Elizabeth (Hervey) Mansel, 1727. 2 portraits. 

Lady Louisa (Hervey) Smyth, 1770. 

George Hervey, second Earl of Bristol, 1776. 

Augustus Hervey, third Earl, R.N., 1779. Gainsborough. 

Fred. Hervey, fourth Earl and Bishop of Derry, 1803. 2 portraits. 

Hon. William Hervey, General, 1815. 

Lepel (Hervey), Lady Mulgrave, 1780. 

Lady Mary (Hervey) Fitzgerald). 1815. 

Lady Emily Hervey, 1814. 

Lady Caroline Hervey, 1819. 

Augustus Hervey, midshipman, 1782. Gainsborough. 

{John Augustus, Lord Hervey, R.N., 1796. Gainsborough. 
Elizabeth (Drummond), his wife, 1818. Kaufman. 
Sir Charles Davers, 1806. Sir Joshua Reynolds. 

{Charles, Lord Seaford, 1845. Lawrence. 
Elizabeth C. C. (Hervey) Ellis, 1803. 
/Robert, Earl of Liverpool, 1829. Lawrence. 
\Louisa (Hervey), his first wife, 1821. Romney. 
Fred. Will., first Marquis of Bristol, 1859. Hoppner and Lawrence. 
Lady Elizabeth (Hervey) Foster, afterwards Duchess of Devonshire^ 
1824. Kaufman. 
/Fred. Will., second Marquis of Bristol, 1864. Grant 
iLady Katherine (Manners) Jermyn, 1848. Grant 

Besides these there are two family groups by Hogarth and Zoffany ; 
a repliqua of West's paintinfc of the death of General Wolfe ; a portrait 
of Madame Le Brun, by herself; two very fine pictures of Spanish 
princes, by and after Velasquez; portraits of Arbuthnot, Addison^ 
Congreve, Milton, Cardinal de Retz, etc., etc. 



LITTLE SAXHAM. 

At about the time when the Wars of the Roses were dying out» 
Jasper Tudor, Earl of Pembroke and Duke of Bedford, had in his 
household a young man from West Suffolk, named Thomas Lucas. For 
nine generations, and perhaps for many more, the fathers of Thomas 
Lucas had been settled, first at Bury St. Edmund's and then at West 
Stow. The young man prospered, and in course of time became 



LITTLK SAXHAM. 69 

Solicitor-General to Henry vii., the nephew of his old master, Jasper 
Tudor. Finding Little Sazham divided into three small manors, vis., 
Gedding's alias Toppesfield's, Large's and Grace's, he managed to acquire 
them all, and there he built him a house. A manuscript in the British 
Museum contains the items of expenses incurred in the building of this 
house. Extracts from it have been published by Mr. Gage in his 
** History of Thingoe Hundred " ; but it would be well if the Suffolk 
ArchflDological Institute would print the MB. in full. The printing of 
such things would be far more profitable than the printing of rechauffe's 
of what has been printed already, such as this article is. The house 
built by the Solicitor-General stood till 1773, when it was pulled down 
by Richard Crofts, m.p., and there remains to-day only the moat and 
some bits of masonry on its banks. But the foundations are still in 
the ground, and a dry summer reveals them. It is a pity that the 
recent visit of the Suffolk Archaeological Institute to Saxham was of 
such A scrambling nature that it could throw no light whatsoever upon 
the building. Thomas Lucas died in 1631. He had built a chantry 
chapel on the north side of Little Saxham church, and had prepared a 
tomb for himself there, but he was not buried there. He bequeathed 
Little Saxham Hall to his grandson and heir, Thomas Lucas, and 
other lands at Saxham to his younger son, John Lucas These two 
sold their inheritance shortly afterwards to Sir John Crofts of West Stow. 

The ancestors of Sir John Crofts, like those of Thoma: Lucas, had 
been settled for several generations, first at Bury and :hen at West 
Stow. He had been in the household of Mary Tudor, Qud3n of France, 
and when he built West Stow Hall he placed her arms over the 
entrance, where they may still be seen. His mother was Elizabeth 
Hervey, which accounts for the Hervey arms being in a window in the 
chancel of Little Saxham church. He died in 1558. 

Another Sir John Crofts was great grandson to the Sir John who 
first acquired Saxham. In his time Ring James i. was an occasional 
visitor to the hall. More than one of his fifteen children held ofi&ce at 
Court ; his daughters were gay, masquerading young ladies, and it was 
reported that James was married to one of them. 

Sir Henry was sou and successor to Sir John. In spite of his 
connection with the Court he does not appear to have suffered severely 
in the Civil War. He represented Eye in Parliament in 1624, and Bury 
St Edmund's in 1660. He died in 1667. 

William was son and successor to Sir Henry. He was a courtier 
from his boyhood to the end of his life. During the commonwealth he 
was au exile, living in his own country house near Paris. He was created 
Baron Crofts, at Brussels, in 1658. After the restoration he entertained y nf i 
Charles ii. at Little Saxham at least four times, viz., in 1666, 1669, \ ^ *^ 
1670, 1676. The first visit is recorded in the parish register of Westley, 
whither the king rode to get a better view of Bury St. Edmund's. The 
second visit is recorded by Pepys, who was there at the time, and who 



70 UTTLB 8AXHAM. 

says that the king was drunk and could not see Lord Arlington when he 
came about state affairs. The third visit is recorded by the printing of 
the sermon that was preached before his majesty in Saiham church, 
A copy of this sermon will be found in the library of the Suffolk 
Archteological Institute. Amongst other visitors to Saxham hall in 
Lord Crofts' time were the Dukes of Monmouth and Buckinghano, 
George Porter, and Baptist May, and one can imagine that their time 
was not entirely occupied in listening to sermons. Lord Crofts was 
visited on his deathbed by Evelyn the diarist, who was btaying with 
Lord Arlington at £u8ton, and died childless in 1677. His younger 
brother, John, was Dean of Norwich from 1660 to 1670. Another 
younger brother, Charles, was, I believe, he who was shot in a duel by 
Jeffrey Hudson, the dwarf. 

After the death of Lord Crofts, Little Saxham passed to his first 
oousin. Major William Crofts, who resided there, as did his son 
Anthony. But William, the son of Anthony, resided at West Harling, and 
henceforth Little Saxham saw little more of its owners. Richard, the 
son of William, represented the University of Cambridge in Parliament 
from 1771 to 1780. In 1773 he pulled down the hall. In 1783 he 
died, leaving an only child, Harriet, the wife of Sir John Sebright. In 
1789 the hall-less estate of Little Saxham was sold to Charles, Marquia 
Cornwallis, who in 1795 exchanged it for West Stow with Robert 
Rushbrook, who in 1808 exchanged it for Rush brook hall with Lord 
Bristol. A part of what is now Ickworth park lies in Little Saxham 
parish, and was once part of Little Saxham park. 

The church, dedicated to St. Nicholas, has a round tower of good 
proportions. A low recessed Norman arch inside the tower is a mystery, 
on which the recent scrambling visit of the Suffolk Archaeological 
Institute threw no light. The chantry chapel on the north side of the 
chancel was built by Thomas Lucas, the solicitor-general, and dedicated 
to Our Lady and St. John the Evangelist. It was built that masses 
might be offered in it for the repose of the soul of the builder and his 
family and of Jasper, Duke of Bedford. But the Reformation came so 
shortly afterwards that but few masses could have baen offered. It ia 
now filled with the monuments of the Crofts. 

Of the rectors of Little Saxham none seem to have left much mark 
behind them or to have risen to much distinction. Of eminent natives 
one may mention Henry Ben net, Lord Arlington, one of the Cabal 
ministry of Charles ii. His mother being one of the numerous children 
of Sir John Crofts, was the reason of his being baptized at Soxhana. 
The Dictionary of National Biography originally passed over Lord 
Crofts, but in a supplementary volume just published this omission has 
been rectified. Of eminent residents one may mention Francis Fauquier, 
who was Lieut-Governor of Virginia from 1758 to 1768. Apparently he 
rented the hall in and about 1730, when the Crofts were just deserting 
it for West Harling. Also Philip Francis, the only son of Sir Philip 



LITTLE WENHAM. 71 

who was the probable Junius, resided at the present rectory (not then 
the rectory) for a part of each year from 1811 to about 1830. 

The Parish Registers from 1559 to 1850 have been published. In 
the original register mention is made of a portrait of Sir John Crofts^ 
drawn in 1612 in his 49th year. This picture was moved from Little 
Saxham to West Harling in the 1 8th century. Where is it now t A 
portrait of William, Lord Crofts, which was engraved for Gage's 
" History of the Thingoe Hundred," is at Althorpe, Lord Croft's second 
wife being a Spencer. Might not a complete list of Suffolk portraits be 
worth printing in some future volume of the Suffolk Archsoological 
Institute f 



EXCURSION TO LITTLE WENHAM. 

There are in Suffolk few places of greater interest than the Hall 
and Church of Little Wenham. Antiquaries have for some years past 
been sorely grieved to notice that these historic buildings of the 
13th century were gradually falling into ruins. Efforts have been 
made to rouse sufficient public interest to secure them from utter 
decay ; but it was not until the Hall was purchased by G. E. Crisp, 
Esq., of Play ford Hall, that any prospect of saving thene unique 
specimens of Early English architecture appeared. With his 
characteristic zeal for the preservation of ancient buildings, Mr. Crisp, 
as soon as he became the owner of what is locally known as Wenham 
Castle, set to work to stay further dilapidation, and to retain all the 
features and details of the early edifice. When satisfactory progress 
had been made in the work he kindly invited the members of the 
Institute to visit the Hall, to see those beauties of the architecture 
which had been concealed for so long a time under a massive growth 
of ivy. 

The extent to which the excursion, held on August 3l8t, 1901, 
was patronised, proves how greatly his invitation was appreciated. 
Well-filled carriages started from the Cornhill, Ipswich, and were 
accompanied by numerous cyclists, who arrived to find other visitors 
in motor cars and carriages had preceded them. The attendance upon 
this occasion was equal to, if not greater than, that of the excursion to 
Icklingham. 

The visitors first assembled in the church, with falling roof, 
broken-down pews, and desecrated chancel, bearing all the signs of 
neglect. Beneath the ruins and debris were marks of the skilful 
masons' hands which placed the stones upon each other. The Hon. 
Secretary read a letter from Dr. H. T. Bensly, of the Diocesan 
R^^try, Norwich, from which it appeared that efforts were being 



72 LITTLB WKNHAM. 

made bj penons intereited in the building, notably Miss Rosa Crisp, 
to preserve the church from further ruin, by replacing the roof and 
windows before the winter storms came on. From a paper read bj 
Mr. V. B. Redstone it was shewn that in the time of the Domesdaj 
Wenham Gombusto, or Great Wenham, and Little Weuham formed one 
district, containing two or more manors. Little Wenham Ghurch was 
distinctly a manorial church, and, with the manor, once the property of 
Odo, Bishop of Bayeux, fell into the hands of the Bigods in 1070. In 
the 13th century it formed part of the possessions of the Browses, who 
were great church-builders. Wherever the family held lands some 
member has recorded his connection with the Ghurch. It has been 
stated by Page and other historians that the Browses were first con- 
nected with Little Wenham in the reign of Henry vi., and that the 
church was probably built by a member of the Holbroke family. The 
Brewses were, however, connected with Little Wenham in 1336, for 
John de Breouse, then parson of the church of Stradbroke, and 
William de Breouse, parson of the church of Little Wenham, settled 
the manors of Little Wenham and of Brent Wenham, and the advowson 
of the church of Little Wenham, on William de Holebroke and Amice 
his wife in tail male, or in default on the heirs of William de Holbroke. 
Whilst there are many nrarks of the presence of the Brewses, there 
remains no sign of a Holbroke having worshipped in the church. 
When a close inspection has been made of the ** Gastle," it will be seen 
that church and hall were planned by the same architect and reared by 
the same masons. The first impression of the architecture of a buildings 
is obtained from the appearance of the windows ; in this instance the 
lancet windows and the sedilia fix the date of erection to be 1260-1270. 
The deep recess of the *Mow window" is very noticeable, but its 
similarity to the " low window " of the " Gastle " chapel shows that it 
could not have beeu used for a " leper's window." Low windows are to 
be found principally in Early English churches. The east window, 
with its three lights and three quatrefoils, is the exact counterpart of 
the east window to be seen in the chapel before mentioned. The north 
window, with its falling mullions, was in style late Perpendicular, and 
once bore in stained glass the many shields marking the alliances of the 
Brewse family. The double-canopied brass to Thomas Brewse and his 
wife Jane, 1514, may be coeval with the altar tonb within the south 
wall. There are many features which excite a curiosity difficult to 
satisfy. The shelving grove in the east wall may have been the site of 
the Easter sepulchre ; within the arch near the south door waa 
probably fixed a holy water stoup, and the frescoes on the east wall 
may once have represented some saints connected with the dedication 
of the church. The foundation of the rood screen is still standing ; 
upon it is scratched, in Elizabethan Gourt-hand, G. Brewse, with date 
in Latin. (Giles Brewse, waa the only son of Sir John Brewse, by his 
second wife). He died at Toddingtou, co. Beds., and his *< Fa/e, 1S84," 



LITTLE WKNHAM. 73 

carved upon the portals of the Castle fixes the period when the Browses 
quitted this their ancestral home. 

Since the visit to the church Miss Rosa Crisp has received enough 
encouragement to be able to commence the work of preservation ; the 
roof is now entirely relaid. During the progress of the work the 
doorway to the rood loft has been opened, the piscina to the altar tomb 
has been uncovered, and sufficient material has been collected to enable 
the old font to be reconstructed. 

More funds are needed to make this church suitable for worship, 
and not to be retained solely as a museum. 

After the reading of the paper an adjournment was made to the 
farmhouse adjacent to the Hall, where, through the kindness of Mr. 
and Miss Curtis, Mr. Crisp and his sister were able to dispense 
hospitality towards their guests. 

When tea was finished the visitors assembled in the " Sovereign " 
or " banqueting " room of the Hall, an apartment 40 feet in length, 
approached from without by a flight of steps, instead of, as formerly, by 
a circular staircase within the massive wall. In this room the Hon. 
Secretary read a short paper before making a survey of the building. 
The extensive earth viorks of OfFton and the circular moats of Denham 
were never protected by em battlements, and the castellated manor- 
houses of Mettingham, Southwold, and Little Wenham never had their 
defences tested as did the Royal and Baronial Castles of Bungay, 
Framlingham, Walton, and Orford. A monumental inscription within 
the church states that Sir Thomas de Brewse was Lord of the Manor, 
and resided at Wenham, in 1500. It is probable that his son Robert, 
who succeeded him in 1514, made those alterations of the building 
which are of the perpendicular style of architecture. The abundant use 
of Flemish bricks, ** waU'tileM" and bricks stamped with the cross 
crosslet of the Browses, mark the work of still earlier alterations than 
those alluded to in the legend over the west door, *' Cfcy fait d I'aide de 
Ditu Van de Graces 1669" In making an inspection of the outer walls, 
proceeding from the west door northwards, we pass a narrow lancet 
window, and the massive buttress on which the lines of the old sun- 
dial are faintly visible. Upon the buttresses, corner-stones, and 
throughout the Castle, three distinct marks are frequently repeated — 
one in a Z running from right to left, and from left to right, or in 
combination ; another is a W, with the final stroke converted into the 
figure 6; and the third is a triangle, with the right side produced 
downwards. The window of the Sovereign room has its dripstone of 
the same character as those over the church windows. Above may be 
seen the narrow window of the chapel corresponding to the "low 
window " of the church. The flint and stone used in the construction 
of the walls resembles the seashore stone of which Orford Castle is 
built; in places the weather has so acted upon the stone that it is 
fretted and branched like coral. The banqueting room — with its Tudor 



74 LITTLE WEXHAM. 

recess, wherein the massive gold and silver plate used at the feast was 
washed in sight of the lord, the extensive hearth, with its charred beano, 
the windows, with deep recesses, used as seats, the glazed tiles of the 
floor, once strewn with reeds and rushes, and its 6ne oak ceiling — 
attracts attention ; but the most charming spot is the chapel, with its 
piscina and sedilia, its vaulted roof and carved figure in the vesica, with 
uplifted hands, in the act of benediction. Wenham is worthy of s 
pilgrimage to see this room alone. An approach is gained to the roof 
by passing through the chapel and ascending a winding staircase. 
Through the loop-holes an extensive view may be obtained of the 
surrounding country, and a close inspection of the curious chimney 
may be made. 

After the reading of the paper Col. the Hon. H. W. L. Corry 
thanked Mr. Crisp for having invited the members to Little Wenham, 
he said it was a matter of congratulation that these ancient buildings 
had passed into the hands of a gentleman so deeply interested in 
matters of archaeological and of antiquarian interest. The restored 
buildings would stand as a memorial to Mr. Crisp's generosity. A vote 
of thanks was passed to Miss Crisp and to Miss Rosa Crisp for their 
hospitality, and for the deep interest and sympathy with which thej 
supported their brother's work. 



CONVERSAZIONE AT IPSWICH. 75 



CONVERSAZIONE AT IPSWICH. 

The third Annual Conversazione was held on Wednesday evening, 
November 6th, 1901, at the Ipswich Town Hall. When it was proposed 
that a conversazione should take place at the county town the Mayor 
(W. F. Paul, Esq.) and the Mayoress heartily responded to the sug- 
gestion. It was by their invitation that the company assembled, and 
under their direction, assisted by the Town Clerk (Mr. W. Bantoft), 
excellent arrangements were made for the occasion. The Council 
Chamber was set out and furnished in drawing-room fashion ; refresh- 
ments were provided in the library, in which an exhibition of objects 
of interest was displayed ; and St. Mary-le-Tower Glee Singers 
were engaged to give variety in a programme which was of great 
archsological interest. 

The members and friends of the Society were welcomed by the 
Mayor and Mayoress. Amongst those present were Mr. F. S. 
Stevenson, m.p., who had kindly consented to take the chair, and 
Mrs. Stevenson ; Lord John Hervey and Mr. H. C. Casley (members 
of the Committee), and many leading townspeople and visitors from 
other parts of the county, the latter including the Rev. Dr. Raven. 
Miss Nina F. Layard, who was also on the Committee, was unable^ 
through a recent bereavement, to be present. 

The Chairman, in opening the proceedings, said this was the first 
occasion on which he had had the pleasure and privilege of being 
present at one of the conversaziones of the Suffolk Archeeological 
Institute, and he felt that, under the circumstances, he should offer 
some sort of apology for the position he was then holding. Whilst on 
the one hand he was very glad to have that opportunity of being 
amongst them, on the other hand he could not make any special claim 
to be considered one of themselves, except in the sense that he had 
always taken a very active and keen interest in the Society. He could 
not claim himself to be an archaeologist, though he was deeply interested 
in the results of archeeology. All those who had had any share in 
historicid or biographical work must feel what a very deep debt was due 
to the labour of archaeologists. Archaeology had been sometimes called 
the " raw material of history." He did not think that was altogether 
complimentary, for it seemed to him that it was a good deal more than 
that. Archaeologists did not carry on their work merely for the purpose 
of enabling historians and biographers to profit by their labours. There 



76 CONVKRSAZIONK AT IPSWICH. 

was an interest attaching to it which was independent of anj result 
which might follow their labour. While he demurred to the phrase 
** raw material," howeveri he should be a little inclined to adopt another 
phrase which was used a good deal by economists at the time when the 
sugar tax was under discussion ; they spoke of sugar as raw material in 
its second stage — material which had been to some extent prepared and 
refined. That applied to the results of archesology. The information 
thus obtained was not presented to the public in the precise form 
in which it was discovered ; it passed through the hands of the 
archaeologist, and underwent a certain refining process which enabled 
it to be subsequently used to greater advantage by the historian and 
the biographer. Like the sugar, too, this raw material in the second 
stage had a merit and sweetness of its own, quite apart from any 
subsequent use to which it might be put As it gave him pleasure to 
attend the meeting, so he was glad that it was being held in Ipswich. 
Not only had a great deal of thought and labour been devoted to 
arch»ological research by eminent local men whose names were well 
known, but the town itself had contributed largely to the materials of 
archflsology. Seven hundred years ago last year the first charter of 
municipal government was bestowed upon Ipswich. That evening they 
were graced by the presence of the Mayor, who formed the connecting 
link between the 19th and 20th centuries. He (the speaker) did not 
say that municipal life came into existence de novo, as it were, 700 
years ago. No doubt there had been some sort of municipal life liefore 
the charter was then granted, for they found, on looking back, that the 
discussions and debates began almost immediately, the people being 
evidently quite used to the forms of conducting their own business. 
With such a long past record as that, and with such a variety of 
documents relating to the past and preserved in the town, Ipswich 
might well claim distinction, both in the making and recording of local 
history. Mr. Stevenson showed the absolute necessity for specialisation 
nowadays in archeeological study, and, referring to the projected 
" Victoria Histories of the Counties of England," said the plan of its 
production was that each contributor should undertake his own 
particular work with which he was most familiar, but to do so in 
conjunction with his colleagues, all acting together in the light of 
certain common principles and for a certain common purpose. In 
conclusion he made happy reference, by way of anticipation, to the 
papers that were to be read. 

After glees had been sung Mr. A. W. Doubleday, editor of the 
work, read a paper, in which he sketched the objects and scope of the 
projected " Victoria Histories of the Counties of England." His state- 
ments showed that this will be a gigantic undertaking, running to 160 
principal volumes and supplements, which will alone be sufficient to 
form a library. He invited the support and co-operation of all who are 
interested in the subject. 



CONVKRSAZIONB AT IPSWICH. 77 

When they had listened to further glees and solos the company 
adjourned to the Library for refreshment. Afterwards, the first item 
on the programme related to the 

Parentaob of Cardinal Wolbbt. 

Upon this subject Mr. Vincent B. Redstone read a paper, in which 
be summarised the results of careful research amongst the Borough 
Records. The late Bishop of London, he said, commenced his *' Life of 
Wolsey " with the following remarks : — " Thomas Wolsey was bom at 
Ipswich, probably in March, 1471. He was the son of Robert Wolsey, 
and Joan, his wife. Contemporary slander, wishing to make his fortunes 
more remarkable, or his presumption more intolerable, represented his> 
father aa a man of mean estate, a butcher by trade. However, Robert 
Wolsey'a will (1496) shows that he was a man of good position, probably 
a grasier and wool merchant, with relatives who were well to do." * As 
an instance of the ''contemporary slander" here referred to, Mr. 
Redstone quoted the following lines from the bitter attack made upon 
Wolsey by the Poet Laureate, Skelton : — 

t " Howbeit the primordyall 
Of his wretched original, 
And his base progeny. 
And his greasy genealogy. 
He came of the sank royal 
That was cast out of a butcher's stall." 

Skelton was an East Anglian, probably allied to an Ipswich family 
of that name, and roust have known Wolsey well. The two were at 
Oxford at the same time, and it further happened that while Skelton 
was Rector of Diss, Wolsey, then only a Chaplain, and holding the 
degree of &a., was appointed to the benefice of Redgrave, a neigh- 
bouring parish, 1506. Under these circumstances the Poet would be 
well acquainted with the Cardinal's parentage. A serious slander had 
been cast upon the character of Wolsey, it was added, by writers who 
asserted that the missing records of the Borough of Ipswich were 
destroyed at his instigation, in order that all traces of his father's 
bumble occupation might be obliterated. Such was not the fact. The 
*Most" records existed in the British Museum Library, the Bodleian 
Library at Oxford, and in private hands. Mr. Redstone explained how 
it was that he came to search amongst the archives at the Town Hall, 
and gave some very curious particulars about the Wolseys : — 

''The Cardinal's family was not the only Wolsey family then 
residing in Ipswich. The late Mr. Cordy Jeafferson, whose services 
render^ to Ipswich historians are great, mentions a market scavenger, 

*Chap. II., p. 18. t ** Why came ye not to Court?'' I. 294. 



78 CONVERSAZIONE AT IPSWICH. 

Elizabeth Wolsey, widow, as receiving wages in the year 1588. In this 
year she died, and was buried in the churchyard of St Mary Key.* 
Her husband's name was John Wolsey, but he could not have been the 
John Wolsey, of Ipswich, who in 1-472 'attained an action of debt of J&6 
before the bailiffs of Ipswich tigainst Thomas Wode, chaplain ' (Chancery 
Proceedings Record Office.) t Was the latter John Wolsey brother to 
Robert Wolsey ? We thus see that other Wolsey s existed at the time 
within the lx)rough, but, save for the entry just mentioned, no record 
has appeared connecting them with the town life. 

*' The question now arises — Was the Cardinars father a Burgess of 
the town ? I think so, for upon the first page of the General Courts 
Book of 2 Henry vii. (1489) his name appears in the list of tweuty-six 
Burgesses, who were tuxed to the sum of twelvepeuce each, to provide 
vnletta or varlets fully equipped to serve the King on horseback, under 
the Earl of Oxford, wearing the Royal badge. The presence of his 
name amongst such as Falstolf, Timperley, Cady (at the time Thomas 
Wolsey was at Oxford) shows that the father was then in fairly good 
•circumstances." 

Upon the question of the exact place of the Cardinal's biilh, light 
was thrown in the following paragraph : — 

''An enrolment made in 1478 records the purchase of a house in 
the parish of St. Nicholas by Robert Wolsey, on 15th October, 1473. 
For the tenement, garden, and use of half the well, Wolsey paid 
the small sum of £8 6s. 8d. This was a greater price than the 
previous owner, John Creyk (who died when holding the office of 
bailiff) must have placed upon it, for in his will, dated 1st March, 
1471, t the same month and year in which the Cardinal is said to have 
been bom, Creyk desired his executors to sell this house and one in 
St. Lawrence parish in the best market-, hoping to realise the sum of 
£10. Thomas Wolsey was not born in this house, but, as we shall see 
from the Lete Rolls, he was born in the parish of St. Mary Elms." 

It was in the " Petty and General Courts Books " that Mr. Redstone 
•discovered the more curious particulars about the Cardinal's father. In 
these Courts, before the bailiffs, such civil actions were heard as those 
which now come before the County Courts, and Robert Wolsey seems 
to have been so fond of litigation that he was always figuring therein* 
One entry shows that he was, together with John Pell, churchwarden of 
St. Nicholas in the year 1492, and that he entered an action against 
John Jurden, the chaplain of the church, in order to recover possession 
of a silver chalice. The paper concluded : — 

" The records of the Lete Court, which tried all offences committed 
against the ordinances of the borough, give us the information we are 
in search of, viz., the calling or trade of Robert Wolsey. . Here is an 

^Parish Register. f Bundle 8S, No. 161. tipewioh Probate Office, Book it. 



CONVERSAZIONE AT IPSWICH. 79 

instance of a benefit arising from an infringement of the bye-laws. 
The townsfolk accumulated the litter before their doors, and when the 
heaps were large enough made a bon-fire.* Bon-fires were especially 
frequent on the Eve of St. John the Baptist's Day, and were known in 
Suffolk as nid (t.^., rubbish) fires. The bailiffs sought to stop the 
custom, but Robert Wolsey would have his fire before his house on 
Colhyll, though he paid a fine for his enjoyment (1490). Colhyll 
occupied the site now known as Silent Street. Another sanitary 
arrangement was objected to by Robert Wolsey. His pigs required 
feeding, and where was there food more abundant than among the 
borough rubbish heaps f Wolsey insisted on allowing his pigs to seek 
their own living, wandering about the streets. The fine of threepence 
which was inflicted upon him for so doing would easily cover the 
expenses of their keep. 

" The Lete Courts sat in the various Wards — North, South, East, 
and West. The first appearance of Wolsey in this Court (of which we 
have the record) was made in the year 1464. He was then dwelling in 
the S. Ward, or St. Nicholas Parish, and was summoned for selling 
victuals in his ' Hospicium ' (Y ttivern) contrary to the Assize of the 
town, and also for permitting his cart to remain as an obstruction in 
the street. Two years afterwards we find he had moved his residence, 
appearing before the Lete Court of the West Ward, i.e., of St. Mary 
Elms, and he constantly renewed acquaintance with this Court until he 
purchased the house in St. Nicholas (1473), and removed once more to 
the South Ward. His dwelling is always called a 'Hospicium,' and as 
I find mention of * le White Horse ' as an * Hospicium,' I am inclined to 
think that he was a tavern-keeper, following at the same time the 
avocation of a butcher, for he is frequently mentioned as selling bread, 
hay, oats, and other horse-meat, as well as offering in the market meat 
deemed to be unfit for food. He did not, according to the market 
regulations, exhibit the skins of the beasts he had killed, nor did he 
provide the Burgesses with a bull-baiting spectacle when he had an ox 
to slaughter, in accordance with the regulations. He sold diverse kinds 
of goods when residing in both Wards, but there is only one entry 
which h.i8 come to my notice in which he appears to have been known 
by his contemporaries as a ' butcher.' 

" From these statements it is manifest that the Cardinal's father 
waA in bourgeoU circumstances, that the shin-bone which Thomas 
Wolsey adopted as a crest marks the fact that he was not ashamed of 
his origin, and that it was the social position of his mother's relatives 
which gave him his start in life." 

In the course of his paper, Mr. Redstone recognised the value of 

the researches undertaken by Mr. H. C. Casley upon the same subject, 

and at the close of it he publicly thanked the Town Clerk and his 

assistants for their kindness in giving him every opportunity of looking 

*Cely Pftperi, p. 118. 



80 CONVRRSAZIONB AT IPSWICH. 

OTer the town records. He added that he had one very pleaaing 
statement to make. Some of the borough documents, as he had told 
them, were dispersed in years gone by, and fell into private hands. 
Amongst the purchasers was Mr. Prigg, a former Secretary of the 
Institute, and, he was happy to say, that the daughter of that 
gentleman — Mrs. -Andrews, of Higham, who was present — had asked 
him to present these documents * that bad been in her possession to 
the Mayor of Ipswich, in order that they might be in future preserved 
amongst the archives of the Borough. 

Mr. Redstone then handed the borough manuscripts to his Worship 
the Mayor, who thanked Mrs. Andrews most heartily for her gift to 
the town. 

The town records, from which Mr. Redstone obtained the materials 
for his paper, were laid on the table for inspection. 

Lord John Hervey, in moving a vote of thanks to the Mayor, who 
was probably more occupied, he said, in making history than in reading 
or writing it, took occasion to quote an extract from the *'Book of 
Ely," which showed that the communal history of Ipswich, as a place 
of '^ great freedom and dignity/' went back for a period of quite one 
thousand years. 

The Mayor briefly acknowledged a vote which was passed with 
enthusiasm ; Mr. H. C. Casley, who showed that the charges brought 
against Wolsey's father were for the most part in respect of venial 
offences, thanked the Chairman for presiding, and also the readers of 
the papers, and a like compliment to the Quartette party brought the 
Gonversasione to a close. 



The Exhibits in the Library comprised contributions by — 

Rev. Dr. Raven — Original pass granted to a soldier by Sir J. Palmer, 
1646.t 

Mr. H. Hancox — Silver coins from old Ipswich mints and other 
specimens of bronze and flint implements. 

Miss Nina F. Layard — Horn picks, PalsBolithic and Neolithic 
implements, etc., lately found in Ipswich and neighbourhood. Human 
skull from the peat of the Orwell. 

Mr. T. Parkington, jun. — Mediaeval pottery and glass, recently 
found in the Butter Market, Ipswich. Six paintings of Ipswich views 
by local artists — Todd, Frost, Fred. Russell, and H. Gaye. 

Woodbridge Field Club — Objects found on the site of the Romano- 
British Camp, Castle Field, Burgh, 1900-1901. 

* Great Court Book 23-34, Henry viii. 
^Proceedings o/ Inttitutt, Vol. x., pt. 8, p. 394. 



(81) 



\y 



GILD OF 8. PETER IN BARDWELL. 

Entries referring (1) to the Gild of St. Peter in 
Bardwell, (2) to Churchwardens' accounts in connection 
with the Church of SS. Peter and Paul in Bardwell, (3) to 
the Town wardens' accounts in connection with the "Town " 
or " Charity Estate " in Bardwell, prior to the Reformation \) 
extracted from an old MS. volume of accounts now lying 
in an iron chest in the vestry of Bardwell Parish Church. 

F. E. Warren. 



List op Abbrbviatiomb, btg. 

In the following pages the original MS. text and orthography have 
been retained, even in the case of obvious mistakes. Abbreviations and 
contractions have been expanded. Punctuation has been modernized. 

In addition to the ordinary contractions or abbreviations for •* and," 
"et," "quia," "quod," "er," "re," "ri," "rum," &c., and for certain 
proper names, e.g.^ Kicardus, Robertus, etc., the following are used, but 
not invariably, in this MS. Where used they have been expanded into 
tbeir English or Latin equivalents. 



a for annus 


ob for obolus, halfpenny 


arr, arre „ arreragium 
b „ bushel 
comp „ computus, computator 
d „ dosen 
di „ dimidium 
h „ Ueuricus 


P „ patet 
ptn „ pertinens 
q ,^ quadrans, farthing 
r, rec „ receperunt, &o. 
r „ regnum 
red „ reddit, &c. 


it „ item 
11 „ libra, pound 
M „ Magister, Master 
Md „ Memorandum 


rs „ regis 
s „ solidus, shilling 
tent „ tenementum 
vz, vid. „ videlicet 


ml „ millesimus 


w* „ with 


mo „ modo 


ye, >e „ the 
y* „ that 



An asterisk * denotes a letter, or a word, or words, torn or worn off. 
Square brackets [ ] enclose words or letters not in the MS. 
T. S.— English Gilds by Toulmin Smith, London, 1870, being 
No. 40 of the Publications of the Eariy English Text Society. 

a 



82 GILD OF ST. PETER IN BARDWELL. 

EPage 11 Memorandum, that John Bally hathe recejred in 

A.D. 1611] dyschys of the Gylde of Seynt petyr in the yere of owr 
lord God millesimo quingiutecimo undecimo ix doaen 
Also in platers iiii doaen 

Also in iron spetys iii 

Item in saucers ii doaen 

The said John Bally schall gave a Cownt whan he is 
required of all these seyd thyugs, and he to have yerely 
for hys labor iiii d 

Also the seyd John Bally schall be owr Kooke, he to 
haue for hys labor xvi d 

Also he schall goo scot fre. 
[▲.D. 1517] Memorandum, that Kechard Haruy hathe Received in 
the yere off owre lorde god millesimo ccccxvii in dyschya 

xi dosen and iii dyschys 
Item, in platers iii dosen and iii platers 

Item, in sawsyrs ii dosen 

Item, in Cuppys vii dosen 

Item, in spets of iryu iii 

The said Rechard to make a Cownte herof, and he to 
haue ffor hys labor t iiii d 

[Page 3] Heo sunt uomina fratrum ac sororum Gilde Sancti petri 

[a.D. 1512] ville de Bardwell anno domini milecimo quingintesimo 
dudecimo, et anno regni regis henrici Octaui [tertio] : 

Dominus Ricardus Hypping, vicarius; Ricardus Doo, 
clericus; Alicia Doo, vidua; Iztibella Cage, vidua; 
Johannes Osere, et uxor eius ; Rogerus Blome ; Cristiaua 
Gilcler«cleve, vidua ; Johannes fox, et uxor ; Elizabeth 
Wyndowt, vidua ; Thomas SetFniy, et uxor ; Johanues 
Seffray et uxor ; Johnnnes Beete et uxor ; Willel- 
mus Selot et uxor ; Robert us herue ; Matilda mun- 
dus, vidua ; Thomas Cage et uxor ; Johannes Sawu- 
sum ; Willelmus Sparke et uxor ; Johanues Balli et 
uxor ; Alicia Bnucard ; Willelmus hooke ; Willelmus 
Baldwin ; Johannes Chele et uxor ; Margareta fravncis ; 
Agnes Bibi, vidua ; Izabella Ampnare vidua ; Radulphus 
West et uxor ; Robertus Seffray et uxor ; Robertus llger 
et uxor ; Elizabeth Smythe ; Thomas pike, et uxor ; 
Johnnnes Sponad reddit per annum Gentilman SchotJ ; 
Thomas Maunynge et uxor ; Willelmus Goolde et uxor ; 
Jacobus Selot ; Ricardus herve et uxor ; Thomas Doo et 
uxor eius ; Robertus Bete et uxor eius ; Johannes Breud- 
t Page 2 is blank. 



t Thie appears to be " f^ntleman scot/' and to be governed by the preceding 
words. Mr. John Sponad paid a higher contribution than ordinary gild members, 
and was what we should call an " honorary mnmber." 



GILD OF ST. PETER IN BARD WELL. 83 

woode et uxor ; Johannes Wyndowt ; Ricardus permentor ; 
Rogerus Cutting ; Margarete Beete ; Agnes ffice ; Izabella 
moriell ; Wyllelmus Crown ; Elizabeth Doo ; Willelmua 
Benett ; Johannes hervy ; Marieria Cage ; Nicholaus 
Morris ; Willelmus Bate ; Johannes Brooke : Andreas 
[Page 4] fflacke ; Margareta Barett ; Robertus Ive ; Robertus 

Coockooke ; Thomas Bennett ; Thomas Viell et uxor 
bius ; Thomas trapett ; Wylliam blomeffelde owre Men- 
strell to owre gilde, he to have ffor hys mede xii d, and 
hys chese ; Margete harper ; John Keche ; Isble Ketyll ; 
robart fFullar et uxor eius ; William Sefferey et uxor eius ; 
Isbell Rastalde ; Johannes perky n ; Johannes doo ; 
iohannes waiter et uxor eius ; galfrydus Bunne ; Johannes 
Selott et uxor eius ; Thomas Waller et uxor eius ; Marian 
Brendode ; Recharde Warne et uxor eius ; Mary Selott ; 
William doo [et] uxor eius ; Robarde gardner ; Anne 
permeffay ; Marget Baldry ; Elizabeth Cokett ; Tomas 
Syllett et uxor eius ; Agnes howys ; Thomas Smythe et 
uxor eius.f 

[Page 5] Robert Wryte et uxor eius ; ffloreus goolde ; John 

Barkar et uxor eius ; John Howchyn et uxor eius ; John 
Sefferey ; Alys Selott wedow ; Ny colas taylor ; John 
Browne ; Recharde Waler ; Robart pyke ; Alys chenert ; 
Thomas geldersleue ; John Reste et uxor eius ; Thomas 
hawys ; laurencius Karman [et] uxor eius ; Thomas Re<ite 
et uxor eius ; Jone Cage ; Wylliam Weste ; Master bronde 
et uxor eiusj ; John Wyndowte et uxor eius ; John 
Cage et uxor eius ; Annes Massom ; John Waller 
et uxor eius J : Goodwyne Ive et uxor eius ; Steuene 
Brendwode ; John Weste et uxor eius ; John 
geldersleue ; master Brond et uxor eius ; uxor Johannis 
Ive ; Master draper et uxor eius ; uxor Johannis IvaJ ; 
John Reder et uxor eius ; Jone Steykell ; Marget 
Carman ; Isbell Cage ; John Walter ; John Tholde ; 
Marget WaruellJ ; Betrys Carman ; uxor lauerans Car- 
roan ; John page et uxor eius ; Thomas gooday ; uxor 
Robert hunt ; Robert serdenze et uxor eius ; Robert 
cage ; William selle et uxor eius ; William Brendyd et 
uxor eius ; Thomas Stanford et uxor eius ; Thomjxs 
anroer ; xristine the servant of John Ive ; Nycholas the 
servant of master draper ; Agiies Brannysden wedowe ; 
Izabell Vynsent ; Necholas Edwyne et uxor eius. 

t The rest of pase 4 is blank. A new lint of names seem to begin on page 5. 
t These names have been wholly or partly struck through aH duplicates, or for 
some other reason. 



84 GILD OF ST. PETER IK BARDWELL. 

[Page 6] Nicolaus plowman mjnstrall of the Ojld of Seynt 

petre, he havjng to hys wage xvi d. 

William Syrlynggam et uxor eius ; Margarete Seffej ; 
Margarete Webbe ; Margarete reve, the wife of T[homas] 
reve, uxor Thomaa revef ; Alicia hejward vidua ; Alioia 
Seh vidua ; Margare hoogge ; Alicia ferthe ; William 
Gooday ; Agnes Waller ; John Burdenze ayngle man ; 
William Weste Sengylman ; Jone Goole sengy 11 woman ; 
Edmond hylton syngylman ; Agnes weest sengle woman ; 
Thomas Reue et uxor eius ; Johonnes Reue ; Margery 
vechyr vedua ; Joaue Hoy ; John Wallur et uxor eius ; 
Margaryt haruy ; Hugo Harrysen ; Radulfus Taylor et 
uxor eius ; Ricardus Brygtham capellanus ; John Hyll et 
uxor; Willelmus Rysynget uxor; Thomas Chele; Johannes 
parkin et uxor eius ; 

Wyllam persun ys owyr kooke, he to have to hys 
wagys xvi d. 

Robert bray ; Thomas warner ; Recharde skarpe et 
uxor eiusf ; Johannes baxster et uxor ; Johannes barkar ; 
Robertus bally et uxor eius ; Johannes Goddard. 

Crystofur, frater Cagge, mynstrall, he to haue to hys 
wage xvid. 

Adam Munde ; Johannes Cooke et uxor eius ; Stephanus 
Doo ; Agnes Goodday singylwoman, Agnes Waller ; 
William Herreford ; Wylliam Wyffyn ; Stefyn Waller et 
uxor eius ; Johannes Skarpe syngyllman. 
[Page 7] Hec sunt debita pertinencia Gylde sancti Petri ville 

de Berdwell. 

s. d. 
Johannes Seffray debet per thoma[m] payn iii iiii 
Johannes Burden iii iiii 

John Bete, late of bowbecke, now dede pro eo 
John ffox debet iii iiii 

Magister vicarius pro eo 
Johannes Bally vi viii 

Thomas Cage pro eo 
Johannes Oger vi viii 

thereof to be paydadfestum omnium sanctorum iii iiii 
Johannes Seffray |x viii 

Robertus Baxster pro eo 
Robertus Baxster debet vi viii 

Johannes SeflFray pro eo 
Thomas Seffray debet iii iiii 

Johannes Seffray pro eo 

t These entries have been lined through. 

t Erased, and xiiif. viiid, written in the margin. 



GILD OF ST. PETER IN BARD WELL, 85 

Memorandum, delyvered to thomas Cage, 8. d. 

Johannes Seffray in hewjs xiii 

and in wethers iii 

Item in 1am bjs viii 

Also delyvered to William Bate a cowe, 
he to pay for the ferme fro mydssomer tyll 
mychaelmas twelmoutbe afbyr ii 

Johannes Seffray pro eo 
Thomas Cage debet xiii iiii 

Thomas Seffray pro eo 

Item delyvered to Rychard Orwell a oowe, 
he to pay at mychelmas twellvemonthe ziiii 

Johannes Seffray pro eof 

[Page 8] Item, delyverde to robarde Baxter a Cowe, and he to 

A.D. I513-] 4] pay messumer nex come the fferme ther off xz d ; or ellys 
he to pay vii s and ii d ffor the cowe and the fferme, and 
Johannes bete suerte ffor hym 

Item, delyverde to recharde orwell a 
Cowe, he to pay for the fferme at mekel- 
messe com twellmonthe xx 

John Sefferay ffor hym 
Item Thomas Cage v ii 

Wylliam Selot pro eo. 
Item, John Sefferey xiii iii 

robart Baxter pro eo 
Item delyuerde to John Sefferey & Tomas 
Cage for ewys & lambys xviii 

Item for wethyrs vi 

Anno regis Henryci octavi quinto. 
Memorandum, that the bretheryn hathe 
letyn on to John Brendoode xiii ewys ix 
lambys and viii wetherys, and he to pay 
ffor the fferme ffor third of a yere v 

and he to delyuer A geyne the hole stok as 
reseyuyd 

Ande robarde Sefferey suyrte ffor hym 

[Page 9] Memorandum, that John ffox owytlie to iii iiii 

the gelde Master vekery suyrte ffor hym 

Memorandum, that John Bailey owythe to vi viii 

the gelde Thomas Cage suyrte ffor hym 

Memorandum, that John ogers owythe to 

the gelde vi viii 

t No total if given, but the income of the gild for this year (o. 1511) seems to have 



86 GILD OF ST. PETKR IN BARDWRLL. 

Memorandum, that Robarde Baxter owjthe 8. d. 

to the gelde John Sefferey sujrte for hym vi viii 
Memorandum, that Thomas SefTerj owythe 

to the gelde John Sefferej ffor hym iii iiii 

Memorandum, that John Sefferey owyth to 

the gelde Robart Baxtar ffor hym xiiii x 

Memorandum, that Robarde Baxter owyth 

to the gelde, to be payd at messomer 

nexte come John Brendoode ffor hym vii it 

Memorandum, that William Blomfylde xall 
pay at mecol mease nexte com ffor the fferme 
of a cowe John Sefferey for hym xx 

[Page 10] Memorandum, that Recharde orwell hath 

a cowe in fferme, he to pay for the fferme 
ther ffor fro mecolniesse to mecolmesse xix 

to be payde at the gelde be ffor mecolmesse 
John Sefferey ffor him 
Memorandum, that Willyam Blomfylde 
hath a browne kowe in fferme to pay ther 
ffor ffrom mecolmesse to mecolmesse xix 

robarde Sefferey ffor him. debet pro uno anno 
Wylliam hooke owythe to the gelde iii iiii 

Thomas Cage ffor hym 
Robart Sefferey owyth to the gelde iiii iiL 

John Sefferey ffor hym 

John Bailey hatho a kowe, and he ha the 
payd the fferme tyll mekolmesse, and he 
)>an to delyuer the cowe 

John Sefferey ffor hym 

John Bailey hathe a kowe in fferme to 
pay \>et ffor fro mekolmesse to mekolmesse xix 

to pay at the gelde he ffor mekolmess 

John Sefferey suyrte ffor hym 

[Page 11] Robart ffullar hathe il nete in fferme to 

pay \>er ffor ffro mekolmesse to mekolmesse iii ii 

to be payde at ye geld of Saint peter be ffor 
mekolmesse. 

John Bete suyrte ffor hym 
Soluitur Thomas Cage owythe to the gelde 
toward the reparation xviii 

Thomas Seffrey pro eo 
Bobert ffullar hathe i cowe in ferme to pay 
at sayant peters tyme xix 



GILD OF ST. PETER IN BARDWELL. 87 

Radulphus West ath i cowe in ferme, he to s. d. 
pay at the ffest of Saynt peters tyaie xix 

Johannes Bete pro eo 
William Spark ow[y]th ii vi 

Johannes perkyn pro eo 
Johannes perkyn ow[ylth ii vii 

William Sparke pro eo 
Robertus Baxter debet iii iiii 

Johannes Seffrey pro eo 
Johannes Seffrey debet x ii 

Robertus Seffrey pro eo 
Johannes Banly debet iii iiii 

Thomas Cage pro eo 
Thomas Doo debet v viii 

Vicarius pro eo 
Memorandum, that John Banly hathe 
receuyd of the gelde of Saynt Petur to bye 
a caldron for the Gylde of Saint Petur xvi ii 

[Page 12] Memorandum, that the brethryne and 

systyrne haht of the Gylde of saint petur 
hathe soldo to the vykyr of Bardewell all 
the flock of schepe and lambys longing uu 
to the Gylde for xxxvis to be payd at the 
feste of Saint mykylmess the archangyl 
nexte foloyng. 

Thomas Cage hathe i cowe in ferme he 
to pay by yere xix 

Johannes Seffrey pro eo 
Thomas Mannyng hathe received of the 
Gylde of saynt petur xl 

Johannes Seffrey pro eo 
Johannes hewchau hathe received of the 
Gylde of saynt petur xx 

Robert Bete hathe received of the Gylde 
of saynt petur viii cowys, he to pay at 
saynt peturs Gylde nexte comyng for the 
same vii iiii 

Thomas Cage pro eo 

Thomas vyell hathe received of the 
Gylde of saint petur i cowe, he to pay for 
the yerly ferme xix 

Wyllyam Goold pro eo 

Johannes Seffray hathe received of the 
Gylde of saynt petur to repare the Gylde hawle viii iiii 

Thomas Cage pro eo 



88 OILB OF ST. PETER IK BARDWEUL 

Thomas Cage hath received of the s. d. 

Gylde of saynt petur to pay for the baner- 
oholthe of saynt petur xii iiii 

Johannes Seffraj pro eo 
Master vekery bathe Received to the 
reperacion of the gelde halle zvi x 

[Page 13] Anno Henrici octaui duodessimo. 

A.D. 1520-21] Thomas Cage hathe received to bey a 

Cowe to be delyuered at Mekolmesse xi 

Robart Beete suyrte for hym 

Robart Beete hathe received to bey a 
Cowe to be delyuered at mekolmesse zi 

Thomas Cuge suyrte ffor hym 
Thomas Cage hathe received to bey torchys ix 

Thomas SefTerey and John Seiferey hathe 
Received to the Reperation of the gelde hall xiii v 

Anno Henrici octaui tercio decimo 
[a.d. 1621-22] John Bailey hathe a Cowe to pay ffor a 

yer fferme at myssomer xir 

Item, William blomefelde hathe a cowe, to pay xix 

Robart Sefferey suerte ffor hym 
Item, Thomas vyell hathe ii nete, to pay iii ii 

Master Bronde suerte ffor hym 
Item, John Roose hathe ii nete, to pay iii ii 

Thomas Cage suerte ffor hym 
Item, Robart ffuUar hathe a cowe, to pay xix 

Wylliam Sefferey suerte ffor hym 
Item, John Brewster hathe a cowe, to pay xix 

Thomas Cage suerte ffor hym 
Item, there be ii nete to be solde to John 
Sefferey and Thomas Cage to bey ii ffor 
hem ageyne 

Item, John Sefferey and William Sefferey hathe 
Received to repare with the gelde halle xv ii 

EPage 14] Anno Henrici octaui quarto decimo 

A.D. 1522-23] John Bully hathe a cowe to pay for the 

yer ferme at myssomer xix 

John Seffei*ey suyrte ffor hym 
Thomtis Vyell hathe a cow to pay ffor 

the yere ferine at missomer xix 

Master Bronde ffor hym 
John Roce of thorpe hath ii nete to pay 

for the yere ferm iii ii 

Thomas Cage suyrte for hym 



GILD OF ST. PKTER IN BARDWELL. 89 

8. d. 
Item Robert ffuller bathe a cow, to pay ziz 

William ssefferey sujrte ffor bym 
Jobn Walter bathe a cow, to pay ziz 

John SefTery ffor hym 
John Brewster bathe a cowe, to pay ziz 

Thomas Cage ffor hym 
Wyllyam blomefelde scball delyuer a cow 
to Master Bronde at mycolmesse, and 
Master Bronde to pay for the ferme ziz 

Wylliam Sefferey suyrte for hym. Item 
Robart Sefferey suyrte ffor Blomefdldd to 
be delyuered at mycolmesse 

Thomas Gooday bathe a cow, to pay ziz 

Thomas Cage ffor hym 

Thomas Waller bathe received of the 
stokke of the gylde zii iiii 

Robert Wryte suyrte ffor hym 
Thomas Cage bathe to bey a cow zii 

Robert Bete suyrte ffor hym 



{Page 15] Anno Henrici octaui quintodecimo 

[a.d. 1523-34] Jobn Bally bathe a cowe to pay for the 

yere ferme at myssomer ziz 

John Sefferey suerte for hym 
John Walter bathe a cowe ziz 

John Sefferey suerte for hym 
Master Bronde bathe a cowe ziz 

John Sefferey suerte for him 
Robert ffullar hathe a cowe ziz 

Wylliam Sefferey suerte 
John Cage hathe a cowe ziz 

Thomas Cage suerte 
John Wyndowte hathe ii nete iii ii 

Thomas Doo suerte 
Wylliam Sefferey hathe a cowe ziz 

Thomas Cage suerte 
John Roce bathe ii nete iii ii 

Thomas Cage suerte 
Memorandum, that ther lie iii nete to \ye 
solde by Thomas Cage 8c goodwyne ive, 
and they to make a cownte of the mony, 
and to provide net a gayne ffor hem 

godwyne ive hathe a cowe ziz 



90 GILD OF ST. PETER IN BARDWELL. 

tPage 16] Anno heurici octaui sexto-decimo 

AD. 1524-25] John Bally bathe a cowe to pay at s. d. 

myBsomer xix 

John SefTerey pro eo 
Robart fTuUar hathe a cowe xix 

Wylliam Sefferey pro eo 
John Cage hathe a cowe xix 

Thomas Cage pro eo 
Wylliam Sefferey hathe a cowe [^1 

Thomas Cage pro eo 
John Roce of Thorpe hath ii nete, one to 
by Bolde iii ii 

Thomas Cage pro eo 
Robart Bete hathe ii nete, one to by solde, 
one to by letyn iii ii 

Thomas Vyell [pro eo] 
John perky n hathe a cowe, one to by solde xix 

Wylliam Sefferey pro eo 
John wyndowte hathe a cowe, to by solde xix 

Thomas Cage pro eo 
Thomas Doo hathe a cowe xix 

Robarte Beete pro eo 
Thomas weste hathe a cowe xix 

[Page 17] Anno Henrici octaui sexto-decimo 

Memorandum, that Master Bronde hathe 
viiis. id, towards to bey a cowe 

Item, ther ys a cowe with John Wyudowt 
to be solde by Master Bronde and Thomas 
Cage, the which cowe was solde by Master 
Bronde and Thomas Cage to Wylliam 
Sefferey for vii«., of the weche vii». the 
seyd Wylliam hat payd flor the stoke of 
the gelde to the Kyuge ii<., item at the 
day of owyr rekenyng v«. 

[a.d. 1525-26] Anno henrici octtxui xvii mo 

John Bailey hathe a cowe to pay at myssomer xix 

John Sefferey pro eo 
Robert ffullnr bathe a cowe xix 

Wylliam Sefferey pro eo 
Wylliam Sefferey hathe a cowe xix 

Thomas Cage pro eo 
John Roce hathe off Thorpe hathe ii nete iii ii 

Thomas Cage pro eo 
Thomas Doo hathe a cowe xix 

Robert Bete pro eo 



GILD OF ST. PKTER IN BARDWELL. 91 

8. d. 
Tbomiui liveate bathe i cow xix 

Thomas Cage pro eo 
Robert Beete hath a cowe xix 

Thomas Cage pro eo 
John Redar bathe [a] cowe xix 

Thomas Doo pro eof 

[Page 18] Anno predicto 

Memorandum, that ther bj iiii nete to by solde the 
wheche iiii nete be in the baudys of Robert Beete, John 
perkyn, John Wyndowt, and John Roce, the seyd net to 
by solde by Thomas Cage & Robert Beete, and they to 
bey wethyr nete with the seyde mony if they Can. 

Memorandum, that Thomas Cage and John Sefferey 
bathe received xxiiii«. and iiiicf. to bey with all a baner- 
clothe of St. Peter. 

Memorandum, that Thomas Cage and John Sefferey 
bathe received ffor the Banerclothe xv«. and viiid, 
Summa XL«.| 

Thomas Cage bathe Received iii«. vd. to bey with all a 
spete.g 

[Page 19] Anno domini millesimo quingeutisimo duodesimo. 

A.D. 1512] Electi sunt Johannes Sampson et VVylleloius Hooke ad 

tenendam geldam sancti petre anno sequente, et recepe- 
runt pro custodia luminis \is, viiic/. 

et Johannes Sefferay Alderroanus. 
Anno domini millesimo quingentesimo tercio decimo. 
[a.d. 1513] Electi sunt Radulphus Weste et Margareta betts ad 

Tenendam geldam sancti petre anno sequente, et recepe- 
runt pro Custodia luminis vi«. viiicf. 
£t Johannes Bete Aldermanus. 
Anno domini millesimo quingentesimo quarto decimo. 
[a.d. 1514] Electi sunt Agness By by et Alicia Doo, vidue, ad tenen- 

dam Gyldam sancti petri anno sequente, et receperunt 
pro custodia luminis vi«. \ind, 

Et Thomas Seffrey Aldermanus. 
Anno domini millesimo quingentesimo quinto decimo. 
[a.d. 1515] Electi sunt Robertus Baxter et Isabella uxor eius ad 

tenendam Gildam sancti petri anno sequente, et recepe- 
runt pro custodia luminis \\s. v'md. 
Johannes Brenwode Aldermanus. 

f These accounts are continued on page 35. 

t Equivalent to about £24 now. It seems to be a very large mxtik to spend upon a 
banner. 

I The lower h^f of page 18 is blank. It must have been a large [iron] spit to 
cost 3s. 5d. 



92 GILD OP ST. PBTBR IN BARDWBLL. 

Anno domini milleBimo quingenteairoo decimo sexto. 
[a.d. 1516] Electi sunt Robertus Seffrey et uxor eius ad tenendam 

Gyldam sancti petri anno sequente, et receperunt pro 
cuatodia lumiuis vis, viiid, 

Johannes Brenwcxie Aldermanus. 

Anno domini niillesimo quingentesimo decimo septimo. 
[a.d. 161 7] Electi sunt Thomas Mannjng et uxor eius ad tenendam 

Gildam sancti petri anno sequeute, et receperunt pro 
custodia luminis vi<. viii<^. valoris iii li[braruroj 
Johannes Seffrey Aldermanus. 

[Page 20] Anno donitni ifaillesimo quingentesimo desimo octavo. 
A.D. 1518] Electi suut Kicardus Hervy et uxor eius ad tenendam 

Gildam sancti petri anno sequente, et receperunt vit. Tiii<f. 
pro custodia luminis. 

Thomas Doo Aldte'manus 
Anno domini niillesimo quingentesimo desimo nono. 
[a.d. 1519] Electi sunt Thomas Doo et uxor eius ad tenendam 

Geldam sancti petri anno sequente, et receperunt 
vi<. vi'i'id. pro custodia luminis. 

Thomas Sefferey Aldermanus 
Anno dofiiiui millesimo quingentesimo visecimo. 
[a.d. 1520] Electi sunt Johannes Brendwode et uxor eius ad 

tenendam geldam sancti petry anno sequente, et recepe- 
runt vi«. viiid, pro custodia luminys. 
Johannes Sefferey Aldermanus. 
Anno domini millesimo quingentesimo visesimo prime. 
[a.d. 1521] Electi sunt liecardus Kyppyng vekeyr et Robertus 

Bete ad tenendam geldam sancti petri anno sequente, et 
receperunt vis, viiid, pro custodio luminis. 

Thomas Cage Aldermanus. 
Anno domini millesimo quingentesimo visesoimo secundo. 
[a.d. 1522] Electi sunt Isabella Cage et Isabella Sefferey ad 

tenendam geldam sancti petri anno sequente, et recepe- 
runt vis, viiid, pro custodio luminis. 

Thomas Cage Aldermanus 
Anno domini millesimo quingentesimo visecimo tercio 
[a.d. 1523] Electi sunt Johannes Sefferey et uxor eius ad tenendam 

geldam Sancti petri anno sequente, et receperunt vi«. viiid. 
pro custodio luminis. 

Wyllelmus Sefferey Aldermanus. 
Anno domini millesimo quingentesimo visecimo quarto. 
[a.d. 1524] Electi sunt Wyllelmus Selott et Thomas Selott ad 

tenendam geldam sancti petri anno sequente, et recepe- 
runt vi«. viiie/. pro custodio luminis. 
Robert Beete aldermanus. 



GILD OF ST. PETER IN BARDWELL. 93 

[Page 21] Anno domiui mdxx quinto. 
A.D. 1525] Elect i sunt Thomas Cage et uxor eius ad tenendam 

gildam sancti petry anno sequente, et receperunt 
yis, \ind. pro custodio luminis. 

Johannes Wallur aldermanus. 
Anno domini mdxx sexto. 
[a.d. 1526] Electi bunt Wyllimiis Spark et uxor eius ad tenendam 

gildam sancti petri anno sequente, et receperunt vi*. viiid. 
pro cnstodia luminis, et 

Thomas Cage Aldermanus. 
Anno domini mdxx septimo. 
[a.d. 1527] Electi sunt Wjllimus Goolde et Johannes Reder ad 

tenendam Gildam saiicti petry anno sequente, et recepe- 
runt viji, \n\d, pro custodia luminis, et 

Robert us Beete Aldermanus. 
Anno domini mdxx octauo. 
[a.d. 1528] Electi sunt Radulphus West et uxor Eius ad tenedam 

Gildam sancti petrj anno sequente, et receperunt vis, viiitf. 
pro custodia luminis, et 

Thomas Cage Aldermanus. 
Anno domini mdxxix. 
[a.d. 1529] Electi sunt Thomas doo et uxor eius ad tenendam 

Gyldam sancti petri anno sequente, et receperunt vi«. 
viiicf. pro custodia luminys. 

Aldjrmanus Johannes cage. 
Anno domini mdxix. 
[a.d. 1530] Electi sunt Robert us Beete et uxor eius ad tenendam 

Geldam sancti petri anno sequente, et receperunt vis, 
viiid. pro custodia luminjs, et 
Goodwiuys Ive Aldermanus. 

[Page 22] Anno domini hdxxxi. 

[a.d. 1531] Electi sunt Johannes Selott et uxor eius ad tenendam 

gildam sancti petri anno sequente, et receperunt vis. viiid, 

pro custodia luminis, et 

Johannes Cage Aldermanus. 

Anno domini millesimo quingentesimo xxxii. 
[a.d. 1532] Electi sunt Wyllimus Doo et uxor eius ad tenendam 

gildam sancti petri anno scqueute, et receperunt via. 

viild, pro Custoditi luminys, et 
Thomas Cage Aldermanus. 

Anno domiui millesimo quingentesinio xxxiii. 
[a.d. 1533] Electi sunt Wyllimus SSefferey et uxor eius ad tenendam 

gildam sancti petri anno sequente, et receperunt vis, viiid, 

pro Costodia luminis et 

Godwynus Ive Aldermanus. 

Anno domini millesimo quingeutesimo xxxiiii. 



S4 GILD OF ST. PETER IN BARDWELL. 

[a.d. 153-1] Electi Buut Johannes Cage et uxor eius, ad tenendam 

gildam saucti petri anno sequente, receperunt vit. viiicf. 
pro costodia luminis, et 

Robertas Cage Aldermauus. 
Anno domini millesimo quingeutesimo tresimo quatto 

[a.o. 1535] Electi sunt Gowinus Ive et uxor eius ad tenendaai 

Gjldam sancti petro anno sequente, et receperunt pro 
costodia luminis vi«. Tiii<f. et 

Robertas Bete Aldernianus. 
Anno domini millesimo quingentesimo xxxti. 

[a.d. 1536] Electi sunt Rhadulphns Brendwoode et uxor eius ad 

teneudam Gyldam saucti petri nuuo sequente, et recepe- 
runt viff. viiic/. pro custodia luminis, et 
Johannes CHge Aldernianus. 

Anno domini millesimo quingentesimo tricesimo septimo. 
{a.d. 1537] Electi sunt Johannes Weste et uxor eius ad tenendam 

Gjldam sancti petri anno sequente, et receperunt 
vi^. vu'id. pro custodia luminis sancti petri, et 
Robertus Cage Aldyrmanus. 

Anno domini millesimo quingentesimo tricesimo octauo. 
[a.d. 1538] Electi sunt Johannes Wendout et uxor eius ad 

tenendam gyldam sancti petri anno sequente, et receperunt 
vis. et octo denarios pro custodia luminis sancti petri, et 
Willelmus Rysynge Alderman us. 

[Page 23] Anno domini millesimo quingentesimo tricesimo nono. 
A.D. 1539] Electi sunt Robertus Cage et uxor eius ad tenendam 

gyldam sancti petri anno sequente, et receperunt vi«. viiirf. 
pro custodia luminis secundum consuetudinem et morem 
dicte gilde. 

Johannes Cage Aldermauus. 

Anno domini millesimo quingentesimo q[a]adragesimo. 
[a.d. 1540] Electi sunt Thomas Syllott et uxor eius ad Tenendam 

gyldnm sancti petri anno sequente, et receperunt vi«. viiirf. 
to kepe the lite of seynet peter be fore the sacrament, 
and 

Thomas Reve Alderman. 

[a.d. 1541] Thomas Doo [et uxor eius] electi sunt ad custodiendam 

Gyldam Sancti petri de berdwell in anno domini millesimo 
quingentesimo quadragesimo primo ad custodiendam 
predicte Gyldam in nnno sequente, et receperunt vis, viiirf. 
to fynde the lyte of Seynt peter before the sacrament, 
and 

Robert Bete Aldyrman. 



GILD OP ST. PETER IN BARDWELL. 95 

[a.d. 1542] Robertas bete [et uxor eius] electi sunt ad custodiendam 

Gjldam Sancti petri de Bardwell in anno domini milllesimo 
quingentesirao secundo, et receperunt vi<. yiiid, and 
Johannes Turner Aldermanus. 

(Page 241 Johannes Turner et uxor eius Electi sunt ad Custodien- 

A.D. 1543] dam Gyldam Sancti [Petri] de Bardwell in anno domini 
millesimo quingentesimo quadragesimo Tercio, et recepe- 
runt yis. vind.f et 

Robertus Bete Aldyrmanus. 

[a.d. 1545] Wjleimus Doo et uxor eius sunt electi ad custodiendam 

gildam sancti petii de Bardwell anno domini millesimo 
quingentesimo quadragesimo quinto, et 
Johannes Cage Aldyrmanus. 

[a.d. 1547] Wyllelmus Doo et uxor eius sunt electi ad custodiendam 

gildam sancti petri de Bardwell anno primo edwardi regis 
anno domini r54vii^ et 

Thomas Doo Aldermnn f 

[Page 34]t 

Anno Henrici octaui xxvii®. 

[a.d, 1535-6] Memorandum, ther ys delyuered to John Wyndowte by 
the hands of John Sefferey iiii wetherys shepe of a wether. 
Item, V Ewys with a lambe shepe ; the syed John Wyn- 
dowte xall kepe the v lyts by fFore oure lady of pety, 
that ys to say to be lyte at Euery prynsi[p]all feste, and 
also to by lyte euery ftnt[e]nne of owre lady, and the 
seyd lyte to be kept with taporys, and he hathe received 
in vax in taporys. 

And the seyd John [Wyndowte] xall delyuer the seyd 
shepe, or ellys the price, at what tyme that he xall 
delyuer them ageyne ; more ouer yt ys agred by the 
hole [con]8ente of the towne that yf the Bey[d] John 
Wyndowte do not kepe the lyte as aboue seyd, that than 
yt ys agered that the habetaiis of the seyd towne xall 
take them fro the sey[d] John [Windowte], or ellys the 
price of the shepe, also the price of the wax, and Thomas 
Doo ys suyrte for to delyuer the 8ey[d] shepe and wax 
for the seyd John Wyndowte. 

[Page 35] Anno Henrici octaui xviii®.§ 

A.D. 1526-7] Wylliam Sefferey hathe a cowe to pay s. d. 
at mysomer Bcfor mycolmesse xix 

Thomas Cage pro eo 

t Thii WM the last election of guardians of the light of St. Peter. In this year 
the ^d wan dimolved and pillaged. 

Z Pages 25-88 are or were blank. Page 25 contains town estate accounts for 1559, 
and pages 26-83 contain town estate accounts for 1710-1713. 

§ These accounts are continued from page 17. 



8. 


d. 


m 


ii 




zix 




xix 




xiz 




xix 




xix 



[ 



96 GILD OF ST. PETER IN BARDWELL. 



John Roce hathe ii nete 

Thomas Cage pro eo 
Thomas Wesste [hathe] a cowe 

Thomas Cage pro eo 
Robert Beete hathe a cowe 

Thomas Cage pro eo 
John Reder hathe a cowe 

Thomas Doo pro eo 
Thomas Doo hathe a cowe 

Robert Beete pro eo 
Thomas goodaj hathe a cowe 

Wylliam Sefferey pro eo, the seyd cowe 
to by hadd a Robert ffullar at Nort[o]Q 

John Bailey hathe a cowe he to paye 
att micolmesse to Robert Beete vi viii 

John Seflferey pro eo 

tPage 36] Anno Heurici octaui xix^. 
A.D. 1527*28] Wylliam Sefferey hath a Cowe to pay at 
myssomer beffor mekelmesse xixd, for a 
ffarow Cow xv 

Thomas Cage pro eo 
Thomas west hathe a cowe xix 

Thomas Cage pro eo 
John Reder hathe a cowe xix 

Thomas Doo pro eo 
Thomas Doo hat ii nete to be received of 
John Roce of thorpe iii ii 

Wylliam SSefferey pro eo 
Robert Beete and Robert ffullar hat ii nete 
to by solde 

Thomas Cage hath received iii«. Yd. to 
bey with a spete 

Memorandum, that we have Bowt a Baner 
clothe that the weche Jamys Buschy hathe 
made — iiii marke xiid,\ 

Memorandum, ther Remaynyth in the 
hands of John Sefferey ii iiii 

[Page 37] Anno Henrici [octaui] xx. 

Thomas West hathe ii nete to pay at 
myssomer be for mekylmesse iii«. iid, if 
ony be fferrow xv 

Thomas Cage pro eo 

t i.e. 9 £2 148. 4d., equivalent to about £26 now. It was a very oo«tly and must 
have been a very handsome banner. 



GILD OF ST. PETER IN BARD WELL. 97 

Memorandum, there remaynyth in the 8. d. 

bauds of Thomas Do ii nete to by soldo 

Item, there Kemaynyth in the baunds 
of Wylliam Sefferey i cowe to be soldo. 

Thomas C^e bathe iiis. vd, to bey with 
all a spete 

John Sefferey bathe ii». iiiirf. lykwyse. 
Thomas Do bathe a cow to pay as aforseyd zix 

Thomas Cage [pro eo] 

John Selot bathe a cowe to by hadd at John 

Sefferey 8, to pay lykwyse xix 

John Wyndowt pro eo. 

Memorandum, there remaynyth in the 
bandys of Robert Bete xiiia. iiiicf. to bey 
withall nete 

Item in the hands of Wylliam Sefferey yi x 

[Page 38] Anno domini Henrici octaui vicesimo primo. 
[a.d. 1529-30J Thomas west hethe ii net to pay at 

mydsomer before micbillmess iii ii 

If any be ferowe x\d, 

Thomas Cage pro eo 
Thomas Doo bath a Cowe paynge for the 
terme Hforseyd xix 

Thomas Cage pro eo 
John Syllot bathe a Cowe paying lyke maner xix 

John Wendowtt pro eo 
John Waller hath ii nete paying at the 
terme aforeseyd iii ii 

John Cage pro eo 
Memorandum, that Robert Burdeuze bathe 
receyvyd for to make a spete for the tone 
in parti of [myment for the seyd payment 
iii«. iiiic/., and he to have for every 
li[bra] iid. 

Memorandum, ther remanyth in the 
hands of Robert bete x 

Also ther remanys in the hands of 
William Sefferey vi x 

John Sefferey hathe in hand ii iiii 

[Page 39] Anno Henrici octaui xxii'^^ 
A.D. 1530-31] Issbell Sefferey, vedow, hathe a cowe to 

pay at myssomer beffor mycbyllmas xix 

Robert beete pro eo 
Thomas west hathe a cowe to pay lyke wyse xix 

Thomas Cage pro eo 



98 QILD OF ST. PETER IN BARDWELL. 

8. <L 
John Selott hathe a cowe paying Ijkewjse xix 

Robert Biirdus pro co 
Thomaa Doo hath a oowe paying lykewjse xix 

Thomas Cage pro eo 
John Wallur hathe ii nete, and he to pay 
lyke maner iii ii 

John Cage pro eo 
Item, ther remajnjth in the handjs of 
Robert Beete and Goodwyne Ive xii ix 

Item, v$ whereof payd ffor iiii^ tyle and 
vi roffe tyls with carrage ii ii 

Item, ffor haffe a chaldyr lyme with the 
Garage ii 

Item, ffor iii day warke of the mason 
with hys seruer and ffor mete and dryuke ii vi 

ffor a key and a gemewe iii 

Item, ffor a key to be the rostyug hows ii 

Item, ffor meudyng of iii pauelys with 
the stuffe iii 

Item, ffor newe spete, the weyte thereoff 
iii Ii [brae] and price x 

[Page 40J Anno Henrici octaui xxxiii™<> 

[▲.D. 1531-2] Isbell Sefferey hathe a cow, paying at 

myssommer by ffor mkylmesse xix 

Roberte Beete pro eo. 
John Wallur hathe a cowe, to pay lyke wyce xix 

Johannes Cage pro eo. 
John Selott hathe a cowe, to pay lyke wyse xix 

Johannes Sefferey pro eo 
William Beete hathe a cowe, and he to paye [xix] 

[ * * pro eo]. 

John Wyndowt hathe a cowe, and he to 
pay lyke wyse xix 

Robertus Beete pro eo. 

Memorandum, that there ys to be solde 
iii nete, or ellys to lete, by the handys off 
Robert beete and goodwyne Ive. 

Also ther ys bawt a cowe of John Selott ffor xi 
and ther ys payd ther off iiii«. 

Item, ther Remaynyth in the handys of 
William Seffery vi x 

Item, there remaynyth in the hands off 
goodwyne Ive vii 



GILD OF ST. PKTKR IN BARDWELL. 99 

[Page 41] Anno Henrici octnui xxiiii^ 

A.D. 1532-3] John Wallur hnth a cowe to pay at 8. d. 

myssommer by ffore niekolmesse xix 

John Cage pro eo. 
John Selot hathe a cowe to pay lyk wyse xix 

John Wyndowte pro eo. 
Wylliam Beete hathe a cowe to pay lyke 
wyce xix 

Thomas Doo pro eo. 
Isbelle Seffere}', wedowe, hathe a cowe 
to pay ]yke wyce xix 

Goodwyne Ive pro eo. 
Thomas Stanfore hathe a cowe to pay 
lyke wyce xix 

Hoberte Bete pro eo. 
Ny colas Erwyne hnth a cowe, to pay lyke wyce xix 

Thoiras Cage pro eo 
Item there Remaynyth in the handj's of 
Wylliam Sefferey vi x 

[tern, deliuered to goodwyne Ive viiis. 
Tiiicf. to doo Reparacion on the gelde hall 
with the mony, or ellys to delyuer the seyd 
mony ageyne. The sed godwyne hathe 
done more in Reparacion than the [money] 
he hathe Received ii«. iiii(/., the weche he 
ys payd at the Reknyng. 

fPage 42] Anno Henrici octaui xxvq. 

A.D. 1533-4] John Walhir hathe a Cowe, to pay at 

myssomer by ffor mycolmesse xix 

John Cage pro eo. 
If the Cowe go a ifarowe than to pay xwd, 
Wylliam Beete hathe a Cowe, to paye lyke wyse xix 

Thomas Doo pro eo. Pro ii vaccis soluit iii ii 

Memorandnm, that Thomas Doo and 
Thomas Rene hathe Received ix«. xd , and 
also they xall Receive a cowe of Wylliam 
Bete to sell, and they to bey ii nete to the 
gelde. 

Anno domini moxxxiv. 
lohannes Syllott hane recenyd off the 
gylde of siiynt petyr i cowe, to pay at 
mydsomyr foloyng xix 

Thomas Reve pro eo. 
Thomas Doo tenet vacam, et soluet pari forma [xix] 

Johannes Cage pro eo. 



100 GILD OF ST. PETER IN BARDWKLL. 

8. d. 
Wjllelmus Bete tenet unam vaccam, et soluet xix 

Thomas Doo pro eo. 
Robertus Bniy bathe i cowe in Ijke maner xul 

Johannes Cage pro eo. 
MeroorandutD, that ther ys a cowe to be 
solde by John Cage and Goodwyn Ive of 
the gylde ef sant petjr 

Willelnms Seffrey hath a cowe, he to pay 
at mydsomyr foloyng xix 

Hobartus bete pro eo 

[Page 43] Anno Henrici octaui xxxv. 

A.D. 1535] Johannes Baxter f boldest i cowe, to paye xix 

Wyllelmus SefFrey pro eo 
Thomas Doo holds i cowe, to paye xix 

Johannes Cage proeo 
Wyllelmus Bete holds i cowe, to paye xix 

Thomas Doo pro eo 
Robertus Bray holds i cowe xix 

Johannes Cage pro eo 
Johannes Cage holds i cowe xix 

Robertus Cage pro eo 
Gowinus Ive i*ecepit ex gilda sancti petri xx^ 

Anno domini, md xxxvi. 
[a.d. 1536] remanet ex in cremento Gylda sancti pretri ix vii^ 
Nomina tenentium catella Gylde sancti 
petri * ix viij 

Robertus Bete tenet unam vaccam, et 
redet pro anno xxix 

Willelmus Seffereye pro eo'J 

[Page 44] Anno domiui m.d. trysenymo septimo 
A.D. 1537] Item John Cage lint he a cowe of the 

gylde of sent petyr, he to pay xix 

Robertus Cage pro eo 
Item, tomas Doo bathe a Cowe, he to pay xix 

John Cage pro eo 
Item, John baxter bathe a cowe, he to pay xix 

Wylliam SafFerey pro eo 
Wylliam Bete, hathe a Cowe, he to pay xix 

tomas Doo pro eo 
Item, tomas Doo hathe solde a Cowe to tbe 
brothyrs of the gylde to be delyuered 
mykylmas nexte coniyng to John baxter 

t These words have been erased, and tbe words ** Robert Beete holds " have been 
written over them. 
It The accounts for this year are incomplete, and are incorrectly written. 



GILD OF ST. PKTKR IN BARDWELL. 101 

8. d. 
' Item, Robert beetc hathe u Co we, he to pay xviiii 

Item, Robert Bniye liath a Cowe, hee to 
pay by jer xix 

and John Cage suirte 
Item, Rol)ert Bally hathe a Cowe, he to pay 
for yt by yere xix 

and Robert Cage suirty for hym 
Item, John Wendout hathe recey vyd of the 
Gylde paying the uex yer xiiiic/. 

[I'age 45j In anno doiuini millesimo quingentesimo 

[▲.D. 1539] . tresimo nouo f 

Johannes Cage habet vnam vaccam, aolvendo 

pro eadem vacca xix 

et Robertus Cage Siiurte 
Item, Thomas Doo hath one Cowe, paynge xix 

et Johannes Cage Suurte 
Item, Wylliam beett hathe oone Cowe, 
paynge xix 

Thomas Doo pro eo 
Robert Bally hathe one Cowe, paynge xix 

et Johannes Cage pro eo 
Robert Bray hathe oone Cowe, paynge xix 

Suurte John Cage 
Item, beete Receveyed one Cowe, owynge to 
the aforsed goowyne iue for seyd Cowe ii i 

Item the brethur and susteme hathe 
bowte of Goodwyu yue one Cowe, the price xi 

of the weche x«. ys owynge the aforseyd 
Goodwyne yue 

The weche Cowe is letyn to John Sylott 
paynge for the ferme xix 

and Thomas Syllot suurte. 

Memorandum, Remaynyth in the hands 
of goodwyn ive & Thomas Selot viii<. \id. 
for to bey a cow wyth. 

Item Wylliam Doo hath one cowe, paynge xix 

goodwyne yue pro eo. 

[Page 46] Anno domini millesimo quingesimo quadragesimo. 
A.D. 1540] Thomas Warner hathe the Cowe that 

William bete holds, payng xix 

Goodwyne Ive for hym. 

t " Oetttoo ** was written 6nt, but was lined through. The account for 1688 it 
wanting. 



102 GILD OF ST. PKTER IN BARDWELL. 

Stefjn Waller hitihe a Cowe weche 8. d. 

Robert brny hath, paynge xix 
£t Thomas Syllot siiirte for faym. 

MemoranduQi, Wylliam Doo payd for a 

farowe Cowe zii 

Item, Thomas Warner for a farowe Cowe zii 

Anno Heurici octauy xzxiii. 
[a.d. 1540-41] John Cage athe a Cowe, he payng for her xix 

Robert Cage [surety]. 
Stevyn Doo hathe a Cowe, he to pay xix 

John Cage 8[urety]. 
John Selot athe a Cowe, he to paey xix 

Thomas Selot s[urety]. 
William Doo hathe a Cowe, he [to pay] [^^] 

John Baxter hathe a Cowe, he to paye xix 

Wyllam Doo sfurety]. 
Thomas Warner hathe a Cowe, he to paye xix 

goodwyne Ive 8[urety]. 
Stevyn Waller hathe a Cowe, he to paye xix 

goodwyne Ive 8[urety]. 
John hylle hathe a Cowe, he to paye xix 

John Cage 8[urety]. 

EPage 47] Thomas Doo et Robertas pyke electi sunt 

A. D. 1541] ad custodiendam Gyldam sancti petri de 
Bardwell in anno domiui millesimo quin- 
geutesimo quadragesimo primo. 
In anno supradicto. 
Bowte of Goodwyne Ive a Cowe the price 
of yt xii 

The weche kowe ys letyn to Stefyn 
Waller for six 

Goodwyne Yue suurte. 
Item, ther remiiynyth in the hands of 
John Cage of the stocke of the Gylde. 

Willinm Doo hathe a Cowe, he to paye xix 

Rol)ert Beete 8[urety]. 

Anno domini millesimo quingentesimo quadragesimo 
Secundo. 
[a.d. 1542] John Cage hath a Cowe, paying the ferme xix 

Suurte Robert Cage. 
Stefyn Doo hathe a Cowe, the price xix 

John Cage suurte. 
John Selot hath a Cowe, the pryce xix 

Suurte Thomas Selott 



GILD OF ST. PETER IN BARD WELL. 103 

[P^ 48] Addo supradicto. 8. d. 

Thomas Warner hath a Cowe, paynge zix 

Suurte Goodwyue lue. 
John hjll hathe a Cowe, the price xiz 

John Cage suurte. 
William Doo hathe a Cowe, paynge xiz 

Suurte Robert Bete 
Robert Bally hath a Cowe, paynge ziz 

Robert Cage suurte 
John Wendout hath a Cowe, paynge ziz 

Steuyn Waller suurte 
[Page 49] Item, I have receyd of the Brethren and 

Sosturs of the Gylde of Seynt petur z«. vid. 
of paty of pamemet of ziis., the weche 
cowe the brethren to take yer Choyse in 
my yerde at the feest of Senct Mychaell 
nezt insuynge. 

by me John Wendout. 

In anno domini millesimo quingentesimo 
quadragesimo Tercio. 
[a.d. 1543] Stefyn Doo debet pro uno vacco ziz 

Suurte William Doo. 
Item, Stefyn Wallar pro uno vacco ziz 

Suurte Goodwyne lue. 
Item, John Selot debet pro uno vacco ziz 

Suurte Thomas Selot 
Item, William Doo pro uno vacco (jLiid, farowe) ziz 

Suurte Robert Bete. 
Item, John Wendout pro uno vacco ziz 

Suurte Stefyn Waller. 
Item, received of John Hylle ziz 

Item, there remanyth in the hands of 

Roberto Bete viii 

Item, rentaynyth in the handftof robert bete vi y 

EPage 50] Item, Anno Domini millesimo quingentesimo 
A.D. 1545] quadragesimo quinto. 

Stevyn Doo soluit pro uno vacco ziz 

Suirte William Doo. 
Item, Steven Wallorr pro uno vacco zix 

Snirte goodwyne Ive. 
Item, Johannes Selott pro uno vacco ziz 

Suirte Thomas Selott. 
Item, Wylliam Doo pro uno vacco ziz 

Suyrte Robert bete. 



104 GILD OF ST. PETER IN BARDWELL. 

8. d. 

Item, John Wyndout pro uno vacco xiz 

Suirte stevvn wallor. 
Item, Isbell Sefferej', wydowe, pro vacco uno xix 

Suirte Roliert bete. 
Item, Robert Cage pro uno vacco xix 

Suirte Johannes Oage. 
Item, Johannes Cage pro uno vacco xix 

Suirte Robert Cage. 

Summa totalis pro septem vaccis [xii viii] 

lent vnto the towne xxi 

Memorandum, so Remayne of the stocke 
of the gyld ouer and besyde the one and 
tewnty shelyng xi i 



1 Page 51] 
>.D. 1546] 


Item, Anno Domini milesimo quingentesimo 






quadragesimo sexto. Anno henrici regis 








octaui xxxviii. 








Stevyn Doo for one cowe 




xix 




Suerte William Doo. 








Stevyn Wallor for one cowe 




xix 




goodwyn Ive [suerte]. 








William Doo for one cowe 




xix 




Suerte Robert Bete. 








John wyndowt the elder for one cowe 




xix 




Isbell Seffeyrey, wydowe, for one cowe 




xix 




Robert Cage for too nett 


iii 


ii 




Receyvid for the nett 


xi 


i 




Summa totalis vaccarum 4°' 






[a.d. 1547] 


Item Anno Domini 154vii. Anno primo 
Edwardi sixti nostri rengni regis 








Willliam doo 


xiii 


iiii 




payinge yerely to the towne 




xvi 




his suerty Robert beete 








Stevyn waller 


xiii 


iiii 




p«y"ge yerely to the tonne 




xvi 




Stevyn Doo 


xiii 


iiii 




paying yerely to the tonne 




xvi 




hys suerty william doo 








John Wyndowt the elder 


xiii 


iiii 




paying yerely to the towne 




xvi 




hys suerty Stevyn waller 








Thomas Doo 


xiii 


iiii 




painge yerely to the tonne 




xvi 



GILD OF ST. PETER IN BARDWKLL. 



105 



8. 


d. 


vi 




:xvi 


viii 


ii 


xiii 


xl 




iiii 




xiii 


iiii 




xvi 



xvu 



XI 



Wjlliam Doo haue recjvid vppon all sowlls 
Day 

his aiirt}' Wvllinm Doo 
(Page 52] Item, in the hands of John Rygen 
paying to the towue 
hys surtys goodwyn Ive 
Item, in the hands of John Kygon 
paying to the towne 
hys surty goowyu eue 
Item Crystion VVyndwod 
paying yerely to the towne 
her suerte steuen waller t 

I Page 65] Memorandum, that John Bete, John 

A.D. 15 13-14] Bailey, and Robart Baxtar, wax men of the 
sepulker lyte hat made a Cownte on 
sainte Petyrs day the a postyll for the vth 
yere of King Herry the viii, &, than remay- 
nyng in their hands 

Memorandum, that John Bete [and] John 
Bailey are chosyn to be sepulker men ifor 
the yere that ys ffor to Come ; the seyde 
John John and Robart hathe made ther 
a counte, and they have delyuered to 
Robart Baxter and Wylliam goolde 

Item, they haue Ress[eived] in wax in 
Jje weyke ^* It viii J 
(a.d. 1516] Computus Willelmi Goolde et Roberti 

Baxter Gardianorum Ecclesie sancti petri 
de Bard well pro ii annis finitis ad festum 
Corpus christi. Anno Domini mcccccxvi, et 
in anno regni regis henrici octaui Octauo 

Idem receperunt in arreragio Recepcionum 
ad ultimum Compotum, ut patet ut supra 

£t ulterius Receperunt in le weyke et 
cere Ixxxviii libras 

Sum ma pecuniarnm receptarum 

Item receperunt pro predictis ii annis ad 
usnm Ecclesie receperunt xlvi«. 

Sum ma totalis recepte cum arreragio \xs. 
xviiic/., vude sulutum in fforencicisg solutio- 
nibus ciis. pruHcuo dicte Kccleuie xlviii«. o^d, 

Et sic del)eut de claro in pecuniis 
Et in Cere et lez weyke 

t Pages 53—64 are blank. The feoffees of the town Estate have utilized pp. 64—63 
ior their accounts for the years 1714—1718. 

Xi'^*iS8 pounds of wax and wick. § For Forinsecis. 



XV 



VI 



XV 



VI 



xin 



vi 



106 GILD OF ST. PETER IN BARDWELL. 

[Page 66] Memorandum, that Joha Sefferej and a. d. 

A.D. 1525*6] WjlliAm Golde, sepulkyr men, hntli made 
ther a counte on sunt markja duj for the 
xvii jere of kjng berry the viiith and soo 
ther remayueth in ther handa xxxiii 

[Page 115] These Be the Brothers & Systers of the gylde of sent petyr 
Rychnrdus Kyppyng, vykeyr, Thomas Doo et uxor 
eius ; Rol^ert Bete et uxor ; John tSelot et uxor ; 
Wylliam Doo et uxor; John Wyndowt et uxor; 
Robert Pyke ; John Cage et uxor ; Thomas Reve et 
uxor; Goodwyn Ive et uxor ; stevyn Brandode et uxor ; 
John Weste et uxor; John Hylle et uxor; William 
rysyng; John Baxster et uxor; Robert Cage et uxor; 
Thomas selot et uxor; stevyu wallar et uxor; Thomas 
Warner; stevyn Doo; wylliam harryson; Isbelle sefferey ; 
John Reve ; Margery Buchur ; Marget harvy ; Ralfe 
Talyr et uxor ; John Cooke et uxor ; Auea Doo ; Robert 
bray ; Wylliam Wyifyn ; Robert bawley ; Robert Heme ; 
Isbell harvy ; John perkyn ; Aues Thelle ; Isbelle Weste ; 
John goddarde; John buchur; stevyn ffullar; Jone 
Combar; Thomas Ive ; Jone Wage of barnynham ; Aues 
rastalte of thys same towne ; marram barham of the same 

[Page 116] towne; John Tumour et uxor eius; Robert Joyns et 
uxor eius ; william weller et uxor eius ; John Barnrd et 
uxor eius ; John Jenery et uxor eius f 

[Page 182] Gardiani Suncti sepulcri. 

[a.d. 1532-3] Robevtus Burdewes et Thomas Seelot Elegemnt 
Custodes Sancti sepulcri luminis octauo die Maii Anno 
regui regis Henrici viiiV^ xxiii, ad quem diem predicti 
Gardiani Receperunt de vltimis Gardianis, videlicet, 
Johannis Seffrey et dicti Roberti Burdewes ixx. xid. 
Item, Receperunt de Nouis Gardianis in eadem diem ffy ve- 
score et xiiii^ cerani cum lez weyke. 

[a.d. 1533-4] Memorandum, that tLe..sepulcur men Thomas Syllet, 
Robert Burdws hathe made theyr cownte on the sonday 
aftyr newe yere in the :^xv*^ yere of Kynge herry the 
viii**>, all expencis a lowyd remaynyth in there handys^ 
xiii«. iui^d. 

[a.d. 1534-5] Memorandum, that the sepulkyr men Tomas Sylbtt,. 
Robert Burdws hathe made there a Counte one the 
Sunday after Twellthe,J in the xxvi yere of Kynge harry 
the viii**>, and all expenses alowyd and so remaynythe 
stylle in there handys xiiiia. y'ld, 

t The rest of p. 116 and pages 117, 118 are blank. 
X Abbreviated probably for Twelfth-night, Jan. 6. 



GILD OF ST. PETER IN BARDWfiLL. l07 

[a.d. 1535-6] Memomudum, that the sepulkyr men Tomas SyHott 
aud Kobert beete bathe made there a Cownte one the ▼ 
day of niarche in xxvii yere of Kynge harry the viii, alle 
exspensus alowyde, and so renmynythe still in there 
haudys of the tuiyde Thomas Syllott and Robert beete 
viiif. vd. 

[Page 183] Memorandum, that the sepulkyr men, Tomas Selott 

[a.d. 1536-7] and Robert Beete, hathe made there acounte one the 
¥!!*• day ot January in the xxviii** yere of Kyng harry 
the viii^, halle exspensus alowyde, and so remaynyth 
stylle in there haudys of the seyd tomas selott and 
Robert beete vU, ix^d, 

[a.d. 1537-8] Memorandum, Receyved by the hands of Robert Bete 
and Thomas Syllot, sepulcur men, iu the xxix yer of the 
reg[u]e of kynge Henry the t 

[a.d. 1536-7] Johannes Cage et VVillehuus Doo I Elegerunt Custodes 
saiicti sepulcri I u minis decimo die mensis marcii in anno 
regni regis henrici octaui vicesimo octauo, ad quern diem 
predicti Gardiani Receperunt de vltimis Gardianis, 
videlicet, Roberto Bete et Thoma Syllot viii«. et vd. 
Item Receperunt predicti none Gardiani in eadem die. 

Item received of wax at that tyme in the wyke iiii 
skore pounds and xi 

[a.d. 1538-9] Anno regis henrycy octaui triceuimo, vicesimo die 
mensis februarii, iohannes Cage et willelmus Beet, 
luminis sepulcri Gardiani, fecerunt Compotum die et 
mense predicto, et renianet in manibus suis xv^cf 

[a.d. 1538-9] Memorandum, that in the yere of our lord god, a[nno] 
millesinio cccccxxxviii in the xxx** yere off the regfnle 
of our most ^>uf!ren lord kynge henry the viii^, and m 
the XX** day of ffebruarii, Wee John Cage and William 
Doo, Wardens of the sepulcur lyte, made ther a cownte 
in the day and yere al>ove wretyn, and all thyngs 
cowntyd and alowyd ther remaynyth in the hands of the 
a forseyd John and William xv|d 

[a.d. 1543-4] Memorandum, that the seconde day of marche in the 
XXXV* yere of the reign of our soueraign lord Kynge 
henry the viii*^ Jhon Cage, and William Doo, wardens of 
the sepulchre light of sayncte peters in Bardewell, made 
ther accompt for fowr yere laste paste before the date 
hereof, and all receyts and deductions accompted and 
allowed, the same wardens were deotures§ vnto the 
churche ii«. xd,, the wiche sum the[y] paid incontynently 
after the accompt made. 

tThii entry ends here abmptly. 
t Written over " Roberiue Bete et ThomM Syllot " •truck out. § uc, debton. 



108 GILD OP ST. PKTKR IN BARDWKLL. 

[Page 184] Newe wanicns elected for the nexte jeare folowjnge, 

William SefFeruy and J lion VVeste. 

Imprimis, delyiiered in to tber bauds of monj reman- 
jnge of the luste accompt \is. j.d. 

[a.d. 1544 5] Memorandum, that the septilcre men Wjlljam Sefieray, 
John West, bathe made these account one the zxiil^^ daye 
of febriiary in the six an thyrty yere of Kynge henry 
the viii^, hall expenses alowyd, and so Hemaynetb stylL 
in the bands of them xviii(/. 

[a.d. 1545-6] Memorandum, that the sepulcre men William Sefferey 
and John West bathe made their acounte one the last 
day of february, in the seuen an thyrty yeare of Kynge 
Hen rye the eygth, delyuered into the bands of Robert 
bete and guodwyn Iiie, the churche wardens and sepulcre 
meu newly chosen for the yere folowyng, and so delyuered 
into tber bauds of mony, xviiic/.f 

[Page 194] This is the stoke of the pouorte I letten out by the 

bands off Uol)erte Kobert bette, Robert cage, 6ood[win] 
eue, the increase tbereoff to be taken at the hands off 
them, and delyuered to the pouertej 
Item, in primis to Thomas Warner ffor s. d. 



vni 



a cowe 


XX 


bis suerte Robert Ive 




payd by Thomas Warner 


vi 


Item, Thomas Reue ffor a cow 


XX 


Robert cage suerte 




paid by John reue 


V 


Item, Thomas cotton ffor a cow 


XX 


Robert cage suerte 




payd by Thomas cotton 


vi 


Item, John Roger ffor a cowe 


XX 


Good wen Ive suerte 




payde by Rychard Lee 


vi 


Item, John barard ffor a cow 


XX 


Steven waller surete 




Item, steuen do [for a cow] 


XX 


iii«. for iii kyne Robert bette surte 




Item, steuen waller ffor a cow 


XX 


John barard surete 




payde liy Stephen waller 


xiii 


Item, Kobert cage ffor nette 


XXX 


Robert Jollv suerte 





vni 



vni 



t Here follow Churchwardeim (called " churche syryffe^s ") account« for the third 
and fifth year of Kdw. vi. Then pages 185—193 are occupied by Town estate 
accounts, 1783— 173ti. 

J For ' * property." This page is not dated. 



GILD OF ST. PKTER IN BARD WELL. 109 

Item, bought of Robart Joly, Wylliam Faxfez, Robart 
bete^ Robert cage, xliiii owenejs and iii grains of syluer 
plate at iiii«. xiid, the ownse, payd xli, xiz«. 
payd by Rychard le vU. 

Item, euery one of thes that haue nette shall pay 
euery quarter for a iiii, and yif so be that any off the 
nette be request of luiy off the affore namyd having on 
quarter warning shalle pay ffor euery cow xx«. 
payd by Rychard lee v«. 
payde by John Barrad vs. 

Rychard lee haue dyscharged the hoole lx)oke for the 
dett of John Rogir. 

Memorandum, that the wedowe Roger hnue payd to the 
towne the some of xviii«. viiic?., no part of the xxs. aboue 
wrytten.t 

[P<ige 195] Memorandum, that ther be iii keys longyng to the 

vestri. The grett key remaynyth in the hands of Thomas 
Cage, the ii^ key in the hands of Roberd Bete. The 
key of the seler in the hands of Thomas Syllott.^ 

[Page 196] Anno heurici octaui xx™° 

[a.d. 1528-9] Thomas Cage bathe geuene to the Gelde, a do«c» 
platerys, a dosen dyshys, a uosen Cuppys,^ a dosen 
sawserys, a dosen trencherys, a dosen sponys. 

Master vekery hathe geuene a dosen quart potts, and 
halffe a dosen p\nte potts. 

John Sefferey hathe geuene a dosen dyshys,|| a doseu 
trencherys, a dosen platerys. 

Thomas Doo hathe geuene a dosen sponys, a doseD 
trencherys, halff a dosen potts, halffe a dosen platerys 

Robert Bete hathe geuen a dosen platerys, halffe a 
dosen quart potts, halffe a dosen pynt potts 

Goodwyne Ive hathe geuen a dose^ platerys, a dosen 
dy:hy8 

Rechard Herruy hathe geuen a dosen sponys 

John C'age hathe geuene a dosen saltys, a dosen dyshys,. 
hnlffe a dossen platerys 

Robert BurdAvs hathe geuene halffe a doseu pynt potts, 
halffe a dosen dyshys 

t Here follow Churchwardens' Accounts for 1559 and 1560. 

t The rest of page 195 is blank. 

§ The woids ** a doeen Cuppys *' have been struck through and the words *' a 
doMen quart potts " have been written over them. 

(I The words ** a dosen dyshys " have been struck through, and the words " halfe 
a dosen potts," have been written over them. 



110 BARDWKLL CHURCHWARDENS' ACCOUNTS. 

Thomas Selott hathe geuene ii doeen Baltjs, a doaen 

trencher js, n doaen aponys, iii plfiterya 
Thoraaa Goodaj ii doaen 
William Beete halif a doaen p1atery[8] 
William Sparke halffe a doaen platerya 
John Reder halffo a do83n aaltys, halffe a dosea 

aawaerjs 

John Wallur halffe a doaen aalta 
John Bailey ii doaen 
Thomaa Weat i doaen 



CHURCHWARDENS' ACCOUNTS. 

f Page 67] Legacyea and bequests gyven to the Church of 

Bardewelle f 

In primis receptum per manus Johannis a. d. 

Cage et Godwini yve modo Gardianorum 
Ecclesie ibidem de dono Elizabethe Clement 
iam defun'jte xiii iiii 

Item, receptum per manus dictorum 
Johannis et Godwini ex dono christiane | 
Gyldyrslene xiii iiii 

Item, receptum per dictos Gardianos ex 
dono Alioie Doo ii 

Item, receptum per manus dictorum 
Gardianorum ex dono Elizabethe Cage xx 

Item, receptum per dictos Gardianos ex 
dono Willelmi Goolde iii iiii 

Memorandum, quod bona dicti Willelmi 
fecerunt fieri le Wetherecooke Ecclesise de 
Bard well 

t No date is given to this lint of legacies, etc., but we infer from the names of the 
•donors and of churchwardens that it may be dated about 1520. 



BARDWBLL churchwardens' ACCOUNTS 111 

Item, receptum per manus dictonim 
dardianoriim de d . . . . [?] existente in 
tempore Nativitatis domini per manus 
Johaniiis Walters et Thome Weste viii vi 

Item receptum de Johanne Seffrej pro le 8. d. 

Churchale v 

Summa totalis receptionum iii/». v«. id, 

Vnde solutum plurabre lU. ixc/. 

Item, solutum pro reparationibus dicte 
Ecclesie prout patet in billa quadam inde 
facta xiii«. ilud. 

£t sic recesserunt quieti 

EPage 1191 Memorandum, that John Bawley and John Bete, 

A.D. 15 16 J chyrcherjvjs hath made thar connte on the xii hevjnf in 
the yere of owyr lorde mccccuxvi, ther renmynjng in ther 
hands ixs. viie/. 

f A.D. 1519] Memorandum, that the ixth day of January in the xth 

yeare of the regne of Kynge hurry the viiith Thomas 
Cage and Thomas Doo, be thasent and Eleccon of the 
hoole Toivncschype he Chosyn Cherche wAi*dens ffor this 
yeere folowynge, and they haue receyvid of Robard 
Wrytht and John Bnuidwoode, wyche wass Chyrche 
wanlens, the yere last past in full paymente of ther 
acounte xiiii«. 

Item, the seyd Thomas [Cage] and Thomas [Doo] 
hathe receyvid a legacy of Thomes Bete by the hands of 
Issabel Beete, wedow, iii«. iiiici. 

Item, Keceyvyd of the legacy and bequest of John 
Beete be the hands of the same Issalicll beete vis, viiicf. 

Item, received of John Chele m. iiiic/. 

Item, gatheryd in the Chyrche xinid. 

Item, received ffor ii yere fferrae of Nicholas parker, 
Butcher, for the Church shoppe xvr/. 

Item, received of a Chyrche ale made the sonday be 
fore halowmesse day, and besyde the Costs of the same 
xxxif. i'lid. 

Summa totalis receptionum urn. vd. wherof is payd in 
dyuerse reparacions, as more plainly dothe apere by a 
bylle herto ffylyd xxxviii«., and so remayneth and is 
delynered in to the newe chyrcherefys, that is to say, 
Thomas Doo and Godwyn Ive, xxii«. vd, 

i Written " xpiane.*' t Is this TwelfthniKht ? 



112 BARDWELL CHURCHWARDENS' ACCO0NT8. 

[Page 1201 Memorandum, that Thomas Doo and goodwjne Ive, 

A.D. 1524] chjrrchewardens of Bard well, hath made ther Cownte be 
ffor the parysche on Saute Nicolfis Day in the xv jere of 
Kynge harry the viiith, and ther remaynyth in there 
handys vii«. yc/. 

Memorandum, the same day we haue elect and chosyn 
the said goodwyne Ive and John Wallur ffor thys yere 
ffolowynge, and they haue Received viix. yd. 

[a.d. 1531] Computus Johaunis Cage et Goodwini yve Gardianorum 

Ecclesie de Berdwell pro uno anno integro finiente in 
ffesto Epiphauio anno regni regis Henrici Octaui xxiiicio. 

Arreniginm de ultimo Computo Nill. Et inde dicta 
Ecclesia hubet in Surplusagio xiii</. prout patet in pede 
ultimi computi. 

lidem Gardiani receperunt hoc anno preterito de 
proficuo unius lez Church Ale hie tenti in die Dominica 
post ffestum Epiphanie Domini, in anno peterito v«. 

Item, receptum per dictos gardinuos de proiicuo altcrius 
lez Church Ale hio tenti die Jovis in ffesto Ascenscionis 
in anno predicto v*. vrf. 

lidem Gardiani receperunt ex dono Roberti Cooke, 
Clerici, Rectoris, Ecclesie de Langham, ut patet in billa 
quadam facta iii«. iiiie/. 

Summa totalis receptionum xiiii«. Wd, 

De quibus dicti Gardiani petunt allocari pro surplusAgio 
ultimi computi xiiis. 

[Page 121] lidem Gardiani petunt in allocacioue prQ diuersia 

solucionibus ct Expensis, prout patet in quadam billa inde 
facta hnic libro annexn, xiit. 

Summa totalis iillocacionum xiix. 
Et sic debent \\b. Wd. 

[a.d. 1533-41 Thomas lleue, Godewinus Ive, Gardiani, feoerunt 
co[ni]potum in anno regni regis henrici octaui vicesimo 
quinto, omnibus computatis et deductis, et remanet in 
manibus eorum m. ix^(/. 

[a.d. 1534-5] Thomas Reue et Kobertus Cage, Gardiani ecclesie, 
receperunt v». m\d. In anno regni regis hennci octaui 
vicesimo sexto. 

[a.d. 1536-7] Memorandum, that whe[n] Robert Cage and Thomas 
Reue, chercherevys of the cherche of Bard well have 
made there a counte one the sevent day of Januarye, in 
the xxviii yere of owyr Soveren lord kyng harry the 
viiith, and than remaynyt sstylle in there handys 
Summa xiiiis. y^d. 



BARDWELL CHURCHWARDENS' ACCOUNTS. 113 

[Page 122] The Cownte mad the xth day of Marche in the xzizth 

[A.D. 1537-8] jere of the regne of Ryng henry the viii by us Robert 

Cage and Thomas Reue Chyrche Wardens, and all thyngs 

Cowntyd ther remanyth in the hands of the aforeseyd 

Robert [Cage] and Thomas [Reue] ziis. viiicf. 

(a d. 1538-9) The Cownte mad the fyfbe day of janerie in the xzxth 
yere of the regfnje of Kynge Henry the yiiith by vs 
Robert Cage and Thomas Reve Chyrche Wardens of the 
Chyrche of Bardwell, all thyngs rekenyd and alowyd, 
ther reroaynyth in the hands of Thomas Syllot and John 
Wendout nowe beynge the Chyrche Wardens v«. 

[a.d. 1540-41] The Cownte jnade the vi day of Janerie in the xxxii 
yer of the reg[n]e of King henry the viiith by vs Thomas 
Syllot and John Wendout, Chyrche Wardens of the 
Town of Bardwell, all thyngs receuyd and alowyd ther 
remanyth in the hands of the aforseyd Chyrche wardens 
vi«. viid. 

[▲.D. 1541-2] The Cownte made the xxv day of Marche in the xxiii 
yere of the reg[n]e of Kynge henry the viii, by ts John 
Wendout and Thomas Selot Cherche Wardens, and ther 
remaynith stylle in ther hands xviic/. 

[a.d. ] 543-4] Memorandum, that John Windout and Thomas Sillott 
churchewardens made these accompts the xvith day of 
Marche in the xxxvth yere of the reign of our soueraryn 
lord King henry the viiith, for two yeres laste paste 
before the makynge of these presentee, that is to say, for 
the 33rd yere, and for the 34 yere of the reign of our 
said soueraign lord ; wheruppon, all receytes caste, and 
costs deductyd and allowyd, the same churchewardens 
had remaynynge in ther hands ^d. 

[Page 123] Memorandum, that the fyrst day of Novembur in the 

[A.D. 1544-5] xxxTi yere of the Reg[n]e of King henry the viii*** by us 
John Wendout and Thomas Selot Chyrche Wardens of 
the seyd Towne, all Thyngs Rekenyd to be Reckonyd, 
and all Thyngs alowyd to be alowyd, the Towne oweth 
unto the seyd Chyrche Wardens nd. 

[A.D. 1545-6] Memorandum, that the sixth day of Jaunwry in the 
zxxvii yere of the reg[n]e of King henry the viiith by 
Robert Cage Chyrche wardens of the seyd towne, all 
Things Rekenyd and owyng to hym vi«. iiiidf 

t The rest of p. 128 and p. 124 are taken up with later churchwardeni' aooounti ; 
p. 125 it blank ; pp. 126—132, contain Town Estate aocounta from 1705—1706. 



4 



114 BARDWELL TOWN ESTATE ACCOUNTS. 



TOWN ESTATE ACCOUNTS. 

[Page 80] Memorandum,! that the laudjs and s. d. 

parcellys of the town goods of Berdewell 
that be letyn to diuera men, fjrst to John 

Modo in tenura Johanuis Brandewoode 
pro X anuorumi futuris dimissum 

John Perkjn hathe the howse calljd 
Betons wyth the yerde [Keddet] per 
annum xii 

Robert pjke holds the howse called 
ynglondys. Reddet per annum v 

viii auuos 

RobertuB Sefferey tenet newgate yerde 

Reddet per annum iiii viii 

the said Robertt shall fense and sett 
with belett of heys owne coste, and charge 
all the said yerys. 

Anno Henrici octaui nono, 
[a.d. 1517-18] Thomas Cage tenet a close callyd the 
cowune raedowe, iacentes iuxta pratum 
Stephani Draper et dicti Thome Cage 
versus boriam et reddet per annum viii 

Johannes Sefferey tenet a pytyl called 
ynglonds pytyl, modo in tenura Roberti 
Wrytt, et reddet per annum xx 

Thomas Cage tenet ix acras terre callyd 
ynglonds, modo Johannis Brandwode pro x 
annorum§ ffuturorum§ at the myllehyll, 
and iii rodys be twyx the myllys, and 
dimidium acre terre jacens at the scharte- 
rows, et reddet per annum. v 

Item, Thomas Cage tenet v acras terre 
wyth the pytyl, jacet in bowbeke felde 
vocato fyschers reddet per annum iii 

t Pages 68-79 were left blank. They now contain the Town Estate Aooounta 
from 1727-1732. The Memoranda on pp. 80-S2, printed here, refer to various Town 
Estate properties from 1516-1620. 

tFor annis. 

§For annis futuris. Similar grammatical solecisms will be found ebewhere. 
They have not, ss a rule, bean called attention to in any way. 



BARDWELL TOWN ESTATE ACCOUNTS. 115 

[Page 81] Johannes Howchjn t4»net certeu londs a. d. 

bowbeke felde et redet per annum ix iiii 

Radulphus Weste tenet xviii acras terre, 
jacet at pjsdals et redet per annum . vii 

Robertus Baxter tenet a medpw vocatum 
doffhowse medow et redet per annum v 

Johannes Brenwode tenet a medow voca- 
tum at the Grovjsende in brodyng, et redet 
per annum iiii vi 

Et sic diniissum pro xcem annorum,t 
Robertus fuller tenet, iiii yere, Coppell 
close, redet per annun iii x 

Thomas Doo tenet vi ncms terre, v yere, 
jacet at the cleypytts, redet per annum iiii vi 

modo dimissas Johanni Brandewoode pro 
xcem annorum,t Johannes Perken iii yere 

The towne wardara tenent the Reede 
medow, et redent per annum ix 



t' 



Summa totalis iiufi ii vi 

Page 82] Anno Henrici octaui vndecimo. 

[a.d. 1519-20] John Chele tenet, vannos, the Coppellys 

Closse et Redit per annum { iii x 

[Page 133] Memorandum, that the counte made of the warders of 

A.D. 1511-12] the towne of berdewell the ii day of Novembyr in the 
yere of the re^ne of King herry the viii the iii yere Jhon 
Seffrey, Jhon Bete, Roberde Seffrey, Rob[ert] Baxter, and 
than oweyng to the toune of Berdewelle a for sayd all 
thyngs cownttyd. viii/t. xi». u^d. 
[a.d. 1512-13] Memorandu!!:, that the Cownt made of the warders 
of the Toune of Berdewell the ii day of Novembyr in the 
yere of the regne of King herry the viii, the iiii yere of 
the sayd warders, that ys to say, Jhon Seffrey, Jhon 
Bete, Roberde Seffrey, Thomas Seffrey, and thanne owying 
to the Towne of berdewell a for sayd, all thyngs 
cownttyd vi/t. xvii«. iuid. 
[a.d. 1513-14] Memorandum, that the Count made of the warders of 
the Toune of Berdwel the ii day of Novembyr in the v 
yeere of the regne of Kynge herry the viii of the seyd 
warders, that ys to say, Jhon Seffrey, Thom»is Seffrey, 
Roberd Seffrey, Jhon Bete and thenne owyng to the towne 
of berdewel, al thyngs Cownttyd and a lowyd vi/t ii<. xrf. 
f For annis. 

t The rert of p. 82 is blank. Pages 83—114 were left blaok. Pages 83-89 are 
uUed up with sammaries of the accounts of the Town Estate feoffees from 1551— 
i(l79. Pages 90 and 91 are blank but for one short entry of the year 1678. Pages 
93—110 contain Town Estate accounts 1719—1726. Pages 111—114 contain accounts 
«l the yean 1658, 1564, 15659, 1726. 



