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1892. 



Grand Lodge 



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OF • • • 



COLORADO. 



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H 



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PROCEEDINGS 



OF THE 



M. W. Grand Lodge 



| OF 



A. F. & A. M. OF COLORADO, 



AT THE 



3 2d Annual Communication 



HELD AT 



Denver, September 20 and 21, 



A. D. 1892 — A. L. 5892. 



Ordered that these Proceedings be read in each Lodge. 

—See Sec. 134 of By-Laws. 



DENVER. COLORADO: 
W. F. Robinson & Co., Printers. 
1892. 






[thenewyork 

PUBLICLIBRARY, 



A*T9A, UNOX AMO J 

TitotN fou^DATK>N8.gRAND OFFICERS, 1892-93. 

t897. f 



Wm. D. Wright, Denver G. M. 

Jethbo C. Sanpord, Durango _D. G. M. 

Wm. L. Bush, Idaho Springs S. G. W. 

"Wm. D. Pejrce, Denver _ J. G. W. 

Frank Church, Denver G. Treas. 

Ed. C. Parmelee, Masonic Temple, Denver G. Sec. 

R. J. Van Valkenburg, Erie _..G. Chaplain 

T. B. MacDonald, Saguache . ..G. Orator 

Clay M. Van, Denver G. Lecturer 

Wm. M. Roller, Salida G. Marshal 

Judson E. Cole, Buena Vista S. G. D. 

Horace T. DeLong, Grand Junction. _ 1 J. G. D. 

Andrew Kellock, Tell u ride S. G. S. 

Scel E. Clark, Fort Collins J. G. S. 

Thomas Linton, Denver G. Tiler. 



COMMITTEE ON JURISPRUDENCE. 

Roger W. Woodbury Denver 

Wm. D. Todd ...Denver 

James H. Peabody Cafion City 



COMMITTEE ON CORRESPONDENCE. 

L. N. Greenleap Denver 

B. F. Rawalt _ Akron 

Ira L. Herron Longmont 



The Thirty-third Annual will be held in Denver, Tuesday, 
September 19th, 1S93. 






• • ..::•: 



• . ••"• •••••• : 



•• • • • • • 



• *.r .'• '..•': • 



••••*.••• I 



• • 



 • • • • 



«• 



PROCEEDINGS 



OF THE 



GRAND LODGE OF COLORADO 



AT THE 



Annual Communication, 

Held September 20th and 21st, 1892. 



Denver, Tuesday, Sept. 20, 1892. 

The M. W. Grand Lodge of A. F. and A. Masons of 
Colorado, commenced its Thirty-second Annual Commu- 
nication at Masonic Temple, in Denver, on the third Tues- 
day of September, 1892, at 10 o'clock a. m. 

The Grand Lodge was opened in ample form by the 
M. W. Grand Master, with prayer by the Grand Chaplain, 
the following Grand Officers and other members occupying 
their respective places: 

OFFICERS. 

JOHN M. MAXWELL _ G. M. 

WM. D. WRIGHT '. D. G. M. 

JETHRO C. SAN FORD 8. G. W. 

WM. L. BOSH J. G. W. 

FRANK CHURCH G.Treas. 

ED. C. PARMELEE G. Sec'y 

R. J. VAN VALKENBERG.. aa G. Chaplain 

IRA L. HERRON G. Orator 

WM. D. PEIRCE G. Lecturer 

HENRY T. WEST G. Marehal 

JOHN A. STEELE 8. G. D. 

WM. W. ROLLER J. G. D. 

RICHARD HARVEY 8. G. S. 

CHARLES F. PAINTER as J. G. 8. 

THOMAS LINTON G. Tiler 

And representatives from 77 chartered Lodges (all but 
Nos. 36 and 63). 



4 PROCEEDINGS OF THE 

COMMITTEE ON CREDENTIALS. 
The M. W. Grand Master appointed Brothers — 

GRAND SECRETARY, 
LUTIAN Q. HOBB8, 
MYER S. RAF1ELD, 

as a Committee on Credentials. 

The Committee soon presented their report, which, with 
other reports during the session from said Committee, 
showed the following Grand Officers, Permanent Members, 
Representatives from Lodges and Grand Representatives 
present : 

GRAND OFFICERS. 

JOHN M. MAXWELL G. M. 

WM. D. WRIGHT D. G. M. 

JETHROC. 8ANFORD. 8. G. W. 

WM. L. BUSH J. G. W. , 

FRANK CHURCH G. Treas. 

ED. C. PARMELEE G. Sec'y. 

IRA L. HERRON G. Orator 

WM. D. PEIRCE G. Lecturer 

HENRY T. WEST G. Marshal 

JOHN A. STEELE... 8. G. D. 

WM. W. ROLLER J. G. D. 

RICHARD HARVEY .8. G. 8. 

THOMAS LINTON G. Tiler 

PERMANENT MEMBERS. 

Past Grand Masters 

HENRY M. TELLER, 

ARCHIBALD J. VAN DEREN, 

WEBSTER D. ANTHONY, 

OREN H. HENRY, 

HARPER M. ORAHOOD. 

BYRON L. CARR, 

LAWRENCE N. GREEN LEAF. 

ROBERT A. QUILL1AN, 

FRANK CHURCH (Grand Treasurer), 

ANDREW 8AGENDORF, 

JAMES H. PEABODY, 

GEORGE E. WYMAN, 

GEORGE K. KIMBALL, 

WM. D. TODD, 

WM. T. BRIDWELL, 

ERNEST LE NEVE FOSTER, 

HENRY P. H. BROMWELL (Honorary). 



GRAND LODGE OF COLORADO. 



5 



REPRESENTATIVES FROM LODGES. 



MAM Or LODGX. 

Golden City No. 1. 
Nevada No. 4 



Denver No. 5. 



Central No. 6. 



Union No. 7. 



Black Hawk No. 11. 



Washington No. 12. 



El Paso No. IS. 



Columbia No. 14 



Mount Moriah No. 15 



Pueblo No. 17 



Collins No. 19 



Occidental No. 20 



Weston No. 22. 



8t. Vrain No. 23 



Doric No. 25. 



Idaho Springs No. 26. 



Huerfano No. 27. 



Las Animas No. 28 



Del Norte No. 29. 



King Solomon No. 80. 



Booth Pueblo No. 31 . 



Olive Branch No. 82. 



San Juan No. 83. 



[Those present In Italics.] 

.Wm. Triplett W. M. 

Wm. P. Benedict S. W. 

James Nankivel J. W. 

.Alex. Aulsebrook W. M. 

Wm. Nichols 8. W. 

Frank Mayhew J. W. 

.Frank Wheeler W. M. 

Robert Hamilton & W. 

Wm. L. H.Millar J. W. 

.Ambrose Bray W. M. 

Ferdinand French 8. W. 

Charles Ellis J. W. 

.Leonard Qutshaw W. M. 

Louis C. Greenlee 8. W. 

Harry Carr J. W. 

.James Richards W. H. 

Ed. C.Hughes 8. W. 

Aug. F. Gritzmacher J. W. 

.Samuel Hardy W.M. 

John L. Carlson 8. W. 

Walter A. Garrett J. W. 

.John Williams W. M. 

Henry G. Berry 8. W. 

David H.Rice J. W. 

.CharlenS. Faurot W. M. 

John L. Church 8. W. 

8. L. Madera J. W. 

.D. A. Bradbury W. M. 

Leroy O.Young 8. W. 

G. H. Kellenberger J. W. 

. Walter L. Dorland W. M . 

ZerezoV. Trine 8. W. 

Geo. W.Gill J. W. 

.Suel E. Clark W. M. 

John P. Campbell 8. W. 

Geo. A. Webb J. W. 

.Chae. E. Stanley _...W. M. 

Jesse 8. Gale 8. W. 

John M. B. Petrekin J. W. 

.W. W. Chapman W.M. 

F.W. Shnckart 8. W. 

Geo. E.Stuart J. W. 

.Willis A. Warner W.M. 

Frank P. 8ecor 8. W. 

ChasJ. Gregg J. W. 

.Abraham Bergh W.M. 

Jacob Adler 8. W. 

Willis H. Deering J. W. 

.Wm. L. Bush W.M. 

John J. Bherwin 8. W. 

Jos. E. Chester J. W. 

.Robert A. Quillian W.M. 

Henry Blickhahn 8. W. 

Fred. Unfug J. W. 

.D.R. CalUiitav W.M. 

Frank D. Goodale 8. W. 

John Humphrey J. W. 

.Cyrup W. Campbell W. M. 

E. R. Hoyt 8. W. 

Jared H. Burghardt J. W. 

.Wm.E. Culver W.M. 

Silas G. Wright 8. W. 

John A. Murphy J. W. 

.Robert H. Wartenbec W. M. 

Wm.L.Hartman 8. W. 

C. V. Marmaduke J. W. 

.J. W. Ram bo W.M. 

T. B. Mac Donald 8. W. 

W. A. Johnson J. W. 

./). R. Davis W.M. 

J.F.Clark H. W. 

Henry Meldron J. W. 



FBOXIXS. 



Ferdinand French. 



Eugene S. Cohen. 



George S. Adams. 

D. A . Bradbury. 

George W. Roe. 



. Walter L. Dorland. 

.Andrew Armstrong. 

.Andrew Armstrong. 

John M. B. Petrekin. 



. E. Jull. 
R. W. Candler. 

John Q. Grant. 
Willis A. Warner. 



.George G. Vivian. 
Willtam Mitchell. 

. Charles O. Unfug. 
Charles 0. Unfug. 



D. R. Callaicay. 



Wm. E. Culver. 
Wm. E. Culver. 



. T. B. MacDonald. 

.T. B. Mac Donald. 

D. R. Davis. 
Thomas Berriman. 



PROCEEDINGS OP THE 



NAME OF LODGE. 

Crystal Lake No. 84 
Ionic No. 35 



Rosita No. 36. 
Ouray No. 37. . 



Silver Cliff No. 38. 



Gunnison No. 39 



Pitkin No. 40. 



Schiller No. 41 



Corinthian No. 42 
Eagle No. 43 

Alamosa No. 44.. . 



Boulder No. 45 



Durango No. 46. 



Breckenridge No. 47. 



Georgetown No. 4*v 



Mt. Princeton No. 49. 



Garfield No. 50 



Leadville No. 51. 



Tin Cnp No. 52 



Loveland No. 53. 



Sterling No. 54 



Mesa No. 55. 



Tellnride No. 56. 



Salida No. 57. 



Crested Butte No. 58 



La Veta No. 59 



..DavidS. Hoffman W. M. 

George Pirie 8. W. 

John L. Kinsey J. W. 

.Lutian Q. Hobbs W. M. 

John P. Armington 8. W. 

W. W. Coble J. W. 

..Not represented. 

..Wm. W.Rowan W. M. 

Jas. K. Herring 8. W. 

H. W.Kinne J. W. 

..John A. Feist W. M. 

Wm.T. Decker 8. W. 

Wm. J. Orange J. W. 

..Herman M. Webgter W. M. 

Henry C.Olney 8. W. 

Trnman W.Gray J. W. 

..John F. Chrystal W. M. 

Josiah C. Nisley 8. W. 

Geo. W. Eastman J. W. 

.Bernard Hertzbach W. M. 

Prank Walters 8. W. 

Frank Kratzer J. W. 

..Andrew E. Chase W. M. 

John W. Hightree 8. W. 

John H. Preeberg J. W. 

..Geo. B. Sinionton W. M 

A. G. Mays 8. W. 

Wm. H.Evans J. W. 

. .John Spriesterabach W. M. 

Wm. IL Hirst... 8. W. 

Fred. W. 8wanson J. W. 

.Richard H. Whiteley W.M. 

JohnH. Crary 8. W. 

R. R. Gibbon J. W. 

.CharletS. Butler W.M. 

Charles H. Barton 8. W. 

Geo. V. Copp J. W. . 

.H. H. Eluxtod W.M. 

Christian Kaiser 8. W. 

H. L. Moyer J. W. 

.Stoat Hart _ W.M. 

Fred.P.Dewry 8. W. 

Robert Neuman... J. W. , 

.Ernest Wilber W.M. 

Frank B. Keyes 8. W. 

W. W.Fay J. W. 

.Joseph R. Potcell W. M. 

John E. Oakley 8. W. . 

Thos. Morgan J. W. 

.Samuel D. Nicholson W.M. 

Henry R. Pendery 8. W. 

("has. E. Dickinson J. W. 

.James W. Forrest W.M. 

Wm. H.Harris 8. W. 

Jas. K. Reed J. W. 

.Clarence J. Chapman ...W. M. 

Louis 8. Woodruff 8. W. 

Charles Maxwell J. W. 

.Arthur W. Warren W.M. 

J. E.Killen 8. W. 

Samuel B. Robnck J. W. 

.Orson Adams, Jr W. M. 

Charles E. Mitchell .8. W. 

Jacob H. Rice .J. W. 

.Charles F. Pointer W. M. 

Wm. T. March 8. W. 

Thomas H. Ballard J. W. 

.Wm. Q. Simon W.M. 

Theodore Martin H. W. . 

Wra.Cummings J. W. . 

.Frank E. Songer W. M. . 

ThomasHtarr S. W. 

Frank Young J. W. 

.Samuel Todd W.M. 

John R. Otson H. W. 

Wm. A. Springer J. W. 



PROXIES. 

.Carl For berg. 
.Carl Forberg. 
.Carl Forberg. 

.Herman Vulpius. 
Lutian Q. Hobbs. 



Wm. W. Rowan. 
Wm. W. Rowan. 
Wm. J. Orange. 
Wm. J. Orange. 



Herman M. Webster. 

John F. Chrystal. 

John F. Chrystal. 



.J. E. Bemus. 

. Wm. H. Nicholson. 

.J. E. Bemus. 

'Charles 8. Butler. 
Charles S. Butler. 



.H. H. Elwood. 
. Fred. P. Dewey. 

. Charles H. Jacobson. 
.Frank B. Keyes. 



. . . R.J. Van Valkenburg. 
. . . Joseph R. Powell. 
. . . Henry R. Pendery. 

...A Iph. A. Burnand. 
F. B. Massey. 

...F. B. Massey. 



Lawrence M. Miller. 
Horace T. DeLong. 



.Andrew Kellock. 

.Jason Qillett. 
.James B. McCoy. 



GRAND LODGE OF COLORADO. 



SAMK OF IjODGK. 

Spar No. 60 

Harmony No. 61. 
Delta No. 62 



Montrose No. 68. 
Euclid No. M.... 



Glenwood No. 65 



Eureka No. 66. _ 



Oasis No. 67. 



Manitou No. 68. 



Windsor No. 60. 



No. 70. 



Wraj No. 71 . 

Granada No. 72. 



Monte Vista No. 73. 



Akron No. 74 



St. John's No. 75 



Colorado City No. 76 



Burlington No. 77. 



Brighton No. 78 



Rico No. 79. 



Rio Blanco No. 80. 



Holyoke No. 81. 



Carbondale No. 82. 



Berthood No. 63. 



Temple No. 84... 
Acacia No. 85 



.Frank H. Denman W. M. 

James McMorray 8. W. 

David F. Goodall J. W. 

.Leonard W. Grant W. M. 

Elliott J. Proctor 8. W. 

Wm. E. McParlin J. W. 

.Abram C.Butler W.M. 

Lewis C.Aley 8. W. 

T. H. McGranahan J. W. 

.Not represented. 

.Benj. F. Haskins W. M. . 

Victor Albera 8. W. . 

Charles F. Kendall J. W. 

.Will 8. Parkison W. M. 

Fran* P. Monroe 8. W. 

Harry E. Van Meckel J. W. 

.W. M. Bridges W.M. . 

Alfred D. Garrett 8. W. 

JohnC McOreery J. W. 

.Moses N. Wagner W.M. 

James T. Devin 8. W. 

J. Frank Arbackle J. W. 

.Hudson H. Aldrich W.M. 

Charles H. Frowine 8. W. 

Edward E. Nichols, Jr J. W. 

.James McGruder W.M. 

Harrison Teller 8. W. 

Adam Hahn J. W. 

.Christ. Johnson W.M. 

George B. Steadman 8. W. , 

Jos. F. Gauss J. W. 

.James N. Counter W. M. 

Adalbert J. White 8. W. 

JohnW. Zepp J. W. 

.Chas. I. Hutching W.M. 

Jacob Mendenhall 8. W. 

F. D. Hesse J. W. 

.Ira J. Bloomfield W.M. 

Wm. A. Packard 8. W. 

A. R. VanEgidy J. W. 

..Louis C. Stephenson W.M. 

John B.Fisher 8. W. 

JohnW. Moore J. W. 

.Elias W.Kearby ....W.M. 

William B. Gobin 8. W. 

Edwin J. Smith J. W. 

. .Wm. Lincicum W.M. 

A. H. Dibble 8. W. 

J. W. Nerwinter J. W. 

.Hiram Wilson W.M. 

Cameron A. Gillette 8. W. 

Michael Higgins J. W. 

.Andrew V. Craig W.M. 

Herbert O. Myrick 8. W. 

Dewey W. 8trong J. W. 

.Filer L. Thompson W. M. 

8. M. Ransom 8. W. 

Lewis Clarke J. W. 

.Arthur C. Moulton W. M. 

Henderson H. Eddy 8. W. 

James Lyttle J. W. 

.Ralph E. Webster W. M. 

Frank M.Smith 8. W. 

Chas. B. Timberlake J. W. 

. Marshall H. Dean W.M. 

Frank E. Sweet 8. W. 

Charles Lehow J. W. 

.John R. Miner ..W.M. 

Fred A.Crane 8. W. 

Harrison K. Hankins J. W. 

.Frank I. Smith W.M. 

Clay M. Van 8. W. 

Joseph C. Dresser J. W. 

.Myer 8. Rafteld W.M. 

Wm. R Coe 8. W. 

Chas. H. Dudley J. W. 



PROXIES. 

David F. Goodall. 



Charles F. Kendall. 
Charles F. Kendall. 



George Wilson. 
. George Wilson. 
. George Wilson. 



E. F. Curran. 



.B. M.Krumpanitzky. 
B.M Krumpanitzky. 



..B. F. Raualt. 



Granville Pendleton. 



A. C. Moulton. 
.Ira W. Waite. 
.J. E. Kidd. 



R. M. Hubbell. 
R. M. Hubbell. 



8 PROCEEDINGS OF THE 

NAME OF LODGE. PROXIES. 

Highlands No. 86 Geo. F. Lewis W.M 

John if . Shannon 8. W 

Luther H. Wygant, Jr. J. W 

Oriental No. 87 Henry M. Furman W.M 

Alonzo F. Vick Roy 8. W 

Jerome A. Tickers J. W 

YampaNo. 88 James M. Darnall W. M C. A. Seymour. 

Frank B. Ranney 8. W C. A. Seymour. 

James L. Tower J. W G.A.Seymour. 

GRAND REPRESENTATIVES. 

E. L. N. F08TEB Alabama 

JOHN W. SLEEPER Arizona 

FRANK C. YOUNG British Colombia 

JAMES H. PEABODY California 

BYRON L. CARR Canada 

GEORGE WYMAN Connecticut and Delaware 

ROBERT A. QUILLION , Caba 

WM. D. WRIGHT District of Columbia 

HENRY M. TELLER Illinois. Minnesota, Nebraska and Wyoming 

HARPER M. ORAHOOD Indiana and West Virginia 

ALPHON8E A. BURNAND Indian Territory 

GEORGE K. KIMBALL Iowa and New Hampshire 

WEB8TER D. ANTHONY Kansas and Wisconsin 

WM. D. TODD Louisiana and Pennsylvania 

ED. C. PARMELEE Maine, Missouri, Oregon and Vermont 

JETHRO C. 8ANFORD Manitoba 

WM. D. PEIRCE Maryland 

L. N. GREENLEAF Michigan and New Mexico 

FRANK CHURCH Mississippi 

WM. T. BRIDWELL Nevada 

H. P. H. BROMWELL New Brunswick 

JOHN M. MAXWELL New Jersey 

CROMWELL TUCKER New South Wales 

HORACE T. DE LONG North Dakota 

ANDREW SAGENDORF Quebec 

WM. L. BUSH South Dakota 

JOHN A. STEELE Tasmania 

LAWRENCE M. MILLER Virginia 

WM.W. ROLLER Washington 

GRAND REPRESENTATIVES. 

The Representatives of other Grand Lodges near this 
Grand Lodge were called to the East, and fraternally wel- 
comed by the Grand Master. 

Past Grand Master H. P. H. Bromwell responded in 
his usual happy manner. 

COMMITTEE APPOINTED. 
The Grand Master appointed the following committee: 

TO EXAMINE VISITING BRETHREN. 

WM. L. H. MILLAR, 
ARTHUR C. MOULTON, 
FRED. P. DEWEY. 



GRAND LODGE OF COLORADO. 9 

GRAND MASTER'S ADDRESS. 

The Grand Master delivered the following address: 
Brethren of Grand Lodge: 

Through the blessing of a kind Providence we are permitted to 
assemble in this our Thirty-second Annual Grand Communication, 
under circumstances which should invoke from us sincere thanks to 
the Giver of every good and perfect gift for His great and continued 
kindness and mercy to us. 

Death has not invaded the ranks of our Grand Lodge during 
the past year; the year has been one of peace, harmony and pros- 
perity, scores of good men and true have been added to the member- 
ship of our Fraternity, we have had the great pleasure and privilege 
of welcoming within our borders and entertaining thousands of our 
brethren from sister Jurisdictions, upon the occasion of the Twenty- 
fifth Triennial Conclave of Knights Templar, to the success of which 
the Blue Lodge Masons as such contributed in no small degree; no 
serious dissension has been brought to the attention of your Grand 
Master, and he has not been called upon to exercise his prerogative 
of discipline during the year; our relations with our sister Grand 
Jurisdictions are of the most fraternal and cordial nature. 

One year ago, when you placed in my hands the gavel of the 
Grand Master. I entered upon the discharge of the duties of the 
office with grave fears and apprehensions, for I realized that without 
experience, as I was, the journey upon which I had entered would 
be beset with many dangers. 

The demands of this large and growing Jurisdiction make the 
duties of the Grand Master numerous and weighty, and at times I 
might have hesitated and despaired had it not been for the kindly 
assistance and advice of brethren, who helped, encouraged and sus- 
tained me. 

The discharge of the duties themselves is pleasant. The study 
of Masonry, its laws and customs, and its illustrious history, that 
golden legend, brings inspiration with it. 

The mingling in its assemblies and meeting with long known 
brothers, and with many a one newly met, but as pleasant as a 
friend of childhood — these furnish rest and help; and I know of no 
assemblies that seem to supply their own refreshment and renewed 
strength equal to our fraternal meetings. I have found on every 
hand Masters of Lodges and brethren, many strangers to me, were 
it not that they all are brothers, rising and changing a heavy load 
into a labor of delight. 

If I shall not find time or space in this address to refer to these 
kindnesses, yet they are not forgotten, but endure as good deeds do, 
without death. 



lO PROCEEDINGS OF THE 



NECROLOGY. 



Another year has passed into history, and Death, the grim 
reaper, has dealt very kindly with our Grand Lodge. 

No officer or member of this Grand Lodge, or Past Grand 
Officer, has received a summons from the Supreme Grand Master to 
appear " in that Celestial Lodge above, not made with hands, eternal 
in the heavens." 

Sixty -six members of our Subordinate Lodges have been called 
hence, whose names will appear upon a page of our record dedicated 
to their memory. 

ILLUSTRIOUS DEAD OP OTHER GRAND JURISDICTIONS. 

I present a list of Grand Officers and Past Grand Masters whose 
deaths have come to my knowledge during the year: 

Ira Berry, died September 20, 1891, aged 90 years; Grand Secre- 
tary Grand Lodge of Maine. 

Benjamin R. Harris, died November 11, 1891, aged 66 years; 
Tennessee; P. G. M. 

Bonum Nye, died November 12, 1891, aged 97 years; Massachu- 
setts; P. G. M. 

Howard B. Ensign, died November 17, 1891, aged 65 years; Con- 
necticut; P. G. M. 

Harmon G. Reynolds, died December 31, 1891, aged 81 yearo; 
Illinois; P. G. M. 

William Parkman, died December 26, 1891; Massachusetts; 
P. G. M. 

Stephen W. B. Carnegy, died January 5, 1892, aged 95 years; 
Missouri; P. G. M. 

Nicholas Van Slyck, died March 3, 1892, aged 63 years; Rhode 
Island; P. G. M. 

Clifford P. MacCalla, died at Port Said, Egypt, April 24, 1892, 
aged 55 years; Pennsylvania; P. G. M. 

Charles Beck, died February 23, 1892, aged 88 years; Kentucky; 
P. G. M. 

Rockey P. Earhart, died May 11, 1892, aged 55 years; Oregon; 
P. G. M. 

Christopher Taylor, died June 24, 1892, aged 69 years; Oregon; 
P. G. M. 

A goodly list of those who have occupied the highest station in 
their several Masonic Jurisdictions. 

Space does not permit even the briefest mention of many, very 
many distinguished brethren, who have been called from earthly 
labor to everlasting refreshment above. 

William Perry Leeper, R.\ W.\ Deputy Grand Master of Indian 
Territory and Grand Representative of this Grand Lodge, died May 
7, 1892. 



GRAND LODGE OF COLORADO. I I 

John W. H. Wilson, M.\ W.\ Grand Master, Grand Lodge of 
Manitoba, died July 19, 1892, aged 59 years. 

Colonel Shadwell Henry Clerke, Grand Secretary Grand Lodge 
of England, " Mother Grand Lodge of the World," died Christmas 
day, 1891. 

William Franklin Baldwin, Grand Senior Warden Grand Lodge 
of Ohio, died April 10, 1892, aged 46 years. 

Rev. Bro. LaFayette Van Cleve, R.\ W.\ Grand Chaplain, Grand 
Lodge of Ohio, died March 3, 1892, aged 67 years. 

But why prolong the list? 

"They lived, and they were useful; this we know 

And naught beside; 
No record of their names is left to show 

How soon they died. 
They did their work, and then they passed away, 

An unknown band. 
And took their places with the greater host, 

In the higher land." 

We extend to our sister Grand Jurisdictions our fraternal sym- 
pathy, and dedicate a page of our Record to perpetuate the memory 
of these distinguished craftsmen. 

GRAND REPRESENTATIVES. 

I have appointed, upon the recommendation of the several Grand 
Masters, the following Brethren as Grand Representatives of this 
Grand Lodge: 

Virginia — W.\ Bro. Jacob Bumgardner, Buena Vista, November 

15. 1891, vice Bro. John Clopton, deceased. 

Michigan — Bro. John S. Cross, P. G. M., Bangor, December 19, 

1891, vice Bro. Geo. E. Hubbard, deceased. 
Montana — Bro. C. B Nolan, Helena, April 9, 1892. 

New Brunswick— Bro. Andrew McNichol, St. John, April 9, 
1892. 

Washington — Bro. Wm. W. Witherspoon, Spokane, April 30, 
1892. 

North Dakota— Bio. John Holmes, Valley City, May 14, 1892. 

Indian Territory — Bro. Walter M. McCarty, Thackerville, May 

16. 1892, vice Bro. Wm. P. Lee per, deceased. 

Tasmania — Bro. Joseph Gilbert Steele, Hobart, July 14, 1892. 
Victoria — John C. House, August 13, 1892. 

Upon my recommendation the following appointments have 
been made of Grand Representatives to and near the Grand Lodge 
of Colorado: 

Virginia — W.\ Bro. Lawrence M. Miller, Grand Junction, 
November 20, 1891. 

Delaware — R.% W.\ Bro. George Wyman, Denver, February 9, 

1892, reappointed. 



12 PROCEEDINGS OF THE 

Montana— W.\ Biro. Donald Fletcher, Denver, March 23, 1892. 

New Brunswick— R.\ W.\ Bro. H. P. H. Bromwell, Denver, 
April 13, 1892. 

Indian Territory — W.\ Bro. A. A. Burnand, Leadville, May 12, 
1892. 

Tasmania — R\ W.\ Bro. John A. Steele, Gunnison, May 25, 
1892. 

New South Wales— VJ.\ Bro. Cromwell Tucker, Denver, July 
4, 1892. 

COMMISSIONS. 

Pursuant to recommendation of the Committee on Appeals and 
Grievances, at the last Communication of this Grand Lodge, under 
date September 18, 1892, 1 commissioned R.\ W.\ Brothers James H. 
Peabody and William T. Bridwell in re B. C. Adams vs. Geo. 
Phillips, Silver Cliff Lodge No. 38, to retry the case and make full 
report to me. Under date June 18, 1892, 1 received the report of the 
committee, which was as follows: 

By virtue of the authority conveyed in the within commission, 
we your committee visited the town of Silver Cliff on the 6th day of 
April, A. L. 5892, and convened Silver Cliff Lodge No 38, M.\ W.\ 
Bro. Jas. H. Peabody presiding. 

The case in question was called up, and after a full discussion of 
each and every item contained in the charge and specification, your 
committee were enabled to arrive at the following conclusion: 

First — That there was no foundation in fact for the charges, 
they not being sustained by evidence. 

Second— That through ignorance the Master of the Lodge erred 
in permitting personal prejudice to be entertained by the Lodge to 
the detriment of its harmony. 

Your committee were successful in spreading oil over the 
troubled waters and conciliating the imaginary differences between 
Brothers Adams and Phillips. 

The two brethren met at the altar and each extended to the 
other the right hand of Masonic Fellowship. 

[Signed] James H. Peabody. 

William T. Bridwell. 

The distinguished brethren composing the commission have my 
thanks for the services rendered and the happy result attained, and 
the brethren of Silver Cliff Lodge No. 38 are to be congratulated 
upon the restoration of peace and harmony to the Lodge. 

I issued a commission under date October 5 to W.\ Bro. Henry 
C. Peterson of Rio Blanco Lodge No. 80, to constitute Yampa Lodge 
No. 88, at Craig, Routt County and install its officers, which duty 
was performed Monday, October 26, and return thereof made to the 
Grand Secretary. 

I desire in this connection to express my sincere thanks to W.\ 
Bro. Peterson for his services in this behalf, as it would have taken 
seven days of my time and a long, hard stage ride to have per- 
formed this duty. 



GRAND LODGE OF COLORADO. 1 3 

March 18, 1 commissioned R.\ W.\ Bro. Ed. C. Parmelee, Grand 
Secretary, to go to Trinidad and investigate and report upon a com- 
plaint made by Bro. R. C. Luesley against W. . Bro. J. B. Hershey, 
W. M., of Trinidad Lodge U. D. 

The commission was executed, and upon the report made to me 
by the Grand Secretary I dismissed the complaint of Bro. Luesley, 
and so informed him. 

DISPENSATIONS FOR NEW LODGES. 

Acting upon the recommendation of the Committee on Returns 
and Work,' in its report to Grand Lodge, at the last Communication, 
in the matter of Trinidad Lodge U. D., I requested W.\ Bro. C. N. 
Blackwell to thoroughly investigate and report to me the errors and 
irregularities pointed out in the report of the committee, and to 
advise me in the premises. 

My request was cheerfully complied with by Bro. Blackwell, 
and for the able and exhaustive report made by him, I return my 
warmest thanks. The conclusions arrived at by me, from the report 
of Bro. Blackwell, and from information derived from other sources, 
were, that the errors and irregularities pointed out in the report of 
the Committee on Returns and Work, were errors and irregularities 
in the records of the Lodge, and that no necessity existed to heal 
the status of any Mason made in said Lodge. 

At the earnest request of the Worshipful Master of Trinidad 
Lodge U. D., W.\ Bro. J. B. Hershey and other members of said 
Lodge, on the 19th day of October, A. D. 1891, I continued the 
dispensation issued by my predecessor, dated May 4, 1891, in full 
force and effect until this Annual Communication of the M. W. 
Grand Lodge. 

February 22, 1 granted a dispensation to eleven Master Masons 
at Lamar, Prowers County, to form and open a Lodge at that place, 
to be known as Lamar Lodge U. D., with Brothers Emil F. Seeberger 
as W. M., Peter S. Lynch as S. W., and A. N. Parrish as J. W. 
This petition was recommended by Granada Lodge No. 72. 

February 23, I granted a dispensation to eleven Master Masons 
of LaFayette, Boulder County, to form and open a Lodge at that 
place, to be known as LaFayette Lodge U. D., with Brothers John 
M. Van Deren as W. M., John H. Simpson as S. W. and David F. 
Davis as J. W. This petition was recommended by Garfield Lodge 
No. 50. 

Both of these petitions for new Lodges caused me a great deal 
anxiety and solicitude, for the reasons, that the number of petitioners 
in each case was small, and both Lodges would be located quite near 
chartered Lodges. I made as careful an examination of all the facts 
as was possible, and availed myself of the advice of our Grand 
Secretary and other Brethren more familiar with the country than 



14 PROCEEDINGS OF THE 

I was, and, after much delay and hesitation, issued the dispensations, 
confident that the Grand Lodge would correct any mistake which I 
might make. 

I am not in favor of granting charters for new Lodges, unless 
the facts warrant a strong belief that a strong, healthy, active and 
vigorous Lodge can be maintained. 

ThiB Jurisdiction already has within it too many weak, inactive 
and almost dormant Lodges, the maintenance of which impose 
heavy burdens upon the Brethren who compose them, and reflect 
no credit upon the Craft. Too often the financial condition of the 
Lodge blinds the eyes of the Brethren to the moral, intellectual and 
physical qualities of the petitioners for initiation. 

All of these Lodges will present petitions for charters, and, as it 
has been impossible for me to visit any of them, I would recommend 
that great care be exercised by the Committee on Returns and 
Work in examining fully all the facts in each case. 

OTHER DISPENSATIONS. 

December 7. To South Pueblo Lodge No. 31, to publicly install 
its officers December 26. 

. December 1 2. To Garfield Lodge No. 50, to elect a Worshipful 
Master from the floor. 

December 15. To El Paso Lodge No. 13, to install its officers on 
the evening of December 18, in the presence of Ramona Chapter 
No. 13, Order of the Eastern Star, and those eligible to membership 
therein. 

December 16. To Spar Lodge No. 60, to hold its annual election 
of officers at its regular communication to be held December 24. 

December 16. To Manitou Lodge No. 68, to publicly install its 
officers on the evening of December 24. 

December 16. To Temple Lodge No. 84, to elect a Secretary at 
its regular communication to be held December 17. 

December 22. To Union Lodge No. 7, to meet at its Lodge 
Room on Saturday, the 26th day of December, A. L. 5891, and open 
said lodge on the several degrees of Masonry, as it may see fit, at 
the hour of 1:30 p. m., of said day, instead of 7:30 p. m., as required 
by the By-laws of said Lodge. 

December 31. To Georgetown Lodge No. 48, to elect and install 
its officers at its regular communication to be held on the evening of 
January 14. 

January 7. To Temple Lodge No. 84, to install its Senior Deacon 
at its regular communication to be held January 21. < 

January 7. To Olive Branch No. 32, to install its Secretary, 
Junior Steward and Tiler at its regular communication to be held 
January 9. 



GRAND LODGE OF COLORADO. I 5 

January 9. To Eureka Lodge No. 66, to install its Senior War- 
den-elect, at a communication of said lodge to be held January 15. 

January 18. To Colorado City Lodge No. 76, to elect and install 
a Junior Warden after the day appointed for the regular annual 
election and installation of officers of said lodge. 

January 22. To Manitou Lodge No. 68, to install its Senior 
Warden-elect, at its regular communication to be held February 5. 

January 26. To Denver Lodge No. 5, to examine as to his pro- 
ficiency, ballot upon his petition for advancement, and if elected, to 
confer the Third degree upon a Fellow Craft, at a special communi- 
cation of said Lodge to be held January 27. 

February 1. To Columbia Lodge No. 14, to install its Senior 
Warden-elect at the next regular communication of said Lodge. 

March 30. To Rio Blanco Lodge No. 80, to install its Senior 
Warden-elect at the next regular communication of said Lodge. 

April 14. To Rico Lodge No. 79, to examine as to his proficiency, 
ballot upon his application for advancement, and if elected, confer 
the Third Degree upon a Fellow Craft, at a special communication 
of said Lodge to be held April 19. 

April 23. To Temple Lodge No. 84, to examine as to his pro- 
ficiency, ballot upon his application for advancement, and if elected, 
confer the Third Degree upon a Fellow Craft, at a special communi- 
cation of said Lodge to be held April 23. 

May 6. To Union Lodge No. 7, to examine as to their proficiency, 
ballot upon their petitions for advancement, and if elected, confer 
the Third Degree upon five Fellow Crafts, at a special communica- 
tion of said Lodge to be held May 9. 

May 20. To Eagle Lodge No 43, to examine as to his proficiency, 
ballot upon his petition for advancement, and if elected, confer the 
Second Degree upon an Entered Apprentice, at a special communi- 
cation of said Lodge to be held May 23. 

July 21. To Mt. Moriah Lodge No. 15. to examine as to his pro- 
ficiency, ballot upon his petition for advancement, and if elected, 
confer the Third Degree upon a Fellow Craft, at a special communi- 
cation of said Lodge to be held July 25. 

August 27. To Glen wood Lodge. No. 65, to install its Junior 
Warden-elect at a special communication of said Lodge held 
August 27. 

Sixteen of the twenty-two Special Dispensations issued by me 
were not returned as required by Grand Lodge By-law No. 24. 

This necessitated correspondence with the officers of the delin- 
quent Lodges. 

In some cases the Special Dispensation had been lost, and return 
could not be made, and a copy of the Dispensation had to be pre- 
pared and sent to the delinquent, and return made on the copy ; all 



1 6 PROCEEDINGS OF THE 

this entailed extra and wholly unnecessary work upon the Grand 
Master. 

DISPENSATIONS REFUSED. 

October 30. To permit a Lodge to receive and act upon a petition 
for initiation, when the petitioner had not resided within the juris- 
diction of the Lodge the length of time required by Grand Lodge 
By-Law No. 55. 

December 16. To install an officer of a Lodge at a time 
subsequent to St. John's day, in advance of the happening of the 
" emergency " required to be " set forth fully " by Grand Lodge By- 
Law No. 25. 

I have refused to grant special dispensations in a number of 
cases, to confer the degrees in less than the regular time, where, in 
my judgment, the " emergency " required to be "set forth fully " by 
Grand Lodge By-Law No. 25, did not exist. 

In most of these cases, the only reason given for asking these 
dispensations was, that the candidates were anxious to get through 
the Lodge and Chapter, and into the Commandery, before the 
Triennial Conclave. I maintain the opinion, that Masonry is some- 
thing more than a "degree machine," and, as the three Symbolic 
Degrees are the foundation of the whole Masonic structure, too much 
care cannot be exercised in selecting the material out of which this 
foundation shall be constructed, and ample time should be taken to 
see that the "stones" composing the foundation are properly and 
Masonically laid. 

This cannot be accomplished by "rushing 7 ' our candidates 
through the three degrees, with the sole object and intention of 
apparently qualifying them for membership in some other Masonic 
body. 

LODGES CONSTITUTED. 

On September 29, with the assistance of the Deputy Grand 
Master, the Grand Secretary, the Grand Chaplain, the Grand Tiler, 
and a number of Brethren, I constituted Highlands Lodge No. 86, 
at Highlands, and installed its officers. 

On September 30, with the assistance of the same Brethren, I 
constituted Oriental Lodge No. 87, at Denver, and installed its 
officers. 

On October 7, I constituted Acacia Lodge No. 85, at Colorado 
Springs, and installed its officers. 

BY-LAWS APPROVED. 

November 5. I approved an amendment to by-laws of Acacia 
Lodge No. 85, making the fees for the degrees 830.00. 

February 18. I approved a complete code of by-laws adopted 
by Pitkin Lodge No. 40. 

March 14. I approved a complete code of by-laws adopted by 
Garfield Lodge No. 50. 



GRAND LODGE OF COLORADO. 1 7 

March 22. I approved a complete code of by-laws adopted by 
Idaho Springs Lodge No. 26. 

April 16. I approved a complete code of by-laws adopted by 
Las Animas Lodge No. 28. 

June 16. I approved a complete code of by-laws adopted by 
Telluride Lodge No. 56. 

March 21. I approved an amendment to Section 1, Article IX, 
of the by-laws of Delta Lodge No. 62, changing the meeting nights. 

June 17. I approved a complete code of by-laws adopted by 
Harmony Lodge No. 61. 

July 16. I approved a code of by-laws relating to Masonic 
Cemetery, adopted by Las Animas Lodge No. 28. 

September 7. I approved amendment to by-laws adopted by La 
Veta Lodge No. 59, changing meeting nights. 

September 12. I approved a complete code of by-laws adopted 
by Leadville Lodge No. 51. 

CHANGE OP QUARTERS. 

Good and sufficient reasons being presented to me therefor, I 
granted permission to the following Lodges to change their places 
of meeting : 

October 2. Colorado City Lodge No. 76, at Colorado City. 
December 23. Sterling Lodge No. 54, at Sterling. 
January 18. Durango Lodge No. 46, at Durango. 
January 23. King Solomon Lodge No. 30, at Las Animas. 
February 18. Washington Lodge No. 12, at Georgetown. 
March 14. Georgetown Lodge No. 48, at Georgetown. 
April 29. Holyoke Lodge No. 81, at Holyoke. 

DECISIONS. 

1. A chartered Lodge may charge brethren raised U. D. dues 
from date they were raised. 

2. Grand Lodge By-Law No. 56 covers petitions for affiliation, 
and as a dimit is made a part of the petition for affiliation under 
Grand Lodge By-Law No. 59, the dimit cannot be returned to the 
petitioner unless his petition should be rejected. 

3. No authority iB vested in the Grand Master to appoint 
officers of a subordinate Lodge to act during the temporary absence 
of the officers of the Lodge. 

4. Only those whose names appear in the dispensation and 
those raised under it can vote upon petitions for the degrees 
in Lodges U. D. 

5. An annual election in a subordinate Lodge held at any other 
time than that designated by the By-Laws of the Lodge is irregular 
and void, unless such election is held by virtue of a special dispensa- 
tion granted by the Grand Master. 



1 8 PROCEEDINGS OF THE 

6. The Secretary of a Lodge has no authority to issue sum- 
monses for any purpose, unless instructed so to do by the Worship- 
ful Master, or the Lodge, or unless the By-Laws of the Lodge make 
it his duty to issue such summonses. 

7. The election to the Mastership of a Brother ineligible to 
hold that office, unless by special dispensation granted by the Grand 
Master, is irregular and void. 

8. A Lodge having elected a member to the office of Senior 
Warden, upon the refusal of the Brother to be installed, cannot at a 
date subsequent to the date for its annual election, elect anyone else 
to that office except by special dispensation granted by the Grand 
Master. 

9. It is the duty of a Lodge to proceed with the trial of a 
Brother charged with a Masonic offense, regardless of the action or 
non-action of the Courts of the State. 

10. A Worshipful Master cannot suspend an officer of his 
Lodge from the exercise of the duties of his office until after " due 
charges, trial and conviction." Such action would be in violation of 
Grand Lodge By-Law No. 94. 

11. A Brother having made application to his Lodge for a 
dimit can withdraw his application at any time before the Lodge has 
taken action upon it. 

12. A Junior Warden cannot prefer charges in his official 
capacity except by order of the Lodge. 

13. Under Section 55, Grand Lodge By-Laws, I decided that a 
Lodge U. D. cannot act upon a petition for initiation unless the 
applicant has resided within the jurisdiction of the Lodge U. D. 
during the preceding twelve months. 

