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Full text of "Proceedings"

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CJie Institution of glec^anital ^nginters. 



GENERAL INDEX 



TO 



PEOCEEDINGS. 



1885-1900. 



By AlTHORITY OF THJ CoCXCIL. 




PUBLISHED BY THE IXSTITUTIOX, 

Storey's Gate, St. James's Park, Westminsteb, S."W. 



The right of Publication and of Translation is reserved. 



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Note. — In the Index the Papers are entered under their subject headings, with 
details of their contents and of the discussions upon them. As far as possible 
similar subject headings are grouped together for reference. 

Under Members' names are given any particulars of their connection with the 
Institution during the sixteen years comprised in the Index : followed by a list 
of subjects with which they were concerned either as authors of Papers or as 
speakers in discussions. The headings of the subjects thus enumerated are so 
arranged as to indicate where fuller details may be found. 

Cross references are added to the subjects of the Papers, and to other subjects 
in the discussions, &c. 

The references are to the Year and Page in the Proceedings, — as 1896, 279. 
For each Paper the year is given only at the commencement, immediately 
preceding the first page reference. 



C^e Institution cf ^etljanical (gnginctrs 



GENERAL INDEX 



PROCEEDINGS. 



1885-1900. 



Arady, J., elected Associate Member, 1896, 279 : — transferred to Member, 

1900, 184. 
Abbott, A. H., elected Member, 1890, 297. 

Abbott AND Co., Thomas, Xewark Boiler Works, Newark, 1885, 435, 448. 
Abbreviated Distixctive Titles for membership &c., 1890, 31. 
Abbreviatioxs foe Metric Uxtits, 1900, 393. 
Abel, Sir F. A., Bart., K.C.B., Baronetcy, 1894, 3, 22. 

Carbon in Steel, Final Report on experiments bearing upon the question 
of the Condition in which Carbon exists ia Steel, 1885, 30. — Remarks 
thereon, 55. 
Abella, J., elected Associate Member, 1896, 462. 
Abeexetht, J., decease, 1897, 5. — Memoir, 1896, 90. 
AcCLES, W. S., elected Member, 1894, 169. 
AccorxTAXT. See Auditor. 

Accouxt Diagrams, 1897, 499. See Diagram Accounts. 
AccorxTS, Abstract of receipts and expenditure, 1885, 4, 10-13 ; 1886, 4, 8-11 ; 

1887,5, 12-15; 1888, 5, 10-13; 1889, .5, 10-13; 1890, 5. 12-15; 1891, 5, 

10-13; 1892, 5, 10-13; 1893, 5, 12-15; 1894, 6, 10-13; 1895, 5, 10-13; 

1896, 5, 12-15; 1897, 6, 12-15; 1898, 7, 14-17; 1899, 8, 14-18; 1900, 

7-8, 14-17, 18-21, 22. 
AcccMTLATORS, Electric, 1885. See Private Electric Lighting. 
AcFTELD, W. C, elected Associate Member. 1898, 142. 
AcKLAM Iron Works, Middlesbrough, 1893, 344. 
AcLAND, C. T. D., Automatic Machine-Gun, 1885, 184. 

A 2 



AcLAND, Capt. F. E. D., elected Member, 1892, 1. 

Adams, A. E., elected Associate Member, 1900, 96. 

Adams, E., elected Member, 1897, 255. 

Adams, G., elected Associate Member, 1896, 462. 

Adams, S. K., elected Graduate, 1892, 2 : — transferred to Associate Member, 

1898, 5. 
Adams, W. A., decease, 1897, 5.— Memoir, 1896, 91. 

Tube-Frame Eailway Wagons. 1890, 490, 517. 
Adamsox, C. J., elected Jlcmber, 1900, I. 

Adamsox, D., elected Vice-President, 1885, 22 ; 1888, 29 ; 1890, 26.— Decease, 
1890, 26, 28 ; 1891, 4.— Memoir, 1890, 167. 

Automatic Macbine-Gun, 1885, 186. 

Automatic Sluice, 1888, 296. 

Brewery Tramways and Rolling Stock, 1888, 342, 

By-laws, 1889, 32. 

Canadian Locomotives, 1887, 238, 255. 

Dredging Clyde Estuary, 1887, 397. 

Forth Bridge, 1887, 302, 311. 

Forth Bridge Machinery, 1887, 318. 

Friction Experiments, 1885, 65; 1888, 196. 

Frictional Gearing, 1888, 368. 

Lancashire and Stationary-Engine Boilers, 1891 534. 

3Iarine-Engine Trials, 1889, 269. 

Petroleum Fuel in Locomutivcs, 1889, 76. 

Spherical Engine, 1885, 110. 

Testing Machine, 1888, 226. 

Triple-Expansion Engines, 1886, 519. 

A'ote of thanks to President for Address, 1889, 232. 
"Warp Weaving, 1889, 494. 
Adamsox, D., elected ^Member, 1897, 255. 
Adamson, J., Authority for Borrowing, 1896, 27. 

Boiler-Shell Drilling :\Iachines, 1894, 517. 

By-laws, 1891, 36 ; 1894, 24. 

Electric Lighting Works, 1894, 311. 

Oxygen Manufacture, 1890, 146. 

Secretary's Eetirement, 1897, 280. 

Steam Nawj', 1885, 364. 
Adamson, T. A., elected Member, 1886, 1.— Decease, 1894, 4. 

Eoller Flour Milling, 1889, 183. 
Adamsox and Co., Joseph, Boiler AVorks, Hyde, 1894, 432. 
Addenbrooke, G. L., Qnick-Eevolution Engines, 1897, 353. 
Addis, F. H., elected Graduate, 1885, 305. 



Address by Bishop of Lincoln, 1885, 306, 434 
Addresses of Presidents (chronologically) : — 

1885. Jeremiah Head, Lincoln, 309. 

1886. Jeremiah Head, London, 275. 

1887. Edward H. Carbutt, London, 163. 

1888. Edward H. Carbutt, London, 21. 

1888. Edward H. Carbutt, Dublin, 272. 

1889. Charles Cochrane, London, 208. 

1890. Joseph Tomlinson, London, 181. 
1892. Dr. William Anderson, London, 106. 

1894. Professor Alexander B. W. Kennedy, London, 174. 

1896. E. Windsor Kichards, London, 106. 

1897. E. Windsor Richards, Birmingham, 258. 

1898. Samuel Waite Johnson, London, 149. 

1899. Sir William H. White, London, 153. 
Addresses of Presidents (alphabetically) : — 

Anderson, Dr. William, F.R.S., at Spring meeting, 1892, 106. — Recent 
deceases of Members, 106. — Progress and present state of Institution, 107 ; 
table showing record of progress from commencement, 108 ; adverse 
criticism, 107; research committees, 110; reference index of engineering 
literature. 111 ; constitution of Council, 111. — Introduction of new warlike 
appliances, 112; difficulties, 113; smokeless explosive, 114; new 
inventions, 114 ; stores, uniform and interchangeable, 115 ; drawings and 
gauges, 116; proof of guns, 116. — Financial arrangements of Ordnance 
Factories, 117; capital, 117; depreciation, 118; piece-work, 119 ; stores, 
production and keeping, 119; annual expenditure, 121. — Composition of 
steel, 123. — Petroleum for illumination, 125 ; as a source of power, 126 ; as 
a lubricant, 127; composition of, 128; oil-bearing regions, 129. 

Bramwell, Sir F., Vote of thanks to President for Address, 131 ; 
artillery and small arms, 132 ; pressures in modern ordnance, 132 : 
petroleum for motive power, 132. — Carbutt, E. H., Seconded vote of 
thanks, 133; research committees, 134; advantage of criticism, 134. — 
Anderson, Dr. W., Reply to vote of thanks, 135. 
CARBrTT, Edward H., at Spring meeting, 1887, on Fifty Years' Progress in 
Gun flaking, 163. — Progress made during past fifty years in art, science, 
and manufacture, 163. — Prosperity of nation dependent on defensive 
power, 163.— Value of British ships and of freight carried annually, 164. 
— Cast-iron guns, 164; want of accuracy in shooting, 165 ; manipulation, 
165. — Steel guns, 165; rifling, 165; breech loading, 165; working by 
hydraulic power, 165. — Breech-loading steel guns hooped with wrought- 
iron coils, 166. — Best pitch and form of rifling, and best length and shape 
of projectile, 166. — Compressed-steel for guns, 167. — Penetration of shot 



6 A 

Addresses of Presidents (alphabttieally, continued) : — 

Caebutt, Edward H., at Spring meeting, 1887 (continued), 
from 9-;nch gun, 168. — Appliances for working guns, 1G8; disappearing 
gun-carriages, 169; turrets, 169. — Wire gun, 169. — Yavasstur's naval 
gun-carriage, 170. — Royal Gun Factory, Woolwich, 170. — Comparison of 
guns in 1837 and 1887, 170.— Testing of 110-ton gun, 172. — Accuracy 
of shooting with 9* 2-inch breech-loading gun, 172; influence of increased 
velocity on accuracy of aim at distance, 172. — Armament of " Benbow" 
and "Colossus," 173. — Quick-firing machine-guns, 174; Gardner, 174; 
Nordenfelt, 17."); Maxim, 175; Catling, 175 ; Hotchkiss, 175. — Report of 
U.S. select committee on ordnance, 176. — Means of supply of guns, 177. — 
Growth of Woolwich Arsenal from 1837 to 1887, 177.— Els wick Works, 
178.— Whitworth Works, 179. — Production and supply of steel forgings, 
179. — Working of steel ingots, 180. — Hydraulic forging presses, 181.— 
Projectiles for piercing compound armour, 182 ; cost of trials, 182. 

Woods, E., Vote of thanks to President for Address, 183.— Bell, Sir L., 
Bart., Seconded vote of thanks, 184; cost of firing per ton of shot, 
184 ; extent of compression of fluid steel, 184.— Carbutt, E. H., Reply to 
vote of thanks, 185; expense of firing shots, 185; contraction of fluid- 
com pressed steel, 185. 
Caijbitt, Edward H., at Annual General meeting, 1888, 21. — Position of 
Institution, 21. — Honours conferred on Members, 21. — Remarks on papers, 
22. — Research Committees, 24. — Edinburgh Summer Meeting, 25. — 
National defences, necessity fur eflScient guns, -5. — Protection of coaling 
stations, 26. — Means of obtaining proper supply of guns, 26. — Report of 
Lord Morley's committee on organisation of manufacturing departments 
of army, 27. — Reorganisation of Woolwich, and necessity for mechanical 
head, 27. — Stock of workshop useable stores, 28. 
Carbitt, Eiiward H., at Summer meeting, Dublin, 1888, 272. — Summer 
meetings, 272. — Works to be visited in Ireland, 272.— Previous Dublin 
meeting, 273. — Population of Ireland, 274. — Emigration, 275. — 
Occupations, 276.— Flax, 276. — Live stock, and exports to Great Britain, 
277. — Meat supply to England, 277. — Agricultural machines, 278. — 
Butter, 278.— Eggs, 279.— Mineral production, 279.— Railways, 280; 
amalgamation, 282. — Cost of carriage by sea, by rail, by traction engine, 
and by Lorse, 283. — Deep-sea fishery, 285. — Drainage of land, 286. — Bank 
deposits, 286.— Technical education, 286.— Shipbuilding in Belfast, 288. 

Rosse, Earl of, Vote of thanks to President for Address, 289 ; decline of 
population in Ireland, 289 ; decay of domestic Industrie.", 289 ; comparison 
with England, 289.— Haughton, Rev. Dr., Seconded vote of thanks, 289 ; 
connection of Trinity College, Dublin, with engineering, 289. — Carbutt, 
E. H., Reply to vote of thanks, 291. 



Addbes*es of President? (alphabetically, continned): — 

Cochrane, Charlei*. at Spring meeting, 1889, 208. — Study of steam engine, 
and importance of research now being carried out by Institution, 208. — 
Neglect of economy in land engines and boilers, 209. — Freer exhaust in 
non-compound locomotives, 209. — Comparative merits of compound and 
non-compound locomotives, 210. — Electrical traction, 210. — Endless-rope 
traction for tramways, 211. — Cheaper inland transport, 211 ; development 
of waterways, 211 ; means of propulsion, 211; water-transport in other 
European countries, 212. — Canals immediately needed in England, 212 ; 
government aid for construction, as in India and elsewhere, 213. — 
Engineering progress in Mexico and elsewhere, 214. — Forth bridge, 215. — 
Eiffel tower, 21o. — Lick observatory. 216. — Transport of ships by railway 
in Nova Scotia, 216. — Development of power machinery, 216; hydraulic 
riveting at Forth bridge, 217 ; dispensing with accumnlators, 217. — 
Triple-expansion marine engines, 218. — Steering by steam power, 218. — 
Self-recording sounding apparatus, 219. — Mechanical improvements in 
railway working, 219. — Sanitary arrangements of towns and houses, 220 ; 
sewerage of Lincoln, Eastbourne, and Bournemouth, 220. — Imperfections 
of London drainage system, 221. — River pollution at New York, 221 ; 
perfect drainage of Pullman near Chicago, 221 ; hydro-pneumatic drainage 
at Houses of Parliament, 222. — Waste of coal in open fire-grates, 223 ; 
smoke and dust in atmosphere. 223. — Water-supply of large towns, 224. — 
Water purification by spongy iron, 224. — Economies in blast-furnace 
practice, 225. — Progress in iron manufacture since 1786, 225. — Early 
boring of cylinders, 226. — Pig iron for large and small castings, 227. — 
Proving cast-iron pipes, 227. — Aluminium in alloy with iron, 227. — 
Superfluous conditions in specifications. 22S. — Testing of iron, 228. — 
Deterioration of wrought-iron by rain water, 229. — Decay of wooden 
spears in pumping shaft, 229. — Desirable improvement in patent system, 
230. — Conversion of arable land into pasture, 231. — Mechanical 
engineering and legislation, 231. 

Carbutt, E. H., Tote of thanks to President for Address, 232; 
development of Mexico, 232 ; government aid for canals, 232 ; scope for 
railway and sanitary engineering work, 232. — Adamson, D., Seconded 
Tote of thanks, 232; underground rope traction for tramcars, 233. — 
Cochrane, C, Reply to vote of thanks, 233. 

Head, Jereml\h, at Summer meeting, Lincoln, 1885, 309. — Relative 
advantages of Iron and Steel, Slft.^Rails and tyres, 311. — Shipbuilding, 
313 : superiority of steel for ship-building purposes, 313 ; interests of 
shipowners and underwriters, 314 ; progress of steel ship-building, 314 ; 
reduction allowed by Lloyd's in weight of steel scantlings, 315 ; resistance 
to compression, 315 ; rigid inspection, 315 ; reduction allowed is too great, 



8 A 

Addresses of Presidents (alphabetically, continued) : — 

Head, Jeremiah, at Summer meeting, Lincoln, 1885 (continued). 

316; virtual exclusion of Bessemer basic steel, 317. — Bridges and roofs, 
318: qualities essential in material, 318; elastic limit in tension of iron 
bridge-plates, 319. — Boilers, 319: employment of mild steel, 319; high 
tensile strength required by Lloyd's and Board of Trade surveyors, 320 ; 
boilers other than marine, 320.— Rolling stock, 321. — Railway sleepers, 
321 : objections to timber sleepers, 322 ; cost of timber sleepers, 323. — 
Bar-iron, 324. — Rolled joists, 325. — Castings, 325 : relative cost of steel 
and iron castings, 326 ; advantages of iron castings, 327 ; cast-iron wearing 
surfaces, 327. — Forgings, 328 : complicated parts machined into form, 328 ; 
soft steel blooms, 328; gun and rifle barrels, 329. — Locomotive crank- 
axles, 329 : precautions to prevent breakage, 330 ; Board of Trade returns. 
330; strains on crank-pins of crank-axles. 331. — Heavy shafting, 332. — 
Steam-hammer piston-rods, 332. — Homogeneity and tearing, 333 : effect of 
cinder in wrought-iron plate, 334 ; Landore steel plate, 331 ; steel test- 
pieces, 335. — Smith work, 335 : welding of steel, 335. — Behaviour of steel 
at non-luminous temperatures, 33G. — Corrosion, 338 : coating with paint, 
338 ; relative liability to corrosion of wrought-iron and steel, 338 ; 
Admiralty investigation into marine-boiler corrosion, 339; conclusions 
arrived at, 340 ; Mr. W. Parker's experiments, 340 ; wire fencing of iron 
and of steel, 341 ; corrosion of painted surfaces, 342 ; suggestions for 
protection of surfaces, 343. — Summary of conclusions, 344. 

Head, J,, INIodification of views with respect to steel and iron ship- 
building, 344 ; annealing of steel castings, 345.— Clarke, F. J., Mayor of 
Lincoln, Vote of thanks to President for Address, 345 ; use of steel 
instead of wood for sleepers, 346.— Clayton, N,, Seconded vote of thanks, 
:)4(j. — Head, J., Reply to vote of thanks, 346. 

Appendix to Address, 346.— Criticisms by Messrs. Martell and Parker, 
and replies, 347-8. 
Head, Jerejiiah, at Summer meeting, Loudon, 1886, 275. — Depression of 
trade, 275. — Over-production, 276. — Conditions determining market-prices, 
276. — Limitation of production, 277. — Relation of mechanical engineers to 
over-production, 277. — Facilities for cheap production by improved 
mechanism, 277. — Illustrations from works visited at recent meetings, 278 : 
cycles, 278 ; agricultural machinery, 278 ; steam navvy, 279. — Watch- 
making, 279. — American Waltham watches, 280. — Swiss watches, 281. 
— American competition in bridge-building, 281. — Production and 
consumption, 282. — Foreign competition in neutral markets, 283. — 
Future effect of exports on national industry, 283 : exportation of 
agricultural machinery, 283 ; of ships, 284 ; of coal, 284 ; of machinery for 
foreign factories, 285. — Iron and steel works in Spain, 285.— English 



Addresses of Presidents (alphabetically, continued) : — 

Head, Jeremiah, at Summer meeting, London, 1886 (continued), 
engineers in foreign works, 285.— Hungarian roller- milling of com, 286.— 
Government control of exports, 28G.— Conditions determining localisation 
of trades, 287.— Relation between over-production and mechanical 
progress, 287.— Influence of wastefulness on depression of trade, 288.— 
Wastefulness in conducting the business of the state, 288.— Railway rat.s, 
289 ; cost of making railways, 289.-Dr. Franklin's remarks on taxes, 
290. -Losses occurring through strikes, 290.— Pauperism and the poor-law 
system, 290.— Poor-rates should be national instead of local, 291.— State 
employment of the otherwise unemployed, 291.— Immoralities causing 
trade depression, 291.— Relation of over-production to producer and to 
consumer, 292.— Increased purchasing power of money, 293.— Revival 
of trade, 293. — Royal Commission on depression of trade and 
industry, 294. 

Rennie, G. B., Vote of thanks to President for Address, 294 ; main 
cause of depression in trade is over-production, 294.— Carbutt, E. H., 
Seconded vote of thanks, 295; cheaper production of manufactured 
articles, 295; increased taxation, 296.— Head, J., Reply to vote of 
thanks, 296. 
Johnson, Samuel Waite, at Spring meeting. 1898, 149.— Railway progress, 
especially of the Midland Railway, 149.— Labour-saving appliances, 150 ; 
increased employment of manual labour, and increased trade, 151 ; 
periodical variation in traffic, 151.— Passenger traffic, periods of prosperity 
and depression, 152.— Goods and mineral traffic, 153.— Train mileage, 
153.— Financial progress, 154.— Cost of power, 155; mileage of engines, 
155; drivers' and firemen's wages, 156; total rates for power, 157.— 
Locomotive expenditure, 157.— Distance run and speed, 158.— Locomotive 
stock, 159; six types of engines, 160.— Locomotive construction, 161 ; 
durability of various parts, 162 ; high steam-pressure, 163.— Compounding, 
164.— Fuel consumption, 164.— Carriages and wagons, 165 ; bogie trucks, 
and size of wheels, 166; express dining trains, 166; objections to long 
heavy wagons, 166.— Brakes, &c.. 167.— Additional lines, and signalling, 
168; length of lines open for traffic, 168.— Permanent way, 168; gauge, 
169.— Electric locomotion, 170.— Tabulated btatistics, 171-200.- -Rails 
and chairs, 201-3. 

Galton, Sir D., Early reminiscence prior to railways, 204 ; Midland 
Railway pioneer of progress, 2it4 ; American railway practice, 205 ; electric 
locomotion, 206; vote of thanks to President for Address, 206.— Kennedy, 
A. B. W., Seconded vote of thanks, 206 ; relation between horse-powtr- 
hours and train-mile, 207.— Johnson, S. W., Reply to vote of thanks, 207 ; 
advantages of electric working of railways, 208. 



10 A 

Addresses of Presidents (alphabetically, continued): — 

Kennedy, Professor Alexander B. W., LL.D., F.R.S., at Spring meeting, 
1894, 174. — Engineering practice in England and abroad, 174. — Electrical 
engineering dependent on mechanic.il, 175. — Uses of electricity : physico- 
chemical processes, power, lighting, 176. — Transmission of power, 177. — 
Electric motors for driving tools; percentage of waste work in shafts and 
belts, 178; ditto in motors, 179; absolute and proportionate saving of 
expenditure, 179. — Electrical energy from public mains, 181. — Electric 
traction, 182; low percentage of useful work; electric railways, 183. — 
DiflBculties of electric tramways, 184. — Electric lighting, 186. — Variations 
of output during a year, a week, and a day, 187. — Varying amount of light 
required, 188; variations on two sides of circuit with three-wire system, 
189. — Maximum and minimum loads, 190. — Sizes of units, 191. — Reserve 
of machinery, 192. — Security of lighting, 193. — Breakdown of engines or 
dynamos, 194. — Duplication of steam-pipes, 196. — Reserve in boilers, 197. 
— Feed arrangements, 198. — Security in mains, 198. — EflBeieney of 
regulation, 199. — Steadiness of pressure, 199. — Regulation by field 
resistance, 200; by stop-valve, 201. — Economy of working, 202. — Causes 
of loss, 203. — Cost of oil, water, and stores, 205. — Ratio of electrical to 
indicated horse-power, 206. — Losses in leads and in transformers, 207. — 
Ratio of actual load to full load, 2(i8. — Electrical measurements with 
continuous and with alternating currents, 209. 

Bramwell, Sir F., Vote of thanks to President for Address, 210; 
electric lighting, 210; driving of tools by electricity, 211. — Anderson, 
Dr. W., Seconded vote of tljanks, 212. — Motion carried, 212. — Kennedy, 
A. B. W., Reply to vote of thanks, 212. 
Richards, E. Windsor, at Spring meeting, 1896, 106. — Manufacture of 
iron and steel, lOG. — Blast-furnace practice; competition of foreign 
countries, 107. — British productions and blast-furnaces, 109; Cleveland 
district, 109; working of blast-furnaces at Eston, 110; at Jarrow-on- 
Tvne, 111; at Middlesbrough, 112; at Cardiff, 113.— American blast- 
furnaces, 113; large productions of iron, 114: water-boxes for preserving 
bosh lines, 114; reduction in size of furnace bricks; size of hearth and 
bush ; effect of rapidity of driving, 115 ; Carnegie's new furuaces and blast 
engines, 116. — Germany and Luxemburg, 117; blast-furnaces at Each, 
117; at Uckange and Ruhrort, 118; Krupp's works at Essen, 119; 
Hoesch's blast-furnaces at Dortmund, 120. — France, 122 ; Ferry's furnaces 
at Micheville, 123. — Belgium, 125; Cockerill furnaces, 125; La 
Providence, 127.— Cost of fuel, 127. — Iron ores, 128.— Railway rates, 
128.— Labour cost, 128. 

Laird, W., Vote of thanks to President for Address, 130 ; foreign 
competition, 131.— Head, J., Seconded vote of thanks; enterprise of 



11 



Addresses of Presidents (alphabetically, ccntinued) : — 

EiCHARDS, E. WixDsoK, at Spring meeting, 1896 (continued), 
foreign manufacturers, 132. — Richards, E. W., Eeply to vote oi 
thanks, 133. 

Richards, E. Windsor, at Jubilee Summtr meeting. Birmingham, 1897, 258 . 
— Address to the Queen, 258. — Objects and establishment of the 
Institution, 259. — First President, Vice-Presidents, and Council, 260.— 
Papers by the first President, 2G1. — Cummencemeut of peripatetic 
Summer Meetings, 262. — Table showing progress from commencement, 
263. — List of SuDLmer Meetings, 2C4. — Half-century of Presidents, 261- 
275. — House for Institution, 275. — Jubilee honours ; Library, 276. 

Williams, R., Vote of thanks to President for Address; original 
member, 276 ; early days of Institution, 277. — Carbutt, Sir E. H., Bart., 
Seconded vote of thanks, 278. — Richards, E. W., Reply to vote of 
thanks, 278. 

ToMLiNsox, Joseph, at Spring meeting, 1890, 181. — Railway Locomotion, 181. 
— Stockton and Darlington Railway, 182 ; early goods engines, 182-5; 
passenger engines, 185-6; working of engines, 186-S; passenger trains, 
188, 190 ; Stockton and Darlington Railway, 1836 time-table, 189. 
— Clarence Railway, 190. — Development of railways and locomotives, 
191-3; chief features of improvements, 19o-'J. — Rails, 196-7. — Bridges, 
197-8.— Stations, 198. 

Exhibition of photographs and time-tables, 199. — Carbutt, E. H, Vote 
of thanks to President for Address, 199; early days of railways, 199; 
experience of President with locomotives, 200. — Anderson, Dr. W., 
Seconded vote of thanks, 200 ; railway and locomotives at Royal Arsenal, 
Woolwich, 200-1.— Riches, T. H., Supported vote of thanks, 201.— 
Tomlinson, J., Reply to vote of thanks, 201. 

White, Sir William H., K.C.B., LL.D., D.Sc, F.R.S., at Spring meeting, 
1899, on the Connection between Mechanical Engineering and modem 
Shipbuilding, 153. — Former Presidents representing marine tngtneering, 
153. — Tonnage of steamships and of sailing ships, 154. — Number and 
tonnage of ships built in 1898, 154. — Disappearance of sailing ships, 154.— 
Change from wood to iron, and from iron to steel, and increase in average 
size, 155. — Causes of present British supremacy, 155 ; impending renewal 
of competition, 156. — Mechanical engineering in the shipyard; manual 
labour for wood shipbuilding, 158; modern machinery and labour-saving 
appliances, 159; machine-tools for early iron shipbuilding, 160 ; hydraulic 
machinery, 160; electrical, 161; pneumatic, 161; economy in weight and 
labour, 162 ; working of steel plates, 163 ; principal machines now in use, 
163. — Mechanical engineering on board ship, 164 ; first sea-going ironclad, 
164; mercantile marine, 165. — Steering, 165. — Capstan.*, windlasses, and 



12 



Addresses of Presidents (alphabetically, continued) : — 

AVhite, Sir William H., K.C.B., LL.D., D.Sc, F.R.S., at Spring meeting, 
1899 (continued), 
cable gear, 167. — Ventilation, 1G8. — Internal lighting, 169. — Pumping, 169. 
— Lifting appliances, 170. — Refrigeration, 173. — Mechanical engineering 
in warships, 174; auxiliary services, and coal consumption, 174; guns, 
construction and working, 175 ; manual power or mechanical appliances. 
176; rapidity of firing guns, 177; torpedoes, 177; boats, and special 
lifting appliances, 178; rapidity of coaling, workshops and machine-tools, 
178; " Vulcan " floating factory, 179. 

Carbutt, Sir E. H., Bart., Re-construction of British navy by President, 
180 ; vote of thanks to President for Address, 181.— Pirrie, Et. Hon. W. J., 
Seconded vote of thanks, 181 ; pneumatic riveting, 182 ; continual progress 
in shipbuilding, 182. — White, Sir W. H., Continuous improvements in 
engineering, 182; new house of Institution, 183; reply to vote of 
thanks, 183; decease of Mr. Jeremiah Head, Past-President, 184. 

Addy, G., elected Member. 1889, 346. 
Alloys Research, 1891, 601. 
Milling Cutters, Paper on Milling Cutters, 1890, .")28.— Remarks thereon, 

.■)38, 549. 
Rock Drills, 1891, 165. 

Adiassewich, a. v., elected Associate Member, 1898, 546. 

Adhhralty Experimental Works, Haslar, 1893, 32. See Ship-Model Apparatus. 

Aer.\ted W.\ter Manikactories, Belfast, 1888, 42"); 1896, 439, 4.54. Dublin, 
1888, 411, 412. 

^tna Edge-Tool Works, Sheffield, 1890, 442, 463. 

African Coal, 1890, 112. See Coal Burning on Cape Railways. 

Agricultural Hall, Kensington, 1886, 423. 

Agricultural Machinery, 1885, 434, 437-47. 

Agriculture, Conversion of Arable land into Pasture, 1889, 231. 

Ahmed Bey, Colonel, elected Member, 1887, 473. 

Ahrbecker, H. C. v., elected ^lember, 1891, 1. 

Ahrons, E. L., elected Associate ^Member, 1895, 328 : — transferred to Member , 
1898, 548. 

AiNLET, H., elected Member. 1893, 1. 

Air, Compressed or Exhausted, for power supply, Paris, 1889, 546, 552, 557. 

Air Meter, 1891, 152. See Rock Drills. 

Air Pump, Edwards, 1899, 228. See Evaporative Condensers. 

AiSBiTT, M. W., elected Member, 1886, 270. 

AiTKEN, H. W., elected Member, 1900, 96. 

Aitken, T., Marine-Engine Trials, 1889, 256. 

Aitken, T. M., elected Associate Member, 1900, 96. 



A 13 

AiTON, J. A., elected Member, 1900, 1. 

Akers, C. H., elected Member, 1898, 2. 

Albaret, a. B., decease. 1892, 3.— Memoir, 1891, 605. 

Albrecht, J. A., elected Graduate, 1898, 342 : — Associate Member, 1900, 90. 

Albright, J. F., elected Member, 1886, 125. 

Alcock, a. E., elected Graduate, 1895, 2 : — Associate Member, 1900, 502. 

Alder, G. F., elected Associate Member, 1899, 293. 

Aldersok, C. a. H., elected Graduate, 1893, 98 :— Associate Member, 1900, 502. 

Alderson, G. a., elected Graduate 1890, 299 : — transferred to Associate Member 

1897, 4. 
Alderson, G. B.. elected Member, 1885, 462. 
Aldwarke Main Colliery, Eotherbam, 1890, 442, 446, 468. 
Alexander, E. D., Graduate transferred to Member, 1887, 3. 
Alexander, J. G., elected Associate Member, 1899, 293. 
Alexandra Grain Warehovse, Liverpool, 1891, 372, 428. See Grain 

Warehousing Machinery. 
Allan, A., decease, 1892, 3.— Memoir, 1891, 289. 

Spherical Eccentric, 1885, 429. 
Allan, F. \V., elected Graduate, 1897, 257. 
Allan, G., Jun., elected Graduate, 1897, 434. 
Allan, E., elected Member, 1898, 340. 

Allcard, H., elected Graduate, 1885, 305 : — transferred to Member, 1888, 3. 
Allen, A. E., decease, 1894, 4.— Memoir, 1893, 489. 
Allen, C. E., elected Associate, 1900, 508. 
Allen, F., Graduate transferred to Member, 1895, 3. 
Allen, J. E., elected Associate Member, 1897, 256. 
Allen, M., elected Member, 1891, 196. 
Allen, E. W., elected Member, 1900, 355. 

Throttling and Variable Expansion, 1895, 196. 
Allen, W. H., elected Member, 1885, 305. 

NaTal Electrical Apparatus, 1892, 277. 
Allen and Sons, David, Printing Works, Belfast, 1888, 426 ; 1896, 436. 
Alley, S., decease, 1899, 6.— Memoir, 1898, 132. 
Alley, S. E., elected Member, 1899, 473. 

Alley and MacLellan, Sentinel Engine AVorks, Glasgow, 1895, 466, 486. 
Alliott, J. B., Manchester Drainage Works, 1894, 399. 
Allott, C. S., elected Member, 1891, 196. 
Alloys Eeseaech, Committee, 1890, 6 .—1892, 7 :— 1893, 7 :— 1894, 7 .—1896, 

7:— 1897, 7:— 1898, 8 :— 1899, 10:— 1900, 8. 
Alloys Eesearch, First Eeport to the Alloys Eesearch Committee, by W. C. 

Eoberts- Austen, 1891, 543. — The properties of the elements are a periodic 

function of their atomic weights, 543. — Two varieties of pure iron, soft 



14 



Alloys Research, First Report, 1891 (continued) : — 

and hard, 543. — Influence of foreign ingredients on softness and hardness, 
544:. — Pyrometer, 546. — Le Chatelier's thermo-electric pyrometer, 547 ; 
graduation, 549. — Photographic curves of heating and cooling, 551. — 
Liquation of silver-copper alleys, or separation of their more fusible 
constituents, 555. — Eutectic or most fusible alloy, 556. — Photographic 
curves of cooling of silver, and of silver-copper alloy, 557 ; of steel. 5.')8. 
— Etfect of small quantities of impurity on freezing point of gold, 558 ; 
mode of conducting experiments, 561 ; atomic fall, 5G2 ; effect of bismuth, 
562 ; of platinum, silicon, and manganese, 563 ; of aluminium, and silver, 
564. — Rate of cooling in mass of steel, at centre and at outside, when 
cooled in air or by water-spray or in tank of water, 564-6. 

Discussion. — Roberts-Austen, W. C, Action of pyrometer, 567 ; 
relation between atomic volume and effect of impurity added to metal, 
567 ; allotropic states of elements, 568 ; of pure iron, 569 ; of electro- 
deposited iron, 570 : alloys of iron with manganese, 571 ; alloys of copper. 
572. — Anderson, Dr. W., Value of pyrometer for large forgings and gun 
steel, 573 ; liquation of steel, 573 ; effect of severe tension, 574. — Hadfield, 
E. A., Classification of elements forming alloys of iron, 575 ; molecular 
changes are structural rather than chemical, 576 ; suggested classification 
for alloys of iron, 576 ; " water-quenched hardness " in steel is produced 
by carbon, 576; effects of nickel and manganese, 577; of chromium and 
tungsten, 578 ; toughness of chromium steel, 578 ; alloys of iron with 
aluminium and silicon, 579 ; with sulphur, arsenic, copper, and 
phosphorus, 579 ; lead, tin, cobalt, bismuth, 579 ; pyrometer, 580. — 
Howe, H. M., Tenacity and melting point of metal, and atomic volume, 
581 ; accuracy and rapidity of Le Chatelier pyrometer, 582. — Arnold, 
J. O., ^cope of report, 583 ; diflercnt kinds of hardness in steel, 584 ; 
annealing, 585 ; theory of hard and soft iron, 585 ; microscopic research, 
586 ; recalescence, 587 ; autographic recorder, 587. — Stromeyer, C. E., 
Influence of impurities in mild steel, 588 ; bending test, 589 ; radiation 
of heat below freezing point, 590. — Stead, J. E., Combinations in iron 
or steel, 591. — Gray, J. M., Ether-pressure theory, 592; pneumatic 
calking tool, 593. — Roberts- Austen, W. C, Classification of elements 
according to atomic volume, 594; object of alloys research, 596; allotropic 
state of iron, 596 ; autographic records of cooling, 597 ; points of 
recalescence, 598 ; microscopic investigations, 598 ; osmotic pressure, 599. 
— Tomlinson, J., Vote of thanks, 599. — Bagshaw, W., Flowering of cast- 
iron, 600 ; castings free from blow-holes, 600. — Marten, E. B., Analogy 
between vulcanite and iron alloys, 600; value of analogies, 601. — Addy, G., 
Cooling of steel ingot, 601 ; pyrometer, 602. — Kennedy, A. B. W., Latent 
stresses in materials, 602; pyrometer for flue gases, 603. — Roberts- Austen. 



A 15 

Allots Research, First Report, 1891 {Di^cumon, continued) : — 

W. C, Action of sulphur on india-rubber and of carbon on iron, G03 ; 
cooling curves of steel ingot, 603. 

Allots Eesearch, Second Report to the Alloys Research Committee, by W. C. 
Roberts-Austen, 1893, 102. — Possibility that mechanical properties of a 
metal will be influenced by small quantities of added elements in 
proportion to their atomic volumes, 103; thermal capacity, elasticity, 
rigidity, cohesion, 10.3. — Molecular porosity, 106. — Influence of impurities 
on copper, 108. — Tensile tests of copper rods, 109. — Mode of casting pure 
electrolytic copper in thin rods, free from oxidation, 110. — "Working of 
experimental copper-rods, 111. — Hydraulic single-lever testing machine, 
112; appliance for determining limit of elasticity, 113. — TensUe tests 
of pure and variously alloyed copper, 114-8. — Effects of arsenic, 
antimony, and bismuth on copper, 119. — Series of copper-bismuth alloys, 
121 ; autographic curves of cooling, 122 ; higher and lower points of 
solidification in cooling, 122. — Effect of pressure on recalescence of steel, 
124. — Newton's metal, triple alloy of bismuth-lead-tin, 127 ; cooling 
under pressure, 129. — Thermal behaviour of chromium steel, 131. — 
Improved autographic recording pyrometer, 132. — General conclusions, 
134. — Appendix, determination of bismuth in copper, 138; analysis of 
copper fire-box plate, 138. 

Discussion. — Roberts- Austen, W. C, Experiments with palladium and 
gold, illustrating action of thermo-couple and pyrometer, 145 ; effect of 
silver and of aluminium on gold ; curves obtained therefrom, and from 
highly carburized steel, 147-8 ; Osmond's method of plotting curves, 148. 
— Kennedy, A. B. W., Distribution of molecules of elements in mass of 
solvent, 149; modulus of elasticity, 149 ; molecular porosity, 150 ; density 
of allotropic copper, 150 ; conductivity of copper, 151 ; tenacity of copper, 
152. — Arnold, J. O., Law of atomic volumes, 152; effects of chromium, 
tungsten, and silicon, on steel, 153 ; theory of hard iron, 153 ; pyrometric 
testing of steel, 154 ; critical points during cooling of iron and steel, 155 ; 
temperature at which iron crystallizes, 157; influence of hydrogen on 
iron, 158; physical conditions of steel due to carbon, 159. — Hadfield, R. A., 
Theory of hard iron, 160 ; alloys of iron with manganese, nickel, cobalt, 
chromium, tungsten, copper, silicon, and aluminium, 161; tensile tests of 
iron alloyed with carbon and tungsten, 163; carbon alone hardens steel, 
163. — Anderson, Dr. W., Practical information on copper fire-box plates, 
164. — Blount, B., Tensile tests of metals and alloys when heated, 164; effects 
of arsenic, antimony, and bismuth on copper, 166 ; of aluminium and 
nickel, 167 ; electric furnace, 167. — Anderson, Dr. W., Use of spectroscope, 
167. — Watson, Dr. D., Copper fr^e from oxygen, 168 ; tests thereon, 169 ; 
influence of arsenic, antimony, and lead on copper, 170; change due to 



16 A 

Allots Research, Second Report, 1893 (Discug^ion, continued) : — 

increase of temperature, 171 ; arsenic in copper, 172 ; electrical conductivity, 
173 ; tests of locomotive fire-box plates, 173. — Gowland, W., Effect of 
bismuth on silver and on copper, 175; electrical conductivity, 176. — 
Jenkins, H. C, Attempt to mix lead witb copper, 177. — Watson, Dr. D., 
Small percentage of lead in copper, 178. — Beare, T. H., Limit of elasticity 
in copper, and in cast-iron, 178 ; relation between shearing and tensile 
strength of copper, 179; modulus of elasticity, 180; coefBcient of 
contraction, 180; influence of heat on tensile strength, 180; electrical 
conductivities, 181. — Instone, T., Conductivity of soft and hard copper, 181. 
— Gowland, W., Conductivity of pure and impure copper, 181. — Tomlinson, 
J., Mileage of copper fire-boxes and brass tubes, 1 82 ; effect of arsenic, 183. 
— Roberts- Austen, \V. C, Density of electrolytic copper, 184 ; molecular 
porosity, 184 ; relation between modulus of elasticity and atomic volume, 
185 ; hard iron, 180 ; allotropic state of iron, 187 ; action of chromium and 
tungsten on pure iron, 187; phosphorus for de-oxidizing copper, 188; elastic 
limit in copper, 189 ; nickel in copper fire-box plates, 189. — Tomlinson, J., 
Utility of Alloys Research, 190. — Le Chatelier, A., Effects of impurities on 
cast metals, 190; on metals mechanically worked, 191 ; silver alloys, 192; 
result of experiments, 193 ; Aspinall, J. A. F., Analysis of copper fire-box 
plates, 193 ; tensile strength of copper rods and stays, 194 ; annealed copper, 
195. — Roberts- Austen, W. C, Remarks from M. Osmond on significance of 
critical points in cooling curves of iron and steel, 195. — Dean, W., 
Comparison of chemical analyses with electrical conductivity tests of 
copper fire-box plates, 198. 

Alloys Research, Third Report to the Alloys Research Committee, by W. C. 
Roberts-Austen, 1895, 238. — ^Folecular porosity, confirmation in electrolysis 
of glass, 238. — Increased sensitiveness of recording pyrometer, 242. — Action 
of impurities on masses of metal, as revealed by cooling curves of electro- 
iron, 244 ; of aluminium-copper and aluminium-nickel alloys ; of iron- 
aluminium alloys, 245. — Welding of iron and steel, 248. — Anti-friction 
alloys, 250. — Connection of melting point with tenacity, 250 ; and with 
atomic volume, 251 ; effect of bismuth on copper and on gold, 252. — 
Significance of upper and lower freezing points, 253. 

Appendix 1 on the Elimination of Impurities during the process of 
making "Best Selected" Copper, by A. Gibb, 254.— Welsh method of 
smelting copper; partial reduction of metallic copper in roasting; 
metallic copper separated in " bottoms " of moulds, underneath layer of 
vesicular or "spongy regulus" yielding purer copper, 254. — Concentration 
of impurities in bottoms, and proportionate purification of spongy regulus, 
255. — Extent of concentration of tin, 25G ; of antimony, bismuth, arsenic, 
257 ; of nickel, and nickel with arsenic ; of gohl, and silver, 258.— Effect 



17 



Allots Eesearch, Third Report, 1895 (continued). 

of metallic iron on concentration of metals, 2.j0. — Conclusions, practical 
advantageous limit to proportion of copper separated in bottoms, 200. — 
Tabulated results of experiments : percentages of copper and of 

1 contaminating metals in spongy regains and in copper bottoms, 261-5 ; 

concentration of several foreign metals in copper bottoms, 2G6 ; relative 
impurity of copper remaining in spongy regulus, and of copper before 
separation of bottoms, 267. 

Appendix 2 on the Pyrometric Examination of the Alloys of Copper 
and Tin, by A. Stansfield, 269. — Autographic cooling curves of copper-tin 
alloys, 269. — Freezing-points, single to quadruple, according to proportions 
of alloys, 270. — Other physical properties : electromotive force, electrical 
conductivity, 272 ; induction, conductivity for heat, surfusion. 273. — 
Tensile strength and elongation, 27i. — Colour, 27r). — Practical applications 
of cooling curves, 277. — Annealing. 277. — Tenacity, 27S. — Summary of 
results, 278. 

Discussion. — Eoberts-Austen, W. C, Freezing-points of metals shown 
by autographic cooling curves,' 280 ; description of experiment ; 
impurity of metal indicated by surfusion curve. 281 ; melting point and 
tenacity of tungsten-copper alloy, pewter, and other alloys, 282 ; 
electrical pyrometer for high temperatures ; correction of temperatures of 
melting points, 283. — "Wrightson, T., Expansion of cast-iron in melting 
and in solidifying, 283 ; welding of iron and steel, 2S<". — Goodman, J., 
Anti-friction alloys and added impurities, 289. — Blount, B., Preparation 
of electrolytic iron; "mitis" metal, 291; influence of bismuth on alloy, 
292. — Darwin, H., Determination of high temperatures, 292. — Kennedy, 
A. B. W., Practical results from reports to Alloys Piesearch Committee, 
293. — Eoberts-Austen, "W. C., Thermometers for high temperatures, 204. — 
Hadfield, E. A., Aluminium steel; eflect of aluminium and silicon on 
iron alloys, 295 ; melting point and tenacity of pure metals : grouping of 
constituent elements in alloys, 296. — Eoberts-Austen, W. C, Alloys of 
iron and aluminium, 297. 

Allots Eeseakch, Fourth Report to the Alloys Eesearch Committee, by W. C. 
Eoberts-Austen, 1897, 31. — Introductory and general observations, 31. — 
French " Commission des Alliages," and other contemporary 
investigations, 32. — Eelation of alloys to salt solutions, 34. — Eelations 
between atomic volume of metals and their elasticity and rigidity, 35. — 
Autographic pyrometry, 36. — Brasses : cooling curves, 36 ; freezing- 
point curves, 37 ; mechanical properties, 39. — Eutectic alloys, 39. — 
Definition of melting or freezing point, 42. — Mechanical properties of 
brasses, considered in relation to their freezing-point curve, 43. — 
Freezing-points of copper-zinc alloys, 44. — Strongest alloy has only a 

B 



18 A 

Allots Eesearch, Fourth lieport, 1897 (continupd) : — 

single freezing-point, 46. — Influence of a outectic on certain properties of 
alloys, 48 ; tenacity of brass and of Aicli's metal, id. — Valuation of gold 
ingots, 49.— General observations on investigation of alloys, 50. — Mode of 
existence of impurity in alloy, 53. — Elastic limit considered in relation 
to molecules, 53. — Diffusion of metals, 5G; liquid, 57; solid, 59. — 
Eelation between melting points of alloys and atomic volumes of their 
constituent metals, 60. — Connection between strength and melting 
point of alloys : influence of atomic volume, 61. — Improvements in 
recording pyrometer, 62. — Comparison of thermo-junction with air 
' thermometer, 64 ; determination of melting points of metals, 65. — Freezing- 
point curves of copper-tin alloys, 67; ''complete freezing-point curve," 68. 
Discus''ion. — Roljerts-Austcn, W. C, Influence of eutcctics, 69; 
freezing-point curves of carburized iron ; relation between tenacity and 
melting points of metals and alloys ; micro-structure of alloys, 70. — 
Anderson, Sir W., Value of Report, 72 ; steel ingots at Eoyal Arsenal, 72 ; 
manufacture of brass powder-cases for quick-firing guns, 73 ; spontaneous 
cracks in cartridge cases. 75. — White, Sir W. II., Effect of alloys and 
diffusion of metals in manufacture of armour plates, 76. — Stead, J. E., 
Eutectic alloy of lead and tin, and most fusible solder, 77 ; alloys of 
lead and antimony, 78 ; chemical composition of eutectic alloys, 79. — 
Arnold, J. O., Effect of small percentage of bismuth on gold, 80 ; 
influence of arsenic and of phosphorus upon iron, 81. — Gowland, W., 
Annealing of brass, 82 ; recording pyrometer ; only one freezing-point in 
strongest alloy of copper and zinc, 83 ; influence of eutectics on certain 
properties of alloys, 84; action of bismuth on silver; examination of 
copper and spelter by recording pyrometer, 86. — Watson, Dr. D., 
Influence of iron on copper-zinc alloys, 87. — Roberts-Austen, W. C, 
Phosphorus removes oxygen from brass, and increases tenacity, 88. — 
Harbord, F. W., Brass tubes for locomotive boilers ; effect of phosphorus 
and arsenic on steel, 88. — Stansfield, A., Cooling curve of brass, 89 ; solid 
solutions and iron-carbon alloys, 90. — Rose, Dr. T. K., Only one freezing- 
point for pure chemical compound ; low eutectic in strong brasses, 92 ; 
development of eutectic, 93. — Richards, E. W., Iron and steel, 93. — 
Hadfield, R. A., Manganese steel ; hardening influence of carbon on 
steel, 94 ; law of atomic volume ; diffusion of metals, 95. — Osmond, M., 
Le Chatelier pyrometer and autographic recorder, 96^ — Roberts-Austen, 
W. C, Suggestive nature of Report, 96; eutectic alloy cannot be 
chemical compound ; melting point of antimony, 97 ; fusible eutectic 
of bismuth and silver ; action of arsenic on carburized ii'on, 98 ; relations 
of carbon to iron ; law of atomic volume applicable to solid solutions, 99 ; 
molecular change produced by mechanical stress, 109. 



A 19 

Alloys Research, Fifth Iteport to tlie Alloys Ecsearch Committee, Steel ; by Sir 
WQliam C. Koberts- Austen, 1899, oo.^Xational Pliysical Laboratory, 35. — 
Carburized iron considered as a solution, 3q. — Recording pyrometer, 
increased sensitiveness, 36 ; cooling of electro-iron from ■white beat, 39 ; 
newly discovered points of recalescence, 40. — Iron and hydrogen, 42.^ 
Carburized iron considered as a solid solution, 44. — Freezing-point curves 
of solution of common salt in Avater, 45. — Carbou-iron solution, 4G; 
chemical analysis of steel from basic-Siemens furnace, Brymbo, 47 ; 
cooling of electro-iron and of pig-iron, 48. — Changes in solid carburized 
iron during cooling, 49. — Mechanical properties of carburized iron 
considered in relation to solubility (or freezing-point) curves, 51. — 
Evidence afforded by the microscope, 52. — Carburized iron considered as 
a solution, 53 ; ferrite, 53 ; cementite, pearlite, Martensite, 54 ; Austenite, 
Troosite, Sorbite, 56. — Photo -micrographs of cementation steel and 
Brymbo steel, 57 ; of pure cast-iron, 59. — Application of photo- 
micrography to the study of steel rails. CO ; distribution of pearlite and 
ferrite in steel rail, C2 ; properties of rail-steel, G4. — Effect of varying 
thermal treatment on structure of steel, low-carbon rail-steel, 65 ; die 
steel, GO. — Structure of steel containing small percentages of chromium, 67. 
D/scM«s/on.^Chairmanship of Alloys Research Committee, 68. — 
Richards, E. "W., Mineralogical names for constituents of steel, 69 ; 
uniformity of arrangement and proportion throughout length of long bar, 
70 ; thermal treatment, 70 ; iron and steel compared 'with concrete, 71. — 
White, Sir TV. H., Varieties of structure in steel, 71.— Richards, E. W., 
Better definition of new ingredients, 71. — Stead, J. E., Recording 
pyrometer, new points of recalescence in cooling curve of electro-iron, 71 ; 
construction of steel when cooled rapidly, 72 ; of soft Swedish steel 
annealed, 73 ; of soft steel quenched in water, 74 ; of steel cooled in slag, 
74 ; of tool steel cooled in slag, 75 ; weakest part in structure of steel 
sections, 75 ; scoriaceous sulphide areas in steel, brittle casting meshed 
with sulphide of manganese, 75 ; structure of laminated steel rail head, 
steel shaft before and after crushing, 76 : wrought-iron shaft. 7G ; sections 
of St. Xeot's steel rail, 77 ; surface of worn locomotive tire, 78 ; conversion 
of coarse grained steel into finer grain by heating, 79 ; abrupt 
absorption of heat coincides with breaking up of crystalline structure in 
annealed soft steel, SO, — Arnold, J. 0., Recalescence in cooling, and 
evolution of hydrogen, 80; brittleness of steel plates at black heat, 81 ; 
analogy of steel and frozen brine, 81 ; eutectic and cryo-hydrate, 81 ; 
diffusion of carbon into iron, 81 ; allotropy, 82 ; condition of steel from 
rolls, 83 ; mechanical influence of carbon on steel, S3 ; defect of 
mineralogical nomenclature for steel ingredients, 84 ; state of carbon in 
hardened steel, 86. — Wrightson, T., Expansion of iron or steel in cooling 

B 2 



20 A 

Allots Eesearch, Fifth lieport, 1899 (Z)/>c??-!<?o)i, contiuued) : — 

at critical temperatures, 8(5 ; experimental verification, 88 ; other critfc-al 
periods, 88. — Stansfield, A., Separation of cementite from molten pig-iron 
cooling slowly, 80; solubility of carbon in iron, 91. Hadfield, R. A., 
Softness and ductility of pure iron, 91 ; combined carbon in slowly cooled 
pig-iron, 02; solution theory not yet substantiated, 02. — Jenkin, ('. F., 
Burnt steel, 02. — Roberts-Austen, Sir W. ('., Cooling curve of electro-iron, 
03 ; similarity of structure throughout length of steel rail, 94 ; constituents 
of slowly cooled steel, and of quenched steel, 04 ; segregation of cementite, 
O.J ; steel rails with large grain or mucli manganese, 95 ; eutectic and 
cryo-hydrate, 9."); tenacity of carburized iron, 05; mineralogical terms, 
0(>; diffusion of carbon in iron, O'!; allotropy, 0:! ; hardness of electro-irou, 
Oo ; burnt steel, 9G,— White, Sir W. H., Further research, 07.— Li debur, 
A., Iron-carbon alloys considered as solutions, 08. — Calleudar, H. L., 
Differential recording pyrometer, 98 ; electrical resistance of pure and 
impure iron ; occlusion of gas by iron, 99 ; limits of temperature for 
molecular changes, 100. — Ewing, J. A., Pyrometric and microscopic 
examination of iron and steel, 100. 

Allport, C. J., decease, 1898, 5. 

ALLSEBnooK, G., elected Graduate, 1898, ."j47. 

Almoxi), M., elected Associate Member, 1894, 170. 

Alternative-Centre Testing-Machine. 1891, 304. See Experimental Marine 
Engine. 

Alumina Factory, Paper on the Alumina Factory at Larne Harbour, by J. 
Sutherland, 1896, 380.— Sources of aluminium, 380. — Analj'sis of bauxite, 
380. — Alumina factory, 381. — Grinding and calcining of bauxite, 381 ; 
caloiner, 382.— Kicrs, 382. — Filter presses, 383 ; cellulose filters, 384. — 
Decomposing cylinders, 384. — Hydrate filter-presses ; washing, drying 
by compressed air, 385- — Calcining furnace, 380. — Evaporator for 
coucentratiiig weak soda liquor, 386. — Electric lighting; extensions, 387. 

Discussion, — Sutherland, J., Exhibited specimens extmplifving 
successive stages in manufacture of alumina from bauxite, 388. — Dobson, 
D. A., Cost of producing aluminium, 388.— Sutherland, J., Extraction of 
pure alumina from ore. 388. — Richards, E. "W., Visit to alumina factory, 380. 

Alumina "Works, Larne, 1896, 380, 421. 

Aluminium, Paper on Aluminium Manufacture, with description of the Rolling 
Mills and Foundry at Milton, Staffordshire, by E. Ristori, 1898, 347.— 
Production of aluminium from alumina, 317. — Milton works, 31S; casting 
sbop, 348; foundrj-, 340 ,- rolling shop, 350 ; fitting shop, testing machine, 
and laboratory, 351. — "Working of aluminium, 351. — Alloys of aluminium, 
353; light alloys, 353; heavy alloys, 354. — Uses of aluminium, 355. — 
Aluminium in shipbuilding, 357. 



A 21 

A1.U311XUM, 1898 (continued) : — 

Discussion. — ^Specimens exhibited by E. Ristori, and Yarrow and Co., 
oj9 ; by Edison and Swan United Electric-Light Co., and W. Mills, 360. 
— Donkin, B., Percentage of aluminium added to castings ; temperature 
for forging, 360.— Thornycroft, J. I., Value of details, 3G0. — Hughes, 
G. D., Eflfect of friction ; tensile strength, 360. — Carulla, F. J. R., Action 
of mercury upon aluminium, 3G1. — Donovan, E. W., Defonnation under 
low prolonged stress, 361. — Sisson, W., Crucibles for£melting aluminium, 
361 ; tensile strength of castings, 362 ; percentage to be added in casting 
other metals, 362. — Powrie, W., Aluminium plates instead of lithographic 
stones, 362.— Dolby, E. E., Tarniihing,'^363.— Sanders, H. C, Ductility 
succeeded by brittleness, 364. — Marshall, J.JG., Soldering, 364. — Barr, J., 
Machined ingot-moulds, 364 ; heavy alloys, tensile strength and 
brittleness, 365. — Mills, W., Use of alloys, shrinkage of aluminium, 
machining, tensile strength, 335 ; cheai^ness, and comparison with brass, 
366 ; bedplates for electric-lighting engines, 366 ; price, bearings for 
shafts, other alloys, 367. — Sharp, T. B., Annealing to take out mechanical 
hardness, 367. — White, Sir W. H., Aluminium for shipbuilding, 387 ; 
coating compositions for protecting from corrosion, 369 ; galvanic action 
in alloys, 369 ; lightness, strength, and elasticity, 370 ; internal fittings 
of ships, 370; piston valves of quick-running engines, 371. ^Johnson, 
S. "\V., Sound steel castings for railway wheels by admixture of 
aluminium, 371. — Owens, P. E., Corrosion of aluminium wire by leather, 
372.— Carulla, F. J. E., Experiments on interaction between mercury and 
aluminium, 372. — Eistori, E., Percentage of aluminium for foundry work, 
and temperature for forging, 373 ; aluminium alloys for sbafting, bicycle 
and car frames, 373 ; mercury and aluminium, low prolonged stress, steam- 
engine pistons, plumbago crucibles, alloys for casting, 374 ; Kthographic 
aluminium plates, tarnishing, tin alloy, soldering, machined ingot-moulds, 
374 ; painting of aluminium for shipbuilding, corrosion of aluminium wire 
by leather, 375. 

Alumixioi, Production, 1888, 105, 114, 128, 132. See Electric Engineering. 

ALriiiNiTJM Works, Milton, [visited at Summer meeting, Derby,] 1898, 348, 460. 

ALrsnxrcM in alloy with Iron, 1889, 227. See Address of President, Charles 
Cochrane. 

Ambi.er, F., elected Associate Member, 1894, 170 :— transferred to Member, 
1900, 184. 

Ambrose, S. P., elected Graduate, 1894, 170 : — Associate Member, 1899, 145. 

Ameeicax Blast-Fuexace Practice, 1893, 236, 265 ; see Cleveland Industries. 
1896, 1 13 ; see Address of President, E. Windsor Eichards. 

A3IEEICAX Locomotives, 1887. See Canadian Locomotives. 

Amos, E. C, elected Graduate, 1885, 2 : — transferred to Member, 1892, 3. 



22 A 

Amos, E. C. (continued) : — 

Portable Pneumatic Tools, Faper, 1900, 119.— Remarks tliercon, 150, 160, 

171, 178. 
Andebson and Lyall, C'lydcside Engine and Boiler Works, Govaii, Glasgow, 

1895, 501. 
Anderson, A. L., elected Associate Member, 1900, 182. 
Andeesox, a. S., elected Member, 1891, 190. 
Anderson, E. E. J., elected Member, 1900, 181. 
Anderson, E. "\V., Graduate transferred to Memlwr, 1893, ;!. 

High-Speed Engine, Paper on the Grafton Iligli-Speed Steam-Engine, 

1894, 213.— Remarks thereon, 228, 24(1. 
Anderson, H. J. C., decease, 1892, ?,. — ]\Icmoir, 1891, 472. 
Anderson, H. W., elected Member, 1890, 17.">. 
Anderson, Sir J., decease, 1887, 3. — Memoir, 1886, 4(;(). 
Anderson, J. W., elected Member, 1892, 101. 

Testing of Materials. 1898, (J9::. 
Anderson, S., decease, 1891, 4. — Memoir, 1890, .")54. 
Anderson, T. S., elected Aesociate Member, 1894, 294 : — transferred to Member, 

1897, 4. 

Anderson, Sir W., K.C.B., re-elected Member of Council, 1886, 22. — Appointed 
Vice-President, 1885, 2(i.— Elected Member of Council, 1887, 2.").— 
Vice-President, 1889, 23.— President, 1892, 23 ; 1893, 28.— Appointed 
Director General of Ordnance Factories, 1890, 1 0. — Created Companion 
of the Bath, 1896, 3.— Knight Commander of the Bath, 1897, 2.') : 

1898, 4.— Decease, 1899, 2, C, 7, (J8.— :Menioir, 1898, G9(J. 
Address as President, 1892, 10r>. 

Alloys Research, 1891, 572; 1893, 148, 1(54, 107 : 1897, 71. 

Articles of Association and By-laws, 1893, 27, 28, 31 ; 1894, 21, 2.".. 

Auditor, 1892, 30. 

Cleveland Industries, 1893, 277. 

Compound Locomotives, 1886, 401. 

Council, Annual Report, 1890, 25 : 1893, 24, 25, 2G ; 1894, 22. 

Dockyard Lifting and Hauling, 1892, 307, 312. 

Drying in Vacuum, 1889, 325. 

Electric Kock-Drill, 1893, 317. 

Floating Bridge, 1892, 353. 

Initial Condensation in Steam Engine, 1892, 214, 215. 

Lighting of Workshops, 1893, 410, 413, 424, 428. 

Marine-Engine Trials, 1889, 281 ; 1892, 104, 105, 173, 185, 190. 

]Middlesbrough Salt Industry, 1893, 293, 307. 

Middlesbrough Summer meeting. Reply to ^layer's welcome, 1893, 218. 

Naval Electrical Apparatus, 1892, 270, 292. 

Portsmouth Summer meeting, 1892, 30. — Reply to Mayor's welcome, 228. 



A 23 

An-derson, Sib W., K.C.B. (continued) : — 

President. — On Ketiring President, 1890, 2(j ; on election of President, 
27. — On taking office, 1892, 2.5. — On retiring from presidency, 1894, 
27.— Eeply to vote of tliauks, 1894, 30. 

Eopes and Belts, 1895, (J.J3. 

Screvr-PropeHer Surface, 1892, oiJO. 

Sewage and Eefuse "Vrorks, 1892, 3tJi. 

Sewage Outfall Works, 1892, 343. 

Shipbuilding in Portsmouth Dock}-ard, 1892, 254. 

Ship-Model Apparatus, 1893, 41, 40, 51, 52. 

Southampton Pier, 1892, 318. 

Steam-Jacket, 1892, 480, 483, 501, 502, 504. 

Steam Pomps on Eussian South Western Eailwavs, 1893, 451, 4G1, 4G9, 
470. 

Steel and Steel Guns, translation of D. Chernoff's " Materials for the study 
of Steel and of Steel Guns," 1891, 465. See Steel Guns. 

Tees Engineering Improvements, 1893, 330. 

Totes of Thanks.— To Eetirmg President, 1890, 30: 1892, 20.— To 
President for Address, 1890, 200 ; 1894, 212. 

Water Works, Southampton, 1893, 03, 76, 87, 8'J. 
AsT)ERSoy, W., Stockton-on-Tees, elected Member, 1891, 300. 
Andrew, G. E., E.X., elected Member, 1899, 473. 

AxDREW, S. E., elected Graduate, 1898, 547 : — Associate Member, 1900, 2. 
Andrew, T., elected Member, 1892, 413. 
Andrews, F. E., elected Associate Member, 1898, 546. 
Andbews, L., Evaporative Condensers, 1899, 217. 
Andrews, T. (Cardiff), elected Member, 1895, 547. 
Andrews, T. (Belfast), Irish Eailways, 1896, 415. 
Angas, W. M., elected Member, 1893, 391. 
Anglo- American Brush Electric-Light Works, 1883, 424. 
Annadale Brick Works, Belfast, 1896, 437. 
Anniversary Dinners. See Dinners. 
Annual Death-Eate in roll of Institution, 1889, 4. 
Antjual General Meeting, Business, page 1 of each year. 

Annual Eeport of Council. See Council, Annual Eeport. , 

An*j;ual Subscription, Additions to By-laws respecting arrears, 1888, 446 ; 

1889, 29-33.— Compounding, 1890, 31. 
Ansaloni, a.. Paper on the Lifts in the Etfifel Tower, 1889, 350. 
Anson, F. H., elected Member, 1885, 1. 
Appleby, C. J., Forth Bridge Machinery, 1887, 320. 

Lake Superior Copper ^MininL', 1887, 118. 
Appleby, G. W., elected Member, 1899, 143. 



24 A 

Appleby, H., Jux., elected Graduate, 1885, 40^. 

Appleby, H. W., elected Associate Member, 1897, 433. 

Appleby, J., elected Associate. 1898, 342. 

Appleby, 1'. V., Graduate transferred to Member, 1893, ;;. 

Appleby, T. D. H., elected Graduate, 1900, 35tJ. 

Appleton', French, and Scraftox, Cleveland Flour ]\Iill, Thoruaby, 1893, 3G7. 

Abc-Lamp for Lighting of Workshops, 1893, 398. See Lighting of Workshops. 

Arc Works, Chelmsford, [visited at Summer meeting, London,] 1886, 410, 413-4. 

Archbold, J., elected Member, 1891, 1.— Decease, 1898, 5.— Memoir, 1897, 513. 

Archbutt, L., Paper on Water Softening and Puriticatiou by the Archbutt- 

Deeley process, 1898, 404. — Kemarks thereon, 447, 449, 4.51, 454. 
ARCHBCTT-DEELEr PROCESS for Softening and Purification of Water, 1898, 404, 

478. See Water Softening. 
Archer, C. F., elected Member, 1889, 340. 

By-laws, 1891, 40. 
Architects* Kegistration Bill, Petition of Council, 1888, 100 : circular, 1G3 ; 

statement, 164.— 1889, 6-7, 22. 
Argon, Discovery, 1895, 28. See Discovery of Argon. 
Armer, J., Roller Flour Milling, 1889, 174. 

Ship-Model Apparatus, 1893, 49. 
Armit, T. N., elected Member, 1887, 283, 

Armitage and Sons, Sir Eikanah, Pendleton New Mills, Manchester, 1894, 413. 
Armitage, W. J., decease, 1896, 4.— Memoir, 1895, 308. 
Armour, J. G., elected Member, 1894, 293. 
Armstrong, The Eight Hon. Lord, C.B., Peerage, 1888, 21. 
Armstrong, G. E., elected Associate Member, 1895, 150. 
Armstrong, G. F., decease, 1901, 6.— Memoir, 1900, G21. 
Armstrong, J., decease, 1889, 3. — Memoir, 1888, 153. 
Armstrong, W. H., elected Associate Member, 1894, 470.— Decease, 1896, 4.— 

Memoir, 1895, 532. 
Arnold, A. A., elected Associate Member, 1899, 145. 
Arnold, F. W., elected Associate Member, 1898, 341. 
Arnold, J. A., elected Member, 1898, 141. 
Arnold, J. O., Alloys Research, 1891, 583; 1893, 152, l.-)8: 1897, SO; 1899, 

80, 91. 
Gas for Fuel, 1890, 40G, 448. 
Steel Rails, 1890, 33G-40. 
Arnold, W., elected Associate Member, 1897, 2 :— transferred to Member, 1900, 

555. 
Arnot, W., elected Member, 1894, 293. 

Arrears of Annual Subscription, Additions to By-laws, 1888, 440 ; 1889, 29-33. 
Arrol, Sir AY., elected Member, 1887, 473.— Elected Member of Council, 1899, 28. 



25 



Arkol, Sik AV. (continued) : — 

Forth Bridge Machinery, Paper ou the Jluchiuery employed at the Forth 
Bridge Works, 1887, 312.— Remarks thereon, 320, 321, 322. 
Arsenal, "Woolwich, [visited at Summer meeting, Loudon,] 1886, 411. 440-1. 
Arsenic Mines and Works, Devon Great Consols, Tavistock, [visited at Summer 

meeting, Plymouth,] 1899, 442, 4(!1. 
Art Galleuy and Museum, Derby, 1838, 498.— Nottingham, 1838, 51 i. 
Arteaga, a. de, elected Member, 1887, 1. 
Articles of Association and By-laws, Notice of amendments, 1892, 416. 

Alterations, 1893, 0.— Anderson, Dr. W., Moved special resolution 
amending Articles of Association ; Kennedy, A. B. W., Seconded ; 
Motion carried, 27.— Anderson, Dr. W., Moved resolution amending 
By-laws; Tomlinson, J., Seconded; Motion carried, 28.- Special 
resolutions confirmed, 31. 
Artificial Draught for Boiler Furnaces, 1886, 380, 39o, 489, 498, 499. 
Artificial Lighting of Workshops, 1893, 390. See Lighting of Workshops. 
AsHBURY, T., Motion for re-appointment of Auditor, 1899, 33. 
AsHBY, F., Roller Flour Milling, 1889, 1811. 
AsHBY, G., elected Member, 1888, 1. 
AsHBY, J. H., elected Graduate, 1887, 284. 
AsHCROFT, A. G., elected Member, 1895, 1. 

Ashcroft Saw and Planing Mills, Gaiusborougli, 1885, 4:jfj, 4j3. 
AsHFORD, J., elected Graduate, 1889, 585 :— transferred to Associate Member, 

1897, 5. 
Ashley, T. J., elected Member, 1890, 471. 

AsHTON AND Co., F. W., Newton Bank Print Works, Hyde. 1894, 435. 
AsHTON Brothers and Co., Carr Field Mills, Hyde, 1894, 435. 
AsHWELL, F., decease, 1897, 5. — Memoir, 1896, 596. 
Ashworth, H., elected Member, 1891, 300. 

AsHWORTH and Sons, Adam, Felt Hat Manufactory, Bury, 1894, 406, 447. 
Askham, J. U., elected Member, 1890, 297. 
AsKHAM, P. U., elected Member, 1890, 297. 

AspiNALL, J. A. F., elected Member of Council, 1892, 23; 1895, 26; 1898, 31.— 
Vice-President, 1900, 34. 

Alloys Research, 1893, 193. 

Autographic Test-Recorder, 1886, 89. 

Boiler Construction, 1891, 509. 

Brewery Tramways and Rolling Stocl', 1888, 341. 

Canal-Boat Propellers, 1894, 369. 

Cleveland Industries, 1893, 271. 

Compound Locomotives, 1886, 301. 

Compounding of Locomotives, 1830, 78, SO. 



26 A 

AspiXALL, J. A. F. (coutinucd) : — 

Electric Welding, 1894, oi5. 

Express Locomotives, 1898, 048. 

Frictional Gearing, 1888, oTl. 

Gas for Fuel, 1890, 410. 

Gas Furnaces, 1891, G6. 

Irish Eailvrays, 1896, 415. 

Lighting of Workshops, 1893, 410. 

Locomotive Boiler Draught, 1893, 109. 

Locomotive Practice, French, 1900, 408. 

Motive Power, Liverpool, 1892, 51, 52. 

Eailway Wagons, Capacity. 1900, 595. 

Eoad Locomotion, 1900, 240, 247. 

Steam Jacket, 1892, 501 ; 1896, 483, 488. 
AsPLEN, B., elected Member, 1891, 190. 
AsQUiTH, W. G., elected Associate Member, 1900, S'jj. 
Associate Mesibek:^, Establishment of class, 1893, C, 27-8, 31. 
AsTOX, J. W., elected Member, 1890, 297. 

AsTROXoMicAL TELESCOPES, 1888, 303. See Clock-DriTiDg for Telescopes. 
Atuertox, p. W., elected Graduate, 1897, 434. 
Atherton, T., elected Member, 1899, 143. 

Atkey, a. K., elected Graduate, 1886, 2 :— transferred to Member, 1893, 3. 
Atkinson, A., elected Member, 1889, 584. 
Atkisson, C. F., decease, 1890, 3. 
Atetosox, E. T., elected Member, 1890, 297. 
Atkinson-, F., elected Associate Member, 1896, 279. 
Atkinson, F. A., elected Member, 1900, 3:i5. 
Atkinson, H., elected Associate Memb'er, 1898, 540. 
Atkinson, J., elected Member, 1892, 228. 

Gas-Engine Eesearch, 1898, 240, 241, 242. 

Portable Pneumatic Tools, 1900, 172. 

Water Softening, 1898, 442. 
Atkinson, E. E., elected Associate Member, 1897, 433. 
Atkinson Gas Engine, 1889, ."i29, 533. 
Atlas Works, Glasgow, 1896, 406, 484. 
Atmospheric Eailway, Paper on the South Devon Atmospheric Eailway, 

preceded by certain remarks on the Transmission of Energy by a partially 

rarefied Atmosphere, by Sir F. Bramwell, Bart., 1899, 299. — Papin's 

machine, 299. — Medhursfs method of propulsion, 300 ; water-seal, 301. — 

Hague's system of exhausting pumps for working engines, 302 ; method 

of raising water by the use of a partially-vacuous condition, 302; 

purification of sugar by means of partial exhaustion, 305; three-throw 

crank-shaft, 307 ; partial exhaustion for driving motor, 308 ; pneumatic 



A 27 

Atmospheeic PiAiLAVAY, Fuijer, 1899 (continued) : — 

crane for docks, 308 ; partial-exhaust engines for driving machine-tools, 
309 ; pneumatic tilt hammer, 310. — Proposed Hyde Park and Bank 
subterranean and pneumatic railway, 312. — Proposed Hungerford Bridge 
and AVaterloo pneumatic railway, 312. — Pneumatic railway from Euston 
to Holborn, 314 ; Kingstown and Dalkey ; Croydon ; South Devon 
Railway, 315 ; section of line from Exeter to Plymouth, 316 ; method of 
■working, 317; description of leading carriage, tube, valve, &c., 319; 
leakage of valve, and abandonment of system, 321. 

Discussion.— Vi^hite, Sir W. H., Thanks to author, 322. — Pendred, V., 
Kingstown to Dalkey Atmospheric Eailway, 322 ; length of line ; 
pumping engine ; section of railway ; return journey to Kingstown by 
gravity, 324 ; method of braking the train, 325. — Lea, H., Piston pipes, 
326.— Bramwell, Sir F., Flexible coupling to piston, 326.— Davey, H., 
Murdoch's system in operation at Boulton and "Watt's works, 326. — • 
Donkin, B., Section of line, 326. — Pendred, V., Subsequent alteration in 
contour of line, 326. — Bramwell, Sir F., Clegg and Samuda's patent, 
326; speed obtained by Medhurst, 327.— Brunei, H. M., I. K. Brunei 
and the atmospheric S3-stem, 327. 

Atsumi, S., elected Member, 1897, 432. 

Attock, F, W., elected Graduate, 1900, 97. 

Attwood, J., elected Member, 1898, 2. 

Aubin, p. a., elected Graduate, 1890, 2. 

Auditor, Alteration in By-law, 1885, 2S. 

Appointment, 1885, 164 ; 1886, 20 ; 1887, 31 ; 1888. 31 ; 1889, 29 ; 1890, 
30 ; 1891, 27 ; 1892, 30 ; 1893, 30 ; 1894, 23 : 1895, 25 ; 1896, 32 ; 
1897, 29 ; 1898, 35 ; 1899, 33 ; 1900, 36. 
Duties and Piemuneration, 1894, 6. 
Institution Accounts, 1898, 30. 

AuGUTiE, H., elected Associate Member, 1900, 182. 

Atjlt, E., elected Member, 1892, 1. 

AusTDf, J. M., elected Member, 1892, 101. 

AcsTBALASiAN Feozen-Meat Store, London, 1900, 471. 

ArTHOEiTY FOR BoERowixG, 1896, 27. — Kennedy, A. B. W., Moved resolution 
authorizing Council to borrow money, 27 ; Adamson, J., 27 ; 
resolution carried, 27. 

AuTOGEAFHic Test-Becdkder, Fciper on an Aiitographic Test-Recording 
Apparatus, by J. H. Wicksteed, 1886, 27. — Previous reference to diagram- 
recording apparatus, 27. — Advantages of obtaining diagrams 
autographically, 28. — Description of autograph diagram, 28. — Record of 
load, 29. — Description of autographic indicator, 30. — Friction of hydraulic 
leatliers, 31. — Freedom from friction by rotation of ram, 32. — Record of 



28 A 

AcTOGKAPHic Test-Recorder, Paper, 1886 (continued) :— 

extension, 33. — Interpretation of records, 35. — Area of diagram represents 
mechanical work of test, 35. — Declining resistance after climax of 
strength, 36. — Local heating and local extension, 36. — Comparative 
ductility of samples not identical in shape or proportions, 37. — Diagram of 
cohesive force of material tested, 38. — Increase in tenacity concurrently 
with decreasing area, 40. — Summary of successive stages in testing of 
specimens, 41. — Advantages of autographic record, 4"2. 

Bucumon. — Wicksteed, J. H., Exhibited test specimens and diagrams, 
62 ; perfect elasticity and correct scale of indicator spring, 62; base line of 
diagram, 62 ; wavering line in diagram at elastic limit, 63. — Kennedy, 
A. B. W., Difficulty in designing test-recording apparatus, 63 ; friction of 
leathers on main ram, 64; elimination of friction of indicator ram by 
rotation, 64; registration of strains within range of elasticity, 65; 
description of autographic apparatus used by himself, 65 ; labour involved 
in constructing non-auttigraphic diagrams, 67 ; measure of value of material 
by mechanical work expended in breaking, 67 ; exclusion of local extension 
near place of fracture, 69 ; comparison of test-pieces of different shapes, 69 ; 
manipulation of poise-weight, 69; excess of tensile strength in drilled 
test-pieces, 69. — Cochrane, C, Enquiry as to effect of shape of material on 
tensile strength, 70. — Kennedy, A. B. W., Former explanation, 70. — 
Walker, B., Value of autographic test-recorder for showing quality of steel, 
70 ; friction of hydraulic leathers is uniformly proportional to water 
pressure, 71 ; hydraulic press for testing steel bridge-links, 71. — Unwin, 
W. jG., Steel-yard of testing machine can be kept floating during test, 72 ; 
, difficulty with very ductile bar, 72; other plans of autographic recording 
apparatus, 73; objection to taking indication of load from pressure in 
hydraulic cylinder, 74 ; adjustments for obtaining uniformity of load scale, 
75 ; arrangement of wire, use of radius-links, and mode of dispensing 
witii compen.«ation, 75 ; difficulty of determining climax in flat-headed 
diagram, 77. — Wicksteed, J. H., Prominence of climax in typical diagram, 
77. — Unwin, W. C, 3Ieasurement of quality of material by mechanical 
work done up to fracture, or only up to climax of strength, 77 ; Professor 
Hartig's results, 78. — Wicksteed, J. H., Stiffness makes up for want of 
extension, 78. — Unwin, W. C., Results of estimating quality of different 
materials by comparison of work done up to rupture, 78. — AVicksteed, J. H., 
Enquired mode of comparison, 79. — Unwin, AV. C, Comparison between 
equal weights of diflercnt materials, 79. — Halpin, D., Desirability of 
magnifying diagram in portion recording extension within elastic limit, 79 ; 
objection to manipulation of poise-weight, 80 ; coefficient of mechanical 
value, 80 ; length of test-pieces, 80. — Turner, T.. Tensile tests of grooved 
bars, 81 ; relation of elongation to diameter of iron and steel bars, 81. — 



29 



Autographic Test-Recorker, I)i<cu<si'on, 1886 (continued) : — 

Cochrane, C, Importance of trustworthy testing machine, 82 ; value of 
Mr. Bennett's tests, 83 ; increased tenacity resulting from drilling and from 
grooving, S3.— Bennett, H. B. S., Use of autographic testing machine at 
Horseley Iron Works, 84. — Turner, T., Increased tensile strength in drilled 
bar is due to shortening of length tested, 84. — Smith, R. H., Degree of 
accuracy in autographic apparatus, 84 ; freedom from friction by rotation of 
indicator ram, 85; extension of wire by friction over pulleys, 85; final 
portion of autographic curve depends on character of testing mechanism, 86 ; 
rate of pumping water into hydraulic cylinder, 86. — Wicksteed, J. H., Water 
is necessarily pumped in at uniform rate, 86. — Smith, R. H., Relative 
movement of jockey-weight, 87; similar experience in other testing- 
machines, 87 ; area of autographic diagram is insufficient by itself to 
represent character of material tested, 88 ; Wertheim's experiments on 
increase of volume under tensile stress, 88; apparatus for testing rate of 
flow in specimens under constant load, 88. — Aspinall, J. A. F., Autographic 
test recorder devised by himself, 89 ; final iwrtion of diagram after climax 
of strength, 89. — Traill, T. W., Utility of autographic apparatus, 90 ; 
length of test specimens, 90 ; percentage of elongation, 91 ; more injurious 
effect of punching in thicker steel plates, 91. — Langley, A. A., Injury to 
rails by punching, 92 ; autographic apparatus for recording movements of 
railway carriages, 92. — Robinson, H., Difference in friction of hydraulic 
leathers in the testing machine, 92, — Wicksteed, J. H., Difference in 
diameters, 93. — Carbutt, E. H., Importance of both chemical and 
mechanical analysis of iron and steel, 93 ; loss of strength after reaching 
the elastic limit, 93. — Wicksteed, J. H., Comparison of grips and pins for 
holding test-specimens, 94 ; loss of strength after reaching the elastic 
limit, 94; measurement of stress by elasticity of straight steel bar or of 
lielical spring, 95 ; accuracy of load scale produced by spring, 96 ; friction 
on wire transmitting extension, 97; use of compensating pulleys, 97; 
friction of hydraulic leathers in relation to diameter of rams, 98 ; clips for 
attaching wire to test-sample, 98 ; Mr. Aspinall's recording apparatus, 9S ; 
practical advantage of perfectly self-acting apparatus, 99 ; inertia of 
moving parts, 100 ; liveliness of indicator, 100. — Head, J., Rapidity of 
tracing diagram after reaching elastic limit, 100. — Wicksteed, J. H., Rate 
of motion of pencil, 101 ; autographic curve is not at any part a function 
of the machine, 101 ; uniformity in pulling force, 101 ; desirability of 
keeping steel-yard free from motion, 101 ; adjustments of indicator, 102 ; 
proper use of autographic diagrams for indicating qualities of materials, 
103. — Sterne, L., Diagrams obtained in punching cold iron, 103. — Head, J., 
True value of autographic testing machines, 104. 



30 A 

Automatic Machine-Gln, Pajper on the Maxim Automatic iMachine-Gun, by 
H. S. Maxim, 1885, 167. — Previous macbine-guns, 1G7. — Jamming caused 
by hang-fire cartridges, 168. — Maxim automatic machine-gun, 1G3. — 
Experimental apparatus, 169. — First gun, 170. — Helical spriug to 
supplement recoil, 171. — Extraction of empty cartridge-case, 171. — 
Magazine, 172. — Cocking, 173. — Kate of firing, 173. — Starting handle, 
174. — Size of gun, supply of cartridges, deflection of smoke, water-jacket, 
174. — Working of gun, 174.— Kegulatiou of speed of firing, 175. — Relative 
movement of barrel and breech-block, 176. — Automatic action, 177. — Hang- 
fire, 177. — Adjustment, 178. — Naval gun, 179. 

Discussion. — Maxim, H. S., Working of experimental apparatus and 
of first gun, 179. — Cochrane, C., Application of water-jacket for cooling the 
barrel, 180. — Carbutt, E. H., Advantage of rapid automatic firing, ISO; 
Gardner gun with mechanical feed, 181 ; Nordenfelt gun, 181 ; 
manufacture of metallic cartridges, 182. — Biurtan, B., Substitution of oil 
for water in jacket, 183 ; improvements in cartridges, 183 ; hang-fire due 
to faulty priming of caps, 183. — Acland, C. T. D., Is recoil aflfected by 
inclination of gun, 184 ; success of water in jacket, 184. — Bryan, W. B., 
Effect of recoil on accuracy of aim, 184 ; hang-fire, and bad cartridges, 184. 
— Longridge, J. A., Ingenuity displayed in gun, 185 ; efficiency of water 
for cooling, 185. — Paget, A., Substitution of oil for water in jacket, 185 ; 
simplicity of gun, 186. — Marjoribanks, Hon. E., High speed of firing, 186; 
noiseless firing, 186. — Adamson, D., Number of parts in gun, 186; oil is 
worst material for cooling the barrel, 186 ; weakening of iron and steel at 
temperature of boiling oil, 187. — Maxim, H. S., Principle of water-jacket, 
187; oil unsuitable, 188; effect of recoil on accuracy of aim, 188; 
metallic cartridges, 189; suggestion for keeping cartridges dry, 189. — 
Cochrane, C, Eenewal of water in jacket, 190. — Maxim, H. S., Renewal 
depends upon speed of firing, 190; efficiency of water-jacket, 190; 
duration and shape of gun, 191 ; smoke-deflecting cap, 192 ; filtration to 
render smoke invisible, 192; noiseless firing, 193; weight of gun, and 
effect of inclination on recoil, 193. — Cochrane, C, Fouling of adjusting 
screws, 193. — Maxim, H. S., Leather covering, 194. — Hayes, J.. Lubrication 
of mechanism, 194. — Maxim, H. S., Simpler construction of later gun, 194 ; 
lubrication, 194. — Mackiulay, Major G., Weight, expense, and number of 
parts, 195. — Maxim, H. S., Comparison with other machine-guns, 195 ; 
lightness and simplicity, 195. — Heneage, E., Facility of movements, 195. — 
Maxim, H. S., Rapidity of manufacture, 196. — Head, J., Self-acting 
principle of Maxim machine-gun, 196; perfection of metallic cartridges, 
196; manufacture of guns iu large quantities, 196. — Inspection of gun, 
197. 



A 81 

AcTOMATiG SLricE, Paper on a Balanced or Automatic Sluice for "Weirs, by the 
Eight Honourable the Earl of Eosse, 1888, 292.— Construction, 292.— 
Sluices at Parsonstown, 293. — Suggestions for future construction, 293. 

Discussion. — Carbutt, E. H., Value of sluice, 29i»— Strype, W. G., 
Eegulation of rivers in Ireland, 294 ; Stoney's sluice, 295 ; advantage of 
author's sluice, 29G. — Adamson, D., Sluices in river Irwell, 296 ; advantage 
of carriage by water, 298. — Marten, E. B., Necessity for making sluice 
-wholly self-acting, 298. — Paget, A., Friction of sluices, 299 ; automatic 
action of valves, 299. — Griffith, J. P., Yalue of sluice for small rivers, 
299 ; efficiency of Stoney's sluices, 300. — Eosse, Earl of, Sluices in river 
Irwell ^ith axis under water, 300 ; sluices worked by turbines, 301 ; 
sliding sluices on the Shannon, 301 ; adaptation of sluice to long weir, and 
prevention of drowning, 301 ; mode of rendering sluices automatic, 301. — 
Carbutt, E. H.. Difficulty with old-fashioned sluices, 302. 

AuTOix Meetixg, 1885, 4GI : 1886,465; 1887,473; 1888,443; 1889,583; 1890, 
471; 1891, 479; 1892, 413; 1893, 391; 1894, 469: 1895, 547; 1896, 
461; 1897, 431; 1898, 545; 1899, 473, 527, 567 ; 1900, 501, 555, 617. 

1885, Coventry. — Business, 461. — Votes of thanks, 465. — Visits to "Works, 
466. 

1886, Leeds. — Business, 465. — Opening of Engineering Department of the 
Yorkshire College, 468. — Invitation Dinner by local Engineers, 470. — 
Donation to Engineering Department of Yorkshire College from 
^Messrs. T. and C. Hawksley, 472. 

1887, London. — Business, 473. — Presentation from Belgian Engineers, 
475. 

AvELiXE, "W. p., elected Associate Member, 1894, 470 : — transferred to Member, 

1898, 548. 
Avery, "W. B., elected Member, 1897, 143. 
AwDRY, "W. L., elected Member, 1899, 143. 

AiLESBrEY, T. A., elected Graduate, 1894, 170 :— Associate Member, 1897, 2. 
Ayresome Irox "Works, IMiddlesbrough. 1893, 341. 
Aybtov Eolleng Mills, Middlesbrough, 1893, 341. 
Atrtox, "W. E., Electric Traction, 1898, 80. 



B 

Babeb, S. E., elected Associate Member, 1899, 145. 

Bache, A., Secretary, Presentation from the Engineers' Association of Lie'ge 
University, 1887, 475-6. — Eetirement from Secretaryship, 1897, 
278-80 ; 1898, 11, 36-42. 
Mean-Pressure Indicator, 1899, 609. 



32 - B 

Back, A. C". L., elected Associate Member, 1897, 144 : — transferred to Member, 
1900, 97. 

Backhouse, J., elected Associate Member, 1899, 145. 

Backman Brake for Lifts, 1889, ?,C,2, 3(JS. See Eiffel Tower Lifts. 

Baelz, R., Drying in Vacuum, 1889, 31G, 322. 

Bag-Making Machine, Paper on a Eotary Machine for making Block-bottomed 
Paper Bags, by J. Duerden, 1889, G31. — Bag-making by hnnd and by 
machine, speed of production, 631. — Sizes of bags, and qualities of paper, 
032. — Construction and working of machine, G'>3. — Regulation of sizes of 
bags by alteration in speed, 634. — Blank fold at bottom of bag, 035. 

Discussion. — Cochrane, C, IMachine at Paris Kxhibition, 636. — Pearson, 
J. T., Collection of specimens, 036. — Chapman, H., Best bag-making 
machine yet known, 636. — Cochrane, C, Enquired actual speed, 636. — 
Chapman, H., Highest speed, and commercial speed, 637. — Head, J., 
Quality of paper used, 637. — Marten, E. B., Object of notched edges at 
ends of bags, 637. — Chapman. H., Action of serrated severing cutter, 
037. — Kennedy, A. B. W., ^Machine admirably contrived, 638. — Xurscy, 
1'. F., Bags made of soft paper, 638.— Paget, A., Opening out of blank 
fold. 038. — Pearson, J. T., Range of quality of paper used, 639 ; serrated 
edges at ends of bags. 039 ; thumb-notch, and blind fold, 639. — Bibby. 
J. T., Mode of ensuring blind fold being opened out, 639 ; speed of 
■working, 039 : severing of bags by serrated knife, 640 ; segmental 
paster-block, 040. 

Bagg, II. A., elected Graduate. 1900, 503. 

Bagnall, W. G., Narrow-Gauge Railways, 1898, 401. 

Bagot, a. C, decease. 1886, 3.— IVIemoir, 1885, 300. 

Bagshaw, W., elected ^Member, 1891, 1. 
Alloys Research, 1891, 000. 

^Moulding Sand, Paper on the Mechanical Treatment of ^Moulding Sand, 
1891, 94.— Remarks thereon, 102, 106. 

Bagtjley, E. E., elected :\rember. 1899, 291. 

Bailey, C. S., elected Member. 1890, 1. 

Bailey, H. D., elected Associate ^lember. 1900, 502. 

Bailey, "VV., elected ]Member, 1886, '270.— Decease, 1896, 4.— 3Iemoir, 18S5, 532. 

Bailey, "\V. D., elected Graduate, 1888, 100 :— transferred to Member, 1900, 503. 

Baii.ey. Sir W. H., elected Member, 1885, 103.- Mayor of Salford, "Welcome to 
:Members at Summer ^Meeting, Manchester, 1894, 291.— Knighlhood, 
1895, 3. 

Bailey, AV. S., elected Member, 1899, 473. 

Baillie, R. a., elected Member, 1887, 283. 

Bain, G., elected Member, 1890, 297. 

Baikbbidce, E., Graduate transferred to 3Iember, 1891, 3. 



33 



Baixbridge, E. (continued) : — 

China, Openings for :Mechanical Engineers in China, 1899, 559. 

Colliery Engineering, Paper on recent improvements in the Mechanical 
Engineering of Coal Mines, 1890, 360.— Eemarks thereon, 395. 

Steel Eails, 189D, 342. 
Baird axd Co., W., Gartsherrie Iron Works, Coatbridge, 1895, 510. 
Baistek, C elected [Member, 1898, 340. 
Baker. Sir B., K.C.:\r.G., elected Member, 1893, 297.— Elected Stember of 

Council, 1899, 2S. 
Baker, G. S., elected 3Iember. 1397, 255. 
Baker, H. G.. elected Associate Member, 1899, 293. 
Baker, J., elected Associate Member, 1897, 433. 
Baker, T. W., elected Associate [Member, 1897, 2. 
Baker. W. H., elected Member, 1893, 101. 
Baker. W. J., elected Member, 1887, 1. 
Bakeries, Dublin, 1883, 410, 411. 
Balch. B. D., elected Graduate, 1898, 3. 
Baldwin-. A., elected Member, 1893, 220. 
Bald-wix. a. H., elected Member, 1894, 293. 
Baldwin. C. E., elected Associate Member. 1930. :'.55. 
Baldwin Gas EsGnrE, 1889, 527. -See Gas Engines. 
Baldwin, T., decease, 1885, 3.— Memoir, 71. 
Bale, ^L P., By-laws, 1885, 465 : 1886. 20. 

Wood-Cutting ^lachinery, 1885, 89. 
Balkwill. a. J., elected Member, 1897, 432. 

Electric Plant, 1898, 592. 
Ball Bearings for Cycles, 1885, 499, 500, 510 :-1883, 177, 179, 184. See Wbcel 
Eoad in Cycles.— For Motor Generators, 1894, 3 i6-S, 310-2. See 
Electric Lighting "Works. 
Ball, E. B.. elected Associate Member, 1899, 293. 
Ball, J., elected Associate [Member, 1897, 433. 
Ball, Sib Pv. S., Clock-Driving for Telescopes, 1888, 31G. 
Ball's Stamp for crushing ores, 1887, 96. See Lake Superior Copper Mining. 
Bamber, H. W.. elected Associate Member, 1897, 256. 
Ba3ifo?.d, Pi. G., elected Member, 1898, 141. 
Bamlett, a. C, elected Member, 1887, 283. 

By-laws, 1891, 39. 
Bancroft, F. J., elected Member, 1898, 141. 
Ban-derali, D., decease, 1891, 4.— Memoir, 1830, 171. 

Compound Locomotives, 1889, 119, 121. 
Banister, G. H., elected Member, 1832, 101. 
Bankhall Engine Works, Liverpool, 1831, 451. 

o 



34 B 

Bank-Xote Printing Machine, Dublin, 1883, 402. 

Banks, G., elected Member, 1899, 473. 

Bae Iron, 1885, 324. See Address of President, Jeremiah Head, 1885. 

Baraclocgh, W. H., elected Member, 1888, 1. 

Baeba, a. G., elected Associate Member, 1896, 279. 

Barbek, E. W., elected Graduate, 1894, 2 :— Associate Member, 1900, 182. 

Barber Gas Engine, 1889, 500-1. See Gas Engines. 

Barber, T. W., elected Associate ]\Iember, 1898, 142. 

Capacity of Railway AVagons, 1900, 5L>3. 

Glass Eevealer, 1900, 545. 
Barbosa, a., elected Graduate, 1896, 2. 
Barbour, J. D., Belfast Meeting, 1896, 417. 

Pvope Driving, 1896, 300. 
Barclay, A., Condition of Carbon in Steel. 1885, 52. 
Barclay, Cvrle, and Co., Shipbuilding Yard and Engineering Works, Glasgow, 

1895, 486. 
Barcroft, II., e'anal-Boat Propulsion, 1894, 360, 377; 1897, 101, 11."., 128, 197, 
200. 

Electric Engineering, 1888, 112. 

Road Locomotion, 1900, 302. 

Screw-Propellers, Paper on Twiu Screw-Propellers with Adjustable 
Immersion, fitted on Canal Boat^■, 1894, 360.— Remarks thereon, 377. 

Screw-Propellers, Paper on Partially Immersed Screw-Piopellers for Canal 
Boats; and the influence of Section of Waterway, 1897, 101. — 
Remarks thereon, 115, 128. 
Barker, A. H., elected Associate Member, 1896, 102. 

Heat Transmission, 1896, 527. 

Steam-Engine Breakdowns, 1896, 58G. 
Barkei:, E. G., elected Graduate, 1888, 160 :— transferred to Associate Member, 

1894, 3 :— transferred to Member, 1897, 4. 
Barker, F. W., elected Associate Member, 1893, 220. — Decease, 1901, C.— 

Memoir, 190O, 323. 
Barker, G., elected Member, 1899, 2!il. 
Barker Gas Engine, 1889, 527, 534-5. See Gas Engines. 
Barker, M. W., elected Member, 1896, 1. 
Barker, T. B., elected Member, 1885, 1. 
Barker, T. P., elected Associate Member, 1899, 293. 
Barley, C. J., elected Member, 1899, 3. 

Evaporative Condensers, 1899, 223, 224. 
Barman, H. D. D., elected Member, 1900, 5i)l. 
Barxaby, S. W., Partially Immersed Propellers, 1897, 115, 

Screw-Propel ler Surface, 1892, 544. 



B 35 

Barnes, J., elected Associate Member, 1895, loO. 
Barnes, J. E. L., elected Member, 1891, 47'J. 
Baexett Gas Engine, 1889, 501. See Gas Engines. 
Barningham, J., elected Member, 1887, 157. 
Baeon, F. E., elected Associate Member. 1894, 170. 
Baron, J. T., elected Associate Member, 1896, 279. 
Baronetcies : — 

Abel, Sir F. A., K.C.B., 1894, 3, 22. 

Bramvrell, Sir F., 1889, 22. 

Carbutt, Sir E. H., 1892, 413 ; 1893, :l 

Coddingtou, Sir W., 1896, 20 : 1897, 4. 

Lewis, Sir W. T., 1896, 26 ; 1897, 4. 

Musgrave, Sir J., 1897, 25. 

"SVilson, Sir A., 1897, 27t3 ; 1898, 4. 

Wood, Sir L., 1897, 276 ; 1898, 4. 

Wrigbtson, Sir T., 1901, 6. 
Baer, a.. Honorary Secretary of Glasgow meeting 1895, Presentation from the 
Institution, 1896, 10. 

Drj-ness of Steam, 1895, 06. 

Friction Experiments, 1888, 187. 

Marine Horse-Power, 1896, 87. 

Eangc-Finders, Fairer on Telemeters and Pange-Finders for naval and 
other ijurposes, 1896, 33. — Pemarks thereon, 59, 61, 74. 

Tay Viaduct, 1887, 382. 

Testing Machine, 1888, 230, 462. 

Throttling and Variable Expansion, 1895, 212. 
Barb, J., elected Associate. 1889, 204. 

Aluminium, 1898, 304. 

Electric Lighting Works, 1894, :1I2. 

Incrustation of Torquay Water Mains. 1899, 484, 518. 

Road Locomotion, 1900, 302. 

Southampton Water Works, 1893, 74. 

Steam Pumps, 1893, 475. 
Barracks, Eastney, 1892, 367. 
Bareatt, S., decease, 1892, 4. — Memoir, G06. 
Barrett, J. J., decease, 1898, ."i. — Memoir, 1897, 513. 

Baerie, W., elected Member, 1885, 103.— Decease, 1899, 6.— Memoir, 1898, 701. 
Barringee, H., elected Member, 1887, 157. 
Babro-w, a. E. M., elected Graduate, 1889, 204. 
Baeeow, J., Forth Bridge Machinery, 1887, 317. 

Barry, Sir J. W., K.C.B., created Companion of the Bath, 1895, 3. — Ejiight 
Commander of the Bath, 1897,^270 ; 1898, 4. 

c 2 



36 B 

Eakry, Ostlere, and Co., John, Linoleum and Floor-Clotli Works, Kirkcaldy, 

1887,437,451. 
Barsanti and Matteuci Gas Engine, 1889, 502. See Gas Engines. 
Bartle, G. W., elected Associate Member, 1898, 2. 
Bartley, B. C, elected Graduate, 1897, 144. 
Barton, A., elected Associate Member, 1896, 2. 
Bakty, a. D., elected Associate Member. 1900, 2. 
Bascule Water Meter, 1900, 4i). See Water Meters. 
Bashfokth, a., elected Member, 18£9, 201. 

Bass, Ratcliff, and Gretton, Brewery. Burton-on-Trent, 1898, 400, 504. 
Bate, Capt. V. M., elected Member, 1887, 28:;. 
Bateman, a. II., elected Associate Member. 1899, 145. 
Bateman, H., elected Member, 1885, 4tJ2. 
Bateman, J. T., elected Member, 1836, '-7S. 

Teclinical Dictionary. 1900, 507. 
Bates, H., elected Member, 1891, lOG. 
Batho, W. l\, decease, 1887, :;.— Memoir. 1886, 2GI. 
Baths, Public, Belfast, 1896, 4:'.4. 
Batteries, Brimary, 1889, 548, .371. 

Battle, A. E., elected Member, 1891, 1D6.— Decease, 1895, 4.— Memoir, 189-1, 160. 
BATTi.Esiiir, Launch, 1899, "«2'.'. See Launch of a llattleship. 
Bauerman, H., Disposal of Slag, 1892, 01. 

Lake Superior Copper Mining, 1887, 111, 114. 
Bai xiTE, 1896, o80. See Alumina Factory. 
Bawden, W., decease, 1889, 3. — Memoir, 1 03. 
Baxandai.l, R. F., elected Graduate. 1897, 434. 
Baxter, P. M., elected Member, 1892, 1. 
Bayford, W. J., elected Member, 1889, 34t). 
Bayley, G. R., elected Member, 1899, 14::. 
Baynes, J., elected Member, 1891, 1. 

B.\yxes, S. W., Electric Lii;hting, Ediiil>urgh, 1895, 580, 580. 
Bazin, J. R., elected Graduate, 1900, 50:;. 
Beale, B, R., elected Member, 1899, 201. 
Bealey, H. E., elected Graduate, 1893, 302. 
Beanland, F., elected Associate, 1898, 3. 
Beard, A. C, elected Member, 1898. 141. 
Beard, B., elected Member, 1895, 1 . 
Beardmore, W., elected ^Member, 1887, 473. 
Beare, T. H., elected Member, 1833, 221). 

Alloys Research, 1893, 178. 

Dryness of Steam, 1895, 56, 57. 

Electric Lighting, Edinburgh, 1895. 583. 



B 37 

Beabe, T. H., (continued) : — 

Olass Eevealer, 1900, 548. 

High-Speed Engine, 1894, -240. 

Marine-Engine Trials, 1891, 2S6. — Ahdrad of results of Experiments on 
Six Steamers, and Conclusions drawn therefrom in regard to the 
efficiency of Marine Boilers and Engines, 1894, 33. — Remarks thereon, 
71, 116, 123, 139. 

Steam-Engine Breakdowns, 1896, 582, 584. 

Steam-Jacket, Value, 1892,490. — Paper on Steam- Jacketing a Locomotive 
Engine, 1896, 466.— Remarks thereon, 494. 

Steam Pumps, 1893, 459, 461. 
Beakixgs, 1888, 173; 1891, 111; See Friction Experiments. — For high speeds, 
1888, 482 ; see Compoimd Steam Turbine. — For vertical shafts, collar, 
footstep, thrust, 1888, 33; see Irrigating Machinery. — See also Ball 
Bearings, and Roller Bearings. 
Beastow, W. H., elected Member, 1893, 97. 
Beattie, F. H., decease, 1888, 3. — Memoir, 153. 
Beatty, H. M., elected IMember, 1891, 300. 
Beau de Rochas Gas Engine, 1889, 5'i3. See Gas Engines. 
BEArirosT, R., elected Member, 1899, 143. 
Beavmont. W. W., Canal-Boat Propulsion. 1897. 207. 

Compound Steam Turbine, 1888, 4!'G. 

Compounding of Locomotives, 1890, 75. 

Electric Plant, 1898, 587. 

Electric Traction, 1898, 99. 

Gas Engines, 1889, 532, 533. 

Heat Distribution in Steam Engine, 1887, ■')-7. 

Marine-Engine Trials, 1890, 273. 

Mean-Pressure Indicator, 1899, 6 ii>. 

Eoad Locomotion, 1900, 283. 

Ropes and Belts, 1895, 64]. 

Steam Jacket. 1896, 492. 

Steam Laundry Machinery. 1898. 29.'. 

Throttling and Variable Expansion, 1885, 210. 

Triple-Expansion Engines, 1886, 530 ; 1887, 46. 
Beazley, E., elected Associate Member, 1893, 22u. 
Beck, J., elected Associate Member, 1897, 144. 
Beckton Gas Works, 1886, 411, 442-7. 
Becktox, W. R., elected Associate Member, 1897, 433. 
Beckmith, G., elected Member, 1887, 1. 
Beckwith, G. C, elected Member, 1891, 1. 
Beckwith, J. H., decease, 1899, G.— 3Iemei.'-, 1898, 7)1. 



38 B 

Bedbrook, J. A. H., elected Graduate, 1893, P.02 :— Associate Member, 1897, 433. 
Bee "Water Meter, 1900, 44. See Water IMcters. 
Beeley, T., Boiler-.'^hell Drilling' :\racluncs. 1894, ."iii-J. 

Hydraulic Power Supply, 1895, :!80. 
Beeley, T. C, elected Member, 1899, -lU-I. ' 

Beesly, G., elected Member, 1898, 141. 
Begbie, S. D., elected Associate Member, 1900, "_'. 
Begbie, W., elected Associate Member, 1899, 3. 
Beldam, A., elected Member, 1888, 2GS. 
Belfast, City and Trade, 1896, 271-7, 406-10. 

Belfast Electpjc Lighting, Paper by V. A, H. McLoweu, 1896, 304. — • 
Preliminary steps, 304. — Area supplied, 305. — Mode of distribution, 306. 
— Charges and pressures, 307. — Station, 307. — Engine room ; switchboard, 
308; connections, 309. — Battery, and regulation, 310. — Dynamos, 311. — 
Gas engines, tandem double-cylinder, and single-cylinder; cyclical 
variation, 311. — Governing, 312. — Graduation of explosions, 313; gas 
valve worked by expanding cam, 314. — Ignition tubes; lubrication and 
packing; cooling water, 314. — Gas supply, 315. — High-speed engines, 
315. — Starting arrangements, electrical or by compressed air ; compressed- 
air apparatus, 317. — Mains, feeders, and distributers, 318. — Culverts, 319. 
— General remarks : cost of current, 321 ; units generated during twelve 
months, 323. — Tabulated testa of tandem double-cylinder engine, 324; 
single-cylinder engine, 325 ; four-cylinder high-speed engines, 32G-S. 

Discussion. — Dolby, E. E., Gas engines ; quality of gas, and relative 
light, 329. — Donkin, B., Indicators; internal deposit in gas engines; 
duration of experiments, 330.— O'Brien, B. T., Comparative economy of 
gas and steam engines, 331. — Goodman, J., Consumption of gas, 331 ; 
governing, and starting arrangement, 332. — McLaren, H., Xoisc from gas 
engines ; cost of working, 333.— Carbutt, Sir E. H., Vibration of engines, 
333.— Greenhill, J. H., Adoption of gas engines, low economy therefrom, 
334.— "Wicksteed, J. H., Difficulties with gas engine at Yorkshire College, 
335. — Jenkin, C. F., Governing and stratification of charge, 337. — 
Eiches, T. H., Low voltage, 338.— McCowen, V. A. H., Vertical and 
horizontal gas-engines ; relative light obtained ; internal deposit in 
engines, 338 ; meclianicul eflBciency ; duration of tests ; gas consumption 
at Yorkshire College, 339 ; machinery running in parallel ; rope drives, 
340 ; cost of stores ; vibration ; total gas consumed, 341 ; low pressure of 
current, 342. — Goodman, J., Experiments on gas engines at Yorkshire 
College, and difiSculties encountered, 342. — McCowen, V. A. H., Tests of 
four-cylinder high-speed engines; calorific value of Glasgow and Belfast 
gas, 344. 
Belfast Fike Bbigade, 1896, 431. 



B 39 

Belfast Gas Woeks, 1888, 4:27— Paper by J. Stelfox, 1896, oOO.— Historical 
review, 390.— Extensions, 391.— Coal supply, 392.— Elevated railway, and 
cranes, 393.— Stoking machinery, 391.— Hydraulic power, 394.— Overhead 
piuifiers, 395.— Pipes and crossings, 39 J.— Water gas, apparatus and mode 
of working, 396.— Advantages of water gas : economy of space ; economy 
in outlay ; ease in dealing with raw material ; effect on residuals ; 
rapidity of production, 399 ; labour saving ; cost of gas production ; 
extension of water-gas system, 400.— Growth of gas production, 401. 
Belfast HAEBorE Works, 1888, 382, 430 ; 1896, 413, 420, 422. 
B-ELFAST Main Draixage Works and Pumpiug Stations, 1896, 430. 
Belfast Public Baths, 1896, 434. 

Belfast, deception at Summer meeting, 1888, 379 : — 1896, 271. 
Belfast PiOpework Co., Pope and Twine Manufactory, Connswater, Belfast, 

1888, 422 :— 1896, 437. 
Belfast Sujluek ]\lEETrN-G, 1896, 271.— Reception, 271.— Business, 278.— Votes 

of thanks, 281.— Excursions, &c., 402. 
Belfast Works, visited at Summer meeting, 1888, 382, 418-36 : — 1896, 402-3, 

422-59. 
Belgian Engineees, invitation to 1886 Summer meeting, London, 1886, 267 ; 
1887, 7.— Welcome by President, 1886, 268.— Attendance at meeting, 
1886, 273.— Provincial excursions, 1886, 273 ; 1887, 8.- Letter of thanks 
from Association of Engineers, Liege, 1887, 9.— Presentation, 1887, 475. 
Bell, A. D., elected Graduate, 1888, 2. 

Bell Brothers, Clarence Iron Works, :\Iiddlesbrough, 1893, 359. 
Bell, C. L., elected Member, 1885, 163.— Mayor of Middlesbrough, Welcome to 

Members at Summer Meeting, Middlesbrough, 1893, 217. 
Bell, C. S., elected Associate Member, 1900, 182, 
Bell, Capt. C. T., P. A., elected Member, 1897, 143. 
Bell,F., elected Graduate, 1898, 144. 
Bell, Sib J., Bart., Lord Provost, Welcome to Members at Summer meeting, 

Glasgow, 189S, 325. 
Bell, Sir L., Bart., Honorary Degree of " Master in Engineering " from 
University of Dublin, 1888, 270. 
Blast-Furnace Practice, 1889, 605-18, 620, 627. 
By-laws, 1885, 26. 
Canadian Locomotives, 1887, 242. 
Cleveland Industries, 1893, 253, 274. 
Condition of Carbon in Steel, 1885, 52, 55. 
Council, Annual Eeport, 1885, 21. 
Gas for Fuel, 1890, 412-4. 
Institution Business, 1885, 25. 
Middlesbrough Salt Industry, 1893, 295. 



40 B 

Bell, Sir L., (contiuucil) : — 

President, on retiring from office, 1885, 21 : — Reply to vote of tliauks, 23. 
Vote of thanks to President for Address, 1887, 184. 
"Water Works, Sheffield, 1890, 42'j. 
Bell, W., elected Associate Member, 1898, 540. 
Bell, W. T., elected Graduate, 1890, 2 : — transferred to Associate IMeniber, 

1898, a. 
Bell and Sons, Thomas, Belmont Works, Dundee, 1887, 4J7. 
Bellamy, A. Pv., elected Member, 1897, 14H. 
Bellefield Sand-Blast Works, Sheffield, 1890, 442, 4G4. 
Belliss and Co., Ledsam Street Engine Woiks, Birmingham, 1897, ;i78. 
Belliss, J., elected ^fember, 1897, 432. 
Bel3iont Works, Dundee, 1887, 457. 

Belting and Shaftinc, Power absoibed, 1828, 553. See Electric Plant. 
Belts, with plain or shaped links, 1894, 309, 314-5; 1888, 122. 
Belts and Kopes, 1895, 51 tH. See Ropes and Bilts. 
Bemrose and Sox.*, Printing Works, Derby, 1828, 4S0. 
Bemrose, Sir II. H., Derby Worthies, 1898, 45S. 
Benard;>s Arc Weldixi;, 1888, 107, 114-G, 124, 145; see Electric Enginecrins. 

—1896, 230 ; see Steel Steam-Pipes. 
Benn, S., elected Member, 1895, 149. 
Bennett, H. A. D., elected Graduate, 1800, 4. 
Bennett, H. B. S., Autographic Test Recorder, and Tests of Iron and Steel, 

1886, 84. 
Bennett, J. W., elected Ulembcr, 1894, 4G9. 

Bennett, P. D., appointed Jlember of Council, 1885, 70— Decea.^c, 1886, 3, 4, 
18, 20.— Memoir, 1885, 525. 
Institution Busines-s 1885, 25. 
Riveted Joints, 1885, 275, 289. 

Tests of Iron and Steel, Paper on Tensile Tesis of Irnn and Steel Bars, 
1886, 44. 
Bennett, W. B. G., Paper on the Southampton Sewage Precipitation AVorks 

and Refuse Di.structor, 1892, 354. — Remaiks thereon, 362, 3(J3. 
Bennetts, E. J., elected 3Iembcr, 1887, 1. 
Bennie, p., elected Member, 1900, 1. 
Bennington, J. W., elected 3Iember, 1895, 327. 
Bennion, C, elected Member, 18S5, 327. 
Bennis, A. W., elected Associate Member, 1895, 150: — transferred to !Momber, 

1899, 475. 
Bennison, W. C, elected Associate, 1886, 271. 
Bentley, G., elected Member, 1894, 1C9. 
Bentley, T. S., elected Associate ^Member, 1900, 182. 



B 41 

Bextlet, W., elected Associate, 1896, 280 :— transferred to Associate Memln r, 

1898, 5 :— transferred to 31ember, 19C0, 184. 
Bequest from Sir J. 'Whitworth, 1888, 4. 

Bekchem, a. H. E., elected Member, 1895, 1. 

Beresford, The Eight Hon. Eear- Admiral Lord I harles, Paper on Openings fur 

MecLanical Engineers in China, 1899, 52','. — Ivemarks theicon, 528, 

561. 
Position of Engineers in Fleet, 1899, 151. 
Berkley, J. E., elected Member, 1890, 175. 
Bernays, J., Water Meters, 1900, 77. 
Berriek-Foxtaise, M., Paper on a rortablc Hydraulic Drilling !Mncliine, 1887, 

72. — Remarks thereon, 81. 
Berky, H., elected Member, 1893, 220. 
Berry, J. F., elected Member, 1893, 301. 
Berry, T., elected Associate ]Member, 1898, 51G. 
Berthiez, C, elected Member, 1897, 4:;2. 
Beutraji, A., elected Member, 1890, 207.— Decease, ISOC, (J.— Jlcmoir, 1899, 

127. 
Bertram, D. N., elected Member, 1891, 196. 
Bertram, George and William, St. Katherine's Taper Machinciy Works, 

Edinburgh, 1887, 43i». 
Beetuam, W., elected Member, 1887, 157.— Decease, 18S3, 4. 
Bessbrook axd Newry Electric Eailway, 1888, :i78, 416. 
Bessbrook Spinning Mills, 1888, 378, 415. 
Bessemer, Sir H., decease, 1899, 6, 7. — Memoir, 1898, 133. 
Best, F. E., elected Member, 1891, 300. 
Beswick, F. a., elected Member, 1899, 473. 
Bettig, R., elected Associate Member, 1899, 14."..— Deccas?, 1900, G.— Memoir, 

1899, G13. 

Betts, S., elected Member, 1893, 391. 

Beven, a. N., elected Associate Member, 1899, 3. 

Beves, N. E., elected Associate Member, 1889, 145. 

Bevis, a. W., elected Member, 1891, 1. 

Bewley, T. a., decease, 1890, 3.— Memoir, 1889, 710. 

Beyer, Peacock, and Co., Gorton Foundry, Manchettpr, 1894, 427. 

Portable Pneumatic Tools, 1900, 173. 
BiBBY, J. T., Bag-Making Machine, 1869, 039. 
BiCKLE AND Co., Engineering AVorks, Plymouth, 1899, 4."0. 
Bickle, T. E., elected Member, 1892, l(jl.— Decease, 1899, 0.— Memoir, 1898, 

308. 
BicKLE Rock-Drill, 1891, 144. See Rock-Drills. 
Bicknell, a. C, elected Member, 1885, 402. 



42 B 

BiCKNELL, E., decease, 1899, C— Memoir, 1898, 308. 

Bicycles, 1885, 4G7; see Construction of Cycles.— 1886, 128: see Wheel Load in 
Cjcles. 

BiGGAKT, A. S., Paper on Hydraulic Stoking Machinery and Labour-Saving 
Appliances in modern Gas AVorks, 1895, 331. — Remarks thereon, 348. 

BiGGEK, C, elected Graduate, 1896, 280 .-—Associate Member, 1898, :i41. 

BiLBiE, J., elected Member, 1898, :;ii). 

Biles, J. H., elected Member, 1899, 292. 

Bill, Akchitects' Registration, retitiou of Council, 1888, 100; circular, 1G3; 
statement, 1G4. 

Billetop, T. C, elected Member, 1897, 2oG. 

BiLLiNTOX, R. J., elected Member, 1888, 139. 

Bingham, C. H., elected Member, 1890, 297.— Decease, 1901, G.— Memoir, 1900, 
622. 

Bixnie, Sir A. R., elected Member, 1887, 173.— Knighthood, 1897, 27G; 
1898, 4. 

Birch. J. (;., elected Associate, 1890, 472.— Decease, 1901, G.— Memoir, 1900, 
623. 

Birch, R. AV. P., decease, 1897, .-).— Memoir, 1896, o9G. 

Birckel, J. J., AVarp AVeaving, 1889, 49o. 

Bird, G., elected Member, 1891, 300. 

Bird, AA'. H., elected Member, 1897, 1. 

BiRKBECK, J. A., Disposal of Slag, 1892, 93. 

Birkenhead Forge, 1891, 4.j3. 

Birkenhead Iron A\''okks, 1891, 432, 431. 

Biukett, H., Graduate transferred to ^Member, 1895, 3. 

Birmingham Electric Supply Station, 1897, 'M'.K 

Birmingham Gas AVorks, 1897, 370, 373. 

Birmingham Small Arms and ]Metal AA'orks, 1897, 381. 

Birmingham Summer Meeting, 1897.— Announcement, 10, 26, 143.— Reception, 
253.— Business, 235.— A'otes of thanks, 282.— Excursions, &c., 363.^ 
Presentations, 437. 

Birminghaji AVater AA'orks, Paper on the City of Birmingham Corporation AV^ater 
AA^orks, by H. Davey, 1897, 297.— Origin and progress of undertaking, 
297 ; transfer to corporation, 299.— Present extent ; AVelsh supply, 300.— 
Interim resources, streams and wells, 301. — Service reservoirs; pumping 
stations, 302.— Steam pumps, improvement and economy, 303. — Pumping 
engines at pumping stations and at wells, 304-3. — Testing of engine 
slack, 306.— AVells, and yield, 307.— Aston engines, 307; alteration in 
steam supply, 308. — Edgbaston station; stand-pipe, and variation in 
hourly consumption, 308. — Dry seasons ; consumption per head per day, 
309. — Cost of pumping, 310. — Hydraulic power supply, 310. 



43 



BiRMixGUAM AVater Works, 1897 (continued) : — 

Discussion. — Davey, H., Fluctuation in supply, oil. — Lougridge. M., 
Compoimding high and low-pressure engines; water-tube boilers for low 
pressures, ol2. — Donkin, B., Gas engines in hydraulic power station ; 
testing of engine slack, 312. — Unwin, W. C, Calorific value of engine 
slack, heat thrown away in chimney, 313. — Pertwee, H. A., "Working of 
compound non-condensing engine with low-pressure engines, 313. — Davey, 
n., "Water-tube and Lancashire boilers ; gas-engines at hydraulic power 
station ; testing of engine slack, 314 ; working of compound engine with 
high-pressure and low-pressure boilers, 315. — ^Richards, E. W., Yote of 
thanks, 315. 
BiKTWijTLE, R., elected IMember, 1888, 2GS.— Decease, 1893, 1.— Memoir, 1892, 

22:!. 
Bishop, C. H., elected Associate Member, 1900, 9(J. 
Bishop, H., elected Associate Member. 1893, 392. 
Bishop of Li>xoLy, Address in Lincoln Cathedral, 1885, 306, 434. 
BijsCHOP Gas Exgixe, 1889, 506. See Gas Engines. 

Black, J. M., elected Member, 1897, 1.— Decease. 1899. 6.— IMemoir. 1898, 528. 
Black, P. B., elected Member, 1896, 278. 
Black, "W., elected Member, 1891, 196. 

Blackburn ant) Sons, Hosiery ^lachinery Works, Nottingham. 1898, 517. 
Blackbcex, A. H., elected Member, 1891, 3;i0. 
Blackburn, G. AV., elected Member, 1891, 196. 
Blackburn, J., elected Member, 1890, 175. 
Blacklead Works, Plymouth, 1899, 458. 
Blackness Foundry, Dundee, 1887, 453. 
Blackstone, E. C, elected Member, 1898, 340. 
Blaik, G., elected Graduate, 1895, 150, 

Blaik, p. B., elected Member, 1890, 471.— Decease, 1892, 4.— Memoir, 1891, 189. 
Blake, H. W., decease, 1900, 6.— Memoir, 1899, 467. 
Blakiston, E., elected Associate ^Member, 1897, 433. 
Blandford, T., elected Member, 1886, 125. 
Blane, W., elected Member, 1898, 546. 
Blast-Furnace Economies, 1889, 225. See Address of President, Charles 

Cochrane. 
Blast-Furnace Practice, Paper on the results of Blast-Furnace Practice with 
Lime instead of Limestone as Flux, by the President, Charles Cochrane, 
1889, 589.— Piatio of carbonic acid to carbonic oxide in escaping gases 
from blast-furnace, 589.— Combustion of carbon into carbonic oxide 
wholly, and, subsequent formation of carbonic acid by reduction of oxide 
of iron, 590.— Theoretical perfection of work, and loss by re-conversion of 
carbonic acid into carbonic oxide, 591. — Two sources of carbonic acid 



44 B 

Bi.AST-FuRNACE PRACTICE, Fopcr 1889 (continued) : — 

when using limestone as flux, 502. — Advantage of larger capacity of 
blast-furnace, 593. — Comparison between working on limestone and 
on lime respectively as flux, 59 i; tabulated accounts of supply and 
expenditure of heat per ton of pig-iron made, 595-7. — Economy when 
working on lime, 598. — Calculation of mischief done in red-hot coke 
region by carbonic acid of reduction and by carbonic acid from flux, 598. 
— Two sources of transfer of carbon from condition of carbonic acid to 
tliat of carbonic oxide, 600. — Two causes of diminution in carbonic acid 
of reduction when working on lime, (JOl ; comparison in this respect 
between working on limestone and on lime, tjflli. — General conclusions : 
diminished consumption of air and increased output of iron when working 
on lime, G02. — Two errors in former Paper : omission of carbon for melting 
pig-iron, and over-estimate of loss in transfer of carbon from condition of 
carbonic acid to that of carbonic oxide, fiO:5. 

Discuxfion. — Bell, Sir L., Part., Samples of escaping gases, 605 : ratio 
of carbonic acid to carbonic oxide, 005 ; experiments bearing on limit of 
ratio, 606. — Cochrane, C, Limit of carbonic acid for perfect working, C09. 
— Bell, Sir L., Higher limit attained than shown in paper, 610 ; cfttct of 
hotter blast, 610; heat supplied into blast-furnace per unit of coke burnt, 
til 1 ; substitution of lime for limestone as flux, 612 ; appropriation of heat 
in blast-furnace jier ton of pig-iron, 61:5 ; alleged economy of coke by use 
of lime, 615 ; obstacles to perfect reduction of oxide of iron at top of 
furnace, 615; weight of oxygen and carbon in blast-furnace gases at 
(lifl'erent depths in furnace, 616; low consumption of fuel in Styrian 
furnaces, 617; heat for melting pig-iron, 618 ; reduction of blast when 
working on lime, 618. — Richards, E. AV., Eston furnaces drove better when 
working on lime, 619; considerable variation in proportion of carbonic 
acid did not affect working, 619. — ^lartin, E. P., Uifl"erence between high 
and low bla»t-furnaces using lime. 620. — Evans, D., Advantage of using 
lime iu low furnaces, 620. — Bell, Sir L., Benefit from using lime in low 
furnaces, 620. — Cochrane, C, Experiments not bearing upon proper 
conditions of blast-furnace working, 620; working compared at same 
temperature of blast, 621 ; saving by use of caustic lime, 622 ; 
disadvantages in working on lime, 622 ; coke consumed with limestone 
and with lime, (;22 ; perfect reduction in upper regions of furnace, 623 ; 
balance in favour of lime, 624; dissociation of carbonic oxide, 624; 
consumption of coke for melting pig-iron, 625 ; economy of working 
depends upon quality of ironstone, 626 ; increased make of pig-iron by 
use of lime, 626. — Bell, Sir L., Calcination of ironstone, and heating 
power of coke, 627. — Cochrane, C, Practical heating power of coke, 627 ; 
approximate agreement between Sir L. Bell's coke consumiition and his 



B 45 

BLAST-FrRXACE Pbactice. Discusswn, 1889 (continued) :— 

own, 628; example of perfect reduction of ironstone, G20. — Toraliuson. J., 
Diversity of opinion owing to size of blast-furnaces, G29. 

Blasx-Furxace Slag, Disposal. 1892, 70. See Disposal of Slag. 

Blast-Fikxaces, Cleveland, 1893, 225, 230 ; American, 23G, 265. See Cleveland 
Industries. 

Blast-Fuexaces in Britain. America, Germany and Luxemburg, France, and 
Belgium, 1896, 109-30. See Address of President, E. Windsor Kichards. 

Blaxtek. a. P.. Jux"., elected Associate Member, 1895, 2 : — transferred to 
Member, 1899, 475. 

Blechtxdex, a., decease, 1898, 5.— Memoir, 18S7, 131. 

Marine Engineering, Paper on Marine Engineering during the past 
decade, 1891, 306. — Piemarks thereon, 3G4, 370. 

Blecutxdex, J., elected Member. 1892, 101. 

Blexkixsop, J. N., elected Member. 1899, 292. 

Blissett, p. T., elected Associate Member. 1899, 3. 

BloomiX'; Mill, Paper on a Blooming 3Iill with Balanced Top Roll at the 
Ebbw Vale Works, by C. B. Holland, 1885, 292.— KoUs, 292.— Balanced 
top roll, and tightening- down gear, 293. — Engines and gearing, 294. — 
Tipping and traversing gear, 294. — Live rollers. 295. — Shears, 296. 

Discussion. — Wood, T., Working of Mill, 296. — Head, J., Disadvantages 
of feathers on wheels, 296 ; value of helical teeth, 297. — Schonheyder, W., 
Working of tightening-down screws, 297. — Wood, T., Wheels with straight 
teeth, 298 ; extent of tightening-down, 298. — Head, J., Eamsbottom 
reversing engines for rolling-mill work, 293 ; hydraulic power for 
balancing top roll and for handling ingots, 29S. 

Bloixt, B., Alloys Research, 1893, 164, 168; 1895, 291. 

Blowixg ExGixES, 1893, 233; 1896, 116. 

BLrMFiELD, T. W., elected Associate Member, 1896, 279. 

BLrxDSTOXE, S. E., Graduate transferred to Member, 1886, 3. 

Blyth, E. B., elected. Graduate, 1899, 204. 

BocQUET, H. C, Graduate transferred to Member, 1895, 3. 

BocQUET, W. S., decease, 1890, 3.— Memoir, 1889, 747. 

BoDDEX, G., decease, 1887, 3.— Memoir, 1886, 461. 

BoDJiER, G. R., Condensation and Re-evaporation, 1889, G92. 
Heat Distribution in Steam Engine, 1887, .330. 
Marine-Engine Trials, 1890, 265. 

BoEnurxGHArs, J., Warp Weaving, 1889, 491. 

BoFFEY, W., elected Member, 1898, 340. 

Boiler Constructigx', Paper on some details in the Construction of modern 
Lancashire Boilers, by S. Boswell, 1891, 484. — Steel, 484. — Lamination of 
plates, 485. — Test strips ; testing, tensile and bending, 485. — Sizes of 



46 B 

Boiler Constrcction, Paper, 1891 (continued) : — 

plates, 48G. — Form of joints, 4S7. — Thinning of corners, 487. — Planing 
of edges, 488. — Bending of plates, 488. — Drilling of rivet holes, 489. — 
Eiveting, 490.— Flues, 492. — Welding of seam, 492. — Circular joints, 493. 
— Calking, 494. — End plates, 494 : attachments to shell and to flues, 495. 
— Gusset stays and angles, 49G. — Longitudinal bolt-staj's, 497. — ISIounting 
blocks, 498. — Hydraulic testing, 499 ; limit of test pressure, 500. 

Discussion. — Boswell, S., Samples of riveting, 502; gauging of end 
plates, r)03. — Kennedy, A. B. "U'., Boilers for high pressures, 503. — Halpin, 
D., Factor for quality of steel, 50:5 ; size of boiler plates, 504 ; butt-strap 
ends, 501; riveting, 505; circular joints for flues, 505; calking, 505: 
gusset stays and mountings, 50(). — Schonheyder, AV., Removal of scale 
before riveting, 506 ; stiffness of flue circular joints, 50G ; strengthening 
of shell at manhole, 507; circumferential seams, 508. — White, W. H., 
Test pressures, 508. — Aspinall, J. A. F., Annealing of plates, 5(t9 ; 
pneumatic calking tool, 509; removal of burr, 510; IMarshall, H. D., 
Locomotive boilers, 510. — Tweddell, E. H., Objection to calking, 510; 
use of drift, 511 ; drilling and punching, 511 ; machine and hand riveting, 
512; flanging machine, 513; attachment of flues to end plates, 513; 
boiler testing, 514. — Jenkinson, W., Leakage from flanged joints, 514. — 
Marten, E. B., Labour-saving took, 515; boiler explosions, 510; thinning 
of plate corners, and bending of plates, 517. — Crosland, J. F. L., Increase 
of pressure in Lancashire boilers, 518; -width of plates, 518; test 
pressure, 519. — Head, J., Size of boiler plates, 519 ; manufacture of 
plates, 520 ; testing. 520 ; bending of plates after drilling, 522 ; factor of 
.safety in boilers, 522. — Phillips, J., Bending of plates, 523. — Boswell, S., 
Innovations in boiler construction, 523; high pressure, 523; tensile 
strength of steel plates, 524 ; stop-water rivet, 524 ; Bowling hoop, 524 ; 
calking and fullering, 525 ; steam-tightness without calking, 525 ; gusset 
stays, 526 ; removal of scale from joints, 526 ; staying of end plates, 526 ; 
test-pressure, 527 ; removal of burr, 527 ; angle for plate edges, 527 ; 
punching, 527 ; machine riveting, 528 ; flanging, 528 ; testing, 529 ; 
flanged flue-joint, 529; manhole doubling plate, 529; boiler explosions, 
529 ; table of boiler explosions in 1865-1890, 530-2 ; bulging of boiler 
plate, 533 ; bending rolls, 538 ; large plates, 533 ; double and triple 
riveting, 533 ; lamination, 534 ; drilling and bending, 5.34 ; steel and iron 
rivets, 5.34 ; horizontal and vertical bending rolls, 534. — Tomlinsou, J., 
Improvement of boilers by Daniel Adamson, 534. — Hiller, E, G., Modern 
and earlier boilers, 535 ; testing strips, 536 ; butt joints and straps, 537 ; 
shell ring seams, 537 ; drilling and punching, 538 ; construction of flues, 
538 ; strengthening of flues, 538 ; gusset stays and angles, 540 ; hydraulic 
test, 540.— Turnbull, A., Steel mounting blocks, 541.— Katlifl'e, G., Steel 



B 47 

Boiler CoysTErcxiON, Di^cu^Hon, 1891 (continued) : — 

castings, 541. — Kixk, A. C, Riveting, 541. — Boswell, S., Steel castings, 
542. 

Boiler DRAroHT, Locomotive, 1893, ino. See Locomotive Boiler Draught. 

Boiler Firing, Mechanical, at Peel Mills, Bury, 1894, 44G. 

Boiler Furx.^ces, Artificial Draught. 1886, 38ii, 39.j, 489, 498, 499. 

Boiler-Shell Drillixg-Machixes, Paper on Drilling Machines for Cylindrical 
Boiler Shells, by S. Dixon, 1894, 506.— Origin of drilling of boiler plates, 
506. — Growth of drilling ; early machine with multiple fixed drills, 507. — 
Suspended boiler-shell drilled on opposite sides, 508. — Sliding drill- 
standards, 509. — Sliding drills on fixed standards, 510. — Tall standard for 
two tiers of drills: drilling radial holes side by side, 511. — 3Iultiple 
drilling machine, 513. — Speed of drills and rate of feed, 514. — Modified 
machines for drilling special work, 515. 

Discussion. — Dixon, S., Feed-motion of drills, 516 : drilling shells of 
locomotive boilers, 517. — Adamson, J., Origin of drilling rivet holes, 517 : 
steel-boilers ; multiple drilling machine, 518 ; time of changing work on 
machine, 519. — Hulse, J. "W., Drilling boiler shells placed horizontally, 
520 ; plural drilling machine for locomotive boilers, 521 ; multiple drilling 
machine for marine boilers, 522. — Beeley, T., Early objections to multiple 
drilling, 522: multiple and single drilling, 523: need of rigid resistance 
to drill against, 524 ; different speeds of drill and rates of feed ; twist- 
drill, 525 : material of boiler plates, 526. — Dolby, E. R., Over-ruuning of 
drill in quick return, 527. — Head, J., Past and present boiler-making, 
527 ; alloy of aluminium and copper for under-frames of railway vehicles : 
open-hearth basic steel for boiler plates and ship plates, 529. — Eobinson, 
L. S., Drilling holes for tubes in tubulous boilers, 530. — Dixon, S., Pdgid 
support for boiler shell against drills, 530 ; horizontal and vertical drilling, 
531 ; locomotive-boiler drilling-machine ; reversal of drills ; necessity for 
rigidity in drilling-machines, 532 ; gauge for advance and return of drills ; 
drilling locomotive tube-plates, 533. — Kennedy, A. B. VT., Contrast of 
former boiler-making and present manufacture, 533. 

BuiLER AVorks, Belfast, 1896, 441, 451, 457.— Cleveland, 1893, 235.— Derby, 
1898, 490.— Glasgow and district, 1895, 497, 501-2, 509.— Manchester 
and district, 1894, 432, 439, 455.— Oldbury, 1897, 368, 409. 

Boilers of Iron and Steel, 1885, 319. See Address of President, Jeremiah Head. 

BoLAXD, Messrs., Eingsend Eoad Flour Mill, and City of Dublin Bakery, 
Dublin, 1888, 408. 

BoLCKOW, VArcHAN, AXD Co.. Cleveland Steel and Iron Works, Middlesbrough, 
1893, 354.— South Bank Iron Works, 3Iiddlesbrough, 1893, 359. 

Bolsover Colliery Co., Creswell Colliery, 1898, 461, 525. 

BOLTOX, A. S., Electric Engineering, 1888, 114. 



48 B 

BoLTOx, E., Eock Drills, 1891, 177. 

Bon Marche Electric Lighting and Eepairing Shops, Paris, 1889, 547, 506. 

Bond, G. C, elected Member, 1895, 517. 

Bone, J. E., Chairman of East Stonehouse Urban District Council, Welcome to 

Members at Summer meeting, Plymouth, 1899, 289. 
Book and General Printing Machinkhy, 1899, 10:!. See Typographic Printing 

Machinery. 
BooRJiAN, J. A., elected Member, 1895, 1. 

Longworth Power-Hammer. 1800, 109. 
Boot, H., Evaporative Condensers. 1899, 2il. 
Booth, J. W., elected Member, 1892, 413. 
Booth, E., elected Member, 1890, 2t»7. 
Booth, W. H., Steam Superheating, 1896, 'Jiil. 
BjOTH, W. S., Graduate transferred to IMeniber. 1891, :!.— Decease, 1895, 4.— 

Memoir, 110. 
BoREHAM, G. H., elected Graduate, 1900, UT. 

BoRNS, G.M., elected Member, 1892, 1.— Decease, 1894, 1.— Memoir, 1893, 480. 
BoRODiNE, A., decease, 1899, C— Memoir, 1898, 528. 

Steam-Jacketing and Compounding, Vuper upon E.xperiments on the 

Steam-Jacketing and Compoumling of Locomotives in Uussia, 1886, 

297.— Eemarks thereon, :563, 4li:;. 
Steam Pumps, Taper on the "Working of Steam Pumps on the llussiau 

South Western llailways, 1893, 483. — Eemarks thereon, 477. 
BoRRiE, J., decease, 1885, :;.— IMcmoir. 1884, 3118. 
BoRRiES (ViiN) AND WoRSDELL Compound Locomotive."?, 1889, 87. — See Compound 

Locomotives. 
Borrow?, W., elected Member, 1888, 443. —Decease, 1901, G. — Memoir, 

1900, C23. 
BosLEY, W. J., elected Associate :\rembcr. 1E96, 102. 
BoswELL, S., elected Member, 1891, 1. 

Boiler Construction, Paper on some details in the Constmction of modern 

Lancashire Boilers, 1891, 481.— Eemarks thereon, 502, 523-34, 542. 
Experimental Marine Engine, 1891, 413. 
B0TANic.\L Gardens, Edgbaston, Birmingham, 1897, 382. 
BoTT, W. S., elected Graduate, 1900, 97. 
BoTTOULEY, J. W., elected Member, 1899, 3. 
Boudenoot and Petit, Vacuum Power Supply, Paris, 1889, 557. 
BoTJGHTON, H. F., elected Member, 1885, 1. 
BoLLDEN, F., elected Associate ^lember, 1895, 150. 

BouLDiNG, S., elected Graduate, 1888, 2 ;— transferred to Member, 1893, 3. 
BouLNOis, H. P., Liverpool Motive Power, 1892, GO. 
BouLT, A. J., elected Member, 1886, 4G5. 



B 49 

r.orLTBEE, F. E., elected :Member, 1888, 1. 
BouLTOS, C. v., elected Graduate, 1900, 503. 
BouLTiN, J., Gas-Engine Research, 1898, 25;). 

Marine-Engine Triab, 1892, 169. 
BornxE, T. J., elected Graduate, 1886, 466 : — transferred tu Member, 

1893, 3. 
BouSFiELD, J. E., elected Member, 1891, 470. 
BorTS, T., elected Associate Member, 1898, 142. 
BowDEX, J. H., elected Graduate. 1897, 144. 
BowEX, E., elected Member, 1888, 1. 
Bow?:r, a., decease, 1892, 4.— :Memoir, 1891, 189. 
Bo-WER, H. A. E., elected Graduate, 1899, 47.">. 
BowKEE, A. F., elected Member, 1892, 1. 
Bowleg, T., elected Member, 1899, o. 
BowMAX, Dr. F. H., elected Associate, 1892, 229. 
BowMAx, H., elected ^lember, 1899, 473. 
Box, W. L., elected Graduate, 1900, 503. 
Boyd. C. A., elected 3Iember, 1900, 181. 
Boyd, J. T., elected :Memher, 1893, 220. 
Boyd, J. W., elected Member, 1890, 471. 
Boyd, 'NV., elected Associate Member, 1900, 502. 

BoYEB Drill, 1900, 139 : — Hammer, 126. See Portable Pneumatic Tool.s. 
BoYER, B. 8., Canadian Lrcomotives, 1887, 229. 

Spherical Eccentric, 1885, 428. 

Steam Xavvy, 1885, 364. 
Boys, C. V., Cycles. Construction, 1885, 506, 516, 520. 

Cycles, Wheel Load, 1886, 162, 170. 

Bange-Finders. 1896, 63. 

Eoad Locomotion, 1900, 253. 
BkICebrldge Gas Works, Lincoln, 1885, 445. 
Bradford Drill, 1900, 157, 177. See Portable Pneumatic Tools. 
Bradley, A. A., elected Graduate, 1888, 444. 
Bradley, C. G., elected Graduate, 1899, 5. 
Bradley, G. T., elected Associate Member, 1898, 2. 
Bradley, I., elected Member, 1889, 203. 
Bradley", J. W., elected Associate Member, 1897, 2 : — transferred to Member, 

1899, 147. 
Bejadxey, W., elected Member, 1896, 1. 
Bradshaw, G. T. M., elected Member, 1897, 1. 
Bragge, "W., decease, 1885, 3.— :Memoir, 1884, 398. 
Brake Gear for Steam Dredger, 1888, 3G5. See Frictional Gearing. 
Bramsdox, W. H., E.X., elected Member, 1900, 1. 

D 



50 B 

Brasiwell, Sir F., Bart., Baronetcy, 1889, 22. 

Atmospheric Eailway, Paper on the South Devon Atmospheric Railway, 
preceded by certain remarks on the Transmission of Energy by a 
partially rarefied Atmosphere, 1899, 299. — Remarks thereon, o2(j. 

Cleveland Industries, 1893, 264. 

Dockyard Lifting and Hauling, 1892, :;!I5. 

Electric Traction, 1898, 101. 

Glass Revcaler, 1900, 5.'!li. 

High-Speed Engine, 1894, 230. 

Incru8t;ition of Torquay Water Mains, 1899, 523. 

Marine-Engine Trials, 1892, ICo. 

Naval Electrical Apparatus, 1892, 2'.il. 

Outlet A'alves at Burrator Reservoir, 1899, 4IG, 417. 

President, A'ote of thanks to President for Address, 1892, i:;i : 1894. 210, 
212.— Vote of thanks to Retiring President, 1898, 33 : 1899, :;i. 

Propeller Ventilating Fans, 1897, 482. 

Salt Industry, Middlesbrough. 1893, 2!>i. 

Sewage Outfall, I'ajyer on tlie Portsmouth Sewage Outfall Works, 1892, 
319.— Remarks thereon, 332, 342. 

Steam Jacket, 1892, 493. 

Tees Engineering Improvements, 1893, 328. 

Training of Engineer Students, 1899, :is;i. 

Watch Screws, 1894, 4'.i:;. 
Bu.vM), D. J., elected .Alember, 1892, 413.— Decease, 1899, G :— Memoir, ITii. 
Bkasses, 1897, 3G. iSee Alloys Research. 

Bi!Ass-Melting Firks, 1889, 51. See Petroleum Fuel in Locomotives. 
BuATT, A. H. H., elected Member, 1888, 443.— Decease. 1897, 5 :— [Memoir, 132. 
Bratt, E. H. F., elected Member, 1895, 547. 
BivEAKDOWNS of Stationary Steam-Kngiues, 1896, '>'.>(>. See Steam-Engine 

Breakdowns. 
Breakwaters in River Tees, 1893, 319, 32G. 
Breakley, B. J., elected Member, 1885, 1. 
Brearley, F. T., elected Member. 1900, 1. 
liREBVER, A., Electric Lighthouse, 1887, 3G1. 
Bkebxer, S. G., elected Member. 1889, 1. — Decease, 1896, 4. —Memoir, 

1895, 308. 
Bheckenridge, L. p., French Locomotive Practice, 1900, 413. 
Hreepen-, J., decease, 1894, 4.— Memoir. 1893, 490. 
Bremxer, B. L., elected Graduate, 1887, 474. 
Bremner, D. a., elected Member, 1900, 501. 
Bremner-Davis, W. J., elected Associate Member, 1896, 4G2. 
Bbessey-, C. E., elected Graduate, 1898, 547. 



B 51 

Brett, A. W., elected Associate Member, 1898, 546. 

Brewekies, Apparatus for Drying wet by-products in breweries, &c., 1889, 307. 
See Drying in Vacuum. 

Bbewekies.— Bass, Ratcliff, and Gretton, Burton-on-Trent, 1898, 4G0, 504.— 
Kenry Mitchell and Co., Smethwick, Birmingham, 1897, 395. — Arthur 
Guiimess, Son, and Co., St. James's Gate, Dublin, 1888, 327, 378, 399. 