116 BARDWELL TOWN WARDENS ACCOUNTS. 

Elect! Sunt vardora Thomas Cage, Johannes Seffrey, 
Thomaa Seffrey, Robertus Seffrey. 

[Page 134] Memorandum, that the Cownt made of the Towne 

A.D. 1514-5] Wardora of Bardewel, the ii day off novembyr in the 
regno of kynge henry the viii, the vi yere, thenne owyng 
to the towne of Bardewel, all things rekeuyd and oowntyd, 
remaynyth in the hands of the towue wardors iii/» 
xviii<. ili^d, 

Theys be the wardors of Bardewel for the yere comynge, 
Thomas Cage, Thomas Seffrey, Johannes Self rey, ThomasDoo. 

[a.d. 1515-16] Memorandum, that the Cownt made of the Towne 
warden of Bardwell the ii day of nouembyr in the 
regno of king henry the viiite, the vii yere, thenne owyng 
to the Towue of Bardewell, all thyngs rekened and 
cowntyd, remaynyth in the hands of the Towne wardours 
vii/f vii«, vii^. 

[▲.D. 1516-17] Memorandum, that the Cownt made of the Toune 
wardours off Bardwell the iii day of Novembyr in the 
regno of kynge henry the viiite, the viii yerre, thenne 
owynge to the towne of Bardwell, all thyngs rekenyd 
and cowntyd, remaynyth in the hands of the tovm 
wardours viii/» xiii<. iii^of. 

[Page 135] Anno Nono Uenrici Viii ui. 

A.D. 1517-18] Thes be the expends done in the towne s. d. 

of Bardwell in the ix yere of kyng herry 

the viii, at halowmesse. 

ffyrste, payd ffor iii bushels whete to 

sancte Thomas drykkyng ii vi 

Item, ffor a combe malte ii iiii 

Item, ffor chece xx 

Item, ffor dyrge and niesse iiii 

Item, to*the clerke and sexten ii 

Item, ffor iiii/» wax to hart tapers ii iiii 

Item, payd to the subsedy iiii 

Item, payd to recharde tornor ffor Mr. 

Wyndham rente xv 

Item, Mr. bronde xiiii 

Item, ffor iiii lodys of thornys dimidium 

redy hewyn and karyd to betons iii ix 

Item, ffor a xi day worke and dimidium 

for hedgynge at betons iii iii^ 

Item, ffor the rom ascot fore betons ^ 

Item, to Mr. Vycury ffor a sangrede iiii 

Item, on solomesse day to the seyde vikary iiii 

Summa huius bille t xxvii ii 

t Page 136 is blank. 



BARDWKLL TOWN WARDENS ACCOUNTS. 117 

tPage 137] Computus Thome Cago, Johanuis Seffrey, Thome 

A.D. 1516-17] Seffrey, et Thome Doo, Oardianorum villate de 
Bardwell, a ffesto Omnium Sanctorum in anno regni regis 
Henrici octaui octauo usque ad idem festum Omnium 
Sanctorum in anno euisdem Regis Nono De profectuo 
tenementorum et terre pertinentium emdem f ville. 

Areragium vltimi Computi ut patet in pede eiusdem 
Computi yiiili xiii<. in^d. 

Summa viiili ziiis. iii^. 

Idem Gomputatores receperunt de profectuo eiusdem 
terre et Tenementorum hoc anno iiii/» ii«. vid. 
Summa iiii/t ii«. vie/. 

Summa Totalis Onerationum cum Arreragio 
ziili xv«. ix^. 

De quibus petit allocari pro redditibus Resultis exeunte 
terre et Tenementorum predictorum hoc anno ii«. v^. 
Et eciam idem petitur in allocatione pro reparationibus 
tenementorum et? hoc anno, ut patet in quodam 
bille huic computo annexa. £t pro Custis et Expends 
de obitibus Willelmi Beeton, Johannis Hert^ et aliorum 
qui dant terram et tenementa predicta ad eiusdem ville. 

Et pro subsedj domini regis pro eiusdem terre hoc 
anno xxvii«. iid, 

Et sic debet xi/» viii«. vii^cf. 
[Page 138] Compotus Thome Cage, Johannis Sefferey, Thon^e 

[a.d. 1517-18] Sefferey, et Thome Doo, Gardianorum yUlate de 
Bardewell, a ffesto omnium Sanctorum in anno Regni 
Regis Henrici Octaui Nono, usque ad idem festum 
Omnium Sanctorum in anno eiusdem Regni decimo, 
De profectuo Tenementorum et terre pertinentium 
eiusdem ville. 

Areragium. Areragium ultimi compoti, ut patet in pede 
eiusdem Gompoti xi/t viii«. Yii^d. 
Summa xi/tviii«. vii^c/. 

lidem Compotatores receperunt de profictuo euisdem 
Terre et Tenementorum hoc anno inili ii«. yid. Summa 
iinli lis, vid. 

Summa totalis Onerationum hoc anno cum Areragio 
xv/» xi«. l^d, 

De quibis petunt allocari pro redditibus resolutis, et 
pro taxis hoc anno solutis ad dominum Regem, et certis 
reparationibus factis super domos, ut patet per billam 
huic Gompoto [annexam] vii/i iiii«. iiii^c?. 

t For eidem. Much of the Latin on this p«ge » corrupt It hM been printed 
here as eliewhere, as it stands in the M8. without emendation. 



118 BARDWKLL TOWN WARDENS ACCOUNTS. 

£t sic debeut viii/t. vis. ixd. 

MernorauduQi, ad idem Computum quod dioti Com- 

potiitoreH receperiint in proficuo pro anno vltimo pro 
Bosco veiidito xxd,, et sic debeut de Clnro 
viii/t viiin. yd. 
[Page 139] Memorauduw, that Thouias Cage bathe 
received for the taxke of lordchepjs aud of 

owtonyst s. d. 

ffjrate, received of Mr. Bronde xii 

Item, of Mr. Edon xiii iiii 

Item, of John Bredwode ffor Mr. Wjndham vi viii 

Item, of the prior of Ixworthe xii 

Item, of Robart kooke of Langham vi 

Item, of Smethe of Walsham vi 

Item, of John perkyr of Walsham viii 

Item, of page of Walsham viii 

Item, ffor Margerys iu Walsham ii 

Item, of Clys of Stanton i 

Item, of Carman of Walsham xx 

Item, of koker of Barton iiii 

Item, of Robart Sefferey for ii nete viii 

Item, of Thomos permente for ii nete viii 

Item, of John perkyu for a cowe iiii 

Item, of Wylliam Crowne for a C wetherys xx 



Summat xu xi 

[Page 141] Thes be the Expends that be done in 

A.D. 1518-19] Bardwell in the x yere of kynge berry the 

viii at halowmesse. 

ffyrst, payd to the taxke of the 

towne goode iiili xviii iii 

Item, payd ffor vi lodys off Bryke to the 

chimney at beteus xii 

Iten), ffor the Carynge therof xiii 

Item, ffor dyggyng and Caryinge of 

iii lods Calke xii 

Item, ffor ii lodys soude iiii 

Item, ffor a combe lyme vi 

Item, ffor a mawtyll ti-e xvi 

Item, ffor vii days and a halffe of the mason ii 
Item, ffor hys borde xv 

Item, ffor hys seruer xv 

Item, ffor his borde xv 

Item, ffor a lode of thornys with hewynge 

Carynge to Betons x 

t Does this stand for " out towns ? t Pag« 140 is blank. 



8. 


d. 


ii 


vi 


ii 


iiii 




xxiii 




iiii 




ii 




viii 




xiiii 




XV 




J 




nil 



11 


viu 




iiii 


iiii 






iiii 



BARDWELL TOWN WARDENS ACCONUTS. 119 

Item, ffor iii bushels whete to sainte 
Thomns drjnkjiig at myssomerf 

Item, ffor a combe malte 

Item ffor chece 

Item, ffor dyrge and mes-e 

Item, to the clerke and sexteu 

Item, ffor a Ii. wax to hurts tapers 

Item, pajd Rente to Mr. Bronde 

Item, pajd Rente to Mr. Wyndham 

Item, to the generall hondere 

Item, for a quetaus ffor the taxke 

Item, to cheljs wyffe ffor mendynge of 
ye well, and for them that lay in the stokkys ii iiii 

Item, ffor owyr Expends whanue we 
led Baxter to Bury ii 

Item, payd for iii pecis of tymbyr to the 
bekbredge 

Item, for the Carynge 

Item, payd to Mr. Vekery fa sangrede 

Item, on solomesse day to Mr. vekeyr 

Summa yiili xm$. im^d.t 

[Page 143] Thes be the Expensys that Be done in 

A.D. 1519-20] the towne of Bardwell in the x§ yere of 

King Herry the viiite at halowmesse. 
In primis, payd for xx days worke off a 

wryte ffor makyuge of the stabyll at Betons v 
Item, ffor a day worke of ffellynge of 

tymbyr to the same hows ii 

Item, ffor hys borde ii 

Item, ffor Bording of the wryte iii 

Item, ffor xii copyll of sparrys xii 

Item, ffor 1 1 lodys of strawe ii viii 

Item, ffor carynge off the seyde strawe ii 

Item, ffor viii days worke of a thatchar ii 

Item, ffor hys borde xvi 

Item, ffor hys seruer xvi 

Item, ffor hys borde xvi 

Item, ffor vi days worke of a cleyar xii 

Item, ffor hys Borde xii 

Item, ffor dyggyng off cley iiii 

t ETidontly the Translation of St. Thomas the Martyr, July 7. The Translation 
of St Tliomas the Apostle on July 8 was not recognized in the Sanim Missal or 
BreTiary. 

X Page 143 is blank, only the words " Summa xlviiij. vd.* being written on it. 

I By error for xi. 



120 BARDWKLL TOWN WARDlilNS AOCODNTS. 

8. d. 

Item, ffor najle iiii 

Item, ffor wax to hartai tapers x^ 
Item, ffor iii bushels whete to Sanct 

Thomas Drynkkynge ii 

Item, ffor a combe malte ii viii 

Item, ffor chece xx 

Item, to Mr. vekery iiii 

Item, to the clerke and the sexten ii 

Item, to Mr. Wyndham ffor Rente xv 

Item, to Mr. Bronde ffor Rente xiiii 

Item, ffor marsimente of the butts ii iiii 

Item, for vetelys wane the butts were made viii 

Item, ffor ii combe lyme to vestry x 

Item, ffor the Caryng iii 

Item, ffor a lode sonde ii 

Item, ffor ii c and a halffe of tyle f xiii 

Item, ffor lathe xvi^ 

Item, for a Mli lathe nayle | xii 

Item, ffor tyle pynnys ii 

Item, for ii day warke of a mason viii 

Item, for hys seruers viii 
Item, ffor here borde 
Item, ffor a lode thomys with hewyng 

and caryng to igiondys ix 

verte ffolium 

[Page 144] Item, ffor ii day worke of a hedger iii 

Item, ffor hys Borde iiii 

Item, to Mr. vekery ffor sangrede iiii 

Item, a Solomesse day to Mr. vekery iiii 



Summa huius bylle xviii v 

per me Stephenum Draper 
per me Ricardum Kyppynge, vioarium. 

[Page 145] Memorandum, quod ad istam computum factum 

Coram Ricardo Kyppynge, vicario de Bardwell, die et 
anno supradictis, secundum formam et effeotum ultime 
voluntatis Willelmi Beton, et ad istam Computum, pre- 
dicti idem Computatores debent, ut patet supra viii/t 
viiis. \d. uude petunt in allocatione pro debitis Hoberti 
Baxter vii«. viii^cf., quia nichill habent unde leuare. 

£t sic debent de claro viii/t v'nild. 

In ueritate predictorum Ego predictus vicarius sub- 
scribe per manum propriam. 

t260 tilee. 71000 nails. 



BARDWELL TOWN WARDENS ACCODNT. 121 

[a.d. 1520-21] CompotuB Thome Cage, Johannis Sefferey et Thome 
Doo, Gardianorum villate de Bard well, a festo omnium 
Banctorum in anno regni regis henrici octaui decimo 
UBque ad idem feBtiim omnium sanctorum in anno regni 
regis henrici octaui xi® 

Areragium ultimi Compoti ut patet in pede eiusdem 
Compoti viii/t viiijc/. 

Summa viii^t viiijcf. 

Idem Compotatores receperunt de profieuo eiusdem 
terrsD et tenementorum hoc anno iiii/t ii«. vid. 

Summa totalis oneratiouum hoc anno cum areragio 

znli iii«. ii^d. 

Dequibus petunt allocari pro redditibus resolutis, et 
pro nliis reparationibus, ut patet in Billa buic annexata 
hoc an>io facta per Gardiauos predictos xlviiia. vc^, et 
sic dehent de Claro. xviii«. ix^d. 
[Page 146] Computus Thome Cage, Johannis SeiTrey, Thome 

Seffrej, et Thome Doo, Gardianorum villate de Bardwell, 
a festo Omnium Sanctorum in anno regni Regis Henrici 
viii xi^ usque ad idem ffestum in anno regni dicti 
Domini Regis xii? factus in die Animarum. 

Areragium vlt^mi Computi ut patet in pede eiusdem 
Computi ix/t. xiiii«. iid. 

Idem Computatores onerantur pro anno vltimo ffiuito 
ad istam computum iiii/t. lis. y'ld, 

Summa totalis oneratiouum hoc anno 
cum arreragio vltimi Computi xiii/t xvii«. Hid, 

De quibus petunt allocari pro redditibus resolutis et 
pro aliis reparationibus, vt patet per billam huic annexam 
hoc anno factam per Gardianos predictos xLviiif. xi^d. 
Et sic debent de claro xii/t. xviii«. in^d, 

[a.I). 1522-23] Memorandum, that the Count made off the towue 
warders of Bard well, Thomas Cage, John Seffrej, Thomas 
Doo, Wylliam Seffrej, in the seconde day of Novembyr 
in the regne off Kyng Uerry the viii the xiii yere, Then 
the seyde warders owyng to the Towue of Bardwelle, all 
thyngs rekenede and Countyd, romaynyth in the handys 
of the Towne warders, xiii/t. ix«. iiijcf. 
Gardiani debent xiii/t. ix«. iii^L 

[Page 147] Thes be the expends done in the churche of Bard well 

A.D. 1519-21] in the xi and xii yere of Kyng Herry the viiite. 

s. d. 

ffyrste, payd mendyng of the chyrche gate v 

Item, payd ffor xxi li off bawde viii 

Item, ffor vii day worke of the plomer ii iiii 



122 BARDWKLL TOWN WARDENS ACCOUNT. 

8. d. 

Item, payd hys lK>rde xvi 

Item, to hys sertier with mete and dr3*nke xiii 
IteQ), puyd ffor ii vejlys at tii<; auter's endya ii 

Item, ffor lacis and curtenren^rys ii 

Item, ffor wyre to hauge them un ii 
Item, pay ffor a horskyn and a halffe off 

whytlether for the bellys iii 
Item, payd for wasshing and choryug to 

the sex ten ffor ii yerys ii viii 

Item, payd to the gassewrytef iiii 

Item, payd ffor iii belle Ropys iii iii 
Item, payd for irynworke to the gas 

wyndownsj v 

Item, for irynworke to the bellys vii 
Item, pay to Thomas Smythe ffor a day 

warke and a halfe at the bellys ix 

Item, to John Waller vi 
Item, payd to John Rofe of yxworthe 

ffor trussinge off the bellys x 

Item, to hys seruer iiii 

Item, ffor her Borde v 

Item, ffor mendyug of ii vestments iii 

Item, ffor a lace ^ 
Item, payd ffor C and dimidium§ of 

pamente tyle iii 

Item, ffor the Carrage ii 

Item, for a day worke of goodwyne Ive iiii 

Item, to hys man ii 

Item, for her borde iiii 

Item, ffor vi bushels lyme * 

Item, ffor a lode sonde * 

Item, ffor clothe for a ames * 

Item, ibr the car* * 
Summajl * 

[Page 149] Thes be the expencis done in the towne 

[a.d. 1,522-3] off Bard well in the xiiii yere of Kynge 
Herry the viiite 

ffyrste, payde to my lady wyndham for rente xv 

Item, payd to Mr. Bronde ffor rente xiiii 

Item, payd to Mr. Sprynge ffor rente for 
iiii yere iii iiii 

Item, ffor ii pounde wax to harts tapers xvii 

t i.e., glwBB Wright. ^^ i.e., glass windows. § i>e., 150 tiles. 
II Page 148 is blank. 



BARDWKLL TOWN WARDENS ACCOUNTS. 123 

Item payd ffor iii busbelH whete to the 8. d. 

drynkyug ffor the beneffuctorys of this towne iii vi 

Item, ffor n com)>e malte ii iii 

Item, to the vekery ffor dyrge and niesse iiii 

Item, to the clerke and to the sexteii ii 

Item, payd ffor chece ii 

Item, payd ffor bread and cbece and ale 

to makyng of the butts vi 

Item, payd to Mr. vekery ffor a saugrede iiii 
Item, payd to Mr. vekery on solcmesse day iii 

Item, payd dychyng and hedgyng with 

thomys v iiii 

Item, ffor drawyng dychys and reueryaf xvi 

Item, ffor mendyng of the heme fflorthet 

at betonys iiii 

Item ffor iii days worke of a thatchare 

with strawe and woude§ iii 

Item, payd to the sawgerysjl at the 

goynge fforthe vi viii 



[Page 151 f] 
U-D. 1521-21 



Summa totalis xzxvii ii 

Thes be the expencis that be done in the towne off 
Bardwell in the ziiite yere of King Henry the viiite at 
halowmesse. 

ffyrste, payd for iii day worke off a 
cleyer at l)etowny8 with mete and drynke xii 

Item, ffor iii day warke of a wryte with 
mete amd drynke xviii 

Item, ffor halffe a c borde xvi 

Item, ffor nayle iiii 

Item, ffor hengelys and hokys tf 
Item, payd to Thomas Smythe ffor 
makynge and hangiuge of the brode gaty 
at yglondes iiii 

Item, ffor iryn worke to the sayde gatys iii 

Item, ffor tymbyr to the same gatys zx 

Item, ffor iiii day warke off a man, with 
mete and drynke fibr drawyng of dychys 
at doffows medowe xvii 

Item, ffo[r'| hedgyng at Coppells olos ii 

Item, ffor a lode cley caryng and 
dyggyng on to iglonds hows ii 

Item, ffor a day warke off cleyer iii| 

tie., ditobM and river*. ^ Le., barn floor. § i.e., wood. || i.e., aoldien. 
IT Page 160 is blank. ft i.e., angles and hookn. 



124 BARD WELL TOWN WARDENS ACCOUNTS* 

Item, (for a lode thomys with hewjnge 8. d. 

and Carjnge x 

Item, ffor C'Hryng off stakjs and wolys f ii 

S^eni, ffor iii day warke off h hedgerr 
] mete and dryuke x^ 

Item, payd ffor placberyug of herlynge 

bredge J x 

Item, payd ffor iilt wax to hartys tapers xx 

Item, ffor iii bnshels wbete to sente 

Thomas drynkynge v 

Item, ffor a combe make iii viii 

Item, ffor chece ii ii 

Item, to Mr. Vykery ffor dyrge and messe iiii 

Item, to the derke and sexten ii 

Item, payd payd ffor wax to the sepulkyr men xvii vii 
Item, payd to Mr. Wyndham ffor rente xv. 

Item, payd to Mr. brond to ffor rente xiiii 

Item, payd to Mr. Vykery ffor sangrede iiii 

Item, on solowmesse day iiii 

[Summa] totalis iii^i § 

[Page 153] Memorandum, that the Cownt made off the towne 

A.D. 1521-22] warders Thomas Oag3, John Seffrey, Thomas Doo, 
Wylliam Seffery, on the ii day of Novembyr in the regne 
of Kyn^ Henry the viii the xiii yere. Then the seyd 
warders owyng to the towne of Bardwell all thyngs 
rekenede Cowntyd Remaynyth in the hands of the towne 
wardens 

Summa xv/t xiiii«. vii^d. 

[a.d. 1522-23] Computus Thome Cage, Johannis Seffrey, Thome Doo, 
Willelmi Seffrey, Gardianorum vitiate de Berdwell, factus 
a ffesto Omnium Sanctorum ab Anno xiiiio. Henrici 
Octaui usque idem ffestum in anno regni eiusdem Regis 
Quinto decimo. 

Arreragium vltimi compoti vt patet in pede oompoti 
eiusdem xv/t xiiii«. v'li^d. 

Computatores Computant et onerantur pro anno 
vltimo ad istum Compotum finito in ffesto Sancti 
Michaelis Archangeli vltimo preterito iii/t ii«. vi<f. 

Summa totalis onerationium hoc unno cum arreragiis 
vltioii Computi xix/t. xvii«. ^d. 

De quibus Predicti Gardiani allocationem de summa 
jlv8, vu)^d. iuste petunt ut in quadam sedula huic libello 
annexa plane aparet. Et sic debent xvii/t xi«. y'ld, £t 
ulterius prefati Gardiani se debere cognouerunt pro 
Subbosco et macremio xi«. xd, 

t Query. t Pla«tering of Harling bridge. § Page 152 is blank. 



BARD WELL TOWN WARDENS ACCOUNTS. 125 

fPage 154 J Computus Thome Cage, Johanuis Seffrej, Thomse Doo, 

A.D. 1523-4] et Willelmi Sefferey, Gardianorum villate de Bardwell, a 
ffesto Omnium Sanctorum anno regni Regis Henrici 
Octnui XV usque ad idem ffestum Onlnium Sanctorum 
anno regni Regis Henrici octaui zvio. 

Arreragium vltimi Computi ut patet in pede euisdem 
Computi xvii/» xiiix. \id, 

Compotatores computant et onerantur pro anno vltimo 
£Bnito ad ffertum Sancti Michaelis archangeli vltimo 
predicto iiii/i u$. \id, 

Summa totalis onerationum hoc anno cum arreragiis 
vltimi Computi xxi/i xv«. 

Predicti Gardiaui petunt allocationem pro diuersis 
reparationibus et altis onerationibus, ut patet in quodam 
cedula huic libro annexa xxzv«. £t sic debentur per 
Gardiat I xx/t x«. 

fPage 155] Thes be the expencjs done in the towne of Bardwell 

A.D. 1524-5] by Thomas Cage, John Sefferey, William Sefferey, and 

Thomas Doo in the xvi te yere of off t Kynge Henry the 

viiite. 8. d» 

ffyrste, payd to lady wyndham ffor rente zv 

Item, payd to Mr. bronde ffor rente xiiii 

Item, payd to Mr. Sprynge ffor rente x 
Item, payd ffor iii bushels whete to 

Sancte Thomas Drynkyng ii vi 

Item, ffor a combe make xx 

Item, ffor chece ii 

Item, to Mr. vekery ffor dyrge and messe iiii 

Item, to the sexteu and clarke ii 

Item, ffor iiii wax to hartys taperys xy 

Item, payd to the Kyngys sobsedy iiii 
Item, payd ffor dyggyuge of flakkys to 

the butts ii 

Item, ffor expencj'S to the butts rii 

Item, ffor a lode thornys to Coppellys cloos x 
Item, ffor a day worke of ii men with 

mete and drynke viii 
Item, payd to Recharde Haruy ffor 

drawynge dychys xvi 
Item, payd for iii day warke of a wryte 

with mete at betonys xviii 
Item, payd to the thatchar ffor iiii day 

warke at betonys, with mete and straw, 

woude, and byndyggys iiii 

tSo MS. t So MS. for Gftrdi*no8. 



126 



BARDWRLL TOWN WARDENS ACCOUNTS. 



Item, payd fFor rede 

Item, payd ffor najle 

Item, payd ffor halffe a chnldyr of lyme 
to yglondys 

Item, payd ffor cccc brykke to the same 
how8 

Item, payd ffor a lode sonde with the 
carrage 

Item, to goodwyne Ive and hys man ffor 
a day worke and a haffe with mete 

Item, ffor wrytys wu[r]ke and the ovene 
at yglondys 

Item, offeryd to Mr. vekery on soloniesse day 

Item, ffor a sangrede on the same day iiii 



Summa totalis xxxv 
^Page I56J Summa vii/t xvi«. xi(/. f 

[Page 157] Thes by the expencs done in the towne of Bard well in 

lA.D, 1525-26] the xvii yere of kynge Herry the viiit 

ffyrst, payd to Recherd turner ffor rente 

Item, payd to Mr. Bronde ffor Rente 

Item, payd to Mr Sprynge ffor Rente 

Item, payd to the bookbynder xiii 

Item, payd ffor ii/t wax ffor harts taperys 

Item, payd ffor iii bushels whete to 

Sante Thomas dry king ii 

Item, payd ffor a combe make 
Item, payd for chece ii 

Item, payd to Mr vekery ffor dyrge and 

messe 

Item, payd to the clerk and the sexten 
Item, payd to the kynge ffor the 

subsedy iiuli xviii 

Item, payd to my lorde of Bury, J ffor 

Rente and Reragysg with expencj^s and 

Costs abowte the same xviii 

Item, payd to the thatchar and hys man 

ffor iii day warke and a halffe, with mete 

and drynke, at Inglonds ii vi 

Item, payd ffor woude and byndyngs iiii 

It«m, payd to the Sowgerys xvi 

Item, payd ffor iii lodys thornys at betonys ii vi 

t The rMt of pA«e 156 is blank, 
tie., the Abbot of Bury St Edmundii. § ie., arrean. 



XV 

xiiii 

X 

iiii 
xiiii 

ix 
xiii 



nil 



vni 



nn 



BARDWELL TOWN WARDENS ACCOUNTS. 127 

Item, payd to Recharde Heruy ffor s. d. 

drawyng of dychys xvi 

Item, payd ffor ii lodys of strawe and 
thatche at luglouds ii viii 

Item, payd to Mr. vekery ffor the sangrede iiii 

Item, payd to Mr vekery ou Soloruesse day 
Summa villi zvi«. x\d. t 

[Page 159] Computus Thome Cage, Johannis Seffrey, Thome Doo, 

A.D. 1524-5] et Willelmi Seffrey, Gardiauorum villate de Bardwell 
a ffesto Omnium Sanctorum anno regni Regis Henrici 
octain xvi". usque idem ffestum omnium Sanctorum anno 
regni Regis Henrici octaui Septimo decimo. 

Arreragiuni vltimi Computi ut patet in pede eiusdem 
Computi xx/t xiic/. 

Idem Computatores computant et onerantur pro anno 
vltimo fiinito ad ffestum suncti Michaelis Archanguli 
vltimo preterito iii/t ii<. v'ui, 

Summa totalis onerationum hoc anno cum arreragio 
vltimi Computi xxiii/i iiis, \id. 

Unde dicti Gardiani petunt in allocatione pro diuei-sis 
reparationibus et redditibus resolutis, et fforensicis 
solucionibus, ut patet in quadam Billa huic folio annexa, 
vii/i xvi<. xiid. 

Summa allocationum viili xvi«. x'ld. £t sic Gardiani 
debent de Compoto xwili vis. viid. 

[a.d. 1526-7] Memorandum, that the Towne wardenys hathe mad 
the Cownte one the ii day of novembyr the xviii yere of 
Kynge Henry the Eygth, that is to say, Thomas Cage, 
John Sefferey, William Sefferey, and Thomas Doo, and 
80 they owne to the Towne of Bardwell xiiii/t ziiii«. viud,, 
and the seyd wa[r]ders have lefte the byll of the expencs 
in thys boke. 

Computus Thome Cage, Johannis Sefferey, Willelmi 
Seffrey, et Thome Doo, Gardianorum villate de Bardwell, 
a festo omnium Sanctorum vsque idem ffestum anno 
regni regis Henrici octaui xix^. vno anno Complete. 

Arreragium vltimi Computi vt patet in pede Eiusdem 
Computi xiiii/t xiiiii. y'liid. 

Idem Computatores Computand et onerantur pro anno 
vltimo ffinito ad ffestum omnium Sanctorum vltimo 
preterito iiii/t ii«. vie/. 

Summa totalis onerationum hoc anno cum arreragio 
vltimi Computi x\mU xvii«. iid. 

t Psgtt 168 iB blank. : Page 160 ia blank. 



[Page 1«1 il 
[A.D. 1527-8] 



128 BARD WELL TOWN WARDENS ACCOUNTS. 

Unde Qardiani petuiit allocari pro diuenis reparationi- 
bu8 et redditibus resolutis ac forencecis solucionibas, Tt 
in quadam billa huic folio aunexa xlviis. iiii^f. 

Summa allocationis xlvii«. iiii(i. 

Et sic Gardiaui debent de Compnto 8uo predicto 
xvi/» ixs, x^. 

[Page 162] Computus Thomea Cage, Johannis Sefferej, Willelrai 

A.D. 1628-29] Seffrey, et Thomie Doo, Gardianoruni villate de Bardwell, 
a ffesto Omuium Sauctorum in anno regni Regis Henrici 
viii in xix^ usque ad idem ffestum in anno regni regis 
dicti Domini Regis xx^ 

Arreragium de vHimo Computo vt patet in pede 
eiusdem Computi xvi/» ]x«. xd, 

Computatores Computa[n]t in onerationibus pro anno 
vlticio ffinito ad festum omnium Sanctorum vltimo 
preterito iiii/t iif. vie/. 

Summa totalis onerationum xx/t xii«. iiii^. 

Und[e] Gardiani petunt allocari pro diuersis repara- 
cionibus et fTerencecis solutionibus et redditibus resolutis, 
vt patet in quadam billa huic folio annexa xi/» iiis. xid 

Summa allocationis xi/» iii«. j\d, 

Et sic Gardiani debent de Computo suo ix/» viiif. v^. 

Gardiani predicti elegerunt cum aliis ffeoffatis Rober- 
tum Beets de nouo in officium Gardiani. 

[Page 163] Compotus Gardianoruni ville de Bardewell, videlicet, 

A.D. 1529-30] Thome Cage, Johannis Seffrey, Thome Doo, et Roberti 
Bete ii® die mensis Nouembris, Anno Regni regis Henrici 
octaui vicesimo primo, omnibus expencis deductis, ut 
patet in billa anrexa. 

Kemanet in manibus dictorum gardianorum. 
x/t vii«. iii|d. 

[a.u. 1530-31] Compotus Gardianorum ville de Bardwell, videlicet, 
Thome Cage, Johannis Seffrey, Thome Doo, et Roberti 
Bete ii^ die Mensis Novembris anno Regni regis henrici 
octaui vicesimo secundo, omnibus expencis deductis, ut 
in billa annexa patet, et sic remanet in manibus dictorum 
Gardianorum. 

Summa vH iis. iiid. 

[Page 164] Computus Thome Cage, Roberti Bets, Johannis 

A.D. 1530-31] Seffrey, Thome Doo, Gardianorum Ecclesie de Bardwell, 
a ffesto Omnium Sanctorum anno Regni Regis Henrici 
viii. xxii° vsque idem ffestum in anno xxiii^^ dicti Regis 
Arreragium de vltimo Computo prout patet in pede 
eiusdem Computi v/i iis. iiid. 



BARDWELL TOWN WARDENS ACCOUNTS. 129 

Computatores computa[n]t in oneracioue pro anno 
Tltiaio ffinito ad ffestum Omnium Sanctorum vltimo 
preterito iiii/t ii«. y\d. 

Summa totalis ix/t iiii«. ixd. 

Unde Gardiaui petuiit allocari pro diuersis Repara- 
ciouibuB et foriuceois soluciouibus et redditibus resolutis^ 
ut patet in quadam billa huic (folio annexa 

Et sic Gardiaui debeut iiii/t iii<. 

[Page 165] Compotus Thome Cnge^ Roberti Betts, Johannis 

A.D. 1531-2] Seffrey, et Thome Doo anno Regni regis henrici octaui 
vicesimo tertio, secundo die meusis novembris anno regis 
dicti henrici, Omnibus expencis deductis, ut in billa inde 
annexa. Et sic remanet in Manibus Gardianorum 
vii/i vii». O^d. 

Et dicti gardiaui cum consensu parachi[an]orum 
eligerunt lohaunem Cage. 

!|Page 1661 Jhesu merci, lady helpe. 

Ud. 1533jt Anno Domini millesimo quingentesimo tricesimo tercio 
Johannes Cape, Robertus Bete, et thomas Doo, et Thomas 
Cage, nuper desessus, fecerunt Compotum de bonis, 
Tenementis, terris, pratis, pasturis, ville de berdewell^ 
datis et concessis secundum vim et fformam Testament! 
vltime voluntatis Willelmi beton, et Johannis herte, et 
aliorum benefactorum ad annualem valorem quatuor 
librarum, et duorum solidorum, et sex denariorum. 
Summa annuatim iiii/i iif. vi{/. 
Vnde dicti gardiaui petunt allocari pro annuali redditu 
soluto diuersis hominibus. 

s. d. 

In primis, domino Thome Deny annuatim xy 

Item, gergeo bronde Generoso xiiii 

Item, magistro Johauni Sprynge x 

Item, baliuo de hunderyd ii vii 

Item, ad Generalem hunderyd annuatim 0^ 

Summa v;i. x^ef. 
Summa in expensis factis in diuersis locis ut patet in 
billa compoti eorum. Summa xxxiiii«. i^d. 
Summa totalis xv9. 
Et sic remanet in manibus dictorum Gardianorum 
xlii«. vid, 

Et debent pro preterito vi/t. viii«. viijd. 
Summa totalis debiti viii/» xis. ild, 
Dicti Gardiani elegerunt goodwine Ive esse vnum 
quatuor Gardianorum. 

K 



ISO BARDWRLL TOWN WARDBN8 ACCOUNTS. 

[Page 167] Aiiuo Domini milleBimo quiugenteeimo [trioeainoo] 

quarto Johannes Cage, Robertus Bete, Johaunee Doo, et 
GoodwynuB Ive fecerunt Co[n|)otum de Bonis et Teuemen- 
tis vt supra, vt putet in anno preterito, Omnibus Ezpensis 
deductis, vt patet in billa anneza ; remanet in miuiibus 
dictorum gardianorum \xli vii<. iid. 

[a.d. 1535] Anno Domini mdxzxv. Johannes Cage, liobertus 

Bete, Thomas Doo, Go[d]winu8 Ive ffecerunt comp<itum 
de bonis et tenementis, ut patet supra, ut patet in Billa 
annexa, et sio remanet in mauibua dictorum Gardianorum 
zii libree z«. viid. 

Anno domini millesimo. 

[a.d. 1536] In the yere of owyr lorde gude a thowsend ffyve 

houdurd and xzzvi^ John Cage, Uobert Beetf, Thomas 
Doo, goodwyue Ive, they have mude there a Cowute of 
the goodys aud teucmeutys of the tuune uf Bard well, and 
yt dothe apere in there byllyn of there accounte, alle 
rentyt payd, and all reparucions alowyd, and so remayuythe 
stylle in there huudys. 

Summa ziii/t zv«. Ofcf. 

[Page 1681 Anno Domini millesimo quingentesimo tricesimo sep- 

A.D. 1537] timo Johannes Cage, Robertus Bete, Thomas Doo, et 
Goodwynus Ive fecerunt compotus de bonis, Tenementis, 
pratis et ceteris bonis ville de Bardwell, omnibus ezpenois 
deductis et solutis, et sio remanet in manibus dictorum 
Gardianorum. 

Summa totalis vii/t zix/i. xid, 

[a.d. 1538] In the yei*e of owyr lord god a thovsend ffyve huudryde 

aud zzzviiit John Cnge and Robert beete and goodwyn 
Ive and tomas Doo have made there a Cownte of the 
goodys aud tenementys off the towne of Bardwell, as yt 
dothe apere iu there bylle off there a Cownte, all rentys 
payd, all Reparaschous alowyde, and so remayuythe stylle 
in there haudys vii/t v«. vi^^. 

[a.d. 1539] Anno DomiiH mi-Hesimo quingentesimo Tricesimo nono 

Johannes Cage, Robertus Bete, Thomas Doo, et Goodwynus 
Ive fecerunt [oompurum] de bonis, Tenementis pratis et 
ceteris bouis vill» de Bardwell, omnibus ezpencis deductis 
et soluti^ et sic Remanet iu manibus dictorum Gar- 
dianorum iz/» zv<. ix(f. 

[Page 169] Anno Domini millesimo quingentesimo Quadragesimo 

[a.d. 1540] et anno Regni regis Heurici octaui Tricesimo secundo, 
Johannes Cage, Roliertus Bete, Thomas Doo et Good- 
wynus Ive, Gardiani ville de Bardwell, fecerunt oompotum 



BARDWKLL TOWN ESTATE ACCOUNTS. 131 

de bonis Tenementis et pratis de Bardwell pi'edicto, et 
omnibus expends deductis solutis, et sic remanet in mani- 
bus dictorum gardiauorum xii^ft xiiii«. id. 

{▲.D. 1541] Anno Domini millesimo quingente8i[mo] quadragesimo 

primo, et anno Kegni regis Henrici octaui Tricesimo 
Tertio, Johannes Cage, Hobertus Bete, Thomas Doo, 
Goodwjnus Ive, Gardiani ville de Bardwell fecerunt com- 
potum de bonis, Tenementis, pratis, de Bardwell predicto, 
onmibus expencis deductis solutis et sic remaneat in 
manibus dictorum Gardianorum villi xviis et x)^d. 

Robertus Cage js Chosjn Towne Warden in Stede of 
Thomas Doo. 

A.D. 1542] Anno Domini millesimo quingentesimo et xlii, et anno 

regui regis Henrici octaui Tricesimo quarto Johannes 
cage, robertus bete, robertus cage, Goodwynus Yve, 
gardiani ville de bardwell, fecerunt compotum de bonis, 
Tenementis, pratis de Bardwell predicto, omnibus exspen- 
cis deductis solutis sic remaneat [in manibus] dictorum 
gardianorum. 

Summa vi/» vs, O^d, 

[Page 1701 The accompt made bj Jhon Cage, Robert Bete, Robert 

▲.D. 1543] Cage, and Goodwjn Ive, townwardens of Bardwell, vppon 
all Sowlles Day in the yere of lord 1543, and the five 
and thyrty yere of the Reign of owr soueraign lord 
Kynge henry the viiith. 

It dothe apere by the accompt takyn the day and yere 
aboue writeu, all thyngs deducted and allowed that ought 
to be 'allawed vnto the said townwardens, that yet 
remanyth in ther hands the some of 
iii/i xiii«. viiic/. 

{a.d. 1544] The accompt made by Jhon cage, Robert Bete, Robert 

Cage, and Godwyu Ive, towne wardens of Bardwell vppon 
all Sowll Day, in the yere of our lord 154iiii<', in the syx 
and thyrty yere of the reign of owr soueragne lord King 
hery the viiith. 

It dothe apere by the accompte takyn the day and 
yere above wryten, all thyngs deducted and allowed that 
awght to be allowed vnto the said townwardens that yet 
remanyth in ther hands the somme of xxix«. vii</.t 

t Pages 171 Mid 173 are bluik. 



132 BARDWKLL TOWN WARDENS ACCOUNTS. 

IPage 173] The6e be the expensua doone in the towne of Bard well 

▲.D. 1544-5] be vs John Cage, Robert Cage. Robert Beete, and 
goodwjne Ive, in the xzxvi^ yere of kyng henry the 
viii*« 

8. d. 
Fyrst, Robert beete payd to the taxe iiiU x ii 

Sumroa iii/t x«. I'ld. 
Ooodwyue Ive payd to the taxe xiiii vi 

Also he paid to the subcedy for the 
towne's lande ii viii 

Item, payd to Sir Thomas darkey for rent xv 

Item, to the towne drynkyug iii bushels 
of whete pryce v 

Item, for a coml)e of malt to the said 
drynkyng ii iiii 

Item, for Chesce to the sayd drynkyng ii 

Item, to the Clarke and the sexsten ii 

Item, payd to the pryst ffbr the sanggred iiii 
Item, payd to the pryst ffor dyrge and 
messe iiii 

Summa xxxii«. iud. 
Item, Stevyu brendode payd to a 
Carpeudar for a day warke at betowns 
howse with mete and drynke vi 

Item, a alpennyorthe t of nayle [0^\ 

Item, he payd to Sir tomas jermyn for rent xiiii 

Summa xx^. 

[Page 174] John Cage payd to the bayley of the 

hundurd for hedage rent ii 

Item, payd to master sprynge for rent x 

Item, payd ffor my expensus, wan the 
suppena'was seruyd vppon me to london- 
warde ffor my horae and myaelfe the- 
thyrwardet ii 

Item, payd for my horse and myselfe there xr 

Item, payd to one of the clarkys of the 
chanssyry ffor hys ffee for to termys vi 

Item, payd to the same Clarke for copyng 
out of the replycatyon iii ii& 

' Item, payd to mastyr lucas for hys counsell v 

Item, payd for my horse and myselfe 
homwarde from londouwarde ii 

t: A half -pennvworth. This page has been stitched into the ▼olume lo awkwardly^ 
that it is impoBsible to read with certainty the right hand or pence column. 
^ It is not known what this law snit was about. 



BARDWKLL TO\VN WARDENS ACCOUNTS. 133 

8. d. 
Item, payd to the hondjrd rent ^ 

Item, pajd to the prjst for takjDg of 
owyr Cownte iiii 

xxi«. v]i|(/. 
Item payd to pake for dychwjng of the 
toune Ryvyrs xii 

Summa xiid, 
Summa totalis vili vU. viiid. 

[Page 175] The accompte made by John Cage, Robarde Bete, 

[a.d. 1545] Robard Cage, and Goodwyn Ive towne wardens of Bard- 
well vpon all sowlls day in the yere of our lord 154v*y, 
and the seven and thyrty yere of the reigne of our 
soueraine kynge henry the viii^ 

It dothe apere by the accompte takyn the daye and 
yere aboue wryttyn, all thyngs deducted and alowed that 
owgth to be allowed vnto the sayd townwardens, that yet 
remaynth in ther hands the some of xix«. id. 

[▲•D. 1546] The accompte made bye Roberte bete, Robert Cage, 

goodwyn Ive, towne wardens of bard well vppon* all 
sowlls day in the yere of our lord 1546, and the xxzviii^ 
yere of the reigne of owr souerann lord kynge henry the 
viii*** 

Item, it dothe apere by the accompte takyn the day 
and yere above writen, all things deducted and allowed 
that awght to be allowed vnto the said towne wardens, 
that nowe the sayd towne doo owe to the seyd Robert 
bete, Robert Cage, goodwyn Ive, and Thomas Sillot. 
iiii/t xiii«. vid, 

[a.d. 1547] The accompte made by Robart Bete, Robart Cage, 

goodwyn Ive, Thomas Selott, the towne wardens of 
Bardwell, vppon all Sowlls daye in the yeare of our lord 
154vii*y in the fyrst yeare of the reygne of our most 
excellent kynge edwarde the syxte of that name, and 
supreme heade ymmediately under god of the chirche of 
ynglond, of france, and ylond. 

Item, it dothe apere by the accompte takyn the daye 
and yeare above wrytteu, all things deducted and 
allowed that awghthe to be allowed vnto the sayd towne 
wardens that ytt remaynyth in thcr hands the summe of 
mony ii«. iiii^d. t 



t The Town wardens' accounta are oontinued up to 1650 ineluaive on p. 177. 
Page 178 is blank. Pages 179—181 are filled with the town wardens accounts 
for 170B-9. 



134 



A PRE-REFORMATION VILLAGE GILD. 

The preceding iDformation is extracted from an old 
and unpublished manuscript volume of memoranda and 
accounts lying in an iron chest in the vestry of the parish 
church of Bardwell, a village in the western division of 
the county of Suflfolk, nine miles from Bury St. Edmund's. 

It throws light on the social and religious life of an 
English village nearly four centuries ago, in connection 
with the constitution and working of the village gild 
system, and illustrates pre-Reformation life, customs, and 
manners. 

We need not enter here upon a technical description 
of the make up of our volume, or of its paper, handwriting, 
mode of entering money payments, &c. One point, how- 
ever, it may be well to remind our readers of, and to 
impress upon them. The value of money was very 
different then from what it is now. Its purchasing power 
was much larger. The are five entries, in five different 
pages of these accounts, of the purchase of a cow. In 
three cases the cow cost eleven shillings, in two cases 
twelve shillings. If the average cost of a cow may now 
be put at fifteen pounds, it would seem to follow that the 
purchasing power of money was then about twenty-four 
times greater than it is now. However, no such enormous 
difference existed. The greater cheapness of kine four 
hundred years ago has also to be taken into considera- 
tion ; and we may probably estimate the purchasing power 
of money to have been ten or twelve times greater then 
than it is now. 

There existed then in Bardwell, as in so many other 
country parishes, before the Reformation, a local society, 



A PRE-REFORMATION TILLAGE GILD. 135 

association, or confraternity, which was called a "gild." 
In Bardwell it bore the name of the " Gild of St. Peter," 
that title being no doubt selected because the parish 
church was (and is) dedicated to St. Peter and St. Paul.* 
We do not know when the gild was formed, or by whom, 
but we know that it existed and flourished in the first 
half of the sixteenth century, during the reign of King 
Henry viii., and no doubt long before that reign as well. 

The volume from which we derive our information 
does not contain the constitution, or rules, or conditions 
of membership of the gild, but we can supply some of 
this information from the gild accounts, and from inciden- 
tal notices scattered up and down its pages, and some may 
be inferred from the constitution of similar pre-Reforma- 
tion gilds in East Anglia ; two specimens of which are 
printed at the end of this paper. 

There are three lists of the members of the gild. 
The first list contains the names of 114 persons, the second 
of 134 persons, and the third of 70 persons ; but the third 
list is incomplete, a part of the page on which it ends and 
the whole of the following page being left blank as if for 
the insertion of more names. 

These lists are not dated ; but the name which stands 
at the head of the first and third list is that of Richard 
Kipping, vicar. Mr. Richard Kipping became vicar of 
Bardwell in 1504, and died in 1541, and these lists must, 
therefore, be placed between those two dates. 

The first list comprises 30 married couples; thirty 
men, without specifying whether they were widowers or 
bachelors ; and 24 women, of whom six are described as 
widows, and the remaining 1 8 must be presumed to have 
been single women. Children were not admitted to mem- 
bership. 

The second list comprises the names of 33 married 

* The Mrlieit evidence fur this conjoint dedication title ia in 1638. There are 
gronnds for believing that the itill earber dedication of the church was to St. Peter 
only. See page 138 n. 



136 A PRB-REFORMATION VILLAGE GILD. 

couples ; 35 men, without specifying whether they were 
widowers or bachelors ; and 33 women, of whom five are 
described as widows and five as wives. There seem to 
have been five cases where the wife was a member of the 
gild, and the husband was not. The remaining 23 must 
have been single women. 

There are no means for ascertaining the exact 
population of any village nearly 400 years ago, but if we 
suppose, as seems probable, that the majority of the adult 
population of the village belonged to the gild, and if we 
take as our basis the second list numbering 134 persons, 
then we may put down the population of Bard well in 
King Henry eighth's reign at about 300 ; rather under 
one half of what it is at the present day, and rather under 
one third of w^hat it was forty years ago, for the population 
of Bard well, like the population of most or all purely 
agricultural villages in East Anglia, has been diminishing 
steadily during that time. 

The gild included all classes of parishioners. There 
is "Mr. Richard Kipping the Vicar." There is one 
** Richard Doo clericus," which may mean a person in Holy 
Order or the Parish Clerk. There is a " Master Draper 
and his wife." There are two servants, " Christine the 
servant of John Ive," and " Nycholas the servant of Master 
Draper." These are the only titles or designations which 
occur, over and beyond words describing the sex and the 
married or unmarried condition of the person named. In 
the third list, and there only, the names of three non- 
parishioners are found. They are all of them women, and 
all of Barningham, a village three miles off. Their names 
were Jone Owynge, Aves Rastall, and Marram (Miriam ?) 
Barham. They were probably inhabitants of Bardwell 
who had migrated to Barningham, and who were allowed 
to continue to be members of the gild after thfir change 
of residence. 



A PRR-REFORMATION VILLAGE GILD. 137 

Mention is made of the following officers or officials 
of the gild : — 

(a) The Aldeiinan. The head or president of the 
gild was called the "Alderman." He was elected 
annually. The same person was never elected alderman 
for two years running. It is worthy of remark that this 
post was never held by the vicar of the parish, although 
the vicar was a member of the gild. 

(b) A Chaplain. The name of the chaplain was 
Richard Brygtham. We would again call attention to the 
fact that, though the Vicar was a member of the gild, he 
never seems to have held the post of chaplain. 

(c) A Cook. The election of John Bally as cook, is 
mentioned in 1511. A few years later William Persun 
became cook. The salary attached to the post was one 
shilling and four pence per annum. The cook was also 
free from the payments usually made by members of the 
gild, and he had charge of the dishes, plates, and other 
gild property of that kind. 

(d) A Minstrel.* William Blomefield was the min- 
strel of the gild in 1512. A little later on the names of 
two minstrels are given on one page, viz., Nicholas 
Plowman and Crystofer Cage. Their wage was one 
shilling and four pence per annum, and an allowance of 
cheese. The duties of the office are not specified, but 
they must have included the enlivening the feasts of the 
gild with strains of music. 

(e) Guardians of the Lights. Two persons were 
elected annually to fill the office of " Guardians of the 
light of St. Peter." They were allowed six shillings and 
eightpence per annum for the purchase of wax. A married 
couple generally held this office, but occasionally two men, 
and on one occasion two women were elected. In 1521 

* Marie in frequently mentioned in fnld nrdinancet, e.ff. in thote of St. Elene 
<T.8., p. 14S) and St. Mary (T. S., p. 149) at Beverley. Bee also pp. 289, 294. Pay. 
nient of minstrels, as part of the cost of a gild entertainment, is mentioned in the 
mles of the gild of St. Geoige, Norwich, founded in 1385 (T.S., p. 447). The Mayor 
of Bristol also bad paid minstrels (T. S., p. 423). 



138 A PRE-REFORMATION VILLAGE GILD. 

Mr. Richard Kipping, the vicar, held this office together 
with Robert Bete. 

Two persons were also elected annually to be " guar- 
dians of the light of the sepulchre." They were always 
men. They did not have a fixed salary, but it is recorded 
each year how much the sepulchre men, as they were 
called, received from their predecessors, e.g., in 1533 they 
took over 9s. lid. in money and 114 lbs. weight of wax, 
together with wicks. The guardians of this light were 
elected on various days in January or February or 
March, and once on May 8. This fact is of interest, 
because the Bardwell fair, which is still kept up, takes 
place on the eighth of May. There is, evidently, some 
connection between Bardwell and the early part of May, 
the origin of which is now lost. A village feast is usually 
in close connection with the dedication festival of the 
parish church. Bardwell church is now, and was in a.d. 
1538, dedicated to SS. Peter and Paul (June 29),* but 
can there have existed an earlier dedication to some saint 
whose festival occurred early in May ? If any one knew 
the derivation and meaning of the word " Bardwell," 
some light might possibly be thrown upon this obscure 
pointt 

The gild possessed a considerable amount of property 
of different kinds. We find mention of the following : — 

(a) Kine. These were usually seven in number. 
They were let out to parishioners by the year. The annual 
charge for one cow was nineteen pence, or if the cow was 
* farow,' that is to say, if no calf was produced, fifteen 
pence. A surety was always required, and the name of 
the surety was always entered in the accounts. 

* But before the 16th century the church was called the '< Church of St. Peter '* 
only, not "the church of SS. Peter and Paul." ExUni of ike Manor of Wpket in 
Bardwell, edited by the Rev. W. Hudson, for the Norfolk and Norwich Arohasol. Soc. 
Vol. xiT., p. 61. Date, c. 1290. 

t The eariiest known mention of Bardwell is in the Domesdav Survey, A.D. 1086, 

*' In Beordewella ecclesia de viii acris libene terrsB.'* The dedication of the 

church ife not given. 



A PRE-REFORMATION VILLAGE GILD. 139 

(b) A Flock of Sheep. These, like the cows, were 
let out to one or more parishioners by the year. In a list 
of the property of the gild there is this entry (we have 
here, as elsewhere, modernized the spelling) : — 

" Memorandiini. Delivered to Thomas Cage and John Sefferaj io 
ewes thirteen ahilHugs, in wethers three shillings, in lambs eight 
shillings." 

These sums do not represent the capitalized value of 
the flock of sheep, but the price at which the flock was 
let out for a year. 

On another occasion (in 1513) the flock was let out 
at the rate of fifteen shillings a year, as appears by the 
following entry : — 

" Memorandum. That the brethren have let to John Brendwood^ 
13 ewes, 9 lambs, and 8 wethers, and he to pay for the farming of them 
for the third of the year five shillings, and he to deliver again the whole 
stock as he received it." 

A few years later we find that for some unexplained 
reason the whole of the flock was sold ofi*, and that the 
Vicar of the parish was the purchaser. 

" Memorandum. That the brothers and sisters of the gild of St. 
Peter have sold to the Vicar of Bardwell all the flock sheep and lambs 
belonging to the gild for thirty-six shillings to be paid at the Feast of 
St. Michael the Archangel next following." 

Mr. Kipping, the vicar, must have been something of 
a farmer as well as of a parish-priest ; though the ordinary 
idea of the pre-Reformation clergy does not associate them 
with farming. 

There are other items of property which illustrate the 
social and festive side of the gild's character. 

(c) The Gildhall. This building is still standing, 
about ten yards south-east of Bardwell churchyard. It 
has been converted into an alms-house, though it still bears 
its old name of '' the Gildhall." Except the church, it is 
the only surviving and connecting link between the village 
of to-day, and the Bardwell gild of St. Peter of nearly 
four hundred years ago. It was an expensive building to 



140 A PRK^REPORMATION VILLAGE GILD. 

keep in repair then, as it is now, and there are many 
entries of sums laid out upon its reparation. In this gild- 
hall the Gild of St. Peter transacted all its business. 
Here was the large banqueting hall, the dimensions of 
which are obscured by the modern division of it into 
apartments, in which the members of the gild could all 
sit down together for their annual feast or feasts, for which 
they were well supplied with the necessary articles for the 
table. It is recorded that — 

(d) In 1511 the gild possessed 108 dishes, 48 platers, 
24 saucers, 2 spits. 

In 1517 it possessed 135 dishes, 39 platers, 24 saucers, 
3 iron spits. 

In 1528 it possessed 30 dishes, 75 platers, 18 saucers, 
12 cups, 12 quart pots, 18 pint pots, 6 pots the capacity 
of which is not mentioned, 72 spoons, 48 trenchers, 36 
salts, and three dozen other articles, the precise nature of 
which is not mentioned. 

These articles were, with the exception of the spits, 
gifts to the gild, the name of the donor being mentioned 
in each case. 

A '* rosting house, a caldron, keys," and a " gemewe," 
are also mentioned as belonging to the gild. There is also 
record of the purchase, evidently in connection with the 
gild, of silver plate of large value — 

" Item, bought of Robert Jolly, Robert Bete, and Rol)ert Cage, 44 
ounces and 3 grains of silver plate, at 6ve shillings the ounce. Paid 
£10 19s. Od." 

But for this entry one would have thought it 
incredible that a village gild could have owned silver plate 
to the value, according to the present value of money, of 
over one hundred pounds. What sort of plate was it? 
In all probability this entry refers to the purchase of a 
standing loving cup, which it was the ambition of social 
gilds to possess. The general weight of these standing 
loving cups, with covers, was from 25 to 100 ounces, and 
44 ounces would be quite a normal weight. The old 



A PRE-REFORMATION VILLAGE GILD. 141 

leather case at SwefBing, recently illustrated in our Pro- 
ceedings (Vol X., pt. 3, p. 366), was probably used for the 
conveyance of such a gild cup.* 

There are other items of property which illustrate 
the religious side of the gild and it-s work. 

(e) The gild possessed three banners or banner-cloths 
of St Peter. They were bought at different dates, at 
prices ranging from 12s. 4d. to £2 14s. 4d. 

(f) Torches, or large wax candles. There are various 
entries relating to the purchase, or to the amount held in 
stock, of these articles. 

By the aid of the above items and entries, coupled 
with what is known from other sources, about such gilds, 
we are able to construct answers to various questions 
which will naturally rise to the minds of readers of this 
paper. 

1. What was the object of such an institution as 
the gild of St. Peter at Bardwell ? 

It object was threefold. 

(a) Beneficial. The property of the gild, so far as it 
consisted of cows and sheep, was let out annually to 
parishioners at such a rental as would on the one hand 
bring in an income to the gild, and on the other hand 
enable the parishioners who hired the animals, to make a 
profit for themselves out of the transaction. 

ThBre is no mention of sick pay or death pay in these 
accounts, which are confined to the receipt and expenditure 
of gild property in kind, but we know from other sources 
that it was customary in such gilds for a member to be 
buried at the gild's expense, all the brothers and sisters of 
the gild attending the funeral, a levy of a small sum all 
round being made, if necessary, to meet or help meet 
expenses. It was also customary to help a brother or a 
sister fallen into pecuniary difficulties through misfortune, 

* LooaI gilda were oftop rioh in plftte, posMMiDg obalioet, patens, OMMilefttiok% 
mAzm, Bpoon«, etc. See Pigot'i "History of Hsdleigh,*''p:>266; and Palmer's 
** Perlustration of Great Yarmontb.*' 



142 A PRB-REFORMATION VILLAGR GILD. 

and not through his or her own fault. Thus such a gild 
as the gild of St. Peter answered in some way to the Odd- 
fellows, the Prudential Assurance Company, and other 
such societies in the present day. 

Secondly, the object of the gild was social. Certainly 
once a year, on St. Thomas' day,* probably more frequently, 
the members sat down to a banquet, or if that is too grand 
a word, to a common meal in the gildhall. It is evident 
from the large number of plates, cups, spits, &c., owned 
by the gild, that all its members could be catered for at 
the same time, and the present gildhall at Brad well, if the 
walls which now divide it into rooms were taken down, 
would accommodate from 100 — 150 guests. 

The third object of the gild was religious. The fact 
that it appointed a chaplain indicates this. We have 
referred to its possession of banners. They were used in 
the procession of gild members at funerals and on other 
occasions; also to its purchase of torches and wax and 
wicks. The Bardwell gild provided certain lights for 
religious purposes. Three different sorts of such lights 
are mentioned in the accounts. 

1. The light of St. Peter, the patron saint of the 
gild. This was kept perpetually burning before the 
reserved sacrament Two persons were elected every year 
for the purpose of keeping this light, and they received 
annually the sum of six shillings and eight pence for so 
doing. 

2. Five lights before our Lady of Pity. This was 
a favourite representation, either in sculpture or painted 
glass, of the dead body of our Lord, after the crucifixion, 
lying across the lap of the Blesssed Virgin. She gazes 
down on the lifeless form of her divine Son, with a tender 
and pitiful expression. There is a fifteenth century stained 
glass representation of this subject at the present time 
in the west window of Bardwell church. These five lights 
were not kept burning perpetually, but they were ordered 

• See p. 119, n. 1. 



A PRE-REFORMATION VILLAGE GILD. 143 

to be lit at every principal great feast of our Lady. These 
feasts at that time would be Feb. 2, The Purification. 
Mar. 25, the Annunciation. Aug 15, the Assumption. 
Sep. 8, the Nativity. Dec. 8, the Conception. They 
were also to be lit at every anthem (or antiphon) of our 
Lady. These were the final anthems iu honour of our 
Lady, four in number, varying with the seasons of the 
Christian year, viz., 1 Alma Bedemptoris, 2 Ave Regina, 
3 Regina csdli laetare, 4 Salve Regina ; (or else they were 
the anthems to the Psalms and Canticles, which occur in 
the little office of the Blessed Virgin Mary). 

3. Thnre was a third light called "the sepulchre 
light," or " the sepulchre light of St. Peter." Two mem- 
bers of the gild who had charge of this light rendered a 
yearly account, and were called " sepulchre men." This 
was a light set upon the grave in the churchyard, after the 
interment of any member of the gild, where it was kept 
burning for at least the first month, and sometimes for a 
whole year after the funeral. The object of this light 
was to remind passers by to pray for the soul of the person 
lately deceased, that it might soon be~bit>ught out of the 
valley of the shadow of death, into the brightness of the 
presence of God. 

We will now answer some further questions which 
obviously suggest themselves. 

From wnat sources did the gild derive its income and 
obtain its property ? 

(a) From the gift of private indtvidtmls. It is on 
record, as has been mentioned, that the large stock of 
dishes, plates, &c., for feasting purposes, were the gifts 
of different people, whose names have been preserved. 
(b) From the profit derived from the annual letting of 
cows and sheep. The gild does not seem to have possessed 
any land. Parishioners who hired these animals pastured 
them either on their own property, or on the large open 
or common lands then existing iu the parish, (c) We 
infer from the analogy of other gilds that a sum was paid 



144 A PRB-RKFORMATION VILLAOE GILD. 

down as entrance money by every person on first joining 
the gild ; that fines were imposed for the violation of the 
rules and for misbehaviour ; and that a general levy might 
be made when money was required for any special purpose. 
But there is no mention of entrance money, fines, or levy, 
in the Bardwell volume of accounts. 

Next, what became of the property once possessed by 
the gild of St Peter at Bardwell, and by the many similar 
gilds that existed in a large number of parishes in England, 
and especially in East Anglia, before the Reformation ? 

The answer is sad, but instructive. Partly under the 
specious plea (which may have been true in a few places 
and to a limited extent) that the intentions of pious 
founders and benefactors had been widely departed from, and 
partly on the ground that superstition was encouraged by 
some of the practices of the gilds (which was true enough), 
the whole of the property of these gilds was confiscated, 
and swept into the royal exchequer, or squandered away 
among the statesmen and courtiers who surrounded the 
English throne in the sixteenth century. This spoliation 
was partly effected by an Act of Parliament of Henry viii. 
in 1545, and more completely by an Act of Parliament 
passed, two years later, in the first year of Edward vi. It 
would be impossible to draft, or even compose in imagina- 
tion anything more drastic than the latter Act It is too 
long to quote in extensOy but it may be judged of by the 
following extract : — 

'* The King our Soveragne Lorde shall from the feaste of Easter 
next comminge, have and enjoje to him, his heires and successors for 
ever, all fratemitjes, brotherheddes, and guyldes, being within the 
Real me uf England and Wales, and other the Kings Dominions, and all 
Mannors, Landes, Tehementes, and other heredjtaments, ^belonging to 
them or any of them ... . and Fthey] shall by vertewe of this 
Aote be judged and deemed in actuall and real possession of our 
Soveri^ignjB Lorde the King, his heires and successors, from the saide 
feaste of Easter next comminge for ever, withowte any inquisicions or 
office thereof to be had or founde/'^ 

* 1 (Edw. , VI. cap. 14, Mc. viL Stototat of the Reftlm, 1817. Vol. iv., pi 27. 



A PRE-RKFORMATION VILLAGE GILD. 145 

No loophole of escape existed, except for such gilds 
as could prove that they existed solely or maiuly . for 
trading. The London gilds escaped in this way. 

No doubt there was some need of reform in the 
country parish gilds, just as there was need of reform in 
the Church itself. But to make such need an excuse for 
plunder ; to commit wholesale robbery because there was 
some superstition in certain gild usages ; to spoil country 
villages of their cups and saucers in order to enrich an 
extravagant monarcn like Henry viii., or the needy or 
greedy courtiers who afterwards surrounded a boy-king's 
throne, these things form a by no means pleasant episode 
in the history of the English Reformation. 



F. E. Warren. 



Bardwell Rectory^ 

Bury St. EdmufuTi, 



146 GILD OP ST. PETER, LYNN. 

As the rules of the gild of St. Peter at Bardwell 
have unfortunately not been preserved, it will help our 
readers to understand the gild accounts if we place before 
them the rules of two other early gilds of St. Peter in the 
eastern counties, as printed by Mr. Toulmin Smith in his 
work on English Gilds. 

GILD OF ST. PETER, LYNN.* 

FOUNDED A.D. 1329. 

These are the statutes of the gild of the holy apostle St. Peter, 
begun iu the town of Lynn, in the worship of God, and of our Lady 
saint Mary, and of the holy apostle St. Peter, in the year of our 
Lord 1329. 

This gild shall have four morning meetings a year. The first shall 
be after the midsummer drinking ; the second shall be the Sunday next 
before Michaelmas Day; the third shall be the Sunday next before 
Candlemas Day; the fourth shall be the Sunday next before St. 
Austin's day in May [May 26.] 

At every morning meeting, every brother and sister who belongs 
to this gild shall pay a halfpenny, to maintain withal a light burning 
in the Church of St. James, before the image of St. Peter, while divine 
service is said on festival days. 

Whosoever is summoned to any morning meeting, if he is in town, 
and will not come, nor send a proxy, he shall pay a penny towards the 
light ; and if the dean fail to summon, he shall pay one penny for the 
light for every one not summoned. 

The alderman shall call up four men of the gild, every year, to 
choose an alderman, stewards, and a dean, who are profitAble to the 
gild. And if any of those chosen refuse office he shall pay to the light, 
that is to say, the alderman one pound of wax, each steward half a 
pound of wax ; and the dean a quarter [of a pound of wax.] 

And if any brother or sister of the gild die, the dean shall provide 
candles for the Dirige, and shall summon all the company to go to the 
Church and offering with the corpse. 

And if anyone, being in health and in town, will not come^ he 
shall pay twopence at the next morning meeting, for alms for his soul. 
And every brother and sister of the gild shall have twenty masses for 
his soul when dead. The alderman and stewards shall have the masses 
6ung within three days after his death on the peril of their souls. 

And it is ordained that the alderman shall deliver the property of 
the gild to the stewards, sufficient surety being given for bringftng it 
again to the general morning meeting, before the alderman and gild 
brethren, under the penalty of two pounds of wax. 

♦ T. S.. p. 62. 



GILD OF ST. PETER, OXBURGH, KORFOLK. 147 

The alderman shall have every day as long as the general drinking 
lasts, two gallons of ale for his fees ; each steward, one gallon ; and 
the dean, one potal ; and the clerk, one potal. 

And whoever shall join this gild shall promise to the alderman to 
keep these statutes, and also pay the rights of the house, that is to say, 
to the alderman, one penny ; to the clerk, one penny ; to the dean, a 
halfpenny ; and for the wax, a halfpenny ; also to pay his entrance fee, 
if the company and he are agreed, or else find surety to pay within 
certain days. The dean shall have sixpence per year for his trouble. 

And it is also ordered that if any brother or sister wrong another, 
and it can be proved they belong to the gild, they shall pay half a 
pound of wax for the keeping up of the light. 

Any brothers or sisters becoming poor, and unable to help them- 
selves, shall be helped by the alms of the brethren and sisters. 

This is a true copy of the statutes of the gild of St Peter the 
apostle, held in Lynn, as aforesaid, written on the festival of St. Hilary 
A.D. 1388. 

GILD OF ST. PETER, OXBURGH, NORFOLK.* 

FOUNDED A.D. 1378. 

To the honour of God, of His mother Mary, and of St. Peter, a 
gild is founded in the second year of the reign of king Richard II. 

This is the ordinance of the gild, that the alderman, and the beadle, 
and the brethren and sisters of the gild shall come at the second bell of 
evensong on St. Peter's Day, and shall carry before them a burning 
torch, consisting of six pounds of wax, and that every gild brother and 
sister be at the evensong and mass of St. Peter, and at the second 
evensong, under the penalty of a pound of wax for the light of St. 
Peter, or if he be five miles distant, of half a pound ; and on their 
gild-day every man is to offer a farthing at mass, and another for alms. 

And also, at the death of a brother, each couple shall pay three- 
pence, and the alderman and beadle shall, with the consent of all the 
brethren, collect it. 

And if any brother or sister fall into trouble he shall have four (f) 
yearly. 

And if any brother or sister betray the secrets of the gild, they 
shall pay a pound of wax for the light of St. Peter. 

Account of the goods of the gild of St. Peter in Oxburgh. Five 
quarters of barley. Price of a quarter, twenty pence. 

Willelmus Mark, Alderman. 
Johannes Skultoun, Beadle. 

The Editor desires to express bis indebtedness to Lord 
John Hervey and to Mr. Henry C. Casley for several 
helpful suggestions and interpretations. 

• T. 8., p 121. 



^tiffolk |tt]5titMt^ 0f ^rcli»0l00g 



atttral §ii]9it0rg. 



OFFICERS, MEMBERS, RULES, AND REPORT, 
1901—1902. 




ESTABLISHED 1848. 



IPSWICH : W. B. HARBISON, ANCIENT HOUBB FBISS. 



(ii) 
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ImtitUttte of 3^Yrbaeot00S) ^^^ i^atuvnl ^ifiUt^. 



patron. 

THE MOST HON. THE MARQUIS OF BRISTOL, L.L. 

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SIR WILLIAM BRAMPTON GURDON, K.C.M.G., M.P. 

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(the AB07E ARB EX-OFFIOIO MiUIBKRS OF THE OOUNOIL.) 

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H. C. Casley, Esq. I The Secretary. 

J. S. CoRDER, Esq. | Kev. F. E. Warren. 

Xibrarian. 

Mr. E. Arnold Crack. 

JSanFters. 

Capital and Counties Bank, Bury St. Edmund's. 



(iii) 



HDemberd of tbe 5n0titute 

Corrected to Deeember, 190t, 

TRG SIGN * INDI0ATE8 THAT THK IfRllBEB IS A COMFOCKDER. 



Abbott, George, 68, Berners Street, Ipswich. 

Aldrich, Vice Admiral Pelham, Great Bealings. 

Allen, Elliston, Ballingdon, Sudbury. 

AUen, Mrs. Katherine, Egeiton Lodge, Fallowfield, Manchester. 

Alm^ck, Henry Horn, J. P., Long Melford, Sudbury. 

^Amherst of Hackney, The Right Hon. Lord, F.8.A., Didlington Hall, Brandon, 
Norfolk. 

Andrews, Mrs. Beatrice, Grey Fiiars, Whiting Street, Bury St. Edmund's. 

Amott, John, Woodbridge. 

Barker, General Sir George Digby, K.C.B., Clare Priory, Suffolk. 

Bamardiston, Colonel Nathaniel, J. P., d.l.. The Ryes, Sudbury. 

Barney, Miss A. U., Rattlesden, Bury St. Edmund's. 

Barrett, Edwin, 8, Queen Street, Ipswich. 

*Beaumont, George Frederick, F.8.A., The Lawn, Coggeshall, Essex. 

Bedell, Rev. A. J., Surbiton House, Stowmarket. 

Bence, Edward Starkie, Esq., Kentwell Hall, Long Melford. 

Bensly, William Thomas, L.L.n., F.9.A , Eaton, Norwich. 

Betham, Rev. Charles Jepson, m.a., Hon. Canon of Ely, Brettenham Rectory, 
Ipswich. 

Be van, Algernon Beckfnrd, J. P., Bury St. Edmund's. 
*Biden, Charles Walter, >f.R.c.g., The Lodge, Cratfield, Halesworth. 

Birch, Rev. Charles George Robert, ll.h., Brancaster Rectory, King's Lynn. 

Bisshopp, Edward Fernley, Haslemere, S. Edmund's Road, Ipswich. 
*Blaki8ton, The Very Rev. R. Milburn, Rectory, Hadleigh. 

Boldero, A. J., White House, Rattlesden, Bury S. Edmund's. 

Bond, Mrs. W. K., Pentucket, S. Edmund's Road, Ipswich. 

Booth, William Henry, Hand ford Lodge, Ipswich. 

Bristol, The Most Hon. the Marquis of, L.L., Ickworth Park, Bury St. Edmund's. 

Brooke, Edward, Ufford Place, Woodbridge. 

Brooke, Walter, Lyndhuntt, Wo<id bridge. 

Brooks, Francis Augustus, u.D., S. Felix, Felixstowe. 

Brown, Rev. Frederic Davy, Witnesham Rectory, Ipswich. 



iv LIST OF MEMBERS, 1902. 

Burrell, Robert, Westley Hall, Bury S. Edmund's. 
Burton, Bunnell Henry, Wberstead Park, Ipswich. 
Butler, Rev. G. H., Gazeley Vicarage, Newmarket 
Buxton, Henry E., J. p., Fritton Decoy, Great Yarmouth. 



Cadogan, The Right Hon. the Earl, k.o., Culford Hall, Bury S. Edmund's. 

Carthew, Major Ranulphus John, j.p., Woodbridge Abbey, Suffolk. 

Cartwright. Yen. Archdeac<m, Icklingham Rectory, MUdenhall. 
Gasley, Henry Clement, Claremont, 133, Woodbridge Road, Ipswich. 

Castleden, Rev. George, m.a., Dennington Rectory, Framlingham. 

Chapman, The Yenerable Frank Rolwrt, m.a.. The Almonry, Ely. 

Cheetham Trust Library, Manchester. 

Chennels, Rev. Alfred William, B.A., ll.d., The School, Ipswich. 

Churchman, Arthur Charles, Wilbury, Norwich Road, Ipswich. 

Clare, Rev. J. B., B.A., Wenhaston Yicarage, Haleaworth. 

Clark, Rev. William Frederick, S. Stephen's Rectory, Ipswich. 
^Clarke, Sir Ernest, m.a., k.h.a., 13a, Hanover Square, London, W. 

Clarkson, Rev. C. B., m.a., Lawshall Rectory, Bury S. Edmund's. 

Claydon, Miss £. A., 25, Fonnereau Road, Ipswich. 

Coates, Miss, 64, London Road, Lowestoft. 

Cobbold, John Dupuis, B.A., j.p.. Holy Wells, Ii)swich. 

Cobbold, Felix Thornley, m.a., j.p.. The Lodge, Felixstowe, Ipswich. 

Colchester, Y. D., 17, High Street, Ipswich. 

Connell, Rev. Archibald John Campbell, m.a., 14, Royal Crescent, Whitby. 
•Copinger, Walter Arthur, LL.n , p.s.a., f.r.s.a., Kersal Cell, Manchester. 

Corder, John Shewell, Royston House, Westerfield Road, Ipswich. 

Corry, The Hem. W. L., j.p., Edwardstone Hall, Boxfurd, Suffolk. 

Cotman, Thomas William, 7, Northgate Street, Ipswich. 

Cowell, Rev. Maurice Byles, m.a., Ashbocking Vicarage, Ipswich. 

Creswell, Rev. Samuel Francis, n.D., f.r.a.s., f.r.g.k., Northrepps Rectory, Norwich^ 

Crisp, Frederick Arthur, F.8.A., Ingle wiK>d House, Grove Park, Denmark Hill. 
London, S.E. 

Crisp, George Edwin, The Hall, Playford, Ipswich. 
•CroBstield, Talbot K., 8, Stone Buildings, Lincoln's Inn, W.C. 

Cnllum, (iery Milner Gibstm, m.a., k.s.a., j.p., Hardwick House, Bury S. Edmund's. 

Deeds, Rev. Cecil, ma., 32, Little London, Chichester. 

Denman-Dean, Rev. Richard, The Rectory, Woodbridge. 

Denman-Dean, Mrs. R., The Rectory, Woodbridge. 

De-Saumarez, The Right Hon. Lord, Shnibland Park, Ipswich. 

Doughty, Rev. Ernest George, m.a., Martlesham Rectory, Woodbridge. 

Du Faur, Mii»s, 48, Leinster Gardens, Hyde Park, W. 

Duleep Singh, His Highness Prince Frederick, Old Buckenham Hall, Attleburgh> 

Norfolk. 
Durrant, Rev. Christopher Rawes, b.a., Freston Rectory, Ipswich. 



LIST OF MEMBKRS, 1902. V 

Earle, Joseph Sim, f.s.a., 6, Kensington Palace Gardens, London, W. 

Edwards, Frederick, 32, Martin Road, Ipswich. 

Eld, Rev. Francis J., m.a., f.s.a., Polstead Rectory, Colchester. 
♦Ely, The Right Rev. Lord Alwyne Coinpton, D.D., Lord Bishop of. The Palace, Ely. 
*Evans, Sir John K.o B., d.cl., ll.d., F.8.A., Nash Mills, Kernel Hempstead. 

Farrer, Rev. Edmund, f.s.a., Hinderclay Rectory, Di^s. 

Feltoe, Rev. Charles Lett, B.D., The Rectory, Fomham All Saints, Bury S. 

Edmund's. 
Fenton, Charlen, Cranford, Vineyard Hill, Wimbledon, S.W. 
Ffiske, Henry, Bleak House, Thorpe St. Andrew, Norwich. 
Ffoulkes, T. B., 8, Burlington Road, Ipswich. 
Fish, Frederick J., Spursholt, Park Road, Ipswich. 
Fison, E. Herbert, Stoke Houra, Ipswich. 
Ford, Francis, 50, Bromhouse Road, Fulham, S.W. 
Frere, Rev. Oonstantine, m.a., j.p., Hon. Canon of Norwich, Finningham Rectory, 

Stowmarket. 

*6arUck, H. Stow, M.u., 1352, Garlick Hithe, Eastern Avenue, Cincinnati, Ohio, 
U.S.A. 

Ganz, Charles, Aldeburgh, Suffolk. 

Gerish, William Blyth, Ivy Lodge, Bishop's Stortford, Herts. 

Gibson, The Venerable Richard Hudson, m.a., Lound Rectory, Lowestoft. 

Gipps, Cyril Estcourt, 10, York Street, S. James's Square, London, S.W. 

Gooch, Sir Thomas, Henstead Hall, Wrentham. 

Gowers, Sir William Richard, Knt., M.D., f.r.8., 50, Queen Anne Street, Cavendish 
Square, London, W. 

Green, Herbert John, a. r. i.e. a., 31, Castle Meadow, Norwich. 

Green, J. W., The Panels, Northgate Street, Bury S. Edmund's. 

Greene, Raymond, M.P., Netherhall, Bury S. Edmund's. 
*Groome, William Wollaston, M.D., 3, Wybum Villas, Surbiton Hill. 

Groflse, Miss Constance, "Ebor," Dorking, Surrey. 
*Gurdon, Sir William Brampton, k.o.m.0., m.p., Assington Hall, Sudbury. 

Gumey, Reginald, Little Haugh, Norton. 

Haggard, H. Rider, Ditchingham House, Bungay. 

Hancox, E. R. H., The Cottage, Nacton, Ipswich. 

Hanson, William Bonser, 35, Clarkson Street, Ipswich. 

Harrison, Thomas, 48, High Street, IpHwich. 

Harri8«m, Walter Evans, The Ancient House, Ipswich. 

Haslewood, Rev. Frederick (xeorge, ll.d., d.cl , ChiHlet Vicarage, Canterbury. 

Halted, Rev. Henry, b.a., j.p.. The Cottage, Nuwton, Bury S. Edmund's. 

Hay ward, Alfred J., Loud water. Melton, Woodbridge. 

Herbert, Dr. A. C, Southwold. 

Hervey, Rev. Sydenham H. A., B.A., 28, Angel Hill, Bury S. Edmund's. 

Hickling, Rev. Edmund Lovegrove, m.a., The Grove, Frostenden, Wangford. 



vi LIST OF MEMBERS, 1902. 

Hill, Rev. Copittger, Buxhall Rectory, Stowmarket. 
*Hill, Rev. Edwin, m.a., f.o.s., Tbe Rectory, Gockfield, r.s.o., Suffolk. 
Hoblyn, Richard Armstrong, F.S.A., 90, Abbey Road. S. John's Wood, N.W. 
Hodges, The Ven. Archdeacon, The Vicarage, Bnry S. Edmund's. 
Hopper, Rev. Edmund Charles, m.a., Starston Rectory, Harleston. 
Hovenden, Robert, F.8.A., Heathcote, Park Hill Road, Croydon, Surrey. 
Hudson, Rev. William, m.a., f.8.a., 15, Hartfield Square, Eastbourne. 
Hunt, Robert, 27, London Road, Ipswich. 

Huntingfield, The Right Hon. Lord, Heveningham Hall, Halesworth. 
Hunt, A., Newton Road, Sudbury. 

•Iveagh, The Right Hon. Lord, 5, Groevennr Place, W. 

Jaokaman, Henry Mason, j.p., 20, Burlington Road, Ipsvrich. 

Jacob, George, Suffolk Archdeaconry Register, 9, Arcade Street, Ipswich. 

James, Rev. C. C, m.a., Wortham Rectory, Diss. 

Jennings, George, The Haven, Walberswiuk, Southwold. 

Jervis, White Jervis Herbert, b.a., Felixstowe, Ipswich. 

Joliffe, John H. J., Warrington House, Ipswich. 

Jones, Rev. Ansell, Claydon Rectory, Ipswich. 

Jones, Rev. Charles William, m.a., Pakenham Vicarage, Bury S. Edmund's. 

Jordan. William £., m.a.. King's College, Cambridge. 

Josselyn, John Henry, J. P., 11, Princes Street, Ipswich. 

Kersey, A. E., Great BealingH, Woodbridge. 

Kemplay, Miss, 48, Leinster Gardens, Hyde Park, London, W. 

King, Herbert Dove, m.d., m.a , 53, Friars' Street, Sudbury. 

Langdon, William John, Holg^te House, Sudbury. 
La Serre, Chas. F., Coshocton, Ohio, U.S.A. 
•Laver, Henry, j.p., f.s.a., f.l.8.. Head Street, Colchester. 
Lawrence, The Ven. Archdeacon, m.a., Honorary Canon of Norwich, The Grove, 

Great Bealings. 
Layard, Miss Nina Frances, Rookwood, Fonnereau Road, Ipswich. 
Layton, Rev. William Edward, m.a., f.s.a., Cuddington Vicarage, Surrey. 
Linnington, Rev. R. L. Martyn, Bad well Ash, Bury S. Edmund's. 
Littlcj Rev. Joseph Russell, m.a., Stansfield Rectory, Clare, Suffolk. 
Lowther, Hon. William, m.p., Camp«ea Ashe, Wickham Market. 

Mason, George Calver, Broadwater, Belstead Koad, Ipswich. 
Maude, Rev. Arthur, b.a.. Burgh Rectory, Woodbridge. 
•Maude, Rev. Samuel, m.a., Hockley Vicarage, Chelmsford, Essex. 
Meinertzhagen, Miss A. L., Great Glemham House, Saxmundbam. 
Mellor, Major Alfred, j.p., The Limes, Rushmere. 
Mercer, Rev. Leslie, m.a., Hawstead Rectory, Bury S. Edmund'n. 
Methold, Frederick John, f.b.a., j.p., Thome Court, Shimpling, Bury S. Edmund's. 



LIST OF MEMBERS, 1902. VU 

*Methold, Thomas Tindal, j.p., 7, Ashburn place, Cromwell Road, London, S.W. 
Miller, Henry, Bosmere House, Norwich Road, Ipswich. 
Miller, Robert Maplestone, j.p., Highwood, Constitution Hill, Ipswich. 
Miller, Thomas, Fairfields, Tuddenham Road, Ipswich. 
Mills, Miss Sarah, 149, Norwich Road, Ipswich. 
Monteith, Henry Campin, Stanley House, I, Burlington Road, Ipswich. 

*Newton, Alfred, h.a., f.b.8.. Professor of Zoology and Comparative Anatomy, 

Magdalene College, Cambridge. 
Normandale, Rev. Thomas, B.A., Grammar School, Cavendish. 

Olorenshaw, Rev. Joseph Russell, B.A., Rattlesden, Bury S. Edmund's. 
*08bome, Charles J., Hotel Bristol, Forty-second Street, New York City, U.S.A. 

Packard, Edward j.p.. Grove House, Bramford, Ipswich. 
*Parkington, Thomas, junior, m.lb. (London), Leicester House, Ipswich. 

Partridge, Charles, junior, m.a., f.r.g.s., Stowmarket ; Assistant District 
Commissioner in H.B.M. Protectorate of South Nigeria, West Africa. 

Peck, Mrs., c/o. Rev. W. H. Davies, The Rectory, Spitalfields, London, E. 

Percival, Major-General, j.p., Newe House, Pakenham, Bury S. Edmund's. 

Perry, Rev. Clement Raymond, D.D., Mickfield Rectory, Stowmarket. 

Petti ward, Robert John, m.a., j.p., Kinborough Hall, Stowmarket. 

Pilkiugton, Rev. James Holme, m.a.. Rectory, Framlingham. 
♦Powell. Edgar, 19, Connaught Street, Hyde Park, W. 

Preston, Richard, Tonbridge, Kent. 

Preston, lleet-Surgeon Theodore J., 238, Portsdown Road, London, W. 

Pretyman, Miss Ella, Haughley Park, Stowmarket. 

Pretyman, Capt. Ernest George, u.p., j.p., Orwell Park, Ipswich. 

Quilter, Sir William Cuthbert, Bart., M.P., j.p., Bawdsey Manor, Woodbridge. 

•Rath-Merrills, Mrs. M. E., 80, North Winner Avenue, Columbus, Ohio, U.S.A. 
Raven, Rev. John James, D.D., f.h.a.. Honorary Canon of Norwich, Fressingfield 

Vicarage, Harleston. 
Raven, Anne H. H., Syleham Hall, Harleston, Norfolk. 
Rawson, Mrs. K.M., Grove House, Maidstone Road, Rochester. 
Redstone, Vincent Burrough, Mill Hill, Woodbridge. 
Ridgeway, Charles Arthur, b.a.. B.Sc, 208, Ea^t Town Street, Columbus, Ohio, 

U.S.A. 
Ridley, Edwin Perkins, Burw(»od, We»terfield Road, Ipswich. 
Rivett-Camac, Col. J. H., A.D.C., ci.E., f.s.a., Schloss Wildeck, Aargau, 

Switzerland. 
Rouse, John Wm., Wilford Lodge, .St. John's, Ipswich. 
Russell, Rev. Henry, B.D., Lay ham Rectory, Hadleigb. 

Scott, Rev. Thomas, m.a.. Honorary Canon of S. Alban's, Lavenham Rectory, 
Sudbury. 



viii LIST OF MEMBERS, 1902. 

Seager, Joseph William, Globe House, Dalton Road, Ipewich. 
Smith, Charlea, Waveney Cottage, Great Bealinga, Woodbridge. 
Spanton, William Silas, Greencroft, Hadley Wood, Barnet, Herts. 
Spencer, Rev. Arthur John, li.A., The Vicarage, Eye. 
^Stevenson, Francin Seymour, m.p., Playford Mount, Playford, Woodbridge. 
Stradbroke, The Right Hon. the Earl of, Henham Hall, Wangford. 
Stuart, Major J., The Hill House, Erwarton, Ipswich. 

Tacon, Sir Thomas Henry, j.p.. Red House, Eye. 

Talbot, John, Plantation House, Ipswich. 

Tapp, W. M., LL.D., 27. South Moulton Street, Oxford Street, W. 
*Tatlock, Miss H. H., Bramfield House, Halesworth. 

Thoroton, Rev. Levett £. W., Beyton Rectory, Bury S. Edmund's. 

Tidswell, Richard H., J.P., 49, Wilton Crescent, London, S.W. 

Todd, Rev. Horatio Lovel, Oocold Rectory, Eye. 

•Turner, Rev. George Francis, m.a., j.p., Hon. Canon of Ely, Rivers House, 
Russell Street, Bath. 

Tyndal, George Herbert, Minster Place, Ely. 

Wade, Mrs., Elmsley, Yoxford. 

Wainwright, Percy F., 167, Norwich Road, Ipswich. 

Walker, Rev. Henry Ashton, m.a., Chattisham Vicarage, Ipswich. 

•Ward, Major Harry Parker, m.a., Ohio National Guard, Worthington, Ohio, U.S.A. 

Warren, Rev. F. E., b.d., f.s.a., Hon. Canon of Ely, Bardwell Rectory, 
Bury S. Edmund's. 

Whaites, R. T., Burlington Road, Ipswich. 

•Whayman, Horace W., F.R.8.A. (Ireland) ; Bexley Hall, Gambler, Knox Co., Ohio, 
U.S.A. 

White, John, 18, Brook Street, Ipswich. 

Williams, Rev. Herbert, M.A., Uflford Rectory, Woodbridge. 

Wild, Rev. Ernest John, m.a., Rattlesden Rectory, Bury S. Edmund's. 

Wood, A. H. E., Sudboume Hall, Orford. 

Wood, J., Hengrave Hall, Bury St. Edmund's. 

Woolsey, Rev. J. J., m.a., Brightwell Rectory, Ipswich. 

Woolnough. Frank, The Museum, Ipswich. 

Wright, Henry John, 4, Museum Street, Ipswich. 

Wyles, Rev. Walter, m.a., Coddenham Rectory, Ipswich. 

Youell, Edward Pitt, j.p., Cumberland Street. Woodbridge. 



Annual Subscriptions, 10s., DUE JANUARY 1st. Life Composition, £5. 

Persons desirous of becoming Members are requested to send in their names and 
addresses to the Honorary Secretary. 

Should any errors, omissions of honorary distinctions, etc., be found in the List 
of Members, it is requested that notice thereof may be given to 

VINCENT BURROUGH REDSTONE, Honomry Secretary, 

Mill Hill, Woodbridge. 



( ix ) 



•fconorarB /Dembers. 

Crteenwell. Rev. William, m.a., d.c.l., f.r.s., f.s.a., Minor Canon of Durham, 
Dnrnam. 

MuBkett, J. J., 11, Talbot Road, South Tottenham. 

White, Rev. Charles Harold Evelyn, f.s.a., Rampton Rectory, Cambridge. 



publicatioiid. 

Copies are aent to :— 

1. Members. 

2. Honorary Members. 

3. The Secretaries of Societies in Union, including those in America. 

4. Librarians of :— 

Ipswich MuHuem. 
British Museum. 
Bodleian, Oxford. 
University, Cambridge. 



The Council are not answerable for any opinions put forth in their publications. 
Each Contributor is alone responsible for his own remarks. 

Authors would greatly further the interests of the Institute and save much 
mmecessary expense in the correcticm of proofs, if they would be good enough to 
write clearly, and on only one side of the paper. 



^mttUfi In ^nion, 

FOR INTERCHANGE OP PUBLICATIONS, ftc. 

Antiquaries, Society of, Burlington House, Piccadillj, London, W. 

Sec., W. H. St. John Hope, Esq., m.a. 
Bedfordshire, Architectural and Archceological Society of. 

Hon. Sec , Rev. Jeremiah W. Haddook, m.a., 7, Windsor Terrace, Bedford. 
Bradford Historical and Arch»ological Society. 

Hon. Sec, John Clapham, Esq., 6, Sunny Bank. Shipley. 
Bristol and Gloucestershire Arctieeological Society. 

Hon. Sec, Rev. W. Bazeloy, m.a.. The Society's Library, Eastgate, Gloncester. 
Cambridge Antiquarian Society. 

Hon. Sec, Thomas Dinham Atkinson, Esq., S. Mary's Passage, Cambridge. 
East Herts. Arcbeeological Society. 

Hon. Sec. W. B. Gerish, Esq., Ivy Lodge, Bishop's Stortford. 
Essex Archesological Society. 

Hon. Sec, George Frederick Beaumont, F.S.A., The Lawn, Coggeshall, Essex. 
Kent Archesologicai Society. 

Hon. Sec, George Payne, jun., Esq., F.8.A., F.L.8., The Precinct, Rochester. 
Lancashire and Cheshire Historic Society of. 

Hon. Sec, R. D. Ratoliffe, Esq., M.A., f.s.a., Royal Institution, Colquitt 
Street, Liverpool. 
Leicester Architectural and Archeeological Society. 

Hon. Sec, Major Freer, 10, New Street. Leicester. 
London and Middlesex Archseologioal Society. 

Hon. Sec, Charles Welch, Esq., F.8.A., GuiloSiall Library, London, E.C. 
Lincoln and Nottingham, Architectural and Archaeological Society of^ 
Counties of. 

Hon. Sec, Rev. Arthur Maddison, h.a.,f.8.a., Librarian,yicar's Court, Lincoln.. 
Lincoln's Inn, The Hon. Society of The Librarian. 
Montgomeryshire, The Powys Land Club. 

Hon. Sec, Thomas Simpson Jone«, M A., Gungrog Hall, Welshpool. 
Natural History Museum, Cromwell Road, S.W. 

Librarian, B. B. Woodward, Esq. 
Newcastle Society of Antiquaries. Hon. Sec, The Castle, Newcastle. 
Norfolk and Norwich Archaeological Society, Norwich. 

Hon. Sec, Leonard G. Bolingbroke, Esq., The Close, Norwich. 
Northampton, Architectural Society of the Archdeaconry of. 

Hon. Sec, Christopher Alexander Markham, Ksq., f.s.a., 4, S. George^s Place 
Northampton. 
Royal Archeeologicnl Institute of Great Britain, 20, Hanover Square, 
London, W. 

Hon. Sec, Arthur Henry Lyell, Esq., k.8.a. 
Somersetshire Archfleological and Natural History Society. 

Hon. Sec, C. J. Turner, Esq., The Castle, Taunton. 
Surrey Archseological Society. 

Hon. Sees., M. S. Guiseppi, Esq., f.s.a., and Rev. T. S. Cooper, m.a., f.s.a.,. 
Castle Arch, Guildford. 
Yorkshire Agricultural Society. 

Hon. Sec, Rev. William Haworth, 10, Bootham Terrace, York. 
Ireland. Royal Historical and Archaeological Association of Ireland. 

Hon. Sec, Robert Cochrane, Esq., U.R.I.A., Rathgar, Dublin. 
Massachusetts Historical Society, Boston, United States of America. 
National Museum, Stockholm, Sweden. 

Librarian, Dr. Anton Blomberg. 
Smithsonian Institution. Washington, D.C. 



(xi) 
RULES OF THE 



1. The Society shall be called the "Suffolk Institute of 
Archaeology and Natural History." 

2. The object of the Institute shall be — 

1. To collect and publish information on the Archeology and Natural 

History of the District. 

2. To oppose and prevent, as for as may be practicable, any^ injuries with 

which ancient monuments of every description, withm the District 
may be from time to time threatened, and to collect accurate 
drawings, plans, and descriptions thereof. 

3. The Institute shuU consist of Ordinary and Honorary Members. 

4. Each Ordinary Member shall pay an annual Subscription of 
lOs., to be due in advance on the 1st of January, and shall be considered 
to belong to the Institute until he withdraws from it by a notice in 
writing to the Secretary. A donor of £b shall be a Life Member. 

5. The OfiBcers of the Institute shall l)e a President, Vice- 
Presidents, a Treasurer, and Honorary Secretary, all of whom shall be 
elected for the year at the Annual Meeting. 

6. The general management of the affairs and property of the 
Institute shall be vested in the Council, consisting of the Officers, and 
of twelve Members elected from the General body of the Subscribers, to 
retire annually, but eligible for re-election. 

7. The Council shall meet to transact the ordinary business of the 
Institute, not less than three times a year. They shall have power to 
make Bye-laws, appoint Committees and Local Secretaries, recommend 
Honorary Members for election by the Annual Meeting, supply vacancies 
that may occur during the year in their own V)ody or among the officers, 
and to make arrangements for Excursions and other meetings. They 
shall also annually frame a Report and prepare the Accounts for 
submission to the Annual Meeting At the Meetings of the Council, 
three to be a quorum, and the Cluiirman to have a casting vote. 

8. The ordinary place of meeting shall be Bury St. Edmund's, 
but it shall be in the discretion of the Council to hold meetings at other 
places, if, and when they shall think it advisable. 

9. Ench Member shall be entitled to free admission to the General 
Meetings of the Institute ; and he shall also be entitled to the use of 
the Library, and to a copy of each publication of the Institute ; but no 
copy of any such publication shall be delivered to any member whose 
subscription is more than twelve months in arrear. 

10. The Annual Meeting shall be held in the month of April or May 
in each year, or at such other time as shall be fixed upon by the Council. 

11. All papers presented to the Institute shall thereby be con 
sidered its property, and the Council may publish the same in any way, 
and at any time, they may think proper. 



xii ANNUAL REPORT, 1901 — 1902. 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1901—1902. 

The work of the Institute during the past year has produced very 
satisfactory results, mainly owing to the increased interest which 
members have shown in its support. If progress and development are 
to be maintained, still greater responsibility than before falls on each 
member in consequence of the loss which the Institute has suffered in 
the death of tlie late Lord John Hervey. From the earliest days of its 
formation he shewed deep interest in its welfare. Both as President, 
Jan. 25th, 1870, for 16 years, and as Member of the Council, he was 
ever ready to give his help and advice. Work in the interests of 
Suffolk Archeeology and for the Institute was done by Loi*d John 
Hervey with untiring zeal, and as a labour of love. 

There has been a slight increase in the number of members, three 
have resigned. The encouragement given to the proceedings by the 
large attendance at the Excursions of 1901, and at the Conversazione, 
which has been held annually for the last three years, induces the 
Council to recommend an additional excursion with the hope that the 
publicity which is given to the undertakings may be a means of 
attracting further support, and of opening a wider field of research. 

The Annual Summer Excursion was attended by more than a 
hundred members and friends, and several members of the London 
East Anglian Society accompanied them. The wide circulation of the 
work done by the Institute will tend to enlarge its opportunities, and 
all its meml>ers are grateful for the friendly co-operation and hearty 
welcome extended to the visitors by the Most Hon. the Marquis of 
Bristol, J. Wood, Esq., of Hengrave Hall, and the other gentlemen who 
received them at the various stopping places. 

The excursion to Little Wenham was of exceptional interest, and 
the thanks accorded to the Misses Crisp and G. E. Crisp, Esq., for their 
kind invitation, were must heartily given. But what is of greater 
importance than the pleasurable outings is the result which attends 
them, and it is most gratifying to be able to report that the ruinous 
churches of Icklingham All Saints and of Little Wenham are now so 
far repaired, that they will remain monuments of antiquity. 

The Council desire to record their thanks to W. Paul, Esq., late 
Mayor of Ipswich, for the warm reception he gave to the members on 
the occasion of the Conversazione held at the Town Hall, Ipswich, 
6th November, 1901. On this occasion a member, Mrs. Andrews, 
graciously restored to the Ipswich Corporation a (^ourt Book, of a date 
earlier than any in the Borough Archives. 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1901 — 1902. xiii 

The fiuancial state of the Institute is such that great freedom 
caunot be given to the work of publishnig from the many manuscripts 
relating to Suffolk County History, which are continually being brought 
to the notice of the Council. Much has yet to be done in this direction. 
The Council sug<<^est that communications should be sent to the Hon. 
Secretary of all discoveries of autiquanan interest made in any locality, 
so that notice may be brought to those who are more immediately con- 
cerned in the History of Suffolk. 



The Election of a Presidbnt. 



At a Meeting of the Council of the Suffolk Institute of Archaeology 
and Natural History held at the Athenaeum, Bury St. Edmund's, 
Ist August, 1902, it was unanimously agreed: — "That this Council 
has heard with regret the death of the late President, Lord Henniker, 
and desires to express the sense of their loss caused thereby to the 
Institute, and to express their sympathy with Lord Henniker and his 
family." 

It was further agreed: — "That Sir William Brampton Gurdon, 
K.C.M.Q., M.P., be elected President of the Institute." 

The Hon. Secretary has received the following letter : — 

" 1, Whitehall Gardens, S.W., 

"August 6th, 1902. 
" Dear Mr. Redstone, 

" I am nmch obliged to you for your letter. Pray 
express my l>est thanks to the Council for the great honour they have 
paid me in asking me to assume the office of President. 

" I am afraid that at present I shall be a bad attendant, but of 
course the work is of great interest to me ; and if they think me 
worthy of the honour I will do my best to serve them. 

" Yours sincerely, 

"Brampton Gurdon." 



XIV 



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April 16ih, 1902. 



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Publications Received, I902. 

Archseologia. Vol. lvii., part 2. 

Bristol and Gloucestershire Arcbseological Society, Transactions of. '^ 

Vol. XXIV., parts 1 and 2. 1901. 

Archaeological Notes 

and Programme of Meetings, 1901. 
British Museum, Presented by the Trustees of. 
General Guide 

Guide to British Fungi. „ 

„ „ Mycetozou. ^ 

„ Fossil Invertebrates. Parts i. and ii. 

„ Fossil Mammals and Birds. 

„ Reptiles and Fishes. 

„ Mammalia. ] 

„ Mineral Gallery. ' 

„ Reptiles and Fishes. j 

„ Shell and Starfish Galleries. 

Index to Minerals. 

Introduction to Meteorites. 

„ Minerals. 

„ Rocks. 

Cambridge Antiquarian Society, Proceedings. No. xui. 

Publications: 

No. xxxiv. Christchurch, Canterbury. 

No. xxxviii., 1901 Twelve Windows in the Choir of Canterbury 
Cathedral. By Montague Rhodes-James. 1901. 
East Herts Archaeological Society, Transactions. Vol. i., part 3. 
Eastern Counties Magazine. February, 1902. 
Essex ArchsBological Society, Transactions. Vol. viii., part 3, 1901 ; 

Vol. VIII., part 4, 1902. 
Ireland, Royal Society of Antiquaries of, Journal of. 

Vol. XXXI., parts 2 and 3 ; Vol. xxxii., part 1. 
Lancashire and Cheshire Historical Society, Transactions. Vol. lii. 1900. 
London Society of Antiquaries, Proceedings. Vol. xviii., part 2, Nov. 

to June, 1901. 
Loraine, Sir Lambton, Bart, Deed Poll (Armorial Bearings). 
Montgomeryshire, Collections Historical and Archeeological. 

Vol. xxxii., part 1. 
Newcastle-on-Tyne Society of Antiquaries, Proceedings of. 

Vol. x., parts 18, 19, 20, 22, 23, 25, 26. 
Norfolk and Norwich Archroological Society, Original Papers for 1901. 

Vol. xiv., part 3. 
Ohio State University, Report of. 
Smithsonian Institute, Report of the Bureau of American Ethnology. 

Part II. 
Somersetshire Archaeological and Natural History Society, Proceedings 

of. Vol. XLVi. 1900. 
Worcester Diocesan Architectural and Archaeological Society. 
46th Report. 



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149 



OBITUARY NOTICE 

OF THE LATE 

LORD JOHN HERVEY. 
By Sir Wm. Brampton Gurdon, m.p. 

LORD John William Nicholas Hervey, third son of 
the second Marquis of Bristol, was born on the 15th 
November, 1841. He was educated at Eton and 
Cambridge, at both of which his charm of manner, his 
constant unselfishness, and his readiness to help all those 
with whom he came in contact, earned for him that 
wonderful popularity which followed him through life. It 
is hardly possible to describe the loss which the County 
of Suffolk has suffered by his death. In all good works, 
in all social movements whose object was to help those in 
need, he was ever prominent ; a good man of business, 
endowed with an excellent judgment and a clear insight, 
never sparing himself, he laboured constantly for the 
good of all around him. In his earlier days on the Board 
of Guardians, and since 1889 on the County Council, he 
has been one of our most useful workers, and as first 
Chairman of the Technical Instruction Committee of West 
Suffolk he inaugurated a system of useful education, 
which has stood the test of time. For some years an 
oflBcer in the West Suffolk Militia, in which he latterly 
held the rank of Major, he did much to raise the tone of 
the Regiment. Ever a free-handed though unostentatious 

M 

Vol. XI. Part 2. 



i 



i 



150 OBITUARY NOTICE OP 



donor, he was even more prodigal of his person ; and, though 
he had been for some years out of health, and had frequently- 
suffered much pain, with patience and resignation, his 
death was actually caused by his devotion to his work. * j 

Undertaking in the very severe weather of last winter an 
inquiry near Bungay, on behalf the County Council, j 

which necessitated a journey and exposure late at night, "1 

he contracted the disease to which he succumbed after a 
fortnight's illness. It is most touching to know that the 
inhabitants of Bungay, who loved him as we all loved 
him in Suffolk, watched with the greatest anxiety the 
progress of the malady, and vied with one another in 
endeavours to serve him, and to help the relations who 
were with him during his last days. 

He had ever taken great interest in our Society, and ^ 

had occupied the Presidential Chair from 1870, when he \ 

succeeded the late Sir Charles Bunbury, to 1886. Since 
that date he has served on the Committee, and has been 
regular in his attendance and work. Most Suffolk in- 
habitants are acquainted with the useful and interesting 
researches which he has made into ancient County Records, ^ 

and with the publications which he issued at his own 
expense, notably the Domesday Book for Suffolk, and the 
"Ickworth Surveye Boocke." So lately as May, 1899, 
he opened Moyse's Hall, in Bury St. Edmund's, as a 
Museum, and it is partly due to his active assistance that ^ 

the collection has been so well housed and arranged. 

For many years he presided over the Bury Athenaeum, 
in succession to his uncle, the late Bishop of Bath and 
Wells. It was no easy task to follow so eminent a man, 
but under Lord John Hervey's care and guidance, the 
institution lost nothing of its value and popularity. 1 

This is not the place to dilate upon his political life, I 

in which, as throughout his whole career, he was always 
labouring for others rather than for himself; and on more 
than one occasion he showed that remarkable chivalry 
and high sense of honour, which were his especial 
characteristics. 



THE LATE LORD JOHN HERVKY. 151 

It may be interesting to our readers to know that he 
was not only a well-read man, but that he had added to 
his knowledge of the world by extended travels. He 
had visited Egypt, Palestine, and Syria, immediately 
after taking his degree in Classical honours at Cambridge ; 
in 1865 he made a tour in Greece, which, as is well-known, 
was rendered more exciting than pleasant by his capture 
by brigands, on which occasion he showed considerable 
personal courage. He had travelled much on the Continent, 
and in 1867-8 he visited India, with which, including 
Cashmere, he made a thorough acquaintance ; and during 
the administration of the present Duke of Argyll in 
Canada he remained for many months a guest at Govern- 
ment House, where he was much appreciated by all who 
knew him. 

Those who may have only casually met him, and have 
been struck by his gentle and unselfish disposition, and by 
his courtesy of the old school, would not guess the force 
of character which lay beneath the quiet exterior. But 
it is a fact that many of us in Suffolk have long been 
accustomed to follow his guidance, never questioning his 
advice, even when it might appear contrary to our own 
judgment, so thorough was our trust in his honesty and 
right-mindedness. 

We are very glad to find that a number of his 
admirers of all shades of opinion have commissioned our 
county artist, Mr. William Robert Symonds, who was 
personally acquainted with him, to paint Lord John 
Hervey's portrait, which will be presented to Christ 
Church Mansion, and will form there a memorial to future 
generations of a Suffolk worthy, whose memory will never 
lade from the hearts of those who knew him and loved 
him. 



152 



^ 



EXTENT OF HADLEIGH MANOR, 1305. 
By (the late) Lord John Hervey. 



Extent of the manor of Hadleigh, made there on the Thursday 
next before the feast of the Annunication of the Blesoed Mary in the 
34th year of the reign of King Edward son of King Henry in the year 
of grace 1305, before John le Doo, steward, by the hand of William 
the Clerk of Felsham, by the oath of William le Hert of Hadleigh, 
John Hitche, Thomas le Gras, John Browning of Hadleigh, Symon the 
Fuller of the same town, Robert of Woodstock, , Richard the Smith, 
John son of I^icholas Browning, William Poer, Nicholas Makke, and 
Nicholas Browning, who all being sworn, say that the Prior of Christ 
Church, Canterbury, and of the Convent of the same place, holds the 
manor of Hadleigh in free, pure, and perpetual alms. 

Messuage. There is there one messuage well and reasonably built, 
and it is sufficient for the outgoing of the manor. And it contains 
within in itself within the walls and ditches, from the King's way up 
the river bank (?) 4 acres by estimation. And the herbage thereof is 
valued annually by estimation at 4 shillings. And the curtilage thereof 
is valued annually at 12d., sometimes more sometimes less according to 
the profit (yield). And the garden thereof is valued annually whether 
in apples, pears, and grapes of the vine when there shall chance to 
be any, at 3 shillings, sometimes more sometimes less according to the 
profit. Total 8 shillings. 

Bovehouse. There is there one Dovehouse, and is valued annually, 
if it be stocked, at 3 shillings, sometimes more sometimes less. 

Total 3 shillings. 

There are there two mills, one a water mill, namely for milling 
corn, and the other for fulling cloth. And they are valued to let 
annually at £9 6s. 7d. And the fishing in the mill stanches is valued 
annually at 2 shillings sometimes more sometimes le^s. 

Total £9 88. 8d. 

Wood. There is there a certain wood called Bonhey : And it 
contains in itself 16 acres, and the underwood thereof is valued annually 
at 3 shillings. And the pasture thereof is valued annually at fid. : the 
pannage thereof is not entered in the extent, because it was lately 
felled (1). 



EXTENT OF HADLEIOH MANOR, 1305. 153 

There is also there a certain other wood called Edolvestone, and it 
contains in itself 7 acres and a half. And the underwood thereof is 
valued annually by estimatiun at 3 shillings. And the pasture thereof 
is valued annually by estimation at 6d. There is also there a certain 
third wood called Estleyle and it contains 7 acres and a half. And the 
underwood thereof is valued annually at 2 shillings, sometimes more 
sometimes less. Of the pannage and nuts the value is nothing, because 
they grow in but few spots. 

There is also there a certain alder-carr called Muchelfen, and it 
contains 6 acres, and the underwood thereof is valued annually at 4 
shillings. And the pasture thereof is valued annually at 8 shillings. 

Total 20 shillings. 

Demesne Lands. There are there of arable land in demesne in divers 
fields 327 acres of land at the lowest reckoning. And they are valued 
annually at £10 18s. at the price of 8d. to the acre. Total £10 18s. 

And be it remembered that a parcel (1 perch) of land in this manor 
ought to be in length 16^ ft And each acre of suitable land can be 
sown with 2^ bushels of com (?) : with 2^ bushels of siligo : with 2 
bushels of peas and beans : and with 4 bushels of oats : and 4 bushels 
of barley. And each plough ought to be yoked with 4 oxen and 4 
heifers (?). And the plough can commonly plough daily 1 acre of land 
at the least. 

There are there of meadows for mowing, in Cosford Meadows 4 
acres and a half. And they are valued annually by estimation at 18s. 
at the price of 4s. the acre. There are also in Benton meadow 4 acres 
and a half And they are valued annually by estimation at 14s. at the 
price of 4s. to the acre. Total 32 shillings. 

Several Pasture with the foggap^e. There is there a certain several 
pasture near the manor house towards the north and it is called Tyefield. 
And it contains in itself 4 acres, and the pasture thereof is valued 
annually at 8s. at the price of 2 shillings to the acre. And the pasture 
at the Herst is valued annually at 4s. 6d. There is also there a piece 
of pasture which formerly belonged to Nicholas of Layham, and it is 
valued annually at 2s. And a piece of pasture at Bradfield brook ; And 
it is valued annually at 6d. And the foggage at Muchelfen is valued at 
8d. Total 16s. 7d. 

Common Pasture. Be it known that the lord Prior is chief lord of 
the common pasture of Hadleigh. And he may pasture in the said 
pasture with easement of the fresh ploughed-land (1) in the fields and of 
the lord's demesne lauds in the open time four score sheep. And the 
pasture of each head is valued annually at 2d. and no more on account 
of the drawback of food for the Shepherds. Total 13s. 4d. 

Common Fishery. There is there a certain common fishery on the 
Hadleigh Bank, where each tenant having land, meadow, or pasture 
along the bank may fish his own land without hindrance (disturbance). 
And the lord may fish over the whole Bank except in the bank next 



154 EXTENT OF HADLEIGH MANOR, 1305. 

the manor house (?) of the lord of Topsfield. And the fishing thereof 
is valued annually to the lord's use by estimation at 38. sometimes more 
sometimes less according to the force of the water course on the said 
Bank. Total Ss. 

Fines and Perquisites of Court. There is there a certain Court 
holden from three weeks to three weeks of the free tenants and customary 
tenants of the lord. And the fines and perquisites thereof are valued 
annually with the view of frank-pledge at 60s. sometimes more some- 
times less. Total 60s. 

Total of the totals aforesaid £28 2s. 7d. 

Free Tenants. The Lord of Toppisfield holds of the lord a certain 
land which is called Pyncheney land, rendering for it annually at the 
feast of negations 14^d. ; at the feast of St. Peter ad vincula 14^. ; 
and at the feast of Michaelmas 17^d. ; and he owes suit of Court. 

Total 38. lOJd. 