14. A man who has lost the left hand at the wrist is ineligible 
to be made a Mason. 

15. Following decision 11 of P.*. G.\ M.\ Bridwell, I held that a 
Lodge cannot entertain the petition of one who is acting as the 
agent of a brewing company and as such selling bottled beer by the 
barrel. 

16. In answer to a complaint made by the R.\ W.\ Grand 
Master F. & A. M. of Pennsylvania, that the jurisdiction of the R.\ 
W.\ Grand Lodge F. & A. M. of Pennsylvania had been invaded by a 
subordinate Lodge of this jurisdiction, I held that the doctrine of "per- 
petual jurisdiction " was not recognized in this jurisdiction. 

17. For good and sufficient reasons a subordinate Lodge may 
suspend its regular communications, and it is not necessary to have 
the Grand Master's permission therefor. 

18. A Brother bringing himself within the requirements of 
Grand Lodge By-Law No. So is entitled to a dimit, although he has 
failed to pay an assessment levied by the Lodge, and the W.\ M. - . 
of the Lodge should not refuse to sign or withhold the dimit. 



GRAND LODGE OF COLORADO. 1 9 

19. A man who is deformed, by one leg being shorter than the 
other, is not eligible to receive the degrees in Masonry. 

20. A man who has lost the first two fingers of his right hand is 
not eligible to receive the degrees in Masonry. 

21. A " physically defective" man, "being very lame," is not 
eligible to receive the degrees in Masonry. 

In addition to the foregoing I have answered a great many ques- 
tions which could and should have been answered by a reference to 
our By-Laws and the decisions of my predecessors. My answers to 
many of these questions may be characterized as information given 
as to the course to pursue, rather than decisions rendered, hence 
I make no record of them. 

OFFICIAL. VISITS. 

Many will recall the promises I made after my installation last 
year, that I would visit all the Lodges in the jurisdiction some time 
during the year, if possible for me to do so. 

We all know that the year just closing has been a very busy one 
in the Lodges of this jurisdiction ; at least one-half of my entire 
time during the past year has been devoted to Masonic matters, and 
yet, I was able to make official visits to only thirty -six Lodges of the 
eighty-two in the jurisdiction. 

I will not detain you with a detailed account of these visits, all 
of which were characterized by that open-handed hospitality, cor- 
diality and fraternal feeling, for which the Masons of this jurisdic- 
tion are justly celebrated throughout the length and breadth of this 
land. 

These visits I will recall as long as life lasts, as among the hap- 
piest moments of my life, and I am sure that I regret, more than 
anyone else can, my inability to visit every Lodge in the jurisdiction. 

Few realize the size and the wonderful growth in population 
during the past twelve years of the State in which we live, and 
Freemasonry in this State has kept pace with this wonderful growth. 

In 1880 there were twenty -nine Lodges in this .State, with a total 
membership of 1,857 ; to-day there are eighty-two Lodges, with a 
total membership of 6,174, an increase of fifty -three Lodges and 
4,317 members in twelve years. 

The magnificent resources and natural advantages of our State 
are attracting the attention and admiration of the world, and Colo- 
rado will continue to grow until it takes its place among the leading 
States of the Union, and as representatives of the Masonic Frater- 
nity of this great and growing State, we should wake up to a realiza- 
tion of the situation and to a full sense of our duty in the premises. 

In what follows, I quote largely from P.\ G.\ M.\ Henry H. 
Brown, of Alabama. 



20 PROCEEDINGS OF THE 

While I would not undervalue the work of Masonry in Colorado, 
as it is now progressing, I must say that we fall very far short of 
what ought and might be done by our noble Order. 

Time and space will not allow me to enter into a detailed discus- 
sion sf the various hindrances that impede the progress of Masonry 
within this jurisdiction, and I can only refer to some of the most 
important ones, as they appear to me. 

In the first place, there is a great want of Masonic knowledge 
and information among a large majority of the membership of our 
subordinate Lodges, and from this want of knowledge and informa- 
tion there are hundreds of the Brethren who do not have a proper 
appreciation of what Masonry is, and of what its objects and aims 
are. And from these causes there is a great lack of interest in the 
workings of the Lodges on the part of large numbers of the initiated 
— members who are seldom seen in their Lodges except on special 
and festive occasions. 

To cure this evil, the Grand Lodge should adopt a more efficient 
system of lecturing the subordinate Lodges, and the Lodges should 
themselves adopt methods for the instruction of their memberB. 

As included in the above suggestion, I would call particular 
attention to the need of more correct and efficient work by many of 
our Lodges in conferring the Degrees. When a man lays the foun- 
dation of his future Masonic edifice, it is all- important that the 
material used should be tried and true, and that the work should be 
well done. As in all other things, the first impressions made upon 
a candidate for the mysteries of Masonry, are lasting and hard to 
overcome, and it is therefore of the utmost importance that, in con- 
ferring the Degrees, the work should be correctly done, and in the 
most solemn and impressive manner, so that when a man shall have 
been raised to the sublime Degree of Master Mason, he will be 
solemnly and lastingly impressed with the teachings of the cere- 
monies through which he has passed, and of the symbols which have 
been called to his attention. Too much stress can not be laid upon 
the importance of ( conferring the Degrees in a proper manner. In 
my experience, I have found that, as a rule, the Lodges which do the 
work of conferring the Degrees best are the Lodges that flourish 
most and have the best membership. 

In the next place, there is not, in Colorado Masonry, that close 
bond of union, brotherly love and friendship that should exist. 

We do not, as we should, teach and practice out of the Lodge 
the lessons taught in it, and we do not, as we should, regard the tieB 
that bind us together as one brotherhood. 

Our relations in the every-day walks of life are not characterized, 
as they 6hould be, by the teachings of the Square of Virtue, and we 
do not always, even among ourselves, act upon the Golden Rule of 
doing unto others as we would have them do unto us. 



GRAND LODGE OF COLORADO 21 

The teachings of Masonry are such as should inspire in the 
breast of everyone who receives them a spirit of love, friendship and 
confidence for and in each other, and are such as should bind its 
votaries together in the closest bonds of union. 

A proper understanding of the objects and aims of Masonry and 
a proper appreciation of its teachings would tend to bind its mem- 
bership together as it should be, and to thus strengthen the cords of 
onion would greatly facilitate the progress of the Order in its noble 
work. 

With the view of securing greater uniformity and efficiency in 
the work of conferring the Degrees and inculcating and disseminat- 
ing a more thorough knowledge and understanding of the objects 
and aims of our noble Order, I recommend and urge the adoption of 
the following amendments and additions to our Constitution : 

Amend Section 25 of the Constitution so that it shall read as 
follows : 

Grand Lecturer. 

m 

Bio. 25 It shall be the duty of the Grand Lecturer to impart the esoteric work 
of this jurisdiction to the District Depnty Grsnd Masters, and also to the officers 
of subordinate Jx>dges who may request him so to do, and who shall visit him for 
that purpose. He may also convene and conduct Lodges of Instruction at such 
times and places as he may deem proper. 

The Grand Lecturer, with the District Deputy Grand Masters, shall exemplify 
the esoteric work of all the degrees before the Grand Lodge, on the evening of the 
first day of its Annual Communication, unless the time may be required by the 
Grand Lodge for other business. He shall receive as compensation the sum of 
three dollars per day, for each day actually spent in the discharge of the duties of 
his office, and actual traveling expenses, to be paid by the Grand Lodge. 

Amend Section 2 of the Constitution, by inserting after the 
words, " The Right Worshipful Grand Lecturer," the words, " The 
Right Worshipful District Deputy Grand Masters." 

Insert after and following Section 25 of the Constitution, the 
following sections : 

8ko. 26. The Masonic jurisdiction of the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge of 
Ancient Free and Aoepted Masons of Colorado, shall be divided into four Masonic 
Districts, each of which shall be under the charge of a District Deputy Grand 
Master. 

8zo. 27. The several Masonic Districts shall be designated, and District Deputy 
Grand Masters appointed and assigned, by the Most Worshipful Grand Master, 
immediately after his installation. No Brother, who is not a Past Master of a 
subordinate Lodge in this jurisdiction, and a member of a subordinate Lodge in 
this jurisdiction, shall be eligible to the appointment of District Deputy Grand 
Master. 

Sic. 28. It shall be the duty of each District Deputy Grand Master to obtain, 
and thoroughly commit to memory, the esoteric work of this jurisdiction, as 
imparted by the Grand Lecturer, as soon as practicable after his appointment ; to 
make an official visit to every subordinate Lodge in his District at least once in 
each Masonic year ; and, upon the occasion of such official visits, he shall require 
the exemplification of the esoteric work, by the regular officers of the Lodge, upon 
a candidate or substitute, and correct all inaccuracies in such work ; to recommend 



22 PROCEEDINGS OF THE • 

by appropriate lectures attention to the moral and benevolent principles of Free- 
masonry, caution in the admission of candidates, punctual attendance at all 
meetings, and representation at every Annual Communication of the Grand 
Lodge ; to examine the books and records of each Lodge, and see that they are 
properly kept ; to ascertain the state and condition of the Lodges ; to see that the 
officers of the Lodges strictly comply with the established rules, regulations and 
landmarks of Freemasonry, and the Constitution, By-Laws and Edicts of the 
Most Worshipful Grand Lodge ; to make a detailed report, in writing, of his 
doings, and of the general condition of the Lodges and of Freemasonry in his 
District, with such particulars and recommendations as he may deem necessary 
and proper, and transmit such report to the Grand Master at least two weeks 
prior to the Annual Communication of the Grand Lodge, or whenever required 
by the Grand Master ; and to perform such other duties and services as may be 
deputed or intrusted to him by the Grand Master. 

Sec. 29. The District Deputy Grand Masters shall each receive the sum of 
three dollars per day for each day actually spent in the discharge of the duties of 
their office, and actual traveling expenses, to be paid by the Grand Lodge. 

Change the numbers of Sections 26 to 31 inclusive of the Con- 
stitution, to 30 — 35, to correspond with the amendment. 

I am aware that frequent or radical changes in our Constitution 
are undesirable, and no changes should be made until the necessity 
for the same is apparent and urgent, and I firmly believe that it is 
the duty of this Grand Lodge to adopt some measures along the 
lines suggested. 

FRATERNAL CONGRESS. 

Through our Grand Secretary I received the following letter: 

Grand Lodge of Kentucky, F. & A. M. 
H. B. Grant, Grand Secretary. 

(Subject: Fraternal Congress.) 

Louisville, Ky., Nov. 5, 1801. 
R.\ HV. and Dear Brother: 

At the Ninety-second Annual Communication of the Grand Lodge of Kentucky, 
hoklen October 7 to 9, the following resolutions were adopted: 

Resolved, That the Grand Lodge of Kentucky, F. & A. M., is in favor of Join- 
ing with other Grand Jurisdictions of the United States and other nations in hold- 
ing a Fraternal Congress, in the city of Chicago, 111., at some time during the 
continuance of the World's Fair. 

Resolved, That it is the sense of this Grand Lodge that said Fraternal 
Congress should not be held with a view to the formation of a General Grand 
Body, but for the interchange of fraternal sentiments, conserving the general inter- 
ests of Masonry throughout the world, and especially looking to a greater uniform, 
ity in the modes of recognition and the fundamental features which characterize 
our system the world over. 

Thereupon delegates were appointed as follows: 

Charles H. Pisk, Grand Master (now P. G. M.) 

J. A. MoKbnzie, Grand Master elect (now G. M.) 

Jas. W. Staton, Chairman Foreign Correspondence Committee (now 
G. B. W.) 

H. B. Grant, Grand Secretary. 

H. R. Coleman, Grand Chaplain. 

J. W. Hoppkb, Past Grand Master. 



GRAND LODGE OF COLORADO. 23 

If the Fraternal Congress (which in no sense is to be a General Grand Lodge, 
otherwise Kentucky would hardly have taken the lead in it) should be composed of 
conservative, thoughtful, working brethren, who are well informed in Masonic 
history, law. usage and the wants of the Craft, I donbt not that mnch good may be 
accompli eh ed. 

Someone must take the initiative in suggesting the time of meeting; I, there- 
fore, venture to recommend that the Congress convene at Masonic Temple, 
Chicago, on the second Monday in August, 1893, at 10 o'clock a. m. 

Fraternally thine, 

H. B. GRANT, 

Grand Secretary. 

Inasmuch as there is no class of Masons who so completely fill the bill as 
Grand Secretaries do, I devoutly trust that you may be one of the delegates from 
your Grand Lodge. 

In reading the proceedings of sister Grand Lodges I find that 
many of them have appointed delegates to this proposed Fraternal 
Congress, and believing, as I do, that much of permanent value may 
result to Masonry throughout the world from a meeting of distin- 
guished Masons from all parts of the world, this Grand Lodge 
should be represented at such meeting by delegates duly appointed, 
who shall make report to this Grand Lodge at our next annual 
communication, and I therefore recommend the appointment of 
such delegates. 

June 21 1 received an invitation from the M.\ W.\ Grand Master 
of Masons in the State of Louisiana to be present at the dedication 
of the new Masonic Temple in New Orleans, Friday, June 24, 1892 

I was, with sincere regret, compelled to decline the invitation, 
on account of pressing duties at home. On behalf of this Grand 
Lodge I extended to the M.\ W.\ Grand Master of Louisiana and 
the Free and Accepted Masons over whom he presides our hearty 
congratulations on the consummation of that for which they have 
striven through many years of patient labor and sacrifice. 

GENERAL MASONIC BELIEF ASSOCIATION. 

I have received during the year several circulars and letters 
from the above Association, and have become somewhat familiar 
with the workings of this Association, by reason of the fact that 
Leadville Lodge No. 51, of which I am a member, has been in affilia- 
tion with the Association for several years. 

Early in the year I received a communication from Bro. J. C. 
Johnston, Secretary of the Masonic Board of Relief of Denver, 
urging me to subscribe for a membership for this Grand Lodge. 

I doubted my authority in the premises, and promised to place 
the matter before the Grand Lodge at this communication, which I 
I now do. 

The following is a copy of a letter received a few days since, 
which briefly explains the objects and aims of the Association, and 
the cost of membership. 



24 PROCEEDINGS OF THE 

General Masonic Hkltkf Association 

of the United States and Canada. 

Office of the President 

Toronto, August 2, 1892. 

Ernest LeNeye Foster, Esq., Grand Master, Grand Lodge of Colorado: 

Dear Sir and M.'. W.'. Brother:— Permit me to draw your attention to the 
cause of the General Masonic Relief Association. Last year I communicated with 
your predecessor with the idea of securing the affiliation of your Grand Lodge, 
but although his reply was favorable to the Organization, I did not receive any 
definite auswer as to the action which might be taken. During the past year we 
have reduced the tax to one-half cent per capita, and as the first result of this 
action and as an acknowledgment of the service of the Organization, the Grand 
Lodge of New York, with its eight hundred Lodges and membership of 80,000, has 
affiliated with us. 

We feel that there is nothing unreasonable in our claim upon Grand Lodges 
for affiliation, as we give good value for the money received, for the one-half cent 
per capita, a tax supplying every Lodge in the jurisdiction, postage free, with printed 
warning circulars once a month, and special circulars, if necessary, for one year 
from date of affiliation. 1 have asked our General Secretary to send you a copy of 
these warning circulars and also a report of our last annual meeting. 

1 may state that the amount of affiliation for your Grand Lodge would be, as 
yon have 5,719 members, $28,594 • 

May I ask your earnest perusal of the report and circular sent you by our 
Secretary ? I hope some day to have the pleasure of personally attending your 
Grand Communication. As you doubtless are aware, I have just passed out of 
office as the Grand Master of Canada. I send you a copy of my address and statis- 
tical form showing the visits made during the two years of my term. 

I shall feel obliged if you will kindly let me have a reply at your convenience 
as to the G. M. Kelief Association. Yours Fraternally. 

J. BOSS ROBERTSON, 

President. 

I recommend that our Grand Secretary be authorized to sub- 
scribe for a membership for this Grand Lodge, and that a warrant 
be ordered drawn in his favor on the Grand Treasurer to cover the 
per capita tax. 

Through our Grand Secretary, I received U A Brief History oi 
the Movement in Connection with the Establishment of the Grand 
Lodge of Ancient Free and Accepted Masons of New Zealand," 
together with a request for fraternal recognition. 

The request of the Grand Lodge of New Zealand for fraternal 
recognition was before this Grand Lodge at its Annual Communi- 
cation of 1890, and at that time the committee to whom the matter 
was referred felt constrained to recommend that recognition be 
deferred. 

I have placed the papers in the hands of R.\ W.\ Bro. L. N. Green- 
leaf, with a request that he be prepared to report upon the same at 
this Annual Communication. 

At the suggestion of our Grand Lecturer, this evening's session 
of the Grand Lodge will be devoted to a study, under his direction, 
of the opening and closing ceremonies of the three Degrees, as pre- 
scribed by our Standard Work, and to answering such questions 
relating to the esoteric work as may be propounded. 



GRAND LODGE OF COLORADO. 25 

I trust that there will be a large attendance at this evening's 
session, as my observation has taught me that there exists in this 
jurisdiction a great lack of uniformity in conducting these cere monies 

CONCLUSION. 

Permit me, Brethren, in closing this address, to again thank you 
for the many honors which you have bestowed upon me, and 
especially for the high honor of having called upon me to preside 
over this Grand Jurisdiction during the past year. 

I have striven, to the very best of my ability, to enforce a strict 
conformity to the established rules, regulations and landmarks of 
Freemasonry, to protect the honor, and promote and advance the 
interests of Freemasonry in this Grand Jurisdiction, and to incul- 
cate and disseminate the objects and aims of our beloved Fraternity. 

My sincerest regret is that I have not been able to accomplish 
more. 

To our Grand Secretary, for his many acts of kindness, his 
prompt response to every call made upon him, his advice and assist- 
ance at all times when requested ; to R.\ W.\ Bro. Todd, Chairman 
of the Committee on Jurisprudence, and a number of our Past 
Grand Masters, for their uniform courtesy and kindness in rendering 
me assistance and advice when it was greatly needed, I return my 
heartiest thanks. 

To the Officers and Members of the Lodges whom I have met 
and with whom I have become acquainted during the seven years of 
my membership in this Grand Lodge, I return sincere thanks for 
many, many acts of kindness, courtesy and hospitality. 

May the friendships which I have made and the attachments I 
have formed, endure through life, and when the summons comes 
from the Supreme Grand Master of the Universe and we take our 
places in the Celestial Lodge above, may we meet and greet each 
other as Brothers. < 

And now, my Brethren, may the blessings of Heaven rest upon 
each and every one of you, may Faith, Hope and Charity prevail and 
abound among you, may Grace, Mercy and Peace be your everlasting 
and eternal reward. 

u The Lord bless and preserve thee. The Lord cause his coun- 
tenance to shine upon thee, and be gracious unto thee. The Lord 
lift up his countenance upon thee and grant thee peace." 

JOHN M. MAXWELL, 

Orand Master. 

ADDRESS REFERRED. 

On motion of Bro. B. L. Carr the address was referred 
to a special committee for division and reference. 



26 PROCEEDINGS OF THE 

ANDREW SAGENDORF, 
CROMWELL TUCKER, 
CHARLES A. SEYMOUR, 

were appointed said committee. 

REPORT ON ADDRESS. 
The special committee on Grand Master's address soon 
presented their report, which was adopted : 

To the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge, A.F.dt A. V. of Colorado : 

Your committee, to whom was referred the address of the M.\ W.'. Grand 
Master for division and reference* present the following report : 

1st. That so much thereof as refers to deceased brethren of this and other 
jurisdictions be referred to a special committee of three. 

2d. That so much thereof as refers to decisions, dispensations, suggestions 
and recommendations and proposed amendments or additions to the Constitution 
of the M.\ W.\ Grand Lodge of Colorado, be referred to the Committee on Masonic 
Jurisprudence. 

3d. That so mnch thereof as refers to other Grand Lodges be referred to the 

Committee on Correspondence. 

Fraternally submitted, 

A. SAGENDORF, 

CROMWELL TUCKER, 

C. A. SEYMOUR. 

SPECIAL COMMITTEE. 
The Grand Master appointed : 

OREN H. HENRY, 
HORACE T. DeLONG, 
HERMAN M. WEBSTER, 

as said special committee. 

The committee afterwards presented the following 
report, which was adopted unanimously : 

NECROLOGY. 
To the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge of Colorado : 

Your committee to whom was referred that portion of the Grand Master's 
address entitled, "Necrology," respectfully report: : 

That we humbly acknowledge the kind protecting care of Divine Providence, 
who has kept all the members of this Grand Lodge free from the claims of death, 
not only daring the past year, bat has spared to as, daring their respective terms of 
service, every elected Grand Officer and every appointed Grand Officer with bat- 
one exception, since its organization, a period of thirty-one years. 

That we extend to all oar bereaved subordinate Lodges sincere sympathy, and 
refer them for consolation to the Holy Bible, that great light in Masonry which 
reveals the correct path through both adversity and prosperity. 

That we extend fraternal sympathy to all sister Grand Lodges that have been 
called upon to moom the loss of their illustrious dead. 

That we set apart and dedicate a page of oar records to the memory of oar 
beloved dead, throughout Masonry universal, this and all other Grand Jurisdictions. 

That we again reverently commit ourselves into the hands of Almighty God, 

and invoke his protection and guidance through all the years to come. 

Respectfully submitted, 

OREN H.HENRY, 

HORACE T. DeLONG. 

HERMAN M. WEBSTER. 



GRAND LODGE OF COLORADO. 2? 

REPORT OF GRAND TREASURER. 

The followiDg report of the Grand Treasurer was read 
and referred to the Finance Committee: 

FRANK CHURCH, Grand Treasurer, in account with 

GRAND LODGE A. F. &A.M., Colorado. 

1891. GENERAL FUND. 

Sept.17. To balance, as per Report 1891 $ 5,200 69 

1892. 

Jane 11. To Grand Secretary 188 00 

Aug. 26. Grand Secretary 1,048 00 

Sept. 7. Grand Secretary 1,349 00 

Sept. 12. Grand Secretary 1,423 00 

Sept. 14. Grand Secretary 1,198 50 

Sept. 17. Grand Secretary 478 00 

8ept.l9. Grand Secretary ._ 184 00 

By Warrant No. 549 $ 1,347 65 

Warrant No. 550 40 00 

Warrant No. 551 200 00 

Warrant No. 553 129 32 

Warrant No. 554 200 00 

Warrant No. 555 1,200 00 

Warrant No. 556 64 50 

Warrant No. 557 85 00 

Warrant No. 558 638 00 

Warrant No. 559 810 00 

Warrant No. 560 300 00 

Warrant No. 561 300 00 

Warrant No. 562 10 00 

Warrant No. 563 300 00 

Warrant No. 564 214 89 

Warrant No. 565 300 00 

Warrant No. 552 100 00 

Tobalance 5,339 83 

$11,029 19 $11,029 19 
1891. LIBRARY FUND. 

8ept.l7. To balance, as per Report 1891 $ 793 65 

1892. 

Sept.17. To Grand Secretary 115 75 

Tobalance $ 909^40 

$ 909 40 $ 90940 
—i 

1891. MASONIC WIDOWS AND ORPHANS* FUND. 

Sept. 17. To balance, as per Report 1891 $ 2,604 15 

1892. 
Hept. 19. Tobalance $2,604 15 

189L RECAPITULATION. 

Sept. 17. To balance General Fond $5,200 69 

Balance Library Fond 793 65 

Balance Masonic Home Fond 2,604 15 

Balance receipts General Fond 5,828 50 

Balance receipts Library Fond 115 75 

By disbursement** General Fond $ 5,689 36 

Disbursements Library Fnnd 

Disbursements Masonic Home Fund 

To balance General Fund 5,339 83 

Balance Library Fund 909 40 

Balance Masonic Home Fund _ _ 2,604 15 

$14,542 74 $14,542 74 

1892. ~~ 
Sept. 19. To total balance, $8,853.38, for which find certified check and vouchers for 

disbursements, and the note belonging to the Grand Lodge for 
$2,500, interest paid to August 2d, 1890 ; also three notes belonging 
to the Grand Lodge amounting to $2,500. 

FRANK CHURCH, 

Grand Treasurer. 



28 PROCEEDINGS OF THE 

REPORT OP GRAND SECRETARY. 

The Grand Secretary presented the following report, 
and the financial part thereof was referred to the Commit- 
tee on Finances and the balance to the Committee on 
Returns and Work: 

To the M. W. Orand Lodge: 

Charters were issued September 16, 1891, to : 
Acacia Lodge No. 85, Colorado Springs, El Paso County. 
Highlands Lodge No. 86, Highlands, Arapahoe County. 
Oriental Lodge No. 87, Denver, Arapahoe County. 
Yampa Lodge No. 88, Craig, Routt County. 

LIBRARY FUND. 

I have received : 

From the Orand Master, for twenty-two Special Dispensations $ 110 00 

From W. D. Todd, donation 6 00 

From B. L. Carr, donation 3 00 

Total $ 119 00 

I have paid : 

For Proceedings of Grand Encampment $ 8 25 

To Grand Treasurer 115 75 

Total $ 119 00 

GENERAL FUND. 

I have drawn warrants on our. Grand Treasurer, on account of : 

Grand Treasurer, Pay Boll, 549 $ 1,347 65 

H. T. West, Books, 550 40 00 

L. N. Greenleaf, Correspondent, 551 200 00 

Thos. Linton, Services, 552 100 00 

Ed. C. Parmelee, Balance Contingent Expenses, 553 129 32 

Ed. C. Parmelee, Contingent Expenses, 554 200 00 

Ed. C. Parmelee, Salary, 555 1,200 00 

E. L. N. Foster, Expenses. 556 64 50 

Thos. Linton, Catalogues, 557 35 00 

The C. C. Lith Co., Printing, 558 638 (JO 

J. M. Rhoades, Printing, 559 310 00 

Ed. C. Parmelee, Salary, 560 300 00 

Ed. C. Parmelee. Salary, 561 300 00 

J. H.Peabody, Expenses, 562 10 00 

Ed. C. Parmelee, Salary, 563 300 00 

J. M. Maxwell, Expenses, 564 214 89 

Ed. C. Parmelee, Salary, 565 300 00 

Total.. $ 5,689 36 

I have received : 

1891. 

Sept. 16. Trinidad, U. D., charter fee $ 20 00 

Highlands No. 86, charter fee 20 00 

Yampa No. KS, charter fee 20 00 

Acacia No. 85, charter fee 10 00 

Oriental No. &7, charter fee 20 00 

Colorado, U. D.;dues 1 00 

La Veta No. 59, balance dues 2 00 

Manitoa No. 6*, balance dues... 100 

Loveland No. 53: dues 43 00 

Weston No. 22, due* 23 00 



GRAND LODGE OF COLORADO. 29 

Sept. 17. Las Aniinas No. 28, balance 1890 dues $ 2 00 

Sept. 23. Burlington No. 77, dues 21 00 

Sept, 24. Gunnison No. 89, balance 1891 does 100 

Oct. 30. Acacia No. 85, balance charter fee 10 00 

1392. 

An*, 13. San Joan No. S3, dues 64 00 

Aog. 20. Temple No. 84, does 90 00 

Bpar No. 60, dues 116 CO 

Aog. 23. Tin Cop No. 52, does 28 00 

Garfield No. 50, dues 49 00 

An*. 24. Garfield No. 50, balanoe 1891 does 100 

Las Animas No. 28, dues 97 00 

An*. 25. Pneblo No. 17, dues 115 00 

Denver No. 5, dues j». 492 00 

Aug. 26. Crystal Lake No. 34, due* 86 00 

KicoNo.79. does 29 00 

Aug. 29- Delta No. 62, dues 3100 

Colombia No. 14, does 159 00 

Colombia No. 14, balance 1891 does 100 

Olive Branch No. 82, dues 37 00 

Aog. 30. Mt. Princeton No. 49, does 50 00 

EoclidNo.64, does 41 00 

Monte Vista No. 73, does 42 00 

Sept. 1. Corinthian No. 42, does 40 00 

La Veta No. 59. dues 28 00 

Colorado City No. 76, due* 52 00 

Kio Blanco No. 80, does 28 00 

El Paso No. 13, does 153 00 

Sept. 2. Nevada No. 4, does 48 00 

Central No. 6, does 54 00 

Collins No. 19, dues 152 00 

Ouray No. 37, does 98 00 

Dorango No. 46, does 114 00 

Eureka No. 66, does 56 00 

Logan No. 70, does 14 00 

Granada No. 72, does 14 00 

Manitoo No. 68, dues 49 00 

Sept 3. Golden City No. 1, dues 84 00 

Glen wood No. 65, does 54 00 

St. John's No. 75, does 27 00 

SalidaNo. 57, does 95 00 

Sept. 5. Berthood No. 83, does 33 00 

Acacia No. 85, does 42 00 

St. Train No. 23, does 94 00 

Mesa No. 55, does 88 00 

Mesa No. 55, balance 1891 does 1 50 

Pitkin No. 40, does 18 00 

Weston No. 22. does 30 00 

8ept. 6. Breckinridge No. 47, dues 44 00 

Eagle No. 43, does 40 00 

Ionic No. 35, dnes 14* 00 

Del Norte No. 29, dues 62 00 

Sept. 7. Washington No. 12, dues 75 00 

Mt. Moriah No. 15, does 156 00 

Occidental No. 20,dnes 93 00 

Silver Cliff No. 38, dues 30 00 

Georgetown No. 48, dues 37 (X) 

LeadvilJeNo. 51, does.. 115 00 

Carbondale No. 82, dues 22 00 

Sterling No. 54, dues 27 00 

OasU No. 67, does 47 00 

Burlington No. 77, does 24 00 

8ept. 8. Huerfano No. 27, dues 57 00 

Gunnison No. 89, dues 88 00 

Crested Butt* No. 58, dues . 50 00 

Yampa No. 88, does 17 00 

Windsor No. 69, dues " 28 00 

Sept. 9. Montrose No. 68, does 49 (Ki 

King Solomon No. 30, does 4100 

Sept. 10. Black Hawk No. 11, does 48 00 

8ept. 12. Idaho Springs No. 26, does . 57 00 

Akron No. 74, does _ 42 00 

Union No. 7, does 457 00 

Schiller No. 41, does 56 00 

Sept. 18. Sooth Pueblo No. 81, doe* 152 00 

Wray No. 71, dues 34 00 



30 PROCEEDINGS OF THE 

Sept. 14. Harmony No. 61, does $ 08 00 

Oriental No. 87, does 99 00 

Sept. 16. Alamosa No. 44, dues 61 00 

Brighton No. 78, does 33 00 

Trinidad, U. D., dnes 1100 

Doric No. 25, dnea W00 

Lamar, U. D., dispensation 40 00 

Lafayette, U. D., dispensation 40 00 

Sept. 17. Holyoke No. 81, dues 89 00 

Sept. 19. Loveland No. 53, dnes 50 00 

Montrose No. 63, balance dnes 1 00 

Highlands No. 86, dnes 48 00 

Lafayette, U. D., dues.... 2 00 

Telluride No. 56, dues 55 00 

Lamar, U, D., dues 8 00 

Sept. B). Boulder No. 45, dues 73 00 

Total $ 5927 50 

I have paid : 

1891. 

Oct. 26. Returned to Trinidad, U. D $ 26 00 

1892. 

Jan. il. Grand Treasurer 168 00 

An*. 26. Grand Treasurer 1,048 00 

Sept. 3. Grand Treasurer _ 1,423 00 

Sept. 7. Grand Treasnrer 1,349 00 

Sept.14. Grand Treasurer 1,198 50 

8ept.l7. Grand Treasurer 478 00 

Sept.19. Grand Treasurer 164 00 

Sept.20. Balance on hand — 73 00 

Total $ 5,927 50 

BOOKS RECEIVED. 

The usual exchanges of other Grand bodies have been received, 
and bound volumes as follows : 

Reprint of Proceedings of Grand Lodge of Illinois, 1840-1850. 

Proceedings of Grand Lodges of Arkansas, Illinois, Kentucky, 
Missouri, North Dakota, Texas and Virginia for 1891, and of Indiana, 
Louisiana, Tennessee and Vermont for 1892. 

Sacred Mysteries among the Mayas and Quiches, from A. Le 
Plongeon. 

Constitution Grand Chapter of Iowa. 

History of Free Masonry in New York, Vol. 2. 

Reprint Grand Chapter West Virginia, 1871-1891. 

I have received the following Masonic publications in exchange 
for our Proceedings : 

The American Mason, Chicago, 111. 

American Tyler, Detroit, Mich. 

Australasian Keystone, Melbourne, Victoria. 

Boletin, Grand Orient of Spain, Madrid, Spain. 

Freemason, New South Wales. 

Freemason's Journal, New York City. 

Herald of Masonry, Kansas City, Mo. 

Iowa Masonry, Cedar Rapids, Iowa. 

Masonic Advocate, Indianapolis, Ind. 

Masonic Chronicle, Columbus, Ohio. 



GRAND LODGE OF COLORADO. 3 I 

Masonic Chronicle, New York City. 

Masonic Constellation, St. Louis, Mo. 

Masonic Journal, Portland, Maine. 

Masonic Review, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Masonic Token, Portland, Maine, 

New Zealand Craftsman, Dunedin, New Zealand. 

Orient, Budapesth, Hungary. 

South Australian Freemason, Adelaide, South Australia. 

Voice of Masonry, Chicago, 111. 

And odd numbers of some others. 

LODGES DELINQUENT. 

Del Norte No. 29, Roeita No. 36, 

Loveland No. 58, Sterling No. 54, 

Eureka No. 66, Logan No. 70, 

Monte Vista No. 73, Holyoke No. 81, 

Oriental No. 87, 
did not report list of officers elected, as required by section 35 of our 
By-Laws. 

Roeita No. 36, 
has not made returns and paid dues. 

Boulder No. 45, 
made returns and paid dues this morniDg. 

Union No. 7, Black Hawk No. 11, 

Doric No. 25, Idaho Springe No. 26, 

South Pueblo No. HI, Schiller No. 41, 

Alamosa No. 44, Boulder No. 45, 

LoTeland No. 53, Tel lu ride No. 56, 

Wray No. 71, Akron No. 74, 

Brighton No. 78, Holyoke No. 81, 

Highlands No. 86, Oriental No. 87, 

did not make returns and pay dues within the time specified by sec- 
tion 36 of our By-Laws. 

ERRORS NOTED. 

Last year Union Lodge No. 7 reported 107 members as being 
over 60 years of age, and exempt from Grand Lodge dues. This year 
they report 96 so exempt. Some reported each year, I am confident, 
are not yet to be classed among the ancients entitled to such exemp- 
tion. 

Corinthian No. 42, reports one dimitted August 20, 1892; the reg- 
ular communication was August 16. The Secretary writes me that 
the dimit was issued to the brother on receipt of a letter asking for 
same, and without action of the Lodge, and of course totally ignoring 
section 85 of our By-Laws. 

Loveland No, 53, reports W. A. Hankins as a member ; he was 
reported last year as dimitted, and is not shown as admitted this 



32 PROCEEDINGS OF THE 

year. Commence recapitulation with 46 ; they had only 45 members 
as shown by last year's returns. 

Fraternally, 

ED. C. PARMELEE, 

Grand Secretary. 

CHARLES F. WAHL REINSTATED. 

The, petition of Charles F. Wahl to be reinstated — with 
the recommendation of Tin Cup No. 52, was read and re- 
ferred to the Committee on Jurisprudence. The commit- 
tee afterward presented the following report, which, on 
motion of Bro. O. H. Henry, was adopted: 

To the M.\ W.\ Grand Lodge of Colorado : 

We recommend that Charles F. Wahl, who was, on February 24, 1S86, expelled 
from all the rights and benefits of Masonry, by Tin Cap Lodge No. 52, be rein- 
stated, upon the recommendation of Baid Lodge, hereto attached. 

Fraternally submitted, 

J. H. PEABODY, 
GEORGE WYMAN. 
W. D. TODD. 

The Grand Lodge was called to refreshment until 2 
o'clock. 



FIRST DAY Second Session. 



Tuesday, Sept. 20, 1892, 2 o'clock p. m. 

Grand Lodge resumed labor. 
Grand Master Maxwell in the East. 

ORATION. 

The Grand Master introduced Bro. Ira L. Herron, 
Grand Orator, who delivered the following : 

Most Worshipful Grand Master and Brethren : 

The science and philosophy of Freemasonry have been bo 
copiously and elaborately discussed that but little new can be said 
upon the subject. 

All the wealth of thought and gift of tongue have been freely 
poured at its altar. The trained pen of eminent scholar and eloquence 
of brilliant orator have lavishly added to its literature, until to-day, 
the best efforts of a mere tyro in its mysteries can but reflect and 



r 



GRAND LODGE OF COLORADO. 33 

express in his own weaker thought and language some of the light 
and truth that has been disseminated from other and greater minds. 

Therefore, if at this time a single thought is awakened as to this 
Order of ours and the relation it bears, through its members, to the 
world at large, we are content. 

All organizations, secret or otherwise, are dependent for their 
existence and continuity among the institutions of the earth, upon 
the influence they exert over the people among whom they are 
maintained, and the permanent value of the principles they enunciate. 

We proudly claim for our Order a pre-eminence and endurance 
over all others, and that it stands as the institution par excellent 
among all secret organizations. 

Assuming this to be true, it devolves upon us to show on what 
basis we maintain our claims. 

The political significance of our Order is comprised in the brief 
and positive admonition that we be good citizens of the country in 
which we live, giving cheerful support to all lawfully constituted 
authority. 

While we are a social organization, it is but as an incident and 
not as an end to be attained. Neither can we properly claim to 
be a beneficiary society, for while other societies have set allowances 
for the relief of sick and unfortunate brethren, we, as an Order, 
have none. 

While they have guarantees of specified sums for their widows 
and orphans, no assessment is made on our members by our Order 
for such purpose. 

Even friendship, the grand characteristic of a Mason, if based 
on no firmer foundation than the simple regard of one man for 
another, would cease with the intimacy that inspired it. 

There must, therefore, be a grander and more enduring prin- 
ciple than any of these that gives basis to our claim and permanence 
to our Order. 

Since man first became a factor in the grand handiwork of the 
universe, as an intelligent and reasoning being, there has been in him 
an inherent disposition to recognize and worship some supreme 
power or being, superior to all created nature, and to whom he is 
responsible as the author of his existence and the guardian and 
director of his destinies. 

This belief is allied to the consciousness of man that there is 

that within himself which makes him superior to other created 

beings, and possesses an affinity to something beyond the mere fact 

of physical existence, and must continue after his animal existence 

has gone to that decay which comes to all that emanates from the 

earth. 

We find this belief pervading all narration and tradition; the 

imagery of the savage, the fetish of the barbarian, the mythology of 



34 PROCEEDINGS OF THE 

the pagan, and the religion of civilization and enlightenment, all 
teach, according to their light, some interpretation of this sublime 
principle. 

It is of this belief, as embodied in the doctrine or principle of 
one supreme, eternal and all-powerful God, and of man as the 
physical habitation of an immortal spirit, preparing in this life for 
a closer relation to that Supreme Being, as exemplified and taught 
by the symbols and philosophy of our art, that we, as Masons, are 
called on especially to contemplate. 

This belief forms the basis of all enlightened government; upon 
it are founded our dearest and purest social and domestic ties; from 
the council of State to the fireside at home, all the relations of man- 
kind, one to another, are purified and ennobled by its benign influence. 

It is in the adherence to and preservation of this great principle 
that our order is indebted for what pre-eminence it has among the 
institutions of the earth, and which gives it the influence for good 
that it exerts among its people. 

Upon this principle is founded all the beneficiary provision that 
our order possesses. The love of God for man, and because of that 
love, of man's love or charity for his fellows; it is this that forms 
the basis of a Mason's charity and makes his friendships sacred and 
enduring. 

Involving as it does the principle that the spiritual future is the 
culmination of the physical combination of mind and matter, it has 
maintained our order as the guardian of Divine truth against the 
ravages of paganism and idolatry on the one hand, and of religious 
fanaticism and persecution on the other. 

While Masonry is conservative and preservative, rather than 
radical and constructive, still the grand doctrines it embodies, illus- 
trating as they do man's relation to himself, his fellow and his God, 
and being as they are the fundamental principles of all enlighten- 
ment, have ever kept it with the vanguard of civilization. 

Even admitting, which we do not, that our version of the exist- 
ence of God and the immortality of the soul is but a beautiful myth, 
still the world is nobler, purer and better for the belief, and the 
skeptic and scoffer were better employed in contemplating the 
beneficence of the results attained than in caviling at the literal 
exactness of its belief. 

As in contemplation of the Golden Legend we admire the 
beautiful story of integrity and self-sacrifice set forth, rather than 
question the literal exactness of its detail; so in the greater and 
broader dogma of man's relation to his God and his fellow, the 
result obtained is beneficent enough to warrant its existence, were 
the detailed history of its origin never so meagre. 

Masonry uses the symbolism of the oldest and most enduring 
operative art to illustrate the grandest and most sublime truth; and 



GRAND LODGE OF COLORADO. 35 

as the work of the operative Mason endures after that of his fellow 
artisan has crumbled to the dust, so the truths it illustrates will en- 
dure through all eternity as grand, glorious and imperishable as the 
source from which they emanate. 

Our influence for good in the world as Masons, depends upon how 
we reflect upon it the light we receive from its symbols and 
philosophy. 

It matters but little whether we date our origin as an order from 
the revival of Masonry at the beginning of the eighteenth century, 
from the return of the crusaders, the traveling workmen of the mid- 
dle ages, the building of King Solomon's Temple, or even to the 
stone of foundation, the great philosophic and moral precepts pre- 
served by it have endured since man was first capable of conceiving 
them. 

Upon them he has built all his morals, religion and civilization; 
to them he looks for all spiritual, intellectual and social progress, 
and in them he treasures his faith of an eternal and glorious exis- 
tence hereafter. 

And my brethren, as the moon at its full reflects with softening 
refulgence upon the darkness of the night, the brilliant rays of the 
sun, so let us, being full of the love of God and our fellows, reflect 
upon the world the glorious light of divine truth shed abroad from 
the altar of Freemasonry. 

Then can we truthfully claim our pre-eminence as an order and 
proudly maintain our position as the conservators and guardians of 
civilization. 

ORDERED PUBLISHED. 

On motion of Bro. W. D. Wright the oration was or- 
dered published with our proceedings. 

REPORT OF GRAND LECTURER. 

The Grand Lecturer, Bro. Wni. D. Peirce, presented 
his report, which was referred to the Committee on Juris- 
prudence. 

REPORT ON RETURNS AND WORK— CHARTERS GRANTED. 

The Committee on Returns and Work presented the 
following, which was adopted on motion of Bro. H. T. De- 
Long, and charters ordered issued as therein recommended, 
to 

Trinidad Lodge No. 89, Trinidad, Las Animas County. 

Lamar Lodge No. 90. Lamar, Prowers County. 

Lafayette Lodge No. 91, Lafayette, Boulder County. 



36 



PROCEEDINGS OF THE 



To the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge : 

Your Committee on Returns and Work have examined the returns of the 
several Lodges under dispensations, together with the records thereof, and the By- 
laws submitted by each, and would respectfully report as follows : 

Trinidad Lodge U. D. located at Trinidad. Las Animas County. This Lodge 
has been working under a Dispensation issued by Grand Master Foster. At the 
last Annual Communication of the Grand Lodge, several errors and irregularities 
appearing in the record of this Lodge, your Committee on Returns and Work 
reported adversely to the granting of a charter. The report was adopted, and the 
matter was referred to Grand Master Maxwell, to take such action as in his judg- 
ment might be deemed necessary. 

