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jjmi 







RULES 

Books and periodicals may be used in the Society rooms by 
members and friends. 

Membprs may borrow books for home use — with the exceptions 
noted below — but no one shall have more than four books at any 
time, or keep any book more than two weeks. 

Volumes belonging to a set — such as volumes of bound period- 
icals and of pro eedings or transactions of societies — and such 
other books as the Board of Government may designate, may be 
taken from the rooms for a limited time only, by special arrange- 
ment with the attendant. They shall be subject to recall at any 
time. 

There shall be no immediate renewal of any book on its return 
to the library. 

A member borrowing a book shall at that time give a receipt 
therefor. 

A fine of one cent per day per volume shall be charged for 
over-time, and must be paid before the delinquent can take any 
more books. 

Hand books, indexes, current numbers or unbound files of 
periodicals, books belonging to the Clemens Herschel Wpecial 
Library, and new books not yet placed on the regular shelves 
must not be taken from the rooms. 

Books of unusual value are marked with a star (*), and 
must not be taken from the rooms, except by written permission 
from the Librarian, to be filed by the attendant. 

Any person mutilating or losing a book shall pay for the 
damage, or replace the book. 

Any one who violates the above rules may, upon written 
request from the Librarian to the Board of Government, be de- 
barred from the privileges of the library for such time, not less 
than three months, as the Board of Government may determine. 

(Revised June 16, 1915.) 



SECTION. DIVISION. BOOK. 

/ _ 



P RO C E ED I N GS 



OF THE 



American Society 



Civil Engineers. 



(INSTITUTED 1S52.) 



VOL. V 
JANUARY TO DECEMBER, 1879. 



NEW YORK : 

PUBLISHED BY THE S O C I E I' Y. 



6176 

1879. 



'^ 1. 



Entered according ijto Act of Congress, by the Americam Society of Civil Engineers, in 
the office of the Librarian of Congress, in Washington, 



Note. — This Sofciety is not responsible, as a body, for the facts and opinions advanced in 

any of its pubUcations. 



PAST 0]?'FICERS 

OF THE 

AMEBIC AN SOCIETY OF CIVIL ENGINEEES. 

PRESIDENTS. 

James Laukie, November 5, 1852, to jSTovember 6, ISG^- 
James P. Kikkwood, November 6, 1867, to August 5, 1868. 
William J. McAlpine, August 5, 1868, to November 3, 1869. 
Alfred W. Craven, November 3, 1869, to November 1, 1871. 
Horatio Allen, November 1, 1871, to November 5, 1873. 
Julius W. Adams, November a, 1873, to November 3, 1875. 
George S. Greene, November 3, 1875, to November 7, 1877. 
E. S. CiiESBRouGH, November 7, 1877, to November 6, 1878. 
W. MiLNOR Roberts. November 6, 1878, to November 5, 1879. 
Albert Fink, November 5, 1879. 

VICE- PR ESI DENTS. 

Edward Gardiner, November 5, 1852, to November 2, 1853. 
Charles \V. Copeland, November 5, 1832, to November 3, 1869. 
Alfred W. Cr.wen, November 2, 1853, to November 6, 1867. 
Julius W. Adams, November 6, 1867, to November 5, 1873. 
James B. Francis, November 3, 1869, to November 2, 1870. 
Thomas C Clarke, November 2, 1870, to November 1, 1871. 
Jacob M. Clark, November 1, 1871, to November 5, 1873. 
W. MiLNOR Roberts, November 5, 1873, to November 1, 1876. 
Theodore G. Ellis, November 5, 1873, to November 7, 1877. 
A. L. Holley, November 1, 1876, to November 7, 1877. 
Albert Fink, November 7, 1877, to November 5, 1879. 
W. MiLNOR Roberts, November 7, 1877, to November 6, 1878. 
James B. FRANCis,November 6, 1878. 
Octave Chanute, November 5, 1879. 

SECRETARIES. 

Robert B. Gorsuch, November 5, 1852, to November 2, 1853. 
Edward Gardiner, November 2, 1853,' to December 1, 1854. 
James 0. Morse, December 1, 1854, to November 3, 1869. 
Thomas C. Meyer, November 3, 1869, to Januaiy 5, 1870. 
Alfred P. Boller, Januaix^, 1870, to November 1, 1871. 
Gabrjel Leverich, November 1, 1871, to November 7, 1877- 
John Bogart, November 7, 1877. 



33^15^ 



TREASURERS. 

Robert B. Gorsucii, November 5, 1852, to November 2, 1853. 
Edward Gardiner, November 2, 1853, to December 1, 1854. 
James 0. Morse, December 1. 1854, to November 3, 18*75. 
John BoGART, November 3, 1875, to November 7, 1877- 
J. James R. Croes, November 7, 1877. 

» 
DIRECTORS. 

W. H. MoRELL, year beginning November, 1852. 

W. H. Sidell, " " " 1852. 

Julius W. Adams, years " " 1852,1875. 

James P. Kirkwood, " " " 1852, to Nov. 1867. 

Alfred W. Craven, " " " 1852, 1867, 1868, 1871 and 1872. 

"William J. McAlpine, years beginning November, 1853, to Nov., 1867, and Nov., 

1869. 
William H. Talcott, " ■* " 1853, to Nov. 1868. 

James O. Morse, " •' " 1853, to Nov. 1867, and Nov., 

1876. 
J. W. Pratt, " " ' 1853. 

1. C. Chesbrough, '• •• •• 1854, to Nov., 1867. 

James K. Ford, '• " " 1867, 1868. 

George S. Greene, ■• '• " 1867,1868,1870,1872,1874, 

1876, 1877, 1878. 
John F. Ward, " " " 1867, 1868, 1869, 1870, 1871. 

E. S. Chesbrough, " " " 1869. 
Thomas Prosser, " " " 1869. 
Jacob M. Clark. " " " 1869, 1870. 
Thomas F. Rowland, " " •' 1870, 1871, 1872. 
Charles Macdonald, " " " 1870,1873, 1874. 
Alfred P. Boller, " " " 1871. 
William E. WoRTHijN, " " " 1871. 

John Bogart, " " " 1872, 1873, 1874. 

F. CoLLiNGWooD, " " " 1872, 1873, 1874, 1875. 
De V0L8ON Wood, " " " 1873. 

Octave Chanute, " " " 1873, 1874, 1875. 

A. L. HoLLEY, " " " 1875. 

Q. A. GiLLMORE, " " " 1875. 

W. MiLNOR Roberts, " " " 1876. 

J. James R. Croes, " " " 1876. 

William H. Paine, " " " 1876,1877,1878,1879. 

M. N. Forney, " " " 1870. 

Joseph P. Davis, " " " 1877. 

C. Shaler Smith, " " " 1877. 

C. Vandervoort Smith, " " " 1877, 1878, 1879 

Thomas C. Clarke, " " " 1878. 

Theodore G. Ellis, " " " 1878. 

Charles Hermany, " " " 1879. 

Edgar B. Van Winkle, " *' " 1879. 

Gouvkrneur K. Warren," " ' " 1879. 



INDEX. 



ADAM, 

Adams, Julius W. — On Committee, 5. 
Additions to Library and Museum. 
(See Library.) 

— To List of Members. (See List.) 
Address of Members, clianges in. (See 

(List.) 

Advance Coi)ies of Papers, 31, 86. 

Alexander, B. S — Paper by, 5. 

Allen, Charles Alisert. — Admitted as 
Member, 29, 39. 

Allen, James P. — Admitted as Junior, 
4, 12. 

Allen, Theodore. — Discussion by, 4i. 

Amendments to By-Laws. (See By- 
Laws.) 

— to Constitution. (See Constitution.) 
Andrews, E. R. — Discussion bv, 46, 74, 

79. 

Announcements.— 1], 17, 25, 38, 57, 63, 
70, 102. — Advance Copies of 
Papers, 38, 57, 63, 70.— Complete 
Sets of Transactions, 103. — Contri- 
bution of Papers, 103. — Discussion 
of Papers, 18, 27, 38, 57, 63, 70, 
102. — Eleventh Annual Conven- 
tion, 11, 17, 25. — Illustrations of 
Papers, 103.— Metric System, 11, 
18, 27, 38, 57, 63, 70, 103.— Society 
House, 11, 18, 27, 38, 57, 63, 71, 
103. — Surveys of Public Lands, 11. 
— Title Page and Contents, Vol. Vll. 
of Transactions, 18. — Title Page 
and Index, Vol. IV of Proceedings, 
18. — Transmission of Letter Bal- 
lots, lo3. — Twenty-seventh Annual 
Meeting, 70, 102. 

Annual Certificate Filed, 15. 

Annual Meeting, 79, 81, 84. (See Min- 
utes.) 

Annual Report of Board of Direction. 
(See Board.) 

Anslev, George D.— Discussion by, 
46. 

Appleton, N. — Discussion by, 105. 

Arrears of Dues, 14, 15, 85. 

Awards for Best Papers, 32. 

Ballots for Amendments to By-Laws, 1. 

— For Amendments to Constitution, 1. 

— For Appointment of Committees, 73. 

— For Members, 4, 13, 29, 52, 59, 65, 

73, 81, 105. 
Barnard, J. G. — Discussion by, 5. — 
Paper by, 5. 



BELL. 

Bell, James E. — Admitted as Mem 
ber, 4, 19. — Death Announced. 40, 
52. — Committee Appointed to Pre- 
pare Memoir, 52. — Memoir, 98. 

Bland, John C. — Admitted as Mem- 
ber, 29, 63. 

Board of Direction. — Report, 80, 82. 
(See Minutes.) 

Bog art, John. — Discussion by, 31.— 
Elected Secretary and Librarian, 
81. — On Committee, 4. — Paper by, 
146. — Secretary of Convention, 41, 
43. 

Boller, Alfred P. — Discussion by, 65. 
— On Committee, 4. 

Boxtecou, Daniel. — Admitted as Mem- 
ber, 81, 103. 

Books on Engineering and Technology, 
List of.— 7, 15, 22, 52, 67. 

BouscARE>f, G. — Discussion by, 45, 46. 

BowDiTf'ii, E. W. — Discussion by, 46. 
— Resolution by, 31. 

Bradley, William II. — Admitted as 
^Member, 4. 

Brazil, its Railways and Water Com- 
munications, by W. MiLNOR Rob- 
erts, 47, 52. 

Bridge, Glasgow Steel; Specifications 
for, by W. Soo«> Smith, 45. 

— New York and Brooklj'n ; Progress 

of Work upon, by F. Colling- 
wooD, 45. 

Bridges, the Use of Steel for, by Theo- 
dore Cooper, 65. t 

Bruner, Daniel P. — Admitted as Mem- 
ber, 13, 19. 

Brush, Charles B. — Discussion bJ^ 45, 
46. 

Brush, C. F. — Paper by, 45. 

Burden, James A. — Admitted as Mem- 
ber, 39, 52. 

Burr, James D. — Paper by, 47, 74. 

By-Laws, Amendments adopted, in re- 
lation to meetings and conventions, 
2. — Special Committees on Engi- 
neering Subjects, 2. 

— Codification adopted, 1. 

Cadastral Maps in Ohio, by II. F. 

Walling, 47. 
Campbell, Allan. — On Committee, 5. 
Campbell, John C. — Discussion by, 105. 
Canfield, Edward. — Admitted as Mem 

ber, 105, 113. 



VI 



CEMENTS. 

Cements, Experiments with Appliances 
for Testing Cements, by Alfred 
Noble, 45. 

— Uniform System for Tests of. — 31, 

73, 84. 
Centennial Commission of the Society, 

80. 
CiiANUTE. 0. — Discussion by, 4, 5, 31, 

82, 65, 79, 105. — Elected Vice- 
President, 81. — On Committee, 44, 

106.— Presides at Meeting, 105.— 

Report by, 34. — Resolution by, 5, 

31, 32. 
Chesbrough, E. S. — Discussion by, 46. 

—Makes Report, 81.— On Board of 

Censors, 74. 
Chester, Stephen. — Paper by, 4. 
Clarke, Thomas C. — I)iscussion by, 52, 

65, 105.— Presides at Meeting, 21, 

29, 52, 65. 
Cleeman, Thomas M.— Admitted as 

Member, 73, 78. 
Cohen, M. — On Committee, 3. 
CoLcuRN, Warren. — Death announced, 

72, 73. — Cemmittee appointed to 

prepare Memoir, 73. 
CoLLiNGWOOD, F. — Discussion by, 6; 45, 

47, 65.— Motion by, 32.— Paper by, 

45, 47. 
Committee on Finance, 31, 38, 80, 106, 

108. 

— Guaging of Streams, 80, 109. 

— Library, 33, 80, 9-1, 106. 

— Local, at Eleventh Annual Conven- 

tion, 48. w 

— Methods of Nominations, 80, 87. 

— Nominations, 46, 75. 

— Paris Exhibit of American Engi- 

neering, 31, 80. 
-T- Q.uarters for the Society, 80. 

— Reseaith, 32. 

— Tests of American Iron, Steel, and 

Other Metals, 30, 82, 36. 

— Uniform Accounts and Returns of 

Railway Corporations, SO, S3. 

Committees, Special, on Engineering 
Subjects ; By-Lfvw as to, 2. 

CoMi'TON, Alfred G. — Discussion bj', 4. 

Coney Island Pier. (See Pier.) 

Constitution, Amendments adopted, in 
relation to Qualifications for ilem- 
bership. Honorary Membership, 
Propositions for Membership, 
Metliod of Amendment, Dues, 1. 

— Amendments proposed, as to Life 

M(!mbers, Methods of Amendment, 
74, 81. 

— Codification adopted, 1. 
Construction and Maintenance of Roads, 

by Edward P. North, 13, 46, 74. 



CONVENTION. 

Convention, Eleventh Annual, 4, 41,83 
(See Minutes.) 

— Twelfth Annual, 80. 
Convention, B\'-Law as to, 2. 
Cooper, Peter. — Discussion by, 105. 
Cooper, Theodore. — -Discussion by, 4, 

5, 31, 52, 65. 79, 105. — Resolution 
by, 5, 13.— Paper by, 65.— Teller, 
80. 

Cornell, George B. — Admitted as 
Junior, 59, 63. 

Coryell, Martin. — Presides at Meet- 
ing, 3. 

Cotton, Joseph P. —Discussion by, 32. 

Craven, Alfred W. — Deatli an- 
nounced, 51, 12. — Committee to 
prepare Memoir, 5. 

Croes, J. James R. — Discussion by, 5, 
74.— Elected Treasurer, 81.— 
Makes Report, 80, 90, 108, 112.— 
On Committee, 106. 

CuNNiNGH.\M, D. W. — Discussion by, 
45. 

Cunningham, James H. — Admitted as 
Member, 59, 71. 

Davis, Joseph P.- -On Committee, 46. 

Death of Members, 86. (See List.) 

De Funiak, Fred. — Report by, 34 

Dempster, Alexander. — Admitted as 
Member, 81, 103. 

DoRSF.Y, Edward Bates. — Admilted as 
Member, 29, 39. 

Dresser, George W. — Deputy Secre- 
tary of Convention, 43. — Discus- 
sion by, 4, 5, 21, 32, 45.— Teller, 
80. 

Dues, Amendment to Constitution re- 
ferring to, 2. 

— Arrears. (See Arrears.) 
Dynamite, Notes on Gelatine, by J. H. 

Strildinger, 4. 

Edge, George W. — Death announced, 
114. 

Egleston, Thomas. — Admitted as Mem- 
ber, 4, 11. — Discussion by, 46. 

Election of Officers, 81. 

Electric Light, Description of, by C. F. 
Brush, 45. 

Engineering, Questions Involved 

in the Development of, by Stephen 
Chester, 4. 

Elliot, Charles D. — Discussion by, 31. 

Ellis, Theodore G. — Address bj^ 42. 
— Discussion by, 47. — Makes Re- 
port, SO. — Presides at Meeting, 30, 
41. 

Emery, Charles E. — Discussion by, 
4, 21, 32, 45, 47, 65, 74, 105.— 



VII 



EMONTS. 

Ou Comniittee, 33, 52. — Paper by, 
30, 45. 

Emonts, W. a. G. — Paper by, 5. 

Erie Canal, Engineering' Problems in- 
volved in its proposed Improve- 
ment by Deepening the Channel 
one foot, by E. Swket, Jr.. 45. 

Evans. Walton VV. — Discussion by, 
103. 

Excursions at Eleventh Annual Con- 
vention, 48. 

Finance, Committee on, 31, 38, 80, 106, 
lii8. 

FixK. Albert. — Discussion by, 105. — 
Elected President of the Society, 
81.— Presides at Meeting, 1'.), 105. 

Finney, Frederick N. — Admitted as 
Member, 65, 71. 

Fiscal year, 81, 84. 

FisuER, Charles II. — Discussion by, 
45. ■ . 

Flad, Henry. — Discussion by, 46. 

Flagg, J Foster. — Discussion by, 31, 
32, 45, 74, 79. 

Flexure and Transverse Resistance of 
Beams, by Charles E. Emery, 45. 

Flow of Water. (See Water.) 

Force, C G. Jr. — Paper by, 45. — Discus- 
sion by, 45. — On Committee, 48. 

Ford, Arthur L. — Discussion by, 105. 

Fox, CiiiRLES Douglas. — Discussion 
by, 46. 

Francis, James B. — Elected Vice-Presi- 
dent, 81. 

Gauging of Streams, Report of Com- 
mittee, 80, 109. 

Gordon, Alexander. — Admitted as 
Associate, 4, 19. 

Gottlieb, AnaAiiAM. — Discussion by, 
45. 

Gi'aphic Railwiy Accounts, by Charles 
Latimer, 45. 

Greene, George S. — Discussion by, 5. 
— Makes report, 109. — Presides at 
meeting, 5, 13. — On Committee, 3. 

Greene, George S., Jr. — Discussion 
by, 4, 5. 

Griffen, John. — On Committee, 4. 

Hardee, Thomas S. — On Committee, 46. 

Harlow, James H. — Discussion l^y, 45. 

Harris, Henrique. — Admitted as Mem- 
ber, 103, 113. 

H^SLETT, Sullivan. — Admitted as Mem- 
ber, 29, 39. 

Haswell, Charles IT. — Discussion by, 
4. — Presides at Meeting, 05. 

G. — Death an- 



il E RING. 

uounced, 4. — Committee Appointed 
to Prepare Memoir, 4. 

Hering, R. — Discussion by, 46, 47, 63. 

Hekmany, Charlf;s. — Elected Director. 
81. 

Hersciiel, Clemens. — Discussion by, 46. 

Hilgari), Julius E. — Discussion by, 46, 
47. 

Hill, A. B. — Discussion by, 46. 

Hill, John W. — Discussion by. 47. 

House of the Society. (See Announce- 
ments.) 

Inter-Oceaaic Canal Projects, by A. G, 

Menooal, 105. 
Illustrations of Papers, 103. 

John, Irvin. — Admitted as Member, 73. 

Katte, Walter. — Presides at Meeting, 

79. — Discussion by, 79. 
Keeker, Thomas C. — On Committee, 46. 
Kelley, F. M. — Discussion by, 105. 
Kennedy, John. — On Committee, 44. — 

Pajier by, 47. — Discussion by, 46. 
Kent, William — Discussion by, 45. 
KiNGSLEY, M. W. — On Committee, 48. 

Latimer, Charles. — Discussion by, 31, 

32, 45, 46, 47.— On Committee, 48. 

— Paper bJ^ 45. — Resolution by, 
, 31. 
Lavoinne, F. — Discussion by, 46. 
Lawson, L. M. — Admitted as Associate, 

105, 113. 
Leiinartz, Frederick W. — Admitted as 

Member, 59, 78. 
Library and Museum. — Additions to, 9, 

23, 54, 68, 76, inO — Statement 

and increase, 84. 
Library Committee, 33, 80, 91, 106. _ 
Library — Consultation and circulation 

of books of the, 32, 80, 84, 91. 
Light-Houses, by J. G. Barnard and B. 

S. Alexander, 5. 
List of Members.— Additions, 11, 19, 

28, 39,. 63, 71, 78, 103, 113. 
,— Changes and Corrections, 12, 19, 

28, 40, 64, 71, 78, lo4, 113. 

— Death, 12, 40, 64, 72, 78, Ktl, 113. 

— Resignations, 72, 104. 

List of New Books dn Engineering and 
Teclinology. (See Books.) 

Long, T. J.— Discussion by, 79, 105. 

Loomis, Horace. — Admitted as Mem- 
ber, 81, 113. 

Macdonald, Charles. — Discussion by, 
5, 31, 45, 65, 105. — On Committee, 
3 —Paper by, 45. — Presides at 
Meeting, 3, 13. 



VIII. 



McALPINE. 

McAlpine, William J. — Discussion by, 

4. — Presidus at Meeting, 4. 
McCoMB, D. E. — Discussion by, 46. 
McKee, Charles H. — Admitted as Mem- 
ber 29, 113. 
McKeown. Thomas — Admitted as Mem- 
ber, 105, 113. 
Meetings. — By-Law as to. 2. — State- 
ment of, 83. — General, 31. 
Meic4S. Montgomery. — Admitted as 

Member, 4, 39. 
Members. — Additions to. (See List.) 
Ballots for. (See Ballots.) Changes 
of Address, (See List ) I 'eaths. 
(See List.) Number, 82. Resigna- 
tions. (See List.) 
Membersliip. — Propositions for, 2. — 
Qualifications for, 1. — Statenit-nt 
and increase, 82. 
Memoirs of Deceased Members. — 'Sam- 
uel J. Reeves, 93. — Franklin A. 
Stratton, 96. — James E. Bell, 98. 
Menocal, a. G — Discussion by, 105. — 

Paper liy, 105. 
Merrill, Wiliiam E. — On Committee, 

44. — Resolution by, 46. 
Merriavether, M. — Discussion by, 46, 
Metcalf, William. — Discussion by, 31, 

45. 
Metric System. (See Announcements.) 
Minutes of Eleventh Annual Conven- 
tion, Cleveland, June IVtli, 18'79, 
41 ; called to order by John Bog art, 
Secretary; chair taken by Past 
Vice-President Theodore C Ellis ; 
address hj Hon. R. R. Herrick, 
Mayor of Cleveland, 41 ; reply by 
Chairman Theodore G. Ellis, 42; 
Charles Paine chosen Permanent 
Chairman ; John Bogart chosen 
Secretary ; George W. Dresser 
chosen Deputy Secretary ; address 
of Chairman Charles Paine ; record 
of members and guests in attend- 
ance ; committee to determine 
order of papers and . discussions ; 
invitation from Union Club, 44; 
"Engineering Problems involved 
in the proposed Deepening of the 
Erie Canal," by E. Sweet, Jr., 
read and discussed by C. H. Fisher, 
Theodore Allen, William Wat- 
son G. Bouscaren ; " Experiments 
with appliances for Testing Ce- 
ments," by Alfred Noble, read 
and discussed by D. J. Whittemore, 
F. Collingm'ood, "W. Sooy Smith, 
D. W. Cunningham, J. H. Harlow, 
C. Latimer, F. (,>. Norto.n, F. 
Rinecker, 45. 



.MINUTES. 

Second Session, June I1t\i. — " The 
Electric Light," by C. F. Brush, 
read; "Design and Construction 
Table for Egg-shaped Sewers," by 
C. G. Force, Jr., read; "Graphic 
Railway Accounts," by Charles 
Latimer, presented ; " The Con- 
struction of the Ocean Pier at Coney 
Island," by Charles McDonald, 
read and discussed by C. Shaler 
Smith, J. Whitelaw. G.W. Dresser, 
C. B. Brush; "Specifications for 
Glasgow Steel Bridge," by W. Sooy 
Smith, read and discussed by W. 
H. Paine. G Bouscaren, A. (jOtt- 
LiEB. W. Kent, Charles Macdonald, 
W. Metcalk, C. G. Force, Jr., F. 

COLLINGWOOD, 45. 

• Tiiird Session, June 18th. — Order as 
to discussions and limit of time ; 
" Flexure and Transverse Resist- 
ance of Beams," by Charles E. 
Emery, read and discussed by W. 
Kent; "Progress of Work on New 
York and Brooklyn Bridge," by F. 
CoLLiNGWooD, read; "Theoretical 
Resistance of Railway Trains," 
discussed by J. F. Flagg, S. Whin- 
ery, W. H. Searles, 45; "The 
Construction and Maintenance of 
Roads," discussed by 0. B. Brush, 
C. Shaler Smith, G. Bouscaren, 

E. B. Van AVinkle, F. Lavoinne, 

F. Rinecker, Charles Douglass 
Fox, 46. 

- Fourth Session, June 18th. — Business 

meeting held (see Minutes) ; Nom- 
inating Committee appointed ; ac- 
tion taken as to public documents, 
46. 

- Fifth Session, June 19th.—" The Con- 

struction and Maintenance of 
Roads," discussed b\' D. E. Mc- 
CoMB, E. R. Andrews, C. Shaler 
Smith, G. Bouscaren, G. D. Ans- 
LEY, E. S. Chesbrough, a. B. Hill. 
J. E. Hilgard, H. Flad, M. Merri- 
wETiiER, B. F. Morse, Edward P, 
North ; " Permanent Way of Rail- 
ways in Great Britain and Ireland, 
with special reference to the use of 
Timber, preserved and unpre- 
served," by John Bogart, discussed 
by E. R. Andrews, C. Latimer, E. 
Sweet, Jr., "W. Watson, T. Egles- 
TON, Charles Paine, John Kennedy, 
E W. BowDiTcii; appointment of 
Committee on Preservation of Tim- 
ber recommended ; " Brick Arches 
for Large Sewers," discussed by C. 



IX 



MINUTES. 

Hersohel, R. Hering, 46; "Distri- 
bution of Rainfall October, 1869," 
by James B. Francis, discussed by 
W. RoToii ; " Comparison of Stand- 
ard Measures," by A. S. C. Wur- 
TELE, discussed by J. E. IIilgard, 
T. G. Ellis, C. Latimer ; " ( -usliion- 
injj the reciprocating parts of Steam 
Enoines,"discussed by C. E. Emery, 
J. W. Hill ; " The use of Com- 
pressed Air in Tubular Founda- 
tions," by D. Mc.N Stai'ffer, dis- 
cussed by F. CoLLiNGWooD ; "The 
Flow of Water in Small Channels," 
discussed by C. H. Swan, R. Ber- 
ing ; " The Improvement of the St. 
Lawrence River, "by John Kennedy, 
read; "Brazil, its Railway and 
Water Communications," by W. 
Milnor Roberts; " The South Pass 
Jetties," by Max E. Schmidt, with 
discussion "by H. D. Wiiitcomr ; 
" The Construction of the Railroad 
over the Raton Mountains," by 
James D. Burr; "The Flow of 
Water in Rivers," by D\<: Volson 
Wood ; " Stability of Stone Struc- 
tures," by W. H. Searles; "Wind 
Pressure," by F. Collingwood ; 
" Cadastral Maps in Ohio," by H. 
F. Walling ; " The Submarine 
Telephone" by C. W. Raymond, 
presented ; Resolutions of thanks 
adopted, 47 ; Convention adjourned; 
Arrangements by and members of 
Local Committee ; General pro- 
gramme for each day, 48 ; E.xcur- 
sions and visits to various locali- 
ties, 51. 
Minutes of Meetings of Board of Direc- 
tion, 1.5, 32, 74, 106. 

— January 3d, 1879, Proposals con- 

sidered; annual certificate filed: 
appropriations made, 15. 

— February 5tli, 1879, Proposals cou- 

siderecl: financial business trans- 
acted, 15. 

— March 6th, 1879, Proposals con- 

sidered; appropriations made, 15. 

— April 2d, 1879, Proposals considered; 

financial business transacted; ac- 
tion taken as to publications, 15. 

— April 30th, 1879, Proposals consid- 

ered ; action token as to arrears of 
dues : resolution adopted as to pub- 
lications ; appropriations made, 15. 

— May 31st, 1S79, Proposals consid- 

ered ; arrangements for convention 
made; api)ropriations made, 32. 

— June 30th, 1879, Proposals consid- 



MINUTES. 

ered ; members designated to at- 
tend turbine tests; conditions of 
award of Norman Medal changed; 
approiu'iations made, 33. 

— August 4th, 1879, Proposals con- 

sidered, 74. 

— September 2d, 1879, Proposals con- 

sidered ; censors to award Norman 
Medal appointed : resolutions as 
to appointment of committees or- 
dered to letter hallot; financial 
business transacted, 74. 

— October 1st, 1879, Proposals con- 

sidered; action taken as to ex- 
change of publications : as to pub- 
lications not credited ; annual re- 
port considered ; report of Nomi- 
nating Committee received and 
ballot ordered prepared ; appro- 
priations made, 74. 

— October 31 at, 1879, Proposals con- 

sidered ; annual report perfected, 
106. 

— November 11th, 1879, Standing Com- 

mittees on Finance and Library 
appointed ; proposals considered ; 
issue of circular ordered ; action 
taken as to members in arrears, 
106. 

— December 5th, 1879, Proposals con- 
sidered : issue of circular ordered ; 
appropriations made, 106. 

Minutes of Meetings of the Society, 1, 
13, 21, 29, 52, 59, 65, 73, 79, 105. 

— January 3d, 1879, Death of Samuel 

J. Reeves. M. A. S. C. E., an- 
nounced and committee appointed 
to |)repare memoir ; i-esult of ballot 
for amendments to Constitution and 
By-Laws; address by W. Milnor 
Roberts, President A. S. C. E., and 
resolutions adopted on his depar- 
ture for Brazil, 1. 

— January 15th, 1879, " Exi)eriments on 

the Resistances of Rolling Stock," 
by A. M. Wellington, read and 
discussed, 3. 

February 5th, 1879, Result of ballet 

to determine place of Eleventh 
Annual Conventi(m ; Cleveland to 
be the place ; ballots for member- 
ship canvassed : " Engineering 
Questions Involved in the Devel- 
opment of Electric Lighting," by 
STEriiEN Chester, read and dis 
cussed, 3. 

— February 19th, 1879, " Notes on Gela- 

tine Dynamite," by Julius H. 
Striedinger, read and discussed, 
4. 



X 



MINUTES. 

-March 5tli, 1879, Dealb of Rohert G. 
Hatfield, M. A. S. C. E., an- 
nounced, and committee a]>pointed 
to prepare Memoir ; ballots for 
membership canvassed ; " Incline 
Planes Crossin<^ the Allegheny 
Mountains," by Moncure Robinson', 
jead and discussed; " High Explo- 
sives," discussed, 4. 

-March 19th, 187n, "Parabolic Arches 
for Masonry," by W; A. G. 
Emonts, read and discussed, 5. 

-April 2d. 187vt, Death of Alfred W. 
Cravk.v, Past President A. S. C. E., 
amionnced and committee ap- 
pointed to prepare Memoir ; 
•■ Minot's Ledge Lighthouse," by 
B. S. Alexander, read and dis- 
cussed; a discussion b}" J. G. Bar- 
nard, upon " The Fall of the West- 
ern Arched Approach to South 
Street Bridge, Philadelphia," read 
and discussed ; reporting abstracts 
of papers considered ; suggestions 
for consideration at Convention 
presented, 5. 

-April 16th, 1879, " The Construction 
and Maintenance of Roads," by 
Edward P. North, read, 13. 

- May 7lh, 1879, Ballots for member- 

ship canvassed; suggestions for 
consideration at Convention, 
adopted, 13. 

- May 21st, 1879, " The Loss of Water 

in Flowing in Open Earth Chan- 
nels, by J. James R. Croes, vend 
and d'scu.^sed, 21. 

-June 4th, 1879, Ballots for member- 
ship canvassed ; action taken as to 
tests of turbines at Holyolce ; 
" Proposed Connected Girder,'' by 
Charles E. Emery, presented and 
discussed. 29. 

-June 18th, 1879, Business meeting at 
convention; Committee on Uniform 
Accounts and Returns of Railroad 
Corporations reported and was 
discharged ; Committee on Tests of • 
American Iron, Steel and other 
Metals reported, and was continued; 
Standing Committee on Finance 
reported ; Committee on Exhibit 
at Paris reported ; resolution as to 
preservation of timber referred; 
resolution as to unilorm system for 
tests of cement referred ; resolu- 
tion as to holding meeting in va- 
rious cities, in addition to the con- 
vention, lost; resolution as to is- 
sue of advance copies of papers 



MINUTES. 

and as to obtaining professional in- 
formation, carried; resolution as 
to research committee carried ; 
resolution as to inviting papers on 
engineering subjects carried; reso- 
lution as to a system to award 
special recognition for the best 
paper-i contributed each year car- 
ried; resolution as to consultation 
of books of library carried ; reso- 
lution as to printing papers and re- 
ports cari'ied, 30. 
July 2d, 1879, Ballots for membership 
canvassed ; death of James E. Bell, 
M. A. S. C. E., announced and com- 
mittee aiipointcd to prepare 
Memoir ; action taken as to tests of 
turbines at Holyoke; "Brazil," its 
Railway and Water Communica- 
tions,'.' by W. Milnor Roberts, 
read and discussed, 52. 
•July 16th, 1879, »' The Flow of 
Water in Rivers," by De Volson 
Wood, read and discussed, 52. 
August 6tli, 1879, Ballots for mem- 
bership canvassed; death of 
Franklin A. Stratton, M. A. S. 

C. E., announced and committee 
appointed to prepare Memoir; 
" The South Pass Jetties," by Max 
E. Schmidt, read and discussed, 59. 

September 3d, 1879, Ballots for 
membership canvassed ; " The 
Stability of Stone Structures," by 
William H. Searles, read and dis- 
cussed, 65. 

September 1 7th, 1879, " The Use of 
Steel for Bridges," by Theodore 
Cooper, read and discussed, 65, 
■ October 1st, 1879, Ballots for mem- 
bership canvassed; ballots on reso- 
lution for appointment of Com- 

• mittee on Preservation of Timber 
and of Committee on a Uniform Sys 
tem for Tests of Cement, canvassed, 
and both adopted; death of Warren 
CoLBiiRN, M. A. S. C. E., announced 
and committee appointed to pre- 
pare Memoir; proposed amendment 
to the Constitution submitted ; 
discussion on " Construction and 
Maintenance of Roads," continued ; 
" The Construction of the Atchison, 
Topeka and Santa Fe Railroad over 
tiie Raton Mountains," by James 

D. Burr, read and discussed, 73. 
October 15th, 1879, discussion on 

" The South Pass Jetties," con- 
tinued, 79. 
■November 5th, 1870, (See Minutes of 



XI 



MINUTES. 

Twenty-seventh Annual Meeting.) 

— November 19th, IS'/O, " Inter-oceanic 

Canal Projects," by A. G. Menocal, 
read and discussed, 105. 

— December 3d. ISYD, Awards of Nor- 

man Medal and Norman Book Prize 
announced ; ballots for member- 
siiip canvassed ; discussion on 
Inter-oceanic Canal Projects," con- 
tinued, 105. 

— December PZth, 18*79, Discussion on 

" Inter-Oceauic Canal Projects," 
continued, 105. 
Minutes of Twenty-seventh Annual 
Meeting, November 5th, 1879; 19. 
—Attendance, 79.— Tellers for Bal- 
lot ; Annual Report of Board of 
Direction ; Annual Report of 
Treasurer ; Annual Report of Fi- 
nance Committee ; Report of Li- 
brary Committee on Consultation 
of Books ; Report of Committee on 
Gauging of Streams ; Place for 
Next Convention Considered ; Re- 
port of Committee on Exhibit at 
Paris presented and Committee dis- 
charged ; Report of Centennial 
Commission of the Society pre- 
sented and Commission discharged : 
Report of Committee on Method of 
Nofiiinations ; Report of Conmiit- 
tee on Quarters for the Society, 
SO. — Officers for Ensuing Year 
Elected ; Amendments to Consti- 
tution Considered ; Ballots for 
Membership canvassed ; Proposed 
change in date of Annual Meeting 
and in termination of Society j'ear 
considered ; Thanks to Officers ; 
Report of Board of Censors to 
award Norman Medal, 81. 

MiTrnELL, Henry. — Admitted as Mem- 
ber, 113. 

MoRisoN, George S. — Discussion by, 4. 

Morse, B. F. — Discussion by, 46. — On 
Committee, 48. 

New Books on Engineering and Tech- 
nology. (See Books.) 

Newell, J. — On Committee, 18. 

Nichols, Aurin B. — Admitted as Mem- 
ber, 115. 

Noble, Alfred, — Discussion by, 45. — 
Paper by, 45. 

Nominating Committee, 46, 47. 

Nominations, Committee on Metliod of, 
80, 87. 

Norman Book Prize Awarded, 105, 112. 

Norman, George .H — Reference to, 33, 
85. 



NORMAN. 

Norman Medal. — Conditions of award, 
33, 56, 59, 66, 75, 85.— Board of 
Censors to award appointed, 74. — 
Makes report, 81, 86, 112. — award- 
ed, 105, 112. 

North, Edward P. — Award of Norman 
Medal to, l''i5, 112.— Discussion by, 
4, 46, 52, 74, 79, 105.— Paper by, 
13.— Report by. 31. 

Norton, F. 0. — Admitted as Fellow, 
29, 30. — Discussion bj^ 45. 

Ocean Pier at Coney Island. (See 
Pier.) 

Osgood, Josifrn O. — Admitted as Mem- 
ber, 4, 12. 

Owen, James. — Discussion bj', 21. 

Paine, .Charles. — Address by, 43. — 
Discussion by, 46. — On IJoard of 
Censors, 74. — On Committee, 46, 
48. — Permanent Chairman of Con- 
vention, 43. 

Paine, William H. — Discussion by, 45, 
105. — Elected Director, «1. — Makes 
report, 31, 38, 109.— On Commit- 
tee, 106. — Presides at meeting, 3, 
73. 

Papers invited, 32, 60, 86. — Advance 
copies, 31, 86. 

Parabolic Arches for Masonrj', by W. 
A. G. Emonts, 5. 

Paris Exhibit of American Engineering, 
31, 80. 

Permanent Quarters for the Society, 
Comii-ittee on, 80. 

Pier. — The construction of the Ocean 
Pier at Conej^ Island, bj^ Charles 
Macdonald, 45. 

Post, J. C. — Discussion by. 74. 

Preservation of Timber. (See Timber.) 

Professional information through Secre- 
tary, 32. 

Propositions for Membership, amend- 
ment as to, 1. 

Prout, Henry G. — Admitted as Mem- 
ber, 65, 71. 

Public Documents, 46. 

Putna.m, J. W. — Discussion by, 79. 

Qualifications for membership, amend- 
ment as to, 1. 

Raton Mountains, construction and 

operation of l,he Railroad over, by 

James D. Burr, 47, 74. 
Raymond, Charles Ward. — Papier by, 

47. 
Reeves, Samuel J. — Death announced, 

1. — Committee to prepare memoir, 

1, 4.— Memoir, 93. 



XII 



RENO, 

Reno, James H. — Admitted as Mem- 
ber, 81, 103. 

Report of Board of Direction, 80, 82. 

— Treasurer, 80, 106. 

Rei)orts made, list of, 83. 

Reports of Committees. (See Commit- 
tees.) 

Rejjorts of Papers and Discussions, 5, 
14, 15, 31, 32. 

Resignation of Members. (See'List.) 

Resistances of Rolling Stock; by A. M. 
AVellington, 3. 

Richardson, Henry B. — Admitted as 
Member, 13, 28. 

Rinecker, F. — Discussion bj', 45, 46. 

Roads, the Construction and Mainten- 
ance of, by Edward P. North, 13, 
46, 74. 

Roberts, Percival, Jr. — ^^Admitted as 
Associate, 13, 28. 

Roberts, W. Milnor. — Address by, 3, 
6. — Paper by, 47, 52. — Presides at 
meetings, 1. — Resolutions as to 
. departure for Brazil, 3. 

Robinson, Monclre. — Paper by, 4. 

Rockwell, Samuel. — Admitted as Mem- 
ber, 113. 

Rolling Stock. (See Resistances.) 

RoTCH, W. — Discussion by, 47. 

SciiMtDT, Max E. — Admitted as Mem- 
ber, 13, 28. — Award of Norman 
Book Prize to, 105, 112.— Discus- 
sion by, 105. — Paper by, 47, 59. 

Schuyler, John. — Resignation of, 104. 

SooviLL, E. Tracy. — On Committee, 48. 

ScowDEM, T. R. — On Committee, 48. 

Searles, William H. — Discussion by, 
4, 21, 31, 45, 65. -Paper by, 17, 
65. 

Sewers. — Design and construction table 
for egg-shaped sewers, by C. G. 
Force, Jr. ,'45. 

SiiELBouRNE, S. F. — Discussion bj-, 
105, 

Sheldon, S.— -On Committee, 48. 

Shinn, William P. — Suggestion by, 31. 
— Report by, 34. 

Smedley, Samuel L. — Discussion by, 
32. 

Smith, Hamilton, Jr. — Admitted as 
Member, 4. 

Smith, C. Siialer. — Discussion by, 32, 
45, 46. — On Board of Censors, 74. 

S>nTH, C. Vandervoort. — Elected Di- 
rector, 81. — Makes report, 109. — 
On Committee, 106. 

Smith, W. Sooy. — Discussion by, 45 — 
Report by, 30, 37. — Resolution by, 
31. — Speciticati'jns by, 45. 



SOCIETY. 

Society management, suggestions as to, 
6, 14, 22, 31. 

South Pass Jetties, by Max E. Schmidt, 
47, 59, 79. 

Stability of Stone Structures, by Wil- 
liam H. Searles, 47, 65. 

Standard Measures, by A. S. C. Wur- 
TELE, 47. 

Stauffer, D. McN. — Paper by, 47. 

Steele, J. Dutton. — Resignation of, 
72. 

Stevens, S. — Discussion by, 105. 

Striedinger, Julius H. — Paper by, 4. 
— Discussion by, 4, 21. 

St. Lawrence River, the Improvement 
of, by John Kennedy, 47. 

Stratton, Franklin A. — Death an- 
nounced, 59, 64. — Committee ap- 
pointed to prepare Memoir, 59. — 
Memoir, 96. 

SiROBEL, Charles L. — Admitted as 
Member, 105, 113. 

Strong, Charles H. — On Committee, 
48. 

Submarine Telephone, bj^ Charles 
Ward Raymond, 47. 

Swan, Charles H. — Discussion by, 47. 

Sweet, C. A. — Discussion by, 106. 

Sweet, E. Jv. — Discussion by, 45, 46. 
— Paper by, 45. 

Tasker, Charles A. — Death announced, 
78. 

Test of Amei'ican Iron, Steel and other 
Metals, Committee on, 30, 32, 36. 

Tests of Cement. (See Cement.) 

Thompson, Wm. G. M. — Admitted as 
Member, 39, 52. 

Timber, preservation of, 31, 46, 73, 84. 

TiTLow, J. Milton. — Admitted as Mem- 
ber, 59, 71. 

Topics on which original papers are in 
vited, 60, 86. 

Torrey', D. — Discussion bj". 65. 

Transactions, complete sets ol. (See 
Announcements.) 

Treasurer's report, 80, 106. 

Turbine tests, 29, 33, 52. 

Uniform Accounts and Returns of Rail- 
road Corporations, Committee on, 
30, 33. 

Van Winkle, E. B. — Discussion by, 
46, 74.— Elected Director, 81.— On 
Committee, 106. 

Vinton, Francis L. — Death announced, 

78. 

Walling, H. F.— Paper by, 47. 
Ward, John F. — Discussion by, 52. 



XllI 

WARD. WHITMAN. 

AVard, L. B. — Discussion by. 21. Whitman, T. J. — On Committee, 46. 

Waruen, G. K. — Elected Director, 81. Wiiittkmore, I). .J,— Discussion by, 45, 

— On C'ominittee, 10(5. 65. 

Water. — The flow of water in rivers, Wditte.v, N. H. — Comrnunicatious from 

by Db Volson Wood, 47, 52. 29. 

— The loss of water in flowing in open Williams, Norman A. — Death an- 

earth channels, by J. James R. nounced, 104. 

Croes, 21. W^ind Pressure, by F. Collingwood, 47. 

Watson, William. — Discussion bj^ 45, Wood, De Volson. — Paper by, 47, 52. 

46. WoRTHEN, William E. — Discussion by, 
AVelch, Asiibel. — Discussion by, 4. — 21, 105. --On Committee, 4, 5, 33, 

Presides at meeting, 4. 52. — Presides at meeting, 52, 59. 

Wellington, A. M. — Paper by, 8. AVurtele, A. S. C. — Paper by, 47. 
AVhinery, S. — Discussion by, 45. 

AVhitcomb, H. D. — Discussion by, 47. Yardlev, Edmlnd. — Discussion by, 4, 
Whitelaw, John. — Discussion by, 45. 52, 74. 

On Committee, 47. 



(I) 



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Vol. V. — January, 1879. 

[Up to April 2d, 1879.] 



MINUTES OF MEETINGS 

(Abstract of such as may be of general interest to members.) 



OF THE SOCIETY. 

Januaby 3d, 1879. — The Society met at 8 p. m., the President, W. 
Milnor Roberts, in the chair. 

The death of Samuel J. Reeves, Member A. S. C. E. , was announced, 
and the President was authorized to appoint a committee to prepare a 
memoir. 

The result of the canvass of the ballots for proposed Amendments to 
the Constitution and By-Laws, was as follows : 

Upon the Codification of the Constitution and By-Laws, as printed 
in Proceedings, Vol. IV., page 95 (July, 1878), there were 74 Ayes and 9 
Nays. This codification was thereiipon declared adopted. 

Upon the Amendment (marked K) to Article XVIII. of the Constitu- 
tion, as printed in Proceedings, Vol. IV. , page 106, there were 81 Ayes 
and 5 Nays. This amendment was thereupon declared adopted. 



Upon the Amendment (marked L) to Article XVII. of the Constitu- 
tion, as i^rinted in Proceedings, Vol. IV., page 107, there were 78 Ayes 
and 7 Nays. This amendment was thereupon declared adoj^ted. 

Upon the Amendment (marked N) to Article XXIII. of the Constitu- 
tion, as printed in Proceedings, Vol. IV., page 108, there were 64 Ayea 
and 21 Nays. This amendment was thereupon declared adopted. 

Upon the Amendment (marked O) to article XXXII. of the Consti- 
tution, as printed in Proceedings, Vol. IV., page 108, there were 79 Ayes 
and 7 Nays. This amendment was thereupon declared adopted. 

Upon the Amendment (marked P), a new Article of the Constitution, 
as printed in Proceedings, Vol. IV. , page 108, there were 71 Ayes and 
15 Nays. This amendment was thereupon declared adojDted. 

Upon the Amendment (marked E) to Section 1 of the By-Laws, as 
printed in Proceedings, Vol. IV. , page 108, there were 80 Ayes and 5 
Nays. This amendment was thereupon declared adopted. 

Upon the Amendment (marked S) to Section 23 of the By-Laws, as 
printed in Proceedings, Vol. IV., page 109, there were 80 Ayes and 6 
Nays. This amendment was thereupon declared ado^sted. 

Uj)on the other projiosed Amendments to the Constitution and By- 
Laws, as printed in Proceedings, Vol. IV. , pages 105, 106, 107 and 109^ 
the vote was as follows: 

Upon proposed Amendment to Article V. of the Constitution (marked 
B.) 5 Ayes, 81 Nays. 

Upon proposed Amendment to Article V. of Constitutien (marked C), 
Ayes, 85 Nays. 

Upon proposed Amendment to Article V. of Constitution (marked D,),. 
•1 Ayes, 82 Nays. 

Upon jaroposed Amendment to Article VI. of Constitution (marked 
E.), 5 Ayes, 81 Nays. 

Upon proposed Amendment to Article VI. of Constitution (marked 
F.), 4 Ayes, 82 Nays. 

Upon proposed Amendment to Article VI. of Constitution (marked 
G.), 1 Aye, 84 Nays. 

Upon proposed Amendment to Article VII. of Constitution (marked 
H.), 3 Ayes, 82 Nays. 

Upon proposed Amendment to Article IX. of Constitution (marked 
I.), 9 Ayes, 76 Nays. 

Upon i^roposed Amendment to Article X. of Constitution (marked 
J,), 12 Ayes, 75 Nays. 

Upon proposed Amendment to Article XIX. of Constitution (marked 
M.), 11 Ayes, 74 Nays. 

Upon proposed Amendment to Section 24 of By-Laws (marked T.), 16 
Ayes, 69 Nays. 

Whereupon these proposed amendments (B, C, D, E, F, G, H, I, J^ 
M, and T), were declared not adopted. 



An address was then made by the President, alluding to his ap- 
proaching visit to Brazil.* 

.On motion, the chair was taken by Martin Coryell. The following 
resolution was adopted: 

Resolved, That a committee of three be appointed to draw up resolu- 
tions in reference to the departure of the President. 

Messrs. Charles Macdonald, Mendes Cohen and J. J. R. Croes, were 
appointed such committee. 

The committee presented the following Preamble and Resolution, 
which were imanimously adopted : 

" Whereas, The President of this Society, Col. W. Milnor Roberts, has announced his in- 
tention of withdrawing from the active administration of the duties of his position, in conse- 
quence of having entered upon a service of great honor and trust under the Government of 
Brazil, be it, 

"Resolved, That we desire to place on record at this time, our sense of Col. Roberts' ser- 
vices to the profession during his long career as an Engineer. 

" Beginning at the age of sixteen on the Union Canal of Pennsylvania, he was intimately 
associated with the development of the most prominent canals of the country. 

" He became identified with the railway system at its first inception, and his name has been 
connected with many of the important railways of the United States ; notably with the Alle- 
gheny Portage, the Harrisburgh and Lancaster, now part of the main line of the Pennsylvania 
Railroad, the Bellefontaine and Indiana, the Iron Mountain of Missouri, several railroads in 
Iowa, and the great Northern Pacific Railroad, of which he still remains Chief Engineer. 

" His abilities as a Hydraulic Engineer have been recognized in his appointment by the 
Government to the charge of the Ohio River Improvement, and as one of the Commissioners to 
advise in regard to the regulation of the mouths of the Mississippi River, in the execution of 
which duty he visited Europe with the Commission, and examined the principal works of river 
improvement there. 

" He has also been engaged as Consulting Engineer upon many important questions per- 
taining to the water supply of several of our principal cities. 

" During his long connection with the direction of the Society, Col. Roberts' active inter- 
est in its affairs has been of great advantage, and his wise counsel has materially aided his 
colleagues in the settlement of many difficult questions, and the furtherance of the objects of 
the associatinn. 

" While his absence will be seriously felt by them, they are reconciled thereto by the con- 
viction that it will inure to the benefit not only of himself and the enlightened government 
which has employed him, but of the profession of which he is an honored member." 

The President resumed the chair. The reading of the paper an- 
nounced for this evening was j)ostponed until the next meeting. 

January 15th, 1879. — The Society met at 8 p. m., Charles Macdonald 
in the chair. 

A paper presented at the Annual Meeting with the report of the Com- 
mittee on Resistances of Trains, being a report of experiments upon the 
resistances of rolling stock, made by A. M. Wellington, under the direc- 
tion of Charles Paine, was read and discussed. 

February 5th, 1879. — The Society met at 8 p. m., William H. Paine 
in the chair. 

* See page 6. 



The ballots to determine the place for the Eleventh Annual Conven- 
tion were canvassed, and the result announced, as follows: 

For St. Louis 73 votes 

For Cleveland 82 " 

For San Francisco 1 " 

In accordance with this vote it was determined that the Eleventh 
Annual Convention should be held at Cleveland. 

The ballots for membership were canvassed and the following candi- 
dates were declared elected as members : William H. Bradley, of Boston, 
Mass., and Hamilton Smith, jr., of San Francisco, Cal. 

A paper entitled "Engineering Questions Involved in the Develop- 
ment of Electric Lighting," by Stephen Chester, was read by the author, 
and discussed by Messrs. Chester, Dresser, Haswell, Morison, Searles and 
Yardley. 

February 19th, 1879. — The Society met at 8 p. m., Past-President 
William J. McAli^ine in the chair. 

A paper by Julius H. Striedinger, entitled " Notes on Gelatine Dyna- 
mite," was read, and discussed by Messrs. Chanute, Cooper, Emery, Geo. 
S. Greene, jr., Haswell, Wm. J. McAlpine and Yardley. 

March 5th, 1879. — The Society met at 8 p. m. , Ashbel Welch in the 
chair. 

The death of Kobert G. Hatfield, member American Society Civil 
Engineers, was announced, and William E. Worthen, James O. Morse 
and John Bogart were apijointed a committee to prepare a memoir of Mr. 
Hatfield. 

The appointment of John Griffen and Alfred P. Boiler was announced, 
as a committee to prejiare a memoir of the late Samuel J. Reeves. 

The ballot for membership was canvassed, and the following candi- 
dates declared elected: — As Members: James E. Bell, of Cincinnati, O., 
Thomas Egleston, of New York, Montgomery Meigs, of Washington, D. 
C, and JoseiDh O. Osgood (elected Junior May 3d, 1876), of Canon City, 
Col. 

As Associate: Alexander Gofdon, of Cincinnati, O. 

As Junior: James P. Allen, of Charleston, S. C. 

A communication from Moncure Robinson, and a report made by him 
in the year 1829 embracing the original recommendation for the plan of 
crossing the Allegheny Mountains by inclined jalanes, were read, and dis- 
cussed by Messrs. Comj)ton, Emery, Haswell, North, Searles and Welch. 

Additional exijeriments with dynamite were described by Charles H. 
Haswell, and the subject of high explosives was discussed by Messrs. 
North and Striedinger. 



March 19th, 1879.— The Society met at 8 p. m., Past President George 
S. Greene in the chair. 

A paper by W. A. G. Emonts, entitled "Parabolic Arches for 
Masonry," was read and discussed. 

An informal discussion followed upon the general policy of the 
Society. 

April 2d, 1879. —The Society met at 8 p. m.. Past President George 
S. Greene in the chair. 

The death of Alfred W. Craven, Past President Amexican Society of 
Civil Engineers, was announced, and the following committee was ap- 
pointed to prepare a memoir of Mr. Craven: George S. Greene, William 
E. Worthen, Julius W. Adams and Allan Campbell. 

Gen. J. G. Barnard, then read a paper on the construction of the 
Miuot's Ledge Light House, including with it a memoir on the subject 
by the late Gen. B. S. Alexander. 

Gen. J. G. Barnard also presented an account of the settlement of Fort 
Livingston, Fla., and referred to the probable cause of settlement of 
Pier 2 of South Street Bridge, Philadelphia. 

George W. Dresser gave an account of the foundations of a large hos- 
pital in New York City. 

Francis CoUingwood gave an account of the method of providing for 
special cases in the foundations of the piers of the New York and Brooklyn 
Bridge. 

The following resolution was offered by Theodore Cooper: 

Resolved, That an invitation be extended to the editoi's of Engineer- 
ing journals to attend our meetings; and that all reasonable facilities be 
given them to I'eport such abstracts of the papers and discussions as they 
may desire to publish. 

The question was discussed by Messrs. Chanute, Cooper, Croes, 
Dresser, G. S. Greene, G. S. Greene, Jr. , and Macdonald. 

The following rule, adojated by the Board of Direction, was read for 
the information of the Society : 

'•That business proceedings are not to be reported for the jDublic 
press. Notices of meetings held, and of the papers read and discussion 
thereon, may be reported. Abstracts, giving the general tenor of the 
paj^ers, &g. , may be published in advance of the issue of ' Transactions ' 
if approved by the Secretary." 

The resolution offered by Mr. Cooper was then withdrawn by him, 
and on motion of Mr. O. Chanute, it was referred to the Board of 
Direction. 

Mr. Chanute gave notice that at the next meeting of the Society he 
would offer the following preamble and resolution : 

Whereas, Every possible effort should be made to increase the sphere 
of usefulness of the Society and to enlarge its membership as well as to 
promote active intercourse between all its members, therefore, be it 



Resolved, That the following suggestions and such others as may be 
submitted, be printed and distributed among the members, with the 
request that they shall favor the Secretary as soon as possible with their 
opinions, as well as with such other suggestions as they may wish to 
offer, so that action upon the same may be taken at the next convention. 

Suggestions. 

1st. That jjrovision be made for the holding of more than a single 
convention in each year for jDrofessional intercourse. > 

2d. That papers be annually invited from members upon subjects 
of general interest, to be specified by the Board of Direction. 

3d. That a system be established to award special recognition for the 
best papers conti'ibuted each year. 

4th. That jaresent members be encouraged to propose worthy per- 
sons for new members, associates and fellows. 

5tli. That to i^romote the discussion of papers, advance copies be 
issued to such members as may be specially qualified to take part in the 
same. 

6th. That members be encouraged to make use of the facilities of 
the Society in New York, for obtaining professional information. 



NOTES AND MEMORANDA. 



REPORTS OF MEETINGS. 



Address made by President W. Milnor But two months have passed since the 

Roberts, at the meeting of the Society. Jauu- members of the Society did me the honor to 

ary 3, 1879* elect me their President for the present year, 

The members present are already aware and it would have been a great gratification 

that I have accepted a position as engineer in to me to. have continued to iireside in that 

the service of the Brazilian Government; an honorable position during the entire year, 

appointment unsolicited on my part, and made Last year our worthy President, E. S. Ches- 

without my knowledge, upon the nomination brough, of Chicago, being prevented by his 

of our fellow member, Capt. Eads, to whom professional engagements from attendance at 

the Emperor, Dom Pedro the Second, had ad- the Society's rooms in this city, devolved 

dresfed an autograph letter, requesting him most of the duties upon myself as Senior 

to nominate an experienced engineer to take Vice-President, during most of the season, 

the direction of the Improvement of the San Now it falls to my lot, in consequence of my 

Francisco River. At the suggestion of Mr. new engagement, to ask the Senior Vice-Presi- 

Borges, the Brazilian Mmister, the appoint- dent to fulfill the duties which properly belong 

ment was afterwards made more general, re- to the President, and, doubtless, he will do 

quiring me to act as engineer upon any of the them well. 

public improvements the Goverunent might Those who are familiar with the working of 

desire. The engagement is for three years the Board of Direction (and Trustees) of the 

from the beginning of January of this year. Society are aware that by far the greater part 

1879. of the labor naturally and necessarily devolves 

* See Minutes, p. 3. 



upon the Secretary and the Treasurer, under 
the instructions and supervision, it is true, of 
the Board of Directon. To the faithful and 
intelligent action of these oiBcers much of 
the past success and present prosperity of the 
Society are due, and I am quite sure that the 
same solicitude for the best interests of our 
members, as a body, will be maintained here- 
after by those gentlemen. 

The field upon which I am about to engage 
in South America, though upon the same 
hemisphere, can only be conveniently ap- 
proached from the United Slates by water, 
and over five thousand miles of ocean inter- 
vene between New York and Rio Janeiro, the 
capital city ot Brazil, requiring about twenty 
days' steaming, or twenty-two days, including 
the usual stops at St. Thomas, Para, Peruam- 
buco and Babia. Besides this direct monthly 
steamship communication, there is regular 
steam communication between the two coun- 
tries via England, France, Germany, etc., 
while much of the commerce between the 
United States and Brazil is still carried by sail- 
ing vessels. 

This is not my first visit to Brazil ; I spent 
seven years in that country — -between 1858 
and 1805 — as senior partner of the company 
who built the 2d sectiou of the " Dom Pedro 
Segunda Railway," at the time deemed to be 
one of the most difficult works ever projected. 
Greater works have since been coustucted in 
Eui'ope and on the west coast of South Amer- 
ica, but the undertaking of the Brazilian 
railroads, nearly a quarter of a century ago, 
exhibited great foresight as well as most 
liberal enterprise on the part of the Govern- 
ment. With an enlightened and energetic 
Emperor, devoted to the maintenance of an 
admirable written Constitution, and ably sup- 



ported by a Parliament and Council composed 
of educated gentlemen, the future of Brazil 
should be very great. In 1865, before leaving 
that country, I had the honor to take part in 
calling public attention to the importance of a 
direct steamship line between Brazil and the 
United States, which was soon after estab- 
lished, sustained in part by subsidies from 
both governments. After running some years 
that line was withdrawn. Recently another 
line has been put on, and it is to be hoped 
that the Government and people of the United 
States will encourage more frequent inter- 
course between the two countries, to their 
mutual advantage. 

Being so far away, I shall miss the profes- 
sional and social gatherings of our members, 
and for a time I will have to content myself 
with the reading of the published Transac- 
tions and Proceedings. I trust, however, that 
thej' will lose none of their interest in con- 
sequence of the distance they must traverse. 
Though absent in body, I will be present with 
you in spirit ; and, should there be time and 
opportunity, I may be able to contribute an 
occasional paper i-elating to South Amor'ca, 
which may have interest for members in 
North America. 

Ours is the; " American " Society of Civil 
Engineers. Itknows no "North," no "South," 
save as amicable, continental designations. 

I cannot but feel sad at parting for several 
years with so many associates and personal 
friends who have been so uniformly kind, but 
soon this feeling will give place to pleasurable 
recollections, which I shall carry with me 
wherever I go. 

I bid you one and all an affectionate adieu. 
May God bless you all. 



LIST OF NEW BOOKS ON 

ENGINEERING^ AND TECHNOLOGY, 



Architecture, Town and country mansions 
and suburban houses, with notes on the 
sanitary and artistic construction of houses. 
W. Young, New York. Fol. 30 plates. 
Spans. $12.50. 

Army Sacrifices ; or. Briefs from Official 
Pigeon-Holes. Sketches based on Official 
Reports, grouised together for the purpose 
of iliustratmg the services and experiences 
of the Regular Army of the United States 
on the Indian Frontier. Maj.-Gen. Jas. B. 
Fry, U. S. A. New York. 16mo. Van JVos- 
trand. $1.00. 



Canal and Culvert Tables, based on the for- 
mula of Kutter, under a modified classifica- 
tion. With explanatory text and examples. 
Louis D'A. Jackson. London. 8vo. W. H. 
Allen. 28s. 

Cast Iron Pipes. Ernest Benedict. New York. 
8vo. Spnns. $0.20. 

Catah gue. The American of books in print 

and for sale on July 1, 1876. Vol. 1. Au- 
thors and Titles. Parts 1 and 2. A. to 
Lennox. By F. Leypoldt and L. E. Jones. 
New York. Quarto. Letjpoldt. For the two 
volumes complete, $25.00. 



Coal, The History of ; lecture at King's 

College. T. VViltshire. Loudon and New 
York. 8vo. Sports. $0.40. 

-Corals and Coral Islands. Maps and illus. 
James G. Dana. New York. Dodd, JUead <£ 
Co. $3.50. 

Dampness, Traite complet sur I'humidite 
qui se fait sentir dans )a plupait dew habita- 
tions. P. Vieuot. Paris. 8vo. New York. 
Vati Nostrand. $1.00, 

Education as a Science. Alexander Bain. 
London. 8vo. C. K.Paul d Co. 5s. 

J£lectric Light. Farmer on the Electric Light; 
extracts from "The Speaking Telephone, 
Electric Light, and other recent electrical 
inventions." G.S. Prescott. Newport, R. I. 
8vo. C.E.Hammett. $0.15. 

Electric lighting. Useful information on 
practical electric lighting. Killingsworth 
Hedges. New York. 8vo. Spons. $0.40. 

Engineers', Architects' and Contractors' 
Pocket Book for 1879. London. 12mo, 
bound. Crosby Lockwood. 68. 

Euel: Its Combustion and Economy. Con- 
sisting of Abridgements of a Treatise on 
the Combusiion of Coal and the Prevention 
of Smnke, by C. W. Williams, and tie 
Economy of Fuel, by T. Symes Prideaux. 
With extensive Additions on Kece t Prac- 
tice in the Combustion and Economy of 
Fuel, ( oal. Coke, Wood, Peat, Petroleum, 
&c., by the Editor, D. Kinear Clark. 
(Weale's Series.) London. 12mo. Crosby 
Lockwood. Ab. 6d, 

Health, and How to Promote it. By Richard 
McSherry, M. D., President of the Balti- 
more Academy of Medicine, l'2mo. New 
York. Appteton. $1.25. 

, The Piiblic. Suggestions as to the 

Preparation ol District Maps and plans for 
Main Seweraue, Drainage and Water Sup- 
ply. With 18 Plans. ISoy. 8vo. R. Raw- 
linson. London. British Government Pub- 
lication. 3s. 

Illuminating: A Practical Treatise on the Art. 
By Marcus Ward, illuminator to the Queen. 
With 26 Examples of the Styles prevailing 
at the different Periods, from the Sixth 
Century to the Present Time; chromo- 
graphed in facsimile and in outline. Fcap, 
4to. London. Marcus Ward <t- Co. 5s. 

Iiithography: Grammar of Lithography. A 
Practical Guide for the Artist and Printer, 
in Commercial and Artistic Lithography, 
Zincography, Photolithoyruphy and Litho- 
graphic Machine Printing. Edited and re- 
vised, with an Introduction, by the Editor 
of "The Printing Preseaud Lithographer." 
Post 8vo. W. D. Richmond. Loudon. 
Wyman . 5s. 

Map Drawing; The parallel and meridional 
system. W.V.Marshall. 4to. New York. 
Barnes. $0.25. 

Mathematical Problems. Jos. Wastenholme. 
8vo. Loudon. 2d ed. enl. New York. 
Macmillan. $6.00. 

Mathematical Tables. James Pryde. New ed. 
12mo. Ediuburg. Chambers. New Y'ork, 
Worthinglon. $1.75. 

Municipal Corporations Companion, Diary, 
Directory, and Year-Book of Statistics for 
1879. 8vo. London. Walerlow. 5s. 

Physics, Pi actical Physics, Molecular Physics 
and Sound. (London Science Class Book.) 
F. Guthrie. 18mo. Loudon. Longman's. 
Is. 6d. 



Physical Forces, new and original theories. 

H. Raymond Rogers. 12mo. Dunkirk, N.Y. 

C. K. Abel (£■ ison. $0.60. 
Price Book for Builders and Contractors for 

1879. (Weale's Series.) 12mo. London. 

Lockwood. 3s. 6d. 
Science Text Books. 16mo, fully illustrated. 

New York. Ap/ileton : 

1. The Elements of Mechanism. By 

Professor T. M. Goodeve, M. A. 
$1 50. 

2. Metals ; Their Properties and Treat- 

ment. By Professor C. L. Bloxam. 
$1.50. 

3. Introduction to the Study of Inorganic 

Chemistry. By W. A. Miller, M. D., 

D. C. L., LL.D. $1.50. 

4. Theory of Heat. By Professor J. C. 

Maxwell, MA. . LL.D. $1.50. 

5. The Strength of Materials and Struc- 

tures. By J. Anderson, C. E., LL. D., 
F. K. S. E. $1.50. 

6. Electricity and Mignetiem. By Profes- 

sor F. Jeukin, F. R. SS. L. & E., M. I. 
C. E. |1 50. 

7. Work.shop Appliances, including Ma- 

chine-Tools used by Engineers. By 
C. P. B. Shelley, C. E. $1.50. 

8. Principles of Mechanics. By Professor 

T. M. Goodeve, M. A. $1.50. 

9. Introduction to the Study of Organic 

Chemistry. By Professor H. E. Arm- 
stroug. Ph. D., F. C. S. $1.50. 

10. Qualitative Chemical Analysis and La- 

boratory Practice. By Professor T. 

E. Thorpe, Ph. D., F.R.S.E., and M. 
M. P. Muir, F.R.S.E. $1.50. 

11. Telegraphy. By W. H. Preece, C. E., 

and J. Sivewright, M.A. $1.50. 

12. Railway Appliances. By J. W. Barry, 

C E $ 1 .50 

13. The Art of Electro-Metallurgy. By G. 

Gore, LL.D., F.R.S. $2.50. 

14. Introduction to the.'-tudyof Chemical 

Philosophy. By W. A. Tilden, D. Sc. 
Lond.,F.C.S. $1.50. 

15. The Elements of Machine Design. By 

Professor W. C. Unwin, C. E. $1.50. 

16. Treatise on Photography. By Captain 

W. De Wiveleslie Abney, F. R. S. 
$1 .50. 

17. The Study of Rocks ; an Elementary 

Text-Book of Petrology. By Frank 
Rutley, F.G.S., of H. M. Geological 
Survey. $ i .75. 

Steam Engine, Text-Book on the . 

T. M. Goodeve. 12mo, illus. New York. 
Van Aostrand. $2.50. 

Strensth of Materials. Wm. Kent. (Science 
Series No. 41.) 16mo. New York. Van 
Nostrand. $0.50. 

Telegraphy. Book for beginners. F. S. 
Beechey. 8vo. London and New York. 
Apons. $0.60. 

Turbine Wheels. On the inapplicability of 
the Theoretical Investigation of the Turbine 
Wheel as given by Rankine, Weisbach, 
Bresse and others, to the Modern Construc- 
tions introduced by Boyden and Francis. 
By Prof. W. P. Trowbridge. ISmo, illus- 
trated. (Science Series No. 44.) New York, 
Van A'ostrand. $0.50. 

Warming Buildings. Practical treatise on 
warming buildings by hot water, steam and 
hot air ventilation, and the various methods 
of distributing artificial heat, and their 



effects on animal and vegetable physiolopy ; 
[also] an inquiry into tbe laws of radiant 
and couductt'd beat, chemical constitution 
of coal, and combustion of smoke. C. 
Hood. 5tli ed., enl. 8vo, illus. New York. 
Spans. $4.25. 
Woods, Native and Foreign. Les Bois Indi- 
genes et Etrangers : Leur Phjsiologie, Cul- 



ture, Production, Qualites, Defauts, Statis- 
tique, etc. I'ar Alph. E. Dupont. Ingenieur 
des Constructions Navales. et Bouquet de 
la Grye, Conservateur des Forets. Un Vo- 
lume in S°, orne de l(;2Gravnre8. Prix. 12fr. 
Year book of facts in Science and the Arts for 
lb78. J. Mason. 8vo. Loudon. Ward <£ 
Lock. 28. 6d. 



ADDITIONS TO 

LIBRARY AND MUSEUM. 



From Administration des Fonts et 
Chausees, Paris : 
Aanales, January, 1879. 

From American Institute of Mining 
Engineers, Thomas M. Drown, Secre- 
tary, Easton. Pa.: 
Transactions, Vol. VI. May 1877, to February, 
1878. 

From Geo. D. Ansley, City Surveyor, 
Montreal, Canada : 
Report of the City Surveyor of Montreal, for 
1878. 

From Argentine Scientific Society, Don 
Felix Amoretti, Secretary, Buenos 
Ayres : 
Annals ot the Society. December, 1878. 
January, 1879. 

From Austrian Society of Engineers and 
Architects, Vienna, Austria ; 
Zeitschrilt. Dr. Wilhelm Fiuter, Kedaktor. 
Part XII. 1878. Part I. 1879. 

From Board of Water Commissioners, 
Biittalo, N. Y : 
Tenth Annual Report of Buffalo City Water 
Works. Buffalo. 1879. 

From Robert Briggs, Philadelphia : 
Machines for making Ice, using Sulphurous 
Acid or Ammonia in the process. Robert 
Briggs. Philadelphia. 1870, 

From W. E C. Coxe, Philadelphia : 
Eeport of 'he President and Managers of the 
Philadelphia and Reading Railroad Co. 
Philadelpliia. 1879. 

From J. James R. Croes, New York : 
Annual Report of the Newark, N. J., Aciuediict 
Board, for the year ending November 30th, 
1878. Newark'. 1878, 
One Photograph " Mattrass Revetment," on 
the upper Missouri River in 1878, in charge 
of S. H. Yonge, Asst. U. S. Civil Engineer. 
From Joseph P. Davis, City Engineer, 
Boston : 
Annual Report of the City Engineer of Bos- 
ton, lor 1878. 

From Fred, do Funiak, Louisville, Ky. : 
Annual Report of the Louisville and Nash- 
ville Railroad Co. June 30th, 1878. 
Cost of road repairs for six months, ending 
December 31, 1878. Lou. and Nash., and 
South and North Ala. Railroads. 
Itemized statement of car repairs, and ex- 
penses lor six months, ending December 



31, 1878. Lou. and Nash, and South and 
North Ala. Railroads. 

From Franklin Institute, Philadelphia: 
Journal of the Institute for January and Feb- 
ruary, 1879. Philadelphia. 1879. 

From F. U. Farquhar, Rock Island, 111.: 
Annual Report of tbe Railroad Conjmissiouers 
of Minnesota, for 1875. J. J. Randall. St. 
Paul. 187fi. 
Second Annual Report of the Geological and 
Natural History Survey of Minnesota. St. 
Paul. 1874. 
Report of the Canal Commissioners of Minne- 
sota, t( r 1875. St. Paul. 1876. 
Second Annual Report of the State Fish Com- 
missioners ot Minnesota. St. Paul. 1876. 
Statistics of Minnesota, for 1871, 1872, 1873 

and 1874. 
Annual Report of the Board of Regents of the 
University of Minnesota. 1872 and 1874. 
First, Second, Fourth, Fifth, Sixth and 
Seventh Annual Reports of the St. Paul, 
Minn., Chamber of Commerce. 
Peat for Domestic Fuel. S. F. Peckham. 
Minneapolis. 1874. 

From Hon. A. A. Haggett, Lowell, 
Mass. : 
Sixth Annual Report of the Lowell Water 
Board. Lowell. 1S79. 

From Hon. Abram S. Hewitt, New York; 
Our National Inheritence. and bow to enjoy it. 
Abraham S. Hewitt. Washington. 1879. 
(Copies for distribution.) 

From General A. A. Humphreys, Chief 
of Engineers, U. S. A., Washington, 
D. C. : 
Cost of Lake Survey. Gen. C. B. Comstock. 

(2 conies.) 
Estima'tes for continuing the improvement of 
tbe White and St. Francis Rivers, the I'An- 
quilla River, and tbe Buffalo Shoals in 
White River. Maj. W. H. H. Benyaurd. (2 
copies.) 
Information in relation to tbe progress and 
present status of the work on tbe canal and 
locks at tbe Cascades of tbe Columbia 
River. Maj. G. L. Gillesine. (2 copies.) 
Information of the result of the survey of 
Portage Lake, Michigan. Col. S. M. Mans- 
field. (2 copies.) 
Information in relation to the improvement 
of the sanitary condition of Washington, 
and deepening the river channel. S. 
Thayer Abert. (2 copies.) 



10 



Information as to the results of examination 
of Wolt River, from Lake Paygau to Red 
River, WiBconsin. Col. J). C, Houston. 
(2 copies ) 

A report upon the examination of Apalachi- 
cola River and Bay. Capt. A. N. Dumrell. 
(2 copies.) 

Report upon the harbor of Buvlingtou and 
Rush Chute, Iowa. Col. F. U. Farquhar. 
(2 copies.) 

The Report upon the Chesapeake and Delaware 
Ship Canal. Col. W. P. Craighill. (2 copies.) 

Repoi ts upon the results of examinations of 
the Chickasaha, Pascagoulaaud Flint Rivers. 
(2 copies.) 

Iteport in relation to removal of the wreck of 
the schooner Addie Walton, from Delaware 
Bay. Gen. J. N. Macomb. (2 copies.) 

Report upon the harbor at the Delaware 
Breakwater. Gen. A. A. Humphreys. (2 
copies.) 

Reports upon proposed improvements in the 
Delaware, at or near Schooner Ledge. Gen. 
J. N. Macomb. (2 copies.) 

Report on improvemeut of Illinois River and 
Illinois and Michigan Canal. Capt. G. J. 
Lydecker. (2 copies.) 

Report on survey of the Kankakee River. 
Maj. J. A. Smith, (2 copies.) 

Report upon Kansas and Arkansas Rivers. 
Maj. C. K. Suter. (2 copies ) 

Eeport upon surveys of Long Island Coast. 
Gen. John Newton. (2 copies.) 

Report iu relation to the amount of appro- 
priation necassary to complete the break- 
water and piers at the harbor, of Michigan 
City, lud. Maj. J. A. Smith. (2 copies.) 

.Preliii.iuary Report ou the survey of the Mis- 
souri River, from its mouth to Sioux City, 
Iowa. Maj. C. R. Suter (2 copies.) 

Report upon survey of Missouri River at 
Saint Charles, Mo. Maj. C. R. Suter. (2 
copies.) 

Report of surveys of North Landing River, 
Onaucock Harbor and Nottaway River, Va., 
and Pedee, Trent, Neuse. Chowan and Tar 
Rivers in North Carolina. Capt. C. B. 
Philips. (2 copies.) 

A Report upon the examination of the flats of 
the Potomac River. Col. T. Lincoln Casey. 
(2 copies.) 

Reports uijon the Harbors of San Luis Obispo, 
Santa Barbara and San Buenaventura, and 
Humboldt River. (2 copies.) 

A Report upon an examination of the Savan- 
nah River above Augusta, Ga. Gen. Q. A. 
Gillmore. (2 copies.) 

Results of an examination made of the Mis- 
soui'i River at and near its junction with the 
Kansas River, and the estimated cost of its 
improvemeut. Maj. C. R. Suter. (2 copies.) 

The Work upon Hoaid's Rocks, Blonongahela 
River. Col. Wm. E. Merrill. (2 copies.) 
From Institution of Civil Engineers, 
publications edited by James Forrest, 
Secretary, London, as follows : 

Abstracts of Papers in Foreign Transactions 
and Periodicals. Vol. LV. Session 1878-9. 
Part 1. 

Engineering Progress in Foreign Countries. 
Vernon-Harcourt, Clark, Bauerman and 
Higgs. 

Harbor and Dock Works; 

(L) The Avoumouth Dock. ' J. Mackensie. 
(2.) The River Lagan and Harbor of Belfast. 
Thomas R. Sulmoud. 



(3.) Whitehaven Harbor. John. E. Wil- 
liams. 
On the Heating and Ventilating Apparatus of 
the Glasgow University. W. W. Phipson. 
From the Institution of Mechanical En- 
gineers, Walter R. Browne, Secretary, 
London : 
Proceedings of the Institute, July 28th and 
29th, 1868. 

From yVm. Ripley Nichols, Boston : 
Chemical Examinations of Sewer Air. Prof. 
Wm. Ripley Nichols, Boston. 1879. 
From Edward P. North. New York ; 
Official Catalogue of the United States Ex- 
hibitors at the Paris Universal Exposition. 
London, 1878. 

From the North of England Institute of 

Mining and Mechanical Engineers, 

Theo.Wood Running, Secretary, New- 

castle-on-Tyne, England : 

Transactions of the Institute, December, 1878. 

From Ernest Pontzen. Paris ; 
Maison Speciale pour I'application de la pres- 
sion Hydraulique a toute iudustrie. H. 
Thomasset. Paris, 1878. 

From W. N. Radenhurst, Rochester, 
N. Y. : 
Report of State Engineer for 1878. Horatio 
Seymour, Jr. Albany. 1879. 

From John Reid, Paterson, N. J. : 
Two Photographs, Iron Work Construction, 
Seventh Kegimeut Armory, New York City, 
C. W. Clinton, Architect. 

From the Publishers, Revue General 
des Chemins de fer. Edgar Moujean, 
Secretary, Paris : 
RevueGeneral des Chemins defer. December, 
1878. 

From William Rotch, Fall River, Mass.: 
Fifth Annual Report of Watuppa Water 
Board. Fall River. 1879. 

From the Royal United Service Institu- 
tion, Capt. B. Burgess, Secretary, 
London : 
Journal of the Institution, No. XCVIII, "Vol. 
XII. 

From John Russell, San Francisco: 
Municipal Reports of San Francisco. 1877-8. 
From Wm. B. Sherman, New Bedford, 
Mass. ; 
Ninth Annual Report of the Acushnet Water 
Board. New Bedford. 1878. 

From Societe des Ingenieurs Civils, 
Paris: 
Memoires. September and October, 1878. 

From R. H. Thurston, Hoboken, N. J.: 
Address before the American As.--ociation for 

the Advancement of Science, at the meeting 

held in St. Louis, Auaust, 1878. Prof. R. 

H. Thurston. Salem, Mass. 1878. 
Friction and its Laws, as determined by 

recent experimeiit. Prof. R. H. Thurston. 

Salem Mass. 1878. 
New determinations of the coefficients of 

Friction of Lubricated Journals, and on the 

law governing such friction. Prof. R. H. 

Thurston. Philadelphia. 1878. 

From George E. Waring, Jr., Newport, 
R. I.; 
Irvingtou Sanitary Survey. An examination 

as to local causes of fcver and ague on the 



11 



east bank of the Hudson River from Dobb's 
Ferry ti> Tarrytowu, with recom'iiendations 
for improvement. Geo. E. Waring, Jr. 
New York. 1879. 

From Joseph M. Wilson, Philadelphia: 

Notes on the Internal Improvements of Penn- 
sylvania, and Reminiscences of the first 
railroad over the Allegheny Mountains. 
W. Hasell Wilson and Solomon W. Roberts. 
Philadelphia. 1879. 
From Wilson Brothers & Co., Philadelphia: 

Two plates of Bridi>e "^ver Pennsylvania R. 
E. at Belmont Avenue, Philadelphiii. 

Two plaes of Bridge over Pennsylvania R. 
R. at Fortieth Street, Philadelphia. 

Two plates of Bridge over Pennsylvania R. 
R. at Forty-first Street, Philadelphia. 

Two plates of Span No. 1 of the Morrisville 



Bridge, New York Division, Pennsylvania 
R.R. 

Two plates of Suspension Bridge (Ordish's 
System) over the Pennsylvania R. R., Forty- 
first Street, Fliladelphia. 

Two plates of Jersey City Station, Pennsyl- 
vania R. R. 

Two plates of Passenger Station, Baltimore 
and Potomac R. R. 

Two plates of West Philadelphia Station, 
Pennsylvania R. R. 

From F. Leypoldt, New York: 
The American Catal'igne, Vol. 1, Authors and ' 

Titles. Part 2. Edwards— Lennox. 
The Library Journal, Nos. 1 and 2, Vol. IV. 
The Library Journal, Index to Vol. Ill, 

March. 1878. December, 1878. 
The Title slip Regisiry, Vol. I, Nos. 1 and 2. 



ANNOUNCEMENTS. 



The Eleventh Annual Convention of the 
Society will be held at Cleveland, June 
17th, 1879. Announcement as to the details 
of programme and proceedings will be issued 
in a short time. 

Copies of the Speech made in Congress by 
Hon. Abram S. Hewitt upon the subject of 
the Public Lands and their Surveys have been 
kindly sent to the Society by the author and 
mailed to the members. 

The following resolution was adopted at the 
Ninth Annual Convention of the Society, and 
ordered printed regularly in the Society pub- 
lications: 

Whereas, the metric system of weights and 
measures is now extensively used abroad, 
and whereas it is desirable that the relation 
of the units of differing systems be made 
familiir to all by comparison: 



Resolved, That members be requested, in 
papers hereafter pi-esented to the Society, to 
write, in parenthesis, weights or dimensions 
by the metric system, in connection with 
those of the system in general use. 

The House of the Society is at 104 East 
Twentieth street, one door from Fourth 
avenue, and near the southwest corner of 
Gramercy Park. It is open from nine o'clock 
A.M. to five o'clock p.m. each business day, 
except Saturday, when it is closed at three 
o'clock p. M. 

The Library and Conversation Rooms will 
also, for the present, be open every Thursday 
evening, from 71^ to 10 p. m. Members are 
invited to avail themselves of the oppor- 
tunities afforded on Thursday evenings both 
for consultation of books and periodicals and 
for conversation . 



LIST OF MEMBERS, 



Egleston, Thomas. 



Date of Election. 



ADDITION'S. 
MExMBERS. 

. Professor of Mineralogy and Metallurgy, 
School of Mines, Columbia College, 
35 West Washington Square, New 
York March 5th, 1879. 



12 

Date of Election. 
Osgood, Joseph O (Elected Junior May 3d, 1876), Division 

Engineer Pueblo and Arkansas Valley 

Railroad, Canon City, Colorado March 5th, 1879. 

JUNIOR. 

Allen, James P Civil Assistant Engineer U. S. Corps of 

Engineers, care of Maj. F. U. Far- 

quhar, Rock Island, 111 March 5th, 1879. 



CHANGES AND CORRECTIONS. 
MEMBERS. 

AucHiNCLOSS, William S. 200 West Logan Square, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Clarke, Thomas C 71 Broadvi^ay, Room 72, New York. 

Fink, Rudolph General Manager, Memphis and Little Rock Railroad, 

Little Rock, Ark. 

Flint, Edward A 11 Tremont Bank Building, Boston, Mass. 

Nichols, Othniel F. . . .Box 229, Westerly, Rhode Island. 

Roberts, W. Milnor. . . .Care of O. C. James, Caixa N. 721, Rio de Janeiro, 

Brazil. 
Smith, Hamilton, Jr. .. .Civil and Mechanical Engineer, Room 24, 320 Sansom 

St., San Francisco, Cal. 
Van Burex, JohnD., jr. . 10 West Thirtieth st.. New York. 

JUNIOR. 

Staats, Robert P 169 West Twelfth st., New York. 



deceased. 



Craven, Alfred W President of the Society from Novem- 
ber 3, 1869, to November i, 1871.. .March 27th, 1879. 




mrncan jJimtq 4 Urn triQmm, 



PROcEEDiisras. 



Vol. V. — February, 1879. 

[Up to May 15th, 1879.] 



MINUTES OJb^ MEETINGS 

(Abstract of such as may be of general interest to members.) 



OF THE SOCIETY. 

April 16th, 1879. — The Society met at 8 p. m. Past President 
George S. Greene, in the chair. 

A paper, entitled "The Construction and Maintenance of Roads," 
by Edward P. North, was read by the author. 

The discussion of the i^aper was postponed to a future meeting. 

May 7th, 1879.— The Society met at 8 p. m. Mr. Charles Macdonald 
in the chair. 

The ballot for membership was canvassed, and the following candi- 
dates declared elected : — As Members — Daniel P. Bruner (elected 
Junior, September 6th, 1876), Harrisburg, Pa.; Thomas G. Dabney, 
United States Engineer in charge of Harbor Works, Vicksburgh, Miss. ; 
Henry B. Richardson, Assistant State Engineer, Louisiana Board of 
State Engineers, St. Joseph, La. ; Max E. Schmidt, Chief Assistant En- 
gineer South Pass Jetty Works, Port Eads, La. As Associate — Percival 
Roberts, Jr., Pencoyd Iron Works, Philadelphia, Pa. 

On motion of Theodore Cooper, the minutes of the meeting of 
the Society of April 2d (Vol. V, p. 5, seventh line from bottom), were 
amended by inserting as follows : ' ' Mr. Cooper withdrew the motion, as 
he considered the expression of the members during the discussion was 
sufficiently expressive without bringing the result to a vote; and not 
being aware of the action of the Board of Direction until after the reso- 



14 

hitiou had been oifered, he did not wish to develox^ by a vote an expi'es- 
siou of the opinion of the meeting in opposition to the action of the 
Board." 

The' action of the Board of Direction in reference to notices of arrears 
of dues and as to publication of Proceedings and Transactions was re- 
ported. (See Minutes of Board of Direction of April 30th, below.) 

The following preamble and resohitiou were then discussed and 
passed : 

Whereas, Every possible effort should be made to increase the sphere 
of usefulness of the Society, and to enlarge its membership as well as to 
promote active intercourse between all its members, therefore, be it 

Resolved, That the following suggestions and such others as may be 
submitted, be printed and distributed among the members, with the 
request that they shall favor the Secretary as soon as possible with their 
opinions, as well as with such other suggestions as they may wish to 
offer, so that action upon the same may be taken at the next convention. 

Suggestions. 

1st. That provision be made for the holding, in addition to the an- 
nual convention, a number of general meetings in various cities in each 
year, for professional intercourse. 

2d. That papers be annually invited from members or other persons 
upon subjects of general engineering interest, to be specified by the 
Board of Direction. 

3d. That a system be established to award special recognition for the 
best papers contributed each year. 

4th. That present members be encouraged to proi^ose worthy persons 
for new members, associates, and fellows. 

5th. That to promote the discussion of papers, advance copies be 
issued to such members or other persons as may be specially qualified to 
take part in the same, or to members applying for them in order to take 
part in the discussion. 

6th. That members be encouraged to make use of the facilities of the 
Society in New York for obtaining professional information. 

7th. That tliL- Juibrary Committee be requested to report whether 
some plan may not be adopted to enable members living away from New 
York to consult the books of the Library, under proper regulations to 
ensure their return and to prevent injury. 

8th. That suggestions be invited from members as to the feasibility 
of adopting some plan of affiliation with local engineers' clubs in other 
cities. 

9th. That the desirability be discussed of appointing Research Com- 
mittees, whose diities shall be to collect the results of existing experi- 
ments oh any siabject, and to suggest what further experiments are 
necessary, and also to collate such professional papers as may have been 
published elsewhere. 



15 

OF THE BOAED OF DIEEOTION. 

Januaky 3d, 1879. — Applications for membership were considered. 
The filing of the annual certificate reipiired by statute was reported by 
the Secretary. Approi^riations were made. 

Ffbettaky 5th, 1879. — Applications for membership Avere considered, 
and financial business transacted. 

Makch 6th, 1879. — -Applications for membership were considered. 
Approisriations were made. 

April 2d, 1879. — Applications for membership were considered. 
Financial business was transacted. A resolution was adopted as to 
publications of Transactions and Proceedings (printed in Minutes of 
the Society for April 2d, 1879, Proceedings, Vol. V, page 5). 

Apeiij 30th, 1879. — Applications for membership were considered. 
The Treasurer reported the number of members in arrears for dues, and 
the amount owing to the Society by its members. The following reso- 
lution was passed : 

Eesolved, That the Secretary be directed to notify all members in 
arrears that unless the dues for the current Society year, beginning 
November 6th, 1»78, are paid before November 5th, 1879, they will cease 
to be members. 

Also, that members who are in arrears for more than the dues for the 
current year, be notified that their dues for years i)revious to the current 
year are still to be paid, and that payment of the same will be required, 
unless good reason to the contrary, in compliance with the provisions of 
Article XXXII, of the Constitution, be assigned before November 5th, 
1879. 

The resolution referred to the Board at the meeting of the Society of 
April 2d, and the former action of the Board on the subject of publica- 
tion of the Transactions and Proceedings, were considered, and the fol- 
lowing resolution was adopted : 

That business proceedings are not to be reported for the public 
press. Abstracts of the papers read and discussions thereon, giving the 
general tenor of the paj^ers, etc. , may be jiublished. 

Appropriations were made. 



LIST OF NEW BOOKS ON 

ENGINEERING AND TECHNOLOGY. 



Alphabets, Prang's Standard ; Designs for permission, from the works of Kuglp.r, 

titles, colored initials, borders, compass Lnbke. Bnrckhardt, Overbeck, DoLme, 0. 

points, topographical signs, the State Arms Von Lntzow, t'alke, Woltmanu, La roix, 

of the Union, etc. Especially adapted for etc. Chronologically arranged. Authorized 

the use of sigQ-) ainters. engraver-, iUnnii- American edition, published under the 

nators, architects and civil engineers. 42 supervision of S. 14. Koehler. Boston, 

plates, 14 in color. Boston. Jr'rang <£• Co. Frang it Co. 
S-'i.OO Tlje complete work w'll cousist of the fol- 

Art ; Illustrations of the History of — . A lowing series : 

series of above 2 000 woodcuts, selected, by I. Architecture, Sculpture, and the Indus. 



16 



trial Arts among the Nations of Antiquity. 
39 plates. $1.50. 

II. Architecture and Sculpture of the Early 
Christian, Komauesque, and Gothic Pe- 
riods. Architecture and Ornamentation 
of the Mohamedau Nations. 57 plates. 
$2.25. 

III. Architecture and !-culpture of the Be- 
naissauce Period and of the Modern 
Times. 48 plates. .1i2.0ii. 

IV. TLie Industrial Arts among the Oriental 
Nations and the Nations of Eiu'ope. troni 
the Middle Ages down to Modern Times. 
42 plate><. $1.75. 

v. The History of Painting, from the Time 
of the Egyptians 'o the Close of the 18th 
Ceuiury." (iO plates. $2.50. 
Size of plate 17,,\12. Each of these series is 
complete ill itself, and is sold separately. 
Astrolaiie ; Ou CLiamplain's — , lost June 8th, 
1613. found August, 1867 ; cons dered in 
solution ot an obscurity iu his journal of 
first voyage up theOtlowa; and the great 
antiquity uf astrolabes, and origin of their 
graduation. 24 p.. maps and phot. A. J. 
Kussell, 8vo. Montreal. Dawion Bros. 
$0.50. 
Building Construction ; Notes on — . Part 3, 
Ma eriuls. 8vo. London. Rivingtnns. 2 Is. 
Buildings for Laboring Classes ; the need, 
and way to meet it ou strict commercial 
principles, in New York and other cities. 
New Ynrk. J'utnams 8vo. $0 ;W. 
Caual Heminisceuces: reitollecticms of travel 
iu the old days on the James River and Ka- 
nawha Caual. Q. W. Bagley. Biihmoud, 
Va V2mo., W' St. J hn sen d- On. $0 2i). 
Carpenters' and Builders' Guide. L. D. 
Gould. Rev. Ed. 8vo illus. New York. 
Bicknell d- Cimstack. $3.0.'. 
Circle: Tbe System of Calculating Diameter, 
Circumference. Area, and Squaring the Cir- 
cle; with tables and iniormition. James 
Mortem. Philadelphia. Claxton, Remsen <£• 
H a tfel finger. $1,00. 
Club Directory: A General Guide or Index to 
the London and County Clubs, and those of 
Scotland, Ireland and British Colonial Pos- 
sessions; together with the English Clubs 
in Europe, the United >states, and elsewhere 
throughout the world; their Constitution, 
Amount of Entrance Fee and Subscrip- 
tion, Names of Trustees and Secretaries, 
together with otber useful iulorniation ; the 
whole interspersed with amusing and iuter- 
estina Anecdotes collected with some 
amount of labor from vari'us sources. G. 
J. Ivevy London 8vo. Harrison. 5s 
Color-sense; its origin and development. 
Grant Allen Boston. 8vo. Hnughttm, Os- 
good d Co. $3.50. 

Color, the theory of — , in its relation to Art 
and Art industry. W. Von Bezold. Trans. 
by S. B. Koehler. Boston. 12mo, illus. 
and plates. L. Prang d Co. $.'i 00. 
Drainage. Hints (ii House Drainage, for 
o«ners, occupants and builders. H. Oiigh. 
8vo illiis. Spans. London. 6d. New 
Yoik 20cts. 
Draining for profit and draining for health. 
G. E. Waring, Jr. 12mo, illus., 2d ed., 
rev. and enl. New York. Orange Judd d 
Co. $150. 
Education as a Science. By Alexander Bain, 
LL.D. Number 25 of "The International 
Scientific Series." 12mo. New Y'ork. Ap- 
pLetons. $1.75. 



Healthy Houses. Fleming Jenkin. Adap- 
ted to American conditions, by G. E. War- 
ing, Jr. New York. Harpers. 25cts. 
Health Primers. No. 5. Personal appearance 
in health and disease. Sidney Coupland, 
M D. No. 6. Baths and Bathing. New 
Y'ork. 16mo. Apjdftons. Each 40cts. 
Lighthouses and Lightships. A Descriptive 
and Historical Account of their Mode of 
Construction and Organiz ition. W. H. D. 
Adams. Illus. from Photographs, &c. 
Post, 8vo. London. Aelson d Sons. 
3s. 6d. 
Locomotive Engines. A Historical Sketch 
and Descri|tion, by G. D. Dempsey, C. E. 
With large Additions, treating of the 
Moilern Locomotive, by D. Kinnear Clark, 
M.I.C.E. Weales Series. London. Crosby 
Lockw od. 3s. 6d. 
Mecbanical Engineering ; Tables of principal 
speeds occurring iu mechanical engineer- 
ing, expressed in metres, iu a second, by 
P. Keerayefif, tr. by Sergius Kern. L"ndon, 
8vn. Sp'ons. 6d. 
Mechanics' Reference Book ; Calverts ; Pract- 
ical and Entertaining Information for 
Handicraftsmen : Being tlie whole Series 
of Calvert's Mechanii-s' Almanack, troni the 
Commencement, 1874 to 1879, inclusive. 
Also a Practical Treatise on Decimal Arith- 
metic, Tables, &c.. to which is added a 
speciallv compiled List of Teclmical Books. 
London. Post. 8vo. J. Heywood. 3s 6d. 
Pebbles. Alpheus Hyatt ( iuides for Science- 
teaching iSo. 1). Boston. Ginn d Heath. 
$0.15. 
Pennsylvania Raih'oad in its engineering 
aspect. Jas. Dredge. New York. 4to. 
Wilei/. $15 (to. 
Railroad Accidents ; their causes and preven- 
tion. Charles Francis Adams. New York. 
12mo. f'uinams. (Aun(Hincemeiit ) 
Railroad Securities, A Treatise on the Law of 
Railroad and other Corporate Securities, in- 
cluding Municipal Aid Bonds. Leonard A. 
Johes. Boston. 8vo. Houghton, Osgood d 
Co. $6.50. 
Rocks, The Study of Uocks. An Elementary 
Text-book in Petrology By Frank Rut y, 
of the English Geological Survey. New 
volume in •' Text-Books of Science Series." 
16mo, illus. New York. Appletons. $1.75. 
Road Loccnnotives. A summary of the Roads 
Locomotive Acts, 1861, 1H65 and 1878, in 
Force in England and Scotland. Compiled 
for the Use of R lad Locomotive Engine 
Proprietors and Users. 18inn, pp. 24, 
Groom iTlietford) Mmpkin. Loudon. 6d. 
Road Maintenance ; The miiintenance of 
Macadamise roads. Thomas Codrington. 
Loud n 8vo. S/ions. 6d. 
Rule ; Spiral slide — equivalent to a straight 
slide rule 83 leet 4 inches long, or a 
circular rule 13 feet 3 inches in diameter 
(patent). By G. Fuller. Fcap, 8vo. Spotis. 
New York. $0.20. 
Sewage Poison ; how to avoid it in the 
cheapest and best way. Ed. T. Blake. 
London. 8vo. Hurdwicke d B'igue, Is. 

Stemn Engine. Marine . Robert 

Murray. (Weale's Series.) New ed. l2mo. 
Crosby Lm kwood. 3s. 

Catechism cf the Marine Steam 

Eneiiie. for the use of entrineprs firemen, 
mechanics. By Emory £d« aids. Illus by 
ens. of luost modern engines. 12m. Phila- 
delphia. H. C. Baird. $2.00. 



17 



Tnisses and Arches analyzed and discussed 
by fji-npliical methods. In three parts. 
Part II : Bridge trusses, single, continnouB 
and draw spans : single and multiple system ; 
straight and iuclined chords. C. E. Greene. 
New York. Ifimo. Plates. Wil>-y. $2..')0. 

Tunnelling in Heavy Ground, for Hallways. 
C. T. Giipper. Loudon. 8vo. Spans. Is. 6d. 



Water; On the quantity and qita'ity of water 
siipplied to Loudon during 1878 Charles 
M. Tidy. London. 8vo. Churchill. Cd. 

Water Pipes; The kitchen boi'er and water 
pipe«: their arrangement and management, 
their treatment during frost, and how to 
avoid explosions. By H. Grimsbaw. 8vo. 
Spons. Loudon. Is. New York. $0.40. 



ANNOUNCEMENTS. 



The Eleventh Annual Convention of 
the Society will he held at Cleveland, begin- 
ning Tuesday, June 17th, 1879. 

Sessions for the consideration of profes- 
sional subjects, and one for the transaction 
of business will be held. 

The details of the programme will be an- 
nounced as soon as determined by the local 
committee. 

The following is a list of topics to be con- 
sidered with reference to papers published 
in Transactions during the preceding year: 

American Engineering at International 

EXHIBITIOhS. 

CLXXIV. American Engineering as illus- 
trated at the Paris Exposition of 1878. 
George S. Morison, Edward P. North and 
John Bogart. 

Bridges. 
Discussion of Paper CXL. The De- 
termination of Stresses in the Eye-Bar 
Head. De Volson Wood. Vol. VII, page 
189. 

Discussion of Papers CXLIV and 

CXLIX. Relative Quantities of Material 
in Bridges of different kinds, of varioun 
heights. V/illiam H. Searles. Vol. VII, 
page 192. 

Cements. 

Discussion on Cements. Don J. 

Whittemore. Vol. VII, page 274. 

Discussion on Cements and Strength 

of Bricks. F. CoUingwood. Vol. VII, 
page 2S0. 

FODNDATIONS. 

CLXXII. The use of Compressed Air in 
Tubular Foundations, and its application 
at South Street Bridge, Philadelphia, Pa. 
D. McN. Stauffer. 

Hydeaulics. 

CLX. Oq the Cause of the Maximum 
Velocity of Water flowing in Open Chan- 
nels being below the Surface. James B. 
Francis. 

CLXI. The Flow of Water in Pipes under 
Pressure . Charles G. Darrach. 



the 



Discussion on the Cause i>f 

Maximum Velocity of Water flowing in 
Open Channels being below the Surface, 
and also on the Flow of Water in Pipe s 
under Pres-ure. Theo. G. Ellis, C. E. 
Emery, Clemens Herschel, De Volson 
Wood and JoLn T. Fanning. Vol. VII., 
page 122. 
CLX V II. Distribution of Rain-fall during 
the great storm of October 3d and 4th, 
]8i')9. James B. Francis. 
CLXVIII. The Gauging of Streams. Clemens 

Herschel. 
CLXXV. The Flow of Water in Small Chan- 
nels, alter Ganguillet and Kutter, with 
Kutter's Diagiam modified, and Graphical 
Tables with special reference to Sewer 
Calculations. R. Hering. 

Masonry. 

CLXX. Brick Arches for Large Sewers. 
R. Hering. 

Discussion on Brick Arches for Large 

Sewers. E. S. Chesbrougli, W. Milnor 
Roberts, R. Hering and F. CoUingwood. 
Vol. VII., page 258. 

CLXXI. Fall of Western Arched Approach 
to South Street Bridge, Philadelphia, Pa 
D. McN. Staufler. 

Discussion on Nomenclature of Build- 
ing Stones and Stone Masonry. J. Poster 
Flagg. J. J. R. Croes, J. P. Davis, F. Col- 
lingwood, J. Veazie and E. P. North. Vol. 
VII., page 284. 
Metals. 

CLXIII. On a newly discovered relation 
between the Tenacity of Metals and their 
resistance to Torsion. Robert H. 
Thurston. 

CLXIV. Observations on the Stresses ' 
developed in Metallic Bars by Applied 
Forces. Theodore Cooper. 
Preservation of Timber. 

CLXXVI. The Permanent Way of Rail- 
ways in Great Britain and Ireland, with 
special reference to the use of Timber, 
preserved and unpreserved. Compiled 
from information received from Engineers 



18 



in charge of those railways. Joliu 
Bogart. 
Railroads. 

CLIX. On the Theoretical Resistance of 
Railroad Curves, S. Whinery. 

Discussion on the Resistance of Rail- 
road Curves. O. Chanute, Chas. E. 
Emery, E. Yardley, E. P. North. C. L. 
McAliDine, F. Colliugwood and Wm. H. 
Paine. Vol. VII, page 97. 

OLXVI. Reminiscences and Experiences 
of Early Engineering Operations on Rail- 
roads, with especial reference to Steep 
Inclines. W. Milnor Roberts. 

Discussions on Inclined Planes for 

Railroads. O. Chanute and William H. 
Paine. Vol. VII., page 216. 

RiVEBS AND HaKBOB.S. 

CLXII. The South Pass Jetties. Descrip- 
tive and Incidental Notes and Memoranda. 
E. L. Corthell. 

Discussions on the South Pass Jetties. 

Charles W. Howell, E. L. Corthell, C. 
Shaler Smith, J. Foster Flagg. Vol. VII, 
page 159. 
CLXIX. The Dangers threatening the Nav- 
igation of the Mississippi River and the 
Reclamation of its Alluvial Lands. B. M. 
Harrod. 
Steam Engines. 
CLXV. Cushioning the Reciprocating Parts 
of Steam Engines. John W. Hill. 

Discussion on Steam Engine Economy, 

J. Foster Flagg and E. D. Leavitt, Jr. 
Vol VII, page 194. 
Submarine Telephony. 
CLXXIII. Submarine Telephoning. Chas. 

Ward Raymond. 
In addition to the above papers, it is ex- 
pected that the following subjects will be pre- 
sented by papers printed previous to the date 
of the Convention, or read at its meeting: 
Engineering Questions involved in the Dev- 
elopment of Electric Lighting. Stephen 
Chester. 
Gelatine Dynamite and High Explosives. 

Ju'ius H. Striedinger. 
Lighthouse Construction. J. G. Barn rd. 
Memoir upon the Construction of the 

Mlnots Ledge Light. B. S. Alexander. 
The Construction and Maintenance of 

Roads. Edward P. North. 
The Resistances of Railway Rolling Stock. 

A. M. Wellington. 
The Railroad Crossing of the Allegheny 

Mountain. Moncure Robmson. 
Notes on Early Railroad Engineering. 
Ashbel Welch. 



Remarks on the Causes of Fall of the 
Western Arched Approach to South Street 
Bridge, Philadelphia, Pa. J, G. Barnard. 

Parabolic Arches in Masonry. W. A. G. 
Emonts. 

Notes on the Foundations of Piers of the 
East River Bridge. F. Collingwood. 

Experiments with Cements and appliances 
for testing. Alfred Noble. 

Comparison of Standard Measures, English, 
French and United States. Arthur S. C. 
Wurlele. 

The Construction of Concrete Blocks at the 
end of the South Pass Jetties. Max E. 
Schmidt. 

Notes as to construction and operation of 
the Railroad over the Raton Mountains, 
Col., and the construction and perform- 
ance of the Locomotives thereon. James 
D. Burr. 

Design and Construction Tables for Egg- 
shaped Sewers. Cyrus G. Force, Jr. 

Members of the Society are earnestly re- 
quested to furnish information or memoranda 
upon any of the subjects referred to. They 
are also invited and expected to take part in 
the discussions either in person or by sending 
to the Secretary notes for presentation. 

In either case, it will assist the Committee 
in arranging the details for sessions of the 
Convention, if Members expecting to take part 
in the discussions will notify the Secretary at 
once to that effect . 

Excursions upon the Lake and by rail from 
Cleveland are contemplated, and the arrange- 
ments for them are in progress. 

Invitation to visit Pittsburg and the Govern- 
ment Works for the improvement of the river 
at that place (Davis Island Dam), has been ex- 
tended by James H. Harlow, Member of the 
Society. 

Please notify the Secretary whether you 
will visit Pittsburg, and whether you wil 
present a paper or take part in the discussions 
at Cleveland. 

The Title Page and Contents of Vol. VII, 
of the Transactions, and Title Page and 
Index of Vol. IV of the Proceedings, are 
issued with this number. 

The following resolution was adopted at the 
Ninth Annual Convention of the Society, and 
ordered printed regularly in the Society pub- 
lications: 

Wnereas, the metric system of weights and 
measures is now extensively used abroad, 
and whereas it is desirable that the relation 
of the units of differing systems be made 
familiar to all by comparison : 



19 



Resolved, That members be requested, in 
papers hereafter presented to the Socipty, to 
write, iu pareuthesis, weights or dimensions 
by the metric system, iu connection with 
those of the system in general use. 

The House of the Society is at 104 East 
Twentieth street, one door from Fourth 
avenue, and near the southwest corner of 
Gramei'cy Park. It is open from nine o'clock 
A.M. to five o'clock P.M. each business day, 



except Saturday, when it is closed at three 
o'clock p. M. 

The Library and Conversation Rooms will 
also, for the present, be open every Thursday 
evening, from 7>2 to 10 p- m. Members are 
invited to avail themselves of the oppor- 
tunities afforded on Thursday evenings both 
for consultation of books and periodicals, and 
lor conversation . 



LIST OF MEMBERS. 



ADDITIONS. 
MEMBERS. 



Date of Election. 

Bell, James E Superintendent City Water Works, Cin- 
cinnati, Ohio Marcli 5th, 1879. 

Bruner, Daniel P (Elected Junior, September 6th, 1876) 

13 Nortli Third street, Harrisburg, 

Pa May 7th, 1879. 



Gordon, Alexander. 



associate. 
General Manager Niles Tool Works, 

Hamilton, Ohio March 5th, 1879. 



CHANGES and CORRECTIONS. 

members. 
Brown, Charles O . . . 52 Wall street. Room 27, New York. 

Brush, Charles B 13 Newark street, Hoboken, N. J. 

Buck, L. L Engineer Suspension Bridge, Niagara Co., N. Y. 

Chester, Stephen 5 and 7 Dey street. New York. 

Durham, C. Wheeler. .109 Dearborn street, Chicago, 111. 

Gardner, G. Clinton . . . Manager Troy, Greenfield and Hoosac Tunnel Railroad, 

Greenfield, Mass. 
Grant, William H Chief Engineer New York City and Northern Railroad 

and Yonkers Rapid Transit Railway, 3 Broad street, 

New York. 



20 



Hall, G. Thomas Division Engineer Metropolitan Elevated Railroad, 71 

Broadway, New York. 

Harris, Rukeri' L Consulting Engineer, Boston, Hoosac Tunnel and West- 
ern Railroad, North Adams, Mass. 

Meriwether, Niles Memphis, Tenn. 

NicoLLS, William J.,. . . .Editor Railway Record, 5 Post Office avenue, Baltimore, 
Md. 

Parkhurst, H. W . . .Topeka, Kansas. 

Pettit, Henry 209 South Third street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Sears, Alfred T Ingeneiro de^ Estado, Peru, Chimbote, Peru, via 

Panama. 

Sedgwick, Thomas S Washington, D. C. 

Turner, Edmund Engineer, Logansport, Crawfordsville and Southwestern 

Railroad, Crawfordsville, Ind. 

W.alling, Henry F Marietta, Ohio. 

ASSOCIATES. 

Brevoort, Henry L 206 Broadway, New York. 

Ford, Arthur L Civil Engineer, Corinto, Nicaragua. 

juniors. 

Bland, John C (Jffice Supervising Architect, Treasury Building, Wash- 
ington, D. C. 

Hayes, Edmund 52 Wall street. New York. 

Horton, Sanford Division Engineer, Atchison, Topeka, and Santa Fe 

Railroad, Wichita, Kansas. 

Kennedy, James C Engineer's Office, Water works, Ottawa, Canada. 

Macy, Arthur Kings Mountain Mine, Kings Mountain, N. C. 

fellow. 
Taylor, William J Chester, N. J. 



^nuMlcan %mdu of toil f nsincDrfi. 



PROCEEDINaS, 



Vol. V. — March, April, May, 1879. 



MINUTES OF MEETINGS 

(Abstract of such as may be of general interest to members.) 



OF THE SOCIETY. 

May 21st, 1879.— The Society met at 8 p. m. Thomas C. Clarke in 
the chair. 

A paper by J. James B. Croes, entitled " The Loss of Water in Flow- 
ing in Open Earth Channels, Avas read by the aiithor, and discussed by 
Messrs. Dresser, Emery, Owen, Searles, Striedinger, L. B. Ward and 
Worthen. 

Note. — At the meeting of the Society of May 7tli, 1879, the following 
preamble and resolutions were passed : 

Members of the Society are requested to favor the Secretary with 
their opinions on the subjects referred to, and with such other sugges- 
tions as they may wish to offer, sending the same in time for presentation 
at the Convention at Cleveland on June 17tli, next. 

Whereas, Every possible effort should be made to increase the sphere 
of usefulness of the Society, and to enlarge its membership as well as to 
promote active intercourse between all its members, therefore, be it 

Besolved, That the following suggestions and such others as may be 
submitted, be printed and distributed among the members, with the 
request that they shall favor the Secretary as soon as possible with their 



22 

opinions, as well as with such other suggestions as they may wish to 
offer, so that action upon the same may be taken at the next convention. 



STjGCtESTIONS. 

1st. That i^rovision be made for the holding, in addition to the an- 
nual convention, a number of general meetings in various cities in each 
year, for ])rofessional intercourse. 

2d. That papers be annually invited from members or other i)er.sons 
upon subjects of general engineering interest, to be specified by the 
Board of Direction. 

3d. That a system be established to award special recognition for the 
best papers contributed each year. 

4th. That jjresent members l)e encoui'aged to propose worthy persons 
for new members, associates, and fellows. 

5th. That to promote the discussion of papers, advance copies be 
issued to such members or other jaersons as may be specially qualitied to 
take i^art in the same, or to members applying for them in order to take 
part in the discussion. 

6tli. That members be encouraged to make use of the facilities of the 
Society in New York for obtaining professional information. 

7tli. That the Library Committee be requested to report whether 
some plan may not be adopted to enable members living away from New 
York to consult the books of the Lil)rary, under proper regulations to 
ensure their return and to prevent injury. 

8th. That suggestions be invited from members as to the feasibility 
of adopting some plan of affiliation with local engineers' clubs in other 
cities. 

9th. That the desirability l)e discussed of appointing Research Com- 
mittees, whose diities shall be to collect the results of existing experi- 
ments on any subject, and to suggest what further experiments are 
necessary, and also to collate such professional papers as may have been 
pubHslied elsewhere. 



LIST OF NEW BOOKS ON 

ENGINEERINa ANE) TECHNOLOGY. 



Alphabets adapted to the use of Architects, . B. Joy Jefferies, M. D. Boston. 8vo. 

EuKiiieers, Engravers, &c. Dan. T. Ames. JInuglUon, Osgood <£• Co. 

New York. 12mo. Bicknell d- Cmnstock. Drafting Instruments and Operations; in i 

$1.50. Divisions: 1, Instruiaeuts and Materials; 

Bridge Building, Girder Making and the 2, Fundamental Operations; 3, Plane Prub- 
Practice of Bridge Building in Wrought lems and Praeticai Exercises; 4, Elements 
Iron. Illustrated by Examples of Bridges, of Taste in Geometrical Drawing: Text- 
Piers and Girder Work, &c.. constructed at' Book for Schools, and Artisans' Classes, 
the Skerne Iron Works, Darlington. By and for Self-instruction. S. E. Warren. 
Edward Hutchinson, Mem. Inst. M. E. 35 New York, 2d ed. rev. and enl. 8vo, plates. 
Plates, demy 8vo. London and New York. Wilpi/ d- Son. $1.25. 
Spans. $4.25. Electric Lighting and its Practical Applica- 

Coal, Practical treatise on Combustion of tion; with Kesuits from Existing Examples. 
Coal, iTicl. descriptions of various uiechan- J. N. Schoolbred. London, 8vo, illus. 
ical devices for the economic generation of Hardwicke d- Bngue. 5s. 
Hf at by the Combustion of Fuel, whether English Army; its Past History, Present Con- 
Solid, Liquid or Gascons. W. M. Barr. dition and Future Proi-pcts. Major Arthur 
Indianapolis. 8vo, illus. Yohn Hrns. $1.50. Griffiths. 12mo. Cassell, Fetter (k Galpin. 

Color BUudness; its Dangers and its Detection. New York. $5.00. 



23 



Gas Measurement. The serious loss and in- 
couveuieuce to {jas comnanies and the pub- 
lic, caused by the freezing and inaccuracy 
of wet meters. George Glover. London. 
8vo. Spons. Is, 

Geometry ; Elements of Co-ordinate — , in 
three ijarts : 1, Cartesian ueometry ; 2, Qua- 
ternions ; 3. Modern Geometry ; and an 
Appendix. De Volson Wood. New York. 
8vo. Wiley i£ Sons. $3.00. 

Mechanism ; the Elements of Practical . 

T. Baker. London. Weales" Series. (Hh 
ed. 12mo. Crosby Lock wnnd. 2s. 6d. 

Military Engineering. Instruction in , 

Miscellaneous. Compiled at tbe School of 
Military Engineering, Chatliim. Vol. I. 
(Partp). 2d ed. London. Post 8vo. Brilish 
Govt. I'ub. 3s. 6d. 

Military Map M ikiug. Captain Holdich. Lon- 
don. Svo. W. Mitchell. Is. ' 

Quantities and Measurements. A. C. Beaton. 
Loudon. Weales' Series. 5th ed. 12mo. 
Crntby Lookwood. Is. 6d. 

River Shannon. Paper on the ; its Pres- 
ent State, and the Means of Improving the 
Navigation and the Drainage; with Discus- 
sion thereon, before Section G, British As- 
sociation, Dublin, 1878. By James Lynam, 
C. E. London. 8vo. P. S. King. Is. 6d. 

Rivers Conservation. Address of E. Easton, 
C. E., and papers read before the British 
Association at Dublin. 1878. London. 8vo. 
F. .v. King. 2s. 6d. 

Royal Engineers. Professional Papers of the 

Corps of . Vol. 2. Occasional P.ipers, 

1878. Svo. Plates. Chatham Royal Knyi- 
ni-er Insiilute. 12s. 

Sanitary Work in the Smaller Towns and in 
Villages. Charles Slagg. London. Weales 
Series. 12mo. Crosby Lockwood. 28. 6d. 

Slide Rule, The Carpi-nter's : Its History and 
Use. Containing Instructions for the Meas- 
urement ot al kiuds of Boards and Planks, 
Timber in the Round or Square, Glazier's 
Work and Painting, Brickwork, Paviour's 



Work, Tiling and Slating, the Measurement 
of Vt'ssels of vailous shapes, the Wedge, 
Inclined Planes, Wheels and Axles, Levers, 
the Weighing and Measurement of Metals 
and all Solid Bodies, Cylinders, Cones, 
Globes, Ship Carpenter's Eight Square 
Lines, the Measurement of Circles, and a 
Comparison of French and English Meas- 
ures, with much other information iiseful 
to Builders, Carpenters, Bricklayers, Glaz- 
iers. Paviours, Slaters, and other Mechanics. 
Now iirst ijrinted, in a complete form, at a 
moderate price. Fcap. 8vo, sd., pp. 32. 
Ribnne tO .So/ji' (Birmingham). 3d. 

Steam Engines. Pocket Book on Compound 
Lugines. N. P. Burgh. London. IGuio. 
Burgh. 78. 6d. 

Table Book. Molesworth's Pocket Book of 
Useful FormuliB and Memoranda, for Civil 
and Mechanical Engineers. With a valuable 
Contribution on Telegraphs, by R. S. 
Brough and Paget Higgs. 19th ed. 32mo, 
S^lons. Gs. 

Thermodynamics. Rob. E. Baynes. New 
York. 12mo. Macmillan. $2.7.5. 

Universal Graphical Computing Table, ena- 
bling anybody without calculation and at 
sight to multiply or divide any two num- 
bers : to find 2d, 3d or 5th power of any 
number ; to extract the 2d, 3d or 5th root of 
any number ; to obtain the circumference 
or area of any circle ; to obtain the volume 
of any sphere, or to multiply or divide by 
the sine, cosme, tangent or co-tangent of 
any arc ; to reduce feet to metres or metres 
to feet. Invaluable to Engineers in making 
estimates ; invaluable in preparing percen- 
tages or reducing statistics. Error of com- 
putation iu all cases less than half of one 
per cent. Handsomely printed on Bristol 
Board 18 x 11) inches, and accompanied by 
a small volume of Text containing directions 
for use and valuable tables. By I,ieut. 
Win. H. Bixby. Wiley & Sons. New York. 
$0.75. 



ADDITIONS TO 

JLIBRARY AND MUSEUM. 



From Administration des Ponts et 
Chausees, Paris: 
Annales. March, 1879. 

From American Chemical Society, P. 
Cassamajor, Secretary, New York: 
Journal of the Society, Vol. 1, Nos. 1-3. 

From American Ins'itute Mining En- 
gineers, Thomas M. Drown, Secretary, 
Easton, Pa.: 
Proceedings of the Baltimore Meeting, Feb- 
ruary, 1m79. 
The Bradford Oil District of Pennsylvania. 

Chas. A. Ashburner. 
The Water Supply at the Bessemer Steel 
Works of the Edgar Thomson Steel Com- 
pany, Limited. P. Barnes. 
The Lake Superior Copper Rocks in Penn- 
sylvania. J. F. Blandy. 
The Great Blast at Glendon. EUifj Clarke, Jr. 



An Iiuijroved System of Cornish Pitwork. 
Ellsworth Daggett. 

Note on the determination of Silicon in Pig 
Iron and Steel. Dr. T. M. Drown. 

Indicator Cards from a Water-pressure Blow- 
ing Engine, with a note on a proposed im- 
provement in such engines. Frank Firm- 
stone. 

The manufacture of Soda by the Ammonia 
process. O. J. Heinrit'h. 

The Pernlot Furnace. A. L. Holley, LL.D, 

The United States Testing Machine at Water- 
town Arsenal. A. L H )lley. LL.D. 

The Coal and Iron of the Hocking Valley, 
Ohio. T, Sterry Hunt. LL.D. 

A Method of Rollmg Steel or Iron Eye Bars. 
Charles .Macdonahl. 

On the Classification of Original Rocks. 
Thoxnas Macfarlane. 

Phosphorus in Coal. A. S. McCreath. 



24 



A Catalogue of Official Reports upon Geo- 
logical Surveys of the United States and 
Territories and of British North America. 
F. Prime, Jr. 

From Argentine Scientific Society, Don 
Felix Amoreti, Secretary, Buenos 
Ayres: 
Annals of the Society. March and April, 
1«79. 

From Association of Civil Engineers, 
Portugal: 
Transactions. September, October, Novem- 
ber and December, 1878; January and Feb- 
ruary, 1879. 

From Wm. S. Barbour, City Engineer, 
Cambridge, Mass. : 
Annual Report ot City Engineer for 1878. 
Fouiteeuih Annual Ke]iortof the Cambridge, 

Mass., Water Board. 1878. 
The Mayors Address aud Annual Reports 
made to the City Council of Cambridge, 
Mass. 

From Walter A. Barlow, London : 
Patentees' Jourual of Dates. Vol II, No. 7, 
1879. W. A. Barlow, Proprietor. 

From H. Bartels, Berlin: 
Betriel)s-Eiurichtuugen auf Amerikanischen 
Eiseub.thuen 1. Bahuhofsaiilagen uud Sig- 
nale. H. Bartels, Berlin, 1879. 

From Mellen Chamberlain, Boston: 
Bulletin of the Bostou Public Library, April, 
1878. Melleu Chamberlain, Librarian. 

From Frederick Brooks, Boston: 
Report of the Standing Committee of the 
Boston Society ot Civil Engineers on the 
Metric System of Weights and Measures, 
presented March 19th, 1879. (5 copies.) 

From Hon. Allan Campbell, Commis- 
sioner Department Public Works, 
New York: 
Report of the Department of Public Works, 
quarter ending December 31, 1878. 

From Civil Engineers' Club of the 
Northwest, L. P. Morehouse, Secre- 
tary, Cliicago: 
The Glasgow Bridge Superstructure. Chas. 

Siioy Smith. 
Blasting under water in Rivers with rapid 
currents. F. W. Farquhar. 

Fi'om Eliot C. Clarke, Boston: 
Common Defects in House Draius. Eliot C. 
Clarke. Boston, 1879. 

From H. Wadsworth Clarke, Syracuse, 
N. Y.: 

Annual Report of the Superintendent of the 
Onondaga Salt Springs. A. C. Powell. Al- 
bany, 1879. 

Journal of the Board of Supervisors of the 
County of Onondaga for 1878. 

Report "n thi> Management and Affairs of the 
Insane Asylum of the Onondaga County 
Poorhouse. ('2 copies.) 

From J. James R Croes, New York: 
Annual R. port of the State Geologist of New 

Jersey lor 1876. 
Report of Water Commissioners of the City of 

Elizabeth, N. J., for 1868. 

From George W. Dresser, N. Y.: 
The Electric Light. A paper read before the 
Society of G.is Lighting, December 12, 1878. 
Eugene Vauderpool. (2 copies.) 



From Charles D. Elliot, Somerville 
Mass. : 
Annual Report of the Board of Harbor Com- 
missioners for 1878. 

From Charles E. Billin. Secretary En- 
gineers' Club of Philadelphia: 
Proceedings ot the Club. Vol. I. No. 2. 

From Sanford Fleming, Ottowa. Can.: 
Report made to the Minister of Public Works 
of (;;an ida in reference to the Canadian Pa- 
cific Railway. Ottowa, 1879. 

From Franklin Institute, Philadelphia: 
Journal of the Institute. April and May, 
1879. 

From George H. Frost, Editor Engineer- 
ing News, New York: 
number's Water Supply of Cities and Towns. 

Part 8. 
Proceedings Engineer's Club of the North- 
west: 

1. Pier Constructions ot Recent Date. G. 
A. M. Liljencrantz. 

2. Anchor Ice as afl'ecting public Water 
Supply. John A. Cole. 

From Fred, de Funiak, Louisville, Ky. : 
Cost of Road Repairs on LcutisviUe and Nash- 
ville and Soutb and North Alabama Kail- 
roads, for nine months ending March 31st, 
1879. 

From James T. Gardner, Albany: 
Report of New York State Survey for 1878. 

From Institution of Civil Engineers, 
James Forrest, Secretary, Lonaon: 
Minutes of Proci ediugs. Vol. LV. 

Publications edited by James Forrest, 
Secretary, as follows: 
(1.) The Geelong Water Supply. Edward 

Dobson. 
(2.) The Sandhurst Water Supply. Joseph 

Brady. 
Discussions on the Geelong and Sandhurst 

Water Supplies. 
Railway Bridge over the River Tyne, at Wylam, 

Northumberland. William G 1 aws. 
On the Best methods of Railway Construction 
for the developm-^nt of New Countries. 
Robert C. Patterson. 
Railway Work in Japan. W. P. Potter. 
Metliod of Blasting Rock for the Lyttleton 
Harbor Works, Canterbury, New Zea and. 
George Thornton. 

From the Institution of Mechanical En- 
gineers, Walter R. Browne, Secretary. 
London: 
Proceedings. January, 1879. 

From the Imperial Teclmic Society, St. 
Petersburg, Russia: 
Notes of tbe Imperial Techuic Society. Part 
xn. 1878. (Russian.) 

From the Iron and Steel Institute. 
London: 
Journal of the Institute, No. 2. 1878. 

From John Kennedy, Montreal, Canada: 
Annual Report of the Harbor Commissioners 
of Montreal for 1878. 

From Geo. A. Kimball, City Engineer, 
Somerville, Mass. : 
Annual Reports. City of Somerville, Mass., 

1878. 
First Annual Report of the Board of Health 

of Somerville. Mass. 
Fifth Annual Report of the City Engineer of 
Somerville, Mass., 1878. 



25 



From J. F. Klein, D. E., Ph'laclelphia: 
T. — T„ 
Concerning — 



— or the Limit of effi- 



ciency of Heat Engines. J. F. Klein, Pliila- 
delphia, 18 ?9. 

From State Board of Health of Massa- 
chusetts. Charles F. Folsom, M. D., 
Secretary: 
Tenth Annual Report of the State Board of 
Health. January, 1879. 

From E. E. Mlddleton, London: 
Impeachment of Modern Astronomy. E. E. 
Mlddleton. London, 1879. 

From George S. Morison, New York : 
Annual Keport of the Eastern Railroad Com- 
pany, 1877-78. Boston, 1873. 

From Edward P. North, New York : 
Report of the President and Directors of the 
Northern Pacific Railroad. September 25th, 
1878. 

From the North of England Institute of 

Mining and Mechanical Eiigineers. 

Theo. Wood Bunning. Secretary. 

Newcastle-on-Tyue. England : 

Transactions of the Institute, February and 

March, 1879. 

From Charles Paine, Cleveland, Ohio : 
Ninth Annual Report of the Lake Shore and 
Michigan Southern Railroad for 1878. 

From Wm. H. Paine, Brooklyn, N. Y.: 
Specifications for the Steel and Iron Work of 
the Suspended Superstructure of the East 
River Bridge. 

From Francis Rinecker, Wvierzburg, 
Germany : 
Der Logarithmische Rechenschieber und 
Seine piactische Anwendung. F. Riuecker. 
Wiirzlnirg, 1879. 
Die Hydrometrische Waage in ihrem Principe, 
Weseu uud Gebrauch. Franz J. V. Czer- 
weuka. Vienna 1878. 

From the Publishers Revue General des 
Cbeniius de ler. Edgar Monjean, 
Secretary, Paris : 
Revu° General des Chemins de fer. January 
and February, 1879. 

From ■• axonian Society Engineers and 
Architects, Leipzic : 
Transactions of the So iety. Part II. 1878. 

From Hon. Horatio Seymour. Jr.. State 
Engineer and Surveyor. Albany; 



Annual Report of the New York State Canals 
for 1878. 

From John C. Trautwine, Philadelphia: 

Aide Memoire portatif a I'usage des officiers 
dii Genie. Vols. I and 11. J. Laisue. 
Paris, If 61. 

A treatise on Internal Navigation. Report of 
Albert Galatin on Roads and Canals. Ball- 
stem Siia. N. Y., 1817. 

Bree's Railway Practice. London, 1847. 

Bree's lUilwa'y Practice. Plates. Vols. I, II, 
and III. 

Bridging the Hudson. Testimony taken be- 
fore the Senate Committee in the matter of 
bridging the Hudson River at Albany, Feb- 
ruary 29th, 1856. 

The Miscellaneous papers of John Smeaton, 
C. E., F. R. S. London, 1814. 

Reports of the late John Smeaton. C. E., F. R. 
S. Vols. I, II and III. London, 1812. 

Report of the Department of Mines of Nova 
Scotia for 1878. 

Reports of the Pennsylvania (^'entral Railroad. 
Two volumes. Volume I, 1848-1855. Volume 
II. 18.")6 1860. 

Traite Elemeutaire des Chemins de fer. Vols. 
1 and II. Aug. Perdonnet. Pai is, 1860. 