Brewery Tramways axd Kullixg Stock, Paper on Tramways and Rolliug Stock 
at Guiunesa's Brewery, by S. Geo^^hegan, 1888, 327. — Nature of 
requirements, 327. — Design of line, gradients, and curves, 328. — Spiral 
tunnel, 329. — Zigzag, 329. — Permanent way, 330. — Points and crossings, 
331. — Rolling stock, 331. — Locomotives, earlier kinds, 331 ; difficulties 
to be overcome, 332 ; coupling-rods and axle-boxes, 332 ; bogey spring- 
frame, 333 ; brake gear, boiler, wheel-base, drag hooks, 334. — Tip wagons, 
331; coupling bars, 336. — Bogey wagons, 336. — Haulage truck, 337. — 
Traffic, 338.— Signals, 338. 

Discussion. — Carbutt, E. H., Traffic in Crewe locomotive works, 340 ; 
ingenuity in details of author's rolling stock, 341. — Haughton, S. W., 
Suggested diagonal connecting-rods on locomotive, 341. — Adamson, D., 
Traffic, 342; locomotive boiler, 342; cost of haulage on Stockton and 
Darlington railway, 342 ; early engines and rails, 342 ; haulage truck and 
break of gauge, 343 ; economy of power, 344. — Aspinall, J. A. F., Distance 
of moving materials, 344 ; advantage of tramways, 3i5 ; narrow-gauge 
tramways and rolling stock at Horwich locomotive works, 346. — Strype, 
W. G., Traffic in old brewery, 316 ; original tramway and locomotives, 317; 
construction of tunnel, ^317 ; nature of ground, 348 ; gauge for Irish 
railways, 348. — Dobson, B. A., Lower cost of railways in America, 349 ; 
tramways for engineering works, 350 ; tram rails and horse traffic, 351. — 
Paget, A., Coupling bars of wagons, 351 ; spiral incline, 3.j1. — Head, .J., 
Tramways in iron and stetl works, 351 ; haulage truck, and uneven 
wear of engine tirts, 352 ; helical gearing, 352 ; coupling-rods, 352. — 
Worthingtou, E., Engines with motion above boiler and below, 353 : 
tramway engine hauling railway trucks by ropes, 354 ; transference of oil 
barrels down inclines, 354. — Lapage, R. H., Gauge of railways, 354 : 
compounding of tramway engines, 355. — ^Wilson, A. B., Haulage on 
tramways by locomotives, 355 ; tramways at shipbuilding works without 
locomotives, 355 ; turntables, 356 ; reduction of gauge on Irish railways, 
357. — Carbutt, E. H.. Alteration of gauge on Great Western Railway, 357. 
— Geoo'hegan, S., Diagonal coupling-rods not suitable for locomotive with 
springs, 358 ; traffic in brewery, 35S ; cm-ves on broad-gauge and narrow- 
<;auge lines, 358 ; wear of horn-blocks, 358 ; Irish gauge, and section of 
tram rails, 350 ; small lines for factories, 359 ; attachment of coupling bars 
to wagons, 359 ; spiral tunnel, 360 ; uneven wear of engine tires, 360 ; slip 



52 B 

Brewery Tramways axd Rolling Stock, Di$ciii>'io)i, 1888 (continued). 

of wheels on rails, 360 ; helical gearing, flexible coupling-rods, moving of 
casks on slides, compounding of engines, sharp curves preferable to 
turntables, 301 ; cost of locomotives and repairs, ."fil. 
BiiEwsTEK, E. H. G., elected Member, 1891, 47'J. 
Southampton Water Works, 1893, 7."). 
Steam Pumps, 1893, 4G4. 
Brewster, W. S., elected Member, 1890, 471. 
Brick Works, Belfast.— Annadale, 1896, 437.— Oimeau, 1888, 4-2S. 
Bridge, Floating, Ijetween Portsmouth and Gosport, 1892, 344, 3r.8. See 

Floating Bridge. 
Bridge, Forth ; Machinery employed at the Forth Bridge Works, 1887, 31-2. St-e 

Forth Bridge Machinery. 
Bridge, Forth ; Structure and Progress of the Forth Bridge, 1887, 287. See 

Forth Bridire. 
Bridge, Sukkur : Cantilevers for Sukkur Bridge, India. 1886, 4.")7. 
Bridge, Tay. 1887, 373, 438. See Tay ^'iaduct. 
Bridges and Roofs of Iron and Steel, 1885, :'.18. See Address of President, 

Jeremiah Head. 
Bridgewater ForxDRY, Patricroft, 1894, 4:!<;. 
Bridie, R. H., elected Member, 1891, 47'J. 

Bkidi,e-Bit and Nickel-Pl.\tixg Work.s, Wal.«-all, 1897, 'M>S, 111. 
BiUER, H., elected Member, 1887, 473. 
Briggs, C, Jun., elected Member, 1889, 203. 
Briggs, H., elected Associate Blember, 1898, 142. 
BiuGGS, J. H., Milling Cutters, 1890, .")42. 
Bright, C, elected IMember, 1897, 143. 
Bright, P., elected Member, 1889, 34t;. 
Rock Drills. 1891, 172. 
Water Meters, 1900, <;i. 
Bright, W., elected Member, 1886, 46.'). 
Brighton Locomotive and Carriage Works, London Brighton and South Coast 

Railway, 1892, 370, 401. 
Brighton Technical School, 1892, 370, 402. 
BuiGHTSiDE Boiler and Engine Works, Sheffield, 1890, 442, 4.')0. 
Brix's Oxygen Works. 1890, 46, 131. See Oxygen Manufacture. 
Brixdlet, G. S., elected Member, 1894, 1. 
Brindley, H. S. B., elected Associate INIember. 1898, 547. 
Brine, 1893, 283. See Middlesbrough Salt Industry. 
Britannia and West Marsh Steel and Iron Works, Middlesbrough, 1893, 

339. 
Britannia Iron ant) Wire Works, Lincoln, 1885, 41.1. 



53 



Britannia Ikon Works, Gainsborough, 1885, i35, ii'J-oi]. 

Britannia Works, Manchester, 1894, 420. 

British Aluminium Works, Milton, 1898, 34S, 4G0. 

British METAL-ExpANf;ioN Works, West Hartlepool, 1893, 336, 387. See also 

1891, 382. 
Britten, T., elected Graduate, 1894, -ITO : — Associate Member, 1900, 353. 
Britten, T. J., elected Member, 1895, 149. 
Broadbent, W., elected Member, 1891, 479. 
Bkoaufoot, a. W., elected Slember, 1896, 278. 
Brock, C. W. H., elected Member, 1891, 1. 
Bhocklehukst, G., elected Member, 1896, 278. 
Brodie, J. A., elected Member, 1890, 1 . 
Brodrick, W. H., elected Member, 1897, 143. 
Brogden, T., elected Member, 1890, 297. 

Bromfield-Ingersoll Eock-Drill, Hand-power, 1891, 151. See Rock Drills. 
Bromiley, W. J., elected Member, 1892, 1. 
Bromley, M., decease, 1885, 3. — Memoir, 1884, 400. 
Bromly, a. H., elected Graduate, 1892, 414: — transferred to Associate Member, 

1894, 3 :— to Member, 1898, 5. 
Brooke, J. W., elected Member, 1892, 228. 
Brooke, R. G., elected Member, 1892, 101. 
Brookfield Linen Co., Belfast, 1896, 439. 
Brook- Fox, F. G., Compound Locomotives, 1886, 382. 
Brooks, H. G., elected Graduate, 1899, 5 :— Associate Member, 1900, 9G. 
Brooks, S. H., elected 3Iember, 1897, 143. 
Brotherhood, A. M., elected ^Member, 1891, 300. — Decease, 1894, 4. — Memoir, 

1893, 491. 
Brotherhood Three-Cylinder Hydraulic jMotor, 1887. See Portable 

H3draulic Drill. 
Broughton, H., elected Graduate, 1900, 183. 
Brounlie, J., elected Graduate, 1886, 12(J. — Decease, 1888, 3. 
Brodsson, R. p., elected Graduate, 1890, 299. 
Brown, A. (London), elected Graduate, 1886, 2: — transferred to ^lember, 

1890, 3. 
Brown, A. (Renfrew), Dredging Clyde Estuary, 1887, 393. 

Marine-Engine Trials, 1889, 255. 
Brown, A. B., Forth Bridge Machinery, 1887, 319. 
Brown, A. M., elected Member, 1891, 300. 
Brown, A. S., elected Graduate, 1889, 585. 
Brown, B., elected Member, 1885, H)3. 

By-laws, 1891, 40. 

Moulding Sand, 1891, 103. 



54 B 

Brown, C. S. V., Edinburgh Electric Lighting, 1895, 595. 

Brown, E. F., elected Associate, 1898, 14:J. 

Brown, F. A. W., elected Graduate, 1889, 2 :— transferred to Member, 1890, 3. 

Brown, F. G., elected Member, 1888, 159. 

Brown, F. R. F., Paper on the Construction of Canadian Locomotives, 1887, 18(>. 

— Remarks thereon, 255. 
Brown, Harold, elected Associate, 1888, 2G9. 
Brown, Harry, elected Member, 1898, 54(;. 
Brown, Henry, decease, 1892, 4 :— IMemoir, 98. 
Brown, James, elected Member, 1887, 2S;j. 
Brown, J. F., elected Member, 1892, 1. 

IMarine- Engine Trials, 1891, 289. 
Brown, John, Road Locomotion, 1900, 248, 249. 
Brown, R., elected Member, 1890, 297. 
Brown, W. (Renfrew), elected Member, 1888, 15!). 
Brown, W. (Woolwich), elected :Member. 1892, 4l;J. 

Evaporative Condensers, 1899, 2:J5. 

Quick-Revolution Engines, 1897, y:!5. 
Brown and Co., James, Esk Paper Mills, Penicuik, 1887, 439, 4G2. 
Brown and Co., John, Aldwarke Main Colliery, Rotherham, 1890, 44(5, 4G8. 
Brown and Co., Walter, Hanover Street Flour Mill, Dublin, 1888, 4()(J. 
Brown and Son, William, Dock Flour Mill, Dublin, 1888, 407. 
Brown's Foundry Co., Nelson Foundry, Derby, 1898, 481. 
Browne, F. J., elected Member, 1887, 28:!. 
Browne, W. R., decease, 1885, 3.— Memoir, 1884, 472. 
Browning, T., Drying in Vacuum, 1889, 322, 323. 
Broxbirn Oil Works, 1887, 437, 449. 
Bruce, G. S., elected Member, 1899, 3. 
Bruce, J. G., elected Graduate. 1898, 3. 
Bruce, R., elected Member, 1889, 584. 

By-laws, 1891, 29. 

Gas Furnaces, 1891, 79. 

Marine-Engine Trials, 1891, 257 ; 1892, ISO. 

Marine Engineering, 1891, 3(18. 
Bruce, R. A., elected Graduate, 1893, 98 :— Associate Member, 1895, 328. 
Bruce, W. D„ decease, 1901, C— Memoir, 1900, 323. 
Bkuff, C. S., elected Member, 1888, 2G8. 
Brunel, H. M., Atmospheric Railway, South Devon, 1899, 327. 

Incrustation of Torquay Water Mains, 1899, 500, 502. 
Brunlees, Sir J., decease, 1893, 4.— INIemoir, 1892, 223. 
Brunlees, J., elected Member, 1892, 228. 
Beunner, A., elected Member, 1891, 19G. 



B 55 

IJRryTOX, P. G., elected Member, 1887, 1. 

Brush Electrical Exgixeebln-g "Works, Loughborough, 1898, 460, 508. 

Bryan, W. B., Automatic Machiae-Gun, 1885, 1S4. 

Lincoln "Waterworks Engines, 1887, 132. 

"Water Meters, 1900, 63. 
Brtce-Douglas, a. D., elected Member, 1888, 159. — Decease, 1892, 4. — Memoir. 

1891, 190. 
BccHANAS, J., elected Member, 1899, 3. 

Buchholz system of Flour Milling, 1889, 164, 173.— See Roller Flour Milling. 
Buckley, J. T., elected Member. 1892, 1. 
BrcKLEY. R. B., Southampton "Water "Works, 1893, 69. 
Buckley, V. E., elected Member, 1895, 547. 
BucKN-EY, T., elected Member. 1886, 270.— Decease, 1901, 6.— 3Iemoir, 1900, 32G- 

"Watch Screws, 1894, 487. 
BucKToy, "W.. elected Member, 1887, 157. 
Buck-well, G. "W., elected :\Iember. 1896, 278. 
BuDDicoM, H. "W., Graduate transferred to Member, 1886, 3. 
BCDDICOM, "W. B., decease, 1888, 3.— 3Iemoir, 1887, 466 ; 1888, 154. 
BuDEXBERG, A., decease, 1891, 4. 
BuDEN-BERG, C. F., elected Graduate, 1886, 2 :— transferred to Member, 1895, 3. 

Mean-Pressure Indicator, 1899, 597. 
Buenos Aires Drainage, 1895, 372, 376. See Hydraulic Power Supply. 
Buffer-Stop, Hydraulic, for Eailways, 1886, 105. See Hydraulic Buffer-Stop. 
BuLFiN, I., elected Associate Member, 1898, 142. 
Bull, R. F., elected Associate Member, 1900, 3.56. 
Bull, T. P., elected Associate Member, 1900, 356. 
Bullock, R. C, elected Graduate, 1897, 434. 
Bulweb, E. H. E., elected Graduate, 1892, 229 :— transferred to Associate 

Member, 1898, 5. 
Bumsted, F. D., elected Member, 1891, 196. 
Burcham, R. E., elected Member, 1899, 473. 
Burden. A. G., elected Associate Member. 1893, 08. 
BuKDEB, "W. C. elected Member, 1885, 1. 
Bubgdorf-Thun Electric Railway, 1900, 438. See Polyphase Electric 

Traction. 
Burgess, F. C. B., elected Member. 1891, 300. 
Burke, M. .J., elected Member, 1894, 469. 
Burn, G. F., elected Associate Member, 1895, 2. 
BcRNE, E. L.. elected Graduate, 1890, 472 :— transferred to Associate Member, 

1896, 3. 
BuRNES, T., elected Member, 1893, 220. 
Burnet and Co., L., Moore Park Boiler "Works, Govan, Glasgow, 1895, 502. 



56 B 

BuRXET, L., Graduate transferred to IMember, 1894, 3. — Decease, 1896, 4. — 

Memoir, 1895, liO. 
Burnett, A. S., elected Graduate, 1887, 2. 
Burnett, K. H., Canadian Locomotives, 1887, 223. 
BuRNSiDE, B. W., elected Associate Member, 1897, 2. 
Burntisland Oil Works, 1887, 437, 450. 
BuRRATOR Reservoir Outlet Valves, 1899, 407. See Outlet A'alves at Burrutor 

Reservoir. — Visited at Summer meeting, Plymouth, 442. 
Bcrrell, F. J., elected Member, 1885, 4G2. 
Burrowes. G. v., elected (Jraduate, 1885, 305. 
Blrstal, E. K., elected .Member, 1887, 473. 
Burstall, F. W., elected .Member, 1896, 4Ul. 

Gas-Engine Research, Fir6t Report to tlie Gas-Engine Research 
Committee ; description of apparatus and methods, and preliminary 
results, 1898, 20l>.— Remarks thereon, 233, 235, 241, 200, 2(J(j. 

Steam Superheating, 1896, !!•?. 
Burstall. H. R. J., elected Jlember, 1890, 175. 

Electric Lighting, Paper on the Electric Lighting of Edinburgh, 1895, 
552. — Remarks thereon, 574, 590, 5UC. 

Electric Plant, 1898, .")85. 

Gas-Engine Research, 1898, 248. 

Marine-Engine Trials, 1891, 243. 
Buut, G., elected ^leniber, 1898, 2. 
Burt, J. M., elected Associate, 1890, 2. 
Burt, T. R., elected Associate Member, 1899, 474. 
BuRTAN, B., Automatic Maehine-Gun. 1885, 183. 
Buktt, G. F., elected (iraduute, 1893, 3'.»2. 
Bushell, E. H., elected Member, 1900, 1. 
Butcher, M. H., elected Associate ^lember, 1896, 270. 
Butcher, W. E., elected Graduate, 1891, 480 :— transferred to Associate I\Iembor, 

1898, 548. 
Butler. H. M., Graduate transferred to Member, 1893, 3. 
Butler, H. W., elected Member, 1892, 413. 
Butler, James, elected Member, 1891, 479. 

Sewage Outfall Worka, 1892, 341. 
Butler, John, decease, 1885, 3 : — Memoir, 71. 
Buttenshaw, G. E., elected Graduate, 1891, 2 :— transferred to Associate 

Member, 1897, 5. 
Butter, F. H., elected IMember, 1888, 2G8.— Decease, 1900, G : — Memoir, 32(;. 
Butter, H. J., elected Member, 1891, lOfJ. 

Narrow-Gauge Railv\-ays, 1898, 393. 

Sewage Outfall Works, 1892, 340. 



57 



Bdtters, H., elected Graduate, 1899, 294. 

BuTTERWORTH, J., elected Member, 1894, 293. 

By-Laws, 1885, Alterations, 2o, 26, 28, 29.-Robinson, J., Moved alteration of 
By-Law 20, 25.— Bell, I. L., Seconded motion, 2G.— Motion lost, 20.— 
Robinson, J., Moved alteration in By-Law 32 respecting Accountant, 28.— 
Paget, A., Seconded motion, 28.— Motion carried, 28.-Head, J., Alterations 
pro°posed in Form A in appendix to By-Laws, 28.-Hughes, G. D., Moved 
alterations in Form A, 29.-Cochrane, C, Seconded motion, 29.— Motion 
carried, 29. — Notice of alteration, 465. 

By-Laws, 1886, Alteration, 20-5.— Bale, M. P., Moved alteration of By-Law 22, 
20.— Taylor, A. J. AV., Seconded motion, 21.— Head, J., Eflfect of 
alteration, 2'l.-0pinion of Council, 22.— Robinson, H., Moved negative 
of proposal, 23.-Cochrane, C, Seconded negative, 23; issue of brief 
statement of purport of Papers, 23.-Griffiths, J. A., Issue of abstract of 
Papers. 24.— Pobinson, H., Members can now get whole of each Paper. 24. 
- —Paget, A., Amplification of titles of Papers, 24.— Greig, D., Briof 
account of Papers beforehand, 24.-Head, J., Suggestions will be 
considered, 25.— Motion negatived, 25. 
By-laws, 1888, Notice of additions, 446. 

By-laws, 1889, Additions proposed respecting arrears of Annual Subscription, 
29-33.— Carbutt, E. H., Nat-ure of proposed additions, 30.— Gray, J. 3L. 
:^Ioved amendment, 30.— Halpin, D., Seconded amendment, 31.— Richards, 
E. W., Supported original proposal, 31.-Adamson, D., Supported original 
proposal, but with amendment, 32.— Paget, A., Seconded Mr. Adamson's 
amendment. 33.— Carbutt, E. H., Mr. Gray's amendment out of order, 33. 
—Proposed additions carried with amendment, 33.— Notice of motions. 

586-7. 

BY-L.VWS, 1890, Additions proposed respecting compounding of subscriptions, 
abbreviated distinctive titles, and certificates of membership, 31.— 
Tomlinson, J., Nature of proposed additions, 31, 32.-Schonheyder, W.. 
Certificate of membership, 32.-Additions agreed to, 31, 32.-Notice of 
motion, 474. 

By-laws, 1891, Gray, J. M., Proposed addition respecting life membership, 27. 
—Bruce, R., Seconded motion, 29.— Richards, E. W., 30.— Crosland. 
J. F. L., 30.— Wicksteed, J. H., 30.— Piatt, J., 31.— Tomlinson, J., 31.— 
Flannery, J. F., 32.— Dobson, B. A., 32.— Head, J., 33.— Marshall, H. D.. 
^}4._Crosland, J. F. L., 35.— Walker, B., 35.— Adamson, J., 36.— Piatt, .1.. 
37.— Gray, J. M., 37.— Daniel, E. F., 37.— Tomlinson, J., 37.— Joy, D., 37. 
— Cowper, C. E., 38.— Tomlinson, J., 38.— Douglass, Sir J. N., 38.— 
Bamlett, A. C, 39.— Archer, C F., 40.— Brown, B., 40,— Tomlinson, J., 
40.- Gray, J. M., 42.— Mair-Rumley, J. G., Moved amendment, 43.— 
Walker, B., Seconded amendment, 44.— Riches, T. H., 44.— Flannery. 



58 B 

By-laws, 1891 (continued). 

J. F., 44. — Tomlinson, J., 44. — Amendment withdrawn, and motion 
negatived, 45. 

Bv-LAWS AND AuTiCLES OF AssociATiox. 1892, Xotico of Amendments, 41tj. 

By-laws, 1893, Alterations, (j, 27-8, 31 ; .see Articles of Association and By-laws. 
— Notice of additions, 394. 

By-iaws, 1894, Anderson, Dr. AV., Moved addition respecting compounding for 
subscription, 24; Adamson, J., 24; Kennedy, A. B. W., 24; Gray, J. M., 
25; Motion c.irried, 25. — Anderson, Ur. W., Moved addition respecting 
printing of Papers in Proceedings, 2o ; Motion carried, 25. 

Byrne, F. F., elected ^lember, 1892, 228. 

Bybke, J. J., elected Member, 1899, 143. 

Bywateb and Co., Engineering Works, Plymouth, 1899, 4r)7. 



c 

(ABLE Tramway. Edinburgh, 1887, 442. 

Caen, Dives, and Luc Narrow-Gauge Light Railway, 1898, 380. 

Caiger, E. J., elected Member, 1887, 473. 

Cairnes, F. E., elected Graduate, 1886, 4Gt; :— transferred to Member, 1892, 3. 

Calais New HAnnocR Works, 1889, .")49, 'tlH. 

(ALASTREJiE, J. C, elected Graduate, 1889, oS.'i :— Member, 1900, 181. 

Calderwood, W., elected Associate Member, 1900, 2. 

Caledonian Railway Works, Glasgow, 1895, 4(1(1, 47t!. 

Calhoun, J. C., Tube-Frame Railway Wagons, 1890, .510. 

Calico Printing Works, ^Manchester, 1894, 402. 

Callan. W., elected .Aleuiber, 1889, :i4(;. 

Callendar, H. L., Alloys Researcli, 1899, 98. 

Calorimeters. See Dryness of Steam, 1895, 31-89. 

Calthrop, E. R., elected Member. 1900, 181. 

Calvi, a. U., elected Graduate, 1903, 503. 

Cambridge, H.R.H., The Duke of, elected Honorary Life Member, 1892, 101. 

Cambridge. H.. elected Member, 1836, 125. 

Cameron, J., elected Member, 1898, 340. 

Cameron, R. B., elected Associate Member, 1893, 143. 

Campbell, A. C, elected Member, 1893, 391. 

Campbell, H., elected Member, 1898, 141. 

Campbell, J. A. M., elected Member, 1893, 220. 

Campbell, R. M., elected Member, 1899, 473. 



C 59 

Campbell, W. W., elected Member, 1892, 101. 

Canadian Locomotives, Taper on the Construction of Canadian Locomotives, by 
F. K. F. Brown, 1887, 186.— Permanent way, gradients, and curves of 
Canadian railroads, ISO.— Classes of trains, ISO.- Dead weight of trains, 
187.— Fuel employed, 187.— S.A. light engines for freight and mixed 
traffic, 188.— S.C. light passenger engines, 18i>.— Capacity of tender for 
water and coal, 189.— S.A. Light Engines, 189; boiler, 189; fire-box, 
190; dome, 193; boiler shell, 193; smoke-box, 195; heating surface, 195; 
testing, 195 ; regulator and steam pipes, 19(5 ; exhaust and petticoat pipes, 
19G; chimney, 197; ashpan, 198; grate, 198; boiler mountings, 198; 
cylinders and saddle, 200 ; frames, 201 ; motion, 201 ; axles and crank- 
pins, 202; wheels, 202; truck, 203; cab, 203; pilot or cow-catcher, 201 ; 
clothing and furniture, 204; tender, 204; painting, 205.— S.C. Light 
Passenger Engines, 205; Westinghoose automatic brake, 205.— S.B. 
Heavy Passenger Engines, 205.— S.D. Consolidation Engines, 207 ; 
boiler, 208 ; smoke-box, 208 ; heating surface, 209 ; regulator and steam 
pipes, 209 ; chimney, 209 ; grate, 209 ; ashpan, 209 ; boiler mountings, 
209 ; cylinders, 210 ; frames, 210 ; motion, 211 ; axles and crank-pins, 
212; driving wheels, 212 ; truck. 212; driving spring-gear, 212; cab, 213; 
clothing and furniture, 213; tender, 213; S.G. Mogul Engines, 214.- 
Cost of Production, 215; detailed costs, 21G. Appendix, Tests of 
materials, 216; boiler iron, 216; boiler and fire-box steel, 217; iron and 
steel stay-bolts and boiler braces, 217; boiler tubes of steel or iron, 217; 
tubes and pipes of brass or copper, 218 ; bar iron, 218. 

D^scuss^on.-^VoTsde\l T. W., Experience of American locomotives, 
218; method of attaching cylinders, 219; sloping or taper connection 
between barrel and fire-box of wagou-top boiler, 219 ; cast-iron wheels, 220 ; 
mild steel for fire-boxes, 220; crosshead, 220; iron or steel boiler tubes, 
221; cost of production and maintenance. 221 ; castings and forgings, 221. 
—Johnson, &!. W., Comparison of English and Canadian locomotives, 221 ; 
cost of production, 222 ; fastening of steel tires by shrinkage only, 223.— 
Burnett, E. H., Futility of comparing American and English locomotives, 
224 ; fie'xibility of wheel-base, 224 ; facility of access and of repairs, 225 ; 
bar-frame reduces width between frames for fire-box, 225 ; failure of steel 
fire-boxes and iron tubes, 226; cast-iron wheel-centres, 226; American 
bogie, axles, axle-boxes, and axle-forks, 227 ; tenders and brake power, 
227 ; standard passenger and goods engines on New South Wales RaUways, 
228.— Boyer, K. S., Cost of finished cylinders, 229 ; hydraulic testing of 
boilers, 229.-Johnson, S. W., Confirmed the cost of finished cylinders, 
229.— Joy, D., Mistake to compare English and American locomotives, 
229 ; renewal of steel fire-boxes, 230 ; old hollow-spoke cast-iron wheel, 
230.— Holden, J., Unsatisfactory experience of steel fire-boxes, 230; cast- 



60 C 

C AX AIM AX Locomotives, Discussion, 1887 (continued). 

iron wheels and fastening of tires, 230 ; unfavourable results from Mogul 
engines, 231. — Greig,D., Adaptability of English and American locomotives 
for their respective circumstances of working, 231 ; rigidity of English 
locomotive and elasticity of American, 231 ; hardness of cast-iron 
wheels, 232 ; bad construction of American boilers, 232 ; steel fire-boxes, 
232 ; corrugated plates for fire-boxes, 232. — Halpin, D., Old Bury bar-frame 
discarded for English locomotives, 232 ; wagon-top boiler, and prevention 
of priming, 233 ; elliptic fire-hole, 234 ; riveting of longitudinal seams in 
boilers, 234 ; cast-irou smoke-box door, 234 ; boiler testing, 234 ; desirability 
of large steam-pipe, 234 ; fixing of boiler mountings, 234 ; water gauges, 
235 ; position of valve-chests for facilitating access, 235 ; adhesive 
weight, 235 ; metallic packing-rings, 235 ; eccentric straps and sheaves, 
235; failure of crauk-pins and tires in frost, 235; cast-iron wheels, 2;!(; : 
cost of finished engine and tender, 236 ; softness of American cylinders. 
23(;. — Tomlinson, J., Trouble experienced with corrugated fire-boxes, 236 ; 
elasticity essential in locomotives for Canadian railways, 237 ; duration of 
engines witii copper fire-boxes, brass tubes, and wrought-iron boilers, 238. 
— Adamson. 1)., Rigidity of forged bar-frame, width of fire-box, and cast- 
iron hollow-spoke wheels, 238; American charcoal-iron, 23S; one-sided 
crossheads, 23!l ; longitudinal seams of boilers, and testing of wagon-top 
l>oilers, 239 ; steadiness of Canadian locomotives supported on three points 
only, 23'J ; desirability of increase in speed, 240. — Head, J., Balancing of 
revolving and reciprocating weights, 240. — Price-Williams, R., Comparative 
performance of English and American locomotives, 241. — Bell, Sir L., Hart., 
Steel and copper fire-boxes, 242 ; original cost and maintenance, consumption 
of fuel, 243; quality of water, 244. — Joy, D., Consumption of fuel in 
American and English locomotives, 244. — Paget, A., Cost of production 
of Canadian locomotives, 244. — Reid, J., Criticism of detailed costs, 245 ; 
building of new engines should be left to manufacturers, 246 ; differences 
in first cost and in maintenance, 246. — Riches, T. H., Staying roofs of fire- 
boxes, 247 ; failure of iron tubes with bad water, 247 ; cement lagging 
for boilers, 247 ; spreading of balance-weights in wheels, 248 ; cost of 
manufacture, 248. — Crampton, T. R., Balancing of reciprocating weights by 
rcvolviug weights. 249 ; heating surface, 249. — "Worsdell, T. W., Experience 
of copper and steel fire-boxes in America, 249 ; balancing of reciprocating 
parts, hollow balance-chambers filled with lead, 250 ; position for steam 
dome, 251 ; consumption and quality of fuel, 252 ; cost of production, and 
designing and building of locomotives, 252 ; transverse beam stays on 
fire-box roof, 254 ; objection to cement lagging for boilers, 254 ; cost of 
cylinders, 254. — Brown, F. R. F., Methods of attaching the cylinders, 255; 
wagon-top boiler and flanging of plates, 256 ; mild steel and copper for 



C 61 

Canadian Locomotives, DiVcu«zo?i, 1887 (continued). 

fire-boxes, 2.36 ; size and quality of iron boiler-tubes, 2'u ; balancing, 2.")7 : 
position of steam domes, 258 ; economy of fuel, 258 ; asbestos cloth for 
lagging, 259 ; weight of locomotives, 259 ; comparison of materials and 
manufacture and detailed costs of English and Canadian locomotives, 2."i9 ; 
success of steel tires without fastenings, 2G0 ; engines with bar-frames 
more numerous than with plate- frames, 2G1 ; wrought-iron, steel, and cast- 
iron for driving wheels, 2G2 ; form of axles, 2G2 ; durability of axle-boxes 
and axle-forks, 263 ; wlieel-base and brakes of tender, 26:; ; New South 
Wales standard passenger engines. 264; over-cylindering, 2G4: consumption 
of coal per mile, 264 : fastening of wheel tires by shrinkage. 2i!4 : four kinds 
of fire-boxes used in America, 265 ; advantage of placing dome on wagon- 
top of boiler, 265; connection of dome to boiler, 266 ; size of fire-hole, 2GG; 
joints of longitudinal seams of boilers, 266 ; cast-iron smoke-box front. 
2G6: tightness of boilers, 266; try-cocks instead of glass gauges. 2t;(;: 
examination of slide-valves, 267 ; difterent construction of driving-wheels 
and truck-wheels, 267 ; preferable quality of English cylinders, 267 ; 
consumption of fuel, mileage of engines, and maintenance of boilers, 268 ; 
rigidity of plate-frame and advantages of bar-frame, 268 ; combination 
frame, 268 ; endurance of bar-frame, 269 ; difference of conditions for 
locomotive and stationary boilers, 269 ; riveted joints for boilers, 27i' : 
form and staying of boilers, 270 ; testing of boiler with lK)t water and 
injector, 271 ; comparative hauling power of English and Canadian engines. 
271 ; mileage and repairs of Canadian locomotives with at eel fire-boxes. 
272 : system of accounts, 272 ; correctness of the costs given, 272 ; crown- 
stays of fire-boxes. 273 ; spreading of balance-weights iu wheels. 273 ; 
balancing by use of four cyiiiiders, 273. 

Caxai.-Boat Propellers. Paper on Twin Screw-Propellers with Adjustable 
Immersion, fitted on Canal Boats, by H. Barcroft, 1894, 360. — Canal-boat 
propulsion; conditions essential, 360. — Description of boats with twin 
screw-propellers fitted in sliding frames at stem, 361. — Dimensions of 
propellers. 362. — Crew, 3G3. — Adjustable immersion of propellers, 363. — 
Performances, consumption of coal, and cost, 364. — Machinery' ; driving by 
petroleum engine, 3G5. — Electricity for conveying power, 36G. 

Discussion. — Kennedy, A. B. W., Working of steam lighter, 366. — 
Wicksteed, J. H., Skew gearing, 3G7. — Longridge. C. C. Adjustable 
immersion, 368. — Piobinsou, L. S., Size of propellers, 3iiS ; use of 
electricity, 3C9. — Aspinall, J. A. F., Thrust of propellers ; electric working 
by overheEid. wires, 369. — Parker, T., Electricity for working canal 
boats, 369. — Piatt, J., Partly immersed propellers replaced by stem 
wheel, 370. — Hopkinson. Dr. E., Overhead wires for working canal 
barges by electricity, 371. — Head, J., Skew wheels for transmitting power, 



62 C 

Cakal-Boat Propellers, DMussion, 1894 (continued). 

372.— Cochrane, C, Petroleum engine for canal barges ; low speed of 
barges, S7;^. — Dobson, T>. A., Worm gearing, 373 ; large propellers, slow 
speed, and less wash, 374. — Tweddell. I\. H., Cylindrical casing round 
propellers, 374. — Paul, 31., Jun., Steering with partially submerged 
propellers, 37."). — Kiches, T. H., Fine pitch for avoiding wash, o7o. — 
Cawley, G., Low speed on canals, 370. — Richmond, W. F., Injury to 
])ropellers from lock gates, 376. — Rogers, H. J., Screw propellers without 
blades, 377. — Spence, A. W., Damage to canal banks from wash. 377. — 
Olive, W. T., Adjustment of immersion of propellers, 377. — Baroroft, H., 
Skew wheels ; dead-wood sponson for thrust, 377 ; efficiency of partially 
immersed propellers ; performance of steamer " Newry " ; time spent in 
locking, 378 : advantage of large blades for propellers ; slip of screw ; 
propellers adjusted for change in load line, 379. — Kennedy, A. B. "W., 
Uifficulties in designing canal-boat propellers, 380. 
Canal-Boat Propellers, 1897, 101. See Partially Immersed Propellers. 
Canal-Boat Propulsion, Paper on Mechanical I'ropulsion on Canals, by L. S. 
Robinson. 1897, 149.— Resistance of boat in channel of restricted section, 
149. — Early investigations in England and France, 149. — Recent 
experiments by Sweet on Erie Canal, l.')0 ; by De ^las on River Seine, 
l.-)l. — Resistance of boats to traction in rivers, experimental and 
calculated, l.")l : relation to draught, l.VJ ; to dimensions, 153; to speed, 
154; coefiBcient of resistance to traction in river, 154. — Resistance to 
traction in canal compared with that in river, 155 ; ratio of resistances 
compared with ratio of sections of waterway and boat, 157. — Errors of 
ordinary formulae for resistance, 1(50.— Influence of depth of canal ; 
Barbet's observation of time taken to enter locks of difl'erent depths, 161 ; 
Fleury's experiments on depths of French canals, 163. — Speed, and 
injury to banks; Pole's trial on Ashby-de-la-Zouch Canal; speeds on 
French and English canals, 164 ; regulation of speed in Holland ; De 
Mas' experiments on shape of buats in France, 165. — Mechanical 
propulsion by screws, in State of Xew York, l(j(j; on Aire and Calder 
Navigation, ltJ9; on Leeds and Liverpool Canal, 170. — Engines for 
driving screws. 170: petroleum and electric motors; twin large-bladed 
propellers partially immersed, 171 ; submerged propeller turning like 
rudder; hydraulic propulsion with Capell turbine, 172. — Mechanical 
haulage upon submerged chain or wire-rope in France and Belgium, 173 : 
on Grand Canal in Ireland, Rhine, Bridgewater Canal, and Erie Canal, 
174. — Electric haulage on Bourgogne Canal, 175. — Mechanical towing by 
endless running rope, 177. — Towing by locomotive ; by electric traction- 
engine, ISO.— Cost of traction, 181.— Relative cost of transport by railway 
and by canal, 183. — Summary of average cost of different modes of 



Canal-Boat Propulsion', Taper, 1897 (continued). 

traction on canals, ISi. — Conclusions, cost of construction of canals and of 
railways. 184; control of canals by railways; best mechanical propulsion 
for independent canals, 18.5. 

Dlscu.<don. — Eobiiison, L. S., Eesistance to traction independent of 
length of boat, ISG : dependent upon ratio of section of waterway to 
midship section of boat ; effect of depth of water beneath bottom of 
boat ; injury to caual banks, 187. — Williams, Sir E. L., Sections of 
channel and injury fo banks, 188 ; early use of steam propulsion upon 
Bridgewater Canal, IS'J; vertical tow-path wall and deepening of caual, 
190 ; Weaver Navigation ; wire-rope experiments on Bridgewater Canal, 
191; electricity on canals; Aire and Calder Navigation; method of 
steering, 192 ; lighters pushed by stem-wheel steamers on Mississippi, 
193. — Ellis, A. D., Capell centrifugal pump for hydraulic propulsion. 1915 ; 
comparison with screw propulsion, 194 ; effect of nozzles on discharge 
orifices, 195. — Capell, Kev. G. M., Turbine for hydraulic propulsion. r,»o; 
semi-rotary engine; details of experiments, 196. — Barcroft, H., Eesistance 
formula not reliable, 197 ; principles of canal-boat propulsion, 198 ; 
economy of space and of weight. 199. — Donkin, B., Position of nozzles for 
hydraulic propulsion, 199. — Ellis, A. D., Size of discharge pipes and 
shape of nozzles, 199. — Barcroft, H., Machinery outside boat, 200. — 
Capell, Eev. G. M., Use of nozzle for hydraulic jet, 200. — Wicksteed, J. H., 
Steam propulsion on Aire and CalJer Navigation, 201 ; resistance 
unaffected by gaps in trains of boats ; broad propeller-blades, 202. — 
"Walker, W. G., Skin friction, 203 ; importance of width in cross sectional 
area of canal. 204. — Segundo, E. C. de. Electric traction on canals. 204 ; 
railway control ; length of boat and tractive power, 205. — Gray, J. M., 
Ratio of wetted cross section of canal to immersed midship section of boat, 
206.— Smith, E. H., Preferable ratio, 207.— Beaumont, W. W., Speed on 
canals, 207. — Froude, E. E., Movement of vessel along canal of confined 
cross section, 208 : bank-towed craft and propeller-driven craft, 209. — 
Neville, L., Speeds in Oxford Canal and Eiver Thames, 209. — Saner, J. A., 
Steamers on Eiver "Weaver Navigation, 210. — Piatt, J., Inland navigation 
and railways. 212. — Salis, H. E. de. Speed with mechanical propulsion is 
dependent upon section of waterway, 214 ; trains of boats on Aire and 
Calder Navigation, 215 ; long-distance trafiic. 216 ; tug must carry cargo. 
217: intermixture of canal and river navigation, 217; supply of water 
to canals, 218 ; drawbridges ; steering ; continuous working ; injury to 
canal banks, 219 ; tunnel haulage, 220 ; haulage by sunken chain, 221. — 
Davey, H., Length of boat immaterial in restricted channel, 222 ; 
hydraulic propulsion, 223 ; conveyance of boats through tunnel by 
current of canal, 224. — Chatterton, A., Navigation upon irrigation canals 



64 C 

Canal-Buat PROPfLSiON. Di'-cmxion, 1897 (continued). 

in India ; electricity for propulsion, 225 ; efficiency of jet propeller, 
22G. — Robinson, L. S., Bank-towed and propeller-driven craft; damage to 
canal banks, 227 ; cost of working ; depth of waterway ; ratio of sections. 
228 ; railway control of canals; tunnel navigation by current; shape and 
resistance of boats, 229 ; resistance independent of boat length ; electric 
traction upon canals ; efficiency of hydraulic nozzles. 280. — Richards. E. W., 
Vote of tlianks, 231. — Wells, L. B., Wood and iron boats, and skin 
friction, 231. — Clayton, T., Improvement of waterways, 2:!2. — Robinson, 
L. S., Skin friction, and length of boat, 232. 

C.\xAL Developsiext in England, 1889, 211. See Address of President, Charles 
Cochrane. 

Canal Eocndry, Blackburn, 1894, 439. 

Canal, Manchester Ship, 1891, 418, 4."i7 ; 1894, 403. See Manchester Ship 
Canal. 

Canal Waves, 1887, 410. See Ship Waves. 

Cannell, W., elected Associate ^lember, 1899, 14."). 

Cantrell and Cochrane, Aerated and IMineral Water IManufactory, Belfast, 
1888, 425 ; 1896, 439 :— Dublin, 1888, 411. 

Capacity of Railway Wagons as nffecting Cost of Transport, by J. D. 
Twinberrow, 1900, 557.— Railway working, 1889-1899.— Total mileage, 
gross receipts and working expenses, passenger journeys and train-miles, 
tonnage of merchandise and minerals, economies in working, 557-60. — 
Goods traffic, 561 ; reduction in tare ; comparison of British with 
American conditions, 562 ; average load per wagon, 563. — Long wagons ; 
design for overcoming inconvenience of long wheel-base, 564 ; wagon for 
carrying rails, timber, «S:c. ; adoption of bogie system, 566 ; limit of gross 
weight to 50 tons; 36-ton8 double-hopper coal-wagon, 567; equalising 
buflers ; whocl-base of bogies, 5f)8. — Terminals : producer's terminal : 
consumer's terminal, 569 ; trader's depot ; shipping terminal, 571. — Various 
methods of shipping coal, 571 ; Scotch method of shipping by hydraulic 
jib-cranes; end-tipping wagons in Welsh coal trade, 572; self-discharging 
hopper-wagons in Durham and Xorthumberland. 573 ; American method ; 
side tipping for long cars, 573. 

Disczist^ion. — Wliite, Sir W. H., Thanks to author, 575. — Twinberrow. 
J. D., Experimental wagons, 575. — Wainwright, J. W., Use of metal 
instead of timber in construction of wagons, 575 ; distribution of load in 
wagons ; abolition of side door, 576.— Jones, W. R. S., Improvement 
needed in vehicular stock, 577 ; train-mileage and variation of average 
weight of trains, 577 ; number of wagons, 578 ; average duty of goods 
wagons in England ; cost of carrying minerals, 578 ; method of saving 
dead haulage per annum, 579 ; gross earning-capacity of a wagon in 



C 65 

Capacity of Eailway Wagons, Discimion, 1900 (continued) :— 

England and India. 580.— Parker, T., Jun., Objections to use of high- 
capacity wagons ; diflSculties of shunting, 581.— "Wright, F. G., Reduction 
of tare ; special wagons for special work, 583.— Meik, C. S., Permanent 
way in England; size of hopper-wagons, oSi; variation in size of coal 
wagons, 585; coal-tipping machinery, 58(!.— Parker, T., Jun., Use of 
large wagons not practicable in England, 5S'j. — Aspinall, J. A. F., Private 
wagons, 587 ; objections to turning wagon over : long wagons and 
coal tips, 588; advantages of small wagons; haulage of heavy trains. 
589.— Twinberrow. J. D., Damage caused by shunting, 589; equalising 
buffer, 590 ; real and nominal capacity of wagons. 5'Jl ; train-mile and 
ton-mile ; improvement in locomotives, 592 ; continuous brakes, 593 ; 
return of empty wagons ; traders' wagons, 59i ; self-discharge of wagons, 
.-,95. — White, Sir W. H., Written contributions to discussion, 595. — 
Barber, T. W., Continuous brakes on goods trains, 595. — Jepson, J. T.. 
Necessity of centre pivots; high-capacity wagons for coal traffic. 59»!; wagon 
with side and bottom doors, 597.— Jones, W. R. S.. Advantages obtained 
by bogie vehicles, 598 ; short wheel-base and long body, 599 ; discharge- 
doors ; substitution of iron or steel for timber, 600 ; new practice in iron or 
steel, 602 ; saving effected in cost and sidings, 604.— Maitland, C, Sliding 
doors; friction of spring plates: reduction of tai-e, 605.— Manton, A. W.. 
American and English practice. 605 ; side-web doors, 606 ; coal-tipping 
plant ; reduction of types of wagons, 607.— Meik, C. S., Carriage of coal 
for shipment, 607.— Steele, J.. Tare of 10-ton wagon, 608.— Twinberrow, 
J. D., Compensating buffer-frame, 609 ; box-cars ; bogie system. f.lO : 
life of wagon ; American hopper-wagon, 611 ; buckling of iron side-doors: 
cost of large steel wagon. 612 ; American railway working, 614-5. 
Capacity ob Volume Water Meters, 1900, 43. See Water :Meters. 
Cape Colony, Burning of Colonial Coal in the Locomotives on the Cape 
Government Railways. 1890, 1 12. See Coal Burning on Cape Railways. 
Capel. H. C, elected Member. 1899, 292.— Decease, 1900, 6 :— Memoir, 327. 
Capell, Rev. G. M., Canal-Boat Propulsion, 1897, 195. 2i;0. 
Capito, C. a. A., elected ^Member, 1885, 1. 
Capper, D. S., elected Member, 1892, 1. 
Dryness of Steam, 1895, 61. 
Gas-Engine Research, 1898, 257. 
Glass Revealer, 1900, 536. 
Marine-Engine Trials, 1894, 118. 

Ropes and Belts, Eeport and Observation" on the Lille Experiments upon 
the comparative Efficiency of Ropes and Belts for the Transmission 
of Power, 1895, 599-630.— Remarks thereon, 630. 648. 651, 657. 
Capron, a. J., elected Member, 1898, 141. 

E 



66 

Carbon in Steel, 1885, 30. See Steel. 
Carbons for Electric Light, 1887, 351, 301, vJGo, 370. 

Carbutt, Sib E. H., Bart., elected Member of Council, 1885, 22. — Vice- 
President, 75:— 1886, 17.— President, 1887, 25:— 1888, 2'J.— Baronetcy. 
1892, 413 ; 1893, 3. 

Addresses as President. — At Spring meeting, 1887, on Fifty Years' 
Progress in Gun flaking, 1G3 : — Reply to vote of thanks for Address, 
1S5. — At Annual General meeting, 1888, 21. — At Summer meeting, 
Dublin, 1888, 272:— Reply to vote of thanks for Address, 291. See 
Address. 

Architects' Registration Bill, 1888, 100. 

Auditor, appointment, 1887, 31. 

Autographic Test-Recorder (Wickstced's), 1886, 1)3. 

Automatic Jlachine-Gun, 1885, 180. 

Automatic Sluice, 1888, 294, 302. 

Ikdfast Summer meeting, Vote of thanks to President, 1896, 282. 

Brewery Tramways and Rolling Stock, 1888, 3iO, 357, 3G0. 

By-laws, 1889, 30, 33. 

Canadian Locomotives, 1887, 218, 247. 

Clock-Driving for Telescopes, 1888, 31(;, 32(J. 

Compound Locomotives, 1886, 31t5. 

Compound Steam Turbine, 1888, 48(;, 491, 4113. 

Council, Annual Report, 1888, 21 :— 1889, 21. 

Dredging Clyde Estuary, 1887, 3iJ6, 401. 

Dublin Summer meeting, Reply to welcome, 1888, 267. — Address, 272.— 
Reply to welcome at Belfast, 380. 

Edinburgh Summer meeting, 1887, 32.— Reply to welcome, 282. — Vote of 
thanks to Sir W. Thomson, 433 ; to Marquess of Tweeddale, 434. 

Electric Engineering, 1888, 111, lilt, 123, 141, 148. 

Electric Lighthouse, 1887, 372. 

Electric Lighting, Belfast, 1896, 33:i. 

Electro-Magnetic Machine-Tools, 1887, 34(j. 

Forth Bridge. 1887, 300, 311. 

Forth Bridge :Machinery. 1887, 321, :!22. 

Friction Experiments, 1888, 180, 205. 

Frictional Gearing, 1888, 367, 373. 

<; rain- Warehousing Machinery, 1891, 381. 

Heat Distribution in Steam Engine, 1887, 510, 535. 

Hydraulic Buffer-Stop, 1886, 112. 

Irish Press, 1896, 418. 

Irrigating Machinery, 1888, 03, 73. 

Lake Superior Copper Mining, 1887, lOi), 114, 123. 



67 



Carbutt. Sir E. H.. Bait, (continued). 

Lincoln Waterworks Engines. 1887, 140. 
London (1S86) Summer meeting, 1887, 476. 
:Marine-Engine Trials, 1889, 256 :— 1890, 244. 
Paris Universal Exhibition. 1888, 166. 
retroleum Fuel in Locomotives, 1889, 6.j, 72, 73, 7.5. 76. 
Portable Hydraulic Drill, 1887, 78. 

President, on taking office. 1887, 27. — On re-election as President, 1888, 
31. — On retiring from presidency, 1889, 2.5. — Keply to vote of thanks, 
1889, 28. 
President's Address, Eemarks thereon. 1899, ISO. 
Quick-Revolution Engines. 1897, o37. 
Kock Drills, Paper on recent Trials of Rock Drills. 1891, 141.— Remarks 

thereon, 161, 171, 187. 
Roller Flour .Milling. 1889, 168. 
Tay Viaduct, 1887, 385. 
Testing Machine (Emery's). 1888, 229. 243. 
Triple-Expansion Engines. 1886, .528 :— 1887, 43, 68. 
Tube-Frame Railway Wagons, 1890, 495. 

Votes of thanks.— To Marquess of Tweeddale, 1887, 434.— To President 
for Address, 1886, 295 ; 1889, 232 ; 1890, 199 : 1892, l:::) : 1897, 278 ; 
1899, 181.— To President at Summer meeting. Belfast. 1896, 282.— 
To Retiiing President, 1892, 26; 1899, 32.— To Sir W. Thomson, 
1887, 433. 
Water Meters, 1900, 58, 65, 73, 74, 76. 
Whitworth, Sir J., decease. 1887, 33. 
Cakdew, C. E.. Spherical Eccentric. 1885, 426. 
Cargo Fleet Iron Works, Middlesbrough, 1893, 351. 
Carlin How Irosstoxe ^Mixes. Cleveland, 1893, 370. — Electric 1 lock-Drilling, 

309. See Electric Rock-Drill. 
Carlyle, T., elected Member, 1887, 473. 
Carxegie, D., elected Member, 1892, 228. 
Carxt, E. C, elected Member, 1899, 473. 
Carolin, E. ^L, elected Associate Member. 1896, 279. 
Carpexter. H. J., elected Associate. 1892, 102. 
Carpmael, W., decease, 1900, 6.— Memoir, 1899, 265. 
Carr, H. O., elected Associate Member. 1900, 502. 
Carr, J. .L W., elected Associate Member. 1898, 143. 
Carr, R., decease, 1898, 6.— Memoir, 1897, 132. 
Cabr, R. a., elected Member, 1895, 547. 
Carr Disintegrator, 1889, 175. See Roller Flour Milling. 
Carr Field JIills, Hyde, 1894, 435. 

K 2 



68 C 

Cabkace, C elected Member, 1892, 413. 

lARRACK, J. W., elected Associate IMember. 1899, o. — Decease, 1901, G. — Memoir, 

1900, 327. 
Carkiage and Locomotive Works, Gorton. 1894, 430. 
Carriage and Wagon Works, London, Brighton, and South Coast Eailway, 

Brighton, 1892, 870. 401. — London and South Western Eailway, 

Eastleigh, 1892, 3G!t, 390.— INIidland Eailway, Derby, 1898, 465. 
t'AiiiiiCK, H., Compound Locomotives. 1886, 391. 
Cakrick. S. S., elected Member, 1888, lol>.— Decease, 1894, 4.— Memoir, 1893, 

203. 
C'akrod, H., elected Associate Meml»er, 1900, 182. 
Car RON Iron Works, 1887, 437. 443. 
Carstairs. G. L., elected Associate ^lember. 1900, 182. 
Carter, E. IM., Honorary Secretary of Birmingham Jubilee meeting 181'7, 

Presentation from the Institution, 1898, 11. 
Carter, E. T., Electric Lighting, Edinburgh, 1895, ")7i». 
Electric Plant, 1898, ."ilril. 
Heat Transmission, 1896, rt28. 
Eopes and Belts, 1895, 042, 64G. 
Steam Superheating, 1896, 207. 
Steel Steam-Pipes, 1896, 2.")1. 
Carter, F. H., elected Associate, 1891, 480.— Decease. 1897, o.— Memoir, 1896, 

5i:i7. 
Carter, H. F., elected Member. 1885, 462. 
Carter, J. H., EoUer Flour Milling, 1889, 170. 
Carter, S. A., elected Associate Member, 1900, 2. 
Carter, W., Electric Plant, 1898, HOS. 
Cahteb, W. C, elected Member, 1891, 480. 

Steam Jacket. 1892, 507. 
Cakulla. F. J. E., Aluminium. 1898, 361, 372. 
Carcs-Wilson, C. a., Paper on Polyphase Electric Traction, 1900, 43.". — 

Eemarks thereon, 462. 
Carver, C. elected Graduate, 1886, 271. 
Carver, C. F., elected Associate Member. 1895, .548. 
Carver, H. C, elected Membei-, 1890, 2;t7.— Decease. 1894, 4.— Memoir, 1893, 

401. 
Casebocrne, a. C, elected Associate IMember, 1900, 502. 
Cash, E. W., elected Associate Member, 1900, 502. 
Cask Machinery, Liverpool, 1891, 444. 
Casson, E. S., Gas Furnaces, 1891, 72, 74. 
Castings in Iron and Steel, 1886, 325, 345. See Address of President, Jeremiah 

Head. 



69 



Castle, F., elected Member, 1888, 443. 

Castle, F. G,, elected Associate, 1889, 585. 

Caswell, C. H., elected Graduate. 1891, 302. 

Caswell, S. J., elected Member, 1891, IL'6. 

Catee, J. M., elected Graduate, 1894, 170 :^Associate Member, 1899, 3. 

Cathedral, Lincoln, 1885, oUt3, 411. 4o4, 43G. See Lincoln Cathedral. 

Catitcr, T, S., elected Associate Member. 1900, 50-2. 

Cattell, W., elected Associate Member. 1900, 182. 

Caulfield, "W. B., Eaising a Wreck. 1886, 1U7. 

CArsEB, "W. G., elected Member, 1892, 1. 

Cave, H., elected Associate Member. 1900, 182. 

Cawley, G., Canal-Boat Propellers, 1894, 37G. 

Dryness of Steam, 1895, Gl. 

Experimental Marine Engine, 1891, 413. 

Fluid-Pressure Reversing Gear, 1894, 2G1. 

Forth Bridge, 1887, 308. 

Friction Experiments. 1891, 128, 137. 

Steam Pumps, 1893, 4t;9. 
Cejiest, Hydraulic, 1893, 240. Manufactui-e at Hartlepool, 378. 
Cement strengthened with Steel Trellis, 1891, 382. See Expanded Metal. 
Cextkal Marine Exgixe Works, West Hartlepool, 1893, 383. 
Centrifugal Pcmps, 1888. See Irrigating 3Iachiuery. 
Cebrito, F. H., elected Associate Member. 1897, 257. 
Certificates of Membership, 1890, 31, 32 : — 1892, 5. 
Chadwick, O., elected Member, 1892, 228. 
CH-iFFEY, G., elected Member, 1894, 4G9. 

Challen, W. B., elected Graduate, 1889, 347 : — transferred to Member, 1898, 5 
Challenger, G. E., elected Associate Member, 1895, 328. 
Chalmers, G., elected Member, 1892, 101. 
Chalmers, J. K., elected Member, 1886, 1. 
Chamberlain, J. G., elected Associate, 1889, 585. 
Chambers, E. J., elected Member, 1897, 25G. 

Diagram Accounts, 1897, o08. 511. 

Electric Traction, 1898, 87. 

Longworth Power Hammer, 1900, lOG, 109, 111. 

Road Locomotion, 1900, 266. 
Chambers, R. M., elected Member, 1896, 278. 
Chambers, T. H. W., elected Member, 1900, 96. 

Champness, H. R., Paper on the Launch of a Battleship, 1899, 329.^Remark3 
thereon, 352, 353. 
Training of Engineer Students, 1899, 393. 
Chandler, N., elected Member, 1890, 471. 



70 C 

Chapman, A., elected Member, 1888, 1. 

Chapman, A. C, elected Member, 1887, 157.— Decease, 1897, 5.— Memoir, 1896, 

255. 
Chapman, H., Honorary Secretary for London Summer meeting 1886 

Presentation from the Engineers' Association of Liege University, 

1887, 475-G. — Honorarj' Secretary for Paris Summer meeting 188l>, 

Presentation from the Institution. 1889, 583:— 1890, 'J.— Member 

of Council, 1899, 28 :— 1900, 34. 
Auditor. 1886, 20 :— 1888, 31 .—1892, 30. 
Bag-Making 3Iachine, 1889, G36, 637. 
Chapman, J., elected :Member, 1885, 1.— Decease. 1892, 4.— Memoir, 1891, 191. 
Chapman, J. C., elected IMember, 1887, 473. 
Chapman, L., elected Member, 1898, 546. 
Chapman, S., elected Associate IMember, 1899, 145. 
Charlesworth, S., elected Member, 1893, 97. 
Chakxock, G. F., elected Member. 1885, 30."). 

Charnock, J., elected Member, 1895, 327. — Decease, 1900, G. — Memoir, 1899, 2G5. 
Chateb, J. K., elected Member, 1890, 472. 
Chatterton, a., elected Member, 1891, 19G. 

Canal-Boat Propulsion, 1897, 225. 
Chattvin, J., elected Member, 1887, 283. 
Chatwin, T., decease, 1890, 3. 
( HATTVOOD, A. B., elected Graduate, 1890, 299 : — transferred to Associate 

Member, 1900, 357. 
Chatwood, S., Auditor, 1895, 25. 
Chatwood, S. K., elected Member, 1898, 340. 
Cheetham and Hill, Sun Foundry, Derby, 1898, 482. 
Cheffixs, H. W. J., elected Associate Member, 1899, 293. 
Chernoff, D., ^laterials for the study of Steel and of Steel Guns, 1891, 4G5. 
(Chevalier de la Legion d'Honnexie : — 

Elwell, T., 1888, 21. 
Chicago Engineering Congress, 1893, 11, 24. 
C HiLDE, H. S., elected Member. 1897, 2.")6. 
Childe, K., decease, 1887, 3.— Memoir, 1886, 4G2. 
China, Openings for Mechanical Engineers, 1899, 528. See Openings for 

Mechanical Engineers in China. 
China Works, Minton's, Stoke-upon-Trent, 1898, 4G0, 512. 
Chittenden, E. B., elected Member, 1886, 4G5 :— 1895, 547. 
Choate, Hon. J. H., James Watt and George Stephenson, 1900, 466. 
Chorlet, E., elected Associate Member, 1900, 182. 
Chrimes, C. E., elected Associate, 1888, 2GU. 
Christie, A., elected ^lember, 1899, 292. 



71 



Chcbb, E. G., elected Associate, 1887, 2. 

C'htbb, H. E., elected Graduate, 1900, it?. 

Chubb, R., elected Associate, 1890, 17G. 

Chubb, T. L., elected IMember, 1888, 159. 

Chuck, Electro-Magnetic, 1887, :;37, 338, 343, 344. See Electro-Magiieli'- 

Machine-Tools. 
Chubch, G. E., Tube-Frame Eaihvay Wagons, 1890, 499. 
Church, H., elected Graduate, 1891, 2. 
Chubchward, G. J., elected 3Iember, 1894, 293. 

Portable Pneumatic Tools, 1900, 1G7, 169. 
City Iron and Wire Works, Lincoln, 1885, 44.5. 
City of London Electric Lighting Station, 1900, 475. 
" City of Paris," K.M.S., 1891, 432, 454. 
Clapham, T. a., elected Graduate, 1900, 4. 
Clare, E., elected Associate 3Iember, 1896, 279. 
Claremont, E. a., elected Member, 1896, 4tJl. 
Clarence Iron "Works, Middlesbrough, 1893, 359. 
Clarence Victualling Yard, Gosport, 1892, 368, 375. 
Clark, A., elected Member, 1891, 300. 
Clark, C. F., decease, 1899, 6.— Memoir, 1898, 530. 
Clark, D. K., decease, 1897, 5.— :\[emoir, 1896, 92. 
Clark, G., Sen., decease, 1886, 3. — Memoir, 1885, IGO. 
Clark, G., Jun., elected Member, 1896, 278. 
Clark, G., elected Associate Member, 1899, 4. 
Clark, G. M., Dryness of Steam, 1895, 73. 

Throttling and Variable Expansion, 1895, 207. 
Clark, H., elected Member, 1899, 14:;. 
Clark, J. L., elected Associate Member, 1894, 470. 
Clark, T. A., elected Member, 1889, 203. 
Clark, T. F., elected Member, 1896, 461. 
Clark, W., decease, 1889, 3. 

Clarke, A. L., elected Associate Member, 1899, 145. 
Clarke, E. F., elected Associate, 1893, 98 :— transferred to Member, 1898, 548. 

Quick-Eevolution Engines, 1897, 354. 

Steam Laundry Machinery, 1898, 291, 293, 306. 
Clarke, F., elected Member, 1889, 1. 
Clarke, F. J., Mayor of Lincoln, Welcome to Members at Summer meeting, 

Lincoln, 1885, 303. — Vote of thanks to President for Address, 345. 
Clarke, G. J., Faper on some Engineering Improvements in the Kiver Tecs 

1893, 318.— Eemarks thereon, 330. 
Clarke, J., decease, 1891, 4. — Memoir, 1890, 171. 
Clarke, J. F. M., Tube-Frame Eailway Wagons, 1890, 508. 



72 C 

Clakke, L., elected Graduate, 1885, 2 :— transferred to Member, 1890, 3. 

Clabke, L. T., elected Graduate, 1895, 150 : — Associate Member, 1900, 96. 

Clarke, W., decease, 1891, 4. 

Clakke's Ckank and Forge Works, Lincoln, 1885, 4:54, 443-4. 

Clarkson, C, elected Member, 1894, 29:!. 

Clarksox, E. J., elected Member, 1900, 1. 

Clarkson, J., elected Member, 1898, 340. 

Clabkson, T., elected Member, 1891, 1. 
Dryness of Steam, 1895, 58. 
Electric Welding, 1894, 341. 
Hydraulic Gas-Stoking, 1895, 346. 
Hydraulic Power Supply. 1895, 388. 

Clatworthy, W. a., elected Associate Member, 1895, 328. 

Clay, C, Typographic Printing ^Facbinery, 1899, 125. 

Clay, C. B., elected Member, 1892, 228. 

t'LAY, Inman, and Co., Birkenhead Forge, Birkenhead, 1891, 453. 

C LAY Lane Iron Works, Middlesbrough, 1893, 352. 

Clayton, N., decease, 1891, 4. — Memoir, 1890, 554. 

Vote of thanks to President for Address, 1885, 346. 

Clayton, S., elected :Member, 1886, 465. 

Clayton, T., Canal-Boat Propulsion, 1897, 232. 

Clayton and Shcttleworth, Stamp End Works, Lincoln, 1885, 434, 437. 

Cleathero, E. T., elected Member, 1890, 297. 

Cleave, A. H. W., elected Associate Member, 1898, 143. 

Cleaver, A., elected Member, 1890, 175. 

Cleeves, J. F., elected Graduate, 1890, 176. 

Clegg, J. H., elected Associate ^Member, 1897, 144. 

Cleland, W., elected Member, 1890, 176. 

Clements, Eev. Sub-Dean, Reply to vote of thanks, Lincoln, 1885, 307. 

Cleminson, J., decease, 1897, 5. — Memoir, 1896, 255. 

Clerk, A., elected Associate Member, 1899, 4. 

Clerk, D., Gas-Engine Research, 1898, 234, 235. 

Cleveland Flour Mill, Thornabj-, 1893, 367. 

Cleveland Industries, Paper on recent developments in the Cleveland Iron 
and Steel Industries, by J. Head, 1893, 224. — Natural advantages of 
Cleveland district, 224. — Origin and growth of Cleveland iron and 
steel industries ; earliest blast-furnaces ; make of pig-iron, 225 ; number 
of works in operation, 226 ; steel manufacture, 227. — Ironstone mining : 
drills, 228 ; nature of ore, 230. — Blast-furnaces, 230 ; output, and 
consumption of coke, 231. — Hot-blast stoves, 233. — Blowing engines, 233 : 
feed-heating, condensing, compounding, 234. — Boilers, 235. — Comparison 
with American blast-furnaces ; volume of blast, 236 ; duration of 



73 



Cleveland Industries, Paper, 1893 (continued) : — 

furnace linings, 237. — Thermo-electric pyrometer with autographic 
recorder, 238. — Slag disposal aud utilization, 238 ; slag wool ; paving 
blocks, 239 ; hydraulic cement, 240 ; pavement flags, 241. — Finished 
iron, 242 ; blooming and finishing mills ; mill engines, 243 ; shears, 
steam winches, lucigen lamps ; corrugated sheets, 244. — Steel 
manufacture ; Bessemer and opeu-heartli, acid and basic processes ; 
mixing and de-sulphurizing, 245 ; ferro-manganese and spiegel-eiseu 
re-carburizing, 246. — Basic slag as manure, 247. — Heating furnaces for 
steel ingots, 247. — Cogging and finishing, reversing engines ; steam 
pressure, 249. — Hydraulic power ; hot-slab shears and hydraulic forging ; 
cogging mills for plates and steel sections, 250. — Steel-melting furnaces ; 
gas producers, 251. — Steel foundries, 252. 

Discussion. — Bell, Sir L., Difficulties encountered in iron trade, 253 ; 
malleable iron ; corrosion of steel, 254 ; Cleveland ore, 255. — Richards, 
E. W., Mild steel and Yorkshire iron, 255. — Cochrane, C, Pressure of 
charge in blast-furnace, 256 ; experiments with oats in tube, 257 ; 
duration of furnace lining, 258 ; forcing oi blast-furnaces, 260. — Heenau, 
H.. Experiments with oats, 261. — Halpin, D., A^arying temperature of 
material in blast-furnace; evaporative surface-condenser, 261. — Howsou, 
K., Upper boshes to relieve pressure in blast-furnace, 2(52. — Hawdon, W., 
Alteration of blast-fui-nace at Newport Iron Works ; pressure of charge 
in furnace, 2G3. — Bramwell, Sir F., Analogy between charge in blast- 
furnace and grain in cylindrical bins, 204. — Sisson, "W., Original 
performance of altered Newport furnace, 264 ; performance of American 
furnaces ; feed make-up at Ormesby Works. 2G5. — -AVhite, W. H., 
Yorkshire iron and basic steel for Admiralty work, 266 ; welding of 
mild steel ; corrosion of steel, 267 ; fracture of steel and of iron, 26S. — - 
Wicksteed, J. H., Comparison of Yorkshire iron and steel, 269. — 
Shaw, W., Eed-shortness in mild steel, 271. — Aspinall. J. A. F., Steel 
for locomotive work, 271 ; jiressure of materials in blast-furnace, 272 ; 
Sprague's grain mixer, 273. — Bell, Sir L., Pressure of materials in 
blast- furnace, 274. — Head, J., Improvements in construction of 
blast-furnaces, 275 ; descent of sand in sand-glass ; .scafi'olding in blast- 
furnace, 276. 

Cleveland Steel and Ikon Works, Middlesbrough, 1893, 354. 

Cleverly, W. B., Jun., elected Graduate, 1892, 2. 

Clifford, C, elected Member, 1897, 256. 

Clift, L. E., elected Graduate, 1885, 164. 

Clifton, G. B., elected Graduate, 1885, 164 .—transferred to Member, 1890, 3. 

Climax Rock-Drill, Stephens, 1891, 144. See Rock Drills. 

Clinkskill, a. a. R., decease, 1893, 4. 



74 



C'lock-Dbivixg for Telescopes, Paper on the latest improvements in the 
Cloelc-Drivlng Apparatus of Astronomical Telescopes, by Sir Howard 
Grubb, 1888, o03. — Essentials of equatorial clock, 303. — Usual contrivances 
for obtaining uniform motion, 303. — Nature of error, 304. — Connecting a 
pendulum with a uniform-motion clock. 305. — Description of four forms 
of electrical control, 305-314. — Hand correctors for refraction. 314. — 
Slow motion in declination. 315. 

Discussion. — Carbutt, E. H., Accuracy of apparatus, 31G.^Ball. Sir 
E. S.. Problem to be solved in pointing of telescope, 31G ; chronographic 
apparatus at Dunsink Observatory. 317. — Ryan, J., Correction for 
refraction, 318. — Rosse, Earl of. Clock movement for reflecting telescope. 
318 ; difficulty in mounting of metallic mirror, 319. — Maw, W. H., 
Delicacy of apparatus as represented by measures of distance, 320. — 
Davey, H., Mechanism for synchronising clocks by electricity, 320. — 
Stoney, G. J., Photographing unseen stars, 32'i ; variation in refraction. 
322 ; mounting of mirror in reflecting telescope, 322 ; elimination of 
errors arising from gearing, 323. — Head, J., Value of paper, 323. — 
Grubb, Sir H., Photographing unseen stars, 324 ; twofold correction for 
refraction, 324; pendulum with slight losing rate, 325; mounting (if 
mirror in reflecting telescope. 325 ; limit to refinement of apparatus, 325. 

Close, II. A., elected Graduate, 1898, 312. 

Close, J., Jux., elected Member, 1885, 1<J3. 

Clothing Wabehouse. Walsall, 1897, 369, 416. 

Cluff, R.. elected Associate Member, 1900, 2. 

Cldtterbcck, H., elected Member. 1885, 4G2. 

Clyde Estuary, Dredging, 1887, 38(5. See Dredging Clyde Estuary. 

Clyde Iron Works, Glasgow, 1895, 488. 

Clyde Navigation, Paper on the Improvement of the Clyde above Port 
Glasgow, by J. Deas, 1887, 402. — Progress and results of deepening 
the river, 402. — Dredging. 403. — Removal of Elderslie rock, 404 ; boring 
and blasting from floating barge, 405 ; arrangement of holes, 405 ; 
explosives, 4uG ; diamond boring tool, 400 ; charging and firing of holes, 
407 ; quantities and cost, 407. — Financial results of improvements, 408. 

Clyde Navigation, Paper on Recent Engineering Improvements of the Clyde 
Navigation, by J. Deas. 1895, 404.— Quantities of material dredged, 
excavated, and deposited annually, 404 ; cost of dredging and 
depositing ; dredgers and hopper-barges, 407 ; lighting of river channel. 
408. — Progress of harbour; quays, piling, 409; docks, cylinder 
foundations, 410. — Queen's dock, 411 ; concrete cylinders, 412 ; walls, 
414. — Swing-bridge pier, 414. — Cessnock dock in process of construction ; 
hydraulic cranes and machinery, 410. — Concrete seat and 130-ton crane, 
418; margin for safety, 420. — Steamer berths, shed*? for goods, 421. — 



75 



Clyde Navigation, Paper, 1895 (coutinued) : — 

Graving docks : ferries. 422. — Appendix : detailed descriptions of 
single-ladder twin-screw dredger and l.noO-tou hopper-barges, 425 ; 
graving dock, 429. 

Diicussion. — Kennedy. A. B. W.. Interest of paper, 435. — Deas, J., 
Progress during last twenty-five years ; concrete cylinders, 435. 

Clyde Steel and Iron Works. Sheffield. 1890, 442, 457. 

CoACHBUiLDEfG AND Harkess Wokks, Derby, 1898, 489. 

Coal BrRNiXG ox Cape Kailways, Paper on the Burning of Colonial Coal in 
the Locomotives on the Cape Government Eailways, by M. Stephens, 
1890, 112.— South African coalfields, 112.— Stormberg mines, 114.— 
Burning of Cyphergat coal in locomotives, 114. — Movable-bar grate, 
115. — Extent of working with colonial coal. 116. — Analysis and price of 
coal, lltj. 

Discu'<<i(/n. — Kennedy, A. B. W., Analysis of coal, 117. — Galloway, W., 
Stormberg and lodwe coalfields, 117 ; regularity of strata, 117 ; thickness 
of seams. 118; volcanic rocks, 118; testing of coal. 119; length of 
railways now open, 120 ; competition between colonial coal and English, 
120. — White, H. W., Trial of Natal coal, 121 ; serrations on movable fire- 
bars, 121. — Tomlinson, J., Colonial coal for marine purposes, 121. — White, 
H. W.. Indwe coal for coasting and towing steamers, 122 ; cleaning fires 
of marine boilers, 122. — Stephens, M.. Working of serrated fire-bars, 122 ; 
comparative consumption of Stormberg and Welsh steam coal, 122 ; 
Indsve coal in tug steamers, 122. — Head, J., Washing and coking of 
colonial coal, 123. — Galloway, W., Coking tried, but not washing, 123. — 
White, H. W.. Scarcity of water for coal washing, 123. — Schonheyder. W., 
Kind of fire-bars used with Welsh coal, 123. — Galloway, W.. Ordinary 
bars used, 123. — Woodall, C, Coal working in Natal, 123; rudimentary 
mode of working, 124. — Tripp, W. B., Formation of colonial coal, 124. — 
Galloway, W., Subaqueous deposition of coal beds, 125. — Kennedy, 
A. B. W., Analyses of colonial coals. 126. — Galloway, W.. Analyses given 
in government report, 126. — Tomlinson, J., Locomotive trials with 
colonial coals, 126 ; development of South African coalfields, 126 ; washing 
and coking, 127 ; movable fire-bars, 127. — Galloway, W., Analyses of coal 
in Cape Colony, 128. — Stephens, M., Natal coal, efficiency for locomotives, 
129 ; description of coalfield, 129 ; analysis of coal, 130. 

Coal Fields, South African, 1890, 112. See Coal Burning on Cape Kailways. 

Coal Measubement at Sea by Spring-balance, 1889, 237, 292. See Marine- 
Engine Trials. 

Coal Mines, 1890, 360. See CoUiery Engineering. 

Coates A^■D Co., Lagan Foundry and Engine Works, and Princes Dock Boiler 
AVorks, Belfast, 1896, 441. 



76 C 

CoBBOLD, A. W., elected Associate Member, 1898, ."li?. 
CocHKANE AND Co., Ormcsby Iron Works, Middlesbrough, 1893, lU'.). 
CocHBANE, C, elected Vice-President, 1887, 25. — President, 1889, 23. — Decease, 
1899, 7-8.— Memoir, 1898, 30'J. 
Address as President, 1889, 2ii8. — Eeply to vote of tlianks for Address, 

233. 
Autographic Test-Piecorder, and Tests of Iron and Steel, 1886, 70, 82. 
Automatic Machine-Gun, 1885, 180, 190, P. 13. 
Lag-Making Machine, 1889, 636, 6i0. 

Blast-Furnace I'ractice, Paper on the results of Blast-Fumace Practice 
with Lime instead of Limestone as Flux. 1889, J8i». — Eemarks 
thereon, 60!», 620-9. 
By-laws, 1885, 29 :— 1886, 23. 
Canal-Boat Propellers. 1894, 372. 
Cleveland Industries. 1893, 2.j6. 

Compound Locomotives, 1889, 121, 127, 136, 140, 140, 147. 
Compound Steam Turbine, 1888, 133, 493, .")li). 
Condensation and Ke-evaporation, 1889, 676, 702. 
Construction of Cycles, 1885, .")1'J. 
Dockyard Lifting and Hauling, 1892, 303. 
Drying in Vacuum, 1889, 318, 319, 320, 323, 326, 330. 
Eiffel Tower Lifts, 1889, 370, 371, 373, 374,'.378. 
Electric Engineering, 1888, 133. 
Electric Welding, 1894, 342. 
Experimental Marine Engine, 1891, 402. 

Forth Bridge, 1887, 307. 

Forth Bridge Machinery, 1887, 319. 

Friction Experiments. 1885, 64 :— 1891, 136. 

Frodiugham Iron Industry, 1885, 418. 

(lias Engines, 1889, .52."), ."^27, 532, 533, ')d'), .)37, .539, .540, .541. 

Gas for Fuel, 1890, 4(i9. 411. 

Grain Warehousing Machinery, 1891, 378. 

Marine-Engine Trials. 1889, 251, 257, 260, 292, 306 :— 1892, 160, 173 :— 
1894, 101. 

Marine Engineering, 1891, 353. 

Middlesbrough Salt Industry, 1893, 295. 

Moulding Sand, 1891, Hi4. 

Paris Summer meeting. Reply to welcome, 1889, 344. 

President, on taking office. 1889, 26. Addre>:'-, 208. 

Eegnault's Steam Experiments. 1889, 451, 462, 468. 

Roller Flour MUling. 1889, 107. 173, 177, 178, 1S8. 

Sewage and Refuse \\'orks, 1892, 302, 363. 



70. 82. 



Cochrane, C. (continued) :— 

Sewage Outfall Works. 1892, 333. 
Steam Jacket. 1892, i'sl. 
Steam Pumps, 1893, iGl, iOS. 
Tay Viaduct. 1887. 3S2. 
Tees Engineering Improvements, 1893, 327. 
Testing Machine, 1888, 4:)0, 4.H. 478. 

Tests of Iron and Steel, and Autographic Test-Eecorder, 1886, 
Triple-Expansion Engines. 1886, 503, 52G :-1887, 42. 
Totes of thanks.-To retiring President, 1887, 30 :-1894, 29. 
Warp Weaving, 1889, 487, 495, 409. ,,o .- 

Water Works.-Eathmines. 1888, 530.-Sheffield. 1890, 428. 4....- 
Southampton, 1893, t;t;. 
Cochrane Evaporative Condekseh, vertical cast-iron double cylinders. 1899, 

211 231, 23:). See Evaporative Condensers. 
Cochrane, G., elected Member, 1887, 157. 
Liverpool Motive Power, 1892, 58. 
Water Meters. 1900, liO. 
( "nPHP.AVE J elected Member, 1885, 305. 
cZ.TbL^us. Sursery S.eel-^ire MUls, Sheffield. 1.90, 442, 448:- 

Fitzalan Steel Works, 449. 
CocKERiLL, T., Electric Welding, 1894, 335. 
CocKEY, F. C, decease, 1889, 3. 
CODDINGTON. SiR W., Bart., Baronetcy, 1896, 20 ; 1897, 4. 

CoEY, E.. elected Member. 1889, 34t;.. i t j ^ •»= 

T^ ^.^ atttt* 1893 -HO 250 ; see Cleveland Industries.— 
Cogging and Finishing Mills, i»»tf, -*^s --J^ - 

1895, 437, 44i, ^^'J : *ee Steel- Works Machinery. 
CoKER, E. G., elected Member, 1898, 141. 

CoLAM W. N., elected Member, 1889, 584. „ c. ,r • 

'" LCHBST.»." Report upon Trials of ..». - Colcbesler," 1890. .03. 5» Mmne- 

Engine Trials. 
Cold-Air Machines, 1886, 201. See Refrigerating Machmery. 
Cole, H. A. B., elected INIember, 1892, 1. 
Cole, J. C, elected Associate, 1895, 548. 
Cole', J. W., decease. 1892, 4.— Memoir, 1891, 290. 
Coleman, C. E. O., elected Associate Member, 1900, 356. 
Coles, H. J., Hock Drills. 1891, 165. 

Southampton Water Works. 1893, 72. 
Coles Rock-Drill, 1891, 147. See Rock Drills. 
Coles, R., elected Member. 1886, 1. 
Collar Bearing, 1888, 173. See Friction Experiments. 



78 C 

Colleges and Schools, Engineering. i;ee Engineering Colleges, Laboratories 

and Technical Schools. 
CoLLEN, K. H., elected Member, 1892, 229. 
CoLLENETTE, K., Spherical Eccentric, 1885, 428. 
CoLLEY, B., elected Member, 1888, 159. — Decease, 1890, 3. 
Colliery, Aldwarke ^lain, Rotberham, 1890, 446, 468. — Creswell, Chesterfield, 

1898, 4G1, 525. 
Colliery Engineering, Paper on recent improvements in the Mechanical 
Engineering of Coal Mines, by E. Bainbridge, 1890, 300. — Sinking, 

361 ; freezing process, 361 ; great depths, 361 ; pneumatic water barrel, 

362 ; explosives, 363 ; power drills, 363. — Pumping, 364 ; underground, 
364 ; by hydraulic power, 364 ; sinking pump, 365 ; straight-line pump, 
366 ; couplings for broken pipes, 366 ; petroleum engim', 367. — Winding 
Coal, 368; guides, 368; speed in winding, 368. :!()9 ; counterbalancing, 
369; winding pulley instead of drum. 370; economical banking and 
quick changing of tubs, 370 ; changing at pit bottom, 372 ; springs for 
protecting cages, 373. — Steam, 373; mechanical stokers, 374; impure 
water, 375; thin plates for steel boilers, 376; boiler setting, 376; gas 
producer for tiring boilers. 377 ; steam econoniiser. 379. — Underground 
Haulage, 378 ; steel sleepers, 379 ; endless rope. 379 ; clips, 379 ; tail- 
rope haulage, 381 ; sheaves, 381 ; lubrication of tubs, 381 ; steep haulage. 
382; haulage by electricity, 383. — Coal Getting, 384; coal cutting 
machines, 384 ; drills, 384 ; picks, 385 ; coal heading machine, 385 ; 
steel girders and props, 386. — Ventilation. 387 : fans, 387 ; useful eflfect. 
388. — Screening and Cleaning Coal, 388 ; tipping, 389 ; screening, 
:I90; jigging screens, 390; belts, 390; loading wagons. 391. 

Discussion. — Lupton, A., Increased production of coal, 393 ; sinking 
through quicksand, 393 ; speed of winding, 393 ; winding engines, 394 ; 
ventQatiug fan, 394 ; electrical transmission of power, 394. — Bainbridge, 
E., Limited use of improved appliances, 395. — Tomlinson, J., Practical 
value of information in Paper, 395. 

Colliery Explosion, St. Etiennc, 1890, 9. 

Collingridge, H., elected Graduate. 1892, 414. 

Collins, A. L., Rock Drills, 1891, 173. 

Collins, J. H., Rock Drills, 1891, 163. 

Collins, W. L., elected Associate Member, 1899, 4. 

COLLiNSON, A., elected Member, 1900, 96. 

CoLLis, A. E., elected Associate Member, 1894, 470 : — transferred to Member 
1898, 5. 

Collom's Washer, 1887, 102. See Lake Superior Copper Mining. 

Colonial and Indian Exhibition, London, 1886, 410, 411, 426-8. 



79 



foLOXiAL Coal in the Locomotives ou the Cape Government Railways, 1890, 
112. See Coal Burning on Cape Railways. 

Colonial Consignment and Distributing Cu.'s Frozen ArsxRALASiAN ^Ieat 
Store, London, 1900, 471. 

Colour PrintcsG, 1899, 1U3. See Typographic Printing Machinery. — Multi- 
colour Printing Co., London, 1900, 48G. 

CoLQUHOUN, J., decease, 1894, 4.— Memoir. 1893, 492. 
Tube-Frame Railway Wagons, 1890, 409. 

CoLYER, F., Auditor, 1885, 104 :— 1887, 31 :— 1888, .Jl :— 1889, 29. 
Drying in Vacuum, 1889, 317, 318, 319, 320. 
Gas Furnaces, 1891, SO. 
Refrigerating Machinery, 1886, 246. 
Roller Flour Milling, 1889, 171. 
Wood-Cutting Machinery, 1885, 93. 

Combe, A., elected Member, 1888, 444. 

Rope Driving, Taper on the introduction and development of Rope 
Driving. 1896, Moo. — Remarks thereon. ;176. 

Combe, Barbour, and Combe, Falls Foundry and Engineering Works, Belfast, 
1888, 430 :— 1896, 443. 

CoMERFOBD, E., elected Associate Member, 1896, 462. 

Common, J. F. F,, elected Member, 1889, 346. 

Companions of the Order of the Bath : — 
Anderson, Sir W., 1896, 3. 
Barry, Sir J. W., 1895, 3. 
Preece, Sir W. H., 1894, 22 ; 1895, 3. 
Vickers, T. E., 1899, 6. 

CoMPA^^ON OF the Order of St. ^Iichael and St. George : — 
Dredge, J., 1899, 0. 

Companion of the Order of the Star of India : — 
Pyne, Sir T. S., 1894, 22 ; 1895, 3. 

Compound and Xon-Compound Locomotives, Resxilts of Trials, 1894, 4i_;0. 

Compound Locomotives, Paper on Compound Locomotives, by R. H. Lapage, 
1889, 85. — Advantages of compounding, 85. — Description of the Worsdell 
and y. Borries plan of compounding two-cylinder locomotives, 80. — 
Intercepting and starting valve, 87 ; automatic closing and opening of 
intercepting valve, 88. — Cylinders. 90. — Slide-valves and valve-motion, 
90; dimensions of valve-gear, 91. — Pistons, 92. — Boiler, 92; inside 
fire-box, 93 ; tubes, smoke-box, heating surface, and grate-area, 94. — 
Steam pressure, 94. — Steaming, 9.5. — Variable blast-nozzle, 9.5. — Starting 
arrangement, 95. — Receiver, relief-valve, 96. — Trial trips. 97. — 
Commercial advantage of compounding, 98 ; economy in fuel, 98 : 
saving in weight and repairs, 99. — Report on working of compound 



80 C 

Compound Locomotives, Paper, 1889 (continued) : — 

locomotive, 101. — Table 1. Particulars of compound goods and passenger 
locomotives at work, in construction, and ordered, 104-o. — Tables 2-12, 
Actual fuel economy in compound engines over non-compound on various 
English and foreign lines, 100-114. — Table 13, Comparative cost of 
repairs, 114. — Tables 14-tj, Steam distribution in different compound 
locomotives, 11")-". 

Discussion. — Johnson, S. W., Working of Webb and AN'oisdell 
compounds, 118; saving of fuel due to increase of boiler-pressure and 
higher expansion, ILS; advantages and disadvantages of Webb 
compound, 1U>; working of heavy fast main-line passenger trains on 
Midland Railway with ordinary locomotives, 119. — Banderali, D., 
Compound goods engine on Northern Railway of France, 110; effect 
of spark arrester, 119; economy from compounding existing engines 
without increasing pressure. 120; capacity of receiver, 120; compound 
engines on Nurthcrn Railway of France, 120; oiling of cylinders, 121 ; 
arrangement of three-cylinder engine, 121. — Sehonheyder, W., Avoidance 
of coupling-rods, 121 ; objections to three-cylinder compound, and 
difficulty in starting, 122; simpler arrangement of two-cylinder 
compound. 122; proportion of cylinders, 12:5; mode of combining 
indicator diagrams from compound engines, 12:!. — Holden, J., Compound 
engines on Great Eastern Railway, 121; starting on a rising gradient. 
124; economy of fuel, 124; higher pressure necessary in compound 
engines. 12."). — Paget, A., Enquired arrangement for starting, 12"). — 
Holdon, J., Engines fitted with Worsdell and v. Borries starting valve. 
125. — IMcDonnell. A., Wear and tear of compound engines, 120 ; use of 
coupling-rods, 126; other means of economy besides compounding, 12«l; 
working of engines under variable load and speed, 126; greater first 
cost of compoimd system, 127. — Cochrane, C, Enquired economy from 
higher pressures in simple engines, 127. — McDonnell, A., Saving from 
higher boiler-pressure on Great Southern and Western Railway of 
Ireland, 127. — Mair, J. G., Heating surface and grate surface in 
compound engine, 128; anomalous evaporative eflBciency, 129. — Halpiu 
D.. Capacity of intermediate receiver, 129 ; equalising work in both 
cylinders, 129 ; blows on cranks and crank-pins, 130 ; relative merits of 
two or three-cylinder compound engines, 130 ; loss of power due to 
coupling-rods, 130; losses due to throttling and back-pressure, 131; no 
necessity for intercepting valves, 132 ; limit to diameter of cylinder, 
132. — Worsdell, T. W., Economy of fuel with liigher boiler-pressure 
and laro^er cylinders in non-compound locomotives, 132 ; effective 
pressures in simple and compound engines, and initial strain on 
working parts, 133 ; reasons for adoption of compound engine, 134 ; 



C 81 

CoMi'orsD Locomotives, Discusdon, 1889 (continued) : — 

introduction of intercepting valve for starting, 134 ; reasons for keeping 
to two cylinders la compound loco.notives, 136; experience of variable 
work on North Eastern Eailway, 136; economy dependent upon work 
done, 136 ; capacity of steam reservoir, 137 ; coupling-rods, 137 ; wire- 
drawing shown in in Ucator diagrams, 138; intercepting valve, 138; 
anomalous evaporation in compound engine, 139 ; iirst cost of arranging 
engine on compound principle, 139 ; coal consumption and boiler pressure 
in compound and non-compound engines, 140 ; compound tank engines 
working heavy traffic up long gradient, 140 ; wear and tear of boiler 
in compound engines, and priming, 141 ; balancing of two-cylinder 
compound engine, 142 ; consumption of fuel, 142 ; eflfect of spark-arrester 
on blast, 142. — Joy, D., Use of higher boiler-pressure, 143 ; less strain 
upon parts of compound engine, 143 ; cut-off with Joy valve-gear, 144. — 
Gray, J. M., Compounding enables higher pressures to be used without 
increasing the stresses, 144 ; relation between boiler pressure and mean 
effective pressure, 14o. — Lapage, K. H., Higher pressure can be better 
utilised in compound engine, 145 ; spaik arrester, 145 ; capacity of 
receiver, 146; leakage through intercepting valve, 146; advantage from 
iucieasing size of cylinders for existing lower pressures, 146; position 
of steam-chests, 147. 

CosiPOUND Locomotives, French, 1900, 375. 

Compound Locomotives in India, Paper on the Working of Compound 
Locomotives in India, by C. Sandiford, 1886, 355. — Conversion to 
compound system of two ordinary locomotives on Scinde Punjaub and 
Delhi Eailway, 35."). — Particulars of two-cylinder and four-cylinder 
compound engine, 35G. — Resulting economy in fuel, 35(3, 357. — Comparative 
expense of alterations, 357. — Coupling rods, 357. — Exhaust from high- 
pressure cylinders into low-pressure, 358. — Blast, and oil consumption, 
358. — General results of compounding in the two engines, 358. — Tractive 
power required, 362. — Table of comparative trials of fuel in daily train 
service with ordinary locomotives, not compound, 360-1. 

Bhcus^ion, 363-40it. See Compound Locomotives in Ilussia. 

Compound Locomotives in Russia, Paper upon Experiments on the Steam- 
Jacketing and Compounding of Locomotives in Russia, by A. Borodin, 
1886, 297. — Previous experiments and investigations, 297. — Mode of 
carrying out present trials, 297. — Part I, Tests made in locomotive 
testing shop, 298. — Description of testing shop, 298. — Appliances ^for 
making observations, 299 ; for collecting exhaust steam, 299 ; for direct 
measurement of feed-water, 301. — Mode of conducting the tests, 301. — 
Data furnished by observations, 302. — Verification of results, water carried 
over by steam, 303 ; consumption of moist steam, 304. — Tests made in 1882 

F 



82 C 

Compound Locomotives in Russia, Paper, 1886 (contiuutd) : — 

with oidinai-y locomotive A 22 steam-jackfted, 305. — Table 1, details of 
seven diflferent steam distributions, 307. — Table 2, results of tests, 308-311. 
— Utility of steam-jacket completely demonstrated, 313. — Table 3, steam 
consumption with and without steam-jacket, 314. — Analysis of indicator 
diagrams with respect to utility of steam-jacket, 315. — Selection of average 
diagrams, and calculations therefrom, '6V>. — Threefold eft'ect of steam- 
jacket, 317. — Table 4, results of analysis of indicator diagrams, 318. — 
Tests made in 1881 with ordinary locomotive A 21 not steam-jacketed, 
319. — Table 5, test with later cut-ofi", olK. — Table 6, test with earlier 
cut-off, 320. — Benefit of steam-jacket confirmed by unjacketed experiments, 
320. — Cylinders of too large size are unfavourable to economy of steam, 
321. — Tests made in 1881 with compound locomotive A 7 stLam-jucketed, 
321. — Table 7, steam consumption in compound engine when steam- 
jackets were not working, 322. — Economy in steam-consumption by 
•compound locomotive, 323. — Pai:t II, Tkiai.s made with ExrEKiMEXTAL 
TRAINS, 324. — Appliances for observations on engiie and tender, 324. — 
Mode of conducting the tests, 325. — Table 8, details of vulve-motions, 
32G-7. — Points noted during tests, 328. — Calculation of work done, 329. 
— Consumption of water and fuel per I.H.P. per hour, 330. — Effect of 
regulator opening on initial steam-pressure in cylinders. 331 . — Evaporation 
of water per pound of wood, 331. — Table 0, details of running, 332-3. — 
Comparative consumption of water and fuel in compound and ordinary 
locomotives expanding equally, 334. — Table lo, water consumption in 
ordinary and compound locomotive, 33tj-7.— Comparative economy in 
compound locomotive, 338. — Comparative work done by compound and 
ordinary locomotives with equal consumption of water and fuel, 338 ; 
Table 11, 339. — Comparative consumption of water and fuel in compound 
and ordinary locomotives doing equal work, 340 ; Table 12, 340. — 
Proportion of work done in small and large cylinder of compound 
locomotive, 341 ; Table 13, 342.^Effect of jackets on consumption of 
steam, 343. — Imperfect draining of jackets, 344. — Advantageous 
peculiarities of compound locomotive, 344. — Experiments made in 1881-82 
with compound and ordinary locomotives while running, 345 ; Table 14, 
34G. — Part III, Consumption of fuel in regular working of compound 
AND ordinary LOCOMOTIVES, 347. — Table 15, mean consumption of wood 
during five years, 347. — Part IY, General conclusions, 349. — Table 16. 
consumption of steam in ordinary and compound locomotives without 
steam-jackets, 348. — Table 17, ordinary locomotive A 22 without steam- 
jackets, 349. — Table 18, compound locomotive without steam-jackets, 351 . 
— Most advantageous distribution of steam, 351. — Table 19, tests made 
in 1883 with compound locomotive in testing shed, 352. — Economy 



C 83 

Compound Locomotives in- Russia, Paper, 1886 (continued) : — 

produced by steam-jackets and by compoun I system, 352-3. — Undoubted 
advantage of compound locomotive, 354. — Advantages of a testing shop 
properly fitted up. o54. 

Di<cumon. — Borodin, A., Agreement of results from these trials with 
those of other experimenters, 363 ; proportionate work done in smiU 
cylinder of compound engine, 363. — Halpin, D., Scope of paper, 303; 
effect produced on indicator diagrams by long and bent indicator pipes. 
:!tj4 ; steam-jackets must act as condensers, 3G5 ; steam-trap for draining 
jickets, 3G5; drainage of jackets by auxiliary injector, 305; by ordinary 
injector, 30G ; three elements affecting the value of steam-jackets, 36G ; 
ratio of jacket surface to cylinder volume, 3G7 ; projecting ribs round 
outside of cylinder barrel for increasing the transmission of heat from 
jacket, 308; friction brake for absorbing whole power of engine. 368; 
cooling of brake-wheel with cold water, 369 ; Royal Agricultural Society's 
trials, 370; drop in steam-pressure from boiler to cylinders, 370; 
too high velocity of steam in pipes, 371. — Duvey, H., Desirability of 
experiments for determining value of steam-jacket, 371 ; steam-jackets 
discontinued on compound mining engines, 372 ; greater value of jacket 
on high-pressure cylinder than on low-pressure, 373. — Mallet, A.. Two 
cylinders only are preferable for compound locomotives, 373 ; ratio i'i 
cylinder capacities, 374 ; arrangement for independent working of the two 
cylinders, 374 ; four-cylinder compound locomotive, 374 ; high-speed 
express engine with triple expansion in four cylindt^rs, 375. — Kennedy, 
A. B. W., Questions as to details of experiments, 376 ; indicator diagrams 
affected by arrangement of indicator pipes, 370 ; amount of condensation 
in steam-jackets, 377 ; difference of heat in jacket steam and cylinder 
steam, 377 ; jackets should be drained automatically, 378 ; arrangement 
for obviating error in friction brake, 378. — Rich, W. E., Steam-jacketing 
of cylinders of compound locomotives, 378 ; economy arising from jackets, 
379 ; errors resulting from long indicator pipes, 380 ; use of small fan for 
blowing the fire, 38 J ; equalisation of work in both cylinders of compo md 
engine, 381 . — Stevart, A., Greater number of facts desirable for determining 
value of compound system in locomotives, 381. — Brook-Fox, F. G., 
Importance of fuel economy on Imlian railways, 382. — Ryan, J., Limit 
to extent of steam-jacketing, 382 ; flow of heat through wall of ribbed 
cylinder, 383 ; ribs are disadvantageous, 381 ; flow of heat d'-pends on 
difference of temperature, 384 ; stoves for warming with ribbed surfaces 
are not analogous, 384 ; cause of diversity in results of experiments on 
steam-jackets, 385 ; advantage of jackets in slow-working engines with 
high expansion. 285 ; use of large jackets, 385 ; dift'eronce between economy 
in steam and in fuel iu compound engine, 38l! ; iliminution in initial 



84 



CoMPorsD LocoMuTivES IN INDIA AND IN RrssiA, Ducu<)<ion, 1886 (continued) : — 
pressure in cylinder is due to closing of regulator, 'SS'o ; importance of 
recording anomalous results in experiments, 387. — Vin9otte, R.. Proper 
draining of steam-jackets. 387; objection to steam-trap acting by 
expansion, 387; application of injector for draining jackets, 387 ; flow of 
heat through cylinder wall, 388; effect of long indicator pipes upon 
indicator diagrams. 389. — Greig, D., Important economy from compounding 
of portable and traction engines, 389 ; value of steam-jacketing depends 
on piston-speed, 389 ; temperature of steam must be kept up in low- 
pressure cylinder, 390 ; economy from comjiounding or fcteam-j.icketing 
should be the same in steam as in fuel, 390. — Urquhart, T., Mode of 
supplying steam to jackets, 390 ; cylinders of too large size, 390 ; conflicting 
opinions as to profit from compounding of locomotives, 391 ; conditions 
essential in a compound locomotive, 391. — Carrick, H., Fuel economy 
on Indian railways. 391 ; importance of simplicity in compounding of 
locomotives. 391. — Aspinall, J. A. V., Experiments made in locomotive 
testing shed are less valuable than actual work done in running, 391 ; 
facility for changing engines from compound to non-compound or 
conversely, 392 ; advantage of Indian wider gauge, 392 ; fuel economy 
on English lines, 393; size of steam-pipes, ;^93. — Riches, T. H., Fuel 
consumption in Indian compound locomotives, 394 ; float-valve lor 
draining steam-pipes, 394 ; use of fan for creating forced draught in 
locomotive, 395. — Carbutt, E. H., Necessity of railways for development 
of India, 395 ; importance of reducing cost of working, 39G ; exportation 
ol grain from India, 39G. — C'rampton, T. R., Commercial aspect of 
expansion, 397 ; early application of steam-jacketing to locomotives, 397 ; 
suggestion of marine boiler for locomotive use, 397. — Walker, B., Early 
experiments proving value of steam-jacketing, 398 ; value of compounding 
begins at low boiler-pressure, 398; low-pressure cylinder should receive 
steam as hot as possible, 399; testing of engines by raising and lowering 
of weights, 399. — Halpin, D.. Effect of compounding ui»n stres-es on 
crank-axle, 399 ; waste of power in coupled engines, 400 ; uniformity of 
power impossible with only two cylinders in compound locomotive, 400 ; 
cost of fuel and burning of wood in Indian locomotives, 400 ; deterioration 
of coal during transport to India, 400 ; injector arrangement for draining 
steam-jackets. 4ul. — Anderson, W., I'amot's doctrine of efficiency of heat 
engines, 401 ; theoretical duty of simple and compound locomotives, 401 ; 
effect of steam jacket on duty of steam within cylinder, 402 ; advantage of 
steam-jacket, and of compound expansion, 402. — Borodin, A., Jacketing of 
cylinders, and discharge of condensed water from jackets, and measurement 
of feed- water in train-trials, 403 ; arrangement of indicator pipes, and 
influence on indicator diagrams, 403 ; mode of draining steam-jackets. 



C 85 

CoMPOCNu Locomotives ix India axd ra Russia. Discussion, 1886 (continued) : — 
404; dift'erence between jackets and condensers, 40o ; boiler-pressure in 
train-trials, 405 ; reduction of initial pressure in cylinders is due to 
closing of regulator, 40G ; steam-jackets supplied direct from boiler, 406 ; 
proportion of heat lost by external cooling, 406 ; Carnot's principle, and 
probable cause of economy in compound engines, 407; advantage of 
locomotive testing shed, 407; uncertainty about fuel-consumption in 
locomotives, 408. — Sandiford, C, Actual consumption of fuel in Indian 
compound locomotives, 408 ; loss of power due to coupling-rods is small, 
408. — Heail, J., Experiments for determining value of steam-jacket, 409. 

Compound Steam Turbise, Paper on the Compound Steam Turbine and Turbo- 
Electric Generator, by the Honourable Charles A. Parsons, 1888, 480. — 
Application of compound steam turbine to driving of dynamos, 480. — 
Working of early turbo-electric generators, 480. — Description of compound 
steam turbine, 481. — Bearings and lubrication, 482. — Turbo-tlectrio 
generator, 4><3; efficiency. 483 ; friction in bearings, 483. — Dynamo. 484; 
coupling, 484 ; armature, 484 ; commutator, 484. — Efficiency of dynamo, 
484. — Electrical control governor, 485. — Steam consumption, 485. — 
Durability, 486. — Advantages, and number of generators supplied, 486. 

Discussion, August 1888. — Parsons, Hon.C. A., Exhibited specimens of 
engine, 486. — C'arbutt. E. H.. Success of compound steam turbine as a 
high-speed steam engine. 486. — Sturgeon. J., Compressed-air power supply 
for Birmingliam. 487; disadvantages of supplying electricity from a 
central station, 487 ; application of compressed air for electric lighting 
in Paris, 488 ; compressed air for working high-speed turbine, 488. — 
Davey, H., Previous attempts at rotary steam engines, 488 ; adaptation of 
compound turbine for driving machinery, and as a condensing engine, 
488; efficiency of engine, 489 ; three stages of expansion, 489. — Molloy. 
Very Rev. Dr., Satisfactory experience with compound steam turbine in 
electric lighting, 489 ; steadiness of action, 490 ; objection to working by 
compressed air, 490; commercial efficiency of dynamo, 491. — Parsons, 
Hon. C. A , Compressed air for driving turbine. 491 ; reduction of leakage. 
491 ; clearance between turbine and casing. 492; probable efficiency as a 
condensing engine, 492 ; steam consumption. 492 ; commercial efficiency 
of dynamo, 492. — Carbutt, E. H., Adjournment of discussion. 493. 

Discussion. October 1888. — Par»ons. Hon. C. A., Exhibited turbo-electric 
generator and specimens of various parts, 493. — Cochrane, C, Cost of turbo- 
electric generator supplying electric light at Ormesby Iron "Works, 493 ; 
steam consumption, 494 ; cost per lamp, 494 ; accurate grinding of spindle, 
494. — Douglass, Sir J. N., High speed, and perfect steadiness of action, 495 
value for tlectric installations afloat, 495. — Beaumont, W. W., Enquired 
economy of motor with higher steam-pressures, 496. — Kapp, G., Testing of 



86 C 

Compound Steam Tui;bine. Di ckj-^iow, 1888 (continiud) : — 

turbine at Xuwcasile exhibition, -490; bumming sound in lamp. 4'.,6; 
cast-iion for magnets, 4',i7 ; hysteresis, 497 ; winding of armature, 497. — 
Scbonheyder, W., Object of waslier bearing.aad suggested modification. 49S. 
— Dobson, B. A., Difficulties attending high-t-peed bearings, 498 ; spindles 
of spinning machinery, 499 ; elastic bearing for absorbirg vibration, 41t9 ; 
action of washers in neutralising tremor, iOO; -^•ib^ation of imperfectly 
balanced spindles diminishes with increase of speed, 500; centrifugal 
governor, 501. — Davey, H., Bearings in De Lavals centrifugal creamer, 
501 ; economy of compound steam turbine, 501. — Robinson, M. H., 
Admiralty scale for electric lighting on shipboard, 502. — Gray. J. M., 
Turbo-electric generator in torpedo-boat, 502. — Mair, J. G., Efficiency of 
steam turbine, 502 ; loss of efficiency with lower pressure or speed, 50:-J. — 
Paget, A., Coudition of minimum power for driving imperfectly balanced 
spindles, 503 ; abundant lubrication of bearings in steam turbine, 503. — 
Hall, \V. 8., ("losed lubricator for bt arings, .")04. — Forbes, G., Important 
advance in dynamo electric machinery, 501; success of turbu-electric 
generators on board Atlantic steamer, 505; frictii'U of steam passing 
through turbines, 505 ; economy of engine, 506 ; deadening the noise from 
turbo-electric generator, 506 ; conversion into altemuting-current dynamo 
machine, 507. — Richmond, J., Lighting power and efficiency of turbo- 
electric generators, 507. — Fearfield, J. P., Relative i fficiency of compound 
steam turbine between wide ranges of load, r)OS ; requirements for electric 
lighting, 5 19; number of lamps driven by dynamo, 509. — Head, J., 
Progress in high-speed engines, 509; relation of power to space and 
weight, 510; addition of condenser, and use of much higher pressure with 
more expansion, ."i 10; importance of saving in weight of motor and of 
fuel and water, .■")11; use of petroleum, fill. — Scolt-iMoncrieS", \V. D., 
Compressed air instead of steam for working of turbine, 511 ; formation 
of ice in working parts, and means of prevention, 512. — Stabler, J., 
Outline of spindle should be adiabalic curve, 518; mode of obtaining 
greatest power from steam, 513. — "Willans, P. W., Ascertain steam 
consumption instead of coal, 513 : difficulty of obtaining tqual efficiency 
at all powers, 511! ; steam consumption, 514; friction of steam in passing 
through compound turbine, 514. — Parsons, Hon. C. A., Automatic grinding 
of spindle and casing, 514; wear of bearings, 515; steam consumption, 
and economy at higher pressures, 515; humming sound in lamp, 516; 
cast-iron magnets, 516; steel washers and springs for bearings, 510; 
bending of steel spindle in fixed bearings, 517; best speed for quiet 
running, 517 ; comparative i fficiencies of compound turbine and compound 
engine, 517 ; piinciple of continuous lubrication, 518 ; breakage of blades, 
and leakage, 518 ; number of lamps lighted, 518; formation of ice when 



87 



CoMPOVKD Steam Turbine, Z)iVcM«</on, 1888 (coutinued) : — 

working with compressed air, ol9; electric lighting on board Atlantic 
steamer, 519 ; application of turbo-electric generator to central -station 
lighting, 519. — Cochrane, C, Development of rotary engine, 519; 
reduction of leakage, 520. — Ryan, J., Heat distribution in turbine, and 
effect of jacketing, 520 ; results of experiments, and efficiency of dynamo, 
521 ; conical form for spindle of turbine, 521. 

CoMPorNT)iNG FOB AxNUAL SUBSCRIPTION, addition to By-laws, 1890, 31. 

Compounding of Locomotives, Paper on the Compounding of Locomotives 
burning Petroleum Refuse in Russia, by T. Urquhart, 1890, 47. — 
First experiment in compounding, 47. — Economy of fuel realised by 
compounding, 48. — Dimensions of engines, 48. — Indicator diagrams, 49. 
— Tractive power in passenger and goods compound locomotives, as 
compared with non-compound, 50 ; mode of calculating tractive power 
in compound engines, 52. — Economy of fuel and repairs, results of five 
months' working, 52; twelve months' working, 53. — Slide-valves, outside 
and inside lap, 54 ; relieving of pressure on back of high-pressure and 
of low-pressure valve, 54. — Sequence of cranks, low-pressure crank 
leading in forward running better than high-pressure leading, 55. — 
Air-inlet valve for running down hill with steam oflf, 56 ; admission of 
hot smoke-box gases mixed with cold air into low-pressure cylinder, 57. — 
Starting valve, 57 ; intercepting valve and interchanging valve, 58. — 
Receiver, advantage of larger capacity, 58. — Progress of compounding, 
60. — Tabulated results from compounded goods and passenger locomotives, 
with high-pressure and low-pressure cranks Itading, Tables 1-11: 62-73. 

Di^cmsion. — Urquhart, T., Present number of compounded locomotives, 
74 ; metallic packing, 74. — Schonheyder, W., Indicator pipes, 74 ; 
relieving rings on back of high-pressure slide-valves, 75. — Beaumont, 
W. "W., Indicator diagrams, 75 ; throw of eccentrics, 75 ; receiver 
capacity, 76 ; conditions of working, 76. — Tomkins, W. S.. Tractive 
power and fuel economy of compounded engines, 77 ; diagrams from 
low-pressure cylinder, 77. — Head, J., Suspended slide-valve, 78. — 
Aspinall, J. A. F., Advantage of liquid fuel in compounding, 78 ; 
metallic packings, 78 ; starting valve, 79 ; advantage of outside cylinders 
in compounding, 79 ; experiments with liquid fuel, 80. — Lapage, R. H., 
Intercepting valve should be automatic, 80 ; boiler-pressure in compound 
engines, 81 ; compounding with two low-pressure cylinders, 81 ; progress 
of compounding, 82 ; larger cylinders for lower boiler-pressure, 82. — 
Tomlinson, J., Objection to low boiler-pressure in compound locomotive, 
82. — Lapage, R. H., Keeping up steam in compounds, 83. — Walker, B., 
Early experience with compound engine, 83; new design for compound 
locomotives, S3. — Fairholme, Capt., Compounding on Royal Saxon State 



88 



CoMPOL'NDiKG OF LOCOMOTIVES, Di'CUision, 18S0 (continued") : — 

Kailways, 84 ; Lindner starting gear, 84 — Tomliiison, J.. J^nquired 
mode of working, 85. — Fairholme, Capt., Construction of slide-valve, and 
details of Lindner gear, 8.").— Marten, E. B.. Xuisy working of relieved 
low-pressure slide-valve, 87. — Tomliuson, J , Cause of noise, 87. — 
Young, G. S.. Equali-sinsr of power in bigh-pressure and low-pressure 
cylinders, 87; capacity of receiver, 87. — Galloway. W.. Compound 
winding engine, 88 — Tomlinson, J., Econumy from use of petroleum 
refuse, 90 ; further economy from compounding, DO ; compounding of 
mill engines and marine engines. 90 ; compounding of locomotives not so 
favourable, 91 ; repairs of compounded engines, 92 ; fuel economy, 
varying results with different drivers, 92 ; former experiments on South 
Western Kail way, 93 ; tandem arrangement for compounding locomotives, 
93; inequality of work in cylinders, 93; indicator diagrams from 
low-pressure cylinder, Hi ; honours conferred upon author, 94. — 
Urquhart, T., Proper way of indicating a locomotive, 94 ; effect of 
indicator connections, 9.") ; relieving of pressure on high-pressure 
slide-valve, 95 ; suspended low-pressure slide-valve and noise in v.dve- 
chest, 96 ; increased throw of eccentrics, 97 ; receiver capacity, 97 ; 
economy of compounded engines, 98; reduction in tractive power, 98; 
repairs, 99; metallic packing, 99; indicator diagrams from low-pressure 
cylinder, 99; liquid fuel advanfcigeous for compounding. 100; hand- 
control of non-automatic starting- valves, 100; compounding of inside- 
cylinder locomotives, 101 ; relation of cylinder capacity to boiler 
pressure, 102 ; compounding of mill engine, 102 ; ratio of cylinders on 
Saxon State Railways. 102 ; sequence of cranks, 102 ; Table 12. results 
in favour of high-pressure crank leading. 103 : variable ditferentiul 
cut-off. 104; hump in low-pressure diagram. 101; enlargement of 
receiver tends to equalise jmwer in two cylinders, 104 : compounding 
of winding engines. 101: extended use of petroleum refuse in Russian 
locomotives, 10.") ; results from different drivers, 100; comparative 
consumption of water, in compounds and non-compounds, 100 ; tandem 
compound locomotives. 106 ; compounding of eight-wheel coupled 48-ton 
goods locomotive, with results in Tables 13 and 14, 107-111. 

CoMPKESSED-AiR PowER in Portsmouth Dockyard. 1892, 297. Ste Dockyard 
Lifting and Hauling. 

Compressed- Air Powek Scpplt, Paris. 1889, 516, r),")2, .)o6. 

Compton-Bracebridge, J. E., Grailuate transferred to Member, 1885, 3. 

CoNATT, G., elected Member, 1896, 1. 

Concrete Cylinder Foundations for Quay Walls. 1895, 412. See Clyde 
Navigation. 

Concrete Mixer, Tavlor. 1899, 37i>. Bee Dockyard Constructional Machinery. 



C 89 

CoNDENSATiox AND Re-evapobation, Paper on Further Experiments on 
Condensation and Re-evaporation of Steam in a Jacketed Cylinder, by 
Major T. English, 1889, 641. — Description of engine, 641 ; clearance, 
load, cylinders, jackets, boiler, (542 ; surface-condenser, weighing of 
feed-water and condensed water, G43. — Mode of conducting trials, 643 ; 
classification of trials, 644; measurement and calculation of indicator 
diagrams, 64.5. — General result, 64G; effect of clearance surface, 646; 
of temperature, 647 ; of density of steam, 648. — Fonnulse for initial 
condensatiim in unjacketed and in jacketed cylinders, 649 ; re-cvaporation 
649. — Calculation of steam used per stroke, 652. — Comparison of calculated 
with observed results, 654. — Comparison of Mr. Willans's observed results 
with calculation, 655. — Three ways of reducing loss from condensation, 
655 ; by increasing length of stroke, 655 ; by increasing rate of revolution, 
656 ; by reducing unjacketed clearance surface, 656. — Tabulated results 
of trials and comparisons with calculation, 658-675. 

Discussion. — Willans, P. W., Why better to weigh condensed water, 
676. — Englisli, Major T., Discrepancies in feed-water, 676. — Willans, 
P. W., Difference between measurements, 676. — English, IMajor T., 
Collected water, 677. — Willans, P. W., No loss from excess of condensation 
over re-evaporation, 677 ; proportion of cylinder diameter to stroke, 679 : 
re-arrangement of results of trials, 680; discrepancies in results, G8I ; 
range of temperature, 681 ; mode of putting jackets out of action, 682 ; 
effect of density of steam, 683 ; diflBculty of constructing general formula, 
684 ; formula for initial condensation, 684 ; comparison with results, 685 ; 
condensation apparently independent of jacketing, 685 ; admission of 
air during exhaust, 68G ; range of temperature, 686. — Cotterill, J. H., 
Relation of condensation to density of steam, 68G ; to range of temperature, 
C87 ; to speed of revolution, 688. — Kennedy, A. B. W., Measurement of 
feed-water, 689 ; range of temperature, 689 ; comparison of calculated 
with observed results, 690 ; division of cylinder surface, G90 ; tabular 
summary of trials, 691. — Gray, J. M., Influence of range of temperature 
on initial condensation, 691. — Bodmer, G. R., Temperatures of clearance 
surface and of admission steam, 692 ; ranges of temperature in cylinders 
of compound engines, 693 ; re-evaporation during admission, 694 ; 
economy from increased compression, 694. — Cowper, C. E., High 
consumption of water per horse-power per hour, 695. — Young, G. S., 
Steam pressure in jacket, 695 ; priming, 695 ; use of steam blast, 696. — 
Paget, A., Research Committee on value of steam-jacket, C96. — English, 
Major T., Variation in internal capacity of boiler, 696 ; heat due to work, 
697; increased length of cylinder, 697; effect of superheating, C97 ; 
density of steam, 608 ; additional surface exposed during stroke, 698 ; 
additional clearance space, 608 ; difference between formulre for jacketed 



90 

CoxDENSATiox AND Re-evapokation, Discu^>:ion, 1889 (continued) : — 

and unjacketed cylinders, G98 ; air admission, G98 ; initial condensation is 
practically instantaneous, 699 ; mean temperature of cylinder, G99 ; range 
of temperature, (j99; agreement between observed and calculated results, 
700; clearance burface and stroke surface, 701 ; synopsis of results, 70l ; 
re-evaporation during admission, 701; priming. 701; pressure in jacket, 
702. — Cochrane, C, Range of temperature, 702. — English, Major T., 
Consumption of coal per horse-power per hour, 702. — Cochrane, C, Value 
of steam-jacket, 702. 

Condensation, Initial, in a .Steam Cylinder. 1887, 500, 503 ; see Initial 
Condensatiim in Steam Cylinder. — 1892, 198 ; see Initial Condensation 
in Steam Engine. — 1900, 5(i9 ; see Glass Kcvealer. 

Condensation of Steam, Surface, 1894, 140. -See Surface Condensation of 
Sfeam. 

Condensation, Transmission of Heat from Surface Condensation through 
Metal Cylinders, 1896, 501. See Heat Transmission. 

Condenser, Ejector, 1894, oUl, ;5!1, 315-0. 

Condensers, Evaporative, 1899, 185. See Evaporative Condensers. 

Condition of Carbon in Steel. 1885, 30. See Steel. 

Connei L, W. P., elected Graduate, 1895, 15(1 :— Associate Jlember, 1897, 2. 

CONRAin, J. 8., elected Associate Member, 1896, 2. 

Constantine, E. G., elected Member, 1888, l.'>9. ^Marine- Engine Trial-. 1891, 
2G5. 

Construction of Cycles, Paper on the Conrtruction of modern Cycles, by 
R. E. Phillips, 1885, 4t;7. — >'cope of paper. 4t!7. — Invention of bicycle, 
467. — Introduction of suspension wheel. 4t;7. — Invention of tricycle, 4f!8. 
— Statistics of cycle industry, 4fi8. — Performances of cycles, 4(i9. — 
Classification, 400. — Ordinary bicycles, 470. — Maintenance of balance, 
470. — Weight, 471. — Vibration, 471. — Dwarf bicycles with geared rotary 
action, 472. — Adjustable height of pedal-axles, 473. — Bearings of divided 
pedal-axles, 473. — Dwarf bicycles with lever action, '' Facile," 473 ; 
•■ 'Xtraordinary," 474. — Safety bicycles with steering wheel in front, 
474. — Rider mounted on independent swing-frame, 474. — Author's 
arrangement for controlling the steering, 475. — Earlier tandem bicycle, 
47G. — Tandem tricycle, 477. — Later tandem bicycle, 477. — Otto bicycle, 
477. — Power required to propel bicycle, 478. — Tricycles, 479. — Single- 
driving tricycle, 479. — " Coventry Rotary " tricycle, 479. — Front-steering 
tricycle, 480. — Double-driving tricycles, 480. — Double-driving by clutch 
action, 480. — Clutch to drive automatically in both directions. 481. — 
Double-driving by diflferential or balance gear, 481. — Differential gear 
for central-geared tricycles, 482. — Comparison between clutch-action and 
differential or balance gear, 483. — H umber tricycle, 483; modified 



C 91 

CoxPTRUCTiON OF CYCLES, Paper, 1885 (continued) :— 

construction, 481 ; latest development, 48 i.— Methods of driving a tricycle, 
485.— Omnicycle, 485.— Direct-action tricycle, 485.— Transmission of 
driving power, 48tJ.— Driving chains, 48G.— Driving bands, 486.— 
Gear wheels, 48'J.— Coupling-rods, 487.— Eccentrics with bands, 487.— 
Variable-speed gear, 487.— Epicyclic speed-multiplying gear, 487.— 
Crypto-dynamic power-multiplying gear, 488.— Cranks with variable 
throw, 488.— Position of rider, 490.— Swing frame, 490.— Automatic 
balance, 490. — Sliding frame, 491. — Hand-power tricycles, 491 : 
Velociman, 491 ; Oarsman, 491.— Sociable tricycles, 492.— Tandem 
tricycles, 492.— Convertible tandems, 493.— Disconnecting of driving 
chain, 493.— Auxiliary driving frame, 494.— Carrier tricycles, 494.— 
Arrangement of driving gear, 495.— Width of tricycle, 496.— Folding 
frame, 497.— Telescopic axle, 497.— Weight of tricycle, 497.— Component 
parts of cycles, 498.— Wheels, 498.-Tyres, 498.— Spokes, 499.— 
Corrugated spokes, 499.— Bearings, 499.— Wear of balls in bearings 
500.— Frame, 500.— Steering gear, 501.- Socket head, 501.— Stanley 
head, 502.— Control of steering wheel, 503.— Brake, 503; spoon brake, 
503 ; band brake, 504.— Pedals, rubber and rat-trap, and combined, 504 ; 
grip pedals, 505.— Fittings, &c., 505. 

DiVcu^'^iow.— Phillips, R. E., Eeference to cycles, 500.- Boys, C. V., 
Efficiency of dwarf bicycles with geared rotary action, 506 ; turning uf 
Otto bicycle, 506 ; double-driving by clutch action and by differential 
gear, 507; clutch acting instantaneously either forwards or backwards, 
508; driving bands on Otto bicycle, 508; Oarsman tricycle, 5C8; 
corrugated spokes, 509; wear of balls in bearings, 510.— Hall, W. S., 
Mode of corrugation of spokes, 510.— Phillips, R. E., Corrugated spokes 
are crimped, 510.— Smith, R. H., Perfect distribution of weight in Otto 
bicycle, 511.— Sampson, J. L., Worm gear driving through unyielding 
connections, 511.— Dalby, J. P., Importance of balance gear, 512; 
comparison of clutch-driven and differential-geared tricycles, 512 ; steady 
running of differential-gear, d tricycles, 513.— Jones, F. W., High speed 
of safety bicycles, 513 ; best position for rider, 513 ; greater safety of 
bicycles with rear driving-wheel, 514 ; size of wheels in Otto bicycle, 
515; principle of swinging frame, 515 ; driving by endless chains, 515; 
corrugated spokes, 516; tangential spokes, 516.— Boys, C. V., Steep 
gradient ascended on Otto bicycle, 516; be=t size of wheels, 516.— 
Phillips, R. E., Efficiency of dwarf bicycles with geared action, 517; 
rapid turning of Otto bicycle, 517; worm driving-gear, 517; double- 
driving by clutch action and by balance gear, 518; driving by bands 
or by chains, 519; Oarsman tricycle, 519; cormgated spokes, 519.— 
Cochrane, C, Wind resistance against wheels of cycle, 519.— Phillips, 



92 C 

C'o\STRCCTiON OF CYCLES, Digcid^sion, 1885 (continued) : — 

K. E., Smaller wheels encounter least resistance from air, 520. — Lawson, 
H. J., Objection to elasticity in spokes, 520. — Phillips, R. E., Elasticity 
insufficient to affect stability of wheel. 520.— Boys, C. V., Elastic yieMing 
not perceptible to eye, 520. — Head, J., Path of bicycle, 520 ; advantages 
of cycling, 521 ; rider's strength available wholly for propulsion, 521 ; 
low speed of pedalling, 521 ; cycles dependent upon combination of 
subsidiary inventions, 522; cycle-ways, 522; benefits of cycling, 523; 
invalid chair, 523: quality of work in manufacture of cycles, 521. 

CoNSTRrcTiON OF CYCLES. 1897, 284. See Cycle Construction. 

Construction of "Long Cecil" Gcx, Paper on the Construction of '-Long 
Cecil," a 4' 1-inch rifled breechloading Gun, in Kimberley, during the 
Siege 1899-1900, by E. Golfe, 1900, 359.— Description of steel, 359.— 
Sources of information as to construction, 3(50. — Quality of powder, 301. — 
Details of construction, 303 ; rifling attachment, 3(!4 ; breech-block and 
obturator, 300. — Carriage, 307, wheels, 308. — Testing and ranging, 308. — 
Ammunition, 309; peivussiun fuse; cartridges and shells, 370. — Fracture 
and repair of rings, 370. — Failure of obturator bolt, 372. — Relief of 
Kimberley: death of G. Labram, 373. 

Dit<cu''mm. — Martin, E. P., Remarkable nature of work accomplished, 
373.— Donaldson. H. F., Fracture of rings and of bolt, :!74. — Martin, E. P., 
Thanks to author, :i74. 

CoNTisrous Mean-Pressire Indicator for Stcam-Engines. 1899, 509. See 
Jlcan-Pressnre Indicator. 

CoxvEUS.KZiONE.— Belfast, 1888, 383; 1896, 421.— Birmingham, Jubilee, 1897, 
308.— Dirby. 1898, too.— Dublin. 1888, :!78.— Edinburgh, 1887, 438. 
—Glasgow, 1895, 4t;7.— Lincoln, 1885, 4:i4.— Liverpool. 1891, 429.— 
London, 1899, 255; 1900, 407.— :Manclii stcr. 1894, 403.— Slieffield, 
1890, 445. 

CoNYERS, S. W., elected Graduate, 1886, 271 :— transferred to Member, 1892, 3. 

Cook, C, elected Member, 1896, HH. 

Cook, G. X., elected Graduate, 1889, :!47. 

Cook, J. J., elected Member. 1888, 208. 

Cooke, R. T., elected Member, 1892, 102. 

Cooke, R. T., Ji n., elected Graduate, 1899, 475. 

Cooke, ?. W., elected Graduate, 1900, 4. 

Co IKE AXD Co., William, Tinsley 8teel, Iron, and Wire Works, Sheffield, 1880, 
440, 4(i7. 

Coombs, J. A., elected Associate ^lember, ISOO, 2. 

Cooper, G.. elected Associate Member, 1899, 293. 

Cooper, H., elected Member, 1898, 141. 

Cooper, M., elected Member, 1891, 480. 



C 93 

CooPEU, T., elected Associate Meiubir, 1896, lOi. 

COOPEK, T. L. K., elected Associate. 1892, 41-1. 

Cooper, W., elected ^lember, 1900, lt»;. 

Cooper, W. J., elected Associate ^Member, 1893, siO : — 1£00, 2. 

Cooperage, Maeliine, Li.erpool, 1891, 444. 

Co-operative Wholesale Society, Manchester, 1894, 414. 

Cope, H. C, elected Member, 1900, 9(J. 

Coppee, E., elected Memlier. 1886, 163. 

Copper, Eliminutinn of Impurities during the prccess of making "Best Selected" 
Copper, 18S5, 254. — Pyrometric Examination of the Alloys of Copper 
and Tin, 1895, 269. See Alloys Kcsearcli. 

Copper Fire-box Plates, Paper on Tensile Tests and Chemical Analyses of 
Copper Piates from Fire-boxts of Locomotives on the Great Western 
Railway, by W. Dean, 1893, loH. — Tabulated details of copper tire- 
box plates, mileage, tensile test, breaking stress, contraction of area, 
elongation, 140-1. — Chemical analyses, 142-3. — Testing machine and 
test pieces, 139, 144. — Electrical conductivity, 144. 
Discussion. — See Alloys Research. 1G4-K'8. 

Copper Mines, Devon Great Consols, Tavistock, 1899, 442, 401. 

Copper Minixg in the Lake Superior district. 1887, J^tj. See Lake Superior 
Copper Mining. 

Copper, Strength, 1895, 658. See Strength of Copper. 

(■opperthwaite. Pi. A., elected Member. 1899, 3. 

Corby, M., elected Associate Member, 1895, 548. 

CoRix, P. B.. elected Member, 1892, 102. 

Cobkhtll, W., elected Associate Member, 1893, 98. 

Corn Mills, 1889, 148. See Roller Flour Milling. -^Ve also Flour Mills. 

CoRXER, J. F., elected Member, 1895, 1. 

Corner, .J. T., Paper on the Lifting and Hauling Appliauces in Portsmouth 
Dockyard, 1892, 295.— Remarks thereon, 3'i7. 
Naval Electrical Apparatu:?, 1892, 283. 

Cobnett, J. P., elected Associate, 1891, 301. 

Cornish, E., elected Member, 1895, 327. 

Cor>tvall Railway Viadccts, 1899, 355. See Railway Viaducts in Cornwall. 

Corporation- Duty, 1888, 5, 21 :— 1891, 5, 11. 

Corbie, .J. B., elected Associate Member, 1899, 474. 

Corrosion of Iron and Steel. 1885, 338. See Address of President, Jeremiah Head. 

Corrosion of Marine ;Machineky, Unusual, 1896, 34.". See Marine Corrosion. 

Corrugated Sheets, 1893, 244, 341. See Cleveland Industries. 

COTEHELE HorsE. Calstock, 1899, 442. 463. 

Cotterill, J. H., Condensation and Pic-evaporation, 1889, ^:86. 
Heat Distribution in Steam Engine, 1887, 536. 
Marine-Engine Trials, 1889, 273. 



91 C 

Cotton, C. C. C, elected Member, 1900, 1. 

Cjtton, G. B., elected Graduate, 1899, 475. 

Cotton, H. S., Graduate transferred to Member, 1892, 3. 

Cotton Mill, Fine-Spinning, Bolton, 1894, 406, 450. 

Cutton-Spisnixg Mills iu Manchester and district, 1894, 40"), 406, 413, 414, 
435, 440, 445, 45:). 

Cottrell, S. B., elected Member, 1896, 101. 

Cottrill, J. 0., elected Member, 1894, 1. 

Cottrill, R. N., decease, 1891, 4. 

CorLMAN, J., elected Member, 1887, 473. 

Coulson, W., decease, 1895, 4.— Memoir, 1894, 276. 

CorNCiL, Annual Report. 1885, 3.— Xuml)er of Members, 3.— Transferences, 
deceases, 3.— Resignations, &c., 4.— Financial statement, 4, 10-3. — 
Research, 5.— Donations to Library, 5, 14-21.— List of Meetings, and 
Tapers, 5, 6. — Attendances at meetings, 6. — Summer meeting, Cardiff, and 
Autumn meeting, Nottingham, 1881, 6, 7.— Summer meeting, Lincoln, 

1885, 7. 

Di^cm''ion. — Bell. I. L., Financial position of Institution, 21 ; retirement 
from oiBce of President, 21 ; moved adoption of Report of Council, 22 — 
Motion carried, 22. 

CoLNCiL fir 1885, v, 27.— Election, 22, 2G, 27.— Resignations,75.— Appointments, 
2(3, 75, 76.— Retiring list, 4G4. — Nominations for 1886, 464. 

CuCNCiL, Annual Report, 1886, 3.— Number of Members, 3. — Transferences, 
deceases, 3. — Resignations, &c., 4. — Financial statement, 4, 8-11. — 
Research, 5. — Donations to Library, 5, 12-7. — List of Meetings, and 
I'apt rs, 6. — Attendances at meetings, 6. — Summer meeting, Lincoln, and 
Autumn meeting. Coventry, 1885, 6, 7. — Summer meeting, London, 1886, 7. 
])i:<cus!'ion. — Heail. J., Financial position of Institution, 17 ; moved 
adoption of Report of Council, 17. — Motion carried, 17. 

CoL-NCiL for 1886, v, 17-9.— Election, 17, 18.— Decease of Mr. P. D. Bennett, 4, 
Ig^ 20. — Appointment, 18. — Retiring list, 466. — Nominations for 1887,467. 

Council, Annual Report, 1887, 3. — Xumler of Members, 3. — Transferences, 
deceases, 3. — Resignations, &c., 3, 4. — Financial statement, 5, 12-5. — 
Research, 5 —Donations to Library, 6, 9, 16-23. — List of Meetings, and 
Papers, 6. — Attendances at meetings, 7. — Summer meeting, London, 1886 : 
visit of Belgian Engineers, 7; provincial excursions, 8; presentation 
to Library, 9 ; letter of thanks from Engineers' Association of Lie'ge 
University, 9.— Autumn meeting, 1886, 9. — Acceptances of invitations, 
10. — Written contributions to discussions, 10. 

Discussion. — Head, J., Commented upon Report, and moved its 
adoption, 24. — Motion carried, 24. 

Council for 1887, v, 25, 26.— Election, 24, 25.— Appointment, 158.— Retiring 
list, and nominations for 1888, 474-5. 



C 95 

CuuxciL, Annual Report, 1888, 3.— XumbL-r of Members, 3 —Transference, 
deceases, 3. — Ecsi-nations, Sec, 4. — Financial statement, 5, 10-3. — 
Research, 5, 6.— Donations to Library, 6, 14-20. — List of Meetings, 
and Papers, 6, 7. — Attendances at meetings, 7. — Summer meeting, 
Edinburgh, 1887, 7. 

Discussion. — Carbutt, E. H., Commented upon Report, 21 ; moved its 
a loption, 29. — Motion carried, 29. 

CoixciL for 1888, V, 30, 31.— Election, 29, 3(i.— Retiring list, and nominations 
for 18S9, 444-G. 

CorxciL. Anntal Report, 1889, 3.— Number of Members, 3.— Transferences 
deceases, 3. — Annual death-rate, 4. — Resignations, &c.. 4, 5. — Financial 
statement. 5. 10-3. — Research, 5, 6. — Architects' Registration Bill, 6, 7. 
— Donations to Library. 7, 14-20. — List of Meetings, and Papers, 7, 8. — 
Attendances at Meetings. 8.— Summer Meeting. Dublin, 1888, 8. — 
Honorary Life Membership, 9. — Summer Meeting, Paris, 1889, 9. 

Discussion. — Carbutt, E. H., Commented upon Report, 21 ; moved its 
adoption, 23. — Motion carried, 23. 

CoofCiL for 1889, v, 24, 25.— Election, 23.— Appointments, 203.— Retiring list 
and nominations for 1890. 5S5-6. 

Council, Ajixtal Report, 1890, 3. — Number of Members, 3. — Transferences, 
deceases, &c.. 3, 4. — Resignations, 5. — Financial Statement, 5, 12-5. — 
Research, 5-7. — Donations to Library, 7, 16-25. — List of Meetings and 
Papers, 7-8. — Attendances at Meetings, 8. — Summer Meeting. Paris, 

1889, 8. — Honorary Li.'e Membership, 9. — Summer Meeting presentations, 
9. — St. Etienne colliery explosion, 9. — Summer Meeting, SheflSeld, 1890, 
10. — Director General of ordnance factoriis, 10. — Taxation of machinery, 
10, 11. 

Discussion. — Anderson, Dr. W., Moved adopti' n of Report, 25. — Motion 
carried, 25, 

Council fur 1890, v, 44, 45. — Election, 26. — Appointments, 43. — Retiring list, 
and nominations for 1891, 472, 

Council, Annual Report, 1891, 3. — Number of Members, 3. — Transferences, 3. 
— Deceases, &c., 4. — Resignations, 5. — Financial statement, 5, 10-3. — 
Research, 6. — Donations to Library, 6, 14-23. — List of Meetings and 
Papers, 6-7. — Attendances at Meetings, 7. — Summer Meeting, Sheffield, 

1890, 7.— Diagrams, 9. 

Dixu'-iion. — Tomlinson, J., Moved adoption of Report, 23. — Head, J., 

Seconded, 23. — Motion carried, 23. 
Council for 1891, v, 24, 25, — Election, 2i. — Appointment, 196. — Retiring list, 

and nominations for 1892, 481. 
Council, Annual Report, 1892, 3. — Number of Members, 3, — Transferences, 3. 

— Deceases, &c., 3. — Financial statement, 5, 10-3. — Certificate of 

Membership, 5. — Research, 6-7. — Donations to Library, 7, 14-22, — 



96 C 

Council, Annual Report, 1892 (continued) : — 

Meetings and Papers, 8. — Attendances at Meetings, 8. — Summer Meeting, 
Liverpool, 1801, 8. — Presentation. 9. 

Di'Ctfigion. — Tomlinsou, J., Moved adoption of Report ; Anderson, 
Dr. W., Seconded ; Motion carried, 22. 

Council for 1892, v, 23, 24. — Election, 23. — Appointments, 23. — Retiring list, 
and nominations for 1893, 415. 

Council, Annual Report, 1893, 3. — Number of Members, 3. — Transferences, 3. 
— Deceases, &c., 4. — Finincial statement, 5, 12-5. — Certificate of 
Membership, 6. — Articles of Association and By-laws, 6. — Abbreviated 
designation of Membership, C. — Research, 7. — Index of engineeiing 
literature, 7. — Donations to Library, 8, 16-21. — Meetings and Papers, 8. 
— Attendances at Meetings, 9. — Summer Meeting, Portsmouth, 1892, 0: 
— Middlesbrough, 1893, 11. — Engineering congress at Chicago, 11. 

Dhcuision. — Anderson, Dr. W., Engineering congress at Chicago ; 
moved adoption of Report, 24. — Daniel, E. F., Valuation of Proceedings, 
24. — Anderson, Dr. W., Valuation at cost price, 25. — Kennedy, A. B. W., 
Records of mechanical experiments, 26. — Gray, J. M., Subscriptions in 
arrear, 26. — Anders m. Dr. W.. Estimated value of arrears, 26. — Motion 
carried, 27. 

Council for 1893, v, 29-30. — Election, 28. — Appoiutnunt, 28. — Retiring list, 
and nominations for 1894, 332. 

Council, Annual Rkpout, 1894, 3. — Number of Members, 3. — Transferences, 3. 
— Deceases, &c., 4. — Financial statement, 6, 10-3. — Auditor; Life 
membership, 6. — Research, 7. — Donations to Library, 7, 14-22. — Meetings 
and Papers, 7. — Attendances, 8. — Summer Meeting, ^liddlesbrough, 1893,8. 
Dkcuiiion. — Anderson, Dr. W., Moved adoption of Report ; honours 
conferred on Members in past year; investments: back Proceedings, 22 ; 
research. 23. — Motion carried, 23. 

Council for 1894, v, 26-7. — Election, 20. — Appointment, 26. — Retiring list, and 
nominations for 1895, 471. 

Council, Annual Report, 1895, 3. — Number of Members, 3. — Transferences, 
3. — Deceases, &c., 4-5. — Financial statement, .">, 10-3. — Research, 6. — 
"Willans memorial, 7. — Donations to Library, 7. 14-22. — Meetings and 
Papers, 7-8 — Attendances, 8. — Summer Meeting, ^lanchester, 1894, 8. 

Z)/.seii<« ion. — Kennedy, A. B. W., Moved adoption of Report ; honour 
conferred on Sir W. H. White ; research experiments, on the use of rop( s 
and belts, 22 ; "Willans memorial ; donations to Library, 23. — Price- 
Williams, R., House for the Institution, 24. — Kennedy, A. B. W., 
Appointment of house committee, 24. — Motion carried, 2j. 

Council for 1895, v, 26-7. — Election, 26. — Appointment, 26. — Retiring list, and 
nominations for 1896, 549. 



97 



CoixciL, An-xual Keport. 1896, 3.— Number of Members. 3.— Honours. 3.— 
Transferences, 3.— Deceases, &c., 4-5.— Fiuancial statement, 5, 12-5. — 
House for Institution, 6.— Research, 6.— Willans Memorial, 7-8, 16-7.— 
Donations to Library, 8. 18-26.— Meetings and Papers, 9.— Attendances, 
9.— Summer Meeting, Glasgow, 1895, 10; Belfast, 1S96, 10-1. 

Di'cusgwn.—Kvimedy, A. B. W., Moved adoption of Report ; honours 

conferred on Sir William Coddington. Bart., and Sir Wm. Thomas Lewis, 

Bart. ; nomination of Professor Unwin as Honorary Life Member, 2G. — 

Motion carried, 26. 

CovxciL for 1896, v, 28-9.— Election, 28.— Retiring list, and nominations for 

1897, 463. 
CurNCTL, Ansial Report, 1897, 4.— Number of Members, 4.— Honours, 4.— 
Transferences, 4. — Deceases, &c., 5-6. — Financial statement, 6, 12-5. — 
House for Institution, 7.— Research, 7-8.— Donations to Library, 8, 18-25. 
— Meetings and Papers, 8-9. — Attendances, 9. — Summer Meeting, Belfast, 
1896, 9; Birmingham, 1897. 10.— "Willans Premium Fund, 16-7. 

Discu^<ion. — Richards, E. W., iloved adoption of Report ; honours 

conferred on Sir William Anderson and Sir James Musgrave, Bart.; 

House for Institution. 25; Jubilee Meeting; accounts and balance sheet; 

research, 26. — Motion carried, 27. 

CorNCiL for 1897, v, 28-9.— Election, 27-8.— Retiring list, and nominations for 

1898, 434. 
Council, ANSr.\L Report, 1898, 4.— Number of ^Members, 4. — Honours, 4.— 
Transferences, 5. — Deceases, &c., 5-7. — Financial statement, 7, 14-7. — 
House for Institution, 8.— Research, 8-9.— Donations to Library, 9, 20-9. 
—Meetings and Papers, 9-10.— Attendances, 10.— Summer Meeting, 
Birmingham, 1897, 10 ; Derby. 1898. 12.— Secretary, 11.— Willans Premium 
Fund, 18-9. 

Discui^ion. — Richards, E. W., Acknowledgments from the Right Hon. 
W. J. Pirrie and Professor Roberts- Austen, 29-30 ; auditing of accounts, 
30: Institution Houie, 30 ; motion for adoption of Report, 31. 
CoryciL for 1898, v, 32-3. — Election, 31. — Apiwintments, 31, 144, 343. — 

Retiring list, and nominations for 1899, 549. 
CousciL, Ajsjtcal Report, 1899, 6. — Number of Members, 6. — Honours, 6. — 
Deceases, &c., 6-8. — Financial statement, 8, 14-8. — Institution House, 9. 
—Research, 9-10.— Donations to Library. 10, 20-7.— Meetings, Papers, 
and attendances, 11.— Summer meeting, Derby, 1898, 12.— Other societies, 
12. — Willans premium fund, 18-9. — Motion for adoption of Report, 28. 
CovNCiL for 1899, v, 29-30.— Election, 28.— Appointments, 28, 147.— Retiring 

list, and nominations for 1900, 567. 
CoLxciL, Anxual Report, 1900, 5. — Number of Members, 5. — Honours, 5. — 
Engineer oflScers of the Royal Navy, 5. — Deceases, &c., 6-7. — Financial 

O 



98 C 

Council, Annual Keport. 1900 (coutinucd) : — 

statement, 7-8, 13 22. — Research, 8-9. — Doiiatious to Library. 9, 24-33. — 

Meetings, Papers, 9-10. — Opening of new Building, 10 —Attendances, 

11. — Meetings for Graduates, 11. — Willans Premium Fund, 22-3. — 

jNIotion for adoptiou of Report, 34. 
Council for 1900, v, 3o-G. — Election, 34. — Appointment, 93. — Retiring list, and 

nominations for 1901, *>17. 
Council Appointments.— 1885, 2r,, 7.1, 7(;.— 1886, IS.— 1887, los.— 1889, 20:!.— 

1890, 43.— 1891, 19ti— 1892, 23.-1893, 28.-1894, 2t;.— 1895, 2';.— 1898, 

31, 144, 343.— 1899, 28, 147.— 1900, 93. 
Council, Petition against Arcliitect-.' Registration Bill, 1888, KjO; circular, 

1«]3; statement, 1(14.-1889, t;-7, 22. 
CouPEB, S., elected Member, 1895, 327. 