Your Committee are informed by Grand Master Maxwell that, upon investiga- 
tion of the affairs of this Lodge, he learned that most .of the [errors appearing in 
the record were defects of " record," rather than of the proceedings ; the Secretary 
having failed to properly record the proceedings. 

Your Committee are also informed that the action of the Lodge, resulting in 
the trial and conviction of a Brother, was had under the advice of Grand Master 
Foster, and that its unwarranted action can not be charged to the Lodge itself. 
The Grand Master renewed the Dispensation, and the Lodge now petitions for a 
Charter. 

Since the date of the Dispensation the Lodge has 

Initiated 13 

Passed 18 

Raised 11 

Elected to Charter Membership IS 

There were Original Petitioners 12 

Total 36 

Died 1 

Petitioners for Charter 35 

The returns are correct. The records of the past year are very neatly and 
accurately kept. The By-laws are in conformity to Masonic law, and we recom- 
mend their approval. 

We recommend that a Charter issue to the petitioners therefor, under the name 
of Trinidad Lodge No. &tt, with John B. Hershey as Worshipful Master ; Alexander 
R. Taylor as Senior Warden ; and Lorin H. Roberts as Junior Warden, and the 
following members : 

Geo. P. Johnson, Samuel H. Schuyler, 

William P. Swaine, James M. Carroll, 

William Thompson, Daniel T. White, 

Carlos H. Blake, Charles Fritz, 

William D. Culley. John R. Espey, 

James E. Wallace, John F. Linthurat, 

Loron Ellis Wade, William B. Smith, 

Matthew H. Moore, Richard A. Greenfield, 

William V. Stevens, Robert A. Bush, 

Cecil W. Browne, James E. Durden, 

Orin M. Baker, Alexander Sneddon, 

Reuben C. Luesley, Alexander Pollock. 

Henry 8. Barr, Robert J. Stillwell, 

Emanuel Sugerman, Frank H. Ross, 

Benjamin F. Wooding, William S. Keeney, 

James K. Stephens, James W. Nichols. 

Lamar Lodge U. D. located at Lamar, Prowers County. 

Dinpensation February 22, 1892. The returns are correct. The records are 
well kept and accurate. The By-laws are in conformity to Masonic law, except 



GRAND LODGE OF COLORADO. 37 

that they provide for a stated compensation for the Secretary, which clause has 

bean stricken oat by your Committee ; we recommend their adoption, with this 

change. 

The Lodge has eleven members named in the Dispensation, and three whose 

dimits have been sent up with the papers, endorsed by the members of the Lodge. 

It has 

Initiated 15 

Passed 9 

Raised 8 

Total Membership 22 

The Lodge has supplied itself with all the essential f ami tare, and is entirely 
oat of debt, with seven candidates "on the way." 

We recommend that a Charter issne to the petitioners, under the name of 
Lamar Lodge No. 90, with Emil F. Seeberger as W.\ M.\ ; Peter S. Lynch as 8.". 
W.\ ; Amos N. Parrish as J.'. W.\ ; and the following members : 

Benjamin B. Brown, James B. Trailer, 

Frank J. Holmes, John Will Marker, 

L. Wirt Markbam, William C. Markham, 

Daniel Kessee, William J. Johnson, 

Clemens B. Thoman, Charles C. Goodale, 

George W. Bntler, Welly C. Gould, 

Merten Strain, Morton J. Underwood, 

Charles D. Ford, Perry McMillen, 

Andrew Kornman, James A. Woodcock, 
T. M. Hall. 

Lafayette Lodge, U. D. at Lafayette, Boulder County. Dispensation issued 
February 23, 1892. 

The returns are correct and the records neatly kept and accurate. The By-laws 
are strictly in accord with Masonic law. We recommend their approval. 

The Lodge 

Initiated 7 

Passed 2 

Raised 2 

Elected to Charter Membership 3 

Original Petitioners 10 

Total Petitioners for Charter 15 

While the present membership is small, the Lodge has five candidates " on the 
way/' and we are informed that there are five other M. M.'s who stand ready to 
apply for membership. The Lodge is located in a prosperous community and we 
can see no reason why a healthy Lodge can not be maintained ; we therefore recom- 
mend that a Charter issue to the petitioners therefor, under the name of Lafayette 
Lodge No. 91, with Bro. John M. Van Deren as W.\ M.\ ; Bro. John H. Simpson as 
8.'. W.\ ; and Gustav W. Runge as J.'. W.\ and the following members : 
William N. Hathaway, Jesse M. Compton, 

Thomas A. Paige, Joseph D. Jones, 

William O. Van Etten, William D. Jenkins, 

Elmer E. Bottenfield, Willard J. Carnseu, 

John N. Holmes, Frank E. Form an, 

John Carruthers, August Beam. 

Respectfully submitted, 

B. L. CARR. 

D. MoNIVEN, 

A. V. CRAIG, 

Committee. 



38 PROCEEDINGS OF THE 

ROBERT H. NEVITT. 

Bro. J. C. Sanford made a verbal statement as to the 
action of Durango Lodge No. 46, in admitting Bobert H. 
Nevitt to membership. On motion the matter was referred 
to the Committee on Correspondence. 

Bro. L. N. Greenleaf, of Committee on Corres- 
pondence, afterwards offered the following : 

Resolved, That the action of Darango Lodge No. 46. in admitting Brother 
Robert H. Nevitt to membership while holding a dimit from Union Concordia 
Lodge No. 40, nnder the Grand Symbolic Lodge of the Republic of Mexico, be 
legalised, bat that it shall not be made a precedent to govern our fa tare action until 
fraternal recognition shall be asked for and accorded to said Grand Body. 

After much discussion the following, offered by Bro. 
B. L. Carr as a substitute for the above, was adopted : 

Resolved, That the action of Darango Lodge No. 46, in admitting to member- 
ship Mr. Robert H. Nevitt, claiming to hold a dimit from Union Corcordia Lodge 
No. 40, of the Republic of Mexico, was, in the opinion of this Grand Lodge, with- 
out authority, this Grand Lodge not being in fraternal correspondence with any 
Grand or subordinate Lodge in said Republic. 

THE BADGE OP A MASON. 

Bro. H. T. West offered the following, which was 
referred to the Committee on Jurisprudence : 

Whereas: From time immemorial the lamb-skin or white leather apron has 
been " the badge of a Mason," and 

Whereas: There has been substituted therefor in many of the Lodges in this 
Grand Jurisdiction, the use of aprons of other and divers material. 

Resolved, That it is the sense of this Grand Lodge, that a Masonic apron 
should be made of white leather only, and that we recommend that no subetitate 
therefor should be permitted, and we recommend that the presentation of the apron 
in the first degree be an actual presentation, and that it be made the duty of the 
Secretary of the Lodge to inscribe, or have inscribed upon the under side of it the 
name of the brother receiving it together with the date of his initiation, to which 
shall be added the date of his passing and raising when the same shall have been 
accomplished. 

REPORT ON CORRESPONDENCE. 

Bro*. L. N. Greenleaf presented the report on Corres- 
pondence, which was ordered published with the proceed- 
ings. ( See appendix. ) 

ELECTION — SPECIAL. ORDER. 

On motion the annual election was made the special 
order for to-morrow at 10 o'clock A. M. 



GRAND LODGE OF COLORADO. 39 

PROPOSED REPEAL OF BY-LAW NO. 76. 

Bro. L. Cutshaw offered the following, which was re- 
ferred to the Committee on Jurisprudence: 

Resolved* That By-Law No. 76, be and the same is hereby repealed. 

Denver, Sept. 20, 1892. 
L. CUTSHAW, W. M M No. 7, 
FRANK WHEELER, W. M„ No. fi, 
HARRY CARR, J. W., No. 7, 
HENRY M. FURMAN, W. M., No. 87, 
WM. D. PEIRCE, G. L., G. L., 
L. W. GRANT, W. M., No. 61. 
WM. T. MARCH, 8. W., No. 56, 
CLAY M. VAN, 8. W., No. 84, 
J. L. CHURCH, S. W., No. 14, 
GEO. F. LEWIS, W. M., No. 86, 
J. M. SHANNON, S. W., No. 86, 
L. H. WYGANT, Jr., J. W„ No. 86, 
BERN. HERTZBACH, W. M., No. 41, 
FRANK KRATZER, J. W., No. 41, 
M. N. WAGNER, W. M., No. 67. 

PHOTOGRAPH. 

Bro. P. D. Leonard invited the Grand Lodge to sit for 
a photograph. On motion the invitation was accepted, 
time to-morrow at the noon recess. 

FINANCIAL. 

Bro. W. D. Anthony presented the following, which 
was adopted, and warrants ordered drawn as therein 
recommended : 

To the M.\ W.\ Grand Lodge: 

Your Committee on Finance, to whom was referred the annual reports of the 
Grand Treasurer and Grand Secretary, respectfully report : 

That we have carefully examined the same with the several vouchers and 
books submitted, and find the same correct and in balance — the Grand Treasurer 
having on band a total balance of $8,853.38, and for which a certified check is pre- 
sented on the American National Bank of this date, and herewith returned. We 
also find in the hands of Grand Treasurer four promissory notes, showing loans 
made by the Grand Treasurer, under authority of the Grand Lodge, amounting to 
15,000.00— making grand total of assets (cash and notes), $18,858.38. 

By the report and Touchers of the Grand Secretary we find and report that an 
appropriation of $200.00 was made to and for the Grand Secretary's contingent 
fund, and he has paid $289.14, leaving a balance due the Grand Secretary $89.14. 
We recommend that a warrant for that amount be drawn on the Grand Treasurer. 

We further recommend that a warrant be drawn for the sum of $200.00, and 
placed to the credit of Grand Secretary's contingent fund for the current year. 

Fraternally submitted. 

W. D. ANTHONY, 
G. W. ROE. 
L. Q. HOBBS, 

Committee. 



40 PROCEEDINGS OF THE 

ERRONEOUS DIMIT. 

Bro. Orson Adams, Jr., presented the following, which 
was referred to the Committee on Jurisprudence: 

To the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge of Colorado: 

The undersigned W.\ M.\ of Mesa Lodge No. 55, A. F. & A. M. respectfully 
submits the following statement of facts, and also asks that this Grand Lodge take 
each action as it may consider just: 

Mathias Siebert and Jacob C. Biebert were both members of Mesa Lodge in 
good standing. 

Mathias Siebert applied for a dim it, bnt through error the dimit was granted 
and issued to Jacob 0. Siebert. 

Jacob C. Siebert returned this dimit, made application to be reinstated, stat- 
ing that he had never applied for a dimit. 

His application took the usual course, and in due time ballot was spread and 
the same was found to be black. 

1 therefore request that this Grand Lodge take such action as may be neces- 
sary to correct the error of Mesa Lodge No. 55. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ORSON ADAMS, Jb., 
W.\ M.\ Mesa Lodge No, 65. 

The Grand Lodge was then called to refreshment until 
8 o'clock P. M. 



FIRST DAY Third Session. 



Tuesday, Sept. 20, 1892, 8 o'clock p. m. 

Grand Lodge resumed labor. 

Grand Master Maxwell in the East. 

The entire session was devoted to the explanation and 
discussion of the ritual, under the direction of Bro. Wm. 
D. Peirce,- Grand Lecturer. During the discussion Bro. 
B. L. Carr moved that the proper furniture of the ballot 
box in this jurisdiction be white balls and black cubes. 
Motion lost. 

The Grand lodge was called from labor to refreshment 
until 10 o'clock to-morrow morning. 



r 

I 



GRAND LODGE OF COLORADO. 4 1 



SECOND DAY-First Session. 



Wednesday, Sept 21, 1892, 10 o'clock a. m. 

Grand Lodge resumed labor. 
Grand Master Maxwell in the East 

REPORT ON RETURNS AND WORK. 

Bro. B. L. Carr presented the following, which was 
adopted: 

TotheMoet Worshipful Grand Lodge : 

Your Committee on Returns and Work, to -whom was referred that part of the 
Grand Secretary's report referring to Chartered Lodges, respectfully report : An 
examination of the returns of Union Lodge No. 7 shows that the following named 
Brethren, viz : W. D. Anthony, Geo. Barrett, W. J. Cassell, J. A. Cleveland, D. J. 
Cook, F. C. Erdmann, J. M. Hampton, Barnard Killen, Joanna Norwood,. A. G. 
Rhoads and M. Spangler were reported last year as over 60 years of age, and are 
not so reported this year. If they were over 60 last year, they certainly must be so 
still, and if they were under 60 last year, then the Lodge owes this Grand Lodge 
$11.00 on their account. To these are to be added the names of W. B. Trufant and 
B. W. Woodbary, reported as ancients last year and since dimited, carried on the 
rolls of Nos. 87 and 86 respectively as paying members. 

An examination of the returns of all the Lodges shows that the general aver- 
age of all the Lodges report 6.78 per cent, over 60 years of age; omitting No. 7, 
the general average is 5.51 per cent.; the average in No. 7, 10.21 per cent, and the 
average in No. 5 is 10.82 per cent. There may be nothing wrong in the returns of 
No. 7, or of any other Lodge, but the returns of last year compared with those of 
this, would indicate that there had been carelessness, to say the least. 

Your Committee have not had the time to compare all the returns, and have 
taken those of No. 7 simply as an illustration. We recommend that the returns of 
No. 7 be returned for correction, and that hereafter, in making the annual returns, 
the Secretaries of all the Lodges be required to report the ages of all the members, 
and that the Grand Secretary be directed to make proper settlement with any 
Lodge that may be found to have made mistakes or errors of this kind. 

Regarding the dirait issued to Bro. D. F. Davis, of Corinthian Lodge No. 42, 
reported as "granted" August 20, 1802, there being no regular communication on 
that date, and the dimit said to have been issued by the Secretary without action of 
the Lodge, your Committee are of the opinion that the "issuing" of said dimit 
was irregular ; that the same is void, and that Bro. Davis is still a member of No. 
42. Section 85 pf the By-laws of the Grand Lodge provides : 

"No Lodge shall grant a dimit except upon written application, which shall 
lie over until the next regular communication, when, if no charges have been pre- 
ferred, and the dues of the Brother have been paid, the dimit shall be ordered issued." 

The Secretary has no power or authority to grant a dimit, and his action is 
therefore, of no effect. 

The action of Loveland Lodge No. 53, in reporting W. A. Hankins as "dim- 
ited" last year, is undoubtedly an error. He v» as at that time a mem ber of Bert hood 
Lodge U. D., having signed the petition for dispensation, but did not sign the 
petition for a Charter, and so never ceased to be a member of No. 53. 

The Lodge is indebted to the Grand Lodge for his Grand Lodge dues last year. 

Respectfully submitted, B. L. CARR, 

A. V. CRAIG, 
D. MoNlVEN. 



42 PROCEEDINGS OF THE 

ANNUAL ELECTION. 

Bros. Henry R. Pendery, Clay M. Van, John F. Chrys- 
tal and George E. Simonton were appointed tellers. The 
balloting resulted in the election of 

WM. D. WRIGHT, Denver G. M. 

JETHRO 0. SANFORD, Durango D. G. M. 

WM. L. BUSH, Idaho Springs S. G. W. 

WM. D.PEIRCE, Denver... J.G.W. 

FRANK CHURCH, Denver G. Tbkas. 

ED. C. PARMELEE, Denver G. Sec. 

JURISPRUDENCE. 

The Committee on Jurisprudence presented the follow- 
ing reports: 

To the M. W. Grand Lodge of Colorado: 

Your Committee on J nrispradence recommend that the resolution repealing 

Grand Lodge By-Law No. 76, be not passed. 

W. D. TODD, 

J. H. PEABODY, 

GEO. WYMAN. 

Which was adopted. 

To the Moat Worshipful Grand Lodge of Colorado: 

In the matter of inquiry from the Jnnior Warden of Highlands Lodge No. 86, 
regarding the petition of Harry Walker to be made a Mason; said applicant being 
engaged in the basiness of selling liqnore on commission, -which has been referred 
to this Committee, we beg to report that decision No. 86, by this Grand Lodge in 
1890, rays : 

" By-Law 125 was constraed to include all persons engaged in the basiness of 

selling intoxicating liquors." 

It is therefore clearly unlawful under said By-Law to receive the said 

application. Fraternally submitted, 

W. D. TODD, 

J. H. PEABODY, 

GEORGE WYMAN. 

Which was adopted. 

Your Committee on Jurisprudence to whom was referred the matter of an 

erroneous issuance of a dimit, recommend that the entire record of Mesa Lodge 

No. 55, be so corrected as to expunge all proceedings relative to the granting of a 

dimit to Jacob Siebert, and the Lodge take action upon the application of Mathias 

Siebert. 

W. D. TODD, 

J. H. PEABODY, 

GEORGE WYMAN. 

Which was adopted. 

To the M.'. W.\ Grand Lodge of Colorado : 

Your Committee on Jurisprudence recommend the adoption of the preamble 
and resolutions presented by Bro. Henry T. West, with this exception : After the 
words "white leather only,'' strike out the following : "and we recommend that no 
substitute therefor should be permitted." • 

Fraternally submitted, J. H. PEABODY. 

GEORGE WYMAN, 
W. D. TODD. 

W r hich was adopted. 



GRAND LODGE OF COLORADO. 43 

Also the following : And that part thereof referring 
to District Deputy Grand Masters was made the special 
order for 2 o'clock, p. m., to-day, and the balance of the 
report was adopted : 

To the M.\ W.\ Grand Lodge of Colorado : 

Your Committee on Jurisprudence beg leave to report upon such matters as 
have been referred to them from the Grand Master's address, as follows : 

That Decisions Nob. 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 9, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20 and 21 be 
approved. 

Decision No. 1 is in contradiction to Decision No. 90, which was ap- 
proved by this Grand Lodge ; this Decision is plain in its language and broad in 
meaning, and your Committee are of the opinion that it is a correct interpretation 
of the law. We recommend that the Decision be not approved. 

Decision No. 6, we recommend that the words "or unless the By-laws of the 
Lodge make it his duty to issue such summon**" be stricken out. Section 90 of By- 
laws pertaining to subordinate Lodges is plain in denning it to be the duty of the 
Lodge or its Worshipful Master alone, to issue any summons. 

Decision No. 10. We recommend that this Decision be not approved. 

Your Committee are of the opinion that it is clearly the duty of the Master of 
a Lodge to suspend from office an officer of his Lodge for unbecoming or on- 
Masonic conduct, in advance of charges and trial for such conduct. 

That portion of the Grand Master's address recommending changes in our 
Constitution, and the appointment of District Deputy Grand Masters, your Com- 
mittee recommend be not concurred in. 

The present law of this Grand Lodge empowers the Grand Lecturer to instruct 
any Lodge who may require any information regarding the esoteric work and lec- 
tures, and has provided for his remuneration while performing such labor. If this 
willingness on the part of the Grand Lodge to place such instruction within the 
reach of Lodges free of cost to them, fails in its purpose, we do not appreciate 
that the new system as presented will accomplish more. 

For the same reasons given above, we disagree with the suggestions made by 
oar Grand Lecturer bearing upon this subject. Your Committee are firm in the 
belief that the dissemination of our esoteric work among the Lodges of this juris- 
diction, and conformity therewith, is most desirable. We recommend that a 
sufficient sum be appropriated from the Grand Treasury, in addition to the per 
diem provided for in Section No. 25 of our Constitution, as will furnish sufficient 
remuneration for the services of .a competent Grand Lecturer. As our Grand Lodge 
has already provided for the payment of the actual traveling expenses of the Grand 
Master or his duly appointed representative, we believe that the work of the Grand 
Lecturer, supplemented by frequent visits from other Grand Officers appointed 
by the Grand Master, are sufficient. 

Such special Dispensations, commissions and appointments of the Grand 
Master as have been referred to your Committee, are hereby approved. 

Fraternally submitted, 

W. D. TODD, 
J. H. PEABODY, 
GEORGE WYMAN. 

The Grand Lodge was then called to refreshment until 
2 o'clock p. M. 



44 PROCEEDINGS OF THE 



SECOND DAY-Second Session 



Wednesday, Sept 21, 1892, 2 o'clock p. m. 

Grand Lodge resumed labor. 
Grand Master Maxwell in the East. 

SPECIAL ORDER 

The C9nsideration of the report of the Committee on 
Jurisprudence as to District Deputy Grand Masters, was 
resumed. 

On motion of Bro. L. Cutshaw the subject was referred 
to a special committee to report at this session. 

Bros. B. L. CARR, 

B. F. RAWALT, 
H. M. FURMAN. 

were appointed said committee. 

* 

The committee afterwards presented the following re- 
port which was adopted by a vote of 97 to 8: 

To the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge : 

¥our special Committee to whom was referred that part of the Grand 
Master's address concerning District Deputy Grand Masters, have considered the 
recommendations contained in said address, and respectfully report as follows : 

1. We recommend that Section 25 and Section 2 of the Constitution of the 
Grand Lodge be amended as recommended by the Grand Master in his address. 

2. We recommend that the Constitution of the Grand Lodge be amended by 
inserting after Section 25 thereof, Sections 26, 27, 2* and 29, as recommended by the 
Grand Master in his address, and that Sections 26 to 81 of the Constitution be 
changed to correspond with the amendments. 

Respectfully submitted, 

B. L. CARR, 
B. F. RAWALT, 
H. M. FURMAN, 

Committee. 

JEWELS FOR PAST GRAND MASTERS. 

Bro. Henry M. Furman offered the following which 
was adopted: 

Resolved, That the M.'. W.\ Grand Lodge of Colorado purchase and present 
to its Past Grand Masters an appropriate jewel, with the proper inscription npon 
the same ; said jewel to be of gold, and to cost not less than $100. 

To carry out the provisions of this resolution, the Grand Master shall appoint 
a Committee of three to purchase the same and have them properly engraved, and 



GRAND LODGE OF COLORADO. 45 

when the Committee ah all hare complied with this resolution and shall certify the 
bill for the same, the Grand Master is hereby authorised to draw a warrant on the 
Grand Treasurer in payment for the same. 

Bros. HENRY M. FURMAN, 
FRANK I. SMITH, 
JAMES B. McCOY, 

were appointed said Committee. 

GRAND LODGE OF NEW ZEALAND. 

Bro. L. N. Greenleaf presented the following, which 
was adopted : 

To the M.\ \V. m . Grand Lodge of Colorado: 

Your Committee on Correspondence, to whom was referred the renewed ap- 
plication of the Grand Lodge of New Zealand for recognition, would respectfully 
submit the following report : 

We have given the matter careful consideration, having been furnished with a 
14 brief history of the movement in connection with the establishment of the Grand 
Lodge of New Zealand," published by its authority in March, 1892, aud also the 
Proceedings of the Annual Communication held at Auckland, April 27, 1892. The 
facts determined are as follows : 

The first movement in favor of an independent Grand Lodge for this Colony, 
was made in 1876, but it did not at that time acquire much strength, and it was not 
until after the formation of the Grand Lodge of South' Australia, in 1884, followed 
by those of New South Wales and Victoria, that the brethren were incited to fresh 
exertion and a renewed determination to form a Grand Lodge. 

The Grand Lodge of New Zealand was organized April 29, 1890, at Christ 
Church, at which time Brother Henry Thomson was elected M. W. Grand Master. 

The proceedings attending its formation appear to have been regular, and in 
accordance with Masonic Law and usage, and were endorsed or participated in by 
a majority of the Lodges in the Colony. 

The Lodges under the several Constitutions at that time were as follows : 

English .■ 85 

Irish 15 

Scotch 47 

Total 147 

Some of these were claimed to be practically dormant. Ninty-two of these 
Lodges voted in favor of a formation of a Grand Lodge; twenty-one against; un- 
decided thirty-four. For various reasons which do not fully appear, some of the 
Lodges voting in the affirmative did not unite with it upon its organization. 

From the Proceedings of April last, we learn that the Lodges upon its roll 
number eighty* and that accessions are being made from time to time, of Lodges 
which have heretofore held aloof. The situation thus briefly outlined is this— 
eighty lodges have given their allegiance to the new Grand Lodge, while sixty- 
seven still adhere to the English, Irish and Scotch Constitutions; the respective 
Grand Lodges of which still refuse their recognition. In fact the attitude at pres- 
ent assumed by the Grand Lodge of England seems to threaten the postponement 
of the question of recognition for an indefinite period. 

The Grand Lodge of New Zealand has been recognized by her sister Grand 
Lodges in the Australasian Colonies; by several American Grand Lodges and those 
of Quebec and New Brunswick; Grand Bodies in Peru and Italy have also accorded 
recognition. 

A controversy has also arisen over the proper interpretation of the rule con- 
tained in Article 219, Book of Constitutions G. L. of England, which allows three 



46 PROCEEDINGS OF THE 

members to bold the warrant of a Lodge. The G rand Regiitrar of the Grand Lodge 
of England rendered an opinion that the above rule did not apply, because the 
majority were not retiring from the Lodge, bnt were merely transferrins fta 
allegiance to another Maaonle paver. Notwithstanding this, circulars had been 
issued by thoae opposed to the movement, claiming that under rale 218 a minority 

What influence this line of argument has had o«er thoee who etill refuse to trans - 
fer their allegiance we do not know. 

the Lodgee of the Colony, and that there is not that degree of unanimity which 
should prevail in order to completely invent the new Grand Lodge with undisputed 

nances, still we (eel constrained to 
until the next Annual Com monica- 



i be again deferred 
Fraternally enlir 



LAWRENCE N. GREENLEAF, 
ANDREW KELLOCK. 
D. B. ROBERTSON. 



PAY ROLL. 
The Finance Committee submitted the following report, 
which was adopted, and a warrant ordered drawn as 
therein recommended : 



To the II.: W,\ (trand Lodge ; 

We report the following sums as 
named below axe entitled on account' 
provided by Section 5 of our By-laws, 
the Grand Truaanrer for fl.«W.W, and 
amounts to wbicb tbey are entitled ! 



i amounts to which the several Brethren 
■er diem and actual traveling expenses, as 
I recommend that a warrant be drawn on 
it he be directed to pay the Brethren the 



W [I Wr.gl.i 

..J i  S.  ( ■■■■! . 
. W.L. Bosh 



Jurisprudence , 



\B.F- Hawaii ... 

iB I., l-arr 

[Dan McNi>eo 



.Frank Wheeler... 



GRAND LODGE OF COLORADO. 



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48 PROCEEDINGS OF THE 

APPOINTED OFFICERS. 

The following list of appointed officers was read by 
the Grand Secretary : 

R. J. VAN VALKENBURG, Erie G. Chaplain 

T. B. MaoDONALD, Saguache G. Orator 

CLAY M. VAN f Denver G. Lecturer 

WM.W. HOLLER, Salida G. Marshal 

JDDSON E. COLE, Baena Vista S. G. D. 

HORACE T. DeLONG, Grand Junction J. G. D. 

ANDREW KELLOCK, Telluride _. B. G. S. 

SUEL E. CLARK, Fort Collins J. G. 8. 

THOMA8 LINTON, Denver G. Tiler 

INSTALLATION. 

Grand Master John M. Maxwell installed Bro. Wm. 
D. Wright Grand Master elect, who installed the other 
elected and appointed officers. 

MONITOR. 

On motion of Bro. H. T. West, Bros. George Wyman 
and Harper M. Orahood were added to the present Com- 
mittee on Monitor. 

The Committee is 

Bros. WM. D. TODD, 

H. P. H. BROMWELL, 
WM. D. PEJRCE, 
GEORGE WYMAN, 
HARPER M. ORAHOOD. 

SALARIES. 

Bro. E. L. N. Foster offered the following, which was 
adopted: 

Resolved, That the Bum of two hundred dollars is hereby appropriated to Bro. 
L. N. Greenleaf, as Chairman of the Committee on Correspondence, for preparing 
report, and the sum of one hundred dollars be allowed Bro. Thos. Linton for 
services as Grand Tiler, and that warrants be drawn on the Grand Treasurer in 
payment thereof. 

MASONIC CONGRESS. 

Bro. E. L. N. Foster offered the following which was 
adopted : 

Resolved, That the Grand Master appoint a delegation of seven members of 
this Grand Lodge of whioh he shall be one, to attend the proposed conference of 
Masons in Chicago in August, 1893. 



GRAND LODGE OF COLORADO. 49 

COMMITTEES. 

The Grand Master appointed the following standing 
Committees : 

ON JURISPRUDENCE. 

ROGER W. WOODBURY Denver 

WM. D.TODD Denver 

JAMES H. PEABODY Canon City 

ON CORRESPONDENCE. 

LAWRENCE N. GREENLEAF ..Denver 

BENJ. F. RAWALT Akron 

IRA L HERRON Longmont 

ON RETURNS AND WORK OF LODGES, U. D. 

BYRON L. CARR Longmont 

WM. T. BRIDWELL Canon City 

ERNEST LE NEVE FOSTER .... Georgetown 

ON APPEALS AND GRIEVANCES. 

JOHN M. MAXWELL Leadville 

GEORGE F.LEWIS.. Highlands 

WILLIAM L. H MILLAR __ Denver 

ON FINANCE, MILEAGE AND PER DIEM. 

CHARLES T. HARKISON Denver 

DAVID 8WICKHIMER Rico 

CROMWELL TUCKER Denver 

CLOSED. 

The minutes were read and approved, and the Thirty- 
second Annual Communication of the M.\ W.\ Grand 
Lodge of A. F. & A. M. of Colorado was closed in- ample 
form. 

WM. D. WRIGHT, 

Grand Master. 

ATTEST. 




Grand Secretary. 



SO PROCEEDINGS OF THE GRAND LODGE OF COLORADO. 

AFTERWARDS. 

The Grand Master, October 18, 1892, appointed as a 
delegation to attend the proposed Fraternal Congress to 
be held in Chicago in August, 1893: 

HENRY M. TELLER, P. G. M Central City 

ROGER W. WOODBURY, P. G. M Denver 

WILLIAM T. BRIDWELL, P. G. M Canon City 

BYRON L. CARR, P. G. M Longmont 

ED. C. PARMELEE, Gr. Sec'y Denver 

CHARLES T. HARKISON, P. M Denver 

WILLIAM D. WRIGHT, G. M Denver 

He also appointed as District Deputy Grand Masters 
in their respective districts: 

Fimt District HENRY T. WEST Greeley 

Second Dibtbiot JOHN WILLIAMS, Colorado Springs 

Third District GEORGE W. ROE Pueblo 

Fourth Dibtbiot L. M. MILLER Grand Junction 

ED. C. PARMELEE, 

Grand Secretary. 



APPENDIX. 



REPORT OF CORRESPONDENCE. 
DIGEST OF DECISIONS. 
RETURNS OF LODGES. 
STATISTICAL TABLES. 
CONSTITUTION AND LAWS. 
FORMS. 



Report on Correspondence. 



To the M. W. Grand Lodge of Colorado: 

Your Committee on Correspondence herewith submits the following report : 

The general plan of arrangement is that adopted by as in former reports. 
The Digest of Decisions will be found at the end of oar review. We shall avoid as 
far as possible repetitions of decisions which are identical with those heretofore 
published in oar preceding digests. 

8pecial matters which are now engaging the attention of the Craft, as well as 
any discussion of important questions, will be found in our Conclusion. 

We have received from the Grand Secretary the proceedings of the following 
Grand Lodges, fifty-five in all, some of them being for two years : 



Alabama 1*91 

Arizona 1891 

Arkansas 1891 

British Columbia 1891-1892 

California 1891 

Canada - 1891 

Connecticut ...1892 

Delaware. _ 1891 

District of Colombia 1891 

Florida 1892 

Georgia ..1891 

Idaho 1891 

Illinois 1891 

Indiana.. 1*92 

Indian Territory 1891 

Iowa 1892 

Kansas ...1892 

Kentucky 1891 

Louisiana 1892 

Maine 1892 

Manitoba _ ...1892 

Maryland 1891-1892 

Massachusetts 1891 

Michigan 1892 

Minnesota 1892 

Mississippi 1892 

Missouri 1891 

Montana 1891 



Nebraska 1891 

Nevada... 1891 

New Brunswick 1892 

New Hampshire 1892 

New Jersey 1892 

New Mexico 1891 

New York 1892 

North Carolina 1892 

North Dakota 1892 

Ohio 1891 

Oregon 1892 

Pennsylvania 1891 

Prince Edward Island 1891-1892 

Quebec 1892 

Rhode Island 1891 

South Australia -1891 

South Carolina 1891 

South Dakota _ 1892 

Tennessee 1892 

Texas 1891 

Utah 1892 

Vermont ...1892 

Virginia 1891 

Washington 1891 

West Virginia .1891 

Wisconsin 1 *»2 

Wyoming 1891 



We have failed to receive the following : New South Wales, Nova Scotia, 
Tasmania and Victoria. The former has not reached your committee for two 
years. 



54 APPENDIX. 



ALABAMA— 1891. 

Seventy-first Annual held at Montgomery, December 
1, 1891. 

Grand Master George M. Morrow devoted three pages 
of his address to the glories of Masonry, setting forth its 
aim and past achievements in faultless rhetoric and in- 
spiring eloquence, and closing his introductory by inciting 
the brethren to deeds of permanent charity, instancing a 
home as the wisest concentration of effort, which "may do 
the greatest good, and shed, like accumulated sunbeams, 
the balmiest influences." 

Announcement is made of the death of Past D. G. M. 
Samuel Thompson, a skillful and zealous worker in 
Masonry. Of the state of Masonry in that jurisdiction, 
we quote these encouraging words : 

Masonry, in Alabama, to-day, is in a happy and prosperous condition. Har- 
mony has been onr distinguishing characteristic. No vexed questions have dis- 
turbed the deliberations of any of our constituent Lodges; no entanglements nor 
issues have arisen among the brethren requiring the interposition of the Grand 
Master. Our laws and Ritual have been held sacred and inviolate ; our charities 
have been unostentatious and far-reaching, and the dignity of Masonry has been 
elevated to the highest plane. 

He had granted thirteen dispensations for new Lodges 
and reinstated six others which had forfeited their char- 
ters. 

He submits a list of thirteen decisions which were ap- 
proved with two exceptions, these being essentially 
modified 

He submits for the consideration of that Grand Lodge 
the resolutions of the Grand Lodge of Kentucky looking 
to the holding of a Fraternal Congress at Chicago during 
the World's Fair. 

The Grand Lodge endorsed the movement and suitable 
action will be taken for proper representation at said 
Congress. 

A ruling of P. G. Master Brown in 1890, in regard to 
"seeing the charter," was reversed. The opinion of the 
Grand Lodge being expressed in the report of the Com- 
mittee on Jurisprudence : "The Committee being unan- 
imously of the opinion that a visitor has the right to 
demand to see the charter of the Lodge before submitting 
to examination.' ' 

The Grand Lodge also adopted the report of the same 
Committee which was adverse to P. G. M. Brown's recom- 
mendation for " a change in the law, as to secret objection 



APPENDIX. 55 

to admission to membership in a subordinate Lodge, and 
to the advancement of candidates for degrees." 

Two of the Committee presented an explanatory state- 
ment in regard to their action in reporting adversely, from 
which we quote the following extracts: 

The words of the Constitution are that no Lodge shall require any member 
to assign his reason for voting against a person applying for initiation or member- 
•hip. This clause, and there is no other in the Constitution on the subject, it will 
be noticed does not prohibit a Lodge from requiring a member to give his reasons 
for voting against a person who may apply for advancement. Whatever rights a 
Lodge has in snch a case are those arising from that particular section of the Con- 
futation. We do not think that those rights can be enlarged or diminished'by any 
action of this Grand Lodge. Whether that section, by necessary implication, gives 
to the Lodge the right to require one of its members to give his reasons for voting 
against a person who applies for advancement, is a question which has not been 
properly presented to this committee and upon which, in oar opinion, we are not 
now called upon to decide. We do not think it would be proper for the commit- 
tee to construe that section until a case arises pzesenting the point. 

We present this opinion in order that we may not be understood when we 
agree to the adverse report of the committee as committing ourselves to the pro- 
position that a Lodge has not the right to require a member voting against an ap- 
plicant to assign his reasons therefor. When that question arises, we wish to be 
left free and uncommitted by concurring in this report. We have views npon that 
question, bat do not think it is proper to present them at this time. 

The following resolutions were* presented, proposing a 
General Masonic Conference and were referred to three 
Past Grand Masters to report at the next annual : 

Whkrkas. There is a want of uniformity in the verbiage and mechanical 
features of the Ritual of Masonry in the various Grand Jurisdictions of the United 
States; And whereas, it is desirable and important to harmonize these differences 
and to have a uniform Ritual throughout the United States; therefore, be it 

Resolved. That it is the sense and opinion of the M. W. Grand Lodge of the 
State of Alabama, that some means should be adopted in common by the various 
Grand Jurisdictions of the United States to correct all differences and to establish 
a uniform ritual throughout the United States. 

Resolved* That we fraternally suggest the following plan: 

1. That eaoh Grand Jurisdiction in the United States adopt a resolution in 
conformity to the suggestions set forth in these resolutions. 

2. That a National Committee on Masonic Ritual shall be appointed, con- 
sisting of one member from each Grand Jurisdiction, to be appointed by the 
several Grand Masters from the Committee on Work of each Grand Jurisdiction. 

S. That this committee shall meet at such time and place as may be deter- 
mined by a majority of said committee as soon after its formation as practicable. 

4. That it shall be the duty of this committee to harmonize the work in all 
particulars, and to report back to the Committee on Work of each Grand Jurisdic- 
tion, through its member on the committee, and the Committee on Work to the 
several Grand Lodges for adoption. 

5. That the salary and expenses of each member of this committee shall be 
paid by the Grand Lodge he represents; and that expenses of the committee as a 
whole shall be pro rated among the various Grand Lodges represented. 

Be it further resolved, That these resolutions shall be printed in the trans- 
actions of this Grand Lodge, and shall be referred to a committee, consisting of 
three Past Grand Blasters, who shall report on them at the next Grand Communi- 
cation for final action. 

The following action was taken in regard to an Orphan's 
Home: 

Whebzab, It is desirable that the Masonic Fraternity of Alabama should at 
the earliest day practicable, establish a home for indigent widows and orphans of 
deceased Masons; therefore be it 

Resolved* That a special committee of five members of this Grand Lodge be 
appointed to take into consideration the advisability of establishing such an insti- 
tution as suggested in the above preamble, and to report to the next Grand 
Communication of this Grand Lodge, a plan to carry out the object herein set 
forth. 



56 APPENDIX. 

The Committee on Jurisprudence reported verbally, in 
answer to a question submitted to them, as follows : "That 
the temporary removal of a charter from the Lodge-room, 
while the Lodge is at labor, does not necessitate the cessa- 
tion of such labor." 

The Grand Lodge adopted the following, which is 
indefinite as to its intent ; nothing being said about the 
payment of arrearages, one would imply that the payment 
of one dollar "wiped out the old score" : 

Resolved, That Masons who are in arrears with their Lodges for dnes at the 
time each Lodges forfeit their Charters, shall be provided with a certificate in the 
nature of a dim it, by the Grand Secretary, upon the payment of one dollar. 

The permanent Trust Fund now amounts to $22,726.92. 

P. G. M. Palmer J. Pillans continues to furnish able 
and instructive reports on correspondence. That for the 
present year covers 146 pages, filled with interesting mat- 
ter, with characteristic comments by Bro. P. where occasion 
seems to demand. Nearly two pages are devoted to Colo- 
rado for 1890. Extracts are made from Grand Master 
BridwelPs address, and our views on the subject of "Grand 
Master's Prerogatives" quoted without comment. 

Grand Master and Grand Secretary both re-elected. 



ARIZONA— 1891. 

Tenth Annual held at Phoenix, November 10, 1891, 
M. W. George W. Cheyney in the Grand East. 

While he reports a small increase in membership, yet 
it keeps pace with that of the population. He announces 
the death of two Grand officers, namelv, Bros. John H. 
Marion, Grand Orator, and James Sias, Junior Grand 
Steward. 

He had granted a dispensation to re-ballot on the 
application of a candidate within the constitutional period 
of twelve months. He recommends to Lodges the greatest 
care in preferring such requests. He says : 

The right of every Master Mason to a full and free use of the ballot moat be 
carefully exercised and guarded. The (Constitution has fixed twelve months as a 
probationary period for a rejected candidate, and it should not be lightly set aside 
by dispensation. 

He had granted one dispensation for a new Lodge. 

He submits a list of seven decisions which were ap- 
proved. 

The Widows' and Orphans' Fund is yearly increasing 
and now amounts to $226. 



APPENDIX. 57 

To the subject of Eitual he devotes some attention, 
with a view of securing uniformity. The Grand Lodge 
has adopted the " California Work." 

Upon the subject of dimits he is quite outspoken, 
believing that the ease with which they are obtained is 
detrimental to the Fraternity. He says that recent statistics 
show that there are over 400,000 non-affiliated Masons in 
the United States out of a total of 1,100,000. In that 
jurisdiction, he says that probably more than one-half are 
non-affiliated. 

M. W. Isaac S. Titus, P. G. M. of California, was 
present, and was received with Grand honors. 

The Grand Lodge decided to take no further action in 
regard to Ritual at that session. 

Action on the application of the Grand Lodge of Hay ti, 
for recognition, was deferred for one year, until it furnishes 
the desired information as to its standing or legality. 

No Report on Correspondence. 

Bro. Alexander G. Oliver, of Prescott, was elected 
Grand Master ; Grand Secretary re-elected. 



ARKANSAS— 1891. 

Fifty-second Annual held at Little Rock, November 
17, 1891, M. W. Bro. W. K. Ramsey presiding. 

He congratulates* the Brethren upon the improved con- 
dition of their material resources during the year. There 
has been no special revival of Masonry, yet there has been 
a healthy and substantial growth. He had felt impelled 
to refuse dispensations looking to any public displays of 
the Fraternity other than those permitted by our laws. 
These refusals referred to picnics, Fourth of July barbe- 
cues, public school entertainments, etc. He expresses his 
joy over the fact that the Grand Lodge will soon have a 
home in their magnificent Temple now in process of erec- 
tion. Far-seeing Masons used their influence to dispose 
of the unprofitable building known as St. John's College, 
and the Craft will soon j)ossess a beautiful, useful and profit- 
able structure in its stead. He refers to the death of Bro. 
Albert Pike, the distinguished Mason, in fitting terms of 
eulogy; upon being appraised of the sad occurrence he 
issued a circular letter to all the Lodges in the jurisdic- 
tion. Bro. Pike was a charter member of Magnolia Lodge 



58 APPENDIX 

No. 60, of Little Rock, with which he was still affiliated at 
the time of his decease. 

Seventeen decisions were rendered, all of which were 
approved, with one exception, which was slightly qualified. 

He granted ten dispensations for new Lodges. 

He reports the arrest of two charters. In one of these 
cases a Lodge refused to inflict any punishment upon a 
member after he was found guilty of publicly ridiculing* 
the Bible and also of gambling. 

Action upon the application of the Grand Lodge of 
New Zealand was again postponed. 

A resolution to the effect that it was the sense of the 
Grand Lodge that the publication of the names of sus- 
pended or expelled Masons in public newspapers was 
inexpedient, was lost. 

The following resolution was adopted : 

Resolved, That the M.\ W.*. G. M. be authorized to appoint a committee of 
fifty Master Masons, holding membership in this jurisdiction, of which the Grand 
Master shall be chairman, to meet similar committees from other jurisdictions at 
Chicago, 111., during the holding of the World's Fair, to confer upon the general 
interests of the Fraternity and to promote uniformity in the work and harmony of 
action. 

Resolved, That said committee shall not anter into any arrangement looking 
to the formation of a National Grand Lodge. 

Bro. S. H. Davidson presented the Report on Corre- 
spondence, Colorado, for 1890, receiving a half page of 
his space. 