Tenants of the lauds of Gloucestres-land, namely Richard at the 
Pond, Osbert of Aldham, the lord of Toppisfield Hall, hold a certain 
free land called Gloucestres-Iand rendering for it annually at the feast of 
St. Andrew 15d. ; on Palm Sunday lid. ; at the Rogations 28. 5d. ; at 
the feast of the Nativity of Saint John Baptist 2s. 5d. ; at the feast of 
Saint Peter ad vincula 2s. 5d. ; and at the feast of Michaelmas 28. lOd. 
And they owe suit of Court. Total 12s. 3d. beside the suit 

Tenants of the lands of the free land called Heest man-land. 
Thomas Fynch, Richard Fauke hold the aforesaid land returning (ren- 
dering) for it annually at the feast of Saint Andrew 2d. ; on Palm 
Sunday (7) IJd. ; at the feast of Rogations 8d., at the feast of Saint 
Peter ad vincula 8d. ; and at the feast of Michaelmas 8d. ; and they 
owe three appearances at three general courts annually. 

Total 2s. 3Jd., besides the suit. 

The said Thomas and Katherine Fynch hold one quarter of the 
free land called Bonleys-land rendering for it annually at the aforesaid 
terms 2s. And they do suit of Court. Total 2s. 

Katherine Fynch holds a certain land freely, which is called 
Stubbynge, rendering for it annually at the feast of Saint Andrew 2d. 

Total 2d. 

Tenants of the lands of the Goddyngge-free-land. John of Layham, 
the heirs of Gylemyn, John Browning, junr., Robert of Woodstock, and 
Symon the fuller hold the free land called Goddyngge-free-land, render- 
ing for it annually at the Rogations lid. ; at the feast of Saint Peter 
ad Vincula lid.; and at the feast of Michaelmas 12d. ; And (they) 
owe suit of Court. Total 28. lOd. besides the suit. 

Thomas Sugge holds a certain messuage, which formerly belonged 
to William le Rede. And he owes (?) for it annually at the feast of 
Rogations 2d. ; and at the feast of St. Peter ad Vincula 2d. ; and at 
the feast of Michaelmas 2d. ; And he owes suit of Court. 

Total 6d., and the suit. 



SXTENT OF HADLEIGH MANOR, 1305. 155 

Alexander Ejri holds a cottage called BundeyeFB-cott. rendering 
for it annually at the feast of Rogations 2d. ; and at the feast of St. Peter 
ad Vincula 2d. ; and at the feast of Michaelmas 2d. in lieu (for) of all 
services. Total 6d, 

Tenants of the land of Knaptoneland, Lord Robert of Raydoni 
Richard at the Pond, Richard Fauke, and John his brother, hold a 
certain land called Knaptone-land rendering for it annually at the feast 
of Saint Andrew 9^d ; at the feast of Rogations lOd. ; at the feast of 
St Peter ad vincula lOd. for all services. Total 2s. 5^d. 

Edmund the Chaplain holds the land called Bugel's-croft, reudeiing 
at the feast of Rogations 4d. ; at the feast of Saint Peter ad Vincula 
4d. ; at the feast of Michaelmas 4d. for all services. Total 12d. 

John of Kyrton holds a piece of laud below (f) his messuage 
rendering for it annually at the feast of Michaelmas 2^. Total 2^d. 

Elyas Brown holds a certain place (?) of land abutting upon 
Hertes-croft rendering for it annually at the feast of Michaelmas 3d. 

Total 3d. 

Tenants of the land of Millei-s-laud. William Syer holds a certain 
land, freely rendering for it annually at the feast of Saint Andrew |d. ; 
on Palm Sunday jd. ; at the Rogations 8d ; at the feast of Saint Peter 
ad vincula 8d. ; and at the feast of Michaelmas 8d., and he owes suit 
of court. Total 2s. IJd. 

John, son of Nicholas Browning, holds a certain land called Terries- 
land , rendering for it at the feast of Saint Andrew 2|d. ; on Palm 
Sunday Ifd. ; and the Rogations lO^d. ; at the feast of ad vincula of 
St Peter lO^d. ; and at the feast of Michaelmas 10|d. ; and he owes 
suit of Court Total 3s. 

Tenants of the lands of West-field land. Nicholas Kacherel, and 
Nicholas the Clerk hold the said land rendering for it at the Rogations 
4d. ; and at the ad vincula of St. Peter 4d. ; and at the feast of 
Michaelmas 4d. ; and they owe suit of Court. Total 12d. 

Richard at the Potid, John Coyse, Adam Tyccat, hold a quarter of 
one free land, rendering for it at the feast of Saint Andrew l^d. ; on 
Palm Sunday ^d. ; at the Rogations 4d. ; at the ad vincula of St 
Peter 4d. ; at the feast of Michaelmas 4d. ; and they owe suit of 
Court. Total 14d. 

Lord Hugh le Despensers holds of the lord a piece of pasture in 
Hadleigh, rendering for it annually at the feast of Michaelmas 6d. 

Total 6d. 

Tenants of the lands of the Blake-land. William Poer, Matilda, 
daughter of John Kirketon, Cristina his sister, Robert of Woodstock, 
and Thomas le Bass hold one quarter of a land called Blake-land, 
rendering for it at the feast of Saint Andrew Id. ; at the Rogations 8d. ; 
at the feast of Saint Peter ad vincula 8d. ; and at the feast of Michael- 
mas 8d. for all services. Total 28. Id. 



156 EXTENT OF HADLEI6H MANOR, 1305. 

Hugh de Wetherafield, the Chaplain, holds of the lord a certain 
tenement called Hey rotis laud, rendering for it at the Rogations 20d. ; 
at the feast of St. Peter ad vincula 20d. ; at the feast of Michaelmas 
20d. And he owes suit of Court ToUl 5s. 

John Poer and William Poer hold a quarter of laud called Hertes- 
croft, rendering at the feast of Saint John Baptist 8d. Total 8d. 

Adam de Hethe-don holds of the lord a certain land called Netham- 
land, rendering for it annually at the feast of Saint John Baptist 6d. 

Total 6d. 

Richard Muffel holds of the lord the fourth part of a land called 
Muffeles-Iand, rendering for it at the Rogations 5d. ; at the feast of 
Saint Peter ad vincula 5d. ; at the feast of Michaelmas 6d. And he 
owes 3 suits at the General Court. Total 16d. besides the suit 

Tenants of the lands of Edd riches-free-laud (t). John of Wygen- 
hall, Adam of Gedding, hold of the lord of the said land, rendering for 
it annually at the feast of St. Andrew 13d. ; on Palm Sunday lid. ; at 
the Rogations 28. Id. ; at the feast of Saint John Baptist 3d. ; at the 
ad vincula of Saiut Peter 2s. Id. ; at the feast of Michaelmas 28. Id. ; 
And they will do suit of Court. ToUl 8s. 6d. 

John Basset and Murte hold from the lord Baddes-acre, rendering 
at the Rogations IJd. ; at the ad vincula of St. Peter l^d. ; at the 
feast of Michaelmas Id. Total 4d. 

John of Wygeuhall and Adam of Gedding hold of the lord a 
certain land called Leones-land, rendering for it at the Rogations 4d. ; at 
the ad vincula of Saint Peter, and at the feast of Michaelmas 4d. And 
(they) owe suit of Court Total 8d. 

Tenants of the lands of Togeles-land. Adam Sieve, Arnulf 
Mustarder, Osbert of Aldham, Robert Lytle hold Togeles-land, render- 
ing for it annually at the feast of St. Andrew l^d. ; on Palm Sunday 
l^d. ; at the Rogations 4d. ; at the feast of St. John Baptist 6d. ; at 
the ad vincula of Saiut Peter 4d. ; at the feast of Michaelmas 4d. ; and 
they owe suit of court. Total 2 Id. 

Richard at the Pond holds one quarter of a land called Hevedes- 
land, rendering at Rogations lOd. ; at the ad vincula of Saint Peter 
lOd. ; and at the feast of Michaelmas lOd. And he owes suit of Court. 

Total 2s. 6d. 

Tenants of Mastildes-land. John of Wygeuhall, Clarice, wife of 
William the Elder, imd the heirs of Richard the little, hold a certain free 
land called Mastildes-land. And they owe at the feast of Saiut Andrew 
3^d. ; on Palm Sunday ^d. ; at the Rogations Z^d, ; at the feast of 
St. Peter ad vincula 3^d. ; And at the feast of Michaelmas 3d. And 
they owe suit of Court Total 1 3}d. 

Osbert of Aldham, John of Layham, and Vincent the fuller, hold 
Bickes-land, rendering at the feast of St. Andrew 2|d. ; and on Palm 



EXTENT OF HADLEI6H MANOR, 1305. 157 

Sunday 2^d. ; at the Rogations lid. ; and at the feast of Saint Peter 
ad vincula lid. ; and at the feast of Michaelmas lOd. And thej owe 
suit of Court. Total 3s. Id. 

Tenants of the lauds of Water-land. Osbert of Aldhani, John of 
Wjgenhall, Adam de Gedding, holding a certain land called Water-land, 
rendering at the Rogations 3d. ; at the feast of Saint Peter ad vincula 
3d. ; and at the feast of Michaelmas 3d. And they owe suit of Court. 

ToUl 9d. 

Tenants of the lands of Rickebrookfield. Osbert of Aldham, 
Robert of Layham, Adam and Thomas, sons of John Makke, and Alicia 
Makke hold this laud, rendering for it at the feast of Saint Andrew ^d. ; 
at the Rogations 4d. ; at the ad vincula of Saint Peter 4d. ; and at the 
feast of Michaelmas 4d. ; aud they owe suit of Court. Total Is. O^d. 

Tenants of the lauds of the Cross-land. William at the Cross, 
Symon Prentice, hold a quarter of a land called Cross land ; rendering 
at the Rogations 20d. ; at the Nativity of St. John Baptist 12d. ; at 
the ad vincula of St. Peter 20d. ; at the feast of Michaelmas 20d. ; at 
the Nativity of the Lord (Xmas) 12d. ; and 2 chickens (?) ; and for 
each house at the said feast 4d. ; and they owe suit of Court 

Total 7s. 4d. with the chickens. 

William Typort holds of the lord a piece of pasture next his Court, 
rendering for it at the feast of Michaelmas 2d. for nil services. 

Total 2d. 

Tenants of the lands of Nelles-land of Corham. Thomas le Gras, 
John Poer, Adam Makke, Thomas Makke, hold this laud which is the 
quarter of one land, rendering for it at the feast of Saint Andrew Id. ; 
at the Rogations 7d. ; at the Nativity of Saint John Bapti;it 7d ; at the 
ad vincula of Saint Peter 7d. ; and at the feast of Michaelmas 7d. ; and 
they owe suit of Court. Total 28. 4d. 

Tenants of the lands of Partridges-laud. Alexander Partridge, 
William Chapman, Thomas le Gras, hold this land as a quarter of land, 
rendering at the Rogations lOd. ; at the ad vincula of Saint Peter lOd. ; 
and at the feast of Michaelmas lOd. ; and they owe suit of Court. 

ToUl 28. 6d. 

Hugh of Wethersfield, the Chaplain, holds of the lord a certain 
land called Beacon-acre, rendering at the feast of Saint John Baptist 14d. 

Total 14d. 

Tenants of the lauds of Davies-land. Richard the Smith, and 
John in the lane, Nicholas Katchterel, and John of Layham hold this 
land of the lord as a quarter, rendering for it at the Rogations 3d. ; at 
the ad vincula of St. Peter 3d. ; at the feast of Michaelmas 4d. ; and 
they owe suit of Court. Total lOd. 

Roger of the Bush holds of the lord a marsh containing half an 
«cre at Layham fen, rendering at the feast of Michaelmas 6d. 

Total 6d. 



158 EXTENT OF HADLBIGH MANOR, 1305. 

Tenants of the lands of Corsfords-land. William of Denston, and 
Thomas of Cockfield, hold of the lord a cei*taiu whole land called 
Corsford's-land, rendering at the feast of Saint Andrew lid. ; on Palm 
Sunday lOd. And they shall plough and harrow half an acre of land 
in winter for wheat (?), and also half an acre of land in the time of 
barley sowing without receiving food from the lord, or they shall give 
for the ploughing and harrowing 6d. ; and sometimes more according 
to the true value of the work. And they shall make suit of Court. 

Total 2s. 3d. with the ploughing. 

Tenants of the lands of Priest's-bridge-land. John of Layham 
and William of Denston, hold of the lord Priest's-bridge-land, rendering 
for it at the feast of Michaelmas 3d. ; and at the Rogations 3d. ; and 
at the feast of Saint Peter ad vincula 3d. ; and on Palm Sunday 2fd. ; 
and at the feast of Saint Andrew 2|d. ; and they shall plough and 
harrow one rood of laud in winter, and 1 rood in Lent with receiving 
food from the lord, or they shall give for the ploughing and harrowing 
3d., sometimes more sometimes less according to the agreement made 
with the sergeant (?). And they will do suit of Court. 

Total 3s. 3d. with the ploughing. 

Tenants of the lands of Long-Croft. Thomas the Bar8(?) and 
William the Chapman hold of the lord five acres of land which are 
called Long-Croft, rendering for it at the feast of Saint Andrew l^d. ; 
on Palm Sunday Id. ; and at the feast of the Rogations 8d. ; and at 
the feast of Saint Peter ad vincula 8d, ; and at the feast of Michaelmas 
8d. ; and they ought to find one horse to liarrow ; and they shall find 
one man to reap (?) at one Bid-reap of wheat (?) receiving food of the 
lord. And they owe suit of Court. Total 2s. 2|d. 

s. d. 
Total of the Rents of Assise of the free tenants annually 

at Saint Andrews term • - 5 9| 

Total of the Rents of Assise of the same annually at 

Palm Sunday term - - - 3 6J 

Total of the Rents of Assise of the same, annually at 

the Rogations term - - - 22 1 

Total of the Rents of Assise of the same, annually at 

St. John Baptist's term - - - 7 1 

Total of the Rents of Assise of the same, annually at 

the term of St. Peter ad vincula - - 22 1 J 

Total of the Rents of Assise of the same, annually at 

the Michaelmas term - - - 23 6^ 

Total of the Rents of Assise of the same, annually at 

the Xmas term - - 2 chickens and 1 4 

Total of the entire rent of Assise of the free tenants, 

annually £4 58. 6d. and 2 chickens. 



EXTENT OF HADLEIGH MANOR, 1305. 159 

Tenants by Custom. 

Tenants of the lands of Nicholes-lund and the herberdarium (?) of 
Aldham. Roger of Aldham, Osbert of Aldham, Nichohis of Aid ham, 
Nicholas the Clerk, Robert of Woodstock, and John of Layham, hold 
in the lordship and service under the lord Prior a certain land called 
Aldham-land, rendering for it annually at the ad Rogations r)B. O^d. ; 
at the feast of Saint Peter ad vincula 5s. O^d. ; at the feast of Michael- 
mas 58. O^d. ; and for land-gable at the same season 15d. ; and at the 
feast of St. John Baptist 12d. ; also for the land formerly Norman's at 
the same season 1 3d. ; and for the land of Sevann at the same season 
ll|d. ; and for the land belonging to Aldham Mill 8d. at the same 
season, and for a certain house at the same season 4d. ; and at the 
feast of Saint Andrew the Apostle for Ilcock's-land Id. ; and for the 
full laud aforesaid of Aldham-land which is workeable laud (?) at the 
same neason Id. ; and the rents to pound-silver at the same term 13^d. ; 
and on Palm Sunday 13|d. ; and they ought to plough 3 acres of land 
in winter, two acres of which should be for wheat (?), which also they 
ought to sow, and to find seed for the same at the lord's granary with 
their own horse and their own sack : and half an acre of land ought to be 
of siliga (?) they ought to harrow, and the lord ought to find seed at the 
granary and to sow it ; the other half acre of land of the aforesaid three 
acres ought to be fallowed for barley against Christmas ; and they ought 
to plough 2 acres of the lord's land in preparation for the season of 
oats in Lent, and they ought to sow it, to harrow, and to seek seed at 
the granary ; and they ought to plough one acre of land for barley with 
their plough, for which (?) they ought to fetch seed at the lord's granary 
for half an acre and to sow it and harrow, and for the other half acre 
of land the lord ought to fetch the seed and sow, and the tenant to 
harrow ; and the ploughing and harrowing of each acre is valued by 
estimation at 6d., sometimes more according to what is approved by the 
sergeant ; and (the tenant) ought to harrow with his harrow between (?) 
Christmas Day and the Purification of the blessed Mary for half a day 
up to noon without receiving food from the lord, with all the customary 
tenants of the township so much as one of the lord's ploughs shall have 
ploughed within the said time. And if he shall not have harrowed, he 
shall give nothing ; yet (the gift) is valued according to the extent for the 
lord's use at Id. if it be taken. And if the lord within the said time 
shall have done no ploughing, they shall do no harrowing nor shall they 
give anything instead ot harrowing. And they owe 7 works which are 
called gavel-fed (?) of which number 5 works ought to be done between 
the feast of Michaelmas and Christmas day ; and 2 works between the 
feast of Christmas and Pentecost without receiving food from the lord. 
And if the tenants shall not do the work, they shall give for each 
work Id. 

Be it known. And be it known that out of these 7 works the lord 
can, if he please, thrash 2 quarters of frumentum or 2 quarters of 
siliga, and of peas or barley 4 quarters and of oats in each work 7 



160 EXTENT OF HADLEIGH MANOR, 1305. 

bushels and a half. And (the tenaut) ought to work between Pentecoet 
and the feast of St Peter ad vincula each week five works throughout 
the whole day without receiving food from the lord, unless he be 
stopped by a feast day, or a Court shall be holden, except Friday (f) on 
which day they ought not to work except for a half day ; and each work 
within the aforesaid time is valued at ^d. And (the tenant) ought to 
spread and to lift and toss dung on the meadow after the lord shall 
have cut it, and allotted it to them in their works. And (the tenant) 
ought to reap in autumn 4 acres of land, that is to say of frumentum, 
siliga, oats, and barley 1 acre of each kind of com without receiving 
food from the lord : And the reaping (harvesting) of each acre is valued 
by estimation at 4d. They shall also reap in autumn by 2 men towards 
the provision of otits for a whole day receiving food from the lord at 
noon. And they shall have two loaves of which one shall be of 
frumentum, and the other of siliga, of which 32 loaves ought to be 
made from the quarter. Aud they shall have morterell (t) and potage 
together with the other reapers of the homage, which are valued at 7d. 
And the aforesaid two men shall have 6 herrings to the value of ^. 
and a cheese. 

Be it known. And be it known that the whole (party making) 
provision of oats shall have a hundred and a half of herrings to the 
value of 6d. the hundred. And they shall have a cheese to the value 
of lOd. and water to drink. They shall also reap in autumu at the 
getting in of the frumentum by 2 men as above, and shall have bread 
potage aud morterell, herrings and cheese as above. And over and 
above that they shall have l^er or cider to the value of 12d. They 
shall also reap in autumn by 1 man at the third procuration receiving 
food from the lord as above when it shall be necessary, and this is not 
entered in the extent (?) on accountof the deduction of food. And if through 
these three procurations they do not reap all the lord's com then they 
ought to reap 1 rood of corn at their own costs without price and with- 
out food. Aud they ought to carry the lord's corn with their own carts 
in autumn for 4 days (7) without food from the lord, for every full land 
in work (cultivation) each work to the value of IJd. And they ought 
to find 2 men to collect the straw (?) for half a day up to noon without 
payment and without food arid herrings in his works. And they shall 
carry the lord's dung in the manor so long as they shall be carried with 
his carts. And they shall have their food, namely bread as above and 6 
herrings to the value of a ^d. and a cheese to the value as above ; and 
if they do not carry they shall have nothing. And the work is of no 
value as regards the extent on account of the deduction of food : and they 
ought to load up and carry the lord's com at Cattiwade to the weight 
of a quarter of frumentum and (? it ought) to be allowed them for 4 
works. And (the tenant) shall give " mercheta " as before. And shall 
do suit of Court. 

Tenants of the lauds of Gerarde's-land. Richard Wulf, Emma 
Mareschal, Nicholas Brunyng, Henry Marshall, John Browning the 



EXTENT OF HADLEIGH MANOR, 1305. 161 

younger, John 8on of Nicholas Browning, John Fawke and Thomas 
Mori, hold one entire acre (?) called Gerarde's-land, rendering for it 
annually at the feast of Saint Andrew 6^. ; on Palm Sunday 5^d. ; at 
the Nativity of Saint John Baptist 9d. ; at the feast of Michaelmas lOd. 
And they ought to plough with their plough-team in two seasons 6 
acres of the lord's land without food, or they shall give for each acre 
6d. as above and sometimes more. And they shall harrow the said land 
80 often as it shall want harrowing. And they shall sow the said land> 
and fetch the seed at the lord's grange as above. And they shall work 
between the feast of Michaelmas and Pentecost 7 works without food. 
And if they shall not do the work, they shall give for each work Id. 

Tenants of the lands of the Husbandes-land. Henry the Marshall, 
Robert the Marshall, Alexander Fyri, John Chapman, and Clarote 
Basset, hold the laud called Husbandes-land, rendering for it at the 
feast of Saint Andrew 61d. ; on Palm Sunday 5^d. ; at the Nativity 
of Saint John Baptist 5^d. ; at the feast of Michaelmas for land-gable 
lOd. ; and the tenant owes in ploughing, harrowing, carriage, and in all 
other services as the land of Gerard. And the tenant shall give 
merchet ; and shall do suit of Court. 

Tenants of the lands of Hill-land. Pagan at the Hill, Osbcrt of 
Aldham, William at the Hill, hold a full laud called the Hill land, 
rendering for it annually at the feast of Saint Andrew 6^d. ; on Palm 
Sunday 5^d. ; at the Nativity of Saint John Baptist 6d. ; and at the 
feast of Michaelmas for laud-gable lOd. And the tenant owes in 
ploughing, harrowing, carriage, reaping (harvesting), and all other 
services as the land of the said Gerard. And the tenant shall give 
merchet ; and shall do suit of Court. 

Tenants of the land of Pichtes-land. Amicia, wife of Richard the 
Little, heir of John Eadrich, John of Wygenhall, Adam of Gedding, 
and James at the Fen, hold half an acre called Pichtes-land, rendering 
for it at the feast of Michaelmas for land-gable 5d. ; at the feast of 
Saint Andrew for rent 3Jd. ; on Palm Sunday 2Jd. ; at the Nativity of 
Saint John Baptist Id. ; and the tenant owes in ploughing, harrowing, 
carriage, and all other services a moiety as the said Gerard's land. And 
the tenant shall give merchet ; and shall do suit of Court. 

Tenants of the lauds of Redes-laud, Thomas Sugge, William the 
Rede, Richard son of Bartholomew the miller, Walter the fuller, Roger 
Mayner, and Alice of Badley, and A vice the Little, hold a certain land 
called the Redes-land ; rendering for it annually at the feast of Saint 
Andrew 6jd. ; on Palm Sunday 5^d. ; at the Nativity of Saint John 
Baptist 5d. ; and for land-gable 5d. ; and the tenant owes in ploughing, 
harrowing, and all other services (?) as the said Gerard's-land. AikI 
the tenant shall give merchet ; and do suit of Court. 

Tenants of the lands of Wareugers-land. John of Aldham holds 
half an acre called Warengeres-land, rendering at the feast of Saint 
Andrew 3Jd. ; on Palm Sunday 3}d. ; at the feast of Saint John Baptist 
28. O^d. ; at the feast of Michaelmas for land-gable 5d. And the tenant 



162 EXTENT OF HADLEIGH MANOR, 1305. 

owes ill ploughing, harrowiug, and all other Bervices a moiety as the 
said Gerard's-laiid. And the tenant shall give merchet ; and shall do 
suit of Court. 

Tenants of the lands of Pillecok-dune. William Hert, John of 
Pillecok-dune, William of Bentone, Adam of Denton (f), John Coyfe, 
Jacob at the Fen, Roger at the Bushes, and John of Lajham, hold 
a certain land called Pillecok-dune, rendering for it annually at the 
feast of Saint Andrew 6|d. ; on Palm Sunday 5|d. ; at the feast of 
Saint John Baptist 5^d. ; at the feast of Michaelmas for land-gable lOd. ; 
and the tenant owes in ploughing, harrowing, carriage, and in all other 
services as the land of the said Gerard. And the tenant shall give 
merchet ; and shall do suit of Court. 

Tenants of the lands of Basilies-land. Adam Ticcat, John Ticcat, 
William of Bentone, John Coyfe, John Pylcoke, Walter Leggy, hold 
half a land called Basilies-land, rendering for it annually at the feast of 
Saint Andrew 3|d. ; on Palm Sunday 2}d. ; at the nativity of Saint 
John Baptist 2|d. ; at the feast of Michaelmas for land-gable 5d. ; 
and in ploughing, harrowing, and in all other services a moiety as the 
land of the said Gerard. And the tenant shall give merchet; and 
shall do suit of Court. 

Tenants of the lands of the customary lands called Gloucester's- 
land. The heirs of Toppisfield, Osbert of Aldham, and Roger of 
Aldham, hold a certain customary land called Gloucester's land, render- 
ing for it at the feast of Saint Andrew 6id. ; on Palm Sunday 5Jd. ; 
and at the feast of Saint John Baptist "5^d. ; and at the feast of 
Michaelmas for land-gable lOd. ; and the tenants owe all services as the 
land of the said Gerard ; and shall give merchet ; and shall do suit of 
Court. 

Teuauts of the lands of Bonheyes-land. Thomas Finch and 
Katheriue Finch, hold half a customary land called Bonheyes-land, 
rendering for it at the feast of Saint Andrew 3^d. ; on Palm Sunday 
2|d. ; at the Rogations 17d. ; at the feast of Saint John Baptist Id. ; 
at the ad vincula 16d. ; at the feast of Michaelmas 16d. ; and for land- 
gable 5d. ; and in all other services the tenants shall do a moiety as 
the land of the said Gerard ; and shall give merchet ; and shall do suit 
of Court. 

Tenants of the lands of Gooding's-land. John of Layham, the 
heirs of Gylemin, John Browning the younger, Simon the fuller, 
Nicholas son of Thomas, Beatrice de Burgh, Nicholas Browning, John 
Bassett, Adam his brother, John Basset the younger, John Sieve, John 
Chapman, Alexander Chapman, Thomas the fuller, Isabella daughter of 
Peter the Clerk, Notekyn her sister, Robert of Woodstock, Henry 
Marshall, Nicholas Bythold, and Richard the Wolf, hold a certain 
-customary land called Goodiugs-land, rendering for it annually at the 
feast of Saint Andrew 6^d. ; on Palm Sunday 5Jd. ; at the nativity of 
Saint John Baptist 5^d. ; at the feast of Michaelmas for land-gable lOd. 



EXTENT OF HADLEIGH MANOR, 1305. 163 

And the tenants owe in ploughing, harrowing, and all other services 
as Gerard's land ; and they shall give nierchet ; and do suit of Court. 

Tenants of the lands of Stones-land. Elyas Ruge, Agnes Persone, 
John do Burg, John Devil, Richard the Barker of Estham, Richard the 
barker of Hadleigh, Hamo at the Stones, and Thomas Richer, hold the 
whole land called Stones-land, rendering for it annually at the feast of 
Saint Andrew 6^d. ; on Palm Sunday 5jd. ; and for laud-gable at 
the feast of Michaelmas lOd. ; and the tenants owe in ploughing, 
harrowing, and all other services as the land of the aforesaid Gerard ; 
and they shall give merchet ; and do suit of Court. 

Tenants of the lands of Clerks-land. Thomas sou of £iy the 
Clerk, Duce formerly the wife of Ely le Hewe, Christina at the Meadow, 
William Syer, John Poer, hold the whole land called Clerks-land, 
rendering for it at the feast of Saint Andrew 6^d. ; on Palm Sunday 
5|d. ; at the nativity of Saint John Baptist IGd. ; at the feast of 
Michaelmas for land-gable lOd. ; and in ploughing, harrowing, and all 
other services as the laud of the aforesaid Gerard. ; and the tenants 
shall give merchet ; and shall do suit of Court. 

Tenants of the lands of Papsies-land. John the Devil, John of 
Layham, Gilbert Lyteman, Richard the barker of Hadleigh, Galfrid 
Merle, Duce le Hewe, hold the whole land called Papsies-land, rendering 
for it at the feast of St. Andrew 6^d. ; on Palm Sunday 5^d. ; at the 
Nativity of Saint John Baptist 5^d. ; and at the feast of Michaelmas 
for land gable lOd. ; and in ploughing, harrowing, carriage, and all other 
services, as the land of the said Gerard ; and the tenants shall give 
nierchet ; and do suit of Court. 

Tenants of the lands of Browns-land. Elyas Brown, Richard le 
Bars, Thomas le Bars, Galfrid Abbey, Nicholas Garleberd, Richard 
Brown, William Chapman of Layham, Elyas son of John Brown, 
Richard his brother, William brother of the said Richard, hold a whole 
land called Brown's-land, rendering for it at the feast of St. Andrew 6id. ; 
on Palm Sunday 5Jd. ; at the Nativity of St. John Baptist 6d. ; and 
at the feast of Michaelmas for land gable lOd. ; and the tenants owe in 
ploughing, harrowing, and all other (services) as the laud of the afore- 
said Gerard ; and the tenant shall give merchet : and do suit of Court. 

Tenants of the lands of Chapmaus-land of Carham. William 
Poer, Gilbert Chapman, Richard Kyi, hold half an acre (?) called 
Chapman'sland of Carham, reudering at the feast of Saint Andrew 3^d. ; 
on Palm Sunday 2}d. ; at the feast of St. John Baptist 2^d. ; at the 
feast of Michaelmas for land-gable 5d. ; and the tenants owe in plough- 
ing, harrowing, carriage, and all other services (and) customs a moiety 
as the land of the said Gerard ; and the tenants shall give merchet ; 
and do suit of Court. 

Tenants of the lands of Basses-land of Carham. Thomas le Bars, 
Richard le Bars, William Chapman, Sevoca Brown, hold a whole land 
which is called Basses-land of Carham, rendering at the feast of Saint 



164 EXTENT OF HADLEI6H MANOR, 1305. 

Andrew 6}d. ; on Palm Sunday 5^d. ; at the Nativity of Saint John 
Baptist 7id. ; and at the feast of Michaelmas for land-gable lOd. ; and 
the tenant owe in ploughing, harrowing, and nil other services as the 
land of the said Gerard ; and the tenant will give merchet : and do suit 
of Court. 

Teuanta of the lands of Loppcdeue-land. Richard OiH, William 
Poer, Adam Altheword, Warren of Bildeston, Roger the Ditcher, 
Matilda Samuel, hold on demesne and in service one whole land called 
Loppedene-land, rendering for it at the feast of Saint Andrew 6^d. ; on 
Palm Sunday 5^d. ; at the Nativity of St John Baptist 8^d. ; at the 
feast of Michaelmas for land-gable lOd. ; and the tenants owe in 
ploughing, harrowing, and other works, as the land of the said Gerard ; 
and they shall give merchet ; and shall do suit of Court. 

Tenants of the lands of Hyches-land. John Uycche, Richard the 
Smith, Hugh Wethersfield the chaplain, William Samuel, Matilda 
Samuel, Thomas Sugge, Roger the miller, Thomas the miller, John 
Poer, and Elyas Brown, hold a whole land which is called Hycches-laud, 
rendering for it at the feast of Saint Andrew 6^d. ; on Palm Sunday 
5|d. ; and at the feast of Michaelmas for land-gable iOd. ; and the 
tenants owe all other services as the land of the said Gerard ; and they 
shall give merchet ; and shall do suit of Court. 

Tenants of the lands of Rustes-land. Richard in the lane, John 
his brother, Thomas Sugge, Robert Monche, Richard the barker, Nicholas 
the Clerk, Symon Prentice, Thomas the barker, John Bere, Duce le 
Hewe, Christina daughter of Elyas the Webber, hold half a land called 
Rustes-land, rendering for it at the feast of Saint Andrew 3^d. ; on 
Palm Sunday 2fd. ; at the Nativity of Saint John Baptist 3d. ; at the 
feast of Michaelmas for land-gable 5d. ; and in ploughing, harrowing, 
and in all other services a moiety as the land of Gerard ; and the 
tenants shall give merchet ; and shall do suit of Court. 

Tenants of the lands of Neiles-land. Thomas le Bars, Augustin 
Brown, Richard Hakun, Christina Webber, Simon the Ditcher, hold 
half a land which is called NeilVland ; rendering for it annually at 
the feast of Andrew S^d. ; on Palm Sunday 2|d. ; at the Nativity of 
St. John Baptist 5|d. ; and for land-gable at the feast of Michaelmas 5d. 
And the tenants owe in ploughing, harrowing, and in all other customs 
a moiety as the land of Gerard. And tlie tenant will give merchet ; 
and will do suit of Court. 

Tenants of the lands of Bridges-land. The Prior of Christ Church 
Canterbury, Symon the ditcher, Thomas Sugge, Augustin Brown, 
Richard the Smith, Thomas le Bass, Nicholas Garlebred, and Adam 
Althewerd, hold a whole land called Bridges-land, rendering for it 
annually at the feast of St. Andrew 6Jd. ; on Palm Sunday 5id. ; at 
the Rogations 4d. ; at the Nativity of Saint John the Baptist 5|d. ; at 
the ad vincula of St. Peter 4d. ; at the feast of Michaelmas 4d ; and 
for laud-gable at the same time lOd. ; and the tenants owe in ploughing, 



EXTENT OF HADLEIGH MANOR, 1305. 165 

harrowing, and all other services as the land of the aforesaid Gerard ; 
and the tenant shall give merchet ; and shall do suit of Court. 

Memorandum. Be it remembered that one Osbert Dore, in the 
time of John Allenbury, steward, took to farm from the aforesaid 
steward for term of his life from the demesne lands of the Hall of the 
Lord Prior in Htidteigh, a fifth part of the land formerly held by John 
at the Bridge, which conttiins by estimation 7 acres ol land with the 
messuage (without the assent of the said lord Prior and of the Convent), 
at a rent to be paid for it annually to the said Prior and Convent of 
Ts. And the aforesaid Osbert sold thereof to one Symon the Ditcher 
that messuage in which he now resides to hold of him an*! his heirs ; 
he sold also thereof to one Thomas Sugge a certain messuage to hold 
from him and his heirs in fee whereof he undertook (?) to speak with 
the lord Prior 

Tenants of the lands of Edrickes-land in Corham. Nicholas 
Garleberd, John of Wygenhall, Adam of Gedding, Adam of Altheword, 
Richard Gyle, and Thomas le Bass, hold a certain full land called 
Edrichs-land of Corham, rendering for it annually at the feast of Saint 
Andrew 6^d. ; on Palm Sunday 5Jd. ; at the feast of St. John Bsiptist 
5d. ; and at the feast of Michaelmas for land-gable lOd. ; and the 
tenants owe in all other services and customs as the land of the said 
Gerard ; and they shall give merchet ; and shall do suit of Court. 

Tenants of the lands of Pick-peas-land. Alexander Pickpeas holds 
a quarter of land which is called Pick-peas-land ; rendering for it at the 
feast of Saint Andrew Id. ; at the Rogations 3d. ; at the Nativity of 
Saint John Baptist 4d. ; at the ad vincula of Saint Peter 3d. ; at the 
feast of Michaelmas 2d. ; and the tenant ought to harrow with the 
other customary tenants of the town so much as the lord's plough- 
teams shall have ploughed between the feast of Christmas and the feast 
of the Purification of blessed Mary. And if he shall have done no 
harrowing, he shall give nothing. And he ought to find one man in 
autumn to reap for one day the lord to find food ; that is to say at 1 
bid-reap. And if he shall not reap, he shall not give anything. And he 
shall give merchet ; and shall do three suits at the general Court. 

Tenants of the lands of Bassets land. William Poer, John his 
brother, Matilda daughter of John of Kirketon, and Cristina his sister, 
and Roger of Kirketon, hold a quarter of a land which is called 
Bassets-land, rendering at the feast of Saint Andrew l^d. ; at the 
Rogations 5d. ; at the Nativity of Saint John Baptist Id. ; at the feast 
of Saint Peter ad vincula 5d. ; at the feast of Michaelmas for land-gable 
5d. ; and the tenants ought to harrow with the customary tenants as 
above ; and to reap at one bid-reap at the lord's expense for food as above 
And they shall give merchet , and shall do suit of Court. 

Tenants of the lands of Skippes-laud. Adam Skip, Pagan Skip, 
Alexander Pickpeas hold a quarter of a land called Skyppes-land, 
rendering for it at the feast of Saint Andrew Id. ; at the Rogations 

N 



166 EXTENT OF HADLEIGH MANOR, 1305. 

13d. ; at the Nativity of Saint John Baptist Id. ; at the feast of Saint 
Peter ad vincula 13^. ; and at the feast of Michaelmas 1 3d. ; and 
they shall harrow with the other customary tenants as above ; and they 
shall find one man at one bid-reap at the lord's expense for food as 
above : and they shall give merchet ; and shall do suit of Court. 

Tenants of the lands of Orotes-land. Dyonisius Kil, Elyas Turne- 
vile, William Poer, Roger of Kirketon hold a quarter of a land called 
Crotes-land ; rendering at the feast of Saint Andrew Id. ; at the 
Rogations 3d. ; at the Nativity of St John Baptist Id. ; at the feast of 
Saint Peter ad vmcula 3d. (f) and iit the feast of Michaelmas 3d. ; and 
the tenants ought to harrow as above ; and they shall give merchet ; 
and shall do suit of Court. 

Tenants of Bentoue-land. Adam sou of Robert of Bentone, William 
his brother, Cristiana Leggy, Alice Pakkenut, Bartholomew Greygoose, 
Richard the Reve, Hugh of Bentone, Alice of Badley, John of Aldham, 
the heirs of Hugh Bentone, hold a certain land culled Ben tone-land, 
rendering for it at the feast of Saint Andrew 3^d. ; on Palm Sunday 
2}d. ; at the Rogations 20d. ; at the Nativity of St. John Baptist 3^d. ; 
at the feast of St. Peter ad vincula 20d. ; and at the feast of Michael- 
mas 20d. ; and the tenant ought to find one man at one procuration of 
reaping wheat (?) at the lord's expense for food as above ; and he ought 
to harrow with the other customary tenants as above ; and they shall 
give merchet ; and shall do suit of Court. 

Tenants of the lands of the country-land. Symou the Fuller, 
Thomas Crench, Robert Marke-day, Robert Rynild, Deunis Rynild, hold 
the country-land, rendering at the feast of Saint Andrew 3fd. ; on 
Palm Sunday 3d. ; at the Rogations 15d ; at the feast of Saiut John 
Baptist 2d. ; at the feast of Saint Peter ad vincula 1 5d. ; at the feast 
of Michaelmas 15d. ; and the tenants ought to plough half an acre of 
land in winter with their plough-team, and to harrow it for the price for 
each work of 3d. ; sometimes more (?) ; and they shall give merchet ; 
and do suit of Court. 
Sum total of the Rents of the Customary tenants aforesaid £4 lis. 4^d. 

Be it remembered that the Lord Prior and Convent of Christ 
Church, Canterbury, are chief lords of the manor and town of Hadleigh. 
And they have their liberty in the said town Iwth of infangene thef, and 
utfangene thef, and they ought to do justice on thieves and malefactors 
caught within the aforesaid liberty cum manu opere, that is to say 
sack-bearing, back -bearing, and hand -having. 

Furce. And the judicial gallows of the said manor ought to stand 
at the Hirst in a certain place called Hadleghe next the house of John 
Eweney in the town of Hadleigh. And be it known that the pillory, 
and the punishment called " Tewe " ought to stand opposite Hadleigh 
Church. And the Tree-bucket of the said manor ought to stand next 
the staunch of the Water Mill belonging to the lord Prior in the afore- 
said town of Hadleigh. 



EXTENT OF HADLEIGH MANOR, 1305. 167 

Monday Lauds. 

Tenants of the lands of Dores-Iand. Sir Hugh of Westhersfield 
the Chaplain, and Adam of Brickvvell, hold of the lord half a land 
called Dores-land, rendering for it annually at the feast of St. Andrew 
3fd. ; on Palm Sunday 2Jd ; at the Nativity of St. John Baptist 6d. ; 
and at the feast of Michaelmas for land-gable 5d. ; and the tenants 
shall find one man at the proper time (?) for sowing the lord's seed at 
the lord's winter or lent procurations (?) or shall give instead of the 
work an half-penny. And they shall find one man to work on each 
Monday which is a working day from the feast of Michaelmas until the 
feast of Peutecost at the lord's will at no expense to him for food ; 
and if he sliall have done no work he shall give for each work Jd. He 
shall also work from the feast of Holy Trinity until the feast of St. 
Peter ad vincula a moiety as the land of the said Gerard. And shall 
reap in autumn 4 aicres of corn, namely one acre of frumentum, 1 of 
siliga, 1 of oats, and 1 acre of barley, without food at the lord's 
expense ; the tenant shall also reap for a whole day with one man at two 
procurations (?) namely of frumentum and oats in autumn at the lord's 
expense for food as before, like as the others, and if he shall not have 
worked, they shall give nothin}<. They shall also find one man to 
collect straw for half a day up to noon without food at the lord's 
expense. And if they don't have to collect they shall give nothing, 
yet the work is worth to the lord's advantage, if it be taken, an half 
penny. The tenant ought also to find one man to fill the dung carts 
when the customary tenants of the town draw out and cart the lord's 
dung at the lord's expense for food as al)ove. And the tenant ought to 
make allowances in his works, and to keep watch, and at his peril to 
have custody of thieves at the lord's mill, so often as an}' shall have 
been caught within the lord's liberty, whensoever by the baillif of the 
lord Prior, or in any other due manner they shall have been delivered 
to him ; and to allow for them iu his works, namely fur ench whole 
night and day 3 works ; and the tenants shall give for marrying their 
daughters namely, if he shall give her in marriage within the town and 
homage they shall give 16d. ; and if without the homage 2s. ; and this 
with license asked. And the tenants shall toss the lord's cum in 
autumn for three half days without food at the lord's expense. And if 
he shall not have tossed it they shall give for the half day an half 
penny. And the tenants shall do suit of Court. 

Tenants of the lands of Pyrdes Monday -land. Philip Pyrde, John 
of Bildeston, the Chaplain, Symon of Bradstreet, Galfrey Webbe, and 
Thomas Poppe, hold half a land called Pyrdes-Monday-land, rendering 
for it in rents, works, customs, and all other things, as the said Hugh 
the Chaplain for Dores-land. And the tenants owe suit of Court. 

Tenants of the land of Honeydon-land. Elyas Turnevile, Richard 
his brother, Cristiana the Webber, Douce her sister, Hugh Stone, 
Nicholas Makke, John of Lay ham, Adam Makke, and Thomas 1e Bass, 



168 EXTENT OF HADLEIGH MANOR, 1305. 

hold half a land called Honey don-land, rendering for it at the fea&t of 
St. Andrew SJd. ; on Palm Sunday 2|d. ; at the Nativity of St. John 
Baptist 19^d. ; and at the feast of Michaelmas 5d ; and the tenant 
shall plough and harrow half an acre of the lord's land with his own 
plough-team in winter. And also half an acre of land in Lent without 
food at the lord's expense.! And the ploughing and harrowing of the 
said land is worth, if it be not required to the lord's use, 6d and some- 
times more. And the tenants shall do in all other services, customs, 
and other things, as the aforesaid Hugh the Chaplain for Dores-land. 
And the tenants shall do suit of Court. 

Tenants of the lands of Hert's-land. Ralph Hart, Adam Wace, 
Agnes Salter, John Pyrde, Richard Furnvile, hold half a land called 
Hert Viand, rendering for it at the feast of Saint Andrew 3Jd. ; on 
Palm Sunday 23d. ; at the Nativity of St. John Baptist 6d. ; and at 
the feast of Michaelmas 5d. ; and the tenant owes in ploughing and 
harrowing the same as Honeydon-land. And in all the other services 
and customs as the aforesaid Hugh for Dores-land. And the tenant shall 
do suit of Court. 

Tenants of the lands of Chapmans-Monday-land. Gilbert Chapman, 
William Poer, hold half a land which is called Chapman's Monday-land, 
rendering for it annually in rents, ploughing, as the half of Harte's- 
land. And in all other services and customs as the half land of Hugh 
the Chaplain. And the tenant owe suit of Court. 

Tenants of the lands of the Bridge-land. Hugh the Chaplain, 
William Poer, Thomas le Bars, Richard Kil, Bartholomew the Shepherd, 
Richard PayncKon, and John Poer, hold half a land called Brid^je-land, 
rendering for it at the feast of Saint Andrew 3Jd. ; on Palm Sunday 
2|d ; at the Nativity of St John Baptist l4d. ; and at the feast of 
Michaelmas 5d. ; and the tenant ought to plough and harrow, the same 
as the half Hart-land. And in all other works and customs the same 
as the aforesaid Hugh Dore. And the tenant shall do suit of Court. 

Tenants of the lands of Basseta-Monday-land. John Basset, Osbert 
Basset the younger, and Alexander Basset, hold a half land called 
Bassets-Monday-land, rendering for it annually at the fea«t of Saint 
Andrew 3Jd. ; on Palm Sunday 2^d. ; at the Nativity of St. John 
Baptist 6d. ; at the feast of Michaelmas 5d. And the tenant owes 
in ploughing and harrowing the same as Hnneydon-land. And in all 
other services and customs the same as the land of the said Hugh the 
Chaplain. And the tenant shall do suit of Court. 

Tenants of the lands of Brownings-land. John Browning the 
elder and John Browning the younger, Nicholas Browning, Henry 
Marshall, Beatrice Marshall, hold a half land called Brownings-land, 
rendering for it annually both in rent and in ploughing, the same as the 
land which is called Bassets-land. And in all other works and customs 
and services, the same as the land of the aforesaid Hugh the Chaplain. 
And the tenant shall do suit of Court. 



KXTENT OF HADLKIGH MANOR, 1305. 169 

Be it known that all the aforesaid tenants of Monday-lands ought 
to be the lords fore men in the manor and to answer (be respon- 
sible for) the outgoings of the same. And they ought to receive from 
the lord as their stipend annually the corn of half an acre of frumen- 
turn, of half an acre of siliga, and of an acre of oats upon the lord's 
plough-land (?) And they ought to have a quarter of frumentura in 
8 weeks. 

Sum Total of the Rents of the Monday-lands 13s. 4^d. 

Of the lands and tenements letised by the Custodians of the 
demesnes belonging to the Hall. And also of the annual rents payable 
out of the said demesnes, and they are called 

New Rents. 

Vincent the Fuller holds one messuage belonging to the demesne 
of the Hall : rendering for it annually at the feast of Michaelmas 12d. 
and for 1 dye-house at the same feast 6d. 

The said Vincent, Adam Damoysele, Nicholas Overlefyn, hold of 
the lord three cottages : rendering for them annually at the feast of 
Saint Michael 12d., of which William the Ditcher ought to render 3d. for 
a moiety of the messuage of one cottage (?) 

William the Ditcher holds one place (piece) of land taken from the 
demesne of the Hall in the Tye-field : rendering for it annually at the 
feast of St. Andrew 12d. ; on Palm Sunday 12d. ; at the Rogations 6d. ; 
and at the feast of Michael mt\s 12d. in lieu of all services. 

Vincent the fuller holds one piece of land, which he had acquired 
from John the ditcher lying in the Tye-field containing in length 8 
perches and 6 feet. And in breadth 2 perches and 1 2 ft., rendering for 
it annually at the feast of Michaelmas 6d. ; on Palm Sunday 6d. ; and 
at the feast of Rogations 6d. for all services. 

Symou Prentice gives to the lord 3d., rendering it at the feast of 
Michaelmas for having an easement in a piece of land belonging to the 
lord opposite his messuage ; so that it be not to the nuisance of the lord. 

Richard the Smith holds a forge of the lord, rendering for it 
anntnill}' at the feast of Christmas 1 ploughshare to the value of 6d. 

Alexander the Miller, Nicholas Rith-hold, hold of the lord two 
cottages which formerly belonged to William Turnevile, rendering for 
them annually at the feast of Michaelmas 5d., and on Christmas Day 1 
ploughshare to the value of 6d. 

Adam Cas holds of the lord 1 cottage, rendering for it annually at 
the fetist of Michaelmas 1 plough share to the value of 6d. 

Richard the Smith renders to the lord annually at the feast of 
Michaelmas for having a certain way next to his messuage on the lord's 
demesne lOd. 

Robert Monks hold a piece of land on the lord's demesne, rendering 
for it annually at the feast of Michaelmas 2s. 



170 EXTENT OF HADLEIGH MANOR, 1305. 

Luciis Foot holds a piece' of land next the said Robert's piece, 
rendering at the feast of Michaelmas, annually, 2s 

Hugh of Wethersfield the Chaplain holds a cottage, rendering for it 
annually at the feast of MichHclmas 12d. 

Roger Tanckard holds of the lord a cottage, rendering for it at the 
feast of Michaelmas annually 8d. 

Thomas Fynch and John his son, John Makke, and Thomas Horold, 
hold 3 cottages, which formerly belonged to Horold, rendering at the 
feast of Michaelmas 7d. 

Coleman Bithold, Thomas Mori, the chaplain, hold 3, rendering for 
them at the feast of Michnelmas 28. 3|d. 

John Segersteyn holds a cottage, rendering for it annually at the 
feast of Michaelmas 12d. 

Henry Marshall holds of the lord a cottage, rendering for it at the 
feast of Michaelmas annually Sid. 

Richard the Reve, Henry Marshall, and Emma Marahall, hold of 
the lord one cottage, rendering for it annually at the feast of Michael- 
mas 6d. ; and on Christmas day 1 chicken, and the tenant shall have 
food. 

Elyas Snow holds of the lord a cottage, rendering for it annually 
at the feast of Michaelmas 7^d. ; and on Christmas day one chicken, 
and the tenant shall have food. 

Adam the fuller, Alexander at the Lowe, and William Gyber, hold 
3 cottages on the lord's demesne, rendering for them annually at the 
feast of Michaelmas 15d. 

William Gyber gives to the lord of rent annually for a certain 
piece of land for enlarging his court, at the feast of Michaelmas l^d. 

Alexander at the Lowe owes to the lord at the feast of. Michaelmas, 
annually, for a certain piece of land and for enlarging a certain cottage 
4id. 

Richard at the Pond gives to the lord for a certain messuage on 
the lord's demesne, which John the Sep and William the Segersteyn 
hold by the ancient peixjuisite (?), namely at the feast of Michaelmas 
2s. 6d. 

And from the said Richard by the new perquisite for the enlarge- 
ment of the said messuage 3d. ; at the feast of Michaelmas annually lOd. 

Adam Pyg and Thomas Pyg hold of the lord two cottages ; render- 
ing for them annually at the feast of Michaelmas 2s. 6d. And for a 
certain new perquisite taken from the lord for enlarging the said 
messuage lOd. 

Bartholomew Greygoose and John Keeble hold of the lord two 
messuages, rendering for them annually at the feast of Michaelmas 
23d. ; and for certain new acquisition of land taken from the lord for 
the enlargement of the said messuages 14|d. 

Symon the Ditcher holds a certain tenement which formerly 
belonged to Philip Carpenter, rendering for it annually at the feast of 
Michaelmas 5^d. 



EXTENT OP HADLEIGH MANOR, 1305. 171 

Nicholiis Fuiigy, and John Monne, and John Piccat, hold three 
cottages, rendering for them at the feast of Michaehnas annually 2s. 

Richard at the Pond and Osbert of Aldham, hold two cottages, 
ivhich Walter the Harper formerly held, rendering for them annually at 
the feast of Michaelmas 18d. 

Henry Thurghston, Isabella wife of John son of Geffrey, and John 
Jullay, hold three cottages, which formerly belonged to John son of 
Geffrey, rendering for them at the feast of Michaelmas 2s. ; and for the 
new land acquired for the enlargement of the said cottages at the same 
time 6|d. 

Jordan the Miller and John JulJay hold of the lord one messuage, 
rendering for it at the feast of Michaelmas annually 19^d. 

Ct'istina Britoun holds of the lord one cottage, rendeiing for it 
at the feast of Michaelmas I8d. 

William Geffrey renders to the lord for one dye-house attached to 
the lord's fee at the fe^st of Michaelmas lOd. 

Christina of Bentone and John Mows for one cottage at the feast 
of Michaelmas 2d. 

John Keeble for Parte- fen renders for it annually at the feast of 
Michaelmas 2s. O^d 

Adam Britun renders annually for one cottage at the feast of 
Michaelmas 4 shoes for shoeing the lord's palfrey to the value each one 
of Id. 

Richard the barker gives to the lord for having an easement on the 
lord's river bank, on Christmas day one capon to the value of 2d., and 
the tenant shall have his food. 

Ralph Hart gives to the lord for the same at the same time one 
capon to the value of 2d., and he shall have his food as above. 

Richard Muffet gives to the lord at the same term 1 fowl to the 
value of Id., and he shall have his food, ^c. 

Sum of the assessed rent of New Rents 44s. 5^d., 2 capons, 3 
fowls, 3 plough-shares, and 4 shoes for shoeing the lord's palfrey. 



Services and Customs of the Manors of Christ Church, Canterbury, 
in the counties of Suffolk, Essex, and Norfolk. 

Hadleigh. 

At Hadleigh are 22^ lands. And they owe from the feast of 
Michaelmas until Pentecost seven score and seventeen works and a half 
(157^), namely (that is to say) from each land during the said time 7 
works. Likewise they owe from the Thursday in Ascension (Pentecost) 
Week up to the beginning (?) of August in each week from each land 
5 works. 

The sum of the works is according as there is a greater or less 
•pace of time between the feasts. Likewise there are there 8 Monday- 
lands, and they owe from the feast of Michaelmas until Pentecost in 



172 KXTKNT OF HADLKIOH MANOR, 1305. 

each week each lAud one work, namely on the Monday nn]e88 any feast 
day should occur on the ttaid day Likewise from the said hinds from 
0) Pentecost until the lie^iiming of August from each land every fort- 
night (?) 5 works. And be it known that when any feast day shall 
occur between Pentecost and the beginning of August, except Saturdays 
and Sundays, then with the aforemiid allowances 22^ lands one work and 
with similar allowances two lauds of Monday -lands one work. 

Likewise the tenants of the aforesaid 22^ lands onglit to plough 
at the season for frumentum 44 acres de gablo, thus for each land 2 acres. 
Likewise the same ought to plough de beneherthe 11 acres and 1 rood 
as the same season, thus for each acre half an acre Likewise 6 
Monday-lands ought to plough 4 acres at the same season. Likewise 
(the tenants) of the aforesaid 22^ lands ought to plough 1 1 acres and 
1 rood de beneherth for fallow for barley (f) Likewise the same ought 
to plough 66 acres and 1 rood de gablo for barley and oats. Likewise 
the same ought to plough 1 1 acres and 1 rood de beuerthe for barley. 
Likewise 6 Monday-lands ought to plough 4 acres de beneherthe for 
barley. 

Sum of the acres to be ploughed 140 acres. 

Likewise (the tenants) of the aforesaid 22^ lands ought to reap de 
gabulo four score and ten acres, thus for each land 4 acres. Likewise 
(the tenants) of the 8 Monday lands (ought to reap) 32 acres. Likewise 
de beneherthe (the tenants) of the same lands (ought to reap) 45 acres 
at the least, thus for each land half (7 two) an acre. Likewise (the 
tenants) of the 8 Monday-lauds (ought to reap) 8 (acres) de beneherthe, 
thus for each land one acre. 

Sum of the acres to Ihj reaped 175 acres. 

Be it remembered that the measure (?) of frumentum and siliga 
contains two bushels and a half, of Iwrley and peas 6 bushels, of oats 
seven bushels and a half. 



(173) 



NOMINA VILLARUM, Co. SUFFOLK, 1316. V/ 
By V. B. Redstone. 

** In January, 1316, the Parliament met at Lincoln, 
nnd there Earl Thomas took a step, which wrested the 
reins altogether from Edward ii.'s hands. He was made 
president of the Royal Council on the express under- 
standing that without the consent of the Council no acts 
touching the Kingdom should be done. The Parliament, 
hoping that a settlement of the quarrel was at last 
attained, made a liberal grant, the towns granting a 
fifteenth, the lords and knights promising the service of 
a foot-soldier from every rural township, to be maintained 
by the township." 

The Returns of the names of the Lords of Townships 
was, therefore, made for the purpose of effecting the 
Military Levies ordained in the Parliament at Lincoln. 
The returns were so much in requisition that in the reign 
of Henry vii. an order was issued for copies of it to l)e 
made, owing to the dilapidated state of the original docu- 
ment (Cooper's Account of Records, Vol. ii., p. 432). 
Palgrave states, p. 318, in 1 Hen. viii., John Sudde, writer, 
was appointed to copy the much worn Nomina Villarum, 
and he was to receive Ss. 4d. a quire for his labour. When 
completed the book contained 20^ quires. Binding, 
covers, &c , cost 8s. lOd., which was paid to one John 
Burell, the stationer. All these particulars appear from 
the Discharge of the Remembrancer enrolled Hillary 
Term, 1 Hen. vii. This volume long ago disappeared. 
Various manuscript copies exist, written at different 
periods ; some are copies of other transcripts (Brit. 



174 NOMINA VILLARIUM, 

Museum Library, Harl. Mss. 2195, 4219, 6281 ; Add. MS. 
26,097 ; Bodleian Library, mss. 5046 and 3550). Printed 
copies of these returns may be seen in Palgrave's Parlia- 
mentarv Writs, Vol. ii. 3. p. 301, and Feudal Aids, Vol. i., 
1284—1431, No. 241. 

Besides these public copies there have recently come 
to light two other manuscript copies, which differ in many 
respects from all others, filling up many lacunne, and 
supplying much that has been formerly wanting. These 
copies are — 

(a.) A small quarto paper volume containing the 
returns for Norfolk and Suffolk. It belonged to Antony 
Norris of Barton, co. Norfolk, 1780, and is now in the 
possession of Sir William R. Gowers, F.R.S. It is in the 
hand-writing of about 1610, and contains the returns for 
the Liberty of St. Etheldreda not previously given. This 
copy appears to have been made for private use. 

(6) The other copy, which is among the archives of the 
Bury Corporation, is a " Copy of precept to the Sheriff of 
Norfolk and Suffolk to make a return to the Exchequer 
of the Hundreds in his Bailwick, and of the cities, burghs, 
and towns in each, and who are their Lords. It is a list 
of those in the Hundreds of Babergh, Cosford, Thingo, 
Risbridge, Thedwastre. Blackbourne, and Lackford." This 
appears to be in the handwriting of 1580 — 1590, and as 
it is on legal paper and contains the entries only for the 
Liberty of St. Edmund, it may have been written for the 
use of Sir Nicholas Bacon, who held that libertv. 

Mention should be made of the copy of these returns 
in Reyce's Breviary of Suffolk, recently published by Lord 
Francis Hervey. It is evident upon making examination 
of the pages (101 — 122) in Lord Francis Hervey 's book,, 
that Reyce made his copy from a manuscript (Harl. MS. 
2195) with double columns, writing first the left hand 
column, then the right. By doing so he has caused 
several errors to arise, mixing the names of vills in 
different hundreds, and making many omissions. 

The Harl. MS. 6281 leaves off, folio 207b, at Eyke,. 



CO. SUFFOLK, 1316. 175 

in the Colneys Hundred, commencing on folio 208b, 
" Libertatis Sancti Edmundi." 

Harl. MS. 639, fo. 128 — 135, is a copy of the above. 
It was made by Sir Simon D'Ewes in 1620. Both are 
written in lines and not in columns. To the latter is added 
the note, " That the remaining towns in the Colneys 
Hundred ; and all the towns in the whole of the Loes 
Hundred are among the Records of the Michaelmas Term, 
11 Edward iv., in the process touching the Priory of Ely. 
See also Loder*s Framlingham, page 407. 

Harl. MS. 2195 is similar in arrangement to the 
Norris MS., and contains the Thredling Hundred, omitted 
in the two former manuscripts. 

Foot notes to the Norris ms. refer — plaih type to 
Palgrave's Parliamentary Writs, italics to the Harl. MS. 
6281, not referred to by Palgrave. 

THE BURY ST. EDMUND'S MSS. 

In qiiodam lihro intitulato nomina villarum folio primo in custodio 
Rememoratoris Thesaurarii in Scaccario remanente (inter alia) contine- 
tur ut sequitur — videlicet. 

Edwardus dei gratia Rex Angliee Dominus Hibemie et Dux 
Aquitanise, Vicecomiti NorffolcisB et SuffolcisB salutem. Quia quibus- 
duni certis de cuusis scitiorari volumus quae et quot hundreda sunt in 
ballivH tua et quorum sunt et quae et quot Civitates Burgi et ville sunt 
in quolit)et hundredorum illorum et qui sunt doniini eorundem tibi 
precipinius firroiter injungentes quod modis et viis omnibus quibus 
plenius et diligencius poteris te informes de promissis. Ita quod supra 
proximum profrum tuum ad Scuccarium noutrum TheHaurnrii et Barones 
iiostros de eodem Scaccario possis inde plenius inforniare et tu ipse in 
propria persona tua ad dictum Scaccarium supra proximum profrum 
tuum ex hac causa nisi tunc licenciam a nobis habueris absens esse et 
tunc per ilium quae supra dictum profrum tuum per te mittes ad 
Scaccarium predictum. Thesaurius et Barones de premissis fac plenius 
informare. Ita quod in te vel in ip80 quem per te ad dictum Scacca- 
rium sic mittes defectus aliquis non inveniatur per quod ad te gagnagio 
capiamus et habeas ibi hoc breve Teste me ipso apud Clipstow quinto 
die Mercurii Anno regni nostri nono. Edwardi secnndi. 

Suffolcia. 

Sciendum quod in libertate Sancti Edmundi est villa Sancti 
Edmundi. Abbas Sancti Edmundi est dominus ejusdem ville. 



176 NOMINA VILLARITM, 

Brtlheijre 

Item in eadeiu libertatc eat liuudredum de Balberge AbUus de 
Saiicto EdiDuudo e^t domiuus ejus^iein hundredi. Et in eoderu 
hundredo est villa de Stokeiieyloiid Alargeria Reginu Anglie est domina 
ejusdein ville. Et villa de Polstede Jacobus de Lnmborue est dominus, 
etc. Et villa de Asingtoue Rogerus Corbett est dominiis, Et villa de 
Wistoue Egia de Horkisley est dominti, Et villa de Bures dotniua de 
poyiiinggs est dotniua ibidem, Et ville de Cornerd magna et parva 
Abatissa de Mallinggs est domina de Cornerd magna I'homas de Graye 
est domiuus ibidem, Et villa de Neuton Willelmus Bontenyle^n est 
domiuus ibidem, Et villa de Sudbury comes Glovecestriae est dominus 
ibidem, Et villa de Boxforde cum Grotene Abbas de Saucto Edmundo est 
domiuus earuudera, Et villa de Aketoue Roberius de Bures est domiuus, 
Et villa de VValdriugfeild magna et parva Johannes de Brockesburue est 
domiuus de Waldingfeild magna Willelmus filius Radulphi et Willelmus 
de Beachampe sunt domini de Waldingfeild parva, Et de Lannham 
Comes Oxfordiffi est domiuus, Et villa de Aleye Mouachorum Prior 
Cautuariae est domiuus, Et villa de Illeye combustai Abbas de Sanctti 
Ositha et Johaiuies Scheltone sunt domini, Et villa de Mildinges 
Remigius de Mildiugiugs est domiuus, Et villa de Prestone Prior 
hospitalarisB Saucti Joliaunis Jerusalym est domiuus, Et villa de Coke- 
feild Abbas de Saucto Edmundo est dominus, Et villa de Molford Abbas 
de Saucto Edmundo est dominus, Et villa de Glemesford Episcopus 
Elieusis est dominus, Et villa de (^avendedishe Johannes de Clyuton est 
domiuus, Et villa de Boxstede Willelmus de La Lee est dominus, Et 
villa de Somertou Thomas de Burgh est domiuus, Et villa de Hertherst 
episcopus Elieusis e^t dominus, Et villa de Stansted Gerardus de 
Wachesham est dominus, Et villa de Lausele Abbas de Ramsey est 
domiuus, Et villa de Schimplings Robertus tilius Walteri est domiuus, 
Et villa de Alfetou et Johannes de Whekiutham est dominus. 

Corsford. 

Item est in eadem libetate hundredum de Corsford Abbas de 
Sancto Edmundo est domiuus eiusdem hundredo Et eodem hundredo 
est villa de Hadlei^e et Prior de Cautuariensis est domiuus, Et villa de 
Leyham Hugo de Despenser est domiuus, Et villa de Kerysou et Hugo 
de Despenser est dominus, Et villa de Aldham Comes OxfordicB est 
dominus, Et villa de Hecham cum Wachisham Episcopus Elieusis est 
dominus, Et villa de Watefeld cum Nawltone Thomas de Cokefeld est 
dominuR, Et villa de Semer Abbas de Saucto Edmundo est domiuus, Et 
villa de Chelisworth Johannes de Sancto Philiberto est domiuus, Et 
villa de Riltistone Thomas de Lovayne est domiuus, Et villa Brethingham 
Comes Gloucestriee est domiuus, Et villa de Helmeste Johanna de Bohun 
est domina, Et villo de Ketisberstoue Thomas de Rydewar est dominus, 
Et villa de Neddingge Henrious de Stantone est dominus, Et villa de 
Thorpe Hugo de Morieus est dominus. 



CO. SUFFOLK, 1316. 177 

Thiiighowe. 

Item eat in eadem lil»ertate Himdrediun de Thinghowe Abbais de 
SHticto Ediiiinido est duminuM eiusdein hnudredi £t in eodem Hundreda 
est villi! de Bnrewe Cumitisya Gloucesteim est doniina, £t villa de 
Shey}njrti»h Abbas de Sancto Kdmundo est dominus, Haregrave Abbas 
de Sancto Edinundo est doiuinus, Et villa de Brucley cum Riede Abbas 
de Sancto Edmnndo est dominus de Kiede et Alexander de Walslmm 
e»t dominus de Broeleye, Et villa de Wbepstede Abbas de Sancto 
Kdmundo est dominus, Et villa de Hausted Thomas filius Eustacii 
est dominus, Et villa de Neutou Abbas de Sancto Edmuudo est 
dominus, Et villa de Herinngeserth magna et parva Abbas de Sancta 
Ednumdo est dominus eanuidem, P2t villa de Ikkeworth Thomas de 
Ikk worth est dominus, Et villa de Haregrave Abbas de Sancto Edmnndo 
est dominus, Et villa de Saxham magna et parva Abbtis de Sancto 
Edmnndo est dominus earundem, Et villa de \Vest1ee Abbas de Sancto 
Edmnndo est dominus, Et villa de Kysbye Abbas de Sancto Edmunds 
est dominus, Et villa de Fornham omnium Sanctorum Abbas de Sancto 
Edmundo est dominus, Et villa de Lackford Johannes de Sancto 
Philiberto est dominus, Et villa de Hemegrave et Flempton Edwardua 
de Hemegrave est dominus de Hemegrave Et Abbas de Sancto Edmundo 
est dominus de Flempton. 

Rysebrege. 

Item in eadem libertate est huudredum de Hisebrege Abb^is de 
Sancto Edmundo est dominus eiusdem Hundredi Et villa de Haverille 
est in eodem hundredo Heuricus de Heilum est dominus, Et villa de 
Witherisfcild Willelmus de Grumsby est dominus, Et villa de Wrottinge 
magna et parva Kicardus de Taleworth est dominus de Magna Wracyuggs 
et Albricus de Capeles est dominus de parva Wrattings, Et villa de 
Thrillowe magna et parva Gilbertus Pecche est dominus de Thrillowe 
magna et Abbas Sancti Edmundi est dominus de Thirllowe parva, 
Et Bradeley magna et parva Johannes Boutetourts dominus de magna 
Bradeley et Jordan de Wythesfeild est don) in us de Bradeley parva, 
Et villa de Conlynggs liobertns Daspale est dominus, Et villa de 
Lidgate et Johannes de Hastings est dominus, Est villa de Dalham 
cum Tunstall Kegina Margareta est domina, Et villa de Denham 
et Margeria de Saye est domina, Et villa de Multon Willelmus de 
Beachamp est domhnis, Et villa de Gidysle cum Kenteford et Ned[blank] 
Con)itissa Gloucesteriae est domina, Et villa de Ounesden Willelmus Crike- 
tofte est dominus, Et villa de Appeden cum Chetebarewe Willelmus de 
Wanncj est dominus de Appeden Thomas de Veridoun est dominus de 
Chetebarewe, Et villa de Wickhambrok Johannes de Hastings est 
dominus, Et villa de Stradesele et Comitissa GloucestriaB est domina, Et 
villa de Denardeston Thomas de Grey est dominus, Et villa de Stansfeild 
Thomas de Grey est dominus, Et villa de Haukedon cum Thurstanton 
Thomas de Multon est domiuus, Et villa de Poselyng worth cum Chypp- 
leye Kicardus de Cornerde est dominus de Poselyngworth Et Gilbertus 
Pecche est dominus de Chyppleye, Et villa de Honeden Comitissa Glou- 



178 NOMINA VILLARIJM, 

cesteriee est dooiina, Et villa de Clare est in rnauu domini Regis Et 
villa de Stoke cum Boston et Chiltou Prior de Stoke est dominus, £t 
villa de Keditou Margareta de Wyleby est dotiiina, Et villa de Widekes- 
hoo Haniou de [blauk] est domiuus, Et villa de Bernardeston Margaret 
de Wilbby est doruina. 

The ward isstrie. 

Item iu eadem libertate est hundredum de Thewardistre Abbas 
Sancti Edmundi est dominus eiusdem huudredi Et iu eodem huudredo 
est villa de Ratlisdeu Episcopus Etieusis est dominus Et villa de Falsham 
cum Qeddin^^e [blauk] Geddiuge est dominus de Geddinge Ed ward us 
Pecche est dominus de Falsham, Et villa de Bradefeld [blank] Abbas 
Sancti Edmundi est dominus, Et villa de Bradefeld Senj;cler Abbas 
Sancti Edmundi est dominus Et Stanefeld cum parva Bradefeld Welthiti- 
tham magna VVelthintham parva Hesthebrok Bingham (? Kougham) 
Beketon and Wolpet Abbas Sancti Edmundi, Et villa de Dreuthistoue 
Thomas de Loveyne est dominus, Et villee de Tostoke, Thurstone, 
Pakenham, Berton, Liveremere parva et Timworth cum Amstauton 
Ablnis Sancti £dmundi est dominus earundem. 

Blakeburne. 

Item in eadem libert<ite est Hundredum de Blakeburne et in 
€odem Hundredo est villa de Westowe cum Wridewell Abbas Sancti 
Edmundi est dominus de Westowe Thomas de Wridewell est dominus 
de Wridewell Et villa de Culford cum lugham Abbas Sancti Edmundi 
€8t dominus, Et villa de Bernham Jacobus de Shirle et Edwardus de 
Hemene sunt domini, Et villa de Eustone cum Gnatishalle Walterus de 
Patishill est dominus [blank] domina de Guatishale, Et villa de Faken- 
ham magna cum parva Fakenham magna est in manu domini Regis Et 
Willelmus de Pakenham est dominus de Fakenham parva, Et villa de 
Hove worth [blank] est dominus; Et villa de Sapston est in manu domini 
Regis Et villa de Troston Abbas Sancti Edmundi est dominus, Et villa 
de Livermere parva Bartholomeus de Ly vermere est dominus, Et villa de 
Ixworth cum Thorpe Edwardus de Pakenham et Willelmus de Criketot 
sunt domini de Ixworth et Thomas de Pakenham est dominus de Thorpe, 
£t villa de Berdewelle Johanna de Pakenham et Isabella de W^ykes sunt 
•dominee, Et villa de [blank] Abbas Sancti Edmundi est dominus, 
Et villa de Bemingham Johannes de xMutford et Prior de Blesworth 
sunt domini, Et villa de Conesweston Abbas Sancti Edmundi est 
dominus, Et villa de Hopton dominus Abbas est dominus, Et villa de 
Weston Hugo Hovel est dominus, Et villa de Hildercle Abbas Sancti 
Edmundi est dominus, Et villa de Thelnetham Johannes de Thelnetham 
est dominus, Et villa de Wattlesfeld cum [blank] Abbas Sancti Edmundi 
est dominus earundem, Et villa de Walsham Edwardus de Pakenham 
est dominus, Et villa de [blank] magna cum Ayshfeld parva Willelmus 
Crjkecrofte est dominus, Et villa de Norton Johannes de Pakenham est 
dominus, Et villa de Elmeswelle Abbas Sancti Edmundi est dominus. 
Et villa de [blank] Willelmus de Langham est dominus, Et villa de 



00. SUFFOLK, 1316. 



179 



Langham Willelmus de Criktoft est doroiuus, £t villa de Stowe [blank] 
Galfridus Pecche est dominus. 

Lakford. 

Item in eadem libertate est hundred um de Lackford Abbas de 
Sancto Edmundo est dominus eiusdem Hundredi Kt in eodem Hundredo 
est villa de Grandon Episcopus Eliensis est dominus, Et villa de Dunham 
Abbas Sancti Edwnrdi est dominus, Et villa de Elveden Abbas Sancti 
Edmundi est dominus, Et villa de [blank] Abbas Sancti Edmundi est 
dominus, Et villa de Lakyngham Prior Eliensis et Comitissa Gloucestrie 
sunt domini, Et ville de [blank] Robertus de Todenham est dominus, 
Et villa de Mildenhale Abbas Sancti Edmundi est dominus, Et villa de 
Weylington Humfridus de Valencia et [blank] sunt domini, Et villa de 
Frekenham Episcopus Roffe est dominus, Et villa de Taverham et 
[blank] Comitissa Gloucestrie est domina, Et villa de Tudenham 
Edmund us de Hemegrave est dominus. 



THE NORRIS MS. 



Page 96 



Hundredum de Hertsmere et 
Stowe sunt in vicecomitatu 
Suffolcie villate eoruudem. 



Villata de Eye 


Et est domiuus eju8( 


lem Dominus Edwardus Hex 


Mendlesham 




Dominus Johannes 

Buttercourte 1 


Wetherinset 


Dominus 


Episcopus Eliensis 


Thoudon2 


Domiuus 


Edwardus Rex Anglie 


AspallS 


Dominus 


Willelmus Botiller 


Kedlingfeild 


Dominus 


Priorissa nonnalium'^ 
de Redlingfeilde 


Cranle 
Cocklingate 
Sutton 5 
Langton6 


Dominus 


Edwardus Rex Anglie 


BrisworthT 


Domini ejusdem 


Willelmus le Parker^ 



' Boiecourte, BotetourU, 'Tbornedene ^Aspbale, ^monialium, ^Suddon et, ' 
'Bryteworthe, *Georgiu8 le Thorpe and m D'Ewes. 



5 vUl., 



180 


NOMINA 


VILLARCM, 


Iiikeslee 


Domini 


Dominus Edward us Rex 
Auglie. Prior de Home 


Melles 


Dominus 


Johannes de Stanifordel 


Burgate 


Dominus 


Petruu de Burgate 


T brand est on 


Doniinus 


Johannes de Dagworthe 



Palurave 



Doniinus 



Petrus Mannerison2 
Johannes Medefeilde 

Abbas de Sancto Edmundo 



page 96. 

Ocle et Stutton3 Domini 



Broome •'> 


Domini 


Wortham 


Domini 


Redgrave et 
RickingaleS 


Dominus 

In Rickinghall 


Gislinghnm 


Domini eiusdem 


MinninghamO 
Wethorpe 


Dominus 


Baketon 


Dominus 


Wyvstonll 


Dominus 


Thornham et 
Stoake 


Domini 


Brock ford et 
Twaite 


Dominus 


Wickham 


Dominus 



Johannes de Hoc 
Nicholaus de Beaufu 
Roliertus de Bokenham 
Johannes Boylande'^ 

Prior mouachorum de 

Thetford 
Bartholomeus Dan vi Hers 6 

Abbas de Sancto Edmundo 
Gerard de Wachesham7 

Abbas de Sancto Edmundo 
Heredes Tho. Talbot 

ffulco de Goldingham 
Johannes de Westlee 
Johannes de Boiland 

Adam de Comers 10 



Episcopus Norwicensis 

Hugo Hovel I 

Prior de Eye 
Prior de Ely 12 

Abbas Sancti Edmundi 



Abbas Sancti Johaunis 
Colcestrie 



^de Swinforde, Swyneford, '-'Maneisin, Mauveityn^ 'Sutton, Stuiion^ *Boylunde» 
*Broin, ^Danvillyrs, Danyllers, ^Wethesham, Weeheikam^ 'Rykyngale, •Myning- 
ham, Nyningham et, Vyninghamy *'*Conyers, ^^Wyvereston, ^'Eye 





CO. SUFFOTiK, 


1316. 181 


Cotton 


Domini 


VVillelmus de Breisworthe 
Richardus Champeigue 


Risbanklel 


Domini 


Thomas de Hicklinge 


page 97. 


STOWE. 




Haugly2 


Dominus eiusdem 


Dominus Edwaidus Rex 

Anglie 


Stowe 


DorainuH 


Abbas Sancte Osithe 


Wetherden 


Domini 


Abbas Saucti Edmundi 
Ranulphus de Skales 


Combes 


Domini 


Robertus de Ufforde 
Johannes de Thorpe 
Willelmus de Boyton 


Onehonse 


Dominus 


Bartholomseus Danvillers 



Buxhall 



fBnbergeS 



Domini 



Domini 



Ricardus Wailande 
Rogerus Sturmy 
Robertus Cockerell 
Johannes de Tendringe 

Prior de Butler* 
Johannes de Pippard 
Robertus fitz Walter 



Thorny 


Dominus 


Ricardus de Amondevill 


Newton et 
Chippinge 


Dominus 


Arnoldus de Mounteny 


Newton vetus 


Dominus 


Willelmus de Boiton 


Cretiuge 


Dominus 


Thomas le Latimer 


Herleston 


Dominus 


Prior de ButlerS 


Theloude 


Dominus 


Robertus Belett 



page 98. 



QlamfordG 



BOSMERE ET CLAYDON 
in manu rice comitis pro Rege. 

Dominus Episcopus Elieusis 



^Ryshangle, 'Haughele, "fligneberghe, ^Buttele, *Buttele, •Grannford, BramfordL 





182 



Nettlested et 
Blakenham 


Dominus 


Blakenham 




supra aquam 




Balhaml 


Dominus 


Somersham 


Domini 


Ofrton et 
Bricett 


Dominus 


Riugsele 


Dominus 


Bati&forde 


Dom;nus 


Berkiuge 


Dominus 


MuckfeildS 


Dominus 


Stouebam 


Dominus 


Stouhatn 


Dominus 


Coddeuham 


Dominus 


page 99. 




Ashe 


Dominus 


Heniug8tone3 


Dominus 


Gosbecke 


Dominus 


Cretinge 


Dominus 


Cretiuge 


Dominus 


WalshamB 


Dominus 




CLAYDON. 


Helmiugham 


Dominus 


Swiueland 


Dominus 


Westerfeild 


Dominus 


Thurlston 


Dominus 



NOMIKA VILLARUM, 

Thomas Dever, de Veer 

Abbas de Becherlewjne 



Johannes de Bumavill 

Johanna de Boham 
Johanna de Bohun 
Johannes de Bonn 

Ricardus Lovedaj 



Johannes de Burnavill 
Philippus de Columbariis 
Prior Eliensis 
Johannes de Boylande 
Comes Norff. 
Petrus Gamegan 
Prior de Royston 

Philippus Hanieis 
Johannes Bacon 
Radulphus de Gosbecke 
Prior de Wilhiinton* 
Prior de Cretinge 
Willelmus de la mote 



Johannes de Thorpe 
Thomas le Latimer 
Willelmus de Weland 
Prior Saucti Petri de Gipwico 



^Beylham, 'Muoklefelde, 'HeininiDKttone, ^Wylnington. Willington, nVryliwham 



CO. SUFFOLK, 1316. 



183 



Wheltenton 


DomiDus 


Episcopus Eliensis 


Cleydon 
Akenham 


Dominus 


Johannes Bacon 


Henly 


Dominus 


Sacrista ecclesie Sancte 
Trinitatis, Norwici 


Bergham 


Dominus 


Prior Eliensis 



page 100 



Dimidium Hundred! de 
Mutford in manu Edmundi 
de Hengraye pro Rege. 



Mutford 


Dominus 


Edmundus de Hengrave 


Oiselham 


Dominus 


Edwardus de Hengrave 


Kesiuglande 


Dominus 


Robertus de Monte alto 




Samforde in 
manu vice comitis. 


Kirketon 


Dominus 


Willelmus Videlou 
de Wisu videlou 


Euerwarton 


Dominus 


Bartholomaeus Davillers 


Herksted 


Dominus 


Willelmus Britton 
Comes le Bretonn 
Johannes .... 


Holbrooke 


Dominus 


Willelmus de Holbrooke 


Stutton 


Dominus 


Willelmus Videlou 


Brantham 


Dominus 


Willelmus de Braham 


Bergholt 


Dominus 


Philippus de Oreby 


Stratford 


Dominus 


Johannes de Stratforde 


Heigham 


Dominus 


Johannes de Reimes 


Shelley 


Dominus 


Johannes de Appleby 


Roidonl 


Dominus 


Robertus de Roidonl 


Wenham et 


Domina 


Petronilla de Holbrooke 



^ReydOD. 



184 



NOMINA VILLARUM, 



page 101. 

Capel Dominus 

Holtou Dominus 
Belstead magna Dominus 

Beutly Dominus 

Tatiuston Dominus 

Wherated Dominus 

ffreston^ Dominus 



Willelmus filius Kadulphi 

Willelmus de Boy ton 

Abbas de Abemai-sia ^ 

Hugo Tamelache^ 

(Hugo)3 de Holbrooke 

Robertus de Koidone 

Johannes de Holbrooke 
Johannes de ffreston 



Copducke 


Dominus 


Kicardus de Copdocke 


Belated parva 


Dominus 


Johannes de Goldingham 


ChilmyntonS 
Wolferton 


Dominus 


Edwardus rex Anglie 


Hintlesham 


Dominus 


Johannes Talliott 
Margeria Pipparde 


Sprowghton 


Dominus 


Willelmus de Ormesbye 




Hoxon in manu 


Episcopi Norwicensis. 


Hoxon et 
Denham 


Dominus 
Dominus 


Episcopus Norwicensis 
Johannes de Castre 


Sillham et 
Essham 


Domini 


Alicia de Sancto Mauro 
Prior monachorum de 
Thetford 


Waibred et6 
Withersden 


Dominus 


Oliverus de Ingham 


page 102. 






Mendham 


Domini 


Comes Oxonie 



ffresingfilde Domini 



Rogerus filius Willelmi 

Abbas Sancti Edmundi 
Johanna Launce 
RicarduH filius Aegidii de 
Brewosa in custodia Edwardi 
Bakun. 



^Alba marla. 
"Talema«he, ^Johannes, ♦Preston, ^Ohdfnyngston, ^Waifhredset et WyresdaU. 



CO. SUFFOLK, 1316, 



185 



Stradbrooke 
Winkefeilde 


Domini 


Laxfeilde 


Domini 


Tattington et 
Brundjshe 


Dominus 


Dyneton 


Dominus 


Badingham 


Domini 


Keleshall et 
Carleton 


Domina 


Bedfeild 
Stasted 


Domini 


page 103. 




Wirlingworthe et 
Soham 


Dominus 


Bedinfeilde 
Southolte 


Domini 



Weileighbegg2 
Horham et 



Dominas 
Domini 



Ricardus de Brewosa (in 
custodia Edwardi Bakun) 

Johannes de Ponte 
Johannes de Hoe 

Willelmus de Rungeton 



Willelmus de Bovill 
Radulphus Hardrichshull 

Willelmus de Bovill 
Ricardus Mundevill 
Radulphus de Hardrichshull 

Comitissa Marescallus (in 
dotario) 

Prior de Ely 
Comitissa Marescallus 



Abbas Sancti Edmuudi 

Abbas Sancti Edmund! 

Abbas de Colcestria 

Matildis(RelictaEdwardi Bed- 
ingfildel Willelmus de Bovis 
nomine custodie heredis 
Willelmi de Gislingham) 

Willelmus de Bovill 

Rogerus filius et herdes 
Willelmi de Hungerforde^ 
(in custodia Peter de Gray) 

(P^trus Gemegan. 



Dimidium Hundred! de Luthinglande 
in manu Comitis Richmondie 



Villa de Bradwell Domini 
Belton et ffritton 



Gorton, Gunton 
Hopton 



Domini 



Bartholomeeus Davillers 
Prior de Leiglis^ 

Prior de Norwicensis 
Johannes de Gorton 



'qui fixit uxor Edi. de Bedyngfeld, 'Wylebeyghe, 'Huntingfeld, ^Leghes. 



186 



NOMINA VILLARUM, 



Ofton, fflizton 

Blundeston 

Lounde 



Domini 



Edwardus Bacou 
WillelmuB de Auney 
Robertas de Blundeston 



page 104. 

Somerleyton Domini 

Askby et 
Heringfleete 

Jermoutha parra Dominus 

Gorleston 

Lowystooke 

Burghe Dominus 



Roger de Loudham 
Robertus de Inglose 
Katherina filia Osberti 

Johannes de Britannia 
Comes de Richmond 

Prior de Bromeholme 



Hundred de Blythinge et 
Wangford in manu Waltari de Norwico Thesaurarii 

Abbas de Layston 

Adam de Swilltington 
Ricardus de Wailonda 
Petrus de Donwico 

Willelmus de Bovill 
Augustinus de la falaise 
Johannes de Risinge 

Johannes de Claveringe 

Prior Monachorum Thetford 
Adam de Swillinton 



Abbas de Sibton 
Robertas Rose et 
Johannes de ffresinfilde 

Nicholaus de Segrave 
Walterus de Norwico 



Petronilla de Nerford 
Johannes de Cour 
Thomas George 
Willelmus de Weston 

Robertas de Ubbeston 
Rogcrus de Heveningham 



Layston 


Dominus 


Jll,lUUloi.OIl 

ffordlee 


Domini 


Westleton 


Domini 


Blithburghe 


Dominus 


Dersham et 
Yoxforde 


Domini 


page 105. 




Sibton 

Walpole 

Cukley 


Domini 


Bromfeilde 

Pesenhall 

Melles 


Domini 


Wenhaston 
Thurton 


Domini 



(Wolverton) Domini 

Ubbeston, Heveningham 



CO. SUFFOLK, 1316. 



187 



Huntinfeild 
Linsted magna et 
Linsted parva 


Dominus 


Rogerus filius et heres 
Willimi Huntinfeilde 


Halesworthe et 
Cratfeilde 


Domini 


Johannes de Argentine 
Johannes de Cour 


Chedeston et 
Blitheforde 


Domini 


Johannes de Boyland 
Hugo Hovell 
Thomaa de Bavent 
Hanio de Micklefeilde 


Wisset 
Holton 
Specteshall 
Rumburghe 


Domini 


Willelmus de Rosce 
Petronilla de Nerford 



page 106. 



Westall 
Sotherton et 
Henham 


Domini 


Brampton 
Stoyen 


Domini 


Uggeshall 
ffrostenden 


Domini 


Raidon 

Sontholde 

Easton 


Domini 


Northales 


Domini 


Wrentham 


Dominus 


Hensted et 
Cove 


Domini 



Robertus de Aspall 
Walterus de Bemham 
Willelmus de Kerdeston 
Willelmus Illegarde 

Willelmus de Kerdeston 
Rol>ertus de Sefilde 
Ricardus de Biskele 

Catherina fitz Ouberne 
Ricardus de Biskele 

Adomur de Valenz 
Heredes Comitis Glocestrie 
Thomas de Bavent 

Johannes de Cove 
Walterus de Cove 
Petronilla de Nerforde 
Richardus de Biskele 

Simon de Perponnte 

herets Michaelis de Poynings 

Simon de Perponnte 
Margeria de Poynings 
Johannes de Cour 
Petronilla de Nerforde 



188 



NOMINA VILLARCM, 



page 107. 

Benaker 
Bulcamp 
Bregg 



Domini 



Simon de Perpoyute 
Willelmus de Kerdestou 
Johhnnes Comouel 
Johannes de Poringland 



Wainjforde 



Worlingham 
Cove 


Domini 


Adomar de Valenz 
Comitib Pembroke 
Abbas de Sancto Edraundo 
Hugo de Berry 
Katherin filial Oubome 


Soterlj 
Shadinfeild et 
Willingham 


Domini 


Edward us de Soterley 
Hugo Berry 
Elizabethe Brusiarde 


Elghe 

Weston 

UpbreealamS 


Domini 


Edwardus Rex Anglie 
Hugo Berrie 


Beccles 
Endegate 


Dominus 


Abbas Sancti Edmundi 


Baraham et 
Shipmedowe 


Domini 


Robcrtus Barsham 
Henricus de Willingtou 
Walter us de Norwico 


page 108. 






Bungay 


Domini 


Comitissa Marescallus 

(in dotari 
Johannes (filius et heres 
Willelmi de Vallibus 


Rinksfeild 
Redsham parvu 





Ikleshall 



Domini 



Metingham Domini 



Southelmham Dominus 



Rohesia de Redsham 

Con.itissa Marescalla 
Guido fferre 
Jacobus llketeshall 

Comitissa Marescalla 
Guido fferre 
Jacobus de llketeshall 
Walterus de Norwico 

Episcopus Norwicensis 



^Bomond, ^fitz,^to, ^Upredesham, Up. lUdeiham. 



CO. SUFFOLK, 1316. 



189 



page 109. 



Fiiberfas Sancte Etheldrede 
in quii Biint qiiinque hundred! et diinidum que 
sunt prioris de Ely viz. Plomsgate, ('arleforde, 
Wilforde, Colneis, Loos, Thredlinge ut patet in sequeutibus. 



A Id burgh 
Haselwode 


Domini 


Prior de Snnpes 
dementia de Tittleshall 


Snapes et 
ffrestou 


Dominus 


Prior de Snapes 


Sudbourne 


Dominus 


Prior Eliensis 


Blazall 


Dominus 


Kicardus de Wailand 


Tunstall 
Wautisden 


Dominus 


Comitissa Mareschalla 


Dunningworth 
Iken 


Dominus 


Comes Norflfolcie 
Rogerus Sturmyn 


Benhall 
ffernham 


Domini 


Guido fferre 
Willelmus de Claydon 


Sterneffeilde 


Dominus 


Johannes Mundevile 


Sazmundham 


Dominus 


Thomas Verly 


Olemham 
Glemham et 
Stratford 


Domini 


Willelmus de Kerdeston 
Prior de Butler 


Reudham 
Brusiard 


Dominus 


Johannes de Brusiarde 
Henricus Hoe 


page 110. 






Cramforde 
Swiftlinge 


Domini 


Prior de Leis 
Willelmus de Dalizone 


Perhnm 


Dominus 


Robertus Ufforde 
Carlforde. 


Otely 


Dominus 


Johannes Parnell 


Clopton 


Dominus 


Thomas le Latimer 


Grundisburgh 
Burghe 


Domini 


Robertus de Tuddenham 
Eva de Uflforde 


Hasketon 


Dominus 


David de ffletwicke 



190 



NOMINA VILLARDM. 



Belings 
Belings 
Saokford 


Domini 


Robertus de Tuddenham 
Johannes Hubert 


Martlesham 
Neubrouae et 
Waldringfeild 


Dominus 


Ricardus de Brewso 


Plaifoid 
Brightwell 


Dominus 


Johannes de Plaiforde 
Johannes de Lamput 


Rishmere 
Alnesburne 


Domini 


Johannesl de Holbrooke 
RicarduD Lowe 


Culpho 
Tuddenham 


Dominus 


Johannes de Verdon 
Johannes de Ludham 


page 111. 






Wetnesham 


Dominus 


Edwardus Bacon 


ffoxhall 
Kessegrave 


Dominus 


Johannes de Holbrooke 



Wilforde. 



Baudesey 


Dominus 


Aiderton 


Dominus 


Gejntonl 
Capell 


Dominus 


Holeske2 
Shawsham 


Dominus 


Sutton 


Dominus 


Ramesholte 
BromeswellS 


Domiui 


Sutton 


Dominus 


Melton 
Ufforde 


Domini 


Peterstree 

Wioham 

Loudham 


Domini 



Robertus de Ufforde 
Hugo de Nauntou 
Simon de Ratlesden 

ComitissA Norffolcie 

Ricardus de Glanville 

Johannes de Paiton 
Comes Marescallus 

Ricardus de Glanvile 

Robertus de Ufforde 
Prior Eliensis 

Robertus de Ufforde 
Johannes de Lowdham 



^Gayton, ^HoleOt e$ Shoii$ham, SBurneaweU. 



CO. SUFFOLK, 1316. 



191 



Bredfeilde 


Doniina 


Boulgei 
Debach et pars 
de Daliugho 




Pi«ell2. 




Walton 


Dominus 


Fillistowe 




Trimlee et 


Dominus 


Trimlee 




Nacton 


Domini 


Levington 
Stratton 




Bucklesham 


Domini 


Helmele 




Altereston 




Kirkton 




fialteuham 




fframiugham 
Same comitis 


Dominus 


Kenton 


Dominus 


Gretingham 


Dominus 


Cretingham 


Dominus 


Monwedon 


Dominus 


Brandeston 


Dominus 


Easton 


Domini 


Kettleberghe 




imgem. 




Marlesforde 


Dominus 


Hacbeston 


Dominus 


Hoo 




Woodbridge 
Dalingbo 





Margareta Regina Anglie 



Colney8.2 



Comitissa Norffolcie 



Episcopus Cestrie 
Willelmus visedelu 

Johannes de Holbrooke 
Johannes [ ] 

Agnes Stratton 

Prior de (Elye in ms. 639) 



Loes. 



Comitissa Norffolcie 

Nigellus de Kenton 

Nigellus de Kenton 

Johannes Colville 

Johannes Abadam 

Willelmus Wejland 

Johannes Charles 
Johannes Kettleberghe 

Bartholomeeus de Sakvile 
Comitissa Norffolcie 



^de Bathe, Bouche. Dalingoohe. ^In margin^ BMid. pro ville in 

Colneys and Lom Hundred Tid. Kot. tr« Miohaelis xj<> Edw. 4th.->HarL 6281. 
in this Hundred, Palgrave only givti Waiton, ffiUhstowe, Athe, JBoukleiham, 
Eyke. 



192 


NOMINA 


VILLARCM, 


Carleford 


Donuni 






ffilius Willelmi Weyland 


Letlieriugbam 








Willelraus de Bovile 


Ashe 


Dominu8 






CoDiitissa Norffolcie 


Eyke 

Oategrave 

Butlee 










Bouklesham 
Reudleshani 


Donnnus 






Philippus [ ] 
Johannes de Colvile 






Thredlinge. 




Debenhnm 


Domini 






Prior de Ely 


Winston 








Willelmus de Beauchampe 


fframesden 


Dominus 






Robertas de Monte alto 


Petaughe 










Ashfeilde 


Dominus 






Robertus de Monte alto 


Thorpe 








Nigellus de Kenton 


Page 114 


Ixninge 


Dimidum Hundredum. 


Ixninge 


Domini 






Comitissa Pembrocke 



Nova mercatum Dominus 



Thomas de Kenslikel 
Thomas de Gardinis 

Johannes de Argentine 



Villa Gipwice 

Donewic 

Oreforde 



Non est aliqua ci vitas in Comitatu Suffolcie 
Burgi 

in manu domini Regis 



Sciendum quod in libertate Sancti 
Edmundi est villa Sancti Edmundi Abbns 
de Sancto Edmundo est dominus eiusdem ville. 

Hundredum de Baberghe est in eadem libertate 
et Abbas de Burie est dominus eiusdem Hundredi. 



Stokenailand 
Polsted 


Domina 
Dominus 




MargaretA Regina Anglie 
Jacobus de Lambnme 


Assington 


Dominus 




Rogerus Corbet 


Wiston 


Domina 


^Ktmetike. 


Domina Archadia Hockesley 



CO. SUFFOLK, 1316. 



193 



Bures 



DotniiiH 



Domina de Poynings 



Cornerde 
Comerde 


magna 
parva 


Domini 


Abbatissa de Mailings 
Thomas Grey 


Newton 




Dominus 


Willelmus Bolevilline 


SudV)iiry 




Domiuus 


Comitissa Glocestrie 


page 115. 








Boxford 
Grotton 




Dominus 


Abbas Sancti Edmund 



Aketon Domiuiis 

Waldinfild magna Dominus 
Waldiugfildeparva Domini 

Lavenham Dominus 

£ley Monachorum Domiuus 
llley combutsa Domini 



Robertas de Buers 

Johannes Brook esbou me 

Willelmus ffilius Radulphi 
Willelmus de Beauchampe 

Comitissa Oxonie 

Prior Cantuariensis 

Abbatissa de Scante Osithe et 
Johannes Schelton 



Mildings 


Dominus 


Kemigius de Mildings 


Preston 


Domiuus 


Prior Hospitalis Sancti 
Johannis Hierosalem 


Cockfeilde 


Dominus 


Abbas Sancti Edmundi 


Mellford 


Dominus 


Abbas Sancti Edmundi 


Glemieford 


Dominus 


Episcopus Eliensis 


Cavendishe 


Dominus 


Johannes de Clinton 


Boxted 


Dominus 


Willelmus de la Lee 


Sonierton 


Dominus 


Thomas de Burghe 


Hartest 


Dominus 


Episcopus Eliensis 


Stansted 


Dominus 


GerarduB de Watchesham 


Lawshall 


Dominus 


Abbas de Ramsey 


Shimpling 


Dominus 


Robertus filius Walteri 


Alfeton 


Dominus 


Johannes de Wekintham 


Edwardstone 


Dominus 





194 



NOMINA VILLARUM, 



Hundredum de Coaforde et est in eadem libertate 
et Abbas de Burie est dominus eiusdem libertatis. 



Pi««ll«. 






Hadleighe 


Dominus 


Prior Cantuariensie 


Laiham 


Dominus 


Hugo de Dispensier 


Kerjsonl 


Dominus 


Hugo de Dispensier 


Aldham 


Dominus 


Comitissa Oxonie 


Hetcham 
Watsham 


Dominus 


Episcopus Eliensis 


Whatfeild cum 
Nawlton 


Dominus 


Thomas de Cookfeild 


Seamour 


l^omiuus 


Abbas Sancti Edmuadi 


Shellisworthe 


Dominus 


Johannes de Sancto Philberto 


Biltistou 


Dominus 


Thomas de Loveine 


Bretenham 


Dominus 


Comitissa Glocestrie 


KettlebarstoQ 


Dominus 


Thomas de Rideware 


Neddinge 


Dominus 


Henricus de Stanton 


Thorpe 


Dominus 


Hugo de Morieuz 



page 117. 



In MS. 2195 Hundred of Thinghowe follows. 

Hundredum de Resbridge in eadem 
libertate et Abbas de Sancto Edmundo est Dominus 
eiusdem Hundredi. 



Haverell Dominus 

Wethersfeild Dominus 

Wrottinge magna Dominus 

Wroitinge parva Dominus 

Thirlo magna Dominus 

Thirlo parva Dominus 

Bradely magna Dominus 

Bradley parva Dominus 

Cowlinges Dominus 



^Ktreteyt, 



Henricus do Helm 
Willelmus de Grimsby 
Ricardus de Taleworthe 
Albricus de Capellus 
Gilbertus Peache 
Abbas Sancti Edmundi 
Johannes Boutcourt 
Jordan de Withfeilde 
Robertus de Aspall 



CO. SUFFOLK, 1316. 



195 



Lidgate 


Dominus 


Johannes de Hastings 


Dalham cum 
Dunstall 


Domina 


Domina Regina Margareta 


Denham 


Domina 


Margeria de Say 


Multon 


Dominus 


Willelmus de Bauchaunte 


Gydisly cum 
Kentford 


Domina 


Comitlssa Glocestrie 


Owesdon 


Dominus 


Willelmus Gnktoft 


Deppeden cum 
Chetebere 


Dominus 
Dominus 


Willelmus de Waimty 
Thomas de Veredon 


Wickambrocke 


Dominus 


Johannes de Hastings 


Gatesele 
Stradesele 


Dominus 


Comes Glocestrie 


Danatstonl 


Dominus 


Thomas de Gray 


Stansfeilde 


Dominus 


Thomas de Gray 


page 118. 






Haukedon cum 
Thurstanston 


Dominus 
Dominus 


Thomas de Multon 
Thomas de Multon 


Posslingworthe 

cum 

Chippele 


Dominus 
Dominus 


Richard de Cornerd 
Gilbertus Betts 


Hoveden 


Dominus 


Comes de Glocestrie 


Clare 


Dominus 


In manu Domini Regis 


Stoake cum 
Boyton et 
Chilton 


Dominus 


Prior de Stokes 


Kediton 


Domina 


Margareta de Willeby 


Widekesho 


Dominus 


Hamon de Sutton2 


Barnard estonl 


Dominus 


Margareta de Willowby 



Hundred urn de Thedwastre est in eadem libertate £t 
Abbas Sancti Edmundi est dominus eiusdem hundredi 

Rattlesden Dominus Episcopus Eliensis 

^Dennardeitonf ^SuUan omitted. 



196 



NOMINA VILLARCM, 



ffeUliaru 
Geddiuge 

Bradfeildel 

Bnid feildeSincleere' 

Hegessett 

Pakenhiini 

Bmdfeild parvn 

Welnetham magna 

Welnetham parva 

Rushbrooke 

Kougham 

page 119. 

Bay k ton 
Wolpett 
Tostocke 



Doniiniis 



Edwardus Peche 
de Geddinge 



Dominus 



Abbas Snncti Edmundi 



Drenkston 

Thurston 

ffakenhm 

Barton 

Livermere magna 

Tymworthe 

Amstanton 



Dominus 
Dominus 



Thomas de Louvaine 
Abbas Sancti Edmundi 



Hundredum de Blackboume est in eadem libertate 



Westow 

Culfordum 

Ingham 

Wridwell 

Bognham2 



Eustou magna 
Gnateshall 



Dominus 

Dominus 
Dominus 

Domini 



Abbas Sancti Edmundi 



Thomas de Wridwell 

Jacobus de Shrile 
Edmundus de Hemegrave 

Walterus de Pateshall 
Domina de Knottishall 
[Alienor CharlesS ] 



^£t villa de Bradfeld [ 1 Abbaa Sancti Edmundi est dominus. Et villa de 

Bradfeld Sengcler Abbaa Sancti fklmundi est dominus. Kt Stanefeld cum parva 
Bradfelde, Welthintham magna, Welthintham parva, Kesshebroke, Bingham [ ] 

Beketon et Wolpet, Abban Sancti Edmundi et villa de Drenthistone, Thomas 
Lovayne est dommus, Et villa de Tastocke, Thurston, Fakinham, Berton, Livermere 
parva et Timworthe cum Amstonton, Abbas Sancti Emdundi est Dominus eorundem. 



^Bameham 



^amittcd. 



CO. SUFFOLK, 1316. 



197 



ffakeuham magna 
cum 
ffukenham parva 


Dominns 
Dominus 


In manu Domini Regis 
Willelmus de ffukenham 


page 120. 






Honeworthe 


Dominus 


Abbas Suncti Edmundi 


Tapestoii 


Domiims 


In manu Regis 


Trostoii 


Dominus 


Abbns Sancti Edmundi 


Livermere parva 


Dominus 


Bartiiolomscus de Livermere 


Ixworthe 


Dominus 


Ed ward us de Pakenham 
Willelmus de Crikelote 


Thorpe 


Dominus 


Thomas de Pakenham 


Berdewell 


Domini 


Johanna de Pakenham 
Isal)ella de Wjkes 


Hepworthe 


Dominus 


Johanna de Rushall 



Barmingham Domini 



Abbas Sancti Edmundi^ 

Johannes de Mutforde 
Petrus de Whalesworthe 



Donewestou 


Dominus 


Abbus Sancti Edwardi 


Hopton 

Hindercley 

Wattesfeilde 






Stanton 






Elmeswell 






Weston 


Dominus 


Hugo Hovell 


Thelnetham 


Dominus 


Johannes de Thelnetham 


Walsham 


Dominus 


Edwardus de Pakenham 


Badwell magna 


Dominus 


Willelmus Cricketoft 


cum 






Ashfeild parva 






Norton 


Dominus 


Johannes de Pakenham 


Hunterston^ 


Dominus 


Willelmus de Langham 


Laugham 


Dominus 


Willelmus de Cricketoft 


P<lg6l21. 






Stowe 


Dominus 


Galfridus Pechey 
' and > omitttd. 



198 NOMINA VILLARUM, 

Rickingale Dominus Abbas Saucti Edmundi 

Hundred urn de Lackford est in eudem libertate 
et Abbas Sancti Edmundi est dominus eiusdem 



Brandon 


Dominus 


Episcopus Eliensis 


Duuham 
Elvcdeu 
Wangford2 


Dominus 


Abbas Sancti Edmundi 


Lakenham 


Dominus 


Prior Eliensis et Comitissa 
Glocestiie 


Eriswell 


Domiuus 


Rol)ertus Tuddeuliam 


Mildeuhall 


Dominus 


Abbas Sancti Edmundi 


Wridlingtou 


Dominus 


Adomarl de Valence 


ffrekiuham 


Dominus 


Episcopus Koffensis 


Tanliam 


Domina 


Comitissa Glocestrie 


Tudenhum 


Dominus 


Edwardus de H engrave 


Herinswell 
Icklingham et 
Barton 


Dominus 


Abbas Sancti Edmundi 



Hundred de Thingowe est in eadem libertate 
et Abbas Sancti Edwardi dominus eiusdem 



Barrowe 


Domina 


Comitissa Gloccstrie 


Thingham2 
page 122. 
Hengrave 


Dominus 


Abbas Sancti Kdmr»ndi 


Dominus 


Abbas Sancti Edmundi 


Brockley 
Reade 


Domini 


Alexander de Wulsham 
Abbas Sancti Edmundi 


Hawsted 


1 >ominus 


Thomas filius Eustache 


Whepsted 

Newton 

Horningerthe 

Horningerthe 

Ikesvvorthe 


Dominus 

magna 
parva 

Dominus 


Abbas Sancti Edmundi 
Thouias de Ikesworthe 



CO. SUFFOLK, 1316. 



199 



Haregrave 
Saxam mngna 
Saxara parva 
Westly 
Risbye 

Fornham omnium 
Sanctorum 

Laokford 

Hengrave 



Dominus 



Dominus 
Dominus 



Abbas Sanoti Edmundi 



Johannes de Sancto Philiberto 

Edwardus de Hengrave 
Abbas Saucti Edmundi 



Summa omnium villarum tarn infra libertates quam extra 453 



^Humfriduai ^Theyyngtbon. 



(200) 



NEOLITHIC SUFFOLK. 
Edward R. H. Hancox. 

Over the whole of Suffolk, l)Ut more particularly in 
the North-west and South-east of the County, have l>ecn 
found those well known weapons and implements cliarac- 
t^eristic of the Neolithic stage of civilization. Examples 
of these beautiful objects, . turned up in the process of 
agriculture, or found lying on the surface of our sandy 
heaths, may be seen in almost every museum and private 
collection. The district which has yielded more than any 
other in England, is that around Icklingham and Brandon, 
w^iere, near the latter town, are situated the pre-historic 
workings known as Grimes Graves. 

Since the exploration of these ancient mines by Canon 
Greenwell, f.r.s., — who probably found them in the same 
condition as did the Saxon, who, investing them with 
dread origin, gave to them their name — much attention 
has l)een given to this interesting branch of archasology, 
and many now experience a keen pleasure in acquiring 
specimens of these antiquities, and gathering from the 
collection the scanty information it affords of the habits 
and life of those who used such weapons. The training of 
the eye to discriminate between the true implement and 
the accidental flake is soon accomplished, and the delight 
experienced in a "find" will fully compensate for the 
perhaps unkind remarks of the village gossips, who may 
come upon an enthusiast overhauling a heap of stones by 
the roadside or wandering, apparently aimlessly, over a 
freshly cultivated field, which proceeding I have known 
to be considered connected in some mysterious way with 
the full moon. 

The commonest form of Neolithic implement, that 






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NEOLITHIC SUFFOLK. 201 

known as the ** scraper," occurs in some districts in such 
abundance as to suggest the probability of their being in 
use long after the introduction of metal. The specimen 
chosen for illustration (Fig 1) is of usual type, but more 
symmetrical ; it shows, as do most of them, the bulb of 
percussion, and is very neatly chipped into horseshoe form, 
and bevelled in such a manner as to give a very sharp 
cutting edge. The original of Fig 1 was found by the 
shepherd on a farm at Martlesham, and given to me with 
an assortment of over 150 more, all of which he had 
picked up in course of his work ; many were recognisable 
as Neolithic, while others might have been used in much 
later times in conjunction with iron to produce fire. On 
this same farm, which is situated on the edge of an 
extensive tract of heathland, over which are scattered 
numerous tumuli, have been found many specimens of 
Neolithic implements, including the three varieties of 
arrow-head (Figs. 2, 3, and 4), the small celt (Fig. 5), 
and others, which speedily passed into private collections. 
My friend, the shepherd, soon after it had been pointed 
out to him that these antiquities had a commercial value, 
found a beautiful celt, which had acquired, in course of 
many ages, a " creamy " appearance, but to satisfy an 
admiring companion that the object really was one of 
** them old flint hatchets," he broke it in two, so as to 
prove its age by the darker colour of the stone within ! 

At once the best known, and most delicately shaped 
of these primitive weapons, are the arrow heads ; four 
varieties are figured ; the last (Fig. 6), an almost perfect 
example, and very similar in shape to the one from 
Icklingham, figured in Part L of Vol. XL, was found by a 
very small youngster in the garden of a cottage on 
Brightwell Heath, near Woodbridge ; it is of grey mottled 
flint, and its point is just as capable of penetrating the 
skin as when fashioned, say, two thousand years ago. 
Fig. 2 is a rarer form. Sir J. Evans, in his " Ancient 
Stone Implements of Great Britain," mentions a similar 
variety having been found near Icklingham. Figs. 3 



202 NEOLITHIC SUFFOLK. 

and 4 are both very delicately worked on one face, the 
greater portion of the other being the untouched surface of 
the flake. 

It would be interesting to know whether any of the 
peasantry of Suffolk share with those of many other 
counties, the belief in the magic powers of the beautiful 
little arrow-head. These objects are regarded by many, 
even in these practical days, as possessed of great virtues ; 
they are looked upon as weapons shot by the fairies in 
their efforts to injure man and beast, and wonderful 
precautions arc taken to preserve cattle from such attacks ; 
they are worn as charms against all kinds of evil, and are 
firmly believed by some to have been showered from 
Heaven, a belief possibly arising from the fact of their 
being often found after a storm in places where l)efore 
they were not seen, the rain in the meantime having 
washed away the mould that hid them from view. 

The polished and unpolished celt are represented by 
Figs. 7 and 8, but not having a good Suffolk specimen 
of the former, I have used one from Elmstead Market in 
Essex, as a type of those found in this county. Fig. 8 
approaches so nearly a Palaeolithic form that I figure it in 
contrast to the more usual Neolithic type as represented 
by Fig. 5 ; it is of a semi-transparent ochreous flint, 
boldly chipped into shape and very sharp at its business 
end. 

Polished celts deservedly occupy a favoured place in 
collections of Prc-historic implements, they are often objects 
of much beauty, the stone, or rock, being occasionally 
chosen by the Neolithic manufacturer for its attractive 
marking or colour, evidencing artistic perception in man 
at that early period. 

Undoubtedly the finest Suffolk specimen bf an un- 
polished Neolithic celt (Plate 1), was found when demolish- 
ing an old wall at Lindsey, near Hadleigh, in 1899. It is 
of flint, stained by contact with lime in the mortar in 
which it had been embedded for about two hundred years. 
Its length is no less than ll| inches; greatest width and 




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NEOLITHIC SUFFOLK. 203 

thickness SVs inches and two inches respectively, and 
weighs 3i lbs. It is now in the possession of Mr. John 
Shewell Corder, who has kindly allowed it to be repro- 
duced in illustration of this paper. 