Couplings for Shafts, 1888, 40, 47. See Irrigating Machinery. 
CovENET, W. C, elected Member, 1899, 3. 
Coventry, Autumn Meeting, 1885, 4i;i ; *ee Autumn meeting, Coventry. — 

Visited at Jubilee Summer meeting, Birmingham, 1897, :><J9. 
Coventry, T., elected Associate Member, 1894, 47(i. 

Cowan and Suns, Alexander, Valleytield Paper W\\h, Penicuik, 1887, 439, 4G3. 
CowcHEB, G., elected Graduate, 1900, 35<i. 
CowDELL, H. C, elected ^Icmber, 1896, 4i;i. 
("owell, J. R., elected Associate Member, 1893, 98 : — transferred to Member, 

1898, .^48. 
CowEN, G. R., elected Member, 1898, 340. 
CowENS, W. E., elected Member, 1898, 141. 
CowiE, W., elected Associate Member, 1895, 328. 
CowLES, Lt.-Commander W. S., elected Associate, 1894, 170. 
CowPEB, C. E., By-laws, 1891, 38. 

Condensation and Re-evaporation, 1889, <)95. 

Fluid-Pressure Reversing-Gear, 1894, 2t!7. 

Heat Distribution in Steam Engine, 1887, 527. 

High-Speed Engine, 1894, 245. 

Marine-Engine Trials, 1890, 208 ; 1894, 109. 

Oxygen ^Manufacture, 1890, 150. 

Water Works, Southampton, 1893, 70. 
CowPEB, E. A., decease, 1894, 4.— Memoir, 1893, 203. 
CowPER-CoLEs, S. 0., elected Member, 1892, 1. 
Cox, E. H., elected Associate Member, 1896, 102. 

Cox, H. H., elected Graduate, 1888, 2<;9 :— transferred to Member, 1897, 4. 
Cox, J., elected Member, 1897, 25G. 
CoxHEAD, F. C, decease, 1896, 4.— Memoir, 1895, 142. 
Cbabbe, a., elected Member, 1887, 473. 



99 



Craig, A. (Londonderry), elected IMember, 1896, 278. 

Craig, A. (Coventry), elected Associate Member, 1897, 433. 

Craig axd Co., A. F., Caledonia Engine Works, Paisley, 1895, 523. 

Craig, Taylor, and Co., Thornaby Shipbuilding Yard, Thornaby, 1893, 368. 

Crampto.n, T. R., decease, 1889, 3, 21.— Memoir, 1888, 437. 

Canadian Locomotives, 1887, 249. 

Compound Locomotives, 1886, 396. 

Triple-Expansion Engines, 1886, 526. 
Crank and Forge Works, Lincoln, 1885, 434, 443-4. 
Craven, J. A., elected Member, 1899, 144. 

Craten, T. E., elected Member, 1890, 176.— Decease, 1893, 4.— Memoir, 1892, 404. 
Craven-, W. H. S., elected Member, 1894, 469. 
Crawford, J. F., elected Associate Member, 1900, 356. 
Crawford, W. W., elected Member, 1897, 1. 
Crematorium, Manchester, 1894, 438. 

Creswell Colliery, Bolsover Colliery Co., Chestertield, 1898, 461, 525. 
Creswelj., F. S., elected Graduate, 1900, 97. 
Crewe, H. T.. elected Member, 1898, 340. 
Crewe Steel and Locomotive Works, 1894, 406, 458. 
Cribb, F. J., elected Member, 1889, 584. 
Crimp, W. S., Manchester Drainage Works, 1894, 394. 
Crippln, E. F., decease, 1893, 4. 
Crippix, T. H., elected Member, 1893, 1. 
Critchley. J. S., elected Member, 1897, 432. 
Crocker, G., Launch of a Battleship, 1899, 347. 
Crofts, J. C. T., elected Member, 1899, 292. 
Crohn, F. W., Paddle- Wheel Navigation, 1885, 158. 

Wood-Cutting Machinery, 1885, 93. 
Crompton, E. E. B., Dryness of Steam, 1895, 59. 

Eiffel Tower Lifts, 1889, 372, 373. 

Electric Engineering, 1888, 131. 

Electric Lighting, Private, 1885, 392. 

Electric Traction, 1898, 78. 

Naval Electrical Apparatus, 1892, 279. 

Quick-Revolution Engines, 1897, 336. 

Ropes and Belts. 1895, 643. 

Spherical Engine, 1885, 106. 
Crompton and Co., Arc Works. Chelmsford, 1886, 410, 413-4. 
Cbonin, R., elected Member, 1898, 546. 
Crooke, W., JuN., elected Associate Member, 1897, 2. 

Crosland, D. W., elected Graduate, 1887, 2 :— transferred to Associate Member 
1894, 3. 

G 2 



100 c 

Ckosland, J., elected Member, 1891, 196. 

Ceosland, J. F. L., Auditor, 1896, 82. 
Boiler Construction, 1891, 518. 
By-laws, 1891, 30, 35. 
Hydraulic Power Supply, 1895, 378. 
Marine-Engine Trials, 1890, 261. 
Ste;im Superheating, 1896, 183. 
Water Softening, 1898, 430. 

Ci!0ss, J., decease, 1896, 4.— Memoir, 1894, 464. 

Cross, R. J., elected Member, 1890, 1.— Decease, 1894, 4.— Jleiuoir, 1893, 00. 

CitossNESs Sewage Wokk#, London, 1886, 412, 452-6. 

Crosta, L. ^y., elected Graduate, 1885, 2:— Member, 1900, 181. 

Cbosthwaite, R. W., Union Foundry, Thornaby. 1893, 364. 

€bow, L., elected Graduate, 1896, 103. 

Cbowe, G., elected Member, 1888, 268. 

Crown Watek Meter, 1900, 44. See Water :^Ieters. 

Crcickshank, G. S., elected Graduate, 1899, 2L»1 .—Associate Member, 1900, 
356. 

Cbuttwell, G. E. W., elected Member, 1898, .">46. 

Cbter, a., elected Associate, 1892, 229. 

Cbyer, T., elected Member. 1886, 27(1. 

CuLLEN, P. J., elected Meml>er, 1898, 340. 

CULLEN, W. H., elected Member, 1889, 346. 

Cummins, W. R., Marine-Engine Trials, 1894, 134. 

CuNLiFFE, T. A., elected Associate Member, 1899, 293, 

CcsT, L., elected Associate Member, 1895, 150. 

■Custom House Flour Mill, Dublin, 1888, 404. 

■Cutler, A. E., elected Member, 1900, 355. 

Cutler, G. B., elected Member, 1887, 473. 

Cutler, S., Jun'., elected Graduate, 1891, 302 :— transferred to Member, 1898, 
548. 

Cutlery and Silver-Plate Works, Sheffield, 1890, 442. 456. 

Cutlery Manufactory, Sheffield, 1890, 442, 459. 

Cutters, Milling, 1890, 528. See Milling Cutters. 

Cycles, Construction, 1885, 467. See Construction of Cycles. 

Cycle Construction, Paper on some points in Cycle Construction, by F. J. 
Osmond, 1897, 284. — Modern bicycle, causes of inefficiency ; want of 
rigidity, 284 ; loss of power ; instability, 285. — Friction, chain driving, 
285. — Factor of safety, 285 ; forces encountered ; arrangement of front 
tubes of frame, 286. — Large tubes, 286. — Aluminium and steel frames, 
287. — Testing of tubes, 287 ; webbed and corrugated tubes ; nickel steel, 
288. — Means of securing rigidity ; construction of frame, and of joints, 



C 101 

Cycle CoNSTRrcnoN, Paper, 1897 (continued) : — 

288. — Chain stays, section of tubes, 290. — D tubes, 291 ; relative stiffness, 
292. — Multicycles, 293.— Back axle, 294. — Chains; roller chain, and 
block chain ; length of links, 29i. — Gear and crank length, 294. 

Discussion. — Osmond, P. J., Exhibited specimens of component parts 
of cycles, unfinished and finished, 295.— Sharp, T. B., Brazing and 
weakening of frame, tubes with thickened ends, 295 ; mechanical joint, 
296. — Osmond, F. J., Rigidity and security of mechanical and brazed 
joints, 296.— Richards, E. W., Vote of thanks, 296. 

Cycles, Distribution of Wheel Load in Cycles, 1886, 128. See Wheel Load in 
Cycles. 

Cycle Works, Birmingham. 1897, 899.— Coventry. 1897, 369, 423, 424, 427.— 
Glasgow. 1895, 491.— Nottingham, 1898, 519, ."i21. 

Cyltkder Fouxdations for Quay Walls, 1895, 410, 412. See Clyde Navigation. 

Cylinder He.^t Losses, Experiments on Heat Losses from Dry and Wet 
Cylinder Walls exposed to a Vacuum, &c., by B. Donkin. 1893, 480. — 
Description of apparatus, 481. — Nature of Experiments, 482. — Cooling of 
dry hot wall.-, 48:3. — Cooling of wet hot walls exposed to a vacuum, 483. — 
Tabulated results of experiments, 484-5. — Couling effects produced 
tlirough different thicknesses of metal wall by a single injection of water, 
4!^6. — Speed of thermal prop.igation through cylinder wall, 488. 



D 

Dadabhoy. C, elected Member. 1888, 1. 

Dadge, N., elected Associate, 1899, 146. 

Dadina, H. M., elected Associate Member, 1894, 470. 

Daglish, G. H., Acknowledged vote of thanks at Summer meeting, Liverpool, 

1891, 305. 
Daglish, H. B , elected Member, 1891, 196. 
Daimler Motor ^Mills, Coventry, 1897, 369, 419. 
Daintree, T. E , elected Member, 1895, 149. 
Dalby, J. P., Construction of Cycles, 1885, 512. 
Dalby, W. E., elected Member, 1890, 1. 

Riveted-Joint Diagrams, Paper on Diagrams to facilitate the design of 

Riveted Joints for Boiler Work, 1898, 124. 
Dale, T., elected Member, 1836, 125. 
Dalgarno, J. R., elected Member, 1889, 584. 
Dall, J., elected Member, 1893, 220. 
DALiiY.MPLE, A., elected Member, 1893, 97. 



102 D 

Dan, T., elected Member. 1899, 144. 
Dania, G., elected Member, 1899, 3. 
Daniel, E. F., Auditor, 1891, 27 :— 1893, :10. 
By-laws, 1891, :!7. 
Council, Annual Report, 1893, 24. 
Daniel, W., High-Speed Engine, 1894, 245. 
Daniels, T., elected Member, 1891, 1.— Decease, 1901, 7.— Memoir, 1900, 328. 

Narrow-Gauge Railways, 1898, 396. 
Danks and Co., Oldbury Boiler Works, 1897, r.68, 409. 
Danks, F. T., elected Associate Member, 1898, ;'>41. 
Dannemora Steel WoRKSi, Sheffield, 1890, 442. 4.59. 
Darbishire, J. E., elected Member, 1888, 444 
French Locomotive Practice, 1900, 421 
Watch Screws, 1894, 490. 
Darby, C. E., decease, 1886, 4.— Memoir, 1884, 400. 
Dare, A. N.. elected Graduate, 1898, .547. 

Darjeeling Nabruw-Gauge Light Railway, 1898, ::7!t, 396, 402. 
Darker, A. H., elected Associate Member, 1900, 356. 
Darlington, J., elected Associate, 1893, 98. 
Dahwin, H., Alloys Research, 1895, 292. 
Darwood, J. W., elected Graduate, 1894, 17ii. 
Davey, E. E. G., elected Associate Member, 1894, 294. 
Davey, H., elected Member of Council, 1896, 28 :— 1899, 28. 
Atmospheric Railway, South Devon. 1899, 326. 
Auditor, 1887, 31. 
Canal-Boat Propulsion. 1897, 222. 
Clock-Driving for Telescopes. 1888, 320. 
Compound Locomotives, 1886, 371. 
Compound Steam Turbine, 1888, 488, 501. 
Electric Engineering, 1888, 138. 
Fluid-Pressure Reversing-Gear, 1894, 261. 
Forth Bridge, 1887, :!09. 
Friction Experiments, 1891, 126. 
Glass Revealer, 1900, 539. 
Heat Distribution in Steam Engine, 1887, 532. 
Heat Transmission, 1896, 526. 
High-Speed Engine, 1894, 238. 
Irrigating Machinery, 1888, 64, 68, 72. 
Lake Superior Copper Mining, 1887, 110. 
Lincoln Waterworks Engines, 1887, 139. 
Marine Corrosion, 1896, 353. 
Marine-Engine Trials, 1890, 251-5. 



103 



Davey, H. (continued) :— 

;Mean-Pres8ure Indicator, 1899, 598. 

Outlet Valves at Burrator Reservoir, 1899, 41'). 

Refuse Dtstructor at Torquay, 1899, 4?.n. 

Road Locomotion. 1900, 295. 

Rock Drills, Paper on recent Trials of Rock Drills. 1891, 141.— Remarks 

tbereon, 182. 186. 
Roller Flour Milling, 1889, 168, 188. 
Steam Jacket, 1892, 480, ."iQl, 505. 
Steam Superheating, 1896, 178. 
Taxation of Machinery, 1890, 38. 
Triple-Expansion Engines, 1887, 68. 

Water Works, Birmingham, 1897, Paper on the City of Birmingham 
Corporation Water Works, 297: Remarks thereon, ?>U, 314.- 
Sheffield, 1890, 433. 
Davidson, A., elected Graduate, 1890, 299 :-transferred to Associate Member. 

1895, 4 .-—transferred to :Member, 1897, 4. 
Davidsok, G., decease, 1889, 3. 

Davidsoh, James (Dunedin), decease, 1887, 3:— :Mcmoir, 146. 
Davidson, James (Woolwich), decease, 1890, 3.— Memoir, 1889, 332. 
Davidson, John, elected Graduate, 1898, 547. 
Davidson, J. M., elected Associate Member, 1896, 102. 
Davidson, S. C, elected Member, 1888, 444. 

Machinery of H.M.S. " Psyche," 1899, 399. 
Davies, E. a., elected Graduate, 1900, 97. 
Davies, E. J., elected Member, 1897, 432. 
Davie?, E. J. M., elected Member, 1885, 163. 
Davies, H., elected Associate Member, 1898, 143. 
Davies, J. H., elected Member, 1891, 300. 
Davis and Son, All Saints' Works, Derby, 1898, 482. 
Davis, F. M., elected Associate Member, 1896, 462. 
Davis, G., elected Member, 1894, 169. 
Davis, G. B., elected Associate, 1892, 2. 

Davis', H. C, elected Graduate, 1899, 475 :— Associate Member, 1900, 356. 
Davis', J. (Manchester), Graduate transferred to Member, 1890, S.-Decease, 

1894, 4._Memoir, 1893, 492. 
Davis, J. (Sydney), elected Member, 1900, 501. 
Davis, R., R.N., elected IMember, 1900, 501. 
Davson, S. F., elected Graduate, 1896, 2. 
Davy, D., Jun., elected Associate Member, 1897, 144. 
Davy, W. J., elected Member, 1892, 102. 
Davy, W. S., decease, 1888, 3.— Memoir, 1887, 274. 



104 



Daw K.jck-Drill, 1891, 147. See Rock Drills. 
Dawe, J. N., elected Graduate, 1896, 103. 
Dawsholjj Gas Works, Glasgow, 1895, :i31-52, 462. 
Dawson, B., decease, 1901, 7.— ilemoir, 1900, 329. 

Gas Furnaces, Paper on some diflferent kinds uf Gas Furnaces, 1891, ^7. 
- — Remarks thereon, 85. 

Oxygen Manufacture, 1890, 1.">1. 

Secretary, Reliring, 1898, 39. 

Steel Rails, 1890, 313. 

Tube-Frame Railway Wagons, 1890, 491. 
Dawsox, E., Giaduate transferretl to Member, 1891, 3. 
Dawson, J. E.. elected Graduate, 1899, I4t;. 

Dawson, P., elected Associate Member, 1896, '279; — (ransfimd to Meiubtr, 
1899, 147. 

Electric Traction, Paper on Mechanical features of Electric Traction, 
1898, 43.— Remarks thereon, 114. 

Throttling and Variable Expansion, 1895, 225. 
Dax, a. de, Paris meeting 1889, Presentation from tlie- Institution, 1890, 9. 
Day, a. G., elected Associate, 1890, 2. 
Day, C"., elected Member, 1896, 278. 

Electric Traction, 1898, 111. 

Steam-Engine Breakdowns, 1896, 5S7. 
Day, C. A. S., elected Associate Member, 1899, 4. 
Day, G. C, elected Member, 1890, 472. 
Day, St. J. Y., Reply to vote of thanks at Summer meeting, Edinburgh, 1887, 

285. 
Day, Summers, and Co., Northnm Iron Works, Southampton, 1892, 3(jf», 385. 
Dayson, W. O., elected Member, 1886, 125. 
DEACeiN, G. F., Incrustation of Torquay Water IMains, 1899, 502. 
Deacon, R. D., elected Graduate, 1900, 356. 
Deacon Water JIeter, 1900, 45. See Water Meters. 
Deadmax, H. E., Paper on the Applications of Electricity in the Royal 

Dockyards and Navy, 1892, -56. — Remarks thereon, 293. 
Deaf and Dumb Institution, Derby, 1898, 502. 
Deakin, B. W., elected Member, 1894, 293. 
Dean, F. W. C, elected Member, 1900, 182. 
Dean, G., elected Graduate, 1899, 294. 
Dean, W., elected Member of Council, 1892, 23 :— 1895, 26 :- 1898, 31. 

Copper Fire-box Plates, Paper on Tensile Tests and Chemical Analyses 
of Copper Plates from Fire-boxes of Locomotives on the Great 
Western Railway, 1893, 139. — Remarks tliereon, 198. 

Tube-Frame Railway Wagons, 1890, 513, 527 



D 105 

Deap, James (Glasgow), elected Member. 1887, 473.— Decease, 1900, 6:— 

Memoir, :;30. 
Clyde Navigation, Paper ou the Improvement of tbe Clyde above Pijrt 

Glasgow, 1887, 402. — Paper on Recent Engineering Improvements if 

the Clyde Navigation, 1895, 404 : remarks thereon, 435. 
Dredging Clyde Estuary, 1887, 392. 
Deas, James (Warrington), elected Member, 1899, 144. 
Death-Rate, Annual, in roll of Institution, 1889, 4. 
Debentures for Institution House, Issue, 1897, 145. 
Decatjville Portable-Railway and Rolling-Stock AVorks, Petit Bourg, 1889, 

548, 573. 
December Meeting, 1899, 5i 17.— 1900, 617. 
De Dax, a., Paris meeting 1889, Presentation from the Institution, 1889, 584 : 

1890, 9. 
Deeble, W. R., elected Member, 1900, 501. 
Deelev. R. M., elected Member, 1890, 1.— Honorary Secretary of Derby meeting 

1898, Presentation from the Institution, 1898, 55(( : 1899, 12. 
Deelev Tonsiox Machine, 1898, 678. See Testing of Materials. 
Deeley Water Softening, 1893, 404, 478. See Archbutt-Deeley process. 
Defries, W., elected Member, 1889, 1. 
Delamake-Deboutteville, E., Paper ou Gas Engines, with description of the 

Simplex Engine, 1889, 500. — Remarks thereon, 5137, 539, .540. 
Gas-Engine Research, 1898, 255. 
Denham, J., elected Member, 1900, 96. 
Dennis, G. D., elected Member, 1892, 102. 
Dennis, W. F., decease, 1890, 3.— 3Iemoir, 1889, 748. 
Denny, J., elected Member. 1900, I . 
Denny, "W., appointed Member of Council, 1885, 76 :— elected Member of Council, 

1886, 18.— Decease, 1887, 158; 1888, 3, 4.— Memoir, 1887, 274. 
Dent. C. H., elected 3Iember, 1888, 414. 
Dc Pape, W. a. H., decease, 1889, 3. 

Depression of Trade, 1886, 21 o. See Address of President, Jeremiah Head. 
Deuby Electric-Light Station, 1898, 473. 
Derby Gas Works, I.itchurch, 1898, 48.5. 
Derby Municipal Technical College, 1898, 498. 
Derby Public Library, Museum, and Art Gallery, 1898, 498. 
Derby Royal Deaf and Dujib Institution, 1898, 502. 
Derby Summer Meeting, 1898, 337. — Reception, 337.— Business, 340.— Council 

appointment, 343. — Votes of thanks, 344. — Excursions, &c., 4." 5. — 

Presentations, 5.j0-1. 
Derby Water Works, 1898, 475. 
Derby Works, 1898, 455-6, 4C0-527. 



106 



Derby Worthies, 1898, 45S. 

Derbyshire Royal Ixfirmauy, Derby, 1898, ."iOO. 

De Ritter, W. H., elected Member, 1898, MO. 

Derwext Foundry, Derby, 1898, 483. 

Destructor for Refuse, ami Sewage Precipit:\tion Works, Southampton, 1892, 

354, 369. See Sewage and Refuse Works. 
Destructor for Refuse, Torquay, 1899, 419. See Refuse Dettructcr at 

Torquay. 
De-sulphurizing and Mixing of Pig-Tron in Steel Mai.ufucture, 1893, 24.'). See 

Cleveland Industries. 
De Ville, M., elected Associate IMember, 1899, 293. 
Devine, W. H., elected Associate, 1896, 2.— Decease, 1900, 6.— Mennar, 1899, 

613. 
Devon and Cornwall Ice and Cold Storage Works, riymoutli, 1899, 457. 
Devon Great Consols Mines, Tavistock, 1899, 442, 461. 
Devonport Dockyard, 1899, 439, 4-J3. 

Detonport, Freedom of Borougli presented to Sir W. H. White, 1899, 439. 
Devonport Municipal Technical School, 1899, 439, 452. 
Dewhubst, J. H,, elected Member, 1895, 547. 
Dewraxce, J., electeJ Member, 1899, 3. 
Dews, F., elected Member, 1900, 96. 
Dewsbury and Son, John, Bridle-Bit and Nickel-Flating Works, Walsall, 1897, 

368, 411. 
Diagram Accounts, Paper on Diagram Accounts for Engineering Work, by 
J. Jameson, 1897, 499. — Principles of diagram accounts, 499. — Compilation 
and interpretation of illustrations, 500. — EflTect of a losing contract in a 
bad year, 502; of brisk and slack times, 503. — Labour cost in relation to 
rough or finished work, 503. — Restriction of output does not reduce 
loss; adequate supply of work, 504. — Advantages from review of past 
operations ; from diagrams of departments, 505. 

Diicusnon. — Ricliards, E. W., Labour disturbances, 507. — Joy. D., 
Output necessary for profit, 507 ; diagram for locomotive stock, 508. — 
Chambers, E. J., Advantages of diagram accounts, 508 ; classification of 
various costs, 509. — Jameson, J., Sulxlivision and grouping of charges ; 
departmental diagrams, 510; previous adoption of diagram accounts. 511. 
— Chambers, E. J., Debenture interest, and interest on capital. 511. — 
Jame.-on, .J., Distinction between two kinds of interest, 511.— Richards, 
E. W., Vote of thanks, 512. 
Diagrams for designing Riveted Joints, 1898, 124. See Riveted-Joint Diagrams. 
Diagrams, Wall, for illustration of Papers, 1891, 9. 
Dial Steam-Power Meter, 1899, 589. See Mean-Pressure Indicator. 
Diamond Drill for Salt Boring, 1893, 284. See Middlesbrough Salt Imlustry. 



107 



Dick, J. N., elected Member, 1891, 1. 

DicKissoN, A., elected Member, 1890, 298. 

DiCKiNsoy. D. H., elected Member, 1891, 1. 

DiCKixsox, H., elected Associate IMember, 1894, 470 :— transferred to Member, 

1899, 5. 
Dickinson, J. C, elected Member, 1891, 1. 
Dickinson, J. G., elected Graduate. 1898, 342. 
Dickinson, R. E , elected Member, 1892, 102.— Decease, 1896, 4.— Memoir, 1895, 

309. 
Dickinson-, R. H., elected Member, 1892, 414. 
Dickinson, W., elected Associate Member, 1898, 341. 
Dickinson Propeller, 1892, 523, 551. See Screw-Propeller Surface. 
Dickson, G. M., elected Member, 1888, 268.— Decease, 1896, 4 :— Memoir, 598. 
Dickson Brothers and Co., Wavorley Steel and File Works, SheffieM, 

1890, 450. 
Dictionary, Technical, 1900, 504. 

Diffusion of Metals, 1897, 56. See Alloys Research. 
Dimes, C. W., elected Graduate, 1899, 5. 

Dinners, Auniversary, Summer, &c. — 1885, 165, 435. — 1886, 127, 410, 470. — 
1887, 159,435.-1888, 168, 375.— 1889, 205, .J42.— 1890, 177,442.— 

1891, 198,429.-1892, 104, 365.-1893, 99, 333.-1894, 171, 404.— 
1895, 152, 464.— 1896, 104, 403.-1897, 146, 366.-1898, 145, 456.— 
1899, 148, 439.— 1900, 463. 

Discovert of Argox, Kennedy, A. B. W., Moved congratulations to Lord 
Rayleigh and Professor Ramsay, 1895, 28. — Head, J., Seconded, 
29. — Kennedy, A. B. W., Example of presence of argon, 29. 

Discussions, Written contributions, 1887, 10. 

Disintegrator, Carr, 1889, 175. See Roller Flour Milling. 

Disposal of Slag, Paper on the Disposal and Utilization of Blast-Furnace Slag, 
by W. Hawdon, 1892, 70.— Production of slag, 70.— Previous extent of 
utilization, 70. — Previous modes of disposal in Cleveland district ; slag 
tips and mountains; deposit in sea, Tl.^Breuking up slag balls by 
contraction in cooling round hollow core, 72; wedge- shape core, 72; 
hog-back core, 73 ; breaking by full upon knife-edged grid, 73.— Other 
attempts and proposals, 73. — Utilization of slag, 74; machines for 
making slag shingle, tlag sand, and slag wool, 74—5. — Endless-chain 
slag-machine, 76 ; power and labour required, 77-8 ; size of fragments, 
78. — Utilization of slag for cement, 78 ; for railway ballast, 79. 

Discussion.— Haivrdon. W., Samples of slag, slag bricks, and slag wool, 
80 ; slag for cement, 80. — Joy, D., Plans for disposal of slag, 81 ; silicate 
cotton, 82 ; slag for breakwater, 83. — Head, J., Slag for piers and 
breakwaters, 84 ; slag sand and wool, 85 ; slag bricks, 86 ; slag sand for 



1C8 D 

Disposal of Slag, Discussion, 1892 (coiitinuefl) : — 

cement, 86; advantHge of endless-chain slag-machine, 87. — Marten, 
E. B., Slag for pitching beds of streams, 87 ; for road making and walls 
and ballast, 88. — Keen, A., Cost of machinery producing slag for road- 
making, 8i). — Xursey, P. F., Slog for roads, walls, and railway ballast, 
90 ; slag tipping at Barrow and Cardiff, 90 ; basic slag for agricultural 
purposes, 91. — Tomlinson, J., Slag for ballasting railways, 91. — 
Bauerman, H., Modes of disposing of slag, 92. — Stead, J. E., Utilization 
of heat from molten slag, 93. — Birkbeck, J. A., Use of cores for breaking 
slag, 93 ; cost of endless-chain machine, 93. — Hawdon, W., Plans for 
disposal of slag, 94 ; slag bricks and cement, 94 ; enormous waste of slag, 
95; cost of slag machines, 9."); waste of heat, 90; hog-back core, 9G. — 
Kennedy, A. B. W., Profit from by-products, 97. 

DiSTASCE-FiNDEES. 1896, 3:^ See Rangc-Fiuders. 

Distilleries.— Belfast, 1896, 444.— Dublin, 1888, 378, S.OS. 

Distribution of Heat in a Stationary Steam-Engine, 1887, 478. See Heat 
Distribution in Steam Engine. 

DiTCHiiURN, R., elected Member, 1899, 3. 

Dixon, R., elected Member, 1886, 1. 

Dixon, S., Auditor, 1895, 25. 

Boiler -Shell Drilling Machines. Paper on Drilling Machines for 
Cylindrical Boiler Shells, 1894, 506. — Remarks thereon, 516, ri'.M), 

Dixon, W., elected Mem})er, 1898, 546. 

Dlxon, W. B., elected Member, 1887, 283. 

Dixon, W. F., elected Member, 1897, 1 . 

DoBBs, H. T., elected Associate ^leniber, 1898, 547. 

DoBSON, A., elected Member, 1896, 278. 

DoBSON, Sir B. A., appointed Munibcr of Council, 1885, 26.- Eh cted Member of 
Council, 1886, 18; 1889, 23.— Appointed ^lember of Council, 1894, 
26.— Elected Member of Council, 1895, 26; 1897, 28.— Knighthood, 
1897, 276; 1898, 4.— Decease, 1898, 144; 1899, 7-8.— Memoir, 1898, 
136. 
Alumina Factory, 1896, 388. 

Brewery Tramways and Roiling Stock, 1888, :;49. 
By-laws, 1891, 32. 
Canal-Boat Propellers, 1894, 373. 
Compound Steam Turl.ine, 1888, 498. 
Eiffel Tower Lifts, 1889, 376. 

Electric Welding. Paper, 1894, 319.— Remarks thereon, 331, 361, 358. 
Electro-Magnetic Maehine-Tools, 1887, 339. 
Flax Dressing Machinery, 1896, 299. 
Gas Furnaces, 1891, 68. 



D 109 

DoBSON, Sir B. A. (ciMitinued) : — 

Hydraulic Biifler-Stop, 1886, 111. 

Lighting of Workshops, Paper on the Artificial Lighting of Workshops, 

1893, 396.— Remarks thereon, 417, 425, 430. 
Propeller Ventilating Fans, 1897, 481. 
Rope Driving, 1896, 366. 
Taxation of Machinery, 1890, 33, 3!:», 41. 
Warp Weaving, 1889, 48s. 
DoBSON, S. T., elected Member, 1899, 292. 

DoBSON AXD Barlow, Kay Street Machine Works, Bolton, 1894, 406, 451. 
Docker, F. D., elected Associate, 1895, 2. 

Docks. — Grimsby, 1885, 436, 455-7. — Hartlepool, 1893, .373. — London and 
St. Katharine, 1886, 450.— Middlesbrough, 1893, 323, 325.— Royal 
Victoria and Albert, 1886, 411, 447-50.— Southampton, 1892, 368, 
377.— Tilbury. 1886, 411, 450-2. See also Dockyards; Harbours; 
Rivers and Estuaries. 
Docks, Refrigerating arrangements at London and St. Katharine Docks, 1886, 

242, 411. See Refrigerating Machinery. 
Dockyards. — Dcvonport, 1899, 439, 443. 

Keyham, 1899, 442, 445. See Dockyard Constructional Machinery, 365 ; 

Dockyard Extension Works, 446. 
Portsmouth, 1892, 365, .370. See Shipbuilding in Portsmouth Dockyard, 
232 ; Naval Electrical Apparatus, 256 ; Dockyard Lifting and 
Hauling. 295. 
Dockyard Constructional Machinery, Paper on the Mechanical Appliances 
employed in the construction of the Keyham Dockyard Extension Works, 
by W. Eliot, 1899, 365. — ^Advances in machinery, 365. — Extent of Keyham 
Works, 366. — Excavation; made ground, 366; mud, 367; rock, 369. — 
Dealing with materials. — Portland cement ; granite, 369 ; limestone ; 
shingle and sand ; broken stone ; timber ; coal : building operations, 370. 
— Workshops, 37J . — Machinery used on the Extension Works, 373. 

Discussion. — White, Sir W. H., Thanks to author, 374. — Mansergh, J., 
Mud scoop ; Lucigen light, 375. — Eliot, W., Guidance of mud-scoop ; 
Wells lights, 375.— White, Sir W. H., Visit to works, 376. 
Dockyard Extensi )N Works, Keyham, 1899, 442, 446. 

Dockyard Lifting and Hauling, Paper on the Lifting and Hauling Appliances 
in Portsmouth Dockyard, by J. T. Comer, 1892, 295. — Three systems of 
mechanical power employed, 295. — Hydraulic power; main pumping 
stations, engines and pumps, 295 ; length and size of pressure pipes, 296 ; 
local applications for riveting, pressing, tube-stretching, 296; coaling. 
297. — Compressed air ; compressing engines, receivers, 297 ; pipes, 298. 
— Steam power; sheers and cranes, 298; shop travellers, 299. — 



110 D 

DocKTABD Lifting and Hauling, Paper, 1892 (continueil) : — 

Comparative advantages of hydraulic power and compressed air, 299. — 
Sliding caissons, 300. — Dock pumps ; chain, 301 ; lift, and centrifugal, 
302. 

Di^cui'sion. — Hunter, W., Floating cranes, 303. — Cochrane, C, Loss of 
air pressure in pipes, 305.— Bramwell, Sir F., Transmission of power by 
steam, and by electricity, 305 ; effect of frost on compressed -air engines, 
305 ; air-storage receivers, 306 ; loss of hydraulic pressure in pipes, 306 ; 
transmission of power by vacuum, 306. — Head, J., Cost of hydraulic power, 
307. — Anderson, Dr. "\V.. Stretching of boiler tubes, 307. — Corner, J. T., 
Floating cranes, 308 ; heating due to compression of air, 308 ; loss of 
pressure in pipes, 309 ; formation of ice, 309 ; power stored and given out 
by air, 309; eCBciency of pneumatic and hydraulic capstans, 310; tube- 
stretching machine, 311. 

Dodge. S. B., elected Graduate, 1899, 14(J. 

DoDRiDGE, F., elected Associate Member, 1899, 145. 

DoLBT, E. R., ekcted Member, 1889, 203. 
Aluminium, 1898, 363. 
Boiler-Shell Drilling Machines, 1894, 527. 
Electric Lighting.— Belfast. 1896, 329.— Edinburgh. 1896, 581. 
Electric Plant, 1898, 576. 
Friction Experiments. 1891, 131. 
Milling Cutters, 1890, 539. 

Domestic Lii;htixg by Electricity. 1886, 376. See Private Electric Lighting. 

Donald, D. B., elected Associate IMembcr, 1898, 2. 

DoNALD.'^ON. H. F., elected Member. 1898, 141. 

Construction of "Long Cecil " Gun, 1900, 374. 

Donaldson, J., decease, 1900, 6. — Memoir, 1899, 613. 

Donation to Engineering Department of Yorkshire College, Leeds, from Messrs. 
T. and C. HawksU y. 1886, 47:.'. 

Donations to Library. 1886, 5. 14-21.— 1886, 5, 12-7.— 1887, 0, 8-9. 13, 16- 
23.— 1888, 6, 14-20.— 1889, 7, 14-20.-1890, 7, 16-25.-1891, 6, 14-23. 
—1892, 7, 14-22.-1893, 8, 16-24.-1894, 7, 14-22.-1895, 7, 14-22, 
23.-1896, 8, 18-26.-1897, 8, 18-25.-1898, 9, 20-9.-1899, 10, 
20-7.— 1900, 9, 24-33. 

DoxcASTER Locomotive Works, 1886, 436, 453-5. 

DoNKiN, A. H., elected Graduate, 1897, 2. 

DoNKiN, B., elected Member of Council, 1895, 26.-1898, 31. 
Aluminium, 1898, 360. 

Atmospheric Eailway, South Devon. 1899, 326. 
Canal-Boat Propulsion, 1897, 199. 
Dictionary, Technical, 1900, 506, 507. 



Ill 



DoNKiN', B. (coutiuued) : — 

Dryness of Steam, 1895, 52. 

Electric Lighting. Belfast. 1896, 330. — Edinburgh, 1895, 575. — 

Manchester, 1894, 312. 
Evaporative Condensers, 1899, 208, 22-1. 
Express Locomotives, 1898, 628. 
Flax Dressing ^lacliiuery, 1896, 300. 
French Locomotive Practice, 1900, 415. 
Gas-Engine Kesearch, 1898, 250. 

Glass Keveakr, Paper on an improved Glass Eevealer for studying 
Condensation in Steam-Engine Cylinders, and rendermg the 
effects visible, 1900, 509.— Remarks thereon, 532, 536, 544, 552. 
Heat Losses, Experiments on Heat Losses from Dry and Wet Cylinder 

"Walls exposed to a Vacuum, &c., 1893, 480. 
Heat Transmission, Paper on Transmission of Heat from Surface 
Condensation through Metal Cylinders, 1896, 501.— Remarks thereon, 
532, 534. 
High-Speed Engine. 1894, 240. 
Hydraulic Gas-Stokiug, 1895, 345. 
Marine-Engine Trials, 1891, 286 ; 1892, 172 ; 1894, 108. 
Narrow-Gauge Railways, 1898, 399. 
Propeller Ventilating Fans, 1897, 483. 
Quick-Revolution Engines, 1897, 331. 
Road Locomotion, 1900, 268. 
Rope Driving, 1896, 373. 
Ropes and Belts, 1895, 636. 
Sewage Outfall Works, 1892, 336. 
Ship-Model Apparatus, 1893, 46. 
Steam-Engine Experiments, Paper, 1895, 90. 
Steam Jacket, 1892, 481, 483, 496, 505. 
Steam- Jacketing, Paper ou Steam- Jacketing a Locomotive Engine, 1896, 

466. — Remarks thereon, 497. 
Steam Superheating, 1896, 194. 
Throttling and Variable Expansion, 1895, 199. 
Watch Screws, 1894, 490. 
Water Works, Birmingliam, 1897, 312. 
DoNKis, H. J., elected Member, 1895, 327. 
Donne, F. E. M., elected Associate Member. 1898, 143. 
DosovAN, E. W., elected Member, 1891, 1. 

Aluminium, 1898, 361. 
DoRMAN, W. S., elected Member, 1896, 1. 
DORMAN AND Cc, R. P., Ayrton Rolling Mills, Middlesbrough, 1893, 341. 



112 D 

DoRMAN. Long, akd Co., Britannia and West Marsh Steel and Iron Works. 

Middlesbrough, 1893, 339. 
Do..iSOB, H., elected Associate Member, 1896, 2. 
Douglas, J. M., elected Member, 1900, Sofj. 
Douglas, L. M., elected Associate, 1899, 29i. 
Douglas, W. J., elected Associate Member, 1898, 547. 
Douglas, W. S., elected Graduate, 1893, :J92 :— Associate Member, 1899, 4. 
Douglass, A. E., eUcted Graduate, 1891, 302 : — transferred to Associate 

Member, 1896, ?,. 
Douglass, Sir J. N , appointed Member of Council, 1885, 76.— Elected Member 
of Council. 1886, 18 .—1888, :10.— Yifo-President, 1889, 23 :— 1892, 
23.— Decease, 1899, 7 8. -Memnir, 1898, 331. 
Brewery Tramways and Rolling Stock. 1888, :!48. 
By-laws, 1891, 38. 

Compound Steam Turbine, 1888, 495. 
Eiffel Tower Lifts, 1889, 375. 
Electric Engineering. 1888, 1:50. 
Electric Lighthouse, 1887, 35S. 
Electric Lighting, Private, 1885, 400, 404. 
Grain- Warehousing Machinery, 1891, 381. 
Hydraulic Buffer-Stop, 1886, 114. 
Liverpool Motive Power, 1892, 51, 61, 66. 
Marine Engineering, 1891, 303. 
Oxygen Manufacture, 1890, 159. 

President, vote of thanks to Retiring President, 1889, 28 :— 1892, 28. 
Steam Xavvy, 1885, 367. 
Water Works, Sheffield, 1890, 428. 438. 
Douglass, W., Description of Mew Island Lighthouse, Belfast Lough. 1888, 432. 
Douglass, W. J., elected Member, 1891, 4S0. 
Douglass, W. T., elected Member, 1887, 283. 

Eddystone Lighthouse, 1899, 443. 
DouLTON and Co., Lambeth Pottery Works, London. 1886, 410, 414-6:— 1900, 473. 
Dove, G.. Paper on the Iron lu'lustry of Frudingham. 1885, 413. — Remarks 

thereon, 419. 
Dow, J. W., elected Member, 1900, 96. 
DowLEN, W. E., elected Associate. 1898, 34J. 
Down, P., elected Graduate, 1900, 4. 
DowsON, E. C. H., elected Associate Member, 1896, 462. 
DowsON, R. M., elected Associate Member, 1898, 143. 
DoxFOBD, C. D., elected Member, 1886, 465. 

Drainage at Bournemouth, Eastbourne, Lincoln, London, New York, Ptdlman, 
1889, 220-3. See Address of President, Charles Cochrane. 



D 113 

Draikage Works, Belfast. 1896, 430._BirmiBgham, 1897, 377.-Buenos Aires 
1895, 372, 376.-Glasgow, 1895, 462, 473.-Lincoln, 1885, 44/.- 
London (Crossness), 1886, 412, 452-6.-Manchester, 1894, 3sl,. 406.- 
Pari8.1889, 546, 559.-Foit3mouth, 1892, 319,367.-Salford, 1894, 426. 
—Southampton. 1892, 354, 3G9. 
Drake A. J., elected Associate Member. 1900, 502. 

DKArcHT in Locomotive Boiler, 1893, 199. See Locomotive Boiler Draught. 
Dbayton- T. J. B., elected Graduate. 1899, 294. 

Dredge J C.M.G., Honorary President of Engineering Congress at 
' Columbian Exposition, Chicago, 1893, 24.-Created Companion of 
the Order of ?t. Michael and St. George, 1899, G. 
DREDGER, Frictional Gearing o. a Steam Dredger, 1888, 363. See Frictional 

Gearing. 
DREDGING CLYDE EsxrARY, Paper on the Dredging of the Lower Estuary of the 
Clvde by C A. Stevenson, 1887, 386.-Clyde estuary, 386.-Scheme of 
improvement, 387.-Dredger, 387; hull, 387; engines and boilers, 388; 
machinery, bucket gearing, and buckets, 389; ladder, 390.-Hopper 
barcres, 390.— Results of working, 391.— Repairs, 392. 

^Discu^slon.-T)ea., J., Improvement of Clyde, 392.-BrowD, A., 
Dred-in- hard material, 393; frictional connections, 393; hopper 
dred<rers°and stationary dredgers, 393 ; dredging in Belfast Lough, 394.- 
«trype W G , Improvement of Clyde, and quantity of silt, 394.- 
HartnJll W. Details of buckets, ladder, and tumbler. 395 ; buckets 
cutting sideways more than in front, 396.-Carbutt, E. H., Increased 
depth of Clyde, 396.-Adamson, D., Dredging is cheapest mode o. 
excavation, 397; comparative costs of carriage by land and water 39 . ; 
advanta-^e of training walls, 398; steam-ship construction on the Clyde, 
398- Manchester Ship Canal. 399.-Eiches, T. H.. Dredging at Cardiff, 
399; cost, and allowance for water, 40:..-Stevenson, C. A., Silt, and cost 
of dredeing, 400.-Carbutt, E. H., Cost of dredging, 401. 
Dredging at Hartlepool. 1893, 373.-In River Tees, 1893, 321. 
Dre-er, C , elected Graduate, 1895, 2 :-Associate Member, 19C0, oob. 
Dressing Copper Ores, 1887, lO.i. See Lake Superior Copper Mining. 
Drew, A., elected Member. 1899, 144. 
Drewet. T., elected Member, 1890, 1 . 
Dretvitt ^^'. H.. elected Associate Member, 1900, 182. 
Drilling' and Pcsching, 1886, 44. See Tests of Iron and Steel.-1885, 27o, 

''gS -^89 290; see Pi iveted Joints. 
Drilling Machine, Portable Hydraulic. 1887, 72. See Portable Hydraulic 

Drill. 
DniLiNO Machinery at Forth Bridge Works, 1887, 314. See Forth Bridge 

Machinery. 



114 D 

DniLLiXG Machinery for Mining, Electric, 1893, 309. See Electric Rock- 

Drill. 
Drilling Machines. Electro-Magnetic, 1887, 325. See Electro-Magnetic 

I\Iacbine-Tools. 
Drilling Machines for Cylindrical Boiler Shells, 1894, oOG. See Boiler-Shell 

Drilling-Machines. 
Drills, Electric, 1898, oi'A-G. See Electric I'lant. 
Drills for Ironstone :Mining, 1893, 228, 310. See Electric Rock-Drill. 
Drills, Pneumatic, 1900, 135. See Portable Pneumatic Tools. 
Drills, Trials of Rock Drills, 1891, 141. See llock Drills. 
Driver and Co., Northam Steam Saw ^lills and AVharf, Southampton. 1892, 

360, 387. 
Dronsfield, J., elected Associate ^Member, 18£5, 548. 
Dronsfield, J. S., elected Member, 1898, 310. 
Dronsfield, W., elected Member, 1896, 101. 
Flax Dressing Machinery, 1896, 299. 
Drcitt, T., Treasurer, decease, 1886, 271. 
Dkummond, D., elected Member, 1886, 1. 

French Locomotive Practice, 1900, 429. 
Drvmmond. G. W., elected Member. 1898, 141. 
Drummond, H. M., elected Graduate. 1891, 2. 
Drummond, p., elected Member. 1898, 141. 
Drcsimond. IJ. O. G., elected IMember, 1889, 203.— Decease. 1899, 7.— Memoir, 

1898, 533. 
DrxMMOND, W., elected IMember. 1899, 144. 
Dryden, a., elected Member, 1900, 1. 
Dryden, T., elected Member, 1896, 101. 
Dryden, W., Jun., elected Graduate, 1896, 280. 

Drying in Yacucji, Paper on an Apparatus for Drying in "N'acuum, by 
E. Passburg, 1889, 307. — Wet by-products from breweries, distilleries, 
&c., undergo rapid decomposition, owing to quantity of water contained, 
which also prohibits their distant carriage, 307. — Importance of drying, 
307 ; two drawbacks of drying machines hitherto employed, 308. — 
Three requirements in drying, 308. — High cost of drying by slow 
evaporation, 309. — Quick evaporation by boiling, not practicable for 
solids, 309. — Evaporation in vacuum, 310. — Description of apparatus for 
drying in vacuum, 310; mode of working, 311; reasons of practical 
success and of economy, 311 ; extent of drying, 312, — Practical 
applications to wet grains and malt, 312. — Air-pump for producing 
vacuum, 313. — Machines at Messrs. Guiuness's brewery, and experience 
of working, 314. — Value of malt grains before and after drying, 314. — 
Drying of grain damaged at sea or harvested wet, 315. 



D 115 

Drying in Vacucm, 1889 (continued) : — 

Discussion. — Strohn, W., Absence of author, 315. — Kennedy, A. B. "W., 
Creeping action for travel of grain, 316.— Strohn, W., Creeping action 
not required, 31G. — Baelz, E., Prices of wet and dried grains, ccal 
consumption, and labour, 316.— :Marten, E. B., What previous attempts 
on same principle, 317 ; working of air-pump, and clogging of material 
in drying cylinder, 317. — Colyer, F., Previous plans of drying, and 
difficulty experienced, 317; air-blast with heat combined, 318; dryinc 
of grains at brewery reduces cost of carriage, 319. — Ellington, E. B., 
Enquired reasons for previous plan being given up, 319. — Cochrane, C, 
Large quantity of moisture to be removed, 319. — Colyer, F., Plan not 
so profitable as expected, 319. — Tomlinson, J., Drying in vacuum is 
natural method, 319. — Cochrane, C, Enquired mode of evaporation in 
previous attempts, 320.— Colyer, F., Drying by heated air driven through 
material, 320. — Halpin, D., Efficiency of air-pump, 320; leakage of 
tubes in revolving drum, 320. — Worssam, H. J., Objections to vacuum- 
drying apparatus, 321 ; price of dried grains, 321 ; corrosion of machine, 
322. — Baelz, K., Disposal of brewers' grains, 322 ; other machines for 
drying, 322.— Browning, T., Drying-machines now successfully at work, 
323. — Cochrane, C, "Whether by means of vacuum, 323. — Browning, T., 
Not by vacuum in closed chamber, but by air-current, 323 ; horizontal 
travel of grains, 323; wear, corrosion, and leakage in grain-drying 
machines, 323 ; price" of wet grains, 324. — Fothergill, J. R., Corrosion of 
tubes, 32-1. — Paget, A., Previous drying processes not carried on in 

vacuo, 324 ; horizontal motion of grain in drying cylinder, 324. Mure 

A. H., Value of dry and wet grains to cow-keepers, 324.— Tomlinson J., 
Not pertinent to drying machine, 325. — Anderson, W., Eoyal Agricultural 
Society's competitions with drying machines, 325; abandonment of 
artificial drying, 325 ; advantage of low temperature for drying in vacuo, 
326.— Harris, W. T., Drying in vacuo seems move in right direction, 
326.— Sevin, C, Price of grains, dried and wet, 326. — Mower, G. A., 
Enquired effect of high temperature in drying, 326 ; grain-dryinf^ iu 

other countries, 326. — Cochrane, C, "VN'hat temperature in drying, 326. 

Mower, G. A., Much higher temperature used without detriment, 327 ; 
timber drying in vacuum, 327 ; what cost of fuel, labour, and repairs, 
327. — Strohn, W., Price of wet grains, and expenses of drying, 327 ; 
advantages of drying in vacuo are realised only with a high vacuum, 
328 ; mode of preventing grains from sticking to heating surfaces, 328 ; 
high vacuum from air-pump with jet condenser, 328; no leakage of 
tubes, 329 ; cost of apparatus, price of dried grains, and number of men 
required, 329; drying of sludge not tried, 329; corrosion from acid iu 
grains, 330. — Cochrane, C, Enquired number of machines in use, and 

H 2 



116 D 

Drtixg in Yacucm, D't cn-non. 1889 (continued) : — 

effect of high temperature, 330. — Strolin, W., Machines in use, 330; 
advantage in drying grains at low temperature, 330. — Cochrane, C, 
Successful application of drying by evaporation without heated air, 330. 

Dryness of Steam, Paper on the Determination of the Dryness of Steam, by 
"W. C. Unwin, 1895, 31. — Importance of determining dryness or wetness 
of steam in trials cither of boilers or of engines, 31. — British Association 
Committee, report at last year's meeting; early attempts at Mulhouse in 
1859; origin of the water suspended or entrained in steam; ebullition 
and foaming in boiler, 32 ; expansion of steam ; condensation by 
radiation, 33. — Methods of determining wetness of steam; weighing, 33; 
separating, by Barrus' and Carpenter's separating calorimeters, 34 ; 
condensing, by Hirn's condenser, 35 ; barrel calorimeter, 36 ; continuous 
condensing, by injection or surface-condenser, 37 ; superheating ; wire- 
drawing, on Peabody's plan, by Barrus' calorimeter, 38 ; combined 
separating and wire-drawing, by Barms' apparatus, 39 ; by Globe 
calorimeter, 40 ; suggested alternative method of superheating, 40 ; 
chemical methods, three variations of salt test, 41. — Practical conclusions 
as to most convenient and accurate methods, 43. — Tests of wire-drawing 
calorimeter. 44. — Test of efficiency of a separator, 45. — Test of a wire- 
drawing and a separating calorimeter side by side. 4G. — Conclusion : for 
little moisture, wire-drawing calorimeter witliout separator; for more 
moisture, separating calorimeter without wire-drawing ; for much priming, 
separator followed by wire-drawing or by separating calorimeter, 47. 

Discussion. — Unwin, W. C, Origin of paper, 47 ; description of 
diagrams, 48: difficulty in getting fair sample of steam; experiments 
of Jacobus, 49 ; nozzle inside steam-pipe, 50. — Longridge, M., Steam- 
separator and calorimeter trials, 50 ; velocity of steam, 51 ; size of 
separator, 52. — Donkin, B., Moisture in steam, 52; experiments with 
fixed locomotive boilers, 53 ; Gehre plan for measuring priming water ; 
suggestions for future experiments, 54. — Halpin, D., Condensing and 
separating methods ; centrifugal separator, 55. — Bcare, T. H., Salt test 
and calorimeter; pressure-gauges of wire-drawing calorimeter, 56. — 
Unwin, W. C, Calculations from pressure-gauges, 5G. — Beare, T. H., 
Samples of steam; priming in experimental boiler, 57. — Clarkson, T., 
Method of sampling ores, 58. — Crompton, K. E. B., Losses through 
water in steam pipes, 59 ; sampling of steam ; platinum thermometer, 
60.— Capper, D. S., Salt test, 61.— Cawley, G., Superheater for 
determining dryness of steam, 61. — Sankey, Capt. H. E., Specific heat 
of steam, 63; calorimeter experiments, 64. — Barr, A., Unreliability of 
salt test; methods of sampling steam, 66; separation of water from 
steam by centrifugal action, 67. — Lockhart, "W. S., Suggested modification 



D 117 

Dryness of Steam, Dt-cM~.--/oH, 1895 (cDutinued): — 

of steam sampler, (JS, — Head, J., British Association Committee, 68 ; 
separating, and superheating, C9 ; sampling of steam, 70. — Mair-Kumley, 
J. G., Separating water from steam, 71 ; size of separator, 72. — Clark, 
G. M., Calorimetric method of determining dryness of steam; sources 
of error, 73 ; ideal calorimeter, 74 ; steam-jacketed separator, 76. — 
Hopkinson, Dr. J., Economy of dry steam; action of separators, 77. — 
Unwin, W. C, Experiments on large scale; total-heat method; Gehre 
calorimeter, 78 ; salt test ; sampling of steam, 79 ; superheated steam ; 
thermometer errors, SO ; specific heat of superheated steam, 81 ; scale of 
esiierimeuts, 82 ; water on sides of steam pipe, S3 ; Joule's mechanical 
equivalent of heat ; attachment of calorimeters ; dryness fraction of 
steam, 8i. — Kennedy, A. B. W., Determination of water present in 
steam, 85. — Eyan, Dr. J., Importance of velocity of steam and radiation, 
85 ; density methods of determining wetness of steam, 86 ; error in 
continuous condensing methods, 88. — Unwin, W. C, Errors in density 
methods, 8S ; calorimeters, Sd. 

Dublin Gas Woiuvs, 1888, 413. 

Dublin Pokt, 1888, 374, 3S4. See Port of Dublin. 

Dublin Sumjier Meeting, 1888, 267. — Reception, 267. — Business, 268. — 
Honorary degrees from University of Dublin to Past-Presidents, 270. — 
Votes of thanks, 271. — Excursions, &c.. 374. — Pieception in Belfast, 379. 

Dublin United Tramways Works, 1888, 375, 413. 

Dublin Water Supply, 1888, 523. See liathmines Water Works. 

Dublin Works, visited at Summer meeting, 1888, 374, 396-414. 

Dubreuil, v., Eopes and Belts, 1895, 654. 

DuBRULE, L. H. J. B., elected Associate Member, 1895, 548. 

Di.33, H. J. S., decease, 1894, 4.— Memoir, 1893, ;;0. 

Dubs and Co., Glasgow Locomotive Works, Glasgow, 1895, 4G6, 478. 

Duckeeing, Charles, elected Member, 1885, 305. 

Duckering, Charles, Water Side Works, Lincoln, 1885, 444. 

DuDiN. H. W., elected Member, 1900, 1. 

Dudley Port, 1897, 368. 

Duerden, J.. Paper on a Eotary Machine for making Block-bottomed Paper 
Bags, 1889, 631. 

DuESBURY, F., Mayor of Derby, Welcome to Members at Summer meeting, 
Derb}-, 1898, 338. 

DuPFiELD Bank Experimental Narrow-Gauge Light Eailway and Works, 
near Derby, 1898, 379, 401, 506. 

Dugaed, AV. H., Graduate transferred to Member, 1894, 3. 
Condition of Carbon in Steel, 1885, 50. 

Dukeeies, excursion from Sheffield, 1890, 447 :— from Derby, 1898, 461. 



118 D 

DcMAS, R., elected Associate Member, 1895, 5iS. 

DuNBAB AND RusTOx's Steam Navvy, 1885, 349. See Steam Navvy. 

Duncan, M. G., elected Graduate, 1891, -±80. 

Duncan, N., elected Member, 1886, 1. 

Duncan, W., elected Associate ^Member, 1895, 150. 

Dundee Foundry, Dundee, 1887, 45i. 

Dundee Harbour, 1887, 4o7. 

Dundee University College, 1887, 458. 

Dundee "Works, Dundee, 1887, 438, 453-9. 

DuNELL, G. R., elected Member, 1894, 293. 

Screw-Propeller Surface, 1892, 551. 

Steam Jacket, 1892, 508. 
DuNKERLEY, S., elected ZMombcr. 1898, 340. 
DuNLOP, J., elected Member, 1892, 229. 

Portable Pneumatic Tools, 1900, 174. 
DuNLOP, P., elected Member, 1900, 355. 

DuNLOP AND Co., D. J., Inch Works, Port Glasgow. 1895, 529. 
DuNLOP AND Co., J., Clyde Iron Works, Glasgow, 1895, 488. 
DuNLOP Hammer, 1900, 173, 174. See Portable Pneumatic Tools. 
Dunn, A. M., elected Member, 1899, 292. 
DuNTf, H. S., elected Member. 1890, 298. 

JIancbester Drainage Works, 1894, 399. 
Dunn, M., elected Associate INkmber, 1895, 150 .-—transferred to Member, 1898, 5. 
Dunolly, A., elected Associate :Membcr, 1894, 170. 
DuNsiNK Observatory, Dublin, 1888, 404. 
Duntley, J. W., Portable Pneumatic Tools, 1900, 164, 166, 167. 
DuNViLLE AND Co., Eoyal Irish Whisky Distilleries, Belfast, 1896, 444. 
Durham, F. W., elected Member, 1885, 462. 
DuRSTON, Sir A. J., K.C.B., elected Member, 1899, 144. 
Dust Collector, 1889, 162, 174. See Roller Flour Milling. 
Dutch, E., elected Associate :Member, 1899, 145.— Decease, 1900, 6.— Memoir, 

1899, 471. 
Dutt, J. N., elected Graduate, 1885, 305. 

Duvall, C. a., elected Graduate. 1886, 466 :— transferred to Member, 1891, 3. 
Dymond, G. C, elected Member, 1887, 157. 

Dynamometer, 1886, 369, 378. See Friction Brake ; and Compound Locomotives. 
Dynamo for Electric Rock-Drill, 1893, 311 :— for Electric Lighting of 

Workshops, 1893, 408. 
Dynamos, 1892, 264. See Naval Electrical Apparatus. 
Dyson, J. D., elected Graduate, 1900, 356. 



119 



E 

"Eagle," Trial of steam-tug '-Eagle," 1890, 279. See Marine-Engine 

Trials. 
Earles axd Kixg, Liverpool Oil Mill, Liverpool, 1891, 445. 
Eastleigh Carriage akd Wagox AVokks, London and South Western Eailway. 

1892, 369, 390. 
East London Water Works, Lee (Lea) Bridge, 1900, 4S3. 
Eastsiead, F. J., elected Associate Member, 1894, 470. 
Eastxey Sewage Works, Portsmouth, 1892, 319, 367. See Sewage Outfall 

Works. 
Eastwood, Swixgler, and Co., Victoria and Railway Iron Works, Derby, 1898, 

483. 
Eastwood. T. C, elected Member, 1892, 229. 
Eastwood, W., elected Member, 1900, 355. 
Eaton. E. M., Incrustation of Torquay Water Mains, 1899, 511. 

Sheffield Water Works. Paper, 1890, 419.— Remarks thereon, 427, 435, 

438-41. 
Southampton Water Works, 1893, 75. 
Eaton Hall Xarkow-Gauge Light Railway, near Chester, 1898, 379, 507. 
Eaton-Shore, G.. elected Member, 1888, 444. 
Ebbw Y.VLE AVORKS, Bloomiug :\Iill with Balanced Top Roll, 1885, 292. See 

Blooming Mill. 
Eborall, C. W., elected Member, 1896, 1. 

Eccentric. Tripier Spherical Eccentric, 1885, 422. S,e Spherical Eccentric. 
Echetarri. J. T. W., elected Associate, 1897, 257 :— transferred to Member. 

1898, 548. 
Eclipse Rock Drill, Hathorn, 1891, 149. -See Rock Drills. 
Eddison, R. W., decease, 1901, 7.— Memoir, 1900, 624. 
Eddtstone LiGHTHorsE, 1899, 443. 
Ede. F. J., elected Member, 1886, 270. 
Eden, Hon. F. F.. elected Member, 1893, 220.— Decease, 1899, 7.— Memoir, 

1898, 311. 
Eden Theatre, Paris, Compressed-Air Machinery, 1889, 546, 556. 
Edgcome, J. E., elected Graduate, 1892, 102 :— transferred to Associate Member. 

1895, 4 : — transferred to Member, 1898, 548. 
Edina Map Printing Works, Edinburgh, 1887, 441. 

Edinburgh Electric Lighting, Paper on the Electric Lighting of Edinburgh, 
by H. R. J. Burstall, 1895, 552.— Districts supplied, low-tension and high- 
tension, 552.— Station, 553.-Boiler house, 553; boilers, superheaters. 



120 E 

EDiXBrr.GU Electeic Lightixg, Paper. 1895 (continued) :— 

554 ; pumps, pipes, feed tanks, 555. — Low-tension engiuc-room, engines, 
55(3 ; pipes, 557 ; foundations ; leads ; switchboard and conductors, 558. — 
Balancing machines, 560. — Batterj, 5G1. — Battery connections, 562. — 
Battery room, 563. — High-tension engine-room, engines, altematora, 
564. — Switchboard, 565. — Rectifiers, 566. — Schedule of machinery ; mains, 
567. — Feeders; balancing, 568.— Koad work : distributing mains, 569. — 
Feeders, 570. — Potential leads; connections, 571. — Public lighting; 
lamps, 572. 

Discumon. — Burstall, H. R. J.. Exhibited specimens of cable joints, 
&c., 574. — Patchell, AV. H., Alternators and continuous-current 
transformers; electrical pumps. 574; superheating, 575. — Kennedy, A. 
B. W., Superheating pipes to boilers. 575. — Patchell, W. H., Superheating 
fit boilers, .")7."). — Donkin, B., Temperature of flue, 575. — Geipel, W., 
Superheating ; drain-valves, 576 ; electric motors ; condensing ; steel 
flanges on copper steam-pipes, 577 ; alternating and continuous-current 
dynamos ; multiplicity of periodicities ; constancy of pressure, 578 ; 
junction-boxes of distributing mains, 570. — Carter, E. T., Superheating, 
579. — Patchell. "\V. H., Electrolytic action between copper and steel in 
steam-pipes, 580. — Baynes, S. "W., Rheostats and constancy of pressure, 
580; evaporation of boilers, 581. — Dolby, E. R., Vibration in suspended 
steam-pipes, 581. — Monkhouse, E. "W., Units generated, load, and cost, 
581 ; n.ains laid, ."82 ; vibration of steam-pipes, 583. — Mair-Rumley, J. G., 
Superheating, and steam-pump, 583. — Beare, T. H., Advantage of 
superheating, 583. — Piatt, J., Heat saved by economiser, 584. — 
Ellington, E. B., Coal for keeping up steam ; vibration of steam-pipes, 
585. — Geipel, AV., Cost of working a station, 586. — Jenkin, C. F., 
Expansion of steam-pipes, 587. — Halpin, D., Transforming a continuous 
current into an alternating, 587 ; experiments on radiation from boilers 
and leakage of air, 588. — Wright, H. W., Cleaning of feed-Iieater, 589. — 
Monkhouse, E. AV., Coal for keeping up steam, condensation of moisture 
in junction-boxes, 589. — Baynes, S. W., Injury to cables, 589. — 
Burstall, H. R. J., Continuous-current transformers ; high-tension and 
low-tension currents, 590 ; vibration of steam-pipes ; cleaning of feed- 
Leater; station cost, 591. — Kennedy, A. B. W., Superheating, 592; 
radiation, 593 ; costs of stations ; size of units ; completion of station 
and roadwork, 594. — Brown, C. S. Y., Sunderland electric lighting, 595. — 
Burstall, H. R. J., Cajjital expenditure, 590 ; future extensions ; cost of 
feeders ; efficiency of motor-driven pumps, 597 ; periodicity of alternators, 
.-,98. 

Edinbcrgh Gas Works, 1887, 442. 

Edinburgh Northern Cable Tramway, 1887, 442. 



E 121 

EuiXBLT.GU Summer Meetixg, 1887, 281. — Reception, 281. — Business, 282. — 
Anniversary cou,i;r,it illations to Mr. Thomas Hawksley, Past-President, 
283. — A'otes of tlianks, 2S.5, 433-4. — Excursions, &c., 43.). 

Edinburgh "Water Works, visited at Summer meeting. 1887, 439, 4;j9-62. 

Edinburgh Works, visited at Summer meeting, 1887, 435-6."). 

Edison and Swan United Electric-Light Co., Specimens of Aluminium. 1898, 
360. 

Edleston, a. E., elected Associate Member, 1900, .j02. 

Edlin, H. W., ekcted Member, 1887, 157.— Decease, 1899, 7.— Memoir, 1898, 
702. 

Edmondson, a. Pi., elected Associate Member, 1893, 392. 

Edoux Lift, 1889, 360. Ste Eiffel Tower Lifts. 

Education, Technical, Pemarks by the Marquis of Hartington, 1883, 170. 

Edwards Air Pump, 1899, 228. See Evaporative Condensers. 

Edwards, A. E. A., elected Member, 1900, 501. 

Edwards, E. L., elected Associate Member, 1898, 143. 

Edwards, F., Auditor, 1897, 29. 

Fluid-Pressure Eeversing-C4ear, 1894, 265, 273. 

Marine-Engine Trials, 1889, 289, 292 :— 1890, 256-61 :— 1892, 184, 185 :— 
1894, 78, 112, 114, 116. 

Edwards, H. F., elected Graduate, 1891, 302 : — transferred to Associate Member, 
1896, 3 :— transferred to Member, 1898, 518. 

Edwards, J., elected Graduate, 1900, 503. 

Edwards, J. G. B., elected Graduate, 1896, 463 : — elected Associate Member, 
1899, 293. 

Edwards, R., Spherical Eccentric, 1885, 432. 

Edwards, W. B., elected Graduate, 1899, 146. 

Edwards, W. C, elected Graduate, 1885, 463. 

Egyptian Delta Xarrow-Gauge Light Iiailways, 1838, 402. 

Eiffel, G., nominated Honorary Life Member, 1889, 583 :— 1880, 9. 
Eiffel Tower Lifts, 1889, 365, 376. 
Paris Summer meeting, Welcome to Members, 1889, .^43. 

Eiffel Tower, Paris, 1889, 215, 350, 547, 561. 

Eiffel Tower Lifts, Faper on the Lifts in the Eiffel Tower, by A. Ansaloni, 
1889, 350. — Four inclined lifts from ground through curved legs of tower, 
and one vertical central lift from second platform up to third, 350 ; speeds 
and capacities of lifts, 350. — Roux, Combali:zier, and Lepape Lifts, 351 ; 
double chain of jointed rods worked by chain wheel on driving shaft, 351 ; 
water pressure from reservoirs on second platform, 352 ; balance, 352 ; 
cabins, 352 ; water distribution, 353 ; safety, 353. — Otis Lifts, worked by 
hydraulic press with multiplying pulleys on ram and with counterbalance, 
354 ; balance, 355 ; cabins, 355 ; water distribution, 356 ; safety, 358. — 



122 E 

Eiffel Tower Lifts, Paper, 1889 (continued) : — 

Edoux Lift, ■with jjair of cages balancing each other, 360 ; balance, 
361 ; safety, 361 ; Backman brake. 36ii. — Pumps for water supply to 
reservoirs, 362.— Work done and consumption of water, 363. — Engines 
and boilers, 364. 

Discussion. — Eiffel, G., "Working of pumping machinery, 365 ; Roux 
Combaluzier and Lepape lift noisy but safe, 36o ; Otis lift silent and 
smooth in working, 366; carrying capacity, 366; change of inclination, 
366 ; Edoux lift smooth in working, 367 ; deficiency of power, 367 ; safety, 
368 ; modification in brake, 368.— Hall, W. F., Capacity of Otis lift, 369 ; 
change of inclination, 369 ; testing of safety apparatus, 370. — Cochrane, C, 
Deficiency in pressure, 370. — Hall, "\V. F., Hydraulic pressure not 
supplemented by compressed air, 370. — Cochrane, C, Safety clutch in 
Otis lift, and change of inclination, 371. — Furman, J. E., Working of safety 
clutch, 371. — Ilalpin, D., Testing efficiency of safety apparatus, 372. — 
Crompton, R. E. B., Interference of water currents, 372. — Paget, A., 
Difference between currents of water and of electricity, 373. — Crompton, 
R. E. B., Explanation not applicable to electricity, 373. — Hall. "W. F., 
Use of supply piije as rising main, 373. — Cochrane, C, Open and closed 
storage tanks, 373. — Hall, "W. F., Ascending pipe serving also as 
descending pipe, 374 ; use of closed storage tanks, 374. — Schiinheyder, W,, 
Ascending main serving as descending main in water supply of towns, 
374 ; double guide-rails fur lifts, 374 ; fuel consumption of pumping 
engines, 373. — Furman, J. E., Objection to dmible guide-rails for car, 375. 
— Douglass, Sir J. N., Vibration of tower under wind pressure, 375. — 
Dobson, B. A., Effect of sun's heat on perpendicularity of tower, 376. — 
Eiffel, G., Oscillation at top of tower, 376 ; seismograph, 377 ; variation 
of temperature, 377 : absence of electrical phenomena, 377. 
Ejector Condenser, 1894, 301, 311, 31.5-6. 
Ekin, T. C, elected Member, 1896, 101. 

Election of Council, 1885, 22, 2-;, 27.— 1886, 17, IS.— 1887, 24, 25.— 1888, 
29-30.— 1889, 2:;.— 1890, 2G.— 1891, 21.-1892, 23.— 1893, 28.— 1894, 
26.— 1895, 26.-1896, 2S.— 1897, 27.-1898, 31.-1899, 28.— 1900, 34. 
Election of Members, 1885, 1. 16 :, 30."i, 462.-1886, 1, 125, 270, 46.-).— 1887, 1, 
157, 283, 473.— 1888, 1, 159, 268, 443.— 1889, 1, 203, 346, 584.-1890, 
1, 175, 297, 471.— 1891, 1, 196, 300, 479.— 1892, 1, 101, 228, 413.— 
1893, 1. 97, 219, 391.— 1894, 1, 169, 293, 469.-1895, 1, 149, 327, 
547.— 1896, 1, 101, 278, 461.-1897, 1, 143, 25.% 432.— 1898, 2, 141, 
340, 516.— 1899, 3, 143, 291, 473.-1800, 1, 95, 181, 3.-.5, 301. 
Election of Secretary, 1897, 43ij. 
Electric Batteries, Primary, 1889, 548, 571. 
Electric Engineering, Paper on the Position and Prospects of Electricity as 



E 123 

Electbic Engineering, Taper, 1888 (continued) ; — 

applied to Engineeriug, by W. Geipel, 1888, 7G. — Electric Transmission 
AND Distribution of Power, 7G; contrasted position of electricity iu 
this country and in America, 76; comparison of loss of power wlien 
transmitted mechanically and electrically, 77 ; loss of power in conductor 
diminishes with diminution of power transmitted, 77 ; depreciation of 
conductors, 78 ; distribution of power from central station, 78 ; merits and 
demerits of electric motors for sujiply of power, 78 ; cost of power, 79 ; 
examples of transmission of power by electricity, 79 ; printing machinery 
driven by electricity, 80 ; colliery working, 81 ; hauling and pumping, 81 ; 
ventilating and drilling, 82 ; cost of maintenance iu colliery pumping, 
83 ; loss of power in different stages, 83 ; application of electricity iu 
shipyards, 84; transmission to great distances, 8i; first cost of plant per 
horse-power transmitted by different systems. So ; cost per horse-power 
transmitted per hour by different systems, 80 ; examples of electric 
transmission for various purposes, 87 ; supply of power for agricultural 
and domestic purposes, 88. — -Electric Locomotion, four practical methods, 
89 ; gearing, 89 ; ordinary rails with third insulated rail as conductor, 90 ; 
overhead conductors, 91 ; underground insulated conductor, 93; storage 
batteries on car, 93 ; ordinary rails as conductors, 94 ; cost of working, 95 ; 
trials of tramway motors at Antwerp in 1885, 95 ; underground haulage, 
95 ; details of working cost, 96 ; electric railways iu Europe and America, 
97; telpherage, 98. — Electric Lighting, 98 ; comfort, convenience, and 
economy, 99 ; details of cost of lighting with arc lamps, and with 
incandescent lamps, 100 ; local conditions, cost per lamp hour, iu relation 
to duration of lightiug and to distance and resistance of lamps, 101 ; 
necessity for lamps of higher resistance and greater efficiency, 103 ; 
conductors, sectional area, cost, and potential fall, 102, 103; transformers, 
alternate-current and continuous-current, 103 ; secondary batteries, 104 ; 
stations for supply of electric light and power, 105. — Electric 
Metallurgy, 105 ; electric smelting furnaces for i^roductiou of aluminium, 
105 ; welding by electricity, 107. 

Discussion. — Fearfield, J. P., Repairs of dynamos, 107 ; variation 
in cost of electric lighting, 108 ; advantages of electric lighting, 109 ; 
ease of fixing electric lights, 109 ; employment of trained electricians, 
110 ; limit of tension for electric currents, 110 ; comparative cost of 
gas and electric lighting. 111. — Barcroft, H., Self-regulation of speed 
of electric motors, 112; electrical connection of railway rails, 112. — 
Snell, A. T.j Electric transmission of power to Solothurn, 112. — 
Walker, S. F., Loss of power in electric conductors, 112 ; measurement of 
power of motor, 112; self-regulating electric motors, 112; insulation of 
dynamos and motors for high tensions, 113; lower speed for motors, 113; 



124 E 

Electuic Engineering, Di<cn>sion, 1888 (continued): — 

electric lighting of collieries, 113. — Bolton, A. S., Electric smelting of 
aluminium, 114. — Urquhart, T., Electric welding in St. Petersburg, 114; 
cutting of metal by electric arc, 115 ; generation of electric current, 116. 
— Shoolbred, J. N., Potential for electric lighting, IIG ; extended 
application of electricity for motive power, IKJ; comparative cost of 
electric lighting and gas lighting, 117; central-station lighting, 117; 
advantage of continuous currents, 117; electric lighting of sugar factory, 
118; direct driving, instead of using belts, 110. — Volk, M.. Electricity is 
simply means of transmitting power, 120; advantages of working au 
electric railway with a succession. of single cars, 120; working expenses 
of Brighton electric railway with ordinary rails as conductors, 121 ; use 
of link belting, 122 ; joining of rails or conductors. 122 ; no diflficulty in 
working the cars in parallel, 123. — Smith, IM. H., Science of electricity 
iu America, 123; comparative progress in England and America, 124; 
transformer, 124; electric welding, 124; cost of haulage by electricity, 
]2."i; power of motors to haul varying loads at varying speeds, 12(i ; chaiu 
gearing for tramway cars, 127; secondary batteries for tramcar haulage, 
128; working of cars in parallel, 128; limitation of speed of cars, 128; 
production of aluminium by electricity, 128. — Hopkinson, J., Overhead 
conductors for electric railways, 12!>; self- regulation of speed of dynamos 
and motors, 130. — Douglass, Sir J. N., Development of electric engineering 
and of electric lighting. 130. — Crompton, K. E. B., Superiority of English 
•lynaino machines, 131 ; size of spindle and bearings for large dynamos, 
132 ; prmluction of aluminium, 132 ; working of tramears by accumulators, 
I'.VS; lutnre of electric engineering, 133. — Cocliraue, C. Parsons steam 
turbine, l;!3. — Gower, T. P., Working of tramears by storage batteries, 
134; construction of accumulators, 134.— Kapp. (i., Efficiency of electric 
transmission at J^olothum, 135; transformer, 13G; switches and crossings 
iu overhead conductor, 136; application of insulated underground 
conductor, 137. — Smith, M. H., Transformer. 138. — Davej', H., 
Underground pumps worked by hydraulic j)ower and by electricity, 1.38 ; 
advantage of electricity for transmitting power over considerable (listance, 
13'.i. — ilordey, "W. 31., Small proportion of fiiilures in electric lighting, 
13!»; speed regulation of motors. 140; English and American electrical 
science, 141 ; power of large dynamo, 141. — Carbutt, E. H., Cost of electric 
lighting compared witii gas, 141. — Geipel, W., Attention and repairs to 
dynamos, 142; tension of electric current^, 113; working cost of electric 
installation depends on time of use, 143 ; loss of power in conductors, 144 ; 
force of electro-motor increases with load, 144 ; potential of electric 
lighting currents and resistance of lamps, 145 ; joining of rails on electric 
railways, 145 ; American and European electricians, 145 ; electric 



E 125 

Electric Exgixeertng, Dl^cumin, 1888 (contiiuied) : — 

■welding, 145; working cost of tramways, 14G; self-regulation of motors, 
14G ; speed and power of dynamos, 146 ; Parsons turbo-electric generator, 
146; underground pumping by electricity, I4G ; motors for low sjiecds, 
147 ; details of cost of electric lighting, 147. — Carbutt, E. H., Competition 
of electricit}' with gas for lighting, 148. — Ellington, E. B., Cost of 
hydraulic transmission of power. 148. — Instone, T., Tenacitj', elongation, 
and conductivity of copper wire, 14'J. — Geipel, W., Calculations of cost of 
power, 150; hydraulic transmission of power, 150; silicium-bronze and 
hard-drawn copper for conductors, 151 ; pitch-chains for tramcar gearing, 
151. 

Electric Generator, 1888, 48;). See Compound Steam Turbine. 

Electric Goverxob for engines, 1885, 370. See Private Electric Lighting. 

Electric Installations for Lighting and Power. See Electric Lighting ; 
Electric Plant : Electricity Works. 

Electric Lighthoitse, Description of the Electric Light on the Isle of May, by 
D. A. Stevenson, 1887, ;!47. — Locality of island, 347. — Previous lighting, 
347. — Site and buildings, 348. — Generators, 348. — Engines and boilers, 
350. — Conductors, lamps, and carbons, 351. — Dioptric apparatus, and 
condensation of light, o'vl ; dipping of light in fog, 353. — Lamp changing 
and revolving arrangements, 354. — Driving machine for revolving cage, 
354. — Power of light, 355. — Men employed, 355. — Cost and range of light, 
and effect of fog, 356. — Advantnges of electric light, 357. — Hypcr-radiaut 
apparatus, 357. 

Discussion. — Douglass, Sir J. X., Importance of good coa&t guides, 358 ; 
cheap electric light is wanted for important positions, 359 ; single 
apparatus preferable for optical work, 360 ; advantage of alternating 
currents, 361 ; improvement of carbons, 361 ; fluted carbons, 362. — 
Paget, A., Comparative cost per candle-power of electric light, 362 ; 
regularity in driving by single or compound engines, 363; mercurial 
contact, 3C3. — Geipel, W., DifiSculty in burning positive carbon below, 
363; resistance of conductors, 364 ; regularity in driving with compound 
engines, 364. — Brebner, A., Eeliability of alternate-current electro- 
magnetic machines, 364 ; lamp with positive carbon below, 365 ; simple 
engine preferable for lighthouse purposes, 365. — Hartnell, W., Cost of 
light, 365 ; trustworthiness of compound engines and of arc-lamps, 366. — 
Kyan, J., Steadiness and candle-power of lamp with difterent dynamos, 
3G6. — Head, J., Distribution of light from lighthouses, and importance 
of fog signals, 367 ; advantage of high-pressure compound engines, 368 ; 
provision for breakdown, 368. — Walker, S. F., Cheapness and power of 
electric light, 369 ; transmission of energy by electrical conductors, 369 ; 
resistance of joints of copper rods, 370 ; amount of light from carbons of 



126 E 

Electric Lighthouse, Di'^cumon. 1887 (continued) : — 

various sizes, 370. — Stevenson. D. A., Greater expense of single apparatus, 

o7U ; reason for placing positive carbon below, 370 ; working of De 

Mcriteus machine, 371 ; mercury contact, and conductors, 371 ; preference 

for simple engiues, 371 ; cost of electric light, and attendance, 371 ; 

observations between St. Abb's Head and Isle of May, 372. 

Electric Lighting, 1885, 37(J ; see Private Electric Lighting.— 1888, 98-105 ; 

see Electric Engineering. — 1894, 18G; see Address of President, 

Alexander B. W. Kennedy. — See also Electric Lighting Installations ; 

Electric Plant ; Electricity "Works. 

Electric Lighting by Inverted Arc-Lamps. 1893, 31)8. See Lighting of 

■\Vorkshoj)s. 
Electric Lighting Installations : — 

Belfast, 1896, :!(I4. See Belfast Electric Lighting. 

Birmingham. 1897, 370. 

City of London, 1900, 47.^. 

Colonial and Indian Exhibition, &c., London, 1886, 411. 412, 42G-7. 

Derby, 1898, 473, 553. See Electric Plant. 

Edinburgh, 1895, 552. See Edinburgh Electric Lighting. 

Isle of May, 1887, 347. See Electric Lighthouse. 

Liverpool. 1891, 442. 

Manchester, 1894, 2S)7, 402. See Electric Lighting Works. 

Nottingham, 1898, 516. 

Oldham, 1894, 405, 440. 

Paris, Bon Marche, 1889, 5CG.— Grand Opera House, 1889, 542, 569.— 
Palais Pioyal, 1889, 548, 5G7. 

Plymouth. 1899, 447. 

Private, 1885, 37G. See Private Electric Lighting. 

Torquay. 1899, 4G4. 

Westminster, 1900, 4G7. 

"Wolverhampton. 1897, 3G8, 408. 

Workshops, 1893, 3!m;. See Lighting of "Workshops. 
Electric Lighting "Works. Description of the new Electric Lighting "^'orks, 

Manchester, Paper by Dr. J. Hopkinson, 1894, 2'J7.— Progress of electric 

lighting, 297.— System of distribution; insulation, 298. — Switchboards, 

290. — Engiues and dynamos, 300. — Boilers, 301. — "Work, 302. 

Discussion. — Kennedy, A. B. W., First year's working, 302. — 

Higginbottom, L., Revenue and expenditure, 303. — Parker, T., Motor 

generators, 304. — Jenkiu, C. F., Energy transferred from one circuit to 

another, 304.— Hopkinson, C. Buildings, 304.— Kennedy, A. B. "W., 

Foundations and water tank, 305. — Hopkinson, C, Concrete foundations ; 

water tank over boilers, 305.— Head, J., Triple-expansion engines with 



E 127 

Electric Lightixg "Works, Discussion. 1894 (continued) : — 

higher pressure, 30G. — Wicksteod, J. H., Ball bearings for motor 
generators, 306.— Francis, G. I., Construction and application of ball 
bearings, 306.— Maw, W. H., Jockey pulleys, 308 ; link belts, 309.— 
"Wordiiigham, C. H., Five-wire and three-wire systems; bare copper 
mains, 309.— Watkinson, W. H., Cunsumption and cost of coal, 310. — 
Hopkinson. Dr. E., Action of transformers or motor generators, 310. — 
Kiches, T. H., Ball and roller bearings, 311.— Parker, T., Ball bearings, 
311. — Adamson, J., Ejector condensers, 311. — Barr, J., Economy in 
condensing, :!12.— Donkin, B., Consumption of steam, 312. — Hopkinson, 
Dr. J., Efficiency of ball bearings; speed of motor generators, 312; water 
tank; triple-expansion engines, 313; jockey pulleys, friction and links 
of belts, 31-1: coal consumption, ejector condensers, 315; steam 
consumption, 316. — Kennedy, A. B. W., Financial results, 316; 
arrangement of steam and exhaust pipes; leakage from negative 
conductor, 317.— Hopkinson, Dr. J., Obligation for middle wire to be 
earthed, 317. 
Electric Plant, Taper on Electric Installations for Lighting and Power on the 
Midland Railway, with notes on Power absorbed by Shaf tiog and Belting, 
by W. E. Langdon, 1898, 553. — Electric installations for lighting and 
power; engines, 553; electrical apparatus, 554.— Derby installation, 555; 
number of lamps, generating station, boilers, engines and dynamos, 556 ; 
output and cost, 557.— Application to power, 558 ; electric working of 
accumulator pumps for hydraulic lift, 559.— Power absorbed by shafting 
and belting, 560. — Details of cost of working eleven electric-light 
stations, 562-3. — Electric power absorbed in driving lathes, &c., through 
shafting and belting, 56 -1-7 ; ditto in driving through shafting and 
belting and in driving direct, 568. 

Discussion. — 'La.ugdoji, W. E., Origin of paper, 570. — Kennedy, 
A. B. W., Piatio of actual output to maximum possible in electric lighting, 
570 ; efBciency of transmission of electric power to accumulator pumps, 
571 ; loss of power in driving through shafting and belting, 572 ; direct 
driving by electricity, or tlirough individual counter-shafts, 572. — Walker, 
A. T., Yalne of hydraulic power for lifts, and loss in driving pumps by 
electricity, 573.— Patchell, W. H., Lifts worked direct by electric motor, 
574; compensators for balancing pressure in three-wire system, load 
factor, 574 ; regulation of electrically-driven pumps by blocking suction- 
valves open, 574 ; regulation by series-wound motors and series-parallel 
switch, 575.— Schonheyder, W., Eegulatiou of pump by holding suction- 
valve open, 575.— Dolby, E. Pi., Ratio of useful work to power expended 
in driving machines ; light and power from same feeders, 576. — Halpin, 
D., Hotel lifts worked direct by steam, 577.— Smith, R. H., Difference of 



128 E 

Electric Plant, Di^'cn^sion. 1898 (continued) : — 

power required for driving niachines separately or collectively, 577 ; 
ammeter readings, 579; direct measurement of cutting force in large 
lathe, 57D.— Harris, H. G., Driving of large tools by separate motor to 
each, 580.— Walker, W. G., Efficiency of motor, 581.— Carter, E. T., 
Single common motor or multiple separate motors, 581. — Lea, H., 
Margin of power in reserve, 582 ; electric driving of polishing -spindles, 
583 ; working of hydraulic lifts by electric motors, 584. — Head, J., Central 
generating station, distributing power through electrical leads, 584. — 
Burstall, H. R. J., Group of small tools driven by common electric 
motor, 585. — Wicksteed, J. H., Relative cost and advantages of driving 
by electricity and by belting. .18(3. — Beaumont, W. W., Driving through 
shafting for concentrated machinery, and by electricity for scattered, 587. 
— Langdon, W. E., Output of Derby electric station, 588 ; loss of power in 
driving through shafting, 588 ; electric driving of shops at Bristol Wagon 
Works, 589 ; power of electric motor driving hydraulic pumps, 589 ; space 
saved thereby, and economy clfected, 589 ; electric regulators, 590 ; loss 
of power in driving workshop tools, 590 ; capital cost of electric driving, 
590 ; power and efficiency of electric motor, 591 ; margin of reserve power, 
591 ; concentraAion or distribution of machinery, 591. — Johnson, S. W., 
Central engine and boilers, for driving by steam power or by electricity, 
592. — Balkwiil, A. J., Substitution of electric driving in place of scattered 
independent steam-engines, 592 ; electric power required to drive lathes 
and slotting machines, 594; ditto foundry machinery, 595; electric 
driving of circular saw, 596 ; coal consumption before and after adoption 
of electric driving, 59G; cost of replacing steam engines by electric power, 
597; comparison of steam-engine driving and electric driving, 597. — 
Carter, W., Regulation of accumulator pumps for hydraulic lift, and rating 
of motors, 598. — Langdon, W. E., Maximum and minimum output of 
Derby electric station, 598; electric driving of shop tools, 599; tests of 
accumulator pumps driven by electric motor, GOO ; efficiency of generators 
and motors and pumping installation, 6Ul ; comparison with steam power, 
602 ; arrangement of compensators or boosters, 602 ; regulation of 
accumulator pumps, 002 ; absorption of power by tools driven individually 
or collectively, 603 ; electric lighting independent of electric power supply, 
603 ; saving of coal by substitution of electric driving in place of steam- 
engine driving. 603. 

Electric R.mlwat, Bessbrook and Xewry, 1888, 378, 416. — Giant's Causeway, 
1888, 383.— Burgdorf-Thun, 1900, 438. 

Electric Rock-Deill, Paper on the Electric Rock-Drilling Machinery at the 
Carlin How Ironstone Mines in Cleveland, by A. L. Steavenson, 1893, 309. 
— Cleveland ironstone mining; hand labour, 309. — Hand ratchet-drill; 



E 129 

Electric Eock-Drill, Paper, 1893 (continued) : — 

compressed-air and hydraulic rotary drills; petroleum engine, 310. — 
Electric drill; dynamo; cables and junction-Loxes, 311. — Drilling 
machine, and motor, 312. — AVorking of electric drills, 313. — Output; 
general results of diflerent drills, 314. 

Discussion. — Steavenson, A. L., Specimens of auger drills, junction- 
box, and cables, 315. — Heenan, H.. Diameter of holes drilled ; roburite, 315. 
— Shoosmitb, H., Petroleum engine, 316. — Jeukin, C. F., Exhaust gases 
from petroleum engine ; speed of motor, 316. — Steavenson, A. L., Diameter 
of auger drills ; explosives ; petroleum machine, 316 ; speed and power 
of electric drill, 317. 

Electric Stations. ^ See Electric Lighting Installations; and Electricity 

Electric Supply "Works, j AVorks. 

Electric Traction, Taper on Mechanical features of Electric Traction, by 
P. Dawson, 183S, 4:3. — Importance of electric traction on tramways, 43. — 
Outside work, wires, 47; poles, 48; insulators, 51. — EoUing stock, 
trucks, 51 ; wheel-base and spring-base, 52 ; side-frames, 5:> ; essential 
conditions, 54. — Four-wheel cantilever truck, 55. — -Swivel truck. 57. — 
Peckham trucks, 57 ; maximum-traction truck, 60. — Motors, double- 
reduction, 62 ; single-reduction, 63 ; steel gearing, 64 ; power, 64 : 
suspension, 65 ; rating, 65 ; rise of temperature, (!>Q. — Power station, 
continuous working, 67; sizes of engines, 67; driving of dynamos, 68; 
power, 68; class of enguies, 69; governing, 70; bearings, 71; coal 
consumption, 72-3. — Fly-wheels, 73; construction, 74; accidents, 74. — 
Generators, 75-7. 

Discussion. — Crompton, E. E., Delay of electric traction in this country, 
78 ; engines for electric traction and for electric lighting, and breakdowns, 
78 ; accumulators in parallel, 79 ; slow-speed engines with heavy fly- 
wheels, and high-speed engines without, 79 ; trucks with long overhang of 
car, 80. — Ayrton, "W. E., Production of electric-traction car-motors, 80 ; 
electric tramways in Boston, and size of power stations, 81 ; fluctuations 
of load in traction stations, 81; insulated conductors underground, 83; 
overhead wires in continental cities, 83. — Eaworth, J. S., Shocks in 
electric-traction engines, 84 ; objections to heavy fly-wheels, 85 ; closeness 
of governing, 85 ; over-compounding of dynamos, 86 ; proportions of 
bearings, 86. — Chambers, E. J., Tubular poles for overhead wires, 87. — 
Harris, H. G., Testing of poles, 88.— Mordey, W. M., Changes in 
American electric traction, 88. — Eobinson, M., Engines for driving 
dynamos, and direct coupling, 90; comparison of high-speed and 
slow-speed engines, 9 1 ; fly-wheels, 91 ; variations of load, 92; examples 
of high-speed dynamo-driving engines, 93. — Head, J., Longer experience 
of electric traction in America, 94 ; absence of roads, 95 ; advantages of 

X 



180 E 

Electric Tkactiox, Dixcusiiion, 1898 (continued) : — 

electric trolley tramcars, 96 ; city and suburban traffic, 97 ; long cars on 
short wheel-base, 98 ; power of motors, 98 ; economy of electric traction, 
98. — Beaumont, W. AV., Tramways in America and in England, 99; 
slow-speed engines and heavy ily-wheels, stresses upon engines, 100 ; 
tramcars in crowded streets, 101 ; early locomotives, 101. — Bramwell, 
Sir F., Bart., Tramways checked by legislation, 101. — Unwin, W. C, 
American conditions favourable to electric traction, 102; engines for 
electric-traction stations, 103; fly-wheels, 104. — Kennedy, A. B. W., 
Engines for driving dynamos, and variations in load, 105. — Sharp, A., 
Accidents with fly-wheels, 10(3; tangent-spoke fly-wheels, 107. — Smith, 
M. H., Fly-wheel with tangential spokes, 109 ; bad condition of 
American roads, 109; accidents on electric tramways, 110. — Gad8by,C. H., 
Tubular poles, 110; tramcar wheels. 111; overhead trolley-wires, and 
underground conduits, 111. — Day, C, Electric-traction and rolling-mill 
engines. 111; bearings, 112. — Lomas, H., Electric tramway accident, 
llo. — Johnson, S. W., Summary of discussion, li:>. — Scott, E. K., 
Armature winding, and car motors, 114. — Dawson, P., Engines, high-speed 
and slow-speed, 114-6; shocks, fly-wheels, governing, 117; tubular 
poles, 118; testing of poles, 119; extension of electric tramways, 120; 
trolley wires, and accidents, 120; dimensions of electric-traction engines, 
121-2; variation in speed, I'l.i; economy, 12:>. 
Electric Traction, Polyphase, 1900, 435. See Polyphase Electric Traction. 
Electric "Welding, Paper by B. A. Dobson, 1894, 319.— Experience in electric 
welding ; mechanical power required, 319. — Principle of electric welding, 
320. — Dynamo, 321. — Transformer; Elihu Thomson welding process, 322. 
— Good and bad welds ; projection of ends to be welded, 323. — IMethod 
of working, 324. — Work done ; power required for electric welding, 325. — 
Strength of welds, 326. — Conductivity at weld; conclusion, 327. — 
Tabulated results of experiments : power expended in electric welding, 
328-9; bending tests, 330.— Cost, 331. 

Discussion. — Dobson, B. A., Exhibited specimens illustrating electric 
welding, 331 ; adaptability of process to variety of purposes, 332. — 
Kennedy, A. B. W., Other plans of electric welding, 333.— Saxon, A., 
Power required for piecing large bars, 333; advantage of swaging; 
welding machine worked by hand power, 334. — Cockerill, T., Cliemical 
efl'ect of acid on section of weld ; measurements of current and of power, 
33.5. — Jenkin, C. F., Electric welding of boiler tubes at Crewe, 336; 
continuous recorder for ascertaining power required, 337. — "Worthington, 
E., Swaging of welds; welding steel crossings for street railways in 
America, 337; welding by electric arc, 338. — Webb, H., Electric welding 
for continuous work, 339. — Head, J., Electric fusion, 339; surfaces of 



E 131 

Electric Weldixg, Ductmion, 1894 (continued) : — 

metal cleanetl by fluxes ; filling up blow-Lolcs in castings, 340 ; wi.lding 
seams of steel casks, 341. — Clarkson, T., Electric welding of alloys; 
automatic welding of copper wires, 341. — Piatt, J., Electric welding 
at Gloucester; heating of plates by electricity for flanging, o42. — 
Cochrane, C, 3Iechanical power in proportion to area of welded section, 
342. — Tweddell, K. H., Power required for producing fusion, 343 ; 
caulking by Benardos process, 344 ; electric welding instead of riveting. 
345. — Aspinall, J. A. F., Electric welding of solid bars and tubes at 
Horwich, 345; machine adapted for straight work only ; blow-holes filled 
by electi ic welding. 346. — Watkinson, W. H., Cost of machine, 34G ; 
experiments by Dr. Joule; current required in Elihu Thomson process, 
347 ; dynamo with large fly-wheel ; iron-clad dynamo, 348. — Hopkinson, 
Dr. J., Electrical resistance in iron ; increased resistance of conductors 
with alternating current, 349. — Parker, T., Transformer prefeiable to 
large current produced direct ; welding or fusing of metals, 3."0; welding 
of steel and platinum by electricity, 351. — Hopkinson, C, Efl"ect of 
welding on temper of hard steel ; resistance at gap of continuity, 351. — 
Dobson, B. A., Size of bars welded by electricity, 351 ; probable cause 
of difiicul ties in electric welding at Crewe, 352; heating by electricity; 
welding or fusing ; welding of hoops and rings, 3.j3 ; horse-power for 
welding different sizes of work ; electric and hydraulic riveting, 354 ; 
pressure on weld ; cost of welding ; lieating by electricity under water, 
355 ; temper of steel destroyed by welding ; resistance from break of 
continuity at weld, 356. — Kennedy, A. B. W., Electric welding process in 
America ; advantages of electric welding, 357. — Dobson, B. A., Heating 
by electricity under water, 3.58. 

Electrical Exekgy, 1894, 176. See Address of President, Alexander B. "\^'. 
Kennedy. 

Electrical Exgineerls-g Works:— 
Chelmsfoid, 1886, 410, 413-4. 
Derby, 1898, 482. 
London, 1886, 424. 
Loughborough, 1898, 460, ."OS. 
Paris, 1889, 547, 565. 
Wolverhampton, 1897, 368, 405, 407. 

Electkicitt, Applications, 1894, 174. See Address of President, Alexander 
B. W. Kennedy. 

Electricity, Distribution, Five-"\Vire and Thrte-Wire, 1894, 298, 309. See 
Electric Lighting Works. 

Electricity in the Eoyal Dockyards and Xavy, 1892, 2.56. See Xaval Electrical 
Apparatus. 

T ^ 

I a 



132 E 

Electricity Works: — 

Birminghaiu, 1897, o79. 

City of London. 1900, 475. 

Derby, 1898, 47;!, 55:^ Set Electric Plant. 

Nottingham, 1898, 51G. 

Plymouth, 1899, 447. 

Torquay, 1899, IGi. 

Westminster, 1900, 4G7. 

Wolverhampton, 1897, 3GS, 40S. 

Electro-Magnetic Machine-Tools, Paper on Electro-Magnetic INIaehine-Tools, 
by F. J. Rowan. 1887, 323. — Difficultied of holiling-on and hokliiig-up in 
employment of portable riveters and other machine-tools, 323. — Ordinary 
method of uniting two parts of riveter, 323. — Superiority of machine 
riveting, 324. — Electro-mngnetic riveting, 321; holder-up, 32."). — Electro- 
magnetic drilling, 32.> ; superiority of drilling to punching, 32."> ; drilling 
machine, 327. — Tapping, 327. — Caulking and chipping, 32S. — Application 
of electro-magnetic tools to side-plating of ship, 328. — Practical results. 
329 ; speed of drilling, and power employed, 329 ; force and speed of 
riveting-hammer blows, 329. — Electro-motors, 329. — Application of 
electrical drilling machines, 330. — Efficiency of electro-magnets, 330. — 
Economic advantage of electro-magnetic machine-tools, 330. — Electrical 
distribution of power, 331. 

AppemJij- on comj^arative efficiency of riveting done by different 
methods, 331. — Conclusions from previous investigations, 331. — Connection 
between riveting pressure and shearing resistance, 332. — Maintenance of 
pressure upon plates alone during riveting, 333. — Comparative results 
(jf hand and hydraulic riveting, 334. — List of recent memoirs on riveting, 
334. 

Dii-cntsion. — Piowan, F. J., Exhibited electro-magnetic drilling 
machine, 335. — Eiches, T. H., Cost of electro-magnetic machine-tools and 
of motive power, 335 ; influence of magnetism on steel ships and boilers, 
336; magnetising and de-magnetising for shifting of machines, 33G. — 
Sterne, L., Electro-magnetic lathe-chuck, 33G ; insufficient duration of 
batteries, 337 ; advantage of agitating batteries, 337 ; choking of 
magnetised cutting edges, and necesity of insulating the tools, 337; 
successful application of electro-magnetic lathe-chuck, 337. — Price- 
Williams. Pi., Difficulty from attraction of cuttings to magnetic tool, 338 ; 
<lctrimental effect of hammer blows on steel rivets, 338. — King, W. F., 
Power required in electro-magnetic machines, 338. — Dobson, B. A., 
Danger to workmen using electro-mngnetic machines, 339; holding power 
of magnets, 339. — Smith, W. F., Description of drills, and speed of 
drilling. 339. — Walker, S. F., Self-contained electrical tools, 339: loss 



E 133 

Electro-Magxetic Maciiise-Tools, Discussion, 1887 (continued) :— 

of power through attr.chment of magnets, 340 ; tUtficulty of magnetising 
hard steel, and facility of magnetising and de-magnetising holding-on 
magnets, 340; law of magnetic resistance, ^41; relative advantages of 
eleetro-motor and of solenoid, 341.— liowan, F. J., Cost of machines, 341 ; 
speed of riveting, 342 ; cost of motive-power. 342 ; influence of magnetism 
on ships, 312; electro-magnetic chuck, 343; application of machines to 
shipwork, 343; no danger to workmen from electric current, 344 ; stroke 
of hammer in electro-magnetic riveter, 344 ; shape of drills and speed 
of drilling, 344; cuttings fly out of hole and cluster upon magnets, 
345 ; dynamo machines, 345 ; magnetism is sufficient to draw plates 
together, 345.— Carbutt, E. H., Advantage of drilling instead of punching, 
34(j. 
Electeo-Platixg Works, Birmingham, 1897, 383. 
Electro Works, Sheffield, 1890, 442. 452. 465. 

Elevators for Grain, 1889, 153, 160, 171. See Koller Flour Milling. 
Elevators in the Eiffel Tower, 1889, 350. See Eiffel Tower Lifts. 
Elkord, E. J., elected Member, 1899, 144. 

Eliot, W., Paper on the Mechanical Appliances employed in the construction 
of the Keyham Dockyard Extension Works, 1899,:365.— Remarks 
thereon, 375. 
Elklxgton and Co., Electro-l'latiug Works. Birmingham, 1897, 383. 
Ellacott and Sons, Foundry and Engineering AVorks, Plymouth, 1899, 457. 
Ellery, H. G., elected Member, 1888, 1. 

Ellington, E. B., appointed Member of Council, 1898, 31 —elected Member of 
Council, 1899, 28. 
Auditor, 1888, 31 :— 1890, 30. 
Drying in Vacuum, 1889, 319. 
Edinburgh Electric Lighting, 1895, 585. 
Electric Engineering, 1888, 148. 
Grain-Warehousing Machinery, 1891, 380. 
Irrigating Machinery, 1888, 74. 
Hydraulic Gas-Stoking, 1895, 3U. 

Hydraulic Power Supply, Paper on Hydraulic Power Supply in Towns : 
Glasgow, :Manchester, Buenos Aires, &c., 1895, 353. —Remarks 
thereon, 375, 394, 399, 403. 
Liverpool Motive Power, 1892, 06. 
Portable Hydraulic Drill, 1887, 77. 
Taxation of Machinery, 1890, 41. 
AVater Meters, 1900, 08. 
AVater Softening, 1898, 433, 449. 
Ellington, G., elected Associate Member, 1900, 2. 



134 E 

Elliot, Sir G., Bart., decease, 1894, 4. 

Elliott, Dr. A. C, elected Member, 1892, 1. 

Elliott, G., elected Member, 1895, 149. 

Elliott, T. G., decease, 1900, C— Memoir, 1899, 127. 

Ellis, A. D., elected Member, 1895, 517. 

Canal-Coat Propulsion. 1897, V.C, 199. 
Ellis, J., elected Associate IMcmber, 1898, 14?). 
Ellis, John S., elected Graduate, 1889, 204. 
Ellis, Joseph S., elected Member, 1892, 414. 
Ellis, W. F. W., elected Member, 1896, 1. 

Ellison, J., elected Graduate. 1898, :^. :— elected Associate Member, 1900, 9G. 
Elmek, J. J., elected Member, 1900, 1. 

Elswick WoitKS, 1887, 178. See Address of President, Edward H. Caibutt. 
Elsworth, J. F., elected Member, 1897, 432. 
Elswortht, E. H., elected Member, 1885, 163. 

Hope Driving, 1896, 378. 
Elwell, T., nominated Chevalier de la Legion d'Honneur, 1888, 21. — Decease, 

1896, 4. 
Embleton, C. a., elected Graduate, 1899, 294. 
Emery, J. I., elected Graduate, 1897, 14."i. 

Emehy's Testing BIachine, 1888, 2(i0, 448. See Testing Machine. 
E.mett, G. H. H., elected Member, 1889, .■)84. 
Enfield Small Arms Factory, 1886, 410, 428-40. 
Engelbach, C. R. F., elected Graduate, 1897, 2. 

Engine, Experimental Marine, 1891, 380. See Experimental Marine Engine. 
Engine, Eobey Semi-Portable, 1885, 371. See Semi-Portable Engine. 
Engine, Spherical, 1885, 90. See Sjiherical Engine. 
Engine, Stirling Hot-Air, Dundee Foundry, Dundee, 1887, 454. 
Engine Trials, Marine, 1889, 235:— 1890, 203 :— 1891, 200:— 1892, 130:— 

1894, 33. See Marine-Engine Trials. 
Engine Works : — 

Belfast, 1888, 418:— 1896, 441, 447, 450. 

Birkenhead, 1891, 451. 

Birmingham, 1897, 378. 

Bolton, 1894, 454, 455. 

Brighton, 1892, 402. 

Clydebank, 1895, 515. 

Crewe, 1894, 458. 

Derby, 1898, 402. , 

Doncaster, 1885, 453. 

Dublin, 1888, 390, 412. 

Dundee, 1887, 454. 



E 135 

Engine "Works (continued) : — 

Gainsborougl), 1885, 4i9. 

Glasgow, 1895, ilG, 478, 481, 482, 484, 486, 49i, 495, 497, 49S, 501, 502 
• 509,510. 

Grantham, 1885, 447. 

Greenock. 1895, 5:!0. 

Hartlepool, 1893, 380, 383. 

Horwich, 1891, 450:— 1894, 455. 

Johnstone, 1895, .527. 

Keyham, 1899, 377, 445. 

Lincoln, 1885, 437, 441, 442, 444. 

Liverpool, 1891, 446, 448, 450, 451. 

London, 1886, 419. 420:— 1900, 477, 485, 495. 

Loughborough, 1898, 508. 

Manchester, 1894, 416, 427, 430, 436, 439. 

Middlesbrough, 1893, 346. 

Newark, 1885, 449. 

Paisley, 1895, 523, 524, 526. 

Paris, 1889, 549, 551. 

Petit-Bourg, 1889, 573. 

Plymouth, 1899, 456, 457, 459. 

Port Glasgow, 1895, 529. 

Portsmouth, 1892, 373. 

Eenfrew, 1895, 522. 

Eugby, 1897, 429 :— 1900, 490. 

Sheffield, 1890, 450, 467. 

Southampton. 1892, 378, 385. 

Wolverhampton, 1897, 405. 
Engutes : — 

Gas. See Gas Engines. 

High-Speed. See High-Speed Engine. 

Hydraulic, 1894, 23S.— 1895, 366, 388, 390. 

Locomotive. See Addresses of Presidents ; Joseph Tomlinson, 1890 ; 
Samuel W. Johnson, 1898. See Locomotive. 

Marine. See Marine Engines. 

Pneumatic, 1899, 308-11 ; see Atmospheric Eailway.— 1900, 137-42, 144; 
see Portable Pneumatic Tools. 

Pumping. See Pumping Engines. 

Quick-Eevolution. See Quick-Eevolution Engines. 

Triple-Expansion. See Trii)le-Espansion Engines. 
Engineers, Openings for Mechanical Engineers in China, 1899, 528. See 
Openings for Mechanical Engineers in China. 



136 E 

Engineer Students at Key ham, Training, 1899, "SO, 447. See IMacLincry of 

H.M.S. '• Psyche." 
Engineering Accounts, Diagrams, 1897, 499. See Diagram Account*. 
Engineering and Shipbcilding "Work*. See Engineering Works ; and 

Shipbuilding Works. 
Engineering Colleges, Labokatoiues, and Technical Schools: — 
Belfast, 1896, 410-:J. 
Birmingham, 1897, 370. :j'J2. 
Brighton, 1892, :570, 4ii'2. 
Derby. 1898, 49S, 
Devonport, 1899, 430, 452. 
Dublin, 1888, 289-90. 
Dundee, 1887, 45S. 
Keyham, 1899, 383, 442, 447. 
Leeds, 1886, 4i;8-70. 
Liverpool. 1891, 429, 433, 
Nottingham, 1898, 525. 
Plymouth, 1899, 451, 455. 
Sheffield, 1890, 442, 447. 
Engineering Congress, Chicago, 1893, II, 24. 
Engineering Lmprovements in Elver Tecs, 1893, 318. ^ee Tees Engiaeering 

Improvements. 
Engineering Laboratories. See Engineering Colleges. 
Engineering, Marine, 1891, 306. See Marine Engineering. 
Engineering Works. See Engine Works; and Marine-Engine Works; and 

Shipbuilding Works ; and Works Visited at Summer meetings. 
England, W. H., elected Graduate, 1887, 158. 
English, Lt.-Colonel T., elected Member, 1890, 298. 

Condensation and Ke-evaporatlon, Paper on Further Experiments on 
Condensation and Re-evaporation of Steam in a Jacketed Cylinder, 
1889, G41.— Remarks thereon, 076, 677, 682, 606-701. 7(t2. 
Heat Distribution in Steam Engine, Paper on Experiments on the 
Distribution of Heat in a Stationiry Sioam-Engine, 1887, 478. — 
Remarks tliereon, 500, 533. 
Heat Transmission, Paper on Transmission of Heat from Surface 
Condensation through Metal Cylinders, 1896, 501. — Remarks 
thereon, 531. 
Initial Condensation in Steam Cylinder, Paper ou Supplementary 
Experiments, 1887, 503 : remarks thereon, 53 !. — Paper on 
Condensation in Steam-Engine Cylinders during admission, 1892, 
198 : remarks thereon, 214, 215, 222. 
Marine-Engine Trials, 1889, 276:— 1892, 184. 



E 137 

English, Lt.-Colonel T. (continued) :^ 

Marine Horse-Power, Paper on Calculation of Hor^o-Power for ilarine 

PioiDulsion, 1896, 79. — Eemarks thereon, 87. 
Steam Jacket, 1892, 4^o. 
Steam Superheating. 1896, 207. 
Surface Condensation of Steara, Paper, 1894, 140. 

English, T. M., elected Member, 1894, 2^3. 

Ennor, C. J., elected Member, 1894, 293. 

Enock, a. G., elected Associate Member, 1900, OG. 

Enock, D., elected Associate :Member. 1398, Uo. 
Evaporative Condensers. 1899, 242. 

Exock, E. C, elected Associate Member, 1899, 293. 

Enock, J. K.. elected Graduate, 1900, 503. 

Epps, L, G. J., elected Graduate, 1900, 4. 

Epton, AV. M.. elected Associate Member, 1837, 2. 

Erringtox, W.. elected Member. 1865, 4G2. 

Ekskine, J., Flax Dressing Machinery. 1896, 29G. 

EsK Papek Mills, Edinburgh, 1887, 4:!9, 462. 

Esson, D. D., elected [Member, 1891, 106. 

EssoN, J., elected Member, 1890, 29S. 

EsTCARiE--. /5>ee Pavers and Estuaries, ^'ee also Docks; Dcclcyards ; Harbours. 

Etches. H., elected 3Iember. 1889, 1. 

Ethee-Peessube Theobt, Paper on the Ether-Pressure Theory of Thermo- 
dynamics applied to Steam, by J. Macfarlaue Gray, 1889, 379. — Scope 
of paper, 379. — Ether-pressure belieyed by Xewton to be cause of 
gravitation, 379. — Every i)hysiciil phenomenon is immediate result of 
ether-pressure, 380. — P^thids and their motions, 3S1. — Definition of meta 
and other terms, 382. — Gravitation, 382.— Ether sub-pressure, 383 ; solar, 
384; terrestrial, 385 — Chemical affinity, 386. — Combustion, 386. — 
Eadiant heat, 387. — Cohesion. 388. — Latent heat, and heat of segregation, 
388. — Energy of gas, 3S8. — Pressure of gas, 391. — Specific heat at 
constant volume, and at constant pressure, and ratio of the two specific 
heats, 392 ; recapitulation, 393. — Second law of thermodynamics, 393 ; 
Carnot's function, 304. — Simplification of thermodynamics, 304. 

Appendix. — Extracts from Newton's works, showing how the 
conception of a gravitational etlier originated with him. and in what 
state he left the theorj', 394-S. 

Etheeington, J., Auditor. 1899, : 3. 

Taxation of IMachinery. 1890, 42. 

Etlinger, G. E., elected Graduate, 1897, 145. 

Ecgster, O., elected Graduate, 1900, 50". 

Evans, A. G., elected Member, 1887, 1. 



138 E 

Evans, D., Blast-Furnace Practice, 1889, 620. 
Steel Rails, 1890, 333. 

Evans, G. C, elected Associate Member, 1900, 2. 

Evans, J., elected Member, 1888, 1. 

Evans, E. K, elected Member, 1885, 1. 

Evans, W., Tube-Frame Eailway AVagons, 1890, 495. 

Evans and Co., E. and J., Shipbuilding Works, Liverpool, 1891, 44G. 

Evans Eotating Table for dressing ores, 1887, 104. See Lake Superior Copper 
Mining. 

Evanson, F. M., elected Member, 1892, 229. 

Evapokation in VACurM, 1889, 307. See Drying in Vacuum. 

EvAPOUATioN of Liquids, 1886, 241. See Eefrigerating Machinery. 

Evapokative Condensers, Paper by H. G. Y. Oldham, 1899, 185.— Advantages 
and principle of evaporative condenser, 185. — Distribution of steam inside 
tubes, 186. — Distribution of water over tubes, 187. — Jointing of tubes, 
and water seal, 189. — Description of various arrangements of condensers, 
190; Led ward, 190; Fraser, 192; Theisen, 195; Wright, 197.— 
Leading water over tubes, 198 ; condenser with horizontal tubes by 
Sir Frederick Bramwell, Bart., Itt8 ; by Messrs. J. Kirkaldy, 199; 
vertical cast-iron condenser, and experiments thereon, 199; Kow 
condenser with indented tubes, 201 ; tests of plain and indented tube, 
201. — Design, arrangement, and efficiency of fans, as applied to 
evaporative condensers, 202. — Conditions governing design, arrangement, 
and maintenance of evaporative condensers, 204. — Jointing and testing, 
205. — Cost and choice of condenser, 206. — Circulating pumps, 207. — Air 
pumps, 207. 

Discmsion.—\\\i\ie, Sir W. H., Tliauks to author, 207.— Oldham, 
H. G. v., Kynoch tube, 207. — Donkin, B., Air and water condensers for 
steam, 208 ; eflect of dirt, 209 ; metal for tubes ; joints, 209 ; air 
propellers, Eow condenser, and American condenser, 210. — Longridge, 
M., Condenser with vertical cast-iron cjlinders, 210; area of condensing 
surface, 211; experiments in Table 2, 213; eflect of cold weather, 214; 
extent of condensing surface, 214 ; additional experiments in Table 4, 
215; circulation of steam through tubes, 21G; position of exhaust-steam 
inlet to condenser, 216; oil carried into condenser, 216; wet blanket 
sheathing on condenser tubes, 217. — Andrews, L., Condenser at Hastings 
electric-light station, 217; course of steam through condensing tubes, 
218; draining water from tubes, 219; condensed water led to hot well, 
219; no benefit from fan, 220; iwsition for condenser, 221. — Spencer, 
H. B., Klein water cooler, 221. — Barley, C. J., Ledward evaporative 
condenser at Elnightsbridge electric-lighting station, 223 ; separation of 
oil and water from exhaust steam, 223 ; auxiliary cooler, 225 ; joints, 



E 139 

Evaporative Coxdensers, Di<ciisii<m, 1899 (continued) : — 

226; plotted observations taken at Kniglitsbridge, 226; Edwards air 
pump, 228.— Patchell, "\V. H., Oil from condenser at Charing Cross and 
Strand Electricity Supply station, 228 ; joints of condenser tubes, 229 ; 
passage of steam through condensing tubes, 229 ; distribution of cooling 
■water over tubes, 230 ; barometric pipe from condenser to hot well, 230 ; 
Fitts American condenser with submerged tubes in shallow water- 
troughs, 231; effect of exhausting fan, 232.— Goss, W. F. M., Fitts 
condenser, 232 ; cooling towers, 233. — White, Sir W. H., Sir F. 
Bramwell's condenser, 233. — Williams, H., Distribution of water over 
condensing tubes, 233 ; ammonia and steam condensers and liquor cooler 
at Meux's brewery, 233; removal of scale from outside of condensing 
tubes, 235 ; early Pontifex evaporative condenser, 235. — Brown, W., 
Cochrane cylindrical condenser, 235. — Oldham, H. G. V., Cleaning of 
condensers ; cylindrical tubes, 237 ; value of fans ; oil in exhaust steam ; 
wet blankets over condenser tubes, 238; extent of condensing surface, 
239; cooling tower, 240. — White, Sir W. H., Water cooling, 240.— 
Boot, H., Wright evaporative condenser at Tunbridge Wells, 241 ; 
distribution of cooling water, and cleaning of tubes, 241 ; blanket round 
tubes, 241 ; air pumps and circulating pumps, 242. — Enock, D., Water- 
cooling towers ; fan, or natural draught, 242 ; combined surface-condenser 
and water-cooling tower ; ground space and cost of different methods of 
water-cooling; capacity of water-cooling tower, 243. — Hammond, R., 
Saving realised by evaporative condenser, 244. — James, H. H. R., Vacuum 
obtained ; power for driving fans, 244 ; cost of evaporative condenser, 245. 
— Murray, T. R., Requirements in designing evaporative condenser, 245 ; 
flat-cell condenser, and experimental results, 246. — Schonheyder, W., Early 
evaporative condensers, 247 ; cooling of air from condenser ; internal 
spiral distributors in tubes; falling gradient from condenser to air pump, 
248; testing for leakage, 249. — Walker, W. G., Condensing tubes with 
internal ribs ; air condenser without evaporation, 249 ; exhausting fan, 
and resistance of air, 250. — Wright, W., Unnecessary to stir up steam in 
condenser tubes, 250; Ledward corrugated tube, 251; requirements for 
evaporative condensers, 251. — Fraser, H., Space required, 251 ; working 
of air and circulating pumps ; fans ; scant water, 252. — Oldham, H. G. V., 
Proportions of cooling surface ; vacuum ; quantity of cooling water, 252 ; 
metal of condenser tubes, 253 ; exhaust-steam inlets ; fan requires casing 
round condenser tubes ; supplementary air-coolers ; circulating water, 
254. 

EvERAED, J. B., elected Member, 1887, 157. 

EvERiTT, N. BL, elected Member, 1887, 1. 

EVERS, J. H., elected Member, 1897, 432. 



140 E 

EvERSox, F. C, elected Associate Member, 1899, 2Q3. 

EvETTS, W., JcN., elected Graduate, 1897, 434. 

EwART AND Sox, CniriiUn Road Linen Mills, Belfast, 1896, 440. 

EwEX, J. T.. elected Associate Member, 1894, 470 : — transferred to Member, 

1897, 4. 
EwiXG, J. A., elected Member, 1891, 480. 

Alloys Eesearch, 1899, 100. 

Experimental Marine Enp:inc, 1891, 404. 
Excavation-, IMcchanical, 1885, 349 ; See Steam Xavvy. — Keyliam Dockyard 
Extension "Works, 1899, 36G-9. Manchester Sliip Canal, 1891, 
419-25. 
ExcEKPT Copies of Papers, 1891, 9. 
Excursions at Summer meetings : — 

Addiewell, 1887, 437. 

Arran, 1895, 4G7. 

Belfast, 1888, 379-83 :— 1896, 402-21. 

Bessbrook, 1888, 37S. 

Birkenhead, 1891, 432. 

Birmingham, 1897, 3G5-9. 

Bolton, 1894, 4(iG. 

Brighton, 1892, 370. 

Broxburn, 1887, 437. 

Burntisland, 1887, 437. 

BurtDU-on-Trent, 1898, 460. 

Bury. 1894, 405. 

Calais. 1889, 549. 

Calstock, 1899, 442. 

Carlingford Lough, 1896, 421. 

Carron, 1887, 437. 

Chatsworth. 1890, 44G. 

Chelmsford. 1886, 410. 

Clydebank. 1895, 4G7. 

Cotehele, 1899, 442. 

Coventry. 1885, 4GG :— 1897. 3G9. 

Creswell. 1898, 4G1. 

Crewe, 1894, 4oG. 

Dartmoor, 1899, 442. 

Derby, 1898, 455-61. 

Devon Great Consols, 1899, 442. 

Devonport, 1899, 439. 

Doncaster. 1885, 436. 

Dublin, 1888, 374-83. 



E Ul 



Exci'KSioxs (continued) : — 

Dudley Port, 1897, 36?. 

Duffield Bank. 1898, 46 ). 

Dukeries, 1890, 447 :— 1898, 4G1. 

Dunbarton (Dumbarton), 1895, 467. 

Dundee, 1887, 43S. 

Eastleigh, 1892, 369. 

Eddystone Lighthoi:s?. 1899, 443. 

Edinburgh, 1887, io5-'J :— 1895, 468. 

Enfield, 1886, 410. 

Frodingham, 1885, 430. 

Gainsborough, 1885, 435. 

Giant's Causeway. 1£88, 3?3:— 1836, 4.'.'. 

Glasgow, 1895, 4G2-S. 

GlenariflF, 18S6, 4.:1. 

Gosport, 1892, 368. 

Grantham, 1885, 435. 

Grimsby. 1885, 436. 

Haddon Hall, 1890, 446. 

Hampton (Middlesex), 190C, 467. 

Hartlepools, 1893, 336. 

Horwich, 1891, 432 :— 1394, 40C, 

Isle of May, 1887, 43.'. 

Isle of Wight, 1832, 369. 

Kirkcaldy, 1887, 437. 

Larne, 1896, 420-1. 

Leith, 1887, 439. 

Lincoln, 1885, 43 1-6. p 

Liverpool, 1891, 428-32. 

Loch Lomond, 1895, 467. 

London, 1886, 410-2 :— 1£0D, 463-7. 

Loughborough, 1898, 460. 

Manchester, 1894, 402-7. 

Manchester Ship Canal, 1831, 432 :— 1894, 40c 

Mew Island, 1888, 3S2. 

Middlesbrough, 1893, 332-6. 

Milton, 1898, 46 '. 

Mount Edgcumbe, 1899, 443. 

Newark, 1885, 435. 

Xewcastle-on-Tyne. 1887, 439. 

Nottingham, 1898, 460. 

Oidbury, 1897, 368. 



U2 E 

Excursions (continued) : — 
Oldham, 1894, 405. 

Paris, 1889, 5t2-9. 

Petit-Bourg, 1889, 518. 

riymoutli. 1899, 439-43. 

Port Eliot, 1899, 443. 

Portsmouth, 1892, 3G5-70. 

Prescot, 1894, 407. 

Eochdale, 1894, 406. 

Eotherham. 18£0. 446. 

Eoyton, 1894, 405. 

Kugby, 1897, 369 :— 1900, 407. 

Salford, 1894, 402. 

Saltash Bridge, 1899, 442-3. 

Saltburn-hy-the-Sea, 1893, liS.j. 

Sheffield, 1890, 412-7. 

Southampton, 1892, 368-0. 

Staines, 1900, 466. 

Stockton-on-Tees, 1893, 33.3. 

Stoke-upon-Treiit, 1898, 460. 

Stratford-on-Avon, 1897, 368. 

Thames and Xore, 1900, 466. 

Thornaby, 1893, 335. 

Tilbury, 1886, 411. 

Walsall, 1897, 368. 

Warwick, 1897, 369. 

Wishaw, 1895, 467. 

Wolverhampton, 1897, 367. 

Woolwich, 1886, 411. 
Exhibitions : — 

Columbian, Chicago, 1893, 11, 24. 

London, Colonial and Indian, 1886, 410, 411, 426-8. 
Newcastle-on-Tyne, Mining, Engineering, and Industrial, 1887, 439. 
Paris, 1888, 166 :— 1889, 542, 548. 
Expanded Metal, 1891, 382.^British Metal-Expansion Woi ks, West Hartlepool, 

1893, 336, 3S7. 
Expansion, allowance in bridge work, 1887, 290, 304, 306, 307, 308, 310, 380, 

382, 384. 
Expansion, Variable Expansion and Throttling, 1895, 154. See Throttling and 

Variable Expansion. 
Expansion with Spherical Eccentric, 1885, 422. ^e Spherical Eccentric. 
Experimental Marine Engine, Paper on the Experimental Marine Engine 



E 143 

ExPERiMESTAL Maiuxe Exgixe, Paper, 1891 (continued) : — 

and the Alternative-Centre Testing ^Machine in the Walker Engineering 
Laboratories of University College, Liverpool, by H. S. Hele-Shaw, 1891, 
3SG. — Object and general conditions of experimental engine, 380.— 
General features of design, 3S7. — ^Cylinders and covers, 388. — Pistons, 
piston rods, and connecting rods, 389. — Crank shaft with adjustable 
angles of cranks, 390. — Bedplate, 390. — Condenser, and measuring tank 
for circulating water, 390. — Air-pump, and measuring tanks for feed 
water, 391. — Feed pumps, 391. — Feed check-valves and relief valve, 392. 
— Dynamometer brake, and adjustment of weights, 392 ; cooling by water, 
393. — Boiler, moimtings, blow-oif tank, 393: circulating arrangement, 
394. — Testing machine with alternative centres, 394 ; mode of changing 
the centres, 395.— Shackles for tensile and shearing tests, 396. — 
Autographic force-strain recorder, 39G. 

Discus'<ion. — Hele-Shaw, H. S., Alterations in circulating arrangement, 
398 ; results of experiments with circulating pipe, 399 ; dynamometer 
brake, 400 ; alternative centres of testing machine, 400 ; shearing dies, 
401. — Kipper, W.. Measurement of steam consumption, 401 ; steam- 
engine economy, 401 ; variable angles of cranks, 402 ; fly-wheel brake, 
402. — Cochrane, C, Circulating arrangement fur boiler, 402. — Piatt, J., 
Temperature of boiler water, 403. — Terry, S. H., Friction iin stufSng-box 
of dynamometer brake, 404 ; economy of boiler, 404. — Lawrence, H., 
Circulating pipe and brake blocks, 404. — Ewiug, J. A., Complication of 
engine, 405 ; turbine and rope brakes, 405 ; rapidity of engine tests, 406 ; 
autographic recorder, 407. — Joy, D., Radial valve-gear, 407. — Reynolds, E., 
Coal consumption in marine practice, 409 ; unequal action of cylinders, 
409 ; unequal wear of cranks, 410. — Luptou, A., Circulating arrangement 
for boiler, 410. — Goodman, J., Experimental engines, 411; loss of feed 
water, 411 ; setting of valves, 411 ; testing machine, 412. — Cawley, G., 
Alternative centres for testing machine, 413. — Boswell, S., Sensitiveness 
of testing machine, 413. — McCulloch, J. M., Boiler circulator, 413. — 
Hele-Shaw, H. S., Other engines in laboratory, 414 ; fly-wheel, 415 ; 
dynamometer brake, 415; boiler circulator, 416; speed of testing 
machine, 416. — Tomlinson, J., Engineering laboratories, 417. 

Explosion, St. Etienne Colliery, 1890, 9. 

Explosions in Flour Mills, 1889, 165, 1C6, 172, 180, 189, 190. See Roller Flour 
Milling. 

ExPBESS Locomotives, Paper on Results of recent practical experience with 
Express Locomotive Engines, by W. M. Smith, 1898, 605.— Object of 
experiments, preparatory work, 605. — Coal employed, particulars of train, 
606. — Section of line, instructions to drivers, time records, 607. — Wind 
resistance, details of trials, 608. — Indicator diagrams, valve adjustment, 



144 E 

ExPEESs Locomotives, Paper, 1898 (continued) : — 

Geo. — Ilorsc-power, engine constants, Gil. — Ratio between indicated and 
dynamometer liorse-power, 613. — Eflect of stoppages, G14.— Tabulated 
details of trials of five engines, and observations and results, G1G-2G. — 
Full and speed curves, G27. 

Discussion. — Donkin, B., Supplementary tabulated results, G28 ; other 
information desirable, G30; best compression in cylinders, 630. — 
Hcbonheyder, W., Coal measurements, GSl) ; indicator, G31.— Price- 
"Williams, K., Earlier experiments, G31 ; train resistance, G32. — Joy, D., 
Criterion of merit in locomotives, G33 ; saving in repairs concurrent with 
saving in fuel, G31 ; further information from future tcbts, GS."). — 
Longritlge, !M., Eatc of evaporation, G3o ; size of fire-bux, steam pipe, 
and ports, C3G ; superheaters in smoke-box, and larger jiipes and ports, 
(;3G. — Peache, J. C, Ratio between draw-bar pull and indicated horse- 
power, C37 ; mean tractive eifort, 638 ; water consumption per I.H.P. per 
Lour, 63S: mode of taking indicator diagrams, G3S. — Smith, 11. H., 
Necessity fjr throttling, and use of link-motion, 639; record wanted of 
acceleration and retardation, G40.— Urie, R. W.. IMetliod of driving, 
640; effect of back pressure, 641. — Halpin, D., Previous experiments on 
train resistance, 641 ; mean horse-power, and ratio of draw-bar pull to 
indicated horse-power, 642 ; size of steam ports, 643 ; heat transmission 
in boiler, 643. — Johnson, S. W., Economical working of locomotives, 644 ; 
tube surface and fire-grate area, 644; economy of fuel from keeping 
engines in order, 64.5; priming, and second regulator, 645; recent 
locomotive performance on Midland Railway, 64G. — Marshall, W. P., 
Resistance of engine and train on level, 646 ; resistance at higher 
speeds, 648. — Aspinall, J. A. F.. Dynamometer, G4S ; wind resistance, 
649 ; increased steadiness and diminished friction at higlier speeds, 649 ; 
friction caused by check rails, G50. — Sauvage, E., Conclusions from 
experiments, 650; efifect of stoppages, 651.— Smith, W. M., Trial of 
three-cylinder compound locomotive, 651 ; water consumption, 652 ; 
vacuum in smoke-box, 654; best compression in cylinders, 654; coal 
measurements, and indicator, 655 ; coal burnt per mile and per hour, 
655 ; water used per I.H.P. per hour, 655 ; total work done iu trip, G5G ; 
ratio between total engine-power and draw-bar pull, 657; two methods 
of calculating total work done, 658 ; effect of acceleration and 
retardation, i;."9 ; indicator diagrams from one side only of engine, 661 ; 
throttling and cut-oft", GGl ; back pressure, and power absorbed by 
engine, 6C2 ; maximum horse-powers, GC3 ; weather during trials, 663 ; 
speed and resistance of train, 664 ; effect of acceleration or retardation, 
664; calculated resistance of train, and mean speed, 667; explanation 



E 145 

ExPKESs Locomotives. Disou?sion, 1898 (continued) : — 

of apparent anomalies, 668 ; relation between speed and train resistance, 

069. 
ExTON, G. G., elected Member, 1890, 298. 
Eyebs, C, elected Graduate, 1900, 4. 



Faikfield Shipbuilding and Engineering "Works, Govan, Glasgow, 1895, 462, 

502. 
Faibholme, Capt. C, R.N., decease, 1892, 4.— Memoir, 1891, 473. 

Compounding of Locomotives, 1890, 84, 85. 
Faiblet, F., elected Associate Member, 1899, 145. 
Falconer, E. A., elected Graduate, 1900, 183. 

Falls Foundry and Engineering Works, Belfast, 1888, 430 : —1896, 443. 
Fans, Ventilating, 1897, 439. See Propeller Ventilating Fans. 
Faulkner, V., elected Graduate, 1900, 183. 
Faube-Sellon-Volkmae Electric Accumulators, 1885, 395. 
Fauvel, C. J., elected Associate, 1892, 102. 
Favell, T. M., elected 3Iember, 1900, 1. 

Fawcett Gas Engine, 1889, 531, 535, 536, 537. See Gas Engines. 
Fawcett, p. W., elected Associate Member, 1895, 150. 
Fawcett, T. C, decease, 1900, 6. 

Fawcett, Pbeston, and Co., Phcenix Foundry, Liverpool, 1891, 446. 
Fay and Co., J. G., Nortbam Yacht and Shipbuilding Yard, Southampton, 1892, 

369, 388. 
Feak, W. M., E.N., elected Member, 1900, 355. 
Feabfield, J. P., decease, 1893, 4. — Memoir, 1892, 98. 

Compound Steam Turbine, 1888, 508. 

Electric Engineering, 1888, 107, 111. 

Electric Lighting, Private, 1885, 399. 
Feather, R., elected Associate, 1900, 97. 
Featherstone, W. B., elected Member, 1888, 268. 
February Meeting, Business. 1900, 93. 
Feed- Water :Measurement, 1889, 238, 241, 258, 284, 291, 292, 296, 306. See 

Marine-Engine Trials. 
Feetham, M., elected Member, 1899, 473. 
Felt Hat Manufactories, Bury, 1894, 406, 447. 
Fendick, W., elected Associate Member, 1894, 294. 
Fenton, J., decease, 1894, 4.— Memoir, 1893, 493. 

K 



146 P 

Fenwick, J., elected Member, 1892, 102. 

Fergusox, J., Roller Flour Milling, 1889, ITS. 

Ferguson, Y. B., elected Graduate, 1895, 32S. 

Ferguson, W. D., elected Member. 1896, 101. 

Ferranti, S. Z. de, elected Member, 1900, 182. 

Festiniog Narrow-Gauge Light Eaii.way. 1898, 380, 395. 

Fforde, "W. J., elected Associate Meu.ber, 1896, 279. 

FiEGEHEX. E. G., elected Graduate, 1896, 463:— elected Associate Member, 

1900, 182. 
Field, H., elected Member, 1888, 159. 
Fielding, J., Gas-Engiue Research, 1898, 265. 
Portable Pneumitic Tools. 1900, 159. 
Spherical Engine, 1885, 114. 
Filters for Water at Southampton, 1893, CO. See Southampton Water 

Works. 
Finished Iron, 1893, 242. See Cleveland Industries. 
FiNLAYSON, D., elected Associate Member, 1894, 470. 
FiNLATSON, F., elected Member, 1891, 480. 

Fire-box Plates, Locomotive. 1893, 139. See Copper Fire-box Plates. 
Fire Brigade, Belfast, 1896, 402, 431.— Manchester, 1894, 404, 413. 
Fire-Grate with Movable Bars, 1890, 115. See Coal Burning on Cape 

Railways. 
Fire Rir^K attending Electric Lighting, 1893, 402. 417. See Lighting of 
Workshops. 

Firth, A., elected Member, 1899, 292. 

Firth, G. H., elected Member, 1891, 19G. 

Firth, J., elected Associate Member, 1896, 279. 

Firth, AV., elected Member, 1887, 1.— Decease. 1893, 4.— Memoir, 1892, 404. 

Fischer, G. J., elected Member, 1888, 444. 

Fish, S. R., elected Member, 1897, 256. 

Fisher, H., elected Associate, 1886, 2. 

Fisher, H. B., elected Member, 1889, 1. 

Fisher, J., Flax Dressing Machinery, 1896, 298. 

Fisher, P., elected Member, 1897, 143. 

FiTTON, J., elected Member, 1885, 462. 

Fitts Condenser, 1899, 231, 232. See Evaporative Condensers. 

FiTZALAN Steel Works, Sheffield, 1890, 442, 449. 

Fitz-Gebald, J. F. G., elected Associate Member, 1894, 294. 

FitzGerald, M. F., elected Member, 1888, 444. 

FitzHebbert, a. H. F., elected Associate Jleniber, 1£00, 1S2. 

Five- Wire and Three- Wire Distribution of Electric Current, 1894, 298, 309. 
See Electric Lighting Works : and Polyphase Electric Traction. 



147 



Flannery, Sir J. F., Knighthood, 1900, 5. 
By-laws, 1891, 32. 44. 

Hydraulic Buflfer-Stop, 1886, 115. 

Flax Dressikg Machinery, Pajxr on Flax Scutching and Flax Hackling 
Machinery, by J. Homer, 1896, 2S3. — Preliminary operations, 283. — 
Scutching, by revolving beaters, 283 ; addition of fluted rollers, 285. — 
Hackling; roughing, machine-hackling, sorting, 286. — Hackling machine; 
sheets of hackles, 2SG ; holders of flax, 287. — Removal of tow. 288. — 
Stripper rods, 288. — Brushes and doflers ; qualities of flax. 289. — Stripper- 
rod machines, single and duplex ; brush and doffer machines, 290. — 
Hackles, 290 ; number, length, pitch, 291 ; number of pins per inch, 
length of pins, 292; size of wire for pins, number of rows of pins, 
grouping, 293. — Speeds of channels aud of hackles ; size of stricks of 
flax, 291. — Ending machine for removal of naps; sorting of dressed flax. 295. 
Discust^ion. — Horner, J., Exhibited flax in successive stages of 
treatment, and specimens of bottomless rollers and tools, and portions of 
hackling machine, 295. — Walker, M. H., Flax scutching abroad and in 
Ireland, 296. — Erskine, J., Improvements in flax dressing machinery, 
296. — Pirrie, J. B., Need of further improvement, 298. — Fisher, J.. 
Methods of scutching and hackling, 298. — Dronsfield, W., Hackle pins. 
299. — Dobson, B. A., Cotton ginning, 299. — Donkin, B., Power and speed 
and number of machines, 300. — Horner, J., Scutching of flax, 300 ; loss 
through improper scutching. 301 ; hackle pins ; cotton ginning in 
America ; driving power required for hackling machine, 302 ; number of 
hackling machines and spindles in Ireland, 303. 

Flax Spinning and Weaving Works, Belfast, 1888, 420 : 1896, 439, 446, 454, 
457.— Bessbrook, 1888, 415. 

Fleischer. P., elected Associate Member, 1895, 150. 

Flemlng and Ferguson, Phoenix Ship- Yard and Engine Works. Paisley. 1896, 
524. 

Fletcher, D. H., decease. 1885, 4 : — Memoir, 72. 

Fletcher, E. (Manchester), elected Member, 1885, 163.— Decease. 1888, 3.— 
Memoir, 1887, 467. 

Fletcher, E. (Newcastle-on-Tyne), decease, 1890, 3. — Memoir, 1889, 748. 

Fletcher, G., decease, 1898, 6.— ^Memoir, 1897, 134. 

Fletcher and Co., George, Masson and Atlas Works, Derby, 1898, 481. 

Fletcher, G. M., elected Graduate, 1899, 294.— Decease, 1901, 7. 

Fletcher, H., decease, 1896, 4. — Memoir, 1895, 533. 

Fletcher, H. A., decease, 1885, 4. — Memoir, 1884, 472. 

Fletcher, H. C, elected Associate Member, 1898, 143. 

Fletcher, J. E., elected Graduate, 1892, 2 : — transferred to Associate Member, 
1895, 4. 

K 2 



148 



Fletcher, L. E., decease, 1898, 0.— Memoir, 1897, lo4. 
Mariue-Engine Trials, 1890, 256. 
Steam Superheating. 1896, 211. 
Fletcher. W., elected Member, 1898, 54C. 
Fletcher, W. and T., Lace Factory, Derby, 1898, 485. 
Flexible Shafts, 1887, 74. 76, 77, 81, 82. See Portable Hydraulic Drill. 
Flint, L. R., elected Associate Member, 1899, 145. 

Floating Bridge, Paper on the new Floating Bridge between Portsmouth and 
Gosport, by H. G. Harris, 1882, o44. — Crossing rivers, 344. — Opening 
bridges, 344. — Ferries, 344. — Tunnels, &c., 345. — Floating bridges, 345 ; 
advantages and disadvantage, 346. — Torpoint floating bridge, 346. — Nile 
floating bridge, 347. — St. Malo traversing bridge, 347. — Portsmouth 
floating bridge, 348 ; gearing and engines, 349 ; chains, 349 ; electric 
lighting, 3;30: water-tight bulkheads, 351 ; distance traversed, &c., 351. 

mscusgion.—Harns, H. G., Towing of new bridge fiora Preston, 352. — 
Pink, Sir W., Approaches to bridge, 352. — Harris, H. G., Improvement of 
approaches, 353. 
Floating Hospital in River Tees, 1893, 325, 366. 
Floor-Cloth and LiNOLEiM WoRKS, Kirkcaldy. 1887, 437. 451. 
Flour ISIills, Dublin, 1888, 404-10.— Lucan, 1888. 414.— Rio de Janeiro, 1889, 

151 : see Roller Flour Milling.— Thornaby, 1883, 367. 
FLorR Milling, Roller, 1889, 148. See Roller Flour Milling. 
Floi:r-Milling Machinery Works, Thomas Robinson and Son, Rochdale, 1894, 

406, 44S. 
Flower, J. J. A., decease, 1889, 3. 

FLriD-PRESSVRE REVERSING Gear, Paper on a Fluid-Pressure Reversing Gear 
for Locomotive Engines, bj' D. Joy, 1894, 252. — Single-eccentric valve-gear, 
252. — Principle of fluid-pressure reversing gear ; eccentric shifted across 
axle by pressure of fluid from reversing cylinder on footi)late of locomotive, 
253. — Details of construction ; eccentric, and fluid passages, 254. — 
Coupling of two eccentrics at right angles, 255. — Reversing cylinder, 
256. — Principles and advantages of plan, 256. 

Discussion. — Joy, D., -Packings; model of gear, 258; fluid used; 
application to marine engines ; eflect of accidental failure, 259. — 
Richards, L., A'ariatiem of lead with throw of eccentric, 260. — Joy, D., 
Even lead for all grades of expansion, 260. — Riches, T. H., Application 
to engines with outside cylinders and coupling rods, 260 ; eflect of 
leakage, 261. — Cawley, G., Friction of eccentrics, 261. — Davey, H., Shifting 
eccentric for marine engines, 261 ; leakage of pressure ; composition of 
fluid; packing, 262; expansion of fluid, 2C3.— Sampson, J. L., Freezing 
of fluid, 203. — Schonheyder, W., Simplicity of gear, 263; position of gear; 
shifting of three eccentrics, 264 ; packing at end of axle, 265. — Edwards, F., 



p 149 

FLriD-PRESsuRE ReversinTt Gear, Discussion, 1894 (continued) :— { 

Application to marine engines, 2G5 ; leakage of oil from built-np sliafts, 
266.— Stone, S., Dri\ing of eccentrics, 2GG.— Cowper, C. E., Asbestos for 
packing, 267.— Young, G. S., Diameter of eccentric, 2G7.— Joy, B. H., 
First form of fluid-pressure gear ; duration of packing ; even lead in all 
grades ; asbe&tos packing, 2G8 ; adjustment of gear for marine engines, 
269.— Joy, D., Locomotives witli outside cylinders or coupling rods; 
prevention of leakage, 260 ; reversing cylinder ; expedients in event of 
breakdown, 270; driving of eccentrics; distilled water; metallic and 
asbestos packing ; freezingof fluid, 271 ; position of eccentrics; adjustment 
of gear in marine engines, 272; shifting of third eccentric, 273.— 
Edwards, F., Regulation of cut-off in three cylinders, 273.— Joy, D., 
Independent adjustment of each eccentric, 273 ; aft stuffing-box ; size of 
eccentrics, 275.— Head, J., Height of locomotive boiler, 275. — Joy, D., 
Boiler not raised, 275. 
Fluted Carbons for Electric Light, 1887, 362. 
FocKEN, C. F., elected Member, 1892, 414. 
Fogertt, R., Roller Flour Milling, 1889, 164, 166, 167. 
Fogg, R., decease, 1898, 6.— Memoir, 1897, 233. 
Foley, N., elected Member, 1887, 157. 
FoLGER, W. M., elected Member. 1886, 465. 
Food Preservation by Cold, 1886, 232, 242, 251, 256, 258. -See Refrigerating 

Machinery. 
FooTNER, H., elected Member, 1899, 292. 
Forbes, G., Compound Steam Turbine, 1888, 504. 