Bro. C. A. Bridewell was elected Grand Master, Bro. 
Fay Hempstead re-elected Grand Secretary. 



BRITISH COLUMBIA -1891. 

Twentieth Annual held at Kamloops, June 18, 1891. 

Grand Master A. McKeown reports a prosperous con- 
dition of affairs in that jurisdiction. He makes feeling 
allusion to the death of P. G. Master Henry Brown, Grand 
Secretary, who died two mouths previous to the meeting 
of the Grand Lodge and whose valuable services to that 
body were coeval with its formation. 

His address is almost strictly confined to a record of 
his official acts. 

Three dispensations were granted for the formation of 
new Lodges. 

Among special dispensations granted was one author- 
izing the brethren of a Lodge "to wear regalia in public at 
a ball." 



APPENDIX 59 

Dispensations for such a purpose are now very gener- 
ally condemned Among " questions answered " we note 
the following: 

Is a candidate minus right thnmb eligible for office? 
Answer. — No. 

Is a Mason under suspension qualified to become a Charter member of a new 
Lodge? 

> Answer. — Certainly not. 

The ignorance which prompted the latter query was 
"dense," to say the least. 

He recommends that in future the delegates from the 
several Masonic districts elect, at the annual session of the 
Grand Lodge, their own District Deputy Grand Masters 
and thus relieve the Grand Master from a delicate task. 
He thinks the various districts conferring the honor will 
naturally place a greater value upon the office. 

The Deputy Grand Master Marcus Wolfe also delivered 
an address embodying a record of his official acts and par- 
ticipation in special ceremonies of the craft. 

From the report of the Acting Grand Secretary we 
glean the following: 

Number of Lodges 10 

Membership _ _ 728 

Increase in membership during year _ 48 

Total funds and property of Lodges $44,086.66 

Charities $808.25 

The reports of the District Deputy Grand Masters 
give a full exhibit of the condition or the Lodges in their 
respective districts which are reported to be prosperous 
almost without exception. 

The Grand Lodges of North Dakota and Tasmania 
were accorded fraternal recognition. 

A committee was appointed to prepare a Masonic burial 
service to be submitted at the next Annual. 

White linen aprons cannot be worn in the Lodges after 
1891, as Article 169 is to be strictly enforced. After the 
close of the regular business, the Grand Lodge attended 
divine service at St. Paul's Church and listened to a very 
interesting sermon by V. W. Bro. A. W. Sillitoe, Past 
Grand Chaplain. 

Bro. Marcus Wolfe was elected Grand Master and Bro. 
W. J. Quinlan, Grand Secretary. 



60 APPENDIX. 



BRITISH COLUMBIA- 1802. 

A portrait of G. M. Marcus Wolfe appears as a frontis- 
piece. 

Twenty-first Annual held at Nanaimo, June 23, 1892, 
M. W. Marcus Wolfe, Grand Master. 

He thus pictures the condition of the Craft : 

It is both with pleasure and gratification that I can report this as a year of 
great prosperity within oar jurisdiction, mostly all the Lodges have increased 
their roll, and the reports which will be submitted to yon, will famish ground for 
encouragement. There is no single instance of insubordination to report, no 
charter suspended or surrendered, a new era appears to have begun in our exist- 
ence, and the outlook for the future is most promising ; vet, let us hope that 
Lodges (while anxious to increase their membership) are taking that due care and 
precaution of investigating into the character and standing of those seeking 
admission, so that nothing but good material may be used in the building of our 
"earthly Masonic edifice," and would impress upon you the words of one of oar 
great Masonic authors, who says : " Ancient, Free and Accepted Masonry was 
originally intended for the few, whose intelligence was such as would enable them 
to appreciate its beauties, and whose morals were such as would enable them to 
exemplify its virtues. Though not another Mason should ever be made, we should 
guard our doors securely against those who seek to wear oar badge for mercenary 

fmrposes, and whose daily lives of debauchery, profanity and vulgarity give the 
ie to their professions of faith in the tenets of oar craft. 1 * 

He had made visitations to many of the Lodges and 
inspected their work. 

He laid the corner-stone of St. Alban's church, at 
Nanaimo, during his term. 

He submits a few of his more important rulings and 
decisions. 

There had been no loss by death of any member of the 
Grand Lodge during the year. 

He extends his congratulations upon their having 
reached the twenty-first year of their existence, and thus 
attained their full maturity and become of age. We copy 
the following from his retrospective view : 

It would not be out of place at this time to review Masonry and its progress 
in British Columbia. The inauguration of Masonry here dates as far back as 1h:>9, 
the first warranted Lodge (Victoria No. KN>) from the Grand Lodge of England, 
then following closely upon each other to 1W7, nine other Lodges were chartered 
or nnder dispensation under England or Scotland. The first proposal to form an 
independent Grand Lodge for the colony was in lv»9, but the object was not finally 
consummated until October, Wl, when our Grand Lodge was duly organized as a 
sovereign and independent body. Since which time we have made steady progress 
as the Province has been opened up and became populated. 

*********** 

Bro. Israel Powell, our first M.\ W.". Grand Master, at the conclusion of his 
address said : " Only the corner-stone of the grand temple we have united to build 
in tliis young Province has been most auspiciously laid; careful supervision, loyal 
obedience, unremitting zeal and the most steadfast devotion, will alone enable us 
to crown our honorable labors with the cope-stone of success." The condition 
and standing of Masonry in the Province tn-dny testifies to the faithful and zeal- 
ous manner in which the advice has been carried out; from eight Lodges, with a 
membership of 21)5, we have fifteen Lodges, with IKK) members. 

He is a warm advocate for the Literary and Social 
Features as an adjunct to Lodge work. 



APPENDIX. 6 1 

He thinks the fee for affiliation should be abolished. 

The report of the Deputy Grand Master also shows a 
gratifying condition of Masonry throughout the Province, 
and he had also made many official visitations. 

Dispensations are still granted to wear regalia at balls 
and public conversaziones. 

The Grand Master having directed attention to the 
fact that one of the Lodges refused to comply with the 
law in regard to uniformity of clothing and that another 
claimed the right to appoint instead of elect their Secre- 
tary, the committee on his address asked that the matter 
be settled by the Grand Lodge. The following action was 
taken: 

That inasmuch as certain rights and privileges were given at the time of form- 
ation of this Grand Lodge to Victoria- Columbia and Ashlar Lodges, as to regalia 
worn by the latter, and the appointment instead of election of Secretary in former; 
be it therefore 

Resolved, That these Lodges shall retain the privileges accorded as long as 
they so desire. 

The same persistency by old Lodge Hiram No. 1, of 
Hartford, Conn., that it had vested rights in regard to 
certain features of the ritual, was declared to be rebellion 
and resulted in the arrest of its charter. Our Brethren of 
British Columbia believe in getting along smoothly even 
if the sovereignty of the Grand Lodge has to be relaxed 
and its own laws abrogated to suit special cases. 

Recognition was accorded to the Grand Lodge of New 
Zealand and the application of the Grand Lodge of Hayti 
was laid over until the next Annual. 

The Grand Lodge resolved to affiliate with the " Gen- 
eral Masonic Relief Association of the United States and 
Canada." 

A resolution was adopted making it the duty of Com- 
mittees on Character of Applicants tor Initiation to report 
upon each of twelve questions identical with those 
required in Colorado. In fact the character of the legis- 
lation of the session is very largely in accord with that of 
our American Grand Lodges, while the printing and 
arrangement of the volume of proceedings is highly 
creditable. There is no Report on Correspondence, but 
one is promised in the near future when the treasury of 
the Grand Lodge will admit of their indulgence in this 
acknowledged necessity. 

Bro. Wm. Downie of Vancouver was elected Grand 
Master, Bro. W. J. Quinlan re-elected Grand Secretary. 



62 APPENDIX. 



CALIFORNIA-1891. 

Upon opening the volume before us, we behold the 
lifelike countenance of the late Grand Secretary, Alex. G. 
Abell, who, for thirty-five successive years performed the 
duties of that office with distinguished ability, and whose 
uamewas a "household word throughout the Masonic 
realm. He died on December 28, 1890, and thus in the 
closing hours of the old year he passed from the scenes of 
earth, ripe in years and the wisdom of experience, crowned 
with the glory of a life well-spent, loved and lamented by 
the Brotherhood wheresoever dispersed. A special com- 
munication of the Grand Lodge was held on January 1, 
1891, to perform the last sad rites and pay fitting honors to 
his memory. 

The eulogies delivered by Grand Master Conklin and 
Grand Orator Boruck were eloquent, tender and expres- 
sive of a deep appreciation of his exalted life and char- 
acter. 

Forty-second Annual, held at San Francisco, October 
13, 1891. 

Grand Master Alvah R. Conklin reports a most grati- 
fying state of offairs, peace and harmony prevailing to 
their fullest extent. 

Out of 241 Lodges with a membership of over 15,000, but 
seven trial records had come up for inspection, while in 
former years there had been from twenty to forty-five. 
The leaven of morality and brotherly love is thus becom- 
ing widely diffused through the fraternity of the Golden 
State. So mote it be. 

He had granted six dispensations for new Lodges. 

In fifteen cases dispensations were granted to reballot 
within less than the prescribed time, and his action was 
approved by the Grand Lodge. In this jurisdiction the 
law is that " an unfavorable ballot cannot be reconsidered 
on any grounds." We believe our law to be in strict ac- 
cordance with ancient usage and hold it to be one of the 
landmarks of the Craft that "neither the Grand Lodge or 
Grand Master has any power to order a reconsideration of 
the ballot." Grand Lodges may declare that they have 
the right to form their own constitutions and that the 
regulation of the ballot and other matters prescribed by 
our predecessors are subject to the changed conditions of 



APPENDIX. 63 

the present time, but we cannot agree with them. Remove 
not the old landmarks which the fathers have set up. 

He refers to the good work being done by the several 
Boards of Relief and recommends a continuation of the 
usual appropriations. 

He favors retrenchment in Grand Lodge expenses and 
believes that the printing should be awarded to the lowest 
responsible bidder, also, that the proceedings should be 
distributed through express companies by special contract 
instead of sending them by mail. 

He also calls attention to a growing sentiment against 
the evil of indulging in wine at the banquet table. 

He laid five corner-stones in person and one was laid 
by proxy. Of the five laid by the Grand Master, foui 
were those of State institutions for the afflicted and un- 
fortunate. 

The membership on July 31, 1891, was 16,262, and the 
balance in the treasury $7,774.55. 

He again decided that Lodge funds cannot be used for 
paying for refreshments. In the case presented, the Lodge 
owned its building, renting the same for various purposes, 
and they desired to set apart the money received from 
such rents as a fund from which they could pay for 
refreshments. He however decided that as this revenue 
went into the Lodge treasury it could only be used for 
charity, etc. 

From the Grand Secretary's report we glean the fol- 
lowing : 

The nam here of the chartered Lodges which are and have been borne upon onr 
register have reached to three hundred and three. Of these thirty-four have volun- 
tarily surrendered their charters : six have become extinct by the revocation of 
those instruments; two, established in Oregon, assisted in the formation and 
became subordinate to the Grand Lodge of that State ; eight, instituted in Nevada, 
transferred their allegiance to the Grand Lodge there established by themselves ; 
three withdrew to form the Grand Lodge of Arizona; and eighteen have consolidated 
into nine— making in all sixty-two vacancies upon our roll. Thus there are now 
in existence within this jurisdiction two hundred and forty-one chartered Lodges, 
which, with the six acting nnder dispensation, make a total number of two hundred 
and forty-seven, with a membership of sixteen thousand two hundred and sixty. 
two. being a net gain for the year of six Lodges and four hundred and thirty-one 
members. 

The report of the Committee on Returns furnishes the 
following interesting items : 

11 Lodges have.. — 200 members or more 

9 Lodges have 150 and less than 200 

22 Lodges have 100 and less than 150 

19 Lodges have 7.5 and lens than 100 

54 Lodges have 50 and less than 75 

75 Lodges have 30 and less than 30 

42 Lodges have 20 and less than :*) 

12 Lodges have 15 and less than 20 

3 Lodges have lees than 15 members 



64 APPENDIX. 

12 conferred t Decrees each daring year 

12 conferred I Degree each daring year 

57 conferred No Degree during year 

25 conferred No Degree daring 2 years 

10 conferred No Degree daring 3 yearn 

5 conferred No Degree daring 4 years 

The Grand Lodges of New South Wales, Wyoming 
and North Dakota were recognized, and action upon the 
application of New Zealand and Tasmania post|K)iied. 

The report of the Committee on Widows' and Orphans' 
Home outlines a general plan of procedure for the forma- 
tion of such an organization. They report the annual cost 
for the care, maintenance and education of each orphan to 
be $125 and upwards. 

They also state that under the general statutes, the 
State of California pays to each orphan asylum in which 
the inmates are supported in part or wholly by charity, 
the sum of £100 per annum for each whole orphan and 
$75 for each half orphan and abandoned child. It appears 
that there are twenty-two orphanages receiving such State 
aid, having 3,655 children under their care. North Caro- 
lina also contributes public funds for the same purpose. 

The report was referred to the Committee on Juris- 
prudence who presented the following resolution, which 
was adopted: 

Resolved* That a committee of nine be appointed by the Grand Master, whose 
doty it shall be to organize a Masonic Widows' and Orphans 1 Home Association, or 
Incorporation, in manner as to that committee may seem best; and which associa- 
tion or incorporation, when so formed, shall have fall power to purohase,reoeive, 
ase and appropriate for the purpose of erecting and maintaining a Masonic Widows* 
and Orphans' Homo, all necessary property, real and personal, or moneys which 
can beobtained by said incorporation or association, by purchase, donation or 
otherwise; and to that end, and for these objects, to receive donations from all 
Masons or Masonic Lodges within this jurisdiction, and to select, receive as a gift, 
or purchase a site for said Home; and, finally, to do and perform all needful acts 
necessary to carry into successful operation the said enterprise. 

The Grand Orator, Bro. Marcus D. Boruck, delivered 
the annual oration which was referred to the four princi- 
pal officers, but was not embalmed in print and therefore 
we cannot speak of its merits. 

Bro. James M. Ellis presents his first report on corres- 
pondence in which he reviews the proceedings of forty- 
nine Grand Lodges, Colorado for 1890 receiving a 
fraternal notice of three pages. The report covers 130 
pages and is a most creditable production, while it con- 
tains mauy extracts, they are judiciously selected and his 
comments thereon are numerous and well considered. He 
devotes considerable space to the dedication of the Masonic 
Teuiple at Denver and the laying of the corner-stone of 
the State Capitol building. Grand Master B rid well's ad- 



APPENDIX. 65 

dress is reviewed and his remarks on Masonic Home 
quoted. In common with others, he disapproves of his 
sixth decision. We quote his comments: 

His sixth decision we differ from. He holds that a Lodge having suspended a 
member for non-payment of dues, cannot, in after years, remit the dues and restore 
10 good standing. We think it can remit arrears at any time; that the rights of a 
Lodge in that respect are not restricted, nor limited to time, except, perhaps, in 
jurisdictions where non-payment of dnes is held a triable offense and suspension is 
only had after a trial, in that instance it may be required that the Grand Lodge 
should act. Bat where a restoration is acquired, as in our Jurisdiction, by the pay- 
ment of arrears, we think it the correct way. The Lodge certainly retains its pre- 
rogative of remitting the dues at all times, when, in its judgment, charity and 
justice require the remission. We are utterly opposed to the suspension of Masons 
for non-payment of dues, except on positive knowledge of their ability to pay. 
The decision in point is not clearly denned: years may mean but two, as well as ten 
or twenty, and we hold that, when positive knowledge removes the presumption, it 
is clearly within the power of the Lodge, on a motion, to remit and restore. 

He criticises Bro. H. T. De Long's oration in that por- 
tion where, as he says, " it seeks to extol Christianity at 
the expense of Masonry." He had read the oration en- 
tire and while admitting it to be an eloquent effort he 
thinks " its beauty is marred when it reflects a religious 
idea peculiar to the Christian pulpit." 

Bro. William Johnston, of Courtland, was elected 
Grand Master and Bro. George Johnson, of San Fran- 
cisco, Grand Secretary. 



CANADA— 1891. 

Thirty-sixth Annual held at Toronto, July 22, 1891, 
M. W. Bro. J. Boss Robertson on the Throne. 

Instead of embodying in his address the usual statis- 
tical information and record of routine duties, he had 
entrusted these matters to the Grand Secretary and they 
appear in his report. 

He alludes to his visit to England in September, 1890, 
where a cordial reception was accorded him at the Quar- 
terly Communication of the United Grand Lodge of 
England. 

He is certainly qualified to speak understandingly of 
the condition of the Lodges in his jurisdiction, having 
visited 130 of them and traveled nearly ten thousand 
miles. He reports that a large majority of the Lodges 
are in a prosperous condition and steadily advancing in 
the leading features of the work. He gives the following 
summary: "Out of the three hundred and fifty Lodges on 
the roll, sixty per cent, are in an active and prosperous con- 
dition ; thirty per cent., while in a semi-prosperous state, 



66 APPENDIX. 

are showing in each case strong signs of improvement ; 
only seven per cent, are weak ; and three per cent, are 
either dormant or dead." 

He discourses upon the vital necessity of selecting 
W. M.'s and officers who are proficieut in the work, and 
who possess sufficient intelligence and personal magnetism 
to make the work attractive. The respective abilities of 
the W. M.'s are thus analyzed : "You will, I am sure, be 
gratified to learn that 260 of the W. M.'s can exemplify 
the E. A., F. C. and M. M. ; 48 can exemplify the E. A. and 
F. C. ; 29 can work E. A. : 9 are only able to open and close, 
and 3 are unable to work." 

Four corner-stones were laid during the year and one 
dispensation granted for a new Lodge. 

No money, he says, ever expended by the Grand Lodge, 
has yielded a better return than the assessment for mem- 
bership in the General Relief Association of the United 
States and Canada. Thousands have been saved the Cana- 
dian Craft through this association, and the familiar face 
of the Masonic tramp has become a reminiscence. 

He suggests a Fraternal Congress, to meet next year 
during the celebration of the Centennial of Canadian Free- 
masonry. 

Among the distinguished dead appears the name of 
P. G. M. James A. Henderson. 

Ilis correspondence was quite extensive, he having 
received upwards of 1500 letters. His decisions, number- 
ing 66, were approved. 

The reports of the District Deputies, covering seventeen 
districts, are full and replete with valuable information. 

The Report on Correspondence is written by Bro. 
Henry Robertson, as usual, and though largely made up 
of extracts, he does not hesitate to comment when it 
appears necessary. 

Colorado for 1890 receives due consideration. He says 
Grand Master Bridwell\s " record of refusals is almost 
unique." Dissents from his decision u that a Lodge hav- 
ing suspended one of its members for non-payment of 
dues cannot in after years remit the amount and restore 
him to good standing." On this point he says: 

We are constantly in the habit of remitting the dues of even suspended mem- 
bers who are poor and unable to pay them, and we consider that Masonic charity 
compels us to do so. 

He agrees with Bro. Bridwell that objections to 
advancement should be investigated by the Lodge, that 



APPENDIX. 67 

Lodge rooms should not be leased for dancing or secular 
purposes, that there is no law requiring a Mason to state 
his reasons for applying for a dimit, and that a certificate 
of good standing is not sufficient evidence for a Lodge to 
admit a visitor upon. 

Our remarks on physical qualifications call forth the 
following : 

What in the world does Bro. Greenleaf mean by " The esoteric significance of 
the physical requirement in the Masonic symbolism?" We would like to have 
him explain it. if he refers to the " Triad " mentioned before, then he is certainly 
in error, because at the time that the ancient charges containing the physical 
requirement were promulgated in 1721, there were only two degrees, so that his as- 
sumed symbolism altogether fails, the third degree not being in existence. Such 
fanciful disquisitions can serve no good purpose. The reasonable rule is that a 
candidate who can do all the work of Masonry is not physically disqualiffed. This 
is ih* correct role and it always toon the correct rule. The " strict construction- 
ists " can only sustain their absurd contention by misquoting that upon which 
they rely for authority. 

We will endeavor to explain our meaning more fully, 
although it seemed to us sufficiently explicit. We ad- 
vanced the idea that there is a triad of perfections in the 
Masonic symbolism, as we understand it, namely, physical, 
intellectual and moral, assigned to the three degrees re- 
spectively, in the order named. That is the adjustment as 
we find it at the present day. If, as Bro. R. contends, 
there was originally but one degree, to which the others 
were subsequently added, it does not affect our position, 
for we maintain that Masonry, whether in one degree or 
more, contained these essential features, and it is possible 
a single degree may have been divided into three sections, 
or parts, corresponding very nearly to what are now known 
as the three degrees. Nor are we alone in this view. Bro. 
G. W. Speth, in an article on Degrees, which was published 
in the Keystone, (Philadelphia,) in 1888, says: "I hold 
that in 1717, and for centuries before that, two degrees 
existed in Masonry ; that one of these was purely formal 
and matter of fact, that the second was mystic and specu- 
lative ;. and that the two combined contained all the 
esoteric knowledge of the present three. Developments 
and additions have accrued, but nothing of vital importance, 
nothing absolutely new. Displacements, embellishments 
and refinements have occurred, but an English craftsman 
of A. D. 1600, if to-day revived, could prove himself a 
M. M. to any Brother whose intelligence is not utterly 
befogged by the ingenuity of our modern ritual-mongers." 

Bro. Speth is the close friend of Bro. K. F. Gould, the 
Masonic historian, and his utterances are entitled to care- 
ful consideration. 

Since writing the above we have received new light; 
see Utah. 



68 APPENDIX. 

We do Dot desire to engage in any idle contention upon 
this subject of physical qualifications, but when Bro. R. says : 
" The reasonable rule is that a candidate who can do all 
the work of Masonry is not physically- disqualified. This 
is the correct rule and it always was the correct rule," 
[italics his] we must dissent It may be the reasotiable 
rule, as the brother says, but not the ancient one. 

He agrees with us in our remarks concerning " consti- 
tutional tinkers." 

Grand Master and Grand Secretary re-elected. 



CONNECTICUT— 18»2. 

One hundred and fourth Annual, held at Hartford, 
January 4 20, 1S92. 

The portrait of Grand Master Hugh Sterling appears 
as a frontispiece, while in the body of the volume, upon a 
single page is the following quartette of Past Grand Mas- 
ters : James L. Gould, E. S. Quintard, William E. San- 
ford and L. A. Lockwood. 

Grand Secretary Wheeler's prolific brain furnished the 
oj>ening ode as usual, which was one of great merit. 

Grand Master Sterling reports a year of prosperity. 

He announces the sudden death of P. G. M. Howard 
B. Ensign in his 65th year, at Philadelphia on November 
17, 1891. 

He reports at length a charge against St. John's Lodge 
No. 6, of Norwalk, of having placed one of its members, 
an aged and infirm brother, in the poor-house, on the 
ground "that under the circumstances, it was the best 
place they could find for him." The commissioners to 
whom the matter was submitted by the Grand Lodge, 
subsequently reported that they found the charges true. 

The Lodge was punished by a reprimand and was or- 
dered to pay the sum of £192.35 to Old Well Lodge for 
expenses incurred in the support of said brother after the 
latter had removed him from the poor-house. 

The concluding paragraph of the report is extremely 
unpleasant reading, it is as follows : 

It appears from the testimony that it is no new cnetom to send indigent and 
decayed brethren to the Alms-house. In the opinion of your commissioners this is 
not only unmasonic, but unchristian like and uncharitable, and in direct conflict 
-with the teachings of our beloved institution. 



APPENDIX. 69 

The Grand Master was emphatic in his condemnation 
of such unmasonic proceedings. He calls attention to the 
many homes that have been established in other jurisdic- 
tions, and trusts that a united effort will be made to put 
their Masonic Charity Foundation into practical operation 
during the coming year. The total amount of this fuud is 
§12.859, as appears by the treasurer's report, sufficient it 
would seem to prevent any brother from being sent " Over 
the Hill to the Poor-house/' 

The "twenty -five years service by Grand Secretary 
Joseph K. Wheeler was suitably recognized by the Grand 
Lodge and $500 appropriated for a testimonial. 

Bro. J. K. Wheeler resumes his post as the writer of 
the Report on Correspondence after his severe illness. 

Colorado, for 1890, receives a fraternal review in which 
our doings are noted, generally with approval though no 
extracts are made. 

He thinks the monitor for ceremonies a good idea, says 
Connecticut did the same thing a few years ago but it 
failed to materialize. 

Grand Master and Grand Secretary re-elected. 



DELAWARE— 181H. 

Eighty-fifth Annual held at Wilmington, October 7, 
1891, M. W. James S. Dobbs, Grand Master. 

He reports peace and harmony throughout the juris- 
diction. 

The only decision reported by him was in regard to a 
delayed report of a Committee on Character. The facts 
presented to the Grand Master were as follows : A petition 
for initiation was received by a Lodge on May 20, 1890, 
and referred as usual to a committee of three, to investigate 
and report. A month later and several times thereafter 
the committee reported progress and was granted further 
time. On November 2 the Lodge ordered the committee 
to be summoned to appear and make final report. On 
December 16 the committee reported, in substance, that 
said petition was lost after it was placed in the hands of 
the committee; that never having examined it, they could 
not say whether it was in proper form or whether the 
petitioner pledged an obedience to regular constituted 
authority, etc.; asked to be discharged from the con- 



70 APPENDIX. 

sideration of a paper of whose contents they were not 
positive, and which they were satisfied, after diligent search, 
could not be found. 

The report was received and the committee discharged. 
After some further discussion the case was sumitted to 
the Grand Master. 

After reviewing the facts, his decision was as follows: 

I conclude that the petition was made in good faith, and was in due and pro- 
per form. The evidence that it was, is the net that the Lodge received it aud 
appointed the committee to investigate the character and worthiness of the ap- 
plicant. The committee in their report made a point of the fact that ** in some 
unaccountable manner the said petition was lost after it had been placed in the 
hands of the committee," and that " your committee never examined the petition,'* 
and were therefore ignorant of its contents. 

On this point 1 would say the committee was not appointed to consider the 
regularity of the petition. The Lodge decided that point when it received the 
petition and appointed the committee, and if the committee had never seen the 
petition it would make no difference whatever as to their performance of the duty 
assigned them, which was to investigate the character of the applicant, and his fit- 
ness to be made a Mason and a member of Union Lodge. 

I would say, further, that the position of the committee in finally reporting 
the petition lost, and that therefore they were unable to make a report upon it. 
after they had had it in hand six months, and had on several occasions reported 
progress and asked for further time, is at least peculiar. 

My decision, therefore, is that under Article X, Section 3, Grand Lodge By- 
Laws, a petition regularly received can not be withdrawn, but must be balloted on; 
and as the committee originally appointed has been discharged without making 
report on the matter referred to them, you will at once appoint a new committee 
to make the necessary investigation, and on the receipt of their report the Lodge 
will proceed to ballot on the application in regular order. 

The loss of the paper containing the application after it has been received 
by the Lodge in no way affects the status of the applicant, and is in no way 
material. The minutes of the Lodge are the evidence that the application was 
duly received. 

The decision was approved by the Grand Lodge. 

He reports the case of a member of a Lodge in that 
jurisdiction who was denied admission to a Lodge in 
Pennsylvania. Upon laying the matter before the Grand 
Master of Pennsylvania it was ascertained that the reason 
for the denial was that the brother was a " Cerneau Rite " 
Mason and that Rite having been declared clandestine, the 
Lodge acted in strict accordance with the edict of the 
Grand Lodge. 

The matter was referred to a special committee but they 
did not report at this session. 

The Committee on Work submitted a report on Ritual 
and Uniformity of Work, which was adopted. 

Having first revised the ritual of the third degree, in 
order to harmonize the entire work, it was found necessary 
to revise the first and second degrees as well. They have 
now a system conformable to other jurisdictions and steps 
will be taken to secure uniformity of work in the Lodges. 

Bro. L. H. Jackson furnishes a most readable and con- 
cise Report on Correspondence, reviewing the doings of 
fifty-six Grand Lodges ; Colorado for 1890 receiving a 



APPENDIX. 71 

fraternal notice of nearly three pages. He is pleased with 
onr custom of welcoming Grand Representatives at each 
annual session. 

Grand Master Bridwell's decisions on advancement 
and demission are quoted with approval. As to Land- 
marks, he says he is content with only seven, but has not 
the space to enumerate them. At all events he has chosen 
a Masonic as well as a sacred number. Bro. Long's ora- 
tion is pronounced of " excellent merit " and a quotation 
made therefrom. 

He has a friendly word for our report, from which ex- 
tracts are made. 

Bro. N. F. Wilds was elected Grand Master, Bro. 
William S. Hayes re-elected Grand Secretary. 



DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA— 1891. 

Eighty-first Annual held at Washington, November 11, 
1891. 

M. W. Thomas F. Gibbs, Grand Master, reports a most 
gratifying state of affairs in that jurisdiction. Never before 
in the eighty years of its history, has there existed greater 
harmony and zeal. He had accepted invitations to be pres- 
ent on many interesting Masonic occasions, among others, 
the annual banquet of the Masonic Veteran Association of 
the District of Columbia, a Communication of Adherence 
Lodge of Baltimore, Maryland, where himself and the 
Grand officers witnessed work on the Third degree, and 
were the recipients of many attentions by Grand Master 
Shryock and the Grand officers of Maryland. He was also 
present at Alexandria — Washington Lodge No. 22, of 
Alexandria, Virginia, upon the occasion of the presentation 
to that Lodge of a gavel made of a piece of the historic 
elm tree under which Washington took command of the 
Continental Army in 1775. 

Wor. Bro. Charles Woodbury made the presentation 
on behalf of Liberty Lodge, Beverly, Massachusetts. 
The interchange of fraternal sentiments by the distin- 
guished brethren present rendered it a memorial occasion. 

Among other beloved craftsmen of which fitting men- 
tion was made, the following Past Grand officers were 
called from their labors on earth : P. G. M. Thomas P. 
Chiffelle, P. G. Secretary William A. Yates, and P. J. G. 
W. and P. G. Secretary William Morris Smith. 



72 APPENDIX. 

He thinks the time is propitious for the establishment 
of a Widows' and Orphans' Home, and advances the 
opinion that when such an institution shall be established, 
it should be placed in charge of the St. John's Mite 
Association, whose members have long been engaged in 
the noble work of Masonic charity, and with whom it has 
been a labor of love. Their past experience would prove 
a valuable factor in the success of the undertaking. 

. In view of the fact that at least one expelled Mason 
had visited Lodges and accepted hospitalities in that 
jurisdiction, he recommends that the Grand Secretary be 
directed to request the Grand Secretaries of other juris- 
dictions in the United States to forward lists of their ex- 
pelled members as soon as convenient after their receipt 
each year. 

He recommends the publication of a digest of the 
decisions of their Grand Masters, which have been sus- 
tained, each year in the proceedings. 

He advocates an annual reception by the Grand Lodge, 
where the brethren of the fraternity, and their lady friends, 
might meet together for mutual companionship and enjoy- 
ment. 

He calls attention to the fact, that one of the Wash- 
ington Lodges had inaugurated a beautiful custom, this 
year, of setting apart one evening in each year for a memo- 
rial service of the dead. He had attended and found the 
Lodge-room decorated with palms, ferns and evergreens, 
suggestive of immortality. 

The recital of incidents in the lives and services of the 
deceased brethren, and appropriate music, rendered the 
ceremonies touching and inspiring, without the attendant 
gloom of a Lodge of Sorrow. 

He submits the correspondence which passed between 
himself and the Grand Master of Iowa, relative to the re- 
call of Bro. E. A. Guilbert, their Grand Representative 
near that Grand Lodge, upon the ground that he was no 
longer agreeable to the Grand Master of Iowa and his 
associates. He could not agree with the proposition con- 
tained in the communication of Grand Secretary Parvin, 
that "Grand Representatives are not the officers of Grand 
Lodges, they are the creatures of Grand Masters." In 
his view, the appointment having been confirmed by the 
Grand Lodge, he could not recall his commission unless 
some extraordinary circumstances justified such action. 
He therefore laid the matter before the Grand Lodge. 



APPENDIX. 73 

The correspondence resulted in the dismissal of Bro. 
Guilbert by the Grand Master of Iowa. 

The matter was referred to the Committee on Juris- 
prudence, who presented their report at the December 
communication. It covers six pages ; the conclusion 
reached was as follows: 

To fiam ap the conclusions arrived at by your committee, they would Bay that 
in their opinion the action of the Grand Master of Iowa in dismissing our Grand 
Kepresentative was, in view of all the circumstances of the case, hasty and ill ad- 
vised, and was not in harmony with that Masonic comity which should regulate the 
actions of one Grand Lodge toward another; that the letter of the Grand Secretary 
of the Grand .Lodge of Iowa, giving notice of this action (which, although seem- 
ingly his action, must have been concurred in by the Grand Master), seemed to be 
entirely too dictatorial in style and assertion, aud lacking in that Masonic courtesy 
which should mark a correspondence between two sister jurisdictions whose re- 
relations to each other had always been friendly; that the Grand Master of Iowa 
had an undoubted right to request the recall of the commission of our Representa- 
tive upon the ground that said Kepresentative was not agreeable to him and his hs- 
fcociate officers, and that he had both the power aud the right to refuse to give 
officially any other reasons for his request; that he had the power to dismiss our 
Kepresentative, but that it would have been more in accord with the spirit of 
Masonry if, before dismissing him, he had communicated through the Representa- 
tive of his Grand Lodge privately and unofficially to our Grand Master the reason 
of the non-acceptability of our Representative near his Grand Lodge, or to have 
stated through him that the reasons were of such a nature that he would prefer not 
to communicate them. In either of these events our Grand Master would, prob- 
ably, without farther question, have recalled the commission of Bro. Guilbert, 
thus preventing possible unfriendly feeling between the two Grand Jurisdictions; 
that our Grand Master had the power and the right to at once recall the commission 
of oar Grand Representative without asking for other reasons, but that he was 
justified in asking for them, if he thought proper to do so, and also in suggesting 
that the matter be referred to the Grand Lodge; for justice seemed to demand 
that, personally, Bro. Guilbert was entitled to some consideration in the premised 
on the part of this Grand Lodge, both as a distinguished brother, and as one who 
for more than twenty-five years has been one of its Grand Representatives. 

In regard to the appointment of another Grand Representative near the 
Grand Lodge of Iowa, your committee suggest that, inasmuch as the Grand 
Lodge, by resolution, has empowered the Grand Master to make all such appoint- 
ments, that this one be left to his judgment and discretion. 

Bro. AVm. E. Singleton presents his twenty-second Re- 
port on Correspondence, which, from his long experience, 
is interesting reading, while his comments are entitled to 
careful consideration on account of his knowledge, ability 
and Masonic scholarship. Colorado for 1890 is fraternally 
reviewed, but his critical eye discovers " weak points " in 
some of the decisions of Grand Master Bridwell. In 
order that we may see ourselves as others see us we re- 
produce them: m 

The large majority of his decisions are according to general usage. To us 
there appears to be errors in the 6th, 13th and 17th, viz: 

The 6th. That a Lodge cannot remit the dues of a membor who had been sus- 
pended for N. P. D. in after years and restore him to membership. Ho says: " Sus- 
pended or expelled Masons are not worthy objects of Masonic charity"— thus 
placing a poor, distressed and unfortunate brother in the same category with the 
worst elements. Is this Masonic charity? 

" 13th. A Mason carrying a dimf t in this jurisdiction more than one year old 
has no legal claims on the fraternity." 

We have known cases where we thought they did have the same right as every 
other object of charity. He who fulfills every Masonic duty has such a claim upon 
the institution everywhere that a compliance with that rule is divested almost of the 
charitable feature. Where the brother has been, from circumstances surrounding 



74 APPENDIX. 

him, prevented from affiliating, and needs the Masonic aid of his brethren, and it 
is cheerfully granted, that, in oar estimation, is charity indeed. 

"17th. A Lodge cannot entertain a petition from an applicant who has not 
resided twelve months within this jurisdiction. This is prohibited by the ancient 
regulations, which are not sabject to change/' 

This last remark is entirely erroneous. There never was any such ancient or 
modern general regulation. It is purely American— applicable to Grand Lodges 
in the United States, and local and modern. Up to within a very few years it was 
not the law of this jurisdiction from the institution of our Grand Lodge. It was 
almost the universal law in the United States fifty years ago, and it continues to 
be the law in all countries outside of the United States, that there is no definite 
term of residence. (See our comments under Idaho.) 

The comments under Idaho are as follows: 

He says in one of his rulings: "One of the best established landmarks of 
Masonry is that the Lodge nearest the place of residence of the applicant has juris- 
diction. This is not a landmark at all; indeed, judging by the constant practice 
of all the Lodges in Europe ever since 1717. the very contrary has been the rule. 
Idaho, some years ago. had a contest upon this very point in regard to the initiation 
of candidates in Scotland, who resided in Idaho, bat were students in Edinburgh. 
Idaho, Iowa and* Missouri Grand Lodges, at different times, had correspondence 
with the Grand Lodges of Scotland, and each in turn had to surrender the point. 
That in the United States, in quite recent times, this dictum has been set up, 
growing out of controversies on that subject, and we believe the Grand Lodge of 
the District of Columbia was one of the laf*t to yield the old prerogative, to com- 
ply with the modern rule, which, in our judgment, is a very wholesome one, but it 
is not a landmark. 

Our desire to furnish the brethren of this jurisdiction 
with full information upon all disputed questions, prompts 
us to give the following, which appears as his conclusion: 

Very much has been written upon the subject of *' Making Masons at Sight" 
in the United States, and a very large number of distinguished writers. Grand 
Masters and Chairmen of Committees on Foreign Correspondence, yet contend that 
Grand Masters have the prerogative (inherent) to make Masons at sight. We have 
always denied that there was ever such an inherent right. The only right must be 
from the constitutional provision by each Grand Lodge allowing the Grand Master 
this privilege. There never was such a prerogative in Europe, nor do we know of 
any such there at this time. 

For the information of our brethren, we publish the following extract from 
Bro. William J. Hughan : 

"There was no such thing as 'Making Masons at Sight' under the old York 
Constitution ; the custom was for the first and second degrees to be given at the 
next meeting after tbe proposition, and, on another ballot, at the next meeting of 
the Lodge, the third degree was conferred. The authority of the Grand Lodge was 
affirmed over the 'first degrees or orders of Masonry.' i. e., Entered Apprentice, 
Fellow Craft, Master Mason, Knights Templar, Sublime Degree of Royal Arch. 
The Royal Arch was evidently considered the climax of Freemasonry and superior 
to the Knights Templar, and neither of these two degrees was considered to be the 
prerequisite of the other. The Grand Lodge of all England, held at York, was the 
only one that recognized Knight Templary in Great Britain, and it was only of 
short duration." 

A digest of the decisions of the Grand Masters of the 
jurisdiction, prepared by Bro. Singleton, by vote of the 
Grand Lodge, is published with the proceedings. It covers 
ninety pages. 

Bro. Fred. G. Alexander was elected Grand Master ; 
Bro. Wm. R. Singleton re-elected Grand Secretary. 



APPENDIX. 75 

FLORIDA— 1892. 

Sixty-third Annual held at Jacksonville, January 19, 
1892, M. W. Angus Patterson, Grand Master. 

In his congratulatory remarks, he alludes to the fact of 
their "belonging to a society whose birth can be traced back 
to the twilight of history." 

Such an assumption may provoke a smile from Bro. 
Gould and some of our Masonic historians, nevertheless it 
is not much farther removed from the truth, than the 
eighteenth century theory of our origin. The latter has 
for years been a "fad" with some of our most distinguished 
writers, and we do not think it can be sustained, nor will 
it ever be adopted by the Craft at large. The antiquity 
of Masonry is a fixed belief in the minds of the majority 
of Masons, and, in our opinion, efforts to root it out will 
ever prove abortive. When writers fix upon England as the 
birthplace of Masonry and the beginning of the eighteenth 
century as the date of birth, it is in order for them to ex- 
plain how it is that traditions in Arabia, China and among 
the medicine-men of North American Indians ante-date 
their "fixed period" by many centuries. 

He announces the death of Bro. John F. Niblack, 
Senior Grand Warden. 

Since their last Annual, the hall where they held their 
meetings was destroyed by fire. The building, furniture, 
etc., belonged to the local Lodges. The Grand Lodge lost 
its collection of portraits of nearly all their Past Grand 
Masters, which hung upon the walls. This is a strong 
argument for placing such portraits in the printed pro- 
ceedings of Grand Bodies, which practice seems to be 
growing in favor with the fraternity from year to year. 

There are now 122 chartered Lodges in the jurisdiction 
working together in unity. 

Five dispensations were granted for new Lodges. 

He submits a list of forty-eight decisions, a few of 
which were modified. 

On the afternoon of the second day of the session the 
corner-stone of the new Masonic Temple was laid by the 
Grand Lodge in due and ancient form. The oration by 
R. W. and Rev. Bro. R. H. Weller, Grand Orator, was an 
able effort, containing practical and timely thoughts upon 
the trend of modern civilization. 

No Report on Correspondence. 

Grand Master and Grand Secretary re-elected. 



76 APPENDIX. 



GEORGIA— 1891. 

One hundred and fifth Annual held at Macon, October 
27, 1891, M. W. Johu 8. Davidson, Grand Master. 

His address is not only an official record of his acts, but 
is a most eloquent production. 

He reports a most gratifying state of prosperity. 
Lodges, which a few years ago were in a languishing con- 
dition, have more than doubled their membership, and 
have well filled treasuries from which to draw for worthy 
objects. Not a single Lodge had forfeited its charter 
during the year. A large number are building their own 
Temples, and it is only a question of a few years before 
the larger number will possess buildings of their own. 

He issued twenty -three dispensations for new Lodges. 

He submits a list of twenty-seven decisions, which 
were approved. "While No. 12, which decided " that the 
W. M. and Wardens of a chartered Lodge, under the 
present law of this jurisdiction, may be applicants for and 
office bearers in a Lodge under dispensation," was approved, 
the Committee on Jurisprudence recommended the follow- 
ing, which was adopted : 

Resolved, That dual membership in Lodges, subordinate to this Grand Lodge, 
is not recognized by this Body ; that a brother cannot be a member of two or more 
Lodges at one and the same time, nor can he, while a member and officer of a 
chartered Lodge, become an applicant and officer of a Lodge under dispensation. 

He makes the welcome announcement of the extinguish- 
ment of the Grand Lodge indebtedness, incurred in the 
erection of their Temple. He gives the history of the 
movement from its first inception to the present time. 
With the removal of this incubus which had weighed 
heavily for many long years, a jubilee was held during 
the session to <*ive fitting expression to the exuberant joy 
which was welling in their hearts. The many eloquent 
addresses which were delivered upon this occasion are 
printed with the proceedings. 

A resolution submitted to the Committee on Juris- 
prudence to the effect that examinations as to proficiency 
shall be conducted at any time, by a committee of three to 
be appointed by the W. M., and to make report prior to 
ballot, was very properly adversely reported upon. 

The recognition of Tasmania was deferred until the 
next Annual. 

Resolutions were adopted upon the subject of inter- 
national correspondence which are in the nature of a new 



APPENDIX. J7 

departure. In substance they recite what bodies compose 
the American System of Freemasonry, namely: Grand and 
subordinate Lodges, Chapters, Councils and Coinmander- 
ies, together with the two Supreme Councils of the Scot- 
tish Rite of the Northern and Southern jurisdictions and 
the bodies of their obedience. The purpose aimed at is 
uniting these separate organizations still more closely by 
the establishing of a system of foreign and domestic cor- 
respondence as a proper and legitimate channel of inter- 
communication and information. To further this object, 
three copies of the Grand Lodge proceedings are to be 
sent to each of the Grand Bodies thus enumerated with a 
request to reciprocate. The Committee on Correspond- 
ence are directed to include a review of the proceedings of 
such bodies in their report. The various Grand Bodies of 
the American System are requested to lend their aid in 
this matter. 