In many districts, the celt, in common with the 
arrow-head, is endowed with supernatural powers, its 
celestial origin being firmly believed in. '* Thunderbolts," 
some call them, having the remarkable property of pre- 
serving the house in which one is kept, from being struck 
by lightning. 

Many other quaint beliefs in the extraordinary virtues 
of these early weapons might be mentioned, superstitions 
which have survived from the time of the discovery of 
copper and tin, and the art of alloying them to form the 
harder metal bronze. 

Figures 9 and 10 show two chisels, typical of those 
found in this county ; the former, of dark flint and ground 
at the chisel end, is from North Stow ; the latter, which 
is of weathered flint and unground, is from Waldringfield. 
A beautiful implement of grey flint from North Stow is 
shown in Fig. 11; it is carefully worked on both faces, 
one of which is flatter than the other, forming a chisel 
edge which is slightly ground ; similiar implements are 
described by Sir John Evans as knives. A very fine 
specimen of a knife, or dagger, was recently unearthed 
during excavations at works now in progress near Portman 
Walk, Ipswich ; it was, however, a little damaged by the 
workman's pick. The implement, which is beautifully 
flaked, is 77? in- in length, 278 i"- wide at centre of blade, 
tapering to a point at each end, and is nowhere of greater 
thickness than ^ in. Fig. 12 is that of a small spear, or 
arrow-head from Nacton. 

In the standard work on this subject — that of Sir 
John Evans — there are over 150 references to Neolithic 
implements found in the County of Sufiblk ; these include 
examples of all known English types, the greater number 
coming from the North West of the County ; and it is not 
surprising in a district where flint, the texture of which 



204 XKOLITHIC SUFFOLK. 

allows of its being readily flaked, abouuds, that evidences 
of the occupation of Neolithic man should be met with in 
such numbers. The Neolithic workman, however, found 
that stone taken from the surface, or even a little below 
it, was not always suitable to his purpose, for Canon 
Green well, in his examination of one of the 150 pits of 
Grimes Graves, discovered that it had been sunk to a 
depth of 39 feet before the best kind of flint had been 
reached, and at this level various horizontal galleries had 
been excavated by means of picks formed from antlers 
of the red deer, many of which, together with numerous 
finished and partly finished implements, were found upon 
the floDr just as left by the Neolithic miner. 

The immense amount of care and patient labour 
bestowed by man of the later stone age upon the pro- 
duction of objects so liable to be lost or broken, seem to 
justify the conclusion that some other use was intended 
for them than merely that which suggested their shapes. 
It is known that the treasured weapons found a place in 
the tomb by the side of their departed owner to accompany 
him on his mysterious journey to the other world, and it 
may be that implements destined for such a purpose were 
fashioned with more than ordinary care during the lifetime 
of the individual. It is not improbable that the more 
highly finished of the smaller implements, the ability to 
produce which, was not general, but confined to districts, 
such as that around Brandon, from which centre they were 
bartered away for other necessaries of life, gradually came 
to be recognised as standard mediums of exchange, thus 
forming the earliest prototypes of a metal currency. 



(205) 



SUMMER EXCURSIONS, 1902. 

The number of excursions was increased this year to three. The 
programme for the half-day's outing elicited many supporters, even 
although the pleasure upon the occasion of the visit to Tuddenham Hall 
-was greatly marred by a downpour of rain, accompanied by lightning 
and thunder. 

EXCURSION TO OTLEY. 

On Wednesday, June 11th, 1902, a visit was made to the late 15th 
century Manor-house of Otley Hall, where the owner, Mr. F. Miller, 
gave the excursionists a cordial and very hospitable reception. There 
were brakes from Ipswich and Woodbridge, but a large number of the 
visitors preferred cycling over from different points of the locality. 
More than one hundred members and friends assembled in the fine hall, 
to listen to a description of the house given by the Hon. Secretary. A. 
few years ago the old hall would have attracted little attention, but in 
recent years Mr. Miller has given the exterior an appearance as charming 
and as interesting as the interior, by stripping the walls of rough white- 
washed plaster, thus exposing the brick and timber of which the 
building is constructed. The most notable features from without are 
the small diamond-paned lattice windows, and the long colonnade, 
surmounted by the grape and vine leaf ornament of late 16th century 
workmanship in the front of the house, the circular addition to the 
north wall, and the massive chimney stack attached to the east wall. 
The reason for this extensive pile is the presence of sanitary arrange- 
ments erected in a large upper room, which was added to the house 
about the year 1612. 

Within the rooms themselves, the msissive carved oak beams of the 
ceilings, the q nan tit}' of oak panels which covered the walls of the hall 
and the passage without the hall, but which once constituted part of 
it, did not fail to attract attention. Upon examination it may be seen 
that the panels represent four or five distinct, and beautifully carved 
examples of the style known as the ribbon or linen pole pattern, in one 
or two instances the character of the carving is unique. Above the 
colonnade are rooms, — to which access is obtained by ascending a broad 
oak staircase, which tradition points out as marred and scarred by the 
spurs of gay cavaliers, who were companions of llobert Gosnold, an 
ardent supporter of King Charles. These rooms are decorated with 
mural designs in many cases as perfect as they were the first day when 
sketched upon the walls. Grotesque heads, armorial bearings and 
panels cover the walls. The armorial bearing (Gosnold quartering 



206 OTLEY HALL. 

PearaoQ and Nuunton) gives a due to the occupier who erected the 
colouuade and rooms above it. Que design upon the wall is credited 
to represent Otley Hall shortly nfter its erection. This may be the 
fact, but the picture bears something of ii conventional design in 
harmony with the other drawings. 

At a little distance, across an adjacent field, may be seen an 
enclosure, once probably surrounded by a moat, but which is of too 
small an area to have been the site of an older hall. The character of 
the bushes and undergrowth which cover it, strengthens the opinion 
that formerly it was a garden-ground, protected by trenches from 
invasion of cattle feeding on the neighbouring lands. 

Robert Gosnold, the founder of the Oosnold family of Otley, left 
his seat at Cloptou, which he sold to Thomas Rous, and which was 
afterwards known as " Rous Hall.'* A John Gosnold, Solicitor-General 
to Henry viii., represented Ipswich burgesses in Parliament in 1547 ; 
the monument erected to John Gosnold, who died in 1628, declares the 
family to be one of Royal descent. The support which Robert Gosnold 
gave to Charles i. brought his family to a state of poverty, so that the 
Rev. John Gosnold, rector of the parish, was compelled to sell hia 
family possessions. 

After the company had enjoyed the tea, kindly provided by Mr. 
and Mrs. F. Miller, on the motion of the Rev. M. B. Cowell, seconded by 
the Rev. F. D. Brown, a hearty vote of thanks was accorded to the host 
and hostess and Miss Miller, for the warm reception they had given 
their visitors. 

The company then proceedetl to Otley Church, where they were 
met by the Vicar, the Rev. H. Gretton. Attached to the church is a 
baptistry provided for the baptism of adults. There are in the church 
some extremely beautiful bench-ends, upon some of which are to be seen 
the letters of the rebus, preparr, carved round the chancel. Dr. G. F. 
W. Meadows used the occasion to exhibit nu eml)osjjed 13th century 
covering of a steelyard weiglit, bearing the arms of Richard, Earl of 
Cornwall, which had been found in his garden several feet below the 
surface. Illustrations and a description of a nimilar object found at 
Claydon appear in Volume vi. p. 131, of the Proceedings of the 
Institute. 

The journey wtis then made from the Church to Otley Barrow^ 
which rises in a field near Otley Bottom. It is a very prominent 
landmark even now, although its perimeter is so overgrown witb 
brushwood, that it is difficult at first sight to trace its outline. In 
appearance and situation its plan resembles that of Eye Castle. 
(Vol. v. p. 104). Besides the circular mound, forty yards in circum- 
ference, with entrenchments on the south, is a deep depression of the 
soil, known as The Gull, the bed of a water course which carries away 
the drainage of the land. The Gull, together with a brook flowing 
parallel with the road, must have formed good natural barriers, adding 
greatly to the secure defence of the Barrow. The field lying between 




Frotn a Photofit-uph by Aynier \\ill.iin.t.% lisq. 

OTLEY HALL. Solth Wail. 



BOXFORD CHURCH. 207 

the Gull and the mound in called Castle Field, and in proxiinit}' to the 
Barrow articles have been found which betoken an early occupation of 
the commanding site. The name Barrow seems to imply that the 
mound was a former burial place. 



EXCUJiSION TO HADLEIGH, KERSEY. POLSTEAD, 
BOXFORD, ASSINGTON HALL, and WENHAM CASTLE. 

The annual excursion took place on Monday, July 28th, 1902. 
The weather was not so bright and promising as one might expect in 
summer time, but a rising barometer inspired members with conGdence, 
for there was a good muster on the Corn Hill, at Ipswich, shortly before 
ten o'clock, when a four-horse char-a-banc and brakes heavily freighted 
started for Hadleigh. 

The tombstone to the memory of the martyr, Dr. Rowland Taylor, 
on Aldham Common, so fauuliar to all travellers along the high road 
from Ipswich, could be seen from the highway, and it was not necessary 
to dismount. A halt was, however, made at Place Farm, in the parish 
of Hadleigh itself, where, hard by the roadside, there is a most interest- 
ing old building of the 15th century, resembling in structure the 
Pykenham Gateway, Ipswich. 

The general arrangements were made by the Hon. Secretary, who 
was assisted by Mr. W. J. Langdon (Salter's Hall, Sudbury). This 
gentleman acted as guide to the members of West Suffolk who started 
from Sudbury by brake for Boxford, which was their first stopping place. 

BOXFORh CHURCH. 

The rector, Rev. J. S. Warman, met the meml>ers at the church, 
and drew their attention to the rich work of the Decorated and Perpen- 
dicular styles. Over the beautiful porch wan an inscription partly 
obliterated, l>eginning with "Ave Maria," the church lieing dedicated to 
St. Mary. The font with folding cuplwardtop was noted, with its 
quaintly written iuHcriptions inside : — "How can a luan be born when 
he is oldc," etc. The cover dates back to 1600. The Rector pointed 
out the middle stone framework of the east window in the form of a cross 
as being rare. A brass on the chapel floor was noted as (according to 
the Latin inscription) : — " The sleeping place of David Bird, son of 
Joseph Bird," over this being an ancient engraving of the sleeper in his 
bed« In the chapel also is a curious mural tablet, "In memory of 
Elizabeth Hyam, of this parish, 4th time widow, who by a fall that 
brought on mortification, was at last hastened to ht^r end on the 4th 
May, 1748, in her 1 13th year. Some interesting plate was shown, the 
chalice being about 1666. The original paper registers are in existence. 
One item of the accounts the Rector read : — " Making of the communion 



208 HADLKIGH CHl-RCH. 

table, 2s" ; labour, it was renuirked, Iteing cheap in thoi$e days. Atten* 
tion w»i8 dmwn to the memori il stone in the floor of the north chapel : 
— " Here lyeth Williaui Doggett, merchant of the <Jity of Loudon," 
with an armorial shield at each corner, including the Arms of the City 
of London and those of the Merchant Adventurers. 

Canon Scott, on behalf of the company, thanked the Rev. J. S. 
WarniRU for his kindness. The party then • re-entered the brake and a 
pleasant journey was made to Hadleigh, where the Sudbury party joined 
the friends from the other side of the county at the Deanery. 

HADLEIGH CHURCH. 

The principal rendezvous for both parties was Hadleigh, where the 
Ven. Dean Blakiston, f.s.a., met the members, and proceeded to point 
out the principal features of interest at the church. The visitors next 
inspected the Deanery, a beautiful 15th century building. In one of the 
rooms was a picture of the church in 1629, and a sketch of the tower 
before the house was built against it. On the top of the tower the 
Dean stated that some of the chimneys were new work, which was 
obvious on a near inspection. In many respects this building reminded 
one of Melford Hall, with its mellow red bncks. 

Great interest was manifested in the old Guildhall, of which the 
Dean gave some entertaining and instructive particulars, it is a 
specimen cf the ancient overhanging timber buildings, of which there 
are several similar in Hadleigh, Sudburj', and other towns in the 
neighbourhood. In Boxford, for instance, one can see these ancient bits 
peeping out from behind modern constructions. 

When the Sudbury party had inspected the places of interest, an 
adjournment was made to the White Lion Hotel club-room for luncheon, 
at which Dean Blakiston presided. 

After luncheon the Hon. Secretary expressed the regret of all at 
the loss of Lord Henniker, and of the Hon. Mary Henniker, who was the 
founder of the '* Eastern Counties' Magazine." Since the last annual 
meeting the Institute had also lost by death Lord John Hervey, who 
had done so much fur this organisation in a variety of ways, and whose 
place would be most difficult to fill. The Hon. Sec. was, however, glad 
to be able to state that, while they had lost valuable friends, othera had 
joined the ranks. He announced the addition that day of two members, 
the Rev. B. S. Fryer, Rector of Roughani, and Mr. Hunt, of Sudbury. 



209) 



HADLEIGH. 

In the third volume of the Proceedinjjs of the Suffolk 
Institute of Archaeology tliere appeared an exhaustive 
paper, written by the Rev. H. Pigott, Curate of Hadleigh^ 
on ** Hadleigli and its Great Men " ; to this paper were 
added two valuable appendixes One of these, "The 
Extent of the Manor of Hadleigh," throws so great a light 
upon the condition of the town and its people in the days 
of the earlv Plantaorenets, that the excellent and careful 
translation which was made l)y the late Lord John Hervey, 
will be read with interest by all who desire to become 
further acquainted wdth the history of this centre of cloth 
manufacture. The paper above quoted dwells more par- 
ticularly upon the History of Hadleigh Hall Manor and its 
Church. The following notes are added in order to render 
assistance to solve the " Town Mysteries " touching the 
origin of such remarkable features as the Guildhall, the 
Place Farm, and the Castle. 

The antiquity of the town is so remote that at the 
commencement of its history we plunge into mist. 
Guthrum is asserted to have established his court upon 
this site, and to have found here a last resting place. 
Within the Danish territory there were other Hadleighs ; 
it is scarcely probable therefore that the word " Hadleigh " 
means chief place, because it was the home of Guthrum, 
nor can it l)e a compound of Had and lagh, as suggested 
by Mr. Piggott, In the neighbourhood the Danish 
" thorp," " toft," and " by " are unknown, but the Saxon 
test words, " ham," " ford," ** field," " ton " and " Hirst'' 
abound in Corham, Corsford, Lafham, Toppesfield, 
Bentoue, the Herat. These all lie within the bounds of 
the parish of Hadleigh. It is difficult to believe that every 
trace of Danish settlement could have been utterly 
obliterated. It is more probable that the derivation of 



210 HADLEIOH. 

the word i« to he obtained from the clue given in the 

Extent itself : — 

'*The judiciiil gallows uf the said manor ought to nt and at the 
Hir$t in a certain place culled HaJlephe" p. 166. 

The " Hei-st," or mound, which overlooked the chief 
place of assembly for the town is marked on the Ordnance 
Survey Map as "Gallows Hill/' An inhabitant dwelling wear 
the spot bore the significant name of Richard at Leigh.* 

The narrative of how the Saxons, by the l>ravery and 
diplomacy of their kings, regained the lost territory of the 
Danelaw, occupies more than one chapter in the history of 
our countrv : the new rulers of the Saxon Ealdomanriea 
were ja7*ls or Earls. Towards the close of the tenth 
century, Brithnoth was Earl of Essex, and ^Ethelwine,' 
Earl of East Anglia. These chieftains supported tlie cause 
of the monks, with a view to the overthrow of Dunstan. 
What were the boundaries of Essex and East Anglia is un- 
certain. When Brithnoth marched forth to the battle of 
Maldon, in which he and all his bodyguard were slain by 
the Danes, a.d. 991, he made a grant of lands at Lalyng in 
Essex, and at lllegh and Hadleigh in Suffolk to the monks 
of Canterbury. (Report of His. Manuscripts Commission, 
1881, part I, p. 322b.) Dugdale, in an early edition of 
his Monasticon, states that the lands at Hadleigh were 
granted in a.d. 835 by EtheJflcda, and in A.i>. 941 by 
Brithnoth. He gives, however, Siricius, who was Arch- 
bishop of Canterbury in 991, as a witness to the grant. 
These statements cannot be reconciled with the former. 
Hadleigh, we are told, wtis held by Ethelfleda, the widow 
of Brithnoth, during her life. Only part of the town 
became the possession of the monks, for several manors as 
those of Lafbara, ("osford, Toppesfield, had other lords at 
the time of the Domesday Survey. 

In the days of William i. Hadleigh was divided into 
various manors ; the one which presents the greatest 
difficulty is that of Lafham, or as the name appears in 

'Demise by Simon le Longe and Alice Payn his wife late wife of Richard de 
Penshiirat to Miehard ate Legk of Hadlegh« ftc. Ancient Deed B. 2891, Kecord Office. 



IIADLEIGH. 211 

Domesday, Latham.* The land of this manor has been 
erroneously considered to have formed part of Leyham, 
but we find in an Inquisition held 16 Edward ii. (1323), 
" One William de Lafham of manor of Plessis, Hadleigh, 
Suffolk, was seized of one Messuage, 70 acres of land, and 
15 acres of woodland. His heir was John de Lafham, 
aged 30 years." Again in the Suffolk Feet of Fines, 
1 John, ** Robert sou of Gerard v. Matilda de Aldham wath 
Nicholas her son in Lafham" 

24 Hen. ni. *' Hugh son of Alexander and William 
his l)rother, v. Thomas de la Pond in Lafham" 

One of the principal landowners of Hadleigh men- 
tioned in the Exter»t of 1305, is John de Lafham, whose 
name is of frequent occurrence. Plessis Manor, or Plessets 
Manor, that is Place or Plaize Manor, was subsequently 
known as Lafham Manor, and finally as Pond Hall Manor 
It may be possible that the words Place Farm retain the 
early name of the manor, for it must be borne in mind 
that Plessete was the Latinized form of ''Place" It is 
well, however, to consider that in the neighbourhood there 
are many dwellings known under the name *' Place Farm," 
from the names of former occupiers or owners. No other 
instance has come to my notice of the name Place in 
connection with the inhabitants or dwellings of Hadleigh. 
The fine brick gateway which stands immediately upon 
Lady Lane was erected towards the close of the fifteenth 
century, when by marriage the manor of Pond Hall 
formed part of the estates of Edward Doyle of Stafford- 
shire. The history of Pond Hall Manor is not definitely 
known, but in the early part of the 14th century it was 
held by Sir William Giffard, afterwards by his only 
daughter and heir, Cicely, the wife of Richard Kyslinbury, 
junior, of London, who had acquired Toppesfield Hall by 
purchase, in 1352, of Sir John .Gernoun and Joan his wife. 
The Pond Hall Estate was sold to Helmyn Legate of 
Essex, Constable of Windsor Cjistlc, who obtained per- 

*SAinMnn*H Regifiter, 1185 :— Hadleigh* Lafham, and Benton are one Leet, 
Hadleigh is a half, i*Hf bam a third, and Benton a sixth. 



212 HADLKIGH. 

mission to enclose liis bouse called Pond Hall, with wall 
and flint or " de Pallo firniare et Kervillare," thereby 
giving it the aspect of a small castle or f6rtress. This 
house, I consider, stood on the site now known as Hadleigh 
Castle. I have not read of another house in Hadleigh 
which could have presented the appearance of a castle. 
The estate of Cosford Hall in Hadleigh belonged to the 
Legate family ; it was sold in part by Edward Legate in 
1422, and in part by Thomas Legate, only son of Helmyn 
Legate, in 1428, to the Cloptons of London and Hadleigh. 
The frequent change in the ownership of the Hadleigh 
Manors may be best explained by shewing the relationship 
existing among the early owners. 

Lady Lora de Ros held 

I Toppesfield Manor, A.i>. 1277. 

Sir Robert Kokerel= Joan de Ros. 

(1) Sir William Kokerel = Cicely Giffard (of Pond =(2) Richard Kywlingbury 
Hall, Hadluigh), held of London, 
manor for life, 1825. 



Mary K. =Sir William de Clopton, died 187H. Joan K. = Sir John Gernoun. 

(I) Sir Walter de Clopton = Elizabeth Pygot=(2) Sir John Howard. 

William de Clopton, sold Toppeiifield Manor to 
Thomaa Bendiah, 1470. 

The reign of Henry in. was a troublous one. In the 
first years of the reign Sir Philip Basset supported the 
party of Richard, Earl of Pembroke, and for his want of 
loyalty was deprived of his estates. They were restored 
to him in 1238 by the King, who, for his services, made 
him Justice of England and granted to him the manor of 
Kersey, which Hu])ert de Roylli gave the King to secure 
his good will in a certain trepass he had committed against 
the King's peace. Basset, husband of Ela, Countess of 
Warwick, also held Cosford Manor and mill in Hadleigh. 
He was captured in the fight at Lewes and imprisoned by 
the barons, who received support from the Hadleigh 
district. This revolt caused the market of Toppesfield 
manor to l)e annulled on the presentment of Sir Nicholas 



BADLEIGH. 213 

de Turze and his fellows, Justices itinerant at Catteshall, 
Suffolk, in 1269. Ten years later the market was granted 
by Sir Philip Basset to Lady Lora de Ros for her life, 
with remainders to Sir Robert Kokerell and Joan, his wife, 
daughter and heiress of the said Lora, who during her life 
disposed of the manor to John de Kirkby of Horton, and 
Margaret, his wife. This transaction was the cause of a 
long suit between John de Kirkl)y and Cicely, late wife of 
Sir William Kokerell. The latter was enfeofeed in the 
Manor of Toppesfield Hall upon the payment of 180 
marks and the defeasance of a recognisance for £400 by 
John de Kyrkeby to the said William in 1343. William 
de Clopton, grandson of Sir William de Clopton, sold the 
manor to Thomas Bendish in 1470, but not before many 
valuable grants of various portions of it had been made 
by former holders to the use of the town. It will be 
noticed that the portraitures of several of the proprietors 
may be seen in the windows of Long Melford Church. 

Pond Hall Manor, which was purchased by Helmyn 
Leget in 1360, was held by his daughter Ann and her 
husband, Edward Doyle, of Staffordshire. It is probable 
that the gateway of Place Farm was erected by their son 
John Doyle. 

Some of the most interesting houses of the town are 
those which abutt upon the churchyard, they form part of 
the gift of the Cloptons to the use of the town. A first 
grant was made in 1417 by William Clopton and John 
Coleman, of Hadleigh, butcher, of a piece of ground near 
the churchyard. In the following year this grant was 
enlarged by the addition of a piece of land belonging to 
the manor of Toppesfield, known as " Cherchecroft," 
granted by Sir John Howard and Elizabeth his wife, late 
wife of Sir Walter Clopton. The market and fair, which 
belonged to the manor, were granted to the same feofees 
for an annual rent of 6s. 8d., which was reduced in 1423 
to 28. yearly. Two houses stood upon this plot, which in 
extent measured 81 ft. by 42 ft. ; in 1467 it was known 
as the " Market Ground." When William Clopton, son of 

R 



214 HADLEIGH. 

Walter, confirmed this ^ant in 1439, he reserved to his 
own use " a certain long house, called the Market House, 
with rooms underneath the same called 'The Alms- 
houses,' " then newly constructed alongside the church- 
yard, but in the same year he granted the " Long House " 
to the use of the town for the annual rent of a red rose. 
This rent of a " red rose " calls to memory later years when 
Sir William Clopton escaped execution on Tower Hill with 
his fellow countrymen and neighbours, who were sup- 
porters of the Lancastrian cause. In 1470, upon the 
appointment of new trustees, the Market House was called 
The Cloth Hall, the rooms under which were still used as 
Almshouses. From the tenour of the grant it is evident 
that the buildings had undergone alterations in order to 
convert them into use as " The Cloth Hall." In this year, 
1470, the manor of Toppesfield was held by Thomas 
Bendish, armiger. WilKftt^ Pykenham is mentioned as 
one of the trustees. It canbe seen by the reading of the 
various grants of town-lands and premises that the 
industry of cloth-making carried on in the town gradually 
developed till it reached its height of prosperity at the 
close of the 15th century. This prosperity may account 
for the many Guilds then in existence. The following 
extract from the appointment of new trustees, in 1498, 
shows the connection between the Guilds and the cloth 
trade at that period : — 

" To William Pykenham, Archdeacoa of Suffolk, E<lward 

Doyle, senior, gentlemau, Thomas Hobart, senior, Robert Martjn, 
senior, Robert Forthe son of William Forthe, Robert Forthe son of 
Robert Forthe, late of Hadleigh, John Martyn, Thos. Rotheman, Thos. 
Brownsmith, Wm. Gardener, senior, Nicholas Peyton, Wra. Markaunt, 
John Emeryngale, John Baredon, Edmund Gosnole, Wm. BlowboU, 
Wm. Wigeuale, Wm. Clerk, Thos. Hynue, Wm. Mannok, Wm. Hammond, 
John Mervju, Robert Clerk, and John Stratford, their heirs and assiigns, 
all that piece of land lying in Hadleigh, anciently known as le Cherche- 
croft, now called le Market grounde, with all the buildings standing 
upon the same, and all the rents arising out of the said market ground. 
Also the market fairs which up to this time have been held there .... 
the said Market Ground abutting and extending up to and towards the 
long house, newly built aud constructed thereon, called the Guildhall, 



HADLEI6H. 215 

And likewise extends towards two butchers' shops, and all the houses 
built thereon called le Prtstys Chnmbtrs, and the houses called " le 
clothehalle," and the rooms beneath the same, and all the other houses 
called le WuiUhous, and its offices " 

Many of the most wealthy townsmen, John Dobitt, 
William Danton, and others, settled in London, where 
they became citizens and members of the Clothmakers' 
Guild. It does not appear that the craft of Clothmaking 
was founded or greatly encouraged by the settlement of 
Flemings within the district. Mr. Edgar Powell has given, 
in The Edst Anglia Rising, 1381," an almost complete 
list of the inhabitants who were required to pay the poll- 
tax levied in that year. They numbered seven hundred 
and five grown-up persons, of whom about ten per cent, 
were engaged in the cloth trade, as merchants, weavers, 
dyers, fullers, and tailors. Few, if any, of these workmen 
bore names of Flemish origin. That this industry was 
mainly due to native genius and talent is further manifest 
by the names of the foreigners given in the Alien Subsidy 
Roll for 1485. Of the three hundred and eight foreigners 
then living in Suffolk only four resided in Hadleigh : — 

Robert Stotard, chaplain, born at Cologne. 
Antony Williamson, tailor, born in Scotland. 
John a Dye, tailor, born " beyond the seas." 
Antony Gylys, born at Magdeburg. 

At Bildeston of the fourteen foreigners mentioned in 
the Rolls, thirteen, who were servants or workmen to John 
Stansby, clothmaker, were Italians by birth. The industry 
appears to have been on the decline after the serious riot 
in Suffolk, 1525, mentioned by Shakespeare (Henry viii., 
Act I., sc. 2). The imposition of the tax was ascribed to 
Cardinal Wolsey. 

" These taxations 
'*The clothiers all, not able to maintain 
" The many to them belonging, hrtve put off, 
"The spinsters, carders, fullers, weavers, who, 
"Unfit for other life, compelled by hunper 
" And lack of other means, in desperate manner 
" During the event to the teeth, are all in an uproar." 



(216) 



KERSEY. The Priory. 

After luncheon a drive was taken to the site of Kersey 
Priory, where the Rev. W. B. Gray, vicar of Kersey, and 
Mr. W. Fickling awaited the visitors. The latter gentle- 
man, who is a tutor at the Normal College, Peterborough, 
acted as guide, both at this spot and at the church. He 
has kindly contributed his notes for publication. They 
are as follows : — 

Of the foundation of Kersey Priory no certain facts 
can be given ; it is the tradition that the Pridry was founded 
in the reign of Henry in., by Nesta de Cokefield. 

" Grant by Nesta de Kokefield to the cauons of S. Mary and S. 
Anthony Keresey, of pasture of six cows at the time of pasture in her 
park of Keresey, in frank almoin." (No date). Record Office A 3749. 

"Sale of land by Henry, Prior of S. Antony of Kereseye ta 
Alexander, son of Ralph." 3 Henry in. (1218). 

" Grant of lands in Kerseye and Leleseya and advowson of Kerseye 
by John de Bello Campo and Nesta, his wife, to the Priory of S. 
Antony of Kerseye." 24 Hon. in. (1240). 

Reference has been made to the existence of the 
Priory in the year 1190.* In Dugdale's " Monasticon," six 
charters referring to grants to the Priory are printed in 
extenso. Four of these are in the name of Nesta, the 
other two in the name of one of her husbands. Her four 
husbands were Thomas de Burgh, John de Bello Campo, 
Mathew de Leyham, and Gilbert Florence. The key to 
the mystery appears to lie in the fact that some of the 
charters refer to *'fratres," the others to ** canonici," which 
fact seems to allude to a re-founding or re-construction of 
what was probably a ** free chapel " or " hospital " into a 
Priory of Austin Canons. Whether the foundress, or not, 
Nesta de Cockfield was the oreatest benefactor. She raav" 

*An early mention of tlie Monastery occurs in Al)bot Sampson's Itegister. 1185. 

*' Lete of Kersey — The huiall monastery is one-half, and Kersey is the other 
half." v.B.K. 



KERSEY. 217 

be identified with the iufant daughter of Adam de Coke- 
field.* 

" Adam, sou of Robert de Cokefield v. Sampson, Abbot of S. 
Edmund's, of half of the hundred of Cosford.'* (Suff. Feet of Fines, 
3 Richard I., 119). 

In 1431 John Holland, Earl of Huntingdon, was 
patron of the Priory ; shortly afterwards, 25 Henry vi., 
Sir Henry de Grey, Lord Powis, gave it with all its 
revenues to King's College, Cambridge. It is probable 
that the Black Death, which raged so fiercely in the imme- 
diate neighbourhood, fell heavily upon this Priory, causing 
its inmates to be in severe stress of poverty. Circum- 
stances seem to point to the fact that when the monastery 
became the property of King's College, the church tower 
was completed, and the building was ornamented and 
enlarged as a compensation to the villagers for the loss of 
their religious house. At the suppression of Dodnash 
Priory, a century later, Cardinal Wolsey enlarged the church 
of Bergholt for the accommodation of the parishioners. 

Of the buildings of the Priory there remain : — 

(a) The south aisle of the choir, widened to permit 
the building to be converted into a private chapel. 

(6) Contiguous fragments of tower, choir, and transept. 

(c) The west wall of the nave. 

(rf) The kitchen, which has undergone many altera- 
tions of recent years. 

The Conventual buildings lay to the north of the 
Priory Church, as at Bury St. Edmund's ; there was no 
aisle to the south nave. This absence of an aisle on that 
side of the church connected with the domestic buildings, 
is noticeable in the house of Austin Friars at Bolton, co. 
Yorkshire. 

The interior walls of the chancel were 49 feet long. 
There were two bays with arches, each 1 1 feet wide. The 
arch from transept to choir was 10 feet wide ; the transept 
itself was 21 feet long. Within the chapel was a piscina, 

♦ Carlyle^a " Paat and Present," Bk. ii., cap. xv. 



218 KERSEY CHURCH. 

now remaining. The bays of the outer wall do not 
correspond with those of the inner wall ; evidently there 
was no vaulting. 



THE CHURCH 

Looking at the chancel we can easily discern the 
great alterations made in the fabric in the year 1862; 
the line of roof was retained, but many details suffered 
greatly. The nave, on the other hand, was carefully and 
conservatively repaired in 1887-9. Beyond new tracery 
to the windows, whose muUions had been destroyed by the 
ravages of time, no conjectural restoration was permitted. 

Basing our information upon the character of the 
building as it now is, we may assert that the early edifice 
was a simple parallelogram, with walls of the same height 
as those of the chancel. It cannot be definitely stated 
whether a tower existed or not. It appears then from 
the structure, that efforts were made about the year 1340 
to replace the small ancient church by one capable of 
supplying the needs of an increasing population. The fact, 
that at this period churches were never closed to the 
public for ceremonies were of daily observ^ance, necessi- 
tated that the work should be done gradually, a portion 
at a time. The first part to undergo alteration was the 
north side, to which an aisle was added without the existing 
north wall, and at the same time a tower was built. When 
the new aisle was complete, the old north wall of the nave 
was removed, and the arcade inserted. At this point we 
may conjecture that the work suddenly ceased never to be 
resumed. To this day the ornaments of the upper part of 
the walls are imperfect, unfinished tool-marks are visible 
throughout the arcade. We may attribute this sudden 
failure to carry on the intended work to the ravages of the 
Black Death within the district. 

Unlike the generality of work to be seen on the walls 



KERSEY CHURCH. 219 

of a village church, the erection of the arcade bears most 
strongly the impress of an individual mind ; the architect 
was a genius of no small talent, an English Orcagna. The 
subtle proportions, the delicate mouldings, especially notice- 
able in the door and the outside base of the wall, the 
singularly impressive tracery and the masterly composition 
of the north wall, were the work of no mean hand, whose 
skill is further betrayed in the noble sedilia, the remains 
of the reredos, and in the carving throughout. When the 
work was suspended, there stood the old nave with a new 
aisle wider than itself, and with a roof lower than that 
recently erected ; the tower was incomplete, having but 
one storey. 

The next step tx)wards church enlargement was made 
in 1440. The tower was raised to its present height, to it 
were added twelve pinnacles ; the masonry above the first 
string course differs from that below, and the passage made 
through the wall for the door is rough. The arch between 
the tower and nave was moved and finished, but with a 
different kind of stone ; the roof was raised, and a half 
hammer-beam was substituted for the original ceiling. 
About the same date as the tower are the two porches ; 
there is evidence that the original north door was not 
provided with a porch. Upon the south porch is a curious 
carving, locally ascribed to a fishwoman, who paid for this 
porch. The panelling of the porch is remarkably good. 

The recess in the north wall was a frame for an alto- 
relievo picture, probably (judging by what remains of the 
carving) of the crucifixion. There is also a recess in the 
south wall. During the progress of the restoration in 
1887-9 many fragments of mural paintings were revealed ; 
one forming part of a subject representing the legend of St. 
George. Of the old furniture there remains an interesting 
lectern, and a portion of the rood-screen, on one panel of 
which is the figure of St. Edmund. A description with 
illustration of the Church and its screen, before the re- 
storation of 1862, is given in a small pamphlet published 
in 1846 by the Suflfolk Archaeological Association. 



(220) 



POLSTEAD CHURCH. 

The next place at which the party alighted was 
Polstead, for the Church and the " Gospel Oak." Here 
the Coronation was being celebrated in the Park, and the 
Church was still bedecked with Coronation colours. Several 
people left the Park and came to the Church. Mr. E. B. 
Cooke (from the Hall), Col. the Hon. H. VV. L. Corry, Mr. 
C. H. Daking, and others, attended. The rector, Rev. F. 
J. Eld, F.8.A., received the members at the Gospel Oak. 
He said that there were more than 100 Gospel Oaks still 
standing in England ; the oak at Polstead, as far as he 
could ascertain, was the only one of them that stood in 
the centre of the parish, and close to the church. This 
agreed with the old tradition that, long before the church 
was built, the oak had been used as a station by the 
Culdee missionaries, circa a.d. 640, at which to preach to 
the heathen Saxons. One Suffolk historian (Houldsworth) 
said that missionaries had preached to the Britons from 
it ; this would carry the date back three or four hundred 
years further. He had consulted the best authorities, 
Strutt, Evelyn, Loudoun, &c., as to the life of trees, and 
he thought that it was possible for a tree to live for 1,500 
years. The Polstead Oak was stated to be the oldest oak 
in Suffolk, and possibly the oldest in England ; if this 
were so, it would have been a grand tree, 200 years old, 
and in full vigour, when used by the Culdees as a preach- 
ing station. All the other Gospel Oaks were on the 
borders of their parishes, not at the centre, and were so 
called because, at the annual perambulation or beating of 
the bounds, they were used as stations at which a portion 
of the Gospel was read. In appearance the Polstead Oak 
was very much like the Cowthorpe Oak in Yorkshire, 
which was the largest oak in England, and which claimed 



POLSTEAD CHURCH. 221 

to be the oldest, but the Polstead was smaller, measuring 
32 ft. in circumference at the height of 5 ft. from the 
ground, whereas the Cowthorpe oak was 43 ft. at the 
height of 4 ft. 

The village itself was a good example of what Dr. 
Maitland would call the Celtic or sporadic, as distinguished 
from the Teutonic or concentrated. These latter were 
generally built at cross-roads, the Squire's hall occupying 
one corner, the church another, and the houses of the 
farmers and labourers the others ; there were very few 
outlying houses. But Polstead, like other villages in the 
neighbourhood, was scattered into hamlets or ** Tyes," the 
Celtic or Welsh word for hamlet. Thus in Polstead itself 
there is " Boar's Tye," and close by " Stoke Tye," " Kersey 
Tye," "Semer Tye," &a, and further oflF ''Mark's 
Tey," " Geat Tey," &c. " Boar's Tye " would mean the 
hamlet of independent peasants, who were not bound to 
render service to the Hall, from the old English word as it 
appears in •* neighbour," or in the East Anglian " bor," or 
in modern high German '•bauer,"or the Dutch "Boer." 
There are many Celtic or Welsh names still to be found in 
this part of Suffolk, Bret, Stour, Box, Pwl, Tye ; and 
possibly the surname Bugg (Pugh). 

Polstead belonged to Queen Ethelfleda, the second 
wife of King Edmund, grandson of Alfred the Great, who 
was murdered in the most tragic manner in his own hall 
at Pucklechurch in Gloucestershire, a.d. 946. In her will 
she left Polstead and eight other manors to Stoke. Her 
will, and also the Anglo-Saxon borders of Polstead, are 

?iven in Birch's Cartularium Saxonicum, Nos. 1288, 1289. 
n Domesday it is stated that eight " equi " or saddle 
horses were kept at the hall, an unusually large number. 

The Church is mostly Late Norman. The semi- 
circular brick arches of the nave, square-edged and of one 
order, and the fluted capitals and square indented bases of 
the columns might be supposed to point to the earlier 
period of that style ; but the semi-circular shafts almost 
detached from the pillars, the free use of the zig-zag 



222 POLSTEAD CHURCH. 

ornament, and the incipient arcade in the clerestory, all 
distinctly point to the Later period. Very probably the 
the church was built after 1164, when the hall and manor 
passed into the possession of a new family, and new owners 
are very apt to begin improvements upon their property. 
The ainles and the tower are Decorated, and must have 
been built before a.d. 1362, as the Lambourn family, whose 
coat of arms is carved over the north door, died out in 
that year. The former Norman aisle or aisles must have 
been pulled down to make way for the new, as is shown 
by the many pieces of moulded stonework embedded in 
the walls. The fine west door of the Norman church was 
ruthlessly blocked up by the Decorated tower being planted 
right against it, as can be seen at the present day. The 
spire is remarkable for being the only stone spire in this 
part of Suffolk. Of the Perpendicular style, " the mark 
of the beast *' as Lord Cobham calls it, nothing is to be 
seen except in the actual windows ; they simply displace 
the smaller windows of the earlier styles, the string- 
courses and wall mouldings being left undisturbed ; thus 
the rude Norman triplet at the east end of the chancel, 
and the Decorated windows of the north aisle have been 
more or less destroyed, and large Perpendicular windows 
inserted in their place. The object of this change was to 
obtain a larger window area for the display of the gorgeous 
stained glass which was then in the height of fashion,, 
and which had superseded the mural colouring of the 
earlier styles. Our great Suffolk Churches, which are 
mostly Perpendicular, e.g. Lavenham, Melford, Stoke, and 
Hadleigh, must have been grand indeed, when every 
window presented a picture of some sacred subject that 
glowed with colour. But now they have lost most of 
their stained glass, owing partly to decay and neglect, but 
principally in Suffolk to the destructive energy of a Par- 
liamentary Commissioner named Dowsing. On April 15th, 
1643, he visited Polstead Church, and broke down 45 
superstitious pictures, as he is pleased to term the glass in 
the windows ; St. Peter with keys and a bishop with mitre 



POLSTKAD CHURCH. 223 

are ppecially mentioned by him; every window in the church 
must then have been filled with stained glass, for there are 
now only 42 lights in the windows of the ground floor of 
the church, the other three must have been either in the 
clerestory or in the tower. Dowsing did his work thorougly ; 
only one square inch of the old glass, a bit of ruby, now 
remains in the church, and that was unknown till two or 
three years ago when the plaster fell off" that had covered 
and protected it. And to add insult to injury Dowsing 
ordered the parish to pay 6s. 8d. for the expenses of this 
piece of wanton vandalism. There are no chancel steps 
here and in many churches in the neighbourhood ; where 
they existed Dowsing gave directions that they should be 
removed. 

The Rector drew attention to a little coloured monu- 
ment, now placed near the pulpit, to the first Brand who 
owned Polstead Hall, 1620, kneeling, with his son by his 
side also kneeling. There is a tradition that the boy lost 
his life by falling out of a window at the Hall on to some 
stone steps leading into the garden, and that his ghost can 
still at certain times be heard wailing on the steps. But 
he believed that the Squire had never yet heard it. 

The Registers are remarkable for two reasons : — 
First, the original paper Register, commencing 1538, has 
been preserved, and is in admirable condition, owing to 
the care of Mr. Nance, a former rector ; there is also the 
usual vellum transcript. Very few parishes in England 
have the original paper, fewer still have that and the 
vellum copy as well ; he believed there were only two 
others in Suffolk, two in the St. Alban's Diocese, two in 
the Worcester Diocese, and a few elsewhere. And 
secondly, they are remarkable for the large number of 
names contained in them which are frequently to be found 
in America. The two principal authorities on American 
surnames are Bowditch's Suflblk Surnames, i.e , of Suffolk 
County in Massachusets, and Hotten's Originalia or Lists 
of Original Emigrants. It cannot indeed be proved that 
any emigrants went from Polstead, though it is probable 



224 POLSTKAD CHURCH. 

that many did ; very many certainly went from the 
immediate neighbourhood, like the Winthrops from 
Groton. The first two Polstead Registers range from 
1538 to 1688, a period that more than covers the great 
emigration to America, and they contain 643 separate 
surnames ; of these 643, 499 occur in Bowditch, and 379 
in Hotten ; 14 too in the small number of those who sailed 
in the Mayflower. Very many of the names that are 
found both in the Polstead Registers and in the American 
lists are common and indistinctive, such as Brown, Clarke, 
Cook, Gardiner, &c. ; but many are strange and un- 
common, so much so that one is inclined to imagine that 
the families on either side of the Atlantic that bear such 
remarkable names must be branches of one and the same 
family which was originally settled somewhere in East 
Anglia, and possibly even in Polstead ; such names as 
Aplegate, Aplewhite, Berdil, Doudal, Fedam, Hawnerd, 
Orrice, Plampin, Scotchmer, Tarball, Winterflood, Yell, 
and many others. 

The Parish Registers, and a small collection of celts, 
coins, and fossils, found in the parish, were laid out for 
inspection in the Vestry. 



STOKE-BY-NAYLAND. 

A short Btaj was made at Stoke-by-Nayland, the fine church being 
visited. There are some handsome monuments, one being a recumbent 
figure of Sir Francis Mannock, Bart., "whose ancestors long since 
derived from Denmarke." The church has a beautiful font, and with 
some exceptions, very fine stained glass windows, the colours in one or 
two (the east for instance) being somewhat obtrusive and glaring ; the 
others are more subdued. 

The Ipswich visitors left, for that town, and paid a visit on the 
way to Wenham Castle, which has been restored so much in keeping 
with its original character by Mr. G. E. Crisp of Playford Hall. The 
state of the parish church was then referred to, but it is now in 
course of complete restoration, thanks to the liberality of Miss Crisp, 
to whom a hearty vote of thanks was accorded. 

The Ipswich party reached home about nine o'clock. The weather 
continued fine throughout, and the meeting passed off most enjoyably 
and successfully. 




From a Photograph by G. CuWer Mason, Esq. 

OLD GUILD HALL. STOKE-BY-NAYLAND. 



(225) 



ASSINGTON CHURCH and the HALL. 

The West Suflfolk party had the pleasure on the 
return journey of a visit to Assington Church and Hall. 
Sir Brampton Gurdon, President of the Institute, regretted 
that he had to return to London, but he requested Rev. 
Dr. Banham to show the party the Church and the Hall, 
and he left some interesting notes for the assistance of the 
guide. The church was visited first. A church was said 
to have been built here after the battle between the 
Saxons and the Danes in 1010, by King Canute, and a 
religious establishment was raised on the site of the 
present hall to perform masses for the souls of heroes. 
The present church was erected late in the 14th or early 
in the 15th century. The chancel fell down in 1827, and 
was entirely rebuilt. Two of the monuments were so much 
injured that it was impossible to restore them. The 
present monuments comprise one in the chancel to Robert 
Gurdon (died 1577) and his wife, Rosa Sextor, of Laven- 
ham ; and John Gurdon (died 1623) and his wife, Amy 
Brampton, of Letton, in Norfolk. Under these were the 
smaller figures, representing Robert's son, John, and his 
daughter, Elizabeth, who married Thomas Waldegrave, of 
Bures, her portrait being over the chimney-piece in the 
dining-room at the hall. The children represented under 
John's monument were his son, Brampton (to whom their 
was a monument in the aisle), and his daughter, Elizabeth, 
who died unmarried at Blickling Hall, Norfolk, where 
there is a monument in the church erected to her by Sir 
Edward Clare. The monument (Assington) was raised in 
obedience to the will of John Gurdon. In the south aisle 
there is a monument to Brampton Gurdon (M.P. for 
Sudbury), who is placed between his two wives. He died 
1648(-9). One wife was Elizabeth Barrett, the ancestors 



226 ASSINGTON CHURCH 

of the Gurdons of Suffolk, and the other Muriel Sedley(?) 
ancestors of the Gurdons of Norfolk. The coats of arms 
at the sides represent the sons and son-in-laws, nearly all 
regicides. Next to this is a simple mural tablet to John 
Gurdon (died 1679). He was M.P. for Ipswich and 
Suffolk, and a member of the Council of State. In bis 
time the property was forfeited, which accounted for the 
humility of his monument. The monument to his elder 
son, Robert, who married a daughter of Lord Lysk and 
died 1683, was destroyed by the fall of the chancel. The 
church was "restored" about 40 or 50 years ago, when 
many interesting points were destroyed. Apparently from 
Mss. in the British Museum, there was formerly some good 
stained glass here, and Sir Brampton Gurdon wrote that 
there must be some gravestones inside the rails of the 
chancel. The tower was rebuilt, almost an exact copy of 
the original. Before the church was quitted Dr. Banham 
referred to the gravestones of Rev. and Mrs. Walker. In 
connection with Mr. Walker was related a pathetic and 
interesting piece of history. He endeavoured to dissuade 
one of the Gurdons from going to London to sign the 
death warrant of King Charles. Gurdon at first was not 
to be moved. So earnest was the pious incumbent, his 
appeal having failed, that on the morning when Gurdon was 
to drive to London, he laid himself across the path over 
which the coach would pass, and said, " If you go, you 
shall drive over my body." This so touched Gurdon that 
his journey was abandoned, and his signature was not on 
the death warrant. 

The party next proceeded to the hall. On entering 
they were shown tne five pardons (?) four from Charles ii. 
and one from James ii., from which the hall and a small 
part of the estate were restored. At the opposite end of 
the room was seen the mantel-piece (with armorial bear- 
ings) from the old dining-room. The present house is 
supposed to be the back part of a quadrangle, which was 
gradually pulled down to suit the reduced estate. The old 
stables were in front of the house, where the cedar trees 



AND THE HALL. 227 

now stand. These were planted by Philip Gurdon about 
1770. Over the dining-room door was a portrait of 
Robert Gurdon (in tilting armour) who died 1577. Over 
the door opposite the front door, were the portraits of 
John Gurdon and Amy Brampton. A large handsome 
picture, a copy of Van Dyck, of Sir Nathaniel Bacon, of 
StiflFkey Hall, in Norfolk, a relation of the family, was 
pointed out. Over the chimney-piece, in the dining-room, 
is a portrait of Elizabeth Waldegrave, n6e Gurdon. There 
were also pictures of Brampton Gurdon, who died 1648-9 ; 
a head of a monk by Van Dyck. This picture had 
belonged to Sir Joshua Reynolds, and Sir Thomas 
Lawrence. Then there was " Edmund Dyer," by Sir 
Joshua Reynolds, painted for Edmund Burke. Near by 
Queen Elizabeth's Lord Essex, and Anne Boleyn, a relative 
of the family. In the drawing room were seen some fine 
pictures. The best, Sir Brampton considered, was a little 
Teniers, representing the " Sense of Smell " ; others were 
by Berghem and Van Goyen, and there was " Haddon 
Hall " by Croswich, Sir Brampton counting these among 
his best art treasures. 

There was, it was stated, a monastery here up to 
1310. The present house was probably built not very 
long after this time, but of course has been several times 
altered ; the large oak beams may be of the 14th century. 
It seems to have been thoroughly changed and the old 
windows destroyed about the beginning of the 18th 
centuty ; some of these contained armorial glass. The 
porch, minarets, and turret at the back, were added 
between 1820 and 1830, when the front was faced with 
brick, it being really a timber house. 

The registers date back to 1598. The Dyers, the 
Mumfords, and the Weymarkes are old names of residents. 
In 1681, *'Mrs. An Gurdon," and in 1862 " Mrs. Brampton 
Gurdon " are both entered as " buried in linning " (linen). 

After thanks to Dr. Banham and Sir Brampton for their kindness, 
the return journey was completed, Sudbury being reached just before 
seven o'clock. 



(228)* 



EXCURSION TO ASHBOCKING and TUDENHAM. 

The excursion to Ash Booking and Tudeuham was arranged for 
Wednesday, August 6th, 1902. At the hour appointed for leaving 
Ipswich the rain was pouring down in torrents, so that it seemed highlj 
probable that the programme would \)e abandoned. About a quarter of 
an hour later however, the sky cleared, there was a promise of fine 
weather, so the brake started at once on the route through Henley to 
Ash Booking Church, where the Ipswich members found the contingent 
from Woodbridge had already arrived. 

The Vicar (Rev. M. B. Cowell) came forward with a very hearty 
welcome, and read the following paper : — 



\i 



ASH BOOKING. 



Ash Bocking Church, Hall, Vicarage and School stand 
in the centre of an irregular triangle of slightly undulating 
stiff boulder clay land, an area of 1412*605 acres by the 
ordnance map. The modern roads running round are 
mostly the parish boundaries. Ash Bocking is 15 miles 
from the sea coast at Hollesley Bay, 231 feet above the 
sea level, i.e., as high an elevation as anywhere in High 
Suffolk. The sharp wind, so frequently blowing from the 
coast, sometimes leaves a saline deposit on the eastward 
windows of the Vicarage. Below the church the meadows 
are still known as the ** Merefields." But now that the 
drainage of the country is less imperfect towards Needham 
Market and the River Gippiug, Ash Bocking Ohurch no 
longer stands on its beach and waterside. Through the 
Plantagenet period, and earlier, it is said to have faced to 
the South of great ** Mere," its mediaeval expanse of a 
hundred acres of water. The church and churchyard were 
till the last century a little holy island of enclosure, amidst 
unenclosed crrass lands that lav round. The father of the 
bite Mr. Charles Stanford set up the gates and hedges, and 
planted the present rows of trees. 



ASH BOGKINa. 229 

The earliest question about each Church and Parish is 
mostly the dedication of the former, and the interpretation 
of the name of the latter. Our parish church is one of 
the seventy-seven {Suffolk churches, and one of the 1,148 
English churches, dedicated on Nov. 1, All Saints' Day. 
From 1326, 19 Ed. ii., the church of All Saints was 
impropriated in the prior and convent of Christ Church, 
Canterbury, patrons of the benefice till the Reformation. 
So in a will bearing date 4 Nov., 1485, John Talbott, of 
Ash Bokkinge, left his body to be buried in the church of 
All Saints of Ashbokkyn, '' j>er lestamentum el ultimam 
voluptatem suam legal corpus suum ad sepeliendum in 
Ecclesia Omnium Sanctorum de Ashbokkinge." As to 
the derivation of the parish name, our letters from 
Government indicate this. Each communication bears the 
heading in two words. " Bocking " beginning with a 
capital B. About 1870, when the Board Schools were 
started, we were requested to head our correspondence in 
these two separate words, to distinguish us amongst the 
multitude of local names beginning with "Ash." The 
authorities at Whitehall were correct as to our historical 
origin. The monosyllable, " Ash," may be a local trace 
of the early Anglo-Saxon tree- worship. t Probably on 
the site of the present All Saints' church in the aboriginal 
time stood a huge patriarchal Ash tree, the local oracle 
and sanctuary, the periodical rendezvous for traders, and 
the rude tribal Justice court, suited to the semi-civilised 
residents. The rich line of meadows below the church, 
the " Mere '^ fields, still mark with a line of willows the 
course of the streamlet through the deeper depression 
once occupied by the Mere, alongside of which for ages 
ran the ancient track from regal Debenham. 

After the Conquest, the family name of the Norman 
lord became attached. First, the parish became Ash Bigot 
or Bigod, from the Conqueror s grant of the lands to the 
great Earls of Norfolk. This was exchanged in Plantagenet 
days for Ash Bocking, from the Bockings, who were lords 

t ef. Raven, Suffolk, p. 60. Kedstone (V. B.), Bygone Wickham Market, p. 6. 

S 



230 ASH BOCKINO. 

of the manor and residents at the Hall from Ed. iii. to 
Elizabeth, and who are said to have represented the 
county in Parliament from this place, and to have built or 
rebuilt the church nave and tower. 

Lord John Herveyt identified in the Domesday 
Survey the three existing manors : — 

1. "Id Ash, Almar a free-man with 93 acres and 20 acres of 
pasture as a manor. Then 3 bordars, now 6. Always 1 plough-team, 
3 acres of meadow, and half a church with 16 acres. Then valued at 
30 shillings, now at 20 and 6d. A church with 3 acres valued at 6d. 
Over all these the fair Edith had soche and commendation in Kiug 
Edward's time. And they render 4 pounds to the farm of Norton, and 
they were added in the time of Earl Ralph." — p. 5.t 

** In Ash, a free- woman, Listeva, under the Abbot, commendation 

1 acre, valued at 2 pence. The King and the Earl have soche." 

"In the same, a freeman by commendation only half an acre, 
valued at Id. The King and the Earl have soche."— p. 33. 

2. " In Ash, Uluric a freeman held 60 acres as a manor. Always 

2 villans, and 1 socheman with 7 acres, and 2 bordars, and 1 plough- 
team in demesne, and half a plough-team belonging to the men, and 2 
acres of meadow, then valued at 20 shillings now at 30. And the 
King and the Earl have soche." 

3. " In the same, Iric a freeman, held 60 acres as a manor and 2 
bordars, and always 1 plough-team, and 1 acre of meadow, valued at 30 
shillings." 

4. " In the same, Edric a freeman in King Edward's time held 40 
acres as a manor, then 1 plough-team, and I acre of meadow. The 
King and the Earl have soche, valued at 20 shillings. The King and 
the Earl have soche." 

** To this manor Edric added in King William's time 8 freemen 
with 35 acres and a socheman with 12 acres, who could not take them- 
selves out of the lordship of Sniut Etheldreda, and among them they 
had then 3 plough-teams, now 2, then valued at 15 shillings, now at 
20. Osbern de Wancey holds the whole ; and Richard claims it as 
belonging to Phin's fee. The King and the Earl have soche. Two of 
these freemen Roger de Uheims claims as of his fee, and he was seized 
thereof. The whole is 6 quarentenes in length, and 2 broad, and pays 
6d. in a gelt. Of all this Phin had nothing iu Kiug Edward's time." — 
p. 37. 

*' In Ash, Alwin a freeman held 4 acres, then valued at 16d., now 
at 6d."~p. 47. 

Ash Booking appears to be a typical specimen of the 
origin of many of our ancient parishes. The erection of 

t See Suffolk Domesday, Bosmere Hundred (1891). 




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ASH fiOCKING. 231 

the church is said to have been due to the joint action of 
the three manorial lords. The Manor of Ash Hall, that of 
Ketts de Campo or Griffield Hall, and the old Manor on 
Ash Bocking Green, seem to have been thus associated. 
The provision of a church and graveyard in common, the 
possession of a place of sanctuary for deeds, documents, 
and family records, the appropriation of payments in kind 
to sacred purposes, the use of the ecclesiastical offices, the 
aid in need of the church's friendly protection, here as 
elsewhere, had for their result the beginnings of our 
existing Parochial System.* Amidst the thousand acres 
of marsh, woodland, and unoccupied waste, the Domesday 
Survey recounts about four hundred acres more of in- 
habited and reclaimed surface soil, where good influences, 
civil, social, and religious, were fostered, the nucleus of 
the later village of " Ash Bigot " or " Ash Bocking " 

The Fitch and Davy mss. in the Suffolk collections 
in the Ipswich and British Museums, may be consulted as 
to the descent of the manors. At present the information 
accessible is imperfect and insufficient as material for a 
parish history. The following are some of the data : — 

I. MANOR OF ASH HALL or BOCKING HALL. 

T. K. E. Almarus, a freeninii. 

20 Will. I., 1086. Ralph Guader, Earl of Norfolk, forfeited. The 
Conqueror gave all hin lands to William de 
Albini Fiiicerna, his butler .... 
12 Ed. III., 1328. Ralph de Bocking had free warren. 
43 Ed. m., 1369. William de Hocking died. 

John de Bocking. son and heir. 
Philip de Bocking, son and heir. 
Ralph de Bocking, son and heir, was living 13 
Ric. II., 1389 ... . 
6 Ed. VI., 15D2. Edmund de Bocking died. 

5 Mary, 1557. Richard Bocking, Esq , son and heir, died. 
27 Eliz., 1585. Edmund Bocking, Euq., hon and heir died. 

Frances Bucking, d. nnd co-heir, married John 
Hervey, of I ck worth, Esq 

6 Jas. I., 1609. Williiim Bunham, ^ent, lord of a part, died 1628. 
3 Car. I, 1628. Thomas Bonhani, Esq., son and heir, died 1655. 

*cf. Gamier, Hi0t<iry of Kngliah Landed Interest. Vol. i. Chap. ix. 



232 ASH BOOKING. 

28 Car. ii., 1676. Thomas Bonbam paid his ingress fine 

4 Geo. III., 1764. Capt. Samuel Cockeril of Harwich, purchased it. 
1763. James Wilkinson, Esq. 

Elisabeth, daughter of Samuel Cockeril, Esq., 
married James Edward Urqubart, of Harlstead, 
Esssex. 
1810. Kenuet Cockeril Mackenzie and Henry Scott 
Boston, grandsons of said Samuel Cockeril, sold 
it to John Stanford. 
1821. He re-sold it to Wilbrabam, Earl of Djsart, in 
whose family it still remains. 

II. MANOR OF HARNEIS or AISHE, or KETTS de CAMPO, 
OR IN CAMPIS, or St. CHRISTOPHER^S in thb Fields, 
OR GREFFIELD HALL, alias CROFFIELD. 

24 Ed. I., 1296 John Harneis had free wurreu. 

9 Ed. IL, 1316. Philip Harneys 

Lionel Talmash, of Bentley, Esq. 
7 Ed. VI., 1552. Lionel Talmash, of Helmingham, Esq., son and 
heir, died 1571. 
13 EHz., 1571. Lionel Talmash of Bentley, Esq., son and heir, 

died 1575. 
17 Eliz., 1575. Sir Lionel Talmach, Bart., son and heir, died 1612. 

9 Jas. I., 1612. Sir Lionel Talmach, Bart., son and heir, died 16 — 

16 Chas. L, 1640. Sir Lionel Talmach, Bart., son and heir, died 1669. 
20 Car. n., 1669. Lionel Talmach, Earl of Dysart, son and heir, 

died 1727. 
13 Gdo. I., 1727. Lionel, Earl of Dysart, guardian of the last, died 

1770. 
10 Geo. III., 1770. Lionel, Earl of Dysart, son and heir, died 1799, s.p. 
39 Geo. Ill, 1799. Wilbrabam, Earl of Dysart, heir of Lionel, died 
1821. s.p. 
2 Geo. IV., 1821. Louisa, ('onntess of Dysart, sister and heir of 
Wilbrabam. In this family it still remains. 

Tradition associates with this manor the memory of 
the Wodehouse family. In Page's Suffolk, we read this 
account: "Henry Wodehouse, Esq., lived in this parish 
at the time of his father's death, 1430. He was eldest 
son of John Wodehouse, Esq., the great warrior, who won 
such fame at Agincourt, 1415, and King Henry v. was his 
godfather. He died in 1450 without issue, and John 
Wodehouse his brother succeeded, who married Constance, 




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ASH BOGKING. 233 

eldest daughter and coheir of Thomas Giddinge, of 
Ickingham, relict, first of Henry Foley, Esq., and after of 
John Alley ne, Esq., one of the Barons of the Exchequer."* 
(p. 563). 

The Rhyming Pedigree given in Blomfield's Norfolk 
(ii. 547), supplies us with the Homeric incidents of the 
Battle. W. A. Cutting's "Gleanings about Gayton " 
(Norfolk) connects Crowfield and Ash Bocking with 
Kimberley also, and Castle Rising, as entitled to share the 
glorious memories of this house, (p. 218 — 225). The 
initial and final limits of their seignoralty of this manor 
are not yet ascertained.t 

The Fitch mss. in the Ipswich Museum have this 
entry : — " Deed of Sale by Roger Wodehouse of his manor 
called * Kittys of the Fields,' with the appurtenances in 
Ash Bocking ; his Lands and Tenements, &c., called 
* Harnesse in Ashe,' Hemyngston, and Lands in Alnes- 
bourne Close, abutting upon the lands of the Prior of 
Alnesbourne, &c., to John Reynor, 1528, 20 Hen. viii." 

From Manorial, Genealogical, and Historical Collections, relative 
to the Hundreds of Bosmere and Clajdon, containing copious extracts 
from Rjce's History of Suffolk Families, Dugdale, Tanner, the works 
published by the Record Commissioners, Arms, etc., 40 parts, 4to. 

Another touch of this family, with the wider history 
of the period, is thus recorded, ** Henry de Wodehouse, 
BCD of John de Wodehouse, 24 years old at his father's 
death, was then living at Ashbocking. He then went 
and lived at Kimberley, Norfolk. He was nearly killed, 
trying to suppress Kett's rebellion, 1549."} 

in. The Manor House on Ash Booking Green. 

The third existing Manor House stands on the 
modern road from Helmingham to Ipswich, on the west 
side of the ancient " Green." Part of the old timber- 
framed dwelling, with its low rooms and narrow passages, 

*See Suff. Feet of Finen, p. 304. 
t Sold to Tho8. Heigham, 1453, for 200 uarks. 
X cf. HiBtory of EMtern England, Vol. i. 5ti7. 



234 ASH BOOKING. 

id Still Standing to the rear of the modern frontage. A 
sister of the late Mr. \V. Brown, of Gippeswyk Hall, 
Ipswich, had a drawing of the house, showing its appear- 
ance in 1810, when partially rebuilt and the present front 
of the house replaced that represented in the sketch. 
This property wa.s last century held in succession by the 
Welham, Boyd, and Skeet families, and last, as now it was 
purchased by Sir Alfred Garrod, m.d., of London, the 
distinguished physician. 

This is traditionally alleged to have been the residence 
of John Felton, by whom, on Aug. 23, 1628, George 
Villiers, first Duke of Buckingham, the unpopular royal 
favourite, was assassinated at Portsmouth. Felton was a 
Suffolk man, and had an estate in Ash Bocking. He was 
probably distantly connected with the Playford family.* 

The Church Lands or "Burses." 

Another ancient holding, now know^n as " The Church 
Farm," is connected by local tradition with a romance of 
the past, and brings vividly before us the social life of a 
bygone day. The story has been well told by Mr. Monk 
in his series of Memoirs of Suffolk Parishes, and may well 
be preserved, in the words of his version, amongst our 
village annals. This account of the origin of this ancient 
Trust is as follows : — 

" A very different scene did this church look down upon centuriea 
ago. Now it sees Ht its Imse rich grass land, on which cattle and sheep 
lead a lazy existence ; but till the reign of good Queen Bess all this 
meadow land was one large mere ; it wns drained in the reign above- 
mentioned; but even now the quantity of willow trees which flourish 
here show that the place is full of moisture. A curious story is told 
here of events which are supposed to have happened in preReforroation 
days. The body of the priest who ministered at the church was dis- 
covered in the mere already referred to, and it was naturally supposed 
that he had been reading his Breviary, sitting on the edge of the mere, 
as was his custom, that he had been seized with illness, and had fallen 
into the water. His body was, of course, buried in the little church 
just near, but tradition says his spirit knew no rest, and often were 
those who passed near the mere at nightfall startled by the groans and 

* See Prooeedings of Suff. Inst Aroh., Vol. ni. 



ASH BOOKING. 235 

cries they heard. A luiui named William Austin, who lived at a farm 
near, had no cauee to feel particularly grateful to the priest, for the 
latter had, it ic: said, interfered in a love uiacch, and had prevented 
Austin from marrying the girl of his choice. This man died some 
years after the priest's body was discovered in the mere, and on his 
deathtied he confessed that he had, from motives of revenge, pushed 
the priest into the water. Of course the murderer was commanded to 
make the only atonement then known, viz., to leave all his lands to the 
Church, and from the fact that he did so, the farm which he owned is 
called Church Farm to thi j day. Even now it is difficult to get children 
and young people to venture after nightfall near the little pond in which 
the priest's spirit is supposed to remain unquiet ; certainly a more likely 
spot for a ghost than this bit of water surrounded by bushes and willow 
trees, it would be almost impossible to find. But we were unable to 
discover anyone who had actually seen anything which could be said to 
partake of the supernatural." — Suffolk Times and Mercury ^ Sept. 7th, 
1894. 

There is an apparent, though not of necessity a real, 
opposition between these interesting details and the 
accessible documents. To quote a transcript or summary 
of earlier records, apparently in the handwriting of Philip 
Laurence, vicar here 1739 — 1793, but resident at Henley 
Vicarage 1741 — 1793 to his death and burial there. This 
paper reads as follows, including probably by error a 
reference to *' Ipsivich " in the preamble : — 

*'John Austen of Ipswich Donor by Will and Enfeoffment House 
and Lands called ' Burses,' acres 25, to discharge subsidies and 15th, 
and to Hnd a light before the Virgin Mary in ye church of Ash bock ing, 
dated 2l8t November, 1432, Tuesday and Thursday next after St. 
Ednmnd's ye King ye Confessor.'' 

Further back in the records, under the year 1650, 
the particulars are thus given : — 

"This is the last Will of John Austen, made the Thursday next 
after St. Edmonde the Kynge the Confessor in the year of our Lord 

God Mccccxxxii The said John Austen willeth that John 

Herfroy of Ipswich and John Ralph of Booking Ashe be the Feoffees in 
the Testament of the said John Austen in Booking Ashe aforesaid called 
Burses." 

It will be noticed that the mention "of Ipswich'' 
seems to have been inserted in the transcript, from the 
line below, where *John Herfrey of Ipswich, and John 
Rolph of Bocking Ashe," are named as the first and 



236 ASH BOOKING. 

original Trustees of the property under John Austen's wilL 
There is therefore nothing inconsistent with the residence 
of John Ansten on this property, and his death there, 
according to tiie story, — in the days, when Henry vi. was 
a minor, the English wars for French territory were still 
raging, the conflicts of the Roses were ahout to begin, the 
feudal landlord to become the modern landowner, the 
villein the tenant farmer, rent was to be paid in place of 
manorial service, and the way opened for the free wage- 
earning labourer in the economy of the village life. 

The last feofi'ment was made in the year 1891. 

The earliest loss from the new ix)ll of Feoffees occurred 
August, 1902, by the lamented death of the Hon. L. P. 
Tollemache, the first name on the new list. 

All Saints Church. 

The Church consists of chancel, nave, south porch, 
and west door. Caveler, in " Architectural Notes of 
Suffolk Churches" (Parker, London, 1855), describes as 
follows : — 

*'The chancel is late £arly English, with a pretty triplet under an 
arch at the east end y in the spandrils are good trefoils ; the side walls 
have two-lights, also with a trefoil in the spandril. Nave, Decorated, 
with two-light windows, which have good flowing tracery." 

On the chancel floor there are a number of large fiat 
stones, size 3 ft. 3 ins. by 6 ft. 6 ins. ; the centre three of 
glossy black stone, which act as a weather glass, throwing 
up damp in anticipation of bad weather. Five of these 
memorials to the forefathers of the village, are in a line in 
front of the communion rails. Heading the inscriptions 
from the north wall, they occur as follows : — 

1. Under the Hursiimn armorial bearings ; motto, ** V^eritiis me 
urget," and then the Latin ; — 

*• Deposituni Edwardi 

Horsnian in Resurrec- 

tione mortuorum 

olim resuniendum. 

Ohiit 4th April a.d. 1659. 

ann. set. 65." 



ASH BOOKING. 237 

2. " Here lyeth the Body of :— 
William Moore, who departed 

this life, May ye 4th, a.d. 
1716, aged 41 years " 

3. " Here lyeth the Body of 

Mary Wolno,* 

who departed this life 

July the 17th a.d. 1767, 

aged 85 years." 

4. Here lyeth the Body of 

William Wolno,t 

who departed this life 

July 27, A.D. 1756. 

aged 62 years. 

5. Next to the little low lancet-shaped Priest's door in south wall, 
on brass inscription, 12in. by 11 in. in size, in pavement the following 
Acrostic, introducing the name of the deceased, '* Thomas Horsman," as 
the initial letters of the Latin Hexameters : — 

*'Natus quem infra legis, Martie 24, 1556. 

Terra fui, terraeque utero jam deinde receptus, 
Hie jaceo, cinis hominum, lacrimisque solutus. 
Omnibus hoBc eadem sedes, heec urna paratur, 
Maxima sed nostri tenues pars vecta sub auras 
Astra petit, Teueranda fides sic credere jussit. 
Scilicet hsec requies, et nostri meta laboris. 

Huspes ades, tumuloque feras solennia nostro, 
Oblectant manes lacrymae luctusque piorum. 
Respondet votis, meritum si vota sequatur, 
Sed male qui meruere, luunt scelvs igne barathri, 
£t lacrimis barathri nuUis extinguitur ignis. 
Me juvat setemi non fallax gloria secli. 
At licet humanse plores discrimina vitn. 
Nam dolor est vit89 merces, solatia mortis. 

Mortuus, quem supra luges, Junii 6, 1619." 

The present oak benching of chancel, and the encaus- 
tic tiles within the altar rails, were part of Mr. HakenilFs 
restoration work in this church in 1870-72. The arcading, 
commandments, <fec., tablets, and reredos, were the gift of 
Miss E. B. Cowell, in memory of her mother, Mrs. C* 
Cowell, late of Ipswich, who died Jan. 11, 1874. Erected 

* Described in the Pariah Register as }Vidow, 
t Described in Register Mfrom Barkam, 



238 ASH BOCKI^G. 

at cost of nearly £150, Eascer, 1884, from design by 
Howard Gaye, architect. 

Next chancel step and prayer desk, between the oak 
benches, in chancel centre passage, lies the body of a 
former vicar with the inscription on a large flat black 
stone : — 

" Sacred 
To the Memory of 
W. G. Plees, clerk, 

late 

Vicar of thin Parish, 

Died Augt. 19th, 1849, 

aged 68 jeani. 

These are the only epitaphs on the floor of the 
church. The brick pavement of the Nave has one large 
dark stone slab adjoining the chancel, but without inscrip- 
tion. In front of the built-up north doorway lies buried, 
below the present organ, — 

£liEa Maria Wilcooks, aged 32 years, 

wife of the Rev. W. W. Wilcocks, 

then curate of this parish. 

She was buried June 27. 1815. There is no memorial. 

On the north wall of the church between the windows 
is a singular mural monument, brass and wood, to the 
last of the family of the Bockiugs, once so important in 
this neighbourhood. It is described in the Suffolk Bis. 
Collections, now in the British Museum. This description 
includes an account of stained glass formerly in the 
church. The paper is entitled, — 

'* MS. Church notes, penes Sir J. Blois. 
1659, April 6, I there and 38 years before." 

''In glasse, 

" A man, Bokin, with his arms on him, offering up the church. 

'' His wife, Brome, with her arms on her, offering up her husbaod's^ 
arms. He built the church. 

" Also, Edmund Bokyn in glasse, his picture and arms. 

'* 1585. The names of his wives, Frances and Mary. 

« The picture and arms of the last a Payn. 

" Arms, Bokyn, quartering Tay impaled Payne, sa. a fesse betweea 
3 leopards' heads, or." 



s 



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ASH BOOKING. 239 

'* A moDument iu brass and wainscoat for £dward Bokyu, Esq., 
»t. 57, 1585, and his wives Franoes, the daughter and heir (il should be 
oo-heit) of Sir Thomas Tey, Knt, by whom Frances, married U) John 
Hervey of Ick worth, Esq. 2nd wife, Mary, daughter and heiress of 
Thomas Paine of Great Denham, iu Norfolk, Esq. 

** The daughter, Katherine, 7 years old." 

The full text of the inscription on the wall runs as 
follows : — 

" Here lyeth the body of Edmund Bockinge, Esquier, who was of 
the age of lvii yeers, when he dyed and djd depart this lyfe the x day 
of Augt. Ao. Dni 1585, who had two wyves and by eche of them a 
daughter, his fyrst wyves name was Ffrances, who was ye daughter and 
heyre of Sr. Thomas Tey, knight, and by her had issue Ffrances, 
maryed to John Harvey of lokworth, esquier, his seconde wyve's name 
was Mary, is one of the daughters and heyres of Thomas Payne, late of 
Great Denham in the County of Norfolk, esquier, deceased, and by her 
had issue Katheryn, of the aged viii years, as by the several picturea 
ingraved upon this stone with the severall armes of both his said wyves 
may appere." 

*' Ezpecto salutem tuam Domine 

Beatus homo qui in te confidit. 

Quanta mihi iu ceelis, domine. 

At nihil procter te placcat in terra." 

Opposite, in the south wall of nave, there is a richly 
decorated canopy of stonework, enclosing small Decorated 
window. Davy in his Church Notes, taken here May 7, 
1824y gives a description of this : — 

'' In the South wall of the Nave is a handsome arch, ogee, with 
pinnacles on the sides, crockets, and finials. There is no appearance of 
any slab or monument below, though it is evident that this must have 
been its original purpose. It is most probabie it was intended to 
oommeniorate one of the family of Booking, the founder or chief bene- 
factor to the church.*' 

Davy's careful description of the walled-up east 
window and font, and the church interior, Ac, are well 
worth record from nearly a century in the past. He thus 
gives his account of what he found here, 1824 : — 

''The church stands on a gentle rise, just above a little valley, 
which runs parallel with it, and is but a small building, though it ia 
kept in neat order and repair. It consists of a nave and chancel, both 
covered with tile and ceiled within. 



240 ASH BOOKING. 

"The chancel is 28 ft. 9 in. long, and 16 ft. 3 in. wide. 

*' The Communion Table is raised one step and railed round. 

" The East end is wainscotted about 7 ft. from the floor. 

" The East window is a square modem one and very uglj. 

"The other windows, 2 on the south, and 1 on the north, are 
uniform, of the following plan." (Here follows a sketch of same design 
as now.) 

" In the window on the north side is a shield of arms, England, 
gu. 3 lions passant, or. But by the stupidity of the glazier this is 
reversed, and a piece being broken out of it, it will probably not be 
there much longer. In the other light of the same window, there was 
another shield, also reversed. Part of the shield still remains of painted 
glass. 

" Here are 3 or 4 deal and oak pews, but very ordinary. 

" The nave is 50 ft. 5 in. long and 23 ft. 7 in. wide. The pulpit 
stands against the pillar of the arch at the East end, and on the north 
side, a pentagon, of deal painted. 

" Against the north wall hang the King's arms, and the Command- 
ments, and on the opposite wall the Lord's prayer and Belief. 

" The nave is filled up with oak seats, very old, carved, without 
doors, and a singular custom prevails here. The men sitting on the 
south side, and the women on the north, and this even to the division 
of the principal families of the parish. 

"The Font stands just to the westward of the doors,t very 
ordinary and clumsy. 

" It appears to be of brick and plaistered over. The old font, if 
any of that remains, none of it appears. 

" The windows in the nave are all uniform, 3 on each side. 

" The steeple is a square tower of red brick, with buttresses, and 
embattled, of no great height." (It is exactly 50 feet high.) 

" On the south side is a turret staircase. There are 43 steps up to 
the bells, which are 3 in number, and thus inscribed : — 

I. " Thos. Gardiner made me 1745." 

2 Blank. 

3. "Miles Graye made me 1615. 

"On the south side of the nave is a small porch of red brick." 

Dr. Raven in his ** Church Bells of Suffolk " gives a 
more accurate account of the Ash Booking Bells : — 

"Ash Backing All Saints, 2 Bells, Inscriptions : — 

1. *' Miles Graye made me, 1615," smaller bell. 

2. " 1584—85 " (five times) big bell. 

He adds, Terrier, 13 May, 1806, •* item, 3 bells with their frames." 
(There is no record as to what became of the third.) 

t The N. and S. doors were then in urn. Now the N. door is built up. 



ASH BOOKING. 241 

Below the tower and bells, on the basement, stands 
" The Parish Purse," a massive timber iron-bound trunk, 
with four locks exterior, two lids, 1 lock interior, said to 
belong to the 13th century, once used for " Peter Pence," 
and for preservation in sanctuary of deeds and family 
records and parish monies, and later of parochial books 
and registers. Now, in our modern usage, this is super- 
seded by the lawyers strong room, the banker's safe, or 
the family closet, box, desk, or drawer. 

A pathetic interest attaches to the Royal Arms of 
King Charles i„ suspended, just below the wall plate and 
hammer beams of the south wall in the nave, high enough 
to be out of reach of wanton insult or violence, amidst the 
tempest of the Civil War, in 1640. King Charles mostly 
bore the same heraldic arms as his father, and as they here 
appear : — 

France and England appear on the Ist and 4th quarters. 
Scotland on the second, Ireland in the 3rd, 

All within the Garter and crowned. 
Th* Scottish Unicorn for sinister supporter. 
The British Lion for dexter. 

A page out of " Walker s Sufferings of the Clergy '^ 
has to be connected with this. In that literary document 
of those troublous times, now a scarce book, there is the 
record of a former Vicar of Ash Bockmg, who died in the 
hulks on the river Thames, a prisoner of the Parliament : — 

Beadle, Theodore, Ash Bocking, Vicar. He was sequestered, July 
18, 1644, for inveighing against the Hel>ellion and the Parliament ; for 
saving Strafford died unjustly, and that the Parliament forced the King 
to it ; for exhorting his people against Popery and not mentioning 
£piscopncy ; for not encouraging his people (to Rebellion indeed, but as 
they word it), to resist the Rebellion of the Cavaliers against the King 
and Parliament (such was the hypocrisy of the times !), for observing 
the Orders of the Church, and for being Disguised in Drink." 

Theodore Beadle's little daughter, Margaret, died 
and was buried here, amidst their family troubles. The 
registers are signed in the interval by the Churchwardens. 
"God save the King," with the date ** 1640," still looks 



242 ASH BOOKING. 

down from the wall, where the Royalist Vicar placed this 
defiant escutcheon, and left it behind him in quiet Ash 
Bocking. 

The discovery and recovery of the Saxon Font dates 
from 1842. Capt. Kitto, a retired Waterloo officer, then 
resident at Coddenham, took great interest in the study of 
old church work, and superintended the first restoration 
here. What Davy saw and described, as then apparent, 
" very ordinary and clumsy," " of brick and plastered 
over," was pulled down, and the present square stone 
bowl recovered. Mr. Iklward Hakewell, late of London, 
the eminent architect, a most accomplished student and 
writer on Art History, confirmed Capt. Kitto's positive 
estimate of the high antiquity of the Ash Bocking Font 
Bowl. Mr. Hakewell gave it as his conviction, after 
careful examination of the bowl, and comparison of the 
work and material, and stated in his " Report " on the 
church at the time of the restoration, that ** the Font was 
Saxon work," and that " the parishioners of Ash Bocking 
might boast that the subjects of King Edward the 
Confessor were baptized at their ancient Font." It stands 
as hitherto in the church, now upon round Norman 
pillars, on an octagonal basement, with a recent cover of 
handsome design pendent from the church roof. 

The benches in the nave are of old black oak of 
unusual design, well preserved, and interesting. Towards 
the tower end, on each side, are poppyheads. • s in many- 
churches there was oncte a gallery for singers at the west 
end under the belfry. This was removed in 1850. 

Ashbocking Churchyard occupies just three quarters 
of an acre of land, forming an irregular four-sided figure, 
whose sides measure in feet, N. 142, W. 166, S. 168, 
E. 213. The area is raised by the burials of ten centuries 
some feet above the surrounding level. Firs and laurels, 
rather thickly planted, overshadow the tombs, reserving 
ample space of ground for future use. The consecration 
probably dates from Nov. 1, about a thousand years ago, by 
one or other of the Saxon Bishops of Elmham. There are no 



ASH BOOKI246. 243 

existing monuments of ancient clergy or laity previous to 
the Reformation. No stone coflSns have been found. 

The Parish Registers date from 1555, and contain 
records of the Bocking, Bonham, Bacon, Tollemache, 
Talbot, Aldous, Horseman, Style, Felgate, Cockerill, 
Welham, Stanford, and other families of interest and 
influence, formerly resident. 

The Church Plate is ancient, interesting, and of some 
value, consisting of an Elizabethan Cup, 2 Patens, Tankard 
with lid, handle, and thumb piece. A full account of 
these, their history, and purchase, is given in the '* Pro- 
ceedings of Suff. Inst, of Archaeology ' (1896), Vol. ix., 
Church Plate of Suffolk, Deanery of Bosmere, p. 3-5. In 
the same is inserted a biographical sketch of our famous 
French Huguenot clergyman and benefactor, Baltazur 
Gardemau, vicar 1692 — 1739. 

The Vicars. 

By the researches of Mr. V. B. Redstone, the Norwich 
Registry's List of Vicars can be supplemented by an 
earlier reference, as follows : — 

" Id 1248, William de Assche, chaplain, bequeathed a messuage in 
St. Nicholas, Ipswich, to the Prior and Convent of S.S. Peter and Paul, 
to pray for his soul and the soul of his father, Richard de Asshe, 
formerly Rector of that parish. We see the living was not then in the 
gift of the Canterbury Monks at that period, or a rector would not be 
holding it." t 

" Again the 1 )e Assche family possessed the greater part of the 
lands, and the Williams of that ilk were numerous, so that William de 
Assche, son of Roger de Asshe, in 1 Ed. ii., 1308, wns also known as 
" William de Campo." Was this l>ecause he owned *The ('amp "or 
field, once the site of the Roman camp, as part of the Manor of Kits de 
Carapo." 

On the series of Vicars, tabulated from 1326, as in- 
stituted to the Vicarage of Ash Bocking, it is interesting 
to notice that the first three derived their surname from 

f The jhurch of Anh BockiD|;c wan triven to the Monks of Christ Christ, Canter- 
bury, by Gwydo de E^se, son of Walter de Haafield, in a.d. 1259. 
See Keport of Hiii. Man. CommiMioii for 1S81, part 1, p. 323d. 



244 ASH BOOKING. 

the locality, " Thomas Gosbeck, 1326," " Robert de Ckxi- 
denham," 1333, "John de Framsden," 1362. Three of 
the vicars of the following century appear in the list 
with a monastic prefix. " Fr.," as in Mr. Zincke's Wher- 
stead List of Vicars, comes oulv in this century's register. 
We have, " 1467, Fr Nic. Aylesham, Ord. Carrael. ; 1470, 
Rob. Rawlyn, Canonicus; 1472, Fr. Tho. Speller, mon." 

The earliest incumbent with an academical degree 
added to his name was 1608 Rich. Harte, M.A., also vicar 
of Swilland. He was a Member of Christ's College, 
Cambridge. Dr. Peile, the present Master of the College, 
tells me that Rich. Harte went on the degree of b.d. 

Of the 24 pre- Reformation vicars, everyone has two 
names only, the first with Surname and double Christian 
name occurs 1833, William Gordon Plees, in this century 
just closed. There have been 12 vicars during the past 
Reformation period, in all Christian countries the name 
of the beloved disciple was in high favour, so we have 
6 " Johns." Next to John, the name of the doubting 
apostle is most frequent, often at a long distance behind 
John. But we have 6 " Thomas." In all we find 
amongst our vicars, 17 Bil)lical names, 16 from the New 
Testament, 1 only from the Old, ** Baltazar." 

LIST OF FOKMER VICAKS OF ASH BOCKING. 
** £t, quasi curaores. Vital Lampada tradunt." — Lucretitu. 

1326, 9 Kal. Aug. Tho. Gosebbk, ad prses. Pr. et con v. Eccl. Chti. 

Cantuar. 
1333, 13 Kal. Jan. Uobbrtus db Coddbnham, ad prses. eoruudem. 
1362, 20 Maii. Joes db Frahbkdbn, ad pra&s. eorundeni. 

1371, 12 Jan. Jobs. Cock. 

Jobs. Bukston, ad prajs. eorundeni. 
1392, 11 Mart. Kob. Sahbournb, ad prses. eorundem. 

1398, 28 Mart. Will. Macharn (permut. cum Leyton, Lond.), 

ad priBs. eorundem. 
1408, 9 Sept. Walt. Robert (permut. cum Aldham, Lond.), 

ad prees. eorundem. 
1414, 24 Dec. Jobs. Huntb, ad pries, eorundem. 

1423. 14 Nov. Jo. Huntb. 



ASH BOOKING. 



245 



1423, 14 Nov. 



1426, 
1431, 
1434, 
1441, 
1449, 
1459, 
1460, 
1467, 



12 Aug. 
26 Jul. 

13 Aug. 

19 Aug. 
ult Jul. 
23 Juu. 
11 Apr. 

20 Nov. 



1470, 22 Jul. 
1472, 10 Feb. 

1504, 16 Jul. 



1505, 5 Sept. 

1506, 17 Maii. 
1552, 6 Mart. 
1566, 6 Sept. 
1602, 19 Jul. 
1608, 25 Nov. 

1639, 11 Nov. 

1660, 30 Aug. 

1692, 22 July. 

1739, 23 Jan. 

1793, 31 March. 

1833, 25 Jan. 

1849, 15 Dec. 

1862, 19 March. 



Tho. Lbche (permut. cum Bradfield), ad praes. 

eorundem. 
Alan Hyboldeston, ad prses eorundem. 
Nic. Pbtntour, ad prees. eorundem. 
WiLU Bello, ad coll. Domini Episcopi, p. laps. 
Walt. Briooe, ad coll. Domini Episcopi, p. lap. 
Andr Brycb, ad praes. Pr. et Cap. Cautuar. 
Tho. Benbt, ad coll. Domini Episcopi, p. laps. 
Rob. Preston, ad coll. Domini Episcopi, p. laps. 
Fr. Nic. Aylesham, Ord. Carmel. ad proBS. 

Prioris et Cap. Cautuar. 
Rob. Rawlyn, <Jauonicus, ad prsds. eorundem. 
Fr. Tho. Speller, mon. ad coll. Domini Vic. 

Gen. 
Edm. Squibr. 
Roo. Wermicham, ad praes. Pr. Et Conv. Eccl. 

Chti. Cantuar. 
Rob. Thrower, ad praes. eorundem. 
Joes. Askew, ad praes. eorundem. 
Tho. Rooke, ad praes Dmni. Reg. Edward vi. 
Nio. Faxb, ad praes. Dmnae. Reg. Elizae. 
Griffinus Warnbr, ad praes. Dmnae. Reg. Elizae. 
Rich. Harte, b.d. (cvm Swyllond vie), ad prass. 

Dmni. Reg. Jacobi. 
Theodore Bbale, alias Beadle, ad praes, Dmni. 

Reg. Caroli. 
John Hovbll, alias Smith, m.a. ad praos. Dmni. 

R. Caroli ii. 
Baltazar Gardbmau (cum Coddenham Vic.) ad 

praes. Dom. R. et R. Gul. et Mar. 
Phiup Lawrence, m.a. (cum Henley Vic.) ad 

praes. Dmni. Reg. Georgii ii. 
Henry Lawton, ll.b., on the presentation of 

H.M King George m. 
William Gordon Plbbs, m.a., on the presenta- 
tion of H.M. King William iv. 
Thomas Clowes, m.a., on the presentation of 

H.M. Queen Victoria. 
Maurice Byles Cowlbs, m.a., on the presenta- 
tion of H.M. Queen Victoria. 



The above liit ia extracted, by the courtesy of Dr. Benely, from the thirty-one 
folio volumes of *' Institutions,** in the Diooesan Registry at Norwich. This series 
begins with the year ISOO. 

AH illustrations to this article have been kindly supplied to members by the 
Rev. M. B. Cowell, Vioar of Ash Hocking. 



(246) 

Bj the kindness of Miss Stanford, the members were allowed to 
inspect the charming residence which adjoins the church, known as 
Ash Booking Hall, wherein an old Tudor ceiling forms one amongst 
many other noticeable features. Up to this stage of the proceedings 
the weather had been fine, but rain now again fell heavily. The next 
journey was to Tudenham Hall. On the way to the Hall we passed the 
sites of an old Roman Camp, and Kits de Campo's Hall, a picturesque 
Jacobean structure. The members met with a hospitable welcome at 
Tudenham from Mr. H. F. Harwood and Miss Hitchcock. After the 
company had partaken of tea, progress was made towards the church, 
where the Hon. Secretary acted as guide. A paper was read on " The 
History of Tudenham and its Church," and then a hasty departure 
was made homewards. The party returning to Ipswich was fortunate 
enough to escape the terrific storm which burst with full force over the 
heads of those members who were driving towards Woodbridge. 



TUDENHAM ST. MARTIN. 

By V. B. Redstone. 

When preparations are being made with a view to 
visiting a locality enquiries are instituted as to its 
situation and surroundings. From the description given 
in answer to our enquiries we are able to judge what 
features will afford us interest, and whether our journey 
will be one of difficulty or one of ease and comfort To 
all who journey it is a matter of importance whether the 
roads lie up hill or down dale. The scenery of the place 
is also of much importance to the traveller. It frequently 
happens that, by careful enquiry into the derivation of the 
name of a place, all anxieties as to the character of a 
locality can be set at rest, should there be no other means 
of affording us information. Such would be the case if 
we were about to visit Tudenham for the first time. Let 
us cast aside the fanciful derivation which ascribes the 
village as the " Home of the Dead," an Esdraelon in fact, 
and enquire what form or forms of spelling the word 
received in the days when phonetic spelling was permis- 



TUDENHAM ST. MARTIN. 247 

sible. The varied forms, Totxlenham, Tudenham, Tudham, 
and Todham, all had their origiu in the combination of 
three Anglo-Saxon words : Jua-fertile, dene-A wide valley 
or plain, /lam-a settlement. The truth of this derivation 
is at once seen by the presence of the broad green valley 
lying on either side of the Fynn. If we but gaze upon 
the scenery as we pass over the bridge, we should be 
struck with the picturesque view of the church which 
crowns the summit of the hill, and of the many houses 
bordering the street which slopes towards the vale. The 
swampy nature of the district, as it was when the winding 
streamlet freely overflowed its banks, is further brought 
to our notice by such field names as — the Fens, the 
Stews, the Oziers, and Alder carres ; and, as where there are 
valleys there must be hills, we have in the neighbourhood 
Broom Hill, Burnt Hill, and Badgers Hill. The meadow 
lands were known as Leyers. 

There are two sources whence we obtain the earliest 
knowledge of Suffolk estates of eight hundred years ago. 
First there is the book familiar to all students, viz., 
Domesday, and secondly the Inquistion of Ely lands, com- 
piled at the same time. The latter work supplies many 
omissions which occur in the first mentioned record, and 
gives a probable explanation to many curious entries in 
the same. Take for example the Domesday entry " half a 
church." From the fact that the Monk of Ely records 
the existence of a church which William's surveyors 
do not mention, we may draw the conclusion that as 
Domesday only mentions property taxable for the Dane 
Geld, Tudenham church and its lands were not so 
taxed. Domesday does not mention a church building 
88 standing in this place, but records two estates belonging 
to the Church — free gifts or glebe lands. It is the Ely 
Inquisition, and not the Domesday, which gives the name 
Totdenham to the village. Let me here state that as 
England possesses many a fertile vale, there must be 
found other Tudenhams in the country. 

The earliest church which stood upon this spot was a 



248 TUDENHAM ST. MARTIN. 

small wooden structure of which we can expect no visible 
remains to exist. In it Alfric the Deacon officiated when 
the Saxon thane Edric gave way to the Norman lord. 
Earl Ralph. We see Saxon and Norman united in Edric, 
the father of Stephen de Tudenham, who gave ten acres of 
land to the Priory of the Holy Trinity, Ipswich. This 
Monastery was further endowed with two parts of the 
rectorial tithes held by John de Tudenham, together with 
the advowson of the church (1240), and with half the 
church. The latter was the gift of Anketil de Mesange, 
a name of Scandinavian origin. A family of Anketil 
resided in the north. One was the Provost of Norham, 
another, Ralph, lived in Lincoln 1103, and a third, 
Bartholomew, followed the occupation of a butcher at 
Northampton. I can find no further connection of the 
family with Tudenham. In gathering information respect- 
ing the history of Tudenham, a great difliculty arises from 
the fact already stated that there are other Tudenhams in 
England, and even in this county. I am unable to 
reconcile Dugdale's statement that the Priory of the Holy 
Trinity held the Advowson, when in 1280 a moiety was 
transferred to Roger of Dunwich by William of Ludham 
and Alice his wife, unless, as is most probable, the 
right was held alternately with half the church. The 
Prior of Holy Trinity, Ipswich, bought for twelve marks 
of silver one moiety of the advowson of William Bullok 
and Roesia his wife in 1240. Page, in his supplement to 
Kirby's Suffolk Traveller, states that Hosdene gave his 
tithes at Tudenham St. Martin to Thetford Priory, I think 
this fact refers to Tuddenham St. Mary, near Bury St. 
Edmund's. 

Although a Norman acquired the lordship, the Saxon 
peasants and yeomen held the estates. Thus we find two 
manors at Tudenham were claimed by Alfric and Goddard, 
of Saxon nationality, and one of 80 acres in extent by 
Bernard d'Alen9on. I am unable here to dwell upon 
the development of these manors, which were held 
under the lordship of John de Tuddenham in 1316. The 



TCJDKNHAM ST. MARTIN. 249 

only manor mentioned under a name is that of Bertil- 
mewes manor, 1455. 

Let us now direct our attention to things material 
to be seen within the Church. The Church presents to us 
features of Norman, late Decorated, and Perpendicular 
styles of architecture. On the North side of the Nave 
is a very good Norman doorway with shafts, one pair 
twisted, the other plain, the arch bearing chevron and roll 
mouldings. Rushmere church has similar features over its 
South door save that there is only one pair of twisted 
shafts. I do not think the doorway is in its original 
position, but that it has ])een moved during alterations. 
The chancel is late Decorated with a modern East window. 
The tower, which is of flint and stone, with flush panelling 
in the battlement, has a good doorway within a square 
head, and a three-light window above. This tower was 
erected between 1452 and 1460. A bequest was made 
towards the building of this tower by Robert Goodwin in 
1458 ; a prior bequest towards the same object had been 
made by John Mynter in 1452. Judging from their 
bequests the Minters belonged to a devout family. 
Besides subscribing towards the erection of the tower, John 
Minter caused a picture of St. Christopher to be painted 
on the North wall, and his son Robert, in 1510, erected a 
village cross to stand in the street. The details of work- 
manship, as seen on the exterior walls of the tower, afford 
much interest. Within the spandrils above the door is a 
shield bearing three smaller shields, the symbol of the 
Holy Trinity, placed in that position to mark the connec- 
tion of the church with the monastery that stood in 
Christchurch Park, Ipswich. Close observation should be 
made of the use of brick, recently introduced. The arch 
above the West window is constructed of brick and 
flint, and while there are here and there a few bricks in 
the lower course of the wall, in the other two courses this 
article is more freely introduced, but, as if marking the 
doubt of the builders as to the strength and durability of 
this newly introduced material, the panelling of the battle- 



250 TUDENHAM ST. MARTIN. 

ments is effaced flint. When this tower was finished it 
must have been the admiration of the neighbourhood, for 
William Cady, a kinsman of Cardinal Wolsey, in 1496 
stated, " That if the parishioners of Rushmere be disposed 
to build their steeple and make it like in fashion and big* 
ness to the steeple at Tuddenham, then I will that my 
executors bear all the cost of workmanship, 8o that the 
parishioners find and readily purvey at their own cost 
and expense all manner of stuff that should be needful for 
the building of the stone steeple, with meat and drink to 
the said masons." The wishes of Cady were carried into 
effect, but brick was not so freely used at Rushmere as at 
Tuddenham. The archaeologist who wishes to have an 
example of perpendicular architecture always in mind, 
should examine and draw a comparison between the 
structure of these two towers. On the East face of the 
tower there is a layer of bricks projecting gable wise 
which may have been so placed to protect that part of the 
roof from the effects of the weather. 

The interior now calls for notice. An entrance 
through a door in the South wall will lead into the old 
timber porch converted into a vestry. Upon the bench- 
ends are carvings representing animals of a symbolical 
character — the cock of St. Peter, the pelican feeding its 
young, the lion of St. Mark ; there are also the wea?el, 
emblem of vigilance, and the preaching Canon. The 
oldest carving is that upon the pulpit, which I consider to 
have been executed about the year 1400, the carving on 
the benches belongs to the latter part of the century. 
The carving on the font, which has l)een *' touched up " of 
late, should be closely inspected. The font was erected in 
1443, at the expense of Richard and Agnes Silvester, as 
recorded on the base. The figures in the panels are those 
of the evangelists, the Virgin at her devotions and in 
another panel enthroned. In a third panel is what I take 
to be St. Martin before his conversion, clad in mail, over 
which is thrown his cloak. The legend of the raising of 
an unbaptised disciple to life by this Saint is here depicted 



TUDKNHAM ST. MARTIN. 251 

by the representation of the dead woman lying in her bed. 
Notice the custom of the period of sleeping in bed not 
wearing a night garment, a habit which is to an extent 
prevalent among villagers. Around the pedestal of the 
font are representations of celebrants and attendants at 
mass. The cloak of St. Martin is represented near the 
figure of the dead woman ; it is probable that the scrolls 
and labels which are to be seen once bore legends or 
inscriptions. Within the altar rails is a piscina, its low 
position recalls the fact that the chancel floor was, accord- 
ing to Durandus, below the floor of the nave. There are 
two mural tablets, the one to Robert Keeble, of Roydon 
Hall, 1653, the other to John Sicklemore and Elizabeth 
his wife, 1644, who held Tuddenham Hall, and were 
blessed with a progeny of seven sons and seven daughters. 

The Rectory was held in mortgage of Edward, 
Viscount of Hereford, to the Rev. Theophilus Hook, and 
was leased by the Vicar, George Raymond, in 1706. 
After the redemption of the mortgage it was sold in 1734 
by the Hon. Pryce Devereux to Claude Fonnereau, a 
London merchant, and his descendants. Thomas Fonner- 
eau, the Rev. Dr. Claudius Fonnereau, and William 
Fonnereau once more connected the history of Tuddenham 
with that of Christchurch Park, Ipswich. 

The manor of Bertilmewes before mentioned was 
granted by Thomas Freeman and Agnes his wife to Henry 
Tumour, of Haverhill, for the sum of 100 marks of 
silver, 1455. 



(252) 



RECORDS OF THE SUDBURY ARCHDEACONRY. 
By V. B. Redstone. 



Through the courtesy of J. W. Green, Esq., Registrar 
for the Archdeaconry of Sudbury, opportunities have been 
given to arrange, calendar, and index, as far as is possible 
the records of the Archdeaconry. Considering the many 
years which these records cover, and the conditions under 
which till recently they have been housed, Mr. Green may 
be congratulated on having so good a collection placed 
under bis care. It is strange that no notice of their 
existence has been taken by the Committee appointed to 
enquire as to the existing arrangements for the collection 
and custody of Local Records. I desire to express my 
thanks to Wiss Ethel Stokes, Record Agent, Lincoln 
Chambers, Chancery Lane, E.C., and to her assistants, for 
the ready and gratuitous help which they so ably rendered 
me to reduce from chaos the indented register bills, which 
commence as early as 1563, i.e. prior to the year 1597, 
when it was required that the churchwardens of every 
parish should, within a month after Easter in every year, 
transmit to the diocesan registry a transcript of the 
register of baptisms, marriages, and burials for the preced- 
ing year. Without the aid of Miss Stokes I should have 
been unable to provide the subjoined calendar, which 
proves the valuable character of the collection. The 
transcripts have been arranged in bundles for the various 
years, those labelled from 1564 — 1650, are indexed accord- 
ing to parishes; the remaining bundles 1650 — 1813 are 
only labelled according to years, as the parishes of the 



RECORDS OF THE SUDBURY ARCHDEACONRY. 253 

Archdeaconry are for the most part represented in each 
bundle. 

The transcripts are in an excellent state as regards 
preservation, though they do not form so perfect a series 
-chronologically as do many other series of Archdeacons' 
** indented bills." (In the Archdeaconry of Bedford for 
instance a lost parish register can generally be replaced 
between 1600 and 1650, with the loss of at most one or two 
years. » Most of the bills are clearly, in some cases, e.g. 
Ketelberston, beautifully written. A very small propor- 
tion of the bills are signed by the incumbent, hence the 
great difficulty of identifying them w-ithout close study 
when the name of the parish has been torn away, or (as 
is frequently the case) was never written on the bill at 
all. Sometimes the name has been added in another hand, 
in not a few cases with obvious incorrectness. Another 
point noticeable in this series is the want of any accepted 
system of dating, sometimes the bill covering say from 
March, 1595-6, to March, 1596-7, will be headed 1595, 
sometimes 1596, sometimes 1596-7. Again the date may 
be given, not of the entries in the register, but of the 
handing in of the copy to the archdeacon. 

A further difficulty in assorting the bills lay in the 
fact that the writers of the same parish entries added 
the name of the parish written in the vernacular. Much 
interest is, however, attached to this as a means of identifi- 
cation, for we are able to learn under what name natives 
were accustomed to speak of their village ; also that when 
they pronounced long names a strong accent was retained 
on the last syllable, this caused the suppression of the 
medial ones ; Assington thereby becomes Aston ; Coney 
Weston, Connestone, Cunston, finally Conson ; Barnardiston, 
Banson ; Kedington. Ketton ; Stradishall, Stragewell ; 
Wydekeshoo, Wixoe ; Elveden, Elden ; Heringswell, 
Hornswell ; Kennett, Knet ; Braiseworth, Breyser ; 
Thrandeston, Transton ; Harleston, Halson ; Haughley, 
Halley ; Bildeston, Bilston ; Whelnetham, Weltham ; 
Thorpe Morieux was known as Morucks, Fakenham 



254 RECORDS OF THE 

Magna as Fakenham Aspis, Wratting Magna as Talworth, 
Hartest as Harthrust, while Horringer is met with as 
Horningsheath, Horningerth, Horningcherry. 

One fact is particularly noticeable to anyone going 
through a number of these bills, viz., the uncommon 
Christian names in use in Suflfolk, as compared with those 
in use in other parts of England at the time. Mary, 
William, Thomas, Robert and Elizabeth of course occur, 
but they do not dominate as is usually the case ; we find 
Triphena, Dorcas, Parnell, Temperance, Lancelot, Luke, 
Allan, Theophilus, Joacin, Maximian, Lionel, Ursula, 
Damascus, Apollo, Baldwin, Lucrece, Priscilla, Judah, 
Joshua, Stephanie, Percy, Holyferns, Curiophilus, and 
Estofidelis; at Barnham St. Martin, w^e find a woman 
named Melchisidis. 



CALENDAR op REGISTER RETURNS, 1580—1640. 

* In bundle marked (Misc.) A, 1580—1640. 

The figures in square brackets [1564] after the name of each parish 
represent the date at which the register is stated to commence 
in the return of parish registers (Population Abstract), 1831. 

Acton [1564] 1563 (in 1564). 4, 5, 7, 77-8, 80-2, 5, 6, 8, 92-5, 8; 

1600, 3, 4. 6, 15, 18-20, 33, 4, 6-40. 
Aldham [1666], 1564, 5, 7, 71, 5. 77, 8, 80-2. 4, 8. 92-5. 97. 8 ; 1600, 

3,4, 12, 15, 18-20,33,4,6,8. 
Alpheton [1571], 1563 (in 1564), 4, 5, 7. 71. 5, 7, 80-2, 4, 6, 92, 4, 

6, 8 ; 1600, 3. 4. 6, 9, 12, 15, 18-20, 31, 3, 4, 6, 8-40. 
Ampton [1559], 1564. 8, 71, 4. 5-7 (in 1576), 83, 4, 7, 8, 90-2, 4-7 

(in Sudbury roll). 98, 9 ; 1603, 4, 6-8, 14. 15, 17, 23, 5, 8, 9, 31, 

32*, 4-40. 
Ashfield magna [1702], 1563, 6. 8. 74-7. 80, 82-5, 7-90, 3, 5-1601 ; 

1603-6, 8. 11. 12, 16-23, 6, 31, 2, 5. 7-40. 
Ashley with Silverley [1746] 1567. 70, 7, 81-4, 8, 92, 3, 5, 9; 1603, 

6-9, 1 1. 12, 14, 15, 19-22. 5, 9, 30. 3, 4, 6, 8-40. 
Aspall [1558], 1564-7, 78. 9, 81 (in 1582), 82, 83 (in 1582), 5, 6, 9. 

91-4, 9; 1600, 1, 4, 8. 13. 14, 16-19, 22, 4, 5, 7, 9, 30, 1, 3, 4, 

8-40. 
Assington [1598], 1564-7, 71, 72 ("Anson"), 5, 7, 80-2, 5,6, 92,. 

4-6, 98 ; 1600, 3, 4. 6. 15, 18-20, 33, 4. 6. 8-40. 



SUDBURY ARCHDEACONRY. 255 

Bacton [7558], 1563, 4 (in 1565). 6-8, 72, 3, 6, 8, 80, 1, 4,5, 7, 9, 

91-3, 95, 8-1601, 4, 6, 8 9, 11-13, 16, 17, 21, 2, 4, 5, 6 (in 162S 

and*), 27-32, 5, 8-40. 
Badweil Ash [7559], 1563, 70, 4-7, 80, 2-90, 2, 3, 5, 6, 8, 9; 160U 

3-6, ?11, 13, 16-21, 3, 6, 30, 3, 7, 8, 40. 
Bardwell [7538], 1563,8, 75-8, 80,2-90, 2-3, 5-1601, 3-6, 11, 13, 

16-20, 22-3, 6, 30, 2, 5-8, 40. 
Barnardiston [;57(r|, 1567, 9, 71, 4 (dupl.), 7-80,2,3,7-90, 2-6, 

98-1601, 6-8, 13, 14, 16-18, 21, 3, 5, 7, 9, 30, 2-6, 8, 41. 
Barnham St. Gregory [7730], 1563, 6, 8,70,4, 5, 6 (fragment), 

7 (in 1578), 80, 3-90, 5-9 ; 1601, 3-6, 11-13, 16-23. 6, 30, 2, 5-8, 

40. 
Barnham St. Martin [7730] , the same as for Barnham St. Gregory, 

plus 1631. 
Barningham [7538], 1563, 6, 8,70, 3-8, 80, 2-90, 2,3, 5; 1601, 3-6, 

11-13, 16-23,6,30-2,5-8,40. 
Barrow (7542), 1563-4, 8, 71, 4, 5, 9, 81, 3-4, 7-90, 2, 4-9 (N.B. 

1597 in Blackburn roll); 1602-3, 7-8, 11, 14-15, 17,19,25, 

28-32, 4-40. 
Barton parva alias Barton Mills [7663], 1563, 7, 9-72,4-7,81-4, 

86-8, 90-6, 9; 1604 (in 1608), 1607-9, 12, 15, 18, 21-22, 5, 7 (in 

Sudbury roll). 30-2, 4-40. 
Barton magna [7563] , 1564, 74, 5, 9, 82-4, 7-92, 4, 8, 9 ; 1602-4, 6, 7, 

10, 11, 14, 17, 19. 23. 5, 6, 8-32, 4, 36-40. 
Beyton [7539], 1564, 79, 81, 3, 4, 5 (in 1587), 87, 94, 5, 8. 9; 

1602-4 (1604 in 1603), 6*, 9, 14, 15, 17, 19, 23, 25, 29-32, 4-40. 
Bildeston [7558] , 1564, 5, 71, 2, 5, 7, 8, 80-2, 4-6, 8, 92-6, 8 ; 1600, 

3, 4, 9, 10, 12, 15, 18-20, 27, 33, 4, 6-40. 
Boxford [7557] , 1564, 5, 71. 2, 5, 7, 8, 80-2, 5, 6, 8, 92-5, 8 ; 1600, 

3, 4, 9, 12, 15, 18-20, 31, 3, 6-9. 

Boxsted [7538] , 1577, 8, 80, 1, 3, 6, 8, 92-6, 8 ; 1600, 3, 4 (in 1603), 

6, 9, 10, 12, 15, 18-20, 31, 3, 6-9. 
Bradfield combusta [7538], 1564, 74-6, 9, 80, 4, 8-92, 4, 5, 7, 8 ; 

1602-4, 6*, 7, 10, 14, 15, 17, 19, 23, 5. 
Bradfield St. Clare [7538], 1564, 71, 4, 6. 9-81, 3, 4, 7, 94, 5, 9; 

1602-4, 6, 14-15. 17, 19, 23, 5, 9-30, 2, 4-9. 
Bradfield St. George [7555] , 1563 (in 1568), 64, 79, 84, 7, 8, 91*, 2, 

4, 5, 8, 9 ; 1602-4 (1604 in 1603), 6», 7, 14, 15, 17, 19, 23. 5, 8, 
9-31, 32*, 4-40. (N.B. Bradfield Monks 1608.) 

Bradley magna [7703] , 1564, 9-71, 4, 5, 7, 8, 80, 1, 4, 94, 6, 9-1601, 

6, 8, 14-17, 23, 5, 7, 9, 30, 2-7. 40. 
Bradley parva [7567] , 69, 70, 4, 7, 81, 4, 8, 9, 93, 5, 8-1601, 6*, 1 1, 

13, 15, 17. 21, 3, 5, 7, 9, 30, 2, 3, 5-8. 
Brandon (Perry) [7653], 1571, 2. 4, 5, 7, 80, 1, 3, 6-8. 90. 8-6, 9 ; 

1600, 6. 7. 11. 12. 20. 1, 4, 5, 9, 30, 4-40. 



256 RKLORDS OF THE 

Braiseworth r/7551 . 1565-8, 72, 8, 80-2, 4-6,9-95,9.1601, 4, 6, 8, 9, 

11, 12, 1417, 19, 23, 4, 7, 8, 30, 1, 4, 5, 7-40. 
Brettcnham [1584], 1564-5, 7, 71, 2, 3 (in 1565), 5, 7, 8, 80-2, 4-6. 

8, 93-6, 8 ; 1600, 4, 6, 9, 12, 18-20. 
Brockford [ J and see Wcthcringsett, 1571, 1622, 31. 
Brockley[/5W, Burials 1605], 1564, 8. 74, 6, 9, 80, 1, 3, 4, 7-92. 4, 

5, 8, 9; 1602. 3*, 7, 14, 15, 17, 19, 25, 9-31, 2*,4-40. 
Bromc [1688], 1565, 72, 3, 8-82, 4-92; 1600, 1, 4, 5, 8, 9, 11, 14, 

16-19, 21-4, 7-9, 31-5, 740. 
Botesdale [ ], 1635. (See Redgrave.) 
Bures St. Mary [1 558, Burials 1642], 1564, (?5), 7, 71, 5, 7,8, 

80-2, 5, 6, 8, 92-6: 1603, 9, 15, 18-20, 7, 34, 6-40. 
Burgate [1560], 1565, 6 (in 1567), 7, 72, 6, 8-82, 4, 6, 7, 9-96, 

97-1601, 4-6, 8, 9, 11, 13, 14. 16-19, 21-3, 5, 7-35, 38-40. 
Burwell [1562] , 1567, 9, 70, 2, 7, 80-2, 4. 6, 7, 9-96, 8-1601, 4-6, 7. 