From Edgar B. Van Winkle, New York : 
Conditions of Proposals for constructing 
Sewers and their Appurtenances in Third 
avenue from Southern Boulevard to 13.5th 
street ; and in 135th street and 134th street, 
from Third avenue to Summits east of 
Willis avenue, with branches in Lincoln, 
Alexander and Willis avenues. 
Conditions of Proposals for Constructing 
Sewers and Appurtenances in 140lh street, 
from Alexander avenue to Brook aveiiiie, 
with branches in Alexander and Willis 
avenues. 
Proposals lor regulating and grading Third 
avenue in 23d Ward, and for additional 
work in said avenue between 147th street 
and Harlem River. 

From D. Van Nostrand, New York: 
Van Nostraud's Engineering Magazine. May 
and June, 1879. 

From F. Leypoldt, New York: 
The Library Journal. No. 3. Vol. IV. 
From Prof. Wm. Watson, Bovton ; 
Reports upon the Public Works of Italy by the 
Minister of Public Woiks. 4 folio volumes 
with full plates. 



ANNOUNCEMl^NTS. 



The Eleventh Annual Convention of 
the Society will he held at Cleveland, begin- 
ning Tuesday, June 17th, 1879. 

Sessions for the consideration of profes- 
sional subjects, and one for the transaction 
of business will be held. 

The details of the programme will be an- 
nounced as soon as determined by the local 
committee. 



The following is a list of topics to be con- 
sidered with reference to xiapers published 
in Transactions during the ijreceding year: 

American Engineering at International 
exhibitio^s. 
CLXXIV. American Engineering as illus- 
trated at the Paris Exposition of 1878. 
George S. Morison, Edward P. North and 
John Bogart. 



26 



Bridges. 

Discussion of Paper CXL. The De- 
termination of Stresses in the Eye-Bar 
Head. De Volson Wood. Vol. VII, page 
189. 

Discussion of Papers CXLIV and 

CXLIX. Relative Quantities of Material 
in Bridges of different kinds, of variouft 
heights. William H. Searles. Vol. VII, 
page 192. 

Cements. 

Discussion on Cements. Don J. 

Whittemore. Vol. VII, page 274. 

Discussion on Cements and Strength 

of Bricks. F. Collingwood. Vol. VII, 
page 280. 
Foundations. 

CLXXII. The use of Compressed Air in 
Tubular Foundations, and its applit'ation 
at Soutti Street Bridge, Philadelphia, Pa. 
D. McN. Stauffer. 
Hydraulics. 

CLX. Oa the Cause of the Maximum 
Velocity of Water flowing in Open Clian- 
nels being below the Surface. James B. 
Francis. 

CLXI. The Flow of Water in Pipes under 
Pressure. Charles G. Darrach. 

Discussion on the Cause of the 

Maximum Velocity of Water flowing in 
Open Channels being below the Surface, 
and also on the Flow of Water in Pipe s 
under Pressure. Theo. G. Ellis, C. E. 
Emery, Clemens Herschel, De Volson 
Wood and Jobn T. Fanning, Vol. VII., 
page 122. 

CLX \ II. Distribution of Rain-fall during 
the great storm of October 3d and 4th, 
18IJ9. James B. Francis. 

CLXVIII. The Gauging of Streams. Clemens 
Herschel. 

CLXXV. The Flow of Water in Small Chan- 
nels, alter Ganguillet and Kutter, with 
Kutter's Diagram modified, and Graphical 
Tables with sjjecial reference to Sewer 
Calou ations. R. iteWug. 

Masonry. 

CLXX. Brick Arches for Large Sewers. 
R. Hering. 

Discussion on Brick Arches for Large 

Sewers. E. S. Chesbrough, W. Milnor 
Roberts, R. Hering and F. Collingwood. 
Vol. VII., page 258. 

CLXXI. Fall of Western Arched Approach 
to South Street Bridge, Philadelphia, Pa 
D. McN. Stauffer. 

Discussion on Nomenclature of Build- 
ing Stones and Stone Masonry. J. Foster 



Flagg, J. J. R. Croes, J. P. Davis, F. Col- 
lingwood, J. Veazie and E. P. North. Vol. 
VII., page 284. 

Metals. 
CLXIII. On a newly di.'covered relation 
between the Tenacity of Metals and their 
resistance to Torsion. Robert H. 
Thurston. 
CLXIV. Observations on the Stresses 
developed in Metallic Bars by Applied 
Forces. Theodore Cooper. 
Preservation of Timber. 
CLXXVI. The Permanent Way of Rail- 
ways in Great Britain and Ireland, with 
special reference to the use of Timber, 
preserved and uupreserved. Compiled 
from information received from Engineers 
in charge of those railways. John 
Bogart. 
Railroads. 
CLIX. On the Theoretical Resistance of 

Railroad Curves. S. Whinery. 
Discussion on the Resistance of Rail- 
road Curves. O. Chauute, Chas. E. 
Emery, E. Yardley, E. P. North, C. L. 
McAlpine, F. Collingwood and Wm. H. 
* Paine. Vol. VII, page 97. 
CLXVI. Reminiscences and Experiences 
of Early Engineering Operations on Rail- 
roads, with especial reference to Steep 
Inclines. W. Milnor Roberts. 

Discussions on Inclined Planes for 

Railroads. O. Chanute and William H. 
Paine. Vol. VII., page 216. 
Rivers and Harbors. 
CLXII. The South Pass Jetties. Descrip- 
tive and Incidental Notes and Memoranda. 
E. L. Corthell. 

Discussions on the South Pass Jetties. 

Charles W. Howell, E. L. Corthell, C. 
Shaler Smith, J. Foster Flagg. Vol. VII, 
page 159. 
CLXIX. The Dangers threatening the Nav- 
igation of the Mississippi River and the 
Reclamation of its Alluvial Lands. B. M. 
Harrod. 

Steam Engines. 
CLXV. Cushioning the Reciprocating Parts 
of Steam Engines. John W. Hill. 

Discussion on Steam Engine Economy, 

J. Foster Flagg and E. D. Leavitt, Jr. 
Vol. VII, page 194. 
Submarine Telephony. 
CLXXIII. Submarine Telephoning. Chas. 

Ward Raymond. 
In addition to the above papers, it is ex- 
pected that the following subjects will be pre- 



27 



sented by papers printed previous to the date 
of the Couveution, or read at its meeting: 

Engineering Questions involved in the Dev- 
elopment of Electric Lighting. Stephen 
Chester. 

Gelatine Dynamite and High Explosives. 
Jn'ins H. Striedinger. 

Lighthouse Construction. J. G. Barnard. 

Memoir upon the Construction of the 
Minots Ledge Light. B. S. Alexander. 

The Construction and Maintenance of 
Roads. Edward P. North. 

The Resistances of Railway Rolling Stock. 
A. M. Wellington. 

The Railroad Crossing of the Allegheny 
Mountain. Moncure Robinson. 

Notes on Early Railroad Engineering. 
Ashbel Welch. 

Remarks on the Causes of Fall of the 
Western Arched Approach to South Street 
Bridge, Philadelphia, Pa. J. G. Barnard. 

Parabolic Arches in Masonry. W. A. G. 
Emonts. 

Notes on the Foundations of Piers of the 
East River Bridge. F. CoUingwood. 

Experiments with Cements and appliances 
for testing. Alfred Noble. 

Comparison of Standard Measures, English, 
French and United States. Arthur S. C. 
Wurtele. 

The South Pass Jetties ; the consolidation 
and durability of the works, with descrip- 
tion of the Concrete Blocks and other 
constructions of the i^ast year. Max E. 
Schmidt. 

Notes as to construction and operation of 
the Railroad over the Raton Mountains, 
Col., and the construction and perform- 
ance of the Locomotives thereon. James 
D. Burr. 

Design and Construction Tables for Egg- 
shaped Sewers. Cyrus G. Force, Jr. 

Traction Experiments to Determine the 
Resistance of Vessels in narrow Channels 
or Canals. E. Sweet, Jr. 

Wind Pressure. F. CoUingwood. 

Flexure and Transverse Resistance of 
Beams. C. E. Emery. 

Stability of Stone Piers. Wm. H. Searles. 

Cadastral Maps in Ohio. H. F. Walling. 

Telford Pavements. James Owen. 

A number of members have already signi- 
fied their intention of taking jiart in discus- 
sions of the papers. 

Members of the Society are earnestly re- 
quested to furnish information or memoranda 
upon any of the subjects referred to. They 
are also invited and expected to take part in 
the discussions either in person or by sending 
to the Secretary notes for presentation. 



In either case, it wil assist the Committee 
in arranging the details for sessions of the 
Convention, if Members expecting to take part 
in the discussions will notify the Secretary at 
once to that effect. 

Excursions upon the Lake and by rail from 
Cleveland are contemplated, and the arrange- 
ments for them are in progress. 

The Secretary is instructed to stale that it 
is permissible that Members of the Society 
should be accompanied by their families. 

Invitation to visit Pittsburg and the Govern- 
ment Works for the improvement of the river 
at that place (Davis Island Dam), has been ex- 
tended by James H. Harlow, Member of the 
Society. 

Please notify the Secretary whether you 
will visit Pittsburg, and whether you will 
present a paper or take part in the discussions 
at Cleveland. 

Under the rule adopted by the Society in 
reference to invitations to Conventions, the 
members of the Boston Society of Civil Engi. 
neers, of the Engineers' Club of the Northwest, 
of the Engineers' Club of St. Louis, of the 
Engineers' Club of Philadelphia, and of the 
American Institute of Mining Engineers; also, 
the Editors of Professional Journals exchang- 
ing with this Society have bpen iuvited to 
attend the Convention and the excursions 
connected therewith. 

The following resolution was adopted at the 
Ninth Annual Convention of the Society, and 
ordered printed regularly in the Society pub- 
lications: 

Whereas, the metric system of weights and 
measures is now extensively used abroad, 
and whereas it is desirable that the relation 
of the units of differing systems be made 
famili ir to all by comparison: 

Resolved, That members be requested, in 
papers hereafter presented to the Society, to 
write, in parenthesis, weights or dimensions 
by the metric system, in connection with 
those of the system in general use. 

The House of the Society is at 104 East 
Twentieth street, one door from Fourth 
avenue, and near the southwest corner of 
Gramercy Park. It is open from nine o'clock 
A.M. to five o'clock P.M. each business day, 
except Saturday, when it is closed at three 
o'clock p. M. 

The Library and Conversation Rooms will 
also, for the present, be open every Thursday 
evening, from 7}-^ to 10 p. M. Members are 
invited to avail themselves of the oppor- 
tunities afforded on Thursday evenings both 
for consultation of books and periodicals, and 
for conversation. 



28 

LIST OF MEMBERS, 



ADDITIONS. 
MEMBERS. 



Date of Elecllon. 

Richardson, Henry B ... Assistant State Engineer, St. Joseph, 

La , May 7th, 1879. 

Schmidt, Max O. E Chief Assistant Engineer, South Pass 

Jetties, Port Eads, La " " 



associate. 
Roberts, Percival, Jr. . . .265 South Fourth street, Philadelphia, 

Pa May 7th, 1879. 



changes and corrections. 
members. 

Cisneros, Francis J 311 West Thirty-third street. New York. 

Sites, Wii.M(JN W. C Architect and Civil Engineer, 8 Oakland avenue, Jersey 

City, N. J. 
Spielman, Arthur 13 Newark street, Hoboken, N. J. 

junior. 

Tasker, Charles A Care of John H. Dailey, Cincinnati -Southern Railway 

Office, 80 West Third street, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

FELLOW. 

Courtwricht, Milton.. . . 19 Courtlandt street, New York. 



d d /if ^(^ 



PROCEEDIISraS. 



Vol. V. — June, 1879. 



MINUTES Oh' MEETINGS 

(Abstract of such as may be of general interest to members.) 



OF THE SOCIETY. 

June 4th, 1879. —The Society met at 8 p.m. Thomas C. Chirke iu 
the chair. 

Ballots for admission to membership were canvassed, and the follow- 
ing were declared elected as members : 

Charles Albert Allen of Worcester, Mass. ; John Carlisle Bland (elected 
Junior, May 5th, 1875,) of Philadelphia, Pa. ; Edward Bates Dorsey of 
San Francisco, Cal. ; Sullivan Haslett of Brooklyn, N.Y. ; and Charles 
Heme McKee of Albany, N.Y. Also as Fellow, Frederick Oakford 
Norton of New York. 

A communication was presented from N. H. Whitten, Member of the 
Society, aecc mpanying a communication from the Holyoke Water 
Power Company, and from the Mayor of the City of Holyoke, inviting 
this Society to designate an Engineer to attend a trial of Turbines at 
Holyoke, Mass.'-^ 

* The City Government of Holyoke realizing the importance of the following proposition, 
join with the Water Power Company in inviting the Locks and Canals Company of Lowell, 
Mass., to send Mr. Francis as Engineer, thfe City of Philadelphia, Pa., to send an Engineer 
familiar with the pumping of water for that city, the Rational Millers' Association to send an 
Engineer familiar with milling matters, the American Society of Civil Eugiueers to send an 
Engineer as reisresentative of that Society, and the representatives of the owners of the 
turbines furnished for trial to select an Engineer to care for the interests of turbine builders, 
the five to be guests of the city during the trial, to have full charge of the tests and at the 
close to report the results in accordance with the proposition of the Water Power Company to 
4he Mayor of this city in order that the said report may be officially isromulgated. 

J. E. DELAXEY, Citi/ Clerk. 
Approved. 

WM. WHITING, Mayor. 



30 

_ On Motion, the following resolution was adopted : Eesolved that- 
this Society accepts the invitation of the Holyoke Manufacturing Com- 
pany and the city authorities of Holyoke, Mass., to send a representative 
to attend the proposed tests of turbines, and that the Board of Direction 
be requested to designate a member of the Society for that purpose. 

A description of a proposed connected girder was presented by Charles- 
-bi. Emery, and the subject discussed. 

June 18th, 1879. -Regular meeting of the Society, held during the 
Convention at Cleveland. 

The Society met at SJ p. m. Director Theodore G. EUis in the chair. 

The Committee on Uniform Accounts and Eeturns of Railroad Com- 
panies presented a report* which was read by the Secretary, and on 
motion the report was accepted and the committee discharged 

The Committee on Tests of American Iron, Steel and other Metals, 
presented a report f which was read by its Chairman, W. Sooy Smith. 

On motion the report was accepted and adopted. 

Holyoke, Mass., May 17, 1879. 
To the Secretary of the American Society of Civil Engineers, 

„ New York City : 

Deah Sir: 

tion nf vn A ^^ ^"'^""^ °^ '^' '""'''"' °^ ^"^^"'^^ ^ ^^'■^'^y cordially invite tbe co-opera- 
tiou of jour Association in accordance with the above. 

WM. WHITING, Afayor. 

HOLYOKE WATER POWER COMPANY. 

Notice to Turbine Builders and Manufacturers. 

The practice of testing turbines, so common the past ten years, has undoubtedly done 
much towards bringing the best into use; but there has been one serious defect in the system- 
that IS, the practice has generally been confined to the trial of small wheels, owing to the' 
great expense that would be caused by the tests of large sizes. As it is a matter of vast 
importance that the best turbine plans should be established beyond chance for doubt this 
company contemplate providing means for a thorough competitive test of the various kinds of 
turbmes that may be oliere.l lor trial, and to invite Water Power Companies. Cities that pump 
their water supply, and all others interested in the matter, to take part in it. The require- 
ments will be, that the wheels shall be ready for test when delivered at the Holyoke Testin- 
Flume, and that each builder shall superintend the setting of his wheel ; the setting and 
testing to be done at the expense of the Water Power Company. Capacity of each wheel to be 
sufficient to discharge about 5 000 cubic feet of water per u,inute, under 18 feet head tach 
wheel will be thoroughly tested from half to whole gate, and if deemed best, under at least 
two different heads ; also under several feet of back water. At the conclusion of the trial a 
full report will be made of the results obtained and of the workmanship, and probable dura- 
bility of each kind of wheel tried. Turbine builders of this or any other country are invited 
to furnish wheels, and those proposing to do so, should give notice of such intention as sooi^ 
as possible. 

Test to commence first day of September next. 

„ , WM. A. CHASE, jtffent. 

Holyoke, Mass., April 10, 1879. 

* See page 33. t See page 36. 



31 

W. Sooy Smith moved that the Committee be discharged and that a 
that a new committee of seven be appointed for the same dnty, which 
motion was lost. 

The committee was coiatiniied as now composed. 

The Committee on Finance then made a report through the chair- 
man, William H. Paine, which on motion was accepted. 

The Committee on the Exhibit of the Society at the Paris Exposition 
made a report of progress through E. P. North, which was on motion 
accepted. 

The following resolution Avas presented (by letter) by Ernest W. 
Bowditch, and was, under By-law 23, referred to the Board of Direction 
for issue of letter Ijallot : 

Resolved, that a standing committee of seven, representing different 
sections of the country, lie appointed from the American Society of Civil 
Engineers, who shall examine into the entire subject of the preservation 
of timber and report to the Society from time to time, and who shall 
collect such samples and data as they may be able, to aid in determining 
the relative values of the different woods, bothi:)reserved and unpreserved, 
in ordinary use in various parts of the country. 

The following resolution was offered by Charles Latimer, and was, 
with a recommendation for its adoption, under By-law 23, referred to the 
Board of Direction for issue of letter ballot : 

Resolved, that a committee of seven members of the Society be ap- 
pointed by the Board of Direction to devise and report a uniform system 
for tests of cement. 

The suggestions referred to the Convention at the meeting of May 
7th, 1879, (see Proceedings, Vol. V., page 21,) were then taken up and 
read. 

The following additional suggestion was j^resented, by letter, from 
William P. Shinn :— That the papers and reports of committees on jiro- 
fessional subjects should be allowed to be printed by any or all of the 
technical journals that think proper to publish them. 

The following resolution Avas offered by O. Chanute : 

Resolved, that it is the sense of this meeting that the Board of Direc- 
tion should take immediate steps to provide for the holding in various 
cities of three general meetings in each year in addition to the general 
Convention, for purjioses of professional intercourse. 

The resolution was discussed by Messrs. Flagg, Bogart, Searles, 
Cooper, Latimer, Macdonald, Metcalf, Elliot and Chanute. 

It was moved by O. Chanute to strike out the word "three" and 
instead thereof to insert " one or more." 

The amendment was lost. 

The original motion was lost. 

The following resolution was offered by O. Chanute : — Resolved, that 
the Board of Direction he requested to issue advance copies of papers to 



32 

such members or otlier persons as may be specially qualified to take part 
m the discussion of the same. That members should be encourao-ed to 
make use of the facilities of the Society in New York for obtaining pro- 
fessional information, so far as the same may be secured without entailing 
onerous labor or expense upon the Secretary. 

The resolution was discussed by Messrs. Eotch, Chanute, Fla-g- and 
Smedley. 

The resolution was adopted. 

The following resolution was offered by O. Chanute :-That a Research 
Committee of five be appointed by the Board of Direction,.if authorized 
by letter ballot, whose duties shall be to collect and publish annually the 
results of existing experiments upon any subject; to suggest what 
further experiments are necessary, and also to collate such i^rofessional 
papers as may have been published elsewhere. 

This resolution was adopted. 

On motion the following, being the second suggestion of May 7th 
was adopted as a resolution :-That papers be annually invited from mem- 
bers or other persons upon subjects of general engineering interest, to be 
specified by the Board of Direction. 

On motion the following resolution, based upon the third suggestion 
of May 7th, was adopted :-Resolved, that the Board of Direction be 
requested to submit, in the usual manner, a system to award special 
recognition for the best papers contributed each year. 

On motion the following, being the seventh suggestion of May 7th 
was adopted : -> > 

That the Library Committee be requested to report whether some 
. plan may not be adopted to enable members living away from New York 
io consult the books of the Library, under proper regulations to ensure 
their return and to prevent injury. 

The following resolution was" off-ered :-That the papers and reports 
of committees on professional subjects shaU be allowed to be printed in 
anj or all journals that think proper to publish them. 

This resolution was discussed by Messrs. Dresser, Flaog Cotton 
Emery, Latimer and C. Shaler Smith. 

The resolution was adopted. 

On motion of F. Collingwood, the Committee on Tests of American 
Iron, Steel and other Metals were thanked for the work it has done. 

The Society then adjourned. 



OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTION. 

May 31st, 1879.— Applications for membership were considered 
Arrangements for the approaching Convention were perfected ; appro- 
priations were made, and general business transacted. 



83 

June 30th, 1879.— Applications for membership were consiclercd. 
In accordance with the resolution adopted by the Society (see page 00), 
requesting the Board of Direction to designate a member of the Society 
to attend the proposed test of turbines at Holyoke, Mass., the Board 
designated William E. AYorthen as such member, and in case of his 
declination or inability to serve, the Board designated Charles E. Emery 
as an alternate. The Library Committee made a report in reference to 
the conditions of award of the Norman Medal, which was accepted and 
forwarded to George H. Norman for his consideration. Appropriations 
were made. 



REPORTS OF COMMITTEES. 

PRESliNTED AT THE TeNTII AnNUAL CONVENTION. 



Eepokt of the Committee on Unieoem Accounts and Eeturns of 
PtAiLEOAD Companies. 



To the American Society of Civil Engineers : 

Your Committee on "Uniform Accounts 
and Returns of Railroad Companies" beg 
leave to report that, in addition to the influ- 
ence which the members of your Committee 
have been able to exert in the furtherance of 
the object of their appointment, the matter of 
uniform accounts and returns has been very 
strongly advocated by Mr. C. F. Adams, Jr., 
Railway Commissioner of Massachusetts, and 
that, in consequence of our united efforts, a 
meeting of the Railway Commissioners of 
several States was called to be held at Colum- 
bus, Ohio, on November 12th, 1878, at which 
meeting it was the intention of the Chairman 
of your Committee to have been present, but 
by some mistake he was advised that the 
meeting would be held on the 14th, which 
mistake was not corrected until the day of the 
meeting. At that meeting a committee was 
appointed, with instructions to solicit the co- 
operation of six parties named as experts in 
railroad accounts, one of whom was the chair- 
man of your Committee. 

This General Committee of Commissioners 
and Experts was called together and held a 
meeting at the St. Nicholas Hotel, New York, 
on April 2-tth, 1879, where the following sub- 
jects were discussed : 

1st. The general principles upon which 
accounts should be required to be kept by 
railroad companies. 



2d. The form of returns to be required to 
be made by railroad companies to the State 
authorities. 

The Chairman of your Committee attended 
this meeting and took active part in its dis- 
cussions, as the result of which certain gen- 
eral rules were adopted to govern the keeping 
of accounts, and a form of returns was agreed 
upon, with the exception of the heads under 
which expense should be classified, which 
was left for further consideration by the Com- 
mittee, at a meeting to be held June 10th. 
The rules and forms of returns, so far as 
adopted by the Committee, are appended 
hereto. 

The Chairman of your Committee was in- 
vited to attend the meeting on June lOth, but 
regrets to say that by reason of ill health he 
was unable to do so. He is advised, however, 
by the Secretary of the meeting, that the 
rules as agreed upon by the Committee at the 
meeting of April 2-tth were adopted, and a 
form for division of expense accounts was 
agreed upon and adopted, which form is also 
appended hereto. It only remains, therefore, 
for the Commissioners of the several States 
to procure such legislation as will enable 
them to adopt the agreed forms, when uni- 
form accounts and returns will have been ac- 
complished so far as the States are concerned 
which have railroad retvirns. 
Opposition may be expected from some 



34 



ailroad companies to the requirements of the 
rules adopted by the Commissioners, biit ex- 
perience in Massachusetts indicates that such 
opposition will gradually yield, and the rail- 
road companies will find it to be an advan- 
tage in the end. 
Kespectfully submitted. 

Wm. p. Shinn, 1 

O. Chanute, { Commillee. 

Feed, de Funiak, ) 



APPENDIX. 

Rules, etc. 
A meeting of the Committee of Railroad 
Commissioners and Railroad Accountants 
on "Uniform System of Accounts and Re- 
turns," appointed at the General Convention 
of Railroad Commissioners in November last, 
was held at the St. Nicholas Hotel, New York 
City, Thursday, April 24, 1879, as per call of 
the Chairman, Mr. Woodruff of Connecticut. 
There were present of the Committee : 
Mes.srs. Woodruff of Connecticut, Carter of 
Virginia, Turner of Wisconsin, Railroad 
Commissioners ; Messrs. Leland of Ohio, 
Shinn of Pennsylvania, Wilbur of Boston, 
Railroad Accountants ; and J. H. Goodspeed, 
Secretary ; also, by invitation, Gen. F. A. 
Walker, Railroad Commissioner of Connec- 
ticut, and Mr. George E. Towne, Accountant, 
of Boston. 

On a general discussion of the matter be- 
fore the Committee, it was unanimously 
voted, — 

" That it is the sentiment of the Committee 
that the system of accounts and returns 
should include a showing in detail of the an- 
nual operation." 

The following general rules, in regard to 
the manner of keeping accounts from which 
the returns are to be made, were discus.=ed 
and adopted : 

I. 

All liabilities (including interest accrued on 
funded debt) shall be entered upon the books 
in the month when they are incurred with- 
out reference to date of payment. 

n. 

Expenses shall be charged each month with 
such supplies, materials, kc, as have been 
used during that month, without reference to 
the time when they were purchased or jsaid 
for. 

m. 

No expenditure shall be charged to prop- 
erty accounts, except it be for actual increase 



in construction, equipments or other prop- 
erty, unless it is made on old work in such a 
way as to clearly increase the value of the 
property over and above the cost of renewing 
the original structures, &c. 

In such cases, only the amount of iL- 
creased cost shall be charged, and the amount 
allowed on account of the old work shall be 
stated. 

IV. 

Mileage of passenger and freight trains 
shall include only the miles shown to be run 
by distances between stations ; allowances 
made to passenger or freight trains for 
switching, and all mileage of switching en- 
gines computed on a basis of ten miles per 
hour for the time of actual service, shall be 
stated separately. 

V. 

Season ticket passengers shall be computed 
on the basis of twelve (12) passengers per 
week for the time of each ticket. 

VI. 

Local traffic should include all passengers 
carried on local tickets, and all freight carried 
at local tariff or special local rates. 

All other traflBc shall be considered through. 



The form of retui'n upon which the reports 
are to be made to the Commissioners was 
taken up and decided upon, with the excep- 
tion of the division of operating expenses. 

A form of division of operating expenses 
was submitted by Mr. Towne, and the Secre- 
tary was instructed to send copies of the 
same, together with the rules and form 
adopted, to the different members of the Com- 
mittee, asking them to take it under con- 
sideration for discussion and final decision at 
the next meeting of the Committee, to be held 
at the time of the General Convention of Rail- 
road Commissioners in June next. 

The form of return as adopted by the Com- 
mittee is as follows: 

GENERAL EXHIBIT. 

Total income 

Total exiiense 

Net income 

Interest on funded debt 

" " unfunded debt 

Rentals 

Balance applicable to dividends 

Dividends declared (per cent.) 

Balance for the year 



35 



■Balance (profit and loss) last year 

(Add or deduct various entries made 

during tlie year not included above 

(specifying same.) 
Balance (profit and loss) carried forward 

to next year 

•Charges and Credits to Property during 
THE Year. 

Construction and equipment (specifying 
same) 

Other charges (specifying same) 

Total charges 

Property sold or reduced in value (speci- 
fying same) 

Net addition (or reduction) for the year . . 

Analysis of Earnings and Expenses. 

Earnings : 
;From local passengers 

Through 

Express and extra baggage 

Mails 

Other sources, passenger department . . 
Total earnings passenger department 

Local freight 

Through freight 

Other sources, freight department 

Total earnings, freight department 

'Total transportation earumgs 

Rents from use of road 

Income from other sources (specifying 
same) 

Total income from all sources. . . . 

Expenses. 
(See form submitted.) 
assets and liabilities. 
Assets : 

•Construction account ; 

Equipment " 

(Locomotives, No. ) 

(Parlor and sleeping cars, No. ) 

(Passenger cars. No. ) 

(Baggage and mail cars. No. ) 

(Freight cars. No. ) 

(Other cars, No. ) 

Other investments (specifying same) 

Cash items : 

Cash 

Bills receivable 

Due from agents and companies 

-Other assets ; 

Materials and supplies 



Sinking funds 

Debit balances 

Total assets ; 

Liabilities : 

Capital stock (as specified below) 

Funded debt (as detailed below) 

Unfundi'd debt, as follows : 

Int<M«st unpaid 

Dividends unpaid 

Notes i^ayable 

Vouchers and accounts 

Other liabilities 

Profit and loss or income accounts 

Total liabilities 

present or contingent liabilities not in- 
cluded IN BALANCE SHEET. 

Bonds guaranteed by this comijany or a 

lien on its road (specifying same) 

Overdue interest on same 

Other liabilities (specifying same) 

mileage, traffic, etc. 

Mileage passenger trains 

Freight " .... 

Switching " 

Other " 

Total train mileage 

Miles run by passenger, mail, and baggage 

cars (north or east) 

Miles run by passenger, mail, and baggage 

cars (south or west) 

Miles run by freight cars (north or east) . . 
" '• " " (south or west).. 

Number of season ticket passengers 

Number of local passengers (including 

season) 

Number of through passengers 

Total number of passengers carried 

Mileage of local passengers (north or east) 

" " " (south or west) 

Mileage of through passengers (north or 

east) 

Mileage of through passengers (south or 

west) 

Total passenger mileage 

Number tons local freight carried 

" " through " " 

Total tons freight carried .... 

Mileage of local tonnage (north or east). .. 
" " " (south or west) .. 



y() 



Mileage of through tonnage (north or east) 
■ " " " (south or west) 

Total freight mileage 

Average weight of passenger trains 

'• number of cars in passenger 
trains 

Average weight of freight trains 

" number of cars in train 

" " persons employed. .. . 

Length of road, branches, sidings, &c. . . . 

Names of officers and directors 

Corporate name of company 

OPKEATING EXPENSES. 

Salaries general officers and clerks 

Law expenses 

Insurance 

Stationery and printing 

Outside agencies and advertising 

Contingencies 

Repairs bridges (including culverts and 

cattle guards 

Repairs buildings 

" fences, road crossings, and signs 
Renewal rails 



Renewal ties 

Repairs roadway and track 

" locomotives 

Fuel " 

Water supply 

Oil and waste 

Locomotive service 

Repairs passenger cars 

Passenger train service 

" " supplies 

Mileage passenger cars 

Repairs freight cars 

Freight train service 

'• " supplies 

Mileage freight cars 

Telegraph expenses (maintenance and 

operating) 

Damage and loss freight and baggage 

" " property and cattle 

Personal injuries 

Agents and station service 

Station supplies 

Total operating expenses .... 
I'axes 

Total operating expenses and 
taxes 



Report of Committee on Tests of American Iron and Steel. 



To the Anurican Society of Civil Engineers : 

Your Committee on Tests of American Iron 
and Steel begs leave to submit the following 
report : At the Annual Convention of the 
Society, held at the City of Chicago seven 
years, ago, your Committee on Tests was 
created. By frequent reports, and by papers 
read before the Society, you have been kept 
fully advised of the efforts made by the com- 
mittee to procure from Congress the neces- 
sary aiJiJropriations lor carrying on the work 
of the United States Testing Board. You 
have also been informed of the scheme of in- 
vestigations devised by the Board, and the 
progress made in such investigations. Two 
appropriations have been obtained, amount- 
ing in the aggregate to ninety-four thousand 
three hundred and ninety-six dollars and 
ninety-eight cents — the odd dollars and cents 
accruing by the addition of an unexpended 
balance to a round sum. The act making the 
last appropriation provides that when the 
money has been expended the Board shall 
cease to exist, and that the testing machine 
built under the direction of the Board, and 
for its use, shall be turned over to the Secre- 



tary of War. As you are aware, the machine 
was but recently completed. By directions 
given the Board at the time of its organiza- 
tion, this machine has been erected at the 
Watertowu Arsenal, situated at Watertown, 
Massachusetts. As soon as it is turned ovf r 
to the Secretary of War it drops into the pos- 
session of the United States Ordnance De- 
partment, subject to this further provision of 
the act referred to, that parties desiring to 
have tests made can do so by paying for the 
same The money will all be expended be- 
fore the end of the present fiscal year, which 
closes June 30th, inst. At the end of this 
month, then, the machine will be turned over- 
and the Unit<;d States Testing Board will cease 
to exist. For seven years your committee has, 
importvmed Congress for the necessary ap- 
propriations, with such measure of success, 
as has been reported to you. For four years 
the Board has labored under many difficulties 
to plan and carry forward the work confided 
to it. A plan of investigation, which has re- 
ceived the hearty approval of this Society and 
of eminent engineers throughout the world, 
has been arranged. Such investigations as. 



37 



■could be economically and effectively carried 
on without the use of the long delayed ma- 
chine, have been faithfully prosecuted by 
some of the sub-committees of the Board, 
and as a foretaste of the valuable results an- 
i cipated by us all from the labors of the United 
States Testing Board reports have recently 
beeu made by these committees, which will - 
at once become standard authority on the 
subjects treated. Our Society, the Testing 
Board, and the country at large, have com- 
pensation for the long delay in the completion 
of the testing machine, in its unprecedented 
excellence, now that it is done. The labors of 
the Board, but just begun, have yielded 
beneSts worth many times the gross amounts 
of the money appropriated, and our Govern- 
ment has for future use by far the best test- 
ing machine in the world. 

From time to time, during the last seven 
years, your committee has performed the dis- 
tasteful duties which devolve upon the " third 
house" at Washington, not corruptly, but 
honestly and earnestly commending a most 
worthy object to the attention and support of 
he Government. In the performance of this 
work its members have willingly spent large 
sums of money in necessary expenses and 
much valuable time, glad of the opportunity 
to make this contribution to so important a 
branch of scientific inquiry. Many members 
of the Society, and some of the manufacturers 
of iron and steel, besides numerous scientific 
societies and institutions of learning, have 
aided the committee with their valuable in- 
fluence. To all these your committee desire 
to return sincere thanks. And we desire to 
ask that you will overlo k or forgive the short- 
comings which have occurred in our efforts 
to perform the duties assigned to us. 

Engineers throughout our country realize 
the urgent need of the knowledge which the 
tests proposed were designed to procure. 
Ths country at large realizes it and fully ap- 
proves the appropriation of the public money 
for this beneficent jiurpose. 

Approprlatons have been obtained; the 
necessary machinery has beeu provided; the 
Board seemed well selected; the work was 
auspiciously begun, when a bolt shot from a 
sky that was already lowering when we held 
our convention in New Orleans, two years 
ago, struck the United States Testing Board, 
the ijet child of our Society, dead. 

If you cannot weep over its fall, picture to 
yourselves the tragedies which result from 
the ignorance which it was created to remove. 



and think of the symmetry, strength and 
perfection of the structures which American 
engineers would have given to the world, 
aided by the knowledge which this effort was 
designed to procure. 

Who, we ask the " American Society of Civil 
Engineers," are the rightful owners of the 
testing machine and other apijliances pro- 
cured with the people's money for the use 
of the United States Testing Board ? If the 
people, then let it be retained in the service 
of the people to promote the common inter- 
ests of the country and not be turned over to 
any single bureau or department of the Gov- 
ernment specially skilled only in a partic- 
ular line of inquiry. 

The knowledge we so much desire and so 
sorely need, can only be obtained by a mixed 
Board of experts independent of the control 
of any particular govermental department, 
except so far as the honest expenditure of 
the money appropriated is concerned. 

Now, what will our Society, with its mem- 
bership of six hundred, distributed in every 
State and Territory of the United States, do 
in this matter ? Have we the necessary power 
and Influence to induce the Government to 
right the grievous wrong that it has done us ? 
Or are we a mutual admiration society which 
meets ijeriodically to air flue spun theories, in 
utter unconsciousness of the density of the 
ignorance that envelops us ? If these ques- 
tions are couched in language lacking grace or 
courtesy, the S'>ciety is asked to pardon the 
want, and to remember that the threatened 
failure of an effort earnestly prosecuted for 
seven years, is likely to provoke strong lan- 
guage 

Your committee respectfully recommends 
that anew committee be appointed, the Chair- 
man of which should reside at or near Wash- 
ington, and that a ten times more vigorous 
effort than any yet made by the Society be 
put forth to recover what has been lost by 
inattention. As engineers, and as a society, 
we owe it to the Committee and Board who 
have labored so long without pay, to procure 
the means and to make the tes-ts. We owe it 
to our country and to the world, since the 
work had been so auspiciously begun, to see 
to it that it shall not be permitted to fail un- 
til the knowledge we so much need, and 
which is now just within our grasp, has been 
secured and thoroughly digested and pre- 
pared for common use. 

WM. SOOY SMITH, 
Ckairman of Committee on Tests. 



38 



Eepoet op the Finance Committee. 



Presented vekbally by William H. Paine, Chaikman. 



I did not expect to make a report this even- 
ing, but being acquainted with the finances 
of the Society, I will make a statement as I 
think it due to you that a report should be 
made. 

I will state that the Finance Committee on 
their organization took up all the papers of 
every character representing the expenses of 
last year, and audited them most carefully 
and fully, and found them correct ; further, 
that with the assistance of the Secretary and 
Treasurer, the Finance Account is now in 
such a shape that the auditing for the present 
year is very simple. I will further state that 
the Committee has made it a jjoint to meet 
regularly and audit the bills and to keep 
them in such a manner that they can be fully 
understood at all times ; this could only be 
done by the full co-operation of the Secretary 
and Treasurer. 

I will state that the bills which were out- 
standing, of which mention has been made at 
previous meetings, the number and amounts 
of which were unknown, have been obtained 
through the course of procedure of asking 
every person who receipted a bill to sign the 
bill in full. We think that all bills are now in, 
so that the Society is out of debt, which condi- 
tion I think we have reason to congratulate 
this Society upon. Furthermore, the state of 
our Finances has been such that the publi- 
cations of the Society were far in the back- 
ground ; at one time, nearly or quite ten 



months ; at the commencement of this year, 
I think, about five months ; so that we have 
been obliged to work very carefully, and to 
husband expenses and proceed with caution, 
requiring a great deal of energy and watch- 
fulness on the part of those who were en- 
trusted with this matter; and I now congratu- 
late the Society upon the fact that just before 
the Secretary started for this meeting, he 
mailed the last copies for the last mouth, so 
that we are up to date with our publications, 
which is, I think, a fact worthy of congratula- 
tion. It is a matter, too, which interests those 
more particularly who are not residents of 
New York, who are not pi'esent at the meet- 
ings of the Society. Those who are near can 
understand what is going on. The Finance 
Committee have felt, as well as the officers, 
that it was of the utmost importance that the 
member farthest distant should get the fullest 
information of the proceedings as promptly 
as possible, so as to make this Society national 
in its character, instead ot a Society simply 
belonging to the City of New York. 

I might go on with other matters, but think 
I have said enough. It has only been by the 
most industrious labor on the part of the 
Secretary and the Library Committee, whom 
you will perceive have bad double and more 
work to do, that we have been enabled to 
reach this result. I hope you will receive this 
verbal report, and I will not occupy your time 
longer. 



ANNOUNCEMENTS. 



At the Meeting of the Society to be held 
A.ugust 6th, a paper by Max E. Schmidt, 
member of the Society, will be presented, 
Bubject, '• The South Pass Jetties, Notes on 
the construction and durability of the works, 
with a description of the concrete blocks and 
other constructions of the last year." This 
paper will be put in print and will 1 e dis- 
cussed at the meeting of the Society to be held 
October 15th, 1879. Advance copies of the 



paper will be sent to persons who will contri- 
bute discussion. 

At the meeting of September 3d, a paper by 
William H. Searles, member of the Society, 
subject, " The Stability of Stone Structures," 
will be read and discussed. Advance copies 
of this paper will be sent to persons who de- 
sire to discuss the subject. 

At the meeting of September 17th, a paper 
by James D. Burr, member of the Society, 



39 



subject, " The Construction of the A. T. hud 
S. F. R. R., over the Raton Mountains," will 
be read and discussed. Advance copies of 
this paper will be sent to persons who desire 
to discuss the subject. 

At the meeting of October 1st, the paper 
No. CLXXX (Transactions May 1879), on the 
Construction and Maintenance of Roads, by 
Edward P. North, member of the Society, and 
the discussions presented on the same at the 
Convention at Cleveland will be considered 
and further discussed. Advance copies of 
these discussions will be furnished to iiersons 
desiring to discuss the subject. 

Discussion on each of these subjects is 
especially invited. The Secretary will for- 
ward the advance copies to those who inform 
bim of their desire to discuss. The discus- 
sions may be presented verbally or sent to the 
Secretary, who will read them lor the authors. 

The following resolution was adopted at the 
Ninth Annual Convention of the Society, and 
ordered printed regularly in the Society pub- 
lications : 



Whereas, the metric system of weights and 
measures is now extensively used abroad, 
and whereas it is desirable that the relation 
of the units of differing systems be made 
familiir to all by comparison: 

Resolved, That members be requested, in 
papers hereafter presented to the Society, to 
write, in parenthesis, weights or dimensions 
by the metric system, in connection with 
those of the system in general use. 

The House of the Society is at 101 East 
Twentieth street, one door from Fourth, 
avenue, and near the southwest corner of 
Gramercy Park. It is open from nine o'clock 
A.M. to five o'clock P.M. each business day, 
except 'Saturday, when it is closed at three 
o'clock p. M. 

The Library and Conversation Rooms will 
also, for the iireseut, be open every Thursday 
evening, from 1^4 to 10 p.m. Members are 
invited to avail themselves of the oppor- 
tunities, afforded on Thursday evenings both 
for consultation of books and periodicals, ;ind. 
lor conversation. 



LIST OF MEMBERS. 



ADDITIONS. 



MEMBERS. 

Date of Election. 

Allen, Charles A City Engineer, Worcester, Mass June 4th, 1S79. 

Burden, James A Burden Iron Works, Troy, N. Y July 2d, " 

DoRSEY, Edward B 261 Fifth Avenue, New York June 4th, " 

Haslett, Sullivan 115 Clinton st., Brooklyn, N. Y " " " 

Meigs, Montgomery U. S. Civil Eng., Rock Island, 111. .. March 5th, " 

Thompson, Wm. G. M Engineer in charge Welland Canal 

Enlargement, Welland Canal, On- 
tario, Canada ; July 2d, " 



fellow. 
Norton, Frederick O 90 Broadway, New York 



June 4th, 



40 



CHANGES AND CORRECTIONS. 
MEMBERS. 

Endicott, M. T U. S. Navy Yard, Portsmouth, N. H. 

Kennedy, William H Principal Asst. Engineer, Oregon Pacific Railroad, 

Walla Walla, Washington Territory. 

Kinsley, Thomas P 508 Franklin ave., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Low, GoRHAM p., Jr Asst. Engineer Missouri River Bridge, Plattsmouth, 

Nebraska. 

Miller, Reuben Crescent Steel Works, 81 Wood St., Pittsljurgh, Pa. 

Opdyke, Stacy B., Jr Engineer New Haven and Northampton, Co., 2?! 

Chapel St., New Haven, Conn. 
Smedley, Samuel L Chief Engineer and Surveyor of Philadelphia, East 

Entrance City Hall, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Thatcher, Edwin Keystone Bridge Co., Pittsburgh, Pa. 



Tasker, Ch.arles a Asst. Engineer, New York and Wood Haven Railroad, 

Wood Haven, Long Island, N. Y. 



dece.ased. 

Bell, Ja.mes E Elected Member March 5th, 1S79. Died June 8th, 

1879. 



Iniericau %mk of '^/uit |^ngineerB 



r^ROCEEDINOS. 



Vol. V, July, 1879. 
MINUTES OF MEETINGS 

(Abstract of such as may be of general interest to members.) 



ELEVENTH ANNUAL CONVENTION OF THE SOCIETY. 

FiEST Session. — The Eleventh Annual Convention was held at Cleve- 
land, Ohio, beginning Tuesday June 17th, 1879. The Society met in the 
Council Chamber of the City which had been kindly offered for the pur- 
pose. The Secretary, John Bogart, called the Convention to order at 
10 A. M. The chair was taken by Director and Past Vice-President, 
Theodore G. EUis. The Hon. R. R. Herrick, Mayor of the City, then 
addressed the Convention as follows : 

Gentlemen, — This is, as I am informed, the Eleventh Annual Convention of the 
American Association of Civil Engineers. I understand that there are represen- 
tatives here from several countries of the American continent. 

You have assembled from these different sections for one of the grandest pur- 
poses for which it is possible for men to meet together, and so intent upon the 
single object on which your thoughts are bent, you forget the difference of 
nationality, the difference of location and all tli« other differences which might 
tend to estrange one from the other and join hands, hearts and minds in the work 
of advancing that science and art whose function it is to utilize the forces and 
material of nature and cause them to subserve the general good. 

You are to be congratulated upon choosing this city at this season of the year 
as the place of holding your convention. We possess broad streets and avenues, 
the beauties of some of which have a world-wide reputation. The charming effect 
of the combination of art with nature is here observed. The abundance of trees. 



42 

some of which are relics of the " forest primeval," and whose refreshing- shade is 
now most grateful, has given us the name of the " Foi'est Citj'." "We have also 
our parks therein are seen on a somewhat limited scale the product of one branch 
of engineering art, the efforts of your brethren in the craft to imitate nature. 
Upon our northern boundary we have an inland sea from off whose bosom fresh 
breezes almost continually blow " To fan our people cool" and on whose water sail 
many ships which bring to us much of our prosperitj'. 

To our'Citj', gentlemen, with all her attractions and her generous hospitality, 
of which I believe you will receive ample proof before your departure, you are 
most welcome. 

Cleveland delights to receive within her boundaries such men as you. She is 
pleased to do honor to the students and practical demonstrators of that science 
which is doing more to develop the material resources of our country than all else 
besides. Your profession and the aims and objects of your gathering insures for 
you a most cordial greeting. We are fully aware of the relation which your 
profession sustains to the general development of our country. We know the 
vast scope wl^ich it comjarehends and realize the debt of gratitude we owe to your 
predecessors and yourselves for our present advanced state of prosperity. AVe 
appreciate the great progress of the jiast sixty j'ears, and know that the profession 
of engineering was the chief instrumentality in its accomplishment. Within that 
time it has covered our oceans, lakes and rivers with independent steamships, which 
ask no favors of the uncertain winds, but plow the waters, " pursuing the even 
tenor of their way" regardless of the quarter from which it blows. It has ditched 
the surface of the land for thousands of miles, thereby making canals for the safe 
and convenient transportation of merchandise. It has netted our country with 
railroads, arteries through which the life-blood of the nation continually flows. 
It has spanned our rivers and valleys with majestic viaducts and bridges. It has 
delved to the center of the earth and brought out the minerals which constitute 
the chief source of our wealth. It has tunnelled mountains and elevated valleys 
that the highway of trade might be made easy. It has constructed breakwaters 
and embankments, aqueducts, light-houses, docks, dams and sewers. All improve- 
ments small and great, incident to the growth of cities. States and nations are the 
products of its labors. As we traverse with ease and safety the viaduct that spans 
the valley, which lies between two sections of our own city, we appreciate the 
triumjA of the engineering art and the skill and ability of our own townsmen. 
Strong. Morse and Miller, who have proven themselves "Masters of the situa- 
tion." We gladly welcome their brethren in convention here assembled, and trust 
their sojourn with us may be both j^leasant and profitable. It affords me jsleasure 
in the name and behalf of the citizens of Cleveland to tender to you the freedom 
-of the city. 

Tlie Chairmau, Gen. T. G. Ellis, responded as follows : 

Mr. Mayor — In the name of the American Society of Civil Engineers, allow me 
to return to you our sincere thanks for this cordial reception. The courtesies ex- 
tended to us by the members of the Society residing in Cleveland, and by others 
of your citizens, as shown in the progamme arranged by the local committee, are, 
let me assure you, highly ajij^reciated. We shall return to our homes with our 



43 

hearts filled with pleasure by the kindness of our welcome, and our minds stored 
with knowledge by what we have seen. 

Again let me thank you for our cordial welcome to your beautiful city. 

Charles Paine, of Cleveland, was then chosen as Permanent Chair- 
man of the Convention, and, on taking the chair, referred to the fact 
that while there were sixty civil engineers in Cleveland, that number 
represented only a fraction of the engineering talent concentrated there, 
it being in fact a city of mechanical engineers. All these members of 
our profession welcomed the Convention to the city with great enthu- 
siasm, and had been so kind in the tender of invitations to visit the 
many points of engineering interest that the Committee had been much 
embarrassed in arranging the details for the few days at its disposal. 

After referring to the geological position of the city and the pro- 
gramme prepared for excursions, he called the Convention to order to 
proceed to business. 

John Bogart was then chosen to act as Secretary of the Convention, 
and George W. Dresser as De^juty Secretary. 

The roll was then called, and the folloAving members and guests were 
found in attendance.* 

Members of the Society. — E. E. Andrews, Boston ; James Archbald, 
Scranton, Pa. ; Theodore Allen, St. Louis ; Geo. D. Ansley, Montreal ; 
W. H. Bradley, F. fJrooks, Boston; John W. Bacon, Danbury, Conn. ; H. 
D. Blunden, John Bogart, New York; C. B. Brush, Hoboken, N. J. ; C. E. 
Broadhead, Hickory Kun, Pa. ; E. N. Beebout, Canton, Ohio ; G. Bous- 
caren, Cincinnati ; W. R. Relknap, Louisville ; D. W. Cunningham, 
Grantville, Mass. ; J. P. Cotton, Newport, R. I. ; O. Chanute, F. Col- 
lingwood, Theodore Cooper, New York ; W. B. Coffin, Elmira, N. Y. ; 
M. Coryell, Lambertville, N. J. ; E. S. Chesbrough, Chicago ; C. 
Constable, Rockwood, Tenn. ; George W. Dresser, New York ; Charles 
Davis, Alleghany City, Pa. ; C. Wheeler Durham, Chicago ; Fred.- de 
Funiak, Louisville, Ky. ; S. C. Ellis, Boston; C. D. Elliott, Somerville, 
Mass. ; Tlieo. G. Ellis, Hartford, Conn.; Thomas Egleston, C. E. 
Emery, NeAV York ; H. Earnshaw, Cincinnati ; John E. Earley, Flor- 
ence, Ala. ; E. A. Flint, Boston ; C. E. Fowler, New Haven, Conn. ; Clark 
Fisher, Trenton, N. J. ; Charles H. Fisher, Albany, N. Y. ; J. F. Flagg, 
MeadA-ille, Pa.; C. G. Force, Jr., Cleveland, Ohio ; H. Fladd, St. Louis; 
B. Godwin, New York ; F. Graff, Philadelphia, A. Gottlieb, Pittsburgh, 
Pa. ; J. M. Goodwin, Sharpsville, Pa. ; Alex. Gordon, Hamilton, O. ; 
A. B. Hill, NeAV Haven, Conn. ; R. Hering, Philalelphia ; J. E. Hilgard, 
"Washington, D. C. ; J. W. Hill, Cincinnati ; J. H. Harlow, Pittsburgh, 
Pa. ; T. S. Hardee, B. M. Harrod, New Orleans, La. ; W. E. KeUey, 
New Brunswick, N. J. ; M. W. Kingsley, Cleveland ; John Kennedy, 
Montreal ; T. C. Keefer, Ottawa, Canada ; D. J. Lucas, Corry, Pa. ; 
Charles Latimer, Cleveland, O. ; T. D. Lovett, Winton Place, O. ; W, 

* This list includes those who arrived at the Convention later. 



44 

H. Lotz, Chicago ; Charles Macdonald, Geo. S. Morison, Chas. H. 
Myers, New York ; D. N. Melviu, New Springville, Staten Island, 
N. Y. ; J. R. Maxwell, Newark, Del. ; D. E. McComb, Washington, 

D. C. ; N. M. McDowell, Alleghany City, Pa. ; Wm. Metcalf, Pitts- 
burgh, Pa. ; C. S. Maurice, Athens, Pa. ; B. F. Morse, Cleveland, O. ; 
W. E. Merrill, Cincinnati ; W. F. Merrill, Peoria, 111. ; John Mac- 
Leod, Louisville, Ky. ; E. P. North, F. O. Norton, New York ; W. J. 
Nicolls, Baltimore ; R. M. Newman, Jackson, Mich. ; Alfred Noble, 
Detroit, Mich. ; G. B. Nicholson, Cincinnati ; W. H. Paine, New York ; 
Charles Paine, Cleveland, O. ; P. A. Peterson, Montreal ; Wm. Rotch, 
Fall River, Mass. ; Thomas Rodd, Pitt.sburgh, Pa. ; R. L. Read, Cincin- 
nati ; H. B. Richardson, New Orleans ; W. H. Searles, New Y^ork ; E. 
Sweet, Jr., Albany, N. Y. ; S. L. Smedley, Philadelphia; F. Slataper, 
Pittsburgh, Pa. ; T. R. Scowden, S. Sheldon, C. H. Strong, Cleveland, 
O. ; H. E. Stevens, St. Paul, Minn. ; C. Shaler Smith, St. Louis ; W. 
Sooy Smith, Maywood, 111. ; E. N. K. Talcott, Morgan Park, 111. ; E. B. 
Van Winkle, New York ; F. O. Whitney, Boston ; J. Whitney, Cam- 
bridge, Mass. ; W. H. Wiley, W. E. Worthen, New York ; J. Whitelaw, 
Cleveland, O. ; H. F. Walling, Marietta, O. ; F. C. Weir, Cincinnati ; D. 
J. Whittemore, Milwaukee, Wis. ; T. J. Whitman, St. Loi;is ; S. 
Whinery, Wheeler, Ala. 

Visiting Engineers. — E. C. Appleton, Geo. H. Crafts, T. W. Davis, 
H. L. Eaton, F. L. Fuller, F. A. May, William Watson, Boston ; E. S. 
Davis, Lowell, Mass. ;* H. Constable, L. M. Haupt, L. C. Madeira, Phi- 
ladelphia ;t Geo. H. Frost, New York ; A. Wolcott, Chicago ;J N. P. 
Bowler, C. F. Brush, Cleveland, O. ; H. R. Bradbury, London, England; 
H. M. Claflen, J. D. Crehore, Cleveland, O.; D. Le Roy Dresser, New 
York ; Jorgen Dahl, Christiana, Norway ; G. Geuder, Cleveland, O. ; C. 

E. Greene, Ann Arbor, Mich. ; F. Hind, Watertown, N. Y. ; J. F. Holla- 
way, Cleveland, O. ; Wm. Kent, Pittsbiirgh, Pa. ; J. N. Knapp, Cleve- 
land, O. ; Thos. B. Lee, Newark, N. J. ; M. D. Leggett, Cleveland, O. ; 

F. A. Mahan, Pittsburgh, Pa. ; A. G. Mordecai, Cleveland, O. ; A. Meri- 
wether, M. Meriwether, Memphis, Tenn. ; M. W. Niven, Hoboken, N. J. ; 
A. H. Porter, M. E. Rawson, W. P. Rice, Cleveland, O. ; E. A. Rudiger, 
St. Marys, O. ; E. H. Talbott, Chicago ; J. WainAvright, A. M. Welling- 
ton, M. C. Younglove, Cleveland, O. 

On motion, the following Committee was appointed to determine the 
order of presentation of jiapers and of discussions : O. Chanute, of New 
York, W. E. Merrill, of Cincinatti, John Kennedy, of Montreal. 

A communication was presented from the Union Club of Cleveland, 
tendering a reception on the evening of June 19th. On motion, this in- 
vitation was accex^ted. 

* Members Bostou Society Civil Engineers, 
t Members Engineers Club of Philadelphia, 
t Members Engineers Club of the Northwest 



A paper by E. Sweet, Jr. , subject : ' ' The Engineering problems in- 
Tolved in tl^e proposed improvement of the Erie Canal, by increasing 
the depth of its channel one foot;" was read by the author, and discussed 
by C. H. Fisher, Theodore Allen, William Watson, Gr. Boiiscaren and 
the author. 

A paper by Alfred Noble, subject: "Experiments with appliances 
for testing cement," was read by the author, and the subject was dis- 
cussed by D. J. Whittemore, F. Collingwood, W. Sooy Smith, D. W. 
Cunningham, J. H. Harlow, C. Latimer, F. O. Norton, A. Noble, and, by 
letter, F. Rinecker. 

Second Session. — The Convention resumed its session at 8 p. m. 
Professor C. F. Brush made au address upon the electric light, which 
was illustrated by the stereopticon. 

A paper, by 0. G. Force, Jr., subject: "Design and Construction 
Table for Egg-shaped sewers," Avas read by the author, and illustrated 
by the Stereopticon. 

A graphic chart, systematically showing the accounts of a railway, 
was presented, illustrated by the Stereopticon and explained by Charles 
Latimer. 

A i^aper, by Charles Macdonald, subject : "The Construction of the 
Ocean Pier at Couey Island," was presented, illustrated by the Stereop- 
ticon, and read by the author. It Avas discussed by C. Shaler Smith, 
J. WhitelaAV, G. W. Dresser, C. B. Brush, and the author. 

The specifications for the GlasgOAv Steel Bridge Avere then read by 
the author, W. Sooy Smith, and discussed by W. H. Paine, G. Bous- 
caren, A. Gottlieb, Wm. Kent, C. Macdonald, W. Metcalf, C. G. Force, 
F. CoUingAvood, and the author. 

Third Session. — The Convention resumed its session at 10 a. m., 
Wednesday, June IStli. 

The Committee to determine the order of presentation of papers and 
of discussions, submitted the folloAving resolutions, Avhich Avere adopted : 
Resolved, that in order to expedite business, each speaker be limited 
to ten minutes, unless by consent of the Convention. 

Resoh-ed, that discussions on published papers shall take precedence 
of new papers, so far as practicable. 

A paper by Charles E. Emery, subject: "Flexure and Transverse 
Resistance of Beams," Avas read by the author, and discussed by William 
Kent. 

A paper, by F. Collingwood, describing the progress of the work on 
the New York and Brooklyn Bridge, was read by the author. 

A discussion of the published papers on the subject of the relative 
quantities of material in Bridges of different kinds of various heights, 
was presented by Charles E. Emery. 

The published papers on the subject of the theoretical resistance of 
railroad curves, were discussed by J. F. Flagg, S. Whinery, and W. H. 
Seaiies* 



46 

The piiblislied paper by Edward P. North, siibject : " The Construc- 
tion and Maintenance of Eoads," was discussed by Chafles B. Brush, 
C. Shaler Smith, G. Bouscaren, E. B. Van Winkle, and by letters, F. 
Lavoiune, of Auxerre, France ; F. Einecker, of Wurzburg, Germany ; 
and Charles Douglas Fox, of London, England. 

FoxjETH Session.— The regular meeting of the Society was held 
Wednesday evening, June 18th (see page 30 ante). At the close of the 
regular meeting the Convention resumed its se^ion and proceeded to 
the business prescribed by Section 24 of the By-Laws : "At the An- 
nual Convention a Nominating Committee of five members, not oificers 
of the Society, shall be appointed by the Convention." 

Nominations were made, and a ballot being taken, the following 
members were appointed by the Convention as the Nominating Com- 
mittee : 

Thomas S. Hardee, of New Orleans, I^a. ; Thomas C. Keefer, of Ot- 
tawa, Canada ; Charles Paine, of Cleveland, Ohio ; Thomas J. Whit- 
man of St. Louis, Mo. ; Joseph P. Davis, of Boston, Mass. 

On motion of W. E. Merrill, the following resolution was adopted : 

Eesolved, that the President of the Society be requested to establish 
such relations with the authorities at Washington, who print public 
documuents as will enable the members of this Society to procure 
engineering documents on the best terms. 

Fifth Session. — The Convention resumed its session at 10 a. m., 
Thursday, June 19tli. 

The discussion of the published paper on the construction and main- 
tenance of roads was resumed and continued by D. E. McComb, E. E. 
Andrews, C. Shaler Smith, G. Bouscaren, G. D. Ansley, E. S. Ches- 
brough, A. B. Hill, J. E. Hilgard, H. Flad, M. Merriwether, B. F. 
Morse and the author, E. P. North. 

The published paper by John Bogart, subject, " The permanent 
■way of railways in Great Britain and Ireland, with s^secial reference to 
the use of timber preserved and unpreserved," was discussed in a paper 
read by E. E. Andrews, and the subject further discussed by C. Lat- 
mer, E. Sweet, Jr., Wm. Watson, T. Egleston, C. Paine, J. Kennedy 
and, by letter, E. W. Bowditch. 

On motion, it was 

Eesolved, that the Convention recommend tlie appointment of a 
Standing Committee on the Preservation of Timber. (See Proceedings, 
page 31 ante.) 

A discussion of the published papers on the subject, "Brick Arches 
for Large Sewers," was presented in a letter from C. Herschel, and the 
subject further discussed by E. Hering. 



47 

The published paper by James B. Francis, subject, " The distribu- 
tion of rain fall during the great storm of October, 1869," was dis- 
cussed by W. Rotch. 

The subject of a comparison of Standard Measures, English, French 
and United States was presented by abstracts from a i^aper by A. S. C. 
Wurtele and discussed by J. E. Hilgard, T. G. Ellis and C. Latimer. 

The published paper by John W. Hill, subject, "Cushioning the 
reciprocating parts of Steam Engines," was discussed by C. E. Emery 
and the author, J. W. Hill. 

The published paper by D. McN. Stauffer, subject, "The use of 
compressed air in Tubular foundations and its "application at South 
Street Bridge, Philadelphia," was discussed by F. Collingwood. 

The published papers by R. Hering, subject, " The Flow of Water 
in Small Channels, after Ganguillet and Kutter," was discussed in a 
paper, sent with a letter, by C. H. Swan, and further discussed by E. 
Hering. 

A paper by John Kennedy, subject, " The Improvement of the St. 
Lawrence Paver," was read by the author. 

The following unpublished i^apers were presented during the Con- 
vention, but not read on account of the want of time after the conclu- 
sion of the discussions on published papers : 

Brazil, its Railways and Water Comrdimications, W, Milnor Roberts. 

The South Pass Jetties — the consolidation and durability of the works, 
with description of the Concrete Blocks and other constructions of the 
past year. Max E. Schmidt. 

Discussion on the South Pass Jetties. H. D. Whitcomb. 

Notes as to Construction and Operation of the Railroad over the 
Raton Mountains, Col., and the Construction and Performance of the 
Locomotives thereon. James D. Burr. 

The Flow of Water in Rivers. De Volson Wood. 

Stability of Stone Structures. Wm. H. Searles. 

Wind Pressure. F. Collingwood. 

Cadastral Maps in Ohio. H. F. Walling. 

Additional notes on the Submarine Telephone. Chas. W. Raymond. 

The following resolutions were adopted : 

Resolved, that the Convention desires to express its hearty appre- 
ciation of and thanks for the great kindness, attention and forethought 
of the Local Committee in making preparations and carrying out the 
many details of arrangements for this Convention. 

Resolved, that the warmest thanks of this Convention be tendered to 
the Mayor and other authorities of the City of Cleveland, to its citizens 
and to the city press, as well as to the various manufacturing and other 
establishments which we have visited, for their kind attentions and hos- 
pitality, which have made this Convention one of the plesantest and 
most successful which the Society has ever held. 



48 

Resolved, that the thanks of the Convention be extended to Mr. 
Charles Paine for the able and courteous manner in which he has pre- 
sided over its deliberations. 

Resolved, that the thanks of the Convention be extended to the 
Managers of Railways and other lines of Transportation who have 
extended facilities for enabling the members to visit the Convention and 
return to their homes. 

Resolved, that the thanks of the Convention are extended to the 
Committee which has so well discharged its duties in preparing and 
presenting the report regarding the Paris Exposition and our exhibits 
there. 

Adjourned. 



Very complete arrangements were made by the Lopal Committee for 
the time occupied in the regular sessions above reported. The visits to 
the many points of engineering interest in Cleveland and its immediate 
vicinity were so managed as to give to the members of the Society and 
their guests quite as full information in regard to the many industrial 
and mechanical works of the city as the time allowed. The excursions 
after the close of the Convention were also of great interest, and were 
fully enjoyed. 

The members of the Cleveland Local Committee were : Charles 
Paine, Chairman ; S. Sheldon, Charles H. Strong, T. R. Scowden, 
John Whitelaw, E. T. Scovill, Charles Latimer, B. F. Morse, J. Newell, 
M. W. Kingsley ; C. G. Force, Jr., Sec'y and Treas. 

The general programme for each day was printed in pocket form, 
with a monogram of the Society on the cover. It was distributed to 
members and guests, and was as follows : 

AMERICAX SOCIETY OF CiViL ENGINEERS. 



ELEVENTH ANNUAL CONVENTIOX. 



The headquarters of tlie Society will be at the Forest City House, Monu- 
mental Park. The Meetin<>-s of the Society will be held in the City Council 
Chamber, City Hall, on Superior Street, East of the Park, three minutes' walk 
from the Society headquarters. Take the elevator in the main entrance, City 
Hall. By the courtesy of the City Council tlie Council Chamber is placed at the 
disposal of the Society. 

The Local Committee on Convention request each member and invited guest 
to call at the rooms of the Committee at headquarters immediately on arrival. 

The members are requested, as soon as possible after their arrival, to signify 
to the Secretary which of the Excursions he proposes to join, and whether accom- 
panied by ladies. 



49 

Ladies accompanying Members and Guests are invited to join all the Excur- 
sions, except on Wednesday afternoon. 

Tuesday, June 17. 

Convention will be called to order at 10 a. m. Hon. R. R. Herrick, Mayor of 
Cleveland, will welcome the Society in behalf of the citizens of Cleveland. Ses- 
sion. Adjournment. Dinner. 

In the afternoon, leaving the hotel at 2 o'clock, an excursion in charge of Mr. 
B. F. Morse, City Civil Engineer, will be made to the Cleveland Viaduct; thence 
to the Reservoir and Pumping Works of the Cleveland Water Works ; at this 
point the party will be in charge of Mr. John Whitelaw, Chief Engineer of the 
"Water Works Department. Returning, will visit the Telegraph Supply Com- 
pany's Works, Nos. 145 and 147 St. Clair street. Here the party will be in 
charge of Hon. M. D. Leggett, President of the Company, assisted by Professor 
Charles T. Brush, the inventor of the Brush Electric Lamp and the Brush 
Dynamo-Electric Machine. Prof. Brush will have a machine taken apart and one 
in operation, and will explain the working of his apparatus. 

The excursion will end with a drive to the Union Steel Screw Company's 
Works, by the way of Euclid avenue. Here the party will be in charge of Mr. 
J. A. Bidwell, Superintendent of the Works. Returning, will visit the private 
grounds of J. H. Wade, Esq., owner of Euclid and Case avenues, thence by the 
way of Prospect street to the hotel. 

At 7:45 p. m., the regular Society Meeting, to which the public is invited. 
The acting President of the Society will deliver an address, giving a summary of 
Engineering progress during the preceding years. 

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 18. 

Mr. Charles H. Strong, Manager of (lie Bay. 

The Convention will be called to order at 10 a. m. Session. Adjournment — 
Dinner.' 

In the afternoon there will be an excursion to some of the manufacturing 
<>stablishments of the city, byway of the Cleveland & Pittsburg and Atlantic tfe 
Great Western Railroads. Special train will leave the Union Passenger Depot at 
2 P.M., arriving at the Otis Iron and Steel Company's Works at 2:05. Here the 
party will be in charge of Hon. Charles A. Otis, President of the Otis Iron and 
Steel Company. Leaving at 2:25, will arrive at the St. Clair Street Crossing 2:28; 
from here Mr. H. M. Claflin, President of the Cleveland Bridge and Car Works, 
will escort the party to the works ot that company ; thence in charge of Mr. Zenas 
King, President of the King Iron Bridge and Manufacturing Company, to the 
works of this company, making a short stop at the Novelty Iron Works, Thomas 
R. Reeves, President. Leave St. Clair Street Crossing at 3 ; arrive at the Cleveland 
Rolling Mill Co.'s Works at 3:20. Here the party will be in charge of Mr. Henry 
Chisholm, President of the company, assisted by Mr. Willson Chisholm, Superin- 
tendent of the Newburgh Works. Thence by way of the A. & G. W. R. R., 
special train, leaving at 4:35, will arrive at the works of the Standard Oil Co. at 
4:50. Here the party will be met by Mr. A. M. McGregor, Superintendent of the 



50 

Manufacturing Department of the Standnrd Oil Co., assisted by Mr. W. P. Cowen, 
Superintendent of the eomjjany's worlis at Cleveland. 

Leaving the Standard Oil Co.'s Works at 6:00, will arrive at the Union Pas- 
senger Depot at 6:30, and at the hotel at 6:50. 

By the courtesy of the officers of the C & P. and the A. <fe G. W. R. R's, 
special trains will be run for the accommodation of the excursion party. 

The locomotive whistle will be sounded five minutes before leaving each stop- 
ping point. 

During the stay at the varions points the movements of the partj' will be 
directed by the Manager of the Day, giving his signal with a policeman's whistle. 

By invitation of Miss Sarah E. Fitch, President of the Women's Christian 
Association, an opportunity will be given the ladies to visit some of the benevo- 
lent institutions of the city. Carriages will be in waiting at the hotel at 2:30 

Session and busijiess meeting at 7:45 p. m. 

THURSD.W, JUNE 19. 

There will be a social meeting of the Society at 10 a m., at the Citj^ Council 
Chamber. 

Two excursions have been provided for this afternoon. 

Excursion on the lake. Jo/m Whitelaw, manager. 

By the courtesy of Captain L. A. Pierce, agent of the Michigan Central R. R. 
Line of Steamers, there will be an excursion on the steamer City of Detroit, Cap- 
tain William McKay. Invitations have been extended to members of the profes- 
sion and others to join this excursion accompanied by ladies. 

Members joining this excursion will leave the hotel at 1:45 p. m. in carriages, 
arriving at wharf No. 23 East River street 1:55. The boat leaves at 2 p. m., return- 
ing at 5 p. M. On the way out the steamer will sail around the Water Works 
Crib, aiid if the weather is favorable an opportunity will be given by those who 
wish to land and examine the work. 

Excursion to Berea and Amherst Stone Quarries. Charles Paine, maiiager. 

Those who wish to visit these stone Quarries will leave the hotel at 2 p. m., 
and the Union Depot at 2:15 p. m., thence by way of the C. C. C. & I. Railway; 
will arrive at Berea at 2:45 p. m., change to ()i)en cars and go into the Beiea Quar- 
ries, under the guidance of Mr. Frank Ford, Chief Engineer, C. C. C. <fe L Rail- 
way. Returning to Berea Station at 3:45 p. m., take excursion coaches and pro- 
ceed to Amherst Quarries. Returning by way of L.' S. & M. S. R. R., will leave 
Amherst at 6 p. m., and arrive at the Union Depot at 7 p. m. 

By the courtesy of the officers of the C. C. C. & L and the L. S. & M. S. R. R., 
a special train will be run for the accommodation of the party. 

reception. 
The Union Club of Cleveland, S. L. Mather, President, has tendered a recep- 
tion to the Society and its invited guests, at the Club House, No, 417 Euclid 
avenue, nbout five minutes' walk from the headcjuarters, Tiiursday evening, June 
19, commencing at 8 o'clock. Those wishing to ride can take the Prospect street 
cars in front of the b.otel direct to the entrance on Euclid avenue. 



51 

FRIDAY, JUNE 20. 

Charles^ Latimer, Mavngev of the Day. 

On this day an excursion will be made to the Mahoning Valley coal fields. 
The party will ^leave the hotel in carriages at 7:40 a. m., and the Atlantic & Great 
Western depot at 8 a. m. ; arrive at Leavittsburgh at 9:20 a. m. ; here a car hoist 
and transfer may be witnessed. Leave Leavittsburgh at 9:40 a. m. ; arrive at 
Vienna Junction at 10:15 a. m., and arrive at Church Hill coal mines at 10:25 a. m. 
Here the party will be in charge of Mr. John Tod, President of the Coal Company 
of Tod, Morris & Co. Leave Church Hill at 11:25 a. m. ; arrive at Youngstown 
at 11:45 a. m. ; headquarters at the Tod House. The citizens of Youngstown have 
provided dinners for the party and carriages for drives to points of interest in 
Youngstown and vicinity during the afternoon. 

During the stay in Youngstown Mr. Robert McCurdy and Mr. Chauncy .An- 
drews will direct the movements of the party. Returning, will leave Youngs- 
town at 4:50 p. m. Arrive at Cleveland at 7:15 p. m. 

The excursion train will be under the direction of J. M. Ferris, Superintendent 
of the M. D. of the A. &G. W. R. R.- 

BHADFORD OIL DISTRICT. 

Members not desiring to go into the Mahoning Valley Coal Fields may take 
the 7:10 a. m. express on the A. & G. W. R. R., arriving at Bradford at 5:15 p. m. 
Leaving Bradford at 2:20 p. m. on the next day, can connect with tlie main line 
going east at 3 p. m. For the west leave Bradford at 10 a. m. and make close con- 
nections, or at 4 p. M. and connect with the main line at 11:39 p. m. 

XIAGARA FALLS. 

Arrangements have been made, by which eastern members and others wishing 
to visit th" ^alls, may leave Cleveland on any of the regular trains, connecting at 
Buffa! ■ l'..r iNiao-ara Falls. 



A large party left Cleveland, as arraDged V^y tlie above programme, 
for the Mahoning Valley Coal Fields, where a descent was made into the 
Great Church Hill Mine. Youngstown was then visited, and industrial 
Avorks of much engineering interest examined. The Society and its 
guests were hospitably entertained by a committee of the citizens of 
Youngstown. A number of the party then visited Niagara Falls. 

Another party visited the Oil District at Bradford, Pa. , where, under 
the kind guidance of Mr. Charles Newell, the operations of drilling and 
tubing oil wells, pumping oil, endeavoring to recover tools lost in the 
wells, etc., were inspected. The use of natural gas for heating and 
cooking was also observed. 

On Monday morning, June 16th (the day previous to the Convention), 
a large number of the members of the Society and their guests, en route 
for Cleveland, arrived at Pittsburgh, Pa. Here they were met by the 
members resident in that city, and first visited the Avorks at Davis Island, 
where a lock and system of movable dams is in course of construction 



52 

by the United States Goverument. The operations in progress and the 
plans for completion were explained bj Lieut. F. A. Mahan, United 
States Engineers, and James H. Harlow, member of the Society. 

The Edgar Thomson Steel Works were also visited, and the details of 
the works, which were in full progress, were inspected. 

The new engines at the pump houses of the City Water Works of 
Pittsburgh, were also examined. 



July 2d, 1879.— The Society met at 8 p. m. William E. Worthen in 
the chair. 

Ballots for admission to membership were canvassed, and the following 
were declared elected as members : James A. Burden, of Troy, N. Y., 
and William G. M. Thomson, of Welland, Ontario, Canada. 

The death, on Sunday, June 8th, 1879, at Cincinnati, of James E. 
Bell, member of the Society, Avas announced, and the President was 
authorized to apjioint a committee to j^repare a memoir of the deceased. 
The Board of Direction re^jorted the designation of William E. 
Worthen to attend the tests of turbines, in accordance with the resolu- 
tion of the Society of June 1th, 1879. In case of inability to serve by 
Mr. Worthen, the designation of Charles E. Emery, as an alternate, was 
announced. 

A Paper by W. Milnor Roberts, on the subject of Brazil, its Railway 
and Water Communications, was read by the Secretary, and discussed 
by members present. 

July ICth, 1879. —The Society met at 8 p. m. Thomas C. Clarke in 
the chair. 

A Paper by De Volson Wood, subject, "The Flow of Water in 
Rivers," was read by the Secretary, and discussed by Messrs. Clarke, 
Cooper, North, J. F. Ward, and Yardley. 



LIST OF NEW BOOKS ON 

ENGINEERINC^ ANE) TECHNOLOOY 



Alphabets, Pocket Book, including Church Arches, Voussoir Arches applied to Stone 

Text, t'pyptian, Egyptian Perspective, Bridges, Tunnels, Domes and Groined 

French, t^rench Antique, French Renais- Arches. William Cain, C. E, New York, 

siince, German Text, Italic, Italian Shaded, IHmo. No. 42 Science Series. Van JVos- 

Italian Hairline, Monograms, Old English, trand. $0.50. 

Old Roman, Open Roman, Open Stone, Architecture, Cottages : How to Arrange and 

Ornamental Roman, Latin, Rustic, Tuscan, Build them to Ensure Comfort, Economy 

,*>:(•. New York. Spons. SO. 20. and Health. With Hiuts on Fittings and 

Aiu-mometer, On the Determination of the Furniture, by a Sanitary Reformer. lUus- 

Constants of the Cup Anemometer, by trated by Woodcuts aud Plates. (Ready to 

Kxperimeuts with a Whirling- Machine. . Hand Guides.) Post, 8vo, i^p. 200. Loudon. 

From the Philosoijhical Transactions of the Bemrnse.. Sa. 6d. 

Royal Society. Part 2. 1878. 4to. T. R. Boiler, The Kitchen Boiler and Water Pipes, 

liobiuson. Loudon. Trubntr. 5s. A few words on their arrangement aud 



53 



iQanagement ; more especially their treat- 
meut during frost, and how to avoid explo- 
sion a. By H. Grirashaw. New York and 
London. 8vo. Spans. SO. 40. 

Bricklaying, Rudiments of practical . 

(Weales Series.) 3d ed. London. 12mo. 
Crosht/ Lrickwdod. Is. 6d. 

Chromatics, Modern , with applicatinns 

to Art and Industry. Ogden N. Kood, Prof, 
of Physics, Col. Coll., New York. 12mo. 
Appitifins. (Announcement.) 

Cleopatra's Needle— The Obelisk of Alexan- 
dria : Its Acquisition and Removal to Eng- 
land described. By Lieut. -General Sir J. E. 
Alexander, Kt. C. B. London. 8vo. Chatto 
& Wimlus. 28. 6d. 

Coal, A Rudimentary Treatise on Coal and 
Coal Mining. W. Warrington Smith. Lon- 
don. 12mo. Crosb)/ Lockwood. 48. 

, Coal Mines Inspection : Its History 

and Results. R. Nelson Boyd. London. 
8vo. IF. //. AlUn. 14s. 

Comstock Lode, Its History. John A. Church, 

E. M., Prof, of Mining, Ohio State Univ. 
New York. 4to. Wiley. $6.00. 

Drainage, Hints on House Drainage, for 
Owners, Occupiers and Builders. Henry 
Ough. London and New York. Bvo. 
Spans. $0.20. 

Electric Light, The in its practical 

application. Paget Higgs, A. I. C. E. 
London and New York. 8vo, illus. Spans. 
$3.50. 

Engineers — Proceedings of the Association of 
Municipal and Sanitary Engineers and Sur- 
veyors. Vol. V. 1877-8. Ed. by C. Jones. 
London. Bvo. SiJons. $4.25 

The Executive Departments of the United 
States at Washington. A comprehensive 
view of the power, functions and duties of 
the heads of Departments, bureaus and 
divisions at Washington, as prescribed by 
law and regulations ; together with a 
description in detail of the organization of 
each ; also a sketch in detail of the imprac- 
tical operations in the transactions of public 
affairs, and of business with the people. By 
Webster Elmes. Washington. 12mo. W. 
H. <£• O. H. Morrison. $4.00. 

Filtration of Potable Water. W. Ripley 
Nichols. New York. 8vo. Van Noslrand. 
$1.50. 

Foundations and Foundation Walls, for all 
classes of Buildings ; Pile Driving, Build- 
ing Stones and Bricks, Pier and Wall Con- 
struction, Mortars, Limes, Cements, Con- 
cretes, Stuccos, etc. By G. T. Powell. 
With Treatise by Fred'k Baumano. New 
York. 8vo, illus. Bicknell <£- Comstock. 
$1 50. 

Gas AnalysiB, The Gas Analyst's Maniial. By 

F. W. Hartley, A.I. C. E. Will contain 
description of Apiaaratus, Standard Burn- 
ers, etc., and instructions for the Testing 
of the Illuminating Powers, Purity, Speci- 
fic Gravity, etc., of Coal Gas ; together with 
Tables to facilitate calculations. London. 
8vo, illus. Spans. $2.50. 

Gas Measurement, Correct . G. 

Glover. London and New York. 8vo. 

Spans. $0.40. 
Health, How to get strong and how to stay so. 

W. Blakie. New York. 16mo. Harpers. $1. 
Heat. Au introduction to the study of heat. 

J. Hamblin Smith. 6th ed., rev. and enl. 

London. 8vo. Rivinglons. 3s. 
, New Determinations of the Mechanical 

Equivalent of Heat. From the Philosophi- 



cal Transactions of the Royal Society. Part 
2. 1878. James Prescott Joule. London. 
4to. Trubner. 2s. 

Levelling, Hints on Levelling Operations as 
Applied to the Reading of Distances by the 
Law of Perspective, and the Saving thereby 
of Chainmen in a Level Survey. With 
Remarks on the other Advantages that can 
be gained in the Survey by adopting this 
Principle in the use of any Ordinary Level- 
ling Telescope and Staff. W. H. Wells. 
London. 8vo. Spans. Is. 

Mechanics. R. Stawell Ball. London. 
(Science Class Books.) 18mo. Longmans. 
Is. 6d. 

Metalliferous Blinerals, Mines and Mining ; 
A treatise on. D. C. Davies. London. 8vo. 
Crosby Lockwood. (Announcement.) 

Military Law, A treatise on and 

the jurisdiction, constitution and pro- 
cedure of military courts with a summary 
of the rules of evidence as applicable to 
such courts. Lt. Rollins A. Ives, 5th Art. 
U. S. A., Prof, of Law, U. S. M. A. New 
York. 8vo. Van Nostrand. $4.00. 

Ordnance Survey. Report for 1878. Maps. 
British Govt. Publication. 4s. 6d. 

Plasterer's Manual. Cont. Description of all 
tools and materials used in plastering ; the 
appearance and action of every variety oS' 
lime and cement ; instructions for making 
all kinds of mortar ; for doing all kinds of 
plain and ornamental plastering ; cistern 
building ; form of contract ; Useful tables; 
recipes, etc. K. Cameron. New York. 
16mo, illus. Bicknell d Comstock. $0.75. 

Railway Accidents. Inspector's roports. Brit- 
ish Govmt. Pub. 5s. 9d. 

Signal Arrangements. British Govmt. 

Pub. 8d. 

Railway reports, American ; collection of 

all rejjorted decisions relative to railways. 
Vol. 11. 13, 14, 15, 16 (W. W. Ladd, Jr.). N. 
Y., Cockroft <£• Co. 1878-79. Ea. 8^ shp., 
$6.00. 

Railways, Narrow Gauge. C. E. Spooner. 
London and New York. Bvo, illus., 2d ed. 
Spans. $6. 

Record, Annual, of Science and Industry for 
1878. Spencer F. Baird. New York. 8vo. 
Harpers. $2.00. 

Roads. The maintenance of Macadamized 
roads : construction, materials, wear, 
spreading, sweeping and scraping, drain- 
age, watering, repairs beyond ordinary 
maintenance, and Management. Thomas 
Codrington, M. I. C. E. London and New 
York. Bvo. Spans. $2.50. 

Science Index, The. A Monthly Guide to the 
contents of Scientific Periodicals: consisting 
of a Classified Alphabetical List of the titles 
and authors (if known) of articles of scien- 
tific or technical interest that have appeared 
in jaeriodicals during the previous month. 
Each issue will comprise about GO quarto 
pages. It will be sold only by subscrip- 
tion, payable in advance. London and New 
York. Spans. Price per annum $6. 

Scientific i^apers. Catalogue of 1864-73. 

Compiled by the Royal Society of London. 
Vol. 8., royal Bvo. British Govmt. Pub. 20s. 

Sewer Gases : their nature and origin, and 
how to protect our dwellings. A. de Va- 
rona, M. D. Brooklyn Eagle Book Print. 
16mo. $0.75. 

Smithsonian Institiition. Documents relative 
to its origin and history, ed. by W. J. Rhees. 
Washington, D. C, Smithsonian Institution, 



54 



1879. (Smithsoniau miscellaueous collec- 
tion, 328.) Cloth, 8vo. 

Society of Eugiueers. Transactions, 1878 : 
ed. \>y P. K. Nursey. London and New 
York. 8vo. Spovs. $0.00. 

Steam Engine. Corliss Engine and Allied 
Steam Motors working with and without 
Automatic Variable Expansion Gear, in- 
cluding the latest, most approved engine 
designs of all countries, with special refer- 
ence to the steana engines of the Paris In- 
ternational Exhibition of 187S. For engi- 
neers, machinists, steam users, and engi- 
neering colleges. Translated from W. H. 
Uhland's work, by A. Tolhausen, Jr., C. E. 
In folio and 4to. Spons. (Announcement.) 

Steel. A Treatise on Steel : its history, manu- 
facture and uses. By J. S. Jeans, Sec. of 
the Iron and Steel Institute. In one large 
volume, 8vo, with numerous jjlates and 
woodcuts. Spons. (Announcement.) 

Surveying. Practice in Underground Sur- 
veying and advocacy of Contoured Mining 
Plans. W. F. Howard. New York. 8vo, 
plate Spans. $0.80. 

Table, Graphical Computing ; Book and 

chart of tables ; book contains directions 
for use of tables which author asserts will 
"enable anybody, without calculation and 
at sight," to multiply or divide any two 
numbers: to find 2d, 3 1, or 5th power or 
root of any number; to obtain the circum- 
ference or area of any circle ; to miiltiply 
or divide by the sine, cosine, tangent or co- 
tangent of any arc; to reduce feet to metres 
or metres to feet, etc., etc. Lt. W. H. Bix- 
by, U. S. Engineers. New York. 16mo, 
chart. ^V^lelJ. $0.75. 

Tables. Mathematical Tables for Trigono- 
metrical, Astronomical, and Nautical Calcu- 
lations; to which is prefixed a Treatise on 
Logarithms, by Henry Law, C. E., together 
with a series of Tables for Navigation and 
Nautical Astronomy, by J. R. Young, for- 
merly Professor of Mathematics in Belfast 
College. New and Revised Edition. Lon- 
don. Crosby Lockwood. 3s. 6d. 



Thames River, Prevention of Floods. Re- 
port and evidence. British Govmt. Pub. 
Is. 6d. 

Tramways. Report and Evidence. British 
Govmt. Pub. 2s. Id. 

War. Course of Instruction in elements of 
Art and Science ot War, for use of cadets in 
U. S. Military Academy. J. B. Wheeler, 
Prof. Mil. Acad. New York. 8vo, ilius. 
Van Nostrand. $1.75. 

War Department. History of War Depart- 
ment U. S. ; with biographical sketches of 
Secretaries. L. D. Ingersoll. Washington. 
8vo. F. B. Mohun. $3.50. 

Water. House Sanitation, Water Supply, and 
Domestic Filtration. Some Remarks on 
the Internal Water Supply of Dwellings, 
and the Best Means to be adopted for the 
removal of the contaminations which re- 
sult from its storage in tanks and cisterns. 
With description of the Self-supplying 
aerated (oxidising) filter, and sketch of 
Dwelling. J. B. Denton. London. 8vo. 
Spons. 6d. 

Weight Calculator. Being a series of tables 
exhibiting at one reference the exact value 
of any Weight from 1 lb. to 15 tons, at 300 
progressive rates, from 1 penny to 168 shil- 
lings per cwt., and containing 186,000 di- 
rect answers, which, with their combina- 
tions consisting of a single addition (mostly 
to be performed at sight), will afiord an 
aggregate of 10,266,000 answers : the whole 
being calculated and designed to ensure 
correctness and promote dispatch. By Hen- 
ry Harben, accountant, Sheffield, author 
of " The Discount Guide." Third edition. 
London. Royal 8vo. Crosby Lockwood. 
(Announcement.) 

Weights and Measures Act, 1878 (41 and 42 
Vict., Chap. 49) ; including a practical sum- 
mary of the Act, with Notes and Cases, to- 
gether with the memorandum prefixed to 
the Act, kc. ; also the Bread Act, 1836, so 
far as it relates to Weights and Measures. 
Slade Butler. 12aio. London. Shaw <£• 
Sons. 4s. 



ADDITIONS TO 



LIBRARY ANDMLTSEUM. 



From American Chemical Society, P. 
Cassamajor, Secretary, New York : 
Journal of the Society, Vol. I, Nos. 3 and 4. 

From American Iron and Steel Associa- 
tion, James M. Swank, Secretary, 
Philadelphia : 
Annual Report of the Secretary for 1878. 
Proceedings ot' the Convention of Iron and 
Steel Manufacturers and Iron Ore Pro- 
ducers at Pittsburgh, Tuesday, May 6th, 
1879. 

From Administration des Ponts et Chau- 
sees, Paris : 
Annales, April, 1879. 

From Edward R. Andrews, Boston: 
Chimney Construction. R. M. Bancroft, 
London. 

From Argentine Scientific Society. 
Don Felix Amoretti, Secretary, Buenos 
Ayres : 
Anales. May, 1879. 



From O. Chanute, New York: 
General Specifications for Iron Bridges, N.Y., 
L. E. & W. R. R. Co. O. Chanute, Chief 
Engineer. (Copies for distribution.) 
From J. James R. Croes, New York: 
Report on Additional Water Supply for the 
City of Newark, N. J. By J. J. R. Croes & 
Geo. W. Howell. Blarch 6th, 1879. 

From Joseph P. Davis, City Engineer, 
Boston: 
Fifteenth Annual Report Of the Overseers of 
the Poor of the City of Boston for 1878-9. 
From J. W. Davis, New York: 
A new Centre of Gravity Formula of general 
appilicability. 

From Dyckerlioff and Sohne, Berlin : 
Verhaudluugen der General Versammlung 
des Vereins deutsches' Cement-Fabrikaten. 
Feb. 3d, 4th and 5th, 1879. 

From Eiigineers' Club of Philadelphia: 
Proceedings of the Club. Vol. I, No. 3. 



55 



From Franklin Institute, Philadelphia: 

Journal of the Institute. June and July, 1879. 

From Gen. George S. Greene, New York: 

Supplementary Report of the Committee on 

Water Supply of Brookliue, Mass., with 

letter of Gen. George S. Greene. 

From James H. Harlow, Pittsburgh, Pa. : 
Eight Photogra])hs, showing work on Davis 
Island Dam, Ohio Kiver, Pittsburgh. 

From William Haywood, London, Eng- 
land: 
Reports in reference to various Asphalte and 
Wooden pavements in the City of London 
for 1873, 1874 and 1877. 
Report on the Accidents to Horses on Carriage- 
way pavements. By Wm. Haywood. 
Report on Experimental Carriageway Pave- 
ments in Moorgate street, London. By Wm. 
Haywood. 
Reports of the Works executed by the Com- 
missioners of Sewers of London, from 1871 
to 1877 inclusive. 

From J. E. Hilgard, Washington, D.C. : 
Communication from the Secretary of State 
in response to a resolution of the House of 
Representatives, in relation to the Conven- 
tion for establishing an International 
Bureau of Weights and Measures. 
Reports in reference to the adoption of the 
Metric System. 

From Gen. A. A. Humphreys. Chief of 

Engineers, U.S.A., Washington, D.C: 

Report of the Chief of Engineers, U.S.A., for 

1878. (In three parts.) 
Report of the results of examination of Caney 
Fork River, and of Obey's River, Tennessee, 
and of a survey of the Cumbei'laud Kiver, 
Kentucky. Capt. W. R. King. (2 copies.) 
A Communication from the Commanding 
General, Department of the Missouri, in- 
closing a report of Explorations in and 
about Pagosa Springs, Colorado. Lieut. C. 
A. H. McCauley. (2 copies ) 
Report upon United States Geographical Sur- 
veys west of the lOUth Meridian. Vol. VI. 
Botany. Lieut. George M. Wheeler. 
A Letter of the Acting Chief of Engineers, in 
relation to the conditions and estimates for 
the improvement of the harbor and river of 
Au Sable, on the western shore of Lake 
Huron. Gen. H. G. Wright. (2 copies.) 
Information in relation to the effect produced 
by the dike across the East Harbor In et, 
at Provincetown, Mass., ui^ou the deposit 
of sand in Cape Cod Harbor, at the mouth 
of said inlet. Gen. H. G.Wright. (2 copies.) 
From Institution of Civil Engineers, 
James Forrest, Secretary, London : 
Minutes of Proceedings of the Institute. 

Volume LVI. 
Abstracts and papers in Foreign Transactions 

and Periodicals. 
Technical report of the German Railway 

Union. Walter R. Browne. 
Irrigation in Ceylon. Henry Byrne. 
The St. Gothard Tunnel. {Second paper.) 

Daniel K. Clark. 
The construction of Heavy Ordnance. James 

A. Lougridge. 
The foundations of the New Capitol at Albany, 

N. Y. W. J. McAlpiue. 
Movable Bridges. James Price. 
On the mapi^ing of a district with reference 
to a Central Meridian. F. P. Washington. 
From Institution of Mechanical Engi- 
neers, Walter R. Browne, Secretary, 
London : 
Proceedings of the Institute, April, 1879. 



From John T. Lansing, Albany, N. Y. : 
Articles of Association of the New York and 

Honduras Company. 
The Rosario Mining Company of Honduras, 

Central America. 

From Charles Latimer, Cleveland, O.: 
Proceedings of the Road Masters meeting of 
the Atlantic and Great Western Railway held 
at Meadville, Pa., Nov. 14, 1878. 

From New York Meteorological Observ- 
atory, Daniel Draper, Central Park, 
New York : 
Abstract of registers New Y'ork Meteorolog- 
ical Observatory for Januaiy, February, 
March and April, 1879. 

From Minister of Public Works, Ver- 
sailles, France : 
Ports Maritimes de la France, Part III. 

From Ernest Pontzen, Paris, France : 
Memoire sur uu Nouveau Belier Aspirateur 
de M. de Caligny pouvant tirer I'eau de 
toutes les profondeurs. M. O. Chemin. 
Paris, 1879. 
Renseisfuements economiques sur I'emploi 
des Locomotives a air comprime pour la 
traction des Tramways et des Chemius de 
fer souterrains . 

From New York Produce Exchange, 
James L. Flint, Secretary, New 
York: 
Annual Report of the New York Produce Ex- 
change for 1878. 

From the Publishers, Revue Generale 
des Chemins de fer, Edgar Monjean, 
Secretary, Paris, France: 
Revue Generales des Chemins de fer, March 
and April, 1869. 

From Society of Engineers, Perry F. 
Nursey, Secretary, London, England: 
Transactions of the Society for 1878. 

From Stevens Institute of Technology,- 
Hobokeu, N. J.: 

Anniial Announcement of the Institute for 
1879. (Several Copies.) 

From U. S. Light House Board, Wash- 
ington, D. C: 

List of Beacons, Buoys, Stakes and other Day 
Marks in the Eig.ith Light House District, 
Corrected to July 1st, 1879. (2 Copies ) 

List of Towers, Beacon^, Buoys, Stakes and 
other Day Marks in the Fourth Light House 
District. 

From U. S. Naval Observatory, Wash- 
ington, D. C: 

A Catalogue of 1,9G3 Stars reduced to the be- 
ginning of the year 1850. together with a 
Catalogue of 290 Double Stars from obser- 
vations made at Santiago, Chili, in 1850, 
'51. '52. B. F. Sands. 

Investigation of Corrections to Hansen's Ta- 
bles of the Moon, with tables for their ap- 
plication. S. Newcomb. 

On the Right Ascensions of the Equatorial 
Fundamental Stars. S. Newcomb. 

Report ot the Commission on site for Naval 
Observatory. 

Report on the Difference of Longitude be- 
tween Washington and Ogden, Utah. J. R. 
Eastman. 

Report on the Difference of Longitude be- 
tween Washington and Detroit, Mich.; Car- 
lin, Nevada, and Austin, Nevada. J. E. 
Eastman. 

Report on the Difference of Longitude be- 
tween Washington and St. Louis. Wm. 
Harkness. 



56 

Tables of Instnimental Constants and Cor- ment Commission for year ending January 

rections for tlie reduction of Transit Ob- 31, 1870. 

servations. J. R. Eastman. . fjonj otj^er sources : 

The Uranian and Neptuauian Systems inves- ^ description of tlie BiUerica and Bedford 

tigated with the 26-inch Equatorial. S. 2-feet gauae Eailroad. 

Nevvcomb. ipijg American Catalogue, Vol. 1, Authors and 
From Robert Van Bureu, Brooklyn, Ti"es. Part 3, Lenoir. Robbie, 
jj Y ■ The Library Jouruel. Vol. IV, No. 6. 
Annual Eepirt of the Board of City Works of New Mode of Making Foundations and An- 
Brooklyn for 1878. chormg Piles in unstable bottoms or quick- 
sands. Charles Poutez, Patentt e. 
From H. D. Whitcomb. Richmond, Reports of the Departments of the Govern- 
Va.; ment of the City of Cleveland for year end- 
Annual Report of the James River Improve- ing December 31, 1877. 



THE NORMAN MEDAL. 

The following rules have been adopted by the Board of Direction, 
with the approval of the donor of the Medal Fund, George H. Norman, 
Member and Fellow of the Society : 

CODE OF EULES 

FCK THE 

Award of the Normal Medal. 

I. — Competition for the Normin Medal of the American Society of 
Civil Engineers shall be restricted to Members of the Society. 

II. — There shall be one gold medal, and only one, struck for each and 
every fiscal year of the Society, and awarded as hereinafter provided. 
The dies therefor shall be with the Superintendent of the United States 
Mint at Philadelphia, in trust exclusively for the above purpose. Such 
medal shall be of a cost equal to the annual interest received upon 
$1,000.00 of the Consolidated Stock of the City of New York, Certificate 
No. 179-, of the additional new Croton Aqueduct Stock of the City of 
New York, authorized by an Act of the Legislature of the State of New 
York, Chap. 230, passed April 15th, 1870, dated November 17th, 1873, 
now held in trust by the Treasurer of this Society, and so held solely for 
this purpose, and shall be executed upon his order. 

III. — All original papers presented to the Society by members of any 
class, during the year for which the medal is awarded, shall be open to 
the awards, provided that such papers shall not have been previously 
contributed in whole or in part to any other association, nor have 
appeared in print prior to their publication by the Society, nor have 
been presented to the Society in any previous year. 

rV. — The Board of Censors to award the Medal shall consist of three 
members of the Society, to be designated by the Board of Direction. 
The Secretary of the Society shall act as Secretary to the Board of 
Censors. 



57 

Y. — The medal shall be awarded to such paper as the said Board shall 
' Judge to be worthy of special commendation for its merits as a contribu- 
tion to Engineering Science, not merely relatively as compared with 
others presented during the same year, but as exhibiting the science, 
talent, or industry displayed in the consideration of the subject treated 
of, and for the good Avhich may be expected to result from the discus- 
sion and the inquiry. 

VI.— In case no paper presented during the year shall be deemed of 
sufficient value to receive an award, the amount of the interest of the 
fund for that year shall be expended by the Board of Direction in the 
purchase of books, to be offered as a premium for the second best paper 
in the next year in which more than one paper of sufficient value may 
be presented. 

VII.— The medal year shall terminate on the first day of August, and 
the award shall be announced at the Annual Meeting in November. 

^^11-— The Treasurer of this Society shall cause the medal to be 
prepared and delivered to, or deposited to the order of, the successful 
competitor, within two mouths after the Annual Meeting at which the 
same shall have been awarded. 



ANNOUNCEMENTS. 



At the Heeling of the Society to be held 
August 6th, a paper by Max E. Schmidt, 
member of the Society, will be presented, 
subject, '■ The South Pass Jetties, Notes on 
the construction and durability of the works, 
with a description of the concrete blocks and 
other constructions of the last year." This 
paper will be put in print and will be dis- 
cussed at the meeting of the Society to be held 
October 15th,' 1879. Advance copies of the 
paper will be sent to persons who will contri- 
bute discussion. 

At the meeting of September 3d, a paper by 
William H. Searles, member of the Society, 
subject, " The Stability of Stone Structures," 
will be read and discussed. 

At the meeting of September 17th, a paper 
by James B. Burr, member of the Society, 
subject, "The Construction of the A. T. and 
S. F. R. R,, over the Raton Mountains," will 
be read and discussed. At the same meeting 
a paper by Theodore Cooper, Member of the 
Society, subject, "The use of Steel for 
Bridges," will be read and discussed. Ad- 



vance copies of these papers will be sent to 
persons who desire to discuss the subject. 

At the meeting ot October 1st, the pajier 
No. CLXXX (Transactions May 1879), on the 
Construction and Maintenance of Roads, by 
Edward P. North, member of the Society, and 
the discussions presented ou the same at the 
Convention at Cleveland will be considered 
and further discussed. Advance copies of 
these discussions will be furnished to persons 
desiring to discuss the subject. 

Discussion ou each of these subjects is 
especially invited. The Secretary will for- 
ward the advance copies to those who inform 
him of their desire to discuss. The discus- 
sions may be presented verbally or sent to the 
Secretary, who will read them lor the authors. 

The following resolution was adopted at the 
Ninth Annual Convention of the Society, and 
ordered printed regularly in the Society pub- 
lications: 

Whereas, the metric system of weights and 
measures is now extensively used abroad, 



and whereas it is desirable that the relation 
of the units of differing systems be made 
familur to all by comparison: 

Resolved, That members be requested, in 
papers hereafter presented to the Society, to 
write, in parenthesis, weights or dimensions 
by the metric system, in connection with 
those of the system in general use. 

The House of the Society is at 104 East 
Twentieth street, one door from Fourth 
avenue, and near the southwest corner of 



Gramercy Park. It is open from nine o'clock 
A.M. to five o'clock P.M. each business day, 
except Saturday, when it is closed at three 
o'clock p. M. 

The Library and Conversation Rooms will 
also, for the present, be open every Thursday 
evening, from T^i to 10 p. M. Members are 
invited to avail themselves of the oppor- 
tunities, afforded on Thursday evenings both 
for consultation of books and periodicals, and 
for conversation. 




j^merican %mi\) 4 |;uil fngiuMB. 



PROCEEOINaS. 



Vol. V, August, 1879. 



MINUTES OF MEETINGS 

(Abstractor such as may be of general interest to memljers.) 



OF THE SOCIETY. 

August 6th, 1879. — The Society met at 8 p. m., William E. Wortlien 
in the cliair. Ballots fov admission to membership were canvassed, and 
the following were declared elected : As Members, James H. Cnnning- 
ham, of Milwaukee, Wisconsin ; Frederick H. Lehnartz, of Portland, 
Oregon ; and John M. Titlow, of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania ; and as 
Junior, George B. Cornell, of New York. 

The death on July 17th, 1879, at Philadelphia, of Frankhn A. Strat- 
ton. Member of the Society, was announced, and the President was 
authorized to appoint a committee to prepare a memoir of the deceased. 

The pajier by Max E. Schmidt, subject: "The South Pass Jetties," 
which was presented at the Convention at Cleveland, was read by the 
Secretary and discussed. 



THE NORMAN MEDAL. 

The following rules have been adopted by the Board of Direction, 
with the approval of the donor of the Medal Fund, George H. Norman, 
Member and Fellow of the Society: 

CODE OF RULES 

FOR THE 
AWAED OF THE NOEMAN MeDAL. 

I.— Competition for the Norman Medal of the American Society of 
Civil Engineers shall be restricted to Members of the Society. 

II. — There shall be one gold medal, and only one, struck for each and 
every fiscal year of the Society, and awarded as hereinafter provided. 



GO 

The dies tliei-efor sliall be witli the Superintenilent of the United States 
Mint at Philadelphia, in trust exclusively for the aljove jjurpose. Such 
medal shall be of a cost equal to the annual interest received upon 
81,000.00 of the Consolidated Stock of the City of New York, Certificate 
No. 179, of the additional new Croton Aqueduct Stock of the City of 
New York, authorized by an act of the Legislature of the State of New 
York, Chap. 230, passed April 15th, 1870, dated November 17th, 1873, 
now held in trust by the Treasurer of this Society, and so held solely for 
this jjurpose, and shall be executed upon his order. 

III. — All original papers presented to the Society by members of any 
class, during the year for which the medal is awarded, shall be open to 
the awards, jDrovided that such papers shall not have been previously 
contributed in whole or in part to any other association, nor have 
appeared in jjrint prior to their publication by the Society, nor have 
been presented to the Society in any previous year. 

IV. — The Board of Censors to award the Medal shall consist of three 
members of the Society, to be designated by the Board of Direction. 
The Secretary of the Society shall act as Secretary to the Board of 
Censors. 

V. — The medal shall be awarded to such paper as the said Board shall 
judge to be worthy of sj^ecial commendation for its merits as a contribu- 
tion to Engineering Science, not merely relatively as compared Avith 
others presented during the same year, but as exhibiting the science, 
talent, or industry displayed in the consideration of the subject treated 
of, and for the good which may be exiiected to result from the discus- 
sion and the inquiry. 

VI. ^ — In case no paper presented during the year shall be deemed of 
sufficient value to receive an award, the amount of the interest of the 
fund for that year shall be expended by the Board of Direction in the 
purchase of books, to be offered as a premium for the second best jDaper 
in the next year in which more than one paper of sufficient value may 
be presented. 

VII. — The medal year shall terminate on the first day of August, and 
the award shall be announced at the Annual Meeting in November. 

VIII. — The Treasurer of this Society shall ^cause the medal to be 
prepared and delivered to, or deposited to the order of, the successful 
competitor, within two months after the Annual Meeting at which the 
same shall have been awarded. 



LIST OF TOPICS 

ON WHICH OBIGINAIi PAPERS ABE IN\^TED. 

The Board of Direction submit the following list of topics, on which 
original j^apers, illustrating the experience of the writers, are requested: 

1. — Topographical Surveys, and the laying out of Towns and the 
most economical divisions of property. 



61 

2. — Instruments and methods of exact measurement for land surveys. 

3. — Trigonometrical and Astronomical surveys. 

4.— Systems of roadmakiup,- and maintenance suitable for (a) large 
towns and heavy traffic ; (b) Surburl)an districts ; (c) Rural districts. 

5. — The sustaining power of diiierent kinds of soils and the con- 
ditions which produce failure of foundations by settlement. 

6. — The weight which can be supported by different classes of 
masonry. 

7. — The preservation of masonry structures. 

8. — The manufacture of cements and methods of testing their strength. 

9. — The proportions of cementing and inert materials in mortars. 

10. — Xlie preservation of timber used in construction. 

11. — The strength, durability and characteristics of various timbers. 

12 — The manufacture of iron and steel in America. Combinations of 
materials, methods emjiloyed and plant used 

13 — Thei^roperties and laws of cast iron, wrought iron, steel and other 
metals used in construction. 

14. — The effect of constant or long continued vibration on metals used 
in construction. 

15. — The design, generally, of iron bridges of large span. 

16. — The construction and operation of drawbridges of large span. 

17. — Testing machines and experiments on the strength of materials 
and structures. 

18. — Appliances and methods of rock boring and blasting. 

19. — Sub-aqueous tunnels. Their design and construction. 

20. — The flow of water in channels of various kinds, and the modes of 
determining the discharge l>y experiment. Also the discharge over weirs 
and through orifices. 

21. — The loss of water in floAving in open channels. 

22.— The relations of rainfall, character of soil, and flow of streams ; 
effect of wooded and of cleared and cultivated land on the flow of 
streams. 

23. — The sources and systems of water supply for towns, including 
storage of surface water, open wells, tube wells, gathering galleries, and 
ground Avater obtained from different geological strata. 

24. — Systems of Avater supply suitable for small communities, whether 
separately or co-operatively. 

25. — The detection and prevention of w^aste of water in towns. 

26. — The design, construction, and cost of operation of pumping 
engines, and mode of computing duty. 

27. — The history of the manufacture of cast iron water pipes in 
America. 

28. — The strength and dimensions of cast iron pipe and of wrought 
iron pipe for Avater supply. Forms of joints for Avater pipe. 

29. — Durability and cost of Avater pipe of cast iron, Avrought iron and 
cement, wood, and other materials. 



62 

30. — The design and construction of eartli embankments and masonry 
dams for reservoirs. 

31. — The construction, dimensions, and operation of navigable canals. 

32. — Methods of overcoming differences of level in canals. 

33.^ — The improvement and training of rivers. 

34. — The construction of harbors of refuge. 

35. — The construction of wharves, piers and docks. 

36. — The construction of fire-proof buildings. 

37. — The warming and ventilation of buildings. 

38. — House di'ainage. 

39. — The sewerage of towns and the disposal of sewage. 

40. — The form, matei'ial and dimensions of sewers. 

41. — The economical location of railroad lines. 

42.— The construction and maintenance of the permanent way on 
railroads. 

43. — The form, manufacture and life of rails. 

44. — The form and material of railway wheels. 

45.— The heating and lighting of railroad cars. 

46. — The prevention of accidents at railroad crossings and intersec- 
tions. 

47. — Rapid transit in large cities. 

48. — The prevention of noise from hea^'y railroad trains moving at 
high speed. 

49. — Safe substitutes for animal power on suriace railways. 

50. — The relative economy of the several kinds of fuel iised in loco- 
motive engines. 

51.— The operation of freight and passenger traffic on railroads, and 
the conditions of economy in the same. 

52. — The arrangement of terminal stations on trunk lines of rail- 
roads. 

53. — The manufacture, distribution, measur3ment and use of ilhimin- 
ating gas. 

54. — Electricity as applied to lighting and to motive power. 

55. — The modern construction of water wheels and engines. 

56. — The engineering questions involved in the .location and manage- 
ment of large Industrial Exhibitions. 

57. — Manufacture, strength and durability of earthenware pipe. 

58. — The relations of Engineers to Employers and to contractors. 

59. — The Status and Compensation of Experts. 

60. — Engineering and Mechanical Law. 



63 



ANNOUNCEMENTS. 



At tbe Meeting of the Society to be held 
September 3d, a paper by William H. Searles, 
member of the Society, eiibiect, " The Sta- 
bility of Stone Structures," will be read and 
discussed. Advanced cojiies of this paper will 
be sent to persons who desire to discuss the 
subject. 

At the meeting of September 17th, a paper 
by James D. Burr, member of the Society, 
subject, " The Construction of the A. T. and 
S. F. R. R,, over the Katon Mountains," will 
be read and discussed. At the same meeting 
a paper by Theodore Cooper, Member of the 
Society, subject, "The use of Steel for 
Bi'idges," will be read aud discussed. Ad- 
vance copies of these papers will be sent to 
loersons who desire to discuss the subject. 

At the meeting ot October 1st, the paper 
No. CLXXX (Transactions May 1879), on the 
Construction and Maintenance of Roads, by 
Edward P. North, member of the Society, and 
the discussions presented on the same at the 
Convention at Cleveland will be considered 
and further discussed. Advance copies of 
these discussions will be furnished to persons 
desiring to discuss the subject. 

At the meeting of October 15th, the paper 
by Max E. Schmidt, subject, "The South 
Pass Jetties," published in the current num- 
ber of the Transactions, will be discussed. 

Discussion on each of these subjects is 
especially invited. The Secretary will for- 
ward the advance copies to those who inform 



him of their desire to discuss. The dis- 
cussions may be presented verbally or sent 
to the Secretary, who will read them for the 
authors. 

The following resolution was adopted at the 
Ninth Annual Convention of the Society, and 
ordered printed regularly in the Society pub- 
lications: 

Whereas, the metric system of weights and 
measui-es is now extensively used abroad, 
and whereas it is desirable that the relation 
of the units of differing systems be made 
familiir to all by comparison: 

Resolved, That members be requested, in 
papers hereafter presented to the Society, to 
write, in parenthesis, weights or dimensioua 
by the metric system, in connection with 
those of the system in general use. 

The House of the Society is at 104 East 
Twentieth street, one door from Fourth 
avenue, and near the southwest corner of 
Gramercy Park. It is open from nine o'clock 
A.M. to five o'clock P.M. each business day, 
except Saturday, when it is closed at three 
o'clock p. M. 

The Library and Conversation Rooms will 
also, for the present, be open every Thursday 
evening, from 73^ to 10 p. M. Members are 
invited to avail themselves of the oppor- 
tunities, afforded on Thursday evenings both 
for consultation of books and periodicals, and' 
for conversation . 



LIST OF MEMBERS. 



ADDITIONS. 
MEMBER. 



Bland, John C . 



Date ot Eleclion. 
(Elected Junior May 5th, 1875), Office 
of Supervising Architect, Treasury 
Department, Washington, D. C... June 4th, 1S79. 



Cornell, George B . 



JUNIOR. 

Ass't Engineer East Side Line Met. 
Elev. R. R., 141 Centre St., New 
York August 6th, 1879.. 



64 

CHANGES AND CORRECTIONS. 
MEMBERS. 

Chittenden, Samuel H. .U. S. Ass't i-'ngineer, Olio, St. Clair Co., Alabama. 
IMarsland, Edward New York ('.as Light Co., Cor. Twenty-first St. and 

Avenue A, Xew York. 

Nichols, O. F 202 Academy St., Trenton, X. J. 

NicOLLS. William J Supervisor Long Island Raikoad, Jamaica, Long Island, 

N. Y. 
Pearsons, Galen W Kansas City, Kansas. 



JUNIORS. 

Haines, Caspar W Supervisor Sub-Division i, Pittsburg, Fori \Yayne and 

Chicago Railroad, Eastern Division, Pittsburg, Pa. 

Horton, Sanford Engineer Department, Atchison, Topeka and Santa F6 

Railroad, Topeka, Kansas. 



DECEASED. 

Stratton, Franklin A. .Elected Member May 3d, 1S76. Died July 17th, 1879. 






l^ROCE Eoi^as. 



Vol. V, September, 1879. 
MINUTES OF ISIEETINCtS. 

(Abstractor such as may be of general interest to members.) 



OF THE SOCIETY. 

September 3d, 1879. — The Society met at 8 p.m. Charles H. Haswell 
hi the chah". Ballots were canvassed, and the following declared elected 
as Members : Frederick N. Finney of Milwaukee, Wis. ; John Thomas 
Lansing of Albany, N.Y., and Henry G. Front (elected Associate Novem- 
ber 6th, 1872,) of Harrisburg, Pa. 

A pajjer by "William H. Searles, subject, "The Stability of Stone 
Structures," was read by the author. Advance copies of this paper 
having been issued, discussions were presented through the Secretary 
from O. Chanute, Theodore Cooper, D. J. Whittemore, F. Collingwood 
and E. Hering. The subject Avas also discussed by Charles E. Emery, 
Charles Macdonald and the author. 

September 17th, 1879. — The Society met at 8 p. m. Thomas C. 
Clarke in the chair. The j)aper by Theodore Cooper on the "Use of 
Steel for Bridges " was read by the Secretary and discussed by T. C. 
Clarke, A. P. Boiler, C. Macdonald, O. Chanute and D. Torrey. The 
discussion of the paper by James D. Burr on the "Construction of the 
Railroad over the Raton Mountains" was postponed till the next 
meeting-. 



66 



THE .\ORMAX MEDAL 

The following rules liave been adopted by the Board of Direction, 
with the approval of the donor of the Medal Fund, George H. Norman, 
Member and Fellow of the Society : 

CODE OF EULES 

FOR THE 
AWAKD OF THE NOEJIAN MeDAL. 

I. — Competition for the Xbrman Medal of the American Society of 
Civil Engineers shall be restricted to Members of the Society. 

II. — There shall be one gold medal, and only one, struck for each and 
every fiscal year of the Society, and awarded as hereinafter larovided. 
The dies therefor shall be with the Superintendent of the United States 
Mint at Philadelphia, in trnst exclusively for the above purpose. Such 
medal shall be of a cost equal to the annual interest received upon 
$1,000.00 of the Consolidated Stock of the City of New York, Certificate 
No. 179, of the additional new Croton Aqueduct Stock of the City of 
New York, authorized by an act of the Legislature of the State of New 
York, Chap. 230, passed April 15th, 1870, dated November 17th, 1873, 
now held in trust by the Treasurer of this Society, and so held solely for 
this purpose, and shall be executed upon his order. 

III. — All original papers jd resented to the Society by members of any 
class, during the year for which the medal is awarded, shall be open to 
the awards, provided that such papers shall not have been previously 
contributed in whole or in part to any other association, nor have 
api^eared in print prior to their publication by the Society, nor have 
been j)resented to the Society in any previous year. 

IV. — The Board of Censors to aAvard the Medal shall consist of three 
members of the Society, to be designated by the Board of Direction. 
The Secretary of the Society shall act as Secretary to the Board of 
Censors. 

V. — The medal shall be awarded to such paper as the said Board shall 
judge to be worthy of special commendation for its merits as a contribu- 
tion to Engineering Science, not merely relatively as compared with 
others presented during the same year, but as exhibiting the science, 
talent, or industry displayed in the consideration of the subject treated 
of, and for the good which may be expected to result from the discus- 
sion and the inquiry. 

VI. — In case no paper presented during the year shall be deemed of 
sufficient value to receive an award, the amount of the interest of the 
fund for that year shall be expended by the Board of Direction in the 
purchase of books, to be ottered as a premium for the second best paper 
in the next year in which more than one paper of sufficient value may 
be jDresented. 



67 



VII.— The medal year shall terminate on the first day of August, and 
the award shall be announced at the Annual Meeting in November. 

VIII. — The Treasurer of this Society shall cause the medal to be 
prepared and delivered to, or deposited to the order of, the successful 
competitor, within two months after the Annual Meeting at which the 
same shall have been awarded. 



LIST OF NEW BOOKS ON 

ENGINEERINa AND TECHNOLOGY 



Army. Report of the Russian Army and its 
Campaigns in Turkey iu 1877-8. By Lieu- 
tenant F. V. Greene, United States Army. 
Attache to the American Legation at St. 
Petersburg. Accompanied by a military 
atlas. New York. Appletons. (Announce- 
ment.) 

Art. The Industrial Arts in Spain. By Juan 
F. Riano. Illustrated with 50 woodcuts. 
(South Kensington Mu.seum Art Hand- 
books.) 12mo. New York. Scribner & 
Wdford. $1.60. 

Bridges. Elementary Theory and Calculation 
of Iron Bridges and Roofs. By August 
Ritter, Dr. Phil., Professor at the Polytech- 
nic School at Aix-la-Chapelle. Translated 
from the German (Third Edition) by H. R. 
Saukey, Lieut. R. E. Spons. London. 
(Announcement.) 

Cables. Strength of Wrought-iron and Chain 
Cables. Government experiments by Com- 
modore Beardslee. Edited by Wm. Kent. 
Svo. New York. Wilen. (Announcement.) 

Car-builder's Dictionary, by a committee of 
Master Car-builders' Association. Illus- 
trated. New York. Railroad Gaxette. 
.$•2.25. 

Chemistry, Laboratory teaching. C. Blox- 
am. Philadelphia. 12mo ill. Lindsay <& 
Blakistim. $1.75 

List of new and important books on 

Chemical Analysis, Assaying, etc. Phila- 
delphia, Henry Carey Baird d- Co. 

Concrete. A Practical Treatise on Natural 
and Artificial Concrete : Its Varieties and 
Constructive Adaptations. By Henry Reid, 
author of "The Science and Art of the 
Manufacture of Poitland Cement," &c. 
New ed., Svo. Sjjons. London. 15s. 

Dictionary of Engineering : Supplement to 
Spons. Edited by Ernest Spon. (To be 
comi)leted iu Three Divisions.) Division 
I. Containing Abacus — Agricultural Imple- 
ments — Air Compressors — Animal ( harcoal 
Machinery — Barn Machinery — Belts and 
Belting — Blasting — Boilers — Brake — Brick- 
making Machines — Bridge— Cages — Calcu- 
lus — Canals — Carpentry — Cast-iron — Ce- 
ment, Concrete, Limes and Mortar— Chim- 
ney Shafts— Coal Mining, &c., &c. Svo. 
Spons. London. 13s. 6d. 
Electric Transmission of Power : Its Present 
Position and Advantages. By Paget Higgs, 
LL.D., Dr. Sc. Crown Svo. Spons. Lon- 
don. 3s. 
Encyclopffidia. Spons' Encyclopcedia of the 
Industrial Arts, Manufactures, and Com- 



mercial Products. Edited by G. G. An- 
dre, F. G. S. Assoc. Inst. C. E. (To be com- 
pleted in Five Divisions.) Division I. — 
Containing Acids — Alcohol — Alkalies — Al- 
loys— .\lum — Arsenic — Asphalt — Assaying — 
Beverages, &c. Super-royal Svo. Spons. 
London. 13s. fid. 

Engineers' Manual. A Manual for Railroad 
Engineers and Engineering Students. Con- 
taining the Rules and Tables needed for 
the Location, Construction, and Equip- 
ment of Railroads, as built in the United 
States. By George L. Vose. With 165 
woodcuts and 31 large Plates. A new re- 
vised edition. Boston. Lee <£• Shepard. 
$12.50. 

Expert Testimony : Its vise and abuse. S. 
Snowdeu Bell. Philadelphia. Svo. Rees, 
Welsh <£ Co. $1.00. 

Graphics for Engineers. Part III. Arches 
in Wood, Iron and Stone. Prof. Greene. 
Svo. New York. Wiley, (.\nnouncement.) 

Locomotive Engineer, Fireniaii and Engine 
Boy ; comprising an Historical Notice of 
the i ioneer Locomotive Engines and their 
inventors, with a Project for the Establish- 
ment of Certificates of Qualification in the 
Running Service of Railways. Michael 
Reynolds. Cr. Svo. Crosby Lockivood. is 6d. 

Mechanics. C. Tomlinson (Weales' Series). 
New ed., 12mo. London. Crosby Lockivood. 
Is. fid. 

Meteorology. The Nottingham for the 

past 12 years, 1867 to 1878 inclusive. From 
Diurnal Observations by M. Ogie Tarbot- 
ton ; to which are added Rainfall Tables 
from several localities on the Trent Water- 
shed. Roy. Svo. Spons. London. Is. fid. 

Military Prize Essay, 1S79. Clayton (Captain 
Emilius). Field Intrenching; its .\pplica- 
tion on the Battlefield and its Bearing on 
Tactics. With Plates. Svo. Loudon. W, 
Milchell. 2s. fid. 

Mining, Mining Machinery and Coal. List of 
Boolis upon these subjects, Netvy Carey 
Baird £ Co Philadelphia. 

Parks and Gardens of Paris. W. Robinson, 
F.L S. With numerous Ilhistrations. Svo. 
Macmillan. London (cheaper issue). ISs. 

Railroad Accidents ; Notes upon — . Charles 
Francis Adams, Jr. 12mo. New York. 
Putnams. $1.25. 

Rainfall— British, 187S. On the Distribution 
of Rain over the British Isles during the 
year 1878, as observed at about 2,000 Stations 
in Great Britain and Ireland. G. J. Symons. 
Svo. London. Stanford. 5s. 



68 



Eaihvay System — The Index to our Railway 
System and our Leading Lines : A Com- 
prehensive Analysis of Ilailway Property, 
1878-79. No. 3. Wm. Fleming. London. 
8vo. McCorquodale, 28. 6d. 

Sanitary Engineering. Report of the Proceed- 
ing of the District Meeting of Municipal and 
Sanitary Engineers and Surveyors held at 
the Town Hall, Wrexham, June 21st, 1879; 
Discussion on Shone's Patent Pneumatic 
Sewerage Systeiu. 4to. Discussion, fcap. 
Brayley and Bradley (Wrexham). Spans. 
London. Is. 

Science, Half-hour Recreations in Popular — . 
Second Series, uniform with the First Series, 
containing: Transmission of Sound by the 
Atmosphere, by Joiin Tyudall ; Gigantic 
Cuttle-Fish. by Saville Kent ; The Glacial 
Epoch of our Globe, by Alexander Brauu; 
The Sun and the Earth, by Pruf. Balfour 
Stewart ; The lee .A.ge in Britain, by Pruf. 
Geikie ; Plant Life in the Sea, bj' L. Kny ; 
The Telephone and ths Phonograph, by 
Prof. F. G . Garbit ; The U.se and Abuse of 
Food, Ozone, Dew ; Thp Levelling Power 
of Rain, by Richard A. Proctor ; The Suc- 
cession of Life on the Earth, by Prof. W. C. 
Williamson ; What the Earth is Composed 
of, by Prof. Roscoe ; Notes on Tree Growth, 
by Prof. Asa Gray ; Science and War, liy H. 
Baden Pntchard ; Existence of Glacial Ac- 
tion upon the Summit of Mt. Washington, 
N. H., by Prof. C. H. Hitchcock. One vol., 
large 12mo. Boston. Este.s<£ Lauriat. $2.50. 

Sewerage. Discussions on Isaac Stone's Pneu- 
matic Sewerage System, by Engmeers, 
Surveyors and Medical Doctors, convened 
under the Auspices of the '• Sanitary Regis- 
ter," held in the Town Hall, Wrexham, 
July 19. 1879, under the Presidency of Dr. 
Lory Marsh. Roy. 8vo. " Guardian" Office 
(Wrexham). Spans. London. 6d. 

Sewers and drains of populous districts, by 
Col. J. W. Adams. New York. Van Nosirand. 
(Announcement.) 

Thames Traffic. Report, evidence, maps. 
British Goct. Publication. London. 8s. 



Thermodynamics. Prof. Henry T. Eddy. 
ISmo. (No. 45. Science Series). Van 
Nosirand. New York. S0.50. 

Tunneling — Practical Tunneling, explaining 
in detiil the setting out works, shaft sink- 
ing, heading driving, ranging lines, leveling 
under ground, sub-excavating, timbering, 
construction of brickwork of tunnels, with 
labor required for and cost of various por- 
tions of the work. By Frederick Walter 
Simms, C E. 3d ed., rev. and extended 
with chapters illustrating the recent prac- 
tice at St. Gothard, Mt Cenis and other 
modern works. By D. Kinnear Clark, C.E. 
8vo, illus. Van Nostrand. New York. $7.50. 

Water — .Analysis of Water. J. A. Wanklyu 
and E. T. Chapman. 5th ed., or. 8vo. Lon- 
don. Trubner. 5s. 

. Address ttpou Water Economy, de- 
livered at the Anniversary Meeting of the 
Sanitary Institute, July 10th, 1879, His 
Grace the Duke of Northumberland in the 
chair. G. Symons. Cr. 8vo, pp. 23. iStan- 
fard. London. Is. 

; Power of Water. J.Glynn. New ed., 

limo. (Weales' series.) Crosby Lockwaad. 
London. 2s. 

; National Water Supply, Sewage and 

Health. Annual Conference, .society of 
Arts, Adelphi, held Thursday and Friday, 
the 15th and 16th May, 1879. Imp. 8vo. 
Bell and Sans. London. Is. 6d.;2s. 

Wave and Vortex Motion. Thomas Craig. 
18mo, (No. 43, Science Series). Fan Aostrand. 
New York. $0.50. 

Weights ; Tabulated Weights, of Angle, Tee, 
Bulb, Round, Square and Flat Iron and 
Steel, and other Information for the use of 
Naval Architects and Shipowners. By Chas 
H. Jordan, Mem. Inst. N. .\.., Surveyor to 
the Underwriters' Registry for Iron Vessels. 
Third Edition, rev. and enl., i-oyal 32mo, 
cloth. Spans. London. 2s. 6d. 

Wood Engraving — Practical Hints. For the 
instruction of reviewers and the ijublic. 
W.J.Linton. 4to. Lee d: Shepard. Boston. 
$0.50. 



ADDITIONS TO 

LIBRARY AND MUSEU M. 



From Administration des Fonts et 
Chausees, Paris: 
Annales. May. June and July, 1879. 
List of Members Pouts et Chausees. 

From American Academy of Arts and 
Sciences, Boston: 
Proceedings from May 1878 to May 1879. 

From American Chemical Society, P. 
Cassamajor, Secretary, New York: 
Proceedings of the Society. Vol. 1. Nos. 4 
and 6. 

From American Institute of Mining 
Engineers, Prof. Thomas M. Drown, 
Secretary, Easton, Pa. : 
The Tessie Gas Producer. A. L. HoUey. 
On some curious phenomena in making a 
Test of Bessemer Steel. Wm. Kent. 



Accidents in the Comstock Mines and their 
relation to deep mining. John A. Church. 

On the use of determining Slag densities in 
Smelting. Thomas Macfarlane. 

The .\ntimony deposits of Arkansas. Charles 
E. Wait. 

Discussion of Charles B. Dudley's paper on 
Steel Rails, read at the Lake George Meeting, 
October, 1877. By R. W. Hunt, W. R. Jones, 
T. Egleston, A. L. Holley, W. Metcalf. Wm. 
Kent, D. Torrey, H. M. Howe, C. E. Stafford, 
R. W. Raymond, W. E. C. Coxe. A. S. 
McCreath and Wra. P. Shinn. 

Note on the Wear of Iron Rails. W. E.C. Coxe. 

On an apparatus for Testing the resistance of 
metals to repeated shocks. Wm. Kent. 

Pittsburgh — Its resources and surroundings. 
Wm. P. Shinn. 



69 



Proceedings of the Pittsburgh Meeting, May 

13, 1879. 
Regenerative Stoves, a sketch of their history 
and notes on their use. John M. Hartman. 
Sketches of the New Mining District at Sui- 

hvau, :\Iaiue. C. W. Kempton. 
The working of the three Hearths at the Cedar 
Point Furnace, Port Henry, N. Y. T. F. 
Witherbee. 

From George D. Ansley, City Surveyor, 
Montreal : 
Our Health and our Diseases ; condition of 
Montreal in a Sanitary point of view. F. P. 
Mackelau, Montreal. 