Spherical Engine, 1885, 109. 
Forbes, G. C, elected Associate Member, 1895, 150. 
Forbes, P. A., elected Member, 1892, 229. 
Forced Combustion, 1886, 380, 395, 489, 498, 499. See Compound Locomotives 

in Russia ; and Triple-Expansion Engines. 
Forced Draught, 1891, 203, 307:-in s.s. "Meteor," 1889, 247,248,288,290, 

304. 5ee Marine Engineering ; and Marine-Engine Trials. 
Ford, T. W., elected Member, 1899, 144. 
FoRD-MooRE, A. P., elected Member, 1899, 144. 
Forge, Mersey, Liverpool, 1891, 449.— Clay, Inman, and Co., Birkenhead, 1891, 

453. 
Forcings in Iron and Steel, 1885, 328. See Address of President, Jeremiah Head. 
Forging, Hydraulic, 1893, 250. 
Forging Presses, Hydraulic, 1887, 181. See Address of President, Edward H. 

Carbutt. 
Forging-Press Cylinder, Hydraulic, 1895, 450. 
FoRMAN and Sons, Printing Works, Nottingham, 1898, 518. 



160 P 

Forrest, H. S., elected Member, 1892, 2. 

Forrest. J., Presentation of Testimonial from the Institution, 1897, 281, 431. 

FoRSTER, A. L., elected Member, 1888, 159. 

FoRSTER, E., decease, 1888, 3 : — Memoir, 104. 

Forster, E. J., elected Member, 1888, 268. 

Fort CrsiBERLAND, Portsmouth, Hydro-Pneumatic Disappearing Gun. 1892, 
367. 

Forth Bridge, Paper on the Structure and Progress of the Forth Bridge, by 
E. M. "Wood, 1887, 287. — Site, and previous proposal of suspension bridge, 
287. — Present plan, steel bridge on cantilever and central-girder system, 
288. — General dimensions, 288 : cross sections of main spans, 289. — Load, 
and wind pressure, 280. — Forms of parts. 2ii0. — Masonry, 200. — Steel, 291. 
— "Work started, 291. — ^laterials, 202. — Shop practice, 292. — Founding 
piers, 204. — Caissons, 294. — Recovery of canted caisson, 296. — Men 
employed, 296. — Raising viaduct girders, 296. — Erecting steel work over 
main piers, 297. — Erecting cantilevers, 299. 

Discussion. — "Wood, E. M., Exhibited photographs and specimens, 300. 
— Carbutt, E. H., Magnitude of bridge in comparisun with otiicr bridges, 
300; mode of carrying out the work, 301. — Tweeddale, ^larquess of, 
DifiBculties lie in details of construction, 302. — Adamson, D., Composition 
of steel employed, and percentage of alloy, 302 ; tensile strength, 303 ; 
effect of variation in temperature on structure of bridge, 304 ; effect of wind 
pressure, 30."). — Head, J., Reconstruction of old Sunderland bridge, 306 ; 
allowance for expansion and for wind pressure, 306. — ]SIartcn. E. B., 
"Warping of roadway from unequal expansion, 306 ; filling up of caissons, 
306 ; yielding of pier under load, 307. — Strype, "W. G., Expansion in 
concrete breakwater, 307. — Cochrane, C, Expansion in Westminster, 
Brooklyn, and Forth bridges, 307. — Cawley. G., Japanese principle of 
bridge, 308. — Tweeddale, Marquess of. Bridge over the Sutlej, 309. — 
Davey, H., Japanese cantilever bridges, 309. — Wood, E. M., Cantilever 
principle in Forth biidge, 309 ; allowance for expansion, 310 ; wind 
pressure, 310; warping, 310; filling of caissons, 311 ; no subsidence of 
piers, 311. — Adamson, D., Effect of increased temperature, 311. 

Forth Bridge, 1889, 215, 217. See Address of President, Charles Cochrane. 

Forth Bridge Machinery, Paper on the Machinery employed at the Forth 
Bridge Works, by W. AitoI, 1887, 312.— Hydraulic bending and setting 
machinery, 312. — Planing machincrj% 313. — Drilling machinery, 314. — 
Erecting and riveting machinery, 315; column-riveting machines, 316; 
erectioQ of large piers, 316. 

Discussion. — Smith, W. F., Ingenious character of the machinery, 317. 
— Piatt, J., Application of machinery in place of hand work, 817. — 
Barrow, J., Speed of drilling, and velocity of endless driving rope, 317 ; 



F 151 

F<jKTH Bkidge Machixekt, Di':ciis?ion (continued) : — 

with Ira wing motion for drills, 318. — Adamson, D., Desirability of drilling 
instead of punching. 31S : force required for closing rivets of different 
diameters. 31S. — Brown. A. B.. Portable tools for bridge work, 319 ; 
objection to leather packings in hydraulic machines, 319. — Cochrane, C, 
Distribution of water-pressure, 319. — Hall, W. S., Power required for 
bending plates, 319 ; Riches, T. H., Adjustment of column-riveting 
machines, 319 ; higher pressure for riveting thicker plates, 320. — Appleby, 
C. J., Similar appliances advantageous elsewhere, 320. —Walker, B., 
Adaptability of machinery described, 320. — ^Arrol, W., Speed and duration 
and length of driving ropes, 320 ; power required for riveting iron and 
steel rivets, 321 ; rivet-heating furnaces, 321 ; packings of hydraulic 
machines, 321 ; distribution of water-pressure, 321 ; steam accumulator 
for sinking caissons, 321 ; bending of plates, 322 ; adjustment of column- 
riveting machines, 322. — Carbutt, E. H., Difterence in cost of rirettng, 
322.— Arrol, AV., Very little difference, 322. 

Forth Bbidge "Works, 1887, 435. 

Forward, E. A., elected Graduate, 1900, 356. 

Forward Gas Ekgixe. 1883, 527, 531-5. See Gas Engines. 

Foster. A. L. X., Watch Screws, 1894, 499. 

Foster, Dr. C. L. X.. Lake Superior Copper Mining. 1837, 109. 
Rock Drills, 1891, 162. 

Foster. E. H. (Paris), elected Member, 1839, 340. 

Foster, E. H. (Bradford), elected Associate Member, 1835, 328. 

Foster, F., elected Member. 1886, 270.— Decease, 1834, 4.— Memoir. 1893, 493. 

Foster, G., elected Associate, 1891, 197. 

Foster, H. A., elected Member, 1889, 204. 

Foster, J., elected Member, 1883, 1. 

Foster, S., elected Graduate, 1897, 2. 

Foster, T. S., Mayor of Portsmouth. "Welcome to Members at Summer meeting, 
Portsmouth. 1892, 227. 

Foster and Co.. "William, "Wellington Foimdry atd Xew Machine-"Works, 
Liucjln, 1885, 434, 444. 

FoTHEKGaL, J. R., Drying in "^'acuum. 1889, 324. 

Marine-Engine Trials. 1883, 2S2. 2S9 :— 1891, 224, 238, 272. 

FocLis, "W., Hydraulic Gas-Stoking, 1835, 341, 352. 

ForsDLixG Hospital, London, new Sanitary Works, 1886, 425. 

ForsDRiES. — See also Engine Works; and Shipbuilding Works; and Works 
visite<l at Summer meetings. 
Belfast. 1888, 430 :— 1896, 441, 443, 452. 
Derby, 1898, 481, 482, 483, 4S7, 491, 494, 495. 
Dundee, 1887, 453-4. 
Glasgow. 1895, 492. 498, 500, 527. 



152 P 

Foundries (continued) : — 
Lincoln, 1885, 444. 
Liverpool, 1891, 446. 
Manchester, 1894, 427, 436. 
Plymouth, 1899, 457. 

Steel, 1893, 'l'}'!. See Cleveland Industries. 
Thornahy, 1893, 364. 

FouBNT, H. F., elected IMember, 1885, 163. 

FowLEB, A. F., elected Member, 1900, S.'iS. 

Fowler. H., elected Associate Member, 1896, •.:71» :— transferred to Member 
1898, 5. 
Eoad Locomotion, 1900, 279. 

Fowler, Sir J., Bart., K.C.M.G., decease, 1899, 2. 7-8:— Memoir. 128. 

Fowler, P. M., elected Associate Member, 1898, 2. 

Fowler, K. H., elected Member, 1894, 2;i3. 

Fowler, W. H., elected Member, 1885, I. 

Fox, B. H., elected Graduate, 1897, 2. 

Fox, C. H., elected Member, 1900, 2. 

Fox, F. J., elected Graduate, 1893, 392 :— elected Associate ]Member, 1899, 474. 

Fox, H. S., elected Associate Member, 1899, 14.J. 

Fox, W., decease, 1892, 4.— Memoir, 1891, 191. 

Frager Water Metkr, 1900, 49, So. See Water Meters. 

Francis, G. I., Electric Lighting Works. 1894, 306. 

Francis, H., Water dieters, 1900, 78. 

Franckex, W. a., elected Member, 1888, 159. 

Fbanki, J. P.. elected Member, 1885, 462. 

Fraser, E. H., Mayor of Nottingham, at Institution Dinner, Derby. 1898, 459. 

Fraser, F. H., elected Associate IMember. 1896, 279. 

Fraser, H.. Evaporative Condensers, 1899, 2.">1. 

Fraser, P., elected Member, 1899, 144. 

Eraser, W. S., elected Graduate, 1898, 144. 

Fkeei CM of Borough of Devonport presented to the President. Sir W. H. White 
K.C.B., 1899, 439. 

Freeman, W. W., elected Associate Member. 1899, 293. 

Freezing Mixtures, 1886, 239-40. See Refrigf rating Machinery. 

French, A. H.. elected Associate Member. 1899, 293. 

French Locomotive Practice. Paper on Recent Locomotive Practice in France, 
by E. Sauvage, 1€00, 375. — Description of different types of French 
locomotives for express and slow trains, 375. — Recent increase in 
dimensions and boiler pressure, 376. — Information concerning the seven 
great railways of France, 377. — Compound locomotives with four 
cjlinders, 377. — Walschaert valve-gear, 379. — Other locomotives, 382 



p 153 

Fkesch Locomotive Practice, Paper, 1900 (continued) :— 

simple locomotives for high speed, 383; simple locomotives with three 
and four-coupled axles, 385; tank locomotives, 385.— Details of 
construction, 387.— References, 390.— International abbreviations for 
Metric Units, 393.— Tabulated summary of four-cylinder compound 
locomotives with two driving-axles. 398; with three and four driving- 
axles, 399.— Principal dimensions of four-cylinder compound locomotives 
with two driving-axles, 400 ; with three driving-axles, 404 ; with four 
driving-axles, 406. 

Difcussion.-Asinnall J. A. F., Compound locomotives for heavy 
ong-distance trains; saving of coal effected by compounding, 408; 
Atlantic type engines with steam-jacketed cylinders. 409 ; arrangement 
of steam superheaters, 410; and of steam-jacketed cylinders, 411.— . 
Ivatt. H. A., Size of boilers, 412; comparison of cost of repairs on 
compound and non-compound locomotives, 413.— Breckeiiridge, L. P.. 
Railway test-car. 413; "Serve" tube, feed-water and scale on pipes. 
414 ; exhaust-tip, 415.— Donkin, B., Economy of compound over non- 
compound locomotive, 416.— Malcolm, B., Success of compound two- 
cylinder engines, 416; Walschaert valve-gear, 417.— Eiekie, J., Increase 
in cylinder capacity, 417; ratio of cylinder area, 418. — Warren. 
W. H., Trials of English and American locomotives in Australia, 410. 
— Schonheyder, W., Capacity of compound engine measured by capacity 
of low-pressure cylinder, 420.— Lineham, W. J., Economy from use of 
drop-valves, 421.— Darbisliire, .J. E., Trials of engines in Australia, 421 ; 
compound engines for hill climbiug with heavy train, 422.— Twinberrow, 
.J. D., Self-balancing of reciprocating parts, 423; lubrication under 
pressure, 424.— Saxon, A.. Application of electricity to locomotives, 42.-J. 
— Sauvage, E., Coal consumption, 425 ; compound engines for suburban 
trains, 426 ; steam-pressure, 427 ; size of cylinders ; balancing of engines ; 
tank engines, 42S.-Martin, E. P., Thanks to author, 428.— Drummond, 
D., Comparison of two systems ; economy in coal consumption, 429.— 
.Joy, D., Success of compounding on marine engines. 429.— Sauvage, E., 
Premiums allowed for coal economy, 430 ; economy of fuel in compound 
engines, 432 ; comparison of compound locomotives and marine engines, 
432. 
Fkench Railway Works. 1889, 542. 548, 549, 569. 
Fkenzel, a. B., elected ::Member, 1888, 1. 
Fberichs, J. A., elected Associate Member, 1897, A33. 

FEiCTioy Brake, cooled by water, 1886, 369, 378. See Compound Locomotives. 
Friction, Second Eeport on Friction Experiments, by B. Tower, 1885, 58.— 
Experiments on the oil pressure in a bearing, 58.— Experimental bearing 
and brass, 58.— Arrangement of oil holes in brass, 58.— Oil pressure at 



164 P 

Friction, Second Report, 1885 (continued) : — 

difl'erent points of bearing, 59. — Experiments on friction at low speed, 
GO. — Diagrams illustrating experiments, 61. 

Discussion. — Tomlinson, J., Lubrication from bottom instead of from 
top of bearing, 63 ; advantage of perfect lubrication by immersion in 
butli, 63. — Tower, B., Actual oil pressure between brass and journal, 64 ; 
possibility of lubrication obviating altogether metallic friction and wear 
and tear, 64. — Cochrane, C, Lubricating journals of railway axles from 
underside, 04. — Robinson, J., Avoidance of actual metallic contact, 64. — 
Adiimson, D., Lubricating journals under heavy pressures by force-pump 
supplying oil, 65. — Schonbeyder, W., Continuation of friction experiments 
with heavier loads, 6(j ; difierence between continuous and iiitc-rmittent 
load, 66. — ^Reynolds, E., Rubbing surfaces should not be too well-fitting 
for high speeds, 67. — Richards, G., Life of oil used for lubrication, 68; 
experioaents by Mr. Isherwood, 68. — Tomlinson, J., Life of oil in railway 
axles, 68. — Head, J., Hanging bearings are not the most frequent, 68 ; 
value of present investigations, 6'J ; Morin's experiments, 60 ; importance 
of lubricating by bath of oil below tlie bearing, 69 ; use of force-pump 
for supplying oil into bearings, 63. — I'agct, A., Vote of thanks to 
Mr. Tomlinson, 70. 

Friction Experiments, Third Beporl of the Research Committee on Friction ; 
Experiments on the Friction of a Collar Bearing, 1888, 173. — Description 
of apparatus, 173, — Measurement of pressure of annular bi-aring surface, 
174. — Lubrication, 175. — Results of experiments, 176. — General 
conclusions : inferiority of collar bearing to cylindrical journal in power 
of carrying weight; higher coeflScient of friction, due to less perfect 
lubrication of collar bearing; friction independent of speed, but 
diminishing somewhat as load increases, 177. — Tabulated results of 
experiments, 178-9. 

Discussion. — Carbutt, E. H., Further experiments contemplated, 180. — 
Turnbull, A., Irregularity of increase in friction due to increase in load, 
180; objection to experimental apparatus, 181; modification proposed, 
182. — Tomlinson, J., Difficulty of lubricating collar bearing, 182 ; 
lubrication is real measure of friction, 183 ; irregularities in results, 183; 
further experiments on pivot bearings, 183 ; diflBculty attending long 
range of load, 183. — Smith, W. F., Quality of metal surfaces in contact, 
183; bearings with loose hardened washers, 184; footstep bearing, 184; 
drilling-machine spindle, 18.5 ; end thrust of horizontal shaft, 185 ; soft 
steel unsuitable for shaft journals, 185. — Unwin, \V. C, Dependence of 
friction on temperature, 186; rate of lubrication varies with speed, 186; 
law of coefficient of friction, 186. — Schonheyder, W., Inferiority of collar 
bearing to cylindrical journal, 187 ; cooling of bearing with water, 187 



p 155 

Friction Experiments. Third Report, 1888 {Di^cmgion. continued): — 

use of abundance of oil. 187.— Barr, A., Theory of friction and lubrication 
in cylindrical bearing. 187; suggestion for form of bearing surfaces in 
end thrust bearings, 188; means of altering pressure in experimental 
apparatus during experiment, 188 ; re-plotting of diagram of results, 
189.— Greig. D.. Necessity for admitting air to bearing. 189.— Wicksteed, 
J. H., Uniformity of spiral spring. 189 ; comparison of pressure carried 
by collar bearing and cylindrical journal. 190 ; instances of thrust collars 
AYorking at higher pressures. 190 ; drill spindle with loose hardened 
washer, 190 ; pressure on thrust collar of screw displacer in lever 
testing-machine, 191 ; further experiments on lubrication of thrust 
bearings. 192; hardness of material for bearing surfaces, 192. — 
Scott-Moncrieff, W. D.. Amount of lubrication, 192; different effect of 
speed with vegetable and with mineral oil, 193. — Smith, M. H., Efftct 
of loose washers in equalising pressure over surfaces of thrust bearings, 
193; thrust collars with inclined bearing faces, 195; circulation of oil in 
collar bearings, 195 ; mode of action of oil in lubricating bearings, 196 ; 
roller bearings, 196.^Adamson, D., Character of bearing surfaces and 
lubricant, 196; mode of lubricating collar bearing and footstep bearing, 
197 ; journals of heavy horizontal shafts, 198.— Paget, A., Reduce friction 
of bearings to friction of solids in liquids, 198 ; discrepancies in pressures 
carried by different bearings, 199 ; effect of vibration in reducing friction, 
199.— 3Iair, J. G., Diflaculty of lubricating in experimental apparatus, 

199 ; intended experiments on pivot bearings, 200 ; quality of metal in 
rubbing surfaces, 200.— Tower, B., Regularity in results of experiments, 

200 ; amount of lubrication, 201 ; design of experimental apparatus, 201 ; 
accuracy of measurement, 201 ; range of experiments, 202; heat generated 
is true limit to load on bearing, 202 ; friction independent of speed, 202 ; 
use of water for cooling bearings, 202 ; design for varying load during 
experiment, 203; ventilation of bearing, 203; small load carried by 
collar bearing, 203; quantity of lubrication, and difference between 
vegetable and mineral oils, 201 ; roller bearings, 201 ; force-pump for 
supplying oil to footstep bearings, 201 ; friction of bearings should 
approximate towards that of liquids, 204. 

Friction Experiments, Fourth Report of the Research Committee on Friction ; 
Experiments on the Friction of a Pivot Bearing, 1891, 111.— Description 
of apparatus, 111.— Lubrication, 112.— Results of experiments, 113. — 
Cieneral conclusions : — automatic lubrication of pivot bearing ; tingle 
diametrical groove best for distributing oil to bearing; low coefficient 
of friction, 116. 

Discussion. — Wicksteed, J. H., Lubrication of hydraulic ram, 117; 
pressure causing seizing, 118 ; advantage of loose revolving discs, 118. — 



156 F 

Friction Experiments, Fourth lieport, 1891 (Dhcu^i'ion, continued) : — 1 

Wilson, J. v., EflFect of temperature upon coefficient of friction, 120 ; 
viscosity of oil, 120. — Kennedy, A. B. W., Greater coefficient of friction 
at slower speeds, 121: cause of diflFerences in coefficients, 122; footstep 
bearings carry only small load, 122 ; insertion of loose discs, 122 ; centre 
of pressure in footstep bearing. 122; grooves for lubrication, 124. — 
Schonlieyder, W., Footstep bearing similar to cross-head slide-block, 124 ; 
mode of lubrication, 125; insertion of loose discs, 125; coefficient of 
friction, 125. — Davey, H., Load carried by lathe centres, 126. — 
Sampson, J. L., Lubrication without oil grooves, 126; wear of footstep 
bearing, 127.— Lockhart, W. S., Flat surface for pivot bearing, 127 ; 
hemispherical pivot upon flat bearing surface, 127; lubrication without 
oil grooves, 128. — Cawlcy. G., Limit of self-lubricating action, 128. — 
Walker, B., Forced lubricition under heavy pressures, 128 : lubrication 
of lathe centres, 129 ; conical footstep for pivot bearing, 130 ; bearings for 
blowing fans, 130. — Dolby, E. E.. Wear of rubbing surfaces in pivot 
bearing, 131 ; Schiele anti-friction curve, 131. — Tower. B., Leakage of 
oil past hydraulic ram, 1:51; footstep bearing with loose discs, 132; 
coefficient of friction affected by speed, 132; small load carried by collar 
bearing, 133; slow speed of lathe centres, 133; effect of temperature on 
lubrication, 133 ; wear and pressure on bearings, 134 ; oil groove essential 
for lubrication, 134 ; duration of experiments, 134 ; hemispherical footstep 
unsatisfactory, 135 ; lubricating action of pivot bearing, 135; wear of 
rubbing surfaces, 135. — Cochrane, C, Friction of conical centre point, 
136. — Tower, B., Elimination of friction of centre point, 136. — Wicksteed, 
J. H., Eevolution of ram or of conical centre point, 136. — Tower, B., 
Friction of ram greater than of hard steel centre, 137. — Wicksteed, J. H., 
Action of multiple discs, 137.— Cawley, G., Loose discs reduce velocity 
137. — Tower, B., Only one pair of discs rubbing at a time, 138. — 
Tomlinson, J., Intermittent pressure favourable to lubrication. 138; 
friction means non-lubrication, 138; limit of pressure, 13'J; flat surface 
for pivot, 140 ; vote of thanks for experiments, 140. 

Friction, Research Committee, 1885, 5 :— 1886, 5 :— 1887, 5 :— 1888, 5 :— 1889, 
5 :— 1890, 6 :— 1891, 6 :— 1892, 6. 

Frictional Gearing, Paper on the Frictional Gearing used on a double Steam 
Dredger in the Port of Dublin, by J. P. Griffith. 1888, 363.— Steam 
dredger, 363.— Grooved frictional gearing, 363. — Duration, and cost of 
repairs, 364. — Wear and form of grooves, 365. — Substitution of spur 
gearing with brake-wlieels, 365. 

D/iScu.s.si'on.— Carbutt, E. H., Durability of surfaces of grooved gearing, 
367.— Stoney, B. B., Efficiency of dredger with grooved frictional gearing 
and with brake gear, 367; putting in and out of gear, 307; action of 



P 157 

Frictional Gearing, Discission, 1888 (continued): — 

friction brake, 367. — Adamson, D., Velocities of frictional surfaces, 3t)S ; 
number of spokes in grooved wheels, 368 ; speed of spur gearing, 368 : 
substitution of brake for frictional clutch, 369 ; advantages of helical 
gearing, and direction of driving pressure on pinion teeth, 369. — Head, J., 
Trial of frictional gearing for three-high plate-rolls. 370. — Aspinall, 
J. A. F.. Grooved friction -wheels for driving a steel-ingot saw, 371. — 
GriflBtb, J. P., Grooved gearing originally intended for high speeds 
and low pressures, 371 ; recent adoption for new dredger, 371 ; radial 
pressure and driving adhesion, and angle of grooves, 372 ; saving effected 
by substitution of brake gear, 373. 

Frier, J. D., elected :\reniber, 1891, 196. 

Fripp, S., Jun , elected Associate Member, 1900, 182. 

Frodikgham Iros Industry, Paper on the Iron Industry of Frodingham, by 
G. Dove, 1885, 41 3. — List of blast furnaces, 413. — Sections of furnaces, 
413.— Ironstone bed, 414. — Analyses of iron made, 415. — Statistics of 
output, 415. — Fuel supply, 415. — Future of Frodingham ironfield, 416. — 
Analyses of section of ironstone bed, 417. 

Discussion. — Cochrane, C, Capacity of Lincolnshire blast-furnaces, 
418; use of charging bell, 418 ; coke consumption per ton of iron, 418; 
selection of stone, 419. — Dove, G., Use of charging bell, 419; coke 
consumption per ton of iron, 419 ; advantages of open-topped furnaces, 
419 ; fuel supply, 420. — Head. J., Interest of paper for excursion to 
Frodingham, 421. — Visit to ironworks and ironstone pits, 436. 

Frodingham Ircn Works, 1885, 413-21, 436. 

Frost Water Meter, 1900, 48, 79. See Water Meters. 

Frotide, R. E., Canal-Boat Propulsion, 1897, 208. 
Marine Horse-Power, 1896, 86. 
Propeller Ventilating Fans, 1897, 495. 
Screw-Propeller Surface, 1892, 535. 

Ship-Model Apparatus, Paper on the Experimental Apparatus and 
Shaping Machine for Ship Models at the Admiralty E.\periment 
Works, Haslar, 1893, 32.— Remarks thereon, 41, 45, 47, 49. 

Froude, E. H., Spherical Engine, 1885, 118. 

Frozen Avstralasian-Meat Store, 1900, 471. 

Fry, H. W., elected Graduate, 1894, 170. 

Fryer, T. J., elected Graduate, 1895, 2. 

FoEL, Petroleum Refuse as Fuel in Locomotive Engines, 1889, 36. See 
Petroleum Fuel in Locomotives. 

FuJii, T., elected Member, 1900, 96. 

FoLCHER, G. C, elected Associate Member, 1899, 145. — Decease, 1901, 7. 

Flller, C. F., elected Member, 1891, 2. 



158 F 

FuLLERToN, HoDGART, AND BARCLAY, Yulcan Works. Paislev, 1895, 526. 

Fulton, A. E. W., elected Member, 1886, 270.— Decease. 1890, :?. 

Fulton Engine Works, Liverpool, 1891, 450. 

Ftjrman, J. K., Eiffel Tower Lifts, 1889, 371, 375. 

Furnaces, Blast. See Blast Furnaces. 

Furnaces, Gas. ^ee Gas Furnaces. 

Furnaces, Petroleum, 1889. — Brass-Melting, 51. — Scrap-Welding, 49, 68. 73. 

78, 82. See Petroleum Fuel in Locomotives. 
FvRNESs, C, elected Associate Member, 1897, 144. 
Furness, E., decease. 1900, 6.— Memoir, 1899, 615. 

Propeller Ventilating Fans, 1897, 483. 

Steam Pumps, 1893, 4i:8. 
Fi'RNIVALL, W. H. G., elected Associate Member, 1900, 3. 

"Fusi Yama," Report upon trials of s.s. "Fusi Yama." 1890, 203. See Murine- 
Ensriue Trials. 



G 

Gapd, W., elected Member. 1890, 2',»8. 

Gadsby, C. H., Electric Traction. 1898, 110. 

Gaertner, E., elected :\Iember, 1887, 283. 

Gainsborough Works, 1885, 435, 449-53. 

Gale, J. M., Hydraulic Power Supply, 1895, 383. 

Gale. R. H., elected Graduate, 1895, 150 :— elected Associate Member, 1899, 4. 

Galle, W. A., elected Graduate, 1895, 2:— elected Associate Member, 1896, 102. 

Galloway, W., Coal Burning on Cape Railways, 1890, 117, 123, 125. 126, 127. 
Compounding of Locomotives, 1890, 8S. 

Galloways, Knott Mill Iron Works. Manchester, 1894, 416. 

Galton, Sir D., K.C.B., created Knight Commander of tlie Bath, 1888, 21.— 
Elected Member of Council, 1888, 30 : 1890, 26.— Appointed Vice- 
President, 1892, 23 ; elected Vice-President, 1893, 28 : 1896, 28 : 

1899, 28.— Decease, 1899, 147 : 1900, 6-7.— Memoir, 1899, 129. 
President's Address, 1898, 204. 

Secretary, vote of thanks on retirement, 1898, 36. 
Galvanizing and Corrugating Works, Middlesbrough, 1893, 341. 
Gandon, p. G., elected Graduate, 1899, 5. 
Gandy, F., elected Member, 1898, 516. 
Ganu, G. v., elected Associate Member, 1897, 433. 
Garbutt, H.. elected Associate Member, 1899, 474. — Decease. 1901, 7. — Memoir, 

1900, 625. 



159 



Garden Party by the Presiiknt, Samuel W. Johnson, at Nottingham Castle, 
1898, 461. 

Gardnek, W., elected Member, 1899, 3. 

Garland, F. J., elected Associate Member, 1900, 182. 

Garrard, C. K., elected ^Member, 1891, 300. 

Garrard, G. M., elected ^lember, 1899, 202. 

Garratt, H. a., elected Associate IMember. 1896, 462. 

Garratt, J. H., elected Associate Member, 1896, 279. 

Garrett, E., elected Associate Member, 1896, 279. 

Garrett, F., Throttling and Variable Expansion, 1895, 226. 

Garrett, F., Jun., elected Graduate, 1890, 299 :— transferred to Associate 
3Iember. 1898, 5. 

Garrett, H. A., Pajjer on Refuse Disposal, and the results obtained from a six 
months' working of the Itefuse Destructor at Torquay, 1899, 419. — 
Remarks thereon, 430, 436. 

Garrett, R., decease, 1885, 4. — Memoir, 1884, 4iio. 

Garvey, R. G. H., elected Associate Member, 1898, .")47. 

Garvie, J., elected Member, 1899, 292. 

Gas Engine, Research Committee, 1896, 7 :— 1897, 7 .—1898, 9:— 1899, 10:— 
1900, 9. 

Gas-Engine Research, First Report to the Gas-Engine Research Committee ; 
descriptiou of apparatus and methods, and preliminary results ; by F. W. 
Bursfall, 1898, 209. — Object of experiments, 209. — Conditions of working : 
compression, speed, ratio of air to gas, heat rejected through cylinder 
walls, 209. — Calibration of measuring instruments, 210. — Brake horse- 
power, 211. — Engine, 211. — Measurement of gas supply, 212 ; of air 
supply, 213; of heat rejected into water jacket of cylinder, 214. — Method 
of sampling exhaust gases, 215. — Measurement of indicated horse-power, 
216; causes of error, 217; rotary Wayne indicator, 218. — Measurement of 
indicator diagrams, 221. — Method of ignition, 222; electric spark tried 
unsuccessfully, 222 ; iron igniting tube heated by gas flame, with timing 
valve worked electrically, 223. — Other apparatus : rope brake, counter, 224. 
— ^Analyses of coal gas, 224. — Nature and classification of seventeen 
experiments, 225 ; tabulated summary of ditto, 226-7. — Previous 
experiments, and further tests iu progress, 228. — Gas-Engine Research 
Committee, 229. 

Discussion. — Kennedy, A. B. W., Measurements of temperature iu gas- 
engine tests, 230 ; aid and advice from the late James Piatt, 231 ; 
apparatus specially designed, 232 ; present experiments preliminary, 232 ; 
further experiments for complete heat balance, 233. — Burstall, F. W., 
Ratio of air to gas, determined by analysLs of exhaust gas, 233 ; economy 
of gas-engine under relative conditions, 233. — Clerk, D., Construction of 
* 



160 G 

Gas-Engike Eeseakch, First Report, 1898 {Di^cu^don, continued): — 

engine, port capacity, 23i ; compression Bpace, 285 ; cooling surface, lose 
by leakage, 23G; nature of explosive mixture, 237 ; want of uniformity in 
conditions, 238 ; ignition earlier or later, 238 ; change of speed, 239 ; 
electric ignition, or open-tube igniter, 2:>9 ; gradations of compression. 
2-iO. — Atkinson, J., lielutivesize of indicator and gas-engine cylinder, 240 ; 
leakage in A\ayne indicator, 24U ; rope brake, 241 ; ignition tubes of 
porcelain or of iron, 241 ; indicator diagram of fifty consecutive explosions, 
241 ; volume of coal gas per lb., 242 ; modified IJicbards indicator, 242. — 
Halpin, D., Ilotary indicator with torsion bar, 243. — liobinsoii, W., 
Additional data regarding tests, 24o ; value of record of failures, 244 ; 
analysis of indicator diagrams and other results, 244 ; change of one 
condition affects others, 246. — Longridge, M., Torsion indicator, 247. — 
Burslall, U. IJ. J., Aim of these experiments, 248 ; degree of accuracy, 
249; leakage through indicator and tiirough timing valve, 249 ; ratio of 
air to gas, determined by analysis of exhaust gas, 250. — Donkiii, B., Size 
of engine, 250; exhaust gas, 201; compression, 251 ; ratio of air to gas, 
and other results, 252 ; temperature of cylinder walls, 252 ; heating value 
of gas, 253 ; proporliou of water-jacketed surface, 2.53. — Boulvin, J., 
C!omi)Osition of exjilusive charge, 253. — Delamare-Deboutteville, E., 
Kesults desirable to be ascertained, 255.— iSlaby, A., Heating value of 
gas, 255. — AVitz, A.. Synthetic metliod preferable to analytical, 256. — 
Capper, D. S., Preliminary nature of tests, 257 ; ratio of air to gas, 258 ; 
indicator diagrams drawn upon smoked mica, 259.— Kennedy, A. B. W., 
Advantage of preliminary experiments, 259.— Burstall, F. W., Conditions 
affecting tests, -60; mode of increasing compression, 260; ratio of air to 
gas, 261 ; effect of compression upon economy, 261 ; leakage through 
indicator, 261 ; timing valve, 262; porcelain or iron ignition-tubes, 262 ; 
barometer, duration of tests, and calorimeter, 263 ; comparison of tests, 
263 ; calibration of indicator spring, 264 ; additional explanations, 
264.— Fielding. J., Governing gas-engines by regulating strength of 
charge, without cut-out, 265. — Burstall, F. "NV., Loss of economy 
with weaker charges, 266; electric ignition, 266; determination of 
heating value of gas, 266 ; governing by regulating strength of charge, 
267. 

Gas Engine 'Works, Paris, 1889, 542, 551. 

Gas Engines, Fuper on Gas Engines, with descrijjtion of the Simplex Engine, by 
E. Delamare-Deboutteville, 1889, 500.— Historical notice of previous gas 
engines, 500 ; Barber, 501 ; Street, 501 ; Barnett, 501 ; Reynolds, 502 ; 
Shepherd, 502; Barsauti and Matteucci, 502; Degrand, 503; Lenoir, 
503 ; Beau de Eochas, 503 ; four conditions, 504 ; four-stroke cycle, 505 ; 
Hugon, 505 ; Otto and Langen, 505 ; Bisschop, 506 ; Otto, 606 ; theory of 



G 163 

Gas Engines. Paper. 1889 (continued) :— 

stratification of charge in three layers, 50G.— Ignition in Otto engine by 
slide-valve, 507 ; in Lenoir by insulator and interruptor, 509 ; other 
methods, 510 ; Funck's ignition by red-hot tube, 510.— Simplex Engine, 
512.— Mode of ignition by electric spark, 512.— Gas mixing, 514.— 
Governing, 514 ; air governor, 515 ; pendulum governor, 516.— 
Various modes of starting, 517.— Working with petroleum vapour, 519; 
carburator, 521.— Engine trials. 521 ; short belt for driving dynamo by 
gas engine, 522.— Tests of consumption, 5-23.— Literature on gas engines, 

524. 

Discussion.— Graj, J. M., Driving dynamo with gas engine, 525 ; 
pendulum governor, 525.— Cochrane, C, Compression of explosive mixture 
525: ignition by electric spark. 526.— Smith. M. H.. Driving dynamo with 
gas engine, 526; ignition by electric spark, 52G ; Baldwin engine, 527; 
source of electricity in Simplex engine, 527 ; governing by dual control in 
Forward engine, 527 ; steadiness of running under varying load, 528.— 
Walker. W., Electric spark for ignition. 529.— Kennedy, A. B. W., 
Comparison of other gas engines with Simplex, 529 ; igniting tube, 529; 
governing. 529 ; indicator diagram with delayed ignition, 530 ; Lenoir 
engine, 530. — Maw, W. H., Gas engines with incandescent tube for 
ignition. 531.— Kapp, G., Oscillating dynamo for ignition, 531.— Shield, 
H.. Use of igniting tube, 531; starting of engine, 532. — Beaumont, 
W. W., Lenoir engines with battery, 532 ; advantages of igniting tubes, 
533._Cochrane, C, Variation in period of explosion, 533.— Beaumont, 
W. W., Position of incandescent part of tube, 533.— Head, J., IMixture of 
air and gas in dual mode of governing, 534.-Smith, M. H., Proportion of 
gas and air kept within Umit of explosiveness, 534.— Head, J., Waste from 
Tncomplete explosiveness, 534.- Smith, M. H., Proportion can be altered 
within given range, 535.— CocLrane, C, Begulation of gas and air, 535.— 
Smith, M. H., Mixture perfectly explosive through certain range, 535.— 
Kennedy, A. B. W., Combustion perfect through wide range, 535.— 
Cochrane, C, Dilution of mixture by air without waste of gas, 535.— 
Shaw, H. S. H., Economy of ignition tubes, 536.— Paget, A., Duration of 
tubes. 53G.— Shield. H., Ignition tubes in Fawcett engine, 536.— Cochrane, 
C, Thickness of tubes, 537.— Shaw, H. S. H., Particulars of tubes, 537.— 
Delamare-Deboutteville, E., Electrical ignition, 537 ; use of slide-valve 
instead of mushroom valve, 537 ; incandescent tubes, 538 ; electric battery 
and dynamo for Simplex engine, 538 ; discharge of burnt gases, 538 ; 
other gas engines, 539; driving dynamo with gas engine, 539.— 
Cochrane, C, Delaying of ignition. 539.— Delamare-Deboutteville, E., 
Economy resulting from delayed explosion, 539. — Cochrane, C, 
Consequence of diminished compression, 540.— Delamare-Deboutteville, 

L 



162 G 

Gas Engines, DtVcuss/on, 1889 (continued) :— 

E., Extent of compression. 540. — Coclirane. C. Earlier ignition with less 
compression, 540. — Powell, H. C. Advantage of over-compression and 
delayed explosion. .540. — Graj'. J. IM., Friction tlirouph dead arc, 541. 

Gas Engines for Belfast Electric Lighting, 1896, 308, 311, 315. 

Gas for Fuel. Paper on the Loomis process of making Gas for Fuel, by R. N. 
Oakman. Jun.. 1890, 402. — Apparatus employed : generator, vertical 
boiler, exhauster and engine, washer and gasholders. 402. — Two-fold 
operation ; production of generator or producer-gas, and of water-gas. 402. 
— Producer-gas. quality, value compared with coal, and applications, 403. 
— Water-gas. qiiality, applications, and quantity. 404. — Analyses of water- 
gas and producer-gas, 405. — Joint production of both gases. 405. — 
Economy of water-gas over coal or coke, 405. 

Discussion. — Arnold, J. O., Freedom from clinker. 406 ; calorific power 
of water-gas, 407; treatment of watch-springs, 407; odour of water- 
gas, 407 ; economy in melting steel, 407. — Lupton. A.. Firing of generator, 
408. — Howell, S. E., Application at tube works, 408. — Hoyle, J. E., 
Economy over coke-firing, 408 : application to Siemens furnace, 409 ; use 
of regenerators, 409. — Tomlinsou, J., Saving due to not letting heat down, 
409. — Hoyle. J. R., Economy in cost from using cheap small coal, 
409. — Hughes, G. D., Application to melting other metals, 410. — 
Lupton, A., Temperature of producer-gas, 410. — Aspinall, J. A. F., Use 
of producer-gas for melting brass, 410. — Cochrane. C, Cost, and duty of 
furnace, 411, — Head. John, Efficiency of water-gas and producer-gas, 411 ; 
rapidity and heat witli water-gas, 411. — Bell. Sir L., Solid and gaseous 
fuel, 412 ; production of hydrogen, 413 ; application of water-gas, 413 : 
treatment of watch-springs, 414 ; high temperatures. 414. — Oakman, R. N., 
Treatment of watch-springs, 414 ; odour of water-gas. 415 ; quantity of 
gas and heating power, 415 ; firing of generator. 415 ; distribution and 
delivery of gas. 415 ; economy in melting steel. 416 ; durability of furnace, 
416; application of water-gas, 4 16; freedom from clinker, 417. — Tomlinson, 
J., Furtlier experiments. 417. 

Gas Fubnaces, Paper on some different kinds of Gas Furnaces, by B. Dawson. 
1891, 47. — Development and applications of gas producers and reversing 
regenerative gas furnaces, 47. — Continuous regenerative furnaces without 
reversing, 48. — "Waste of heat by use of cold air. 48. — Insufficient 
temperature in chimney, and consequent failures, 49. — Gas furnaces with 
reversing regeneration, 50 ; for high temperatures. 51 ; Batho basic-steel 
furnace, 51 ; Siemens gas furnace with regenerators above ground, 52 ; 
Casson open-hearth steel - melting furnace, 52. — Gas furnaces with 
continuous regeneration for annealing, 53.^Nou-regenerative gas furnaces 
for low temperatures, 53. — Blow-pipe furnaces with forced blast, 54. — 



G 163 

Gas Furnaces, Paper. 1891 (continued) : — 

Successful applications, and failures, 55. — Gas furnaces for crucible steel. 
56. — Keversing valves, 57. — Re-beating furnaces for ingots, 5S. — 
Producer combined with furnace, 58; Siemens, Gorman, and Eadcliffe 
furnaces, 59 ; Boetius and Regnault glass furnaces, 60. — Gas furnaces for 
glass melting, tube welding, steel and brass melting, 60-2. — Water-gas 
furnaces, 02. — Ponsard revolving steel furnace. 63. — Pottery and brick 
kilns, 63. — Gas retorts, 64. — Gas furnaces compared with coal-fired 
furnaces, 64. — Gas furnaces used in chemical industries, 65. 

Disoussion. — Aspinall, J. A. F., Gas furnaces at Horwich works, 66 ; 
brass melting, 67 ; firing of Lancashire boilers by gas, 67 ; revolving 
Ramsbottom valve, 67 ; flow of gas through long distances, 68. — Dobson. 
B. A., Boilers fired by gas, GS. — Head, John, Picgenerative Siemens 
furnaces, 68 : number of regenerators, 69 ; temperature in chimney. 69 ; 
forced-blast furnaces, 70 ; position of regenerators, 70 ; description of new 
Siemens furnace, 71. — Casson. R. S., Overhead regenerators for open- 
hearth steel-melting furnace. 72. — Head, John, Steel from pig-iron only, 
or from pig-iron mixed with scrap. 73. — Casson, E. S., Proportions 
of pig-iron and scrap, 74. — Slater, A., Siemens regenerative gas- 
furnace for heating iron, 74. — O^kman, R.'N., Water-gas furnaces, 75; 
mixing of water-gas and producer-gas, 76; open-hearth steel-melting 
furnaces, 77. — Reed. A. H., Cornell water-gas furnace, 77. — Gray, J. M., 
Suitable for badly constructed furnace, 78. — Bruce, R.. Heating of air for 
boiler furnaces, 79. — Marten, E. B.. Difliculties of firing boilers with gas, 
79. — Colyer, F., Gas firing for brewers' coppers, 80. — Kennedy, A. B. W., 
Furnaces fired with hot gas, 81 ; difference between metallurgical 
operations and boiler firing, 81. — Marten. E. B., Gaseous fuel for distant 
boiler firing, 82. — Halpin, D., Duty of fuel in boiler furnaces, 83. — 
Snelus, G. .T.. Gas-furnace valves, hydraulic slide-valve, butterfly valve, 
double-beat valve, 88 ; Lash furnace, 84. — Head. John, Slide valve and 
bell valve, 85. — Dawson, B., Distance no obstacle to flow of gas, 85 ; gas 
firing for boilers, 85 ; failures of gas furnaces, 87 ; chimney draught, 87 ; 
leakage in Eadclifte furnace. 88 ; sooting up of regenerators, 88 ; water- 
gas furnaces, 89 ; pyrometers. 89 ; firing of boilers by gas, 89 ; water- 
tube boilers, 90 ; cylindrical egg-ended boilers, 91 : brewers' coppers. 
91 ; hydraulic slide-valves, 92 ; furnaces with horizontal regenerators, 
92 ; reversing regenerators for firing boilers, 92. — Tomlinson, J., Value 
of information in Paper, 93. 

Gas, Manufacture and Storage of Oxygen, 1890, 131. See Oxygen Manufacture. 

Gas Producers. 1891, 47: see Gas Furnaces. — 1893, 251: see Cleveland 
Industries. 

Gas Purification by pure Oxygen, 1890, 164. See Oxygen ^lanufacture. 

L 2 



164 G 

Gas-Stoktxg Machinery. 1895, I531. See Hydraulic Gas-Stoking. 
Gas Works : — 

Beckton, 1886, 411. 44-J-7. 

Belfast, 1888, 427 :— 1896, :590. See Belfast Gas Works. 

Birmingham, 1897, 370, 378. 

Derby, 1898, Gas Light and Coke Co., 48.") :— Midland Railway. 464 :— 
Oil-Gas. 4G4. 

Dublin. 1888, 41:;. 

Edinburgh, 1887, 442. 

Lincoln, 1885, 445. 

IManchester, 1894, 402, 408. 

Portsmouth, 1892, :!7ii. 

Salford. 1894, 42:;. 

.Southampton, 1892, 369. 38!t. 
Gash, L. C, elected Associate Member, 1900, .">02. 
Gass, J., elected Associate Member, 1898, 14:1. 
Gaston, A. B., elected Associate Member, 1900, :;. 
Gatehouse, T. E., elected ^lember, 1894, 46;i. 
Gauge, Self-liecording Water-(iauge, 1890, 426. See Sheffield Water 

AVorks. 
Gauntlett, W. H.. decease, 1899, 7.— Memoir, 1898, 703. 
Gatnor, Capt. H. F., R.E., elected ^lember, 1895, :;27.— Decease, 1900, 6.— 

:\remoir, 1899, 266. 
Gaze, E. H. J., elected Member. 1888, 268. 
Geach, F. S., elected Member, 1895, 149. 
Geach, J. J., decease, 1885, 4.— Memoir, 1884, 4:il. 
Gearing, Frictional, 1888, 363. See Frictional (bearing. 
Geddes, C., elected Member, 1888, 444. 

Geipel, W., Electric Engineering, Paper on the Position and Prospects or 
Electricity, as applied to Engineering. 1888, 7(5. — Remarks thereon, 
107, 142, 150. 

Electric Lighthouse, 1887, HG.\. 

Electric Lighting, Edinburgh, 1895, 576, 586. 

Ropes and Belts. 1895, 645. 
Steam Superheating, 1896, 225. 
Generator. Turbo-Electric, 1888, 133, 146, 480. See Compound! Steam 

Turbine. 
Geoghegax. S., Paper ou Tramways and Rolling Stock at Guiunesa's Brewery, 

1888, 327. — Remarks thereon, 358. 360. 
George, J. M., elected Associate ]\Ieniber, 1900, 3. 
German, W. H., elected Member, 1896, 279. 
Giant's Causeway Electric Railway, 1888, :;S3 :— 1896, 421. 



G 165 

GiBB, Allan, Alloys Itesearch. Appendix on the Elimination of Impurities 
during the process of making " Best Selected " Copper, 1895, 25-t. 
See Alloys Kesearch. 

GiBB. Andrew, elected Jlember, 1887, I.")7. 

GiBB, M. S., elected Graduate, 1898, Ji". 

GiBBiNs, J. E.. elected Associate Member, 1899, 14.5. 

Gibbons. T. H., Paper on Eailway Viaducts in Cornwall, Old and New, 1899, 
3.5o. — Remarks thereon, 3G4. 

Gibbb, J. W.. Propeller Ventilating Fans, 1897, 4S.j. 

Gibson, G. H. (Liverpool), elected Member, 1898, HI.— Decease, 1900, :— 
Memoir. Sol. 

Gibson, G. H. (Glasgow), elected Associate Member. 1900, 3. 

Gibson-Scgars, J. S., K.N., elected Member, 1899, 473. 

Gilbert, E. E., decease, 1890, 3. 

Giles, B., elected Member, 1898, 340. 

GiLKES, E., decease. 1895, 4 : — Memoir. 142. 

Gill, C. E., elected (rraduate. 1895, o2s. 

Gill. F. H., elected Member, 1889, 204. 

GiLLATT. T. 8., elected Graduate, 1891, 107. 

GiLLiNG, A. H., elected Associate Member, 1900, 183. 

GiLLOTT AND SoNS, Steel Pen Manufactory, Birmingham, 1897, 385. 

GiLKOT Sons and Co., Tay Jute Works. Dundee. 1887, 4.55. 

GiNDERS, E. M., elected Associate Member, 1900, 3. 

Gievan, W., elected Associate Member, 1899, 14.5. 

Given, E. C, elected Associate ilember, 1896, 279. 

Gjeks, J., decease, 1899, 7.— Memoir, 1898, 704. 

Gjers, Mills, and Co.. Ayresome Iron Works, Middlesbrough, 1893, 341. 

Glasgow, A. G., elected Member, 1896, 1. 

Glasgow Haebouk. See Dredging Clyde Estuary, 1887, 3S6. See Clyde 
Navigatiou, 1887, 402 : 1895, 404. 

Glasgow Hydraulic Power Supply, 1895, 353 : see Hydraulic Power Supply. — ■ 
Pumping Station, 471. 

Glasgow Sewage Works, 1895, 4(12, 473. 

Glasgow Summer Meeting, 1895, 325. — Keception, 325. — Business, 327. — 
Votes of Thanks, 329. — Excursions, &c., 462. 

(iLASGOW Water Works, 1895, 462, 468. 

Glass Eevealer, Paper on an improved Glass Eevealer, for studying 
Condensation iu Steam-Engine Cylinders, and rendering the effects 
visible, by B. Donkin, 1900, 50'J. — Eevealer on a compound steam- 
jacketed vertical condensing beam-engine, 509. — General description, 
509. — Eevealer on low-pressure cylinder, 510 ; size of condensed globules, 
511 ; fog in revealer, 512. — Coudeusation on the cast-iron, 512. — Eevealer 



166 G 

Glass Eevealer, Paper. 1900 (continued) : — 

on liigh-pressure cj'liuder, 511] ; no film of condensation water on surfaces 
of steam-engine cylinders, 514. — Steam revealer with two cylindrical 
glasses, and internal steam or water-jacketed cast-iron cylinder in centre, 
515. — Description of first experiment; fall of temperature in cylinder; 
measurement of radiation, 516. — Latest experiments: first set, hot walla 
cooled down, 517 ; second set, cooled walls heated up ; third set, constant 
temperatui-e cylinder walls, 518. — Radiation experiments, 51'J. — Tables 
showing results of experiments, 5'20-5. — Appendix by M. Nadal, 526 ; 
formula of mean temperature of unjacketed walls, 529. — Determination 
of mean temperature of imjacketed walls, 5:^(1. 

Discussion. — Donkin, B., Position of revealer on horizontal and on 
vertical cylinder engine, 532 ; difficulty of photographing drops : shape of 
drops, 533. — Unwin, W. C., Fog in the steam, 533 ; qualitative not 
quantitative results ; shape of drops on cylinder walls, 534 ; heat-emitting 
and heat-absorbing properties of the wall, 535. — Gray, J. M., Actual or 
ideal drops, 535. — ( upper, D. t?.. Patches of oil upon walls, 536 ; 
temperature of thermometer above mean temperature of two portions of 
stroke in cylinder, 537. — Ruunthwaite. II. ^I., Disadvantage of high jacket 
temperatures in marine work, 538. — Bramwell, ^^ir F., Early experiment 
by Mr. Cowper of fixing glass gauge-tube in communication with interior 
of cylinder, 530. — Davey, H., Heat-absorbing andjieat-emitting properties 
of cast-iron, 539. — Schunheyder, W., ^Moving piston to flatten globules of 
water, 541. — Smith, li. H., Percentage of results indicated to what 
actually occurred, 541 ; objection to mixture of iron and glass in cylinder ; 
difficulty of investigating phenomena in cylinder, 543. — Doukin, B., 
Shape of drops ; mean temperature of indicator diagram ; effect of piston 
in cylinder; mixture of glass and iron, 544. — White, Sir W. H., Thanks 
to author, 544, — Barber, T. W., Condition of steam before admission to 
cylinder, 545 ; size of globules on glass and iron ; work performed in the 
cylinder, 54G ; cause of devaporation throughout volume of steam, 547 ; 
condensation not largely due to condition of cylinder wall and ends, .548. 
— Beare, T. H., Qualitative nature of experiments, 548 ; production of 
fog in steam; experiments on condensation of steam, and difficulty of 
obtaining quantitative results, 549. — Northcott, W. H., Conductivity and 
specific heat of glass and iron ; formation of globules, 550 ; deposit of 
moisture as a film ; heat-absorbing and heut-emitting properties of 
cast-iron, 551. — Donkin, B., Films and drops of water ; absorption and 
emission of heat in cylinder-wall, ^^b'l. 

Glass Works, F. and C. Osier, Birmingham, 1897, 39S. 

Gledhill, M., elected Member, 1887, 283.— Decease, 1899, 7 :— Memoir, 267. 

Glen, D. C., elected Member, 1898, 546. 



G 167 

Globe Ikon Works, Bolton. 1894, 406, 455. 

Globe "VYokks, Lincoln. 1885, 4o4, 442-3. 

GoDDARD, "W. H., elected Graduate, 1896, 2. 

Godfrey, S., decease, 1888, 3.— ^Memoir, 1887, 276. 

Godson, E. H., elected Graduate, 1897, 257 : — elected Associate Member, 1900, 

96. 
Godwin, J. A., elected Graduate, 1900, 183. 
GoFF, J., elected Member, 1888, 268. 
GoFFE, E., elected Associate Member, 1896, 279. 

Gun, Paper on the Constructiou of '-Long Cecil," a 4-1-inch Eifled 
Breechloading Gun, iu Kimberley, during the Siege 1899-190 
1900, 359. 
GOLBY, F. W., elected Associate. 1889, 2. 
GoLDiNG, H. A., elected Associate Member, 1898, 2. 
Good, B. P., elected Graduate, 1899, 5. 
GooDALL, F. H., elected Graduate, 1899, 294. 
GooDBEHERE, A., elected Graduate, 1898, 3. 
GooDBEHERE, E., elected Graduate. 1898, 3. 
GooDBODY, It., IJopes and Belts. 1895, 648. 
Goodman, A. C, elected Associate 3Iember, 1900, 3. 
Goodman, F. A., elected Graduate. 1899, 146. 
(iooDMAN, J., elected Member, 1890, 17i;. 
Alloys Kesearcb, 1895, 289. 
Electric Lighting. Belfast, 1896, 331, 342. 
Experimental Marine Engine. 1891, 411. 
Quick-Kevolution Engines, 1897, 341. 
Hope Driving, 1896, 374. 
Testing Machine, 1888, 460. 
Goodrich, W. F., elected Associate, 1900, 97. 

Goods Statioxs. — London and North Western Hallway, Broad Street, London, 
1886, 422.— Midland Eailway, Whitecross Street, London, 1886, 422. 
Goodwin, A., Jun., elected Member, 1885, 305. 

Wheel Load in Cycles. 1886, 179. 
Goodwin, A. B., elected Member, 1899, 292. 

Goodwin, G. A., Openings for Mechanical Engineers in China, 1899, 557. 
Goold, W. T., elected Member, 1889, 204. 
GOBANSSON, G. F., decease, 1901, 7. — Memoir. 1900, 625. 
Gordon, A., elected Member. 1887, 473. 
Gordon, D., elected Graduate, 1898, 144. 
Gordon, J., elected Associate Member, 1898, 2. 
Gordon, J. AV., elected Associate Member, 1897, 257. 
Gordon, L., elected Graduate, 1896, 103. 



168 G 

Gore, A. S., elected Member. 1888, 159. 
GoBMAN, W. A.. Kaising a Wreck. 1886, 197. 

Refrigerating Machinery. 1886, 249. 
Gorton Foundry, Manchester. 1894, 427. 
Gorton Locomotive "Works, Manchester. 1894, 4I!0. 
GoscHEN, Et. Hon. G. J.. Connection of Mechanical Engineering with Xaval 

Architectiire and Marine Engineeiing, 1899, 150. 
GospORT Victualling Yard. 1892, 3G8, o75. 
Goss, "W. F. M.. Evaporative Condensers. 1899, 2:!2. 
GossELL, O., decease. 1889, :!. 

Gottschalk, p. a., decease, 1899, 7.— Memoir. 1898, ;!]2. 
Gotz, C. J. W.. elected Associate, 1889, 340.— Decease. 1896, 4.— Memoir. 1895, 

143. 
GovLDiNG, B. J. J., elected Graduate, 1897, 2. 
Goulstone. E. E., elected Associate Member. 1899, 4. 
Goulty, W. K., Auditor. 1894, 23. 
GouKLAY, C. G.. elected Member, 1887, 283. 

Gourlay Brothers and Co., Dundee Foundry. Dundee 1887, 454. 
GovAN Engineering and Shipbuilding AVorks. Glasgow, 1895, 462. 501-10. 
Governing of Steam Engines by Throttling and by Variable Expansion. 1895, 

154. See Throttling and Variable Expansion. 
Governors, Electric, 1885, 379-89,390-5,390,398-404.407-11. &« Private 

Electric Lighting. 
Governors for Gas Engines, 1889, 514, 527, 534-5. See (ias Engines. 
GowER, T. P.. Electric Engineering. 1888, 134. 
Gowland, W.. Alloys Kesearch. 1893, 175, 181 :— 1897, 82. 
Grace, R. W.. elected Jlember, 1890, 472. 
Graduates' Meetings. Remarks by the President. Sir W. H. White, 1899, 

476. 
Grafton High-Speed Steam-Engine. 1894, 213. See High-Speed Engine. 
Graham, H. B.. elected Associate Member. 1898, 143. 

Narrow-Gauge Railways, 1898, 402. 
Graham, M., elected Associate Member, 1894, 2 : — transferred to Member. 1897, 4. 
Graham, R.. elected IMember. 1896, 461. 
Graham, W., elected Associate Member. 1900, 183. 
Graham. W. V., elected Member, 1900, 182. 
Grain Bins, 1888, 400.— 1889, 153, 166, 167. 169, 170, 171, 173, 175, 184, 188. 

See Roller Flour Milling ; and Grain AVarehousing Machinery. 
Grain Drying, 1889, 307. See Drying in Vacuum. 
Grain Elevators, 1889.153, 169. 171. <See Roller Flour Milling; and Grain 

Warehousing Machinery. 
Grain Mixer, Sprague, 1891, 377, 379. See Grain Warehousing Machinery. 



G 169 

Grain Warehousing Machinery, Paper on the Warehouse and Maclunery for 
the Storage and ^Transit of Grain at the Alexandra Dock. Liverpool, 
by W. Shaptou, 1891, 372.— Objects in designing granary, 372. — 
Arrangement of building, and storage of grain in silos or bins, 372. — 
Elevators at dock side and in granary, 373. — Carrying bands, 374. — 
Sack-weighing machine, 375. — Delivery of grain from granary to ships, 
375. — Motive power, 375. — Elevators, bands, and hydraulic maclunery, 
376. — Silos, mixing of grain, 377. 

Discussion. — Westmacott, P. G. B., Storing in bins, 37S. — Cochrane, C, 
Comparison between hexagonal and circular silos, 378. — Wicksteed, J. H., 
Sprague's mixer, 379. — Lee, S. E., Granary at Limerick, 379 ; square 
bins, and elevators instead of bands, 380. — Piatt. J., Lining of silos, 380. 
— Ellington, E. B., Ventilating granary at Kothcrhithe. 380.— Carbutt, 
E. H., Granaries in America, 381 ; cost of moving grain, better mixing by 
silo system, 381. — Head, J., Timber or brickwork for granaries, 381. — 
Douglass, Sir J. X., Cement cylinders for silos, 382; expanded steel 
trellis, 382.— Westmacott. P. G. B., Iron bins, 382; air-blast for 
ventilating grain, 383 ; construction of silos, 383 ; mixing of grain, 384. — 
Tomlinson, J., Vote of thanks, 384. — Shapton, W., Silos not lined, 384 ; 
cost of granary, 384 ; charge for receiving and delivering grain, 385. 
Granary and Eoller Flour Mill at Rio de Janeiro, 1889, 151. See Roller 

Flour Milling. 
Grand Opera House, Paris, Electric Lighting, 1889, 542, 5(J9. 
Grant, H., elected Associate Member, 1897, 2. 
Grant, J. M., elected Graduate, 1885, 2. 
Grant, L., elected Member, 1900, 90. 

Grant, P., elected Graduate, 1886, 2 :— transferred to Member, 1893, 3. 
Grant, T. M., elected Member, 1895, 327. 
Grant, W., elected Associate Member, 1896, 279. 
Grantham Works, 1885, 435, 447-8. 
Gray, A. C, elected Associate Member, 1896, 102. 
Gray, G. M., elected Member, 1891, 2. 
Gray, J. M., Alloys Research, 1891, 592. 
Auditor, 1895, 25. 

By-laws, 1889, 30 :— 1890, 474:— 1891, 27, 37, 42 :— 1894, 25. 
Canal-Boat Propulsion, 1897, 200. 
Compound Locomotives, 1889, 144. 
Compound Steam Turbine, 1888, 502. 
Condensation and Re-evaporation, 1889, U91. 
Council, Annual Report, 1893, 26. 

Ether-Pressure Theory, Paper on the Ether-Pressure Theory of 
Thermodynamics applied to Steam, 1889, 379. 



170 G 

Gray, J. M. (continued) : — 

Gas Eiigiues, 1889, .".2:), 541. 

Gas Furnaces, 1891, 78. 

Glass Revealer, 1900, Jl!5. 

Marine Engineeriug, 1891, '.'>5i. 

Marine-Engine Trials, 1889, 2(;5 :— 1890, 272 :— 1891, 200 :— 1892, ISo: 
—1894, 110. 

Milling ( utter-s, 1890, .".44. 

Purtable Pneumatic Tools, 1900, l.")l. 

Regnault's Steam Experiments, Paper on the Rationalization of 
Kegnault's Experiments on Steam, 1889, 399. — Remarks thereon, 
462. 

Screw-Propeller Surface, 1892, .">42. 

Ship-Model Apparatus. 1893, 4."). 

Technical Dictionary, 1900, aO^J, aU7. 

Testing of Materials, 1898, iJ87. 

Water ^Meters, 1900, 73. 
Gkay, .J. W., decease, 1897, 5. — Memoir. 1896, 2.'i(J. 

Lincoln Waterworks Engines, 1887, 141. 
Gkav axd Co., William, Ship Yards, West Hartlepool, 1893, 384. 
Great Central Railway, Loughborough to Switliland, 1898, 4i;0, 50'J. 
Great Eastekx Railway Works, Stratford, 1886, 41'J:-1900, 477. 
Great Xortherx Railway Locomotive Works, Doncaster, 1885, 436, 453-5. 
Great Wkstern Railway Loci .motive Works, Wolverhampton, 1897, 308, 

405. 
«;i!Eat Western Railway Viaducts, Cornwall, 1899, 442. ,>Ve Railway 

A'iaducts in Cornwall. 
Greathead, J. H., decease, 1897, ."i. — Alemoir, 1896, .jL»8. 
Greavex, a. a., elected Member, 1900, 2. 
(iREAVEX, L., elected 3[ember, 1898, 2. 
(>REEX, H. H. R., elected Graduate, 1898, 144. 
(iREEN, H. J., elected 3Iember, 1888, 1. 
(iREEX, J. S., elected Associate Alember, 1899, 4. 
(iREEX, T. W., elected Member, 1898, 2. 
GiiEEN, W. P., elected 3Iember, 1893, 97. 
(iuEEXE, F. A., elected Associate Member, 1900, 3. 
(jREEXE, W. S. C, elected Associate Member, 1895, .348. 
(iREENER, J. H., dcceasc, 1896, 4. — Memoir, 1895, 31U. 
(:iREENHiLL, A. G., Kangc-Finders, 1896, 60. 
(tReenhill, J. H., Belfast Electric Lighting, 1896, 334. 
(iREEXiXG, W. A., elected Member, 1890, 472. 
ClREENSMiTu, J. E., elected Member, 1895, 14:i. 



G 171 

<tKEGOKY, (t. F., elected Associate, 1889, o46. 
Gregory, H. H. M., elected (Graduate, 1891, o02. 
Gregory, H. M., elected Member, 1894, ltJ9. 

Greig, D., appointed Vice-President, 1885, 7."> :— elected Aico-President, 1886, 
17.— Decease. 1892, i.— Memoir, 1891, i74. 

J3y-laws. 1886, 2i. 

( anadian Locomotives, 1887, 231. 

Compound Locomotives, 1886, 389. 

Electric Lighting, Private. 1885, 402. 

Friction Experiments, 1888, 189. 

Heat Distribution in Steam Engine, 1887, .501, 528. 

Semi-Portable Engine, 1885, 402. 

Triple-Expansion Engines, 1886, 528. 
Greig, D., Jcn., elected Member, 1885, 4tJ2. 
(t REINER, A., Reply to President's welcome at Summer meeting, London, 1886, 

209. 
Grel Valve for Pulsometer, 1893, 457. See Steam Pumps. 
Gresham, H. E., elected Member, 1892, 414. 
Gresley Iron Works, Salford, 1894, 421. 
Grew, X., decease, 1898, c..— Memoir, 1897, 283. 
Grice, E. J., decease, 1890, 4.— :\Iemoir, 1889, 333. 
Griffith, C. L. T., elected Graduate, 1895, 548. 
Griffith, J. P., Automatic Sluice, 1888, 299. 

Frictional Gearing, Paper on the Frictional Gearing used on a double 
Steam Dredger in the Port of Dublin, 1888, :!•;:;. — Remarks thereon, 
371. 

Port of Dublin, Description, 1888, 384. 
Griffith, P., elected Member, 1895, 327. 
Griffiths, A., elected Graduate, 1895, 15u : — elected Associate Member, 1897, 

433. 
Griffiths, H., elected Graduate, 1899, 475. 
Griffiths, H. D., elected Member, 1895, 1. 
Griffiths, J. A., By-laws, 1886, 24. 

Cycles, Paper on the Distiibution of the Wheel Load in Cycles, 1886, 128. 
— Remarks thereon, 162, 180. 
Griffiths, J. E., decease, 1900, C— Memoir. 1899, 471. 
Griffiths, W. J., elected Associate Member, 1900, 3. 
Grigg, R., Paper on the Middlesbrough Salt Industry. 1893, 278. — Remarks 

thereon, 292, 301. 
Grimley, W. R. N., elected Associate Member, 1900, 3. 
Grimsby Docks, 1885, 436, 455-7. 
Grimshaw, J. W., elected Member, 1889, 1 . 



172 G 

Gbittox, J., elected Associate Member. 1893, 220. 

Groom, E. A., elected Member. 1891, 30U. 

Geooved Frictioxal Gearing, 1888, 3iJ3. See Frictional Gearing. 

Gboundwatek, S., elected Associate Member, 1895, l.iO. 

Grove, D., elected INIember, 1886, 125. 

Grove, H., elected Associate IMember. 1897, 257. 

Grover, F., elected Member. 1898, 2. 

Groves, M., elected Associate Member. 1895, 54S. 

Grubb, Sir H., Paper ou the latest improvements in the Clock-Driving 

Apparatus of Astronomical Telescopes, 1888, oO:>. — Remarks thereon, 

324. 
Optical and Mechanical Works, Dublin, 1888,401. 
Guest, C. H., elected Member, 1898, 340. 
Guest, J. J., elected Member, 1900, 182. 
Guilford, F. L., decease, 1895, 4. — Memoir, 1894, ItJO. 
Goinness, Son, and Co., Arthur, St. James's Gate Brewerj-, Dublin, 1888, 327, 

378, 399. 
GvLLivEK, (i. H., elected Graduate, 1900, 183. 
Gun, Construction of "Long Cecil" (Jun in Kimberley, 1900, 359. See 

Construction of " Long Cecil " Gun. 
Gun Factories, Birmingham, 1897, 381, 403. 

(iuN, Hydro-Pneumatic Disappearing, Fort Cumberland, Portsmouth, 1892, 367. 
Gun Making, Fifty Years' I'rogress. 1887, 1(J3. See Address of President, 

Edward H. Carbutt. 
Gun, Maxim Automatic Machine-Gun, 1885, 107. See Automatic Machine-Gun. 
Gun, Maxim Automatic ^lachine-Gun "Works, Loudon. 1886, 417. 
Gun-Pboof House. Birmingham, 1897, 400. 
Guns, Quick-Firing ^lachine-Guns. 1887, 174. See Address of President, 

Edward H. Carbutt. 
Gunning and Campbells, Fine-Yarn Spinning Works, Belfast, 1896, 44G. 
Guthbie, W. J., elected Graduate. 1897, 257. 
Guy, C. W., elected Member, 1886, 1.— Decease. 1896, 4.— Memoir, 1895, 534. 



Hacking, W. H., elected Member, 1899, 473. 

Hackling Flax, 1896, 283. See Flax Dressing IMachinery. 

Hackwortu Valve-Gear, 1886, 519, 522. 

Hadengue, C. B., elected Associate Member. 1894, 170. 

Hadfield, p., decease, 1889, 3.— ^Memoir, 1888, 2G0. 



H 173 

Hadfielp. R. a., elected IMeraber, 1888, lo9. 

Alloys Research. 1891. 574-Sl :-1893, 160 :-1895, 294 :— 1897, 94:— 

1899, 91. 
Oxygen Manufacture. 1890, 147. 
Steel Rails, 1890, 334-(;. 
Hadley. W. p. H.. elected Associate Member, 1899, 145. 
Haggie. p.. decease, 1887, 3.— :Memoir, 146. 

Hagfe. Johx.— Transmission of Power by Exhaustion of Air, 1892, 306.— 
Z^Iachine for maintaining Partial Vacuum, 1899, 302 ; for Raising 
Water, 302 : for Purifying Sugar, 306.— Wharf Crane. 1899, 308 ; 
Tilt Hammer. 310. -Se-^ Dockyard Lifting and Hauling; and 
Atmospheric Railway. 
Haigh. X. X., elected Member. 1894, 1. 
Haines, C J., elected Associate Member, 1895, 2. 
Halcomb, S. B., elected :\Iember, 1900, 501. 
Haldaxe. Dk. J. S.. Propeller Ventilating Fans, 1897, 493. 
Haldane. J. W. C, elected ilember, 1897, 143. 
Hale. H.. elected Graduate. 1899, 294. 
Hall, B. .J., elected Associate Member, 1896, 2. 

Hall, G. E., elected 3Iember. 1892, 229.— Decease, 1899, 7.— :\remoir, 1898, 137. 
Hall, H. P., elected :\Iember. 1894, 293. 
Hall, O. S., elected Member. 1890, 176. 
Hall, E. F.. elected Associate Member, 1894, 470. 

Hall, W. B.,R.N.. elected Graduate. 1895, ."i48 :— elected Member, 1900, 501. 
Hall. W. F.. Eiffel Tower Lifts, 1889, 369, 370, 373, 374. 

Hall, W. J., elected ^lember. 1886, 270.— Decease, 1891, 4.— Memoir, 1890, 291. 
Hall, W. S.. Compound Steam Turbine, 1888, 504. 
Cycles. 1885, 5ln. 

Forth Bridge Machinery, 1887, 319. 
Petroleum Fuel in Locomotives, 1889, 75. 
Eeirigerating ^laehinery, 1886, 260. 
Riveted Joints, 1885, 231. 
Spherical Eccentric. 1885, 430. 
Triple-Expansion Engines, 1887, 68. 
Hall-Brown. E.. elected IMc-mber. 1889, 346. 
Hali.ett, J. H.. Marine-Engine Trials, 1890, 245. 
Halpix. D., Autographic Test-Recorder. 1886, 79. 
Boiler Construction. 1891, .".03. 
By-laws. 1889, 31. 
Cleveland Industries, 1893, 261. 
Drying in Vacuum. 1889, 32(i. 
Dryness of i^team. 1895, 55. 
Eiffel Tower Lifts. 1889, 37 L 



174 H 

Halpin, D. (coutinued) : — 

Electric Lighting :— KdinburgL. 1895, ".ST :— rrivate. 1885, 308. 

Electric I'lant, 1898, 577. 

Gas-Engine Eeseaich, 1898, "Jio. 

Gas Furnaces. 1891, 83. 

Heat Distribution in Steam Engine. 1887, 52G. 

Heat Transmission. 1896, .■'>29. 

High-Speed Engine. 1894, 2o3. 

Locomotives :— Canadian. 1887, 2:;2 :— Compound. 1886, :;(;8. :«it»; 1889, 
12(t :— Express, 1898, 641. 

Marine-Engine Trials. 1889, 2Ur) :— 1891, 247:— 1894, 10:;. i:!S. 

Middlesbrough Salt Industry, 1893, 3ii0. 

Eaising a Wreck. 1886, I'.'U. 

IJefrigeratiug INIachinei y, 1886, 252. 

Eiveted Joints, 1885, 285. 

Eope Driving. 1896. :57S. 

Kopes and Belts. 1895. G3'.'. 

Semi-Portable Engine. 1885, 30.s. 

Steam Jacket, 1896, 481i. 

Steam Laundry Machinery. 1898, 28it. 2;tl. 

Steam Pumps, 1893, 453. 47<;. 

Steam Superheating. 1896, 194. 

Steel Stt ani-Pipes, 1896. 244. 

Throttling and Variable Expansion, 1895, 204. 

Triple-Expansion Engines. 1887, 58. 

Water Softening. 1898, 437, 450. 
Halsey, C.T.. elected Graduate 1894, 2 .-—elected Associate Member. 1897, H4, 
Halsey. "W. S., elected Graduate. 1886, 126. 
Halstead, a. F.. elected Member. 1898, 340. 
Halstead, J. H., elected INIember. 1895, 327. 
Hambly, J., elected 3Iember. 1900, 355. 
Hasier, ^X.. elected Member, 1894, ir,0. 
JIamiltok, a. G.. elected Jlembcr, 1888, 1. 
Hamilton, H.. elected Graduate. 1898, 342. 
Hamilton, R., elected IMember. 1894, 169. 
HAMiLTOy, Rev. Dr. T.. Queen's College, Belfast, 1896, ill. 
Hamilton Ieox "SVokks, Garston, 1891, 44ti. 
Hammers, Pneumatic. 1900, 12u. See Portable Pneumatic 'J'ools. 
Hammett, J. G.. elected :Merab€r, 1898, 142. 
Hammond, E.. elected Member. 1899, 144. 

Evaporative Condensers. 1899, 244. 
Hammond, R. W., elected Graduate. 1898. 342. 



H 175 

Hamptox. W. E.. elected Graduate, 1889, 2. 

Haxbiry. J. J., elected Member. 1886. 1. 

Haxby, W. a. E.. elected (Graduate. 1887. 284. 

Hancock. S.. elected ^lember. 1899. -J'.'-J. 

Haxdyside, C. B., elected Member, 1896. 462. 

Handtside ANT) Co.. Britannia Iron Works. Derby. 1898. 4S7. 

Haksell. E. B.. elected IMember, 1892, 22'.'. 

Haxsox, Pi., elected Member. 1891. 4Sii. 

Hanssex, a., Portable Pneumatic Tools. 1900, 160. 

Haeada.T.. elected Member, 1888. 1. 

HAEB.1BD, F. W., AUoYs Kesearch. 1897, 88. 

Harbmuks.— Belfast. 1888, 382. 430 : 1896, 413. 420. 422.— Calaii. 1889. :.4;'..576. 

—Dublin, 1888. 374, 384.— Dundee. 1887. 4."i7.— Hartlt-pool^, 1893, 

372.— Leith. 1887, 439.— :Middlesbrough. 1893, 318. Se^ also Docks; 

Dockyards ; Eivers and Estuaries. 
Harcoirt. O. S. H., elected :Member, 1891, 301. 
Harding, J. C elected Member. 1894. lU'.". 
Haedin-g, T. TV., elected IMember, 1888. 160, 

Hardmax axd Co., Stained Glass Works. BirminErhani, 1897, 3s7. 
Habdmax, Powell, axd Co.. Metal Works, Birmingham. 1897. 387. 
Habdy, W., elected Associate ^lember. 1894. 470. 
Habgraves, E., elected Member. 1887. 1. 
Hargreayes, J. H., elected Member. 1887. 1. 
Harker, W.. elected Member. 1888, 2. 
Harlaxd. Sir E. J., Bart., elected Member. 1888, :444.— Decease. 1896. 4.— 

ISIemoir, 1895, .334. 
Hablaxt) axd Wolff. Shipbuilding and Engineering Works, Queen's Island, 

Belfast. 1888, 382. 418:- 1896. 278. 408-9. 447. 
Habllxg. W., elected Associate Mt-mber. 1898. .347. 
Harlock, E. B., elected Member. 1898, 34". 
Hablotv, B. S., elected Associate 3Iember, 1897, 144. 
Habmer, O., elected :Member, 1894, 293. 
Haerap. G. T.. elected INIember, 1899, 292. 
Habeis. F. G. E., elected Graduate, 1899, 294, 
Harris. G., elected Member, 1891. 2. 
Harris, H. E., elected Graduate, 1898, 342. 
Harris, H. G.. elected Member of Council, 1898, 31. 
Electric Plant. 1898, .380. 
Electric Traction, 1898, 88. 
Floating Bridge. Paper on the new Floating Bridge between Portsmouth 

and Gosport. 1892, 344.— Eemarks thereon, 352, 353. 
Marine-Engine Trials, 1892, 172. 



176 H 

Harris, H. G. (coutinucd) :— 

Portable Pneumatic Tools. 1900, l."i8. 
Sewage Outfall Works, 1892, 341. 
Training of Engineer Students. 1899, 402. 
Harris, H. N., elected Associate Member, 1894, 470. 
Harris, J. H., elected Member, 1885, 4G'2.— Decease, 1895, 4.— Memoir, 1894, 

160. 
Harris, L. P.. elected ^lember. 1900, 3.")."). 
Harri:*, W. T.. Drying in Vacuum. 1889, 326. 
Harrison, A. W., elected Member. 1892, 229. 
Harbison, C. G., elected Member, 1900, 182. 
Harhison, p., elected Associate Member, 1898, r)47 :— transfeiTcd to Member, 

1899, 5. 
Harrison, F. H., elected Member, 1885, 30.1. 
Harrison, G., elected Member. 1888, 268. 
Harbison, Liect. G. H., elected Graduate, 1889, .JSo :— transferred to Member, 

1892, 3. 
Harrison, J., elected Member, 1885, 1. 

Refrigerating Machinery. 1886, 2r)0. 
Harbison, J. H., elected Member, 1891, 2. 
Harrison, T. E., decease, 1889, 3.— Memoir, 1888, 261. 
Harrison, T. H., elected Member, 1887, 474. 
Harrison. W. A., decease. 1885, 4.— Memoir. 1884, 402. 
Harrison, W. J., elected Member, 1894, 1. 
Harbison, \V. R., elected Member, 1890, 1. 
Hart, N., Graduate transferred to Member, 1885, 3. 
Hart and Co., David, North London Iron Works, London, 1886, 425. 
Harttord Iron Works, Oldham, 1894, 40."). 442. 

Hartington, Right Hon. the ^Marquis of, Technical Education, 1888, 170. 
Hartlepool, Excursion from Middlesbrough, 1893, 336. 
Hartlepool Engine Works, 1893, 380. 

Hartlepools, Faper on the Port and Industries of the Hartlepools, by T. Mudd, 
1893, 372.— Position of Hartlepools, 372.— Dredging ; advantages of port ; 
docks. 373. — Imports and exports ; shipbuilding and marine engineering, 

•)74. Iron and steel works, 375. — Saw mills. 376. — Portland cement, 378. 

-Wire ropes ; paper pulp, 379.— Fish trade; sea wall, 380. 

Hartnell, W., Dredging Clyde Estuary, 1887, 395. 

Electric Lighthouse, 1887, 365. 
Harvey, C. R., decease, 1900, 6.— Memoir. 1899, 616. 

Harvey. E. C, elected Member. 1892, 229.— Decease, 1895, 4 :— Memoir, 311. 
Harvey, F. H., elected Member. 1892, 102. 
Harvey, J., elected Associate, 1896, 102. 



H 177 

Hakvet, J. B.. elected Member. 1886, r2o. 

Harvey. R., elected l^Iember, 1897, 432. 

Har-wood. J. H., elected Associate Member, 1899, 293. 

Harwood, E. H., elected Associate ^lember. 1897, 257. 

Haske-w, F. J., JuN., elected Associate IMember. 1900, 18:'.. 

Haslam, Sir A. S., Welcome to Members at Summer meeting. Derby. 1898, 

339. 
Haslam, A. V., elected Graduate, 1898, o47. 
Haslaji, W. G., elected Member. 1898, 340. 

Haslam Fouxdrt and Engineering Works, Union Foundry, Derbj'. 1898, 4S7. 
Haslab Experiment Works, 1893, 32. See Ship-Model Apparatus. 
Haslett, Sir J. H., Welcome to Members at Belfast. 1888, 379. 
Hastie Engine for driving a dynamo. 1895, 390. 401. 
Haswell, J.. Watcli Screws. 1894, 497. 
Hat Manufactories, Felt, Bury, 1894, 4(i(;. 447. 
Hatch, W. T., elected Member, 1899, 3. 
Hathorn Eclipse Rock Drill, 1891, 149. See Rock Drills. 
Hatterslet, E. L., elected Member, 1900, o'ta. 
Hatton, R. J., elected Member, 1885, 1(J3. 
Hatton, T. R., elected Graduate, 1890, 176. 
Hattoei, S., elected Member, 1888, 2. 
Haughton, G. B., elected Associate Member, 1900, 3. 

Havghton, Rev. Dr. S., nominated Honorary Life Member. 1888, 443. — 
Decease, 1898, »l— Memoir, 1897, .^14. 

Address of President, 1888, 289. 
Haughton, S. W., decease, 1900, 6.— Memoir, 1899, 616. 

Brewery Tramways and Rolling Stock, 1888, 341. 
Havghton, T. J., elected IMember, 1885, 1. 
Hauling and Lifting Appliances in Portsmouth Dockyard, 1892, 295. See 

Dockyard Lifting and Hauling. 
Hawdon, W., Cleveland Industries, 1893, 263. 

Dispo.sal of Slag, Paper on the Disposal and Utilization of Blast-Furnace 
Slag, 1892, 70.— Remarks thereon. 80. 94. 
Hawes. D. M. a. G., elected Associate ^lember. 1896, 279. 
Hawes, W. F., Jun., elected Associate Member. 1897, 144. 
Hawkins, E. S., elected Graduate, 1899, 475. 
Hawkins, E. S., elected :\rember, 1892, 414. 
Hawkins, T. S., elected Associate Member, 1897, 144. 
Hawksley, C, Incrustation of Torquay Water IMains, 1899, 510. 

Institution business, 1885, 25. 

Secretary, Vote of thanks on retirement, 1898, 40. 

Water Meters, 1900, 58. 



178 H 

Hawksley, G. AV., elected INIember, 1891, 301. 

Auditor, 1897, 29. 
Hawksley, K. p., elected !Meuiber, 1900, :!55. 

Hawksley, T., Anuiversary congratulations from the Institution. 1887, 28o. — 
Decease, 1894, 4. 

Triple-Expansion Engines, 1887, 6"), 06. 
Ha'Wksley, T. and C. Donation to Engineering Department of Yorksliire 

College, Leeds, 1886, 472. 
Hawksley, Wild, and Co., Brigbtside Boiler and Engine Works. Sheffield, 

1890, 450. 
Havtkswokth, F. S., elected Associate Member, 1900, 3. 
Hawley, C. E., elected Associate Member, 1894, 294. 
Haworth and Co., Kichard. Ordsal Jlills, Salford, 1894, 414. 
Hayes, J. (London), Automatic ^lachine-Gun, 1885, 194. 
Hayes, J. (Birmingham), elected Associate, 1894, 170. — Decease. 1897, 5. — 

Memoii-, 1896, 94. 
Haynes, T. J., decease, 1888, 3.— Memoir, 1887, 147. 
Hayter, H., decease, 1899, 7.— IMemoir, 1898, 533. 
Hayward, R. F., elected Graduate, 1889, 5S5. 
Haywood, A. R., elected Associate Member. 1900, 502. 
Head, A. P., elected Graduate, 1885, 305 .-—transferred to Member. 1892, 3. 

High-Speed Engine, 1894, 241. 

Kange-Finders, 1896, G9. 
Head, H. E., elected :Meraber, 1888, 160. 

Head. Jeremiah, elected I'resident, 1885, 22: 1886, 17.— Decease. 1899, 184: 
1900, 6, 7.— Memoir, 1899, 134. 

Addregaes as President. — At Summer meeting, Lincoln. 1885, 3u9 : Keply 
to vote of thanks for Address. 346. — At Summer meeting, London, 
1886, 275 : lieply to vote of thanks for Address, 296. See Address 
of President. 

Argon, Discovery, 1895, 29. 

Auditor, 1885, 164:— 1886, 20. ^ 

Autographic Test-Recorder. 1886, 100, 103. 

Automatic Machine-Gun, 1885, 19tJ. 

Bag-Makins: 3Iachine, 1889, 637. 

Blooming Mill, 1885, 296, 298. 

Boiler Construction, 1891, 519. 

Boiler-Shell Drilling 3Iachines, 1894, .")27. 

Brewery Tramways and Rolling Stock, 1888, 351. 

By-laws, 1885, 29 :-1886, 21, 24 :— 1891, 33. 

Canal-Boat Propellers. 1894, 372. 

Carbon in Steel, Condition, 1885, 49, 57. 



H 179 

Head, Jeremiah (continued) : — 

Cleveland Industries, Paper on recent developments in the Cleveland 

Iron and Steel Industries. 1893, '22i. — Remarks thereon, 275. 
Clock-Driving for Telescopes. 1888, 323. 
Coal Burning on Cape Railways, 1890, 122. 
Compound Steam Turbine, 1888, .j09. 
Council, Annual Report, 1886, 17 :— 1887, 24 :— 1891, 23. 
Coventry Autumn meeting, 1885, 461. 

Cycles, Construction, 1885, r)20.— Wiieel Load in Cycles, 1886, 185. 
Disposal of Slag, 1892, S4. 
Dockyard Lifting and Hauling, 1892, :i07. 
Drilling Jlachine, Portable Hydraulic. 1887, 76. 
Dryness of Steam, 1895, GS. 
Electric Lighthouse, 1887, 367. 

Electric Lighting. Manchester. 1894, 306.— Private, 1885, 389, 412. 
Electric Plant, 1898, 584. 
Electric Traction, 1898, 94. 
Electric Welding. 1894, 339. 
Fluid-Pressure Reversing Gear. 1894, 275. 
Forth Bridge, 1887, 306. 
Friction Experiments, 1885, 68, 70. 
Frictional Gearing, 1888, 370. 
Frodingham Iron Industry, 1885, 420. 
Gas Engines, 1889, 534. 
Grain Warehousing Machinery, 1891, 381. 
Heat Distribution in Steam Engine, 1887, 532. 
High-Speed Engine, 1894, 242. 
Hydraulic Buffer-Stop, 1886, 119. 
Hydraulic Gas-Stoking, 1895, 346. 
Lincoln Summer meeting. Reply to welcome, 1885, 303. 
Liverpool Motive Power, 1892, 55. 
Locomotives. — Canadian. 1887, 240. — • Compound, 1886, 409. — 

Compounding, 1890, 78. 
London Summer meeting, 1886, 267. — Welcome to Belgian Engineers. 

268. 
Marine-Engine Trials, 1894, 92. 
Marine Engineering, 1891, 359. 
Middlesbrough Salt Industry, 1893, 299. 

Middlesbrough Summer meeting, Welcome to 3Iembers, 1893, 218. 
Narrow-Gauge Railways, 1898, 394. 
Paddle- Wheel Navigation, 1885, 159. 

M 2 



180 H 

Head, Jeremiah (continued) :— 

President, on taking office. 1885, 24.— On re-election as President. 1886, 
19. — On opening of Engineering Department of Yorkshire College, 
Leeds, 1886, 469.— On retiring from presidency, 1887, 20.— Eeply to 
voteof thanks, 1887, 31. 

Raising a Wreck, 1886, 200. 

Refrigerating INIachinery, 1886, 260. 

Eegnault's Steam Experiments, 1889, 461, 462. 

Eiveted Joints, 1885, 2it0. 

Kope Driving, 1896, 362. 

Secretary, Retiring. 1898, 38. 

Semi-Portable Engine, 1885, :!8;t. 412. 

Sewage Outfall Works, 1892, 3:^6. 

Ship-Model Apparatus, 1893, 47. 

Spherical Eccentric, 1885, 432. 

Spherical Engine, 1885, IIU, 119. 

Steam Jacket, 1892, 504. 

Steam Navvy, 1885, 369. 

Steam Pumps, 1893, 45.1. 

Steam Superheating, 1896, 200, 2U7. 

Steel Rails, 1890, 340-2, :i47. 

Steel-Works Macliinery, 1895, 4.i2. 

Taxation of Machinery, 1890, 37. 41. 

Tees Engineering Improvements, 1893, 326. 

Testa of Iron and Steel, 1886, 103. 

Treasurer, 1886, 271. 

Triple-Expansion Engines, 1886, 497, 531. 

Votes of thanks.— To President for Address, 1896, 132.— To retiring 
President, 1890, 29 : 1894, 28 : 1898, :;4.— To retiriug Secretary, 
1898, 38. 

Water Works, Southampton, 1893, 7u. 

Wood-Cutting INIachinery. 1885, 93. 

Yorkshire College, Eeeds. 1886, 469. 
EfeAD, John, Gas for Fuel, 1890, 411. 

Gas Furnaces, 1891, 68, 73, 85. 
Head. Wrightson, and Co., Teesdale Iron Works, Thornaby. 1893, :;65. 
Headley, St. J. B., elected Graduate, 1900, 503. 

Heap, E. D. T., elected Graduate, 1890, 2 :— transferred to Member, 1892, 3. 
Heabson, H. E., elected Member, 1898, :;41. 

Heat Distribution in Steam Engine. Paper on Experiments on the Distribution 
of Heat in a Stationary Steam-Engine, by jMajor T. English, 1887, 478.— 



H 181 

Heat DiSTRiBmox in Steam Exgixe, Paper, 1887 (continued) : — 

Object and scope of trials, 478. — -Description of engines ■with which 
trials were made, 478. — Condenser, air-pump, and circulating pump, 
479. — Boilers, 479. — Steam-jacket and pipes, 480. — Condensing and non- 
condensing trials, 481. — Coal and evaporative duty, 481. — Mode of 
conducting trials, 482. — Method of calculating results, 48"2 : graphic 
representation, 483. — Ratio of efficiency, 485. — Initial condensation of 
steam, 486. — Calculation of water required per stroke, and of indicator 
diagrams, &c., 487. — Relation between surface of steam passages, diameter 
of cylinder, and length of stroke, 487. — Calculated efficiency of engine 
and consumption of water with two different points of cut-off" and with 
varying lengths of stroke, 488. — Condensation and re-evaporation during 
stroke, 489. — Details of calculation of heat distribution, 490-3. — 
Tabulated results for series of sixteen trials, 494-9. 

Discussion, May 1887. — English, IMajor T., Experiments on initial 
condensation in steam cylinder, 500, 503. — "Walker, B., Yalve-motion 
with sharp cut-off', 500. — Greig, D., Reverse calculation of indicator 
diagrams, 501 ; small percentage of heat utilised in engine, 501 ; re- 
evaporation in cylinder, 502. 

Discussion, September 1887. — Carbutt, E. H., Economy in steam-engine 
management, 510. — Longi-idge, M., Consumption of water in single- 
cylinder engines, 510 ; superheating of steam, 510 ; leakage at valves and 
pistons, 510 ; internal heat in steam, 511 ; preferable mode of presenting 
experiments, 511 ; weight of steam and water in non-condensing cylinder, 
512; distribution of heat in non-condensing cylinder, 513; equation of 
heat in cylinder, 516 ; initial condensation in cylinder, and extension of 
compression curve, 516 ; material desirable for cylinder surface of low 
specific heat and low conducting power, 517. — Kennedy, A. B. W., 
Indicator diagram shows less steam than is supplied from boiler, 517 ; 
difference between actual and hyperbolic expansion curve, 518 ; serious 
loss from initial condensation, 519 ; commencement of re-evaporation in 
cylinder, 519; condensation and re-evaporation of steam in cylinders 
lagged but not jacketed, 520 ; prevention of initial condensation by 
steam-jacketing, 521-2 ; instantaneous process of initial condensation, 
522 ; other experiments on initial condensation, 523 ; steam temperatures 
preferable to densities in calculations, 523; re-evaporation during 
return stroke, 523 ; condensation in cylinders lined with lead. 524. — 
Longridge, M., Condensation due to water in cylinder, 524. — Kennedy, 
A. B. AV., Cylinder lined with lead, and with vulcanite, 524. — Unwin, W. C, 
Saturation curve instead of hyperbolic curve represents steam used, 524 ; 
large consumption of water suggests leakage in surface condenser, 525. — 
Halpin, D., High consumption of water, and desirability of steam-jacketing. 



182 H 

Heat Distributiox ix Steam Engine, Discussion, 1887 (continued) : — 

526 ; automatic expansion-gear preferable, 526 ; efficiency of boilers. 527. — 
CowiJer, C. E., Jacketing desirable of cylinders, 527. — Beaumont, W. AV.. 
Better results with longer stroke in proportion to cylinder diameter, 528 ; 
conditions of experiments on initial condensation, 528. — Greig, D., 
Uneconomical result of too early cut-off, 528 ; greater expansion requires 
more cylinders, 529 ; most eflfective cut-off, 520. — Willans, P. W., 
Differences in initial condensation. 529 ; condensation due to range of 
temperature, and obviated by compression, 529 ; Bodmer, G. R., 
Conditions of condensation and re-evaporation in adiabatic expansion, 
530; heat transferred from cylinder to steam, 531. — Head, J.. Consumption 
of water in compound engines, 532 : cylinder lining of compressed steel 
with non-conducting packing behind, 5o2. — Davey, H., Extent of variation 
in initial condensation, 5l!2. — English, Major T., AVant of economy 
in engine. 533 ; condensation in jacket on steam-pipe, 533 ; tightness of 
pistons and valves, 533 ; balance of condensation and re-evaporation, 533 ; 
zero of exjjosed surface, 533 ; initial condensation varies with density of 
Bteam, 'VA3 ; condenser free from leakage, 534 ; conditions almost identical 
in experiments on initial condensation and in actual running, 5:i4 ; most 
effective point of cut-off. 534 : variation of results arises from experimental 
errors, 534. — Carbutt, E. H., Importance of utilising larger percentage of 
steam, 535. — Cotterill, J. H.. Consumption of steam, 53G : cylinder 
condensation augmented in alternate condensation and re-evaporation, 
53G : assumptions affecting calculation of heat transfer in cylinder, and 
causes of condensation, 537 ; coating of clearance surface with suitable 
substance, 538 ; relation of condensation and re-evaporation, 538. 

Heat Losses from Dry and Wet Cylinder Walls exposed to a Vacuum &c., 1893, 
480. See Cylinder Heat Losses. 

Heat Transmission, Paper on Transmission of Heat from Surface Condensation 
through Metal Cylinders, by Lt.-Colonel English and B. Donkin, 1896, 
501. — ^Description of experimental apparatus, 501. — Observations of 
condensing steam, 502. — Twofold measurement of rate of heat 
transmission, 503. — Description of experiments and of metal cylinders, 
504. — Summary of results, 505. — Previous experiments by Nichol and 
Hagemann, 507, 522-5. — Tabulated details of observations, 510-21. 

Discussion. — Davey, H., Condensation in condenser tubes, 526. — 
Walker, W. G., Transfer of heat through ribbed cylinders, 527. — Barker, 
A. H., Steam on both sides of metallic wall, 527. — Carter, E. T., 
Cloudiness in condensing steam, 528. — Halpin, D., Actual rate of heat 
transmission, 529. — Longridge, M., Jacketing of cylinders by admitting 
steam through jacket into cylinder, 530. — English, Lt.-Colonel, Eate of 
condensation; effect of film of water; object of steam-jacket; adiabatic 



H 183 

Heat Traxsmissiox, Difcmnon. 1896 (continucJ) : — 

expansion and cloudiness, 531 : rate of heat transmission, 532. — Donkin, 
B.. Continuous or not continuous transmission of heat, 532 ; tabulated 
results of experiments, 53i-5. 
Heath. A. M., elected :\[ember, 1898, H2. 
Heath, C. L. E., elected Associate Member, 1896, 102. 

Training of Engineer Students, 1899, o9o. 
Heath, E. A., elected 3Iember, 1899, 292. 
Heath, G. W., elected Member, 1889, 584. 

Heathorn, Capt. T. B., Partially Immersed Propellers, 1897, 121. 
Heating Fukkaces for Steel Ingots, 1893, 247. See Cleveland Industries. 
Heatlt. H.. elected Member, 1888, 160. 
Heaton. C. elected Member, 1897, 432. 
Heaton, G., elected Meuiber, 1897, 256. 
Hedley, R.. elected :Member. 1899, 474. 
Hedlev, W. S., elected Graduate, 1900, 3.5G. 
Heexan. E. H., Cleveland Industries, 1893, 201. 
Electric Rock-Drill, 1893, 315. 
Middlesbrough Salt Industry, 1893, 298 

Spherical Engine, Paper on the Tower Spherical Engine, 1885, 96. — 
Eemarks thereon, 105, 117. 
Heixke, E. H. a., elected Member, 1895, 547. 
Heinkich. H. K.. elected Graduate, 1893, 392. 

Hele-Shaw, H. S., Experimental Marine Engine, Paper on the Experimental 
3Iarine Engine and the Alternative-Centre Testing ^Machine in the 
"Walker Engineering Laboratories of University College, Liverpool, 
1891, 3SG. — Eemarks thereon, 398, 403, 414. 
Gas Engines, 1889, 535, 537. 
Eegnault's Steam Experiments. 1889, 459. 

Eoad Locomotion, Paper, 1900, 185. — Supplementary Paper on the recent 
1.000 Allies Eoad Trials, 1800, 254.— Eemarks thereon, 247, 253, 
298, 299, 318. 
Hemingway. A., elected Associate Member, 1897, 144. 
Hemecgw^ay. L.. elected Graduate, 1899, 294. 
Henderson, A. J., elected Associate Member, 1894, 470. 
Hent)ekson, J.. Irish newspaper printing, 1896, 419. 
Henderson. T.. elected :Member, 1891, 30l.— Decease. 1897, 5. — Memoir, 1896, 

258. 
Henderson, W., Graduate transferred to Member, 1886, 3. 
Henderson and Co., D. and W., Shipbuilding Yard and Engineering Works, 

Glasgow, 1895, 490. 
Heneage, E., Automatic Machiue-Gun, 1885, 195. 



184 H 

Henesey, E., decease, 1893, 4 :— ^lemoir. 494. 

Henking, G. C, elected :Member. 1888, 444. 
Koad Locomotion, 1900, 276. 
Testing :Macbine. 1888, 466. 

Hepburn, T., elected Member, 1891, 196. 

Hepworth, J. W., elected Member, 1900, 2. 

Hepworth-Collins. W., elected Associate Member. 1899, 145. 

Herbert, A., elected Member, 1892, 229. 

Herbert, Alfred, Machine-Tool "Works, Coventry, 1897, 369, 421. 

Herbert, C, elected Member, 1893, 1. 

Herbert, G. H., elected Member. 1893, 1. 

Herman, B. 11., elected Member, 1894, 469. 

Herriot, W. S., elected Member, 1894, 293. 

Hebschmann, a. J., elected Associate Member, 1898, 143. 
Water Softening, 1898, 4:!.'). 

Hersey Water Meter, 1900, 44. ^'ee Water Meters. 

Hetherixgton. E. p., elected Member. 1897, 2.'6. 

Hewett, E. E., decease, 1885, 4.— Memoir, 1884, 473. 

Hewitt, C. J., Paper on the Manufacture of Standard Screws for Machiue-made 
Watches, 1894, 473.— Eemarks thereon, 486, 49J, 497, 501. 

Heydemann, H. G. J., elected Graduate. 1900, 356. 

Hibbert, G.. elected Member. 1887, 1. 

Hick, J., decease, 1895, 4.— iMemoir, 1894, 161. 

Hick, Hargreaves, and Co., Soho Iron Works, Bolton, 1894, 406, 454. 

HiCKEN, T., elected Member, 1885, 163. 

Hicks, F. G., elected Associate Member, 1900, 356. 

Hide, T. C. decease, 1892, 4.— [Memoir. 1891, CA){i. 

HiGBY, R. G., elected jMember, 1896, 462. 

HiGGENS, T. W. E., Eoad Locomotion, 1900, 294. 

Higginbottom, L.. elected ^Member, 1894, 293. 

Electric Lighting Works. ^Manchester, 1894, 303. 

Higgins, W. B.. elected Graduate. 1893, 98. 

Higgs, a. F., elected Graduate, 1900, 4. 

High-Speed Engine, Paper on the Grafton High-Speed S team-Engine, by 
E. W. Anderson, 1894, 213. — General construction; single-acting single- 
cylinder engine, 213. — Cylinder ; pistons, 214. — Principle of design, 214. 
—Effective length of stroke, 216. — Steam distribution, valve-motion 
diagrams, 217. — Details of construction, 222. — Economy of steam 
consumption, 223. — High-speed of revolution, low speed of pistons, 224. 
—Balancing, 225. — Clearance, and compression, 225. — Wear, 225. — 
ludicator, 226. — Condensing, 227. 

Discussion. — Anderson, E. AV., Exhibited pistons; Perry reflecting 



H 185 

High-Speed Engine, Difcu<^ion, 1894 (continued) : — 

indicator, 22S. — Brainwell, Sir F., Indicator diagrams ; short stroke 
and liigh speed, 230; C3'lindrical slide-valve, 231.— Wicksteed, J. H., 
Mechanical efiBciency, 232. — Halpin, D., Initial condensation, 233 ; 
indicator diagrams at high speeds, 234. — Kichards, L., Brake horse- 
power ; temperature of lubricant, 23i. — Eigg, A., Compression of exhaust 
steam ; weight of pistons, 235 ; slide-valve ; clearance, 236 ; balancing of 
moving parts, 237. — Davey, H., Clearance and compression, 23S ; weight 
of pistons and construction of packing, 239.— Beare, T. H., Brake horse- 
power and indicator diagrams, 240. — Donkin, B., Dryness of steam, 240 ; 
indicator, 241. — Jenkin, 0. F., Compression and release, 241. — Head, 
A. P., Reflecting indicator, 241.— Head, J., Balancing of reciprocating 
■weights, 242 ; high speed of turbine engines ; lubrication of single- 
acting high-speed engines, 243. — Schonheyder, W., Horse-power; starting 
and lubricating, 244. — Cowper, C. E., Piston weight and engine speed ; 
bath of lubricant, 245.— Daniel, W., Governor, 245.— Anderson, E. W., 
Compression; weight of pistons, 246; dead points; surface exposed to 
steam, 247; bath of lubricant; advantage of compression, 248; piston 
pacMng; mechanical eflSciency; calibration of reflecting indicator, 249; 
valve diagrams, 250 ; size of engine, starting and governing, 251. — 
Kennedy, A. B. W., Valve diagi-ams, 251. 

High-Speed Engines, Self-Lubricating. 1897, 316. -See Quick-E evolution 
Engines. 

HiLDAGE, H. T., elected Associate Member, 1899, 474. 

HiLGEB, A., Kange-Finders, 1896, 67. 

Hill, A. C, decease, 1890, 4 : — Memoir, 172. 

Hill, A. P., elected Associate Member, 1898, 143. 

Hill, A. K., elected Member, 1889, 204. 

Hill, J., elected Associate Member, 1898, 2. 

Hill, J. K., Graduate transferred to Member, 1895, 3. 

Hill, E. A., elected Member, 1885, 1. 

Hill, T., elected Associate Member, 1896, 102. 

Hill, W. C, elected Associate ^Member, 1897, 2. 

Hill, ^\. H., elected Graduate, 1900, 183. 

Hill, W. S., E.X., elected Member, 1900, 2. 

HxLL AND Co., John, Newport Rolling Mills, Middlesbrough, 1893, 338. 

Hill and Sons, Lucan Woollen Factory, Lucan, 1888, 414. 

HiLLER, E. G., elected 3Iember, 1890, 1. 
Boiler Construction, 1891, 535. 
Water Softening, 1898, 439. 

HiLLEB, H. K., elected Member, 1899, 474. 

Hilton, C. W., elected Member, 1886, 465. 



186 H 

Hind, E,, elected Associate, 1887, 474. 

HiNDMAESH, T., elected Member, 1885, 2.— Decease, 1890, 4.— Memoir, 1889, 103. 

HiNDSON, W., elected Member, 1887, 283.— Decease, 1897, 5.— Memoir, 1896, 599. 

HiPKiNs, W. E., elected Member, 1898, 341. 

HiKAOKA, H., elected Member. 1897, jl.lC. 

HiEN, G. A., Triple-Expansion En^jines, 1887, 50. 

Hirst, G. F., elected Associate ^leiuber, 1898, 2. 

Hirst, J., elected Member, 1897, 250. 

Hitchcock, C, elected Member, 1896, 4GJ. 

HiTCHiNS, C. F., elected Associate Member, 1899, 474. 

HoBBS, C. J., elected Member, 1898, 142, 

HoBSON, J. E., elected Member. 1900, 501. 

Hockley, N. J., elected Associate Member, 1896, 54S. 

Hodge, A., elected Member. 1891, 190. 

Hodges, F. G., elected Member, 1891, 301. 

Hodges, F. W., elected Graduate. 1894, 170 :— elected Associate Member. 1897, 

144 :— transferred to ^lember, 1898, 548. 
Hodges, M. H., elected Member, 1896, 1. 
Hodgkin, J. E., Steam Pumps, 1893, 450. 
Hodgson, G. H. (Bradford), elected IMcruber, 1889, 584. 
Hodgson, G. H. (Newcastle, New South Wales), elected (Jraduate, 1896, 103:— 

elected Associate Member, 1900, 90. 
Hodgson, H., elected Member, 1899, 3. 
Hodgson, H. E., elected Member, 1892, 2. 
Hodgson, E. B., elected Associate ^lember, 1898, 517. 

Kefuse Destructor at Torquay, 1899, 431. 

Eoad Locomotion, 1900, 301. 
Hodgson, W., elected Member, 1900, 5(il. 
Hodgson, "W. J., elected Graduate. 1891, 197. 
HoDSON, R., decease, 1891, 4.— iMemoir, 1890, 550. 
Hogarth, T. O., elected Member. 1891, 190. 
Hogg, W., elected Graduate. 1887, 281. 
Hoggins, A. F., elected jMember, 1889, 1. 
Hoists, Pneumatic, 1900, 142. Sec Portable Pneumatic Tools. 
HoLDEN, J., elected Member. 1886, 405. 

Canadian Locomotives, 1887, 230. 

Compound Locomotives, 1889, 124, 125. 

Milling Cutters, 1890, 545. 

Petroleum Fuel in Locomotives, 1889, 70, 72, 73. 
HoLDEN, It., elected Member, 1899, 474. 

Mean-Pressure Indicator, 1899, 003. 
HoLDEN AND SoN, Tanncrs, Curriers, and Japanners, Walsall, 1897, 309, 412. 



H 187 

HoLDswoKTH, F. M., elected Graduate, 1886, 466. 

HoLGATE, C. H., elected Member, 1895, 327. 

HOLL-VNT), C. B., Paper ou a Blooming 51111 with Balanced Top KoU at the 

Ebbw Vale Works. 1885, 292. 
HOLLIDAT, J. (Westbromwich), decease, 1886, o. — Memoir, 1885, IGl. 
HOLLIDAT, J. (Dublin), elected Member, 1895, ail. 
HoLLixGswoRTH, A. A., elected Graduate, 1897, 3 : — elected Associate Member, 

1899, 145. 
HoLLiNGSWORTH. E. M., elected Graduate, 1894, 294 : —elected Associate 

3Iember, 1896, 102. 
HoLLis, C. W., elected Member, 1886, 125. 
HoLLis. H. "W., elected Member. 1885, 4()2. 
HoLMAN, F., elected Member. 1896, 101. 
HoLiiAX, H. W.. elected Member, 1891, 301. 
Holmes, H., elected Associate ^lember. 1899, 145. 
Holmes, J. H., elected Member. 1899, 144. 
Holmes, P. F., elected Member, 1896, 1. 

Holmes and Co.. Coachbuilding and Harness Works, Derby. 1898, 489. 
HoLMSTKOM. C. A., elected Member, 1892, 2. 

HoLROYD, J. H.. elected Graduate. 1885, 2 : — transferred to Member, 1889, 3. 
HoLROYD, V. A., elected Associate Member, 1898, .")47. 
HoLT, F., decease, 1894, 4.— Memoir, 1893, 91. 
Holt, R., elected Member. 1880, 298. 
Holt. W. L., decease, 1890, 4.— Memoir, 1889, 194. 
Holt, W. P., elected Member, 1890, 298. 
HoMAX, B. v., elected Graduate, 1898, 3. 
HoMAX, H., elected ^Member, 1888, 2. 
HOMEK, C. J., decease. 1894, 4.— :Memoir. 1893, 49."). 
HoMERSHAM. S. C. deccase, 1887, 3. 
HoMFRAT, S. G., elected 3Iember, 1895, 327. 
HoNiBALL, C. E.. elected Associate Member, 1898, 143. 
Honorary Life Memberships.— 1888, 443.— 1889, 9. 583.— 1890, 9. 175.— 

1892, 101.-1896, 2i;.— 1899, 143. 
Hooker. B., elected Member. 1890, 1. 
Hope, J. B., elected Member, 1892, 102. 
Hopkins, J. S., decease, 1899, 7.— Memoir, 1898, 138. 
Hopkins and Sons, Granville Tin-Plate Works, Birmingham. 1897, 388. 
HoPKiNSON, A. H., elected Graduate, 1900, 97. 
Hopkinson, C. elected IMember, 1885, 2. — Honorary Secretary of ^Manchester 

Summer meeting, 1894. Presentation from the Iiistitutiou, 1895, 9. 
Drainage Works. ^lanchester, 1894, 397. 
Electric Lighting Works, Manchester, 1894, 304, 305. 



188 H 

HoPKiNSON, C. (continued) : — 

Electric Welding, 1894, 3ol. 

Eopes and Belts, 1895, 653. 
HoPKiNSox, Dr. E., elected Member, 1894, 1. ' 

Canal-Boat Propellers, 1894, 371. 

Electric Lighting Works. Manchester, 1894, 310. 
HoPKiNSON, Dk. J., appointed Member of Council, 1889, 203. — Elected Member 
of Council, 1890, 2G: 1893, 2S: 1896, 28.— Decease, 1898, 545: 
1899, 7-8.— :\remoir, 1898, .".34. 

Dryness of Steam, 1895, 77. 

Electric Engineering, 1888, 129. 

Electric Lighting, Paper on the new Electric Lighting Works, 
Manchester. 1894, •J',t7.— Kemarks thereon, 312, 317. 

Electric Welding, 1894, 349. 
Hopper, A., elected Member, 1890, 176. 
Hopper, J. E., elected Member, 1890, 176. 
Hopper, W., decease, 1886, 3 :— Memoir, 121. 
HopwooD, J., elected Member, 1889, 346. 
Horxbrook, K. H., elected Member, 1891, 480. 
HoRNBROOK, W., Mayor of Devonport, Welcome to ^lembers at Summer Meetings 

Plymoutl), 1899, 288. 
Horner, George, Clonard Foundry, Belfast, 1896, 4.">2. 
Horner, J., elected Hember, 1895, 327. 

Flax Dressing Jlachineiy, Paper on Flax Scutching and Flax Hackling 
Machinery, 1896, 283.— Remarks thereon, 295, 300. 
HoHNER, J. G., elected Associate Member, 1895, 2. 

HoRNSBY AND SoNS, Kicliard, Spittlegate Iron Works, Grantham, 1885, 435, 447. 
Horse-Hati: Cloth Works, Sheffield. 1890, 442, 453. 
Horseless Carriages, Petition to Local Government Board, 1895, 550. 
Hoeseley Co., Bridge and Eoofing Works, Dudley Port, 1897, 368. 
Horse-Power foi; Marine Propulsion, 1896, 79. ,sVe ^Marine Horse-Power. 
Horsfield, C, elected Member, 1889, 346. 
Horsfield.P. F., elected Graduate, 1900, 3r)6. 
Horsfield, R., elected Member, 1891, 1K6. 
HoRSLEY. T., decease, 1886, 3, — Memoir. 1885, 5"25. 
Horsxaill, AV. O., elected Associate Member. 1899, 14."). 
HoRSNELL, D., elected Member, 1892, 414. 

Horwich Locomotive Works, 1891, 432, 4.j6 : 1894, 406, 456. — Electric 
Lighting 1893, 40S, 410. — Narrow-gauge Tramways and Rolling 
Stock, 1888, :!46 : see Brewery Tramways. 
HosGOOD, J. H.. elected Graduate, 1886, 126:— transferred to :\Iember, 1891, 3. 
HosGOOD, O. S., elected Slember, 1899, 144. 



H 189 

HosGOOD, T. W., elected Graduate, 1889, 204. 

HosGOOD, W. J., elected C4raduate, 1891, 2 : — transferred to Member, 1898, ."i. 

Hosiery Machinery Works, Nottingham, 1898, 517. 

HosKEX, A. F., elected Graduate, 1889, 585. 

HosKEN, E., elected :Member, 1889, ?>i6. 

HosKiN, R., Sheffield Water Works. 1890, 438. 

HosKixG, T.. elected 3Iember, 1888, 268. 

Hospitals. — Floating, in River Tees, 1893, 325, 366. — Foundling, London, new 

sanitary -works, 1886, 425. — New General, Birmingham, 1897, ;!S4. 

See also Infirmary. 
HoT-AiB Engine, Stirling, at Dundee Foundry, Dundee, 1887, 454. 
Hot-Blast Stoves, 1893, 233. 
HocGHTOX, F. G., elected Member, 1892, 414. — Decease. 1898, (;.^]Memoir,. 

1897, 234. 
HouGHTOx, R. J., elected Member, 1898, 2. 
HocGHTON, T. H., elected Member, 1889, 584. 
HorGHTOx-BKOwx, E., elected Member, 1887, 157. 
House, H. A. (Bridgeport, U.S.), elected Member, 1896, 462. 
House, H. A., Jux. (East Cowes), elected .Associate ^lember. 1895, 548 : — 

transferred to Member. 1899, 5. 
House of the Ixstitction, 1889, 28 ,—1895, 24 : — 1896, G .—1897, 7, 25, 145>. 

275 :— 1898, 8, 30 :— 1899, 1, 9, 255-64 :— 1900, 8. 
How, W. F., elected Member, 1891, l'J6. 
Howard, C, elected Associate, 1898, 547. 
Howard, G., elected Graduate, 1889, 585. 
Howard, H. F., elected Member, 1897, 256. 
Howard, J., decease, 1890, 4.— IVIemoir, 1889, i;t5. 
Howard, J. H., Graduate transferred to Member, 1890, 3. 
HowABTH, A. M.. elected Member, 1896, 1. 
HowARTH. W., elected 3Iember, 1885, 305. 
Howe, H. M., Alloys Research, 1891, 581. 
Howe Machixe Co.. New, Glasgow, 1895, 491. 
Howell, E. J., elected Associate Member, 1900, 3. 
Howell, S. E.. Gas for Fuel. 1890, 408. 

Steel Steam-Pipes, 1896, 244. 
HowiTT, J. J., elected Member, 1892, 2. 
HowsoN, R., Cleveland Industries, 1893, 262. 
Hoy, H. a., elected Member, 1891, 480. 
HoYLB, J. E., elected Member, 1887, 1. 

Gas for Fuel, 1890, 408, 409, 410. 
HoYLE AND Sons, Thomas, Calico Printing Works, Manchester. 1894, 402 
HuBBACK, C. A., elected Member, 1891, 480. 



190 H 

Hldsox, F. J., elected :Meinber. 1898, 142. 
Hudson, J. G.. Marine-Engine Trials. 1890, -271. 

Steam-Engine Breakdowns. 1896, :i9:;. 

Steam Jacket, 1892, 509. 

Throttling and Variable Expansion. 1895, 220. 
Hudson, W., elected 3Ieniber, 1893, 3C>1. 
Hughes, E. S., elected Graduate. 1900, 4. 
Hughes. E. 8. B., elected Graduate. 1891, 480. 
Hughes, F. E. H., elected Associate Member. 1899, 4. 
Hughes, G., elected Member. 1899, 144. 
Hughes, G. D., Aluminium. 1898, :^.t;(i. 

Business of Institution, 1885, 25.— By-laws, 1885, 29. 

Gas for Fuel. 1890, 410. 

ShefSeld AVater Works. 1890, 432. 

Water Softening, 1898, 440. 
Hughes. G. H., elected Associate Member. 1898, 2. 

Steam Laundry ^Machinery. 1898, 2'.t7. 
Hughes, J., elected Member, 1889, :;4tJ. 
Hughes, R. M., elected Member. 1891, ilOl. 
Hughes, T. W. R., elected Member. 1900, 5nl. 
HuGON Gas Engine. 1889, 50j. See Gas Engines. 
Hullah, a., elected Member. 1892, 229. 

HuLSE, J. W., Graduate transferred to Member. 1891, 3.— Decease, 1899, 7.— 
Memoir. 1898, 314. 

Boiler-Sbell Drilling Machines. 1894, :<-20. 
HuLSE, R. L., elected Member. 1897, 2.'.0. 
HuLSE, W. W., decease. 1898, 6.— Memoir. 1897, 137. 
HcLSE AND Co., Ordeal Works, Salford, 1894, 418. 
Human, E.. elected Associate Member. 1893, 220. 
Human. H.. Lighting of Workshops, 1893, 417. 
HuMBER AND Co., Cvcle Works.— Becston. Nottingham, 1898, 519.— Coventry, 

1897, 3G9, 424. 
Humphries, E. T., elected Member, 1890, -I'JS. 
Humphrey, F. G., elected Graduate, 1896, 403. 
Humphrey, H. A., elected Member. 1899, 3. 

Humphrey -Moore, M. G. A., elected Associate Member, 1900, 'J6. 
Humphreys, H. H., elected Member, 1900, 3."i.j. 
Humphreys. W. H., elected Associate Member, 1899, 474. 
Humfidge, J. D.. elected Member, 1894, 1. 

Hungarian Flour Milling. 1889, 149. See Roller Flour Milling. 
Hunt, H., elected Associate 31ember, 1899, H.j. 
Hunt, R., elected Member, 1885, 2. 



H 191 

Hist. K. W.. elected 3[ember. 1898, 54fJ. 

Hunt, T.. decease, 1897, 5.— Memoir, 1898, ooG. 

Hunter, C. L., elected Member. 1889, 5S4. 

Hunter, F., Water Meters, 1900, 78. 

Hunter. G. L., elected INIember. 1899. 144. 

Hunter, J., elected Member. 1886, 1. 

Hunter, W., Dockyard Liftin;,' and Haulinix, 1892, '.Vt?,. 

HuNTON, W., elected Graduate, 1900, 4. 

Hurst. I. E., K.N., elected Member. 1900, 2. 

Hutchinson, E. J., elected Associate ^leraber, 1900, .■>02. 

Hutchison, P.. elected Graduate. 1899, 294. 

Hutson, C. a., elected IMember, 1899, o. 

Hutton, "W., elected Associate, 1896, 4i32. 

Htjtton and Sons, William, Silver and Electro-Plate I\Ianuf;\ctory, Sheffield, 
1890, 452. 

Huxley, G., elected Member. 1888, 2G9. 

Hyde, G. H., elected Associate Member, 1894, 2i»4. 

Hyde, Major-General H., Pl.E., decease, 1888, 3.— 3Iemoir, 1887, 467. 

Hyde Park Foundry Co., Glasgow, 1895, 492. 

Hyde Park Locomotive Works. Glasgow, 1895, 460, 481. 

Hydraulic Buffer-Stop, Paper on a Hydraulic Buffer-Stop for Pailways, by 
A. A. Langley, 1886, 105. — Object and advantages, 105. — Construction of 
hydraulic cylinders and pistons, 105. — Tapering strips for maintaining 
uniform resistance throughout stroke, 106. — Length of stroke, 106.— 
Fixed stop, 107. — Counterweights for drawing the pistons forwards again 
after impact, 107. — Body of buffer-stops. 107. — Air as a resisting medium, 
108. — Piesults of trials of hydraulic buffer-stops, 108. — Cost, maintenance, 
and space, 108. — Length of stroke, lii9. — Theory of action, 109. — 
Hydraulic buffer-stops now in use, 110. 

Discussion. — Langley, A. A., Eesistauce offered by hydraulic buffer- 
stop, 110. — Tower, B., Length of stroke independent of speed, 111. — 
Dobson. B. A., Piston-rods remaiu closed up when carriages are left 
standing against them. 111. — Tomlinson. J., Experience with ordinary 
fixed stops, 111; hydraulic stop remains closed up until obstruction is 
removed, 112. — Carbutt, E. H.. Utility of hydraulic stops in terminal 
stations, 112. — Walker, B.. Hydraulic buffer for controlling recoil 
of guns, 113; hydraulic control of steam-engine. 114. — Douglass, 
Sir J. N., Hydraulic buffer-stop for gun recoil and railway trains, 114. — 
Smith, K. H., Shock upon chain attached to counterweight, 114. — 
Sterne, L., Objection to overhanging -weight in projecting buffer-stops 
with considerable stroke, 115 ; experience with pneumatic buffer-stop, 115. 
— Flannery, J. F., Absence of recoil in hydraulic buffer-stop, 115. — 



192 H 

Htdkatjlic Buffer-Stop. Difcti^^'ion, 1886 (continued) : — 

Wilmer, H., Efficiency of laydraulic buffer-stops. 116; pressure of water 
in cylinders. IIG; maintenance of proper efficiency. 117: absence of 
recoil, 117. — Robinson. H., Hydraulic power for controlling steam starting 
gear in marine engines, 1 17.— Langley, A. A., Length of stroke 
Independent of speed, 117: stops remaining closed up, 118: speed 
of running into stops experimentally, 118: damage to fixed buffer-stops, 
118: chain attached to counterweight. 118. — Head, J.. Gauge-plates for 
regulating size of orifices in pistons, 119. — Langley, A. A., Size of orifice* 
ascertained by trial, 119. — Head, J., Necessity for efficient buffer-stops, 
119 ; hydraulic stops for gim-carriages, 119. 

Htdbaulic Cement, 1893, 24n. — Manufacture at Hartlepool, 1893, 378. 

Hydraulic Drill. Portable, 1887, 72. See Portable Hydraulic Drill. 

Hydraulic Gas-Stoking, Paper on Hydraulic Stoking Machinery and Labour- 
Saving Appliances in modem Gas Works, by A. S. Biggart, 1895, 331. — 
Hand labour, 331. — Labour-saving appliances, 332. — Coal breaker: 
hydraulic charging machine, 333 : method of working. 334 ; improvements 
inj construction, 33.") : coal-feeding drum, 330 : lateral traverse of 
machine, 337. — Hydraulic drawing machine. 338. — Results of working, 
339. 

Discusmm. — Foulis. W., Rapidity of reciprocating motions, 341. — 
Walker. A. T., Pressure of water: flexible tubes, 341. — Ellington, E. B., 
Power for working machines. 341. — Parsons, Hon. R. C, Shock resulting 
from reversal of water pressure, 341. — Piatt, J., Pressure adopted ; 
inclined retorts, 342. — West. J., Saving by machinery ; early machines. 
343 ; gas-stoking in Scotland and in England, .344 ; compressed-air 
machinery. 34."). — Donkin, B.. Coal charged per hour, 345. — Clarkson, T., 
Single hand-lever for five operations, 34<).^Saxon, A., Copper tubes, 346. 
— Head. J.. Coal-charging machinery in America, 346 : electrical power 
instead of hydraulic, 347. — Biggart. A. S., Low hydraulic pressure ; flexible 
pipe ; power required ; shock from sudden stoppage, 348 ; number of 
retorts worked per day, 349 : weight of charge, time of charging and 
drawing, 3')0 ; operations controlled by one lever ; breakage of copper 
tubes; elevators: electrical power. 3ril. — Foulis. W., Original machines 
still working. 3.")2. — Kennedy. A. B. W., Power expended in ciiarging 
and drawing retorts, 3.52. 

Hydraulic Lift for Ships, Xova Scotia, 1889, 216. See Address of President, 
Charles Cochrane. 

Hydraulic IMachinery. Forth Bridge Works, 1887, 312; see Forth Bridge 
Machinery.— Western Railway. Paris, 1889, 548. 569. 

Hydraulic Power in Portsmouth Dockyard. 1892, 295. See Dockyard Lifting 
and Hauling. 



H 193 

Hydraulic Power Supply, Notes on Hydraulic Power Supply in Towns : 
Glasgow, Manchester, Buenos Aires, &c., by E. B. Ellington, 1895, 353. — 
Existing hydraulic-power woiks, 353-4 ; general arrangement in Glasgow 
and in ^lanchester, 353 ; engines, boilers, 355 ; accumulators, delivery, 
356 ; site of station : water, mains, 357 ; joints ; registration of supply, 
358; efficiency, 359. — Automatic flow-recorders, 360. — Detection of waste, 
362. — Frost, 363. — ^Meters, 364. — Application of power, 366.— Comparison 
of hydraulic and electric power supply, 367. — Use of hydraulic power for 
generating electricity, 370. — -Antwerp hydraulic-power service. 371. — 
Cost of hydraulic power, 371. — Hydraulic power supply for drainage ia 
Buenos Aires, 372 ; trials of pumping engines, 374. 

DiscH'^sion. — Ellington, E. B., Specimens of damaged pipes and bolts, 
375. — Parsons, Hon. R. C, Drainage of Buenos Aires, 376 ; electrical, 
compressed-air, and hydraulic systems, 377. — Crosland, J. F. L., Boilers 
in Manchester and Glasgow pumping stations, size of economisers, 378. — 
Beeley, T., Construction of boilers used in Glasgow station, 380. — 
Wicksteed, J. H., Flanges at joints of pipes ; hydraulic and electric 
distribution, 382. — Smith, H., Valve for sewage-pump motors, 382. — 
Pearson, H. W., Coal consumption and water supply ; efficiency of 
hydraulic pjwer supply ; water meters ; frost, 383. — Gale, J. M., Pressure 
adopted in Glasgow, 383 ; size of mains, 384. — Tweddell, R. H., 
Hydraulic power at Hull, 385 ; horse-power transmitted per mile ; horse- 
power per machine ; application of power and efficiency, 386 ; comparison 
between hydraulic and electric power supply ; generation of electricity by 
hydraulic power, 387.— Clarkson, T., Pelton wheel, 388.— Walker, A. T., 
Hydraulic power for cranes, 389. — Riches, T. H., Hastie engine and 
Pelton wheel, 390. — Kennedy, A. B. W., Electric and hydraulic supply, 
.390; load factor, 391; comparison of salaries and coal, 392 ; hydraulic- 
power efficiencies ; station costs, 393. — Ellington, E. B., Station costs, 394 ; 
speed of engines, and losses, 395 ; cost of fuel, 396 ; financial results, 398. 
— Kennedy, A. B. W., Electric meters, 398. — Ellington, E. B., Horse-power 
taken per mile and per machine, 399 ; pressures adopted in Manchester 
and Glasgow ; Pelton wheel, 400 ; Hastie engine ; valves of hydraulic 
sewage-pumps, 401. — Schonheyder, W., Hydraulic meters, 401. — 
Watklnson, W. H., Comparison of hydraulic power and electricity, 402. — 
Ellington, E. B., High-pressure meters; automatic running of pumping 
engines, 403. 
Hydraulic Power Supply. — Birmingham, 1897, 310.— Buenos Aires, 1895, 372, 
376. — Glasgow, 1895, 353 ; see Hydraulic Power Supply, Notes : 
Pumping Station, 471.— Liverpool, 1891, 443 : 1892, 32 ; see 
Liverpool Motive Power. — London, 1886, 417: 1900, 469. — 
Manchester, 1894, 403, 407. 



194 H 

Htdbaulic Eams, 1888, 57, 68, 75. See Irrigating Machinery. 

Hydrailic Kivetixg at Forth Bridge. 1889, 217. See Address of President, 

Charles Cochrane. 
Hydraulic Testing Machines.— Emery's, 1888, 206, 448.— Whitvrorth's, 1898, 

670.— Wicksteed's, 1886, 27. See Autographic Test-Recorder ; 

Riveted Joints ; and Testing. 
Hydro-Pneumatic Disappearing Gun, Fort Cumberland, Portsmouth, 1892, 367. 
Hyland, J. F.. elected IMember, 188-5, 4t;2. 



PAnson, J. C., elected Member, 1897, 432. 

Ice and Cold Storage Works, Plymouth, 1899, 457. 

Ice-Making IMachisery, 1886, 201. See Picfrigeratiug INIachinery. 

Iddon, J., elected IMember, 1900, 2. 

Iden, G., elected Associate [Member, 1896, 270 :— transferred to Member, 1900, 357. 

Imperial "Water Meter, 1900, 51, 70, 78, 00. See Water dieters. 

Incandescent Glow-Lamps, 1893, r.OO. See Lighting of Workshops. 

Inchicore Locomotive Works, Dublin, 1888, 378, 306. 

Incrustation of Torquay Water ^JIains, Paper on the Incrustation of Iron 
Pipes at the Torquay Water AN'oiks, by W. Ingham, 1899, 470. — "\\'ater 
supply of Torquay, 470. — Quick corrosion of water main, 479. — 
Construction of scraper ; knives ; force required to drive scraper, 480. — 
Tabulated summary of scraping water-mains by water-pressure in various 
towns, 482-4. — Approximate cost of scrapers, hatch-boxes, and wash-outs, 
485. — DiflSculties encountered in scraping, 485. — Air-valves and decrease 
of corrosion, 486. — Delivery of mains before and after scraping, 487. — 
Diagram showing incrustation in section of 10-inch pipe in one year, 489. — 
Time occupied in scraping 14 miles of pipe, 491. — Analyses of rust taken 
from the Torquay mains compared with that of Aberdeen, 491. — Analyses 
of Torquay water before it nterspipe and afier it reaches Torquay 
(14 miles), 492. — Construction of nodules of rust; chemical action in 
formation of rust, 493. — Considerable variation of incrustation in different 
districts, 494. — Analyses of Otterboume water at Southampton Water 
Works, 494. — Analyses of water at Bath, 495. — Methods employed in 
pipe-making to lessen incrustation, 497. 

Discussion. — Ingham, W., Exhibited specimens of incru.-tation ; action 
of scraper, 498 ; nodules of rust accumulated in one year and in forty 
years on an uncoated pipe, 499.— AVhite, Sir W. H., Paper prepared for 
the Plymouth Meeting, 499.— Brunei, H. M.. Lajing of main from 



I 195 

I.vcRCSTAxnN OF ToEQUAY Water Mains, Discussion, 1899 (continued) : — 

Tottiford to Torquay, 500 ; reduced flow of water tlu-ough incrustation ; 
successful result from scraping, 501 ; following the scraper by sound along 
the pipe Hue, 502. — Deacon, G. F., Acidity of upland waters ; nodular 
oxide formation in cast and wrought-iron pipes ; growth of nodule through 
defect in asphalte coating, 503; — precautions to avoid defects; peaty 
deposit in mountain water consists of oxides of irou and manganese, 504 : 
retardation of flow in main from Lake Vyrnwy to Oswestry, 505 ; floating 
steel-drum scraper fur Liverpool and Kivington main, 506 ; parallel flow 
turbine-brush with whalebone blades for Yyrnwy pipes, 507 ; velocity of 
brush ; position in pipe known by means of gong, 508 ; successful 
brashing without damage to coating of pipe, 509 ; filter beds close to 
reservoir; advantage of double coating to pipes, 509. — Hawksley, C, 
Comparison of actual delivery with theoretical delivery after scraping ; 
heating of pipes before being coated, 510 ; testing with oil instead of 
water, 511. — Eaton, E. M., Incrustation of pipes in Sheflield ; spiral-spring 
tube-scraper for small pipes, 511 ; peaty deposit in main, 512 ; tubercles 
on coated aud uncoated pipes ; growth of tubercles, 513 ; white paint for 
coating pipes, 514. — Ingham, W., Lc eating sciaper by twine attached, 514 ; 
small pin-poiut underneath centre of nodule ; iron microbe theory, 515 ; 
delivery of pipes at Torquay; cost of scraping at Sheffield and Kendal, 
516, — "White, Sir W. H., Importance of the mechanical engineer, 517. — 
Pearson, H. W., Exhibited pieces of pipe in use over fifty years, 517. — 
Barr, J., Jointing of pipes ; pipe scraping at Tarapaca, Chili, with 
increase of delivery ; air-valves decrease corrosion, 518. — Nicholson, H., 
Date of Dr. Angus Smith's patent, 518 ; obstructions in pipes ; wash-out 
pipes; improvements in coating pipes, 519. — Lacey, G. W., Cost of 
scraping at Oswestry, 519. — Schonheyder, W., Faulty design of scraper, 
520; wear of cup leathers, 521. — Walker, A. T., Liability of iron and 
inorganic substances to incmstation ; piece of wrought-iron pipe exhibited 
with four ye:irs' incrustation ; longer life by coating pipes ; wrought-iron 
pipes incrust quicker than cast-iron, 522. — Parry, J., Painting pipes with 
linseed oil before coating ; value of anthracene oils in pitch, 522 ; 
experiments with coated and uncoated pipes ; effect of coating en a tank 
at Piivington ; chemical (not bacterial) origin of nodules, 523. — Bramwell, 
Sir F., Scraping main at Eeigate and consequent diminution of pressure, 
523. — Ingham, W., Damage to scraper by obstructions; washing-out and 
scraping i^ipes ; backward and radial movement of knife, 524 ; cup 
leathers and thin steel plates, 525. 

Indian and Colonial Exhibition, London, 1886, 410, 411, 426-8. 

ISDiCATOK, Mean-Pressure, 1899, 569 : ?ee Mean-Pressure Indicator. — With 
Lubricated Piston, 1889, 2Sd : see Marine-Engine Trials. 

N 2 



196 I 

Indicator Diagrams. — Effect of loug pipes to indicator, 1886, 364, 376, 380, 
388, 403 : 1889, 240, 283-4, 29C-7, 305 : 18S0, 49, 74, 75, 94, 95.— 
From Compound Engines, 1887, 47-50, 64, 68-70. 

Industrial Dwellings, 1886, 425. 

Infante, P., elected Associate Member, 1900, 356. 

Inferential Water Meters, 1900, 41, 72. See Water Meters. 

Infirmary, Derbyshire Royal, Dei by. 1898, 500. See also Hospitals. 

Ingate, G. J. A., elected Graduate, ISOO, 97. 

IxGEBSOLL Rock-Drill, Haud-powcr, 1891, 150. See Rock Drills. 

Ingeusoll-Mayne Rock-Dbill, 1891, 145. See Rock Drills. 

Ingham, W. (Manchester), Water Softening, 1898, 442. 

Ingham, W. (Torquay), elected Associate Member, 1896, 328 : — transferred to 
Member, 1898, 548. 
Incrustation of Torquay Water Mains, Paper on the Incrustation of Iron 
Pipes at the Torquay Water Works, 1899, 479. — Remarks tliereon, 
498, 514, 524. 
Outlet Valves at Burrator Reservoir, 1899, 414. 

Ingleby, J., elected Member, 1888, 269. 

Isglis, a. and J., Poiiit House Ship- Yard. Glasgow, 1895, 492. 

Inglis and Co., Machine Bakery, Belfist, 1896, 4r)3. 

Inglis, W. R. H., elected Associate Member, 1898, 143. 

Initial Condensation in Steam Cylinder, Fapcr on Supplementary 
Experiments on the Initial Condensation in a Steam Cylinder by Major 
T. English, 1887, 503. — Description of engine and method of conducting 
trials, 503-4. — Details of calculations, 504. — Summary of results, 505. 
— Tables showing net initial condensation in jacketed cylinder of non- 
condei sing and of condensing engines, 506-9. 

Liscu-sio)i. — 510-38. iSee Heat Distribution in Steam Engine. 

Initial Condensation in Steam Cylinders, 1889, 641. See Condensation and 
Re-evaporation. 

Initial Condensation in Steam P-ngixe, Paper on Condensation in Steam- 
Engine Cylindirs during admission, by Lt.-Col. T. English, 1892, 198. — 
Proportion of steam condensed to steam uncondensed at cut-off, in jacketed 
and uiijacketed cylinders, 198. — Comparison of calculated with observed 
results, 199. — Tabulated differences between calculated and observed 
results in 210 experiments, 201-11. — Probable error in Cidculatious of 
condensation, 212. 

Discufsion. — Willans, P. W., Object and defect of calculation, 212; 
condition of clearance surfaces, 213. — Anderson, Dr. W., Effect of grease 
on condensation, 214. — English, Lt.-Col., Effect of grease, and of 
clearance surface, 214; and of compression, 215; condensation during 
compression, 215. — Anderson, Dr. W., Practical information for working 



I 197 

IxiTiAL CoxDENSATiox IX Steam En^gine, Di<cu<cion, 1892 (coulinued) : — 

of steam engines, 215. — Xortheott, W. H., Four assumptions in previous 
paper, 21G: effect of surface upon cylinder condensation, 217; quantity 
of heat available for absorption and emission by clearance surfaces, 21 S- 
21. — English, Lt.-Col., Reply to remarks, and cause of difference in 
views, 222. 
lyjECTOR, 1893, -135. See Steam Pumps. 
Institution Convebsazioxe, London, 1899, 2o5. — 1900, 467. 
IssTiTLTiox Dinner, Anniversary, Summer, &c. — 1885, 165, 4.35. — 1886, 127. 
410 470.— 1887, 159, 435.— 1888, 168, 375.— 1889, 20.3,542.-1890, 
177, 442.-1891, 198,42'.^.- 1892, 104,365.-1893, 99, 333.— 1894, 171, 
404.-1895, 152. 464.— 1896, 104, 403.-1897, 146, 366.— 1898, 145, 
456.— 1899, 148, 439.-1900, 463. 
Institution History. 1892, 106-12 :— 1897, 2.59-78 :— 1899, 1, 255-64. 
iNSTiiuTiov House. 1895, 21:— 1896, 6:— 1897, 7. 25, 145, 275 :— 1898, 8, 30:— 

1899, 1, 9, 255-64 .— 19C0, 8. 
Isstone, T., Alloys Research, 1893, 181. 
Auditor, 1898, 35. 
Electric Engineering, 1888, 149. 
Instrument Factory. (Glasgow, 1895, 501. 

Interception Wh\rf for House Refuse, Birmingham. 1897, 377. 
Inverted Arc-L.amps for Lighting of Workshops, 1893, 398. See Lighting of 

Workshops. 
"loNA,"' lieport upon Trials of s.s. " lona," 1891, 200. See ^larine-Engine 

Trials. 
loRNS, C. R., elected Member, 1894, 469. 
Ireland, FL.ur Milling, 1888, 404-10, 414 :— 1889, 151, 164. 
Ireland, Industrial Welfare. 1888, 272 :— 1896, 271-7, 405-20. 
Irish Press. 1896, 418-20. 
Irish Railways, 1888, 280-2 :— 1896, 415-7. 

Iron, Deterioration of wrought-irou by rain water, 1889, 229 :— 1893, 440, 451-2. 
Iron Industry of Frodingham, 1885, 413. See Frodingham Iron Industry. 
Iron Works. See also Engine Works ; Iron and Steel Works ; Shipbuilding 
Works ; Works Visited at Summer meetings. 
Birmingham, 1897, 378, 387. 
Carron. 1887, 437, 443. 
Derby, 1893, 483, 484. 487, 491. 
Frodingham, 1885, 413-21, 4^6. 
Glasgow, 1895. 488, 493, 496, 510. 
Hartlepool, 1893, 375, 380-7. 
Hoiseley, 1897, 368. 
Liverpool, 1891, 44t;. 448. 449, 451, 453. 



198 I 

Iron Wobks (continued) : — 

London, 19C0, 494. 

Middlesbrough, 1893, 332, 337-42, 344-01. 

Oldbury. 1897, 409. 

Park Gate, 1890, 396-401. 

Plymouth, 1899, 450, 457, 459. 

Eugby, 1897, 429 :— 19C0, 490. 

Stanton. 1898, 49."i. 

Thornaby, 1893, 3:55, 362-7. 

Walsall, 1897, 369, 414. 

Wolverhampton, 1897, 405. 
Ikox and Steel iNDrsxRiES, Cleveland, 1893, 224. See Cleveland Industries. 
Ikon and Steel, relative advantages, 1885, 310. See Address of President, 

Jeremiah Hi atl. 
Iron and Steel, Tensile Tests, 1886, 44. See Tests of Iron and Steel. 
Iron and Steel WonKS, Paper on the Park Gate Iron and Steel Works, by C. J. 

Stoddart. 1890, 390. — Previous history of works. 396. — Old iron works, rail 

mill and plate mill, 390. — Present iron works, extent and production, 397. 

—New steel works, 397. — Gas producers and furnaces, 398. — Cogging 

mill, turnover gear, 398.— Plate mill, 399.— Plate shears, 399.— Engines, 

cranes, live rollers, hydraulic power, boilers, 399.^Testing, 400. — Koll- 

turuing lathe, 400. — Steel proJuction, 400.— Transport, 400. — Specimens, 

401. 
Iron and Steel Works. See also Iron Works ; and Steel Works. 

Hartlepool, 1893, 375, 380-7. 

Middlesbrough, 1893, 332, 335-61. 

Park Gate, 1890, 396-401. 

Thornaby, 1893, 335, 362-7. 
Ironing Machinery, Steam, 1898, 280. See Steam Laundry Machinery. 
Irons, T., elected Member, 1892, 229. 
Ironside. W. A., elected Graduate, 1894, 170 ; — elected Associate Member, 1897, 

144. 
Ironstone Mines, Cleveland, 1893, 335. — Carlin How, 370: Loftus, 371: 

Lumpsey, 370 : North Skelton, 309. 
Ironstone Mining, Cleveland, 1893, 228, 309, 309-71. See Cleveland Industries. 