8, 11, 13. 14, 16-19. 21-3, 5, 7-31, 3, 4, 7, 8, 40. 

Catlidge, see Kirtling. 

Cavendish [1594r] , 1563 (in 1564), 4. 7, 71, ?2, 5, 7, 8, 80-2, 5, 6, 8, 

92-6, 8; 1600, 3, 6, 9, 11 (in 1612), 15, 18-20, 33, 4, 6-40. 
Cavenham [1539], 1563,7,9, 702, 4-7, 80-4, 6-8. 90-6,9; 1600, 

3, 6-9, 11, 12, 14, 15, (16?), 17, 19-21, 4, 5, 9, 30, 4, 6, 7,9,40. 
Chedbury [1538], 1567, 70, 1, 4, 5, 7, 8, 81, 7-96, 98-1601, 6, 13-18, 

23 5 7 9. 
Chelsw'orth \l559] . 1564. 5, 7, 71, 2, 8, 80-2, 5, 6, 92-6, 8 ; 1600. 3, 

4, 9, 12. 18. 20, 31, 3, 4, 6-40. 

Chevelcy [1559], 1567, 9, 70, 1, 4-6, 80-4, 6-8, 91, 3-6, 9; 1600, 3, 

6-9, 11. 12, 14, 16, 17, 19-21, 4, 5, 9-31, 3-40. 
Chevington [1559], 1564, 71, 4-6, 80. 1, 3, 4. 6-92. 4, 5, 8,9; 

1602-4, 7, 11, 14, 15, 17, 19, 21, 3, 5, 9. 
Chilton [1623], 1612, 15, 19, 20, 31, 4, 6-9. 
Chippenham [1559] . 1567. 70. 1, 75-7, 80, 3, 4, 7, 8, 91-6, 99; 1600, 

3, 6-9, 11, 14 (in 1615), 15. 16 (in 1615). 19, 20, 4, 5, 9, 30, 1, 

3-5, 7-40. 
Clare [1558] , 1564, 71. 4, 5. 7-9. 80, 1, 3. 92-4, 98, 1601, 4*, 11, 14, 

15, 17, 18, 23, 5. 9, 34. 5, 7, 8. 
Cockfield [1561], 1564,5, 7, 9, 71, 2. 5, 7, 8, 80-2,4,6,8,92-6, 

97 (in 1598), 98; 1600, 3, 9. 12. 15, 19. 20, 33, 4, 6-40. 
Combes [1568], 1565, 6, 8. 72, 6. 84. 6. 7. 9-94, 6, 8-1601, 4-6, 8, 

11, 13, 14, 16-19, 21-5. 7-9, 31, 4, 5, 8-40. 
Cornard magna {1705), 1564, 5, 7. 71, 2, 4 (in 1575), 6-8, 80-2, 4*, 

5, 6, 88, 926. 8 ; 1600, 3. 10, 15, 18-20, 31, 3, 4, 6-9. 
Cornard parva [1565] , 1564, 5, 7, 71, 7, 80-2, 6, 8, 92-6, 8 ; 1600, 3, 

6, 9, 12, 15, 18-20, 7, 33, 4, 6-40. 

Cotton [1538] , 1564, 6-8, 72, 4, 8, 9, 80-2, 4-6, 89-94, 99-1601, 4, 6, 

9, 11-15, 17-19, 21-5, 7-9. 31-3, 5, 8-40. 



SUDBURY ARCHDEACON KY. 257 

Cowlinge [1700], 1567, 71, 4, 5, 7, 8. 84, 8, 92-6, 8-1601, 6, 8, 11, 

13, 14, 16-18, 21, 3, 5, 7, 9, 30, 2-4, 7, 8, 40. 
Greeting All Saints [7706], 1563, 4, 6-8, 73, 9, 82, 4-7, 9 (in 1590), 

90, 1, 4, 9-1601. 4, 5, 9, 11-14, 16, 18, 19, 22-5, 9, 30, 3-5, 38, 

40. 
Greeting St. Mary [1681], 1565. 
Greeting St. Peter [1558], 1562 (in 1563), 7, 8, 71 (in 1573), 4, 8, 

82. 6, 7. 90, 1, 3-5, 9-1601, 4, 6, 8, 9, 11. 13, 14, 16-19, 23-5, 

7-31.33-5,8-40. 
Gulford [1561], 1563,8,70,3,6,80,2-90,2,3,5-9; 1601,6,8,11-13, 

17-21, 3, 6. 

Dalham [1558], 1563, 4, 7, 70, 1, 4, 5, 80, 1, 3, 8, 9, 92, 3, 5, 6, 

8-1601, 13-15, 17, 18, 23, 5, 7, 9, 30, 2-8. 
Dcnham [1540], 1563, 6 (in 1567), 7, 9, 71, 4-7, 80, 89-95, 6 and 7 

(both in 1598), 8-1601, 8, 11, 14-18, 25, 7, 30-8, 41. 
Dcnstone [1561], 1564, 7, 9-71, 4, 7-81, 3, 7, 9-91, 5, 7-1601, 8, 14, 

16, 17, 23, 7, 9, 30, 2, 3, 6-8. 40, 1. 
Depden [1538], 1564, 7, 9-71, 4, 5, 7, 8, 80, 1, 87-96, 8-1600, 11, 

13-15, 17, 18,21,3,7,9. 
Downham Santon [1576] , 1563, 6 (in 1567), 7, 9, 71, 4-7, 9 and 80 

(both in 1581), 81, 2 (in 81 and 83), 3,91, 3, (7 ?), 9 ; 1600, 3, 7, 

8, 11, 12, 17, 19-22, 5, 9-31, 3-40. 
Drinkstone [1666] , 1579-81, 3, 4, 9, 98, 9 ; 1602, 3, 7, 15, 19, 23, 5, 

6, 9-31, 4-40. 

Edwardstone [1645], 1564, 6 (in 1567), 7, 75, 7,8, 80-2, 4-6, 8, 92.5» 

8 ; 1600, 3, 6, 12, 15, 18-20, 7, 33, 4, 6-40. 
Elmsett [1684] , 1564, 5, 7, 71, 2, 5, 7, 8, 80-2, 4-6, 8, 91-6, 8; 1600, 

3, 6, 9, 15, 19, 20, 33, 4, 6-40. 
Elm«wcll [/55P], 1566, 8, 70 (fragment), 74.8,80,2.90,2.3,5-7, 

8 (in 97), 9-1601, 2 (in 1603), 3, 4, 6, *10-13, 18-23, 6, 30-2, 

5-8, 40. 
Elvedon [1651], 1570-2, 3 (in 1574), 4-7, 9.83, 5, 8, 90-6, 9; 1600, 

3, 6.9, 1 1, 12, 14, 15, 20, 2, 4, 5, 9. 
Ely combusta [1580] , 1564, 7, 71, 2, 5, 8, 80-2, 4, 6, 92-6; 1600. 3, 

6, 9, 12, 15, 19, 20, 34, 6, 8-40. 
Eriswell [Bap. 1706, M. 1678, Bur. 1669], 1567, 9, 70-2, 4-7, 80, 1, 

3-7, 93-6, 9 : 1602, 6, 7, 9, 11, 15, 16, 22, 5, 9-32, 5-40. 
Euston [1566], 1561 and 1562 (in 1563), 8, 70, 3-8, 80, 2.90, 2, 3, 

5.1601. 3-6, 8, 11.13, 17-19, 22, 3, 30-2, 5-8, 40. 
Eye [1538], 1563, 4. 6, 8, 72, 80-2, 4-7, 9-95, 8-1601, 5, 6, 8. 9, 14, 

16. 17, 19,21-5,7,9.31,3,5,8.9. 

Fakenham magna [1559] . 1563. 8, 70. 3. 5-8. 80, 2, 3 (two bills, both 
so headed, but relatmg to different parishes). 4. 6-8. 90. 3. 5.. 
7-1600 (1601). 3-6. 8. 11. 16, 19-23, 6. 30. 5-7. 40. 



258 RECORDS OF THK 

Pelsham St. Peter [7656] , 1568, 71, 4-6, 9, 81, 3, 4, 8, 9, 91, 4.6«-9 ; 

1602, 3, 7, 8, 11, 14, 15, 17, 19, 23 (in Clare roU), 5, 8-31, 4-40. 
Pinborough magna [1704], 1563 (in 1564), 71-3 (in 73), 6, 8, 80, 1 

(in 86), 2, 4-7, 8 (in 89), 90, 1, 3-6, 9-1601, 4-6, 8, 9, 11-4, 16, 

17, 19,21-5,7,9,34,5,8. 
Pinborough parva [1558], 1562 (in 1563], 96, 8-1601, 4, 5*, 6» 8, 

9 12-17 21 4 7 9 30 39. 
Pinningham [1560], 1563-7,' 72-4, 6, 8-82, 4-6, 89-95, 8-1601, 4, 8, 

9, 11, 13, 14, 16, 17, 19, 21-5, 7, 9-31, 4, 5. 8, 9. 
Plempton cum Hengrave [1561], 1564, 75, 83, 4, 8, 93 and 4 (in 

1584), 97 and 8 (in 1584), 9; 1602,3,5, 6, 14-16 (in 1614), 8 (in 

1614), 19, 22-6 (N.B. 1624 in 23), 9, 3140. 
Pordham [1567], 1569-72, 4-6, (?7), 80-4, 6-8, 90-6; 1600, 3, 6-9, 

11, 12, 15, 16, 19, 21, 2, 5, 30, 1, 4-40. 
Pornham All Saints [1558], 1564, 71, 4-7 (1577 in 78), 80, 1, 3. 4, 

94, 8, 9 ; 1602, 3, 7, 8, 11, 15, 17, 25, 8-30, 35-40. 
Pornham St. Genevieve [1538, S^.] , 1564, 8, 71, 5, 6, 9, 80, 3, 4, 7, 

9, 94, 5, 9; 1602, 3, 8, 10, 14, 7, 9, 23, 5, 8-31, 2* 5-40. 
Pornham St. Martin [1539] , 1564, 8, 71. 4 (in 1575), 5, 83, 4, 6 (in 

1587), 7, 94, 5, 7 (in 98), 8, 9; 1602, 3, 11, 14, 15, 17, 19, 25, 

8, 31, 4-40. 

Gazeley [1544], 1567, 9-71. 75, 7, 9-81, 92*, 93-6, 8, 9 (in 1600) ; 

1600-2, 6 (in 1607)-8, 9-11 (in 11), 13-18, 25-7, 9, 30, 2, 4, 6-8. 
Gcdding [1543], 1576. 9. 81, 3. 4, 7-90, 2, 4, 5, 8, 9; 1602, 3, 10, 

14, 15, 19, 28-30. 34-8(1638 in 39), 40. 
Gislingham [1558] , 1564, 76, 8, 9, 81, 3, 4, 7-90, 2, 4, 5, 8, 9 ; 1602, 

3, 10, 14. 15. 19, 28-31. 34. 5, 8-40.* 
Glemsford [1550], 1564. 76, 8, 9, 81, 84 (fragment). 5, 6, 92-5, 8 ; 

1600, 3, 4, 9. 10, 12. 15, 20, 3*, 31, 4, 6-40. 
Groton [1562], 1564, 5, 7, 72, 5, 7, 8, 80-2, 4-6, 8, 92-6, 8; 1600, 

3, 5, 6, 9, 12, 15, 18, 19. 33, 4, 6-40. 

Hadleigh (pec. Canterbury), none. 

Hargrave [1710], 1564. 74-6, 80, 1, 3, 4, 7-92, 94, 5, 8, 9; 1602, 4, 

11, 15, 17,23,9,30,35-9. 
Harleston [1561], 1567, 96, 9; 1607, 8, 13, 14, 16, 17, 19,21-5, 

7-31, 2*. 3-5, 8, 9. (Harleston parva 1609.) 
Hartest [1556], 1564. 72, 5, 7, 8, 81, 2, 4-6, 8, 93-5, 8; 1600, 3, 6, 

9, 12, 15, 19, 20, 34, 6-40. 

Haughley [1558], 1564, 5, 7, 8, 72-6. 8-82, 4, 7, 9-92, 4-6, 8-1601, 

4-6, 11, 14, 16-19, 21-5, 7-30, 5, 8, 40. 
Haverhill [1670], 1563, 9-71, 4, 5, 87, 8, 90-5, 9-1601, 6, 13-5, 17, 

18,21-3,5,7,9,30,3-6,8,41. 
Hawkedon [1709], 1564, 7, 9, 70. 1, 4. 5, 8-81, 7-91, 3-6, 8-1601, 6, 

11, 13-17, 23, 5, 7, 9, 30, 2-8, 40. 



SUDBURY ARCHDEACONRY. 259 

Hawstead [7558], 1564, 8, 71, 4, 6, 9, 81, 3, 4, 7, 8, 90-2, 4-6, 9; 

1602-3, 8, 11, 14, 15, 19, 21, 3, 5, 6, 9-31, 4-40. 
Hc88ct [1538], 1564, 75, 6, 9-81, 3, 4, 7-92, 4, 5, 7*, 8 ; 1602-4, 11, 

14, 15, 17, 19, 23, 5, 6, 9-31, 4-40. 
Hengrave (cf. Flcmpton), 1564, 75, 83, 8; 1602. 
Hcpworth [1765] , ? 1562 (in 63), 63, 5 (in 66), 6, 8, 70, 3-8, 80, 2, 3, 

5-7, 9-91», 2, 3, 5-8 ; 1600-6, 8, 9*, 11-13, 17, 19-23, 302, 5-8. 
HeringswcU [1748], 1563, 9-72, 4-7, 80-4, 6, 8, 90-2, 4-6; 1600, 3, 

68, 11, 12, 15-17, 19-22, 5, 9-31, 3-40. 
Hinderclay [1567] , 1573-6, 8, 80, 2, 3, 5-8, 95, 7, 8 : 1600, 1, 3-6, 8, 

9*, 11-18, 16-21, 6, 30, 2, 3 (in 32), 5-8, 40. 
Hitcham [1575], 1564, 5, 7, 71, 7, 8, 80, 2, 4-6, 8, 92-6, 8 ; 1600, 

3, 9, 15, 18-20, 33, 4. 6-40. 
Honington [1559], 1563, 6, 8, 70, 4-6, 80, 2-6 (in 87), 7-9, 92, 3, 

6-8; 1600, 1, 3-5, 8, 10 (in 11)-13, 16-23, 31, 5-8, 40. 
Hopton [1673], 1566, 8, 70, 3, 5-80, 2-7, 9, 90, 3, 5-1601,3-6, 

11-13, 16, 18-20, 2, 3, 6, 30, 2, 5-8, 40. 
Horringer magna [ ], 1571, 5, 6, 80, 1, 3, 4, 7-9, 91*, 2, 4, 5, 

9; 1601 (in 1602), 3, 10, 15, 17, 23, 5, 6, 8-32, 4-40. 
Horringer parva [ ] , 1631, 2 5-40. 
Hundon [1621], 1562, 7, 9, 74, 5, 8-81, 7-95, 8-1601, 6-8, 11, 13-17, 

21,3,5,7,9,30,2,3, 5-8,40. 
Hunston [1561] , 1561 and 2 (in 63), 70, 3-7 (in 78), 8, 80, 3, 4 (in 

83), 5-90, 2, 3, 7, 9-1601, 3, 4, 8, 18-21. 

Icklingham All Saints [1560], 1563, 7, 9-72, 4-7, 80-3, 6, 7, 9-91, 

93-6, 9; 1600, 3, 6-9, 11, 12, 14-16, 19, 20, 2, 5, 9-32, 4-40. 
IcUingham St. James [1703], 1563, 7, 9-72, 4-7, 80, 2-4, 6-8, 90-6, 

9 ; 1600, 3, 6-9, 12, 14-17, 19, 20, 2, 5, 9-40. 
Ickworth[/55(r|, 1575, 81-3 (in 83), 8, 91-4 (in 94), 8,9; 1602-4, 

14, 15, 17, 19. 23, 5, 9-31, 4, 6-9. 
Ingham [1538], 1563, 6, 8, 80, 2, 4, 9, 93, 6-9; 1601, 3-6, 11-13, 

16-23, 6, 30, 2, 4 (in 35), 5-7, 9. 
Ixworth [ ], 1566, 70, 74 (in 73), 7, 8, 80, 3, 4, 6-90, 2-6, 8; 

1600, 1, 3-6, 8, 12, 13, 17, 18, 21-3, 6, 30-2, 4-40. 
Ixworth Thorpe [1559] , 1566. 70, 3 (1574), 7, 8, 82, 4, 5, 7-90, 2, 3, 

5, 8-1601, 3-6, 8, 12, 13, 16-23, 6, 30-2, 5-8, 40. 
Ixning [1558] (? 1563), 1566 (in 1567), 7, 74, 6, 7, 81-3, 6, 7, 91-6, 9 ; 

1600, 7-9, 11, 14, 15, 16 (in 1615), 19-21, 5, 9, 30, 4-40. 

Kedington [1686], 1564, 7, 9-71, 4, 7, 8, 80, 3, 9, 94-6, 8-1601, 6, 

11, 14-16,21,3,5,7,9,30.2-8. 
Kennet [1735], 1567, 72, 6, 7, 83, 4, 90, 3-6, 9 ; 1600, 8, 9, 11, 12, 

16, 19-22,5,30, 1,3-8,40. 
Kentford [1724] (cp. Gazelcy), 1608, 10, 13-18, 22* 3, 5. 7, 9, 30, 

32, 4-38. 



260 RECORDS OF THE 

Kersey [7542], 1565, 72 (in 1575), 5, 7, 8, 802, 4-6, 8,92-6,8; 

1600, 3, 9, 10, 12, 18-20, 33, 4, 6-40. 
Kettlebaston [1578], 1580-2, 4-6, 8, 92-6,8; 1600, 3,4 (in 1603). 

6,9, 15, 18-20,31,3,6-40. 
Kirtling alias Catlidge [7555], 1576, 7, 80-4, 6, 95, 6, 9: 1600, 3, 7» 

12. 15-7, 19,20,5,9-31,5-40. 

Knettishall [1772] , 1562 (in 1563), 3, 8. 70, 6-9, 81, 3, 4, 9, 93, 5, 6, 
8-1605,8, 11-13, 15, 17-23,6. 

Lackford [1587], 1563-4 (in 1564), 71, 4, 6. 9, 80, 1, 3, 4, 7-92, 4. 

5, 8, 9; 1602, 3, 7, 10, 11, 15, 17, 19, 25, 6, 8-30, 32, 540. 
Lakenheath [7772], 1563, 7-70,2,4-7, 81-4,6-8, 91-6,9; 1600,3, 

7-9, 11, 12, 14-17, 19, 21, 2, 5, 9-31, 3-7, 9, 40. 
Land wade 1638-40. 
Langham [1561] , 1561 and 2 (in 1563), 6, 8, 70, 3, 5-8, 80, 2-5, 7-9^ 

93, 5-1606, 13, 17-23, 6, 30, 2, 5-40. 
Lavenham [1558], 1564, 5 (?75), 7, 8, 80-2, 4 (two fragments), 5. 

6, 89 (in 1588), 92-6, 8; 1600, 3-5 (in 1606), 6, 8 and 9 (in 
1609), 10, 12, 15. 18-20, 31, 3, 4, 6-40. 

Lawshall [1558, &c.], 1564, 71, 5, 7, 8, 80-2, 4, 5*, 92-6, 8; 1600, 

3, 4, 9, 15, 19, 20, 33, 4, 7, 8, 40. 
Layhain [1538], 1572, 89; 1609, 15, 19. 

Lidgate, [7547, &c.], 1563 (in 1564), 4, 7, 9-71, 4, 5, 7, 8, 80, 1, 3, 
7-96, 8-1601, 8, 13, 14, 16, 18, 21, 5-7, 9, 30, 2, 338. 

Lindsey [755P] , 1564, 75, 7, 8, 80-2, 4 (fragments), 5, 6, 8, 92-6, 8 ; 
1600, 6, 10, 12, 15, 17, 19, 20, 7, 33, 6-40. 

Livermere magna [1538], 1568, 71, 74 (dupl.), 6, 9, 80, 1, 3, 4, 7-92, 

4, 5, 8, 9 ; 1602-4 (in 1603), 7, 8, 10, 11, 14, 15, 17, 18, 23, 5, 
8-32, 4. 6-40. 

Livermere parva [1559\ 1563, 6, 8, 70, 3-8, 80, 3-90, 3, 5, 6, 
8-1601, 3, 4, 6, 8, 12, 13, 16, 17, 19-23, 30-2, 5-40. 

Melford [1559], 1564, 5, 72, 5, 7, 8, 9 (in 1580), 81, 2, 4 (fragment), 

5, 6, 8, 92-5, 8; 1600, 3, 6, 9, 12, 15, 17-20, 34 (in Clare roll), 
6-40. 

Mellis [755P], 1564, 5-8, 72, 3, 9, 80, 1, 4-7, 9-94, 8-1601, 4 (in 

1603), 5, 8, 9, 11-14, 16, 17, 19, 22-5, 7-9, 31-5, 37(?)-40, 
Mendtesham [7555], 1563-7, 72-4, 6, 8-82, 4-7, 90-3, 8-1601, 4, 9, 1 1, 

13, 14, 16, 17, 21-5, 7-9, 31, 3-5, 8. 9. 

Mildenhall [755P], 1567, 74, 6, 83, 91-6, 9; 1600,3,7.9, 11, 12. 

14-17, 20-3, 5, (?) 9, 30, 1, 3-5, 7-40. 
Milding [7555], 1564. 5, 7, 72, 5, 7. 8, 80-2, 4 (fragment), 5, 6, 8. 

92-6, 8; 1600, 3, 5, 9, 10, 12, 15, 20. 31, 3, 4, 6-40. 

Naughton or Nawton (Sudbury deanery) [7557], 1564-6, 71, 2, 5, 7, 
80-2, 4, 6, 8, 92, 4, 5, 9 ; 1600, 2, 4, 6, 12, 18, 33, 4, 6-40. 



SUDBURY ARCHDEACONRY. 261 

Nayland [1558], 1564, 5, 7, 8 (in 1567), 71, 5, 7 (in 1578), 8, 80, 1, 

5, 6, 8, 92-6, 8 ; 1600, 3, 6, 9, 10, 12. 18(?).20, 33, 4, 6-40. 
Nedging [1559], 1563 (in 1564), 4, 5, 7, 71, 5, 7 (in 1578), 8, 80-2, 

4-6, 8, 92, 4, 6, 8 ; 1600, 3, 4,6, 9, 12, 15, 18-20, 33, 4, 6-40. 
Newmarket All Saints [1622], 1594. 9; 1600, 3, 6-9, 14-16, 20-2, 5, 

30, 3, 6, 8, 9. 
Newmarket St. Mary [1638], 1568 (in 1567), 9, 70, 1, 6, 7, 81, 3, 4, 

6, 7, 90, 2-6 ; 1600, 3, 6, 9, 11, 15, 16, 19-21, 4, 5, 9-31, 340. 
Newton next Stow {alias Old Newton) [1559], 1566, 7, 73, 6, 8, 9, 

80-2, 4(?) (fragment), 6 (in 1587), 9-92, 4, 5, 8-1601, 4-6, 8, 9, 

11-14, 16-19, 21-5, 7-9, 34, 5, 8-40. 
Newton by Sudbury [7555], 1564, 5, 7, 71,2,5, 7,8, 80-2,5-8, 

92-6, 8; 1600, 4, 6, 9, 10, 15, 18, 19, 33, 4, 6-40. 
Norton [1539], 1563, 70, 3-8, 80, 2-8, 90, 3, 5-1601, 3-6, 8, 9, 11-13, 

16-19,21-3,6,31,2,5,7-40. 
Nowton alias Newton (by Bury) [1559], 1564, 8, 71, 4, 6, 9, 80, 1, 

3, 4, 7-92, 4, 5; 1603, 4 (in 1603), 10, 11, 14, 17, 19, 25, 8-32, 
4-40. 

Occold [1681], 1564-6, 8, 70, 9, 80, 4-7, 9, 90 (in 1591), 1-5, 8-1601, 

4-6, 8, 9, 11, 13, 14, 16, 17, 19, 22-5, 7-34, 7-40. 
Okelcy [1726], 1563, 4, 6-8, 72, 4, 882, 4, 5, 8, 9, 91-4, 6, 9-1601, 

4-6, 9, 11, 12, 14. 16-19, 21-5, 7-34. 7-40. 
Onehousc [1552], 1565, 7, 72 (in 1573), (?4), 6, 8. 80-2, 4-7, 90-9; 

1604, 6, 8, 9, 13, 14, 16, 17, 19, 21-5, 8, 30, 1, 3-5, 9, 40. 
Owsden [1675], 1566 (in 1567), 9, 71, 4, 5, 7, 9-81, 3, 796, 8-1601, 

8, 11, 13, 14, 16-19, 23, 5, 7, 9, 30, 2-6, 38, 41. 

Pakenham [1670], 1568, 71, 4-7, 9, 81 (in 1580), 4, 7, 9-91*, 2, 4, 5, 
8, 9 ; 1602-4, 7, 1 1, 14, 15, 17, 23, 5, 6, 9, 30, 1, 5-40. 

Palgrave [1559], 1564-7, 72, 3; 6, 8-82, 4-7, 9-95,8-1601, 5, *6, 8. 9, 
11, 13, 14, 16, 17, 19, 21-5, 7-35, 7-9. 

Foisted [/5J5], 1564, 5, 70, 2, 5, 7, 80-2, 4-6,8, 92-5, 8; 1600, 

4, 6, 12, 15, 18-20, 33, 4, 6. 7. 

Poslingford [1678], 1564, 9-71, 4, 5, 7, 8, (?9), 80, 4, 7, 9-96. 

8-1601. 6, 8, 11, 13-18, 21, 3, 5, 7, 9 (in 1627) 30, 2-8. 
Preston [1628], 1564. 71, 2, 5, 80, 4-6, 92-6, 8; 1600, 3, 6, 9, 10, 

15, 18-20, 31, 3, 6-40. 

Rattlesden [1558], 1561-3 (in 1564), 4, 8, 72 (in 1571), 4, 6, 9-81, 3, 

4, 7-92, 4, 5, 8, 9 ; 1602, 3, 7, 1 1, 14, 17, 19, 23, 5, 8, 34-40. 
Rede [1538], 1564,8. 71.4-6. 9. 81, 3, 4, 7-9, 91, 2, 4, 5, 8 (in 1599), 

9; 1602-4, 7. 10, 11, 14, 17, 25, 9-32,4, 6-9. 
Redgrave (with Botesdale) [1538], 1564, 76, 90, 3. 8-1600 (in 

1599), 1601. 5. 6. 8, 9, 11, 17-19, 21-5, 8-31, 7-9. 
Rcdlingficld [1739], 1565, 72, 82, 4-7, 9, 90, 2, 4, 8-1601, 4, 5, 8, 9, 

11, 16, 17, 19, 22-5, 7-31, 34, 5, 7-40. 

U 



262 RECORDS OF THE 

Rickinghall Inferior [1652\, 1563, 4, 8, 72, 6-80, 2, 3, 6, 98-1600, 3, 

4, 6, 8, 1113. 16. 18. 19. 21-3, 30-2. 6-40. 

Rickinghall Superior [15571 ^563, 4,8.72, 6-82,4-7,90,2-5, 8-1601. 

5, 6. 9. 11-14, 17-19. 21, 3-5. 7-9, 31. 2. 5, 7-40. 

Risby [1674], 1564. 71. 5, 9-81, 3. 4, 7, 8, 91, 2, 4, 5, 8-1600, 2-4 (in 

1603), 7, 8. 11. 14. 15, 17, 21, 3, 5, 6. 9, 30. 2, 4, 6-40. 
Rishangles [/5PJ]. 1564-8. 76, 84-7, 90 and 91 (in 1592), 2. 3, 

8-1601, 4-6, 8. 9. 11. 12, 14, 16, 18, 19, 22-5, 7-35. 8-40. 
Rougham [75671 1570 (in 1571), 1, 4, 5, 9. 80, 1, 3, 4, 7-9, 92, 4, 5. 

8, 9 ; 1602. 4 (in 1603), 14, 15. 17, 19. 23, 5, 6, 8, 30-2, 4-9. 
Rushbrook [7565], 1564 (1567. 71-5, 8, 82-4, 7-90, 2, 4, 5, 7-9 in 

separate Rusbrook bundle). 1586; 1603, 6-8, 14, 15, 19, 23, 5, 

6, 8-32. 4-40. 

Sapston [16801 1568, 9 (in 1570), 70, 3, 5-80, 2-90, 2, 3, 5-1601, 3. 

6, 8, 11-13, 17-23,6,30-2,5-40. 
Saxham magna [1555], 1564, 74, 6, 81, 3, 4, 8 (in 1587), 9, 94, 5; 

1603. 10. 11, 14, 15, 19, 23, 5, 9, 30. 4-40. 
Saxham parva [1698], 1564, 71,4.5. 80, 1, 3, 4. 7. 8-90 (all in 1590). 

92, 4, 5, 8, 9; 1601, 2, 7, 8, 10, 11, 15, 17, 19, 23, 5, 30, 1, 4, 

5, 7-40. 
Semer [1538], 1564, 5, 7, 71. 2, 6 (in 1575), 7, 8, 80-2, 4-6, 8, 92-4. 

8; 1600, 3, 4, 6, 12, 15, 18-20, 7, 33-4, 6-40. 
Shelland [ ], 1593, 4. 98-1603 (1600-3 in 1601), 5, 9, 12-14. 16. 

18,21-5.7-31,5,8-40. 
Shimplingthorne [1538], 1563 (in 1564), 5, 7, 71, 5, 7, 8, 80-2, 4 (in 

1585), 5, 92-5, 8; 1600, 3. 4. 6. 9. 12. 15, 18-20, 33, 6-8, 40. 
Snailwell [1629] , 1570, 6. 80, 1, 3, 4, 6-8, 90, 1, 3-6, 9 ; 1600, 3, 7-9, 

11, 12, 16,20,2,5,30,4-40. 
Soham Monks [1559], 1563, 7, 9-72, 5-7, 80, 1, 3, 4, 6, 7, 91, 4-6, 

9; 1600, 3, 6. 9. 12, 13, 15, 16, 19-22, 4, 5, 9-31, 5-8, 40. 
Somerton [1538], 1564, 8, 71, 2, 4, 5, 7, 8, 80-2, 5, 6, 8, 92-5, 8 ; 

1600. 3, 4. 6, 9. 10, 12, 19, 20, 33, 4, 6-40. 
Stanningfield [1561], 1564, 8, 74-6, 9, 80, 1, 3, 4, 7, 97*-1600, 2, 7, 

10, 11, 14, 15, 17, 23, 5, 8-32, 4-40. 
Stansfield [1538], 1564, 7, 8(in 1567)-71, 5, 7-9 (in 1578), 80, 1. 3, 

7-96, 8-1601, 4 (in 1603), 5, 11, 13-17, 21, 3, 5, 7, 9, 30, 2-4, 

6-8, 41. 
Stansted [1570] , 1564, 7, 75, 7, 8, 80-2, 5, 6, 8, 92-4, 6, 8 ; 1600, 3, 

4 (in 1603), 6, 9, 10, 15, 19, 20, 33, 4, 6-40. 
Stanton All Saints [1584], 1562 (in 1563), 3, 6, 74, 9, 87, 8, 90, 2, 

3, 5-1600, 3-6, 8, 11-13, 16-22, 6, 30, 5-8. 
Stanton St. John [1579], 1562 (in 1563), 3, 6, 74, 9, 80, 3-5, 7, 8, 

9 (in 1590), 90, 2, 3, 5-1601, 3-6, 8, 11, 13, 16-18, 20-3, 30, 1, 

5-8. 
" Stanton," 1639. 



SITDBHRY ARCHDEACONRY. 263 

Stoke Ash [1538], 1564-6, 8 (with list of burials of those that 

made or might have made wills there 1564-9), 72, 3, 6, 8-80, 

2,5-7,9, 90, 3 (in 1592), 4, 6; 1600, 4, 8, 9, 11-14, 16, 19, 

22, 3, 5, 7-32, 4, 5, 7-40. 
Stoke by Clare [f538], 1564, 6 (in 1567), 7,9-71, 4, 5, 7-81, 3,8-96, 

9-1601, 6, 8, 11, 13-18, 23, 5, 9, 30, 2-8, 41. 
Stoke Neyland [7558], 1564, 7 (?71), 2, 7, 8, 80. 2, 5, 6, 8, 92-6, 

8 ; 1600, 4, 10, 12, 20, 33, 6, 8-40. 
Stow [7559], 1572, 6, 8, 84, 7, 9-96, 8-1601, 4-6, 9, 13, 14, 16, 17, 

19, 21-5, 7-31, 4, 8-40. 
Stowlangtoft [7770], 1566, 8, 70, 3-8, 80, 82-5*, 6 (in 1587), 7-90, 

2,3,5-9; 1601,3-6, 8, 11, 13, 17-23,6,31, 2,6-40, 
Stradishall [75^8] , 1561-3, 7, 9, 71, 4, 5, 9, 80, 2,3, 7, 8, 90, 1,3-6; 

1600, 1, 6, 11, 13, U (in 1615), 15-18, 23, 5, 7, 9, 30, 2, 3, 5-8. 
Sturston [7630] , 1563, 4, 6-8, 72, 3, 8, 80-2, 4-7, 91-4, 8-1601, 5, 6, 

8, 9, 11, 13, 14, 16-19, 22-5, 8, 9, 31, 2.5, 7-40. 
Sudbury All Saints [7564], 1563 (in 1564), 4, 5, 7, 71, 2, 5, 7, 8, 

80-2, 5, 6, 92 (?93), 4, 5, 8 ; 1600, 3, 4, 6, 9, 15, 18, 20, 33, 

4, 6-40. 
Sudbury St. Gregory [7653], 1564, 5, 7, 71, 5, 7, 8, 80-2, 4-6, 8, 

92-6, 8 ; 1600, 3, 9, 10, 12, 15, 17 [? 18] , 19, 27, 31, 3, 4, 6-40. 
Sudbury St. Peter [7593], 1565, 71, 2, 5, 8,80-2,4,5, 92-6,8; 

1600, 3, 6, 9, 15, 17, 19, 31, 3, 4, 6-40. 

Thelnetham [7538\ 1561 (in 1563). 3, 6, 8, 70, 3,5-8,80,2-90, 

2 (fragment), 3, 5-1600, 3-5, 8, 11, 13. 16-21, 3, 6, 30-2, 5-40. 
Thorndon All Saints [7538^ , 1564, 5, 76, 80, 1, 3-7, 9-93, 5, 8-1601, 

4, 5 (in 1604), 8, 9, 11, 13, 14, 16-19, 20-3, 5, 7, 9-31, 4, 5, 7-9. 
Thornham magna [7555], 1563-7, 71 (in 1567), 2, 3, 6. 8, 80,2 

(3 different returns for different parishes, all headed Thornham 

magna), 4, 6, 7, 9-95, 8-1601, 4-6, 8, 9, 11, 13, 14, 16, 17, 19, 

22-5,7,8,30. 1,4, 5,7-40. 
Thornham parva [7766], 1564-7, 72-4, 9, 85, 90, 2, 3, 5, 7 (in 1596), 

8-1600, 4-6, 8, 11, 13. 15, 16, 18, 19, 21, 2, 4, 5, 7-30 (in 1632), 

1, 2, 4, 5, 7-40. 
Thorpe by Ixworth, see Ixworth Thorpe. 
Thorpe Morieux [7538] . 1564, 5, 7-9, 71, 2, 5, 7, 8, 80, 2, 92-6, 8 ; 

1600, 3, 4 (in 1603). 6, 9, 12, 15, 18-20, 33. 4, 6-40. 
Thrandeston [7558], 1564-8, 724, 6, 8-82, 4-7, 9-95, 8, 1601 ; 4-6, 

8, 9. 12-14, 16-22, 4, 5, 7-31, 4. 5, 7-40. 
Thurlow magna [7636] , 1564, 8 (in 1567), 9, 71, 4, 8, 80-2. 8-90, 2, 

. 4, 5. 8; 1600-2, 6, 8, 11, 13-18. 21, 3, 5, 7, 9, 30, 2-8, 40. 
Thurston [7707], 1563 and 4 (in 1564). 8, 74-6, 9, 80, 1, 3, 4, 7-9, 

92, 4, 5, 8-1600, 2-4 (in 1603), 8, 11, 14, 15, 17, 21, 3, 5, 8, 

9-31, 4-40. 



264 RECORDS OF THE 

Thwaite [1709], 1563-8, 71 to 3 (in 1573), 4, 6, 9-81, 4, 6. 7, 9-94, 

6, 8-1601, 5, 6, 8, 9, 11-14, 16, 17, 19, 21-5, 7-33, 5, 7-40. 
Timworth [7558], 1564, 8, 71, 4-6, 9, 81, 3, 4, 94, 5, 8-1600, 2, 4, 

10, 15, 25, 9-31, 4-40. 

Tostock [1675], 1564, 8, 71, 4, 5, 9, 81, 3, 4, 7, 9 (in 1588), 90 (in 

1689), 1, 2, 4, 5, 8; 1600, 2-5, 7, 8, 14, 15, 17, 19, 23, 5, 9-32, 

4-40. 
Troston [1558], 1566, 8, 75, 7, 8, 80, 2-9, 92, 3, 5, 7, 9-1601, 3-5, 

12-13, 17-23,6,31,5-8,40. 
Tuddenham [1558], 1566 (in 1567) 8-71, 4-7, 80-2, 4, 6, 7, 9, 91-6, 

9 ; 1600, 4, 6-9, 12, 14-17, 19-22, 5, 9, 30, 4, 6, 8-40. 

Waldingfield magna [1539], 1565, 7, 72, 5, 7, 80-2, 4 (fragments), 

6, 8, 92-5, 8; 1600, 2 (in 1603), 4, 9, 10, 12, 15, 18-20, 31, 3, 

4, 6-40. 
Waldingfield parva [1568], 1564, 5, 71. 2, 7, 80, 4 (fragment), 5, 6. 

8, 91 (in 1592), 2, 3, 5 ; 1603, 6, 9, 15, 18, 20, 34, 6-9. 
Watham (Sudbury, ? Wattisham), 1593 (in 1592). 
Walsham le Willows [1539], 1560-2 (in 1563), 8, 73, 5-8, 80, 2-6, 

8, 91 (in 1592), 3, 5 ; 1603, 6, 9, 15, 18, 20, 30-2, 7, 40. 
Wangford [1678] , 1567, 9, 70-2, 4-7, 80-4, 7, 8,89 and 90 (in 1591). 

91-6, 9 ; 1600, 3, 12, 30-2, 4, 6, 8, 9. 
Wattisfield [1540], 1565, 8, 70, 4-9, 82-8, 90, 2, 3, 5-1601, 3, 4, 8, 

11-13, 17-19, 21-3, 6, 30-2, 5, =6-40. 
Wattisham [1564], 1564, 5, 72, 5, 80, 1, 4 (fragment), 6, 8, 93, 4, 

8 ; 1600, 3, 4, 6, 9, 15, 20, 31, 3, 4, 6-40. 
Weston Coney [1562], 1562 (in 1563), 3, 8, 70, 3, 5-8, 82-90 (in 

1589), 92, 3, 5-1601, 3-6, 11-13, 16-23, 6, 30, 2, 5-8, 40. 
Weston Market [1563] , 1563, 6, 8, 70, 6, 8, 80, 3, 6-8, 92, 3, 5, 6, 

8-1601, 3, 6, 8, 11, 13, 15, 17-21, 3, 6, 30-2, 3, 5-8, 40. 
Westow [1558], 1564, 8, 71, 4, 5, 9, 83, 4, 7, 8, 90-2, 4, 5, 8, 9; 

1605, 10, 14, 19, 23, 5, 6, 9-32, 4-7, 39, 40. 
Westhorpe [1538] , 1566, 72-4, 8, 9-82, 4, 6, 9-94, 9-1601, 3-6-, 8, 

11-14, 16, 18, 19, 21-5, 7-35, 7-40. 
Westley [1565], 1571, 6 ; 1610, 14, 15, 19, 23, 9, 30, 2, 6, 7-40. 
Wetherden [1538] , 1563, 4, 8, 71 (in 1572), 6, 86, 7, 9, 90, 2, 4, 5. 

8; 1600, 1, 4-6, 8, 9, 11-14, 16, 17, 19,21-5, 7-32, 4, 39, 40. 
Wetheringsett [1556], 1564-7, 73, 83, 9, 91-5, 8-1601,4,6,8,9. 

11, 13-18, 21, 3-5, 7, 9-31, 4, 5. 7-40. 

Wethersfield [1558], 1567, 9, 71, 2, 4,5,7,9-81,3,7-9,92, 4-6, 
8, 9 ; 1601, 8, 11, 13-18, 21, 3, 5, 7, 9, 30, 2, 4-8, 41. 

Whatfield [7558], 1565, 7, 71-3, 5,7,80-2,4,6,93,5,6,8; 1603, 
4, 6, 9, 15, 19,20,33,4,6-9. 

Whelnetham magna [1561], 1564, 8, 71, 4, 81. 3, 4, 9,92.4,5, 
♦7-9 ; 1602-4, 7, 11, 14, 15, 17, 19, 23, 5, 9-32, 4-40. 



SDDBURY ARCHDEACONRY. 265 

Whelnetham parva n680] , 1564, 74, 6, 9, 81, 3, 4, 7, 8, 91, 4, 5, 8, 

9; 1602, 7, 14, 15, 17, 23, 5, 6, 9, 31, 2, 4-40. 
Whepstead [1540], 1564, 8, 71, 4, 6, 9, 81, 3, 4, 7-9, 91, 2, 4, 9;. 

1602, 4. 7, 11, 14, 15, 17, 19, 23, 4, 5, 8, 9, 32, 4-40. 
Wickhambrooke [1559], 1567, 9-71, 4. 5, 7-9, 81, 3, 8, 9, 92-6, 

8-1601, 6, 8-10 (in 1611), 13-18, 23. 5, 7, 9, 30, 32-7*, 8. 
Wickhamskeith [1557], 1563-8, 70, 2-4, 6, 8, 80-2, 4, 5. 7, 9-93, 5, 

8; 1601, 4-6, 8, 9, 11 (in 1612), 12-14, 16 (in 1617), 17-19, 

21-5, 7-31, 3, 5, 8-40. 
Wicken [1565], 1567, 70, 1, 4-7, 81-4, 6-8, 92-6, 9 ; 1600, 6-9, 12, 

(? 13), 15, 16, 19, 20, 2, 5, 9-36, 38, 39. 
Wissington (alias Wiston) [1538], 1564, 5, 7, 9,75,81,2,4-6,8, 

92-5, 8; 1600, 3, 4. 6, 9, 16, 12, 15. 18-20, 34, 6-40. 
Wiverston [1560], 1563 (fragment). 64 (In 1563 fragment), 5,7, 

72, 3, 6, 9, 80, 1, 4, 6, 9-91, 3 (in 159^), 5 ; 1600, 1, 4-6, 8, 9, 

12, 14, 16, 17, 19, 21-5, 7-31, 3-5, 8-40. 
Wixoe [1772], 1563 (in 1564), 4, 5 (in 1575), 74, 7, 9, 80, 1, 3, 8, 

90-3, 6; 1600, 1, 6, 8, 13, 14, 16-19. 23, 7, 9, 30, 2-8. 
Wood Ditton [1567], 1569, 70, 1, 5, 6, 80, 1, 5, 90, 1, 3, 5, 6, 9; 

1600, 3, 6, 9, 15, 17, 19-21, 4, 5, 9-36, 8-40. 
Woolpit [1558], 1580, 1, 9, 91, 4-6, 8, 9 ; 1602, 3, 7, 14, 15, 17, 19, 

25, 28-31, 5-40. 
Wordwell [1581], 1568, 70 (in Fordham roll), 3, 4, 6-8, 80, 2, 4-6, 

90, 5-9; 1604-6, 8, 11-13, 17-23, 6, 30, 5-8, 40. 
Worlington [1719], 1567, 70, 2,4. 5, 84, 6, 7, 93-6, 9; 1600, 3, 7, 

8, 15, 16, 25, 8 (in 1629), 9-31, 4, 5, 8. 
Wortham [1538], 1564-8, 72-4, 6, 9, 80. 4. 7, 9, 91-6, 8-1600, 4-7*, 

8, 9, 11, 14-17, 19, 21-3, 5, 7-35, 8-40. 
Wratting magna [1593], 1569. 75, 9. 93 (in 1592), 5, 6 (in 1595), 9. 
Wratting parva [1555] , 1564, 7, 9-71, 4, 5, 7-80. 2, 3, 7, 9, 90, 3, 4, 

8; 1600, 6, 8, 13-17, 25, 31, 4, 5, 7, 8. 

Yaxley [1684], 1564, 6 (bis) 157-*. 2, 6, 9, 80-2, 4-7, 9,91-5, 
8-1600, 4-6, 8, 9, 11-14, 16, 17, 19, 21-5, 7-35, 9, 40. 



266 



RECORDS OF THK StTDBfTRY ARCHDKAOONRY. 



List of years for which there are bundles after 1640. 



1640 


1687 


1728 


1771 


1641 


1688 


1729-30 


1773 


1660 


1689 


1730 


1774 


1661 


1690 


1731-2 


1775 


1662 


1692 


1732 


1776 


1663 


1692 


1733 


1778 


1664 


1693 


1735-6 


1779 


1665 


1694 


1737 


1780 


1666 


1695 


1738 


1780 


1667 


1696 


1739 


1782 


1668 


1697 


1740-1 


1783 


1669 


1699 


1741 


1785 


1670 


1700-1 


1742 


1785 


1671-2 


1701-2 


1743-4 


1787 


1672 


1702 


1744 


1788 


1672-3 


1703 


1747-8 


1789 


1673 


1704 


1749 


1790 


1673-4 


1706-7 


1750 


1792-3 


1674-5 


1707 


1751 


1793 


1675 


1709 


1752 


1795-6 


1675-6 


1710 


1753 


1796 


1676 


1711 


1754 


1797 


1676-7 


1712 


1755 


1797 


1677 


1713 


1756 


1798 


1677-8 


1714 


1757 


1800 


1678 


1716-7 


1758 


1801 


1679-80 


1717 


1760 


1802-3 


1680 


1718 


1762 


1803-4 


1680-1 


1719 


1763 


1804 


1681 


1720 


1764 


1806 


1682 


1721 


1765 


1807 


1683 


1723-4 


1766-7 


1808 


1684 


1724 


1768 


1809 


1686 


1725 


1769 


1810 


1686 


1726 


1770 


1811 



^niMh Ittjstitttte tti ^ 



Itatural gisittfvg. 




OFFICERS, MEMBERS, RULES, and REPORT, 
1902—1903. 




ESTABLISHED 1848. 



IP8WI0H : W. ■. HABBI80N, ANOXBNT H0U8K FBISS. 



SUFFOLK 

Ittstitttte of g^whHwIo0H antl gatutal giiirton|. 



patron. 

THE MOST HON. THE MARQUIS OF BRISTOL^ L.L. 

presfbent 

SIR WILLIAM BRAMPTON GURDON. K.C.M.G., M.P. 

IDiceopresibentB. 

THE RIGHT HON. THE EARL OADOGAN, KG. 

THE RIGHT REV. THE LORD BISHOP OF ELY. 

THE RIGHT HON. THE EARL OF STRADBROK^E. 

THE RIGHT HON. THE LORD DE SAUMAREZ. 

HIS HIGHNESS PRINCE FREDERICK DULEEP SINGH. 

PROFESSOR NEWTON. M.A., F.R.S. 

REV. CANON RAVEN. D.D., F.S.A. 

GERY MILNER GIBSON CULLU\I. ESQ., M.A., F.&A. 

ROBERT JOHN PETTIWARD, ESQ. 

ERNEST GEORGE PRETYMAN, ESQ., M.P. 

THE VEN. ARCHDEACON CHAPMAN. 

REV. CHARLES W. JONES, M.A. 

COLONEL NATHANIEL BARNARDISTON, J.P., D.L. 

ton. Secretary* 

VINCENT BURROUGH REDSTONE. ESQ. 
(thk above are ex-officio membebs of the council.) 

£Iectet) /Dembers ot tbe Council. 

Algernon Bkckford Bevan, Esq., j.p. Miss Nina F. Latard. 

Robert Bcrrell. Esq., j.p. I Charles Partriikjk, Esq., jun., ila., 

Henry Clement Casley, Esq. f.r.g.s., f.s.a. 

John Shewrll Corder, Esq. ] Rev. Canon Scott, m.a. 

Rkv. Charles Lktt Feltoe, b.d. 

Rev. Henry Hasted, j.p. 

Rev. Sydenham H. A. Hervey. 



Fkancis S. Stevenson, Esq., m.f. 
Rkv. Frederick E. Wabbkn, b.d., 

F.S.A. 



Xiterars Committee* 

H. C. Casley, Esq. I The Secretary. 

J. S. Corder, Esq. 1 Rev. F. E. Warren. 

ton. librarian* 

Rev. Sydenham H. A. Hervey {Moyta Ball, Bury St. Edmund^s), 

Xanfiers* 

Capital and Counties Bank, Bury St. EdmumVt, 

ton. XErcasurer* 

Algernon Beckford Bevan, Esq., j.p. 



(iii) 



flDembers of tbe 3nstitutc 



THB SION * INDICATB8 THAT THB MEMBER 18 A COMPOUNDER. 



Abbott, George, 68, Berners Street, Ipgwich. 
Aldrich, Vice Admiral Pelham, The Croft, Great Bealings. 
Allen, Mrs. Katherine, E^erton Lodge, Fallowfield, Manchester. 
Almack, Henry Horn, J P., Long Melford, Sudbury. 
^Amherst of Hackney, The Right Hon. Lord, F.S.A., Didlington Hall, 
Brandon, Norfolk. 
Andrews, Mrs. Beatrice, Grey Friars, Whiting Street, Bury St. Edmund's. 
Amott, John, Woodbridge. 
Armstrong, J. K., 110, Chiistchurch Street, Ipswich. 

Barker, General Sir George Digby, K.O.B., Glare Priory, Sufifolk. 

Bamardiston, Colonel Nathaniel, J. P., d.l., The Ryes, Sudbury. 

Barney, Miss A. E., Rattlesden, Bury St. Edmund's. 

Barrett, Edwin, 8, Queen Street, Ii^swich. 
^Beaumont, George Frederick, F.S.A., The Lawn, Coggeshall, Essex. 

Bence, Edward Starkie, Esq., Kentwell Hall, Long Melford. 

Bensly, William Thomas, ll.d., y.s.A., Eaton, Norwich. 

Betham, Rev. Charles Jepson, m.a., Hon. Canon of Ely, Brettenham 
Rectory, Ipswich. 

Be van, Algernon Beckford, J. P., Bury St. Edmund's. 
''Biden, Charles Walter, m.r.c.8., The Lodge, Cratfield, Halesworth. 

Birch, Rev. Charles George Robert, ll.m., Brancaster Rectory, King's Lynn. 

Bisshopp, Edward Femley, Halesmere, S. Edmund's Road, Ipswich. 
♦Blakiston, The Very Rev. R. Milbum, Rectory, Hadleigh. 

Board of Education, South Kensington, London, S.W. (No. 12,688). 

Boldero, Albert J., White House, Rattlesden, Bury St. Edmund's. 

Booth, William Henry, Handford Lodge, Ipswich. 

Bristol, The Most Hon. the Marquis of, L.L., Ickworth Park, Bury St. 
Edmund's. 

Brooke, Edward, Ufford Place, Woodbridge. 

Brooke, Walter, Lyndhurst, Woodbridge. 

Brooks, Francis Augustus, M.D., S. Felix, Felixstowe. 

Brown, Rev. Frederic Davy, Witnesham Rectory, Ipswich. 

Barrell, Robert, Westley Hall, Bury S. Edmund's. 

Burton, Bunnell Henry, Wherstead Park, Ipswich. 

Butler, Rav. George H., Gazeley Vicarage, Newmarket. 

Buxton, Henry E., J. p., Fritton Decoy, Great Yarmouth. 

Cadogan, The Right Hon. the Eari, K.O., Culford Hal], Bury S. Edmund's. 



iv LIST OF MEMBERS, 1903 — 4. 

Caiihew, Major lUnulphiu John, J. p., Woodbridge Abbey, Suffolk. 

Cftrtwright, Yen. Arcbdeaoon, Icklingham Rectory, Mildenhall. 

Caaley, Henry Clement, Claremont, ISS, Woodbridge Road, Ipewieh. 

Caatleden, Rev. George, v. a., Deonington Rectory, Framlingham. 

Chapman, The Venerable Frank Robert, M.A., The Almonry, Ely. 

Cheetham Trust Library, Mancheater. 

Churchman, Arthur Charles, Wilbuiy, Norwich Road, Ipswich. 

Clark, Rev. William Frederick, S. Stephen^s Rectory, Ipswich. 
*Clarke, Sir Ernest, M.A., F.a.A„ ISa, Hanover Square, London, W. 

Clarkson, Rev. Charles B., m.a., Lawshall Rectory, Bury S. Edmund^s. 

Clayden, Miss £. A., 25, Fonneresu Road, Ipswich. 

Coates, Miss, 64, London Road, Lowestoft 

Cobbold, John Dupuia, B a., j.p.. Holy Wells, Ipswich. 

Cobbold, Felix Thomley, m.a., j.p., The Lodge, Felixstowe, Ipswich. 

Colchester, Valentine D., Norton House, Ipswich. 

Connell, Rev. Archibald John Campbell, m.a., 14, Royal Crescent, Whitby. 
*Copinger, Walter Arthur, ll.1)., F.S.A., f.il8.a., Kersal Cell, Manchester. 

Corder, John Shewell, Royston House, Westerfield Road, Ipswich. 

Corry, The Hon. W. L., j.p., Edwsrdstone Hall, Boxford, Suffolk. 

Cotman, Thomas William, 7, Northgate Street, Ipswich. 

Cowell, Rev. Maurice By lea, u.a.. Ash hocking Vicarage, Ipswich. 

Crisp, Frederick Arthur, F.8.A., Inglewood House, Grove Park, Denmark 
Hill, London, S.E. 

Crisp, George Edwin, The Hall, Playford, Ipswich. 
*Crisp, Miss Emma, The Hall, Playford, Ipswich. 
*Cri8p, Miss Rosa, The Hall, Playford, Ipswich. 
^Crossfield, Talbot K., 8, Stone Buildings, Lincoln's Inn, W.C. 

CuUum, Gery Milnei- Gibson, m.a., F.S.A., j.p., Hardwick House, Bury S. 
Edmund's. 

Deeds, Rev. Cecil, m.a., 32, Little London, Chichester. 

Denman-Dean, Rev. Richard, The Rectory, Woodbridge. 

De-Saumarez, The Right Hon. Lord, Shrubland Park, Ipswich. 

Dewing, Col. E. J., Rougham House, Bury S. Edmund's. 

Doughty, Rev. Ernest George, m.a., Martlesham Rectory, Woodbridge. 

Du Faur, Miss, 48, Leinster Gardens, Hyde Park, W. 

Duleep Singh, His Highnebs Prince Frederick, Old Buckenham Hall, 

Attleburgh, Norfolk. 
Durrant, Rev. Christopher Rawes, b.a.| Freston Rectory, Ipswich« 

Earle, Joseph Sim, F.8.A., 11, Pembridge Gardens, London, W. 

Eld, Rev. Francis J., m.a., F.8.A., Polstead Rectory, Colchester. 
*£ly, The Right Rev. Lord Alwyne Compton, D.D., Lord Bishop of, The 

Palace, Ely. 
*Evans, Sir John, K.O.B., d.o.l., ll.d., F.8.A., Nash Mills, Hemel Hempstead. 

Farrer, Rev. Edmund, y.8.A., Hinderclay Rectory, Diss. 



LIST OF MEMBERS, 1903 — 4. V 

Teltoe, lUv. Charles Lett, B.D., The Rectory, Fomham All Saints, Bury St. 

Edmund's. 
Fenton, Charles, Cranford, Vineyard Hill, Wimbledon, S.W. 
Ffoulkes, Thomas B., 8, Burlington Road, Ipswich. 
Fish, Frederick J., Spursholt, Park Road, Ipswich. 
Fison, E. Herbert, Stoke House, Ipswich. 
Ford, Francis, 50, Bromhouse Road, Fulham, S.W. 
Frere, Rev. Constantino, M.A., J. p., Hon. Canon of Norwich, Finningham 

Rectory, Stowtnarket. 
Fryer, Rev. Benjamin S., The Rectory, Rougham. 

Cans, Charles, Aldeburgh, Suffolk. 

*6arUck, H. Stow, if.D., 1352, Garlick Hithe, Eastern Avenue, Cincinnati, 
Ohio, U.S.A. 

Gipps, Cyril Estoourt, 10, York Street, St James's Square, London, S.W. 

Gooch, Sir Thomas, Bart., Henstead Hall, Wrentham. 

Gowers, Sir William Richard, Knt., v.i>., F.R.R., 50, Queen Anne Street, 
Cavendish Square, London, W. 

Green, Herbert John, A.R.I.B.A., 81, Castle Meadow, Norwich. 

Greene, John W., The Panels, Nortbgate Street, Bury St. Edmund's. 

Greene, W. Raymond, h.p., Netberhall, Bury St. Edmund's. 
*6roome, William Wollaston, m.d., 8, Wyburn Villas, Surbiton Hill. 

Gross, Miss Maud, 4, Chequer Square, Bury S. Edmund's. 

Grots, Frank W. W., Doric Place, Woodbridge. 

Grouse, Miss Constance, " Ebor," Dorking, Surrey. 
'^Gurdon, Sir William Brampton, k.c.m.0., h.p., Assington Hall, Sudbury. 

Haggard, H. Rider, Ditchingham House, Bungay. 
Hancox, Edward R. H., The Cottage, Nacton, Ipswich. 
Hanson, William Bonser, 14, Fonnereau Road, Ipswich. 
Harrison, Thomas, 48, High Street, IiMwich. 
Harrison. Walter Evans, The Ancient House, Ipswich. 
Haslewood, Rev. Frederick George, ll.d., d.c.l., Chimlet Vicarage, 

Canterbury. 
Hasted, Rev. Henry, b.a., j.p., Tho Cottage, Nowton, Bury St. Edmund's. 
Hayward, Alfred J., The Old Mill House, Melton, Woodbridge. 
Herbert, Dr. A. C, Southwold. 

Hervey, Rev. Sydenham H. A., B.A., 28, Angel Hill, Bury St Edmund's. 
Hewetson, George, Henley Road, Ipswich. 

Hickling, Rev. Edmund Lovegrove, v. A., The Grove, Frostenden, Wangford. 
Hill, Rev. Copinger, Buxhall Rectory, Stowmarket 
*Hill, Rev. Edwin, M.A., P.O. 8., The Rectory, Cockfield, B.8.O., Suffolk. 
Hodges, The Ven. Archdeacon, The Vicarage, Bury S. Edmund's. 
Hopper, Rev. Edmund Carles, m.a., Starston Rectfiry, Harleston. 
Hovenden, Robert, p.s.a., Heathoote, Park Hill Road, Croydon, Surrey. 
Hnbbard, Miss M. M., 28, Fonnereau Road, Ipswich. 
Hudson, Rev. William, H.A., F.8.A., 15, Hartfield Square, Eastbourne. 



Vi LI8T OF MEMBERS, 1903 — 4. 

Hambley, Rev. Williun C, The Vioftnge, Anhfield 1^Ia«iia» Buit S. 

EdmundV 
Hunt, A., Newton Road, Sudbury. 
Hunt, Robert, 27, London Road, IiMwich. 
Huntingfield, The Right Hon. Lord, Heveningham Hall, Haleawoith. 

*Iveagh, The Right H4»n. Lord, 5, Grotvenor Place, W. 

Jackaman, Henry Maaon, J. p., 20, Burlington Road, Ipewioh. 

Jacob, George, Suffolk Archdeaconry Register, 0, Arcade Street, Ipswich. 

Jennings, George, The Haven, Walberswick, Southwold. 

JervU, White Jervis Herbert, B.A., Felixstowe, Ipswich. 

Joliffe, John H. J., Warrington House, Ipswich. 

Jones, Rev. Ansell. Claydon Rectory, Ipswich. 

Jones, Rev. Charles William, m.a., Pakenham Vicarage, Bury S. Edmund V 

Jordan, William E., m.a., King's College, Cambridge. 

Josselyn, John Henry, J. p., II, Princes Street, Ipswich. 

Kemplay, Miss, 48, Leinster Gardens, Hyde Park, London, W. 
Kersey, Arthur Edward, Great Bealings, Woodbridge. 
Kmg, Herbert Dove, m.d., m.a., 68, Friars* Street, Sudbury. 

La Serre, Cbas. F., Coshocton, Ohio, U.S. A. 
Langdon, William John, Holgate House, Sudbury. 
*Laver, Henry, j.p., f.h.a., f.l.8.. Head Street, Colchester. 
Lawrence, The Yen. Archdeacon, m.a., Hon. Canon of Norwfch, The 

Grove, Great Bealings. 
Lajrard, Miss Nina Frances, Rookwood, Fonnereau Road, Ipswich. 
Lay ton, Rev. William Edward, m.a., p.h.a., Cuddington Vicarage, Surrey. 
Little, Rev. Joseph Russell ma., Stansiield Rectory, Clare, Suffolk. 
Lord, Henry, Kentff>rd Lodge, Newmarket. 
Lowther, Hon. William, m.p., Campsea Ashe, Wickham Market. 

Martyn-Linnington, Rev. Richard W., Bad well Ash Vicarage, Bury S. 
Edmund's. 

Mason, George Calver, Broadwater, Belstead Road, Ipswich. 

Maude, Rev. Arthur, B.A., Burgh Rectory, Woodbridge. 
*Maude, Rev. Samuel, m.a., Hockley Vicarage, Chelmsford, Essex. 

Meinertzhagen, Miss A. L., Great Giemham House, Saxmundham. 

Meller, Major Alfred, j.p.. The Limes, Rushmere. 

Meroer, Rev. Leslie, m.a., Hawstead Rectory, Bury S. Edmund's. 

Methold, Frederick John, F.8.A., j.p., Thome Court, Skimpling, Bury 3. 

Edmund's. 
*Methold, Thomas Tindal, j.p., 7, Ashburn place, Cromwell rd., London, S.W. 

Miller, Fenry, Bosmere House, Norwich Road, Ipswich. 

Miller, H. Cleveland, 8, Graham Road, Ipswich. 

Miller, Thomas, Fairfields, Tnddenham Road, Ipswich. 

Mills, Mias Sarah, 148, Norwich Road, Ipswich. 

Monteith, Henry Campin, Stanley House, 1, Burlington Road, Ipswich. 



LIST OP MEMBERS, 1903 — 4. vii 

^Newton, Alfred, if.A., r.R.8., Professor of Zoology and Comparative 

Anatomy. Magdalene College, Cambridge. 
Nonnandale, Kev. Thomas, B.A., Grammar School, Cavendish. 
Norton, H. Turton, 103, Lancaster Gate, Hyde Park, W. 

Olorenshaw, lie v. Joseph Russell, B.A., Rattlesden, Bury St. Edmund's. 
*08bome, Charles J., Hotel Bristol, Forty-second St., New York City, U.S.A. 

Packard, Edward, j.p.. Grove House, Bramford, Ipswich. 
*Parkington, Thomas, junior, M.I.B. (London), Leicester House, Ipswich. 

Partridge, Charles, junior, m.a., f.r.o.s., p.h.a., Assistant District Commis- 
sioner in H.B.M. Obubura Hill, Cross River, South Nigeria, West 
Africa. 

Feck, Mrs., 7, Porchester Place, London, W. 

Perdval, Major-General, j.p., Newe House. Pakenham, Bury St. Edmund's. 

Perry, Rev. Clement Raymond, n.D., Mickfield Rectory, Stowmarket. 

Pettiward, Robert John, M.A., J.P., Finborough Hall, Stowmarket 

Pilkxngton, Rev. Jarae« Holme, m.a.. Rectory, Framlingham. 

Flumpton, W. P., Bury St. Edmund's. 

•Powell, Edgar, 19, Connaught Street, Hyde Park, W. 

Preston, Richard, Tonbridge, Kent. 

Preston. Dep. Inflpector-Genl, Theodore J., 16, St John's Park, Bbick- 
heath, S.E. 

Pretjrman, Miss Ella, Haughley Park, Stowmarket 

Pretyman, Ernest George, m.p., j.p., Orwell Park, Ipswich. 

Qttilter, Sir William Cuthbett, Bart., m.p., j.p., Bawdsey Manor, Woodbridge. 

•Rath-Merrill, Mrs. M. £., 80, North Winner Avenue, Columbus, Ohio, IT.S.A. 
Raven, Mrs. Anne H. H., Syleham Hall, Harleston, Norfolk. 
Raven, Rev. John James, ».D., F.8.A., Hon. Canon of Norwich, 

Fressingfield Vicarage, Harleston. 
RawBon, Mrs. K. M., Grove House, Maidstone Road, Rochester. 
Redstone, Vincent Burrough, Mill Hill, Woodbridge. 
Ridgeway, Charles Arthur, b.a., b.sc., 208, East Town Street, Columbus, 

Ohio, U.S.A. 
Ridley, Edwin Perkins, Burwood, Westerfield Road, Ipswich. 
RivettCamac, Col. J. H., A.D.C., o.i.k., f.8.a.. Schloss Wildeck, Aaigan^ 

Switzerland. 
Rouse, John Wm., Wilford Lodge, St John's, Ipswich. 

Sankey, Rev. Edward A., The Rectory, Great Whelnetham, Bury S. 
Edmund's. 

Scott, Rev. Thomas, m.a., Hon. Canon of S. Alban's, Lavenham 
Rectory, Sudbury. 

Saager, Joseph William, Globe House, Dalton Road, Ipswich. 

Sikes, Miss L. Mand, Pentlow Hall, Cavendish, Suffolk. 

•Simpeon, Thomas H., Gambref House, Coggeshall. 

Smith, Charles, Waveney Cottage, Great Bealinga, Woodbridge. 

Spanton, William Silas, Greencrof t, Hadley Wood, Bamet, Herts. 

Spracer, Rev. Arthur John, m.a., The Vicarage, Eye. 



viii LIST OF MKMBKR8, 1903 — 4. 

'"Steveiiion, FraaoU Seymour, X.P., Playford Mount, PUyford, Woodbridgs. 
Stradbroke, The Right Hon. th« E*rl of, Henham Hall, Waogford. 
Stuart^ Major J., the Hill Houee, Erwarton, Ipswich. 

Taoon, Sir Thomai Henry, J. p.. Red House, Eye. 

Talbot, John, Plantation House, Ipswich. 

rrapp, William M., ll.d., 27, South Moulton Street, Oxford Street, W. 
rratlock, Miss H. H., Brarofield House, Halesworth. 

Taylor, Hev. Henry, The Hall, Lavenham. 

Thoroton, Rev. Levett E. W., Bey ton Rectory, Bury & Edmund's. 

Tidswell, Richard H., J.F., 49, Wilton Cresoent, London, S.W. 

Todd, Rev. Horatio Lovel, Oocold Rectory, Eye. 
'"Turner, Rev. George Francl^ m.a., j.p., Hon. Canon of Ely, Rivers Honse, 
Russell Street, Bath. 

Turner, Philip J., The Acacias, Stowmarket 

Tyndal, George Herbert, Minster Place, Ely. 

XJpcher, Rev. Abbot Rowland, m.a.. The Rectory, Halesworth. 

Walker, Rev. Henry Aston, ii.a., Chattisham Vicarage, Ipswich. 

*Ward, Major Harry Parker. H.A., Ohio National Guard (retired). Worthing- 
ton, Fraakhn Co., Ohio, U.S.A. 

^Warren, Rev. Frederick E.. B.D., p. 8. a., Hon. Canon of Ely, Bardwell 
Rectory, Bury S. Edmund's. 

Whaites, R. T., Burlington Road, Ipswich. 

*Whayman, Horace W., P.B.B.A. (Ireland), Drayton, Ohio, U.S.A. 

White, John, 18, Brook Street, Ipswich. 

Williams, Rev. Herbert, m.a., UfFord Rectory, Woodbridge. 

Wild, Rev. Ernest John, m.a., Rattlesden Rectory, Bury S. Edmund's. 

Wood, Arthur H. E., Sudbourne Hall, Orford. 

Wood, John, Hengrave Hall, Bury S. Edmund's. 

Woobey, Rev. Jeremiah J., m.a.. Bright well Rectory, Ipswich. 

Woolnough, Frank, The Museum, Ipswich. 

Wright, Rev. Clement H. L., Play ford Rectory, Ipswich. 

Wright, Henry John, 4, Museum Street, Ipswich. 

Wyles, Rev. Walter, m.a., Coddenham Rectory, Ipswich. 



Annual Subscriptions, lOs., DUE JANUARY Ibt. 
LiPB Composition, £5. 

Persons desirous of becoming Members are requested to send in their 
names and addresses to the Honorary Secretary. 

Should any errors, omissions of honorary distinctions, etc, be found in 
the List of Members, it is requested that notice thereof may be given to 

VINCENT BURROUGH REDSTONE, Honorary Secretary, 

Mill Hill, Woodbridge. 



(ix) 



1)onorari? Aembcrs. 

Green well. Rev. WiUIam, ii.A., d.cl., F.R.S., y.s.A., Minor Canon of Durham. 
Durham. 

MuBkett, J. J., 11, Talbot Road, South Tottenham. 

White, Rev. Charleii Harold Evelyn, F.8.A., Rampton Rectory, Cambridge. 



pubUcatfons. 

Copies are sent to :— 

1. Members. 

2. Honorary Members. 

8. The Secretaries of Societies in Union, including those in America. 
4. Librarians of :— 

Ipswich Museum. 

British Museum. 

Bodleian, Oxford. 

University, Cambridge. 



The Council are not answerable for any opinions put forth in their 
publications. Each Contributor is alone responsible for his own remarks. 

Authors would greatly further the interests of the Institute and save 
much unnecessary expense in the correction of proofs, if they would be good 
enough to write clearly, and on only one side of the paper. 



Sodetiee in 'Union, 

FOR INTBRCHANGB OF PUBLICATIONS, ftc 

Antiquaries, Soctetj of, Burlington House, Piccadilly, London, W. 

Aasiatant See., W. H. St. John H«>pe, Esq., m.a. 
Bedfordshire, Architectural and Archeoological Society of. 

Hon. Sac., Rev. Jeremiah W. Haddock, m.a., 7, Windsor Tenaoe, Bedford. 
Bradford Historical and Archax>logicHl Society. 

Hon. Sec., John Clapham, Etq., 6, Sonny Bank, Shipley. 
Bristol and Gloucestershire ArchsBological Society 

Hon. Sec., Rev. W. Baseley, X.A., The Society** Library, Eaatgale, Glonoeeter. 
Cambridge Antiquarian Society. 

Hon. S^c, Thomas Dinham Atkinson, Esq., S. Mary's Passsge, Cambridge. 
Cambridgeshire and Huntingdonshire Archaeological Society. 

Hon. Sec., Rev. C. H. Evelyn White, F.S.A., Rampton Rectory, Cambridge. 
East Herts. Archeeological Society. 

Hon. Sec., W. B. Gerish, Esq., Ivy Lodge, Bishop*s Stortford. 
Essex Archteulogical Society. 

Hon. Sec., George Frederick Beaumont, F.S.A., The Lawn, CoggeshalL Essex. 
Kent Archeeolojrical Society. 

Hon. Sea, George Payne, Jan., Esq., P.S.A., F.L a., The Precinct, Rodieater. 
Lancashire and Cheshire, Historic Society of. 

Hon. Sec., R. D. Ratoliffe, Esq., M.A., P.S.A., Royal Institution, Colquitt 
Street, Liverpool. 
Leicester Arohitectural and Archeeological Society. 

Hon. Sec., Major Freer, 10, New Street, Lnioester. 
London and Middlesex Archieological Society. 

Hon. Sec., Charles Welch, Eiiq., F.S.A., Guildhall Library, London, E.C. 
Lincoln and Nottingham, Architectural and Archieological Society of, 
Counties of. 

Hon. Sec, Rev. Arthur MaddtHon, m.a., F.8.A., Librarian, Vicar's Court, Lincoln 
Lincoln's Inn, The Hon. Society of. The Librarian. 
Montgomeryshire, The Powys Land Club. 

Hon. Sec, Thomas Simpson Jones, m.a., Gungmg Hall, Welshpool. 
Natural History Museuu), Cromwell Road, S.W. 

Librarian, B. B. Woodward, Esq. 
Newcastle Society of Antiquaries. Hon. Sec, The Castle, Newcastle. 
Norfolk and Norwich ArchfBological Society, Norwich. 

II<in. Sec, Leonard G. B«>lingbroke, Esq., The Close, Norwich. 
Northampton, Architectural Society of the Archdeaconry of. 

Hon. Sec, Christopher Alexander Markham, Esq., F.S.A., 4, S. George's Place, 
Northampton. 
Royal Archsoological Institute of Great Britain, 20, Hanover Sqaare, 
London, W. 

Hon. Sec, Arthur Henry Lyell, Esq., F.8.A. 
Somersetshire Archaoological and Natural History Society. 

Hon. Sec, C. J. Turner, Esq., The Castle, Taunton. 
Surrey Archieologicul Society. 

Hon. Sees., M. S. Guiseppi, Esq., F.8.A., and Rev. T. S. Cooper, M.A., F.8.A., 
Castle Arch, Guildford. 
Yorkshire Agricultural Society. 

Hon. Sec, Rev. William Haworth, 10, Booiham Terrace, York. 
Ireland. Royal Historical and Archseological Association of Ireland. 

Hon. Sec, Robert Cochrane, Esq., M.R.I.A., Rathgar, Dublin. 
Massachusetts Historical Society, Boston, United States of America 
Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C. 



(xi) 
RULES OF THE 



1. The Society shall be called the "Suffolk Institute of 
ArcbsBologj and Natural History." 

2. The object of the Institute shall be — 

1. To collect and frablish information on the Archeology and Natural 

History of the District. 

2. To oppose and prevent, as far as may be practicable, any injuries with 

which ancient monuments of every description, within the District 
may be from time to time threatened, and to collect accurate 
drawings, plans, and descriptions thereof. 

3. The Institute shall consist of Ordiuary and Honorary Members. 

4* Each Ordinary Member shall pay an annual Subscription of 
lOs., to be due in advance on the 1st of January, and shall be considered 
to belong to the Institute until he withdraws from it by a notice in 
writing to the Secretary, or until his name is removed by order of the 
Council. A donor of £5 shall be a Life Member. 

5. The Officers of the Institute shall be a Patron, President, Vice- 
Presidents, a Treasurer, and Honorary Secretary, all of whom shall 
be elected for the year at the Annual Meeting. Honorary Members 
shall pay no subscription and shall not 1x3 entitled to vote, but they 
shall have a copy of all publications of the Institute, and shall be 
entitled to all other privileges of meniV)ership. 

6. The general management of the affairs and property of the 
Institute shall be vested in the Council, consisting of the Officers, and 
of twelve Members elected from the General body of the Subscribers, to 
retire annually, but eligible for re-election. 

7. The Council shall meet to transact the ordinary business of the 
Institute not less than three times a year. They shall have power to 
make Bye-laws, appoint Committees and Local Secretaries, recommend 
Honorary Members for election by the Annual Meeting, supply vacancies 
that may occur during the year in their own body or among the officers, 
and to make arrangements for Excursions and other Meetings. They 
shall also annually frame a Report and prepare the Accounts for 
submission to the Annual Meeting. At the Meetings of the Council, 
three members shall be a quorum. 

8. The ordinary place of meeting shall be Bury St. Edmund's, 
but it shall be in the discretion of the Council to hold meetings at other 
places, if, and when they shall think it advisable. 

9. Each Member shall be entitled to free admission to the General 
Meetings of the Institute ; and he shall also be entitled to the use of 
the Library, at Moyses Hall, Bury St. Edmund's, and to a copy of each 



XU RULES OF THE INSTITUTE. 

publication of the Institute ; but no copy of any such publication shall 
be delivered to any Member whose subscription is more than twelve 
months in arrear. 

10. The Annual Meeting shall be held in the month of April or 
May in each year, or at such other time as shall be fixed upon bj the 
Council. 

11. All papers presented to the Institute shall thereby be con- 
sidered its property, and the Council may publish the same in any way, 
and at any time they may think ptx)per. 

12. There shall be a Librarian, who shall not be, as sucb, ex- 
officio a member of the Council. He shall be elected for the year at 
the Annual General Meeting. 

13. There shall be a Literary Committee consisting of not more 
than five members, who shall not be, as such, ex-officio members of the 
Council. They shall be elected fur the year at the Annual General 
Meeting. 

14. No alteration shall be made in these rules, by way of addition, 
omission, or otherwise, except at a General Meeting ; and aifter at least 
oue week's previous notice of such proposed alteration has been sent to 
every Member of the Institute. 

15. A Special General Meeting, apart from, and in addition to the 
Annual Gener^Al Meeting, may be called at any time on the demand of 
the Patron, or of the President, or of the Council, or of not less than 
five Ordinary Members of the Institute who shall signify their demand 
to the Secretary in writing. At least one week's notice of such Meeting 
shall be given to all Members of the Institute together with a statement 
of the proposed agenda. 

16. At all Meetings, both of the Institute, and of the Council, and 
of any Committee thereof, the Chairman shall have a casting vote, in 
addition to his own vote. 

17. The Chair at all Meetinga shall be taken by the Patron, or 
the President, or in their absence by the senior of the Vice-Presidents, 
or in their absence by some Memb^ of the Institute elected Chairman 
for the occasion. 

18. Should any dispute or difference arise concerning the in- 
terpretation of the foregoing rules the decision of the Chairman for the 
time being shall be final. 



( xiii ) 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1902-3. 

The Council report, with regret, the death of the h\te President, 
Lord Heuniker, on June 27th, 1902, and express the sense of their loss 
thereby to the Institute. Sir Wm. hrampton Gurdon, e.g.m.o., m.p., 
upon the unanimous election of the Council succeeded to the office of 
President, 8th August, 1902. 

The number of the members of the Institute is two hundred and 
twenty-one, of which number three are honorary members, and twenty- 
eight are life members. This is an increase of ten upon the previous 
year, which proves that the work of the Institute is appreciated. 

The Annual Excursion to Hadleigh, Kersey, Polstead, and Wenham, 
was well attended, and the thanks of the Institute are due to the Rev. 
Francis J. Eld, F.8.A., and to Mr. W. Fickling, for the carefully prepared 
papers which were read upon the 03casion. These papers have been 
published in Vol. xi. part 2, of our Proceedings. 

Thanks are also due to Mr. F. Miller, for permission to visit his old 
manor house, Otley Hall ; to the Rev. M. B. Cowell for the hearty 
welcome he extended to members of the Institute when they visited 
Ash Bocking, and for the views with which he has illustrated his paper 
on that parish ; and to Mr. H. F. Harwood for the welcome with which 
he received his visitora at Tuddenham Hall, 6th August, 1^02. 

A sum of £20 has been given by the Institute to the fund for the 
carrying on of excavations upon the site of Bury Abbey. The excellent 
results which have already followed this work are mainly due to the 
energy and constant attendance of the Rev. Sydenham H. A. Hervey, 
Hon. Sec. for the Excavation Committee. Further finds of a still 
more interesting character are anticipated. 

It has l)Gen considered advisable to terminate the agreement with 
the Committee of the Athenaeum for the retention of the library within 
that building, and arrangements have been made to remove the books 
to Moyses Hall before Michaelmas, 1903, on the condition, which has 
been granted, that free access to them may be obtained at all times 
when the Museum is opened to the public. It is deemed that by so 
doing the volumes will be better arranged and preserved, in rooms 
which will be exclusively in the occupation of Institute. 

The reeommendation of the Editing and Literary Committee, that 
the offer of the Hon. Sec. to transcribe the Ship Money Returns for 
Suffolk (1639-40), be accepted, has been adopted by the Council. These 
returns will throw much light on our County History prior to the 
outbreak of the Civil War. 



XIV 



BALAXCB SHKKT. 



SUFFOLK INSTITUTE OF ARCH>EOLOG| 



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XV 



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Publications Received, I903. 



Bradford Historical and Antiquarian Society — The Bradford Antiqaarj. 

Part VIII., July, 1903. 
Bristol and Gloucester ArchsDological Society's Transactions. Yol xxt. 

ParU 1 and 2. 1902. 
British Museum, Natural History. Set of directions for collecting aad 

preserving specimens of Natural History. Nine Pamphlets. 
Cambridge Antiquarian Society — Cambridge Gilds — Proceedings. 

No. XLiiL, Vol. X., part 3. 4th Vol., New Series. 
East Herts. ArchaDological Society's Transactions. Vol. ii., part 1. 1902 
Essex Archaeologicnl Society, Proceedings. Vol. ix., part 1. New 

Series. 1903. 
Ireland. Royal Society of Antiquaries. Transactions. Vol. xxxn., 

part 4. 
Lancashire and Cheshire Historical Society. Transactions. Vol. uiLt 

New Series, Vol. xvii. 
Life in it Suffolk Village. Presented by the author. Rev. C. R. 

Durrant, ax. 
Lincoln's Inn Records. Black Books. Vol. iv., 1776—1845; pub. 1902. 
London and Middlesex Archaeological Society's Transactions. VoL L,pt4. 
London Society of Antiquaries. Archseologitu Vol. Lviii. 

Proceedings, Second Series, Vol. xix., No. 1, Nov. 1901 — June, 1902 
Montgomeryshire Collections, Historical and Archaeological. VoL xxxl 

part 3. 
Newcastle-on Tyne, Proceedings of Society of Antiquaries. Vol. i., 

parte 28—30 (Index) ; Vol. i. (3rd series), parts 1—6. 

Archasologia Aelinna xxiv., part 2 ; xxv., part 1. 
Norfolk and Norwich Archceological Society. Original Papers, Vol. xv. 

part 1. Marriage Register of Norwich Cathedral, 1697 — 1764. 
Notes on Land and Freshwater Molluscs, presented by the author, A. 

May field, Mendlesham. 
Somersetshire Archaeological and Natural History Society. Proceedings. 

Vol. XLviii. 1902. 
Surrey Archroological Society Proceedings. Vol. xviii. 
Woolwich, Records of the District of. Presented by the author, W. T. 

Vincent. 

ForeiEn Publications. 

National Museum of Stockholm, Sweden, Antiquarisk Tidskrifb. 
Risings in the English Monasteries. Presented by the author, N. M. 

Trenholme, U.S.A. 1902. 
^ithsonian Institution — Annual Report, No. 27; Bulletins, No. 50, 
-^1 ; Proceedings of U.S. National Museum, Vol. xxiii.^ xxiv., pub. 
190l ^^^^' Directions for Collecting Specimens, 
j^'^iginal uses of plauto— Dragou Flies — Small Mammals — 
Fossi^ — Minerals — Rocks — Scale Insecte. 



( xvii ) 
PUBLICATIONS of the 

Suffolk instuute of Jlrcbaeologp ft natural Ristorp. 



Members desirous of completing their Sets of the Society's 
PablicatioDs can purchase them at the following prices : — 



Vol. I. 

Vol. 11. 

VoL III. 
Vol. IV. 

Vol, V. 

Veil. VI. 
VoL VII. 
Vol. VIII. 
Vol. IX. 
Vol. X. 
Vol. XI. 



Part 1 
,. 2 
,. 8 
.. 4 
.. 5 
„ 6 

Pait 1 

::i 

.. 4 
., 5 
.. « 
,. 7 
Part 1 

Part 1 

::i 
:t 

M 6 

.. 7 
Part 1 

'• 8 
» 4 

Part 1 
» 2 

Part 1 
Part I 

"I 

Part 1 



I Reprinted J 
r 1896 ^ 



out of print 
out of print 



out of print 
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::i 



with Title Page and Index 
with Title Page and Index 



Date. 


Pages. 


Price. «.(/. 


1849 


1 ti) 28 


\ ... 


1849 


29 to 60 


I ... 5 


1849 


61 to 88 


(•• 


1850 


8!) to 156 


)... 


1851 


157 to 286 


... 5 


1852 


237 to 814 


... 6 


1858 


815 to 852 


... 8 6 


18.54 


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.. 8 C 


1855 


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... 3 6 


1855 


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... 3 6 


I 1855 


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... 8 6 


I85fi 


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1 1857 


227 U* 278 


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1858 


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... 7 6 


18H0 


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18fi2 


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... 3 6 


, 1863 


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... 4 


1864 


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... 3 6 


18r>5 


65 U> 98 


... 8 6 


1868 


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1870 


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... 3 6 


1872 


225 to.HOO 




1873 


801 to 404 




1874 


405 to 466 


.'.'; 2 6 


1 1876 


1 to 124 


... 5 


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... 3 6 


' 1880 


la'i to 275 




i 1888 


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[76 


1H84 


887 to 557 


1885 


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.. 3 6 


188tf 


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1891 


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145 t«i 278 


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... 7 6 


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... 4 


1901 


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1902 


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( xviii ) 

Pigot'8 liatlUigh (Piirt 1 of Vol. II L), ia cloth, complete ... Ts. 6d. 

Copieu of the " Church Plate of Suffolk," the Set iu 27 Deaneries, 
complete, bound in mnroon cloth, lettered at back, and Rtamped with 
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OP TUB 

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the type and pagination agreeing in all i^espects, whilst the woodcuts 
and lithograpiis have been most carefully reproduced. 



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Other Volumes bound on the same terms. 




a. 

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267 



RECORDS OP THE SUDBURY ARCHDEACONRY. 
By Vincent B. Redstone. 



II. Terriers and Surveys. 



The Constitutions and Canon Ecclesiastical, issued in 
1604, contain an injunction (No. 87), " that a 
true note and terrier of all the glebe lands, &c., . . 
and portions of tithes lying out of their parishes — which 
belong to any Parsonage, Vicarage, or rural Prebend — 
be taken by the view of honest men in every parish, by 
the appointment of the Bishop — whereof the minister be 
one — and be laid up in the Bishop's Registry, there to 
be for a perpetual memory thereof." This injunction does 
not lix the frequency with which the terriers were to be 
procured by the Bishop, and, consequently, existing docu- 
ments of that character are not to be found for any 
definite years or periods. It is evident by the existence 
of early terriers in the keeping of the Registrar for the 
Archdeacon of Sudbury, that such returns were made by 
churchwardens along with their presentments before the 
year 1604. The terriers at Bury St. Edmund's commence 
as early as 1576, whilst those in the Bishop's Registry at 
Norwich, date from 1627. It is unknown from what 
circumstances the Archdeacons' Registrars became possessed 
of documents which the above mentioned canon dis- 
tinctly enjoins should be laid up in the Bishop's Registry. 
In the Exchequer there is a terrier of all the glebe 
lands in England, made about the eleventh year of the 
reign of Edward iii. The taxes levied upon the temporal 

V 
Vol. XI. Part 8. 



268 RBOORDS OF THB 

possessions of the Charch in every parish throughout the 
Diocese (see HarL MS. 1005, fo. 29, et seq.) during the 
episcopacy of Walter, Bishop of Norwich, 1245 — 1257, 
could have been adjusted only upon the existence of a 
roll or survey of the lands belonging to all ecclesiastical 
bodies and foundations. All the religious houses possessed 
surveys and rentals of their estates. The completeness 
with which these surveys were made and carried out, may 
be seen by the minute details entered in those which now 
fortunately remain. The registers once belonging to Bury 
Abbey are well known. Among the other pre-Reformatioa 
" extents " and surveys which refer to lands in Suffolk, 
the most interesting are those referring to Hadleigh and 
Monks' Eleigh, manors of Christ Church, Canterbury 
(HarL 1006), to Hinderclay and Rickinghall (Add. 
MS. 31,970), to Bawdsey — a manor of Butley Priory — 
this survey was made by Walter Fulbourne, c. 1470, and 
to the manors of Ely in 1277 (Claudius cxi.). As the 
latter extent throws great light upon the subdivision of 
lands and the nomenclature of fields, I purpose to give 
various extracts which will give assistance in the explana- 
tion of terms used in the accompanying Calendar of the 
terriers which may be consulted upon reference to the 
Records of the Sudbury Archdeaconry. 

Ely Lands, 1277 (Ms. Brit. Mub., Claudius cxi., fol. 276b, et seq.) 

Battlesden. Au inquisition made by Adam the Chaplin, Robert 
son of Philip, Richard son of Hubert, William Cobbe,* William the 
Forester, Nicholas the Steward, Adam son of Henry, Anselm son of 
Nicholas, Richard the Rowe (? Reve), Adam Aluerich, Ralph Cobb, and 
Hervey the Steward. 

This manor is in the county of Suffolk, in the Hundred of Thed- 
wastre, which is of the liberty of St. Edmund, in which Hundred, 
Robert son of Roger and his heirs owe suit of court of the Hundred, 
in the Hundred for the manor. This manor has liberty in itself by 
the King's writ. The advowson and the gift of the Church belongs to 
the Bishop of Ely, and is in the Diocese of Norwich, and in the Arch- 
deaconry of Sudbury, and in the Deanery of Thedwastre, except two 
parts of all the tithes of the lord's land which the pittaucer of St. 
Edmund holds of the Lord Bishop in alms. 

* Murdered by his wife and her (mramour. 



SUDBURY ARCHDEACONRY. 269 



Demesne lands. 










A. R. p. 




A. 


B. P. 


Bramleje Field 


... 14 2 20 


Shukkethornealede ... 


41 


20 


Milnecroft 


... 11 2 


Field near the HaU... 


7 


2 


Aldeber ... 


... 16 


Banton Field 


5 





Baronesfield 


... 27 1 


Alongside Le Leh ... 


5 


1 20 


Patesik ... 


... 9 


Field towards Clopton 


23 





Stoniland ... 


... 3 3 


Edeldedune 


23 





Ancelotes field 


... 42 3 


Fields about Kenes- 








1 stoneshej 
Sum total of land for tillage 


52 







251 


3 20 



. 




A. R. P. 

12 


A. 

17 


R. 

2 


P. 



14 








2 
1 


2 
2 







Measured by the lesser numbering, and by the jyerch of eighteen 
feet and a half it can be tilled by two ploughs to each of which are 
fowr oxen and four stoites* according to the custom of the town. 
Further, one horse for carting and harrowing. It is valued for whatso- 
ever acre there is in extent, eight pence. Total value nine pounds 
seven shillings and seven pence (? eleven pence). 

Meadow Landy by the aforesaid perch. 

In Arewellemede (value of each acre, 2s. 6d.) 

Pasture Landy value of each acre. Is. 4d. 

In Langebeock ... 
Towards Tunggnichwalle and ) 
Towards Areswalle ) 

In Holedich, value at 12d. 
In Kenestonesweye 

Sum Total 

Woody at 3d. an acre. 

A great wood called Mikelwode 
A wood called Le Ho 
A "Grave " called Kenestoneheg ... 
Another ** Grave " called Leh 

Sum total of woods and " Graves " 

A windmill, value twenty-six shillings. 

John the Chaplain, Ralph Wlnoth, and Nicholas Holiday, hold a 
virgate of land which contains twenty acres. 

* ^®^ '^ gelded bull (Levin's Man. Vocab.— Slot, a bullock ; 
Way's Prompt. Parv.— Stot. Horg.. Caballut), 



25 


2 





A. 


R. 


p. 


78 








14 








4 


2 





3 


2 





00 









270 



RECORDS OF THE 



mtduun, in Conford Hundred (fo. 283b). 



A. 


R. p. 




A. 


B. 


p. 


In Gospadel ... 70 





In Caldhall Field 


170 








In Hacatonesdone Field 42 


I 


In BelhuB Field 


57 








In Purtepool ... 63 





In Homecroft 


66 








III Purtepool (Ralph 




In Edtfield 


50 








Chuney) ... 22 













In Purtepool by the mill 20 





















Sum total of land for tillage 


560 





1 



Measured by the lesser numbering, and bj the perch of sixteen 
and a half feet, which may be tilled by three piatighs, to each of which 
are four oxen and four stottes, according to the custom of the town. 
Besides there are two horses for carting and harrowing. 

Meadows. Purtepool, Chapelmedwe, Brademedwe, Wechesham- 
medewe Mor, containing in all fourteen acres. 

Pastures, In the aforesaid meadows, together with Hinchenes- 
medewe and Morweye, which begin at Chaldhalewey and extends 
towards Qualmstowe, twenty-eight acres, valued at one shilling an acre. 



Wood, Westhey, valued at 2^d. per acre 
Esthey „ „ 3d. „ 

Oxenhey „ „ 3d. „ 
Grave called Caldhalle, 2^d. per acre 



A. R. p. 

160 

80 

40 

6 

286 



Barking in Hundred of Bosmere (fo. 292). 

Advowson and gift of church, together with the chapel of Ver- 
mundesdon and the chapel of Needham, belong to the Bishop of Ely. 





A. 


R. 


p. 




A. 


R. 


p. 


In Rokeshey 


22 








In Two okes 


... 11 








-- Andelbertescroft 


8 








— Wytheland 


... 12 








— Sydbrok 


23 








— Kadokosfed 


... 15 








— Tunmanesland ... 


10 








— Wynton 


... 5 


2 





— Barkesfield and 








— Therspit 


... 120 








Breche 


54 








Near Tykele 


... 30 








Walpornft 


54 
















— Oxelond 


45 





V 






409 


2 






Measured by the lesser numbering and by the perch of sixteen 
and a half feet. Valued at seven pence per acre. It can be tilled by 
three ploughs, to each of which are four oxen and four stottes. 
Further there are two horses for carting and for harrowing. 



SUDBURY ARCHDEACONRY. 271 



A. R. P. 
Meadows. Bradmed ... 9 Kenelbodesraed 
Boseburg ... 6 

Value per acre, two shillings and sixpence. 

A. R. p. 

Pasture, In Bromhil and mersh ... 10 

— Sjbrooke ... ... 6 



A. 

3 


R. 




p. 



18 









16 
Value per acre, one shilling. 

There is a certain way called Hallestrete, which is the lord's 
pasture, it begins at the " ahel juxta Bstkaeh " and extends as far as 
the pasture of Geoffrey Hucus for two quarentenes and is valued per 
annum^ twelve pence. 

There is a common pasture known as Berhingtye^ ninety acres, on 
which the whole town in common with the Lord Bishop may feed 
their cattle. There is also a small **park" with a lawn nine acres, 
▼alued four shillings, in which cattle may not feed. 

A. R. p. 
Woods. Grave called Tykele ... 5 

Prestele 30 OV Value at 168. 



A Great Wethershey 7 2 

Wood called Wynaey 180 Valued at £4 10 



'i' 



222 2 



There belongs to the manor a certain market called Needham, 
which is let to farm for five marks less one-tenth. 

There is a water mill let to farm with the fishery of the same 
pool for six marks less one-tenth. The fishery of the said pool belongs 
to the lord and begins above the head of KeneboldeBmedwe and extends 
as far as the wheel of the mill. 

There is also a certain mara which is called Bosmere, and the 
whole fishery belongs to the Lord Bishop of Ely. The stock consists 
of eight cows and a free bull, thirty pigs and one boar, one hundred 
and sixty sheep. To Henry of Sandwich belong two carucates of land 
in Taston, which Petronilla de Glanville holds of him for half a knight's 
fee. They ought to hold a free bull and a free boar. All his tenants 
owe suit to the court of the manor, as do also the tenants of Geoffrey 
de Bumavill in Veremundesdon. 

A. R. p. 
Hubert de Barking holds ... 110 

John de Gardine >» ... ... 4 

Geoffrey de Derhey „ ... ... 8 

Heirs of Hugh Raven hold ... 8 



272 



RBC0RD8 OF THB 







A. B. p. 






Richard Raven holds 


9 






Colin de Fen and his), u 
wife Alice ^^^^ 


30 






Richard son of John de Fen holds 


4 






John son of John the Chaplain holds 


Bromhill 






Walter son of Simon holds 


2 






Geoffrey of Batisford „ 


34 






Avice de Boses 


3 






Walter son of Richard Faber holds 


2 






Geoffrey Goodrich 


Pasture 






John Towld a piece 10 perches 


by 10 perches 






Peter Carpenter 


a messuage 






Ralph Sacristan 


a messuage 






Hubert del HanverV u 
John Edus r^^ 


4 






John Edus holds 


4 






Robert the Forester holds 


41 






Robert the Forester „ 


4 






Robert brother of the parson holds 


pasture 






Richard Legat holds 


pasture 






Sum total 


267 






WetheringBet. 






Demesne lands. 




Demesne lands. 






A. R. p. 


Netherdodington a. 


R. 


p. 


InWestwode ... 80 




(another) 16 








— Scabbehowe Field 60 


Chapmanessete ... 17 








— Asewonge Field ... 9 


Hoverboyewallecrofte 1 7 








— Netherbloctre ... 24 


Millene Field ... 5 








— Hoverbloctre ... 18 


Stubbinge 


... 18 








— Hoverdodington ... 16 


Netherboyewallecrofte 16 








— Netherdodington 17 








— 




Sum total of tillage 312 









Measured by the lesser number and by the perch of fifteen and a 
half feet. It can be tilled by two ploughs for which the cattle of each 
are six oxen and two stottes. Value per acre eight pence. 



Meadow. 



In Holm meadow 

— Small meadow 

— Dodington 



A. 


B. 


p. 


2 


2 





6 








3 








10 









A. 


R. 


p. 




6 










8 










2 










6 










21 












A. 


B. 


P. 




20 










10 










[t is 


iai 


bho 


^e J 


Hundred of 



SUDBURY ARCHDEACONRY. 273 



Pasture enclosed. 
In Le Broc, from the Hall to the meadow Breche 
From the meadow Breche to Galmenes bill 
Hall Lane 
Babbewalleweye ... 



A certain way called Hejwardesweje. 

A Brussectus called Kulesweje, in which the cows of 

the lord feed during summer months 
A park with lawns 
A windmill valued at forty shillings. 

Bramford. Manor belongs to Hugh, Bishop of Ely. 
Hundred of Bosmere, but certain soohemen dwell in the 
Claydon. 

The advowson and gift of the church belong to Butley Abbey. 
The advowson of Westerfield and Whitton belong to the Bishop of Ely. 
They are in the Hundred of Claydon, but belong to the manor of 
Bramford. The Prior of Waleton receives yearly in the parish church 
of Westerfield twu parts of the tithes of com of the demesne of 
Thomas, son of Alcher. 

Demesne lands. 
In Brokhole Field 

— Goldpittes Field 

— Scotsdune at Flosford ... 

— Bulehyme 

— Faukendon Field 

— Benhey 

— Benhey by parcels 
Between lands of Thos. Rodland 
In messuages of Wm. Chaplain and 

land of Juliana of the Tye 
Near wood called Newhey 
In Kateland Field 

Near Messuage of Robert, son of William 
In Blodhill Field 

— Odulfuesmere Field 

— messuage of Thos. Lolt and Alice Snayl 
Near the Hall ... 
In Holm Field (in parcels) 
Near messuage of Sampson 
In Hoberge Field, which Peter 

Bramford holds during life of }- 20 
Walkelin de Oalsia 



"i 



A. 


R. 


p. 


62 








30 








4 








4 








7 








4 








8 








6 


2 





2 








6 


1 





13 








1 








2 


2 







3 





3 








3 








30 








9 









Sum total of tillage ... ... 231 1 



274 RECORDS OF THE 

This land can be tilled bj two ploughs, to each of which are foar 
oxen and four stottes. It is measured by the perch of sixteen feet and 
a half. The value of an acre is sixpence. 

Meadows, Beyond the water ... 

Between the two streams 
In an island called Hoper 



A marsh called Aires 

Siglemere Marsh 
Pasture from Cunegara to Salcetam .. 

on the verge of the wood Newhey, i.e. half of * The Tye ' 

way from house of John de Newhey towaixls Burgord. 

another way on the bank of Burgord. 



A. R. P. 

7 3 

11 

20 




18 3 20 

22 
20 
15 
of 'The Tye' 


B. p. 
2 



A way at Faukendon. 

Colpettel. 

Boleheme. 

Brokholes. 

Half the way at Sevenacres. 



A way to house of Sampson. 

Robert Mete. 

Juliana de la Tye. 



at Benhey. 



Two headlands. 



All other ways as well as the hog-run are common. 

A. B. p. 

Pasture at Clene water ... ... ... 020 

Cwenebrigg ... ... ... 2 

Catteland 2 perches in length and 6 ft in width. 

And a certain other common pasture which is called ' The Tye,* 

A. R. p. 
' Graves ' with lawn and enclosing ditches ... 400 

There are two watermills. The fishery, which begins at Normersh, 
and extends to Londune for a good league (per unam bonam leucam) 
belongs to the lord. The sum of works for the year by the lesser 
numbering is two hundred. In the same register (fo. 254), a good 
quarentine (una bona quarentina) is mentioned ; the demesne lands of 
Northwold (fo. 258) are said to comprise four hundred and forty-eight 
acres by the greater numbering (per majorem numerum), whilst the 
works are reckoned by the lesser numbering. 

In the survey of the Manors of Mettingham, Ilketshall and Ship- 
meadow, taken in 1562, the arable lands were measured by the perch 
of sixteen and a half feet, but the tvoods were measured by the perch of 
eighteen feet. 

In the Glemsford survey it is stated that the works are by the 
lesser numbering, four thousand eight hundred and forty-eight, some- 
times they increase owing to the length of the summer, sometimes 
they decrease on account of its shortness. Whether within or without 
the autumn season three works are valued at one penny. 



SUDBURY ARCHDEACONRY. 275 

These early surveys help us to understand upon what 
conditions the various parcels of glebe-lands became 
situated in different parts of the parish. The areas under 
cultivation, whether known as lands, " Inlands," " Out- 
lands," or as shifts, were measured out into acres, '* quaren- 
tines" or "virgates," by a perch of varying length, 
18| ft., 16^ ft., or 15^ ft, so that the acre in one parish 
was sometimes greater, sometimes less than the acre in 
neighbouring parishes. The virgate was liable to variation, 
in one instance we find it contained only twenty acres. 
There is, however, a special point to note in the foregoing 
surveys, viz., that Mr. Birch's eloquent plea for the four 
ox team is based upon false premisses, as it is distinctly 
stated that Suffolk ploughs required teams of eight oxen. 
The constitution of the team varied as to the number of 
" stots " or bullocks which were to accompany the older 
and more experienced cattle. In the Hitcham team four 
" stots " were admitted, whilst it was deemed practicable 
to join only two "stots" to the Wetheringset team. 

It appears that in most villages the land under culti- 
vation was parcelled out into large fields, known as " lands " 
or shifts. The survey of the parish of Cowlinge in 1578, 
classes the lands underthree " Procincti," which were divided 
into quarentines. The Procinctus, wherein stood the 
church, hall, market place, fairstead, and chapel, was the 
central one, and contained ten quarentines, as did the third 
Procinctus, in which the woods lie. The outer " Pro- 
cinctus," consisting mainly of arable land, contained 
eleven quarentines, one of which was sub-divided into 
twenty-eight parcels, the largest contained fifteen acres. 

The terriers of glebe lands furnish us with the names 
of many of these various subdivisions or parcels of land, 
and add to our local knowledge of the district by explain- 
ing many terms, which have become so corrupted as to be 
otherwise unexplainable. 

The Church acquired its lands by gifts, by endow- 
ments, or by purchase. No church could be erected until 
a suitable endowment of glebe land had been made. In 



276 RECORDS OF THK 

some cases, as at Melford. Eyke, and HasketoD, the 
endowment took the form of a manor. In the days of 
Edward the Confessor, Aluriek son of Wigor bestowed 
upon the church of Me]ford 236 acres of land besides ll| 
acres of meadow, this land comprised the two carucates 
mentioned in the Domesday Survey. The Thelnetham 
terrier for 1613 is a complete and interesting survey of 
the Rectory Manor. In some instances, however, as at 
Wattisham, Hunsdon, and Ixworth Thorpe, no glebe lands 
remain, nor could it be found by the " honest men " that 
these churches ever held any glebe. Oftimes the parcels 
of glebe are very numerous, Honington Church held fifty- 
four acres, one rood, twenty perches, in seventy-four 
pieces, scattered about in diverse lands ; Thelnetham held 
seventy-two pieces, amounting in area to sixty acres. 
The parcels " in the shifts as they lay in sundry furlongs,'^ 
varied greatly in size ; the Rickinghall parson claimed a 
piece of meadow measuring from " stulp to stuLp "* twelve 
feet. Of the thirty-two pieces of Saxham Parva glebe, 
sixteen pieces lay in Blyshall Field, and thirteen in 
Wrong Oak Field. Some glebe was to be found in other 
parishes ; Worlington Church held a parcel in the common 
fields of Freckenham, " a small piece was doled out in the 
common meadow of Whatfield " as glebe for Aldham, and 
the " tithes of the entrecommon field betwixt Culford 
and Westow " were shared by the parsons of both churches. 
A piece in Badwell, known as ''Three parsons' bush,'^ 
paid tithes to three churches. These facts carry us back 
to the times when new churches were erected to supply 
the wants of a growing population in our rural villages^ 
and when two or three districts formed a unit for assess- 
ment, known as a " villa integer '* The names of fields a& 
Bell Meadow, Lampland, Bread Close, Taper acre, clearly 
indicate the purpose for which the gift of land was made to 
the church. The circumstances attending the consolidation 
of Rectories, as of Horringer magna and parva are 
mentioned. We obtain occasional glimpses of the robbing 

*A imall wooden post or stake to murk a boundary. 



SUDBURY ARCHDEACONRY. 277 

of church lands by Henry viii., and in the Fordham 
terrier complaint is made how the Abbott of Sempringham 
unjustly defrauded the church of a manor and its rights. 

I have endeavoured in an accompanying glossary to 
explain some of the more interesting field names, and 
their terminations. It is noticeable that many fields take 
their names from their shape or position, as Goreacre, 
Harpacre or the Horpe, Language, Highfield, Overwonge, 
Overhcdmere, Sugar Loaf ; some from the characteristics 
of the soil, Sloughland, Oravelpitacre, Blackheath, Ston- 
lays, Wrongland; others from some natural feature, as 
Womansgrave, Brackland, Greengrass bushes, Bromewent, 
Cutshawe, Dodthornes, Ashwent. 

The terriers drawn up after 1613 give the customs 
attending the payment of tithes, many of which are 
extremely curious, especially those which refer to the 
tithe on milk. Good Friday was the general day for 
collecting tithe eggs, and Lammas day for bringing the 
tithe cheese to church in some parishes ; at Barningham 
the parson was expected to '' provide his parishioners 
with a sip of wholesome victuals at his house after the 
Sunday afternoon service." The tithe customs of Barn- 
ingham should be carefully studied ; the term " Lohe " 
has not its usual significance. Sufficient has been said to 
show that the terriers are of great value to the local 
historian. 

CALENDAR. 

AldhUL Terrier 1813. Henry Uhthoff, Rector. 

OUhe lands. Total area, 45 acres 2 roods 27 poles. 

Field nam$8. Coney Hill, Park field, The Slade, Smallbrook Grove. 

Local terms. " Park field with a bottom of grass or mowing 
ground." " A small piece of meadow doled out in the Common meadow 
of Whatfield." 

Tithe customs. " There goes from the parish to the Rectors great 
detriment two-thirds of all tithes of the demesne lands given in pre- 
Reformation days by the Earl of Oxford to the Priory of Earls Colne. 
It passed through several hands and is now possessed by Lord Hunting- 
field, who pays eighteen shillings a year to the Crown on account 
thereof." 



278 RECORDS OF THE 

GifU, £1 per annum from lands in Roydon given by Joha 
Ooodall, jeoman, to be distributed in bread on St John the Evangelist's 
day. XI per annum interest on £20 left by the Rev. Jn. Spooner, a 
former Rector, 1735. 

Ampton. Terrier 1613. Wm. Noble, Rector. 

Olehe lands Thirteen pieces, varying in sise from three acres to 
two roods. Total area, 18 acres. 

Outlands. Glebe in Livermere parva. N.B. — In time of Abbot 
Sampson, e. 1185, Ampton with Livermere parva formed half a leet. 

Namet of lands. Common green, Upper, Middle and Nether 
graves, Homegate, Catchfetoh, The Holmes. 

Local ternu. Went. 

Customs^ dsc. Tythe calves, pigs, geese, ducks, chicken. 

Turkeys and eggs at Good Friday, two for every hen. 

The seventh calf and pig are titheable. If there be less than 
seven the Parson is to have a penny for every calf eaten in the house or 
weaned. If sold, then, the tenth penny. But if more, then the allow- 
ance answerable to the parson. 

And so for geese and ducks and chicken one penny, for pigs a 
half-penny. 

£aster offerings for every man, servants and children male and 
female, two-pence, and for every wife or widow 6d. 

Lakes, These excused fruit upon the ground. Jas. Frost's farm 
8d., Rich. Tippins 6s., £dw. Barkway's 8d., Ju. Drake's 8d., Jn. 
Spalden's 8d., Robert Towler's 8d. 

Bacton. Terrier 1813. Edw. Burton Parker, Rector. 

Ghhe landn. Total area 52 acres 1 rood 20 poles. 

Field names. Town close, Land's end, Bacton field. Great kyllea, 
Pickleden heath, Warren's dole. 

Local terms. Peak's hern, Three Paraons' bush, Middlegate way. 

Tithe customs. Thut every parishioner being termed A Loker by 
the ancient custom of his dwelling house, of which there are forty 
in the parish, and paying a Loke hen or Lioke silver yearly is to be 
discharged of all manner of titles for orchards, gardens, tithe eggs, 
geese and pullery. 

Town funds lying in Finningham, Bacton, Old Newton. Total 
area, 48 acres 2 roods. 

Bardwell. Terrier 1613. Thos. Newcome, clerk, Vicar. 

Glebe lands. One piece, croft and pasture of 2 acres, extent of 
churchyard 1 acre. 

Local term^. Bowbeck. 

Bamham St. Gregory. Terrier 1613. John White, Rector. 

Glebe lands. Twenty-seven pieces, varying in extent from 4 acres 
to 20 perches. Total area, 20 acres 20 perches. 

Field names. Many similar to those in terrier of Bamham St. 
Martin, and Twenty acre furlong, Lamhokeland, Flowerholme, Dead 



SUDBURY ARCHDEACONRY. 279 

lane, St. Gregory's green, Cades croft, Poundyeard, Stranshill, Bradfield, 
Estlingheath, Lampythill, Blowfield, Fyshing dole, Langlond, Baggots 
bordland, Crandell heaved, Knyghtpyt, Garbyt, North. 

Local terms. Point (Angel point on common river). 

N.B. — Bamhara St. Gregory, sometimes known as Barnham St. 
George, and Barnham St. Martin as Barnham St Andrew. The two 
parishes were first served by one incumbent when Edmund Stearue, 
Rector of St. Gregory, 1660, was appointed to St. Martin's by John, 
Bishop of Norwich, in the following year. 

Barnham St. Martin. Terrier 1613. John White, Rector. 

Glebe lands. Thirty-nine pieces, varying in extent from 5 acres to 
1 rood. Total area, 30 acres 1 rood. N.B. — The Barham's, Fakenham 
parva, Word well and Culford, formed one leet in 1185. 

Field names. Washbrook common, Portmer furlong, Coltrup> 
Stumpcrosse, Nunes, Palmer's fen, Great Skots dole, Little Bridge Hill 
common, Baggot's Shot dole, Langhill, Langly, Playford headland. 
Cad's dole, Blethowe, Lugsons, Tottis, Mossy, Malmy head, Wordwell, 
Rushbroke headland, Bibelsmer, Crandell, Stanwell pit, Blowfield, 
Stan well hill, Calpit, Worsted thorn. Little how, Borowe, Rydgeway, 
Bordland, Brakepitham, Downham dale, Theusty, Fifty Stonlays, Roty 
hill, Oldinge, Bulspit, Reves dole. 