We seriously question the advisability of this step. 
The Grand Bodies, representing the different branches of 
Masonry, already have their own annual reports, and to 
include in Grand Lodge reports a review of the doings of 
Grand Chapters, Grand Commanderies or Supreme Coun- 
cils would hardly seem practicable, and must eventually 
lead to confusion without any proportionate benefits. 

The lleport on Correspondence was prepared by Bros. 
B H. Bigham, W. E. Mumford and W. S. Ramsay, whose 
names are appended to the portions written by each. 
Colorado for 1890, is fraternally reviewed by Bro. Bigham, 
receiving a notice of three and a half pages. He quotes 
from Bro. Alva Adams' oration at the laying of the corner- 
stone of the State Capitol, thinks our manner of opening 
the Grand Lodge "stylish," quotes most of Grand Master 
Bridwell's decisions, but takes exceptions to No. 0. 

He agrees with us on physical qualifications, quoting 
our symbolical reasons which we adduced in support 
thereof. 

Grand Master and Grand Secretary re-elected. 



IDAHO 1891. 

Tweuty-fourth Annual held at Boise, September 8, 
1891, W. M. Gerge Ainslee, Grand Master. 

Considerable space was devoted in his address to show- 
ing the imperfections of their Constitution, and he rec- 



78 APPENDIX. 

ommends that immediate steps be taken to remedy the 
same. 

He recommends a system of Lodges of Instruction. 
He also calls attention to the fact that the office of Grand 
Lecturer had been created, but no provision was made to 
pay even his traveling expenses. The California work had 
been adopted, but no means employed to promulgate it. 
As a natural consequence, he avers that the endeavor to 
secure uniformity has been a failure. 

He announces in fitting terms of eulogy the decease of 
P. G. M. Lafayette Cartee, one of the pioneers of Idaho 
and also a pioneer in Masonry, having participated in the 
organization of the Grand Lodge. 

From the Grand Secretary's report we learn that the 
net increase in membership was 117. 

The Orphan Fund amounts to $17,432.98, securely in- 
vested in county bonds and warrants. 

Recognition was extended to the Grand Lodge of Tas- 
mania, postponed in the case of Victoria until the next 
Annual, and refused to the United Grand Lodge of New 
South Wales. 

The Committee on Jurisprudence reported the follow- 
ing resolution, which was adopted: 

Your committee deem the Cerneau rite clandestine, and productive of evil, 
and only evil, in all its tendencies; therefore be it 

Rc*olved % That this Grand Lodge deeply deplores the discord and schism 
caused by this clandestine body in other jurisdictions, and earnestly recommends 
that the Craft in Idaho have nothing whatever to do with this rite, and that we pro- 
tect ourselves from the evils thereof by simply letting it alone. 

The Grand Lodge believes in the preservation of his- 
torical and biographical data, also in the counterfeit pre- 
sentment of the faces of the Masons in that jurisdiction. 
Resolutions were adopted declaring it the imperative duty 
of each Lodge to compile a history of their members, also 
a suggestion to supply itself with their photographs and 
place them in suitable frames in their halls. It was also 

Resolved, That the past, present and future elective Grand Officers of this 
Grand Lodge be required to file brief autobiographies with the Grand Secretary, 
for preservation in the archives of this Grand Lodge. 

An attractive feature of the proceedings is the Report 
on Correspondence, by Bro. Charles C. Stevenson. Colo- 
rado, for 1890, receives a very liberal share of his space. 
Flattering comments are made upon the exercises at the 
dedication of the Temple and the corner-stone laying of 
the State Capitol. 



APPENDIX. 79 

Grand Master Bridwell's utterances in regard to the 
Grand Orient of France, are greeted with approval. He 
dissents from his decision, that the loss of the first joint of 
the thumb of the right hand disqualifies a person to be 
made a Mason. In reply to Bro. Stevenson's query as to 
the standing of a Mason who petitions for affiliation and is 
rejected, we would say that so long as he continues to 
petition he remains in good standing. He should renew 
his petition at least once each year. 

He quotes from our Report with approval, and announces 
his belief in the antiquity of Freemasonry, and that it 
originated at King Solomon's Temple. He pointedly asks 
if there is any harm in that. Certainly not. It is but 
reiterating the old belief of the Craft. 

Bro. John H. Myer was elected Grand Master ; Grand 
Secretary re-elected. 



ILLINOIS— 1891. 

A view of the new Masonic Temple at Chicago appears 
as a frontispiece. An Emergent Communication of the 
Grand Lodge was convened at Chicago on November 6, 

1890, for the purpose of laying the corner-stone of 
the above edifice. There were in the procession 3,724 
persons, which was composed of the following bodies: 
Policemen, 50; one consistory, 85; eight commanderies, 
600; thirty-seven Lodges, 2,277; visiting brethren, 150, and 
twenty-four bands, 562. The exercises were of the most 
imposing character. In the evening a grand banquet was 
given by the Mystic Tie Club at the Sherman House, 
which was attended by a large number of distinguished 
craftsmen. 

Fifty-second Annual was held at Chicago, October 6, 

1891, M. W. John M. Pearson presiding. 

He reports a season of unusual prosperity with a 
larger accession of membership than in former years. 

The building and furnishing of comfortable Lodge 
rooms is still a marked feature in that jurisdiction. 

He announces the death of three Past Grand officers 
during the year, viz : Bros. Andrew J. Kuykendall, P. S. 
G. W.; Hosmer A. Johnson, P. G. Orator, and John D. 
Hamilton, P. S. G. D. 



80 APPENDIX. 

He reports the final settlement of a "very peculiar case," 
which had disturbed the harmony of Mithra Lodge for 
fifteen years. A Brother who had received the first and 
second degrees in said Lodge, had often applied for the 
third, but, for "no good reason that he was aware of," had 
never received it. Grand Master Pearson instructed the 
D. D. (t. M. of the District to visit the Lodge, as his special 
proxy, and preside while the case was discussed, and to 
carry out the By-Laws of the Grand Lodge relative thereto. 
After visiting the Lodge twice, he fiually succeeded in 
effecting a harmonious adjustment of the matter, and the 
third degree was duly conferred. 

He granted fourteen dispensations for new Lodges. 

Seven Masonic halls were dedicated ; three in person, 
and four by proxy. 

Nine corner-stones were laid; four in person, and five 
by proxy. 

The Charters of two Lodges were surrendered. 

He cautions the Lodges against entering into any con- 
tract, involving civil rights, unless with the advice of an 
able, honest lawyer. 

From the report of the Grand Secretary, we learn that 
the Lodges have contributed for the relief of their own 
needy members, or their widows and orphans, $17,592.45, 
and for the relief of Masons, not members of their respec- 
tive Lodges, $5, 146.59, besides contributing $1,08445 to 
the Orphans' Home, making a total of $23,823.49. This 
does not, however, represent the full amount contributed, 
as a large number of the Lodges do not make any state- 
ments, because the members contribute individually, in- 
stead of drawing funds from the treasury. 

Among the distinguished visitors present were : M. 
W. Alphonso Barto, Grand Master of Minnesota ; R. W. 
Edward Mitchell, Grand Treasurer of the Grand Lodge of 
Canada, and R W. David McLellan, P. S. G. W. of the 
Grand Lodge of Canada. 

An oration upon " The Antiquities of Masonry " was 
delivered by R. \V. Bro. George W. Warvelle, Grand Ora- 
tor. He is disinclined to admit its great antiquity, relying 
upon historical data for his conclusions. His summing up 
is as follows : 

I have thus, brethren, in a very brief, desultory and fragmentary manner en- 
deavored to sketch the origin, progress, and development of Masonry aa revealed 
to as by the authentic data now in oar possession. If it lacks the romantic 
glamour with which it was clothed on its first presentation to yoa, attribute it not 
to the unsympathetic nature of the speaker, but to the cold, hard facts of history. 
No royal mandate or princely fiat gave it birth, nor did it spring into a vigorous 
life with one grand impulse, on the contrary its beginnings were of the moat 



APPENDIX. 8 1 

humble kind, and its evolution from the primitive association of timid workmen, 
laboring under the shadow of the church, to the magnificent philosophical brother- 
hood that constitutes its organization in the nineteenth centnry has been the slow 
and constant work of nearly a thousand years. And let it be a matter of congratu- 
lation for ns that we are unable to connect ourselves with the learned and mystical 
societies of the ancient world, for, by the light of authentic history, oar path has 
ever been onward and upward, with no diminishing glories, lost arts, or forgotten 
knowledge. 

The Report on Correspondence by Bro. Joseph Bobbins 
now clains our attention. It is always one of the best that 
comes under our notice. That before us comprises nearly 
800 pages and in it he reviews the proceedings of fifty- 
three Grand Lodges, Colorado for 1890 receiving a liberal 
notice of six and one-half pages. He thus discourses in 
regard to the opening ceremonies: 

We don't know whether the Maryland notion of opening the Grand Lodge in 
due form (by the Deputy Grand Master), informing the waiting Grand Master of 
that fact, and proclaiming the entrance of His Amplitude, can permanently sur- 
vive in the rare atmosphere of the Bookies, or not, but on this occasion was put in 
practice. 

We quote the following comments upon a statement of 
Grand Master Bridwell in reference to the conferring of 
the third degree in Grand Lodge: 

In stating that he had arranged for having the third degree conferred during 
the session, he suggests that it will be a recurrence to sn ancient custom of the 
Craft in conferring that degree in Grand Lodge. This is somewhat misleading, 
although not intended to be. When the distinctions of Fellow Craft and Master 
were merely honorary and involved the communication of no additional secrets, 
the brethren were admitted to them only in the Grand Lodge " unless by dispensa- 
tion/* bat when they were worked up into degrees they v*ere probably conferred in 
Lodges only. There is no evidence that we are aware of that either of them was 
ever worked in Grand Lodge. The " Master's part was not much sought after. 
There being no mystery in it, comparatively few cared enough about it to pay the 
small fee charged for it. But somebody in one or more of the Lodges conceived 
the idea of outdoing their neighbors by adapting a ceremonial to the occasion when 
under a dispensation the admission to the distinction took place in their particular 
Lodge. Whether Desaguliers or Anderson were the fabricators of this cermonial, 
or some other brother or brethren, it was of course not authorized by the Grand 
Lodge. Once started in one Lodge others had to have it, or thought they bad to, 
just the same as we have seen in our own day when one Lodge started the fad of 
royal robes and other accessories, introduced torchlight processions and calcium 
lights as aids to secrecy and intensified the accompanying silence with hewgag and 
brass band, other Lodges take up the sensationalism iu order to compete with the 
original discoverer. As the demand for the distinction and the new ceremonial 
grew in the Lodges, the demand for it minus the ceremonial, that is, in the Grand 
Lodge, diminished, and after awhile the conferring of it in Grand Lodge lapsed 
altogether. 

We do not believe in any such development theory as 
enunciated in the above. It has been the assumption of 
Masonic writers for the past few decades, but happily it 
has now received its quietus since the discovery of the 
Dr. Manningham letters. Of course we feel elated that 
our views have been confirmed upon this question. We 
have advanced the idea that Masonry was a perfect system 
at the start and that restoration should engage the thought 
and be the aim of the Masonic student. The evidence of 
the past century goes to show that there has been a con- 
stant lopping off or actual loss of the essential features 

6 



82 APPENDIX. 

of our symbolism, instead of any material accessions. See 
Bro. Speth's remarks quoted under Canada. See, also, 
Utah and our remarks upon Degrees. 

He quotes eight of Bro. Bridwell's decisions, to which 
he takes more or less exceptions. 

Bro. Bobbins devotes about three and a half pages to 
our Report and matters therein contained. His criticisms 
are couched in his usual vigorous and incisive style. We 
accept them good naturedly, Bro. Bobbins, but, as there is 
not the remotest prospect of our agreeing in our opinions, 
it is useless to continue such discussions ; let us "agree to 
disagree" and turn our attention to subjects of more 
importance to Craft Masonry. 

Bro. Monroe C. Crawford was elected Grand Master ; 
Grand Secretary re-elected. 



INDIANA— 1892. 

Seventy-first Annual held at Indianapolis, May 24, 
1892, M. W. Nicholas R. Ruckle, Grand Master. 

He reports a general growth in numbers, in financial 
strength and in Masonic spirit. 

He pays a fitting tribute to the memory of P. G. M. 
William Hacker, whose portrait adorns the proceedings. 
He was for forty-six years a regular attendant of the 
Grand Lodge and has left the impress of his long and 
faithful labors in the legislation and ceremonies of that 
jurisdiction. 

He submits a list of twenty-six decisions, all of which 
were approved. 

The corner-stones of four churches were laid by proxy. 

He reports the case of a Lodge which was forbidden to 
rent its hall to other organizations and which thereupon 
issued a circular to the other Lodges of the jurisdiction 
urging them to unite in a petition to the Grand Lodge for 
the repeal of the law against joint occupancy of Lodge 
rooms and requesting their authority under seal to place 
their Lodge name and number upon said petition. This 
being in violation of the regulations of the Grand Lodge, 
the Grand Master ordered the Lodge to recall the circu- 
lars, which it did. The petition, the signatures to which 
were obtained by a violation of the Regulations of the 
Grand Lodge, was, however, filed with the Grand Secre- 



APPENDIX. 83 

tary for presentation to the Grand Lodge, but as we fail 
to find any mention of it, it was doubtless very properly 
pigeon-holed. 

The Grand Treasurer reports a balance in the treasury 
of $17,036.18. 

The Grand Secretary reports that the American flag 
floats over the Masonic Temple of Indiana, though it has 
called forth both favorable and unfavorable criticism. 

He makes a vigorous "kick" against the Central 
Traffic Association for its continued discrimination 
against the great fraternal organizations of the country. 

The Committee on Jurisprudence, to whom was 
referred the communication of the Masonic Belief Board 
of San Francisco, Gala., asking that a Lodge in Indiana 
be required to reimburse it for money expended as 
charity in a certain case, reported that whatever money 
was given was without the knowledge or consent of the 
Lodge and after the Board had been informed that the 
Lodge would not give any more money or authorize any 
others to do so. We quote from the report the following 
references to preceding legislation, which shows the In- 
diana law % on this vexed question: 

Resolved, That a Grand Lodge has not the power of controlling the charity of 
any subordinate Lodge, and the Charity fund 01 each and every Lodge is under its 
own control.— Proceeding* of 1862, p. 45. 

In 1873 the Grand Lodge adopted the following report : 

Yonr Committee would farther add that a Master Mason in good standing is 
justly entitled to all the rights and benefits of Masonry, not only while nnder the 
jurisdiction of the Lodge which made him a Mason, or with which he may have 
sabseqaen tly affiliated, bat he may claim them of any Lodge in the world under 
whose jurisdiction he may happen to be. His Lodge extends from East to West 
and from North to Soath ; and may he always find Masonic charity equally as 
extensive. 

The Committee's report concludes as follows : 

Many other instances might be cited. The rale is universal and well estab- 
lished, and can not and ought not to be changed. To make the rule otherwise would 
be to rob Freemasonry of one of her brightest gems, Charity, and make it only a 
Mutual Benefit Association, and leave the Lodge without the power of controlling 
its own finances or bestowing its own charities. 

Adopted. 

We quote the following case for the benefit of Wor- 
shipful Masters. Appeal from decision of Worshipful 
Master, reported by Committee on Grievances and Appeals : 

The transcript shows that a motion was pending before the Lodge to adopt an 
amendment to certain articles of the By-Laws of the Lodge. Twenty-seven menu 
hers were present. The Worshipful Master required a rising vote, and called upon 
all who were in favor of the motion to rise to their feet. Nine members aroee and 
were counted, the remaining eighteen kept their seats. He then called for all 
opposed to the motion to arise to their feet, but none did eo. He repeated the 



84 APPENDIX. 

request for those Who were opposed to rise, and none votecL in the negative. The 
Worshipful Master thereupon declared the motion lost, upon the ground that two- 
thirds of the members present did not concur therein. 

The question thus involved was, at their request, 
referred to the Committee on Jurisprudence, who reported 
as follows : 

It is the duty of every member of a Lodge to vote upon all questions presented, 
unless excused by the Lodge. In this case, nine voted for the adoption of the 
amendment, and no one voted in the negative. It appears from the statement in 
the record that others were present who did not vote. As they are required to vote 
unless excused, it is fair for us to conclude that tbe members not voting were 
excused, and that the amendment in question was adopted by a unanimous vote. 

This was concurred in and the decision of the W. M. 
overruled. 

A special committee reported in favor of the Fraternal 
Congress during the World's Fair, as proposed by Ken- 
tucky, and recommended that six brethren, well informed 
in Masonic Law and History, be appointed by the G. M. 
to attend, but without expense to the Grand Lodge. The 
report and recommendation adopted. 

A memorial on Widows' and Orphans' Home, showing 
the status of the association organized in 1877 and sub- 
mitting resolutions, was presented and referred to a special 
committee of five to report at the next Annual. 

Bro. Thomas B. Long, after a ten years' experience as 
the writer of Grand Chapter reports, presents his first 
Report on Correspondence for the Grand Lodge. He finds 
the labor involved much greater, but his report shows the 
experienced hand. He reviews the proceedings of fifty- 
nine Grand Lodges — Colorado, for 1891, receiving a most 
kindly review of over three pages. He gives a synopsis of 
Grand Master Foster's address and quotes many of his 
decisions, which he deems of general application. 

He pronounces Bro. Bush's oration "a very pleasing 
effort," from which he makes several quotations. He has 
a friendly word for our Report. 

Bro. Sidney W. Douglas of Evansville was elected 
Grand Master, R. W. Bro. William H. Smythe re-elected 
Grand Secretary. 



INDIAN TERRITORY— 1891. 

A portrait of the Grand Master, Leo E. Bennett, 
appears as a frontispiece. 

Seventeenth Annual held at Oklahoma, August 18, 
1891. 



APPENDIX. 85 

The Grand Master reports a prosperous condition of 
affairs. Ten dispensations for new Lodges had been 
granted. He had been able to visit but six of the Lodges 
of the jurisdiction, which he found working harmoniously 
and for the good of the Fraternity. 

The Webb-Preston work, in his opinion, was a myth; 
many attempts had been made to discover it in its pristine 
purity, but they had come to nought. The Grand Lec- 
turer of Arkansas had been engaged to hold a school of 
instruction at Muskogee, from which much benefit was 
derived. 

He condemns the shiftless manner in which Lodge 
records are too often kept, also calls attention to the fact 
that few Secretaries are prompt in collecting dues, in con- 
sequence of which neglect Brethren are allowed to fall 
behind in their dues until they are finally stricken from 
the roll. In his opinion, " District Deputies should be 
required io examine and' report upon the condition of the 
books of every Lodge within their respective districts." 

He also recommends positive action against their late 
(irand Treasurer, who is a defaulter to the amount of over 
*1,200. 

He embodies in his address the reports of the District 
Deputies, which are encouraging. The Deputy for the 
Chickasaw District calls attention to what might be aptly 
termed a salivated pavement: 

Some of oar Lodge rooms are not kept as neat as they might be, and it seems 
to me it must be unpleasant for a candidate to wade through the amount of 
tobacco jaice I have seen upon the floors of some Lodges. Then, too, it is such a 
bad example for a W. M. to take the Ea6t with a cigar in his mouth. 

The Grand Secretary reports $118 as the amount of 
the Orphans' Home Fund. He says the voices of fourteen 
orphan children reported in the returns, and others not 
reported, cry aloud for prompt action in this noble under- 
taking. 

Two orations by Bro. R. W. Hill are published in the 
proceedings, one being an eloquent tribute to the memory 
of Bro. Albert Pike, and the other being entitled " Funda- 
mental Ideas of Freemasonry." He believes that it should 
depend upon something more than memories, otherwise 
its usefulness is ended. Progress within the limits of the 
Ancient Landmarks and adaptation to the needs of the 
present is the lesson he seeks to enforce. 

The Grand Lodge has adopted the custom of present- 
ing all its Past Grand Masters with jewels. They are 
procured at a cost of $50 each. 



86 APPENDIX. 

At the close of the session the Grand Lodge attended 
a banquet given by North Canadian Lodge, which was a 
most enjoyable occasion. 

Bro. J. S. Murrow furnishes a most concise and read- 
able Report on Correspondence. Colorado for 1890 
receives fraternal consideration. The dedication of the 
Temple and the corner-stone laying of the State Capitol, 
with extracts from the addresses, occupy half the space 
allotted. He pronounces Grand Master Bridwell's address 
a valuable paper. He regards Decision No. 6 as contrary 
to the rule in other Grand Lodges, and contrary to justice. 
Bro. De Long's oration he finds "instructive." He is 
very favorably impressed with our Digest, which he thinks 
is the most valuable part of our Report 

Grand Master and Grand Secretary both re-elected. 



IOWA— 1892. 

Upon opening the Annals we are confronted by a fine 
steel portrait of Grand Master R. G. Phelps. The volume 
in its arrangement and typographical appearance, like its 
predecessors, is without an equal. 

Forty-ninth Annual, held at Dubuque, June 7, 1892. 

The Grand Master reports that the requirements of that 
large jurisdiction had filled every moment of his time. 
Notwithstanding the recent Cerneau difficulties, he says 
the Craft were never more united, harmonious and zealous. 
There had been a larger increase in membership than the 
average for many previous years. 

Seven corner-stones were laid in person or by proxy. 
In this connection he says: 

On the 4th of July I received three invitations to lay corner-stones of court- 
houses in Jefferson, Wright and Adair counties, respectively. It was to me a novel 
question, whether the Grand Lodge could be properly opened in three several 
places within the jurisdiction at the same hour; but Masonry is as universal as duty, 
and I decided that it could be done. The more difficult question of being in three 
places at the same time was also answered by the assistance of certain brethren. 

We had occasion to decide this same question, and de- 
cided that it could not be done, which decision was ap- 
proved by the Grand Lodge. 

He had granted six dispensations for new Lodges. 

Five Lodges lost their entire property by fire having 
no insurance. One Lodge surrendered its charter, while 
the membership was thirteen, but ten were supporters, and 



APPENDIX. 87 

these with the exception of the Master, were all more than 
sixty years of age, and could not attend regularly. There 
is sadness in the thought that this little band of veterans 
should be compelled through force of circumstances to sur- 
render their charter. 

The charter of a Lodge was arrested because it was in- 
corporated in violation of the Grand Lodge law. Upon 
dissolving their incorporation in obedience to his order, 
the charter was restored. 

He again calls attention to the failure of Lodges to 
collect their dues promptly when the amount is compara- 
tively trifling, instead of allowing them to accumulate 
until many brethren are unable to pay them. In responce 
to a circular sent out by him to elicit information on this 
point, he found that the delinquent dues in that jurisdiction 
on July 1, 1891, approximated to $47,026.24. 

He also refers to the army of non-affiliates, and proposes 
that the life of a dimit be limited to one, two or three 
years. 

The Cerneau difficulties which have disturbed the peace 
and harmony of that jurisdiction for several years have 
nearly disappeared. 

He had arrested the jewel of P. G. M. John Scott, 
W. M. of Nevada Lodge No. 99, for having issued a printed 
circular and published certain articles in the secular press, 
etc. The review of th ecase is quite lengthy, and the cor- 
respondence relative thereto was submitted in an appendix. 
Bro. Scott presented a petition to the Grand Lodge for 
review of the order of the Grand Master. 

This petition was first referred to the Committee on 
Appeals and Grievances, but, by a subsequent vote of the 
Grand Lodge, was recalled, and referred to a special com- 
mittee of three, to be appointed by the Grand Master, said 
committee to report thereon at the next Annual. 

This case has attracted wide notice among the fraternity 
at large, and we trust this "celebrated case" may be satis- 
factorily settled. 

In his address, the Grand Master devoted much space 
to the subject of Masonic Homes, his conclusion being 
unfavorable to the immediate building of a Home. He 
thinks the work should first begin by the exercise of private 
benevolence by the fraternity, after which the united 
strength of Iowa Masons would be enlisted in the under- 
taking. 



88 APPENDIX. 

The Committee on Grand Master's Address endorsed 
his views in the following words, which are similar to those 
of Past Grand Master Todd, of this jurisdiction, upon the 
same subject : 

Each Lodge cad best inquire into and know what necessitous cases there are 
in its own jurisdiction. Relief can be granted in such a way as to accomplish the 
most good, and with the most tender regard to the feelings of the recipients. 

It requires the breaking op of no home associations or severing of domes- 
ticities; every dollar contributed is devoted to the purpose of relief, and none to 
the erection of buildings, for transportation, or expense of maintaining of a public 
institution. It avoids the designation of a class as the recipients of charitable 
relief. It enables many to receive a small amount of relief, which, added to their 
own exertions, brings comfort and happiness which they would not receive were 
they required to become inmates of a public institution. It is believed by many, 
and we think a large majority of Masons in Iowa, that greater good can be done 
with less money in this way than in any other, and with greater regard to that 
feeling of confidence and brotherly love Masons repose in each other. We confess 
to a strong belief in this as the true method for the exercise of practical Masonic 
charity. 

The reports of the Grand Secretary and Grand Libra- 
rian are models of excellence and filled with interesting 
matters. 

The Committee on Jurisprudence reported adversely 
to the repeal of the law against Cerneau bodies. The 
report was adopted by a vote of 502 to 543. 

Bro. T. S. Parvin writes a characteristic Report on 
Correspondence, covering 138 pages, Colorado for 1891 
coming under his critical observation. He gives Grand 
Master Foster credit for condensing his eighteen decisions 
within a single page. 

He takes exception to the following : 

One of them reads very strangely to us. It is that— 

"A candidate initiated when the letter of disiiensation was absent is irregularly 
made, and should be healed before proceeding further." 

This is contrary to all usage and custom and law. If the Master has the dis- 
pensation of his Lodge within his reach, whether it be at his house or his office, or 
in his overcoat pocket in the ante-room, it has been held to be quite as sufficient 
and legal as if lying on the desk befere him. This is making the acts of the Lodge 
wholly dependent upon the presence of a little paper, rather than upon the authority 
of the Grand Master, of which it is merely the evidence. 

Bro. Parvin has flattering words of commendation for 
our Report. He also criticizes us when it seems to him 
that we are going astray in our antiquarian perigrinations. 
We quote the following comments : 

We note a remark under Utah, in which Bro. (ireenleaf says he "has a well- 
defined idea that Masonry in three degrees goes back to a remote time, despite the 
ridicule so frequently heaped upon those who advance such views." We are not 
aware that any ridicule has l>een heaped upon such persons, but we are nevertheless 

J greatly surprised to find that so intelligent a Mason as Brother Greenleaf should 
lave a " well-defined idea," and thus stand oat, as it were, solitary and alone en- 
tertaining such an idea. If there be any fact well established in Masonic history, it 
is that upon the organization of the Grand Lodge of England in 1717, and fn the 
promulgation of the Constitutions of 1723, there were not three degrees then in ex- 
istence, while it is equally well proven that in the preceding century there was bat 
one. The reason for the faith that is in him, Brother Greenleaf declares, is found 
"in the internal structure of our system, and not in historical references, which 
are too often misleading." 



APPENDIX. 89 

The same evidence found in the internal structure of onr system of Royal Arch 
Masonry would prove that the several degrees of that system were as ancient as 
Symbolic Masonry itself, because they are founded upon incidents in connection 
with the erection of King Solomon's Temple, and the proof from internal structure 
is as valid as to their remote antiquity as anything in the system of Ancient Craft 
Masonry, while it is a fact well known to reading Masons that neither the Royal 
Arch nor any of its associate degrees had an existence prior to the year 1740, not- 
withstanding King Solomon is made to father them, as he is everything else in 
Masonry. We hope our good brother will not charge us with seeking to cast any 
ridicule upon him because of his entertaining and promulgating opinions so con- 
trary to those held by Masonic students and historians. 

With all dtie deference to Bro.Parvin's great learning and 
the many years he has devoted to historical research, we 
most emphatically deny the correctness of his historical 
statements as well as his conclusions. We have no desire 
to stand oat " solitary and alone " unless we are sure we 
are resting upon the solid foundation of truth. Contro- 
versies as to matters of historical fact can only be settled 
by a reference to recognized authority. The authority rec- 
ognized by the fraternity of Masons, and to which we ap- 
peal, is the Old Constitutions, to which we most respectfully 
invite Bro. Parvin's attention. In the extract quoted above, 
Bro. Parvin says: "If there be any fact well established in 
Masonic history, it is that upon the organization of the 
Grand Lodge of England in 1717, and in the promulgation 
of the Constitutions of 1723, there were not three degrees 
then in existence, while it is equally well proven that in 
the preceding century there was but one." 

Now what are known as " The General Regulations of 
the Free and Accepted Masons" were first compiled by 
Bro. George Payne, Grand Master, 1720, and approved by 
the General Assembly at Stationer's Hall, on June 24, 1721. 
Next, by order of Grand Master Montagu, James Ander- 
son compared them with the ancient records of the Fra- 
ternity, the Grand Lodge revised and approved them and 
ordered them to be printed in the Book of Constitutions 
March 25, 1722. 

At the time of this compilation these regulations had 
been so long in existence among the Fraternity as to bo 
denominated " Old." 

They had been compared with ancient records as above 
stated and the Grand Lodge approved them, as the old 
regulations of the Craft. 

If, then, investigation proved them to be " old " they 
certainly antedated the organization of the Grand Lodijo 
in 1717. The Grand Lodge of England would not style 
regulations old if at the time of their compilation by Grand 
Master Payne in 1720 they had been in existence four or 
five years. 



90 APPENDIX. 

We now call Bro. Parvin' s attention to Old Regulation 
No. XIII. , Section 2, which reads as follows: "Apprentices 
must be admitted Fellow Crafts and Masters only here, 
unless by a Dispensation from the Grand Master" 

Italics as in original. 

The above Old Regulation was first compiled in 1720, 
and yet Bro. Parvin seriously asserts that "in 1717 and in 
the promulgation of the Constitutions of 1723 there were 
not three degrees then in existence." 

Not only were there three degrees in existence, but the 
F. C. and M. M. could be conferred in Lodges as well as in 
Grand Lodge, by dispensation. 

Again, this regulation was altered on November 22, 
1725, so as to read as follows: "The Master of a Lodge 
with his Wardens and a competent Number of the Lodge 
assembled in due form, can make Masters and Fellows at 
discretion." 

Italics as in original. 

The regulation thus amended was then styled " New " 
in contradistinction to the above which still retained the 
designation " Old." 

Thus, Bro. Parvin, your "well established fact in Masonic 
history" is not proven upon reference to the Old Regula- 
tions of the Craft which have come down to us from the 
past, and which were hoary enough with antiquity in 1720 
to pass current with intelligent Masons as decidedly old — 
and upon comparison with ancient records then extant, 
were stamped with the approval of the Grand Lodge of 
England. 

But we have already occupied too much space with this 
discussion. In other portions of this report we shall ex- 
press our opinion in relation to the antiquity of the 
fraternity. 

Under Canada we have quoted Bro. G. W. Speth's 
views upon the subject of degrees, while under Utah will 
be found the latest views upon the subject. 

Grand Master Phelps and Grand Secretary Parvin were 
both re-elected. 



APPENDIX. 91 

KANSAS— 1892. 

Thirty-sixth Annual held at Leavenworth, February 
17, 1892, M. W. Andrew M. Callahan, Grand Master, pre- 
siding. 

He refers to the organization of the Grand Lodge with 
less than 100 members, and contrasts it with the present 
membership of 19,304. The growth has been largely due 
to the wonderful immigration into that State during the 
past thirty-five years, for among these immigrants were a 
large number of Masons. Yet aside from tnis there has 
been a steady increase, the number ra e d during the past 
year being 1,384 He makes a strong — ea for more care- 
ful inspection of material, in order that the character of 
their membership should be of the highest order. 

He announces the death of R. W. Bro. Christian Beck, 
Grand Treasurer for thirty-four years, to whom he pays a 
most eloquent and feeling tribute. The Grand Lodge 
also mourns the death of its Junior Grand Deacon, Frank 
B. Day, and Bro. B. J. F. Hanna, P. 8. G. W. 

He had granted dispensations for four new Lodges. 

Five corner-stones were laid by proxy. 

The evil of special dispensations he says has grown to 
an alarming magnitude. Within the first ninety days 
after assuming the duties of his office he was asked for 
110 special dispensations to confer degrees out of the 
regular time. Most of these were to confer the second 
and third degrees upon candidates about to leave the 
jurisdiction, etc. With a view of checking this growing 
evil he recommends the imposition of a fee upon Lodges 
making such requests of such an amount as will deter 
them from hastily making such applications. 

Of the ten decisions submitted eight were approved. 

He recommends that they accept Kentucky's invitation 
and take proper steps to be represented at the Masonic 
Convention to be held in Chicago during the World's 
Fair. 

He devotes considerable space to the subject of a 
Masonic Home, which he favors. To engage in the under- 
taking, Article VIII., Section 6, of their Constitution, pro- 
hibitory of such an enterprise, must be repealed. To do 
this would require a two-thirds vote of the Grand Lodge 
and the subsequent approval of two-thirds of the Lodges 



92 APPENDIX. 

in the jurisdiction. Immediate steps were therefore 
recommended. 

The Board of Inspectors appointed to examine the 
records and accounts of the Masonic Mutual Benefit 
Society of Kansas reported that the total amount paid out 
to beneficiaries from the date of its organization to 
December 31, 1891, was $467,58(5.80, and that it was 
entitled to the hearty support of the Masons of Kansas. 

A fine oration was delivered by Bro. Bestor G. Brown, 
Grand Orator, entitled "The Philosophic Origin of 
Masonry and the Purpose of that Philosophy." It was 
filled with original and practical ideas and was listened to 
with marked attention. 

The Committee on Masonic Home made a report in its 
favor, which was adopted by a rising and unanimous vote. 
The amendment to the Constitution making the under- 
taking legal was also adopted unanimously and ordered to 
be submitted to the Lodges for their approval or disap- 
proval. 

A resolution was adopted requesting the Grand Secre- 
tary to ask the railroad companies hereafter to extend as 
fair treatment to Masonic as they do to other organiza- 
tions. They have charged Masons one and one-third fare 
and others one fare for round trip. 

Majority and minority reports were presented by the 
Committee on Jurisprudence regarding a decision of the 
Grand Master on the Past Masters Degree. The majority 
report was adopted, which was as follows: 

It is recommended that a Worshipful Mueter*elect receive the Past Master's 
Degree before being installed. 

Bro. John H. Brown furnishes a most interesting Re- 
port on Correspondence, covering 188 pages ; Colorado for 
1891 receives a notice of nearly four pages. He quotes 
from Grand Master Foster's address, and also makes a 
synopsis of the more important matters contained therein. 
He also quotes from Bro. Bush's oration, which he says is 
well prepared. Ho quotes our reply to Bro. Bobbins in 
full ; also our remarks on Past Master's Degree, with a 
commentary thereon, showing his disgust at this "sickly 
plant/' which has been cultivated in some jurisdictions, 
and says : " It is not recognized by the Grand Lodge of 
Kansas." Not only was it recognized in your Grand 
Lodge, Brother Brown, at this very session, but it was the 
subject of ttco reports from the Committee on Jurispru- 



APPENDIX. 93 

dence, and a lengthy discussion besides, and now your 
Grand body recommends Worshipful Masters-elect to re- 
ceive it before being installed. " Now we go up, up, and 
now we go down, down." Brother Brown, this is a strange 
world of contraries. 

Bro. David B. Fuller was elected Grand Master ; Bro. 
John H. Brown re-elected Grand Secretary. 



KENTUCKY— 1891. 

A fine steel portrait of the late Hiram Bassett, Fast 
Grand Master, appears as a frontispiece. 

The records of three Emergent Communications precede 
those of the Annual. The first convened for the burial of 
P. G. M. Hiram Bassett, the second to dedicate and unveil 
the Governor Blackburn monument, and the third to dedi- 
cate Robert Morris' monument, a picture of which appears 
iu the proceedings. The exercises upon the latter occasion 
were of the most interesting and impressive character. 

Bro. Elisha S. Fitch, P. G. M., delivered the principal 
address, which was a review of the life and character of 
Bro. Morris, and placed many incidents in his career before 
his hearers in a new light. During the exercises several 
of his most famous poems were recited by different brethren, 
the renditions being interspersed with musical selections. 

Ninety-second Annual held at Louisville, October 7, 
1891, W. M. Charles H. Fisk, Grand Master. 

He pays a feeling and deserved tribute to the memory 
of P. G. M. Hiram Bassett and also to deceased brethren 
of that and other jurisdictions. 

He suspended the W. M. of a Lodge for having con- 
ferred the M. M. degree upon a F. C, in the face of an 
objection made to him personally and in open Lodge. 

He had granted thirteen dispensations for new Lodges. 

He had invariably refused all applications to confer 
degrees out of time, acting under the provisions of the 
Constitution. We believe he had the power, if disposed 
to exercise it. Bro. Drummond's reply to Bro. Singleton, 
on the subject of the prerogatives of Grand Masters, 
should convince any impartial investigator of that fact. 

Three corner-stones were laid by proxy. He declined 
to lay the corner-stone of a Jewish Temple on Sunday. 



94 APPENDIX. 

He submits a list of fifty-five decisions, which were 
approved, with two exceptions, and slight modifications in 
respect to two others. 

He issued a circular letter of warning against spurious 
Masons hailing from the clandestine Grand Lodge of 
Ohio. 

He speaks in the warmest terms of commendation of 
the glorious and noble work that is being done by their 
Masonic Home. 

Having noted that 136 representatives were excused 
from full discharge of Masonic duty at the last Annual, 
he announces that under no circumstances will he grant 
leave of absence to any member of that body. He says : 
"Masonic duties must be Masonically discharged." 

Five delegates, with the present Grand Master (Charles 
H. Fisk) as ex officio chairman, were appointed to attend 
the Fraternal Congress to be held during the World's Fair 
at Chicago. 

Several resolutions were offered with a view to secure 
uniform work in that jurisdiction, but they were all laid 
on the table. 

A resolution was adopted fixing the assessment for 
the Home at one dollar for each member of subordi- 
nate Lodges, instead of fifty cents, to include a copy 
of the Home Journal to each affiliated Mason in the juris- 
diction without cost. 

A very full and complete Report on Correspondence 
was prepared by Bro. James W. Staton. Colorado for 
1890 receives a fraternal review of two pages. The special 
communication for dedicating Masonic Temple, also that 
for the corner-stone laying of State Capitol, receives due 
attention. Bro. Alva Adams' address, he says, was 
"magnificent." He has very little use for our manner of 
opening the Grand Lodge and receiving the Grand Master 
"with great pomp and a grand flourish of trumpets." 
Grand Master Brid well's address he pronounces "an 
admirable document." Our Report is favorably com- 
mented upon, but he does not agree with us in our 
statement that our English brethren have departed from 
the Landmark on the physical qualification question. He 
emphatically denies that it is a Landmark. He says that 
"every Grand Lodge has a right to make its own regula- 
tions, provided, always, that the essentials of Masonry are 
preserved, but physical qualification is not an essential." 



APPENDIX. 95 

We have frequently expressed our opinion on this sub- 
ject, Bro. Staton and believe that physical qualification not 
only is, but always was an essential, if we read the old 
charges aright We stand to Anderson's Constitutions and 
not those or the spurious Dermott Grand Lodge. 

Bro. James A. McKenzie of Oak Grove was elected 
Grand Master, Bro. H. B. Grant re-elected Grand Secretary. 



LOUISIANA— 181)2. 

Eightieth Annual, held at New Orleans, February 8, 
1892, M. W. Charles F. Buck, Grand Master. 

Four pages of his address are devoted to necrology. 
Among deceased brethren of that jurisdiction were F. M. 
Brooks, P. S. G. W.; W. H. Moon, P. M., and J. G. Dea- 
con, and John G. Fleming, P. G. M. Fitting tributes are 
paid to the memory and virtues of each of these lamented 
craftsmen. 

Under the head of "Relations with Masonic Grand 
Bodies in Europe," he pays his respects to the Committee 
of Foreign Correspondence of the Grand Lodge of Penn- 
sylvania for having commented, as he says, in an uncharit- 
able manner upon the following suggestion, which appeared 
in his address in 1891: 

Referring to the fact that we are not in "oomnranication" or " fraternal rela- 
tions with many Grand Orients in Europe." I ventured a suggestion "tost the 
Committee on Foreign Correspondence take the matter in hand to assist the Grand 
Lodge, or the incoming Grand Master, in determining where it may be desirable 
or proper to establish or renew formal fraternal intercourse." 

Nearly five pages are. devoted to a scathing and incisive 
review of the assumption of the Pennsylvania Committee. 
We give place to a few extracts : 

What tradition is assailed ? What principle endangered ? What shrine in- 
vaded? What sanctity impaired? What idol have 1 desecrated? What dire 
menace do 1 conjure np, to arouse the feare of my esteemed Brethren of Pennsyl- 
vania that they should " feel so deeply" and "speak so earnestly," when 1 simply 
direct the attention of a Committee of this M. W. Grand Lodge to a matter winch 

is, by oar written law, within the province of its dnty ? 

• * * * * *********** 

Bnt Will they deny that in the Protestant countries of Northern Europe Free- 
masonry assames and holds as pare and lofty a standard as anywhere ? 

Freemasonry in Europe operates under entirely different conditions, which the 

truly charitable "Brother" must not fail to concede. 

* * * * * *********** 

This philosophy, withont taking open part, spread light and progress \ it 
illumed even the period of the French Revolution, and kindled the flame which 
spread over the world when Thomas Jefferson wrote that "all men were created 
free and equal." It inspired the patriotism of Lafayette, and made universal the 
humanity of George Washington. It pleads in the music of Mozart. It lives in 
the philosophy of Leasing. It pervades the poetry of (ioethe. A century and a 
half ago, Leasing wrote : * * * '"The rent d*>tds of Freemasonry are so 
great that centuries may pass ere one can say, * this has it accomplished ;' and yet 
it has worked on all the good that is in the world, and it will continue to labor on 
and for the good that ever will be in the world." 



96 APPENDIX. 

Was ever a truer or greater thing said of Freemasonry than this ? 

These men were Freemasons, and successors worthy of them — and, my 
Brethren, worthy of yon and ns— are Masons to-day in Europe— true Masons, 
citizens of the world, laboring and struggling to elevate and emancipate man. 

Because, in this blessed country, we live under happier conditions, and enjoy 
under the law of the land a freedom which realizes one of the ideals of Masonry, 
must we condemn those who, against terrible odds, contend for that which we enjoy? 

I must contend that our Brethren of Pennsylvania read but hastily what I 

wrote, and misunderstanding it, wrote " more in sorrow than in anger." 

* * • * • *********** 

I must add, in conclusion, that could the mattpr have been allowed to rest 
between myself and the Brethren of the Foreign Correspondence Committee of 
Pennsylvania, I should have been willing to stand on the record as it was. 

But the double slander against this Grand Jurisdiction on the one hand, and 
the Freemasons of Europe on the other, for which my words were made the provo- 
cation, has gone forth to the entire Masonic world, and I deemed it my duty to do 
what, with propriety, was possible in this address, to show that our Brethren of 
Pennsylvania have taken needless alarm ; having mistaken an utterance sprung 
from the soul and bottom of Masonic confraternity, for a treasonable heresy, the 
apostacy of disbelief, which destroys the brotherhood of man when it repudiates 
the supremacy and essentiality of God ! 