See Electric Eock-Drill. 
Irrigating Machinery. Paper on Irrigating Machinery on the Pacific Coast, by 

J. Eichards. 1888, 33. — Character of the Pacific Coast in California, 33.— 

Causes of need for irrigation, 34. — Water training by dit.hes, 34. — 

Character of machinery required for irrigation and drainage, 35. — Cost 

and eflSciency, 35. — Extent of percolation, 35. — Early irrigating 

machinery, Chinese pump, 30. — Tube-well pumps, 37. — Cost of sinking 



199 



Irrigating Machixeky, Paper, 1888 (continued) : — 

tube-wells, 38. — Wear of valves or leathers of pumps, 38. — Centrifugal 
pumps, 38.— Height of lift, and eflBciency, 39.— Four kinds of centrifugal 
pumps in California, 39. — Centrifugal pump with open vanes, 39. — Shaft 
couplings, 40. — Charging of pumps, 40. — Driving by bands, 40. — 
Centrifugal pumps with shroudtd or enc.xsed vanes, 41. — Skin friction, 
41. — Axial upward thrust, 42. — Collars supporting vertical pump-shaft, 42. 
— Compound centrifugal pumps, 43. — Circumferential speed and lift, 43. — 
Efficiercy attained in high lifts, 43. — Guide-blades, and air-vessels, 44. — 
Bottom bearing of pump spindle, 4.5. — Triple compound centrifugal 
pump, 4.5. — Liberation of gas in suction pipe, 45. — Balanced pump with 
single lateral inlet, 45.— Bearing and packing, 46.— Proportions for 
different sizes, 46.— Improved pit pumpi, 47.— Supporting and coupling 
of vertical driving shaft, 47.— Size and speed of pumps, 48. — Difficulties 
in utilising axial thrust, 48. — Horizontal pump for shallow pits, 49. — 
Low-lift centrifugal pumps for land reclamation and irrigation, 49. — 
Tule lands, 49.— Bench lauds, 50.— Semi-portable pump with horizontal 
spindle, driven by single-acting engine, 59. — Submerged centrifugal 
pumps, 52. — Bulkhead pumps, 53. — Centrifugal pumps driven by bands, 
55. — Single-acting engines, advantages and diffi'ulties, 55. — Differential 
or compound engiues, 57. — Hydraulic rams, 57 ; with self-acting valves, 
58; with cushioned valves, 58; witli escape valve, opened by independent 
mechanism, 59. 

Discussion, September 1887. — Unwin, W. C, Success of compound 
centrifugal pumps for moderately high lift, 60; centrifugal pump is 
simply a reversed turbine, 60 ; low efficiency due to variations of 
condition, 61 ; two causes of low efficiency of centrifugal pump, 61 ; 
leakage not serious in pumps with encased or shrouded vanes, 61 ; 
balancing of axial thrust of single-inlet centrifugal pump, 62 ; hydraulic 
footstep, 62. 

Discussion, February 1S88. — Eichards, J., Difference between 
centrifugal pump and reversed turbine, 63 ; baffling vanes in compound 
centrifugal pumps, 64 : axial thrust, 64.— Davey, H., Defects of triple 
compound centrifugal pump, 64 ; waste of energy from baffling of 
vortex, 65; cnion bearing for carrying heavy vertical spindle, 65. — 
Mair. J. G., "Whirlpool chamber for water leaving pump disc, 66; relative 
efficiencies and advantages of reciprocating and centrifugal pumps and 
scoop wheels for different heights of lift, 67; decreasing discharge of 
centrifugal pump with increasing lift, 68. — Pearsall, H. D., Loss of power 
in hydraulic rams with cushioned waste-valves, 69 ; addition of ante- 
chamber for receiving water during closing of waste valve, 70 ; percussive 
action not necessary in hydraulic rams, 70 ; smooth working of hydraulic 



200 Si 

lRKiGATi>fG Machinery, Di cushion, 1888 (continued) : — 

ram with ante -chamber, 71. — Eichards, G., Balancing of vertical shafts, 
and avoidance of thrust bearings, 71. — Davey, H.. Onion bearing carries 
only part of weight of vertical shaft, 72. — Schunheyder, W., Balancing 
of vertical centrifugal pumps, 72 ; higher efficiency from better shape of 
vanes, 73. — Ellington, E. B., Reason for reduced efficiency of reciprocating 
pumps working against low heads, 74. — Richards, J., Collar bearing 
acts only at starting, 74 ; advantage of onion bearing, 74 ; baffling of 
water causes little loss in pump's dutj' with high lifts, 75; cushioning of 
escape valves in hydraulic rams, 75. 

Irvine, A. J., elected Associate Member, 1897, 433. 

Irvine, W. C, elected Mtmber. 1889, 31G. 

Irwin, D. H., elected Member, 1898, 142. 

Irwin, T. F.,electcd Member, 1894, 1.— Decease, 1898, 6.— jMemoir, 1697, 235. 

Isaac, R., elected Member, 1895, 140. 

Isle of May Electric Lighthouse. 1887, 347-72, 439. See Electric Lighthouse. 

Isle of Wight. Voyage round. 1892, 3Gi). 301. 

IssiGONis. G. D., elected Associate Member, 1896, 4G2. 

Ito, K., elected Associate Member. ISO"), ls;>. 

IvATT, H. A., elected Member, 1887, 2.— Elected Member of Council. 1900, 34. 
French Locomotive Practice, 1900, 412. 
I'ortablo Pneumatic Tools, 19C0, 157, 158. 

IvATTS. L. E., elected Moinbcr, 1887, 2. 

IVESON. T. G., elected >! ember, 1898, 142. 
Testing of Materials, 1898, tiOl. 



Jack. A., decease. 1887, ::.— Memoir, 1886, 4t;2. 

Jacketed and Uxjacketed Cylinders. -See Conelensation and Re-evaporation. 

See Steam Jacket. 
Jackling. D. C, elected Associate Member, 1899, 203. 
Jackman, J., elected Associate, 1891, 301. 
Jackson, A. B., elected Member, 1898, 142. 
Jackson, Edward, Tube-Frame Railway Wagons, 1890, 408. 
Jackson. Ernest, elected Associate Member. 1898, 2. 
Jackson, H. D., elected Associate Member, 1900, '.'>. 
Jackson, H. J., decease, 1885, 4.— Memoir, 1884, 473. 
Jackson, H. L., elected Associate Member. 1898, 2. 
Jackson, Sir J., elected Member, 18£9. 474. 



J 201 

JacksON, J. B., Mayor of Sheffield. Welcome to jM embers at Summer meeting, 
Sheffield. 1890, •2'J.>. 

Jackson-, J. B. (Bury), elected Member, 1894, 169. 

Jacksox, M. M., decease. 1893, 4 :— Memoir. 01. 

Jacksox, p. R., decease. 1900, 6. 7— Memoir. 1899, 137. 

Jackson. R. C, elected Member, 1895, 1. 

Jacksox, R. H., elected Associate Member. 1898, 143. 

Jackson, T., elected Member, 1886, 1 . 

Jackson, W., elected Member. 1889, ."84. 

James, A. A., elected Associate. 1897, 257. 

James, A. W., elected Member. 1893, 1. 

James, C, decease. 1896, 4.— Memoir, 1895, 143. 

James, C, Jcn.. elected Member. 1900, 3.5."). 

James. Charles W., eli cted Member. 1889, 34G. 

James, Christopher W., elected Member. 1895, 1. 

James, E., elected ]Member, 1895, .547. 

James, H. H., elected Member, 1899, 144. 

James, H. H. R., elected Associate Member, 1898, ;'.4I. 
Evaporative Condensers. 1899, 244. 

James. R. W., elected Mtmber, 1889, 584. 

James, T.. elected Member, 1899, 3. 

James, W. H., elected Associate Member, 1898, 341. 

James and Sons, Starch, Blue, and Blacklead Works. Piymouth, 1899, 458. 

JamesuN, J., Paper on Diagram Accounts for Engineering Work. 1897, 499. — 
Remarks thereon. 510, .'11. 

Jamieson, J. L. A., ekcted Graduate, 1894, 470.— Decease, 1896, 4. 

Japanese Locomotive Biilding, Paper on Locomotive Building in Japan, by 
R. F. Trevithick, 1895, 298. — First locomotive built in Japan, 298.— 
Leading dimensions. 299 ; imported English locomotive, 300. — Particulars 
of building at Kobe Works, 301. — Tabulated comparative working of 
compound and non-compounl locomotives, 304. — First cost of compound 
and non-compound locomotives, 305. — Valve setting in non-compound and 
in compound locomotive, 30c-6. — Comparative working of compound and 
non-compound locomotives on Japanese railways, 307. 

Japanning and Tanning Works, Walsall, 1897, 369, 412. 

Jaqces, Lieut. W. H.. ekcted 31ember, 1888, ICO. 

Jardine, John, Messrs. Edward Cope and Co.'s Lace-Curtain Factory, 

Nottingham, 1898, 5is. 
Jeejeebhoy, p. B., elected Member, 1888, 2. 

Jefferds, M. R., Paper on Tube-Frame Goods Wagons of light weight and 
large capacity, and their tft'ict upon the Working Expenses of 
Railways. 1890, 475.— Remarks thtreon, 490, 517-24. 



202 J 

Jeffebies, J. R., decease, 1901, 7.— Memoir, 1900, C26. 
Jeffreys, E. A., decease, 1890, 4.— Memoir, 1889, 334. 
Jenkin, C. F., elected Member, 1893, 3D1. 

Alloys Research, 1899, 92. 

Electric Lighting Works.— Belfast, 1896, 337.— Elinburgh, 1895, 587.— 
Manchtster. 1894, 304. 

Electric Rock-Drill. 1893, 316. 

Electric Welding. 1894, 33(j. 

High-Speed Engine, 1894, 241. 

Steam Jacket, 1896, 492. 

Steel Steam-Pipes, 1896, 250. 

Watch Screws, 1894, 495. 
Jenkin, C. J., elected Associate Member, 1893, 220. 
Jexkix, H. C. F., decease 1886, 3.— Memoir, 1885, 458. 
Jenkin, T. H., elected Member, 1894, 469. 
Jenkixs, H. C, Alloj-8 Research, 1893, 177. 
Jenkins, R., Graduate transferred to Member, 1887, 3. 
Jenkins, Y>^ J., elected Member, 1892, 2. 
Jenkixson, T., elected Member, 1896, I. 
Jenkinson, W., Boiler Construction, 1891, 514. 
Jennings, F. W., elected Associate Member, 1900, 183. 
Jennings, G. H., elected Associate, 1891, 480. 
Jennings, S., elected Associate, 1890, 299. 
Jennins, H. H., elected Member, 1893, 1. 
Jepson, J. T., Capacity of Railway Wagons, 1900, ."9G. 
Jessop, G., elected Member, 1889, 584. 
Jewell, H. W., elected Member, 1886, 270. 
Jockey Pulleys, 1894, 3'i8-9. 314-5. 
Johns, C, elected Associate Member, 1897, 433. 
Johnson, A., elected Associate Jlember, 1896, 462 :— transferred to Member, 

1900, 97. 
Johnson, G., elected Associate Member. 1897, 2. 
Johnson, H. H., elected (Graduate. 1896, 103. 
Johnson, J. C, elected Member, 1885, 3u5.— Decease, 1901, 7.— Memoir, 1900, 

332. 
Johnson, J. W., elected Member, 1890, 298. 
Johnson, L. P., elected Member, 1888, ICO. 
Johnson, L. R , elected Member. 1891, 301. 
Johnson, S. H., elected Member, 1887, 2. 

Johnson, S. W., elected Member of Council, 1887, 25 : 1890, 26 : 1893, 28.— 
Tice-President, 1895, 26.— President, 1898, 31. 

Address as President, 1898, 149 : see Address. — Remarks thereon, 207. 



203 



Johnson, S. W. (continued) : — 

Aluminium, 1898, 371. 

Council appointment, 1898, 'Sio. 

Deceases, 1899, 2 :— Dr. Hojikiuson, 1898, .")4:>. 

Derby Summer meeting, Reply to welcome, 1898, 33S, 340.— rrescntations 
to Honorary Local Secretaries and others, 1898, "loO-l. 

Electric Plant, 1898, 592. 

Electric Traction, 1898, 113. 

Gas-Engine Kesearch, 1898, 230, 247, 2U4. 

Hopkinson, Dr., death, 1898, 545. 

Institution House, 1899, 1. 

Locomotive Engineer! nij;, 1898, 4.":9. 

Locomotives.— Canadian, 1887, 221, 223, 229.— Compound, 1889, 118.— 
Express, 1898, G44. 

Narrow-Gauge Railways, 1898, 401. 

Turtable Pneumatic Tools, 1900, l."2. 

President, on taking office, 1898, ;;3.— Keply to vote of thanks, 1898, 346. 
— Reception and Garden Party at Nottingham Castle and Museum, 
1898, 461.— On retiring from Presidency, 1899, 30 :— reply to vote of 
thanks, 33. 

Railway Mileage, 1898, 4:9. 

Secretary, appointment, 1897, 437. 

Steam .Jacket, 1896, 486, 488. 

Steam Laundry Machinery, 1898, 289, 291, 293, 297, 305. 

Testing of Materials, 1898, 685, 693. 

Throttling and Variable Expansion, 1895, 202. 

Vote of thanks to retiring President, 1896, 30. 

Water Softening, 1898, 446, 452. 
Johnson, T. 0., elected Associate Member, 1896, 102. 
Johnson, W. (London), elected Member, 1886, 4(j5. 
Johnson, AV. (Leeds), elected :JIemljer, 1888, 269. 
Johnson, W. W., elected Graduate, 1894, 2 :— elected Associute Jlember, 1898, 

143. 
Johnston, A., elected Member, 1891, 301.— Decease, 1897, 5. :Mcmoir, 1896, 95. 
Johnston, C. M., elected Associate Member, 1900, ."02. 
Johnston, J., elected Member, 1896, 279. 
Johnston and Cp., Ball's Bridge Bakery. Dublin, 1888, 411. 
Johnston, W. and A. K., Edina Map Printing Works, Edinburgh, 1887, 441. 
Johnstone, Capt. J. H. L., elected Member, 1895, 149. 
Throttling and Variable Expansion, 1895, 21(». 
Johnstone, J. W., Tube-Frame Railway "Wagons. 1890, .o08. 
JoiCET, J. G., decease, 1£0D, 6. 



204 J 

Joists, Rulled, 1885, 325. See Adilress of President, Jeremiah Head. 

Jones, A. D., elected Graduate, 1890, 2: — transferred to Associute Member. 

1899, 147. 
Jones, C. F., elected Member, 1891, 480. 
Jones, E. E., elected (Graduate, 1887, LIS. 
Jones, F. H., elected Associate Member, 1900, 5(i2. 
Jones, F. W., Construction of Cycles, 1885, .")!:'>. 
Jones, H. E., Road Locomotion, 1900, 271. 
Jones, H. W., ^^■atch Serewd. 1894, 499. 
Jones, M. G., elected Member, 1890, 298. 
Jones, S. H., elected Associate Member, 1900, .■)(i2. 
Jones, T., elected Member, 1887, 28:5. 
Jones, T. G., elected Associate Member. 1896, l(i2. 
Jones, W., elected IVIember, 1900, 3.").".. 
Jones, W. R. S., Au.litcr, 1896, 32. 

Capacity of Railway Wagons, 1900, 577, 598. 
Jones and Sons, John, St. George's Iron "Works, Liverpool. 1891, 448. 
Jordan, F. W., elected Graduate, 1891, 480. 
JoKDAN, H. G., JcN., elected :Member, 1891, 197. 
JossELYN, E., elected (Graduate, 1900, 4. 

Joy, B. H., elected Graduate, 1889, 204 :— transferred to Associate Member, 
1898, 5. 

Fluid Pressure Reversing Gear, 1894, 208. 

Propeller Ventilating Fans, 1897, 497. 

Steam-Knginc Breakdown!^, 1896, .")85. 
Joy, D., Auditor. 1892, 30 :-1894, 2:'. .—1898, :;:.. 

By-laws, 1891, 37. 

Diagram Accounts, 1897, ."i(»7. 

Disposal of Slag, 1892, 81. 

Experimental Maiine Engine, 1891, 407. 

Fluid-Pressure Reversing Gear, Paper on a Fluid-Pressure Reversing 
Gear for Locomotive Engines, 1894,252. — Remarks thereon, 2c8, 260, 
2G9. 273, 275. 

Liverpool Motive Power, 1892, .".3. 

Locomotives. — Cnnadian, 1887, 229, 244. — Compound. 1889, 143.— 
Express, 1898, t;:i:i.— Fnnch Practice, 1900, 429. 

Longworth Powi-r Hammer, 1£00, 115. 

Marine-Engine Trials, 1890, 270. 

Propeller Ventilating Fans, 1897, 489. 

Road Locomotion. 190O, 307. 

Rock Drills, 1891, 184. 

Steam Jacket, 1896, 485. 



J 205 

Joy, D. (continued): — 

Throttling and Variable Expansion, 1895, 201. 

Watch Screws, 1894, 494. 
Jot Valve-Gear, 1889, tU, 144. See Compound Locomotives. 
Joyce, T. W., elected Associate Member, 1899, 474. 
Jubilee of Institctijx, 1897.— Summer meeting, Birmingham, 2.Jo.— Dinner, 

14t;, 363. 
JrDD, J. H., eltcted Member, 1891, 2. 
Jute Works, Tay, Dundee, 1887, 455-7. 



Kahthack, E., elected Member, 1889, 346. 
Kapp, G., Compound Steam Turbine, 1888, 496. 

Electric Engineering, 1888, 135. 

Gas Engines, 1889, 531. 
Kapteyn, a., elected Member, 1888, 160. 
Kay. G., elected Member, 1899, 292. 
Kay Street Machine Works, Bolton, 1894, 406, 451. 
Keatinge, S. a. J., elected Associate Member, 1900, 96. 
Keeling, H. H., decease, 1894, 4.— Memoir, 1893, 388. 

Keen, A., elected Member of Council, 1891, 24 :— 1894, 26 :— 1896, 28.— ^"ice- 
President. 1898, 31. 

Birmingham Summer meeting, Welcome to Members, 1897, 254. 

Disposal of Slag. 1892, 89. 

Narrow-Gauge Kailways, 1898, 397. 
Keen, F. W., Graduate transferred to Member, 1890, 3. 
Keen, H. A., elected Graduate, 1895, 2. 
Kekewich, G. O., elected Member, 1899, 144. 
Kelsey, F. F. S., Paper on the New Tay "N'iaduct, 1887, 373. — Remarks 

thereon, 384. 
Kelson, F. C, decease, 1898, 6. — 3Iemoir, 1897, 137. 
Kelvin, Lord. See Sir W. Thomson. 
Kempt, A. R., R.N., elected Associate Member, 1899, 474. 
Kendall, G., elected Member, 1885, 305. 
Kendall and Gent, Victoria Works, SalforJ, 1894, 419. 
Ken-nan, AV. T., elected Associate, 1896, 280. 

Kennedy, A. B. W., appointed ^lember of Council, 1885, 2 J. — Elected Member 
of Council. 1886, 18 :— 1888, 30.— Appointed A'ice-President, 1890, 



206 K 

Kentjedt, a. B. W. (continued) : — 

4?..— Elected Vice-President, 1891, 24.— Elected President. 1894, 26 : 

—1895, 20. 
Addres< as President. 1894, 174; see Address. — Eeply to vote of thanks, 

212. 
Alloys Eesearch. 1891, G02 :— 1893, 140. i:0:— 1895, 293. 
Argon, discovery. 1895, 2S, 2!». 
Articles of Association. 1893, 27. 
Auditor. 1895, 2.3. 

Autographic Test-Recorder. 1886, G3. 
Bag-]Making Machine, 1889, 63S. 
Boiler Construction, 1891, .^OS. 
Boiler-Shell Drilling Machines. 1894, 533. 
Borrowing by Institution. 1886, 27. 
By-laws, 1894, 24. 

Canal-Boat Propellers, 1894, 3G6, 380. 
Clyde Navigation, 1895, 43.3. 
Coal Burning on Cape Piailways. 1890, 117. 12G. 
Compound Locomotives. 1886, 373. 
Condensation and Ue-cvaporation. 1889, G89-91. 
Council, Annual Keixjrt, 1893, 2t5 :-1895, 22. 24 :— 1896, 2G. 
Disposal of Slag. 1892, 97. 
Drainage Works, Manchester. 1894, 4nl. 
Drying in Vacuum. 1889, olG. 
Dryness of Steam. 1695, 8.3. 
Electric Lighting Works. — Edinburgh, 1895, 57.3, 592. — Manchester, 

1894, 302, 305, 31G. 
Electric Plant, 1898, .370. 
Electric Traction. 1898, 105. 
Electric Welding, 1894, 333. 357. 
Fluid-Pressure Reversing Gear, 1894, 275. 
Friction Experiments. 1891, 121. 
Gas Engines, 1889, 529, 535 :— 1898, 230, 259. 
Gas Furnaces, 1891, 81. 

Glasgow Summer meeting. Reply to welcome, 1895, 326. 
Heat Distribution in Steam Engine, 1887, 517, 524. 
High-Speed Engine, 1894, 251. 
Hydraulic Gas-Stoking, 1895, 352. 
Hydraulic Power Supply. 1895, 390. 398. 
Lighting of Workshops, 1893, 422. 
Manchester Summer meeting, announcement, 1894, 30. — Reply to 

welcome. 292. 



K 207 

Kennedy, A. B. W. (continued) : — 

Marine-Engine Trials. — Report upon Trials of the s.s. "Meteor," 1889, 
235; remarks thereon, 2.il, 255, '25S, 260, 300.— Report upon Trials 
of three steamers, "Fusi Yama," '"Colchester," "Tartar," 1890, 203; 
remarks thereon, 275-82, 288-90. — Report upon Trials of the s.s. 
"lona," 1891, 200; remarks thereon, 223, 282, 287.— Report upon 
Trial of the p.s. " Ville de Douvres," 1892, 136 ; remarks thereon, 
191.— Remarks on Abstract of Six Trials, 1894, 110, 112, 129. 

Oxygen Manufacture, 1890, US. 

Petroleum Fuel in Locomotives, 1889, GS. 

President, on taking office, 1894, 28. — On retiring from Presidency. 1896, 
29 ; reply to vote of thanks. 31. 

Quick-Revolution Engines, 1897, 338. 

Regnault's Steam Experiments. 1889, 457. 

Riveted Joints. — Report upon experiments on Double-Riveted Lap and 
Butt Joiuts, Series xi, xii, siii, 1885, 198 : Abstract of results of 
experiments on Riveted Joints, with their applications to practical 
work, 23G: remarks thereon. 264, 286, 289, 290.— Report upon 
experiments on Double-Riveted Lap and Butt Joints made with 
Thicker Plutes and Larger Rivets closed under Heavier Pressures, 
Series xiv, 1888, 538. 

Ropes and Belts, 1895, 636, 648, 650, 651, 652. 

Screw-Propeller Surface, 1892, 554. 

Ship-Model Apparatus. 1893, 46. 

Spherical Engine, 1885, 110. 

Steam Jacket, 1892, 501, 502. 

Steam Pumps, 1893, 461. 

Steam Superheating, 1896, 164. 

Steel- Works Machinery. 1895, 460. 

Tests of Iron and Steel. 1886, 69, 70. 

Throttling and Variable Expansion, 1895, 219. 

Triple-Expansion Engines, 1886, 504:— 1887, 69. 

Vote of Thanks.— To Retiring President, 1894, 29.— To President for 
Address, 1898, 206. 

Warp Weaving, 1889, 4'Jl. 

Watch Screws, 1894, 4S7, 492, 49S, 499. 

Water Works, Southampton, 1893, 6-3. 
Kennedy, J., decease, 1887, 3.— Memoir. 1886, 532. 
Kennedy, J. P., decease, 1898, 6.— Memoir. 1897, 515. 

Kennedy, R. B., elected Associate INIember, 1895, 150. — Decease, 1901, 7. — 
Memoir, 1900, 627. 



208 K 

Kennedy, T., elected ilember, 1892, 2. 

Water Meters, 1900, 65, Tn. 
Kennedy, T. S.. decease, 1895, 4.— Memoir. 1894, 598. 
Kennedy Water Meter, 1900, 4G, SO. See Water Meters. 
Ken KICK, A., Jun., elected Graduate, 1898. 3. 
Kensington, F., elected Member, 1892, 414. 
Kensington, J. C, elected Associate Member, 1899, 474. 
Kent, W. G., Water Meters, 1900, SI. 
Kent Water Meters, 1900. — "Absolute," 50; — "Uniform," 44, 69, 81. See 

Water Meters. 
Kenway, W. E., elected Associate, 1897, 144. 
Kerr, A. E. C, elected Associate Member. 1896, 279 : — transferred to Member, 

1900, ."03. 
Kere, J., decease, 1885, 4 : — ^lemoir, 72. 
Kerb, J. B., elected Associate :Membtr. 1898, 311. 
Kersey, A. T. J., elected Associate Member, 1900, 502. 
Kershaw, F., elected Member, 1888, 269. 
Kershaw, G., ekcted Associate ^Icmber, 1899, 203. 
Kershaw, T., elected Associate .Member. 1893, 220.— Decease, 1900, 6.— 

Memoir, 1899, 017. 
Kerslake, W. E., elected Associate Member, 1894, 2. 
Ketley, C. B., elected Associate Member, 1897, 433. 
Key, a., elected Member, 1887, 2 
Key, G. a., elected Member, 1890, 472. 
Key, J. E. H. de, Water dieters. 1900, r)S. 
Keydell, a. E., elected 3Ieniber, 1885, 462.— Decease, 1893, 4.— Memoir, 1892, 

404. 
Keyham Dockyard and Stea.m Factory, 1899, 442, 445. 
Keyham Dockyard Extension Works, 1899, 441, 446. — Mechanical Appliances 

employed in the construction, 365 : see Dockyard Constructional 

Machinery. 
Keyham Royal Naval Engineering College, 1899, 442, 447. — Training of 

Students, 3S3 : see Machinery of H.:M.S. '• Psyche." 
Keyjier, H. J. C, elected :Mcmber, 1885, 2. 

Keyworth, T. E., elected Graduate, 1885, 305 :— transferred to Member, 1889, 3. 
KiDD, H , eLcted .^lember. 1885, 305. 
KiERNAN, G., elected Member, 1894, 293. 
KiKLCHi, K., elected Member, 1888, 444. 
KiLGOUR, M. H., elected Member, 1899, 144. 
KiMBER, E., Petroleum Fuel in Locomotives, 1889, 65. 
KiMBER, H. W., elected Graduate, 1899, 294. 



K » 209 

KiMBERLEY, Construction of Gun during Siege, 1900, 359. See Construction of 

"Long Cecil" Gun. 
IviSG, A., elected Associate Member, 1897, 257. 
KixG, B. T., elected Associate, 1896, 4G2. 
King, C. Penrose, elected Member, 1896, 327. 
KiXG, C. Philip, elected Member, 1900, 1S2. 
KiXG, H. C, elected Member, 1897, 1. 
IvixG, J. J., elected Member, 1899, 144. 
King, T. S., elected 3Iember. 1895, 347. 
IviXG, W. F., Electro-Magnetic Machine-Tools, 1887, 33S. 
KiXGHORx, J. "W., elected Member, 1893, 1. 
Kingstown and Dalkey Atmospheric Piailway, 1899, 320, 322. See 

Atmospheric Eailwaj'. 
KiRBY, F. E., elected IMember, 1889, 584. 
Kirk, Db. A. C, decease, 1893, 4.— Memoir, 1892, 405. 

Boiler Construction, 1891, 541. 

Marine-Engine Trials, 1892, 171. 

Triple-Expansion Engines, 1887, 43. 
Kirk, P. P., elected Associate Member, 1893, 220. 
Kibkaldy, W. G., elected Member, 1899, 144. 
Kirkcaldy Works, 1887, 437, 451. 
KiRKwooD, T., decease, 1885, 4: — Memoir, 161. 
Kitchen and Co., Severn Boiler Works, Derby, 1898, 490. 
KiTSELL, A. E., elected Graduate, 1896, 103. 
KiTSON, J. H., decease, 1900, 6.— Memoir, 1899, 269. 
KiTTO, W. H., elected Associate, 1896, 2 : — transferred to Associate Member, 

1899, 475. 
Knap, C, elected Member, 1889, 201. 
Knight, B. T., elected Member, 1891, 480. 
Knight, G. A., elected Member, 1886, 271. 
Knight, J. P., elected Member, 1890, 298. 
Knight, S. Y., elected Graduate, 1896, 463. 
Knights Commanders of the Bjth : — 

Anderson, Sir W., 1897, 25 : 1898, 4, 

Barry, Sir J. W.. 1897, 276 : 1898, 4. 

Gallon, Sir D., 1888, 21. 

Preece, Sir W. H.. 1900, 5. 

Poberts-Auiten, Sir W. C, 1899, 69, 97 : 19C0, 5. 

White, Sir W. H., 1895, 22 : 1896, 3. 
K^^GHTII00D : — 

Bailey, Sir W. II., 1895, 3. 

Binnie, Sir A. E., 1897, 276 : 1898, 4. 



210 K 

Knighthood (continued) : — 

Dobson, Sir B. A., 1897, 27G : 1898, 4. 

Flannery, Sir J. 1'., 1900, 5. 

Pyne, Sir T. S., 1894, 22 : 1895, 3. 

Eicliardson, Sir T., 1897, 276 : 1898, 4. 

Smith, Sir J., 1888, 21. 

Turney, Sir J., 1889, 22. 

Watson, Sir W. II., 1892, 413 : 1893, 3. 

Williams, Sir E. L., 1895, 3. 
Knitting and Weaying with Warp and without Weft, 1889, 4G9. See Warp 

AVeaving. 
Knott Mill Iron Works, Manchester, 1894, 410. 
Knovtles, J., elected Member, 1900, 355. 
Knox, J., elected Member, 1889, 1. 
Kkaft, J., Marine-Engine Trials, 1892, 1G8. 
KwANG, K. y., elected Member, 1896, 27:). 



Laboratories, Engineering. See Engineering Colleges. 
Laboratory, Marine Biological, Plymouth, 1899, 455. 
Lace Factories, Derby, 1898, 4S5: — Nottingham, 51S. 
LACE-CrETAiK Factory, Nottingham, 1898, 518. 
Lacey, G. W., Incrustation of Torquay Water Plains, 1899, 519. 
Lackland, J. J., elected Member, 1898, 341. 
Lacoste Water Meter, 1900, 84. See Water dieters. 
Lacy-Hclbert, C. E., elected Associate Member, 1897, 144. 
Laidler, T., elected Graduate, 1885, 2. 
Laird, H. H., decease, 1894, 4.— Memoir, 1893, 205. 

Laird, W., elected Member of Council, 1887, 25 .—1890, 2G :— 1893, 28 :— 1896, 
28.— Decease, 1899, 2 ; 1900, G, 7.— Memoir, 1899, 139. 

Marine Engineering. 1891, 344. 

Marine-Engine Trials, 1899, 243. 

Vote of Thanks to President for Address, 1896, 130. 
Laird Brothers, Birkenhead Iron Works, Birkenhead, 1891, 432, 451. 
Lake Superior Copper Minikg, Paper on Copper Mining in the Lake Superior 

district, by E. P. Eathbone, 1887, 8G.— General description of district, SG. 

— Production of fine copper, 8G. — Geological and mineralogical features. 

87. — Percentage of copper in Yeinstone, 88. — Value of copper produced for 

electrical purposes, 88; and for manufacture of brass, 89. — Two methods 



L 211 

Lake Superior Copper Minixg, Faper, 1887 (continued) : — 

pursued in mining : mass mining, and stamp-rock mining, 89. — ^Mass 
mining, 89. — Most productive mass mines, 90. — Relative value of mass 
mines, 90. — Stamp-rock mining, mode of working, 91. — Automatic tipping 
of skip, 92. — Compressed-air -winches for underground winding, 93. — 
Overhand stoping, 93. — Timbering, 94. — Contracts for stoping, 91. — 
"Winding engines, 94. — Large compound condensing and rotary beam- 
engine, working air-compressors and winding-drums, 95. — Eock houses, 
and crushers, 95. — Stamp mills, 9G. — Ball's steam-hammer stamp, 96. — 
"Weight and power of stamp, 99. — System of ore-dressing, and machinery 
employed, 100. — Hydraulic separators, 100. — Jigging. 101. — Collom's 
washer, 102. — Evans' rotating table, 104. — Kieving and huddling, 105. — 
Losses in dressing, 106. — Special features of Lake Superior copper 
mining, 107. 

Discus-<ion. — Rathbone, E. P., Description of specimens exhibited, 108. 
— Foster, C. Le N., Production of copper in 1886, and introduction of 
Leavitt stamp, 109. — Rathbone, E. P., Nature of improvement in Leavitt 
stamp, 109; increase in stamping capacity, 110. — Davey, H., "Value of 
mechanical treatment in ore-dressing, 110. — Bauerman, H., Visit to- 
Lake Superior district in 1865, and development of mines. 111; mass 
mining and stamp-rock mining, 112; stamping and dressing machinery, 
113 ; mode of getting out masses of copper, 114 ; other minerals found in 
the district, 114. — Sopwith, T., Extensive use of machinery for ore- 
dressing at Lake Superior, 1 15 ; more successful working of poorer mines. 
116 ; apportionment of cost of working, 117. — Seymour, G., Ores of low 
percentage, 118; Ball stamps, 118. — Appleby, C. J., Too small area of 
gratings in stamping machiner}', 118; forged steel for stamp-shoes and 
anvils, 119 ; importance of mechanical dressing ajipliances, 119. — Ryan, 
J., Hardness of native copper, 120; formation of native silver, 120; 
refuse ore at Cornish copper mines, 121. — Rathbone, E. P., Difference 
between copper ores in Cornwall and at Lake Superior, 121 ; fissure 
veins, 121; apportionment of cost of production for Lake Superior 
copper, 121 ; advantage of Ball stamp, 122 ; rolling of leaf-copper into 
pellets, 122; geology of Lake Superior district, 123. — Carbutt, E. H.. 
Profitable woiking of poorer ores, 1L3. 

Lake Vtknwy, 1891, 461. 

Lakin-Sjiith, C, elected Graduate, 1900, 503, 

Lasibe, G. C, elected Member, 1892, 102. 

Lambert, "W, F., elected Member, 1897, 256. 

Lamberton, a., Steel-"Works Machinery, 1895, 456. 

Lambeth Pottery Works, Doulton and Co., London, 1886, 410, 414-G : — 
1900, 473. 

O 2 



212 L 

I 

Lancashiee and Yorkshire Eailway, Locomotive Works, Horwich, 1891, 432, 
45G :— 1894, 406, 450. 

Lancashire Boilers, Some details in the Clonstruction of modern Lancashire 
Boilers, 1891, 484. See Boiler Construction. 

Lancashire "Watch Works, Prescot, 1894, 407, 4CL 473. 

Lancaster, J., decease, 1885, 4. — Memoir, 1884, 402. 

L.VNE, D. W., Naval Electrical Apparatus, 1892, 276. 

Lane, F. L., elected Member, 1896, lOL 

Lang and Sons, J., Lathe and Tool Works, Jolmstone, 1895, 526. 

Langdon, H. a. W., elected Graduate, 1898, 842. 

Langdon, W. E., Paper on Electric Installations for Lighting and Power on the 
Midland Railway, witli notes on Power absorbed bj- Shafting and 
Belting, 1898, 533.— Remarks thereon, 570, 588, 598. 

"Lange, H. L., decease, 1893, 4,— Memoir, 1892, 406. 

Langfobd, W., elected INIember, 1893, 391. 

Langlet, a. a.. Autographic Test-Recorder, and Tests of Iron and Steel, 1886, 
02, 
Hydraulic Buffer-Stop for Railways, Taper, 1886, 105.— Remarks thereon, 
110, 117, 119. 

Lapage, E. H., Brewery Tramways and Rolling Stock, 1888, 354. 

Compound Locomotives, Taper, 1889, 85.— Remarks thereon, 145, 146. 
Compounding of Locomotives, 1890, 80. 82. 

Larard, C. E.. elected Associate >Iember. 1895, 2. 

LAEMrTH, J. H., elected Associate Member. 1897, 257. 

LARJirTH, W. O., elected Graduate, 1894, 170:-elccted Associate IMember, 
1898, 3. 

Larne Aloiina Factory, 1896, SSX 421. See Alumina Factory. 

Lash, H. W., elected Associate Member, 1889, 474. 

Last, A. J., elected Member, 1890, 298. 

Latham, B., elected Member, 1888, 269. 

Latta, J. G., elected Member. 1899, 292. 

Launch op a Battleship, Paper by H. R. Champness, 1899, 329.— Launch of 
H.M.S. " Ocean," 329.— Building slips, 330.— Building declivity, 330.— 
Calculation of ship's launcl;ing weight, 331. — Ground ways, 334.— Cradle, 
335._Internal shoring, 339.— Lubrication of sliding surfaces, 339. — 
'• Setting up " the ship, 342.— Hogging and sagging, 344.— Freeing dog- 
shores, 344.— Watertight compartments, 345.— The launch, 346. 

Discussion. — White, Sir W. H.. Advanced condition of H.3I.S. 
"Bulwark." 347.— Thornycroft, J. I., Completeness of preparations for 
launch, 347.— Crocker, G., Cambering the ways, 347.— Scott, R. J., 
Permanent ways, 348.— "VMiite. Sir W. H., Continuity in design of 
launching apparatus, 319; groundways, 350; quality of lubricant, 351; 



L 213 

Lacxch of a Battleship, Discussion, 1899 (continued) :^ 

thanks to author, 352.— Champness, H. R., Cambeiing the ways: 
permanency of lower ways, 3:)2.— AVhite, Sir W. H., Launch of 1131.8. 
"Victoria," 353. 
Laundry, Harborne, Birmingham, 1897, 395. 

Laxjkdry Machinery, Steam, 1898, 2^8. See Steam Laundry Machinery. 
Laurie, L. G., elected Member, 1890, 2'JS. 
Lav ALLEY, A., decease, 1893, 4: — Memoir, 93. 
Lawrence, H., Experimental Marine Engine, 1891, 404:. 
Middlesbrough Salt Industry, 1893, 293. 
Spherical Eccentric, 1885, 429. 
Law^rie, J., elected Member, 1893, 1. 
Lawson, H. J., elected Associate Member, 1896, 102. 

Construction of Cycles, 1885, 520. 
Lawson, J. I., decease, 1897, 5.— Memoir, 1896, GOO. 

Laycock and Soxs. Samuel, Horse-Hair Cloth Works, ShefBehl. 1890, 453. 
Laycock, W. S., Railway-Carriage Fittings Works, Sheffield, 1890, 455. 
Lea, a. H., elected Associate Member, 1893, OS. 
Lea, H., appointed Member of Council, 1898, 144 :— 1899, 147. 
Atmospheric Railway, 1899, 326. 
Electric Plant, 1898, 582. 
Mean-Pressure Indicator, 1899, 585. 
Lea, R. H., elected Member, 1892, 229. 
Lea, W. A., elected Member, 1895, 327. 
Leaf, H. M., elected Member, 1889, 584. 
Leather, J. T., decease, 1886, 3 :— Memoir, 262. 
Leather "Works, Nottingham, 1898, 523. 
Leavitt Stamp for crushing ores, 1887, 109. See Lake Superior Copper 

Mining. 
Le Chatelieb, a., Alloys Research, 1893, 190. 

Leckie and Co., Saddlery and Harness AVorks, "Walsall, 1897, 3J9, 413. 
Ledebcb, a., Alloys Research, 1899, 98. 
Ledixgham, J. M., elected Member, 1890, 298. 
Lee (Lea) Bridge Water- Works, 1900, 483. 
Lee, C. E., elected Member, 1886, 271. 
Lee. C. R., elected Member, 1887, 157. 
Lee, R. J., elected Member, 1892, 102. 
Lee, S. E., elected Member, 1890, 176. 

Grain Warehousing Machinery, 1891, 379. 
Lee, W., elected Graduate, 1900, 4. 
Leechmax, G. D., elected Associate, 1898, 113. 



214 L 

Leeds Autumn Meeting, 1886, 4'j.5.— Business, 465. — Opening of Engineering 

Department of the Yorkshire College, 46S. 
Legkos, L. a., elected Graduate, 1889, 347 :— transferred to Member, 1891, 3. 

Marine-Engine Trials, 1891, 2(57. 
I>EiCESTEn Corporation Water Works, Swithland Reservoir, 1898, 460, 510. 
Eeisse, G. C, elected Member, 1896, 101. 
I.eitch, a., elected Associate ^lembtr, 1897, 144. 

Leith Harbocb and Docks, visited at Summer meeting, Edinburgh, 1887, 439. 
Lemkes, C. R. L., elected Associate. 1896, 462. 

Lemon, J., Mayor of S^outhainpton, Welcome to Members at Southampton, 
1892, 3C8. 
Sewage Outfall Works, 1892, 339. 

Southampton Pier, Paper on the new Royal Pier at Southampton, 1892, 
313.— Remarks thereon, 318. 
Lexoir Gas Engine, 1889, 500, 503, 509, 530, 532. See Gas Engines. 
Lenox, G. D., elected Graduate, 1900, 3.36. 
Leonard, P., elected Associate ^lembsr, 1898, 517. 
Leonard, R. M., elected Associate, 1900, 336. 
Leopard, C. W., elected Jlember. 1898, 3U. 
Leslie, A., decease, 1895, 4.— Memoir, 1894, 162. 
Leslie. Sir B., K.C.I.E., elected 3Iembcr, 1888, 269. 
Leslie, W., elected Associate Merabtr, 1897, 257. 

Letchford, J., elected Graduate, 1888, 2i;'J :— transferred to Member, 1891, 3. 
Lever Brothers, Sunlight Soap Works, Birkenhead, 1891, 4,15. 
Lewis, G., ^lanchcster Drainage Works, 1894, 400. 
Lewis, H. W., elected Member, 1895, 54S.— Decease, 1898, 6. 
Lewis, J. S., electtd Member, 1898, 142. 
Lewis, R. W., elected Member, 1887, 471. 
Lewis, Sir W. T., Bart., Baronetcy, 1896, 26 ; 1897, 4. 
Lewis, W. T.. Jun., elected Graduate, 1886, 466. 
LiB?v.AKV, Donations. See Donations to Library. 
Library, ^Iuseum, and Art Gallery, Derby, 1898, 498. 
Lick Observatory, 1889, 216. -See Address of President, Charles Cochrane. 
LiEBERT, H. A., elected Member, 1894, 293. 

LiKGE University, 1886, 267 :— 1887, 7, 8, 9, 475. See Belgian Engineers. 
Life Membership, 1894, 6. 
Lift, Hydraulic, for Ships, Nova Scotia, 1889, 216. See Address of President, 

Charles Cochrane. 
Lifts in the Eiffel Tower, Paris, 1889, 350. See Eiffel Tower Lifts. 
Lifting and Hauling Appliances in Portsmouth Dockyard, 1892, 295. See 
Ddckvard Lifting and Hauling. 



L 215 

Light, G. M., elected Associate. 1898, 3. 

LiGHTFOOT, T. B., Paper on Refrigerating and Ice-^Iaking Machinery and 
Appliances, 1886, 2i)l.— Eemarks thereon, 242, 256. 

LiGHTHorsES : — Eddj-stone, 1899, 443. 

Isle of May, Firth of Forth, 1887, 347. 439. 

Mew Island, Belfast Lough, 1888, 382, 432, 

Xaval Exhibition, London. 1891, 332. 

Port of Dublin, 1888, 300-1. 

St. Catherine's, Isle of "Wight, 1892, 370, 303, 397. 

Lighting by Electricity. See Electric Lighting and Electric Lighting 
Installations. 

Lighting of Workshops, Paper on the Artificial Lighting of Workshops, by 
B. A. Dobson, 1893, 396. — Importance of artificial lighting in 
manufacturing districts, 390. — Requirements for a well-lighted workshop, 
397. — Electric lighting by inyerted arc-lamps; success in continental 
mills, 398. — Incandescent glow-lamps, 399 ; advantages and objections, 
400. — Trial of arc-lamps in machining room, 401 ; and in cotton mill, 
402. — Fire insurance, 402; refusal of ijermission for open arc-lamps in 
■cotton mill, 402 ; absence of fire-riak through cotton fibre, 403. — 
Construction of inverted arc-lamp ; carbons, 405. — Practical results of 
lighting machine-rooms in engineering woiks, 40(3 ; absence of shadows ; 
advantages to workpeople, 407. — Dynamo, and numbers of lamps, 408. — 
Arc-lighting at Horwicli locomotive works, 408. — Comparative cost of 
-electric lighting and gas,, 400. — Conclusion, 409. 

Discussion. — Anderson, Dr. W., Exhibition of inverted arc-lamp alight, 
410. — Aspinall, J. A. F., Arrangement of arc-Lmps in fitting shop at 
HorwiL'h locomotive works, 410 ; percentage of light from carbons, 411. — 
Parsons, Hon. C. A., Advantages of inverted arc-light, 412 ; adoption in 
"works ; light from arc-liglit and from illuminated screen, 413. — Piatt, J., 
Inverted arc-light in drawing office, 413. — Rogers, H. J., Prevention of 
lisk from fire, 413. — Segundo, E. C. de. Cost and candle-power of gas and 
•electric-light, 414 ; arc and incandescent lamps, 415 ; duration of carbons, 
416; incandescent lamps of higher power, instead of arc-lamps, 417. — 
Human, H., Fire-risk from arc-lights in cotton mill.-', 417. — Small, J. M., 
Breakdown, independent " police " circuit, 419.— White, W. H., Electric 
lighting for naval work, 420. — Trotter, A. P., Reflecting power of white 
paper and white-wash, 421; reflector for inverted arc-lamp, 422. — 
Kennedy, A. B. W., Inverted arc light in ait school, 422 ; nominal and 
real caudle-power, 423. — Anderson, Dr. W., Electric lighting at Royal 
Arsenal, 424. — Dobson, B. A., White-washed ceiling for reflection ; 
■objection to glass shades, 425 ; steadiness of light ; fire-risk, 426 ; 
breakdown, independent " pilot " lamps, 427. — Sampson, J. L., Oil 



216 L 

LiGHTiyG OF Workshops, Diicmsion, 1893 (continued) : — 

flare-lamps for lighting iron-foundries, 42S ; burner, and oil supply, 42I>; 
cost of oil lighting, 4;:;0. — Dobson, B. A , Comparative cost of gas and 
electricity, 430. 

Lighting and Power, Electric, on Midland Railway. 1898, :>33. See Electric 
Plant. 

Lille Experimexts upon the comparative EflBciency of Ropes and Belts for the 
Transmission of Power, Beport, 1895, 5!i9. See Ropes and Belts. 

Lime as Flcx in Blast-Furnaces, 1889, oS.K See Blast-Furnace Practice. 

Lincoln Cathedral, Musical Service and Address by the Bishop, 1886, 306, 
434. — Electric Lighting, 411. — Visit at Summer meeting, 436. 

Lincoln Summer Meeting, 1885, 303.— Reception, 30;i. — Business, 301. — Votes 
of thanks, 307. — I^xcursions, &c., 434. 

Lincoln Wateb-works Engines. Fajyer on the Pumping Engines at the Lincoln 
Water Works, by H. Teague, 1887, 124. — Sims' original compound 
engine, 124. — Self-closing spring balance-valve in main delivery -pipe 
from pump, 124.— Safety catches for exhanst and equilibrium valves, 125. 
— Combined bucket and plunger pump, 126. — Combined piston and 
plunger pump, 127. — Relief or break-ilack for pumps, 127, 129. — Vacuum 
above and below clacks, 128. — Vacuum vessel for obviating fluctuations 
of water in long suction-pipe, 129. — New Cornish pumping engine, 130. — 
Check throttle-valve in equilibrium pipe, 130.— Dead-weight balance- 
valve in delivery main, 131. — Coal consumption, 131. — Reservoirs and 
standpipe. LSI. — Sewage pumping engines, 132. 

Discussion. — Bryan, W. B., Cornish engines at East London Water 
Works, 132; suction-boxes upon long suction-mains, 13J; Worthington 
and Davey engines, 133 ; combined bucket and plunger pump with 
double-beat valve on bucket, 133. — Restler, J. W., Cornish engines at 
Southwark and Vauxhall Water Works, 134 ; compound engines with 
automatic governor acting on expansion gear, 134. — ^Morris, E. L., 
Early engines at New River Water Works, fitted with safety-catches 
and vacuum-vessel.*, 135; advantages of rotatory engines, 135; compound 
engines preferable for avoiding too much expansion in single cylinder, 
136. — Marten, E. B., Sims' compound succeeded by rotatory engine at 
Lincoln Water Works, but Cornish engine afterwards reverted to, 137. — 
Mair, J. G., Cornish engine unfitted for pumping under varying pressures, 
137; consumption of feed-water in Cornish and rotative engines, 138; 
varying flow from rotative engine, 138; uniform flow from Worthingtoa 
engine, 139. — Davey, H., Uniform flow from uncoupled pair of engines 
at Clay Cross collier}-, 139. — Marten, H. J., Relative duty of Cornish and 
rotatory engines, 110; early example of combined bucket and plunger 
pump, 141. — Gray, J. W., Compmnd C'orjis'i engines at Birmingham 



217 



Lincoln "Waterworks En'gtnes, Di^cuxsion, 1887 (continued) : — 

Water Works. 141.— Vawilrey, W., Cornish engines at Suiith StaflurJsLire 
Water Works, 112 ; relative economy and safety, 142 ; use of safety 
catches, 142. — Teague, H., Variation of pressure in delivery from 
Cornish engine, 143; reason for rotatory engines being replaced by 
Cornish, 143; Sims' compound rotutory engine nsed at mine both for 
pumicing and for winding. 144 ; small economy of compound engino 
over single-cylinder rotatory, 144 ; value of leather break-clack, and of 
vacuiun vessel, 145. 

Lincoln Works, visited at Summer meeting, 1885, 434, 437-47. 

Lindner Starting Gear, for compound locomotives, 1890, S4-G. 

Lindsay, J., elected Member, 1887, 283. 

Lindsay, W. R., elected Member, 1891, 2. 

LiNEHAM, W. J., elected ^lember, 1890, 472. 
French Locomotive Practice, 1900, 421. 

Linen Warehouses, Belfast, 1888, 423, 425. 

Linen Works, Belfast, 1888, 420: 1896, 439, 440, 454, 457.— Bessbrook, 1888,. 
415. 

Link Belts, 1888, 122: -1894, 300, 314-5. 

LiNK-MoTiON-s. 1885, 423-32; see Spherical Eccentric— 1891, 310-7.342,359;. 
see Marine Engineering. 

LiNNiNGTON, E. A., Triple-Expansion Enginrs, 1887, 02. 

Linoleum and Floor-Cloth Works, Kirkcaldy, 1837, 437, 451. 

LiNTHORPE Iron Works, Middlesbrough, 1893, 345. 

Lion Cotton-Spinning Mill, Eoyton, 1894, 405, 440. 

Liquid Fuel. 1889, 30 ; — see Petroleum Fuel in Locomotives. — 1890, 47 ; see 
Compounding of Locomotives burning Petroleum Eefuse in Russia. 

List, J., Marine-Engine Trials, 1889, 207. 

Lister, F., elected Member, 1885, 305. 

Lister, R. R., elected Member, 1890, 298. 
Narrow-Gauge Railways, 1898, 393. 

Litster, D. M., elected Member, 1887, 474. 

Little, E., R.X., elected :Member, 1900, 2. 

Little, G., decease, 1897, 5. — Memoir, 1896, 000. 

Little Giant, Drill, 1900, 137 : — Hammer, 123.. See Portable Pneumatic Tools. 

Livens, F. H., elected Member, 1890, 1. 

Liverpool Motive Power, Paper on Slechanical Features of the Liverpool 
Water Works, and on the supply of Power by pressure from the public 
mains, and by other mean?, by J. Parry, 1892, 32. — Engines pumping 
from wells, 32. — Cost of pumping during 1890, 33. — Water supply; area, 
sources, and rate, 33. — Motive power from street mains ; advantageous 
conditions for power supply in Liverpool, 34. — Use of hydraulic 



218 L 

Liverpool 3Ictive Power. Paper, 1892 (continued) :— 

machinery, and consumption of water, 3.3. — Pressure of water, 3G. — 
Other lowers, 3G. — Cost of water power, 36. — Cost of difierent powers, 
37. — Low-pressure hydraulic hoists, 37. — Steam pt)wer, 38. — Gas engines, 
41. — Compressed air, 43. — High-pressure water, 44. — Comparative cost of 
high-pressure and low-pressure water for equivalent motive power, 45. — 
Tabulated comparisons of cost of working hoists by steam, gas, and 
compressed air, 47-9. — Cost of motive power per foot-ton, 50. 

Discussion. — Douglas?, Sir J. N., Paper prepared for Liverpool 
meeting, 51. — Parry, J., Prices of coal and slack, and of gas, 51; 
utilization of exhaust water, 51. — Aspinall, J. A. F., Utilization of 
exhaust water at railway station, 51. — Marten, E. B., Back-pressure of 
exhaust water, 52. — Aspinall, J. A. F., Comparison of steam, water, and 
gas for working warehouse machinery, 52. — Joy, D., Water-pressure for 
lifting and for organ-blowing, 53; percentage of power from water- 
pressure, 54 ; servo-moti)r, 55. — Head, J., Loss of power in friction of 
pipes, 55 ; comparison between cost of hydraulic power and of pumping 
by compound engine, 55. — Schiinlieyder, "NV., Mode of estimating cost of 
obtaining power, 57. — Cochrane, (J., Cost of high-pressuro hydraulic 
power, 58. — Marten, E. B., Gravitation supply for Liverpool and for 
Birmingham, 58; price of water for lifts at Stourbridge, 50; economical 
pumping for water supply, GO. — Boulnois, H. P., Comparative cost of 
^lifterent motive powers, GO. — Piatt, J., Prcveutiou of waste of water for 
light loads, Gl ; comparison of gas engines and water-power, Gl. — 
Douglass, Sir J. X., Unit of cost, high price of gas, oil engines, 62 ; 
electric motors, G3. — Parry, J., Distribution of power from a centre, G3 ; 
cost of high-pressure water in Liverpool, G4 ; safety from tire, Gl ; cost of 
water per indicated horse-power, Gl; loss of power by friction, 65; 
organ-b!owiug, 65 ; gas engines, 66. — Douglass, Sir J. N., Vote of 
thanks, GG. — Ellington, E. B., EflBciency of lifting appliances worked by 
steam, gas, hydraulic, and electrical power, C6; rtquirements for lifting 
appliances, G7 ; examples of consumption and coat of water from 
hydraulic-power mains, OS. 

Liverpool Oil Mill, Liverpool, 1891, 445. 

Liverpool Overhe.4d Railway, 1891, 428. 

Liverpool Self-Profelled Traffic Association, 1900, 188,212,247,252,313-4. 
See Eoad Locomotion. 

Liverpool Summer Meeting, 1891, 297. — Pcception, 297. — Business, 300. — 
Votes of Thanks, 303. — Excuraions, &c., 428. — Presentation, 479. 

Liversedge, H. T., R.X., elected Member, 1900, 2. 

Livingston, J., elected Member, 1895, 149. 

LivsEY, J, E., elected Member, 1886, 271. 



219 



Lloyd, G. B., Tay Viaduct, 1887, 3S3. 

Lloyd, G. E., Throttling and Variable Expansion, 1895, 233. 

Lloyd, K. S., Steam Pumps, 1893, 451. 

Lloyd, S. Z., elected Member, 1894, -iGO. 

Watch b^crews, 1894, 494. 
Lloyd, T. Z., elected Graduate, 1894, 470. 
Lloyd's Proving House, Xetherton, for Chain Cables, Chains, and Anchors, 

1897, 390, 
Lloyd's Eegister, requiiements for ships and boilers of iron and steel, 1885, 

313-20. See Address of President, Jeremiah Head. 
LoANE, S. J., elected Member, 1897, 1. 
LoBB, C, elected Member, 1900, oOl. 
LoBNiTZ, F., elected Member, 1898, 142. 
Loch Katrine Water Works, Glasgow, 18S5, 4G2, 4GS. 
Locke, A. G. X., elected Member, 1890, 17G. 

Locket, A., elected Graduate, 1897, 434 : elected Associate Member, 1900, 96. 
LccKHART, W. S., Dryness of Steam, 1895, GS. 

Friction Experiments, 1891, 127. 

Eock Drills. 1891, 181. 

Roller Flour Milling, 1889, 190. 
LocKYEK, X. J., Graduate transferred to Member, 1885, 3. 
Locomotion, Electric, 1888, 89. See Electric Engimering. 
Locomotion, Eoad, 1900, 185. See Eoad Locomotion. 
Locomotive Boiler Draught, Experiments on the Draught produced in 

different parts of a Locomotive Boiler when running, by J. A. F. 

Aspinall, 1893, 199. — Particulars of engine, train, and mode of 

experiments, 199.— Vacuum pipes, 199.— Induced draught instead of 

forced draught, 202.— Tabulated results, 200, 201. 
Locomotive Building in Japan, 1895, 298. ^e Japanese Locomotive Building. 
Locomotive, Carriage, and Wagon Works : — 

Caledonian Eailway, St. Eollox. Glasgow, 1895, 47G. 

Great Eastern Railway, Stratford, London, 1900, 477. 

Great Xorthern Eailway, Doncaster, 1885, 430, 453-5. 

Great Southern and Western Eadway, Inchlcore, Dublin, 1888, 378, 
396. 

Lancashire and Yorkshire Eailway, Horwich, 1891, 432, 456 :— 1894, 406, 
456. 

London, Brighton, and South Coast Eailway, Brighton, 1892, 370, 401. 

London, Chatham, and Dover Eailway, Loughedge Works, Battersea, 
London, 1886, 420. 

Manchester, Sheffield, and Lincolnshire Eailway, Gorton, 1894, 430. 

Midland Eailway, Derby, 1898, 4G2, 405. 



220 L 

Locomotive, Carriage, axd Wagon Works (continued) :— 

Midland Great AVestern Eailway, Broadstonc, Dublin. 1888, 412. 

North British Railway, Cowlairs. Glasgow, 1895, 482. 
Locomotive Ceank-Axle8 of iron and steel, 1885, o29. i<cc Address of President, 

Jeremiah Head. 
Locomotive Engines, 1890, 182; see Address of President, Joseph Tomlinson 
see also Locomotives. — Fluid-Pressure EeviTsing Gear, 1894, 252 
see Fluid-Pressure Reversing Gear. — Steam Jacketing, 1896, 466 
see Steam Jacket. 
Locomotive Pbactice in France, 1900, 375. See French Locomotive Practice. 
Locomotive Works : — 

Beyer, Peacock, and Co., Gorton, 1894, 427. 

Caledonian Railway, St. Rollox, Glasgow, 1895, 476. 

Diibs and Co.. Glasgow, 1895, 478. 

Great Eastern Railway, Stratford, London, 1900, 477. 

Great Northern Railway, Doncaster, 1885, 4^6, 453-5. 

Great Southern and Western Railway, Inchicore, Dublin, 1888, 378, 396. 

Great Western Railway. Wolverhampton, 1897, :^G8, 405. 

Lancashire and Yorkshire Railway. Ilorwich, 1891, 432, 456 : — 1894, 406, 
456. 

London and North Western Railway, Crewe, 1894, 406, 458. 

London, Brighton, and South Coiist Railway, Brighton, 1892, 370, 401. 

London, Chatham, and Dover Railway, Longhedge Works, Battersea, 
London, 1886, 420. 

Manchester, Sheffield, and Lincolnshire Railway, Gorton, 1894, 430. 

:Midland Railway, Derby, 1898, 462. 

:Midland Great Webtern Railway, Bioadstone, Dublin, 1888, 412. 

Neilson and Co., Glasgow, 1895, 481. 

North British Railway, Cowlairs, Glasgow, 1895, 4S2. 

Paris, Lyons, and Mediterranean Railway, Paris, 1889, 542, 549. 

Sharp, Stewart, and Co., Glasgow, 1895, 484. 
Locomotives : — See also Locomotive Engines. 

Brewery Tramway, 1888, 331. 

Burning Colonial Coal on Capo Government Railway.", 1890, 112. 

Bmning Petroleum Refuse in Russia, 1889, 36 : — 1890, 47. 

Canadian, 1887, 186. 

Compound, 1889, 85.— In India, 1886, 355.— In Russia, 1886, 297; 1890, 
47. — Compound and Non-Compound, Results of tiiils, 1894, 460. 

Express, 1898, 605. 
Lofts, D., elected Graduate, 1888, 269. 
LoFTCS Ironstone Mines, Cleveland, 1893, 371. 
Logan, J. W., elected Member, 1890, 176. 



L 221 

LOMAS, H., Electric Traction, 1898, 113. 

London and North Western Railway, Goods Station, Broad Street, Loudon, 

1886, 422.— Steel and Locomotive Works, Crewe, 1894, 40G, 4.58. 
London, Brighton, and South Coast Railway, Locomotive, Carriage, and 

Wagon Works, Brighton, 1892, 370, 401. 
London, Chatham, and Dover Railway, Longhedge Locomotive, Carriage, and 

Wagon Works, Battersea, London, 1886, 420. 
London Hydraulic Power Supply Stations, 1£09, 469 : — Millbank, 470 : — 

Wapping, 470. 
London Sujijiek Meeting, 1886, 2G7. — Welcome to Belgian Engineers, 268.— 
Business, 270. — Appointment of Treasurer, 271. — Votes of thanks, 
273. — Excursions, &c., 273, 410. 
London Summer Meeting, 1900, 353. — Reception of American Engineers, 353. — 

Business, 354. — Votes of thanks, 358.— Excursions, &c., 463, 466-7. 
London Works, visited at Summer meeting, 1886, 410-59 : — 1900, 463, 466, 

467-500. 
London Yard Iron Works, Poplar, Loudon, 1886, 412, 457-9. 
Longbottom, J. G., elected Associate Member, 1895, 150. 
" Long Cecil" Gun, 1900, 359. See Construction of ''Long Cecil" Gun. 
LoNGDEN, J. N., elected [Member, 1885, 163. 
Longley, H. B., elected Associate Member. 1900, 3. 
Longridge, Capt. C. C, elected Member, 1894, 469. 

Canal-Boat Propellers, 1894, 368. 
LoNGKiDGE, J. A., Automatic Machine-Gun, 1885, 185, 

Longridge, M., Breakdowns of Stationary Steam-Engines, Paper, 1896, 536. — 
Remarks thereon, 575, 584, 589, 595. 
Dryness of Steam, 1895, 50. 
Evaporative Condensers, 1899, 210. 
Express Locomotives, 1898, 635. 
Gas-Engine Research, 1898, 247. 
Heat Distribution in Steam Engine, 1887, 510, 524. 
Heat Transmission, 1896, 530. 
Marine-Engine Trials, 1890, 284-8. 
Marine Engineering, 1891, 3G1. 
Narrow-Gauge Railways, 1898, 398. 
Rope Driving, 1896, 368. 
Ropes and Belts, 1895, C31, 636, 646, 652. 
Steam Jacket, 1896, 486. 
Steam Superheating, 1896, 169. 
Throttling and Variable Expansion, 18S5, 191, 202. 
Water Works, Birmingham, 1897, 312. 
Longridge, R. C, Riveted Joints, 1885, 264. ; 



222 L 

LoNGSDON, A., decease, 1894, 4. — llemoir, 1893, 496. 

LoNGWOBTH Power-Hammer, Improvements, Paper by E. Samuelson, 1900, 99. — 
Control of hammer by varying the cushion of air, 100. — Description of 
cylinder, valve, and actuating cylinder, controlled by liand or foot levers, 
100.— Self-acting air-valves, 101.— Protection of cylinder from grit, 102. 
— Acceleration of actuating cylinder due to position of crank and 
rocking lever ; quick speed and short stroke for riveting work ; planishing 
hammer with movable fulcrum; uniformity in number of blows; power 
absorbed by 3-cwt. hammer, 10:!. — Indicator diagrams from top and 
bottom of actuating cylinder compared witli those from steam liammer, 
101. — Hammer and specimens of steel exhibited at the Meeting, 104. 

Discussion. — Samuelson, E., Simplicity of construction of hammer, 105. 
— "Wicksteed, J. H., Comparison of power and steam hammers, 105.— 
AVorthington, E., Compressed-air forge-hammer; power-hammer for 
forging horse-shoe nails, lOG. — Chambers, E. .T.. Power-liammer in place 
of Oliver, lOG; difficulties encountered in working, 1(>7; adjustments 
and defects; strains, 108; spindle making, 109. — Boorman, J. A., 
Comparison between power and steam hammers, 109 ; economy; inability 
to strike single blow, 110. — Reavell, AV., Compressed air in ordinary 
steam-hammer, 110. — Samuelson, E., Limit of size for power-liammers. 
110. — Chambers, E. J., Power of blow varied by pressure of foot. 111. — 
"Wicksteed, J. H., Jlithod of working Longworth power-liammor. 111. 
— Simpson, C. L., Comparison of power and steam hammers, 112. — 
Kadclyffe, L., "Player" hammer, 112; economy of power-hammer, 113; 
strokes per minute, 114. — Samuelson, E.. Limit of size of power-hammers ; 
comparison of power and steam hammers, 114; wear and tear of 
hammers; ability to strike single blows, 115. — Joy, D., Power-hammer 
for forging horse-shoe nails, 115; wooden spring lever, IIG. — Phipps, 
G. E., Steam-hammer worked by compressed air, 116. — Samuelson, E., 
Comparison of steam and power hammers made when at heaviest blow, 
116 ; '"Player" hammer ; blows per minute of Longworth hammer, 117. 

Loxxox, W., R.X., elected Member, 1899, 474. 

LooMis Process of making Gas for Fuel, 1890, 402. See Gas for Fuel, 

LoBRAiN, J. G., elected Member, 1887, 283. 

LoTBiNiERE, Capt. A. C. J. de, elected Member, 1898, 341. 

LoTE, E. T., elected Associate Member, 1898, 341. 

LovELL, D. E., elected Member, ISOD, 501. 

LovELL, S. G., elected Associate Member, 1896, 4G2. 

Low, D. A., elected Member, 1888, 2. 

Low, G., decease, 1895, 4.— IMemoir, 1894, 276. 

Low, R., elected Member, 1885, 2. 

Low-Pkessx:re Water Meters, 1900, 39. See Water Meters. 



L 223 

LowuoN, T., elected ilembcr, 1891, 2. 

Lowe, J. E., decease, 1898, C— Memoir, 1897, 235. 

LowsLEY, S. E., elected Graduate, 1899, o. 

LoYXD, J. S., elected Member, 1887, 2. — Decease, 1891, 4. 

LuBEiCATiox, 1885, 58: 1888, 175: 1891, 111: see Friction Experiments. — 

1894, 213, 
LuBRiCATiox, Forced, 1897, 316. See Quick-Kevolutioa Engines; and Friction 

Experiments, 1885, 1888, 1891. 
LrBRiCATiox with Petroleum Refuse, 1839, 52, 70, 75. See Petroleum Fuel io 

Locomotives. 
Lucas and Co., Felt Hat Manufactory, Bury, 1894, iOG, 4i7. 
Lucy, A. J., elected Member, 1889, 1. 
Lucy, E. E., elected ^Member, 1897, 25G. 

Lucy, W. T., elected Graduate, 1886, 2 :— transferred to Member, 1891, 3. 
LuMPSEY Iroxstoxe Mines, Cleveland, 1893, 370. 
LuiiSDEN, T. T. M., elected Member, 1895, 327. 
Lund, H., elected Associate Member, 1900, 356. 
LuxD, J., elected Associate Member, 1898, 143. 
LuNDOX, R., elected Member, 1889, 1. 
LuNT, C. T., elected Member, 1898, 341. 
LuPTON, A., Colliery Engineering, 1890, 393. 

Experimental Marine Engine, 1891, 410. 

Gas for Fuel, 1890, 408, 410. 

Xarrow-Gauge Railways, 1898, 390. 

Water Softening. 1898, 436. 
LuPTOX, H., elected Member, 1897, 432. 
LuPTOX, K., elected IMember, 1887, 474. 
LuPTOX, N. D., elected Graduate, 1900, 183. 
LuPTOX, "W. ^Y., elected Member, 1800, 182. 
LuTHY, R., decease, 1885, 4.— Memoir, 1884, 403. 
Lyxtox axd Barnstaple Xarrow-Gauge Light Railway, 1898, 380, 385, 



M 

Macallax, G., elected Member, 1889, 1. 
Macax, R. T., elected Member, 1890, 1. 
Macbean, J. J., elected Member, 1892, 414, 
3IACBETH, J. B. K., elected Member, 1888, 444. 
MacBrair, W. M., elected 3Iember, 1890, 298. 
MacBrayxe, L., elected Associate, 1895, 548. 



224 M 

MacCarthy, S., Paper on Steel Steam-Pipes and Fittings, and Bcnardos Arc 
Welding in connection tlierewitli, 1896, 230. — Remarks thereon, 
243, 252. 

MacColl, H., Paper ou unusual Corrosion of Marine Macliinery, 1896, 345. — 
Eemarks thereon, 350, 354. 

MacDoxalp, D. J., eleded Memher, 1897, 256. 

3IacDonai.d, J., elected Member, 1899, 141. 

Macdoxald. J. A., elected Member, 1889, 204. 

Macfaklaxe, W., decease, 1886, 3.— Memoir, 1835, 52G. 

3IacGarvet, H., elected ilembcr, 1895, 327. 

Machado, Dr. A. A., elected Member. 1892, 2. 

3IACHIXE CooPEKAGE, Liverpool, 1891, 444. 

Machixe-Gcx. Maxim Automatic, 1885, 107. See Automatic Machinc-Gun. 

3Iachixe-Tools, Klectro-^Iagnetic. 1887, 323. See Electro-^Iagnetic Machine- 
Tools. 

3Iachixe-Tool Works, Coventry, 1897, 3G9, 421. 

Machixery at the Forth Bridge Works, 1887, 312. See Forth Bridge 
Machinery. 

Machixery of II.IM.S. "Psyche," Paper on the ^Machinery of 11. M.S. "Psyche" 
and H.M.S. " Proserpine," as illustrative of the work done at Keyham, 
particularly with reference to the practical training of Engineer Students, 
by R. Mayston, 1899, 377. — ^lachinery supplied at Keyham, 377. — 
Arrangement of engines of H.M.S. " Psyche," 37S. — Boilers, 370. — Forced 
draught. — Additional machinery, 380. — Results obtained on trials, 381. — 
Further trials, 382. — Training of Engineer Students, 383. — Scheme of 
training in first, second, third, and fourth year, 385; fiftli year's training, 386. 
JDucimion. — White, Sir W. H., Training of modern naval engineer, 
:'S8; Royal Naval engineers and the Institution, 389. — Bramwell, Sir F., 
A'alue of Paper, "89. — Thornycroft, J. I., Improvements in boilers, 390. — 
Unwin, W. C, Education of engineers, 390 ; practical woik in engineering 
schools, 391. — O'Brien, J. O., Theoretical and practical work, 392. — 
Champness, H. R., Close connection between naval conbtruction and 
marine engineering, 393. — Heath, C. L. E., Combination of theoretical 
with practical work, 393 ; scheme adopted in Hull, 394. — Worthington, 
A. ^I.. Educational instruction at Keyham, 395 ; increased attention to 
physics and mechanical subjects ; training at Greenwich, 3!1G. — Scott, R. J., 
Efficiency of machinery, £97; evaporative efficiency of Westport and 
Welsh coal, 398.— Walker, A. T., Education of engineer students, 399. — 
Davidson, S. C Diameter of fan for forced draught, 399. — Marshall, J. G., 
Organisation of work, 399 ; instruction of pupils at Brown and Sharpe's 
works, 400. — Spooner, H. J., Entrance of assistant engineers in Royal 
Navy from outside colleges, 400 ; after-career of students, 401.— Harris, 



M 225 

Machinery of H.IM.S. " Psyche," Diicianoti, 1899 (coulinucd) :— 

H. G., Education of stmleuts, 402.— White, Sir W. H., Advisability of 
early -worksliop experience, 403 ; efficient system of education at Keyham, 
404.— Mayston, K., Further training at Greenwich, 404 ; water used, on 
trials ; coal ; drawing-office instruction, 40o. 
Machinery of modern Steel Works, 1895, 436. See Steel- Works Machinery. 
Machinery Taxation, 1889, 587 :— 1890, 10, 33. See Taxation of Machinery. 
IMacilraith, J., decease, 1891, 4. 
MacIvor, a., elected Associate Member, 1897, 257. 
Mackay, C. O., elected Member, 1892, 102. 
Mackay, J., elected Member, 1890, 298. 
Mackenzie, J. W., elected Member, 1885, 163. 
Mackenzie, K. K., elected Associate, 1886, 466. 
Mackessack, H., elected Graduate, 1900, 97. 
Mackesy, W., elected Graduate, 1893, 221. 
Mackie, J., elected Member, 1894, I. 

Mackie and Thomson, Govau Shipbuilding Yard, Glasgow, 1895, 507. 
;Mackinlay, ]\Iajor G., Automatic Machine-Gun, 1885, 195. 
Macknight, T., Irish Press, 1896, 419. 
MacLay, A., elected Member, 1889, 340. 
MacLean, a. S., elected Member, 1886, 271. 
MACLEOD, A. W., elected Member, 1888, 100. 

MacMullen, Shaw, and Co., Custom House Flour Mill, Dublin, 1888, 404. 
Macnab, J., elected Associate Member, 1898, 341.— Decease, 1901, 7.— Memoir, 

1900, 627. 
Macnee, D., decease, 1894, 4.— Memoir, 1893, 496. 
Mactear, J., elected Member, 1892, 2. 
Magee, W. S. T., elected Member, 1889, 584. 
Magneto-Electric 3Iachine, De Meritens, 1887, 349, 361, 364, 365, 366, 371. 

See Electric Lighthouse. 
Mahon, Capt. K. H., elected Member, 1891, 197. 
IMaia, H. de A., elected Graduate, 1895, 150. 
Main, J. P. S., elected Associate Member, 1900, 183. 
Main, W. H., elected Member, 1896, 2. 

Maik, J. G., elected Member of Council, 1889, 23. See also Mair-Eumley. 
Auditor, 1885, 164 :— 1886, 20 :— 1889, 29. 
Compound Locomotives, 1889, 128. 
Compound Steam Turbine, 1888, 502. 
Friction Experiments, 1888, 199. 
Irrigating Machinery, 1888, 66, 68. 
Marine-Engine Trials, 1889, 279. 
Testing Machine, 1888, 239. 

F 



226 M 

Maib, J. G. (conlinued) : — 

Triple-Expan=ion Engines. 1887, 54. 

Water Works, Eathmines, 1888, 531. 

Waterworks EDgines, Liucoln, 1887, 137. 
3rAiK-EciiLEY, J. G.. appointed Member of Council, 1892, 2:;.— Elected Member 
of Council, 1893, 28 :— 1896, 28. See also Mair. 

By-l.iws. 1891, 4:^. 

Dryness of Steam, 1895, 71. 

Electric Lighting, Edinburgh, 1895, 583. 

Maiine-Engino Trials, 1891, 262. 

Mean-Pressure Indicator, 1899, 600. 

Moulding Sand, 1891, 102. 

Steam Jacket, 1892, 492. 
3IAITLAND, C, elected iMember, 1898, 2. 

Capacity of Railway Wagons, 190D, 605. 
Maitland, Major-General E., K.A., elected Member, 1888, 269. 
"Majestic," R.M.S., 1891, 428, 432. 

IMalan, E. de M., Graduate transferred to Member, 1894, ". 
Malcolm, B., Honorary Secretary of Belfast meeting 1896, Presentation from 
the Institution, 1897, 10. 

French Locomotive Practice, 19C0, 416. 
Malcolm, J., elected Associate Member. 1898, 143. 
3IALI.ET, A., Compound Locomotives, 1886, :>73. 
JklALLOCu, W. ¥., elected Associate Jlembt-r, 1896, lii2 :— transferred to Member, 

1898, 548. 
Mall )CK, A., Range-Findcrs, 1896, 01. 
3Ialt Drying, 1889, 307. See Drying in Vacuum. 
Malt Store, 1838, 400. 
Manchester Crematorium, 1894, 438. 
3L\xcnE.>TER Drai.sage Works, I'dper on the Manchester Main Drainage 

Works, by W. T. Olive, 1894, 3S1.— History of floods and works, 381.— 

Area and population ; rainfall, discharge into Ship Canal, 382 ; subsoil 

water, 383.— ^Main intercepting sewers, 383; storm overflow chamber; 

Bridge water Canal crossings. 384 ; sewer laid through running sand, 385. 

— Outfall works; boiler house, 385; engine house; lime-mixing house; 

lime store, 386 ; press house, 387 ; settling tanks, 388 ; filtering beds, 389. 

— Extension of works ; additional filtration areas, 389 ; section of conduits, 
390. — Machinery ; sludge pumps, 393 ; sludge presses, 394 ; boiler and 

«ngine; air-compressors; accumulator; liming, 395. — Electric lighting; 
dynamo, accumulators, storage batteries, lamps, 396. 

Discussion. — Hopkiuson, C, Floods of MedJock and Irwell, 397; 
disposal of sludgt' cake ; non-coadensing engines ; electric accumulators, 



M 227 

Maschestek Dkaixage Works, Di-cum'on, 1894 (continued): — 

39S. — Crimp, W. .S., IJaiufall in London ; set-tion of outfall sewer ; 
filtration area, o9S. — Dunn, H. S., Sludge cake as manure, 399. — Alliott, 
J. B., Sludge presses, 399.— Lewis, G., Presses, 400.— Olive, W. T., 
Floods ; disposal of sludge cake ; nou-condensiug engines ; electric 
accumulators, 400 ; rainfall; section of outfall sewer; filtration area, 401. 
—Kennedy, A. B. W., Visit to sewage works, 401. 

^Ianchester Electric-Light Statiox, 1894, 297, 4U2. 

31AXCHESTER FiRE Beigade, 1894, 404, 413. 

3lANCHESTErw Gas Works, 1894, 402, 408. 

*■ Manchester Glardiax axd Evexixg News," Printing Works, 1894, 402. 

3IANCHESTER HYDRAULIC POWER SuPPLY STATION", 1894, 403, 407 :— 1895, 353. 

^ee Hydraulic Power Supply. 

3lA}fCHESTER Maix Draixage Works, 1894, 381, 40G. 

-Manchester, Sheffield, axd Lixcolxshire Railway Works, Gorton, 1894, 430. 

3IAXCHESTER Ship Caxal, 1887, 397-9 :— 1891, 457 :— 1894, 403. 

Manchester Ship Caxal. Paper on the Jlecbanical Appliances employed in the 
construction of the Manchester Ship Canal, by E. L. Williams, 1891, 
418. — Magnitude of work, 418. — Railway, 418. — Eate of excavation, 
419. — Preparation, 419. — Excavators : Euston and Proctor's, Wilson's, 
Whitakcrs', 419-21. — Grabs, Priestman's and others, 421. — French land 
dredger, 421. — German land dredger, 423. — Summary of results, 424. — 
Floating dredgers, 424. — Pile-driving engines with water jet, 425. 

Discussion. — Williams, E. L., Further particulars of mechanical 
appliances, 425 ; number of workmen, 426. — Tomlinson, J., Vote of 
thanks, 42G. — AVorks viaited, 432. — Description, 457. 

^Manchester Shipping Offices and Packing Co.'s Warehouse, 1894, 403, 412. 

Maxchester Summer IMeetixg, 1894, 289. — Eeception, 289. — Business, 293. — 
Votes of thanks, 296. — Excursions, &c., 402. 

Manchester Warehouses, 1894, 402, 403, 411, 412, 414, 417. 

Manhattan Jute Works, Dundee, 1887, 456. 

Manisty, E., elected Member, 1891, 301. 

^Iaxx, J. H., elected Member, 1894, 293. 

Mano, B., elected Member, 1888, 269. 

Mansell, W. R., elected Member, 1900, 96. 

Mansergh, J., Dockyard Constructional Machinery, 1899, 375. 
Outlet Valves at Burrator Reservoir, 1899, 411, 413. 

Mansfield, A., elected Graduate, 1894, 234: — elected Associate Member, 
1896, 2. 

Mansfield, E., elected Member, 1894, 169. 

Mansfield, E. A., elected Associate Member, 1894, 470: — transferred to 
Member. 1899, 147. 

P 2 



228 M 

Mansfield, F., elected Graduate, 1897, 3. 

^lAXtfFiELD, J. F., elected Associate Member, 1899, 293. 

M.\NSFiELD, O., elected Graduate. 1899, 294. 

3IAXSFIELD, W., elected Graduate, 1894, 170:— elected Associate Member, 
1897, 2. 

Maxsox, J., elected Member, 1891, 480. 

:\Iaxti,e, H. G.. elected Member, 1897, 1. 

IMaxton, a. W., elected Associate Member, 1893, 220 : — transferred to Member, 
1899, 5. 
Capacity of Railway Wagons, 1900, 605. 

IMAxrFAcrrRE axd Storage of Oxygex. 1890, 131. See Oxygen Mauufacture. 

Maxtfactcres IX Chixa, 1899, 537. -See Openings for Mechanical Engineers iu 
China. 

:\Iap Prixting "Works, Edinburgh, 1887, 441. 

Mappix axd Webb, Eoyal Cutlery and Silver-Plate Works, Sheffield, 1890, 456. 

:Mapplebeck. E., elected Member, 1897, 432. 

Maria, H. S , elected Graduate, 1898, 144. 

March Meeting, 1885, 75 :— 1891, 109:— 1900, 9.->. 

Marixe Biological Associatiox Laboratory, Plymouth, 1899, 455. 

Mabixe Corrosiox, Paper on unusual Corrosion of Marine Machinery, by H. 
MacColl, 1896, 34."). — Steamer and cargo; submergence, 34.'). — Cause of 
corrosion, 346. — Extent of corrosion, and remedies, in machinery and 
boilers, 347. — Steam trial ; conclusions, margin of strength, advantage of 
paint, 349. 

Discussion. — MacColl, II., Exhibited specimens of corroded parts; 
submergence of two other steamers, 350. — West, H. H., Corrosion in 
boiler, 350 ; repairs, 351 ; cause of corrosion ; wrought-iron and steel 
showed most corrosion, 352. — Davey, H., Sulphate of copper in water 
from Cornish mines, 353. — ;5IacColl, H., Margin of strength for 
machinery, 354. 

:Marixe Exgixe, Experimental, 1891, 386. See Experimental Marine Engine. 

Marixe Exgixeerixg, Paper on Marine Engineering during the past decade, 
by A. Blechynden, 1891, 306. — Two-stage expansion compound engines in 
18S1 now succeeded by three-stage expansion engines with higher steam- 
pressure, 306. — Forced draught with closed stokc-holds or with closed 
ash-pits, 307 ; sources of economy, and summary of advantages, 308 ; 
adoption in navy, 309. — Boilers, tubnlous and cylindrical, 310 ; material 
and manufacture, 311 ; furnaces, increase of strength, thickness of 
plates, 312; size and weight of boilers, 313. — Engines, triple and 
quadruple, and tandem, 313; number of cranks, length of engines, 313; 
horizontal engines in navy replaced by vertical, 314 ; engines in separable 
sets, 315. —Piston-valves, with spring lings or springless sleeves, 316; 



M 229 

Marine Engineering, Paper, 1891 (continued) :— 

leakage, 316 ; balanced slide-valve for low-pressure cylinder, 316. — Valve- 
gear, 316 ; advantages of radial gear and of link-motion, 317. — Crank- 
shaft built up, 318. — Centrifugal pumps for circulating water in 
condensers, 318. — Steam-pipes, remedies for want of elastic strength in 
copper, substitution of steel or iron pipes, 318; absence of corrosion, 319. 
— Strength of gun-metal at high temperatures, 320. — Feed heating, and 
resultant economy, 320. — Auxiliary supply of fresh water, 321 ; still or 
evaporator, 322. — Screw propeller. 322 ; pitch ratios and surface ratios, 
.323 ; steel or bronze blades, 324 ; springing of blades in working, 324. — 
Twin screws, 32o ; diminished weight of machinery, 32i!. — "Weight of 
machinery relatively to power and to cylinder capacity, 326 ; increase in 
speed of revolution, 327. — Economy of fuel, comparison of present 
performance with 1872 and 1881, 328; performance of machinery 
relatively to coal consumption, 329. — Power of machinery in passenger 
and war steamers, 330. — General conclusions: increase in pressure, in 
economy of coal, and in power, 331. — Tabulated comparison of three-stage 
expansion engines, 332-6 ; working of marine engines, 337 ; performance 
relatively to coal consumption, 338. 

Discussion. — Marshall, F. C, Progress since 1881, 339 ; forced draught, 
333 ; improvement in boilers, 340 ; thickness of plates, 341 ; tube-surface 
too large, 342; valve-gear, 312; copper steam-pipes, 342; power 
relatively to coal consumption, 343 ; screw propellers, 343 — Laird, W., 
Forced draught with closed stoke-hold, 344 ; arrangement of cylinders, 
locomotive boilers, 345. — White, W. H., Early experiments with forced 
draught, 346 ; difficulties due to boiler design, 347 ; application of assisted 
draught, 318; thinner boiler shells and lighter engines in navy, 348: 
xiccidents to machinery, 349 : range of power in cruisers, weight of 
machinery, twin screws, 350 ; three screws, 351 ; four sets of engines, 351 ; 
low speed by disconnecting cylinders, 352 ; coal consumption, 352. — 
Eeynolds, E., Cast-iron steam-pipes, 353. — Cochrane, C, Weldless steel 
tubes, 3.53 ; evaporators, 3.54 ; twin screws, 354. — Gray, J. M., Economy 
of forced draugiit, 3o5 ; calorific value of coal, 355 ; efficiency of heating 
surface, 356 ; lightness of engines and boilers, 357 ; corrugated flues for 
furnaces, 357 ; thickness of furnace-plates, 358 ; disconnection of low- 
pressure cylinder, 35S ; crossing of rods in link-motion, 359 ; wrought- 
iron for steam pipes, 359. — Head, J., Inferior coal available with forced 
■draught, 360.— Smith, AV. F., Early use of forced <lraught, 360.— 
"Wickbteed, J. H., Strength of furnace plates, 360. — Longridge, M.. 
Economy of forced draught, 361 ; rate of transmission of heat through 
boiler plates, 362 ; coefficient of heat transmission, 363. — Douglass, Sir 
J. N., Practical advantages of forced draught, 363. — Blechynden, A., 



230 M 

Marine Exgixeerixg, Di^^ai^sion, 1891 (continueil) : — 

Economy in coal consumption with forced drauglit, 361 ; pass-over slide- 
valve, 365 ; blast-pipe in locomotives, 36o ; tabular statement of vreigbt 
in relation to horse-power, 366 ; relative weight in navy double of that in 
mercantile marine, 367.— Tomlinson, J., Remarks on marine engineering, 
367.— Bruce. K., Continuous working of forced draught. 368. — Miller, 
T. L., Feed-heating, 360 ; experiments on cfHeiency of condenser tubes, 
370. — Blechynden, A., Closed stoke-holds, 370; efficiency of condenser 
tube, 371. 
Marine-Engine Trials, Research Committee, 1887, 6 :— 1888, 6 :— 1889, 6:— 

1890, '^ :— 1891, 6 :— 1892, 6 ;— 1893, 7 :— 1894, 7 :— 1895, 6. 
Makine-Engixe Trials, Eetearch Committee on Marine-Engine Trials. Fird 
lieport upon Trials of the s.s. " Meteor," by A. B. Vi'. Kennedy, Chairman, 
1889, 235. — Description of ^teamer and engines, 'I'o'y. — Boilers, 236. — Object 
of trial, 237. — Coal measurement, and chemical analysis, 237. — Furnace 
gases. 238. — Feed-water measurement, 238. — Power measurement, 240. — 
General conditions and results, 240. — Duration of trial. 240. — Quantity of 
coal used, 240; aualyfeis of fuinace-gases, 241.— Temperature and weight 
of feed-water, 241. — Speed, 242. — Mean pressures in boilers, jackets, and 
receivers, 242. — Mean effective pressures in cylinders, aad indicated horse- 
powers, 243.— Boiler efficiencies, 243; engine efficiencies, 244; total 
efficiency, 24.1. — Steam accounted for by indicator diagrams, 24.5. — Twa 
methods of combining expanded indicator diagrams, 246; '• dryness 
fraction," 246. — Coal consumption, 247. — Speed of vessel, 247. — 
Supplementary triil of engines driven at full power with forced draught, 
247-8. — Trial with engines reversed, going astern, 249. — Staff of 
oljservers, 240. 

D/sc«8.<io7i. — Cochrane, C, Names of Research Committee, 251. — 
Kennedy, A. B. W., Work done by Committee, 251 ; diameters of 
cylinders, 251; starting and ending of experiment, 251; subsequent 
trial on " Fusiyama." 2.52 ; intended trial on " Colchester," 253 ; two-fold 
object of trials, 2.53. — White, W. H., Importance of results, 253 r 
omissions in enquiry, 254 ; feed-water measurement, 255; steam used in 
jackets, 255. — Brown, A., Fuel consumption in early s-crew-steamers, 255. 
— Carbutt, E. H., Satisfactory nature of trials, 256 ; means of obtaining 
more perfect experiments, 256. — Aitken, T., Improvement in marine 
engines. 257. — Cociirane, C, Rate of tranfmission of heat through boiler 
plates, 257; proportion of steam accounted for by indicator diagrams, 
257. — Kennedy, A. B. W, Arrangement of tanks for feed-water 
measurements, 258; rate of transmission of heat through boiler plates, 
259; measurements of steam from indicator diagrams, 259. — Cochrane, C, 
Efftct of measuring diagrams at later period of stroke, 260. — Kennedy, 



M 231 

Mabine-Engine Trials, First Report, 1889 {Biscmdon, continued) : — 

A. B. W., Diagrams not measured for re-evaporatinn, 260. — 'Willans, 
P. W., Jacket water not measured, 260; initial condensation large, 260; 
water consumption large, 261 ; efficiency of engines and boilers, 261 ; 
standard of efficiency for engines, 261 ; formulaj for efficiency, 263 : 
higher efficiency of "Meteor" engines, 26;); results from smaller 
engine, 264 ; overlapping in ranges of cylinder temperatures, 264 ; 
initial condensation, 265 ; limit to economy in large engines, 265. — 
Gray, J. M., Duty of perfect engine, 265 ; real efficiency of " Meteor " 
engines, 266 ; mean range of temperature must be taken in applying 
Carnot function, 266-7. — List, J., Yslue of informiition respecting water 
consumption per I.H.P. at sea, 267; inability to measure jacket- water, 
267 ; jacket pressures, 267 ; value of sttam-jackets is questioned, 268 : 
jackets should be automatic in steam supply and in draining, 268 ; coal 
consumption, 268 ; fclide-valves preferable to piston-valves for second and 
third cylinders, 269. — Adamson, D., Triple and quadruple engines, 269 ; 
moderate efficiency of " Meteor " engines, 269 ; work of boiler. 269 ; plan 
of stoking, 270 ; coal analysis, 270 ; indicator diagram from high-pressure 
cylinder, 270 ; range of temperature and expansion iu cylinders, 271 ; 
jacketing of cylinders, and pressures in jackets, 271 ; power developed in 
successive cylinders, 272; trials desirable of best engines, 272; advantage 
of three or foiur cylinders, 273; importance of higher velocity, 273. — 
Cotterill, J. H., Standard of perfection for condensing and non-condensing 
engines, 273; losses inherent in engine determine selection of standard. 
274 ; liquefaction in cylinders, 274 ; action of condensing surface dependent 
on density of steam, 275 ; method of combining expanded diagrams, 275. 
— English, Major T., Indicator diagrams required from receivers, 276; 
calculations simplified by treating each cylinder separately, 276 ; area of 
initial condensing surfaces, and volumes of receivers, 276. — Unwin, W. C. 
Consumption of feed-water not excessive, 277 ; comparison between two 
modes of combining indicator diagrams, 277-S ; dryness fraction, 278. — 
^lair, J. G., jNIeasurement of indicator diagram down to perfect vacuum. 
279 ; comparison of actual steam engine with Cainot's perfect heat- 
engine, 279 ; comparison preferable between power developed and heat 
used, 280; absolute efficiency of "Meteor" engine, 280; indicator 
diagrams show some room for improvement, 280. — Anderson, W., Scope 
of trials, 281 ; coal analysis, moisture, ash, and clinker, 281 ; heat 
for feed-water, 281 ; excess of air supply to furnace, 282 ; slide-valve 
preferable to piston-valve for low-pressure cylinder, 282. — Fothergill, 
J. R., Choice of engines for testing, 282 ; ratio of cylinder capacities and 
powers, and ranges of temperature, 283; method of indicating, 283; 
measurement and heating of feed-water, £84 ; condition of boilers, 284 ; 



232 M 

Makine-En'GIXe Trials, First Report 1889 (Discussion, continued) : — 

funnel temperature and analysis of furnace gases, 285 ; coal consumption, 
285. — Morison, D. B., Difficulty attending marine-engine trials, 281! ; 
accuracy of results obtained, 28G ; comparison of " Meteor " engines with 
cargo-boat practice, 287 ; suggested trial with cargo-engine, 287 ; feed- 
heating arrangement, 287 ; comparing vacuum in cylinder and condenser, 
287; advantage of independent feed-pump, 287; initial loads on pistons, 
288; high coal consumption of "Meteor" boilers, 288; long fire-grates, 
288; lubricated piston for indicator, 289. — Fothergill, J. K., Use of 
lubricated indicator-piston, 289. — Edwards, F., DiflBculties met with in 
marine-engine trials, 289 ; sizes of cylinders and design of boilers in 
" IMetoor," 290 ; feeJ-water measurement, 290 ; cut-off in indicator 
diagrams, 291 ; twofold conditions for working of engines, 292 ; weighing 
of coal at sea with spring-balance, 292 ; measurement of water tanks in 
*' Fusiyama," 292 ; condition of boilers in " Meteor," 292 ; triple- 
expansion engines working at low pressures, 293 ; use of steam-jackets, 
293. — Wilson, C. J., Explanation of coal analysis, 293: calculation of 
calorific value, 294 ; precautions in taking samples of furnace gas, 294. 
— Halpin. D., Trial of engines of " Colchester," 295 : inaccuracy of 
experiments sometimes recorded, 295 ; measurement of feed-water by 
meter, 296 ; efficiency of Worthingtou pump, 29G ; effect of long pipes to 
indicators, 29G; pressure and circulation in stcam-jacketa, 297; advantage 
of ribbed jackets, 297 : efficiency of engines and boilers of " Meteor," 
298 ; mode of estimating efficiency of boiler, 298 ; rate of heat transmission, 
299. — Kennedy, A. B. VV., Jacket-water measurement, 300 ; standard of 
t fficiency, 300 ; Carnot ratio expresses highest possible efficiency, 300; 
ideal steam-engine and physical difficulties, 301 ; disagreement between 
calculated efficiencies of "'Meteor" engines, 302; standard of comparison 
should not vary, 302; Table 2, possible efficiencies of five kinds of 
engines, calculated according to two methods, 302-3 ; maximum difference 
not above 2 per cent., 304 ; conditions of working in "Meteor" engines, 
304 ; management of fires, 304 ; difficulty in getting ship to test, 305 ; 
proper position of indicators, 305 ; heating of feed-water, 305 ; volumes of 
receivers, 305; expanded indiciitor diagrams, 305 ; caloiific value of coal, 
30G; measurement of feed-water by meter, 30G. — Cochrane, C, Vote of 
thanks for report, 306. 

Marine-Engine Trials, Research Committee on Marine-Engine Trials, Second 
Report upon Trials of three steamers, " Fusi Yama," " Colchester," 
" Tartar," by A. B. W. Kennedy, Chairman, 1890, 203.— Preface, 203.— 
Description of steamers, engines, and boilers, 201-5; 212-3; 224-5. — 
Time, place, and duration of trials, 204-5 ; 212-4 ; 224-6.— 
Coal measurement and chemical analysis, 205-G; 214-5; 22G-7. — 



M 233 

Marin'e-Exgixe Trials, Second Report, 1880 (continued) : — 

Furnace gases, temperature and chemical analysis, 207 ; 216-8 ; 228- 
30.— Chimney draught, 207; 218; 230.— Feed-water measurement, 207 ; 
219 ; 230. — Power measurement, mean pressures in cylinders, and 
indicated horse-powers, 208; 219-20; 231.— Speed, 209; 220; 232.— 
Jacket water, 232. — Mean pressures in boilers, receivers, jackets, and 
valve-chests, mean vacuum in condenser, and mean initial and back 
pressures in cylinders, 209-10 ; 221 ; 232-3. — Boiler efficiencies, 
engine efficiencies, and total efficiencies, 210-1 ; 221-2 ; 233-5. — 
Coal consumption, 211; 222; 234. — Steam measured from indicator 
diagrams. 211; 223; 235.— Speed of vessels, 223; 224; 235.— Tabulated 
comparison of dimensions and other data, and of principal results in four 
trials, 237-40. — Appendix, instructions given for taking indicator 
diagrams, 241 ; staflfs of observers, 242. 

Discussion. — Tomlinson, J., Votes of thanks, 243. — Laird, "\V., 
Advantages of trials reported, 243. — Carbutt, E. H., Steam for 
circulating-pump engine, 244; comparative results and value of trials, 
244. — Hallett, J. H., Smoke analysis, circulating pump, and waste 
water from glands, 245-6. — "Willans, P. "NV., Comparison of three 
trials, 246 ; efficiency of engines, 246 ; calorimeter, 247 ; indicator 
diagrams, 247 ; water in cylinders, 248-51. — Davey, H., Steam-jackets, 
251; piston-speed, 251; extent of expansion, 252; water in cylinders, 
252; efficiency of engines, 253; valve-gear, 254. — Schonheyder, W., 
Indicator diagrams from circulating-pump engine, 255 ; efficiency of 
boilers, 255. — Fletcher, L. E., Effect of steam-jackets, 256 ; piston 
constants, 256. — Edwards, F., Condition of engines. 256 ; feed-water 
measuring tanks, 257-9 ; priming, 259-60 ; indicator diagrams from 
feed-pump and circulating pump, 260 ; furnace gases and chimney 
temperatures, 261. — Crosland, J. F. L., Kate of evaporation and coal 
consumjition for marine engines, 261-2. — Stromeyer, C. E., Weighing 
of coal by spring balance or steelyard, 262 ; measurement of condensing 
water, 263 ; air in boiler steam, 263 ; efficiency of boilers, 263 ; furnace 
temperatures, 264 ; draught, 264 ; influence of cleaning fires, 265. — 
Bodmer, G. K., Initial condensation, 265; Yenturi water meter, 266. — 
Wilson, C. J., Analyses of coals and gases, 266. — Phillips, J., Effect 
of engines working below power, 267-8. — Cowper, C. E., Effect of 
steam-jackets on condensation and re-evaporation, 268-9 ; combining 
of indicator diagrams, and calculation of efficiencies, 269-70. — Joy, D., 
Indicator diagrams, 270; further experiments, 270. — Watkins, A., 
Engines and boilers not worked at full power, 270-1. — Hudson, J. G., 
Designing of surface condensers, 271. — Gray, J. M., Verification of 
engineering constants, 272; recording of data, 272.— Young, G. S., 



234 M 

Marine-Engine Trials, Second lieport. 1890 (Lifcu^flon, continued) : — 

Priming of boilers, 272. — Eobinson, L. 8., Furnace drang^ht and heating- 
surface, 273. — Beaumont, W. W., Priming of boilers during trial. 
273-4. — Tomlinson, J., Advantages of large heating surface, 274; 
uniformity of work on cranks, 274-5. — Kennedy, A. B. W., Sleana 
for circulating-pump engine, 275 ; piston constants, 276 ; excessive 
consumption of water. 27(> ; trial of steamer without cargo, 277-S ; 
superheated-steam calorimeter, 278 ; measurements of circulating water, 
278 ; combining of indicator diagrams, and standard of theoretical 
eflSciency, 278; water in engine cylinders, 27t) ; conditions of trials at 
sea, 279; trial of steam-tug "Eagle," 279-82; tabulated results, 280-1. 
— Moriton, D. B., " Tartar " trial without cargo, 2f<2-3 ; boiler 
capacity, 2S3-4. — Longridge. M., Mean indicator diagrams, 284-.") ; 
calculated weight of steam and water in cylinders, 285, 287; analyses of 
furnace gas and coal, 286, 288 ; thermometer for high temperatures, 288. — 
Kennedy, A. B. W., Engine trial without cargo, 288 ; furnace-gas 
analyses, 288-9 ; thermometer, 289 ; measurement of wetness of steam, 
289 ; functions of Research Committee on marine-engine trials, 290. 

Mabine-Exginp: Trials, R( search Committee on Marine-Engine Trials, Third 
lieport upon Trials of the s.s. " lona," by A. B. W. Kennedy, Chairman, 
1891, 200.— Description of steamer and trial, 20(1.— Engines, 201. — 
Boilers', 202. — Forced Draught, 203. — Weights, and duration of trial, 204. 

— Coal measurement and analysis, 204-5. — Furnace gases, 206, 208-9. — 
Feed-water measurement, 207. — Priming, 210. — Additional water- 
measurements, 210. — Power measurement, mean effective pressures in 
cylinders, and indicated horse-powers, 211. — Speed, 212. — Pressures, 
213. — Boiler eflSciencies, engine efBciencics, and total efficiencies, 213-5. 

— Coal consumption, 214. — Steam measurements from indicator 
diagrams, 215. — Subsequent trial by chief engineer, 215-7. — Speed 
of vessel, 217. — Statf of obsers'ers, 219. — Comparative results of tlie 
two trials, 220-2. 

Discussion. — Kennedy, A. B. W., Measurement of priming, 223 ; 
indicator diagrams from receivers. 223 ; subsequtnt trial, 224. — 
Fothergill, J. R., Deflector jilate in furnace, 224 ; quality of coal, 224 ; 
large supply of air, 225 ; tabulated particulars of four voyages, and 
consumption of coal, 226-7; temperature of feed-water, 228. — Mudd, T., 
Satisfactory results of trial, 229 ; coal and water consumption, and 
forced draught, 229 ; arrangement of cylinders and steam-jacket, 230 ; 
temperatures of feed-water, 230; supplementary feed supply, 231 ; 
condensation in cylinders, 233 ; theoretical combined indicator diagram, 
234; slide-valve and piston valve, £37; piston packing-rings, 237. — 
Marshall, F. C, Size of boilers, 287 ; temperature of funnel gases. 



M 23& 

MABiSE-EycrxE Trials, Third Beport, 1891 {DUcus-'ion, continued) :— 

23S ; ratio of heating surface to grate area, 238. — Brown, J. F., Object 
of subsequent trial, 239 ; coal consumption, 240 ; feed-water temperature^ 
and supplementary feed-water, 240 ; temperature of funnel gases and of 
air supply, 241 ; position of indicators, 242. — WiUans, P. W.. Condensation 
in cylinders. 242 ; jacketing of high-pressure cylinder, 213. — Burstall, 
H. E. J., Leakage at feed-pump glands, 243. — Mudd, T., Continuance of 
leakage during trial, 244.— Terry, S. H., Fan for forced draught, 244 * 
corrugated flues, 24.") ; air-pressures, 245 ; experiments with colliery fan 
246. — Halpin. D.. Measurement of feed-water, 247 ; circulating water 
248 ; drainage of steam-jacket, 248 ; flat slide-valves, 249 ; boilers too- 
large, 249 ; efiBciency of locomotive boiler, 250 ; size of chimney, 250 
forced draught, 251 ; transmisuion of heat through metal of boiler, 251 
position of indicators, 252. — Schunheyder, W., Size of boilers, 253 
glass water-gauge, 253. — Phillips, J., Indicator diagrams, 253; size of 
engines and boilers, 254; temperature of chimney, 254; relation of boiler 
pressure to horse-power, 255 ; priming, 255 ; coal measurement, 256 : 
supplementary feed, 257. — Bruce, R., Quality of coal. 258; assisted 
draught, 258 ; temperature of waste gases, 259. — Gray, J, M.. Calorimetrie 
tests, 260 ; engine efficiency, 260 : eflfect of partially closing funnel 
damper, 261 ; retardation of heat by radiators, 261. — Mair-Rumley» 
J. G., Size of engines and boilers. 262 ; comparative expansion and 
horse-power in " lona " and " Meteor," 263 ; insufficient jacketing, 264 ; 
closing of funnel damper. 264 ; size of indicator pipes, 204. — Constantine,. 
E. G., Discrepancies between the two trials, 265; temperature of 
circulating water, heating of feed-water, closing of damper, 266. — 
Legros, L. A.. Leakage from feed-pump glands, 207; ThomsoQ 
calorimeter and mode of working. 267. — Wilson, C. J., Priming, 269 ;. 
calorimeter, 270 ; funnel gases, 270. — Marten, E. B., Advantage of 
working boilers slowly, 272. — Fothergill, J. E., Size of engines and 
boilers, 272; success of forced draught. 273; closing of damper, 273; 
temperature of funnel gases, 274 ; advantage of large funnel, 274 ; 
supply of air above tire-bars, 274 ; deflector plate, 275.; duration of fire- 
bars, 275 ; combined engine and fan. 275 : power and speed of steamers, 
276. — Mudd, T., Object of trial, 277 ; construction of steam-jacket, 277 ; 
supplementary feed, 277 ; economy in wire-drawing between boiler and 
engine, 278 ; relation of horse-power to pressure or revolutions, 279 ; 
proportion of coal received abroad, and quality, 280; extent of expansion. 
281 ; description of pistons and piston-rings, 281. — Kennedy, A. B. W'., 
Differences between the two trials, 282 ; supplementary feed-water, 283 ; 
feed-pump kakage, 283; arrangement of jacket, 284; temperature of 
funnel gases, 281; transmission of heat, 285.^Tomlinson, J., Votes of 



336 M 

IMarine-Exgine TiuAis, Third Report. 1891 {lHscHS*ion^ continued^ : — 

thanks, 285. — Donkin, B., Jun., Tabular comparison between '"lona" 
entities anil Sulzer mill-en.i.dne, 28G. — Bcare. T. H., Constants used in 
calculations, 2SG ; variations in boilers and efficiencies, 2S7. — Kennedy, 
A. B. W., Constants used, 287. 

3Iakine-Exgine Trials, Research Committee on Marine-Engine Trials, Fourth 
Beport upon Trial of the p.s. " Ville de Douvres," by A. B. W. Kennedy, 
Chairman, 1892, 13G. — Description of steamer, l:>6. — Engines, 137. — 
Paddle-wheels, 13;>.— Boilers, 1:19.— "Weights, 140.— Duration of trial, 141. 
— Fuel measurement and chemical analysis, 141. — Furnace gases, 143; 
analysts of gases by volume and by weight, 144-5. — Feed-water 
measurement, 14G ; feed-water to auxiliary engines, 147. — Priming- 
water tests, 148. — Power measurements, 15it. — Speed, 152. — Pressures, 
152. — Boiler efficiencies, engine efficiencies, and total efficiency, 153-5. — 
Fuel consumption, 154. — Steam measurements from indicator diagrams, 
155. — Speed of vessel, 156. — Staff of observers, 157. — Comparative 
results of the trials of the " Meteor," " Fust Yama," " Colchester," 
■"Tartar," "'lona,"' and "Ville de Douvres," 158-10:5. 

JJisoission. — Anderson, Dr. W., Vutes of thanks to all connected with 
trial. 1G4; scope of discussion, 1G5. — Bramwell, Sir F., Separation of fuel 
and water for auxiliary engines from consumption for main engines, 1G5. 
— Cochrane, C, Arrangement of condenser, vacuum, and size of exhaust 
pipe, IGG ; ratio of condensing water to condensed steam, 1G7; absence of 
feed-heater, 1G7; leakage of joints, 1G7; constants used in calculations, 
1G7. — Kraft, J., Steamer built under special conditions, 1G8; high speed 
and limited weight of engines, 1G8; circulation of water in condenser, 
and vacuum, 169. — Boulvin, J., Improvements needed, 169; weight of 
machinery and boilers, 170; consumption of fuel, 170; value of research, 
171. — Kirk, Dr. A. C, Boiler efficiency separated from that of engine, 
171 ; efficiency not always cnmpatible with object cf engine, 172.— 
Donkin, B., Jun., Indicator springs, 172. — Harris, H. G., Measurement 
of fuel, 172. — Anderson, Dr. W., Vacuum, 173. — Cochrane, C, Additional 
data, 173; temperature of condtnsed steam, 174; fuel burnt per square 
foot of heating surface per hour, 174; efficiency of condensation, 175; 
substitution for steam-jacket round high-pressure cylinder, 176. — Eowan, 
J.. Earlier cut-off in low-pressure cylinder, 177; feed-heating apparatus, 
178. — Stroraeyer, C. E., Efficiency of boilers, 178; balancing of heat 
accouut, 179; priming of boilers, 180; leakage of surface-condenser, 181; 
xange of efficiency of engines, 181. — Willans, P. W., Use of water meter, 
182; determination of priming, 182; condenser, 183; best vacuum, 183; 
performance of engines, 184. — English, Et-L'ol., Capacity and surface of 
intermediate receiver, 184. — Edwards, F., Fuel consumption and priming, 



M 237 

Makixe-Engixe Trials, Fourth Report, 1892 {BUcu^don, continued) :— 

184; condenser, and permanent feed-measuring apparatus, 185. — Gray. 
J. M., Engine efficiencies and steam pressures, 18G; heat escaping up 
funnel, 187. — Wilson, C. J., Measurement of priming, 187; heat 
unaccounted for, 188. — Young, G. S., Samples of steam, and measurement 
of priming, 188; construction of surface condensers, 189. — Bruce, E., 
Control of evaporation by forced draught, 190. — Kennedy. A. B. W., 
Separation of steam consumption in auxiliary engines and in main 
engines, 191; separation of boiler and engine efficiency, 192; 
measurement of fuel consumption, 192; aJteration of cut-oflF, 193: 
balancing of heat account, 193; measurement of priming, and samples- 
of steam, 194; jacketing of high-pressure cylinder, 195 ; votes of thanks. 
195. — Anderson. Dr. "VV., Thanks to Mr. Kraft, 196. — IJowan, J.. 
Advantage of earlier cut-ofFin low-pressure cylinder, 196. 

Marixe-En'gine Trials. Research Committee on 3Iarine-l]ngine Trials. Abstract 
of results of Experiments on Six Steamers, and Conclusions drawu 
therefrom in regard to the efficiency of Marine Boilers and Engines, by 
T. H. Beare, 1894, 33. — Steamers tried, 33 ; dimensions and speed on trial, 
34. — General description of boilers, 36 ; observations made, and relations- 
between them, 38. — Analysis and thermal value of fuel and ashes, 41. — 
Feed-water, in relation to boiler and fuel, 44. — Priming, 46. — Funnel 
gases, 48. — Air supply, 50. — Radiation, 51.— General conclusions as to 
boilers, 52. — Engines, 53. — Observations made, 55. — Steam pressures, 56. 
— Power measurement, 57. — Back-pressure, 59. — Feed-water, in relation 
to engine and power, 60. — Steam-Jackets, 62. — Initial condensation, and- 
re-evaporation, 63. — Expansion of steam, GS. — Weight of machinery, and 
indicated horse-power, 68. — Circulating water, 69. — Condensing surface, 
and temperatures of circulating water and condensed steam, 70. — 
Conclusions, 71. 

Discussion. — Beare, T. H., Priming in " Tartar," 71 . — White, Dr. W. H., 
Value of trials, 74 ; comparison of results. 77. — Edwards, F., Indicator 
diagrams from "lona," 78. — Mudd, T., Overlapping of diagrams from 
"lona," 79; initial condensation; temperature of funnel gases, 81. — 
Sankey, Capt. H. E., Transformation of indicator diagrams into theta-phi- 
diagrams, 82-9 ; priming, 89 ; back-pressure, 90 ; expansion, 91. — 
Phillips, J., Effect of damper, 91.— Mudd, T.. Temperature in funnel, 91 ; 
leakage of heat, 92. — Head, J., Comparison of " lona " and " A'ille de 
Douvres," 92 ; economy of fuel in cargo boats ; boilers and fuel, 94 ; forced 
draught and natural draught, 95 ; weight and power of machinery, 97 ; 
margin of power for safety, 98. — Saxon, A., Reserve of power in " lona " ; 
loss of pressure in steam-pipe, 99. — Cochrane, C. Loss of steam pressure ; 
condensing and condensed water, 101. — Halpin, D., Measurement of feed- 



238 M 

jMarise-Engise Trials, Abstract, 1894 (J)i<cm.<io7i, contiuued) : — 

water ; loss of steam pressure, 10'3 ; radiation, 104 ; condensing water, 105. 
— McGregor. J., Performance of boilers, lOG ; temperatures of fncs, 107; 
size and power of engines, 107; vacuum, 108. — Donkiu, B., Maximum and 
minimum results of trials, 108. — Cowper, C. E., Tbeta-phl diagrams, 109, 
110. — riiillips, J., High boiler-pressure. 111. — Edwards, F., Damper in 
•cbininey, 112. — Kennedy, A. 15. W.. Temperature in chimney, 112. — 
Phillips, J.. Priming, li:!. — Scgundo, E. C. de, "Water consumption, 113; 
<;oal consumption, 114. — Edwards, F., Testing of pistons, 114; priming 
and coal consumption, \l'^. — I3eare, T. H., Uniform rate of coal 
•consumption, IIG. — Edwards, F., Back-prersure, IIG; vacuum gauges, 
117. — Capper, D. S., Indicators; steam-jacketing, 118. — Schunheyder, W., 
"Water measurement, 119. — AValker, AV. Ci., Efficiency, and number of 
cylinders, 12(t. — Eobinson, L. S., Progressive power trials, 122. — 
Kobinson, M., Brake horsepower, 122. — Beare, T. H., Initial condensation, 
1215; oveilapping of indicator diagrams; priming, 124; back-pressure; 
radiation, 125; loss of pressure in steam pipe, 126; disparity between two 
steamers; funnel gases, 127; air leakage, 128. — Kennedy, A. B. "W., 
Objects of trials, 129. — Sankey, Capt. H. P., Theta-phi diagrams, and 
comparisons made, 180; heat turned into work, l:'.2. — Cummins, "W. P., 
I'riming, 134; boiler pressure, expansion, and efficiency, 135; initial 
condensation and re-evaporation, 135; mode of estimating weight of 
steam. 137. — Halpin, 1).. Measurement of boiler efficiency, 138. — 
Beare. T. H., Theta-phi diagram.s ; initial condensation, 139. 

IMarise-P'ngine Work.s : — 

Belfast. 1888, 382, 418 :— 1896, 447, 45G. 

Birkenhead, 1891, 4."»1. 

Birmingham, 1897, 378. 

Dundee. 1887, 4.".4. 

<ila9gow, 1895, 48G, 490. 492. 49.-). 497, 501, 502, 509, 510, 512, (522, 523, 

524, 52G, 529, 530). 
Greenock, 1895, 530. 
Hartlepools. 1893, 33G. 380-5. 
Keyhani, 1899, 445. 457. 459. 
Livciijool, 1891, 44G, 418, 450. 
London, 1886, 457 :— 1900, 485, 494. 
Paisley, 1895, 523, 524, 52G. 
Port Glasgow. 1895, 529. 
Portsmouth. 1892, 373. 
Penfrow. 1895, 522. 
Rugby, 1897, 429 :— 1900, 490. 
Southampton, 1892, 378, 385. 



M 239 

Marine Engines, Triple-Expansion, 1886, 47:^> :— 1887, 35. See Triple- 
Expansion Engines. 

Marine HoRSE-rowEii, Faper on Calculation of Horse-Power for Marine 
Propulsion, by Lt.-Colonel T. English, 1896, 79.— Calculation based on 
Froude's law of resistance at corresponding speeds, 79. — Principle, 80. — 
Apparatus, 81. — Example of determination of horse-power required for 
torpedo-destroyer designed on lines of existing vessels, 83. — Extension of 
method to determine horse-power for vessel of same displacement and 
same speed, but on different lines, S"). 

Biscmsion. — Froude, R. E., Elements of variation in resistance of 
models ; distance apart of models, 8G. — Barr, A., Instability of lever for 
towing models ; wooden or wax models, 87. — Robinson, L. S., Horse-power 
calculated from experiments, 87. — English, Lt.-Col.. Distance apart of 
models, 87; diagonal cords preventing models from coming too close 
together; wooden models ; calculated horse-power sufficient; objection to 
counter-model not representing ship of known horse-power, 88. — Richards, 
E. W., Vote of thanks for Paper, 89. 

I\Iarine Propulsion, Calculation of Horse-Power, 79. See 3Iarine Horse-Power. 

Makjoribanks, Hon. E., Automatic Machine-Gun. 1885, 180. 

I^Iarkham, C, decease, 1889, 3, 21.— Memoir, 1888, 439. 

Markham, R. G. L., R.N., elected Member, 1900, 355. 

Mabks, a, p., elected Graduate, 1892, 102. 

Marks, E. C. R., elected Member, 1891, 301. 

Marks, George Croydon, elected Member, 1888, 444. 

Marks, Gordon Cumminc, elected Associate Member, 1900, 5(i2. 

Markwick, a. E., elected IMember, 1896, 462. 

Marquis OF Ripon, Opening of Engineering Depaitment of Yorkshire College, 
Leeds, 1886, 4G8. 

Marriner, J., elected Graduate, 1895, 2. 

Marriner, W. W., elected J\[ember, 1900, 501. 
Portable Pneumatic Tools, 1900, KJl, 162. 

Marriott, W., elected Member, 1887, 2. 

Tube-Frame Railway Wagons, 1890, 501. 

Marsden, a., elected Graduate, 1899, 146. 

Mabsden, B., elected IMember, 1887, 157.— Decease, 1898, 6.— Memoir, 1897, 
138. 

Marsh, D. E., elected IMemljer, 1896, 2. 

Marsh, H. W., decease, 1898, 6. 

Marsh, L. S. M., Water Meters, 1900, 83. 

Marshall, Rev. A., decease, 1901, 7. 

Marshall, A. T., elected Graduate, 1900, 183. 

Marshall, A. W., elected Member, 1900, 355. 



240 M 

Marshall, F. C, elected IMember of Council, 1885, 22 :— 1892, 23 :— 1895, 26 — 
Elected Vice-President, 1896, 2S. 
Jlarine Engineering, 1891, 339. 
]\Iarine-Engine Trials, 1891, 2:!7. 2:!8. 
Vote of thanks to retiring President, 1886, 23. 
Marshall, F. H., elected Member, 1890, 298. 
Marshall, F. T., elected Graduate, 1889, HS."). 
IVIarshall, H., elected IMember, 1897, 4:>2. 

]Marsh.\ll, H. L)., elected Member, 1885, 1C4.— Elected IMember of Council, 
1889, 2;'.:— 1892, 23:— 1895, 26:— 1897, 28:— 1900, VA. 
Boiler Construction, 1891, 510. 
By-laws, 1891, 34. 

Taxation of Machinery, 1890, 34, 38. 
Votes of thanks, London Summer meeting, 1900, SoS. 
Marshall, J. F., elected Graduufc, 1896, 280. 
Marshall, J. G., elected IMember, 1885, 1(1 J. 
Aluminium, 1898, 3t;4. 
Training of Engineer Students. 1899, 399. 
Marshall, L., elected Associate, 1896, 402 :— transferred to Member, 1899, 5. 
Marshall, L. P., elected Associate Member, 1899, 4. 
Marshall, P., elected Associate, 1898, 3. 
Marshall, T., elected Associate Member, 1900, 96. 
Marshall, W. B., Honorary Secretary of Birmingham Jubilee meeting 1897, 

Presentation from the Institution, 1898, 11. 
Marshall, W. P., Express Locomotives, 1898, (i46. 

IMarshall, Sons, and Co., Britannia Iron Works, Gainsborough, 1885, 435, 449. 
Marsland, J. S., elected IMember, 1899, 3. 
Marslanii, L. W., Wheel Load in Cycles, 1886, 172. 
Martell, B., Address of President, 1885, :!46 s. 
Portable Pneumatic Tools, 1900, 16(i, 104. 
SIarten. E. B., appointed IMeniber of Council, 1885, 70. — Elected IMember of 
Council, 1886, 18:— 1889, 2:'.. —Appointed Jlember of Council, 1891, 
196.— Elected VHce-Presideiit. 1892, 2:;. 
Alloys Research, 1891, 000. 
Automatic Sluice. 1888, 298. 
Bag-IMaking IMachine, 1889, 637. 
Boiler Construction, 1891, 515. 
Compounding of Locomotives, 1890, 87. 
Disposal of Slag, 1892, 87. 
Drying in Vacuum, 1889, 310. 
Electric Lighting, I'rivate, 1885, 402. 
Forth Bridge, 1887, :i06. 



M 211 

Marten, E. B. Ccontinued) :— 

Gas Furnaces, 1891, 79, 82. 

Liverpool Motive Power, 1892, 52, 58. 

Marine-Engine Trials, 1891, 271. 

Middlesbrougli Salt Industry, 1893, 299. 

Oxygen Manufacture, 1890, H8, 130. 

Kiveted Joints, 1885, 290. 

Sewage Outfall Works, Portsmouth, 1892, 338. 

Ship-Model Apparatus, 1893, -16, 47. 

Steam Xavvy, 1885, 861. 

Steam Pumps, 1893, 464, 476. 

Water Works, Katlimines, 1888, 530.— Sheffield, 1890, 430-2.— 
Southampton, 1893, 63. 

Waterworks Engines, Lincoln, 1887, 137. 
IMarten, H. B., elected Graduate, 1888, 444. 
Marten, H. J., decease, 1893, 4.— Memoir, 1892, 507. 

Tube-Frame Railway Wagons, 1890, .'lOS. 

Waterworks Engines, Lincoln, 1887, 140. 
Martens, A., Abstract of Report on the results of preliminary tests of the 
Strength of Copper ; translated and abstracted by C. H. Moberly, 1895, 
658. 
Martin, E. P., appointed Member of Council, 1886, 18.— Elected Member of 
Council, 1887, 25 :— 1890, 26 :— 1893, 28.— Elected Vice-President, 
1894, 26 .—1897, 27 :— 1900, 34. 

Blast-Furnace Practice, 1889, 620. 

Electric Traction, Polyphase, 1900, 459. 

French Locomotive Practice, 1900, 428. 

Gun, Construction of "Long Cecil" Gun, 1900, 373, 374. 

London Summer meeting. Welcome to American Engineers, 1900, 353. 

Road Locomotion, 1900, 297, 302. 

Steel Rails, 1890, 343-4. 

Vote of thanks to retiring President, 1896, 30. — At London Summer 
meeting, 1900, 358. 

Water Works, Sheffield, 1890, 428. 
Martin, G. B., elected Associate Member, 1896, 279. 
Martin, H. J., elected Member, 1888, 269. 
:Martin, H. and J., Ormeau Brick Works, Belfast, 1888, 428. 
Martin, The Hon. J., elected Member, 1889, 346.— Decease, 1900, :— Memoir, 

332. 
Martin, J., elected Associate Member, 1899, 293. 

Martin, T. G., elected Member, 1892, 102.— Decease, 1897, 5.— Memoir, 1896, 258, 
Martin, W. H., elected Member, 1886, 1. 

Q 



242 M 

JIartindale, Col. B. H., Effrigcrating :\racliiiiery, 1886, 242. 

^Iartindale, W. B. H., Graduate transferred to Member, 1891, 3. 

Mason Ukiversity College, Birmingham, 1897, 392. 

3Iass Mixing, 1887, 89. See Lake Superior Copper Alining. 

Massey, E., elected Associate Member, 1900, 3. 

Massey, L. F., elected Associate Member, 1895, 328. 

Massey, S., elected Member, 1890, 1. 

Massey, W. H., elected Member. 1893, 1. 

Masterton, J. F., elected Member, 1892, 2. 

Mastkantosis, p., elected Member, 1899, 144. 

Mate, AV. E., elected Associate IMember. 1900, 183. 

Materials, ^Mechanical Testing. IMidland Railway Locomotive Works, Derby, 

1898, 670. See Testing of Materials. 
Mather, G. R., elected Member, 1894, 1. 

Steam Pumps 1893, 4G4. 
Matheson, H. C, Narrow-Gauge Railways, 1898, 402. 
:Matuews, C. J., elected IMember. 1900, 502. 
3L\thewson, J. E., elected IMember, 1891, 2. 
Matteccci Gas Engine, 1889, 502. See Barsanti and IMaltuucci Gas 

Engine. 
IMatthews, R , elected Member. 1886, 125. 
^Iatthews, T., elected Member, 1895, 548. 
Matthews, W., Pa/jer on the I'umping Engines and Water-Softening ^Machinery 

at the Southampton Water Works, 1893, 53. — Remarks thereon, 62, 

63, 78, 87. 
IMattos, Alvaro G. de, elected Graduate, 1886, 4GG. 
IMattos, Antonio G. de, decease, 1895, 4. — Memoir, 1894, 464. 
Maudslay, H., decease, 1900, C— IMemoir, 1899, 270. 
Paddle-Wheel Navigation, 1885, 151). 
Spherical Engine, 1885, 113. 
IMaunsell, R. E. L.. elected Member, 1893, 1. 
^Iavor and Coclson, Electric Works, Glasgow, 1895, 493. 
Maw, H., elected Graduate, 1897, 3 : — elected Associate Member, 1899, 4. 
3Iaw, AV. H., appointed Member of Council, 1890, 43. — Elected Member of 

Council, 1891, 24: 1894, 26.— Elected Vice-President, 1896, 28: 

1899, 28. 

Clock Driving for Telescopes, 1888, 320. 

Electric Lighting Works, 1894, 308. 

Gas Engines, 1889, 531. 

Narrow-Gauge Railways, 1898, 395. 

Votes of thanks at Summer meeting, Derby, 1898, 345. 

Water Softening, 1898, 445. 



M 243 

3Iaxim, H. S., Paper on the Maxim Automatic Machine-Gun, 1885, 1G7.^ 

Remarks thereon, 170, 187, 193, 193, 104, 105, 106. 
Tropeller Ventilating Fans. 1897, 495. 
3Iaxim Automatic Machine-Gux. 1885, 1G7 : see Automatic Machine Gun. — 

"Works, 1886, 417. 
May. H. M., elected Graduate, 1887, l.iS. 

May Island, Electric Lightliousc, 1887, 347, 439. See Electric Lighthouse. 
:Mates. H., elected Graduate, 1898, 144. 
Matlok, J., decease, 1888, 3.— Memoir, 1887, 539. 
Mayo, "\V. H., elected Graduate, 1899, 140. 
Mats, J. A., Road Locomotion, 1900, 307. 
Maystox, E., Paper on the Machinery of H.M.S. "Psyche" and H.M.S. 

'•Pioierpine," as illustrative of the work done at Keyham, 

particularly with reference to the practical training of Engineef 

Students, 1899, 377.— Remarks thereon, 404. 
INIcAll. H. W.. elected Associate ilember, 1899, 4. 
McBeax, J., elected Associate Member, 1899, 4. 

McCaw, STEVEysox. AXD Orr, Linenhall Printing Works, Belfast, 1898, 453. 
McCoxxocHiE. J., deceas?, 1890, 4.— Memoir, 1889, 335. 
McCoRMACK, A. J., elected Associate Member, 1899, 4. 
McCoRMACK, W. J., elected Associate Member, 1896, 102. 
McCowEX, V. A. H., elected Member, 1898, 142. 

Electric Lighting in Belfast, Paper, 1896, 304.— Remarks thereon, 338, 

344. 
McCkedie, a. L.. elected Member, 1891, 301. 
McCuLXOCH, J. M., Experimental Marine Engine. 1891, 413. 
McCcLLOCH Rio Tinto Rock-Dhill, 1891, 142. See Rock Drills. 
3IcDermott, H., elected Graduate, 1900, 4. 
JlcDoxALD, J., elected Member, 1892, 2. 
McDoxxELL, A., Compound Locomotives, 1889, 125, 127. 
McDowALL, Steven, and Co., Milton Iron Works, Glasgow, 1895, 493. 
McFarlane, G., elected Member, 1891, 301. 
McFaelane, J., elected Member, 1895, 518. 
3IcFerran, H. a., elected Associate ^lember. 1899, 145. 
3IcGee, W., elected Member, 1895, 327. 
3IcGE0rGE, .J., elected Associate Member. 1894, 2. 
McGiLLivEAT, W., elected Associate, 18S0, 200. 
McGlashan, W., elected Member, 1897, 1. 
McGregor, John, elected Graduate, 1897, 3. — Elected Associate Member, 1898, 

547. 
McGregor, .Josiah, Marine-Engine Tiialp, 1894, lOG. 
Spherical Eccentric, 1885, 420. 

Q 2 



2ii M 

McGregor, P., elected Member, 1892, 229.— Decease, 1897, 5.— IMcmoir, 1896, 

601. 
MclNSES, D. W., elected Member, 1899, 292. 
McIntosh, W. F , elected Member, 1892, 2. 
McIntyke, J. H. A., elected Member, 1889, 31G. 
McKiKNEL, W., elected Associate, 1889, 204. 
McLaren, II., elected Member, 1888, IGO. 

Electric Lighting, Belfast, 1896, 333. 
Eoad Locomotion, 1900, 295. 
Eope Driving, 1896, 373. 
jVIcLaken, J. A., elected Associate Member, 1900, 3. 
McLaren, U. A., elected Member, 1899, 3. 
^IcLaren, I{. L., Graduate transferred to :Member, 1885, 3. 
McLarty, F. M., elected Member, 1888, 2G9. 

McLean, R. A., appointed to audit Institution accounts, 1885, 1C5 :— 1886, 20 : 
1887, 31 :— 1888, 31 :— 1889, 29 :— 18S0, 30 :-1891,'27 :— 1892, 30 
1893, 30 .—1894, 23 :— 1895, 25 :— 1896, 32 :— 1897, 29 :— 1898, 35 : 
1899, 33 :— 1900, 30. 
Institution accounts, 1898, 30. 
JNIcMeekin, a., elected Associate, 1891, 301 :— transferred to Associate Member, 

1897, 4. 
INIcNeii., .1., elected Member, 1885, 305. 
jMcOnie, W., Jun., decease, 1888, 3.— Memoir, 1887, 277. 

:McOnie, Harvey, and Co., Scotland Street Engine Works, Glasgow, 1895, 494. 
McPhail, H., Steam Superheating, 1896, 181, 208. 
McPherson, S., elected Member, 1896, 101. 
I^IcQuEEN, J., elected Member 1894, 469.— Decease, 1901, 7.— :Memoir, 19C0, 

333. 
McTaggart, J., elected Associate Member, 1899, 4. 
M'Dowall and Sons, J., Walkinshaw Foundry, Johnstone, 1895, 527. 
Meade, T. de C, elected Member, 1891, 30L 
Meadex, N., R.N., elected ^Member, 1899, 474. 

Mean-Pressure Indicator, Faptr on a continuous IVIean-Pressure Indicator for 
Steam-Engines, by Professor W. Kipper, 1899, 509.— Description ; short- 
stroke type, 569 ; long-stroke type, 570.— Time-pressure diagrams, 571.— 
Eelation between time-pressure and distance-pressure diagrams, 573. — 
Trials of the mean-pressure indicator, 577.— Readings by pressure-gauges, 

579. Pressure-gauge syphons, 580. — Prevention of the disappearance of 

■water from syphon, 581. — Summary of advantages gained by use of mean- 
pressure indicator, 584. 

Discussion.— ^^hite, Sir W. H., Thanks to author, 584.— Lea, H. 
Indicator diagrams from" constant and variable loads, 585: Storey's. 



M 245 

Mean-Pressure Indicator. Di^cmsion, 1899 (contlnuedj :— 

continuous indicator, 585; apparatus for fixing on Ricliards' indicator, 
587; formula for calculating I.H.P., 587; instrumeut unreliable on 
high-speed engine, 588. — Terry, S. H., Design for dial steam-power 
meter, 589. — Smitii, E. H., Aluminium roller for use on high-speed 
engines, 595 ; gradual error after constant use of indicator, 595 ; 
comparison between true time-average and true distance-average, 596. — 
Budenberg, C. F., Accuracy of pressure-gauges, 597. — Davey, H., 
Difference between time-presiure and distance-pressure diagrams, 598 ; 
principle of mean-pressure indicator, 593 ; priming, 600. — White, 
Sir W. H., Communication from M. Sauvage, 600. — Beaumont, W. W., 
ilean-prcssure indicator for gas or oil engines, 600. — Mair-Eumley. J. G., 
Professor Boys' integrating macliine, 60.) ; accuracy of throttled pressure- 
gauges, 601. — PuUen, W. W. F., Indicator diagrams from high-speed 
engines, 601; errors due to hunting of governor, 602; indicating a 
locomotive, 602. — Holden, K., Initial .steam-pressures in cylinders and 
dial pressure-gauges on boilers, 603 ; tlirottling of gauges, 603. — 
Ripper, W., Leakage of valves, 604 ; advantages of use of mean-pressure 
indicator, 605. — White, Sir W. H., Practical value of discussion, 606. — 
Sauvage, E., Throttling passage connecting indicator with engine 
cylinder, 607 ; Janet's apparatus for indicating, 607 ; value for obtaining 
mean indication during stroke of piston, 608. — Bache, A., Loss of 
pressure through great lengths of pipes, 609. — Strickland, F., Indicating 
high-speed engines, 609; simple method of syphoning gauges, 610. — 
Kipper, W., Automatic valve, 611 ; difference between this arrangement 
and M. Janet's, 612 ; prevention of loss of pressure ; indicator diagrams 
at high speeds, 612. 

Meat Store, Australasian Frozen Meat, London. 1900, 471. 

Mechax and Sons, Neptune Works, Glasgow, 1895, 495. 

Mechanical Exgixeers in China, Openings for, 1899, 528. See Openings for 
^Mechanical Engineers in China. 

Mechanical Features of Electric Traction, 1898, 43. See Electric Traction. 

3IECHANICAL PROPULSION ou Gauals, 1897, 149. See Canal-Boat Propulsion. 

Mechanical Stoking at Peel Willis, Bury, 1894, 446. 

Mechanical Testing of Materials, Midland Railway Loconiolive Works, Derby, 
1898, 670. See Testing of Materials. 

Mechanical and Optical Works, Sir H. Giubb, Dublin, 1888, 401. 

Medal, Calais Xew Harbour V.'orks, 1889, 549. 

Jubilee, presented at Summer meeting, Birmingham, 1897, 369. 

Medhurst, G., Proposal for Propulsion of Trains, 1899, 300. See Atmospheric 
Railway. 

JIeek, G. T., elected Associate Member, 1900, 3. 



246 M 

Meek, J., elected Associate Member, 1898, 347: — transferred to Meinler, 1900, 

184. 
Meek, S., decease, 1889, 3.— 3Iemoir, 1888, 1 Jo. 



Meetings. 


Annual General. 


Spring. 


Summer. 


Autumn. 


1885. 




7.5, 1G:3 


303 




461 


1886. 




125 


267 




465 


1887. 




].57 


281 




473 


1888. 




1.-.9 


2G7 




443 


1889. 




203 


343 




58a 


1890. 




17.-) 


295 




471 


1891. 




109, l'J5 


297 




47» 


1892. 




101 


227 




413 


1893. 


],:u 


97 


217 




391 


1894. 




1G9 


289 




46» 


1895. 




141) 


325 




547 


1896. 




101 


271 




461 


1897. 




143 


253 




431 


1898. 




141 


337 




545 


1899. 




143 


287 


473, 


, 527, 507 


1900. 




93, 9.5, 181 


353 


:or 


, ^o'y, 617 



Meeti.ngs, Monthly, 1899, 476.— Graduates', 1899, 476. 

BIeggitt, G. T., tlected Associate jMembcr, 1897, 144. 

Meggitt, S. N., elected Associate, 1890, 299. 

BIeik, C. S., Capacity of Itailway "Wagons, 1900, 584, 58.5, 6)7. 

Meik, T., decease, 1897, 5.— Memoir. 1836, 96. 

Meintjes, L. S., elected Associate, 1898, 342. 

Melhuish, F., elected Member, 1887, 2. 

Mellaxd-Smith, H. R., elected Graduate, 1900, 50). 

Melville, W. C., elected ^iMember, 1891, 3(il. 

IMelville, W. W., elected Member, 1888, 2. 

Membership Certificates, 1820, 31, 32: — 1892, 5, 10. 

Memoirs of Members recently deceased.— 1885, 71, IGO, 300, 458,525.-1886, 
121, 261, 460, 532.-1887, 146, 274, 4Ui;, 539.-1888, 153, 260, 437.— 1889, 
193,332,746.-1890, 167, 291, 554,-1891, 189, 289,472,60.5.-1892, 98, 
223, 404, 567.- 1893, 9'J, 203, 388, 4S;t.— 1894, 160, 276, 464, 5GS.— 1895, 
140, 308, 532.-1896, 90, 25.5, 596.-1897, 131, 233, 513.-1898, 132, 308, 
528, 696.— 1899, 127, 265, 467, 613.— 1900, 323, 621. 

Mendham, C. F., elected Member, 19C0, 502. 

Mendizabal, C^ elected Member, 1897, 1 . 

Meszies, W., decease, 1899, 7. — Memoir, 1898, :37. 

Meredith, J., elected IMember, 1897, 143. 

Merrick, E., elected Member, 1894, 469, 



M 247 

BrERRiFiELD, L. L., elected Member, 1896, 4C2. 

Mersey Dock Estate, 1891, 431, 486. 

Mersey Forge, Liverpool, 1891, 440.' 

IMersey Tcxxel Railway, 1891, 431, 440. 

Messeb, E, H., elected Associate Member, 1895, 150. 

Metal-Expansion "Works, British, West Hartl^>pool, 1893, 3:16, 387. See also 
1891, 382. 

Metal "Works, Birmingham, 1897, 381, 387. 40"!. 

^Metallic Packing for Piston-rods and "N'alve-rods, 1890, 74, 7S, 00. 

:Metallurgy, Electric, 1888, 10.% 114, 124, 128, 132, 145. See Electric 
Engineering. 

Metcalfe, F. S., elected Member, 1891, 197. 

" Meteor," Report upon Trials of the s.s. " :Meteor," 1889, 235. See Marine- 
Engine Trials. 

Meter, Air, 1891, 152. See Eock Drills. 

Meters, "VN'ater, 1900, 37. See Water ^Meters. 

Metrical Abbreviations, 1900, 303. 

3Iew Island Lighthouse, Description of IMew Island Lighthouse, Belfast 
Lough, by W. Douglass, 1888, 432. — History and position of station, 
432. — Description of station and lighthouse, 432. — Lantern, 433. — • 
Opticiil apparatus, 434. — Fog signal, 435. — Gas supply, 435.— Cost, 435. 

Meyer, E., Honorary Secretary of Belfast meeting, 1896, Presentation from the 
Institution, 1897, 10. 

Michell, "W. H., E.X.. elected Graduate, 1900, 183. 

Mickleytright, "W., elected Member, 1898, 142. 

Middlesbrough Salt Industry, Paper by II. Grigg, 1893, 278. — Previous 
information ; ocnurrence of .-alt deposits, 278. — Origin of rock fcalt, 279. — 
Discovery at Middlesbrough, and establishmsut of salt works, 281. — 
Extent of deposit, 282. — Analysis; biine, 283. — Cheshire salt district; 
^liddlesbrough borings ; diamond drill, £84. — Free-fulling tools, and 
sand-pump; derrick, 285. — Diilling tools, 28^5. — Accidents; sinking and 
lining of wells, 287. — Pumping of briiie, i;88. — Yield and strength of 
brine ; surface subsidence ; filtration and evaporation of brine, 290. — 
Different kinds of salt manufactured. 291. 

Discussion. — Giigg, E., Exhibited drilling tools, damaged tubes, sand- 
pump, and salt samples, 292. — Eichards, E. "W., Discovery of salt at 
Middle^brough, 292; salt wells at Xancy; surface subsideuce, 293. — 
Lawrence, H., Impurity of surface water for brine, 203. — Steavenson, 
A. L., Boring for salt and coal at Seaton Carew ; filling of abandoned 
bore-boles, 294. — Bramwell, Sir F., String of tools; evaporation of brine. 
294. — Cochrane, C, Surface subsidence, 205. — Bell, Sir L., Investigations 
respecting subsidence, 295 ; evaporation of brine, and eli'ect of vegetable 



248 M 

^IiDDLESBKOUGH Salt INDUSTRY. Discumoji, 1893 (continued) : — 

matter in water; discovery of Middlesbrough salt bed, 297.— Heenan, 
H., Formation of domes over well cavities, 298. — Head, J., Surface 
subsidence gradual, 299.— Marten, E. B., Subsidence at Droitwich, 299 ; 
rock cores brought up by diumond drill ; action of string of tools, 300. — 
Halpin, D., Economy of successive evaporations, 300. — Pattison, J., Salt 
production in Sardinia, 301. — Grigg, E., Objection to sealing of wells: 
string of tools, 301 ; elasticity of hemp cable ; cores obtained by diamond 
drill ; bent suction-tubes, 302 ; ultimate subsidence at Middlesbrough, 
308 ; cavities of wells, 304 ; loss of salt in underground streams ; brine 
evaporation prevented by vegetable matter or oil, 303 ; impurity of salt 
evaporated by sun ; failure of triple process for salt evaporation, 306 ; 
utilization of waste heat for evaporating, 307.— Phillips. J., Sealing of 
well?, and fall of roof, 308. 
IMiDrLESBEorGH SrsiMKR Mketing, 1893, 217.— Eeception, 217.— Business, 219. 

— Votes of thanks, 222. — Excursions, &c., 382. 
MiDDLETON, H. H., elected Associate Member, 1899, 298. 
JIiDDLETON, R., elected Member, 1891, 197. 
:\IiDDLETOX, R. T., elected Member, 1891, 480. 
MiDELTON,T., elected Memk'r. 1886, 125.— Decease, 1895, 4.— Memoir, 1894, 277. 

Midland Railway CAKitiAOE and Wagon Works, Derby, 1898, 4G5. 

Midland Railway Electric Plant, 1898, 553. See Electric Plant. 

JIidland Railway Gas Works, Derby, 1898, 404. 

^Midland Railway Goods Station, Whitecross Street, London, 1886, 422. 

:Midland Railway Locomotive Works. Derby. 1898, 4G2. 

Midland Railway Oil-Gas Works. Derby. 1898, 404. 

Midland Railway Signal ^^■o^Ks, Derby, 1898, 471. 

MiERS, J. W., decease, 1893, 4.— :Momoir. 1892, 99. 

iliLES, F. B., elected INIcmber, 1887, 474. 

Miles. F. H.. elected Graduate. 1892, 414.— Decease, 1901, 7. 

Miles, W. H., elected Associate, 1889, 347. 

Mill and Granary, Rio de Janeiro, 1889, 151. See Roller Flour :\Iilling 

jMillbay Engineering Works, Plymoutli, 1899, 457. 

Mill Engines, 1893, 243. See Cleveland Industries. 

Mill for Crushing Gold Quartz, 1886, 411, 427-8. 

:Millar, H. L.. appointed Treasurer, 1886, 272. 

:Millar, J., elected INIember. 1893, 97. 

:Miller, a., elected Member. 1889, 1. 

IMiLLER, H. W., elected Member, 1886, 104. 

ISliLLER, J. S.. elected Member. 1886, 271. 

Miller, T. L., elected Member, 1887, 158. 
Marine Engineering, 1891, 369. 