Manors. Playford, Sir John Crofts ; Baggots, Sir Jn. Crofts ; 
Coltrup, Sir Jn. Crofts. 

Local terms. Mere, feu, dole, shot, grondell, head, bordlands, 
ham, way. 

Barnitigham. 4 Terriers, 1613, 1635, 1664, 1807. Andrew Carter, 
Rector, 1613. Ralph Gilpin, Rector, 1635. 

Glebe lands. Forty-eight pieces, varying in extent from 10 acres 
to 1 rood. Total area, 56 acres 1 rood 20 perches. N.B. — Barningham 
and Coney Weston together formed one leet in 1185. 

Field names. Furr close and Merklaudmere both in parish of 
Weston, Steinckacre, Tungeacre, Onglesworth, Longleysworth, Way- 
mere, Little, Rough mere, Ronglemere, Cockerslaud, Weston town close. 
Woman's grave, Longacre, Hellpit, Bastershill, Longhedges, Bullis- 
niere, Stanton way, Blewpightle, Blewliiud, Rowonge, The Nabbs, 
Nabway, Maggisacre, Gibbscroft, Wrangland, Short Breck, Middle fg., 
Wrenspark, The Dale, Roseland, Longland, lughams end, Blackland, 
Churchcroft, Alsons sinke, Verdons in Coney Weston, Waterlay lands, 
Honeypitts, Fish mere, Sondpitts at Weston, Short Onglesworth, Sabins 
close, Brackland, Onewent. 

Local terms. Grave, sink, acre, croft, close, went, quarentine for 
furlong, '*In length two quarentines," 1613; *'ln length two fur- 
longs," 1635 ; wong, breck, dale, " Bullisway, called Bullismere." 

Manors^ dec. " Lands of Gunville Hall," ** Lands formerly Abbott 
of Langley's." 



280 RECORDS OF THE 

Titheif Ctuionu^ d:c. Winter Corn, ».«., wheat, rye, and mislen, 
the tenth sheaf as it shall arise of the heap when it is made ready for 
the curt. 

Barley and Oats, the tenth sheaf, unless carried loose, then the 
tenth swathe, and he is to gather the said swathes himself and servants, 
but for gleaning oi raking there have never been any tithe paid. 

Peas and Tares, the tenth stetch according to the quality of the 
ground. 

Meadow or mowing ground in kind the tenth cock the first time 
cocked. 

Feeding ground for Milch Kyne and Calves, for every cow two-pence 
a year, for every calf a halfpenny. Upon Sunday next after Lammas 
Day the parishioners '* have usen to reckon at the Parsonage house, and 
pay offerings one penny for their gardens, one penny for fuel burnt on 
their hearths, or elsewhere, viz., the Hearth penny, a penny called 
Plough fhot for tithe of pease or grass growing at the ends of the 
ploughed grounds so far as four or five horses may well turn. A penny 
for a foal. Where six lambs or six pigs threepence, seven pigs or 
lambs one for tithe, and the parson to pay the parishioner three half- 
pence for the three pigs or lambs which want ten, at which time the 
custom hath been time out of mind until these few years to have their 
sip of wholesome victuals provided by the parson." 

Pasture grounds, feed by cattle for out-dwellers eightpence in the 
noble. 

For hens two eggs, " we use to pay on Good Friday." 

Apples, pears, wardens, quince, " wali-notts " and cherries, in kind. 

For keeping of tithe ]»ig8, for the roasting pig is to be taken withia 
three weeks and store pigs within six weeks. 

In 1807, ** Turnips are paid by the rod-pole measure two shillings 
the acre, but not customary," 

Value of living, £200 per annum. 

Terrier 1664. Land called ** Steinkacre," five roods. Mr. Heron 
sued for these lands by an action of trespass under the name of Johnson 
V. Brandish, and recovered them 4 Aug., 1663, before Judge Hales at 
The t ford, where the Suffolk assizes were held. 

Town lands, <tc. Four cottages and six pieces of land in hands of 
feofees in trust. Extent of lands, 14 acres 3 roods 4 poles. Moiety of 
Grove. 1807. 

BaiTOW. Terrier 1613. Richard Oadock, Rector (1608—1630). 

Glebe lands. In four separate fields — Churchfield fourteen pieces, 
area 25a. Ir. ; Cockrowe field twenty-one pieces, area 19 acres; Man- 
holde field seven pieces, area four acres ; Farndell field four pieces, area 
twenty-one acres. Total number of pieces forty-six ; area, 69 acres 
one rood. 

Field names. The Hilles, Spurreway, Lexidge way, Gurtons, 
Cherry yard, Crattal, Broad green rowe, Borden hill, Smallway, Stub- 
binge wood, " Risby field without the perambulation of Barrow," Great 



SUDBURY ARCHDEACONRY. 281 

Paplj wood, Pytland, "Nomaus furres alias Notnans land/' Sheep 
pasture. 

Local terms. Way, ley, furres. 

Manor, ** John Heigham, Lord of the manor and patron of the 
Church." 
Barton Magna. Terrier 1613. Roger Burwyn, clerk. 

Glebe lands. Fifty-five pieces varying in extent from fourteen 
acres to one rood. Total area, 91 acres. 

Field names: Paddockes, Longwooddowe, Flytchmere, Pedder's 
way, Garland, Westwall, Knyghtjarde, Blackheath, Eastfield, Downes, 
Mellhill, Mapledale, Pynchmer, Bury, Tolecat way, Catsall, Hasells, 
Downume (? Dowubam). 

Local terms, " The Church Green otherwise called by the name of 
Pleisto, so recorded in the lord's field book, with the mention of a Stone 
Cross, on the west the lands of the manor sideth south upon the 
highway." Went, furlonge, dale, rowe, yard. 

Boxtod. Terrier 1813. Jn. Carlton, Rector. 

Glebe lands. Total area, 8 acres 2 roods. 

Local names. Farm house called Trucketts. 
Bradfield Combust. Terrier 1613. Clement Ager, Rector. 

Glebe lands. Three pieces, total area 4 acres 2 roods. '' Tithe 
lying out of Perambulation. A parcel of ground called Skippers, in 
tenure of Wm. Hill of Bradfield Combust, lying between the grounds 
of the inhabitants of Stauningfield and Lawshall, alias Lawsell." 
N.B.— Bradfield with Stanniugfield formed part of the sixth leetof the 
Thedwastre Hundred. 

Bradfield St. Oeorge. Terriers 1613, 1820. Robert Davers, Rector, 
1820. 

Glebe lands. Seven pieces, total area, 9 acres 2 roods 21 poles. 

Field names. Westfield, Wrapall wood, Carre. 

Local names. Customary lands, drift way, grove. 

The dwelling house taken down recently (1820), and coach 
house built with the material. The Rectory was consolidated to Rush- 
brook Rectory, 15 May, 1788. 

Brockley. Terriers 1590, 1613, 1806. Symon Wells, Rector, 1613, 
Thos. Reeve, Rector, 1806. 

Glebe lands. Eight pieces. Total extent, 1613, 26 acres 2 roods 
10 poles; in 1806, 21 acres 2 roods. 

Field names. Werde, Pyes, Guuholds, Highfield, Wisemans, Set- 
cup, Woodland, Slowland, Brockley hedge, Peridon meadow (1613); 
The Ward, Gutrouldes, Round, Sloughland. May water meadow. 

Tithes. All lands tithnble, except a little piece belonging to 
Downing's farm, called Custom Meadow, pay twopence per annum. 

Town lands, dec. Annual rent of j£4 issuing out of the manor of 
Hawstead, the gift of Sir Robt. Drury, Knt, paid by Dame Peppy, 
widow of Sir Jn. CuUum, Knt, for working poor. 



282 RXCORDS OF THE 

Kent of £2 out of lands in Wickham Brook, the gift of one Robt. 
Gervice, gent 

Land called "Shortnecks," next Brockley Green, rent X2 per annum. 

" Woodcroft," 6 acres in Brocklej, rent £8 158. per annum. 

Lands called " Ediths/' and 10 acres on the King's highway called 
"Saddlers' Lane." 

A tenement in Hardwick and £4 annuity for a widow. 

Fanonage, " Lathed, plaistered, thatched within a moat." 
" Ancient great orchard," ploughed up 1806. 

The terrier for 1590 is among the Churchwardens' presentments 
for that year. There are two copies of this terrier. 

Bury 8. Edmund's. Accounnt of Church Goods, 1772, W. Craske, 

minister. 

St. Mary't, " Eight movable forms used at sacraments." Ten in 
the Middle aisle. 

LandB. " Bell Meadow," £8 per annum ; " Turrett's close," £4 per 
annum. Guildhall feofees to repair chancel, £15 per annum. 

Oheveley. Terrier 1638. Robt. Levett, Rector. 

Glebe lands. Sixty-three pieces in thirteen fields, varying in extent, 
13 acres 2 roods in one field to 3 rood in another. Total area 55 acres 

1 rood. Rectory grounds 7 acres. 

Field names. Pond, Horpe, Ashley, West, Stybbin, Holgate, 
Waploe, Wrongland, Farmers, Mill, Braythorue, Sunden. 

Local terms. " The Gripp," The Packe, " Wrongland went in the 
furlong called Wrongland." 

Manor. Sax ton Hall. 

Ooney Weston alias Coniston. Terriers 1613, 1638, 1806. Thos. 

Smyth, Rector, 1613; Ju. Hodsou, Rector, 1638, Jn. Barnes, 

Rector, 1806. 
Glebe lands. Fifty pieces in 1613, varying from 6 acres to 1 rood, 
in twenty-eight separate wents, lands, or furlongs. Total area, 51 acres 

2 roods 20 poles. 

Field names. Short Buxlow, Bucksland. Blolond, Long Langland, 
Nether Peasewent, Over Pejisewent, Over Styes, Thisley land, Over 
Buxlowe, Comokes, Bredlond alias Blakland, Pismer, Waterlayeloud, 
Le Crofts end, Cappid, Bush, Mikhil, Chapmans, Southfield, Cowles 
yard, Brake lond, Sniallwell, Middlewent, Woodsden, Middlefurlong, 
Camoke, Peaselond, Nether Swynes, Pepper, Le Short went, Styhe, 
Sinkland. 

Local terms. Wonge, croft, "Stadium, called Middlewent,** 
" Quarentine, called Woodsden furlong." 

" A note of such land as be of the fee of the manor of Cony weston 
whereof the parson of Cony weston is to have the tithe (a) in Biardwell, 
(h) in Knettishall. This note vras taken out of a Drage taken out of 
the Lord's Survey Book, 1583." Barningham Hall lands. 



SDDBURY ARCHDEACONRY. 283 

Town hotueSy pensions, gifts, ttc, 1806. Four pieces of pasture, in 
all 7 acres, yearly rent JC6 Gs. 

Three pieces of arable land, in all 2 acres 24 poles, yearly rent 
JBI 68. 6d. Piece of Fen, 10 acres. 

Arable land in Rattlesden intermixed with land belong to several 
other parishes, yearly rent £2. 

Oomard Magna. Terrier 1806. Chas. Edw. Holden, Vicar. 

Glfht lands. Total arcH, 8 acres 3 roods. 

Fidd names. Chequer, Two acres, Shephards, Paddle-pit, Church- 
field. The Wrongs, Perryfield. 

Local terms. The Clogs, Pound, the Mote, the Moors. 

Tythes, All small tithes. Endowed with all tithes, both great and 
small, of 200 acres called Church croft, lying next the Churchyard. 

Cnlford. Terriers, 1613, 1635. Wm. Knight, Rector, 1613. The 
terrier of 1613 ^' was taken from anew book lately made of the 
abuttals, 1586." 

Glebe lands. Thirty-nine pieces, varying from 3 acres to 20 perches. 
Total area, 28 acres 3 roods 20 pis. 

Field names. Common green called Churcli green, Netherpath, le 
Drove, Mickelwonge, Brodgate, Stonehill, Armeld ho we, Altonespit, 
Sandfurlong, Hoppisland, Spenfilde, Fenu furlonge, Long furlong, 
Dokylond, Whitethorne, Stockwell, Wickthorne, Skaldings, Dale, Small- 
thorne, Lemmerswong, Overgarbrods, Nethgarbrod, Gravelokehowewent. 
Brakeyfeld, Netherpath, Prespit. 1613, The Ham, Sloughlands, 
Broomehille, Howhill, Calkpit, Ashwent, Westleather pin, Outshift. 

Six pieces are outfield or outshift land near Word well ; the other 
pieces are infield land. N.B. Word well and Culford formed together 
half aleet in 1185. 

Local terms. Wong, howe, went, " a went called The Ham," furres, 
pin. 

Manors. East hall, Ingham, Word well. 

Drinkstone. Terriers, 1613, 1635, greatly injured by damp, 1813. 
Thos. Cabeck, Rector, 1635. Hen. Patteson, Rector, 1813. 

Glebe lands. Forty-six pieces, varying in extent from 5 acres to 
20 perches. Tctal area, 48 acres. In 1813, only thirty pieces. 

Field names. Tysers (13 pieces) Long close, Medowe hards. Church 
meadow. Bread close, Cawdell, Brampton, Hustlegate, Deadmans lane, 
Counterlaiids, Waterlane, Upper Long Nore, Foxborough, Upper and 
Spring Damlaud, New brake. Bodes, Jecks, Dambeland. 

Local terms. Went, close, hards, nore. 

Manors. Tymperleys. 

Tovni houses and lands. Town farm, 10 acres 1 rood 14 poles, left 
by Mr. Camborne (Rector 1679 — 1693) and confirmed by deed in 
Chancery for the setting and keeping at work the poor of the parish. 

W 



284 RKCORDS OF THE 

Laiid, 15 acres 3 roods 17 poles, left by Mr. Jn. Bowie for the same 
purpose. 

"Shortland," purchased with money arising from sale of Mr. 
Camborne's effects in Ooss Street, 2 acres. 

A close, called Bread close, left by will of Mr. John Wren, 16 Aug., 
1565, money to be expended in providing wheat for the poor. 

Rev. Rich. Moseley (1763— 1804), by will, 28 Jan., 1804, gave 
X700 sterling to be invested in the purchase of stock, in 3 per cent, 
consolidated annuities, to be applied for the establishing and support of 
a Sunday School and Day School for Drinkeston atid Rattlesden. 

Tenement next Burnt Houne for widows, and Burnt House yard 
12 poles. 

Land let for Church Rates, 5 acres and piece of meadow. 

Total extent, 45 acres 1 rood 3 perches. 

From the Caml)ome bequest the incumbent was to pay every year 
to the clerk 208., for a yearly perHmbuhition 15s., for the repair of 
eauseway, 10s. 

SlmawelL Terrier 1613. *' Taken by view of honest men in the said 
parish." Edward Swallow, clerk. 

Glebe lands. Total area, 23 acres 1 rood. Piece of pasture 15 acres. 

Field fiamM. Hallifax, Ships, Stoney, New, Eastfield, Scares, Dod- 
thornes, Longaker, Netherclose. 

Local terms. Hundred way, pightle. 

EuBton. Terriers, 1613 and 1801. Jas. Kyrre, Rector, 1613. 

Glebe lands. Total area, 2 acres. 

Edward Rokewood, of Euston Hull, refused to sign terrier, 
asserting : — ** It maketh no mention of a sponge between the glebe land 
and the North part of the lord's barn, being left pur|K)sely for the lord's 
horses and cattle to take footing upou his own ground when drawing 
into the barn. It doth not abut in any part on the River, but upou a 
piece of ground sometimes common, between the glebe and the said river, 
the which the parson hired of the town whilst it was common and paid 
a rent for the same. The Parson states that he bought the sponge." 

Tythe customs. Composition £25 per annum for part of Euston 
park ; and 20s. for 37 acre^ of land taken from the Wood Breck and 
laid to the park about the year 1732 ; and £12 for part of the park iu 
Little Fakenham. Hay tithes the tenth cock if the Rector sends a 
tenth man to help make it, otherwise the eleventh cock. Decoy meadow 
pays no tythe unless sown with grain, so long as the Rector be suffered 
to enjoy as his own a certain meadow by the river. Turnips fed by 
the Hock tithe free, fed by cattle pay 2s. an acre. Tithe milk is paid 
in kind every Sunday night and Monday morning, from May to July. 
The milk of the whole dairy to be paid. 

Fakenham Magna alias Aapis. Terrier 1638. Jn. Frost, Rector. 

Glebe lands. Thirty-eight pieces, varying in extent from 4 acres 
to 1 rood. Total area, 60 acres 2 roods. 



SUDBURY ARCHDEACONRY. 285 

Field naniea, Gosham common, North, Netherwent, Langland, 
Broome way now Butt lane, Cutteshaw, Clipston, '* Furlong called Joan 
Ives' bushes " Outshifts, Stonyhill, Portway, Greengrass bushes, No 
man's bushes, No man's heath, Overwhartlands, Shepheards, Shortwent, 
Bromewent, Lincroft, Marlpit, Harper piece, Honington, Shortrowe. 

Local term*. '* In a quarentine called Langland heard*. In a 
quai-entine called Clipston went. Marlepit furlong alias Shortrowe." 

FelflhAin. Terriers 1613, 1638. 

Glebe lands. Total area, 5 acres 2 roods. 

Field luimes. Highfield, " the way thereunto going from the south 
end of Gedding Green, and so directly along thiough the ground now 
in occupation of Jn. Bridges until we come to a field called High6eld, 
and so directly along in Highfield till we come to a hauke which leadeth 
to a lodjre, which lodge standeth on the way leading to the said glebe." 

Tithes. One portion of tithes for a certain field (3 acres) lying in 
Geddinge. 
Plempton. Terrier 1613. Francis Spencer, Rector. 

Glebe lands. Sixty-five pieces in three fields, Homeshift, Middle- 
shift, varying in extent from 1 acre to 1 rood. Total area, 34 acres 
3 roods. 

Field names. Talbots, Shortfurres, Warren hill. Cake acre, Small- 
way, Oak grove, Shepispyns, Goseweli, Sternes, Dumfield. 

Local terms. Lymekill pit, layes, ** the entercommou heath of 
Risby and Flempton, five acres on Rectory land of Lackford." N.B. — 
Lackford, Flempton and Barrow formed the firat leet of the Thingoe 
Hundred in 1185. 

Pornham All 88. Terriers 1 638, 1 678. Oliver Phillipps, Rector, 1 638 ; 
Wm. Elliott, Rector, 1678. The latter terrier much destroyed. 

Glebe lands. Seventeen pieces. Total area, 26 acres. 

Field names. Old field. Great htath. Sixteen acres, Hide field, 
Motherland went, Short heath, Boltons. 

PordhanL Terriers 1576, 1613. Wm. Barcroft, Vicar, 1576; Hugh 
Owen, Vicar, 1613. 

Glebe lands. In three fields. Butgat, alias Byggyn, 1576 ; Big- 
gine 1613; Barrow field, 1576, 1613; Churchfield, alias Kedinydhall 
field, 1576; Keninggall field, 1613. Thirty-seven pieces, varying in 
extent from 4 acres to 1 rood. Total area, 39 acres 3 roods. 

Field nanus. Northcnd, Landmer, Blackland, Northfenne, Sheep 
furlong, Luk grave, I^mmermas ground. 

Manors. Beggins, Coxshall, Feltons, Bftssingbonie. 

Inquisitio. Apud Fordham, Dicunt juratores quod Prior de Sera- 
pringhnm appropriavit sibi et Doniui sum unum messuagiuni et unam 
acram terrro cum pertinentiis in Fordham de Dedricus le Reade triginta 
anuin elapsis tine licentia Regis et valent per annum novem solidi. Et 
quod idem Prior appropriavit ibidem nnum messuagium quadraginta 
acras terrro, duo villanos tenentes libertateni unius faldse et vaccarum 



286 RECORDS OF THE 

ejusdeai villse in proprios usus triginta aunis ellipsis sine licentia Regis 
et valetit per annum triginta librw. 

Oedding. Terriers, 1613, 1806. Thos. Smith, Rector, 1613. Thos. 
Hallum, Rector, 1806. 

Ghhe landi. Eight pieced, in ull 8 acres. No parsonage house. 

Field nameB. HighHeld, Ditchfield. 

Local trrms. Grensett lane, Grovett. 

One ncre of glebe lay in Felsham. N.B. — Felsham and Geddiug 
M'erc in the same leet in 1 185. 

A pension of two shillings per annum was paid out of Mr. Cock- 
sedge's farm in Rattlesden, 1806. 

Gislingham. Terrier, 1814. Hen. Parteson, Rector. 

Glebe lands. Forty-five pieces. Total area, 56 acres 15 poles. 

Field names. Marrins croft, Oxleisure meadow, Little Black pit. 
Upper and Lower Black pit, Swattishall leys, Aahenhedge knoll, Colham 
pightle. Little Drapers, Long acre, Moorfield, Drapers, Mill mount. 
Haw croft. Horse close, A 11 wood green, Wrens park, Slade meadow, 
Shelton wong, Cross close, Rail field. Hill field. Parkway close, Wood- 
hern grove, Padders Oak or Broad dock, Woodhouse lands, Hubbards 
close. 

Local ttrmHf dc " Fifteen poles conveyed by deed in (-hancery 
enrolled, 28 May 1799 in trust for Thos. CoUyer then Rector." " Piece 
allotted under Act of Parliament 42 Geo. in. for dividing, allotting, 
enclosing the commons and waste grounds within the parishes of 
Finningham and Gislingham, Hardgress lane, Spurway, Faverell street, 
Stannel pool river." 

Afanors Rushes, Jauneys. 

7'oivn lands. Total areai *I6 acres 2 roods. 'Tenement in Thomdon 
with 4 acres ; Poole meadow, three acres ; Hanger pightle, 4 acres ; 
Thurbens close, 15 acres ; Brasens close and Downes Pightle, 9 acres ; 
Fenn meadow, 3 acres ; Park close, 7 acres, given by Jn. Darby ; 
Hamnionds close, 2 roods ; Town pightle, 1 acre. 

7Ws^ £50 given by Mrs. Alice Symonds, secured out of the 
estate of Rev. Henry Heigham, the interest to provide shirt cloth for 
the poor. £6 per annum out of the same estate given by Mr. Jn. 
Symonds, jun. 

Free School, founded by John, Edmund and Mary Darby, in 1639 
and 1647, endowed with a schoolhouse and XI 7 per annum given to 
the master issuing out of the rent charge of the estate of the Rev. Henry 
Heigham. Also, by the same donors, £3 per annum to teach poor 
children the English tongue in reading. 

Hargrave. Terrier 1613. Richard PleHsaunce, Rector. 

Glebe lands, P^ivo "closes," in all 24 acres 2 roods. 

Field names. Brett's green, Buckes meadow, Kitches, Sugar loaf, 
Chevington park. N.B. — Hargrave, Chevington, and Ickworth formed 
one leet, 1185. 



SUDBURY ARCHDEACONRY. 287 

Hawstead. Terriers 1613, 1635. Ezekiel Edgar, Rector. 

GUbe lands. Eighteen pieces, in all 24 acres 1 rood. 

Field names. Common green, Home close, Cox acre. Haven's nest, 
Colefield, Briers wood, Peaseland, Little doves, Wood close, Crouchfield, 
Bridgefield, Carbrook, Menwood, Grenemere, Language, Hopper's hill, 
Bridge, Oatland, West wood haven, Highfield, Bull's hill. 

Manors. Cold ham Hall. 

Hengrave cum Flempton. Terrier 1613. Francis Spencer, Rector. 

GUbe lands. In all 14 acres 2 roods. Three acres lay in Fornham 
All SS. N.B. — Hengrave and Fornham formed one leet, 1185. 

Field names. Lyme close. Renter's close. Haddocks, Wrennes Park. 

Hepworth. Terriera, 1613, 1638. 

Glebe lands. Twenty-seven pieces, in all 33 acres 3 roods. 

Field names. The Moore, Arlie way, Easthawe, Hedgfield, Bruns- 
kott, Mans, Liberty close, Wysdome, Beckstreet, Tropps, Stoubbing, 
Sallowpitts, The Harpc, Taperacre, Hedgfield, Brodeoke, Overpeasty, 
Slead way, Snialwyckers, Long close. 

Tithes. Composition for lands in Barningham held of the manor 
of Hepworth, £[ 1.3s. 4d. ; for lands in Weston, £1 28. ; for lands held 
of the four manors of Hepworth, 14s. 

Manors. Brockhall, Rushall. 

Hessett. Terriers, 1635, 1784, 1813, 1834. Wm. Heggall, 1784; 
Thos. Waddington, 1813 ; Thos. Ellis Rogers, 1834, Rectors. 

Glebe lands. Seventeen pieces. Total area, 13 acres 1 rood. 

Field names. Canssell close, Langums, Langmere, Copsterd, 
Highfield. 

Local names. Wonge, lynke. 

Town lands. 1784. Town grove, 2 acres; **Cloits." 1 acre; 
'* Hiuderlays," 2 acres ; Hicket Heath lands, 2 acres ; Meadow, given 
in exchange for Black ditch, 3 roods ; Town meadow, 2 acres ; two 
houses and a yard converted into a workhouse in 1813 ; the Town yard, 
almshouse. 

Customs. The parishioners singly give the clerk what they can. 
Fiee Croft lands, Free Croft grove, and Monk Wood grove are tithe 
free, but Free Croft lands pay a couple of capons yearly to the Rector 
of Rougham. A hearth-hen, or sixpence for each family, is paid to the 
Rector the day after Christmas Day. Value of tithes, glebe, &c., in 
1834, £350 per annum. 

HoningtoiL Terrier 1638. John Kidson, Rector. 

Glebe lands. Seventy-four pieces, varying in extent from 3 acres 
to I rood. Total area, 53 acres 1 rood 20 poles. 

Field names Bull's croft, Slathorne, Nethersudbergh, Bloddie, 
Oversudberugh, Mansbrigg, JJurdale, Okestubl>e, Thorpe dale. Middle- 
oke, Roodiege, Derhurie, Overwonge, Stoneyland, Curlescroft, Aggers 
acre, Arnestie, Bradegate alias Bracketts, Ansty, Wicklesmere, Over- 



288 RECORDS OF THE 

hedmer, Byscott, Ketleuiere, Pipers, Cadowe, Connjhill, Middle furlong, 
the Gate. 

Local temu ''In furlong Austie 2 acres, it is all one trmf. In 
furlong overhedmer. In went called Kettleroere went." Thorpe town- 
land. N.B. — Hep worth, Honington and Thorpe formed one leet in 1 185. 

Manors. Fakeuham, Coldham, Sapistou manor. 

Horringer. Terrier 1638. Robt. Gooderick, Rector. 

Whereas the parishes of Horningsherth magna and Homingsherth 
parva were some time distinct, and the one of them exceeded not the 
value of 56s. 8d. in the Court of the King's Majesty's First Fruits, 
neither were they distant above the space of a mile, by virtue of a 
statute made 37°V* Hen. 8, the said two parishes were united by the 
consent of William, Lord Bishop of Norwich, Ordinary, and Sir Thee. 
Darcie, Kut., patron, and John Griffith, incumbent of the said churches, 
and called by the name of Horningsherth magna, and the church of 
Horningsherth parva was demolished ; and all tithes, oblations, glebe, 
lands, belonging to the same were annexed to the parish of Hotuings- 
herth magna, as by an indenture tripartite made thereupon, bearing 
date 24 Mar., 1548. Where there is a vestry annexed to the north 
part of the chancel the reparations thereof doth belong to the 
parishioners. 

Glebe lands Total area, 16 acres 1 rood 20 poles and several 
parcels. 

Field names. Homestall, Bunwick lane, Garrard acre, Horsecroft, 
Grene ditch, Stroibush, Heckford's croft, Runboroughes, Hopley, Sheep 
green, Gospel acre, Clapp gate, Tyler's corner, Goaria acre. Hanging 
hill, Long acre, Long half acre. Parlour plot, Lowsie bush. Chalk hill, 
Broome. 

Local terms, Grindel, sponge, parrock, leyes. 

Out-tithes, The <>hurch of Hornint'sherth is and since the memory 
of man hath been in peaceable possession of the tithes, and all this land 
that lie between the green way leading from Horningsherth through the 
meadow towards Fornham on the Wesit, and another green way leading 
from Cheviugton way towards the toll gate on the East, and the 
meadow towards the South, and the way that leads from Bury S. 
Edmunds towards Westley to the North unto Hamerland. And from 
thence going down by the mere that lieth between the said Hamerland 
and the land late Geo. Deanes, along by the head of Hamerland to a 
long mere that lieth by the brow of the hill the North side of Geo. 
Deanes lands and leads to the Chalk pit and from thence to a doole in 
the aforesaid way to Fornham over against the land late in the tenure 
of Wra. Emyns in which there is another Chalk pit. Excepting only 
eighteen ridges in the first land of Geo. Deanes to the south at the 
foot of the hill which tithe to Westley, and 3 roods which lie more 
Easterly by Cheviugton way which tithe to Ick worth. Gladford, 12 
acres ; mere about one acre, upon which a stubbie oak grows, a doole 
of stone ; Napland, 2 roods ; Scarbutts croft, 2 acres ; Westwood green. 



SUDBURY ARCHDEACONRY. 289 

Twenty-nine acres in Hawstead, anciently parcel of the demesne of 
Horningsherth. Hoowood croft, 2 acres. Fourteen acres in Whep- 
stend, belonging to manor of Horningsherth. North Ogwell, excepting 
only ridges on South part when it is ploughed, which tithe to Ick worth. 
Thistle field is parted by the sheaf by agreement with the Rector of 
Ick worth anciently, but in neither of both hath the Rector of Ick worth 
any herbage. 

A pension of 6s. 8d. is paid to Rector of Ick worth in kind. 

Hundon. Terrier 1801. Wm. Stockdale, Vicar. 

GUhe lands. Total area, 16 acres 3 roods. 

Field names, Newfield, Longfield, Great Swains, Hoppits, Lay- 
ground, Clerkes, Common, The Grove, Further valleys. 

By the benefit of Queen Anne's Bounty, and by the liberality of the 
Hon. J as. Vernon, esq., the living was augmented by X20 per annum 
out of lands lying in Hotham — Thorp Hall, now belonging to Sir 
Joshua Vnnneck. 

Honors. Pinnow Hall. 

Toion lands. Total area, 77 acres 1 rood. 

Tenement called Rogerons. Bevall green. Fishers close, Sorrells, 
Randells, Longrun, Snakes acre (partly in Hundon, partly in Barnurdis- 
ton), Cangate field, Small field. Heady field, Great and Little Bawley. 
The Estate of Rogerons, let for £135 per annum. 

Two cottages, one in the churchyard. 

Free School, founded by the Hon Jas. Vernon, esq., in 1753, endowed 
with dwelling house and J&IO per annum from lands in Stradishall, 
Charity endowed by Wm. Rich, in 1690, to provide 40s. worth of bread 
for the poor on Holyraass day and Candlemass day, from lands in 
Hundon. 

HnnstoxL Terrier 1638. 
GMf lands. None. 

Ickworth. Terrier 1639. Wm. Sudbury, Rector 

Glebe lands. Parsonage, 5 acres ; in the Great Common Field, 1 
rood ; in Prime Field, in bounds of Chevington, 1 acre ; Total area, 6 
acres 1 rood. N.B. — Ickworth and Chevington were part of the same 
leet in 1185. 

Ingham. Terriers 1613, 1638. Christopher Pert^ Rector. 

Glebe lands. Total area, 31 acres 3 roods. 

Field names. Cockets, Cricoll fen, Cauckway went, Stowway, 
Black went, Hempyt went. Short butts, Culford field, Calke pttts, 
Brackett way. 

Ixworih Thorpe. Terrier 1638. 

Glebe lands. '^ Thease are to Certifie unto you, that wee cannot 
inquire out any glibe land in our towne, nor wee for our partes knowe 
not any as doe witness our hands." 

Jn. Wright and Silvester Howlet, Churchwardens. 



290 RECORDS OF THE 

Keddington. Terrier 1834. 

Glfbf /ands. Fifty-two pieces. Total urea, 102 acres 1 rood 16 poles. 

Fieldnames, Upper shot, Meer common, Lower shot, Bush pasture, 
Meer meadow (called Fleeting rood), Kridge acre, Blackamoor com moo. 
Great deau, Shepherd 'h ley, High, Fox head common, Southern commoo, 
Oueland, Brink ley's close, Cherry down. Cherry yard, Kawlingsons, 
Stephensons, Hush meadow, Langhiuds, Calfs pightle. Hop grouud, 
8lings close, Chantry barn, Bansou grove. Four-acre wood, Taylors, 
Hundon close. 

l^oum lands. A farm in Sturmere, Co. Ehscx, profits to be equally 
divided l>etween both parishes, X35 per annum, 5 roods of meadow, 
an annuity of 4s. 3d. arising out of lands called Batemaus, 3 roods, 
called Hope acre; cottnge and 2 roods land called Faircloths ; XI 
arising from rent of Faircloths to be paid yearly to the Hector of 
H even ham. 

The Rev. Jn. Fairclough wtia Hector of Keddington, 1662. 

KnettishalL Terriera 1613, 1813. Thos. Winter, Hector, 1613 ; Rich. 
Deane, Hector, 1813. 

Glebe lands. Thirty -seven pieces. Total area, 30 acres 2 roods. 

Field names, Portway furlong, Lampitts, Nether and Over Smith- 
field, Lnngland, Gungrave, Buxlowe, Stonyland, Hyllistech, Credleden, 
Brumblebruske, Bunsdell, Cammocke land, Daves land, Peaseland, 
Cunyger, Home sitting, C'hurchwent, Onewent, VVronglaud, Appletree 
hill. Pepper hill, Lilly stetch. 

Local ttrms. "Twelve foot upon Coney weston Shortland," 
" Between the gats," Connyger otherwise Coney Weston. 

Lackford. Terrier 1614. 

Glebe lands. Sixteen pieces. Total area, 35 acres. 

Field names. Masters yard, Brookfielu, Shortlands, Whitthowe, 
Broadmeere, Hogge Layes, Kastfield, The Okes, Flemptou Field, Shepos- 
pynne, Furthest shift, Bracky pynne. 

Lftngham. Terrier 1613. Wm. Gosse, Hector. 

Glebe landK. T\venty-nine pieces. Total area, 31 acres. 
Rector complains about enroachments. 

Liyermere magna. Terriei-s 1639, 1834. Thox. Howlett, Hector, 1639. 

Glebe lands. Sixty-five pieces. Total area, 57 acres 3 roods 20 poles. 

Field names Neales, West dale. Sere woods, Great Bodingtou, 
Great furre close. Castle Green, The Slades, Over Shidborough, Pro- 
cession meere, Sybstyway, Over and Middlewent, Peasland Heads, 
Wasty way, Clint furlong, Wales croft, Sallowe Went, C<»ramon moor, 
Brackland, Cherrytree rowe. Blackeland, Bushy piece. The Layes, 
Dowle went, Breygat« alias Bracket way, Rusty way, Goryland, Calke 
pitts, Cooketts, Coninger, Cavons, Brack}^ close, Overstreet, Wongs, 
Nether and Over street, Crabthorne, Brad land, Horshead. 

Tithes. 124 acres 2 roods of *Mand lying in Little Livermere pays 
tithe unto the Church of Grent Livermere, the sau)e being latel}' 



SUDBDRY AROHDKACONRY. 291 

recovered by Thos. Hewlett, clerk, Rector of the said Church against 
Wm. Chapman, patron, and Hen. Whitehead, Rector of Little Liver- 
mere, by a decree in H.M. High Court of Chancery." In Broome went, 
Great Livermere tithes 2 sheaves, Little Livermere 1 sheaf. 

Tovm lands. Five pieces. Total airea, 26 acres 2 roods 24 poles. 

Mendlesham. Terrier 1806. Rich. Corhould Chilton, Vicar. 

Glebe lands. Total area, 1 9 acres. 

Toivn lands. Five pieces. Total area, 217 acres 3 roods. 

Tithes. Copy of (customs, &c. " received by the Rev. Chris. Wragg, 
Vicar, 1624, by the Rev. Edw. Riggs, who was Vicar before him about 
thirty-eight years, and by the Rev. Mr. HoUiuwell, predecessor to 
him, Ac." 
I Corfi One-third sheaf due to Vicar, two-thirds sheaf due to parson. 

Headlands of ploughed grounds, with other convenient pasturage 
for horses not tithai>le. 

Cheeses to be paid and delivered at the Church on Lammas Day. 
MildenhalL Terrier 1638 Jn. Blower, Curate. 

Glebe lands. One piece, 2 acres. 
l^awton alias Newton. Terrier 1613. Two copies. Jn. Adams, Rector. 

Glebe lamfs. Twenty-two pieces. Total area, 12 acres. 

Field names The Lawue, The Hawkes, The Bottom, Barkefield, 
Slade, Rushmcer, Rutland, Stonielayes, Hencoote.Coesland, Pettitswent, 
The Vineyard, Copsage. 

Local tenns. ** A piece of four rigges." 
Kewton by Sadbnry. Terrier 1806. (^eo. Borlase, Rector. 

Glebe lands. Twenty-four pieces. Total area, 69 acres 3 roods. 

Field names. Little Ston hards, Bo wens green, Tye field, Homer, 
The Fenns, Warrens, Colds, Out-field, Copfield went, Wases, Perry field, 
Shornfoni, Hettiugton hills. 

Toun lands. Trotts, Burkitts, Priors, " The Saracens Head." 
Pakenham. Terrier 1806. Wm. Carpenter Ray, Vicar. 

Glebe lands Total area, 66 acres 1 rood 25 poles. 

Field nnm^s. Home-sitting, Hogsdale, Camping close. 

Local teniu. New House, Retl House, ** open and commonable 
fields." 

Tithes. Turnips, two shillings an acre ; on the common field 
•eigh teen -pence an acre. 

Town lantls. Rental of fourteen pieces, £88 6s. Od. 

Battlesden. Terriers 1590, 1639. Peter Devereux, Rector, 1639. 

Glebe lands. Total area, 39 acres 3 roods. 

Field names. Rye croft, High town ;xreen. 

Manors. Clopton, Ruttlesden, Shelland. 

Lfical terms. " On close wt fowre peces of lond joynyng therto." 
" ye othir bed upon ye waye ledynge holye upon ye sow the." Cold ham. 
The terrier for 1590 is among the Churchwardens' presentments for that 
jcar. 



292 RK(X)RDS OF THK 

Red«. Terrier 1613. Win. Pitches, Rector. 

Olfhe landn. Total area, 24 acres 1 rood. One rood lying next to 
glebe of Chedburgh given by deed dated A.n. 1321. 

Field names. Emniesfield, Iplund, Walles, Highfield, Runctons. 

BickinghAll, Lower. Terrier 1613. Ju. Smith, Rector. 

Glfhe lands. Thirty-four pieces, of which nineteen lay in North 
Field. Total area, 33 acres. 

Field names. Hohne land, Long meadow, The Layes, Fenn Head. 

Local terms. In Ijttle meadow " Ttoelvt FooC* 

BickinffhAll Superior. Terrier 1806. 

Glebe lands. Total area, 25 acres 2 roods. 

Field names. Alewood green, Camping close, Micklewood, Hall field, 
Gatlott, Eaglin field, Holm lane, Thorough. 

Local terms. " Hundred river^ sometimes called the Swimming 
Ditch," (?) Bhickl)ourne. 

Bisby. Terners 1613, 1775. Nicholas Buckenham, Rector, 1613; 
Thos. Gough, Rector, 1775. 

Glebe lands. Total area, 35 acres 2 roods 20 poles. 

Field names. Hacks, Lady Pightel, l^ay fee, Welmere head, 
Westfield, Woodefield, Stonie hill, Brakye bottom, Skidber bill went. 

Local terms. No man's Firs. 

Tovni lands. Two houses upon the lord's waste ; Penhion of forty 
shillings arising out of manor and farm of Lackford, given by Lady 
Kitaon ; Needham Street farm in Gaseley, 19 acres. 

Bishangles. Terrier 1806. Thos. Barker, Rector. 

Glebe land*. Fourteen pieces. Total area, 52 acres 3 roods. 

Field names. Home close, Pear tree hill. Ditch plash. Seven acres. 
Ditch knowl. Hither hill, Browniles. 

A piece of land called 'Jatbridge piece, lying in Occold, and part of 
Thorndon town gmund, pays by way of custom 6d. per annum to 
Hector of Rishangles. 

A piece of land in Occold, 2^ acres, called Castleway piece, pays 
twopence an acre for herbage, and tithes in kind when sown. 

Pension paid by Rector of Rishangles to Rector of Stoke Ash. 

Bougham. Terrier 1639. Hen. White, Rector. 

Glebe lands. Twenty -five pieces, of which twelve lay in Church- 
field. Total area, 20 acres 3 roods 35 poles. 

Field names. Laymeere, Horsecroft, Bukenham's lane, Double 
row, Laniswell went, Black thorpe. 

Local terms. John of Black thorpe. 

Ruahbrook. Terrier 1820. 

Glebe laiids Two pieces. Total area, 4 acres 2 roods 28 poles. 

The Rectory house was demolished 15 May, 1788, to build coach 
house and stsibles at Bradfield St. George ; that Rectory was then 
consolidated with the Rectory of Rushbrook. 



SUDBURY ARCHDEACONRY. 293 

SaxhAm magxiA. Terriers 1613, 1834. 

GUhe lands. Total area, 15 acres 3 roods. 

Field names, Possold way, Broome haven. Kisiuge hill. 

Toum lands. Farm in Whepstead, 13 acres; Meadow in Fornham 
All SS., giving by the Rev. Ralph Weld, 2 acres. 

GifU, Annuity of 408. left by Hollofernes Allen, a second annuity 
arising out of 3 acres in Saxham magna ; 23s. given by Edm. Friend ; 
Gs. 8d. arising from Mabb's close ; interest on £100 in the 3 per cent, 
consols given by Tbos. Mills, Esq. 

Saxham parra. Terrier 1613. Rich. Warde, Rector. 

Glebe lands. Thirty-two pieces. Sixteen pieces in Blyshall field, 
thirteen in Wronge Oak field. Total area, 34 acres 3 roods 35 poles. 

Field names. Saffron piece, Hatchfield, Black acre. 

Local terms. " Furrie or whinuie ground." 

Stanton All SS. Terners 1613, 1806. 

Glebe lands. Total area, 17 acres 2 roods 20 poles. In 1806, 
28 acres 1 rood 18 poles. 

Field names. Wickenway, Hookers, Gyes wood, Brethels bush, 
Glasker's way, Damgate, Bowbeck. 

Local terms. " Pecia terrw quae est forera, i.^., an headland/' 
Apes cross, le griudle lane. 

Manor. Mickfield, Stanton Hall. 

Stanton St. John. Terriers 1614, 1806. Rector. 

Glebe lands. Total urea, 35 acres 2 roods. 

Field names. St. Parnells, H'^hwood, Hogs wood, Hatchfield, 
Dalefield, Bardwell, Mill mount, Overbury wav, Deepgrave pit. Over 
deepgrave pit, Stone went, Gal try dale, Broom liili, High Galtry, Long 
halfacre, Bedwell's went, Le Char went, Tiirpin's grove. 

Local terms. "Land containing three stetches," The Charr, 
Upthorp. ^^The Hundred land" Church close 2 acres 310 decimals, 
Pasture ground 2 acres 200 decimals, Rectory grounds 210 decimaus. 

Stanningfield. Terrier 1613. 

Glebe lands. Total area, 30 acres 3 roods. 

Field names. Campinge close, Stowfield, Mare close. Priests close. 
Haggards green, Broome close. The Ha we, Thistly. 

Stansfltld. Terrier 1813. Quotes terrier 1686. Jn. Carleton, Rector. 

Glebe lands. Total area, 78 acres 31 poles. 

Field nanus. Dead man's land. Church field, Pickles' close, Chillon, 
How, Brakey, Eldingcote ley, The T, Burnt ash, The Harp, Upper and 
Lower Ladylaud, Horse pasture, Rumbledown. 

Local teiTfis. " Green slips or doles," ** Green slip containing in 
length from stulp to stulp, 12 and two-third poles ' ; "Close called 
from its figure, the T. It is aflfirmed by some that 'The Harp ' close 
has its name from its figure.'' 

Manors, Hawked on Hall, Thurston Hall. 



294 RKCOROS OF THE 

CtutomBf dec. Two pieces of 5 ncres are titheable by equal portions 
between the pamhe» of Hawkedon and StansHeld. Two great lejs of 
5 acres belonging to Thurston Hall lie in the parish of Stansfield. 
"Verdict of twelve men at the Summer's Assize held at Bury 1688." 
'* In the churchyard stood a Chauntry House, for which the Hector and 
his predecessors have paid His Mnjesty twopence per annum since the 
Dissolution of Chaun tries." 

7Wa lniid% and bequests. Upper Lady land gift of Edra. Plum, 
4 acres 2 roods. Four acres in parish of Hawkedon, gift of Mr. 
Wiseman. Land given by Mr. Shaw, a former rector. 

Stansted. Terriers 1806, 1813. 

GUbe lands. Total area, 25 nci^es 1 7 poles. 
Field nanus. Home pasture, Mills close. 

Stowlangtoft. Terrier 1613. 

Olebe lands. Ninety acres. 

Field flames. Stocket wood, Chandlers, Norton dales, Mill field, 
High field, Nether hall, Makins hall. 

Sudbury St. Peters. Terrier 1813, called Hasells land. 

Town lands. 3 acres, left by will of Mrs. Susan Girling, 1724, to 
provide a minister to preach two sermons a year on "The Lord's 
Supper," and 5s. to the clerk for cleaning the church. Martin Cole's 
gift of 6s. 8d. a year for a sermon to be preached on Ascension Day. 
Twenty shillings left by .In. Jessop every third year, to be paid out of 
inn called "The Bear," to provide books for the poor. 

Thelnetham. Terrier 1613. Robert Dade, Hector. 

Glehe lands. Seventy- two pieces, varying in extent from 9 acres 
to 1 rood. Total area, 85 acres 3 roods 5 poles. 

Field mimes. Le Goare, Bellomer, Le Cauncye, Le Snape, Reydon 
fen, Le Green way, Launsicke, Wheatland, Spencers croft, Pottersearth, 
Hau^h croft, Shinsharpe, Le Slead, Bretts, Le Breches, Overharcotts, 
Hendell, Alvinjys, Sondfield, Raffehaugh, Kuttlen, Peakock acre, Over 
and Nether Blackland, Little Reydon, Le Parkway, Flowerland, 
Drinksons croft, Rokescroft, Tllershyerth, Hopton ditches, Ledglun, 
Broad meadow went, Stanborow, Basils grove, Longfurloug, Le Barrow, 
Ferstreet field, Hinderclay broom, Tatersgate, Gandgredeland, Planche, 
Messenghall. 

Local terms. "Quarentine, called Newton furlong," "In Qnarentine, 
Little Reydon," Piggs lane, " Quarentine, cnlled Hopton ditches," 
"Inter meta, called .Austines meer," " Le Parkway," "Basils Grove," 
" Le CoUys Crosse " Lands lie in Hinderclay, Thelnetham and R«ydon. 

Thrandeston. Terrier 1801. Nathaniel D'Eye, Rector. 

Glebe lands. Twenty-one acres. 

Field names, (ireat green, Greenway, Great field, The Went, The 
Lays, Slug bush, Black row. Sponge and Sallowes pightles, Pimpsey 
close, Lam pet way. 



SUDBURY ARCHDEACONRY. 295 

Thurston. Terrier 1613. Zachary Cateline, Vicar. 

Glebe lands. Total area, 60 acres. 

Field nanus. Crash, Churchfield, Poiutacre, Furry pightle, Glener- 
field, Nether went, Upper went, Spurmaiis, Norton, Rountlacre, 
Littlehow, Thickrow acre, Coniers close, Netherplace cloee. The Plauce 
common, Wheatfield, Broadlund, Stockrow. 
Timworth. Terrier 1613. 

Gifhe lands. Fotiil area, 32 acres. 

Field names. Bottom way, Hulegate way, Blackwell way, Carpit 
way. Drove way, Stone way, The ('age, Livermere way, Neteheards way^ 

Tostock. Terrier 1627. Rector, Hen. Sulyard. 

Glebe lands. 1 7 acres 3 roods 8 poles. 

Field names. Sinderland hill, otherwise Fistley went, Sliortland, 
Churchfield, Wheatcrofr, Lam pel and, Ropeland, [^unwey, Greene way, 
Mill field, Morlond^ mersh, Merchway, Kunnynge rode. 

Local terms. " Lnmpeland in the King's manor, by Act of Parlia- 
ment," ** Ropeland, now Townland," "Closes formerly belong to the 
Blessed Virgin, now Townland." 

Manors. Littlehaugh. 

Troston. Terriers 1613, 1634. Wm. Bradstreet, Rector. 

Glebe lands. Total area, 53 acres 1 rood 23 poles, 1613 ; 57 acrea 
1 rood in 1634. 

Field names. Hop ground, Upper went, Netherwent, Mageniccolls, 
Bacon's acres, Carter's stuff. Upper clint, Bnshie rode, Middle Clint 
went, Walnut tree croft, Warren's wong, Slades, Scasies way. Home- 
croft, Francis, Lingham, Broadway, W^est field alias Sande field, Pro- 
cession meere, On went, Shedborrowe went. Harp piece, Longland, Cold- 
ham, Old Houseway, Beddingfield went, Ravens, Swaylesmeere Willowes, 
Broydland went, Pathes, ** Piece of two stetches," Millhambusse went,. 
Gunser field in Mill went, Odsdale close, otherwise Oadshall, Lingscot 
went. The Heath, Barrowes head, Blackmillelode, Brockhole dale, 
Fowesland, Rowland, Colsyard, Townsend. 

Waldringfield panra. Terriers 1813, 1834. B. Biomfield Syer, Vicar. 

Glebe lands. 2 acres 

Field names. Gummon's pit. Much field, Lower harp. 

Town lands. 12 acres in Felshani and Gedding for use of poor; 
12 acres in Little Waldringfield for use of poor ; 7 acres with barn, in 
Washbrook for use of poor, given in exchange for four acres of meadow 
iu Chelsworth, the gift of Joshua Dove ; two pieces of land in Wald- 
ringfield called Bell pieces, containing 4 acres, given for the ringing of 
the Watch Bell every night and morning from the feast of St. Michael 
to the 12th of March. 
Wangford. Terrier 1618. 

GUbe lands. Total area, 49 acres 1 rood. 

Field names. Church mere, Coolea pightle, Lynge fenn, Sharlowes^ 
Boultam. 



296 RECORDS OF THE 

" There do belong unto the parsonage forty-one acres of arable 
land, whereof sixteen acres three roods lieth in Townfield and Boultam, 
and these lands may be sown every year. There are twenty-four acres 
one rood in the shifts as they lie in sundry furlouges." 

Tithe customs. '* The Grange hath time out of mind paid two lambs 
and two stone of wool to the parson of Wangford, and the third lamb 
and the third stone of wool to the parson of Brandon ; when Wangfuitl 
Grange is sown two tithe sheaves are paid to the Wangford parson, and 
the third to Brandon. When Livermere Grange is sown it payeth two 
tithe sheaves to Brandon, and the third to Wangford, so likewise for 
hay." The lambs to be arranged into three sorts, first of all the fitads^ 
next the riggen (? riggut^ an imperfect ram) and then the pontes. 
Churching of women if the child died three-pence, if it lived seven- 
pence. Hemp by the sheaf or heate. 

The tenement Shines with Pooly pays yearly on the 9th October, 
called St. Dennis Day, fourteen pence to the parson of Wangford being 
parson of St. Dennis. 

Wattisliain. Terrier 1806. Hen. Pratt Beauchamp, Curate, 
Glebe lands. None. 

Wattisfield. Terrier 1834. Rowland Morgan, Rector. 

Glebe lands. Total area, 29 acres 3 roods 20 poles. 

Field names, Sleadway, Upwent, West Hall green. Bundle green, 
Gibbett piece, Dearbought, Kingswood green. Broom close, Foxledge, 
D'aum, Wrongland, Ostend, Longfield. 

Local terms. '* Eight stetches, four furrows to the stetch." 

Manors. Wattisfield Hall, Squirrel's Hall. 

IHthe customs. Persons stowing trees, unless for their own Orewood, 
to pay tithes. Wattisfield Hall to pay nine days cheese, i.e., from 3 May 
till every Lammas, every Tenth Day as much cheese for tithe as they 
commonly make every day. Two eggs to be paid for every hen on 
Good Friday. Churching of women, four-pence to be paid in the church 
and the parson hath his dinner of custom. Everyone that keepeth a 
plough must pay one penny. 

Toivn lands. Total area, 56 acres 3 roods 39 poles. 

Weston. Terrier 1613. Roliert Anmant, Rector. 

Glebe lands. Total area, 30 acres. 

Field names. Popelacre, Ratton lane. The Holes, Scamlets, SmalU 
wickers way. Swallow close, Manscroft, Cnibacre, Gore close, Broadacre, 
Broad wong, SufTron pane, Furre close, Crosse close, Longacre, Dennis- 
wonge, The Frith, Sleadfield. 

Westow. Terrier 1613. Wm. Hill, Rector. 

Glebe lands. Toti\l area, 28 acrea 1 rood 20 poles. 

Field names. Lentyard, Coldhome, Branbarrow, East hill, Stowhall, 
Lumpkins, Blarylockway, Blarydale, Stotterfield, The Layes, Purchase, 
Streetway. 



SUDBURY ARCHDEACONRY. 297 

Local teriM, ** The eutercoDimou field betwixt Culford and Westow, 
called Blackheath," ** One Rood of land, two furlongs in length," The 
Lajes, Chimny Mill, " Tenement land." Arable land in Culford field, 
belonging to the Manor of Word well, one-third part of the tithe 
belongeth to the Rectory of Westow. N.B. — Culford and Word well 
formed one half leet in 1185. 

Whelnethain magna. Terrier 1613 Richard Stafford, Rector. 
Glebe lands. Total area, 41 acres. 
Field names, Cobdoes, Loosecroft. 

Whelnetham XMurva. Terriers 1613, 1638. Alex. Pistor, Rector. 
Glebe lands. Total area, 16 acres. 
Field names. Chappel hill, Broad meadow. Birds close. 

W^tlierixigBet. Terrier 1801. 

Glebe lands. Total area, 56 acres 1 rood. 

Field names. Block pightle, Causeway pightle. The Down, Wren's 
park. Smokes, Little Collin^^forths, Great home, Hardlands. 

Local terms. Collingford bridge. 

Town lands. Pudding-poke hall, Mundfords, Rookes, Bell grove. 
Total area, 77 acres 2 roods. 

Tithe ciistoms. Cheese five on Midsummer day, four on Lammas 
day, the first to be made Crouchmas day (3 May). For tithe 
Hemp the tenth heate. Tithe eggs, one for each hen, two for each 
cock, the Parson to fetch them himself. 

Manors. Braham Hall, Fox Hall. 

Whepstead. Terrier 1638. Anthony Evat, Rector. 
Glebe lands. Total area, 5 acres 1 rood. 
Field names. Full well, Morewell, Pendon, Woodland. 
Manor. Manston Hall. 

Wolpit. Terriers 1613, 1801, 1813. John Watson, Rector, 1613; 
Thos. Corbould, Hector, 1801. 

Glebe lands. Total area, 34 acres 1 rood. Thirty pieces in 1801, 
35 acres and 20 poles. 

Field names. Aldfield, Spring close, Heathfield, Shipley field, 
Pale lane. Horse fair pightle, Slade close. Bread meadow, one acre. 

Church lands. 5 acres 3 roods. 

Town lands. 18 acres 1 rood 34 poles. 

WordwelL Terriers 1613, 1827, 1834. John Askew, Rector, 1613 ; 
J as. Sidney Neucatre, Rector, 1813. 

Glebe lands. Outfield (Culford lands), Infield (Wordwell lands). 
Total area, 24 acres I rood. 

Field names. Woodtield, Bracket waj. Nether spring. Lodge field, 
Rasbe Fenn, The Havens, Brand borough. Short heath. 

TitJie cusUtms. All the arable lands l)elonging to the manor of 
Wordwell, and lying in the fields of Wordwell and Culford, do pay 
tithe to the Rectory of Wordwell, only excepting two pieces, one 



298 RECORDS OF THE 

whereof contnineth five roods, the other one acre, lying in Culford 
fields, which pay one-third part of the tithe to Stow Rectory. N.B. — 
Wordwell and Culford formed otie-half Icet in 1185. 

Worlington. Terrier 1813. Rich. Burton PhilHpson, Rector, 1813. 

Gifbe lnnfi$. (On common fields of Freckenham) Total area, 2tf2 
acres 1 rood 12 poles. 

Field names. Watland field, Heath, Beck bridge, Badlingham 
bridge. 

Benefactiims. Twenty-four shillings left yearly by will of Thos. 
Blackerby, of Stowmarket, in 1688, to buy six loaves of bread weekly 
(the in -bread included) to be distributed to six poor Protestants who 
constantly attend church. £50 put out by the parish on the tolls of 
the Turnpike Hoad lending from Newmarket to Thetford. Interest 
thereof for use of the poor. 
Wratting parra. Terriers 1807. Thos. Baines, Rector. 

Glebe landi. Total area, 28 acres. 

Field names, Parkfield, Sumpfield, Dean common. Hatchment, 
Chantry Tuy, Haverhill common. Lees common. Dean common, (Sreat 
Wilsey, Wratting crofts. 



GLOSSARY OF FIELD NAMES and TERMINATIONS 

TO BE FOUND IN THE TERRIERS AND SURVEYS. 

Abel— a white poplar tree. 

Balk, bawk — a raised ridge of greensward used as a mere or dividing 

boundary between parcels of land lying in a common field. 
Beck — a small river, a streamlet. Beck bridge, Gosbeck. 
Berugh, ber burgh — a mound. Oversudberugh. 
Bracket — a broad path. Bradgate alias Bracket. 
Hruke — land broken up for cultivation. 

Breche, breck — a ditch used as a boundary. Les Breches, Short breck. 
Brode, brad — large, extensive. Brodoke, Bradfield. 
Buske — a wood, Bramblebuske. 

Butts — Archery grounds. Short butts, i.e., for children's practice. 
Carre — a reedy pool. Carbrook. 
Cauucye — a causeway, raised path. Cauncey pightle. 
Chequer — a tree, its berries called sorbs, or sorb apples, were used as 

un antidote against scurvy. The Chequer, Cornard Magna. 
Clint— a narrow valley. Middleclint went. 
Cop — the head, Copfield. 
Coote, cot — a pen, Hencoote, Overharcot. 
Crandell—? crane, dell. 
Croft — enclosed pasture. Hawcroft. 
Cup — cop, a head. Setcup. 
Dale — a woodland dale. Mapledale. 
Dell — a narrow valley. Farndell. 
Den, dene — a plain, or level valley. Borden, Sunden. 



SUDBURY ARCHDEACONRY. 299 

Dock — an enclosure. Broad Dock, Braddock. 

Dole — an object marking limits or bounds of divisions of land. 

Dowlewent. 
Down — a slope of greensward, closely fed, Rumbledown. 
Ej — an island. Great Wilsey (m^/, a stream). 
Fen — low-lying pasture land. Palmers fen. 
Ford, forth — place where a stream may be crossed on foot. Wilford, 

CoUiugforth, Sometimes corrupted into toorth. Went worth, 

near Clare. 
Foria — a headland. Stanton terrier. 
Furres — furlongs. " Nomnusland alias Nomans furres." 
Furrie — land overgrown with gorse. ** Furrie or whinny ground." 
Gate — a broad way, a cart-track. Broadgate. 
Gatlott — a narrow path. Rickiughall superior terrier. 
Ger— a corruption of various final syllables. Cunniger for Coney 

Weston, Hurringer for Homings heath. 
Gore — a triangular, or harp-shape piece of land. Gory land. 
Grave — a thick wood. Luk grave. Red grave. 

Grindel — a pathway in a hollow, a gully Stanton terrier and Horringer 
Haven — 1 a shelter. Broome haveu. [terrier. 

Ham — a wood. Gosham. " A went called The Ham." 
Hards, beards — an enclosure within Hardle for hurdle. Langland herds, 

Felsham terrier. 
Haugh — a mound. Raffehaugh. 
Haw — a hedge. Haw croft. 

Heads, heaved — headlands. Play ford headland, Peaseland heads. 
Heam —a corner. Woodhearn. 

Hey — a wood with uudergrowth, a copse. West hey, Oxen hey. 
Holme — flat land near water. Flower holme, The Holmes. 
Howe — a high mound. Gavel oke ho we, Whit howe. 
Rene — oxen. Kene stones way. 
Knoll — a small hillock. Ashen hedge knoll. 
Lawn — a woody slope of pasture. 
Language — ?lang-ridge, Hawsteud terrier. In Bromeswell survey, 1601 

a field is marked " Langridge went, alias Language went." 
Lay — a meadow. Waterlay land, Laymere. 
Legh — a headland for grass or pease. Guiding legh. 
Lesser numbering — various lengths of the perch, 16^ ft. for arable 

laud, 18^ ft for woods. 
Lode — a ford or f a stream. Black mill-lode. 
Loker — an inhabitant possessing a garden or enclosure. Ampton and 

Bacton terriers. 
Low — a bank or hill. Waploe, Buxlow. 
Lynke — ? ling, furze. Hessett terrier. 
Mere — a grass balk. *' BuUisway, called Bullismere." 

a boundary. " A meta or boundary, called Austines meer." 
March — a marsh. Morlonds merche. 

W 



300 RECORDS OF THB SUDBURY ARCHDEACONRY. 

Nab — the summit of a hill. Nabwaj, the Nabba. 

Nether — Nearer. Nether Dodington. 

Nore — a point. Upper long nore. 

Padel — a pond. Qoe-padel, Padlepit. 

Paddook — pad a path, dock an endoaure. 

Parrock — enclosure of field and woodland, a park. Horringer. 

Pane — a shallow pit made to retain water. Saffron pane. 

Pin, pjnne — a pen for cattle. West leather pin. 

Pightle — small enclosure of pasture. Blew pightle. 

Place — a close. 

Planche, plnsh — a shallow pool of water. The Plance common. 

Point — a nore. Angel point. 

Pol — a pool. 

Qualm. — execution. Qualmstowe, i.e. Gallows Hill. 

Quareutine — a furlong. ** Quarentine, called Woodsden fbrlong." 

Ray don — alias Rojdon. 

Riggs — ridge. '* A piece of four riggs." Norton. 

Rowe — a hedge. Thickrowe acre. 

Sink — a miry swamp. Alsons sinke. 

Shot — a headland ''wide enough for four or five horses to turn." 

Barningham. 
Shaw — a wood. Cutshaw. 

Shukke — an ill-conditioned creature or object. Shukkethomeway. 
Sitting, set — grass enclosure near a farmstead. Homesitting, Hedgeaet, 

Greenset. 
Skott — a horse. Brunskott 
Slade — a valley. Sladefield, Sclead way. 
Snape — 9 a spring in arable ground. 

Sponge — marshy grassland sear a stream. Euston terrier. 
Stetch — land lying between two furrows. Lilly stetch. 
Stadium — a fnrlong. " A stadium called Middlewent.'' 
Stihe, stie, sty — path or lane, Overstyes, Sybsty, Ansty. 
Stow — a place. Pleistow, Dualinstowe. 
Thorpe — a cluster of dwellings. Blackthorpe. 
Ton — an enclosed yard, an orchard. Prests appelton. 
Tre, try — a croft. Galtry. 

Tye— an extent of common pasture. Gostye, Berkingtye. 
Virgate — one-fourth of a hide, i.e.y 30 acres, but in Rattlesdeu survej 

mention is made of a virgate containiug 20 acres. 
Wall — a raised balk or mere. 
Went — a parcel of land surrounded by a path or way. Clipston went, 

Hon i ton terrier. 
Well — a spring Goswell, Laniswell. 

Wong, onge — a large extent of arable land. Rowonge. Mickelwong. 
Worth, werde — a nook of laud lying between two rivers. Onglesworth. 
Wrang, wrong — twisted, crooked, stunted vegetation, hence poor soil. 

Wrongland, The Wrongs, Wrangoke, cf. Camoke, caw, bent. 



301 

NOTES ON SUFFOLK CASTLES. \J 
By Vincent B. Redstone. 

L HAUGHLEY CASTLE and its PARK. 

The site of Haughley Castle, with its irregularities of 
surface, caused by the artificial mound with its encircling 
moat, and the rectangular enclosures similarly surrounded, 
presents to the mind much food for reflection. We are 
led to consider, who, or what workmen were engaged in 
throwing up this defensive earthwork ; what was the 
character of the fortress reared upon the mound ; and by 
what fate it was destroyed. A search among early 
chronicles throws little light upon the subject, and we 
are compelled to base our knowledge of its history upon 
a comparison of the earthworks as they now remain, with 
those of which we have reliable information as to their 
construction. A few scanty records bearing on its history, 
however, remain, and will assist us to form a judgment as 
to the origin and character of the Castle. The plan of 
Haughley Castle and its defences presents a resemblance to 
that of Eye Castle, which was probably constructed about 
the same period. Before dwelling upon the history of 
the owners and occupiers of the site, we will examine the 
nature of the defences as shown in the recent Ordnance 
Survey. 

The most striking feature is the artificial mound with 
its level summit. The diameter of the inner circle of the 
enclosing moat is 70 yards, and if we measure this 
diameter from the passage over the moat, proceeding at 
the same time due north, we shall find the summit is not 
concentric with the moat, for the distance from the 
entrance to the summit is 26^ yards, but only half the 
distance lies between the northern edge of the summit 
and the nearest part of the moat. The diameter of the 



302 HAUQHLEY CASTLE 

summit itself is 26^ yards. These measurements at once 
speak to us of design, and we note that the engineer of the 
work conceived it necessary to protect the south side 
more securely than the north, because the approach lay in 
that direction, where the highway passed by. The path 
leading to the castle wound up the steep sides of the 
slope eastward. Further protection was afforded to the 
entrance side by making the moat at that place 8 yards 
(nearly 9 yards) in width, whilst in the north the moat 
was only four yards wide. 

Further, no admittance to the mound entrance could 
he gained without first passing through a rectangular 
enclosure, in length measuring 130 yards, and in breadth 
80 to 110 yards, the longest side running due east and 
west. The surrounding moat is 7| yards wide ; the 
passage across it was over the eastern side. This passage 
was protected by another rectangular moated enclosure on 
the east, where the buildings of Castle Farm now stand. 

The mound has all the characteristics of one on 
which a wealthy landowner, Saxon, Dane or Norman, in 
the first half of the llth century reared his fortified 
dwelling, surrounded by massive timber defences, for 
himself and family ; and which no enemy could approach 
without first passing through the enclosure reserved for 
his retainers. If this conjecture is right, and I see no 
reason to doubt it, we learn from Domesday that Good- 
mund, who had his hall on this spot in the days of 
Edward the Confessor, was the probable author of these 
defensive works. In his days Haughley was an important 
place, for it gave its name to one of the four Honours 
which existed at the time of the Conquest ; the Honours 
of Eye and Clare were of subsequent creation. We may 
therefore consider Haughley Castle to have been one of the 
earliest castles founded in Suffolk. 

The Domesday Survey tells us that Breme, a neigh- 
bouring landowner lost his life on the field of Senlac, that 
his lands were given to Hugh de Montfort, who also acquired 
the hall and estates of Goodmund. This baron was the 



AND ITS PARK. 303 

Constable, upon whom fell the duty of regulating the 
supplies of William's anny. He is said to have furnished 
the Norman Duke with 50 ships and 60 knights, when he 
set sail for England. Unlike the majority of Normans, 
De Montfort was unshaven, and bore the name of Hugh 
with the beard. As a reward for his services at the 
battle of Hastings, he received 114 lordships, 51 of which 
were in Suffolk. Haughley Castle was his principal seat, 
which, doubtless, he further strengthened and fortified. 
He lost his life in a duel with Walcheline de Ferrers ; his 
son Hugh, succeeded to his estates, and as General of the 
army of William ii. he retained the Honour of Hagenet 
or Haughley (known as the Honor Constabularie) until 
the year 1100, when, having favoured the cause of Robert 
against his brother Henry i., he lost his estates and 
departed on a crusade to the Holy Land. From a state- 
ment made in the Pipe Rolls for 15 Hen. ii. (1169), it 
appears that Gilbert de Gant, a grandson of Alice de 
Montfort, daughter of Hugh, the first Constable of that 
name, held Haughley castle and manor. He was a warm 
supporter of Stephen, with whom he was captured at the 
battle of Lincoln, 1141. He gave a great part of the 
estate to Gilbert de Ver, and also lands to William, son 
of Hervey, a freeman at the time of the Domesday 
Survey. When a prisoner, Gilbert de Gant was forced 
to marry Rohais, daughter of Wm., Earl of Lincoln, and 
niece to Ralph, Earl of Chester. Henry ii. at his accession 
resumed his right over the Haughley lands ; and upon 
the marriage of his daughter Matilda to Henry the Lion, 
Duke of Saxony, demanded an aid of 20s. from the town. 
This monarch marched rapidly throughout his dominions, 
fortifying the castles in his hands, and erecting new ones 
as at Orford, and Walton near Felixstowe, to overawe and 
subdue rebel barons such as Hugh Bigod. The king 
deprived Beckett of the Honor of Eye in 1 164, strengthened 
its castle, and, probably, at the same time increased the 
defences of Haughley, although its position did not give 
it the strategical importance belonging to the coast and 



304 HAUGHLKY CASTLE 

border fortresses. These newly erected castles of Orford 
and Walton were able to withstand the attack of Robert, 
Earl of Leicester, and his Flemings, in 1173, their 
garrisons each numbered 100 men ; but Haughley, with a 
small force of 30 men under Ralph de Broc, was not able 
to withstand the combined assault made by the 1400 
Flemish mercenaries and Bigod's followers. The 30 soldiers 
and their leader were held to ransom, the castle was 
destroyed and burnt. Its destruction by fire seems to 
imply that it was constructed largely of timber. The 
castle appears never to have been rebuilt, for no notice is 
taken of it hereafter, although frequent mention is made 
of this royal manor, and of the visits to Haughley made 
by the king. Ralph de Broc was one of Beckett's 
bitterest enemies. At the Council of Northampton, it 
was " this rufiian adventurer,'' who rushed upon the 
Archbishop with cries of " Traitor, traitor " ; he held the 
custody of the archi-episcopal estates for four years, and, 
although excommunicated, would not give them up; at 
Saltwood Castle he presided over the council which 
planned the murder of Becket ; and his presence at 
Haughley is probably due to the fact that he was holding 
the Honor of Eye, which was taken from the archbishop. 

After the destruction of the Castle the history of 
Haughley is centred around its Royal manor and park. 
The manor was placed out to ferme by Henry ii. to 
Robert fitz Isilie and Ralph of Rochester; and in the 
31st year of his reign to Wm. de Assheford and Robert 
de Welles, when it brought into the Treasury a revenue 
of £55 18s. 8d. One of the means, adopted by Richard i. 
to obtain money that he might embark on the Crusade, 
was the sale of Royal estates, and it is probable that when 
he bestowed the hand of his niece, Matilda of Saxony 
(1187), upon Count Thos. de Perche, he gave with her, 
as dowry, the manor of Haughley, for upon the death of 
this noble at the Fair of Lincoln (1218), this estate 
formed part of his possessions, and by forfeiture once 
more reverted to the King. Henry iii. bestowed the 



AND ITS PARK. 305 

manor upon his brother Richard, Earl of Cornwall, King 
of Sicily and Emperor of Germany, but, owing to the 
support given by this Prince and his son Edmund to the 
rebellious barons, it was again forfeited. Richard, Earl of 
Cornwall, began in 1246, and finished, at an expense of 
10,000 marks, in 1251, a noble Abbey for monks of the 
Cistercian Order at Hales, or Tray, in Gloucestershire. 
He endowed this Abbey with part of his Haughley estates, 
and it was the duty of the Abbot to maintain the gallows 
erected in Luberlow Field. The patronage of the church 
was in the possession of these monks, who, at the time 
when numerous benefices were held by Italian priests, 
nominated, in 1255, to this living, Master John de Monte 
Luelli. This priest had an indulgence from the Pope, 
whereby he was permitted to hold at the same time two 
other benefices with cure of souls. 

The Keeper of the manor was distinct from the 
Parker or Warrener, and between the two personages 
constant disputes arose. Edmund, Earl of Cornwall, 
brought his park-keeper from the neighbourhood of his 
religious house at Hales, and conferred upon him by 
charter an annuity of 45s. 6d. and a robe, which was to be 
supplied to him by the keeper of the Haughley manor. 
When the manor was in the hands of Edward ii., John de 
Morewode, keeper of the manor, refused to grant this 
annuity to Hugh de Treie, which he and his father had 
received for many years. Morewode was dismissed from 
his oflice (1313), and Gilbert de Ruston was appointed in his 
stead ; but it appears he was unable to cope with the 
outlaws, who broke into the park, murdered John King, 
the newly-appointed keeper, and stole the King's deer. 
Like Robin Hoods company, these outlaws had among 
them a green-wood priest, Reginald de Denham, rector of 
the church of Tofts, who, upon payment of the sum of 
60 marks, re3eived pardon for stealing deer. He had for 
an accomplice a member of a notorious poaching family, 
Richard, brother of John de Tendringge, who atoned for 
the murder of King by a payment of £20 to the 



306 HADOHLKY OASTLK AND ITS PARK. 

Exchequer, Fines and imprisonment did not deter 
priest or people from these practices. In the year 1318, 
when the manor was assigned to Margaret, Countess of 
Cornwall, the King's niece, and afterwards to her husband, 
Hugh Daudele, John, the bailiff and chaplain of Norton, 
was cast into prison for deer stealing. William de Marny, 
under the plea of attending the funeral of a relative, 
Roger Fillol, the King's yeoman, of Hadleigh, made his 
escape from gaol, to which he had been committed for the 
same offence. 

Although the Castle had been destroyed, a substantial 
residence or hall must have been standing on the spot in 
these days, for in 1325 Edward ii. and his Court, after 
keeping Christmas and New Year's Day at Bury St. 
Edmund's, made a stay of a week at Haughley before 
proceeding to South Elmham. 

Upon the creation of Robert de Ufford as Earl of 
Ufford in 1339, the castle, manor, and honor of Eye, and 
the manors of Thorndon and Haughley, were conferred 
upon him. The town and manor of Haughley had a 
yearly value of £126 5s. 74d. This change of lords did 
not check deer-poaching raids, for in 1341 Jn. Marcys, of 
Stowmarket, Rich. Sone, Thos. Chaundelour, Nicholas 
Treye, of Haughley, and others, robbed the park of its 
deer, and to prevent their capture by the sheriff's officers, 
armed themselves and resorted to Stowmarket Church, 
which they held as a fortress. After the death in 1389 of 
Isabella, Countess of Suffolk, widow of the last of the 
Uffbrds, Haughley park and manor was assigned to the 
unfortunate Wm. de la Pole, Earl of Suffolk, who was 
beheaded in a boat 1450. The Haughley estates formed 
part of the possessions of Charles Brandon, Duke of 
Suffolk, who, on the 1st August, 1515, granted them to 
the keeping of his relative, Sir Thos. Tyrrell, and they 
remained in the hands of the Tyrrell family within the 
memory of some of the present inhabitants of Haughley. 
I find in a Haughley rental for 1390 the name of Tyrrell 
appears as John Tarel. 



307 



HAUGHLEY CHURCH NOTES. 

1S9S, A relaxation of six years and six quadragene to penitents, 
who on the Feasts of the Invention and Exaltation of the Holy Cross, 
and that of the Dedication, visit and give alms for the conservation of 
the Chapel of St. Cross, in the parish church of Haughley. 

Papal Letters, p. 456. 

Same date. Probably the following gift resulted from the above 
relaxation. Laud to the extent of 1 acre 3 roods, formerly belonging to 
Alice Good wine and late John Spring, was held by Edward Wulleman, 
John Glaunvylle, and Wm. Cook, procurators of Haughley Church, to 
use and common profit of church aforesaid. Rental, temp. Rich, ii.. 
Record Office. 



308 



II. BURGH CASTLE, 

There is throughout the whole of Suffolk no place of 
deeper interest to archaeologists than Burgh Castle. These 
remains carry our thoughts far hack into the dawn of the 
History of our Isle, and conduct us through a course of 
events marked by fierce struggles. The greatest sceptic 
will not venture to assert that the Romans founded do 
station here, when he beholds the massive walls with their 
layers of Roman tiles standing before him. There is no 
record of the Roman occupation of this site, yet, however, 
besides the abundant supply of fictile fragments which lie 
scattered over the surface after the plough has done its 
work, many interesting objects have at various times been 
discovered, which seem to confirm the tradition that Burgh 
Castle was in its earliest days the site of a Roman Camp. 

1 do not however consider the place was occupied by 
a large garrison of Roman horse soldiers, as some writers 
assert, but that a defensive work was erected to answer 
the purpose of a fort, and that when, during the later 
years of the Roman occupation, a more peaceful aspect 
prevailed over the district subsequently known as East 
Anglia, many dwellings arose within the area enclosed by 
these massive walls. 

The earliest allusion to this settlement, if we may 
give credit to the statement made by Stevenson in his 
edition of Bede's Ecclesiastical History, (a) is that of the 
venerable writer, who alludes to the missionary work of 
St. Fursey, the Irish priest, in this neighbourhood. Bede 
records St. Fursey to have seen his vision in his youth in 
his Irish monastery, and not in his East Anglian cell. 
But it is difficult to state what authority Stevenson had 
for considering the Cnobheresburg of Bede to be Burgh 
Castle. Let me here point out that it is erroneous to 
consider the ground within the walls was the site of 
" Heresburga," or, in other words, " a station for an army."^ 



BURGH CASTLE. 309 

It is true the Danish army is mentioned throughout the 
Anglo Saxon Chronicle as the " here,'' whilst the Saxon 
army is always spoken of as the " fyrd " ; but the Scandi- 
navian pirates dwelt upon " haughs," or roamed the seas, 
and did not trust themselves within " burhs." 

The statement made by Bede is to the eflfect that 
St. Fursey erected a monastery upon the place granted to 
him by King Sigbert. This monastery was in the midst 
of a woodland, and pleasantly situated near the sen coast, 
and was erected within a certain fort, which in the days 
of the writer was called by the Angles Cnobheresburg, 
" id est urhs QiobheriJ' (a) or, in other words, the city 
of Cnobhere. This monastery was enriched by King 
Anna, the successor of Sigbert, and his nobles, who 
erected extensive buildinep and bestowed upon it 
numerous votive offerings. 

If, then, Burgh Castle be the old site of Cnobheres- 
burg, this land, now destitute of all sign of habitations, 
was once teeming with a busy population — priests, monks, 
and people. Should the opportunity ever be afforded to 
investigate the nature and character of the many interest- 
ing relics of the past which may lie buried beneath this 
soil, we shall probably find numerous traces of the home- 
life of the Angles who dwelt here in the seventh century. 

It is well to notice that Bede speaks of the place as a 
** castrum," or fort, and as an " urbs," or city, and not as 
a camp. Under these circumstances, I do not think it 
surprising that we see only three walls standing, for it is 
probable a west wall never existed ; the foundations which 
were discovered by Harrod in his investigations may have 
been those of a road, and not of a wall. It is strange that 
all writers who have sought to clear up the mysteries 
surrounding this place have not turned their attention to 
the existence of roads, whereby an easy access might be 
made either to the river-side or inland. 

Assuming that this site was selected by the Romans 
in order to check the inroads of the Danes and Saxons, 
and that a garrison was established to carry out this 



310 BURGH CASTLR. 

object, we must not expect to discover weapous and 
military accoutrements to verify the fact Anyone who 
traverses the enclosed space can collect for himself relics 
of the Roman occupation, but he must not hope to find, 
as a native confessed to me that he had found, a coin 
stamped with the date a.d. 148. He will come across 
many fragments which mark the various callings of the 
citizen rather than of the soldier. All Roman camps 
were established in favourable places near rivers, where 
the dyer, potter, and tile maker could carry on their 
trades under the most favourable circumstances. 

It will be seen from the reference made to Bede's 
Ecclesiastical History, that the term Castle, as applied to 
these remains, is not a misnomer. The term Castle was 
given to many Saxon " Burhs," or moated mounds, which 
the Normans made further secure by the addition of 
palisades of timber, and described as " Castels." Here, 
although there was an abundant supply of timber, the 
Norman engineer, Ralph, upon whom William had be- 
stowed the manor and church of " Burch" found the burh 
sufficiently protected by the existence of massive flint 
walls. I would suggest that the mound discovered by 
Ives within the enclosure was the defensive earthwork 
whence the place derived its name " Burgh," and not the 
site of the Proetorium. There does not appear to be any 
record of the occupation of this space after the Conquest, 
and we must look among the records of the Priory of 
Bromholm (6) for any possible account of its subsequent 
history. I do not find the place mentioned as Burgh 
Castle before 1 534 (c) ; any earlier reference has been under 
the name of Burgh St. Peter — the church of the village is 
dedicated to St. Peter. The terrier for 1611 mentions the 
Castle ditch, as if the walls were surrounded by a moat in 
those days. 

For a description of the remains as they now stand I 
am indebted to the scholarly paper on Roman Suffolk 
written by the well-known Silchester excavator, Mr. G. E. 

Fox, F.S.A. 



BURGH CASTLE. 311 

According to the plan on the Ordnance Survey 
map, the walls enclose a quadrangular area roughly 
640 feet long by 413 feet wide, the walls being 9 feet 
thick, with a foundation 12 feet in width. The angles of 
the station are rounded. The eastern wall is strengthened 
by four solid bastions, one standing against each of the 
rounded angles, the other two intermediate, and the north 
and south sides have one each, neither of these being in 
the centre of the side, but rather west of it. The quaggy 
ground between the camp and the stream would be an 
excellent defence against sudden attack. 

There is one peculiarity in the construction of wall 
and bastion which must be noted. For a height of some 
7 feet from the ground the bastions are not bonded into 
the wall ; above that height, for the remaining 7 feet 
10 inches, they are bonded into it. 

The solid towers have round holes in the tops 2 feet 
deep and 2 feet in diameter, which may possibly indicate 
some method of planting ballistae upon them, though 
from the restricted diameter of each bastion, only 15 feet, 
there would be little space for such engines to work in. 

The southern wall of the station is an obtuse angle 
with the eastern one, evidently with the intention of 
bringing the s w. angle of the enclosure as near the river 
as possible. Two objects seem to have been present to 
the minds of the builders of the station — the first, to- 
dominate the waterway, the second, to occupy a position 
high above the marshes, for the sake of overlooking as 
wide an extent of the neighbouring country as possible. 

Only two gates remain — the east, which is the principal 
one, and the north, which is only a postern 5 feet wide, 
situated to the west of the tower on that side. The 
eastern gate has a width of 1 1 feet 8 inches. It is in the 
centre of the eastern wall, and is commanded by towers, 
though those are more than 100 feet on each side of it. 

The body of the walls is of flint rubble concrete, and 
they have lacing courses of tiles, six of which may yet be 
seen. These courses run two tiles deep into the wall, and 



312 BCR6H CASTLE. 

are three in width. The spaces between these tile courses 
vary from 1 foot 8 inches to 2 feet 1 inch in width, show- 
ing a faced flint facing. The walls are faced on the inside, 
but the lacing courses are irregular and fewer than on the 
outside, and the flint facing is ruder also. 

The mortar employed in the outer facing is pink 
with coarsely pounded tile. 

I do not consider that the well which lies beneath the 
hanger, or cliff*, towards the north, can be a Roman well, 
as such wells were for the most part square in formation. 
Its sides certainly do not appear of so early a date. It 
may be the well known in early deeds as Elbeswell, 
wherein the cattle feeding upon the adjacent marshes 
found a supply of fresh water. 

Note A, Bede. Bist, EccL, Vol, III. chap. 19. 

Verum dum adhuc Sigberet regni infulas teneret, supervenit de 
Hibemia vir sanctus nomine Fureeus verbo et aotibus clarus sed et 

egregiis insignia virtutibus qui cum ad provinciam OrientHlium 

pervenisset Anglorum, susceptus est honorifice a rege pnefato et 
solitum sibi opus evangelizandi exsequens multos est ezemplo virtutis 
ad Christum convertit 

Ubi quadam infirmitate corporis arreptus angelica meriut visione 
perfrui, in qua admonitus est coepto verbi ministerio seduhis insistere 

vigilisque erat nutefn monasterium sitvanum et maris vicinitate 

amoenum conttructum in castro quodam quod lingua Anglorum Cnob- 
heresburg, id est urbs Cnobkeri^ vacatur, quod iude rex provinoiae illius 
Anna ac nobiles quique augustioribus aedifiois ac donaris adomarunt 
erat autem vir iste de nobilissimo genere Scottorum, sed longe animo 
quam came uobilior 

Quid multaf procedente tempore et ipse sibi monasterium in quo 
liberius caelestibus vacaret construxit : ubi correptus infirmitate, sicut 
libellus de vita eius conscriptus sufficieuter edocet, raptus est e 
corpora et a vespere usque ad galli cantum corpore exutus angelicorum 
agminum 

Cum ergo, ut ad superiora redeamus, multis annis in Scottia verbum 
dei omnibus adnuntians tumultus inruentium turbarum non facile 
ferret, relictis omnibus quse habere videbatur, ab ipsa quoque insula 
putria discessit et paucis eum fratribus per Bretonnes in provinciam 
Anglorum devcnit ibique praedicans verbum, ut diximus, monasterium 

construxit reliquit monasterii et animarum curam fratri suo 

Fullano et presbyteris Gobbano et Dicullo navigavit Gal Ham. 



BURGH CASTLE. 313 



NoUB. 



The following reference to the manor of Burgh Castle is from the 
late Lord John Hervey's translation of "The Hundred Rolls, 2nd 
Edward i." :— 

". . . the township of Burgh in Lothingland is a sergeancy 
of the lord Ring, and that the father of the lord King that now is had 
that township for some time, and afterwards granted it by his charter 
to the Prior and Monks of Bromholm, saving nevertheless to him and 
his heirs the advowson of the church of that township, which advowson 
the King himself afterwards conferred upon the Prior and Canons of 
Herringfleet." 

The contiuuator of Blomfield, vol. xi., p. 23 (Rev. Chas. Parkin, m.a.. 
Rector of Oxburgh, Norfolk), quoting from the Bromholm Cartulary 
2 and 3, states : — 

" King Henry i. gave the manor of Burgh to Vincent, the prior, 
which Ralph son of Roger de Hurgh held of him in Burgh in Lothing- 
land, by serjeantry, which serjeantry Ralph granted to Gilbert de 
Wesenham, and he afterwards regranted it to the King and the King 
confirmed the manor free to the Convent, reserving the advowson to 
the crown, and the dower of Alice, widow of Roger de Burgo for her 
life, and in consideration of this grant, the Convent released to the 
King, a rent charge of five marks per annum from the Exchequer which 
the King had granted in honour of the Holy Cross" 

The monarch should be Henry iii., not Henry i. Vincent was prior 
of Bromholm 21 Henry iii. The Holy Cross was brought into England, 
according to Mathew Paris, in 1223. Gilbert de Wesenham, in 
26 Henry iii., paid half a mark as a fine for not accompanying the 
King into Gascony. 

This fact is further confirmed by a reference to the Register of Brom- 
holm Monastery now in the Cambridge University Library, M.m. ii., 20. 

Fol. 6. April 20th, 1246.— "Carta Regis de mauerio de Burgo in 
Ludyuglond.'' 

Fol. 7. Sept. 10th, 1312.— "Carta Regis Edward ii. confirmat 
Burgo." 



NoU a 

There is a very complete record of the Manor Courts of Burgh 
Castle, commencing Hen. vii., also 41 Eliz. 1 — 7, Jas. i. — Record Office. 
Court RoIIh. Portfolio 203, No. 12 ; and No. 93. 

The latter, folio 13, commences with the records of the first court 
of Nathaniel Bacon, arm., and Dorothy his wife, guardians of William 
and Robert Smythe, generosi, held 13 June, 41 Eliz. 



314 BUROH CASTLE. 

SURVEY OF LOTHINGLAND IN 1574. 

[S,P, Dom. Elizabeth, Vol. 171, No. 6S.] 

" The island is in circuit between 29 and 30 miles ; it oontaineth [ ] 
parishes ; it is environed near 20 miles towards the land with a great 
river and other fresh waters, which be in some places about eight score 
yards over and some places more and some places less. And in the 
wide waters the depth of some places four fadome, most of two or three 
fadome, some places are sholder, but the straightest and the sholdest 
places being navigable for lighters or great burden. Other places 
thereof is environed with Yermothe Haven which ebbeth and floweth 
and meeteth with the said fresh waters and is in some place a mile 
broad and in some places deeper and in other some sholder, but 
navigable as aforesaid. Where it is most sholder and where the 
waters be sholdeRt It is contpassed with Marshes of great breadth on 
both sides the Ryvers. And the main sea environeth the said island 
about six miles and meeteth with the said waters at the one end of the 
Island and meeteth them at the other end within a flighte-shoote where 
the ground is verie low and was an havens mouth sometimes. And 
may as it seemeth in a short space be cut through again without any 
great charge and the passages in to and out of the Island are very easy 
to be kept. And so the island seemeth to be very great defence for 
itself, both against the Sea and by land for none can come to it from 
the sea in the night time neither in the day time without sufferance of 
the Island if it be planted for defence as it was in King Henry the 
eight his daies, by reason of the sands in the sea which be as a wall to 
the same haven a road for ships within. 

** The means for outward defence in the judgement of the wiser sort 
to have their places of defence reduced to their ancient strength even 
such as were in Her Majesty's fathers days provided to be contynued 
(videlt) the three old Bulwarks to be reared of new at the charge of 
the Island and country adjacent. The blockhouse being now eaten up 
of the sea, which was so planted as y* did beate the South and North 
Roade, to be built of new and so planted as it may serve most to avoid, 
and then the Bulwarks and Blockhouses being stored with a convenient 
proportion of ordanance cannot (in our poor judgement) but make a 
strong resistance against all attempts of invasion of sea which 
ordanances we are humble suitors for the Island unto all your good 
lordships that you will be means for them unto Her Majesty that they 
may be once furnished of. And they be bound for ever after to main- 
tain them at their own and the country's charge because the old are 
verie few and utterly unserviceable." 

The later paragraphs deal with the men residing in the island, 
armour and weapons, captains, fertility of the island, traitors and 
*' poseessyoners " there ; also the government of the island. 

There exists in the same volume of State Papers a sketch, or plan of 
the Island of Lothingland, its churches, block-houses, mansions, roads, tScc. 



315 



III. METTINGHAM COLLEGE and CASTLE, 1562. 



Com. Suff. The viewe <fe Survey of the manors of Mettingham, 
Ilkensall, & Shippmedowe in the sajde Countje of 
Suff. there made by John Hill sf ante to the righte 
honorable S^ Nycholas Bacon, Knight, lorde keap 
of the great Seale the xxV^ daye of December in the 
fyfte yeare of the reign e of our so^aigne ladye 
Elizabeth by y« grace of god of England, ffrannce, 
and Ireland, Quene defender of y« faythe &^. Anno 
1562 as followyth. 

That is to saye 
The descripcon of the mannor. 

The saide mannor of Mettingham is scituate in the Northest borders 
of the Countye of Suff. one mile from Bongaye three miles from 
Beccles fiket Townes eighte miles from Leystofte and 12 myles from 
yarmouthe haven Townes in a Countrie plenty full of wood pasture 
errable lande & meadowe the nature of the soyle very good and hol- 
some to inhabit upon A, the said mannors extende into the Townes & 
pishes of mettingham S*. Johns of Ilkensatt S*. Margaretts St. Andrewes 
St. Agnes S^. Laurence Bongaye Becles & Elloughe and the woods 
growing within the sayde mannors are solde at highe prises because 
y* same maye be conveyed to London by waiter for there cometh within 
one myle & a halfe of the Castell y« Ryver runynge from Becles w^ 
wyll beare a kele or barge of xx** tunne. The woods are pte coppes 
ft pte tymber. Vf^^ are for y* moste parte stand inge within one 
myle ft a halfe of y* water verie mete to be conveyed to London or to 
any other parte of the Real me by Water as well for fyre wood as for 
tymber and are ptelye replenyshed withe ashe which is very muche 
desired of coopers to make barrells for y® costes of Suff. & Norif. in 
herringe tyme. 

The gatehouse and other decaied lodgings. 

The Scyte of the Castell standyth at the Sou t best corner of the 
comen called Mettingham grene inclosed rounde aboute withe a mote 
and a fayer stone wall conteyniuge in height xxx^ foote and in 
thickness three foote but decayed in some places. And at thintre into 
the same staudithe a gate house well and strouglye bylded the walles 
of stone, and above over the gate a fayer Chamber with a chymney 
nowe decayed by reason of the taking of the leade whiche covered the 
same where before the leade was taken awaye over the same chamber 

X 



316 METTIN6HAM COLLBGE 

wfts a fayer tower where was a goodlye specie to view Townee and 
Tillagea there aboutes and also moste pte of the demeanee of the same 
mannor were within the view of the same. And the Gatehouse coa- 
taineth in length zxii^ foote and in bredthe zvij foote but will decaje 
out of hande if it be not shortleje covered. And adiojninge on the 
est sjde of the said gate house are dy^s lodgings as well above as 
benethe for the Porter and lodgings for sv^nts whereof remajneth on! je 
the walles of stone, the tjmber and coveringe whereof are utterly 
decayed. 

The Courte. 

And within the gate house is a fayer large base courte conteyning in 
length two hundred fytie eighte foote, and in bredth, oue hundred 
fiftie two foote inclosed on thest North and West withe the Stone wall 
and on y® South withe y* buyldings and lodgings of the mansyon house. 

The Porche and the Chamber above it. 

And on the South syde of the Courte ys a fayer Porche ledinge into 
the hall conteyninge in length xiij foote and in bredth viij foote withe 
a Chamber over the same wherein is a chymney and a wyndowe 
openinge into the Courte well glased the walles of stone and covered 
with leade. 

The hall. 

And within the porch is a fayer large hall withe an open roof covered 
withe tyle conteyninge in length xlvj foote and in breadth xxx foote 
wherein is a chymney on the north syde, the Walles of stone with one 
yle on e^y syde covered withe leade conteyninge in length xlvi foote 
and in breadth vi foote with vii spouts of leade to the same yies and 
gutters of leade descending from the toppe of the hall into the same 
spouts the flower of the same hall well paved with bricke. 

The p'lour. 

And at the ende of the hall is a verie fayer plour conteyninge in 
length XXV** foote and in breadth xviij foote withe a large chymney on 
the est syde and a fayer baye wyndowe of stone glased openinge at the 
South ende into a lyttle Court which adioyneth to the mote inclose on 
the southe syde withe a stone walle betwene the Courte & the mote. 
And the plour ys verie fayer seled with waynescott carved with knoppes 
fayer gilte hanginge downe and withe two fayer benches of waynescott 
and the flower lx)rded with oke. And the armes of the last master of 
Coll edge rounde about the same parlour fayer gilte. 

The pHour chamber. 

And over the same parlour is a fayer chamber called the plour 
chamber conteyning in length xxv foote and in breadth xviii foote with 
a fayer chimney Je but little decayed the wyndowe whereof is well 
glased & openeth towards the South into the forsaid Courte. 



AND CASTLE. 317 

The vestry ds ye vestrye chamber. 

And adioyning to the plour on thest sjde js a Chamber somtjroe 
called the vestrie Chamber withe two Chambers above yt adioynge to 
the yestrie whiohe are uncovered & sore decayed & the vestrie adioyn- 
inge to the same ys utterly decayed. 

The pantrie. 

And at the nether ende of the hall on the south syde ys the pantry 
seled cofit in length xviij foote & in breadth xij foote the walles of 
stone co^ed with tyle. 

The buttrie. 

And at the nether ende of the hall on the northe syde nere the 
hall dore is the buttrye seled and paved with stone conteyninge in 
length xx^ foote and in breadth xviii foote the walles of stone. 

The larder. 

And adioyuinge to the buttrie at the Weste ende is the larder con- 
teyninge in length xij foote <k in breadth viij foote the walles of stone. 
The wine celler. 

And next unto that on the Weste Ende is the Wyne celler whiche 
hath byn used for Wyne but in my opynyon not mete for that purpose, 
because it is verie little it conteyneth in length x foote & in breadthe 
viij foote. 

The lodginges over the buttrie Pantrie Wyne celler it larder. 

And at the hall door is a payer of stayers leading up into an olde 
decayed Gallery where on the southe syde of the same over the pantrey 
buttrey larder k wyne celler is a storye Whearein are vij chambers 
ptiely decayed. Whereof fower have chimneys and two houses of 
office, and somtyme weare called the Gestes Chambers and ^ved to laye 
Strangers in And on the southe syde of the same ys a payer of stayers 
descendinge downe into the little Courte that adioyneth to the mote 
covered with leade on the toppe conteyninge in length iiij foote di & 
in breathe iij foote. 

The entrie. 

And at the nether ende of the hall is a fayer entrie conteyninge in 
length liiij foote and in breadthe x foote. 

The Kytehyn^ boyling house and theire necessarie chambers. 

And at the nether ende of the entrie is a Chamber withe a Chimney, 
whiche belyke s'ved for the Clarke of the Kytchyn, and adioyning to 
that is the Kitchyn whearein ys one raunge, and the Kytchyn con- 
teyneth in length xxx foote, and in breadth xxvi foote and above that 
ys a little chamber over the boylinge house at the West end, whiche 
belyke was for lodginges for the cookes. And next the Kytchyn is the 
boylinge house at the West ende conteyninge in length xxiiij foote and 
in breadth xij foote wythe a chymney in yt partelye decayed. All 
whiche sayde houses weare covered withe leade, butt nowe are 
uncovered wherebye they are greately decayed. 



318 METTINGHAM COLLKOE 

The hakfhotue yard. 

And at the West end of the Kjtohin is the bakehouse jarde con- 
tejninge in lengthe one hundred and eighte foote and in breadth xxxij 
foote and on the South was the slaughter house and other offices lately 
pulled down. 

The bakehouse, brewhouse, and maltinge h*nue. 

And at the Weste end of that is the bakehouse, brewhouse, and 
maltinge house, but are decayed because theye were covered withe leade, 
and are now uncovered which is thonly cause of theire decaye and 
there are neyther leads nor brewinge vessels. 

The atorehotue. 

And ou the uorthe side of the sayd bakehouse-yard ys a house called 
the store house conteyning in lengthe xxxvj and in breadthe xviij foote, 
the flower planuched with oke and in it a chamber to laye apples in the 
roofe covered withe tyie. 

Cynnyhalle mthe a buttrie and one chamber. 

One fayer house adioynge to the store house at the North ende cno- 
teyninge in length xxij foote aud in breadth xviij foote called Cynnye 
halle with a chymney and the wyndowes well glased withe a lyttle 
buttrey and one other chamber adjoyinge at ihe West ende. 

The lodgings over Cynny halle and the malte c]iamh\ 

And o# the same halle and buttrie ys a storye whearein are two 
chambers whereof one bathe a chymney and a house of office. And 
adjoining to them at y® West ende is a chamber to laye malte in withe 
a payer of stayers decending into y« malte house. 

The Stable. 

The Stable incloseth parte of the northe syde of the Court <fe 
adjoyneth to the gate-house verie large conteyninge in length Ixxvj 
foote & in breadth xxvj foote and it fawted x for above it was a fayer 
rome to laye in haye but is decayed because the coveringe of leade is 
taken awaye, & the raigne cominge in hathe rotted the plankes & there 
remayneth nothinge, but the walls of stone & the rafter that beare up 
the leade are taken awaye & solde. 

The olde castelL (See note, p. 319.) 

The olde oastell inclosed withe a mote by it selfe, from the mansyon 
house con in length fewer score foote, and in breadthe fyftie foot, but 
that ys utterlye decayed and dyvers of the walles fallen downe, but 
there remaineth yet a fayer chymney of freestone standinge withe two 
great barres of Iron holdinge up parte of it. 

The Inner ortyarde. 

Thinner Ortyarde ou the South syde of the CoUedge inclosed withe 
the mote conteyneth in it five roods sett withe dyvers trees of fruite 



AND CASTLE. 319 

and dcvided into sondrje partes with quickesett hedges & quicke hedges 
of boze where hathe bjn manye fajer Arbors & many small gardens 4 
wolde be agayne if it were well kepte <k hathe fower little pondes in it 
called fridaye pondes. Wherein is small store of fyshe or none but 
they Ived to ^sve fishe taken on y« weke dayes tyll fridaye. 

The greate Orteyarde, 

The great Orteyarde at the West end of the Colledge thre parte 
inclosed withe thutter mote and the Sothende withe a pece of grounde 
called the Bowlinge Alley with a fayre ponde in the northe ende wythe 
some fyshe in yt but small store which are breames & perche. And it 
ys verie full and thicke sett withe fruite trees of all kinds for pears 
apples wardens plumes & such other & it conteyneth one acre & thre 
roods. 

The mote. 

Within the mote are roche. breame, trenche, and perche, but small 
store because it is not well keapte, nor looked to, for the fish are sore 
distroyed with an otter and with some pickerell, which are in the same 
and hathe not been stored of a great time but hathe been taken very 
much with bow netts but if it weate scowered & well stored and kept 
it would be verie good for all kindes of fishe. 

Demesne lands. 

The scite of the Castle or College of Mettingham, with the houses, 
offices, ponds, orchards, gardens, and a small park, called the Kitchen 
park, contains 28 acres 3 roods. Value of an acre, 5s. p. Ann. 

Rental and Cust. of Mon. of St. Edm. Brit Mus. Add ms. 14850. 



Note. — Permission to crenellate or fortify his manor house 
Mettingham was granted to John de Norwich, 1 7 Edward iii. 



320 



LIST OF THE MARINE MOLLUSCA RECORDED 
AS FOUND IN SUFFOLK. 

By Carlktok Greene, m.a., 

Vicar of Roxton with Great Barford, Beds. 

The following list is inteDcled to be supplementary 
to that which appeared in this Journal in 1891 (Vol. vn., 
p. 275), dealing with the land and freshwater species. 
There has been great difficulty in obtaining information 
on the subject. Beginning with the shells found by the 
late Dr. Churchill Babington and myself, I have added 
those recorded by the following : — Messrs. A. Mayfield, G. T. 
Rope, James E. Cooper, A. Patterson, F. W. Harmer, 
Dr. Sorby, f.r.s., and Miss Powles. Dr. Sorby alone has 
found a large number, but as terrestrial localities can only 
be given by him in a few instances, I have mentioned only 
those which other authorities have not noted. Thanks 
are due to Messrs. E. A. Smith and Claude Morley for 
records from the British Museum and Ipswich Museum. 
Jeffreys' British Conchology also has been made use of. 

OraspedochilnB cinereufl. — Melford, on a plant in the Stour (C. B.) ; 
Aldeburgh (J. E. C.) 

Oraspedochiltts onyx. (Sorby, living) 1 

Acanthochites ilBUicicularis. (Sorby, living) ? 

Nucnla nucleus. — Felixstowe (C. B.), Aldeburgh (J. £. C), Lowes- 
toft (F. W. H.) 

Nucula nitida.— Felixstowe (F. W. H.) 
Anemia epMppium. — Felixstowe (C. G.) 

Mytilufi edulis. — Felixstowe (C. G.), Ipswich (A. M.), Aldeburgh 
(J. E. C), Southwold (C. M.), Gorleston (A. P.) 

Volsella modiolus.— Felixstowe (A. M.), Aldeburgh (J. E. C.) 
Modiolaria marmorata. — R. Orwell (C. B.) 



MARINE MOLLUSCA FOUND IN SUFFOLK. 321 

Modiolaria di8Cor8.—Aldeburgh (C. B.), R. Aide (J. E. C), R. Orwell 
(Clarke in Jeffreys' B. C.) 

Ostrea ednlis.— R. Orwell (0. O.), Felixstowe (A. M.), Aldeburgh 
. (J. E. C), Ipswich (A. M.) 

ChlamyB ▼arius.— Felixstowe (C. G.), Aldeburgh (J. E. C), South- 
wold (C. M.) 

Chlamys ▼arins van niyea.— Felixstowe (Powles). 

Aequipecten opercularis.— Felixstowe (C. G.), Lowestoft (A. P.) 

Oyprina lalandica. — Southwold (C. M.) 

Loripes lacteus. — Gorleston (A. P.) 

Syndosmya nitida.— Aldeburgh (C. B.) 

Syndosmya alba.— -Felixstowe (C. B.), Aldeburgh (J. E. C), Lowes- 
toft (F. W. H.) 

Syndosmya tennis.— Felixstowe (C. B.), Aldeburgh (J. E. C), Lake 
Lothing (C. B.). Ipswich (A. M.) 

Scrobicnlaria plana.— R. Orwell (0 G.), Ipswich (A. M.), Aldeburgh 
(J. E. C), Breydon (A. P.) 

Tellina tennis.- Felixstowe (0. G,) 
Tollina &bnla.— Orford (Sorby), Lowestoft (T. W. H.) 
Maconia balthica.— Felixstowe (0. B.), Lake Lothing (C. B.)^ 
Ipswich, Aldeburgh (A. M.), Southwold, Thorpe next Alde- 
burgh (C. M.), Lowestoft (F. W. H.), Breydon (A. P.) 

Donax yittatns. — Felixstowe (C. G.) 

Maetra stnltomnL— Felixstowe (C. G.), Aldeburgh (J. E. C.)> 

Southwold (C. M.) Gorleston (A. P.), Lowestoft (F. W. H.) 
Spicnla solida.— Felixstowe (C. G.) 

Spicnla snbtmncata. — Felixstowe (C. G.;, Southwold (C. M.) 
Tapes anreus.- Felixstowe (C. G.) R. Orwell (Sorby). 
Tapes pnUastra.— Felixstowe (C. G.), Southwold (0. M.) 

Oardinm exignm.— R. Orwell, Felixstowe (C. B.). Aldeburgh (J. E. C), 
Lowestoft (F. W. H.) 

Oardinm ednle.— Felixstowe (0. G.) Aldeburgh, Ipswich (A. if.), 
Lowestoft (F. W. H.) Southwold (C. M.) Breydon (A. P.) 

Mya arenaria. — Aldeburgh, Felixstowe, Lake Lothingland (C. B.)» 
Ipswich (A. M.), Breydon (A. P.) 

Mya tnmcata.— Felixstowe (C. F.), Aldeburgh (J. E. C), South- 
wold (C. M.) 

Bnsis siligna.— Aldeburgh (J. E. C.) 

Fholas dactylns.— Felixstowe (C. G.) 



322 LIST OF THB MARINE MOLLDSCA 

Baxnea eudidA.— Aldeburgh (J. £. C), GorleBton (A. P.), Lowes- 
toft (F. W. H.) 

Bamea parva. — Felixstowe (C. G.) 

Zirphosa crisiiata. — Felixstowe (Powles). 

Teredo iiATalis. — Felixstowe, Gorleston (A. P.) 

Patella vnlgata.— Felixstowe (Powles), Gorleston (A. P.) 

Oibbula emeraria.^Felixstowe (C. G.), Aldeburgh (J. E. C), Soath- 

wold (C. M.) 
Oibbnla nmbilicata. --Felixstowe (A. M.) 

CaUiostoma lUplimns.— Aldeburgh (J. £. C), Southwold (C. M.) 
Lacuna divaricata.— Felixstowe (A. M.) Aldeburgh (J. E. C.) 
Lacuna pallidnla.— Aldeburgh (J. E. C.) 

Littorina obtusata. — Felixstowe (C. M.) Ipswich, Aldeburgh (A. M.), 
Southwold (C. M.) 

Littorina obtusata var. SBStuariL — R. Deben (C. B.) ; Martlesham 
Creek (G. T. R.) 

Littorina neritoides. — Brejdon (A. P.) 

Littorina rudis.— Felixstowe (C B.), R. Deben, R. Aide (G. T. R), 
Aldeburgh, Ipswich (A. M.), Woodbridge (E. A. S.), Breydoa 
(A. P.) 

Littorina rudis var. flaTatilis. — Aldeburgh, Felixstowe (C. R), 
R. Deben (G. T. R.) 

Littorina rudis var. tenebrosa. — Aldeburgh (J. E. C.) 

Littorina litorea.— Felixstowe (0. B.), Ipswich, Aldeburgh (A. M.), 
Southwold (C. M.), Breydon (A. P.) 

Bissoa parva. — Aldeburgh (A. M.) 

Bissoa partra var. interrupta. — Aldeburgh, Felixstowe (A. M.) 

Bissoa parva var. inconspicua. — (Sorby, living). 

Zippora membranacea. — Aldeburgh (J. E. C.) 

Zippora membranacea var. labiosa. — Felixstowe (C. B.) 

Paludestrina stagnalis. —Felixstowe (A. M.), Aldeburgh (J. £. C), 
R. Aide, R. Deben, Martlesham Creek (G. T. R), Lowestoft, 
Ipswich (A. M.), Woodbridge (E. A. S.) 

Paludestrina stagnalis var. albida. — Aldeburgh (J. E. C.) 

Paludestrina ventrosa. — Aldeburgh (J. E. C), Lowestoft (A. M.), 
Breydon (A. P.) 

Paludestrina ventrosa var. pellucida. — Breydon (A. P.) 

Truncatella truncata.— Felixstowe (C. B.), Bawdsey (J. £. C.) 

Oalyptroaa chinensis. — Felixstowe (C. B.) 



RECORDED AS FOUND IN SUFFOLK, 323 

Natica catena.— Felixstowe (C. B.), Aldeburgh (J. E. C), South- 
wold (C. M.) 

Torbonilla lactea.— Aldeburgh (J. £. C.) 

Eulimella commutata. — Felixstowe (C. 6.) 

Tnrritella communis. — Felixstowe (A. M.) 

Buccinnm nndatnm. —Felixstowe (C. G.), Ipswich (A. M.), Alde- 
burgh (J. E C), Southwold (C. W.) 

Buccinnm undatum var. paupercula. — Aldeburgh (J. E. C.) 

Neptunea antiqua.— Felixstowe (A. M.), Aldeburgh (J. £. C.) 

Ocinebra erinacea. — Felixstowe (C. B.), Aldeburgh, Southwold (C. M.) 

Purpura capillus.— Felixstowe (C. G.), Ipswich, Aldeburgh (A. M.), 
Breydon (A. P.), Lowestoft (F. W. H.) 

Nasaa reticulata.— Felixstowe (C. G.). Aldebugh (J. E. C), South- 
wold (C. M.) 

NasBa reticulata var. nitida.— Felixstowe (C. B.)» Aldeburgh (J. E. 0.) 

Nassa incrassata. — Felixstowe (C. B., A. M.) 

Bela turricola.— Felixstowe (A. M., C. B.), Ipswich (C. B.), R. 
Orwell (C. G.) 

Bela rufiL— Felixstowe (C. B.), Aldeburgh (J. E. C.) 

Tomatina truncatula. — Aldeburgh (J. E. C.) 

Tonatina obtUBa.— Aldeburgh (J. E. C, C. B.) 

Haminea hydatis.— R. Orwell (C. B.) 

Acera bullata.— Felixstowe (C. B.), R. Orwell (Clarke in Jeff. B. C.) 

Philine aperta.— Felixstowe (A. M.) 

Chdvina cingulata var. vittata. — (Sorby, living). 

Pacelina coronata. — (Sorby, liviug). 

Piona marina. — (Sorby, living). 

AcanthodoriB pilosa. — (Sorby, living). 

Qoniodoris castanea.— (Sorby, living). 

Leuconia bidentata.— Aldeburgh (C. B., J. E. C), Felixstowe (C. B.) 

Alexia denticulata var. myoeotis. —Felixstowe (C. G.), Iken and 
Snape (G. T. R.), Southwold (J. E. C.) 

Loligo media. — Harwich Harbour, R. Orwell (Sorby, living). 

Sepia olBcinalis.— Aldebugh (J. E. C.) 

flepiola atlantica. — (Sorby, living). 

Sepiola scandica.— Lowestoft (F. W. H.) 