He reports the Fraternity in a prosperous condition, 
the Lodges have done much work and gained largely in 
numbers, though the total aggregate has not materially in- 
creased. "Death has made terrible inroads upon our 
ranks and almost off-set our gains. Thus we are still feel- 
ing the effects of years of stagnation." He explains by 
saying that the older members are dying off while their 
places are not fully recruited by younger material. 

He had granted six dispensations for new Lodges. 

The new Masonic Temple and matters connected there- 
with occupy a large portion of the address. In this con- 
nection he refers to the issue of Grand Lodge bonds 
authorized in 1890, amounting to $70,000. After exchanging 
$16,000 of old bonds, there was left only $54,000 to place; 
he says the brethren have manifested great indifference in 
the matter of negotiating these bonds. Only $35,100 had 
been taken thus far, of which amount, $15,000 was taken 
by two large corporations, $3,100-by the Lodges and $11,- 
800 by fire individual brethren. A large proportion of the 
bonds were issued for $100, with the expectation that many 
of the brethren would at least invest in one bond. 

Resolutions were adopted to maintain intact the Per- 
manent Charity Fund inaugurated in 1853. 

The Grand Lodge edict relating to assessments on de- 
grees was amended so as to read two dollars instead of three. 

Resolutions expressive of smypathy with H. R. H. the 
Prince of Wales, in his recent affliction, were passed 
unanimously. 

Bro. J. Q. A. Fellows again presents a topical Report 
on Correspondence. We have heretofore expressed our 
high opinion of these reports. 

Colorado is referred to incidentally under "Land- 
marks," "Masonic Home," etc., where the opinions of 



APPENDIX. 97 

Bros. Bridwell and Todd are commented upon by other 
reporters. 

Grand Master and Grand Secretary both re-elected. 
Grand Master Buck for the sixth term. 



MAINE— 1892. 

Seventy-third Annual held at Portland, May 3, 1892, 
M. W. Henry R. Taylor, Grand Master. 

He reports brotherly love and unity as characterizing 
the Craft of that jurisdiction. The number of Lodges 
remains the same; the net increase in membership is 209. 
He calls attention to the fact that from year to year there 
is a noticeable increase in the average membership of 
Lodges; at present it is 110. 

He recommends the appointment of a committee to 
consider and report such action as may be necessary in 
the matter of a Fraternal Congress during the World's Fair. 

The death of Grand Secretary Bro. Ira Berry is 
announced with eloquent words of eulogy. He was laid 
to rest upon the ninetieth anniversary of his birth with 
the solemn ceremonies of the Fraternity, which were con- 
ducted by P. G. M. Josiah H. Drummond. 

He is outspoken upon the subject of side degrees, the 
place for which he says " is ouiaide even the porch of the 
Temple." 

His correspondence had been extensive ; he had 
received 1,380 letters, all of which had been answered. A 
reference to the Maine Digest would no doubt have mate- 
rially lightened his labors. 

The five decisions rendered by ]}im were confirmed. 

We copy the following from the Report on Returns as 
showing the growth of our extreme Eastern sister juris- 
diction : 

A comparison of oar membership since early days may be interesting. Before 
1950 statistics were neglected. 

MEMBERSHIP OF THE GRAND LODGE OF MAINE. 

1850. _ 1,402 1868.. 13,001 1877. 19,858 1S85_ .19,862 

I860.. 4,.H19 1869.. 14,121 1878. .19,464 1nh>. .20,039 

1861. _ 4,744 1870.. 14,926 1879. .19,260 1*87. .20,218 

1862. - 5,323 1871.. 15,818 1880.. 19,303 1*88.. 20,261 

1*63.. 6,041 1872. .16,358 1 MSI.. 19,093 1*89.. 20,340 

1*64.. 7,227 1873..17,224 18*2 18,991 1890. .20.675 

1865.. 8,884 1874.. 18,118 1888. .19,477 1891.. 20,968 

1866..10,075 1875.. 18.673 1884. .19,641 1892. 21,177 

1867.. 11,491 1876.. 18,843 

It will be observed that the gain was gradual up to the time of the war, when 
it was rapid. This continued nntil after the panic in 1873, when hard times began, 
and for six years the gain was small. In 1881 and 1*82 there was a Iobh, and then 
we began to gain once more. 



98 APPENDIX. 

The Grand Lodge of Tasmania was recognized. 

The masterly Report on Correspondence, by Bro. J. 
H. Drummond, covers 220 pages of the proceedings. It 
is certainly one of the best that has emanated from his 
pen. Colorado for 1891 receives a notice of three and a 
half pages. He quotes Grand Master Foster's report of 
the condition of the Craft, and also eleven of his eighteen 
decisions. We quote Nos. 2 /md 7 and his comments 
thereon : 

2. A request for waiver of jurisdiction must be made before ballot; a Lodge 
has do right to receive the application of a Brother, the material of another 
Lodge. 

7. A Lodge is not compelled to pay the fanonil expenses of a Brother, even 
thongh one of its own members, bat can dispense its charity in the way it deems 
best. 

These were all approved by the Grand Lodge, except that No. 2 was amended 
by omitting all after the word ballot, and No. 7 by inserting the word "legally 1 ' 
before *' compelled." 

The amending of No. 2 in effect makes it declare that a Lodge may receive the 
petition of a candidate over which it has no jurisdiction, but mast obtain the 
requisite permission before balloting; the original decision is the rule in many 
Grand Lodges, and it seems to as that permission should bs obtained to recrive the 
petition, as the reception of the petition is a jurisdictional act and usually the 
effective one. 

We confess that we cannot discover the purpose of the amendment to the 
seventh, nor wherein it really changes the decision ; the idea that a Lodge may be 
illegally compelled to do un act seems to us qnite absurd. 

Wo do not perceive why the Grand Lodge should not allow Lodges U. D. to 
adopt roles of action for which "by-laws" are-only another name. With this 
exception, the decisions are in accord with the law in this jurisdiction. 

He styles Bro. Bush's oration "appropriate." He 
makes a number of extracts from our report. As to Bro. 
Bromwell's status he has the following : 

This illustrates the truth of our views as given in our review of Alabama— the 
tendency to destroy the universality of Masonry. There should be no question that 
a Past Grand Master's rank is not a local one, but a universal one, and wherever 
affiliated, he should stand on a level with his peers. In olden times, a Past Master 
was a Past Master in Masonry, and not of a particular Lodge or a particular State 
— his rank was recognized universally precisely the same as in case of a Master 
Mason; the change has arisen from local jealouny, which should find no place in 
Masonic polity. We hold that under the Constitution of the Grand Lodge of 
Colorado, Bromwellis a member of it, with the name rights and powers as Bro. 
Greenleaf possesses. We hope our distinguished Brother will examine the question 
and give as his conclusion. 

No one would more willingly accord to Bro. Bromwell 
the rights and powers referred to than ourself. We were 
asked what privileges honorary membership in our Grand 
Lodge conferred, and we answered: "It accords to him all 
the rights and privileges of the Grand Lodge, except the 
right of ballot." AVe based our reply upon the following 
declaration of our Grand Lodge relative to honorary mem- 
bership in subordinate Lodges. Section 130 Grand Lodge 
By-Laws: "Honorary membership gives the right to speak 
in Lodge, but not to vote. It cannot be conferred on a 
regular member of a Lodge by the same body." 



APPENDIX. 99 

After quoting our remarks upon the Oregon decision 
upon objection to advancement, he says : 

We go a step farther ; if the objection is in the nature of a charge, regular 
proceedings should be taken upon that basis, and the Brother, if convicted, 
suspended or expelled; bat if the Lodga refuses advancement only, we think the 
action shoo. Id be no more than a rejection by ballot, and that, as we have already 
stated, he should be allowed to petition again, in due time, as in other cases. 
And especially do we hold that, after a Lodge bas decided that the objections are 
sufficient to prevent advancement, it is not Masonic to allow the objector to perm it 
him to advance, or to advance the candidate after the objector ceases to be a mem- 
ber; when the Lodge takes it up, it becomes a question between the candidate and 
the Craft, of whom the objector is one ; in a word, the candidate stands just as if 
rejected by ballot. 

Of our digest, he says : 

Bro. Greenleaf appends to his report a digest of decisions, involving much 
labor. We have contemplated doing the same, bat concluded that so many depend 
on local law that they would be misleading to the (/raft of our jurisdiction. 

Under District of Columbia, Bro. Druinmond replies 
to Bro. Singleton upon the subject of the "Old Regulations," 
and he disposes of his argument most effectually. We feel 
that our space cannot be better occupied than by giving a 
few extracts : 

The first impression one gets from reading it is one of wonder at the ingenuity 
displayed in an effort to maintain his position. We are always prepared for some- 
thing new and startling; but this effort of our Brother surpasses our wildest 
expectations. 

The basis of his argument is, that the "Old Regulations" were not old regula- 
tions at all, bat were new ones! And he challenges Bro. Schultz to show whenever, 
before 1723. they were known to the Craft! He apparently requires printed evidence 
or written evidence of Masonic law at a time when nothing had been printed, and 
it was contrary to Masonic custom to multiply copies of what had been written. 

Bat for all that, the evidence exists— evidence that stands as conclusive by all 
the rules which the wisdom of the ages has established as the tests. 

They were published in 1723; theyare accompanied by the statement that they 
were first "compiled" by Grand Master Payne in 1720, and his compilation was 
approved by the Grand Lodge in 1721 : that by order of Grand Master Montagu, Dr. 
Anderson compared them with the ancient records and immemorial usages of the 
Fraternity and digested into the order in which they were published. 

In the second edition, now before us. it is stated that Grand Lodge having 
revised them, ordered them printed in the Book of Constitutions, on March 25, 1722. 

The publication was not completed during Montagu's Grand Mastership; but 
during the term of his successor, Philip, Duke of Wharton, the book was lesued 
from the prose- Although it had been previously approved by the Grand Ijodgp, 
an 'approbation" was added, signed by the Grand Master, Deputy Grand Master 
and Grand Wardens, and by the Master and Wardens of twenty Lodges, averring 
that the contents are the " History, Charges and Regulations of the Ancient Fra- 
ternity"; that they had been submitted to Grand Master Montagu, for his appro- 
bation, who by the advice of several brethren had ordered them to be printed; that 
they, having perused them, joined their predecessors in their laudable approval 
thereof. This "approbation" was published in the Book of Constitutions and 
makes a part of it ; and all these are witnesses to the truth of the " approbation " 
and of the contents of the book to far they had knowledge: that they knew whether 
they were new regulations, enacted since 1717, or a compilation of the old regula- 
tions in a new Book of Constitutions, is absolutely certain, and their evidence is 

conclusive. 

* * * ************** 

At the December session, 1721, "Montagu, Grand Master, at the desire of the 
Lodge, appointed fourteen learned Brethren to examine Bro. Anderson's Manu- 
script, and to make report." 

On March 23, 1722, in Grand Lodge, "with former Grand Officers and those of 
twenty-four Lodges:" 

"The said committee of fourteen reported that they had perused Bro. Anderson's 
manuscript, viz, the History, Charges, Regulations and Master's Song, and > fter 
some amendments, had approved it: upon which the Lodge desired the Grand 
Master to order it to be printed." 



* > 



Do-WO 



IOO APPENDIX. 

In passing we note an instance showing that Anderson recognized the natures 
of the Craft as the law; at a meeting he says, " they put in the chair the oldest Mas- 
ter Mason (who was not the present Master of a Lodge, also irregular.") 

There was no regular meeting of the Grand Lodge in Jnne, 1722, but the Grand 
Master summoned it to meet January 17, 1722 (1723, N. 8.), when 

"Grand Warden Anderson produced the new Book of Constitutions, now in 
print, which was again approved with the addition of the antient manner of consti- 
tuting a Lodge." 

On Jnne 24, 1723, the order of January 17th, preceding, was read, and it was 
moved *' that the said General Regulations be confirmed, so far as they are consis- 
tent with the ancient rules of Masonry;" but it was then " moved and put whether 
the words [so far as they are consistent with the ancient rules of Masonry] be part 
of the question," and it was "resolved in the affirmative." "But the main ques- 
tion was not put." 

At the communication held in November following, sundry regulations were 
adopted, which in 17:38, with those subsequently adopted. Dr. Anderson published 
under the title of " New Regulations," and the former compilation was published 
under the title of the " Old Regulations." 

Thus it appears: 

1. That Bro. Singleton's claim that there were not " Old Regulations'* exist- 
ing before 1717, i6 disproved by testimony— overwhelming in its force— that they 
existed previously. 

2. That his claim that they were enacted between 1717 and 1723 is disproved 
by the record that only two were enacted during that time. 

8. That his claim (which others also have made) that these regulations were 
enacted by the Grand Lodge, in disproved by showing by the record that they were 
not enacted, but compiled as existing law. and never formally approved until pro- 
duced in print before the Grand Lodge, when the book was approved. And, more- 
over, at the very next meeting of the Grand Lodge it was resolved in substance 
thut they were law "only so tar as they are consistent with the ancient rules of 
Masonry." 

Another thing is certain: that from 1717 to 1723, the affairs of the Craft were 
administered, not under a written code of law, but under the law as found in the 
usages of the Craft nnd old manuscripts, which were assumed to be sufficiently 
well known to be followed. 

The resolution that the regulations were law " only so far as they were con- 
sistent with the ancient rules of Masonry" clinches the argument; we had forgot- 
ten, if we ever knew it, that the Grand Lodge so early recognized the doctrine that 
the old regulations are subject to the ancient rules of Mssonry. 

This exposition would not be complete without calling attention to the differ- 
ence between the functions of the Historian and those of the Jurist. The Historian 
is at perfect lil>erty to question statements of facts in his effort to discover the 
very truth. Hut when certain propositions are assumed to be facts in the enact- 
ment of a law. the Jurist, in construing that law, is bound by such assumed facts, 
and it makes no difference whether they were facts or not; he is "bound by the 
record." If it were possible that Dr. Anderson manufactured these regulations 
" out of whole cloth," but they were made, received and recognized as a compila- 
tion of ancient usages, laws, constitutions, etc.. then they must be read and 
expounded as if they were in fact such a compilation. When they are received as 
the law ok the Craft in later days they must be read and expounded by the same 
rule. Whatever powers these regulations recognize as possessed by the Grand 
Master as inherent in the office, must l>e held to be possessed by him, without 
regard to what the Historian may believe the actual fact was. 

'I his of it-elf would be a full answer to all Bro. Singleton's (et id omne genus) 
talk about "historical facts," which after all are ''guess work;" but against all 
the speculations of himself and others we oppose the solemn declarations of the 
Grand Lodge and Grand Masters, made at the time, or immediately after the time, 
and remaining unquestioned a century and a half, and the rule of evidence that 
such declarations, so made and so long acquiesced in, can l>e overcome only by the 
strongest evidence of a positive character, which Bro. Singleton and those holding 
with him utterly fail to give. We have carefully read and considered what Bro. 
Gould has written, and while no one exceeds us in our admiration of the diligence 
and peivcverence with which he has collected his evidence, and the ability with 
which he sustains his conclusions, we are compelled to say that if the case were 
presented to a judicial tribunal, examining it according to the rules which the 
wisdom of ages has established, in our opinion Bro. Gould would be sent out of 
court as utterly failing to overcome the case which the record makes against him. 

Grand Master re-elected, Bro. Stephen Berry elected 
Grand Secretary. 



APPENDIX. 1 01 



MANITOBA— 1892. 

Seventeenth Annual held at Winnipeg, June 8, 1S92, 
M. W. William G. Bell, Grand Master. 

He thus discourses upon the condition of Masonry in 
that jurisdiction: 

To sum np, the impression I formed from my visits throughout the jurisdic- 
tion is that Masonry is in a healthy, prosperous condition. Most of tbe Lodges 
have greatly improved of late, and nowhere are to be found more zealous or 
capable Masons.* The Lodges are generally in a good condition financially, and, 
with few exceptions, the Secretaries perform their duties well. Harmony prevails 
in almost every Lodge. With a few exceptions the officers are well up in the ritual, 
bat in those minor details which go to make np a successful Lodge many are 
deficient. Not haviug opportunities to compare their work with that of other 
Lodges, and having really no chance of obtaining instruction, many think that 
Grand Lodge should send them some well-skilled Craftsman to give the needed 
instruction. Something should be done, and I would recommend that Grand 
Lodge place a sum of money at the disposal of the Grand Master, to be expended 
by him in paying the railroad expenses of well-skilled Brethren to visit the outly- 
ing Lodges. 1 have no doubt that Brethren will be found willing to give their 
services, and I know the Lodges will be only too glad to pay hotel expenses. 

He announces the death of Brothers Samuel L. Bed- 
son, P. S. G. W., and Hugh Noble, Grand Steward. 

A large number of dispensations were granted to wear 
regalia at divine service, and one for the healing of a 
clandestine Mason hailing from a Lodge under the spuri- 
ous Grand Lodge of Ontario. 

Under " Fraternal Relations " he refers to his visit to 
Colorado as follows: 

While in Denver, Colo.. I was introduced to a Lodge by the Grand Mas- 
ter, who was making an official visit. As there was an exemplification of the 
Hitnal and speeches from several Grand Officers, the evening was an interesting 
one. M. W. Bro. Ernest Le Neve Foster, Grand Master, and K. W. Bro. Parmelee, 
Grand Secretary, placed me under obligations by their kindness to me. 

He issued one dispensation for a new Lodge with eight 
members, " but it is located at a new town with excellent 
prospects." 

Reports from the District Deputies of eight districts 
were presented, which give faithful pictures of the condi- 
tion of the Lodges under their immediate supervision. 

The net increase in membership was 140; present mem- 
bership 1,992. 

The Grand Lodge of New Zealand w r as recognized. 

The fpllowing resolution, contained in the Report of 
the Board of General Purposes, was adopted: 

That in the opinion of the Board no further charitable grants should, for a 
time, be made to hospitals^ but after the books are closed for eaoh year, that all 
foods in excess of $500 in the bands of the Grand Treasurer be invested in 
Approved debentures or other convertible securities, under the direction of the 
Board of General Purposes, for the carrying on of works consistent with the 
objects of Masonry. 



102 APPENDIX. 

In the face of this action an effort was made at the 
close of the session to appropriate $100 each to four hos- 
pitals, but it did not prevail. 

The proposed Fraternal Congress was endorsed and 
eight delegates were elected, the Grand Master being 
empowered to fill vacancies. 

No Report on Correspondence. 

Bro. John W. H. Wilson was elected Grand Master, 
Grand Secretary re-elected. 



MARYLAND— 1891. 

Portraits of Past Grand Masters Charles Webb and 
John H. B. Latrobe appear in the Proceedings. 

One hundred and fifth Annual, held at Baltimore, No- 
vember 17, 1891, M. W. Thos. J. Shryock, Grand Master. 

The attention of the Craft is now directed to the recon- 
struction of their Masonic Temple, destroyed Christmas 
day, 1890. 

He says the General Masonic Relief Association of the 
United States and Canada was projected in Baltimore by 
their Lodge of Relief. The convention was called in that 
city and its organization perfected. He commends the 
great good it has accomplished in the saving of thousands 
of dollars annually which were once thrown away on 
Masonic tramps. 

The Grand Lecturer, he says, has paid a large number 
of visits to the county Lodges, some of whom were work- 
ing in direct violation of the Grand Lodge laws. As two- 
thirds of the Lodges composing the Grand Lodge are 
located in the counties, these visits were productive of 
great good and resulted in the correction of many irregu- 
larities. 

He had visited in person all of the Baltimore Lodges. 
A school of instruction is held every Thursday night, and 
the attendence is larger than at any other meetings held 
in the Temple, great interest being manifested in the ex- 
emplification of the work. 

He declined to grant dispensations to confer two degrees 
upon candidates at the same communication. 

Three dispensations for new Lodges were granted. 



APPENDIX. IO3 

After presenting a full record of his official acts, with 
thoughtful and timely recommendations, he turns his 
thoughts to the vacant seats once occupied by the three 
Grand Masters, John S. Tyson, Charles Webb and John 
H. B. Latrobe, beautiful tributes are paid to their mem- 
ories, and he closes his address with IJro. Albert Pike's 
beautiful poem, " Every Year." 

The reports of the Inspectors of the various districts, 
some twenty in all, are published in the proceedings, and 
show the conditiou of the Lodges throughout the jurisdic- 
tion to be flourishing as a general rule. 

Resolutions were adopted forbidding Masonic inter- 
course with the so-called Grand Lodge at Worthington, 
Ohio, its subordinates or any Mason connected therewith. 

The action of Kentucky, in the matter of a Fraternal 
Congress, was approved, and the Grand Master authorized 
to appoint such delegates as his judgment dictated. 



MARYLAND— 1892. 

Semi-Annual Communication held May 10, 1892. 

Grand Master Shryock records his official doings for 
the previous six months. He again commends the work 
of the Grand Lecturer and their school of instruction. He 
is also in favor of music as an auxilliary to Lodge work. 
The Temple Quartette, of Boston, visited their city and 
interspersed the Lodge ceremonies with their impressive 
selections. This awoke such enthusiasm that the Maryland 
brethren are endeavoring to form a quartette whose services 
will be at the disposal of the Baltimore Lodges generally. 
He reports the reconstruction of the Temple as progressing 
satisfactorily. 

He calls attention to a growiug evil, that of non- 
obedience to a summons issued by a subordinate Lodge. 
Upon this subject he says : 

I have frequently been present in Lodges, and was surprised to hear the names 
of brethren called oat by the Secretary, who had been gammoned, and who had 
paid no attention whatever to it. This has got to be quite a custom. In many 
instances the brethren allow the most trivial excuses to avail them in avoiding a 
summons to the Lodge, and many times the Worshipful Master, by virtue of his 
office, accepts these excuses. In ray judgment nothing is more sacred than a sum- 
mons to a Lodge, and I feel that brethren disobeying them ought to be severely 
disciplined. 

He has the sad announcement to make of the death of 
B. W. Bro. Jacob E. Krebs, Deputy Grand Master, who 



104 APPENDIX. 

died with scarcely a moment's notice. He pays a loving 
tribute to his personal worth and emiuent services in 
Masonry. 

He says their library is increasing satisfactorily, not- 
withstanding the drawback of the fire, so that by the time 
their new Temple is completed they hope to show a library 
worthy of the Masons of that jurisdiction. 

Bro. E. T. Schultz furnishes a Report on Correspond- 
ence, as usual, and it ranks among the best. Colorado for 
1891 is fraternally reviewed. Extracts are made from 
Grand Master Fosters address and Bro. Bush's oration, 
as well as from the writer's Report. 

Under Minnesota we quote the following as to the 
right of a Past Master to open and preside over a Lodge 
in the absence of the Master and Wardens : 

Several prominent writers having, as intimated under the review of California , 
expressed views at variance with those of your Committee u pon this subject, we 
have examined sach Grand Lodge Constitutions as were available, with the object 
of ascertaining what is the general practice in this regard, and with the following 
result : 

Pennsylvania, Michigan, Mississippi, South Carolina. New Jersey, District of 
Columbia, Alabama, North Carolina, Iowa, Texas, Georgia, Colorado, Delaware, 
Virginia, West Virginia. Nebraska. Louisiana, Rhode Island, Missouri, California, 
Illinois, Arkansas and Kentucky, by express regulations, forbid their Lodges to be 
opened in the absence of the Master and both Wardens, while Massachusetts and 
several other jurisdictions do so by implication. 

The Constitutions of New York, Maryland, Ohio, Connecticut and Tennessee 
are silent upon the subject of the presence of the officers, but as they require the 
Charter to be present, it would be safe to say it would be held in those jurisdictions 
also, that Lodges cannot be opened in the absence of the first three officers. 

So far as our examination has extended, Minnesota, Kansas, Maine and New 
Hampshire are the only jurisdictions which permit, by express regulation, a Lodge 
to be opened by a Past Master in the absence of the Master and Wardens. 

We thus see that a majority of the Grand Lodges of our country most wisely 
prohibit their Lodges to open in the absence of the installed officers, the proper 
custodians of the Charter. That this is a wise prohibition all must admit, if they 
will reflect for a moment upon the irregularities that might result from irrespons- 
ible parties having the control of a Lodge in the absence of its legal custodians. 



MASSACHUSETTS-1S91. 

Quarterly Communication, held at Boston, September 
0, 1891. 

Only business of a local nature was transacted. 

A proposed amendment to the Constitution increasing 
the minimum fees for the degrees from 825 to $30 was in- 
definitely postponed. The committee to whom the amend- 



APPENDIX. 105 

merit had been referred embodied the following figures in 
their report: 

36 city Lodges charge _ $50 

1 city Lodge charges _.. 45 

18 city Lodges charge 40 

19 city Lodges charge 35 

10 city Lodges charge _ 80 

5 city Lodges charge 25 

An average of about $11.07. . 

3 town Lodges charge _..$50 

2 town Lodges charge 45 

9 town Lodges charge 40 

34 town Lodges charge 35 

W town Lodges charge 80 

25 town Lodges charge __ 25 

An average of about $31.23. 

These figures do not include the five foreign Lodges, all of which charge $50. 

Quarterly held December 9, 1891, at which Grand 
Master Samuel Wells delivered his annual address. He 
says the course of events has run smoothly in that juris- 
diction. He has no deaths to report of past or present 
Grand Officers. He records the death of the oldest Mason 
in that State, W. Bro. Bonum Nye, at the age of ninety- 
seven years and who had been for seventy-five years a 
Mason. After he had been Master of his Lodge, the anti- 
Masonic excitement took place, during the whole of which 
he remained steadfast to Masonry, at the cost of great 
personal annoyance and even persecution. 

One Lodge surrendered its Charter, at Barnstable, on 
account of lack of interest and of work. 

He had granted one Dispensation for a new Lodge. 

A very lengthy list of special Dispensations to confer 
degrees out of time and for various other purposes are 
reported. 

There are 225 Lodges in that jurisdiction and five in 
foreign countries also belonging to it. The increase in 
numbers during the year was 906, present membership 31,- 
786. The amount of the Grand Charity Fund is £54,- 
811.74 A fine steel portrait of P. G. M. Henry Endicott 
appears in the proceedings. 

The stated Communication, one hundred and fifty- 
eighth aniversary, was held December 29, 1891, at which 
the installation of officers elect took place, followed by 
the Grand Feast with characteristic toasts and eloquent 
responses. 

Grand Master and Grand Secretary re-elected. 



106 APPENDIX. 



MICHIGAN 1892. 

A portrait of Grand Master Look appears as a frontis- 
piece. 

Forty-eighth Annual, held at Detroit, January 26, 1892. 
M. W. John Q. Look in the East. . 

He reports a prosperous condition of affairs in that 
large jurisdiction. The record of his official acts shows 
him to have been busily occupied during his term. 

Four corner-stones of Masonic buildings were laid, 
three in person and one by proxy. 

He granted four dispensations for new Lodges. 

Also, sixteen dispensations to receive and ballot upon 
applications and to confer degrees. He granted permis- 
sion for a Lodge to attend divine service. 

He appointed the Grand Representatives for the trien- 
nial period ending January, 1894, some forty-six in number. 

He issued a circular letter to the Lodges announcing 
the completion and opening of the Masonic Home for 
occupancy. After congratulations he reminds the breth- 
ren that it will need their financial assistance. 

He suggests that June 24th — St. John's Day — of each 
year, be made a fitting occasion by the Fraternity, to con- 
tribute their aid to this noble undertaking, in such manner 
as they deem proper, by picnics, entertainments or special 
services. The celebration of St. John's Day in this man- 
ner will be a red-letter day in Michigan and the gifts on 
these occasions will be returned ten-fold. The circular 
was not intended to be official but as a personal appeal in 
aid of the great and glorious work. 

The amount contributed by the various Lodges in re- 
sponse was $909.52. 

He submits a list of twenty-eight decisions which were 
approved with three exception s. 

From the report of the Grand Lecturer we learn that 
sixty Lodges of Instruction were held during the year. 
356 Lodges were represeuted and the aggregate attendance 
of officers and members was 7,913. 

An amendment to the Constitution was proposed mak- 
ing all of the Grand Officers elective. It was laid over 
under the rule for one year. 

The Committee on Ritual presented majority and min- 
ority reports and exemplified the E. A. degree. The 



APPENDIX. I07 

minority report presented by the Grand Lecturer was fin- 
ally adopted. 

On motion, further consideration of this entire subject 
and the further report of the committee was indefinitely 
postponed. 

The report of the Special Committee on the communi- 
cation from the General Masonic Relief Association of the 
United States and Canada, recommending that no action 
be taken, was adopted. 

The special committee on Masonic Home, appointed at 
the last session, to consider the proposition of the Trustees 
tendering that institution to the Grand Lodge, presented 
a very able report on the subject, which was adopted. 
We extract the following particulars : 

The Michigan Masonic Home Association is a corporation, and the object of its 
incorporation is to provide for and maintain a home for aged, decrepid or destitute 
Masons, their widows and orphans, and to provide for their moral, physical and 
intellectual culture. 

In pursuance of its charter, the association purchased beautiful grounds near 
the city of Grand Rapids, and have erected thereon, at large expense, a commodious, 
substantial structure, and furnished it with all necessary conveniences for the 
comfort of those who are admitted to its benefits. It is a typical American home, 
an honor to Masonry and a credit to the State in which it is located. 

» At present it can care for from fifty to seventy-five people, but the building is 
so constructed that the capacity can be increased from time to time hereafter, 
*hould occasion require. 

The committee believe that this institution can be carried on more satisfactorily 
and more economically through its own legally chosen officers than it can by this 
Grand Lodge, and for this reason we should not advise its management to be 
changed at present. 

In addition to this reason, we do not believe that the Masonic Home Associa- 
tion haii the legal right at this time to make a valid transfer of its property to this 
Grand Lodge, although we believe that such right can be obtained whenever it 
shall be decided that this Grand Lodge wishes to take the property upon the con- 
ditions imposed. For these reasons, we recommend that the Grand Lodge do not 
accept the offer referred to at this time. 

while your committee believe that it will be for the best interests of the 
institution to have its control and management in the hands of the Masonic Home 
Association, yet it will require money to give effect to its scope and porpose. This 
can only be obtained through Masonic channels, or through some well devised 
nyetem of charity giving. The helpless inmates cannot be fed and clothed for a 
week or a month, and left unprovided for during another week or month. The 
money supply must be continuous in order to meet the continuous demands which 
will necessarily be made for it. 

This brings us to consider, first, whether this Masonic Home, which has been 
built and furnished at such large expense, and through the self-sacrificing devotions 
of so many Michigan Lodges and Masons, is a proper subject of Masonic charity. 
Your committee unanimously agree that it is, and that it is a proper subject of 
recognition by this Orand Lodge. It appeals to the kindliest feeiingB of every 
Mason, and suggests a regular and constant recognition of our Masonic obligation 
to do all in our power to aid and assist our needy brethren, their widows and 
orphans. 

After a further consideration of the subject in all its 
bearings, the Committee recommend the raising of $7,500 
annually, and provide for its proper distribution, conclud- 
ing their report with the following resolutions : 

In accordance with this report, your committee recommend the adoption of 
the following resolutions : 

Resolved, That this Grand Lodge will contribute to the Masonic Home 
Association, out of its surplus funds, the sum of $3,000, or such part thereof as may 
be needed. 



108 APPENDIX. 

Resolved, That the sum of $7,500 be raised for the purpose of aiding the 
Masonic Home annually hereafter ; that each Lodge be solicited to pay its pro- 
portion of said amotmt on or before the 10th day of July, of each year, to the Grand 
Secretary ; that the Grand Secretary pay the same over to the Grand Treasurer, to 
be paid ont by him as above provided. That the Grand Secretary be instructed to 
give each Lodge due and timely notice of the amount which it is requested to pay. 

Bro. William P. Innes furnishes a voluminous Report 
on Correspondence, covering some 350 pages. It abounds 
in well selected extracts, with comments wherever occa- 
sion demands. Colorado for 1890 has a liberal allotment 
of seven pages. Grand Master Bridwell's decisions are 
copied entire, but without comment. Bro. H. T. DeLong's 
oration is pronounced a fine and polished address, from 
which he would gladly quote, did space permit. He de- 
votes over two pages to extracts from our report, giving 
our conclusion in full. 

We congratulate Bro. Innes upon his election as 
Grand Master, and also the Brethren of Michigan upon 
their wise selection of one so eminently fitted to discharge 
the responsible duties of the office. 

Bro. Jefferson S. Conover, of Coldwater, was elected 
Grand Secretarv. 



MINNESOTA— 1892. 

Thirty-ninth Annual held at St. Paul, January 13 
1892, M. W. Alphonso Barto, Grand Master, a portrait of 
whom appears as a frontispiece. 

One hundred and sixty-three out of one hundred and 
eighty-four active chartered Lodges represented. 

Grand Master Barto says: 

This Grand Lodge is to be congratulated upon the prosperity of the country 
at large, and especially of this State. 

The Entered Apprentices have wrought with zeal and fidelity; the FeUow 
Crafts have cultivated with care, and the Master Workman has found nature 
returning, with prodigal hand, the fruits of his toil. 

Masonry always prospers under the white robe of peace, and this year has been 
no exception to the rule. Peace has reigned within our borders and prosperity has 
blessed the land. 

He laid the corner-stone of the Court House and City 
Hall at Minneapolis, the finest and most expensive public 
building in the new Northwest. 

He granted five dispensations for new Lodges, and 
refused applications for the same number. Among dis- 
pensations refused were these: 

To receive petition on less than one year's residence. 
To join in Memorial Days 1 t«ervice& as a Lodge. 



APPENDIX. 109 

To ballot on petition of a candidate in lees than six months after rejection. 

To allow the eon of a Mason (formerly called a Lewis) to petition for the 
degrees before he is of lawful age. 

To allow a profane to apply for degrees oat of the jurisdiction where he 
actually resides. 

To waive jurisdiction and allow a profane to apply for and receive the degrees 
while on a visit to his old home in another State. 

To issue a circular asking relief for che widow of a non-affiliate Mason. 

He submits three decisions, which were approved. He 
also cites nineteen questions which were asked of him as 
samples, nearly all of which might have been answered by 
consulting Todd's Digest. 

He says two cases of invasion of jurisdiction had 
caused him much perplexity and were not yet fully 
settled. 

Four Lodges suffered from fire during the year. In 
two instances everything was destroyed, including Char- 
ters, with no mention of insurance. The losses of the 
other two were covered by insurance. 

Two Lodges had asked his endorsement of their action 
looking to the establishment of Masonic Homes, but he 
had not yet had an opportunity to investigate the matter 
to his own satisfaction. He refers to the fact that the 
Grand Lodge has been, for many years, accumulating a 
Widows' and Orphans' Fund ; if a Home could be estab- 
lished and maintained, this Fund should be used for that 
purpose. He recommends the appointment of a committee 
of five to investigate the subject of Masonic Homes, as to 
the practicability of establishing and maintaining one in 
that jurisdiction, to report at the next session. 

He announces, in fitting terms of eulogy, the death of 
Bro. Thomas C. Bivans, D. D. G. M. 

He recommends the increase of Grand Lodge dues 
from forty cents to fifty. 

The Grand Secretary announces in his report that he 
has secured phototypes of all Past Grand Masters, which 
will appear from time to time in the proceedings. A 
catalogue of the library is being prepared, which he says 
should be printed. 

The net increase in membership during the year was 
521, present membership 12,830. 

Washington's Masonic apron, owned by Mt. Nebo 
Lodge No. 91, of Shepherds town, W. Va., having been 
temporarily loaned for exhibition to Warren Lodge No. 
150, of Minnesota, it was exhibited to the Grand Lodge by 
consent of the former and courtesy of the latter, and reso- 



I IO APPENDIX. 

lutions of thanks were unanimously adopted. The follow- 
ing description may interest our brethren: 

The apron referred to is a beautiful piece of needlework, of the usual size, the 
body being of white satin, bordered with a strip of black silk nearly an inch in 
width and raffled, and lined with dark cloth. The Bqaare and compass is worked 
in silk and gold thread. The stars and stripes and the French tricolor are em- 
broidered in colors above the square and compass, a wreath or vine encompassing 
all. It was the handiwork of the lady members of the family of Lafayette, and was 

Ereatly prized by Washington in consequence. It is in a fair state of preservation, 
at one of the conditions of its being loaned was that it should be exhibited under 
glass. 

Bro. Irving Todd again presents a most acceptable Re- 
port on Correspondence. Colorado for 1891 receives 
most favorable consideration. Several of Grand Master 
Foster's decisions are copied, but without comment. He 
says Bro. Bush's oration was interesting, brief and sensible. 
Liberal extracts are made from our Report, and our digest 
he regards as "a feature of great convenience, both to the 
reporter and the general reader." 

Grand Master and Grand Secretary both re-elected. 



MISSISSIPPI— 1892. 

Seventy-fourth Annual held at Vicksburg, February 11, 
1892, M. W. John M. Ware, Grand Master. 

After extending the usual congratulations, he turns his 
thoughts to the fraternal dead, and announces the death of 
Bro. Herman Denio, P. J. G. W. 

He had made no official decisions. 

Four Dispensations were granted for new Lodges. 

Two corner-stones, being those of a Court House and 
Hebrew Temple, were laid by proxy. 

The Charter of a Lodge was arrested for having failed 
to make returns and pay dues. 

He says the Lodges were never in a more healthy and 
prosperous condition than at the present time. 

He appeals to the Brethren of the Grand Lodge on be- 
half of their Masonic Home. 

The Finance Committee of the Masonic Home reported 
having invested $3,400 in 7 percent, bonds. 

Majority and minority reports were presented by the 
Committee on Jurisprudence upon the saloon question, 
and after a lengthy discussion, the following rule was 
adopted as a substitute for both reports : 



APPENDIX. I I I 

Rale— It shall be an offense against Masonry, for any Mason now engaged in, 
to continue in the business of selling intoxicating liquors, to be used as a beverage, 
after the first day of January next, and the penalty therefor shall be expulsion. 

Which was adopted by a rising vote— 137 for, 20 againt-t— a large number not 
being present or not voting. 

The resolution offered at the last session, proposing a 
per capita tax of twenty cents per member, for the benefit 
of the Masonic Widows' and Orphans' Home, was adopted 
by a vote of Lodges ; 34(5 for, and 310 against. 

The Committee on State of the Craft presented a 
lengthy report, covering nearly six pages. On December 
1, 1891, they issued a circular letter with sixteen interrog- 
atories, which they sent to the W. M. of each Lodge in the 
jurisdiction. We extract the following : 

Responses were received from 165 Lodges. Some answered all, and others 
only part of the queries, but from such a6 we have, we report : 

1. A considerable increase of good material. 

2. Stated Communications reported average HVi to each Lodge, and one-half 
8pecial Communications during the year. 

3. Of the deaths reported, nineteen-twentieths were buried Masonically, and 
a Lodge of Sorrow was held for two. 

4. Seventy-eight i ergons elected for initiation have neglected to avail them- 
selves of the privilege. 

5. As there has been no provisions for the payment of the Grand Lecturer, or 
the District Deputies, except such as was made by the Lodges seeking light, the 
official visit** reported were very few. 

6. In the matter of Lodge Monitor— that known as the Power Text Book we 
find is in general use, and most of the Lodges reporting are in possession of one or 
more copies, and several have from three to ten. Having examined the new edition, 
we cheerfully recommend it for the use and government of the Fraternity. 

7. Twenty-three Lodges report ownership of libraries, but in the matter of 
Masonic periodicals, the Committee were astonished to find that less than a score 
of subscribers reside in Mississippi, and your Committee fraternally suggest that a 
Lodge coo Id not invest two dollars in a more profitable manner than by subscribing 
to a good Masonic periodical, and having the same read in open Lodge at the stated 
communications. 

k. We suggest, also, the Proceedings of the Grand Lodge, and the rules and 
regulations thereof, be read at least once a year in open Lodge. 

Query No. 16 reads as follows : 

16. Kindly and fraternally give us your opinion as to the best method of 
increasing membership of good material. On this point write fully, freely, 
fraternally, for the Committee are but the servants of the ("raft and desire to know 
what each member may suggest. All are equal in a Masonic Lodge, and some of 
yon, who never take part in discussions on floor of Grand Lodge, may suggest 
a thought or an act that will be a gem worthy to take precedence in matters looking 
to the good of the Craft. 

Over eighty replies to the above were received, and 
they are embodied in the report. As showing the sweep of 
the Masonic pendulum of opinion, we select the two 
following : 

*• More wealth." 

** Vitalize the principles of Masonry, not for an empty parade, but for service. 
Life i« more valuable than the badge. Purge the Lodge of unworthy members and 
close tbe door against those who seek it for nefarious ends." 



112 APPENDIX. 

It is now the practice in that jurisdiction to refer all 
questions of Masonic law which do not call for executive 
action to the Committee on Jurisprudence. They sub- 
mitted their report, which was adopted, in which they rule 
upon thirty-one questions which had been submitted to 
them. Question 30 called forth a ,majority and a minority 
opinion. It was as follows: Can a man who can neither 
read nor write be installed as Master? One of the com- 
mittee thought he could, but that a Lodge must be hard 
pushed to elect such a person. 

P. G. M. Frederick Speed delivered a splendid eulogy 
upon the the illustrious dead, in which he paid glowing 
tributes to the memories of Bros. Albert Pike, Alfred F. 
Chapman and Ira Berry. 

As a preface to his report of a corner-stone laying of 
the Hebrew Temple at Port Gibson, Bro. Speed gives 
what he calls the result of an aggregation of experience 
which sparkles -with quiet humor. He says it has no 
reference whatever to the occasion above referred to. The 
spirit prompted him to " shoot it off " at the present time. 
We quote it as a pleasing diversion: 

" Suitable arrangements mnst be made for lowering the Btone by three gradual 
motions. A platform, sufficiently large to accommodate the Grand Master and the 
Officers of the Grand Lodge, the Chief Magistrates and other civil officers of the 
place, and the Official Body under whose charge the structure is to be erected, is 
necessary." And it should be so planned that it is possible for the Grand Lodge to 
" compass the foundations in solemn procession " without climbing over sundry 
fences, scaffolding and other impediments, such gymnastic performances not add- 
ing to the dignified appearance of the " acting Grand Master and his officers." 

it is the duty of the local Lodge to see that all the preparations are made, and 
also that proper solemnity is observed upon the occasion by the spectators. Of 
course the occasion is made all the more solemn if all the giddy school girls and 
their rattle-pated escorts in the vicinity, interspersed with all the especially bad- 
mannered boys in the county, are engaged to drown the voices of the officers of the 
Grand Lodge, with their loud conversation and laughter. This should be by no 
manner of means neglected, and to heighten the effect, there should not be left- 
elbow room on the platform, because the Grand Officers might in that event, be 
accidentally seen and heard. There is a great deal more mystery about something 
which cannot be understood, and to make sure on this point, the local I<odge ought 
by all manner of means to have such a din created that nothing can be heard. 