M 249 

Miller, W. T. W., elected Graduate, 1900, 4, 

MiLLiGAK, W. S., elected 3Iember. 1893, 220. 

3IILLING Cutters, Paper on Milling Cutters, by G. Addy, 1890, 52S.— 
Advantages of milling, and difficulties encountered, 528. — Solid cutter, 
529. — Jointed cutter, 530. — Backed-cff cutter, 531. — Expansible milling 
cutter, advantages, 531 ; annular cutters of large size, 532. — Cutting 
angle of teeth, 533. — Pitch of teeth, 53i. — Speed of cutters, 534. — 
Milling machines, solidity of construction, 535; example, 535. — Steel for 
milling cutters, 53G ; analyses of crucible cast-steel and self-hardening 
steel. 537. 

Difcmsion. — Addy, G., Cutters and specimens exhibited. 538 ; wasters, 
539; self- hardening steel, 539; rrigin of milling, 539. — Dolby, E. R., 
Milling discs for cutting out webs of crank-axles, 539.— Tomes, W. J., 
Application of milling to locomotive work, 541 ; self-hardening steel, 
541 ; stiffness of machines, 541 ; pitch of teeth, 542. — Briggs, J. H., 
Speed of cutters. 542 ; diameter of cutlers, and strength of machine, 543 ; 
pitch of teeth, 544 ; relation of milling to planing, 544. — Gray, J. M., 
Rule for pitch of teeth, 544.— Smith, 31. H., Cutting and sharpening of 
teetli, 545. — Holden, J., Built-up cutters. 545; hardening of teeth, 545. — 
Richards, G., Cutters with separate blades inserted, 546; comparative 
cost of milling and planing, 54G ; milling head solid with shank, 548 ; 
speed of cutters, and mode of regulation, 548 ; pickling of work before 
milling. 549. — Addy, G., Skilled workmen not needed for milling 
machines, 549 ; lubrication of work, 550 ; quality of steel for cutters, 
550 ; speed of cutting, 550 ; Cutters of mild steel case-hardened, 
550 ; milling compared with planing, 550 ; inclination of teeth and 
cutting angle, 551 ; sand-blasting of castings, 551 ; cutting and 
sharpening of teeth, 551. — Tomlinson, J., Growth of milling, 551. — 
Riches. T. H., "Work done by ordinary and expansible cutters, 552; by 
stepped cutter at two speeds, 552. 

^IiLLiXG. Roller Flour, 1889, 148. See Roller Flour Milling. 

3IILLINGT0N, F. H., elected Member. 1893, 1. 

3I1LLIS, C. T., elected Member. 1885, 2. 

3I1LLS, A. E., elected As;ociate Member, 1894, 470. 

Mills, G. P., elected Member, 1898, 142. 

3I1LLS, J. A., elected Associate Member, 1899, 293. 

Mills, M. W., elected Graduate, 1891, 197. 

3I1LLS, R., elected 3Iember, 1898, 341. 

3I1LLS, S. J. A., elected Associate 3Iember, 1897, 2. 

3I1LLS. AViLLiAM (Sunderland), elected 3Iember, 1897, 256. 
Aluminium, 1898, 3G), 365. 
Road Locomotion, lEO"), 310. 



250 M 

jMiLLS, AViLLiAM (Jloncluster), elected ^lembtr, 1899, 3. 

3IILLS, Cotton-Spinning, in ^lanchester and district, 1894, 405, 40G, 413, 414. 

435, 440, 445, 450.— Fine-Spinning. Eolton, 1894, 406, 450. 
Mills, Flax. Belfast. 1888, 420: 1896, 439, 44(5, 451, 457.— Be^sbrook, 1888, 

415. 
Mills, Flour, Dublin, 1888, 404-10.— Lucan. 1888, 414.— Bdo de J.meiro, 1889, 

151.— Thornaby, 1893, 3G7. 
Mills, Iron and Steel Works.— Blooming, 1885, 292.— Blooming and finishing. 

1893, 243.— Cogging. 1893, 250 : 1895, 437.— Cogging and finishing. 

1893, 249.— Plate. 1825, 444; Boiling, 437; Three-high. 446. 
Mills, Jute, Dundee, 1887, 455-7. 
Mills, Linen. See Mills, Flax. 
Milne, J., Road Locomotion. 1900, 311. 
MiLXE, W., elected Member, 1887, 474. 
Milton Pi mtixg Station, Swadlincote and Ashby-dc-la-Zouoh Water "Works. 

1898, 477. 
jNIilton "Wohks. British Aluminium Co.. StaiTordshirc. 1898, 348, 160. 
]\IiNDO, A. W., elected Associate Member, 1898, 547. 
Mineral Water ^Ianvfactories : — 

Belfast. 1888, 425; 1896, 439, 454. 
Dublin, 1888,411,412. 
Mixes, Devon Great Consols, Tavistock, 1899, 442. 4i;l. 
Mines, .Alechanical Kngineeiing of Coal Mines, 1880, 360. See Colliery 

Kngineeriug. 
Mining in China, 1899, 535, 549. See Openings fur 'Mechanical Kngineers in 

China. 
3I1NING OF Copper in the Lake Superior district, 1887, 86. See Lake Superior 

Copper Alining. 
MiNOUs. E.. elected Graduate. 1900, 357. 
:\liXT. Boyal, London, 1886, 410, 413. 
MixTOXs' China, Earthenware, and Tii 1; Work^;, Stokc-upon-Trent, 1898, 460, 

512. 
Mirror Laundry, Harbome, Birmingham. 18S7, 395. 
Mitchell. C.. decease, 1886, 4.— Memoir. 1895, 537. 
:\liTCHELL, G., elected Member, 1898, 341. 
Mitchell. J. F. B., elected Associate ^Icmber, 1893, 220. 
Mitchell and Co., Cape Hill Brewery, Birmingham, 1897, 395. 
MlTCHE:^ON, G. A., elected ^Member, 1892, 414. 
MiTTON. E. M., Jux., elected :\lember, 1899, 292, 
MiTTON, T. E., elected Associate Member, 1886, 462. 
Mixers : — 

Sprague Grain Mixer, 1891, 377, 379. 
Tavlor Concrete Mixer, 1899, 370. 



M 251 

Mixing and De-sulphuuizing of rig-Iron in Steel ^ranufacture. 1893, 243. See 

Cleveland Industries. 
:Mitabara, Capt. J., elected 3Iember, 18S7, 25G. 
3I0BERLY, C. H., Abdract of EciMit on Strength of Copper, by A. :Martens, 1895, 

058. 
Kiveted Joints. 1885, 27G. 
Moffat, T., decease, 1887, 3 :— IMcmoir, H7. 
MoFFATT, A. C, elected Member, 1896, 279. 

IMoiB, J., elected Member, 1885, 462.— Decease, 1901, 7.— :\[emoir, 1900, 028. 
MOLECET, C. S. T., elected Member. 1898, .■i46. 
MoLLOY, H. J., elected Member, 1899, 292. 
MoLLOY, Very Rev. Dr., Compound Steam Turbine, 1888, 489. 
MoxARCH Hammer, 1900, 177. See Portable Pneumatic Tools. 
MoxcKTOx, C. J., elected Graduate, 1893, 98. — Elected Associate Member, 

1894, 294. 
MoNCRiEFF, R. AV., elected Associate Member, 1896, 4G2. 
Monk, E., elected Member, 1885, 462. 
MoNKHorsE, E. W., elected ^leuiber, 1897, 2.";6. 

Electric Lighting, Ediuburgii, 1895, 581, 589. 
MoNiE, H., Jan., elected Associate, 1891, 480. 
Montgomery, C. H., elected Graduate, 1897, 257. 
Monthly Meetings, 1899, 476. 

Moon, E. R., elected Graduate, 1894, 170. -Elected Member, 1898, 341. 
Moore, B. T., decease, 19C0, 6.— Memoir, 1899, 618. 
MooKE, G. E., elected Associate Member, 1900, 96. 
Moore, T. L., elected Associate ^Member, 1895, 2. 
Moore, W. J. P., elected Member. 1895, 548. 
Moraes, .J. A., elected Graduate, 1900, 4. 
MoRCOM, A., elected Member, 1897, 1. — Appointtd Member of Council, 1898, 

343. 
Quick-Revolution Engines, Paper on Quick-Revolution Self-Lubricating 

Steam-Engines, 1897, 316.— Remarks thereon, 332, 343, 354, 363. 
Mordey, W. M., Electric Engineering, 1888, 139. 

Electric Traction, 1898, 88. 
Morgan, C. H., elected 3Iember, 1900, 502. 

London Summer meeting. Reply as President of the American Society of 

Mechanical Engineers to the welcome offered to the Society by the 

Institution. 1900, 354. 
Morgan, David James, elected Graduate, 19C0, 4. 
Morgan, David John, elected ^lember, 1889, 5S4. 
Morgan, G. H., elected Graduate, 1893, 98. 



252 M 

Morgan, J. B., Mayor of Liverpool, elected Associate, 1891, 2. 

Liverpool .Summer meeting. Welcome to Members, 1891, '101. — Votes of 
Thanks, 299, 304. 
3I0RGAN, T. E., elected Member. 1885, 3l).j. — Decease, 1898, 0: — IMemoir, 

31.-). 
MoRisoN-, D. B.. elected Member. 1887, ITS. 

Marine-Engine Trials, 1889, 2!S(J :— 1890, 282. 
Steam Jacket, 1892, 483. 

Triple-Expansion Engines, 1886, 497, 503 :— 1887, :'..'), 43. 
3I0RLEY, H. AV., elected IMember, 1898, 102. 
MoRLET, J., elected Associate. 1892, 414. 
3I0RRIX, K., elected :Member, 1895, 327. 
IMoRRis, C, elected Member, 1888, 444. 
AIoRRis, E. L., Lincoln Waterworks Engines, 1887, 1 :'.."). 
Morris, F. S.. elected ilember. 1890, 298. 
^loRRis, J., elected :\Iember. 1898, 2. 
Morris, J. A., elected Member, 1890, 472. 
3I0RRIS, W., Watt r ileters, 1900, 72. 
3I0RRIS, W. J., elected Associate Member. 1893, ."t47. 
3I0RKIS0N, G. J., elected Member, 1900, 2. 

Openings for ^lechanical Engineers in China, 1899, 5j2. 
Morse, H., elected .Member, 1885, 1G4. 
3I0RT0X, D. A., elected Associate Member, 1900, 96. 
3IORTON, D. H., elected Member, 1892, 102. 
3I0RTOX, J. H., elected Graduate, 1896, 28u. — Elected Associate Member, 1900, 

502. 
Morton and Co., Francis, Hamilton Iron Works, Garston, 1891, 449. 
MosER, C. H., elected Associate, 1885, 463. 
MoTiTi; Power, Supply of Power by pressure from public water mains. 1892, 32. 

Si'e Liverpool Motive Power. 
3I0TOR Cars, 1900, is."). Sre Boad Locomotion. 
^Iotor-Car Trials. 1900, 254. See Boad Locomotion. 
3I0TORS, Electric, 1894, 178. S<-e Address uf President, Alexander B. W. 

Kennedy. 
Motor for Electric Bock-Drill. 1893, 312. Sec Electric Bock-Drill. 
3I0TOR Generators or Transformers, 1894, 298, 304, 310, 312. See Electric 

Lighting Works. 
3I0TOR Mills, Daimler, Coventry, 1897, 369, 419. 

3I0DLDING Sand, Paper on the Mechanical Treatment of 3Ioulding Sand, by W. 
Bagshaw, 1891, 94. — Nature and composition of moulding sand, 95. — 
3Iixing by hand riddling and treading, 96. — Power riddling, 97. — Roller 
mill, 98. — Centrifugal mixer, 98. — Toughness of sand, 100. — AVorking 



M 253; 

JIorLDiNG Sand, Paper. 1891 (continued) : — 

expenses, 100. — Equivalent hand-labour, 101. — Durability of centrifugal! 
mixer, 101. 

Discussion. — Bagshaw, W., Samples of moulding sand, 102. — Piatt, J.. 
Forms assumed by sand under microscope, 102; utility of centrifugal' 
mixer, 102.— Mair-Rumley, J. G., Sand formerly riddled and mixed br 
hand, 102; rollers with grooved face for mixing. 103; advantage of 
plumbago, 103 ; sand used for cores in America, 103. — Brown, B.,'Life of 
sand, 103. — Wilson, J. W., Jun., Wear of beater pins in centrifugal 
mixer, 104. — Cochrane, C, Saving by use of centrifugal mixer, 104 ; wear 
of beater pins, 10r>; brake desirable for stopping machine, 106. — Bagshaw. 
W., Durability of beater pins, lOG ; brake for stopping machine, lOG ; life 
of sand, 106 ; economy of centrifugal mixer, 107. — Tomlinson, J., Principle- 
of Carr's centrifugal disintegrator, 107 ; uniform texture of sand, 107, 

^louLE. F. O., elected Associate Member, 1897, 433. 

MouLTON, A. J., elected Member, 1898, 142. 

3rocxTAiN, B., elected Associate Member, 1893, 9S. 

Mou.vTAiy, W. C, elected Member, 1886, 12o. 

]MonxT-EDGCUMBE Park, Plymouth, 1899, 443, 463. 

I\Iount-Haes, a., elected Associate Member, 1895, 150. 

Mower, G. A., Drying in Vacuum, 1889, 326, 327. 

MoYLAN, W. M., elected Associate Member, 1893, 220. 

Mud Scoop, 1899, 367. See Dockyard Constructional Machinery. 

MiDD, T., elected :Member, 1885, 462.— Elected :Member of Council, 1896, 28. — 
Decease, 1898, 343 ; 1899, 7-8.— Memoir, 1898, 538. 
Belfast Harbour, 1896, 413. 

Hartlepools, Paper on the Port and Industries of the Hartlepools, 1893, 372.. 
:Marine-Engine Trials, 1891, 228. 244, 276 :— 1894, 79, 91. 
Propeller Ventilating Fans, 1897, 487. 
Triple-Expansion Engines, 1886, 510 :— 1887, 47. 

McDiE, C, elected Graduate, 1885, 164. 

MrGGEKiDGE, H. C, elected Graduate, 1897, 145. 

MuiK, Sir W., Welcome to Members at Edinburgh Summer meeting. 1887, 282. 
— Vote of thanks to Sir W. Thomson (Lord Kelvin) for lecture, 1887,. 
433. 

MuiR, W., decease, 1889, 3.— Memoir, 1888, 440. 

MriK AND Co., William, Britannia Works, Manchester, 1894, 420. 

MuiR AND HousTox, Harbour Engine Works, Glasgow, 1895, 495. 

MuiRHEAD, D., elected Associate Member, 1899, 4. 

MvLLER, H. A., elected Member, 1890, 298. 

MuLTi-CoLOUR PraxTiN-G, 1900, 4S6. 

MujiFOKD, C. E., elected Member, 1890, 176. 



:254 M 

JlrxiciPAL Techxical Colleges or Schools. Sec Tecliuical Colleges or 

Schools. 
3IrNX, J. A., elected Associate Member. 1899, 4. 
3Iu.\R0, E. M., elected ^lember. 1897, 432. 
3IcxR0, J., elected ^Member. 1890, 472. 
3IUNR0, R. D., elected Member. 1890, 2. 
3ie.\sTER, B. A., elected Member, 1889, 340. 
3I0XYARD, A., elected Assocuite ^leinber, 1898, 312. 
3IURCH, P., Sewage Outfall Works. Portsmouth. 1892, 337. 
3ICRD0CH, A. G.. elected Graduate. 1900, 183. 
3IuRiK)CH, R. 31.. elected :Member, 1891, 3 H. 
3IuRE, A. H., Drying in Vacuum. 1889, 324. 
3IURPHY, E. O., elected Associate 3Iember, 1894, 17ii. 
3IURRAY, A. J., elected 3Iember, 1890, 472. 
3IUKKAY, D. J., elected Graduate. 1892, 414. 
3IunRAY, K. S., elected Member. 1890, 17G. 

Oxygen Manufacture, Paper on the 3Iechanical Appliances employed 

in the JIanufacture and Storaire of Oxyiren. 1890, i:U. — Remarks 

thereon. 146, Hit, l«(i, IGl, 102 
31i RRAY. T. R., elected Member, 1894, 291. 

Evaporative Condensers, 1899, 24.">. 
3Il uray-:Morgan. E. H., elected Associate, 1898, 342. 
3Iu!>Er3i AND Art Gallery, Derby, 1898, 4'jS : — Nottingham. 514. 
3ICSGRAVE, Sir J.. Bart.. Baronetoy. 1897, 25. 

Belfast Harbour, 1896, 413. 
3IUSGRAVE, James, decease, 1897, .">. 
3IUSGRAVE, John, decease. 1890, 4. 
3Iusgi:ave, J. R., elected 3Iember, 1899, 3. 

3IUSGRAVE AND Sons, John, Globe Iron Works, Bolton, 1894, 400, 4.")5. 
3Iushet, D., Discoveries in 3Ianufacturc of Iron and Steel, 1895, 488-9. 
3IUSICAL Sehtice in Lincoln Cathedra]. 1885, 3(t0. 434. 
3lui«KEn, A., elected 3Iember, 1897, 1. 
3riSKEU, C, elected Member. 1897, I. 
31YERS, W. B., elected Member, 1888, 160. 
3IYERS Propeller, 1892, 546. See Screw-Propeller Surface. 



N 

Nadal, 31., Glass Revealer, 1900, 526. 

Xakagawa, G., elected Associate 3Iember, 1897, 257. 

2\"ancy, Salt Wells, 1893, 293, 290. See Middlesbrough Salt Industry, 



N 255 

Napiek, J. 'M., decease, 1896, 4.— Memoir, 1895, 530. 

Napier Brothers, AVindlass Engine Works, Glasgow, 1895, 495. 

Xaebow-Gauge Eailways, Paper o;\ Narrow-Gauge Eailwaj's, of two feet gauge 
and under, by L. S. Robertson, 1893, 376. — Reasons for adoption, 376 ; 
reduction in power, loads hauled by one horse, 877. — Advantages, 377. — 
Disadvantages. 378.— Gauge, 378.— Duffield Bank and Eaton Hall 
railway, 379 ; Darjeeling, 379 ; Pithiviers, Caen Dives and Luc, 
Festiniog, Lynton and Barnstaple, 380 ; military railways, light lines in 
large engineering works, 381. — Permanent way, 381. — Locomotives, 3S2. 
• — Carriages and wagons, 384. — Break of gauge and trans-shipment, 384. 
— Financial aspects, 384. — Conclusions, 385.— Lynton and Barnstaple 
railway, 385. — Woolwich Arsenal shop railways, 38iJ ; locomotives, 387 ; 
rolling stock, permanent way. 3S8 ; general considerations, 388. 

Discussion. — Robertson, L. S., Gauge dependent upon funds and profits, 
389.- Lupton, A., Narrow gauge advantageous for sharp curves, but not 
cheaper, 390 ; gauge for collieries, 391 ; tramway and road traction, 391. — 
Robinson. ^L, Three gauges for engineering works. 391. — AVicksteed. C, 
Tourist lines, 392. — Lister. R. R., Shop railwaj's of IS inches gauge, 393. — 
Butter, H. J., Woolwich Arsenal railways. 393. — Head, J., Narrow-gauge 
light railways for mountainous country, 394 ; bogie rolling stock, heavier 
rails, 394. — Maw, W. H., Reduction in size and weight of trucks, 395; 
high speed reached, 395. — Daniels, T., Narrow gauge for engineering 
■works, 39G ; Darjeeling railway, 396 ; Chinese lines, 397 ; tramway gauge 
for country turnpike roads, 397. — Keen, A., Relative cost of narrow-gauge 
and standard-gauge lines, 3it7. — Longridge, M., Difficulty of boiler power, 
design of heavy locomotive, 398. — Tomkins, W. S., Darjeeling locomotives, 
399. — Donkin, B.. Details of working of narrow-gauge locomotives, 399. — 
Robertson, L. S., Reasons for adoption of liglit railways. 400 : bogie stock, 
heavier rails, boiler power, 400 ; number of diflereiit narrow gauges, 401. 
— Johnson, S. W., Vote of thanks, 401. — Bagnall, W. G., Number of 
■wheels for locomotives, and tiactive power, 401; Woolwich Arsenal 
locomotives, 402.— Graham, H. B., Darjeeling railway, cost and gauge, 
402. — ^Matheson, H. C, Egyptian Delta light railways, 402. — Eobertaon, 
L. S., Railways on existing roads, and best gauge, 403. 

Nasbet, G. W., elected Member, 1899, 292. 

Nash, T., elected Member, 1889, 204. 

Sheffield Testing Works, Sheffield, 1890, 457. 

Nasmith, J., elected Associate, 1889, 347 : — transferred to Associate Member, 
1895, 4 :— transferred to Member, 1898, 5. 

Nasmyth, Wilson-, axd Co., Bridgewater Foundry. Patricroft, 1894, 433. 

Nathan, A., elected Member, 1888, 444. 

National Telephone Switchroom, Birmiugliam, 1897, 396. 



256 N 

Naval Electrical Apparatis, Paper on the Applications of Electricity in tlie 
Eoyal Dockyards and Xavy, by H. E. Deadmau, 1892, 250. — Electrical 
■work done in dockyard, 256. — Search lights, 257; naval-service projector, 
258 ; mirrors, carbons, and projector requirements, 260. — Internal lighting 
of ships, 261 ; progress, 262 ; difficulties and remedies, 263 ; dynamos, 
other fittings, 264; switchboard, temporarjMnstallations, 265 ; cost, testing 
of dynamos, 266 ; requirements, 267 : engines, resistances, 268. — Torpedo 
circuits, firing by compressed air, 269 ; by cartridge, 278. — Gun circuits. 
270; safety arrangements, 271. — Electric communication on shipboard. 
272 ; voice pipes and call bells, 273 ; telegraphs, 274. — Other applications 
of electricity, 274 ; submarine mines. 274 ; night signalling, gun sights, 
examination of gun bores, 275 ; motors, 276. 

Dkcussion. — Anderson, Dr. "NV., Specimens exhibited, 276. — Lane, 
D. W., Consumption of water per electric horse-power, 276. — Allen, W. H.. 
Tefcting of engines and dynamos, 277; apparatus for testing engines, 277; 
accuracy and economy of shorter test. 27S ; Admiralty requirements, 270. 
— Crompton, E. E. B.. Projectors. 279 : fluted carbons, 280 ; high-speed 
engines, 281 ; electrical distribution, 281.— Oughterson. G. B., High-speed 
engines, 282 ; testing of engines, 283.— Corner, J. T., Engine testing, 283. 
— Walker, S. F., Lead-covered cables, 284 ; automatic safety appliances for 
gun circuits, 286 ; search lights, telephones, 286. — White, "W. H., Progress 
realised, 287 ; private enterprise. 288 ; hydraulic and electric power for 
guns, 288 ; economy of coal, 289 : training of electricians, 290; temporary 
installations in ships building, 291. — Bramwell, Sir F., Testing of engines. 
291 ; advantage of two methods, 292. — Anderson, Dr. W., Introduction of 
new warlike stores, 292. — Deadman, H. E., Comparison of projectors. 293. 

Navigatiox, Clyde, recent Engineering Improvements. 1895, 404. See Clyde- 
Navigation. 

Navigation, Steam, 1885, 121. -See Taddlc-Wheel Navigation. 

Navvy, Dunbar and Rustou's Steam Navvy. 1885, 349. See Steam Navvy. 

Naylok, J., elected Associate Member, 1900, 3. 

Naylor, J. "W., decease, 1900, G.— Memoir. 1899, 141. 

Naylor, S., elected Associate, 1896, 462 :— transferred to Jlember, 1899, 5, 

Naylor, T. H., elected Member, 1898, 142. 

Naylor, "W., elected Member, 1891, 480. 

Neal, E. H. B.. elected Associate Member, 1899, 293. 

Neate, C, Eoller Flour Milling. 1889, 172. 

Needham, J. E., elected Member, 1889, 1. 

Neilsox, J. B., Invention of Hot Blast, 1895, 488-9. 

Neilsox, E. M., elected Associate Member. 1900, 502. 

Neilsox, AV. si., decease, 1890, 4. 

Neilson axd Co., Hyde Park Locomotive Works, Glasgow, 1895, 4CC, 4SL 



N 257 

Nelsox, a. D., elected ^rember, 1892, 102. 

Nelson, S. H., elected Member, 1887, 283. 

Nelson axd Sons, Thomas, Parkside Printing "Works, Edinburgh, 1887, 440. 

Neptune Works, Glasgow, 1895, -idj. 

Nesbit, D. i\I., elected Associate Member, 1895, 150 : — transferred to Member, 

1898, 548. 
Nettlefold, Ct., elected Associate -Member, 1899, 145. 
Nettlefold, H., decease, 1894, 4. 

Network, Steel, 1891, 3S'2. — 1893, 3S7 ; see British INIetal-Expansion "Works. 
NEr, L., Eopes and Belts, 1895, 654. 
Neyile, K. H. C, Paper on Private Installations of Electric Lighting, 1885, 

37G.— Remarks thereon, 390, 403, 407. 
Neville, E. H., elected Associate, 1887, 474. 
Neville, L., Canal-Boat Propulsion, 1897, 209. 
New, a. "W., elected Associate IMember, 1896, 279. 
New, D. J., elected Associate Member, 1896, 102. 
New Howe Machine Co., Cycle Works, Glasgow, 1895, 491. 
New Premier Cycle Works, Coventry, 189T, 369, 427. 
Newall, E. S., decease, 1890, 4.— Memoir, 1889, 336. 
Newark Boiler Works, Newark, 1885, 435, 448-9. 
Newark Works, 1885, 435, 448-9. 
Newcastle-on-Tyxe, Mining, Engineering, and Industrial Exhibition, 1887,, 

439. 
Newdigate, a. L., decease, 1889, 3.— Memoir, 1888, 263. 
Newell, E., elected Associate Member, 1896, 279. 
Newlove, K. E., elected Member, 1885, 2. 
Ne-wman, E. W., elected Associate Member, 1897, 2. 
Newport Iron Works, Middlesbrough, 1893, 337. 
Newport Kollixg Mills, Middlesbrough, 1893, 338. 
Newsum and Co., H., Ashcroft Saw and Planing Mills, Gainsborough, 1885, 

436, 453. 
Newton, G. H., elected Graduate, 1900, 183. 
Newton, H. E., elected Associate, 1886, 466. 
Newton, P., elected Member, 1890, 298. 
Newton, S. B., elected Associate Member, 1898, 342 : — transferrei to Member, 

1900, 93. 
Newton, T. G., elected Member, 1897, 256. 
Newton Bank Print Works, Hyde, 1894, 435. 
Nicholl, J. J., elected Member, 1900, 355. 
NiCHOLLS, P., elected Associate Member, 1896, 2. 
Nicholson, H., Incrustation of Torquay Water IMains, 1899, 518. 
Nicholson, J., elected ]\Iember, 1894, 294. 

B 



258 N 

NiCHOLSoy, T., elected Member, 1891, 107. 

Nicholson and Son, W. N., Trent Iron Works, Newark. 1885, 43."). 4i9. 

Xickel-Plating and Bridle- Bit "Works, "Walsall, 1897, 368, 411. 

XICOL, E. G.. elected Member, 1899, 202. 

NiSBET, W. H., elected Member, 1899, 144. 

Nixon, C. B., elected Graduate, 1897, 434. 

NoAKES, T. J., elected Member, 1886, 1. 

NoN-CoNDUCTiNG Material for Cylinders, &c., 1887, 517, 524, 532. 537. 

NoRMANBY Iron "Works, ^Middlesbrough, 1893, 35U. 

NoKRis, 31. O.. decease, 1886, 4 :— 3Iemoir, 121. 

NoRBis, "W., elected Member, 1892, 102. 

NouTH, A., Tyijographic Printing 3Iachinery, 1899, 124. 

North, G., elected Member, 1891, 3()1.— Decease, 1894, 4. 

North, H., elected Associate Member, 1894, 470. 

North, J. T., decease, 1897, 5.— Memoir, 1896, 250. 

North British Railway "Works, Glasgow, 1895, 4CG, 482. 

North Eastern Steel "Works, Middlesbrough, 1893, 343. 

North End Spinning Mill, Bolton, 1894, 406, 450. 

North London Iron Works, 1886, 42."). 

North Skelton Ironstone 3Iines, Cleveland, 1893, 360. 

NoBTHAM Iron Works, 3Iessrs. Day, Summers, and Co., Southampton, 1892, 

3G9, 385. 
NoRTHAM Steam Saw Mills and AVharf, 31essrs. Driver and Co., Southamiiton, 
1892, 369, 387. 

Northam Yacht and Shipbuilding Yard, 31essrs. J. G. Fay and Co., 
Southampton, 1892, 3G9, 388. 

NoBTHCOTT, W. H., Glass Revealer, 1900, 550. 

Initial Condensation in Steam Engine, 1892, 21G. 

Northey, p. W., elected 3Iembcr, 1900, 1 82. 

Norton, A., elected Associate 3Iembcr, 1897, 257. 
Atmospheric Piailway, 1899, 325. 

Norton, S. J., elected Associate Member, 1899, 203. 

Norton, W. E., elected 31ember, 1888, 444. 

Norton Water Tower, Kuucorn, of Lake Vyrnwy Water Works, Liverpool, 
1891, 464. 

Nottingham Castle, 1898, 461, 514. 

Nottlsgham Electricity Supply Station, 1898, 516. 

Nottingham Musecm and Art Gallery, 1898, 4G1, 514. 

Nottingham Works, 1898, 461, 516-25. 

November SIeeting, 1899, 527 : — 1900, 555. 

Nunnery Colliery, Sheffield, 1890, 445, 465. 

Nursery Steel- AVire 31ills, Messrs. Cocker Brothers, Sheffield, 1890, 44S. 



N 259 



NuRSEY, P. F., Bag-Making ^fachine, 1889, GHS. 

Disposal of Slag, 1892, 89. 

Roller Flour Milling, 1889, 174. 
Ndtt, G. B.. elected Member, 1893, 311. 
Nutter, H. X., elected Graduate, 1899, 2Di. 



Oakes, Sir R. L., Bart., elected Member, 1885, .">0o. 

Oakmax, R. N., Jux., Paper on the Loomis process of making Gas for Fuel, 
1890, 41 »2.— Remarks thereon, 410, 414-7. 

Gas Furnaces, 1891, 75. 
Oates, a. J., elected Associate Member, 1899, 14"). 
O'Brie.v, B. T., elected Member, 1887, l.iS. 

Belfast Electric Lighting, 1896, 331. 
O'BitiEX, H. E., elected Graduate, 1899, 14G. 
O'Brien, J. O., elected Member, 1887, 2. 

Outlet Valves at Burrator Reservoir, Plyir.outh, 1899, 413. 

Training of Engineer Students, 1899, 332. 
Observatory, Dunsiuk, Dublin, 1888, 404. 
OcKESDEN, M. A., Jun., elected Associate INIember, 1900, 3. 
OcKESDON, W., elected Member, 1890, 298. 
October Meeting, 1899, 473 :— 1900, 501. 
O'DoNNELL, J. P., elected Member, 1888, IGO. 

Portable Pneumatic Tools, 1900, 174. 
Officers. See Council. 
O'Flyn, J. L., elected Member, 1887, 283. 
Ogdex, C. C, elected Associate Member, 1898, 143. 
Ogden, F., elected Member, 1889, 2. 
Ogle, P. J., elected Member, 1886, 271. 
Oil-Gas Works, Midland Railway, Derby, 1898, 4G1. 
Oil Mill, Liverpool. 1891, 445. 
Oil Works. 1887, 4:J7. — Addiewell, Young's Paraffin, Light and Mineral Oil 

Works, 448. — Broxburn, 449. — Burntisland, 450. 
Oka, S., elected Member, 1894, 294. 
Oke, F. R.. elected Member, 1893, 220. 
Oldbury, 1897, 368. 
Oldbdry Boiler Works, 1897, 368, 409. 
Oldham Corporation Electric-Light Works, 1894, 405, 440. 
Oldham, H. G. Y., elected Associate Member, 1898, 3. 

K 2 



260 O 

Oldham, H. G. V. (continued) : — 

Evaporative Condensers, Paper, 1899, ISo. — Eemarks thereon, 207, '237, 
252. 
Oldham, T., elected Member, 1900, 182. 
Olive, W. T., Canal- Boat Propellers, 1894, 377. 

Manchester Main Drainage Works, Paper, 1894, 381. — Eemarks thereon, 
400. 
Oliver, H., elected Member, 1887, 2. 
Oliver, T., elected Member, 1899, 474. 
Olbick, H., decease, 1887, *>. 

Openings for Mechanical Engineers in China, Paper by the Rt. Hon. Rear- 
Admiral Lord Charles Beresford, C.B., M.P., 1899, 029.— Vast territory 
and population ; length of railways completed, building, and projected, 
529; Tongshan locomotive works; cost of building locomotives; lack of 
skilled labour ; American engiucs and quick delivery, 530 ; failure of 
native cement works; Chinese hatred of foreigners, 531. — Electric 
traction in Pekin ; bad state of roads ; electric light in European 
settlements, 532 ; large increase in use of electrical power in Japan ; 
electric power station near Kioto. Japan, 533. — Inventive genius of 
Japanese ; quick-firing artillery gun and magazine rifle, 534. — Electrical 
power from Niagara Falls. 53i. — Bad tt-legraph system in China, 535. — 
Mining ; gold in Manchuria, 535 ; coal fields of .Shansi, iron and coal 
mines of Hanyang, 53G. — Water works needed in European settlements, 
537. — Manufactnres, 537. — Purchasing power of China increased by 
exploiting minerals ; increased supply creates demand, 538. — Chinese 
cotton and silk mills, no provision made for renewal ; decline of tea 
trade, 539 ; increased sale of Indian and Cingalese teas due to 
improved machinery, 540. — Chinese arsenals ; Krupp gun with 
Armstrong breech-piece, 541 ; primitive metliods of loading and firing 
guns with disastrous results, 542 ; Chinese powder mill ; proper 
supervision required, 543. — Wages in t^outh China; agents required 
for selling British machinery, 544 ; British, German, and American 
machinerj'; proposed exhibition of British machinery in China, 545. — 
Depreciation and renewal of machinery ; lalx)ur-saving machines and 
strikes, 546 ; eflfects of a high tariff, 547. — Advantage of learning 
Chinese language, 547. — Appointments on the Chinese railways ; mining 
work and the Peking Syndicate ; " open door " in China, 549 ; growth of 
feeling in America in favour of " open door " policy, 550. 

Discussion. — White, Sir W. H., Thanks to author, 551 ; volume, not 
percentages, of trade; foreign competition, 552. — Morrison, G. J., First 
railway in China and its destruction, 552 ; difficulties to be encountered 
in Cliina, 553; corruption of mandarins, 554; richness of China in 



O 261 

Openings for ^Mechanical Engineers in China, T>iscussiou, 1899 (continued) : — 
minerals, and great openings for the mining engineer, 555. — Goodwin, 
G. A., British exhibition of machinery, &c., in China, 557 ; " chop " or 
trade-mark; tool steel, 559. — Bainbridge, E., DiflSculties in opening 
trade, 559; guarantee of capital, 5G0; "likin" taxes, 561. — Beresford, 
Lord C, Present difficulties in way of trade, 561 ; honest mandarins, 
562; integrity of Chinese merchant, 563; British exhibition of 
machinery, &c. ; " chop," 564 ; effects of opening railways, 565. 

Opera House, Paris, Electric Lighting, 1889, 542. 569. 

Optical and Mechanical Works. Dublin, 1888, 401. 

Orcctt, H. F. L., elected Member. 1899, 474. 

Ordnance Factories, 1892, 117. ,See Address of President, Dr. William 
Anderson. 

Ordnance Survey Office, Southampton, 1892, 369, 380. 

Ordsal Mills, Salford, 1894, 414. 

Ordsal AVorks, Salford, 1894, 418, 

O'Reilly, F. J., elected Associate Member, 19C0, 502. 

Ormeatj Brick Works, Belfast. 1888, 428. 

Ormerod, K. O., elected Member, 1885, 164. 

Ormesby Iron Works, Middlesbrough, 1893, 349. See also Blast-Fumace 
Practice, 1889, 595-7. 

Obmsbt, a. S. a., elected Member, 1899, 3. 

Orphanage, Eailway Servants', Derby, 1898, 503. 

Orr, C. R., elected Member, 1897, 1. 

OsBOBN, S.. decease, 1892, 4.— Memoir, 1891, 291. 

OsBORN AND Co.. Samuel. Clyde Steel and Iron Works, Sheffield, 1890, 457. 

Osborne. T. P., elected Member, 1899, 144. 

OsBURN, G. v., elected Associate Member, 1899, 474. 

OsLER, F. and C, Crystal Glass Works, Birmingham, 1897, 398. 

Osmond, F. J., elected Graduate, 1892, 102 .-—transferred to Member, 1897, 4. 

Cycle Construction, Paper on some points in Cycle Construction, 1897, 
284.— Remarks thereon, 295, 296. 

Osmond. :M.. Alloys Research, 1893, 195 : — 1897, 96. 

Osmonds, Cycle Works, Birmingham. 1897, 399. 

O'SuLLiVAN, A. T., elected Associate, 1888, 444, 

Oswald, G. H., elected Graduate, 1897, 145 : — elected Associate Member, 1899, 
145. 

Otis Lift. 1889, 354. See Eiffel Tower Lifts. 

Ottebbourne Water Works, Southampton, 1892, 369. 

Ottewell, a., elected Member, 1899, 474. 

Otto and Langen Atmospheric Motor, 1889, 505. See Gas Engines. 

Otto Gas Engine, 1889, 506. See Gas Engines. 



262 O 

OuGHTERSOX, G. B., Xaval Electrical Apparatus. 1802, 282. 
Vote of thanks to retiring Secretary, 1898, 4(i. 

OrxLET Valves at Buebator Reservoir, Paper on tlic Outkt Valves at the 
Burrator Eeservoir of the Plymouth "Wafer "Works, by E. SaDdemmi, 
1899, 407. — History of Plymouth water supply, 407. — Reservoir, 407. — 
Control of outlet pipes, 408. — Valves for ordinary use, 409. — Special 
valves, 40'J. — Action of valve, 410. — "Water meter, 4I(i. 

Discussion. — White, Sir W. H., Vote of thanks, 411. — Mansergh, J., 
Leat from Dartmoor to Plymoutli replaced by pipe, 411 ; prolific yield 
from Dartmoor watershed ; shape of reservoir ; subsidiary dam at 
Sheepstor ; structure of rock, 412. — AVhite, Sir "W. H., Depth of ton.irues 
in dam, 413. — Mansergh, J., Shape of fissures; quality of granite, 413. — 
O'Brien, J. O., Width of tongue in rook, 413. — Sandeman, E., Width 
of concrete and trench, 414. — Pearson, H. W., Conical valve; Venturi 
meter ; foundations, 414. — Ingham, W., Back-lash in valves, 414 ; 
foundations, 415. — Davey, II., Inside and outside valves, 415 ; difliculty 
cf repairing, 41(j. — Bramwell, Sir F., Bart., I'lpe with float attached, 
416. — Sandeman, E., Seizing down of outer valve ; Venturi meter ; 
back-lash in valves, 417; syphous, 418. — Terry, S. H., Previous reports 
on Plymouth water supply, 418. 

Outram, F. D., elected Associate 3Iember, 1897, 2 : — transferred to Member, 
1898, 548. 

Overhead Railway, Liverpool, 1891, 428. 

Owen, T., elected Member, 1889, 34G. 

Owen, T. H., elected :Member. 1886, 271. 

Owens, P. E., elected 3Iember, 1897, 432. 
Aluminium, 1898, 372. 

OxTGEN Manufacture, Paper on the Mechanical Appliances employed in the 
Manufacture and Storage of Oxygen, by K. S. Murray, 1890, 131. — 
Extraction of oxygen from atmosphere by means of barium oxide, 131. — 
Manufacture of barium oxide as employed in Brin process, 131. — 
Production of oxygen, 133. — Oxygen producer, 134; retorts, 135; 
connecting pipes, 136; air pump, 13(J ; purifiers, 137; cost of purification. 
138; automatic reversing gear, 139. — Cycle of operation, 140. — Labour, 
142. — Purity of oxygen, 142. — Cost of production, 142. — High-pressure 
storage cylinders, 143. — Compressors, 144. — Pressure regulator, 144. — 
Industrial applications of oxygen, 145. 

Discussion. — Murray, K. S., Specimens exhibited, 146 ; visit to Brin's 
Oxygen Works, 146. — Adamson, J., Simplification of process, 147 ; use 
of oxygen for engineering purposes, 147. — Hadfield, R. A., Use of oxygen 
for metallurgical processes, 148; moisture in air, 148. — Kennedy, 
A. B. W., Uniform temperatuie of retorts due to variation of preesure. 



263 



Oxygen Masvfacture, Biscif^don, 1890 (continued) : — 

148. — Marten, E. B., Applications of oxygen, 14S ; automatic reversing 
gear, 149; storage cylinders and compressing pump. 149.— 3Iurray, K. S., 
Pressure of oxygen in storage vessels, 149. — Cowper, C. E.. Leakage, and 
precautions against explosion, 150. — Marten, E. B., Labels for vessels, 
150. — Schiinbeyder, "\V., Waste in process, 150. — Dawson, B., Use of 
oxygen for glazing pottery, 150. — Tborne, Dr. L. T., Higb-pressure 
storage vessels for distribution of oxygen, 151 ; precaution against 
accidents, 152 ; waste of beat, 152 ; application of oxygen to metallurgical 
work, 152; moisture in atmospbere, 152; Boussingaults experiments, 
153 ; constant temperature of retorts, 154 ; use of oxygen for glazing- 
pottery, and in glass blowing, 155 ; purification of coal gas, 155 ; 
increased illuminating power of ligbting gas, 15G ; application to 
bleacbing, 157 ; to oxidation of oils, and production of vinegar, 15S. — 
Douglass, Sir J. N., Experiments witb oxygeu at Orford Xess ligbtbouse, 
159; eflScient working of tbree-stage compressor, 159. — Paget, A., Price 
of oxygen, 160. — Murray, K. S., Cost witbout compression, and 
compressed, 100. — Paget, A., Probable reductiun of cost, 160; process 
not wasteful, 161 ; maturing of wbiskey, 161. — Murray, K. S., Work of 
compressor, 161; cost of oxygen, 161; oxygenated wbiskey, 161; 
leakage from storage vessels, 161. — Tomlinson, J., Metal used for 
valves, 162. — Murray, K. S., Valves made of bronze, 162 ; precautions 
against accident. 162; automatic gear, 162. — Tomlinson, J., Applications 
of oxygen, 163.— Valon, W. A., Purification of coal gas, 164; percentage 
of coal gas required, 164; ordinary lime purification, 165; advantages 
of using oxygen, 166. 

Oxygen Works, Brin's, 1890, 46, 131. See Oxygen JIanufacture. 



Packixg, Metallic, for piston-rods and valve-rods, 1890, 71, 78, 99. 

Packing Warehouse, Mancbester, 1894, 403, 412. 

Paddle- Wheel Navig.4.tion, Paper on tbe bistory of Paddle-Wbeel Steam 
Navigation, by H. Sandbam, 1885, 121.— Early use of paddle-wbeels, 
121.— Blasco de Garay, 121,— Prince Rupert, 122.— Denis Papin, 122.— 
Tbomas Savery, 122.— Jonatban Hulls, 122.— Daniel Bernoulli, fin 
propellers, 122. — Euler and De la Cour, 123. — Marquis de Jouffroy, 124. — 
James Watt, 124.— Patrick Miller, 124.- William Symington, 125.— 
Earl Stanbope, 126.— Robert Fulton, 126.— First steamer crossing 
Atlantic, 127. — The "Comet," 127. — First passenger steamer on the 



264 P 

Paddle-Wheel Xavigation, Paper, 1885 (continued) : — 

Thames, 128. — First steamer on the Khine, 120. — First steamer built 
in Germany. 129. — Lowering of funnels, 129. — "Water-tight bulkheads, 
blow-out pipes, brine pumps, bilge injection, 130. — First steamer 
registered at Lloyd's, 130. — Oscillating engines, 130. — Long-voyage 
steamers. 131. — Royal Navy, 132. — "Gorgon" engine, 133. — Tank 
coal-bunkers, paddle-boxes covered by life-boats, 134. — Telescopic funnel, 
135. — British Atlantic-Ocean paddle-wheel steamships, 135. — The "Great 
Western " and " Sirius," 135. — Cunard line, 136. — Contemporaneous 
ocean steamers, 136. — Steam navigation companies, 137. — Excess of 
engine power. 137. — Iron steamers, 138. — Progress on the Thames, 
139. — Inverted-cylinder engines, 142. — Marine engines with locomotive 
link-motion, 143. — High-pressure steeple engines, 143. — Iron-built 
vessels for royal navy, 144. — Small iron paddle-wheel steamers on the 
Thames, 144. — The '"Persia" and the "Scotia," 146. — Diagonal system 
for wooden ship-building, and composite construction, 146. — Compound 
expansion engine, 146. — Screw-propeller superseding paddle-wheel, 147. 
— Home services, 147. — Atmospheric engines, 148. — Channel service, 
150.— The "Castalia," 150. — The " Calais-Douvres " and the "Bessemer," 
151. — Saloon steamers, 151. — Stern-wheel steamers, 152. — The "Great 
Eastern," 152. — Hydraulic or water-power propulsion, 154. — Curious 
schemes for driving small steamers, 154. — American beam-engines. 
155.— Tugs. 156.— Steam ferries, 157.— Steam trawlers, 157.— Patents 
for i)addle-wheels, 158. 

Discusnon.—CTohn, F. W., 'Model of stem-wheel steamer "Inez 
Clarke," 158.— :Maudslay, H., Iron floats for lalancing cranks of engines, 
159. — Head, J., Paper entirely historical, 159. 

Page. D.. elected Associate, 1800, 503. 

Page. H., elected Associate ^Member, 1897, 144. 

Paget,|A., elected Vice-President, 1887, 25 :— 1889, 23.— Decease, 1896,4.— 
Memoir. 1895, 144. 
Automatic Machine-Gun. 1885, 185. 
Automatic Sluice, 1888, 299. 
Bag-Making Machine, 1889, C38. 
Brewery Tramways and EoUing Stock, 1888, 351. 
By-laws, 1885, 28 :— 1886, 24 :— 1889, 33. 
Canadian Locomotives, 1887, 223, 244. 
Compound Locomotives, 1889, 125. 
Compound Steam Turbine, 1888, 503. 
Condensation and Re-evaporation, 1889, 696. 
Condition of Carbon in Steel, 1885, 49, 54. 
Drying in Vacuum, 1889, 324. 



265 



Paget, A. (continued) : — 

Eiffel Tower Lifts, 1889, 372. 

Electric Lij^hthouse, 1887, 3G2. 

Friction Experiments, 1885, 70 :— 1888, 198. 

Gas Engines, 1889, 536. 

Oxygen Manufacture, 1890, 160. 

Eegnault's Steam Experiments, 1889, 461. 

Eoller Flour Milling, 1889, 165. 

Spherical Eccentric, 1885, 432. 

Spherical Engine, 1885, 112. 

Steel Rails. 1890, 344. 

Taxation of Machinery, 1890, 40. 

Testing Machine, 1888, 23.3. 

Triple-Expansion Engines, 1887, 66. 

Vote of thanks to retiring President, 1889, 26 : — to President at Summer 
meeting, Paris, 1889, 349. 

Warp Weaving, Paper on Warp Weaving and Knitting without Weft, 
1889, 469.— Eemarks thereon, 486, 487, 491. 496. 

Water Works, Sheffield, 1890, 433. 

^Mieel Load in Cycles, 1886, 179. 
Paget, Sir E., Bart., Welcome to ^Members at Summer meeting, Derby, 1898,337. 
Paget, E. L., elected Graduate, 1889, 347. 
Pajeken, J. F., elected Member, 1900, 182. 
Palais Eoyal, Paris, Electric installation, 1889, 548, 567. 
Palmek, B. J., elected Associate Member, 1900, 183. 
Palmer, H. B., Jun., elected Graduate, 1895, 328: — elected Associate Member, 

1900, 3. 
Paper-Bag Making Machine, 1889, 631. -See Bag-Making Machine. 
Paper Machinery Works, Edinburgh, 1887, 439. 

Paper Mills, visited at Summer meeting, Edinburgh, 1887, 439, 462-5. 
Papers, Excerpt Copies, 1891, 9. — Wall Diagrams, 1891, 9. 
Papin's Machine for transmission of energy, 1899, 299. See Atmospheric 

Eailway. 
Paraffin I>ight and Mineral Oil Work?, Young's, 1887, 437, 448. 
Paris Exhibition, 1889, Eepreseutation of English Engineers, 1888, 166. — 

Visited at Summer meeting, 1889, 542, 548. 
Paris Lyons and Mediterranean Eailway Locomotive Works, Paris, 1889, 

542, 549. 
Paris Sewers, 1889, 546, 559. 

Paris Summer Meeting, 1889, 343. — Eeception, 343.— Business, 345. — Totes 
of thanks, 348. — Excursions, &c., 542. — Honorary Life Membership, 
583.— Presentations, 583-4. 



266 P 

Paris "Works, visited at Summer meeting, 1889, 512, 51G-76. 

Parish, C. E., elected Associate Member, 1897, 2. 

Park, C. A., elected Member, 1898, 341. 

Park Gate Irox and Steel Works, 1890, 390. — Visited at Summer meeting, 

446. See Iron and Steel AVorks. 
Parker, F. G. W., elected Associate INIeniber. 1900, 356. 
Parker, H. A., elected Associate Member, 1900, 3. 
Parker, J., elected Associate Member, 1896, 4(J2. 
Parker, Thomas (Wolverhampton), elected ^Member, 1891, 480. 

Canal-Boat Propellers, 1894, 3G9. 

Electric Lighting Works, 1894, 304, 311. 

Electric Welding, 1894, 350. 

Electrical Engineering Works, Wolverhampton, 1897, 30S, 407. 
Parker, T., Ju x. (Gorton), elected Member, 1888, 269. 

Capacity of Railway Wagons, 1900, 581, 586. 
Parker, T. H., elected :Member, 1899, 144. 
Parker, W., Experiments on relative Corrosion of Iron and Steel, 18S5, 340-1. 

President's Address, 1885, 34G-8. 

Triple-Expansion Engines, 1886, 499 :— 1887, 65, CO. 
Parkinson', E., elected Associate ^fember, 1900, 356. 
Parkinson, H. C, elected Associate ^lember, 1895, 2: — transferred to Member, 

1896, 3. 
Parkixsox, J., elected Member, 1900, 96. 
Parkixsox Water Meter, 1900, :>i\ 59, 68. See Water dieters. 
Parkside Prixtixg Works, Edinburgh, 1887, 440. 
Parley, V., elected Graduate, 1900, 183. 
Parrack, W. T., elected :Member, 1899, 3. 
Parratt, W. H., elected ^lember. 1892, l(i2. 
Parrott, T. H., elected :\Iember, 1892, 102. 
Pabrt, A., elected Member, 1886, 125. 
Parry, E. H., elected :Member, 1889, 584. 
Parrt, J., Incrustation of Tonjuay Water Mains, 1899, 522. 

laverpool Motive Power. Faper on lilechanical Features of the Liverpool 
Water Works, and on the supply of Power by pressure from the 
public mains, and by other means, 1892, 32. — Remarks thereon, 
51, 63. 
Parry-Joxes, R., elected Member, 1900, 182. 
Parsonage, W. R., elected Graduate, 1899, 5. 

Parsons, Hon. C. A., Paper on the Compound Steam Turbine and Turbo- 
Electric Generator, 1888, 480.— Remarks thereon, 486, 491, 492, 
493, 514. 

Lighting of Workshops, 1893, 412, 413. 



P 267 

Parsons, H.. elected Associate Slember, 1898, 14o. 

Parsons. Hon. K. C, Hydraulic Gas-Stoking, 1895, oil. 
Hydraulic Power Supply, 1895, 37G. 

Partially Immersed Peopelleks, Paper on Partially Immersed Scrow- 
Propellers for Canal Boats ; and the influence of Section of Waterway, 
by H. Barcroft, 1897, 101. — Action of screw-propeller, 101 ; screw out of 
centre is neutral in steering, 102. — Size of screw ; practical comparison 
of small and large screws, 103. — Section of waterway; backward or 
displacement current, 103; loss of power. 104; slip; ordinary screws in 
shallow canals, 105 ; no wash from partially immersed propellers, lOG. — 
Analysis of voyage of steam-lighter " Ulster." 107-8 ; influence of 
contracted section of waterway, 109 ; obseivations on voyage of steam- 
lighter "Tyrone," 110-1. — Emergence of tips of screw blades, and 
consequent loss of power, 112. — Appendix, pleasure-boat "Pioneer," 112 ; 
suitable for shallow water; speed and horse-power, 113. — Steam-lighter 
"Hilda," 113; analysis of working, 114. 

Discwdon. — Barcroft, H., Exhibited models of canal boats, propellers, 
and frames, 115. — Barnabj-, S. ^\'., Large and small screws, 115; wash on 
banks; drawing air down, 116. — Thornycroft, J. I., Displacement current. 
IIS; inclined propeller-shaft; drawing air down, ll'J ; cavitation; 
inclined paddles; immersion of large screw in shallow draught, 120. — 
Scbunheyder, W., Skew pinion for planing machine, 121. — Heathorn, 
Capt. T. B., Boss of screw out of water, 121. — Wicksteed, J. H., 
"Pioneer" propellers, 121; absence of splash of water; disc area; 
angles of teeth in skew gearing, 122.— Scott, E. K., Electric rudder- 
motor, 123 ; accumulators, 124. — Robinson, L. S., Efl'cct of reduced 
section of waterway, 125 ; drawing air down to propellers ; backward 
current, 120; effect of reduced cross-section upon speed; necessity for 
strong simple light machinery, 127.— Barcroft, H., Large blades for 
propeller; backward current, 128; skew gearing; drawing air down; 
application of mechanical power to existing boats on existing canals, 129 ; 
propeller bosses out of water, 130.— Eichards. E. W., Vote of thanks, 130. 

Paschixix Boiler, 1889, 46. See Petroleum Fuel in Locomotives. 

1'ashby, a. H., elected Graduate, 1899, 5. 

Passburg, E., Paper on an ApjDaratus for Drying in Vacuum, 1889, 307. 

Passmore, F. B., elected Member, 1886, 1. 

Patchell, W. H., elected Member, 1896, 279. 
' Electric Lighting, Edinburgh, 1895, 574, 575, 580. 

Electric Plant, 1893, 574. 
Evaporative Condensers, 1899, 228. 
Steam Superheating, Paj>er, 1896, 134.— Remarks thereon, 161,185,218, 228. 

Patel, :M. B., elected Associate Member, 1896, 102. 



268 P 

Patel, K. M., elected Associate Member, 1896, 102. 

Patent System, desirable improvements, 1889, 230. See Address of President, 

Charles Cochrane. 
Paterson, J. A., R.N., elected Member, 1900, 2. 
Patekson, J. E., elected Graduate, 1887, 474. 
Paterson, R. M., elected Associate IMember. 1893, 9S. 
Patekson, W. S., Graduate transferred to IMember. 1886, 3. 
Paton, J. M. C, Steam Laundry Machinery, 1898, 306. 
Paton, R. J., elected Member, 1891, 301. 
Pattinson, J., decease, 1887, 3.— ^Memoir, 1886, 463. 
Pattison, John (Giovanni), decease, 1900, 6. 

Middlesbrough Salt Industry, 1893, 301. 
Pattison, Joseph, elected Member. 1891, l!t7. 
Paul, M., Jun., elected Member. 1891, 301. 
Canal-Boat Propellers, 1894, 375. 
Throttling and Variable Expansion, 1895, 187. 
Pavlson, S., elected Member, 1891, l'J7. 
Payne, F. G., elected Graduate, 1898, 144. 
Payne, H., elected Associate Member, 1900, 3. 
Payton, F. J., elected Graduate, 1892, 102. 
Peache, J. C, Express Locomotives, 1898, 6M. 

Throttling and Variable Expansion, 1895, 183, 184. 
Peacock, F., elected Member, 1890, 17G. 
Peacock, J. A. W., elected :Mcmbcr, 1890, 176. 
Peacock, Ralph (Goole), decease, 1889, 4 : — Memoir, 337. 
Peacock, Richard, elected Vice-President, 1887, 2.5.— Decease, 1889, 203; 

1890, 4.— Memoir, 1889, 197. 
Peacock, W. J. P., elected Associate, 1886, 271. 
Peake, R. C, elected Associate, 1888, 26'J. 
Peakeb, G., decease, 1885, 4. — Memoir, 1884, 474. 
Pearce, H., elected Graduate, 1895, ].")0. 
Pearce, R., decease, 1899, 7.— Memoir, 1898, 539. 
Pearce, R. 31., elected Member, 1894, 1.— Decease, 1897, 5. 
Pearce, R. W., decease, 1890, 4 :— Memoir, 2'.t2. 
Peabce, S. L., elected Associate ^Member, 1899, 4. 
Pearce, T., elected ^lember, 1897, 432. 
Pearsall, H. D., Irrigating Machinery, 1888, 68. 
Pearson, C. D., elected Graduate, 1899, 2'J4. 
Pearson, H. AV., elected IMember, 1885, 463. 
Hydraulic Power Supply, 1895, 383. 
Incrustation of Torquay Water Mains, 1899, 517. 
Outlet Valves at Burrator Reservoir, 1899, 414. 



269 



Teabsok, J. T., Bag-Making Machine, 1889, C36. 689. 

Pearsox, T. H., Graduate transferred to ^Member, 1885, 3. 

Peck, W., Graduate transferred to Menaber, 1887, 3. 

Pedlet, H. I., elected Associate Member, 1898, 547. 

Peech, H., elected Associate, 1887, 284. 

Peech, W. H., elected Associate, 1887, 284. 

Peel, C. E., elected :Member, 1888, 269. 

Peel Foundbt, Derby, 1898, 494. 

Peel Mills, Bury, 1894, 405, 445. 

Peeeage, The Eight Hon. Lord Armstrong, C.B., 1888, 21. 

Peet, J., elected Member, 1899, 144. 

Peet, W. G., elected Member. 1898, 142. 

Testing of Materials, Paper on ^lechanical Testing of Materials at the 
Locomotive Works of the Midland Eailway, Derby, 1893, 670. — 
Remarks thereon, 691, 695. 
Peltox "Wheel for driving a dynamo, 1895, 366, 388, 400. 
Pexdleton Xew Mills, Manchester, 1894, 413. 
Pesdred, L. St. L., elected Associate ^lember, 1896, 462. 
Pexdred, v., elected Member, 1900, 2. 

Atmospheric Eailway, 1899, 322, 323, 325, 326. 
Pexsiax and Co., Caledonian Iron Works, Glasgow, 1895, 496. 
Penn, F. J., elected Member, 1897, 143. 
Pexx, W. C, elected Associate Member, 1895, 2. 
Pexney axd Co., City Iron and Wire Works, Lincoln, 1885, 445. 
Pepper, J. E., Associate transferred to Member, 1886, 3. 
Percy, Dr. John, Portrait, 1890, 328. 
Peregrine, W. H., elected Graduate, 1899, 294. 
Perkins, L., decease, 1892, 4.— :Memoir, 1891, 192. 
Perkins and Sons, Britannia "Weaving Mill, Coventry, 1897, 369, 428. 
Peeks, J., elected Member, 1898, 341. 

"Water Softening, 1898, 436, 452. 
Peebett, E., Steam Superheating, 1896, 199, 200. 

"Water Works, Southampton, 1893, 64. 
Peebeue-Llotd, Pere et Fils, Primary Batteries, Paris, 1889, 548, 571. 
Pekey, A., decease, 1893, 4.— :\Iemoir, 1892, 407. 
Perby, E., elected Associate, 1890, 472. 
Pebey, E. W. F., elected Graduate, 1900, 357. 
Pebky, T. J., decease, 1886, 4.— :Memoir, 1885, 301. 
Perry, W. A., elected Member, 1890, 298. 
Pebtwee, H. a., elected Associate Memljer, 1893, 220. 

Water Works, Birmingham, 1897, 313. 
Petebs, L. B., elected Associate, 1894, 294: — transferred to Associate Member, 
1900, 504. 



270 P 

Pethick, J., Mayor of Plymouth, Welcome to ^Members at Summer meeting, 
Plymouth, 1899, 287 :— Garden party at Yelvertou, 443. 

Petit and Boidenoot, Vacuum Power Supply. Paris, 1889, 557. 

Petroleuji, 1892, 125. See Address of President. Dr. William Anderson. 

Petroleum Fuel in Locomotives, Supplementary Paper on tlie use of 
Petroleum Eefuse as Fuel in Locomotive Engines, by T. Urquhart, 1889, 
36. — Further experience since previous paper in 1884, and extended 
use of petroleum refuse as fuel, oG. — Spray injector for passenger 
locomotives, 37. — Regenerative or accumulative combustion-chamber, 37. 
— Details of cost of altering locomotives fur petroleum firing. 38. — 
Comparative results of working for whole year with coal and with 
petroleum refuse, in ordinary working and in special trials, 39-40. — 
Cost of fuel, and entire workintr cost of locomotive department for period 
of thirteen years, 41. — Comparative consumption of fuel on Giazi and 
Tsaritsin Eailway and on two neighbouring lines, 41. — Effect of 
petroleum fut-1 on boilers, 42 ; cost of repairs during thirteen years, 43. 
— Plating up of fire-door in locomotive boilers, 43. — Verderber boiler, 
43-4 ; modification adopted, 45-6. — Paschinin boiler, 46. — Blower for 
air supply to furnace, 47. — Trial of compressed air for si)ray injector, 48. 
— Evaporative value of petroleum fuel, 48. — Copper tubes, 49. — Petroleum 
refuse for metallurgical purposes, 49-52 ; scrap-welding furnaces, 49 ; 
brass-melting fires, 51. — Use of petroleum refuse for lubrication, 52; 
mode of testing value of lubricating oil, 52 ; results, 53. — Equivalent 
Russian and English measures, 54.— Tables x-xvii, 55-64. 

Discussion. — Carbutt, E. H., Attention commanded by author's previous 
paper, 65. — Urquhart, T., Increasing adoption of petroleum firing, 65 ; 
price of petroleum refuse, 65. — Kimber, E., Price of petroleum refuse 
and cost of transit, G6; oil production at Baku, 66; importation of 
Russian burning oil into London, 67 ; plan for increasing efficiency 
of liquid fuel by admixture with hydrogen, 67 ; successful use of air 
blast in scrap-welding furnace, 68.— Kennedy, A. B. W., Efficiency 
already reached leaves little room for further economy, 68 ; efficiency 
actually higher than stated. 60 ; use of crude oil for lubrication, 70. — 
Holden, J., Experience on Great Eastern Railway in firing boilers with 
liquid fuel, 70 ; alteration undesirable in locomotive fire-box, 70 ; 
necessity for accumulator of heat, 71 ; combined use of liquid and solid 
fuel, 71 ; modified construction of injector, 72 ; scrap-welding furnace at 
Stratford works, 78 ; quality of iron obtained, 73. — Worsdell, T. W., 
Experiment with crude petroleum gas on Pennsylvania Railroad, 73; 
suggested improvement in modified Verderber furnace, 74 ; flashing 
point of oil, 74; relative cost of petroleum and cual, 74; use of 
petroleum on steamboats, 74. — Hall, W. S., Petroff's method of testing 
oil, 75 ; use of petroleum fuel on steamers, 75. — Carbutt, E. H., Burning 



P 271 

rETBuLECM FuEL ix LOCOMOTIVES, Supplementary Paper, 1889 (Ducussion, 
continued) : — 
of petroleum or of coal is question mainly of cost, 75 ; regenerative 
process with crude gas at American steel-works. To ; Lindrauces to 
use of petroleum fuel for marine boilers, 76. — Adamson, D., Subject 
deserves further consideration, 7G. — Carbutt, E. H., Closing of 
discussion, 76. — Urquhart, T., Cost of petroleum refuse, 77; progress 
made in utilising liquid fuel, 77 ; increased efHcieucy by working crude 
gas on regenerative principle, 78 ; action of fire-brick lining, 78 ; details 
respecting high evaporative efSciency, 79 ; explanation of Table xvii, SO ; 
tlieoretical evaporative value of petroleum refuse, 80 ; Table xviii, ditto, 
81 ; use of liquid fuel on Great Eastern Eailway, 80-2 ; Verderber 
fire-box. 82; flashing point of petroleum refuse, S3; price of coal, S3; 
use of liquid luel in steamers, S3 ; development of native petroleum 
wealth, 84. 
Petroleum Fuel in Locomotives, 1890, 47. See Compounding of Locomotives. 
Petroleum A'apoub for Gas Engines, 1889, 510. See Gas Engines. 
Petter, E. "W., elected Associate Member, 1900, 183. 

Petter, p. W., elected Graduate, 1894, 2 :— elected Associate Member, 1899, 14G. 
Pettigrew, "NV. F., elected Member, 1898, 2. 
Phelps, Colonel P., Propeller Ventilating Fans, 1897, -iSO. 
Philip, W. L., elected Member, 1893, 97. 
Phiups and Co., J. andX,, Warehouse, Manchester, 1894, 414. 
Philipson, J., decease, 1899, 7. — Memoir, 1898, 316. 
Philipson, J., JuN., elected Graduate, 1890, 299. 
Phillipps, J., elected Associate, 1898, 547. 
Phillips, C. D., elected Member, 1885, 2. 
Phillips, E., elected Associate Member, 1895, 548. — Decease. 19C0, 6. — 

Memoir, 1899, 141. 
Phillips, E. G., elected Associate ^Member, 1897, 257. 
Phillips, H. P., elected Member, 1885, 2. 
PniLLtPS, J., Boiler Construction, 1891, 523. 

Marine-Engine Trials, 1890, 267 :-1891, 253 :— 1894, vl. Ill, 112. 
Middlesbrough Salt Industry, 1893, 308. 

Screw-Propeller Surface, 1892, 556. ^ 

Steam Jacket, 1892, 494. 
Steam Pumps, 1893, 469. 
Steam Superheating, 1896, 193. 
Watch Screws, 1894, 497. 
Phillips, L., elected Member, 1885, 161. 
Phillips, Pi. E., Graduate transferred to Member, 1885, 3. 

Cycles, Paper on the Construction of modem Cycles, 1885, 467. 

Piemarks thereon, 506, 510, 517, 519, 520. 



272 P 

Phillips, W., elected Member, 1890, 176. 

Phillips. W. P. F., elected Graduate, 1898, 144. 

Phillott, G. H., elected Associate Member, 1899, 293. 

Philpot, H. P., elected Graduate, 1899, 475. 

Phipps, G. p., Longworth Power-Hammer, 1900, 116. 

Phcexix Foundry, Derby, 1898, 491. 

Phcenix Foundry, Liverpool. 1891, 446. 

Pickering, F., elected Associate Member, 1900, 3. 

PiCKERixG, J., elected Member, 1894, 469. 

Pickles, J. E., elected Associate Member, 1897, 2. 

Pier, Plymouth, 1899, 4G0.— ^Southampton, 1892, 313, 368; see Southampton 

Pier. 
PiGOTT, A., elected Associate ^Member, 1899, 4. 

PiLKiSGTOX, H., elected Graduate, 1888, ItJO:— transferred to Member, 1891, 4. 
Pillai, V. P. D., elected Member, 1900, 182. 
PiLLATT, A., elected Associate Member, 1898, 143. 
PiLLATT, A. E., elected Graduate, 1897, 4:i4. 
Pilling, F. S., elected Associate Member. 1899, 4. 
Pilling, H., elected Associate Member. 1897, 2 :— transferred to Member, 1900, 

93. 
PiNDER, C. P., elected Member, 1892, 229. 
PiNEL, C. L. M., decease, 1896, 4.— Memoir, 1895, 540. 
PiNEL, P. G. M., elected Graduate, 1896, 103. 
Pink, Sir W., Floating Bridge, 1892, 352. 

Sewage and Eefuse Works, 1892, 362. 
Sewage Outfall Works, 1892, 334, 337. 
Pipes Proving of Cast-Iron Pipes, 1889, 227. See Address of President, Charles 

Cochrane. 
Pirie, G., elected Member, 1892, 102. 
PiRRiE, J. B., elected Associate, 1891, 301 :— transferred to Associate Jlember, 

1897, 4. 
Flax Dressing Machinery. 1896, 298. 
PiP.RiE, J. S., decease, 1897, 5.— Memoir, 1896, 97. 
Pirbie, X., elected Member, 1888, 209. 
PiRBlE, The Eight Hon. W. J., elected Member, 1888, 444.— Appointed member 

of Her ^Majesty's Most Honourable Privy Council in Ireland. 1898, 

4: — acknowledgment of congratulations, 29.— Elected Member of 

Council, 1899, 28. 
Address of President, 1899, 181, 
BeKast, City and Trade, 1896, 40G. 
Summer meeting, Belfast, AVelcome to Members as Lord Mayor of 

Belfast, 1896, 271 :— engineering progress, 272-4. 



273 



PiTHiviERS Narrow-Uauge Light Eailwat, 1898, 3S(). 

PrvoT Friction. 1891, 111. See Friction Esperiments 

Place. J., flectpcl Member, 1887, 474. 

Plaister, W. E., elected (graduate, 1900, 117. 

Planin.; ]Machinery at Forth Bridfj;e Works, 1887, 31:!. See Forth Bridge 

^lachinery. 
Plant, D. T., elected Associate ^leinber, 1900, 183. 
Plant, G., elected As.sociate. 1891, 2. 
Plante, S. G., elected Gr.adnate, 1900, 3.'p7. 
Platt, F. J., elected INIember, 1899, 2i»2. 

Platt, James, appointed Member of Council, 1893, 28 : — elected Climber of 
Coimcil, 1894, 26; 1897, 28.— Decease, 1898, G— Memoir, 1897, 516. 

Auditor, 1890, 3(1 :— 1891, 27. 

By-laws, 1891, 31, 37. 

Canal-Boat Propellers, 1894, 370. 

Canal-Boat PropuLsion, 1897, 212. 

Electric Lighting, Edinburgh, 1895, 584. 

Electric Welding, 1894, 342. 

Experimental ^Marine Engine, 1891, 403. 

Forth Bridge ^rachiuery. 1887, 317. 

Grain Warehou.sing Machinery, 1891, 380. 

Hydraulic Gas-Stoking, 1895, 342. 

Lighting of Work.shops, 1893, 413. 

Liverpool 3Iotive Power, 1892, 61. 

Moulding Sand, 1891, 102. 

Kopes and Belts, 1895, (".30. 

Steel Steam-Pipes, 1896, 247. 

Taxation of Machinery, 1890, 36, 41. 
Platt, John, elected ^Icmber, 1894, 294 :— 1899, 292. 
Platt, S. K., elected ^lember of Council. 1900, 34. 

Platt Brothers and Co., Hartford Iron Works, Oldham, 1894, 405, 442. 
Platts, W., elected Associate ^lember, 1898, 547. 
Plater Power-Hammer, 1900, 112. See Longworth Power-Hammer. 
Player, R., elected Associate Member, 1897, 433. 
Plyjiouth Electricity Works, 1899, 447. 
Plymouth ForNDRY, 1899, 457. 
Plymouth Free Public Library, 1899, 449. 
Plymouth Institution, 1899, 454. 
Plymouth Promenade Pier, 1899, 4C0. 
Plymouth Science. Art, and Technical Schools, 1899, 451. 
Plymouth Summer Meeting, 1899, 287. — Reception, 287. — Business, 291.— 
Votes of thanks, 296.— Excursions, &c., 1899, 439. 
* 8 



274 P 

Plymouth Water Works, A^isited at Summer INTeetiiig, Plymouth. 1899, 442. 

Plymouth Water Works Outlet Valves, 1899, 407. See Outlet Valves at 
Burrator Iteservoir. 

Pneumatic Power in I'ortsmoutli Dockyard. 1892, 21)7. See Dockyard Lifting 
and Hauling. See also Compressed-Air Power Supply, 1889, 54G, r)52. 

Pneum.^tic Propulsion' of Trains, 1899, 300, 314. See Atmo8i)heric Railway. 

Pneumatic Tools, Portable. 1900, 119. See PortaV)le Pneumatic Tools. 

PoGSON, A. L., elected ^Member, 1892, 229. 

PoGSON, J., elected Member, 1888, 4i4. 

PoiLLON, L., Paper on tlie Tripier Spherical Eccentric, 1885, 422.— Rejdy to 
discussion, 433. 

Point Hocse Ship- Yard, Glasgow, 1895, 492. 

PoiNTON, J. E., elected Oraduate, 1899, 47.'i. 

Poke, G. H., elected jNIembt^r, 1890, 170.— Decease, 1893, 4 :— Memoir, 95. 

Poland, W., elected Member, 1894, 1C9. 

PoLL-iiRD, F. J., elected Associate ]\Iember, 1896, 279. 

PoLLiT, E. E., elected Member, 1893, 97. 

PoLLiTT, H.. elected Member, 1894, 294. 

Pollock, J., elected Member, 1886, 1. 

Polyphase Electric Traction, Paper by C. A. Carus-Wilaon, 1900, 43r>.— 
Features of Polyphase system, 435.— Power transmission liy continuous 
and alternating currents, 437.— Burgdorf-Thun Railway, 438 ; electrical 
connections, 4:'.8 ; passenger motor-ears, 439 ; motors, 440 ; automatic 
speed-record, 440; grades, 441; influence of the starting period, 442; 
time lost in starting, 443 ; goods traffic, 444. — Acceleration tests on the 
Burgdorf Railway, 445 ; method of deducing results, 445 ; criticism of 
iests, 44G; results of tests, 447; comparison with those obtained with 
continuous currents, 448; conclusion, 450. — Polyphase motor, 451; 
clearance, 451 ; variation of speed with load, 452 ; maximum load, 453 ; 
speed regulation, 453 ; action when descending a grade, 455 ; starting, 
456. — Particulars of motors used on Burgdorf Railway motor-cars, 45G ; 
test and load curves of G4 h.p. polyphase motor, 457.— Coasting testa 
with polyphase motors, 458. 

D/gcu8s/on.— ^lartin, E. P., Vote of thanks to author, 459.— Walker, 
S. F., Control of speed essential; comparison of two systems, 459; 
arrangement of train service, 460 ; compound-wound motor, 462. — Carus- 
Wilson, C. A., Polyphase motors for cross-country lines; series-wound 
motor for traction purposes, 462. 
PoNTiFEx Evaporative Condenser, 1899, 235. See Evaporative Condensers. 
PooLEY, H., JuN., elected IMember, 1898, 546. 
Pope, J. G., elected ]Member, 1899, 292. 
Popp, v., Compressed-Air Power Supply, Paris, 1889, 546, 552. 



P 275 

PoppLETON, C. F., elected Associate Member, 189i, 170. 
Porcelain Works, Derby, 1898, 4i»2. 

PORCHESTEB CaSTLE, 1892, 068. 

PoBRiTT, L. A., elected Associate Member, 1898, o42. 

Port Eliot, St. Germans, 1899, 44o. 

Port ClarencEj Works visited at Summer meeting, ^liddlesbrougb, 1893, 

;>:!o. 
Port of Calais, 1689, 549, 57G. 

Port of Dfelix, TJe^cnption of the Port of Dublin, by J. P. Griffith, 1888, 384. 
— History of the port, 284. — Improvements in the river channel, 386. — 
Dublin quays, 387. — Lights, fog-signals, beacons, and buoys, 380. — 
Graving dock and slips, 392. — Bridges, :>92. — Summary of works executed 
in harbour since 1SC5, 392. — Port and docks board, 393. — Income, 393. — 
Tonnage and revenue, 394. 
Portable Engine, 1885, 371. See Semi-Portable Engine. 
Portable Hydraulic Drill, Paper on a Portable Hydraulic Drilling Machine, 
by M. Berrier-Fontaine, 1887, 72. — Advantages of portable machines for 
drilling in place, 72. — Driving of hydraulic drilling machines, and size of 
drills, 73. — Description of hydraulic motor, and of drill-holder driving 
the drill either director through a flexible shaft, 73. — Weight of machine, 
and rapidity of drilling, 75. — Extending use of portable hydraulic drills, 
75. 

Discussion. — Head, J., Loss of power in transmission through flexible 
shafts, 76. — Schunheyder, W., Speed of drill, 76. — Tomlinson, J., Drilling 
by flexible thafts in America, 76; speed of drill is dependent on feed 
pressure, 70. — Ellington, E. B., Higher speed of three-cylinder hydraulic 
engine, 77 ; no mateiiul loss of power in use of flexible shaft, 77 ; general 
eiBciency of machine, 77. — Carbutt, E. H., Substitution of machinery for 
manual work, 78. — Tweddell, E. H., Employment of portable hydraulic 
drills at Elswick, 78; use of three-cylinder hydraulic motor, 79; other 
applications of hydraulic power for drilling, 70 ; experience at Toulon and 
at Brest, 79 ; working of machine-tools by three-cylinder hydraulic motor, 
80 ; eiSciency of rotary hydraulic machine-tools, SO ; wider scope for 
application of portable hydraulic drills, SO. — Berrier-Fontaine, M., Loss of 
power by use of flexible shafts, 81 ; flexible shafts driving direct, 81 ; 
flexible shafts driving through bevil gearing, 82 ; number in use at 
Toulon, 82 : hydraulic motor driving flexible shaft direct, 82 ; speed and 
feed of drills, !-3 ; duty of hydraulic motors, 83; economy from hydraulic 
appliances collectively, 84 ; further extension for applications of hydraulic 
power, 84 ; advantage of Brotherhood three-cylinder hydraulic motor, 85. 
Portable Pnevmatic Touls, Taper by E. C. Amos, 1900, 119. — Portable tools 
driven by compressed air, 119. — Hammers of two types: (1) with piston 

8 2 



276 P 

Portable PxErMATic Tools, Paper, 1900 (continued) : — 

forming the valve, speeds up to 20,000 strokes per minute; (2) witli 
reciprocating valve at right angles to, or parallel with, striking piston, 
speeds up to 2,000 strokes per minute ; for riveting, caulking, and 
chipping, 120. — "Ross" hammer, 121. — "Q and C" hammer, 122. — 
"Little Giant" hammer, 123.— "Boyer" hammer, 126. — Table showing 
sizes, weights, and approximate air-consumption, 129. — Vibration, 130. — 
Hand-riveters, 130. — "Boyer" long-stroke hammer, 131. — Yoke riveter; 
holder-up ; plate-closing device, 132. — " Little Giant " yoke riveter, 134. 
■ — Ck)mpari8on of cost of machine- and hand-riveting in shipyards, 136. — 
Portable drills: "Little Giant," 137: " Whitelaw," 13S ; "Boyer," 139.— 
Table giving particulars of drills, 1:19. — Low air consumption, 141. — 
I*neumatic hoists, 142 ; jacks, shears, mining drills, 144. — Results of 
work done by pneumatic tools in this coimtry, 147. 

Discussion. — Wicksteed, J. H., A'alue of Paper, 150. — Amos, E. C, 
Three-cylinder high-speed portable i)iieumatic drill, loO; revolutions of 
unloaded machines, 151. — Worthiugton, Iv, Gray's portable riveter 
and Dunlop's pneumatic riveter, l.")l. — (Jray, J. M., "Inside blow "of 
pneumatic hammer, 151 ; one ton of coal equivalent to work of one man 
for ten years, 152. — Johnson, S. W., Pneumatic tools in locomotive 
construction, 152. — Riches, T. H., Work of early riveter; vibration of 
tool, 1.").!; consumption of air in drills, 154. — Wicksteed, J. H., Riveting 
with staking hammer and dolly, 155. — Simpson, C. L., " Tabor " moulding 
machine, 155 ; "Boyer" piston-drill: air-hoists, 156. — Wicksteed, J. H., 
Use of pneumatic power at Doncaster, 156. — Ivatt, H. A., Pressure of 
air; cold air for compressor; "Bradford" drill, 157; pneumatic white- 
washing plant; cleaning cushions, 158. — Harris. H. G., Cooling of air, 
158. — Ivatt, H. A., Water-jacket, 158. — Harris, H. G., Removal of dust from 
carriage cushions, 159. — Fielding, J., I'lieumatic and hydraulic riveting; 
spring tool socket in caulking machine. 159. — Amos, E. C, Pressure of 
air, 160. — Martell, B., Rapid and sound work produced by air tools, 100; 
pneumatic riveting at Cramp's shijiyard, 101. — Marriner, W. W., 
Vibralion of air tools ; quality of hose : pneumatic drills for expanding 
boiler-tubes, 162; pneumatic hoists; pneumatic and electrically-driven 
tools, 163. — Schonheyder, W., Cost of riveting by compressed air, 164. — 
Duntley, J. W., Success of air-tools in America, 161; various uses for 
air tools, 165 ; biter for removing heads of bolts ; painting cars by air 
pressure, 100. — Churchward, G. J., Stay-bolt biter, 107. — Duntley, J. W.. 
Heads of bolts bitten off square, 167. — Churchward, G. J., Life of air 
tools; vibration, 167; flexible air-pipes; long-stroke hammer, 168; 
air pressure at Swindon works, 169. — Hanssen, A., Wear of tools by grit and 
dust. 109 ; low efficiency of pneumatic t:ansmission, 170. — Wicksteed. J. H.. 



277 



PonxABLE PxErMATic TooLS, Di<cusfion, 1900 (contituiod) : — 

Length of discussion, 171.— Amos, E. C. Air riveter in Chicngo shipyard, 
171; air pressure. 172. — Atkinson, J., Pneumatic liammers, 172. — Beyer, 
Peacock, and Co.. " Dunlop " valveless pneumatic hammer, 173. — Dunlop, 
J., Differential-piston valveless hammer, 171. — O'Donnell, J. P., " Little 
Giant" tools, 174. — Rcavell, W., Pneumatic hoists, 174; vibration; 
liability of injury to workman, 175; compressed air for cleaning shop- 
motors, 176. — Kiches, T. H., Working results of drilling machines, 170. — 
« "Monarch" pneumatic chipping and caulking hammer; "Bradford" 
power drill and reamer, 177. — Amos, E. C, Speed of hammer, 178 ; 
tabulated tests of ''Little Giant"' tools, 179. 

Portable-Railway Works, Dccauville, Petit-Bourg, 1889, 548, 573. 

Poster, S. W., elected Associate Member, 1897, 433. 

Portrait of Dr. John Percy, 1890, 328. 

Portsmouth Dockyard, 1892, 3iJ5, 370. See Shipbuilding in Portsmouth 
Dockyard. 232 ; Naval Electrical Apparatus. 256 ; Dockyard Lifting 
and Hauling, 295. 

Portsmouth SEWAr.E Outfall Works, 1892, 319, 367. See Sewage Outfall 
AVorks. 

Portsmouth Sumjier Meeting, 1892, 227. — Reception, 227. — Business, 228. — 
Votes of Thanks, 231. — Excursions, &c., 365. 

Positive Water Meters, 1900, 40. See Water Meters. 

Pott, G. T., elected Associate Member, 1900, 502. 

Potter, W. H., elected Member, 1890, 2. 

Potter and Sons, W. H., Shipbuilding Works, Liverpool, 1891, 450. 

Pottery Works, Doultou and Co., Lambeth, 1886, 410, 414-6:— 1900, 473. 

Powell, B. X., elected Associate Member, 1895, 150. 

Powell, D. T., elected Associate Member, 1900, 3. 

Powell, E. B., elected Associate Member, 1899, 293. 

Powiell, F., elected Graduate, 1890, 472. 

Powell (afterwards Power, H. C, Gas Engines. 1889, 510. 

Powell. J. R., elected Member, 1890, 298. 

Powell, T., Eeirigerating Machinery, 1886, 253. 

Powell, W. F., elected Graduate. 1899, 294. 

Power, A. C, elected Graduate, 1892, 414. 

Power and Sox, John. John's Lane Distillery, Dublin, 1888, 378, 398. 

Power Absorbed by Shafting and Belting, 1898, 553. See Electric Plant. 

Power and Lighting, Electric, on Midland Railway, 1898, 553. See Electric 
Plant. 

Power Hammers, 1900, 99. See Longworth Power-Hammer. 

PoM'EK, Hydraulic, Pneumatic, and Steam, in Portsmouth Dockyard, 1892, 
295. See Dockyard Lifting and Hauling. 



278 P 

Power Supply in Towns, Hydraulic, 1895, 353. See Hydraulic Power Supply. 
PowEB TRAXsMiriSiox, 1894, 177 :— see Address of Piesideut, Alexander B. W. 

Kennedy. — 1895, 599 : see Ropes and Belts. 
PowLES, H. H. P., elected :Member, 1891, 301. 
PowBiE, W., elected ^Member, 1898, 142. 
Aluminium. 1898, 3G2. 

Typographic Printing IVIacliinery, Paper on ^lacliincry for Book and 
General Printing, 1899, 103.— Remarks thereon, 121, 124. 
PowPviE, W. L., elected Associate Member, 1899, 474. 
Pkaxce, C. R., elected Associate Member, 1898, 342. 
Pratt, G. J.. Honorary Secretary of Derby meeting. 1898. Presentation from 

the Institution, 1898, .")50 : 1899, 12. 
Pratt, M., elected Member, 1882, 2. 
Pratten, 'VV. J., elected Member, 18£5, 403. 
Precipitation AVokks, Sewage, 1892, o.-)4, 360 : — gee Sewage and Refuse Works. 

— 1894, 3S8 : see Manclu>tcr Drainage Works. 
Preece, Sir W. II., K.C.B., elected Member, 1890, 208. — Companionship of the 
Bath, 1894, 22 ; 1825, 3.— Cieatel Knight Commander of the Bath, 
1900, 5. 
Preex, a. H., elected Graduate, 1898, 342. 
Presentations from the Institution Ac. : — 

Bacbe, A , from Belgian Engineers, 1887, 47j-G. 

Barr, A., 1896, M. 

Carter, E. M., 1898, 11. 

Chapman, II., fmrn Belgian Engineers, 1S87, 17.")-G : — from the 

Institution. 1890, 9. 
Dax, A. do, 1890, 0. 
Deeley, R. M.. 1898, .5.50 : 1899, 12. 
Forrest, J., 1897, 2S1, 431. 
Hopkinson, C, 1895, 9. 
:Malcolm, B . 1897, 10. 
Marshall, W. B., 1898, 11. 
]Meyer, R., 1897, 10. 
Pratt, G. J., 1898, 550 : 1899, 12. 
Radford, R. H., 1890, 471 : 1891, 8. 
Ripper, W., 1890, 471 : 1891. 8. 
Vaslin, H.. 1889, 5S4 : 1890, 9. 
West, H. H., 1891, 479 : 1892, 9. 
Wilson, A. B., 1897, 10, 
President's Address. See Address of President. 

President's Reception at Garden Party at Summer meeting. Derby, 1898, 
461. 



P 279 

Preston, F., decease, 1892, 4 :— Memoir, 99. 

Pbice, C. E., elected ilember, 1897, 432. 

Price, C. G., elected Associate Member, 1897, 257. 

Price, H. S., Eopes and Belts, 1895, G47. 

Price, James, elected 3Iember, 1896, 102. 

Price, John (Jai-row), Institution business, 1885, 25. 

Price, John (Workington), elected ^lember, 1890, 2. 

Price, J. B., elected Member, 1889, 204. 

PpiCE, E., elected Associate ^Member, 1900, 502. 

Price, W. F., elected Graduate, 1893, SJS : — elected Associate Member, 1899, 

146. 
Price- Williams, J. M., elected Graduate, 1887, 474 : — transferred to Associate 

Member, 1896, 4. 
Price-Williams, E., appointed 3Iember of Council, 1887, 158. 

Canadian Locomotives, 1887, 241. 

Council Annual Eeport, 1895, 24. 

Electro-Magnetic Machine-Tools, 1887, 338. 

Express Locomotives, 1898, G31. 

Eefrigerating Machinerj-, 1886, 250. 

Steam Navvy, 1885, 365. 

Steel Bails, 1890, 352-9. 

Tay Viaduct, 1887, 382. 
Price- Williams, S. W., elected Graduate, 1886, 466 : — transferred to Member,. 

1890, 3. 
Primary Batteries, 1889, 548, 571. 

Priming, 1894, 46, 71, 89, 113, 115, 124, 134. See Marine-Engine Trials. 
Printing Machinery, 1899, 103. See Typographic Printing Machinery. 
Printing, Multi-Colour, 1900, 486. 
Printing Works : — 

Belfast, 1888, 422, 426 :— 1896, 436, 453, 455. 

Derby, 1893, 480. 

Edinburgh, 1887, 440. 

Manchester, 1894, 402. 

Nottingham, 1898, 518. 
Prior, J. D., elected Associate, 1897, 434. 
Pritchard, H., elected Associate Member, 1896, 102 : — transferred to Member, 

1899, 475. 
Pritchard, E. C, elected Graduate, 1899, 475. 
Private Electric Lighting, Paper on Private Installations of Electric 

Lighting, by E. H. C. Nevile, 1885, 370. — Engine and dynamo, and 

lamps, 376.— Circuits of current, 377. — EegLstration of current by 

spring am-meter, 377. — Cables and wiring, 377. — Lamps, 878. — DefectlT© 



280 



Private Electric Lighting. Paper, 1885 (coutiQued) : — 

working of ball governor, 378. — Electric governor, 379. — Compensating 
weight or cylinder, 380. — Dift'erential compensating lever, 381. — Loss of 
electromotive force in main leads, 382. — Objections to compound dynamo, 
382. — Constant electromotive force between lighting centres, 382. — 
Application to large installation for a town, 383. — Advantage of electrical 
regulation, 383. — Experiments with governor having compensating 
arrangement, 384. — Combined electrical and centrifugal governor, 384. — 
Variation in resultant force on valve-spindle, 385. — Regulation of 
electromotive force from a distance, 386. — Effect of governor on duration 
of lamps, 387. — Electrical governor for arc-lighting, 388. — Professor 
Thompson's experiments with electrical governor, 388. — Arrangement 
for stopping engine on severance of main lead, 389. 

Discussion. — Head, J., Joint discussion upon Semi-Portable Engine 
and Private Electric Lighting, 389. — Richardson, J., Former Paper on 
portable engine, 389 ; expedition of putting together semi-portable 
engine with tank foundation, 390 ; small variations of current with 
electrical governor, 390. — NeviJe, II. H. C, Driving of electrical 
apparatus from a distance, 390; working of combined centrifugal and 
electrical governor, in conjunction and independently, 391; adjustment 
of cylinders in compensating arrangement, :i9l,^Crompton, K. E. B., 
Importance of electrical governing from a distance, 392 ; objection to 
direct action of solenoids on throttle-valve, 392 ; pull of solenoids, 393 ; 
complication of compensating device, 393 ; governing by use of electricity 
for actuating intermediate mechanism, 394 ; Willans governor, 394. — 
Timmis, I. A., Current for working solenoids, 394 ; am-meter, 395 ; 
Faure-Sellon-Yolkmar accumulators, 395. — Walker, S. F., Effect of 
constancy of electromotive force on life of lamps, 395 ; compensating 
arrangement detracts from utility of electrical governor, 39(3 ; more 
powerful governor with larger solenoid, 396 ; AVillans governor, 396 ; 
advantage of electrical over mechanical governor, 397 ; use of larger 
wires, 397; capabilities of comjwund dynamo, 397; use of accumulators, 
397. — Halpin, D., Initial pressures shown in indicator diagrams, 398 ; 
electricity should not be employed to do heavy work in governing, 398 ; 
8tea43y driving of compound engine at Temesvar, 399. — Fcarfield, J. P., 
Uniformity of speed in engines driving lace machinery, 399 ; Crompton's 
compound dynamo with constant electromotive force, 400 ; mode of 
governing the dynamo, 400. — Douglass, Sir J. N., Importance of arc- 
■ lighting for factories, &c., 400 ; economy in using arc lights, 401 ; 
improvements in carbons, 401 ; regulation of lamps, 401. — Marten, E. B., 
How much electrical power is absorbed in working the governor, 402. — 
Greig, D., Position of cylinder in semi-portable engine, 402. — 



P 281 

PiJiVATE Electric Lighting, IH^cus^ion, 1885 (continued) : — 

Willans, P. W., Slipping of diiving belt, 402 ; variation in pull of solenoid, 
40o. — Nevile, R. H. C, Relative variation in pull at solenoid and at valve, 
403. — Willans, P. W., Fiiction in stuffing-box of valve-spindle, 403 ; relay 
governors, 403; action of compensating cylinders, 404. — Douglass, Sir 
J. N., Governing by a falling weight, 404. — "Willans, P. W., Principle of 
relay governor, 40t. — Sterne, L., Gas engines giving steady electric 
light, 40i. — Richardson, J., Position of cylinder in semi- portable engine, 
405 ; explanation of initial pressures shown in indicator diagrams, 40o ; 
friction in stuffing-box of valve-spindle, 40G ; compensating arrangement 
not needed for arc lighting, 406 ; threefold compensation required for 
incandescent lighting, 406. — Nevile, R. H. C, Variation in pull of 
solenoid, 407 ; friction in stuffing-box of valve-spindle, 407 ; AVillans 
relay governor, 407 ; electromotive force required for governor, 408 ; use 
of accumulators, 408 ; difiference between Willans governor and 
compensating arrangement, 408; arc-lightiug impracticable for small 
rooms, 409 ; increased cost of heavier wires, 409 ; mechanical governor 
could be made to give a rising speed to a rising load, 409; imperfections 
of compound dynamos, 409; slipping of driving belt, 410; reason of 
compensation being re(iuired in working of governor, 410; unsatisfactory 
working of gas engines for electric lighting, 410. — Venables, Rev. 
Precentor, Electric lighting of Lincoln Cathedral, 411. — Head, J., 
Electric lighting of Lincoln Cathedral, 412. — Semi-portable winding 
engine with wrought-iron foundation shown under steam, together with 
combined centrifugal and electrical governor, 443. 

Prockter, F. M., elected Associate Member, 1899, 4. 

Pkockter, G. H., R.N.R., elected Associate Member, 1900, 502. 

Proctor, C. F., elected Member, 1895, li9. 

Producer-Gas for Fuel, 1890, 402. See Gas for Fuel. 

Projectiles for Guns, 1887, 166, 182. See Address of President, Edward H. 
Carbutt. 

Projectors for Search Lights, 1892, 258. See Naval Electrical Apparatus. 

Proof House for Guns, Birmingham, 1897, 400. See also Proving House. 

Propeller Surface, 1892, 514. See Screw-Propeller Surface. 

Propeller Ventilating Fans, Paper on Experiments upon Propeller Ventilating 
Fans, and upon the Electric Motor driving them, by W. G. Walker, 1897, 
439. — ^Former experiments, and object of present trials, 439. — Nature 
of propeller ventilating fans, 440. — Experimental apparatus, 440. — ■ 
Measurement of air discharge, 442. — Measurement of brake horse-power, 
444. — Speed cliaracteristics of electric motor, 445. — Mutual relations of 
revolutions, brake horse-power, and air discharge, 446. — Calculation of 
horse-power in air discharged, and of mechanical, volumetric, and 



282 P 

PuoPELLER Yestilating Fans, Taper, 1897 (oontinned) : — 

pressure efficiencies, 447. — EsperimeDtB with fau blades at different 
angles, 448. — Effect of cross section of fan blades, 450. — Fans feeding 
from tips of blades, 452. — Velocity of air on entering and on leaving 
fans, 4.'i2. — Fan combined with electric motor. 454. — Experiments with 
contracted outlet and inlet, 454. — Forced and induced draught, 456. — 
Negative slip, effect of thickness of blades, 457. — Tabulated results of 
experiments on seventeen fans, with blades set at different angles to 
plane of revolution, 458-62. — Fans ^^ith different numbers of blades, 
463. — Experiments with helical blades, 46 i. — Negative slip, 465. — 
Kelatiou of revolutions and air discharge, 466. — Calculation of horse- 
power and size of fan, 466. — Effect of area of fan and velocity of air, 
468. — Tunnel ventilation. 468. — Propeller fans and centrifugal fans, 469. 
Discufsion. — Walker, W. G., Exhibited experimental apparatus in 
operation, illuttrating eftVct of adding rounded backs upon blades, and 
of surrounding fan by cylindrical casing, 470; contracted outlet, and 
addition of central disc to fan ; rotary motion of air discharged ; 
cylindrical column of air discharged, 471. — Wingfield, C. H., Mechanical 
efficiency of fans ; measurement of air velocity, 472 ; air discharge at high 
speed of revolution ; formula fur volumetric efficiency, 473 ; effective 
pitch of tlat ur curved blades, not helical ; acceleration of air entering 
fan, 475 ; fan better for exhausting than for proix;lliiig ; negative slip, 
476. — Walker, W. G., Repetition of experimental illustrations, 477. — 
Smith, M. Ilolroyd, Fan's principal work is inducing current, not 
propelling it ; greatest effect produced by buck of fan ; experimental 
illustrations, 478. — Phelps, Colonel P., Ventilation of barracks in India, 
480 ; of iK)wder magazines, and of steamers in tropics, 481. — Dobson, 
Sir B. A., Centrifugal blowing fans, 481.— Brarawell, Sir F., Bart., 
Griffiths screw-propeller with jntch increaeing from leading to trailing 
edge of blades, 482; negative slip with fine pitch, 483. — Furuess, E., 
Discharge of air through conical nozzle, 483. — Donkin, B., Piotary 
motion of air discharged from fan, 483; testing of anemometers; skin 
friction upon fan blades ; best number of blades, 484. — Gibbs, J. W., 
Number of blades ; electric motor ; fans open round circumference ; 
induced and propelled currents ; ship ventilation ; testing of anemnmeters, 
485. — Wingfield, C. H., CouipariBon of flat and helical blades; value of 
rounded backs cf blades, 486. — Mudd, T., Induced and forced draught, 
437 ; negative slip, and rounded backs of propeller blades, 488. — Joy, D., 
Induced draught by exhaust in locomotives, 489. — Walker, W. G., Bird's 
•wing section for propeller fan blades; drying of powder magazines; 
sea-weed on portions of screw-propeller blades ; air discharge through 
conical nozzle ; baffling of discharge outlet, 490 ; testing of anemometers; 



P 283 

Pkopeller Vextilatixg Faxs. riicu'shn, 1897 (continued) : — 

number of fan blades ; experiments on ccntiifugal fcins, 491 : air 
discbarge and speed of revolution ; formula for volumetric efficiency ; 
negative slip, 492 ; helical and flat blades; forced and induced draught, 
493.— Richards, E. W., Vote of thanks, 493.— Haldane, Dr. J. S., 
Ventilation of metropolitan tunnels, 49;{ ; fans working against low 
resistances; funnel-shaped inlet and outlet for fan, 491. — Froude, E. E., 
Bounding backs of blades conduces to apparent negative slip by 
increasing etiective pitch, 49j. — Maxim, H. S., Slip and thrust of 
blades in flying-machine experiments, 495. — Joy, B. H., Air current 
obtained by water jet, 497. — Walker, W. G., Air discharge through 
funnel-shaped outlet, 497 ; relation between thrust, revolutions, and 
diameter of propeller ; air current produced by water jet, 498. 

Pkopellers, Large-Bladed Partially Submerged, for Canal Boats, 1894, y60. 
See Canal-Boat Propellers. 

Propellers, Screw, Partially Immersed, 1897, KH. See Partially Immersed 
I'ropellers. 

Pkopclsion on Canals, ^Mechanical, 1897, 149. See Canal-Boat Propulsion. 

"Proserpine," H.:\r.S., Machinery, 1899, 877. See Machinery of H.M.S. 
"Psyche." 

Prosser, R. W. 0., elected Graduate, 1899, 14G. 

Prosser, W. H., decease, 1895, 4.— Memoir, 1894, 598. 

Proving Hocse, Lloyd's, Netherton, for Chain Cables, Chains, and Anchors, 

1897, 390. See also Proof House. 
Pryce, H. J., elected Member, 1894, 47(». 

" Psyche," H.M.S., Machinery. 1899, 377. See Machinery of H.:\I.S. '• Psyche." 

PcDAN, O., elected Member, 1885, I6t. 

PuGH, C. H., elected Member, 1890, '298. 

PuGU, C. v., elected Associate Member, 1895, 548 : — transferred to Member, 

1898, 548. 

PcGH, J. v., elected Associate Member, 1899, 4. 

Pcllar, A. E., elected Associate ^Member. 1895, 2 : — transferred to Member, 

1900, 357. 
Plllar, F. p., elected Graduate, 1897, 43i. 
Pullen, W. W. F., elected Graduate, 1887, 474 :— transferred to Member. 1892, 

3. — Premium awarded for design for Certificate of Membership, 

1892, 5. 
Mean-Pressure Indicator, 1899, 601. 
Quick-Revolution Engines, 1897, 361. 
Pullman, near Chicago, Drainage, 1889, 221. See Address of President. 

Charles Cochrane. 
PuLMAN, T. C, elected Member, 1893, 516. 



284 P 

PcLSOMETEn, 189?, 435, 45G-G0. See Stei.m Pumps. 

Pumping Engines at Water Works. See Waterworks I'umping Engines. 

Pumping of Brine, 1893, 288. See Middlesbrough Salt Industry. 

Pumps, Ccntiifugul, 138?, 38. See Iirigating Machinery. 

Pumps, Steam, on Eussiau South Western Kailways, 1893, 433. See Steam 

Pumps. 
Punching and Drilling, 1886, 44; see Tests of Iron and Steel.— 18C5, 'iT.'), 285, 

289, 2:K) ; see Kivettd Joints. See also Drilling. 
Purification and Softenino of Water, 1898, 401. See Water Softening. 
PuKTES, W. T., elected Associate Member, 1900, 3. 
Putnam, W., decease, 1898, G.— 3Iemoir, 1897, 138. 
Ptne, Sir T. S., C.S.I., elected Member, 1887, 2.— Knighthood and 

Companionship of the Star of India, 1894, 22; 1895, 3. 
Pyrometer : — 

Electrical Platinum, 1896, l.'o, 164, 197, 221. See Steam Superheating. 
Thermo-Electric, with autographic recorder, 1891, 54G; 1893, 132, 238; 

1897, G2 ; 1899, 3G. See Alloys Piescarcli. 



Q 



*• Q AND C " Hammer, 1900, 122. See Portable Pneumatic Tools. 

Quartz Mill, Queensland, for crushing gold quartz, 1886, 411, 427-8. 

Queen's College, Belfast, 1896, 282, 410-3. 

QuENTRALL, T., elected Member, 1892, 102. 

Quick-Revolution Engines, Paper on High-Speed Self-Lubricating Steam- 
Engines, by A. Morcom, 1897, 31G. — Early high-speed single-cylinder 
engine for steam cutters and pinnaces, 31G. — Recent engines for torpedo 
boats and destroyers; triple-expansion, four cranks, two low-pressure 
cylinders, 317; full-power trials, 318; water-tube boilers, 319. — Total 
weight of machinery per I.H.P. in various classes of vessels, 319. — Forced 
lubrication, supply of oil under pressure to every bearing, 319. — Standard 
make of high-speed engines ; single-crank with single or tandem 
compound cylinders ; compound with two opposite cranks ; oscillating 
oil pump, 321 ; two-crank trii)le-expansion engines, 322. — Vibration, 
three kinds, 322 ; means of prevention ; buildings respond to quicker 
vibrations, ships to slower, 323. — Advantages of forced lubrication, 323; 
proportion of journal friction to whole engine friction, 324 ; effect of forced 
lubrication upon efficiency of engine, 32.5 ; trials of quick-revolution self- 
lubricating engines at Sunderland and Cheltenham, 325-7. — Governing 
by throttle valve or by expansion valve, 327; fly-wheel effects, 329; 
superiority of throttle-valve governing for electric lighting and power 



Q 285 

QncK-KEVOLUTiON' ExGiKES, Paper, 1897 (continued) :— 

supply, 330; reduction of water consumption. 330; results of comparative 
trials of self-lubricating engine when governing by expanding and by 
throttling, 331. 

Discussion.— J!>loTcom. A., Small advantage of expansion governing over 
throttling in self-lubricating engines, 332.— Thornycroft, J. I., Effect of 
high-pressure lubrication in rapid rotating engines ; storage space for oil 
to settle ; oil filters, 333 ; factor of safety, 334.— rnwiu, W. C, Journal 
friction, 334. — Donkin, B., Piston speed; trials of engines with and 
without forced lubrication, 334.— Brown, V>'., Running of two-cylinder 
compound engine, 335.— Wicksteed, J. H.. Expansion-valve and throttle- 
valve governing, 335.— Walker, A T., Lubrication; piston speeds, 335. — 
Croraplon, E. E., Continuous running of high-speed engines, 336; 
advantages of quick-revolution engines, 337. — Carbutt, Sir E. H., Bart., 
Vibration from engines running synchronously, 337. — Kennedy, A. B. W., 
High brake efficiency of self-lubricating engines, 338 ; combined efficiency 
of engine and dynamo, 339 ; vibration due to imperfect foundation, 339 ; 
continuous working of self-lubricating engines, 339. — Saxon, A., 
Comparison with Lancashire mill-engines : reduction of clearance, 340. — 
Goodman, J., Friction experiments and bath lubrication, 341 ; white- 
metal bearings ; constant power to drive engine itself at all loads ; working 
pressures on bearings, and quantity of oil used, 342; friction-testing 
machine, 343.— Morcom, A., Return connecting-rod, 343. — Sisson, W.. 
Forced lubrication and bath lubrication, 343; unequal pressure on 
beariuo-, 344 ; governing, 345. — Piyan, J., Vibrations, 346 ; prevention cf 
synchronism, 347. — Ripper, W., Indicated horse-power, 347; mean- 
eflfcctive -pressure gauge for indicating high-speed engines, 348.— Smith, 
M. H., Prevention of vibration in engines, 349. — Robinson, L. S., Forced 
lubrication in marine engines, 352. — Addenbrooke, G. L., High-speed 
engines, and Perry indicator, 353.— Clarke, E. F., Pressure of oil in forced 
lubrication, 354. — ^Morcom, A., Constant pressure in oil ; size of quick- 
revolution engines, 354; forced lubrication in large engines; vibration, 
:^55; o-oveming, 356 ; governor tests with non-condensing and condensing 
engine, 357 ; high-speed and slow-speed engines, and mode of governing, 
358 ; oil pressure ; metal for bearings ; quantity of oil used ; clearance. 
359 ; superiority of throttle-valve governing, 360 ; settlement of dirt in 
oil; factor of safety, 361.— Richards, E. W., Vote of thanks, £61.— PuUen. 
W. W. r., Leakage of piston-valves, 361; gland packing; efficiency of 
engine and of dynamo ; viscosity of oil film in forced lubrication, 362 ; 
vibration, 363.— Morcom, A., Piston-valves ; packing for piston-rods and 
glands, 363 ; viscosity of oil, 364. 
QriLTER, F. R., elected Associate Member, 1899, 4. 



286 Q 

QriN, E. C, elected Member, 1899. 144. 

Quirk, E. P. S., elected Member, 1893. 97.— Decease, 1898, C— Memoir. 1897, ir.9. 

QuiKK, W. M. H., elected Member, 1900, 90. 



R 

E.\DCLTFFE, L., Longwortli rower-Hammer, 1900, 112. 114. 

Kadfokd, R. H., Honorary Secretary of Sheftield meeting 1890. Presentation 

from the Institution. 1880, 471 ; 1891, 8. 
Radley, B. v., elected Associate Member, 1899, 4. 
FiAiLS, Steel Kails, considered Chemically and Mechanically, 1890, 301. See 

Steel Kails. 
Kails and Tihls of Iron and Steel, 1885, ?>\\. See Address of President, 

Jeremiah Head. 
I.'ailway, Atmospheric, South Devon, 1899, 299. See Atmospheric Kailway. 
Kailwat I3cffer-Stop, Hydraulic, 1886, 10."). See Hydraulic Buflfer-Stop. 
Kailway ( arkiage and "SVacox Works : I-ondon and South Western Kailwaj', 

Eastlcigh, 1892, oU9, :!90. — See also Locomotive. Carriage, and Wagon 

Works. 
Kailway-Carkiage Fittings Works, Shttficld, 1890, 442, 4.5."). 
Kailavay Development. 1690, It^l. See Address of I'resident, Joseph 

Tomliuson. 
Railway. Overhead. Liverpool. 1891, 428. 
Kailtvay Kails, 1880, 19G-7, ;i01 . .Sec Address of President, Joseph Tomlinson ; 

and Steel Rails. 
Railway Sertants' Orphanage, Derby, 1898, 503. 

Eailavay A'iaducts in Cornwall, Old and New, Paper by T. H. Gibbons. 1899, 
35.5. — Great Western Railway old viaducts in Cornwall. 355. — Xew 
viaducts. 357. — Quarry for supplying stone for bridges, 358. 

Difcu^Kion. — White, Sir W. H., Tlianks to author; Royal Albert 
Bridge, Saltash, 364.— Gibbons, T. H., Visit to viaducts, 3G4. 
Railway Wagons. Capacity, 1900, 557. See Capricity of Railway Wagons. 
Railway Wagons, Tube-Frame, 1880, 475. See Tube-Frame Railway Wagons. 
Railway Works. See Locomotive Works; Locomotive, Carriage, and Wagon 

Works ; Portable-Railway Works ; and Railway Carriage and Wagon 

Works. 
Railways. Electric. 1888, 89, .378, 383, 41G:— 1896, 421 :— ICCO, 438. See 

Electric Engineering; and Electric Kailway; and Polyphase Electric 

Traction. 
Railways in China, 1899, 529, 548. See Openings for Mcclianical Engineers in 

China. 



R 237 

Kailt\-ays in 'Woiks, narrow-gauge : — 

Beyer, Peacock, and Co., Gorton, 1894, 428 :— 1898, 303. 

Crewe Steel and Locomotive "Works, 1883, 340. 

Decauville Works, Petit-Bourg, 1889, o73-6 :— 1898, 394. 

Guinness's Brewery, Dublin, 1888, 327. 

Horwich Locomotive Works, 1888, 345-6:— 1891, 4.")G-7 :— 1894, 45S. 

Willans and Kobinson, Victoria Works, Rugby, 1693, 391-2 :— 1900, 490. 

Woolwich Arsenal, 1898, 3S6-9, 393, 402. 

Railways, Irish. 1888, 2S0-2 :— 1896, 413-7. 

Railways, Xarrow-Gauge, of two feet gauge and under. 1898, 376. ySee Narrow- 
Gauge Railways ; and Portable Railway Works ; and Railways in 
Works. 

Railways, Working Expenses, 1890, 47.5. See Tube-Frame Railway Wagons. 

Rainforth, W.. Jcx., tdected Member, 1885, 463. 

Rainforth, W. F., elected Graduate, 1897, 257. 

Raixfokth and Sons, Iron and Wire Works, Lincoln, 1885, 445. 

Rain Water, Deterioration of Wrought-Iron, 1889, 229:— 1898, 440, 451. 

Raising a AVeeck, Paper on the Raising of the Wrecked Steamship " Peer of 
the Realm." by T. W. Wailcs, 1886, 189.— Position and details of wreck, 
189. — Treatment of after part of vessel, and of space amidships, 189. — 
Platforming of fore part over coal cargo in hull, 190. — Preparations, and 
tides, 190. — Construction and fixing of platform in fore part, 191. — Use 
of cement for making water-tight joints, 191. — Pumping arrangement, 
192 — Process of raising and towing, 192. — Condition of wreck, and 
subsequent repairs, 193. 

iJiscug^ion. — Wailes, T. W., Details of difficulties encountered, 194 ; 
minimum freeboard, 194; salvage tugboat with pumping gear, 195. — 
Halpin, D., Excellence of arrangements, 196 ; precarious nature of salvage 
operations, 196. — Tomlinson, J., Cost of operation, 197. — Gorman, W. A., 
Employment of diver, 197; use of cement, 197. — Caulfield, W. B., 
Platforming always difficult and often impossible, 197 ; caulking without 
cement, 198 ; size of pumps, 198. — Wailes, T. W., Prevention of leakage by 
cement, 198 ; objection to employment of diver, 199 ; size of pumps, 199 ; 
cost of operation, 199. — Head, J., Importance of wreck-raising operations, 
200. 

Raleigh, C, elected Associate Member, 1894, 294. 

Raleigh Cy'Cle Works, Nottingham, 1898, .521. 

Rams, Hydraulic, 1888, 57, C8, 75. See Irrigating Machinery. 

Ramsay, W., elected Member, 1892, 414. 

Eamsbottom, J., Honorary degree of " blaster in Engineering" from University 
of Dublin, 1888, 270.— Decease, 1£93, 6.— Memoir, 1897, 23 J. 
Vote of Thanks to Retirinr President, 1885, 22. 



288 R 

Kamsbottom, J. G., elected Associate Member, 1894, 470 :— transferred to 
Member, 1896, 3. 

Kasisden. Sir J., elected Member of Cimncil, 1887, 25.— Appointed Vice- 
President, 1889, 203.— Elected Vice-rresident, 1890, 2G ; 1893, 28. 
Steel Eails, 1890, 329. 
Tube-Frame Railway Wagons, 1890, 507. 

Raxge-Findeks. Paper on Telemeters and Ranpre-Finders for naval and other 
purposes, by Professors Barr and Stroud. 1896, 33. — Telemeters and range- 
finders in general, 33. — Principle of telemeters, 33 ; short-base single- 
observer range-finder, 34. — Alignment, 35. — Limits of accuracy attainable. 
3(3. — Methods of producing alignment, 39. — Optical details of naval range- 
finder, refracting prism, 40 ; scale, 41 ; reflectors, 43 ; eye-piece prism 
combination, 45 : astigmatiser, 4G. — Mechanical details, frame, 47; case, 
49 ; supports of frame-work, 50; gear, 51 ; adjustments, 53 ; electric lamp, 
stand, 55. — Uses for gunnery and navigation, 55. — Hand distance-finder, 
or portable single-observer range-finder, 57. 

Discusiion. — Barr, A., Method of using naval range-finder, 59; its 
accuracy and permanency, 60. — Mallock, A., Eye-piece prisms, 01. — 
Barr, A., Magnifying power, Gl. — Mallock, A., Defining power of 
telescope, 61 ; division of image, 62 ; Blallock range-finder, 63. — Boys, 
C. v., Double-prism eye-piece, 63 ; defining power of lens, 64 ; refracting 
prism of small angle, 65. — Greenhill, A. G., Time occupied in finding 
range, 66. — Ililger, A., Manufacture of prisms. 67 ; quality of glass, and 
magnifying power, 68. — Wicksteed. J. 11.. Length of Ecale, 69. — Head, 
A. P., Angle of field of view ; hand distance-finder, 69; box-sextant for 
land observer, 70. — Stroud, W., Length of scale ; range-finding for objects 
in motion ; eye-piece prism combination ; travelling prism for producing 
optical shift of image, 71 ; accuracy of instrument, 72 ; size of aperture of 
telescope field; Mallock telemeter; overlapping images, 73. — Barr, A., 
Use of range-finder in rough weather, 74 ; comparison of observed and 
verified distances, 75 ; physical limitations to rcsolving-power of 
telescopes, 76 ; experiments on alignment of separated and overlapping 
images, 77 ; graduation of scale, 78. — Richards, E. "\V., A'otc of thanks for 
Paper, 78. 

Ranger, R., elected Member, 1898, :AC. 

Rankix, T. T., elected Associate, 1891, 480. 

Ransom, H. B., elected Graduate, 1892, 102. 

Ransome, J. E., elected Member, 1886, 125. 

Raxsome, R. C, decease, 1887, 4.— Memoir, 1886, 122. 

Raxsome. R. J., decease. 1892, 4.— Memoir, 1891, 292. 

RAPiEn. R. C, decease, 1898, 6.— Memoir, 1897, 140. 

Eapley, F. H., elected Member, 1888, 2. 



R 289 

Eapson, J. T,, elected Associate Member, 1899, 148. 

Basey, a. E., elected Graduate, 1900, i. 

Eatcliffe, J. T., elected ISIember, 1889, 201. 

Eathboxe, E. p., Paper on Copper Mining in the Lake Superior district, 1887, 
86.— Eemarks thereon, IDS, 109, 121. 

Eathgar Watek Works, 1888, 523. See Eathmines Water Works. 

Eathmines Water Works, 1888, 378. — Paper on the Eathmines and Eathgar 
Townsliip Water Works, by A. W. N. Tyn-ell, 1888, 523.— Description of 
4 locality, 523. — Projects fur water supply, 524. — Gathering ground and 

quality of water, 524. — Flood channels and catchwater conduits, 525. — 
Eeservoirs, 526. — Embankments, 526. — Eduction tunnels and valve 
towers, 527. — Masonry, 528.— Floods, 528. — Township supply, 529. — 
Compensation water and preferential supply to mill-owners, 529. — Total 
supply of water available, 530. 

Biecussion. — Marten, E. B., Difficulties in gathering and conveying 
water, 530; holes below crest of weir in diverted channel, 531. — Mair, 
J. G., Water supply during drought in 1887, 531 ; passage of water 
through embankments, 532 ; excessive rainfall, 532. — Tyrrell, A. W. X., 
Diversion of unsuitable water from peat-covered area, 532 ; precautions for 
carrying off flood-water, 532 ; floods during construction of embankments, 
533 ; object of weir with culverts through it, 534 ; excessive rainfall, 534 ; 
Sir J. Hawkshaw's report on capacity of reservoirs for protracted drought, 
585; present population, and extent of water supply, 530. — Cochrane, C, 
Eainfall in Ireland, 536. 

Eating op Machinery, 1889, 587 : — 1890, 10, 33. See Taxation of Machinery 

Batliffe, G., Boiler Construction, 1891, 541. 

EArscH, C. W., Tube-Frame Eailway Wagons, 1890, 500. 

Eaven, H. B., elected Associate, 1886, 466. 

Eaven, Y. L., elected Member, 1893, 220. 

Eavexhill, J. E., decease, 1895, 4 : — Memoir, 145. 
Treasurer, 1886, 272. 

Eavenhill, W. a., elected Associate Member, 1898, 1 43. 

Eawlins, J., decease, 1899, 7.— Memoir, 1898, 317. 

EAWOF.TH, J. S., Electric Traction, 1898, 83. 
Steam Superheating, 1896, 175. 
Throttling and Variable Expansion, 1895, 179. 

Ratner, H. S.,elected Graduate, 1895, 150 : — elected Associate Member, 1896, 102. 

Eead, G. H., elected Graduate, 1895, 2 :— elected Associate Member, 1899, 293. 

Eeadhead, E., elected Member, 1887, 158. 

Eeadhead, E., Jun., elected Graduate, 1894, 294. 

Eeavell, W., Longworth Power-Hammer, 1900, 110. 
Portable Pneumatic TooLs, 1900, 174. 

T 



290 R 

Deception and Garden Fakty, President's, at Summer meeting. Derby, 1898, 461. 

Eecokding Pyrojieter, Tliermo-Elcctric, 1891, 54G ; 1893, 132,238; 1897,62; 
1899, 30. See Alloys Eesearcli. 

Eedding, "\V., elected Associate Member, 1899, 474. 

Eedfekn, C. G., elected Graduate, 1892, 229 : — transferred to Associate Member, 
1898, a. 

Eedit, D., elected Member, 1895, 149. 

Eeed, a. H., Gas Furnaces, 1891, 77. 

Eeed, E. C, elected Associate, 1892, 414. 

Eeed, J. W., elected Member, 1894, 294. 

Eeed, T. A., elected Member, 1891, 197. 

Eeeves, F., elected Jlember, 1890, 2. 

Kefkigerating ^Iachinery, Paper on Eefrigcrating and Ice-making Machinery 
and Appliances, by T. B. Lightfoot, 1886, 201. — ArrARATis for 
abstracting heat by the BAPID MELTING OP A SOLID, 202. — Use of 
calcium chloride by Sir William Siemens, 203. — Use of ammonium 
nitrate in Toselli machine, 203; and in American machine, 203. — 
Extended form of Sir William Siemens' apparatus, 204. — Machinery 

AND APPARATUS FOR ABSTRACTING HEAT BY THE EVAPORATION OF A MORE 

OR LESS VOLATILE LiQCiD, 205. — Vacuum process, 205 ; Carre's machine, 
200 ; Wlndhausen's, 206 ; production of clear ice, 20S ; details of working 
and cost, 2i)S; Harrison's apparatus, 209. — Compression process, 210; 
early machine by Hague and Perkins, 210; Harrison's ether apparatus, 
211; cans or moulds for ice, 212; cell system, 213; production of 
transparent ice, 213 ; expenditure of mechanical work in machine, 214 ; 
results of actual experiment, 214 ; employment of mcthylic ether by 
Tellier, 215; of eulphur dioxide by Pictet, 215; of anhydrous ammonia, 
216; difficulty from leakage in ammonia compression machines, 216; 
glycerine as a lubricant, 216 : selection of brine that will not congeal, 217 ; 
cost of working, 217 ; results of test, 218. — Absorption process, 218 ; Carre''8 
machine, 218 ; Eeece's, with improvements by Stanley, and by Pontifes 
and Wood, 219 ; mode of action, 220 ; comparison of absorption system and 
compression, 220; cost of ice production by absorption, 221. — Binary 
absorption system, 221 ; IMort and Nicolle'a ammonia apparatus, 222 
Dc Motay and Eossi's ethylo-sulphurous dioxide, 222 ; Pictet's liquid, 
223. — Machinery by which a gas is compressed, partially cooled 

WHILE TjNDER compression, AND FURTHER COOLED BY SUBSEQUENT 

EXPANSION, 223. — Physical laws relating to permanent gases, 223. — 
Adiabatic expansion and compression, 224. — Moisture contained 
in air, 225. — Special air-drying apparatus can be dispensed with, 
226. — Hall's cold-air machine, 227. — Haslam's dry-air refrigerator, 
227. — Author's horizontal dry-air refrigerator, 228 ; vertical machine, 



R 291 

Refrigeeatikg Machin-ery, Pajjer, 1886 (continued) : — 

229 ; power expended, 230. — Applications of refriireratinLr macLiues. 2ol. 
— Preservation of food by dry-air refrigerators, 232 : by evaporation of 
volatile liquid, 233. — Means adopted for freezing and preservation of 
meat, 233.— Capacity of machine, 234. — Storage of frozen meat, 234. — 
Dry-air machine combined with gas engine, 235. — Ventilation and 
cooling of ships' holds, 23.5. — Eefrigerating plant on board ship, 235. — 
Fish preservation, and cooling of chocolate, 236. — Freezing of running 
ground in Stockholm tunnel, 236 ; in sinking of wells and colliery shafts, 
23S.— Table of freezing mixtures, 239-40.— Table of evaporation of 
liquids, 241. 

Di.?cuS''ion. — Lightfoot, T. B., Model of cold-air machine, 242 : 
Haslam's dry-air refrigerator, 242. — Martindale, Col. B. H., Eefriircrating 
arrangements at London and St. Katliarine Docks, 242 ; capacity and 
construction of storage chambers, 243 ; snow in air-tmnks, 243 ; boilers^ 
244 ; results of experience at stores, 244 ; rise of temperature in air, 245 : 
coal consumption, and cold-air supply, 245 ; employment of chemicals, 246. 
— Colyer, F., Harrison's ether machine. 246 ; cooling water, and consumption 
and price of coal, 246 : relative advantages of ether machines and 
ammonia machines, 247 : results obtained, 248 ; leakage in ammonia 
compression machines, 249 ; air-cooling in large open rooms, 249. — 
Gorman, W. A., Ether machine, 249. — Harrison, J., Latent heat of 
vaporisation of ammonia and of sulphuric ether. 250 ; equal efficiency of 
refrigerating agents, 250. — Price-Williams, R., Cost of ice-production by 
different processes, 250 ; food preservation on board ship, 251 ; cooling of 
berths, 251 ; setting of mortar in Stockholm tunnel, 252. — Halpin, D., 
Insulation of cooled chambers, 252 ; cork as a non-conductor, 252. — 
J^chonheyder, W., Place of admission of cold air into chamber, 253. — 
Powell, T., Improvements in "Windhausen vacuum machines, 254 ; 
production of transparent ice, 254 ; continuous circulation of sulphuric 
acid, 255 ; cost of working, 255 ; applications of machine, 256. — Lightfoot, 
T. B., Capacities of refrigerating machines, 256 ; coal consumption, 256 ; 
air cooling in large rooms, 257; variation of heat of vaporisation with 
pressure, 258 ; cost of ice-making, 258 ; freezing of meat, 258 ; snow in 
storage chamber, 259 ; setting of cement in Stockholm tunnel, 259 ; cork 
as a non-conductor, 259 ; "Windhausen vacuum process, 259 ; Hall, "W. S., 
!*etting of brickwork in Stockholm tunnel, 260. 

Kefcse Destructors : — 

Birmingham, 1897, 377. 

Southampton Eefuse Destructor, and Sewage Precipitation AVorks, 1892, 

354, 369. See Sewage and Refuse Works. 
Torquay, 1899, 419. See Refuse Destructor at Torquay. 

T 2 



292 K 

PiEfLSE Destructor at Torquay, Paper on Refuse Disposal, and the results 
obtained from a six moutlis' working of the Refuse Destructor at 
Torquay, by H. A. Garrett, 1899, 419. — Disposal of towns' refuse, 419. — 
Quality of refuse and power obtained, 420. — Primary object of destructor, 
420. — Types of destructors, 421. — Cost of treatment of refuse. — Torquay 
destructor, 422. — Component parts of refuse, 424. — Tests, 425. — Power 
obtained for electric lighting, 428. — Analysis of residuum, 429. 

Discussion. — White, Sir W.H., Thanks to author, 4;)0. — Garrett, H. A., 
Value of refuse, 4S0. — Davey, H., Electricity fiom combustion of towns' 
refuse, 430 ; value of refuse for generating steam ; cheapest method of 
disposal, 431. — Terry, S. H., Objections to refuse disposal at sea, 431; 
situation of destructors to prevent nuisance; cremation of fumes, 432; 
success of Brighton destructor, 4:!3. — White, Sir W. H., Further 
communications, 433. — Hodgson, R. B., Power derived from destructor ; 
utilization of waste heat; wear and tear of destructor; oil-jet cremator ; 
evaporation from one lb. of refuse, 434 ; steam-pressure ; manufacture 
of disinfectant powder from flue-dust, 435. — Garrett, H. A., Disposal of 
towns' refuse by cremation ; dust-catching chamber ; temperature in 
destructor, 436 ; steam-pressure, 437. 
Kegnault's Steam Experiments, Paper on the Rationalization of Regnault's 
ExiJeriments on Steam, by J. ilacfarlaue Gray, 1889, 399. — Two 
thcrmotlynamical principles deduced from Newton's hypothesis, 399. — 
Definitions, 400 ; unit of heat and of energy, 400 ; common (water) 
unit of heat, and new (liydrogen) unit, 401. — Specific heat of water, 401 ; 
discrepancy in Begnaull's calculated results, 401 ; revision of ditto, 402-3. 
— Regnault's experimental apparatus, 401. — Rowland's exj^eriments, 404. 
— Ideal water, or aquene, 405. — New specific heat of water, 405. — Ratio 
of the two specific heats, at constant pressure and at constant volume, 
406. — Ideal steam or gasene, and vapene, 408. — Regnault's method of 
ascertaining specific heat of superheated steam, 408. — Regnault's specific 
heat of steam re-stated, 409. — Heat of evaporation, 410. — Molecular 
weight of water, 411. — Tlieta-phi (9 <^) or temperature-entropy diagram, 
a graphic representation of the Carnot-Clausius fundamental principle, 
411; area shows heat units, 412; co-ordinates are temperature 6 and 
entropy <p, 412. — Definition of graph, 413. — Thermodynamic relations 
exhibited upon theta-phi diagram, 413. — Theta-phi diagram for water, 
with geometrical features and deductions therefrom, 414. — Curves for 
aqucue and water, 415. — Splitting heat, or energy of segregation, 416 ; 
constitutional heat, or energy of gas state, 416. — Explanation of persistent 
relation between temperature and pressure, 417. — Regnault's steam 
pressures compared with calculated vapene pressures, 418. — Critical 
temperature determining liquefaction, 419. — Point of complete gasification 



R 293 

Eegxault's Steam Expeeimexts, Paper, 1889 (continued) : — 

in evaporation is point of commencing liquefaction in compression at 
constant pressure, 42i).— Example of an ideal diagram, 421.— Determination 
of gasene curve, 425. — Cliange of volume uf gas at constant temperature, 
426. — Gas compression resolved into appression and collapse, 428. — 
Eegnault's total heat of saturated steam compared witli new formula, 
433-5. — Pee-vee (p v) diagram of work (pressure x volume) for isothermal 
expansion, 43G. — Critical condition determining liquefaction, 437. — 
Calculations verified b_v Regnault's experiments, 438. — Alternative 
method of calculation, 438.— Pressure of steam, 439.— Comparison of 
Eegnault's experimental steam pressures with autlior'.s theoretical 
pressures, showing closer agreement than is obtained by Eegnault's most 
accurate forraulai, 445. — Steam j^ressures up to critical temperature, 
calculated hy 8 <(> formula, 447.— Theta-phi diagram for steam-engine 
temperatures, 447. — Order in which change of licat into mechanical work 
proceeds in a perfect steam engine, 448. — " Slip " of expansion, 450. — 
Advantage of theta-phi diagram, 450. 

Discussion.— Cochrane, C, Eatio of two specific heats of air. as deduced 
from velocity of sound, 451 ; verification of Laplace's hypothesis 
respecting work done in compression, 452. — Ryan, J., Error in recording 
Eegnault's observations, 452; examination of Eegnault's apparatus 
preserved in College de France, 453; author's previous Paper, 455; 
Newton's hypothesis of a gravitating ether, 4.35 ; Eaukine's attempt, 456 ; 
second law of thermodynamics, 45(j ; velocity of sound in air, 450. — 
Kennedy, A. B. W., Summary of author's results, 457; theta-plii 
diagram, 458; abridgment of formulie, 458; introduction of new 
expressions, 458. — Shaw, H. S. H., Value of author's work, 459 ; 
simplification of formula}, 460 ; theta-phi diagram, 460.— Head, J., 
Importance of fuel economy, 461. — Paget, A., Proposed to republish 
author's earlier Paper, 461. — Head, J., Seconded proposal, 462. — 
Cochrane, C, Slotion carried, 462. — Gray, J. M., Origin of theta-phi 
diagram, 462 ; Professor Gibbs' Paper on graphical methods in 
thermodynamics of fluids, 463 ; Carnot originator of entropy-temperature 
co-ordinates, 461; water-wheel illustration of Leat relations in steam- 
engine, 464 ; simplification of formulse, 465 ; theta-phi diagram for 
practical use, 466; entropy values (p for curves in theta-phi diagram, 
467 ; second law of thermodynamics, 468.— Cochrane, C, Author's grasp 
of physical laws, 468. 

Reid, A. T., elected Member, 1897, 256. 

Eeid, H., elected Member, 1891, 301. 

Reid, James, decease, 1895, 4. — Memoir, 1894, 278. 
Canadian Locomotive?-, 1887, 215. 



294 R 

Hew. John-, elected Member, 1897, 2oC.. 
PvENDELL, A. W., elected IMember, 1889, 2. 
Kekdell, S., elected Member, 1890, 17f.. 
PvEN-NiE. G. B., elected Vice-President, 1885, 22. 

Vote of Thanks to President for Address, 1886, 20i. 
PiENXiE, J. A., elected Graduate, 1893, 144. 

Kepairixg Shops, Union Steamship Co., Southampton, 1892, oC8, 378. 
Report of Council. See Council, Annual Report. 
Repoktj of RESE.vrvCH Committees : — 

Alloys, 1891, 513 :— 1893, 102 :— 1895, 238 :— 1897, 31 :— 1899, 35. 

Friction, 1885, ."^8 :— 1888, 173 :— 1891, 111. 

Gas Engine, 1898, 2ii;t. 

Marine-Engine Trials, 1889, 235 :— 1890, 203 :— 1891, 200 :— 1892, 13G :— 

1894, 33. 
Riveted Joints, 1888, 538. 

Steam Jacket, 1889, 703:— 1892, 118 :— 1894, .-)35 :— 1896, 4GG. 
Research Committees. 1887, .■">:— 1888, 5-G, 24 :— 1889. 5-G :— 1890. 5-7:— 
1891, G:— 1892, G 7 :— 1893, 7 .—1894, 7 :— 1895. G. 22 :— 1896, G:— 
1897 7-S. 2G :— 1898, 8-0 :— 1899. '.(-10 :— 1900. 8 9. 
Reservoirs, Waterworks : — 
Birmintrbam, 1897, 207. 
Burrator, Plymouth, 1899, 407. 442. 
Derby. 1898. 475. 
Edinburgh, 1887, 4:;9, 459-G2. 
Glasgow, 1895, 402, 468-71. 
Rathmines, Dublin, 1888, .378, 52G. 
Sheffield, 1890, 410-27, 445. 
Staines, London, 1900, 4GG, 487-9. 
Swithland, Leicester, 1898, 4G0, 510. 
Vyrnwy, Liverpool, 1891, 4G1-3. 
"Walthamstow, East London, 1900, 481-5. 
Resteer, J. W'., Lincoln Waterworks Engines, 1887, 131. 

Retirement of Secretary. — Richards, E. W., Announcement, and moving of 
resolution for presenting honorarium, 1897, 278. — Smith, Sir J., 
Seconded resolution, 280. — Adamson, J., Supported resolution, 280. — 
Richards, E. W., Applications for secretaryship, 280. — Bache. A., 
Acknowledged resolution, 280. 
Revealer, Glass, for studying Condensation in Steam-Engine Cylinders, 1900- 

509. See Glass Revealer. 
Reversing Gear, Fluid-Pressure, for Locomotive Engines, 1894. 252. See 

Fluid-Pressure Reversing Gear. 
Rew, J. H., elected Member, 1895, 327. 



R 295 

Reynolds, E., decease, 1898, 4.— :\Iemoir, 1895, 143. 

Condition of Carbon in Steel, 1885, 50. 

Experimental Marine Engine, 1891, 409. 

Friction Experiments. 1885, G7. 

Marine Engineering, 1891, :)53. 

Testing Machine, 1883, 448, 451. 
Reynolds, W. F., elected ^lemher, 1398, 2. 
Reynolds Gas Engine, 1889, 502. See Gas Engines. 
Rice Mills, Liverpool, 1891. 446. 
Rice, T. S., elected Member, 1890, 472. 
Rich, "\V. E., decease, 1887, 4.— Memnir, 148. 

Compound Locomotives, 1886, ?~id. 
Richards, E. W., elected Member of Council, 1885, 22; 1888, 30.— Appointed 
Vice-President, 1890, 43.— Elected Vice-President, 1891, 24; 139^., 
2G.— Elected President, 1896, 28 ; 1897, 27. 

Address as President. London spring meeting, 1896. 106 ; acknowledgment 
of vote of thanks, 133. — Birmingham Jubilee meeting, 1897, 258; 
acknowledgment of vote of thanks, 278. 

Alloys Research, 1897, 93 .—1899, G9, 70, 71. 

Alumina Factory, 1896, 389. 

Belfast Electric Lighting, 1896, 342. 

Belfast Gas Work.s, 1896, 401. 

Belfast Summer meeting. Reply to Lord Mayor's welcome, 1896, 277. 

Birmingham Jubilee meeting, 1897, 145 : — Reply to Lord Mayor's 
welcome, 251. 

Blast-Furnace Practice, 1889, 619 :— 1396, lOG. 

By-laws, 1889. 31 :— 1891, 30. 

Canal-Boat Propulsion, 1897, 231. 

Cleveland Industries, 1893, 255. 

Council, Annual Report, 1897, 25 :— 1893, 23. 

Cycle Construction, 18S7, 296. 

Diagram Accounts, 1897, 507, 512. 

Flax Dressing Machinery, 1896, 303. 

Heat Transmission, 1896, 533. 

London Summer meeting, "Welcome to American Engineers, 1900, 
351. 

Marine Corrosion, 1896. 352, 354. 

Marine Horse-Power, 1896, 89. 

Middlesbrougli Salt Industry, 1893, 292, 293. 

Partially Immersed Propellers, 1897, 118, 130. 

President, on taking office, 1896, 29. — Acknowledgment of vote of thanks, 
1896, 282.— At Institution Dinner, Belfast, 1896, 405, 406, 418.— On 



296 R 

EiCHARDS, E. "W. (continued) : — 

re-election as President, 1897, 230. — On retiring from Presidency, 
1898, 33 ; acknowledgment of vote of thanks, 3."). 

Propeller Ventilating Fans, 1897, 4t»3. 

Quick-Revolution Engines, 1897, 361. 

Eange-Finders, 1896. 78. 

Rope Driving, 1896, 378. 

Secretary, Retirement, 1897, 278, 280.— Appointment, 43(5. 

Steam-Engine Breakdowns, 1896, "iSO, 592. 

8team Jacket, 1896, aOO. 

Steam Superheating, 1896, 185, I'M, 223. 

Steel Rails, 1890, 331. 

Steel Steam-Pipes, 1896, 252, 2.H. 

Steel-Works Machinery, 1895, 4."jl. 

Testimonial to Jamtis Forrest, 1897, 231. 

Vote of Thanks to retiring President, 1896, 31. 

Water Works, Pirmingham, 1897, 315. 
Richards, G., Friction Experiments, 1885, 08. 

Irrigating Machinery, 1888, 71. 

:\lilliug Cutter.s 1890, 54(;. 

Wood-Cutting Machinery, i'apcr on recent improvements in Wood-Cut(ing 
INIachincry, 1885, 77. — Remarks thereon, 94. 
Richards, H. W. H., elected Member, 1897, 25G. 
Richards, James, G., elected Graduate, 19C0, 97. 
Richards, John, Paper on Irrigating Machinery on the Pacific Coast, 1888,33. — 

Remarks thereon, (13, 74. 
Richards, Josiah, decease, 1889, 4.— ^Memoir. 1888, 15(J. 
Richards, L., decease, 1899, 7.— Memcir, 1898, 540. 

Fluid-Pressure Revt-rdng Gear, 1894, 200. 

High-Speed Engine, 1894, 231. 

Steel- Works Machinery, 1896, 451. 
Richardson, A., elected Member, 1895, 140. 
Richardson, G., decease, 1885, 4.— Memoir, 1384, 474. 
Richardson, H. A., elected i\Iimber, 1892, 229. 
Richardson, J., Private Electric Ligliting, 1385, 405. 

Semi-Portable Engine, Paper on recent adaptations of the Robey Semi- 
Portalde Engine, 1885, 371.— Remarks thereon, 389, 405. 
Richardson, J. R.. elected Associate ilember, 1899, 14G. 
Richardson, J. S., elected ^lember, 1891, 2. 
Richardson, Sir T., elected :\Iember, 1887, 158.— Knighthood, 1897, 276; 1898, 

4.— Elected Member of Council, 1899, 28. 
Richardson, W., decease, 1893, 4.— Memoir, 1892, 408. 



R 297 

KiCHARDSoy AND SoN:?, T., Hartlepool Engine Works, Hartlepool, 1893, 380. 
RiCHARDSOX, Sons, and Owdex, J. X., Linen Warehouse, Belfast, 1888, 

425. 
Riches, C T. H., elected Graduate, 1895, 328:— elected Associate Member, 

1900, 356. 
Riches, G. M., elected Member, 1890, 2. 

Riches, T. H., elected Member of Council, 1885, 22 :— 1888, 30:— 1891, 24:— 
1834, 26 :— 1898, 31.— Elected Vice-President, 1899, 28. 

By-laws, 1891, 44. 

Canadian Locomotives, 1887, 217. 

Canal-Boat Propellers, 1894, 375. 

Compound Locomotives, 1886, 394. 

Dredging Clj'de Estuary, 1887, 399. 

Electric Lighting, Belfast, 1896, 338. 

Electric Lighting Works, Mancliester, 1894, 311. 

Electro-Magnetic Macliine-Tools, 1887, 335. 

Fluid-Pressure Reversing Gear, 1894, 200. 

Forth Bridge Machinery, 1887, 310. 

Hydraulic Power Supply, 1895, 390. 

Milling Cutters, 1890, 552. 

Portable Pneumatic Tools, 1900, 153, 176. 

Steam Navvy, 1885, 364. 

Tube-Frame Railway Wagons, 1890, 50 i. 

Tote of Thanks to President for Address, 1890, 201. 
EiCHET, W. F. A., elected Associate Member, 1893, 220. 
Richmond, J., elected Member, 1889, 2. 

Compound Steam Turbine, 1888, 507. 
RiCHMONT), W. F., elected Graduate, 1894, 170:— elected Associate Member, 
1897, 144 :— transferred to Member, 1899, 147. 

Canal-Boat Propellers, 1894, 376. 
Ride, S., elected Member, 1899, 144. 

EiDEHALGH, G. J. M., decease, 1893, 4.— Memoir, 1892, 410. 
Rider, J. H., elected IMember, 1899, 292. 
Ridley, C. O., elected Associate Member, 1895, 548. 
Ridley, J. C, Jun., elected Graduate, 1892, 229 : — transferred to Associate 

Member, 1900, 97. 
Ridley, J. T., elected Member, 1893, 220. 
RiEKiE, J., elected Member, 1887, 474. 

French Locomotive Practice, 1900, 417. 
RiETER, E. H., elected Associate Member, 1896, 279. 
RiGBT, J., Testing Machine, 1888, 452. 
RiGG, A., High-Speed Engine, 1894, 235. 



298 R 

lliLEY, J., Paper on modern Steel-Works Machinerr, 1895, 436. — Remarks 

thereon, 459, 4t)l. 
EiLEY, J. H., elected Member. 1894, 1. 
Rio DE Janeiro, Eoller Flour Mill and Granary, 1889, I'll. ^ee Roller Flour 

Milling. 
Rio Tinto Rock-Drill. McCuUocIi, 1891, 142. See Rock Drills. 
Ripley, P. E., elected Graduate, 1886, 1G4 : — transferred tu ^Member, 1894, :?. 
Ripox, Marquia of, K.G., Opening of Engineering Department of Yorksiiiro 

College, Leeds, 1886, 468. 
RiPPEK, W., Associate transferred to IMember, 1887, o. — Honorary Secretary of 
Sheffield meetin? 1890, Presentation from the Institution, 1890, 471 ; 
1891, 8. 
Experimental Marine Engine, 1891, 401. 

IMean-Pressure Indicator, 1897, :!47. — Paper on a continuous Mean- 
Pressure Indicator for Steam-Engines, 1899, 569 :— remarks thereon, 
601, 611. 
Quick-Revolution Engines, 1897, M7. 

Sheffield Summer meeting. Welcome to JMenibers, 1890, 295. 
RiSTORi, E., Paper on Aluminium IMannfacture, with description of the Rolling 
Mills and Foundry at Milton, Staftordshire, 1898, 347. — Remarks 
thereon, 359, :!7:{. 
RiVA, E., elected Member, 1889, 58.1. 