From Argentine Scientific Society. Don 
Felix Amorette, Secretary, Buenos 
Ayres : 
Aunales, June and July, 1879. 

From Board of Water Commissioners, 
Toronto. Canada: 
Annual Reports of the Board for 1875, 1876, 
1877 and 1878. 

From Boston Public Library, Boston: 
Twen*y-seveuth Annual Eeport of Boston 
Public Library. 

From Hon. Allan Campbell, New York: 
Eeport of the Department of Public Works, 
quarter ending March 31, 1879. 

From E, S. Chesbrough, Chicago: 
Third Annual Report Department of Public 
Works of Chicago. 

From Civil Engineers' Club of the 
Northwest. L. P. Morehouse, Secre- 
tary, Chicago: 
Proceedings of the Club. 
Metric System. 

Memorial of William H. Clarke. 
Superstructure of the Glasgow Bridge. 
Proposed Constitution and By-Laws by Com- 
mittee on Reorganization. 

From Prof. John Collet, Indianapolis, 

Ind.: 

Eighth. Ninth and Tenth Annual Report of 

the Geological Survey of Indiana, made 

during the years 1876-77-78. E. T. Cox, 

Indianapolis, 1879, 

From Joseph P. Davis, City Engineer, 
Boston : 
Third Annual Report of the Boston Water 
Works. 

From Ma.j. Geor^je W. Dresser, Secre- 
tary of Society of Gas Lighting, New 
Yoili: 
Transactions of the Society for 1877. 

From Essayons C ub, Corps of Engi- 
neers. U. S. A , W. M. Black, Secretary. 
Willetts Point, N. Y. : 
Papers read before the Club during the win- 
ter 1878-79. as follows : XLV, Useful Tables 
lor finding Specific Gravity. Lieut. -Col- 
Heger. XLVI — Notes on the use of Loga. 
rithms. H. S. Palfrey. XLVII— Testing of 
medium and high tensioii fuses. Gen. 
Abbot. 

From Desmond Fitzgerald, Brookline, 
Mass. : 
Third Anntial Eeport of the Boston Water 
Works. 

From Charles E. Fowler, City Surveyor, 
Harlford, Conn.: 
Annual Reports of the Street Department of 
the Citv of New Haven, for 1876, 1877, and 
1878, 



From the Imperial College of Engineer- 
ing, Henry Dyer, Principal, Tokio, 
Japan: 
Reports of the Principal and Professors from 
1873 to 1877. 

From the Imperial and Royal Legation 
of Austria: 
Beitrjige zur Beleuchtung der allegemein Ver- 
hjiltnisse der Oesterreichischen Eisenbah- 
nen. 

From the Imperial Technic Society, 
Prof. Paul Panayeff, Director, Mos- 
cow, Russia: 
Notes of the Society. Part 6 (Russian). 

From the Institution of Civil Engineers, 
James Forrest, Secretary, London : 
Minutes of Proceeding. Vol. LVII. 
List of Members of the Institution, July 2, 

1879. 
Abstracts of papers in foreign Transactions 
and Periodicals. Vol. LVII. Session 1878- 
79. Part 3. 
Excerpt from Minutes of Proceedings. Edited 
by James Forrest, as follows : 
Dioptric Apparatus in Lighthouses for 

the Electric Light. James T. Cliance. 
The Electric Light applied to Lighthouse 

11 uminatiou. James N. Douglas. 
Descrii)tion of Several Bridges erected in 

Switzerland. Jules Gaudard. 
Description of Machinery for the pro- . 
duction aud transmission in the larger 
Factories of East Lancashire and West 
Yorkshire. George W. Sutcliffe. 
Strength and elasticity of Materials. Wm. 

J. Millar. 
Dock Gates. Adam F. Blandy. 
The Improvement of the Bar of Dublin 
Harbor by Artificial Scour. John P. 
Griffiths. 
A Search for the Optimum System of 

Wheel Teeth. Edward Sang. 
Street Carriageway Pavements. George 

F. Deacon. 
Wood as a Paving Material under Heavy 

Traffic. Osbert H. Ilowartli 
Discussion on the two foregoing subjects. 
Experiments on the Filtration of Water. 
George Higgins. 

From the Iron and Steel Institute, J. S. 
Jeans, Secretary, London: 
Journal of the Institute, No. 1. 1879. 

From Henry F. Kane, C. E., New York: 
Address to the Members of the New York Ex- 
change, by Henry F. Kane, On the Prac- 
ticability of permanently maintaining sev- 
eral feet increased depth over the Sandy 
H'lok Bar, and otherwise improving the 
Channel, 

From Charles Latimer, Cleveland, O.: 
The French Metric System, or the Battle of 
the Standards. (Several copies.) 

From Hon. R. C.McCormick, Washing- 
ton, D. C. : 
Our Success at Paris in 1878. E. C McCor- 
mick. New York, 1879. 

From W. H. McFadden. Philadelphia: 
Annual Report of the Chief Engmeer of the 
Water Department of the City of Philadel- 
phia for 1878. 

From Midland Institute of Mining, 
Civil and Mechanical Engineers, 
Joseph Mitchell, Secretary, Barnsley, 
England : 



70 



Transactions. November, 1878. February, 
March, May and July, 1879. Vol. VI, Part 
XLVI. 

From New York Meteorological Obser- 
vatory, Daniel Draper, Director, New 
York: 
Abstracts of Registers from Self-Recording 
Instruments. Juue and July, 1879. 

From North of England Institute Min- 
ing and Mechanical Engineers, Theo. 
Wood Bunning, Secretary, Newcastle- 
on-Tyne, England : 
Transactions. April, May and June, 1879. 

From the Publishers Revue Generate 
fies C'hemins de fer, Edgar Monjean, 
Secretary. Paris : 
Revue Generale des Chemins de fer. Mav and 
June, 1879. 

From Philadelphia and Reading Coal 
and Iron Co. Philadelphia : 
Diagram and Tables showing the Annual Pro- 
duction of Anthracite Coal in Pennsylvania 
since 1820, and the amount produced from 
each region. 

From Royal United Service Institution, 

Capt. B. Burgess, Secretary, London : 

Appendix to Vol. XXII of the Journal of the 

Institution. 
Vol. XXIII, Journal of the Institution, No. 
C. Extra number. 

From Society des Ingenieurs Civils, M. 
Mallet, Secretary, Paris : 
Memoires de la Society. November and De- 
cember, 1878. January, February, March 
and April, 187'J. 

From R. H. Thurston, Hoboken, N. J. : 
Friction and Lubrication. Prof. R. H. Thurs- 
ton. New York, 1879. 
Mechanical and Physical Properties of the 
Copper-Tin Alloys. Prof. R. H. Thurston. 
Washington, 1879. 

From United States Light House Board, 
Washington, D. C: 
List of Beacons, Buoys. Monuments and other 
Day Marks in the First Light House Dis- 
trict, corrected to July 1, 1879. 



From Jerome B. Ward, Newark, N.J. : 

Report on Additional Water Supply for the 
City of Newark, N. J. By J. James K. Croes- 
and George W. Howell. March 6th, 1879. 
(Several copies.) 

From Hon. A. A. Wagstaff, New York : 

Annual Report of the Superintendent of Pub- 
lic Works, State of New York, for 1878. B. 
S. W. Clark. 

Annual Financial Report of the Auditor of 
the Canal Department of the State of New 
York for 1878. G. W. Schuyler. 

Second Annual Report of the Superintendent 
of State Prisons of the State of New York. 
Louis D. Pilsbury. 

Report of the Board of Commissioners of 
Pilots, December 31st, 1878. 

Communication from the Superintendent of 
State Prisons relative to the Contract Sys- 
tem in the State Prisons. L. D. Pilsbury. 

Communication from the Acting Chief of En- 
gineers, U. S. A., relative to the Pier and 
Bulkhead Lines of New Y'ork Harbor. Gen. 
H. G. Wright. 

A Proposed New City Park for the extreme 
Eastern portion of New York. Wm. J. 
Fryer, Jr. 

The Necessity to Commerce of Cheap Water 
Comniunication between the West and East. 
An Address to the Farmers of Ohio. Indiana 
and Illinois. 

From Gen. H. G Wright, Chief of En- 
gineers, U. S. A.. Washington, D. C: 

Reports upon the Specimens obtained from 
Borings made in 1874 between the Missis- 
sippi River and Lake Borgne, at the site 
proposed for an outlet for flood water. 
Prof. Eugene W. Hilgard and Dr. F. V. 
Hopkins. 

On the Use of the Barometer on Surveys and 
Reconnaissances. Lieut. Col. R. S. Wil- 
liamson. 

Eleventh Report iipon the Improvement of 

the South Pass of the Mississippi River. 

Capt. M. R. Brown. (Copies for distribution.) 

From A. F. Wrotnowski, New Orleans : 

Topographical and Drainage Map of New Or- 
leans and Surroundings. 



ANNOUNCEMENTS. 



At the meeting of the Society of October 1st, 
the paper by James D. Burr, member of the 
Society, subject, "The Construction of the 
Railroad over the Raton Mountains," will be 
read and discussed. 

At the meeting ol October 1st, the paper 
No. CLXXX (Transactions May 1879), on the 
Construction and Maintenance of Roads, by 
Edward P. North, member of the Society, and 
the discussions presented on the same at the 
Convention at Cleveland will also be con- 
sidered and further discussed. Advance 
copies of these discussions will be furnished 
to persons desiring to discuss the subject. 

At the meeting of October 15ih, the , paper 
by Max E. Schmidt, subject, "The South 
Pass Jetties," published in the current num- 
ber of the Transactions, will be discussed. 



Discussion on each of these subjects is 
especially invited. The Secretary will for- 
ward the advance coijies to those whi' inform 
him of their desire to discuss. The dis- 
cussions may be laresented verbally or sent 
to the Secretary, who will read them lor the 
authors. 

The Twenty-seventh annual meeting of the 
Society will be held at its rooms in Now York, 
on November 5th, 1879, at 10 .\.m. 

The following resolution was adopted at the 
Ninth Annual Convention of the Society, and 
ordered printed regularly in the Society pub- 
lications: 

Whereas, the metric system of weights and 
measures is now extensively used abroad, 
and whereas it is desirable that the relation 



71 



of the imits of differing systems be made 
familur to all by comparison: 

Resolved, That members be requested, in 
papers hereafter presented to the Society, to 
write, in parenthesis, weights or dimensions 
by the metric system, in connection with 
those of the system in general use. 

The House of the Society is at 104 East 
Twentieth street, one door from Fourth 
aveniie, and near the southwest corner of 



Gramercy Park. It is open from nine o'clock 
A.M. to five o'clock P.M. each business day, 
except Saturday, when it is closed at three 
o'clock p. M. 

The Library and Conversation Rooms will 
also, for the present, be open every Thursday 
evening, from 7)a to 10 p. M. Members are 
invited to avail themselves of the oppor- 
tunities, afforded on Thursday evenings both 
for consultation of books and periodicals, and 
for conversation. 



LIST OF MEMBERS, 



ADDITIONS. 

MEMBERS. 

Diite ot Klection. 

Cunningham, James H. . . Engineer and Proprietor, Milwaukee 
Bridge and Iron Works, Milwaukee, 
Wis August 6, 1879. 

Finney, Frederick N.... General Manager, Wisconsin Central 

Railroad, Milwaukee, Wis Sept. 3, " 

Prout, Henry G (Elected Associate, Nov. 6, 1872), 12 

Barclay street, New York " " " 

TiTLOW, John M Ass't Engineer, Department of Surveys, 

E. Entrance, City Hall, Philadelphia, 

Pa August 6, " 



changes and CORRECTIONS. 

MEMBERS. 

Allen, C. Frank Engineers' office. New Mexico & Southern Pacific Rail- 
road, Las Vegas, New Mexico. 

MoRSS, Foster Engineer Shenandoah Valley Railroad, Berry ville, Va„ 

Whitney, Joseph ....... .Cambridgeport, Mass. 

junior. 
Lucas, D. Jones Box 405, Lewiston, Maine. 



72 

RESIGNATION. 

Steele, J. Button September 5th, 1S79. 



CoLBURN, Warren, 



DEATH. 

.Elected Member, March i8th, 1868. Died September 
i6th, 1879. 



'-^'^/mtrJ^^ims^ 



m^rican %ockk a| |;iiil |;;nr)tnMi 



I^ROOEEDINOS. 



Vol. V, October, 1879. 
MINUTES OF MEETINaS, 

(Abstractof such as may be of seueral interest to members.) 



OF THE SOCIETY. 

OcTOBEK 1st, 1879. — The Society met at 8 p. m., William H. Paine in 
the chair. Ballots were canvassed, and Thomas M. Cleemau, of Pliila- 
deliahia, Pa., and Irvin John, of New York, were declared elected mem- 
bers. The vote was canvassed on resolutions submitted to letter ballot, 
with the following result : 

On the 'resolution : 

Resolved, That a standing committee of seven, representing different sections of the 
country, be appointed from the American Society of Civil Engineers, who shall examine into 
the entire subject of the preservation of timber, and report to the Society from time to time, 
and who shall collect such samples and data as they may be able, to aid in determining the 
relative values of the different woods, both preserved and unpreserved, in ordinary use in 
various parts of the country. 

There were 149 yeas and 7 noes. 

This resolution was thereupon declared adopted. 

On the resolution : 

Resolved, That a committee of seven members of the Society be appointed by the Board 
of Direction to devise and report a uniform system for tests of cement. 

There were 147 yeas and 9 noes. 

This resolution was thereupon declared adopted. 

The death, on September 16th, 1879, of Warren Colburn, member of 
the Society, was announced, and the Chairman was authorized to ap- 
point a committee to prepare a memoir of the deceased. 



74 

The following ameudmeiits to the Constitution were submitted : 
Amendment to Article XXII., proposed by William E. Worthen, L. 
B. Ward, Charles Macdonald, J. J. E. Croes, and Stevenson Towle : 

At the end of Article XXII. insprt : " On and after the ttfth day of November, 1879, Past 
Presidents of the Society shall be Life Members, entitled to all the privileges of members 
without the payment of Annual Dues. 

Amendment to Article XXXIII., proposed by William P. Shinn, 
William Metcalf, Reuben Miller, C. Vandervoort Smith, and William H. 
Paine : 

To amend Article XXXIII. so that the amended article shall read as 
follows : 

Article XXXIII.— Proposed amendments to this Constitution must be submitted in 
writing, signed by not less than Bve members, on or before the first Wednesday in October, 
and then sent by letter to the several members of the Society, at least twenty-five days 
previous to the Annual Meeting. Such amendments shall be in order for discussion and 
amendment at such Annual Meeting, and ivith such amendments thereto as may have, been appmved 
by a majority vote of the Annual Meeting, shall be voted upon by letter ballot, the vote to be 
counted at the first regular meeting in February. An affirmative vote of two-thirds of all 
ballots cast shall be necessary to secure the adoption of any amendment. 

The words in italics constitute the proposed amendment ; otherwise 
the article is unaltered. 

These amendments will be in order for discussion at the Annual 
Meeting, and afterwards wall be voted upon by letter ballot. 

The discussion on the paper by Edward P. North on "Construction 
and Maintenance of Roads" was resumed and participated in by E. B. 
Van Winkle, J. J. R. Croes, E. R. Andrews, E. Yardley, J. C. Post, and 
E. P. North. 

A paper by James D. Burr, subject " The Construction of the Atchi- 
son, Topeka & Santa Fe Railroad over the Raton Mountains, and the 
performance of Locomotives on its steep grades," was read by the Secre- 
tary and discussed by J. Foster Flagg (by letter), E. Yardley, C. E. 
Emery, aud E. P. North. 



OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTION. 

August -Ith, 1879.— Applications for membership were considered. 

September 2d, 1879.— Applications for memliership were considered. 
The Board of Censors to award the Norman TMedal for the present year 
were appointed as follows : E. S. Chesbrough, Charles Paine, and C. 
Shaler Smith. Resolutions for appointment of standing committees 
were considered and ordered to be submitted to vote by letter ballot. 
Financial matters and arrears due from members were considered, and 
appropriations were made. 

October 1st, 1879.— Applications for membership were considered. 
The distribution and exchange of publications were acted upon. The 



75 

pnblioation of a Society pnper in a journal, without giving credit to the 
Society, was brought up, and action taken, Preparation was made for 
the Annual Eeport of the Board. The report of the Nominating Com- 
mittee was received, and it was ordered that a ballot should be prepared 
and issued in accordance Avith the By-Laws. Appropriations were made. 



THE NORMAN MEDAL. 

The following rules have been adopted by the Board of Direction, 
with the approval of the donor of the Medal Fund, George H. Noi-man, 
Member and Fellow of the Society : 

CODE OF RULES 

FOR THE 

Award of the Norman Medal. 

I. — Comiaetition for the Norman Medal of the American Society of 
Civil Engineers shall be restricted to Members of the Society. 

II. — There shall be one gold medal, and only one, struck for each and 
every fiscal year of the Society, and awarded as hereinafter provided. 
The dies therefor shall be with the Sui:)erintendent of the United States 
Mint at Philadeli)hia, in trust exclusively for the above purijose. Such 
medal shall be of a cost equal to the annual interest received upon 
.$1,000 00 of the Consolidated Stock of the City of New York, Certificate 
No. 179, of tlie additional new Croton Aqueduct Stock of the City of 
New York, authorized by an act of the Legislature of the State of New 
York, Chap. 230, passed April 15th, 1870, dated November 17th, 1873, 
now held in trust by the Treasurer of this Society, and so held solely for 
this purpose, and shall be executed upon his order. 

III. — All original papers presented to the Society by members of any 
class, during the year for which the medal is awarded, shall be open to 
the awards, provided that such papers shall not have been previously 
contributed in whole or in part to any other association, nor have 
ajjpeared in print prior to their publication by the Society, nor have 
been presented to the Society in any previous year. 

IV. — The Board of Censors to award the Medal shall consist of three 
members of the Society, to be designated by the Board of Direction. 
The Secretary of the Society shall act as Secretary to the Board of 
Censors. 

V. — The medal shall be awarded to such paper as the said Board shall 
judge to be worthy of special commendation for its merits as a contribu- 
tion to Engineering Science, not merely relatively as compared with 
others presented during the same year, but as exhibiting the science, 
talent, or industry displayed in the consideration of the subject treated 



7C 

of, and for the good which may be expected to result from the discus- 
sion and the inquiry. 

VI,— In case no paper presented during the year shall be deemed of 
sufficient value to receive an award, the amount of the interest of the 
fund for that year shall be expended by the Board of Direction in the 
purchase of books, to be offered as a premium for the second best paper 
in the next year in which more than one paper of sufficient value may 
be presented. 

VII. —The medal year shall terminate on the first day of August, and 
the award shall be announced at the Annual Meeting in November. 

VIII.— The Treasurer of this Society shall cause the medal to be 
prepared and delivered to, or deposited to the order of, the successful 
competitor, within two months after the Annual Meeting at which the 
same shall have been awarded. 



ADDITIONS TO 



LIBRARY AND MUSEUM. 



From Administration des Fonts et 
Cbausees, Paris : 
Annales. August, 1879. 

From American Chemical Society, P. 
Cassamajor, Secretary. New York : 
Journal of the Society. Vol. 1. No. 7. 

From Argentine Scientific Society, Don 
Felix Amoretti, Secretary, Buenos 
Ay res: 
Anales. August. 1879. 

From Hon. Allan Campbell, New York: 

Report of the Department of Public Works of 

the City of New York, for the quarter ending 

June 30, 1879, with special report on the 

subject of Water Supply. 

From O. Chanute, New York : 
Blue and white Tracings of Sample Test Bars. 
Kecords of Tests, Iron and Steel, N. Y. L. 
E. and W. R. R. (Several copies.) 

From Theodore Cooper, New York: 

Repurt of the proceedings of the Interoceanic 

Canal Congress, held at Paris, May, 1879, 

and instructions given to Uaniel Ammen 

and Civil Engineer A. G. Menocal, U.S. N. 

From Department of the Interior, 
Washington, D. C: 
Report of the Commissioner of Education for 
the year 1877. (Two copies.) 

From Charles E. Fowler, New Haven, 
Conn. ; 
City Year Book of New Haven, containing 
List of officers, messages of the Mayor, 
Reports of Departments, Public Documents 
and Miscellaneous papers from 1876 to 
1878. 

From George H. Frost, New York: 
A comprehensive Treatise on the Water Sup- 
ply of Cities and Towns. William Hum- 
ber. 



From E. T. Hall, New York: 
Bulletin of the American Geograijhical So- 
ciety. No. -t. 1878. 

From Julius E. Hilgard, Assistant in 
charge United States Coast Survey, 
Washington, D. C: 
Report on Interoceanic Canals and Railroads 
between the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. 
Charles H. Davis. 
Methods and results— secular change of Mag- 
netic Declination in the United States and 
at some foreign stations. Third edition. 
From the Institute for the advancement 
of Technical Education, London, 
Programme of Technological Examinations 
for 1880. 

From the Institution of Civil Engineers, 
James Forrest, Secretary, London : 
Charter, By-Laws and Regulations, and List 
of Members. Institution of Civil Engineers, 
August 2d, 1879. 
Minutes of Proceedings. Vol. LVIII. 
Abstracts of Papers in foreign Transactions 

and Periodicals. Vol. LVIII. 
Session 1878-79. Part i. 

Ex'jerpt from Minutes of Proceedings. Edited 

by James Forrest, as follows : 

Description of a New Balance Bridge over 

the Royal Canal at Dublin. Biudon B. 

Stoney. 

On Keeping Irrigation Canals clear ot 

Silt. R. B. Buckley. 
On the Street and Footwalk Pavements of 
Montreal, Canada, from the year 1842 to 
1878. Percival W. St. George. 
The Travelirg of Sea Beaches. George 
U. Kinahan. 

From the Institution of Mechanical 
Engineers, W. R. Browne, Secretary, 
London : 
Proceedings of the Institute. June, 1879. 



77 



From M. Fero tie Lesseps, Paris, France : 

Prcceetliugs of the International Congress on 

tbe Inter-oceanic Canal, held at Paris, May 

15th to May 29th, 1879 (Fren.h). 

The reality of a Ship Canal acro.ss the Isthmus 

of Panama. Lucien de Puydt (French). 
International Company of the Columbian 
Ship Canal, founded in Paris, March 9th, 
1864. Organized for the purpose of cutting 
a Ship C.inal on a level without Locks or 
Tunnels, across the Isthmus of Darien. 

From G. A. M. Liljencrautz, Chicago: 
America's Climate. Graphical illustrations 
of the Daily Variationsof Temperature for 
one year, from July 1, 1878, to June 30, 
1879. Sheets 1 and 2. G. A. M. Lilieucrantz, 
C. E. 

From E. P. Lull, Commander U. S. N., 
Washington, D. C: 
Reports of Explorations and Surveys for the 
.location of a Ship Canal between the At- 
lantic and Pacific Oceans, through Nica- 
ragua. 1S72-73. 

From the National Board of Health 
Washington, I). C: 
Schedules of Questions for a Sanitary Survey 
of a City or Town. 

From Simon Newcomb, Supt. American 
Ephemeris and Nautical Almanac, 
Washington, D. C. : 
Astronoiiiical Papers, prepared for the use of 
the American Ephemeris and Nautical Al- 
manac. Vol. I., Part I. Tables of Eclipses. 

From New York Meteorological Observa- 
tory, Department Public Parks, Daniel 
Draper, Direttor, New York : 
Abstracts of Registers from Self-Recording 
Instruments. August, 1879. 

From Charles Paine, Cleveland, Ohio : 
Proceedings of Civil Engineers of the North- 
west. August 5th, 1879. 
Letter objecting to the proposed Constitution 
of Civil Engineers' Club of the Northwest. 
From Ernest Pontzeu, Paris, France : 
Le Verre Trempe. 

From the Royal Technical High school, 
Hanover. Germany : 
Prdspectus for 1879-80 (German). 

From W. H. Schock, Engineer-in-Chief 
U. S. N. Bureau of Steam Engineer- 
ing, Washington, D. C: 
Annual Report of the Chief of the Bureau of 

Steam Engineering 
Report on tha Herreshoff Boiler, submitted to 

the Navy Department January 12th, 1878. 
Report of the Board to recommend a Stan- 
dard Gauge for Bolts, Nuts, and Screw 

Threads for the United States Navy. May, 

1878. 
Speed Co-eiiicients of Screws of Vessels in the 

United States Navy. 
Power Co-efficients of Engines of Vessels in 

the United States Navy. 
Report on the two kinds of Coal submitted by 

the Chesapeake and Ohio Railroad Co. 
Iron Manufacturers in Great Britain. Prof. 

R. H. Thur-ston. 
Report on the Ashcroft Furnace Doors and 

Grate Bars. 
Report on the Murphy Grate Bar. 
Report on D. C. Green's System of Ventilation. 
Report on Safety Valve Tests made at the 

United States Navy Yard, Washington, D. 

C, September, li^75. 



From Societe des Ingenieurs Civils, M. 
Mallet, Secretary, Paris, !•' ranee : 
Memoires de la Societe. May and June, 1879. 
From United States Light House Board, 
Washington, D. C. : 
List of Towers. Beacons. Buoys, Stakes and 
other Day Marks in the Seventh Light 
House District. Corrected to July 1, 1879. 
(Two copies ) 

From E B. Van Winkle. Topographical 
Engineer, Department Public Parks, 
New York : 
Conditions of proposals for Constructing 
Sewer and Appurtenances in 1.34th Street, 
from 410 feet East of Willis Avenue to 
BrnoK Avenue, with Branch in Brown 
Place. 
Conditions of proposals for Consti'ucting 
Sewer and Appurtenances in 1 41st Street, 
from Alexander Avenue to Brook Avenue, 
with Branches in Alexander Avenue and 
Willis Avenue. 
Form of agreement in Triplicate for the Con- 
struction of Drains on and for the Lauds 
bounded by George Street on the north. 
Union Avenue and White's Lane ou the east, 
Delmonico and Concord .\venue8 on the 
west, and thence southerly to Long Island 
Sound, in the 23d Ward of the City of New 
York. 

From George E. Waring, Jr., New- 
port, E. I. 
Excremental Diseases: Their causation and 
their prevention by Hygienic means. 
George E. Waring, Jr. 

From A. R. Whitney, New York: 
Two framed Photographs of the Third Avenne 
Elevated Railroad. 

From tbe World's Fair Committee for 
1883, W. H. C. Price, Secretary, New 
York : 
The World's FairComraittee for the proposed 
World's Fair in the City of New York for 
1883. 
Address of the Committee to the people of 
the United States. 

From Geu. H. G. Wright, Chief of En- 
gineers, U. S. A., Washington, D. C: 
Official Army Register for 1879. 

From othei sources; 
The American Catalogue, Vol. 1, Authors and 

Titles: Part 4. Robbie— Z. 
On the Molecular Changes produced in Iron 
by variations of temijerature. Prof. R. H. 
Thurston. 
New York Ore Separator Company. 
The Manufacture of Steel. M. L. Gruner. 
Railway Gauges', from the London Times of 

January 17th, 1873. 
Proceedings of the National Narrow Gauge 
Railway Convention, held at St. Louis, Mo., 
June 19th, 1872. 
A letter to the Ht. Hon. H. C. E. Childers, M. 

P., on Railway Gauges. W. W. Evans. 
A letter on the Railway Gauge question, by B. 
H. Latrobe, with extracts from English 
Eegineers' rf^ports to the British Govern- 
ment on Railway Gauges, published by W 
W. Evans. 
The Street Railroads of the City of New York. 
Railway Rolling Stock and discussion by W. 

R. Browne and W. A. Adams. 
Time Tables, London. Chatham and Dover 

Railway, August, 1878. 
Time Tables of London and Northwestern 
and other railways in connection, January, 
1879, 



78 

LIST OP MEMBERS, 



ADDITIONS, 
MEMBERS. 



Date of Election. 

Ci.EEMANN, Thomas M 340 South Twenty-first street, Phil- 
adelphia, Pa October 1st, 1879. 

Lehnartz, Frederick W. . .United States Engineer's Office, Cas- 
cade Locks, Owasco Co., Oregon . August 6, 1879. 



changes and corrections. 



MEMBERS. 

BiLLiN, Charles E Pencoyd L-on Works, 265 South Fourth street, Phila- 
delphia, T'a. 

Falconnet, E. F Chief Engineer, Ovvensboro and Nashville Railroad, 

Nashville, Tenn. 

FUNIAK, Fred. DE General Manager Louisville and Nashville Rail- 
road, Louisville, Ky. 

James, John C Chief Engineer Northwestern Grand Trunk Railroad, 

Battle Creek, Mich. 

Nichols, O. F 25 Wall street, Trenton, N. J. 

Pontzen, Ernest 4 Rue de Castellane, Paris, France. 

Stauffer, D. Mc. N 129 South Thirteenth street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Stephens, Clinton F Resident Engineer, Texas and St. Louis Railroad, 

Texarkana, Ark. 

Vardlev, Edmund 104 East 20th Street, New York. 

associate. 
Harris, Charles M 83 Cedar street. New York. 

junior. 
Francis, Henry N City Hall, Providence, R. I. 

deaths. 
Vinton, Francis L Elected Member August 5th, 1868. Died October 

6th, 1879. 
Tasker, Charles A Elected Junior, November 4th, 1S74. Died October 

4th, 1879. 



^mmcm locidg of mm\ jw^mm. 



PROCEEDiisras. 



Vol. V, November, 1879. 
MINUTES OF MEETINGS 

(Abstractof such as may be of general interest to members.) 



OF THE SOCIETY. 

October 15th, 1879. — The Society met at 8 p. m., Walter Katte in 
the chair. The pajier by Max E. Schmidt, subject "The South Pass 
Jetties," published in Transactions for August, 1879, was discussed by 
J. Foster Flagg (by letter), and by Messrs. E. E. Andrews, O. Chanute, 
T. Cooper, W. Katte, T. J. Long, E. P. North and J. W. Putnam. 

November 5th, 1879. — The Twenty-se\^nth Annxtal Meeting of 
THE Society. — The Society met at 10 a. m. , Vice President Albert Fink 
in the chair. The following members were present : 

Messrs. Edward E. Andrews, George S. Baxter, John Bogart, Eobert 
Briggs, O. Chanute, E. S. Chesbrough, Thomas C. Clarke, F. Colliug- 
wood. Theodore Cooper, Martin Coryell, J. J. E. Croes, AVilson Crosby, 
D. W. Cunningham, E. B. Dorsey, G. W. Dresser, Theodore G. Ellis, 
Charles E. Emery, Albert Fink, Clark Fisher, Edward A. Flint, A. 
Gordon, Bryant Godwin, G. Thomas Hall, Sullivan Haslett, A. L. 
Holley, William E. Kelley, George O. Knapp, Charles Latimer, G. 



80 

Leverich, W. W. Maclay, Edward Marsland, Charles C. Martin, Charles 
L. McAlpine, D. N. Melvin, William Metcalf, W. A. Nichols, Edward P. 
North, E. O. Norton, William H. Paine, Franklin C. Prindle. C. Van- 
dervoort Smith, George C. Tingley, E. B. Van Winkle, W. W. WHson, 
De Volson Wood, WHliam E. Worthen and W. W. Wright. 

George W. Dresser and Theodore Cooper were appointed Tellers of 
the ballots for officers. 

The Annual Eeport of the Board of Direction was then presented, 
read by the Secretary, and on motion w-as accepted. 

The Annual Eeport of the Treasurer was presented, read and 
accepted. 

The Annual Kejiort of the Finance Committee was presented, read and 
accepted. 

The Eeport of the Library Committee on the subject referred to it at 
the last Convention, namely, whether some plan may not be adopted to 
enable meml)ers living away from New York to consult the books of the 
Library, under proper regulations to ensure their return and to prevent 
injury, was then presented, read and accepted. 

A report from the Committee on Gauging of Streams was then read, 
accepted, and the Committee continued. 

The Secretary presented a statement of the answers to the circular 
requesting suggestions as to the time and place for the next Annual 
Convention. After discussion, it was resolved that there should be 
issued to the Society a circular giving an abstract of the suggestions 
made on the subject, and that the determination of the i^lace for the 
Convention should be submitted to letter ballot, restricting the vote to 
the three cities already suggested by the largest number of members, 
namely, St. Louis, Washington and San Francisco. 

The Eeport of the Committee on the Exhibit of American Engineer- 
ing at the Paris Exposition was then presented, read by Edward P. 
North, accej)ted, and the Commission discharged. 

A report from the Centennial Commission of the Society was then 
presented by the Chairman, Theodore G. Ellis, to the effect that the 
Commission had been continued from year to year, in the hope that the 
Chairmen of the Sub-Committees, on various divisions of Engineering 
Exhibits would prepare reports. Only two, however, had been jire- 
sented, those on Lighthouses and on Elvers and Harbors, and as there 
■was no probability of further reports, the Commission asked to be dis- 
charged. The report was accej^ted and the Commission discharged. 

The Committee on Method of Nominations then presented a verbal 
report through the Chairman, J. J. E. Croes. On motion, it was 
resolved that the Committee be continued, and that the former report 
made by it be printed and sent to the members of the Society for dis- 
cussion and suggestion. 

The Committee on Quarters for the Society presented a report, which 
was, on motion, accepted, the Committee continued, and instructed to 



81 

report, as soon as practicable, by letter to the Society, Avliat was con- 
sidered a feasible plan for procuring a suitable building to belong to the 
Society. 

The tellers of the ballots for officers then reported the canvass of the 
■votes, and the following named members were declared elected officers 
of the Society for the ensuing year : President, Albert Fink ; Vice- 
Presidents, James B. Francis and Octave Chanute ; Secretary and Libra- 
rian, John Bogart ; Treasurer, J. James R. Croes ; Directors, William 
H. Paine, C. Vandervoort Smith, Charles Hermauy, Edgar B. Van 
Winkle and Gouverneur K. Warren. 

The following proposed Amendment to Article XXII. of the Consti- 
tution was considered : 

At the end of Article XXII, insert: "On and after the fifth day of November, 1879. Pas 
Presidents of the Society shall be Life Members, entitled to all the privileges of members 
■without the payment of Annual Dues." 

After discussion, it was resolved that this i^roposed amendment be 
submitted to letter ballot without comment. 

The following proposed Amendment to Article XXXIII. of the Con- 
stitution was considered : 

To a uend Artic'e XXXIII, so that the amended article shall read as follows : 
iRTiCLE XXXIII. — Proposed amendments to this Constitution must be submitted in 
-writing, signed by not le=s than five Members '^n or before the first Wednesday in October, 
^Qd then sent by letter to the several Members of the Society, at least twenty-five days pre- 
vious t > the Annual Meeting. Such amendment shall be in order for discussion and amend 
vienl at such Annual Meeting, and with such, aniindinfnts thereto as may have been approved by a 
■majority vote of the Annual Meeting, shall be voted upon by letter ballot, the vote to be 
counted at the first regular meeting in February. .\ny affirmative vote of two-thirds of all 
ballots cast shall be necessary to secure the adoption of any amendment. 

The words in italics constitute the proposed amendment; otherwise 
the article is unaltered. 

After discussion, it was resolved that the i^roposed amendment bo 
iipproved by this meeting. 

The result of the canvass of the ballots for membership was then 
announced, and the following candidates were declared elected members: 
Daniel Bontecou of New York, Alexander Dempster of Pittsburgh, Pa., 
Horace Loomis of New York, and James Hart Reno of Pittsburgh, Pa. 

The suggestion made in the report of the Board of Direction as to 
the advisability of changing the day of the Annual Meeting and the date 
of termination of the Society year was discussed, and the Secretary was 
requested to present the subject for discussion at the next Convention. 

On motion, the thanks of the Society were presented to the officers 
for the i^ast Society year. 

The Board of Censors to award the Norman Medal and Book Prize 
then presented its report through E. S. Chesbrongh. 



82 



THE 

ANNUAL EEPOUT OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTION, 

FOR THE YEAR ENDING NOVEMBER 5, 1879. 
Presented and Accepted at the Annual Meeting of that date. 



The Board of Direction presents the following Report for the fprm from 
November Gth, 1878, to November 5th, 1879 : 

On November Gth, 1878, the membership in the Society was — 

Honorary Members, resident, 2 ; non-resident, 4 ; Total 6 

Corresponding Members " 3 " S 

Members, resident 120 " 334 " 454 

Associates, " 4 " 13 " 17 

Juniors, " 8 " 49 " 57 528 

Making 134 403 537 

Fellows, 67 — of whom 10 Members and 1 Honorary Member are included above, 

leaving 56- 

Total connected with the Society November Gth, 1878 593 

At the present time the membership is — 

Honorary members, resident, 2; non-resident, 4 ; total G- 

Corresponding Members ... . " 3 •' ^ 

Members, resident 119 " 345 " i64 

Associates, " 5 " 13 " 18 

Juniors " 8 " 4G " i>i 536 

Making 134 411 545 

Fellows, 67 — of whom 10 members and 1 Honorary Member are included above, 

leaving 5G. 

Total connected w ith the Society November 5th, 1879 ^^^ 

The increase during the year has been — 

Members admitted — , 28- 

Associates admitted 2 

Juniors admitted * 

Fellows admitted 1 



Total increase -^^ 

The decrease during the year has been — 

Members died 8; resigned 10 

Associates " — " — Transferred to Members. 1 

Juniors " 1 " — " '' 5 

Fellows " 1 " — " " 

Total died 10; resigned 10; transferred 6 

On November Gth, 1878, there were, as stated in the last annual report, G 
proposals pending ; 44 proposals have been received during the year ; 31 can- 
didates have been elected members, of whom 5 were transferred from Juniors. 



83 

and 1 from Associates ; 2 candidates have been elected as Associates, and 3 
candidates have been elected as Juniors ; 28 persons have qualified during 
the year as Members, 2 as Associates, 3 as Juniors, and 1 as Fellow ; 3 candi- 
dates elected as Members during the year have not yet qualified ; there are 13 
proposals now pending. 

23 meetings of the Society were held during the year, one of which was 
the Eleventh Annual Convention ; all the sessions of the Convention, includ- 
ing the business meeting, being counted as one meeting of the Society. Meet- 
ings have been held on the first and third Wednesdays of each month, except 
the third Wednesday of Augtist. 13 meetings of the Board of Direction have 
been held during the year. 

The Eleventh Annual Convention was held at Cleveland, Ohio, June 17th, 
18th, and 19th, 1879. During this time and after the close of the Convention, 
many works of engineering interest were visited both in Cleveland and its 
immediate vicinity, and also at Leavittsburgh, at the Mahoning Valley coal- 
fields, at Youngstown, Pittsburgh, the Davis Island dam, the Edgar Thomson 
Steel Works, the Bradford oil district, and at Niagara Falls. Full reports of 
the Convention have been published in the Proceedings. 

The answers to a circular issued to the Society, requesting suggestions as 
to the place and time for the next convention will be submitted at this 
meeting. 

Reports made during the year have been as follows : 

By the Board of Direction.— The AnnuarReport for the year ; also a report as to the publica- 
tion of papers, a report as to arrears of dues from members, and a report as to designation 
of engineers to attend turbine tests at Holyolje. 

By the Finance Committee. — ,2 reports. 

By the Library Committee.— A report, embodying the changed rules for the award of the Nor- 
man Medal. 

By the Treasurer.— His annual report, and also frequent financial statements to the Board. 

By the Secretary. — Monthly Reports to the Board. 

By the Centennial Commission of the Society. — 1 repor . 

By the Committee on Exhibit at Paris. — 2 reports. 

By the Committee on Tests of American Iron. Steel, and Other Metals.— 2 reports. 

By the Committee on Gauging of Streams. — 1 report. 

By the Committee on Quarters for the Society. — 1 report. 

By the Committee on Uniform System of Railroad Accounts.— 2 reports. 

By the Committee on the Resistances of Railway Trains. — 1 report. 

By the Committee on Method of Nominations. — 1 report. 

The Treasurer's Eeport and the Report of the Finance Committee will be 
submitted at this meeting. 

At the last annual meeting, the Committee on Resistances of Railway 
Trains made a final report, and asked to be discharged, which was done. 

At the last convention the Committee on Uniform Accounts and Returns of 
Railroad Companies made a final report, and asked to be discharged, which 
was done. 

The other committees referred to in the last report ot the Board are still 
existing, and reports will be expected from them at the present annual 
meeting. These are the Centennial Commission of the Society; the Commit- 
tee on Tests of American Iron, Steeh and Other Metals; on Gauging of Streams; 
on Quarters for the Society; on Methods of Nominations; and on the Exhibi- 
tion at Paris. 



84 

Eesolutions were offered at the last Animal Convention for the appoint- 
ment of a Committee on the Preservation of Timber, and a Committee on a 
Uniform System for Tests of Cement. 

These resohitions have been submitted to letter ballot, and approved. 
The Board is now in correspondence with members in reference to the i>ev- 
sons to serve on these committees. 

At the Anniial Convention the following resolution was adopted: 

" Thut the Library Committee be requested to report whether some plan may not be 
adopted to enable members living away from New York to consult the books of the library, 
under proper regulations to insure their return, and to prevent injury." 

The Library Committee will report on this subject at this meeting. 

A list of the papers and discussions pnblished d^^ring the year, also of 
those presented in addition to those published, and also of the contents of 
Proceedings, will be given in an Appendix. 

The library has been increased during the year by the following ad- 
ditions : 

Number of Books, bound 7S 

" " unbound 102 

Pamphlets 387 

" Maps '.) 

PJans l:, 

" Photographs 30 

" Drawings, Specifications, Models and Specimens 38 

These do not include the magazines and papers contributed to the Societj' 
by publishers or received in exchange for the Transactions, a list of which is 
given in an appendix. 

The present state of the Library is about as follows : 

Books and Pamphlets 8 054 

IMauuscripts 95 

JMaps, Plans, Drawings, Charts, Photographs and Engravings 1.906 

Models and Specimens 218 

At the last Annual Meeting a codification of the Constitution and By- 
Laws, together with a number of proposed amendments were discussed. 
These were afterwards submitted to a letter ballot of the Society and the 
Constitution and By-Laws, as finally ado2ited, have been printed in pamphlet 
form. 

Two amendments have been submitted for debate at the ijresent Annual 
Meeting, one relating to the Past Presidents of the Societj% and the other 
relating to the method of amending the Constitiition. 

In this connection, it has been suggested by a number of members, that 
the date of the Annual Meeting is particularly inconvenient, coming, as it 
does, the day after the date of the elections in quite a number of States. 
The Secretary has been informed by several members that their attendance at 
that day would be inconvenient, and in some cases, impracticable, and a 
change in the date of the Annual meeting might be discussed, and a more 
desirable day suggested. 

The Board suggests that the fiscal year shall end on December 31st ; that 
the Annual Meeting, election of officers and reception of reports be held on 



85 

the 3d Wednesday of January, and that the term of office shouUT begin on 
the day of election. 

In the last Annual Report the Board called attention to the large number 
of members in arrears for their dues. In its judgment the interests of the 
Society demanded that measures should betaken to determine whether th& 
dereliction was due to inability to pay or to indifference, and if the latter wufi 
the cause, that the connection of the delinquents with the Society should 
cease. In accordance with these views, the Board, on April 30th, in com- 
pliance with the provisions of the Constitution, passed the following resolu- 
tion : 

" Besolved, That the Secretary be directed to notify all members in arrears 
" that unless the dues for the cvirrent Society year, beginning November Gth, 
" 1878, are paid before November 5th, 1879, they will cease to be members. 

'•Also, that members who are in arreai's for more than the dues for the 
" current year, be notified that their dues for years previous to the current 
" year are still to be paid, and that payment of the same will be reqiiired, 
" unless good reason to the contrary, in compliance with the provisions of 
" Article XXXII of the Constitution, be assigned before November 5th, 1879." 

In accordance with this action, there were sent, on May 1, 1878, to each 
member whose dues were not then paid, a copy of the above resolution, the 
formal notice (Form C) prescribed by the Constitiition for i;se in case of non- 
payment of dues and a cojjy of the Articles of the Constitution relating to 
this subject. 

Since that time a number of members have paid their di;es in full ; others 
have jDaid the dues for the past year only, thus retaining their membership 
under the resolution quoted above; others have written in reply expressing 
their intention or desire to pay as soon as possible, and a large number have 
made no response whatever. 

The necessity of preparing this rejjort previoias to the Annual Meeting and 
the probability that a number of members may give attention to this matter at 
the time of the meeting, prevents the Board from giving a final statement on 
the subject. After this meeting a full statement will be prepared and pre- 
sented in a future report. It is apparent, however, that there will be quite a 
number of members whose names have been on the roll of the Society for 
some time past, whose membership will cease. 

While the Board regrets the apparent decrease in membership, caused by 
this action, it feels that it is necessary to the prosperity of the Society that 
it should be distinctly understood that membership of the Society carries 
with it the obligation to contribute to its support, and that members cannot 
be carried on its rolls unless they bear their burdens equally with their 
fellows. 

The subject of the conditions of award for the Norman Medal has Ijeen 
carefully considered by the Library Committee and by the Board and the 
donor of the medal, Mr. George H. Norman, member and Fellow of the 
Society, has been fully consulted. 

No paper was presented in competition for the medal either the last or the 
present year, and it was felt to be for the best interests of the Society and 
due also to the donor of the medal that a different plan for its award should 
be adopted. 



8G 

AVitli his fiill concurrence the code of rules for this award has been mod- 
ified, and competition is now extended to all papers conforming to the rules, 
presented to the Society during each year. The modified niles have been 
published for several months with the Proceedings. The Board of Censors to 
award the medal for this year, Messrs. E. S. Chesbrough, Charles Paine and 
C. Shaler Smith are expected to report at this meeting. 

The Board has issued a list of topics upon which original jiapers, illus- 
trating the experience of the writers, are requested. The attention of mem- 
bers of the Society is called to the great desirability of the presentation of 
papers by them upon subjects of engineering interest. Discussions of the 
papers presented are also in many cases essential to a full development of 
professional information on the subjects of those papers. Early information 
is now given, by notification to the members, of the papers to be read at 
each meeting and advance copies are sent to svich members as are designated 
by the authors of the jjapers as specially qualified to take part in the discus- 
sions, and also to other members who desire such advance copies. The 
result of this practice has been not only to secure more extended discussion, 
but also to have the paper and its discussions presented at the same time, the 
Secretary reading the discussions sent him by persons not able to be present. 

The Transactions of the Society are now issued up to date, the Number 
for October, 1879, having been sent out some time since. At the time of the 
last Annual Eeport one year ago, the Transactions were much behind. The 
reasons, altogether financial, for that state of things were explained in that 
Report. It has been found possible during the imst year to publish not only 
the twelve monthly Numbers, but enough in addition to bring the issues to 
date in their regular sequence. This has added considerably to the labor of 
editing and supervising the publications, but it is the belief of the Board 
that with the systematic and business-like management of the financial 
affairs of the Societj' now in operation the futiire issues of its publications 
can be regularly made. 

In but one previous year of its history has the Society lost so many of its 
members by death. The decease of eight members, one Junior and one 
Fellow, is announced, as follows : 

Alfred W. Craven, Past-President and one of the original incorjjorators of 
the Society, November 5th, 1852, died March 27, 1879. 

Eobert G. Hatfield, elected Member December 4, 1867, who died Feb- 
ruary 15, 1879. 

Warren Colburn, elected Member March 18, 1868, who died September 
16, 1879. 

Samuel J. Reeves, elected Member April 15, 1868, who died December 15, 
1878. 

Francis L. Vinton, elected Member August 5, 1868, who died October 6, 
1879. 

Norman A. Williams, elected Member February 17, 1869, who died Oc- 
tober 12, 1879. 

Franklin A. Stratton. elected Member May 3, 1876, who died July 17, 
1879. 

James E. Bell, elected Member March 5, 1879, who died June 8, 1879. 

Charles A. Tasker, elected Junior November 4, 1874, who died October 4^ 
1879. 



87 

Thomas T. Tasker, Jr., elected Fellow January 7, 1873, who died August 
19, 1877. 

Memoirs of each are in i^reparation and will be published directly. 
Eespectfully submitted, 

JOHN BOGAIIT, 

Secretary. 



REPORTS OF COMMITTEES 

PRESENTED AT THE ANNUAL MEETING, NOVEMBER 5th, 1879. 



On Methods op Noiunation fok Officeks. 



The following report was first presented at 
the Annual ISIeeting, November ?6th, 1878. 
The'Committee also at the Annual Meeting, 
November 5th, 1879, made a verbal report. 
It was then resolved that the Committee be 
continued, the report printed and issued to 
the Society for discussion and suggestion. 
Keport. 

The Committee appointed at the regiilar 
meeting held during the Annual Convention, 
in June, 1878, to examine the methods of 
nominations for oiQcers practiced by various 
societies and clubs, and to report a by-law 
embodying such features of the same as may 
seem best adapted to the use of this Society, 
respectfully report that they have performed 
the duty assigned them, and they present the 
following synopsis of the usages of ten asso- 
ciations, and also a plan proposed by a mem- 
ber of the Society. The existing by-law of 
the Society is aj^pended for comparison. 
The Institution of Civil Engineers, London : 

17 Honorary Members, 1 148 Members, 1 200 
Associate Members, 622 Associates. 

President, 4 Vice-Presidents, and 12 mem- 
bers and 3 associates form the Council. (20 in 
all.) 

Council elected annually. 

President shall not serve more than 2 con- 
secutive years, and then is not eligible for 3 
years. 

Senior Vice-President to be nominated for 
President unless he gives notice of intention 
to decline. 

At the general meeting on the Tuesday be- 
fore the Annual Meeting, the Council present 
a list of persons whom they nominate as suit- 
able for offices. The list shall contain the 
names of 23 members and 6 associates. 



The names presented (except for President 
and Vice-Presidents) shall be arranged alpha- 
betically. 

In voting tliis ballot, members may erase and 
substitute names, but the total number of 
names left must not exceed the number to be 
elected. 

At the Annual meeting, the meeting chooses 
2 scrutineers. The ballot is Ijept open for 1 
hour. 

The treasurer, secretary and other execu- 
tive officers are appointed annually by the 
Council. 

The Society of Engineers, London : 

372 members. 

The officers elected at the General Meeting 
in December. 

The year of office begins on January 1st. 

Council consists of — President, 3 Vice-Presi- 
dents, 8 members. 1 Honorary Secretary and 
Treasurer elected at the Annual Meeting. 
Also 6 Past Presidents who retire by seniority. 

Blembers of Council are eligible for re-elec- 
tion. 

The Council prepare a balloting list of pro- 
posed new Council and officers which shall 
be sent to each member who has paid his sub- 
scription for the current year, at least fourteen 
clear days before the date of the annual meet- 
ing. 

Any member offering himself or proposing 
other members for election on the council 
must give in his or their names to the coun- 
cil on or before the first ordinary meeting in 
November. Such names shall be appended 
to the list proposed by council. 

Members may erase and substitute. 

At the annual meeting the President ap- 
points 2 scrutineers. 



88 



In case of a tie, election to be decided by 
lot. 

North of England Institule of Mininc/ and 
Mechanical Engineers. 

i classes of members — Original. 750 ; or. 
dinary, 17; associate, 12; honorary, 24; tutal, 
803 members : students, 151. 

Officers other than Secretary and Treasurer 
are elected from the original, ordinary and 
associate members, and consist of a President- 
six Vice-Presidents and eighteen Councillors, 
who with the Treasurer and Secretary consti- 
tute the council. 

The President, Vice-Presidents and Coun- 
cillors are elected at the Annual Meeting in 
August, and are eligible for re-election, with 
the exception of any President or Vice-Presi- 
dent who shall have held office for three im" 
mediately preceding years, and such six conn 
cillors as may have attended the fewest coun" 
cil meetings during the past year. 

The Treasurer and the Secretary are appoint- 
ed by the Council and are removable by the 
Council subject to appeal to a general meet, 
ing. 

Each member is at liberty to nominate in 
writing, and send to the Secretary not less 
than eight days prior to the ordinary general 
meeting in June, a list duly signed of mem- 
bers suitable to till the offices— for the ensu- 
ing year. 

The Council prepares a list of the persons 
FO nominated, together with the names of the 
officers for the current year eligible for re- 
election, and of such other membei s as they 
may deem siiitable. Such list must comprise 
at least 30 names. The list so prepared is 
submitted to the June meeting, and is the 
balloting list for August. 

A copy of this list is posted to each mem- 
ber who may erase and substitute names, but 
names left must not exceed number to be 
elected. 

The Chairman of the Annual Meeting ap- 
points 4 scrutineers who receive the balloting 
papers, and after scrutiny destroy the same, 
and sign and hand to the Chairman a list of 
the elected officers. 

Balloting papers may be sent by mail to 
Secretary or Chairman. 

All Past Presidents are ex-offtcio members 
of Council, and Vice-Presidents who retire 
shall be ex-officio members for the following 
year. 

Institution of Civil Engineers of Ireland. 
148 members. 

Officers : President, two Vice-Presidents, 
Honorary Secretary, and eight other mem- 
bers, who constitute the Council. 



The President is not eligible for more thau 
two years, and on vacating becomes an ex- 
officio member of Council. One Vice-Presi- 
dent and two members of Council retire 
each year, but are re-eligible after one year. 

Two members of Council are elected from 
the Associates. At the ordinary general 
meeting in December, the Council present a 
list of persons whom they nominate. Mem- 
bers may erase and substitute, leaving, how- 
ever, twelve names. Lists containing more 
or less than twelve names to be rejected. 

The meeting chooses two Scrutineers. 

American Institute of Mining Engineers. 

734 members. 

Nominations may be sent in writing to the 
Secretary, accompanied with the names of 
the proposers, at any time not less than 
thirty days before the Annual Meeting, Two 
weeks before said meeting, the Secretary 
mails to every member the list of all nomi- 
nations received. Voters may substitute, 
but the number of names voted shall not 
exceed number of officers to be elected. 

At the Annual Meeting, three Scrutineers, 
appointed by presiding officer. 

Persons who have received the greatest 
number of votes are elected. 

Union League Club, New York. 

Annual Meeting held in January. Poils 
for election opened at 6:30 p. m., and open. 
three hours. 

At monthly meeting in December, a com- 
mittee of seven, appointed by the Club at 
large, who shall reijort list of candidates. 

Four inspectors and canvassers of election 
appointed by Club. 

lYcTO York Club. 

At Annual Meeting the Club ballots for of- 
ficers. The presiding officer appoints three 
inpectors. 

Candidates receiving the highest number 
of votes are elected. 

Century Club of Neiu York. 

600 members. 

The officers are chosen at . eacli -AamuT 
Meeting by ballot. There are no provisions 
in the constitution and By-Laws for nomina- 
tions, or for insiiectors of election. 
Harvard College Plan. 

Five Ovei seers elected each year. 

A nominating committee of seven is elected 
by the electors at a public meeting. This 
committee makes up a list of twenty eligible 
persons and sends this to each voter. The 
voter fills out his ballot with six names, but is 
not confined to those suggested by the com- 
mittee. 



89 



The ten names having the greatest number 
of votes are then submitted to the Annnal 
Meeting as candidates. Each voter must 
erase five names, leaving five voted for. 

The nominations are thus made by letter 
ballot, but the election is by personal ballot. 

The New England Society, of Orange, N. J. 

102 members. 

Board of officers consists of a President, 
two Vice-Presidents, six Counsellors, a Secre- 
tary and Treasurer, elected annually. Elec- 
tions conducted on the Hare System. At 
least one month before Annual Meeting, the 
Secretary must furnish each member with 
five blank forms for nominations. These 
ballots to be filled out and returned to Secre- 
tary within ten days, and opened as received 
and counted by a committee, of whom the 
Secretary shall be one. The committee's re- 
port to the Annual Bleeting to be final. 
E. Yardley's Plan. 

Board of Direction to consist of eight. 
Nominating committee to present twelve 
names. 

Members to erase or substitute. Each 
member to have eight votes which he may 
assign all to one man, or divide as he 
pleases. The eight names having largest 
number of votes to be elected. The Board 
then to choose from their own number Presi- 
dent and Vice-Presidents. 

The Board to elect Secretary and Treasurer 
not of their number, who shall hold office 
during good behavior or until election of 
successor. 

Term of office to begin on January 1st fol- 
lowing election. 

American Society of Civil Engineers. 

600 members. 

Present By Law. 

At the Annual Convention a nominating 
committee of five members, not officers 
of the Society, shall be appointed by the 
Convention. This committee shall present 
to the Board of Direction, on or before 
the first day of October, the names of 
the i5ersons selected by Ihem as candidates 
for officers. Of these, at least one Vice- 
President, three Directors, the Secretary and 
the Treasurer, shall be resident members. 
The Board of Direction shall thereupon cause 
such list to be posted in the rooms of the 
Society and shall issue at least twenty days 
before the Annual Meeting a letter ballot 
containing the names thus ijroposed. 

Any five members, not officers of the So- 
ciety, may present to the Board of Direc- 
tion, on or before October Is*, a list of names 



proposed by them for officers, which list or 
lists shall also be issued for ballot. 

No member of any nommating committee 
shall be presented by such committee as a 
candidate for office. 



It will be seen that, in these eleven schemes 
of nomination, there are four distinct methods 
of selection. 

I. — No previous nominations are provided 
for, but the election is supposed to be left to 
the discretion of members voting, as in the 
New York Club, the Century Club, and the 
New England Society of Orange. In practice, 
a nominating committee is appointed in the 
two first named organizations. 

II. — The officers of the Society prepare a 
list of candidates, the number of the same 
being greater than the number to be elected, 
as iu the Institution of Civil Engineers and 
the Institution of Civil Engineers of Ireland. 

III. — Nominations are sent in by individual 
members, and a list of such, with additional 
names proposed by the officers, is sent out 
for ballot, as in the Society of Engineers 
(Loudon), the North of England Institute of 
Mining and Mechanical Engineers, and tho 
American Institute of Mining Engineers. 

IV. — A nominating committee is elected by 
the members at a general meeting, which 
committee proposes a list of candidates to be 
voted for, as iu the American Society of Civil 
Engineers, the Harvard College Board of Over- 
seers, and the Union League Club. This 
feature is also retained in Mr. Yardley's plan. 

The first method named was practiced by 
this Society i^revious to the annual meeting of 
1877. The objection to it was that it placed 
the selection of officers entirely in the hands 
of the small proportion of members who at- 
tend the annual meeting, and the greater part 
of these being resident members, the Society 
at large had little voice in the election. A great 
deal of unnecessary time was consumed in 
the election, owing to the scattering nature of 
the vote. Usually several more ballots were 
taken than there were officers to be elected. 

If efficiency and interest in ^Society affairs 
was the sole thing to be looked at iu the selec- 
tion of officers, the second plan would un- 
doubtedly be the most effective, for the actual 
officers of the Society know best which of the 
members display an intelligent interest in its 
affairs. The plan is open, however, to the 
objection that it might tend to make the board 
a close corporation, and keep the same set in 
office all the time. 

The third plan is open to serious objections 
in the case of this Society. Either members 



90 



will neRlect to send nominations, leaving the 
board to make up the list, as in the second 
lalan, or else a large number of nominations 
will be presented, most of them representing 
the personal preference of a single member. 
No judicious selection could be made from 
such a list by the mass of members who are 
widely scattered and who really know little 
about the business of the Society or the per- 
sonal character of its officers. 

The fourth plan appears to be the fairest 
and best, and when submitted to the Annual 
Convention in 1877 was approved by a unani- 
mous vote. The few objections which have 
been made are to its mode of application. It 
has been urged that sufficient liberty of choice 
is not left to the members, and that, there- 
fore, the plan is not as democratic as it should 
be. By the Harvard plan, the selection of 
candidates is certainly made in a more demo- 
cratic manner, but involving as it does, prac- 
tically, two ballots on the iiart of all the 
members, it is believed to be too cumbrous 
and unwieldy for the use of this Society. It 
must be borne in mind also that the. dices 
of this Society are not merely honorary posi- 
tions, but that the officers are the trustees of 
the xjroperty of the Society and the directors 
of its policy. By the law under which it is 
incorporated, a majority of the trustees con- 
stitute a quorum for the transaction of busi- 
ness, and they must, therefore, be so situated 
as to be able to attend the meetings of the 
board. The experiment of having a number 
of the trustees residents of remote districts, 
which was tried during the past year, has not 
been a success, as three members of the board 
have not attended a single meeting nor made 
any inquiries as to the action of their col- 
leagues. 

The committee, in deference to the opinion 
which is widely entertained, that mors lati- 
tude should be given to the representation of 
the preferences of the members at large in 
the formation of the list for candidates, sub- 
mit to the Society* the subjoined by-law, as a 
substitute for that which was adopted at the 
Annual Convention in New Orleans in 1877. 
KeBpectfully, 

J. J. K. Croes, 

Chairman. 
November G, 1878. 

By-Law. 

1. Before the annual convention each year, 

the Board of Direi:tinn shall make a territorial 

apportionment of the members of the Society 

(including also Associates and Juniors) into 



seven districts, each containing, as nearly 
as practicable, the same number of mem- 
bers, and shall present the same at the 
convention. The convention shall select a 
mamber from each of said districts to serve 
on the Nominating Committee. The Chair- 
man of said comiuittee shall be the member 
representing the district in which the place 
of business of the Society i« situated. 

2. Before the first day of August next en- 
suing, each member of said committee shall 
send to the Chairman a list of persons pro- 
posed by him for officers, giving one name for 
each officer to be elected. The Chairman 
shall thereupon send a full list of the names 
proposed to each member of the committee, 
who shall return said list to the Chairman, 
having first erased therefrom all names in 
excess of double the officers to be elected, 
except that only one name shall be left for 
President. 

The Chairman shall prepare from the re- 
turned lists a balloting list, comprising the 
one name for President, three names for Vice- 
Presidents, the two names for Secretary, the 
two names for Treasurer, and the ten names 
for Directors T>-hich appear on the greatest 
number of lists. 

The balloting list thus prepared shall be 
pi-esented to the Board of Direction on or 
before the third Wednesday in Septem- 
ber, and shall be sent by them to each 
member of the Society before the first day of 
October. 

Each membpr entitled to vote at the annual 
election may erase any names on said list and 
substitute others, but no ballot shall contain, 
when presented to the Society, more than 
one name for each officer to be elected. 

The ballots shall be received by the Secre- 
tary in accordance with the rules established 
by the Board of Direction for letter ballots, 
and all ballots received before twelve o'clock 
of the day of the annual meeting shall be 
lilaced in the hands of three tellers, appointed 
by the Presiding Officer, and by them can- 
vassed, and the result certified to in writing 
and presented to the Chairman, who shall de- 
clare it to the Society. The person having the 
greatest number of votes for each office shall 
be declared elected. In case of a tie, the 
choice between the two candidates to be made 
by ballot of the members present. 

No member of the Society who is in arrears 
for dues for either any previous or the cnir- 
rent year, shall be eligible for office or for a 
position on the Nominating Committee. 



91 



On the Circulation of teih Books op the Libkary. 



The following report was presented by the 
Xibrary Committee to the Board of Direction, 
-adopted by the Board, submitted at the 
annual meeting, November 5th, J879, and 
-accepted : 

To the Board of Direction of the American So- 
ciety of CiviL Engineers : 

At the meeting of the Society held during 
the Annual Convention in Cleveland, on June 
18th, the Library Committee was requested 
to report whether some plan may not be 
adopted to enable members living away from 
New York to consult the books of the library, 
Tinder pioper regulations to insure their re- 
turn and to prevent injury. 

The question here presented is by ■ no 
means a new one to the members or officers 
•of the Society, having been discussed at con- 
:siderable length between July 2d, 1873, and 
1st November, 1876. On the last named date 
the Board of Direction, in their Annual Re- 
port (Vol. 2. p. 146), said : 

" The use of a library of the Society wil 
be restricted to resident members and 
those non-residents who occasionally visit 
New York, unless means be taken, under ne- 
•cessary restrictions, to send works to those 
■who desire it, or here to make examinations 
•for them. That by some such plan it is feas- 
ible to render a library of this character of 
.great value to members remote from the cen- 
tres of literary and professional kuowledtte, 
is ijelieved, and full consideration of the mat- 
ter by the Society, with a view to elaborate 
such a plan, is recommended." 

This recommendation was not favorably 
•considered by the annual meeting, and no ac- 
tion was taken upon it.. 

The reason lor this indifference was, doubt- 
less, that at the preceding annual convention, 
held in Philadelphia in June, 1876, the Com- 
mittee on the Establishment of an Engineer- 
ing Library and Museum, which was appoint- 
ed in 1873, reported (Vol. 2, p. 82) that they 
had taken no action since the previous con- 
veution, and were discharged. 

In addition, the Committee on the Policy of 
the Society, appointed in June, 1875, which 
made a careful and valuable report at the an- 
nual meeting in November, 1875 (Vol. 1, p. 
318). had not in their report considered the 
possibility of such a dissemination of the 
library; while they had urged that the rooms 
should be kept open at all times to give mem- 
bers the opportunity to consult professional 
literature. 



The committee above mentioned, on "Es- 
tablishment of an Engineering Library," 
while sugf^esting the possibility of a circu- 
lating system, were not agreed as to Its ad- 
visability. The Chairman, Mr. Leverich, said 
(Vol. 1, p. 226), " In these times of cheaij and 
rapid exjiressage, duplicate volumes may be 
loaned to a non-resident member, and at small 
risk and cost sent to him, no matter how re- 
mote his residence is; while another mem- 
ber, Mr. C. Hermany, held that "this plan 
would not do, for the reason that nine out of 
every ten books sent out would never find 
their way back to the library " (p. 228). 

Although the question of circulation of the 
library would thus seem to have been ad- 
versely decided, after much discussion, the 
Library Committee have felt it their duty to 
carefully consider it again in compliance with 
the desire of those of the older members who 
have forgotten the previous discussions, and 
the new members who are unacquainted with 
them, and earnestly hoping that some means 
might be devised to make the store of pro- 
fessional information in the library of the 
greatest possible value to all the members of 
the Society. 

The conclusion the committee have reached 
is that it is impracticable and inexpedient to 
al-ow volumes to be taken from the library, 
In support of this conclusion, they present 
the following considerations : 

The functions and uses of a library for 
professional reference and study are as differ- 
ent from those of a library of general litera- 
ture as are the contents of one from those of 
the other. 

The library of the Society contains few 
books which can be read continuously within 
a hmited time, with profit. The student of a 
particular subject for practical use in his pro- 
fession requires generally not one book alone 
for perusal; and then, after the lapse of sev. 
eral days, another, to be in turn replaced by 
another, but he must have access to a quan- 
tity of works on the subject at one time, so 
that while the matter is fresh in his mind he 
may collate and compare a chapter, perhaps, 
of one, a sentence in another, a plate in a 
third, and a mere reference in others. 
Twenty or thirty books and papers may have 
to be consulted, and it is not infrequent to 
find among that number only one or two 
v;hich give the exact information desired. 

Mere titles and headings go for little in 
such a research. The particular treatment of 



92 



a subject, or the note sought cannot be sur- 
mised even from the name of the book. 

One great practical objection to making a 
library of reference circulating is based on 
this fact. The matter treating of any subject 
of importance is scattered through so many 
books and technical journals, that in most 
cases a large number of volumes ■woixld have 
to be sent to the seeker for information, and 
possibly the greater portion of them would 
prove not to contain exactly what he needed. 
But he would be at the expense of their trans- 
portation, all the other members of the 
Society would be deprived of their use while 
they were absent, and the library would be 
at the risk of losing them, and consequently 
of the destruction of the value of the sets to 
which volumes belong. 

The absence from the library of even a few 
volumes for several days, or mere probably 
weeks, would be of more injury to the library 
itself and to the society by creating dissatis- 
faction than the inability of distant members 
to use the books. 

It is probable that more real use of the 
library for study is made by non-resident 
members now than by residents. Members 
from a distance when visiting New York take 
advantage of that opportunity to look up the 
literature of the subject iu which they are in- 
terested. If such a visitor found that the 
works he desired to consult were scattered to 
all parts of the country, to be absent for 
several weeks, he would unquestionably con- 
clude that the library of the Society was a de- 
lusion, and the pretended facilities it ofi'ered 
a humbug. 

The risk of losing the volumes sent out, is 
too great to be taken. The books most likely 
to be needed are not only valuable in them- 
selves, but they have the additional value that 
I'arity confers, and which is hardly to be 
estimated in money. No librarian or ciScer 
of the Societj' would feel warranted, even by 
the most liberal grant of authority by a 
Society vote, in either fixing a price to be 
deposited in advance for the loan of, for in- 
stance, one of the ten volumes of the papers 
of the Royal Engineers, or in sending without 
security one of them to Chicago or New 
Orleans. 

The value of a book to its possessor is not to 
be estimated by any one else, and even with 
such a provision for exorbitant deposits as 
secxirity, as to be prohibitory to the majority 
of the members, the loss or mutilation of val- 
uable books would be certain. The testimony 
of librarians on this point is very strong, and 
c ffers a great mass of facts which are aston- 



ishing to those not familiar with the efifects 
of bibliomania on otherwise respectable and 
honorable men. 

The members entitled to the use of the 
library number now more than six hundred, 
and they are distributed over the whole area 
of the United States and Canada. The difft- 
culties of enforcing any penalties for violation 
of rules or breach of confidence would be so 
great as to be practically insurmountable. 

The conditions under which many of the 
books in the Library have been presented, 
make it impossible to allow them to be sent 
out. After deducting such books from the 
list, and also those which are rare and diffi- 
cult to replace, and those which are in the 
character of encyclopsedias and unfit for cir- 
culation, the number left for circulation 
would not be great, and their character would 
be such that they would not be likely to be in 
demand. 

While the project of making the library a 
cii'culating one seems unadvisable, it is un- 
questionable that much may be done in the 
way of making it useful to all the members. 

To this end, the first requisite is that mem- 
bers should know what may be found in the 
Library, and for this p urpose a printed cata- 
logtie is essential, to be classified according to 
subjects. The card system of cataloguing is 
undoubtedly exceedingly useful and con- 
venient for Library use, but to non-resident 
members it is valueless. For various reasons, 
mostly financial, no catalogue has yet been 
made, but the time has arrived when it is a 
necessity, and it should be the first duty of 
the Board of Direction to have it done. It is 
the only means by which members can be in- 
formed of the condition of the Library and 
of its needs. It is desirable that we should 
have a very full collection of American re- 
jjorts, and there are doubtless many in the 
possession of members who would send them 
to fill vacancies in our lists. 

With a catalogue in its possession, supple- 
mented by the monthly publication in the 
" Proceedings" of additions to the Library, a 
member could decide what he wanted to look 
at in advance of a visit, and thus save much 
of his own time and that of the Librarian. 

The periodical literature of the day is so 
voluminous and so rich iri valuable matter, 
that the Engineer cannot keep up with current 
advances in science without great cost and 
labor. It would be of immense advantage to 
members of the Society to have a topical index 
to the journals received by the Society pub- 
lished monthly in the Proceedings. The pre- 
paration of such an index would occupy the 



9J 

whole time of one man, and he should be only be furnished after several days of carefu 

one familiar with several languages. examination by an expert in the branch in 

It would be out of the power of the Secre- quired about, and instances have occurred of 

tary to attend to this duty in addition to the much dissatisfaction being expressed, because 

business, the correspondence, the editorial all the information could not be given with- 

work, and the necessary attention to mem- out expense. It may fairly be questioned 

bers and others visiting the rooms of the So- whether this class of special research for in- 

■ciety. divlduals should be done at the expense of 

With the aid of such an index, distant mem- the Society. At the same time those who need 

bers could generally procure copies of the the information are frequently not able or 

special articles they desired to see, at less ex- willing to bear the cost alone. For such cases 

peuse than would be involved in correspond- there docs not seem to be any relief except 

ence and transportation of volumes from the by the establishment of a fund the interest of 

Library. which should be devoted to the purpose. 

It is a question to be carefully considered The means of such establishment do not 
whether the expense of this work can be now appear. ■ It is not advisable that the So- 
undertaken in the present state of the So- ciety should go begging for money and thus 
ciety's affairs. lower its character and standing. The day 

The matter of furnishing to members may, and probably will, come, when the 

searches of authorities and abstracts or briefs money will be offered. 

on special subjects is wurthy of considera- The Committee invite a full and and frank 
tion. Letters are sometimes received from discussion of these points and ask for prac- 
distant members asking for such full and tioal suggestions from members of the So- 
detailed information of tiiis kind as could ciety, 



MEMOIRS OF DECEASED MEMBERS. 



SAMUEL J. EEEYES,* Member A. S. C E. 

Died Decp:mbee 15th, 1878. 

By the death of Mr. Reeves. American engineering has lost one who 
has contributed in no small degree to the extraordinary development of 
coustrnctive iron work in America which the last twenty years have 
witnessed. "While men markedly inferior in attainments, personal 
-characteristics and influence have been noticed far and wide in the public 
prints, it is somewhat astonishing that the career of a man who has 
done so much practical good for his country as Mr. Eeeves should 
pass away Avithout exciting even a ripple of public comment, further 
thaa in the immediate professional and business circles with which he 
was in contact. The history of Mr. Eeeves' life would be largely a 
history of iron making in America, an industry in which he was always 
in the van, impelled as much by the ambition created by a liberal 
education as by the purely vulgar considerations of trade. 

Mr. Eeeves was the son of David Eeeves, and was born at Bridgeton, 
N. J., in 1818; was educated at Lawrenceville (N. J.) Academy, where 
he was prepared for Princeton College, from which institution he was 
.graduated in 1837. To this educational preparation for his future career, 
Mr. Eeeves added the experiences of travel, both in this country and in 

*Committee to prepare memoir, John Grifl'en, Alfred P. Boiler. 



94 

Europe. In 1846 he married a Baltimore lady, Miss Handy, who still 
survives him, together with five of the six children which were born to- 
them. 

Mr. Eeeves commenced his business life about 1841 under his father and 
uncle, proprietors of the Cumberland Nail and Iron Works, at Bridgeton, 
N. J. The father and uncle were at the time, and had been for a long 
period also interested in a nail mill at Norristown and also in the Phoenix 
Iron Works, at Phcenixville, Pa., which latter was established in 1790 by 
Benjamin Longstreth. In 1827 the Phoenix Iron Works passed into the 
hands of Reeves, Whitaker & Co., afterwards (1846) Reeves, Buck & Co., 
which firm, in the same year, also became owners of the Bridgeton- 
Works, with which the family connection, however, ceased in 1870. In 
1855 the firm of Reeves, Buck & Co. became the Phceuix Iron Company, 
the title still retained. At Phcenixville the iron operations of the Reeves 
family were on a much larger scale than those conducted at Bridgeton or 
Norristown, where it Avas confined chiefly to the manufacture of nails. 
At Phcenixville the manufacture of railroad iron, pig iron and merchant 
bars was added to their nail production. 

In 1846— November 16— the first rails were rolled at these works, 
since which time there has been a progressive increase in the iron shapes 
rolled at this establishment, until their " list" of shapes has become the 
most comprehensive of any rolling mill in America. In 1848 Reeves, 
Abbott & Co. erected a rolling mill and blast furnace at Safe Harbor, 
Penn., to roll rails for the Pennsylvania Railroad Company, of which, 
enterprise Mr. Reeves Avas the virtual head. Mr. Reeves for many 
years and up to his death was a Director in the Board of the Cambria. 
Iron Company, as his father before him had been. As President of the 
American Iron and Steel Association, a position filled by Mr. Reeves for- 
ten years preceding his death, he had the unrpialitied support and 
confidence of its members. 

From this brief summary, it will readily be seen that Mr. Reeves Avas 
necessarily an employer of labor on a vast scale, Avhich, to successfully 
control and direct, required a talent for organization and system pos- 
sessed by but few men. At the time of his death the great Phoenix 
Iron Works employed over 2,000 men in all its departments. 

As might be expected in a Pennsylvanian and an iron master, Mr. 
Reeves Avas a strong Protectionist of the Carey school, and he was ever- 
ready to defend the principles of that school of political economy with 
an earnestness bred of conviction and a thoroughness due to thoughtful- 
study. Mr. Reeves by nature was extremely conservative, and had he 
been simply the self made man, self taught, Avith only the experience 
of his local surroundings, Avould have been a successful folloAver in the- 
improvements continually introduced into the manufacture of iron, 
instead of being in the van. He Avould have made rails, and good ones,, 
too, all his life, and been successful as a business man. Fortunately ». 



95 

the atlvantages of a liberal education and the opportunities of travel 
tempered his natural disposition and broadened his views, so that as 
always comes to a naturally strong man, with a trained intellect, he was 
ambitious to accomplish something more than the mere success of 
making money. 

Seconded by the able assistants he called around him, he, as rapidly 
as he was able and so soon as he saw an opening for new ideas, intro- 
duced tli8 manufacture of specialties at PhoenixviUe, and in every sense 
was the pioneer of constructive wrought iron work in America The 
double lipped wrought iron railroad chair was first made at Phoenix- 
viUe by rolling, enormous quantities of which were used on our railroads 
until the pear head section^ of rail gave way to the now universally 
adopted girder section with a straight stem. 

While it is true the Trenton Works made the first rolled beam in this 
country (9 inch in 1853), the Phoenix Works were practically the first to 
manufacture for the market beams of varying sizes and sections, for many 
years being without a competitor— until 18G4 they were the only manu- 
facturers of large beams and channels in America. One of the boldest 
strides forward was the manufacture of hydraulic die forged eye bars, 
undertaken with a view to supplying such bars for the channel span of 
the Steubenville bridge about being constructed by Mr. Linville in 
1863.— the first of the great spans with which we have since become so 
familiar. 

Foreseeing with an almost prophetic eye the great demand that would 
spring up for constructive iron work, Mr. Eeeves made all his improve- 
ments tend towards the manufacture of " shapes," and the designing 
and construction of all descriptions of Avrought iron framing. In 18(32 
the wrought iron column known as the "Phoenix Column" wis patented 
by Mr. Reeves, and far a long time it was considered almost impossible 
to build a long span bridge without its use. This patent was contested 
on the ground of infringement by Linville & Piper, in 1867, but was 
sustained by the judge on its priority and principles. Previous to the 
panic of '73 Mr. Eeeves commenced the "new mill" at Phreuixville, on 
a scale second to none in America, being 930 feet long and 430 feet wide. 
At the time of the panic it was almost completed, and still awaits the 
revival in the iron trade that will warrant the additional product that 
such a mill is capable of turning out. It was intended that this mill 
should be perfectan every proved modern appliance for manufacturing 
iron and steel, and no labor or money was spared to carry out this vieAV. 

It will be seen from the above rapid summary of the development of 
the Phrenix Works, of which Mr. Reeves was practically the sole 
head, that American engineering owes much to him, and the Transactions 
of the American Society of Civil Engineers form a fitting tablet to 
place this debt on record. But far above all is the legacy of character 
Mr. Reeves has left his family and friends, and the example of a wonder- 



96 

f ally successful business career, untainted by trickery or any dislionor- 
able dealing. 

Mr. Reeves was not perfect; he liad Lis peculiarities of character and 
imperfections of humanity like others; he had his enemies, like every 
other strong man; but his heart was warm, his aspirations high, and an 
irreproachable integrity was his through life. He was a gentleman in the 
highest and best sense of the term, generous and sympathetic, and 
whose death is a real bareavement to those with whom he was associated. 



FRANKLIN ASA STRATTON,* Member A. S. C. E. 

Died Jitlt 17th, 1879. 

Franklin Asa Stratton was born in Northfield, Mass., November 30, 
1829. His parents were Asa and Sophia Stratton, the latter still living. 

Early manifesting a fondness for books and study, he was allowed to 
gratify his own childish wish of attending school at the age of three and 
a half years. After finishing the common school course he entered the 
academy of his native town. He exhibited an aptitude and decided taste 
'for mathematics, taking up and completing, unassisted, the study of 
algebra, that branch not being included in the school course. 

He was remarkable, even in those early years, as a patient and inde- 
fatigable student, not only of text books, but those embracing a wide and 
varied range of knowledge, and for his perfect self-reliance. These 
qualities gave him high rank in the boys' school at Brattleboro, Vt., 
which he entered, after completing his academic course, and which was 
under the charge of the Eev. Addison Browne, who taught the classics 
and higher mathematics, including civil engineering. He here excelled 
in mathematics, and mastered the difficulties of problems which had 
puzzled many teachers. 

On leaving the school at Brattleboro, Yt., he formed a party of 
engineers at Rochester, N. Y., and as a mark of confidence in his ability 
he was entrusted with the construction of a short road to Lake Ontario, 
which he completed to entire satisfaction. As a well-deserved tribute 
to the perfect confidence placed in his judgment and discretion, it should 
be recorded that the work here included not only the engineering and 
building of the road, but the disbursing of the moneys invested in the 
enterprise, and this at the early age of twenty years. 

From here he went to the Toledo & Wabash Railroad, and was 
located at Lafayette, Ind., until the completion of the road. Leaving 
Lafayette he went to Fort Dodge, Iowa, where he opened a land office, 
transacting the business connected with that position. 

At the time of the massacre at Spirit Lake in 1857, he commanded a 
company of riflemen in a severe mid-winter campaign against the Sioux 



* Committee to prepare memoir, F. C. Prindle. 



97 

Indians. At tlie outbreak of the Rebellion he was engaged in the study 
of law, but heeding his country's call and need, he formed a company, 
went to Washington and entered the military service as captain of Com- 
pany A, Eleventh Pennsylvania Cavalry, and was regularly promoted, 
to the grade of major in September, 1862, Lieut. -Colonel, September, 
1864, Colonel, May, 1865, and Brevet Brigadier General in September, 
1866. 

Of Gen. Stratton's military service, "Bates' Martial Deeds of Penn- 
sylvania " makes honorable mention in a biographical notice. 

"We find that he was engaged in nearly thirty pitched battles, beside 
many skirmishes and minor affairs. He was twice wounded, viz., on the 
17th of March, 1863, in a sabre charge at Franklin, in which he displayed 
great courage and skill ; and again in a hand to hand encounter in the 
battle of October 7th, 1864, where he received a sabre cut in the hand. 

He particularly distingiiished himself in the raid led by Wilson and 
Ivautz, five hundred miles inside of the enemy's lines, in which three 
battles were fought and thirty miles of the Danville Railroad Avere de- 
stroyed, he having the lead in withdrawing in face of vastly superior 
numbers sent to intercept them. 

In the last campaign against Lee, his command had the honor of 
opening the final battle of the war in Virginia, it having occiipied with 
Gen. Miles' division of infantry the famous Lynchburg turni^ike, leading 
out of Ajipomattox. 

In addition to constant service in the saddle, he performed a great 
deal of military engineering for the government, making military maps 
•of the country before Petersburg, for Gen. Mansfield, which were of 
great service during the latter part of the war. 

Gen. Stratton was married February 24, 1866, to Mrs. Georgie E. 
■Griffith, nee Keeling, of Norfolk, Va. , who still survives him, and on the 
28th March, 1867, was commissioned a Civil Engineer in the naval ser- 
Tice, and ordered to duty as Civil Engineer of the Washington Navy 
Yard, a position formerly filled by Gens. Rosecvans, Benham and others 
•of the United States Engineer Corj^s. July 9, 1875, he was ordered to 
League Island in charge of the construction of the important public 
works projected for a navy yard at that iJoint, and wdiere he was stationed 
at the time of his death. 

In addition to these arduous duties, he served as a member of the 
Boards of Civil Engineers appointed by the Navy Department to examine 
the sites of the League Island, Mare Island, and New London Navy 
Yards, and jjrepare plans for their develojjment and permanent improve- 
ment upon a large scale, and was also entrusted with other important 
IJvofessional duties by the government, all of which were j^erformed with 
zeal and efficiency. 

While engaged at League Island a severe storm visited that vicinity, 
in October, 1878, which culminated in a disastrous flood, causing an 



98 . 

overflow of the dykes aud blowing down the shiphouse, etc. During- 
this crisis Gen. Stratton remained at his post of duty almost constantly 
for several successive days and nights, personally directing repairs and 
trying to avert further disaster, and animating his men in the hurried 
and imperative work of saving government property, utterly regardless 
of personal discomfort and exposure, being often knee deep in mud and 
water and thoroughly drenched. A severe and deep seated cold was con- 
tracted as a result of this exposure, which culminated in an attack of 
typhoid pneumonia, from which he died, at Chestnut Hill, near Phila- 
delphia, on Thursday evening, July 17th, 1879, in the fiftieth year of his 
age, 

Gen. Stratton was remarkably modest and retiring in his character, 
which also possessed that most rare, difficult and victorious element, a 
patient spirit— one that could learn to labor and to wait and abide its 
time. Professionally he possessed superior abilities as a civil and me- 
chanical engineer, and in his death the government has lost a faithful 
and efficient officer ; the profession, a valued member, whose attain- 
ments and experience, combined with his personal worth and estimable 
character, furnish an example worthy of all notice ; and his personal 
acquaintances, a warm and generous friend. 

His whole life Avas full of work— hard work, both mentally and 
physically, and it deserves to be written as a golden honor to his mem- 
ory, that during all these busy years of varied and arduous service, away 
from his home, his love and continual remembrance of his aged mother 
was a noticeable feature of his excellent character. 

Eeviewing the character of Gen. Stratton, we find it strikingly illus- 
trative of the trite but truthful adage, " the boy is father of the 
man ;" from the early schooldays, until the close of his laborious and 
eventful life, we see the same masterful spirib modestly asserting itself, 
persistently surmounting difficulties and bravely ignoring self in the dis- 
charge of his duties, until the loyal soldier, the faithful servant, the true 
friend, and the loving husband, father, and son falls at his post— with 
the harness on— to be sincerely mourned by all who knew him. 



JAMES E. BELL,* Member A. S. C. E. 

Died June 9th, 1879. 

James E. Bell was born in Cincinnati, Ohio, on the 28th of December 
1849. His grandfather was a captain in the British army, who came to 
America in 1812, just before the declaration of war. He first settled in 
Lancaster, Pennsylvania; but in 1817 he removed to Cincinnati, and, 
with the exception of a few years' residence at Kising Sun, Indiana, he 
continued to be a citizen of Cincinnati until his death. 



■ Committee to prepare memoir, Col. Wm. E. Merrill. 



.99 

Mr. Bell's father, Josej)li Bell, Esq., lias loug resided in Cincinnati, 
where he is in charge of an extensive foundry and machine shop. 

James E. Bell received his early education in the common schools of 
Cincinnati, and finished his course at the Woodward High School in 
June, 1869. In September of that year he entered the Kensselaer Poly- 
technic School at Troy, N. Y. , whence he was graduated in June, 1873. 
He Avas thus careful to prepai'e himself by special study in the best 
schools, and did not assume the title of "engineer" until his diploma 
gave him the right to use it. The success which at the time of his early 
death had already attended his efforts in his chosen profession was 
largely due to his excellent training, by means of which he was soon able 
to erect a stable edifice of j^ractice on a broad foundation of the funda- 
mental principles of mechanics and engineering. 

Ambitious to excel, and desirous of speedily acquiring experience in 
practical construction, he sought and obtained service, during his vaca- 
tions, as an assistant to Jno. C. Wilson, C. E., engineer in charge of the 
erection of the Newport and Cincinnati Railroad Bi'idge over the Ohio 
river. 

After leaving Troy Mr. Bell was employed about three months on 
surveys connected with the location of the Cincinnati Southern Railway, 
under the direction of the Chief Engineer, Mr. Wm. A. Gunn (Member 
Am. Soc. C. E.). For nearly a year longer he hadr charge of a party 
engaged between Dayton and Springfield, Ohio, m re-surveying a route 
for the C. C. C. and I. R. R. (Dayton Short Line or Bee Line). 

In July, 1874, he took service under Col. W. E. Merrill, U. S. Engi- 
neers (Member Am. Soc. C. E.), and made a survey of the Big Sandy 
river from its mouth to Warfield, Ky., on the Tug Fork, and to Piketon, 
Ivy. , on the Louisa Fork. In 1875, in obedience to an Act of Congress, 
this survey was extended up the Louisa Fork to the mouth of Dismal 
Creek, in Virginia. This second survey was also made by Mr. Bell. 

In November, 1875, he was assigned to duty at Hoard's Rocks, W. 
Va., on the Monongahela, below Morgantown, with orders to continr.e 
the work of building a masonry lock and dam at that point. He 
remained on this duty until November, 1876, when all work was stopped, 
owing to the exhaustion of the appropriation. 

In June, 1877, Mr. Bell was put in charge of the improvement of the 
Little Kanawha river, and he remained on this duty until work was 
sto^jped by cold weather. This was his last service under the govern- 
ment. His reports on the Big Sandy, and his rejjorts of operations on 
the Monongahela and on the Little Kanawha, will be found in full in the 
Annual Reports of the Chief of Engineers. 

On the 10th of July, 1878, he received from the Board of Public 
Works of the City of Cincinnati the appointment of Superintendent of 
the City Water Works. He filled this important and responsible position 
with great acceptance until his death on the 9th of June, 1879, at the 



100 

■early age of twenty-nine. He succumbed to an attack of inflammation 
of the bowels. He left a widow, but no children; having been married 
but little more than a year. 

He was elected a member of the American Society of Civil Engineers 
on the 5th of March of the present year, and thus was numbered amongst 
us for the very brief period of three months. 

Of a genial disposition, his business relations were always pleasant; 
but his kindness of heart never caused a relaxation of official vigilance. 
Sternly honest himself, and animated by a keen sense of duty, shirking 
contractors found no weak spots that would excuse them from a complete 
and exact j^erformance of their engagements. Full of zeal for his pro- 
fession, with the best available training and an increasing experience, 
and already the incumbent of one of the highest professional positions 
in his native City, life seemed to j)resent for his acceptance the highest 
honors of his chosen career. But the destroyer seized the strong man 
in the vigor of his youth, and in a few short days his honors had faded, 
his place had been filled by another and his memory alone was left to 
the friends that loved him and had rejoiced in his early success. 



ADDITIONS TO 

LIBRARY AND MUSEUM. 



Donations to the Library, — Members and others are asked to contribute regularly to 
the library of the Society, copies of government, municipal, railway, canal and other reports, 
specifications, profiles, maps, photographs and like matter, making up the record of engineer- 
ing operations for the past or present, and to inform the Secretary where such may be had. 
Duplicate copies are desired, for transmission to foreign societies in return for works col- 
lected and sent to this library by them; also for exchange with memliers and others who wish 
complete sets referring to particular subjects. Donations of old or new reports or pamphlets 
which i-efer to or illustrate Engineering constructions or oj^erations are particularly solicited. 
Many of these may be really of great importance as a part of the Library, and as possibly 
containing information which might not otherwise be preserved. 

" Copies for distribution" named in this list will be sent to members forwarding stamps 
to prepay postage until the supply is exhausted. 



From Administration des Fonts et Experiments with Charcoal, Coke, and Anthra- 

Chaussees, Paris : cite in the Pine Grove Furnace, Pa. John 

Anuales, September, 1879. Birkiubine. 

From Aeronautical Society of Great I^e'-eut Improvements in Concentration and 

Britaiu, Fred. W. Brearey, Hon. Secre- . Amalgamation John A Church, 

tarv Loudon- An Autographic Trausmittmg Dynamometer. 

Thirteenth Annual Report of the Society. ^,^'ii- ^.''"' , ,^. t, -^r i, 

j^y-j^ The Hygiene of Mines. R. W. Kaymoud. 

Washing Phosphoric Pig Iron for the Open 

From American Chemical Society, P. Hearth and Puddling Processes at Krupp's 

Cassamajor, Secretary, New Y. rk: Works. Essen. A. L. HoUey, L.L.D. 

Journal of the Society. Vol. I., Nos. 8 and 9. Relations of Sulphur in Coal and Coke. Dr. 

From American Institute of Mining Eu- J. P. Kimball. ..,,.„ ^, 

giueers, Dr. Thomas M. Drown, Secre- ^o**^'^ o" ^^''■^''',1 Deposits ot Southern Mis- 

tary, Easton.Ha.: souri. A.W.Raymond. 

Proceedings of the Meeting held at Montreal, From Argentine Scientific Society, Don 

September, 1879. Edwardo Aguirre, Secret iry. Buenos 

A direct Process of Copper Smelting. H. M. Ayres: 

Howe. Annals of the Society. September, 1879. 



101 



From Boston Public Library, Slellen 
Chamberlain, Librarian, Boston: 
Bulletin of the Library. October, 1879. 
From E. S. Cbesbrorgh, Chicago: 
Third Annual Report of the Department c>f 
Public Works of the City of Chicago. 

From Francis Collingwood, New York; 
Photograph view of Trestle for the erection of 
Second Block of the New York Approach of 
the East River Bridge, together with the 
Arch over Cliff street. 
Photograph view of New York Anchorage and 
first two Arches of the Approach of East 
River Bridge. 

From Commissioners of Second Geo- 
logical Survey of Pennsylvania, Wm. 
A. Ingham, Secretary, Philadelphia: 
Part First. The Northern Townships of But- 
ler Co. 
Part Second. A special Siirvey made in 1875 
along the Beaver and Chenango Rivers in 
Beaver, Lawrence and Mercer Counties. H. 
Martyn Chance. 
Second Report of Progress in the Laboratory 
of the Survey at Harrisburg. Andrew S. 
McCreath. 

From Charles E. Emery, New York: 
United States Centennial Commission. Re- 
ports and Awards Group XX. Motors, Hy- 
draulics and Pneumatic Apisaratiis, &c. 
Francis A. Walker. 

From John Ericsson, New York: 
Contributions to the Centennial Exhibition. 
Capt. John Ericsson. 

From Albert Fink, New York; 
Proceedings of Meetings and Conventions of 
Officers of Eastern and Western Railroads 
held in June and December, 1878; January, 
Ajiril, May, June and September, 1879. 

From Julius E. Hilgard, Assistant in 

Charge, United States Coast Survey, 

Washington, D.C.: 

Methods and Results ; Secular Change of 

Magnetic Declination in the United States 

and at some foreign stations. 3d edition. 

(Copies for distribution.) 

From John W. Hill, Cincinnati: 
Report of the Board of Experts on the Test 
Trial of theWarden Compound Pumping En- 
gine at the Hunt Street Station to the Board 
of City Commissioners of Cincinnati, Ohio, 
1879. (Copies for distribution.) 

From Hungarian Society of Engineers 
and Architects, Budapest: 
Transactions, January to July inclusive, and 
October, i879. 

From Institution of Civil Engineers, 

James Forrest, Secretary, London: 

Excerpt from Minutes of Proceedings. Edited 

by James Forrest. Note on a Graphic 

mode of ascertaining the Flow of a Mill 

Stream. Wm. Shelford. 

From Institution of Engineers and Ship 
builders, W. J. Millar, Secretary, Glas- 
gow, Scotland : 
Transactions of the Institute. Vol. XXII. 

From E. D. Leavitt, Jr., Cambridge- 
port, Mass. : 
City of Boston; Improved Sewerage; Pump- 
ing Engines. 

From Hon. F. W. Lincoln, Boston: 
The History of the Bunker Hill Monumental 
Association during the first century of the 
United States of America. George Washing- 
ton Warren. Boston, 1877. 



Proceedings of the Bunker Hill Monumental 
Association at the Fifty-sixth Annual Meet- 
ing, June 17th, 1879. With Address of 
Frederick W. Lincoln. 

From Thomas J. Long, New York : 

Annual Report Department of Docks of New 
York, made of the year ending April 30th, 
1877. 

From E. P, lull, Commaner U. S. N., 
Washington, D. C: 

Reports of Explorations and Surveys for the 
location of luteroceanic Ship Canals through 
the isthmus of Panama and by the Valley of 
the River Napipi, by U.S. Naval Expeditious, 
1875. Commander E. P. Lull, U. S. N., and 
Lieut. Frederick Collins, U. S. N. Wash- 
ington, 1870. 

From New York Meteorological Ob- 
servatory, Department Public Parks. 
Daniel Draj^er, Director, Central Park, 
New York: 
Abstracts of Registers from Self-recording 
Instruments, September and October, 1879. 
From North of England Institute Min- 
ing and Mechanical Engineers, Theo. 
Wood Running, Secretary, Newcastle- 
on-Tyne, England: 
Transactions, February, March, April, May, 
June, August, 1876 ; May and June, 1878 ; 
August, 1879. 

From Mechanics' Institute, S. H. 
Wheeler, Cor. Secretary, San Fran- 
cisco, Cal.: 
Reports of the Eleventh, Twelfth and Thir- 
teenth Industrial Exhibition under the 
auspices of the Mechanics Institute of Sau 
Francisco. 

From Midland Institute of Jliniug, Civil 
and Mechanical Engineers, Joseph 
Mitchell, Secretary, Barnsley, Eng- 
land : 
Transactions, Vol. VII. Part XLVII. August 
and September, 1879. 

From Charles Paine, Gen. Sup't. L. S. 
and M. S. R. R., Cleveland, Ohio : 
Memorandum of Tests showing relative cost 
of burning oil (with Campbell's Patent Oil 
Burner) and coal ; for Fuel in Stationary 
Engines at Cleveland Engine shops, Sept. 
24th and 25th, 1879. 

From H. V. and H. W. Poor, New York : 
Manual of the Raikoads of the United States 
for 1878-79. 

From the Publishers Revue Generale 
des Chemins de fer^ Edgar Monjean, 
Secretary, Paris: 
Revue Generale des Chemins de fer. July 
and August, 1879. 

From the Royal United Service Institu- 
tion, Capt. B. Burgess, Secretary, Lon- 
don : 
Vol. XXIII. No. 101. Double Number. Jour- 
nal of the Institution. 

From the Saxonian Society of Engineers 
and Architects, Dr. Kahl, Secretary, 
Dresden : 
Transactions. Part 1, 1858, containing descrip- 
tion of Viaduct between Waldheim and 
Limmritz. Part 1, 1879. 
Photograph and detail Drawings of Viaduct m 
Zschopauthale between Waldheim and 
Limmritz. 

From Societe des Ingenieurs Civils, M. 
Mallet, Secretary, Paris: 
Memoires de la Societtj. July and August,18i9. 



102 



From Society of Gas Lighting, George 
W. Dresser, Secretary, New Yorls: 
The Waste of Energy iu the production of 
Water Gas. Eugene Vanderpool. ('2 copies.) 
From D. Torrey, New York: 
A sample of Iron clad Steel Wire. 

From J. Nelson Tubbs, Rochester, 
N. Y. : 
Annual report of Executive Board in charge 
of Water Works, Fire and Highway Depart- 
ments and Street Improvements of the City 
of Rochester for 1878. 

From United States Centennial Com- 
mission, Philadelphia, Pa.: 
"Report of the Director-General of the Centen- 
nial Exhibition, Philadelphia. 1876, includ- 
ing Reports of Bureaus of Administration. 
Vols. land II. 
Reports of the President. Secretary and Ex- 
ecutive Committee, together with the Jour- 
nal of the final session of the IT. S. Centen- 
nial Commission. Philadelphia, 1876. 
Appendix to the reports of the U. S. Centen- 
nial Commission and Centennial Board of 
Finance. 
Grounds and Buildings of the Centennial Ex- 
hibition Edited by Dorsey Gardner. 
Six volumes, containing Reports and Awards 
of Groups 1 to 36. and Group on National, 
State and other Collective Exhibits. 

From United States Light House Board, 
Washington, D. C. : 
List of Towers, Beacons, Buoys, Stakes, Spin- 
dles and other Day Marks in the Third 
Light House District. 2 copies. 
List of Beacons, Buoys, Stakes and other Day 
Marks iu the Fifth Light House District. 
Corrected to October 1, 1879. 2 copies. 
List of Towers, Beacons, Buoys, Stakes and 
other Day Marks in the Sixth Light House 
District. Correcied to November 1. 1879. 
2 copies. 

From Samuel Webber, Manchester, 
N H : 
Manual of Power for Machinery, Shafts and 
Belts, with the History of Cotton Manufac- 
ture of the United States. S-imuel Webber. 
New York. 1879. 

From other sources: 
The Library Journal, Vol. IV, Nos. i, 5, 7, 8, 

9 and 10. 
Annual Report of the State Engineer and 
Surveyor on the Canals of the State of Now 
York for 1878. H. Seymour, Jr. 
Sx>ecial Report on the Coal fields of Little 
Sequatchee, with a general description of 
the Cumberland Table Laud. J. B. Kille- 
brew, Nashville, Teun. 1876. 



Exploration of the Colorado River of the 

West and its tributaries. Explored in 1869 

1870, 1871 and 1872, 
Key to the Geology of the Globe. Richard 

Owen, Nashville, Teun. 1857. 
Report on the Geology of the eastern portion 

of the Uinta Mountains. J. W. Powell. 
Mineral and Agricultural Resources of the 

northern portion of Tennessee, along the 

Cincinnati Southern and Knoxville & Ohio 

Railroads. J. B. Killebrew. Nashville, 

Tenn. 1876. 
The Mineral Wealth, Climate and Rainfall 

and Natural Resources of the Black Hills of 

Dakota. W. P. Jenney, Washington 1876. 
Report on the Ocoee and Hiwassee Mineral 

District. J. B. Killebrew, Nashville, Tenn. 

1876. 
The Delta of the Mississippi. C. G. Forshey, 

Cambridge. Mass. 1873. 
History of the Discovery and Settlement of 

the Valley of the Mississippi. Vols. I and 

II. John W. Mimette, New York. 1846. 
Annual Report upon the Improvement of the 

Mississippi River. Appendices to Annual 

Report of Chief of Engineers for 1875, 

18^6 and 1877. Maj. C W. Howell. 
Annual Report upon the Improvement of the 

South Pass of the Mississippi River, June 

30. 1878. Capt. M. R. Brown. 
Ninth Report upon the Improvement of the 

South Pass of the Mississippi River. April 

15, 1878. Capt. M. R. Brown. 
The Physics of the Gulf of Mexico and of its 

chief affluent, the Mississippi River. C. G. 

Forshey. Salem, Mass. 1878. 
Lists of Elevations, princii^ally in that portion 

of the United States west of the Mississippi 

River. Henry Gannett. Washington. 1877. 
Commercial Freedom for the Mississippi Val- 
ley. Capt, John Oowdon. Memphis, Tenn. 

1877. 
The World's Navigation. The Problem of 

River Mouths. W. T. Stackpole. Bloom- 

iUgton, HI. 1879. 
Fresh-Water Shell Mounds of the St. John's 

River, Florida. Jeffries Wyman. Salem, 

Mass. 1875. 
Tobacco; Its Cultnre in Tennessee, with sta- 
tistics of its commercial importance, etc. 

J. B. Killebrew. Nashville, Tenn. 1876. 
Bulletin of the United States Entomological 

Commission. No. 2, F. V. Hayden. 1877. 
Bvilletin of the United States Geological and 

Geogtaphical Survey of the Territories. 

Vol. II., No. i. Vol. III., Nos, 1 and 2. F. 

V. Hayden. 1877. 
The Winds of the Globe; or, The Laws of 

Atmospheric Circulation over the surface of 

the Earth. James H. Coffin, Washington. 

1875. 



ANNOUNCEMENTS. 



The meetings of the Society during De- 
cember will be on the 3d and 17th. The 
paper by A. G. Menocal, on Interoceanic 
Canal Projects, published in the present 
number of the Transactions (November, 1879) 
■will be discussed at both meetings. 



On the evening of the Annual Meeting, on 
the 5th of this month, a reception and supper 
took the place of the formal dinner heretofore 
given on similar occasions. Those present 
enjoyed a very pleasant evening, and it is un- 
derstood, approved the change. 



m: 



Membees of the Society are reqiiested to 
contribute papers on Engineering subjects, 
giving results of practice, or discussing perti- 
nent theoretical questions ; their comments 
upon papers published in Transactions are 
solicited, and they are urged to contribute 
from note-books and other records whatever 
may bear upon the subjects considered, or 
upon other practical topics. A list of subjects 
relating to the practice of engineering and its 
connection with kindred art and public affairs, 
on which papers are desired, may be found on 
page GO, Vol. Y. 

Illdstratioks op Papers presented for 
IDublication should be distinctly drawn, in 
broad, sharp lines, upon luhite, smooth (not 
"egg" or enameled) paper, with perfectly 
(not glossy, or gray) black ink, to a scale twice 
or thrice greater than the print is to be, 
which ia no case should require folding in 
more than one direction (i. e., the depth of 
plate, as inserted in Transactions, should not 
exceed 7 inches). Shades are to be produced 
by variations in size and spacing of black 
lines; no brush work or colors are admissible. 
Unless figures and letters can be well put in, 
Biniply pencil them, leaving the engi-aver to 
insert them on the plate. Always put a lineal 
iscale uijon each drawing. 

In traksmitting letter ballots members 
of the Society are requested to conform in all 
respects with the printed regulations issued 
with the ballots. These regulations are fre- 
quently not complied with. Ballots are re- 
ceived without the signature of the member 
on the outer envelope, with initials instead of 
full signature, or with other irregularities. 
"When laid before the Society such irregular 
ballots are thrown out, and members sending 



them lose their votes. The regulations 
seem to be as simple as possible to secure a 
fair secret ballot. 

Members who desire to secure complete 
sets of the Transactions of the Society are 
requested to send to the Secretary a list of 
the papers which are needed to fil! their sets. 
Some of the earlier papers are out of print. 
If orders are received for a sufficient number 
to warrant the expense, a reprint will be made. 

The following resolution was adopted at the 
Ninth Annual Convention of the Society, and 
ordered printed regularly in the Society pub- 
lications: 

Whereas, the metric system of weights and 
measures is now extensively used abroad, 
and whereas it is desirable that the relation 
of the units of differing systems be made 
familiar to all by comparison : 

Kesolved, That members be requested, in 
papers hereafter presented to the Society, to 
write, in parenthesis, weights or dimensions 
by the metric system, in connection with 
those of the system in general use. 

The House of the Society is at 104 East 
Twentieth street, one door east from Fourth 
avenue, and near the southwest corner of 
Gramercy Park. It is open from nine o'clock 
A. M. to five o'clock P.M. each busiuess day, 
except Saturday, when it is closed at three 
o'clock p. M. 

The Library and Conversation Rooms will 
also, for the present, be open every Thursday 
evening, from 73a to 10 p- m. Members are 
invited to avail themselves of the oppor- 
tunities afforded on Thursday evenings, both 
for consultation of books and periodicals and 
lor conversation . 



LIST OF MEMBERS, 



ADDITIONS. 



D:ite of KIe<.tion. 
BoNTECOU, Daniel 466 West Twenty-tliird street, New 

York City, N. Y November 5, 1879. 

Dempster, Alexander City Engineer, Pittsburg, Pa " " " 

Re.\o, J.-vmes H County Engineer, Court House, 

Pittsburtr, Pa " " " 



lUi 



CHANGES AND CORRECTIONS. 



MEMBERS. 

Haven, William A Engineer in charge construction Buffalo Division N. 

Y. L. E. & W. R. R., Buffalo, N. Y. 

McCoMB, David E P. O. Box 289, Washington, D. C. 

Monroe, J. Albert Mississippi River Commission, 1351 Washington ave- 
nue, St. Louis, Mo. 

NicOLLS, William J Engineer Long Island Railroad, Jamaica, Queens- 
Co., N. Y. 

Parkhurst, Henry W Chief Assistant Engineer, Plattsmouth Bridge, Platts- 

mouth, Nebraska. 

Schmidt, Max E Care of U. S. Engineers, Memphis, Tenn. 

Shinn, William P Vice President and General Manager Vulcan Iron 

Works, 221 Oliver street, St. Louis, Mo. 

Stanley, Ira N 88 Van Dyke street, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Whitford, Oscar F East Plattsmouth, Iowa. 



associate. 
Du Barry, Edmund L 621 Penn. Avenue, Washington, D. C. 

juniors. 

Emonts, William A. G San JoSe, Costa Rica, via Panama. 

Horton, San FORD Engineer Department N. M. & S. P. R. R., LaS 

Vegas, New Mexico. 

Illsley, William A P. O. Box 2353, Leadville, Colorado. 

Kennedy, James C P. O. Drawer 33, Owen Sound, Ontario, Canada. 

Stahlberg, Albert J South Pacific Coast Railroad, foot of Market street, 

San Francisco, Cal. 

Whinery, Samuel Assistant Engineer Elk River Shoals, Wheeler Sta- 
tion, Lawrence Co., Alabama. 

resignation. 
Schuyler, John October 18, 1S79. 



death. 

Williams, Norman A Elected Member February 17, 1869. Died October 

I2th, 1879. 



Imerican locidg of :(j;tjH l^nDtnm^. 



FROOEEDINaS. 



Vol. V. — December, 1879. 
MINUTES OF MEETINGS 

(Abstract of such as may be of general interest to members.) 



OF THE SOCIETY. 

NovEMBEE 19th, 1879. — The Society met at 8 p. m., President A. 
Fink in the chair. A paper, entitled "Inter-Oceanic Canal Projects," by 
A. G. Menocal, Member Am. Soc. C. E., was read by the author and 
discussed by Messrs. Chanute, T. C. Clarke, Cooi)er, Emery, Fink, Ford, 
and Menocal. 

J)ecembek 3d, 1879. — The Society met at 8 p. m., Vice-President 
Chanute in the chair. The awards of the Norman Medal and Book Prize 
for the i)ast year were then announced as follows: 

The Norman Medal to Edward P. North, Member Am. Soc. C. E., for 
the pa^jer, " The Construction and Maintenance of Roads," published in 
Transactions, Vol. VIII., No. CLXXX. (May, 1879). 

The Norman Prize of Books to Max E. Schmidt, Member Am. Soc. 
C. E., for the pajier, "T/ce South Pass Je//ies," published in Transactions, 
Vol. VIII., No. CLXXXIII. (August, 1879). 

Ballots for admission to membership were canvassed, and the follow- 
ing were declared elected as Members: Edward Canfield, of Buffalo, N.Y. ; 
Henrique Harris, of Brooklyn, N. Y. ; Thomas McKeown, of Hamilton, 
Ont., Canada; Charles L. Strobe], of Pittsburgh, Pa. Elected as Asso- 
ciate : L. M. Lawson, New York, N. Y. 

The discussion on the subject of Inter-Oceanic Canal Projects was 
resumed and continued by Messrs. J. C. Campbell, Chanute, Emery, F. 
M. Kelley, Macdonald, Menocal, North, W. H. Paine, Shelborne and 
Worthen. 

December 17th, 1879.— The Society met at 8 p. m., Vice-President 
Chanute in the chair. The discussion on the subject of Interoceanic 
Canal Projects was resumed. Papers were laresented, through the 
Secretary, by Messrs. Evans, F. M. Kelley, M. E. Schmidt and C. A. 
Sweet, and the discussion was continued by Messrs. Long, Menocal, 
Appleton, Shelbourne, S. Stevens, and Peter Cooper. 



lOG 

OF THE BOAED OF DIRECTION. 

October 31st, 1879. — Ai)plications for membersliip were considered. 
The Annual ReiDort was i^erfected. 

NovEMBEK 11th, 1879.— The following committees were appointed: 
On Finance — "William H. Paine, C. Vandervoort Smith, G. K. Warren. 
On Library— J. J. E. Croes, E. B. Van Winkle, O. Chanute. 

Api^lications for membership were considered. The issue of a circular 
was authorized in reference to a record of members desiring engage- 
ments. Action was taken as to members in arrears for dues. 

December 5th, 1879. — Applications for membership were considered. 
The Secretary was directed to issue copies of forms for apjalications, with 
a circular. Api^ropriations were made. 



EEPOET OF THE TEEASUEEK 

For the Year Ending November 5tu, IS'ZO. 



PrcKcitlrd and Accepted at the Tmentij-Hcocnth Annnal Mcetivg. 



Receipts. 



Balance on hand November 6th, 1878 $749 61 

Entrance fees 800 00 

Fellowship subscription, 150 00 

Current dues — from 82 Resident Members f!2 000 00 

Do. from 214 Non-resident Members S 062 50 

Do. from 3 Resident Associates 45 00 

Do. from 8 Nou-resident Associates 75 00 

Do. from 7 Resident Juniors 82 50 

Do. from 34 Non-resident Juniors 340 00 

5 605 00 

Past dues — from 11 Resident Members $350 00 

Do. from 37 Non-resident Members 725 00 

Do. from 1 Resident Associate 30 00 

Do. from 1 Non-resident Associate 30 00 

Do. from 4 Non-resident Juniors 40 12 • 

__„ J 175 J3 



107 

Dues for year beginning Nov. 5th, 18 79 : 

From 22 Residont Members |550 00 

From 83 Non-resident Members 1 245 29 

From 1 Resident Associate 7 00 

From 3 Non-resident Associates 30 00 

From 1 Resident Junior 15 00 

From 12 Non-resident Juniors 120 00 

|1 907 29 

Sales of Publications 566 28 

Certificates of Membership 49 00 

Advertisements 503 65 

From former Secretary — Balance 65 00 

Miscellaneous 29 00 

Interest on Fellowship Fund Bonds $560 00 

Interest on ISorman Medal Fund 70 00 

Interest on Savings Bank Deposit 40 31 

Interest on Railroad Stock 82 80 

753 11 

$12 412 96 



Disbursements. 

Rent $1600 00 

Janitor, House Supplies, Fu«l, Furniture, Water and Gas 981 23 

Library 1 54 48 

Publications 4 406 71 

Insurance 34^ 23 

Postage 545 24 

Salaries 3 000 00 

Stationery and Printing 502 91 

Annual Meeting and Convention 235 47 

Certificates of Membership 58 20 

Other expenditures 157 12 

Transferred to Savings Bank Deposit 40 31 

Balance on hand 697 06 

$12 412 96 



108 

The funds of the Society are as follows, par values being staled : 
Fellowsliip Fund : 

79 Subscriptions to Nov. 6th, IS^S ifS 000 00 

Accumulated interest to Nov. 6th, 1878 886 12 

Received during past year 1 Subscription 150 00 

" " " " Interest on bonds 560 00 

" " " " Interest from Savings Bank 40 31 



9 636 43 
Expended from fund during year for publications 710 00 

8 926 43 

Present condition : 80 Subscriptions $8 150 00 

Accumulated interest.... 776 43 



926 43 



The Fellowship Fund is invested as follows : 

8 Bonds Jersey City Water Loan $8 000 00 

Deposit ir Seamen's Bank for Savings 926 43 

Norman Medal Fund : 

1 Certificate Croton Aqueduct Stock, New York City 1 000 00 

General Investment: 

10 Shares New York Central and Hudson River R. R. 

Stock lOOo 00 

1 Consolidated Certificate New York Central and Hud- 
son River R. R. Stock 35 00 

1 035 00 



J, J. R. CROES, 

Treasurer, 



REPORTS OF COMMITTEES. 



Eepokt or THE Committee on Finance. 

Presented akd Accepted at the Twenty-Seventh Annual Meeting. 

The Committee on Finance respectfully 6th, 1878, to Nov. 5th, 1879, as reported 

presents the following report for the year is $11663 45 

ending November 5th, 1879: Balance on hand Nov., 1878 749 51 

The balance of funds on hand, as reported 

Nov. 6th, 1878, was Total.. $12 412 96 

Qg^glj $ 749 51 Disbursements 11715 90 

Invested funds 10 92112 Balance on hand 697 06 

Invested funds 10 96143 

Total $11770 63 

The amount of cash received trom Nov. Total $11658 49 



109 



Por the full details from which the forego- 
ing hns beeu condeused, you are respectfully 
referred to the Treasurer's Report. 

One year since we were congratulated upon 
emerging from debt, to accomplish which it 
was necessary to economize, and curtail ex- 
penses in every possible direction, and thus 
the publication of our transactions remained 
sadly behind. 

During the past year these have been 
brought up to date without involving us 
again in debt, so that the expenses of a year 
and a half of publishing has been borne dur- 
ing the past year, and we think it proper to 
remind the Society of the vast amount of 



extra labor which has been done by the 
Secretary and Treasurer, who have had the 
principal labor of editing, publishing, and 
distributing so many columns in addition to 
the usual number in the same space of time. 
We have found the accounts systematically 
and carefully kept, and so conveniently ar- 
ranged that the labor of examination is 
greatly facilitated, with very little danger of 
errors occurring or escaping notice. 

Very respectfully submitted. 



W. H. Paine, ] 

C. v. Smith, 
George S. Gbeene, ] 



Committee. 



Report of CoM»nTTEE on the Gauging of Streams. 

Presented at the Annual Meeting, Nov. 5th, 1879. 



The Committee have not yet been able to 
secure the desired co-operation of observers 
in communicating to the Society the results 
of continuous measurements of rainfall and 
flow of streams. There are, without doubt, 
many systematic observations made of the 
height of water in storage reservoirs and 
ponds used for city water supply and manu- 
facturing purposes. With the aid of a few 
measurements giving the form and length of 
over-falls of dams, and the dimensions of 
pipes, gates, conduits, and race-ways, these 
notes could be made available for the iufoi ma- 
tion desired. The Committee again call the 
attention of members to desirability of col- 
lecting and forwarding all possible statistics 
on this subject, to be collated and put in use- 
ful shape. If the observers are unable, from 
want of time or other reasons, to reduce the 
notes, the original observations, if preserved 
in the Society, would furnish a mass of infor- 
mation which could be put into useful form 
by any one desirous of using it. 

With a view to arousing more interest in 
the matter, the Committee have prepared 
some plain, practical suggestions to observers, 
which are offered for discussion and which it 
is proposed to issue to all who are in position 
to secure records of the kind desii'ed. 



Ai^art from the question of continuous 
records of flow, it is very desirable to have 
notes of the maximum and minimum dis- 
charge of streams of known water-shed. The 
records of this kind are scattered through re- 
I>orts and professional journals which are not 
easily accessible. Members are requested to 
furnish any memoranda of this kind to the 
Committee for collation and publication. 
Notes of the least flow and of the dry- weather 
flow of streams are greatly needed, the term 
"dry-weather flow" meaning the mean dis- 
charge during several weeks when the stream 
is at its lowest, and usually, though not 
always, including the period of 24 or 48 hours 
of least discharge. 

There is probably a certain ratio existing 
between the area and the least flow which may 
be expected, depending more on the charac ter 
of the water-shed than on either the mean or 
least recorded rain-fall. 

We are not in possessien of enough records 
to determine this ratio with any accuracy. 

Such notes as we can obtain are presented 
in the following table, the publication of 
which may induce members of the Society 
and others to contribute additional memo- 
randa on the subject : 



110 



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o 
O 


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o 


■s 


60 


J 
S 


n 


o 


M 


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es 


CM 




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i-i 



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Sr ■" ''2 ., 






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X X 00 00 



X X X X 



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O O CO ►^ -< 



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CI CO CO CO 



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112 



While a knowledge of the probable least dis- 
charge is desirable in connection with ques- 
tions of water supply and water power, the 
greatest probable flood discharge of streams is 
important to be known in connection with the 
designing of all structures over or in flowing 
waters. 

Reliable notes on this subject are also very 
rare. Several efforts have been made to de- 
termine formulpe expressing the discharge 
in terms of the drainage area, but without 
much success. 

In the accompanying table a number of ob- 
served maximum discharges of American 
streams are arranged according to size of 
drainage area. Several of these are taken 
from the paper by J. H. Shedd in Transac- 
tions A. S. C. E., Vol. IV, p. 301, but with the 
discharge given in cubic feet per second per 
square mile of area instead of per minute per 
acre. It is believed that the number of in- 
stances of extraordinary freshets can be 
largely increased by contributions from mem- 



bers having such records in their possession. 

In remarkable contrast with the dischar ^es 
in this table is that of the Seine in France, in 
the flood of March 17, 1876, which was said to 
be the greatest since 1807, and in which the 
discharge was only 3.48 cubic feet per second 
per square mile. The drainage area is 16 860 
square miles. (Annales des Fonts et Chaus- 
sees. Vol. XIII, p. 435.) 

It will bo observed that all of the streams 
above named are in the Northern Atlantic 
States. 

It is an interesting subject of inquiry 
whether the same general rule will apjjly to 
the maximum and minimum discharge of 
streams in this region and those in the South- 
ern Atlantic Slope, and those in the Missis- 
sippi Valley and on the Pacific Slope. The 
Committee request memoranda bearing on 
this subject. 

3. James K. Ckoes, 
Chairman. 



AWARD OF THE NORMAN MEDAL AND NORMAN BOOK PRIZE 
For the Year ending August 1st, 1879. 



Competition for the Norman Medal Las heretofore been restricted to papers 
offered especially for that purpose. Under the new Code of Rules adopted by 
the Board of Direction, with the approval of the donor of the Medal Fund, 
George H. Norman, Member and Fellow of the Society, all the original papers 
presented to the Society by members of any class during the year ending August 
1st, 1879, have been submitted to a Board of Censors, designated as directed by 
those rules. This Board for the past year was composed of the following mem- 
bers of the Society : E. S. Chesbrough, Charles Paine, C. Shaler Smith. The Board 
reports that the Norman Medal should be awarded to Edw.^rd P. North, Member 
Am. Soc. Civ. Eng., for the paper " The Construction and Mainteiiance of Roads" 
The Norman Prize of Books to Max E. Schmidt, Member Am. Soc. Civ. Eng., for 
the paper " The South Fass Jetties." The Board also reports that several of the 
other papers presented during the year are deserving of high praise. 



113 

LIST OF MEMBERS 



ADDITIONS. 

MEMBERS. 

Dale of Election. 

Canfxeld, Edward Assistant Engineer, N. Y., L. E. & 

W. R. R., Mansion House, Buf- 
falo, N. Y December 3, 1879. 

Harris, Henrique Chief Engineer, N. Y. & Manhattan 

Beach Raih'oad, 402 Sackett 

street, Brooklyn, N. Y " " " 

LooMis, Horace . .Assistant Engineer, Department of 

Public Works, Room iij^ City 

Hall, New York November 5, 1879. 

McKee, Charles H Assistant Engineer, Delaware & 

Hudson Canal Co., Albany, 

N. Y June 4, 1879. 

IVIcKeown, Thomas Chief Engineer, Marquette & 

Mackinaw R. R., Detroit, Mich. December 3, 1879. 

Mitchell, Henry Chief of Physical Hydrography, 

U. S. Coast Survey, i Ellis street, 

Roxbury Station, Boston, Mass. . January 7, iSSo_ 

Nichols, Aurin B Engineer of Railroads, Department 

of the Interior, Washington, D.C. " " " 

RocKWtLL, Samuel Civil Engineer, 18 East Fourteenth 

street. New York City, N. Y.. . " " " 

Strobel, Charles L > Principal Assistant, Keystone Bridge 

Co., Pittsburg, Pa December 3, 1879. 



associate. 
Lawson, Leonidas M 92 Broadway, New York December 3, 1879. 



CHANGES AND CORRECTIONS. 
MEMBERS. 

BiLLiN, Charles E 4039 Locust street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Brown, Charles O Tunja, United States of Colombia. 

Buck, Leffert L 1632 Rhode Island avenue, N. W., Washington, D. C. 

Burden, James A 139 F-ifth avenue, New York City, N. V. 



114 

DoRSEY, Edward B 6i Broadway, New York City, N. Y. 

Greene, George S 94 Chestnut street, Boston, Mass. 

Katte, Walter Chief Engineer, New York Elevated Railroad, 6 Bow- 
ling Green, New York City, N. Y. 

Knapp, Louis H Deputy City Engineer, 410 Franklin street, Buffalo, 

N. Y. 

MacLeod, John 547 Second street, Louisville, Ky. 

McDowell, Nathan M. . . .Alleghany City, Pa. 

Osgood, Josesph O Division Engineer, N. M. «& S. P. R. R. Care of A. A. 

Robinson, Esq., Chief Engineer, Pueblo, Colorado. 

Richardson, Henry B .. .Assistant Engineer, Board of State Engineers, St. 
Joseph, Tensas Parish, La. 

Stauffer, D. McN Contractor's Ofifice, Dorchester Bay Tunnel, Boston, 

Mass. 

Talcott, Cook Chief Engineer, Astoria c\: Winnemucca Railroad, P.O. 

Box 446, Portland, Oregon. 

Wallinc;, Henry F Eaton, Preble Co., Ohio. 



fellow. 
Oilman, Charles C President Hawkeye Telegraph Co., Eldora, Iowa 



DEATH. 

Edge, George \V Elected member March 4th, 1874. Died January ist, 

1880. 



PROCEEDINGS 



American Society 



Civil Engineers 



(INSTITUTED 1852.) 



VOL VI. 
JANUARY TO DECEMBER, 1880. 



^ 



NEW YORK : 
PUBLISHED BY THE SOCIETY. 



Entered according to Act of Congress, by the American Society of Civil Engineers, ia 
the office of the Librarian of Congress, at Washington. 



Mote. This Society is not responsible, as a body, for the facts and opinions advanced in 

any of its publications. 



INDEX. 



ADAMS. 



BAUMANN. 



Adams, Julius W. — On Committee, 2. — 

Paper by, 1. 
Additions to Library and Museum, (See 

Library.) 

— to List of Members. (See list.) 
Allen, Horatio. — Discussion by, 10. 
Allen, Theodore. — Discussion by, 

50. — On Committee, 46. 
Amendments to By-Laws. (See By- 
Laws.) 

— to Constitution. (See Constitution.) 
Anderson, Thomas S. — Admitted as 

Member, }8, 31. 

Andrews, Edward R. — Discussion by, 
58. 

Announcements. — 7, 15, 19, 29, "34, 54, 
61, 63, 77, 85.— Anmial Meeting, 
85. — Catalogue of Library, 77. — 
Committee on Gauging Streams, 
77. — De Lesseps, M., reception to, 
15. — Institute of Mining Engineers, 
15.— Metric System, 7, 15,' 20, 21, 
30, 35, 54, 61, 69, 77.— Nominating 
Committee, 77. — Proposed Amend- 
ments to the Constitution, 77. — 
Society House, 7, 15, 21, 31, 35, 54, 
61, 63, 77.— Society Meetings, 61, 
63, 77. — Twelfth Annual Conven- 
tion, 7, 15, 19, 29, 34.— Twenty- 
eighth Annual Meeting, 85. 

Annual Address, 45. 

Annual Meeting, 83, 85, 89, 100, 104.— 
Change of date proposed, 49. (See 
Minutes ) 

Annual Report of the Board of Direct- 
ion. (See Board.) 

Arch at Cohoes, by D. H. Van Auken, 
113. 

Armingto.v, James H. — On Committee, 
2,18. 

Arrears of Dues, 34, 58, 69, 108. 

Ballard, Robert. — Admitted as Mem- 
ber, 69, 87. 

J3aliot3 for Amendments to Constitution, 
9, 10. 

— For Members, ], 9, 18, 23, 33, 50, 58, 

69, 83, 90. 

— For Place of Convention, 1. 
Barnard, John F. — Admitted as Mem- 

ber, 69, 87. 



Baumann, Edward. — Admitted as As- 
sociate, 50, 55. 

Baxter, George S. — Discussion by, 58. 

Belcher, (teorge C. W. — Admitted as 
Associate, 33, 55. 

Bender, Charles. — Resignation of, 82. 

Blaisdell, Anthony H. — Admitted as 
Member, 18, 21. — On Committee, 
46. 

Blunden, Henry D. — Transferred 
Junior to Member, 9, 35. 

Board of Direction. — Report, 89, 90, 
100, 101. (See Minutes.) 

BoGART, John. — Discussion by, 18, 42, 
60, 58, 98, 114.— Elected Secretary 
and Librarian, 90. — Makes report, 
42, 100, 109.— On Committee, 2, 4, 
9. — Reads Annual Atldress, 45. — 
Secretary of Convention, 37. 

BoLLER, A. P. — Discussion by, 98. 

Books on Engineering and Technology, 
List of.— 11, 58. 

BouscAREN, L. G. F. — Elected Director, 
90.— Paper by, 69. 

Bridges, Lyman. — Admitted as Mem- 
ber, 113, 125. 

Bridges, The Use of Steel for, by Theo- 
dore Cooper, 90. 

Briggs, Robert. — Discussion by, 23, 
45. — On Committee, 45. 

Brough, Redmond J. — Admitted as 
Member, 69, 87. 

Browne, J. Vincent. — Paper by, 45, 
69. 

Brown, Robert N. — Resignation of, 16. 

Brown, Thom.vs E , Jr. — Admitted as 
Junior, 90, 111. 

Brush, Ch.\rles B. — Discussion by, 42. 
— Paper b}', 42. 

Building Fund.— 114. 

Burr, William H. — Transferred Junior 
to Associate, 33, 55. 

By-Laws, Amendments proposed, 49, 
97. 

Campbell, John C. — Discussion by, 18, 
48. — Paper by, 2. — Presides at 
Meeting, 48. 

Canals, Inter-Oceanic. (See Inter- 
Oceanic.) — Ship Locks. (See 
Locks.) 



IV 



CARTWRIGIIT. 

Cartwright, R. — Discussion by, 98. 
Catalogue of Library, 77, 105. 
Cements, American, by F. 0. Norton, 
42. 

— Tensile Tests of, and an Appliance for 

more Accurate Determinations, by 

D. J. WlIITTEMORE, 42. 

— Uniform System for Tests of, Com- 

mittee and Reports, 10, 34, 43, 89, 
90, 110. 
CuANUTE, 0. — Annual Address by, 45. — 
Discussion by, 2, 10, 18, 23, 57, 85, 
98.— Elected Vice President, 90.— 
On Committee, 57, 100. — Presides 
at Meeting-, 1, 2, 10, 17, 23, 33. 57, 
83, 90. 

Chaphe, Andrew J. — Admitted as Mem- 
ber, 9, 16, 21. 

Chesbrougii, E. S. — Discussion bj', 42, 
50, 113, 114.— On Committee, 45, 
49. 

Chimbote Tunnels, Location of, by 0. 
F. Nichols, 42. 

Civil Engineers, Employment on Gov- 
ernment Works, 49, 69. 