Our Hebrew brethren have a Bolemn ceremony which is performed in their 
synagogues once a year, known as the blessing by the Cohen, which it is said no 
Jew may gaze upon, but jnnt why, no living man can give a reason, for it is lawful 
for Gentiles to look upon the Cohen, in the giving of the blessing, and in like 
manner no Freemason could give a reason why the arrangements at the laying of a 
foundation stone should not be made so that all in attendance should both see and 
hear, but the oldest living Freemason never saw it done, and none can give a reason 
why it should not be done. Of course a band of music is provided, and the breth- 
ren appear in the insignia of the Order, dressed in black, with white gloves and 
aprons, when they have no other store clothes to wear, and are not especially 
anxious about appearances. The most clumsy and akward instrument to be found 
in or about the premises should be chosen to be presented to the acting Grand 
Master to be used as a trowel lest he might carry it off with him in his saddle-bags. 
There ought not, bj any manner of means, be any mortar prepared ready for use, 
it is more convenient to keep the audience waiting, while a lame colored man is 
sent half a mile ormora for it. Corn, wine and oil ought not to be thought of until 
the Grand Lodge is being formed in procession, when it will generally be found 
more convenient to substitute maize for wheat, the corn of our ancient brethren. 
In marking the stone no reference ought to be made to the fact that it was laid 
with Masonic ceremonies, lest there should be an anti-Masonic outbreak at some 



APPENDIX. 113 

fixture time, and it would be displeasing to them— and last, bat not least, no one in 
the local L*od$e should be allowed to read over the ceremony because it might have 
the effect to discourage the Lodge if it should find oat when, how and where things 
are to be done, and that there is something to be attended to before the arrival of 
the acting Grand Master in their town— and as a consequence fewer foundation 
corner-stones would be doused with Masonic wine and oil, and as an old lady said 
to me on each an occasion, "a heap of scrubbing would be saved." 

The Report on Correspondence by Bro. A. H. Barkley 
now claims our attention. His introductory covers three 
pages, the thoughts contained therein having been sug- 
gested by his review. Colorado for 1890 and 1891 are 
given fraternal consideration, the latter proceedings being 
received so late that he could only give them a passing 
notice. He speaks very favorably of the addresses de- 
livered at the dedication and corner-stone laying. Of Bro. 
H. T. Long's oration he says it was " couched in beauti- 
ful and impressive words." 

He is in accord with us in the following: 

Under the head of Wyoming, Bro. Greenleaf touches the knock lee of Bro. 
Koykendall, about his progressive opinions, and his desire to see Masonry adopt 
the good features of other organizations. 

We are perfectly willing that other organizations shall enjoy to their hearts' 
content. aU the good features that are in them, bat as for ourself , we do not propose 
to favor ingrafting anything upon Masonry, save that which legitimately belongs 
to it. There are enough good features in this grand old institution, to occupy our 
whole time. 

Bro. W. A. Roane was elected Grand Master ; Bro. 
J. L. Power re-elected Grand Secretary. 



MISSOURI— 1801. 

Seventy-first Annual held at Kansas City, October 13, 
1891, M. W. George E. Walker, Grand Master. 

From his opening we gather the following retrospective 
comparisons : 

In April, 1821, the Grand Lodge was formed by 
three Lodges with a membership of eighty-four ; to-day 
it has upon its roll 556 Lodges chartered and U. D., with 
a membership of about 28,000. The population of the 
State has increased from 66,557 in 1820 to 2,679,184 in 1890. 

Not only has there been a numerical growth, but the 
quality of the material has also steadily improved. 

It was his sad duty to make announcement of the death 
of two Past Grand Masters, M. W. Bros. M. H. McFar- 
land and John H. Turner, the former serving in 1860 and 
the latter in 1863. 

8 



114 APPENDIX. 

Nine Dispensations were granted for new Lodges. 

He reports having officiated in person at the laying of 
the corner-stones of two Masonic Halls and that of the 
new City Hall of St. Louis. 

The Grand Master attended several District Lodges of 
Instruction; no State Schools of Instruction being held 
during the year, the last Grand Lodge not giving them 
favorable consideration. He recommends that the holding 
of these latter be left to the discretion of the Grand 
Master. 

Thirty-five or more Lodges were visited by him during 
his term. 

Besides several important rulings in the case of Lodges 
requiring executive action, he submits a list of nine deci- 
sions ; both the former and latter were approved. 

He congratulates the Craft upon the possession of a 
Home for Widows and Orphans. In this connection, he 
says : 

I would also call your attention to the fact thit, though practically created 
by the Grand Lodge, and an integral part of Missouri Masonry, the Home is entirely 
separate and distinct from Grand Lodge influence, except daring the Annual 
Coram unication. 

In my opinion, the Grand Master should be, by virtue of his office, at least a 
member of the Board of Directors. On this subject, Kentucky has the following 
regulation : 

"It is the duty of the Grand Master and Grand Wardens, who are ex officio 
members of the Board of Directors of the Home, to attend at least one meeting 
annually of said Board, and they are requested to report the same to the Grand 
Lodge/ 

This defect in our system was doubtless an accidental omission, and should be 
remedied ; the Grand Master should not be a nonentity in this important branch of 
the institution, and should be able to say something of his own knowledge of its 
working?. 

From the financial exhibit in his report a probable 
deficit is shown of £3,429.5#. The contingent and dis- 
cretionary appropriation of £~>,000, made by the last Grand 
"Lodge for the benefit of the Home, has not been paid, the 
condition of the treasury not admitting of its withdrawal. 

From the Grand Secretary's report we learn that the 
net gain in membership was over 990, or nearly 1,000. 

Bro. Vincil says : 

Having been in close touch with the Fraternity for more than thirty yearn, 
profoundly interested in its progress and condition, along other lines than mere 
numerical gain, I am satixfied that the advancement of Freemasonry in Missouri 
ha* been to a higher plane of intelligence, moral character, and larger views as to 
duty to God and humanity, than ever known in this Grand Jurisdiction. 

It has been said that we live in a practical age. While this is true in other 
departments of life, it is not lean so in the realm of our ancient and honorable 
Institution. Asa conservative organization, it employs none of the methods in 
vogue and used by other societies to increase its numbers; consequently, its work, 
like the operation of nature's laws, moves on well fixed lines and operates force- 
fully, without seeking to attract and draw to its folds members by superficial 
methods. 



APPENDIX. 115 

The report of the Kansas City Board of Relief, which 
was recently reorganized, shows that in five months it 
disbursed aid to the amount of $170.50. The report of the 
St. Louis Board has fewer particulars this year of its dis- 
bursements ; the total was 8377.70. 

The Report of the Superintendent of the Homo gives 
many interesting items. The present number of inmates 
is thirty-eight, two from Si Louis and thirty-six from 
country Lodges. They comprise eighteen girls, eleven 
boys, ten willows and one maiden lady. Twenty-one of 
the children are in attendance at the public school in St. 
Louis. They were reported to be quiet, orderly and studious, 
ranking first in the school both in deportment and studies, 
and the superintendent says he is very proud of them. 
Among the gifts we note So from Bro. A. A. Burnand to 
buy Christmas presents. 

The report of the Treasurer of the Home shows total 
receipts for the year, $24,111.20; disbursements, §8,17436; 
balance on hand, $15,936.84; bonds held on account of 
Knights Templar Triennial Endowment Fund, $35,400. 

The report of the Special Committee on Masonic 
Home elicited much discussion. The proposed change in 
the law increasing the Grand Lodge dues to §1 per capita, 
one-half of which is to be appropriated to the support of 
the Home, was carried by the following vote: 802 for, 763 
against; majority 39. The report was then adopted 
unanimously as a whole. Among other recommendations 
it embodied the following : 

We conenr in the Grand Master's euggeetion, that the Grand Master ought 
to be. ts-offtcio, a member of the Board of Directors of the Masonic Home, and we 
hereby recommend that, from and after the election of Grand Officers at this Com- 
munication of the Grand fx>dge. the Most Worshipful Grand Master and the Might 
Worshipful Senior and Junior Grand Wardens be, ex-afflcio* members of the Hoard 
of Directors of the Masonic Home; and it shall be their duty to attend at leaHt one 
meeting annually of said Board. 

Bro. John D. Vincil's Report on Correspondence covers 
207 pages, in which the proceedings of fifty-five Grand 
Lodges are reviewed in his incisive and masterly style. 
Colorado for 1890 has three pages. He passes most ap- 
preciative comment upon our Temple Dedication and the 
laying of the corner-stone of our State Capitol. He 
reviews the salient points of Grand Master B rid well's 
annual address, which he styles interesting and valuable. 

He devotes some space to a reply to our criticism of 
his attitude on the Cerneau question. As this has become 



Il6 APPENDIX. 

a dead issue, our space can be more profitably occupied by 
matters directly appertaining to Craft Masonry. 

Bro. B. H. Ingram of Sedalia was elected Grand Master. 
Bro. J. D. Vincil re-elected Grand Secretary. 



MONTANA— 1891. 

A portrait of the Grand Master appears as a frontis- 
piece. 

Twenty-seventh Annual, held at Butte, October 14, 
1891. M. W. William T. Boardman, Grand Master. 

He says the condition of the Craft is generally pros- 
perous. More careful selection of material is being made- 
Negative qualities should never elect. Where he had been 
unable to visit the Lodges the Grand Lecturer had kept 
him fully informed. 

He calls attention to some violations of Grand Lodge 
laws, some Lodges receiving and acting upon petitions 
without the required fee accompanying the same; others by 
motions entertained and passed doing away with examina- 
tions of proficiency in the preceding degrees. He recom- 
mends the arrest of the charter of Benton Lodge, being 
convinced that it is "a useless member of the Masonic 
family, and its further existence a detriment to the fra- 
ternity." 

He pays a tender and appreciative tribute to the 
memory of P. G. M. John Anderson, who filled that office 
in 1889 and who died December 1, 1890. 

He laid two corner-stones during the year, those of the 
Helena High School and the Masonic Temple at Butte. 

He made quite a number of recommendations, among 
others, to rescind the resolution permitting Lodges to in- 
corporate, and that they be prohibited from so doing; that 
there be one ballot for the three degrees; that a by-law be 
passed rendering ineligible for the degrees proprietors of 
saloons or barkeepers; that but one representative from 
each Lodge draw mileage and per diem. They have paid 
three heretofore. He shows by comparison that had they 
have inaugurated this one representative system in 1887 
the balance in the treasury would now be nearly $4,000 in- 
stead of $1,103.25 as at present. He had written to fifty- 
six Grand Lodges for information on this subject arid 



APPENDIX. 117 

learned that thirty-one paid neither mileage nor per diem, 
twenty-four paid for one representative from each Lodge, 
one imposed a per capita tax of $1.25 in addition to its 
regular Lodge dues to be applied to the payment of 
representation, one (Montana) only Grand Lodge paying 
three. 

He also recommends the setting aside annually of at 
least a small portion of their revenue for the formation of 
a Grand Lodge Charity Fund, in support of which he 
cites the example and gives figures from many other 
jurisdictions. 

The standing resolution concerning non-affiliates was 
amended, and now reads : 

Resolved, That non-affiliates may visit Lodges in Montana for one year after 
their arrival in the State, or after snch non-affiliation shall commence; after the 
lapse of each time they shall not be permitted to visit, nor shall they have any of 
the privileges accorded to members or Lodges, unless snch non-affiliation be cansed 
by their rejection by the Lodge in whose jurisdiction they may reside, after a bona 
fide effort on their part to affiliate by petition in the usual way. And in case of 
snch rejection, the non-affiliate may apply by petition for affiliation with any 
Lodge within this jurisdiction; and until such affiliation is perfected may continue 
to enjoy all Masonic rights and privileges by paying Grand Lodge dues, either 
directly to the Grand Secretary or through some subordinate Lodge. 

Also the following standing resolution was adopted : 

Be it resolved. By the Grand Lodge of A. F. and A. M. of Montana, that while 
by right and immemorial usage it claims to be entitled to the property, effects and 
credits of every Lodge holding by charter under it, upon its demise, it hereby de- 
clares that it will be no further responsible for any debt or obligation contracted 
by such demised Lodge, beyond the value of the property, effects and credits of the 
Lodge, that may come to its hands. 

A special committee reported in favor of arresting the 
charter of Benton Lodge forthwith. After discussion and 
an effort to amend, committee was discharged and the 
whole matter referred to the incoming Grand Master, with 
power to act. 

A resolution was adopted requesting Secretaries of 
Lodges to give notice of expulsion or suspension of mem- 
bers to the Secretaries of Chapters on blanks furnished 
by the Grand Chapter. 

The Jurisprudence Committee reported unfavorably 
upon the recommendation of the Grand Master to reduce 
the paid representation to one from each Lodge. 

The report of special Committee favoring single ballot 
for the three Degrees was rejected by a vote of 42 to 84 

The Grand Lodge voted to become a contributing 
member and supporter of the National Masonic Relief 
Association. 

Five per cent, of the amount received each year from 
annual dues was set apart to create a Charity Fund. 



Il8 APPENDIX. 

Majority and minority reports were presented by the 
Committee on Jurisprudence, in regard to saloon keepers. 
After considerable discussion was had, the majority report 
was adopted, as follows : 

Your Committee on Jurisprudence have duly considered that portion of the 
Grand Master's address recommending the passage of a by-law to the effect that no 
person engaged in the retailing of intoxicating liquors, either as a proprietor of a 
saloon or barkeeper therein, shall be eligible to the degrees of Masonry; and respect- 
fully report that they deem it inexpedient at the present time to amend the by-laws 
prescribing new qualifications for candidates for the degrees, deeming it but 
proper that the subordinate Lodges should be left as free as possible in determin- 
ing the qualifications of their material, restricting them as little as possible. 
Your committee are of the opinion that the present rules and regulations are 
sufficient to secure proper material for Masonry without adding any more, and 
especially any rule or regulation which will proscribe any trade, occupation or pro- 
fession as a class, and therefore we recommend that no further action be taken 
upon the subject referred to. 

Later in the session the following resolution was 
adopted, being virtually the same as that embodied in the 
minority report referred to above : 

Resolved, That it is the sense of this Grand Lodge that persons engaged in 
the saloon business, as proprietors or employes, are not fit or proper material for 
the degrees of Masonry, and we enjoin upon all subordinate Lodges careful in- 
vestigation of all such applications. 

And then the Grand Lodge proceeded to indulge in a 
little " circus " on the adoption of the Webb work. We 
quote Bro. Hedges' remarks preceding and following the 
resolution : 

The following resolution, offered by Bro. Chapman, after a heated, prolonged 
and wearisome contest of motions and speeches, was declared adopted : 

Resolved, That the regulation of the Grand Lodge at its Annual Grand Com- 
munication in 1M87, providing for the adoption of the Webb work for this Grand 
Jurisdiction, be rescinded, and that it is the 6ense of thiH Grand Lodge Communi- 
cation that the work in vogue before the adoption of said resolution shall be the 
work for Montana. 

Much confusion followed the announcement of the vote, and many inquiries 
were made by Masters of Lodges as to the work they should follow for the coming 
year, and how they should be instructed therein. 

It was voted that the officers of the Lodges may continue to work as they are 
now doing until otherwise officially instructed. 

Our good Bro. Cornelius Hedges, whom we had the 
pleasure of meeting in Denver recently, continues to fur- 
nish the Beport on Correspondence, which, it is unneces- 
sary to say, is always full of good things. It covers 113 
pages. Colorado for 1890 comes under his fraternal pur- 
view. The dedication of the Temple and the corner-stone 
laying of the State Capitol are most pleasantly referred to. 
A brief synopsis of Grand Master Bridwell's address is 
given, from which we extract the following : 

The annual address indicates a busy year. Physical perfection was vindicated, 
but we should like to know some good reason why a Lodge may not remit the dues 
of a member suspended for non-payment of dues. We have known such who were 
worthy objects of Masonic charity, and when a Lodge becomes satisfied that it has 
dealt hastily and unjustly, should it be prevented from making amends? 



APPENDIX. 119 

Thanks, Bro. Hedges, for your kindly reference to our 
report and ourself. 

Richard O. Hickman, of Helena, was elected Grand 
Master ; Grand Secretary re-elected. 



NEBRASKA— 1891. 

Thirty-fourth Annual held at Omaha, June 17, 1891, 
M. W. Robert E. French, Grand Master. 

His address is quite lengthy, covering nearly fifty-five 
pages, containing a record of his official acts and recom- 
mendations for the consideration of the brethren. It is a 
finished address, despite his depreciatory utterances as 
found in this bit of biography by way of a preface : 

To those of yon whom I have had no previous acquaintance, it may not be 
improper for me to say I am only a plain, common mechanic, having left the anvil 
to fulfill the duties of this office. 1 commenced the battle for bread at the age of 
ten years; at the age of thirteen I commenced my apprenticeship as a conning work- 
man in metal, and learned to blow the coals in the nre and brought forth an instru- 
ment for my work. And inasmuch as 1 am possessed of only a very limited 
education, I must be permitted to present my report to yon in my own plain way. 
When 1 served my apprenticeship, the boss I learned under did not spend any 
money on files, drills or chisels. We were compelled to forge our work by the eye 
under the hammer; from the anvil and from the hammer came the skilled work; 
not from the vise or the file. Whoever heard of a horse nail being filed to give it 
form, strength or beauty? And yet it is considered one of the greatest feats of the 
smith to forge a perfect horse nail. 

8o it is, brethren, with my report— it comes directly to you as forged from the 
anvil under the swinging hammer. I never learned the art of finishing. It is for 
you to file, polish and finish as you in your wisdom may see proper. 

The death of Rev. Bro. Jacob A. Hood, Grand Chap- 
lain, is announced in fitting words of eulogy. 

His correspondence had been very extensive, over two 
thousand letters had been written during his term. 

Eight dispensations for new Lodges were granted. 

Seven dispensations were granted to confer degrees out 
of time and an equal number refused. 

A large number of special dispensations to install 
officers were granted, the fee in each case being ten dollars. 

He laid the corner-stones of a court house and two 
churches, another, that of a court house, was laid by his 
proxy. 

He submits a list of eight decisions. 

In accordance with resolutions of the Grand Lodge 
adopted at the last Annual, Nebraska Lodge No. 1, haviDg 
rescinded and expunged from its records the obnoxious 



120 APPENDIX. 

resolutions of August, 1889, when convened for that pur- 
pose by the Grand Master, its charter was restored. 

For the purpose of eliciting information upon various 
points, he issued a blank report to all the Lodges request- 
ing them to fill out the same and return to him. Fifty- 
five of the Lodges failed to respond. From the 127 who 
did so, he compiled the following summary: 

Suspension for non-payment of dues JS81 

E. A. who will probably never advance 681 

F. C. who will probably never advance 181 

Number of members over one year in arrears for does 1,667 

Estimated number of non-affiliates 1,256 

Number of members engaged in the liquor traffic. _ 15 

Amount paid for all hall rents $11,357.83 

Number of Lodges who occupy halls with other societies.. 67 

Uncollected dues $12,361.4* 

Number of Lodges not harmonious _ _ 10 

Number of Lodges who failed to promptly send in their re- 
turns to Grand Secretary of election and installation of 

officers 11 

Number of Lodges who do not own their halls 108 

Number of Lodges who have no insurance 44 

The Grand Custodian was also required to fill out a 
blank report containing full particulars as to inspection of 
the records, proficiency of officers, etc. From this sum- 
mary many very important particulars were obtained. 

In answer to appeals for relief from the brethren in the 
drouth-stricken district of the State, the Grand Master 
issued a circular letter to each Lodge requesting them to 
contribute 50 cents per capita for each Mason in good 
standing. The majority of the Lodges responded at once 
and the result was prompt and substantial relief. 

He had made a very large number of official visita- 
tions, devoting almost his entire time to the duties of his 
office. 

He seems to be a born statistician, for on February 9, 
1891, he again issued a circular with a series of interroga- 
tions eliciting information from the various Lodges 
regarding indigent Master Masons, their wives, widows 
and orphans. This was done in the interest of the 
Nebraska Masonic Home by action of the stockholders. 
The returns to time of his report were: Two men, five 
women and four children. 

The report of the Trustees of the Orphan Educational 
Fund shows the present total to be $19,705.35. No part 
of this fund is to be used until it shall have reached the 
sum of $25,000, and thereafter only the interest may be 
used for educational purposes. 

The net gain in membership during the year was 435; 
present membership 9,717. 



APPENDIX. 121 

The following report was adopted : 

The Belief Committee, to whom was submitted the portion of the Grand 
Master's address having reference to the Nebraska Masonic Home, have had the 
same under consideration, and would say that the facts presented to them are not 
sufficiently complete to allow them to make any recommendations in the matter at 
present. They believe that further time and information are necessary to enable 
the Grand Lodge to act intelligently in the ore raises, and that in the mean time 
the matter can be safely left in the hands of the Directors of the Home and the 
Grand Master. 

Bro. Andrew R. Graham, the Grand Orator, was 
detained on account of flooded railways, and his oration 
was ordered spread upon the record. It is a very fine 
production, concise, with truths forcibly expressed. We 
quote the following : 

Now let us ask, what are some of the agencies which assist the Masonic 
student in his search for this Masonic wisdom? The literature of Masonry is 
extensive. Over all the fields of investigation our scholars have traveled, and deep 
into the treasures of antiquity have they explored ; with pick and hammer, honest 
toilers have opened the tombs of buried centuries : they have traversed the shores 
of Palestine, and have visited her sacred places. They have crossed the deserts of 
Arabia, have journeyed along the Nile to the foot of the pyramids of old Egypt, 
have descended into her hidden chambers with compass, rule and plumb-line, have 
interpreted the hieroglyphics of early ages, and have brought to us volumes filled 
with the results of their researches. 

Face to face with the sphynx have they stood, studied with scientists, 
chronologists and astronomers of the far off East, and have, in monasteries and 
ancient libraries, obtained the wealth for our enrichment. 

Our chief Masonic libraries are the sacred repositories of great treasures, in 
poetry, philosophy, tradition, art, science, history, travel and all general literature. 

It is not the privilege of the ordinary workman to possess these, or to have, to 
any great degree, the advantage of their use, but all Masons may possess some of 
the standard works. Masonic periodicals, reports and addresses, by which they 
may increase their knowledge of Masonry, and to this possible extent all should 



Exact and familiar knowledge of the ritual, of the written and unwritten 
work of the three degrees, gives honor to the possessor; but, if I mistake not, this 
acquirement, however worthy, is not the highest form of Masonic knowledge which 
we of the common opportunity may gain. By the faithful use of this Masonic 
literature, the searcher for truth becomes a man of strong faith and earnest devotion 
to the cause of Masonry, 

The Masonic creed of such student is well built, and he is not so anxious to 
know the exact date of the origin of Masonry, as to know that the principles he 
loves have eternal sources and eternal results, that they are related to the greatest 
systems of faith, and to the wisdom which has moved the noblest of all ages to high 
achievements. 

He is in feUowhip with companions in study in every age, in sympathy with 
hearts of fellows in all climes and among all nationalities, ana, with all reverent 
minds, bows before the common altar, to pay his adoration to Deity, cherishes his 
hopes for life beyond the grave, and strives to order his life aright. 

What Masonry is, and how its principles should be practiced, is a more sublime 
thing to know, than to have even complete knowledge of the unwritten work, 
which, in itself, is but the scaffolding for the building not made with hands. 

Further, the true relation of Masonry to the outer world can only be under- 
stood by the true student of Masonry. 

No Report on Correspondence, but one was ordered to 
be prepared and published next year. 

Bro. Bradner D. Slaughter, of Fullerton, was elected 
Grand Master; Grand Secretary re-elected. 



122 APPENDIX. 



NEVADA— 1891. 

Twenty-seventh Annual held at Reno, June 9, 1891, 
M. W. John W. Eckley, Grand Master. 

He reports that his official acts had been few ; peace 
and harmony had reigned supremely, and he had merely 
the routine duties of his office to perform. 

He declined to approve an amendment to the • By-Laws 
of a Lodge requiring dues to be paid quarterly, in advance. 

The loss in membership during the year was fourteen, 
occasioned by a greater mortality, and not from any lack of 
interest, more Degrees being conferred than during the 
preceding year. 

He thus calls attention to an evil not peculiar to Nevada: 

The matter I allude to is the groat haste there always seem to be for the 
election of Grand Officers, and the greater haste so often shown to get away im- 
mediately after this election. I realize as folly as any of yon the sacrifice often 
made to attend these Grand Communications— possibly the neglect of other duties, 
or leaving your homes at a time of sickness or othe- cares that you feel should have 
kept you there. But when you do come to our Grand Lodge and remain until after 
the election of Grand Officers, can't you continue with us the few remaining hours. 
I hope you will decide that you can and that you will. 

The Grand Lodges of Tasmania and Victoria were 
recognized. 

Bro. Robert L. Fulton presents a concise Report on 
Correspondence, accompanied by a Digest of Decisions. 

Colorado for 1890 receives a brief review of half a 
page, with extracts from Grand Master Bridweirs address 
and our report. 

Bro. Frank Bell was elected Grand Master ; Grand 
Secretary re-elected. 



NEW BRUNSWICK— 1892. 

Twenty-fifth Annual held at St. John, April 26, 1892, 
M. W. Thomas Walker, Grand Master. 

He gives an encouraging review of Masonry in that 
jurisdiction. 

He announces the death of two Past Grand Masters, 
Robert T. Clinch and James McNiehol, to whose memories 
he pays eloquent and well-deserved tributes. 

He reports a large number of official visitations. 



APPENDIX. 123 

The Grand Lodge was summoned by him to attend 
Divine service on St. John's Day, the services being con- 
ducted by the Grand Chaplain. 

He laid the corner-stone of a church. 

Upon the subject of physical qualifications, he holds, 
" that candidates should be able literally to conform to all 
the requirements of the Degrees." 

He recommends the affiliation of the Grand Lodge 
with the General Masonic Relief Association of the United 
States and Canada. 

The reports of District Deputies of four districts are 
published, giving detailed information as to the condition 
of the Lodges therein. 

No Report on Correspondence. 

Grand Master and Grand Secretary re-elected. 



NEW HAMPSHIRE— 181)2. 

A portrait of M. W. Henry E. Burnham, Grand Master 
in 1885, appears as a frontispiece. 

One Hundred and Third Annual held at Concord, May 
18, 1892, M. W. Frank D. Woodbury, Grand Master. 

He reports the past year peaceful and prosperous. 
The increase in membership was small, owing to the fact 
that in that jurisdiction there is no exceptional increase of 
the population. Thirty-nine of the Lodges had made a 
gain in membership, and all but five had had work. 

He had the mournful announcement to make of the 
death of four members of the Grand Lodge, viz, Bros. 
Albert O. Phillips, Past District Deputy G. M.; Edgar 
H. Woodman, Member of Committee on Jurisprudence: 
. George E. Beacham, P. J. G. W., and Thomas J. Smith, 
P. D. D. G. M. 

He laid the corner-stone of the new Masonic Temple at 
Dover, onj August 31, 1891. This is one of the largest build- 
ings in New England, outside of Boston, being six stories 
in height, and built of brick and granite, and having 
elevators and all modern improvements. 

A Lodge in Massachusetts having made a Mason of a 
former resident of Concord, who had been rejected by a 
Lodge in that city four times, complaint was made to the 
G. M. of Massachusetts, who issued an order declaring 



124 APPENDIX. 

said person to be a clandestine Mason, and all Masonic 
intercourse with him forbidden, while his name was 
stricken from the rolls by the offending Lodge. 

Six delegates were appointed to attend the Fraternal 
Congress at Chicago, " it being the distinct understanding 
that the meeting is in no sense to be for the forming of a 
General Grand Lodge, but for fraternal conference and in- 
terchange of views." 

Bro. Albert S. Wait is the experienced writer on For- 
eign Correspondence. His report covers 205 pages and is 
very largely what is known as a written report. Colorado 
for 1891 has a fraternal review of four pages in which 
Grand Master Foster's address is favorably commented 
upon with extracts from the same, together with some of 
his decisions. He says Bro. W. L. Bush delivered a brief 
but very interesting oration. 

He concurs with us in our dissent from Oregon on ob- 
jection after ballot, but when he turns to Utah he cannot 
stand our "giants" of the primeval period of Masonry. 
We quote his comments thereon:. 

When Masonry was founded it can truthfully be said: " There were giants in 
those days." 

We desire to ask if, by the last sentence of the above, including its quotation, 
oar brother of Colorado means that Masonry was founded by men in some particular 
age of the world, however remote? that it was an invention of the gigantic brains 
of some particular man or number of men? If so, we mast be permitted to doubt. 
We much incline to regard it as a growth, founded upon the needs and sentiments 
of men as they were developed with the progress of time. There is nothing 
artificial in the Masonic institution. It is founded in the nature of man, and grows 
necessarily out of his social needs and his intellectual and spiritual aspirations. 
We do not think giants, physical or intellectual, made Masonry, bat that He who 
made the universe made it a necessity. We, henoe } do not doubt its ancient 
character, or that it must continue while humanity exists. 

We certainly did intend, Bro. Wait, that our language 
should bear the above interpretation, and a year's further 
study and investigation of the subject has but served to 
strengthen us in our opinion. The growth and develop- 
ment theory imposed upon the Craft by the Masonic 
writers of the last few decades cannot be much longer 
maintained. The discovery recently of incontestable evi- 
dence, together with the patient investigation of our sym- 
bolism by those best fitted for the task by mathematical 
training, will soon enlighten Masons as to its immensity 
and scope. They will then realize how idle the assertion 
that Masonry originally had but one degree, to which the 
others were added, etc.; that Dr. Desaguliers got up the 
"Legend," that Anderson did this and Dunckerly did that, 
and so on to the end of the chapter. This inclination to 
belittle the origin of Masonry and its founders has about 



APPENDIX. 125 

spent its force. We say that there were giants in those 
days, and not pigmies. When some of the best intellects 
of our generation have spent nearly forty years in the 
reconstruction of the Masonic symbolism and are still 
amazed at its unfathomed possibilities, doth it not ill be- 
come us to speak of the founders otherwise than possessed 
of mighty intellects? We are told that geometry or 
Masonry were originally synonymous terms. The only 
key that will unlock our symbolism is geometry. We are 
not certain but that in the near future a special training 
will be required in this branch of study in order to fit one 
to properly demonstrate the astronomical and geometrical 
lines and figures involved in the Masonic symbolism. 
What attracted the attention of learned minds to our Craft 
in the seventeenth century? Why did they not ally them- 
selves with the "Carpenters and Joiners" or some of the 
other London trade guilds? Was it not because Masonry 
was in sole possession of the most sublime truths ever con- 
ceived by man? And yet our writers go on discoursing 
about the " thirty-two frivolous questions and answers and 
a Mason's word " that constituted the ritualistic endow- 
ment of Masonry at that time. 

In spite of such assertions we find that the cultivated 
minds of the period referred to did continue to join the 
fraternity of Masons in considerable numbers, which they 
would never have done in our opinion unless it had some- 
thing more to offer than the scanty ritual referred to in the 
preceding paragraph. No. Bro. Wait, the growth theory will 
sooner or later be superceded by that of restoration. We 
claim that Masonry has lost more of its own distinctive 
riches in the last century than have been added to it. Of 
course there have been ritualistic changes to suit the vary- 
ing structure of the language spoken at different periods, 
but they were mostly verbal. We have already exceeded 
our space in this discussion and must therefore close with- 
out touching upon many other points which we had in 
mind and which are really more convincing than those we 
have cited. In other portions of this report we shall have 
something additional to say upon this subject. 

Bro. John Pendar, of Portsmouth, was elected Grand 
Master, Grand Secretary re-elected. 



126 APPENDIX. 



NEW JERSEY— 1892. 

One hundred and fifth Annual, held at Trenton, Jan- 
uary 27, 1892. M. W. Thomas W. Tilden, Grand Master. 

The following was the opening ode: 

Li. M. 

(Hebron.) 

Master 8upreme, accept our praise. 

Still bless this consecrated band; 
Parent of Light, illume oar ways, 

And guide us by Thy sovereign hand. 

May Faith, Hope, Charity, divine. 

Here hold their undivided reign; 
Friendship and Harmony combine 

To soothe our cares, to banish pain. 

May pity dwell within each breast. 

Relief attend the suffering poor; 
Thousands, by this, our Lodge, be blest. 

Till worth, distress'd, shall want no more. 

Grand Master Tilden reports a year of material pros- 
perity and harmony and progress among the Craft. 

He pays a tribute to the memory of P. G. M. William 
Hardacre. 

Twelve District Grand Lodges of Instruction were held 
and the G. M. attended them all. There was a large at- 
tendance and much interest was manifested. 

Several of the cases of invasion of jurisdiction which 
had attracted considerable attention, were reported as hav- 
ing been amicably adjusted. 

He was present at several adversaries of Lodges and 
other Masonic celebrations. 

He has the following to say on the subject of a Masonic 
Home : 

My observation during the year has compelled the conclusion that there is 
not sufficient enthusiasm among the Craft on the question of the procurement 
and establinhment of a Masonic Home, to warrant the belief that the requinite 
amount will be obtained for some time to come. On the contrary, I have found a 
general inclination to, and a preference for, the establishment of a Grand Lodge 
Charity Fund. May it not be a wise course to now provide for such Charity Fund, 
the present necessity for which is generally conceded, with the hope and expectation 
that in no very long time it will attain sufficient proportions to justify the estab- 
lishment of a Home. Herewith I submit a report of the chairman of the Committee 
on Masonic Home. 

He reports but a single decision, which was approved. 

The Committee on Masonic Home reported that 
twenty-three additional Lodges had reported subscriptions 
amounting to 31,728.50. Total amount subscribed $8,237.00. 
Many Lodges will send their subscriptions later, having 



APPENDIX. 127 

delayed for various reasons ; only two Lodges disapprove 
of the object. The report concludes as follows : 

This venerable Grand Lodge ought not to hesitate in taking immediate steps 
for the establishment of a Home, under the roof of which sach Brethren might pass 
the remainder of their lives in peace, comfort and happiness. Your committee does 
not insist upon the adoption of its proposed plan if a better can be selected, bnt 
stands prepared to render all the aid in its power for the accomplishment of any 
plan that will result in the speedy establishment of a Home. Yonr committee has 
again thoronghly calcnlated and investigated the cost of a Home, as set forth in its 
plan heretofore submitted to the Grand Lodge ; has visited suitable properties, ex- 
amined them and ascertained their values and their sale prices, and is convinced 
that a very desirable property may be purchased, stocked and famished for the sum 
of $15,000, and that the cost of maintenance woald not exceed the earn named in its 
report. No Home or Charity Fund can be established without the money necessary 
therefor is raised by voluntary subscriptions, a per capita tax or an appropriation 
from the Grand Lodge. Three years of effort have not resulted in obtaining the 
amount of £15.000, and your committee feels that the said sum cannot be obtained 
by subscription unless this Grand Lodge shall give the matter heartier support than 
in the past. 

The report of the Committee on Grand Lodge Charity 
Fund reported in favor of its establishment, and the 
plans devised by them were adopted. Among the recom- 
mendations were a special assessment of five ceuts per 
capita, to be levied annually, on each and every member 
of the subordinate Lodges, such assessment to accompany 
their annual returns. Provisions are made for its manage- 
ment and control by a committee consisting of the G. M. 
and two other members of the Grand Lodge. We quote 
the following provision : 

All interest derived from the Permanent Fund shall be added each year to the 
principal until the Permanent Fund, with its accumulations of interest and unex- 
pended balances reaches the sum of $20,000, when the interest of such fund, together 
with the per capita tax and appropriations and donations, shall, at the option of 
the Grand Lodge, be available for annual grants of relief. 

The following resolution was adopted : 

DIM IT. 

Resolved, That it is the duty of the Secretary of a Subordinate Lodge, on the 
presentation of a petition for affiliation, to immediately correspond with the Lodge 
purporting to have granted the dimit accompanying the petition, for the purpone 
of ascertaining whether or not the applicant has been a member of said Lodge and 
if the dimit is regular. 

The Assembly of the State adopted a resolution extend- 
ing the privileges of the House to the Grand Lodge while 
in session. 

Bro. Henry Vehslage again presents the Report on 
Correspondence, and it is fully up to his usual high per- 
formance of this duty. Colorado for J 891 receives a brief, 
but fraternal, review of a little over a page. Referring to 
Bro. Ed.'s effort to have returns made and dues paid on 
time, just for once, he says, after quoting his remarks : 

It would seem that while efforts are being made to improve the quality of 
Masters and Wardens of Lodges, similar endeavors should reach out to the Secre- 
taries as well, since so much of the efficiency of the Lodge depends upon the capacity 
of the Secretary, to say nothing of the W. M.'s peace of mind and the Grand Secre- 
tary's comfort. 



128 APPENDIX. 

He has words of praise for Bro. Bush's oration. Of 
our report he says : 

We have failed to find any sign or indication of the name of the author of the 
report on Correspondence, not even the letter G, but it is an excellent paper, and 
makes amends for the limited dimensions of the Proceedings of the Grand Lodge. 
It is an interesting resume of current matters of interest. 

Why, Bro. Vehslage, the conspicuousness of that name 
shows a reckless disregard of economy in the use of 
printers' ink — we measured it and found it spread itself 
over 2\ inches at the end of the Digest, which forms a part 
of our report, but you missed it, nevertheless. It was a 
large pica-dillo, but we pardon you this time, but don't 
let it occur again. 

Grand Master and Grand Secretary both re-elected. 



NEW MEXICO— 1891. 

Fourteenth Annual held at Albuquerque, November 16, 
1891, M. W. C. H. Dane, Grand Master. 

A portrait of Bro. David J. Miller, First Grand Secre- 
tary, 1877-1883, appears as a frontispiece. 

P. G. M. Hugh McCurdy, of Michigan, was received 
with the grand honors and attended the sessions. 

The Grand Master says that Masonry was never more 
prosperous than during the past year. 

He laid the corner-stone of a public school building at 
East Las Vegas. 

In regard to saloou keepers he gave the following 
opinion : 

RIGHT OF ADMISSION OF SALOON KEEPER. 

Cerillos Lodge No. 19 desired to know if it would be proper for them to enter- 
tain an application for the degrees of Masonry from a saloon keeper. 1 replied that 
I knew of no landmark, regulation or By-Law of his Grand Lodge that would inter- 
fere with such an application. While the occupation of saloon keeping was not 
considered a recommendation to one seeking the degrees of Masonry, bat on the 
contrary a hindrance, still there has been no action taken by our Grand Lodge that 
would act ab a bar to one applying for the degrees, providing the members of the 
Lodge considered the applicant worthy. 

He recommends a change in the Grand Lodge By-laws 
permitting less than seven members to open a Lodge. 

We quote the following: 

MASONIC TEMPLE. 

In regard to the building of a Masonic Temple, it has seemed to me that the 
financial conditions throughout the Territory were not favorable for the commence- 
ment of such a work at the present time, especially if we are to have a temple of 
which we may all be proud, and I could recommend no other. It is true our records 



APPENDIX. 1 29 

and Grand Lodge reports are sadly in need of a permanent home, bat let as not 
commence the work until we know we can baild each a temple as we want, and one 
that will be an honor to as. 

The report 011 Grand Master's address which was 
adopted, contained the following recommendations: 

The remarks of the Grand Master concerning the request for an opinion on the 
admission into Cerillos Lodge of an applicant who followed the business of saloon 
keeping, are in accordance with our Constitution and By-Laws, as they now stand, 
and while not desiring to assume to lay down a course of action, still yonr com- 
mittee is of the opinion that it is the prevailing sentiment of the craft throughout 
the United States of America, that the occupation of keeping a saloon is a bar to 
the admission of persons, holding such occupation, to the mysteries of Free Masonry. 

Concerning the recommendation of the M.\ W.\ Grand Master, that less than 
seven members of any Lodge be permitted to open and do business as a Lodge of 
Master Masons, your committee feel constrained, in view of our landmarks, customs 
and ancient usages, to recommend that the same be not adopted. 

From the summary of the returns we learn that 13 out 
of 17 Lodges were represented. The present membership 
is 692 as against 696 in 1890, showing a loss of 4 

Bro. Max Frost continues as the writer of the Report 
on Correspondence. It covers 100 pages of interesting 
matter in good sized type. Colorado for 1892 receives due 
consideration. 

Bro. Richard English was elected Grand Master, Grand 
Secretary re-elected. 



NEW YORK— 1892. 

Steel portraits of Grand Master Sherer and R. W. Bro. 
Robert Macoy, Deputy Grand Master in 1856 and 1857, 
appear as companion frontispieces, while in the body of 
the volume upon a single plate are portraits of the eight 
Trustees Masonic Hall and Asylum Fund, and upon the 
opposite page a picture of the Masonic Home aud School 
at Utica. 

One hundred and eleventh Annual held at New York 
City, June 7, 1892. M. W. William Sherer, Grand Master 
presiding. 

From his opening remarks we quote the following: 

The year now passed into history has been made bright with the sunshine of 
Masonic success. Everywhere in this great State, from the ocean to the lakes. 
oar Lodges have been blessed with an unprecedented prosperity. Scores of good 
men and true have been added to the Fraternity, and with scarcely an interruption 
the utmost harmony has characterized the action of all our brethren. 

While the true spirit of Masonry has found an abiding place among us, and 
while as a Craft we have been abundantly blessed, shadows have also darkened our 
pathway and the forms and the faces of old companions, not here to-day, have 
passed into the dark eternity. 

tJnder the head of Fraternal Dead he records the death 
of the following craftsmen: John Boyd, P. (t. Treasurer; 

9 



I3O APPENDIX. 

Horace E. Allen, James M. Dudley, Cyrus Stewart and 
Caleb B. Ellsworth, Past D. D. Grand Masters; Horace L. 
Greene and Simeon T. Clark, P. G. Stewards. 

The record of his official acts is lengthy. He laid two 
corner-stones in person, those of Armory buildings in 
Brooklyn and Middletown. 

The following upon the subject of Invasion of Juris- 
diction contains some new ideas: 

I desire to call the attention of the Grand Lodge to the frequent invasion of 
jurisdictional lines. This I have no doubt arises from a lack of knowledge of the 
law on this subject, and carelessness in the performance of their duty by the officers 
and investigating committees. The violation of the statutes governing in this 
matter has led to discord and confusion in the Craft on several occasions. 
Lodges at fault have deemed it a sufficient amende to pay to the .Lodge whose 
jurisdiction they have invaded the amount of the initiation fee. This seems to me 
to be an undignified course. Masonic material should not be treated in a com- 
mercial sense. The jurisdiction of a Lodge over candidates is not given as a prop- 
erty right or a chose in action, but is given that the Lodge may act as a Committee 
of the vincinage to ascertain the fitness of a candidate to become a Mason ; hence, 
the initiation of a candidate by a Lodge that has not jurisdiction, without a full 
and complete waiver given by the Lodge within whose jurisdiction the candidate 
resides, in a serious error ; and, unless it can be shown that the officers and members 
of the offending Lodge have been deceived, invasions of jurisdiction should meet 
with our severest condemnation. 

m 

He made official visitations to twelve districts and also 
to many Lodges. On all important topics of interest to 
the brethren of that jurisdiction he expresses his ideas in 
convincing and well chosen language. 

The Trustees of the Hall and Asylum Fund report cash 
on hand after meeting all payments, §151,983.65. 

From the report of the New York Board of Relief we 
quote the following: 

During the course of the year, this Board has been actively engaged in raising 
a fund with which to establish a place where sojourning Brethren, sick and dis- 
tressed, may be temporarily housed and fed. pending investigation as to their 
worthiness. It is proposed, further, in connection therewith to establish a Labor 
Exchange, where Masonic employers, in need of men or women, may apply for 
such help as they may require. The latter feature is intended to apply not only to 
sojourning Brethren, but to every Mason who has a Lodge membership in this city. 

The receipts on this account were §3,738.22 from the 
Lodges of the vicinity with #250 voted but not yet received. 
This seems to be a move in the right direction and one 
which will doubtless accomplish great good besides relieving 
the mental anxiety of those who find themselves in urgent 
need of immediate help pending inquiry. We note how- 
ever that the committee calls the attention of the Grand 
Lodge to the fact that out of 160 Lodges in the city only 
54 are contributing members of the Board of Relief, the 
burden thus falling upon one-third who are cheerful 
givers. 

St. John the Baptist's Day was designated as a Masonic 
Thanksgiving Day. 