Rivers and Estuaries, Engineering improvements. See Cly<le Navigation, 
1887, 402; 1895, 404 :— Dredging Clyde Estuary, 1887, 38 i :— 
Manchester Ship Canal, 1891, 418, 457; 1894, 403:— Tees 
Engineering Improvements, 1893, 318. See also Docks ; Dockyards; 
Harbours. 
Riveted Joints, Research Committee, 1885, 5 :— 1886, .") :— 1887, 5 :— 1888, 5 :— 

1889, 6. 
Riveted Joint.-*, lieport upon experiments on Double-Riveted Lap and Butt 
Joints, Series XI, XII, XIII, by A. B. W. Kennedy, 1885, 198.— Design 
of joints for these experiments, 198. — Materials and preparation of 
specimens, 200. — Testing, 201. — Double-riveted lap-joints in g-indi steel 
plate, 201. — Double-riveted butt-j)ints in 3. inch steel plate, 203. — 
Double-riveted Ltp-joints in ^-incli steel plate, 205. — Double-riveted 
butt-joints in |-inch steel plate, 207. — Tenacity of steel used, 209. — 
Influence of mode of riveting, 210. — Average load at which visible slip 
began, 211. — Efficiencies of joints, 213. — Higher riveting pressures. 214. 
— Formulae and proportions deduced from experiments. 214. — Table of 
pro^iortions for double-riveted lap-joints, 216. — Proportions for double- 
riveted butt-joints, 216. — Diagonal pitching of rivets, 217. — Tabulated 
details of experiments, Tables XXIX-XXXIII, 218-27. 



R 299 

Riveted Joints, Report, 1885 (continued) : — 

Addendum from R. H. Tweddell, 22S. — Comparisons of hand-riveting 
and hydraulic-riveting, 22S. — Closing pressure on rivets, 2o0. 

Letter from W. S. Hall, 231. — Widest pitch of rivets for steam- 
tightness, 231. — Proportions for single-riveted lap joints, 231. — Proportions 
for double-riveted lap joints, 233. — Examples in iron boiler-work, 
234. 

Riveted Joists, Ahdract of results of experiments on Riveted Joints, with 
their applications to practical work, by A. B. W. Kennedy, 1885, 230. 
— Summary of experiments, 23G. — Tenacity and elasticity of steel, 23G. 
— Shearing resistance of rivet steel, 237. — Testing of perforated plate, 
238. — Tenacity of metal between rivet holes, 238. — Testing of Series YI, 
2:59.— Series VI I. 210.— Series YIII, 240.— Excess tenacity, 242.— 
Series IX, 242. — Heavier rivets, 243. — General conclusions, 213. — 
Bearing pressure in Series X, 244. — Testing of Series XI, 245. — 
Hydraulic riveting in Series XII and XIII, 247. — Visible slip, 24S. — 
Conclusions, 248. — Excels tenacity between rivet holes, 249. — Shearing 
resistance of rivet steel, 249. — Size of rivet-heads and ends, 2.'iO. — 
Strengtli of joint made across plate, 250. — Bearing pressure, 2.">1. — 
Margin, 251. — Breadth of lap, 251. — Visible slip, 251. — Experiments on 
shear, 253. — Comparison between hydraulic-riveting and hand-riveting, 
253. — Joints of maximum strength, 254.— Double-riveted lap-joints, 
255. — Double-riveted butt-joints, 256. — Joints for boilers, 257. — Further 
experiments on hydraulic and hand-riveting, 259. — Other memoirs for 
Committee on Riveted Joints. 259. — Tabulated details of experiments 
on single-riveted lap-joints, Table XXXIV, 200-1.— Shearing resistance 
of steel, Table XXXV, 2G2. — Summary of experiments, Series I-XIII, 
Table XXXVI, 263. 

Discussion. — Kennedy, A. B. W., Additional experiments (Table 
XXXV) on shearing resistance of steel. 204. — Lougridge, E. C "Wider 
specimens desirable for testing, 264 ; mode of holding specimens in testing 
machine, 265 ; shape of specimens, 205 ; testing a second time, 265 ; width 
should be multiple of pitcli, 26G; pressure on rivets in riveting up, 266 ; 
grip of rivets, 260 ; excess tenacity of perforated steel plates, 267 ; chain- 
riveting. 207 ; pitch for large rivets, 208. — Uuwin, W. C, Small variation 
in efficiency of joints with large variation in proportions, 209 ; increase 
of tensile strength in perforated plate, 270 ; experiments of United 
States Testing Board, 270 ; increase of strength through hindering of 
contraction in area, 271 ; crushing pressure on rivets, 271 ; connection 
between slipping and rivet area, 272 ; designing of single-shear and 
double-shear joints. 273. — Bennett, P. D., Holding of specimens in 
testing machine, 275 ; punched holes and drilled holes, 275 ; pressure 



300 R 

KiVETED Joints, Abstract, 1885 {IH^cmgion, continued) : — 

in riveting, and value of large rivet heads, 270. — IMoberly, C. II.' 
Experiments fur steel boilers, 27(3 ; higher limits fur tensile strengtli 
of steel plates, 270 ; ultimate tensile strength of plate between rivets, 
277; quality of rivet steel, 277; mode of working rivets, 277; pressures 
on rivets, 27S; rivets should fill holes, 279; proportions for double- 
riveted joints, 279 ; diagonal and straight fracture, 279 : diagonal and 
straight pitch, 280; margin, 280; maximum pitch for fateam-tightness, 
280 ; examples of steel boilers, 281. — Rubinson, J., Diflerenee in 
behaviour of iron and steel, 282 ; danger from too hard steel for 
boiler plates, 282 ; tenacity of perforated plates, 283 ; advantage of 
large rivet-heads and of machine-riveting, 284. — Halpiu, D., Testing of 
punched plates, 285 ; slipping of joints in boilers, 285. — Kenned)-, 
A. B. W., Rounding-out of corners in test-pieces, 286 ; re-lests of old 
joints, 286 ; mode of holding specimens in testing machine, 286 ; 
excess tenacity of perforated steel p'.ates, 287 ; contraction of area at 
point of fracture, 287 ; no connection between slip and tensile resistance, 
288 ; duration of pressure in hydraulic riveting, 288 ; lengths of rivets, 
289 ; punched and drilled holes in experiments, 289. — Unwin, W. C., 
Contraction of area at point of fracture, 289. — Keimedy, A. B. \V., 
Actual breaking load over actual contracted area, 290. — Marten, E. B,, 
Cause of excess tenacity between punched rivet-holes, 290. — Kennedy, 
A. B. W., Greater excess between drilled rivet-holes, 290 ; preservation of 
broken test specimens, 290. — Head, J., Value of results from experiments, 
291; gratuitous aid, 291, 

Riveted Joints, Report upon Experiments on Double-Riveted Lap and Butt 
Joints made with Thicker Plates and Larger Rivets closed under 
Heavier Pressures, Series XIV, by A. B. W. Kennedy, 1838, 538. — 
Nature of these experiments, 538. — Preparation and testing of materials 
and joints, 538. — Description of jointd in Series XIV, 539. — Double- 
riveted lap and butt joints in | and f-inch plates with much heavier 
pressures in riveting, 539. — Double riveted lap and butt joints in J and 
1-incli plates, with extra large rivets and specially heavy pressures, 539. — 
Analysis of results of experiments, 540-5. — Excess strength due to 
perforation, 545. — Conclusions from experiments, 546. — Illustrative 
instances, 54G. — Tensile tests of steel plates, 548. — Shearing tests of 
rivets aud rivet-steel, 548. — General conclusions from experiments in 
Series XI to XIV, 549. — Tabulated details of experiments. 
Tables XXXVII to XLI, 550-70. 

Riveted Joint Diagrams, Paper on Diagrams to facilitate the design of 
Riveted Joints for Boiler Work, by W. E. Dalby, 1898, 124.— Graphical 
expression of results of Institution Research on Riveted Joints, 124. — 



R 301 

IlivETED Joint DiAGr>A3is, Paper, 1898 (continued) : — 

Pitch of rivets for equal tearing and shearing resistances, 125 ; general 
solution of problem, 125. — Graphical representatiou of bearing resistance, 
127. — Equality of shearing and bearing areas for given diameter of rivet. 
128. — Construction of diagrams, 128; examples of use, 129. — Single and 
double-riveted butt-joints, 130. — Pitch of rivets for equal shearing and 
tearing resistances, with given strength of rivet and tenacity of plate, 131. 

Riveters, Pneumatic, 1900, 130. See Portable Pneumatic Tools. 

Riveting, Comparative Efficiency of Riveting done by diiferent methods, 1887, 
331. 

Riveting, Hydraulic, at Forth Bridge, 1889, 217. See Address of President, 
Cliarles Cochrane. 

Riveting Machinery at Forth Bridge Works. 1887, 315. See Forth Bridge 
Machinery. 

Riveting Machines, Electro-Magnetic, 1887, 324. See Electro-Magnetic 
Machine-Tools. 

RixsoN, F., elected Member, 1898, 546. 

Road I.ocoiiotion, Paper by H. S. Hele-Shaw, 1900, 185. — Revival of road 
locomotion by motor vehicles, 185. — Its importance to engineers, 186. — 
Cartages and terminal charges exceed those of sliort haulage by rail, 
187. — Advantages of motor vehicles, 188. — "Weight upon each wheel, 
189. — Mechanical problem of the wheel rolling upon a road, 190; 
resistance to traction, 191 ; horse-power velocity curves, 192. — Viagraph, 
193. — Trials and comparisons of tyres, 195 ; tyres for heavy traffic, 196; 
solid india-rubber tyres, 197 ; " Michelia " tyre, 198 ; " Callus " and 
" Goodyear " tyres, 199.— Steering, 200. — Turning, 202. — Motive power 
and transmission, 202 ; internal-combustion motors, 204 ; carburettors, 
205 ; ignition, 205 ; starting, 206 ; governors, 207 ; balancing, 207 ; 
cooling, 209. — External combustion (steam) motors, 210 ; position of 
boilers, 210; position of engines, 211; burners for liquid fuel, 212. — 
Steam generators, 214; water-tube boilers, 215; flash boilers, 216. — 
Use of electricity, advantages and disadvantages, 218. — Gearing or 
transmission. 220. — Results and conclusions, 221. — Estimated cost of 
transport by motor wagon, 223. — Relation between cost of transit by 
railway and by motor vehicle, 224. — Future of motor vehicles, 226. — 
Results of trials at Liverpool, 228. — Table showing estimated annual 
expenditure for motor wagon, 230. — Appendix on working of Leyland 
motor wagon, 231. — Appendix on working of Tliomycroft motor wagon, 
233. — Appendix on working of Leyland motor wagon, 235. — Appendix 
on working of Thomycroft steam-dray, 237. — Appendix on tests of 
motor carriages at Richmond and Birmingham, 238-45. 

Di!-cussion. — "Wicksteed, J. H., Working of motor wagon, 246. — 



302 R 

EoAD Locomotion, Dhcnsnon. 1900 (continued) : — ' 

Aspinall, J. A. F., Satisfactory results, 24G ; rate per ton-mile on 
railway, 247 ; excessive speeds in France, 247. — -Wicksteed, J. H., 
Viagraph, 248. — Brown, J., Description of viagraph, 248 ; speed ; spring 
wheels, 249. — Thornycroft, J. I., "Wear and tear of wheels, 250. — 
"Wicksteed, J. H., Thanks to author, 252.— Smith, E. S., Liverpool 
Self-Propelled TrafSc Association, 252 ; thanks to autlior, 253. — Boys, 
C. v.. Seconded vote of thanks, 253. — Hele-Shaw, H. S., Cost of fuel and 
wear of tyres per mile, 253. 

Supplementary Paper on the recent 1,000 Miles Road Trials, by H. S. 
Hele-Shaw, 254. — Satisfactory results, 2.>4 ; route of tour ; hill-climbing 
trials, 255 ; map of route, 25G ; tabulated summary of results, 257 ; 
failures and accidents, 258 ; speed, tyres, 258. — Table showing results 
of hill-climbing competitions, 2G0-5. 

Discu*non. — Chambers, E. J., Motor ears and nervous horses, 2G6 ; risk 
of fire when overturned, 267. — Donkin, B., Table showing cost for fuel 
per ton-mile of weight, 2G8 ; noise caused by gearing ; vibration, 270 ; 
smell and smoke, 270 ; oil motors for long journeys and electric motors 
for short town journeys ; motors in France, 271. — Jones, H. E., Horses 
frightened by motor cars, 272. — Sturmey, H., Bules of tlie road, 272; car 
construction, 273 ; railway charges, 273 ; vibration and cross-strains, 274 ; 
tyres, 274 ; transmission gear, 275 ; circulation of cooling water, 27G. — 
Henning, G. C, Noise from motors, 276 ; prevention of smoke, 278 ; steel 
road bed, 278. — Fowler, H., Oil-driven lorry, 279 ; nervousness of horses, 
279 ; duration of trials, 279 ; use of aluminium, 280 ; risk from fire, 281 ; 
difficulty of travelling in snow, 281. — Sauvage, E., Nervousness of horses, 
281. — Thornycroft, J. I., Use of aluminium, 282; trouble with horses, 
283 ; quality of roads, 283. — Beaumont, "W, W., Importance of good roads, 
283 ; cost of transit, 284 ; method of preparing oil or petrol, 286 ; 
governors, 287; cooling water, 287; balancing, 288. — "Walker, S. F., 
Electric motor, 288 ; wear of accumulators, 289. — Smith, M. H., Back 
steering, 290; heavy oil engines, 290; electric ignition, 291 ; balancing. 
292 ; wheels, 293 ; Deburgo wheel, 293.— Ventris, A.. "Working of steam 
motor, 294.— Higgens, T. W. E., Road surface, 294.— Davey, H., Rule of 
the road, 295. — McLaren, H., Steering gear, 295 ; weight of motors, 29G ; 
tyres, 296.— Martin, E. P., Interesting discussion, 297.— Hele-Shaw, H. S., 
Burning of car, 298 ; contact-maker, 298 ; tare weight, 300 ; comparison 
with railway rates, 300; future trials, 301. — Martin, E. P., Vote of 
thanks, 302. — Barcroft, H., Uniform compression, 302. — Barr, J., 
Viagraph, 302. — Hodgson, R. B., Difficulty of starting, 304 ; balancing, 
305 ; Bennett-Thomas motor, 305. — Joy, D., Early form of traction- 
engine, 307. — Mays, J. A., Relation between radius and circumference. 



R 303 

KoAD Locomotion, D!fcu-<<ion, 1900 (continueJ) : — 

o07 ; function of pneumatic tyre, 308. — Mills, W.. Use of aluminium, 310. 
—Milne, J., Vibration meter, 311. — Smith, E. S., Noise of motor, 311 ; 
cost per net ton-mile, 312 ; terminal charges, 312 ; conditions of future 
trials, 314. — Smith, IM. H., Construction of spring wheels, 314. — "Walker. 
S. F., Electrical accumulators, 316; connection of cells in parallel, 317. — 
Hele-Shaw, H. S., Scope of discussion, 318; 3-ton tare limit; steering, 
319 ; action of pneumatic tyre, 320. 
KoBEKTS, B. O., elected Giaduate, 1895, loO. — elected Associate Member, 1899, 

146. 
Egberts, C. T., elected Associate Member, 1893, 220. 
RoBEKTS, D., elected Meml)er, 1899, 474. 
RoBEET.s F. E. L., elected Graduate, 1898, 312. 
Egberts, H. E., elected Graduate, 1898, 3. 
Egberts, H. J., elected Member, 1891, 2. 
Egberts, P. E., elected Associate Member, 1899, 474. 
Egberts, E. C, elected Graduate, 1899, 294. 
Egberts, T., elected Member, 1887, 2. 
Egberts, W., elected Member, 1887, 2. 

Egberts- Austex, Sir "\V. C., K.C.B., nominated Honorary Life Member, 1898, 
5 : — acknowledgment, 30. — Created Knight. Commander of the Bath, 
1899, 69, 97 ; 1900, 5. 
Alloys Eesearch, Fird Eeporf, 1891, 543 ; remarks thereon, 567-72, 
594-9, GOS.—Second Beport, 1893, 102 ; remarks thereon, 145, 148, 
150, 158, 184, 195.— Third Eeporf, 1895, 238 ; remarks thereon, 280, 
294, '2d7.— Fourth Eeporf, 1897, 31 ; remarks therecn, 69, 88, 96.— 
Fifth Eeparf, 1899, 35 ; remarks thereon, 68, 70, 93. 
Rgbertsgx, H., decease, 1889, 4. — IMemoir, 1888, 264. 

Kgbertsgx (previously Eobinson), L. S., elected Member, 1892, 414. See L. S. 
Eobinson. 
Xarrow-Gauge Eailways, Paper on Xarrow-Gauge Eailways, of two feet 
gauge and under, 1898, 376.— Eemarks thereon, 389, 400, 403. 
Egbertsox, T. E., elected Graduate, 1895, 328. 
Egbertsox, ^y., decease, 1899, 7: — Memoir, 141. 
Eobertsox, "\V. H. a., elected Graduate, 1900, 357. 

Egbertsgx Gkooved Frictignal Gearixg, 1888, 363. See Frictional Gearing. 
Kobey asd Co., Globe "Works, Lincoln, 1885, 434, 442. 
Egbey Semi-Portable Exgise, 1885, 371. See Semi-Portable Engine. 
EoBixs, G. M., elected Member, 1899, 144. 
Eobixsox, a. M., elected Member, 1894, 294. 
EoBixsGN, C. A., elected Member, 1897, 143. 
Egbisson, C. J., elected Member, 1894, 294. 



304 R 

RoBissox, E. M., elected Member, 1900, 355. 
EOBINSON, F. A., elected Member, 1890, 298. 
EoBiNsoN, Henry, Autographic Test-Eecorder, 1886, 92. 

By-laws, 1886, 23, 24. 

Hydraulic Buffer-Stop, 1886, 117. 
Robinson, Herbert, elected Graduate, 1897, 257. 
EoBiNSOX, James, elected Member, 1895, 150. 
EOBINSOX, John- (Leek), By-laws, 1885, 25, 28. 

Friction Experiments, 1885, G4. 

Eiveted Joints, 1885, 282. 

Spherical Engine, 1885, lOG. 
EoBiNSON, John (Cardiff), elected Member, 1886, 125. 
EoBiNsoN, J. A., elected Member, 1898, 112. 
EoBiNSON, J. D., elected Member, 1899, 292. 
EoBiNSON, J. G., elected Member. 1891, 480. 
EoBiNSON, J. S., decease, 1893, 4.— Memoir, 1892, 5GS. 

EoBiNSON (afterwards Eobertsou). L. S., elected Member, 1892, 414. See L. S. 
Robertson. 

Boiler-Shell Drilling Machines. 1894, 530. 

Canal-Boat Propellers, 1894, 368. 

Canal-Boat Propulsion, Paper on Mechanical Propulsion on Canals, 1897, 
149.— Remarks thereon, 186. 227, 232. 

:Marine-Engine Trials, 1890, 273 :— 1894, 122. 

Marine Horse-Power, 1896, 87. 

Partially Immersed Propellers, 1897, 125. 

Quick-Revolution Engines, 1897, 352. 

Steam Pumps, 1893, 4G3. 
Robinson, M. H., elected Member, 1894, 294 , 

Compound Steam Turbine, 1888, 502. 

Electric Traction, 1898, 90. 

Marine-Engine Trials. 1894, 122. 

Karrow-Gauge Euilways, 1898, 391. 

Steam Superheating. 1896, 207. 

Steel Steam-Pipes, 1896, 249. 

Throttling and Variable Expansion, 1895, 202. 
Eobinson, S. J., elected Member, 1890, 298. 
EOBINSON, T. N., "Wood-Cutting Machinery, 1885, 91, 93. 
Eobinson, "\V., elected Member. 1895, 327. 

Gas-Engine Eesearch, 1898, 243. 
Robinson and Cleaver, Royal Irish Linen Warehouse, Belfast, 1888, 423. 
Eobinson and Son, Thomas, Eailway Works, Eochdale, 1894, 406, 448. 
Robson, G., elected Member, 1897, 25G. 



R 305 

EoBSON, T., deccaso, 1891, 4.— :Memoir, 1890, 173. 

ROBSOX, W. H., elected ^lember, 1899, 292. 

EocHAT, H. L., elected Associate Member, 1899, 4. 

EocHE, F. J., elected 3Iember, 1891, 2. 

RocHFORD, J., elected Member, 1890, 472. 

RocHFORT. B., elected Associate, 1891, 4S0. 

Rock, J. ^V., elected ^lember. 1888, 444. 

Rock-Dbillixg M.\chinery. Electric. 1893, 309. See Electric Eock-Drill. 

Rock Drills, Paper on recent Trials of Rock Drills, bj' E. H. Carbutt and H. 
Davey, 1891, 141. — Trials of rock drills at Exhibition of Mining and 
Metallurgy at Crystal Palace in 1890, 141. — Three classes of percussive 
drills exhibited. 141 ; valve worked by air, or by tappet; valveless drills, 
141.— McCulloch's "Rio Tinto" drill, 142.— Stephens' •' Climax" drill, 
144.— Bickle drill, 144.— Ingersoll-Mayne drill, 145.— Daw drill, 147.— 
Coles drill, 147. — Hathoru's "Eclipse" drill, 149. — Ingersoll hand- 
power drill, 150. — Bromficld-Ingersoll hand-power drill, 151. — Trials, 
151 ; hole bored by hand, 151 ; pressure of air supplied to drills, 151. — 
Air meter, 152. — General observations on drilling, 153; on results of 
trials, 154. — Tabulated details of results, 15G-9. — Rules for competition, 
159. 

Di^cu?sion. — Carbutt, E. H., Importance of trials in this country, 161 ; 
hand-power drills slower than hand drilling, 162. — Foster, C. Le Neve, 
Previous trials of rock drills in Cornwall, 162 ; circumstances of present 
trials, 163. — Collins, J. H., Importance of underground trials, 164 ; effect 
of weight of drills, 164. — Addy, G , Shape of cutting edge of drill, 165. — 
Coles, H. J., Valves, worked by air or by tappet, 166 ; best feeding done 
by hand, 167; cutting edge of drill, 169: steel for drills, 169; size of 
hole bored, 169. — Schonheyder, "\V., Automatic feed, 169; fixing of chisel 
in piston-rod, 170 ; measurement of air consumption, 170. — Carbutt, E. H., 
Air meter, 171. — Bright, P.. "VTater meter used for air measurement, 172. — 
Collins, A. L., Rock drilling in Norway, 173; time occupied, 173; 
comparison between hand and machine boring, 174 ; Norwegian single- 
handed hand-boring, 175 ; rotation of borer, 175 ; tabulated summary of 
results, 176; explosives used, 177. — Bolton, R., Eclipse drill, 177; 
rotation of borer, 177; valve and valve-box, 178; hardness of drill, 179; 
pressure of air, 179; circumstances affecting trials, 180; hand-power 
machines, 181. — Lockhart, "NV. S., Single-handed hand-drilling in Upper 
Burmah, 181. — AVilson, T., Working of valves, 182; springs for tappet 
valves, 183 ; rust and grit in air-worked valves, 183. — Stevens, J., Hand- 
power drill compared with hand labour, 184. — Joy, D., Early rock drill 
worked by steam power, 184. — Stephens, R., Working of drill with 
tappet-valve or air-worked valve, 185. — Davey, H., Circumstances of trials, 

V 



306 R 

Eock-Drills, Discussiun, 1891 (continued) : — 

18G. — Tomlinson, J., Saving of time in machine diillliig, 187. — Caibutt, 
E. H., Benefits resultin;;- from trials, 187. 

EODDA, J. T., elected Associate :Member, 1898, 3. 

Rodger, W., decease, 1894, 4.— .AUmoir, 1893, 498. 

KoDGERS, J., elected Jlember, 1892, 102. 

EoDGERS AND SoNS, Joseph, Cutlery 3Ianufac(ory, Sheffield. 1890, 4o9. 

EoE, Sir T., Oak walls of navy, 1898, 459. 

Roe's Timber Works, Derby, 1898, 4;i3. 

RoFE, "VV., elected Associate ^lember, 1900, 183. 

Rogers, H. J., elected ^lember, 1885, 303. 
Canal-Boat Propellers, 1894, 377. 
Lighting of Workshops, 1893, 413. 

Rogers, H. W., elected Graduate, 1887, 2 :— transferred to Jlember, 1892, 3. 

Rogers, P. P., decease, 1891, 4. 

Rogers, W. I., elected Associate Member, 1897, 433. 

Rolf, G., elected Associate Member, 1897, 433. 

RoLFE, J. H. II., elected Member, 1898, 341. 

Rolled Joists, 1885, 325. See Address of President. Jeremiah Head. 

Roller Bearings for Carrying Wheels of Steam Traverser, 1894, 311. 

Roller Flovr Mill and Granary at Rio de Janeiro, 1889, l.")!. &t' Roller 
Flour iMilling. 

Roller Flour Milling, Paper on the latest development of Roller Flour Milling, 
by H. Simon, 1889, 148. — Change in mode of milling by abandonment 
of millstones and substitution of rollers. 148. — Treatment of products 
without handling, 14'J. — Contrast between English and Hungarian 
milling, 149. — Introduction of roller milling in England, 151. — Description 
of new roller flour mill and granary at Rio dc Janeiro, 151. — Site and 
buildings, 152. — Motive power, 153. — Landing and cleaning of grain, 
153. — Storage of grain on floors and in silus. 154. — Sorting, mixing, and 
airing of grain, 154. — Final wheat-cleaning machinery. 154. — Roller mill 
machinery, 156. — Four-roller break-mill with fluted rolls, for breaking the 
kernel of the wheat from the bran, 156. — Three-high roller reducing mill 
with smooth rolls, for reducing the broken grain to flour. 157. — Purification 
of middlings by winnowing, J58. — Centrifugal dressing machine for 
separating flour, 159. — General outline of milling process as performed 
by series of machines, 160; extraction of germ, ItJl. — Dust collector, 162. 
Discussion. — Simon, H., Samples of milling products, and specimen 
of dust collector, 164. — Fogerty. J., Early attempts to employ rollers in 
Irish mills, 164; decline of millstone grinding, 165; explosions in flour 
mills, 165. — Paget, A., Enquiry respecting cause of explosion, 1G5. — 
Fogerty, J.. Cause of explosions, 166; automatic milling is not recent, 



R 307 

EoLLER Flocr Milling, IH^cussion, 1889 (continued) : — 

1C6 ; construction of bins, 1G6. — Cochrane, C, Reason for bursting of 
bins, 167. — Fogerty, J., Lateral pressure of grain, 167 ; milling machinery 
in America, 107; superiority of Hungarian flour, 167. — Schi3nheyder, W.. 
Enquired variation of speed in roller milling, 168. — Davey, H., Eelative 
driving power for roller mill and for millstones, 1G8. — Carbutt, E. H.. 
Objection to grinding by millstones, 168 ; flour mill at Minneapolis, 168 ; 
construction of silos, 169; grain store at Chicago, 169; speed of grain 
elevators, 1 69 ; contrivance for seeing quantity of grain in high-speed 
buckets, 170. — Carter, J. H., Automatic working of stone flour mills. 
170; lateral pressure in silos, 170 ; automatic principle, 170. — Colyer, F.. 
Speed of grain elevators, 171 ; bursting of vertical bins, 171 ; coal 
consumption, horse-power, and work done, 171. — Neate, C, Details of Eio- 
mill. 172 ; precautions against fire, 172. — Thelwall, W. H., Construction 
of Eio mill, 173 ; construction of bins, and lateral pressure of grain, 173. 
— Xursey, P. F., "Working of dust collector, 174. — Armer, J., Use of dust 
collector for extracting moisture from compressed air, 174 ; lateral 
pressure of grain in bins, 175. — Taylor, S., Early attempts at roller 
milling, 175 ; Buchliolz system, and Carr disintegrator, 175 : general 
principles of roller mills, 176 ; power required with millstones and 
with rollers, 176; advantage of rollers over milLtones, 176; stone mills 
as much automatic as roller mills, 177; hand labour in Hungarian 
mills, 177. — Cochrane, C, Enquired number of separations of products. 
177. — Taylor, S., Large number of separations, 177 ; grinding action of 
millstones and of rollers, 178. — Cochrane, C, Adjustment of roller 
machinery, 178. — Tavlor. S., Eoller machinery is capable of adjustment. 
178. — Ferguson, J., Eoller milling attended with introduction of superior 
dressing machinery, 178 ; improvement of stone milling by adoption of 
better dressing machinery and better methods, 179; elimination of germ, 
and sacrifice of food properties to colour of flour, 179; foreign roller 
milling machinery, 179. — Ash by, F., Division of wheat grain into food for 
man and for beasts, ISO; explosions in flour mills. 180; centrifugal 
dressing machine, 181 ; automatic and non-automatic processes, 181 : 
power used, 182; continuous separation of products is characteristic 
feature of roller milling, 182. — Davey, H., Flour produced per lb. of coal. 
183. — Taylor, S., Power dependent upon rate of feed and nature of wheat. 
183. — Adamson, T. A., Introduction of roller milling in Ireland, 183. — 
Stringer, W., Construction of silos or bins, 184; lateral pressure of grain. 
184; power required in roller milling and stone milling, 185; practical 
diflference in results of automatic and non-automatic mills, 186; variation 
of .speed in automatic milling, 188; coal consumption, 188; limit of 
automatic action in milling, 188. — Cochrane, C, Pressure of grain in 

V 2 



308 R 

KoLLER Flovr Millixg, THxciissifM, 1889 (continued): — 

vertical Lins, ISS; removal of germ from flour, 189; explosions in flour 
mills, 189; sacrifice of food properties to colour of flour, 190. — Lockhart, 
W. S., Causes of explosions in flour mills, 190. — Simon, H., Adoption of 
automatic action in flour mills, 191 ; use of cast-iron chilled rollers, 192 ; 
relative nutriment in white and in dark flour, 192. 
EoLLixG-MiLL Engines, 1895, 436. 
EoLUNG Mills, 1895, 437. 
EOLLiXG Stock of Iron and Steel, 1885, 321. See Addrets of President, 

Jeremiah Head. 
EoLLiNG Stock for "Works, 1888, 3:51, 345; see Brewery Tramways. — 1889, 
573-t;; see Portable-Eailway Works.— 1898, 388, 391, 393-G, 400 ; see 
Narrow-Gauge Eailways. 
EoLLiNG- Stock "Works, Decauville, Petit-Bourg, 1889, 548,573. See Locomotive 
"Works ; Locomotive, Carriage, and "Wagon "Works ; and Eailway 
Carriage and "Wagon Works. 
EoLLO, D., decea.se, 1891, 4.— Memoir, 18S0, 293. 
EoLLO AND Sons, David, Fulton Engine Works, Liverpool, 1891, 450. 
EoNALD, H., elected 3Iember, 1892, 102. 
JRooFS AND Bridges of Iron and Steel, 1885, 318. See Address of President, 

Jeremiah Head. 
EooPE, W., elected Graduate, 1889, 2. 
Eootham, H. M., elected Graduate, 1897, 434. 
EooTS, J. D., elected Associate Member, 1898, 143; — transferred to Member, 

1£99, 147. 
EoPE AND Twine Manufactory, Connswatcr, Belfast, 1888, 422 :— 1896, 

437. 
EoFE Driving, Paper on the introduction and development of Eope Driving, by 
A. Combe, 1896, 355. — Introduction of rope driving, 355. — Angle for rope 
grooves, 356. — Material of ropes ; relative diameters of ropes and pulleys, 
35G. — Power transmitted ; speed of ropes, 357. — Extended form of 
rope-driving; cotton ropes; shafts not parallel, 358. — landless rope for 
close shafts, rope fly-wheels, 359. — Crossed and half-crossed ropes, 3G0. 
— Endless rope with loose guide-pulleys; endless rope driving several 
pulleys; substitution of ropes for geared wheels, and relative power 
absorbed, 3G1. 

i)iscus«on.— Head, J., Diameter of sheaves, 3G2 ; splicing ; endless 
ropes, 3G3 ; wear of rope and jpeed ; nianila and cotton for ropes ; half- 
cross drives, 364. — "Walker, A. T., Double rope for travelling cranes, 365 ; 
splicing and speed, 366. — Dobson, B. A., Early rope-driving, 366; 
relative diameters of ropes and pulleys, 367. — Longridge, M., Speed 
of shafts in cotton mills; size and life of ropes, 368.— Barbour, J. D., 



R £09 

KoPE Driting, Discmoion, 1896 (continued) :— 

Speed of ropes ; power absorbed in transmission, 369. — Wicksteed, J. H., 
Expanding pulley, 370. — Saxon, A., Barring engine, 370 ; friction from 
counter rope-driving ; gearing and rope-driving, 371. — Smith, W. F., Size 
of pulleys and ropes for durability, 371.— Saxon, G., Three-strand and 
four-strand ropes, 372.— McLaren, H., Rope driving for steam ploughing. 
373. — Donkin, B., Steel-wire ropes, 373. — Wise, W. L., Introduction of 
rope driving, 374. — Goodman, J., Factor of safety for rope driving, 374. — 
Wilson, A. B., Experiments -with different kinds of ropes, 374; laying 
of strands, 375 ; relative diameters of ropes and pulleys, 37G. — Coir 
rope of cocoa-nut fibre, 376. — Combe, A., Minimum diameters of pulleys ; 
half-cross drives, 376; margin of safety; barring engine; direction of 
running in driving by ropes, 377; power transmitted; splicing, 37S. — 
Elsworthy, E. H., Cocoa-nut fibre for ropes, 37S. — Halpin, D., Loss of 
power in transmission, 378. 

EoPES AND Belts, Report on the Lille Experiments upon the comparative 
Efficiency of Eopes and Belts for the Transmission of Power, translated 
by D. S. Capper, 1895, 599. — Origin and constitution of Commission, 599 ; 
programme of experiments, engine driving dynamo through ropes or belt, 
for electric lighting, 600. — Method of carrying out experiments, 601 ; 
fonstancj' of load, difference of potential, current, 602. — Details of 
trials, 603. — Summary and general remarks, 605. — Tabulated results,. 
C08-20. 

Observations on the Lille Experiments upon the comparative Efficiency" 
of Ropes and Belts for the Transmission of Power, by D. S. Capper, 621. 
— Limited scope of experiments, 621. — ^lachinery employed : engine,, 
indicators, 622 ; boiler, dynamo, fiy-wheel, pulley ; results of trials, 
623 ; slip of belt, 624. — Previous experiments, Morin, Briggs and 
Towne, 625 ; Leloutre, 62G ; Lewis, 627 ; Lanza, Fauquier, Pearce, 628. — 
Conclusion, 629. 

Discussion. — Capper, D. S., Exhibited specimens of belting and ropcv 
630. — Piatt, J., Speed of belts and ropes, 630. — Longridge, M., Limitation 
of trials, 631 ; sizes of drums and pulleys ; coefficient of friction, 633 
comparative advantages of ropes and belts, 634. — Kennedy, A. B. W., 
Length of drive for ropes and belts, 636.— Longridge, M., Sizes of drums 
and pulleys, 636. — Donkin, B., Earlier rope driving; results of present 
experiments, 636. — Saxon, A., Horse-power per rope, 637 ; manila ropes ; 
rope driving more favourable than belt driving, 638 ; speed of driving, 
639. — Halpin, D., Determination of power absorbed by ropes and belts, 
639. — Beaumont, W. W., Xew ropes and belts used for trials; tension 
of belts; surface of belt pulleys, 641.— Carter, E. T., Efficiencv 
ascertained in driving by dynamos, 612. — Crompton, R. E. B., Accuracy 



310 R 

KoPES AND Belts, Lifcus^ion, 1895 (continued) : — 

of electrical measurements, G4o ; efficiency of transmission ; loss in belt 
and rope transmission, 644 ; loss in transmission by rods in Cornwall, 645. 
— Geipel, "W., Steadiness in driving by ropes or belts, 645 ; convexity 
in rim of belt drums ; short driving with ropes, 646. — Longridge, M., 
Katio of pulleys for rope driving, 640. — Carter, E. T., Electrical 
measurement of eflSciency of rope and belt transmission, 640. — 
Price, H. S., Balancing of fly-wheels and pulleys, 647. — ScLonlieyder, W., 
Shape of rim of belt fly-wheel, 047. — Goodbody, R., Relative size of ropes 
and drum, 648. — Wilson, A. B., Power absorbed in transmission by ropes 
and belts, 618. — Capper, D. S., Rim of belt fly-wlieel, 648; efficiency 
obtained, 64!) ; determination of slip ; condition of ropes and belts used, 
050. — Kennedy, A. B. W., Limitation of trials, 650. — Capper, D. S., 
Torsion voltmeter, 651. — Kennedy, A. B. W., Electrical measurements 
and calibrated indicators, 651 ; loss of power in transmission by ropes 
or belts, 052. — Longridge, M., Mill engines, 652. — Kennedy, A. B. "\V., 
Percentage of load of mill engines, 652. — Anderson. Dr. W., Limitation 
of present trials. 65:5. — Hopkinson, C, Slip of belts, 653. — Neu, L., 
Determination of accuracy of measuring apparatus, 651. — Dubreuil, V., 
Scope of trials, 654 ; calibration of voltmeter unnecessary, 656. — 
Capper, D. S., Relative determination of power in trials, 657. 

Rose, Dr. T. K., Alloys Research, 1897, 92. 

Rosenthal, J. H., elected IMember, 1889, 2(»4. 

Ro^EVEiiE, G. R., elected Graduate, 1896, 280. — Elected Associate Member, 

1899, 146. 

RosEVEUE, R. G., elected Graduate, 1900, 4. — Elected Associate Member, 

1900, 356. 

Ross, E. S., elected Associate Member. 1885, 328. 
Ross, "W., JuN., elected Jlember, 1899, 292. 

Ross AND Duncan, Whitefield Works, Govan, Glasgow, 1895, 509. 
Ross AND Sons, Aerated and Mineral Water Manufactory, Belfast. 1896, 454. 
Ross Hammeb, 1900, 121. See Portable Pneumatic Tools. 

RossE, Right Honourable the Earl of, nominated Honorary Life Member, 1888, 
443. 

Automatic Sluice, Taper on a Balanced or Automatic Sluice for Weirs, 
1888, 292.— Remarks thereon, 300. 

Clock Driving for Telescopes, 1888, 318. 

Dublin Summer Meeting, Welcome to Members, 1888, 267. 

Vote of Thanks to President for Address, 1888, 289. 
RossiTER, J. T., elected Associate Member, 1894, 2. 

RoTHERY, W. B., elected Associate Member, 1896, 462 : — transferred to 
Member, 1898, 548. 



R 311 

Rothschild, L. V., elected Graduate, 1896, 2S0. 
RorxTHAVAiTE, H. M., elected Member, 1893, 391. 
Glass Revealer, 1900, 538. 
Screw-Propeller Surface, 1892, ooi. 
Steam-Engine Breakdowns, 1896, 5S5. 
Steam Jacket, 1896, 491. 
RouTLEDGE, T., deccase, 1888, 3.— Memoir, 1887, i6d. 
RoLX, CoMBALUZiEU, AND Lepape LiFT, 1889, 351. See Eiffel Tower Lifts. 
Rorx, P. L., Graduate transferred to Associate Member, 1898, 5-18. 
Row, O. 31., elected Member, 1898, 2. 
Rmwax, F. J., roper on Electro-^Iagnetic Macliiue-Tools,. 1887, 323. Remarks 

thereon, 335, 3il. 
RowAX, J., elected Member, 1888, IGO. 

Marine-Engine Trials, 1892, 177, 196. 
Rowan and Son, David, Marine Engine and Boiler "Works, Glasgow, 1895, 

497. 
RowcLiFFE, W. C, elected Associate. 1891, 480. 
Rowe, a., elected Member, 1892, 414. 
RowE, D., elected Associate ^lember, 1894, 170. 
Rowe, J., elected Associate Member, 1899, 4. 
RowELL, J. H., elected Associate, 1888, 444. 
RoMLAND, B. R., elected IMember, 1891, 197. 
Royal Crown Derby Porcelain AVorks, Derby, 1898, 492. 
Royal Naval Engineerisg College, Keyliam, 1899, 442, 447.— Training of 

Students, 383. See Machinery of H.M.S. " P.-yche." 
Rotce, F. H., elected Member, 1898, 2. 
Roylance,A. H.. elected Associate :Member, 1897, 144 :— transferred to IMember, 

1900, 97. 
Ruffle, F. F., elected Associate Member, 1896, 283. 
Rugby, "Willans and Robinson, Victoria Engine Works, 1897, 369, 429:— 

1900, 467, 490. 
Rvles of Institution. See By-laws. 
RuMMELE, A., elected Graduate. 1888, 2. 
Russell, B., elected Associate Member, 1898, 143. 
Russell, F., elected Associate Member, 1895, 150. 
Russell, H., elected Associate Member, 1899, 293. 
Russell, The Hon. W., decease, 1889, 4.— Memoir, 338. 
Russell, W. C, elected Graduate. 1894, 23.""). 

Russell and Co., Kingston Shipbuilding Yard, Port Glasgow, 1885, 329. 
Russell and Co., John, Alma Tube "Works and Cyclops Iron "Works, "Walsall, 

18S7, 360, 414. 
Russell and Sons, R., Peel Foundry. Derby, 1898, 494. 



312 R 

Russian Locomotives, burning retroleum Fuel, 18C0, 47. See Compouudiug of 

Locomotives. 
Russian South Western Eailm-ays, Steam Pumps, 1893, 433. See Steam 

Pumps. 
RusTON, J., decease, 1898, C— Memoir, 1897, 141. 

Steam Navvy, Paper on Dunbar and Euston"s Steam Xavvy. 1885, 349. — 
Remarks thereon, 363, 367. 
RusTON, PuocTOu AND Cc, Sheaf Iron Works, Lincoln. 1885, 434. 441. 
RuTHEN, C. T., elected Associate Member, 1897, 433. 
Ryan, Dr. J., elected Member, 1885, 2. 

Clock Driving for Telescopes, 1888, 318. 

Compound Locomotives, 1886, 382. 

Compound Steam Turbine. 1888, 520. 

Dryness of Steam, 1895, S."). 

Electric Lighthouse, 1887, 3t;C. 

Lake Superior Copper MiniiiLr, 1887, 120. 

Quick-Revolution Engines, 1897, 310. 

Reguault's Steam Experiments, 1889, 4rt2. 

Tees Engineering Improvements, 1893, 328. 

Triple-Expansion Engines, 1887, .Jl. 
Rycroft, J. E., elected Associate Member, 1897, 2i~. 
Rtdee, G., decease, 1893, 4.— Memoir, 1892, 5G9. 
Eyland, p., decease, 1900, C— Memoir, 1899, 142. 
Rylaxds and Sons, Warehouse, Manchester, 1894, 417. 



Sachs, E. O., elected Associate, 1889, J. 

Sacre, a. L., decease, 1898, 0.— Memoir, 1897, 141. 

Sacre, C. R., decease, 1890, 4.— Memoir, 1889, r.S'J. 

Saddlery and Hauxess Wouks, Walsall, 1897, 360, 413. 

Said, Marshal M., Pasha, decease, 1897, 5.— :\Iemoir, 1896, 97. 

Sainsbuuy, F. C. B., elected Member, 1892, 414.— Decease, 1900, 6.— Memoir, 

1898, 706. 
St. Catherine's Lighthouse, Isle of Wight, 1892, 370, 393, 397. 
St. George's Iron Works, Liverpool, 1891, 448. 
St. Katherixes Paper Machinery Works, Edinburgh, 1887, 439. 
Saleord Corporation Gas Works, 1894, 423, 
Salford Corporation Sewage Works, 1894, 426. 
Salis, H. R. de, elected Associate Member, 1894, 470. 
Canal-Boat PropulsioD, 1867, 214. 



S 313 

Salomoxs, Sir I). L. G.-S., Bart., elected Associate, 1900, 50:5. 

Salt Industry, Middlesbrough, 1893, 'IIS. See Middlesbrough Salt Industry. 

Salt Test for determining Dryness of Steam, 1895, 41, rj. See Dryness of 

Steam. 
Salt U>aoN, Port Clarence Salt Works, Middlesbrough, 1893, 3G1. 
Saltbcrn-by-the-Sea, Excursion, 1893, 335, 336. 

Saltek, F., elected Member, 1887, 158.— Decease, 1889, -1 :— Memoir, 199. 
Sampsox, J. L., Construction of Cycles, 1885, 511. 

Fluid-Pressure Reversing Gear, 1894, 263. 

Friction Experiments, 1891, 12tJ. 

Lighting of "Workshops, 1893, 428. 
Samoda, J. D'A., decease, 1886, 4.— Memoir, 1885, :^02. 
Samcel, B. L., elected Associate 3Iember, 1896, 2. 
Samuelson, Right Hon. Sir Bernhard, Bart., appointed Member of Her Majesty's 

Privy Council, 1896, 3. 
Samcelson, E., Paper on improvements in the Longworlh Power-Hammer, 

1900, 99.— Remarks thereon, 105, 109, 110, 114, 11 G. 
Samuelson and Co., Sir B., Newport Iron "Works, Middlesbrougli, 1893, 337. 
Sand, Moulding, 1891, 94. See Moulding Sand. 
Sandberg, C. p., elected :Member, 18S0, 298. 

Portrait of Dr. John Percy, 1890, 328. 

Steel Rails, Paper on Steel Rails, considered Chemically and 
Mechanically, 1890, 301. —Remarks thereon, 328-31, 318-50. 

Tube-Frame Railway Wagons, 1890, 524. 
Sand-Blast, Bellefield Sand-Blast Works, Sheffield, 1890, 442, 464. 
Sandeman, E., elected Member, 1899, 144. 

Outlet "N'alves, Paper on Outlet "N'alves at the Burrator Reservoir of the 
Plymouth Water Works, 1899, 407.— Remarks thereon, 414, 417. 
Sakdeman, F. S., Manhattan Jute Works, Dundee, 1887, 45G. 
Sanders, G., elected Associate Member, 1897, 144. 
Sanders, H. C. Aluminium, 1898, 364. 
Sanders, J., Tube-Frame Railway Wagons, 1890, 500. 
Sanders, P. H., elected Graduate, 1890, 472. 
Sanderson, H. W., elected Graduate, 1899, 146. 
Sandford, H., elected :Member, 1886, 12G. 
Sandham, H., decease, 1893, 4:— Memoir, 95. 

Paddle-Wheel Xavigaticn, Paper on the history of Paddle- Wheel Steam 
Navigation, 1885, 121. 

Tube-Frame Railway Wagons, 1880, 503. 
Saxdiford, C, Paper on the Working of Compound Locomotives in India, 

1886, 355.— Remarks thereon, 408. 
Sands, IL, elected Member, 1891, 2. 



314 S 

Saner, J. A., Canal-Boat Propulsion, 1897, 210. 
Saxgsteb, C, elected Associate Member, 1896, 2.^0. 
Saxgsteb, ^y. S., elected Associate, 1896, 4G2. 

Sanitary En'gineerixg, 1889, 220. ,sVe Address of President, Charles Cochrane. 
Sanitary Works, Foundling Hospital, London, 1886, 425. 
S.\NKEY, Capt. 31. H. P. R.. elected Member, 1894, 294. 
Dryness of Steam, 1895, Go. 
3Iarine-Engine Triab, 1894, 82, 130. 
Steam-Engiue Breakdowns, 1896, 575. 

Throttling and Variable Expansion, Paper on Governing of Steam 
Engines by Throttling and by Variable Expansion, 1895, 154. — 
Eemarks thereon, 179, 184, ISO, 213, 234. 
Sabgeant, E. F., elected 3Iember, 1899, 474. 

Sautteb, Lemonnier, and Co., Electric-Light Works, Paris, 1889, 547, 565. 
g.iCVAGE, E., elected ^Member, 1900, 2. 
Express Locomotives, 1898, 050. 
French Locomotive Practice, Paper on Recent Locomotive Practice in 

France, 1900, 375. — Remarks thereon, 425, 430. 
Mean-Pressure Indicator, 1899, 607. 
Road Locomotion, 1900, 281. 
Savill. a. S., elected Member. 1891, 197. 
.Saw Mills, HartlejKxils, 1893, 37G. 
Saxelby, H. R., elected Graduate, 1890, 299. 
.^.-s^xoN, A., elected ^lembcr, 1893, 1. 
Electric Welding, 1894, :J33. 
French Locomotive Practice, 1900, 425. 
Hydraulic Gas-Stoking, 1895, 340. 
Marine-Engine Trials, 1894, 99. 
Quick-Revolution Engines, 1897, 310. 
Rope-Driving, 1896, 370. 
Ropes and Belts, 1895, 037. 
Steam-Engiuc Breakdowns, 1896, 578, 580. 
Steam Jacket, 1892, 509. 
Steel- Works Machinery, 1895, 455. 
Tlirottling and Variable Expansion, 1895, 205. 
Water Softening, 1898, 445. 
Saxon, G., elected Member, 1894, 294. 

Rope Driving. 1896, 372. 
Saxon, J., elected Member, 1894, 169. 
Scanlan, H. E., elected Associate Member, 1896, l02. 
ScABFE, G. N., elected Graduate, 1892, 102. 
Scattergood, p., Jux., elected Member, 1892, 414. 



515 



ScnLOESSER, II.. elected Associate Member, 1893, 220. 
ScHMiD Water JIeter, 1900, 50. See Water Meters. 
ScHOFiELD, C. J., decease, 1893, 4. — Memoir, 1892, 509. 
Schofield, G. a., elected Member, 1890, 2. 
ScHOFiELD, J. W., elected Associate, 1890, -172. 
Scholes, W. H., elected Member, 1886, 120. 
ScHuxHEYDEK. W., Auditor, 1900, 30. 
Blooming Mill, 1885, 297. 
Boiler Constriictioa, 1891, 500. 
By-laws, 1890, 32. 

Coal Buraiug on Cape Ilailways. 1890, 123. 
Comiwund Locomotives, 1889, 121. 
Compound Steam Turbine, 1888, 498. 
Compounding of Locomotives, 1890, 74. 
Eiftel Tower Lifts, 1889, 374. 
Electric Plant, 1898, 575. 
Evaporative Condensers, 1899, 247. 
Express Locomotives, 1898, 030. 
Fluid-Pressure Reversing-Gear, 1894, 263. 
French Locomotive Practice, 1900, 420. 
Friction Experiments, 1886, 00:— 1888, 187:— 1891, 121. 
Gas-Engine Research, 1898, 212. 
Glass Reveuler, 1900, 541. 
High-Speed Engine, 1894, 244. 
Hydraulic Power Supply, 1895, 401. 
Incrustation of Torquay Water Mains, 1899, 520. 
Irrigating Machinery, 1888, 72. 

Liverpool ^Motive Power, 1892, 57. 

3Iarine-Engine Trials, 189D, 255:— 1891, 252 :— 1894, 119. 

Oxygen 3Ianufacture, 1890, 150. 

Partially Immersed Propcllcrn, 1897, 121. 

Portable Hydraulic Drill, 1887, 70. 

Portable Pneumatic Tools, 1900, 104. 

Refrigerating Machinery, 1886, 253. 

Rock Drills, 1891, 109. 

Roller Flour Milling. 1889, 108. 

Ropes and Belts, 1895, 047. 

8hip-Model Apparatus, 1893, 45, 40. 

Spherical Engine, 1885, 111. 

Steam-Engine Breakdowns, 1896, 582. 

Steam Jacket, 1892, 497 :— 1896, 490. 

Steam Pumps, 1893, 454. 



316 S 

ScHoxHEYDER, W. (continuGil) : — 

Steam Superheating. 1896, 217. 

Steel Steam-Pipes, 1896, 243. 

Testing Machine, 1888, 2:56. 

Throttling and Variable Expansion. 1895, 193. 

Triple-Expansion Engines. 1887, tl4. 

"NVater-Meteis, Paper on Water IMeters of the present day. with special 
reference to Small Flows and "Waste in dribbks, 1900, 37. — Uematlis 
thereon, 5G, 74, SG. 

Water Works, Southampton, 1893, C8. 

Wood-Cutting :Machinery, 1885, 93. 
ScHOXTHEiL, F., elected Graduate, 1899, 291. 
Schools ou Colleges, Technical. See Engineering Colleges, Laboratories, and 

Technical Schools. 
SCHRAM, J. R., decease, 1899, 7.— Memoir, 1898, 31S. 
ScHnEiBER Water Meter. 1900, 40. See Water IMeters. 
ScHKOLLER, W., clccted Member, 1890, 472. 
SciiURR, A. E., elected ^lember, 1886, 465. 
ScHUTTE, F. A., elected Associate 3Iember, 1900, 183. 
SCHUIZE Centrifugal 3Iixer for Moulding Sand, 1891, 98. -See Moulding 

Sand. 
Scorgie, J., elected Member, 1885, 2.— Decease, 1896, 4.— Memoir, 1885, .".41. 
Scoria Brick Works, Tees, ^liddlesLrough, 1893, 352. 
Scott, A. F., elected IMember, 1891, 197. 
ScOTT, C. H., Graduate transferred to Member, 1889, 3. 
Scott, D., decease, 1887, 4. -:Mtmoir, 1886, 203. 
Scott, E. K, Electric Traction, 1898, 114. 

Partially Immersed Propellers, 1897, 123. 
Scott, F. M., elected :Meml)er, 1890, 29S. 

Scott, F. W., elected Member, 1891, 2.— Decease, 1898, C— Memoir, 1897, 112. 
Scott, H. J., elected Member, 1891, 301. 
Scott, H. K., elected Associate 3Iember, 1897, 257. 
Scott, J., elected Member, 1886, 12f.. 
Scott, N. L., elected Associate ^lember, 1897, 433. 
Scott, Robert (Tokio), elected Member, 1885, 1(J4. 
Scott, Robert (Calcutta), elected ^lember, 1894, 2Ii4. 
Scott, Robert (Kroonstad), elected Associate Member, 1899, 14 3. 
Scott, R. .J., elected Member, 1891, 301. 

Launch of a Battleship, 1899, 348, 352. 
Machinery of H.M.S. "Psyche," 1899, 3.(7. 
Scott, W., elected Associate, 1887, 281. 
Scott, W. G., elected Member, 1899, 202. 



S 317 

Scott axd Co., Ship-Yard and Engine Worlcs, Greenock, 1895, 530. 

ScOTTER, R. H., elected Associate Member, 1897, 2 :— transferred lo Member, 
1900, 07. 

ScoTT-MoxcRiEFF, W. D., Compound Steam Turbine, 1888, "ill. 
Friction Experiments, 1888, 192. 
Taxation of :Macliincry. 1890, 40. 
Triple-Expansion Engines. 1886, 320. 

Scrap-Welding Fuexaces, 1889, 40, OS, 73, 78, 82. -See Petroleum Fuel in 
Locomotives. 

Scraper fob Water Mains, 1899, 479. .See Incrustation of Torquay Water 
Plains. 

Screws for Machine-made Watches, 1894, 473. See Watch Screws. 

Screw-Pkopeller Surface, Paper on the Arrangement of the Surface of a 
Screw-Propeller, by W. G. Walker, 1892, 514. — Seven propellers difiering 
only in arrangement of virtual surface, with two and four blades, and 
with three and six, 514.— Description of yacht, 516.— Mode of experiment, 
516.— Measure of eflSciency, 518. — Examination of results, 519. — Sum of 
pressures of slip and propulsion, 520. — Discussion of results, 521. — 
Practical trials on sea-going steamers, 523 ; comparison of six-bladed and 
ordinary four-bladed propellers, 524.— Trial on tug steamer, 525.— 
Tabulated results of experiments with seven propellers, and of trials in 
voyages, 52S. 

Discussion. — Walker, W. G., Experiments desirable on larger scale, 
535. — Froude, E. E., Accuracy of results, 535 ; elimination of screw- 
blade friction, 536 ; low coefficient of friction for blades, 536 ; power 
wasted in slip, 537 ; friction due to load, and friction of engine, 538 ; 
constant edgeways resistance of screw blades, 539 ; shape of blades, and 
direction of motion, 540 ; multiplying and narrowing of blades, 541 ; no 
substantial advantage in multiplying blades, 542.— Gray, J. M., Equal 
efficiency of ordinary and Dickinson propellers, 542. — Thornycroft, J. I., 
Eelative position and number of blades, 543. — Barnaby, S. W., Increasing 
pitch for broader screw-blades, 545; negative slip, 545. — Shield, H., 
Experiments with flyers propellers, 546; tabulated results of trials with 
ordinary and Myers propellers, 548; increased number of blades, 551. 

Dunell, G. E., Trials of Dickinson and Yarrow propellers, 551. — 

Rounthwaite, H. ^I., Efficiency of six-bladed propeller, 554 — Kennedy, 
A. B. W., Engine friction, 554.— Phillips, J., Larger boss for propeller, 
550. — Walker. W. G., Indicated horse-power, 556 ; surface friction of 
blades; engine friction, 557; edgeways resistance constant, 558; 
increased efficiency of narrower blades, 559 ; advantages of multiple 
blades, '559; negative pressure, 561; efficiency of thicker blades, 562 ; 
blades with increasing pitch, 562; maximum efficiency and working 



318 S 

t^CRETV-PKOPELLEu SURFACE, iJiscufsion, 1892 (ooutinued) : — 

speed, 508; comparison of trials, 5tii ; coefficient of performance, 5GG. — 
Anderson, Dr. W., Theory of screw-propeller, 5UG. 

Screw-Peopellers, Partially Immersed, 1897, 101. See Partially Immersed 
Propellers. 

ScRiYEX, C. elected Member, 1896, 102. 

Scutching Flax, 1896, 28.". See Flax Dressing ^Machinery. 

Seabrooe, a. H., elected Associate Member, 1900, o02. 

Seafield Jute AVorks. Dundee, 1887, 455. 

Seaman, C. J., elected Member, 1892, 414. 

Search Lights, 1892, 257. See Naval Electrical Apparatus. 

Secchi, L.. elected Associate Member. 1899, 4. 

Secretary (Alfred Bacbe), Illness, 1896, 278 :— Retirement, 1897, 278; fee 
Retirement of Secretary: — 1898, 11 : — Vote of tlianks on retirement. 
1898, 36-42. 

Secretary (Edgar "Worthington), Appointment, 1897, 4:!G:— 1898, 1, 11. 

Section of "Waterway in Canals, 1897, HH. See Partially Immersed 
Propellers. 

Seddon, J., decease, 1892, 4.— Memoir, 1891, 47G. 

Seddon,E. B., elected Member, 1886, 271.— Decease, 1897, 5.— Memoir. 1896, 0!). 

Seebohm and Dieckstahl. Dannemora Steel Works. Sheffield, 1890, 45r». 

Segundo, E. C. de, elected Associate Member. 1893, itS. 
Canal-Boat Propulsion. 1897, 204. 
Lighting of Workshops. 1893, 414, 417. 
Marine-Engine Trials, 1894, 11:^. 
Steam Jacket, 1896, 49:!. 

Selby, M., elected Member, 1891, 2. 

Self-Lubricating Engines, 1894, 2i:'. :— 1897, :;1G. See High-Speed Engines; 
and Quick-Revolution Engines. 

Self-Propelled Traffic Association, Liverpool. 1900, IBS, 212, 247, 2J2, 
313-4. See Road Locomotion. 

Self-Recokding Water-Gauge, 1890, 426. -See Sheffield Water Works. 

Sellers, G., elected Member. 1888, IGO. 

Seluer, a. L., elected Member. 1891, 480. 

Selman, D. C., elected Slember, 1889, :>4(i. 

Semi-Poktable Engine, Paper on recent adaptations of the Robey Semi- 
Portable Engine, by J. Richardson, 1885, :i71. — Portable engine, ;>71.— 
Semi-portable engine on cast-iron foundation-plate, :!71. — Sinking engine, 
372. — Lighter engine on wrought-iron tank foundation, o72. — Details of 
design, 373. — Compound engine, 374. — Governing, 374. 

Dtscussjon.— 389-412. See Private Electric Lighting. Semi-portable 
winding engine with wrought-iron foundation shown under steam, 44J. 



S 319 

Senxett, a. K., elected Member, 1896, 4G2. 

Sennett, R., decease, 1892, 4.— Memoir, 1891, 47G. 

Sevi.v, C. Drying iu Vacuum, 1889, o-J6. 

Sewage Istekception- Wharf, Birmingham, for House Refuse, 1897, 377. 

Sewage Outfall Works, Paper on tlie Portsmouth Sewage Outfall Works, by 
Sir F. Bramwell, Bart., 1892, 319.— District. 319.— Sewerage system and 
pumping arrangements, 320.— Outfall, 320.— Tidal experiments, 322.— 
Storage tank, 323 ; ventilation, 324 ; construction, 325.— Discharge valves 
opened by turbines, 326.— Electrical indicators, 327.— Outlet pipes, 
protection ; groynes, and movements of shingle, 328.— ^lain from pumping 
station to storage tank, 329.— Pumping engines, 329.— Reconstruction of 
sewers, 331. 

Discussion. — Bramwell. Sir F., Increase of population, 332.— Cochrane. 
C, Sewage at various towns, 333 ; storm water, 334 ; nature of ground, 
334. — Pink, Sir W., Accumulation in old sewers, 335 ; storm water, 336 ; 
discharge into sea, 33G.— Donkin, B., Jun., Turbines opening discharge- 
valves, 336.— Head, J., Ventilation of sewers, 33G.— Murch, P., Ventilation 
by shafts, 337.— Pink, Sir W.. Ventilation, 337 ; flusliing of sewers, 338.— 
Marten, E. B., Langstone Harbour acts as ejector, 338.- Lemon, J., 
Former discharge of sewage at Southampton, 339; sewer gas, 340; 
rainfall, 340.— Butter, H. J., Furnace ventilation for sewers, 340.— Butler, 
J., Sewer ventilation at Halifax, 341.— Harris, H. G., Turbines, 341 : 
sewer gas, 342.— Bramwell, Sir F., Langstone Harbour, 343 ; reconstructed 
sewers, 343 ; rainfall, 343. 

Sewage Pkecipitatiox Wokks axd Refuse Destkuctok, Southampton, 1892, 
354, 369. See Sewage and Refuse Works. 

Sewage Works :— Pumping Stations, or Refuse Works. 
Belfast, 1896, 430. 
Birmingham, 1897, 377. 
Buenos Aires, 1895, 372, 376. 
Glasgow, 1895, 462, 473. 
Lincoln, 1885, 447. 
London (Crossness), 1886, 412, 452-6. 
Manchester, 1894, 381, 406. 
Portsmouth, 1892, 319, 367. 
Salford, 1894, 42G. 
Southampton, 1892, 354, 369. 
Sewage AXD Refuse Works, Pa^er on the Southampton Sewage Piecipitation 
Works and Refuse Destructor, by W. B. G. Bennett, 1892, 3.54.— Former 
sewage disposal at Southampton superseded by present system, 354 : 
precipitation of sludge, 354.— Pneumatic ejectors, transmitting precipitated 
sludge to refuse destructor, and discharging clarified effluent, 3.55.- 



320 S 

Sewage axd Eefcse Works, Paper. 1892 (continued) : — 

Reservoirs, 35'!. — ^Material for precipitation, 3o7. — ^Manure mixing, 357. — 
Refuse destructor, boiler and chimney, 3.j8. — Steam power obtained, 3.")9. 
— Utilization of sludga and refuse, 350. — Electric lighting and other uses, 
360. — Cost of destructor and of working, 3G0. — Value of refuse as fuel, 
361 —Revenue, 361. 

Ducmnon. — Bennett, W. B. G., Visit to works, 362. — Cochrane, C, 
Destruction of refuse in Chicago, ?tQ2 ; damage to destructor chimney by 
lichtning, :!G2. — Pink, Sir W., Quality of manure, 362 ; utilization of 
clinkers, 362. — Bennett, "\V. B. G., Lightning conductor, 363; manure 
and clinkers, 363. — Cochrane, C, Failure of lightning conductor to protect 
chimney, 363. — Bennett, AV. B. G., Explanation of accident, 363. 

Sewers, Paris. 1889, 516, .■>.")9. 

SEYMoru, G., Lake Superior Copper Alining, 1887, 118. 

Seymour, L. I., elected IMember, 1894, 2'. li.— Decease, 1901, 7.— ^lemoir, 1900, 
628. 

Seymour, "NV. F. E., elected Graduate, 1892, 414 : — transferred to Associate 
:Member, 1897, 5. 

Shackletox and Sons. George, Anna LiflVy Flour Mill, Lucan, 1888, 414. 

Shaft Bearings and Couplings, 1888. See Bearings ; and Irrigating 
3Iachinery. 

SuAFT Couplings, 1888, 40, 47. See Irrigating Machinery. 

Sh.^ft, Flexible. 1887. See Portable Hydraulic Drill. 

Shafting and Belting, Power absorbed. 1898, 5."i3. See Electric Plant. 

Shanp, J., elected Member, 1894, 294. 

Shanks and Co., James, Mineral Water Manufactory, Dublin, 1888, 412. 

Shannon and Son. Clothing and Woollen Warehouse, Walsall, 1897, 369, 416. 

Shaping Machine for Ship Models, 1893, 32. See Ship-Model Apparatus. 

Shapton, W., decease, 1897, 5. — ^lemoir, 1896, 260. 

Grain Warehousing jMachinery, I'aper on the Warehouse and ^Machinery 
for the Storage and Transit of Grain at the Alexandra Dock, 
Liverpool, 1891, 372. — Remarks thereon, 384. 

Shardlow, A., elected 3Iember, 1890, 298.— Decease, 1895, 4.— :Memoir, 1894, 
599. 

Sh-VRP, A., Electric Traction. 1898, in6. 

Sharp, H., elected Member, 1891, 197. 

Sharp, J., elected 3Iember, 1897, 256. 

Sharp, J. H.. elected Member, 1895, 327. 

Sharp, S., elected IMember, 1898, .J46. 

Sharp, T. B., Aluminium, 1898, 367. 
Cycle Construction, 1897, 295. 

Sharp, W., elected Graduate, 1898, 3. 



S 321 

Sharp, Stewart and Co., Atlas "Works, Glasgow, 1895, iGC, iSL 

Sharpley, G. R., elected Graduate, 1893, 98 :— elected Associate Member, 1897, 
433 :— transferred to Member, 1900, 503. 

Shaw, D., decease, 1886, 4. 

Shaw, P. C. "W., elected IVIember, 1900, 96. 

Shaw, "\V., Cleveland Industries, 1893, 271. 

Shaw, "W. C, elected Associate Member, 1900, 3. 

Shaw, W. T., Wheel Load in Cycles, 1886, 109, ISO. 

Shawcross, G. N., elected Associate Member, 1899, liG. 

Sheaf Iron Works, Lincoln, 1885, 43t, 441-2. 

Shears, Hot-Slab, 1893, 250. 

Sheffield, F. G., elected Associate Member, 1899, 4. 

Sheffield Scmmer IMeeting, 1890, 295.— Eeception, 295.— Business, 299. — 
Votes of Thanks, 300.— Excursions, &c., 442.— Presentations, 471. 

Sheffield Technical School, 1890, 442, 447. 

Sheffield Testing Works, 1890, 442, 457. 

Sheffield Water Works, Paper on the Sheffield Water Works, by E. M. Eaton, 
1890, 419. — Source of supply, and average rainfall, 419. — High-level 
reservoirs, 419.— Low-level reservoirs, 420. — Reservoir capacities, and 
areas of gathering grounds, 420. — Summary of supply, 421. — Redmires 
reservoirs, 421. — Rivelin reservoirs, 422. — Depositing pond, 423. — Agden 
reservoir, and gauge for compensation water, 423. — Strines reservoir, 423. 
— Dale Dike reservoir, 423. — Damflask reservoir, 424. — Distribution of 
supply, 425.-^Self-recording gauges, 42G. — Quality of water, 426. 

Discussion. — Eaton, E. M., Model and specimens, 427. — Cochrane, C, 
Cast-iron pipes, 428. — Martin, E. P., Boiler corrosion by pure water, 428. 
— Douglass, Sir J. X., Cast-iron destroyed by salt water, 428 ; boilers fed 
with rain water, 429. — Bell, Sir L., Corrosion of locomotive boilers, 429 ; 
effect of pure water on iron, 429 ;jrain water not perfectly pure, 430. — 
Marten, E. B., Proportion secured of rainfall, 430 ; gauging apparatus, 
and experiments at Wolverhampton, 430 ; intermittent and constant 
supply, 431 ; external corrosion of pipes, 432 ; wooden pipes and pump- 
trees, 432 ; effect of pure water on lead and wrought-iron pipes, 432 ; 
daily consumption and waste, 432. — Hughes, G. D., Average pressure, and 
measurement of water, 432. — Hoskin, R., Use of water under pressure, 
433. — Paget, A., Jointing of wooden pipes, 433 : boiler fed with purest 
soft water, 433. — Spconer, H. J., Boiler fed with distilled water, 433; 
positive meter, 433. — Davey, H., Leakage of boilers fed with pure water, 
433. — Tomlinson, J., Salt and pure water in marine boilers, 434. — • 
Cochrane, C, Corrosion due to oil, 435. — Tomlinson, J., Cylinder 
lubrication with water instead of grease, 435. — Eaton, E. M., Sheffield 
water in boilers, 435 ; hardness of water, 436 ; wrought-iron pipes cannot 

X 



322 S 

Sheffield "Water Wokks, Di<cus<ion, 1890 (contiuucil) : — 

be used, 436 ; rust in cast-iron pipes, 4o6 ; action of pure water upon lead, 
and use of chalk, 437 ; action upon steel and cast-irou, 437 ; external 
corrosion of cast-iron pipes, 438 ; hardening eflect of atmosphere, 438 ; 
irregular corrosion of wrought-iron, 438 ; pressure of water, 439 ; supply 
for motive power, 439 ; high-pressure and low-pressure meters, 439 ; 
jointing of wooden pipes, 440 ; quantity of water collected in dry years, 
440; models of district, 441. — Tisited at Summer Meeting, 445. 

Sheldon, H. C, elected Member, 1890, 47-2. 

Sheldon, W. J., elected Member, 1900, 2. 

Shelley, C. P. B., decease, 1892, 4.— IMemoir, 1891, 292. 

Shenton, J., elected Member, 1891, 301.— Decease, 1899, 7.— 3Iemoir, 1898, 706. 

Shephekd, J., elected Member, 1892, 2. 

Shepherd, J. H., elected Graduate, 1892, 229. 

Shepherd, J. L., elected IMember, 1897, 143. 

Shepherd, E. L., elected ^lember, 1899, 144. 

Shepherd Gas-Engixe, 1889, .■)02. See Gas Engines. 

Shiba, C, elected Associate Member, 1899, 293. 

Shield, H., Gas Engines, 1889, 'yM, 5:;2, 536. 
Screw-Propeller Surface, 1892, 546. 

Shiels, J., elected Associate Blembei, 1898, 3. 

Shin, T., elected IMember, 1888, 269. 

Ships. /See Steamships ; and Steimiers. 

Ship Canal, :\[anchester, 1891, 4:;2, 457 :— 1894, 403. 

Ship 3Iodel Apparatus, I'aper on the Experimental Apparatus and Shajjing 
Machine for Ship ^Models at the Admiralty Experimental Works, Haslar, 
by K. E. Froudc, 1893, 32. — Principal feature of present works at Haslar 
and former at Torquay, '.'>2. — Water-way and experiment carriage, 32. — 
Stationary engine and hauling gear, 33 ; governor, 34. — Model-shaping 
machine, 35; principal differences from original Torquay machine, 35 ; 
adjustable level of cutters, 35 ; lateral motion of cutters, 36 ; drawing 
table, position and size, 37. — Copying apparatus, 37. — Travel of model, 
39. — !Melting and casting of parafifine for models, 39. — Steel-yar<l 
weighing-machine, 39. 

Discussion. — Anderson, Dr. AV., Improvements effected in machine, 41. 
— Fronde, R. E., Exhibited segment of paraftine model ; object of Paper, 
41. — White, W. H., Scope of Paper, and advantage of experiment works, 
42 ; governor, copying macliine, and experiment carriage, 43 ; other 
experimental works, 44.— Thomycroft, J. I., Economy resulting from 
experiments, 44 ; construction of apparatus, 45. — Gray, J. M., Straightness 
of centre line in model, 45. — Schunheydcr, AV., Copying apparatus, 45. — 
Froude, R. E., Tracer, 45. — Schouheyder, W., Lost time and slap, 46. — 



S 323 

Ship 3Iodel Appakatcs, Discussion, 1893 (continued) : — 

Donkin, B., Jun., Cost of apparatus, 4G.— Anderson, Dr. W., Gradual 
growth of apparatus, 4G.— Kennedy, A. B. W., Procedure at Haslar, 4G.— 
Marten, E. B., Enlargement from drawing, 4(j. — Froudc, E. E., Relative 
size of drawing and model, 47. — 5Iarten, E. B., Performance of model 
and of ship, 47. — Head, J., Experimental works at Torquay and at 
Haslar, 47 ; resemblance to AVatt's copying machine ; benefit of 
experiments, 48. — Armer, J., Shape of water-way, 49. — Froude. R. E , 
Sectional area of water-way ; lost time and slap ; copying gear, 49 ; 
relative performance of ships and models ; resistance proportional to 
wetted surface, 50 ; origin of experiment works, 51. — Anderson, Dr. W., 
Paucity of experimental works in this country, 51. — White, "W. H., 
Proposals for other works, 51. — Anderson, Dr. "W., Value of experiments, 
52. 
Ship, Raising of the Wrecked Steamship "Peer of the Realm,'' 1886, ISO. 

See Raising a A\'reck. 
Ship Waves, Lecture on Ship Waves, by Sir W. Thomson, 1887, 409.— Definition 
and examples of waves, 409. — Caxal Waves, Scott Russell's researches 
Ijrocession of waves in rear of boat, 410. — Viscosity of water. 411. — 
Natural velocity of long wave, 412. — Generation of wave, 41.3. — Velocity 
of progression of free wave, 414. — Procession of waves, 414. — Speed of 
roar of procession, 416. — Boat moving faster than long wave leaves no 
procession of waves behind, 41G. — Origin of system of fly-boats, 41S. — 
Scott Russell's experimental station, 420. — Force required to drag boats 
at difterent speeds, 421.— Traction on canal and on railway, 422. — Ship 
Waves at Sea, Fronde's experiments, 422. — Mathematical theory and 
pattern of ship waves, 423. — Echelon waves, 425. — Formation of ship 
waves, 425. — Thwart-ship waves at different speeds, 427. — Velocity and 
length of free waves, 428. — Parallel ^Middle Body, 429. — Effect on 
resistance to ship, 429. — Best form of ship, 430. — Wave-making resistance 
and skin resistance, 431. — Suggestion for swelling out the ship below 
water line, 432. — Examples of wave-pattern, 432. 

Muir, Sir W., Proposed vote of thanks for lecture, 433. — Carbutt, E. H., 

Seconded vote of thanks, 433; and moved thanks to Marquess of 

Tweeddale for presiding, 434. 

SmPBriLDixG, Connection between Mechanical Engineering and modern 

Shipbuilding, 1899, 153. See Address by the President, Sir AVilliam 

H. White. 

Shipbuilding and Engineering Works. See Shipbuilding Works ; and 

Engine AVorks ; and Marine-Engine AVorks. 
Shipbuilding in Iron and Steel, 1885, 313, 347. See Address by the President, 
Jeremiah Head. 

X 2 



324 S 

b'liiPBriLDiXG IX PoRTSJiouTH DOCKYARD, Taper on ShiiDbuilJinp: in Portsmouth 
Dockyard, by W. H. White, 1892, 232.— Portsmouth dockyard, origin and 
growtli, 232. — Shipbuilding,' on slips and iu docks, 234. — Latest extension 
of dockyard, 235. — Construction of new ships and machinery, conditions 
and examples, 236. — Expenditure on labour and materials, 237. — Past 
shipbuilding, retrospect of typical examples from 1859 to " Eoyal 
Sovereign" 1892, 238-41. — Armament, armour, rate of progress, and 
cost, 241. — Siiips now in progress of building or completing, 243-7. — 
Reconstruction and repairs, 248. — Tabulated particulars of ships 
complefed and in progress, 249-53. 

Discussion. — White, W. H., Extent of naval reserve, 254 ; rapidity of 
construction of " IJoyal Sovereign," 254. — Anderson, Dr. W., Wars now 
getting shorter, and preparation of warlike materials getting longer, 255. 

SmPBriLDiNG Works or Y.krus : — 

Belfast, 1888, 382, 418:— 1896, 447, 456. 

Birkenhead, 1891, 451. 

Clydebank. 1895, 512-21. 

Gla-'gow, 1895, 486, 490, 492, 502-10. 

Greenock, 1895, 530. 

Liverpool, 1891, 446, 448, 450. 

London, 1886, 457 :— 1900, 485. 

Paishy, 1895, 521. 

Plymouth. 1899, 459. 

Port Glasgow, 1895, 529. 

Portsmouth, 1892, 232. 

Renfrew, 1895, 522. 

Southampton,, 1892, 369, 385. 

Thornaby. 1893, 3tj8. 

West Hartlepool, 1893, 374, 3S4. 

■Shipping Offices, Manchester, 1894, 403, 412. 

Shirl.\w, a., elected Member, 1892, 229. 

Shiktliff, F., elected Associate Member, 1897, 2. 

Shoxe, I., elected Member, 1889, 346. 

Shoolbked, J. X., Electric Engineering, 1888, 116, 119. 

Shoosmith, H., elected Member, 18£0, 472. 
Electric Kock-Drill, 1893, 310. 

Shore, A. T., elected 3Iember, 1890, 472. 

Shroff, A. B., elected :\rembcr, 1893, "91. 

Shcttleworth, A., elected Member, 1885, 164. 

Shuttleworth, Major F., elected 3Iember, 1885, 1G4. 

SiBBERixG, G. T., elected Member, 1899, 474. 

Siemens, A., elected Member, 1891, 2. 



S 325 

Siemens, Dr. E. W. vox, decease, 1893, 1.— Memoir, 1892, 570. 

Siemens, F., elected Member, 1888, 1(J0. 

Siemens, W., elected Member, 1888, 160. 

Siemens "Fan" and "Turbine" Wateu :METEi!*i, 1900, 41, 72. See Water ^Meters. 

Signal?, 1888, 33S. See Brewery Tramways. 

Signal "Works, Slidland Railway, Derby, 1898, 471. 

SiLCOCK, C. W'., elected Graduate, 1886, 126. 

SiLLAR, A. 31., elected Member, 1898, 142. 

Silver and Electro-Plate Manufactory : — 

Birmingham, 1897, 365, 383. 

Sheffield, 1890, 442, 452, 465. 
SiME, W., elected Associate INIember, 1897, 144 : — transferred to INIember, 190D, 555. 
StMKiNS, C. W., elected Graduate, 1887, 2. 
SiMMANCE, J. F., elected Member, 1899, 292. 
Simon, H., decease, 1900, 6.— Memoir, 1899, 270. 

Roller Fliiur ^lilling, Paper ou the latest development of Roller Flour 
Milling, 1889, 148.— Remarks thereon, 164, 191. 
Simon, I., elected Graduate, 1893, 221. 
Simons and Co., W., London Works, Renfrew, 1895, 522. 
Simplex Gas-Engine, 1889, 512. See Gas Engines. 
Simpson, C. L., Graduate transferred to Member, 1893, 3. 

Longworth Power-Hammer, 1900, 112. 

Portable Pneumatic Tools, 1900, 155. 
Simpson, D. G., elected Associate ilember, 1903, 356. 
Simpson, E. P., elected Associate, 1893, 221. 
Simpson, J., decease, 1890, 4. — IMemoir, 1889, 749. 
Simpson, J. T., elected ^Member, 1885, 46 !. 
Simpson, L. S., elected Graduate, 1894, 295 : — elected Associate Member, 

1900, 3. 
Simpson, N. de L., elected Graduate, 1896, 103. 
Simpson, S., elected Associate Member, 1898, 342. 
Sims Compound Engine, 1837, 124. See Lincoln Waterworks Engines. 
Sinclair, X., elected ^Member, 1889, 5S5. 

Sinclair, Robert, decease, 1898, 2; 1899, 7, 8.— Memoir, 1898, 707. 
Sinclair, Russell, elected Member, 1891, 301. 
Sinclair, R. C, decease, 1394, 4 — :Memoir, 1893, 388. 
Singer Sewing-Machine Works, Kilbowie, 1895, 467, 511. 
SiRRi, Lieut. M., elected Associate ^lember, 1899, 474. 
SissON, W., Aluminium, 1898, 361. 

Cleveland Industries, 1893, 261. 

Quick-Revolution Engines. 1897, 343. 

Spherical Eccentric, 1885, 4.30. 



326 S 

h'issON', W. {continued) :- 

Throttling and Variable Expansion, 1885, 222. 
Water Softening, 1898, 44H. 
SiVEWBiGHT, G. W., elected Member, 1385, 1G4. 
SKiN-yEK, E. F., elected Graduate, 1894, 170. 
Slabt, a.. Gas-Engine Research, 1898, 2.".5. 
Slag, Disposal and Utilization of Blast-Furnace Slag, 1892, 70 :— 1893, 238-42, 

247. See Disposal of Slag; and Cleveland Industries. 
Slater, A., Gas Furnaces, 1891, 74. 
Slater, I., decease, 1886, 4.— Memoir, 1885, IGl. 
Slacghteh, E., decease, 1892, 4.— Memoir, 1891, 2;t3. 
Sleepers of Timber or Iron or Steel, 1885, ;i21. See Address of President, 

Jeremiah Head. 
Slight, G. H., elected :Membev, 1892, 102. 
Slight, W. H., elected IMeniber, 1885, 1G4. 

SuKG-BY, W., elected Graduate, 1897. :>:— elected Associate Member, 1899, 4. 
Sloax, E. a., elected [Member, 1891, 4S0. 

Sluice for Weirs, Automatic, 1888, 2'J2. See Automatic Sluice. 
Small, J. M., elected Member, 1886, 126. 
Lighting of Workshops, 1893, 4Ut. 

Small-Arms Factory, Enfield, 1886, 410, 428-40. 

Smallmax, H. S., elected ^lember, 1897, 4:;2. 

Smakt, a., elected ilember, ISOO, J. 

Smart, L. S., elected Member, 1898, 142. 

Smeddle, J. H., elected Mt mbcr, 1899, 292. 

Smelt, J. D.. elected Member. 1889, o85. 

Smelting, Electric, 1888, 105. See Electric Engineering. 

Smethurst, W., elected Member, 1899, 144. 

SsiiTH, A. D., elected Member, 190D, 2. 

Smith, C. H., decease, 1898, 6. 

Smith, E. S., Eoad Locomotion, 1800, 252, 311. 

Smith, Frederick Hardca^^tle (Rodlcy), elected Associate Member, 1900, 356. 

Smith, Frederick Hugh (London), elected Graduate, 1895, 548 :— elected 
Associate Member, 1899, 203. 

Smith, F. S., elected Associate Member, 1899, 1. 

Smith, G. A., elected Graduate, 1893, 547. 

Smith, G. E., elected Associate, 1899, 5. 

SsHTH, H., Hydraulic Power Supply, 1895, ."82. 

Smith, H. B. B., elected Graduate, 1889, 204. 

Smith, H. W., elected Associate Member, 1898, 312. 

Smith, L, elected Member, 1898, 341. 
Water Meters. 1900, 65. 



S 327 

Smith, James, Lord Mayor of Birmiagham, AVclcome to ^leinbers at Jubilee 

Summer fleeting, Birmingham, 1897, 250. 
Smith, Sir John-, knighthood, 1888, 21.— Decease, 1898, C— Memoir, 319. 

Auditor, 1893, P.O. 

Secretary, 1897, 280. 
Smith, Johx (Rochdale\ decease, 1900, G.— Memoir, 1899, 619. 
Smith, John (Birmingham;, elected Jremljcr, 18S3, 07. 
Smith, John- (Burtouou-Trent), elected ^Member, 1898, 516. 
Smith, J. B., elected Associate Member, 1900, 97. 
Smith, J, J., Tube-Frame Railway Wagons, 1890, 503. 
Smith, J. P. G., elected Graduate, 1891, 302 :— transferred to Associate Member, 

1896, 4. 
Smith, J. R., elected Member, 1891, 301. 
Smith, J. S., Jcn., elected Associate Member, 1900, 3. 
Smith, Johx William, elected Member, 1898, 142. 
Smith, John- Wisdle, elected IMember, 1890, 472. 
Smith, Michael Holroyd, Electric Engineering, 1883, 123, 133. 

Electric Traction, 1898, 109. 

Friction Experiments, 1888, 193. 

Gas Engines, 1889, .326, 527, 534, 535. 

Milling Cutters, 1890, 545. 

Propeller Ventilating Fans, 1897, 478. 

Quick-Revolution Engines, 1897, 349. 

Road Locomotion, 1900, 2S9, 299, 314. 

Steam-Engine Breakdowns, 1896, 580. 
Smith, Montague HowArp, elected Assxsiate Member, 1£0C, 502. 
Smith, R. A., elected Member, 1886, 2. 
Smith, R. B., elected Graduate, 1899, 5. 
Smith, R. H., Autographic Test-Recorder, 1886, 84, 86. 

Canal-Boat Propulsion, 1897, 206, 

Construction of Cycles, 1885, 511. 

Electric Plant, 1898, 577. 

Express Locomotives, 1898, G39. 

Glass Revealer, 1900, 541. 

Hydraulic Buffer-Stop, 1886, 114. 

Mean-Pressure Indicator, 1839, 595. 

Technical Dictionary, 1900, 505. 

Triple-Expansion Engines, 1886, 521. 

Water Softening, 1898, 444, 
Smith, R. T., elected Member, 1896, 4C2. 
Smith, R. Y., elected Graduate; 189?, 547. 
Smith, R. W., elected Member, 1897, 143. 



328 S 

Smith, S , elected Associate Member, 1837, 257. 

Smith, T., elected INIember, 1886, 463. 

Smith, T. G., elected Member, 1898, 142. 

Smith, T. J., elected Associate Member. 1898, 143. 

Smith, T. R., elected Graduate. 1890, 2 :— transferred to :Memb;r, 1892, 3. 

Smith. Wai.teu Mackeksie, elected Member, 1898, 142. 

Express Locomotives, Paper on Results of recent practical experience 
with Express Locomotive Engines, 1898, Gi'5. — Remarks thereon, 
G5L 
iSmith, William (St. Helen's), elected Member, 18£0, 472. 
Smith, "William (Sydney), elected ^Member, 1394, 470. 
Smith, AV. A., elected Associate Member, 1894, 470. 
Smith, W. F., Electro-Magnetic Miichine-Tools, 1837, 3",9. 
Fortb-Brid-c :\Iachinery, 1887, 317. 
Friction Experiments, 1888, 18:5. 
Marine Engineering, 1831, 3G0. 
Rope Driving, 1896. :;71. 
Steel Rails, 1390, 313. 
Smith, William Hex::v, elected Associate. 1897, 431. 
Smith, William Hill, elected Jlember, 1900, 355. 
Smith, William Mahk, elected Member, 1887, 2. 
Smith, W. T., elected Graduate, 1900, :!57. 

Smith and Co., Hugh. Rossil Engine Works. Glasgow, 1895, 498. 
Smith and Covextrt. Gresley Iron Works, Salford, 1894, 421. 
Smith Rotary Wateh-:Meter, 1900, G6. See Wnter Meters. 
Smith Work in Iron and Steel, 1885, 335. See Address of President, Jeremiali 

Head. 
Smyth, R. H., elected (iraduate, 19C0, 4. 
Sxell, a. T.. Electric Engineering, 1888, 112. 
SxELL, J. F. C, elected Graduate, 1891, 2 :— transferred to Associate Member, 

1896, 4 :— transferred to Member, 1838, 51S. 
Snelus, G. J., Gas Furnaces, 1891, 83. 
Sxow, J., elected Associate l^Iember, 1898, 143. 
Snowball, E., elected Member, 1885. 3 i.'i. 
Snowdon, F. a., elected Member. 1886, 2. 
Snowdon, J. A., elected Member, 1885, 30.1. 
Snoxell, G. E., elected :Member, 1897, 144. 
Soap Works, Port Sunlight, Birkenhead, 1891, 45."). 

Softening axu Purification of Watek, 1898, 401. See Water Softening. 
Softening of Water, 1898, 263, 290, 291, 296, 297, 301, 300. See Steam 

Laundry ^lachinery. 
Softening Machixery for Water at Southampton, 1893, 59. See Southampton 
Water Works. 



329 



SoHO Iron Works, Bolton, 1894, 40G, 454. 

Solenoid Magnets, 1885. See Private Electric Lighting. 

SoMERS, W., elected Member, 1895, 518. 

SoMERViLLE, F. H., elected Associate Member, 1899, 140. 

SoPER, W., "Wheel Load iu Cycles, 1886, 172. 

SopwiTH, T., Lake Superior Copper Mining, 1887, 115. 

SoRABJi, S., elected Member, 1887, 158. 

Sounding Appar.\tus, Self-recording, 1889, 219. See Address of President, 
Charles Cochrane. 

SouTER-RoBERTsoN, D., clcctcd Member, 1889, 34G. 

Southampton Docks, 1892, 308. 377. 

Southampton, Excursion to, 1892, 308. 

Southampton Gas Works, 1892, 309, 3-d. 

Southampton Ordnance Survey Office, 1892, 309, 380. 

Southampton Pier, I'aper on the new Royal Pier at Southampton, by 
J. Lemon, 1892, 313. — Old pier, 313. — New pier, general description, 313. 
— Timber piles, 314. — Cast-irou screw-piles, 315. — Bracing, horizontal 
and vertical-diagonal, 315. — Decking, 310. — Pier arms ; wood piles and 
bollards, 317. — Landings, 317. — Curriage road, 317. — Weight and cost, 
317. 

Discussion. — Anderson, Dr. W., Visit to pier, 318. — Lemon, J., Wood 
bollard piles independent of iron structure, 318. 

Southampton Sewage Pkecipitati jn Works anJ Refuse Destructor, 1892, 354, 
309. See Sewage and Refuse Works. 

Southampton Water Works, 1892, 309. — Paper on the Pumping Engines and 
Water-Softening Machinery at the Southampton Water Works, by W. 
Matthews, 1893, 53. — Pumping engines at Mansbridge, 53 ; at 
Otterbourne, 54. — Cylinders and valves, 54. — Surface condensers, &c., 55. 
— Beams, 55. — Shafts, and fly-wheels, 50. — Pumps, low-lift, 50; high- 
lift, 57. — Boilers; cost of pumping; engine trials, 58. — Water-softening 
machinery ; cream of lime, 59 ; lime-water, 00 ; filters, and cleaning, 00. 
— Cost of softening, 01. 

Discussion. — Matthews, W., Whipping of pump- rods ; cost of pumping 
and softening, 02. — Anderson, Dr. W., Sinking fund, 03. — ^Matthews, W., 
Lime for softening, 03. — Marten, E. B., Wells, 03 ; whipping of rods, taste 
of water, filtering discs, duty of engines, 04. — Perrett, E., Filter cloths, 
04. — Kennedy, A. B. W., Duty of engines, 05. — Straker, S., Purity of 
water, 05 ; cleaning of filter cloths, CO. — Cochrane, C, Chemical action of 
lime water, 00 ; object of calcining chalk, filter cloths, taste of water, 07. — 
Schonheyder, W., Fly-wheel shaft, bucket-rod guides, 08 ; steam pressure, 
69. — Buckley, R. B., Filtration in India, 09; cost of pumping, 70. — 
Cowper, C. E., Filter, and cost of filtering cloths, 70. — Head, J., Water 
supply and softening, 70 ; quality of coal, 71 ; steel beams for pumping 



330 S 

Southampton Water "Woeks, Discussion, 1893 (contimied) : — 

engines, 72. — Coles, H. J., Clark's process for softening and filtering, 72 ; 
cleaning of filters, 7o; disposal of precipitated carbonate of lime, 7i. — 
Barr, J., Valve grids and guards, level of water, 74; water-grooved 
pistons, 75. — Eaton, E. M., Cost of lifting water, 75. — Brewster, E. H. G., 
■\Vator packing for pistons, 75. — Anderson, Dr. W., Water from surface 
condensers, advantages of slow-running engines, cast-iron beams, 7G ; 
scrap-iron filters. 77 ; Clark's softening process, 78. — ^Matthew?, W., Lift 
of pumps, hardness of water, 78; guiding of bucket rods; taste and 
analysis of water, duty of engines, 79 ; duration of filter cloths, 80 ; 
fly-wheel shaft bearings, 82 ; steam pressure, position of well-water pipe, 
filtration of muddy water, 83; softening oilier Inrd water.^ 81 ; cost of 
softening, space occupied, water-tight joints, 85 ; disposal of waste 
deposit, 8G. — Anderson, Dr. "NV., Conversion of waste into lime, 87. — 
Matthews, W., Cost of pumping ; corrosion of valve grids and guards, 
level of water in wells, 87 ; water-grooved buckets, quality of coal, 88 ; 
capital outlay for settling ponds and mechanical filtration, S'J. — Anderson, 
Dr. W., "Visit to Otierbourne works, S;». 

South Bank Iron Works, iliddlesbrough. 1893, 35.i. 

South Devon Atmospheric Railway, 1899, 299. See Atmospheric Railway. 

Southward, J., Typographic Priutiug Machinery, 1899, 121. 

Southward, P. E., elected Graduate, 1895, .S2S. 

Southwell, F. C, elected Member, 1885, 403. 

SoYRES, B. de, elected Graduate, 1900, 183. 

Spabkes, S. H., elected Member, 1900, 96. 

Spear and Jackson, .Etna Edge-Tool Works, Sheffield. 1890, 463. 

Special General Meeting, Busims-*, 1893, 31. 

Speight, J. W., elected Associate Slember, 1899, 4. 

Spence, a. W., elected Member, 1893, 220. 
Canal-Boat Propellers, 1894, 377. 

Spence, J. C, elected Associate Member, 1897, 144.— Decease, 1899, 7.— 
Memoir, 1898, 320. 

Spence, W., elected Member, 1887, 283. 

Spence, W. L., elected Member, 1898, 142. 

Spencer, A., elected Member, 1887, 474. 

Spencer, C. J., elected Member, 1896, 4<J2. 

Spencer, E., decease, 1888, 3. — Memoir, 1887, 470. 

Spencer, F. H., elected Associate, 1891, 197. 

Spencer, G., decease, 1890, 4.— Memoir, 1889, 339. 

Spencer, H. B., elected Member, 1892, 229. 
Evaporative Condensers, 1899, 221. 

Spencer, H. W., elected Associate Member, 1897, 433. 

Spencer, J., elected Member, 1897, 433. 



s 



331 



Spescer, M., elected Member, 1885, 4G3. 

Spe>-ckr, p., elected Associate Member, 1899, 293. 

Spencer, T. H., elected Member, 1897, 433. 

Spencer, W., elected Member, 1891, 301. 

Spherical Eccentric, Paper on the Tripier Spherical Eccentric, by L. Poillon, 
1885, 422.-Details of construction, 422.-Throw of eccentric, and 
distribution of steam, 423.-Keversing, 423.-Hand control over steam- 
driven machines, 424.- Advantages of spherical eccentric, 424.-Examples 

of application, 425. 

J9»sc«moH.-Cardew, C. E., Throw of eccentric, 426 ; Gooch's link- 
motion, 426; variable lead preferable for expansion, 427 : objection to 
spherical eccentric for locomotives, 427 ; Joy's valve-gear, 427 ; working 
of several slide-valves from single eccentric, 427 ; Meyer expansion gear, 
428.— Boyer, K. S., Controlling of marine engines, 428.— Collenette, R., 
Wear in spherical eccentric, 428.-Lawrence, H., Spherical eccentric on 
underground locomotives, 429.-Allan, A., Spherical eccentric unsuitable 
for locomotives, 429 ; Carmichacl's single fixed eccentric, 429.-McGregor, 
J Two ways of effecting expansion, 429 ; former arrangement of single 
eccentric, 430; travel of valve, 430.-Hall, W. S., Spherical eccentric 
gives same motion as Stephenson link, 430 ; difiBculty of application to 
locomotives, 430.-Sisson, W., Gooch's link-motion, 430; increase of lead 
is preferred, 431 ; working with single fixed eccentric, 431 ; spherical 
eccentric unsuitable for hard work, 431 ; exposure of oiled surfaces to 
dust, 432.— Edwards, K., Dodds' wedge valve-motion, 432.— Paget, A., 
Exposure to dust, 432.-Head, J., Interest of valve-motions, 432.- 
Poillon, L., Applications of spherical eccentric, and satisfactory .working, 

433. 
Spherical Engine, Paper on the Tower Spherical Engine, by E. H. Heenan, 
1885, 96.— Original idea of engine, 96.— Geometrical construction, 96.— 
Relative motions of parts, 97.— Construction of engine, 98.— Hinge joints, 
98.-Steam distribution, 99.-Point of cut-off, lOO.-Relations of angular 
motions, 101.— Yalve-f aces and blocks, 101.— Steam and exhaust passages, 
102— Packings, 102.— Piston, blades, and casing, 103.— Lubrication by 
oil pump, 103^^Efficiency of engine, 104.-Daiability, I04.-Applications, 
105. — Reversing, 105. 

Ducussion.— Heenan, R. H.. Exhibited engine after working. 105.— 
Crompton, R. E. B., Satisfactory working of spherical engines for electric 
lighting of railway trains, 106; lubrication by oil pump, 106.— Robinson, 
J.° Ingenuity of engine and of lubricating pump, 106.— Woodley, R., 
Experience with engine for electric lighting of railway trains, 108 ; 
satisfactory working of engines and dynamos, lOS.— Forbes, G., Action of 



332 S 

Spbebical Engine, iJiscmsion, 1835 (continued) : — 

engine is not complicated, 109; success depends on packing, 109; mode 
of lubrication suited for high speed, 109. — Adamson, D., Advantage of 
forced lubrication, 110; piston velocity probably not excessive, 110. — 
Kennedy, A. B. "W., Spherical engine is best of rotary type, 110 ; old disc 
engine, 110; relative motions in universal joint, 111 ; difficulty of packing 
is less at high speed of engine, 111. — Schonheyder, W., Spigot and faucit 
joint preferable to steady-pins. 111 ; steam-tightness dependent on single 
packing-ring, 112; advantage of sight-feed lubricators, 112; eflect of 
reversing, 112. — Paget, A., Supply of oil for lubrication, 112.— Mnudslay, 
H., Smallness of space for steam to work in, 113 ; compound motion, lla; 
utilisation of power from dummy shaft, 114. — Fielding, J., Tacking round 
bosses of hinge joints, 114. — Tower, B., Experience with spherical engine, 
114; percentage of power delivered, 114; steam consumption, 114; 
importance of sufficient lubrication, 11."); expansion, IIG. — Head, J., Is 
the cut-off constant, 11(5. — Tower, B.. I'onstant cut-off, IIG; reversing, 
116; steady-pins instead of spigot and faucit joint, IIG; tool for boring 
out hemispheres, 117. — Heenan, K. H., Steam space in engine, 117; 
lubrication of main bearing, 117; use of valvoiine, 118; packing round 
bosses of hinge joints, 118. — Froude, R. H., Object of forced lubrication, 

118; objection to taking off power fmm dummy shaft, 118. — Head, J., 

George Stephenson's paper on the fallacies of the rotary engine, 119; 

comparison of spherical engine with ordinary reciprocating engine, 

119; compactness of engine, and pains taken in its manufacture, 

120. 
Spice, K. 1'., decease, 1890, 4.— Memoir, 1889, 310. 
Spiller, C, elected Associate Member, 1899, 4. 
SriNNiKG OR Weaving JIii.i.s, or both : — 

Belfast, 1888, 420. 423 :— 1896, 433, 44G, 454, 457. 

Bessbrook, 1888, 415. 

Bolton, 18S4, 450. 

Bury, 1894, 445. 

Coventry, 1897, 3G?, 428. 

Dundee, 1887, 455, 45G, 457. 

Lucan, 1888, 414. 

Manchester, 1894, 413, 414, 417, 4.35. 

Nottingham, 1898, 518. 

Eoyton, 1894, 440. 
Spiral Tunnel, 1888, 329. -See Brewery Tramways. 
Spittlegate Iuox Works, Grantham, 1885, 447-8. 

Spoxgy-Iron Filtration' of Water, 1889, 224. See Address of President, 
Charles Cochrane. 



S 333 

Spooner, G. p., electeJ Member, 1885, 4G3. 

Spooler, H. J., Graduate transferred to Member, 1887, ;>. 

Sheffield Water Works, 1890, 433. 

Training of Engineer Students, 1899, 400. 

Water Meters, 1900, 84. 
Spkague, E. H., elected Member, 1895, 548. 

Sprague Grain Mixer, 1891, 377, 379. See Grain Warehousing Machinery. 
Spring, F. J. E., CLE., elected Member, 1896, 27'J. 

Spring Meeting, 1885, 75, 163; 1886, 125; 1887, 157: 1888, 159; 1889,203; 
1890, 175; 1891, 109,195; 1892, 101; 1893,97; 1894, 169; 1895, 
149; 1896, 101 ; 1897, 143; 1898, 141 : 1899, 143; 1800, 93, 95, 181. 
Springer Torsion Balance, 1888, 243. 
Squire, G. F., elected Associate ^lember, 1900, W^C^. 
Stableford, W.. decease, 1888, 3.— Memoir, 1887, 277, 
Stabler, J., Compound Steam Turbine, 1888, 513. 

Vote of thanks to Chairman at Summer meeting, London, 1900, 358. 

Watch Screws, 1894, 495. 
Stagg, W., elected Member, 1897, 144. 
Stained Glass Works, Birmingham, 1897, 3S7. 
Staines Reservoirs Work-, 1900, 46G, 4S7. 
Stanier, a. C, elected Member, 1899, 292. 
Stamp End Works, Lincoln, 1885, 434, 437-40. 
Stamp-IiOCK Mining, 1887, 91. See Lake Superior Copper Alining. 
Stamps for Crushing Ores, 1887. See Lake Superior Copper IMining. 
Stanger, W. H., Testing Machine, 1888, 229. 
Stanley, H. F., elected Member, 1888, 269. 
Stanley, H. F., Jcn., elected Graduate, 1898, 3. 
Stan*nah, J., elected Member, 1888, 2. 
Stansfield, Dr. A., Alloys Research, 1895, 269 :— 1897, 89 :— 1899, 89, 91. 

Pyrometric Examination of the Alloys of Copper and Tin, 1896, 269. 
Stanton Iron Works, Nottinghamshire, 1898, 495. 
Starch Works, Plymouth, 1899, 45S. 
Starley, W., elected Associate, 1897, 144. 
Starting Gear for Compound Locomotives, 1880, 57, 84-6. See Compounding 

of Locomotives. 
Statham, F. B., elected Associate Member, 1898, 143. 
Statham, H., elected Associate Member, 1900, 3. 
Stead, J. E., elected Associate, 1892, 2. 

Alloys Research, 1891, 591 :— 1897, 77 :— 1899, 71. 

Disposal of Slag, 1892, 92. 
Steam, Determination of Dryness, 1895, 31. See Dryness of Steam. 
Steam Dredge?., Frictional Gearing, 1888, 3y3. See Frictional Gearing. 



334 S 

Steam-Engine BnEAKDOAVxs, Paper on Breakdowns of Stationary Steam- 
Enginfcs, by -M. Longridgc, 1896, 53G. — Classiitlcutiou and analysis of one 
thousand breakdowns of factory engines, 537. — Breakdowns originating 
in valves and valve gear, 538 ; spur gearing, 540 ; air-pump motions, 
54G ; air-pump buckets and valves, 550 ; columns, entablatures, bedplates, 
and pedestals, 552 ; main shafts, 555 ; connecting rods, 5G0 ; cylinders 
and valve-chests, 5G1 ; parallel motions, 5G2 ; governors and governor 
gear ; piston-rods, 5G:{ ; piston-rod cross-heads, 5G5 ; pistons, 5G6 ; 
McXaught and main links ; fly-wheels, 568 ; air-pumps and condensers, 
569 ; cranks ; gudgeons in beams, 570 ; crank-pins, 571 ; beams, 573 ; 
slide-bars ; ropes, 575. 

JJiscussion. — Longridge, M., Exhibited specimens of parts which had 
caused breakdowns, 575. — Sankey, C'apt. H. 11., Fatigue of metals and 
efifects of varying stresses, 575; AViJhler's experiments on safe stress, 
576 ; complete breakdown of engine, 577 : elasticity of materials, 578. — 
Saxon, A., Eepairs of breakdowns, 57S ; lubrication ; steel gearing for 
rope-driving ; fly-wheels ; pitch of teeth in pinion, 579 ; Eicliards, E. W., 
Size of pinion, 580. — Saxon, A., Air-pump buckets, 5S0. — Smith, 31. H., 
Keys and key-ways, 580. — Schonheyder, W., Keys, 582. — Bearc, T. H., 
Repeated stresses, 582 ; fracture of cast-iron beam, 583. — Longridge, M., 
Cracks in beam, 581. — Beare, T. H., Limit of elasticity, 584. — 
Rounthwaite, H. 'SI., Design of engines, 585. — Joy, B. 11., Breakdown 
of valves and valve gears, 585 ; air-pump buckets ; slide-bars, 5SG. — 
Barker, A. H., Breakdowns of marine .engines, 586. — Day, C, Corliss 
valve-gear ; steel spur-gearing, 587 ; air-pump buckets ; groove in main 
shaft ; governors, 588 ; cotters or nuts for pistons ; mild steel for 
cranks, 5i0. — Longridge, I\I., Fatigue of metals, 589 ; effect of repeated 
stresses ; steel gearing for rope-driving ; pitch of teeth, 590 ; speed of 
■wheels ; long-stroke horizontal engines ; Corliss valve-gear, 591 ; 
governors ; slide-bars ; pistons ; cranks, 592. — Richards, E. "\V., Specimens 
exhibited, and compilation of Paper, 592. — Hudson, J. G., Breakdowns 
in old-fashioned engines; adoption of steel, 593; transverse strains, 
vibration, overhang, 594. — "Woodhouse and ^litchell. Piston bolts, 594. — 
Longridge, M., Class of engines ; main shafts ; piston bolts, 595. 
Steam-Esgixe Cylinders, Initial Condensation, 1892, 19S. See Initial 

Condensation in Steam Engine. 
Steam Exgixe, Distribution of Heat in a Stationary Steam-Engine, 1887, 

478. See Heat Distribution in Steam Engine. 
Steam-Exgine Experiments, Pajyer on Experiments on a Vertical Single- 
cylinder Steam-Engine, with and Avithout Steam in the Jackets, 
Condensing and Xon-condensing, Double and Single-acting, at different 
Expansions, with Saturated and Superheated Steam, by B. Doukin, 



335 



Stea3I-Exgixe Experiments, Paper, 1895 (continued) : — 

1895, 00. — Engine, 90. — Objects of experiments; steam and boiler, 91. 
— Description of engine and apparatus, 92.— Clearance volumes and 
surfaces, 9;i ; temperatures of walls ; temperature cups, 9i. — Programme 
of each trial, 9i. — Limits of possible error, 95. — Experiments, 9.5 ; 
indicated horse-power for engine alone; temperature of walls outside 
at ends of non-jacketed cylinder, 9G. — Economy obtained by using 
different jackets, 97 ; water, vacuum, and oil in jacket ; jackets and 
speed ; gain with jackets, non-condensing, 98 ; jackets and dryness- 
fraction ; superheated steam in cylinder and jackets, or in cylinder only ; 
conclusion, 99. — Condensation in cylinder with walls colder tban steam, 
99. — Numerical example for calculating condensation ; experiments with 
superheated steam, 101. — Graphic representation of condensation, 101. 
— Summary of experiments, 102-lG.— Tabulated results, 117-39. 
Steaji Exgixe, High-Speed, 1894, 213 :— 1897, 316. See High-Speed 

Engine ; and Quick-Revolution Engines. 
Steam-Engine Indicator, 1899, 569. See Mean-Pressure Indicator. 
Steam Exgixe, Initial Condensation in a Steam Cj'linder, 1887, 500, 503. See 

Initial Condensation in Steam Cylinder. 
Steam Exgixe, Research Committee, 1897, S :— 1898, 9 :— 1899, 10:— 1900, 9. 
Steam, Ether-Pressure Theory of Thermodynamics applied to Steam, 1889, 

379. See Ether-Pressure Theory. 
Steam Jacket, Research Committee, 1887, G :— 1888, G :— 1889, 6 :— 1890, 6 :— 
1892, 7 :— 1893, 7 .—1894, 7 :— 1895, G :— 1896, 6 :— 1897, 7 :— 1898, 
8 :— 1899, 9 :— 1900, 9. 
See Compound Locomotives ; Condensation and Re-evaporation ; Heat 
Distribution in Steam Engine ; Initial Condensation in Steam 
Cylinder ; Marine-Engine Trials ; Triple-Expansion Engines. 
Steam Jacket, First Beport of the Research Committee on the Value of the 
Steam-jacket, Tabulated Results of previous Experiments, 1889, 703. 
See Index to Experiments, 70i. 
Steam Jacket, Second Report of the Research Committee on the Value of the 
Steam-jacket, Mr. Henry Davcy, Chairman, 1892, 418. — Summaries of 
seven sets of experiments, 421. — Records of experiments made by 
members of committee, 427. — Suggestions for future experiments, 453. 
— Index and summary of experiments, 469. 

Discussion. — Anderson, Dr. W., ^lembers of Committee, 480. — Davey, 
H., Economy effected, 480. — Donkin, B., Jun., Conclusions from own 
experiments, 481 ; conditions for greatest economy, 482 ; temperature of 
cylinder walls, 4S3. — Anderson, Dr. "W., Use of oil inside cylinder, 483. 
— Doukiu, B., Jun., Large quantity of oil, 483. — English, Lt.-Coh, 
Initial condensation and gain from jacket, 483. — Morison, D. B., 



836 S 

Steam Jacket, Second lieport, 1892 (Discusxiou, continued): — 

Transmission of heat through cylindcr-liDers, 483 ; tabulated results of 
experiments, 485; steam-jackets in marine engines, 4SG; jacket 
surrounded by receiver, 488 ; water formed during expansion, 489 ; 
economy of circulating receiver, 490. — Unwin, AV. C, Jacket never did 
harm, 490 ; wet steam, 491 ; disadvantages of experimental engine, 
491. — Mair-Rumley, J. G., Apparent priming in experiments, 492. — 
Cochrane, C, Water consumed in jacket and saved in feed, 492. — 
Bramwell, Sir F., Value of steam-jacket, 493 ; heat lost through 
imperfect cleading, 493 ; combined steam, 494 ; circulating receiver, 494. 
— Phillips, J., Advantage of combined steam, 491 ; value of superheating, 
495; steam-jacketing- of pistons, 495; economy of jacket, 49G; jacketing 
of steam-pipes, 49G. — Donkin, B., Jun., Jacketing of pistons, 496. — 
Schdnheyder, W., Conditions for good results, 497 ; air-cock, 498 ; 
jacket condensation while engine working and standing, 499. — Beare, 
T. H., Economy of jacketing, 499 ; jacket condensation while engine 
standing, 500. — Anderson, Dr. W., l^team-jacketing of locomotive 
cylinders, 501. — Aspinall, J. A. F., Offered exjjeriments on locomotives, 
501. — Kennedy, A. B. "NV., Circulating receiver, 501. — Anderson, Dr. W., 
Position of air-cock, 502. — Kennedy, A. B. AV., Measurement of feed- 
water, 502; superheated steam, 503. — Thornycroft, J. I., Jacket for 
drying receiver steam, 503; large economy in small engines, 504; 
jackets for marine engines, 504. — Head, J., High expansion with jacket, 
504. — Anderson, Dr. W., Kelation of cut-off to expansion, ;"04. — 
Donkin, B., Jun., Expansion reduced by clearance, 505. — Unwin, AV. C, 
Superheated steam, 505. — Davey, H., Condensation in jacket, 505 ; no 
risk of overheating, 505 ; circulation in jacket, 506 ; air-cock, 506. — 
Carter, AV. C. Jackets on cylinder ends, 507 ; automatic draining, 508 ; 
oil-jacket, 508. — Dunell, G. E., Value of sui)erheating, 508. — Saxon, A., 
Jacketing of small cylinders, 509. — Hudson, J. G., Piemoval of air from 
jackets, 509; steam supply to cylinder through jacket, 511 ; transmission 
of heat through cylinder wall, 512. 

Steam Jacket, Third Eepnrt of tiie Research Committee on the Value of the 
Steam-jacket, :Mr. Henry Davey, Chairman, 1894, 535.— Records of five 
experiments made by members of committee, 536-91. — Summaries of 
four sets of experiments, 502-7. 

Steam Jacket, Paper upon Experiment on a Locomotive Engine, by T. H. 
Beare and B. Donkin, 1896, 46G.— Object of experiment, 466. — 
Description of engine, 467 ; and of trials ; observations ; coal, 468. — 
Furnace gases and temperatures, 4G9. — Feed-water, steam-jacket water, 
470. — Times, pressures, &c. ; indicator diagrams, 471. — General results, 
472. — Tables of engine dimensions, 473; boiler results, 474-5; engine 



S 337 

Steam Jacket, Paper, 1896 (continued) : — 

results, 476-7 ; and details of trial.-, 478-81. — AppoudLs, testing of 
Boyer speed recorder, 482. 

Discussion. — Aspinall, J. A. F.. Difficulties attending trials ; coal 
consumption, 483 ; measurement of feed-water ; speed recorder, 484 ; 
indicator diagrams ; steam-jacket economy, 48.5. — Joy, D., Steam- 
jacketing of marine engines, 48.1 — Johnson, S. W., Value of steam- 
jacket on locomotive engine, 486. — Longridge, M., Conclusions to be 
drawn from trials, 486 ; evaporation per pound of coal, 487 ; lieat units 
per pound of coal; superheater in smoke-box, 488. — Aspinall, J. A. F., 
Temperature of smoke-box, 488. — Johnson, S. AV., Superheated steam 
in locomotives, 488 ; diiFerence in water consumption by priming, 489. — 
Halpin, D., Eate of evaporation in locomotives; need of time for 
transference of heat, 489 ; high consumption of steam from priming ; 
length of indicator pipes, 490. — Schonheyder, AV., Area of jacketed 
surface, 490; measurement of feed- water, 491. — Eounthwaite, H. M., 
Temperature of external air; cylinder liner, 491. — Jenkins, C. F., 
Feed-water consumption, 492. — Beaiimont, W. W., Coal consumption ; 
errors of indicators, 492 ; high piston-speed with steam-jackets, 493. — 
Segundo, E. C. de, Indicator diagrams, 493.— Beare, T. H., Difficulties 
attending trials, 494; measurement of feed-water; condition of fires 
and consumption of coal, 495 ; counters ; errors in indicators ; high 
evaporation, 496 ; weather, 497. — Donkin, B., Proportion of internal 
surface exposed to steam-jackets, 497 ; French experiments, 498 ; 
priming ; evaporation ; measurement of feed- water, jacketing with hot 
gases; indicator pipes, 499. — Eichards, E. "W., Small economy obtained ; 
vote of thanks, 500. 

Steam LArsDRY Machinery, Paper on Steam Laundry Machinery, by 
."^. Tebbutt, 1898, 268. — Introductory conditions, 268; arrangement of 
laundry, 268. — Cleansing machinery, 269 ; water softening, 269 ; piping, 
270 ; pulleys, 271. — Soaking and rinsing, 271. — "W'asliing machines, three 
plans, 272; revolving cage inside outer casing, 273; construction and 
materials, 273 ; lifters, 274 ; single-cage washer, 275 ; speed of 
revolution, height of fall into water, quantity of water, 275; circulation 
of water, 275 ; use of steam pressure, 276 ; disinfection by boiling, 277 ; 
large washing machines, 279. — Drying by centrifugal extractor and by 
drying room, 279. — Ironing or finishing machines, 280 ; hollow steam- 
heated metal roller and rag-made calender, 280 ; Decoudin ironer, 281 ; 
ironer with central hollow steam-heated cylinder surrounded by padded 
jockey rollers, 282 ; true diameter of rollers, 283 ; ironer with padded 
rollers pressed against hollow steam-heated concave beds, 283 ; endless 
broad band of felt, passing, over hollow steam-heated convex bed, 284 ; 

Y 



338 S 

Steam Lauxdrt Machinery, Paper, 1898 (continued) : — 

endless cotton-duck band passing over steam-chests, 285 ; combination 
ironers, 285 ; double Decoudin ironer, 286 ; comparative merits of various 
ironers, 286. — Collar and cuff ironer, 287. — Linen and flannel ironer, 288. 
Discussion. — Wood, H. S., Power for driving, 2SS ; time needed for 
washing, 289. — ^Halpin, D., Screw-down cocks, 289; fan or blower, and 
drying room, 289 ; water softening by heat, 290 ; temperature required, 
291. — Clarke, E. F., Proportions of laundry, 291 ; power required for 
driving, 292 ; surface heating for water and liquors, 292 ; exhaust steam 
for feed-water heater, 292 ; galvanized-iron piping, 293 ; Johnson, 
S. AV., Iron mould from iron piping, 293. — Clarke, E. F., Iron mould 
l>revented by galvanizing, 293. — Johnson, S. W., Joints for piping, 293. 
— Clarke, E. F., Screw joints, 293 ; washing by beaters in dolly 
machine, 294 ; doors of washing machines, 294 ; washing by boiling, 
and by fall of clothes, 294 ; drying by heated air current, 295. — 
Beaumont, AV. W., Drying, and ironing, 295 ; water softening by heat, 
296 ; piping, 29G ; doors of washing machines, 296 ; driving power, 296. 
— Hughes, G. H., Driving power determined by centrifugal drying 
machines, 297; pipes, and quality of water, 297; iron mould, 297; cost 
of softening water, 297 ; drying by steam coils, and ventilation of 
drying chamber, 298. — Tebbutt, S., Arrangement of laundry, 298 ; 
driving jx)wer and centrifugal drying machines, 299 ; injury to clothes, 
300 ; water softening, mode and cost, 301 ; piping and joints, 302 ; 
circulating water in washing machine, 303 ; screw-down valves of 
piping, 303 ; washing by dollies or beaters, 304 ; friction and fall of 
clothes in washer, 304 ; time required for washing, 304 ; boiling of 
clothes in washer, and disinfection, 305. — Johnson, S. W., Laundries on 
Midland Railway, 305 ; cost of softening Derwent water, 306. — 
Thornycroft, J. I., Nature of washing process, 306. — Paton, J. M. C, 
Lace curtains washed in dolly machines with heavy beaters, 306. — 
Clarke, E. F., Water heated in Ptoyle heater, 306.— Tebbutt, S., Cost of 
softening water, 307 ; wool washing, 307. 

Steam Navigation, 1885, 121. See Paddle-Wheel Navigation. 

Steam Navvy, Paper on Dunbar and Huston's Steam Navvy, by J. Euston, 1885, 
349. — Successful employment of navvy, 349. — Nature of work, 350. — 
Development, 350. — Construction, 350. — Handling, 351. — Details of 
construction : main frame, 352 ; crane post, tower, and jib, 333 ; engine, 
and winding gear, 354 ; bucket arm, 354 ; bucket, 355. — Plan of excavation, 
356. — Gullet cutting for double line of railway, 356. — Cutting for single 
line, 357. — Side-face cutting, 357. — Depth of working face, 358. — Men 
employed, 358. — Output, 359. — Working expenses, 360. — Equivalent hand- 
labour, 361. — Subaqueous work, 362. 



S 339 

Steam Xavvy, 1885 (continued) :— 

Discussion. — Huston, J., Success of steam navvy, 363. — ^farten, E. B., 
How does machine deal with boulders, 364. — Adamson, J., Machine tears 
Itoulder out, 3G4. — Boj-er, E. S., AVorking in stiff clay, 3Gt. — Riches, T. H. 
Excavating in marl and blue lias, 36-1.— Price-Williams, R., Economy in 
use of steam navvy, 365. — Walker, B., ;\reclianical engineering industry 
in Lincoln, 365. — Tomlinson, J., Admirable working of navvy, 366. — 
Walker, S. F., Suggestion for working by electro-motors, 366. — Douglass, 
Sir J. X., Expert management of machine, 367. — Euston, J., Strengthening 
of original construction, 367 ; adoption of heavy steel picks on bucket, 368 ; 
mode of dealing with boulders, 368 ; application of electro-motors, 369 ; 
wide cutting by three navvies abreast, 36D ; skill of men working the 
navvy, 369. — Head, J., Characteristics of steam navvy, 369 ; advantage 
of steam machinery over animal labour, 369. — Navvy exhibited in 
operation, HI. 
Steam Pipes, Steel, and Bcnardos Arc Welding, 1896, 230. See Steel Steam- 
Pipes. 
Steaji Power in Portsmouth Dockyard, 1892, 298. See Dockyard Lifting and 

Hauling. 
Steaji Pcmps, Paper on the Working of Steam Pumps on the Russian South 
Western Railways, by A. Borodin, 1893, 433. — Trials of steam pumps 
for water supply of railway stations, 433. — Description of several kinds of 
pumps employed, 434-6. — Results of trials, and conclusions drawn in 
regard to work done per hour and per pound of steam, 436 ; consumption 
of steam per horse-power per hour, 438^0 ; relative economy, 440-2. — 
Comparison of work done by old and new pumps at same station, 443. — 
Comparison with results of other observers, 443-5. — Tabulated results of 
trials, 446-9 ; dimensions of steam pumps, 450. 

Discussion. — Lloyd, R. S., Performance of Hayward Tyler pumps, 451 ; 
comparison with Worthington pumps, 452. — Haljnn, D., Indicator 
diagrams from direct-acting steam-pump, 453 ; details of trial, 454. — 
Schooheyder, W., Cheap pump.s, 454 ; condensers of steam engines, 455. — 
Head, J., Cameron single-acting plunger-pump, 455. — Hodgkin, J. E., 
Performance of pulsometcr, 456 ; Grcl controlling valve, 457 ; economy 
of pulsometer, 458 ; comparison with Cornish pumping engine, 459. — 
Beare, T. H., Trial of pulsometer, 4."9; water horse-power; steam 
consumption, 461. — Anderson, Dr. W., Pistons in Tangye pump, 461. — 
Kennedy, A. B. W., Steam jiumps used as feed-pumps, 461 ; leakage of 
steam in feed-pumps : work of pumps seems proportionate to their size, 
462. — Cochrane, C, Work of Tangye pump, 463. — Robinson, L. S., Hot- 
air engines for pumping, 463. — Mather, G. R., Condition of pumps, 464. — 
Brewster, E. H. G., Old pumps, 464.— Marten, E. B., Value of results, 

T 2 



310 S 

Steam Tumps, Biscwsiot), 1893 Cconlinued) : — 

4G4; duty of small steam engines, 4G5-G ; duty of pulsometer ; injector; 
cause of bad duty of pumps, -167 ; duty from large and small pumps, 4(38. 
— Furness, E., Speed of pumps, 468. — Walker, "\V. G., Lower efficiency of 
small pumps, 408. — Phillips, J., Condition of pumps in trial, 469. — 
Anderson, Dr. W., Trials in actual condition, 469. — Cawley, G., Cornish 
pumping engine, 409.— Urquhart, T., Cost of water supply on Grazi and 
Tsaritsiu Railway, 470, 472-3 ; comparison with three other lines, 471, 
474. — Barr, J., Pumps for wells ; ratio of indicated horse-power to 
pump horse-power ; Cockerill pump ; slip of pumps, 475. — Marten, E. B., 
Duty of centrifugal pump in Holland, 470. — Halpin, D., Pulsometer test, 
470 ; test of KiJrting pulsator, 477. — Borodin, A., Horizontal Worthington 
and Blake pumps ; steam consumptiou in Tangyc pump, 477 ; cause of 
bad duty of pumps, 478; duty of pulsometer, 479. 

Steam, Uationalization of Regnault's E.\perimeuts on Steam, 1889, 399. See 
Regnault's Steam Experiments. 

Steam Reveai.eh, 1900, 5J9. See Gkiss Revealer. 

Steamship, Raising of tlio Wrecked Sti amship " Peer of the Realm," 1886, 189. 
See Raising a Wreck. 

Steamships in Marine-Engine Triiils: — 1889, "Meteor," 235; "Fusi Yama" 
and " Cok-hester," 252-3, 292, 295; "Prompt" and "Malvena," 
255: — 1890, "Fuai Yama" and "Colcliester" and "Tartar," 
203:— 1891, " lonn," 2 iQ :— 1892, " Ville de Douvres," 130. See 
Marine-Engine Trials. 

Steam Steebixg Gear, 1839, 218. See Address of President, Charles Cochrane. 

Steam ScpePvHeatini;, Paper by W. H. Patchell, 1896, 134. — Nature of steam 
superheating, 131. — Aim of superheating; early attempts at superheating, 
135: more recent efforts, 130. — Reasons for former abandonment ; present 
elimination of old hindrances to successful application, 137. — Re- 
introduction of superheating apparatus ; Gehre's superheater, 139. — 
!Musgrave and Dixon's, 140.— McPhail and Simpsons', 142. — Induced 
draught by fan, 153. — Schwoerer's superheater, 150. — Sinclair's, 159. — 
Amou:it of snpi rlieut, 1 59. 

Discussion. — Patchell , W. H., Inci eased evaporation witli superheater ; 
later tests of Schwoerer and of McPliail superheaters, 161.— Kennedy, 
A. B. W., Sinclair superheaters at Edinburgh electric lighting station, 
104; platinum thermometers, lOt; eaving effected, 105 ; tiibulated results 
of tests, 100; covering of steam-pipes, boilers, and flanges, 108; early 
marine engines with superheaters, 16S ; duty per cubic foot of boiler 
house, 168. — Longridge, M., Degree of superheat to be aimed at, 169; 
mode of obtaining desired superheat, 171 ; tabulated results from four 
kinds of superheaters, 172-3 ; proper place for superheater, and head of 



S 341 

Steam Scperheatixg, Dl^cumon, 1896 (continued) : — 

temperature necessary, 174; rate of beat transmission, 175. — Rawortli, 
J. S., Coal economy with superheater, 175 ; superheated steam more 
economical than saturated, 176; McPhail superheater mainly an addition 
to boiler power, 177 ; existence of water in presence of superheated steam, 
178. — Davey, H., Superheating economical but difficult, 178 ; effect on 
engine economy, 179; superheat from waste heat of boiler, ISO; high 
superheat for preventing initial condensation, 181. — McPhail, H., 
Superheater controlled by boiler pressure with regular firing, 181 ; 
uniform temperature ensuring dry steam, 182; superheated steam remains 
dry below temperature of saluration, 182; no seiliment in superheating 
tubes, 183.— Crosland, J. F. L., Early form of superheater, and difficulty 
in lubricating engine, 183 ; economy resulting from superheat ; efficiency 
of McPhail superheater, 184.— Patchell, W. H., Evaporation from water- 
tube boilers; advantage gained by superheating, 185; freedom from 
scaling of superheater tubes, 18G.— Unwin, W. C, Three ways of using 
steam, 186; economy from superheated steam is an engine gain, 187; 
ancient superheating, 188; boiler economy and engine economy, 189; 
chimney waste; action of McPiiail superheater, 190; calculation of 
evaporation, 191; regulation of temperature of superheated steam, 192; 
economy from superheating, in steam and in coal, 193. — Phillips, J., 
AVethered's combined steam, 193.— Unwin, W. C, Wethered's plan, 194.— 
Halpin, D., Date of ditto, 194.— Donkin, B., Reasons of economy of 
superheated, steam, 194; reported experiments, 196.— Burstall, F. W., 
Platinum thermometer, 197.— Perrett, E., Experimental engine with 
superheated steam, 199.- Richards, E. AV., Temperature of superheated 
steam, 199.— Head, J., Boultun superheating engine, 200; tabulated 
results of trials, 202-5; fire-brick regenerative superheater, 206.— Carter, 
E. T., Water-gas from fire-brick superheater, 207.— Head, J., Absence 
of evidence, 207. — English, Lt.-Col. T., Dissociation of steam, 207. — 
Robinson, M., Heat-units from fire-brick superheater, 207.— Head, J., 
Records of experiments, 207. — McPhail, H., Freedom from risk in 
superheating, 208; automatic regulation of temperature; action of 
superheater, 209; radiating pipes of steel, 210; efi'ects of sending 
superheated steam direct to engines, 211. — Fletcher, L. E., McPhail's 
and Musgrave's superheaters, 211; tabulated tests of ]Musgrave's 
superheater, 212-5; saving effected, 216.— Schonheyder, W., Separate 
furnace for superheater ; deterioration of superheater pipes, 217. — Patchell, 
W. H., Economy from superheating dry steam, 218 ; efficacy of small 
degrees of superheating; regulation of temperature; cold feed, 219; 
Schwoerer superheater tests, 220; gain from McPhail superheater; 
Burstall pyrometer, 221 ; experimental engine with fire-brick superheater ; 



8d2 S 

Steam Supeuheatixg, Discu^.-'ion, 1896 (continued) : — 

early use of combined steam, 222 ; position for superheater ; freedom of 
pipes from deterioration, 223. — Richards, E. W., Vote of thanks for Paper, 
223. — Booth, W. H., Superheater pipes; increase in boiler capacity by 
superheatinj; ; Solignac boiler, 224 ; superheating prevents loss from 
wetness of steam, 225. — Geipel, AV., Superheating less economical for 
liigh-speed than for low speed, and for multiple-expansion than for single- 
cylinder engines, 225 ; loss by radiation and conduction, 227 ; rate of 
coal consumption, 228. — Patchell, W. H., Evil eft'ects of simple flue 
superheater; superheat by wire-drawing is merely nominal; mixed 
superheated fcteam, 228 ; rate of evaporation, 229. 
Steam, Surface Condensation, 1694, 110. See Surface Condensation of Steam. 
Steam Tvkbine, Compound, 1888, 480. See Compound Steam Turbine. 
Steamers visited at Summer meeting, Liverpool, 1891 : — " Majestic," 428, 432 ; 

" City of Paris," 432, 454. 
Steavexson, A. I.., Electric Rock-DiiW, Taper on the Electric Kock-Drilling 
Machinery at the Carlin IIuw Ironstone Mines in Cleveland, 1893, 
3Jt). — Remarks thereon, 315, 31G. 
Middlesbrough Salt Industry, 1893, 294. 
Steel, T. J., elected Associate Member, 1900, 502. 
Steel axd Ikox, relative advantages, 1885, 310. See Address of President, 

Jeremiah Head. 
Steel and Irox, Tensile Tests, 1886, 44. See Tests of Iron and Steel. 
Steel axd laox "Works. See Iron "Works ; and Steel Works. 
Crewe, 1894, 40G, 458. 
Hartlepool, 1893, 375, 380-7. 
Middlesbrough, 1893, 332, 335-Gl. 
Park Gate, 1890, 300-401. 
Thornaby, 1893, 335, 3G2-7. 
Tinsley, 1890, 446, 4G7. 
Steel axd Locomotive "Works, Crewe, 1894, 406, 458. 
Steel, and Steel Guns, 1891, 4G5. -See Steel Guns. 

Steel Guns, Matermls for the study of Steel and of Steel Guus, by D. ChernoflF; 
translated by Dr. "W. Anderson, 1891, 4G5.— Crystallization of steel, 465. 
— Experiments with forged steel, 4GG.— Experiments with steel guns, 
4G7-9.— Heating furnace and oil tank for steel forgings, 470.— 
Necessity for forging steel castings, 471. 
Steel, Hardening &c. of Steel, Final Report on experiments bearing upon the 
question of the Condition in which Carbon exists in Steel, by Sir F. A. 
Abel, 1886, 30. — Previous experiments, 30.— Carbon-determinations in four 
series of steel discs, 31-3.— Results obtained by Dr. F. C. G. Miiller, 33. 
— Variations in bichromate solutions and in the steel experimented upon, 



S 343 

Steel, Hardening &c. of Steel, Final Reporl, 1885 (continued) :— 

•]-l— Method of experimenting, 35.— Analysis of the carbide, 3S.— 
Annealed and hardened steel, 40.— Tempered steel, 42.— Composition of 
carbides in best experiments, 4o.— Specific gravity of steel and of carbide, 
4(;._Conclusions, 47.— Table of experiments, facing page 48. 

Dtscussion.— Head, J., Value of Keport, 49.— Paget, A., Seeming 
irregularity in some of the steel supplied, 49 ; use of thicker pieces of 
steel, 49.— Reynolds, E., Chemical knowledge does little towards solving 
the difficulties met with, 50.— Dugard. W. H., Investigation suggested in 
first Eeport, 50 ; conclusions from Professor Xorris's observations, 51 ; offer 
to supply thin steel for experiments, 51.— Barclay, A., Enquiry about 
temper-colours, 52.— Bell, I. L., Value of chemical knowledge to steel- 
makers, 52; hardening and tempering of steel depend on definite 
compound of iron and carbon, 53; condition of carbon in cast iron, 53; 
transfer of carbon from cast iron to malleable iron without fusion, 53 ; 
irregularity in composition of steel, 54.— Paget. A., Transfer of carbon in 
thin discs of steel, 54.— Bell, I. L., Penetration of carbon into wrought- 
iron plate. 55.— Vickers, T. E., Steel cementation and malleable iron 
castings, 55.— Abel, Sir F., Transfer of carbon to or from steel, 55; 
experiments with acids on annealed and hardened wires, 56 ; nature of 
temper-colours, 56.— Head, J., Vote of thanks to Sir F. A. Abel, 57. 
Steel Manufactore, 1893, 245-7, 251. See Cleveland Industries. 
Steel, Nature and Composition, 1892, 123. See Address of President, Dr. 

William Anderson. 
Steel Pen Manufactory, Birmingham, 1897, 3S5. 

Steel Eails, Faper on Steel Eails, considered Chemically and Mechanically, by 
C. P. Sandbcrg. 1890, 301.— Chemical composition in relation to safety and 
durability, 301.— Favourable effect of high percentage of silicon, 303.— 
Experiments on ingots and rails, and conclusions drawn therefrom, 304. — 
Hardness dependent on carbon and phosphorus, 307.- Safety requires 
harder rails to be made heavier also, 308.— Light rolling stock on heavy 
rails in England, converse on continent, 309.— Increase in length and 
weight of express trains on Austrian railways, 311-2.— Flange rail 
without base-plate, 311.— Goliath rail with steel base-plate and steel 
key, 313.— Double-headed and bull-head rail with chairs, 314.— 
Development of flange rail, 315.— Angular and deep fish-joint, 316.— 
American flange rail, with height equal to base, and flatter top, 316. — 
Base of flange rail, and fixing to sleeper, 317.— Influence of speed 
on safety and economy. 319. — Tabulated chemical and mechanical tests, 
322-6; comparison between weight of rails and of engines, 327. 

DiVcitss/on.— Tomlinson, J., Samples of rail sections, 328.— Sandberg, 
C. P., First steel rails made in Sheffield, 328; foreign opinions of 



344 S 

Steel Rails, Di^cu^sioji, 1890 Ccontinued) : — 

Goliath rail, 328 ; aluminium steel, 329 ; Furncss railways, 329 ; 
influence of silicon, 330 ; strengthening of rood with flange rails, 330. — 
Richards, E. W., Condition of locomotives and permanent way for high 
speeds, 331 ; length of rails, 331 ; hard rail not safest, 332 ; proportions 
of phosphorus, carhon, silicon, and manganese, 332 ; tensile and 
transverse tests, 333.— Evans, D., First Goliath rails, 333; percentage 
of carbon and silicon, 333 ; steel rail long in use, :!33.— Hadfield. R. A., 
Durability of steel rails due to carbon, 334 ; cflfoct of silicon and 
aluminium, 335; piping of steel, 335; testing of hardness, 336; 
manganese steel, 33G. — Arnold, J. O., Hardness of steel, 337 ; chemical 
action in Bessemer converter, 337 ; proportion of silicon in steel castings, 
337; action of silicon, 338; analysis of experiments, 338. — Head, J., 
Flange rail considered as girder, 340 ; objection to double-headed rail. 
340; chemical composition for steel rails, 341 ; tensile tests superfluous, 
341; safety and resistance to abrasion, 341. — Bainbridge, E., American 
heavier engines on lighter roads, 342.— Smith, W. F., Hardness conducive 
to strength and safety in rails, 343. — Dawson, B., Extent of use of 
flat-bottomed rails, 343. — Tomlinson, J., Flat-bottomed rails on 
longitudinal sleeper.-", 343. — Martin, E. P., Phosphorus renders steel 
weak and brittle, 343; efl"ect of temperature in making steel, 344. — 
Paget, A., Value of chemical analysis, 344.— Wicksteed, J. H., Strength 
of hard and soft steel, 345 ; tensile testing of rails and cables, 345 ; 
suspended fish-joint, 346.— Head, J., Tensile test of rails, 347. — 
Tomlinson, J., Objection to flange rail, and advantage of bull-head 
section, 347; early steel rails, 347; high-silicon steel rails, 348. — 
Sandberg, C. P., Safety of small ingots, 348 ; advantage of silicon, 349 ; 
falling test, abrasion, and tensile test, 350.— Urquhart, T., Speed of 
trains and curves, 3.")1 ; light rails on Russian railways, 351. — 
Price-Williams, R., Wear of steel rails, 352; examination of tests, 352; 
hardeners in terms of phosphorus units, 354, 356-7 : wear of steel rails, 
354 ; heavier sections of rails. 3.-)8. 
Steel, Research Committee, 1885, 5 ; — 1886, ."). 

Steel Steam-Pipes, Paper on Steel Steam-Pipes and Fittings, and Benardos 
Arc Welding in connection therewith, by S. MacCarthy, 1896, 230. — 
Cast-iron and copper pipes, 230; wrought-iron and steel pipes, 231. — 
Corrosion, 2:il.— Thickness of metal, 232.— Methods of manufacture, 233. 
— Roll welding ; gas welding, 234.— Benardos arc welding, 235 ; flanges, 
outlets, branches, and tee pieces, 230; bends and expansion pipes: 
length and size of are; strength of electric-welded flanges, 237. — 
Other applications of arc welding, 238.— Joints ; bolt holes, 239.— 
Experiments on electrically-welded bar.->, 239-42. 



S 345 

Steel Steam-Pipes, 1896 (continued) : — 

Discussion. — MacC'arthy, S., Specimens of arc-vreldcd steel pipes &c., 
243. — Schiinheyder, W., Sharp corners inside -svelded pipes, 243. — 
Halpin, D., Joint for high-pressure steam-pipes, 244. — Howell, S. E., 
Electric soldering ; tests of welding of steel tubes by rolls, 244 ; electric- 
welded and gas-welded bars, 245 ; welding of flanges ; corrosion of steel, 
246. — Plait, J., Seamless pipes drawn cold from solid ingots, 247 ; arc 
welding for steel castings; flanges shrunk on and riveted over, 248; 
copper ring for pipe joint, 249. — Robinson, M., Experiments with 
lap-welded and weldless steel tubes, 249 ; copper rings for pipe-joints and 
flanges, 250. — Jenkin, C. F., Tests with Thomson electric welder, 250. — 
Carter, E. T., Electric welding is not mere soldering or fusion ; cost 
of electric and ordinary welding, 251. — Eicliards, E. "W., Length of 
pipe welded, 252. — MacCarthy, S., Corners left inside welded joints ; 
joints for steam-pipes, 252 ; soundness of electric welding ; roll-welded 
steel tubes ; corrosion ; solid-drawn pipes, lap-welded and weldless 
tubes, 253 ; screwed collars or flanges for pipe-joints ; cost of welding, 
and length of welded pipes, 254. — Richards, E. "\V., Reliable steam- 
pipes, 254. 

Steel Tkellis, 1891, 382.— 1893, 387 ; -See British Metal-Expansion Works. 

Steel-Wire Mills : — 

Sheffield, 1890, 442, 448. 
Tinsley, 1890, 446, 467. 

Steel Works, Sheffield, 1890, 442, 449, 450, 457, 459, 463. See Steel and Iron 
AVorks ; and Iron Works. 

Steel-Works Machisert, Paper on modern Steel-Works Machinery, by 
J. Riley, 1895, 436. — Rolling-mill engines, compound condensing with 
automatic valve-gear for non-reversing mills, 436; compound reversing 
engines ; central condensing station, 437. — Cogging mills at Wishaw 
Steel Works and at Blochairn Steel Works, 438 ; live rollers, and tilting 
gear, 438 ; screwing gear for horizontal and vertical rolls, 439 ; traversing 
vertical roll ; dead rollers, ingot and slab carriages, 440 ; pushers, 441. — 
Hydraulic slab-shears, 442. — Steam slab-shears, 443. — Plate-rolling mills, 
reversing, 444. — Three-high plate-mills, 446. — Steam plate-shears, 447. — 
Hydraulic plate-shears, 448. — Hydraulic forging-press cylinder, 450. 

Discussion. — Richards, E. W., Three-high non-reversing plate-mills, 
and two-high reversing mills, 451. — Richards, L., Economy of steam in 
rolling-mill engines, 451 ; coal consumption, 452. — Head, J., Necessity 
for machinery to be modem, 452 ; American rolling of plates from flat 
ingots ; percentage of saleable plates obtained ; reversing and three-high 
plate-mills, 4c3 ; cooling of plates; electric cranes and electro-magnets 
for lifting plates, 454 ; forging presses for armour plates, 455.— Saxon. A., 



346 S 

Steel-Works 3Iachixeky, Discussion, 1895 (continued) : — 

Friction in rolling-mill engines ; triple-expansion engines for three-liigh 
plate-mills, 455. — Lamberton, A., Hjdraulic plate-shears, 456. — Tweddell, 
Ii. H., Parallelism of cutting blade in hydraulic plate-shears, 45(3. — 
Wicksteed, J. H., Bolting together of cast-iron standards of shears, 457 ; 
speed of shearing hot slabs, 458. — Riley, J., Economy of steam in rolling- 
mill engines ; percentage of good plates obtained, 459 ; separate mills for 
difi'erent sizes of plates ; cooling of plates ; friction iu rolling-mill engines, 
4G0.— Kennedy, A. B. "\V., Visit to steel works, 4G0. 

Steele, J., elected Member, 1897, 144. 

Capacity of Railway Wagons, 1900, COS. 

Steebixg by Steam Foweh, 1889, 218. See Address of President, Charles Cochrane. 

Steinjietz, a. S. B., elected Graduate, 1898, 144 :— elected Associate Member, 
1899, 294. 

Stelfox, J., Paper on the Belfast Gas Works, 1896, 390. 

Stephen and Sons, A., Shipbuilding Yard, Govan, Glasgow, 1895, 4G2, 510. 

Stephens, C. R., elected Associate Member, 1899, 294. 

Stephens, INI., Paper on the Burning of Colonial Coal in the Locomotives on the 
Capo Government liailways, 1890, 112.— Remarks thereon, 122, 129. 

Stephens, R., Rock Drills. 1891, 185. 

Stephens Climax Rock-Dhill, 1891, 144. See Rock Drills. 

Stephenson, A., elected Associate Member, 1900, 502. 

Stephenson-Peach, W. J., elected Member, 1888, 2. 

Sterne, L., Autographic Test-Recorder, 1886, 103. 
Electro-Magnetic 3Iachine-Tools, 1887, 336. 
Hydraulic Buffer-Stop, 1886, 115. 
Private Electric Lighting, 1885, 404. 
Treasurer, 1886, 271. 
Tube-Frame Railway Wagons, 1890, 503. 