Clarke, T. C. — Censor to award Nor- 
man Medal, 69, 91, 108,— On Com- 
mittee, 49. 50 —Paper by, 23, 98. 

CoLBURN, Warren. — Memoir of, 4. 

CoLLiNGWooD, Francis. — Discussion by, 
48, 98.— Paper by, 42. 

Columns, Crippling Strength of 
Wrought-lron, by C. L. Gates, 42. 

— Experiments on Wrought-lron, by 

G. Bouscaren, 69. 
Committee on Finance, Report, 44, 89, 
90, 100, 109. 

— Employment of. Civil Engineers on 

Government Works, 49, 69, 

— Gauging of Streams, 43, 77, 98. 

— Library, 100. 

— Local, at Twelfth Annual Conven- 

tion, 45, 46. 

— Nominations, 45, 77, 100. 

— Permanent Quarters, 10. 

— Preservation of Timber, 10, 34, 44. 

— Tests of American Ii'on, Steel, and 

other Metals, 42, 43. 

— Uniform Tests of Cement. (See 

Cements.) 

— Wind Pressure, 45. 
Committees, List of Reports of, 104. 
CoMPTON, A. G. — Discussion by, 98. 
CoMSTOcK. Cyrus B. — Admitted as Mem- 
ber, 69, 87. 



CONSTITUTION. 

Constitution, Amendments adopted, 
10.— Amendments proposed, 9, 77, 
84, 89, 93, 94, 97. 

Convention, Twelfth Annual, 1, 7, 15, 
33, 34, 37, 104. (See Minutes.) 

— Thirteenth Annual, 50, 90, 91. 

Cooper, Theodore. — Award of Norman 
Medal to, 90. — Discussion by, 2, 
45, 50, 58.— On Committee, 45. 

Coryell, M. — Discussion by, 42, 57. — 
Paper by, 45, 57. 

CouvREUx, A., .Ir. — Discussion by, 17. 

Craven, Alfred W. — Memoir of, 24. 

Croes, J. J. R. — Discussion by, 49, 50, 
58, 73, 98.— Elected Treasurer, 
90._Makes report, 43, 98, 116.- 
On Committee, 41, 50, 100.— Reso- 
lution by, 50. 

Crosby, Benjamin L. — ;Admitted as 
Junior, 60, 55. 

Crosby, W.— Discussion by, 94. 

Crowell, James Foster. — Admitted as 
Member, 113, 125. 

CuRRiE, Daniel McN. — Admitted as 
Member, 33, 54. 

Davis, J. P.~Discussion by, 98, 113, 
114.— Elected Director, 90.— On 
Committee, -IrtO. — Presides at Meet- 
ing, 50. 

Dauzat, V. — Discussion bj% 10. 

Day, G. Frederic P. — Admitted as Ju- 
nior. 90, 111. 

Death of Members. (See List.) 

Dep-rees, Morris M.^Admitted as 
Member, 18, 54. 

Dempster, A.— Discussion by, 50. — On 
Committee, 50. 

Dickinson, P. P. — On Committee, 2. 

Dirks, Justin. — Admitted as Honorary 
Member, 54, 58. — Discussion by, 
10, 17.— Paper by. 17. 

Dresser, George W. —Amendment pro- 
posed by, 96 — Discussion by, 23, 
57, 95, 98.— Paper by, 33.— Pre- 
sides at Meeting, 1 . 

Drummond, John M. — Aids in prepar- 
ing Memoir, 4. 

Dues, Arrears of, 54. 

Eads, James B. — Address by, 37. — 
Discussion by, 42, 45, 50. — On 
Committee, 46. — Permanent Chair- 
man of Convention, 37. 

Edge, George W. — Deatii announced, 
and Committee to prepare Memoir, 
], 108.— Memoir, 18. 



V 



EGLESTON. 

Egleston, T. — Discussion by, 94. 

Elastic Limit in Metals, Variation due 
to Orthogonal Strains, by R. H. 
Thurston, 23. 

Election of Officers, 90. 

Emery, Charles E. — Discussion by, 48, 
98. 

Emmet, Thomas AoDrs. — Death an- 
nounced, and Committee to pre- 
pare Memoir, 1, 8, 108. — Memoir, 
2. 

Ericsson', John. — Admitted as Honorary 
Member, 58, 62. 

Errata, 126. 

Field, George S. — Admitted as Mem- 
ber, 23, 31. 

Finance Committee. (See Committee.) 

Finances of Society, 108. (See Com- 
mittee.) (See Treasurer.) 

Fink, Albert — On Committee, 50. — 
Presides at Meeting, 18. 

Fiscal Year. Change proposed, 49. 

Flad, Henry. — On Committee, 41, 46, 
50. 

Flow of Streams, by A. Fteley, 98. 

Ford, Arthur L. — Death announced, 
and Committee to prepare Memoir, 
56, 57, 108.— Memoir, 75. 

FoRNKY, M. N. — Discussion by, 48, 57. 
— On Committee, 57. 

Fox, Stephenson Waters. — Admitted 
as Junior, 58, 68. 

Francis, James B. — Censor to award 
Norman Medal, 69, 91, 108.— Dis- 
cussion by, 42, 45. — Elected Presi- 
dent, 90. — Presides at Convention, 
37.— Presides at Meeting, 49. 

Frazier, James L. — Admitted as Mem- 
ber, 69, 87. 
Freeman, Claude. — On Committee, 46. 

Ftelev, A. — Paper by, 98. 

Gates, C. L. — Paper by, 42. 

Gauging of Streams, Report of Com- 

\iiittee. 43, 77, 98. 
Goodwin, J. M. — Discussion by, 2. 
Graff, Frederick. — On Committee, 45. 
Greene, B. H. — On Committee, 49. 
Greene, G. S. — Discussion by, 85. 
Greenwood, William H. — Admitted as 

Member, 18, 31. — Death announced, 

82, 83, 108. 

Hammond, Henry B. — Admitted as 

Associate, 58, 88. 
Hardee, Thomas S. — Death announced 

and Committee to prepare Memoir, 

49, 56, 108. 



HARLOW. 

Harlow, J. H. — Discussion by, 42. 

Harrod, B. M. — Makes report, 44, On 
Committee, 49. 

Haswell, Charles H. — Presides at 
Meeting, 69. 

Hawksiiaw, Sir John. — Admitted as 
Honorary Member, 124. 

Hayes, E. — Discussion by, 113. 

Hayward, James A. — Death announced, 
69, 82, 108. 

Hermany, Charles. — Censor to award 
Norman Medal, 69, 91, 108. 

Heuer, William H. — Admitted as Mem- 
ber, 18, 31. 

Hilgard, Julius E. — Discussion by, 98. 
— On Committee, 50. 

Hjortsberg, Max. — Death announced 
and Committee to prepare Memoir, 
49, 56, 108. 

Holley, a. L. — On Committee. 9. 

House of the Society. (See Announce- 
ments.) 

Hudson River Tunnel, by Arthur Spiel- 
man and Charles B. Brush, 42. 

Hughes, William M. — Admitted as 
Member, 50, 54. 

HuTTON, W. R. — Discussion by, 42, 50, 
96. 

Institute of Mining Engineers, 15. 
Inter-Oceauic Canal Projects, 1, 2, 10, 

17, 18, 23, 83, 85. 

Jackson, Thomas. — Admitted as Mem- 
ber, 33. 

Jetties, Notes on South Pass, by Max 
E. Schmidt, 45. 

Johnson, Lorenzo M. — On Committee, 
46. — Ti'ansferred Junior to Mem- 
ber, 23, 36. 

Katte, Walter. — Discussion by, 96. — 
On Committee, 49. — Presides at 
Meeting, 9. 

Kelley, F. M. — Discussion by, 2. 

Kellogg, Charles. — Admitted as Mem- 
ber, 50, 54. 

Kennedy, James C. — Resignation of, 
111. 

Kinsley, T. P. — Discussion by, 85, 113. 

Knapp, George 0.— Resignation of, 
111. 

Knight, William B. — Transferred 
Junior to Member, 1, 36. 

Leach, Smith S. — Admitted as Mem- 
ber, 58, 82. 
Lesseps, M. de. — Discussion by.. 9, 10. 



VI 



LIBRARY. 

Library and Museum. — Additions to, 
13, 26, 51, 65, 77, 85, I'iL— Cata- 
logue, 77, 105,121. — Publications 
and Papers received for, 118. — 
Statement and Increase, 105. 

Library Committee. (See Committee.) 

Library, Consultation and Circulation 
of Books of the, lOG. 

Light, Relative Efficiency of Gas and 
Electric, by G. W. Dresser, o3. 

Light-house in Pascagoula Harbor, Re- 
newal of Foundation and Transfer 
of, by J. W. PuTN'AM, 113. 

List of Members — Additions to, 7, 16, 
21, 31, 35, 54. 62, 68, 82, 87, 111, 
124. 

— Changes and Corrections, 8, 16,21, 

31, 36, 55, 62, 68, 82, 88, 111, 125. 

— Deaths, 8, 16, 32, 56, 82, 108, 125. 

— Resignations, 16, 82, 88. 112. 

List of New Books on Engineering and 
Technology. (See Books.) 

Locks, Ship Canal, Calculated for 
Operation by Steam, by Ashbel 
Welch, 45. • 

Long, Thomas J. — Transferred Junior 
to Member, 1, 7. 

Macdonald, Charles. — Discussion by, 
50, 57.— On Committee, 41, 50, 57. 
— Paper by, 18. — Resolution by, 
49. 

MaoNaughton, James. — Admitted as 
Member, 33, 54. 

Malezieux, Emile. — Admitted as Hon- 
orary Member, 124. 

Manley, Herny. — Admitted as Membei-, 
50, 54. 

McMath, Robert E. — Admitted as 
Member, 18. 21. — On Committee, 
46. — Paper by, 45. 

McNultv. George, W. — Admitted as 
Member, 33, 82. 

Meetings. — Annual. (See Annual.) 

— General, 103, 104. 

— Omitted in Summer Months, 58. 

— Statement of, 103. 

Meier, Edward D. — Admitted as Mem- 
ber, 9, 31. — On Committee, 46. 

Members, Additions to. (See List.) 
—Ballots for. (See Ballots.)— 
Changes of Address. (See List.) 
— Deaths. (See List.) — Engage- 
ments for, 107. — Number of, It'l. 
— Professional Record of, 10, 107. 
— Resignations of. (See List.) 

Membership, Method of Balloting for, 



MEMOIRS. 

and Election to. 49, 58, 70.— State- 
ment and Increase of, 101. 

Memoirs of Deceased Members. 2, 4, 
18, 24, 75. — Thomas Addls Emmett, 
2. — Warrkn Colburn, 4. — George 
W. Edge, 18.— A. W. Craven, 24. 
— Arthur L. Ford, 75. 

Memphis, The Sewerage of, by F. S. 
Odell, 98. 

Menooal, a. G.— Paper by, 83, 85. 

Merrill, William E. — On Committee, 
45. 

Metals, Elastic Limit, Variation due to 
Orthogonal Strains by, R. H. 
Thurston, 23. 

Metcalf, William. — Discussion by, 58, 
73. 

Metric System. (See Announcements). 

Minutes of Meetings of Board of Direc- 
tion, 10, 34, 58, 69, 100, 114. 

— January, 7th, 1880, Proposals Con- 

sidered, 10. 

— January 19th, 1880, Proposals con- 

sidered ; action taken as to Com- 
mittees on Tests of Cement and on 
Preservation of Timber ; circular 
to be issued requesting biographi- 
cal records of members ; circular 
to be issued as to professional in- 
formation to be fur nibbed to mem- 
bers ; financial business transacted, 
10. 

— February 5tli, 1880, Proposals con- 

sidered, 10. 

— February 11th, 18S0, Proposals con- 

sidered ; arrangements for special 
meeting made ; appropriations 
made, 10. 

— March 11th, 1880, Proposals con- 

sidered; action taken as to Com- 
mittees on Preservation of Timber 
and on Tests of Cements, 34. 

— April 5lh, 1880. Proposals considered: 

action taken as to lease of house ; 
action taken as to members in ar- 
rears ; programme for 12th Annual 
Convention considered, 34- 

— April 7th, 18S0, Proposals consid- 

ered, 34. 

— May 6th, 1880, Proposals considered; 

appropriations made ; action taken 
as to members in arrears, 34. 

— June 9th, 1880, Proposals considered; 

action taken as to members in ar- 
rears ; appropriations made, 58. 

— July 1 3th, 1880, Proposals consid- 

ered, 58. 



VII 



MINUTES. 

— August 3d. 1880, Proposals con- 

sidered ; action taken as to arrears 
of dues; appropriations made; 
Board of Censors to award Norman 
medal appointed, 69. 

— October 1st, 1880, Arrangements 

made for annual meeting; action 
taken on report of Nominating 
Committee; appropriations made, 
100. 

— November 1st, 1880, Proposals con- 

sidered ; Secretary's report re- 
ceived and annual report perfected, 
100. 

— November Ki^li, 1880, Board organ- 

ized ; Standing Committees ap- 
pointed; proposals considered; 
appropriations made, 100. 

— December 8th, 1880, proposals con- 

sidered ; provision for permanent 
quarters discussed, 114. 

— December 22d, 1880, Mode of issu- 

ing ballots determined ; action 
taken as to proposed fund for per- 
manent quarters, 114. 

— December '29tli, 1880, Proposals 

considered; action taken as to 
fund for permanent quarters ; reso- 
lutions adopted, and form of circu 
lar determined, 114. 
Minutes of meetings of the Society, 1, 2, 
9, 10, n, 18, 23, 33, 48, 57, 69, 83, 
89. 113. 

— .Tanuary 'Zth, 1880, Ballot for mem- 

bership canvassed ; ballot for place 
of Twelfth Annual Convention 
canvassed ; St. Louis adopted ; 
discussion on Inter-oceanic Canal 
projects, continued, 1. 

— January 14, 1880, Deaths of George 

W. Edge, and T. A. Emmett an- 
nounced ; discussion on Infer- 
oceanic Canal projects continued, 1. 

— January 21st. 1880, Discussion on 

Inter-oceanic Canal projects con- 
tinued, 2. 

— February 4th, 1880, Death of John 

C. Thompson announced ; commit- 
tee appointed to arrange for ad- 
dress bj' M. DE Lesseps ; ballots 
for membership canvassed ; bal- 
lots for amendments to Constitu- 
tion canvassed — one adopted, one 
not adopted ; report of Committee 
on Quarters presented 9. 

— February 20th, 1880, Meeting at 

Theatre of Union League Club ; dis- 
cussion on Inter-oceanic Canal pro- 



MINUTES. 

jects by M. de Lesseps and others, 
'lO. 

- March 3d, 1880, Discussion on Inter- 

oceanic Canal projects continued ; 
ballots for membership canvassed, 
17. 
-March I7th, 1880, Discussion on 
Inter-oceanic Canal projects, con- 
tinued, 18. 

- April 7th, 18S0, Ballots for member- 

bership canvassed; discussion on 
Inter-oceanic Canal projects con- 
tinued ; " Variation due to ortho- 
gonal strains in the elastic limit ot 
metals" by R. H. Thurston, read 
and discussed, 23. 
-April 21st, 1880, Death of I. M. 
St. John announced ; arrange- 
ments for Convention ; notes on ex- 
periments on the relative efficiency 
of gas and the electric light by 
George W. Dresser, read and dis- 
cussed, 33. 

- May 5th, 1880, Ballots for member- 

ship canvassed ; rooms to be here- 
after open on evening? of Wednes- 
day instead of Thursday of each 
week, 33. 
-May 19th, 1880, " Suggestions and 
notes in regard to a new decimal 
system of weights and measures," 
by T. S. Sedgwick, read and dis- 
cussed, 48. 

- May 26th, 1 880. Business meeting 

at Convention ; suggestions for 
change of date of annual meeting 
and close of fiscal year dis- 
cussed ; deaths of Thomas S. Har- 
dee and of Max H-jortsberg an- 
nounced, and committees to pre- 
pare memoirs appointed ; rules for 
nomination and election to mem- 
bership discussed ; resolution in 
reference to employment of Civil 
Engineers upon public works of- 
fered, discussed, amended, adopted 
and committee appointed, 49 ; 
places for 13th Annual Convention 
suggested, .^0. 

-June 2d, 1880, Ballots for member- 
ship canvassed. 50. 

-June 16th, 1880, Death of Arthur L. 
Ford announced and committee 
appointed to prepare memoir; 
"Cheap Transportation versus 
Rapid Transit and Delivery," by 
M. Coryell read and discussed, 57. 

-July 7th, 1880, Rules for nomination 



YIII 



MINUTES. 

and election to membership dis- 
cussed, 57 ; election of John Erics- 
son, Justin Dirks and Baron vox 
Wkber as honorary members an- 
nounced ; ballots for membership 
canvassed, 58. 

— September 1, 1880, Death of James A. 
Hayward announced ; " Harbor 
Improvements of Quebec" by J. 
Vincent Browne read ; " The 
Strength of Wrought Iron Col- 
ums " by G. Bouscaren read ; com- 
mittee on employment of civil en- 
gineers on government work asked 
extension of time ; ballots for mem- 
bership canvassed, 69. 

— September 15th, 1880, Death of Wil- 
liam H. Greenwood announced ; 
discussion on inter-oceanic canals 
continued, 83. 

— October 6th, 18S0, Ballots for mem- 

bership canvassed ; arrangements 
for annual meeting made, 83 ; pro- 
posed amendment to Constitution 
submitted, 84 ; letter in reference 
to report of United States Board to 
test metals read ; Inter-oceanic 
canal discussion continued, 85. 

— October 20, 1880, Wind pressure dis- 

cussed, 89. 
— N"ovember 3d, 17th, 18th, 1880, An- 
nual Meeting (see minutes of,) 89. 

— December 1st, 1880, Ballots for mem- 

liership canvassed; "Renewal of 
Foundation and Transfer of Light- 
house in Pascagoula Harbor " by 
J. W. Putnam read and discussed, 
113. 

—December 15th, 1880, " Wind Strains 
in Bridges " by C. Shaler Smith 
read ; description of arch center- 
ing presented, 1 1 3. 

Minutes of Twelfth Annual Convention, 
37; St. Louis, May 25th, 1880; 
called to order by John Bogart, 
Secretary ; chair taken by Vice- 
President James B. Francis ; James 
B. Eads elected Chairman of Con- 
vention ; William P. Shinn, Vice- 
Chairman ; Address by James B. 
Eads, 37. — Address by Hon. Henry 
OvERSTOLZ, Mayor of St. Louis, 38. 
— List of members and guests, 40 ; 
Committee on arrangement of pa- 
pers and discussions, 41 ; Pro- 
gramme of excursions and local 
invitations ; '" The Hudson River 
Tunnel " by Arthur Si'ielman and 



MINUTES. 

Charles B. Brush read and dis- 
cussed ; " Location of the Chimbote 
Tunnels" by 0. F. Nichols read, 
42; Second Session, 9 a.m., May 26th; 
" Tensile Tests of Cements, and Ap- 
pliances for more Accurate Deter- 
minations" by D. J. Whittemore 
read and discussed ; " American 
Cements " by F. O. Norton read 
and discussed; "Waterproof Cov- 
erings" by F. CoLLiNGWooD read; 
" Web Strains in Simple Trusses" 
by E. Sweet, Jr., read ; " The 
Crip23ling Strength of Wrought 
Iron Columns" by C. L. Gates 
read ; report for Committee on 
Tests of Iron and Steel referred to 
and discussed, 42 ; Report of Com- 
mittee on Gauging of Streams ; Re- 
port of Committee oa Tests of Ce- 
ments; Committees continued; Re- 
port of Finance Committee, 43 ; 
Report of Committee on Preserva- 
tion of Timber, 44 ; Nominating 
committee appointed, 45 ; Third 
Session, 8 p. m. May 26th ; Annual 
address read ; Business meeting 
held (see minutes), 45 ; Fourth 
Session, 9 a. m., May 28th; "Ship 
Canal Locks Calculated for 
Operation by Steam " by Ashbel 
Welch read ; " Practical Conse- 
quences of the Variation of the 
Wet Section of Rivers " by R. E. 
McMath read; "Notes on the 
South Pass Jetties" by Max E. 
Schmidt read and discussed ; 
" Cheap Transportation versus 
Rapid Transit and Delivery " by M. 
Coryell presented ; " Wind Pres- 
sure against Bridges " by Ashbel 
Welch read and discussed ; Com- 
mittee as to Wind Pressures ap- 
pointed ; " Improvement of the 
Harbor of Quebec " by J. Vincent 
Browne presented ; resolution of 
thanks, 45 ; Convention adjourned; 
Arrangements by, and members of 
Local Committee ; General pro- 
gramme for each day ; Excursions 
and visits to various localities, 46. 
Minutes of Twenty-eighth Annual 
Meeting, November 3d, 1880; An- 
nual report of Board of Direction 
presented, ordered printed and 
submitted at adjourned meeting ; 
Tellers for ballot appointed; Annual 
reports of Treasurer and Finance 



IX 



MINUTES. 

Committee presented ; Report of 
Committee on Uniform System of 
Tests of Cement presented ; 
Amendment to Constitution consid- 
ered. 89 ; Suggestions for place of 
Thirteenth Annual Convention pre- 
sented ; recess taken to 8 r. m.; 
ballots for membership canvassed ; 
ballots for officers canvassed and re- 
■ suit announced ; adjourned to No- 
vember 17th, 90. 
— November I7th, 1880, Arrangements 
for meeting announced ; Annual 
report of Board of Direction ac- 
cepted ; Reports of Treasurer and 
Finance Committee accepted ; Com- 
mittee on Tests of Cement contin- 
ued ; Report of Board of Censors 
to award Norman Medal presented; 
Medal awarded to Theodore Coop- 
er, 90 ; Suggestions for place of 
Thirteenth Annual Convention pre- 
sented, discussed and letter ballot 
ordered to determine place, 91 ; 
Proposed amendments to Constitu- 
tion discussed, 93 ; 8.30 p. m., pro- 
posed amendments to Constitution 
■tliscussed and amended ; Amend- 
ment to By-Laws proposed, 97 ; 
ordered issued with arguments for 
and against; Report of Committee 
on Gauging Streams presented and 
<liscussed ; Paper on How of streams 
by A. Fteley read and discussed ; 
"The Sewerage of Memphis" by 
F. S. Odell read and discussed ; 
Adjournment of meeting ; Pro- 
gramme of excursions and enter- 
tainments connected with Annual 
Meeting, 98 ; Attendance at Annu- 
al Meeting, 100. 

Mitchell, Henry. — Admitted as Mem- 
ber, 1. 

Morisox, George S. — Discussion by, 
lis.— Plattsmouth Bridge, 48. 

MooREi Charles E. — Admitted as Mem- 
ber, 1, 16. 

Moore, Robert. — Discussion b}', 50. — 
On Committee, 46. 

Morse, Henry G. — Admitted as Mem- 
ber, 23, 54. 

Neilson, Charles. — Admitted as Mem- 
ber, 1,31. 

JS^ew Books on Engineering and Tech- 
nology. (See Books.) 



NEWTON. 

Newton, Isaac. — Admitted as Member, 
18, 21. 

Nichols, Aurin B. — Admitted as Mem- 
ber, 1. 

Nichols, 0. F. — Paper by, 42. 

Norman Medal, Award, 90. — Board of 
Censors to award. 69, 90. — Code of 
Rules for its Award, 60, 64, 81. 

North, E. P.— Appointed Teller, 89.— 
Discussion by, 2, 57, 58. 

Norton, F. O. — Paper by, 42. 

NoyES, Ellis B. — Admitted as Junior, 
58, 68. 

OcKER.soN, John A. — Admitted as Mem- 
ber, 58, 68. 

Odell, F. S. — Paper by, 98. 

OvERSTOLz, Henry. — Address at Con- 
vention, 38. 

Paune, William H.— Elected Director, 
90._Makes Report, 43, 109.— On 
Committee, 100. — Presides at Meet- 
ing, 89, 90. 

Palmer, Francis Ingram. — Admitted as 
Member, 113, 125. 

Pegram, George H. — Admitted as Jun- 
ior, 23, 36. 

Permanent Quarters for the Society, 
Action Taken, 114 — Committee on, 
10, 106. 

Philbrick, E. S. — Discussion by, 98. 

Plattsmouth, Excursion to and Bridge 
at, 48. 

Pope, Willard S. — On Committee, 49. 

Preservation of Timber. (See Tim- 
ber.) 

Prindle, F. C. — Discussion by, 18. 

Professional Information through Secre- 
tary, 10, 106. 

Publications and Papers received for 
Library, 118. 

Putnam, Joseph W. — Admitted as Asso- 
ciate, 18, 31.— Paper by, 113. 

Quebec, The Improvements of the Har- 
bor of, by J. V. Browne, 45, 69. 

Radenhurst, William N. — Transferred 
Junior to Member, 68. 

Records of Members, 10, 107. 

Report, of Board of Direction, Annual, 
89, 90, IGO, 101.— Appendix to, 
118. 

— Of Treasurer, 89, 90, 116. 

Reports of Committees. (See Com- 
mittees.) 



REPORTS. 

Reports made, List of, lOi. 

Resignation of Members. (See List.) 

Reuscuel, William. — Admitted as Jun- 
ior, 50. 68. 

Richards, Joseph R. — Admitted as As- 
sociate, Y, 9. 

Richardson, Henry B.— On Committee, 
49. 

Rivers, Practical Consequences of Va- 
riation of the Wet Section of, by 
Robert E. McMath, 4.5. 

Robinson, Albert A. — Admitted as 
Member, 33, 54. 

Rockwell, Samuel. — Admitted as Mem- 
ber, L 

Ross, William B. — Resignation of, 88. 

Schmidt, Max E. — Discussion by, 42, 
— Paper by, 45. 

Sedgwick, T. S. — Paper by, 48. 

Sewerage of Memphis, by F. S. Odell, 
98. 

Seymour, Horatio, Jr. — Transferred 
Associate to Member, 23, 36. 

Shailer, Robert A — Admitted as Mem- 
ber, 18, 36. 

Shelbourne, S. F. — Discussion by, S3. 

SmcKLE, F. — On Committee, 46. 

Shinn, "W. p.— Discussion by, 42, 43, 
49, 70, 94.— On Committee, 46.— 
Vice-Chairman of Convention, 3Y. 

Simpson, George Hume. — Admitted as 
Member, 83, IIL 

Slataper, F. — Discussion by, 94. 

Smedley, S. L. — Discussion by, 98. 

Smith, Charles A. — Admitted as Mem- 
ber, 23, 55. 

Smith, C. Shaler. — Discussion by, 45, 
49, 50, 72.— On Committee, 45, 46. 
—Paper by, 113. 

Smith, C. Vandervoort. — Elected Di- 
rector, 90.— On Committee, 100. 

South Pass Jetties. (See Jetties.) 

Spielmann, Arthur. — Paper by, 42. 

Stanton, Robert B. — Admitted as Mem- 
ber, 69, 88. 

Steam Engines, Discussion on Cushion- 
ing the Reciprocating Parts of, by 
Charles E. Emery and J. W. Hill, 
111, 115. 

St. John, Isaac Monroe. — Death an- 
nounced, and Committee to prepare 
Memoir, 32, 33, 108. 

St. Louis, Bridge at, 48. — Convention at, 
1, 7, 15, 33, 34, 37. — Engineers 
Club of, 45. 

Strains, Variation due to Orthogonal 



STRANG. 

Strains in the Elastic Limit of 
Metals, by R. H. Thurston, 23. 

— Web Strains in Simple Trusses, by 

E. Sweet, Jr., 42. 

Strang, S. A. — Discussion by, 67. 
Sweet, Charles A. — Admitted as Mem- 
ber, 18, 21. 
Sweet, E. Jr. — Paper b}', 42. 

Tests of Cement. (See Ceqient.) • 
Tests of Iron, Steel and Other Metals, 

Committee on. (See Committee.) 

United States Board for, 85. 
Thompson, John C. — Death annoiinced, 

and Committee to prepare Memoir, 

9, 16, 108. 
Thurston, R. H. — Communication from, 

85.— Paper by, 23. 
Timber, Committee on Preser\ation of. 

(See Committee.) 
Tintorer, Jose Giberga. — Admitted as 

Member, 33, 55. 
Transactions, 108. 
Transportation, Cheap, versus Rapid 

Transit and Delivery, by M. Cor- 
yell, 45, 57. 
Treasurer, Annual Report, 89, 90, 116. 
Trusses, Web-Strains in Simple, by E. 

Sweet, Jr., 42. 
Tunnel, Chimbote, Location of, by 0. 

F. Nichols, 42. 

— Hudson River, The, by Arthur 

Spielmann and C. B. Brush, 42. 

Van Auken, D. IL — Description of 

Centering, by, 113. 
Van Brocklin, Martin. — Admitted as 

Member, 1, 21. 
Vance, Hart, — Admitted as Member, 

58, 88. 
Vandfrpool, E. — On Committee, 2, 18. 
Van Horne, John G. — Admitted as 

Member, 7, 9.— Appointed Teller, 

89. 

Watte, Christopher C. — Admitted as 
Member, 18, 31. 

Walker, William Williams. — Admitted 
as Member, 83, 111. 

Ward, Charles D. — Discussion by, 2. 

Ward, L. B. — Discussion by, 85. 

Waterproof Coverings, by F. Colling- 
wooD, 42. 

Weber, Max Maria, Baron Von. — Ad- 
mitted as Honorary Member, 54, 
58. — Discussion by, 57. 

Weights and Measures, Suggestions 
and Notes in regard to a new 



XI 



WEIR. 

Decimal S^'stem of, by T. S. Sedq- 
• WICK, 48. 

Weir, Charles G. — Admitted as Mem- 
ber, 33, 55. 

Welch, Ashbel. — Discussion by, 2, 10, 
17, 18, 42, 58, 83, 98, 113.— 
Elected Vice-President, 90.— On 
Committee, 100. — Paper by, 45. — 
Presides at Meetina,-, 57, 96, 113 
114. 

WELLMA>f, D. W.— On Committee, 46. 

Wheaton, Edward.— Admitted as As- 
sociate, 9, 16. 

WniTELAW, JoH\. — Discussion by, 50. 

Whitman, T. J.— On Committee, 46. 

Whittemore, D. J. — Discussion by, 42. 
— Elected Director, 90.— Paper bj^ 
42.— Report by, 43, 110. 



WIND. 

Wind Pressure, Against Bridges, by 
AsHBEL Welch, 45. 
— Discussion of, 89. 

Wind Strains in Bridges, by C. Siialer 
Smith, 113. 

Worthed, W. E. — Discussion by, 98, 
113. — Presides at Meeting, 113. 

WoRTHixGTON, Henry R. — Death an- 
nounced, 125. 

Wright, Horatio G. — Admitted as 
Honorary Member, 16, 18. 

Wyse, L. K B.— Discussion by, 23. 



Yardley, Edmund. — Discussion bv, 48 
58. ^ 

Yonge, Samuel H. — Admitted as Mem- 
ber, 33, 55. 






Vol. VI.— January, 1880. 
MINUTES OF MEETINGS 

(Abstractof such as may be of geueral interest to members.) 



OF THE SOCIETY. 

January 7th, 1880. -The Society met at 8 p. m., Vice-President 
Chanute in tlie chair. Ballots for admission to membership were can- 
vassed, and the following were declared elected Members: WilHam B. 
Knight (elected Junior January 6, 1875), Kansas City, Mo.; Thomas J." 
Long (elected Junior November 3, 1875), New York City; Henry Mitchell^ 
U. S. Coast Survey; Charles E. Moore, Fayetteville, Vt.; Charles Neil- 
son, New York; Aurin B. Nichols, Washington, D. C. ; Samuel Eockwell 
Brooklyn, N. Y. ; Martin Van Brocklin, New York. 

The ballots for determining the place of the Twelfth Annual Con- 
vention were canvassed, Avitli the following result: 

For St. Louis r- < . 

,, ti -o ■ ^^ votes. 

San IranciKco i~ ,, 

iO " 

' ' Washington .^. , ^ 

Whereupon it was determined that the Convention should be held at 
St. Louis. 

A paper in continuation of the discussion on Inter-Oceanic Canal 
Projects was then read by Julius W. Adams, Past President of the 
Society. 

January 14th, 1880. -The Society met at 8 p. m., George W 
Dresser in the chair. The deaths on January 1st, 1880, of George W. 
Edge, Member of the Society, and on January 12th, 1880, of Thomas 
Addis Emmet, Member and one of the Founders of the Society were 
announced, and Committees to prepare memoirs for publication were 
appomted, as follows : To prepare a memoir of George W Ed-e 



Messrs. Armington, Vanderpool and the Secretary ; to prepare a memoir 
of Thomas A. Emmet, Messrs. Julius W. Adams, P. P. Du^kmson and 

*^'^The disTiission upon the subject of Inter-Oceanic Canal Projects was 
continued by Ashbel Welch, Charles D. Ward and F. M. Kelley, and by 
a Daper by John C. Campbell, presented through the Secretary. 

January 21st, 1880. -The Society met at 8 p. m., Vice-President 
Chanute in the chair. The discussion upon the subject of Inter-Oceanic 
Canal Projects was continued by E. P. North, T. Cooper, J. M. Goodwin 
(through the Secretary) and O. Chanute. 



MEMOIRS OF DECEASED MEMBERS. 



THOMAS AUDIS EMMET,* Member A. S..C. E. 

Died Jaxxaky 12th, 1880. 
Thomas Addis Emmet was born in the city of New York, June 4th, 
1818, the son of Eobert Emmet, and grandson of Thomas Addis Emmet. 
He was educated principally at the school of the Rev. William Powell, 
and was there prepared for Columbia College, which he entered m the 
year 1834 He remained at college only one year, his inclination being 
for a more active life. In 1835 or 1836, having decided on the profession 
of Civil Engineer, he was appointed to a position on the first surveys 
that were made by the Erie Railroad at Deposit, Delaware County, New 
York He was afterwards transferred, in the same employment to 
Tappan, New York, where he remained until 1840. He then took a 
position with Major McNeil in the construction of a railroad m South 
Carolina, between Columbia and Charleston, and remained here one 
year when he returned to New York and was appointed to the State 
Survey of the head waters of the Hudson River, where he continued until 
they were completed. 

Between 1843 and 1851 he was engaged upon the construction of the 
Erie and Hudson River Railroads. His next employment was m Penn- 
sylvania, on some of the coal roads, and he was the Chief Engmeer of the 
dattawissa Railroad, which was completed under his charge. He was 
next in charge of a division of the Erie Railroad, and after its completion 
retired for a period from the profession, and was elected the President of 
an insurance company in the city of New York. After two years experi- 
ence of an inactive life in the City, he resigned this position and returned 
to his profession, which he found more congenial to his tastes and habits. 
From that time he was principally employed on^the Eri^Railroad.^ 

.r^o^~it;7t^^r;par7^emoIr;^Ii.^^rAdam8 P. P. Dickinson. John Bogart. 



had charge of the construction of the line from Paterson to Hoboken, 
and also of the Niagara River branch, and was for several years on the 
Delaware Division, where twenty years before he had commenced his 
professional career. 

After leaving the Erie Railroad he was appointed an assistant in the 
Croton Aqueduct Department. This was about the year 1870. He from 
that time resided at Carmel, in Putnam County, New York, and was in 
charge of the reservoir, and various sources of water supply in that 
section. He superintended the construction of the large reservoir lately 
completed at Brewsters, in Putnam County, and various other works 
connected with it. Latterly he had been principally emploved nearer 
the city on examinations for further water supply, and on surveys for a 
new aqueduct, but he still retained his superintendence of the Putnam 
County works, and was there .ugaged with his duties at the time of his 
death. 

Up to a very recent period he had enjoyed very robust health, pro- 
moted, no doubt, by his active out-of-door life. On January 1st he had 
an alarming attack of difTiculty of respiration, but he had apparently 
entirely recovered from it, and actively continued in the discharge of his 
duties. On the 12th of January he went to Carmel, seemingly well in- 
tending to return on the following day. He was occupied all day. After 
he had retired for the night he was attacked with the same symptoms of 
difhculty of breathing. He had prompt assistance, which was of no 
avail. He died m twenty minutes after he was attacked, having retained 
his consciousness to within a few minutes of his death. 

His professional life covered a period of nearly forty-five years He 
loved and took pride in its practice, and highly prized the intimacies 
and friendships he contracted in the course of it. He filled his various 
positions conscientiously, justly and honestly. It was not in his nature 
to do otherwise. He was unassuming and unobtrusive ; free from false 
pretense; unselfish and generous; rigidly upright and just in all his deal- 
ings; manly and courageous in all his thought and actions, and his 
friendships were sincere, lasting, and to be depended on 

He never married, and through boyhood and manhood his ties to his 
km were of the tenderest character. With them he passed all his leisure 
time and found among them his recreation and happiness 

]\Ir Emmet was one of the twelve who, on November 5th, 1S52 met 
a the Croton Aqueduct Department in the City of New York and founded 
us Society^ His membership has continued without interruption since 
that date. During the twenty-seven years of the existence of the Society 
his interest in it has always been sustained. Very few of the men to whom 
the Society owes its origin are left with us, and this loss of one of them 
prompts he reflection that they laid its foundation well and skillfully 
^ssentially the same to-day in its objects, its aims and its laws, with sucli 
Changes only as have been made necessary by its growth and enlarged 



area of membership, tlie Hociety may well make record of the proven 
wisdom and forethought of its early members, and acknowledge the 
debt it owes to the founders of the American Society of Civil Engineers. 



WARREN COLBURN,* Member A. S. C. E. 

Died Septembeb 15th, 1879. 

Wavren Colburn (elected member of the Society March 18th, 1868), 
was born in the Town of Waltham, Massachusetts, on the 18th day of 
August 1824 He was the eldest son of Warren Colburn, the famous 
mathematician and author of a series of arithmetics and other more 
advanced mathematical works. At an early age he was sent to the public 
schools in the' City 'of Lowell, where he evinced an unusual aptitude 
for learning, particularly in mathematics, his apprehension of that 
science seeming almost preternatural. At the age of thirteen l^e entered 
the celebrated preparatory school of the late Dr. Muhlenberg, at Flush- 
ing Long Island, where he pursued his studies assiduously for a series 
of years and received an admirable intellectual training, making for him- 
self an excellent record for scholarship. While at this school he attained 
such proficiency in mathematics that it appears to have been the pastime 
of his leisure hours to compose mathematical problems, many of which 
were so highly esteemed for their originality that a leading scientific 
journal published them as productions of an intellect of rare mathe- 
matical promise. 

Mr Colburn's first business employment after leaving school was in 
the capacity of an actuary of an insurance company, engaged more par- 
cularly in the preparation of insurance computations and mathematically 
tabulated scales. But the impulse of his mind towards Civil Engineer- 
ing was so predominant that he soon relinquished this position for a 
subordinate one in an engineering party on the Fitchburg Eailway. With 
his superior mathematical attainments, ready apprehension and natural 
o-enius for Civil Engineering, he soon acquired a practical mastery of the 
rudimentary principles of that profession. Upon concluding his engage- 
ment with that line, he was appointed Assistant Engineer of the Cheshire 
Railwav the duties of which office he most efficiently and satisfactorily 
discharged up to the period of the completion of that work, m the year 

Mr Colburn was then, and when he had barely attained his twenty- 
fifth year, appointed Chief Engineer of the Ashuelot Railway, certainly 
a flattering testimonial to his professional proficiency and enterprise^ 
He remained in the personal supervision of the^gineenng otjhis road 

'^'Tcoim^iUeTtolii^e^re'n^emMr^^J^^ Secretary., The Secretary desires to 

.cknowle^re the kincLL of John N. Prummoud, Esq.. of Toledo, O.. ,vho, though not a 
Ltrhlof this society, has with great care collected the materials for this meoiou-. 



until it was finislied and ready for operating, and the solidity and 
thoroughness of its construction well attests the skill and sound engi- 
neering judgment exercised in its i^rosecution. 

x\t the beginning of the year 1851 Mr. Oolburn was appointed Chief 
Engineer of the Rochester, Lockport & Niagara Falls Railway, in- 
cluding the Lockport & Buffalo Railway. His supervision of the con- 
struction of these roads continued until both were finished, and his man- 
agement of all departments of the work was characterized by marked 
energy, skill, tact and business ability. Ui3on the opening of these roads 
for traffic he was ajjpointed General Manager, and performed the duties of 
that office until both were merged by consolidation into the New Yoi*k 
Central Railway. 

In the year 1853 Mr. Colburn was elected to the office of Chief Engi- 
neer of the Lake Erie, Wabash it St. Louis Railway (commonly known 
as the Wabash Line). He entered upon the duties of the surveying, 
locating and construction of this extended line of railway during the 
month of May of that year, and accomplished its completion late in the 
aiitumn of 1856. The difficulties attending the building of this great 
road, with its extensive bridging and other formidable and expensive 
artificial structures, as well as those arising from sharp conflicting inter- 
ests as to its location, he met and most successfully surmounted, his vipe 
professional experience and discreet judgment seeming all-sufficient for 
the solution of eveiy problem, the reconciling of all differences, and the 
encompassing of the wisest and most judicious results. On the opening 
of this line he was appointed Vice-President and General Manager, and 
during the eleven ensuing years he continued to fill those positions in a 
manner acceptable to the company and with'the confidence and esteem of 
all with whom he had business intercourse. 

After his withdrawal from the last-named line Mr. Colburn was made 
Chief Engineer of the Decatur & East St. Louis Railway. He supervised 
the surveys, location, construction and equipment of this railway, and 
that liaving been accompished, he delivered it over to the Wabash Line, 
which absorbed it by consolidation. 

Mr. Colburn was also elected President of the La Fayette, Blooming- 
ton & Mississippi Railway, and supervised its engineering and construc- 
tion until it was completed, when it became leased to the Wabash Line. 

At this juncture Mr. Colbtirn, after a long and ardiious professional 
experience extending over a period of nearly thirty years, permanently 
withdraw from all direct personal participation in railway construction 
and management — thus concluding a career of public official life that 
was eminently useful and successful, distinguished for a thoroughly 
scientific and practical mastery of his profession, and inflexible adherence 
to the highest principles of manly firmness and honor. 

In the year 1871 Mr. Colburn visited Euroiie, and prolonged his 
sojourn there through a period of more than two years. Soon after his 



6 

return he accepted a temporary position as Commissioner for the joint 
Trunk Lines, but his connection with railway affairs thereafter was 
almost exchasively of an advisory.and consulting <^^--;^-' ^ ,^™^J^^ 
^hich he, of course, brought the advantages of npe professional skill and 
thoroughly matured practical experience. During the later yeais of his 
life, he was often selected by the courts to act as a commissioner and 
arbitrator in controversies between railway companies involving q^jestions 
of construction and engineering, and it has been particularly ^ohc^-^_^ 
that his conclusions in such cases have been so clear, accurate, ^^P^^^^^^ 
and convincing, that they have been accepted by contestants and made 
the iudament of the court. . 

Till" far reference has been made almost exclusively to those points 
of Mr Colburn's character, which were more directly open to public and 
general observation. Before concluding, it seems but proper that some 
brief expression should be given to the feelings with which his memory 
.as chel-ished by his associates and those who were favored by his friend- 

'^'^In intellectual power and quality Mr. Colburn was not only an un- 
common man, but an uncommon style of a man. He was an original 
thinker, an extensive reader, gifted with a prodigious "^^7^T> and an 
acute faculty for discrimination and analysis. His power of abstiact on 
and concentration of thought was such, that the processes oi^^^^^^ 
towards results seem to have had the quickness of intuition His knowl- 
edge of his profession unquestionably was extensive, practical and pi o- 
ound, the result, no doubt, of a well-directed early training and assiduous 
shidy and reflection. It was due to this fact that in questions of Civi 
Engineering his opinions were so generally esteemed and accepted as ot 

the hiehest authoritv. , . . , , n e 

Mr Colburn was a man of genuine integrity and disinterestedness of 
character free from ambition, and without a trace of an unworthy aim 
or an ungenerous purpose. He never sought praise or preferment, but 
: ther recoiled fJm everything calculated to bring him into prominence 
or secure personal influence or reward. While he was firm m his own 
conv ctions, he was generously tolerant towards those of others. Although 
Lmewhat predisposed to be reserved and reticent m manner, he was in 
reality genial and courteous, approachable and sympathetic. 

In person Mr. Colburn was healthful and vigorous to an unusual 
degree-tall, broad-shouldered, muscular, and of imposing P^e^^^^^- 
tith finelv-cut features, a keen, clear, bright eye, -^^ ^ ^^^ ^ ^^^^ ^ ^ti 
ful animaiion, intelligence and intensity of purpose, ^^^^f ^^^ Pjf 
twenty or more years he had made his permanent home at Toledo, Ohio 
He died at Saratoga Springs on the 15th day of September last m the 
mellow ripeness of a well-rounded life, and the tender appreciation of a 
wide circle of loving friends will cherish and preserve his memory- 



ANNOUNCEMENTS. 



The Twelfth Annual Convention of the So- 
ciety will bo held at St. Louis. The time will 
be the latter part of May. The particular date 
•will soon be announced, 

The following resolutions were adopted at 
the Ninth Annual Convention of the Society, 
and ordered printed regularly in the Society 
publications : 

Whereas, the metric system of weights and 
measures is now extensively used abroad, 
and whereas it is desirable that the relation 
of the units of the differing systems be made 
familiar to all by comparison : 

Eesolved, That members be requested, in 
papers hereafter presented to the Society, to 
write, in parenthesis, weights or dimensions 



by the metric system, in connection with 
those of the system in general use. 

The House of the Society is at 104 East 
Twentieth street, one door east from Fourth 
avenue, and near the southwest corner of 
Gramercy Park. It is open from nine o'clok 
A.M., to five o'clock P.M. each business day, 
except Saturday, when it is closed at three 
o'clock P.M^ 

The Library and Conversation Rooms will 
also, for the present, be open every Thursday 
evening, from 1)^ to 10 p.m. Members are 
invited to avail themselves of the oppor- 
tunities afforded on Thursday evenings, both 
for consultation of books and periodicals and 
for conversation. 



LIST OF MEMBERS 



ADDITIONS. 



MEMBERS. 



Long, Thomas J. 



Date of Election. 



Van Horne, John G. 



.(Elected Junior, Jan. 6, 1875), As- 
sistant Engineer, Department of 
Doclvs, 26 West 6ot]i St., New 

Yor]< City, N. Y January 7, iSSo. 

Assistant Engineer, Metropolitan 
Elevated Railroad, 437 Communi- 
paw Ave., Jersey City, N. J February 4, 18S0. 



ASSOCIATE. 



Richards, Joseph R 46 Court St., Boston, Mass February 4, i 



8S0. 



8 



CHANGES AND CORRECTIONS. 



Constable, Casimir Constableville, Lewis Co., N. Y. 

Pearsons, Galen W. Oceanus P. O. (Rockaway Beach), Queens Co., N. Y. 

Sears, Alfred F Portland, Oregon. 



JUNIOR. 

» Lucas, D. Jones 233 South 4th St., Philadelphia, Pa. 



E.MMET Thomas Addis .... Elected Member November 5, 1852. Died January 

12, 1880. 



^wmimx mtkto o| :(|;iiH injinM^^ 



PROCEEDI^aS. 



Vol. VI.— February, 1880. 
MINUTES OF MEETINaS 

(Abstractor such as may be of general interest to members.) 



OF THE SOCIETY. 

Febkuaby 4th, 1880. — The Society met at 8 p. m., Mr. Walter Katte 
iu the chair. 

The death of John C. Thompson, Member of the Society was an- 
nounced, and A. L. Holley and John Bogart were appointed a com- 
mittee to prejiare a memoir for publication. 

The approaching visit to New York of M. de Lesseps, and the 
engineers' accompanying him, was announced, and a committee was 
ajjpointed to make arrangements for a j^roper reception of these gentle- 
men, and for their participation in discussion at a meeting of the 
Society. 

Ballots for admission to membership were canvassed, and the follow- 
ing were declared elected : As Members, Henry D. Blunden (elected 
Junior January 5, 1876), of New York, Andrew J. Ohaphe, of St. Louis, 
Mo., Edward D. Meier, of St. Louis, Mo., John G. Yan Home, of Jersey 
City, N. J.; as Associates, Joseph E. Richards, of Boston, Mass., 
Edward Wheaton, of Providence, R. I. 

Ballots on proposed amendments to the Constitution were canvassed, 
with the following result : 

On proposed amendment to Article XXII: 

At the end of Article XXII, insert: On and after the fifth day of November, 1879, Past 
Presidents of the Society shall be Life Members, entitled to all the privileges of members 
without the payment of Dues. 

There were 92 ayes. 

5.3 noes . 

This projiosed amendment not having received an affirmative vote of 
two-third of all ballots cast was declared lost. 
On proposed amendment to Article XXXIII: 

To amend Article XXXIII. so that the amended article shall read as follows : 



10 

.Vkticle XXXIII. — Proposed amendments to this Constitution must be submitted in 
writing, signed by not le^s than five Members, on or before the first Wednesday in October, 
and then sent by letter to the several Members of the Society, at least twenty-five days pre- 
vious to the Annual Meeting. Such amendments shall be in order for discussion and amend- 
ment at such Annual Meeting, and with such amendments thereto as may have been approved by a 
majority vote of the Annual Meeting, shall be voted upon by letter ballot, the vote to be 
counted at the first regular meeting in February. An affirmative vote of two-thirds of all 
ballots cast shall be neoessai-y to secure the adoption of any amendment. 

(The words in italics constitute the amendment ; otherwise the Arti- 
cle is unaltered. ) 

There were 128 ayes. 

" 17 noes. 

This amendment having received an aifirmative vote of two-thirds of 
all ballots cast was declared adopted. 

A report was presented from the Committee on Permanent Quarters. 
The report was received, the committee discharged, and the subject 
referred to a committee consisting of the President, Secretary and 
Standing Committee on Finance. 

Febeuary 2r)TH, 1880. — The Society met at 7-J- p. m., at the Theatre of 
the Union League Club in New York, Vice-President Chanute in the 
chair. 

M. Ferdinand de Lessejjs spoke, in French, in continuation of the dis- 
cussion upon " Inter-Oceanic Canal Projects." His remarks were trans- 
lated by Mr. N. Appleton. Mr. J. Dirks, C. E., of Amsterdam, Holland, 
followed, discussing engineering questions connected with the proposed 
construction of a canal at the'Isthmus of Panama. Mr. V. Dauzats, C. 
E., of France, gave details of the depth of ciitting at various points on 
the line at sea level, the lengths of the different excavations, the depth 
of soil, etc. The discussion was continued by Messrs. O. Chanute, 
Horatio Allen, Ashbel Welch, Cyrus Butler, J. Dirks, V. Dauzats 
and F. de Lesseps. 



OF THE BOAED OF DIRECTION. 

Jantjaky 7th, 1880. — Applications were considered. 

Jajstuaky 19th, 1880. — Applications were considered. The Secretary 
was directed to correspond Avith members of the Society in reference to 
their serving upon the Committees on Tests of Cements and on Preser- 
vation of Timber. The issue of a circular was directed requesting mem- 
bers to furnish biographical records. The issue of a circular as to 
professional information to be furnished to members was authorized. 
Financial business was transacted. 

Febeuaky 5th, 1880. — Applications were considered. 

Febrtjaey 11th, 1880. — Action was taken as to a meeting to be held at 
the Theatre of the Union League Club. A23plications were considered. 
Appropriations were passed. 



11 



LIST OF NEW BOOKS ON 

KNGINEERNG AND TECHNOLOGY. 



Alloys ; Copper-Tin Alloys. Keport on a Pre- 
liniiuary Invpstigatiou of the Properties of 
Copper-Tiu Alloys, made under tue direc- 
tion of the Committee on Metallic Alloys ; 
U. S. Board to test Iron, Steel and other 
Metals : Robert H. Tliurston, Chairman. 
Washington. Gavernment Printing Office. 
187!). $2 50.' 

Army ; Guide for Regimental Courts Martial. 
Horaiio C, King. 24mo. New York. Van 
A'ostrand. $0.75. 

The Russian Army and its Campaigns 

in Turkey in 1877-78. Lieut. F. V. Greene, 
U. S. A. 8vo. Atlas. New York. Apple- 
ions. .$ i; 1)0. 

Artisan's Year Book, and Engineer and Build- 
ing Trades Almanack. 1880. Po.st 8vo. 
Loudon. Heiiwnrid. 

Baggage Car Traffic ; illustrating Customs 
and necc.-^sary Rules and Regulations of the 
Baggage Department and Parcel Traffic in 
the U. S. and Europe. Marshall M. Kirk- 
man. New York. 12mo. Jiailrnad Gazette. 
.S2.0I). 

Bridges ; Handy Book for thp Calculation of 
Strains in Girders and similar Structures. 
3d Ed. Wm. A. Humbor. London. 8vo. 
Crusby Lock wood. 7s. (id. 

Iron Bridges and Roofs, Elementary 

Theory and Calculaticins. August Ritter, 
Ph.D. Trans, trom the German. 8d Ed. 
By H. R Sankey. fc02 engs. Svo, 395 pp. 
E. (t; F. N. Spnn. S6.00. 

• Trusses and .Arches by Graphical 

Methods. Part III. Arches in Wood, Iron 
and Stuue, for Koofs, Bridges and Wall 
Openings; Arched Ribs and Braced Arches; 
Stresses from Wind and Changes of Tem- 
perature ; Stiffened Suspension Bridges. 
Charles E. Greene, A. M., Professor of Civil 
Engineering in University of Michigan. 
1 Vol., 8V(>. New Y'ork. Wilei/. $2.rM. 

Catalogue of Scientific Serials of all Countries, 
inch Transactions of Learned Societies in 
the Natural, Physical and Mathematical 
Sciences, 1G33-1.S7G. (Library of Harvard 
Univ., special publications, 1.) Svo. (Applied 
Sciences not included ) S. H. Scudder. 
Cambridge Librar;/. $4.00. 

Cables ; Experiments on the Strength of 
Wrought Iron and of Chain Cables ; Report 
of the Committees of the United States 
Board appointed to test Iron, Steel and 
other Metals, on Chain Cables, Malleable 
Iron, Reheiiting and Rerolliug Wrought 
Iron ; including Miscellaneous Investiga- 
tions into tne Physical and Chemical Prop- 
erties of Kolled Wrought Iron. By Com- 
mander L A. Beardslee. U. S.N.. Member of 
the Boai'd and Chairman of the Committees, 
Revised and abridge- 1 by William Kent, M. 
E., formerly Assistant to the Committee ou 
Alloys of the United Stales Board'. With 
Heliotype Plate, showing Fractures. 8vo. 
New York, )Vile)/. $2.0(1. 

CatskUl Mountains, Map of. New York. Scrib- 
Tiers. $0 75. 

Civil Service in Great Britain. A History of 
Abuses and Reforms, and their Bearing 
upon American Politics. By Dorman B. 
Eaton. Svo. New York. Harpers. $2.50. 



College Fraternities ; a Descriptive Analysis^ 
of the Society System in the Colleges ot the 
United States, with a detailed account of 
each Fraternity. William Raymond Baird. 
12nio. Pbiladelphia. Lippincott. $1.50. 

Concrete ; Practical Treatise on Natural and 
Artificial Concrete. Henry Beid. New ed., 
illus Svo. E. (£ F iV. .s>o?tj.-. $6.00. 

Decimal System. A Manual for the use of 
Jewellers, Pawnbrokers Silversmiths, &c., 
with Examples of Decimal Calculations, 
Table of Value of Gold ; a Nomenclature 
for the New Troy Bullion Weights, and 
the Application to the System of Diamond 
Weights, uith Tables of any Weigbts of 
Diamonds, from -0001 oz. to 10 ozs , and 
£1 to £10 a carat, W.J.Abbott. London.' 
12mo. Muxu-etl. 3s. 6d. 

Dictionary of Engineering. Supplement to 
Spons. Division I. (To be completed iu 
tliree Divisions ) Ed. by Ernest Spon. 
Roy. 8vo, illus. Upons, New York. (Sub- 
scription.) $5.00. * 

Electricity and Magnetism, a Physical Treatise 
on. J. E. H. Gordon. London. Illus. 
Low, Marston it Vo. (Announcement.) 

Electricity as a Motive Power. W. E. Ayr- 
tuuu. Sheffield. Spojis. 

Electric Signals. With an Explanation of the 
Principles on which they are Constructed, 
and full Instructions for their Fixing and 
Maintenance, Edward Patterson. London. 
Svo, Spops. 6d. 

Electric Transmission of Power ; its present 
Position and Advantages. Paget Higgs, Cr. 
Svo. New York. E. d: F. N.'Spon. $1.20. 

Electrical Researches of the Hon, Henry 
Cavendish, F. R. S Wiilten between i77'l 
and 1781. Edited from the Original Manu- 
scripts in the possession of the DuUe of 
Devonshire, K. G., by J. Clerk Maxwell, 
F. R. S. Demy 8vo, cloth, with numerous 
Diagrams, Cam'n-idqe University Press. 18s. 

Field Book for Engineers, IVIiners, Surveyors 
and Contractors, W. Davis HaskoU. 4th 
Ed., eul. illus. Loudon. Lockwood. (An- 
nouncement.) 
.Gas-consumers Guide, hand-book of iuhtruc- 
tion on proper management and economi- 
cal use of gas; with descriijtion of uas- 
meters, and directions for ascertaining the 
consumption by meter; on ventilation, etc. 
Boston. 10 mo., Alex. Moore. $0.50, 

Gazetteer, The Imperial — . A General Dic- 
tionary of Geography — Physical, Political, 
Statistical, and Iiescriptive — including com- 
prehensive Accounts of the Countries, Cities, 
Principal Towns, Villages, Seas. Lakes, 
Rivers, Islands. Mountains, Valleys, &c.,ia 
the World. Edited by W. G. Blackie. With 
a supplement bringing the information 
down to the latest dates. Illustrated by 
nearly 800 Engravings. Two large Vols., 
including tue Supplement, imperial Svo. 
Edinbugh. Blakie di Sons. .£4 15s. 

Geology; The Utica slate and related forma- 
tions. Fossils of the Utica slate and meta- 
morphoses of triarthrus Recki, [Printed in 
advance ol V, 10. Transactions Albany In- 
stitute, June, 1879, C, D. Wolcott, Albany, 
Svo. Mansell $0.50. 



12 



Bealth; The habitation iu relation to health. 
F. S. B. Francois tie Chaimiont, M. D. 
Prof. in'Arniy Med School, Netly. London. 
8vo. Hoc. Prom. Ch. Knowledge. Is. 

.Public Health Reports and Papers. 

Vol. IV. Presented at the meetings ot the 
American Public Health Association in the 
years 1877--78. Boston. 8vo. Houghton, 
Osgood <£■ Co. 

Heat; The mechanical theory of heat. R. 
Clansius. Traus, by Walter R. Browne. 
Loudon. Cr. 8vo. ' AlacMiUan. 10s. 6d. 

Solar Light and Heat. Z. Allen, New 

York. 8V0. Applelons. $1.50. 

Hydraulic Engineering. G. R. Burnell. New 
ed. rev. and enl by D. K. Clark. (Weales 
Series.) Loudon. Crosby, Lockwood <£ Co. 
(Annouuoemeut.) 

Ice Making Machines. Ledoux, M. Ice- 
making machiues: Theory of action of va- 
rious forms of cold-prnduciug or so-called 
Ice Machines {M ichines afroid); from the 
French. Reprinted from Van Nostrand's 
Magazine. N. Y. Van Nostrai d. (Van 
Nostrand's Science ser. No. 46.) $U..iO. 

Labor-making machinery. F. P. Powers. 
New York. 12 mo. Putnam's. $0.20. 

Machinery. Appleby's illustrated Handbook of 
— Pwt IV. Machine Tools. London. Spans. 
(Announcement.) 

.Machinery and Mill Work, Manual for. W. 
J. M. Rankiue. dth ed.. rev. by W. J. Mil- 
lar. London. Post 8vo. Griffin. 128. 
6d. 

Mathematical and Physical Papers. G. G. 
Stokes, Cambridge University Press. (An- 
nouncement.) 

JMechanics R. S. Ball. New York. IGmo. 
Holt. $0.60. 

Metalliferous Minerals and Mining. D. C. 
Davies. Loudon. (Jr. 8vo, illus. Lockwood. 
12s. 6d. 

Metallurgy. Silver aud Gold. Part I. John 
Percy. London. Murray. (Annouucemeut. ) 

Meteorology. Modern. A Series of Six Lec- 
tures delivered under the auspices of the 
Meteorological Society. By Dr. Mann, F. 
R. C S., J. K. I aughtou, F. R. G. S., R. 
Strachan, Rev. W Clement Ley, .«!. A., G. 
J. Symons, F. R. S., and K. H. Scott, M. A., 
F. R. S. London. Cr. 8vo, Stanford. 4s. 
6d. 

Metric System. The Metric System of Weights 
and measures; address del. before the con- 
vocation of the Univ. of N. Y. at Albany, ' 
August 1, 1871. F. A. P. Bar ard. 3d ed., 
wiih add. aud ind. of 2.000 references. Bos- 
ton. 8 vo. .4(?i. Metric Bureau. $1.50. 

Microscopic Organizations in Cochituate 
Water. Robert White, M. D. Boston. 8vo 
illus. Alex. Moore. $0.25. 

Military Entjineering, Instruction in. Vol. 1. 
part 3. Military Bridges. Compiled at the 
Schoo, of Military Engineering. Chatham, 
3rd ed. Adjutant General's Office, Horse 
Guards. 1st August, 1879. Post 8vo. 
British Government PuM. 3s. 

Naval Architect's and Shipbuilder's Pocket 
Book of Formulpe, Rules and Tables, and 
Marine Eugineer's and Surveyors Handy 
Book of Reference. C. Mackrow, A. I. N. 
A. London. 8vo, illus. Lockwood. 12s. 6d. 

Park* and Gardens of the World. Described 
and Illustrated. New York. Imp. 4to, illus. 
Nelson d: Sons. $6.50. 

Penmanship, Ornamental. George J. Becker. 
Pliilidelvihia. 4to, 50 Plates. J. W. Queen 
d- Co. $4.00. 



Pipes and Pipe Joints in the Open Trenches, 
The Testing of, with a description ot the 
Osset Water Works. Malcolm McCulloch 
Paterson, C. E. London. 8vo, 2 plates. 
Spon. New York. $0,80. 

Plumbing. A Text-book to the Practice of 
the Art or Cratt of the Plumber, with chap- 
ters upon House Draiua^^'e, embodyiug the 
latest improvements, by W. P, Buchan. 
New ed.. rev. aud extended. 300 illus. 
(Weale'.-. Series.) Loudon. Crosby. 3s. 6d. 

Power, Manual of Power. For Machines, 
Shafts and Belts. With a History of Cotton 
Manufacture in the United States. By 
Samuel Webber, C. E. New York. 8vo. 
Appletons. $3.50. 

Kailwaya aud Locomotives. A Series of Lec- 
tures delivered at the School of Military 
Engineering, Chatham, in the year 1877. 
Railways, by Johu Wolfe Bar y, M. Inst. C. 
E. Locomotives, by K. J. Bramwell, F.R.S., 
M. lust. C. E. London. Longmans. (An- 
nouncement.) 

Railway Construction; The Science of; SirR. 
Stephens. (Weale's Series.) Loudon. 12mo. 
Lockwood. 4s. 

Scientific Terms. Dictionary of: edited by 
William Rossiter. London and New York. 
8vo, illus. Pulnams. $1.75. 

Sewage : )isposal. lutermittant Downward Fil- 
tration, per se, and iu Combinatiou with 
Surface In-igatiou. By J. Bailey Denton, M. 
Inst. C. E 1 vol, 20 pages. 8vo, jjaper. 
1872 and 1879. Spons. (New York.) $0.40. 

• Report to the Rural Sauitary Au- 
thority, Wrexham Uuion, on the Gravitat- 
ing Sewerage Scheme ( per se) intended for 
Stausty, &c. With Proposals for Sewering 
the same on " Isaac Shone's Sewerage 
System." With Plans. Loudon. 8vo. Spons, 
'2s. 

Steam and the Steam Engine— Stationary and 
Portable. Being an Extension of Mr. John 
Sewell's "Treatise ou Steam," by D. K. 
Clark, M. 1. C E. 2d ed. corrected, with 
numerous illus. (Weale's Series.) London. 
Lockwood. 

Surveys. Aid to Survey Practice, for Refer- 
ence in Surveying, Levelling, Setting-out, 
aud Route-Surveys for Travellers, with For- 
mulae Tables aud Illustrations. Ky Louia 
D'A. Jackson. Wood engraviugs aud fold- 
ing plates. London. Lockwood. (Announce- 
ment) 

Telephone, Microphone aud Phonograph. 
Count du Moncel. Authorized trans., with 
add. and cor. by author. New Y'ork. 12mo, 
illus. Harpers. $1.25. 

Terms of Art and Science. G. Bankes Brooke. 
Philadelphia. 12mo. Lippincott. $1.50. 

Tin and Tin Plates. A Short Description of 
Tin Mining and Metallurgy — A Hi.story of 
the Origin aud Progress of the Tin Plate 
Trade, and a Description of the Ancient and 
Modern Processes of Manufacturing Tin 
Plates. By P. W. Flower. Loudon. Svo, 
illus. G.lieU-d: Son. 10s. 6d. 

Tin Mining in Larut. Patrick Doyle. New 
Yoik. 8vo, illus. Spons. $1.50. 

Torpedoes and Torpedo Warfare, Offensive 
aud Defensive. Being a complete History 
of Trnpedoes and their application to Mod- 
ern Warfare. By C. Sleeman, late Lieut- 
enant R.N. and' late Commander Imperial 
Ottoman Navy. Portsmouth, Eug. Royal 
Svo, illus. aud jjlates. Griffin <£• Co. 24s. 

Tunnel Shafts: A Practical and Theoretical 
Essay on the Construction of Large Tunnel 



13 



Sbafts. B5' J. H. Watson Buck, M. Inst. C. 
E. With folding plates. London. Royal 
8vo. Lockivnnd. (Auuouucenient ) 
"Wood-Working Machinery : Its Rise, Progress 
and Construction. With Hints on the Man- 
agement of Saw Mills, and the Kcouomical 
Conversion of Timber. Illustrated with 
Examples of Keceut Designs by leading 



English, French and American Engineers* 
By M. Fowls Bale, C. E., M. I. M. E Lou- 
don. Large crown, 8vo. Lockwood. (An- 
nouncement.) 
Workshop Companion, The. A Diction- 
ary of Practical Information. John Phin. 
New York. 12mo. Industrial I'ub. Oo^ 
$0.35. 



ADDITIONS TO 



LIBRARY AND MUSEUM. 



From Administration des Ponts et 
CUausees, Paris: 
Annales October and November, 1879. 

i'rom American Chemical Society, P. 
( assamajor. Secretary, New York: 
Proceedings of the Society. Vol. 1, No. 10. 

From American Institute of Mining 
Engineers, Thomas M. Drown, Secre- 
tary, Easton, Pa. : 
Transactions, Vol. I. to VII., inclusive. 

From American Iron and Steel Associa- 
tion, James \1. Swank, Secretary, 
1 hiladelphia. Pa.: 
The Cause of our National Prosperity. An 
address to Congress by the American Iron 
and Si eel Association. 
The Wearing Qualities of American Steel 
Rails. 

From Argentine Scientific Society, Don 
Eduardo Aguirre, Secretary, Buenos 
Ay res: 
Annals ot the Society, October, November and 
December, 1879. 

From Hon. Allan Campbell, Commis- 
sioner, Dept. Public Works, New 
York : 
Report ot the Department for the quarter end- 
ing Sept. 30. Ih79. 

From Thos. Lincoln Casey, Lt. Col. 
Corps of Engineers, U. si. A., Wash- 
ington, D. C: 
Ret ort ot the Joint Commission created to 
direct and supervise the completion of the 
Washington Monument. (2 copies.) 
Letter from VV. W. Corcoran, Chairman of 
Joint Commission for the completion of the 
Washington Monument, showmg the extent 
and progress made in the work and the 
amount of money expended. 
Annual Report of Lieut. Col. Thos. Lincoln 
Casey, di-tailiug the work done toward the 
completion of the Washington Monument 
during the year ending November 30, 1879, 
tofjether with statement of moneys expend- 
ed upon the same, and two sheets of trac- 
ings, &o. 

From Civil Engineers' Club of the 
Northwest, L. P. Morehouse, Secre- 
tary, Chicago: 
Proceediugs Vol. IV. 

From Clarke, Reeves & Co., New York; 
Two framed Photographs of Metropolitan 
Elevattd Railroad at Eightli Avenue, New 
• York City. 



From the Department of the Interior, 
Washington, D. C: 
Annual Report of the Auditor of Railroad Ac- 
counts made to the Secretary of the In- 
terior, for the year ending June 30, 1879. 
From A. J. Du Bois, New Haven, Conn. :^ 
Upon a New Theory of the Retaining Wall. 
A. J. Du Bois, Ph. D. Philadelphia. 1879. 
From J. Lawrence Smith, Louisville: 
Intei'-Oceanic Canal. Practicability of the Dif- 
ferent Routes and Questionable Nature of 
the interest of the United States in a C<inal. 
J. Lawrence Smith, Louisville, 1879. 
(Copies for distribution.) 

From Bryant Godwin, New York: 
Proceedings of the Special Committee on 
Railroads appointed under a Resolution of 
the Assembly to investigate alleged abuses 
iu the management of railroads chartered 
by the State of New York. Eleven parts. 
From Julius E. Hilgard, Assistant in 
charge. United states Coast Survey, 
Washington, D. C: 
Methods and Hesults; on a chart of the Mag- 
netic Declination in the United States. 
(Copies for distribution.) 
Methods and Results; Standards of Measure 
of the United States compared with those of 
Great Britain and France. (Copies for dis- 
tribution.) 

From Institution of Civil Engineers, 
James Forrest, Secretary, London: 
Excerpt from Minutes of Proceedings. Edited 

by James Forre»t. 
Report of Proceedings at the Annual General 

Mertiug, held December 23, 1879. 
Cushing's Reversible Level. Edward H. 

Courtney. 
La Corbiere Lighthouse, Jersey. Imbrie 

Bell. 
Experiments on the Resistance to Horizontal 
Stress of Timber Piling. John W. Sande- 
min. 
Brief account of the Woosung Railway. Rich- 
ard O. Rapier. 

From Institution of Mechanical En- 
gineers. Walter R. Browne, Secre- 
tary, London: 
Proceediugs. Glasgow meeting, August, 

1879. 
First Report of Prof. W. C. Unwin to the Sub- 
committee of the Institute on the form of 
Riveted Joints. (2 copies.) 

From MM. E Lavoinue and E. 
Pontzeu, Paris : 



14 



Xes Chemins de fer en Ameriqne. One 
volume Text and two atlases of plates. 

FroDi McGill University. Henry T. 
Bovey, Dean of the Faculty of Ap- 
plied Science, Montreal, Canada: 
Annual Calendar and Examination Papers, 
1879-80. 

From Midland Institute of Mining, 
Civil and Mechanical Engineers, 
Joseph Mitchell, Secretarj', Barnsley, 
England: 
Transactions. October and November, 1879. 
From Prof. Simon Newcomb, Supt. 
American Ephemeris, Washington, 
D. C. : 
The American Ephemeris and Nautical Alma- 
nac for 1882. 

From New York Meteorological Obser ■ 

vatory, Department Public Parks, 

Daniel Draper, Director, Central 

Park, New York: 

Abstract from Self-Recording Instruments. 

November, 1879. 
Annual Report of the Director for year ending 
Dec. 31, 1878. 

From Joseph Nimmo, Jr., Chief of 
Bureau of Statistics, Washington, 
D. C: 
Annual Report of the Chief of Bureau ol Stat- 
istics on the Foreit^u Commerce of the 
United States fur the year ending June 30, 
1879. 

From North of England Institute of 

Mining and Mechanical Engineers, 

Theo. Wood Bunning, Secretary, 

Ne\vca.stle-on-Tyne, England : 

List of Members. Rules, Barometer Readings, 

Index, Vol. XXVItl., &c. 
Transactions. Septemlier and October, 1879. 
From Charles I aine. Gen. Supt. L. S, 
and M. S. R. R., Cleveland, Ohio : 
Seventh Annual Report of the Commissioner 
of Railroads ot the State of Michigan, for 
the year ending Dec. 31, 1878. Lansing, 
1879. 
Thirty-second Report of the Ohio State Board 
of Agriculture, with an aVjstract of the rro- 
ceedings ( f the County Agricultural Societies 
to the General Assembly of Ohio, for the 
year 1877: Columbus, 1878. 
Michigan Railroads. Comparative Summary 
from returns for 1877 ard 1878, showing 
percentages of increase and decrease. 

From the Publishers Revue Generale 
des Chemins de fer, Edgar [Monjean, 
Secretary, Paris : 
Revue Generale des Chemins de fer. Septem- 
ber and October, 1879. 

From Charles Ward Raymond, New 
York : 
Four Photographs of the Metropolitan Ele- 
vated Railroad at 110th St. and Eighth Ave., 
New York City. 

From Francis Rinecker, Wuei'zburg, 
Germany : 
Oeconomie im Briicken-Maurwerk. F. Ein- 
ecker. 

From Royal United Service Institution, 
Capt. B. Burgess, Secretary, London: 
Journal of the Institution. Vol. XXIII. No. 
ClI. 

From Thomas C. Rnggles, New York : 
Annual Address of the President of the New 



York Produce Exchange, with accompanying 
Documents, May 27, 1879. 

From Thomas S. Sedgwick, Washing- 
ton, D. C: 
The Compressed Asphalt Block Pavement. 
Its Uses. Merits, and mode of Manufacture. 
(3 Copies. ) 

From Societe des Ingenleurs Civils, M. 
Mallett. Secretary, Paris : 
Memoires de la Societe. September and 
October, 1879. 

From St. Louis Public School Library, 

Fred. M. Crunden, Librarian, St. 

Louis : 

Bulletin of the Library. List of Additions. 

January to June, and July to August, 1879. 

From Joseph W. Turtle, Newark, N. J. : 

Congressional Directory, Forty-sixth Congress 

(Second Session). Corrected to December 

6, 1879. » 

From United States Light House Board, 
Washington, D. C: 
List of Beacons, Buoys, Stakes, Spindles, and 
all other Day Marks in the Second Light 
House District. Corrected to July 1, 1879. 
(2 Copies.) 
List ol Beacons, Buoys, Stakes and other Day 
Marks in the Eighth Light House District. 
Corrected to December 31, 1879. (2 Copies). 
List of Beacons, Buoys, Stakes. Spindles, and 
other Day Marks in the Twelfth Light 
House District. Corrected to December 31, 
1879. (2 Copies.) 

F^rom United States Naval Observatory, 
WashinHtou, U. C. : 
Narrative of the Second Artie Expedition 
made by Charles F. Hall. Prof. J. E. 
Nourse, U. S. N. Washington, 1879. 

From Welton and Bonnett, Waterbury, 
Conn. : 
Thirteenth Report of the Board of Water 
Commissioners of the City of Waterbury, 
Conn., Ijec. 31, 1879. 

From John Wiley & Sons, New York : 
Experiments on the Strength of Wrought 
Iron and of Cha n Cables. Commander L. 
A. Beardslee, U. S. N. Edited by Wm. 
Kent. 

From Gen. G. K. Warren, Corps of 

Engineers, U. S. A , Newport. R. I.: 

Report on Bridging the Mississippi between 

St. Paul, Minn., and St. Louis, Mo. Gen. 

G. K. Warren. Washington, 1878. (Copies 

for distribution.) 

From Gen. Horatio G. Wright, Chief of 
Engineers, U. S. A., Washington, 
D. C. : 

Report of Board of Engineers in relation to 
bridge over Detroit River, &c. 

Reports of Survey of Chattahoochee, Etowah 
and Duck Rivers. Maj. W. R King. 

Reports of Surveys of i owlitz River, Wash- 
ington Territory and Umpqua River and 
Ahsea Harbor and Bar, Oregon ; also a Survey 
of Bar at mouth of Columbia River. Maj. 
G. L. Gillespie. 

Report ef Survey of Cuivre River Missouri. 
Capt. A. Mackenzie. 

Special Reijort touching progress made in 
building north wing edifice for use of the 
Department of State, War and the Navy, &c. 
Lt.-Col. Thos. Lincoln Casey. 

Reports of Moose-a-bec Bar, Cathance River 
Jonesport, Me., and of the outlet of Lake 



15 



Winnepesaukee, New Hiimpsbire. Col. 
(ieorge Thorn. 

Eeports relatiuo; to a harbor of refuge at en- 
trance to Portage Lake and Lake Superior 
Ship Canal and Bayfield and Ashland 
Harbors. Wisconsin, and Manistique Kiver, 
Mich. Maj. H. M. Robert. 

Keport of Survey of Falls on Red River, la., 
and of Black River. Ark., and ot Tchula 
Lake and Yallabusha River, Miss. Maj. 
W. H. H. Benyaurd. 

Kejjort giving an account of the construction 
of a sluiceway at the Falls of St. Anthony, 
Minn., and urging the importance of im- 
mediate i-epairs to the apron built by the 
Gi)verumeut of the United States for the 
pi'eservatiou of the Falls. Capt. C. J. Allen. 

Kecommendatious for a special appropriation 
for the improvement of theTenessee River. 
Maj. W. R. King. (2 Copies.) 

Report of Survey to estimate the damage 



done to the Town of Venice, 111., by reason 
of the Government improvements on ther 
Mississippi River. Col. J. H. Simpson. 

Letter Irom W. W. Corcoran, Chairman of 
Joint Commission for the completion of 
the Washington Monument, showing the 
extent and progress made in the work, and 
the amount of moneys expended. (Several 
copies.) 

Surveys of Waukegan Harbor, HI., and Oconto 
and Wolf Rivers, Wisconsin. Maj. D. C. 
Houston. (2 copies.) 
From other sources : 

The Interoceanic Canal. Count Ferdinand de 
Lesseps. North American Review for 
January, 1880. 

The Library Journal, Vol. IV., Nos 11 and 
12. 

Annual Report of the State Engineer and 
Surveyor on the Canals of the State of New 
York for 1877. 



ANNOUNCEMENTS. 



The Twelfth Annual Convention of the So- 
ciety will be held at St. Louis during the week 
beginning May 24th, 1880. The local com- 
mittee at St. Louis is already engaged in 
preparation, and is in correspondence with 
the Secretary as to the details, which will be 
announced by circular to the members of the 
Society. 

After the meeting of the Society of Febru- 
ary 26th, at which M. de Lesseps and the 
engineers accompanying him took part in the 
discussions on the subject of Inter-Oceanic 
Canal Projects, a reception was given to 
these gentlemen by subscribing members. 
This reception was in the hall attached to the 
Theatre of the Union League Club and gave 
a pleasant opportunity to the members pres- 
ent and their Iriends of personally meeting 
M. de Lesseps and his associates, who had 
just returned from the Isthmus of Panama. 
All these gentlemen were present, including 
Mr. J. Dirks, Engineer of the Waterstaat of 
Holland, and of the canal from Amsterdam to 
the sea, Mr. V. Dauzats, Engineer of the Suez 
Caual, Mr. Edmond Boutan, Engineer of the 
Corps of Mines, Lieut.-Com. L. N. B. Wyse, 
Mr. A. Couvreux/fe, and others. 

The American Institute of Mining Engi- 
neers held its Annual Meeting on February 



17th, 1880, at the House of the American So- 
ciety of Civil Engineers in New York. 

The following resolution was adopted at 
the Ninth Annual Convention of the Society, 
and ordered printed regularly in the Society 
publications : 

Whereas, the metric system of weights and 
measures is no.v extensively used abroad, 
and whereas it is desirable that the relation 
of the units of differing systems be made 
familiar to all by comparison : 

Resolved, That members be requested, in 
papers hereafter presented to the Society, to 
Ntite, in parenthesis, weights or dimensions 
by the metric system, in connection with 
those of the system in general use. 

The House of the Society is at 104 East 
Twentieth street, one door east from Fourth 
avenue, and near the southwest corner of 
Graraercy Park. It is open from nine o'clock 
A.M. to five o'clock P.M. each business day, 
except Saturday, when it is closed at three 
o'clock P.M. 

The Library and Conversation Rooms will 
also, lor the present, be open every Thursday 
evening, from 732 to 10 p.m. Members are 
invited to avail themselves of the oppor- 
tunities afforded on Thursday evenings, both 
for consultation of books and periodicals and 
for conversation. 



16 

LIST OF MEMBERS. 



ADDITIONS. 
HONORARY MEMBERS. 



Date of Election. 

Wright, Horatio G Chief of Engineers, Brig, and Bv't 

Maj.-Gen'l U. S. A., Washington, 

j)_ C March 3, 1880. 

members. 

Chaphe, Andrew J Chief Mechanical Engineer St. Louis 

Water Works, St. Louis, Mo February 4, 1880.. 

MoORE, Charles E 6 Kellogg Street, Syracuse, N. Y. . . January 7, 1880. 

associate. 
Wheaton, Edward Naragansett Hotel, Providence, R. I. February 4, 1880, 



changes and corrections, 
members. . 

JUDSON John A (Frank B. Porter & Co.) Bellevue Ave., Newport, R. L 

RiNECKER, Francis Civil Engineer, Rieneck, Bavaria. 

ScoviLL, E. Tracy Ass't Engineer Northern Pacific Railroad, Walla 

Walla, Washington Territory. 

Stephens, Clinton F Chief Engineer Texas and St. Louis Railroad, Te.xar- 

kana. Ark. 
Warfield, Albert G.,Jr. .508 Second St., San Francisco, Cal. 

junior. 

Cornell, George B Ass't Engineer Brooklyn Elevated Railroad, 31 Fulton 

St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 



resignation. 
Brown Robert N Elected member Dec. i, 1852. Resigned Feb. 21, 1S80. 



DE.'VTH. 

Thompson, John C Elected member May 18, 1870. Died Jan. 17, iS 



Jmerkait nmid of |;tiil l^'n^mm 



FROOEEDINQS 



Vol. VI.— March, I 



MINUTES OF MEETINGS, 

{Abstractor such as may be of general interest to members.) 



OF THE SOCIETY. 

March 3d, 1880. — The Society met at 8 p. m. Vice-President 
Ohanute in the chair. The discussion upon the subject of Inter-Oceanic 
Canal j^rojects was I'esumed. 

M. J. Dirks, Engineer of the Waterstaat, of Holland, read a paper 
in reference to the prices fixed by the Paris Congress for various kinds 
of work on the proijosed canal at Panama, giving reasons why they were 
not considered too low. He also, in answer to questions, presented 
details of the results of examinations made on the line of the proposed 
canal by the Engineers recently returned from the Isthmus. 

M. A. Couvreux fils, gave an interesting account of the various steps 
in the conduct of the enterprise by M. de Lesseps and others for secur- 
ing full information as to the proposed canal, including the preliminary 
operations in France, and the subsequent work on the Isthmus, giving 
detailed information as to the organization of the parties making the 
survey and of their work on the line between the two oceans. 

Mr. Ashbel Welch presented considerations as to the question of the 
relative economy of a canal with or without locks. 



18 

The appointment as Honorary Member of the Society of General H. 
G. Wright, Chief of Engineers, U. S. Army, was announced. 

Ballots for admission to membership were canvassed, and the follow- 
ing were declared elected : as Members, Thomas S. Anderson, Green- 
ville, Miss. ; Anthony H. Blaisdell, St. Louis, Mo. ; Morris M. Defrees, 
Indianapolis, Ind. ; William H. Greenwood, Denver, Col. ; William H. 
Heuer, Captain Corps of Engineers, U. S. A. , Key West, Fla. ; Robt. E. 
McMath, St. Louis, Mo. ; Isaac Newton, New York ; Robert A. Shailer, 
Wilmington, Del. ; Charles A. Sweet, Syracuse, N. Y. ; Christopher C. 
Waite, Zanesville, O. As Associate, Joseph W. Putnam, New Orleans, 
La. 

Maech 17th, 1880.— The Society met at 8 p. m. President Fink in 

the chair. 

Mr. Charles Macuonald presented a paper in continuation of the dis- 
cussion on Inter-Oceanic Canal Projects, and the subject was further 
discussed by Messrs. Welch, Chanute, J. C. Campbell, Prindle and 
Bogart, 



MEMOIRS OF DECEASED MEMBERS. 



UEORGE W. EDGE,* Member A. S. C. E. 

Died Janx'aey J^st, 1880. 

Mr. Edge was born in Jersey City, New Jersey, February 22d, 1811, 
and died January 1st, 1880. His parents were Isaac and Frances Edge, 
who settled in Jersey City in the year 1804. 

Mr. Edge became a member of the American Society of Civil Engi- 
neers June 11th, 1874. 

Early in life Mr. Edge studied and became an expert in the science 
of chemistry, which afterwards, in his business as a gas engineer, was 
of great service to him. In the year 1852 he was waited upon by parties 
owning the gas works in Jersey City, and asked to become their manager 
and engineer. After many misgivings as to his ability to manage a gas 
works, he accepted the proposal and entered upon the duties, which 
only ceased with his life. 

When Mr. Edge commenced his labors as a gas engineer, clay retorts 
were not used in this country, the retorts being of cast-iron set in 
benches of threes, and supported on bars of cast-iron, in some cases 
extending entirely across the bench, in other settings the bearing bars 
extended from a brick pier carried up to the necessary height, and were 

* Committee to prepare memoir, Eugene Vanderpool, James H. Armington. 



10 

placed under one retort only. Plates of cast-iron were used to protect 
the batteries of the retorts from the heat, and the whole arrangement of 
the bench was in a crude state. The works were found entirely out of 
order, and the supply of gas to the cousiimers was very irregular. This 
state of affairs was very unpleasant to Mr. Edge and not profitable to 
the company. Mr. Edge's ingenious mind soon devised a plan of relief 
from this condition, and as soon as the necessary material could be pro- 
cured he energetically had carried out alterations and improvements 
which prevented any future difficulty in the supjily of gas to the con- 
sumers. At the same time the improvements were a source of much 
profit to the company. During the time that Mr. Edge Avas engaged as 
a manager of gas wor^ his mind was constantly occupied with plans for 
the improvement of tlie apparatus used, and for a more perfect system 
for the economical production and distribution of gas. 

The results of his stiidy he practically applied, and it is not too 
much to say that many gas engineers in this country have been 
instructed by advising with him. It is certain that many companies, 
both in this country and abroad, have profited by the use of apparatus 
designed and improved by him. 

Mr. Edge was always ready to impart his knowledge to others, and 
it seemed to give him much pleasure to meet with those of his profes- 
sion, and to speak and advise in reference to the theory and practice of 
the manufacture of gas. 

Mr. Edge's modest estimate of his abilities, as evinced by his dif- 
fidence in accepting the position of the engineer of the Jersey City Gas 
Company, and of other positions that were forced upon him, was a 
characteristic trait of the man, fully recognized by his friends. He was 
a man of marked ability, but extremely modest in claiming recognition 
for his inventions and services. 

Mr. Edge was not only widely known as a gas engineer, but was 
known at home, in Jersey City, as a leading man, a good citizen, a warm 
friend, and wise counsellor. He has left an enviable reputation as a 
consolation for his relatives and friends. 



ANNOUNCEMENTS. 



The Twelfth Annual Convention of the The followiug is a list of topics to be con- 
Society will be held at St. Louis, Mo., begin- sidered with reference to papers published in 
ning Taesday, May 25th, 1880. Transactions during the preceding year : 

Sessions for the consideration of profes- CLXXV. (Jan. 1879.) The Flow of Water in 

sional subjects, and one for the transaction of small Channels, after Ganguillet and Kut- 

business, will be held. ter, with Kutter's Diagi-am modified, and 

The details of the programme will be an- Graphical Tables ivith special reference to 

nounced as soon as determined by the local Sewer Calculations.— E. Bering, 

committee. CLXXVI. (Jan.) The permanent Way of 



20 



Railways in Great Britain and Ireland, with 
especial referenoe to the use of Timber, 
Preserved and Unpreserved, Compiled from 
information received from Engineers in 
charge of those Railways.— John Bogart. 
CLXXVII. (Feb.) Experiments on the Re- 
sistances of Rolling Stock. Made under the 
direction of Charles Paine.— A. M. Welling- 
ton. 
CLXXVIII. (March.) Light-house Engineer- 
ing as displayed at the Centennial Exhibi- 
tion.— John G. Barnard. 
CLXXIX. (April.) Minot's Ledge Light- 
house. — B. S. Alexander. 
CLXXX. (May.) The Construction and Main- 
tenance of Roads —Edward P. Kortli. 
CLXXXI. (June.) Flexure and Transverse 

Resistance of Beams.— Charles E. Emery. 
CLXXXII. (July.) On the Flow of Water In 

Rivers. — De Volson Wood. 
CLXXXIII. (Aug.) The South Pass Jetties. 
Notes on the Consolidation and Durability 
of the Works, with a description of the Con- 
crete Blocks and other Constructions of the 
last year. — Max E. Schmidt. 
CLXXXIV. (Sepl.) The Ocean Pier at Coney 

Island.— Charles Macdonald. 
CLXXXV. (Sept.) Stability of Stone Struc- 
tures.— William H. Searles. 
CLXXXVI. (Oct.) The Use of Steel for 

Bridges. — Theodore Cooper. 
CLXXXVII. (Oct.) The Construction of the 
Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railroad 
over the Raton Mountains, and the Per- 
formance of Locomotives on its Steep 
Grades.— James D. Burr. 
CLXXXVIII. (Nov.) Inter-Oceanic Canal 

Projects. — A. G. Menocal. 
January, February, March, 1880. — Inter- 
Oceanic Canal Projects, by Walton W. Evans, 
Frederick M. Kelley, Charles A. Sweet, John 
C. Campbell, Charles D. Ward, Nathan Ap- 
pleton, S. F. Shelbourne, Max E. Schmidt, 
Thomas J. Long, Edward P. North, Ashbel 
Welch, Julius W. Adams, F. de Lesseps, J. 
Dirks, V. Dauzats. 

Also papers in continuation of the discus- 
sion on luter-Oceanic Canal Projects, by A. 
Couvreux^is, Charles Macdonald, and others, 
will be printed before the date of the Con- 
vention. 

CLXXXIX. (March.) Engineering Problems 
Involved in the Proposed Improvement of 
the Erie Canal, by Increasing the Depth of 
its Channel One Foot. By ji. Sweet, Jr. 
The following papers also will be printed 
and ready for distribution before the time of 
the Convention : 



Note on Kutter's Diagram. By Charles H. 

Swan. 
The New York and Brooklyn Bridge Ap- 
proaches and Superstructure. By F. 
Collingwood. 
Experiments with Apparatus for Testing 
Cements, by Alfred Noble, with discussion 
on testing cement by F. Collingwood, D. 
W. Cunningham, C. Latimer, F.O. Norton, 
F Rinecker, W. Sooy Smith, D. J. Whitte- 
more. 
Design and Construction Table for Egg- 
shaped Sewers. By C. G. Force. 
The Preservation of Timber. By J. W. 

Putnam. 
On the Variation due to Orthogonal Strains 
in the Elastic Limit in Metals, and on its 
Practical Value and more important appli- 
cations. By R. H. Thurstoa. 
Members of the Society are earnestly re- 
quested to furnish information or memoranda 
upon any of the subjects referred to. They 
are also invited and expected to take part in 
the discussions, either in person or by send- 
ing to the Secretary notes for presentation. In 
either case it will assist the committee in ar- 
ranging the details for sessions of the Con- 
vention, if members expecting to take part in 
the discussions will notify the Secretary at 
once to that efl'ect. 

Excursions by river and by rail from St. 
Louis are contemplated, and the arrange- 
ments for them are in progress. The Secre- 
tary is instructed to state that it is permissible 
that members of the Society should be accom- 
panied by their families. 

Under the rule adopted by the Society in 
referenoe to invitations to Conventions, the 
members of other engineering organizations; 
also the editors of professional journals ex- 
changing with this Society will be invited to 
attend the Convention and the Excursions 
connected therewith. 

The details of arrangements are now being 
perfected, and will soon be announced. 

Please notify the Secretary whether you 
will attend the Convention, and whether you 
will present a paper or take part in special dis- 
cussions. 

The following resolutions were adopted at 
the Ninth Annual Convention of the Society, 
and ordered printed regularly in the Society 
publications : 

Whereas, the metric system of weights and 
measures is no.v extensively used abroad, 
and whereas it is desirable that the relation 
of the units of the differing systems be made 
familiar to all by comparison : 



'21 

Eesolvecl, That members be requested, in except Satiu'day, wben it is closed at three 

papers hereafter presented to the Society, to o'clock p.m. 
write, in parenthesis, weights or dimensions 

by the metric system, in counection with The Library and Conversation Rooms will 

tliose of the system in general nse. also, for the present, be open every Thursday 

The House of the Society is at 104 East ew.ning, from 7}^ to 10 p.m. Members are 

Twentieth street, one door east from Fourth invited to avail themselves of the oppor- 

avenue, and near tbe southwest corner of tuuities afforded on Thursday evenings, both 

Gramercy Park. It is open from nine o'clock for consultation of books and periodicals and 

A.M. to five o'clock P.M. each business day, for conversation. 



LIST OF MEMBERS. 



ADDITIONS. 
MEMBERS. 



Dale of Election. 

Blaisdell, Anthony H.. . .U. S. Assistant Engineer, 1351 Wash- 
ington. Avenue, St. Louis, Mo. . . .March 3, 1880. 

CiiAriiE, Andrew J. Chief Mechanical Engineer, Water 

Works, St. Louis, Mo February 4, 1880. 

McMath, Robert E U. S. Assistant Engineer, 404 Mar- 
ket St., St. Louis, Mo March 3, 18S0. 

Newton, Isaac Engineer, Kemble Coal and Iron 

Co., P. O. Box 157, iNew York 

City, N. Y March 3, 1880. 

Sweet, Charles A Syracuse, N. Y " " 

Van Brocklin, Martin Chief Engineer, Tehuantepec Rail- 
road, Coatzacoalcos, Mexico January 7, 1880. 



changes and corrections. 

members. 

Harrod, Benjamin M Member Mississippi River Commission, New Orleans, 

La. 

Hayward, James A U. S. Engineer's Office, Box 900, Galveston, Texas. 

Menocal, Aniceto G Civil Engineer, U. S. N!, Managua, Nicaragua. 

Pettit, Robert E Principal Ass't Engineer, Penna. Railroad, Altoona, Pa, 



22 

CHANGES AND CORRECTIONS. 
MEMBERS. 

Rice, Edward C Chief Engineer, Louisville, New Albany and St. Louis 

Railway, 3649 Baker Ave., St. Louis, Mo. 

Rockwell, Samuel Boreel Building, 115 Broadway, Room 84, New York 

City, N. Y. 

RoTCH, William New Bedford, Mass. 

associate. - 
Ford, Arthur L Care Panama RR. Co., 37 Wdl St., N. Y. City, N. Y. 



^inericHn .pcicfg of :(j;uil l^njiniJi^rn. 



T ^ 



PROOEEDINaS. 



Vol. VI.— April, 1880. 



MINUTES (JF MEETINQS 

(Abstract of such as may be of general interest to members.) 



OF THE SOCIETY. 

April 7th, 1880. — The Society met at 8 p. m. Vice President 
Channte in the chair. B illots for admission to membership were can- 
vassed and the following declared elected : as Members, George S. Field, 
of New York ; Lorenzo M. Johnson (elected Junior, March 3d, 1875), of 
St. Louis, Mo. ; Henry G. Morse, of Youngstown, O. ; Horatio Seymour, 
Jr. (elected Associate, Jan. 8th, 1873), of Albany, N. Y'". ; Charles A, 
Smith, of St. Louis, Mo.— as Junior, George H. Pegram, of St. 
Louis, Mo. 

A discussion on the subject of Inter-Oceanic Canal projects by T. C. 
Clarke was, in the absence of the author, read by the Secretary. A 
letter on the same subject from Lt. -Commander L. N. B. Wyse was also 
read, and discussion followed by Geo. W. Dresser and O. Chanute. 

A paper on the Variation due to Orthogonal Strains in the Elastic 
Limit in Metals, and on its Practical Value and more important a^iplica- 
tions, by R. H. Thurston, was, in the absence of the author, read by the 
Secretary and discussed by Robert Briggs. 



24 

MEMOIRS OF DECEASED MEMBERS. 

ALFRED WINGIATE CRAVEN, Past President, A. S. C. E. 

Died Makch 27th, 1879. 

Alfred Wingate Craven, the second son of Tunis Craven, was born at 
the Washington, D. C, Navy-yard, October 20th, 1810. The family had 
been long connected with the navy. His grandfather. Commodore 
Tingey, was then in charge of this yard, and later his elder brother, the 
present Admiral T. T. Craven, and. younger brother, Capt. T. A, M. 
Craven, who Avent down in command of the " Tecumseh " at the battle of 
Mobile Bay, adopted the naval profession. By the regulations of the 
service the family was transferred to the navy-yard at Portsmouth, 
N. H., and Alfred was sent to school at Exeter and Berwick, and when 
about thirteen years old was entered at Yale College. His connection 
with the college was severed after about one year, and he was then 
entered at Columbia College, and there graduated. 

After leaving college he studied law, was admitted to the bar, and 
opened an office in the City of New York. This profession he soon left 
for the more congenial out-door life of the Civil Engineer. 

From December, 1835, till about the same date of the following year 
he was engaged in the surveys and construction of the Mad Eiver Eail- 
road in Ohio. From Ohio he went to South Carolina, and was engaged 
three years on the Louisville, Cincinnati & Charleston Railroad, on sur- 
veys and construction, having sole charge of the first division of that 
road from its commencement to its completion. 

He then became an assistant of Major G. W. Whistler on the Boston 
& Albany Eaih'oad, and was transferred thence to the post of First As- 
sistant on the Central Division of the Erie Eailway, where he continued 
till the work was suspended in 1842. 

He was next engaged on the Mohawk & Hudson Railroad as First 
Assistant and afterwards as Chief Engineer in the change of location and 
removal of the inclined planes at Schenectady and Albany, which posi- 
tion he left in consequence of his refusal to assent to management which 
he considered inconsistent with i^rofessional honor. 

He next took charge of the construction of the wharves, docks and 
basins of the Beading Eailroad on the Delaware Eiver. From there he 
was transferred to the position of Chief Engineer of the Schuylkill Val- 
ley Eailroad, to which was soon after added the duties of the same 
position of the Mine Hill Navigation & Eailroad Company, both of which 
he completed and took charge of, till the health of his family necessitated 
a removal to a mnre southerly climate, when he resigned and took charge 
of the work on the Camden Branch in South Carolina. Having finished 
this work, he was offered tiie charge of the Columbia ct Charlotte Eail- 



25 

road, but declined, returned to the City of New York, and received 
the appointment of Chief Engineer and Commissioner of the Croton 
Aqueduct Department, July 17, 1849. His experience in construction 
enabled him to bring into practice in this department a system of hydrau- 
lic constructions which have become models of this kind of work for the 
profession. Mr. Craven brought to his new position a wonderful 
physique, an intimate understanding of men, great executive ability and 
uncompromising honesty. Daring his administration of this office the 
water service was much extended, the large receiving reservoir in the 
Central Park was built, surveys of the w^ater-shed of the Croton were 
made, the large catch-basin at Boyd's Corner commenced, and the in- 
troduction of the large main and the pumping engine at High Bridge 
were contracted for. The sewers were transferred to the Croton Depart- 
ment, and the present system of sewers inaugurated. Eeservoirs on 
Blackwell and Ward's Island were built, with pipe-services from the city. 
He continued in the duties of this office, under varied political organiza- 
tions, with credit to himself and to the benefit of the city, till May 1st, 
1868, when he resigned, and with his family made an extended tour 
through Europe. 

While occupying the position of Chief Engineer of the Croton De- 
partment it may be said that there was hardly any important scheme for 
the supply of water to cities and towns in which his advice was not 
asked, either officially or by his engineer friends in charge of the works, 
and the latter were under many obligations to him for the prompt and 
extended replies which he gave them. He was the Consulting Engineer 
of the Brooklyn Water-works, made a report on water- works for the City 
of Augusta, Ga., reported on and constructed water- works at Savannah, 
Ga., was Consulting Engineer for the construction of a quarantine hos- 
pital. Advisory Engineer to the Department of Public Charities and 
Correction, to the Fire Department, Eifle Eange Association and 
Yacht Club; in fact, with regard to anything of public interest in the 
city, his advice was always asked, and his influence considered of the 
utmost importance. His resignation was regretted as " a loss to the city 
of one of the most capable, upright and useful public officers ever con- 
nected with any department of the city government." 

On his return from Europe Mr. Craven opened an office in this city 
as a Consulting Engineer, and became one of the Commissioners on the 
Fourth Avenue Eailroad Improvement, Chief Engineer of the Syracuse 
Water-works, Consulting Engineer of the Newark and Brooklyn Water- 
works and the Gilbert Elevated Eailroad. 

Failing in health, he went to England in April, 1878, where his 
disease was further developed, and he died at Ohiswick, of cerebral soft- 
ening, March 27th, 1879. 

Few men in this country have occupied a larger si3ace in the engi- 
neering profession, and very few have contributed so much to give char- 



26 



acter and standing to it as a profession. He was identified witli t le very 
first efforts to form an American Society of Civil Engineers, and attended 
a meeting of Engineers in Angusta, Ga., by whom a call was made or 
a convention at Baltimore, Feb. 13, 1839, to form an Engineer Society 
He was among the first to form the present American Society of UvU 
Engineers, in 1852, and at the reorganization in 1868 became one of is 
Directors, and was President of the Society from November, 1869, till 

November, 1871. 

To conclude, a very fair estimate of the character ot Mr Craven may 
be drawn from an extract of a communication of his to the New York 
Tribune, on an attempt by the Common Council to have some se^^r 
work paid for, which the Croton Department would not accept, as tlie 
contract had not been complied Avith: 

«' As Chief Engineer and one of the heads of this Department, I am 
placed here in charge of certain interests of the property holders and 
people generally of this city. If by any illegal or corrupt act injustice 
be clone to them in any matter in the most remote degree connected with 
this Department, I deem it due to them and myself not o be content 
with the mere requisition of the law, but to perform my full duty in t he 
protection of their rights and in the preservation of the integrity of the 
Department on which they rely; and I ,\o ^o with a full sense of my re- 
sponsibilUies, persoKnlly ami officialhj." _ 

The key-note of his character was his outspoken convictions with 
a full sense of his personal and official obligations. Hohlmg what is 
<leemed by many a political office, and almost always in party affiliations 
opposed to the dominant party in the city, he secured their esteem aiid 
maintained his position and the integrity and character of his De- 
partment. Among his old friends he was designated as the Bayard 
of the Engineer profession." 



ADDITIONS TO 

LIBRABY AND MUSEUM. 



..o.. AmeHcan Acadexny of Arts and A ^ew ^^^^l^^^^^J^^Tt 'I 

Sciences, Boston : „ . t R.,vn,,iTul 

Proceedings. Vol. VIL NewSer.es Parti. ,«;^^J^ j^'^celreest Journal Bearing. J. C 

From May, 1879. to December. Ib79. mu .Ir. 

From American Chemical Society. P. ^j^^' -^^^ ^f patiaue and Refreshment of 

Cassamajor, Secretary, New York : Metals. Dr. Thomas E^'leston. 

Journal of the Society. Vol. I. No. 11. Silver Islet. Thomas Maofarlaud. 

From American Institate of Mining A^jerican Iron and Steel Associa 

Engineers.^ Div^rbomas M. oro«n, ^.^^ ^^^^^^ ^^ Swank, Secretary 

A new Afr! Wr^ssor. "eI GyW^°^,SPJ.lf j"-y:. ^emoh^of"Henry''c^Carey, read before th< 

Atmospheric OxidaUon or Weathenng ot ^ g^„° ^Jg^.i^ty of Pennyslvania. Phila 

Coal. Dr. James P. Kiniball „.,,„_ delnhia Jan. 5, 1880. William Elder. 

The new Coalfield of West Virginia. S. Fisher ^ ^elphia J^an.^.,^i« ^^.^^ ^^^ ^^^^ ^^^ ^^^ 

Morris. 



Mauufacturera, at a hearing before the 
Ways auil Means Committee of the House 
of Representatives, at Washington, Feb. 3, 
i and 5, 1880. 

From George D. Ausley, City Surveyor, 
Montreal: 
Keport of the City Surveyor of the various 
works executed by the Road Department of 
the City of Montreal during tbe year 1879. 
From Argentine Scientific Society. Don 
Eduardo Aguirre, Secretary, Buenos 
Ayres. 
Annals of the Society. January, 1880. 
From Nathan Appletou, Boston: 
Consideration of the Inter-Oceanic Canal Pro- 
jects. How American Interests vpere mis- 
represented. M. de Lesseps and his oppo- 
nents. N. Appleton, in Supplement of 
Boston Herald. 

From John W. Bacon, Danbury, Conn. 

Biennial Report of the Commissioners of 
Transportation of the State of California for 
1877 and 1878. 

Twenty-seventh Annual Report of the Rail- 
road Commissioners of Connecticut, 1879. 

Second Annual Report of the Board of Rail- 
road Commissioners of the State of Iowa, 
1879. 

Report of Railroad Commissioners of the 
State of Maine for 1879. 

Report of the Commissioners on Railroads of 
Michigan for 1877 and 1878. 

Annual Report of the Railroad Commissioner 
of the State of Wisconsin for 1877-1878. 
From Wm. S. Barbour, City Engineer, 
Camhridgeport, Mass. 

Report of the Special Committee on the Water 
Supply of the City of Cambridge, Mass. 
December, 1879. 

From Charles E. Billin, Philadelphia : 

Dephosphorization of Iron. F. Gautier. (3 
coijies.) 

From Board of Supervisors of San Fran- 
cisco, San Francisco, Cal. 
Municipal Reports of the City of San Fran- 
cisco tor fiscal year 1878-79. 

From Boston Society of Civil Engineers. 
George S. Rice, Secretary, Boston. 
Constitution and By-Laws, List of Members, 

Committees, &c., of the Society, 
Reports ot Proceedings— September, October, 
November and December, 1879, January and 
February, 1880. 

From Boston Public Library. Mellen 
Chamberlain, Librarian, Hoston. 
Bulletin of the Library. January, 1880. 

From Bureau of Education, Washing- 
ton, D. C: 
Circulars of the Bureau, No. 5, 1979.— Ameri- 
can Education, as described by the French 
Commission to the International Ezhibition, 
1876. 

From J. Vincent Brown, Quebec, Can- 
ada; 
Keport of Quebec Railway and Harbor Works. 
Nos. 1 and 2. 

From Hon. Allan Campbell, Dep't Pub- 
lic Works, New York : 
Report of the Department for the Quarter 
ending September 30, 1879. 

From H. Wadsworth Clarke, Syracuse, 
N. Y : 
Journal of the Board of Supervisors of the 
County of Onondaga, N. Y., for 1879. 



From Martin Coryell, Lambertsville, N. 
J.: 
Third .\nnual Report of Lambertville Water 
Comijauy. 

From Gen. George W. Cullum, New 
York : 
Biographical sketch of Major-General Richard 

Montgomery, of the Continental Army. 

Gen. Geo. W. Cullum, New York, 1876. 
Biographical sketch of Captain William H. 

Swift, of the Topographical Engineers, U. 

S. A.. 1832-1849. Gen. Geo. W. Cullum, 

New Y'ork, 1880. (2 copies.) 
Biograijhical sketch of Brig-General Joseph 

G. Swift, Chief Engineer, U. S. A. July 31, 

1812. to November 12, 1818. Gen. Geo. W. 

Cullum. New York, 1877. 

From Joseph P. Davis, Boston: 
Annual Report of the City Engineer for the 

year 1879. 
General SiJecifications for Pumping Engines 

to govern designs accompanying proposals 

for Improved Sewerage of Boston. 
Sixty-eight Blue prints illustrating Improved 

Sewerage of Boston. 

From Engineers' Club of Philadelphia, 
Charles E. Billin, Secretary, Philadel- 
phia: 
Proceedings. Vol. 1. No. IV. 

From Engineer Department, District of 
Columbia, Washington, D. C. : 
Annual Report of the operations of the Engi- 
neer Department gf the District of Colum- 
bia for 1879. 

From Engineers' Society of Western 
Pennsylvania, .James H. Harlow, 
Secretary. Pittsburgh, Pa.: 
Description of a Derrick used at Davis Island 

Dam. James H. Harlow. 
Why does Steel Harden ? Wm. Metcalf. 

From Walton W. Evans, New York: 
American versus English Locomotives. Cor- 
respondence, criticism and commentary 
respecting their relative merits. New York, 
1880. (Copies for distribution.) 

From Maj. F. U. Farquhar, Washington, 
D. C : 
Annual Report of the Light- house Board to 
the Secretary of the J^vy for the fiscal j'ear 
ending June 30, 1879. 

From F. G. Field, London, England : 
The Notching of Steel Rails. F. G. Field. 

From Albert Fink, New I'^ork : 
Argument before the Committee of Commerce 
of the House of Representatives of the 
United States on the Reagan Bill for the re- 
gulation of interstate commerce. January 
14, 15 and 16, 1880. Albert Fink. (2 
copies.) 

From Robert Fletcher, Hanover, N. H. : 
Annual Report of Atchison, Toneka aud 

Santa Fe Railroad. 1877 aud 1878*. 
Thirtj'-third and Thirty fourth Annual Report 
of the Northern Railroad of New Hamp- 
shire. 
Annual Report of the Manchester and Law- 
rence Railroad for 1879. 
Annual Report of Louisville and Nashville 

Railroad for 1878-9. 
Annual Reports of Worcester and Nashua 
Railroad for 1878 and 1879. 

From George H. Frost, Engineering 
News, New York: 



28 



Railroad Engiueers' Practice. Thomas M. 
Cleemauu. New York, 1880. 

' From Senor F. de Garay, Mexico: 
Ferrocarril de Tehuantepee. Mexico, 1879. 
Informe sobre el Reconocimiento del Istmo 

de Tehuantepee. Manuel Fernandez. 

Mexico, 1879. 

From F. H. Garrett, Baltimore, Md. : 
A Bibliography of the Baltimore and Ohio 
Railroad from 1827 to 1879. John W. M. 
Lee. Baltimore, 1879. 

From Geographical Society of Dresden, 
Germany: 
Sixteenth Annual Report of the Geographical 
Society of Dresden. Scientific part. (Ger- 
man.) 

From Charles O. Gleim, Cologne, Ger- 
many : 
Zeitschrilt lUr Baukunde. Parts 1, 2, 3 and 
4. 1879. 

From Hon. A. A. Haggett, Lowell, 
Mass.: 
Seventh Annual Report of the Lowell Water 
Board. 

From A. E. Hall, Boston; 
Specifications forming part of Letters Patent 
on an Improvement in Transporting and de- 
livering Dredged Material. A. E. Hall. 
Two framed Pliotographs of Apparatus for 
transporting and delivering Dredged Ma- 
terial. Patented Dec. 9, 1879, by A. E. 
Bali. 

From Hungarian Society of Engineers 
and Architects, Buderpest : 
Transactions — November and December, 1879. 
January and February, 1880. 

From Willaim R. Huttou. Baltimore, 
Md.: 
Annual Report of the Harbor Board for 1879. 

From Institution of Civil Engineers, 
James Forrest, Secretary, London : 
Address of the President, William Henry 

Barlow. January 13, 1880. 
Abstract of papers in Foreign Transactions 
and Periodicals. Vol. LIX. Session 1879- 
80. Part 1. 
List of Members of the Institution. 
Account of Two Drainages in Ireland. John 
Hill. 

From Institution of Mechanical Engi- 
neers, Walter K. Browne, Secretary, 
London : 
Proceedings. October, 1879. Index. List of 
Members. 

From *rhomas C. Keefer, Ottawa, Can- 
ada: 
Handbook and Official Catalogue of the Can- 
adian section, Paris Universal Exhibition. 
1878. Compiled and Edited by Thomas C. 
Keefer. 

From John Kennedy, Montreal, Can- 
ada : 
Annual Reports ot the Harbor Commissioners 
of Montreal for 1879. (2 copies.) 

From William Metcalf, Pittsburg : 
Why does Steel Harden ? (Copies for distri- 
bution.) 

From Henry Mitchell, Boston : 
An Inspection of the terminal points of the 
Proposed Canals through Nicaragua and 
the Isthmus of Darien. Prof. Henry 
Mitchell. Washington, 1880. 



From North of England Institute, Min- 
ing and M echanical Engiueers. Theo. 
Wood Buuning, Secretary, Newcastle- 
ou-Tyne, England : 
.Transactions. Vol. XXVIII. 

From P. A. Peterson, Montreal, Canada : 
General Specifications and form of tender for 
the Iron Superstructure of the Chandiere 
Bridge. 

From E. Prince. Quincy 111.: 
Fourth revised list of Water Works in the 
United States and Cauadas. Edward Prince, 
Quincy, 111. (2 copies.) 

From the Publishers Revue Generale 
des Chemius de fer, Edgar Monjean, 
Secretary, Paris : 
Revue Generale des Chemins de fer. Novem- 
ber and December, 1879. 

From Wm. Rotch, New Bedford, Mass. : 

Sixth Annual Report of the Watuppa Water 

Board. Fall River, Mass., 1880. (2 copies.) 

From Royal United Service Institution, 

Capt. li. Burgess, Secretary, London: 

Journal of the Institution. Vol. XXIII. No. 

CIIL 

From Wm. B. Sherman, New Bedford, 
Mass. : 
Tenth Annual Report of the Acushnet Water 
Board. New Bediord, 1880. 

Trom T. Guilford Smith, Bufifalo, N. ¥.: 
Report of President and Managers of Phila- 
delphia and Reading Railway Company for 
1879. 

From Societe des Ingenieurs Civils, M. 
Mallet, Secretary, Paris : 
Memories de la Societe. November and 
December, 1879. 

From the Society of Civil Engineers of 
Portugal, Lisbon : 
Transactions. November and December, 
1879. 

From St. Louis Public School Library, 
Fred. M. Crunden, Librarian, St. 
Louis: 
Annual Report of the Library for 1879. 

From E. Sweet, Jr., .\lbany, N. Y.: 
Report on the New York Elevated Roads. E. 
Sweet, Jr. Albany, 1880. 

From H D. Tiffany, New York: 
Illustrations of the Croton Aqueduct. F. B. 

Tower. New York, 18i3. 
Spring Water versus River Water for supply- 
ing the City of New York, containing a com- 
pendius examination of the internal sup- 
pUes, the method and actual expense of 
obtaining them. M. Hale. New York, 1835 
An examination of the Water Commissioners' 
Report of the City of New York of Novem- 
ber, 1833, refuting many of the objections 
therein contained, and exhibiting errors in 
their estimate of expenpe for procuring 
water on the island of more than $2,000,000. 
M. Hale. New York, 1835. 

From D. Torrey, New York: 
Statistical Atlas of the United States based on 
the results of the Ninth Census, 1870. 
Francis A. Walker. New York, 1874. 

From United States Light-house Board, 
Washington, D. C: 
Annual Report for fiscal year ending June 30, 
1879. 

From United States Naval Observatory, 
Washington, D. C: 



29 



Catalogue of the United Stales Naval Ob- 
servatory. Part 1. Astronomical Biblo- 
graphy. Prof. Edward S. Holden. Wasli- 
lutoii, 1879. 

From Gen. G. K. Warren, Newport, R. 

Report upon Bridging the Navigable Waters 
of the United States, being Appendix X of 
the Annual Report of the Chief of Engi- 
neers for LS79 Gen. G. K. Warren. Wash- 
ington, 1879. (2 copies.) 

From W. W. Wilson, Yonkers, N. Y. : 

Seventh Annual Report of the Board of Water 
Commissionors of the City of Yonkers, N. 
Y. (3 copies.) 

From Gen. Horatio G. Wright, Chief of 
Engineers, U. S. A., Washington, D. 
C : 

Official Army Register for January, 1880. 

The Improvement of the Allegheny River, 
Pennsylvania. Col. Wm. E. Merrill. (2 
copies.) 

Information in regard to the Appropriation 
for the Improvement of the Allegheny 
River, from Pittsburg to the mouth of 
French Creek. Col. Wm. E. Merrill. 

Report in relation to the survey of the Ar- 
kansas River, near Pine Bluff, with esti- 
mates of cost of improving the same. 
Maj. C. R. Suter. (2 copies.) 

A report of a survey with a view to the con- 
struction of a ship canal to connect the 
waters of Delaware and Chesapeake Bays. 
Maj. W. P. Craighill. (2 copies.) 

Report of survey of Delaware River at Ches- 
ter and Marcus Heok, Pa., with accompany- 
ing recommendations touching the con- 
struction of an ice-harbor at that point. 
Col. J. N. Macomb. (2 copies ) 

Improvement of Rocky River Harbor, Ohio. 
Maj. J. M Wilson, (2 copies.) 

Papers relative to the payment of first in- 
stallment of compensation to Mr. James B. 
Eads, for maintenance of channel at South 
Pass, Mississippi River, for quarter ending 
October 30, 1879. 



Report relative to the improvement in Har- 
lem River, New York, and making certain 
recommendations. Gen. John Newton. (2 
copies.) 

Copy of letter inclosing draft of proposed act 
for the operation, maintenance and repair 
of locks and dams on Great Kanawka 
River. Maj. W. P. Craighill. (2 copies.) 

Report in regard to the superintendence, &c., 
of the Louisville and Portland Canal. Gen. 
G. Weitzel. (2 copies.) 

Senate resolution of January 7, 1880, regard- 
ing the condition of the Missouri River, 
between Omaha and Plattsu. outh, Neb., and 
inclosing a report on same from the Chief 
of Engineers. (2 cojjies.) 

Report of surveys of the Mississippi River 
at Hannibal, Mo., and memorial of the City 
Council, with accompanying reports. Capt. 
A. Mackenzie. (2 copies.) 

Correspondence in relation to the construc- 
tion of a bridge across the Ohio River at 
Beaver, Pa., by the Pittsburg and Lake 
Erie Railroad Company. Col. Wm. E. Mer- 
rill. (2 copies.) 

Report of survey of Pataluma Creek, Cali- 
fornia. Col. Geo. H. Mendell. (2 copies.) 

The improvement of the harbor at Peters- 
burg, Va. Maj. W. P. Craighill. (2 copies.) 

Senate resolution, December 3, 1879, relating 
to improvement of Taunton River, Mass., 
with estimates of cost of same. Gen. G. 
K. Warren. (2 copies.) 

Report of a resurvey of the outlet to Wolf 
Lake, Indiana. Capt. G. J. Lydecker. (2 
copies.) 

Report of the Surveyor-General of Wyoming 
tor the year 1879. Edward C. David. 
From other sources: 

Annual report of Railroad Commissioners of 
Massachusetts for 1879. 

The Library Journal. Vol. V., Nos. 1 and 2. 

Zvveite Abhandlung iiber die Wasser- 
zunachme in den Quellen, Flusaen und 
Stromen bei ' Steigerung der Hochwasser 
in den Oulturliiudern. Gustav Ritter vou 
Wex. Vienna, 1079. 



ANNOUNCEMENTS. 



The Twelfth Annual Convention of the 
■Society will be held at St. Louis, Mo., begin- 
ning Tuesday, May 25th, 1880. 

Sessions for the consideration of profes- 
sional subjects, and one for the transaction of 
business, will be held. 

The details of the programme will be an- 
nounced as soon as determined by the local 
committee. 

The following is a list of topics to be con- 
sidered with reference to papers published in 
Transactions during the preceding year : 
CLXXV. {Jan. 1879.) The Flow of Water in 

small Channels, after Ganguillet and Kut- 

ter, with Kutter's Diagram modified, and 



Graphical Tables (vith special reference to 
Sewer Calculations. — R. Hering. 

CLXXVI. (Jan.) The permanent Way of 
Railways in Great Britain and Ireland, with 
especial reference to the use of Timber, 
Preserved and Unpreserved, Compiled from 
information received from Engineers in 
charge of those Railways.— John Bogart. 

CLXXVII. {Feb.) Experiments on the Re- 
sistances of Rolling Stock. Made under the 
direction of Charles Paine.— A. M. Welling- 
ton. 

CLXXVIII. (March.) Light-house Engineer- 
ing as displayed at the Centennial Exhibi- 
tion.— John G. Barnard. 



30 



CLXXIX. {April.) Minot's Ledge Light- 
house. — B. S. Alexander. 

CLXXX. (May.) The Construction and Main- 
tenance of Koads. — Edward P. North. 

CLXXXI. (June.) Flexure and Transverse 
Resistance of Beams. — Charles E. Emery. 

CLXXXII. (July.) On the Flow of Water in 
Rivers. — DeVolson Wood. 

CLXXXIII. (Aug.) The South Pass Jetties. 
Notes on the Consolidation and Durability 
of the Works, with a description of the Con- 
crete Blocks and other Constructions of the 
last year. — Max E. Schmidt. 

CLXXXIV. (Sept.) The Ocean Pier at Coney 
Island. — Charles Macdonald. 

CLXXXV. (Sept.) Stability of Stone Struc- 
tures.— William H. Searles. 

CLXXXVI. (Oct.) The Use of Steel for 
Bridges. — Theodore Cooper. 

CLXXXVIL (Oct.) The Construction of the 
Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railroad 
over the Raton Mountains, and the Per- 
formance of Locomotives on its Steep 
Grades. — James D. Burr. 

CLXXXVIII. (Nov.) Inter-Oceanic Canal 
Projects.— A. G. Menoeal. 

January, February, March, 1880. — Inter- 
Oceanic Canal Projects, by Walton W. Evans, 
Frederick M. Kelley, Charles A. Sweet, John 
C. Campbell, Charles D. Ward, Nathan Ap- 
pletou, S. F. Shelbourne, Max E. Schmidt, 
Thomas J. Long, Edward P. North, Ashbel 
Welch. Juliiis W. Adams, F. de Lesseps, J. 
Dirk.s, V. Dauzats. 

Also papers in continuation of the discus- 
sion on Inter-Oceanic Canal Projects, by A. 

Couvreux fils, Charles Macdonald, T. C. 

Clarke, W. E. Merrill, and others, will be 

15rinted before the date of the Convention. 

CLXXXIX. (March.) Engineering Problems 
Involved in the Proposed Improvement of 
the Erie Canal, by Increasing the Depth of 
its Channel One Foot. By E. Sweet, Jr. 
The following papers also will be printed 

and ready for distribution before the time of 

the Convention : 
Note on Kutter's Diagram. By Charles H. 

Swan. 
The New York and Brooklyn Bridge Ap- 
proaches and Superstructure. By F. 
Collingwood. 
Experiments with Apparatus for Testing 
Cements, by Alfred Noble, with discussion 
on testing cement, by F. Collingwood, D. 
W. Cunningham, C. Latimer, F. O. Norton, 



F. Rinecker, W. Sooy Smith, D. J. Whitte- 
more. 

Design and Construction Table for Egg- 
shaped Sewers. By C. G. Force. 

The Preservation of Timber. By J. W. 
Putnam. 

On the Variation due to Orthogonal Strains 
in the Elastic Limit in Metals, and on its 
Practical Value and more important appli- 
cations. By R. H. Thurston. 

Members of the Society are earnestly re- 
quested to furnish information or memoranda 
upon any of the subjects referred to. They 
are also invited and expected to take part in 
the discussions, either in person or by send- 
ing to the Secretary notes for presentation. In 
either case it will assist the committee in ar- 
ranging the details for sessions of the Con- 
vention, if members expecting to take part in 
the discussions will notify the Secretary at 
once to that effect. 

Excursions by river and by rail from St. 
Louis are contemplated, and the arrange- 
ments for them are in progress. The Secre- 
tary is instructed to state that it is permissible 
that members of the Society should be accom- 
panied by their families. 

Under the rule adopted by the Society in 
reference to invitations to Conventions, the 
members of other engineering orgauizatious; 
also the editors of professional journals ex- 
changing with this Society will be invited to 
attend the Convention and the Excursions 
connected therewith. 

The details of arrangements are now being 
perfected, and will soon be announced. 

You are invited to attend the Convention 
and take part in the discussions and excur- 
sions. 

Please notify the Secretary whether you 
will attend, and whether you will present a 
paper or take part in special discussions. 

The following resolutions were adopted at 
the Ninth Annual Convention of the Society, 
and ordered printed regularly in the Society 
publications : 

Whereas, the metric system of weights and 
measures is now extensively used abroad, 
and whereas it is desirable that the relation 
of the units of the differing systems be made 
familiar to all by comparison : 

Resolved, That members be requested, in 
papers hereafter presented to the Society, to 
write, in parenthesis, weights or dimensions 
by the metric system, in connection with 
those of the system in general use. 



31 

The House of the Society is at 104 East The Library and Conversation Rooms wUl 

Twentieth street, one door east from Fourth also, tor the present, be open every Thursday 

avenue, and near the southwest corner of evening, from Ifi to 10 p.m. Members are 

Gramcrcy Park. It is open from nine o'clock invited to avail themselves of the oppor- 

A.M. to five o'clock P.M. each business day, tunities afforded on Thursday evenings, both 

except Saturday, when it is closed at three for consultation of books and periodicals and 

o'clock P.M. for conversation. 



LIST OF MEMBERS. 



ADDITIONS. 

MEMBERS. 



Date of Election. 

Anderson, Thomas S Chief Engineer, Board Mississippi 

River Commission, Greenville, Miss. . .March 3, 1880. 

Field, George S Manager Central Bridge Co., 52 Wall 

Street, New York April 7, 1880. 

Greenwood, William H. .Civil Engineer, Canon City, Colorado. . . .March3, 1880. 

Heuek, William H .Captain of Engineers, U. S. A., 37 

Union St., New Orleans, La March 3, 1880. 

Meier, Edward D Meier Iron Co., St. Louis, Mo February 4, 1880. 

Neilson, Charles Engineer in charge Fuel Department, 

N. Y. L. E. & W. RR., New York. .January 7, 1880. 

Waite, Christoi'HER C. . ..Chief Engineer and Superintendent 
Muskingum Valley RR., Zanes- 
ville, O March 3, 1880, 

associate. 

Putnam, Joseph W Sup' t Bridges New Orleans and Mobile 

Railroad, Box 2734, New Orleans, I^a . . March 3, i88a. 



CHANGES AND CORRECTIONS. 
MEMBERS. 

ANDERSON, Adna Engineer-in-Chief, Northern Pacific Railroad, St. Paul, 

Minn. 
Burr, James D Ass't Engineer, P. and A. V. and N. M. and S. P. R.R., 

Topeka, Kansas. 
Cogswell, William B 108 Willow St., Syracuse, N. Y. 



32 

CHANGES AND CORRECTIONS. 
MEMBERS. 

Early, John E Division Engineer, Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe 

Railroad, Pueblo, Colorado. 

Katte, Walter Chief Engineer, New York Elevated Railroad, 7 Broad- 
way, New York City, N. Y. 

Kinsley, Thomas P Sup't National Construction Co., East Long Branch, N.J. 

Monroe, J. Albert Providence, R. I. 

Sedgwick, Thomas S Assistant U. S. Engineer, Galveston, Texas. 

associate. 
Wheaton, Edward Westfield, Clark Co., 111. 



death. 
St. John, Isaac Munr'oe. .Elected member, July 14, 1871. Died April 7, iJ 



^wmkmx |ocieii) of |;iiil pjin^^rs. 



PROOEEDIISraS. 



Vol. VI.— May, 1880. 
» ♦ ^ 

MINUTES OF MEETINGS 

(Abstractof such as may be of general interest to members.) 



OF THE SOCIETY. 

April 21st, 1880.— The Society met at 8 p. m. Vice-President Cbanute 
iu the chair. 

The death of I. M. St. John, Member A. S. C. E., was announced, 
and the appointment of a committee to prepare a memoir for publication 
was directed. 

Arrangements for the aijproaching Convention were read. 

Notes of experiments upon the relative efficiency of gas and the 
electric light were presented by George W. Dresser, and discussed by 
members present. 

May 5th, 1880. — The Society met 8 p. m. Vice-President Chanute in 
the chair. 

Ballots for admission to membership were canvassed, and the 
following candidates declared elected : As Members— Daniel McN. Currie, 
of St. Louis, Mo. ; Joseph Tintorer Giberga, of Barcelona, Spain ; 
Thomas Jackson, of Fort Wayne, lud. ; James MacNaughton, of Albany, 
N. Y.; George W.'McNulty, of Brooklyn, N. Y.; Albert A. Eobinson, of 
Pueblo, Col. ; Charles G. Weir, of New York City, N. Y. ; Samuel H. 
Yonge, of St. Charles, Mo. As Associates— George C. W. Belcher, of St. 
Louis, Mo. ; William H. Burr (elected Junior, June 3, 1871), of Troy, 
N. Y. 

The Committee on recei^tion of M. de Lesseps, and the engineers 
accompanying him, made a final report. 

The following resolution was adopted: 

That for the present the Society rooms be open on each Wednesday evening instead 
of Thursday evening as heretofore, and that during the cool weather the rooms be also 
opened each Saturday evening. 



34 



OF THE BOAKD OF DIPvECTION. 

Makgh 11th, 1880. — Applications were considered. Communications 
in reference to the Committees on Preservation of Timber and on Test- 
ing of Cements were acted upon. 

ApRiii 5th, 1880. — Applications were considered. Action was taken 
as to a continuance of the lease of the Society House. The Secretary 
was instructed to notify members in arrears for dues, and request pay- 
ment. The programme for the Twelfth Annual Convention was con- 
sidered. 