324 



ADDITIONS AND CORRECTIONS to SUFFOLK LAND and 
FRESHWATER SHELLS (1891. Proceedings, Vol. vii., p. 275). 

Authorities Cited. 

Mr. Arthur Mayfield, Mendlesham, Stowmarket ; the late Mr. K 
B. Skepper, of Bury S. Edaiund's ; Mr. J. E. Cooper, Highgate. 

Fresh WATER. 

add Pisidium milinm ( ^^roseum Jeff.) Thetford (A. M.) 

for PlanorbiB nitidua read Planorbis fontaaos, 
and add to localities — Tuddenham (E. B. S.) 

Fhysa hypnorum. add to localities— Gisleham (A. M.) 

Ancylus lacustris. add to localities — Blazhall (A. M.) 

add Unio pictomm. Near Oulton Broad (A. M.) 

add Neritina fluviatilis. R. Gipping, Bramford (A. M.) 

Land. 

Helix aspersa. 

add var. flammea. passim (A. M.) 

var. Eonata. Meudlesham (A. M.) 

var. grisea. Carlton Colville (A. M.) 

Helix hortensia. 

add var. albina. Mendleshum, Greeting (A. M.) 

var. arenicola. Mendlesham, Needham Market (A. M.) 

var. incamata. Mendlesham (A. M.) 

var. olivacea. Mendlesham (A. M.) 

add HeUx cartasiana. Little Glemham (Rope), Needham Market 

(A. M.) 

Helix virgata. 

add var. caxinata. Mendlesham, Lowestoft (A. M.) 

var. lineata (= submaritima Je/.). Lowestoft (A. M.) 

var. subalbida. Mendlesham, Lowestoft, Needhsm Market (A. M.) 

var. albicans. Lowestoft, Mendlesham, Coddenham, Brandon 
(A. M.) 

var. alba. Lowestoft (A. M.) 

var. aubglobosa. Lowestoft (A. M.) 



SUFFOLK LAND AND FRESHWATER SHELLS. 325 

Helix hiBpida. 

add var. hispidosa. passim (A. M.) 

Yar. depilata. Mendlesham, Creetiag (A. M.) 

Helix caperata. 

add var. enbecalaiia. Between Thetford and Brandon (A. M.) 
Tar. omata. Between Thetford and Brandon (A. M.) 
var. ftilva. Needham Market, Greeting (A. M.) 

Helix ericetonuL 

add var. leucozona. Mendlesham, Greeting (A. M.) 

var. alba. Needham Market (A. M.) 
dele Vertigo monlinBiana. 
add Vertigo poailla. Thwaite (A. M.) 

Vertigo minutiBsinia. Burgh Gastle (A. M.) 

Vertigo angnstior. Aldeburgh (Gooper, in Journal of Gonchology, 
Jan., 1896). 
dele Clausilia biplicata. 
Achatina acicnla. add to localities — Aldeburgh (Gooper, as above). 

Pnpa marginata. add to localities — Landguard Fort (A. M.), between 

Thetford and Brandon (A. M.) 



326 



\/ 



NOTES ON SOME EAST SUFFOLK NEOLITHS. 
By William A. Dutt. 

The pre-historic archaeology of North- West Suffolk 
has been exhaustively dealt with by distinguished 
authorities, and, although a district that has produced 
such immense numbers of Palaeolithic implements, and 
which possesses such interesting works of Neolithic man 
as Grimes Graves, must be considered one of fascinating 
possibilities, the present-day searcher there for pre-historic 
relics may well despair of making any discovery that will 
call for more than a repetition of what are now familiar 
deductions and assertions. Indeed, it is just possible 
that, so far as Suffolk is concerned, so much has been 
heard about the .prolific productiveness of its North- West 
division that a little too much attention has been devoted 
to that neighbourhood, and, in consequence, what may be 
termed the "pre-historic possibilities" of other parts of 
the county have been somewhat ignored. That this might 
be the case occurred to me some time ago, when, after a 
fortnight spent in searching for Neolithic implements on 
the warrens of North- West Suffolk, I turned to the very 
few records in my possession of the discovery of Stone Age 
implements in East Suffolk, and more particularly in the 
Hundred of Lothingland. 

These records are few and generally disappointing. 
On turning to the standard work on stone implements, 
"The Ancient Stone Implements of Great Britain," by 
Sir John Evans, I find only one record from the Hundred 
of Lothingland. It is that of a Neolithic flint knife 
which was found a good many years ago on Gorton Beach, 
and which is described in the ArchcBological Journal 



s-r'^ 




Figs 







Fig 3 





?a> 



:J^^ 



fgm"^ 



F«g7 




Fig 6 




Fig 8 




- ^Jj ''^' 



Fig 4 



'HE hEW YO 

i^UlsUC LlihARYj 






NOTES ON SOME EAST SUFFOLK NEOLITHS. 327 

(Vol. xxii., p. 75), and in the Proceedings of the Society 
of Antiquaries (2nd series, Vol. iii., p. 19). In Suckling's 
" History of Suffolk " reference is made to the discovery 
of celts at Lound so long ago as 1776, and at Bramfield 
in 1842 ; but in neither instance is it stated whether the 
celts were of stone or bronze. On making inquiries in the 
neighbourhood of Lowestoft, I could hear of only three 
recent " finds " having been made. In the possession of 
Mr. Grimmer, of Oulton Broad, I found a good polished 
axe of the common type, figured No. 43 in " Ancient 
Stone Implements.*' Mr. F. Morse, of Lowestoft, has a 
few chipped, partly polished, and wholly polished axes 
which were unearthed at Lound and Belton during excava- 
tions in connection with Lowestoft Waterworks. These 
implements, with a portion of a rubber, were found lying 
on or in a bed of sand, overlain by several feet of peaty soil 
containing buried trunks of oaks. The finest implement 
I could hear of, however, was a large Neolithic axe (Fig. 1), 
found by Mr. J. Bruce Payne, .late of St. Aubyn's, 
Kirkley, by the side of a railway line on the south side of 
Lake Lothing. This axe, which 1 believe to be by far the 
finest flint implement East Suffolk has as yet produced, is 
beautifully flaked and chipped, and partly polished. It 
is 7j inches in length, 4| inches in breadth, 10 inches in 
girth, and weighs 42| ounces. It is of elongated horse- 
shoe shape, has a sharp, though somewhat abraded cutting 
edge, and seems equally adapted for use as an axe or an 
adze. At first I was inclined to believe that it might 
have been brought to Kirkley with railway ballast, but 
Mr. Bruce Payne tells me that he found it partially 
embedded in apparently undistur})ed soil, and Sir John 
Evans, to whom 1 submitted it, thinks it probably belongs 
to the locality where it was discovered. It is, he adds, of 
" rather peculiar form." 

The above notes are practically all I was able to 
obtain as regards the finding of Neolithic implements in 
the neighbourhood of Lowestoft. They were enough to 
suggest that it was worth while to keep a look-out for 



328 NOTES ON SOME 

Neoliths, but not enough to make one feel confident of 
being well rewarded for careful searching. 

My own Hint-hunting rambles around Lowestoft were 
commenced within a week of my return from North-West 
Suffolk, where I had tried, with some success, to train my 
eyes to distinguish Neolithic implements as they lay 
strewn about the warrens, and to detect the slighter traces 
of Neolithic flint-working. Before entering into any 
details of ray discoveries it may be as well, perhaps, to 
state what conclusions I have been led to draw from those 
discoveries. 

In the first place I may say that there is plenty of 
evidence of the Hundred of Lothingland, and, indeed, 
of the whole coast between Gorleston and Kessingland, 
having been inhabited by a Later Stone Age race. From 
the abundant traces remaining of them it seems that these 
pre-historic people were either exceedingly numerous or — 
what is more probable — in occupation of the district for a 
very long time. Their chief settlement, so far as the 
Hundred of Lothingland is concerned, seems to have been 
situated along the north shore of what is now known as 
Lake Lo thing, but which, in Neolithic times, may have 
been a part of the estuary of a river, which entered the 
sea by way of Kirkley Ham. The most important part of 
this settlement was probably situated on the slopes of the 
uplands on which Lowestoft parish church now stands. 
On the north side, and near the west end of Lake Lothiug, 
I have found a large number of flint implements, and the 
fact that flint flakes and chips are very numerous indicates 
that the manufacture of such implements was carried on 
there. In the parish of Flixton, about three miles north- 
west of Lowestoft, there are similar traces of a settlement 
near Flixton Decoy, on the slope of a hill bordering the 
marshes. Five miles further north-west there was 
probably a settlement near the shores of what is now 
known as Fritton Lake, for, not only have several axes 
been found in that neighbourhood, but traces of Neolithic 
flint-working are detectable near the Fritton end of the 



BAST SUFFOLK NKOLITHS. 329 

Lake. Between Fritton Lake and Belton, Neolithic relics 
are easily found, especially near the tumulus called the 
Bell Hill, and on Fritton Common. Along the coast, 
between Gorleston and Kessingland, there is hardly a field 
where traces of Neolithic work are not to be seen. In the 
neighbourhood of the Empire Hotel, on Kirkley Cliff, I met 
with several well-worked implements which had been dug 
up when the hotel's foundations were laid, and which had 
been spread with excavated soil on the slope of the cliff.* 
Taking England as a whole, there appears to be 
conclusive evidence that at the time of the advent of the 
Neolithic race or races the land surface of the country was 
of about the same extent as it is now. East Anglia, 
however, at that time presented a somewhat different 
aspect to what it at present wears, for into the heart of it, 
as far as Norwich in one direction, Harleston in another, 
and Aylsham and North Walaham in others, extended 
arms of a great estuary which covered what are now the 
marshes of Broadland. As there is good reason for 
believing that as recently as the time of the Roman 
Occupation, and perhaps of the Norman Conquest, this 
estuarine condition obtained, we are, I think, justified in 
assuming that during the period of Neolithic man's occu- 
pation of East Suffolk the Hundred of Lothingland was 
practically an island, bounded on the east by the North 
Sea, on the north and west by the waters of the great 
estuary, and on the south by the estuary and, possibly, a 
small river. Such an island, protected in a measure by 
its comparative isolation from the mainland, would be 
admirably adapted for a Neolithic colony. That parts of 
it were cultivated by the Later Stone Age settlers is 
probable, for I have, on more than one occasion, come 
across large flint implements which can hardly have been 
used for any other purpose than ploughing ; but fishing 
and fowling must have been the chief pursuits of these 
early inhabitants of East Suffolk, and of fish and fowl 

* I have found Neolithic implements in the following East Suffolk parinhes :— 
Lowestoft, Kirklev, Pakefield, Kessingland, Gisleham, Carlton, Oulton, Flizton, 
Gunton, Gorton, Hopton, Gorleston, Fntton, Somerleyton, and Belton. 



330 NOTBS ON SOME 

there must have been an abundance around the Hundred 
of Lothingland. 

As regards the ancient stone implements I have 
found in East Suffolk, I think I may safely say that, with 
two exceptions, they may all be safely assigned to the 
Surface or Neolithic Period. Up to the present I have 
met with only two Palaeolithic implements, and these, I 
have every reason to believe, were brought into the district 
with railway ballast from Mid-Norfolk. A great many of 
the implements I have found are shaped out of naturally 
rounded flint pebbles or portions of such pebbles. 

Aoces, Adzes, and Choppers. 1 have already referred 
to the fine axe found by Mr. Bruce Payne, and also to those 
which were discovered in the parishes of LouDd and Belton 
during the excavations conducted in connection with the 
Lowestoft Waterworks. The latter are interesting on 
account of their workmanship ; but they represent types 
which are not uncommon in England, though they appear 
to be by no means numerous in East Suffolk. In the 
Hundred of Lothingland, axes or adzes of a rather unusual 
type are not infrequently met with. These are generally 
small, the larger ones seldom exceeding three inches in 
length. In shape they are often not unlike some of the 
axes of the Bronze Age, for they are narrow at the butt- 
end and often expand into a semi-circular or fan-shaped 
blade. I notice that Sir John Evans figures implements 
of a similar kind (Figs. 38 and 38a, " Ancient Stone 
Implements of Great Britain.") from Undley Common in 
Lakenheath, and East Dean, Sussex, and he suggests that 
when in use they were fixed in a socket, probably of stag's 
horn, the socket being in turn fixed in a wooden handle. 
Three or four small adzes in my possession may easily 
have been so used ; but one, which I found just out- 
side Lowestoft, has a prominent knob left on the butt- 
end, and is, it seems to me, better adapted for use in a 
handle made of a withy of willow or osier. Blacksmiths 
frequently use handles of this kind to hold their hard 
chisels. Indeed, I am inclined to think that, although 



EAST SUFFOLK NEOLITHS. 331 

their butts shew do abrasion, some of these small axes 
and adzes may have been used after the fashion of hard 
chisels, hammer blows being struck on the bone handles 
into which they were socketed. Dr. C. B. Plowright has 
described and figured* an axe from Massingham, in West 
Norfolk, which closely resembles some I have found in 
East Sufiblk. 

To a certain type of implement which is fairly 
common in East Suffolk, but which I have not met with 
elsewhere, I apply the name of chopper, on account of its 
superficial resemblance to a familiar kind of chopper or 
hatchet in general use for splitting firewood. I have found 
over a score of these implements (of which Fig. 2 is a fair 
example) at Lowestoft, Kirkley, Flixton, and elsewhere. 
Generally speaking, they are uniform in shape, though of 
varying size, ranging from 1^ inches to 3| inches in 
length, and f inch to 2| inches in breadth. One or two 
of them have been fashioned by skilful flaking and 
chipping on both sides ; but most of them are shaped out 
of naturally rounded pebbles, the naturally smoothed 
portion, in the case of the larger implements, being left 
where it would rest against the palm of the hand while 
the implement was in use. It is not unlikely, I think, 
that some of the larger of these choppers were used for 
breaking or splitting bones ; but they seem to be equally 
adapted for flaking and chipping tools. 

Scrapers. In East Suffolk, as is the case almost 
everywhere where Neoliths occur in large numbers, scrapers 
of various kinds are more numerous than any other kind 
of implement. I have found as many as a hundred 
in a month, and more than one spot is known to me 
where, after heavy rains have washed the surface of the 
ground, I can generally pick up a dozen or more. The 
majority of them are of rough workmanship, and probably 
were never intended to serve more than a temporary 
purpose ; but some I have preserved in my collection are 
perfectly shaped and their secondary chipping is equal to 

^Trails, of the Norfolk Aod Norwich NaturalitU' Society, Vol. ▼., p. 26S» Fig. 4. 

y 



332 NOTES ON SOME 

the best I have seen in East Anglia. The fields around 
Lowestoft have produced several excellently worked oval 
and horseshoe-shaped scrapers ; but half-a-dozen of the 
finest I have met with were found lying within a space of 
about four square yards at Fritton. Among these was a 
well-chipped, almost circular implement only f inch in 
diameter. A similarly shaped but much larger scraper 
(2j inches in diameter) was met with at Pakefield. The 
so-called duck-bill type is not uncommon in East Suffolk. 
An interesting "find" at Lowestoft was a semi-circular 
scraper, which had been made into almost perfect shape, 
and probably lost after five secondary chips had h)een taken 
off* its edge. Some of the horseshoe-shaped and straight 
scrapers are notched each side, just above the butt or 
handle end. This would make them easy to secure, by 
binding, to bone or wood handles. 

ELoUoiv Scrapers. My largest implement of this 
kind is from Fritton. It is about 3 inches in length, 
3| inches in breadth, nearly an inch in thickness, and has 
a worked " hollow "if inches across and f inch in depth, — 
large enough to admit a broom handle. Hollow scrapers 
so large as this, or approaching it in size, are rare. 
Scrapers with hollows f inch or | inch across, however, 
are not uncommon ; but the commonest kind are those 
with a hollow f or ^ inch across. These, which are made 
out of variously shaped flakes and fragments of flint, seem 
well adapted for the smoothing of arrow-shafts ; but the 
apparent absence of arrow-heads from East Suffolk makes 
it doubtful if they ever served this purpose. More 
probably they were used for shaping and sharpening 
implements of bone and wood. 

An interesting series of hollow scrapers in my collec- 
tion have very small but, generally, finely chipped 
hollows. These are probably implements which were used 
to round and point bone needles. I have found these 
small-hollowed scrapers — which are usually made of rather 
thin flakes, or portions of such flakes — at Lowestoft, 
Fritton, Kirkley, and elsewhere. One or two of them 



EAST SUFFOLK NKOLITHS. 383 

have more than one hollow, and a few appear to have 
been used also as straight and side scrapers. On others a 
minute but acute point is left, such as would very well 
serve the purpose of boring the eye of a bone needle. At 
any rate, the point must have been left intentionally on 
the edge of the scraper, for there is usually secondary 
chipping around the projection, which is sometimes made 
the sharper by the detachment of a tiny chip quite at the 
point. 

Knives. A large number of the Neolithic flakes met 
with are more or less abraded at the edges and have 
undoubtedly been used not only as scrapers but as cutting- 
tx)ols ; but some of the knives are well- worked implements. 
In shape these often resemble one or another type of 
scraper ; but they can be distinguished from scrapers by 
the sharpness of their edges. The chipping of some of 
these implements is very fine. Some of the circular, or 
almost circular knives, are not more than 1 J inches in dia- 
meter, and when in use they must have been held between 
the thumb and first finger. This remark applies also to 
some small oval and horse-shoe-shaped knives. I have 
not met with one chipped to a cutting edge all round, 
and usually not more than a third of the edge shews 
secondary chipping. I have one beautiful little cutting 
implement only f inch in diameter. 

The most interesting knife in my collection is from 
Fritton (Fig. 3). It is fashioned out of a three-inches 
long fragment of flint in such a way as to leave a two- 
inches long handle which fits the under part of the first 
finger when held there by the second finger and thumb. 
Unfortunately about a quarter of an inch of the blade has 
been broken oflf. 

Fig. 4 represents an implement which is undoubtedly 
a knife and possibly a scraper as well. 

BorerSy Awls, and Drills. Roughly shaped borers 
of various sizes are almost as numerous as scrapers at some 
of the spots which appear to be the sites of Neolithic 
settlements. Many of them show little or no secondary 



334 NOTBS OK 80MB EAST SUFFOLK NK0LITH8. 

chippiDg ; but the abraded appearance of the sharp edges 
of the flint near the point, as well as the shape of Uie 
implement, usually indicates plainly the purpose for which 
it was used. I have something like fifty of these imple- 
ments in my possession, but with one or two exceptions 
they differ little or not at all from the ordinary types 
common in many parts of Britain. The exceptions are an 
unusually large and weighty implement from the Church 
Fields, Lowestoft, and an unusually small and well worked 
one from Lake Lothing. The implement represented by 
Fig. 5 I think should be included among the borers. Its 
point is very acute and admirably adapted for making the 
eyes of bone needles. Some of the smaller borers are 
adapted for use as awls, and may have been used as such 
in the making of skin garments. 

Fabricators. Fig. 6 represents a type of implement 
not uncommon in East SuflFolk, and which may have been 
used for chipping and flaking. A less common type is 
seen in Fig. 7. Implements which may be described as 
intermediate between the former type and the figured 
chopper (Fig. 5) are also met with. 

Large Discoidal Implement At Santon Downham 
and elsewhere in north-west Suffolk, large discoidal imple- 
ments to which it is difficult to assign a use are found, I 
came upon a similar implement (Fig. 8) at Fritton. It 
is worked by secondary chipping to a fairly sharp edge 
almost all round, and has a hollow worked in one part of 
the edge. This implement was probably made out of half 
a rather large pebble, the side shewn in the figure being 
that on which the surface of the pebble was flaked off. 
The other side is unworked, excepting that the bulb of 
percussion is partly knocked off. Implements of this 
kind may have been used as scrapers or bone-breakers. 




F.cl 



Scale -r 



335 



NEOLITHIC SUFFOLK. 
By Edward R. H. Hancox. 

There are undoubtedly many implements of Neolithic 
man's workmanship still lying unheeded upon the surface 
of those localities where such evidences of man's early 
occupation have already been noticed. 

The polished celt, the perforated axe, the carefully- 
finished arrow-head, if undamaged, are easily recognised 
and secured, even by those to whom such antiquities 
are nothing more than '* stones " of curious, but accidental 
shape. This, however, cannot be said of what was probably 
a large proportion of the implements and weapons of the 
Neolithic stage of civilization, viz., the less carefully 
wrought instruments that require an experienced eye to 
detect the true nature of the work upon them. To this 
class may be said to belong implements of the "scraper" 

The idea of producing a serviceable weapon with as 
small an expenditure of labour as possible, no doubt, at 
times, occurred to Neolithic man ; and implements, bearing 
a close resemblance to some Paleolithic types, were shaped 
from stones of such formation as suggested their easy 
adaptability to certain purposes. 

The scraper (Fig. I), found upon the surface of a field 
at Nacton, is a good example of this rough type of Neolithic 
weapon. The illustration does not, perhaps, clearly convey 
the impression that the flaking was intentional, but the 
work is identical on both sides, forming a cutting edge 
that had evidently done good service. 

The natural form of the stone admitted of its being 
conveniently hafted, and to strengthen the idea that such 
was the method of use, there appears a small groove 



336 NEOLITHIC SUFFOLK. 

round the butt end, which was probably chipped for the 
purpose of giving the weapon greater security in its haft 
A diligent search in the same neighbourhood, resulted in 
another, almost exactly similar find. 

Undoubtedly of intentional shaping is the original of 
Fig. II. The object, which is also from Nacton, may be 
described as a borer or awl, and is formed from a flat 
splinter of flint, the broad end of which shows the 
natural crust of the stone from which it was struck. The 
sides of the flake are carefully bevelled from the same 
surface, so that when in use, a sharp cutting edge would 
be brought into play both by a forward and a backward 
turn of the hand. 

Several similar implements were found in the pits at 
Grime's Graves, where they had probably done duty in 
drilling the holes in wooden and l)one handles for other 
implements that were fabricated there. 

The stone next figured, with a hole of natural 
fprmation, provided the pre-historic workman with a 
ready-made hammer. The casual observer might say 
that some effort of the imagination was needed to convince 
one that such was the case, A careful examination, how- 
ever, will show that, for the better insertion of the haft, 
certain irregularities within the hole have been removed ; 
and it will be admitted that in such a position it is 
barely possible for flaking to be produced by accident. 
The stone, which is of quartzite, was found on the beach, 
near Bawdsey. The more pointed end is much abraded, 
evidently from repeated and well-directed blows. 

As a contrast to the foregoing rough types of man's 
early handiwork, is figured the beautiful knife from 
Ipswich, mentioned, but not illustrated in the Proceedings, 
Vol. xi, pt, 2, page 203. 



Fio. 4. 
Nbolithic Implhment 

POUND AT IPSWICn t1^ 

1902. 
See Vol. xi. 203. 




Scale \ 



337 



ROMANO-BRITISH POTTERY, near IPSWICH. 
By John Shkwell Cordkr. 

From time to time people delving in the soil in and 
around the town of Ipswich have discovered specimens 
of fictile ware, buried but a short distance beneath the 
surface of the ground. The specimens, when found, have 
been recovered in a more or less perfect condition, accord- 
ing to the nature of the subsoil in which they have been 
deposited. But not unfrequently the pick and shovel 
have demolished them ere the excavator was aware of 
their presence. 

Towards the end of 1902, two fine specimens were 
recovered, in a nearly perfect condition, from the place of 
their concealment, in the sandpits now being worked at 
the Dales, near Mr. Fonnereau's brickfield. They were 
found buried about 3 ft. 6 in. beneath the present surface 
of the land, just where the vegetable soil merges into the 
sandy sub-soil, which in its turn overlays the valley 
gravels and flint deposits of an ancient river bed. 

When found, the pots were standing upright in 
small cave-like hollows roughly formed in the ground, 
and were both empty. One pot had a nicely moulded 
cover over its aperture. They are made of brown clay, 
moulded on a wheel and burnt in the sun, and are exceed- 
ingly elegant in outline, being ornamented with moulded 
bands in relief ; whilst the smaller pot is decorated with 
surface incised indentations executed with a comb or small 
sharp wood implement. 

The larger pot has a cover, and measures 15 ins. to 
the top of the cover, and is 1 1 ins. in diameter in the widest 



\/ 



338 ROMANO-BRITISH POTTERY NEAR IPSWICH. 

part, or shoulder ; and 5^ ins. across the lip of the open- 
ing. The smaller pot measures 7 ins. to the top of the 
rim, and 4^ ins. across the widest part of the vase. There 
seems little doubt that the two pots are specimens of early 
Romano-British manufacture, and that they are cinerary 
urns. But they are exceedingly interesting from the fact 
that they are so perfect, due, no doubt, to the dryness of 
the soil, and that their position and locality can be so 
clearly identified. The discovery of the pots and of others 
in the immediate vicinity, clearly exemplifies that ancient 
settlements existed all round the neighbourhood of Ipswich 
prior to the Roman Invasion ; for though signs of occu- 
pation by the latter nation are rare in the adjacent valley 
of the River Gipping, yet it is almost certain that all along 
the banks, amidst the oak forests which spread like a 
mantle over this part of the country, many early settle- 
ments existed. Specimens of pottery have been unearthed 
in the brickfields on the Norwich Road, and right away 
to Westerfield where the railway line crosses the road, a 
workman, laying drain pipes in a meadow, came across 
aeveral more or less perfect examples. The pots are 
now in my possession, and I shall be pleased to show 
them at any time. 




CO 

^ i 



o 
o 



»'^^ 






; JjUt 



339 



LOWESTOFT CHINA FACTORY. 
By Henry C. Casley. 



^J 



The annual excursion of the members of the Institute 
to Lowestoft, on the 30th July last, as nearly as possible 
n century from the close of the china works, was eventful 
for affording, through the courtesy of Messrs. E. and 
O. Morse, the owners of the Crown Brewery, the 
opportunity of visiting the site of the manufactory and 
witnessing the excavations then in progress. To the East 
Anglian who all his life has been accustomed to hear of 
the Lowestoft works, and occasionally to see specimens 
of its ware, the controversy waged an^ongst the Cognoscenti 
has been very perplexing. At the onfe extreme were those 
who questioned the existence of a pottery, or certainly 
that it ever made porcelain, whilst, at the other were some 
who claimed for it every piece of delft ware with East 
Anglian inscriptions, and all those pieces of hard paste 
porcelain with maroon and purple network or trellis 
borders, with bouquets and festoons of roses, and the 
addition of English armorial bearings. Our great museums, 
to which one naturally looks for guidance, contributed 
little to elucidate the matter. The museum of Practical 
Geology, in Jermyn Street, which possessed the best 
-collection of English ceramics, from an educational point 
of view, classed a most dubious series of specimens as 
illustrating the productions of Lowestoft, whilst it was 
stated in their handbook, " it should be understood, how- 
ever, that several of the pieces are placed with the 
Lowestoft china, simply in deference to the opinion of 
certain collectors, and not as authenticated specimens." 
The British Museum for years had only a very few pieces 
of the ware. The splendid collection of Lady Charlotte 



340 LOWESTOFT CHINA FACTORY. 

Schreiber, presented to the South Kensington Museum, 
emhraced but two specimens, whilst in the same case was 
a hard-paste teapot of the Chinese " Jesuit China" painted 
with the scene of the Crucifixion, but inscribed at the 
bottom with " Allen, Lowestoft," in red. The County- 
Museum at Ipswich has not a single specimen. 

Prior to 1867, a similar mystification obscured the 
identity of many of the productions of Bow and Chelsea. 
Apart from the fact that the former copied many of the 
designs of the latter, we know from the early books of 
William Duesbary, who afterwards became the proprietor 
of the Derby china works, and later purchased and closed 
down both the factories of Bow and Chelsea, that his 
early days (1751-3) were spent in London as an enameller 
to the trade, and that the white-glazed productions of 
these and the Staffordshire factories were sent to him to 
be decorated. Other enamellers in London are known 
to have been engaged in the same practice, notably one- 
John Gyles, who decorated the "Craft" bowl. Thus the 
purchaser of Bow and Chelsea wares paid his money and 
took his choice as to which factory he allocated his pur- 
chase, until the chance trenching for a drain on the site 
of Messrs. Bell & Black's match works, at Bow, in 1868, 
led to the discovery of a number of fragments of the ware,. 
which, deposited in the Museums, has rendered it possible 
to assign the productions of the respective factories with 
tolerable certainty. 

Under such circumstances it can be easily understood 
that the local collectors looked anxiously for the opportunity 
of making investigations on the site of the Lowestoft 
works, but the difficulty seemed insuperable until chance 
once again came to the rescue. In the autumn of 1902, 
Messrs. Morse, desiring to obtain a greater draught to one 
of their kilns, cut an air shaft to the outer wall. A 
portion of the floor in front of the former kiln of the 
china works was disturbed, revealing several portions of 
moulds and fragments of both unglazed and decorated 
china. The floor of the malting appeared to be about two 



LOWESTOFT CHINA FACTORY. 341 

feet higher than the original floor of the pottery, the space 
between the floors being filled with the shard heaps and 
moulds of the former factory, which had apparently been 
used for the purpose of filling the space, and for a century 
had thus remained decently interred. Mr. A. Merrington 
Smith, of Lowestoft, who is an enthusiast on the subject 
of the Pottery, obtained the permission of the courteous 
proprietors to conduct a systematic examination of this 
floor, which is 132 feet by 16 feet, in the summer of 1903, 
with the result that a vast mass of moulds and fragments 
of ware, both biscuit and decorated, and before and after 
glazing, was discovered, wasters, saggars, and all the usual 
debris of a pottery were found, even the stone upon which 
it is supposed the colours were ground. 

The early historians of Lowestoft, were Isaac and 
Edmund Gillingwater, who lived in a house in the High 
Street. Isaac, who was a hairdresser, collected the 
materials, save probably the ancient and ecclesiastical 
history, which has the appearance of being based upon 
some unpublished MSS. He was born on the 14th of 
April, 1732, and died on the 14th of May, 1813, aged 81. 
His brother Edmund was born on the 29th December, 
1736, and died shortly before Isaac. The history was 
published by Edmund, who at that time was a school- 
master and bookseller at Harleston, from which town he 
dates the preface to the work on St. Martin s Day, 1790. 
He says : — 

* " The only Manufactory carried on at Lowestoft is t)iat of making 
" porcelain, or china ware ; where the proprietors have brought this 
" ingenious art to a great degree of perfection ; and, from the prospect 
"it affords, promises to be attended with much success. The origin of 
" this manufactory is as follows : — 

"In the year 1766 Hewlin Lu8on,t Esq., of Ounton hall, near 
" Lowestoft, having discovered some fine clay, or earth, on his estate in 
"that parish, sent a small quantity of it to one of the china manu- 

* GillinffwUer'a Hutnry of Lowaioft, p. 112. 

find «on of William Luson (by Elizabeth daur. of Benjamin Hewling), who 
bendeii the estate at Gunton, had wopertv at Blundestone and South Elmham. For 
a full account of thin family see Palmer $ PerluHratiom of Oreat Yarmouth, vol. ii. 
p. 801. 



842 LOWESTOFT CHINA FACTORY. 

** factories near Londou, in view of discovering what kind of ware it 
"was capable of producing; which upon trial, proved to be somewhat 
" finer than that called the Delft ware. Mr. Luson was so far en> 
'* couraged by this success as to resolve upon making another experi> 
*' ment of the goodness of its quality upon his own premises ; accord- 
'Mngly, he immediately procured some workmen from London, and 
" erected upon his estate at Gunton, a temporary kiln and furnace, and 
"all the other apparatus necessary for the undertaking: but the 
" manufacturers in London being apprized of his intentions, and of the 
"excellent quality of the earth, and apprehending also, that if Mr. 
"Luson succeeded he might rival them in their manufactory, it in- 
educed them to exercise every art in their power to render his scheme 
"abortive; and so far tampered with the workmen he had procured, 
" that they spoiled the ware, and thereby frustrated Mr. Luson's design. 
'' But, notwithstanding this unhandsome treatment, the resolution 
" of establishing a china manufactory at Lowestoft was not relinquished, 
^but was revived again in the succeeding year by Messrs. Walker, 
" Brown, Aldred and Richman, who having purchased some houses on 
" the south side of the Bell Lane, converted the same to the uses of 
" the manufactory, by erecting a kiln and other conveniences necessary 
" for the purpose : but, in carrying their designs into execution, thej 
" also were liable to the same inconveniences as the proprietor of the 
" original undertaking at Gutiton was ; for being under the necessity of 
"applying to the manufactories in London for workmen to conduct 
" the business, this second attempt experienced the same misfortune as 
" the former one, and very near totally ruined their designs ; but the 
" proprietors happening to discover these practices of the workmen 
" before it was too late, they took such precautions as rendered every 
"future attempt of this nature wholly ineffectual, and have now 
"established the factory upon such a permanent basis as promises 
"great success. They have now enlarged their original plan and hy 
" purchasing several adjoining houses, and erecting additional buildings, 
" have made every necessary alteration requisite for the various pur- 
"poses of the manufactory. They employ a considerable number of 
" workmen ; and supply with ware many of the priucipal towns in 
" the adjacent counties, and keep a warehouse in London* to execute 
" the orders they receive both from the city and the adjoiuing towns ; 
" and have brought the manufactory to such a degree of perfection as 
" promises to be a credit to the town, useful to the inhabitants, and 
" beneficial to themselves." 

We get further particulars of the buildings of the 
factory from one who had personal acquaintance with 

• Clark Durnford, Lowestoft China Warehouse, No. 4, Great St. Thomas the 
Apostle, Cheapaide, London, Where Merchants and Shopkeepers may be supplied 
with any quantity of the said wares at the usual prices. N.lB. — Allowance of Twenty 
per cent, for ready money. AdvtHiument London Newtpaper^ March 17, 1770. 



LOWESTOFT CHINA FACTORY. 343 

them whilst the works were still in operation, in the state- 
ment obtained by the late Mr. ChaflTers (the author of 
" Marks and Monograms on Pottery and Porcelain,") from 
Abel Bly, on the occasion of his making some personal 
inquiries at Lowestoft, in 1865. Bly was 84 years of age 
at the time that he made the statement, which is pub- 
lished in Mr. Chaffers' work, and his father and two uncles 
were all employed at the works. He says : — 

"The Factory was situate in Crown Street, where the Brew house 
" and malting of Messrs. Morse and Woods now stand, the rear fronting 
" the, what is now called. Factory Lane. Where Messrs. Morae's count- 
^* ing house stands was the packing room ; the counting house of the 
** factory being to the east of the packing room. At the rear of the 
** packing room and counting room were two turning rooms and further 
** to the rear adjoining Factory Lane were two Kilns. On the ground 
" floor was also the drying room. The painters worked in a chamber 
** approached by a staircase to the eastward of the counting room. 
** Over the east turning room was a chamber for finishing the turners* 
" work. There was a chamber approached from the east kiln in which 
** the ware was tested as to its shape. Over this was an attic in which 
** women* were employed painting the blue and white ware. The clay 
*'was made in the factory premises now known ns Mr. W. J. Balls*^ 
"Auction Mart, from whence it was taken to Ounton Ravine (where 
" there is to this day a constant flow of the purest water discharging 
" many gallons per minute) and there ground by a large mill,'' 

Before proceeding to consider how far other writers 
subsequent to Gillingwater have contributed to his 
narrative, or the results of the recent investigations, it is 
necessary to take a retrospestive glance at what was the 
position of the home market, and the ceramic industry^ 
both as respects hard and soft paste china, in the early 
half of the 18th century. Practically, at that time, the 
Oriental natural hard paste porcelain held the market. 

By a natural hard paste porcelain is meant a ware 
made from a china stone, a disintegrated granite rock, 
with a china clay, both, wherever found, being in close 
association. The clay, in fact, being the china stone after 
it has undergone in nature's laboratory a process of de- 
composition of its felspathic properties. The china stone 

* SylM Nerille in his J<mmal (circa 1767) Mya, in hia time the painting wai mottlj 
oon6 bjT women. 



344 LOWESTOPT CHINA FACTORY. 

is the fusible, and the china clay the infusible constiti^nt, 
or, as the Chinese say, the flesh and the bones of true 
porcelain. The stone is first finely pulverised. The clay 
having been deprived of any undecomposed particles of 
felspar by suspension in water, the water is run off, leaving 
a plastic friable mass. When mixed with the powdered 
stone in about equal proportions, and subjected to the 
most intense heat of the porcelain furnace, the stone fuses, 
forming a translucent glass, which cements the refractory 
clay, the latter preserving the rigidity of the form in 
firing and imparting a milky whiteness to the ware, which 
with the glaze is fired at one burning. 

But the Oriental china which possessed the market 
was not the antique porcelain treasures of the Sung, 
Yuan, or Ming dynasties, these were too jealously held by 
the Chinese themselves to be allowed to leave the country, 
save as occasional presents to eminent personages. Rare 
instances are known of such pieces, and those probably 
not of the best, reaching Europe in the 15th century. 
To the Portuguese we owe the first direct consignments 
to Europe, in the 16th century, by way of the Cape. 
A very few pieces are known of the Ming dynasty in 
this country mounted in silver bearing the Elizabethan 
hall mark. With the establishment of the English and 
Dutch East India Companies in the I7th century, how- 
ever, came regular importations, gradually increasing in 
volume, until, in the 1 8th century, vast quantities of Chinese 
and Japanese porcelain found its way into the houses of 
England, Holland, and France. In the main this was a 
modern china made for the European market. With the 
second quarter of the 18th century, on the other side of 
the Atlantic, the ports of New England were establishing 
direct importations, and through Salem, New York, 
Providence, Newport, Boston, and other ports, the same 
character of porcelain was being largely imported into 
America. What the charact/Cr of this ware was, almost 
everybody knows, scarce a middle-class house but can 
shew some specimens of it, but for reasons, which will 



LOWESTOFT CHINA FACTORY. 345 

afterwards appear, it is worth while recalling its general 
features. It took the form of jars and beakers, punch 
bowls, tea, dessert, and dinner services, dainty bottles 
and basins for the old Chippendale toilet stands, cider 
mugs, spill vases, jardineres, pot pourri jars and ginger 
jars of every conceivable quality, form, and decoration. 
Fragile cups and saucers of eggshell porcelain, others with 
more substance, but beautifully translucent, plates of 
exquisite whiteness, others with a somewhat grey tone, 
others again with a greenish cast, down to a kind of 
porcellaneous stoneware of which many of the tureens, 
salad bowls and heavier dishes of the dinner services were 
made. In London and other large cities were depdts 
where specimens could be seen and selected from, shewing 
all the marvels of underglaze blue, and varieties of 
decoration in enamel painting, with intricate and minute 
elaborations of borders. Resident European merchants 
at Nankin and Canton transmitted the orders from Europe 
to the potteries and attended to their execution. In 
smaller towns, where the shops could not afford to stock 
specimen services, the dealer would be provided with 
sample plates divided into segments, each section shewing 
a different mode of decoration. Such plates may 
occasionally be met with to-day, as also single specimen 
plates, bearing the name and address of the agent at 
Canton, painted and fired on the back. At these 
depdts the purchaser made his selection, and in the 18th 
century, when armorial bearings were so much in vogue 
for the services of the table, left the blazon of his arms to 
be executed on the services, and in due course of time the 
returning East India vessels would bring back the services 
executed in compliance with the orders with almost as 
much regularity, if with greater delay, as an order given 
to the home potteries to-day. So faithful a copyist was 
"John Chinaman," that a book plate having been sent 
out instead of the illuminated tricking of arms, the service 
was returned with a most painstaking imitation in black 
of every line of the copper-plate engraving. Or a pen and 



346 LOWESTOFT CHINA FACTORY. 

ink sketch, haviug been handed in with written instruc- 
tions as to the tinctures, the executed order came back with 
the words red, blue, green, &c., burnt in under the colours. 
An amusing instance is related of a lady who sent out a 
sketch of the armorial bearings, writing underneath the 
instructions : " Put this in the middle." Her dismay may 
be imagined when, on the arrival of the service, she found 
underneath each coat of arms indelibly burnt in, the 
words, ** Put this in the middle." In America the older 
families in a similar way were having services made for 
them in China, with their arms emblazoned, whilst a 
popular device on general services was the American 
Eagle in gold, surmounted by gold stars, supporting a 
shield, the whole shaded in brown and red. From 
Holland occasionally come specimens of Dutch heraldry 
and ships flying the Dutch flag. European designs were 
constantly copied. On marriage services may be seen 
surmounting the escutcheon containing the initials of the 
bride and bridegroom, two fat cherubims supporting a 
crown and holding in their hands long trumpets, a frequent 
detail of early Georgian ornament. Sometimes a couple 
of billing doves surmount the shield containing the initials. 
The French modes of decoration were not unfrequently 
imitated, the detached bouquets of roses, festoons, and 
sprigs of flowers often occur, whilst the cobalt blue 
borders with gold stars, the shield for the initials set in a 
mantle of blue, lined with ermine, are a favourite pattern. 
Only when copying figures was the Celestial hopelessly at 
fault. The copies from pictures supplied by the Jesuit 
Missionaries, of the Crucifixion, of Christ with the twelve 
Apostles, are positively painful, whilst the mythological 
auhjects, the pastoral scenes, and the attempts to depict 
the English hunting field, or Masonic subjects on dishes 
and punch-bowls, from line engravings, or highly-coloured 
representations of the operations in the harvest field on 
bowl or jug, inscribed with the names of English farms, 
and dated, are often grotesque. Landscape effects were 
attempted with more success, both winter scenes with 



LOWESTOFT CHINA FACTORY. 347 

figures skating in palpably Dutch or German costume, and 
summer prospects in a busy commercial seaport are often 
found quaintly depicted on plates and teapots, and some- 
times with better effect in reserve panels on the sides of 
jars and salt-cellars. Quiet rural scenes copied from 
books on English country seats, of houses nestling amongst 
trees on the banks of a river may be seen, whilst a certain 
form of vase, much used in decoration, seems to have 
derived its inspiration from European design. Large 
punch-bowls, with portrait of John Wilkes and inscribed 
" Wilkes and Liberty," have been copied from English 
prints. Nor was the Chinaman content with borrowing 
merely European design and decoration. Form was like- 
wise imitated — satyr mugs, after the Crown Derby ; coffee 
pots, from Copenhagen ; covered milk jugs, from Dresden 
and Berlin ; vases, from Venice ; toilet ware, tureens, 
vegetable dishes, salad bowls, and hot water plates from 
Staffordshire, are each in turn to be seen. 

The secret of hard paste porcelain had been jealously 
preserved by the Oriental for centuries. The researches 
of every pioneer amongst European potters had been 
directed to penetrate the mystery, but hitherto all had 
failed, and were necessarily bound to fail until the dis- 
covery of the two allied minerals upon which its success- 
ful fabrication depended. An artificial substitute made 
from a glass and a clay was known in Italy as early as the 
16th century, but to France was reserved the credit of 
first manufacturing a beautiful artificial soft paste porce- 
lain in general external appearance imitating the orien- 
tal, though differing materially from it in texture, com- 
position, and method of manufacture. Composed largely 
of silica with a small proportion of clay, the form wa^ 
first fired to a biscuit state at a much lower temperature 
than that required for true porcelain, it was then glazed 
with a soft fusible glass into the composition of which 
lead largely entered, and again fired at a still lower 
temperature. Originating with the invention of Louis 
Foterat at St. Severs in 1673, manufactories successively 

z 



S48 L0WB8T0FT CfflNA FACTORY. 

sprung up at Passy, 8t Cloud, Lille, Menecy, and Yiii- 
cennes. Seeing the familarity of the French with the 
letters of Pere d' EntrecoUes and the French Jesuit Mis- 
sionaries in China, who, writing home in 1712, had 
described the raw materials and the processes of the 
manufacture of Chinese porcelain, it is surprising that the 
honour of the invention of true hard paste porcelain in 
Europe should have fallen to Bottger, the assistant of an 
apothecary in Saxony, who succeeded early in the 1 8th 
century in discovenng the constituents of true porcelain. 
The story of how he made the discovery literally with his 
head, is familiar to all studeuts of the ceramic art. 
Finding his wig one day heavier than was its wont, he 
examined the powder with which it had been dressed, and 
discovered that a mineral earth had been substituted for 
the usual dressing of flour. On inquiry he ascertained 
that the powder had been made from a clay found in the 
environs of Aue. Upon analysis he recognised it as 
china clay. This discovery would not have availed him 
much, but if the story means that he was thereby led to 
an examination of the place in which the clay was found, 
and by that means discovered the associated china stone, 
there may be something in the legend. At all events a 
manufactory was established by the Elector of Saxony, 
at the fortress of Meissen in 1710, with Bottger as 
director, and workmen sworn to preserve the secret till 
death. Here true porcelain, as hard and as white as the 
oriental paste, was gradually brought to perfection. 
Confined as closely as birds in their cage, it is not to be 
wondered at that the workmen should have sighed for 
their liberty, and it is probable that to renegade hands 
escaping with the knowledge of the secret processes, is 
due the establishment of manufactories of hard porcelain 
successively at Vienna and Anspach in 1718, Bayreuth 
1720, Hochst 1740, St. Petersburg 1744, Berlin 1750, 
and other places later. 

To return to artificial soft paste porcelain, experiments 
seem to have been made in London as early as 1716, to 



LOWESTOFT CHINA FACTORY. 349 

make a ware by grinding up broken fragments of oriental 
porcelain and mixing them with quick lime dissolved in 
gum water. We only get to firm ground, however, with 
the grant of a patent to Messrs. Heylin and Fry of Bow, 
in 1744. Chelsea is thought by some to have been 
established as early as 1730, the earliest known dated 
piece bears the year 1745. The first proprietor, Gouyn, 
was a Fleming, the second Sprimont was a Frenchman, 
who had been carrying on business for some little time 
in London as a plate worker. In both the factories of 
Bow and Chelsea a number of French workmen were 
employed, and as factories sprung up in the provinces, 
Worcester in 1751, Derby and Lowestoft in 1756, work- 
men were sent for from the London works, thus the early 
glass or frit porcelain of these works all have a family 
resemblance to the artificial soft paste of France. 

To sum up then, we find in the first half of the 
18th century, a modern Chinese hard paste porcelain in 
full possession of the market, and the English manu- 
facturers all striving to make a soft paste porcelain, which 
by imitating the oriental decorations and by the lower 
cost of production, should enable them to undersell and 
oust the oriental in the public estimation. 

It will be readily understood that, containing so large 
a proportion of fusible glass in its composition, soft paste 
was extremely erratic in its behaviour and required great 
watchfulness in its firing. Any excess of temperature 
beyond what was necessary to produce translucence and 
preserve its form, causing it to fall out of shape, hence 
the percentage of loss was frequently very serious. It is 
said of the beautiful transparent porcelain made by 
Billingsly some years later at Pinxton, Nantgarw, and 
Swansea, that it involved a loss of approaching 90 per 
cent. The constant efforts of the potters were, therefore, 
addressed to the introduction of some substance which 
should render it less fusible and less likely to lose its 
shape upon a slight excess of temperature. About 1760 
modifications in the composition bad begun to be made. 



350 LOWESTOFT CHINA FACTORY. 

at Worcester soap rock was introduced, and at other 
manufactories, such as Chelsea, bone ash, with good 
results. 

Having reference to the claims which have been put 
forward on behalf of Lowestoft to the manufacture of 
hard paste, it may be well here to trace briefly the intro- 
duction, and, one may almost say the conclusion of the 
fabrication of a natural hard paste porcelain in England. 
William Cookworthy, the clever apprentice of a Loudon 
chemist, and managing a branch shop for his master at 
Plymouth, had for years been familiar with the corres- 
pondence of the French Jesuit Fathers, and the nature 
of the minerals required in the production of true porce- 
lain, and had been conducting experiments with the view 
to their discovery. He at length found in Cornwall the 
materials of which he had been in search, and took out a 
patent in 1768 establishing a manufactory in Plymouth. 
After a short time a true porcelain was made, not 
absolutely faultless, and certainly not commercially 
successful. In 1770 the business was removed to Bristol, 
the patentee selling his rights to Kichard Champion, 
who for some years made a beautiful true porcelain at 
a heavy loss. To recoup himself, Champion made an 
effort in 1775 to obtain an extension of Cookworthy's 
patent, which met with the opposition of Josiah Wedg- 
wood and the Staffordshire potters. In the result he 
obtained the extension for use in porcelain only, the other 
potters being left free to use the china stone and china 
clay if they saw fit in the manufacture of their earthen- 
ware. The costs of this opposition and the want of 
commercial success which attended his enterprise, must 
have proved tx)o much for his resources, for in 1781 he 
sold his rights to a company of Staffordshire potters, who 
set up business at New Hall. Their object, however, was 
not to continue the manufacture of true porcelain, or 
Champion's art productions, but rather to acquire the 
patent rights to use the china clay and the china stone, to 
make certain compositions and mixtures to sell in their 



LOWESTOFT CHINA FACTORY. 351 

raw state to the other Staffordshire manufactures to 
improve their wares, commercially a much more profitable 
business. Thus, it may be said, the fabrication of a 
natural hard paste porcelain in England came to an end. 

The competition of the Oriental porcelain was not 
the only difficulty that confronted the English potters, 
the productions of the Dresden factory were presently 
being pushed on to the market, and somewhere between 
1752 and 1759 we find the undertaker of the Chelsea 
Pottery memorialising the Customs to check the contra- 
band importations of the wares of the Dresden Factory. 

Marryat, writing in 1850, scarcely half a century 
after the close of the Lowestoft Pottery, had evidently 
taken no trouble to make personal inquiries at a time 
when really valuable information might have been obtained, 
and he had little acquaintance with its wares, for, beyond 
mentioning some pieces of delft ware, which will be 
presently alluded to, he concludes by stating that a mark 
of the pottery is said to be three parallel lines. The only 
mark known of this kind is St. Petersburg. 

To the late Llewellynn Jewitt must oe awarded the 
credit for the first painstaking endeavour, by personal 
enquiry, to learn something of the works. He visited 
Lowestoft in 1863, and contributed the results of his 
enquiries to the Art Journal of that year, which, with 
subsequent emendations, he published in his work on the 
" Ceramic Art of Great Britain," in 1878. He also refers 
to the plates mentioned by Marryat with local names and 
inscriptions, and the date 1752, together with other pieces 
of delft of a similar character, the inscription of one of 
which, in a heart-shaped tablet supported by two cheru- 
bims surmounted by a crown, he illustrates. Considering 
the close water communication between Lowestoft and 
Holland, and that pieces of Delft were not unfrequently 
ordered to be inscribed with English names and the date 
of presentation, 'and also that the makers of Dutch 
fayence likewise copied the decorations of the Chinese, 
who are already shown to have borrowed this particular 



352 L0WK8T0FT CHINA FACTORY. 

de&ign, there is very little doubt that these pieces are 
Dutch Delft. The form of writing and the mis-spelling 
of the names seems further evidence of this suggestion. 
Mr. Jewitt gives some interesting particulars of the pro- 
prietors, and of the productions of the works, quoting an 
inkstand made for the first Robert Browne, the manager 
and a proprietor, and inscribed with his initials and the 
date, 1762, as the earliest dated example. He narrates a 
story told by Mr. Robert Browne of his great grandfather, 
the first Robert Browne, having gone to London under 
the guise of a workman and engaged himself at one of 
the factories, where he bribed the warehouseman to lock 
him up secretly in that part of the factory where the 
principal was in the habit of mixing the ingredients after 
the workmen had left the premises. Here, concealed 
under an empty hogshead close to the table on which the 
principal operated, he could see, through an opening, all 
that was going on. From his hiding place he watched 
all the processes, saw the proportions of the different 
ingredients used, and gained the secret he had so long 
coveted. Having thus remained a willing prisoner for 
some hours, he was at last released when the principal left 
the place, and shortly afterwards returned to Lowestoft, 
after an absence of only two or three weeks. 

This story reminds one of the earlier exploits of 
Astbury and Twyford, who feigned idiotcy to obtain the 
entry to the Elers' works at Bradwell Wood, and by this 
artifice succeeded in witnessing all the manipulations and 
mastering most of the secrets. 

Jewitt illustrates a blue painted mug inscribed 
"James and Mary Curtis, Lowestoft, 1771," and after 
instancing other dated examples, mentions a mug of 1789 
as the latest known dated specimen. He says : — 

*' The great characteristic of the latter and more advanced porce- 
"lain made at Lowestoft is its extreme minuteness and intricacy of 
" pattern and beauty of finish. Indeed the decorations on many of the 
" specimens which I have examined are of a character far superior both 
"in design and in the exquisite and almost microscopic nicety of finish, 
" to those mostly produced at other manufactories. The borders are 



LOWESTOFT CHINA FACTORY. 358 

''frequently very minute and elaborate, and the wreaths, festoons, 
"or groups of flowers nre equally delicate in their proportions." 

If this glowing statement stood by itself, one would 
speculate whether he was not describing some of the 
Chinese porcelain which has been previously alluded to, 
but the next passage makes it quite clear, for he says, 
"Some of the productions of the Lowestoft works are 
apparently painted on Oriental body," and later on he 
quotes one of the well-known Chinese " Wilkes and 
Liberty " bowls, and gives a woodcut of what is patently 
a Chinese coffee pot, decorated with festoons and sprigs 
of flowers, part of a service made for Captain Welch, 
whose initials are borne within an oval shield supported 
by Cherubim, with a human heart pierced by two arrows, 
the whole surmounted by a crown. The latter is probably 
a crest, but the general device has been before referred to. 
He describes another tea service, with the crest of an owl 
and the monogram " W. W." conjoined. The writer has 
seen several cups of this service, which were beyond doubt 
Chinese. Another woodcut illustrates a barrel mug and 
tea and coffee cups with a saucer. The coffee cup is 
a piece of a well-known Lowestoft service, bearing the 
arms of the Rev. Robert Potter, Prebendary of Norwich 
and Vicar of Lowestoft, instituted 26th June, 1789. The 
tea cup, which has the initials ** M. S. J." surrounded by 
wreaths and ornamentations, surmounted by a crest, is of 
different pattern to the saucer, which is decorated with 
the usual Bcale border and sprigs, with a pair of large 
full-blown roses in the centre, and with the barrel mug, 
which is decorated with the net-work and flame border 
and sprigs and bouquet of roses, are all three obviously 
Chinese. No one can hope to be more than a contributor 
to the general stock of knowledge, and if we except these 
mystifications, the article is a valuable contribution. It 
concludes with some information as to some specimens of 
transfer printing, and the simple figures executed by the 
pottery, and gives the names of some sixteen painters, 
besides women, who he found were employed at the 



354 LOWESTOFT CHINA FACTORY. 

works. The principal of these were Thomas Rose, a 
French refugee, who is said tx) have given the French 
character to the general style of decoration of many of 
the services; Robert Allen, who was employed in the 
factory as a boy and became foreman and mixer, and is 
said to have been a painter in blue, after the close of the 
factory painted the east window for the church, and 
carried on business on his own account as a painter of 
china ; Thomas Curtis, said to have been employed at 
Dresden ; Redgrave, Abel, John and Joseph Bly ; James, 
John, and Margaret Redgrave, and others named Stephen- 
son, Balls, Mollershed, and Simpson. The causes assigned 
for the closing of the works are said to have been the 
successful competition of the Staffordshire manufacturers, 
the loss caused by the failure of the London agents, and 
the capture of a quantity of the ware at Rotterdam during 
the Napoleonic invasion. 

The Rev. E. A. Downman, in his small book on 
"English Pottery and Porcelain," comes to a conclusion 
negativing the manufacture of hard paste, and is a little 
doubtful as to the other productions, though he gives 
woodcuts of the mug and inkpot in the South Kensington 
Museum. 

In an edition of his " Marks and Monograms on 
Pottery and Porcelain," published subsequently to the 
articles by Mr. Jewitt in the Art Journal ^ Mr. William 
Chaffers makes full use of Mr. Jewitt's material. He 
makes the statement that the pottery was establised in 
1756 for the manufacture of pottery and porcelain soft 
paste; about 1775 hard paste was introduced. He thus 
fixes on the period when Champion was applying for an 
extension of Cookworthy's patent, which it has been 
shown he succeeded in obtaining so far as respects the 
manufacture of porcelain. It would, therefore, have been 
impossible for hard paste to be made at Lowestoft without 
infringing Champion's rights. He further says, " it is 
probable that a manufactory of ordinary pottery existed 
many years before, or at least the Delft ware was painted 



LOWESTOFT CHINA FACTORY. 355 

at Lowestoft. Gillingwater would certainly have men- 
tioned the fact if this had been the case, whereas he states 
Mr. Hewlin Luson's trial ware "proved to be finer than that 
called delft." This may mean that it was earthenware, or 
that it was that dense opaque porcelain of which the flat 
flask in the British Museum, inscribed "Thomas Butterfunt 
A trifle from Lowestoft," is an example. It is just 
possible that when the manufacture was commenced in 
Lowestoft, earthenware was made, for, allowing a year or 
so for the conversion of the purchased buildings and the 
erection of the kilns, the pottery must have been turning 
out something prior to the earliest date (1761) found 
on the soft paste porcelain pieces. In the Seago sale 
was an earthenware jug (now in the collection of Mr. 
Fred. A. Crisp, of Grove Park, Denmark Hill), with 
landscapes in medallions and armorial bearings, in- 
scribed " The Rev. Mr. Bowness, Lowestoft, Suffolk," 
with green borders. The Rev. Fras. Bowness was rector 
of Gun ton and vicar of Gorton, and was instituted in 
1758, somewhat later than Mr. Hewlin Luson's trials. At 
the samft sale was another jug similar in shape, and 
inscribed " C. Cook 1792," with flowers and Carpenter's 
coat of arms surrounded by flowers, with colored bands 
and lip (now also in the Crisp collection), and if it was 
made at the factory would from its date prove that 
earthenware was made throughout the whole period of 
the pottery's existence. Another curious pottery jug sold 
at the same sale, was in the form of a Bacchanalian figure 
and Pan seated on a tub with an owl, fruit, &c. In the 
present state of the evidence, the writer can only express 
his conviction that the last is undoubtedly Staffordshire, 
whilst the form, ware and glaze, of the others, appear 
indistinguishable from a well-known manufacture of cream 
ware. 

Mr. Chaffers ^ves an extract from Essays for December 
1716, by a Society of Gentlemen for the benefit of the 
People of England, which relates how a shipwrecked 
Dutch sailor, who had been received into the house of a 



356 LOWESTOFT CHINA FACTORY. 

gentleman for shelter, identified a white earth disclosed 
by some draining operations on his property, as the clay 
used by the makers of Delft ware in his own country, 
and suggests that the incident may probably relate to the 
discovery made by Mr. Hewlin Luson. Seeing, however, 
that Mr. Luson's father only purchased the estate at 
Gunton in 1724, and Mr. Hewlin Luson only succeeded 
to it in 1746, the little anecdote scarcely fits. 

Mr. Chaffers seems to have paid a visit to Lowestoft 
in 1865, and to have obtained the declaration from Abel 
Bly giving particulars of the works, which has been 
already quoted, but in his enthusiasm for pastures new, 
he devotes a greater part of his article to claiming for the 
Lowestoft pottery all the services of Chinese porcelain he 
was shown in the neighbourhood, on no greater evidence 
than that afforded by the presence of the armorial bear- 
ings of East Anglian families and the local traditions that 
they were the productions of the factory. Some new 
facts he adds, however, when he says that dessert services, 
with raised mayflowers and pierced sides similar to 
Worcester, were produced here. Or, again, that towards 
1800 they began to imitate the French china, like that of 
Angoulfime, with a small blue cornflower. He also gives 
extracts from some memoranda as to the mixing of the 
colours employed in the factory which formerly belonged 
to Robert Allen, and adds some information as to the 
character of the figures made at the works, and some 
particulars he gathered locally as to the proprietors and 
artists. He supplements his article with a list of inscribed 
and dated pieces, with a schedule of the Birth Tablets in 
the collection of Mr. Fred. Crisp. This is followed by a 
list of pieces with mottoes, inscriptions, cyphers, and 
crests, which requires to be used with caution, as it 
embraces a large number of Oriental examples. It should 
be added that the present Editor of the last editions of 
the work takes occasion to express in a note his difference 
with the opinions expressed by Mr. Chaffers on the subject 
of these Oriental pieces. 



LOWESTOFT CHINA FACTORY. 357 

Professor Church, in his S. K. Handbook on English 
Porcelain, has done his utmost to clear away the mystifi- 
cations of previous writers, and to relegate the ware to its 
proper position. He gives a careful list of the dated and 
inscribed examples which had been brought to his notice 
at that date, and devotes to the subject as much space as 
the compass of his Handbook enables him to bestow on 
minor factories. 

Mr. Frederick Litchfield, in his work on "Pottery 
and Porcelain," opens no new ground, but he gives an 
excellent illustration of several examples from the collec- 
tion of Mr. Fred. Crisp. 

In his valuable " History and Description of English 
Porcelain," Mr. William Burton, f.c.s., brings the weight 
of his technical knowledge to settle the controversy which 
has been waged over the Lowestoft productions in a notice 
regrettably brief, and illustrates an inkpot and the 
Oriental teapot in the South Kensington Museum with 
Allen's name painted underneath. He falls into a slight 
error in dating the decoration in enamel colours subse- 
quent to 1790, for examples are known bearing dates 
nearly 20 years before. 

The Burlington Magazine for August, 1903, also 
gives an illustration of the Allen teapot. 

The Connoisseur Magazine for October, 1903, con- 
tains an article on Lowestoft by Mrs. Willoughby Hodgson, 
in which she illustrates a Mandarin Mug inscribed, a 
cylindrical mug inscribed and dated, and one of the fiat 
fiasks inscribed and dated, all from the British Museum 
Collection, with some other pieces from other sources, 
amongst which are one or two which look very like 
Staffordshire china. These latter, however, she omits in 
her recently published bright little work, " How to 
identify Old China," whilst she adds an admirable illus- 
tration of a tea pot and scent bottle in the possession of 
Mr. Ernest Woods of Beccles. 

In his delightful work, **A Brief History of Old 
English Porcelain," recently published, M. Solon addresses 



358 LOWESTOFT CHINA FACTORY. 

himself with his unique knowledge of the ceramic art, to 
clear away the mystifications cast around the description 
of ware produced by the Pottery. After indicating the 
general character of its productions, he suggests, as a 
possible solution of the theory that oriental porcelain 
could have come from Lowestoft, that the proprietors and 
their London agent may have undertaken to get orders 
for Chinese services executed with their customers armorial 
bearings from the wholesale importers. It is an ingenious 
theory, were one necessary, but the advertisement of the 
London agent does not support it, neither would there 
appear to have been any greater difficulty in the local 
china dealer in such towns as Norwich, Ipswich, and 
Colchester, in that day getting their customers orders 
executed through the London dep6ts, than there is at the 
present time. M. Solon gives an illustration of a blue 
painted inscribed and dated t«a-pot, and also the dish in 
the British Museum with blue ground and panels con- 
taining views of Lowestoft church, light-houses, and 
shipping. 

The first discovery in the autumn of 1902, consisted 
mainly of parts of plaster moulds, with a few fragments 
of porcelain before and after firing. Some account of 
these moulds, illustrated by photographs, appeared in 
the Connoisseur for August, 1903. Most of them were 
for fluted cups, cream jugs and sauceboats, others were 
embossed with flowers and conventional designs. Of the 
latter was the mould of a well-known teapot with a pretty 
floral design, with the date, 1761, on a raised medallion. 
There was also a jug, evidently copied from the cabbage 
jugs of Worcester or Caughley. A sugar or grounds 
basin had a decoration of embossed leaves and scrolls. 
There were likewise moulds of part of an oval open work 
fruit basket, the embossed border of a plate, and of a 
scallop shell, spouts of teapots, and handles of cups, and 
fruit knobs for tureens, with a cat, stag, and other small 
ornaments. A fluted helmet-shaped sauce boat, with 
medallion and sprays of leaves, had the date 1785 cut in 



LOWESTOFT CHINA FACTORY. 359 

the back. The greater part of these moulds passed into 
the collection of Mr. Fred. A. Crisp. 

The result of the more systematic investigation in 
the summer of 1903, revealed a much more varied trou- 
vaille. Fragments of biscuit, blue painting under glaze 
and enamel painting, some of the former before firing. 

The unglazed specimens included portions of saucers 
decorated with Chinese pagodas with borders, also with 
flowers after the Japanese style, fragments of cups of the 
same character, portions of fluted jugs with bold con- 
ventional blue painted borders, a small cream jug with 
oval panel intertwined with a running wreath of flowers. 
Two portions of a large bowl, one with blue painted 
Chinese landscape, the other with flowers in blue, and 
triangle and spider-web border. Portions of plates 
painted in blue with Chinese pagodas, and borders of 
plates with basket work edges embossed. Parts of birth- 
day tablets, one with the inscription, *• Barrett, Aprial ye " 
— part of a sauce boat and handle, with other fragments 
with leaves and scrolls in relief. Fragments of reeded 
tea cups and a coft'ee can. Reeded tea-pot covers, with 
blossom and leaf knobs. Portions of a sauce boat with 
flowers in bold relief, and panels formed with leafy scrolls. 
A small leaf-shaped artichoke butter-boat, with feet 
slightly raised in the form of a trefoil leaf Bottoms of 
mugs and portion of a tray. Part of a dome-shaped 
coffee pot cover with broad flutes, and spout of a jug. 
Fragments of the necks of three bottle-shaped ewers. 
Tea-pot covers with plain knobs, and modelled blossom 
and leaf knobs, others with raised decoration and plain 
knobs, and the cover of a mustard pot. Parts of a 
dessert basket, with border in relief and pierced sides. 
A nest of saucers (wasters). Various forms of handles of 
sauce boats and artichoke butter-boats, and, perhaps, the 
greatest surprise of all, two pistol-shaped knife handles, 
one plain, and the other with a bold tendril pattern, with 
hawthorn flowers. Two arms of small figures and the 
wing and portion of a bird. There were several toy tea 



360 LOWRSTOPT CHINA FACTORY. 

cups, both glazed and unglazed, some of them blue 
painted. 

Amongst the glazed specimens were pieces bine 
painted, with Chinese pagoda and trellis pattern and 
Chinese flowers, one with white panels with blue sprigs, 
divided by spiral bands of blue scale ground. Parts of a 
bowl or teapot decorated with blue painted fishing-smacks 
and lighthouses. There was also the bottom of a cup 
with the open crescent mark of Worcester — of which 
mark more will be said anon — with several fragments of 
Oriental cups, the decorations of which had evidently 
served as studies for the painters. There were also three 
china blocks for moulding the birthday tablets. 

Of enamel painting there were numerous fragments, 
amongst them specimens of the Bourbon and Tournay 
sprigs. A number of clay churchwarden pipes were 
found, evidently used by the workpeople, some probably 
made at the Great Yarmouth Factory. There was also a 
plaster cast of some ornament, probably an angel, and a 
large mould for an openwork or pierced dish. 

Careful photographs were taken of all the trouvaille^ 
which passed into the possession of Mr. W. R. Spelman, 
of Norwich. 

Could we know the date of the anecdote related of 
Robert Browne's visit to one of the London factories it 
might help to establish the date at which the manufacture 
of porcelain commenced, for, whatever knowledge the 
workmen brought with them, it is clear something was 
wanting to ensure success, and that something Robert 
Browne went to London to acquire. 

The forms manufactured at the Lowestoft Works 
have been fairly indicated by the description of the frag- 
ments discovered. Others which have come under the 
writer's observation are punchbowls, mugs globular, bell 
shaped, and cylindrical, flat flasks, pickle leaves, candle- 
sticks, inkpots, ornamental jars with covers, and beakers, 
scent bottles, trinket stands and trays, birthday plaques, 
simple figures, animals, and other small ornaments. 



LOWESTOFT CHINA FACTORY. 361 

The paste of the earliest pieces is apparently a frit 
porcelain made from the local sand and clay. It is white 
and fairly translucent, a greenish yellow when viewed 
through a transmitted light, generally exhibiting slight 
imperfections in the potting, is somewhat heavy at the 
lower parts of the ware, and the glaze frequently somewhat 
speckled, due to careless manufacture. 

The earliest decoration was blue painted under glaze, 
in imitation of the Chinese, and later a floral decoration, 
much in the style of the Worcester of the Dr. Wall 
period. Occasionally a pattern of vine leaves and grapes 
may be met with. This blue decorated ware, of which 
the earliest inscribed piece yet noted is a birth tablet 
dated 1761, probably continued to be the staple pro- 
duction throughout the whole period of the existence 
of the pottery, A frequent feature in this blue ware 
is the drawing a line in blue down either side of the 
junction of the handle with the body, probably sug- 
gested by the little curly scroll sometimes seen in a 
similar position on old Nankin sauceboats. This can 
be seen quite plainly in several of the examples on 
plate I. Often it will be present at the junction of the 
upper part only. In pairs of sauceboats perhaps one 
will be lined and the other plain. The colour of the blue 
varies very much from a very dark to a very faint blue, 
and between these extremes it is occasionally excellent in 
tone and depth of colour. After 1760 some of the pieces 
are not so translucent, and by the transmitted light are 
much more brown in appearance, suggesting that, as with 
other soft paste factories, experiments were being made to 
render the paste less susceptible to the variations of tem- 
perature in the kiln. Soap rock was probably the con- 
stituent introduced, if we may judge from the colour ; 
bone-aeh may have been tried later. Decoration in relief 
now becomes very frequent, and there is a marked 
similarity in the designs of jugs, sauceboats, and t'Ca ware 
to the Worcester of that period. Some of the designs 
are undoubtedly original, but much of the embossed and 



362 LOWESTOFT CHINA FACTORY. 

fluted ware savours of il Worcester inspiration. Where in 
cases of doubt the specimen is placed side by aide with 
Worcester of the Dr. Wall period, the comparison is 
always to the disadvantage of Lowestoft, the Worcester 
being better potted and better painted. 

It is said that no mark was employed, and this is 
true as regards the factory, but evidently some mark was 
found necessary to distinguish the work of the painters 
in blue underglaze, who probably all copied from the 
same designs and were paid by the piece. At Worcester 
the practice prevailed of each painter in blue having his 
own mark, and a large number of such workmen's marks 
have been observed and recorded, and at some of the 
Staffordshire potteries a similar plan has been pursued 
with enamel painters filling in outline patterns, and with 
the painters of figures. At Bristol the enamel painters 
each boldly recorded his number under the mark of the 
pottery. At Lowestoft a large number of the blue pieces 
will be found marked with a number, generally on the 
inside of the rim underneath the piece, and occasionally 
on the flange of the covers. The writer has noted most 
of the numbers from 1 to 24, and there may be others. 
The names of the painters have yet to be identified with 
the numbers. As the painters but seldom signed their 
work, this may prove a matter of considerable difiiculty. 
The " Ann Hammond" mug (1764), illustrated on plate i., 
is signed under the tip of the handle by " Richard Phillips," 
and the John Cooper mug (1768), on the same plate, has 
the initials ** R. P." in a similar position, both are marked 
with the figure 3, which may perhaps settle the mark of 
this artist. Several other pieces in the writer's collection 
bear the same number. One of the most prolific painters, 
if one* may judge by the frequency with which the 
number appears, is No. 5, which, if one may hazard a 
conjecture, is probably Robert Allen. 

Jewitt drew attention to pieces which were shewn 
to him locally, bearing the crescent mark, and adds, that 
** it is perhaps unnecessary to say that the pieces marked 




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LOWESTOFT CHINA FACTORY. 363 

with the Turkish crescent are the ordinary blue and white, 
with the Worcester and Caughley marks, and that some 
of the pieces are the well-known cabbage leaf and other 
forms of those makers." Besides the Salopian imitations 
of the Worcester mark, Staflfordshire and French forgeries 
are also known. Is Lowestoft to be added to the others ? 
It has already been said that amongst the fragments 
recently discovered, was a piece with the Worcester open 
crescent mark, and did this stand alone it might be fairly 
inferred it was a piece from which the workpeople had been 
copying the decoration or form, both of which it is clear 
were imitated. But Mr. Crisp has a whole tea service of 
the blue painted spiral scale pattern shewn in the cups 
and saucers on plate iv., with the open crescent mark on 
each in a very black blue, whilst an undoubted Lowestoft 
cup and saucer in the writer's collection bears on the rim 
a triangle and a dot, which is generally classed amongst 
the Worcester workmen's marks. A number of opaque 
dishes and plates with blue grounds and circular and fan- 
shaped panels, clearly made in imitation of the Worcester 
powder-blue ground, have marks so closely resembling 
the Japanese and Chinese marks copied on the similar 
ware at Worcester, that a comparison is necessary to 
detect the difference. 

Perhaps no Pottery, unless it be Leeds, did so much 
in the way of inscribing its wares. In all probability 
this was due to the well-known predilection of visitors to 
a sea-side resort to take away with them a memento of 
their visit. " A trifle from Lowestoft " is quite commonly 
met with, both in blue painting underglaze and on enamel 
painted mugs, and similar mugs were inscribed for Yar- 
mouth, Beccles, Bungay, &c. Bowls and other mugs, 
teapots and coffee jugs, are frequently found inscribed 
with the name and address of an individual, with the 
date. Circular plaques, painted with sprigs of flowers, 
and panels reserved by rococo scrolls, inscribed with the 
name and date of birth, and pierced with two holes to be 
suspended by string from the wall, were a favourite form 

AA 



364 LOWESTOFT CHINA FACTORY. 

of presentation. Upwards of twelve of these are in Mr. 
Fred. Crisp's collection. On plate i. will be 8e3n a large 
medallion so inscribed, it is remarkable also for having 
the back decorated with a transfer print of fruit and 
iiowers. Other forms of transfer printing in blue may be 
met with, the commonest on tea services is a variation of 
the Willow pattern. The willow trees, orange and peach 
trees are all in different positions to the Caughley story, 
whilst the mandarin gesticulates from the balcony of his 
pavilion at the escaping lovers. The doves, too, become 
two flocks of birds. The border is of the honeycomb and 
diaper pattern, with an inner border of sprays of leaves 
and flowers. Two or three jugs with a print of a sports- 
man carrying a gun and accompanied by a dog are known. 
This print is said to have been presented by Gamble, of 
Bungay. There is a mug with this print on plate v. 

Decoration in enamel colours appears on dated and 
inscribed pieces as early as 1776 in the writer's collection, 
and as the dates are found to the end of the century, no 
doubt such decoration continued to the close of the 
pottery. Some of the coffee jugs and punch bowls are 
executed with considerable care, which bespeaks the work 
of the best artists. They are occasionally inscribed with 
verses or conundrums — one such is illustrated on plate ii. 
Mandarin decoration is found on tea services, and on 
mugs inscribed with names and dates. Others of the tea 
services are distinctly French in character (see plates ii. 
and III.), the decoration most frequently met with being a 
bouquet of roses and flowers with green leaves, sometimes 
issuing out of a Cornucopia or basket, as a central design 
on a white ground, the rest of the ground being decorated 
with scattered sprigs. The borders are generally of red, 
lake, and maroon network or trellis, sometimes relieved by 
a black, red, or green line, or at other times a serrated 
edge in green. The trellis borders are frequently outlined 
with red scrolls and a somewhat gaily painted butterfly, 
festoons of flowers with loops of brown beads, heightened 
with a dash of yellow, depend from these borders ; or a 




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LOWESTOFT CHINA FACTORY. 365 

double red line, broken at intervals with clusters of red 
sedge leaf, will form the border, from which are suspended 
swags of bright green laurel, intertwined with festoons of 
roses and flowers. This form of decoration is often 
repeated with considerable variety of detail in the borders, 
which are sometimes simply single or double red lines, 
with an additional trefoil or a crenelated and dot orna- 
ment in red. Occasionally the scale or network border is 
in bright pink, outlined with red, and panels in a blue- 
grey ; or the panels may be reserved by a kind of chain 
work in lake colour. A decided feature on the teapots is 
the strokes of red on knobs and tips of the spouts. Of 
the Lowestoft rose, it was said by Chaflfers that it had the 
appearance of being plucked from the stalk and dropped 
upon the surface, the stalk being seldom represented, or if 
at all, only a slight thread-like line to denote it. This is 
partially correct, but the writer's observations tend in the 
direction of the stalk being more oft^n represented than 
not. The roses are clearly of at least four different types. 
That most frequently seen is an overblown, ill-drawn rose, 
the shading being conveyed by lines of colour on each 
petal. When this rose is repeated on the commoner tea 
ware, probably by the apprentices, it seems to lose all 
semblance of a rose at all. Another form of rose, very 
small, seems to be indicated by dabs of colour, rather than 
drawn, yet it is decidedly eflfective. Another rose is 
somewhat stiff — the high-lights are left unpainted, the 
inner petals being merely indicated, whilst the outer 
petals are shaded down with lines of colour. A fourth 
form noticed is a large open-mouth rose, with more 
deliberate attempts at drawing, the light and shade being 
imparted in the more usual methods. A pretty pattern 
aeea on tea ware i& a bunch of pinks, with a border of 
festoons of roses passing through rings from a single red 
line. Another most effective pattern on tea ware is a 
delicate festoon of the vine, with tendrils and leaves in 
gold, the grapes being in bright red. One of the wedding 
tea services made for the second Robert Browne, in the 



866 LOWESTOFT CHINA FACTORY. 

possession of Mr. Crisp, is decorated with flowers in pink 
en camaieu in a superior fashion. As in the Worcester, 
Derby, and Pinxton Potteries, the Bourbon and Tournay 
sprig copied from the china of Angouleme may be seen on 
mugs and tea services, sometimes with' the addition of a 
gold sprig in the spaces. Another Browne wedding tea 
service, in the possession of the late Mr. Peter de Lande 
Long, was of the Bourbon sprig, every piece having the 
date of the wedding painted under the rim. Lowestoft also 
had its Japan patterns, so favoured at Derby, Worcester, 
and elsewhere. Four such are represented in the writer's 
collection (see plate iv.). These Japan patterns being 
sometimes painted in underglaze blue, with over decora- 
tion in enamel colours, the painter s number may be found 
in the usual place. Occasionally the decoration on jars 
and mugs may be found in black. A covered jar in this 
decoration is shown on plate ii. 

Armorial bearings, contrary to what has been generally 
alleged, seem to have been but sparingly executed. The 
best-known service is that made for the Rev. Prebendary 
Potter, which was probably a presentation service. It 
was of the old frit porcelain, translucent, and evidently 
executed with care, though it depends for its decoration 
solely upon the emblazonment and the gilt edge. Speci- 
mens of this service are given on plate li. Only one or 
two other instances have come under the writer's observa- 
tion. Mr. Crisp has a mug with the Blacksmith's arms 
painted in enamel colours. 

The forms of the blossom and leaf knobs on these 
enamel-painted tea services are obviously copies of 
Worcester, but they are not modelled or finished off with 
anything like .the same care. The lids of the teapots are 
more dome-shaped than the Worcester, and, unlike the 
latter, the flange is glazed. 

The glaze is soft, but not so soft as the Chelsea, 
although, like the latter, it is frequently found to have run 
down the sides in tears in the firing. It is easily abraded, 
and is sometimes slightly irridescent, and the enamel colours 




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LOWESTOFT CHINA FACTORY. 367 

in the firing seem to merge into it. Probably with the 
view of improving the white of the ware, the glaze seems 
to have been tinged with cobalt, and seemingly was more 
or less in an experimental stage. On some of the blue 
underglaze ^ painted ware the glaze is comparatively clear ; 
on others it is heavily toned with cobalt. On the poly- 
chrome pieces the glaze is sometimes scarcely more than 
straw-coloured ; at other times, where it has gathered in 
the bottom of the pieces, or at the junction of the handles, 
the blue is most striking. 

Gilding was but sparingly used. It is good in 
quality, but indiflferently applied, which gives it an imper- 
fect appearance. Chafiers quotes some memoranda in the 
possession of Mr. Robert Allen Johnson, a descendant of 
Robert Allen, the former manager, which principally 
relates to the mixing of the colours employed in the 
factory, but amongst them is a letter from James 
Mollershead, of Hanley, dated 5th November, 1793, " the 
process for preparing the gold," which seems to suggest 
that Allen was not satisfied with the gilding so late as ten 
years before the closing of the works. 

In his Declaration, Al)el Bly speaks of two kilns only, 
which must have been a biscuit kiln and an enamelling 
kiln, and at the period of its greatest prosperity it is not 
suggested that more than between 60 and 70 hands were 
employed. The output cannot, therefore, at any time 
have been very large. Whether the " blurred " specimens 
of blue and the coarsely-painted enamel pieces which are 
sometimes met with were allowed to leave the pottery, or 
whether they were " seconds " dispersed at the final sale, 
will probably never be known. It would be satisfactory 
to think they were the latter. 

Much speculation has been wasted as to the singu- 
larity of a pottery being established at such a seemingly 
land's-end part of the country. When, however, it is 
remembered that in the days of the early frit porcelains 
the only requirements were a supply of sand and clay, 
with wood for firing and facilities for water carriage, and 



368 LOWESTOFT CHINA FACTORY. 

that all these conditions were complied with at Lowestoft, 
it can readily be seen that the chances of success were as 
good as at several other parts of the country where soft 
paste works were located. 

Several reasons have l)een urged as contributing to 
the closing of the works. One alone was sufficient. The 
change from wood to coal for firing, enabled the Stafford- 
shire manufacturers, with their proximity to the coal- 
fields, and the abundant supply of local clays, to make 
their bone-ash porcelain at such a price as made competi- 
tion impossible, especially when, on the close of Bristol, 
the Cornish china stone and clay became available for 
introduction into the various compositions. Bow, Chelsea, 
Longton Hall, Plymouth, Bristol were closed down, 
Lowestoft was bound to go, to bo followed later on by 
Nantgarw, Swansea, Rockingham, and eventually Caughley 
Derby itself, to say nothing of other minor factories. 

After the close of the works in 1803, Robert Allen, 
the manager, opened a shop for the sale of china in the 
town, and appears to have done some little business in 
painting ware bought in the white from other potteries, 
which he enamelled in a muffle kiln, which he had erected 
on his own premises. Absolon, at Yarmouth, had been 
doing a similar business at Yarmouth for some yean*, 
enamelling china and glass as souvenirs for visitor's to the 
sea port town. Lowestoft had come and gone, and, 
although the competition of the English factories had 
done much to undersell and check the trade in Chinese 
porcelain, it continued to be imported for some years, for 
the wars with England and France, and the Taiping 
rebellion, which almost entirely checked the importation 
for a time, were yet to come, and Allen seems to have 
dealt in it, as we see from the oriental teapot in^outh 
Kensington Museum, bearing his name and address 
painted on the bottom. 

Reference has been made to the various quarters 
where illustrations of the museum exhibits and specimens 
from private collections have l)een given. They have 




< 
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X 







LOWESTOFT CHINA FACTORY. 369 

been moBtlv selected on account of their bearincr external 
evidences ia the shape of inscriptions and dates to connect 
tbera with the Pottery. To the general collector it may 
be of interest to see side by side with such pieces, some 
of the specimens more generally accessible. The first 
four illustrations to this paper have, therefore, been 
selected with this object from the waiter's collection, only 
those being given as arc verified, either by the numbers 
upon them or by the fragments which have been recently 
discovered on the site of the Pottery. Plate v. contains 
a selection from the collection of inscribed and dated 
pieces in the possession of a neighbour, Mr. W. II. Booth. 
A special feature is the jug with the Ipswich to Lowestoft 
coach painted in blue underglaze, starting by the old 
Spring Road. This jug was especially ordered at the 
Pottery by a gentleman traveller, who desired to make 
the coachman a present. The panel of the coach is 
inscribed " Lowestoft," whilst under the painting appears 
the inscription, "Willm. Bevein, Lowestoft coachman, 
1786." The large '' Ellis " plate is dated behind '' 1770." 
The small mugs are painted in enamel colours, and exhibit 
a somewhat novel form of dancette border, int-ertwined 
with a running border of tendrils, and another form with 
ribbons in festoons intersected with a sprig. 

It is hoped the observations here recorded may be 
some contribution towards dispelling the mist w^hich has 
hitherto obscured the productions of the Pottery, and that 
it may dispose of the oriental and hard paste theory. A 
monograph yet remains to be written. Such a work, even 
of a minor factory, whose productions may have done 
little to contribute to the development of the Ceramic 
Art of the country, must possess a value, from an anti- 
quarian point of view, in the hands of a writer with 
access to the books of the factory, and who does not allow 
his patriotism to outstrip a due sense of proportion. 



(370) 



EXCURSIONS, 1903, 

I. NEEDHAM MARKET, HAUG5LEY, and WETHERDEN. 

The memlters of the Institute were favoured with bright weather 
on the occasion of their visit to Haughley Park and its neighbourhood, 
Wednesday, 24th June, 1903, at the kind invitation of Mrs. Pretjman. 
The carriages which left Ipswich and Bury were so well filled, that the 
attendance was equal to that of any of the previous excursions. 

The first stoppage was at Needham Market, where the vicar, the 
Rev. A. C. Dundas, received the visitors at '* the wayside chapel of St. 
John the Baptist,'' and pointed out several features of interest in hia 
church, especially the double hammer-beam roof, and the font of good 
workmanship. 'The roof, until recently, had been concealed by a 
ceiling of lath aud plaster. In response to the Vicar's request 
the Hon. Sec. endeavoured to throw additional light upon the 
history of the building, an account of which is given in Volume iv., 
page 245, of the Proceedings of the Institute. Mr. Redstone men- 
tioned that he did not Agree with the author of that article, the Rev. 
W. H. Sewell, who ascribes the foundation of the chapel to Bishop 
Grey of Ely (1458 — 1478). A church or chapel was standing upon 
the site at least two centuries before Bishop Qrey was appointed to the 
see of Ely. In a survey of the manors belonging to the Bishop of Ely, 
in 1277 (see page 270), two chapels, one at Vermundesdon and the 
other at Needham, are mentioned as being attached to the church of 
Barking. It is most probable that at Needham, as in other Suffolk 
parishes, church restoration or re-building was being extensively 
carried out, whilst the northern and midland counties were plunged in 
the miseries of the war raging between ihe rival factions of York and 
Lancaster. 

The early English dripstone worked into the wall above the 
priest's door, standing in the south wall near the east end, may be a 
fragment of the old wall ; and the pierced buttress leaning against the 
east wall, may owe its construction to the necessity of erecting a 
support in a narrow passage-way between the church and an adjacent 
building. Many wills of the 15th century mention various bequests, 
such as, the leading of the roof (1460), the erection of a stone cross 
and three stone beasts upon the porch, ' new-building * in that year, and 
confirm the statement of the existence of an early church. 

The inscription upon the walls : — 

Pray we alle for grace 
For he y^ hath holpe yt place. 
God reward he for her ded 
And heaven may be her mede. 

— points to the number of benefactors to the church-building as being^ 



EXCURSION — HAUGHLEY CHURCH. 371 

more than one (?ie=^them, Iter — their, in Early English). Doubtless the 
brethren and sisters of the three gilds — Gild of Holy Trinity, Gild of 
St. John the Baptist, Gild of St. Thomas — which met in the church, 
were its chief supporters. 

When a careful examination of the building had been made, the 
carriages proceeded to Haughley Church, where the members from the 
Bury district had already Jissembled. Here the rector of Wetherdeu, 
the Kev. A. Dimock, kindly acted as guide. He stated that the orienta- 
tion of Haughley Church exactly coincides with the pole star. Com- 
pared with the neighbouring churches in size and proportion it was 
second only to Woolpit Church. The tow^er is Decorated and of five 
stages, tlie exterior and interior pillars of the porch are remarkable for 
their unusually elaborate, round, and hollow mouldings. A curious 
feature is the small sanctus bell on the apex of the roof. The east 
window shows elaborate tracery of the Transition period ; and the 
traces of the remains of the Chapel of the Holy Cross (see pa<^e 307) 
are yet visible in the east end of the south aisle. A small chapel, 
which stood to the north of the Sacrarium, has been removed. 

The old Castle mound, in close pro^jimity to the church, was next 
visited and examined, by the kind permission of Mr. Wilfrid Be van, of 
Plashwood. The party assembled on the summit of the mound to 
listen to a paper on " Haughley Castle and its Park," read by Mr. V. B. 
liedstono (see page 301). Mr. J. S. Corder made a few remarks upon 
the subject of the paper, and after a vote of thanks had been passed to 
the owner (Mr. Bevan) and to the occupier, who had taken great pains 
to make access to the summit easy and pleasant, the carriages pro- 
ceeded to Wetherden Church, where the Rector again acted as guide. 

Wetheruen Cliurch is smaller than Haughley Church, but bears 
the same general features. The interior tower arch is fine, and is 
considered to be of Early English construction. The double hammer- 
beam roof, with its double set of carved figures, or, rather, the har- 
monising of this roof with the wood carving of the seats, is the unique 
feature of the church. 

The south aisle was built in the 16th century, l)y Sir John 
Sulyard, of Wetherden Hall, Chief Justice of the Common Pleas. 
This aisle constituted a private chapel. It consists of three bays, and 
within it are the tombs of the founder and his grandson. The dese- 
cration of these tombs is noted by W. Dowsing in his journal, 1643, as 
follows : — 

" We brake a hundred superstitious pictures in Sir Edward 

Suliarde's Isle, and gave orders to brake down sixty more 

There were taken up niueteen superstitious inscriptions that weighed 
sixty-five pounds." . 

The north chapel retains its vaulting, and is reputed to be the 
snallest in England. 

Tlie base of the exterior walls of the Sulyard aisle, and of the 
porch, as also the wood carving of the interior and three hatchments, 

BB 



372 EXCURSION — HAUOHLET PARK. 

give the Suljard arms, with numerous quarterings, marking alliances 
with the Fajnford, Bacon, Good, Andrewes, Wejland, Bumavil), 
Stratton, Bedingfield, and Sydenham families. 

A short and delightful walk across Haughley Park brought the 
visitors to the picturesque home of the Suljards, where Mrs. Pretyman 
offered her guests the most cordial welcome. A free inspection of 
all the rooms was granted to the visitors, and especial notice was taken 
of the hall, the grand oak staircase, and the room wainscotted with oak 
panelling. 

The Rev. A. Dimock read an interesting paper on "Haughley 
Park and the Sulyards." 

In 1463 a John Sulyard became possessor of the Manor of Wether- 
dene. ^* Sir John Suylliarde discended of the Ancient family of the 
Suylliards of Aye here in Suffolk was in the time of King Henry 
the 7^ one of the Justices of the King's bench and afterward Lord 
Cheife Justice of England." ("Suffolk in the xvnth Century," by 
Reyce, p. 135.) John, the grandson of Sir John Sulyard, was a loyal 
supporter of Queen Mary, who, tradition states, slept for one night at 
Wetherden Hall, when her adherents were collecting their forces to 
oppose the Duke of Northumberland. For his services he received 
knighthood, and the Haughley estates, possessions of the Duke of 
Suffolk, which had reverted to the Crown. A manuscript formerly 
belonging to Mr. Appleton, nephew to Reyce, of Preston, states that 
the house within The Park was built by Sir John Sulyard in the latter 
years of the reign of James i., and that his son. Sir Edmund Sulyard, 
was residing at the Hall in 1653, the year in which the manuscript was 
written. If such were the facts, the writer must have been living 
when he could obtain reliable information from inhabitants of Haughley 
who assisted at the building, and thus we have circumstantial evidence 
that Sir John Sulyard, Lord Chief Justice in the reign of Queen Mary, 
did not try nor condemn to the stake " prisoners for conscience' sake " 
within the panelled room of the old Hall. Sir Edward Sulyard, son of 
the Lord Chief Justice, was vigorously persecuted as a recusant in the 
reign of Elizabeth. His son, John, who succeeded to his father's 
estates in 1605, and was knighted by James i., erected the Hall. 

" The Hall was never environed with a broad and deep ditch or 
moat. Its three leading characteristics were — plenty of materials, 
large chimneys and small windows." — Xeyce us. The east front, 
excepting the library windows and minor details, remains practically 
the same as itwas when first built. 

A vote of thanks was passed for Mr. Dimock's kindness in prepar- 
ing the paper and in acting as guide during the day. Mr. J. S. Corder 
and Mr. Cotman expressed the gratitude of all present to Mrs. Pretyman 
and the members of her household for the warm hospitality which they 
had bestowed upon their guests. 

Before quitting the park, many members took the opportunity of 
inspecting the grand old tree known as '^ The Gospel Oak." 



(373) 



II. EXCURSION TO LOWESTOFT and its NEIGHBOUKHOOD. 

On Thursday, July dOth,. the meuibers of the Institute made an 
excursion to the extreme north of the county. A visit was 6rst made 
to the curious vaulted underground chambers belonging to the shops of 
Mr. F. Able, butcher, Cromwell House, and of Mr. R. Simons. These 
vaults appear to have been used as store-houses late in the 15th century. 

Later on a visit was paid to the Marine Biological Laboratory in 
Waveney Road, where an inspection was made of specimens of labelled 
fishes as set free by the Government s.8, Httxley, to trace their immi- 
grations in the North Sea. In the absence of Mr. Garstang, Mr. C. 
Foster Cooper acted as guide, and explained the various charts and the 
object of the work. ' The method of determining the age of fish was 
also explained, and specimens of North Sea fauna were shovrn. 

Before luncheon, Miss Coates, of London Road, Lowestoft, kindly 
invited the members to inspect her interesting collection of china and 
other local curios. 

Luncheon was served at the Suffolk Hotel. The Mayor of Lowestoft 
(Councillor L. F. Orde) presided. After luncheon Mr. H. C. Casley 
thanked the Mayor for presiding and for the welcome they had received. 
He spoke of the manufacture of Lowestoft china and of hard oriental 
ware, and complimented the inhabitants upon their efforts to protect 
the East Coast from the erosion of the sea. The Mayor, in reply, 
announced the great pleasure it gave him to welcome the members of 
so influential a society as the Suffolk Institute of Archaeology. Votes 
of thanks were also passed for the kind reception accorded to tlie visitors 
by Mr. Garstang and his assistants, and for the help rendered by Mr. C. 
Ganz of Aldeburgh. 

It was in a downpour of rain, which unfortunately continued for the 
greater part of the day, that the carriages started for St. Margaret's 
Church. An examination was made of this handsome Perpendicular 
church, its font, brasses, eagle desk, and the crypt beneath the chancel. 
The inclement weather compelled the excursionists to forego a visit to 
the site of the old Lowestoft china works and to hasten to Blundestou 
Church, where Mr. V. B. Redstone read a short paper. The building 
has recently undergone judicious repairs, and still maintains many 
features of interest to the antiquary. Its association with the life- 
history of David Copperfield will not be soon forgotten. Traces still 
remain of "The Sepulchre" in the north wall and of the site of St. 
James' chapel in the south wall. The corbel stones in the north wall and 
the head now placed beneath the stoup by the south door appear to be the 
"Work of the fourteenth century. The panels of the screen, which is of 
good workmanship, probably date from the early sixteenth century. 



874 LOWESTOFT AND NEIGHBOURHOOD. 

Butts Bacon, who was buried in the chancel, wns the grandson of the 
physician to Henry viii., and of Sir Nichohis Bacon, of Redgrave. 

In the year 42 Edward in. the manor of Blundeston and the 
advowson of the church was granted V)y Osbert de Blundeston to Wnu 
Roger and Hugh Fastolf, and thus began the connection of the Fastolf 
family with this district, a connection which is brought prominently to 
our notice in the Pnston letters. In 1274 Patrick of Blundeston 
endowed the church w ith three acres of land. 

It was a long drive from Blundeston to Burgh Castle, and the 
heavy roads caused great delay, so that only a few remarks were made 
on the spot about the character and history of this ancient Roman camp. 
The paper, which the rain prevented the Hon. Sec. from reading at the 
Castle ruins, is published in this number of the Proceedings. The 
thanks of the Institute are due to Sir Maurice Boileau, the owner of 
the ruins, and to Canon Venables, rector of Burgh, for the permission 
to inspect the Castle, and for the trouble wliich they had taken to 
welcome their visitors. 

From Burgh Castle a journey was made to Fritton, but there was 
no time to examine Fritton Church, with its Norman apse and tower of 
flint and rubble work. The present church extends some distance from 
the foundations of the ancient church. There are features of Norman 
and imitative Normnn work, barbarised with Gothic. The small piscina 
within the chancel rails appears to have been recently recut ; it may he 
Norman. The chancel was enlarged in 1350. The mural paintings of 
St Christopher with the infant Chiist upon his shoulder, and the iigure 
of St John in the splay of the south window, are clearly visible. 

At Fritton Decoy old Hall, Miss Coates, of Lowestoft, kindly 
arranged to provide her guests with a most inviting tea ; an abundance 
of fruit was placed l>efore the visitors, who fully appreciated this lady's 
generosity, and befjre departing accorded her a hearty vote of thankp. 

A short time was then given to examine the ruins of St Olave's 
Priory, and to listen to Dr. W. A. S. Wynne, who had taken great pains 
to give his visitora a warm welcome. He had made excavations in the 
floor of the vaulted rooms, and had thus brought to light the whole of 
one of the octagonal pillars which support the roof. By this work the 
true character and early form of the building was made manifest. 
Everyone present thanked Dr. Wynne for his kindness. 

'I'he arrangements for members to enter the train at St Olaves^ 
considerably shortened the homeward journey. 



(375) 

INDEX. 
1. NOMINA LOCORUM. 



Acton, 36, 2M 

Affinoourt, 232 

AKenhAiQ, 183 

Aketon, 176, 193 

Aldburgh, 189 

Aldttber, 269 

Aldebui^h, 320, 821. 322, 323 

Alderton, 190 

Aldham, 36, 54, 176, 194, 276, 277 

Aldham Common, 207 

Alewood, 292 

Aleye. 176 

Alfeton, 176, 193 

Allwood, 286 

Alnasbarne, 190, 233 

Alpheton, 85, 254 

Aires, 274 

Alteroftton, 191 

Althorpe, 71 

Altonespitt, 2^3 

Ampton, 2, 254, 278 

Amttanton, 178, 196 

AnoeloteB Field, 269 

AndelberteMroft, 270 

Angouldme, 866 

Anspftch, 348 

Appedeii, 177 

Areawalle, 269 

Arewellemede, 209 

Arlie way, 287 

Armeld howe, 283 

Arnem, 48 

Arnestie, 287 

AMwonge, 272 

Ash Booking, 228 

Ashe, 182, 191, 192 

Ashfeilde, 192 

Ashfield, 254 

Ashfield magna, 10 

Ash Hall Manor, 231 

Ashley, 16, 254 

AskbT, 186 

Aspall, 29, 179, 254 

Asphale, 179 

AMiugton, 36, 176, 192, 254 

Assington Church, 225 

Assingtou Hall, 207 

Aylshain, 829 

Ayshfield, 178 

Babbewalleweye, 273 



Babergh, 

Bactoii, 29, 25.\ 278 

Baddesacre, 156 

Bad^rs Hill, 247 

Badingham, 185 

Badliiigham Bridge, 298 

Badwell, 276 

Badwell Afih, 255 

Badwell magna, 197 

Baggots, 279 

Baktston, 180 

Balberge, 176 

Balhain, 182 

Banson grove, 290 

Banton ileld, 269 

Barhams, 279 

Bardwell, 10, 81, 134, 255, 278, 293 

Bardwell Anh, 10 

Bardwell St. Martin, 11 

Barewe, 176 

Barkesfield, 270 

Barking, 270 

Baruardeston, 195 

Bamardiston, 30, 178, 255 

Barneham, 196 

Bamham S. Gregory, 11, 255, 278. 279 

Barnham St. Martin. 255, 278, 279 

Bamingham, 10, 106, 136, 197, 265, 277. 

279. 287 
Baronesfield, 269 
Barrow (o), 3, 60, 198, 255, 280 
Barton, 118, i74. 196, 198 
BartfHi Magna, 2, 255, 281 
Barton Mills, 17, 255 
Basilies land, 162 
Basses land, 168 
Basnetii land, 1(», 168 
BasKingbouma, 285 
Bastershill. 279 
Hatiiiforde, 182^ 
Baude^y, 190 
Bawdsey, 268, 322 
Bawlby, 289 
Baykton, 196 
Beacon-acre, 157 
Beocles, 188, 315, 857. 868 
BiHsk bridge, 298 
Beck-street, 287 
Bedfield. 185 
B«dinfeilde, 185 
Beighton, 3 



376 



NOMINA LOCORUM. 



Beketon, 178 

Belings, 190 

Belhus, 270 

Bell grove, 297 

Bell Meadow, 276 

Bellomer, 294 

Belntead magna, 184 

BeUtead parva, 184 

BeltoD, 185, 327, 329, 830 

Benaker, 1K8 

Benhall, 189 

Benhey. 273. 274 

Bently, 184 

Bentone, 166, 209 

Berdewell(e), 178, 197 

Bergham, 183 

Bergholt, 183. 217 

Berkinge, 182 

Berkingtye, 271 

Berlin, 348 

Bernardeston. 178 

Bernham, 178 

Berningham, 178 

Bert<»n, 178 

Bevall green, 289 

Beverley, 137 

Beyton, 255 

Bit)el8mer, 279 

Bildeston, 36, 265 

BiltiKt«>ne, 176, 194 

Bingham, 178. 196 

Blackam<x>r common, 290 

Blackbourne, 174, 178 

Black bourne river, 292 

Blackburne, 178 

Black Ditch, 287 

Blackhejith, 2M1, 297 

Blackthorpe, 292 

Blackwell way, 295 

Blake-land, 155 

Blakenharo, 182 

Blaryhxikway, 296 

Blaxhall, 189, 324 

Blenheim, 66 

Blethowe, 279 

Blewland, 279 

Blickling Hall, 225 

Blithburghe, 186 

Blitheforde, 187 

Blodhill, 273 

Blowfield, 279 

Bluudeston, 186, 874 

Blyshall, 276 

Blythburgh, 51 

Boars Tye, 221 

Bodington, 290 

Bognham, 196 

Bolton, 217 

Bonhey, 152, 162 

Bonley, 154 

Borden, 280 

Boaeburg, 971 

Boaroere, 233, 243, 270, 271, 273 

Boston, 344 



Boteadale, 24, 256, 261 

Bouche, 191 

Bouklesham, 191, 192 

Boulge,l»l 

HoulUm, 295 

Bow, 849 

Bowbeck(eX 84, 293 

BowenB green, 291 

Box, 221 

Boxford, 86, 42, 176, 198, 207, 255 

BoxBtead, 87 

Boxted(e), 176, 193, 255, 281 

Boyton, 178, 195 

Brackett'B, 287 

Brackett way, 289, 297 

Brackland, 279 

Bracky pvnne, 290 

Bradefield, 178 

Bradtield, 245 

Bradefeld Senseler, 178, 196 

Brademedwe, 270, 271 

Bradfeilde. 196 

Bradfield Clare. 2, 178 

Bradfield combufita, 2, 255 

Bradfield S. George, 8. 255, 292 

Bradfeilde Sindeere, 178, 196 

Bradfield S. Clare, 178, 255 

Bradeley, 177, 194 

Bradley magna, 8. 80, 255 

Bradley parva, 80, 255 

Bradwell, 185, 852 

Brabam Hall, 297 

Braiitworth, 22, 256 

Brakepitham, 279 

Bramfield, 327 

Bramford, 181, 278 

Bramieye Field, 269 

Brampton, 187 

Bran barrow, 296 

Branborough, 2i)7 

Brandeitttm, 191 

Brandon, 198, 204, 296, 825 

Brandon Kerry, 17, 255 

Brantham, 183 

Braythome, 282 

Bread Clo*e, 276 

Breche, 270, 294 

Bredfeilde, 191 

Bregg, 188 

Bret. 221 

Bretenham, 194 

Brethingham, 176 

Brettenham, 36, 194, 256 

Bray don, 321, 322 

Breygate, 290 

Bricett, 182 

l^ricett parva, 42 

Bridges-land, 164, 168 

Brightwell, 19C 

Brightwell Heath, 201 

Bristol, 187, 862 

Brisworth, 179 

Broad Mieere, 290 

Brockford, 26, 180, 256 



NOMINA LOCORUM. 



377 



Brockhall, 287 
Brookhole, 295 

Brockley, 3, 198, 256, 281, 282 
Brocley, 177 
BrodvDg, 116 
Brokhole, 27S, 274 
Brom, 180 
Brome, 266 
Bromhil, 271 
Bromholm, 318 
Brome8well„60, 190 
Bromfeilde, 186 
Broome, 22, 180, 288 
Broome haven, 293 
Broom Hill, 247 
Browniles, 292 
Brownings-land, 168 
BrownR-land, 163 
Bnimblebruske, 290 
Brundyshe, 185 
Brunnkott, 287 
Brusiard, 189 
Bruasela, 69 
Brysewortbe, 179 
Buers, 37 

Bnlehyme, 273, 274 
BnUand, 291 
BulHDit, 279 
Bundle green, 296 
Bungay, 315, 363 
Bunsdell, 290 
Bunwick, 288 
Bures S. Mary, 256 
Burgate, 22, 256 
Burgh Castle, 308, 826, 374 
^urghe, 186, 189 
Burgood, 274 
Burnt HUl, 247 
Burses, 235 
Bueklesham, 191 
Bugel's-croft, 156 
Bulcamp, 188 
Bundevers-cott, 155 
Bungay, 73, 150, 188 
Bnreii, 176. 193 
Burgate, 180 
Burrow Green, 47 
Burwell, 16, 256 
Bury S. Edmund's, 45, 59, 68, 160, 217, 

267,282 
Butlee, 192 
Butley Priory, 268 
Buxball, 27, 181 
Ruxlow, 282 
Byggyn, 286 
Byscott, 288 

Cadowe,288 
Cammocke, 290 
Caldhall, 270 
Calinenes Hill, 278 
Cambridge, 149, 161 
Camping close, 292, 298 
Canada. 161 



Canterbury. 152, 268 
Canton, 345 
Capel. 184 
Capell, 190 
Carbrook, 287 

Carham (? Corham), 163. 165 
Carleford, 192 
Carleforde. 189 
Carlton Golville, 186, 324 
Carpit way, 295 
Casnmere, 151 
CaHtle Field. Burgh, 80 
Castle Green. 290 
Castle Rising. 233 
Catbridge. 292 
Catchfetch, 278 
Catlidge, 256. 260 
Catsall. 281 
Cattenball. 213 
Cattiwade. 160 
Cauckway St.. 289 
Caughley. 358 
Cauncye, Le, 294 
Caussell close, 287 
Caven, 36 

Cavendish, 87, 176, 256 
Cavendishe, 193 
Cavenham, 17, 256 
Cawdell. 283 
Chalk hill. 288 
Chantry barn, 290 
Chantry Tey. 298 
Chapelmedwe, 270 
Chapmanessete, 272 
Chapman's land, 163, 168 
Charr. 293 

ChHuntry House, 294 
Chedeston, 187 
Chedburgh, 30, 67 
Chedbury, 256 
Chelisworth, 176 
Chelsea, 849 
Chelsworth, 256, 295 
Chequer, 283 
Chercbecroft, 218 
Chetebarewe. 177 
Chetebere, 195 
Cheveley, 17, 256, 282 
Chevington, 8, 266, 288, 289 
Chillon, 293 
Chilmynton, 184 
Chilsford, 50 
Chilton, 38, 178, 195, 256 
Chimnv Mill. 296 
Chippele, 196 
Chippenham, 17, 266 
Chippinge, 181 
Chnst Church Mansion, 151 
Chyppleye, 177 
Clappgate, 288 
Clare. 31, 178, 196, 266 
Claydon, 206, 238, 278 
Clenewater. 274 
Clerks-land, 168 



378 



NOMINA LOCORUM. 



Cloydoii, 188 
Cliut» 2*.>5 
Clintfurlonge, 290 

Cli»)»»tow, 175 

CUiiU. 287 

Clopton, 189. 269 

Cluuton Maut»r, 291 

Cloth Hall, 214 

Onobhere-Hurgh, 308 

CobdoeB, 297 

CuckerHland, 279 

Cockfeilde, 193 

Cooktield, 38, 170, 2;)6 

C*>cklingate, 179 ^ ^ ^^^ 

Coddeiiham, 182. 245. 824 

Colch«Kter, 358 

Coldharu, 291 

Coldham Manor. 288 

Coldh.)me, 290 

Colham, 280 

C.>lhyll, 79 

Colli iigford bridge, 297 

ColneiH, 189 

Cnliieyu, 191 

Cologne, 215 

Coli»ettel, 274 

Coltrupp, 279 

Combes, 22, 181, 256 

ComokfH. 282 

Coney Hill, 277 

Coneaweston, 178 

Coney Wbston, 279, 282 

ConierH cloae, 295 

Connyhill, 288 

Co|)docko, 184 

Copenhagen, 347 

Coppt'll clone, 115, 128 

Copnage, 291 

Copnterd, 287 

Corby, 57 

Corham, 157,105.209 

Cornard magna, 37, 176, 256, 283 

Cornard parva, 38, 256 

Cornerde, 177, 192 

Corsford, 209 

C(»r8fordM-land, 158 

Corton, 185, 355 

CoHford, 153, 174, 176, 210, 212 

Cotton, 22, 25, 181, 250 

Coulynggrt, 177 

Cove, \t>7, 188 

Cowlings, 30, 257 

Cowlinges, 194 

Cowthorpe, 220 

CoxHhall, 2S5 

Crafoide, 189 

Crandell heaved, 279 

Cranle, 179 

Cratfeilde, 187 

Crattal, 280 

Credleden, 290 

Creating, 181, 182, 324 

Cr«eting All Saints, 23, 257 



Greeting S. Mary, 257 

Creeting parva, 27 

CreetiiiK 8. Peter, 23, 257 

Creti ogham, 191 

Cri(xiU fen, 289 

Crouch6eld, 287 

Cross-land, 157 

Croswich. 227 

Crotas-laud, 166 

Cukley, 186 

Culf«>rd, 11. 178, 257, 276, 279, 283, 287 

Culf<irdam, 196 

Culpho, 190 

Cunegara, 274 

Cun\ger, 290 

Curicwroft, 287 

Cutte»haw, 285 

Cweuebrigjc, 274 

Balham, 31. 177, 195, 257 

Daliugho, 191 

Danatston. 195 

Darton, 57 

Uavies laud, 157 

Deadman's land, 298 

Dean Commitn. 298 

Dearl»ught, 296 

l)el>ach, 191 

Deben, 50 

Debenham. 192 

Deepgi'ave. 298 

Deuardestou, 177 

Deuardston. 31, 177 

Denham, 31, 177, 184, 195, 257 

Denham, Great. 239 

Denmark Hill. 855 

Denstone, 257 

Depden. 31. 257 

Deppeden, 195 

Dorburie, 287 

Derby, 349 

Derhey, 271 

Dersham, 186 

DIbSj 77 

l)odington, 272 

D(»dthorne8, 284 

Doneweston, 197 

Donewic, 192 

Dore-sland, 167 

Downhain, 18, 279 

Downhaiu Santon, 257 

Drenkston, 196 

Drenthistone, 178 

Drenden, 847 

Drinkston, 3 

DrinkBtono. 257, 288, 284, 847 

Dunham, 179, 198 

Duningworth. 50 

Dunningwortn, 189 

DunHtall, 195 

Dunwich. 52 

Durdale, 287 

Duxford, 40 

Dyneton, 185 



NOMINA LOCORUM. 