Stevaut, a., Compound Locomotives, 1886, 381. 

Steven and Stbutuers, Anderston Brass Foundry, Glasgow, 1895, 498. 

Stevens, A. J., elected Member, 1898, 2. 

Stevens, E. C, elected Associate Member, 1899, 294. 

Stevens, J., elected Member, 1891, 301. 
Rock Drills, 1891, 184. 

Stevens,' P. H., elected Graduate, 1899, 295. 

Stevens, T., elected Member, 1894, 294. 

Stevenson, C. A., Faptr on the Dredging of the Lower Estuary of the Clyde, 
1887, 386.— Remarks thereon, 400. 

Stevenson, D. A., elected Member, 1887, 283. 

Electric Lighthouse, Paper on tlie Electric Light on the Isle of May, 
1887, 347. — Remarks thereon, 370, 372. 



S 347 

Stevensox, G. W., decease, 1890, 4.— Memoir, 1889, 75). 

(5TEVESS0X, H., elected ^Member, 1898, 142. 

8TEVIXS0N, T., elected Member, 1892, 1U2. 

Steward, G. R., elected Member, 1893, 1. 

Stewart, A., elected Member, 1887, 2S3. 

Stewart, C, elected Graduate, 1899, 295. 

Stewart, C. N., elected Associate Member, 1896, 2. 

Stewart, J., decease, 1898, 6.— Memoir, 709. 

Stewart and Co., D., Loudon Eoad Iron Works, Glasgow, 1895, 493. 

Stewart-Hamiltox, r., elected Member, 1885, ICi. 

Stiff, W. C, elected 3Iember, 1888, 2G9.— Decease, 1897, 5.— Memoir, 1896, 601. 

Still, "\V. H., elected Member, 1892, 2. 

Stirling, M., elected Member, 1885, 305. 

Stirling, Patrick (Sen.), decease, 1896, 4.— Memoir, 1895, 542. 

Stirling, Patrick (Jan.), elected Member, 1896, 279. 

Stirling, Egbert (Doncaster), elected :\Iember, 1838, 2. 

Stirling, Egbert (Baku), elected Member, 1898, 2. 

Stirling Hot- Air Engine, Dundee Foundry, Dundee, 1887, 451. 

Stgbart, H. G., elected Associate Member, 1896, 102. 

Stgbie, G., elected Member, 1898, 54G. 

Stocks, H. B., elected Associate Member, 1899, 294. 

Stockton, C, elected Associate Member, 1898, 547. 

Stockton, J. S., elected Associate Member, 1893, 392 :— transferred to Member, 

1898, 5. 
Stockton, P. S., elected Associate Member, 1897, 257. 
Stgckwell, C. E., elected Associate Member, 1897, 433.— Decease, 1900, C— 

Memoir, 1899, G19. 
Stoddart, C. J., Paper on the Park Gate Iron and Steel Works, 18S0, 390. 
Stokek, F. W., decease, 1899, 7.— Memoir, 1898, 320. 
Stokes, F. T., elected Graduate, 1892, 102. 
Stoking, Mechanical, at Peel Mills, Bury, 1894, 446. 
Stoking Machinery, Hydraulic^ 1895, 331 . ^'ee Hydraulic Gas-Stoking. 
Stone, E. H., elected Member, 1892, 229. 
Stone, F. H., elected Member, 1887, 158. 
Stone, S., elected Associate Member, 1894, 2 :— transferred to Member, 1898, 5. 

Fluid-Pressure Eeversing Gear, 1894, 260. 
Stosebbidge, a. W., elected Graduate, 1900, 4. 
Stonet, B. B., Frictional Gearing, 1888, 307. 
Stoney, F. G. M., Wheel Load in Cycles, 1886, 175. 
Stoney, G. J., Clock-Driving for Telescopes, 1888, 322. 

Stop, Hydraulic Buffer-Stop for Eailway.s 1886, 105. Ste Hydraulic Buffer- 
Stop. 



348 S 

Storage and Transit of Grain, 1891, 372. See Grain "V^'a^ehousing 
Machinery. 

Storage of Oxygen, 18£0, 131. See Oxygen Manufacture. 

Stove, A. E., elected Associate, 1892, 229. 

Stoves, Hot-Blast, 1893, 2yr.. 

Stow, G., elected Graduate. 1899, 475. 

Stot\- Flexible Shaft, 1887, 82. See Portable Hydraulic Drill. 

Strachan. .James, elected Member, 1888, 269. — Decease, 1901, 7.— Memoir, 
1900, 630. 

Strachan, James, C.I.E., elected Member, 1898, 546. 

Stkachan, John, elected Member. 1892, 229. 

Straker. S., elected Member, 1888, IGO. 

Water Works, Southampton, 1893, 65. 

Stratford-on-Avon, Excursion at Jubilee Summer meeting, Birmingham, 
1897, 253. 

Street's Gas-Engine, 1889, 501. See Gas Engines. 

Strength of Copper, Abstract of Report on the results of preliminary tests of 
the Strengtli of Copper, by A. Martens ; translated and abstracted by C. H. 
Moberly, 1895, 658.— Discrepancies of data, G5S ; nature of investigation, 
660 ; form and preparation of test-bars, 662. — Eflfect of heat : influence of 
once heating and then quenching. 6G3 ; influence of continued heating, 
and of repeated heating and quenching. 665. — Elastic properties of sheet 
copper in difi"erent conditions of hardness, 667. — Speed of carrying out 
tests, 673. — Shape of tensile test-pieces : influence of method of measuring 
extension f n numeiical value of same, 673 ; influence of form of heads or 
ends of test-bars, 674 ; influence of length measured on numerical value of 
extension ; influence of form and magnitude of cross section, 675 ; law of 
similarity, 677.— Comparison of test-bars: results from measurements 
with mirror and telescope, 678 ; extension in subdivisions of bars, 
principal numerical results, 679. — Influence of method of preparing test- 
bars. 6S0.— Re-testing bars already torn asunder, 682. — Strength of copper 
in heated state, and influence of admixture cf foreign substances, G82. — 
Impact experiment.^. 6S4.— Bending tests, 687. — Safe working stress of 
coi)per, 689. — Conclusions, G90. 
Strickland, F., elected Member, 1897, 256. 

Jlean-Pressure Indicator, 1899, 609. 
Stringer. W., elected Member, 1891, 480.— Decease, 1894, 4.— 3Iemoir. 1893, 
498. 
Roller Flour IMilling, 1889, 184. 
Strohn, W., Drying in Vacuum, 1889, 315, 316, 327, 330. 
Strometer, J. P. E. C, elected Member, 1895, 150. 
Alloys Research, 1891, 588. 



S 349 

Steomeyek, J. p. E. C. (contLnued) : — 

Marine-Engine Trials, 1890, 262-5 :— 1892, ITS. 

Water Softening, 1898, 4il. 
Strong, A. G., elected Graduate, 1898, 517 : — elected Associate 3Iember, 1900, 183 . 
Stroud, "\V., Paper on Telemeters and Range-Fiuders for naval and other 

purposes, 1896, 33. — Remarks thereon, 71. 
Stbotjdlet, "W., decease, 1890, 4. — Memoir, 1889, 751. 
Strype, W. G., decease, 1899, 7.— Memoir, 1898, 321. 

Automatic Sluice, 1888, 2'J4. 

Brewery Tramways and Rolling Stock, 1888, 34G, 3-l.S. 

Dredging Clyde Estuarj-, 1887, 394. 

Forth Bridge, 1887, 307. 
Stuakt, J., M.P., Associate transferred to Member, 1885, 3 
Stcart-Hartlaxd, D. A., elected Member, 1889, 5S5. 
Stcbbs. J. H.. elected Member, 1899, 292. 
Stuiiore, F., elected Associate, 1886, 466. 
Sturgeon, J., Compound Steam Turbine, 1888, 487. 
Sturmey, H., Road Locomotion, 1900, 272. 
Stutzek, ^y.. elected Member, 1890, 298. 

SuBSCRiPTiox.— Arrears, 1888, 446 ; 1889, 29-33.— Compounding, 1890, 31. 
SuFFiELD, C. A., elected Associate Member, 1898, 5i7. 
Scffield, F. "\V., elected Graduate, 1894, 295 :— elected Associate Member, 

1897, 144. 
SuKKUR Bridge Cantilevers, 1886, 457. 
SuLZER. J., elected Member, 1890, 2. 
Summer Meetings in chronological order. See also names of places severally. 

Lincoln, 1885, 7, 303. 

London, 1886, 7, 267. 

Edinburgh, 1887, 32, 281. 

Dublin, 1888, 31, 267. 

Paris, 1889, 9, 313. 

Sheffield, 1890, 10, 295. 

Liverpool, 1891, 20, 297. 

Portsmouth, 1892, 30, 227. 

Middlesbrough, 1893, 11, 217. 

Manchester, 1894, 30, 289. 

Glasgow, 1895, 27, 325. 

Belfast, 1896, 10,271. 

Birmingham, 1897, 10, 145, 253. 

Derby, 1898, 12,337. 

Plymoutli, 1899, 12, 287. 

London, 1900, 12, 353. 



350 S 

Summers axd Patxe. Yacht Building Works, Southampton, 1892, 3S8. 

Sunlight Soap "Works, Port Sunlight, Birkenhead. 1891, 455. 

Superheating Steam, 1896, 131. See Steam Superheating. 

Surface Condensation of Steam, Paper by Lt.-Colonel T.English, 1894, 110. — 
Engine used, 140. — Jacketing ; auxiliary valve-gear, 141. — Measurement of 
initial condensation, 142. — Results of trials, 143-9. — Calculations, 150. — 
Evaporation of water by surface condensation of steam, 153. — Comparison 
of calculated with obser^•ed results, 154. — Transmission of heat from 
steam-jacket through cast-iron cylinder-liners of varying thickness, 156. — 
Steam condensation in surface condenser, 157. — Comparison of calculated 
with observed results, 159. 

Survey Office, Ordnance, Southampton, 1892, 3G0. 380. 

SuRTEES, H. W., elected Member, 1899, 144. 

SuTCi-iFFE, E. R., elected Associate Member, 1900, ;'.. 

Sutherland, J., elected Associate Member, 1896, 280. 

Alumina Factory, Paper on the Alumina Factory at Larue Harbour, 
1896, 380. — Remarks thereon, 388. 

Sutton. H. R., elected Associate Member. 1894, 294. 

SuvERKROP, J. P., elected Member, 1887, 474. 

Swadlincote and Ashbt-de-la-Zouch M'ater "Works, ^Milton Pumping Station, 
1898, 477. 

Sw.^LE, G., decease, 1899, 7.— Memoir, 1898, 710. 

Swallow, J., elected Associate ^lember, 1896, 4G2. 

Swaset, a., elected Member, 1898, 341. 

Swinburne, G., elected Member, 1897, 433. 

Swinburne, J., elected 3Icmber, 1898, 341. 

SwiNERD, E., elected :Membcr, 1890, 472. 

SwiNGLER, A., elected Member, 1898, 341. 

Swinnerton, R. a. "W., elected Member, 1890, 17G. 

SwiTHLAXD Reservoir, Leicester Corporation "Water "Works, 1898, 460, 510. 



Tabor, E. H., elected Graduate, 1887, 284 :— transferred to Associate Member, 

1896, 4. 
Taggart, ^\ S., elected Member, 1900, 182. 
Taite, G. C, elected Graduate, 1900, 183. 
Taite, J. C, Tube-Frame Railway "Wagons, 1890, 501. 
Takatsuji, N., elected Associate Member, 1893, 220. 
Takimuba, T., elected Associate Member, 1895, 328. 



T 351 

Talbot, F. W., elected Associate ^Member, 1893, 98. 
Talbot, W. J., elected Associate Member, 1897, -133. 

Tangye, H. L., elected Graduate, 1889, 585 :— transferred to Member, 1896, 3. 
Tangye, J. H., elected Graduate, 1885, 4G3. 
Tanxktt, J. C, elected Member, 1895, 548, 

Tasxett-Walker, a. T. (previously A. T. Walker), elected Member, 1891, 107. 
—Appointed :Member of Council, 1895, 2G :— elected Member of 
Council, 1896, 28.— Appointed Vice-President, 1899, 147. — 
Appointed Member of Council, 1900, 93. 
Electric Plant, 1898, 573. 
Hydraulic Gas-Stoking, 1895, 341. 
Hydraulic Power Supply, 1895, 389. 
Incrustation of Torquay Water IMains, 1899, 521. 
Quick-Revolution Engines, 1897, 335. 
Kope Driving, 1896, 365. 
Training of Engineer Students, 1899, 399. 
Water Softening, 1898, 446, 453. 
Tannixg and Japan-ning Wobks, Walsall, 1897, 3G9, 412. 
Taplik, J. M., elected Member, 1899, 292. 
Tarling, T., elected Graduate, 1899, 475. 
" Tartar," Beport upon Trials of s.s. " Tartar," 18S0, 203. See Marine-Engine 

Trials. 
Takver, H. H., elected Graduate, 1898, 548. 

Tasker, F., elected Member, 1893, 391.— Decease, 1898, 6.— Memoir, 1897, 517. 
Taverner, H. L., elected Associate Member, 1899, 4. 
Taxation of Machinery, 1889, 587.- Cochrane, C, Invited attention to 

question, 587.— Dobson, B. A., Notice of resolution, 587. 
Taxation of ISIachinery, 1890, 10, 33.— Dobson, B. A., Proposed resolution of 
sympathy with object of National Society for Exemption of Machinery 
from Eating, 33; extension of rating, 33; legal decisions, 33; effect on 
various industries, 34.— Marshall, H. D., Seconded motion, 34 ; general 
rule for rating, 35 ; legal decisions, 35 ; bill for settling principle of 
rating, 35; definition of rateable machinery, 35.— Piatt, J., Supported 
resolution, 36; Chard rating, 36; legislation needed, 36. — Head, J., 
Rating of independent machines, 37; investigation wanted first, then 
legislation, 37; definition of fixed and loose, 37.— Davey, H., Unequal 
incidence of rating, 38.— Tomliuson, J., Subject should be well ventilated, 

38. Marshall, H. D., Investigation by special committee of House of 

Commons, 38; reasonable interpretation of law, 39. — Dobson, B. A., 
Present rating based on antiquated conditions, 39; use of machinery 
discouraged by rating, 39.— Paget, A., Supported resolution, 40 ; injustice 
of extension of rating, 40.— Scott-Moncriefl', W. D., Information about 



352 T 

Tasatiox of Machisery, 1890 (continued) : — 

rating, 40. — Piatt, J., Means of obtaining information, 41. — Ellington, 
E. B., Sympatliy witli object, 41. — Head, J., All machinery and motive 
power should be exempted from taxation, 41. — Dobson, B. A., Aim of 
bill, 41. — Etherington, J., Rating of machinery at Nottingham, 42. — 
Tomlinson, J., Legislation needed, 42. — Motion carried, 42. 

Tay Jcte Works, Dundee, 1887, 455. 

Tay Viaduct, Paper on the New Tay Viaduct, by F. F. S. Kelsey, 1887, 37:!. — 
Site and dimensions, 373. — Piers, cylinders, blue-brick shafts and 
connecting-piece, 374. — Base of pier superstructure, and superstructure of 
piers, 375. — Cylinder sinking, 375. — Depths of foundations, 376. — Testing 
of foundations, 370. — Girders, 377. — Transferring girders from old to new 
viaduct, 377. — Floating out the high girder.*, 378. — Lifting the high 
girders, 379. — Decking, 380. — Expansion, parapets, permanent way, and 
gradients, 380. — ^3Iaterials, wind pressure, testing of viaduct, and time 
occupied in construction, 381. 

Discussion. — Barr, A., Lining of pier cylinders, and arched form of iron 
superstructure, 382 ; wind pressure and parapet, 382. — Cochrane, C, 
Importance of wind screen, 382. — Price-Williams, R., Allowance for 
expansion, 382. — Lloyd, G. B., Utilisation of original structure, 384. — 
Kelsey, F. F. S., Brick lining of pier cylinders, 384 ; arched portions of 
pier superstructure, 384 ; wind pressure, and allowance for expansion, 
384 ; utilisation of old bridge, 385. 

Tay Viaduct, visited at Summer meeting, Edinburgh, 1887, 438. 

Tayler, a. J. W., Associate transferred to Member, 1885, 3. 
By-laws, 1886, 21. 

Taylor, A. J., elected Associate Member, 1897, 2. 

Taylor, C. G., elected Member, 1900, 2. 

Taylor, C. P., elected Graduate, 1898, 3 : — elected Associate Member, 1900, 3G6. 

Taylor, E., Jun., elected Associate Member, 1898, 342. 

Taylor, E. B., elected Member, 1900, 182. 

Taylor, F. C, elected Graduate, 1899, 146. 

Taylor, James, elected Member, 1887, 158. — Decease, 1893, 4. 

Taylor, John, elected Associate, 1890, 299. 

Taylor, Joseph (Birmingham), decease, 1891, 4. — Memoir, 1890, 556. 

Taylor, Joseph (Stockport), Graduate transferred to Member, 1900, 93. 

Taylor, J. H., elected Associate, 1896, 2. 

Taylor, R., Jux., elected Member, 1893, 220. 

Taylor, S., Roller Flour Milling, 1889, 175, 177, 178, 183. 

Taylob, T. a. O., decease, 1895, 4.— Memoir, 1894, 466. 

Taylor, W., elected Associate Member, 1894, 170. 
Watch Screws, 1894, 490, 492, 493. 



T 353 

Taylor, W. T., elected Member, 1896, -ITIK 

Taylor Coxcrete Mixer, 1899, o70. 

Teagce, H., Paper on the Pumping Engines at the Lincoln Water Works, 1887, 
124. — Remarks thereon, 14:>. 

Tearing of Wrought-Iron and Steel, 1885, 333. See Address of President, 
Jeremiah Head. 

Tebbutt, S., elected Member, 1895, 548. 

Steam Laundry Machinery, Paper, 1898, 268.— Remarks thereon, 298, 307. 
Technical Dictionary, 1900, 507. 

Technical Colleges. See Eogineering Colleges. 

Technical Dictionary, 1900, 504. 

Technical Education, Remarks by the Marquis of Hartington, 1888, 170. — 
Training of Royal Naval Engineer Students, Key ham, 1899, 383, 447. 

Technical Schools. See Engineering Colleges. 

Tees Conservancy Works, Excursion to, 1893, 336. 

Tees Engineering IjirROVEJiEXTS, Fairer on some Engineering Improvements in 
the River Tees, by G. J. Clarke, 1893, 318. — Tees Conservancy ; channel 
of river; training walls, 318. — Breakwaters; concrete blocks, 319. — 
Reclamation of foreshore; dredging, 321. — Dredgers, 322; hopper 
barges; tugs, 323. — Graving dock, slipway, and repairing shops, 323. — 
Lighting of channel, 324. — Moorings ; floating hospital ; results of 
improvements, 325. 

Discussion. — Head, J., Gas buoys; slag concrete breakwaters, 326 ; 
advantages attending improvements in river, 327. — Cochrane, C, 
Discharge of clay from dredger-bucket?, 327. — Ryan, Dr. J., Tidal scour, 
328. — Bramwell, Sir F., River Tees fifty years ago ; training walls at 
HaATe, 32S ; avoidance of training walls for Manchester Ship Canal, 329. 
— Anderson, Dr. W., Visit to works of Tees Conservancy Commission, 
330. — Clarke, G. J., Gas buoys; dredger buckets, 330; tidal scour; 
training walls, 331. 

Tees Iron Works, Middlesbrough, 1893, 348. 

Tees Scoriae Brick Works, Middlesbrough, 1893, 352. 

Tees Side Iron and Engine Works, Middlesbrough, 1893, 346. 

Teesdale Iron Works, Thornaby, 1893, 3G5. 

Telemeters and Range-Finders, 1896, 33. See Range-Finders. 

Telephone Switch-Room, National, Birmingham, 1897, 396. 

Telescopes, 1888, 303. See Clock-Driving for Telescopes. 

Telpherage, 1888, 98. See Electric Engineering. 

Tennant, W. J., elected Associate Member, 1899, 4. 

Tenney, D., elected Associate Member, 1893, 220. 

Tensile Tests of Iron and Steel Bars, 1886, 44. See Tests of Iron and 
Steel. 



354 T 

Terry, S. H., Experimental Marine Engine, 1891, 404. 
Marine-Engine Trials, 1891, 244. 
Mean-Pressure Indicator, 1899, 5S9. 
Outlet Valves at Burrator Reservoir, 1899, 418. 
Refuse Destructor at Torquay, 1899, 431. 

Tester, W. A., elected Associate Member, 1899, 14G. 

Testimonials. See Presentations. 

Testing of Irox, 1889, 228. See Address of President, Charles Cochrane. 

Testing of BIaterials, Paper on -Mechanical Testing of Materials at the 
Locomotive Works of the Midland Railway, Derby, by W. G. Pect, 1898, 
670. — Mechanical testing for commercial purposes, 670. — "Whitworth 50-ton 
hydraulic testing machine, 670 ; power pumps, hand pump, and oil 
accumulator for applying pressure, 671 ; determination of friction of 
cup-leather packing, 673 ; total friction of machine, 674 ; comparison of 
tests by hydraulic and by lever machine, 675. — Blethods of holding test- 
specimens, 675. — Tensile strength and elongation of copper and bronze 
fire-box stays, cold and hot ; and analysis of bronzes, 677. — Deeley torsion 
machine, 678; autographic recording apparatus with Crosby indicator, 
680. — Details of test specimens, 680. — Flaws in steel crank and straight 
axles, 682 ; crystalline fractures, 683. 

Discussion. — "Wicksteed, J. H., Advantage of accumulator over direct 
pumping for liydraulic testing machine, 683 ; bending tests, method of 
bending to true semicircle, 684. — Johnson, S. W., Speed of bending, 685 
— "Wicksteed, J. H., Rapidity of bending, 685 ; indicating gauge of torsion 
machine, 685; advantage of dead-weight testing machines over hydraulic, 
686. — Gray, J. M., Lloyds' rule for bending tests, 687. — Unwin, W. C, 
Bending tests are relative, 6S7 ; hydraulic testing machine, 688 ; 
graduation of pressure-gauge dials, 688 ; friction of hydraulic machines, 
689 ; relative accuracy of lever machine and of hydraulic, 689 ; modes of 
holding test-specimene, 690; tension machine, 690; form of cast-iron 
tensile bars, 690. — Peet, W. G., Hydraulic testing machine, and graduation 
of pressure-gauge dials, 691. — Wicksteed, J. H., Scale of graduation, 691. 
— Peet, W. G., Motion of finger over dial, 691 ; uniform speed of testing, 
691 ; friction constant, 692 ; bending tests, 692 ; torsion testing'machine, 
692 ; form of cast-iron tensile bars, 692. — Johnson, S. W., Hydraulic and 
lever testing machines, 693. — Anderson, J. W., Tests of raw and 
manufactured material, 693. — Iveson, T. G., Uniformity of testing, and of 
results, 694 ; hydraulic and lever testing machines, 695. — Peet, W. G., 
Test pieces selected from manufactured articles, 695. 
Test PiECOrder, Wicksteed Autographic, 1886, 27. See Autographic Test- 
Recorder. 
Tests of Iron and Steel, Paper on Tensile Tests of Iron and Steel Bars, by 



355 



Tests op Iron and Steel, Paper, 1886 (continued) : — 

P. D, Bennett, 1886, 44. — rrincipal object in making these tests, 44. — 
Table 1, tensile tests of flat iron bars, with drilled or punched hole, 44, 
48-9. — Table 2, tensile tests of flat steel bars, with drilled or punched 
hole, 45, 50-1.— Table 3, tensile tests of flat iron bars, with drilled or 
punched hole filled with rivet, 45, 52-3. — Table 4, tensile tests of flat 
bteel bars, with drilled or punched hole filled with rivet, 46, 54-5. — 
Conclusion from four Tables 1-4, 4G. — Table 5, tensile tests of round iron 
bars, turned down to diflerent diameters and lengths, 4G, 56-7. — 
Table 6, tensile tests of flat steel bars, pulled by grips or by pins, 47, 
58-9. — Table 7, tensile tests of flat steel bars, with difi'erent lengths of 
part tested, 47, 6)-l. 

Biicussion. — 62-104. See Autographic Test-Eecorder. 
Tetlow, E., elected Member, 1891, 197. 
Thackeray, T., elected Member, 1899, 3, 
Thaix, "NV. a., elected Associate Member, 1898, 143. 
Thames, Excursion down Eiver from London Bridge, 1900, 46G, 497. 
Thames Irox Works, Blackwall, 1900, 494. 
Theatre Royal, Manchester, Gala performance, 1894, 40G. 
Thelwall, W. H , Roller Flour Milling, 1889, 173. 

Thekmodyxamics, Ether-Pressure Theory of Thermodynamics applied to Steam^ 
1889, 379. -See Ether-Pressure Theory ; and Regnault's Steam 
Experiments. 
TniiKMOMETER, Elcctrical Platiuum, 1896, loo, 1G4, 197, 221. See Steam 

Superheating. 
Theta-Phi (9 <^) Heat Chart, or Temperature-Entropy Diagram, 1889, 

411-3. See Regnault's Steam Experiments. 
Tueta-Phi (0 (p) Diagrams transformed Irom Indicator Diagrams, 1894, 82, 130. 

See Marine-Engine Trials. 
Thom, r., elected Graduate, 1896, 2. 
Thomas, H. R., elected Associate Member, 1899, 4. 
Thomas, J. D., eleeted Member, 1889, 585.— Decease, 1901, 7.— Memoir, 1900, 

630. 
Thomas, J. F. I., elected Associate Member, 1900, 3. 
Thomas, J. M., elected Member, 1896, 102. 
Thomas, L. R., elected Member, 1897, 2. 
Thomas, 0. P., elected Associate Member, 1899, 4. 
Thomas, P. A., elected Member, 1888, 269. 
Thomas, T., decease, 1901, 7.— Memoir, 1900, 631. 
ThjJiasset Gavge, 1888, 449. See Testing Machine. 

TiiOMASSOX, L., elected Associate Jlemher, 1893, 220.— Decease, 1899, 7.— 
Memoir, 1898, .^42. 

z 2 



356 T 

Thompson, E. H., elected Graduate, 1900, 503. 

Thompson, G. W., elected Member, 1900, 3o5. 

Thompson, H., elected Associate Member, 1897, 433. 

Thompson, James, elected ^lember, 1891, 301. 

Thompson, Joseph, Welcome to ^Members at Summer meeting, Manchester, 1894, 

289. 
Thompson, J. E., elected Member, 1900, 2. 
Thompson, T., elected Associate Member, 1896, 280. 
Thompson, W. P., elected :\reraber, 1887, 2. 
Thomsett, F. D., E.N.. elected INIember, 1900, 2. 
Thomson, A. M., elected Graduate, 1899, 475. 
Thomson, D., decease, 1887, 4. — Memoir, 1888, 533. 
Thomson, G., elected :Member, 1900, 2. 
Thomson, H., elected Associate ^Member, 1894, 470. 
Thomson, J. W., elected Associate Member. 1893, 392. 
Thomson, R. M., elected Member, 1889, 58.".. 

Thomson-, Sir W. (Lord Kelvin), Lecture on Sliip Waves, 1887, 400, 438.— Vote 
of thanks, 433. 

Sounding Apparatus, 1889, 219. See Address of President, Charles 
Cochrane. 
Thomson, J. and G., Clydebank Sliipbuilding Yard and Engineering Works, 

1895, 467, 512. 
Thomson, Shepherd and Co., Seafield Jute Works, Dundee, 1887, 455. 
Thokbukn, W., elected :^^ember, 1899, 474. 
Thornaby Ikon Woi;ks, Thomaby. 1893, 3G2. 

Thornaby-on-Tees, Excursion to Works at Summer meeting, 1893, 335. 
TiioitNABY Shipbcilding Yard, Thornaby, 1893, 368. 
Thoknbery, W. H., Jdn., elected Member, 1893, 220. 
Thorne, Dr. L. T., Oxygen Manufacture, 1890, 151. 
Thorneley, W., elected Member, 1898, 546. 
Thorniey, G., elected Member, 1885, 463. 
Thornton, K. S., elected Member, 1888, 269. 
Thornycroft, J. E., elected Associate Member, 1899, 5. 
Thornyckoft, J. T., elected Member of Council, 1897, 28 :— 1900, 34. 

Aluminium, 1898, 360. 

Launch of a Battleship, 1899, 347. 

Partially Immersed Propellers, 1897, 118. 

Quick-Kevnluiion Engines, 1897, 333. 

Koad Locomotion, 1900, 250, 282. 

Screw-Propeller Surface, 1892, 542. 

Ship-Model Apparatus, 1893, 44. 

Steam Jacket, 1892, 503. 



T 357 

Thorntceoft, J. I. (continued) : — 

Steam Laundry Machinery. 1898, 306. 

Training of Engineer Students, 1899, 390. 

Vote of thanks to President at Summer meeting, Derby, 1898, 345. 

Water Softening, 1898, 429. 

Thoextcroft and Co.'s "Works, Chiswick, 1900, 485. 

Thorpe, W. B., elected Graduate. 1894, 170. 

Thorpe, W. C, elected Associate Member, 1894, 2. 

Three- Wire axd Five-Wire Distkibutiox of Electric Current. 1894, 298, 309. 
See Electric Lighting Works ; and Polyphase Electric Traction. 

Thkelfall, G., elected Associate Member, 1896, 150. 

Throttlixg axd Variable Expaxsiox, Paper on Governing of Steam Engines 
by Throttling and by Variable Expansion, by Capt. H. K. Sankey, 1895, 154. 
— Governing by variable pressure with constant expansion, or by constant 
pressure with variable expansion, 154. — Effect on steam consumption 
and on closeness of governing under sudden and gradual changes of load, 
and relative capability to deal with overloading, 154. — Economy with 
varied speed and constant mean-pressure, and with constant speed and 
varied mean-pressure, 156 ; theoretical investigation for condensing engines 
and for non-condensing, 158. — Governing under different conditions. 
164. — Four varieties of irregularity in speed, 165. — Governing for rapid 
changes of load in high-speed engines, simple, compound, and triple, 167. 
— Governing of electric-light engines, 169 ; dynamo engines for 
transmission of power, 172 ; engines for electric tramways and railways, 
173 ; mill engines, 177. 

Biscussion. — Sankey, Capt. H. R., Advantage of expansion governing 
in being able to overload engine in excess of economical load, 179. — 
Eaworth, J. S.. Most economical engine always governed by variable 
expansion, 179 ; disadvantage of bad governor in regard to sensitiveness, 
and advantage of good expansion, 180 ; crank-shaft governors three times 
as good as throttle-valve governors, 181 ; with thruttle-valve governor, 
sudden increase of load causes great initial condensation, choking the 
engine, 1 82 ; variable-expansion governor costs one-fourth more than 
throttle-valve governor ; variable expansion best in economy of steam and 
in perfection of governing, 183. — Peache, J. C, Original Willans trials 
•without throttle-valve, but with varied boiler-pressure, 183; variation of 
cut-off in all cylinders of compound engines, not in high-pressure only. 
184 ; advantages derived from variable-expansion governing, 185 ; ditto 
from throttling, 180 ; variable-expansion gear applied to triple-expansion 
and compound electric-light engines, 18G. — Paul, M., Jun., Effect of 
reduction of initial pressure by throttle governor on running of engine, 
187; relative economy of two methods of governing, 188. — Sankey, 



358 T 

Throttling axd VAraABLE Exvansion, Di^-cufsiot), 1895 (continued) : — 

Capt. H. R., Throttle governors less efficient at slow speeds, 189 ; greater 
sensitiveness of throttle governors, 190 ; initial condensation with throttle 
governors, 191 ; actual gain by throttling practically same as theoretical 
gain, 192 ; varying cut-oflf in all cylinders of compound engines, 192 ; 
effect of later cut-off, 193; theoretical water-consumption line, 194. — 
Longridge, M., Special advantages from variable-expansion governors ; 
Siemens chronometric governor, 195. — Schunheyder, W., Hunting of 
chronometric governor, 196. — Allen, R. W., Experiments in governing, 
197; time of governor coming to rest, 198; throttle-valve governor with 
floating fly-wheel, 199.— Donkin, B., Water-consumption curves, 199; 
economy from fixed cut-off and throttle-valve governor, 200. — Joy, D., 
Working of locomotives witli regulator or throttle-valve, and witli 
reversing lever or variable-expansion, 201. — Johnson, S. W., Working of 
locomotives with regulator only, 202. — Longridge, M., Difference in 
blast, 202.— Johnson, S. W., Size of blast-pipe, 202.— Robinson, M., 
Improvements in throttle-governed engines, 203; variable-expansion 
governing in America, 203. — Halpin, D., Testing of governors by Moscrop 
recorder, 204. — Saxon, A., Coal consumption as criterion of economy, 205 ; 
effect of speed on economy; wire-drawing by stop-valve, 20G ; lap of 
slide-valve; power of fly-wheel, 207. — Clark, G. M., Water-consumption 
tests, 208.— Johnstone, Capt. J. H. L'E., Conditions less favourable to 
variable-expansion governing, 210. — Beaumont, W. W., Possible advantage 
attending throttle-governing, 211. — Barr, A., Method of experimenting 
on two modes of governing, 212. — Sankey, Capt. H. R., Conclusions 
from theoretical consumption-curves, 213; working of locomotives, 214 ; 
governing of mill engines, 21") ; throttling at light loads ; effect of 
floating fly-wheel, 210 ; watcr-consunipticn diagrams ; advantage of 
superheating by wire-drawing, 217; therraul efficiency, as basis of 
comparison, 218. — Kennedy, A. B. W., Value and originality of Paper; 
conditions of electric-light stations, 219. — Hudson, J. G., Highest speed 
for trip-gears ; shaft-governors or independent governors, 220 ; combined 
throttle and expansion governing, 221. — Sisson, W., Compression and 
clearance, 222 ; expansion gear for eacli cylinder of compound engine, 
223 ; rolling-mill engines with variable-expansion shaft-governors, 224. — 
Dawson, P., Rapid governing in electric ti action, 225. — Garrett, F., 
Trials of throttling and variable-expansion governing in single-cylinder 
and compound portable engines, 22(j ; tabulated results, 228-31 ; economy, 
and closeness of governing, 232. — Lloyd, G. E., Greatest economy from 
engines working together at same mcsm pressure, 233. — Sankey, Capt. 
H. R., Limit of speed fur trip-gears ; steady running with throttle- 
governing, 234 ; compression and clearance, 236 ; tests of variation in 
speed, 237. 



T 359 

Thcmwood, L. E., E.X., elected Member, 190O, 2. 

Thwaites, E. H., elected Jlember, 18S7, 474. 

TiCEHCRST, H. G., elected Associate Member, 1898, 342. 

TiCKNER, II., elected :Member, 1886, 462. 

Tijou, W., elected Member, 1886, 164. 

Tilbury Docks, 1886, 411, 450-2. 

TiLFouRD, G., decease, 1894, 4.— Memoir, 1893, 3f 9. 

TrLGHMAN, IMessrs., Bellefield Sand-Blast Works, ShcfBcM. 1890, 464. 

TiLLEY, A., elected jNIember, 1891, 197. 

TiLNEY Movable-Bar Grate, 1890, 115. See Coal Burning on Cape Railways. 

Timber Works, Derby, 1898, 49:5. 

Timmermans, F., elected Member, 1885, 161. 

TiMMis, I. A., Private Electric Lighting, 1885, 394. 

Tin, Pyrometric Examination of the Alloys of Copper and Tin, 1895, 269. See 

Alloys Eesearch. 
Tix-Plate Works, Birmingham, 1897, 388. 

TiNSLEY Steel, Iron, and Wire Works, Sheifield, 1890, 442, 446, 467. 
Tip Wagons, 1888, 334. See Brewery Tramways. 

Tipping, H., elected Member, 1886, 271.— Decease, 1897, 5.— Memoir, 1896, 99. 
Tires and Rails of Iron and Steel, 1885, 311. See Address of President, 

Jeremiah Head. 
Titles, Abbreviated Distinctive, for membership &c., 18C0, 31 : — 1893, 6-7. 
TiTLEY, A., elected Member, 1890, 298. 
Titren, J. E. DE K., elected Graduate, 1895, 328. 
Todd, E. E., elected IMember, 1888, 209. 
Tomes, W. J., elected Associate Member, 1893, 221. 

Milling Cutters, 1890, 541. 
ToMKiNS, W. S., Compounding of Locomotives, 18&0, 77. 

Xarrow-Gauge Railways, 1898, 399. 
ToMLiNtON, J., appointed Vice-President, 1885, 75. — Elected Vice-President, 
1886, 17: 1888, 29.— Elected President, 1890, 26: 1891, 24.— 
Decease, 18S6, 4.— Memoir, 1894, 163. 

Addrefs as President, 1890, 181. 

Alloys Research. 1891, 599 :— 1893, 182. 189. 

Auditor, 1890, MO:— 1891, 2(5. 

Blast-Furnace Practice, 1889, 029. 

Boiler Construction, 1891, 534. 

By-laws, 1890, 31, 32 :— 1891, 31, 37, 38. 40. 44 :— 1893, 28. 

Canadian Locomotives, 1887, 230. 

Coal Burning on Cape Railways, 1880, 121, 122, 126. 

Colliery Engineering, 1890, 395. 

Compounding of Locomotives, 1880, SO, 82, 85. 87. 89. 



360 T 

ToMLiNSOJf, J. (coutinued) : — 

Council, Annual Kepoit. 1891, 23 :— 1892, 22. 

Disiwsal o^ Slag, 1892, 91. 

Drying ia Vacuum, 1889, 31'J. 325. 

Experimental Marine Engine, 1891, 417. 

Friction Experiments, 1885, G3, CS :— 1888, 182 :— 1891, 138. 

Gas for Fuel, 1890, 408, 409, 410, 417. 

Gas Furnaces, 1891, 93. 

Grain Warehousing ^lacliincry, 1891, 384. 

Hydraulic Buffer-Stop, 1886, 111. 

Iron and Steel Works, 1890, 401. 

Manchester Ship Canal, 1891, 420. 

Marine Engineering, 1891, 367. 

Marine-Engine Trials, 1890, 243, 274, 282:-1891, 285. 

Milling Cutters, 1890, 5r)l. 

Moulding Sand, 1891, 107. 

Oxygen Manufacture, 1890, 1G2, 163. 

Portable Hydraulic Drill, 1887, 76. 

President, on entering upon Presidency, 1890, 27.— Pieply to vote of 
thanks for Address, 1890, 201.— Reply to welcome at Summer 
meeting, Sheffield, 1890, 297.— On re-election, 1891, 25.— Reply to 
welcome at Summer meeting, Liverpool, 1891, 299. — On retiring 
from Presidency, 1892, 25. -Reply to vote of thanks, 1892, 28. 

Raising a Wreck, 1886, liMI. 

Rock Drills, 1891, 103, 183, 187. 

Steam Navvy, 1885, 3fJ<J. 

Steel Rails, 1890, 328, 343, 347-S, 350. 

Summer Meeting, Liverpool. 1891, 26. 

Taxation of Machinery. 1890, 38, 42. 

Tube-Frame Railway Wagons. 1890, 507, 524. 

Vote of thanks to Retiring President, 1887, 30 : — at Summer meeting, 
Liverpool, 1891, 303, 304. 

AValker, Benjamin, ^Member of Council, decease, 1891, 195. 

Water Works, Sheffield. 1890, 434, 435, 441. 
ToMLixsox, W. A., elected Associate ^lember, 1893, 392. 
Tools, Portable Pneumatic, 1900, 119. See Portable Pneumatic Tools. 
Tools worked by Electricity, 1887, 323. See Electro-Magnetic Machine-Tools. 
TooNE, W. C, elected Member, 1896, 102. 
Topple, C. J., elected Member. 1888, 100. 
ToPvPEDoBoAT WoKKS, Chiswick, 190D, 485. 
Torquay Electric Lighting Works, 1899, 404. 
Torquay Refuse Destructor, 1899, 419. See Refuse Destructor at Torquay. 



T 361 

ToRQCAY "Water Works, Incrustation of Mains, 1899, 479. See Incrustation of 

Torquay Water INIains. 
ToKSiox Balance, Springer, 1888, 243. 

ToRSiox Testing Machine, Deeley, 1898, 078. See Testing of Materials. 
ToTTLE, E. G., elected Associate Member, 1900, 185. 
TorCH, J. E., elected :\Iember, 1894, 294. 
Tower, B., Friction Experiments. — Second Beport, 1885, 58; remarks tbcrcon, 

64.— 1888, 200.— 1891, 131, 136, 137, 138. 
Hydraulic Buflfer-Stop, 1886, 111. 
Spherical Engine, 1885, 114, IIG. 
Tower, Eiffel, Paris, 1889, 350, 547, 561. 
Tower Spherical Engine, 1885, 96. See Spherical Engine. 
Towler, a., elected Member, 1889, 2. 
Towne. H. R., elected Member, 1886, 271. 

Testing Machine, Paper on Emery's Testing ISIacbine, 1888, 2oG. — 

Remarks thereon, 225, 244. 479. 
TowNSEND, Capt. C. C, elected Member, 1893, 97. 
TowNSEND, W.. elected Associate Member, 1900, 356. 
TozER, E. S., elected Associate, 1887, 284. 
Traction, Electric, 1898, 43. See Electric Traction. 

Traction, Polyphase Electric, 1900, 435. See Polyphase Eketric Trac;.ion. 
Trade Depression, 1886, 275. See Address of President, Jeremiah Head. 
Trafford, A., elected Associate Member, 1896, 2. 
Teafford, J. P., elected Graduate. 1899, 295. 
Trail, J., elected Member, 1890, 298. 

Tbaill, T. W., Autographic Test-Recorder and Tests of Iron and Steel, 1886, 9a. 
Training of Royal Xaval Engineer Students, Keyham, 1899, 383, 447. See 

Machinery of H.M.S. " Psyche." 
Training Walls in River Tees, 1893, 318. 
Tramway, Edinbm-gh Northern Cable Tramway. 1887, 442. 
Tramway Traction by Endless Ropes, 1889, 211. See Address of President, 

Charles Cochrane. 
Tramways, Brewery, 1888, 327. See Brewery Tramways and Rolling Stock. 
Tramways, Electric, 1888, 89. See Electric Engineering; and Electric 

Railway ; and Electric Traction. 
Tramways Works, Dublin, 1888, 413. 
Transferences of Associate Members. Associates, and Graduates. — 1885, 3: — 

1886, 3 .-—1887, 3 :— 1888, 3 :— 1889, 3 :— 1890, 3 :— 1891, 3 :— 1892, 

3:— 1893, 3:— 1894, 3:— 1895, 3 :— 1896, 3:— 1897, 4 :— 1898, 5, 

548 :— 1899, 5, 147, 475 :— 1800, 93, 97, 184, 357, 503, 555. 
Transformers on Motor-Generators, 1894, 298, 304, 310, 312. See Electric 

Lighting Works ; ajid Polyphase Electric Traction. 



362 T 

Transsiissiox of Exekgy by a partially rarefied Atmosphere, 1899, 299. See 
Atmospheric Railway. 

Transmission of Heat from Surface Condensation through Metal Cylinders, 
1896, 501. See Heat Transmission. 

Transmission of Power, 1894, 177: see Address of President, Alexander 
B. W. Kennedy. — 1895, 599 : see Piopes and Belts. 

Trasenster. J. L., decease. 1888, .S, 4. — Memoir, 1887, 149. 

Travjs, H., elected Member. 1888, 2. 

Treasurer, decease, 1886, 271. — Appointment of successor, 272. 

Tregoxing. W. H., elected Graduate, 1899, 29.'>. 

Trehakne, G. a., elected Graduate, 1889, .'So :— transferred to ^Member, 
1894, :i 

Trellis, Steel, 1891, o82.— 1893, 387 ; see British :Metal-Expan8ion Works. 

Trenerry, W. p. (subsequently Trencry), elected ^lember, 1889, 31G. 

Trent Inox Works, Xewark, 1885, 43.'), 449. 

Tresca, H. E.. decease, 1886, 4.— Memoir, 1885, 459. 

Trevitiiick, R. F., Paper on Locomotive Building in Japan, 1895, 298. 

Trew, J. B., electetl Member, 1886, 4G5.— Decease, 1895, 4.— Memoir, 1894, 
406. 

Trials of ^Iarine Engines, 1889, 235 :— 1890, 203 :— 1891, 200 :— 1892, 13G :— 
1894, 33. See Marine-Engine Trials. 

Tricycles, 1885, 479 :— 1886, 128. -See Constiuction of Cycles; and Wheel 
Load in Cycles. 

Trier, F., elected INIember, 1887, 2. 

Tripier Spherical Eccentric, 1885, 422. See Spherical Eccenfric. 

Triple-Expaxsiov Engines, Paper on Triple-Expansion Marine Engines, by 
R. Wyllie, 1886, 473.— High-pressure triple-expansion engine successfully 
rivals double-expansion compound, 473. — Positions of three cylinders, 
473. — General conditions of eflBciency, 474. — Steam-jackets, 474 ; 
advantage of fitting cylinders with independent liners, 475. — Cylinder 
ratios, 475. — Steam velocities, 476. — Piston-valves, 476. — Low-pressure 
cylinder, 477. — Contracted or indirect passages in high-pressure ami 
intermediate cylinders, 477. — Cut-off, 477. — Speed of revolution, 478. — 
Sequence of cranks, 479. — Number of cranks, 480. — Converaion of two- 
cylinder compounds into triple-expansion engines, 480. — Advantages of 
three-crank engines, 482. — Twisting moment on crank-shaft, 482. — 
Length of engine-room is not increased for three-crank engines, 482. — 
Valve gear, requirements, 483; four principal kinds, 483. — Single- 
eccentric sliding-block gear, 483. — Swinging-link gear, 483. — Practical 
results from triple-expansion engines, 484. — Table 1, three days' log of 
triple-expansion engines in '"Para," 484, 492-6. — Table 2, comparative 
results from three similar atcamcrs with compound and wilh triple- 



T 3G3 

Tkiple-Expansiox Engines, Pajyer, 1886 (contiaucJ) .— 

expansion engines, 4S5. — Table 3, ditto from another similar trio of 
steamers, 480.— Triple engines of, "African" and " Shakspear," 48G.— 
Compound and triple engines of '* Anglian," i87. — Ditto of " Lusitania," 
488. — Triple-expansion engines of " Stella,'' 489. — Artificial draught for 
boiler-furnaces, 480.— Memorandum respecting diagrams, 490.— Table 1, 
three days' log of triple-expansion engines in " Para," 492 -G. 

Dbcusdon. — Morison, D. B., Scope of Pnper, 497 ; care required in 
taking indicator diagrams, 497; difficulty in obtaining true di:igrani 
from high- pressure cylinder, 498; diagrams ifrora engines of "Para," 
and of "Kaisow," 498; engineer's log from "Stella," 498; application 
of artificial draught, 498 ; corrugated flues for boilers, 499.— Parker, W., 
Triple-expansion engine is the engine of the future, 499 ; fuel economy 
and forced combustion, 499 ; practicil results obtained from steamers 
fitted with triple-expansion engines, 500 ; position of cylinders, 500 ; 
steam-jackets, 501 ; cylinder ratios, 501 ; number of cranks, 501 ; 
calculition of twisting moments should include weight and momentum 
of moving parts, 502 ; progressive adoption of triple-expantion engines. 
502 ; introduction of mild steel and corrugated boiler-flues, 502. — 
Cochrane, C, Enquiry respecting terminal pressure in low-pressure 
cylinder, 503.— Morison, D. B., Terminal pressure of 10 lbs. above 
perfect vacuum, equivalent to vacuum of o lbs. below atmosphere, 503 
— Cochrane, C, Boiler duty should be separated from engine dutv. 
503 ; limit of steam velocity for full expansion without wire-drawing. 
504. — Kennedy, A. B. W., Two-cylinder and three-cylinder compound 
engines, 504 ; size of ports, 504 ; want of exact experiments on marine- 
engine economy, 505; measurement of feed and circulating water, 505; 
calculation of steam consumption from indicator diagrams, 505 ; Table 
showing consumption of steam so calculated in two-cylinder and 
three-cylinder engines, 50(j ; utilisation of higher pressure and greater 
expansion in three cylinders than in two, 508 ; relative inefficiency of 
low-pressure and high-pressure cylinder, 509 ; expanding of indicator 
diagrams from corajwund engines, 509.— Mudd, T.. Conditions of 
efficiency in triple-e.xpansion engines, 510; efficiency of steam and of 
mechanism, 510 ; five principal sources of loss in efficiency of steam, 
511; triple-expansion engines of "Abeona," 511; comparison of actual 
with theoretical indicator diagrams, 512; sequence of cranks, 513; 
low-pressure crank leading, 513; high-pressure crank leading, 513; 
explanation of advantage in high-pressure crank leading, 514; oblique 
dividing lines between diagrams from triple-expansion engines, 514; 
three causes of advantage, 515; ranges of temperature in cjlinders, 
510 ; equality of initial stresses, and of horse-powers, 517 ; steam- 



364 T 

Tbiple-Expaksion Engines, T)i>'cussion. 1886 (continued) : — 

jacketing more important for low-pressure cylinder, 517; cj'linder 
ratios, 518 ; designing of steam-passages, 518 ; three cranks superior to 
two, 518; single-eccentric valve-gear, 518; Hackwortli's valve gear, 
519. — Adamson, D., Practical value of triple-cylinder engine, 520: 
advantage of still higher boiler-prcssure, 520; quadruple engine, 520; 
triple compound engines for stationary purposes, 520 ; range of temperature 
in cylinders, 521 ; steam-jacketing and superheating of steam between 
cylinders, 521 ; single-eccentric valve-gear, 522 ; Hackworth's valve-gear, 
522; irregularities in indicator diagrams, 523; use of steel for steam 
boilers, 523 ; effect of temperature on btrength of iron, 523 ; sequence of 
cylinders, and torsional strains on crank-shafts, 524 : advantages of 
higher piston-speed in triple engines, 52i. — Smitii, R. H., Evaporating 
power of boilers, 524 ; greater etficiency of triple-expansion engines, 524 ; 
comparison of mechanical horse-power of boiler with indicated horse- 
power of engine, 525 ; conditions of efficiency in a triple engine, 52G. — 
Cochrane, C, Complete severance is wanted between performance of boiler 
and of engine, 52G. — Ciampton, T. R., Consumption of water per horse- 
power, 52G ; theoretical gain from high expansion is lost in friction «S:c., 
527 ; locomotive with balanced cylinders neutralising strains, 527. — 
West. H. H., Range of temperature in cylinder should be considered in 
relation to stroke, 527. — Carbutt, E. H , C brrugated boiler-flues and saving 
in fuel, 528. — Greig, D., Three-cylinder and two-cylinder engines should 
be compared at same steam-pressure, 528 ; performance of boiler distinct 
from that of engine, 528 ; probability of higher steam-pressures, 529. — 
Scott-Moncrieff, "NV. D., Tlieoretical expansion curve for comparison with 
actual indicator diagrams, 52;t ; interdependence between boiler and 
engine, 529. — Beaumont, W. W., Economy of fuel guides design of 
engines, 530 ; relative amounts of condensation in the several cylinders, 
530. — Head, J., Adjournment of discussion, 531. 

Adjourned JH^cussion, 1887. — IMoiison, D. B., Thrt e-crank engines 
preferable to two-crank tandems, 35 ; conversion of two-cylinder compounds 
into triples, 35 ; compound tandems not so economical as receiver compounds, 
35 ; cylinder ratios, 36 ; diagrams of twisting moments on crank-shaft 
with weight of moving parts allowed for, 36 ; difficulty of obtaining 
correct data, 37 ; saving effected V'y triple-expansion engines, 37 ; 
commercial value of results is main question, 38 ; economical use of 
higher steam-pressure in triple-expansion engine, 39 ; sequence of cranks, 
and its effect on passage of steam between cylinders, 39 ; sources of loss in 
steam efficiency, 41 ; designing of steam passages, 41 : cylinder ratios, 41 ; 
connection between three conditions of eflQciency, 42 ; application of 



T 365 

TfiiPLE-ExPAysiON Engines, l>i.<cn^''ioit, 1887 (continued) : — 

artificial draught to marine boilers, i2. — Cochrane, C, Velocity of steam 
between cylLnders, 43. — 3Iorison, D. B., Particulars of steam velocities, 
43. — Kirk, A. C, Woolf compound engines with four cylinders, 43 ; 
introduction of receiver, with cranks at right angles, 43 ; higher steam- 
jiressure leading to triple expansion, 44 ; multiple expansion becomes 
a commercial rather than a mechanical question, 44. — Wright, J., 
Ultimate adoption of quadruple-acting engines, 44 ; size of crank-pins, 
45 ; cylinder ratios and size of steam passages, 45 ; overheating of 
cylinders by steam-jackets, 45 ; unsatisfactory diagrams due to defective 
valve arrangements, 46. — Beaumont, "NV. W., Utilisation of higher steam- 
pressures, 46; economy in working is most important ior determining 
selection of engine, 47. — Mudd, T., Sequence of cranks, 47 ; steam 
passages not contracted by piston- valves, 47 ; sequence of combined 
indicator diagrams, 48 ; correct method of combining indicator diagrams, 
48 ; re-combination of diagrams from engines of " Abenna," 50. — Eyan, J., 
Kange of temperature in cylinders, ol ; connection between temperature- 
range and horse-power, irrespective of initial stress, 52 ; condensation and 
re-evaporation in cylinders, 53 ; steam-jackets more useful for intermediate, 
and low-pressure cylinders than for high-pressure, 53. — Mair, J. G., 
Superior economy of three-cylinder engine over two-cylinder is not due to 
diminished range of temperature so mucli as to higher expansion, 55 ; 
limit to advantageous number of expansions in two-cylinder compound 
engine, 55 ; use of steam-jackets for marine engines, TO ; heat given up by 
steam-jackets to cylinders, 56; letter from G. A. Hirn respecting 
trials by Alsatian engineers, 56-7 ; Regnault's experiments on heat of 
steam, 57. — Halpin, D., Automatic draining of steam-jackets, 58 ; relative 
efficiency of steam-jacket on successive cylinders of triple engine, 58 ; 
measurement of feed-water in experiments on steam-jacket, 60 ; coal 
consumption should be wholly weighed, 60 ; friction-brake wheel for 
testing marine engines on shore, 61 ; size of steam-pipes and ports, 61 ; 
vacuum should be stated in percentage of barometer, 61 ; difficulty in 
keeping crank-shaft bearings true at sea, 62. — Linnington, E. A., Sizes of 
steam-pipes and ports, 62 ; great differences in steam velocities, 62 ; steam- 
jackets, 63 ; higher piston-speed, 63 ; artificial draught in war-ships and in 
mercantile marine, 63 ; SchiJnheyder, "\V., Proper mode for combining 
indicator diagrams from compound engines, 64. — Hawksley, T., Heat used 
by engine, 65. — Parker, AV., Comparative results from two-cylinder 
compound engine and triple-expansion engine working at same high 
pressure, 65. — Paget, A., Comparison dependent on boilers being identical, 
66. — Parker, W., Boilers identical except in size, 66. — Hawksley, T., 



366 T 

Triple-Expansion Engines, Discussion, 1887 (continued) : — 

Enquired terminal piessures and amount of expansion, 66. — Parker, W., 
Expansion greater in triple-expansion engine, 6iJ; forced draught not 
injurious to boiler, 66; marine-engine trials, 67; difficulty of measuring 
feed-water and circulating-water at sea, 67. — Davcy, II., Discrepancies as 
to steam velocities and sizes of ports, 68. — Carbutt, E. H., Further Paper 
and discussion, 68. — Hall, W. S., Interpretation of indicator diagrams, 68. 
— Kennedy, A. B. W., Measurement of feed-water is most essential, 6i» ; 
calculation of steam quantities from indicator dia,uram.s, 6!) ; combining of 
successive diagrams from compound engine, GO ; comparison is of areas, 
and not of lines, 70. 

TrjPLE-ExPAXsioN ExGiXES, 1889, 218. See Address of President, Charles 
Cochrane. 

Tripp, W. B., Coal Burning on Cape Railways, 1890, 124. 

Triumph Cycle Works, Coventry, 1897, :!69, 42 !. 

Trotter, A. P., elected Member, 1896, 102. 
Lighting of Workshops, 1893, 421. 

Trueman, T. B., elected Member, 1885, vWo. 

Truxchiox, W. T. F., elected Associate Member. 1899, 146. 

Tube-Frame Railway Wagons, I'uper on Tubu-rramc Goods Wagons of light 
weight aniLlarge capacity, and their cfl'ect upon the Working Expenses 
of Railways, by M. R. Jeflferds, 1890, 475. — Long wagon carried upon 
bogie truck at each end, 47.'). — Construction of frame with longitudinal 
tubes clamped together iu pair3, forming four sole-bars, 476. — Trussed 
headstocks, 478. — Bogie trucks; diamond-.'shaped side-frames, 480. — 
Absence of rivets, 481. — Wheels, 482. — Axles, 483. — Brakes, 483. — 
Strength of wagon, 483. — Flexibility of wheel-base, 484. — Carrying 
capacity and dead weight, 485. — ^Maintenance and repairs, 486. — Working 
expenses and goods rates on English and American railways, 487. — 
Triangles instead of turntables, 4!s8. — Weigh-bridges; weigliing of loDg 
wagons one end at a time, 489. — Cost of tube-frame wagons, 489. 

Discussion. — Jeiferds, M. R., Exhibited photographs of wagons, and 
specimens of tubes and clamps, 490. — Adams, W. A., Dead weight and 
paying load, 490 ; load upon each wheel, 491 ; cost of repairs, 492 ; 
early American railways and bogies, 492 ; difficulties of introducing long 
wagons on Engli-sh railways, 492; short coal-wagons in America, 493; 
American locomotives, 493. — Dawson, B., Difficulties of using long 
■wagons on English lines, 491 : Furness Railway experience, 494. — Evans, 
W., Wagons of larger carrying capacit}', 49."). — Carbutt, E. H., Railway 
rates, 495 ; bogie trucks, 496 ; comparison of American and English 
Avagons, 490 ; wheels loose on their axles, 496 ; coal traffic, 497 ; long 
heavy haulage, 498. — Jackson, E., Cost of repairs of long wagons, 498. — 



T 367 

Tlbe-Frajie Railway Wagons, Difcu<!-ion, 1890 (contiuuccl) : — 

AVatson, J. II., Paying weight in proportion to dead weight, 49S 
competition with canals, 499. — Colquhoun, J., Alterations attending- 
adoption of long wagons, 499. — Church, G. E., Extensive use of tube- 
frame cars in America, 499 ; bogie trucks, instead of rigid wheel-base, 
500 ; elasticity of long cars, 500. — Rausch, C. "W., Facility of repairing 
or rebuilding, 500. — Smith, J. J., Size of Great "Western Railway 
wagons, 500. — Sanders, J., Divided axle, 500. — Taite, J. C, Pressed-steel 
under-frames, 501. — Marriott, W., Long wagons for English railways, 502 ; 
carriage of traffic in bulk, 502. — Sterne, L., Pressed-steel under-frames, 
503 ; tube-frames for short wagons, 503 ; first cost and maintenance, 503 . 
• — Sandham, H., Short four-wheeled wagons with light tube-frames, 503.— 
Marten, H. J., Carriage by water and by railiva^v, 503. — Riches, T. H., 
Reduction of tare in Great Western Railway wagons, 504 ; long bogie- 
wagons would entail extensive alterations, 504; experience of tube-frames 
working loose, 505 ; tare and load of wagons, 505 ; chilled cast-iron 
wheels, 506 ; bogie truck, application to locomotives and long carriages, 
506. — Ramsden, Sir J., Tube-frame wagons on Furness Railway, 507. — 
Twelvetrees, R. H., Triul on Great Northern Railway, 5J7. — Johnstone, 
J. W., Objections to long wagons, 598. — Clarke, J. F. M., Weldless steel 
tubes instead of welded wrought-iron tubes, 508. — Wilkinson, J. L., 
Bogie truck not new iu this country, 509 ; English railway traffic, 509 ; 
difficulty of getting full loads, 510 ; trial of long wagon on Great Western 
Railway, 510; obligations laid upon English railways, 511; carrying 
capacity of wagons, 511 ; difficulties attending adoption of long wagons, 
511. — Dean, W., Construction of frame and position of buffers, 513; 
carrying capacity of American freight cars, 513; standard axle, 514; 
chilled-tire cast-iron wheels, 514. — Calhoun, J. C, Cheap transport and 
growth of traffic ou railways in Georgia, 516; cheapest haulage with tube- 
frame bogie-cars, 517. — Adams, W. A., Tare and load of English wagons, 
517. — Jeflferds, M. R., Saving due to tube-frame construction of wagons, 
and to use of bogie trucks, 518 ; proximity of stations on railways in 
Georgia, 518; haulage power for long bogie-wagons, 518 ; hopper bottoms 
for coal wagons, 518 ; average load of long wagons, 519 ; use of steel tubes 
abandoned, 519 ; tubes and malleable castings from America, 519 ; pressed- 
steel bogie-frames, 519 ; weight and cost of bogies and car, 520 ; 
shunting, 520 ; diagonal bracing of wagon frame, and fastenings of tubes, 
520 ; strength of car, 520 ; chilled wheels, 520 ; average distance of 
haulage, and charge, 521 ; conditions of goods traffic in United States. 
521 ; comparative statistics and working expenses of Great Western 
Railway and Xew York Central, 522 ; average loads, 523 ; average 
equipment of American and English railways, 524. — Sandberg, C. P., 



S68 T 

Tibe-Fhajie Railway Wagoxs, IH<cusnon, 1890 (continued) : — 

Advantages of bogie system, 524 ; constructioni of tube-frame wagons, ."iiG ; 
continental railways, 526. — Dean, ^^'., Mileage of steel-tire wrought-iron 
wheels and chilled-tire cast-iron wheels, 527. 
Tube AVorks, Walsall, 1897, 369, 414. 

TrcKEK, T., elected Associate, 1888, 2G9.— Decease, 1892, 4.— Memoir, 1891, 193. 
TrxxEL Excavation-, freezing of running ground, 1886, 236, 252, 259, 260. 

See Refrigerating Machinery. 
TrxNEL, Spikal, 1888, 320. See Brewery Tramways. 

TuKBixE, Compound Steam, 1888, 133, 480. See Compound Steam Turbine. 
TuEBiNE Bp.rsH for scraping water mains, 1899, 5U7. See Incrustation of 

Torquay Water Mains. 
TrKBO-ELECTKic Gexeratoi!, 1888, 146, 480. See Compound Steam Turbine. 
TcnxBULL, A., elected IMember, 1887, 474. 
Boiler Construction. 1891, 541. 
Friction Experiment?, 1888, 180. 
TcRXBCLL, C. II., decease, 1889, 4.— ilemoir, 200. 
TuRXBCLL, J., JrN., elected 3Iember, 1885, 164. 
TcRXEii, Albert, elected ^lember, 1894, 2. 
TcnxER, Alfred, elocted ^lember, 1897, 256. 
TcRXER, Arthur, elected Associate. 1892, 229. 
TcRXER, A. H., decease, 1886, 4.— Memoir, 123. 
Turner, F. W., elected Associate Member, 1900, 3. 
Turner, George Ri.ynhlds, elected Member, 1886, 2.— Decease, 1894, 4.— 

Memoir, 1893, 3!<9. 
Turner, George Robert, elected Associate ^lember, 1897, 434. 
Turner, H. A., elected Associate Member, 1893, 221. 

Turner, J. A. A., elected Member, 1887, 2.— Decease, 1896, 4.— r^Iemoir, 1895, 543. 
Turner, J. W., elected Associate :\Iember, 1896, 462. 
Turner, T., Autographic Test-Recorder and Testa of Iron and Steel, 1886, 

81,81. 
Turner, T. N., elected IMcmber, 1886, 2. 
Turner, V., elected Graduate, 1898, 3. 
Turner, W., elected Associate Memljer, 1900, 3. 
TuKNEY, f^ir J., Knighthood, 1889, 22. 

Turney Brothers, Trent Bridge Leather Works, Nottingham, 1898, 523. 
TuRTON, T., decease, 1887, 4. — Memoir, 151. 
Turtox, W. H., elected Member, 1899, 293. 

Tweddell, R. H., elected Member, 1891, 2.— Decease, 1896, 4.— Memoir, 1895, 
544. 
Boiler Constiuction, 1891, 510. 
Canal-Boat Propellers, 1894, 374. 



T 369 

TwEDDELL, E. H. (continued) : — 
Electric Wilding, 1894, 343. 
Hydraulic Power Supply, 1895, 385. 
Portable Hydraulic Drill, 1887, 78. 
Eivcted Joints, 1885, 228. 
Stei'l- Works Machinery, 1895, iM). 
TwEEDDALE, ^larqupss of. Welcome to Members at Summer meeting, Edinburgh, 
1887, 281.— Reply to vote of thanks, 434. 
Forth Bridge, 1887, 301, 309. 
TwELVETKEES, R. H., Tubc-Framc Railway Wagons, 1890, 507. 
TwELVETiiEES, W. N., clectcd ^lember, 1897, 256. 

TwixBEiiRow, J. D., Capacity of Railway Wagons, Paper on Capacity of Railway 
Wagons as ailecting Cost of Transport, 1900, 557. — Remarks thereon, 
57,5, 584, 589, 609. 
French Locomotive Practice, 1900, 423. 
TwixE AND Rope Manifactouy, Connswater, Belfast, 1888, 422 : — 1896, 437. 
Tyley, F. J., elected Graduate, 1898, 3. 
Tylor Ixfekextial Water-IMetek, 1900, 42, 61 : — Tylor Positive Water-Meter, 

49. See Water Meters. 
Typographic Prixtixg Machinery, Paper on Machinery for Book and General 
Printing, by W. Powrie, 1899, 103. — Object and diversity of typography, 
103. — Hand press, 104. — Single-cylinder machines, 105. — Fine-art 
machines, 111. — Two-revolution machines, 112. — Two-colour machines, 
114. — Perfecting machines, 115. — Platen macliines, 117. — Printing on 
dry paper, 119. — AVorking pressure, 119. — Grinding of surfaces, 120. — Air 
buffers, 120. 

Discussion. — Powrie, W., Specimens exhibited, 121. — Southward, J., 
Progress of improvements in printing machinery, abroad and in England, 
121. — North, A., Automatic feeding, 124. — Powrie, W., Enterprise of 
printers' engineers, 124. — AVhite, Sir W. H., Vote of thanks, 125. — 
Clay, C, Durability of printing machinery, 125 ; motions for driving the 
bed of two-revolution machine, 125 ; American printing machinery, 126. 
Ttkeell, a. W. N., Paper on the Rathmines and Rathgar Township Water 

Works, 1888, 523.— Remarks thereon, 532. 
Tyekell, J. J., elected Member, 1889, 2. 



u 

Ulster Spinning Co., Falls Mills, Belfast, 1896, 4.54. 

Umney, H. W., elected Associate Member, 1896, 2 : — transferred to Member, 
1900, 357. 

2 A 



370 U 

Union Foundry, Thoraaby, 1893, 364. 

Union Steamship Co., Repairing Shops, Southampton, 1892, 368, 378. 

University College, Dundee, 1887, 458 :— Nottingham, 1898, 525. 

Unsworth, H. G., elected Member, 1899, 144. 

Unwin, W. C, nominated Honorary Life Member, 1896, 20 :— 1897, 4. 

Dryness of Steam, Paper on tlie Determination of the Dryness of Steam, 

1895, 31.— Remarks thereon, 47, 56, 78, 88. 
Electric Traction, 1898, 102. 
Friction Experiments, 1888, 186. 
Glass Revealer, 1900, 533. 
Heat Distriijutiou in Steam Engine, 1887, 524. 
Irrigating Machinery, 1888, 60. 
3Iarine-Engine Trials, 1889, 276. 
Quick-Revolution Engines, 1897, 334. 
Riveted Joints, 1885, 268, 289. 
Steam Jacket, 1892, 490. 505. 
Steam Superheating. 1896, 186, 194. 
Testing of Materials, 1898, 687. 
Testing IMachine, 1888, 240, 241. 4.37. 
Test-Recorder, Autographic. 1886, 72. 77. 78, 79. 
Training of Engineer Students, 1899, o90. 
Water Meters, 1900, 59. 
Water Works, Birmingham. 1897, 313. 
Upward, A. R., elected ^lember, 1900, 182. 

Ure and Son, J., Regent Flour Mills, Sandyford, Glasgow, 1895, 499. 
Urie, R. W.. elected Member. 1898, 142. 

Express Locomotives, 1898, 640. 
Urie, W. M., elected IMember, 1899, 144. 
Uequhart, R. J., elected Associate Member, 1898, 3. 
Urquhart, T., Compound Locomotives, 1886, 390. 

Compounding of Locomotives, Paper on the Compounding of Locomotives 
burning Petroleum Refuse in Russia, 1890, 47.— Remarks thereon, 
74, 94-111. 
Electric Engineering, 1888, 114. 

Petroleum Fuel in Locomotives, Supplementary Paper on the use of 
Petroleum Refuse as Fuel in Locomotive Engines, 1889, 36. — 
Remarks thereon, 65, 76-84. 
Steam Pumps, 1893, 470. 
Steel Rails, 1890, 351. 
Ubqtjhart, Lindsay and Co., Blackness Foundry, Dundee, 1887, 453. 
Uewick, a. J., elected 3Iember, 1898, 341. 



871 



VACCU3I for Drying. 1889, :>()7. See Drying in Vacuum. 

V.\C0DM Power Supply, Hague, 1899, :;02-ll ; see Atmospheric Railway. — 

Petit and Boudenoot, Paris, 1889, 5i6, 557. 
Vaizey, J. L., elected Graduate, 1891, 480. — Decease, 1897, 5.— IVIemoir, 1896, 

2U0. 
Vallance plau for Atmnspheric Subterraucan Railways, 1899, '.'>12. See 

Atmospheric Railway. 
Valleyfield Paper Mills, Peuicuik, Edinburgh, 1887, 431», 4(!o. 
Vallint, F. W., elected Associate IMembcr, 1896, 102. 
Valon, W. a., Oxygen Manufacture, 1890, 1G4. 
Value of Steam-Jacket, 1892, ilS:— 1894, 5."5 :— 1896, 4(itj. See Steam 

Jacket. 
Valve-Gear, Singlc-Ecccntrie, 1886, 483, 518, 519, 522. 
Valve-Gears, 1885, 42(3-32. See Spherical Eccentric. 
Valves at Burrator Reservoir, 1899, 407. See Outlet Valves at Burrator 

Reservoir. 
Van Raalte, J., elected Member, 1895, 327. 
Variable Expansion and Throttling, 1895, 154. See Throttling and Variable 

Expansion. 
Vauley, J., decease, 1893, 4.— Memoir, 1892, 410. 
Vaslin, H., Paris meeting, 1889, Presentation from tlie luvstitution, 1889, 584 : — 

1890, 9. 
Vaughan, J. C, elected Graduate, 1898, 342. 
Vaughan, W. H., elected Member, 1885, 164. 
Vaux, W., elected Member, 1897, 256. 
Vawdrey, W., Lincoln "Waterworks Engines, 1887, 142. 
Veen, V. A. A. tee, R.N., elected Member, 1900, 2. 
Venables, Rev. Precentor, Private Electric Lighting, 1885, 411. 
A'enning, A. J., R.N., elected Associate Member, 1900, 3. 
Venning, T. A., R.N., elected Associate Member, 1900, 356. 
Ventilating Fans, 1897, 439. See Propeller Ventilating Fans. 
Ventris, a.. Road Locomotion, 1900, 294. 
Venturi Water Meter, 1900, 45, 59, 74. See Water Meters. 
Verdekber Boiler, 1889, 43, 74, 82. See Petroleum Fuel in Locomotives. 
A^ernon, C. E., elected Member, 1899, 474. 
Vernon, W. H., elected Associate Member, 1896, 280. 
Yesun, J. S. E. DE, Graduate transferred to Member, 1891, 4. 

* 2 A 2 



372 V 

Vezey, a. E., elected CJraduatf, 1892, li29 :— tninsfcrrLd to Associate Member, 

1898, 048. 
Viaduct, Tay, Kailway. 1887, 37:$, 438. See Tay Viaduct. 
Viaducts in Cornwall, Railway, 1899, 35.i, 442. See liailway Viaducta la 

Cornwall. 
Viagkaph, Brown's, 1900, 193, 248, 302. See Road Locomotion. 
ViCAR-s, J., elected IMcmber, 1891, 480. 
ViCKEKs, T. E., created Comi)anion of the Order of the Lath, 1899, 6. 

Condition of Carbon in Steel, 1885, 55. 
Victoria Works, Salford, 1894, 419. 
Victualling Yard, Gosport, 1892, 3GJS, 375. 
ViGERS, G. A., elected Associate ^Member, 1900, 502. 
'•ViLLE DE DouvRES." Btport upoH Trial of p.s. " Ville do Douvrcs," 1892, 13G. 

See Marine-l'.ngino Trials. 
V1N9UTTE, K., Compound Locomotivt s. 1886, 387. 
Vines, C. G., elected Associate ^Member, 1900, 502. 
ViNEY, H., elected Graduate, 1900, 357. 
VoLK, M., Electric Engineering, 1888, 120, 123. 
Volume or Capacity Water Meters, 1900, 43. See Water IMeters. 
Votes of Thanks : — 

At Autumn meeting, Coventry, 1885, 4G5. 

At Summer meeting, Lincoln, 1885, 3(l7 : — London, 1886, 273 : — 
Edinburgh, 1887, 28.% 433-4 :— Dublin, 1888, 271 :— I'aris, 1889, 
348, 34i» :— SheflieM. 1890, .mo :— l.iveri)0ol, 1891, 303 :— Portsmouth, 

1892, 231 :— Middlesbruugii, 1893, 222 :— Mancliester, 1894, 206:— 
(^lasgow, 1895, 329 :— Belfast, 1896, 281 :— Birmingham, 1897, 282 : 
—Derby, 1898, 344-5 :— Plymouth. 1899, 296 .—London, 1900, 358. 

Marine-Engine Trials, 1890, 243, 282 :— 1891, 2S5 :— 1892, 1(34, VM. 

To Institution of Civil EnginLers, 1885, 2'.t, 7f;, 166 : -1886, 26. 127, 273 : 
— 1887, 34, 15;t, 477:— 1888, 32, 167, 447:— 1889, 35, 205,588:— 
1890, 4(;, 177, 474:— 1891, 46, 110, 198, 483 :— 1892, 31, 103, 417:— 

1893, 31, ;t'j, 395:- 1894, 32, 171, 472 :— 1895, 30 :— 1896, 32,104, 
465 :— 1897, 30, 146, 438 :— 1898, 42, 145, 552. 

To President for Address, 1885, 345 :— 1886, 2'J4 :— 1887, 183 :— 1888, 
289 :— 1889, 232 :— 1890, 19'J :— 1892, l:;i :~1894, 210:— 1896, 130: 
—1897, 276-8 :— 1898, 204-7 :— 1899, KSO-3. 
To Retiring President, 1885, 23 :— 1887, 31 :— 1889, 2(;-!t :— 1890, 29, 30 : 
—1892, 25-8 :— 1894, 28-30 :— 1896, 30-1 :— 1898, 33-5 :— 1899, 
31-3. 
To Retiring Secretary, 1898, 36-42. 
VoYSEY, H. W., elected Member, 1888, 2. 
Vyrnwy, Lake, 1891, 461. 



373 



w 

Waddell, J., elected Member, 1887, 158.— Decease, 1889, 4.— Memoir, 1888, 156. 

AVaddixgtox, K., elected Member, 1899, Hi. 

"Waddingtox, S. S., elected Graduate, 1888, 160. 

Waddle, H. "W., elected Member, 1898, 341. 

Wade, F. E.. elected Graduate, 1897, 257. 

Wadham, a., elected Associate, 1893, 221. 

AVadham, R., elected Graduate, 1900, 4. 

Wadia, The Hon. N. X., CLE., decease, 1900, 6.— Memoir, 334. 

Wagons, Railway, 1890, 475 ; 1900, 557. See Capacity of Railway Wagons ; 

and Tube-Frame Railway Wagons. 
Wagons, Tip, 1888, 334. See Brewery Tramways. 
Wailes, G. H., Graduate transferred to Member, 1890, 3. 
Wailes, T. W., Paper ou the Raising of the Wrecked Steamship " Peer of the 

Realm," 1886, 189.— Remarks thereon, 194, 198. 
Wainwbight, J. W., elected Member, 1898, 341. 

Capacity of Railway Wagons, 1900, 575. 
Waister, W. H., elected Member, 1888, 269. 
Wakefield, W. M., elected Graduate, 1885, 463. 
Waldron, p. L., elected Member. 1892, 414. 
Wales, H. R. H. Albert Edward, Prince of Wales, becomes Honorary Life Member 

of Institution, 1890, 175 :— 1891, 3. 
Walke, C. N. E., elected Member, 1898, 341. 
Walkeden, G. H., elected Member, 1890, 2. 

Walker, A. T. (subsequently Tannett- Walker). See A. T. Tannett- Walker. 
Walker, B., appointed Member of Council, 1885, 76.— Elected Member of 
Council, 1886, 18 :— 1889, 23.— Decease, 1891, 195 : 1892, 4.— Memoir, 
1891, 294. 

Autographic Test-Recorder, 1886, 70. 

By-laws, 1891, 35, 44. 

Compound Locomotives, 1886, 398. 

Compounding of Locomotives, 1890, S3. 

Fortli Bridge Machinery, 1887, 320. 

Friction Experiments, 1891, 128. 

Heat Distribution in Steam Engine, 1887, 500. 

Hydraulic Buffer-Stop, 1886, 113. 

Steam Xavvy, 1885, 365. 

Testing Machine, 1888, 226. 
Walker, C. B., elected Graduate, 1896, 280. 



374 W 

Walker, C. C, elected Associate Member, 1893, 392. 

"Walker, F. J., elected Member, 1898, 3il. 

Walker, H., elected Member, 1890, 298. 

Walker, H. C, elected Member, 1894, 16'J. 

Walker, 31., Graduate transferred to Member, 1889, 3. 

Walker, M. H., Flax Dressing Machinery, 1896, 296. 

Walker, K. H., elected Graduate, 1898, 548. 

Walker, E. J., elected Graduate, 1886, 12G : — transferred to Member, 1889, 3. 

Walker, R. T., decease. 1894, 4.— :Memoir, 1893, 499. 

Walker, S. F., Electric Engineering, 1888, 112. 

Electric Lighthouse, 1887, 369. 

Electric Lighting, Private, 1885, 395. 

Electric Traction, Polyphase, 1900, 459. 

Electrical Apparatus, Naval, 1892, 284. 

Electro-Magnetic Machine-Tools, 1887, 339. 

Eoad Locomotion, 1900, 288, 316. 

Steam Navvy, 1885, 366. 
Walker, W., decease, 1895, 4.— Memoir, 1894, 166. 

Gas Engines, 1889, 529. 
Walker, AV. G., elected Member, 1890, 2. 

Canal-Boat PropuLion, 1897, 203. 

Electric Plant, 1898, 581. 

Evaporative Condensers, 1899, 249. 

Heat Transmission, 1896, 527. 

Marine-Engine Trials, 1894, 120. 

Propeller Ventilating Fans, Paper on Experiments upon Propeller 
Ventilating Fans, and upon the Electric Motor driving them, 1897, 
439.— Remarks thereon, 470, 477, 490, 497. 

Screw-Propeller Surface, Paper on the Arrangement of the Surface of a 
Screw-Propeller, 1892, 514. — Remarks thereon, o'io, 556. 

Steam Pumps, 1893, 468. 
Walker, W. H., decease, 1893, 4.— Memoir, 1892, 410. 
Walker, W. P., elected Associate Member, 1899, 146. 
AValker Exgixeering Laboratories, Liverpool, 1891, 429, 433. 
AValker and Hall, Electro AVorks, SheflSeld, 1890, 4G5. 
AValkinshaw, F., Graduate transferred to Member, 1886,3. 
AVall, C. H., elected Member, 1897, 256. 
Wall Dlagrams for illustration of Papers, 1891, 9. 
AA'all Paper Manufactory, Derby. 1898, 496. 
AVallace, J., elected Member, 1895, 518. 
AVallach, L. C, elected Associate, 1897, 2. 
AVallis, AV. AV., elected Graduate, 1892, 229. 



W 375 

Wall-work, R., elected IMember, 1893, 07. 

Walmsley, J., elected Member, 1891, 2. 

Walsall, visited at Jubilee Summer meeting, 1897, 368. 

Walton, D., elected Graduate, 1900, i. 

Wans, O., elected Graduate, 1898, 548. 

Ward, F. A., elected Associate :Member, 1898, o47. 

Ward, J. C, elected Associate [Member, 1897, 434. 

Ward, J. P., elected Associate Member, 1900, 503. 

Ward and Co., IMarcus, Royal Ulster Printing, Publishing, and Stationery 

Works, Belfast, 1888, 422 :— 1896, 455, 
Wardex-Stevexs, F. J., elected Associate 3Iember, 1900, 97. 
Wardle, C. W., decease, 1889, 4, 21 —Memoir, 1888, 442. 
AYardle, F. H., elected Graduate, 1898, 144. 
Warehouse, Alexandra Grain Warehouse, Liverpool, 1891, 372, 428. See Grain 

Warehousing Machinery. 
Warehouses, :\ranchester, 1894, 402, 403, 411, 412, 414, 417. 
Warehousing Machinery ecu Grain, Liverpool, 1891, 372, 428. See Grain 

Warehousing Machinery. 
Warham, J. R., decease, 1887, 4.— :\temoir, 1883, 2G4. 
Waring, H., elected Graduate, 1888, 2. 
Warner, A. W., elected Associate, 1898, 143. 
Warner, H. G., elected Associate Member, 1898, 342. 
Warner, J. S., elected Graduate, 1900, 4. 

Wabp Weaving, Paper on Warp Weaving and Knitting, without Weft, by 
A. Paget, 1889, 469.— Three methods of weaving threads into cloth, 469. 
—Shaping of fabrics, 469.— Functions and movements of three primary 
parts which manipulate threads of warp and weave them into cloth, 
470._Stripes in fabric, and closeness of weaving, 472.— Troughs, 473.— 
Needles, 475. — Presser, 475. — Hooks, 477. — Reservoir rod, 478.— 
Re-threading, 479. — Fringing, 481. — Selvedge, 481. — Shaping, 482; 
Yaucanson chain, 483.— Weaving from creel, 484.- Construction of 
presser, 485. 

Discussion.— PsLget, A., Exhibited woiking model to illustrate action of 
three primary parts, together with samples of work, 486; mode of 
weaving shaped vest, 487 ; extremes of coarse and fine weaving done by 
same machine, 488.— Dobsou, B. A., Examination of machine, 488 ; speed 
and smoothness of working, 489 ; variation in nature of work, and celerity 
of change from one material to another, 489 ; old knitting machines with 
single thread, 489 ; high speed of warp weaving, 490 ; shaping mechanism, 
490.— Boeddinghaus, J., Weaving of thick and thin fabrics, 491.— Paget, A., 
Range of work, 491.— Kennedy, A. B. W., Examination of machine, and 
timing of work done, 491 ; heavy towelling, 491 ; clouds, 492 ; changing 



376 W 

Warp AVeaving, Discussion, 1889 (continued) : — 

beams and re-threading, 492 ; reservoir-rod, 493. — Adamson, D., 
Advantage of using one quality of yarn, 494 ; needles, 494 ; educational 
value of machine, 495.— Birckel, J. J., Nicety of control of motions, 
493. — Cochrane, C, Construction of presser and needles, 495 ; wear and 
tear of machiuc, 49G. — Paget, A., Shaping of fabrics in warp weaving, 
496 ; educational value of delicate machinery, 496 ; increase in wages of 
operatives, 497 ; accurate control of movements in machine, and use of 
Whitworth's measuring machines, 497 ; prevention of sagging in long 
bars, 498; needles, 498; wear and tear of machine, 498.— Cochrane, (.'., 
Simple mode of producing patterns and changes, in place of Jacquard 
system, 499. 
AVarrex, F. F., elected Member, 1899, :?. 

AVarrex, F. L., elected Graduate, 1886, 2 .-—transferred to Member, 1892, 3. 
AVarkex, H. J., Jcx., elected Alember, 1885, 30.3. 
AV.vRREX, R. A., elected Graduate, 1899, 5. 
AVarrex, AVilliam (Uruguay), elected Alember, 1885, 305. 
AVaruex, AVilliam (Sunderland), elected Member, 1897, 433. 
AVarrex, AV. H., French Locomotive Practice, 1900, 419. 
AVarsop, H., decease, 1894, 4. 
AVar.sop, T., elected Member, 1889, 34G. 
AVartox, R. G. F., elected Graduate, 1892, 414 :— tran.'^fcrred to Associate 

Member, 1898, 548. 
AVarwick Castle, visited at Jubilee Summer meeting, 1897, 369. 
AA'asdell, a., elected Associate Member, 1896, 150. 
AVasdell, T., Jix., elected Associate Member, 1894, 470. 
AVashixg axd Iruxixg Machixery, Steam, 1898, 268. See Steam Laundry 

JIachinery. 
AVatch Screws, Paper on the ^Jlanufacture of Standard Screws for Machine-made 
AVatches, by C. J. Hewitt, 1894, 473. — Importance of screws in watch- 
making, 473. — Defective screws, 473; principal defects, 474.— Factory 
system applied to making screws, 475.— Standard screws, 475. — Master 
taps, 476. — Dies, 477.— Screwing machines; slitting of screw-heads, 478. 
— Automatic screw-making machine ; lathe spindles, headstock, and 
turret, 479; turning and screwing, 480 ; slitting saw, 481 ; screw carrier, 
482; feed, 483; rotation of turret, 484.— Slit; screw-driver, 484.— 
Polisiiing of screw-heads, flat, round, and conical, 485. 

Biscussion. — Hewitt, C. J., Alodification in arrangement of screwing 
machine, 486.— Kennedy, A. B. A\''., Standardizing of small screws, 487. — 
Buckney, T., British Association and A\'^hitworth screw-threads, 487 ; taper 
slitting of screw-heads ; grinding of screw-threads, 489. — Darbishire, J. E., 
Tempering of screws after cutting, 490.— Donkin, B., Revolutions and 



W 377 

"Watch Screws, I)i$cu^sion, 1894 (continued) : — 

output of macliine, 490.— Taylor, W., Intercliangeability of screws, 490 ; 
duuble calliper gauge, 491.— Kennedy, A. B. W., Pitches of threads in 
photographic screws, 492.— Taylor, W., Inch and Whitworth thread for 
photographic screws; accuracy of screw taps, 492.— Bramwell, Sir F., 
Bart., Tightness in interchangeable screws, 493.— Taylor, W., Limiting 
gauge to prevent shake of screws, 493.— Lloyd, S. Z., Accuracy of pitch 
in cutting threads with die ; screw-threads used at Messrs. Xettlefolds', 
494.— Joy, D., Lse of helical springs, 494.— Jenkin, C. F., Taking up slack, 
495.— Stabler, J., Output of perfect screws, 495.— Hewitt, C. J., Angle of 
thread ; grinding of thread ; limiting gauges, 495 ; speed of machine ; 
helical springs for return motions, 49G ; cutting threads with die, 497.— 
Phillips, J., Lubrication of screws during cutting, 497.— Haswell, J., Screw- 
thread standard in America, 497.— Hewitt, C. J., Tempering of screws, 
497 ; taking up slack ; machine for one size of screw ; standard taps and 
screws, 498.— Kennedy, A. B. ^\'., Interchangeable screws from independent 

taps, 498. Foster, A. L. X., Origin of British Association thread, 498.— 

Kennedy, A. B. W., Complicated work of machine, 499.— Jones, H. W., 
Absence of standard for screws in torpedoes, 499; single-spindle and four- 
spindle screwing-machines, 501. — Hewitt, C. J., Adoption of British 
Association screw-thread at Lancashire Watch "Works, 501 ; "Whitworth 
pitches, and British Association thread modified, 502; dimensions of 
standard screws with flat heads for tool-making purposes, 503 ; four- 
spindle screwing machme ; simplicity in machinery, 504. 
"Watch "Works, Prescot, 1894, 407, 461. 
Watchukst, C. L., elected Member, 1900, 182. 
Water Gas, 1896, 396. See Belfast Gas "VN'orks. 
"Water Gas for Fuel, 1890, 402. See Gas for Fuel. 
Water Gaige, Self-Eecording, 1890, 426. See Sheffield Water Works. 
Water Meters, Paper on Water Meters of the present day : with special 
reference to small flows and waste in dribbles ; by W. Schonheyder, 1900, 
37.— Six classes of water meters, 37.— Table showing leakages through 
small holes per hour and day ; waste of water per day in London, 38.- Sale of 
water by meter, 39.— Low-pressure meters : " Parkinson," 39 ; " Bascule," 
40.— Inferential meters : Siemens' "Turbine"; Siemens' "Fan," 41; 
" Tylor Inferential," 42.— Volume or Capacity Meters, 43 : " Hersey " ; 
" Crown " ; " Bee " ; Kent " Uniform," 44.— Venturi Meter, 45.— Waste- 
Detectiou Meters: "Deacon," 45.— Positive Meters: "Kennedy," 46; 
Duplex Meters : " Frost," 48 ; " Tylor Positive " ; " Worthington " ; 
"Frager"; " Schreiber,"' 49; Kent "Absolute"; "Schmid," 50.— 
"Imperial" meter, 51-4 ; tests of four water meters, 55. 

Discii-ision.— Schonheyder, W., Difficulties in construction of meters ; 



378 W 

Wateu Meters, Digcussion, 1900 (continued) :— 

piston-cups, gun-metal crank-spimlle, 56 : meter exliibitud in action, 57. — 
Key, J. E. H. de. Scope of discussion, 58. — Hawksley, C, Defects in 
various meters, 58 ; effects of various kinds of water, 59. — Unwin, W. C, 
" Venturi " meter, 59 ; substitution of vulcanite for metal, 60. — Bright, 
P., "Tylor " meter, 61 ; tests of positive and volume meters; friction of 
working parts, 62. — Bryan, W. B., Accuracy of inferential meters for 
large supplies, 63 ; cost and rent of meter prohibitive for small supplies ; 
meters in Berlin ; advantage of use of " Deacon " meter, 64 ; accuracy 
of " Venturi " meter, 65. — Smith, I., Rotary meter containing series 
of spiral channels, 65 ; details of meter, 66 ; danger to health by 
curtailing water supply, 67. — Ellington, E. B., Low-pressure meter for 
hydraulic power supply, 68 ; cost of meters, 69. — Cochrane, G., Kent 
" Uniform " meter for high-pressure system in ^lanchester, 69. — 
"NVIieatley, T. A., Cost of positive meters, 70 ; working conditions for 
meters, 71. — Morris, "\V., Water meters for garden supplies, 72 ; water 
supply in Berlin, 73. — Carbutt, Sir E. H., Bart., Contributions to 
discussion in writing, 73. — Gray, J. M., Excellent design of "Imperial" 
meter, 73. — Carbutt, Sir E. H., Bart., Tefeting of meters at National Physical 
Laboratory, 7-t. — Schunheydir, W., Registration of " Venturi " meter, 74 ; 
lignum vitae for working parts ; difference in registration of volume and 
"Imperial" meter, 75; infereutial meters for large supplies; Berlin 
supply, 76. — Carbutt, Sir E. H., Bart., National Physical Laboratory, 
76. — Bernays, J., Action of ''Bernays " Positive meter, 77. — Francis, H., 
Indiscriminate use of water meters; accurate registration of "Imperial" 
meter, 78. — Hunter, F., Efficiency of "Kennedy" meter, 78. — Kennedy, 
T., Construction of " Frost" meter ; comparison with " Kennedy " meter, 
79 ; immersion of working parts, 80 ; cost of maintenance at Irvine, 81. — 
Kent, W. G., Indiscriminate use of meters, 81 ; large consumption of 
water per head in America ; registration of " Uniform " rotary piston 
meter in Manchester, 82. — Marsh, L. S. !M., High-pressure meter 
desirable, 83. — Spooner, H. J., Incrustation in water meters ; "Lacoste" 
meter, 84 ; " Frager " meter, 85 ; lignum vitae for working parts, 86. — 
Schonheyder, W., Cleansing of meter, 86 ; inferential meters in Berlin, 
87 ; cost of meters ; registration by meter in Manchester, 88 ; relative 
cost of positive and inferential meters; absence of stuffing-boxes iu 
" Imperial " meter, 89 ; limit of speed of meters, 90 ; tests of " Imperial " 
meter; direction of movement of meter, 91 ; inability of volume meter 
to register small flows, 92. 
AVateu PuraFicATiox, 1898, 404. See Water Softening. 

Water PrrviFicATiox by Spongy Iron, 1889, 224. See Address of President 
Charles Cochrane. 



W 379 

■Water Side Woeks, Lincoln, 1885, 4i-i. 

"Water Softening, Paper on Water Softening and Purification by the Archbutt- 
Deeley process, by L. Archbutt, 1898, 404.— Hard water, and nature of 
hardening ingredients ; carbonate of lime, 404 ; carbonate of magnesia, 
405 ; sulphate of lime, solubility in pure water, 406 ; temporary versus 
permanent hardness, 409 ; chloride and nitrate of calcium, 410 ; sulphate, 
chloride, and nitrate of magnesium, 410. — Carbonating softened water, 
411.— Softening apparatus, 413. — General remarks, 417. — River Derwent 
water, 418. — Bacterial purification, 419. — Other applications, 419. — St. 
Helens. 420.— Swadlincote and Ashby, 422.— Cost of softening, 423. — 
Advantages of softening, 42.5 ; prevention of incrustation, 426 ; of pitting 
and corrosion, 427; saving of soap, 427. — Clarification of waste 
water, 428. 

Discussion. — Thomycroft, J. I., Carbonating of softened water for 
boilers; corrosion by carbonic acid in water, 429. — Crosland, J. F. L., 
Loss of fuel through incrustation in boilers, 430 : floury deposit, 430 ; 
grease in feed- water from surface condenser, 431. — Ellington, E. B., 
Clarification of dirty Thames water, and cost, 433 ; filtration through 
sponge and through charcoal, 434 ; use of alumino-ferric for clarification 
of water. 43.5. — Herschmann, A. J., "Water softening in Austria, and in 
Germany, 435. — Lupton, A., Softening of feed-water heated by exhaust 
steam, 436. — Perks, J., Carbonating of softened water, superseded by 
heating of feed-water, 436. — Halpin, D., Precipitation of sulphate of lime 
by heating water, 437 ; loss of fuel through incrustation, 438 ; softening 
of water for locomotive boilers by heating, 438. — Hiller, E. G., Blowing 
arrangement for disturbing precipitate in softening tanks, 439 ; action in 
removing grease, 439 ; depreciation in softening tanks, 440. — Hughes, 
G. D., Pitting and corrosion of boilers by carbonic acid, and by distilled 
water, 440. — Stromeyer, E. C, Heating of clarified feed-water, 441 ; loss 
arising from scale, 441. — Atkinson, .J., Scale outside flue-tubes or inside 
water-tubes, 442. — Ingham, "W., Overheating by thickening of water 
without incrustation, 442 ; pitting and corrosion by carbonic acid, 443. — 
Sisson, "W., Resistance of bounding surfaces to transmission of heat, 443. 
— Smith, R. H,, Efl'ect of soft sludge and of hard scale, 444. — Saxon, A., 
Cleaning of flues and tubes from dust, 445. — Maw, W. H., Cost of cleaning 
boilers fed with softened water, '445 ; efiect of incrustation upon 
evaporative efficiency, 446. — "Walker, A. T., "Water softening in German 
steelworks, 446.— Johnson, S. "W., Effect of softening process for 
locomotives on Midland Railway, 446. — Archbutt, L., Carbonating of 
softened water, 447 ; corrosion of boilers prevented by thin scale, 448 ; 
pittings, and remedy, 448 ; loss of fuel through incrustation, 448 ; cost of 
filtering and filter-cloths, 449 ; corrosion by alumino-ferric, 449 ; water 



380 W 

Wateu Suftenisg, Ducmsion, 1898 (contiuuerl) : — 

softening in Austria, 450 ; softeuiny; of feed-water heated by exhaust 

steam, 450 ; precipitation of sulphate of lime by heat, 450. — Halpin, D., 

Thermal storage precij^itates free of cost, 450. — Archbutt, L., Removal of 

grease by precipitation, 451 ; corrosion by cold distilled water, 451 ; 

cleaniug of boilers fed with softened water, 4.52. — Johnson, S. W., Value 

of information, 452. — Perks, J., Steam jet blowing into feed-water, 452 ; 

injection of fuel gas into softened water, 453. — Walker, A. T., Use of 

softened water in (ierman steelworks, and cost of softening, 453. — Archbutt, 

L., Heating or carbonatiug of softened water, 4.")4. 
"Wateu Softening for Laundries, 1898, 260, 290, 201, 29G, 207, 301, 300. See 

Steam Laundry Machinerj'. 
Water-Softening ^Machinery at Southampton Water Works, 1893, 59. See 

Southampton Water Works. 
Watei! Tower, Norton, near Kuncorn, 1891, 4G4. 
Water A\ays, Inland, 1889, 214; see Address of President, Charles Cochrane. — 

Section of Water ANays, 1897, 103, 140. 
Water AVorks : — 

Birmingham, 1897, 207. 

Derby, 1898, 475. 

East Loudon :— Lee (Lea) Pridge, 1900, 483 :— Walthamstow, 1900, 484. 

Edinburgh, 1887, 439, 450-02. 

Glasgow, 1895, 462, 408. 

Leicester, 1898, 510. 

Lincoln, 1885, 44G-7 :— 1887, 124. 

Liverpool, 1892, 32. 

Plymouth, 1899, 407, 442. 

Portsmouth, 1892, 370. 

Pitthmines ami Kathgar, Dublin, 1888, 378, 523. 

ShefHeld, 1890, 419, 445. 

Southampton, 1892, 360 :— 1893, 53. 

Staines Reservoirs Works, 1900, 466, 487. 

Swadlincote and Ashby-de-la-Zouch, 1898, 477. 

Torquay, 1899, 479. 
Water- Works Pipe Scraper, 1899, 479. See Incrustation of Torquay Water 

Mains. 
Water- Works Pumping Engines : — 

Birmingham, 1887, 141 :— 1897, 304. 

Bridgnorth, 1887, 141. 

Derby, 1898, 475. 

East London, 1887, 132, 138 :— 1900, 483-5. 
Leicester, 1898, 511. 



W 381 

Water-"«'orks Pi mpino Exgines (continued) :— 
Lincoln, 1887, 1-24-4:). 
Liverpool, 1892, 32. 
Milton. 1898, 477. 
New River. London, 1887, 135. 
Southampton, 1893, .iS. 
South Staffordshire, 1887, 142. 
South-wark and Vauxhall, 1887, 134. 
Swadlincote and Ashby-de-la-Zouch, 1898, 477. 
West Middlesex, 1887, 138. 
Water- Works Valves, 1899, 407. -See Outlet Valves at Burrator Eeservoir. 
Wateblow, D. S., elected Associate, 1899, 294. 
Waterous, J. E., elected Member, 1891, 480. 
Watertown Arsenal Testing Machine, Emery's, 1888, 20G. See Testing 

3Iachine. 
Watkins, a., Marine-Engine Trials, 1890, 270. 
Watkinson, W. H., elected Member, 1890, 472. 
Electric Lighting Works, 1894, 310. 
Electric Welding, 1894, 346. 
Hydraulic Power Supply, 1895, 402. 
Watnet, T. S., elected Member, 1900, 182. 
Watson, Dr. D., Alloys Eesearch, 1893, 168, 178 :— 1897, 87. 
Watson, George (London), elected Associate Member, 1893, 392 :— transferred 

to Member, 1900, 184. 
Watson, George (Leeds), elected IMember, 1900, 96. 
Watson, G. C, elected IMember, 1890, 2. 
Watson, J. B., elected Member, 1897, 433. 
Watson, J. F., elected Member, 1896, 102. 
Watson, .J. H , Tube-Frame Eailway Wagons, 1890, 498. 
Watson, J. W., elected ^lember, 1898, 142. 
Watson, R., elected Associate Member, 1900, 183. 
Watson, T. J., elected Member, 1897, 2. 

Watson, Sir W. E., Knighthood, 1892, 413: 1893, 3.— Decease, 1901, 7.— 
:\remoir, 1900, 334. 
Welcome to Members at Summer meeting, Glasgow, 1895, 326. 
Watt, C, elected Member, 1891, 2. 

Watts and Co., S. and J., Warehouse, Manchester, 1894, 402, 411. 
WArGH, H. N. D., elected Graduate, 1895, 328 :— elected Associate IMember, 

1898, 342. 
Waverley Steel and File Works, Sheffield, 1890, 442, 4.50. 
Waves, 1887, 409. See Ship Waves. 
Waynforth, H. M., elected Associate Member, 1897, 257. 



382 W 

Wearing, J. E., elected Member, 1897, 256. 

Weatherburx, E., elected Member, 1886, 271. 

AVeatherhead, p. L., decease, 1889, i. — Memoir, 1888, 157. 

"Weaving and Knitting with Warp and -without Weft, 1889, 469. See Warp 

Weaving. 
Weaving or Spinning 3Iills. -See Spinning or Weaving ^lills. 
Webb, H., elected Member, 1894, 2. 
Electric Welding, 1894, 339. 
Webb Compound Locomotive, 1889, US, 119, 121, 13i, 137. See Compound 

Locomotives. 
Webley and Son, Gun Manufactory. Birmingham, 1897, 403. 
Webster, J. J., elected 3Iember, 1890, 472. 
Webster, W., elected Member, 1887, 284. 
Weighing Machines, 1888, 206, 448. See Testing ^Machine. 
Weightman, W. J., elected Member, 1891, 2. 
Weir, G. and J., Holm Foundry, Cathcart, Glasgow, 1895, 500. 
Weirs, Automatic Sluice, 1888, 292. See Automatic Sluice. 
Welding, Benardos Arc, 1896, 230. See Steel Steam-Pipes. 
Welding, Electric, 1888, 107, 114, 124, 145 :— 1894, 319. 
Welding Furnaces, with Liquid Fuel, 1889, 49, 68, 73, 78, 82. See Petroleum 

Fuel in Locomotives. 
Wellington, J. INI., elected Associate Member, 1900, 183. 
Wellington Foundry and Xew ^Machine- Works, Lincoln, 1885, 434, 444. 
Wellman, S. T., elected 31ember, 1888, 2. 
Wells, C, decease, 1891, 4.— ISIemoir, 1890, 293. 
Wells, G. J., elected Member, 1898, 546. 
Wells, L. B., Canal-Boat Propulsion, 1897, 231. 
Wells, S. H., elected Associate Member, 1893, 221. 
Welsh, J., elected Associate Member, 1897, 257. 

Wesley, J. A., elected Graduate, 1886, 2 : — transferred to Member, 1900, 503. 
West, C. H., elected Associate Member, 1895, 2 : — transferred to Member, 

1898, 5. 
West, E. H., elected :Member, 1898, 341. 
West, H. E., elected Associate Member, 1899, 5. 
West, H. H., Honorary Secretary of Liverpool Summer meeting 1891, 

Acknowledged vote of thanks, 1891, 305. — Presentation from the 

Institution, 1891, 479 : 1892, 9. 
Marine Corrosion, 1896, 350, 352. 
Triple-Expansion Engines, 1886, 527. 
West, James, elected Member, 1894, 470. 
West, John, elected Member, 1894, 470. 
Hydraulic Gas-Stoking, 1895, 343. 



W 383 

West, L., elected Member, 1891, 197. 

West Hartlepool, Excursion from Middlesbrough, 1893, 33G. 

West Hartlepoul Steel axd Iron- Works, West Hartlepool, 1893, 385. 

Western-, H., elected Graduate, 1900, 4. 

Westgarth, T., elected INIember, 1891, 301. 

Westjiacott, H. a., elected Member, 1895, 548. 

Westmacott, p. G. B., Grain Warehousing Machinery, 1891, 378, 382. 

Westminster PZlectric Supply Stations, 1900 : — Davies Street, 467 ; 3Iillbank 
Street, 468. 

Weston, G. C, elected Associate ^lember, 1899, 294. 

AVestwood, J., decease, 1899, 7. — Memoir, 1898, 322, 

Wetness of Steam, Methods of determining, 1895, 33. See Dryness of 
Steam. 

Weyman, J. E., elected Member, 1888, 160. 

Whale, G., elected Member, 1900, 2. 

Whale, R. A., elected Associate ^Member, 1897, 434. 

Whale Island, Portsmouth Harbour, 1892, 368. 

Wheatley, T. a., Water Meters, 1900, 70. 

Wheel Load in Cycles, Paper on the Distribution of the Wheel Load in 
Cycles, by J. A. Griffiths, 1886, 128. — Running resistances of cycle 
wheels, 128. — Classification of cycles, 129. — Efficiency of cycles, 130. — 
Five points of efficiency. 131. — One-wheeled cycles, 132. — Two- 
wheeled cycles, 132. — Hobby horse, 132. — Front-driving bicycles, 132. 
— Distribution of weight in ordinary bicycle, 133. — Power of rider to 
vary distribution, 133. — Effect of brake on stability of bicycle, 134. — 
Safety bicycles, 134. — Rear-driving bicycles, 135. — Stability of rear- 
drivers when brake is applied to hind wheel, 136. — Kaiser gafety 
bicycle with swinging seat-pillar, 137.— Relative stability of various 
kinds of bicycles, 137. — Speed of dwarf bicycles, 137. — Dicycles or 
broad-gauge bicycles, 138. — Three-wheeled cycles, 139. — Three-track 
tricycles :— class A, wheel-base triangle with apex aft, 139 ; front-drivers, 
single-driving, 139 ; double-driving, 140 ; stability increased by carrying 
the seat back, 141 ; rear-drivers, 141 : — class B, wheel-base triangle 
with apex forwards, 142 ; Starley's balance-driving gear, 142 ; addition 
of fourth or guard wheel in rear, 142 ; perfect stability under action of 
brake, 142. — Two-track tricycles; — class C, wheel-base triangle with 
apex forwards laterally, 143 : — class D, wheel-base triangle with apex 
symmetrical laterally, 144. — Cycles fob two riders, 145. — One-track 
tandems, 145. — Tandem and sociable dicycles, 146. — Sociable and 
tandem tricycles, 146.— Four-wheeled cycles, 147. — Convertible sociable. 

147. — Swivel coupling, 148. — Cycles with five or more wheels, 148. 

Influence of gradient and of rider's position, 149. — Arrangements for 



384 W 

Wheel Load ix Cycle*. Paper, 1886 (continued) : — 

varying rider's position, 149. — Sliding seats, and adjustable double 
frame, 150. — Automatic adjustment of rider's position, 151. — Spinaway 
tricycle with automatic adjustment of rider's position, 151 ; driving and 
carrying portion, 152; steering and braking apparatus, 152; load 
distribution, 153. — Kaiser cycles, with automatic adjustment of seats, 
15o. — Tabular analysis of gross and relative wheel-loads in thirty-nine 
examples, 154-61. 

Discussion. — Griffiths, J. A., Keccnt progress in cycle manufacture, 
162. — Boys, C. V., Introduction of word " dicycle," 163 ; classification 
of tricycles, 163; variation of load distribution according to the driving 
action, 164 ; dynamical considerations connected with treadle action and 
application of brake, 164; fore and aft stability of cycles, 166; effect 
of gyroscopic action of wlieels on lateral stability of cycles, 167 ; 
steering of Otto dicycle, 16S; want of efficient positive driving gear, 
168; motion of seat in Spinaway and Kaiser cycles, 168. — Shaw, W. T., 
A'ariatiou of road resistance in relation to wheel diameter, 169; 
distribution of load in tricycles, 169; application of pressure to pedals 
and to brake, 170.— Boys, C. V., Effect of pedal pressure upon 
distribution of load, 170: effect of brake-action and of back-treadling, 
]70. — Marsland, L. W., Ease of riding Spinaway tricycle, 172. — 
Soper, W., "Wheel load in relation to stability and rider's safety, and 
to ease of propulsion, 172 ; proper position for front wheel of bicycle, 
173 ; triangle of stability, 173 ; resultant line of thrust when bicycle ia 
in motion, 173 ; best form for tricycles, 174 ; Berkshire tricycle, 174. — 
Stoney, F. G. 'SI., Early four-wheeled velocipede, 17.5 ; twin cycle, 175 ; 
compound driver or positive clutch-grear, 175; advantages of ball 
bearings, 177 ; simple construction of ball bearing, 178 ; objection to 
curved surface of conical jouraal, 178. — Goodwin, A., Jun., Experience 
with ball bearings and roller bearings, 179 ; ball bearings for railway 
carriages, 179. — Paget, A.. Application of ball bearings, 179 ; variation 
of road resistance in relation to wheel diameter, 180. — Shaw, "W. T., 
Eelation between rolling resistance and wheel diameter, 180. — Griffiths, 
J. A., Use of name "dicycle," 180; classificatioa of tricycles, 180; 
variation of wheel load from dynamical considerations, 181 ; reduction of 
weight on rear-steering wheel in front-driving tricycles of class A, 181 ; 
distribution of rider's weight, 181 ; positive driving gear, 182 ; riding 
of Otto dicycle and of Spinaway tricycle, 182; variation of road 
resistance in relation to wheel diameter, 182 ; height of rider's centre of 
gravity, 182; triangle of stability, 183; clutch-diiving and balance- 
driving-gear, 183; wear of cones and of cases for ball bearings, 184; 
disadvantages of long bearings, 181; ball bearings for railway carriages, 



W 385 

"Wheel Liiad ix Cycles, Di.<cumon, 1886 (continued): — 

185. — Head, J., Cycles worthy of attention by mechanical engineers, 185 ; 
good roads essential, 18G ; cycle ways, 18G ; danger of ordinary bicycle, 
ISC; wheel-gauge of tricycles, 187; sociables preferable to tandems, 
187. 
Wheeler, G. U., elected Associate Member, 1899, 146. 
"Wheeler, 0., elected Associate Member, 1899, 474. 
"Wheeler, P., elected :Member, 1896, 102. 
"Wheelock, J., elected Member, 1898, 540. 
Whichello, E., elected Graduate, 1888, 269. 
"Whisky Distillery, Belfast, 1896, 444.— Dublin, 1888, 378, 398. 
"Whitaker, a., elected Member, 1898, 142. 
"Whitby, A. G., elected 3Iember, 1894, 169. 
"White, A. G., elected Member, 1887, l.">8. 
White, D. H., elected Associate Member, 1900, 503. 
White, H. W., Coal Burning on Cape EaUways, 1890, 121, 122, 123. 
White, J., Instrument Factory, Glasgow, 1895, 501. 

White, Sir W. H., K.C.B., elected Member. 1888, 1 CO.— Appointed Member of 
Council, 1890, 43.— Elected Member of Council 1891, 24; 1894, 26 : 
1897, 28.— Elected Vice-President, 1898, 31.— Elected President, 1899, 
28 ; 1900, 34.— Created Knight Commander of the Bath, 1895, 22 ; 
1896, 3.— Presented with Freedom of Borough of Devonport, 1899, 
439. 
Address as President, 1899, 153. — Acknowledgment of vote of thanks for 

Address, 182. 
Alloys Eesearch, 1897, 76 :— 1899, 71, 97. 
Aluminium, 1898, 367. 

Atmo.^pheric Railway, 1899, 322, 323, 325, 327. 
Boiler Construction, 1891, 50S. 
Business of Institution, 1899, 476 :— 1900, 95. 

China, Openings for Mechanical Engineers in China, 1899, 528, 551. 
Cleveland Industries, 1893, 266. 
Dockyard Constructional Machinery, 1899, 374, 376. 
Evaporative Condensers, 1899, 207, 232, 233, 240. 
Gallon, Sir D., Vice-President, decease, 1899, 147. 
Glass Revealer, 1900, 544. 

Head, Jeremiah, Past-President, decease, 1899, 184. 
Incrustation of Torquay Water Mains, 1899, 499, 502, 514, 517. 
Launch of a Battleship, 1899, 347, 349, 353. 
Lighting of Wsorkhops, 1893, 42U. 
Marine-Engine Trials, 1889, 253, 255 :— 1894, 74. 
Marine Engineering, 1891, 345. 

2 B 



386 W 

White, Sir W. H., K.C.B. (continued) :— 

3 lean -Press me Indicator, 1899, 58i, 600, 606. 

^leetings of Institution, Monthly and Graduates', 1899, 476. 

Xaval Electrical Apjtaratus, 1892, 287. 

Outlet Valves at Burrator Reservoir, 1899, 411, 413. 

President, on taking office, 1899, 30.— Reply to Welcome at Summer 
meetintr, Plymouth, 1899, 289.— Ilhiess, 1900, 95, 181, 353. 

Railway Viaducts in Cornwall, 1899, o64. 

Railway Wagons, Capacity, 1900, 575, 595. 

Refuse Destructor at Torquay, 1899, 43(), 4o3. 

Shipbuildinir, Paper on Shipbuilding in Portsmouth Dockyard, 1892, 
232. — Remarks thereon, 254. 

Siiip-:\Iodel Apparatus, 1893, 41, 51. 

Technical Dictionary, 1900, 504, 505, 506, 507, 508. 

Training of Engineer Students, 1899, 388, 403. 

Typographic Printing Machinery, 1899, 125. 

York, H.R.H. the Duke of York becomes Honorary Life IMember of 
Institution, 1899, 143. 
Whitehead, A., elected Member, 1900, 182. 
Whitehead, J. G., elected Jlember, 1885, 305. 
Whitehead, J. P., elected Associate Member, 1899, 146. 
Whitehead, R. D., elected Associate, 1892, 414. 
Whitehui^e, A., elected Associate Member, 1899, 5. 
Wiiitehoise, E. E. J., elected IVIember, 1890, 472. 
Whitelaw DiuLi,, 1900, 138. iSee Portable Pneumatic Tools. 
Whitelegg, R. H., elected Graduate, 1894, 295. 
Whitley, J., decease, 1892, 4.— Memoir, 1891, 19;!. 
Whitmoke, F. L., elected Member, 1900, 502. 
Whittakek, J., elected Member, 1891, 301. 
Whittell, a. L., elected ISIember, 1897, 256. 
Whittem, T. S., decease, 1899, 7.— Memoir, 1898, 138. 
AVhittle, J., elected 3Iember, 1888, 2. 

Whitwell and C(x, William, Thornaby Iron Works, Thoinaby, 1893, 362. 
Whitwukth, Sir J., Bart., decease, 1887, ^3 ; 1888, 3, 4.— Letter of condolence 
to Lady Whitworth, 1887, 33.— Memoir, 1887, 152.— Bequest to 
Institution, 1888, 4. 
Whitworth Hydkailic Testing IMachine, 1898, 670. See Testing of 

Materials. ' 

Whitworth Works, 1887, 179. See Address of President, Edward H. Carbutt. 
Whyte and Co., John G., ^Machine Cooperage, Liverpool, 1891, 444. 
Wicksteed, C, elected Member, 1897, 144. 

Narrow-Gauge Railways, 1898, 392. 



^ 



W 387 

WiCKSTEED. J. H., appointed :Member of Council, 1885, 76.— Elected Member of 
Council. 1886, IS; 1889,23; 1892, 23.— Elected Yice-rre8ident. 1895, 
26; 1897, 27: 1900, oi. 

Autographic Test-Eecordln- Apparatus, Paper, 1886, 27.— "Remarks 
thereon, and on Tests of Iron and Steel, 62, 69, 77, 78, 79, 86, 93, 94, lul. 

Business of Institution, 1900, 9i. 95, 181, 184. 

By-laws, 1891, 30. 

Canal-Boat Propellers. 1894, 3G7. 

Canal-Boat Propulsion. 1897, 201. 

Cleveland Industries, 1893, 269. 

Electric Liirhting. Belfast, 1896, 335 ;— 3Ianchester, 1894, 306. 

Electric Plant, 1898, 586. 

Friction Experiments, 1888, 189 :— 1891, 117, 130, 137. 

Grain Warthousing [Machinery, 1891, 379. 

High-Spetd Engine, 1894, 232. 

Hydraulic Power Supply, 1895, 382. 

Longworth Power Hammer, 1900, 105, 111, 114. 

Marine Engineering. 1891, 3G0. 

Partially Immersed Propellers, 1897, 121. 

Portable Pneumatic Tools, 1900, 150, 155, 156, 166, 169, 171. 

Queen's College, Belfast, 1896, 410. 

Quick-Revolution Engines, 1897, 335. 

Eangc-Finders, 1896, 69. 

Eoad Locomotion, 1900, 246, 248, 249, 252. 

Hope Driving, 1896, 370. 

Steel Bails, 1890, 344-6. 

Steel- Works ZMachinerj-, 1895, 457. 

Testing of Materials, 1898, 683, 685, 691. 

Testing [Machine, Emery's. 1888, 236, 241, 452, 454. 

Tests of Iron and Steel, 1886, 94. 

Vote of Thanks to President at Summer meeting, Derby, 1898, 345. 
WicKSTEED AxTTOGEAPHic Test-Eecokdek, 1886, 27. See Autographic Test- 
Recorder. 
WiDDOWS, F. R., elected Associate, 1892, 414. 
WiDDOWsox, E. L., elected Graduate, 1900, 4. 
WipDO-wsox, J. H., elected Member, 1891, 2. 
WiBDOWsox, J. H., Jfx., elected Member, 1897, 433. 
WiGGLESwoRTH, F., elected Associate Member, 1898, 3. 
WiGHAM, J. C, elected Graduate, 1889, 347. 
WiGHAM, J. R., elected Member, 1889, 34G. 
"Wild, A. G., elected Associate Member, 1895, 328. 

AVild' J., elected Member, 1890, 299.-Decease, 1896, 4.-Memoir. 1895, 312. 

2 B 2 



388 W 

WiLDRiDGE, J., elected Member, 1886, 2.— Decease, 1901, 7.— Memoir, [1900, 

631. 
WiLDY, AV. L., elected IMember, 1890, 176. 
"Wilkin, E. V., elected Graduate, 1895, 2. 
WiLKiNS, G. C, elected Associate Member, 1893, 392. 
WiLKiNS AND Co., Wall Paper Manufactory, Derby, 1898, 496. 
Wilkinson, K R., elected Member, 1892, 2. 
"Wilkinson, G., elected Member, 1898, 341. 
"Wilkinson, J. L., Tube-Frame Railway Wagons, 1890, 509. 
WiLLANS, p. W., elected Jlember, 1888, 269.— Decease, 1893, 4.— Memoir, 1892, 
224. 
Compound Steam Turbine, 1888, 513. 
Condensation and Re-evaporation, 1889, 676, 677-86. 
Electric Liglitinir. Private, 1885, 402, 403. 404. 
Heat Distribution in Steam Engine, 1887, 529. 
Initial Condensation in Steam Engine, 1892, 212, 215. 
IMarine-Engine Trials, 1889, 260 :— 1890, 246-50 :— 1891, 242 :— 1892, 
182. 
WiLLANs Electiucal Engine-Goveknui!, 1885, 392, 31t4, 402. See Private 

Electric Lighting. 
WiLLANS Memokial, ou Premivm Fund, 1895, 7, 23 :— 1896, 7-8, 16-7 :— 1897, 

16-7 :— 1898, 18-9 :— 1899, 18-9 :— 1900, 8, 22-3. 
WiLLAXs AND RoBiNsoN, Victoria Works, Rugby, 1897, 369, 429:— 1900, 467, 

490. 
WiLLCox, F. W., elected ^lember, 1885, 164.— Decease, 1897, 5.— Memoir, 1896, 

100. 
Williams, A., elected Associate jMember, 1900, 97. 
Williams, A. E. (Warwick), elected Graduate, 1892, 414: — transferred to 

Associate ^lember, 1897, 5. 
Williams, A. E. (Dagenham), elected Member, 1893, 391. 
Williams, C, E., elected Associate Member, 1900, 3. 
Williams, E., decease, 1887, 4.— IMemoir, 1886, 264. 
Williams, Edwabd, Linthorpe Iron Works, Middlesbrough, 1893, 345. 
Williams, Sir E. L., Knighthood, 1895, 3. 
Canal-Boat Propulsion, 1897, 187. 

Manchester Ship Canal, Paper on the Mechanical Appliances employed 
in the constructiou of the Manchester Ship Canal, 1891, 418. — Remarks 
thereon, 425. 
Williams, H., elected Graduate, 1897, 145. — Elected Associate Member, 1899, 
146. 
Evaporative Condensers, 1899, 233. 
WiLUAMS, H. W., elected Associate Member, 1895, 548. 



W 389 

Williams, J. E., elected Associate [Member, 1899, 294. 

WiLLLiM:^, J. K., decease, 1891, 4, 

WiLLLiMS, L. "W., elected Graduate, 1896, 4G3. 

"Williams, N. C, elected Graduate, 1898, 3. 

Williams, N. T., elected Member, 1885, 463. 

Williams, R., Vote of thanks to President for Address, 1897, 276. 

Williams, S., elected Graduate, 1895, 150. 

WiLLL\MS, T. D., elected Member, 1890, 2. 

Williams, V. I. N., elected Graduate, 1900, 4. 

Williams, W. D., elected Associate Member, 1900, 3. 

Williams, William HExnT, elected ^lember, 1899, 145. 

Williams, Wyxdham Henry, elected ^Member, 1897, 433. 

WiLLLiMS, W. L., decease, 1899, 7.— Memoir. 1898, 711. 

Williams, W. W., Jxrs., elected Member. 1889, 585. 

WiLLiASisox, E., elected Associate [Member, 1899, 146. 

Williamson-, J., elected [Member, 1896, 102. 

Willis, E., elected Associate [Member. 1900, 503. 

Willis, E. T., elected Graduate, 1889, 204 :— transferred to Associate Member, 
1895, 4. 

Willmax, C, decease, 1895, 4.— [Memoir, 1894, 279. 

WiLLMOTT, A. W. W., decease, 1887, 4.— Memoir, 1886, 265. 

WiLLOCK. Capt. H. B., R. E., decease, 1890, 4.— [Memoir, 1889. 200. 

WiLLOUGHBY Bkotheks, Engineering and Shipbuilding Works, Plymouth, 1899, 
459. 

Wills, F., elected Member, 1897, 2. 

WiLMER, H., Hydraulic Buffer-Stop, 1886, 116. 

Wilson, Sir A., Bart., Baronetcy, 1897, 276 ; 1898, 4. 

Wilson, A. B., Honorary Secretary of Belfast [Meeting, 1896, Presentation from 
the Institution, 1897, 10. 
Brewery Tramways and Rolling Stock, 1888, 355. 
Rope Driving, 1896, 374. 
Ropes and Belts, 1895, 648. 

Wilson, A. C, elected Graduate, 1890, 299. 

Wilson, Rear-Admiral A. K., Water-Tube Boilers in Navy, 1900, 1465. 

Wilson, C. J., Marine-Engine Trials, 1889, 293 :— 1890, 266 :— 1891, '269:— 
1892, 187. 

AViLSON, C. L. N., elected Member, 1899, 145. 

Wilson, D. E., elected Associate [Member, 1898, 3. 

Wilson, G., decease, 1886, 4.— [Memoir, 1885, 527. 

Wilson, H., elected Member, 1900, 182. 

Wilson, J. C, elected Associate Member, 1898, 3. 

Wilson, J. C. G., elected Member, 1892, 102. 



390 W 

"WiLSOx, J. 31. G., elected Associate. 1899, 5. 
"WiLSOx, J. v., Friction Experiments, 1891, 119. 
WiLSOX, J. ^Y., decease, 1899, 7.— :Memoir, 1898, 712. 
M'lLSOx, J. ^V., Jix., elected ^Member, 1890, 17G. 

Moulding Sand, 1891, 104. 
Wilson, R. (London), decease, 1899, 7. — ^lemoir, 1898, 139. 
Wilson, Robert James (Argentine Reiniblic), elected IVlciuber, 1890, 299. 
WiLSox, RuBERT James (Chiswick), elected (haduate, 1897, H'^. 
AViLSOX, Thomas (Deptford). decease, 1891, 4.— :\[emoir, 1890, 293. 
WiLSox, Thomas (Iquique), elected Member, 1891, 197. 
WiLSOX, Thomas (London), Rock Drills, 1891, 182. 
AViLSOx, "VV. C, elected Member, 1897, 433. 
WiLSox, Walter Henry, elected Alember, 1888, 444. — Welcome to Members at 

Summer meeting. Belfnst, 1896, 274 :— Belfast industries, 275-7. 
WiLsox, Uii.LiAM Henry, elected Member, 1897, 4:!3. 
Wilsox, William Hope, elected Member, 1899, 145. 
WiLSOx AXD Co., John H., Bankliall Engiue Works, Liverpool, 1891, 451. 
WiLsoxs, Pease and Co., Tees Iron Works, Middlesbrough, 1893, 348. 
Wimpenxy, a. B., elected Associate, 1898, :!. 
WiMSHUusT, J. E., elected Jlember, 1891, 2. 
WixcH, A. B., elected Graduate, 1900, 97. 

Wind Pressuj!E on Bridges, 1887, i^S'.t, 30."i, 30G, 310, 3S1, 3S2, 3S4. 
Winder, C- A., elected Alember, 1890, 2'.t9. 
WiND.-<i>R, E. W., elected Member. 1886, 4G.1. 
WiNi-iELDs, Cambridge Street Works and Rolling Jlills, Birmingham, 1897, 

403. 
WiNGFiELD, C. H., elected Member, 1900, :\o5. 

Proiieller Ventilating Fans, 1897, 472, 486. 
WiNGFiEi.D, D. C, elected Member, 1890, 170. 
WixKRELD. R. E., elected Graduate, 1889, 1^04. 
Wixlaw, W. W., elected Graduate, 1896, 4G3: — elected Associate Member, 

1900, 4. 
WiNMiLL, G., elected Member, 1887, 474. 
WiNMiLi., IL, elected Graduate, 1890, 472 .—transferred to Associate Member, 

1895, 4. 
Wixx, C. R., elected Member, 1898, 142. 
WixsTOX, H. H., elected Associate Member, 1896, 280. 
Wire Mills, Steel, Messrs. Cocker Brothers, Sheffield, 1890, 442, 448. 
Wise, W. L., Rope Driving, 1896, 374. 
Wiseman, A., elected Associate ^lember, 1896, 2. 
Wiseman, E.. elected Associate, 1891, 480. 
WiTZ, A., Gas-Engiue Research, 1898, 25G. 



w 



391 



Wolff, C. E., elected Associate Member, 1898, 143. 

"Wolff, G. W., elected :\Iember, 1888, 444. 

Wolff, H. M., elected Member, 1886, 2. 

WoLLASTON, T. K., elected ISIeraber. 1900, 2. 

"Wolverhampton-, visited at Jubilee Summer meeting, 1897, SG7. 

"WOLVEKHAMPTOX ELECTRIC LiGHT "WOKKS, 1897, 3(J8, 408. 

"Wood, C, elected Associate Member. 1900, 4. 

"Wood, General Sir E., Engineering "Work in South African War, 1900, 465. 
Wood, E. M., Paper on the Structure and Progress of the Forth Bridge, 1887, 
287 :— Remarks thereon, 300, :)00. 

Wood, E. W. X.. decease, 1890, 4.— Memoir, 1889, 752. 

Wood, H., elected :Member, 1887, 2S4. 

Wood, H. S., Steam Laundry :Macliinery, 1898, 288. 

AVoOD, J. 31., Graduate transferred to :Member, 1887, 3. 

Wood, Sir L., Bart., Baronetcy, 1897, 276 : 1898, 4. 

Wood, K. H., elected Member, 1885, 463.-Decease, 1896, 4.-Memoir, 1896, 
313. 

Wood, S. H., elected Member, 1898, 2. 

Wood, T., elected Member, 1885, 305.— Decease, 1887, 4.-Memair, 1886, 463. 
Blooming :\Iill, 1885, 296, 298. 

Wood, T. E., elected Member, 1890, 472. 

Wood, W., elected Member, 1890, 2. 

Wood, W. A., elected Associate, 1897, 144. 

Wood, W. C, elected Member, 1896, 2. 

AVood, W. H., elected Associate Alember, 1900, 97. 

AVooD-CuTTixG Machinery, Paper on recent improvements in Wood-Cutting 
Machinerv.bvG. Richards, 1885, 77.— Comparison between metal-cutting 
and wood-cutting machinery. 77.-American machines, 78.-Application 
to pattern making, 79.-Planing machine, 80 ; cutter-block with cutters 
set askew, 81 ; cutter guard, 81.— Dimension-sawing machine, 82; variety 
of work, 82 ; eccentric die for setting saw-teeth, 83.— Band-sawing machine, 
83 ; lighter wheels for preventing breakage of saws, S3.— Sharpening of 
cutter!, 84 : ordinary modes of grinding cutters, 85 ; machine for grinding 
cutters. 86 : use of wire cords, 87.— Panel-planing machine, 87.— Scraping 
machine, 88. -Breaking-down machines, 89. 

Discussion.-Ba\e,M. P., Othermachines worthy of notice, 89; cast-iron 
bos-framing, 90 ; cutter-blocks with cutters askew and spii-al, 90 ; setting 
of saw teeth, 90 ; reasons for band-saws breaking, 91.— Robinson, T. N., 
Rigid support for tables of hand-feed planing machine, 91 ; tables mounted 
on^incliued slides, 91; skew cutter-block, 92; cutters should be ground 
slightly curved, 92; use of fixed knives in planing, 92; breaking-down 
machines, 92.— Crohn, F. W., Cutter-blocks with cutters askew, 93.— 



392 W 

WooD-CuTTixG Machinery, Di^'cm^ion, 1885 (continued) : — 

Colyer, F., Skew-cutters, 93. — Schunheyder, W., Grinding of skew-cutters, 

93 ; formation of burr on edge of scraper, 93. — Robinson, T. N., Grinding 

of skew-cutters, 9;> ; burred edge for scraping tool, 03. — Head, J.. 

Application of wood-cutting machinery extends far beyond pattern making, 

93. — Richards, G., Recent improvement in skew-cutters, 95 ; fixed-knife 

planing-machine, 95. 
Wood- Working Machixeky Work.<, Thomas Robinson and Son, Rochdale, 1894, 

40G, 448. 
WooDALL, C. Coal Burning on Cape Railways, 1890, 123. 
Woodford, E. G., elected :\Iemb€r, 1888, 444. 
WooDHEAD, J. P., decease, 1885, 4. — Memoir, 1884, 404. 
AVooDHEAD, W. R., elected Member, 1899, 293. 
AVooDHOU.-<E, W. B., elected Associate Member, 1900, 35G. 
WooDHor>E AND MiTcuELL, Stcam-Eugine Breakdowns, 1896, 594. 
WooDLET, R., Spherical Engine. 1885, 108. 
Woods, A. R. T., elected Member, 1897, 256. 
Woods, E., Vote of thanks to President for Address, 1887, 1S3. 
Woods, W. H., elected Member, 1894, 294. 
Woof, T., elected Member. 1899, 474. 
Woollen, T. H.. elected Member, 1898, 142. 
Woollen Factory, Lucan, 1888, 414. 
Woollen Warehouse, Walsall, 1897, 3G9, 416. 

Woolwich Arsenal, visited at Summer meeting, London. 1886, 411. 440-1. — 
1887, 170, 177; see Address of President, Edward H. Carbutt.— 1892, 
112-23; see Address of President. Dr. William Anderson. 
Woolwich Arsenal Shop-Railways, 1898, 386, 393, 401. 
WooTTON, A., elected ^lembor, 1885, 305. 
WooTTON, J., elected Member, 1899, 293. 
WoRDiNGHAM, C. H., elected Member, 1895, 1. 

Electric Lighting Works, Manchester, 1894, 309. 
WoKGER, D. F., elected 3Iember, 1887, 2. 
Working of Steam Prjips, 1893, 433. See Steam Pumps. 
Workman, Clark and Co., Sliipbuilding and Engineering Works, Belfast. 1896, 

278. 456. 
Works Visited at Institution meetings : — 

Addiewell, 1887, 437, 448. 

Belfast, 1888, 382, 418-36 :— 1896, 402-3, 283-344, 355-401, 422-59. 

Bessbrook, 1888, 378, 415-7. 

Birkenhead, 1891, 432, 451-6. 

Birmingham, 1897, :i(J5-8, 370-430. 

Blackburn, 1894, 439. 



W 393 

WoBKs Visited at Institution meetings (continued) : — 
Bolton, 1894, 406, 430-6. 
Brigliton, 1892, ilTO, 401-3. 
Broxburn, 1887, 437. 449-50. 
Burntisland, 1887, 437, 450-1. 
Burton-on-Trent, 1898, 460, 504-6. 
Bury, 1894, 405, 445-8. 
Calais, 1889, 549, 576-81. 
Carron, 1887, 437, 443-8. 
Chelmsford, 1886, 410, 413-4. 
Coventry, 1885, 406 :— 1897, 369, 419-29. 
Creswell, 1898, 461, 525-7. 
Crewe, 1894, 406, 45S-61. 
Derby, 1898, 455-0, 462-527. 
Devonport, 1899, 443-7, 452-3. 
Doncaster, 1885, 436, 453-5. 
Dublin. 1888, 374-5, 378, 384-417. 
Dudley Port. 1897, 368. 
Dunbarton, 1895, 467. 
Dundee, 1887, 438, 453-9. 
Eastleigh, 1892, 369, 390-1. 
Edinburgh, 1887, 435, 439-65 :— 1895, 468. 
Enfield, 1886, 410, 428-40. 
Frodingham, 1885, 413-21, 436. 

Gainsborough, 1885, 435, 449-53. 

Glasgow, 1895, 462-4, 468-531. 

Gosport, 1892, 368, 375-6. 

Grantham, 1885, 435, 447-8. 

Greenock, 1895, 530-1. 

Grimsby, 1885, 436, 455-7. 

Hartlepools, 1893, 336, 372-87. 

Horwich, 1891, 432, 456-7 :— 1894, 406, 456-8. 

Johnstone, 1895, 526-8. 

Kirkcaldy, 1887, 437, 451-3. 

Lame, 1896, 420, 380-9. 

Leith, 1887, 439. 

Lincoln, 1885, 434, 437-47. 

Liverpool, 1891, 428, 432-64. 

London, 1886, 410, 413-59 :— 1890, 46, 131-66:— 1900,463, 467-500. 

Loughborough, 1898, 460, 508-11. 

Lucan, 1888, 414. 



394 W 

Works Visited at Institution meetings (continued) : — 

Manchester, 1891, 432, 457-61 :— 1894, 402-3, 407 -C3. 

Mi.ldlesbrougli, 1893, 332, 337-87. 

Netherton, 1897, 390. 

Newark, 1885, 435, 448-0. 

Nottingliam. 1898, 461, 514-25. 

Oldham, 1894, 405, 440-5. 

Paisley, 1895, 523-6. 

Paris, 1889, 542, 549-81. 

Parkgate, 1890, 446, 396-400. 

Petit-Bourg, 1889, 548, 573-6. 

riymouth, 1899, 439, 443-66. 

Port Glasgow, 1895, 529-30. 

Portsmouth, 1892, 319-53, 365-8, 370-5, 391-401, 

Prescot, 1894, 4U7, 461-3. 

llenfrew, 1895, 522. 

Pochdale, 1894, 406, 448-50. 

Kugby, 1897, 360, 420-30 ;— 1900, 467, 400-4. 

Saltburn-by-tlu-Sea, 1893, 335, 369-71. 

Sheffield, 1890, 442, 447-69. 

Southampton, 1892, 313-8, 354-64, 368-9, 377-80. 

Staines, 1900, 466, 487-0. 

Stockton-on-Tees. 1893, 318-31, 336. 

Stoke-on-Trent, 1898, 460, 512-4. 

Tavistock, 1899, 442, 461-3. 

Thomaby, 1893, 335, 362-9. 

Tilbury. 1886, 411,450-2. 

Walsall, 1897, 368, 411-0. 

AViabaw, 1895, 467. 

AVolverhampton, 1897, 367, 405-9. 

Woolwich, 1886, 411, 440-1. 

Yelvert(3n, 1899, 442, 407-18. 
Workshops, Artificial Ligliting, 1893, 306. See Lighting of Workshops. 
WoRMALD, H., elected :Member, 1893, 301. 
WoRSDELL, T. AV., elected Member of Council, 1886, 18 :— 1889, 23:— 1891, 24. 

Canadian Locomotives, 1887, 218, 249. 

Compound Locomotives, 1889, 128, 132, 136, 140. 

Petroleum Fuel in Locomotives, 1889, 73. 
WoRsuELL, W., elected Member, 1894, 2. 
WoESDELL AND V. BoRRiES COMPOUND LOCOMOTIVES, 1889, 87. See Compound 

Locomotives. 
WoKSLEY, P. J., Jcx., elected Associate Member, 1897, 257. 



W 395 

WoRSSAM, H. J., Dryinj? in Yacuiim, 1889, 321. 

"Wort, "\V. E., elected Graduate, 1893, 392 : — elected Associate Member, 

1895, 2. 
WoRTHixGTox, A. M., Training of Engineer Students, 1899, 395. 
"WoRTHiNGTOx, C. C, elected Member, 1886, 126. 

WoRTHiNGTiiy, E., elected Member, 1888, 160. — Appointed Secretary, 1897, 436 : 
—1898, 1, 11. 
Brewery Tramways and Eolling Stock, 1888, 353. 
Electric Welding, 1894, 337. 
Longworth Power Hammer, 1900, 106. 
Portable Pneumatic Tools, 1900, 151. 
"WoRTHTNGTox, "W. B., elected Member, 1897, 2. 
WoRTHiNGTON PuMPiNG ExGiNE, 1887, 133, 139. See Lincoln "Waterworks 

Engines. 
WoRTHixGTi IX Water Meter, 1900, 49, See Water Meters. 
WoTHERSPi lox, ,J. D., elected Member, 1899, 474. 
Wray, C. D., elected Graduate, 1885, 463. 
Weat, R. P., elected Graduate, 1899, 146. 
Wbeck-Eaising, 1886, 189. See Eaising a Wreck. 
AVeexch, J. H. K., elected Graduate. 1887, 2. 
Wright, B. F., decease, 1889, 4.— Memoir, 1888, 265. 
Wright, B. H.. elected Member, 1900, 355. 
Wright, E., elected Associate ^Member, 1900, 97. 
Weight, F. G., elected Member, 1897, 144. 

Capacity of Railway Wagons, 1900, 5S3. 
Wright, H. T., elected Graduate, 1889, 585:— transferred to Associate Member, 

1896, 4. 
Wright. H. W., Edinburgh Electric Lighting, 1895, 589. 
Weight, I. H., elected Associate Member, 1900, 183. 
Weight, James, Auditor, 1900, 36. 
Wright, Joseph (Tipton), decease, 1894, 4. — IMemoir, 167. 

Triple-Expansion Engines, 1887, 44. 
Weight, R. 0., elected Associate ^lembcr, 1900, 4. 
Wright, W,, elected Member, 1895, 327. 

Evaporative Condensers, 1899, 25'1. 
Wright, W. C, elected Graduate, 1890, 2. 
Wrightsox, Sir T., Bart., Baronetcy, 1901, 6. 
Alloys Research, 1895, 283 :— 1899, 86. 
Wrixch, H. E. H., elected Associatt- Member, 1898, 547. 
Wroe, J., elected Member, 1891, 2. 
WvLD, W., elected Associate Member, 1900, 183. 
Wylde, T., elected IMember, 1891, 301. 



396 W 

Wtlie, J., elected Member, 1886, 126. 

Wylie, J. C, elected Member, 1895, 1. — Decease, 1900, C— 3Iemoir, 1899, 472. 

Wtlie, K. C, elected Graduate, 1898, 342. 

Wtllie, a., decease, 1901, 7. — Memoir, 1900, 335. 

Wyllie, E., decease, 1887, 4.— Memoir, 1886, 4G4. 

Triple-Expansion Marine Engines, Paper, 1886,"473 : — 1887, 35. 
Wtmax, R., elected Associate Member, 1898, 342. 



Yacht Building Wures, Southampton. 1892, 369. 
Day, Summers and Co., 3S5. 
J. G. Fay and Co., 38S. 
Summers and Payne, 388. 
Yabbow, a. F., elected Member, 1889, 585. 
Yarrow Propeller, 1892, 552. See Sere w-Propeller -Surface. 
Yarrow and Co., Specimens of Aluminium, 1898, 359. 
Yarrow and Cu's Works, Poplar, London, 1886, 412, 457. 
Yarwood, W. J., elected Member, 1895, 327. 
Yates, D. R. M., elected Graduate, 1900, 503, 
Yates, E., elected Graduate, 1888, 269. 
Yates, H., decease, 1895, 4. — Memoir, 1894, 466. 
Yates, J., elected Member, 1899, 145. 
Yates, W., elected Member. 1899, 145. 
Yates axd Thom, Canal Foundry, Blackburn, 1894, 439. 
Yeames, J. L., elected Graduate, 1895, 2 :—electedJ Associate Member. 1899, 

294. 
Yeo, G. J., elected Member, 1885, 164.— Decease, 1887,[4.— Memoir,[278. 
Yerbury, F. a., elected Graduate, 1891, 197. 
Y'oKE Riveter, 1900, 132. See Portable Pneumaticl Tools. 
YoKoi, S., decease, 1890, 4. 
York, H. R. H. the Duke of Y'ork becomes Honorary Life^^Member of Institution, 

1899, 143. 
York Street Flax Spixxing and Weaving Works, Belfast, 1888, 420 : — 1896, 

457. 
Yorkshire College, Leeds, Opening of Engineering Department by President of 
Institution at Autumn meeting, 1886, 468. — Donation from Messrs. T. 
and C. Hawksley, 472. 



Y 397 

YoRKSfflRE Engine Works, Sheffield, 1890, 442, 446, 4G7. 

Young, D., elected Member, 1889, 585.— Decease, 1900, C— Memoir, 1899, 620. 

Young, G. S., Compounding of Locomotives, 1890, 87. 

Condensation and Ke-evaporation, 1889, 695. 

Fluid-Pressure Reversing Gear, 1894, 267. 

Marine-Engine Trials. 1890, 272 :— 1892, 188. 
Young, H. J., elected Associate Member, 1899, 294. 
YouKG, H. W., elected Associate Member, 1900, 4. 
Young, J. D., elected Assocmte, 1899, 475. 
Young, E., elected Member, 1892, 102. 
Young, S. J., elected Associate Member, 1894, 470 : — transferred to Member, 

1897, 4. 
Young, T., elected Member, 1899, 474. 
Youxg, W., elected Associate Member, 1899, 294. 
Young, W. A., elected Member, 1887, 158. 
Young's Paraffin Light and Mineral Oil Works, Addiewell, 1887, 437, 448. 



Zigzag Incline, 1888, 329. See Brewery Tramways. 
ZiMMEE, G. F., elected Member, 1885, 164. 



•jj Institution of Mechanical 

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I^ Proceedings 

Index 
1885-1900 



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