Apkil 7th, 1880. — Applications were considered. 
May 6th, 1880. — ^Applications were considered. Appropriations were"" 
made. Action as to dues from members in arrears was directed. 



ANNOUNCEMENTS. 



The Twelfth Annual Convention of the 
Society will be held at St. Louis, Mo., begin- 
ning Tuesday, May 25th, 1880. 

Sessions for the consideration of profes- 
sional subjects, and one for the transaction of 
business, will be held. 

The details of the programme will be an- 
nounced as soon as determined by the local 
committee . 

The following is a list of topics to be con- 
sidered with reference to papers published in 
Transactions during the preceding year : 
CLXXV. (Jan. 1879.) The Flow of Water in 
small Channels, after Ganguillet and Kut- 
ter, with Kutter's Diagram modified, and 
Graphical Tables (vith special reference to 
Sewer Calculations. — R. Heriug. 
CLXXVI. (Jan.) The permanent Way of 
Railways in Great Britain and Ireland, with 
especial reference to the use of Timber, 
Preserved and Uupreserved, Compiled from 
information received from Engineers in 
charge of those Railways.— John Bogart. 
CLXXVII. (Feb.) Experiments on the Re- 
sistances of Rolling Stock. Made under the 
direction of Charles Paine. — A. M. Welling- 
ton. 
CLXXVIII. (March.) Light-house Engineer- 
ing as displayed at the Centennial Exhibi- 
tion. — John G. Barnard. 
CLXXIS. (April.) Miuot's Ledge Light- 
house. — B. S. Alexander. 
CLXXX. (May.) The Construction and Main- 
tenance of Roads. — Edward P. North. 
CLXXXI. (June.) Flexure and Transverse 
Resistance of Beams.— Charles E. Emery. 



CLXXXII. (July.) On the Flow of Water in 
Rivers. — De Volson Wood. 

CLXXXIII. (Aug.) The South Pass Jetties. 
Notes on the Consolidation and Durability 
of the Works, with a description of the Con- 
crete Blocks and other Constructions of the 
last year. — Max E. Schmidt. 

CLXXXrV. (Sept.) The Ocean Pier at Coney 
Island. — Charles Macdonald. 

CLXXXV. (Sept.) Stability of Stone Struc- 
tures. — William H. Searles. 

CLXXXVI. (Oct.) The Use of Steel for 

Bridges. — Theodore Cooper. 

* CLXXXVII. (Oct.) The Construction of the 

Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railroad 

over the Raton Mountains, and the Per- 

. formance of Locomotives on its Steep 
Grades. — James D. Burr. 

CLXXXVIII. (Nov.) Inter-Oceanic Canal 
Projects. — A. G. Menocal. 

January, February, March, 1880. — Inter- 
Oceanic Canal Projects, by Walton W. Evans, 
Frederick M. Kelley, Charles A. Sweet, John 
C. Campbell, Charles D. Ward, Nathan Ap- 
pleton, S. F. Shelbourne, Max E. Schmidt, 
Thomas J. Long, Edward P. North, Ashbel 
Welch, Julius W. Adams, F. de Lesseps, J. 
Dirks, V. Dauzats. 

Also papers in continuation of the discus- 
sion on Inter-Oceanic Canal Projects, by A, 

Couvreux fds, Charles Macdonald, T. C^ 

Clarke, and others, will beprinted before 

the date of the Convention. 

CLXXXIX. (March.) Engineering Problems 
Involved in the Proposed Improvement of 



35 



the Erie Canal, by Increasing the Depth of 
its Channel One Foot. By E. Sweet, Jr. 
The following papers also will be printed 
and ready for distribution before the time of 
the Convention : 
Note on Kutter's Diagram. By Charles H. 

Swan. 
The New York and Brooklyn Bridge Ap- 
proaches and Superstructure. By F. 
CoUingwood. 
Experiments with Apparatus for Testing 
Cements, by Alfred Noble, with discussion 
on testing cement, by F. CoUingwood, D. 
W. Cunningham, C. Latimer, F. O. Norton, 
F. Rinecker, W. Sooy Smith, D. J. Whitte- 
more. 
Design and Construction Table for Egg- 
shaped Sewers. By C. G. Force. 
The Preservation of Timber. By J. W. 

Putnam. 
On the Variation due to Orthogonal Strains 
in the Elastic Limit in Metals, and ou its 
Practical Value and more important api^li- 
catious. By R. H. Thurston. 
Members of the Society are earnestly re- 
quested to furnish information or memoranda 
U150U any of the subjects referred to. They 
are also invited and expected to take part in 
the discussions, either in person or by send- 
ing to the Secretary notes for presentation. In 
either case it will assist the committee in ar- 
ranging the details for sessions of the Con- 
vention, if members expecting to take part in 
the discussions will notify the Secretary at 
once to that effect. 

Excursions by river and by rail from St. 
Louis are contemplated, and the arrange 
ments for them are in progress. The Secre- 
tary is instructed to state that it is permissible 
that members of the Society should be accom- 
panied by their families. 

Under the rule adopted by the Society in 
reference to invitations to Conventions, the 
members of other engineering organizations; 



also the editors of professional journals ex- 
changing with this Society will be invited to 
attend the Convention and the Excursions 
connected therewith. 

The details of arrangements are now being 
perfected, and will soon be announced. 

You are invited to attend the Convention 
and take part in the discussions and excur- 
sions. 

Please notify the Secretary whether you 
will attend, and whether you will present a 
pajjer or take part in special discussions. 

The following resolutions were adopted at 
the Ninth Annual Convention of the Society, 
and ordered printed regularly in the Society 
publications : 

Whereas, the metric system of weights and 
measures is no^v extensively used abroad, 
and whereas it is desirable that the relation 
of the units of the differing systems be made 
familiar to all by comparison : 

Eesolved, That members be requested, in 
papers hereafter presented to the Society, to 
srite, in parenthesis, weights or dimensions 
by the metric system, in connection with 
those of the system in general use. 

The House of the Society is at 104 Esst 
Twentieth street, one door east from Fourth 
avenue, and near the southwest corner of 
Grammercy Park. It is open from nine o'clock 
A.M. to five o'olock r.M. each business day, 
excei)t Saturday, when it is closed at three 

o'clock P.M. 

The Library and Conversation Rooms will 
also, for the present, be open every Wednes- 
day evening from 1}^, to 10 P. M., and during 
the cooler months every Saturday evening, 
also for the same hours. The rooms will not 
for the present be open on Thursday evenings, 
Members are invited to avail themselves of 
the opportunities afforded on these evenings, 
both for consultation of books and periodicals 
and for conversation. 



LIST OF MEMBERS. 



Blunden, Henry D. 



ADDITIONS, 

MEMBERS. 

Date of Election, 

.1. (Elected Junior, January 5th, 1876), 

Ass't Engineer N. Y., L. E. and 

W. RR., 187 West St., New York 

City, N. Y February 4, 1880. 



36 

Johnson, Lorenzo M (Elected Junior, March 30!, 1875), 

General Manager Cairo and St. 
Louis RR., 520 Walnut 'St., St. 
Louis. Mo April 7, 1880. 

Knight, Whxiam B (Elected Junior, January 6ih, 1S75), 

P. O. Box L., Kansas City, Mo. .January 7, 1880. 

Seymour, Horatio, Jr (Elected Associate, January 8th, 

1873), State Engineer, and Sur- 
veyor, Albany, N. Y April 7, 18S0. 

Shailer, Robert A Assistant Engineer Edgmoor Iron 

L-on Co., Wilmington, Del March 3, ibSo. 

JUNIOR. 

Pegr.\m, George H 213 Washington Ave., St. Louis, Mo. April 7, 1880. 



CHANGES .AND CORRECTIONS. 
MEMBERS. 

Blaisuell, Anthony H. .. .W^estern Boat Building Co., South St. Louis, Mo. 

Dresser, George W 35 University Place, New York City, N. Y. 

Emery, Charles E 16 Cortlandt St., New York City, N. Y. 

Golay, Philip Paducah, Ky . 

Grant, William H 71 Broadway, Room 88, New York City, N. V. 

Harris, Robert L Austin, Texas. 

Hembule, Edward Engineer, Delaware Bridge Company, Major Block, 

Chicago, 111. 
Herschel, Clemens Hydraulic Engineer, Holyoke Water Power Company, 

Holyoke, Mass. 
Morris, M.\rsh.all Engineer and Superintendent Road Dep't, L. N. A. 

and C. RR., Louisville, Ky. 

Newman, Robert M Lansing, Mich. 

Nicholson, George B Division Engineer, Cin., South. RR., 134 Vine St., 

Cincinnati, Ohio. 
Whitford, Oscar F Jamestown, Boulder Co., Colorado. 

junior. 

Cl.ark, Ira E Davisville, Yolo Co., Cal. 

Staats, Robert P N. Y., L. E. and W. RR., office 187 West St., New 

York City, N. Y. 

fellow. 
Norton, Frederick O....45 Coal and Iron Exchange, New York City, N. Y. 



j^)iierican mtkb of :^;uil |^n5inem. 



FROCEET)I:^^as. 



Vol. VI.— June, 1880. 
► ♦ ^ 

MINUTES OF MEETINQS. 

(Abstract of such as may be of general interest to members.) 



TWELFTH ANNUAL CONVENTION OF THE SOCIETY. 
Held at St. Louis, Mo., May 25, 26, 28, 1880. 

May 25th. — The Twelfth Annual Convention was held in the City of 
St. Louis, in the Hall of the Washington University. The Convention 
was called to order on Tuesday, May 25, 1880, at 10 a. m., by John 
Bogart, Secretary of the Society. The chair was taken temporarily by 
Vice-President James B. Francis. 

On the nomination of the local committee, James B. Eads, of St. 
Louis, was elected Chairman of the Convention. William P. Shinn, of 
St. Louis, was elected Vice- Chairman. 

On taking the chair, Mr. Eads said : Gentlemen of the Convention, 
I feel profoundly grateful for this evidence of your regard. To be called 
upon to preside over the deliberations of the Society of Civil Engineers, 
numbering, as it does, among its members many of the most eminent 
engineers in the world, men whose originality of conception, boldness 



88 

of design and high scientific attainments have added so much lustre to 
the profession at home and abroad, should certainly fill the ambition of 
any member of the Society. I, therefore, repeat to you, that I feel 
deeply sensible of the high honor which you have conferred upon me. 
As the profession of a civil engineer does not involve a knowledge of 
parliamentary rules, I shall have to ask your forbearance if I commit 
any errors in that particular, and as engineers are not expected to be 
orators, I shall proceed at once to the order of business. We have an 
orator ^jreseut who will address the Convention, the Hon. Henry Over- 
stolz, Mayor of St. Louis. I will appoint Col. J. B. Moulton and Mr. L. 
M. Johnson to escort Mayor Overstolz to the platform. 

As Mayor Overstolz came upon the platform, the Chairman said : I 
take special pleasure in introducing my personal friend, the Hon. Henry 
Overstolz, whose statesmanship, good judgment and careful administra- 
tion of our city affairs have done so much to advance the jDrosperity of 
our city. 

Mayor Overstolz said : Mr. President and Gentlemen of the Con- 
vention, Captain Eads, in his short address, has paid me a compli- 
ment which I think you will say I do not deserve, the compliment of 
being an orator. It is one of my weaknesses that I cannot make public 
.speeches . I have, therefore, written my address, and I will read it. 

Mayor Overstolz then read the following address: 

ADDRESS OP WELCOME BY MAYOK OVEKSTOLZ. 

Mr. President and Gentlemen of the Convention : The government 
and people of the City of St. Louis most cordially welcome you on this 
occasion, and gladly extend to you the freedom and hospitality of the 
city. This is, I believe, the Twelfth Annual Convention of the American 
Society of Civil Engineers, and while we trust that its results may be 
equal in harmony and importance with any of the former meetings, we 
further hope that you may carry away from St. Louis some adequate 
impression of its commercial wealth and influence, and of the warm 
sympathetic interest with which all of our people regard the objects and 
spirit of your Society. 

Gentlemen, you meet to-day in the great inland city of the continent. 
One whose history and development, and that of the magnificent regions 
surrounding it, constitute one of the most marvelous chapters in the 
record of American civiUzation. Within the space of almost half a cen- 
tury a mighty jieople and a metropolis, the commercial influence of 
which is felt throughout the globe, have been created. The time is not 
yet beyond the memory of living men when St. Louis was but a river 
village, and the Valley of the Mississippi was almost in a state of nature. 
This swift transformation scene, this "miracle-play" of history is full 
of solemn significance and beauty, but chiefly does it illustrate the irre- 



39 

sistable power of human energy wlien guided by the improved instru- 
ments and princij^les of modern knowledge. 

I allude to these things, gentlemen, not from any spirit of enthusiasm 
for the city of my home, but because there are facts connected with the 
rapid advance of 8t. Louis that have educated our people to appreciate 
properly, and to respect profoundly, the glorious profession of which 
this Convention is at once the exponent and representative. The natural 
advantages of location, the settlement and cultivation of the vast agricul- 
tural lands stretching out on all sides of ;is might ultimately have made 
St. Louis an important city, but only by a slow process, stretching 
through many ages. In the olden times, in the gray and flickering 
dawn of civilization, cities and their commercial influence were slow of 
growth, and progress could only be accelerated by making them the 
seat of imperial power. It is only in modern times that it became jdos- 
sible to compress civic growth within the limits of a century or less. 

This possibility is almost wholly the product and fruit of the science 
of civil engineering, and to this science the rapid progress of St. Louis 
must be largely attributed. It was the steamboat that first stimulated 
into activity the sluggish life of the river trading jjost ; it was the rail- 
road that broke down the barriers of distance, and, pouring in popu- 
lation and wealth, started our foundries and factories, and carried the 
l^roducts of our industries to the shores of the Eastern and Western 
oceans, and it was the telegraph that made the daily diffusion of our 
commercial data possible, and so rendered jjossible the establishment of 
a controlling Western market here. Improvements in machinery stimu- 
lated all branches of manufacture ; the building of our magnificent 
bridge made a railroad highway across the Mississij^pi and gave us indis- 
pensable commercial facilities ; and lastly, the jetties have brushed away 
the obstructions at the mouth of the Mississippi, and made a broad and 
deep highway to the ocean for the shijis that carry our cereals to all 
quarters of the world. 

These things, these great achievements, are the work of civil engineer- 
ing, and of sciences connected therewith. It is the men of this profes- 
sion that practically apply science to the forwarding of human industry, 
and this profession has undoubtedly accomplished more for the material 
advancement of this country than any I know of. 

The facts alluded to have taught the citizens of St. Louis the benefits 
tlowing from this profession. They realize all it has done for the city 
in its trade, manufactures, waterworks, ancl general improvements. 
Hence, it is evident, gentlemen, you are among friends and aelmirers, 
and this feeling should assist the enjoyment of your visit. 

The President of our Board of Improvement and the Chief Engineer 
of our Waterworks are, I believe, members of your Society, also our 
distinguished citizen, James B. Eaels, whose bold and original genius 



40 

lias done so much for this city, in the j^'reat steel arch bridge over our 
river, and for the country generally, in the successful execution of the 
jetties. To a former member of your Society, the late Mr. Kirkwood, 
this city is indebted for the original design of our Waterworks system. 

In a city that owes so much to civil engineers, there must be many 
objects worthy the attention and inspection of the members of this Con- 
vention. The bridge, the waterworks, the iron furnaces, and many 
other features of interest will, I think, j^rove worthy of a visit. I trust 
you will also have time to see our parks and public institutions, and so 
far as possible, I will gladly co-operate in any arrangement for your 
entertainment. 

In welcoming this Convention, I express the sentiments of all our 
people, and I beg to assure you that your proceedings will be regarded 
■j\'ith the deepest interest and resj)ect by all classes. 

The following members and guests were in attendance at the Con- 
vention : 

Members or the Society — E. E. Andrews, New York; Wm. S. 
Auchincloss, Philadelphia; Theodore Allen, St. Louis; James P. Allen, 
Eock Island, 111. ; John B. Atkinson, Earlington, Ky. ; E. W. Bowditch, 
Fred'k Brooks, Boston; H. Bissell, Salem, Mass.; John W. Bacon, Dan- 
bury, Conn.; H. D. Blunden, John Bogart, New York; Charles B. 
Brush, Hoboken, N. J.; Charles E. Billin, Eobert Briggs, Philadelphia. 
Arthur Beardsley, Swarthmore, Pa.; G. Bouscaren, Cincinnati; A. H. 
Blaisdell, St. Louis ; Edward Baumann, Chicago ; James D. Burr, 
Topeka, Kansas; O. E. Gushing, Lowell, Mass.; Theodore Cooper, J. 
James E. Croes, New York; Wm. B. Cogswell, Syracuse, N. Y. ; Martin 
Coryell, Lambertville, N. J. ; D. N. Currie, A. J. Chaphe, St. Louis; E. S. 
Chesbrough, Chicago; J. H. Cunningham, Milwaukee; Charles G. 
Darrach, Philadelphia; Alexander Dempster, Pittsburgh; Edwin A.Doane, 
Meadville, Pa.; M. M. Defrees, Indianapolis; James Dun, James B. 
Eads, St. Louis; Geo. D. Emerson, Eolla, Mo.; James B. Francis, 
Lowell, Mass.; Clark Fisher, Trenton, N. J.; C. G. Force, Jr., Cleve- 
land, O.; Henry Flad, St. Louis; B, Godwin, New York; Frederick 
Graff, Phihidelphia; P. Golay, Cincinnati; . A V. Gude, Louisville, Ky.; 
Albert B. Hill, New Haven, Conn.; Wm. E. Hutton, Baltimore ; James 
H. Harlow, Pittsburgh; Edward Hemberle, Chicago; F. B. Howard, 
Detroit; B. M. Harrod, New Orleans; L. M. Johnson, St. Louis; Louis 
H. Knapp, Buffalo; Wm. B. Knight, Kansas City, Mo. ; E. D. Leavitt, Jr., 
Cambridgeport, Mass.; D. Jones Lucas, Philadelphia; Thomas D. 
Lovett, Cincinnati; Wm. H. Lotz, Chicago; E. C. Lewis, Nashville, Tenn. ; 
diaries Macdonald, Arthur Macy, New York; D. N. Melvin, New 
Springville, N. Y. ; James MacNaughton, Albany; Henry G. Morris, 
Philadelphia; Mansfield Merriman, Bethlehem, Pa.; C. S. Maurice, 
Athens, Pa. ; Henry G. Morse, Youngstowc, O. ; Eobert E. McMatli, 
E. D. Meier, Eobert Moore, St. Louis; M. Meigs, Eock Island, 111.; W. 



41 

H. McClintock, Fair Grounds, Ky, ; Joliu McLeod, Marshall Morris, 
Louisville; F. O. Xortou, New York; George B. Nicholson, Cincinnati; 
Joseph O. Osgood, Milton, Mass. ; E. Prince, Quincy, 111. ; George H. 
Pegram, St. Louis; Joseph R. Richards, Boston; Percival Roberts, Jr., 
Philadelphia; E. C. Rice, St. Louis; Henry B. Richardson, St. Joseph, 
La.; C. L. Strobel, Pittsburgh; S. Sheldon, Cleveland; Robert A. 
Shailer, Wm. P. Shiun, Charles A. Smith, C. Shaler Smith, St. Louis; 
Max E. Schmidt. Memphis, Tenn. ; Marshall M. Tidd, Boston; Cook 
Talcott, Newark, N. J. ; E. N. Kirk Taleott, Morgan Park, 111. ; John G. 
Yau Home, Jersey City, K J.; Frank O. Whitney, Boston; W. H. 
Wiley, W. E. Worthen, New York; Charles D. Ward, Jersey City, N. J. ; 
Ashbel Welch, Lambertville, N. J.; John Whitelaw, Cleveland; D. W- 
Wellman, Thomas J. Whitman, St. Louis; Don J. Whittemore, Milwau- 
kee; George Y. Wisner, Detroit; S. Whinery, Wheeler, Ala.; Samuel H. 
Y'onge, St. Charles, Mo. 

Visiting Engineers.— J. Y. McClintock, W. Ripley Nichols, E. B, 
Noyes, Boston; A. F. Noyes, Newton, Ma.«s. ;* Howard Constable', 
Harold A. Freeman, L. C. Madeira, Howard Murphy, T. Roney Wil- 
liamson, Philadelphia;! W. Marshall Rees, Memphis, Tenn. ; J Edward 
Adams, Pittsburgh; J. A. Coulter, Greenburg, Pa.; F. W. Gordon. 
Karl Van Wagner, Pittsburgh, Pa..| R. Chauvenet, John W. Conlogue, 
Claude Freeman, Carl Gayler, James W. Hill. H. S. Hopkins, Jacob 
Johann, Richard Klemm, J. H. Maclind, John H. Maxon, Julius Moul- 
ton, Charles Pfeiffer, Frank H. Pond, Wm. B. Potter, A. Ranschenback. 
P. W. Schaumleffel, Fred. Schickle, Thad. S. Smith, A. A. Talmage, 
Wm. Taussig, B. Warren, Wm. Wise, C. M. Woodward, St. Louis;|| 
Charles J. Bates, E. L. Bremerman, E. C. Carter, St. Louis; M. Cowles, 
Chicago; Howard Fleming, George H. Frost,^ New York; John C. Gault, 
Allen C. Glasgow, George B. Hopkins, St. Louis; Wm. W. Jefiferis, 
Westchester, Pa. ; R. Ralston Jones,1 Keokuk, la. ; Thos. B. Lee, New- 
ark, N. J.; Thos. McKissock, St. Louis; H. S. Morse, Indianapolis; J. 
H. Morley, C. P. Morrison, J. B. Moulton, J. A. Ockerson, St. Louis; 
L. S. 01mstead,1[ Jacksonville, 111. ; Hon. Henry Overstolz, St. Louis; 
George C. Prussing, Chicago; J. R. Rees, St. Louis; W. H. Sears, 
Eau Claire, Wis. ; C. H. Sherman, Charles W. Stearns, A. W. Loper, 
St. Louis; Joseph D. Weeks, New York; John W. Weston,TI Chicago; 
W^m. Woodyard, New Y'ork. 

The Chairman then announced the committee on the details for the 
proceedings of the Convention, order of papers, discussions, etc., viz.: 
Henry Flad, J. J. R. Croes, and Charles Macdonald. 

* Members Boston Society of Civil Engineers. 

t Members Engineers' Chib of Philadelphia. 

t Member American Institute, Mining Engineers. 

§ Members Engineers' Society, Western Pennsylvania. 

II Members Engineers' Club of St. Louis. 

11 Memb ers Civil Eugiueere' Club of the Northwest. 



42 

The Secretary annouuced the progi-amme of excursions, invitations 
to points of interest, etc., as arranged by the local committee, at St. 
Lotiis. 

A paper, subject, " The Hudson Kiver Tunnel," by Arthur Spiel- 
mann and Charles B. Brush, Members, A. S. C. E., was then read by 
Charles B. Brush, and discussed by E. S. Chesbrough, James B. Eads, 
James B. Francis, Ashbel Welch, and Charles B. Brush. 

A jjaper, subject, "Location of the Chimbote Tunnels, Peru, 1874- 
5," by O. F. Nichols, Member A. S. C. E., was read by J. J. E. Croes ; 
the Convention then adjourned. 

May 26th. — The Convention resumed its session at 9 a. m. 
A paper, subject, •" Tensile Tests of Cement and an Appliance for 
more accurate Determinations," by D. J. Whittemore, Member A. S. C. 
E., was then read by the author, and discussed by M. Coryell, James- 
B. Eads, James B. Francis, William P. Shinn,^ Ashbel Welch and D. J. 
Whittemore. 

A paper, subject, "American Cements," by F. O. Norton, Fellow A. 
S. C. E., was then read by the Secretary, and discussed by John Bogart, 
E. S. Chesbrough, James B. Francis, J. H. Harlow, W. E. Hutton, Max 
E. Schmidt and D. J. Whittemore. 

A paper, subject, "Waterproof Coverings," by F. CoUingwood, 
Member A. S. C. E., was then read by the Secretary, 

A paper, subject, "Web Strains in Simple Trusses," by E. Sweet,. 
Jr. , Member A. S. C. E. , was then read by the Secretary. 

A paper, subject, " On the Crippling Strength of Wrought-Iron 
Columns," by C. L. Gates, Junior, A. S. C. E., was read by the Sec- 
retary. 

Eeports of committees being called for, and that from the Committee 
on Tests of American Iron and Steel being in order, John Bogart, Sec- 
retary, said : 

The Chairman of that committee. Gen. W. Sooy Smith, is now in 
Europe. As Secretary of the Society, I have sent to each member of the 
committee a note, saying that it would be called upon for a report at 
this Convention, but the Secretary has received no report, and if no 
member of the committee is present or has a report ready, I think 
proper that I should say that Gen. Smith, just before sailing, informed 
me that his efforts, or the efforts of the committee in regard to the con- 
tinuance of the board for the testing of American Iron, Steel and other 
metals before Congress, had not, so far, been successful, and that there 
was danger that the resiilts of so enormous amount of labor by that Com- 
mittee would be lost. I think that is about what the Chairman of that 
committee would say if he were here, but of course it is not so forcibly 
presented, nor in so vigorous a manner as Gen. Smith would put the 
case. 



43 

William P. Shinn :— Gentlemen of the Convention, I will take this 
occasion, as a manufacturer of steel, to say to the members that I regard 
the work of this committee as one of the very greatest importance to 
American engineering. All of us who have had occasion to work with 
iron and steel know that we have been working with material about 
which we knew very little. If we have discovered, from time to time, 
various phenomena in their use and action under strain, we could not 
tell whether these phenomena were subject to any law, because Ave had 
not made sufficient tests to define any law. We have been endeavoring 
to use a material manufactured in this country from raw materials found 
in this country, upon formula established with regard to material manu- 
factured in another country out of raw materials found in that country, 
and it needs no argument to show how absurd the effort was, and how 
unwise it was to expect any good results. From which I repeat, there- 
fore, it is of the utmost importance to this Society that every member of 
it should use whatever influence he may have with members of Congress 
and the public to bring about a restoration of this board for testing 
American iron and steel. As far as I can see, it is only by that means 
that we shall arrive within any reasonable time at the laws which govern 
the manufacture and use of iron and steel in this country. 

The Vice-Chairman called for a report of the Committee on " Gauging- 
of Streams." 

J. J. E. Croes (chairman of the committee), — " The Committee on 
Gauging of Streams " has no written report to make. The chairman 
can only state that some one hundred letters or more have been written 
to members of the Society in various parts of the country during the past 
year asking for the gauging of streams, specially for the flood water dis- 
charge of streams in places where there were reports of very heavy rains 
and freshets. Some ten replies have been received, but in none was 
there any information given. 

The Vice-Chairman next called for a report from the special com- 
mittee on a " Uniform System of Tests of Cements." 

Mr. D. J. Whittemoke (chairman of the committee).— When I was 
notified that I was appointed chairman of that committee, I wrote the 
other members of the committee and gave topics which I thought proper 
for us to consider in devising a uniform system of tests, but have had 
hardly time yet to receive their answers, and therefore am able to report 
only progress. 

The Vice-Chairman. — I think it best to announce that all these special 
standing committees will be continued unless a motion is made for their 
discharge. 

The Secretary then read the report of the Finance Committee, as 
follows : 



44 

The Finance Committee would respectfully' report : 

That on entering upon their term of office they carefully compared 
the accounts of the Secretary and Treasurer for the preceding year, in- 
cluding the books and vouchers, and found them correct and correspond- 
ing with the annual reports of those officers for that year, to which 
reports your committee would refer for a hill and complete statement of 
all the receipts and expenditures, together with the assets and liabilities 
of the Society at the commencement of the present fiscal year. 

During that portion of the present year already passed, a larger 
expenditure than usual has been made for printing circulars and notices, 
and postage on the same ; also in putting the library in better order and 
making catalogues of the books. 

This has been done in the carrying out of those ideas which have had 
for their object the increasing of the usefulness and advancing the 
interests of the Society. The wisdom of this is already manifested by a 
larger increase of membership and more general interest. 

The delinquency which still continues in regard to the i^ayment of 
dues may Avell claim thoughtful attention, as by this delinquency our 
.finances have been all along seriously embarrassed, and we have been 
prevented from doing many things which would have added to our pros- 
perity. It is hoped that the dawn of better times now upon us will show 
that it was not a lack of interest and want of a disposition to pay that 
has kept so large a list of debtors upon our books. 

While circumstances have in the past, and still do render it necessary 
to be very economical and prudent in our expenditures, we feel it our 
duty to congratulate the Society upon its present increasingly prosjierous 
financial condition. 

Your committee feel that it is a matter of great importance to our 
future prosiierity that suitable permanent quarters be obtained for the 
Society at as early a time as they can be secured, without embarrassment 
to our finances, and hope the movement already inaugurated may, in its 
present, or some modified form, result in placing us in possession of a 
suitalile building at an early date. 

In conclusion, we would congratulate the Society upon the fact, that 
financially, and in every other respect, this Society is now more prosper- 
ous than at any previous time in its history. 

Respectfully submitted, 

W. H. Paike. 
Chairman of Finance Committee. 

The report was accepted and filed. 

The Yice-Chairman then called for the report of the Committee on 
the Preservation of Timber. 

B. M. Hakeod (chairman of the committee). — I can only report that 
the committee has met, an organization has been effected, and the com- 
mittee intends to continue its meetings during the sitting of the Conven- 
tion. "We, therefore, simply report progress. 



45 

The appointment of a Nominating Committee was then considered, 
and after discussion, it was determined to choose the committee from 
nominations made representing the resident members at New York, the 
Atlantic States, the Lakes and Ohio Valley, the Northwest and the 
Southwest. 

The following members of the Society were appointed as a Nom- 
inating Committee : 

Theodore Cooper, of New York; Frederick Graff, of Philadelphia; 
William E. Merrill, of Cincinnati; E. S. Chesbrough, of Chicago; C. 
Shaler Smith, of St. Louis. 

The Convention then adjourned. 

May 26th. — The Convention met at 8 p. m. 

The Annual Address prepared by O. Chanute, Vice-President of the 
Society, was read by the Secretary. 

At the conclusion of the address, it was, on motion, resolved, that 
the thanks of the Convention be tendered to Vice-President Chanute. 

The Convention then adjourned. 

May 28th. — The Convention met at 9 a. m. 

A paper, subject, "Ship Canal Locks, Calculated for Operation by 
Steam," by Ashbel Welch, Member A. S. C. E., was read by the author. 

A paper, subject, "Practical Consequences of Variation of the Wet 
Section of Rivers under General and Special Conditions," by Robert E. 
McMatli, Member A. S. C. E. , was read by the author. 

A paper, subject, "Notes on the South Pass Jetties," by Max E. 
Schmidt, Member A. S. C. E., was then read by the Secretary, and 
additional remarks on the subject were made by James B. Eads. 

A paper, subject, "Cheap Transportation versus Rapid Transit and 
Delivery," by M. Coryell, Member A. S. C. E., was then presented. 

A paper, subject, "Wind Pressure against Bridges," by Ashbel 
Welch, Member A. S. C. E., was tlien read by the author, and discussed 
by Robert Briggs, Theodore Cooper, James B. Eads, James B. Francis 
and C. Shaler Smith. 

On motion, it was resolved, that a committee be apjiointed to corre- 
spond with Gen. A. J.'Myers, Chief Signal Officer, U. S. A., on the sub- 
ject of experiments upon wind pressures, and Messrs. C. Shaler Smith, 
Theodore Cooper and Robert Bi'iggs were appointed as such committee. 

A paper, subject, "The Improvements of the Harbor of Quebec," by 
J. Vincent Browne, C. E., was presented by the Secretary. 

Resohitions of thanks were jiassed to the Local Committee at St. 
Louis, to the members of the Engineers' Club of St. Louis, to the 

Note. — FFor the proceedings at the business meetiug of the Society, see report, page 49 
seq.] 



46 

various organizations, clubs, firms and individuals who had so largely 
extended courtesies to the Society, to the Western Union Telegraph 
Company for the use of its lines for social and domestic telegrams, and 
to the officers of the various railway corporations over whose lines the 
members had traveled en roide to the Convention. 
The Convention adjourned sine die. 

The arrangements made by the Local Committee for excursions and 
visits to places of interest, and for the comfort and entertaiment of the 
visitors to the Convention were very complete. The Local Committee 
was composed of members of the Society, and of the Engineers' Club of 
St. Louis, appointed at a joint meeting, and was as follows : Theodore 
Allen, A. H. Blaisdell, James B. Eads, Henry Flad, Claude Freeman, 
L. M. Johnson, Eobert E. McMath, E. D. Meier, Robert Moore, Fred. 
Shickle, W. P. Shinn, C. Shaler Smith, D. W. Wellmann, Thomas J. 
Whitmah. 

These gentlemen were assisted by the other members of the Special 

Committees for each day. 

The programme was illustrated, and handsomely printed. Its details, 
apart from the sessions of the Convention, are as follows: 



AMERICAN SOCIETY OF CIVIL ENGINEERS. 

Twelfth Annual Convention-St. Louis, May 25, 20, 27, and 28tli 1880. 

The headquarters of the Society during the Convention will be at the 
Linden Hotel. The Secretary's office will be in Parlor 22. 

The meetings of the Convention will be held in the Washington University, 
on the southwest corner of Washington avenue and Seventeenth street. 

From Linden Hotel take yehow cars on Washington avenue. 

Members of the Society and guests of the Convention will please report to 
the Secretary's office at the hotel immediately upon arrival. 

The following named railways have kindly placed specal trains at the 
disposal of the Convention for the excursions indicated in the programme: 
The Missouri Pacific Railway ; the Wabash, St. Louis & Pacific R^^i/way ; the 
St. Louis, Iron Mountain & Southern Railway ; the St. Louis, A. ct T. H. K. 
R Co • the E St. L. & C. R. W. and the Union Transit Co. 

' The various manufacturing establishments named in the programme extend 
invitations to the Convention to visit and inspect their works. 

The St. Louis Club also extends its hospitalities to members of the Con- 
vention. , , .„ 
Special committees for each day are designated m the programme, and will 

be recognized by red ro.settes. ' 

Members of the Society, and guests of the Convention, will be provided 

with special badges. . , 

Tuesday, May 25th. -The Convention wUl assemble at the ^^ashmgton 



47 

University at 9:30 a. m. ; adjourn at 12 m. ; lunch at hotel ; leave Union Depot 
at 1:30, bj' Wabash, St. Louis & Pacific Eailway, and arrive at St. Charles at 
2:15 p. M. ; inspect St. Charles Bridge ; leave St. Charles at 2:45 p. m., and re- 
turn bj' steamboat ; arrive at the St. Louis AVater Works at 5:45 p. m. ; leave 
Water Works at C:30 and land at the Bridge at 7 p. m. 

Special Committee for the day. — C. Shaler Smith, John C. Gault, Thos. J. 
Whitman, A. J. Chaphe, Thos. McKissock. 

Wednesday, May 26th, St. Louis Engineers' Chib Day. — At 1 p. m. take 
steamer Elon G. Smith, at foot of Washington avenue ; lunch on the boat ; 
arrive at Vulcan Steel Works at 2 p. m. ; visit Vulcan Steel Works, Western 
Iron Boat Building Co., Jupiter Furnace and Missouri Zinc Works until 3:45; 
at this point the excursion will divide into two parties ; party No. 1 will take 
MissoTiri Pacilic liailroad at 3:45 and go uia Kirkwood to Cheltenham, arriving 
at 4:45 ; there visit St. Louis Smelting Works and Laclede Fire Brick Works 
and leave at 5:45, arriving at Union Depot at 6 p. m. 

Special Committee. — Fred. Shickle, J. H. Maxon, A. A. Talmage. 

Part}' No. 2 will leave the Zinc Works at 3:45 and cross the river on the 
steamer Elan G. Smith to the Meier Iron Works ; at 4:30 leave Meier Iron 
AVorks by East St. Louis & Carondelet Kaihvay, and go to National Stock 
Yards. 

Special Committee. — B. Warren, Chas. Pfeiffer, Wm. Taussig, Claude Free- 
man, Jno. W. Conlogue. 

Thursday, May 27th. — Excursion to Iron Mountain, Pilot Knob and Crystal 
City. Leave Levee and Washington avenue at 7:30 a. m. on the St. Louis, 
Iron Mountain &, Southern Railway ; arrive at Iron Mountain at 10:45 a. m. ; 
leave Iron Mountain at 11:45 a. m. ; visit Pilot Knob 12 to 1:20 p. m. ; arrive at 
Arcadia at 1:30 p. m. Dinner. Leave Arcadia at 2:10 p. m. ; arrive at Crystal 
City at 4:30 p. m. ; leave Crystal City at 6 p. m. ; arrive at Washington avenue 
at 7 :30 p. m. 

Special Committee. — E. D. Meier, A. W. Soper, |L. M. Johnson, W. P. 
Shinn, J. H. Morley. 

Friday, May 28th. — In the afternoon, carriages will be at the disposal of 
members to visit such jDlaces as they may desire, such as Shaw's Garden, Fair 
Grounds, Merchants' Exchange, Cotton Compress Works, American Wine 
Co.'s Cellars, National Stone Block Co.'s Works, Wood Preserving Works, 
&c., &c. 

Special Committee. — Chas. A. Smith, Theodore Allen, A. H. Blaisdell. 

Subscription Dinner at Masonic Hall at 7:30 p. m. 

The Committee in charge of the Carriage Excursion of Friday the 2Sth, 
would suggest to such members and invited guests of the Society as have no 
individual preferences, that visits may be made to the places named below by 
parties as follows : 

No. 1. — Excursion by steamer A. A. Humphreys, through the kindness of 
Capt. Oswald H. Ernst, U. S. Engineers, at 2:30 (not 3h p. m.), from near the 
foot of Washington avenue, to the Horsetail Dyke, where may be seen the 
latest practice in the improvement of Silt Bearing Rivers. 

Committee.— Capt. 0. H. Ernst, D. M. Currie. 

No. 2.— Carriage Excursion at 2h 30m p. m., to Pipe Foundry and general 



48 

iron works of Shiekle, Harrison & Co., The Harrison Wire Works, Lafaj-ette 
Park, Compton Hill Reservoir, Shaw's Garden, Western (W. J. Lemp's) 
Brewery. 

Committee.— Chas. A. Smith, M. L. Hoi man. 

No. 3. — Carriage Excursion at 2h 30m to the Levee, inspecting one or more 
Typical Western River Steamboats, Peper and St. Louis Cotton Compress 
Companies, The St. Louis Cotton Mill, Anhei;ser Busch Brewery. 

Committee. — Theodore Allen, J. W. Meier. 

No. 4.— Carriage Exciirsion at 2h 30m to The St. Louis Lead & Oil Works, 
The Works for the Preservation of Timber, The Laclede Rolling Mill, The St. 
Louis Fair Grounds, The American Wine Co. 

Committee.— A. H. Blaisdell, P. W. Schaumleffel. 

Persons desiring to go to places other than above, please inform the Com- 
mittee for Friday. 

A pamphlet, with descriptions of matters of engineering interest, the 
l^arks, public works, &c. of the city, together with a map, was prepared 
and presented to the Convention. 

Special facilities were provided by the officers of the St. Lonis Bridge 
for an examination of that work by visitors to the Convention during 
their stay in St. Louis. 

On Saturday, May 29th, a number of those who had attended the 
Convention, left St. Louis and proceeded via Kansas City to Platts- 
mouth, Neb., by invitation of Geo. S. Morisou, Member of the Society, 
who is erecting at that point a bridge os^er the Missouri river. Oppor- 
tunity was afforded for a fall examination of this structure, one sj^an of 
which, 400 feet in length, had just been erected. 

Both in going to the Convention, on the trip to Plattsmouth and 
Omaha, and on the return to their homes, the attendants uiion the Con- 
vention were afforded by the railway companies special accommodations in 
travelling, and also were given opportunities for examining the works of 
engineering interest on the various lines. These courtesies were so ex- 
tended that a general acknowledgement of them, as expressing the hearty 
appreciation by the Society of these attentions, seems more appropriate 
than to attempt to publish a detailed list of all those from whom such 
attentions were received. 



MINUTES OF MEETINGS OF THE SOCIETY. 

May 19th, 1880.— The Society met at 8 p. m. John C. Campbell in 
the chair. A i^aper by T. S. Sedgwick, Member of the Society, subject: 
"Suggestions and Notes in regard to a New Decimal System of Weights 
and Measures," was read by the Secretary, and discussed by Messrs. 
CoUingwood, J. C. Campbell, Emery, Forney and Yardley. 



49 

May 2(3th, IhSO. — [Meeting of the Society held during the 12lh Annual 
Convention at St. Louis.^ The Society met at 9:30 p. m. Vice-President 
James B. Francis in the chair. 

Tlie Secretary, in accordance with the direction of the last Annual 
Meeting, j) resented for discussion the following suggestions made in the 
last report of the Board of Direction : 

" It has been suggested by a number of members, that the date of the Annital Meeting is 
particularly inconvenient, coming, as it does, the day after the date of the elections in quite a 
number of States. The Secretary has been informed by several members that their attendance 
at that day would be inconvenient, and, in some cases, impracticable, and a change in the date 
of the Annual Meeting might be discussed, and a more desirable day suggested. 

The Board suggests that the fiscal year shall end on December 31st ; that the Annual Meet, 
ing, election of officers and reception of reports be held on the 3d Wednesday of January, and 
that the term of office should begin on tlie day of election. 

These suggestions were discussed. 

The death of Thomas S. Hardee, - Member A. S. C. E., of New 
Orleans, La., which occurred May 21st, 1880, was announced, and 
Messrs. B. M. Harrod, B. H. Greene and Henry B. Richardson were ap- 
pointed a committee to prepare a memoir for publication in the Pro- 
ceedings. 

The death of Max Hjortsberg, Member A. S. C. E., of Chicago, HI. 
which occurred May 16th, 1880, was announced, and Messrs. W. Katte, 
E. S. Chesbrough, T. C. Clarke and Willard S. Pope were appointed a 
committee to prepare a memoir for publication in the Proceedings. 

The provisions of the Constitution and By-Laws regarding nomina- 
tions, balloting and elections to membership in the Society, were dis- 
cussed by William P. Shinn, C. Shaler Smith, and J. J. R. Croes. 

The following preamble and resolution were offered by Charles Mac- 
donald : 

Whereas, It is contrary to the spirit of a ReiDublican form of Govern- 
ment to constitute and educate at the public expense, a privileged class 
of engineers in military service, to whom alone are entrusted the design 
and supervision of works of public improvements, to the exclusion and 
prejudice of engineers in the civil service, whose education has not been 
a tax on the public treasury, who have proved themselves perfectly com- 
petent to execute works of the greatest magnitude in the best and most 
economical manner ; and 

Whereas, The United States has adopted a policy of entrusting the 
design and execution of works constructed at the expense and for the 
benefit of the general i^ublic to engineers of the United States army ; 
therefore, be it 

Resolved, That we hereby make an earnest protest against the in- 
justice thus being done to us as members of a profession ujjon whom 
so largely depends the material progress of our country ; further, that a 
committee of seven members of this Society be apiiointed, with power to 
act in the premises, whose duty it shall be to memorialize Congress for 
the correction of this great wrong. 



50 

After discussion by Charles Macdonald, J. J. R. Croes, Theodore 
Allen, James B. Eads, E. S. Chesbrough, Theodore Cooper and .Alex- 
ander DemiDster, the following substitute was offered by J. J. R. Croes : 

Resolved, That a committee of seven be appointed to preiiare a 
memorial to Congress asking that Civil Engineers may be placed in full 
charge of the works of public improvement carried on at Government 
expense ; such memorial to be submitted to the Society and voted on by 
letter ballot, on the first Wednesday in November. 

This substitute was accepted by Charles Macdonald, the mover of the 
original resolution. 

After discussion by Theodore Allen, J. J. R. Crees, Charles Mac- 
donald, James B. Eads, Robert Moore, William R. Hutton, John 
Bogart, John Whitelaw, C. Shaler Smith, and E. S. Chesbrough, the 
resolution was adopted. 

Under the provisions of this resolution, the following committee was 
appointed : Charles Macdonald, J.J. R. Croes, Albert Fink, Thomas C. 
Clarke, Alexander Dempster, Henry Flad, Julius E. Hilgard. 

Suggestions as to the place for the next (13th) Annual Convention, 
were made by various members, as follows : St. Paul, Minn. ; Milwaukee, 
Wis. ; Washington, D. C. ; Richmond, Ya. 

June 2d, 1880. — The Society met at 8 p. m. Joseph P. Davis in the 
chair. Ballots Avere canvassed, and the following candidates declared 
elected : As Members — William M. Hughes, of Cincinnati, O., Charles 
Kellogg, of Athens, Pa. ; Henry Manley, of Boston, Mass. As Associate — 
Edward Baumann, of Chicago, 111. As Juniors — Benjamin L. Crosby, of 
Plattsmouth, Neb. ; William Renschel, of Cleveland, O. 



ADDITIONS TO 



LIBRARY AND MUSEUM. 



From AdiiuDistratiou iles Pouts et 
C'haussees, Piiris: 
IJst of Members for 1880. 
Amjuls. February aud March, 1880. 

From Americau Chemioal Society, P. 
CasKamajor, Secretary , New York: 
Journal of tlie Society. Vol. 1. No. 12. 

From Americau lustitute of Mining 
Euaiueers, Dr. Thomas M. Drown, 
Secretary, Eastou, Pa.: 

Proceedings of tbo Annual Meeting held iu 
New York. February, 1880. 

Blast Furuace Working. Julian Kennedy. 

Notes on Battery aud Copper-Plate Amalga- 
mation. Kobert H. Richards. 

Notes on the Blast Furuace. J. M. Hartman. 

The Successful Manufacturer of Pressed Fuel 
at Port Uiohmond. Philadelphia, Pa. K. F. 
Loiseau. 

The Claiborne Group and its remarkable fos- 
sils. Prof. P. H. Mell, Jr. 

The Heat of the Comstock Lode. J. A. 
Church. 

The North Staffordshire Coal and Iron Dis- 
trict. \Vm. H. Merritt. 

The Mineral Resources of Southwestern Vir- 
s,'iuia. C. R. Boyd. 

The Puddling Process— Past aud Present. 
Percival Roberts, Jr. 

Notes on the Siemens Direct Process. A L 
Holley, LL.D. 

From American Iron and Steel Associa, 
tion. James M. Swank, Secretary- 
Philadelphia, Pa. : 
Directory to the Irou and Steel Works of the 
United States. Corrected to March 15, 
1880. 

From Argentine Scienttfic Society, Don 
Edwardo Aguirre, Buenos Ayres: 
Aualos. February, 1880. 

From Wm. S. Barbour, Cambridge, 
Mass. : 
Mayor's Ad>h'eRs and Annual Reports made to 
the City aud Council of Cambridge for 1879. 
Anuual Report of the City Engineer of Cam- 
bridge, for year ending Nov-. \iO, 1879. 
Fifteenth .innual Report of the Cambridge 

Water Board, lor 1879. 
The peiiticm of the Mayor of Cambridge for 
Annexation of a part of Belmont. Hearing 
before the Committee on Towns. 

From Boston Public Library, Mellen 
Chaniberlain. Librarian Boston: 
Bulletin for April, 1880. 

From Boston Society of Civil Engi- 
neers, George S. Rice, Secretary, Bos- 
ton: 
Proceedings. March, 1880. 
Main Drainage Works at Boston. Eliot C. 
Clarke. 



From Bureau of Education, Washing 
ton, D. C. : 
Circulars of Information of the Bureau. Nov. 
1. 1880. College Libraries as aids to instruc- 
tion. 

From Wm. H. Burr, Troy, N. Y. : 
Papers read before the Pi Eta Scientific So- 
ciety. Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. 
1679-80. 

From Hon. Allan Campbell, Commis- 
sioner Depaitment Public Works, 
New York: 
Report of the Department for Quarter ending 
Dec. 31, 1879. A review lor the year 1879. 

From Francis Collingwood, New Y''ork: 

Photograph view of Two Arches ue.\t in rear 
of Anchorage, New Y^ork Approach East 
River Bridge, 3,3 ■ aud 34' span. Keystone 
8' high. Extreme height of masonry, 74' 
above ground. Built. 1878. 

View down Frankfort Street from Elevated R. 
R. Height nearest cap, 62'. Size of cap, 
1() ' X 5 ■ V 2 • . Built. 1878 to 1880. 

Cliff Street Arch, New York approach East 
River Bridge, Span, 51'. 8". Clear height, 
42'. Built, 1879. 

Photograph one-half of one of the abutments 
at Vandewater Street, showing lightning 
Arches. Built, 1879. New York approach 
East River Bridge. 

Photograph Skew-Arch on CherryStreet front, 
and view through one of the anchorage tun- 
nels. Built, 1878. New York approach 
East River Bridge. 

Photograph showing Band of Brick Work iu 
Arches, &c. New York approach East River 
Bridge. 

From George W. Dresser, Editor, Amer- 
ican Gas-Light Journal, New York : 
Report of Proceedings of the Annual Meeting 
of the American Gas- Light Association. held 
at Cincinnati, Oct. 17, 1877, and at New York 
City, Oct. 15, 1878. 

From Capt. James B. Eads, St. Louis, 

Mo.: 

Address of Mr. James B. Eads before the 

House Select Committee on Inter-Oceanic 

Canals, March 9, 1880, in reply to Count F. 

de Lesseps. 

From Albert H. Emery, New Y'ork: 
Message from the President of the United 
States transmitting papers in the case of A. 
H. Etaery. 

From Engineers' Society of Western 
Pennsylvania, James H. Harlow, 
Secretary, Pittsburgh, Pa.: 

The Alleghany River. Thomas P. Roberts. 

The Metric System. William Kent. 

The Tay Bridge. A. Gottlieb. 



52 



From James T. Gardner, Albany, N. Y. : 
■Special report of New York Survey on the 
Preservation of the Sceueryof Niagara Falls, 
aud Fourth Annual Report on the Triangu- 
latiou of the State. James T, Gardner, 
Albany. 1880. 

From Charles O. Gleim, Cologne, Ger- 
many : 
Zeitsohrift fur Bankunde. Parts I, II, III 
and IV. 1879. 

From Samuel BI. Gray, Providence, 
R. I.: 
Aunual Report of the City Engineer of Prov- 
idence. 
Fourth Annual Report of the Board of Water 
Commissioners of the City of Providence. 
From Wm. Ham Hall, San Francisco, 
Cal. : 
Report of the State Engineer of California for 

1879. Wm. H. Hall. 

From Institution of Civil Engineers, 
James Forest, Secretary, Loudon: 
The Thames Steam Ferry between Wapping 

and Kotherhithe. Frederic E. Duckham. 
Tunnel Outlets from Storage Reservoirs. 
Charles J. Wood. 

From Institution of Mechanical Engi- 
neers, Walter R. Browne, Secretary, 
London : 
Transactions. January, 1880. 

From David Kirkaldy, London: 
Letter from David Kirkaldy to the Members 
of the Research Committee of the Institu- 
tion of Mechanical Engineers. January 28, 

1880. (Coi)ie8 lor distribution.) 

Letter from David Kirkaldy to the President, 
Council aud Members of the Institution of 
Mechanical Engineers. April 8, 1880. 
(Copies for distribution.) 

From Louis H. Knapp, Buft'alo, N. Y. : 
Map showing Territory to be drained by the 
Ferry aud Bird Ave. Receiving Sewer. Buf- 
falo, N. Y. : 

From ilassachusetts Institute of Tech- 
nology, BoFton: 
Fifteenth Aunual Catalogue of the Institute. 
1879-80. 

From Midland Institute, Mining, Civil 
aud Mechanical Engineers, Barnsley, 
Euglaud: 
Transactions. December, 1879. February 
and March, 1880. 

From Prof. Mansfield Merriman, Beth- 
lehem, Pa.: 
Register of the Lehigh University for 1879- 
80. 

From Minister of Public Instruction, 
Paris : 
Catalogue of the Ministry of Pubiic Instruc- 
tion. Universal Exposition at Paris, 1878. 
Parts 1, 2 and 3. (French.) 
Part 1. Catalogue of Library of Corps of 
Instructors. 
Part 2. Section 1. Theses. Publications 
of the Ministry. Subscriptions. Aca- 
demic Library. Books and Archives. 
Part 2. Section 11. Scientific Voyages 
and Missions. Exhibits as to Theatrical 
Representation. 
Part 3. Section I. Advanced Education. 
Part 3. Section II. Elementary Educa- 
tion. 
Belgian Section. Paris Exposition, 1878. 
Official Catalogue of the Works of Art and 



Products of Industry and Agriculture. 
(French.) 

From Prof. W. Ripley Nichols, Boston : 
Sanitary condiiion of Schoolhouses. Boston, 
Mass. Prof. W. Ripley Nichols. 

From North of England Institute Min- 
ing and :Mechauical Engineers, Theo. 
Wood Buuuiug, Secretary, Newcastle- 
on-Tyne, England; 
Transactions. November and December, 
1879. 

From Charles Paine, Gen. Sup't L. S. 
and M. S. R. R., Cleveland, Ohio: 
Twelfth Annual Report, Cleveland, Columbus, 
( inciunati and Indianapolis Railway Com- 
pany. Cleveland, 1880. 
Tenth Annual Report Lake Shore and Mich- 
igan Southern Railroad. Cleveland, 1880. 
Annual Report Minneapolis and St. Louis 
Railway Company. Minneaiiolis, 1880. 
From Steven C. Pierson, W. Moriden, 
Conn.: 
Annual Reports of the several departments of 
the City of Meriden, for the years 1878 and 
1879. 
Second Annual Report of the State Board of 
Health of Massachusetts for the fiscal year 
ending November 30, 1878. 

From Ernest Pontzeu, Paris: 
Les Chemins de fer devant le Parlement. 
L'exploitation par I'etat et par I'industrie 
privee. M. Emile Level. Paris, 1880. 
Die Alternativ- Trassen der Arlbug-Bahn. 
Wilhelm von Nordling. Vienna, 1879. 

From Publishers Revue Generale des 
Chemins de fer, Edgar Monjean, 
Secretary, Paris: 
, Revue Generale des Chemins de fu. January, 
■1880. 

From Moncure Robinson, Philadelphia, 
Pa.: 
Obituary Notice of Mitchel Chevalier. Mon- 
cure Robinson. 

From School of Mines, Columbia Col- 
lege, New York: 
School of Mines Quarterly. Vol. I., No. 4. 
May, 1880. 

From Sidney F. Shelbourne, New 
York: 
A Comparative View of the Panama aud San 
Bias Routes for an Interoceanic Canal. S. 
F. Shelbourne. (4 copies.] 
San Bias Route, Interoceanic Ship Canal. S. 
F. Shelbourne. (3 copies.) 

From Societie des lugenieurs Civils. M. 
Mallet, Secretary, Paris: 
Memoirs. January and February, 1880. 

From Spielmaun and Brush, Hoboken, 
N. J.: 
Scientific American and Supplement of May 8,' 
1889. Containing an account of the Pro- 
gress of Work on Hudson River Tunnel. 

From United States Association of Char- 
coal Iron Workers, John Birkinbine, 
Secretary, Harrisburg, Pa. : 
Journal of the Association, No. 1, April, 
1880. 

From United States Naval Observatory, 
Washington, D. C. : 
A Subject- Index to the Publications of the U. 
S. Naval Observatory, 1845-1875. Edward 
S. Holden. 



From Gen. Horatio G. Wright, Chief 
of Jhiyiueers, Washiugton, D. C. : 

Annual Report on the Improvement of the 
South Pass of Mississippi Kiver, June 30, 
1879. Capt. M. K. Browne. (Copies for 
distribution.) 
Eeport of Survey of Month of Red River, 
La., with maps. Maj. W. H. H. Benyaurd. 
(2 copies.) 
Report of Survey of Mississippi River, near 
Lake Concordia, La., and Cowpen Bend, 
Miss., looking to the protection of the har- 
bors of Natchez and Vidalia. Maj. W. H. 
H. Benyaurd. (2 copies.) 

Letter from Chief of Engineers covering 
copy of report from Ma.j. S. M. Mansfield, 
of the result of are-survey of Trinity River, 
Tex., from its mouth to the bridge of the 
Great North- rn Railroad, made in accord- 
ance with the River and Harbor Act of 
March 3, 187i). (2 copies.) 

Letter from the Chief of Engineers in rela- 
tion to the bills now before Congress to 
confirm the survey of the Pueblo of San 
Francisco, suggesting certain amendmeuts. 
(2 copies.) 

Report in regard to the Improvement of San- 
\lu8ky River, below Fremont. Ohio, giving 
estimate of cost of same. Maj. J. M. Wil- 
son. (2 copies.) 

Communication from Chief Engineers rela- 
tive to a bill entitled " A Bill to confirm the 
survey of the Pueblo of San Francisco." 
(2 copies.) 

Report of Survey of I)an River from Clarks- 
ville to Danville, Va. S. Thayer Abert. (2 
copies.) 

A copy of Report upon Survey of Mobile 
Harbor, Alabama. Capt. A. N. Dami-ell. 
(2 copies.) 

A Report upon Survey of the harbor of Mo- 
bile. Capt. A. N. Damrell. (2 copies.) 

Copies of Reports of Pamunkey and Archer's 
Hope Rivers, Va., of Lockwood's Folly and 
Waccammaw Rivers, North Carolina; and 
of Pee Dee River, South Carolina. Capt. 
C. B. Philips. (2 copies.) 

Copy of Report of Surveys of York River and 
of Lynn Haven, Link Horn and Broad 
Bays, Virginia. Capt. C. B. Philips. (2 
copies.) 

Report of Survey of Kankakee River, in In- 
diana and Illinois. Maj. J. A. Smith. (2 
copies.) 

Report of Survey of Green River and its 
tributaries. Muddy and Barren rivers, Ken- 
tucky. Col. Wm. E. Merrill. (2 copies.) 

Papers relative to the payment of first install- 
ment of compensation to Mr. James B. 
Eads for maintenance, of channel at South 
Pass, Jlississippi River, October 30, 1879. 
(Copies f(ir distribution.) 

Report of the Board of Engineers on the Im- 



provement of the Wisconsin River. (3 
copies.) 

Report of Committee, on Railways and Canals 
(H. R.) to obolish all tolls, on the Louisville 
and Portland Canal. (2 copies.) 

Information relative to the Improvement of 
the Harbor at Grand HaveE, Mich. Maj. 
F. Hanwood. (2 copies.) 

Report of Examinations and Surveys made 
in compliance with River and Harbor Act, 
of Naticoke River, Delaware and Maryland ; 

Broad Creek, Northeast River, Tuckahoe 
Creek, Slaughter Creek and Cabin Creek, 
Maryland, andChincoteague Inlet, Virginia. 
Maj. W. P. Craighill. (2 copies.) 

Report upon the Improvement of Alton Har- 
bor, together with a map of the Mississippi 
River in that vicinity. Col. J. H. Simpson. 
(2 copies.) 

Report of an Examination and Survey of 
Gasconade River, from its mouth to Vienna, 
in Marie's Co., Missouri. Maj. C. II. Suter. 
(2 copies.) 

A Report of the Survey of the Connecticut 
River below Hartford, Conn. Gen. G. K. 
Warren, (2 cojiies,) ; 

Report in relation to Inland Water Routes 
from Norfolk, Va., to the Atlantic Ocean, 
south of Cape Hatteras, &c. Capt. C. B. 
Philips. (2 copies.) 

Report of the Survey of AUegheney River 
from French Creek to Olean, N. Y. Col 
Wm. E. Merrill. (2 copies.) 

From De Volson Wood, Hoboken, N. J.: 

Quarternions. Prof. De Volson Wood. Vol. 
III., No. 3. May, 1880. 

From Frank W. Whitlock. W. Newton, 
Mass. : 

Canal do Nicaragua. Expose de la Question. 
M. Felix Belly. Paris. 1859. 

From Lucien N. B. Wysc, Paris, 
France : 

Raj^ports sur les Etudes de la Commission 
Internationale d'exploration de I'lsthme 
American. L. N. H. Wyse, Armand Reclus, 
P. Sosa. Paris, 1879. 
From other sources : 

The American Catalogue. Author and Title 
Entries of Books in print and for sale (in- 
cluding reprints and importations) July 1, 
1876. Lynd E. Jones. New York. 1880. 

Library Journal. Vol. V., Nos. 3 and 4. 

Bernard Quaritch's letter to General Starring. 

Jan. 14, 1880. 
Report of Special Committee of Board of 
■Trade of San Francisco on Interoceanic 
Canal San Francisco. 1880. 
Annual Report of the Engineer and Manager 

Toronto Water Works, for 1879. 
L'Etat et les Chemins de fer en Angleterre. 
Lettre addresse Commission des jinnals da 
Fonts el Cliaussees par Ch. de Franqueville. 



ANNOUNCEMENTS. 



The following resolutions were adopted at Twentieth street, one door east from Fourth 

the Ninth Annual Convention of the Society, avenue, and near the southwest corner of 

and ordered printed regularly in the Society Grammercy Park. It is open from nine o'clock 

publications : a.m. to five o'clock p.m. each business day, 

Whereas, the metric system of weights and except Saturday, when it is closed at three 

measures is now extensively used abroad, o'clock p.m. 

and whereas it is desirable that the relation The Library and Conversation Rooms, will 

of the units of the differing systems be made also, for the present, be open every Wednes- 

familiar to all by comparison : day evening from ly^, to 10 P. M., and during 

the cooler months every Saturday evening. 

Resolved, That members be requested, in ^^^^ ^^^ ,j^g ^^^^ ^^^^^^^ ^j^^ ^^^^^^ ^j^ ^^^ 

papers hereafter presented to the Society, to ^^^ ^^^ ^ve^^ut be open on Thursday evenings, 

yrite, in parenthesis, weights or dimensions ^^^^^,^,,^ ^re invited to avail themselves of 

by the metric system, in connection with ^^^ opportunities afforded on these evenings, 

those of the system in general use. ^^^1^ ^^^ consultation of books and periodicals 

The House of the Society is at 104 East and for conversation. 



LIST OF MEMBERS. 



ADDITIONS. 
HONORARY MEMBERS. 

Date of Election. 

Dirks, Ju.stin Chief Engineer " Waterstaat " and the 

Canal from Amsterdam to the Sea, 

Amsterdam, Holland June 2, i88o. 

Weber, Max Maria, Baron Von. .Imperial Councillor, 15erlin, 

Germany June 2, iSSo. 



Currie, David McN Assistant U. S. Engineer, 404 Market 

St., St. Louis, Mo May 5, 1880. 

Defrees, Morris M 29 Court House, Indianapolis, Ind.. . .May 5, 1880. 

Hughes, Wiu.iam M. .. .Assistant City Engineer, Cincinnati, 

Ohio June 2, 18S0. 

Kellogg, Charles (Kellogg & Maurice), Athens, Bradford 

Co., Pa June 2, 1880. 

MacNaughton, James . . . Albany, N. V May 5, 1880. 

Manlev, Henry T. Assistant City Engineer, Boston, Mass. June 2, 1880. 

Morse, Henry G Morse Bridge Co., Youngstown, Ohio. April 7, 1880. 

Robinson, Albert A. . . .Chief Engineer Atchinson, Topeka and 

Santa Fe Railroad, Pueblo, Col May 5, iSSo. 



55 

Smith, Charles A Washington University, St. Louis, Mo. April 7, 18S0. 

TlNTORER, Jose Giberga. Union 7 pr., Barcelona, Spain May 5, 1880. 

WEn<, Charles G Assistant U. S. Engineer, 24 East Tenth 

St., New York City, N. Y May 5, 1880. 

YoNtiE, Samuel H Assistant U.S. Engineer, P. O. Box 

26, St. Charles, Mo May 5, 1880. 

ASSOCIATES. 

Baumann, Edward Architect, 59 Metropolitan Block, 

Chicago, 111 June 2, 1880. 

Belcher, Gkokce W. C, .Belcher Sugar Refining Co., St. Louis, 

Mo May 5, 1 880. 

Burr, William H (Elected Junior, June 3, 1874), Renns- 

selaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, 

N. Y May 5, 1880. 

JUNIOR. 

Crosby, Beniamin L Assistant Engineer, Plattsmouth Bridge, 

Plattsmouth, Neb June 2, 1880. 



changes and corrections, 
members. 

Allen, C. Frank Engineers' Office A.', T. and S. F. RR., Pucl.Io, Col- 
orado. 

AuCHiNCLOSS, William S.209 Church St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Baxter, George S 209 East Eighteenth St., New York City, N. Y. 

Belknap, Morris S Corner Eighth and Oak Sts., Louisville, Ky. 

Davis, Joseph P Room 23, Western Union Building, New York City, N. Y. 

Durham, C. Wheeler. . . 154 Michigan Ave., Chicago, 111. 

Earley, John E Locating Engineer, A. and P. RR., Albuquerque, N. M. 

Greenwood, William II. Care of Santiago Lohse, 4 Calle de vSan Manuel, City of 
Mexico, Mexico. 

Katte, Walter Chief Engineer Midland Improvement Co., 20 Nassau 

St., Room 5, New York City, N. Y. 

Low, GoRiiAM P., Jr Care of St. Paul Union Depot Co., St. Paul, Minn. 

Marsland, Edward Sing Sing, N. Y. 

Newton, William H 490 Webster Ave., Chicago, 111. 

Noble, Alfred Sault Ste. Marie, Mich. 

Osgood, Joseph O Milton, Mass. 

Rotch, William Jamaica Plain, Mass. 

Sedgwick, Thomas S. . . .Rockport, Aransas Co., Texas. 

Shreve, Samuel H 31 East Thirty-first St., New York City, N. Y. 

Striedinger, Julius H. .85 East Tenth St., New York City, N. Y. 

Unthank, a. W Tucson, Arizona. 

Walling, Henry F 98 Trowbridge St., Cambridge, Mass. 

Warfield, Albert G., Jr. Oakdale, Florence P. O., Howard Co., Md, 



)6 



JUNIOR. 

Reevp:s, David 410 Walnut St., riiiladelphia, Ta. 



DECEASED. 

Hardee, Thomas S New Orleans, I-a. (Elected Member April 4, 1877) ; died 

May 21, 1880. 
IIjORTSREKG, Max Chicago, 111. (Elected Member November 22, 1872) ; died 

May 16, 1880. 
Ford, Arthur L Panama, C. A. (Elected Associate November 6, 1872) ; 

died May 30, 1880. 



American ^ocieb o| |;ml Iniginem. 



PROCEEDINOS. 



Vol. VI.— July, 1880. 
» ♦ ^ 

MINUTES OF MEETINQS 

(Abstractof such as may be of general interest to inembers.) 



OF THE SOCIETY. 

June 16th, 1880.— The Society met at 8 p. m. Vice-President Chan- 
ute in the Chair. 

The death of Arthur L. Ford, Associate A. S. C. E., which occurred 
at Panama, May 30th, 1880, was announced, and Messrs. M. N. Forney, 
O. C!hanute and Charles Macdonald were appointed a committee to pre- 
pare a memoir for publication. 

A paper by Martin Coryell, Member A. S. C. E., subject "Cheap 
Transportation versus Eapid Transit and Delivery," was read by the 
author, and discussed by Messrs. Chanute, Coryell, Dresser, Forney, 
Macdonald, North, Strang and von Weber. 

July 7th, 1880.— The Society met at 8 p. m. Ashbel Welch in the 
Chair. 

The provisions of the Constitution and By-Laws regarding nomina- 
tions, balloting and elections to meml)ership in the Society, together 
with suggested modifications of these provisions, were discussed by 



58 



William Metcalf (by letter), and by Messrs. Andrews, Baxter, Bogart, 
Cooper, Croes, North, Welch and Yardley. 

The election to Honorary Membership and the acceptance of their 
election by John Ericsson, of New York, Justin Dirks, of Amsterdam, 
Holland, and M. M. Baron von Weber, of Berlin, Germany, was 
announced. 

Ballots were canvassed, and the following candidates declared elected: 
As Members — Smith S. Leach, Corps of Engineers, U. S. A., St. Louis, 
Mo. ; John A. Ockerson, St. Louis, Mo. ; William N. Radenhurst (elected 
Junior July 7th, 1.S75), Rochester, N. Y. ; Hart Vance, St. Louis, Mo. 
As Associate — Henry B. Hammond, New York. As Juniors— Stephenson 
Waters Fox, St. Louis, Mo. ; Ellis B. Noyes, Boston, Mass. 

OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTION. 

June 9th, 1880. — Aijplications Avere considered. Action was taken 
as to Members in arrears. Approi^riations were made. 

July 13th, 1880. —Applications were considered. Under the provis- 
ions of Section 1 of the By-Laws the further meetings of the Society 
during the months of July and August were directed to be susj^ended. 
The rooms of the Society will be open during these months each Wed- 
nesday evening from 7 :30 to 10 o'clock. 



LIST OF NEW BOOKS ON 

ENGINEERNG AND TECHNOLOGY 



Arcbes : Theory of solid aud braced elastic 
arches ; applied to arch bridges aud roofs 
iu iron, wood, concrete or other material ; 
graphical analysis reprinted from Van IVos- 
trand's Magazine. W. Cain, New York. 
I'imo., illiis. (Science Series, No. 48.) Van 
Nostrand. $0.50. 

Architecture : Glossary of Terms used in 
Grecian, Roman, Italian and Gothic Archi- 
tecture J. H. Parker, New York. l6mo., 
illus. Scribner £ Welford. $3.00. 

Arms : American inventions and improve- 
ments in breech-loading small arms, heavy 
ordnance, machiue guns, magazine arms, 
fixed ammunition, pistols, projectiles, ex- 
plosives, and other muuitions of war, iucl. a 
chapter on sporting arms. C. B. Norton, 
Springfield, Mass. (Juarto, illus. Chapi i 
d- Gould. $10. OU. 
Bridges : Modern Examples of Road and 
Railway Bridges ; iUustrating the most Re- 
cent Practice of Leading Engineers iu 
Euroi^e and America. Partially reprinted 
from Engineering. 94 plates. Folio. W. 
H. Mawand J. Dredge. London. Engineer- 
ing. 42s. 



Camping : How to camp out ; hints for camp- 
ing and walking. Knapsack ed. J. M. 
Gould, New York. Scribners. $0.75. 

Drawing : Draughtman's hand-book of plan 
aud map drawing, with instructions for 
preparation of engineering, architectural 
and mechanical drawings. G. C. Andre, 
London. ' 4to. plates. Spous, Ne%u York. 
$3.75. 

: Hand-book of drawing ; with upward 

of 200 woodcuts and diagrams. 1st Amer. 
from '2d Eng. ed. W. Walker. 12mo. New 
York. Scribners. $1.75. 

: ; Mathematical drawing instru- 
ments, and how to use them. F. E. Hulme, 
New York. 12mo. Bicknell <£ Comstock. 
$1.50. 

Electric Light : Its Production and Use. 
Embodying Plain Directions for the Work- 
ing of Galvanic Batteries, Electric Lamps, 
and Dynamo-Electric Machines. J. W. 
Urquhart, C. E. Edited by F. G. Webb. 
London. 8vo., illus. Crosby Lockwood. 
(Announcement.) 

Excavation and Embankment Tables, for the 



59 



rapid and accurate finding, directly from 
cross-seciiou notes, of the cubic contents of 
railroad excavations and embankments. 
Edited by C. and C. Piillen, Cbicago. Sv>i., 
plates. J. M. ^y. Jones. $5.00. 

Export : American export trade guide for 
buyer.s in loreign countries ; cont. an ac- 
curate list of American manufacturers, ex- 
porters and commission merchants, in all 
parts of the U. S. ; articles of merchandise 
exported alphabetically arr. and classified 
under their respective headings ; foreign 
steamship and shipping lines. New York. 
16mo. T. G. Kent <£• Co. $2 . 50. 

Eyesight: good and bad. Treatise on the 
ex(^rcise and preservation of vision. R. B. 
Carter. Philadelphia. 12mo., illus. Presley 
Blackiston. $1.50. 

Field Engineer : H •ud-book of Practice on the 
Survey, Location, and Track-work of Rail- 
roads. \V. Findlay Sbunk. New York. 
12mo. Van Nostrand. $2.50. 

Fluid Motion : Elements of the mathematical 
theory of fluid motion ; motion of a solid 
in a fluid ; vibrations of liquid spheroids. 
Reprinted from Van Nostrand' s Magazine. 
J. Craig. New York. (Science Series No. 
49.) Van Nostrand. $0.50. 

Geology : Engineering Geology. With colored 
Maps and Illustrations. W. H. Penning. 
London. 8vo. Bailliere. 3s. 6d. 

Graphic Statics. G. Sydenham Clarke. 
Loudon, ito., illus. Spous, New York. 
$650. 

Inter-Oceanic Canal : The American Inter- 
Oceanic Canal Quessiou. Bear Admiral D. 
Ammen, U. S. N. Philadelphia. 8vo. 
Hamerslij. 

: Inter-Oceanic Canal and the Mon- 
roe Doctrine. New York. 12mo. Put- 
nanis. $1.00. 

Library Key : An index of general reading. 
F. A. Archibald. New York. 8vo. Phillips 
it Hunt. $1.00. 

Lightning Conductors : Their history, nature 
and mode of application. R. Anderson. 
London. 8vo. Spous, New Yorh. .f_6.50. 

Linkages : The different forms and uses of 
articulated links ; tr. from Rtvw. Universelle 
des Mines, and reprinted from Van Nos- 
trand's Magazine. J. D. C. de Roos. New 
York. (Science Series, No. 47.) Van Nos- 
trand. ,$0.50. 

Machine Drawing Copies : A series of Litho- 
grai>h('d Working Drawings ot the most im- 
portant parts of Machines and Engines. 
W. Btisbridge. London. Spous. New York. 

Mine Drainage : Being a Complete and 
Practical Treatise on Direct-.Acting Under- 
ground Steam-Pumping Machinery. Stephen 
Michel). Loudon. 8vo., illus. Crosby 
Lockwood. (Announcement.) 
Mining : Lectures delivered at the School of 
Mines, Paris, by J. Gallon, Inspector 
General of Mines. Translated by C. L. 
Ko.ster and W. Galloway. Paris. 8vo. 
Atlas. Plates. 3 vols. Ormod, Paris. Dulau, 
London. Per vol. 2tip. 
MiQoraldgy : Elementary guide to determina- 
tive mineralogy, for the use of the practical 
mineralogist and prospector, and for in- 
struction in schools and academies ; based 
upon the method of Weisbach's TabcUen 



zur bestimmung der minerallen ; applied 
chiefly to American species. C. Gilbert 
Wheeler, Chicago. 12mo. S. J. Wheeler. 
$1.00. 

Patent Case Index : Containing lists of all 
cases involving patents for inventions, as 
reported in the State and e ederal reports, 
Robb's patent cases, and Patent Ofiice 
Gazette, to present time ; with brief synop- 
sia«>f law points decided, arr. alphabetically. 
W P. Treble, Jr. Boston. 12mo. Little, 
Broivn <£ Co. $5.00. 

Railroads : Permanent Way, Rolling Stock 
and Technical Working of Railways. 
Charles Couche, Inspector General of Mines, 
Paris, Vol. I. translated by James N. School- 
bred. Vol. II., translated by J. Edwards 
Wilson. London. 4to. Text. Folio Atlas. 
Dunod, Paris. Dulau, London. To be 
completed in 4 vols. Vol. 1, £2 ; Vol. 2, £5. 

: Taxation of Railroads and Railroad 

Securities. C. F. Adams, Jr. New York. 
12mo. Railroad Gazette. $0.25. 

; Federation of the Railroad System ; 

argument, Feb. 27, 1880, before the Com- 
mittee of Commerce of U. S. House of 
Representatives, on the bills to regulate 
Inter- State Railroad Traffic. Chas. Francia 
Adams, Jr. Boston. 8vo. Estes <& Lauriat. 
$0.20. 

Roads : Hints to highway surveyors on the 
repair of main roads. W. H. Wheeler. 
London. 8vo. Spuus, New York. $0.20. 

Royal Engineers : Professional Papers of the 
Corps of Royal Engineers. Series of Occa- 
sional Papers. Vol. 3, 1879 Edited by 
Major R. H. Vetch, R. E. With numerous 
plates. 8vo., pp. 408. ^Royal Engineer 
Institute, Chatham, 12s. 

Sanitary Science : Brain work and overwork. 
H. C. Wood, Jr., M. D. (American Health 
Primers.) Philadelphia. 32mo. Presley 
Blackiston. $0.50. 

: Cleanliness and Disinfection. 

Elisha Harris, M. D. New York. IGmo. 
Putnams. $0.08. 

: Dwelling Houses ; Their Sanitary 

Construction and Arrangement. W. H. 
Corfield, M. A., M. D. (Van Nostraud's 
Science Series.) 18mo. New York. D. Van 
Nostrand. $0.50. 

: Public Health, Reports and Papers. 

Vol. IV. Presented at the meetings of the 
Am. Public Health Assn., 1877-1878. Boston. 
8vo. Nouglitnn, 0.'<gnod it Co. $5.00. 

Sewage Disposid. Henry Robinson. Loudon. 
8vo. Spous, New York. $1,50. 

Sewers and Drains for Populous Districts. 
Julius W. Adams, Chief Engineer to the 
Board ot City Works, and Consulting Engi- 
neer to the Board of Health, Brooklyn. 8vo, 
illustrated. New York. Van Nostrand. 
$2.50. 

Specifications : Hand-book of Specifications ; 
or, Practical Guide to the Architect, Engi- 
neer. Surveyor, and Builder, in drawing iip 
Specifications and Contracts for Works and 
Constructions. With Preliminary Essay, 
Forms of Specifications and Contracts, &c., 
&c., with numerous illustrations. T. 
Donaldbon. London. 8vo. Crosby Lock- 
wood. £1, lis. 6d. 

Steam Boilers ; Practical treatise on high 



GO 

pressure steam boilers; iiicludin;,' results Valves: The Slide Valve Practically Explainocl. 

of recent exinriiiieiitnl tests of boiler ina- Einbraciug Simple and complete Practical 

terials ; with dcscriptiiiu of ajjproved safety I » inniistrations of the Operations of each 

apparatus, steam pumps, injectors and Element in a Slide Valve Movement, &c. 

economizers in actual use. W. M. Barr. Joshua Rose. Philadelphia. 8vo. H. C. 

Indianapolis, Ind. 8vo. lUus. Yohn Bros. Baird de Co. $1.00. 
$4.00, 

Steam Ent,'ine : Corliss Engino and Allied Water Analysis for Sanitary Purposes. With 

Steam Motors, working with or without Hints for tlie Interpretation of Results. E. 

Automatic Expansion-gear ; including the Faukland. l'hilad?lphia. l'2mo. lUus. 

most approved Designs of all Countries, , I'resley Blakiston. $1.00. 
with .special reference to the Steam Engines 

of the Paris International Exhibition of Water and Gas Works. Remarks on the Ra- 

1878. Translated from the German of W. tings of. Josepli Quick, Jr. London. 

H..Uhland, by A. Tolhausen, C. E. In two 8vo. Illus. Spous. New York. $1.00 
vols. 4to, and Atlas of about 60 Photo- 

lithogi'aphed Drawings. London. Spou.<!, Wire Gauge : Birmingham Wire Gauge. Cor- 

New York. $32. Ou. I'ect values of the Birmingham Wire Gauge 

: Richards' Steam Engine Indicator. i" l^Oths of an inch, &c. John Watkins. 

Charles T. Porter. Revised with large addi- On a card. London. Spous, New York. $0.10. 

tions, by F. W. Bacon. New York. 12nio. „,.,„,.„ „ 

Illus. Van Noslrand. $1.00. -—; English Wire Gauge : With des- 

c. , T. XT- i nr <• * 1 TT criptive table, and drawmg. T. Hughes. 

Steel : Its History, Manufacture and TTses London. 8vo. Spous, Nexv York. $100. 
J. S. Jeans, Sec. Iron and Steel lust, of 

Great Britain. Loudon. 8vo. Plates and ^ . Keport of the Committee of the 

Illus. Spous, i\ew lurk. $14.50. Society of Telegraph Engineers on the Birm- 

Tin verse Tables : Traverse Tables com- ingham Wires Gauge, by C. V. Walker ; 

])Utod to Four Places of Decimals for every together with Papers on the Unit of the 

Degree of Angle, up to 100 of Distance, for Birmingham Gauge. And on the Birming- 

thc use of Surveyors and Engineers. R. L. ham Wire Gauge, by Latimer Clarke, Lon- 

Gurdon. Loudon. Folio, GriJJin. 308. dou. 8vo. pp. 39. Spou. Is. 



THE NORMAN MEDAL. 



CODE OF KULES FOR ITS AWARD. 

I.— Competitioii for the Norman Medal of the American Society of 
Civil Engineers shall be restricted to Members of the Society. 

II. — There shall be one gold medal, and only one, struck for each 
and every fiscal year of the Society, and awarded as hereinafter pro- 
vided. The dies therefor shall be with the Superintendent of the 
United States Mint at Philadelphia, in trust exclusively for the above 
purpose. Such medal shall be of a cost equal to the annual interest 
received ujion $1 000 of the Consolidated Stock of the City of New 
York, Certificate No. 179, of the additional new Croton Aqueduct Stock 
of the City of New York, authorized by an Act of the Legislature of the 
State of New York, Chap. 230, jaassed April 15th, 1870, dated November 
17th, 1873, now held in trust by the Treasurer of this Society, and so 
held solely for this purpose, and shall be executed upon his order. 

III. — All original })apers presented to the Society by members of any 
class, during the year for which the medal is awarded, shall be oijen to 
the awards, provided that such paj^ei's shall not have been previously 
contributed in whole or in part to any other association, nor have 
appeared in print prior to their publication by the Society, nor have been 
presented to the Society in any previous year. 

IV. — The Board of Censors to award the Medal shall consist of three 



61 

members of the Society, to be desiguated by the Boanl of Direction. 
The Secretary of the Society shall act as Secretary to the Board of 
Censors. 

v.— The medal shall be awarded to such paper as the said Board shall 
judge to be worthy of special commendation for its merits as a contribu- 
tion to Engineering Science, not merely relatively as compared with 
others presented during the same year, but as exhibiting the science, 
talent or industry displayed in the consideration of the subject treated 
of, and for the good which may be expected to result from the discussion 
and the inquiry. 

^I-— 111 ti'i-se no paper presented during the year shall be deemed of 
sufficient value to receive an award, the amount of the interest of the 
fund for that year shall be expended by the Board of Direction in the 
purchase of ^books, to be offered as a premium for the second best paper 
in the next year in which more than one paper of sufficient value may be 
presented. 

VII- —The medal year shall terminate on the first day of August, and 
the award shall be announced at the Annual JNIeeting in November. 

VIII- —The Treasurer of this Society shall cause the medal to be 
prepared and delivered to, or deposited to the order of, the successful 
competitor, within two months after the Annual Meeting at which the 
same shall have been awarded. 



ANNOUNCEMENTS. 



The next regular meeting of the Society will Eesolvecl, That members be requested, in 

be held Wednesday, September 7th, 1880, at papers hereafter presented to the Society, to 

8 P. M. A paper by J. Vincent Browne, C. E., ^rite, in parenthesis, weights or dimensions 

on the Harbor Improvements of Quebec, by the metric system, in connection with 

Canada, will be read and discussed. those of the system in general use. 

During July and August the Society rooms The House of the Society is at 104 East 

will be open as usuid during the day, and also Twentieth street, one door east from Fourth 

on each Wednesday evening from T}i to 10 avenue, and near the southwest corner of 

° "'°cl^- Grammercy Park. It is open from nine o'clock 

The following resolutions were adopted at ''''^- *° ^""^ °'°^°''^ ^•'^- ^""^ lousiness day. 

the Ninth Annual Convention of the Society, ^^"""^^ Saturday, when it is closed at three 

and ordered printed regularly in the Society °''"°'''' ''•'^• 

publications : The Library and Conversation Rooms will 

also, for the present, be open every Wed7ies- 

Whereas, the metric system of weights and day evening from T'^', to 10 p. m. Members 

measures is now extensively used abroad, are invited to avail themselves of the oppor- 

and whereas it is desirable that the relation tunities afforded on Wednesday evenings both 

of the units of the differing systems be made for consultation of books and periodicals and 

familiar to all by comparison : for conversation. 



62 

LIST OF MEMBERS. 

ADDITIONS. 
HONORARY MEMBERS. 

Date of Election. 
Ericsson, John 36 Beach St., New York City, N. Y. .October 2, 1879. 



CHANGES AND CORRECTIONS. 

Cogswell, William B 41 McBride St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

CoPELAND, George M 24 Park Place, Room 17, New York City, N. Y. 

Harding, Henry. Care of Richmoncl and Southwestern Railway, Pcaris- 

burg, Giles Co., Va. 

Moore, Charles E Care of Crane Bros. Mfg. Co., Chicago, 111. 

NicoLLS, William J General Office Long Island Railroad, Long Island City, 

N. Y. 
RoTCH, William Consulting Engineer and Purchasing Agent, Mexican 

Central Railway Company, 87 Milk St., Boston, 

Mass. 
Seymour, Charles Chief Engineer Lookout Mountain Railroad (from 

Chatanooga, Tenn., to Rome, Ga.), Chatanooga, 

Tenn. 
Stearns, Frederick P Ass't Engineer Improved Sewerage Works, Atlantic, 

Mass. 



^nierican mtki^ of :^;tiil |nflinem 



(f . 



PROOEEOIN^aS. 



Vol. VI. — August, I 



ANNOUNCEMENTS. 



The next regular meeting of the Society will 
be held Wednesday, September 7th, 1880, at 
8 p. M. A paper bj J. Vincent Browne, C. E., 
on the Harbor Improvements of Quebec, 
Canada, will be read and discussed. 

During July and August the Society rooms 
will be open as usual during the day, and also 
on each Wednesday evening from 7}j to 10 
o'clock. 

The following resolutions were adopted at 
the Ninth Annual Convention of the Society, 
and ordered printed regularly in the Society 
publications : 

Whereas, the metric system of weights and 
measures is now extensively used abroad, 
and whereas it is desirable that the relation 
of the units of the differing systems be made 
familiar to all by comparison : 
4 



Resolved, That members be requested, in 
papers hereafter iiresented to the Society, to 
ivrite, in parenthesis, weights or dimensions 
by the metric system, in connection with 
those of the system in general use. 

The House of the Society is at 104 East 
Twentieth street, one door east from Fourth 
avenue, and near the southwest corner of 
Grammercy Park. It is open from nine o'clock 
A.M. to five o'clock P.M. each business day, 
except Saturday, when it is closed at three 
o'clock P.M. * 

The Library and Conversation Rooms will 
also, for the present, be ojien every Wednes- 
day evening from l}i, to 10 p. m. Members 
are invited to avail themselves of the oppor- 
tunities afforded on Wednesday evenings both 
for consultation of books and periodicals and 
for conversation. 



04 
THE NORMAN MEDAL. 

CODE OF EULES FOR ITS AWAED. 

I.— Competition for the Norman Medal of the American Society of 
Civil Engineers shall be restricted to Members of the Society. 

II. — There shall be one gold medal, and only one, struck for each 
and every fiscal year of the Society, and awarded as hereinafter pro- 
vided. The dies therefor shall be with the Superintendent of the 
United States Mint at Philadelphia, in trust exclusively for the above 
purpose. Such medal shall be of a cost equal to the annual interest 
received upon $1 000 of the Consolidated Stock of the City of New 
York, Certificate No. 179, of the additic>nal new Croton Aqueduct Stock 
of the City of New York, authorized by an Act of the Legislature of the 
State of New York, Chap. 230, passed April 15th, 1870, dated November 
17th, 1873, now held in trust by the Treasurer of this Society, and so 
held solely for this purpose, and shall be executed upon his order. 

III.— All original papers presented to the Society by members of any 
class, during the year for which the medal is awarded, shall be open to 
the awards, provided that such papers shall not have been previously 
contributed in whole or in part to any other association, nor have 
appeared in print prior to their publication l)y the Society, nor have been 
presented to the Society in any previous year. 

IV. — The Board of Censors to award the Medal shall consist of three 
members of the Society, to be designated by the Board of Direction. 
The Secretary of the Society shall act as Secretary to the Board of 
Censors. 

V. — The medal shall be awarded to such paper as the said Board shall 
judge to be worthy of sjDCcial commendation for its merits as a contribu- 
tion to Engineering Science, not merely relatively as compared with 
others presented during the same year, but as exhibiting the science, 
talent or industry disjjlayed in the consideration of the subject treated 
of, and for the good which may be expected to result from the discussion 
and the inquiry. 

VI. — In case no paper presented during the year shall be deemed of 
sufficient value to receive an award, the amount of the interest of the 
fund for that year shall be expended by the Board of Direction in the 
purchase of books, to be offered as a premium for the second best paper 
in the next year in which more than one paper of sufficient value may be 
presented. 

VII. — The medal year shall terminate on the first day of August, and 
the award shall be announced at the Annual Meeting in November. 

VIII. — The Treasurer of this Society shall cause the medal to be 
prepared and delivered to, or deposited to the order of, the successful 
competitor, within two months after the Annual Meeting at which the 
same shall have been awarded. 



65 

ADDITIONS TO 

LIBRARY AND MUSEUM. 



From Aclmiuistration des Pouts et 
Chansees, Paris: 
Annaes. April and May, 1880. 

From American Chemical Society, P. 
Cassamajor, Secretary, New York: 
Journal of the Society. Vol. II., Nos. 1, 2, 
and 3. 

From American Institute of Architects, 
H. M. Congdon, Secretary, New 
York; i 

Proceedings of Thirteenth Annual Conven- 
tion, held in New York, November 19th and 
20th, 1879. 

From American Iron and Steel Associa- 
tion, .James M. Swank, Secretary, 
Philadelphia; 
Annual Report of the Secretary for 1879. 

From C. A. Angstrom, Stockholm, 
Sweden: 
Handbok for Berakuing och Byggnad af Tur- 
blner och Turbin-Pumpar. Stockholm, 
1880. 

From Argentine Scientific Society, Don 
Eduardo Aguirre, Secretary, Buenos 
Ay res: 
Anales. February, April and May, 1880. 

From Charles E. Bilhn, Philadelphia: 
On the Grothard Railroad. Charles E. Billin 
(5 coisies.) 

From Boston Society of Civil Engi- 
neers, Fred'k Brooks, Librarian, 
Boston: 
Proceedings. April, 1880. 

From G. Bouscaren, Cincinnati, Ohio: 
Report on the progress of work and cost of 
completing and maintaining the Cincin- 
nati Southern Railway. G. Bouscaren, 
Cincinnati, 1880. (Copies for distribu- 
tion.) 

From Robert Briggs, Philadelphia: 

The Decimal Gauge. Robert Briggs. Phila- 
delphia, 1880. 

From Francis Colliugwood, New York : 

Specifications for Steel Wire Ropes for the 
Over-Floor Stays and Storm Cables of the 
East River Suspension Bridge. 1880. 

Specifications for Steel Suspenders, Connect- 
ing Rods, Stirrups and Pius for the East 
River Suspension Bridge. 1880. 

Specifications for the Construction of a 
Bridge on the Hue of the East River 
Bridge across Franklin Square, in ihe City 
of New York. June, 1880. (Several 
copies.) 

From Commissioners of Second Geo- 
logical Survey of Pennsylvania. Wm. 
A. Ingham, Secretary. Philadelphia: 
Report of Progress in Indiana County. W, 

G. Piatt. Harrisburg, 1878. 
The Geology of Lawrence County. A special 
Report on the Correlation of the Coal 
Measures in Western Pennsylvania and 
Eastern Ohio. I. C. White. Harrisburg, 
1878. ° 

The Geology of Mercer County. I. C. White, 
Harrisburg, 1880. 



The Permian or Upper Carboniferous Flora 
of West Virginia and Southwestern Penn- 
sylvania. Wm. M. Fontaine and I. C. 
White. Harrisburg, 1880. 

From Joseph P. Cotton, Newport, 
R. I.: 
Lithograph Map of the Battlefield of Five 
Forks. 

Prom J. James R- Croes, New York: 
A Table of general information concerning 
the Water Works of the Uuited States and 
Canadas. C. G. Hildreth, l.ockport, 1878. 
From Dyckerhott' and Sohue, Amijeu- 
burg, Germany: 
Proceedings of the General Convention of 
the German Society of Cement Manufac- 
turers and the Sessions of the Society of 
Manufacturers of Bricks, Hollow Ware, 
Lime and Cement, February 5th, 6th and 
7th, 1880. (German.) 

From Capt. James B. Eads, St. Louis: 
The preliminary report of the Mississippi 
River Commission. 

From Engineer Department, U. S. A., 
Washington, D. C. : 
Report upon the Blasting Operations at 
Lime Point, Cal., in 1868 and 1869. Col. 
George H. Mendell. 

From M. N. Forney, New York: 
Improved Tank Locomotives. M. N. Forney. 

From Hiram F. Hills, Boston; 
Experiments upon Piezometer used in Hy- 
draulic Investigations. Hiram F. Hills, 
Boston, 1878. 

From Institution of Civil Engineers, 
.James Forrest, Secretary, London : 
Minutes of Proceedings. Vol. LIX. 
Abstracts of papers published in Foreign 
Transactions and Periodicals Vol. LX. 
Session 1879-80. Part II. 
Excerpt Minutes of Proceedings. Edited by 
the Secretary, as follows : 

The use of Asphalt and Mineral Bitumen 
in Engineering. William H. Delano. 

Bridge over tha Monougahela River at 
Port Perry, Pa. Joseph M. Wilson. 

Fire Hydrants, with description of one 
in use at Halifax, N. S. Edward H. Keat- 
ing. 

Fixed and Movable Weirs. L. F. Vernon 
Harcourt. 
Movable Dams in Indian Weirs. Robert 

B. Buckley. 

Dredging operations on the Danube be- 
tween Pressburg and Gonyo, in Hungary. 
Murray Jackson. 

The River Nile. Benjamin Baker. 

Iron and Steel at Low Temperature. 
John J. Webster. 

The Theory of Modern American Sus- 
pension Bridges. Celeste Clericetti. 

The regulation of the Waters of the Jura. 

C. de Gralfenried. 

New Zealand Light-houses. John 
Blackett. 

From L. J. Le Coute, Oakland, Cal.: 



66 



Eeport of the State Engineer of California 
for 1879. William Ham Hall. 

From Wm. H. McFadden, Chief Engi- 
neer Water Department, Phila- 
delphia: 
Annual Report of the Water Department of 
Philadelphia for 1879. 

From McGill College and University, 
Montreal ; 
Annual Calendar. Session 1880-81. 

From Simon Newcomb, Superintend- 
ent American Ephemeris, Washing- 
ton, D. C: 
A Transformation of Hansen's Lunar Theory 
compared with the Theory of Delaunay. 
Simon Newcomb. Washington, 1880. 

From Gen. John Newton, Corps of En- 
gineers U. S. A., New York: 
Annual Report on the removal of obstruc- 
tions at Hell Gate. Gen. John Newton. 
Washington, 1877. 

From New York Meteorological Ob- 
servatory, Daniel Draper, Director, 
Central Park, New York: 
Abstracts from Self-Recordiug Instruments. 
April and May, 1880. 

From Edward P. North, New York: 
Reports of the Executive Committee and 
Treasurer of the New York Bridge Com- 
pany, Brooklyn, 1872. 
Report of Chief Engineer of East River 
Bridge on Prices of Materials and estimated 
cost of the Structure. June 28, 1S72. 
Pneumatic Tower Foundation of the East 
River Suspension Bridge. New York, 
1872. 
Report of Board of Consulting Engineers ap- 
pointed to recommend a plan for the New 
Y'ork and Long Island Bridge across the 
East River at Blackwell's Island. 
Memoir of the Iron Bridge over the Missouri 
Kiver at St. Joseph, Mo. Built in 1871-2-3. 
A method of constructing Bridge Piers and 
the substructure of Wharves or other 
Harbor Works. S. B. Cushing. Provi- 
dence, R. I., 1870. 
Calculation of Strain on Members of Girders 
continuous over Supports. Prof. Charles 
A. Smith. St Louis, 1873. 
The effects of High Atmospheric pressure, in- 
cluding the Caisson Disease. A. H. Smith, 
M. D. Brooklyn. 1873. 
Bullion Its production and use. Compiled 
bv the Editor of Bullion. . New York, 1880. 
Chimney Construction. R. M. Bancroft. 

London, 1878. 
Reports of the Department of Public Works, 
City of New York, for Quarters ending 
Dec. 31, 1877, Deo. 31, 1878, March 31, and 
Sept. 30, 1879. 
Annual Reports of the Department of Public 
Works, City of Chicago, for 1873, 1876 and 
1878. 
Fitz John Porter, Commissioner of Public 
Works, to Andrew H. Green, Comptroller 
of the City of New York. Dec. 2, 1875. 
Annual Report of the Harbor Commissioners 

of Montreal for 1878. 
Annual Report of the Chief of Engineers for 
year ending June, 1878. Vol. II. Parts 1 
and 2. 
Annual Report of the Ontario Silver Minmg 

Com'.iany, for year ending Jan. 3l8t, 1878. 
Annual Report of the State Engineer and 
Surveyor, on the Canals of the State of New 
York, for 1878. (2 copies.) 



Report of the Committee on the Affairs of 
Cities, to the Assembly ot New York, April, 
1880, as to the present system of Street 
Cleaning in the City of New York, and the 
means whereby a more efficient and econ- 
omical method of doing the work may be 

Annual Report of the James River Improve- 
ment Commission, for 1879. 
The Delta of the Mississippi; the physics of 
the river, the control oi its floods, and the 
redemption of the alluvion. Prof. C. G. 
Forshey, Cambridge, 1873. 
Report on the Mississippi Jetties, August 18, 

1876. Capt. James B. Eads. 
Hydraulic Lime of Teil and French Cements. 

H. Charapin and Gillet. New York, 1873. 
A resolution (H. R.) of March 20, 1872. relative 
to removing the Light-house at New Haven 
harbor to Southwest Ledge. Hon. S. W. 
Kellogg. 
The Strength of Wrought Iron, as aflected 
by its Composition ami by its Reduction in 
rolling. A. L. Holley, Ph. B. 
The Hayford Process and Apparatus for Pre- 
serving Timber. Edward R. Andrews. 
Proceedings of the Roa.lmasters Meeting of 
the Atlantic and Great Western Railroad, 
held at Meadville. Pa., Nov. U, 1878. 
Notes on the Mineral District of Minora. 

Isaac Saffrans. 
On the Relation of Moisture and Air to Health 

and Comfort. Robert Briggs. 
Statement of E. J. Lewis, showing why he 
should not be removed as Superintendent 
23d and 24th Wards, Department Public 
Parks, Aug. 13, 1879. 
Stat-ment by Commissioner Smith E. Lane, 
of the Violations of Law, and Irregularities 
in the Department of Public Parks, on the 
part of Commissioners Wenman, Wetmore 
and Conover, in answer to the letter of 
Mayor Cooper, Sept. 9, 1879, calUng for 
such statement. 
The National Advantages of Government Aid 
to American Commerce. Wm. P. Clyde, 
New York, 1880. 
Specitications of the Boundary street inter- 
cepting Sewer. 
Specifications for laying Granite Block Pave- 
ment in the City of Washington, D. C, 
1879.. . . 

Specitications for completing and equipping 
with rolling stock, and all necessary ap- 
purtenances, the railroad of the New York 
City and Northern Railroad Co., from 
Highbridge. in the City of New York, to the 
New York, Harlem and Albany Railroad, in 
the town of South East, Putnam Co., N. Y. 
Seventh Annual Report of the Trustees of 
the Metropolitan Museum of Art, May 17, 
1«77. 
Foundation of the Washington National 

Monument. Washington, 1873. 
A paper relating to Fraction Engin38 or Road 
Locomotives. The past, the present and 
tUe future of Steam on the Common Road. 
Prof. R. H. Thurston, Philadelphia, 1872. 
Report of the .American Scientific Commis- 
sion on the Artihcial Waterways of Europe, 
with special reference to the Tehuantepeo 
Railway and Ship Canal. 1871. 
luterooeanic Canal. Practibility of the differ- 
ent routes, and questionable nature of the 
interest of the United States in a Canal. 
J. Lawrence Smith. 
Tehuantepec Railway, 1879. Grant bv the 
Government of Mexico to Edward Learned, 



67 



of Pittsfleld, Mass., for construction of 
Railways and Telegraph Lines, with control 
of Ports ou both sides of the Isthmus. 
Dated ,Juue 2, 1879. 

Third Annual Report of the Water Commis- 
sioners of the City of Lowell, Mass., 1873. 

Official Catalogue, International Exhibition, 
Philadelphia, 1876. Part I., Main Building 
and Annexes. 

Official Catalogue, International Exhibition, 
Philadelphia, 1876. Part II., Department 
IV. Art. 

Official Catalogues of the Austrian, German, 
Russian and New South Wales Depart- 
ments, International Exhibition, Philadel- 
phia, 1876. 

From North of England Institute 

Mining and Mechanical Eugineers, 

Theo. Wood Running. Secretary, 

Newcastle-ou-Tyne, England : 

Transactions. February, March, April and 

May, 1880. 

From Publishers Revue Generale des 
Chemines de fer, Edgar Monjean, 
Secretary, Paris : 
Revue Generale des Chemins de fer. Febru- 
ary, JVIarch and April, 18 -iO. 

From Royal United Service Institution, 
Capt. B. B.irgess, Seureiarv, London: 
Journal of the Institute. Vol. XXIV No. 
CIV. 

From Hon. Horatio Seymour, Jr., State 
Engineer and Surveyor, Albany, N. 

State Engineer's Report on Railroads of the 
State of New York, for 1878. 

From Charles A. Smith, St. Louis: 
Proposals, Contract and Specifications for 
Hydraulic Pumping Machinery, Richmond 
Water Works. 

From Societe des Ingenieurs Civils. 
Paris : 
Memoires. April, 18S0. 

From St. Louis Public School Library, 
Fred. M. Crunden, Librarian, St. 
Louis : 
Bulletin of the Library. Nos. 5 and 6. Sep- 
tember-December, 1879. 

From Joseph W. Turtle, Newark, N. J.: 
Congressional Directory. Second Session. 
4Gth Congress. F. A. Richardson. 

From University of Tokio, H. Kato, 
President, Tokio. Japan : 
Calendar of the Departments of Law, Science 
and Literature, for 1879-80. 



From United States Light-house Board, 
Washington, D. C: 
List of Beacons, Buoys, Towers and other 
Day-Marks, in the First Light-house Dis- 
trict. Corrected to May 1, 1880. (2 copies.) 

From United States Naval Institute, 
Annapolis, Md. : 
Proceedings of the Institute. Vol. VL, No. 2. 

From Gen. Horatio G. Wright, Chief 
of Engineers, U. 8 A., WashiUKton, 
D. C: 
Report of Board of Engineers for fortifica- 
tions, and for river and harbor improve- 
ments : the suggestion of the Chief of 
Engineers that the unexpended balances of 
the appropriations of June 18, 1878, and 
March 3, 1879, be applied to the improve- 
ment and dri-dging, &c., of the mouth of 
Red River. 
Report upon examination of Broad River, 
South Carolina, made in compliance with 
law. Gen. Q. A. Gilmore. 

Report on a survey of the entrance to Cum- 
berland Sound, Florida, made in accordance 
with River and Harbor Act, March 3, 1879. 
Gen Q. A. Gilmore. 

Communications from Chief of Engineers on 
reports of Capt. Chas. B. Phillips, of ex- 
aminations made in accordance with law, of 
Catawba, Wateree and Santee rivers. 

A letter of Chief of Engineers accompanying 
copy of report on surveys of St. Mary's 
River, Mich., made in compliance with 
law. Gen. G. Weitzel. 

Copies of reports on survey made of Superior 
Bay, for the improvement of harbor at head 
of Lake Superior. Capt. Charles J. Allen. 

Report on survey made in compliance with 
requirements of River and Harbor Act, of 
March 3, 1879, of the Mississippi River, op- 
posite the mouth of the Missouri. Col. J. 
H. Simpson. 

Widening the channel at Rock Island Rapids. 

Report in relation to the mining debris in the 
Sacramento hiver. Col. Geo. H. Mendell. 

Reports respecting the entrance of Yaquiua 
Bay, Oregon. 

The removal of Wrecks which may obstruct 
navigation. 

From Joseph M. Wilson, Philadelphia : 
The bridge over the Monongahela River at 
Port Perry, Pa. Jos. M. Wilson. 

From William E. Worthen, New York : 
Report upon the Construction of Relief Sewers 
m the City of Brooklyn, N. Y. Wm. E. 
Worthen and Robert Van Buren. Brook- 
lyn, 1878. 

From other sources : 
The Library Journal. Vol. V., Nos. 5 and 6. 



C8 

LIST OF MEMBERS 



ADDITIONS. 



MEMBER. 

Date of Election. 
OCKERSON, John A U. S. Assistant Engineer, 2828 Wash- 
ington Ave., St. Louis, Mo T^ily 7> 1S80. 



JUNIORS. 

Fox, S. Waters. U. S. Assistant Engineer, 135 1 Wash- 
ington Ave., St. Louis, Mo July 7, 18S0. 

NoYES, Ellis B U. S. Naval Station, New London, 

Conn July 7. 1S80. 

Reuschel, William Assistant Engineer, Cleveland Bridge 

and Car Works, Cleveland, Ohio. .June 2, 1880. 



CHANGES AND CORRECTIONS. 



Nicholson, George B ...Chief Ass't. Engineer Knoxville and Cincinnati South- 
ern Railway, Knoxville, Tenn. 

Pearsons, Galen W Kansas City, Mo. 

Schmidt, Max E U. S. Ass't. Engineer, 404 Market St., St. Louis, Mo. 

Stephens, Clinton F. . . .Chief Engineer Texas and St. Louis Railway, Tyler, Tex. 
Walling, Henry F U. S. Coast and Geodetic Survey, Washington, D. C. 



juniors. 



Glaskin, Edwin E 52 Queen Victoria St., London, England. 

Horton' Sani-ord Engineer Dep't. N. M. and S. P.R. R., Silver City, N. M. 






I^KOCEEDIISraS. 



Vol. VI. — September, 1880. 



MINUTES OF MEETINGS. 

(Abstractof such as may be of general interest to members.) 



OF THE SOCIETY. 

September 1st, 1880. — The Society met at 8 p. m. Charles H. Has- 
Tvell in the Chair. 

The death of James A. Hay ward, Member A. 8. C. E., waS' an- 
nounced. 

A paper by J. Vincent Browne, C. E., on the "Quebec Harbor Im- 
provements," and a paj^er by L. G. F. Bouscaren, Member A. S. C. E., 
on "Experiments on Wrought Iron Columns," were read. 

The Committee on a Memorial to Congress respecting the employ- 
ment of Civil Engineers on National Public Works, asked through the 
Chairman, C. Macdonald, for an extension of the time for i^reparing the 
memorial, which was granted, and the date for the ballot on the memorial 
was fixed at January 5th, 1881. 

Ballots were canvassed, and the following candidates were declared 
elected : As Members — Eobert Ballard, of Queensland, Australia ; John 
F. Barnard, of St. Joseph, Mo. ; Eedmond J. Brough, of Toronto, 
Canada ; Cyrus B. Coaastock, U. S. Army, Detroit, Mich. ; James L. 
Frazier, of Morehead, Ky. ; Robert B. Stanton, of Madisonville, O. 

OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTION. 

August 3d, 1880. — Applications for membershi^D were considered. 
The Secretary and Treasurer presented list of members in arrears for 
dues, and Form C was ordered to be sent to all such. Appropriations 
■were made. Leave of absf-nce was granted to the Secretary for six weeks, 
and the Treasurer was requested to act as Secretary, pro tern. James B. 
Francis, Thomas C. Clarke and Charles Hermany were appointed 
Censors to award the Norman Medal. 



70 ■ 

DISCUSSION, 

At tlie regular meeting held duriug the Annual Convention Maj 
26th, 1880 (page 49, Proceedings, July, 1880), on 

THE MODE OF ELECTING MEMBERS. 

W. P. Shinn.— The fourth article of the Constitution, provides thafl 
civil, military, geological, mining and mechanical engineers, architects 
and other persons who by profession are interested in the advancement 
of science, shall be eligible for admission in their appropriate class. 
There are other sections which provide what the particular requirements 
are of eligibility to the position of member and of associate, respect- 
ively ; and there is another section that provides that ballots shall be 
taken to decide whether or not the persons who are recommended as mem- 
bers of this Society shall be allowed to become members, and I take it, 
that under our Constitution, it is a right that belongs to every engineer 
described in this section to become a member of this Society in his 
appropriate class, if he comes within the description of tliis section, and of 
the other sections which describe the qualification for each class. Some- 
two years ago I recommended to the membership of this Society a 
gentleman who has been for about thirty years a member of this profes- 
sion, who has practiced in the various branches of the profession, but 
principally in the coustruction and management of railroads, during 
nearly the whole of that thirty years, and who has attained the position 
of general manager of a company controlling nearly a thousand miles of 
railroad ; the application of that gentleman was brought before the 
Board of Direction, was considered by them, was approved by them, and 
his name was sent out to be balloted for. At that time our Constitution 
provided that three negative votes should exclude, and the gentleman 
received precisely three negative votes ; they thought possibly there 
was some mistake, and a second ballot was had upon the same applica- 
tion, with the same result, there were precisely three negative votes. 
Recently, within the past two months, the name of this same gentleman 
has been again presented, and again balloted for, but the change in our 
Constitution having made it necessary for five negative votes to exclude, 
I understand there were six, and this gentleman was excluded from mem- 
bership by sis negative votes. Now, of course, every member of this 
Society has a right to cast a negative vote, and I take it that that right 
applies to negative votes cast for professional considerations, and not for 
social or merely unfriendly reasons ; I do not know the names of the 
members who cast negative votes in the case, and I do not want to know 
them ; I am told that the names are known, or are believed to be known, 
but I have no desire to know them; but it has appeared to me, and it has 
appeared to some other members of the Society with whom I have con- 
versed upon the subject, and, indeed, my attention was called to the 



71 

matter by other members, that the reasons for the exclusion of that 
gentleman from membership wei'e not professional reasons, 
that to-day he is as fully entitled to membership of this Society as I am, 
and I know of no reason why he should not be a member of this Society; 
I know of no reason that comes within the prohibitions of our Constitu- 
tion, and if, as has been thought, and indeed, alleged, that one or all of 
those negative votes were cast for social and personal reasons, an injustice 
has been done. First, to the gentleman against whom the ballot was 
cast ; second, to the members of this Society who recommended that 
gentleman ; and third, and worst of all, to the Society itself. This 
Society cannot afford to stand on so narrow a basis that any social or 
personal reasons can keep out of it any man whose professional attain- 
ments entitle him to membershiii. There are in every city of any size 
social clubs, and a gentleman has a perfect right to black-ball an appli- 
cant for social reasons ; if he don't see proper to associate with the ap- 
plicant it is his right to black-ball him ; to say that he does not wish to 
meet him at the club ; but I take it, Mr. President, this is no such 
place, and that no member in this Society has any right to cast a nega- 
tive vote against any applicant for any reasons of that character. Now, my 
object in calling attention to this matter was not to find fault with those 
gentlemen who cast those negative votes, far otherwise ; what I wished 
to do was,, to call the attention of .the Society to the fact that the votes 
cast against this applicant have indicated that our present mode of elec- 
tion is not satisfactory ; that it is not going to answer for the future 
welfare of the Society. Probably the best point that can be taken against 
it is this, that at present there is nobody responsible for any one who is 
an applicant failing to become a member of this Society. The Board of 
Direction have tried, before the names of the applicants are brought up 
for ballot, to canvass the subject, to make such inquiries as they think 
proper, and if any member choose to write them, and state reasons why 
a person known to him to be an applicant should not become a member, 
the Board will undoubtedly take it into consideration, and after the Board 
has passed on the subject, and has decided, as far as they knoAV, that 
an ajaplicant is eligible, and is a proper person to be balloted for, then, if 
that i^erson does not become a member, there is nobody responsible ; 
the parties who say he shall not become a member are anouymous ; you 
cannot put your finger on them ; you cannot find out in any regular way 
what their reasons are, and as our Constitution now stands, you have no 
right to ask, and I submit, that that is not a safe founda- 
tion for us to rest upon. I propose, therefore, between this and the 
time of the next annual meeting, within the proper time, as required by 
the Constitution, to submit an amendment to the Constitution which 
shall provide in substance, that applications for membership shall go be- 
fore the Board of Direction, and that a circular shall be issued by the 
Secretary, stating that at a certain meeting of the Board of Direction, at 



72 

least thirty days ahead, the application will be considered by the Board ; 
that the Board at that meeting shall decide whether or not that applicant 
shall become a member ; then all will know who is responsible if a 
proper man is rejected, while every member of the Society will have an 
opportunity to give the Board, through any of its members, any reasons 
of a professional nature which exist against the applicant becoming a 
member. 

I would suggest, as one of the possibilities under the present state 
of our Constitution in regard to an election, that it is within the power 
of any five members of this Society now to say that this Society shall 
not have any more members ; I do not wish to say, or even to intimate, 
that there are any five members who would combine for that purpose, 
but I simply say it is in the i30wer of any five, not only in their power, 
but, as far as the forms of our Constitution are concerned,, it would 
seem to be their right, although I claim that that is not the fact ; that 
on the other hand, I believe an applicant, if he is eligible, and has the 
proper qualifications professionally, has a right to be a member 
of this Society. I wish to bring the subject before this large- Conven- 
tion, in order that when the amendment to the Constitution is presented, 
that members will all understand its bearing ; that it is not brought up 
now with any reference to the particular person who has thrice been re- 
jected by the Society ; that case is the test that has called attention to 
the subject, and, as I believe myself, as well as some other members 
with w^hom I have conversed, we are not on the right path ; we must re-, 
trace our steps. 

I will say right here that I urged most strongly the adoption-. 
of the present mode of balloting for applicants, but I have repented. 
I believe it was a mistake, and I propose to signify my repentance by 
oflfering the amendment to the Constitution I refer to. 

C. Shaler SinTH. — I would state in relation to what Mr. ghinn 
has so well stated, the evil has been larger probably, and of a greater , 
extent, than perhaps we are aware of ; I have in my hand a letter from 
a member in New York who, in speaking of questions to be brought up 
before this meeting, states : " Then another question which should be. 
discussed is the matter of admission of members ; it is well known that , 
a clique has been formed to prevent the admission of members, to black- j 
ball certain prominent members well worthy of admission into the ^ 
Society, because of personal antipathy, etc." This comes from New. 
York ; I learn to-day also from a member from Cincinnati, that a similar ^ 
case has occurred there, where a man thoroughly well knoAvn and 
thoroughly fit for admission to the Society, has been black-balled in a 
similar manner. 

Like Mr. Shinn, I was one of those who strongly advocated the 
present mode, but I think the best method of correcting the present evil 
is this, no man having a desire to black-ball a member of this Society 



73 

should be afraid to acknowledge that fact, and over his own signature 
give his reasons therefor. I think the Constitution should take this 
shape ; allow the ballot to stand as it is, and provide in the amendment 
to the Constitution that members desiring to l:)lack-ball shall, over their 
own signature, give their reasons for so doing ; and then, that the Board 
of Direction shall correspond with those members, and ascertain the 
facts or data that they have to give in investigating the qtiestion, and if, 
in their own opinion, the charges are not sustain^-d, that the black-balls 
be thrown out, and considered as a vote not cast ; I believe that will give 
US a solution of the question, and enable the Board of Direction to get at 
the root of the question, and find whether the charges which may be 
made against any member are made in good faith. 

J. J. R. Ckoes. — Before the discussion goes any further, it may be as 
well to correct a misapprehension under which the gentleman who has 
just spoken seems to labor. He states that the letter from which he 
read was received from New York ; in that letter it is stated : " It is well 
known that a clique had been formed to prevent the election of certain 
prominent engineers." I have been in communication with a great 
many members, and I hear a great deal that goes on in the Society, and 
I have never heard anything of such a thing except in connection with 
the two members who were black-balled, or for whom negative votes 
werc^ cast in the April or March meeting. I think there have been no 
candidates black-balled for more than two years, with the exception of 
those two, and one other case, and that other one I have heard no more 
about. I know there were five negative votes, and the matter dropped; 
but I do not believe there is any clique formed to prevent the admission 
of certain men at all, and I would want better evidence than a letter of 
that kind to convince me of it ; I do not believe the members of the 
Society would form such cliques. As Mr. Shinn has stated, one gentle- 
man was rejected twice, two years together, and the manner of electing 
was changed then— and it was his rejection that caused that change— and 
when he was nominated again he got six black-balls. Now, if the Board 
of Direction should reject any member,is the Board of Direction to be 
changed because they find persons objectionable ? The fact is, that 
there has been a large number of members voted for and elected, I think 
over one hundred within three years, and only three have been rejected, 
and-I do not think that looks very much as if there was any clique formed. 

I do not want to be understood as opposing any change in the mode 
of election ; it is very probable that some better mode than the present 
one might be devised. I only doubt the correctness of the assertion that 
well known combinations have been formed to prevent the election of 
members. I do not believe that to be the case. 

William METCAI.F.*— It seems to me that the " black-ball " feature 
in elections for members should not be abolished. If the Society is to 

* By letter, June 24, 1880. 



74 

retain a professional character, it will be necessary to throw sonae safe- 
guard around the question of admission to membership; and, on the other 
hand, if the Society is to be national in character, which I suppose we 
all wish it to remain, it is equally clear that any person of good character 
who shall have attained sufficient standing in his profession to meet the 
requirements of the Constitution and By-Laws, has then a right to be- 
come a member, upon appUcation in due form. The Society should be 
able to protect itself against the admission of persons of insufficient ex- 
l^erience, or of bad character, such as dishonesty, imfaithfulness, unpro- 
fessional conduct of any kind, or gross immorality of any sort, that 
might bring discredit upon the profession, or be seriously repugnant to 
the idea of personal association to decent members. 

On the other hand, it is belittling to the Society when any members 
use the negative vote to exclude an eligible candidate from any motives 
of personal spite or sjileen, and some of us are compelled to believe that 
such mean use has been made of a power which was only intended as a 
professional safeguard. 

I would suggest as a remedy, that one negative vote should be suffi- 
cient to exclude when accompanied by a written statement of the reasons 
for such a vote, and indicating the means by which the Board of Direc- 
tion could verify such statement. The statement, of course, would require 
no signature, coming as it would under cover with a letter ballot. 

The course of the Board of Direction should then be as follows : 

First. — It should be obligatory upon the Board to ascertain whether 
the charges were true or not. 

Second. — It should be discretionary with the Board to decide whether 
the charges were proven, and, if jiroven, whether they were sufficient to 
justify exclusion under the laws of the society. 

Third. — All .such statements, examinations and decisions should be 
inviolably secret. It is certainly no function of the society to announce 
to the world its own sanctity, or the want of virtue in others. 

Fourth. — No negative vote unaccompanied by a statement of the rea- 
sons for such vote, should be counted against a candidate, unless a ma- 
jority of all the votes cast should be negative; in ease of such serious 
opposition, we, as good Americans, ought to siibmit to the will of the 
majority. 

I have not put these suggestions in the shape of formal resolutions, 
because I do not know just how the question stands before the Society; 
but I wish you would lay them before the Society in some shape as a dis- 
cussion of the question. 

I believe we ouglit to guard the matter of membershiji carefully, and 
I think we ought to be able to trust our Board of Direction, and to in- 
vest them with authority to see that a wise provision of our laws is not 
abused for the gratification of personal ill feelings, in which the mem- 
bers as a whole can have no jjossible interest. 



75 
MEMOIRS OF DECEASED MEMBERS. 



ARTHUR LIVERMORE FORD,* Assoc. Member, A. S. C. E. 

Died May 30th, 1880. 

Arthur Livermore Ford was born at Plymouth, New Hampshire, on 
January 4th, 1851. Mr. Ford's professional work ended too soon and 
too abruptly to leave many evidences of the skill and judgment of which 
those who knew him best believed him to be capable. His preparation 
for practical work was unusually elaborate. Wliile a boy he had formed 
the habit of close application to study, which he always retained. His 
memory was a rare one, enabling him to repeat, verbatim, half a dozen 
pages of a book, after having read them rapidly twice, and a year after- 
ward he would remember them with substantial accuracy. He worked 
earnestly and continuously to make this faculty of service by mastering 
the principal modern languages, and acquiring a thorough knowledge of 
their engineering and general literature. The retentive quality of his 
memory made his acquisitions as lasting as they were rapid. He was a 
good chemist, geologist and mineralogist, and his manliness and frank- 
ness not only prevented his ever claiming more knowledge than he jjos- 
sessed, but always led him to give the limits of his information at once. 
With great zeal for general cultiire, he was too earnest to be a dilletante; 
a man of enthusiasm and imagination, he, nevertheless, maintained an 
admirable poise and acted deliberately. 

After completing, in 1870, the "special course" at Columbia College 
School of Mines — the institution at that time having no regular civil 
engineering course — he spent the summer and fall of that year as min- 
eralogist in Professor Hay den's geological survey of Wyoming Territory. 
In 1871 he was assistant to Professor Egleston, at the Hchool of Mines, 
making the drawings for his work on Crystallography. 

From 1871 to 1877 he was successively employed as transit-man on a 
Brooklyn townshij? survey; assistant engineer on the hydrograijhic sur- 
vey of Passaic river, under Mr. Walter Brinkerhoff, assistant to General 
Newton; assistant engineer in charge of party on topographic survey of 
Long Island City, under Mr. George S. Greene, Jr. ; transit-man on the 
Saddle River Eailroad Survey, itnder Mr. E. P. North ; on surveys 
under Mr. M. J. Becker, Chief Engineer, Pittsburgh, Cincinnati and St. 
Louis Eailway; assistant in charge of surveys for 30 miles of the 
Chesapeake and Ohio Canal Extension, under Col. Wm. E. Merrill ; 
engineer in chiu-ge of construction of 15 miles of the Lake Shore branch 
of the Eome, Watertown and Ogdensburg Eailroad, and of a portion of 
the road through the City of Oswego; and assistant engineer in charge 



* Committee to prepare memoir, M. N. Foruey, O. Clianute, C. MacDouald. 



76 

of bnilding crib-work for Little Sodus Harbor Breakwater, under Major 
W. McFarlaud. In November, 1877, Mr. Ford went to Cuba and l)uilt 
the Zaza (narrow gauge) Railroad, and afterward spent some time in 
Havana on various engineering and architectural works. 

It was here that he conceived the idea of devoting himself especially 
to Spanish- American engineering work, a field for which his extraordinary 
facility in using the language and ready adaj^tability eminently fitted 
him. His subsequent experience, in 1879, as an engineer on the location 
and construction of the Nicaraguan Government railroad confirmed him 
in his determination, and those who knew him believed that Avith his 
singular tact, persistent energy and rugged health he had a career of 
unusual promise before him. 

In March of th3 present year he sailed for Aspinwall to reconstruct 
the foundation of the Chagres River Bridge of the Panama Railroad, 
which had been destroyed by the floods last fall. He had nearly finished 
this work, and had so far completed negotiations for a considerable con- 
tract in one of the South American countx'ies that he exjiected to go 
there as soon as he could leave the bridge, when he was attacked by the 
fever prevailing at Aspinwall. His last act, when he knew death was 
inevitable —that of writing a letter to his father, expressing wishes to be 
carried out — was done with characteristic coolness and orderliness. 

Mr. Ford's tastes and manners were such as are usually ascribed to 
"gentlemen of the old school. " He was absolutely pure. He had the 
utmost abhorrence for every form of wrong or dishonesty. It seemed 
that no disguise could make such things alluring to him. Unusually 
ready in conversation, aided by his wit and unerring memory, he ex- 
pressed himself with force, and yet always with such tact and modesty 
that he made few enemies. He had many friends, and these by no means 
limited to those of his own age. Few young men had more or warmer 
friends than he among older men. 

His death is still so recent, and was so shockingly sudden, that those 
who loved him most can now hardly think of it with composure; and yet 
they find a singular comfort in recalling the loveable qualities which will 
make him live forever in their memories. 



77 



ANNOUNCEMENTS. 



The next regular meeting of the Society will 
be held on Wednesday, September 15th, at 8 
p. M. Discussion will be had of papers pre- 
viously read. 

A regular meeting of the Society will be 
held on Wednesday, October 6, 1880, at 8 p. M. 
Proposed amendments to the Constitution 
must be submitted in writing, signed by not 
less than five members, at or before this 
meeting, in order to be acted upon this year. 
The Nominating Committee will present, on 
or before the first day of October, the names 
of the persons selected by them as candidates 
for officers for the year beginning November 
3d, 1880, to be voted for on November 3d. 

It is provided by the 5th section of the 2-tth 
By-Law, that in addition, any five members 
may present to the Board of Direction, on or 
before October 1st, a hst of names proposed 
by them for officers, which list shall also be 
issued for ballot. 

The Committee on Gauging of Streams re- 
quests measurements of flood discharge of 
streams, and also of discharge In periods of 
great dryness. It is very desirable that state- 
ments of the drainage area auo ve the point of 
measurement should accompany such data. 

A classified catalogue of the Library of the 
Society is in course of preparation, and the 
first part, comprising titles relating to Eail- 
roads, is now in the printer's hands, and will 
be issued about October Ist. It is hoped that 
the publication of this catalogue will result in 
large additions to the Library, especially of 
reports of companies of which partial files are 
now in our possession. 



Lieut. Commander Gorringe, U. S. N., 
has promised to lay before the Society an ac- 
count of the methods employed in the re- 
moval of the Al«»xandrian Obelisk to this 
country, as soon as his engagements will per- 
mit. Due notice will be given of the date of 
the presentation of his remarks. 

The following resolutions were adopted at 
the Ninth Annual Convention of the Society, 
and ordered printed regularly in the Society 
publications : 

Whereas, the metric system of weights and 
measures is now extensively used abroad, 
and whereas it is desirable that the relation 
of the units of the dilXering systems be made 
familiar to all by comparison : 

Eesolved, That members be requested, in 
papers hereafter presented to the Society, to 
^rite, in parenthesis, weights or dimensions 
by the metric system, in connection with 
those of the system in general use. 

The House of the Society is at 104 East 
Twentieth street, one door east from Fourth 
avenue, and near the southwest corner of ' 
Grammercy Park. It is open from nine o'clock 
A.M. to five o'clock P.M. each baisiness day, 
except Saturday, when it is closed at three 
o'clock P.M. 

The Library and Conversation Eooms. will 
also, for the present, be open every Wednes- 
day evening from 7>^ to 10 p. m. Members 
are invited to avail themselves of the oppor- 
tunities afforded on Wednesday evenings both 
for consultation of books and periodicals and 
for conversation. 



ADDITIONS TO 

LIBRARY AND MUSEUM. 



From Administration des Ponts et 
Chausees, Paris: 
Annaler,. June and July, 1880. 

From American Academy of Arts and 
Sciences, Washington, D. C: 
Proceedings. Vol. VIL New Series. Part 
II. December, 1879. to May, 1880. 

From American Gas-Light Association, 
Wm. Henry White, Secretary, New 
York : 
Report of Proceedings of the Annual Meet- 
ings held in Cincinnati, Oct. 17, 1877, and in 
New York City, Oct. 15, 1878. 



From American Iron and Steel Associa- 
tion, James M. Swank, Secretary, 
Philadelphia: 
Tracts issued by the Association, as follows : 
Our Foreign Commerce. 
A Tariff is not a Tax. Giles B. Stebbins. 
Free Trade and Protection. Hon. John 
Welsh. 

Short Essays on Protection. David H. 
Mason. 
Who are Benefited by Protection ? 
What Protection has done fur the United 
States. Hon. Thomas H. Dudley. 
The "Barbarism of Protection." An 



78 



open letter to Joha Bright. Augustus T. 
Freed. 
Who is Augustus Mongredien ? 

From Boston Public Library, Mellen 
Chamberlain, Librarian, Boston : 
Twenty-eighth Annual Report of the Library. 
Bulletin of the Library. July, 1880. 

From Robert Briggs, Philadelphia: 
Report on the Plaus for Warming and Venti- 
lating the Bridgeport (Conu.) School House. 
Rob't Briggs. (6 copies.) 

From Hon. Allan Campbell, Commis- 
sioner of Public Works, New York : 
Report of the Department of Public Works, 
Quarter ending March 31, 1880. 

From Bureau of Statistics and Geology 
ot Indiana, John Collet, Chief, Indian- 
apolis : 
First Annual Report of the Department of 
Statistics and Geology of the State of Indi- 
ana. 

From Frank Doherty, Columbus, Ohio: 
Tenth Annual Report of the Trustees of the 
Water Works of Columbus. 

From Engineers' Club of Philadelphia, 
Howard Murphy, Cor. Secretary, 
Philadelphia : 
Proceedings. Vol. 1. No. 5. 

From Engineers' Society of Western 
Pennsylvania, James H. Harlow, 
Secretary, Pittsburg : 
Use of Steel in Construction. Albert F. Hill, 
C. E. 

From Charles E. Fowler, New Haven, 
Conn. : 
Annual Reports of the Street Department of 
New Haven for ls79. 

From Albert F. Hill, New York : 
Use of Steel in Construction. Albert F. Hill, 
C. E. 

From Institution of Civil Engineers, 
James Forrest, Secretary. London: 
Minutes of Proceedings. Vol. LX. 
The Main Drainage of Torquay. George 

Chatterton . 
The Purification of Gas. Harry E. Jones. 
The Chile Vein Gold Works, South America. 