379 



Eaglin field, 292 

Earls Colne. 277 

East DeAn, 880 

EaBtHarling, 11 

EMton. 187, 191 

Eddricbeftfree-Iand, 156, 166 

Edeldedune, 269 

Edolvestone, 158 

EdwardstoD, 39, 198, 257 

Effvpt, 151 

Elbeswell, 812 

Kldinffcote, 298 

Eleigh oombusta, 89 

Elev Monachorum, 198 

Elffhe, 188 

EUough, 815 

Elmmtt, 257 

Elmstead, 202 

ElDiHwellCe), 178, 197, 257, 284 

Elvedon. 18, 65, 179, 198, 257 

Ely, 62, 268 

Ely combusta, 257 

Emmesfield, 291 

Endegate, 188 

Eriswell, 18, 198, 257 

Esdraelon, 246 

Essex, 211 

Essham, 184 

Estfield, 270 

Esthach, 271 

Estbam, 168 

Esthey, 270 

Estleyle, 158 

Estlingbeath, 279 

Eton, 149 

Euerwarion, 188 

Eu8ton(e), 11, 70, 176, 257, 284 

Euston magna, 196 

Eye, 23, 69, 179, 257, 801 

Eyke, 50, 174, 191, 192, 276 

Fakenham, 178, 196, 197 
Fakenham magna, 11, 257, 284 
Fakenham Manor, 288 
Fakenbam Parva, 279, 284 
FalMbam, 178 
Faltenham, 191 
Famdell, 280 
Faukendon, 278, 274 
Faverell, 2b6 
Felixstowe, 803 
Felsham, 4, 152, 196, 285, 295 
Felsbam S. Peter, 258 
Feltons, 285 
Fenibam, 189 
Femingbam, 89 
Fillistowe, 191 
Finberge, 181 
Finborougb, 28 
Finborough magna, 258 
Finborougb parva, 258 
Finningham, 28, 258, 278, 286 
Flempton, 5, 177, 258, 259 



Flempton, 285, 287 

Fleeting rood, 290 

Flixton, 828, 881 

Flowerholme, 278 

Flytchmere, 281 

Fordham, 18, 258, 277, 285 

Fordleo, 186 

Fomham, 64, 129, 177, 199, 288 

Fomham All Saints, 5, 258, 285, 287 

Fomham Genevieve, 4, 258 

Fornham S. Martin, 4. 258 

Foxborough, 283 

FoxhaU, 190 

Fox Hall Manor, 297 

Framesden, 192 

Framlingham, 73, 191 

Freckenham, 179, 198, 276, 298 

Freeingfilde, 184 

Freston, 184, 189 

Fritton, 185, 828, 329, 832, 333, 374 

Frostenden, 187 

FuUwell, 297 

Fyshing dole, 279 

Gallows Hill, 210 

Galtry, 293 

Garland, 281 

Gaseley, 15, 31, 292 (see Gazeley) 

Gandgredeland, 294 

Gascony, 313 

Gategrave, 192 

Gatlott, 292 

Gatesele, 195 

Gazeley, 258, 259 

Geat Tey, 221 

Gedding, 4, 25, 178, 196, 258, 285, 286, 295 

Gedding's Manor, 69 

Gerord'sland, 160. 161, 162, 163 

Geynton, 190 

Gidysle, 177 

Gippeswyk Hall, 234 

Gipping, river, 338 

Giselham, 183, 324 

Gislingham, 23, 180, 258, 286 

Glamford, 181 

Glasker^s way, 298 

Glemesford, 176, 193 

Glemham, 189, 324 

Glemipford, 193 

Glemsford, 258, 274 

Gloucester's-land, 162 

Gnatesball, 196 

Gnatishale, 178 

Goarie acre, 288 

Goddvngge-free-land, 154, 162 - 

Goldfittes, 273 

Goryland, 290 

Gorleston, 186, 820, 321, 322, 338 

Gosbecke, 182 

Gosewell, 285 

Gosham, 285 

Gospadel, 270 

Gospel acre, 288 

Grace's Manor, 69 

CC 



380 



NOMINA LOCORUM. 



Gnndon, 179 
Orannford, 181 
Great dean, 290 
Grimes Grmyee. 900, 304, 896 
Groton, 89, 176, 234, 358 
Grofcton, 198 
GroTyeende, 115 
Grandiiborrii. 189 
Gull, The, fi6 
Gunton, 186, 866 
GuDton Hall 841, 843 
Gunville Hall, 379 
GurtoiM,380 
Gutrouldei, 381 
Gyduly, 196 

Haebeitoii, 191 

Haoiitoneadone, 270 

Hadleige, 176 

Hadleigb, 152 et leq., 166, 202, 207, 208, 

209, 210, 211, 212, 222, 258, 268 
Hadleighe, 104 
Hef^enet, 80S 
Heftue, 48 
HiJei, 806 
Haletworthe, 187 
Hallertreete, 371 
Hidlifai, 284 
Halitead, 4 
HamerUnd, 288 
Hampton Court, 60 
Manginghill, 288 
Hanfey. 867 
Hardwiok, 2S2 
Haregrave, 177, 199 
Harvrave, 5. 358, 286 
Harretton, 28, 258, 829, 841 
Harlstead, 282 
Harnesffe, 238 
Harp piece, 287, 295 
HartesL 193, 258 
Harwich, 48, 232 
Haselwode, 189 
Hatchfield. 298 
Hatchment, 298 
Haughley, 28, 181, 258, 870 
Haughley Castle, 801 
Haukedon, 177, 196 
Hausted, 177 
Haven's nest, 287 
Haverell, 194 
Haverhill, 32, 251, 258 
Haverhill common, 298 
Haverille, 177 
Hawdedon manor, 298 
Hawkeden, 82 
Hawkedon, 258, 294 
Hawstead, 259, 287 
Hawsted, 198 
Hecham, 40, 176 
Heeatman-land, 154 
Heigham, 188 
Hegessett, 196 
Hellpit, 279 



Helmele, 191 

HelmesAe, 176 

Helmingham, 183, 382, 338 

Hemegrave, 177 

Hemyngtton, SSB8 

Hendelf, 394 

Henooote, 391 

HengI«v^ 5, 66, 196, 199, 358, 239, 387 

Hengrave Hall, 64 

Hennam, 187 

Heningstone, 183 

Henley, 385 

Henly, 188 

Henttead, 187 

Hepworth, 13, 369, 387, 388 

Hepworthe, 197 

Heringfleete, 186 

Heringewell, 18, 859 

HerinugeMrth, 177 

Herinswell, 198 

Herkated, 188 

Herleeton, 181 

Herat, 158, 209, 810 

Hertes croft, 156, 156, 168 

Hertford, 63 

Hertherat, 176 

Hesaett, 4, 387 

Heaset,359 

Hetcham, 194 

Hethe don, 156 

Hevedes land, 166 

Hevenhaoi, 290 

Heveningham, 186 

Heyrona-land, 156 

Heywardesweye, 273 

Hicket Heath, 287 

Higham, 80 

Highfield, 285 

Hightown green, 291 

Hildercle, 178 (see Hinderclay) 

HilMand, 161 

Hinchenes medwe, 270 

Hinderclay, 12, 268 

Hinderclay broom, 294 

Hinderclays, 287 

Hinderaley. 197, 269 

Hintlesham, 184 

Hitcbam, 259, 270, 275 

Hober^e, 273 

Hogge Layes, 200 

Holbrooke, 183 

Holcombe Bumell, 60 

Holedich, 269 

Holesle, 190 

Holgate, 282 

HoUesley Bay, 228 

Holmeland, 292 

Holm meadow, 272 

Holton, 184, 187 

Homegate, 278 

Homer, 291 

Honeden, 177 

Honeworthe, 197 

Honeydon-land, 167 



NOMINA LOCORUM. 



381 



Honeypitta, 279 

HoningtoD, 12, 269, 276, 286, 287, 288 

Hoo, 191 

Hoowood, 289 

Hoper, 274 

Hoppits, 289 

Hoptim, 10, 178, 186, 197, 269, 294 

Horham, 186 

Horneeroft. 270 

Homing«ruie. 198 

HomingBhertD, 288 

Horringur, 4, 67, 276, 288 

Horringer magna, 269 

Horrioger parva, 269 

Horton, 21S 

Hotham, 289 

Hoveden, 196 

Hoverbloctre, 272 

Hoverboyewalleorofte, 272 

Hoverdodington, 272 

Hoveworth, 178 

HoxoD, 184 

Huggarda Green, 298 

Hnndon, 32, 269, 289 

Huningham, 42 

Hunadon, 276 

HunBton, 12, 269, 289 

Huntenton, 197 

Huntingfield, 187 

Husbandea land, 161 

HuHUegate, 283 

Uychesland, 164 

HylliBteoh, 290 

Icklingham, 61, 198, 201 
Icklingbam All Sainta, 19, 269 
Icklingham St. Jamea, 19, 259 
lokworth, 6, 69, 66, 239, 269, 286, 289 
Iken. 189 
Ike»worthe, 198 
Ikkeworth, 177 
Iklesball, 188 
Iloocks'land, 169 
Ilketsball, 274, 816 
lUey onmbusta, 198 
Ingham, 18, 178, 196, 269. 289 
Ipswich, 69. 71, 77. 192. 203, 206, 207. 226, 
233, 287. 248, 249, 820, 321. 323, 336, 839 
Ixninge. 192 

Ixworth(e), 18, 118. 178, 197, 259 
Ixworth Thorpe, 269, 276, 289 
Ixning, 19, 269 

Jakeslee, 180 

JanneyB Manor, 286 

Jeoki,283 

Jermoatha pftrva, 186 (see Yarmouth) 

Kadokeafed, 270 
Kateland, 278. 274 
Keddington, 290 
Kedington. 32, 259 
Kediton. 178, 196 
KeleahaU, 186 



Kenelbodesmed. 271 

Kenestoneheg, 269 

Kenestoneweye, 268 

Keninggall, 286 

Kennett, 19, 269 

Kenteford. 177 

Kentfttrd, 196, 259 

Kenton, 191 

KerMy, 207, 216, 260 

Kersey Manor, 212 

Kersey Tye, 221 

Keryson, 176, 194 

Kesinglande. 1H3 

Kessegrave. 190 

Kessingland, 328 

Ketisberstone, 176 

Kettlebarston, 40, 194 

Kettlebaston, 260 

Kettleberghe, 191 

Kettlemere, 288 

Kimberley. 233 

King's College, Cambridge. 88, 41, 217 

Kingswood green, 296 

Kirkton, 183, 191 

Kirkley, 327, 328, 331, 332 

KirUing, 17, 256, 260 

Knapt4>ne-Iand. 166 

Knattisball, 260 

Knettishall, 18, 282, 290 

Kokeiield, 216 (see Cockfield) 

Kulesweye, 273 

Kuttlen, 294 

Kylles, Great, 278 

Lackford, 9. 174. 177, 199. 260, 285, 290 

Ladyland. 293 

Lady Pightel, 292 

Lafham, 209, 210. 211 

Laiham. 194 

Lakenham. 198 

Lakenheath, 260, 380 

Lakenhithe, 19 

Lakford, 179 

Lakyngham, 179 

Larobfikeland, 278 

Lam pet way, 294 

Lampland, 276, 296 

Landwade, 260 

I^ngebeock, 269 

I^ngham, 13, 112, 179, 197, 260, 290 

LanghiU, 279 

Langlond, 279 

Langly. 279 

Langton, 179 

Language, 287 

Languard Fort, 326 

LanflTums, 287 . 

Lantswell. 292 

Large*8 Manor, 69 

liatham, 211 

Launham, 176 

Launsicke, 294 

Lausele, 176 

Lavenham, 59, 193, 222, 260 



382 



NOMINA LOOORCM. 



Law»h«ll, 9, 198. 280. 281 

LaxfeUde, 185 

Layham, 40. 153, 157, 176, 260 

Laymeere, 292 

Le Broo. 273 

Ledfflun. 294 

LeedB, 868 

Leh, 269 

lie Ho. 269 

Leleseya, 216 

Lentyanl. 296 

Letheringham, 192 

Letton. 225 

Levington. 191 

Lexidge, 280 

Leyham, 176 

Liberty cloee, 287 

Lidgate. 177, 195, 260 

LUle. 848 

Lilly Ptetch, 290 

Linooln. 248 

Lindsey. 202, 260 

LingscHit. 295 

Linsted, 187 

Ltttlehaugh Manor, 295 

Livermere. 178, 196. 197, 296 

Livermere magna, 5, 260. 290 

Livermere parra. 13. 260, 278 

Loes. 191 

London. 9. 48, 49, 208, 211. 212, 215, 226, 

.284. 842 
Londune. 274 
LongCroft, 168 
Long Melford Church. 218 
Longton Hall, 868 
Loos. 189 

Loppedene-land. 1G4 
Lothingland, 818, 314, 321 
Loudham. 190 
Lounde. 186, 827, 830 
Lowestoft. 321. 822. 326. 827, 828. 381,832, 

333, 339 et seq., 373 
Lowsie bush. 288 
Lowystocke. 186 
Luberlow. 805 
Lydgate, 83 
Le Wullehous, 215 
Lynn, 146 

Mageniccolls, 295 
Madgeburg. 215 
Makins Hail. 294 
Maldon. 210 
Malmy head. 279 
Manholde. 280 
Mansbrigg. 287 
Manscroft, 296 
Manston Hall Manor, 297 
Mapledale, 281 
Mark's Tey. 221 
Marlesforde. 191 
Martlesham. 190. 201 
Massachusets. 223 
Massingham, 331 



Mastildenland, 156 

Maywater. 281 

Melford, 41, 59, 193, 222, 260, 276, 9» 

Melford Hall, 208 

Melle^ 28 

Melliis 180. 186. 260 

Melton, 190 

Mendham, 184 

Mendlesham. 24, 179, 260, 291, 824, S25» 

Menecy, 848 

Menwood, 287 

Merefields, 228 

Metingham, 188 

Mettingham. 78, 274 

Mettingham Castle, 815 

Metttugham College, 315 

Mickfield Manor,^ 

Minklewood. 292 

Middleton. 186 

Mikelwode, 269 

Milden. 41 

Mildenhale, 179 

Mildenhall. 20, 47. 48. 198, 260. 291 

Milding. 198, 200 

Mildinges, 176 

MiUene Field. ZTi 

Millem-iand. 155 

Milnecroft, 269 

Minuingham. 180 

Molford.176 

Monk Wood, 287 

Monks' Eleigh. 268 

Monwedon. 191 

Morewell. 297 

Morweye, 270 

Moyses Hall. 59. 150 

Muchelfen, 158 

Muckfield. 18i 

Muffelesland, 156 

Multon, 177, 195 

Mutford, 183 

Myningham, 180 

Nabbs, 279 
Nacton. 191. 386 
Nankin. 845 
Nantgarw, 349 
Napland. 288 
Naughton. 42, 260 
Nawlton. 176. 194 
Nawton. 260. 291 
Nayland, 261 
Nedging. 41. 176, 194, 261 
Needham. 177. 292, 325, 870 
Needham Market, 228, 270, 271 
Nellesland. 157. 164 
Netham-land. 156 
Netherbloctre. 272 
Netherboyewallecrofte. 272 
Nether dodington. 272 
Nether Hall, 294 
Nettlestead. 182 
Neubroune, 190 
New Hall. 350 



NOMINA LOCORUM. 



383 



Newhey, 273 

Newmarket, 60, 192 

Newmarket All Saints, 20, 261 

Newmarket St. Mary. 20, 261 

Newton, 28, 42, U^J. 177, 181, 193, 198, 291 

Newton by Sudbury, 261 

Newton next Stow, 261 

Newton veto*, 181, 278 

New York, 344 

Newport, 344 

Nolton, 9 

Norham, 248 

Normersh, 274 

Northale8, 187 

Northampton, 304 

North Stow, 203 

Norton, 18, 96, 178, 197, 261, 306 

Norwich, 137, 358 

Northwoid, 274 

Nova mercatum, 192 

Nowton, 261 

Oadshall, 295 
Ocoold(e), 24, 261, 292 
Ocle. 180 
Odsdale, 295 
Odulfuasmere, 273 
Oflfton, 182, 186 
O^ell, 289 
Okeley, 261 
Okestubbe, 287 
Oldinge, 279 
Onehouiie, 29, 181, 261 
Onglesworth, 279 
Orford, 50, 78, 77, 192, 303 
Orwell, 320, 323 
Otley, 205. 206 
OBtend, 296 

Otleye (? Oakley). 24, 189 
Oulton. 324, 327 
Ounesden, 177 
Ousden. 33 
Overbury way, 293 
Overbarcotto, 294 
Overpeasty, 287 
Oweadon, 105, 261 
Oxbuitrh, 147, 3i3 
Oxelond, 270 
Oxenhey, 270 

Pakefield, 332 

Pakenham, 6, 178, 196, 261, 291 

Palestine, 151 

Palgrave, 24, 180, 261 

Pa0y, 281 

Papsies-Iand, 163 

Paris, 69 

Partridges-land, 157 

Pa8«y,348 

Patesik, 269 

Peakshern. 278 

Pedder's way, 281 

Pendon, 297 

Pepper hill, 290 



Perham, 189 

Pendon, 281 

Perryfield, 288, 291 

Pesenhall, 186 

Petaughe, 192 

Peterstree, 190 

Pickleden Heath, 278 

Pick-peasland, 165 

Pillecockdune, 162 

Pinipsey close, 294 

Pin now manor, 289 

Pinxton. 349 

Pismer, 282 

Pitches land, 161 

Plaiford, 190 

Plance common, 294 

Planche, 294 

Playford, 279 

Playford Hall, 71, 224 

Pleistow, 281 

Plessets, 211 

Plessis, 211 

Plomsgate, 189 

Plymouth, 360 

Polstead Church, 220 

Polstead Hall, 223 

Polsted, 42, 176, 192, 207, 261 

Pond Hall Manor, 211, 212 

Portman walk, 203 

Portsmouth, 234 

Portway, 290 

Poselyngworth, 177, 195 

Poaling£»rd, 33, 261 

Possold way, 293 

Pottersearth, 294 

Prestele, 271 

Preston, 42, 49, 176, 184, 193, 261 

Priest*s-bridge-land, 156 

Prime field, 289 

Providence, 344 

Pucklechurch, 221 

Pudding-poke hall, 297 

Pulham, 27 

Purchase, 296 

Purte-fen, 171 

Purtepool, 270 

Pwl, 221 

Pykenham Gateway, 207 

Pyncheney, 154 

Pynohmer, 281 

Pyrdes-Monday-land, 167 

Qualmstowe, 270 

Raffehaugh, 294 

Ramesholte, 190 

Ramsden, 36 

Rashe fen, 297 

Ratlisden. 6, 178 

Kattlesden, 196, 261, 268, 284, 291 

Ratton lane, 296 

Raydon, 40, 155, 187 

Reade, 177. 198, 261 

Ready field, 289 



384 



NOMINA LOCORUM. 



IUde,292 

RodMland, 161 

Kedffrave, 24, 77, 180, 2M, 261, 374 

RrOfiafi 9 

Redlingfield, 179, 261 

Redshiun parvft, 188 

Randham, 18» 

RaodleihMn, 192 

Renthebrok, 178 

Reydon, 188 

Reydon fan, 294 

Riokebrookfield, 157 

Rickingale, 180, 198 

Rickinghall, 268, 276 

Riokinghall inferior, 14, 262 

Rickinghall superior, 24, 262, 292 

RidlingBeld, 25 

Rinksfeild, 188 

Riabridge, 174 

Ritbv, 9, 60, 199, 262, 280, 285 

Riaebregge, 177 

Rithangles, 25, 262, 292 

Rishankle, 181 

Riflhmere, 190 

Riainge hill, 293 

Kogerons, 289 

Roidon, 183 

Rokeshey, 270 

Ronglemere, 279 

Roptley. 57 

Roodiege, 287 

RotyhiU, 279 

Rougham, 6, 65, 196, 208, 262, 287, 292 

Reughmere, 279 

Rowonge, 279 

Roydon, 278 

Rumbledown, 293 

Rumburghe, 187 

Runboroughes, 288 

Runctons, 292 

Runnynge rode, 295 

RuBhall, 287 

Rushbrook(e), 6, 196, 262, 292 

Rushbrook Hall, 70 

Rushmere, 249, 250 

Rushes Manor, 286 

Rustesland, 164 

Rysbye, 177 

Ryshangle, 181 

Sackford, 190 

St. Albans, 62 

St. Cloud, 348 

St. Martin's, London, 36 

St. Olaves. 374 

St. Pamells, 293 

St. Petersburg, 348 

St. Severs, 347 

Saloetam, 274 

Salen, 344 

Saltwood Castle, 304 

Same comitis (Soham), 191 

Santon Downham, 333 

Sapiston, 12 



Sapiston Manor, 288 
Sapeton, 178, 262 
Saxam. 199 
Saxham, 59, 68, 177 
Saxham magna, 7, 962, 293 
Saxham parva, 7, 262, 276, 293 
Saxmunaham, 189 
Soabbehowe, 272 
Scamlets, 296 
Scarbutts, 288 
Schimplings, 176 
Scotland, 215 
Scotsdune, 273 
Semer, 43, 194, 262 
Semer Tye, 221 
Senlao, 302 
SerewfKxis, 290 
Setcup, 281 
ShadifeUd, 188 
Shawsham, 190 
Shedborrowe, 295 
Shelland, 29. 262 
Shelland Manor, 291 
Shelley, 36. 183 
ShAllisworthe, 194 
Shidborough, 2^ 
Shimpling, 193 
Shiraplingthome, 37, 262 
Sliinsn\rpe, 294 
Shipley, 297 
Shipmeadow, 274 
Shipmedowe, 188 
Shomfoid, 291 
Shukkethoroeslede, 269 
Sibton, 186 
Siglemere, 274 
Silent Street, 79 
SUlham, 184 
Silverley, 16, 254 
Skaldings, 283 
Skidber Hill, 292 
Skippes-land, 165 
Skots dole, 279 
Skdes, The, 2iX) 
Slathorne, 287 
Slings close, 290 
Slouffhland, 281 
Smallbrook Grove, 277 
Smallwell, 282 
Smallwickers way, 296 
Smalwyckers, 287 
Smithfield, 290 
Snailwell, 21, 262 
Snakes acre, 289 
Snape, 294 
Snapes, 189 
Soham, 20, 185 
Soham Monks, 262 
Somerleyton, 186 
Somershani, 182 
Someiton, 42, 176, 193, 262 
Soterly. 188 
Sotherton, 187 
Southelmham, 188 



N 



NOMINA LOCORUM. 



385 



Southolde, 187 

SoutholU, 185 

Souihwold, 54, 73, 320, 321, 323 

SpectoRhall, 187 

Sprowghton, 184 

Spurreway, 280 

SUffordibire, 213 

StanboTow, 294 

Stonefeld, 178, 196 

Stanninfffield, 7, 262, 281 

Staniiisfield, 83 

Stenefield, 177, 195, 262, 294 

Stanstead, 40 

Stansted, 176, 193. 262, 294 

Stonton, 118, 197, 262 

SUuton AU Saints, 14, 262, 293 

Stanton St. John, 14, 262, 293 

Stanwell, 279 

Stasted, 185 

Staverton, 50 

Steinkacre, 279 

Sternefeilde, 189 

Stififkey HaU, 227 

Stoake, 180, 195 

Stooket wood, 294 

Stockrow, 295 

Stockwell. 283 

Stoke, 178, 222 

Stoke Ash, 25, 263, 292 

Stoke by Clare, 263 

Stoke Nayland, 61, 42, 176, 192, 224, 2§8 

Stoke next Clare, 34 

Stoke Tye, 221 

Stoneham, 182 

Stoneeland, 163 

Stonharda, 291 

Stoniland, 269 

Stonlays, 279 

Stotterfield, 296 

Stour, 221 

Stoven, 187 

Stoway, 289 

Stowe. 179, 181, 197, 263 

Stowfield, 293 

Stowlangtoft, 14, 263, 294 

Stowmarket, 29, 306 

Stradbrooke, 185 

StradeMle, 195 

Stradeele, 177 

StradiRhall, 33, 263, 289 

Stranshill, 279 

Stratford, 183, 189 

Stratton. 191 

Stroibush, 288 

Stubbinge, 272 

Stumpcrosse, 279 

Sunden, 282 

Sturmere, 290 

Stnrston, 25, 263 

Staiton, 180 

Stutton, 180, 183 

Sadbergh, 287 

Sudboume, 189 

Sadboume Hall, 50 



Sudbury, 43. 44, 176, 193, 208, 268 

Sndbury All Saints, 268 

Sudbury S. Gregory, 263 

Sudbury S. Peter, 263, 294 

Suddon, 179 

Sumpfield, 298 

Sutton, 179, 190 

Swansea, 3 19 

Swattishall, 286 

Sweffling, 141 

Swiftlinge, 189 

Swineland, 182 

Sybstyway, 290 

Sydbrok, 270, 271 

Syria, 151 

Tanham, 198 

Taper acre, 276, 287 

Tapeston, 197 

Taston, 271 

Tatersgate, 294 

Tatinston, 184 

Tattington, 185 

Taverham, 179 

Terries-land, 155 

Thedwastre, 174, 268 

Thelnetham, 14, 178, 197, 268, 276, 294 

Thelonde, 181 

Therspit, 270 

Thetford, 248, 280, 324 

Theusty. 279 

Thewardisstrie, 178 

Theyyngthon, 199 

Thingbam, 198 

Thinghowe, 177 

Thingu(e), 174, 285 

Thirlo, 194 

Thorndon, 27, 179, 292 

Thomdon All Saints, 263 

Thorndon, 306 

Thomedene, 179 

Thomham, 180 

Thomham Magna, 22, 25, 263 

Thomham parva, 26, 263 

Thorny, 181 

Thorpe, 90, 176, 178, 192, 194, 197, 288 

Thorpe by Ixworth, 263 

Thorp Hall manor, 289 

Thorpe Morieuz, 41. 263 

Thorpe next Ixworth, 15 

Thrandeston, 25, 180, 263, 294 

Thredling Hundred, 175 

Thredlinge, 189 

Thrillowe, 177 

Thurlow, 34 

Thurlow magna, 263 

Thurlston, 182 

Thurstanton, 177, 195 

Thur8ton(e). 7, 178, 186. 196, 263, 296 

Thurston manor, 293 

Thwaite, 264 

Tilerahyerth, 294 

Timworth, 7, 178, 264, 296 

Toddington, 72 



386 



NOMINA LOCORUM. 



Tofto, 906 
TomWUnd, 166 
Toleoat. 281 
Toppesfieldi Manor, G9 
Toptfield, 164, 163 
Toppesfield, 209, 210, 213 
Tostook, 7, 178, 196, 264, 296 

Tmy.aoe 

Trinilee, 191 

TropfMs 287 

TroHton, 14. 178. 197, 264 

Tuddenhiun, 21, 179, 190, 196, 206, 228, 

264 
Tuddenham Hall, 246 
Tungeaore, 279 
Tunggniohwalle, 269 
Tunmaneiland, 270 
Turpins grove, 293 
TunsUU. 60, 177, 1H9 
Twaite. 180 
Tye, The, 274 
Tyefield, 153, 169 
Tykele, 270, 271 
Tymperleyg, 288 
Tymworthe, 196 

Ubbeston, 186 
UfForde, 190 
URmahall, 187 
Undley Common, 830 
Upbreesham, 188 
Upthorp, 293 

Verdoni, 279 
Venice, 347 
Vermundeedon, 270 
Vinoennea, 348 
Vienna, 348 
Vineyard, 291 
Virginia, 70 

Waohiiham, 176 

Waibred, 184 

Waldingfield magna, 44, 264 

Waldingfield parva, 44, 264 

Waldingfilde, 198 

Waldringfield, 176, 190, 203, 296 

Waleoroft, 270 

Walpole, 186 

WalBham, 118, 178. 182, 197, 329 

Walsham le WIIIowb, 16, 264 

Walton, 73, 191, 303 

Wangford, 21, 198. 264, 296 

Wantiiden, 60, 189 

Waploe, 282 

Warengers land, 161 

Waehbrook, 279, 295 

Wasty way, 290 

Watefield, 176 

Water-land, 167 

Watham, 264 

Watoham, 194 

Wattesfeilde, 197, 264 

WattiiAeld, 16 



Wattuharo. 44. 264, 276, 296 

WattlesBeld, 17H 

WaybredMt, 184 

Waymere, 279 

Weehesham, 270 

WeUeighbegg, 186 

Welthmham, 178 

Walmere, 292 

Webetham, 196 

Wenham, 183, 207 

Wenham Castle, 224 

Wenham magnii, 72 

Wenham parva, 71 

Wenbaston. 186 

Werde, 281 

Weetall, 187 

Westerfield. 182. 273. 338 

Weit-field land, 166 

West Hall Oreen, 296 

West Harling, 70 

Weithey, 270. 288 

Wentlee, 177 

Weetleton, 186 

Weatley, 6, 69, 264, 288 

Weitly, 199 

Weeton, 15, 31, 178, 188, 197, 296 

Weston Coney, 264 

Weston Market, 264 

Weetow, 68, 70, 276, 296 

Westowe, 8, 178, 196. 264 

Westhorpe, 26. 264 

Westwode, 272 

Westwood green, 288 

Wetherden, 29. 181, 264, 370 

Wetheringaet, 26, 179, 266, 264, 272, 275 

Wethersfeild, 194, 264 

Wetherrfiey, 271 

Wethorpe, 180 

Wetnesham, 190 

Weylington, 179 

Whatfield, 38, 191. 264, 276. 277 

Whelnetham magna, 8, 264, 297 

Whelnetham parva, 8. 265. 296 

Wheltenton, 183 

Whepstead, 9. 177, 266 

Whepated, 177, 198, 289 

Whepatead. 297 

Wherated, 184 

Whitthowe, 290 

Wicham, 190 

Wichingham magna, 49 

Wiokelameie, 287 

Wickenway, 293 

Wickham 180 

Wickhambrooke. 35, 177, 196, 266, 282 

Wiokhamnkeith, 266 

Wioken, 266 

Wickthome, 283 

Widekeshoo, 178, 196 

Wilford, 60, 189 

Willingham, 188 

Wilaey, Great, 296 

Windaor Castle, 211 

Winkefeilde, 186 



NOMINA LOCORUM. 



387 



Wintford, 20 

Winrton, 192 

Wirlingworthe, 185 

WiMet,187 

Winington, 265 

WUton. 44, 176, 192 

Withenden, 184 

Witberistield, 177 

WiTenton, 265 

Wizoe, 36, 165 

Wolferton. 184 

WoUey, 60 

Wolpet, 178, 196 

Wolpit, 8, 297 

Wolverton, 186 

Wonn, 290 

Woodbridge, 191, 201, 205, 322 

Wood Ditton, 2C, 21, 265 

Woodaden, 282 

Woolpit, 265 

Woroeater, 849 

WordweU, 15. 64, 265, 279, 297 

WorliDgham, 188 

Worlington, 19. .21, 265, 276, 298 

Wonted, 279 

Wortham, 26, 180, 265 

WncynggB, 177 



Wrangland, 279 
WrapaU, 281 

Wratting magna, 32, 35, 265 
Wratting parva, 265. 296 
Wrennee Fark, 287 
Wranapark, 279, 286, 297 
Wrentbam, 187 
Wridewell, 178 
Wridlington. 198 
WridweU, 196 
WrottiDge, 177,' 194 
Wygenball, 156 
Wyken, 21 
Wylebeyghe, 185 
Wynaey, 271 
Wynton, 270 
Wyreadale, 184 
Wysdome, 287 
Wytheland, 270 
Wyyereaton, 26, 180 
Wyvston, 180 

Yarmoutb. 141, 360. 363 
Yarmouth baven, 314 
Yaxloy, 27. 265 
Yoxforde. 186 



(388) 



II. INDEX NOMINUM. 



AUdMn, Jn., 191 

Abbey. Galfrid, 1«8 

AbemaraiA, Abbot of, 184 

Able, F., »7» 

Adami, Jo., 9, 291 

Addison, 68 

Aethelwine, Earl of East Anglia, 210 

Ager, Clement, 281 

Affer, Thfie., 2 

Albemarle, Abbot of, 184 

Albini, Wm., 231 

Alcher, Th<w., 278 

Alderaon, Mrs , 61 

Aldham, Jn., 161, 166 

Aldham, Matilda, 211 

Aldham, Mr., 12 

Aldham, Nicholas, 159, 211 

Aldham. Osbert, 161. 156, 157, 159. 161, 

162, 171 
Aldham, Hog., 159, 162 
AldouB, 243 
Alen9on. Bernard. 248 
Aleston, £dw..36 
Alexander. Hugh, 211 
Alexander. Wm., 311 
Alfred the Great, 221 
Alfric, 248 
Alington, Giles, 86 
Alington, Mrs., 85 
Allen. Hollofemes, 293 
Allen, Jn., 19 
Allen. Nick. 17 

Allen. Robt.. 11, 854, 857. 362, 868 
Allenbnry. Jn.. 165 
Allington. Gyles, 20 
Allington, Jane, 40 
Almar, 230 
Aluerioh, Adam, 268 
Alnesbourne, Prior of, 238 
Altheword, Adam, 164, 165 
Aluriek, 276 
Amondevill. Rich.. 181 
Ampnare, Isabella, 82 
Andrewes, 372 
Andrews, Mrs. C, 80 
Anger, Jane, 47 
Anger, Rich., 47 
Anmer. Thos., 83 
Antis, Jn., 47 
Anton, Mr., 86 
Aplegate, 224 



Aplewhite, 224 
Appleby, J*n., 188 
Appelby, Wm., 40 
Appleton, Mr., 372 
Arbuthnot, 68 
Argentine, Jn,, 187. 192 
Arlington, Lord, 70 
Artest, Mr., 28 
Askewe, Jn., 15 
Askew, Jn , 245, 297 
Aspall, Robt. 187. 194 
Aashe, Rich., 248 
Asshe. R<«er. 243 
Assche, WmM 243 
Assheford, Wm., 304 
Asshfilde, Mr., 12 
Asuhfilde. Robt, 14 
Artbury, 352 
Atkenson, Thos., 18 
Aumant, Robt, 296 
Auney, Wm., 186 
Austen. Jn.. 235. 286 
Austin. Wm., 235 
Awdeley. Katherine, 2 
Aylesham, Nich., 244, 245 

Bacon, 243, 872 

Baoon, Butts. 374 

Bacon, Dorothy. 313 

Bacon, Edm.. 4, 186 

Bacon, Edw., 190 

Bacon, Jn.. 182, 188 

Baoon, Nathl., 227. 313 

Baoon, Nicholas, 11, 13, 14, 22, 24, 26, 

174, 315, 374 
Badley, Alioe, 161, 166 
Bailarde, Simon, 3 
Baines, Thos., 298 
Bakun. Edw., 184, 185 
BaJdooke, Jeremiah, 21 
Baldry. Manrt., 88 
Baldwin, Wm., 82 
Bailarde, Robt, 26 
Balli, Jn.. 82 
Balls. 354 
Balls, W. J.. 343 
Bailey, Jn., 85, 86 
Bally, Jn , 82. 84, 88, 89, 90. 96, 105, 

110, 111, 137 
Bally. Robt. 84, 101, 108 
Baoibeigh, Mr., 61 



INDEX NOMINUM. 



389 



Banly, Jn., 87 

Baucard, AJioe, 82 

Banham, Rev. Dr., 225, 226 

Banyard, Thos., 16 

Barard, Jn^ 116. 118, 119 

Barcroft, Wm.. 285 

Baredon, Jn., 214 

Barett. Maif^t , 8S 

Barbam, Marram, 106, 136 

Barkar, Jn., 88, 84 

Barker, Rich., 163, 164, 171 

Barker, Tboo., 164, 292 

Barking, Hubert, 271 

Barkway, £dw^278 

Bamardiston, Tboe., 30 

Barnes, Jn., 282 

Barrett, 859 

Barrett, Eliz., 226 

Barrow, Wm., 26 

Barrowe, Wm., 40, 42 

Ban, Ricb. le, 163 

Bars, Tbo8., 168 

Bars, Thus, le, 163, 164 

Barsbam, Robt., 188 

Barwicke, Wm., 40 

Bas^ Thos. le, 155, 164, 165, 167 

Bassett, Adam, 162 

Basset, Alex., 168 

Basset, Glarote, 161 

Basset, Jn., 156, 162, 168 

Basset, Osbert. 168 

Basset. Sir PbU., 213, 213 

Bate, Wm.. 83, 85 

Batb and Wells, Bishop of. 150 

Batisford, Geoffrey, 272 

Baucbante, Wm., 195 

Bavent. Thos., 187 

Bawley, Robt., 106 

Baxster, Jn., 84 

Baxster, Robt., 84, 85' 

Baxter, 119 

Baxter, Isabella, 91 

Baxter, Jn., 100, 106 

Baxter. Robt., 86, 87, 91, 105. 115 

Baythorne, Edw.. 66 

Beadle, Margaret, 241 

Beadle, Theodore, 241 

Beale, Theodore, 245 

Beaobainp, Wm., 177 

Beachampe. Wm., 176 

Beachara, Wm., 177 

Beaucbamp, Hen. Pratt, 296 

Beancbampe, Wm.. 192, 193 

Beaufn, Nich.. 180 

Becherlewyne, Abbot of, 182 

Beckett, Thos. k, 303 

Bede, 306, 309 

Bedingfilde, Edw.. 185 

Bedingfylde, Hen., 18 

Bedingfield, Jn., 25 

Bedingfilde, Matilda, 185 

Bedingfield, Michael, 23 

Beete, Jn., 82 

Beete, Margt., 83 



Beete, Wm., 98, 99, 100, 107, 110 

Beet, Wm., 101 

Beeton, Wm., 117, 120 

Belett. Robt, 181 

Bell k Black, Messrs., 340 

Bello Campo, Jn., 216 

BeUo, Wm., 245 

Bemys. Thos., 28 

Bendiah, Thos., 212, 213, 214 

Bennet. Hen., 70 

Bennet, Isabella, 67 

Bennett, Thos., 83 

Benet, Thos., 245 

Benett, Wm., 83 

Bentone, Adam, 166 

Bentone, Christina, 171 

Bentone, Hugh, 166 

Bentone, Robt., 166 

Bentone, Wm., 162, 166 

Berdil, 224 

Bere. Jn., 164 

Beighem, 227 

Bernham, Walter, 187 

Berry, Hugh, 188 

Berry e, Wm., 19 

Best, Christopher, 35 

Bete, Isabell, 111 

Bete, Jn., 84, 86, 86, 87. 91. 105, 111, 116 

Bete, Rich., 82 

Bete, Robt., 87, 88 

Bcte(i.). Robt., 89, 90, 91. 92. 93. 94, 95, 
96, 97, 98, 99. 100, 101, 102, 103, 104, 
106, 107, 108, 109, 128, 129, 130, 131, 132, 
133. 138 

Bete, Thos , 111 

Betts, GUbert, 195 

Betts, Margt., 91 

Bevan, Wilfrid. 371 

Bevein, Wm., 369 

Bibi, Agnes, 82 

Bigod. Hugh, 303 

BildsMton, Jn., 167 

Bingham, Thos., 25 

Birch, W. de Gray, 275 

Bird. David, 207 

Bird, Joseph, 207 

Biskele, Rich., 187 

Bithold, Coleman. 170 

Blackthorpe. Jn.. 292 

Blakiston, Yen. Dean, 208 

Blois, Sir Jn., 238 

Blome, Roger, 82 

Blomeffelde. Wm., 83 

Blomfelde, Wm., 89, 187 

Blomfield, 313 

Blomfylde, Wm.,86, 88 

Blowboll, Wm., 214 

Blower, Jn., 21)1 

Blundeston, Patrick, 374 

Blundeston, Robt., 186 

Bly, Abel, 343, 367 

Bly, Jn.. 354 



390 



INDBX NOMINTJM. 



Booktiige, Edm., 281, 239 

Booking, FranoeH, 231 

Bocking, Jn.. 231 

Booking, Phil, 231 

Bdcking, Rtilph, 231 

Bocking, Wm., 231 

Bohun. Joan, 17H, 182 

Boileau, Sir Maurioe, 374 

Bokenham, RobU, 180 

Bokyn, Edm., 238 

Bokrn, Frances, 238, 239 

Bokyn, Mary, 238, 239 

Boleyn, Anne, 227 

BolevUUne, Wm., 193 

Bomond, Jn., 188 

Bonham, 243 

Bonham, Thou., 231, ^2 

Bonham, Wm., 231 

Booth, W. H., 369 

Borlase, Geo., 291 

Boeee, Avioe, 272 

Boston, Hen. Soott, 232 

Botecourte, Jn., 179* 

Botetourte, 179 

Botilller, Wm., 179 

Botterell, Peter, 21 

Bottger, 348 

Boatociurt, Jn.. 194 

Boutenyleyn, Wm.. 17H 

Boutetourts, Jn., 177 

Bovill, Wm., 185. 18«, 192 

Bovis, Wm., 185 

Bowditch, 224 

Bowie, Jn., 284 

Bownde, Nioh., 13 

BowncKB, FraM., 355 

Bowser, Hen., 40 

Boyd, 234 

Boydon, Thos., 19 

Boylande, Jn., 180. 182, 187 

Boynge, Robt., 4 

Boyse, Hen., 42 

Boyton, Wm., 181, 184 

Brabon, Rich., 9 

Bradstreet, Symon, H\7 

Bradstreet, Wm., 14, •J95 

Braham, Wm., 183 

Brames. Thos., 44 

Bramford, Peter, 273 

Brampton, Amy, 225, 227 

Branae, Jn., 42 

Brandon, Chas.. 306 

Brandode, Steph., 106 

Brannysden, Agnes, 83 

Bray, Robt, 84, 100, 101, 106 

Breisworthe, Wm., 181 

Breme, 302 

Brendode, Marian, 83 

Brendoode, Jn., 83, 85, 86 

Brendyd, Wm., 83 

Brendwode, Ralph, 94 

Brenwode (Brandwode), Jn., 91, 92, 111. 

114, 115, 118, 138 
Breton. Count, 183 



Brewse, Giles, 72, 184, 185 

BrewM, Jn. de, 72 

Brewne, Rich., 184, 190 

Brewse, Thos., 72, 73 

Brewse, Wm. de, 72 

Brewster, Jn., 88, 89 

Briokwell, Adam, 167 

Bridges, Jn., 285 

Bright, Robt., 7 

Brigge, Walter, 245 

Bristol, Marquis of, 59 

Britannia, Jn., 186 

Brithnoth, Barl of ICssex, 210 

Britoun, Cristina, 171 

Britnn, Adam, 171 

Britton, Wm., 183 

Broo, Ralph, 304 

Brockesbume, Jn., 176 

Bromeholme, Prior of, 186 

Bromholme, Vincent, Prior of, 313 

Brond, Jn., 39 

Bronde, Geo., 129 

Bronde, Mr., 83, 88, 89, 90, 116, 118, 119, 

120, 122, 125, 126 
Brooke, Jn., 83 
Brookesboume, Jn., 193 
Brown, Augustin, 164 
Brown, Elyas, 156, 163, 164 
Brown, F. D., 206 
Brown, Jn., 163 
Brown, Rich., 163 
Brown, Sevoca, 163 
Brown, Wm., 163, 234 
Browne, Jn., 83 
Browne, Robt., 352, 360, 365 
Browning, Jn., jun., 152, 154, 155, 160, 

161. 162, 168 
Browning, Nich., 152, 155, 168 
Browninge, Rocker, 2 
Brownsmith, Thos., 214 
Brundiah, 280 
Brunynff, Nich., 160, 162 
Brusiarae, Eliz., 188 
Brusiarde, Jn., 189 
Bryoe, Andrew, 245 
Brygtham, Rich., 84, 137 
Bucher, Margery, 106 
Buchur. Jn., 106 
Buckenham, Edm., 15, 25 
Buokenham, Hen., 15, 22, 32 
Buckenham, Nich., 292 
Buckingham, Duke of, 70 
Buers, Robt., 193 
Buffg, 221 
Bukston, Jn., 244 
Bulbrooke, Jn., 39 
BuUok, Roesia, 24^ 
BuUok, Wm., 248 
Bulwar, Christopher, 45 
Bunbury, Chas., 150 
Burden, Jn., 84 
Burden ze, Jn., 84 

Burdenze (Burdus), Robt, 97, 98, 106, 109 
Burell, Jn., 173 



INDEX NOMINUM. 



391 



Bures, Robt., 176 
Burg, Jn. de, 163 
Burgate, Peter, 180 
Burgh, Alice, 313 
Burgh, Beatrice of, 162 
Burgh, Ralph, 313 
Burgh, Roger. SIS 
Burgh, Thus., 176, 193, 216 
Burke, Edm., 227 
Bumavill, 872 
Bumavill, Jn., 182 
Burton, Wm., 367 
Burrowe, Peter, 3 
Burwyn, Roe.. 281 
Burlinhain, Mr., 26 
Buachy, Jas., 96 
Bu»h, Roger of the, 157 
Bushes, Roger at the, .162 
Buttercourte, Jn., 179 
Butterfunt, Thos., 355 
Buttley, Prior of, 181, 189 
Butt«, Robt., 67 
Byby, Agnes, 91 
Byrde, Joseph, 36 
Bythold, Nich., 162 

Cabeck, Thos.. 283 

Cady. Win., 250 

Cage, Elizb., 110 

Cage, Isabella, 82, 83. 92 

Cftge, Joan, 83 

Cage, Jn., 83, 94, 96, 98, 99, 100, 101, 102, 

103, 104, 106, 107, 110, 112. 129, 130, 

131, 132, 133 
Cage, Mary, 83 
Cage, Robt., 83, 94, 100, 101, 102, 103, 

•104, 10-J, 108, 112, 113, 131, 132, 133 
Cage, Thos., 82, 84, 85, 87, 88, 89, 90, 91, 

93, 95. 9t>, 97, 98, 99, 109, HI, 114, 116, 

117, 118, 121, 124, 125, 127, 128, 129, 

ISO, 131, 138 
Cagge, Christopher, 84 
Cainbome, Mr., 283, 284 
Campo, Wm., 243 
Canterbury, Prior of, 176, 193, 194 
Canute, King, 225 
Capel. Albricus, 194 
Capell, Arth.,19 
Capeles, Albert, 177 
Carevr, Jane, 65 
Carewe, Thos., 36 
Carewe,Wm..65 
Carlton. Jn , 281, 993 
CarUll, Tht)s., 31 
Carman, 118 
Carman, Betrys, 83 
Carman, Lawrence, 83 
Carman, Margt., 88 
Carpenter, Peter, 272 
Carpenter, Phil., 170 
Carr, Hervey, 68 
Carr, Isabella, 67 
Carr, Robt. 67 
Carter, Andrew, 60, 279 



Carter, Geo., 38 

Cartwrighte, Kdm., 17 

Cartwright, Ven. Archdeacon, 62 

Cas, Ac&m, 169 

Castleton, Hugh, 27 

Castre, Jn., 184 

Cateline, Zachary, 295 

Caveler, 23*5 

Chaffers, Wm., 343, 354, 855 

Chambers, Thos , 36 

Chamberlyn, Rich., 12 

Cham peigne. Rich., 181 

Champion, Rich., 350, 354 

Chandelour, Thos., 306 

Chaplain, Adam, 268 

Chaplain, Edm. the, 155 

Chaplain, Hugh, 168 

Chaplain, Jn., 269, 272 

Chaplain, Wm., 273 

Chapman, Alex., 162 

Chapman, Gilbert, 163, 168 

Chapman, Jn., Ibl, 162 

Chapman, Thos., 13 

Chapman, Wm., 157, 168, 163, 291 

Charles i., 226, 241 

Charles, Jn., 191 

Cheek, Hugh, 34 

Cheek, Jn., 34 

Cheeke, Lady, 34 

Chele, Jn., 82, 111, 115 

Chele, Thos., 84 

Chenard, Thos., 17 

Cbenert, Alice, 83 

Chester, Ralph, Earl of, 303 

Cheston, Jane, 47 

Cheston, Rich., 47 

Cheston, Robt., 47 

Cheston, Rose, 47 

Chest4)n, Thos., 47, 48 

Cheston, Wm., 47 

Chilton, Corbould, 291 

Chuney, Ralph, 270 

Church, Professor, 357 

Clarice, wife nf Wm. the Elder, 156 

Clarke^ Francis, 5 

Clavennge, Jn., 186 

Claydon, John, 34 

Claydon, Wm., 189 

Clinton, Jn., 193 

Clare. Sir Edw., 225 

Clowes, Thos., 245 

Cleare, Edw., 18 

Cleare, Mr., 18 

Clement, Eliz., 110 

Clench, Mr. Justice, 28, 28 

Clerk, Ely the, 163 

Clerk, Isabella, 162 

Clerk, Nich. the, 155, 159, 164 

Clerk, Notekyn, 162 . 

Clerk, Peter, 162 

Clerk, Robt, 214 

Clerk, Thoe, 163 

Clerk, Wm., 62, 214 

Clopton, 8tr Wm., 212, 213 

KB 



S92 



INDflX KOMINCM. 



aoptoo. Sir Walter, 313, 21B, 314 

Cljmton, Jn., 176 

Clyt, 118 

Coale, Thofl., 3 

CoAtM, Miai, S7S 

Cobb, Ralph, 868 

Cobbe, Wm.. 268 

CobhAm, Lord, 333 

Cook, Jn., 106, 244 

Cockerill, 243 

Cookeril, Eliih., 383 

CockeroU, Kobt, 181 

Cockeril, SmdI., 383 

Cockfield, ThoA. of, 168 

Cuokman, Wm., 18 

Cookiedge, Mr., 286 

Coddenham, Robt, 344 

Cokeaald, Adam, 317 

Cokefield, Robert, 217 

Cokefeld, Tho«., 176 

C(»kett, Klish., 8S 

Colobentor, Abbot of, 186 

Cole, Martin, 2H 

Cole, Thoe., 82 

Coleman, Jn., 218 

Collyei, Thot., 286 

Colman, Jn., 87 

Colman, Saml., 46 

Colman, Wm., 22 

Colte, Wm., 80 

ColumbariU, Pliil, 183 

Colville, Jn., 191, 193 

Combar, Jone, 106 

Comers, Adam, 180 

Comone, Jn., 188 

Cttngreve, 68 

Conyen, Adam, 180 

Cook, C, 365 

Cook. E. B., 320 

Cwik, Wm., 8, 18, 807 

Cooper, C. Foater, 878 

Cooper, Jas. E., 320, 324 

Cooke, Jn., 84 

Cooke, Kobt., 112, 118 

Cooke, Peter, 42 

CookfeUd, Thoe., 194 

Cookworthy, Wm., 360. 354 

Coockooke. Robt., 83 

Cooper. Jn., S62 

Copdocke, Rich., 184 

Copley, Edw., 43 

Coppinffer, Hen., 27, 41 

Copperfield, Da^id. 373 

Corbett, Rog., 176, 192 

Corbould, Thos . 297 

Cordell, Thoe., 12 

Corder, J. S., 871 

Cornerde, Rich., 177, 295 

Cornwall, Edm., Earl of, 305 

Cornwall, Margt, Countesii of, 306 

Cornwall^ Rich., Earl of, 206, 305 

CornwalliB, Chas., Marquie of, 70 

Comwallie, Thoe., 22, 24, 25 

Corry. H. W. L., 74, 220 



Corton, Jn., 186 

Cotmaa, W., 372 

Cotteaforde, Robt, 23, 27 

Cotton, Edm., 23 

Cotton, Thos., 106 

Cotton, Jn., 17, 33 

C<»ur, Jn., 186, 187 

Coucter, Jn., 11 

Cove, Jn., 187 

Cove. Waiter, 187 

Cowell, E. B., 237 

CoweU, BL B., 206, 228, 245 

Coyfe, Jn., 162 

Coyee, Jn., 165 

Cradock, Rich., 280 

Crane, Paul, 8 

Craniihawe, Danl, 37 

Cranahawe, Thos., 37 

Craake, Wm., 282 

Crench, Thoa., 166 

Cretinge, Prior of, 182 

Creyk, Jn., 78 

Criktoft, Wm., 177, 179, 195, 197 

Crisp, Fred. A., 365, 356, 357, 359 

363,364, 366 
Criap, G. E., 71, 224 
Crisp, Roaa, 73 
Croft, Chas., 13 
Croftea, Chaa., 16 
Croftea, Jn., 8 
Crofta, Anthony, 70 
CrofU. Chaa., 70 
Crofta, Harriet. 70 
CrofU, Hen., 69 
Crofte, Jn., 69, 70. 71, 279 
Crofta, Richard, 69, 70 
CrofU, Thoa., 7 
CrofU, Wm., 69. 70. 71 
Croaa, Wm. at the, 157 
Croawich, 227 
Crown, Wm., 83. 118 
Crykeorofte, Wm., 178 
Cullmn, Sir Jn., 281 
Curtea, Danl.. 38 
CurtiM, Jaa., 352 
Curtia. Mary, 352 
Curtia, Thoa.. 354 
Cutler, Robert, 2 
Cutting, Roger, 83 
Cutting, W. A.. 233 

Dade, Robt., 294 
Dagworth, Jn., 180 
Daking, C. H., 220 
Dalisone. Wm., 189 
Damoyaele. Adam, 169 
Dandye. Thoa., 22 
Danton, Wm., 215 
Danvillera. Barth., 180, 181 
Danyell, Francia, 36 
Danyllera, Barth., 180 
Darby, Edm., 286 
Darby, Jn. 286 
Darby, Mary, 286 



r 



INDEX NOMINUM. 



393 



Darcie, Sir Thos., 288 

DsHett, Mr., 24 

Daipalt, Robt., 177 

Daudele, Hush, 906 

Davenport, Ralph, 17 

Baven, Cha>i., 68 

Davers, Robt, 281 

I>avillen, Barth., 185 

Dawwn. Hen., 14 

Deane, Gm., 288 

D«ane, Rich., 290 

Deanlye, Thoe., 99 

Dene«, Gylbert, 60 

Deimond, Earl of, 49 

Denhom, Reginald, 306 

Dennis, Elizfi., 60 

Dennis, Gilbert, 60 

Dennis, Rich., 60 

Dennis, Thoe., 60 

Denston, Wm. of, 158 

Denton, Adam of, 162 

D'KntrecoUeii, P^re, 348 

Derhey, Geoffrey, 271 

Dersy, Thos., 129, 132 

De Sancto Mauro, Alice, 194 

Despenser, Hugh le, 155 

De Spenser, Hugh, 176 

D'Ewes, Sir Simon, 176 

De Veer, Thos.. 182 

Devereux, Peter, 291 

Devereux, Pryce, 261 

Devil, Jn., 163 

D*£ye, NathL, 294 

Dickenson, Geo., 27 

Dicullus, 312 

Dimook, A., 371, 372 

Ditcher, Jn., 169 

Ditcher. Roger the, 164 

Ditcher, Simon the, 164, 165 

Ditcher, Symon, 170 

Ditcher, Wm., 169 

Dobben, Jn., 23 

Dobitt, Jn.. 215 

Doggett, Wm., 208 

Donwich, Peter, 186 

Doo, Alice, 82, 91, 110 

Doo, Aves, 106 

Doo. Elizh.,83 

Doo, Jn., 83, 152 

Doo, Rich., 82 

Doo, Steph., 84, 102, 103, 104, 106 

Doo, Thos., 82, 87, 89, 90, 91, 92, 93, 94, 

95, 96, 97, 98, 99, 100, 101, 106, 109, 

111, 112, 115, 116, 117, 121, 124, 125, 

127. 128, 129, 130, 131 
Doo, Wm., 83, 93, 95, 101, 102, 103, 104, 

105, 106, 107 
Dore, Hugh, 168 
Dore, Osbert, 165 
Doubleday, A. W., 76 
Doudal, 224 
Dove, Joshua, 205 
Dowe, Robt. 24 
Downman, E. A., 354 



Dowsing, Wm., 222, 371 
Doyle, Edw., 211 
Doyle, Edw., 213, 214 
Doyle, Jn., 213 
Drake, Jn., 278 
Draper, Jn., 61 
Draper, Master, 83, 136 
Draper, Steph., 114, 120 
Drummond, Elizh., 68 
Drury, Hen., 65 
Drury, Jane, 65 
Drurye, Kath., 15 
Drurye, Robt. 3, 5, 6, 9, 30 
Drury, Sir Robt, 281 
Drury, Wm., 65 
Duesbary, Wm., 340 
Dunwicb, Roger, 248 
Dumford, Clark, 342 
Dyck, Van, 227 
Dye, Jn., 215 
Dyer, Edm., 227 
Dysart, Lionel, Earl of, 232 
Dysart Louisa, Countess of, 
Dysart, Wilbraham, Earl of, 

Eadrich, Jn., 161 

Eden, Thos., 44 

Edgar, Ezekiel, 287 

Edith, Queen, 230 

Edmund. King, 221 

Edric, 230, 248 

Edus, Jn., 272 

Edward the Confessor, 230, 242, 276, 302 

Edward ii., 173, 175, 179, 180, 181, 184, 

188, 195, 197, 306 
Edward iii., 267 
Edwyne, Nich., 83 
Eld, F. J., 220 
Eler, 352 

Elizabeth, Queen, 227, 372 
EUice, Wm., 17 
Elliott, Wm., 285 
Elwes, Gervase, 66 
Ely, bishop of, 176, 178, 179, 181, 183, 

193, 194, 198 
Ely, Hugh, Bishop of, 273 
Ely, Prior of, 179, 180, 182, 183. 185, 189, 

190,192 
Emersmgale, Jn., 214 
Emyns, Wm., 288 
Erwyne, Nich., 99 
Esse, Gwydo, 243 
Essen, General, 48 
Essex, Lord, 227 
Ethelfleda, 210 
Ethelfleda, Queen, 221 
Eustace. Thos., 177, 198 
Evans, Sir Jn., 201, 203, 326, 327, 390 
Evat, Anthony, 297 
Evelyn, 70, 220 
Everard, Martha, 32 
Eweney, Jn., 166 
Ewyn, Mr., 12 
Eye, Prior of, 180 



394 



IKDEX NOMINDM. 



Eyri, Alex., 155 

Faber, Walter, 272 
FaircloQgh, Jn., 290 
Fake, Jn., 155, 161 
Fakenham, Wm., 197 
FalaiM, AugUBtin, 186 
Fanner, Nich , 23 
Faro ley, Jn., 23 
Fastolf, Hugh, 374 
Fauke, Rich.. 154, 155 
Fawcett, Jn., 21 
Faxe, Nich., 245 
Faxfex. Wm., 109 
Fayercliff, Lawrence, 32 
Faynford, 372 
Fedam, 224 
Felgate, 243 
Feltham, Thtw., 41 
Feltun, Anthony, 26 
Felton, Elizii., 67 
Felton, Jn., 234 
Felton, ThoB., 67 
Fen, Alice. 272 
Fen, Colin, 272 
Fen, Jae. at the, 161, 162 
Fen, Jn., 272 
Fen. Rich., 272 
Ferre, Guy, 188, 189 
Ferrers, Hugh, 303 
Ferrers, WMoheline, 303 
Ferthe, Alice, 84 
Fioe, Agnes, 83 
Fickling, W., 216 
Fillol, Koger, 30C> 
Finch, Kath., 162 
Finch, ThoB., 162 
Fitch, Francis, 36^ 
Fitzfferald, Mary, 68 
Flacke, Andrew, 83 
Fletwieke, David, 189 
Florence, Gilbt, 216 
Fonnereau, Claudius, 251 
Fonnereau, Mr., 337 
Fonnereau, Wm., 251 
Foot, Lucas, 170 
Forester, Robt., 272 
Forester, Wm.. 268 
Fortescue, Dudley, 38 
Forthe. Kobt,, 214 
Forthe, Wm., 214 
Fowler, Humphrey, 22 
Fox, G. E., 310 
Fox, John, 82, 84, 85 
Framsden, Jn.,244 
Francis. £dw., 6 
Francis, Philip, 70 
Frauncis, Margt., 82 
Freeman, Agnes, 251 
Freroan, Stephen, 24 
Freeman, Thos., 251 
French, Clement, 33 
Fresinfilde, Jn., 186 
Freston, Jn., 184 



Freston, Mr., 27 

Friend, Edm., 298 

Frost, Jn., 4, 278, 284 

Fryer, B. 8., 208 

Fullanos, 312 

Fttllar, Robt, 83. 86, 88, 89, 90, 96, 115 

Fuller, Steph., 106 

Fuller. Adam, 170 

Fuller, Symon the, 152, 154, 162, 166 

Fuller, Thoe. the, 162 

Fuller, Vincent the, 156 

Fuller, Vincent, 169 

Fuller, Walter the, 161 

Fungy, Nich., 171 

Fynch, Jn., 169 

Fynch, Kath., 154 

Fynch, Thoe.. 154, 170 

Fyri, Alex., 161 

Gage, Edw.. 67 

Gsge, Penelope, 66, 67 

G Je, Arthur, 43 

Gallawaye, Edm., 14 

Galsia, Walkelin, 273 

Gant, Gilbert, 303 

Gant, Rohais, 303 

Gardeman, Baltazar, 245 

Gardener, Wm., 214 

Gardine, Jn., 271 

Gardiner. Thos., 240 

Gardinis, Thos., 192 

Gardner, Robt, 83 

Gardyner, Robt. 6, 8, 11 

Garlebed, Nich., 163, 164, 165 

Goniegan, Peter, 182 

Gamett, Rich., 6 

Garrod, Sir Alfred, 234 

Garstang, Mr., 373 

Gedding, Adam of, 156, 157, 161, 165 

Geddinge, 178 

Geffrey, Jn., 171 

Geffrey, Wm., 171 

Geldersleve, Jn., 83 

Geldereleve, Thos,, J3 

George, Thos., 186 

Gerard, Robt, 211 

Germany, Emperor of, 305 

Gemegan, Peter, 185 

Gemoun, Sir Jn., 211, 212 

Gervioe, Robt, 282 

Giffard. Cicely, 211, 212 

Giddinge, Constance. 233 

Giffard, Sir Wm., 211 

Gilberde, Wm., 41 

Gilderscleve, Christian, 82 

Gill, Hich., 164 

Gillingwater, Edm., 341, 355 

Gillingwater. Isaac, 341 

Gilpin, Ralph, 279 

Girling, Susan, 294 

Gislingham, Wm.. 185 

GlanviIIe, Petronilla, 271 

Glanville, Rich., t90 

Glaunvylle, Jn., 307 



INDEX NOMINUM. 



395 



Gloucester, Countess of, 177, 179, 193, 

195 198 
Glimcester. Earl of, 176, 187 
Gobbanufl, 312 
Goddard, 248 
Goddard, Jn., 84, 106 
Godley. Hen.. 29 
Golde, Wm., 82 
Goldinge, Jn., 28 
Goldinge, TboR., 33 
Gnldingham, Fulken, 180 
Goldingrham, Jn., 184 
Good. 372 

Goodday, Ag^efi, 84 
Gooday, Thos., 83. 89, 96, 110 
(iooday, Wm., 84 
Gooche. Philip, 16 
Goodall, Jn., 278 
Gooderick, Robt., 288 
Goodniund. 302 
(Goodrich, Geoffrey, 272 
Goodwin, Robert, 249 
Goodwine, Alice, 307 
Goold, Wm.. 87, 93, 105, 106, 110 
Goolde, Florence, 83 
Goole, Jone, 84 
G<)««beck, TboH., 244 
Goi,>)ecke, Rnlph, 182 
Gosebek, Thos., 244 
Go#inuld, Edm., 214 
Gosnold, Jn., 206 
Gosnold, Robt, 205, 206 
GoBse, Wm., 13. 290 
Gough, Thos., 292 
Gonyn, 349 

Gowers, Sir Wm. R., 174 
Grafton, Henry, Duke of, 67 
Granditch, Rich., 2 
Grae, Thos. le, 152, 157 
Gray, Peter, 186 
Gray, Thos., 176, 177 
Gray, W. B., 216 
Graye, Miles, 240 
Greaves, Leon, 7 
Greene, J. W., 252 
Greenwell, Canon, 200, 204 
Gretton, H., 206 
Grey, Sir Hen., 217 
Grey, Tho«.. 193. 195 
Greygoi)Be, Barth., 166, 170 
Griffith, Jn., 288 
Grimmer, Mr., 327 
Grimsby, Wm., 194 
Grumsby, Wm., 177 
Gmndye, Geo., 23 
Grympfton, Edw.. 25 
Gnader, Ralph. 231 
Gurdon, An., 227 
Gurdon, Brampton. 225. 227 
Gurdon, Jn., 225, 226, 227 
(lurdon, Mr., 36 
Gurdon, Philip, 227 
Gurdon, Robt. 225, 226 
Gyldynleve, Christian, 110 



Gyle, Rich., 165 
Gylemyn, 154 
Gyles, Jn.,M) 
Gylys, Antony, 215 

Hoche, Elizh., 60 
Hache, Hakyn, 60 
Uacklett, Rich., 26 
Hakenill, 237 
Hakewell. Edw., 242 
Hakun, Rich., 164 
Hall, Geo., 30 
Hall, Joseph, 4 
Hall. Wm., 24 
Hammond, Ann, 362 
Hammond, Wm., 214 
Hancken, Jn., 42 
Hanver, Hubert, 272 
HardrichshuU. Ralph, 185 
Harmcr, F. W., 320 
Harneis, Jn., 232 
Hamei«, Phil., 182 
Harneya, Phil., 232 
Harper, Margt., 83 
Harper, Walter. 171 
Harrison, Francis, 36 
Harrison, Jas., 22 
Harrison, Jn., 43 
Harrison, Thos., 37 
Harrod, 309 
Harwood. H. F., 246 
Harrysen, Hugh, 84 
Harryson, Wm., 106 
Hart. Ralph, 168, 171 
Hart, Thos., 22 
Harte, Rich., 244, 245 
Harvy, Isabell, 106 
Harvy, Margt., 6, 84 
Harvy, Rich, 82 
^Harvye, Jn., 5. 15, 239 
Hasfield, Walter. 243 
Hasted, Hen., 67 
Hastings. Jn.. 177, 195 
Hatton, James, 26 
Hawnerd. 224 
Hawys, Thos., 83 
Hayes. Thos., 38 
Hepgall, Wm , 287 
Hei^am, Clement, 11 
Heigham, Hen., 286 
Heigham, Jn..41,43(2), 281 
Heigham. Thomas, 233 
Heilum, Hen., 177 
Helm, Hen., 194 
Helme, Robt, 4 
Hemegrave, Edm., 179, 196 
Hemegrave, Edw.. 177 
Hemene, Edw., 178 
Hengrave, Edm., 183 
Henirrave. Edw., 198, 199 
Hennell, 60 

Henniker, Hon. Mary, 208 
Henniker, Lord, 208 
Henry, Adam, 268 



396 



INDEX NOMINUM. 



Henry i., a08 

Henry n., SOS, a04 

Henry iii., 21H, 904 

Henry vii., 173 

Henry viii., 277, 814 

Hereford, Edir., Vioount. 261 

Herfrey, Jn., 236 

Heron. Mr.. 280 

Herreford, Wm., 84 

Hert,Jn., 117 

Hert, Wm. le, 162, 162 

Herve, Rich., 82 

Herve, Robt, 106 

Hervey, Augustus, 68 (2) 

Hervey, Caroline, 68 

Herrey. Elizh. C. C, 68 

Hervey, Elixh. Foater, 68 

Hervey, Emily, 68 

Hervey, Felton, 68 

Hervey, Fredk., 66, 68 

Hervey. Fredk. Wm., 63 

Hervey, Geo., 68 

Hervey, Isabella, 67 

Hervey, Jane, 66 

Hervey, Jn., 66. 67, 68, 83, 281, 289 

Hervey, Jn. Augustus, 68 

Hervey, Lord Franois, 59, 174 

Hervey. Lord Jn., 80, 149. 208, 209, 280, 

813 
Hervey, Mary, 67 
Hervey, Nich., H7 
Hervey, Kobt., 82 
Hervey, Sydenham H. A., 63 
Hervey, Thos., 66, «7. 68 
Hervey. Wm., 65, 66, 67, 68, 303 
Hervy. Rich., 92, 109, 125, 127 
Hethedon, Adam de, 156 
Heveningham, Roger, 186 
Hewe. Duce le, 168, 164 
Hewe. Ely the, 163 
Hewling, Benj., 841 
Hoye, Wm.. 41 
Heylin and Fry, Messrs., 349 
Heyward, Alice, 84 
Hicklinge. Thos,. 181 
Hill, Jn., 315 
Hill, Pagan at the, 161 
Hill, Wm. at the. 161 
Hill, Wm., 281, 296 
Hitche, Jn., 152 
Hitchcock, Miss, 246 
Hobart, Thos., 214 
Hoc, Jn., 180 
Hcickesly, Archadia, 192 
Hodgson, Willoiighby, 357 
Hodson, Jh., 282 
Hoe, Henry, ItfO 
Hoe, Jn., 185 
Holden, Chas. £dw\, 283 
Holden, Rich., 7 
Holden, Wm.. 6 
Holebrooke, Amice de, 72 
Holbrooke. Hugh, 184 
Holbrooke, Jn., 184, 190, 191 



Holbrook^ PetRmilU, 183 

Holbroke, Wm., 183 

Holobroke, Wm. de, 72 

Holiday, Nich., 289 

Holland, Jn., 217 

Hollinwell, Mr. 291 

Holte, Robt, IS 

Holy Trinity, Norwich, Sacristan of, 183 

Hoogge, Margt., 84 

Hook, Theophilus, 251 

Hooke, Wm., 82, 91 

Horkisley,£gia,176 

Horold, Thos., 170 

Horseman, 243 

Horsroan, Kdw., 236 

Horsman, Thos., 287 

Hort, Geo., 18 

Hosdpne, 248 

Hcivell, Hugh, 178, 180, 187, 197 

Hovell, Jn., 246 

Howard, Elizh., 67, 213 

Howard, General C, 48 

Howard, Sir Jn, 218 

Howchyn, Jn., 16, 83, 87 

Howe, Rich., 28 

Howlet. Silvester, 289 

Hewlett, Thos., 290 

Howys, Agnes, 83 

Hoxne, Pnor of, 180 

Hny Joan, 84 

Hubert. Jn.. 190 

Hubert, Richard, 268 

Hudson, Jeffrey, 70 

Hudson, Jn., 10 

Hungerforde, Roger, 185 

Hungerforde, Wul, 185 

Hunt, Jn., 244 

Hunt. Mr., 208 

Hunt. Robt, 83 

Huntingfeilde, Rog., 187 

Huntingfield, Ijord, 277 

Huntingfield, Wm., 185, 187 

Hyam,Elizh., 207 

Hyboldeston, Alan, 245 

Hycche, Jn., 164 

Hyll, Jn.. 2, 3, 6, 84 

Hylton, Kdm., 84 

Hynne, Thos., 214 

Ikesworthe, Thos., 198 

Ikkworth. Thos., 177 

Ilger, Robt.. 82 

Ilketeshall, Jacob. 188 

Ingham, Oliver, 184 

Inglose, Robt, 186 

Iric, 230 

Irwell, Jn., 45 

Isilie. Robt, 304 

Ive, Goodwyn, 83, 98, 94, 98, 99, 100, 101, 

102. 103, 104, 105, 10(5, 108, 109. 110, UU 

112, 126, 130, 131, 182, 133 
Ive, Jn.,«3, 136 
Tve, Robt, 83 
Ive, Thos, 106 



INDEX NOMINCM. 



397 



Jacob, John, 21 

Jeaffenon, Gordy, 77 

Jeffery, Thos., 81 

Jenery, Jn., 106 

Jermyn. Hon., 67 

Jormsm, Jn., 81 

Jermyn, Hobt, 2, 3, 4, 6, 8, 12, 14 

Jennyn, Suiian, 67 

Jenop, Jn., 294 

Jewitt, Llewellyn, 851, 852, 8M, 862 

Johnson, 280 

Johneon, Robt A., 867 

Johnson, Wm., 88 

Jolly, Kobt, 108, 109 

Joym, Robi., 106 

Jullay, Jn., 171 

Jurdeu, Jn., 78 

Kacherel, Nich., 155 

Kannan, Lawr., 83 

Katchterel, Nich., 157 

Keche, Jn., 88 

Keeble, Jn., 170, 171 

Keeble, Kobt., 251 

Kemeeike, Thoe., 193 

Kempe, Mr.. 42 

Kenncke, Kalph, 28 

Kenslike, Thoe., 192 

Kenton, Nigel, 191, 192 

Kerdeeton, Wm., 187, 188, 189 

Kerrye, Jas., 11 

Kersey, Henry, Prior of, 216 

Kett, 238 

Kettleberghe, Jn., 191 

Ketyll. If«beUa, 88 

Keye, Robt., 12 

Keyser, G. £.,64 

Kidson, Jn., 287 

Kil, Rich., 168 

Kilner, H. L., 60 

Kinfc, Jn^ 805 

Kirkby, Cicely, 218 

Kirkby, John. 218 

Kirketon, Cristina, 155, 165 

Kirketon, Matilda, 155, 165 

Kitto, Cuptain, 242 

Knewstubbe, Jn., 88 

Knight, VVm^ 283 

KnottUball. Lady, 196 

Knowles, Thos., 67 

Kokefield. Nesta, 216 

Kokerel, Jnao, 212, 213 

Kokerel, Mary, 212 

Kokerel. Sir Robt., 212, 218 

Kokerel, Sir Wm., 213 

Kydnon, Lady, 3, 4. 5, 8, 9 

Kyi, DionysiuR, 166 

Kyi, Rich., 163 

Kynge, Michael, 30 

Kynvett, Mr. 24 

Kyppyng, Rich., 83, 92, 105, 120, 135, 136, 

137, 139 
Kyrke, Edw., !) 
Kyrre, Jas., 284 



Kyslinbury, Rich., 211, 212 
Kyrton, Jn. of, 156, 165 
Kyrton, R^r of, 165, 166 

Lafham, Jn., 211 

Lafham, Wm., 211 

Lambourn, 222 

Lambume, Jacob, 176, 192 

Lamput, Jn., 190 

Lancaster. Thos., Earl of, 173 

Lane, Jn. in the, 157 

Laugdun, W. J., 207 

Langham, Wm., 178, 197 

Latimer, Jn. , 182 

Latimer, Thos., 181, 189 

Launoe, Jn., 184 

Laurence, Phil., 285 

La we. Jn., 35 

Lawrence, Phil, 245 

Lawrence, Sir Thos., 227 

Lawtim, Hen., 245 

Layard, Nina F., 80 

Layham, Jn. of, 154, 157, 158, 159, 162, 

163, 1H7 
Layham, Nich. of, 158 
Layham, Osbert of, 157 
Layham, Robert of, 157 
Laysttm. Abbot of, 186 
Lea, Robt., 9 
Leche. Thog., 245 
Lee. Rich., lOS, 109 
Lee. Wm., 176, 193 
Iiegat, Rich., 272 
Legate, Helmyn, 211, 212, 213 
Legate, Edw., 212 
Legate, Thos., 212 
Legrice, Jn., 44 
Leggy, Cristiana, 166 
Leggy, Walter, 162 
LeffliRH, Prior of, 185 
Lenuut^ Jn., 80 - 
Leicester. Robt., Earl of, 48, 804 
Leigh. Rich., 210 
Leis, Prior of, 189 
Lepel. Mary, 68 
Levett, Robt., 282 
Lewes, Albanus, 6 
Lewes, Wm., 20 
Lewkenor, Edw., 31 
Leyham, Math., 216 
Lincoln, Wm., Earl of, 303 
Listeva, 230 

Litchfield, Frederick, 357 
Little, Amicia, 161 
Little, Avice, 161 
Little, Rich., 161 
Little, Thos., 57 
Livermere, Berth., 178, 197 
Lolt. Thos., 278 
Loudham, Kog., 186 
Long, Peter de Lande, 366 
Londoun, 220 
Lf»uvaine, Thos., 196 
Lovayne, Thos , 176, 178 



398 



INDEX NOMINUM. 



Loveday, Philip, 60 
Loved»7, Joan, 60 
Loveday, Rich., 182 
Loveine, Thot., 1U4 
Lovell, Thos., 11, 12. 44 
Lowe, Alex., 170 
Lowe, Rich., 190 
Ludham, Alice, 248 
Ludham, Jn., 190 
Ludham, Wm., 248 
Lucas, ThoB., 68, 69, 70 
Luson, Hewlin, 341, 855, 356 
Luson. Wm.,341,342 
Lynge, Jaines, 25 
Lysk, Lord, 226 
Lyster, Ralph, 35 
Lyteman, Gilbt, 163 
Lytle, Robt., 156 

Mackenzie, Kennet C, 232 

Machani, Wm., 244 

Maise, Leonard, 20 

Makke, Adam, 167, 167 

Makke, Alicia. 157 

Makke, Jn., 157, 170 

Makke, Nich.. 167 

Makke, Toob., 157 

Mallin^gv, Abbess of. 176, 193 

Maneiain, Peter, 180 

l^lanneriflon, Peter, 180 

Manners. Katherine, (>8 

Manninge, Jeremiah, 10 

Mannock, Sir Francis, 224 

Mannock, Wm., 42, 214 

Mannynge. Thos., 82, 87, 92 

Man8el,£lizh., 68 

MarcyH, Jn., 306 

Margaret, Queen, 176, 177, 191, 192, 195 

Mark, Wm., 147 

>Carkaimt, Wm.,214 

Marke-day, Robt., 166 

Marny, Wm , 306 

Marrelen, Jn., 40 

Marrowe, Isaac, 85 

Marryatb, ?51 

^larshall, Beatrice, 168 

Marshall, Countess, 185, 188, ISO 

Marshall, Karl, 190 

Marshell, Kmma, 100, 170 

Marshall. Hen., 160, 161, 16\ 168. 170 

Marshall, Kobt., 161 

Martyn, Jn., 214 

Martyn, Robt, 214 

Mary, Oueen, 372 

Mason, Rich., 37 

Masdom, Annes, 83 

Mauveisyn, Pftter, 180 ' 

May, Baptist, 67, 70 

May, Humphry, 67 

May, Judith 67 

Maye, George, 30 

Mayfield, A., 320, 324 

Mayner, Roger, 161 

Meadow, Christian, 163 



Meadows. F. F., 206 

MedefeUde. Jn., 180 

Merle, Galfrid, 163 

Mervyn, Jn., 214 

Meeange, Anketil, 248 

Mesange, Ralph, 248 

Micklefeilde, Hamo, 187 

Mildings, Hemigiua, 176, 193 

Miller, Alex., 168 

Miller Barth.. 161 

Miller, F., 205 

Miller, Jordan, 171 

MUIer, Rich, 161 

Miller, Roger. 164 

Miller, Thos.. 164 

Mills. Thos.. 293 

Milttm, 68 

M inter. Jn., 249 

Moeoe. Antony, 12 

Mollerahed, 354 

Mollershead, Jas., 367 

Moore, Wm., 237 

Monche, Robt., 164 

Monck. Thos., 29 

Monk. W., 234 

Monks, Kobt, 169 

Monmouth, Duke of, 70 

Monte alto, Robt., 183, 192 

Monte Luelli, Jn., 305 

Montfort, Alice, 303 

Montfort, Hugh, 302, 303 

Monynges, Humphrey, 36 

Morewode, Jn., 345 

Morgan, Rowland, 296 

Mori, Thos, Ifil, 170 

Morieux, Hugh, 176, 194 

Moriell, Isabella, 83 

Morley, Claude, 320 

Morley, Mr., 7 

Morris, Nich., 83 

Morse, F., 327 

Morsd, Messrs. G. & £., 339, 340, 343 

Moselev, Humph., 33 

Moseley, Margt., 33 

Moseley, Rich., 284 

Mosse, MUo, 22 

Mi.te, Wm., 182 

Moune. Jn., 171 

Mounteny- Arnold, 181 

Mows, Jn., 171 

Muffel, Rich., 156 

Muffet, Rich., 171 

Multon, Thos., 177, 195 

Mumford, 227 

Munde, Adam. 84 

Mundevile, Jn., 189 

Mundas, Matilda, 82 

Mundevill. Rich., 185 

Murre, 166 

Mufikett Rich., 128 

>f ustarder, Arnulf, 156 

Mutford, Jn., 178. 197 

Nance, Mr., 223 



INDEX NOMINUM. 



399 



Xaanton, Hugh, 190 

Nerford. Petronilla, 186. 187 

Neucatre, Jm. Sidney, 297 

Neve. Peter le, 49 

Nevell, Mr. l>r.. 16 

Neville, Sylas, 343 

Newcnme, Tho8.. 10, 15, 278 

Newhey, Jn.,274 

Newman, Jn., 38 

Nicholas, Anselm, 268 

Nicholson, Tho8.» 32 

Noble, Wm., 2 

Non, Jn , 7 

Nonne, Robt., 7 

Norden, Jn., 50 

Norfolk. Countess of, 190, 191, 192 

Norfolk, Earl of, 182, 189 

Norridge, Jn., 16 

Norrid, Cuthbert, 1 

Norris, Antony, 174 

North. Dudley, 16, 18 

North, Koger, 48 

Northfylde, Reginald, 7 

Northumberland, Duke of, 372 

Norwich, Bishop of, 180, 184, 188 

Norwich, Jn., tiishop of, 279 

Norwich, Prior of, 185 

NenK'ich, Walter, 186, 188 

Norwich, Walter, Binhop of, 268 

Norwich, Wm., Bl«hop of, 288 

Nuce, Thos., 15, 31 

Nun, Mr., 10 

Nun, Rich., 10, 11 

Oger, Jn., 84 
Orde, L. F., 373 
Oreby, Philip, 183 
Orroetibye, Wm., 184 
Orrice, 224 
Orwell, Rich., W5. 86 
Osbert, Kath., 186 
OMbome, Mr., 15 
Osere, Jn.. 82 
Osyth, Abbot of, 176 
()ul»me, Kath., 188 
Overlefyn, Nich.. 169 
Owen, Hugh, 285 
Ow'ynge, Jone, 136 
Oxford, Countess of, 193, 194 
Oxford, Earl of, 176, 184, 277 

Packard. Edw., 49 
Pago, 118 
Page, Jn., 83 
Paige, Robt,, 4 
Paine, Mary, 239 
Paine, Tlios., 239 
Paiton, Jn., 190 
Pakenham, Kdw., 178. 197 
Pakcnham, Jn.. 178. 197 
Pakenham. Thos., 197 
Pakenham, Wm.. 178 
Pakkenut, Alice, 166 
Palgrave, 173 



Palmer, J., 80 

Parker, Nich., Ill 

Parker, Wm., 179 

Parkin. Chas., 313 

Parkin, Jn., 84 

Parkington, T., 80 

Parnell, Jn., 189 

Partridge, Alexander, 157 

Parrye, Klnathan, 24 

Parrys, Philip, 40 

Paston, Edw., 43 

Pateshall, Walter, 196 

Patishill, Walter, 178 

Patterson, A., 320 

Patteson, Hen., 28^ 286 

Payne, 238 

Payne, Anthony, 10 

Payne, J. Bruce. 327, 330 

Payneton, Rich, 168 

PHjrton, Jn., 8, 35. 

Peache, Gilbert, 194 

Peachie, Rich., 31 

Peade, Thos., 46 

Peagrem, Wm., 29 

Pearchill, (ieo , 23 

Pecche, Edw., 178, 196 

Pecche, Gilbt., 177 

Pecche. U»»f., 179 

Pechey. Geof., 197 

Peargc, 54 

Peile, Dr.. 244 

Pell. Jn.. 78 

Peuiberton, A. H.. 64 

Pembroke, CounteHS of, 192 

Pembroke, Karl of, 188 

Pembroke, Rich., Earl of, 212 

Penninge, Anthony, 26 

Peppy, Dame, 281 

Pepys, 69 

Perche. Thos. de, 304 

Perkyn. Jn., 83, 1%, 114, 115, 118 

Permeffay, Anne, 83 

Permente, Thos., 118 

Permentor. Rich., 83 

Perponnte, Simon, 187, 188 

Persons, Agnes, 163 

Per«un, Wm., 84, 187 

Pert, Chris., 289 

Peter, Jn., 19 

Peyntour, Nich., 246 

Peyton, Nich., 214 

Philip, R<ibert, 268 

Philhpps, Oliver, 8, 80, 285 

PhilliiJS, Rich., 362 

Phillipson, Rich. B., 298 

Phin. 230 

Piccat, Jn.,171 

Pickpea«. Alex., 165 

Pigott. H., 209 

Pike. Thos., 82 

Pill«cokdune, Jn. of, 162 

Pippard, Jn., 181 

Pipparde. Margery, 184 

Piftor, Alex., 297 



400 



INDEX KOMINUM. 



Fitchew. Wm , 29S 

Plaiforde, Jiu, 190 

PlMBptn, 224 

PleManoe, Kiob., 5, 286 

P16M, Wm., O., 238, 244, 945 

Plowman, Nich., 84, 187 

Plowright, C. B., 881 

Piier, Jn., 156, 157, 168, 164, 165, 168 

Poer, Wm., 155, 156, 168, 164, 165, 166. 

168 
Pole, Wm. de 1a, 809 
Poley, Judith, 67 
Polye, Giles, 27 
Pond, Kich., 170, 171 
Pond, Rich. At the, 154, 155, 156 
Pond, Thos., 211 
Ponder, Jn., 14 
Poute, Jn., 185 
Poppe, Thou., 167 
PonngUnd, Jn., 188 
Porter, Gec»., 70 
Porter. Tho^, 9 
Poterat, Louis, 347 
Potter, Kobt, 853 
Potter, Kev. Prebendary, 866 
Powell, Kdffar, 215 
PowiR, Lord, 217 
Powlen, MisB, 320 
Poyuiugs, Lady, 176, 193 
Poynings, Margery, 187 
PoyningH, Mich., 187 
Prentice, Syinon, 157, 164, 169 
Preston, Robt., 246 
Pretyman, Jn., 20 
Pretyman, Mr., 22, 27 
Pretyman, Mrs., 28, 872 
Pricke, Jn., 40 
Pricke, Robt., 31 
Pugh, 221 

Puruvile, Rich., 168 
Pyg, Adam, 170 
Pyg, Thoa , 170 
Pygijt, Elizh., 212 
Pyke, Robt , 88, 102, 114 
Pykenham, Wm., 214 
Pynder, Geo., 85 
Pyrde, Jn , 168 
Pyrde, Philip, 167 

Ralph, Alex., 216 
Ralph, Karl, 230, 248 
Ralph, Jn., 235 
Ralph, the Kn^iineer, 310 
Ralph, Wm., 176, 184, 198 
RaniHey, Abbot of, 176, 193 
Rastalde, Isabella, S3 
Rastall, AvoM, 106, 136 
Ratlesden, Simon, 190 
Raven, Rev. Canon, 57 
Raven, Hugh, 271 
Raven, Jn.. 47 
Raven, Rich., 272 
Ravens, Rich., 15 
Rawly n, Robt., 244, 245 



Ray, Carpenter Wm., 291 

Raydon, Lord Robt of, 165 

Raye,Robt^tt 

RayiBoiid, Geo., 251 

Radar, Jn., 88, 91. 98, 96 

Rade, Wm. le, 154, 161 

Redgrave, Jaa., 854 

Redgrave, Jn., 864 

Redmve, Margt., 854 

Redlingfield, Prioress of, 179 

Redsham, Rohesia, 188 

Reimes, Jn., 188 

Reste, Jn., 88 

Rests, Thus , 88 

Rats, Cardinal de, 68 

Reve, Jn.. 84, 106, 108 

Reve, Margt, 84 

Rave, Rich., 166, 170, 968 

Reve, Thos., 64, 94, 99, 106. 106, 112, 113, 

281 
Reyoe, 174 
Reynolds, Joshua, 59 
Reynor, Jn.. 288 
Reynolds, Sir Joshua, 2S7 
Rewse, Hen., 11 
Ryce, Robt, 42, 49, 872 
Richer, Thos., 168 
Richmond, Earl of, 186 
Rideware, Thos., 194 
Ridley, K. P., 59 
Ridgwell, Wm.. 20. 21 
Rigges, Edw.. 24, 291 
Risinge, Jn., 186 
Rithhold, Nioh., 169 
Robert, Walter, 244 
Rochester, Bishop of, 179, 198 
Rochester. Ralph, 804 
Rodland, Thos.. 278 
Roger, Jn., 108, 109 
Roger, Robt, 268 
Roger, Wm., 874 
Rogers, Thos.. 4 
Rogers, Thos. Ellis. 287 
Roidon, Robt , 184 
Rokewood, Edw.. 284 
Rolfe, Jn., 122 
R<»lflF, Ralph, 39 
Rooke, Thos., 245 
Rookes, Nicholas, 3 
Rookwoodde, Ambrose, 7 
Rope, G. T., 820 
Roper, Mr., 89 
R<i«, Lora. 212, 213 
Rosce, Wm.. 187 
Rose, Jn., 88, 89, 90, 96 
Rose, Robt. I8ti 
Rotheman. Thos., 214 
Rous, Thos., 206 
Rowe, Jn.. 33 
Rowp, Rich., 268 
Rowlande, Griffin, 19 
Roylli, Hubert, 212 
RoyAton, Prior of, 182 
Ruge, Elya^ 163 



INDEX NOMINUM. 



401 



Ruogeton, Wm., 185 
RuBhaU, Joan. 197 
Rimton, Gilbert, M5 
Rydewar, Tbos., 176 
Rygen, Jn., 105 
Rynild, Dennis, 166 
Rynild, Robt, 166 
Rysynge, Wm., 94, 106 
Ryuynget, Wm., 84 

Sacker. Robert, 80 

Sacrintan, Ralpb. 272 

St. EdmundX Abbot of, 175, 17«, 177, 

178, 179, 180, 181, 184, 185, 188, 192, 

193. 194, 195, 196, 197, 196, 199 
St Ktheldreda, 280 
St. Fureey, 808, 309 
St. John of Colchmter. Abbot of, 180 
St John of Jerusalem, Prior of, 176, 193 
St Osyth, Abbe«s of, 181, 193 
St Peter's, Ipswich, Prior of, 182 
St Philibert, Jn., 176, 177, 194, 199 
Sakvile, Barth., 191 
Salter, Agnes. 168 
Samboume, Robt , 244 
Sampson. Abbot of St. Edmund's, 216, 

217.278 
Sampson, Jn., 91 
Samuel, Matilda, 164 
Samuel, Wm., 164 
Sandwich. Henry, 271 
Sandys, Joseph, 66 
Sarsim, Oliver, S3 
SawuMum. Jn.. 82 
Saxony, Elector of, 348 
Saxony, Henry, Duke of, 303 
Saxony, Matilda of, 303, 304 
Say, Margery, 177, 195 
Scbelton, Jn.,. 176, 193 
Schreiber, Lady Charlotte, 340 
Scotchmer, 224 
Scott, Rev. Canon T., 59, 208 
Seaford, Chas.. Lord, 68 
Sebright, Jn., 70 
Sedley, Muriel, 226 

Seiferey, Isabella, 92, 97, 98, 99, 104, 106 
Sefferey. Jn., 83, 89, 90, 91, 9?, 95, 1K>, 97, 

98, 106, 109. 111. 114, 115, 116, 117, 121, 

124, 125, 127, 128, 129, 130, 138 
Sefferey. Robt. 85, 86, 87, 88, 89. 92, 114, 

115, 116. 118 
Sefferey, Thos., 91, 92, 116. 117, 121 
Sefferey, Wm., 83. 88, 89. 90, 92. 93, 95, 

96, 97. 99. 100, 107. 121, 124, 125, 126, 

128, 129. 130 
Seffey, Margt.. 84 
Seffray, Jn., 82, 84. 85. 86, 87, 88 
Seffray, Robt, 82 
Seffray, Thos., 82. 84, 85, 86. 88 
Sefilde, Robt., 187 
Segersteyn, Jn., 170 
8egen*teyn, Wm., 170 
SMrave. Nich.. 186 
Sele. Alice, 84 



Selle, Wm., 83 

Selott Alice, 83 

Selot, James, 82 

Selott, Jn., 88, 93, 97, 98, 99, 101, 107. 

103,106 
Selott, Mary, 83 
Selott. Thos.. 92, 94. 101, 102. 103, 106, 

107, 110, 113. 133 
Selot, Wm., 82. 85, 92 
Sempringhsjn, Prior of, 277, 285 
Sendall, Robt, 17 
Sep, Jn., 170 
Serdenze, Robt, 83 
Sewell, W. H., 370 
Sextor, Rosa, 225 
Shaw. Mr., 294 
Sheldrake, Wm.,26 
Shepherd. Barth.. 168 
Shrewsburv, Earl of. 41 
Shrile, Jacob, 178. 196 
Simons, R., 373 
Skales, Ranulph, 181 
Skip, Adam, 165 
Skip. Pagan, 165 
Skultoun. Jn.. 147 
Sibton, Abbot of. 186 
^iicklemore, Elizh., 251 
Sicklemore. Jn., 251 
Sigbert. King. 309 
Sill, Miles, 2tf 
Silvester, Agnes, 250 
Silvester. Rich., 250 
Simon, Walter, 272 
Simptton. 354 

Singh. Prince Fredk. Duleep, 63 
Skarpe, Jn.. 84 
Skarpe. Rich., 84 
Skeet. 234 
Skepper. £. B., 324 
Skidmore. Jas., 8 
Skynner, Thos*., 41 
Sieve. Adam, 156 
Sieve Jn., 162 
Smeth, Gervis, 42 
Hmeth, John. 14, 32, 34, 35 
Smeth, Robt, 23 
Smeth, 1 h<M«., 11 
Smith, A. Merrington, 341 
Smith, E. A., 320 
Smith, Jn.. 292 
Smith, Rich., 162, 1.57, 164, 169 
Smith, ThoH, 4, 286 
Smith, Toulmin, 81, 146 
Smyth, Louisa, (is 
Smyth, Thos., 282 
Smythe, Elizh., 82 
Smythe, Robt., 313 
Smythe, Thos., 83, 122, 123 
Smythe, Wm., 313 
Snape, Prior of, 189 
Snayl, Alice, 273 
Snow, Klyss. 170 
Soham, Stephen, 19, 26, 32, 34 
Southwell, Jn., 21 



402 



INDEX NOMINCM. 



Sowethouae. «Td., 17 

80I011, M.. 857, 358 

Sone, Rich., S0() 

Sorby, Dr., 3i0 

Soterley, Kdxv., 188 

Spaldeii, Jn., 278 

SjMWiton, W. S.,59 

Spark. Wm., 87, 93, 110 

Sparke, Wm., 82 

S()eUer, Thng., 244, 245 

Spelman, W. H., 300 

Spencer, 71 

S^jencer, Francin, 285, 287 

Sponad, .Tq., 82 

S|.K>oner, Jn., 278 

Sp^irle, Hich., 12 

SpriiiKmt, 849 

Springe, Mr., 38 

Springe, John, Mr., 122, 125, 120. 121). 

Springe, Thos., 1« 

Squier. Thou . 245 

StaflFord, Rich., 8, 297 

Stainforde, Jn.. 180 

SUnfoid. 243, 240 

Stanford, Chas., 228 

Stanford, Jn., 232 

Stanford, Tho«., 83, 99 

Stanhope. Michael, 50 

Stansby, Jn., 215 

Stanton, Hen., 17G, 194 

Stapelton, Hen., 40 

Stearne, Kdm., 11 

Stebben, Thos., 42 

Stephenson, 354 

Stevenson, F. S., 70 

Steward, Hervey, 208 

Steward, Nich , 2«8 

Steykell. J«>an, 83 

Stockdale, Win.,289 

StokoH. Ethel, 252 

Stokes, Prior of, 195 

Stone, Hugh, 107 

Stonefi, Hamo at the, 103 

Stotard, Kobt., 215 

Strade, Win., 25 

Stratford, John, 183, 214 

Stratton, 372 

Stratton, Agnes. 191 

Strutt. 220 

Striitt, Wm., 44 

Sturm vn, Roger, 181, 189 

Stutviil, ThoM., 31 

Style, 243 

Sudbury, Simon, 43 

Sudbury, Wm., 289 

Sudde, Jn., 173 

Sugge, ThoM.. IM. 161. 164, 165 

Suffolk, Isaliella, Countess of, 306 

Sulyard, Sir Edw., 371. 372 

Sulyard, Hen., 295 

Sulyard, Sir John, 871, 372 

Sutton, Hamon, 195 

Sutton, Thos., 18 

Swall<iw, Edw., 13, 284 



Swillinton, Adam. 186 
Swillington, Ju., 56 
Swynotorde, Jn., 180 
Syday, Danyell, 37 
Syer, B. Blomfield. 295 
Syer, Wm., 155, 103 
Syllet, ThoK., 83 
Symondetf, Jn., 26 . 
Symondes. Wm., 28 
Syrlynggam. Wm.. 84 
Symonds, Alice. 286 
Symond^ Wm. Robt. 151 

Talbot. 243 
Talbott. Jn.,184,229 
Talbot, Thos., 180 
Talemafthe, Huarh, 184 
Tahnash. Lionel, 232 
807 Talcworth. Rich., 177, 194 
Tamelacho, Hugh, 184 
Tanckard. R<«er, 170 
Tarball, 224 
Tarel, Jn..306 
Tavemor, Jn., 25 
Tavlor, Nich.. 88 
Taylor. Ralph. 84, 100 
Tayler, Rich , 29 ^ 

Taylor, Rowland, 207 ^ 
Tendringe. Jn., 181, 305 
Tendriugge, Rich., 305 
TenierH, 227 
Tev, Frances, 239 
Tev. Sir Thos., 289 
Thackivew. Leon. 4 
Thelle, Aves, 100 
Thelnetham, Jn., 178. 197 
Theodred, Bishop, 05 
Therford, Prior of, 180, 184, 186 
Tholde, Jn..83 
Thomas, Nich., son of, 162 
Thompson, Jn., 38 
Thorpe, (Jeo.. 179 
Thorpe, Jn., 181. 182 
Thniwer, Robt., 245 
Thurghston. Hen.. 171 
Ticcat, Adam., 162 
Ticcat, Ju.. 102 
Tieye, Nich., 306 
Tilney, Mr. 30 
Tippin, Kich., 278 
Tittleshall, Clementia. 189 
Todenham. Robt., 179 
Tollemache, 243 
Tollemache, Hon. L. P., 230 
Towld, Jn., 272 
Towler, Rcbt., 278 
To^-ne, Jn.. 29 
Trapett, Thos . 83 
Tudenham, Jn., 248 
Tuddenhaui, Robt., 189. 190. 198 
Tudor, Jasiier, 68, 70 
Tudor, Mary, 09 
Turner. Anne, 85 
Turner. Jn.. 95, 106 



INDEX NOMINCM. 



403 



Turner, Rich., 126 
Tumeville, Wm., 169 
Tumor, Thou., 33 
Tumour, Hen., 251 
Turaville. £1ym, 166, 167 
Turaville, Kich., 167 
Turze, Sir Nich., 213 
Twyford, 862 
Tyceat, Adam, 165 
Tye, Juliana, 273 
TyreU, Thou., 806 
Tyndall, Humfrey, 20 
Tyndall, Jn., 29 
Tynley, Robt, 89 
Typort, Wm., 167 
TyrreU, Rich., 20 

UbbeBton, Robt., 186 

Ufford, Kva, 1*49 

UfTord. Robt., 181, 189, 190, 306 

Uhthoflf, Hen., 277 

Uluric, 230 

Underwodde, Augustine, 3 

Urquhart, J as. £ , 232 

Ussher, Rich., 27 

Valencia, Humph., 179 
Valenz, Adomar, 187, 188, 198 
Vallibus, Jn., 188 
Vallibujs, Win., 188 
Vanburgh, Jn., 66 
Van Goyen, 227 
Vanneck, Sir Joshua, 289 
Vechyr, Margery, 84 
Vekery, Master, 86, 87 
Venabies, Rev. Canon, 374 
Ver, Gilbert, 303 
Verdon, Jn., 190 
Veredon, Thos., 195 
Veridoun, Tbos., 177 
Verly, Thos., 189 
Vernon, Hon. Jas , 289 
Videlon, Wm., 183, 191 
Viell, Thos., 83, 87, 88, 90 
Villen, Geo.,234 
Vincent, Wm., 41 
Vynaent» Isabell, 83 

Wace, Adam, 168 
Wachesham, Gerard, 176, 180 
Waddington, Thos., 287 
Wadesworthe, James, 22, 25 



Wage, Jone, 106 
WaSand, V" ' 



, Rich,, 181, 186, 189 
Waimty, Wm., 196 
Waldegrave, Elizh., 225, 227 
Waler, Rich., 83 
Waldegrave, Thoe., 225 
Walker, Brown, and Co., Messrs., 342 
Walker, Mrs., 226 
WaU, Dr., 861, 362 
Waller, Agnes, 84 
Waller, Jn., 83 



Waller, Stephen, 84, 102, 103, 104, 105, 

106, 108 
Waller, Thos., 83, 89 
Walles, Jas., 14 
Wallur, Jn., 84, 93, 97, 98, 99, 110, 112, 

122 
Walsham, Alex., 177. 198 
Walter, Jn., 83, 89 
Walter. Robt., 181, 193 
Walters, Jn., Ill 
Wanoey, Osbert, 230 
Ward, Jn., 5 
Warde, Jn., 13 
W»rde, Rich., 7. 293 
Warde, Robt., 38 
Warman, J. S., 207 
Warne, Rich., 83 
Wamell, Margt, 83 
Warner, Griffin, 245 
Warn«r, Hen., 20 

Warner, Thos., 84, 101, 102, 103, 106, 108 
Warren, 104 
Warren, V. E., 81 
Warren, Maigery, 21 
Warren, Martin, 19, 21 
Warren, Mr., M 
Warren, Thos., 7 
Warwick. Ela. Countess of, 212 
Watchesham, Gerard, 193 
Watson, Jn.. 297 
Wauncy, Wm. de. 177 
Webbe, Galfrey, 167 
Webbe. Margt., 84 
Webbe. Mr.. 13 
Webbe. Roger, 10 
Webber, Cnstiana, 67, 164 
Webber, Donee. 167 
Webber, Elyas, 164 
Wedgwood, Josiah, 350 
WeekeH. Wm., 31 
Welaud. Wm., 182 
Welch, Captain, 353 
Welche, Robt., 44 
Weld. Ralph, 293 
Wekintham, Jn., 193 
Welhsm. 234, 243 
Weller, Wm., 106 
Welles, Robt., 304 
Wells, Symon. 281 
Wermicham, Roger, 245 
Weaenham, Gilbt, 313 
West, Agnes, 84 
West, Isabel, 106 
West, Jn., 83, 94, 106. 107 
West, Ralph, 82, 87, 91, 93, 115 
West, Thos., 90, 96, 97, 110, 111 
Weste, Wm., 83, 84 
Westlee, Jn., 180 
Westiey, Robt, 28 
Weston, Wm., 186 
Wether»field, Hugh de, 156, 157, 164, 

167, 170 
Wethesham, Gerard, 180 
Weyland, 872 



404 



INDEX NOMINUM. 



Weylftnd, Wm., 101, 102 
Weymark, 227 
Whalenworthe, Peter, 197 
Whekinthem, Jn., 176 
Whetaueroii, Laur., S 
White, Hen., 292 
White, Jn., 278, 279 
Whitehead, Hen., 291 
Whitfylde, Nich., 82 
Whitfyld. Reginald, S 
Whittell, Jn., 41 
Wigenale, Wm., 214 
Wigor, 276 

WiTcocks, Klizh. M., 288 
Wiloockn, W. W., ik 
Wilkes, Jn.. 847 
Wilkinson, JaR , 282 
WiUan, Robt, 18 
Willeby, Margaret, 195 
Willes, Thos.. 42 
William ii., 808 
William, Rubt, 378 
William, Roger. 184 
Wm. the Elder. 156 
Williamson, Antony, 215 
Willington, Hen., 188 
Willninton, Prior of, 182 
Wilson. Rich., 6 
Wingfylde. Anthony, 20 
Winter. Thos.. 290 
Winterflood, 224 
Winthrops, 224 
Wintroppe, Jn., 89 
Wiseman, Mr., 294 
Withfeilde, Jordan, 194 
Wlnoth, Ralph, 269 
Wodehouse, Constance, 232 
Wodebouse, Hen., 232, 238 
Wodehouse, Jn., 288 
Wodehouse, Roger, 233 
Wolno, Mary, 237 
Wolno, Wm., 237 
WolL Rich, the, 162 



Wolfe, General, 68 

Woleey, Cardina], 215, 250 

Wolsey, Elit, 78 

Wolaey, Joen, 77 

Woleey, Jn., 78 

Woleey, Robert, 77, 78 

Woleey, Thoe., 77 

Wood, A. H. E., 50 

Wood, J., 64 

Woode, Giles, 24 

Woods, Ernest, 867 

Woodstock, Robert of, 152, 154, 155, 159, 

162 
Wootton, Wm., 21 
Worthington, Mr., 88 
Wothers, Wm., 6 
Wragg, Chris., 291 
Wren, Jn., 284 
WridwelL Thos., 178, 196 
Wright, Jn., 289 
Wright, Robt, 111 
Wryte, Robt., 88. 89 
Wrytt, Robt, 114 
Wnlf, Rich., 160 
Wulleman, Edw.. 807 
WuWenden, Jaoobus, 8 
Wyffyn, Wm., 84, 106 
Wygenhall, Jn. of, 156, 157, 161, 165 
Wykes, IsabelU, 197 
Wyleby, Margt, 178 
Wyndbam, Lady, 125 
Wyndham, Mr., 116, 118, 119, 120, 124 
Wyndowt, Elizh., 82 
Wyndowte (Windout), Jn., 88, 89. 90, 

91, 94, 95, 97, 98, 101, 108, 104, 106, 118 
Wynne, W. A. S., 874 
Wynter, Thos., 18 
Wynwod, Christian, 105 
Wythesfield, Jordan, 177 

Yell, 224 

Zincke, B„ 244 



N*^ 



nwoctu 



PROCEEDINGS 









AND 




ESTABLISHED 1848, 



VOLUME XL PART L 



FBINTKD FOR THK 8O0IKTT BY 
W. B. HARRISON, THB ANCIENT HOUSB PRKK8, IPSWICH. 

1901. 



CONTENTS. 



PAOB 

Opfiobrs, ii ; List of Mbmbirs, iii — ix ; Sociktibb 15 Union, x ; 
RiTLBS, xi ; Rbport, xii ; Balanob Shbbt, xiy ; Pvbuoations 
RbobivbDi xvi ; Publications, xvii — xviii - i-xviii 

Thb Condition of thb Archdbaoonribs of Suffolk and StTDBURT 

IN THB TBAR 1603 - • - • -1 

A Suffolk Captain of thb timb of Qubbn Elizabbth. 

By CoL J. H, Jonelyn - - - 46 

SuRVBT OF Orfobd Castlb, 1600 - - - - 50 

Thb Funt-Work Inscription on Bltthburoh Church. 

Bj Sir W, R. OouffTB^ m.d., f.r.s, - - - 51 

Annual Excursion, 1901 : — 

Bury St Edmund's^ Little Saxham, Ruhy^ Icklingham^ Stow 

Hall, Worduffll, Ichvorth, Little Saxham - - 59 

Excursion to Littlb Wbnham - - - - 71 

convbrsazionb at ipswlch - - - - 75 

Gild of St. Pbtbr in Bardwbll. Bj F, E. Warren - - 81 

Bardwbll Churchwardbns' Accounts. „ - - 110 

Bardwbll Town Wardbns' Accounts. „ - - 116 

A Prb-Rkformation Village Gild „ - • 134 



ILLUSTRATIONS. 



PAOI 

Orford Cabtlb .... /ronttspieee 

Insobiption ok £. Wall of Bltthburgh Church - iofcuse 51 

Anoixmt British Dbinkinq Cup. Funt Arrow-Hbad - to face 59 

IcKUNGHAM All Saints .... to face ^3 



^ .<J* 



^\ 



''vofxeo 



PROCEEDINGS 



OF THK 



J^nfftlk Institute 0{ ^tthmUtj^ 



AND 



Mnul §iij8it0vg« 




ESTABLISHED 1848. 



VOLUME XL PART 2. 



PRINTBD FOB TBI SOOIKTT BT 
W. B. HARRISON, TETB ANCIBNT H0U8K PRESS, IPSWICH. 

1902. 



CONTENTS. 



FACJt 



Officers, ii ; Libt of Mkmbbrs, iii — ix ; Sociktibs in TTitmii, xj 
RuLBS, xi ; Report, xii ; Balance Sheet, xiv ; Pubucations 

Received, xvi ; Pubucations, xvii — xviii - - i-zviii 

Obituary Notice of the late Lord John Hebvby. 

By Sir Wm. Brampton Gurdon^ M.P. - 149 

Extent of Hadleiqh Manor, 1305. 

By (the late) Lord John Hervty - - 152 

Nomina Villarum, Co. Suffolk, 1316. By F. B. Bedstone - 173 

Neolithic Suffolk. By Edward R, U, Hancox - - 200 

Excursions, 1902: — 

Otlep, IfadUigh, Eer$ey, PoUitad^ Boxford, Auington Hall^ 

and Wenham CantU ^ - - 205 

Otley . - - - - - 205 

BoxFOKD Church ..... 207 

Hadleiqh Church ..... 208 

Hadleiqh . . - - - 209 

Kersey. The Priory - -216 

„ The Church - - - - 218 

PoLSTKAD Church ..... 220 

AssiNQTON Church and the Hall - - - 225 

Ash Booking. By Bev. M, B, Cowell - - 228 

TuDENHAM. By r. B, Redstone - - - 246 

Records of the Sudbury Archdeaconry. By V, B. RedHone - 252 



ILLUSTRATIONS. 



PAG I 

Clotb Wbavxr'8 Houbk, Kersbt • frontiipiece 

Suffolk NaoLifme Ixpujubnts - to face 201 

„ „ Flint to /ace 203 

Otlbt Hall .... 

„ South Wall - to /ace 207 

Old House, St. Gborok Strbbt, Hadlbiqb - to/acs 209 

Old Gateway, the Placb Farm, Hadlbioh to /ace 211 

Thb Oldb Guildhall^ Hadlbioh - to face 216 

Kerbbt Strbbt from the Church Hill to /ace 217 
Kbrset Church. .... to /ace 219 

Old Guild Hall. Stoeb-bt-Natland to /ace 225 
Abhbockino Old Hall .... to /ace 231 

Old House at Ashbocrino to face 233 

Ashbookino Church. Exterior to face 236 

„ Interior to /ace 239 



t^Jtux 206 \i 



" '--t.; 



PROCEEDINGS [i^::;-| 

OP THB 



gatural gistonu 




ESTABLISHED MARCH, 1848. 



VOLUME XL PART 3. 



PRINTED FOR THE SOCIETY BY 

W. E. HARRISON, THE AN'CIENT HOUSE PRESS. 

IPSWICH. 



1903. 



CONTENTS. 



U: r • iERs> ii ; List ok Members, iii— ix ] Societies in Union, x ; 
Rur^s, xi ; Report, xiii ; Balance Sheet, xiv ; Pubucations 
Received, xvi ; Publications, xvii — xviii - . i-xviii 

•». . >RDS of the Sudbury Archdeaconry. By V, B. Eedstone. 

11. Terriers and Surveys - - - 267 

W .'^iS ON Suffolk Castles. By Vincent B. Bedstone - 301 

liM jhley Castle and its Park - - - 301 

i] 1" H Castle ..... 308 

!..'. ."INGHAM College and Castle, 1562 - . - 315' 

X'' OP THE Marine Mollusca Recorded as found in Suffolk. 

By Bev. Carieton Greene, m.a. - - - 320 

:8 ON some East Suffolk Neoliths. 

By William A, Dutt - - - - 326 

*':/ jTHic Suffolk. By Edmird B. I/. Ilancox - 335 

' .0 IN 0- British Pottery, near Ipswich. 

* By Johti Shewell Corder - - - 337 

i J, :sT0FT China Factory. By Heyiry C. Casley - - 339 

*Kx • RSioNS, 1903:— 

Needhani Market^ Ilauifhley, Wctherden, and Lowestoft and 

its Neighbourhood - - • - 370 

Nij >nAM Market - - - - -371 

f.» ;hlky Church - . . . . 371 

\V iKRDKN Church - . . . . 371 

L stoft and its Nkighuouuhood - . • 373 



ILLUSTRATIONS. 



The Hall, Haughley Park 

Ea8T Suffolk Neoliths 

NTeolithic Suffolk 

Neolithic Implement found at Ipswich in 1902 

Romano British Pots pound at Ipswich 

Lowestoft China — Blue Painted underolaze 

Lowestoft China — Enamel Painting 

joWBSToPT China — Enamel Painted Tea and Coffee Service to face i^ 

!iOWFSTOFT China — Japan Patterns and Miscellaneous to face c '• 

liOWESTOFT China — Dated and Inscribed Pieces - to face 'v-.l 



froniis^ 


1 k B 

•V- '<f 


to face 


32 'i 


to face 


;35 


to face 


33G 


to face 


j:<8 


to face 


'MV2 


to face 


:Jt)-r 



-5tr i '-> -'•-■'3 



/c ; 






v^. 



r 



1