George Attwood. 
Explosive Agents applied to Industrial Pur- 
poses. Fredt^ric A. Abel, C. B. F. R. S. 
Cleopatra's Needle. Benjamin Baker. 
Note on a New Snow Plow, John Newman. 
The Caledonian Railway Viaduct over the 
River Clyde at Glasgow. Benjamin H. 
Blyth. 
The Calder Viaduct on Wishaw Line of the 

Caledonian Railway. David M. Westland 
Note on the Sao Francisco River, Brazil. W. 

Miluor Roberts. 
The Removal of Sunken Rocks in Brest 

Harbor. H. WiUotte. 
Abington Sewerage. Charles F. Gower. 
The Temnograph. Alexander M. Rymer 

•Jones. 
Rural Water Supply. Thomas S. Stooke. 

From Baltasar Muuoz Lumbier, Mexico: 
Los Aerolitas de Chihuahua. Baltasar Munoz 
Lumbier, Mexico, 1880. 

From New York Meteorological Ob- 
servatory, Daniel Draper, Director, 
Central Park, New York: 
Abstracts of Registers from Self-Recgrding 
Instruments. June and July, 1880. 



From Wm. Ripley Nichols, Boston: 
Papers on Water Supply. Prof. Wm. Ripley 
Nichols. Boston, 1880. 

From Edward P. North, Nev? York : 
Remonstrance against the removal of the 

Murray Hill Reservoir. New York, 1880. 
Seven I h Annual Report of the Water Commis- 
sioners of the Village of Saratoga Springs. 
Saratoga Springs, 1880. 
Twefth Annual Report Nassau Water Depart- 
ment. Brooklyn, 1872. 

From Henry V. Poor, New York : 
Manual of the Railroads of the United States 
for 1880. Henry V. Poor. 

From Ernest Pontzen, Paris : 
Chemin de fer de I'Arlberg. M. E. Pontzen, 
Paris, 1880. 

From Publishers Revue Generale des 
Chemins de fer, Edgar Monjean, 
Secretary, Paris : 
Revue Generale des Chemins de fer. May, 

1880. 

From Col. W. Milnor Roberts, Rio de 
Janeiro, Brazil : 
Abstract of the report of the Hydraulic Com- 
mission of Brazil upon the examinations of 
the Siio Francisco River. W. Milnor 
Roberts, New York, 1880. 

From Royal Technical School, Hanover, 

Germany : 

Catalogue of the School, 1880-81. (German.) 

From Royal United Service Institution, 

Capt. B. Burgess, Secretary, London: 

Journal of the Institution. Vol. XXIV. No. 

105. 
Contents Vol. XXIII. 
Proceedings 49th Anniversary Meeting. 

From George P. Rowell & Co., New 
York : 
American Newspaper Directory. New York, 
1880. 

From Hon. Horatio Seymottr, Jr., Al- 
bany, N. 1' : 
Annual Report of the State Engineer and Sur- 
veyor ou the Canals of the State of New 
York for 1880. 

From Societe des lugenieurs Civils, 
M Mallet, Secretary, Paris : 
Memoires. May and June, 18^0. 

From State Board of Health of Massa- 
chusetts, Charles F. Folsom, M. D., 
Secretary, Boston : 
Eleventh Report of the State Board of Health. 
Index Vols. I-XI. F. H. Brown, M. D., 
Boston, 187a. 

From John C. Trautwine, Philadelphia: ' 
The Civil Engineers' Pocket Book. J. C, 
Trautwine, Philadelphia. 1880. 

Fr'im J. Nelson Tubbs, Rochester, 
N. Y.: 
Annual Report of the Executive Board and 
Water Works and Fire Board, Rochester, 
N. Y., 1880. 

From United States Coast Survey, Wash- 
ington, D. C: 
Report of U. S. Coast Survey for 1876. Wash- 
ington, 1879. 

From United States Light-house Board, 
WaRhingtou, D. C. : 
List of Beacons, Buoys, Towers and other 
Day-Marks, in the Fifth Light-house Dis- 
trict. Corrected to May 1, 1880. 



79 



From Capt. George M. Wheeler, Corps 
of Engineers, U. S. A., Washington, 
D. C: 
Five Volumes. Geographical Surveys West 

of the lUOth Meridian. 
Volume II. Astronomy and Barometric 

Hypsometry. 
Volume III. Geology. 
Volume IV. Paleontology. 
Volume V. Zoology. 
Volume VI. Botany. 

From Engineer Department, U. S A., 
Gen. Horatio G. Wright, Chief of 
Engineers, Washington, D. C. : 

A Report from the Chief of Engineers urging 
the necessity for completion of the 
office work connected with the surveys of 
the 100th Meridian, under charge of Capt. 
George M. Wheeler, and recommending an 
appropriation therefor. 

A Letter from the Chief of Engineers covering 
copy of report from Maj. F. Harwood, upon 
a resurvfcy of the Bar at the mouth of Bell 
River, Micb., made in compliance with law. 

A Letter from the Chief of Engineers and ac- 
companying report of Maj. F. Harwood, 
upon the resurvey of Clinton Run, Mich. 

A copy of a Report of the results of a Survey 
of the Illinois Kiver. Maj. G. J. Lydecker. 

A Telegram from Gen. Q. ^. Gillmore, Presi- 
dent of the Mississippi River Commission, 
recommending that the estimate heretofore 
submitted for surveys and expenses of the 
Commission be increased. 

Papers showing maintenance of the Channel 
at the South Pass Jetties, Mississippi River, 
for quarter ending May 9, 1880. 

A Letter from the Chief of Engineers submit- 
ting copy of report of Gen. John Newton, 
" in relation to the port and harbor of New 
York, and the waters near the same." 

A Letter from the Chief of Engineers covering 
copy of report of Gen. Q. A. Gillmore, and 
accompanying map, upon an examination of 
Port Royal River, Beauiort, 8. C. 

Report of the results of an examination made 
of the Peninsula of Florida, with a view to 
the constructinn of a Ship Canal from St. 
Mary's River to the Gulf of Mexico. Gen. 
Q. A. Gillmore. 

A Letter from the Chief of Engineers covering 
copy of report of Col. C. S. Stewart upon an 
examination of Trinidad Harbor, Cal., 
made in comijliance with law. 

Specifications for dredging in Tubee Chan- 
nel, Maine. Gen. Geo. Thom. 

Specifications lor the excavation of Sunken 
Ledge at the Gut, opposite Bath, Me. Gen. 
Geo. Thom. 

Specifications for furnishing Rubble Stone 
for the Breakwater at Richmond's Island, 
Maine. Gen. Geo. Thom, 

Specifications for the removal of Sunken 
Ledge and furnishing Rubble Stone in 
Portsmouth Harbor, N. H. Gen. Geo. 
Thom. 

Specifications for the Dredging in Lake Win- 
nipiseogee, N. H. Gen. Geo. Thom. 

Proposals for River and Harbor Improve- 
ments in Maine. New Hampshire and Mas- 
sachusetts. Gen. Geo. Thom. 

Specifications for the Dredging in Boston 
Harbor, Massachusetts. Gen. Geo. Thom. 

Specifications for the Dredging of Plymouth 
Harbor, Mass. Gen. Geo. Thom. 

Specifications for Excavation in Taunton 
River, Mass. Gen. G. K.. Warren. 



Specifications for Excavation in Block Island 
Harbor, R. I. Gen. G. K. Warren. 

Specifications lor Excavation in Providence 
River, R I. Gen. G. K. Warren. 

Specifications for Excavation in Connecticut 
River. Conn. Gen. G. K. Warren. 

Specifications for Rip-Rap Granite for Jetties 
at mouth ol Connecticut River, Conn. 
Gen. G.K. Warren. 

Specifications for Excavation in Little Narra- 
gausett Bay, Rhode Island aud Connecticut. 
Gen. G. K. Warren. 

Specifications relating to the Deepening of the 
Channel leading to the Port of Havre de 
Grace. Md. Maj. W. P. Craighill. 

Advertisement, Instructions, Specifications, 
Proposals and Bidder's Bonds for improving 
Calumet Harbor, 111. Maj. G. J. Lydecker. 

Advertisement, Instructions, Specifications, 
Proposals and Bidder's Bonds for improv- 
ing Chicago Harbor, 111. Maj. G. J. Ly- 
decker. 

Specifications relating to the Construction of 
Jetties at Sullivan's Island, S. C. Gen. Q. 
A. Gillmore. 

Advertisement, Instructions, Specifications 
and Proposals for improving " The Nar- 
uows" of Sabine River, Texas. Maj. S. M. 
Mansfield. 

From Gen. William W. Wright, Phila- 
delphia: 

Report on the Survey of the Alleghany Valley 
Railroad. W. Milnor Roberts. Pittsburgh, 
1853. 

Reports of Superintendent and Engineer of 
the Alleghany Portage Railroad tor year 
ending November 3U, 1858. 

Third Report of the Alleghany Railroad aud 
coal Co. Philadelphia, 1855. 

Report of the President, Directors aud Chief 
Engineer of the Alabama and Tennessee 
River Railroad at the Second Annual Meet- 
ing 1 t the Stockholders, November 18, 
1851. 

Report of the Chief Engineer of the Bellefon- 
taine and Indiana Railroad Co. W. Milnor 
Roberts. Siduey, Ohio, 1851. 

Second Semi-Annual Report of Pittsburgh, 
Fort Wayne and Chicago Railroad. Pitts- 
burgh, 1859. 

Fir.st Report of the Fort Wayne, Lacon and 
Platte Valley Air Line RaiU-oad Co. Novem- 
ber 10, 1853. 

Documents of Controversy between Canal 
Commissioners of Pennsylvania and the 
Harrisburg aud Lancaster and Pennsyl- 
vania Railroad Co. Philadelphia, 1852. 

Second Annual Report of the Lancaster, Le- 
banon and Pine Grove Railroad Co. Phila- 
delphia, 1854. 

Ninth Annual Report of the Little Miami 
Railroad Co. for 1851. 
• Report of the Chief Engineer upon Survey, 
Location and probable Cost of the North- 
east and Southwest Alabama Railroad. E. 
D. Sanford. Tuscaloosa, Ala.. 1855. 

First Annual Report of the Marietta and Cin- 
cinnati Railroad Co. Philadelphia, 1851. 

First Annual Report of the Chief Engineer of 
the Memphis and Charleston Railroad. 
Charles F. M. Garnett. Huntsville, 1851. 

Third Annual Meeting of the Stockholders of 
the Memphis and Charleston Railroad Co., 
with Reports of Directors, Chief Engineer 
and Superintendents. Huntsville, 1853. 

Fifth, Seventh and Ninth Annual Reports of 



80 



the Mempbis and Charleston Railroad Co. 
Memphis, 18.55, 1857 and 1859. 

Exhibit of the Affairs of the Memphis and 
Charleston Railroad Co. Memphis, 1854. 

Summary of Proceedings of the Convention 
of the Stockholders of the Memphis and 
Charleston Railroad Co., held at Tuscum- 
bia, Ala., April 3. 1854. 

A compilation of the Acts of the Lef^slatures 
of Tennessee. Alabama and Mississippi, in 
relation to the Memphis and Charleston 
and La Grange and Memphis Railroad Cos, 
Memphis, 1852. 

Seventh Annual Report of the Nashville and 
Chattanooga Railroad Co. Nashville, 1855. 

Report in regard to the Western Extension of 
the New York and Erie Railroad; New 
York, 1856. 

Report of the Chi 3f Engineer of the Norria- 
town and Freemansburg Railroad Co. L. 
E.' Corson. Norristown, 1853. 

Map of the North Pennsylvania Railroad and 
its connections. 185::{. 

North Pennsylvania Railroad to connect Phil- 
adelphia with North Pennsylvania, Western 
New York, the Lakes and Canada West. 
Philadelphia, ln53. 

Second Report of the North Western Railroad 
Co. Philadelphia, 1855. 

Second Report of the Ohio and Pennsylvania 
Railroad Co. Solomon W. Roberts. Phila- 
delphia, 1850. 

Sixth .Annual Report of the Ohio and Penn- 
sylvania Railroad Co. January 24, 1854. 

Exhibit explanatory of the seven per cent, 
special mortgage convertible Bridge Bonds 
of the Ohio and Pennsylvania Railroad Co. 
Philadelphia, 1H56. 

Report on the Ohio and Indiana and Fort 
Wayne and Chicago Railroad, March 5, 
1855. W. H. Wilson. 

Report of the Philadelphia and Reading Rail- 
road Co. Januai-y 14. 185(5. 

Report of the Superintendent of the Philadel- 
phia and Columbia Railroad. November 30, 
1854. 

Organization for conducting the business of 
the Pennsylvania Railroad. Philadelphia, 
1852. 

By-Laws and Charter of the Pensylvania Rail- 
road Co., and its Supplements. Philadel- 
phia, 1853. 

Charter and Supplements of the Pennsylvania 
Railroad Co., with By-Laws of the Board of 
Directors. Philadelphia, 1859. 

First Annual Report of the Chief Engineer of 
the Penasylvania Railroad Co. J. Edgar 
Thompson, i hiladelpLiia, 1848. 

First, Third, Fourth, Fifth, Sixth. Seventh, 
Eighth, Ninth and Thirteentli Annual Re- 
ports of the Pennsylvania Railroad Co. for 
1847, 1849, 1850, 1852, 1853, 1854, 1855, 1856 
and 1860. 

Report of H. Haupt, Chief Engineer Pennsyl- 
vania Railroad Co., with a communication 
from the President of the Ohio and Penn- 
sylvania Railroad Co. ou the expediency of 
aiding the Ohio and Indiana and the Fort 
Wayne and Chicago Railroad Cos. to com- 
plete their roads. Philadelphia, 1854. 

Reasons of the Board of Directors of the Penn- 
sylvania Railroad Co for declining to offer 
to purchase the main Line of the State 
Works. Philadelphia, 1854. 

Robert Wightiiiau versus Pennsylvania Rail- 
road Co. 1854. 

Will the Interests of Pennsylvania be ad- 
vanced or the Revenue increased by contin- 



uing the tonnage tax upon the Peunaylva- 
nia Railroad'? 

Is a Tax upon the through tonnage Constitu« 
tional ? 

Laws relating to the Pittsburgh and Connells- 
ville Railroad Co. Pittsburgh. 1853. 

Annual Report of the Pittsburgh and Con- 
nellsville Itailroad Co. for 1853. 

Second Annual Report of the Pittsburgh and 
Steubenville Railroad Co. Pittsburgh, 
1853. 

Proceedings of the Stockholders of the South 
Carolina Railroad Co. and of the S.)Uth- 
weatern Railroad Bank, at their Annual 
Meetings, Feb. 10, 11 and 12, 1852, Feb. 8 
and 9, 1853, and Feb. 14 and 15, 1854. 

Proceedings of the Southern Railroad Con- 
vention. Savannah. 1855. 

By-Laws of Board of Managers of the Sun- 
bury and Erie Railroad Co. Philadelphia, 
1852. 

Report of the President and Board of Mana- 
gers of the Sunbury and Erie Railroad Co. 
Feb. 14, 1853. 

Report of the final location of the Southern 
Railroad from Brandon, Miss., to the Ala- 
bama Line, in the direction of Charleston 
and Savannah. H. Haupt. Philadelphia, 
1853. 

Semi-Annual Report of the South Carolina 
Caual and Railroad Co. January 18, 1840. 

Report of Survey for the Tyrone, Clearfield 
and Erie Railroad. James E. Montgomery. 
Clearfield, 1854. 

Proceedings of the Stockholders of the Wil- 
mington and Blan. Railroad Co. January 
•24, 1855. 

Report of the Superintendent and Treasurer 
of the Western and Atlantic Railroad to His 
Excellency Herschel Y. Johnson. Sept. 30, 
1855. 

Report of a Survey of a Line of Railroad be- 
tween the City of Cordova and some other 
point ou th»; River Parana, Argentine Con- 
federation. Allan Campbell. London, 
1857. 

On the Railway Connections of Philadelphia, 
with the Central West. Letters of Prof. 
Edward D. Mansfield of Cincinnati to Job 
R. Tyson, Esq., LL.D., of Philadelphia. 
Philadelphia, 1853. 

Letter on the Improvement of the Alabama, 
and Mobile River to Johh J. Walker, Esq., 
President Mobile Chamber of Commerce. 

. Albert Stein. Mobile, 18.56. 

First Annual Report of the Clearfield Coal and 
Lumber Co. Philadelphia, 1856. 

Constitutional Liberty. M. Le Comte de 
Montalembe"t. Loudon, 1855. 

The Geodesy of Britain; or, the Ordnance 
Survey of England, Scotland and Ireland. 
Adelos. Loudon, 1859. 

Address on the Life and Character of Hum- 
boldt. Alfred Stille, M. D. Philadelphia, 
1859. 

Fourteenth Annual Report of the Monouga- 

. hela Navigation Co. Pittsburgh, 1854. 

Au Act to incorporate the Ohio River Im- 
provement Co. Philadelphia, 1855. 

Cost, Revenue and Expenditure of the Public 
Works of Pennsylvania. Harrisburg, 1854. 

European and Asiatic Intercourse via British 
Columbia by means of a Main Through 
Trunk Railway from the Atlantic to the 
Pacific. London, 1858. 

Alleghany Bituminous Coal. L. Pusey, 1856. 



81 
THE NORMAN MEDAL. 



CODE OF RULES FOR ITS AWARD. 

I.— Competitiou for the Norman Medal of the American Society of 
Civil Engineers shall be restricted to Members of the Society. 

II.— There shall be one gold medal, and only one, struck for each 
and every fiscal year of the Society, and awarded as hereinafter pro- 
vided. The dies therefor shall be with the Superintendent of the 
United States Mint at Philadelphia, in trust exclusively for the above 
purpose. Such medal shall be of a cost equal to the annual interest 
received upon $1 000 of the Consolidated Stock of the City of New 
York, Certificate No. 179, of the additional new Croton Aqueduct Stock 
of the City of New York, authorized by an Act of the Legislature of the 
State of New York, Chap. 230, passed April 15th, 1870, dated November 
17th, 1873, now held in trust by the Treasurer of this Society, and so 
held solely for this purpose, and shall be executed upon his order. 

Ill- —All original papers presented to the Society by members of any 
class, during the year for which the medal is awarded, shall be open to 
the awards, provided that such papers shall not have been previously 
contributed in whole or in part to any other association, nor have 
appeared in print prior to their publication by the Society, nor have been 
presented to the Society in any previous year. 

IV.— The Board of Censors to award the Medal shall consist of three 
members of the Society, to be designated by the Board of Direction. 
The Secretary of the Society shall act as Secretary to the Board of 
Censors. 

v.— The medal shall be awarded to such paper as the said Board shall 
judge to be worthy of special commendation for its merits as a contribu- 
tion to Engineering Science, not merely relatively as compared with 
others presented during the same year, but as exhibiting the science, 
talent or industry displayed in the consideration of the subject treated 
of, and for the good which may be expected to result from the discussion 
and the inquiry. 

VI-— In case no paper presented during the year shall be deemed of 
sufiicient value to receive an award, the amount of the interest of the 
fund for that year shall be expended by the Board of Direction in the 
purchase of books, to be offered as a premium for the second best paper 
in the next year in which more than one paper of suiiicient value may be 
presented. 

VII.— The medal year shall terminate on the first day of iVugust, and 
the award shall be announced at the Annual Meeting in November. 

VIII.— The Treasurer of this Society shall cause the medal to be 
prepared and delivered to, or deposited to the order of, the successful 
competitor, within two months after the Annual Meeting at which the 
same shall have been awarded. 



82 



LIST OF MEMBERS 



ADDITIONS. 



Date of Election. 
Leach, Smith S U. S. Ass't. Engineer, 2828 Washington 

Ave., St. Louis, Mo July 7, 18S0. 

McNultYj'George W. . . .Ass't. Engineer, East River Bridge, 21 

Water St., Brool<lyn, N. Y May 5, iSSo. 



CHANGES AND CORRECTIONS. 

Burr, James D (Lantry & Burr), Topeka, Kansas. 

Earlev, John E Locating Engineer, R. G. M. & P. RR., Pueljlb, Col. 

Fink, Rudolph Gen. Manager Selma, Rome & Dalton Railroad, Selma, 

Ala. 
Rockwell, Samuel P. (). Box J., Kansas City, Mo. 

RESIGNATION. 

Bender, Charles August 11, iSSo. 

deaths. 

Havward, James A Elected Member, September 5, 1877. Died August 13, 

1880. 
Greenwood, William H Elected Member, March 3, 18S0. Died August 29, 1880. 



^nii^rican locietg of :(j;tiit |^n()in^^r3. 



I^KOOEEDINaS. 



Vol. VI.— October, 1880. 



MINUTES OF MEETINQS. 

(Abstractof such as may be of general interest to members.) 



OF THE SOCIETY. 

September 15th, 1880.— The Society met at 8 p. m., Vice-President 
Chanute in the chair. 

The death of William H. Greenwood, Member A. S. C. E., was an- 
nounced. 

A discussion on Inter-Oceauic Canals, by A. G. Menocal, Member A. 
S. C. E., was read, and the discussion was continued by Messrs. Shel- 
bourne and Welch. 

October 6th, 1880.— The Society met at 8 p. m., Vice-President 
Chanute in the chair. 

Ballots were canvassed, and George Hume Simpson, of Terre Haute, 
Ind., and William Williams Walker, of Hannibal, Mo., were declared 
elected as Members. 

A communication from the Board of Direction, suggesting arrange- 
ments for the approaching Annual Meeting, was read, and the sugges- 
tions formally approved. These are as follows: That as the day 
of the Annual Mepting, November 3d, is the day after the National 
election, it will not be convenient for non-resident members to attend. 
It is suggested, therefore, that the following arrangements be made: 

The Annual Meeting to be called to order at 10 a. m., November 3d; 
Tellers appointed to canvass the votes for officers, Eeport of the Board 
of Direction presented and ordered printed, and a recess taken until 
8 p. M. 

In the evening the report of the Tellers of the votes to be presented, 
and a recess to be taken until November 17th, at 10 a. m. 

The Annual Meeting to be resumed at 10 a. m. , November 17th, as a 
business meeting for discussion on reports, constitutional amendments 
and other business. In the evening at eight, a publie meeting for pro- 



84 

fessional discussion only with special paper on a subject to be an- 
nounced. The evening meeting to be followed by a collation. On 
November 18th, the resident members to arrange for either an excursion 
to points of interest or a discussion on some professional subject; the 
arrangements to larovide also for the evening of this day. 

The following proposed amendments to the constitution were regu- 
larly submitted. These amendments will be in order for discussion and 
amendment at the Annual Meeting, and will afterwards be voted ujion by 
letter ballot: 

As TO Election of Honoeary Members. 

Proposed amendment to Article XXIII. 

Strike out the words, " and the Past Presidents of the Society,'' and 
insert " such Past Presidents of the Society as shall be at the time mem- 
bers of the Society and resident in the United States." 

As TO Time of Annual Meeting, etc. 
Proposed amendment to Article XXII. 
For " first Wednesday in November," read " first day of January." 

Proposed Amendment to Article XXX. 

The Article to read: 

The Annual Meeting for the election of officers and hearing the 
Annual Reports shall be held on the third "Wednesday of January. The 
Board of Direction shall lay before the meeting a report of the state of 
the Society, together with a statement of the Treasurer, verified by the 
Committee on Finance, of the funds of the Society, and the receipts and 
payments during the year ending on the 31st of December preceding. 

Proposed Amendment to Article XXXI. 

The Article to read: 

The annual contributions shall become due for the ensuing year on the 
first day of January, and shall be payable in advance. It shall be the 
duty of the Secretary to notify each, member of the amount due for the 
ensuing year at the time of giving notice of the Annual Meeting. Mem- 
bers in arrears for the dues of the current year shall not be allowed to 
vote at the Annual Meeting. 

Proposed Amendment to Article V. 
After the words "Annual Meeting of the Society," strike out the 
words, "and shall hold their offices until others are elected," and insert, 
" The term of office shall begin at the close of the Annual Meeting, 
and continue for one year, or until other officers are elected." 



85 



A letter from Professor E. H. Thurston, Member A. S. C. E., Secre. 
tary of the late United States Board to test iron, steel and other 
metals, was read. [See Announcements below.] 

A paper by A. G. Menocal, Member A. S. C. E., giving additiona 
information obtaiuei-l by recent surveys in Nicauragua, was read by the 
Secretary, and discussed by Messrs. Chanute, G. S. Greene, T. P. Kins- 
ley and L. B. Ward. 



ANNOUNCEMENTS. 



The Annual BIeeting will be held Wednes- 
day, November 3d, 1H80, at 10 a. m. As ar- 
ranged at the meetiug of October 6th (see 
miuutes ou page 83 preceding), a recess 
will be taken to November 17th, when the 
Annual Meeting will be resumed, in order to 
give members unable to attend on the former 
date an opportunity to be present. The arrange- 
ments for the meeting will be made by the 
members resident in New York, and will ex- 
tend over the days and evenings both of No- 
vember 17th and November 18th. 

The Second Report of the late United 
States Board to test Ikon, Steel and 
Other Metals will soon be issued. The fol- 
lowing letter is published for the information 
of members: 



Stevens Institute of Technology. 
Department of Engineering. 

HoBOKEN, Sept. Ist, 1880. 
John Bogart. Esq., 

Sec. Am. Society of Civil Engineers, 

New York City : 
Dear Sir,— The second report of the late 
" United States Board, appointed to test iron 
steel and other metals," is now going through 
the press, and will probably be ready at the 
meeting of Congress, or somewhat later in 
the vviuter. 

Members of the Society wishing copies 
should apply to members of Congress at 
once. 

The whole edition of the first report was 
tiiken up before many members of our Soci- 
ety had learned that it was published. 

It is probable that a properly directed eS'ort 
might secure its re-publication. 
Very truly yourw, 

E. H. THURSTON, 
Sec. late Board, <6c. 



ADDITIONS TO 



LIBRARY AND MUSEUM. 



From Administration des Fonts et 
Chaussees, Paris: 
Annales. August, 1880. 

From American Chemical Society. P. 
Oassamajor, Secretary, New York : 
Proceedings. July, 1880. 

From American Society of Mechanical 
Engineers. New York: 
List of Officers, Members and Rules. Organ- 
ized April 7, 1880. 

From Edward R. Andrews, New York: 
Creosoting Timber. Preserved Crossties. A 
reprint from the Railroad Gazette. Vol. 
Xn. No. 21. (Copies lor distribution,) 

From Argentine Scientific Society, Don 
Eduardo Aguirie, Secretary, Buenos 
Ayres: 
Anales. July and August, 1880. 



From E. W. Bowditch, Boston; 
Paper on the Drainage of Summer Hotels and 
Country Boarding Houses. E. W. Bow- 
ditch, Boston, 1880. 

From Robert Briggs, Philadelphia: 
The Absolute Economy of Electric Lighting. 
Robert Briggs. Philadelphia, 1880. (5 
copies.) 

From Bureau of Education, Washing- 
ton, D. C. : 
Proceedings of the Department of Superin- 
tendence of the National Education Asso- 
ciation at its meeting at Washington, D. C, 
Feb. 18-20, 1880. 
Circulars issued bv the Bureau, as follows: 
Legal Rights of Children. 
Progrpss of Western Education in China 

and Siam. 
The Inaiau School at Carlisle Barrack. 
Vacation Colonies for Sickly School Chil- 
dren. 



86 



From O. Channte, New York: 
Argiimeut before the Committee on Com- 
merce of tbe U. S Senate iu opposition to 
the Keagan Bill tor reyiilaiion of Inter- 
state Commerce by Railway. Feb. 11, 1879. 
G R. Blaucbard. New York, 1879. 
Testimony of George K. Blanchard before the 
Special Railroad Committee of the New 
York Assembly. New York. 1880. 
Politics; Railway Problems and Theorists. G. 
R. Blauchard. New York, 1880. 

From Eliot C. Clarke, Boston: 
Paper on Sewerage. Eliot C.Clarke. Boston, 
1880. 

From Prof. George H. Cook. New 
Brunswick, N. J.: 
Fifteenth Annual Report of Rutger's Scien- 
tific School. New Brunswick. 1879. 
Annual Report of the State Geologist of New 
Jersey for 1879. George H. Cook. Tren- 
ton, 1879. 

From J. James R. Croes, New York: 

The be.«t site for the International Exhiljition 

of 1883. J. J. R. Croes, New York, 1880. 

From James B. Eads. St. Louis: 

Inter-Oceanic Ship Railway. Address of Capt. 
James B. Eads before the San Francisco 
Chamber of Commerce, Aug. 11, 188(1. 

From Engineer Department, XJ. S. A. 
Gen. Horatio G. Wright, Chief of 
Engineers, Washington, D. C: 

Annual Report of Chief of Engineers for 
1879. Parts I., II and III. 

Improvemeut of Harbors at Washington and 
Georgetown, D. C. S. Thayer Abert. 

Proposals for Building Lock N. G, Great Ka- 
nawha River, W. Va. Maj. Wm. P. Craig- 
hill. 

Specifications for furnishing Piles at Horse- 
tail Bar. Capt. O. H. Ernst. 

Specifications, &c.. for Improvement of the 
Osage River between Osage City and Tus- 
cumbia. Mo. Capt. O. H. Ernst. 

Specifications relating to the Improvement of 
St. -lohus River, Florida. Gen. Q. A. GiU- 
more. 

Specifications for Improvement of Inside 
Passage between Ft-ruaudina and St. Johns 
River, Florida. Gen. Q. A. Gillmore. 

Specifications for Improvement of the en- 
trance to Cumberland Sound between 
Georgia and Florida, Gen. Q. A. Gillmore. 

Specifications tor improvement of the Har- 
bor at Brunswick, Ga. Gen. Q. A. Gill- 
more. 

Specifications for improving Volussla Bar, 
Florula Gen. Q. A. Gillmore. 

Specificatious for U. S. Haibor Improvement, 
Grand Haven, Mich. Maj.F. Harwood. 

Specifications for Improvement Portage Lake, 
Michigan. Maj. F. Harwood. 

Specifications tor Harbor Improvement of 
Muskegon, Mich. Maj F. Harwood. 

Specifications for Harbor Improvement, Lud- 
ington, Mich. Maj. F. Harwood. 

Specifications for River Improvement, An 
Sable, Mich. Maj. F. Harwood. 

Specifications for Harbor Improvement of 
Chorlevoix, Mich. Maj. F. Harwood. 

Specifications for Improvement of harbor of 
Cheboygan, Mich. Maj. F. Harwood. 

Specifications tor Harbor Improvement, Sebe- 
waing, Mich. Maj. F. Harwood. 

Specifications for Improvement of Schuylkill 
River, Pa. Col. J. N. Macomb. 



Specifications for Construction of Piers ii 
Marcus Hook Harbor. Col.. J, N. Macomb.| 

Specifications for Improvement of Delaware 
River between Camden and Philadelphia.] 
Col. J. W Macomb. 

Specifications for Improvement of Delaware" 
River at Miffliu Bay. Col. J. W. Macouib. 

Specifications for Improvement of Mispillion 
Creek, Delaware, Col. J. N. Macomb. 

Specifications of Improvement of Delaware 
River near Bordentown, N, J. Col. J. N. 
Macomo. 

Specifications for Improvement of Duck 
Creek. Delaware. Col. J. N. Macomb. 

Specifications for Improvement of Wilming- 
ton Harbor, Delaware. Col J N. Macomb. 

Specifications for U. S. Ii-on Landing Pier 
near Lewes, Delaware. Material for Fen- 
der System. Col. J. N. Macomb. 

Specifications fur Removal of Wrecks in Dela- 
ware Bay and Delaware BreakAater Har- 
bor. Col. J. N. Macomb. 

Specifications for Improvement of Cohansey 
Creek, N. J. Col. J. N. Macomb. 

Specifications for improvement of Schooner 
Ledge, Delaware River. Col. J. N. Ma- 
comb. 

Spec.fications for Improving the Channel at 
the Mouth of Salem River, N. J, Col. J. N. 
Blacomb. 

Advertisement, Specifications and Proposals 
for Dredging iu the Mississippi River near 
Keithsbva-g, 111. Capt. A. Mackenzie. 

Specifications, &c., for Constructing Dams 
and Shore Protections of Brush and Stone 
at Bar one mile above Winona, Minn. 
Capt. A. Mackenzie. 

Specifications, &o., for constructing Dams and 
Shore Protections of Brush and Stone near 
Alexandria, Mo. Capt A. Mackenzie. 

Specifications for Dredging in the Harbor of 
Kock Island, 111. Capt. .\. Mackenzie. 

Specifications for Constructing a Dam and 
Shore Proiection of Brush and Stone near 
Red Wing, Minn. Capt. A. Mackenzie. 

Specifications for Constructing a Dam of Stone 
at Denmark Island, opposite Mundy's Land- 
ing. Mo. Capt. A. Mackenzie. 

Specifications for Constructing Dams and 
Shore Protections of Brush and Stone at 
Bar above Gregory's Landing, Mo. Capt. 
A. Mackenzie. 

Specifications for Constructing Dams and 
Shore Protections of Brush and Stone at 
Westport Chute, near Falmuth, Mo. Capt. 
A. Mackenzie. 

Specifications for Constructing Dams and 
Shore Protections of Brush, Stone and 
Gravel, near Hannibal, Mo, Capt. A. Mac- 
kenzie. 

Specification for improvement of Newton 
Creek, New York. Gen. John Newton. 

Proposals for Dredging Currituck Sound, N. 
C. Capt. Chas. B. Philips. 

Proposals for Dredging Harbor at Norfolk, 
Va. Capt. Chas. B. Phillips. 

Specifications for improvement of St. Marys 
River, Mich. Gen. G. Weitzel. 

Second Treatise on the Decrease of Water in 
Springs, Creeks, and Rivers, contemporane- 
ously with an increase in Heif^ht of t lor.ds 
in cultivated countries. By Sir Gustav Wex. 
Translated by Gen. G. Weitzel. Washing- 
ington, 1880. 

Specifications for Dredging in Quincy Harbor, 
111. 



87 



From Senor F. de Garay, Mexico : 
Memoria del Miuisterio de Fomento 1865. 
Anales de Miuisterio de t'omento de la Re- 

pnblica Mexicana. Tomo 111. Mexico, 

1880. 
Memorial presented to the Congress of Mexico 

by the Secretary of State on the Public 

Works, Colonization, Industry and Com- 
merce of Mexico. (Spanish.) Mexico, 1880. 
Memorial on the Industry and Commerce of 

Mexi.:o. Presented to Congress of Mexico 

by the Secretary of State June 30, 1873. 

(SiJanish.) 

From M. Martial Haus, Brussels, Bel- 
gium: 
Memoire sur les travaux de Canalisation de la 

Meuse. M. Martial Hans, Brussels, 1880. 
From Institution of Civil Engineers, 
James Forrest, Secretary. London: 
Minutes of Proceedings. Vol. LXI. 
Abstracts of vapers in Foreign Transactions 

and Periodicals. Vol. LXI. Session 1879- 

80. Part 3 
The Practical Strength of Beams. Benjamin 

Baker. 
The Hydrology of the lower Greensands of 

Suriey and Hampshire. Joseph Lucas F. 

G. S. 
The Kandahar Railway. 
The Amsterdam Ship Canal. Harrison Hay- 

ter. 
The Seven Stones Light Vessel. James N. 

Douglas. 

From Iron and Steel Institute, London: 
Journal of the Institute. ISfo. 1. 1880. 

From Robert E. Johnston. London: 
Report of the Court of Inquiry and Report of 

Mr. Rnthery upon circumstances attending 

the Fall of a portion of the Tay Bridge on 

Dec. 28, 1879. 



From Louis H. Knapp, Buffalo, N. Y.: 
Eleventh Annual Report of the Buffalo City 
Water Works. 1880. 

From Charles Latimer, Cleveland, O. : 
Proceedings of the Road Masters' Meetings of 
the Atlantic and Great Western R. R. (New 
York, Penn. & Ohio R, R.) held at Meadville, 
Pa., Nov, 13, 1879. 

From James Lick Trust. Chicago: 
Report to the Trustees of the "James Lick 
Trust " of observations made on Mt Hamil- 
ton. S. W., Burnham. Chicago, 1880. 

From Massachusetts State Board of 
Health, Boston, Mass. 
First Annual Report • n Health, Lunacy and 
Charity, 1879. Supplement containing the 
Report and Papers on Public Health. Bos- 
ton, 1880. 

From Massachusets Institute of Tech- 
nology, Boston: 
On the Boston Water Supply. Prof. W. R. 
Nichols. Boston, 1880. 

From John Newman. London: 
Note on a New Snow Plough. John Newman . 
London, 1880. 

From Joseph Nimmo, Jr., Chief of 
Bureau of Statistics, Washington, D. 
C: 

The Proposed American Inter-Oceanic Canal 
in its Commercial Aspects. Joseph Nimmo, 
Jr Washington, 1880. {Copies for distri- 
bution ) 

From W. Milnor Roberts, Rio de Ja- 
neiro, Brazil : 
Andre Reboucas. These de Concourso. Rio 
de Janeiro, 1880. 



LIST OF MEMBERS 



ADDITIONS. 

MEMBER. 

Date of Election. 

Ballard, Robert Engineer Northern Divisions Queens- 
land Railways, Rockhampton, 
Queensland, Australia Sept. x, i88o. 

Barnard, John F Gen. Supt. Kansas City, St. Jo.seph and 

Council Bluffs R. R., St. Joseph, 
Mo " 

Brough, Redmond J. .. .Engineer and Supt. Water Works, 

Toronto, Canada " " 

CoMSTOCK, Cyrus B Maj. Corps of Engineers, Bvt. Brig. 

Gen. U. S. A., Detroit, Mich. ... 

Frazier, James L Res. Eng. Elizabethtown, Lexington, 

and Big Sandy R. R., Morehead, 

Ky " " 



Stanton, Robert B. 
Vance, Hart 



..Engineer's office, Union] Pacific Rail- 
road, Denver, Col Sept. i, i5 

..U. S. Ass't Engineer, 1,351 Washing- 
ton ave., St. Louis, Mo July 7, 18I 



Hammond, Henry B. 



associate. 



. Pres. Indianapolis, Decatur and Spring- 
field R. R.. 120 Broadway, New 
York, N. Y July 7, 1880. 



changes and corrections. 

members. 

Doane, Edward A Chief Engineer Meadville Railroad, Box 1,715, Mead- 

ville, Pa. 

Hasell, Bentley D Pier 27, N. R., P. O. Box 2,605, ^^^w York, N. Y. 

Kinsley, Thomas P . . . .231 Broadway, New York, N. Y. 

Michaelis, Otho E Capt. Ordinance Corps, U.S. A., Frankford Arsenal, 

Philadelphia, Pa. 

Moore, Charles E Care of Sweet Mfg. Co., Syracuse, N. Y. 

Sears, Alfred F Chief Engr. Oregonian Railway Co. (Limited), Port- 
land, Oregon. 

Searles, William H...Newburg, N. Y. 

Ward, Charles D., ..U. S. Engineer's office, Cleveland, Ohio. 

Weir, Frederick C Burnet House, Cincinnati, Ohio. 



juniors. 

Crosby, Benjamin L Nemaha City, Neb. 

HoRTON, Sanford Engineer Dept. Southern Pacific R. R., Mescilla, N. M. 



resignation. 
Ross, William B Junior Sept. 23, 1880. * 



pmkmx mkb of iiml |^nc(in^^r3. 



p^ROCEEDiisras. 



Vol. VI.— November, 1880. 



MINUTES OF MEETINaS. 

(Abstractof such as may be of general interest to members.) 



OF THE SOCIETY. 

October 20th, 1880.— The Society met at 8 p. m. William H. Paine 
in the chair. 

The subject of wind pressures was discussed by members present. 



THE TWENTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL MEETING OF 
THE SOCIETY, 

November 3d, 17th and 18th, 1880. 

NovEMBEK 3d, 1880.— The Society met at 10 a. m. William H. Paine 
in the chair. 

The Annual Report of the Board of Direction was presented, ordered 
printed and submitted to the adjourned meeting on November 17th. 

Edward P. North and John G. Van Home, Members A. S. 0. E., 
were appointed tellers of the ballots to be canvassed this day. 

The Annual Reports of the Treasurer and of the Finance Committee 
I were presented, and their consideration postponed. 

The Report of the Committee on a Uniform System of Tests of 
Cement was presented, and its consideration postponed. 

On motion, the proposed amendment to Article XXXI. of the Con- 
stitution, as printed on page 84, Proceedings, Vol. VI. (October, 1880), 
was amended by omitting the last clause, it being explained that the 



90 

clause was inserted by a clerical error. Tlie amendment, as now pro- 
posed, is as follows : 

Proposed Amendment to Article XXXI. The Article to read : 

The annual contributions shall become due for the ensuing year on the first day of Janu- 
ary, and shall be payable in advance. It shall be the duty of the Secretary to notify each 
member of the amount due for the ensuing year, at the time of giving notice of the Annual 
Meeting. 

The consideration of all the proposed amendments was then post- 
poned to November 17th. 

The Eeport of the Canvass of Suggestions as to place and time for 
the Thirteenth Annual Convention was presented, and its consideration 
also postponed. 

A recess was taken until 8 p. m. 

November 3d, 8 p. m.— The Annual Meeting was resumed. Vice- 
President Chanute in the chair. 

The report of the canvass of ballots for membership was made, and 
the following were declared elected Juniors of the Society: Thomas Ellis 
Brown, of New York, and G. Frederick P. Day, of Fitchburg, Mass. 

The report of the canvass of ballots for officers was presented, and 
the following members were declared elected officers of the Society for 
the ensuing year : 

President— James B. Francis. 

Vice-Presidents— Octave Chanute, Ashbel Welch. 

Secretary and Librarian— John Bogart. 
[ Treasurer— J. James E. Croes. 

Directors— William H. Paine, C. Vandervoort Smith, Joseph P. 
Dayis, G. Bouscaren, D. J. Whittemore. 

The Annual Meeting was then adjourned to meet on Wednesday, 
November 17th, at 10 a. m. 

November 17th, 1880.— The Annual Meeting, adjourned from Novem- 
ber 3d, was resumed at 10 a. m. William H. Paine in the chair. 

The Secretary announced the details of the proposed arrangements, 
for this and the following day, as shown by the printed programme. 

The Annual Eeport of the Board of Direction was then presented in 
printed slips and accepted. The Eeports of the Treasurer and of the 
Finance Committee were also presented and accepted. The Eeport of 
the Committee on a Uniform System for Tests of Cements was read, 
placed on file, and the Committee continued. 

The Eeport of the Board of Censors to award the Norman Medal wasi 
read, as follows . 

"We, the Board of Censors appointed to award the Norman Medal 
for the year 1880, do award the same to Theodore Cooper, Member A. S. 



91 



C. E., author of Paper No. CLXXXVI., "The Use of Steel for 
Bridges." 

James B. Francis. 

Chas. Hermany. 

Thos. C. Clarke. 

The Eeport of the Canvass of Suggestions as to place for the next 
Annual Convention was . read. These are answers to a circular issued 
requesting such suggestions. 96 answers were received, as follows: 

San Francisco was suggested by 32 



Washington 
New York 
Long Branch 
St. Paul 
Niagara 
Buffalo 
Richmond 



" 24 

" 8 

" 4 

" 4 

" 3 

" 3 

" 3 

Ithaca (Cornell University) was suggested by 2 

Baltimore was suggested by 2 

Minneapolis was suggested by 2 

Cincinnati " " " 2 

Alexandria Bay was suggested by 1 



Lake Superior 

Troy 

Chicago 

Providence 

Saratoga 

Montreal 



The subject of a recommendation by this meeting as to the place for 
the next Convention was discussed, and the following suggestions and 
remarks as to the places named were made by members present, or read 
by the Secretary from the answers to the circulars issued on this 
subject. 

As to San Francisco, it was stated that holding the Convention there, 
and the trip across the continent, would excite a more extended interest 
in the Society ; that excellent opportunity to examine the minei'al re- 
sources and mining operations would be afforded ; that the Pacific Coast 
contains some of the most peculiar engineering works in this country ; 
that San Francisco itself is one of the most interesting cities of this con- 
tinent ; that while the time occupied might be longer than usual it 
would be well occupied, and that to many members, such an excursion 
would be the only opportunity for a visit to the Pacific ; that engineers 
will probably be able to alford such a trip better than for years past ; 
that the Society being National, should take a comprehensive view of 



92 

the situation ; that the desire to hold a Convention at San Francisco has 
been growing and has found expression frequently during several years 
past ; that, probably, satisfactory arrangements could be made as to the 
cost of the trip to members. 

On the other hand, it was stated that it was understood that while 
the members of the Society now residing in Cahfornia would be glad to 
have a Convention held in San Francisco, yet it was considered that a 
year or two later than the present would be more desirable, because the 
Southern railway connections would then be completed, and it was alsa 
hoped that the membership of the Society on the Pacific coast would 
be considerably increased in the meanwhile. It was also said that there 
were the great objections of the expense of a trip to San Francisco, 
and the time, little less than a month, that would necessarily be required, 
and that both these considerations of cost and time would probably pre- 
vent the attendance of many members. 

On motion it was determined that San Francisco be not recommended 
as the place for the next Convention. 

As to Washington, it was urged that the National Capital possesses 
many objects of interest to the engineer ; that a Convention there would 
aid in obtaining National recognition of the Society ; that it is con- 
venient of access for many members ; that it has great local conveniences 
for convention purposes ; that the conventions should alternate between 
the East and West or the North and South ; that Congress should be 
urged to re-establish the work of the commission for testing iron and steel. 

On the other hand, it was stated that the regular session of Congress- 
terminated this year on the 4th of March, and that there was no proba- 
bility of a session being held there this spring or summer ; that it was 
not desirable that the Convention should be held at Washington at a- 
time when Congress was not in session. 

On motion it was determined that Washington be not recommended 
as the place for the next Convention. 

As to St. Paul, it was stated that members resident in the northwest 
were desirous of having the Society visit that part of the country, but that 
considering the location of the last two conventions it would probably 
not be best to go to St. Paul at this time, and that a special invitation, 
would probably be extended to the Society for some future year. 

As to Ithaca, N. Y. , an invitation was read from Prof. Fuertes, Mem- 
ber A. S. C. E., suggesting that at Cornell University the problems of 
technical and higher education are being solved under auspices and with 
tendencies entirely American ; that it is the only American university 
where all courses of study are placed on an equal footing ; that there is 
ready access to many interesting places in Central New York, and that 
the faculty of the university would welcome the Society. It was, how- 
ever, suggested that there was a question as to the extent of the hotel 
accommodations. 



93 

As to Troy, it was suggested that it was easy of access from all sec- 
tions ; that many members of the Society who began their professional 
life there will be glad to visit that city ; that a Convention has never 
been held in the northern part of the State of New York ; that many 
places and works of interest could be visited ; large steel works, paper 
manufactories, &c., are in the vicinity. 

As to Providence, it was said that there were excellent hotels and many 
points of engineering interest ; that it is a great railroad center, only one 
hour from Boston and close to Newport and many pleasure resorts on 
Narragansett Bay ; and that also there are in it and its neighborhood many 
great manufactories. 

Another suggestion was made that it might be best for the Society to 
hold a Convention at some watering place or summer resort ; that such 
a place could be selected where good accommodations could be secured 
at reasonable rates, and which should be accessible and intei'esting ; that 
a meeting could thus be held without local invitation and thus avoid the 
imposition of a large tax for entertainment upon the local membership ; 
that at least one experiment of this kind might be desirable. 

After the discussion it was on motion determined that a letter ballot 
be issued, and that this Annual Meeting recommend as the place for the 
next Convention one of these three points, Niagara Falls, the Thousand 
Islands or Montreal. 

The proposed amendments to the Constitution were then discussed. 

It was recommended that the following amendments be adopted. 

Proposed Amendment to Article XXIII. 

strike out the worda " and the Past Presidents of the Society," and Insert '■ such Past 
Presidents of the Society as shall be at the time Members of the Society and resident in the 
United States." 

Proposed Amendment to Article XXII. 

For " first Wednesday in November," read " first day of January." 

ProiDosed Amendment to Article XXX. The Article to read : 

The Annual Meeting for the election of officers and hearing the Annual Reports, shall be 
held on the third Wednesday in January. The Board of Direction shall lay before the meeting 
a report of the state of the Society, together with a statement by the Treasurer, verified by the 
Committee on Finance, of the funds of the Society, and the I'eceipts and payments during the 
year ending on the 31st of December preceding. 

Proposed Amendment to Article XXXI. The Article to read : 

The annual contributions shall become due for the ensuing year on the first day of January, 
and shall be payable in advance. It shall be the duty of the Secretary to notify each member 
of the amount due for the ensuing year, at the time of giving notice of the Annual Meeting. 

Proposed Amendment to Article V. 

After the words " Annual Meeting of the Society," strike out the words "and shall hold 
their offices until others are elected," and insert " The term of office shall begin at the close of 
the Annual Meeting and continue for one year or until other officers are elected." 



94 

The following proposed Amendment was then discussed. Article 
XIX to read : 

Proposals for admission to tbe Society, endorsed by five members as provided in preced- 
ing Article, shall be submitted to the Board of Direction at its next meeting. If the applicant 
is deemed eligible by the Board of Direction, letter ballots shall be issued and these ballota 
shall be canvassed by the Board of Direction not less than twenty-five days after the date of 
mailing the ballots. A member voting in the negative on any application, to give with the 
ballot a itritten statement of his reasons for such negative vote, which statement he may sign 
or not as he chooses, but if not signed he must indicate means by which his statement can be 
verified ; the Board of Direction will then consider the reasons given, and if they are good and 
sufficient, and if they are deemed to be well founded, the negative vote will be counted and 
five or more negative votes will exclude the applicant. 

Members of the Board of Direction may change their votes to the negative for the reasons 
shown, after the reasons for giving such vote have been held sufficient ; but such negative 
vote shall be given openly in the meeting of the Board. 

In case of the non-election of any person balloted for, no notice shall be taken thereof in 
the Society minutes. 

Letters favorable to this or a similar amendment were read from 
Messrs. W. P. Shinn, F. Slataper and T. Egleston. 

Mr. W. Crosby presented l>y letter the following : " I am oj^posed to 
the proi^osed amendment for the following reasons : 

1st. It destroys the secrecy of the ballot which was to take the place ^ 
of the black ball and be equally secret. 

2d. It substitutes the judgment of the Board of Direction for that of 
the individual voting, and, in so doing, takes from the members nearly 
the last right left them in the managing of the Society's affairs, except 
that of paying dues. 

3d. It calls upon the Board of Direction to reverse a decision already 
made by it ; a much more trying thing to do, than to come to a just deci- 
sion m the first instance. 

In support of these reasons I advance as follows : 
Secrecy is desirable because — 

1st. It might often be a great injury to a candidate to relate, even to 
a limited circle, facts known to be against him, unless it is considered 
that, like a woman's secret, which is better kept the more possess it; five 
members added to the whole number in the Board of Direction, can 
better keep those facts to themselves than could the same five members 
without the assistance of the Board. 

2d. The secrecy of the ballot is desirable even when the unworthinesa 
of the candidate is known to many, because most men, not ambitious of 
martyrdom, do not wish to be known as opposing the admission of any 
one, whatever their feelings may be, but prefer to let the responsibility 
be a little indefinite. 

The ijroposed plan gives to a bare majority of a quorum of the Board 
of Direction, four persons, the power to override the wishes of a great 
number, or even of all of the members outside of that quorum, and to 
admit to membership any man,however objectionable, that small majority 
may see fit. 



Since there is practically no way of getting rid of an obnoxious mem- 
ber, so long as he pays his dues, if we would preserve a high standard, 
too great care cannot be exercised in the admission, and therefore mem- 
bers should be free to vote effectively in this matter, and this seems an 
undesirable bestowal of power, particularly when there is such a diver- 
sity of opinion as to the conditions that candidates should fulfill, some 
persons who have been very much in the Board of Direction, being much 
less strict in that than many members outside of that Board." 
The following discussion then took place : 

George W. Dresser. — I desire to offer an amendment to this pro- 
posed amendment to the Constitution. It seems to me that this point 
can be made against this amendment as proposed. The members may, 
or may not send in, in writing, signed or unsigned, their reasons for their 
negative vote. If they do, the Board can have that information to act 
upon, and, of course, the votes of the Board will be sufficient to defeat the 
election of the man. The common course of the thing would be that the 
members would say, I don't care to write out my reasons, but I will sim- 
ply vote against that man, and get four others to do so, and we will de- 
feat his election. The simplest way to rectify this matter is to put the 
responsibility of a recommendation for election, not for ballot, but for 
election, upon the Board of Direction. They are in a position to enquire 
and obtain whatever information may be necessary for them to form a 
judgment, and if the matter is so adjusted that their recommendation is 
for election, they will take very great care to inquire and inform them- 
selves about each proposed candidate and not give a negative recommen- 
dation but a positive one. If they simply do not know anything either 
for or against the man, they will post themselves, and for that reason I 
would suggest the propriety of placing the responsibility uiaon the 
Board, who are bound to see that no detriment shall come to the Society, 
and in that light there is nothing more imi^ortant for them to consider 
than the admission of members. The second point I would like to make 
is this : that the affirmative votes count for nothing, and it is only the 
negative votes that throw the man out. It is simply within the power 
of any five members to prevent the admission of a single member to the 
society by simply striking their pen through the word yes on the ballot 
as sent out. Therefore I would require that there shall be more than 
five members necessary to reject a candidate for membership of this 
Society after a recommendation of the Board of Direction for election 
has been made. 

To bring this to a point, I would recommend that in the fourth line 
of the present amendment, as printed, the words " deemed eligible " be 
stricken out, and the words "recommended for election " be inserted in 
their place, so that clause would read : " If the applicant is recommended 
for election by the Board of Direction, letter ballots," &c. That leaves 
the letter ballot as it stands in the proposed amendment, and that change 



96 

being made, leaves the rest of the proijosed amendment useless, and I 
would scratch out all that follows, beginning with " a member voting in 
the negative," &c., and would insert there: " An affirmative vote of at 
least four-fifths of all the votes cast shall be necessary for an election." 
This places the matter upon the same basis as the Institution of Civil 
Engineers in England. They require four-fifths of the votes cast to elect 
a member, and I think the success of that institution is sufficient guaran- 
tee for us to adopt the same rule. 

It seems to me that this will place the matter in a very simple form ; 
that it will eradicate the difficulty that we have been laboring under, and 
it will put the matter where no man can assume to say to us that we 
manage the alfairs of a professional Society as though it were a social 
club. 

The great objection to the present system is apparent, I think, to 
every one. It is well known to many members of the Society that gentle- 
men of high standing, and occupying high positions — men who are a 
credit and an honor to the profession, and would be men of influence and 
importttnce to us as a body if they were members of the Society — have 
been rejected as members by barely five votes, and that this thing may 
be done again. Any man who occupies a high position must find it 
necessary at times to bring some of the younger members up with a 
round turn occasionally. It may have been, i^erhaps, without any inten- 
tion of being unkind, but it must work a hardship to these younger 
gentlemen. But finally this man who has done this thing comes up 
as an applicant for membership. This young man meets one or two of 
his friends : ' ' Here we have got him ; we can sock it to him now ; we 
will make him smart." That is the way the thing works practically. 
Shall we ask all who want to join to submit themselves to the risk of any 
such treatment V It seems to me that an affirmative vote of four-fifths 
ought to be ample, and I would move this amendment, sir, to the amend- 
ment. 

This was seconded. 

W. R. HuTTON. — As I understand the amendment, as printed, only 
those votes can be counted which are sustained by the objection. 

The Secret AKY. — That is not as suggested by Mr. Dresser. 

Mr. Katte. — I think there is a radical defect in this amendment as 
printed. I don't see how it will be proper for the Board to change any 
vote. If a man votes no, where does the Board of Direction derive the 
power to throw that ballot out ? 

I think we must change that proposition entirely. Otherwise I 
think the amendment is a very good one, indeed. The four-fifths rnle 
in London has been found to work well for a long time. There can 
hardly be any doubt that our present rule has done us a great deal of 
injury. This whole discussion has arisen from a case in point. We 
have undoubtedly lost a very valuable member — a gentleman who stands 



97 

high in the jDrofession and in the estimation of his friends. Now, I think 
that when a gentleman of that character is rejected by this Society by 
five negative votes it is nearly approaching a scandal upon this Society. 
For that reason I concur in the amendment offered by Mr. Dresser. 
The meeting was then adjoiirned to 8:30 p. m. 

November 17th, 8:30 p. m. — The session of the Annual Meeting was 
resumed, Vice-President Ashbel Welch in the chair. 

Mr. Welch. — Gentlemen, I take this occasion to thank the Society 
for the unexpected honor done to me by electing me to one of its high 
places. 

The consideration of the amendment jiroposed to Article XIX of the 
Constitution was continued. 

The annual meeting then, by vote, adopted the following amend- 
ment to the proposed amendment to Article XIX of the Constitution 
and recommended its passage as thus amended. Article XIX to read : 

Proposals for admission to the Society, endorsed by five members as provided in the pre. 
ceding Article, shall be submitted to the Board of Direction at its next meeting. If the appli- 
cant is recommended for election by the Board ot Direction, letter ballots shall be issued and 
these ballots shall be canvassed by the Board of Direction not less than twenty-five days after 
the date of mailing the ballots. 

An affirmative vote of at least four-fifths of all the votes cast shall be necessary for an 
election. 

In case of the non-election of any person balloted for, no notice shall be taken thereof in 
the Society minutes. 

The following proposed Amendment to the By-Laws was then 
brought up. Proposed by F. Collingwood, Member A. S. C. E., and 
seconded by G. Leverich, Member A. S. C. E. 

An amendment to the By-Laws, to take the place of Section 24. 

Section 24. Any member entitled to vote for officers of the Society, may, before the 
third Wednesday of November, in any year, nominate such officers for the ensuing year, by 
presenting the names of such nominees in writing over his own signature, in a sealed envel- 
ope, addressed to the Board of Direction, and endorsed, ' ' Nominations for Officers." 

The Board of Direction or those of its members present at a meeting of the Board, to be 
held on said third Wednesday of November, for this purpose, shall prepare a list in alphabet- 
ical order, under the title of each office, of all the persons thus nominated and eligible to the 
respective offices, together with the class of membership of each as to whether resident or 
non-resident. 

Within one week thereafter, the Secretary shall mail such list, with a copy of this sec" 
tion, to all members of whatever class. 

Members qualified to vote for officers may do so by striking from or adding to this list, 
and return the same as their ballots, but each ballot shall contain not more than one name for 
President, one for Secretary, one for Treasurer, and one for Li rarian, two names for Vice- 
President and five names for Directors. Of these, one Vice-President, the Secretary, the 
Treasurer, the Librarian and three Directors must be resident members. 

The vote shall be by letter, in like manner as prescribed for admission to membership, 
and be canvassed at the Annual Meeting next succeeding. The presiding officer shall appoint 
three or more tellers for the canvass, who shall reject all ballots not in conformity with the 
Constitution and By-Laws, and report the result in full to the meeting in writing, such report 
to be preserved by the Secretary for reference. 

The nominee for any office receiving the greatest number of legal ballots shall be de- 
clared elected to that office. 



98 

If, in any case, in consequence of two or more nominees receiving an eqi\al number of 
Totes, there is no election of a particular officer, the members present, who are entitled to 
vote, shall elect such officer by plurality ballot, from those nominees receiving the highest 
number ef votes. 

On motion it was determiued that the letter ballot on this proposed 
amendment to the Bv-Laws be issued with a brief statement of the argu- 
ment for and against the change proposed, such arguments to be pre- 
pared by the proposers and by any opposer there may be to it. 

The Committee on Gauging Streams then presented a report 
through J. J. R. Oroes, chairman, including certain tables and document* 
furnished by A. Fteley, Member A. S. C. E. 

The report was discussed by Messrs A. Welch, J. P. Davis, F. Col- 
lingwood, C. E. Emery, G. W. Dresser, S. L. Smedley, J. E. Hilgard, 
T. C. Clarke, A. G-. Compton, O. Chanute and J. J. E. Croes. 

A paper by Mr. Frederick S. Odell, C. E. , describing the sewerage 
recently put in at Memphis, Tenn., was then read and discussed by 
Messrs. E. S. Philbrick, F. Collingwood, J. J. R. Croes, A. P. Boiler, 
G. W. Dresser, R. Cartwright, S. L. Smedley, W. E. Worthen and J. 
Bogart. 

The Annual Meeting then adjourned. 



In addition to the meetings, the record of which is above given,^ 
visits and excursions were made to the points named in the programme 
arranged by the resident members for this occasion. This programme, 
which was carried out as printed, was as follows : 



AMERICAN SOCIETY OF CIVIL ENGINEERS. 

Twenty-Eighth Annual Meeting, 
New Yoek, No\^mber 17th and 18th, 1880. 



The Annual Meeting adjourned from November 3d, will be resumed 
on Wednesday. November 17th. 

The following arrangements have been made for that and the suc- 
ceeding day : 

Wednesday, November 17th. 

10 A. M. — Annual meeting at Society House, No. 104- East 20th street. 
Business Meeting. — Reading of Annual Reports, Discussion on Reports, 
and on proposed Amendments to the Constitution and By-Laws, and 
other business. Meeting to adjourn at 12.30 p. m. 

1 p. M. — Meet at the Engineer's Office of the New York and Brook- 
lyn Bridge, corner of Pearl and Cherry streets. New York — (Franklin 
Square station of East-side Elevated Railroads.) Lunch will be served 
at 1 o'clock. The plans and structure of the bridge will then be exam- 
ined, under the guidance of the engineers in charge. 



99 

3 p. M. — Those -who do not desire to spend the rest of the afternoon 
in the examination of the bridge, will elect one of the following ex- 
cursions, each of which will be in charge of resident members : 

(a.) a steamer will leave the Bridge Pier at 3 p. m. , and passing 
down the East River and around the Battery, the party will inspect the 
terminal arrangements of railroads at Jersey City, and proceed to the 
Elevator of the Erie Railway, and afterwards the works of the Hudson 
River Tunnel. 

(b. ) A party in company with resident members will visit the build- 
ings of the Western Union Telegraph Company, the Equitable Life In- 
surance Co., and the exhibition of the electric light. 

(c.) Those who desire to make more detailed examinations of the 
Bridge, will have facilities for doing so during the rest of the afternoon. 

8. p. M. — Meeting at Society House. 

Thursday, November 18th. 

10 A. M. — A special train will leave on the up-town track of the Ele- 
vated Railroad at Ninth street and Third avenue, at 10 a. m., shai'p ; pro- 
ceed to and inspect shops at 99th street and Third avenue. Leave shops 
at 10. 50, arrive at terminus, 129th street and Tliird avenue, at 11. Pro- 
ceed on foot to termius |of Second Avenue Elevated Railroad at 127th 
street and Second avenue, and leave there at 11.15; pass over Second 
Avenue Railroad to the Battery. Leave the Battery at 12; inspect ar- 
rangements for dispatching trains at Rector street, and proceed via Sixth 
and Eighth Avenue Elevated Railroads to 125th street and Eighth 
avenue. 

1 p. M. — Visit and inspection of the apparatus of the Prall System for 
Heating and Cooking by Hot "Water, at 125th street and Eighth avenue. 
Lunch will be served at the same place. 

After lunch the members will visit either of the following jDoints of 
interest, the parties for each will be conducted by resident members : 

The Armory of the Seventh Regiment. 

The pumping station, reservoirs and aqueduct of the Croton Water 
Department. 

Some of the illuminating gas works of the city. 

The Egyptian Obflisk, its proposed site, and the Central Park. 

The excursions may be joined at any of the points mentioned above. 
The presentation of a member's ticket will be required, which may be 
obtained from the Secretary of the Society. 

8 p M. — A reception will be given by the resident members at 
Pinard's, No. 6 East 15th street ; to be followed by a supper. Special 
tickets for this will be required, which may be obtained from the 
Secretary of the Society. 

P. S. — A visit to the Fair of the American Institute may be made at 



100 

any time. Members desiring to make this visit will be supplied with 
tickets by the Secretary. 

The members of the Society present dviring the meeting were as fol- 
lows : 

Edward R. Andrews, John W. Bacon, George S. Baxter, H. D. Blun- 
den, John Bogart, A. P. Boiler, D. Bontecou, T. E. Browne, Robt. 
Cartwright, O. Chanute, T. C. Clarke, F. Oollingwood, A. G. Compton, 
G. B. Cornell, M. Coryell, J. J. R. Croes, D. W. Cunningham, J. H. Cun- 
ningham, Joseph P. Davis, P. P. Dickinson, E. B. Dorsey, George W. 
Dresser, T. Egleston, S. Clarence Ellis, Theo. G. Ellis, C. E. Emery, 
Albert Fink, Clark Fisher, R. Fletcher, M. N. Forney, B. Godwin, Geo, 
S. Greene, Jr., M. S. Greenough, G. Thomas Hall, Wm. G. Hamilton, 
S. Haslett, Charles H. Haswell, Clemens Herschel, J. E. Hilgard, W. R. 
Hiitton, Walter Katte, William E. Kelley, Thomas P. Kinsley, E. D. 
Leavitt, Jr., G. Leverich, Thomas J. Long, Charles Macdonald, Wm. 
W. Maclay, C. S. Maurice, Arthur Macy, C. C. Martin, C. L. McAlpine, 
G. W. McNulty, A. G. Menocal, C. H. Myers, Chas. Neilson, Geo. B. 
Nicholson, F. O. Norton, E. B. Noyes, Wm. H. Paine, E. S. Philbrick, 
F. C. Prindle, Jos. R. Richards, S. H. Shreve, S. L. Smedley, C. V. 
Smith, T. Guilford Smith, R. P. Staats, Cook Talcott, Geo. C. Tingley, 
S. Towle, J. G. Van Home, E. Vanderpool, E. B. Van Winkle, W. W. 
Walker, C. G. Weir, A. Welch, H. M. Wightman, Wm. H. Wiley and 
Wm. E. Worthen. ' 



OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTION. 

October 1st, 1880. — Ai-rangements for the Annual Meeting were 
considered, and a recommendation adopted that such meeting be ad- 
journed on November 3d and continued on November 17th and 18th. 
The report of the Nominating Committee was received, and action was 
taken thereon as provided by the By-Laws. Appropriations were 
made. 

November 1st, 1880. — Applications w^ere considered. The Secretary 
presented his Annual Report to the Board. The Annual Report of the 
Board of Direction was perfected. 

November 10th, 1880. — The Board of Direction for the year begin- 
ning November 3d, 1880, met and organized. The following Standing 
Committees were appointed : 

( William H. Paine, 
On Finance, -| C. Vandervoort Smith, 
( Joseph P. Davis. 

ij. James R. Croes, 
O. Clianute, 
Ashbel Welch. 
Applications were considered. Appropriations were made. 



101 



ANNUAL REPOET 

OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTION FOR THE YEAR ENDING, 
NOVEMBER 3, 1880. 



Presented and accepted at the Annual Meeting of tliat date. 



4 


Total. 


6 


3 


" . 


S 


347 


" . 


...463 


13 


a 


...18 


46 


a 


...54 






535 



The Board of Direction presents the following report for the term 
from November 5, 1879, to November 3, 1880 : 

On November 5, 1879, the membership in the Society was 

Honorary members, resident, 2 Non-resident. 
Corresponding members... " 

Members, resident 116 " 

Associates " 5 " 

Juniors " 8 " 

Making, resident 131 Non-resident... 413 

Total 544 

Fellows, 66 of whom 10 members and 1 Honorary Member are 

included above, leaving 55 

Total connected with the Society November 5, 1879 599 

At the present time the membership is : 
Honorary members, resident 3 Non-resident 9 Total... 12 



Corresponding members 

Members, resident 114 

Associates, " 6 

Juniors. " 6 



.... 3 
....359 
.... 14 
.... 42 



473 

20 

48 



541 

Making, resident 129 Non-resident. .. .427 — - 

Total • 556 

Fellows 66 of whom 10 members and 1 honorary member are in- 
eluded above, leaving <^<^ 



Total connected with the Society November 3, 1880 611 



102 

The additions during the past year to the several classes of Society 
membership have been : 

Honorary members 6 

Members qualified 58 

Associates qualified 8 

Juniors qualified 5 

Total additions to the several classes of membership 77 

The decrease during the year in the several classes of membership 
has been : 

Members. .Died, 8. . .Eesigned 3 11 

Associates . Died, 1 . . . Resigned Transferred to member .... 1 2 

Junior. . ..Died, 0. ..Resigned 1 | Tr-ferred to --'-.. -6 | 

Totals . . .Deaths, 9 . . .Resignations, 4 Transfers 7 20 

There has also been a decrease during the year of the following num- 
bers whose membership has ceased under the provisions of Article 
XXVII of the Constitution: 

Members, 37 Associates, 4 Juniors, 4 Total, 45 

There has thus been an addition of 77 to the various classes of mem- 
bership, and a loss by deaths, resignations and transfers of 20, making 
the actual net additions during the year 57 in number. 

The loss of 45 members for non-j^ayment of dues makes the apparent 
increase for the year only twelve. It is, however, proper to state that 
this loss is entirely of those who have contributed nothing to the Society 
for a number of years, and the continuance of whose names upon the list 
of members has been in many cases a mere formality. 

The addition of 77, or, not counting the seven transfers from one class 
to another, the actual addition of 70 new members to the Society, is a 
gratifying increase over the number of yearly additions, and has not been 
equalled for many past years of its history, in fact not since the period 
of its general reorganization. It is the belief of this Board that the rate of 
increase may easily be made greater by a very moderate amount of per- 
sonal effort on the part of present members. A suggestion to this effect 
was issued in a circular note sent to members during the past year, from 
which the following is quoted : " The American Society of Civil Engi- 
neers now contains nearly six hundred mt-mbers. In order to iucrease 
its usefulness, while maintaining its high standard of requirements, it de- 
sires to draw to itself a larger proportion of those engaged in engineering 
and kindred pursuits, who ai'e estimated to number about 8 000 in this 
country. It is suggested that you may be able to proijose the names of 
worthy persons for New Members, Associates, Juniors and Fellows." 
Each addition to the list of members actually increases in a large ratio 



103 

the benefit of the Society to each individual, and enlarges its opportuni- 
ties as regards the profession of engineering. 

A number of aj^plications for membership has been received from 
engineers residing beyond the limits of the Utiited States, and an in- 
creasing interest in the Society has been manifested in various ways, both 
in this country and elsewhere. 

Since the last rejjort of this Board there has been added to the list of 
honoraiy members of the Society the names of six distinguished engineers, 
each one of whom has been, in the opinion of the members of the Board, 
and of the past presidents of the Society, a gentleman of acknowledged 
eminence in some branch of engineering, as specified in our constitution. 
Two of these are resident in the United States, General H. G. Wright, 
the Chief of Engineers of the United States Army, and Mr. John Ericsson, 
the distinguished man who, during half a century, has made so many 
additions to the theory and practice of civil and mechanical engineering. 
The four other honorary members added during the year. Sir John 
Hawkshaw, Baron M. M. Von Weber, Mr. E. Malezieux, and Mr. Justin 
Dirks are representative engineers of England, Germany, France and 
Holland. 

On November 5, 1879, there were, as stated in the last annual report, 
13 proposals pending ; 65 proposals have been received during the year ; 
58 caodidates have been elected members, of whom 5 were transferred 
from Juniors and 1 from Associate ; 8 candidates have been elected As- 
sociates, of whom 1 was transferred from Junior ; 5 candidates have been 
elected Juniors. 

58 persons have, during the year, qualified as Members, of whom 
1 was elected last year ; 8 have qualified as Associates ; 5 have qualified 
as Juniors ; 1 candidate elected during the year as Member has not yet 
qualified ; there are are 4 proposals now pending. 

Twenty-four meetings of the Society were held during the year, one 
of which was the Twelfth Annual Convention, all the sessions of the 
Convention, including the business meeting, being counted as one meet- 
ing of the Society. Meetings have been held on the first and third 
Wednesdays of each month, except that there were no meetings in 
August, and but one in July. Three meetings of the Society were held 
in January and three in February. 

Sixteen meetings of the Board of Direction have been held during the 
year. 

One of the Society meetings in February was held at the Theatre 
of the Union League Club on the occasion of the discussion on the sub- 
ject of Inter-Oceanic Canals. At this meetings M. de Lesseps presented 
his views and was followed by Messrs. Dirks, Dauzat, and other 
engineers. The experiment of holding public meetings on the occasion 
of the discussion of subjects of general public interest proved in this in- 
stance very successful, and it is hoped that opijortunities for meetings of 



104 

such a character will frequently occur and be taken advantage of. A. 
healthy renewal of interest in the society may result both on the part of 
its members and of the public generally. 

At the meeting of the Society in May last it was determined that the 
library and conversation rooms at the Society House should thereafter be 
open each Wednesday evening instead of Thursday evening. This 
change has proved very acceptable. Members now find the rooms 
lighted, and either a formal meeting of the Society or an opportunity for 
conversation and the consultation of books, papers, and periodicals 
on the evenings of every Wednesday of the year. 

The Twelfth Annual Convention was held at St. Loixis, Mo. May 
25th, 26th, 27th, and 28th, 1880. 

Fully detailed reports have been published in our Proceedings, of 
that Convention, of the excursions and entertainments connected with 
it, and of the great hospitality given the Society and its guests by citi- 
zens of St. Louis, both members of the Society and many others inter- 
ested in its work. The great advantage to the Society, and to the pro- 
fession of engineering, from such meetings of engineers, from all parts 
of the country, is more and more evident with each annual convention. 

In the arrangements for the present Annual Meeting, suggested by 
this Board, and approved at the meeting of the Society of October 6th, 
it has been the purpose to provide for the more convenient attendance of 
non-resident members, and for more perfected arrangements for their 
entertainment than has been attempted generally on the occasion of 
annual meetings. These having occurred heretofore on the first 
Wednesday in November, a date which has been found inconvenient for 
many members, and each annual meeting continuing but one day, and 
that being necessarily largely devoted to business discussions, there has 
not been develojjed such an interest in the meetings as to attract many 
members to them. The proposed adjournment of this meeting to the 
middle of the month, and the arrangements in progress under charge 
of a committee to make the meeting attractive, will, it is believed, add 
to the interest heretofore attaching to these occasions, and, it is hoped, 
will increase the attendance upon them in the fixture. 

The answers to a circular issued to the Society, requesting sugges- 
tions as to the place and time for the next convention, will be submitted 
at this meeting. 

Reports made during the year have been as follows : 

By the Board of Direction. The Annual Report for the year. 

By the Finance Committee. 2 reports. 

By the Library Committee. A report on the Circulation of the Books of the Library. 

By the Treasurer. His annual report, and also frequent statements to the Board. 

By the Secretary. Monthly reports to the Board. 

By the Committee on Tests of American Iron, Steel, and other Metals. 1 report. 

By the Comm ttee on Gauging of Streams. 2 reports. 

By the Committee on Methods of Nominations. 1 report. 



105 

By the Committee on Uniform System of Tests of Cement. 1 report. 

By the Committee on Preservation of Timber. 1 report. 

The Treasurer's Report and the Eeport of the Finance Committee will be submitted at 
this meeting. 

By the Committee on Paris Exhibit. 1 report, and the committee discharged. 

By the Centennial Commission. 1 report, and the committee discharged. 

By the Committee on Permanent Quarters for the Society. 1 report, the committee 
discharged, and a new committee appointed. 

Keports will be expected at this meeting from the Committees on 
Tests of Iron and Steel ; on Gauging of Streams ; on a Uniform System 
of Tests of Cement ; on Experiments on Wind Pressures, and on the 
Preservation of Timber. 

The Library has been increased during the year by the following ad- 
ditions : 

Number of books bound 93 

" " ixnbound 187 

' ' i>amphlets 404 

" maps and plans 70 

' ' photographs 18 

" drawings, specifications, models and 

specimens 72 

These do not include magazines and papers contributed to the Society 
by publishers, or received in exchange for the Ti'ansactions, a list of 
which is given in an ai^pendix to this report. 

The present state of the Library is about as follows : 

Books and pamphlets 8,738 

Manuscripts 105 

Maps, plans, drawings, charts, photographs and 

engravings 2,114 

Models and sijecimeus 230 

Previous to this year, the funds of the Society were not in such a 
condition as to Avarrant, in the opinion of the Board, any greater 
expenditure upon the Library, than was requisite to its proper pres- 
ervation and arrangement. With the establishment of a financial 
management, which now gives the Board a fair assurance of the 
income to be depended upon for a current year, it has been possible 
to push forward the work of making and printing a library catalogue, 
which shall give to our members information of what the library eon- 
tains. As suggested in the Report of the Library Committee, presented 
and accepted at the annual meeting one year ago (printed in Proceedings 
for November, 1879), such a catalogue will be of value for mem- 
bers desiring to consult books on special subjects, and also will, by 
showing what the library lacks, be serviceable in securing additions to- 



106 

wards perfecting its collection. The railroad section has been com- 
pletely arranged, catalogued, and the catalogue printed. The very 
large amount of labor and care and time absohitely necessary in perfect- 
ing the proofs, is almost inconceivable to those who have not had 
similar work to do. The final revision, however, is now in j)ress, the 
catalogue of other sections of the library are also being perfected, and 
during the coming year it is hoped may be completed and issued. 

The attention of members is asked to the fact that they can render 
im^Dortant assistance in making the library more complete by forwarding 
such books, reports and pamphlets as they are willing to give to the 
Society, and by making suggestions concerning books to be added and 
the management of the library. 

As also suggested in the report of the Library Committee referred to 
above, the Board, at the beginniug of the present year, authorized the 
Secretary to arrange for such use of the library as might be laossible by 
the members of the Society who could not personally consult its volumes. 
A circular note was consequently issued to the following i3urr)ort : 

" In order that members, more particularly non-residents, may better 
avail themselves of the facilities of the Society in New York, the Secre- 
tary is authorized by the Board of Direction to state, that he will assist 
in jjrocuring such profesional information as may be asked for. 

If members will address him concerning data I'equired by them, refer- 
ence to engineering books or works, the elucidation of particular sub- 
jects, or other information which they may desire, he will consult the 
library of the Society, or members who are exi^erts upon the subject -pve- 
sented, and endeavor to furnish the information desired, or to indicate 
where it is to be found. 

So far as practicable such services will be rendered gratuitously. 
When however they involve expense for copying drawings or extracts 
from books and j^apers, or the surrender of considerable time by the 
Secretary or the members whom he may consult, a charge will be made 
therefor, but in such cases an approximate estimate of the cost will be 
submitted to the member applying for the information, and his instruc- 
tions asked for before incurring the expense." 

The Secretary has been able, in the way thus arranged, to give to a 
number of members j)rofessional information from the sources indicated. 

The subject of a provision of more permanent quarters for the Society 
than the present house, which is rented from year to year, was, at the 
meeting of the Society in February last, referred to a committee consist- 
ing of the President, Secretary and Standing Committee on Finance. 
This committee issued a circular suggesting a subscription to a loan 
secured by bonds which it was thought might enable the Society to 
secure a suitable house by purchase and pay for the iJrojDerty during a 
term of years. A number of replies were received but the result was not 
such as to warrant the j)urchase of a house at that time. The considera- 



107 

tion of this matter will, do;ibtIess, be resumed during the ensuing year, 
and should receive earnest attention. 

The following note addressed by the Secretary in February of the 
present year to all members of the Society, explains itself : 

' ' The records of the Society are very incomplete as regards the profes- 
sional life of its members. Except in recent cases the applications for 
membership give but meagre details of the Engineering Works of the 
applicants, and in few instances has sufficient additional information 
been furnished to keep up a proper record. 

I am requested therefore, by the Board of Direction, to ask you to 
transmit a condensed statement of your professional life, including the 
character of the works upon which you have been engaged, giving dates 
and full titles of the organizations under which they were prosecuted. 
Please add also your full name and the date and place of birth. These 
statements are asked for the purpose of perfecting the records of the 
Society, and furnishing hereafter information concerning the lives and 
works of American Engineers." 

The Board regrets that the replies to this note have been but few, and 
it desires to impress upon all the members the importance of completing 
this record which can, of course, only be perfected by the individual 
replies of each member of the Society. 

Applications for the recommendation of engineers to fdl various posi- 
tions have been occasionally made to the Secretary and other officers of 
the Society, and the subject of some systematic provision for an official 
attention to such applications was considered by the Board early during 
the current year. It was determined to authorize the Secretary to keep 
a record of the members of the Society, who may inform him that they 
are open to new engagements, together with a statement (furnished by 
such members) of their previous engagements and experience, and of 
the positions and compensations desired. To any person desiring the 
services of an engineer the record of those who would be apt to fill the 
requirement is to be sent. The intervention of the Secretary is intended 
only to put into communication employers and members desiring en- 
gagements. No charge is made and no responsibility is assumed. 

Circulars to this effect were issued to members of the Society and to 
a number of managers of public works. There are now on the record the 
statements of several members desiring engagements, and quite a num- 
ber of applications for the records have been received from persons 
desiring the services of engineers. Several important appointments 
have resulted from the correspondence inaugurated by this means but 
to be entirely successful there should be a much greater number of 
members' names and statements put on record. The Secretary can only 
send those which are formally presented. 

A number of proposed amendments to the Constitution and By-laws 
have been submitted for debate at the present Annual Meeting. These 
have been already issued to members of the Society. 



108 

The Board of Censors to award the Norman Medal for the past year, 
Messrs. James B. Francis, Thomas C. Clarke and Charles Hermany, are 
expected to report at this meeting. 

The financial affairs of the Society are in excellent condition, as will 
be seen from the reports of the Treasurer and of the Finance Committe. 
The general business measures referred to in the last Annual Report of 
the Board of Direction have been carried out with gratifying results. 
These measures include the action then determined upon with reference 
to arrears of dues. There had been carried upon the register of the 
Society for a number of years the names of persons who contributed 
nothing to its support, and who have during the past year permitted 
their names to be dropped from the rolls. This reduces, apparently, the 
increase of membership to a small figure, although there have been actu- 
ally 77 members qnalitied in the various classes of membership during 
the year. There is not the slightest doubt felt by the Board of Direction 
that these business methods in reference to the financial conduct of the 
Society will continue to be of the greatest value in its future progress. 

The Transactions of the Society have been regularly issued monthly 
during the past year. An appeal is earnestly made to the members to con- 
tribute papers, discussions or even brief notes upon practical engineering 
works which come under their observation. It is much desired to in- 
clude in the Transactions of this Society records of the progress of engi- 
neering in America. The past volumes are becoming valuable books of 
reference, and if the members of the Society will co-operate with the 
otficers in this respect the worth of the Transactions will be greatly 
increased. 

The loss to the Society by the death of eight Members and one Asso- 
ciate during the year has been as follows : 

Thomas A. Emmet, elected Member November 5, 1852, who died 
January 12, 1880. 

John 0. Thompson, elected Member May 18, 1870, who died January 
17, 1880. 

I. M. St. John, elected Member July 14, 1871, who died April 7, 1880. 

Max Hjortsberg, elected Member November 22, 1872, who died May 
16, 1880. 

George W. Edge, elected Member March 4, 1874, who died January 1, 
1880. 

Thomas S. Hardee, elected Member April 4, 1877, who died May 21, 
1880. 

James A. Hayward, elected Member September 5, 1877, who died 
August 13, 1880. 

William H. Greenwood, elected Member March 3, 1880, who died 
August 30, 1880. 

Arthur L. Ford, elected Associate November 6, 1872, who died May 
30, 1880. 



109 

In all nine, of wliom memoirs have been publisbed or are in prepa- 
ration. 

Respectfully submitted, 

John Bogart, 

Secretary. 



EEPORT OF THE FINANCE COMMITTEE. 

Presented at the Annual Meeting, 

NOVEMBEK 3d, 1880. 

To the President and Directors of the American Society of Civil Engineers : 

Gentlemen, — The Finance Committee would respectfully report that 
on entering upon tlieir duties they carefully examined and compared the 
accounts of the Secretary and Treasurer, including all of the entries and 
vouchers for the year ending November 5tli, 1879, and found them cor- 
rect and corresponding with the annual rejDorts of these officers. 

The committee also examined the assets of the Society, personally 
inspecting all securities held by the Treasurer, and found them as re- 
ported. 

During the year just closed the committee has audited all bills pre- 
sented, and has in no instance allowed any expenditure to exceed the 
appropriations made by the Board of Direction for such objects. 

That while the expenditures for the j)rinting of circulars and postage 
upon the same, together with the costs of the arranging and catalogueing 
of the librai'y, now in progress, have been unusually large, the amounts 
so expended were, in our opinion, wisely appropriated, as the results 
have been to widen our field of usefulness, increase our membership and 
replenish our ti'easury. 

There has been a large and valuable accession to our list of members 
during the past year, which is not ajjparent from the fact that there has 
also been dropped from the rolls the names of many .delinquents, who 
have been an incubus upon our progress, and served to misrejDresent 
our real strength ; the actual number admitted to active membership 
exceeds that of any former years since the years in which the Society was 
reorganized. 

The income of the Society has more largely exceeded its expendi- 
tures than in any former year. 

The books of the Secretary and Treasurer have been so systematically 
and intelligibly kept, and so promptly posted up to date, that the verifi- 
cation of the accounts of the year just closed is already accomialished, 
and the committee can endorse the reports of these officers as correct, 
and would respectfully refer the members to these reports for all the 



\ 



110 



items and amounts of income, expenditures, assets and debts of tlie 
Society. 

And, in conclusion, would congratulate the officers and members 
upon tlie fact tliat this past has been the most prosperous year of the 
existence of this organization, and that we have evidently entered upon 
an era of increasing prosperity. 

Tery respectfully submitted, 

W. H. Paine, 
Chrm. Finance Com. 



REPOPtT OF THE COMMITTEE ON A UNIFORM 
SYSTEM FOR TESTS OF CEMENTS. 

Presented at the Annual Meeting, 
noatembek 3, 1880. 

To Ihe American Society of Giinl Engineers : 

The committee appointed by your Society to devise a uniform system 
for testing cements, report progress as follows, viz. : 

Soon after being notified of their appointment the Chairman of said 
committee addressed a communication to each member, suggesting topics 
for consideration relating to the duty expected of them. 

There has been received by the Chairman of said committee valuable 
papers relating to the testing of cement, from the following parties: J. 
B. White & Sons, London, England; translations of the German official 
regulations for uniformly delivering and testing cement, from F. W. 
Lehnartz, member of the Society; also the same in German from Charles 
O. Gleim, corresponding member of the Society at Cologne, the receipt 
of which contributions has been duly acknowledged. There has also 
been received by the Chairman, from an unknown source, a copy of the 
papers upon Portland Cement, by John Grant, M. I. C. E. ; Maj. Gen. 
H. Y. D. Scott, C. B. E. E. , Assoc. Inst. C. E. ; and Gilbert E. Eedgrave, 
Assoc. Inst. C. E. ; and E. A. Bernays, M. Inst. C. E., entitled: I.— "The 
laanufacture and testing of Portland Cement;" II.— "Portland Cement 
Concrete, and some of its applications;" III.— "Portland Cement; its 
nature, tests, and uses;" being papers read before and published by the 
Institution of Civil Engineers, London, England. 

All of these papers have an important bearing upon the subject in 
hand, and will undoubtedly aid us in formulating a uniform system of 
tests. 

It is the intention of the committee to commence an interchange of 
views upon the subject during the coming winter months, during which 



Ill 

time the pajjers referred to will be laid before tlie members of the com- 
mittee for their cousideration, aud they will endeavor to complete their 
duty on or before the date of the next annual convention of the 
Society. 

We would sugf^cst that the Society endeavor to procure for such of 
the committee as have not received them copies of the publication of the 
Institution of Civil Engineers last referred to above. 
KespectfulJy sxibmitted, 

D. J. Whittemoke, Chairman. 



LIST OF MEMBERS. 



ADDITIONS, 

MEMBERS. 



Date of Election. 

Simpson, George H City Engineer, Terra Haute, Tnd Oct. 6, 1880. 

Walker, William W Gen. Supt. St. Louis, Hannibal and Keo- 
kuk U.R., Hannibal, Mo 



JUNIORS. 

Brown, Thomas E., Jr. . . , Asst. Engineer Manhattan Railway Co., 
337 W. Thirty-fourth Street, New 
York City, N. Y Nov. 3, iSSo. 

Day, G. Frederic P Asst. Engineer Fitchburg R.R., Fitch- 
burg, Mass " " 



changes and corrections. 

members. 

Allen, C. Frank Engineer's Office A. T. & S. F. R.R., Las Vegas, N. M. 

Canfield, Edward New ^York, Lake Erie and Western R. R. Co., Buffalo, 

N. Y. 
DoANe, Edwin A Chief Engineer, Rome, Watertown and Ogdensburg R.R., 

Lewiston, N. Y. 
Duncklee, John B loio Mass. Ave., Washington, D. C. 



112 

Fink, Rudolph Ferro Carril Mexico Central, Ciudad de Mexico, Repub- 

lie of Mexico. 

Haslett, Sullivan 5 Cortland St., Room 77, New York City. 

Hill, John W Glenn Building, Room 21, Cor 5th and Race Streets' 

Cincinnati, Ohio. 

MoRSS. Foster Chief Engineer Shenandoah Valley R.R., Hagerstown, 

Md. 

Osgood, Joseph O Chief Engineer California Southern R.R., San Diego, 

Cal. 

Richards, Charles B . . .Supt. Southwark Foundry and Machine Co., 430 Wash- 
ington Ave., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Richardson, Henry B. . .Chief State Engineer, New Orleans, La. 

Shinn, William P Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Wellman, David W 1351 Washington Ave., St. Louis, Mo. 



Juniors. 

Haines, Caspar W Cheltenham, Montgomery Co., Pa. 

Pegram, George H Edgmoor Iron Co., Wilmington, Del. 



resignations. 

Kennedy, James C Junior Nov. i, 1880. 

Knapp, George O " Oct. 23, 1880. 



mkm locidg of :(j;tiil f nigmm^^ 



PROOEEDINOS. 



Vol. VI.— December, 1880. 



MINUTES OF MEETINQS. 

(Abstractor such as may be of general iuterest to members.) 



OF THE SOCIETY. 

December 1st, 1880. — The Society met at 8 p. m. William E. 
Worthen in the Chair. 

Ballots were canvassed, ^and Lyman Bridges, of San Francisco, Cal. ; 
James Foster Crowell, of Elizabeth City, N. C, and Francis Ingram 
Palmer, of New York, were declared elected Members. 

A paper by J. W. Putnam, Associate A. S. C. E., on the "Eenewal 
of Foundation, and the Transfer of a Lighthouse in Pascagoulas Har- 
bor," was read by the Secretary and discussed by Messrs. J. P. Davis, 
Kinsley, Morison and Worthen. 

Samples of piles destroyed by the teredo, and of others protected 
by creosote, were presented and examined. 

December 15th, 1880.— The Society met at 8 p. m. Vice-President 
Welch in the Chair. 

A paper by C. Shaler Smith, Member A. S. C. E., on "Wind Strains 
in Bridges," was read by the Secretary, and discussed by Messrs. T. C. 
Clarke, Hayes and Welch. 

A photograph and description of an arch erected at Cohoes, N.Y., 
with centering posts founded on cast iron pots filled with sand, was pre- 
sented by D. H. Van Auken, C. E., through W. E. Worthen, Member 



114 

A. S. C. E., and was discussed by Messrs. Bogart, T. C. Clarke, J. P. 
Davis and Welch. 

OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTION. 

December 8th, 1880. — Applications for membership were considered. 

The question of a provision for more permanent quarters for the So- 
ciety was discussed. 

December 22d, 1880.— The mode of issuing ballots for proposed 
amendments to the Constitution was considered and determined. 

Action was taken upon the subject of a proposed fund for securing 
more permanent quarters for the Society. 

December 29th, 1880.— Applications were considered. The follow- 
ing resolution was adopted: Whei^eas, The Society has now outgrown 
its house accommodations and cannot well secure adequate quarters 
unless the same be specially planned for its needs, therefore Resolved, 
that in order to secure a more permanent home for the Society, the 
Board of Direction will inaugurate tlie collection of a Building Fund, 
and the Secretary be instructed to issue a circular in the name of the 
Board to members and to other jDersons interested in the advancement 
of engineering, asking for contributions to such fund. 

Resolved, That all such contributions shall be duly acknowledged by 
printing lists of the same from time to time, in the proceedings of the 
Society. 

Resolved, That the names of all those persons who may subscribe $100 
or more shall regularly be printed to accompany future lists of members 
of the Society, under the head of " Subscribers to the Building Fund," 
and they shall be entitled to receive regularly, for life, one copy of the 
Transactions of the Society for each .$100 subscribed by them ; such 
copy to be in addition to those which they may be entitled to as Mem- 
bers or Fellows. 

The form of circular to be issued under the above resolutions was 
then considered, and adopted as follows : 

January 1st, 1881. 

The American Society of Civil Engineers has comj)letely outgrown 
its ijresent house accommodations, and its usefulness is impeded by want 
of adequate lodgings. It needs a more permanent home, pro^jerly ar- 
ranged for its use, where the business of the Society and that of non- 
resident members on a visit to New York can be carried on. This 
should comprise in addition to offices, writing and consultation rooms, 
a lecture room in which meetings will be held, and especially a library, 
where its 9,000 volumes and pamphlets of engineering literature, its 
models, drawings, maps and pictures, can be conveniently arranged for 
referejice, be reasonably secure against fire, and have jirovision for con- 
stant enlargement. 



115 

A few members of the Society, appreciating these needs, have taken 
steps to organize a building association. They have subscribed part of 
the money required, have begun negotiations for some lots in desirable 
locations in New York City, and [have proposed to the Society that it 
shall join them in erecting a building, of which the lower story should be 
devoted to the uses of the Society, and the upper floors be finished into 
jDrivate apartments or flats for the members of the building association. 
Whatever may be the outcome of this plan — and the Board of Direc- 
tion will only commit itself to it, if upon due examination it is found to 
answer every needful requirement of security and convenience — the flrst 
requisite step to provide for the necessities of the Society is to raise an 
adequate sum of money. 

The Society now owns a Fellowship Fund of some $9,000 ; but this 
is a trust specifically pledged to the publication of the Transactions of 
the Society, and cannot be diverted to other purposes. The Board of 
Direction, therefore, proposes to collect a Building Fund, which it de- 
sires to reach .$25,000 or $30,000, for the purpose of securing a more 
permanent home for the Society upon the most desirable basis. This 
Fund to be placed in a special trust, under proper security, until enough 
is collected, and plans are decided upon. 

A contribution to this fund will be gratefully accepted from you ; it 
is hoped that every member of the Society will give something according 
to his means. 

To provide for such other voluntary contributions as may be off"ered, 
a copy of this circular will also be sent to engineers who are not members 
of the Society, to the Managers of Public Works, and to other gentle- 
men interested in the advancement of engineering, in the hope that they 
will avail themselves of this method of becoming connected with the 
Society, by enrolling their names upon its books. By a resolution of 
the Board of Direction, all contributions to the Building Fund are to be 
acknowledged from time to time, by printing lists of the same in the 
monthly laroceedings of the Society, and in addition to this, the names 
of all those who may subscribe $100 or more are to be regularly enrolled 
and published in future lists of the Society, under the head of Subscribers 
to the Building Fund, and they shall be entitled to receive one copy of 
the monthly publications comprising all papers and transactions of the 
Society, regularly, for life, for each $100 subscribed by them, such 
copies to be in addition to those which they may be already entitled to, 
if they are Members or Fellows. 

As negotiations are pending, it is important that we should know 
soon what can be done. Will you be good enough, therefore, to answer 
at once on the enclosed blank, by filling in the amount which you are 
willing to contribute, payable one-half the 1st of March, and one-half 
the 1st of July, 1881, and return the same in the envelope addressed to 
the Secretary. 



116 

"We specially request an answer from every member, even from those 
■who are not in position to subscribe at present, so that the Board of 
Direction may know how much can be raised. 

The Boabd of Dikection. 

James B. Fkancis, 

President. 

O. Chanute, I 
AsHBEii Welch, j 

Vice-Presidents. 
John Bogakt, 

Secretary, 
J. James R. Ceoes, 

Treasurer. 

WHiLiAM H. Pabste, "1 

C. Vandervookt Smith, 
Joseph P. Davis, V 

G. BOXJSCAEEN, I 

D. J. Whittemoee, J 

Directors. 



REPOET OF THE TREASURER 

Fob the Year Ending Nos^ember 3d, 1880. 



Presented at the Twenty -eigUli. Annual Meeting. 



Keceipts. 

Balance on hand November 5th, 1879 $697 06 

Entrance fees 1 850 00 

Current dues — from 88 Eesident Members $2 151 28 

2G2 Non-resident Members 3 697 43 

5 Eesident Associates 67 50 

13 Non-resident Associates 120 00 

2 Eesident Juniors 30 00 

33 Non-resident Juniors 300 20 

6 366 41 



117 

Past dues— from 8 Kesident Members $350 00 

" "18 Non-resident Members 440 00 

" " 1 Kesident Junior 15 00 

" " 2 Non-resident Juniors 30 00 

$835 00 

Dues for year beginning Nov. 3d, 1880 : 

From 25 Resident Members $625 00 

" 99 Non-resident members . 1 461 13 

' ' 3 Non-resident Associates 30 00 

" 13 Non-resident Juniors 130 00 

2 246 13 

Sales of Publications 299 80 

Certificates of Membership 82 50 

Miscellaneous 8 00 

Interest on Fellowship Fund Bonds $560 00 

Norman Medal Fund 105 00 

" Savings Bank Deposit 37 40 

Eailroad Stock.. 82 80 

785 20 



$13 170 10 



DiSBXmSEMENTS. 

Eent $1 600 00 

Janitor, House Sui^plies, Fuel, Furniture, Water and Gas 955 88 

Library 385 53 

Publications ; 2 364 06 

Insurance 47 12 

Postage 649 14 

Salaries 3 000 00 

Stationery and Printing 558 77 

Annual Meeting and Convention 150 65 

Certificates of Membership 55 10 

Other expenditures 132 26 

Transferred to Savings Bank Deposit 37 40 

Norman Medal 65 80 

Balance on hand 3 168 39 

$13 170 10 



118 

The funds of the Society are as follows, par values being stated : 
Fellowship Fund : 

80 Subscriptions $8 150 00 

Accumulated interest, Nov. 5, 1879 77G 43 

Interest received during past year 597 40 

S9 523 83 
Expended from fund during year for publications . 5G0 00 

$8 963 83 

Present condition : 80 Subscriptions $8 150 00 

Accumulated interest 813 83 

$8 963 83 

The Fellowship Fund is invested as follows : 

8 Bonds Jersey City Water Loan $8 000 00 

Deposit in Seamen's Bank for Savings 963 83 

Norman Medal Fund : 

1 Certificate Croton Aqueduct Stock, New York City 1 000 00 

General Investment : 

10 Shares New York Central and Hudson River E. 

E. Stock 1 000 00 

1 Consolidated Certificate New York Central and 

Hudson Eiver E. E. Stock 35 00 

1 035 00 

J. JAMES E. CEOES, 

Treasurer. 



LIST OF PUBLICATIONS AND PAPERS EECEIVED FOR 

LIBRARY. 

Appendix to Annual Report of Board of Direction, 

November 3d, 1880. 

The following papers are contributed to the Society, or are received 
in exchange for Transactions. 

American Architect and Building News Weekly Boston. 

American Engineer Monthly Chicago. 

American Gas Light Journal Semi-Monthly New York. 

American Machinist Weekly 



119 

Annales des Travaux Publics Monthly Paris. 

Army and Navy Journal Weekly New York. 

Builder " London. 

Building and Engineering News " " 

Bulletin American Iron and Steel Association Semi-Muntbly Pliiladelphia. 

Bulletin du Canal Interoceanique Semi-monthly Paris 

Commissioner of Patents Journal Semi- Weekly London. 

Deutsolie Bauzeituug Weekly Berlin. 

Engineer " London. 

Engineering. •' " 

Engineering and Mining Journal " New York. 

Engineering News " " 

Iron " London. 

Iron Age " New York. 

Journal of Artillery and Military Engineering Monthly Vienna. 

" of Society of Arts Weekly London. 

Manufacturer and Builder Monthly New York. 

Manufacturer and Iron World Weekly Pittsburgh. 

Monthly Record of Scientific Literature Monthly New York. 

National Car Builder " " 

Railroad Gazette Weekly " 

Railway Age " Chicago. 

Railway Reporter Monthly Pittsburgh. 

Railway Review Weekly Chicago, 

Railway World " Philadelphia. 

Repertorium der Technischen Literatnr Leipsig. 

Revue Generale des Chemins de Fer Monthly Parij. 

Sanitary Engineer Semi-Monthly New York. 

Scientific American Weekly " 

Tehnic Tidskrift Monthly Stockholm. 

Telegraph Journal and Electric Review Semi-Monthly London. 

The Locomotive Monthly Hartford. 

Universal Engineer Weekly London 

Van Nostrand's Magazine Monthly New York. 

Zeitschrift fur Baukunde Quarterly Munich. 

The following are subscribed for : 

American Bookseller Semi-Monthly New York. 

American Catalogue " " 

American Library Journal Monthly " 

Bookseller : " London. 

Publishers' Weekly Weekly New York, 

U. S. OfBcial Postal Guide Monthly Boston. 

The Society has received during the year, in exchange for the 
"Transactions" official ijublications of the following associations iu 
many instances for preceding years : 

Aeronautical Society of Great Britain London. 

Academy of Sciences Washiuston. 

American Chemical Society New York. 

American Gas Light Association 

American Institute of Architects 

American Institute of Mining Engineers Easton. 

American Iron and Steel Association Philadelphia. 

Annales des Ponts et Chausees Pans. 

Argentine Scientific Society Buenos Ayres. 

Association of Civil Engineers Lisbon . 



120 

Austrian Society of Engineers and Architects (Two Publications) Vienna. 

Boston Public Library Boston. 

Boston Society of Civil Engineers " 

Civil Engineers' Club of Cleveland Cleveland. 

Die Administration der " Mittheilungen " Vienna. 

Engineers" Club of Philadelphia . . Philadelphia. 

Engineers' Club of St. Louis St. Louis. 

Engineer Department, U. S. A Washington. 

Engineers Society, Western Pennsylvania Pittsburgh. 

Essayons' Club, Corps of Engineers, U. S. A Willetts Point. 

Franklin Institute, Journal Philadelphia. 

Imperial School Moscow. 

Imperial Technic Society of Russia St. Petersburg. 

Imperial University Tokio. 

Institution of Civil Engineers Loudon. 

" " of Ireland Dublin. 

* ' of Engineers and Shipbuilders of Scotland Glasgow. 

" of Mechanical Engineers London. 

Iron aud Steel Institute " 

Massachusetts Institute of Technology Boston. 

McGill University, Department of Science Montreal. 

Mechanics' Institute San Francisco. 

Midland Institute Mining, Civil and Mechanical Engineers Barnsley. 

New York Meteorological Observatory New York. 

North of England Institute of Mining and Mechanical Engineers Newcastle-on-Tyne. 

Pi Eta Scientific Society Troy. 

Eoyal United Service Institution - London. 

School of Mines, Columbia College New York. 

Smithsonian Institution Washington. 

Society of Arts London. 

Society of Civil Engineers Paris. 

Society of Engineers London. 

Society of Engineers and Architects of Hungary Budapest. 

" " •' of Saxony Dresden. 

<i << •< Hannover. 

Stevens Institute of Technology Hoboken. 

Swedish Society of Engineers Stockholm. 

Thayer Scientific School, Dartmouth College Hanover. 

Thomasson Civil Engineering College, Indian Engineering Eoorkee. 

United States Coast Survey Washington. 

" Light House Board " 

Naval Institute Annapolis. 

Naval Observatory Washington. 

" Ordnance Department " 

University of Michigan Ann Arbor. 

Western Society of Engineers Chicago. 



121 



ADDITIONS TO 

LIBRARY AND MUSEUM. 



From Administration des Fonts et 
Chauasees, Paris: 
Annales. September and October, 1880. 

From Aeronautical Society of Great 
Britain, Maidenstone Hill, Loudon: 
Fourteenth Annual Report of the Society. 
London, 1880. 

From American Institute of Mining En- 
gineers, Thomas M. Drown, Secre- 
tary, Easton, Pa. : 
Proceedings of the Lake Superior Meeting. 

August, 1880. 
Supplement 1 to a Catalogvie of Official Re- 
ports on Geological Surveys of the United 
States and British North America. J. 
Prime, Jr. 
Removing .Scaffolds in Blast Furnaces. J. P. 

Witherow. 
The Silver Sandstone District of Utah. Charles 

M. Roker. 
A short blast at the Warwick Furnace. John 

Birkinbine. 
The Mineral Resources of Wisconsin. R. D. 

Irving. 
On the Self- Fluxing Properties of Chateaugay 
Blagnetite, from Clinton Co., N. Y.. and 
its treatment in the Blast Furnace. James 
P. Kimball. 
Some Copper deposits of Carroll Co.,Md. Per- 

sifor Frazier. 
The determination of Silicon and Titanium 
in Pig Iron and Steel. Thomas M. Drown 
and P. W. Shimer. 
A comparison of certain forms of Posts for 

Steel Melting Furnace. P. Barnes. 
Notes on two Scaffolds at the Cedar Point 

Furnace. T. F. Witherbee. 
A Flux for rolling Mill Cinder and Silicious 
Iron Ores in the Blast Furnace. James 
P. Kimball. 
The manufacture of Charcoal in Kilns. Dr. 

Thomis Egleston. 
A Glossary of Mining and Metallurgical terms. 

Dr. R. W. Raymond. 
The Mica Veins of North Carolina. W. C. 

Kerr. 
Remarks on a Gold Specimen from California. 

Geo. W. Maynard. 
The losses in Copper Dressing at Lake Supe- 
rior. A. S. Munroe. 
The Gold Graves of North Carolina. Their 
structure and origin. W C. Kerr. 

From Argentine Scientific Society, Don 
Eduardo E. Clerice, Secretary, Buenos 
Ayres : 
Anal PS. September, October and November, 
1880. 

From M. Leon Aucoc, Paris: 
Les Tarifs des Chemius de fer et I'autoritS de 
I'Etat. M. L6on Aucoc, Par:s 1880. 

From Prof. Arthur Beardsley, Bethle- 
hem. Pa.: 
Register of the Lehigh University for 1879-80. 

FroTM Boston Public L'brary, Boston: 
Bulletin of the Library. Vol. IV. No. 8. 

From Boston Society of Civil Engineers, 
S. E. Tinkham, Secretary, Boston: 



Proceedings. September, October and No- 
vember, 1880. 

From Bureau of Steam Engineering, 
U. S N., Washington, D. c;.: 

Report on Experiments in Boiler Bracing. 

Report of a Board of U. S. Naval Engineers 
on the Herreshoff Boiler and System of Ma- 
chinery for Steam Yachts and Steam 
Launches. 

Instructions to Commanding and Engineer 
Officers for the care and preservation of the 
Steam Machinery of Naval Vessels. 

Report on D. C. Greene's System of Ventila- 
tion. 

Experimental determination of the Velocity of 
Light, made at U. S Naval Academy, Anna- 
polis, Md. A A. Micbelson. 

Report on experiments to ascertain jjropor- 
tions for the ends of Boiler Braces. 

Report on the two kinils of Coal submitted by' 
the Chesapeake and Ohio R.R Coal Agency. 

Annual Report of the Chief of the Bureau of 
Steam Engineering for 1879. 

From Hon. Allan Campbell, New Y^ork: 
Reports of Denartmeut of Public Works, City 

of New York, for 1878 and 1879. 
Report of Department of Public Works City 

of New York, lor the Quarter ending June 

30, 1880. 

From John C. Campbell, New York: 
Opinion of the Court of Appeals. On appeal 
John G. Campbell from an order of the Su- 
preme Court, denying his application for a 
reversal of the proceedings ol the Commis- 
sioner of Public Works in removing him 
from office of Chief Engineer, Croton Aque- 
duct, October 5, 1880. 

From Eliot C. Clarke, Boston: 
City Scavengeriug at Boston. E. C. Clarke, 
Boston, 1880. 

From H. WadswortU Clarke, Syracuse, 

N. Y. 

Report of the Regents of the University of 

the State of New York on the Resurvey of 

the New York and Pennsylvania boundary 

line. Albany, 1879. 

From M. A. Durand-Claye, Paris: 
Report of Commission on the Purification of 

the Seine, in five parts. (French). 
De I'alteration dns cours d'eau, Congres In- 
ternational d'Hygieue de Paris. A. Du- 
rand-Claye, Pans, 1880. 

From Commissioners Second Geologi- 
cal Survey of Pennsylvania, Wm. A 
Ingham, Secretary, Harrisburg, Pa. : 
The Geology of Potter County. Andrew Sher- 
wood. 
Report on the Coal Fields. Franklin Piatt. 
The Geology of Clarion County . H . Martyn 

Chance. 
The Geology of Lycoming and Sullivan 

Counties. 
The Geology of Lancaster County. 
Maps of Lancaster Co. Blair Atlas. 
Maps and Charts of Oil Reigon. 
Maps and Charts of McKean County. 



122 



Catalogue of the Geological Museum. Part 
2. (Jhas. E. Hall. 

From E. L. Corthell, New York: 
A History of the Jetties at the Mouth of the 
Mississippi River. E. L. Corthell, New 
York, 1880. 

From Jos. P. Cotton, Newport, R. I. : 
Report otthe Committee on Streets and High- 
ways to the City Council of Newport on 
plan of Sewerage. Newport, 1880. (6 
copies.) 

From M. A. Couvreux fils, Paris. 
Nouvelles Installation Maritimes des Port 
d'Auvers. A. Couvreux and H. Hersent, 
Brusels, 1880. 

From M. A. V. Dauzats, Paris: 

Rappoit sui les documents deposes par M.F. 
de Lessepsjiour I'ouverture du Canal Inter- 
oceaniqiie. M. de la Gournerie. Paris, 
1880. 

Rapport sur le Memoirs de M. le Dr. Com- 
panyo, relatif a rorganization du service 
Sanitaire. M. Larrey. Paris, 1880. 
From E. B. Dorsey, New York: 

The " Prall " System of Supplying Heat and 
Power to Cities by means ot Superheated 
Water. (Copies for distribution.) 
From Olney B. Dowd, New York: 

Safe and Rapid Mode of Tunneliug the Hud- 
son and Similar rivers. O. B. bowd. New 
Y'ork, 1880. 

From Engineers' Chib of Philadelphia, 
Howard Murphy, Cor. Secretary, 
Philadelphia: 
List of Members. November, 1880. 
Proceedings. Vol. II. No. 1. 

From Engineer Department, U. S. A. 
Gen. H. G. Wright. Chiet of Engi- 
neers, Washington, D. C. : 

Report of the Chief of Engineers U. S. A. 
for 1880. 

Copy of the report of George Davidson, Ass't 
of the Coast Survey, on the methods 
employed in irrigating land in India and 
South Europe, 

A lecture on the Improvement of the Danube 
at Vienna, delivered l>efore the Austrian 
Society of Engineers and Architects, 
March 18, IBTfi, by Sir Gu.stav von Wex. 
Tranglated by Gen. G. Weitzel, U. S. A. 

Specitications for Dredging Rappahannock 
River, Va. S. T. Abert. U. S C. E. 

Sp-oitications for Construction of Dikes in 
Improvement of Rappahannock River, 
Va. S. T. Abert, U. S. C. E. 

Notes on the Strength of Hollow Brick in 
Arches whose spans are approximately 
3 '4 and 6!^ feet. Lieut. W. H. Bixby. 

Specifications for improvement of Broad 
Creek, Delavare. Maj. Wm. P. Craig- 
hill. 

Specifications for improvement of Harbor at 
Onancock. Va. Maj. Win. P. Cra'shill. 

Specifications for Three Barges. Capt. O. H. 
Ernst. 

Specifications for improvement of Harbor at 
Charleston, S. C. Gen. Q. A. Gilmore. 

Specifications relating to removal of obstruc- 
tions from Savannah River above Au- 
gusta, Ga. Gen. Q. A. Gilmore. 

Specifications for improving Tangipahoa 
River, La. Capt. C. W. Howell. 

Specifications for improving Vermillion River, 
La. Capt. C. W. Howell. 



Specifications for improving Harbor at New 
Orleans, La. Capt. C. W. Howell. 

Specifications for improving Bayou Terre- 
bonne, La. Capt. C. W. Howell. 

Specifications for improvement of Delaware 
atMifllin Bar. Col. J. N. Macomb. 

Specificaticms for removal of wreck from 
Bulkhead Shoals, Delaware River. Col. 
J. N. Macomb. 

Specifications for improving Pass Cavallo 
Inlet into Matagorda Bay. Maj. S. M. 
Mansfield. 

Specifications for improvement of the San 
Joaquin River, Cal. Col. Geo. H. Men- 
dell. 

General instructions for Bidders for the Im- 
provement of the Sacramento River. Cal. 
Col. Geo. H, Mendell. 

Specifications for dredging Pagan Creek, Va. 
Capt. Chas B. Phillips. 

Specifiralions for dredgiug Waccamaw River, 
S. C. Capt. Chas. B Phillips. 

Specifications for dredging and the removal 
of Sunken Ledge in Boston Harbor, Mass. 
Gen. Geo. Thorn. 

Specifications for dredging Portland Harbor, 
Me. Gen. Geo. Thom. 

From Walton W. Evans, New York : 
Memoir of Alfred W. Craven. W. W. Evans. 
Except Proceedings. Inst. C. E. Vol. LX. 
Part n. (Several Copies.) 

From Charles E. Fowler, New Haven, 
Conn.: 
City year Book of the City of New Haven for 
1879. 

From Charles O. Gleim, Cologne, Ger- 
many: 
Zeitschrilt fur Baukunde. Vol. III. Part i. 

From Prof Julius E. Hilgard, U. S. 
Coast Survey, Washington, D. C: 
Methods and Resutls American Standards 
of length. (Copies for distribution.) 

From Hungarian Society of Engineers, 
Buda pest: 
Transactions. September, October, 1880. 

From Institution of Civil Engineers, 
James Forrest, Secretary. London: 

Minutes of Proceedings. Vol. LXII. 

Abstracts of Papers in Foreign Transactions 
and Periodicals. Vol. LXII. Session 1879- 
80. Part 4 

Portland Cement : I Nature, Tests and 
Uses. John Grant. 

Portland Cement Cone ■ te and some applica- 
tions. Edwin A. Be • ays. 

The Manufacture and Testing of Portland 
Cement. Mij. Gen. H. Y. D. Scott and Gil- 
bert R. Redgrave. 

Earthwork Slips on the Leeds and Westerly 
Branch Railway. Harrold Copperthwait. . 

Earthwork Slips in the Cuttings and Embank- 
ments of various Railways, with their 
causes and modes of treatment. John B. 
Squire. 

Earthwork Slips on the Castle Eden and 
Stockton Railway. Henry M. Whitely. 

Notes on the principal systems of Electric 
Light in use in England and in the United 
States. K. W. Hedges. 

Small Motive Power. Henry S. H. Shaw. 

Light Draught Steel P. S " Terranora " for 
O ean and River Navigation. John A. 
Thompson . 



123 



From Institution of Civil Engineers of 
Ireland. John Chaloner Smith, Sec- 
retary, Dublin: 

Transactions. Vol. XII. 

From Institutions of Engineers and 
Shipbuilders. Glasgow, Scotland: 

Transactions. Vol. XXIII. 

From A. G. Menocal, C. E. U. S. N., 
■Washington, D. C. : 

Nicaragua Ship Canal. Report of the Exe- 
cutive Committee to the Members of the 
Provisional Society. 

From Midland Institute Mining, Civil 
and Mechanical Engineers, Barusley, 
England: 

Transactions. Vol. VII. Part L. April, May, 
July and .\ugust 1880. 

From Minister of Public Works, Paris: 

Ports Maritimes de la France. Part IV. with 
25 Lithographs. 

From George T. Neally : 

Brief description of a system of Tables for 
computing Earthwork, occurring in regu- 
lar Piismoids on Railways. Also a set of 
auxiliary Tables for constructing the same. 
Geo. T. Neally. 

From Isaac Newton, New York. 

The American Booksellers Guide. Vol. VI. 
No. 5. New York 1874. 

Catalogue of a large collection of books, 
mostly illustrated. Also the best edition 
of American and English Authors. 

Catalogue of Scientitic, Naval and Military 
Books. New York, 1875. 

Catalogue of the valuable importations of 
Scriljner, Welford and Armstrong, com- 
prising works in History, Biography, 
Poetry, Science. Art, &c. New York, 1876. 

Catalogue of Books sold by Hurd & Hough- 
ton. New York, ISfJS. 

Catalogue of Standard English Books in va- 
rious departments of Literature. 

The American Bibliopolist. A literary Regis- 
ter and Repository of Notes and Queries, 
Shakesperian, &c. Vol. VII. No. 7. 1875. 

Catalogue of the Collective Exposition at the 
Centennial Exhibition at Philadelphia, of 
the Netherlands Booksellers' Association. 

Supplement to Catalogue of Books publshed 
by Macmillan & Co. 

Catalogue of Books i^ublished by Tickner & 
Fields. 

J. B. Peterson & Bros. Library of Sterling 
Novels. 

Descriptive list of English Newspapers, Maga- 
zines and Periodicals supplied by August 
Brentano's Literary Emporium. 

Catalogue of Books in the various depart- 
ments of Literature, prepared by G. Rout- 
ledge k Sous. 

OflBcial Catalogue of the Natural and Indus- 
trial products of New South Wales, Phila- 
delphia Exhibition, 1876. 

Swedish Catalogue, Philadelphia Exhibition, 
1876, I. Statistics. II. Exhibits. 

Official Catalogue, Philadelphia Exhibition, 
1876. Japanese Sections and descriptive 
note on Industry and Agriciilture In Japan. 

Russian Catalogue, Philadelphia Exhibition, 
1876. Collection of the Ministry of War. 

Catalogue British Section, Philadelphia Exhi- 
bition, 1876. 

Catalogue German Section, Philadelphia Ex- 
hibition, 1876. 

Catalogue Brazilian Section, Philadelphia" Ex" 
hibition, 1876. 



Machinery Hall, Models of Ships exhibited 
by the Rio de Janeiro Navy Yard. 

Special Catalogue of the Netherland Section, 
Philadelphia Exhibition, 1876. 

Catalogue of the Argentine Republic. Phila- 
delphia Exhibition, 1876. 

Journal of the Proceedings of the United 
States Centennial Committee at Philadel- 
phia, 1876. Seventh session. 

Journal of the Proceedings of the United 
States Centennial Commission. May, 
1873. 

Official Catalogue, Department of Machinery. 
Philadelphia Exhibition, 1876. 

Official Catalogue, Department of Agriculture 
and Horticulture. Philadelphia Exhibition, 
1876. 

Official Catalogue, Main Building. Philadel- 
phia Exhibition, 1876. Part II. 

I. Department of Mining and Metallurgy 

II. Department of Manufactures. 

III. Education and Science. 

Official Catalogue, Department of Art. 4th 
ed. Philadelphia Exhibition, 1876. 

Official Catalogue of Exhibits. Victoria, Aus- 
tralia. Philadelphia Exhibition, 1876. 

Notes in regard to some Textile Plants of 
Brazil at Philadelphia Exhibition, 1876. 

Report of the Secretary of the Treasury on 
Finance. Washington, 1875. 

The Century Memorial Notices. 1875. 

A letter on Currency. 

Pacific Mail. A review of the Report of the 
President. 

Report relative to the Survey for the Improve- 
meut of Harlem River, New York. Gen. 
John Newton. Washington, 1875. 

Annual Report of the Secretary of the Navy 
on the Operation of the Department. Wash- 
ington, 1875. 

Prnceediugs of a Public Meeting, held at West 
Side Hall, New York, Dec, 1st, 1871. 

Annual Report of the Secretary of the Treas- 
ury for 1876. 

U. S. District Court, Southern District of New 
York. Daniel Brown et al. versus The Brig 
•'Annie Lindley," her tackle. &c. New 
York, 1875. 

Chemins de fer de la Province de St. Paul. 
Donuees Techniques et Statisques. M. J. 
Ewkank. Rio de Janeiro, 1875- 

Notes on the relation between Aesthetics and 
Economy in construction. 

Description of a method of Transmitting 
Power by Means of Wire Ropes. W. A. 
Roebling. New York, 1869. 

Metaline, Machinery withoiit Lubricants. 

Guide de la Tour de Loudres. J. Hewitt. 

Sketches of the Tower of London as a For- 
tress, a Prison and a Palace. Loudon, 1857. 

The Shimoneski affair. A chapter of Japanese 
History. 

The Japanese or Shimoneski Indemnity. 

Japanese Indemnity Fund. David Murray. 
New Brunswick, 1875. 

From New York Meteorological Obser- 
vatory, Daniel Drainer, Director, Cen- 
tral Park, New York : 
Abstracts of Registers from Self-Recording 
Instruments, August, September, October 
and November, 1880. 

From Aurin B. Nichols, Washington, 
D. C: 
Report of Board convened to determine on a 
Standard for Construction of the Pacific 
Railroad. Washington, 1866. 



124 



Circular of Instructions for the Examination 
of Railroads. Washington, 1871. 

From Edward P. North, New York: 
Report of the Department of Public Works of 

the City of New York for quarter ending 

June 30, 1878. 
Report of the Committee on Sites of the 

World's Fair Committee. New York, 1880. 

From Thomas M. North, New York: 
Charter, Reports, &c., of the Hudson River 
Railroad. New York, 1853. 

From North of England Institute, Min - 

ingand Mechanical Engineers, Theo. 

Wood Running, Secretary, Newcastle- 

on-Tyne, England: 

Transactions. Vol. XXIX. 1879-80. June 

and August, 1880. 

From Publisher Revue Generale das 
Chemius de Fer, Paris: 
Revue Generale des Cbemins de fer, June, 
July, August and September, 1880. 

From Royal United Service Institution, 
London: 
Journal of the Institution. Vol. XXIV. No. 
7. 

From the School of Mines, Columbia 
College, New York: 
The School of Mines Quarterly. Vol. II. No. 
1. 

From Hou. Horatio Seymour, Jr., State 
Engineer and Surveyor, Albany, N. 
Y.; 
Annual Report of the State Engineer and Sur- 
veyor on the Railroads of the State for 1879. 
From Wm. F. Shuuk, New Y'ork: 
The Field Engineer. Wm. F. Shuuk. New 
York, 1880. 

From J. E. Simpson & Co., Baltimore, 
Md.: 
Album of Photographs, with description of 
Baltimore Dry Dock Company's Property. 
From Societe des Ingenieurs Civils, 
Paris: 
Memoires, July, August and September, 1880. 
From St. Louis Public. School Library, 
St. Louis, Mo. : 
Bulletin. Nos. 7-8. January-February, 1880. 



From Superintendent American Ephem- 
eris, Simon Newcomb, Sup't, Wash- 
ington, D. C. 
American Ephemeris and Nautical Almanac 
for 1880. 

From John C. Trautwiue, Philadelphia: 
Rough Notes of an Exploration for an Inter- 
Oceanic Canal Route by way of the rivers 
Atrato and San Juan, in New Granada, South 
America. John C. "Trautwine, C. E. Phila- 
delphia, 1852. 

From Wm. G. TuUer, New York: 
Minutes of Proceedings Commissioners of 
Rapid Transit, appointed April 2, 1879. 

From United States Naval' Institute, 
Anuaijolis, Md.: 
Proceedings. Vol. VI. No. 12. 1880. The 
Autobiography of Com. Charles Morris, U. 
S. N. 

From United States Light House Board, 
Wasbington, D. C. : 
List of Beacons, Buoys and other Day Marks 
in the Second Light House District, cor- 
rected to July 1, 1880. (2 copies.) 
List of Beacons, Buoys, Towers and other Day 
Marks in the Third Light House District, 
corrected to September 1, 1880. 
List of Beacons. Buoys, Towers and other 
Day Marks in the Fourth Light House Dis- 
trict, corrected to September 1, 1880. 
List of Beacons, Buoys, Towers and othpr 
Day Marks in the Sixth Light House Dis- 
trict, corrected to October 1, 1880. 
List or Beacons, Buoys, Towers and other 
Day Marks in the Seventh Light House Dis- 
trict, corrected to October 1, 1880. 

From Henrj M. Wightman, City Engi- 
neer, Boston: 
Fourth Annual Report of the Boston Water 
Board. Boston, 1880. 
From other sources: 
Notices on the Designs, Models and Works of 
the " Pouts et Chausees, at the Melbourne 
Exhibition. 1880. 
Manitou, Colorado. Its Mineral Waters and 
Climate. S Edwin Solly. St. Louis. 1875. 
The Library Journal. Vol. V. Nos. 7-8, 9- 

10. 
The Publishers' Trade List Annual for 1880. 
New York. 



LIST OF MEMBERS 



ADDITIONS. 

HONORARY MEMBERS. 

Date of Election. 
Hawkshaw, Sir John.. . .33 Great George Street, London, 

England Nov. 3, 1880. 

Malezieux, Emile, Inspector General Fonts et Chaiissees, 

Paris, France " " 



125 



MEMBERS. 

Bridges, Lyman Chief Engineer California Central Rail- 
way, 702 Market St., San Francisco, 
Cal Dec. i, 1880. 

Crovvell, J. Foster Chief Engineer Elizabeth City and Nor- 
folk Railway, Elizabeth City, N. C. " <« 

Palmer, Francis J 68 Wall St., N. Y. City , <« <« 



CHANGES AND CORRECTIONS. 

MEMBERS. 



Dickinson, P. P 237 Broadway, New York City, N. Y. 

Frazier, James L Alabama Great Southern Railroad Co., Chattanooga, 

Tenn. 

Fteley, a Chief Asst. City Engineer, Boston, Mass. 

GoLAY, Philip '. . . .307 Court St., Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Kinsley, Thomas P 72 Myrtle Ave., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Low, GoRHAM P., Jr Engineer's Office New York and New England Railroad, 

Boston, Mass. 

Newman, Robert M Cheboygan, Mich. 

Nichols, AURIN B Gen. Man. Reynoldsville Mining and Mfg. Co., Rey 

noldsville. Pa. 
NicoLLS, William J Chief Engineer Danville, Mocksville and Southwestern 

R. R., Leaksville, N. C. 
Parkhurst, Henry W... . ist Asst. Engineer Bismarck Bridge, Bismarck, Dakota. 

Posr, Levi W Care of Wilkins, Post & Co., Atlanta, Ga. 

Striedinger, Julius H.. .Chief Engineer Magdalena River Improvement, Ban-an- 

quilla, U. S. of Colombia. 
Sweet, Elnathan, Jr New York, Ontario and Western Railway, West Point, 

N. Y, 



juniors. 



Crosby, Benjamin L P. O. Box, 194, Nebraska Ci.y, Neb. 

Lucas, D. Jones Div. Engineer, Philadelphia and Long Branch Railroad, 

Toms River, N. J. 
Stahlberg, Albert J.... Asst. Engineer Oregonian Pacific Railway (Limited), 

Portland, Oregon. 



126 

Death. 

WoRTHiNGTON, Henry R . Elected Member January 5, 1876. Died December 17, 

1880. 



EEKATA. 

Proceedings, Vol. VI., page 96. November, 1880. 

12th line from bottom, for " objection," read "Direction," so as to 
read "only those votes can be counted which are sustained by the 
Dii'ection. " 



C^i 



PROCEEDINGS 



American Society 



Civil Engineers 



(INSTITUTED 1852.) 



VOL. VII. 
JANUARY TO DECEMBER, 1881. 



NEW YORK : 

PUBLISHED BY THE SOCIETY 
188 I . 



Entered according to Act of Congress, by the Amehican Society of Civil Engineers, in 
the office of the Librarian of Congress, at Washington. 



HoTE.-This Society is not responsible, as a body, for the facts and opinions advanced 
in any of its publications. 



INDEX. 



ABBOTT. 

Abbott, Arthur V.— Admitted as 

Junior, 1, 2. 
Adams, Julius W. — Discussion by 
121. •'' 

Additions to Library and Museum. 

(See Library.) 
— to List of Members. (See List.) 
Address of Members, Changes and 

Corrections of. (SeeList.) 
Aldrich, Trttman H.— Admitted as 

Member, 17, 19. 
Allaire, William M.— Admitted as 

Junior, 7, 73. 
Alloys, Copper-Tin-Zinc, Strength 
and Ductility of, by K. H. Thurs- 
ton, 39. 
Announcements, 2, 6, 11, 15.— Con- 
stitution and By-Laws, 6.— House 
of the Society, 2, 11. 15.— List of 
Members, 6.— Metric System, 2, 

11, _ 15. — Society Meetings, 2. 

Thirteenth Annual Convention 
6, 11, 15. 
Annual Address by President James 

B. Francis, 31. 
Archer, William.— Admitted as Mem- 
ber, 7, 11. 
Attwood, William H.— Admitted as 

Member, 19, 85. 
AucHiNCLoss, W. S.— Paper by, 8. 
Averaging Machine, 8. 

Baldwin, Ward.— Admitted as Jun- 
ior, 7, 12. 

Ballots for Members, 1, 3 7 13 19 
61, 75 . , . , 

Barnes, Oliver W.— Admitted as 
Member, 75. 79. 

Beaudry, J. L.— Address at Conven- 
tion, 24. 

Bentley, Henry A.— Admitted as 
Member, 7, 11. 

Blackwell, Ch.arles.— Admitted as 
Member, 87, 110. 

Bland, George P.— Transferred to 
Member, 17, 19. 

Blickensderfer, Jacob.— Admitted as 
Member, 61, 73. 

Blickensderfer, Robert —Admitted 
as Member, 61, 85. 



BOGAKT. 

BoGART, John.— Discussion by, 20,40, 
72, 96.— On Committee, 40, 114* 
—Opens Thirteenth Annual'Conl 
vention, 23. — Proj^oses Amend- 
ment to By-Laws, 96.— Proposes 
Amendment to Constitution, 96. 
—Report by, 103. 
BoLLER. Alfred P.— Discussion bv 
32, 40, 67, 68, 69, 70, 72. -On 
Committee, 40. ^Proposes Amend- 
ment to Constitution, 96. 
BoNZANO, A.— Paper by, 39, 113. 
Bouscaren, G.— Discussion by, 7, 113. 
—Proposes Amendment to Con- 
stitution, 62. 
Boyd, Ch.\rles R.— Admitted as Mem- 
ber, 13, 17. 
Bradbury, Henry R.— Admitted a.s 

As.sociate, 75, 79. 
Breckenridge, Cabell.— Admitted as 

Member, 61, 73. 
Bridge, The re-enforcement of the 
anchorage and the renewal of 
the suspended structure of the 
Niagara Railway Bridge, by L. L. 
Buck, 31, 32. 
Bridge, The Victoria, 43. 
Briggs, a. D.— Death announced, 7. 
Brittain, Alfred.— Admitted as Mem- 
ber, 95, 119. 
Bronzes, The Strongest of the Bronzes, 

by R. H. Thurston, 1. 
Brooks, F.— Discussion by, 40. 
Buck, L. L.— Paper by, 31, 
Building Fund, 5, 13, 14, 19 20 72 

81, 114, 122. 
Burr, William H. — Discussion bv 
114. ^' 

Butts, Edward.— Admitted as Junior 

13, 17. 
By-£aws, Amendment proijosed, 96. 

Canadian Canals, 45. 

Canadian Railways, 48. 

Canadian Watervvays, 44. 

Canals of Canada, 45. 

Canal, Rideau, 51. 

Cartwright, Henry. — Death an - 

nounced, 112, 114. 
CAS.SATT, A. J. — On Committee, 32. 



IV 



CEMENTS. 

■Cements, Uniform system for tests 

of; Committee and Keports, 62. 
Chanute, O.— Discussion by, 8, 14, 
96._On Committee, 40,— Paper 
by, 32. — Proposes Amendment to 
By-Laws, 96. — Proposes Amend- 
ment to Constitution, 96. — Pre- 
sides at meeting, 3, 7, 13. 
Chesbeotjgh, E. S. — Discussion by, 
14, 32, 62.— On Committee, 114.— 
Presides at Meeting, 113. 
Civil Engineers, Engagement on Gov- 
ernment Works, 32. 
Clarke, Eliot C. — Discussion by, 40. 
Clarke, Eeeves & Co. — Paper by, 39, 

113. 
Clarke, Thomas C. — Discussion by, 
113.— Make report, 32. —On Com- 
mittee, 40.— Paper by, 39, 113. 
Coffin, Amory. — Discussion by, 3. 
CoLLiNGWooD, F. — Discussion by, 67, 
69.— On Committee, 40.— Paper 
by, 14. — Proposes Amendment to 
Constitution, 96. 
Columns, Experiments upon Phcenix. 

(See Experiments.) 
Committee on Engagement of Civil 
Engineers upon Government 
Works, 32. 

— on Finance, Kejiort, 102. 

— on -Gauging of Streams. (See 

Gauging.) 

— on Nominations, 39. 

— on Preservation of Timber. (See 

Timber.) 

— on Standard Time. (See Time.) 

— on Tests of American Iron, Steel 

and other metals. (See Iron.) 

— on Uniform System for Tests of 

Cements. (See Cements.) 

Comparative Economy of Light and 
Heavy Rails, (See Rails. ) 

Constitution, Amendments adopted, 
4.— Proposed, 61, 95, 114.— Re- 
jected, 5. 

Convention, Thirteenth Annual, 3, 
13, 14, 22, 23.— Business Meeting 
at, 62.— Invitations to, 22.— Pro- 
gramme, 41. (See Minutes.) 

Cooper, Theodore. — Discussion by, 
96, 113, 114.— Receives Norman 
Medal, 75. 

Ceoes, J. James R.— Discussion by, 
40, 70.— Makes report, 32, 71.— 
Resolution by, 39. 

DA\^s, Joseph P.— Discussion by, 8, 
20, 62, 96, 121.— Presides at Meet- 
ing, 19. — Proposes Amendment 



DAWSON. 

to Constitution, 96. — Proposes 
Amendment to By-Laws, 96. — 
Report by, 102. 

Dawson, Principal. — Address at Con- 
vention, 28. 

Death of Members. (See List.) 

DeFuniak, F.— Proposes Amendment 
to Constitution, 62. 

Doane, Walter A. — Admitted as 
Member, 87, 94. 

Dues, Annual, Proposed Compound- 
ing by One Payment, 22, 102, 
114. 

for November and December, 

1881, 114. 

EcKART, William R.— Admitted as 
Member, 1, 2. 

Economy of Light and Heavy Rails. 
(See Rails.) 

EoLESTON, T.— Discussion by, 68, 71, 
72.— On Committee, 32. 40. 

Elevated Railroad. (See Railroad.) 

Ellis, Theodore G.— Address by, 37. 
—Discussion by, 40, 72. — On 
Committee, 32, 40. 

Ellis, N. W.— Admitted as Member, 
3, 6. 

Ely, Theodore N. -Admitted as Mem- 
ber, 7, 11. 

Emery, Charles E.— Discussion by, 
7, 113, 121. 

Engle, Robert L,— Admitted as Mem- 
ber, 87, 110. 

Experiments upon Phoenix Columns, 
by Clarke, Reeves & Co., 39, 113. 

Fargo, William G. --Death announced, 
86, 87. 

Fellowship Fund, 22, 72, 114. 

Ferguson, John W.— Admitted as 
Junior, 1, 2. 

Ferry, Charles A.— Admitted as 
Junior, 17, 19. 

Field, George S.— Proposes Amend- 
ment to the Constitution, 96. 

Finance Committee, Report on Com- 
pounding Dues, 102. 

Flagg, J. Foster.— Discussion by, 40. 

Fleming, Sandford.— On Committee, 
32.— Paper by, 31. 

Fletcher, Robert. — Discussion by, 7. 

Fowler, Charles E.— Discussion by, 
40. 

Fox, Charles Douglas.— Discussion 
by, 7. 

Francis, James B.— Annual Address, 
by, 31. — Discussion by, 68, 69, 
70.— On Committee, 40.— Presides 
at Meeting, 3, 8, 62. 



FUND. 

Fund, Building, 5, 13, 14, 19 20 72 
81, 114, 122. ' ' 

— Fellowship, 22, 72, 114. 

Gates, C. L.— Discussion by, 114. 

Gauging of Streams, Committee and 
Keports, 71. 

Gl.\skin, E. E.— Transferred to Mem- 
ber, lU, 79.— Discussion by, 96. 

Goad, Charles L.— Admitted as Mem- 
ber, 87. 110. 

GoEEiNGE, Heney H.— Admitted as 
Associate, 13, 73.— Paper by, 8. — 
Presents Specimens from Obelisk, 
8. 

Gottlieb, A.— Discussion by, 7. 

Grand Trunk Kailway, 31, 39. 

Geeene, GeoegeS.— Presides at Meet- 
ing, 14, 19. 

Geeenwood, William H.— Memoir of 
89. 

Geiefen, John.— Paper by, 39, 113. 

Haddock, Aeba R.— Admitted as 
Associate, 17, 19. 

Haight, Stephen S.— Admitted as 
Member, 61, 73. 

Hall, G. Thomas. — Paper by, 14. 

Death announced, 74. 87. — Mem- 
oir of, 97. 

H.iEEis, William P.— Admitted as 
Member, 61. 73. 

Haswell, Chaeles H. — Proposes 
Amendment to Constitution, 96. 

Haywaed, James A. —Memoir of, 88. 

Hendele, John S.— Admitted as Mem- 
ber, 87, 94. 

Henshaw, M.— Address at Conven- 
tion, 26. 

Heeing, R.— Paper by, 39. 

HiDEE, Aethur.— Admitted as Mem- 
ber, 87, 94. 

HiLGAED, J. E.— On Committe, 32. 

HoLBBooK, Feancis N.— Admitted as 
Junior, 7, 12. 

House of the Society, 13, 14, 19, 20. 

HuTTON, William R.— Di.scussion by, 
40, 62.— Paper by, 121. 

Iron, Steel, and other Metals, Tests 
of ; Committees and Reports, 40, 
64, 71. — Discussion uj^on, 67. 

Johnston, Robert E.— Discussion bv 
7. ■" 

JuDSON, William P.— Admitted as 
Member, 87, 94. 

Katte, Waltee.— Proposes Amend- 
ment to Constitution, 96. 



KEEPER. 

Keefee, Thomas C— Presides over 
Thirteenth Annual Convention, 
23. 

Keith, George T.— Admitted as Mem- 
ber, 19, 110. 

Kennedy, John, — On Committee, 39. 

Knapp, L. H.— Discussion by, 40. 

Lane, Moses.— On Committee, 39. 

Latimer, Chaeles.— Discussion by 
69, 70, 72.— Motion by, 71.— Pa- 
per by, 40. 

Lesage, Louis.— Admitted as Mem- 
ber, 87. 

Lewis, Sidney F.— Admitted as Mem- 
ber, 17, 19. 

Library.— Additions to, 8, 15, 76, 83 
91, 101, 116, 127.-Contributions 
for, 114. 

Light, Alexander L.— Admitted as 
Member, 87. 

List of Members. — Additions to, 2, 6, 

II, 17, 73, 79, 86, 94, 110, 119. 

— Changes and Corrections of Ad- 

dress, 2, 6, 12, 18, 73, 79, 86, 94, 

III, 119. 

— Deaths, 74, 79, 86, 112. 

— Resignations, 6. 

Macdonald, Chaeles.— Discussion by, 
62, 121.— Makes report, 32.— 
Presides at Meeting, 114. 

MacLeod, John.— On Committee, 39. 

Masonry, Repairs of, by 0. Chanute, 
32. 

May, William A.— Admitted as Mem- 
ber. 75, 85. 

Mc Alpine, Chaeles L. — Paper bv 20 
62. F J. . 

McKenzie, Theodore H.— Admitted 
as Member, 87, 94. 

McLain, Louis Randolph.— Admitted 
as Member, 3. 

Members.— Additions to. (See List.) 
—Ballots for. (See Ballots.)— 
Changes of Address. (See List. ) 
—Deaths. (See List.)— Resigna- 
tions. (See List.) 

Memoirs of Deceased Members, 88 
89, 91, 97, 122, 124.— James A. 
Hayward, 88.— William Heney 
Greenwood, 89.— Charles A. 
Tasker, 91.— George Thomas 
Hall, 97. — Andrew Kloman, 122. 
— Henry Carteight, 124. 

Meeeill, William E. — Proposes 
Amendment to Constitution, 62. 

Mereiman, Mansfield. —Discussion 
by, 114. 



VI 



METALS. 

Metals —Tests of Iron, Steel and 
other Metals. (See Iron, ) 

Metcalf, William.— On Committee, 
40. 

Metric Measures in Papers Written 
for the Society, 2, 11, 15, 71. 

Minutes of Meetings of the Board 
of Direction, 5, 14, 20, 72, 87, 
114, 121. 

_ February 2d, 1881, Proposals con- 
sidered; action taken as to Build- 
ing Fund, 5. 

~ February 25th, 1881, Proposals con- 
sidered; arrangements made for 
Annual Convention: action taken 
us to Building Fund; appropria- 
tions made, 14, 

— March 23d, 1881, Proposals con- 

sidered; arrangements made for 
Annual Convention; appropria- 
tions made, 14. 

— April 5th, 1881, Proposals consid- 

ered; Trustees and method of 
investment of Building Fund 
determined; action taken as to 
new House for Society, 14. 

— April 23d, 1881, Proposals consid- 

ered; action taken as to purchase 
of new House for Society, 14. 

— May 7th. 1881, Proposals consid- 

ered; Building Fund collections 
reported; circulars issued as to 
new House for Society, and as to 
collection of Building Fund; 
action taken as to execution of 
papers, etc., on purchase of new 
House for Society; financial busi- 
ness transacted; compounding 
of dues considered, 20 
_ May 23d, 1881, arrangements con- 
sidered for Annual Convention,, 
22. 

— May 25th, 1881, arrangements made 

and resolutions as to invitations 
adopted for Thirteenth Annual 
Convention; action taken as to 
investment of the Fellowship 
Fund: Proposals considered; ap- 
propriations made, 22. 

— June 8th, 1881, Proposals consid- 

ered; action taken as to Building 
Fund and as to Fellowship Fund, 
72. 

— August 9th, 1881, Proposals con- 

sidered; appropriations made, 87. 

— September 6th, 1881, Proposals 

considered, 87. 
-■ October 4th, 1881, Amendments to 
the Constitution and By-Laws 



MINUTES. 

were considered; the amount of 
dues for months of November 
and December, 1881, determined; 
Censors for Awarding the Nor- 
man Medal appointed; a circular 
soliciting Subscriptions to the 
Building Fund, and also one 
soliciting Contributions to the 
Library were ordered, 114. 

— October 12th, 1881, Proposals con- 

sidered; report on compounding 
dues received, 114. 

— November 2d, 1881, financial busi- 

ness transacted; investment of 
Fellowship Fund directed; ap- 
propriations made, 114. 

— December 7th, 1881, Proposals 

considered; arrangements for 
Annual meeting made, 121. 

Minutes of Meetings of the Society, 
1, 3, 7, 13, 19, 61, 75, 87, 95, 113, 
121. 

-. January 5th, 1881, Ballot for Mem- 
bership canvassed; "The Strong- 
est of the Bronzes; a newly 
discovered Alloy of Maximum 
■Strength," by K. H. Thukston 
read and discussed; death of 
Henky R. Woethington an- 
nounced, 1. 

— Januarv 19th, 1881, The Crippling 

Strength of Wrought Iron Col- 
umns; also Inter Oceanic Transit 
discussed, 3. 

— February 2d, 1881, Ballot for Mem- 

bership canvassed; Ballot can- 
vassed determining Montreal as 
place for Thirteenth Annual Con- 
vention; Ballots for proposed 
Amendments to the Constitution 
canvassed, 3. 

— February 16th, 1881, Wind Strains 

upon Bridges discussed, 7. 

— March 2d, 1881, Ballots for Mem- 

bership canvassed; death of A. D. 
Bbiggs announced; specimens 
from Egyptian Obelisk presented 
by H. H. Gokeinge; " Exponent 
of the Principle of Moments," 
by AV. S. AucHiNCLoss, read; 
Wind Strains in Bridges dis- 
cussed, 7. 

— March 15th, 1881, "The removal 

of the Obelisk from its site m 
Alexandria, Egypt, to its present 
site in the Central Park, New 
York City," by Heney H. Gob- 
bing e, read, 8. 

— April 6th, 1881, Ballots for Mem- 



VII 



MINUTES. 

liership canvassed; arrangements 
for Annual Convention an- 
nounced; purchase of premises 
No. 127 East Twenty third street 
authorized; advanced sub.'jcrip- 
tions to purchase made; "An 
Examination into the Method of 
Determining Wind Pressures," 
by F. CoLLiNGMooD, read and 
discussed, 13. 

— April 20th, 1881, "The Construc- 

tion of the Second Avenue Line 
of the Metropolitan Elevated 
Railroad of New York," by G. 
Thomas Hall, read, 14. 

— May 4th, 1881, Ballots for Member- 

ship canvassed; purchase of 
property No. 127 East Twenty- 
third street announced; Sub- 
scriptions to Building Fund, 19. 

— May 18th, 1881, "Quicksand in 

Excavation," by Charles L. 
McAlpine, read and discussed; 
death of Baeon von Weber 
announced, 19. 

— June 1st, 1881, Ballots for Mem- 

bership canvassed ; proposed 
Amendment to Constitution pre- 
sented; "Quicksand in Excava- 
tion" discu.ssed, 61. 

— June 17th, 1881, Business Meeting 

at Thirteenth Annual Conven"^ 
tion; Report ot Committee on 
a Uniform Method for Tests of 
Cements received, and the com- 
mittee continued 62; Committee 
on the Preservation of Timber 
reported progress, and was con- 
tinued; Committee on Tests of 
Iron and Steel made rei)ort, 
which was accepted and the com- 
mittee discharged, 64; Special 
Committee appointed to examine 
further into the subject, and to 
report a recommendation to the 
Board of Direction, which shall 
take such action as it sees fit; 
Committee on the Gauging of 
Streams made report, and was 
continued; standing resolution 
rescinded requesting dimensions 
in metric measures" to be includ- 
ed in papers written for the 
Society, 71. 
-July etii, 1881, Ballots for Mem- 
bership canvassed; Norman 
Medal presented to Theodore 
Cooper, 75. 

— September 7th, 1881, Ballots for 



MINUTES. 

Membership canvassed; death of 
William Milnor Roberts, of G. 
Thomas Hall, of James H. Reno, 
and of William G. Fargo, an- 
nounced; "Shaft Sinking under 
Difficulties at Dorchester Bay 
Tunnel, Boston, Mass.," by D. 
McN. Stauffer, presented, 87. 

— September 21st, 1881, "Shaft Sink- 

ing under Difficulties at Dorches- 
ter Bay Tunnel, Boston, Mass.," 
by D. McN. Stauffer, read and 
discussed, 95. 

— October 5th, 1881, Ballots for Mem- 

bership canvassed ; proposed 
Amendments to the Constitution 
and B^-Laws presented; Shaft 
Sinking under Difficulties at Dor- 
chester Bay Tunnel, Boston, 
Mass., discussed; the Points of 
Reference for Strains discussed 
95. 

— October 19th. 1881, Experiments 

upon Phoenix Columns dis- 
cussed, 113. 

— November 2d, 1881, Communica- 

tion received from Engineers' 
Club Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, ex- 
pressing sympathy for the death 
ot Past President Roberts; also 
album of Brazilian Railroad 
Photographs; committee appoint- 
ed to make reply; Experiments 
on Phcenix Columns discussed, 

— November 16th, 1881, death of 

Henry Cartwright announced; 
Protection against Slips in Clav 
Slopes, the Lateral Thrust o'f 
Earthwork, Supplying Steam 
Heat and Power to Cities, dis- 
cussed, 114. 

— December 7th, 1881, arrangements 

made for Annual Meeting; Quick- 
sand in Excavation discussed, 121 

— December 21st, 1881, a note upon 

the "Recent Railroad Crossing 
Case at Elmira, N. Y., with refer- 
ence to the hydraulic questions 
brought forward," by William R, 
Hutton, was read and discussed. 

Minutes of Thirteenth Annual Con- 
• vention, 23; Montreal, Canada, 
June 15th, 1881; met at Molson 
Hall, AicGill University, 10 a. m. ; 
called to order l)y John Bogabt,' 
Secretary of the Society; Thoma.s 
C. Keefer elected Chairman of 



YIll 



MINUTES. 

the Convention, 23; address by 
Hon. J. L. Beaudky, Mayor of 
Montreal, 2-4: address by Mr. 
Henshaw, President of the Board 
of Trade, 26; address by Mr. 
Thomas White, Member of the 
Dominion Parliament; address 
by Mr. Mitchell, President of 
the Corn Exchange, 27; address 
by Principal Dawson of McGill 
University, 28; address by Vice- 
President AsHBEL Welch, 30; 
"The Re-enforcement of the 
Anchorage and the Renewal of 
the Suspended Structure of the 
Niagara Railway Bridge," by L. 
L. Buck, read; "Uniform Stand- 
ard Time for Railways, Tele- 
graphs and Civil Purposes Gen- 
erally," by Sandeokd Fleming, 
read; Drive Through Mountain 
Park, and Garden Party ; Evening 
Session, June loth, invitations 
received ; annual address read by 
President James B. Francis, 31; 
committee appointed on Standard 
Time; "Repairs of Masonry," by 
0. Chanute, read; Report of 
Committee on Engagement of 
Civil Engineers upon Govern- 
ment Works presented, and com- 
mittee discharged, 32: June 16th, 
visit to Ottawa, Canada, 34; June 
17th, "Comparative Economy of 
Light and Heavy Rails," by 
AsHBEL Welch, read; Business 
Meeting, 38; Nominating Com- 
mittee appointed; excursion on 
harbor; visit to Victoria Bridge; 
visit to works of the Grand Trunk 
Railway ; visit to City Waterworks ; 
Reception in evening.— June 18; 
Resolution of thanks for court- 
esies; "Experiments upon Phce- 
nix Columns," by Clakke, 
Reeves & Co.. read and discussed; 
" The Strength and Ductility of 
the Copper-Tin-Zinc Alloys," by 
R. H. Thdeston, read; "Systems 
of Sewerage," by R. Hering, 
read; Sewerage discussed, 39.— 
Weights and Measures; The 
British Inch," by C. Latimer, 
read and discussed; Committee 
on Tests of Iron and Steel, an- 
nounced; Committee to Draft 
Replies to Addresses announced; 
Adjournment.— Visits to Niagara 
Falls and to Toronto, 40.— Pro- 



MINUTES. 

gramme of Convention, 41.— Pro- 
gramme of Visit to Ottawa, 49.— 
Exhibit by Fire Brigade at Mon- 
treal; Visit to Quebec; Attend- 
ance at Convention, 60. 

Mitchell, M.— Address at Conven- 
tion, 27. 

Moments. — Exponent of the Principle 
of Moments, by W. S. Auchin- 

CLOSS, 8. 

Montreal, Canada, Annual Conven- 
tion at. ^See Convention.) 

— Description of City of, 42. 

Muneoe, Henry S.— Admitted as 
Member 19, 73. 

Murdoch, Gilbert.— Admitted as 
Member, 87, 94. 

Niagara Falls, Visit to, 40. 

Niagara Suspension Bridge. (See 

Bridge.) 
Nominations, Committee on, 39. 
Norman Medal, Board of Censors to 

Award, 114.— Code of Rules for 

Award of, 100, 115, 126. 

Obelisk, The Removal from Alexan- 
dria, Egypt, to the Central Park, 
New York City, by Henry H. 

GORKINGE, 8. 

Ottawa, Canada, Visit to Ottawa dur- 
ing Convention, 34, 49.— Descrip- 
tion of, 51.— Sewerage of, 54.— 
Water Works of, 54. 

Paine, Charles.— On Committee, 32. 
—Proposes Amendment to Con- 
stitution, 96. 

Paine, William H.— Discussion by, 
96.— Presides at Meeting, 87.— 
Proposes Amendment to By- 
Laws, 96.— Proposes Amendment, 
to Constitution, 96.— Report by, 
96, 102. . 

Parent, Etienne Henry.— Admitted 
as Member, 87, 110. 

Peterson, P. A.— Discussion by, 40. 

PoETScH Chaeles J.— Admitted as As- 
sociate, 17, 19. 

Pope, Wellard S.— Discussion by, 7. 

Preservation of Timber. (.See Tim- 
ber.) 

Quebec, Canada, Visit to, 60. 
Quicksand in Excavation, by ChableS- 
L. McAlpint:, 20, 62, 121. 

Railroad Crossing Case at Elmira, N. 
y., A note with reference to the- 



IX 



EAILEOADS. 

Hydraulic Questions brought for- 
ward, by WlLLLiM E. HUTTON, 

121. 

Eailroad, Elevated, The construc- 
tion of the Second Avenue Line 
of the Metropolitan Elevated 
Eailroad, of New York, by G. 
Thomas Hall, 14. 

Eails, Comparative Economy of 
Light and Heavy Eails, by 
AsHBEL Welch, 38. 

Eailways of Canada, 48. 

Eayiniond, C. W. — Disciassion by, 20. 

Eead, Eobeet L. — Proposes Amend- 
ment to the Constitution, 62. 

Eeece, Benjamin. — Admitted as Mem- 
ber, 7, 11. 

Eeeves, David. — Paper by, 39, 113. 

Eeno, James H. — Death announced, 
86, 87. 

Eepairs of Masoniy, by O. Chanute, 
32. 

Eeports of Committees. (See Com- 
mittees.) 

Eesignation of Members. (See List.) 

Eio de Janeiro, Engineers' Club of, 
113. 

EoBEETs, WnxiAM MiLNOE. — Death an- 
nounced, 80, 87. 

Sandeeson, James G. — Admitted as 
Member, 75, 79. 

Savage,6Albekt C. — Admitted as Mem- 
ber' 19. 

Sewerage, Discussion on, 40. 

Sewerage, Systems of, by E. Heeing, 
39. 

Shaft Sinking under difficulties at 
Dorchester Bay Tunnel, Boston, 
Mass., by D. McN. Staotfee, 87, 

95, 96. 

Shinn, William P. — Presides at Meet- 
ing, 1. 

Skilton, Geoege S. — Admitted as 
Member, 87, 110, 

Smith, Chaeles A. — Discussion by, 7. 

Smith, C. Shalee. — Proposes Amend- 
ment to Constitution, 62. 

Smith, C. Vandervooet. — Proposes 
Amendment to By-Laws, 96. — 
Proposes Amendment to Consti- 
tution, 96.— Eeportby, 102. 

Smith, William Soot. — Discussion by, 
62, —Makes Eeport, G4. 

Standard Time. (See Time.) 

Stauffee, D. McN.— Paper by, 87, 95, 

96. ^ 

Steel, Tests of Iron, Steel, and other 
metals. (See Iron.) 



STEWAET. 

Stewaet, Huntee. — Admitted as Jun- 
ior, 61, 86. 

Streams, Gauging of (See Gaug- 
ing-) 

Stkiedingee. J. H. — Discussion by, 
62, 

Steobel, Chaeles L. — Discussion by, 
114. 

Symington, William N. — Admitted as 
Member, 19, 73. 

Taskee, Chaeles A. — Memoir of, 91. 
Tests of Cement. (See Cement.) 

— Iron, Steel and other metals. 

(See Iron.) 
Thomas, Joseph E. — Admitted as 

Member, 95, 110. 
Thukston, E. H.— Paper by, 1, 39. 
Timber, Preservation of. Committee 

and Eei^orts, 64. 
Time, Uniform Stanard Time, by 

Sandfoed Fleming, 31. 

— Standard, Committe on, 32. 
Toronto, Canada, Visit to, 40. 
ToucEY, J. M. — On Committee, 32. 

Waddell, John A. L. — Admitted as 
Member, 95, 110. 

Walkee, John S. — Admitted as Mem- 
ber, 1, 2. 

Waeeen, G. K. — Eesignation of, 6. 

Webee, Max JVTaeia, Baeon von. — 
Death announced, 20, 74. 

Weights and Measures, The British 
Inch, by Chaeles Latimee, 40. 

Welch, Ashbel. — Address at Conven- 
tion, 30. — Discussion by, 8, 40, 
62, 121 .—On Committee, 40,114.— 
Paper bv, 39. — Presides at Meet- 
ing, 7, ^61, 75, 95, 113, 121.— 
Proposes Amendment to Consti- 
tution, 96. 

Wellington, Abthue M. — Admitted 
as Member, 19, 85. 

Whittemoee, Don J. — Discussion by, 
7, 114.— Makes Eeport, 62. 

Whineey, Samuel. — Transferred to 
Member, 19, 73. 

White, Thomas. — Address at Conven- 
tion, 27. 

Wildee, Feancis M. — Admitted as 
Member, 1. 73. 

Wilson, Joseph M. — Discussion by, 7. 

Wind Pressures, An Examination into 
the Methods of Determining, by 

F. COLLINGWOOD, 14. 

Wind Strains in Bridges, Discussed, 
7, 8. 



WIMMEE. 

Wjmmeb, Sebastian. — Admitted as 

( -. Member, 7, 11. 

"Wood, De Volson. —Discussion by, 
113. 

WoKTHEN, William E.— Discussion by, 
14, 20, 121.— On Committee, 39, 40. 
—Presides at Meeting, 95.— Pro- 
poses Amendment to Constitu- 
tion, 96. 



WOETHINGTON. 

WoKTHiNGTON, Heney E. — Death an- 
nounced, 1 

WBOTNO^YSKI A. F.— On Committee, 
39. — Proposes Amendment to 
Constitution, 9G. 

Wuetele, a. S. C— Discussion by, 
114, 

Yakdley, Edmund. — Discussion by, 
121. 



J^ni^ricHn locidi) of :(j;ml l^^njinem. 

Vol. VII.— January, 1881. 



MINUTES OF MEETINGS 

(Abstract of such as maybe of general interest to memljers.) 



OF THE SOCIETY. 



Januaky 5th, 1881.— The Society met at 8 p. m., William P. Shiun in 
the chair. Ballots were cauvassed, and the following candidates de- 
clared elected: As Members — William Eobert Eckart, San Francisco, 
Oal. ; John Simpson Walker, Wheeler, Ala. ; Francis Milton Wilder, 
Binghamton, N. Y. As Juniors— Arthur Yaughan Abbott, Brooklyn, 
N. Y. ; John William Ferguson, Rutherford, New Jersey. 

A paper, subject " The Strongest of the Bronzes ; A Newly Discovered 
Alloy of Maximum Strength." by R. H. Thurston, Member A. S. C. E., 
was read by the author, illustrated by models and by samples of 
bronzes, and discussed by Messrs. Forney, HoUey, Shinu, Tliurston and 
Worthen. 

The death, on December 17, 1880, of Henry R. Worthington, Member 
A. S. C E., was announced, and a committee appointed to prepare a 
memoir for publication in the Proceedings. 



ANNOUNCEMENTS. 



At the Meeting of the Society to be held 
Wednesclay, February 16, 1881, at 8 P. m., the 
discussion will take place of the paper on 
"Wind Pressure upon Bridges," by C. Shaler 
Smith, Member A. S. C. E. Advance proofs 
of this paper have been prepared and fur- 
nished to members who might desire to par- 
ticipate in the discussion. 

The following resolutions were adopted af 
the Ninth Annual Convention of the Society, 
and ordered printed regularly in the Society 
publications : 

Whereas, the metric system of weights and 
measures is no.v extensively used abroad, 
and whereas it is desirable that the relation 
of the units of the differing systems be made 
familiar to all by comparison : 

Resolved, That members be requested, in 



papers hereafter iiresented to the Society, to 
write, in parenthesis, weights or dimensions 
by the metric system, in connection with 
those of the system in general use. 

The House of the Society is at 104 East 
Twentieth street, one door east from Fourth 
avenue, and near the southwest corner of 
Gramercy Park, It is open from nine o'clock 
A.M. to five o'clock P.M. each business day, 
except Saturday, when it is closed at three 
o'clock P.M. 

The Library and Conversation Rooms will 
also, for the present, be open every Wednes- 
day evening from l}i to 10 p. m. Members 
are invited to avail themselves of the oppor- 
tunities afforded on Wednesday evenings both 
for consultation of books and periodicals and 
for conversation. 



LIST OF M EMBERS 



ADDITIONS. 
MEMBERS. 



EcKART, William R . 
Walker, John S . . . . 



.P. O. Box 1587, San Francisco, Cal. 
. Huntsville, Ala 



Date of Election. 
January 5, 1881, 



Abbott, Arthur V. 
Ferguson, John W . 



JUNIORS. 

.21 Water St., Brooklyn, N. Y January 5, 1881. 

. Ass't. Engineer New York, Lake Erie & 

Western Railway, Rutherford, N. J. " " 



CHANGES AND CORRECTIONS. 
MEMBERS. 

Buck, L. L 124 Bedford Ave., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

GuNNELL, William C . . 6o.o 20th St., Washington, D. C. 

Johnson, L. M Assistant to President Piillman's Palace Car Co., Chicago, 

111. 
Masten, C. S Chief Engineer St. Louis, Jerseyville & Springfield, R. R., 

Rochester, N. Y. 
Nicholson, George B.. .Chief Ass't. Engineer Knoxville & Cincinnalti Southern 

Railway, Covington, Ky. 



J[merican mcki^ of :(j,iiiil Jnriineeri 

V J •J J 



I^JROCEEDIjNGS. 



Vol. VII.— February, 1881. 



MINUTES OF MEETINOS 

(Abstract of such as may be of general interest to members.) 



OF THE SOCIETY. 

JA^■CAEY 19th, 18S1. — The Society met at 8 p. m., Vice President 
CJlianute in the Chair. 

A discussion by Amory Coffin, Member A. S. 0. E., on the paper by 
C. L. Gates, Junior A. S. C. E., was read by the Secretary. 

■She subject of Inter-Oceanic Transit was discussed by members 
present. 

Febeuary 2d, 1881. —The Society met at 8 p. m., President James 
B. Francis in the Chair. 

Ballots for membership were canvassed, and the folloAving candidates 
declared elected as Members : Nathaniel Webster Ellis, of Manchester, 
New Hampshire, and Louis Eandolph McLain, of Buchanan, Yirgiuiu. 

The vote for determining the place for the Thirteenth Annual Con- 
vention was canvassed, with the following result : 

Montreal received 7G votes. 

Niagara Falls received 4,5 ■ • 

The Thousand Islands received 39 " 

Other places received 5 " 

The City of Montreal was thereupon determined as the place, and it 
was referred to the Board of Direction to determine the time, and to 
make arrangements for the Thirteenth Annual Convention of the Society. 
These will be announced at as early a date as possible. 



Ballots for tbe proposed Amendments to the Constitution were can- 
vassed, with the following results : 

Upon the proposed Amendment to Article V (see Proceedings, Vol. 
VI, pages 84 and 93), there were — 

In the Affirmative 157 votes. 

In the Negative 4: 

This Amendment was thereupon declared adopted. The amended 
Article is as follows : 

Article V.— The officers of the Society shall consist of a President, two Vice-Presidents, 
a Secretary, Treasurer, Librarian, and five Directors, who shall be elected by written ballot, 
by a majority of votes, at the Annual Meeting of the Society. The term of office shall begin 
at the close of the Annual Meeting, and continue for one year, or until other officers are 
elected. Any vacancy occasioned, by resignation or otherwise, may be filled at the next 
monthly meeting after notice of said vacancy. 

Upon the proposed Amendment to Article XXII (see Proceedings, 
Vol. VI, pages 84 and 93), there Avere— 

In the Affirmative 156 votes. 

In the Negative 5 

This Amendment was thereupon declared adopted. The amended 
Article is as follows : 

Article XXII.— The amount of entrance fee to be paid, as well as the annual dues or 
assessments for the support of the Society, shall be determined from time to time, at some 
regular meeting of the Society, provided that notice of intended action thereon shall have 
been given at a previous regular meeting. No alteration in the amount of said fees or assess- 
ments shall apply to the fiscal year during which it is made, but shall take effect on and after 
the first day in January next succeeding the day of the date of said alteration. Members 
who become Residents or Non- Residents by removal into or beyond the limits prescribed in 
Article XXI, shall be subject to assessments in the class in which they were on the day of 
the Annual Meeting, as may appear upon the records of the Society or by written notice to the 
Secretary. 

Upon the proposed Amendment to Article XXIII (see Proceedings, 
Vol. VI, pages 84 and 93), there were— 

In the Affirmative 139 votes. 

In the Negative 18 

This Amendment was thereupon declared adopted. The amended 
> Article is as follows : 

\RTicLE XXIII.-Honorary Members, not exceeding twenty in number, in all, may be 
appointed by a unanimous vote of the Board of Direction and such Past Presidents of the 
Society as shall be at the time Members ol the Society and resident in the United States. A 
person to be eligible as an Honorary Member shall be a gentleman of acknowledged eminence 
in some branch of engineering. Honorary Members shall be subject to no fees or assess- 
ments, and shall not be entitled to vote. 

Upon the proposed Amendment to Article XXX (see Proceedings, 
Vol. VI., pages 84 and 93), there were— 

In the Affirmative 156 vote.«. 

In the Negative 5 



This Amendment was thereupon declared adopted. The amended 
Article is as follows : 

Article XXX.— The Aunual Meeting for the election of officers and hearing the Annual 
Keports shall be held on the third Wednesday in January. The Board of Direction shall lay 
before the meeting a report of the state of the Society, together with a statement by the 
Treasurer, verified by the Committee on Finance, of the funds of the Society, and the receipts 
and payments during the year ending on the 31st of December preceding. 

Upon the proposed Amendment to Article XXXI (see Proceedings, 
Vol. VI, pages 84, 90 and 93), there were— 

In the Affirmative 15G votes. 

In the Negative 5 " 

This Amendment was thereupon declared adopted. The amended 
Article is as follows : 

Article XXXI.— The annual contributions shall become due for the ensuing year on the 
first day of January, and shall be payable in advance. It shall be the duty of the Secretary to 
notify each Member of the amount due for the ensuing year, at the time of giving notice of 
the Annual Meeting. 

Upon the proposed Amendment to Article XIX (see Proceedings, Vol. 
VI, pages 94 and 97) there were— 

For the Amendment as originally proposed and as printed, page 94, 
Proceedings, Vol. VI, 32 votes. 

For the proposed Amendment as amended at the Annual Meeting 
and as printed, page 97, Proceedings, Vol. VI, 67 votes. 

That neither Amendment be adopted, leaving the Article as at present, 
59 votes. 

These proposed Amendments not having received an affirmative vote 
of two-thirds of all ballots cast, were declared not adopted. 

Ballots were canvassed upon the proposed Amendment to take the 
place of Section 24 of the By-Laws as printed, page 97, Proceedings, Vol. 
VI, with the following result — 

In the Affirmative 32 votes. 

In the Negative 113 «< 

This proposed Amendment, not having received two-thirds of all the 
votes cast, was declared not adopted. 

The Board of Direction was requested to consider and report what 
action the Society should take in reference to the proposed International 
Exhibition in New York in 1883. 

OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTION. 

Febkuakx 2d, 1881.— Applications were considered. Action was 
taken in reference to the proposed collection of a building fund. 



ANNOUNCEMENTS. 



A list of the additions to membership in 
the Society, together with the corrected ad- 
dresses of all Members whose addresa is 
different from that given in the Catalogue of 
July, 1880. is issued with this number of the 
Proceedings. This list is corrected to date, 
and is arranged so that it makes, in connec- 
tion with the Catalogue of July, 1880, a com- 
plete list of the Members of all classes, with 
their addresses. 

All Articles of the Constitution which have 
been amended since the issue in January, 
1879, of the printed copy of the Constitution 



and By-Laws^have been issued to the Mem- 
bers of the Society upon a slip, which can be 
pasted in the printed copies, thus making 
those copies, with the addition of the slip, 
correct records of the present Laws of the 
Society. 

The Thirteenth Annual Convention of the 
Society will, as determined by the letter ballot 
canvassed February 2, 1881, be held at Mont- 
real, Canada. The Board of Direction has 
been requested to determine the time, and 
to make arrangements for the Convention. 
These will be announced as soon as possible. 



LIST OF MEMBERS 

ADDITION. 
MEMBER. 



Ellis, N. W. 



Date of Election. 
.52 Wall Street, New York City, N. Y Feb 2, iSSi. 



CHANGES AND CORRECTIONS. 
MEMBERS. 

Moore, Charles E Ass't. Engineer, St. Louis, Jersey ville and Springfield R. 

R., Jerseyville, 111. 
Rice, E. C Chief Engineer Louisville, New Albany and St. Louis 

Railway, 3649 Pine Street, St. I-ouis, Mo. 
Weeks, Harvey R Div. Engineer Cincinnati Southern Railway, Butlerville, 

Ind. 



Crosby, B. L. 



JUNIOR. 

.40 Cedar Street, Ro.xbury, Mass. 



Warren, G. K. 



Resignation. 
.Member.. - 



.Dec, 4, 1880. 



Imericmt mtkt^ of fcit pginem. 



FKOCEEDIlS^aS. 



Vol. VII.— March, 1881 



MINUTES OF MEETINGS 

(Abstract of such as maybe of general iuterest to members.) 



OF THE SOCIETY. 



Febktjaky 16th, 1881. — The Society met at 8 p. m., Vice-President 
Chanute in tlie Chair. The paj)er uj)on Wind Strains in Bridges, by C. 
Shaler Smith, Member 'A. S. 0. E., which was read December 15th, 
1880, was discussed by Charles E. Emery and, by letter, by Messrs. 
Charles Douglas Fox, Robert E. Johnston, G. Bouscaren, Eobert 
Fletcher, A. Gottlieb, W. S. Pope, Charles A. Smith, Don. J. Whit- 
temore and Joseph M. Wilson. 

Maech 2d, 1881. — The Society met at 8 i*. m., Vice-President 
Welch in the Chair. Ballots were canvassed, and the following candi- 
dates declared elected: As Members, William Archer, Cincinnati, O. ; 
Henry Adamson Bentley, Newport, R. I. ; Theodore Newel Ely, Altoona, 
Pa. ; Benjamin Keece, Toledo, O. ; Sebastian Wimmer, New York City, 
N. Y. As Juniors, William Miller Allaire, New York City, N. Y. ; Ward 
Baldwin, Cincinnati, O. ; Francis Newberry Holbrook, Brooklyn, N. Y, 

The death of A. D. Briggs, Fellow of the Society^ was announced, 
and a committee appointed to prepare a memoir for publication in the 
proceedings. 



8 

Specimens of stone cut from tlie Obelisk recently erected in the 
Central Park, New York, and of the stone of the steps, of the white 
mortar, of the yellow cement, a piece of one of the steel clamps, of the 
lead, and of the copper dowels connected with the copper crabs used 
in Egypt in connection with the Obelisk, were presented to the Society 
by Lt. Commander Gorringe. U. S. N., and the thanks of the Society 
tendered to him for these additions to its museum. 

A paper by W. S. Auchincloss, Member A. S. C. E. Subject: "Ex- 
ponent of the Principle of Moments," was read by the author, and an 
Averaging Machine described in the paper was practically exhibited. 

The discussion on the subject of Wind Strains in Bridges, was con- 
tinued by Messrs. O. Chanute, Joseph P. Davis and Ashbel Welch. 

Makch 15th, ISSl.— The Society met at 8 p. m. President James 
B. Francis in the Chair. A paper by Lt. Commander Gorringe, U. S. 
N., on "The removal of the Obelisk from its Site in Alexandria, 
Egypt, to its present Site in the Central Park, New York City," was 
read by the author and illustrated by special drawings. 



ADDITIONS TO 



LIB-RAKY AND MUSEUM. 



From Administration des Pouts et 
Chaussees, Paris: 
Annates. November and December, 1880. 

From American Institute of Mining En- 
gineers, Thomas M. Drown, Secre- 
tary, Easton, Pa. : 
Transactions. Vol. VIII. May, 1879 to Feb- 
ruary, 1880. 
List of Officers and Members, and Rules of the 

Institute, November, 1880. 
The Wearing Power of Steel Rails in relation 
to their Chemical Composition and Physi- 
cal Properties. Charles B. Dudley. Easton. 
1881. 
The American Bloomary process for making 
Iron direct from the Ore. Thomas Egles- 
ton. 
The Chemical Reactions in the Bessemer pro- 
cess ; the charge containing but a small 
percentage of Mansauese. Charles F. King, 
The cost ol Milling Silver Ores in Utah and 

Nevada. R, P. Eothwell. 
On Rail Specifications and Rail Inspection in 
Europe. C. P. Saudberg. 

From Argentine Scientific Society, Don 
Eduardo E. Clerice, Secretary, Buenos 
Ayres: 
Anales. December, 1880. 

From Boston Society of Civil Engineers, 
S. E. Tinkham, Secretary, Boston: 
Proceedings. December, 1880. 
Additional Width of Gauge on Railroad 
Curves. Thomas Doane. 

From Henry T. Bovey, Montreal, Can- 
ada : 
Crib work i a Canada. Henry T. Bovey. Lon- 
don, 1880. 



From Buruham. Parry & Williams & 
Co,, Philadelphia : 
Illustrated Catalogue, of Baldwin Locomotive 
Works. Philadelphia, 1881. 

. From Bureau of Steam Engineering, 
Washington, D. C, : 
Report of the Board to recommend a Standard 
Gauge for Bolts, Nuts and Screw-threads 
for the U, S. Navy. May, 1880. 

From Hon. Allan Campbell, Comptroller, 
New York: 
Report of the Department of Public Works, 
Quarter ending September 30, 1880. 

From H. Wadsworth Clarke, Syracuse, 
N. Y. 
Proceedings of the Board of Supervisors of 
the County of Onondaga, N. Y. for 1880. 

From Justin Dirks, Amsterdam, Hol- 
land : 
De Rotterdamsche Waterweg. Justin Dirks, 
Amsterdam, 1881. 

From Engineer Department, U. S. A. 
Gen. H. G. Wright, Chief of Engi- 
neers, Washington, D. C. : 
Advertisement for Removing Obstructions 

from Red River, La. 
Specifications for building an Iron Stern- 
wheel Snag Boat. Maj. W. H, H. Benyaurd. 
Annual Report of the Engineer in charge of 
the Comiiletion of the Washington Monu- 
ment. Col. Thos Lincoln Casey. 
The Harbor at Baltimore. Col. W. P. Craig- 

hill. 
Specifications for Improvement of Mobile 
Harbor, Ala. Capt. A. N. Damrell. 



The Impvovemeut of Winton Point, 111. 
Capt. O. H. Ernst. 

Specifications for Improving the Lower Willa- 
mette and Columbia Rivers. Maj. G. I/. 
Gillespie. 

Specifications for Improving the Upper Co- 
lumbia and Saake Kivera. Maj. G. L. Gil- 
lespie. 

Specifications for Improving lower Clearwater 
River near Lewiston, Idaho, Maj. G. L. 
Gillespie. 

Specifications for Improving Volusia Bar, 
Florida. Gen, Q A. Gillmore. 

Specifications for Imyrovement of Savannah 
Harbor and River, Georgia. Gen. Q. A. 
Gillmore. 

Specifications for Improvement of Harbor at 
Brunswick, Ga. Gen. Q. A. Gillmore. 

Specifications for Improving Harbor at Wau- 
kegau. 111. Maj. D. C. Houston. 

The damages cause i by the Improvement of 
Fox and Wisconsin Rivers. Maj. D. C. 
Houston. 

Report of Survev of the Calcasieu River, La. 
Capt. C. W. Howell. 

Specifications for continuing Improvement of 
Pearl River, Miss., from Jackson to Carth- 
age. Capt. C. W. Howell. 

Specifications for Improving Bayou Teche, La. 
Capt. C. W. Howell. 

Specifications for Improving Amite River, La. 
Capt. C. W. Howell. 

Specifications for Improving Pearl River, be- 
low Jackson, Miss. Capt. C. W. Howell. 

Specifications for Improvement of Schujlkill, 
River, Pa. Col. J, N. Macomb. 

Specifications for Improvement of Susque- 
hanna River above Richard Island, Pa. 
Col. J, N. Macomb. 

Reports of .Surveys on the Mississippi River 
at Andalusia, 111 , and Louisiana, Mo. Capt. 
A. Mackenzie. 

Specifications for furnishing Material for the 
Improvement of Galveston Harbor. Maj. 
S. .\I. Mansfield. 

Specifications for Improvement Petaluma 
Creek, Cal. Col Geo. H. Mendell. 

Specifications for Improvement of Oakland 
Harbor, Cal. Col. Geo. H. Mendell. 

A Report of the Survey of the Youghiogheny 
River. Col. Wm. E.Merrill. 

Specifications for Ohio River Improvement. 
Col. Wm. E. Merrill. 

Reports of Surveys of the Sumpawaums In- 
let, Patchogue River, and waterway con- 
necting Jamaica Bay with Cornell's Land- 
ing. Gen. John Newton. 

Specifications for Improvement of Raritan 
River, New Jersey. Gen. John Newton. 

Specifications for Improving Buttermilk 
Channel, New York Harbor. Gen. John 
Newton . 

Report of Survey for a harbor at Kewau- 
nee, Va. Maj. H. M. Robert. 

Report mi the Maintenance of the Des Moines 
Rapids Canal Capt. A.Stickney. 

Specifications for Rubble Stone in Rockland 
Harbor, Me. Gen. Geo. Thom. 

Specifications for Dredging Exeter Harbor, N. 
H Gen. Geo. Thom. 

Reports of Surveys of Wareham Harbor and 
Potowamut River. Gen.G. K. Warren. 

Reporter Work on Connecticut River. Gen. 
G. K. Warren. 

Specifications tor Excavating Material and 
Constructing Pier Revetment, at the St. 
Mary's Falls Canal, Mich. Maj . G. Weitzel. 



Specifications for Removing Shoals in aiid 

around the Harbor of Refuge at Sand Beach, 

Mich, Maj. G. Weitzel. 
Specifii-atious for Fairport Harbor, Ohio. 

Maj. Jolm M. Wilson. 
The Preliminary Report of the Mississippi 

River Commission. 

From Engineers' Society of Western 
Pennsylvania, Jas. H. Harlow, Secre- 
tary, Pittsburgh : 
Annual Reports. January, 1881. 
Discussion on The Basic Dephosphorizing 
Process. What is it, and what may be ex- 
pected from it. 
Dam of the Montaubry Reservoir.' Lieut. F. 
A. Mahan. 

From Theo's. French, Auditor Railroad 
Accounts, Washington: 
Annual Reports for 1878, 1879, and 1880. 

From Fred, de Funiak, Gen. Man. 
Louisville and Nashville B. R. Louis- 
ville: 
Annual Report year ending June 30, 1880. 

From Charles O. Glelm, Cologne, Ger- 
many: 
Das teehniche Vereinswesen des Auslandes 
und die daraus zu ziehende Nutzanwcu- 
duuglilrdie. Deutschen Verhiiltnisse. Gus- 
tav Meyerand C. O. Gleim. Berlin. 1880. 

From Robert B. Gorsuch, Mexico: 
The Mexican Southern Railway, to be con- 
structed under a Charter from the Mexican 
Government, through the States of Vera 
Cruz and Oaxaca. Robert B. Gorsuch. 
New York, 1881. (Copies for diHriliulion.) 
The Republic of Mexico and Railroads. A 
brief review of her past history and present 
condition. Robert B. Gorsuch. New York, 
1881. [Copies for distribution.) 

From E. J. Habich. Lima, Peru: 
Anales de Constructioues Civiles y de Minas 

del Peru. Tomo 1. Lima, 18S0 
Etudes Cinematiques. M. E. J. Habich. 
Paris, 1879. 

From Institution of Civil Engineers, 
James Forrest. Secretary, London: 
Annual Report of the Council for 1880. 
Report at the Annual General Meeting held 

December 21, 1880. 
Address of James Abernethy, President. 

January 11, 1881. 
Dredging and other Plant employed at the 
Quebec Harbor Works. St. George J. Bos- 
well. 
The Monte Penna Wire Ropeway. William P. 

Churchward. 
Sandy Island Lighthouse, Antigua, West 

Indies. L. A. E. Mackinnon. 
The Co-Efficient of Friction of Air Flowing in 

Long Pipes. William C. Unwm. 
The River Weaver Navigation. John W. 

Sanderman. 
Machinery for Steel-\raking by the Bessemer 
and the Siemens Processes. Benjamin 
Walker. 

From Institution Mechanical Engi- 
neers, Walter R. Browne, Secretary, 
London : 
Proceedings. August, 1880. Barrow Meeting 
From the Iron and Steel Institute, 
London: 
Journal of the Institute. No. 2. 1880. 



10 



From Hon. Edward Learned, New York: 
The Tebuantepec Inter-Ocean Railroad. Alex. 
D. Anderson. 

From Lyceum of Natural History, Al- 
bert K. Leeds, Cor. Secretary, New 
York: 
Index and Contents. Annals of the Lyceum 
Vol. XI. No. 13. New York, 1876. 

From Massachusetts Institute of Tech- 
nology, Boston: 
Abstract of Proceedings of the Society of 

Arts for 1879-80. 
Sixteenth Annual Catalogue of the Officers 
and Students of the Institute 1880-81. 

From Miles Meriwether, Memphi,*, 

Tenn. : 

Biennial Report of President of Fire and 

Police Commissioners of Taxing District, 

Memphis, Tenn. December 1, 1880. (2 

Copies.) 

From Midland Institute Mining, Civil 
and Mechanical Engineers, Barnsley, 
England: 
Transactions, September, October and No- 
vember, 1880. 

From George S. Morison, New York: 
Forty-sixth Aiinual Report of Eastern Rail- 
road Co. Boston, 1880. 
Detailed plans, &c. Plattsmouth Bridge, Ne- 
braska. Geo. S. Morison, Chief Engineer. 

From New York Academy of Sciences, 
New York: 
Annals. September, 1879, March and April, 
1880. 

From Edward P. North, New York: 
Hackney Carriages, Tables of Distances 
within a circle of four miles radius from 
Charing Cross, London. 1878. 

From North of England Institute, Min- 
ing and Mechanical Engiuetrs, Theo. 
Wood Bunniug, Secretary, Newcastlc- 
on-Tyne, England: ' 

Transaction?. September, October and No- 
vember, 18S0. 

From W. C. Oastler, New York: 
Hints about Roadways and Steam Road-Roll- 
ing. W. C. Oastler, New York. 1881. 3d 
Edition. 

From P. A. Peterson, Montreal, Canada: 
Report to Quebec, Montreal, Ottawa and Oc- 
cidental Railway Commissioners on the 
propriety of changing the Terrebonne loca- 
tion of "the North Shore Railway, between 
the Western Edge of the " Grand Savane " 
and Montreal, back to the original or Bout 
de I'Isle route. P. A. Peterson. Quebec. 
1880. 

From Edward S. Philbrick, Boston : 
American Sanitary Engineering. E. S. Phil- 
brick. New York, 1881. 

From Pi Eta Scientific Society, Troy, 
N. Y.: 
Papers read before the Society as follows: 
Vol. IL. No. 1. 
Notes on Railroading. A. L. WaddeU. 
Theory of the Masonry Arch. Wm. H. 

Burr. 
Braced Iron Piers. Thomas M. Cleemann, 



From Edward Prince, Quincy, 111.: 
Sny Island Levee. A History of Legislation) 
relating to it, and a Criticism of the Systen* 
of Engineering adopted. Were the Leveea- 
properly and scientifically constructed ? E. 
Prince. 1880. 

From F. C. Prindle, U. S. Navy Yardi 
N. Y. : 

Annual Reports of Engineer in charge of 
Construction Washington Monument, years- 
ending November 30, 1879 and 1880. Col. 
Thos. Lincoln Ca.sey, 

Report of Commission showing extent audi 
progress made iu the work for the comple- 
tion of Wushiugtou Monument, and the 
amount of money expended. 

From Publishers Revue Generale de» 
Chemius de fer. Paris. 
Revue Generale des Chemins de fer. October 
and November, 1880. 

From I. W. Raymond, San Francisco: 
San Francisco System of Wire Rope Street 
Railroads. 

From Col. W. Milnor Roberts, Rio dft 
Janeiro, Brazil: 
Report of Hydraulic Commission to examine 
Sao Francisco River 1879-80. W. Milnor 
Roberts, Chief Engineer, Rio de Janeiro. 
1880. 

From Hon. Horatio Seymour, Jr., Stat© 

Engineer and Surveyor, Albany, N, 

Y.: 

Report on Prosperity of New York Canala. 

Horatio Seymour. Albany, 1881. (Several 

copies.) 

From T. Guilford Smith, Buffalo, N.Y.: 
Statement of the present condition of Phila- 
delphia and Reading Railroad and Phila, 
and Read. Coal and Iron Co. with plans for 
their further financial reorganization. 
Franklin B Gowen, 1880. 

From Societe des Ingenlerus Civils 
Paris : 
Memoires. October, November and Decem- 
ber, 1880, 

From St. Louis Public School Library, 
St. Louis: 
Bulletin. No. 11. September-October, 1880. 

From Americus Symmes, Louisville, 
Ky.: 
The Symmes Theory of Concentric Spheres. 
John C. Symmes. Louis\ille, 1878. 

From United Statss Association of 
Charcoal Iron Workers, John Birkin- 
bine Secretary, Harrisburg, Pa. : * 
Journal of the Association. Vol. II, No. 1. 
January, 1881. 

From United States Light House Board, 
Washington, D. C: 
Annual Report of the Light House Board for 

year ending, Juno 30, 1880. 
List of Beacons, Buoys, Towers and other 
Day Marks in the Eighth Light House Dis- 
trict, corrected to December 31, 1880. 

From United States Naval Institute, 
Annapolis, Md.: 
Proceedings. Vol. VI. No. 13. 



11 



From V>. H. Van Auken, Cohoes, N. Y. : 

Photograph and Description of Centering 

Arch over New Canal through Ontario St., 

Cohoes, N. Y. D. H. Van Auken, C. E. 

1880. 

From A. F. Wrotnowski, New Orleans: 
Report of the Louisiana Land Reclamation 
Company. Columbus H. Allen. New Or- 
leans, 1880, 

From other sources : 
Proceedings of the meeting to draw up Ar- 



ticles of Association between sundry Engi- 
neering Societies and Clubs for the purposa 
of securing a Joint Publication of Proceed- 
ings, held at Chicago, December 4, 1880. 

Reference Catalogue of Current Literature. 
New York, 1880. 

Annual Report of Columbia Oil Co. Pitts- 
burgh, 1880. 

The Library Journal. Vol. V. Nos. 11-12. 
Vol. VI. No. 1. 



ANNOUNCEMENTS. 



The Thirteenth Anniial Convention of the 
Society will be held at Montreal, Canada, on 
. June 1.5th, 1881. The Board of Direction has 
been requested to make arrangements for the 
Convention. These are in progress and will 
be announced as soon as possible. 

The following resolutions were adopted at 
the Ninth Annual Convention of the Society, 
and ordered printed regularly in the Society 
publications : 

Whereas, the metric system of weights and 
measures is now extensively used abroad, 
and whereas it is desirable that the relation 
of the units of the differing systems be made 
familiar to all by comparison : 

Resolved, That members be requested, in 
papers hereafter presented to the Society, to 



write, in parenthesis, weights or dimensions 
by the metric system, in connection with 
those of the system in general use. 

The House of the Society is at 104 East 
Twentieth street, one door east from Fourth 
avenue, and near the southwest corner of 
Gramercy Park. It is open from nine o'clock 
A.M. to five o'clock P.M. each business day, 
except Saturday, when it is closed at three 
o'clock P.M. 

The Library and Conversation Rooms will 
also, for the present, be open every Wednes- 
day evening from 7J^ to 10 p. M. Members 
are invited to avail themselves of the oppor- 
tunities afforded on Wedqesday evenings both 
for consultation of books and periodicals and 
for conversation. 



LIST OF MEMBERS, 



ADDITIONS. 

MEMBERS. 

Date of Election. 

Archer, William Engineer Marietta & Cincinnati R. R. 

Cincinnati, Ohio March 2, i88i 

Benti.ey, Henry A Newport, R. I " " 

Ely, Theodore N Superintendent Motive Power Department 

P. R. R., Altoona, Pa 

Reece, Benjamin Engineer M. S. Division L. S. & M. S. 

Railway, Toledo, Ohio " " , 

Wimmer, Sebastian Chief Engineer New York City & North- 
ern R. R., Room 56, Dre.xel Build- 
ing, New York " " 



12- 

JUNIORS. 

Date of Election. 

Baldwin, Ward Assistant Engineer Cincinnati Soitlhern 

Railway, Cincinnati, Ohio March 2, l88l 

HoLBROOK, Francis N...Care J. P. Holbrook, P. O. Box 1624, 

New York " " 



changes and corrections. 

Billin, Charles E Indianapolis, Ind. 

Chittenden, S. H Sup't Lake Valley Mining Co., Lake Valley, N. M. 

Greene, Benjamin H Chief Engineer New Orleans Pacific R.R., Shreveport.La. 

Harlow, James H Engineer Monongahela Navigation Co., 81 Wood Street, 

Pittsburgh, Pa. 

John, Irvin Fleming Building, Room 6, Jersey City, N. J. 

McClintock, W. H Assistant Engineer Louisville & Nashville R. R., Bowl- 
ing Green, Ky. 

NicoLLS, William J General Manager Snowshoe Coal Co., Bellefonte, Pa. 

Post, James C Captain of Engineers, U. S. A., Newburgh, N. Y. 

Stephens, Clinton F.... Chief Engineer Texas & St. Louis Railway, Corsicana, 

Texas. 

WiSN£R, Geo. Y 2828 Washington avenue, St. Louis, Mo. 

WuRTELE, A. S. C New York Central & Hudson River Railroad, 19 Jay 

street, Albany, N. Y. 



Junior. 
Whitney, Samuel New Orleans & North Eastern R. R., Meridian, Miss. 



Im^rican locidg of |;mt |^n()in^er3. 



FROCEEOIISraS. 



Vol. VII.— April, 1881. 



MINUTES OF MEETINaS. 

(Abstract of such as maybe of geueral interest to members.) 



OF THE SOCIETY. 



April Gth, 1881.— The Society met at 8 p. m, Vice-President 
Chamite in the Chair. 

Ballots were canvassed and the following candidates declared elected ; 
As Member, Charles Rufus Boyd of Wytheville, Va. ;— As Associate, 
Henry H. Gorringe, of New York ;— As Junior, Edward Butts, of Kansas 
City, Mo. 

The Secretary reported that the date of the next Annual Convention 
was fixed as June 15th, and that arrangements were in progress as to the 
proceedings at that date at Montreal. 

The Board of Direction reported the results of their action in refer- 
ence to securing more permanent quarters, and brought to the notice of 
the Society the house No. 127 East Twenty-third street, New York. 

The following resolution was adopted: That the Board of Direction 
be authorized to purchase the property No. 127 East Twenty-third street, 
at a price not exceeding thirty thousand dollars. 

In order to secure this proi:)erty a payment of §5,000 was required. 
The subscription to the Building Fund did not yet amount to $10,000, 
and under the terms could not be immediately called in. The following 
named ten members of the Society advanced the sum of five hundred 
dollars each, to be repaid from subscriptions ; James B. Francis, O. 
Chanute, Ashbel Welch, E. S. Chesbrough, William E. Worthen, Wal- 
ter Katte, Charles Macdouakl, L. B. Ward, A L. Holley, Eckley B. 
Coxe. 



14 

A paper by F. Collingwood, Member A. S. C. E., on " An Examina- 
tion into the Methods of Determining Wind Pressures," was read by the 
author and discussed by Messrs. Chanute, Chesbrougli and Worthen. 

April 20th, 1881. — The Society met at 8 p. m. Past President 
Greene in the Chair. 

A paper by G. Thomas Hall, Member A. S. C. E. Subject; "The 
Construction of the Second Avenue Line of the Metropolitan Elevated 
Railroad of New York," was read by the Secretary and discussed by 
Members present. 

or THE BOARD OF DIRECTION. 

February 25th, 1881. — Applications were considered. The Secre- 
tary was directed to make preliminary arrangements for the next Annual 
Convention. A form for an additional circular in reference to the col- 
lection of a Building Fund was determined upon and its issue ordered. 
Approi3riations were made. 

March 23d, 1881. — Applications were considered. Arrangements for 
the approaching Annual Convention were discussed. Appropriations 
were made. 

April 5th, 1881. — Applications were considered. Arrangements for 
the Convention were made. The following resolutions were adojjted: 

Resolved, That Messrs. W. H. Paine, C. Vandervoort Smith and 
Joseph P. Davis, be instructed to act as Trustees for the Building Fund, 
with instructions to collect the same from the subscribers and to deposit 
the proceeds in some trust company or savings bank offering due se- 
curity, so that the signatures of at least two of the Trustees or their 
successors shall be required to draw out the funds. 

Resolved, That the Building Fund shall only be invested uj^on an 
order signed by a majority of the whole Board of Direction. 

The Secretary reported as to a number of houses examined by him, 
giving location, size and price. A committee was appointed to further 
examine houses suitable for purchase and to present the subject at the 
next meeting of the Society . 

April 23d, 1881. — Applications were considered. Resolutions were 
adopted as advised by the Counsel of the Board in reference to the 
purchase of the property No. 127 East Twenty-third street, New York, 
and as to the execution of a bond and mortgage on the same by the 
designated officers of the Society. 

Arrangements were made as to the occupation of the new Society 
House. 



15 

ANNOUNCEMENTS. 



The Thirteenth Annual Convention of the Society will be held at Montreal, 
Canada, June IStii, 1881, Arrangements are in progress to have such of the 
Members as desire to do so, meet at Niagara Falls on Saturday, June 11th, and 
examine the new suspended structure of the railroad suspension bridge, and the 
re-enforcement of its anchorage. A paper on this subject will be presented at 
the Convention by L. L. Buck, Member A. S. C. E., the Engineer in charge of 
the work. 

After spending Sunday at Niagara, the party will proceed to Toronto, and 
after a short stay at that city, will go to Montreal by a steamer, on Lake 
Ontario, i)assing on Tuesday the Thousand Islands and the Rapids of the St, 
Lawrence, and arriving at Montreal the evening before the day of the opening of 
the Convention. 

The arrangements at Montreal are in charge of a Committee, and will be duly 
announced. 

Members who cannot make the trip by way of Niagara and Toronto can go 
directly to Montreal, and should arrive there by June loth. 



Possession of the newly purchased House of the Society has been obtained 
during the last week of April. Its location is No. 12Y East 23d street. It is 
near Madison Square, the great hotels, and the stations of the Elevated Rail- 
roads, and has a number of lines of surface street railroads in the immediate 
vicinity. 

The House of the Society will, as heretofore, be open from nine o'clock a. m. 

to five o'clock p. m. each business day except Saturday, when it is closed at three 

o'clock p. M. 

The Library and Conversation Rooms will also, for the present, be open every 

Wednesday evening from 7^ to 10 p. m. Members are invited to avail themselves 

of the opportunities afforded on Wednesday evenings for consultation of books 

and periodicals, and also for conversation. 

The following resolutions were adopted at of the units of the differing systems be made 

the Ninth Annual Convention of the Society, familiar to all by comparison: 

and ordered printed regularly in the Society „,,,„, ^ , , i •, ■ 

c ,. ./ TSesoZuec?, That members be requested, m 

papers hereafter presented to the Society, to 

Wiereas. the metric system of weights and write, in parenthesis, weights or dimensions 

measures is nov extensively used abroad, by the metric system, in connection with 

and whereas it is desirable that the relation those of the system in general use. 



ADDITIONS TO 

LIBRARY AND MUSEUM. 



From Administration des Fonts et President'slnaugural Address at First Anuyal 

Chaussees, Paris: Meeting American Society Mechanical En- 

Annales. January, 1881. gineers! R. H. Thurston, New York. 

An Adaption of Bessemer Plant to the Basic 

From American Society Mechanical En- Process. A. L. HoUey, New York, 

giueers, 'I'homas Whiteside Rae, Sec- The Field cf Mechanical Engineering. A. L. 

retary, New York: HoUey, New York. 

Proceedings. 1st Annual Meeting American High Ratios of Expansion and Distribution of 

Society Mechanical Engineers. New York, Unequal Pressure in Single and Compound 

November 4 and .5, 1880. Engines. J. C. Hoadley. 



16 



The Metric System ; is it wise to introduce 
into our Machine Shops. Coleman Sellers. 

Friction as a Factor in Motive Power Ex- 
penses. Prof. John E. Sweet. 

From Argentine Scientific Society, Don 
Eduardo E. Clerice, Secretary, Buenos 
Ayres : 
Annales. January, 1881. 
La Vida y Costumbres de los Termitos. 

From Appleby Brothers, London: 
Appley's Handbook of Machinery. 
Section 1. Prime Movers. 

" 2. Hoisting Machinery. 
" 3. Pumping Machinery. 

From Capt. Doiii^las Galton, London: 

Tlie Effect of Brakes on Railway Trains. 1st 
Paper. Uounlas Galton. 

EfJect of Brakes ou Railway Trains. 2d 
Paper. Douglas Galton. 

Efl'ect of Brakes upon Railway Trains. Doug- 
las Galton. 

Recent Brake E.'cperiments iipon the Lyon.s 
Railway. M. George Marie London. 

Memorandum on Brake Experiments made 
on the North Eastern Railway Co., at York, 
on July 14 and 1.5, 1879, upon a train fitted 
with the Westiughouse Automatic Brake. 
Douglas Galton. 

Reports on Brake Experiments made at Gis- 
burn on the Lancashire and Yorkshire Rail- 
way, July 14 and 15, 1880. Douglas Galton. 

From J. M. Goodwin, Cleveland: 
The Panama Shij) Canal and Inter-oceanic 
Railway Projects. J. M. Goodwin. Cleve- 
land, 1880. 

From R. Gordon, Henzada, British 
Burmah: 
Report,on the Irrawaddy River. 

fart 1. Hydrography ot the Irrawaddy. 
Part 2. Hydrology of the Irrawaddy. 
Part 3. Hydraulics of the Irrawaddy. 
Part 4. The Hydraulic Works connected 
with Nawoon River. ll.Gordon. Rangoon, 
1880. 

From Charles A. Ashburner, Phila- 
delphia: 
The Geology of McKean County and its con- 
nection with that of Cameron, Elk and 
Forrest. Charles A. Ashburner, Harris- 
burgh, 1880. 
Maps and Charts of McKean Co., Peuna. 
Charles A. Ashburner. Harrisburgh, 1880. 

From William S. Barbour, Cambridge, 
Mass. : 
Mayor's Address and Annual Reports of City 

of Cambridge, Mass. Cambridge, 1881. 
Annual Report City Engineer Cambridge, 

November 3, 1880. Cambridge, 1881. 
Sixteenth Annual Report Cambridge Water 
Board. Cambridge, 18S1. 

From Board of Supervisors, John A. 
Eussel, Clerk, San Francisco, Cal. : 
Municipal Reports of San Francisco for year 
ending June 30, 1880. 

From Boston Society of Civil Engineers. 
S. E. Tinkham, Secretary, Boston: 
Proceedings January and February, 1881. 
Railroad Signals. Geo. W. Blodgett. 
Report on Metric System. 
Fall River Bridge. E. N. Winslow. 



From H. W. Clarke, Syracuse, N. Y.: 
Report of Commissioners of New York and 
Penusylvania Boundary Line to the Re- > 
gents of the University of the State of New 
York. Albany, 1881. 
Report of the Regents of the University of 
the State of New York on Resurvey of the 
Boundary line, New York and Pennsylvania. 
Albany, 1880. 

From A. Durand-Claye, Paris, France: 
Conferences sur I'Assaiuissement Municipal. 

Ecole des Pontt et Chaussees, 1871, 1875. A. 

Durand-Claye, Paris. 
Sur les temprietur des eaux sunterraines de 

Paris pendant les Mois de Decembre, 1879. 

A. Durand-Claye. Paris, 1879. 
Enqueto sur les Stations Agronomiques. A. 

Durand-Claye. Paris, 1878. 
Communication sur Tassainissement des 

Villes. A. Durand-Claye. Paris, 1880. 
Mcmoire sur le Dessechement du lac Funcino. 

A. Durand-Claye. Paris, 1878. 
Etat de la Question des Eaux d'Egout en 

France et al 'Etranger. A. Durand-Claye. 

Nancy. 1877. 
Situation de la Question des Eaux d'Egout et 

de leur emploi Agricole en France et a 

I'Etranger. A. Durand-Claye. Paris, 1873. 

From M. Coryell, Lambertville, N. J. : 
Fourth Annual Report of Lambertville Water 
Co. Lambertville, 1877. 

From James B. Fads, St. Louis: 
The Isthmus Ship Railway, North American 
Review. March, 1881. James B. Eads. 1881. 

From John W. Hill, Cincinnati: 
Report of the Expert on the Test Trials of 
Automatic Cut-off Steam Engines at the 
First Millers International Exhibition, Cin- 
cinnati, June, 188U. 

From W. R. Hntton, Baltimore: 
Three Photographs showing Lock and Dam 
of Kanawha River Improvement. 

From Institution of Civil Engineers, 
James Forrest, Secretary, London: 

Abstract of Papers in Foreign Transactions 
and Periodicals. Session 1880-81. Parti. 

New Zealand and Ceylon Government Rail- 
ways. James P. Maxwell and James R.Mosse. 

The Dififei-ent modes of erecting Iron Bridges. 
Theopbilus Seyrig. 

Ultimate Working Strength of Materials. Dr. 
J. Weyrauck. 

From Institution Mechanical Engineer, 
Walter R. Browne, Secretary, Lon- 
don: 
Proceedings. October, 1880. 
Index, Contents and List of Members, Insti- 
tution of Mechanical Engineers for 1880. 
On Implements and Machinery for Cultivat- 
ing Land by Horse Power. W. R. Buns- 
fould. 
On recent improvements in the Machinery 
for Repariug and Spinning Cotton. Eli 
Spencer. 

From W. S. Johnston, Chester, Pa. : 
Memoir of Edwin Ferry Johnson, Civil Eq- 
gineer. Philadelphia, 1880. 

From Louis H. Knapp, Bufi'alo, N. Y. : 
Specifications for the Intercepting Sewer, 
City of Buffalo. 



17 



From Charles Neilson, New York: 
Drawings accompanyiug the report of Capt. 
TurnbuU on Surveys and Construction of 
Alexandria Aqueduct, July 2, 1838. Wash- 
ington, 1838. 

From PubUshers Eevue Generale des 
Chemins de fer. Edgar Monjean, 
Secretary, Paris: 
Eevue Generale des Chemins de fer. Decem- 
ber, 1880. 

From Royal United Service Institution, 
Capt. B Burgess, Secretary, London: 
Journal of the Institution. Vol. XXIV No. 
CVIIX. 

From William F. Shunk, New York: 
Gilbert Elevated Eaihvay ; a .collection of 
facts in reply to the pamphlet " The opin- 
ions of Two Eminent Civil Engineers " on 
Eapid Transit. Wm. F. Shunk, Mew York, 
1877. 

From Societe des Ingenieurs Civil. 
Paris : 
Memoires, December, 1880, and January, 
1881. 

From St. Louis Public School Library: 
Bulletin No. 12. November and December. 
1880. 

From United States Coast Survey, 
Washington: 
Annual Eeport United States Coast and Geo- 
detic Survey, 1877. Washington, 1880. 

From U. S. Naval Observatory, Eear 
Admiral John A. Eogers, Supt., 
Washington: 



Reports on the Total Solar Eclipses of July 
29, 1878, and January 11. 1880. Washing- 
ton, 1880. 

From William Watson, Boston: 
A report to the American Social Science Asso- 
ciation on Protection of Life from Casual- 
ties in the use of Machinery. William 
Watson. Boston, 1879. 

From Welton and Bonnett, Waterbury, 
Ct.: 
Fourteenth Eeport of the Board of Water 
Commissioners of the City of Waterbury. 
W^aterbury, 1881. 

From H. M. Wightman, Boston : 
Annual Eeport of the City Engineer of Bos- 
ton for the year 1880 (2 Copies.) 

From other sources: 

The Library Journal. Vol. VI. No, 12. 

The Architectural Employment of Terracotta. 
A Eeprint from The Builder, August U and 
11, 1880. New York. 1881. 

Length of Tracks of Railroads owned, leased, 
operated, and controlled by the Pennsyl- 
vania Eoilroad Co. December 31. 1880. 

Twelfth Annual Eeport of the Board of Rail- 
road Commissioners of Massachusetts. 
Boston, 1881. 

Narrative of the Second Artie Expedition 
made by Charles F. Hall. Prof. J. E. 
Nourse. Washington, 1879. 

Narrative of the North Polar Expedition U. 
S. Ship Polaris, Capt. Charles F. Hall, Com- 
uiauding. C. H. Davis, U. S. N. Washing- 
ton, 1876. 



LIST OF MEMBERS 



ADDITIONS. 

MEMBERS. 

Date of Election. 
Aldrich, Truman H. . . .jNIontevallo Coal Mines, Montevallo, Ala. . .May 4, 1881 

Bland, George P (Elected Junior, April 7th, 1875,) 3214 

Woodland Ave., W. Philadelphia, Pa. 

Boyd, Charles R Wytheville, Va April 6, 1881 

Lewis, Sidney F Ass't. State Engineer, 289 Royal St., New 

Orleans, La May 4, 1S81 



associate. 



Haddock, Area R 410 E. 14th St., New York City, N. Y. . . .May 4, 1881 

juniors. 
Butts, Edward Ass't. Engineer Kansas Pacific Railway, 

Erie, Col April 6, i88i 

Perry, Charles A Ass't. City Engineer, 18 City Hall, New 

Haven, Conn May 4, 1881 

POETSCH, Charles J. . . . Ass't. City Engineer, Milwaukee, Wis " « 



18 



CHANGES AND CORRECTIONS. 



MEMBERS. 

Guilds, James E Gen. Supt. New York, Ontario and Western R. R., 

Middletown, N. Y. 

Clarke, Thomas C 49 William St., Room 58, New York Gity, N. Y. 

GoGSWELL, William B. ..109 Willow St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

CoRTHKLL, E. L North Egremont, Mass. 

Falconnet, Eugene F. .Pres. and Engineer N. cS; T.R. R., Nashville, Tenn. 

Force, Gyrus G., Jr Cleveland, Ohio. 

Glover, O. L Engineer Iquique R. R., Iquique, Peru, S. A. 

Harding, George E 40 Exchange Place, New York City, N. Y. 

Harding, Henry P. O. Box 280, Salem, Mass. 

Hughes, William M Engineer Bridges N. Y. G. & St. L. Rwy., 32 Board of 

Trade, Cleveland, Ohio. 

Kinsley, Thomas P Horseheads, Chemung, Co., N. Y. 

Leverich, Gabriel Engineers' Office East River Bridge, 279 Front St., New 

York Gity, N. Y. 

McLain, Louis R Res. Eng. Rope Ferry Bridge, Lorraine, Va. 

Meier, Edward 1) 214 Pine St., St. Louis, Mo. 

Schmidt, Max E Care James Harrington, Tampico, Mexico. 

Sedgwick, Thomas S 1009 O St., N. W. Washington, D. C. 

SiCKELS, T. E 90 Broadway, New York City, N. Y. 

Sites, Wilmon W. G Chief Engineer Board Public Works, Jersey City, N. J. 

TowLE, Stevenson Engineer in charge of Sewers, 25 Chambers St., New 

York City, N. Y. 

Wilson, Henry W 435 Chestnut St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Wilson, John A 435 Chestnut St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Wilson, Joseph M 435 Chestnut St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Wimmer, Sebastian 71 Broadway, New York City, N. Y. 

associates. 

Harris, Charles M 67 Wilham St., New York City, N. Y. 

Lawson, L. M 102 Broadway, New York Gity, N. Y. 

Juniors. 

Crosby, B. L Ass't. Engr. Bismarck Bridge, Bismarck, Dak. 

Lucas, D. Jones Lock Box 33, Lebanon, Pa. 

Staats, Robert P 39 W. 12th St., New York City, N. Y. 

fellows. 
Gourtwright, Milton. .55 Broadway, New York City, N. Y. 
Gurnee, W. S.- 35 Nassau St., New York City, N. Y. 



I 



Im^rkmt Socidg of ^^id Ign^mm. 



PHOOEEDINGS. 



Vol. VII.— May, 1881. 
MINUTES OF MEETINaS 

(Abstract of such as may be of general interest to members.) 



OF THE SOCIETY. 



May 4th, 1881. — The Society met for the first time in its newly pur- 
chased house, at 8 p. m. Past President Greene, in the chair. 

Ballots were canvassed, and the following candidates declared elected: 
As Members — Truman H. Aldrich, of Montevallo, Ala. ; William H. At- 
wood, of Jersey City, N. J. ; George P. Bland (elected Junior April 7, 
1875), Philadelphia ; E. E. Glaskin (elected Junior April 5, 1876), Lon- 
don, Eug. ; George T. Keith, of Olean, N. Y. ; Sidney F. Lewis, of New 
Orleans, La. ; Henry S. Munroe, of New York ; Albert C. Savage, of 
Belle Plain, Texas ; William N. Symington, of New York ; Arthur M. 
Wellington, of Laredo, Mexico ; Samuel Whinery (elected Junior April 
1, 1874), Meridian, Miss. As Associate — Arba Read Haddock, of New 
York. As Juniors— Charles A. Ferry, of New Haven, Ct. ; Charles J. 
Poetsch, of Milwaukee, Wis. 

The Secretai-y reported that the property No. 127 East Twenty- 
third street. New York, had been i^urchased at the price of .^30,000 ; that 
$5,000 cash had been paid, and a mortgage executed for the balance, 
$25,000, for five years, at 5 per cent, per annum, with a provision for the 
payment of any portion of this amount at any time in sums not less than 
$1,000. Also that the subscriptions now amount to .?10,100, and that a 
circular had been prepared calling for their payment. 

May 18th, 1881.— The Society met at 8 p. m. Director Joseph P. 
Davis, in the chair. 



20 

The Secretary announced the death, on April 18th, 1881, of Max 
Maria, Baron Von Weber, Honorary Member of this Society, and the 
President was authorized to appoint a committee to prepare a memoir 
for publication. 

A paper by Charles L. McAlpine, Member A. S. C. E., subject, 
" Quicksand in Excavation," was read by the author, and discussed by 
Messrs. Bogart, Joseph P. Davis, Raymond, Torrey, and Worthen. 

OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTION. 

May 7, 1881.— Applications were considered. The Treasurer re- 
ported the collection of over ^5,000 of the Building Fund subscriptions, 
and was authorized to repay that amount to the members of the Society 
who had advanced the same for the first payment on the purchase of the 
property. The thanks of the Board were ordered transmitted to these 
gentlemen. 

The Trustees of the Building Fund reported arrangements made for 
the deposit of its proceeds in a trust company. 

The Secretary reported the preparation of the following circular, the 
issue of which was approved : 

May 5, 1881. 

Sik: 

I am instructed to acquaint you with the fact that the property 

No. 127 East T-r-enty-Thied Street, New Yoek, 

has been purchased by the American Society op Croh Engineeks, and 
that during the past week the Society has taken possession, and will 
hereafter occupy the house at that location. 

You have been informed, by previous circulars, of the establishment 
of a BriLDiNCr Fund, and of the provision that subscriptions to that fund 
would be binding" when $10,000 should be subscribed. During the 
month of March, many houses were visited and examined by the Board 
of Direction and the Committee entrusted with that duty ; and at the 
meeting of the Society of April 6th, a report was made of the result of 
these examinations. It was then decided to purchase this house. To 
secure the property a payment of $5,000 was necessary. The subscrip- 
tions to the Building Fund, at that time, did not amount to $10,000, 
and, therefore, could not be called in. A prompt decision on the sub- 
ject was necessary, because the lease of the house then occupied in 
Twentieth Street expired on May 1st, and had either to be renewed or 
given up at once. Ten members of the Society directly advanced $500 
each. The title of the property was thoroughly examined and the pur- 
chase completed, by the payment of $5,000 on April 26th. The price of 
the property is $30,000, and on the remaining sum of $25,000 interest is 



21 

now running at 5 per cent. Since the purchase, subscriptions have been 
received, so that the total subscription is now $10,600. These will be 
directly called in, and the advance made by members repaid to them. 
The amount remaining due on the property will be reduced as subscrip- 
tions are paid, a provision allowing this being incorporated in the 
mortgage. 

The house is twenty-five feet wide, about sixty feet deep, with a lot in 
the rear forty feet deep. The house is excellently built, with Oliio stone 
front and brick sides and rear. It is four stories high, with basement 
and cellar. It afifords at once much more convenient accommodations 
than the Society has heretofore possessed for its library, its meetings, 
and for the general uses of members and visitors. The location and con- 
struction of the house are such as, in the opinion of careful judges of 
real estate, will assure its security as an investment and a probable ad- 
vance in value. 

This decided action of purchasing a house has been largely determined 
upon, in accordance with the advice and suggestions of many members 
of the Society to the effect that, in order to secure a Building Fund, 
some decided action was imi^erative. 

The subscriptions have varied in amounts from small sums up to one 
of $2,500, which latter has been made by one member. Quite a number 
of subscriptions have been made by persons not members of the Society, 
to whom the suggestion of aiding in the establishment of this Fund has 
been made by members. One member has already forwarded sixteen 
subscriptions of $100 each. All subscriptions will be acknowledged and 
published as provided for in the circular of January 1st, 1881. 

To reduce the interest account, and to enable the Society to devote 
its funds more entirely to its publications, and other suitable purposes, 
additional subscriptions are desired, and you are requested, as in previous 
circulars, to bring the subject to the attention of persons interested in 
Engineering, and who might probably be very willing to become sub- 
scribers to the Building Fund, and receive the Transactions of the 
Society, if the subject was presented to them. 

EespectfuUy, 

John Bogakt, 

Secretary Am. Soc. C. E. 

The Secretary also reported the preparation of the following circular, 
the issue of which was authorized : 

American Society of Civuj Engineers, 
127 East Twenty-third Street, 

, , New York, 188 . 

Mr 

^ij^*— Under the provisions of the circular issued on March 1st, 1881, 
the subscriptions to the Building Fund of this Society become binding 
when $10,000 shall be subscribed. 



22 

The subscriptions now amount to .^10,600. You are therefore re- 
quested to forward the amount subscribed by you, either in two instal- 
ments or in one payment, as may be convenient. If made m two mstal- 
ments the first half should be sent directly, addressed to the Secretary, 
in draft or money orders made payable to the Treasurer of the American 
Society of Civil Engineers ; the second half to be paid at your con- 
venience on or before July 1st, 1881. 

The amount subscribed by you was -S 

Respectfully, 

John Bogaet, 

Secretary Am. Soc. C. E. 

The Secretary reported in full the transactions connected with the 
purchase of the property No. 127 East Twenty-third street, including 
the report as to title by the legal advisers of the Board, and the execution 
of the requisite papers by the designated officers of the Society, The 
Board approved the action thus taken. 

Action was taken as to bank deposits and checks. • The Finance 
Committee was requested to consider the question of a proper sum for 
compounding the annual dues now payable by members ot the Society 
by the payment of such sum for constituting a life membership. Ap- 
propriations were made. 

May 23d, 1881. -Arrangements for the 13th Annual Convention were 

considered. 

Mat 25th, 1881.— Arrangements for the 13th Annual Convention were 
made The following was adopted as to invitations to the Convention : 

Eesolved That invitations be extended to the families of members ; 
that the Committee on Convention be empowered to invite individuals 
eminent in the profession, aud editors of professional papers, and that 
the local comnlittee at Montreal be requested to extend invitations at 

their discretion. . . 

Resolved That the Committee on Convention be requested to mvite 
to the Convention the officers of Engineers' Societies, of the American 
Institute of Mining Engineers, and of the American Society of Me- 
chanical Engineers. , » xi -p n i ;« 

Action was taken in reference to the investment of the Fellowship 
Fund. Applications were considered. Appropriations were made. 



inuTican |oiidu of Mil Incjinm^, 



FROOEEDIIsTGS. 



Vol. Vll.— June, I 



MINUTES OF MEETINQS 

(Abstract of such as maybe of general interest to members.) 



THIETEENTH ANNUAL CONVENTION OF THE AMERICAN 
SOCIETY OF CIVIL ENGINEERS. 

Held in the City of Montreal on the 15th, 16th, 17th, and 18th of 

J^TNE, 1881. 

FiEST Se.ssion — Reception. 

Ou the morning of Wednesday, the 15th, the Convention assembled 
in Molson Hall, McGill University. 

Mr. John Bogaet, the Secretary of the Society, called the meeting to 
order, and said : 

I am requested to open the Thirteenth Annual Convention of the 
American Society of Civil Engineers, and to say that we will be wel- 
comed to the City of Montreal by His Worship the Mayor of the City. 
Previous to that, however, in accordance with the law of the Society, a 
Chairman of the Convention is to be elected from among members, not 
officers, of the Society ; and in accordance with the custom, the local 
committee at Montreal have nominated as CUiairman Mr. Thomas C. 
Keefek, and I now have much pleasure in. presenting that nomination 
to the Convention. 

The nomination was unanimously ratified, and Mr. Keefer took the 
Chair. 



24: 

The Chairman. — It is proper, gentlemen, that the first words of wel- 
come should be siJoken to you. by the only gentleman who is authorized 
to speak for the whole of the citizens of Montreal. I regret to say that 
his Worship the Mayor, who has come here with great difficulty, is un- 
able, through illness, to perform that duty himself, but he has brought 
a substitute who will assure you of a hearty welcome to the city over 
which he prbsides. 

Mayor Beaudet. — Mr. President and gentlemen of the American 
Society of Civil Engineers, allow me to congratulate you upon your 
presence in the City of Montreal, and to welcome you and oflfer you the 
freedom of the city. I regret that I am unable to read the address 
which expresses so truly the sentiments I euteitain in regard to your 
visit. It will be read to you by my son-in-law, who is also the city 
attorney of Montreal. I beg to introduce to you Mr. Koy. 

Mr. Roy read the following address : 

Address of the Hon. J. L. Beaudry, Mayor of the City of Montreal, 
TO the President and Members of the American Society or Civid 
Engineers, in Convention assembled at the Wm. Molson Hall op 
McGiLL Univeesity, on Wednesday, the 15th of June, 1881. 

Mr. President and Members of the American Society of Civil Engineers : 

I have the honor, in the name of our citizens, to welcome you and to 
oflfer you the freedom of this our City of Montreal. I believe it is the 
custom of your Society to hold a convention annually in some of the 
principal cities of the continent, and this is, I believe, your thirteenth, 
and the first one held outside of the limits of United States territory. 
I was about to say, your own country, as was recently remarked by one 
of our city newspapers in commenting upon your expected visit, but I 
will not make use of that phrase myself, because I think that, as en- 
gineers, men who are intimately identified with all the great enterprises 
which unite not only territories, but continents, in the great march of 
civilization and progress, it should not be said that you ar- not in your 
own country, merely because you have crossed the line which divides two 
distinct political governments. I am sure that the American engineer 
never feels out of his country in pursuing the objects of his noble 
profession ; at all events, he need not feel so, while he is in this Canada 
of ours; the lines that mark difierences in political institutions are 
obliterated in these pursuits ; besides, are not the arms of your Society 
extended open to your professional brethren on this side of the line, 
and have we not, as citizens of Canada .and in this city, men who are 
members of your honorable body, and to whom the privileges and 
honors of your institution are extended as fully and as freely as to those 
who live under the American flag. Your brethren here, I am very cer- 
tain, do not look upon you as strangers out of your own country, but 



25 

they are, as you are yourselves, all members of one body tliat knows no 
difference in creed or nationality ; and the Montreal members must feel 
gratified in being the cause, as I liave no doubt they are, of the honor 
of this distinguished visit to our city. In connection with this visit, 
my attention has been particularly drawn to the importance of your 
Society as an institution, and I have to offer you my humble congratula- 
tions on the aims and objects for which it exists. I have glanced over 
the subjects which claim your thought and study, and the manner in 
which, in your discussions, those subjects are treated, shows me how you 
probe and burrow for the truths of i^ractical life, and prompts me to 
increase, if that were possible, my admiration for the noble profession 
of civil engineering ; that i^rofession whose object, it has been truth- 
fully said, is the imj^rovement of everything it touches for the use, 
economy and convenience of man. It is to your profession, Mr. President 
and gentlemen, that we are indebted for the great highways of commerce 
that stretch far and wide over the continent from the Atlantic to the 
Pacific ; that has shortened the once almost trackless ocean between 
two great commercial worlds to a mere bagatelle of a trip ; that lirings 
those magnificent ships to our harbors ; that has laid hold of the light- 
ning and used it to link the whole civilized world in instantaneous com- 
munication ; that pierces our mountains to let the iron horse go through, 
and that bridges our rivers so that even our gretit St. Lawrence offers 
no obstacle to the transportation of our merchandise and our products 
at all seasons of the year. And I am aware that, in the intelligent as- 
semblage which I have now the privilege of addressing, there are men 
who have done these things, and who are capable of doing and will do still 
greater than have yet been done ; minds which have conceived and 
carried to successful completion many of those bold projects, in the in- 
terests of commerce, which have astonished the world and won the 
admiration and gratitude of their fellow-citizens, and have brought 
honor to their country. It is to your profession also that we are in- 
debted for many of the conveniences, comforts and even luxuries of 
daily life ; usefulness to your fellow-men, is your great aim, and many 
of you have placed your naines high uji on the roll of fame, both in 
this and the mother country, for your achievements in your art. It is, 
therefore, an honor to our city that, by an almost unanimous vote, you 
have selected her as the place for this meeting. 

With regard to what we have to offer for your entertainment, I regret 
that we have not vei-y much to show of that which is most interesting 
to you. The Victoria bridge and the workshops of the Grand Trunk 
Railway Company are worthy of your inspection ; the harbor also may 
present a feature of interest to you ; and, on behalf of the city works, 
there are the Water Works and the Mount Royal Park. 

In conclusion, Mr. President and gentlemen, let me say that, although 
our city lies far north, the hearts of our peojile are warm, and, on behalf 



26 

of the citizens, accept my best wishes for your enjoyment here, and 
for the success of your meeting. And I hope that this will not be your 
last convention here ; I also hope, on behalf of our Canadian engineers 
who are not members, that they will take advantage of the privileges your 
iostitution offers to them, and that the Canadian membership will aug- 
ment, for we cannot shut our eyes to the fact that un ion of men, par- 
ticularly in such noble pursuits as those of your calling, must tend 
largely to cement the friendly feeling which exists generally between the 
inhabitants of both sides of the line which separates our governments. 
Again, Mr. President and gentlemen, let me heartily welcome you and 
tender you the freedom of the city. 

I have the honor to be, 

J. S. BEAtDEY. 

' Mayor. 
The Chairman then introduced 
Mr. Henshaw, President of the Montreal Board of Trade, who said : 

When I had the honor of an invitation to meet this distinguished 
body, I had no idea that I was to be other than a silent spectator, and a 
very pleased one, of the proceedings of to-day. Had I imagined I 
should be called upon for anything in the way of a speech, I should have 
followed the example of our worthy Mayor, and made some little prepara- 
tion for it. Occupying, as I do, the position of President of the Mon- 
treal Board of Trade, I cannot do less, certainly, than to welcome most 
heartily to this city so distinguished a body of gentlemen as have favored 
us with their presence. I have occasionally heard it remarked : "What 
practical good does a visit, such as this, do to a place ?" I felt a pity for 
those who proposed such a question. For my part, I think the peculiar 
circumstances under which a visit of this kind is made, ought to be wel- 
comed by the city wuth the greatest pleasure possible. The Civil Engi- 
neers are a class of men who are closely identified with the commercial 
interests of the whole world. They are naturally interested in, and 
competent to speak upon, railway lines, canals, and, in fact, every 
channel of intercourse between the west and the ocean through which 
commerce must pass, and, I think, under the circumstances, Montreal 
has been very highly honored by the presence of these gentlemen. I 
hope that the merchants of Montreal, and the citizens' generally, will ex- 
tend to them during their stay all the attentions they possibly can. We 
are particularly favored, also, by the presence of a large number of 
ladies who accompany the members of the society, and I trust they will 
receive such impressions of the city that we shall have the pleasure of 
seeing them again. In the name of the Board of Trade of Montreal, 
gentlemen, I offer you our warmest welcome. 

The Chairman. — I now introduce to you another member of the 
Board of Trade, Avho is also a member of the Dominion Parliament, Mr. 
Thomas White. 



27 

Mr. White. — I confess, Mr. Chairman, tbat I am very much sur- 
prised, indeed, at this summons, for, although a member of the Council 
of the Board of Trade, in the presence of our President, I think no one 
else should speak in their name. I cannot, however, do otherwise, as a 
citizen of Montreal, than very cordially to express my own gratification at 
the presence of so distinguished a body in our city, and to extend to you 
the heartiest possible welcome on the part of the citizens of Montreal. 
There is, perhaps, no city on the continent more interested in works to 
which your minds are specially directed, than is this City of Montreal at 
the jjresent time. The charts on each side of this room indicate some of 
the works upon Avhich the success and prosperity of Montreal depend, 
and upon the successful carrying out of these works, I believe, will very 
largely depend the future of our city. I sincerely trust, gentlemen of 
the American Society of Civil Engineers, that your stay in Montreal will 
be not only a pleasant one, but a profitable one in affording you an op- 
portunity of seeing those works upon which the city has so far depended 
for its i^rosperity in the past, and those works which we are now entering 
upon. There is no class of men, no department of industry, or intel- 
lectual labor, upon which the fiiture of the country, and even of this 
whole continent, so largely depends as iipon the profession represented 
here to-day. If to-day we have railways extending over every j)art of 
this vast continent, we owe it to the skill, to the foresight, to the in- 
domitable industry of the dejiartment of civil engiiieering. If to-day we 
have great water highways which afibrd means of communication for the 
traffic and business of the country, we owe it to that same department of 
labor. I sincerely congratulate the City of Montreal that it has been 
selected for the place of meeting of so distinguished a body of gentlemen. 
I have the honor again, gentlemen, to Avelcome you most heartily on be- 
half of the city, and to express my earnest hope that your visit here will 
be one Avhich, when looking back upon it in the future, you will have 
no reason to regret. 

Mr. Mitchell, President of the Montreal Corn Exchange, said : 
When I came here I hardly exi:)ected to be called uj)on to speak, but I 
am glad to say that I heartily concur in what has been said by my 
friends of the Board of Trade, in Avelcoming the distinguished visitors 
we have with us. I wish the society that has so kindly favored us with 
this visit, every enjoyment during their stay here. I am sure that the 
association for which I speak welcomes them most heartily to Montreal, 
and unites Avith me in wishing them every enjoyment while sojourning 
in our city. 

Tlie Chaieaian. — It is now my pleasant duty to present to you a 
gentleman who requires no introduction from me, a gentleman whose 
reputation is trans-Atlantic as well as cis- Atlantic, Principal Dawson, the 
distinguished geologist, who is the President of this University, and to 
whom we are indebted for the use of the hall in which we are assembled. 



28 

Pkincipaij Dawson. — I do not know that it is necessary for me to add 
•words of welcome to those that have already been spoken, but I may say 
•one word on behalf of the University which I represent here. I must 
say that it gives us very great pleasure, and we regard it as a very high 
honor, to be able to entertain within our walls the distinguished Sgciety 
which meets here to-day. McGill University, in some resj^ects, perhaps> 
has a claim on the profession of civil engineering because it was the first 
university in this Dominion to recognize that profession as a learned 
profession, and to establish a professorship and a course of study in con- 
nection with this branch of knowledge. We did it as far back as 1856, 
and for the last twenty yeai's nearly, our young men have been going out 
more or less prejoared for active duty on the public works of this country 
and its engineering enterprises. 

That our action in this respect has been a wise one, is borne out by 
the growth of our engineering department, now united with the other 
professions of mechanical and mining engineering in our faculty of ap- 
plied science, and by the public supjaort which the effort has secured. 
The work of the engineer, based on scientific princij)les, and carrying out 
those great enterprises of construction, almost of creation, is undoubtedly 
one of the highest connected with the material advancement of nations. 
The engineer is, in triith, at once the missionary and the pioneer of ma- 
terial civilization in its extension into new fields, and as was very well 
stated in the address of the Mayor, he is the organizer of the means 
whereby the larger and denser communities of men can exist with com- 
fort, can be supplied with the necessaries and luxuries of life, and can 
hold communication with each other. Without the structures which he 
plans, rears and maintains, the fabric of our modern civilization would 
fall asunder, and its political, social and commercial arrangements would 
disapijear like a dream. We do well, therefore, to welcome you as 
representatives of this great and honorable profession, and of the science 
and culture which its achievements represent, and to throw oj^en to you 
whatever we have in books, collections or other objects of interest. 

Not being an engineer, I cannot refer to those works in which you 
are professionally interested, but as a geologist, I may introduce you 
to the ancient and venerable foundations on which our city stands, and 
which may afford a field for the exercise of the profession of civil 
engineering. The lower Silurian Limestone of the Trenton age, which 
underlies a great part of the Island of Montreal, though originally a con- 
geries of organic fragments of shells and corals, has nevertheless attained 
to the hardness and density of marble, and is our chief material of con- 
struction, along with its companion beds, the Chazy and Black River 
limestones. That is our great substratum here in Montreal, and consti- 
tutes the material for our great works of construction, and that out of 
which all our best buildings are built. These limestones may well be 
seen in the extensive quarries near the city. The next formation in 



29 

ascending order is the thick and soft Utica shale, dipping gently to the 
south towards the country from which you come. Though soft and 
comparatively useless, it has nevertheless permitted our noble river to 
excavate that channel which you see represented on the wall, because 
rivers, like engineers, select the softest material for their work, and one 
which they can most easily excavate. That Utica shale, also, is the 
material in Avhieh our engineers expect to build this tunnel which you 
see represented on the wall, and which is to bind us, along with the 
Victoria Bridge, to the south shore of the St. Lawrence. We are also 
indebted to that Utica shale, crumbling and soft, for much of the 
fertility of the soil south of the river, from which much of the food 
supply of this city is derived. Then we have here to the north of us 
that mass of rock. Mount Royal, not great as a mountain, but great in 
relation to Montreal, a mass of igneous rock of Dioritic and Syenitic 
character, which, in old times has burst up through this Trenton lime- 
stone and Utica shale, and now lifts it head above our city. It affords 
the beautiful ground for our Mountain Park, and serves also the more 
homely use of supplying material to macadamize our otherwise bad and 
dusty streets. Dr. Hunt and Dr. Harrington have worked out much of 
the chemical and microscopic characters of this great and varied mass. 
In regard to that mountain, I am reminded by the chairman that we 
should value it more than we do at present if we could calculate how 
much it would have cost to put it there. Associated with the mountain 
in origin is the patch of volcanic breccia on St. Helen's Island, a rem- 
nant of the ancient cone of the Montreal volcano, and which, by its 
being associated with the fossils of the Upper Silurian age, fixes the age 
of the chief erujotions of our mountain. Lastly, in the much later 
Ledea clays and Saxicava sands of the Pleistocene age, overlaying the 
older formations, we have the materials of our durable, if not very 
beautiful, red bricks ; and in them the geologist can collect abundant 
specimens of marine shells, identical in species with those now living in 
the northern part of the Gulf of St. Lawrence, and indicating the sub- 
mergence of our country under the cold waters of the Arctic sea in that 
age known as the Glacial period, and in which the imagination of certain 
extreme theorists would have us believe that our continent was covered 
with a mantle of solid ice. Montreal now profits by all these prejiara- 
tions of past geologic ages, and, having passed out of its Glacial age, 
can now welcome you to a summer clime, a rich vegetation, and the hos- 
pitality of a growing, if not yet great city. In conclusion, allow me to 
say, that the University, in offering the use of its hall to this society, 
also offers you all the conveniences and arrangements in connection with 
it ; the library and the museum rooms will be entirely at your service 
during your sojourn here, for we wish to do everything in our power to 
make it both pleasant and useful to you. 



30 

Vice-President Welch, at the request of the President of the >^o-^ 
ciety, responded on behalf of the Society as follows : ^H 

Mr. Chairman,— The worthy Mayor used one expression which 
runs against all my former conceptions. He spoke of the American 
Society of Civil Engineers in Montreal being out of their own country. 
Why, I thought Canada was in America! It does not make any dif- 
ference whether some members of the society acknowledge as their 
Chief Magistrate the illustrious man who lives in the White House 
at Washington, while other members acknowledge as their sovereign 
that glorious woman whom we all love— not because she is Queen 
of Great Britain and Ireland and Canada— not because she is Empress 
of India— not because she rules over one-quarter of the human race, and 
that the best quarter— but because she realizes and exemplifies this 
sentiment : 

" The rank is but the guinea's stamp, 

The man's (or woman) the gowil, for a' that." 

We -feel that she's the "gowd." I say it does not make any differ- 
ence which of the two we acknowledge as our Chief Magistrate, we are 
all Americans, and in the simplicity of my heart I thought the American 
Society of Civil Engineers embraced Canada as a matter of necessity. 
But, Mr. Chairman, this welcome, and one or two other welcomes to 
Canada that I have witnessed, remind me of a great contrast. In 1812 
some Americans came over to a small place then called Little York, now 
the magnificent city of Toronto. Well, we were welcomed on that 
occasion by bayonets, bullets and grape shot, and we returned what 
they gave. Now, we have just heard these warm words of welcome, 
w^ords used, I doubt not, in all sincerity, judging from our own feelings, 
because we attribute the same feelings to our fellow-citizens— I 
mean our friends— of the City of Montreal. We have heard of the 
great material benefits civil engineers have conferred upon this city— 
upon every part of the continent, and upon mankind. But that is not 
the highest object attained by the civil engineer. He has made the 
bonds that unite the North and South of the United States. Those 
bonds have healed the dissensions and mitigated the hostility that 
unfortunately existed at one time between those two sections. I believe 
that the railroads connecting North and South have done more than any 
other cause, except religion, to harmonize those sections of our common 
country. And so it is with other countries. Canada and the United' 
States are now practically one people, though under different govern- 
ments. That engineer has a very inadequate conception of his mission 
who considers that material good, commercial good, is the highest end 
of his profession. The real and highest result accomplished by the 
engineer is by the works he constructs, the railways, the telegraphs and 



31 



the steamships by whicli he unites the distant regions of the whole 
■world, to assimilate, to civilize and to Christianize the human race. 

The reception being ended, the Convention proceeded to the busi- 
ness of the dav. 



The Secretary made an announcement concerning the entertain* 
menta provided by the Local Committee. 

A paper by L. L. Buck, M. A. S. C. E., subject, "The Re-enforce- 
ment of the Anchorage and the Renewal of the Suspended Structure of 
the Niagara Railway Bridge," was, in the absence of the author, read by 
the Secretary. 

The Secretary announced that the Department of Railways and 
Canals at Ottawa had sent to Montreal, for the use of the members of 
the Convention, 100 copies of the last report of the Chief Engineer, con- 
taining illustrutions of Canada's public works ; also, railway maps ; and, 
through Colonel Denis, of the Department of the Interior, 100 maps of 
those portions of the Northwest Territory opened up by the Canadian 
Pacific Railway. 

Mr. Sanford Fleming, M. A. S. C. E., then read a paper, subject, 
"Uniform Standard Time for Railways, Telegraphs and Civil Purposes 
Generally. ' 

A recess was then taken, during which occurred the drive to the 
Mountain Park and the garden party at the residence of Mrs. Redpath. 

Evening Session, June 15th.— On the Convention reassembling at 8 

p. M., 

The Chairman read a letter from the Managing Director of the 
Grand Trunk Railway, offering a special train for the conveyance of the 
members to Quebec ; also, a letter from the Art Association of Montreal, 
extending an invitation to the Society to visit the Art Gallery ; also, 
from the Secretary of the Mechanics' Institute of Montreal, inviting 
the Society to visit the library and reading-room ; also, a telegram 
from Mr. Collingwood Schrieber, Chief Engineer of the Intercolonial 
Railwaj', offering free passage to members of the Convention wishing to 
visit the Maritime Provinces. 

The Secretary made several announcements regarding the local pro- 
gramme, and stated that he had received a telegram from Mr. Benjamin 
Rhodes, Engineer in charge oi the upper Suspension Bridge at Niagara 
Falls, tendering an invitation to the Society to hold its next Conven- 
tion at that place. 

The President, James B. Francis, then read the Annual xiddress, which 
will be printed in the Transactions. 

On the suggestion of the Secretary, the Convention then proceeded 
to the consideration of Mr. Fleming's paper on "Standard Time for 
Railways and Telegraphs." 



32 

On motion, the following committee was appointed, Avith power to 
add to their number, to whom the paper presented by Mr. Sanford 
Fleming was referred for consideration and report : Sanford Fleming, of 
Ottawa, Canada ; Charles Paine, of Cleveland, Ohio ; A. J. Cassatt, of 
Philadelphia, Pa. ; J. M. Toucey, of New York, N. Y. ; J. E. Hilgard, 
of Washington, D. C. ; T. Egleston, of New York, N. Y. ; T. G. Ellis, 
of Hartford, Conn. 

The paper on the Keenforcement of the Anchorage and the Eenewal 
of the Suspended Structure of the Niagara Railroad Bridge, by L. L. 
Buck, was then discussed by Messrs. A. P. Boiler and E. S. Chesbrough, 

A 'paper by O. Chanute, Vice-President of the Society, subject. 
" Eepairs of Masonry," was, in the absence of the author, read by the 
Secretary, and discussed by members present. 

Mr. J. J. R. Croes, for the Committee on the Engagement of Civil 
Engineers upon Government Works, presented the following report : 
To the American Socie/i/ of Civil Engineers, N'ew York, June 14, 1881: 

At a meeting of the Society, held during the Twelfth Annual Con- 
vention, at St. Louis, the following resolution was adopted : 

" Resolved, That a committee of seven be appointed to prepare a 
memorial to Congress, asking that Civil Engineers may be placed in full 
charge of the works of public improvement carried on at Government 
expense, such memorial to be submitted to the Society, and voted on by 
letter ballot on the first Wednesday in November." 

The committee appointed under the provisions of the above resolu- 
tion beg leave to submit the following report : 

It will be observed that the resolution under wdiich this Committee 
was appointed specifies that the form of memorial reported by the 
Committee shall be submitted to the Society for letter ballot. This 
would seem to imply that the Society as a body shall be asked to accept 
the memorial, and present the same to Congress. 

Your- Committee, after maturely considering the subject, have 
thought it advisable to suggest that it may be inexpedient for the Society 
to place itself in the position of advocating before Congress the claims 
of a certain class of its membership, in seeming conflict with any other 
class whose interest may be in a different direction. 

Your Committee have not lost sight of the fact that a large majority 
of the members of the Society are engineers practicing in civil^ life. 
Nevertheless, it must be borne in mind that some of our most prominent 
colleagues are, or have been, military engineers in the sense referred to 
in the memorial, and it may very well be questioned whether the 
Society, as a body, should commit itself to a line of action which might 
be construed as in the least inimical to the professional interests of any 
of its members. 

The objects for which the Society was instituted are clearly defined 
in Articles II and III of the Constitution, which read : 



33 

"Art. ir. Its object sliall be : Tbe pvofessional improvement of its 
members, the encouragement of social intercourse among men of prac- 
tical science, the advancement of engineering in its several branches, 
and the establishment of a central point of reference and union for its 
members. 

"Abt. in. Among the means to be employed for attaining these 
ends shall be periodical meetings for the reading of professional papers, 
and the discussion of scientific subjects ; the foundation of a library ; 
the collection of maps, drawings and models ; and the publication of 
such parts of the proceedings as may be deemed expedient." 

From all of which it would appear that, while the professional im- 
provement of its members is to be considered as a prime motive, there 
should never be the least appearance of an attempt at discrimination in 
favor of a particular class of membership to the detriment of others. 

Your Committee have acted upon this view in preparing the memo- 
rial. 

It is intended to be an expression of opinion of such civil engineers 
as may sign and present it to Congress in furtherance of their own 
interests, and the Society may with propriety decline to consider the 
subject further. 

The Committee respectfully request that they be discharged. 

Chakles Macdonald, 
J. J. B. Oboes, 
T. C. Clakke. 

[Form of Memorial.] 
To tlie Senate and House of Representatives of the United States : 

Your petitioners, citizens of the United States, and civil engineers by 
profession, beg leave to call your attention to the fact, that the civil 
engineering works now carried on by the General Government, such as 
the improvement of harbors and rivers, explorations and surveys for the 
extension of agriculture and commerce, etc., although they employ in 
positions of responsibility and trust a large number of civilians, are 
superintended, with one or two exceptions, exclusively by officers of 
the Corjjs of Engineers of the Army. 

The number of such ^vorks is greater than the number of experienced 
officers who can be detailed to take charge of them, in addition to their 
other duties in the construction and maintenance of our national 
defenses. 

Consequently, most of these works are practically in the hands of 
civilians, although occupying subordinate positions, and many of the 
most experienced civil engineers in the country, who are well fitted by 
skill and education to take principal charge, are unwilling to accept such 
positions, where neither adequate emolument nor reputation can be 
h )ped for. 



Your petitioners therefore pray that sucli legislation may be had as 
shall admit of the direct employment of civil engineers iipdn Govern- 
ment works in such positions as they may he competent to occupy, and 
shall put the civil and military engineers of the United States upon a 
common footing in regard to the execution of national public works not 
of a military charac<-er. 

On motion, the report of the Committee was accepted and the Com- 
mittee discharged. 

The Convention then took a recess. 

VISIT TO OTTAWA. 

June 16.— In the morning the members of the Convention embarked 
on a special train of the Q., M., O. & O. R.E., placed at their service by 
the Local Government of the Province of Quebec, and proceeded to 
Ottawa, the Capital of the Dominion, distant 115 miles from Montreal. 
At Ottawa they were received at the railway station by Sir Leonard 
Tilley, Finance Minister of the Dominion, the Hon. Mr. Caron, Min- 
ister of Militia, and by a local Reception Committee, whose names are 
given hereinafter. The party having visited the Chaudiere Falls, and 
inspected the extensive saw mills situated there, made the descent of the 
timber slides upon cribs of squared timber which had been prepared 
for this purpose, and then drove to the Union House, where they 
were entertained with a collation. The following letters were received 
by the Secretary of the Committee. 

From Sir H. L. Langevin, Minister of Public Works for the Domin- 
ion of Canada : 

W. B. Smellie, 

C. E., Otlaiva: 
Mx Dear Mk. Smellte,— I would have been very happy to avail my- 
self of the kind invitation from the Reception Committee, thereby show- 
ing my appreciation of the visit to Ottawa of the body of American 
engineers ; but, unfortunately, I had previously made an engagement 
which it is impossible for me to cancel. I am convinced that these gen- 
tlemen will receive at your hands every attention to which they are 
entitled and so honorably deserve, and that they will carry back with 
them a good and memorable souvenir in favor of our Canadian Capital. 
Yours very truly. 

Hector L. Langevin. 

From the Hon. D. L. Macpherson, Speaker of the Dominion Senate: 
Mr. ]Macpherson regrets that a previous engagement will prevent his 

having the pleasure of assisthig at the reception of the American Society 

of Civil Engineers this afternoon. 
Ottawa, 16th June, 1881. 



From the Hou. J. A. Mousseau, President of the Council of the 
Domiuiou: 

Ottawa, June 16th, 1881. 
W. B. Smellie, Esq., 

Engineer, 0/tawn : 
Mv Deak Sir,— It is only this morning that I had the honor to 
receive your invitation to attend the reception of the American Associa- 
tion of Civil Engineers, at 1 o'clock p. m. to-day. I am sorry previous 
engagements make it impossible for me to shake hands with the Ameri- 
can and Canadian Engineers, who in this time of railways and canals, 
are the true pioneers of civilization, because they foster progress,' pros- 
perity, and international intercourse amongst the various nations in the 
world. 

Most truly yours, 

J. A. Mousseau. 

Mr. C. H. Mackintosh, Mayor of Ottawa, presided at the collation. 
The first toast proposed and honored was that of "The Queen." The 
next toast was that of " The President of the United States." 

The Hon. J. Q. Smith, Consul-General of the United States in Can- 
ada, in response, said : "Mr. Mayor, Ladies and Gentlemen— A few 
minutes before we came into this room it was intimated to me that there 
would be a toast to the President of the United States to which I would 
be expected to respond. I expressed the opinion to the gentleman who 
conveyed that intimation, that it was an improper time to make speeches, 
and he replied, " The shorter the better." I shall, therefore, say just as 
few words as I consistently can in grateful acknowledgment of the 
toast to the President of the United States. I apprehend there is a sort 
of double duty about it. In the first place, I have to thank the people 
of Canada, and particularly the people of Ottawa, on behalf of the Presi- 
dent of the United States, for receiving the American Society of Civil 
Engineers so kindly ; and in the second place, as a temporary resident 
of Canada, I have to congratulate the Society of Civil Engineers upon 
the heartiness of their reception in Canada. When I first came to Can- 
ada I was asked almost every other day what the people of the United 
States thought of Canada. Well, I think Canadians are finding out 
pretty well what the people of the United States think of them by 
these frequent visits of distinguished societies from the United States 
to Canada. I am very sure, gentlemen, that the people of the United 
States who visit Canada will carry back with them a very vivid im- 
pression of the kindness and hospitality of the people of Canada. I 
thank you for the compliment you have paid the President of the 
United States. 

The toast to the Governor-General and the Princess Louise having 
been honored, 



36 

The Matok.— I have reason to regret that some more eloquent 
tongue, some more intellestual mind was not chosen on this occasion to 
propose the important toast that I am about to propose. I feel myself 
inadequate to the occasion, and for this reason I asked Mr. Bogart to 
announce to you that we were in a great hurry. The tokens of honor, 
ladies and gentlemen, the resjject with which your profession has been 
received are proof positive that we are on the march of civilization, that 
we are making progress. Men are coming to recognize all professions as 
honorable in proportion as they depend ujDon the exercise of high human 
intelligence. We know what you have accomplished on the other side 
of the border, and you know what we are accomplishing in our younger 
and less developed country. I can assure you, gentlemen, that Canadians 
are proud of our civil engineers who are among us, and who are your 
hosts to-day. We are proud of Mr. Fleming, who, on the Canadian 
Pacific, and on the Intercolonial, has proved himself a competent and 
able engineer. We have here, ladies and gentlemen, Mr. Keefer, whose 
name, like Mr. Francis' name in the United States, is a household word 
in Canada. We have here Mr. Walter Shanley, and you who know what 
the Hoosac Tunnel is can form some idea of Mr. Shanley's engineering 
capacities. We know you to be an able class of engineers. We know 
you as hydraulic engineers, we know you as mechanical engineers, and 
as civil engineers, but it has remained for you to learn to-day that we 
have a class of engineers that I don't think you can surpass, and that is 
our " Crib Engineers."* Latlies and gentlemen, I have always heard 
that the associations from the other side of the line, when they come to 
Canada, always behave very well, and I have always observed that when 
they get that credit they always have their wives and sisters with them. 
The present occasion abundantly bears out the rule, and I congratulate 
you ui^on it. I can only hope that this visit to the Capital of Canada 
will be iJroductive of a continuance of that harmony that already exists 
between the two nations. I can only hope that we may all be able to 
sing "Yankee Doodle" — though my friend. President Francis, says he 
does not like it as well as the " Old Suwanee River" song — in the words 
of somebody whom I once heard sing it : 

" Now let us strive these bonds to knit, 
And in the work he handy, 
That we may blend ' God save the Queen ' 
With ' Yankee Doodle Dandy.' " 

Now, gentlemen, I only hope those days will come, and that harmony, 
peace and good-will will always exist between the two nations. We are 
all jointly interested in solving the problem of national progress on this 
side of the Atlantic, and I believe that on this side of the Atlantic now 



* Referring to the ciibs of square timber which had been floated down the slides at the 
Chaudiere Mills. 



37 

exists the greatest confederation of freemen that ever existed under 
tlie sun. I, therefore, hidies and gentlemen, without any further com- 
ment, beg to propose the toast of "The President and members of the 
American Society of Civil Engineers," coupled with this I will call 
upon General Ellis and Mr. Bogart to respond. 

Geneeal T. G. Ellis. — Since you have called upon me to respond 
for the American Society of Civil Engineers, I will say that when Mon- 
treal was proposed last year as the place of meeting for our Convention, 
it was with a great deal of doubt that I acquiesced in going to a foreign 
country. I was a little afraid that the invasion of a Society like this into 
a foreign country might be regarded in a little diflerent light from what 
we intended. But when we arrived at Montreal and met with such a 
kind reception, when we were carried around the mountain to see that 
delightful view, and were received so hospitably by all whom Ave met, 
my doubts entirely vanished. I began to feel that we were all Ameri- 
cans ; that the people of the United States and the people of Canada 
were in sympathy with each other ; that though they might be under 
different governments they were really all Americans. We are all on the 
same side of the water, and we assimilate and associate together as one 
people. And when I came up here to Ottawa and saw the beautiful 
scenery along the railroad, and observed the extensive lumber manufac- 
ture, I thought then also that we were all Americans. I see here the 
same spirit of enterprise and development that I see in the United 
States. And when I visited the Chaudiere Mills and witnessed that 
hydraulic experiment in rafting lumber down the slides, I thought that 
in some respects, at least, the engineers of Canada were greatly in ad- 
vance of the engineers of the United States. Previous to seeing that ex- 
periment I do not think there was an engineer in our Society who would 
have volunteered to carry those rafts safely down those rapids, but I think 
now we could all do it. We have learned something. And, gentlemen, 
let me sfiy in conclusion that whenever any engineer or any resident of 
Canada, any person bearing the devices that we see around this hall, any 
person who calls himself a Canadian, shall come to the United States, 
we shall receive him with as warm hearts and as open arms as you have 
received us here to-day. 

Me. J. BoGAET then made a few remarks. 

The Mayoe. —Prior to leaving for Parliament Hill the corporation 
of Ottawa desires to present to your diffident President and the diffident 
members of your Association a short address, which I will now read : 

Mayor's Office, ) 

Ottawa, June 16, 1881. J 

To the President mid Members of the Americaii Society of Civil Engineers : 

Gentlemen,— On behalf of the corporation we welcome you to the 
Capital of the Dominion, and only regret that the pressure of your en- 



38 

gagements precludes the possibility oi a more tangible manifestation of 
regard and appreciation. 

The splendid engineering triumphs achieved by you and those you 
represent throughout the United States ; the record of active, indomita- 
ble zeal and intellectual exertion, productive of such wonderful progress 
is stamped upon every page of your country's history, whilst the practi- 
cal results will ever remain as monuments commemorative of the intelli- 
gence and civilization which mark the nineteenth century. 

Be assured that we are not unmindful of what Canada owes to those 
who have set so noble an example in the field of scientific research, and 
we shall ever retain a kindly and generous sentiment towards the distin- 
guished visitors present in Ottawa to-day. 

Signed in behalf of the corporation. 

C. H. Mackintosh, 

Mayor. 

W. P. Lett, 

City Cleric. 

The Mayor, after reading the address, presented it to Mr. Feancis, 
President of the Society, who said ; 

On behalf of the American Society of Civil Engineers I beg to present 
to you their hearty thanks for your hospitable reception. We hope to 
see any or all of you in the United ^tates. 

The company then proceeded to inspect the Parliament buildings 
and the city water works, after which they re-embarked for Montreal 
where they arrived shortly after 10 o'clock. ^ 

Friday, June 17th. — The Convention resumed business at 10:30 a. m. 

The Chairman suggested the propriety of appointing a committee to 
draft an address in reply to the address presented to the Society at 
Ottawa yesterday, and which bore the official seal of the corporation of 
Ottawa, and also an address in reply to that presented by the Mayor in 
behalf of the corporation of Montreal. 

On motion, the Chairman was requested to appoint a committee for 
that purpose. 

The Secretary read a telegram from Atlanta, Georgia, inviting the 
Society to take part in the Exposition to be held there during the three 
last months of the jDresent year. 

On motion, the Secretary was instructed to acknowledge the receipt 
of the telegram and to present the thanks of the Society therefor. 

A paper by Ashbel Welch, Vice-President of the Society, subject 
"Comparative Economy of Light and Heavy Ptails," was then read by 
the author. 

A recess was then taken during the business meeting (see page G2). 

At the close of the business meeting the session of the Convention 



39 

vrxs resumed, and the following Nominating Committee was appointed 
in accordance with section 24 of the by-laws: 

Wm. E. Worthen, of Xew Nork ; John Kennedy, of Montreal, Cana- 
da ; John MacLeod, of Louisville, Ky. ; A. F. Wrotnowski, of New 
Orleans, La. ; M. Lane, of Milwaukee, Wis. 

A recess was then taken. 

In the afternoon an excursion was taken upon the river in a steamer 
provided by the Harbor Commissioners. After a sail along the city 
front, the lower lock of the L^chine Canal was visited and the operation 
witnessed of putting into position one of the new lock gates of the en- 
larged canal. The steamer then passed through the canal to the Wel- 
lington basin. 

A special train upon the Grand Trunk Eailway was then taken, and 
the Victoria Bridge visited and examined Afterward the train took the 
party to the extensive shops of the Grand Trunk Eailway. All tlie 
mechanical deiiartments were inspected under the escort of the officers 
in charge, and at the close of the inspection the library and reading 
room for the employees Avere visited. Here a handsome collation was 
jjrovided, and addresses were made by members of the Society and by 
officers of the railway. Music was given by a band formed of employees 
of the railway. 

The same train then took the party to the pumping station of the 
city water works which were examined in comiiany with the engineers 
in charge of the water service. 

In the evening a r3cej)tion was given at the AYind^^or Hotel. 

Saturday, June 18th. — The Convention reassembled at 10:40 a. m. 

The Secretary made announcements. 

The following resolution offered by J. J. K. Croes was adopted: — 
That the thanks of the American Society of Civil Engineers, in Annual 
Convention assembled, be returned to the several corporations, com- 
mittees and individuals who have, by their kind feelings, courtesies and 
liberality, shown their interest in the Society and contributed so largely 
to the enjoyment of its members on this occasion, and that the Secretary 
be directed to communicate to each of the same a copy of this 
resolution. 

A pai^er by Messrs. T. C. Clarke, John Griffin, A. Bonzano and David 
Keeves (Clarke, Reeves <fc Co.), subject, " Exijeriments upon Full Size 
Phceuix Columns," was read by the Secretary, and discussed by A. 
Coffin. 

A paj^er by Eobert H. Thurston, subject, "On the Strength and 
Ductility of the Cojjper -Tin-Zinc Alloys," was, in the absence of the 
author, read by the Secretary. 

A paper on Systems of Sewerage, by E. Hering, was read by the 
author. 

The Secbetaet— I have here several answers to a set of questions on 



40 

this subject which a member of the Society, Mf. J. J. E. Croes, pre- 
pared some time ago, and sent out to some of the members. 

Tlie Secretary then read answers to these questions and discussion 
on the subject which had been received from Messrs. W. R. Hutton, C. 
E. Fowler, Eliot C. Clarke, J. F. Flagg, and Louis H. Kuapp. 

The subject was also discussed by Messrs. C. E . Fowler, A. Mer- 
riwether, J. Bogart, T. G. Ellis, A. P. Boiler, J. J. R. Croes and 
P. A. Peterson. 

A paper on Weights and Measures, by C. Latimer, was then read by 
the author, and discussed by Messrs. A. Welch and F. Brooks. 

Vice-President Welch announced, for the President, the following 
committee upon the subject of Tests of Iron and Steel : T. Egleston, A. 
P. Boiler, T. C. Clarke, F. Collingwood, William Metcalf. 

The Chairman announced the following Committee for drafting re- 
plies to the addresses of the corporations of Montreal and Ottawa: The 
President, the Vice-Presidents and Secretary of the Society, and Messrs. 
Wm. E. Worthen and T. G. Ellis. 

The Convention then adjourned. 



A large number of the members of the Society, en route to the Con- 
vention at Montreal, met at Niagara Falls on June 11th, the Saturday 
23receding the opening session of the Convention. During that day they 
fully examined the re-enforcement of the anchorage and the new sus- 
l^ended structure of the Niagara Railway Suspension Bridge. They 
were accompanied by Mi-. L. L. Buck, Member A. S. C. E., who was the 
engineer in charge of that work, and by Mr. W. G. Swan, the superin- 
tendent of the bridge. 

The roadway Sui^ension Bridge near the Falls, was also visited, and 
the three recently built suspension bridges on the Canada side connect- 
ing the islands above the Falls. These were examined under the escort 
of Mr. Benjamin Rhodes, the engineer in charge of their construction. 
The new constructions of the water power company were also inspected. 
A visit was made to Lewiston, and to the wreck of the old Suspension 
Bridge near that place. 

On Monday morning the party proceeded by the Great Western 
Railway to Toronto. At that city they were met by W. Gooderham, 
Jr. , Esq. , under whose escort a drive was taken through the city, visit- 
ing the station of the Toronto & Nipissing Railway, where the success- 
ful working of the Haggas Water Elevator for Locomotives was practi- 
cally exhibited. After a drive through the park, and the grounds of the 
university, a reception was given to the members of the Society and its 
guests by Col. C. S. Gzowski, Member A. S. C. E. The party was wel- 
comed by Col. Gzowski and family, and by the Lieutenant-Governor of 
the Province of Ontario. Short addresses were made on this occasion. 



41 

The journey from Toronto to Montreal was made by steamer on Lake 
Ontario, passing the Thousand Islands and the Eapids of the St. Law- 
rence, and arriving at Montreal on Tuesday afternoon, June 14th. A 
delegation of the local committee at Montreal met the steamer early on 
that day and returned with the party so as to assure every arrangement 
for their reception at that city. 

The jH-ogramme of the Convention was printed in a handsomely 
bound pocket-size form, with an appropriately illustrated cover. This 
printed programme was as follows : 

AMERICAN SOCIETY OF CIVIL ENGINEERS. 

Thirteenth Annual Convention -Montreal, June 15, 16, 17 and 18, 
1881. 

The headquarters of the Society during the Convention will be at the 
Windsor Hotel. The Secretary's office will be in Parlor No. 4. 

The meetings of the Convention will be held in the William Molsou 
Hall, McGill University. 

Members of the Society and guests of the Convention will please 
report at the Secretary's office, in the hotel, immediately on arrival. 

Special Committees for each day are designated in the programme, 
and will be known by a tri-color badge. 

The Grand Trunk Railway, and the Quebec, Montreal; Ottawa & 
Occidental Railway, have kindly placed special trains at the disposal 
of the Convention for the excursions indicated in the programme. 

Wednesday, June 15th. — Convention will be called to order at 9 30 
A. M. ; Hon. J. L. Beaudry (M. L. C), Mayor of Montreal, will welcome 
the Society on behalf of the citizens of Montreal ; the Board of Trade 
and Corn Exchange will assist in the reception ; Principal Dawson 
(McGill University), C. M. G., will deliver an address. 

Adjournment. — Lunch. In the afternoon, leaving the liotel at 1.45 
o'clock, an excursion in carriages will be made to the Mountain Park, 
and Terrace Bank, the residence of Mrs. Redpath, who has kindly invited 
the Society to a garden party, from 4 to G.30 p. m. At 8 p. m. the regular 
meeting will be held, to which the public are invited. The President of 
the Society, James B. Francis, Esq., will deliver the Annual Address. 

Special Committee.— *C. S. Gzowski, *G. D. Ansley, Henry T. Bovey, 
I F. R. Redpath, *R. J. Brough. 

! Thursday, June 16th.— Excursion to Ottawa. Leave the Mile End 
Station of the Q. M. O. & O. R. R. at 9.20 a. m., arriving at Ottawa at 
'1 P.M.; visit the Chaudiere Falls, AVater Works and Timber Slides; 
opportunity will be given to descend the latter upon cribs ; dinner ; 
visit the Parliament Buildings, Rideau Canal, etc., returning from 
Ottawa at 6.30 p. m., and reaching Montreal at 10 p. m. 

* Are Canadian membars of the Society. 



42 

Special Committee. — W. Shanly, *Samuel Keefer, *P. A. Peterson, 
*Sandf(>rd Fleming, *W. G. Thompson. 

Friday, June 17th. — Session, 9-12. In the afternoon, leave the hotel 
at 1.30 and drive to the Island "Wharf for an excursion upon the river 
in a steamer which has been kindly placed at the disi:)osal of the Con- 
vention by the Harbor Commiss'oners. The boat will return at 2.30 
P.M., when those who were unable to be present for the first trip may 
be taken on board at the lower lock of the Lachine Canal, and then pass 
up the canal to the Wellington Bridge Basin ; visit the Victoria Bridge, 
Grand Trunk Work-shops and the City Water Works ; return to Bona- 
ventiare Station at 6 o'clock. 

Special Committee. — J. Page, *J. Kennedy, *E. P. Hanuaford, H. 
Wallis, L. Lesage, E. H. Parent. 

Society reception at the Windsor at 7.30 p. m. 

Saturday, June 18th. — Session, 9-12. 

List of illustrations : page 2 — Boat approaching Rapids ; page 4 — 
Victoria Bridge ; page 6 — Port of Montreal (Summer) ; page 8— Port of 
Montreal (Winter) ; page 10 — Ice Piaihvay ; page 12 — Lock, Lachine 
Canal ; page 14 — Parliament Buildings, Ottawa ; page 16— Timber Slide, 
Ottawa ; page 18 — Canadian Winter and Summer Scenery. 

The City of Montke.\Xi. 

On the second of October, 1535, Jacq^ues Cartier landed about six 
miles below the current St. Mary, and was conducted with certain cere- 
monies into Hochelaga, now the eastern suburb of the City of Montreal. 
After having ascended the mountain which forms the beautiful back- 
ground to the present city, Cartier gave it the name of " Mont Royal " 
in honor of the King of France, and, on his return to his native country, 
recommended it as a favorable site for a settlement. 

The actual foundation of Montreal may be dated from the 17th of 
May, 1642, when Maisonneuve landed. His followers forthwith fell on 
their knees, and all joiaed their voices in songs of thanksgiving ; an altar 
was erected, mass was celebrated, and the officiating priest, under the 
shadow of Mount Royal, tlius addressed the pioneers of the present 
city: "You are a grain of mustard seed which .shall rise and grow until 
its branches overshadow the land." In the evening, Maisonaeuve and 
his comjDauions pitched their tents, lighted their fires, stationed their 
guards, and lay down to rest. Such was the birth-night of Montreal. 

Exactly one century later, the site selected for the city was conse- 
crated with due solemnities, commended to the " Queen of the Angels," 
and called "Ville-Marie," a name which it retained for a long joeriod. 
In 1760, it was taken by the English. In 1704, the first newspaper in 
Canada was ijublished in Montreal. In 1809, the first steam vessel made 
a trip from Montreal to Quebec; she had berths for 20 jDassengers. In 
1836, the first railway in Canada was ojiened from St. Lambert's, oppo- 



43 

site Montreal, to St. Johns, and in 1847, the Montreal & Lachine Rail- 
way, the first railway on the north side of the St. Lawrence, was put in 
operation. In June, 1853, the Grand Trunk Railway was opened to 
Portland. In 1801, the first water works were erected in Montreal by a 
company. The Avater was sujiplied by gravitation through wooden 
pipes. In 1819, they were rejjlaced by 4-inch iron pipes. In 1832, the 
works passed into the hands of another company, and water was pumped 
from the river in front of the city, into a reservoir on Notre Dame street. 
In 1849, a new reservoir was built 25 feet higher in another part of the city, 
which contained 208 000 cubic feet of water. Referring to this reservoir, 
a city newspaper remarks at the time : " The great altitude of this im- 
mense cistern will enable the committee to supply water to the upper 
stories of almost every house in town." In 1852, the plans for the pres- 
ent mode of su^Dijly by water power were submitted and adopted. The 
works have been enlarged with the growth of the city, and the pumping 
caiaacity is now 24 million imperial gallons per 24 hours— the daily con- 
sumption averages 10 millions, or 74 gallons per head ; there are 133 
miles of mains, 25 752 houses supplied, and 86(3 hydrants. The annual 
revenue from the water suioply is ^366 475. 

The sewerage has a total length of 83| miles. 

The area of Mount Royal Park is 430 acres. 

The population of Montreal is about 150 000, occupying an area of 
3 630 acres within the corporate limits. Length of streets, 105 miles. 
Assessed value of real estate, $66 160 613, of which the property of the 
Government, churches and educational establishments, to the value of 
^13 964 050, is exempt from taxation. The total annual revenue of the 
city from all sources is $1 519 817. The rate of assessment is one per 
cent, on real estate, and for business taxes seven and a half per cent, on 
rental of premises. 

ViCTOEiA Bridge. 

First stone. No. 1 Pier, laid 20th July, 1854. 
First passenger train passed 17th December, 1859. 
Total length of bridge, 9 184 feet lineal. 
No. of spans, 25 ; 24 of 242 feet ; one of 330;feet. 
Height from surface of water to underside of centre tube, 60 feet. 
Height from bed of river to top of centre tube, 108 feet. 
Greatest depth of water, 22 feet. 
General rapidity of current, 7 miles an hour. 
Cubic feet of masonry, 3 000 000. 
Cubic feet of timber in temporary work, 2 250 000. 
Cubic yards of clay used in puddling dams, 146 000. 
Tons of iron in tubes, say 8 250. 
Number of rivets, 2 500 000. 

Acres of painting on tubes, one coat, 30 ; or for the four coats, 120 
acres. 



44 

Force emi^loyed in construction during summer of 1858, the working 
season extending from the middle of May to the middle of November : 

Steamboats, 6 ; horse power, 450 ; barges, 72 12 000 tons. 

Manned by 500 sailors. 

In stone quarries 450 men. 

On works, artisans, etc 2 090 " 

Total 3 010 " 

Horses, 142 ; locomolives, 4. 

Total cost ,$6 300 000 



, Test of Tubes. 

A train of platform cars, 520 feet in length, and drawn by three 
engines, extending over two tubes, was loaded almost to the breaking 
limit of the cars, with large blocks of stones. 

When the train covered the first tube, the deflection in the centre 
amounted to I of an inch, and the adjoining one to which it was coui^led, 
was lifted in the middle § of an inch. The load then being placed over 
both tubes, the deflection was the same in each, or i of an inch in the 
middle, and on being entirely removed, both sides assumed their original 
level. 

The large centre span, entirely disconnected from the other tubes, on 
being covered with the load throughoiit its entire length, deflected in 
the centre 1 J inches, and came back to its previous level on the load being 
removed. 



CANADIAN WATERWAYS. 

The Valley of the St, Lawkence. 

This great basin covers an area of 400 000 square miles, exclusive of 
lakes and rivers, which, including the gulf, have an area of 130 000 
square miles . About 70 000 square miles belong to the United 
States, leaving 330 000 to Canada, 280 000 of which is upon the north 
side of the St. Lawrence, embracing not only some of the finest agricul- 
tural and timbered lands, but also the great northern hill region, or 
Laureutian system, the oldest known rock formation of the globe, rich 
in iron, copper, lead, gold, silver, jjhosphates, j)lumbago, mica, barytes, 
asbestos, etc. 

The great lakes, the largest and purest body of fresh water in the 
world, have an area of 90 000 square miles, with dimensions, depths, 
and elevations above tide, as follows : 



45 





Length. 


Breadth. 


Depth. 


Elevation 
above Sea. 


Area in 
Sq. Miles. 


Superior 


Miles. 
460 
330 
260 

250 
ISO 


Miles. 

170* 
90 

110 
CO 
60 


Feet. 
800 

700 
700 
200 
600 


Feet. 

600 
676 
574 
565 
235 


31 500 


Michisi'an 


22 000 


Huron 


21 000 


Erie 


9 000 


Ontario 


6 400 







The calculated discharge from the upper lakes by the Niagara river 
is over twenty millions of cubic feet per minute, and as this does not 
rejjresent more than half the rain-fall upon the drainage area of their 
basins, it is assumed that the evaporation is equivalent to the volume 
discharged by the outlets to the sea. 

The Lakes of the Pkaieie Region. 

The lake system of the prairie region is low in altitude, covers an 
area of 13 000 square miles, and is as follows : 

Winnipeg area 8 500 square miles above sea 650 feet. 

Manitoba " 1900 " " 670 " 

Winnepegosis " . 1 936 " " 692 " 

Cedar Lake " 312 " " 688 " 

Dauphin Lake " 170 " " 7u0 " 

The RrvEK System. 

The four principal rivers on the eastern, northern and western water- 
sheds of Canada are : 



St. Lawrence, length, 1 500 miles, .drainage area, 330 000 square miles. 
Saskatchewan! ,. j .^„^ ,< _ _ ., .. ^^_^^^^^ 

and JNelson, ) 
Mackenzie, " 1 200 " . . " " 440 000 

Fraser, " 450 " .. " " 30 000 

The Ottawa, a branch of the St. Lawrence, is nearly 600 miles in 
length. 

Canals of Canada. 

The canals of Canada are more remarkable for their breadth than for 
their length. The total length of canal and river improvement embraces 
about 250 miles upon the St. Lawrence, Ottawa, Rideau, and Richelieu 
Rivers, exclusive of the ship channel improvement below Montreal. The 
existing St. Lawrence canals have a bottom width of 80 to 100 feet, 
surface width 120 to 150 feet, with 10 feet depth of water, the locks being 
200 feet long by 45 to 50 feet wide in chamber. The locks of the Wei- 



46 

land Canal are 150 feet in length by 26 feet in width of chamber, depth 
of water, 10 feet. Both these works are now in covirse of enlargement 
upon a uniform scale of locks 270 feet long by 45 feet wide, in the cham 
ber, with a depth for vessels drawing 14 feet. The Welland will be 
Oldened with enlarged locks, but only 12 feet draught of water, nexl 
month. 

From the Atlantic entrance of the Straits of Belle Isle via the River 
St. Lawrence and lakes, to Fond du Lac (head of Lake Superior), the 
distance is 2 384 miles. On this route there are the Lachiue, Beau- 
harnois, Cornwall, Farron's Point, Eapide Plat, Galops and Welland 
Canal, the aggregate length of which is 70i miles, and the total lockage 
536^ feet through 54 locks up to Lake Erie ; also the Sault Ste. Marie 
Canal, 1 ^ miles in length, wdth 18 feet lockage, imiting Lake Huron 
and Lake Superior. 

The progress of imi^rovements on the St. Lawrence is shown as 
follows : For the 

Lachine Canal. 

Boat Canal. — Formed last century via River St. Pierre to Montreal. 
Depth of water, 2 J feet. 

Barge Canal. —Commenced in 1821, and completed in 1825. Cost> 
$438 404. Length, 8i miles; lockage, 44^ feet; bottom width, 28 feet, 
at water surface, 48 feet ; 7 locks, 100 feet long, 20 feet wide, with 4^ 
feet depth of water on sills. 

Ship Cano/.— Commenced in 1843, and completed in 1849. Cost, 
$2 149 128. Length, 8^ miles ; lockage, 44^ feet ; bottom width, 80 feet, 
at water surface, 120 feet ; 5 locks, 200 feet long, 45 feet wide, with » 
feet of water on sills. 

Enlarged Ship Canal. 

Commenced in 1875. Probable cost, .!?6 500000. Length, 8i miles ; 
lockage, 45 feet. Summit level, Lachine to Cote St. Paul, 5 J miles long, 
mean Avidth, 150 feet. Reaches, downward to Montreal, 3 miles ; mean 
width, 200 feet ; intended deptb, 15 feet ; 5 locks, each 270 feet long, 45 
feet wide in the chamber — three of which have 14. feet depth of water on 
the sills, and two at the lower entrance, together with adjoining basins 
between Grand Trunk Railway at Point St. Charles and Harbor of 
Montreal, are adapted to vessels of 18 feet draught. 

Five swing bridges on piers of cut stone, having an opening 46 feet 
wide on each side of centre for jjassage of vessels, and a waterway, 32 
feet wide, on both sides of canal. 

Lock walls throughout, also the basin and dock walls for one mile 
above lower terminus, are of cut stone laid in hydraulic cement mortar. 
Thence upwards for half-a-mile the dock walls are of random coursed 
masonry laid in cement mortar. Between the third and fourth locks, a 
distance of 1^ miles, the side walls are of random coursed stone laid at 



47 

right angles to a face inclination of two-thirds to one ; summit level, for 
Ai miles, faced on both sides with masonry. 

Entrance to Lake St. Louis formed of crib-work, on which is to be 
built a superstructure of masonry . 

Dimensions of enlarged canals on St. Lawrence to be uniform from 
Montreal to Lake Erie. 

Total cost of Canadian canals, when completed, will be about 
855 000 000, of which about §33 000 000 is the cost of enlargement of 
St. Lawrence, Welland, and Ottawa Canals, !?22 000 000 having been 
expended on canals previous to Confederation in 1867. 

Dkedging Ship Channel below Montreal. 

After an abortive attemjDt by the Government to cut a new channel 
through the flats of Lake St. Peter, between the years 1844-1847, the 
work was undertaken in 1851 by the Harbor Commissioners of Montreal, 
Hon. John Young, Chairman, in the natural channel . In 1866, the depth 
of 20 feet was obtained where before was only 11 feet at low water. In 
187.5, dredging was resumed for di'aught of 25 feet depth at low watei% 
which result will be attained next year. The present depth is for 22 
feet draught of water. 

The points of dredging extend over about one hundred miles of river, 
commencing 50 miles above Quebec, and form, in their aggregate length, 
over 30 miles of deepened channel, of which more than one-half is at 
one point — in Lake St. Peter. The dredging embraces all varieties from 
the silt of Lake St. Peter, through boulders and hard-pan up to shale rock 
at Cap La Roche. About 6^ millions cubic yards have been dredged since 
1874 out of the estimated 8 000 000 yards to be removed for the 25 feet 
channel. Last year 806 000 yards were removed from Lake St. Peter at 
a cost of §31 600, or an average of S-iW cents per cubic yard — covering 
all charges except interest and depreciation. The minimum breadth of 
channel is 300 feet, in which there is now at low water a greater depth 
below the original bottom than above the same level; in other Avords, 
when completed, Hths of the depth of channel through Lake St. 
Peter will be artificial. 

The effect of this work on the Port of Montreal is shown by the 
following figures : 



Yeaks. 


Sea- going 
Vessels 
in Port. 


™„, , Value of 
lotal : Merchandise 
Tonnage, i Exported. 


Value of 

Merchandise 

Imported. 


Customs 

Duties 

Collected. 


1850 


211 

710 


1 
46 156 4$1 744772 00 
628 271 8U 224 904 ('0 


17 714 780 00 
37 103 869 00 


|;l 00!) 256 80 


1880 


5 232 783 00 







48 



The number of vessels in 1880 included 354 steamship?, their aggre- 
tonnage being ten times greater than that of all the vessels in 1850. 





1850. 


1880. 




Receipts. 


Shipments. 


Keceipts. 


Shipments. 


AVheat, bushels 


845 277 
51 965 


71 359 


9 637 124 

7 772 549 

2 617 656 

1 191 531 

3&7 176 

443 528 

735 596 


9 084 266 


Indian Corn, bushels 


7 622 161 


Peas, " 


21 256 . 98 006 

3 677 • 1061 

512 ; 350 


3 081 674 


Oats, " 


1 853 829 


Barley, ■' 

Rye, " 


293 023 
452 847 


Fluur, barrels 


483 603 182 988 


739 007 



There are no figures at hand to show the shipments (if any) of butter 
and cheese from Montreal in 1850. Some idea may be formed of the 
increase in the trade in these articles by comiDaring the following figures 
relaliug to the years 1870 and 1880 : 



SJdpmenis in 1870. 

Butter..7 7G3 976 lbs..va]ue$l 507 591 
Cheese. 5 633 883 ". . " 801170 



Butter. 
Cheese. 



Shipments in 1880. 



,13 983 840 lbs. 

.34 770 180 " . 



.value 12 882 360 
. " 3 995 220 



Canadian Eailwai's. 

There are over 7 000 miles of track laid, and another thousand under 
construction, besides over 2 000 miles of the Canadian Pacific Kailway, 
under contract, on which construction has not yet been commenced. 

The total Canadian mileage is only exceeded by that of the United 
States, Germany, Great Britain, Russia and France. In mileage, in jsro- 
portion to population, Canada equals the United States, which in this 
respect surpasses every Euroi^ean country. 

Of the $100 000 000 of Canadian capital invested in railways, over 
$99 000000 are Government and municipal contributions, in the propor- 
tions of $74000 000 by the Dominion Government, $27000 000 by the 
Provincial Governments, and $8 000 000 by municiiJalities. Over 
8100000 000 of share capital is held in England, and preference shares 
and bonds, in nearly equal proj^ortions — chiefly held in England — 
supply the remainder, about $150 000 000, of the total cost. • 

Canadian Pacific Railway. 

Length from Lake Nipissiug to Burrard Inlet on Pacific coast, about 
2 600 miles. From the Lake Nipissing terminus to Montreal, the dis- 



49 

tance is 340 miles. The section between Lake Superior and Eed Kiver, 
406 miles, will be completed next year. 127 miles at Pacific coast, 
through the canons of the Fraser, has been let for ^9 000 000, and is to 
be completed in 1885. The whole line is to be completed in 1891. It 
will open a country which coatains, between the Eed Eiver and the 
Eocky Mountains, over 250 000000 acres of arable and grazing lands- 
more than half of which is arable. 

The proportion of those undeveloped territories to that of the settled 
Provinces, is shown in the following : 

Area or the Dominion of Canada. 



Provinces. 



i Squaek Miles. 



Ontario 

Quebec 

New Brunswick '.!...!... 

Nova Scotia ..*.'.".*.".' 

Pi'ince Edward Island ."..." 

Manitoba 

British Columbia, including Vancouver and otliei- Islands 

North-WestK Teiritory 

Keewatin District .^] ..........[.[ . 

Islands in tiie Arctic Ocean ..............[.. 

Islands in tlie Hudson's Bay 



103 460 

193 355 

27 322 

21731 

2 133 

153 250 

390 344 

1 891 400 

309 077 

311 700 

23 400 



3 427172 



Statement reconstructed (to date) of areas of the several Territories, 
Provinces and Districts comprised in the Dominion of Canada. 

J. S. Dennis, 

^ ^ „ D. 31. Int. 

Ottawa, June 7, 1881. 

Cei'tified, A. E. 



On Thursday, June 16th, when the special train approached Ottawa, 
a Eeceptiou Committee welcomed the Society, and distributed a special 
programme for the day, which was also handsomely printed, bound in 
pocket form, and which read as follows : 

Pkogkamme for the Eeception of the American Society of CmL 
Engineers at Ottawa, June 16, 1881. 

PEOGEAMME. 

The visitors will arrive at the station of the Q. M. O. & O. E. E. at 1 
o'clock p. M. Conveyances will take them via Queen and Bridge streets 
to near the Saw Mills at the Chaudiere, Falls. After inspecting the 



50 

Falls, Mills, etc., the party will drive across the Suspension Bridge, as 
far as the Sash Factory of Mr. E. B. Eddy, in Hull. Any of the party 
desirous of running the slides will be taken to near Mr. Rochester's 
Saw Mill Queen street, where the cribs will be in readiness, and any of 
the visitors not desirous of descending the slides will be driven down 
Middle street, to near Messrs. Bronsons' Mills, where they can see the 
party descend the Slides. The entire party will thereafter assemble on 
Middle street, near Bronsons' Mills, and be driven to the Grand Union 
Hotel, where luncheon will be served at three o'clock, sharp. At four 
o'clock the party will visit the Parliament Buildings, Library and 
Grounds, and any desirous of visiting the residence of H. E. the 
Governor General, will be driven to Eideau Hall, on making application 
to the Secretary. The party will assemble at the Grand Union Hotel at 
5:30, sharp, when they will be driven to inspect the Water Works, near 
Pooley's Bridge, and from thence to the Railway Station. 

The following gentlemen, subscribers, have been constituted the 
Reception Committee, and will be glad to give all the assistance and 
information required to further the enjoyment of those now visiting the 
Capital of the Dominion: Allan Gilmour, Esq., Ottawa; Bronsons & 
Weston, lumber manufacturers ; Perley & Pattee, lumber manufactur- 
ers • J.'li- Booth, Esq., lumber merchant ; John Rochester, Esq ,M. P., 
lumber merchant; Levi Youug, Esq., lumber merchant; E. B. Eddy, 
Esq lumber merchant; Gilmour & Co., lumber merchants; David 
Moore Esq., lumber merchant; Thos. McKay & Co., floiir merchants; 
Samuel Keefer, Esq., C. E. ; T. Trudeau, Esq., C. E., Deputy Minister 
Riihvays and Canals ; John Page, Esq., C. E., Chief Engineer Canals; 
G F. BaiUarge, Esq., C. E., Dep. Minister Public Works ; F. N. Gise 
borne Esq., Supt. of Telegraph and Signal Service ; Col. Brunei, C. E., 
Commissioner of Inland Revenue; C. Blackwell, Esq., C. E., Dept. 
R-dlways and Canals ; Sandford Fleming, Esq., C. E., C. M. G. ; Thos. 
c' Keefer, Esq., C. E., C. M. G. ; Walter Shanly, Esq., C. E. ; Frank 
Shanly Esq-> C. E. ; Thos. S. Scott, Esq., Chief Architect Public Works 
Dept H. f! Perley, Esq., Chief Engineer Public Works Dept. ; Col- 
lingwo'od Schreiber, Esq., Chief Engineer Canadian Pacific; W. P. 
\nderson, Esq., Dept. Marine and Fisheries ; Col. Dennis, Dep. Minister 
of Interior; W. B. Smellie, Esq., C. E., Canadian Pacific Railway; F. 
A Wise, Esq., C. E., Supt. Rideau Canal; C. H. Mackintosh, Esq., 
Mayor o'f Ottawa ; Lindsay Russell, Esq., Surveyor General ; Leonard 
G Bell, Esq., C. E., ; J. G. Macklin, Esq., C. E. ; William Kingsford, 
Esq c' E • R. C. Douglass, Esq., C. E., Dept. Railways and Canals; 
j' Tomhnson, Esq., C. E., Dept. Railways and Canals ; T. Ridout, Esq., 
C E Dept Railwavs and Canals; G. P. Brophy, Esq., C. E., Ottawa 
River Works; Robert Surtees, Esq., City Engineer, Ottawa; James 
Goodwin, Esq., Ottawa ; William Davis, Esq., Ottawa ; Francis Clemow, 
Esq., Ottawa. 



5L 

The following geutleraen, members of the Executive Committee, will 
attend persouiilly to the requirements of the visitors : W. B. Smellie, C. 
E., Chairman of Committee ; C. H. Mackintosh, Esq., Mayor of Ottawa; 
George P. Brophy, C. E. ; F. A. Wise, C. E. ; H. F. Perley, C. E. ; -J. 
G. Macklin, C. E. ; and Kobert Surtees, City Engineer, Secretary. 

The following is a brief sketch of the princi^Dal points of attraction in 
the vicinity of the 

City of Ottawa. 

In 1S54, the population of Bytown — now Ottawa — was 10 000, and 
from that time its jarogress has been uninterrupted. The great fire of 
1870 was the means of maturing a scheme which has resulted in the 
present water works system. 

Her Most Gracioias Majesty Queen Victoria decided upon the present 
location for the Parliament Buildings, and they were commenced in 
December, 1859. 

Among the improvements eiTected since Confederation at the expen.se 
of the city alone may be mentioned : 

Five new Market Buildings, costing $90 000 

Dufferin Bridge and improvement to Sappers' Bridge 90 000 

Pooley's Bridge at the Chaudiere 18 000 

Bridges across Rideau River and Canal 9 000 

New Iron Bridge across Slide Channel 45 000 

Main drainage 295 000 

New City Hall 90 000 

Registry Office 12 000 

Water Works 1 014 000 

Collegiate Institute GO 000 

Central School Buildings 42 000 

Fire Stations 5 000 

Making an aggregate expenditure of $1 770 000 

in less than twelve years for city public improvements alone. 
The popuhition at present is over 26 000. 

RiDEAXJ Caxal. 

This canal was commenced by Colonel By, R. E., in 1826, and con- 
sisted in utilizing two rapid and obstructetl streams— the Rideau from 
Ottawa and the Cataraqui from Kingston into one continuous navigable 
channel. This object was accomplished by the construction of 47 locks, 
24 dams, and 24 waste and regulating weirs. Of these locks 33 ascend 
from Ottawa and 14 descend towards Kingston, embracing a total lock- 
age of 446J feet, of which proceeding southward there is a rise of 282|- 
feet and 164 feet fall. The locks are constructed of cut stone masonry, 
their dimensions over all being 134 feet, or 110 feet clear by 33 feet in 



52 

breadth, with a navigable depth throughout of 5h feet. The length of 
the canal from Ottawa to Kingston on Lake Ontaria, is 126i miles. The 
works were constructed by the Imperial Government, and originally cost 
about §J: 000 000. This canal is now under the control of the Dominion 
Government, and Mr. F. A. Wise, Superintending Engineer. 

The Paeliament BurLDiNGS. 

These buildings are generally known as the Eastern, Western and 
Central Blocks. The latter contains the Legislative Chambers and Par- 
liamentary offices and Library— the two former the various departments 
of the Government. The three blocks form as many sides of a square, 
which is open to Wellington street on the south. The grounds, which 
were naturally very rough, have been laid out in walks and drives. A 
noteworthy adjunct to the grounds and surroundings is the "Lovers' 
Walk," a delightful winding path, which threads the edge of the pre- 
cipice surrounding the grounds on the river side at an approximate dis- 
tance of half way between its summit and the Ottawa river. The 
general style of architecture of the buildings is a modified twelfth cen- 
tury Gothic. The principal material used in the construction is a hard 
cream colored sandstone from the adjoining Township of Nepean. 
The dressings, stairs, gablets, pinnacles, &c., are of Ohio freestone, 
whilst a pletising variety is given to the whole by the relieving arches of 
red Potsdam sandstone over the window and door openings. The roofs 
are covered with slate of a dark color, with bands of a brighter hue, 
obtained from the State of Vermont. The marble was obtained from 
Arnprior, and other localities in the Ottawa Valley, and all the timber 
used in the construction, except the oak, came from the Valley of the 
Ottawa. 

The basement floors of the central building are 160 feet above the 
low water level of the Ottawa river, the Eastern and Western Blocks 
being respectively 135i and 142^ feet above same level. The central 
building has a frontage of 472 lin. feet, 3 stories in height. The central 
tower has an altitude of 220 feet, and a superficial area of 30 feet 
square. 

The superficial area covered by the buildings is as follows : Central 
building, 82 886 sup. feet ; Eastern Blocks il 840 sup. feet ; Western 
Block, 50 176 sup. feet ; or a total area of near 175 000 sup. feet, or 
4 acres. 

The Library is connected with the central building. The ground 
plan is of circular shape in the centre, inscribed by a polygon lean to of 
sixteen sides ; at each of the sixteen angles are buttresses carried up 
solid to a point above the top of the lean to, serving as bases for the 
flying buttresses, which receive the thrust of the main vault. The gen- 
eral exterior view presents the form of a cone ; the roof is groined, with 
ribs of stone filled in with solid masonry, and supported by marble 



53 

columns, resting on corbels of the same material. The groin is 42 feet 
in height, and the springing line 40 feet over the floor. In the centre of 
the vaulted sj^ace is an opening of 30 feet in diameter ; the main ribs 
being so arranged as to touch its circumference, and continue in a vertical 
plane between the springers ; above this opening is a groined lantern 42 
feet high, the top of which is 124 feet above'the floor level. 

The total exiaenditure on these buildings and grounds is over live 
million dollars. 

Rtdeau Hall. 

The official residence of His Excellency the Governor General is 
situated in the Village of New Edinburgh, a suburb of Ottawa. It was 
built as a private residence by the late Hon. Thomas McKay, a man 
early identified with the chief interests of Bytown. About 87 acres of 
.land are attached, and the amount expended for this property by the 
Dominion Government is over .S:^00 000. The finest cricket ground in 
the Dominion is located on this domain. 

s 

Suspension Bridge (Chaudiere), 

On the Union of the Provinces in 1841 steps were taken to renew 
the inter-provincial communication, and in 1842 the present structure 
was commenced, the engineer being Mr. Samuel Keefer. The construc- 
tion occupied over two years. The bridge is 2.56 feet span ; width of 
roadway 23 feet 6 inches. 

The City Public Buildings 

Include the City Hall, which is of the modern style of architecture, 
with a leaning to the French style, and constructed of massive dressed 
limestone blocks, with cut stone trimmings. It is centrally and con- 
veniently situated on Elgin street ; at its northwest corner is a tower 
rising 175 feet above the pavement, used for the fire alarm offices ; the 
internal arrangements are most commodious and complete. It con- 
tains the offices of the several officials and a public council hall, com- 
mittee rooms, etc., with all desirable modern appliances. The total 
cost was over §90 000. 

The markets include the old and new By Ward Market, the Welling- 
ton Ward Market, and two subsidiary markets on Auglesea and Cathcart 
squares. 

The City Eegistry Office, on Nicholas street, a substantial stone 
building on the general Government plan, cost S12 000. 

The County Buildings comprise the Court House, Jail and Registry 
Office buildings. They are surrounded by a massive cut stone wall, 
surmounted by handsome wrought-iron cresting. They are of a very 
substantial character. 



54 

The Public School Buildings are of substantial character, and cost as 

follows : 

Land. Building. 

Victoria Ward (Primary) $5 050 $10 000 

Wellington Ward (CentVal) 6 780 24 000 

" (Primary) 5 460 4 500 

St. George's Ward (Primary) 2 400 10 000 

By Ward (Central) 2 100 10 000 

(Primary) 600 3 500 

Ottawa Ward (Primary) 600 2 000^ 

Or a total of nearly .^90 000 expenditure on public school buildings 
Avithin ten years. 

Churches.— There are 24 Churches in Ottawa, as follows : 1 Baptist, 
1 Congregational, 1 German Lutheran, 5 Episcopal, 5 Methodist, 5 Pres- 
byterian, and 6 Eoman Catholic. Most of these are very fine edifices, 
while some of them are exceptionally so, particularly the Cathedral, St. 
Patrick's, St. Andrew's, Christ's Church, Knox Church, the Baptist, 
and Dominion and Episcopal Methodist. Christ Church cost $id OCO ; 
Dominion Methodist, S!50 000 ; St. Andrew's, $60 000 ; Knox's Chuich, 
§52 000 ; St. Patrick's, §40 000 ; Baptist, $30 000. 

Sewerage. 

The principal outfall sewer commences at the west end of the city. 
It is of egg shape pattern, 3 ft. 9 in. by 3 ft. ; brick ; runs easterly 
through earth and rock alternately for 1 119 yards, at which point it 
increases in size to 4 ft. 3 in. by 3 ft. 4 in. in a distance of 582 lin. yards, 
passing under the Kideau Canal to Kideau street, at which point it is 
again enlarged to 6 ft. 6 in. by 4 ft. 4 in. in brick and stone, passing 
through earth and rock excavation a distance of 2 411 yards, where it 
discharges into the Ottawa Kiver near the Eideau Falls. The average 
depth is about 20 feet, the grades varying from 15 to 1-5 per 100, except 
at the discharge, where the grade is 30 in 100. The Chaudiere outfall 
sewer is egg shape pattern, 4 ft. by 2 ft. 8 in., 870 yards in length 
through solid rock ; average depth, 16 feet. The main sewers com- 
menced in 1874 and completed in 1877, at a cost of $395 000. 

Streets. 

On the east side of Canal the total length of streets is 31 miles, of 
which 81 miles are either paved or macadamized. On the west side of 
the Canal there are 30 miles of streets, of which 24 miles are improved, 
and 7^ miles paved or macadamized. 

Water Works. 

The supply is a water jjower-pumping one, under the "direct" 
system, without stand-pipe or reservoir. It difi'ers from the Holly 



system of tlie United States in that tlie same machinery is employed for 
fire as well as for ordinary purposes ; the greater delivery required for 
fires being eflected by an increase of speed, or of the number of pum^js, 
or of both, without the necessity of exceeding the ordinary working 
si^eed of reciprocal pumps. Tlie works will be best described from the 
source of supply to the i^oints of delivery under the following heads of — 

Isr. The Source of Supply. 

The water is obtained from the Ottawa Elver, above the Chaudiere 
Falls, at a point where there is a strong current flowing over a rocky 
bed. The river for more than one hundred miles above the city is a 
succession of large deep lakes, forming magnificent natural reservoirs, 
from which the water is decanted over rocky chutes until it reaches the 
city in the condition of lake water aerated by the rapids above. The 
difference between Ottawa and St. Lawrence water as to purity, apart 
from color, may be inferred from the fact that a single drop of coloring- 
matter Avill tinge a quantity of water in which a teaspoonful of salt 
may be dissolved without detection by the eye. 

2d. The Water Power. • 

The Falls of the Chaudiere range from 25 feet at high to 35 feet at 
low water, the difference being due to the fact of a rise of two feet 
below to one foot above the Falls during freshets. The wide expanse of 
Deschenes Lake, into which no tributaries of importance are discharged, 
prevents a rapid rise above Ottawa, while below, the comparatively 
narrow and shallow reach between Ottawa and Greenville, receives some 
half tlozen imi^ortant tributaries, sending up the flood level of this 
jjortion of the river fully 20 feet above low water mark. 

3d. The Aqueduct. 

A canal 2 500 feet in length has been cut through the solid rock , 
20 feet wide, with perpendicular sides, to a depth of about 13 feet below 
low water of the head level. The entrance is formed by two lines of 
crib work, each 20 feet wide and about 200 feet long, placed 60 feet 
apart, boomed across at the head, and. provided with stop logs, and 
divided by a central pier containing a well, fitted with screens, from 
which the pture water supply-pipe for the pump is fed. 

4th. Pure Water Pipe. 

A trench about three feet in width and one foot in depth is excavated 
in the bottom of the aqueduct, in the bottom of which trench, at inter- 
vals of twelve feet, iron bolts are imbedded in the rock, for the purpose 
of anchoring the clean water from the river, because the aqueduct at 
l^resent receives such local drainage as may penetrate through the rock 
in banks above it. 



56 

The clean water pipe is 30 inclies diameter inside, and is formed of 
pine staves 2 inches thick, hooped every 4 feet with 3 in. by | in. iron, 
(excejit for the anchorage, where the iron for the hoops is 3 inches by | 
inches thick), open at the bottom, and secured with f inch bolts through 
the eyes of the anchors. The anchor bolts are 1 inch diameter, with 
strong head, containing the eye, sharpened at the points, let 18 inches 
into the rock, and secured by first dropping a soft pine tree nail, about 
i of an inch less in diameter than the drill hole, into the latter, and then 
driving the eye-bolt through the wood to its position. Each bolt was 
subjected to a lifting strain of 2^ tons after being driven, but none could 
be removed. The strain was increased in one case to test the resistance, 
but the bolt broke without drawing. The lower end of this pipe leaves 
the bottom of the aqueduct about 70 feet above the forebays, laasses 
under the retaining walls, and goes to the pipe vault in rear of the 
jjumps, this section, about 100 feet in length, is cast-iron, and the por- 
tion within the whesl-house is provided with valves between each set of 
pumps, and is connected (below the pumps) with a 21 inch pipe leading 
from the aqueduct in front of the wheel-house. The pumps_ must have 
water, and if from any cause the supply from the clean water pipe 
should be interrupted, aqueduct water can be drawn upon. 

5th. Pumping Machineky. 

This consists of three distinct sets, each cajjable of delivering over 
3 000 000 gallons in 24 hours, under a pressure of 150 lbs. at the pumps. 
Each set is capable of affording a sujjply for domestic purposes to 
double the population now receiving it. This large provision of pump- 
ing jDower is necessary in the absence of a high level storage and dis- 
tributing reservoir, as well as for the requirements of a large fire, to 
which Ottawa, by reason of its extensive lumber yards and many wooden 
buildings, is peculiarly exposed. The demands of a great fire being 
measiired by the delivery of a given quantity in a given time under the 
recpiired jiressure, can be more readily and safely met br large pumps 
moving slowly than by smaller ones at a higher veloci'y, as in the 
"Holly" system. Two sets are sufficient for any emergency; and 
with three sets, two can always be ready for the fire alarm while the 
remaining one is being overhauled. The wheel-house is the reservoir 
of the Ottawa Water Works, and it is therefore of the first importance 
that it should be capable of meeting any and every demand upon it ; 
with water power this can be done in the most perfect manner, for, 
unlike steam, here all the required power is held in reserve without 
extra cost. The wheels are Leffell's double turbine, 61 inches in 
diameter, seated at the level of the bottom of the aqueduct, having their 
discharges about 12 feet below low water level of forebays, and more than 
20 feet below water level of the Ottawa river below the ChauJiere Falls. 



57 

The "steps" are, therefore, always accessible during the highest known 
floods. To utilize the whole fall at all times, wrought-iron draft tubes, 
5 J feet diameter, air tight, extend from the bottom of the wheels to a 
depth of 14 feet, giving a total available head and fall at low' water of 
25 feet, with a clearance of 5 feet depth in tail race below the bottom of 
the draft tubes. The wheels are worked by water pressure from the 
mains, acting on a piston connected by each, and jjinion with the gate 
spindle controlled by a small globe or " thumb" valve. Pumps — The 
pumi3s are in sets of three, driven by one water wheel, and are cast- 
iron chests, having a suction chamber below and a delivery one above 
the pump barrels. The valves connecting each chamber consist of two 
rows, four in each, of rubber discs 9 inches in diameter, and 1§ inches 
thick, working on a centre spindle, with brass seats and springs. The 
plungers are 19 inches diameter, with a stroke of 3 feet 6 inches, cast 
hollow, to "float " as much as possible, and thus reduce the weight on 
their horizontal bearings. The pump chests are connected with the 
pedestals of the crank- shaft by strong distance girders, bearing against 
horizontal thrust upon the foundations. Each set of machinery, making 
17 revolutions of crank-shaft per minute, will pump, allowing for loss, 
a little over 3 000 000 imperial gallons per 24 hours, so that the diurnal 
capacity of each pump at safe limits of speed may be called 1 000 000 of 
imijerial gallons. Each set is sufficient for the domestic wants of 
50 000 people, so that without further outlay here or increased cost of 
working expenses, a population of 100 000 can be served with one com- 
plete set in reserve. The whole machinery occupies a floor space of about 
48 feet square, covered by a fire-proof ceiling of iron girders, supporting 
" Dennet " arches of brick overlaid with sand. 

A fire-alarm gong is placed in the machinery room. When an alarm 
is struck, the pressure, which is ordinarily about 85 lbs. at the pumps, 
is at once raised to 110 lbs. 

Height of Fountain Jet at Pump House, from triguometrical meas- 
iirement : 

2 J nozzle, 90 lbs. pressure 192 iin. feet. 

"' 100 " " 209 

120 " " 242 

The cost of the whole system was as follows : 
Water power, including wheel-house and foundations, 

aqueduct, and all structures connected therewith . . .'$215 000 

Pumping machinery, 3 sets ' 90 000 

Distribution, 43 miles, including culverts 490 000 

Fire-alarm 7 000 

Engineering 40 000 

Financial, land and general charges 172 000 

$1 014 000 



58 

The works were constructed under a Board of "Water Commissioners, 
with Mr. Thomas C. Keefer, Chief Engineer, but they have for the past 
two years been under the management of the Corporation of the City of 
Ottawa and their officers. 

River Ottawa. 

The remotest sources of the Ottawa lie to the southeast of Hud- 
son's Bay, near the 4:9th parallel of N. latitude. The upper portion 
descends from the northeast towards the southwest towards Lake 
Temiscamingue, a distance of about 300 miles ; then suddenly turning 
towards the southeast, and following this general direction for about 400 
miles, it discharges into the St. Lawrence at the head and foot of the 
island of Montreal. 

Its total length is about 700 miles from its principal outlet to the 

village of Ste. Anne, or head of the island, and it drains an area of 

about 57 800 sqiiare miles. Its most important tributaries are the 

Riviere du Nord, Riviere Rouge, North Petite Nation, South Petite 

Nation, Riviere du Lievre, Gatineau, Rideau, Madawaska, Bonnechere, 

Coulonge, Black River, Petewawa, Riviere du Moine, Mattawan and the 

Montreal river, and of these the largest is the Gatineau, which falls into 

the Ottawa from the north about Ih miles below this city, after a course 

of about 400 miles, and having drained about 9 000 square miles of 

territory. 

The Ottawa Valley 

was for a considerable distance explored by the early French voyageurs, 

and passed through by the Hudson Bay and Northwest fur traders at a 

very early date, but little or nothing was done to promote its settlement 

or open it up to the ways of civilization until the latter end of the 18th, 

or the present century, when a colony was planted at Hull, on the 

opposite side of the river, about the year 1800 ; and these early settlers 

may be said to have been the pioneer farmers, lumberers, manufacturers, 

and merchants of this thriving district surrounding the capital of the 

Dominion. 

The Lumber Trade. 

The principal manufacturing industry in connection with the Ottawa 
Valley belongs to the production of .square timber and sawed lumber, 
principally in white pine. 

As many as IGO rafts of square timber have, in prosperous times, 
been taken annually from the Upper Ottawa limits or timber berths, 
and upwards of a million and a half of sawlogs. A raft of square 
timber may be said to contain on an average 80 subdivisions or cribs, 
equal to about 100 000 cubic feet in the aggregate. A crib of timber is 
about 25 feet in width by the length of the sticks, ranging from 35 to 
80 feet, and the total output ranges from 12 000 000 to 16 000 000 cubic 
feet annuallv for this district. To facilitate the descent of timber on 



59 

the Ottawa, the Government first constructed slides at the various falls 
on the river abont forty years ago, and the cribs are j'assed through 
thenr to escaiJe the chutes. The principal slides on the Ottawa are at 
this city, at the Chats, 3(1 miles above this place, and at the Calumet 
Station, 65 miles from. Ottawa. 

The fall at the Chaudiere (this city) is upwards of 30 feet, which is 
overcome by the slides in less than half a mile. 

On the main tributaries the timber and sawlogs are passed through 
what are known as single stick slides to escape the chutes. These slides 
are about 5 ft. to 6 ft. wide by 3 ft. or 4 ft. deep, and in some instances 
are upwards of half a mile in length. At some of these structures, such 
as the Coulonge and Black Eiver, the pieces of timber and logs are shot 
through with great velocity. Timber is guided through the safe chan- 
nels, and kept under the control of the raftsmen in dangerous raj^ids by 
systems of piers and booms. 

Square timber is exported from Quebec chieHy to the British and 
other European markets. 

At the City of Ottawa, City of Hull and immediate vicinity, about 
1 000 000 of sawlogs are cut up annually, producing about 200 000 000 
feet B. M. of sawed lumber, the great bulk of which finds its way to the 
United States markets, the remainder being sent to Europe in the shape 
of deals, or absorbed by builders and others for home use. Sawed 
lumber on its way to market from this neighborhood takes the water 
route principally, although of late years the quantities transported over 
the various systems of railway tajoping the Ottawa Valley have been very 
considerable, and likely to be largely increased with additional improved 
outlets. 

About 29 years ago the Canadian Government leased the first install- 
ment of the Chaudiere water ijrivilege, and since then sold all the 
hydraulic lots, about 25 in number. With each lot power equivalent to 
the driving of 10 runs of stones is guaranteed, so that about 8 000 horse 
power may be said, through the agency of the Chaudiere Falls, to be 
developed within the city limits. The lumber manufacturing establish- 
ments at this point are stocked with the most improved modern 
machinery, and, taken in connection with mills of a similar nature, and 
the very extensive match and pail factories at the City of Hull, on the 
opposite side of the river, form a source of attraction to scientific 
men and practical mechanics from various quarters of the globe. The 
various works for facilitating the moving of lumber on the Ottawa and 
its tributaries are under the control of the Minister of Public Works for 
the Dominion of Canada. 

Minerals. 

The Ottawa A^alley is also rich in mineral productions. Within a 
short distance of this city there are immense beds of iron ore and 



60 

deposits of apatite or phosphate and plumbago in abundance. These, so 
far as they have been worked, have proved to be most excellent in 
quality, and only await the action of capitalists for development on a 
large scale, the more especially as the system of railways already con- 
structed, and those now in progress and projected, cannot fail to give to 
the City of Ottawa and its environs a commanding jaosition as a distri- 
buting centre. 



On Saturday, jjrevious to the session of the Convention, an exhibit 
was made of the high water service of the City of Montreal and of the 
Avorking of its fire brigade. On the same day, after the adjournment of 
the Convention, the La Crosse grounds were visited and a game between 
the two prominent clubs Avas witnessed. 

On Saturday evening a large number of the party proceeded, via the 
Grand Trunk Eailway, to Quebec, staying at that city until Monday 
evening. 

Another party on Monday went by steamer to Quebec by invitation 
of the Harbor Commission of Montreal through John Kennedy, Esq., 
member A. S. C. E., the Chief Engineer of the Commission. During 
this trip down the St. Lawrence the interesting work of deepening the 
channel by dredging was witnessed at a number of points. 

In conclusion, it should be stated that the reception given to the 
Society in Canada was extremely cordial, and that remarkably complete 
arrangements had been made for the meetings at McGill University, for 
travel on the railways (largely provided by the courtesy of the Grand 
Trunk Railway, the Quebec, Montreal, Ottawa & Occidental Railway, 
and the Pullman Palace Car Company), for comfort at the hotels and for 
visits by carriage and steamer to various points. The Committees at Mon- 
treal and at Ottawa perfected and successfully carried out these arrange- 
ments, and the fact that the Canadian members of the Society were 
greatly aided in their work by a number of gentlemen who were not 
members renders this acknowledgement peculiarly appropriate. 



The following members were in attendance at the Convention : 
—James H. Armington, Brooklyn, N. Y. ; George D. Ansley, Montreal, 
Canada ; E. W. Bowditch, Fred'k Brooks, Boston ; William S. Barbour, 
Cambridgeport, Mass.; Henry A. Bently, Newport, R. L; John W. 
Bacon, Danbury, Conn. ; John Bogart, Alfred P. Boiler, D. Bontecou, 
Henry R. Bradbury, New York ; L. L. Buck, Brooklyn, N. Y. ; A. 
Bonzano, Phcenixville, Pa.; R. J. Brough, Toronto, Canada; Wilson 
Crosby, Bangor, Me. ; E. L. Corthell, North Egremont, Mass. ; Francis 
Colling wood, J. James R Croes, New York; C. Constable, Constable- 
ville, N. Y. ; C. L. Crandall, Ithaca, N. Y. ; Martin Coryell, Lambert- 
ville, N. J.; Amory Coffin, PhcenixviUe, Pa.; E.S. Chesbrough, Chicago; 



61 

E. C. Davis, Northampton, Mass.; A. J. Du Bois, New Haven, Conn.; 
Joseph P. Davis, New York ; E. A. Doane, Oswego, N. Y. ; Alex. 
Dempster, Pittsburgh ; S. Clarence Ellis, Boston ; Charles D. Elliot, 
Somerville, Mass. ; Theo. G. Ellis, Hartford, Conn. ; Thomas Egleston, 
New York ; George D. Emerson, Bolla, Mo.; Kobert Fletcher, Hanover, 
N. H. ; James B. Francis, Lowell, Mass. ; Charles A. Ferry, Charles E. 
Fowler, New Haven, Conn. ; Charles H. Fisher, Albany, N. Y. ; Sanford 
Fleming, Ottawa, Canada ; Bryant Godwin, Now York ; C. S. Gzowski, 
Toronto, Canada; Albert B. Hill, New Haven, Conn.; Stephen S. 
Haight, Bentley D. Hasell, Sullivan Haslett, New York ; Wm. P. 
Harris, Newark, N. J. ; E. P. Hannaford, Montreal, Canada ; R. Hering, 
Philadelphia; J. E. Hilgard, Washington, D. C. ; George A. Kimball, 
Somerville, Mass ; Louis H. Kuapp, Buffalo ; John Kennedy, Montreal, 
Thomas C. Keefer, Ottawa ; Samuel Keefer, Brockville, Canada ; E. D. 
Leavitt, Jr., Cambridgeport, Mass.; Charles Latimer, Cleveland; Thomas, 
D. Lovett, Cincinnati ; Wm. H. Lotz, Chicago ; Sidney F. Lewis, New 
Orleans ; Henry Manley, Boston ; C. C. Martin, Brooklyn, N. Y.; Henry 
G. Morris, Philadelphia; Mansfield Merriman, Bethlehem, Pa. ; C. S. 
Maurice, Athens, Pa.; A. G. Menocal, Washington, D. C. ; Robert E. 
McMath, E. D. Meier, St. Louis ; John MacLeod, Louisville ; George 
H. Norman, Boston ; S. C. Pierson, Meriden, Conn. ; Henry G. Prout, 
New York ; P. A. Peterson, Montreal, Canada ; Joseph R. Richards, 
Boston ; Robert L. Read, Cincinnati ; D. McN. Stauffer, Boston ; T. 
Guilford Smith, Buffalo ; F. Slataper, C. L. Strobel, Pittsburgh ; George 
H. Simpson, Terre Haute, Ind.; W. G. M. Thompson, Welland, Canada; 
John G. Van Home, Jersey City, N. J. ; Frank O. Whitney, Henry M. 
Wightman, Boston ; Wm. H. Wiley, Wm. E. Worthen, New York ; 
Charles D. Ward, Lebbeus B. Ward, Jersey City, N, J. ; Ashbel Welch, 
Lambertville, N. J. ; H. F. Walling, Washington, D. C. ; Fred. C. Weir, 
Cincinnati ; A. F. Wrotnowski, New Orleans. 



MEETINGS OF THE SOCIETY. 

Juke 1st, 1881. — The Society met at 8 r. m. Vice-President Welch 
in the chair. 

Ballots were canvassed and the following candidates declared 
elected : 

As Members, Jacob Blickensderfer, of Omaha, Neb. ; Robert Blick- 
ensderfer, of Terminus, Montana ; Cabell Breckenridge, of Chattanooga, 
Teun. ; Stephen S. Haight, of West Farms, N. Y. ; William P. Harris, of 
Newark, N. J.— as Junior, Hunter Stewart, of St. Louis, Mo. 

The following amendment to the Constitution was presented and 
read : Any member or associate whose subscription is not in arrears may 
compound for future annual subscriptions by the payment of three 
hundred dollars, if he is a resident, and of one hundred and fifty dollars, 



62 

if he is a non-resident. But should a non-resident become a resident he 
shall i^ay the remainder of the composition, viz. : one hundred and 
fifty dollars, or the usiial annual subscription during the time of his 
residence. 

This amendment was signed by the following named members : G. 
Bouscaren, AVilliam E. Merrill, Robert L. Read, F. -de Funiak, C. Shaler 
Smith. 

The pajDer by C. L. McAlpine, read May 18th, 1881, was discussed 
by Messrs. Chesbrough, Wm. Sooy Smith, "Welch, Macdonald, Joseph 
P. Davis, Striedinger and (by letter) William R. Hutton. 

June 17th, 1881. — Business meeting at Thirteenth Annual Conven- 
tion. The President, James B. Francis, in the chair. 

The following report of the Committee on a Uniform Method for 
Tests of Cements was read by the Secretary : 

To the American Society of Civil Engineers. 

John Bogaet, Secretary: 

The undersigned. Chairman of the Committee ajipoiuted to devise and 
rejjort a uniform method of cement tests to your Society, desires to make 
the following report of progress : 

The Committee have had under advisement during the past year the 
matter of forms of test specimens, and of what kinds of tests should be 
employed, and such matters as are closely connected therewith. It is 
found the European practice generally embraces tests of mortars com- 
posed. of certain definite mixtures, by weight, of cement and sand ; that 
is to say, one weight unit of cement with one, two, three or four units 
weight of sand. No one can question the advisability of testing mortars 
containing the sand mixture, as in practice the bulk of our mortars is 
largely composed of sand. It has been the desire of the Committee to so 
perform their duty that whatever system they might recommend would 
be one from which the results of different experimenters could be com- 
pared in arriving at a correct opinion of quality, and that the system 
might be one that in a few years the Society would not be comi^elled to 
change. Knowing that our American hydraulic cements vary in weight 
of equal bulks 20 per cent, and over, and that almost similar variation 
exists in the weight of equal bulks of sand, it is readily seen that the 
European practice of using equal units of weight, regardless of bulk, in 
making mortar mixtures, would per se be so indefinite as to preclude 
comparability of tests. The variability of sand in weight, in fineness 
and in sharpness caused me to hesitate, in jDressing before the other 
members of the Committee, the advisability of making our final report 
until I had an opportunity to make, at least, a jiartial examination of the 
physical qualities of our American sands, and to this end, at about the 
termination of last year, I had devised a scheme for making a collection 



03 

of sands from different sections of our continent, and, when received, 
intended to carefully examine same as to sharpness, fineness, voids and 
weight of equal bulks, Szc, so as to proceed understandiugly with the 
duty allotted to us, and, if possible, engraft in the system of tests only 
such safeguards as were found absolutely necessary, as it is the undoubted 
desire of not only the members of the Society, but of your Committee 
also, that any system of tests should be made as simple as possible con- 
sistent with the end desired — uniformity. When ready to commence 
this inquiry, severe domestic affliction visited my household which pre- 
cluded my devoting evenings to this study. For many years previously 
the greater share of my evenings have been devoted to the subject of 
cements, and my other duties are such that I have no other time to spare 
for this subject. The affliction to which I alluded still continues, and 
may continue for months, and until this ends I can give the subject very 
little thought ; but when it does end I hope and intend, whether con- 
tinued as a member of said Committee or not, to pursue the inquiry, and 
report the results to your Society. At present I can only say that my 
knowledge of the subject is so deficient in this and some other particulars 
that I do not feel it advisable or safe to ask your Committee to formulate 
a system of cement tests such as will be demanded and will suit our 
American products and practice. 

With more knowledge and under favorable circumstances, which I 
trust to secure during the present year, I hope to feel competent to aid 
any Committee you may contiaue or appoint for the purpose in defining 
a proper mode of conducting tests of cements. 

Kespectfully submitted, 

D. J. Whittemoke, 

Ckairynan. 

Milwaukee, June 6, 1881. 

On motion, the report was received, and the Committee continued. 

The Secretary read a suj^plementary request on the same subject, as 
follows : 

The Committee appointed by the Anaericau Society of Civil Engi- 
neers to devise a uniform method of cement tests, desire to procure 
from several localities throughout the United States and Canadas speci- 
mens of sands ordinarily used in the fabrication of cement mortars for 
the purpose of investigating their properties as to fineness, weight, 
voids, etc. , with a view of recommending a practicable standard to be 
used in mortar mixtures of sand and cement for test purposes. 

Will you kindly select and send the subscriber by express from your 
locality, say, two specimens, one of sharp bank sand, if you have any 
ordinarily iised, also one si^ecimen of shore wa'shed or water worn sand, 
and mark plainly on each package your name and from what locality the 
sand is taken. 



I 



64 

Please do not send mucli less or any more than about one pint of 
each kind of sand. 

Yours very truly, 

D. J. Whittemoke, 
Chairman of said Committee. 

The Secretary said that the Committee on the Preservation of Timber 
simply asked to report progress, stating that they were collecting a 
great many samples of timber from various parts of the country, and 
Avere endeavoring to put their investigations into form. 

On mcrtion, the report of progress was received, and the Committee 
continued. 

The Secretary read the following report of the Committee on Tests 
of Iron and Steel : 

To the President of the American Society of Civil Engineers : 

Sib, — The Committee of the American Society of Civil Engineers on 
Tests of Iron and Steel, beg leave to submit the following report : 

As the members of the Society must be aware, the United States 
Board appointed to test American iron and steel was legislated out of 
existence just as its labors, which promised to be invaluable, had fairly 
commenced. By far the best testing machine in the world had been 
constructed and erected under the direction of this board, and with 
funds ap2Dropriated for the purpose by the Congress of the United 
States, at the urgent solicitation of the American Society of Civil 
Engineers, the American Institiite of Mining Engineers, the American 
Iron and Steel Association, and other scientific societies and institu- 
tions. 

The scientifis and technological schools and colleges of the whole 
country joined earnestly in recommending and urging these appropria- 
tions. These solicitations and recommendations clearly indicate the 
general interest felt throughout the country in, this effort to obtain, for 
the use of all, such accurate knowledge of the qualities of the iron and 
steel used in the United States as would guide to their safe employment 
for all the purposes to which they are applied in the trades, arts and 
industries of the country. 

The legislation obtained and the organization of the board and the 
investigations and experiments planned by it were broad and compre- 
hensive, and the labors of the board were auspiciously begun. Mean- 
time repeated efforts had been made to subject the board to the control 
of the Ordnance Department of the United States army. This, in the 
opinion of your Committee, would have resulted in injurious limitations 
on the labors of the board, and it would have been unjust to the 
engineer officer of the United States Army, to the two officers of the 
United States Navy, and to the three civil engineers who were members 
of the board. 



65 

On the other hand, no good could result from such control, and no 
reason could hi discovered for the efforts made to obtain it, other than 
the desire of the Ordnance Department to secure to itself the credit of 
the investigations to be made bj the board. 

These facts have been presented to the Society in previous state- 
ments made to it by your Committee, but they have thus far failed to 
arouse the Society to such action as would have prevented the hostile 
legislation in the first instance, and which will yet, if vigorously taken, 
secure the passage of a new bill repealing it, rehabilitating the board, 
and restoring the testing machine to the uses for which it was intended 
and built. 

Your Committee would therefore recommend that a memorial and 
jjetition to Congress be prepared and signed by the officers of the 
American Society of Civil Engineers, setting forth the history of the 
effort made to secure a complete set of tests of iron, steel and other 
materials used in construction in this country, and praying that the 
board legislated out of existence shall be reaj^pointed, the testing 
machine built under its direction restored to its possession, and that 
additional approj^riations be made to enable the board to complete its 
labors. 

If this recommendation is ajjproved and carried into effect, your 
Committee also recommend that every member of the American Society 
of Civil Engineers shall take an active personal interest in obtaining the 
favorable action of Congress ujaon the petition proposed, and that the 
Society, as such, shall ask the active co-operation in this effort of all the 
scientific societies and colleges, and of the associations of tradesmen, 
mechanics, engineers and manufacturers in our country. 

In response to a request sent to Colonel T. T. S. Laidley, U. S. 
Ordnance, President of the late U. S. Testing Board, he has kindly 
furnished your Committee with the following report of the duty per- 
formed by the testing machine : 

Watertown Arsenal, June 11, 1881, 
Gen. W. S. Smith, No. 31 East 22d street, New York : 

Dear Sir, — In reply to your inquiry of this date, I have to say, that 
since the 1st of July last, when the funds became available, the testing 
machine has been constantly at work, about one-half of the time for 
private individuals, the Pennsylvania Railroad Co., the New Y''ork and 
Brooklyn Bridge, Passaic Rolling Mill Co., Mr. Andrew Kloman, and 
Mr. E. D. Leavitt, Jr., being those who have had most work done. 734 
specimens have in all been tested. 

The first work was to test the cylinders of cast iron prepai'ed under 
authority of the board for testing iron and steel. The results in brief 
are given in the annexed table, and establish the important fact that 



66 

cast iron, such as is used in making guns, makes a stronger gun than a 
similar one made of cast and lined by a wrought iron tube. 

Experiments liave been made on the resistances of woods, and provi- 
sion made to extend them much, as soon as the wood shall have become 
sufficiently seasoned. 

Arrangements have been made to test a large number of iron 
columns, and this will commence in a day or two. 

Trials have been made on the transVerse strength of pins of various 
sizes and lengths, and on sliding and rolling friction. 

Experiments have been made to determine the effect of rerolling iron 
for bridge work. Quite a number of tests of eye bars have been made 
to determine the best method of forming the eyes, the strength of 
riveted work for boilers, and bridges, wire rop*e and fastenings, open 
hearth steel, stone, etc., etc. The experiments made for individuals will 
not be published ; those made on Government account will accompany 
the report of the Chief of Ordnance. 

It is much to be regretted that the law was passed requiring the use 
of the machine to be given to any one who will pay the actual expenses, 
for, as the law now stands, such persons have the precedence. 
Eespectfully yours, 

T. T. S. Laidley, 
Colonel of Ordnance, Commanding. 



CYLINDER TESTS. 





Undeb Initial Load of 5 000 lbs. on 
Piston. 


Ultimate 


Loads. 


DistinstiisUing 
Mark. 


Length of 
Bore filled 
with Wax. 


Snrface of 

Bore exposed 

to Wax. 


, Volume of 

Wax, 
cubic inches. 


Actual lbs. 


Lbs. Sq Inch 

Internal 
Pressure. 


\ 1 


Inches. 
10.0C4 

10.371 

10.445 

10.097 

10.010 

10.471 

10.388 

10.385 


Sq. Inches. 
113.00 

11G.37 

117.03 

112.71 

118.81 

116.57 

115.71 

115.61 


86.23 
89.13 

89.02 
85.62 
84.88 
88.79 
88.09 
87.96 


769.200 
737.600 
792.500 
635.500 
687.900 
660.200 
735.400 
698.100 


83.518 


A. 2 


85.867 


\ 3 


92.366 


B 1 


74.935 


go 


81.120 


J3 3 


77.853 


CI 

C 2 


8G.722 
82.420 







A Lined with thin copper -jV inch thick. 

B Lined with wrought iron 0.912 inch thick. 

C Lined with bronze 0.508 inch thick. 



67 

Cyliuders 22 inches long, 11 inches diameter. Diameter of bore, 
3.3 inches. 

A 1 and A 2 were bored through, and the breach end closed with a 
screw. 

T. T. S. Laidley, 

Colonel of Ordnance. 
Eesi^ectfullv submitted, 

Wai. SooY Smith, 
Chn. Com. on Tests of Iron and Steel. 

A. P. BoLLEE. — This commission was commenced as long ago as 
1873 or 74. I was familiar with its constitution at the time, and did 
what share of work I could to get it launched and into practical working 
order. Since that time we have been much disappointed in the results 
obtained by that commission, and from the admissions of their own re- 
port there is evidently such a clashing of authority that we cannot ex- 
pect the work to advance in the direction or to the extent that we all 
hoped for. I would move, therefore, in order to examine the true con- 
dition of affairs, and without any disrespect to the gentlemen composing 
the commission, that the report be referred to the Board of Direction for 
examination as to its inferences and charges, and that the committee be 
discharged and thanked for the work they have done up to the present time. 
The result of such action will be, I think, getting at the real facts of the 
case, and a reorganization as it were, of the part our Society has taken and 
must take in furthering this work ; for there is no scheme that has been 
started for the advancement of American engineering, in my judgment, 
comparable with the work that was laid out for the investigation of that 
commission. It is so far beyond the possibility of private effort that we 
must have hearty Government co-operation in it. No steps should be 
taken unadvisedly or hastily, and it is for that reason I move that the 
report be referred to the Board of Direction for examination, or to a 
special committee— I do not care which— for examination into the 
charges and jealousies therein contained, to report to the Society for 
future action, and that the committee be discharged with thanks for past 
labors. But as it would be better to divide my motion into two parts, I 
would move first for the acceptance of the report, and the discharge of 
the committee with thanks. 

Motion agreed to. 

A. P. BoLLEE.— I now move that a special committee be appointed to 
whom that report shall be referred for report at the earliest practicable 
moment, with recommendations as'to the future action of the Society in 
the matter. 

F. Collin GwooD. — To whom does that report come ? 

A. P. BoLLEE. — It was to be a committee to examine into the working 
of the commission, and into the charges conveyed in their report. We are 



68 

plainly told that the differences and jealousies between the civil and 
military departments have utterly blocked the useful working of the 
commission, and we will stand where we are to all eternity if we do not 
have that obstacle removed out of our way. 

The Pbesident. — I question whether that is a proper motle of pro- 
ceeding, whether it would be altogether in order to appoint a committee' 
to report upon the action of another committee just discharged. Of 
course, it is just ns gentlemen choose to vote. 

T. Egleston.— It is necessary that the bottom facts of this ease 
should be known, but it is not necessary that the conduct of the com- 
mittee should be scrutinized. It is possil^le, however, that somebody in 
authority should know exactly what the reasons are why this commission 
has failed of its object. In view of the greatest engineering problem 
that has been started in 200 years, and with the prospect of our doing 
for the metals what has never been done or even thought of before, it 
does seem to be about time this commission was organized and at work. 
Here is a commission with a large amount of money, with the patronage 
of the Government and the sympathy of its officers, with the machine 
already in hand, and "yet it has not succeeded. I think it is desirable 
that somebody should know the reason why; it is not, I think, desirable 
that if there is any personal jealousy, or if there is anything approaching 
to a scandal, it shoiild be made known to the public. The Governing 
Board of this Society is quite competent to discuss any question that 
may come np, and it therefore seems to me that if a committee is ap- 
pointed to look over this matter and see what shall be done in the 
future, it should report to the Governing Board of this Society, and the 
advice of that Board should be taken. This investigation is of great in- 
terest, not only to engineers, but to all mankind, because it involves the 
whole question of factors of safety, and if there is to be any reorganiza- 
tion, the action preliminary thereto should come from the governing 
body of this Society. 

The President. — I do not question at all the propriety of the investi- 
gation, but simply the form of proceeding to arrive at it. The question 
is whether it should be done by a new committee, with full powers to 
pursue the matter. 

A. P. Boller. — It is apparently a little diificult to get at. We are 
not prepared now to appoint a new committee to prosecute this subject. 
A committee of that character must be selected with a great deal of fore- 
thought, and a great deal of examination into the qualifications of the 
members, and the time they can give to the matter. The obstacles 
wdiich that report tells us exist, must be examined into in some form 
or shape, and I can conceive of no other way of doing it than to refer 
that report to a committee, or to the Board of Direction— I do not cai'e 
which — for examination and deliberation as to the further action this 
Society should take in furtherance of the object of this great commis- 



69 

sion, for no greater one in the interests of science has ever been started, 
I am willing to accept any amendment that will get over questions of 
test or comi^etency, for I am deeply convinced we must do something 
before we separate this morning for carrying forward the object of that 
commission. 

The Pkesident.— My objection was to the appointment of a com- 
mittee to criticise the action of a committee whose report we had just 
accepted. I question whether that would be in order, or is a proper 
thing for the Society to do. I think, however, it would be in order to 
refer it to the Board of Direction, with full power to pursue the matter. 

A. P. BoLLEE.— I am perfectly willing that the Board of Direction 
should take it up, and possibly we might profitably discuss the matter a 
little more before we pass a final resolution upon it. But as I have 
stated my views on the matter, and how I stand, I will withhold pressing 
my motion until we have heard further from the members of the Society. 

F. CoLLiNGWooD.— I think we can get over this difficulty by changing 
the words of the motion. It is in the minds of members about me, that 
a committee should be appointed, but there is an objection to the motion 
taking the form of criticism. I think it is not dellirable that we should 
ask the Board of Direction to undertake the matter because they have 
already a great deal of work to attend to. The committee should -be 
composed of men who have more leisure, and I would, therefore, suggest 
that the motion be put into this form : That a committee be appointed 
to examine further into the subject, and to report a recommendation to the 
Board of Direction, who shall take such action as they see fit. I think 
that will meet the whole matter. 

Mr. BoLLEE. — I accept that as an amendment. 

C. Latimer.— It seems to me the appointment of another committee 
to continue the same subject is a criticism upon the former committee 
that has been discharged. 

I am not acquainted with the merits of the question ; but it seems to 
me that I would not like to see another committee appointed to throw 
discredit upon a committee that has already done something and to throw 
discredit on their work. I think it would be better to refer the matter 
to the Board of Management to decide on the merits of the work, and 
that the committee should do what may be further necessary in order to 
carry out what the Board may recommend. 

The President. — I should say it was perfectly in order to criticise the 
report of that committee before it was accepted, but after it has been re- 
ceived, I do not think it is in order to criticise what they have done. 

A. P. BoLiiER. — May I ask if a new committee is appointed to be ac- 
tive commissioners in the matter, whether the reports and past observa- 
tions on this matter are not open to examination and criticism ? 
Whether the reports of the Board or the reports of a special committee 
on any other subject may not be examined, and whether it is not perfectly 



70 

competent for us to review the whole question, and see where the diffi- 
culty lies, and if there is difficulty, to remove it before there is trouble ? 
It is impossible to couch the motion in such terms as to preclude all 
criticism. I do not propose to critcise that committee. They are all 
gentlemen whom I esteem very highly, and I believe they have worked 
to the best of their ability in the matter. But they have evidently come 
to a standstill, and now we must find out just where that difficulty lies. 
When a matter of great importance is up, I do not believe in mincing 
matters. I believe in going to the root of the difficulty, and when that 
is found to eradicate it. 

The President. — It is perfectly in order to refer the same subject to 
a new committee 

A. P. BoLLER. — Very well, that is tlie j^oint Mr. Collingwood made, 
and I accepted that as an amendment to my motion. 

J. J. E. Ckoes. — There is a certain mystery in all this that we who 
are uninitiated cannot understand. We have a report presented which 
asks that this Society do something. We receive that report and dis- 
charge the committee. Then we ask for a committee to be appointed or 
for the Board of Direction to do something, but nobody seems to have a 
clear idea of what they do want, or of what the matter is. Why do not 
gentlemen who have these grievances behind them state whether they are 
against the Committee of the American Society of Engineers, or the 
National Board, or the Ordnance Board, or Congress, or whoever it 
may be. If they would state who it is they want to hit so that we can 
find out who they are, we will be much better satisfied, and it could be 
done in five words then. 

A. P. Bolder. — I do not know whether my friend, Mr. Croes, took 
a nap during the reading of that report, but I think the report itself is 
abundant cause for the discussion we have had on this subject. I have 
no grievance against Congress, or against the Engineers, or against the 
Ordnance, or against the Society, or against anyone else. I simjily 
know that by their own admission their work has come to a standstill. 
They make certain charges in the report which, divested of all rhetoric 
and of all complimentary terms, reveals a clashing between the com- 
ponents parts of the Board, the one civil and the dther military. Now 
there may be two sides to this question, as there generally are to all 
questions, and I am very anxious to get at the secret and see exactly 
what the trouble is. Unless we do that our past work is good as far as it 
has gone, but it is so far short of what we have been striving for that it 
is a confession of failure to stop at this point. 

C. Latimer. — I would like to know what the members of the com- 
mittee themselves think of the matter. It seems to me that if there is 
anything kept back, any trouble in the Commission, they ought to know 
all about it, certainly, and if they would only explain it to us now, we 
would be much obliged to them. It seems to me a curious ^jroceed- 



71 

ing to appoint another committee to examine into the doings of a previ- 
ous one. 

T. Egleston. — I do not think there is any ambiguity or hinting in the 
matter. If there are words in the English h^nguage that can state plain- 
ly what the difficulty is, I think those words are contained in the report. 
The gist of the whole matter is this : I have had occasion to use that 
testing machine in making some investigations recently, and I went to 
Washington, to headquarters, to ascertain what the conditions were under 
which I could iise it. I found every engineer officer and every govern- 
ment officer extremely anxious that the Commission should go on and 
do the work. I went back to New York and the several members of 
the Commission were also extremely anxious. I talked with 
Col. Laidley and found that he was extremely anxious. In the mean- 
time I have found that certain members of Congress are extremely 
anxious that the work should be done. But when you come to look over 
that report you will find the Chairman of the Committee states positively 
that he could not report to the Ordnance Department, and that the Com- 
mittee of this Society preferred that the whole thing should die without 
a motion in its behalf, rather than that they should report to the Ord- 
nance Department. I think that is the short of it. 

Mr. Boiler's motion, as amended by Mr. Collingwood, was adopted. 

The President. —The Chair will make the appointment and announce 
the names of the committee hereafter. (See page 40. ) 

J. J. R. Ckoes then reported verbally : The Committee on the Gaug- 
ing of Streams has the honor to report that a considerable correspond- 
ence has taken place with members in various parts of the country who 
have been asked to make gaugings of the streams in their vicinity, and 
to send them to the Society for tabulation. No response has been re- 
ceived since the meeting in last November. At that time a paper was 
presented by Mr. Fteley, of Boston, on the gauging of the Sudbury 
river, which paper was discussed to some extent, and is now in print and 
will probably be issued in the next number of the Transactions. The 
work of the committee will be seen, to some extent, in that paper, and 
in the discussions upon it. Further papers on the same subject have 
been promised by Mr. Fteley and will be forthcoming probably in a 
month or two. The result of the applications for gaugings, sent to all 
parts of the country, has not been so satisfactory as the committee would 
desire. In very few instances have any responses been received at all, 
and these responses were to the effect that the parties applied to had not 
measured any streams at all. The committee ask to be continued. 
On motion the report was accepted and the committee continued. 

The Seceetaey asked if any member of the Society had any business 
to propose. 

C. Latimer.— There has been heretofore a standing resolution on our 



'72 

statutes that the metric measures be put upon the papers of this Society. 
I move that that resolution be rescinded. 

The President asks for information. 

The Secretary. — At the Ninth Annual Convention of this Society a 
resolution was passed that, thereafter in all papers written for the Society, 
members should include in such papers the dimensions in metric 
measure as well as in English feet and inches, and that this resolution 
should be published continuously in the Proceedings of the Society. It 
has been so published since that Convention, 

T. G. Ellis. — I would like to ask the Secretary whether any members 
have availed themselves of that resolution to put metric measures in any 
of their papers ? 

The Secretary. — Two, I think, since I have been Secretary. 

T. G. Ellis. — Is there any other sucli standing resolution ? 

The Secretary. — Not that I am aware of. 

T. G. Ellis. — I think under these circumstances it is not necessary to 
print it for the benefit of two papers in so many years. I think if it 
stands we should add the measures of other nations where we have moi'e 
resident members than we have in the case of France. For instance, in 
Mexico and South America we have more resident members than we have 
m any other country whose metric system we are acquainted with. 

T. Egleston.- — The metric system is adopted in Mexico. 

C. L.\TiMER. — That is true, and Mr. Wellington says it has produced 
such confusion that he does not know where he is. I have a letter from 
him to that efifect. 

A. P. BoLLER. — With regard to the motion rescinding the resolution 
it does not make much difference except to expunge from the record an 
inojierative resolution. There is nothing to prevent any member putting 
as many measurements into his jiaper as he chooses. The fact that only 
two papers have included metric measurements during Mr. Bogart's 
secretaryship shows that members do not regard this as a compulsory 
resolution, but one tliey can disobey at their own pleasure. As long as 
the resolution must be a dead letter, and we cannot compsl members to 
abide by it, perhaps we had better expunge it from the i'eeord. 

Mr. Latimer's motion was submitted to a vote, and adopted by 28 
foi', to 9 against. 

The business meeting of the Convention was then adjourned. 

OF THE BOAED OF DIRECTION. 

June 8th, 1881. — Applications were considered. Action was taken 
in regard to the Building Fund and the Fellowship Fund. 



73 

LIST OF MEMBERS. 



ADDITIONS. 
MEMBERS. 



Date of Election. 

Blickensderfer, J.\cob. .Chief Engineer Union Pacific R.R., Omaha, 

Nebraska June i, 1881 

Breckenridge, C.A.BELL. . .Engineer Alabama Great Southern R.R. 

Chattanooga, Tenn 

H.viGHT, Stephen S West Farms, New York City, N. Y 

H.vrris, \Vm. P Supt. New York and Greenwood Lalce 

R. R., 37 Ailing St., Newark, N. J. . . 
MuNROE, Henry S School of Mines, Columbia College, New 

York City, N. Y May 4, 1881 

Symington, Willi.a,m N. .P. O. Box 2011, New York City, N. Y. . . " 
WiiiNERY, Samuel (Elected Junior April i, i874,)Ass't. Eng'r. 

New Orleans and North Eastern R. R., 

Meridian, Miss " 

Wilder, Francis M Sup't. M. P. Department N. Y. L. E. and 

W. Railway, Susquehanna Depot, Pa. Jan. 5, 1881 

ASSOCL\TE. 

Gorringe, Henry H 32 Waverly PLace, New York City, N. Y.. April 6, 1881 

juniors. 

Allaire, William M....358 West Thirty-second St., New York 

City, N. Y March 2, 1881 



changes and corrections. 

members. 



Beckwith, Arthur 115 Broadway, New York City, N. Y. 

Beckwith, L. F- 115 Broadway, New York City, N. Y. 

DoANE, Edwin A Chief Engineer R. W. & O. R. R., Oswego, N. Y. 

Ellis, N. W 33 Pine St., Room 19, New York City, N. Y. 

Flagg, J. Foster Div. Engineer, Mexican National R. R., Manzanilla, 

Mexico. 

Fuller, S. T Chief Engineer Texas Mexican R. R., Houston, Texas. 

Golay, Philip Paducah, Ky. 

Harris, Robert L (Ross & Harris,) San Antonio, Texas. 

Neilson, Charles Sup't. Delaware Div. N. Y., L. E. and W. Railway, 

Port Jervis, N. Y. 

Walker, John S Ass't. Engineer Mex. National Cons. Co., Laredo, Texas. 

Ward, Charles D Windsor Hotel, Jersey City, N. J. 

Ward, Lebbeus B Windsor Hotel, Jersey City, N. J. 



74 

Juniors. 

Brooks, Fred'k Office Mexican Central Railway, Mexico, Mexico. 

Curtis, Wendell R California Southern R. K., San Diego, Cal. 

Ferguson, John W Ass't. Engineer N. V., L. E. and W. Railway, Hornels- 

ville, N. Y. 

fellows. 

Dillon, Sidney President Union Pacific R. R., 78 Broadway, New York 

City, N. Y. 

Norton, F. O 92 Broadway, New York City, N. Y. 

Seymour, M. T 55 Broadway, New York City, N. Y. 

DEATHS. 

Weber, M. M. Baron Von., Elected Honorary Member June 2, 1S80. Died April 

18, 1881. 
Hall, G. Thomas Elected Associate October 2, 1872, and transferred to 

Member September 2, 1874. Died June 2, iSSi. 



^merican ^ocidg of ^p\ Inji 



nfimcm. 



p^nocEEDi ]s: as. 



Vol. VII.— July, 1881 



MINUTES OF MEETINaS 



(Abstract of such as may be of general interest to members.) 



OF THE SOCIETY. 

July 6th, 1881.— The Society met at 8 p. m., Yice-Presiclent Welch 
in the chair. Ballots were canvassed and the following candidates de- 
clared elected: — As Members, Oliver Weldon Barnes, New York City; 
William Anderson May,. Scranton, Pa. ; James Gardner Sanderson, 
Scranton, Pa. : — As Associate, Henry Robert Bradbury, New York City. 
The Norman Medal for the last year was formally presented to Theodore 
Cooper, M. A. S. C. E. 



76 



ADDITIONS TO 



LIBRABY AND MUSEUM. 



From S Thayer Abert, U. S. C. E. 

Washington, D. C: 

Annual Report on Improvement of Rivers and 

Harbors in District of Columbia, Maryland, 

Virginia and North Carolina. S. Thayer 

Abert. 

From Administration des Pouts et 
Chaussees, Pans: 
Annales. February, March, April and May, 

1881. List of Members, 1881. 

From American Academy of Arts and 
Sciences. Boston: 
ProceedinKs. Vol. VIII., New Series, Part I., 

May, 1880 to February, 1881. 

From American Chemical Society, New 
York: 
Journal of the Society. Vol. II., Nos. 8-12, 

August, December, 1880. 

From American Institute of Mining En- 
gineers, Dr. T. M. Drown, Secretary, 
Eastou, Pa.: 
Proceedings of the Annual Meeting held in 

Philadelphia, Kebruary, 1881. 
The Gold-Bearing Mispickel Veins of Mar 

mora, Ontario, Canada. R. P. Kothwell. 
The Whopper Lode, Gunnison County, Col 

orado. Prof. Persifor Frazer. 
Steel for Bridges. J. W. Clowd. 
The advance in Mining, Metallurgical Art 

Science, and Indubtry since 1875. W. P 

Shinn. 
Shocks on Railway Bridges. J. 'W. Clowd. 
The Industrial School for Miners and Me 

chanics at Orifon, Luzern Go. Pa. O. J 

Hemrich. 
Gas Producers using Blast. F. H. Daniels, 
liffect of Sewage on Iron. C. O. Thompson 
The Construction on Geological Cross-sections 

H. Martyu Chance. 
Ore Roasting Furnace. W. J. Taylor. 
Note on the Estimation in Speise. F. C. 

Blake. 
Method for the Estimation of Manganese in 

Spiegels, Irons and Stee.'s. S. A. Ford. 
Note on a Direct Process for Treating fine Iron 

Ores. W. E. C. Eustis. 
A Fluxing Gas Prod c.cer for making Heating 

Gas. W. J. Taylor. 
The Amount of Manganese Required to remove 

the Oxygen from Iron after it has been 

blown in a Bessemer Converter. S. A. 

Ford. 
Notes on the Assay Spitzlutte. R. H Rich- 
ards. 
On the Applicability of Edison's System of 

Electric Lighting to Mines. O. A. Moses. 
A new Bottom for Bessemer Converters. C. 

F. Manness. 
Auriferous Slate Deposits on the Southern 

Mining Region. P. F. Mell, Jr. 
Can the ikagneti^m of I on and Steel be used 

to Determine their Physical Properties ? 

Wm. Metcalf. 
On the action of Common Salt and other 

Crystalline Salts in Wire-Drawing. C. O. 

TlKJiiipsoii. " 

On Kail Patterns. A. L. Holley. 

From American Iron and Steel Associa- 
tion. James M. Swank, Secretary, 
Philadelphia: 



Preliminary Report upon the Iron and Steel 
Industries of the United States in the Cen- 
sus vear 1880. ended May 31, 1880. James 
M. Swank. Philadelphia, 1881. 

From Argentine Sdentific Society. Don 
Eduardo E. Clerice, Secretai y, Buenos 
Ay res: 
Annales. February, March and April, 1881. 
From Arthur Beardsley, Bethlehem, 
Pa.: 
Register of the Lehigh University, 1880-1881. 

From Thomas J. Bell, Cincinnati: 
Forty-tirst Annual Report of the Water De- 
partment of Cincinnati. 

From Charles E. Billin, Indianapolis, 

Ind.: 

Proceedings of the Convention of Engineers 

and Surveyors of the State of l^enusyivania., 

held at Ha'rrisbnrg, Pa., Oct. 27th, 2«th and 

29th, 1881 (Copies for distriOufiov). 

From Boston .Society ol Civil Engineers. 
S. E. Qiukham, Secretary, B .s-t 'n: 
Proceedings, Apr.l. 1881. Annual Meeting of 

the Society, March, 1881. 
Annual Report of the Government. 
The Back Bay Park. E. W. Howe. 

From Boston Public Library, Boston : 
Bulletin oi the Library. April, 1881, Vol. IV., 
No. 10. 

Irom G. Bouscaren, Cincinnati: 
Instruction for Laying out Circular Curves 
with Special Approaches. G. Bouscaren. 
(Several copies). 

From Lyman Bridges, San Francisco: 
Report on the San Francisco and Ocean Shore 

Railroad Co , Calitoruia. New York, 1881. 
Report on the California i entral Railway in 
California and Nevada. New York, 1881. 
From L. L. Buck, Brooklyn. N. Y. : 
Report on the Renewal of Niagara Suspension 
Bridge. L. L. Buck. New York, 1881 (2 
copies). 

From Bureau of Education. Washing- 
ton. D. 0,: 
Report of Commissioner of Education for 

1878. 
Library Aids. .Samuel S Green. 
Comparative Statistics ol Elementary Educa- 
tion in Fifty Principal Countr.es. 

From H. M. Chance. Philadelphia: 

The Construction of Geolo;4icalCroKs-seition8. 

H. M Chance, M. D., P.i.ladelphia, 1881. 

From M. A, Durand-Claye, Pans: 

Les Eaux d'Egout. A. Durand Claye, Paris, 

1880 
Les Travaux d'Assainissement de Danzig, 
Berlin, et Breslau. A. Durand Claye, Paris, 
1881. 

From Wm. B. Cogswell, Syracuse, N. 
Y.: 
The Credit Mobilier of America. Rowland 
Hazard, Providence, 1881. 

From John Collet, Chief of Bureau of 
Statistics and Geology of Indiana, In- 
dianapolis; 
Second Annual Report of Department of 
Statistics and Geology of Indiana. 



From Jbrgen Dahl, Norway, Swerien : 

Types of Constructiou ou the. Norwegian 
Uailways of 3 feet 6 incbes gauge. 

From Thomas M. Drown, Easton, Pa. : 

An Adilress at the Keopeuiiig oi Pardee Hall, 
Lafayette College, 1881, Easton, Pa. 
From C E. Durkee. Albany, N. Y. : 

Keport ou Itoutes and Ei-timates. Sacketts 
Harbor aud Saratoga Raihoad. Saratoga 
Springs, 1852. 

The Adirondack Railroad and Estate. New 
York, 1873. 

Frnm Engineers' Club of Philadelphia, 
Howard Murphy, Cor. Secretary, Phil- 
adelphia : 

Proceeding, Vol. II., No. 2. 

From Engineers' Department, U. S. A. 
Was .in}>ton, D. C. : 

OflBcial Army Register, January, 1881. 

Lecture on the Progress ot the Works of 
Completion of the new Improved Bed of 
the Danube at Vienna, by Sir Gustav von 
Wex. Translated by Gen. G. Weitzel, U. 
S. A. 

Annual Report of the Chief of Engineers, 
U. S. A. Parts 1., IL, III., 1880. 

The Water-jet as an Aid lo Engineering Con- 
struction. L. Y. Schermerhoru, Washing- 
ton. 1^81. 

Contribution to the Theory of Blasting or 
Military Mining. H Holer. Translated by 
C. W. Raymond. Wa»hinnton. 1881. 

Specifications for Dredging in Inner Harbor 
at Michigan City, Indiana. Maj. J. A. 
Smith. 

Specifications for Constructing Dams and 
Shore Protections of Brush and Sione, at 
Andalusia. III. Capt. A. Mackenzie. 

Specifications for Dredging in the Galena 
River, 111. Capt. A. Mackenzie. 

Specifications for Building a Wing-Dam at 
Glastonbury Bar. on the Connecticut River. 
Gen. G. K. Warren. 

Specifications for Improvement of Rancocas 
River, N.J. Col. J.N. Macomb. 

Specifications for Ri -Rap for Jetties at the 
Mouth uf Connecticut River. Gen. G. K. 
Warren . 

Copies of Reports submitting plans for the 
Improvement of the Mouih of Columbia 
River. Colonel G. L. Gillespie. 

A Report relative to devising a system of 
works to prevent the turiher injury of the 
navigable waters ot California from the 
debris of mines arising from hydraulic 
mining. Col. G. H. Mendell. 

A copy of the Report of ttie Board of En- 
gineers examining the several points on the 
Pacific coast fur the purpose ot locating a 
harbor of refuge, and espt.'cially that re- 
lating to Port uiford, Oregon. 

A Communication and Report upon the 
results obtained from the surveys and ex- 
aminations of the season of 1880, for the 
establishment of Reservoirs at the head- 
waters of the Mississippi River and the 
sources of certain streams in Wisconsin 
aud Minnesota, including Rock River, Wis- 
consin and Illinois. Capt J. C Allen. 

The report ot the Mississippi River Commis- 
sion . I Copies fur liistriOuticn .) 

Specifications, Advertisement, Proposals, and 
Bidder's Bond for Improving Chicago Har- 
bor. Maj. G. J. Lydecker. 

Advertisement. Ohio River Improvement. 
Proposals for Iron Work at the Davis 
Island Dam. Col. Wm. E. .Merrill. 



Specifications for Dredging in Winnepissiogee 

Lake, New Hampshire. Gen. Geo, Thom. 
Specifications for breaking up and Removing 

Sunken Ledges in Merrimau River, Maes. 

Gen, Geo. Thom. 
Spfcifications for Excavation of Sunken 

Ledges at the " Gut," opposite Bath, Me. 

Gen. Geo. Thom. 
Specification for Dredging and Building a 

Rubblest iiie Wing-dam in Kennelec River, 

at and near Richmond, Maine. Gen. Geo. 

Thom. 

Specifications for the Construction of the 
Breakwater on the Saint Croix River, near 
Calais, Maine Gen. Geo. Thom. 

Advertisement. Instructions, Specifications 
and Proposals for Improving Harbor at 
MenomouU (Mich, and) Wis. Maj. Henry 
M. Robert. 

A Communication accompanying copy of 
Report upon the Survey ot the Reopening 
of the Santee Canal, South Carolina. Gen. 
Q. A. Gillmore. 

From Charles E. Fowler, New Haven, 
Ct. : 
City Year Book of New Haven. 1880. 
Antiual Report of the Street Department of 

New Haven'for 1880. 
Public Parks : A Lecture by Simon E. Bald- 
win. 

From Robert Gordon, Henzada, British 
Burmah : 
Fragment containing a Discussion of a New 
Formula lor Flow of Water in open Chan- 
nels. Robert (iordon. Milan, 1875, 
On the Theory .'f the Flow of Water in Open 
Channels, Robert Gordon. Rangoon. 1875. 
From Geo. S. Greene, Jr., New York : 
Annual Report Department of Docks, City of 
New York lor 1880. (2 copies.) 

From John W. Hill, Cincinnati : 
Report of the Expert on the Contract Trials 
of the Gaskill Compound Pumping Engine 
at the Evansville Water Works. J. W. Hill, 
Cincinnati. 1881. 

From E A. Hill, New Haven, Ct. : 
Annual Report of the Boston & New York 
Air Line Railroad Company from 1878 to 
1881. inclusive. 
Statutes of the State of Connecticut relating 

to Railroads Hartford. 1878 
The Hay ford Process and Apparatus for 
Preserving Timber. E. R. Andrews. Phila- 
delphia. 1878 

From Institution of Civil Engineers, 
James Forrest, Secretary. Loudon : 
Minutes of Proceedings Vol. LXIII. 

From M. E. Lavoinne. Paris : 
The Purification of Memphis. St. Germain. 
1881 (French), 

From Massachusetts Institute of Tech- 
nology, Bot^ton : 
Sixteenth Annual Catalogue of the Institute. 
1881. 

From A. G. Menocal, C. E., U. S. N., 
Washington, D. C: 
Transportation of .'^hips on Railways. Some 
of the difficulties presented. S. L. Phelps. 
Washingion, 1881. 

From Dr. W. H. McFadden, Phila- 
del| hia : 
Annual Report of the Philadelphia Water De- 
partment lor 1880. Philadelphia. 1881. 



78 



From Midlancl Institule Miuinjj, Civil, 
aud Mechauical Eugineers, Barn-lej', 
EiJ{,'laud : 
TransactiDiiB. December, 1880. February, 
1881. 

From Edward Mitchell, New York : 
Seventh Auuual Report on the Progress of 
ot the Tnpographical Survey ol the Adiron- 
dack liegiou ot New York. Verplauck 
Calvin. Albany, N. Y. 

From Charles Neilson, New York : 
Effect <■! the Motion of .\ir within an Auditor- 
ium upon its Acoustic QiialitieB. W. W. 
Jacques. 
The History and Description of the Great 
Westeru Kailway. John C. Bourne. Lon- 
don, 1856. 

From Gen. John Newton, New York : 
Keportou a tjeueral scheme of Improvements 
lor the Harbor of Montreal, by the Com- 
mission ot Eiigiueers. IVIr. Robert B. Bell, 
Maj. (ien. John Newton, and Mr. Sandlord 
Fleming. Montreal. 1877. 

From North of England Institute 
Mining and Mechanical Engineers, 
New Castle-on-Tyue, England : 
Transactions. December, 1830- February, 
1881. 

From Charles Paine, Gen. Supt. L. S. 
aud M. S. Railway, C evelaud : 

Eleventh Auuual Report of the Lake Shore 
and Miihigan Southern Railway Co. 
Cleveland. 1881. 

Special Report of the Commissioner of Rail- 
roads aud Telegraphs of Ohio. Columbus. 
1881. 

Reports of the Great Western Railway of 
Canada, from 1870 to 1880, iuclusive. 

From the Pi Eta Scientific Society, 
Troy. .S. Y., 1881 : 
Papers read before the Society : ' 

The Chamber of Bridges, T. M. Cleeman. 
The Inter Uceam- Canal. W. E. Dauchy. 
Bridge Pin-* — Their Sizes and iSeariugs. -J. 

A. L.Waddell. 
Rational Fractions. A. E. Besosa. 
Note on Gordon's Formula on Long Columns. 

W. H. Burr. 
The nize of an Angle Block in a Howe Truss 

Bridge. T. M. Cleeman. 
Discussion of Paper on " Braced iron Piers." 

VV. H Burr. 

Fr m Wm . Rotch, Boston. Mass. : 
Annual Reijort of the Mexican Central R'y. 
Co. (Ld.), year ending December 31, 1880. 
Boston. 1881. 



Report on the Case of the Watuppa Reservoir 
Co. vs. The City of Fall River. Wm. Rotch, 
C. E., December, 1880. Fall River. 1881. 
From Sax'iniau Society of Ent^iueers 
and Architects, Li ipsic : 
Transactions. '2ct half. 1880. 

From School of Mines, Columbia 
College, New York : 
School of Mines Quarterly. Vol. II., No. 8. 

From Hon. Horatio Seymour, Jr.. State 
Engineer and Surveyor, Albany, New 
York : 
Prosperity of our Canals. Horatio Seymour, 
Jr. Albany, 1881. 

From W. W. C. Sites, Jersey City, N. J. : 
Annual Report ot the Chief Enaiueer of the 
Department of Public Works of Jerse City, 
N.J. Jer-ey City. 1881. (2 copies.) 

From Smithsonian Institution, Wash- 
ington, D. C. : 
Annual Report for 1879. 

From Society of Engineers, Bartholo- 
mew Reed, Secretary, London : 
Transactions. 1880. 

Erom Society des Ingenieurs Civils, 
Paris : 
Memoires, February, 1881. 

From Treasury Department, Washing- 
ton : 
S atistical Abstract of the United States, 1880. 
Third Number. Finance, Coinage, Commerce, 
Immigration, Shipping, The Postal Service, 
Population, Railroads, Agriculture, Coal 
and Iron, etc. 

From United States Naval Institute, 
Annapolis, Md. : 
Proceedings Vol. VI., No. 14. 

From M. M- I'rhrm von Weber, Berlin: 
Studie iiber die Wasserstrassen schwedeus. 
M. M. Frhrm von Weber. Berlin. 1880. 

From Westeru Society of Engineers, L. 
P Morehouse, Secretary, Chicago: 
Proceedings. Vol. V. 

From Other Sources : 

A List of Railroads, Canals and Ferries 
owned, leased, operated aud controlled by 
the Pennsylvania Railroad Co. on December 
31st. 1880 

Arguments of Mr. E. P. Wheeler, before As- 
sembly Committee on Cities, on Under- 
ground Telegraph Wires in Cities. New 
York. 1H81. 

Annual Report Department City Works of 
■ Brooklyn, N. Y., for 1880. 

The Library Journal, Vol. VI., No. 14. 



79 



L I S T O F M E M H E R S . 

ADDITIONS. 

MEMBERS. 

Date of Election. 
Barnes, Oliver W 57 Broadway, New York City, N. Y July 6, 1881 

Glaskin, Edwin E (Elected Junior April 5, 1876,) 52 Queen 

Victoria Street, London, England . . . May 4, 1881 

Sanderson, J. Gardner. .115 Broadway, Room 80, New York City, 

N. Y July 6, 1881 

associate. 

Bradbury, Henry R Manager Neuchatel Asphalte Co. (Ld.), 

54 Aster House, New York City, N. Y. July 6, 1881 



changes and corrections. 
t 

members. 
Brown, Charles O Civil Engineer and Contractor, 52 & 54 William Street, 

New York City, N. Y. 
Buck, L. L Central Railroad of New Jersey, 119 Liberty Street, New 

York City, N. Y. 
Chittenden, Samuel H..East River, Conn. 
Davis, Charles E. L. B. Capt. Corps of Engineers U. S. A., Sabine Pass, Texas. 

Endicott, M. T Civil Engineer U. S. N., Navy Yard, League Island, Pa. 

Flagg, J. Foster Div. Engineer Mexican National R. R., Colima, Mexico. 

Latcha, Jacob A Chief Engineer New York, Chicago and St. Louis R.R., 

32 Board of Trade, Cleveland, Ohio. 
North, Edward P Chief Engineer Sinaloa and Durango R. R., Culiacan, 

Mexico. 

Smith, Wm. Sooy Hudson River Tunnel, Jersey City, N. J. 

Sweet, Charles A Mexican Central R. R., Durango, Mexico. 



80 

ASSOCIATE. 

Belcher, George W. C. .2646 Washington Ave., St. Louis, Mo. 

JUNIOR. 
Emonts, William A. G. . .Huntington Valley, Bucks Co., Pa. 



DEATH. 

Roberts, W. Milnor {Past President,) Elected Member September 21, 1870. 

Died July 14, 1881. 



American %(uk 4 ^p^^ f nflincfrB. 



P^HOCEEDINOS. 



Vol. VII.— August, 1881, 



Note. — No meetiDgs of the Society are held in August. 



CONTKIBUTIONS TO THE BUILDING FUND. 

By a resolutiou of the Board of Direction, all contributions to the 
Building Fund are to be acknowledged, from time to time, by printing 
lists of the same in the monthly Proceedings of the Society, and in 
addition to this the names of all those who may subscribe SlOO or more 
are to be regularly enrolled and published in future lists of the Society 
under the head of Subscribers to the Building Fund, and they will be 
entitled to receive one copy of the monthly publications, comprising all 
papers and transactions of the Society, regularly for life, for each ^100 
subscribed by them ; such copies to be in addition to those which they 
may be already entitled to if they are Members or Fellows. 

The following contributions up to this time are acknowledged : 



Thomas S. Anderson .... $10 00 

Andrews, Hitchcock & Co. 100 00 

John B. Atkinson 20 00 

H. C. Ayer 100 00 

John F. Barnard 100 00 

L. F. Beckwith 50 00 

H. P. Bell 100 00 

Charles E. Billin 100 00 

T. B. Blackstone 100 00 



D. Bontecou S25 00 

G. Bouscaren 100 00 

N. S. Bouton 100 00 

E. S. Bowen 100 00 

Fred. Brooks 100 00 

Charles O.Brown 100 00 

E. E. Cable .. 100 00 

A. Carnegie 100 00 

S. Chamberlain 100 00 



* Has subscribed double this amount. 



A. Chanute SIOQ 00 

E. S. Chesbrough 100 00 

Wm. Chisholm 100 00 

James Christie 20 00 

T. M. Cleeman 20 00 

Cleveland City Forge and 

Iron Co 100 00 

Wm. B. Cogswell. ...:... .50 00 

F. Collingwood 100 00 

*E. L. Cortliell 50 00 

M. Coryell 150 00 

JohnCrerar 100 00 

B.L. Crosby.... 25 00 

Joseph P. Davis 100 00 

P. P. Dickinson 100 00 

G. L. Dunlap 100 00 

*J. B. Eads 125 00 

D. P. Eells 100 00 

C. E. Emery 100 00 

B. N.Farren.- 100 00 

S. M. Felton 100 00 

A. Fink 100 00 

C.H.Fisher 100 00 

C. E. Flint 100 00 

J. B. Francis 500 00 

J. L. Frazier 50 00 

O. L. Glover 100 00 

W. Gooderham, Jr 100 00 

J. C. Goodridge, Jr 100 00 

H. H. Gorringe 100 00 

S. S. Haight 5 00 

*Henrique Harris 50 00 

W. H. Harris '. . . . 100 00 

B. D. Hasell 100 00 

A. L. Holley 500 00 

W. B. Hyde 100 00 

Washington Jones 50 00 

Thos. C.Keefer 100 00 

Charles Kellogg 100 00 

Wm. B. Knight 50 00 

E. D. Leavitt, Jr 100 00 

.Ilex. J. Leith 100 00 

Charles Macdonald 200 00 

Maher & Bray ton •'SlOO 00 

*Has subscribed double this amouut. 



C. S. Maurice UOO 00 

J. R. Maxwell 25 00 

Chas. McFadden 100 00 

D. N. Melvin 100 00 

A. G. Menocal 30 00 

Wm. Metcalf 100 00 

Robert Moore 40 00 

Geo. H. Nettleton 100 00 

Wm. A. Nettltton 100 00 

John Newell 100 00 

G. B. Nicholson 100 00 

*Wm. J. Nicolls, 12 00 

Geo. H. Norman 100 00 

E. P. North 100 00 

F. O. Norton 100 00 

J. A. Ockerson 10 00 

Henry B.Payne 100 00 

C. E. Perkins 100 00 

E. S. Philbrick 100 00 

H. H. Porter 100 00 

O. W. Potter 100 00 

E. M. Reed 100 00 

W. Milnor Roberts 200 00 

A. A. Robinson 100 00 

Moncnre Robinson 100 00 

Wm. Rotch 100 00 

T. F. Rowland 2,500 00 

M. E. Schmidt 50 00 

C. Vandervoort Smith ... 100 00 

Wm. Alex Smith 250 00 

J. S. T. Stranahan 100 00 

Wm. A. Sweet 100 00 

McRee Swift 100 00 

M. L. Sykes 100 00 

John Tod 100 00 

Joseph Veazie 50 00 

J. H. Warle 100 00 

J. S. Walker 50 00 

*F. C. Weir 50 00 

A. Welch 100 00 

S. Whipple 100 00 

Eugene Whittemure 100 00 

Name not given 100 00 



83 



ADDITIONS TO 



L I B K A R Y AND M U S E U M 



From Charles L. McAlpine, New York : 

Geological Keport for St. Clair Railroad and 
Coal Compauy. J. P. Lesley. New York. 
1855. 

Annual Report of the State Engineer and Sur- 
veyor of the State of New York. Albany. 
1851. 

Annual Reports of the Chicago and Rock 
Island Railroad Company. New York. 
1857 and 1859. 

An Act to Incorporate the Woodstock and 
Lake Erie Railwaj and Harbor Company. 
Woodstock, C. W. 1852. 

Documents submitted to the Galena and 
Chicago Union Railroad Compauy in rela- 
tion to the Leasing of the Chicago, Fulton 
and Mississippi Railroad Bridge at Fulton. 
Chicago. 1858. (2 copies.) 

Annual Report of the Baltimore and Ohio 
Railroad Company. Baltimore. 1859. (2 
copies.) 

First Annual Report of the London and Port 
Stanley Railway Company. London, C. W. 
1854. 

Articles of Agreement between the Corning 
and Olean Railroad Company and the New 
York and Erie Railroad Company. 

Robert D. Sillinian vs. The Hudsorj River 
Bridge Company at .\lbany ; F. W. Coleman 
vs. The same Defendant. In the Supreme 
Court of the United States for the Northern 
District of New York. 

Annual Reports of the Railroad Corporations 
in the State of Massachusetts for 1852. 

Catalogue of the Library of the Young Men's 
As'sociation of Chicago. Chicago. 1856. 

Annual Report of the Commissioners of the 
Canal Fund. Albany. 1848 and 1860. 

Oswego and Syracuse Railroad. Freight 
Tariff. Utica. 1852. 

Annual Meeting and Keport of the Great 
Western Railroad. Hamilton, C. W. 1852 
and 1853. 

Report of the Hannibal and St. Joseph Rail- 
roaV Boston. 1859. 

Report on Surveys for the Pictou Branch 
Railway, with some Remarks on the Trunk 
Line. James Laurie. Halifax. 1860. 

Annual Report ol the Department of the City 
of Baltimore lo the Mayor and the City of 
Baltimore. Baltimore. 1860. 

Report of the Pacific Railroad. San Fran- 
cisco. 1806. 

Report of the New York and Erie Railroad. 
New York. 1856. 

A Memoir upon Stephenson's Silver Mine. 
J. M. Sprague. Albany. 1858. 

Address to the Government of the United 
States upon the Merits of Pirssou's Patent 
Steam Condenser. Washington. 1860. 

Statement of the Trustees and the Scientific 
Council of the Dudley Observatory. Al- 
bany. 1858. 

Report on the Position of the Prospect Hill 
Engine House. New York. 1858. 

Annual Report of the Board of Water Com- 
missioners of the City of Detroit. Detroit. 
1850 and 1857. (3 copies.) 

Report of the Water Board of Georgetown, D. 
C. Washington, D. C. i860. 



Report and Plan of Sewerage of the City of 
Chicago. Chicago. 1855. (2 copies.) 

Report of the Engineer to the Commissioners 
of Sewerage of the City of Brooklyn. 
Brooklyn. 1H59. 

Annual Review ol the Trade and Commerce 
of the City of Chicago. ( hicago, 111. 1859. 

The Cleveland Herald's First Annual State- 
ment of the Trade and Commerce of Cleve- 
land for 1858. 

Report upon a Water Supply for the City of 
Baltimore. Baltimore. 1854. 

Report of the Water Commissioners of the 
City of Albany. Albany. 1850. (2 copies ) 

Report of the Engineers to the Commissioners 
of Drainage of the City of Brooklyn. Brook- 
lyn. 1857. 

Map of the Mississippi and Rock River Junc- 
tion and Lyons Iowa Central Railroad. 

Military Reconnaissance of the Arkansas, Rio 
del Norte and Rio Gila. W. H. Emory. 
1847. 

Rates of Toll per 100 pounds of the New York 
and Erie Railroad. May, 18:)7. 

Plan of the Grand Junction Railroad. 1848. 

Map of the various Channels for Conveying 
the Trade of tLie North-\veir.t. 1852. 
From Isaac Newton, New York : 

Proceedings of the Baltimore Meeting of the 
American Institute of Mining Engineers. 
February. 1879. 

The American Bloomary Process for Making 
Iron direct from the Ore. T. Egleston. 

New Determination of the Cueliicieuts of 
Friction and Lubricated Journals, and on 
the Laws Governing such Friction. R. H. 
Thurston. 

Notes on the Result of an Experiment with the 
Wheeler Process of Combining Iron and 
Steel in the Head of a Rail. W. E. C. Coxe. 

Experinieutsou the Removal of (!arbon Silicon 
and Phosphorus from Pig Iron by Alkaline 
Carbouaies. T. M. Drown. 

The Mesozoic Formation in Virginia. O. J. 
Heinrich. 

Improved Pipe and Tenyere. J H. Hartman. 

The Wheeler Process for Welding Iron and 
Steel without the use of Fluxes. D. Tor- 
rey. 

The Chemical Composition and Physical 
Properties of Steel Kails. ' C. B. Dudley. 

Thin Plate.H of Metal. T. Egleston. 

Does the Wearing Power i)f Steel Rails in- 
crease with the hardness of the Steel. C. 
B. Dudley. 

The Production of Charcoal for Iron Works. 
J. Birkinbine. 

Note on a Deposit of Cadmia in a Coke Fur- 
nace. H. Firmstone. 

The New River Coal Field of West Virginia. 
F. S. Morris. 

Au Improved Universal Suspended Hydraulic 
Lift. J, A. Herrick. 

The Manufacture of Soda by the Amonia 
Process. O. J. Heiuiich. 

The Jeuks Corundum Mine, Macon County, 
N. (!. R. W. Baymond. 

A Catalogue of Official Reports upon Geolog- 
ical Surveys of the U. S. and Territories 
and of British North America. F. Prime, Jr. 



81 



Note on the Defreest Journal-Bearing. J. C. 

Piatt, Jr. 
The Law of Fatigue and Refreshment oi 

Metals. T. Egleston. 
The Tessie Gas Producer. A . L. Holley. 
Accidents in the Comstock Mines, and their 

Relation to Deep Mining. J. A. Church. 
On the use of determining Slag Densities in 

Smelting. T. Macfarlaue. 
The Mechanical Work Performed in Heating 

the Blast. Prof. P. W. Frazier. 
The Heat of the Cumstock Mines. J. A. 

Church. 
Proceedings of the Meeting of the American 

Inst. Mining Engineers, at Lake George 

and Lake Champlain. 
On some Curious Phenomena observed in 

maliiug a Test of a Piece of Bessemer Steel. 

Wm. Kent. 
Proceedings of the Pittsburgh Meeting of the 

American Inst. Mining Engineers. 
Note on the Wear of an Iron Rail. E. C. Coxe. 
The U. S. Testing Machine at AVatertown 

Arsenal. A. L. Holley. 
The Antimony Deposits of Arkansas. C. E. 

Wait. 
The Working of Three Hearths at the Cedar 

f oint Furnace, Port Henry, N. Y. T. F. 

Witherbee. 
On the Apparatus for Testing the Resistance 

of Metals to Repeated Shocks. Wm. Kent. 
Pittsburgh— Its Resources and Surround- 
ings. Wm. P. Shinu. 
Sketches of the New Mining District at Sulli- 
van, Maine. C. W. Kempton. 
Regenerative Stores— A Sketeh on their His- 
tory and Notes on their Use. J. M. Hartman. 
The Coal and Iron of the Hocking Valley, 

Ohio. T S. Hunt. 
Discussion of Dr. C. B. Dudley's Papers on 

Steel Rails, read at the Lake George Meet- 
ing, October, 1877. 
A New Method of Dredging, Applicable to 

siiuie kind of Mining Operations. R. W. 

Raymond. 
The Nickel Ores of Oreford, Quebec, Canada. 

E. G. Eustis. 
Notes upon the Drainage of a Flooded Ore 

pit at I'iue Grove Furnace, Pa. John 

Birkinbine. 
Manganese Pig. Dr. R. W. Raymond. 
On The Mauufacture of Artificial Fuel at Port 

Richmond, Philadelphia. E. F. Loiseau. 
A Method of Rolling Steel or Iron Eye Bars. 

Chas. Macdonald. 
The Peruot Kurnace. A. L. Holley. 
The Fire-Clays and Associated Plastic Clays 
Kaolins. Feldspars and Fire Sands of New 

Jersey. Prof. J. G. Smock. 
The Economy Effected by the use of Red 

Charcoal. B. Fernow. 
Note upon the Cost of Construction of the 

Converting Works at the Edgar Thompson 

Steel Company of Pittsburgh, Pa. P. 

Barnes. 
On the Use of Red Charcoal in the Blast 

Furnace. Wm. Kent. 
A New Air Compressor. E. G. Spilsbury. 
The Late Operations on the Mariposa Estate. 

C M. Rolker. 
The Strength of Wrought Iron as Affected by 

its Composition and by its Reduction in 

Rolling A. L. Holley. 
The Maiihattau Salt Mine, atCiodrich, Canada. 

O. J. Heiurich. 
Fluxing Silicious Iron Ores. T. F. Witherbee. 



Memorandum Relating to the Construction 
Account of the Rail Mill of the Edgar 
Thompson Steel Company, Pittsburgh, Pa. 
P. Barnes. 
.\ New Method of taking Blast Furnace Sec- 
tions. T. F. Witherbee. 
Memoranda showing the Percentage of the 
Diflereut Expense Accounts in Mining 
Hematite Ore at the Manhattan Mine, 
Sharon Station, New York. F. J. Lewis. 

Improvements in the Appliances for Venting 
Molten Steel or Iron from a Casting-Ladle 
or Shoe. J. A. Herrick. 

New Steam Engine Indicator. J. E. Sweet. 

Phosphorus in Coal. Andrew S. McCreath. 

Note on the Determination of Silicon in Pig 
Iron and Steel. Dr. T. M. Drown. 

Experiments with Charcoal, Coke and Anthra- 
c te, in the Pine Grove Furnace, Pa. John 
Birkinbine. 

Relation of Sulphur in Coal and Coke. Dr. J. 
B. Kimball. 

On the Classification of Original Rocks. T. 
Macfarlaue. 

Notes on the Zinc Deposits of Southern 
Missouri. R. W. Raymond. 

A I)irect Process of Copper Smelting. H. M. 
Howe. 

Washing Phosphoric Pig Iron for the Open- 
Hearth and PuddliEg Processes, at Krupp'a 
Works, Essen. A. L. Holley. 

The Hygiene of Mines. R. W. Raymond. 

Proceedings of the Montreal Meeting, of the 
American Inst. Mining Engineers, Septem- 
ber, 1879 

The Cost of Milling Silver Ores in Utah and 
Nevada. R. P. Rothwell. 

Recent Improvements in Concentration and 
Amalgamation. J. E. Church. 

An .\utographic Transmitting Dynamometer. 
Wm. Kent. 

Silver Islet. T. MacFarlane. 

The Humboldt-Pocahontas Veiu, Rosita, 
Colon! do. R. N. Clark. 

The Great Blast at Glendon. E. Clark, Jr. 

The Lake Superior Copper Rocks in Pennsyl- 
vania. J. F. Blandy. 

The Bradford Oil District of Pennsylvania. 
Chs. A. Ashburuer. 

An Improved System of Cornish Pitwork. E. 
Dagget. 

.\nnual Report of the Engineer and Surveyor 
of the State of New York, of the Railroad 
Corporations. 

Returns of the Railroad Corporations in Mass. 
achusetts. 1866. 

Fourth and Fifth Annual Reports of the 
Board of Railroad Commissioners of Mass- 
achusetts. 

Secoud Annual Report of the Board of Health 
of the City of New York. 

Sixteenth Annual Report of the Chamber of 
Commerce of the State of New York.. 

Public Papers of John T. Hoffman, Governor 
of New York. 

Message of the President of the United States 
and Accompanying Documents, to the Two 
Houses of Congress, at the Commencement 
of the First Session of the Thirty-eighth 
Congress. 

Annual Report of the Commissioners of 
Patents for the Year 1867. 

Statistics of Mines and Mining in the States 
and Territories West of the Rocky Moun- 
tains. R. W. Raymond. 



85 



Historical View of the Art of Electro-Mag- 
netic Telegraphiug in connectiou with the 
Telegrajsh Cablo aud its lusulation by Gutta 
Percha. 

Argument of Franklin B. Go wan, Esq.. before 
the Joint Committee of the Legislature of 
Pennsylvania. 

Transactions of the American Philosophical 
Society. Vol. XII. Part III. 

The Imperial Cyolopsedia of Machinery. 

The Woodruff Scientific Expedition Around 
the World. 1877-9. 

The Empire of Brazil at the Universal Exhi- 
bition of 1876, in Philadelphia. 

Catalogue of the Officers and Students of Co- 
lumbia College. 1869-1870. 1876-77. 

Catalogue of Columbia College School of 
Mines. 1868-G9. 

Catalogue of Columbia Academic Department. 
1872-73. 

Sixteenth Annual Eegister of the Free Acad- 
emy of the City of New York. 

Seventeenth Annual Register oi the Free Acad- 
emy of the City of New York. 

Twenty-second Annual Register of the College 
of the City of New Y'ork. 

Merit KoU of the New York Free Academy, 
First Academic Term. 

Oration and Poem Delivered Before the Asso- 
ciate Alumni of the College of the City of 
New York. 

Address of the Associate Alumni of the Board 
of Trustees of the College of the City of 
New I'ork. 

Historical Cabinet of the College of the City 
of New York. 

Thirty-filth Annual Catalogue of the Officers, 
Faculty and Students of the University of 
Notre Dame, Indiana. 

Catalogue of the Officers and Students of La- 
fayette College. 1871-72. 1872-73. 

Annual Catalogue of the Officers and Students 
of Hamilton College. 1872-73. 

Charter, Constitution aud By-Laws of the 
Lyceum of Natural History in the City of 
New York. 

By-Laws of the Lyceum of Natural History of 
the City of New York. 

List of Officers, Honorary Members, IMeui- 
bers and Associates of the American Chem- 
ical Society. 



Silver as a Commodity, as Money and as a Ma- 
terial for Token Coins or Fractional Cur- 
rency. Hon. Wm. D. Kelley. 

Royal College of Science for Ireland. Sylla- 
bus of a Course of Lectures on Botany. 

Science and Art Department, Royal College of 
Science for Irelanl. Programme of the 
Educational Arrangements. 1870-71. 

Annual Report of the Chief Eugineers U. 
S. A. for 1873. Parts I and II. 

The Legislative Manual of the State of New 
York for 1861. 

Thc Correlation and Conservation of Forces. 
A Series of E.vpositions. Edited by Edward 
L. Y'oumans 

Davies' Surveying. New York. 1841. 

The Marine Steam-Engine. Thos. J. Main 
and Thos. Brown. 

An Elementary Course of Civil Engineering. 
D. H. Mahan. 

From R. E. Peary, Washington, D. C. 

Message from the President of the United 
States in response to Senate Resolution of 
February 11, 1880. Covering report of 
Secretary of State ; with accompanying 
documents in relation to the proposed luter- 
oceafaic Canal between the Atlantic and Pa- 
cific Oceans. 

Message from the President of the United 
States, transmitting copies of correspond- 
ence in relation to the Inter-oceanic Canal. 
March, 1881. 

Letter from the Secretary of the Navy, with 
the report of Rear- Admiral Davis on Inter- 
oceanic Communication at the American 
Isthmus. 

Speech of Hon. W'm. Windom, of Minn., in 
the Senate of Ihe United States, on Isthmus 
Ship Canals, February 28,1881. Washing- 
ton, 1881. 

Report oi Mr. King, from the Committee on 
Inter-oceanic Ship Canal. February, 1881, 
on Inter-oceanic Ship Railway. 

Report of Mr. Oscar Sumer, from the Select 
Committee on Inter-oceanic Shij) Canal, 
submitted February 17, 1881, on Tehuante- 
pec Ship Railway. 

Review ot Capt. Phelps' Pamphlet, entitled 
Transportation Ships on Railways. Capt. 
Jas. B. Eads. 



LIST OF MEMBERS 



ADDITIONS. 

MEMBERS. 

Date of Election. 

AxwooD, William H Res. Engineer, New York, Lake Erie and 

Western R.R., Jersey City, N. J May 4, 1881 

Blickensderfer, RoiJERT.Div. Engineer Utah and Northern Rail- 
way, Terminus, Montana . ..June I, 18S1 

M.\Y, William A Box 173, Scranton, Pa July 6, 1881 

Wellington, Arthi'r M. Locating Engineer Me.\ican National Rail- 
road, Mexico, Mex May 4, 1881 



86 

JUNIOR. 

Stewart, Hunter 2828 Washington Ave., St. Louis, Mo June i, 1881 



CHANGES AND CORRECTIONS. 



MEMBERS. 

Becker, M. J Chiel Engineer P., C. & St. L. R.R., Pittsburg, Pa. 

Bruner, D. P P. O. Box 4, Allegheney City, Pa. 

Chesbrough, E. S .Uept. Public Works, 31 Chambers St., New York City, 

N. Y. 
Corthkll, £!. L Chief Engineer N. Y., W. S. eS; 15. R.R., 20 Nassau St., 

New York City, N. Y. 

Ellis, N. W Box 53, Manchester, N. H. 

Gardner, G. Clinton. ...Gen. Man. Mexican National R.R., 47 William St., New 

York City, N. Y. 

Harding, Henry Maverick House, East Boston, Mass. 

Harris, William P Supt. N. Y. & G. L. R.R., Jersey City, N. J. 

Lehn.artz, F. H (Stockder & Lehnartz), Lake City, Col. 

Leverich, G Box 174, South Orange, N. J. 

McKee, Charles H D. & H. C. Co. R.R., French Mountain, N. Y. 

McLain, Louis R .Div. Engineer G. & P. R.R., Oxford, Ala. 

Paine, Charles Gen. Man. N. Y., W. S. & B. R.R., 20 Nassau St., New 

York City, N. Y. 
Stanton, Robert P Div. Engineer U. P. R.R. , Union Depot, Denver, Col. 

associate. 
Harris, Charles M Care Parsons & Co., 42 Pine St., New York City, N. Y. 



juniors. 

Brooks, Fredk Mexican Central Railway, Tampico, Mex. 

Butts, Edward P. O. Box L, Kansas City, Mo. 

Horton, Sanford 48 Carroll St., Poughkeepsie, N. Y. 

Lucas, D. Jones Corry, Pa. 

Raymond, Chas. Ward. .269 West Eleventh St., New York City, N. Y. 



deaths. 

Reno, James H Elected Member, Nov. 5, 1879. Died Aug. 5, 1881 

Fargo, William G " Fellow, May 6, 1870. " " 4,1881 



Imalcan ^oddg of ^pA jn^mm. 



PROOEEDINaS. 



Vol. VI L— September, 1881, 



MINUTES OF MEETINQS, 

(Abstract of such as may be of general interest to members.) 



OF THE SOCIETY. 



September 7th, 1881. — The Society met at 8 p. m., Director William 
H. Paine in the chair. Ballots were canvassed, and the following candi- 
dates declared elected : — As members, Charles Blackwell, Ottawa, Canada; 
Walter A. Doane, Meadville, Pa. ; Robert L. Engle, Cincinnati, Ohio; 
Charles Edward Goad, Montreal, Canada ; Arthur Hider, St. Louis, 
Mo.; William Pierson Judson, Oswego, N. Y. ; Louis Lesage, Montreal, 
Canada; Alexander Ludus Light, Quebec, Canada; Theodore H. 
McKenzie, Southington, Ct.; Gilbert Murdoch, St. Johns, New Bruns- 
wick, Canada; Etienne Henri Parent, Montreal, Canada; George Steele 
Skilton, Mexico, Mexico. As Associate, John Strathearn Hendrie, Mar- 
quette, Mich. 

The death was announced of William Milnor Roberts, Past President 
of the Society, which occurred in Brazil, South America, July 14th, 1881 ; 
also the death of G. Thomas Hall, Member of the Society, which oc- 
curred in New York, June 2d, 1881 ; also the death of James H. Reno, 
Member of the Society, which occurred in Pittsburgh, Pa., August 5th, 
1881; also the death of William G. Fargo, Fellow of the Society, which 
occurred in Buffalo, N. Y., August 4th, 1881. The appointment of Com- 
mittees to prepare in each case a memoir for publication, was authorized. 

A paper by D. McN. Stauflfer, Member A. S. C. E., subject, Shaft 
Sinking under difficulties at Dorchester Bay Tunnel, Boston, Mass., was 
jjresented and its discussion postponed until the next meeting, 

OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTION. 

August 9th, 1881. — Applications were considered. Appropriations 
were made. 

September 6th, 1881. — Applications were considered. 



MEMOIRS OF DECEASED MEMBERS. 



JAMES A. HATWAIID, Member A. S. C. E. 

Died August 13th, 1880. 

James A. Hay ward was born in Dublin, New Hami^sliire, September 
12th, 1849. He spent some time, when quite young, at Antioch College, 
Ohio, and in 1870 graduated with honor as a Civil Engineer at the Uni- 
versity of Michigan. He was engaged in map business during a part of 
the time, from 1870 to 1873, in which latter year he married Miss Ida 
Upjohn, of Kalamazoo, Michigan. His wife and child died in 1876. 
In 1873 Mr. Hayward entered the United States service as U. S. 
Assistant Engineer on the survey of Pass Cavallo, entrance to Matagorda 
Bay and Channel to Indianola. In December, 1873, he was placed in 
charge of the portion of the survey for a canal to connect the inland 
waters along the Gulf of Mexico from the Mississippi Eiver to the Eio 
Grande, extending from Donaldsonville to Vermillion Bay, La. 

After this survey was completed and estimates made he was employed 
in the U. S. Engineer office in New Orleans, at various duties, and for 
a short time assisted in taking cross-sections of South Pass, Mississippi 
River. He was thus employed until March, 1875, when he left the ser- 
vice and returned to Michigan. In November, 1876, he was placed in 
charge of the survey of a ship channel through Galveston Bay and was 
afterwards continued in the government employ in charge of the surveys 
of Sabine Pass, Texas, and as inspector of dredging at the mouth of the 
Neches Eiver. He was accidentally drowned from the schooner Amadeo,. 
August 12th, 1880, upon which vessel he was making a trip down the 
west coast of the Gulf of Mexico. 

Mr. Hayward leaves a widowed mother and a sister. His professional 
life had been confined to the duties connected with the United States 
Engineer service, and his early death has cut off a member of the pro- 
fession who gave great promise of enlarged lasefulness in the future had 
his life been spared. Mr. Hayward was devoted to his family, and will 
be remembered as a most amiable and interesting man. He became a 
member of the American Society of Civil Engineers September 5th, 
1877. 



89 



WILLIAM HENRY GREENWOOD, Member A. S. C. E. 

Died Atjgitst 29th, 1880. 

William Henry Greenwood was born in Dublin, New Hampshire 
March 27, 1832. His family removed to Marlborough, in the same 
state, in 1834, and he received his earlier education in the public schools 
of that place. As a boy he showed a great fondness for machinery and 
seemed to have inherited from his father considerable inventive genius. 
Quite early in life he determined to become a Civil Engineer and entered 
Norwich University in 1850, graduating in 1852. Directly after his 
graduation he was engaged upon the Central Military Tract Railroad, 
now the Chicago, Burlington and Quincy. He was afterwards connected 
with what was then known as the American Central Railroad and con- 
tinued there until the commencement of the late war. 

He enlisted on the 17th day of January, 1862, in the 51st regiment of 
Illinois Volunteers and was commissioned First Lieutenant, to date from 
his enlistment. He became Captain, May 9th, 1863, in the same regi- 
ment. Soon after the battle of Stone River Gen. Rosencranz selected 
Captain Greenwood to organize a topographical engineer service, and 
directed him to report, for better facilities for the observation of the 
country, to Gen. Stanley, at that time in command of the Cavahy of the 
Army of the Cumberland. ' As Lieutenant-Colonel and Inspector he 
continued with the 4th Corps of the Army of the Cumberland to the 
close of the war, and Gen Stanley states that no officer was present and 
l^articipated in more battles, actions, affairs and skirmishes than Colonel 
Greenwood. He was entrusted with constant, difficult and delicate 
duties. He constructed a very large amount of field fortifications, and 
was especially known as one of the most indefatigable and enterprising 
officers of the corps. He was habitually careless as to his own safety. 
In 1865, still in the service of the government, he rebuilt the Gulf and 
San Antonia Railroad in Texas, which had been destroyed. After a 
short visit to his home he entered the service of the Kansas Pacific Rail- 
road, of which he was appointed Chief Engineer in 1«67, and while 
holding this position made surveys on the 32d and 35th parallels to the 
Pacific Coast. Under his direction some of the most rapid known rail- 
road construction was accomplished. Upon completion of this road to 
Denver, in the summer of 1870, he resigned his position as Chief Engi- 
neer, and was soon afterwards appointed General Manager of the Den- 
ver and Rio Grande Railroad Comjriany, and occupied that jjosition until, 
the road was completed to Pueblo and Canon City. Resigning this 
position he returned to the East in December, 1874, and spent all of the 
year 1875 in Vermont. He resided in Philadelphia during the year 1876, 
and in Vermont in 1877, engaged professionally only upon some minor 



90 

railroad operations. In May, 1878, lie took charge of the construction of 
the railroad now operated by the Denver and Rio Grande Company 
through the Grand Canon of the Arkansas and further west toward Lead- 
ville, to which work he devoted very remarkable energy and ability. 
During 1879 he was in charge of the construction of the Marion and 
MacPherson Railroad in Kansas. He left New York on the 19th day of 
May, 1880, for Mexico, and arrived in the City of Mexico on the last day 
of the month, where he directly took charge, as Chief Engineer, of the 
surveys for the Mexican National Railway under the control of Messrs, 
Sullivan and Palmer. Up to the end of August preliminary lines had 
been surveyed and location made between the City of Mexico and Toluca, 
distant about 44 miles, together with some extensions beyond that point. 

On Sunday," August 29th, 1880, the camp of Colonel Greenwood and 
his party was near Toluca. He, with an assistant and a servant, started 
toward the City of Mexico, and had proceeded to within about 15 miles 
of that city when the assistant and the boy left the Colonel temporarily, 
but found upon following him that he had ridden quite a distance ahead. 
He was followed rapidly, but after crossing a deej) ravine at a small mill 
at the top of a plateau on the Mexican side, his dead body was found 
lying in the trail with a bullet hole through the left hand which also 
passed entirely through the body . He was also wounded upon the right 
wrist and slightly upon the head. His horse and arms were missing, 
but his watch, money and some valuable papers were untouched . The 
murder of Colonel Greenwood excited intense indignation and grief in 
the City of Mexico. His funeral was very largely attended and he was 
buried at the American cemetery, in Mexico. 

Colonel Greenwood leaves a widow who had been his constant com- 
panion, not only at his home in Vermont, but also in the frontier towns 
where so large a part of his engineering life had been spent. She went 
with him to Mexico and was there at the time of his death. 

All the associates of Colonel Greenwood for many years past unite in 
speaking of him with a personal affection and a regard for his profes- 
sional ability which could only be inspired by remarkable characteristics 
both of the man and the engineer. Removed at a comparative early age, 
and in the prime of life, and in active exercise of important engineering 
duties, he will be remembered by those who knew him as one of the 
finest examples of the life and service of the American Railroad Civil 
Engineer. The very activity and constancy of his professional wor