APPENDIX. 1 3 1 

The communication from Kentucky on Fraternal Con- 
gress was read and ordered on file. 

The Committee on Jurisprudence reported favorably 
upon the application of " The Symbolic Grand Lodge of 
Hungary" for recognition and it was adopted. It has 
forty-one subordinate Lodges with a membership of 2,091. 

In regard to the application of the Grand Orient of 
Italy they thus report: 

We find that this Grand Orient is composed of a " Supreme Council of the 
Thirty-third Degree of the Scottish Rite and the Symbolic Grand Lodge for the 
Symbolic Rite," and Section 12 of their General Constitutions declares that, 

"Masonic sovereign ty lies with the Masonic people as a whole, and it is exerted 
for the government of the three first Degrees by the ordinary or extraordinary 
legislative or constitutive assemblies, composed of the representatives of all the 
Lodges of both rites, active and regularly working." 

Section 17 provides that Charters for the Lodges of both rites are granted 
exclusively by the Grand Orient. 

This folly confirms the opinion of yonr Committee, as expressed last year, 
thatthisGrand Orient is a conglomerate body ; composed of a " Supreme Council of 
Thirty-third Degree of the A.', and A.\ S.'. Rite and the Symbolic Grand Lodge of 
the Symbolic Rite, 11 and is the governing body of Lodges of the first three Degrees 
in either or both rites. 

We find in the report of onr Committee on Foreign Correspondence of 1892, 
that no direct communication of their proceedings has been received by them, but 
we find from onr exchanges that from the last reports the " Grand Orient of Italy 
at Rome " comprises one hundred and thirty-two St. John subordinate Lodges. 

Whenever these subordinate Lodges unite in forming a Grand Lodge entirely 
separate from and independent of the Supreme Council of the A..'. A.'. b.\ Kite, or 
any other rite than Symbolic Masonry, this Grand Lodge will cheerfully receive 
them into the family of independent Grand Lodges and exchange representatives ; 
bat we are not prepared to recommend a recognition of the Grand Orient com- 
posed of bodies of other rites than Symbolic Masonry. 

The Independent Spanish Grand Lodge of Sevilla, 
Spain, again applied for recognition. Previous applica- 
tions were made 1884 and 1887. Until evidence of its 
regularity shall be furnished recognition was again de- 
ferred. 

One-half cent per capita on the membership of the 
jurisdiction was appropriated for the support of The 
General Masonic Relief Ass6ciation of the United States 
and Canada. 

This large jurisdiction is divided into thirty districts, 
with 723 Lodges and a membership embracing 80,023 
Master Masons. 

P. G. M. Jesse B. Anthony again presents the Report 
on Correspondence, to which he has added some special 
features, while his table of statistics is very complete, and 
contains much valuable information in regard to the work 
of the Fraternity during this and former years. Colorado 
for 189 L is the subject of review. Referring to Grand 
Master Foster's decision in regard to " absence of dispen- 
sation," he says he is hardly prepared to admit that its 
temporary absence would have the effect claimed. He 



132 APPENDIX. 

makes an extract from Bro. W. L. Bush's oration, which he 
finds interesting. Our digest, he says, is an admirable 
compilation. 

R. W. Charles Sackreuter reviews and translates the 
proceedings of Grand Bodies in foreign languages. 

Bro. James TenEyck was elected Grand Master; Grand 
Secretary re-elected. 



NORTH CAROLINA— 1892. 

Oue Hundred and Fifth Annual held at Raleigh, 
January 12, 1892; M. W. Hezekiah A. Gudger, Grand 
Master. 

He reports the utmost harmony and fraternal feeling 
as prevailing in their midst, and friendly relations with all 
other Grand Bodies. The tendency toward a higher moral 
standard is noted with satisfaction. 

He has the mournful intelligence to communicate of 
the death of their Grand Treasurer, R. W. Bro. D. S. 
Waitt. 

The condition of The Oxford Orphan Asylum is thus 
referred to: 

The work done there has been good, the management has been economical, and 
the result will be lasting. 

We have there, at this date, two hundred and thirteen children, in ages 
ranging from five to sixteen Tears ; all of them homeless and fatherless. Do not 
these, oar jewels, appeal to all that is noble and manly within ns ? To them we can 
point with pride, as a practical illustration of the charity we profess. 

We may talk of brotherly love, repeat the beautiful monitorial sentences so 
prolific in onr literature, discourse learnedly on the ancient origin of our Order, 
yet, if we have not charity, we are nothing. 

It will be seen by the Treasurer's report that onr finances are in first-class 
condition. The debt at the beginning of the year amounted to $5,24tt.28. We have 
operated the institution and paid all current expenses, and have a balance against 
ns of only $761.24. This too. without selling a foot of the land we were authorized 
by you to dispose of: in fact, we could find no sale for the land at this time. 1 
feel confident that the Brethren will join me in saying that this is a most remark- 
ably good showing. It is more gratifying when it is remembered that we spent 
during the year $2,390. r>0 in needed improvements. I feel quite sure that before the 
close of another year this great Masonic charity will be entirely out of debt, and 
have within its walls an increase* I number of orphan children. It is a pleasure to 
know that it makes no distinction in its inmates, if a child be fatherless and 
homeless, it is admitted, it matters not whether it be the child of a Mason or not. 
Nor is the institution in any sense denominational. It belongs to the Masons of 
North Carolina. It is their pride, and under no circumstances will they allow it to 
be in the slightest degree tinctured with sectarianism. 

Powers and prerogatives of Grand Masters are thus 
discussed : 

Much discussion is being had in some of our sister jurisdictions on this sub- 
ject. Such frequent and varied applications have been made to me to exercise this 
high authority, that I deem it necessary to notice the question briefly. 



APPENDIX. 133 

The highest exponent of Masonic laws in North Carolina is the Grand Lodge. 
From its decision there is no appeal. 

It can make, and. if desirable, construe the law. 

ETery Mason is bound by a most solemn engagement to respect and " obey the 
edicts of the Grand Lodge.*' 

When this tribunal says, thou shalt or shalt not, I know of no power to 
avoid a rigid observance of its mandates, nor, indeed, should we desire to do to. 
Hence, I have repeatedly refused to authorize by dispensation anything plainly 
forbidden in our code 

He decided that a person who could neither read nor 
write was eligible for the degrees. 

He recommends firm and decided action against " Cer- 
neauism," also that officers of Lodges shall be permitted to 
resign, subject to the approval of the Grand Master, and 
that the law be amended accordingly. 

He granted twelve dispensations for new Lodges. 

From the Superintendent's report of the Oxford Orphan 
Asylum we gather these figures: 

Admitted during the year _ 94 

Placed in homes 4tf 

Returned to their own homes :tl 

Dismissed \ 2 

Ran a way....* 2 

Died _• 6 

Now in asylum _ 213 

The printing office, shoe shop, broom factory and asy- 
lum farm, all show a profit over expenditures. The King's 
Daughters donated $420 to provide bath-tubs for the 
children. 

The invitation to the Fraternal Congress was accepted 
and seven delegates appointed, the Grand Lodge em- 
phatically declaring that the meeting shall in no wise be 
considered as a General Grand Lodge. 

Resolutions were adopted interdicting Cerneauism. 

Section ]2, Article 10 of the Code was amended to read 
as follows: 

A petition once rejected shall not again be acted upon within one year. A 
candidate whose petition for the Degrees has been rejected, can not petition 
another Lodge withoat the consent of the Lodge by which his petition was rejected. 
When a petitioner has been rejected by one of the two Lodges in a town, and after 
twelre months applies to the other, and consent of the first Lodge is sought by the 
second to entertain the petition, it requires a unanimous vote to grant such permis- 
sion to the second Lodge." 

Bro. Julius C. Martin furnishes the Eeport on Corres- 
pondence, covering fifty-six pages. Colorado for 1890 
receives fraternal consideration. An extract is made from 
Bro. Alva Adams' oration at the corner-stoue laying of the 
State Capitol. Grand Master Bridwell's address is reviewed 
and extracts made therefrom. He copies the report of the 



134 APPENDIX. 



Committee on the Grand Orient of Prance circular, and 
exclaims: "Good! In deed and in truth would Masonry, 
without 'His Holy Name,' be 'the veriest mockery.' " 

Grand Master and Grand Secretary re-elected. 



NORTH DAKOTA— 1892. 

A portrait of Bro. Frank J. Thompson, the newly- 
elected Grand Secretary, appears as a frontispiece. 

Third Annual held at Grand Forks, June 28, 1892; 
M. W. John F. Selby, Grand Master. 

He reports the condition of the Lodges as first-class, 
but one appeal having been taken. 

He announces the death of Eev. Bro. Wm. T. Currie, 
Past Grand Chaplain. 

One dispensation for a new Lodge was granted and one 
withheld. 

Action was taken in regard to the spurious Grand 
Lodge of Ohio. 

The following resolution in regard, to the observance of 
St. John's Day was adopted : 

Whbrkab, We are taught to venerate the sublime principles as illustrated in 
the lives of those two eminent patrons of Masonry, St. John the Baptist, and St. 
John the Evangelist, 

Resolved, That it is the sense of this Grand Body that every Subordinate 
Lodge within this Grand Jurisdiction should, as a body, attend public worship on 
the festival of St. John the Baptist, June 24th; or if preferred* on the Sunday near- 
est said day, in each year, and then otter up their devotion to the Grand Architect 
of the Universe, oar Supreme Grand Master. 

P. G. M. William Bell of Manitoba, was received with 
the grand honors and delivered a brief address. 

The work of the ML M. degree was exemplified before 
the Grand Lodge by the brethren of Crescent Lodge. 

Bro. Thomas J. Wilder furnishes a most interesting 
Report on Correspondence covering 102 pages, Colorado 
for 1891 included. He quotes the salient points of Grand 
Master Foster's address and sixteen of his decisions. He 
says Bro. Bush delivered an excellent oration. A page and 
a half of his space is devoted to extracts from our report. 
He quotes our remarks upon " objection after ballot " in 
full. Does not coincide with us in our opinion that if 
Lodges U. D. are permitted to affiliate members that it 
will result in additional complications. He says we are a 
firm believer in Masonry beyound the Lodge, but produce 



APPENDIX. 135 

no proof. That depends, Bro. Wilder. In a strict sense 
there is no Masonry beyond the Lodge except, possibly, 
the Royal Arch, which, it is claimed, with some plausibility, 
was once a part of the Master's degree. Other rites with 
their numerous degrees, have built upon the old founda- 
tion and, during the past century, have gained more or less 
recognition from the ancient Craft. In view of the troubles 
that have arisen between these contending rites over in- 
vasion of occupied territory, legitimacy, etc., and which 
has been the occasion of strife and dissension among their 
members, and has brought scandal upon the Masonic 
fraternity itself, many Grand Lodges have thought it a fit- 
ting time, once for all, to determine what shall be recog- 
nized as Masonic bodies, and thus have constituted what 
is sometimes designated as the American Bite, consisting 
of Lodge, Chapter, Council, Commandery and certain 
Scottish Rite organizations. In our discussions we have 
never contended that the Masonry of these bodies was the 
Masonry of our Ancient Craft. As we claim that Ancient 
Craft Masonry is not a growth or development, it would 
be an impossibility for us to advance any such claim. 
Those who do believe that the growth theory is the correct 
one, are doing all in their power to disintegrate Ancient 
Craft Masonry, for if their position is correct, and Masonry 
originally consisted of but one degree, to which two others 
have been added, then with the concurrence of Grand 
Lodges there is no end to their multiplication. But happily 
there is no danger of such a deluge of new degrees. 

The recent discovery of important letters written by 
Dr. Manningham, Deputy Grand Master of England, in 
1757, to the Provincial Graud Lodge of Holland, shows 
conclusively that 

1. No higher degrees than the first three belong to 
Pure and Ancient Freemasonry. 

2. The secrets of the first three degrees were the same 
before the year 1717 as after it. 

3. The so-called high degrees were introduced after 
1740. 

The above is the summing up of Bro. R. F. Gould, in 
his memoir of the above named brother, published the cur- 
rent year. It is the latest and most important contribution 
to Masonry, and more recent than any information con- 
tained in Gould's History of Freemasonry. 

While these letters will prove unpalatable to the dis- 
seminators of the growth theory, they will be hailed with 



I36 APPENDIX. . 

joy by all true lovers of the Ancient Craft who believe in its 
remote antiquity and unchangeable nature, except in non- 
essentials. 

Bro. Albert B. Herrick was elected Grand Master and 
Bro. Frank J. Thompson, Grand Secretary. 



OHIO— 1891; 

Eighty-second Annual held at Columbus, October 21, 
1891; M. W. Levi C. Goodale, Grand Master. 

From his opening remarks we quote the following : 

The past year has been filled with faithful service, abundant blearing and 
infinite mercy. A year of advancement in Freemasonry in this jurisdiction has 
passed into history. 

Let ns endeavor to realize in its fullest significance the sentiment of the elder 
Longfellow: 

" From hand to hand the greeting flows ; 
From eye to eye the signals ran ; 
From heart to heart the bright hope glows ; 
The seekers of the light are one. 

One in the freedom of the Truth. 

One in the joys of paths untroa ; 
One in the sours perennial youth. 

One in the larger thought of God " 

He has some forcible remarks upon Lodge Officers and 
especially upon negligent Secretaries, some of whom, he 
has been told, have not written up their minutes for 
months. He says : "Such men are no help to the Order, 
and confer no honor upon their Brethren who elect 
them." 

Five dispensations were granted for new Lodges. One 
weak Lodge surrendered its charter and some others con- 
template doing so. He says there is one Lodge of eighty 
members, sixty of whom are under suspension for non- 
payment of dues. Out of 30,000 Masons, there are almost 
ten per cent, under suspension for non-payment of dues. 
There must be something wrong; either "hard times" 
or neglect of Secretaries. He commends the growing 
tendency to make Lodge meetings more attractive, and 
especially the social feature, after the work, where light 
refreshments are served. 

Three corner-stones were laid; one in person, the 
others by proxy. 

At the instance of some of the Toledo brethren of 
German nationality, he endeavored to open up corres- 
pondence with the Grand Lodge of Berlin, but so far 



APPENDIX. 137 

without success; with their large membership of German 
parentage, many of whom occasionally return to their 
mother country on a temporary visit, it seems proper 
that fraternal relations should be more thoroughly estab- 
lished. 

Over three hundred questions had been submitted to 
him for decision, most of which were answered by referring 
inquirers to the Code. Fifteen are deemed of sufficient 
importance to submit, and they were all approved. 

Eight pages of the address are devoted to Cerneau 
difficulties, and the organization of the spurious Grand 
Lodge. 

He recommends the adoption of a standard ritual of the 
Esoteric Work, and suggests the Massachusetts plan of 
promulgation for their consideration. 

He issued a circular letter to the Master of each Lodge, 
containing certain questions to which answers were re- 
quested. Among the facts thus gathered we note the 
following : 

Total number of stated meetings 7,281 

Total number of special meetings 1,605 

Total number of meetings where degrees were worked 3,645 

Arerage attendance at Lodge meetings 15 

Number of meetings at which no work was done 5,241 

Number under suspension 3,989 

Total membership in this State 35,002 

A net gain over 1890 of 762 

To the question, " When was your Lodge visited by the Representative of the 
Grand Master or by a District Lecturer? the answers are singularly startling. 
Lodges have never been so visited. 

There is discovered a singular lack of care in protecting records from fire, 
and, in many instances, the records are not even signed: by the Master. 

Amount Grand dues in 1890 $16,718 53 

Amount Grand dues in 1891 _ 17.591 95 

Net increase in revenue in 1890 1,037 63 

Net increase in revenue in 1891 3,428 70 

Amount distributed by charity during the past year 15,110 00 

Average amount charged for conferring the three degrees. . 24 00 
Average annual dues 2 40 

Number of Lodges which have a life membership claim 52 

In answer to the question: "What suggestion have you 
to make concerning the best method of occupying with 
profit the time of the Lodge meeting where no degrees are 
conferred?" he received the usual large variety, from 
which he selects these twenty as showing what different 
ideas are entertained : 

L The reading of good Masonic history. 

2. Beading an essay upon some subject connected with Masonry. 

3. Develop the talent for speaking and singing, so as to make such meetings 
interesting. 

4. Practice work in conferring Degrees. 

5. Pay a fraternal visit to a sister Lodge. 



1 38 APPENDIX. 

6. Beading the Proceedings of the Grand Lodge, and any other good Masonic 
literature. 

7. Headings, lectures, music, and any other studies which will develop the 
mind and improve the character. 

8. School of instruction. 

9. Discussion of matters relating to the objects of Masonry. 

10. Investigating into the condition of our poor and destitute members, and 
alleviating their necessities. 

11. Discussing the business of the Lodge, and familiarizing ourselves with the 
business of the Grand Lodge. 

12. Have some member prepare an intelligent lecture upon foreign travel, and 
listen to it. 

13. Working for a Lodge library* 

14. Readings or remarks by brethren named by the Worshipful Master. 

15. Musical and literary exercises, concluded by a light lunch. 

16. Have a banquet. 

17. Have a Committee on Entertainment, which shall furnish program, and 
conduct a variety of lectures, readings, etc. 

18. Taking the time to get acquainted. 

19. Rehearsal of the Ritual. 

20. Drilling in singing and other work. * 

He reports that the Trustees of the Masonic Home have 
selected 150 acres of desirable land near Springfield, and 
that the building will soon be under construction. 

The total number of Lodges reported by the Grand 
Secretary is 487. 

The recognition of the Grand Lodge of Hayti was 
postponed. The Committee enumerate the eight Grand 
Lodges comprising the Grand Lodge League of Germany; 
but, as they had none of their printed proceedings at hand, 
further consideration of the matter was postponed. A 
resolution was subsequently adopted requesting the G. M. 
to open fraternal relations with the German Grand Lodges. 

The Trustees of Masonic Home report $ 0,000 sub- 
scribed, which includes the 154 acres of land donated by 
Masons and citizens of Springfield. They desire to have 
$100,000 at their command in order that the erection of 
buildings may not be delayed, and request the Lodges to 
send in their contributions as soon as possible. 
• The brethren participating in the attempt to form 
another Grand Lodge were each and all expelled from all 
the rights and benefits of Masonry. 

A committee of five was appointed to prepare a Ritual 
to be approved and kept in the custody of the Grand 
Master, for the instruction of the Masons of that jurisdic- 
tion, and to be, by him, transmitted to his successor. 

The Committee on History reported that 100 pages had 
been written, and they were reappointed to continue the 
work. 

Bro. W. M. Cunningham furnishes an exhaustive Re- 
port on Correspondence covering about 210 pages, of which 
four are devoted to Colorado for 1890. Grand Master 
Bridwell's address is epitomized. He coincides with him 



APPENDIX. 139 

on the subject of conferring degrees out of time, but like 
some others, he disapproves decision No. 6 as "neither in 
accordance with the tenets of Masonry or its laws." 

He says on this subject: 

It is too difficult to find any rule that is not susceptive of change, or to which 
there can be no exception, to warrant an iron-clad law npon snch a narrow basis as 
the foregoing. Gases have occurred where Masons were wrongfully suspended and 
expelled for non-payment of does, not only because of their inability to pay, but 
from other causes, and also for want of notice, in some instances their address 
being unknown ; and, doubtless, many others have not only occurred from the 
same and similar causes, but are occurring every day ; and any rule that would 
prevent a Lodge from being charitable, or at least doing justice to a brother, would 
be rm masonic. 

A liberal quotation is made from Bro. H. T. DeLong's 
oration. 

He quotes from our Report several articles, viz: On 
"physical qualifications;" replies to Bros. Bobbins and 
A incil; and also the Grand Lodge of New York and its 
position on the Cerneau question. 

Grand Master and Grand Secretary both re-elected. 



OREGON— 1892. 

The proceedings are embellished with portraits of the 
following Past Grand Masters: David G. Clark, 1869-1870; 
T. McF. Patton, 1872-1873; Jay H. Kunzie, 1876. 

Forty-second Annual held at Portland, June 15, 1892; 
M. W. Brenham Van Dusen, Grand Master. 

He reports having visited officially thirty-eight Lodges 
in the western part of the State, he also intended to visit 
those in the eastern portion but was unable to do so. 
While banquets were prepared on most of these occasions, 
he says in no instance was wine or any other intoxicants 
introduced. 

He is able to report peace and prosperity as reigning 
within their borders. 

He announces the death of two distinguished members 
of the Grand Lodge: Bros. F. J. Babcock, P. G. Secretary, 
and B. P. Earhart, P. G. M. 

Four corner-stones were laid; three in person and one 
by proxy. 

He submits a list of eleven decisions, all of which 
except one were approved. 

He issued a circular letter interdicting the Cerneau 
Bite. 



I40 APPENDIX. 

He granted three dispensations for new Lodges. 

The Masonic Board of Relief distributed to distressed 
worthy brethren $472. 

Bro. S. F. Chadwick presents a very complete Report 
on Correspondence, covering 218 pages. Colorado for 1891 
is fraternally and critically reviewed. 

The principal features of Grand Master Foster's address 
are noticed, and he says he "made an earnest worker, as his 
name implies." 

Bro. Chadwick commends our Report and Digest of 
Decisions. Our remarks on "Objection after Ballot" call 
forth a lengthy reply. He says there is do Masonry in the 
Colorado law as it now stands, and we surrender our space 
to Bro. Chadwick, that we may "see ourselves as others 
see us." 

We cannot recognize the above as good Masonic law. There ia no Masonry in 
it. No institution can long exist as a secret society that will admit trialB of the 
kind contemplated above. Tell us, pray, why a lodge of Masons can take from a 
brother the right to object and the right to have that objection respected. He can- 
not be made, Masonically speaking, to give a reason for his objection. Onr views 
are so well known on thiB point that it is not necessary to repeat them. This doc- 
trine inculcated by the Colorado law will drive more brothers ont of the lodge thau 
it will take into it. Those who framed that law were taught, among other thing*, 
that a brother had, in joining the order, certain absolute rights which he received 
upon his honor O. B. Amonq them was the right to use the ballot and the right to 
object to advancement. But in using the ballot and objecting to advancement he 
must act Masonically. This he agreed to do, he being the conscientious judge of 
his reasons in all cases. Here he was left with the full satisfaction that the newly- 
made Mason would not do an un-Masonic act by rejecting a worthy man, or object 
to the advancement of a worthy candidate. Bat would, if he found Masonic cau*e, 
quietly do one or both of these things, as duty and as his vows requi red. This is our 
Masonry. But no. Now comes the Colorado law and says the brother who objects 
is a falsifier, insane or mean, and he must be put on trial for doing this thing. You 
may say that the applicant is to be tried— that is not the case. It is the brother who 
objects that is accused, and who must make a fight, a thing this prerogative wn» 
given him to prevent. And what will be the result? How can the brother accused 
have any respect for Masonry after he has objected, to find that his right in this 
respect is taken from him, and he placed on the defensive for doing a quiet, not to 
say secret, duty which was mao^e one of his conditions of membership. We admit now 
and then a bad Mason will break his vow in this respect, and ont of personal spite 
reject or object to advancement, but in order to detect him it is not wise to destroy 
the safeguards of Masonry. This bad Mason will be detected soon enough. Such 
are always found ont, and when there is evidence enough they should be proceeded 
against for un-Masonic cond act. When we are admitted into a body of men on 
condition that we are to be the judge of the moral character of those coming after 
as, there is an honor that pervades that body upon which frank and candid men 
—men who have confidence in one another— love to bank. Time only will deter- 
mine whether this evasion is wise or not. We, as it may well be inferred, have 
pleasure in believing the old is the only Masonic doctrine. 

Our position on this question has been endorsed by 
Bro. Drummond (see Maine) and others. A careful read- 
ing of the above fails to disclose any answer to the point 
under consideration, viz: The rights of E. A.'s and F. C.'s 
to be heard in their own defence, they being members of 
the fraternity and subject to trial and discipline. When 
Bro. Chadwick asserts as above, that '"the Colorado law- 
says the brother who objects is a falsifier, insane or mean, 
and lie must be put on trial for doing this thing," etc., etc., 



APPENDIX. 141 

he is certainly in an excited mood and fails to confine his 
attention to the true intent and effect of our law in its 
practical application. No such terrible consequences have 
yet followed its enactment. We say that a Lodge may, 
not shall, try the sufficiency of an objection after giving the 
objecting brother two week's notice. We say that it is not 
only Masonic but strictly in accordance with that cardinal 
virtue to which the E. A.'s attention was early directed 
namely, justice. We are sorry that Oregon says that E. 
A.'s and F. C.'s have no right as Masons to be heard in 
their own defense. They may be entirely innocent of 
wrongs and among the most respected members of the com- 
munity, but they are nevertheless destined to rest under 
the false accusation of some cowardly objector, perchance 
for a lifetime. The "bad Mason" will not be detected 
soon enough and is not always found out, he is still abroad 
in every jurisdiction and manages to get in his nefarious 
work by stopping good Masons from advancement because 
of some personal pique or dislike. 

Shall the objections of such go unquestioned is the 
t question at issue? Colorado says: No! 

Bro. F. A. Moore, of St. Helens, was elected Grand 
Master; Bro. S. F. Chadwick re-elected Grand Secretary. 



PENNSYLVANIA— 1891. 

Steel portraits of M. W. Bros. J. Simpson Africa, Grand 
Master, and Robert Clark, P. G. M. 1876-1877, appear in 
the volume. 

Quarterly Communications were held March 4, Juue 3, 
September 2 and December 2, 1891, at each of which the 
business was chiefly of local importance. 

Annual Communication held at Philadelphia, December 
28, 1891; M. W. Bro. J. Simpson Africa, Grand Master. 

He announces the death of Bros. Charles H. Kingston, 
Deputy Grand Secretary; James P. Wickersham, member 
Committee on Library, and Christopher Little, District 
Deputy Grand Master for a quarter of a century. 

He laid the corner-stone of a Jewish Temple, in person, 
and those of three churches were laid by proxy. 

Two Lodges, Nos. 51 and 52, each appropriately 
celebrated their centennials, he being present on both 
occasions. 



142 APPENDIX. 

He made Grand Visitations to six Lodges in the north- 
eastern part of the jurisdiction, also informal visits to 
many Lodges daring the year. The Temple School of 
Instruction he found to be accomplishing much good. 

He reports twenty-two decisions. 

The number of Lodges is reported as 401, and present 
membership 42,382; net increase 1181. 

He granted two dispensations to bury unaffiliated 
Masons and one to bury a suspended brother. 

The present Grand Lodge debt, incurred in the erection 
of their Temple, is $713,569.68. Its cost, including furni- 
ture and fixtures, was $1,567,568.41. 

From the Grand Lodge Charity Fund the almoners 
distributed §3,820 among 362 applicants. 

The Report on Correspondence is by P. G. M. Richard 
Vaux, and covers 248 pages, filled with interesting and 
instructive matter as usual. Nearly a dozen pages are 
devoted to his introductory remarks, in which he discourses 
most ably upon the subject of Landmarks, their acceptation 
and preservation by the Craft. We cannot forbear from 
quotiug these sentences, which are in marked contrast to 
those of some of our "lesser lights" upon the same topic : 

If, then, Masonry was not, in the beginning, dependent on written teachings; 
if its usages, customs and Landmarks were only to be known by oral communica- 
tion, it is no argument to say that, as Landmarks are not put into print, there is a 
doubt as to what is to be construed or accepted as a Landmark. 

Serious students of even written history know that, careful as authors were to 
obtain evidence from even the earliest periods of written language for making 
statements of events, yet it iB by tradition that much of true history is preserved. 

It is more reasonable to believe that the concensus of Masonic tradition, as to 
which the memory of man runs not to the contrary, is the truer exposition of 
Masonic law and Landmark. 

We are constrained to believe that, so far as Freemasonry is concerned, oral 
teachings are more reliable than the notions, views, prejudices, and imperfect 
knowledge, even if printed, of those who profess to be standard authority. A 
plain story, told to an earnest listener, is more certain to be understood, and more 
correctly repeated, than by the reader of the same story, whose interest is diluted 
by the printed page. 

What do we see to-day ? The oral revelations made to those who afterwards 
wrote what God taught to the fathers, are now disputed by some who accept 
modern reason for original troth. Modern knowledge, as it is called, is proud that 
it knows so much. Wisdom is humble that it knows no more. Hundreds of cen- 
turies have consecrated the teachings of wisdom. 

You may not, dear brethren, accept these suggestions. But believe, that to 
prevent the introduction of novelties in our work and esoteric teachings is regarded 
as so imperatively demanded that the very perpetuation of Freemasonry must 
depend upon effective efforts against these aliens and strangers. 

Would it not be truer wisdom to accept what is claimed by acknowledged 
thoughtful teachers to be Landmarks, than to try to destroy them by seeking super- 
ficialobjections which tend to deny them ? # What is thus to be gained ? Iconoclasts 
may rejoice at the effect of such destruction, but what have they to set up on the 
empty pedestals, but the fragments, the ruins scattered over "the floor," and, it 
may be, covering the golden rays of our " Great Light." 

Colorado for 1890 receives a fraternal notice of five and 
a half pages. 

Of Grand Master Bridwell's address, he savs : "It is 
replete with sound Masonic law, wise, deeply interesting, 



APPENDIX. J43 

and admirably expressed in style and construction." He 

Quotes his views on "Ancient Lanchnarks M and "Grand 
Orient of France," with warm approval. A page and a 
half is devoted to our Report, in which he finds much with 
which he coincides, notably "Grand Masters' Prerogatives," 
" Landmarks," " Physical Qualification," " Cerneauism," 
New York's attitude on the same, etc. 

Grand Master and Grand Secretary both re-elected. 



PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND— 1891. 

Sixteenth Annual held at Charlotte town, June 24, 
1891; M. W. John W. Morrison, Grand Master. 

The address is confined almost exclusively to a record 
of his official acts. The condition of the Lodges he reports 
as generally satisfactory, many had been visited in person, 
while commissions were issued to distinguished brethren 
to perform a like service in visiting others. But two dis- 
pensations were issued, one to attend Divine Service and 
the other to confer the third degree in less than the 
regular interval. 

We quote the following bit of history : 

Brethren, you are aware that this Grand Lodge was organized on the 24th of 
June. 1875. and that we have no account on the records of the first Lodge chartered 
in this Province. I think it advisable to do so on this occasion. On the 9th day of 
October, 1797, Saint John's Lodge, now No. 1 in this jurisdiction, received a charter 
or warrant from the English Provincial Grand Lodge of Nova Scotia under No. 20, 
subsequently from the Grand Lodge of England. The then Governor of this island, 
General Edmund Fanning, being a charter member; at that time this Province was 
called Saint John's Island, andT in consequence of many mistakes of letters and 
merchandise addressed to persons in the Island by being carried through mistake 
to Saint John's, New Foundland, or Saint John, New Brunswick, or Saint John's 
on the Labrador Coast, or elsewhere, by Act of Parliment the name was changed 
to that of Prince Edward Island on the 20th day of November, 1798, and received 
the Royal allowance February 1st, 1799. 

***** ****** 

Saint John's Lodge is now nearly a century old, is one of our most prosperous 
Lodges, and without a link being missing has come down to the present time 
through the Anti-Masonic •persecution of 182ft to 1836, when many Lodges on this 
continent went down. 

He says that this Lodge, at the time of the persecution 
referred to, had only about eighteen members, while its 
funds were very low. To-day it is one of the most pros- 
perous Lodges in the jurisdiction, and will soon be able to 
celebrare its centennial. 

He had no decisions to report. 

No Report on Correspondence. 

Bro. Donald Darrach was elected Grand Master; Bro. 
B. W. Higgs re-elected Grand Secretary. 



144 APPENDIX. 



PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND— 181)2. 

Seventeenth Annual, held at Summerside, June 27, 
1892; Grand Master Darrach presiding. He thus pictures 
the condition of the Graft: 

Though we cannot show a large increase during the past year in oar member- 
ship, the general condition of the Craft is good. Harmony and peace prevail, and 
th»re exists a friendly emulation of who can best work, and we trust, best agree, 
though the latter is more difficult of attainment. Accession of good material has 
been made to our ranks, and a favorable, truer, and more faithful public sentiment 
is being disseminated. 

He paid an official visit to most of the Lodges in that 
Province and therefore speaks from personal observation. 

But four special dispensations were granted. 

From the Grand Secretary's Report we learn that there 
are twelve Lodges in the jurisdiction with a membership 
of 502. The net loss was seven. The Grand Treasurer 
reports a balance of $84.40. The Grand Lecturer visited 
all the Lodges. 

Bro. Simon W. Crabbe was elected Grand Master; 
Grand Secretary re-elected. 

The following was adopted: 

Resolved, That Masonic funerals cannot be conducted without the pall bearers 
appearing as Masons, and directed by the Lodge. 



QUEBEC— 1892. 

Twenty-second Annual held at Montreal, January 27, 
1892; M. \V. Frank Edgar, Grand Master. 

Shortly after the close of the last session he directed 
the attention of the District Deputy Grand Masters to the 
following special matters: 

1. The importance of the proper working of the several degrees by the officer* 
of Lodges, and the selection of competent and able brethren to perform the work. 

2. The encouragement of the social element at Lodge communications, in 
addition to the regular work of the Lodge. 

3. Against the practice (becoming prevalent) of the undue display of regalia 
and jewels at Masonic funerals. 

He says these recommendations were well received, 
and promise to meet the hearty approval of the brethren. 

He calls attention to the importance of a Masonic 
Home, and reports having appointed a committee in 
accordance with the action had at the last session, to take 
the matter into consideration and report a practical plan 
for its endowment and support. 



APPENDIX. 145 

The history of Freemasonry in Quebec is now being 
written by M. W. Bro. John H. Graham, who is well 
qualified for the work, funds being voted for the purpose 
by the Grand Lodge. The condition of the Craft is 
referred to as being peaceful and harmonious. 

The Grand Secretary reports thirty-six working Lodges, 
and gives these items. 

I give also synopsis of returns of Lodges for twelve months ending December 
27, last. It shows 212 initiations, 198 passings, 196 raisings, 38 joining members, 
63 withdrawals; 49 deaths, 75 suspensions, two of which were for nn-Masonic con- 
duct, 15 brethren re-instated, 38 life members, and total membership of 3,141 mem- 
bers. 

The reports of the District Deputies appear, as usual, 
in the Proceedings, showing at a glance the condition of 
the Lodges in their respective districts. 

The Grand Lodge of New Zealand was recognized. 

The application of the Grand Lodge of Mexico for 
recognition and that of the Grand Lodge of the Island of 
Cuba were referred to the Committee on Foreign Rela- 
tions to make report. This committee subsequently 
recommended delay until further information is forth- 
coming. 

The spurious Grand Lodge of Ohio was condemned 
and intercourse prohibited. 

Upon the subject of the Fraternal Congress action was 
postponed until the next annual. 

The Special Committee on Masonic Home in their 
report cited the noble work accomplished in Kentucky, 
and recommended a per capita tax of twenty-five cents per 
member for the establishment of a fund for the above 
purpose. Action on report will be had at the next annual. 

The discourse of the Grand Chaplain, Rev. Bro. W. 
Percy Chambers, entitled " The Mason's Central Light," 
is a splendid effort, covering less than three pages. 

The Report on Correspondence, by Bro. E. T. D. 
Chambers covers 129 pages, sixteen of which are devoted 
to his introductory, wherein he directs attention to the 
leading topics which now engage Masonic thought. 

Colorado for 1891 is briefly reviewed. An extract is 
given from Grand Master Foster s address, Bro. Bush's 
oration was "brief though interesting," and our resolu- 
tions on the Spurious Grand Lodge of Ohio are copied. 
He has a friendly word for our Report and says we are 
sound on the Cerneau question. 

Grand Master and Grand Secretary both re-elected. 
10 



I46 APPENDIX. 



RHODE ISLAND— 1891. 

One hundred and first Annual held at Providence, 
May 18, 1891; M. \V. George H. Kenyon, Grand Master. 

He says: 

The year just passed has been one of prosperity and unity among the Craft. 
Harmony and the true spirit of fraternity seems to prevail throughout our entire 
Jurisdiction. We have been wonderfully favored in the preservation of our num- 
bers, having lost but two members by death daring the whole year. 

One of those referred to was W. Bro. Benedict Aldrich 
who died at the age of 97 years and 10 months. He was 
made a Mason in 1814, elected Master of his Lodge Sep- 
tember 12, 1825, serving four years. He was the oldest 
Past Master and the oldest member of that Grand Lodge, 
having been a member sixty-six years. He was believed 
to be the third oldest Mason in the United States. He 
was buried with Masonic honors. 

The corner-stones of a town -hall and a Masonic hall 
were laid by him, full accounts of which appear under the 
head of Special Communications. 

He reports but one decision, which was approved, with 
a slight modification. 

Few special dispensations were granted. 

He granted one dispensation for a new Lodge. 

Section 20, Article VII, of the Constitution was 
amended, and now reads as follows: 

No Subordinate Lodge shall hold more than one Communication for business 
the same day, and no Subordinate Lodge shall confer the first degree on more than 
five candidates at the same Communication. 

The Special Committee on Centennial Celebration pre- 
sented a report, outlining the programme and general 
arrangements. On the last day of the session the members 
of the Grand Lodge enjoyed a banquet at one o'clock, 
where they discussed the various plans for their approach- 
ing centennial. 

On June 24, 1891, that glorious event took place, and 
was a grand success. The programme observed was as 
follows : 

9 o'clock A. M Special Session of Grand Lodge 

10 o'clock a. h Parade of Grand and Subordinate Lodges 

11 o'clock a. M._ Literary Exercises in Infantry Hall 

2 o'clock p. m Collation at Crescent Park 

8 o'clock p. M.___ Grand Banquet at Narragansett Hotel 

The speeches and a full account of the Celebration is 
to be published in the Centennial Volume. 

Grand Master and Grand Secretary re-elected. 



APPENDIX. 147 

SOUTH AUSTRALIA— 1891. 

Quarterly Communication held at Adelaide, July 16, 
1890; R. W. Bro. H. E. Downer, D. G. M., as Grand 
Master. 

A letter from Grand Master Kintore was read, express- 
ing his inability to be present. 

Business of local importance. 

Quarterly Communication held October 15, 1890; M. W. 
the Hon. S. J. Way, Pro Grand Master, as Grand Master. 

The Grand Lodge of Tasmania was recognized upon 
the recommendation of the Board of General Purposes. In 
the matter of the Grand Lodge of New Zealand, recognition 
was delayed until further information could be had as to 
the number of Lodges, members, etc. 

A communication from the Grand Secretary of New 
South Wale6, to the effect that the Board of General Purposes 
of that Grand Lodge had resolved: "That the claim of the 
Grand Lodge of South Australia to be the senior Grand 
Lodge is untenable in fact, and opposed to Masonic law, 
custom and precedent," was read by the Grand Secretary. 

The Pro Grand Master most emphatically maintained 
the claim of South Australia to the seniority over the 
other Grand Lodges in Australia, and other brethren took 
the same ground. The communication was "referred to 
the Board of General Purposes, with power to take such 
action as may be thought advisable so as to maintain and 
uphold the seniority to which this Grand Lodge is en- 
titled." 

A valuable sword — a genuine "Ferrara" — was presented 
to the Grand Lodge on behalf of W. Bro. Kemp. This 
sword was valuable for its antiquity, having been forged 
by Andrea Ferrara, who enjoyed great reputation as an 
armorer at Belluno, North Italy, in 1585. It had been in 
the possession of Bro. Kemps family for many years. His 
father, who died in 1883, aged 84 years, was a Freemason 
for 62 years, and bequeathed also his apron and certificate 
to his son, which were exhibited to members of the Grand 
Lodge. 

Quarterly Communication held January 21, 1891 ; M. W. 
Earl of Kintore, Grand Master. 

Business of a local nature. Several proposed amend- 
ments to the Constitution lie over until the next commu- 
nication. 



I48 APPENDIX. 

The Board of General Purposes having investigated 
the claim of the Grand Lodge of New Zealand, it was 
recognized. 

The Grand Master conferred the rank of Past Grand 
Master upon the R. W. Deputy Grand Master, Bro. H. E. 
Downer in recognition of his valuable services to the Craft, 
more especially in connection with his securing Free- 
mason's Hall as a home for the Craft. Bro. Downer 
responded in acknowledgment and detailed the eiforts of 
the past ten years since the purchase, and the generosity 
of many brethren w T ho subscribed for the same, enabling 
them to acquire this valuable property which was now en- 
tirely free from debt. It was their intention that the in- 
come should be devoted to the purposes of benevolence 
and charity or education. They hoped to establish cottage 
homes, to found scholarships and do something to show 
that Masonry had some vitality in it. 

Quarterly Communication, April 15, 1891; M. W. Bro. 
H. E. Dowuer, D. G. M., presiding. Election of officers. 

Grand Master and Grand Secretary re-elected. 



SOUTH CAROLINA— 1891. 

One hundred and fifteenth Annual held at Charleston, 
December 8, 1891; M. \V. Laurie T. Izlar, Grand Master. 

"We quote his remarks on the State of the Order: 

It is gratifying to me to be able to report that through oat this jurisdiction 
Freemasonry is marching onward. Not only are we increasing in numbers, bat 
there is a manifest desire, evidenced by the numerous letters received by me from 
all sections of the State, to maintain, nphold and make prominent the true prin- 
ciples and teachings of the Order. The good results of this disposition on the part 
of the brethren are already apparent in many sections, and a faithful perseverance 
along that line must and will work out lasting good to every true Mason, and bring 
the Order into that honorable and marked prominence in the eyes of the profanes 
which it is so well qualified to occupy and so juBtly belongs to the great truths 
which it inculcates. 

You have but to refer to the number of new Lodges instituted and dormant 
Lodges revived daring the past year, and note the number of corner-stones laid 
with Masonic ceremonies to see at a glance that the brethren are awakening to a 
sense of duty which promises good results, and that an educated public are more 
and more appreciating the importance of our ancient and honorable Order. And, 
indeed, it can not be otherwise. As the masses are educated, so in like proportion, 
will the great truths and teachings of Freemasonry be comprehended, be appre- 
ciated and gladly received and accepted by an intelligent public. Oar star is in the 
ascendant. Let as keep it rising antil it shall shed its resplendent beams from 
high meridian. 

He laid the corner-stones of two large educational build- 
ings in person, while eight others were laid by proxy. 
They were those of a City Hall, two Court Houses, four 
Public Schools and a Confederate monument.. 



APPENDIX. I49 

He issued two dispensations permitting dual member- 
ship, also one to confer more than five degrees at the same 
communication. 

Two dispensations for new Lodges were granted, and 
five Lodges were revived. 

There was a slight strain in fraternal relations with the 
Grand Lodge of Pennsylvania growing out of the appoint- 
ment of a Grand Representative who had been recom- 
mended by certain of the Grand Officers of Pennsylvania 
instead of by the Grand Master, who claims it as his pre- 
rogative to make such nomination. The correspondence 
is published to date, but the end is not yet. 

This is the second case that has come under our notice, 
Iowa and the District of Columbia having a little un- 
pleasantness upon the same subject, only in a different 
shape. 

He recommends the consolidation of weak Lodges, 
some of which have only the extreme limit of seven mem- 
bers, while over fifty of the Lodges have less than thirty- 
two members. 

He had been called upon to render numerous decisions, 
four of which only are submitted, the others being in 
accordance with the Constitution and Digest. 

The Committee on Masonic Home and Asylum, com- 
posed of the D. D. G. M.'s of the several Masonic Dis- 
tricts, submitted a report stating that after mature delib- 
eration and careful inquiry they found it would require a 
tax upon the fraternity which could not* be safely borne in 
addition to its present financial burdens. They therefore 
recommended that the further consideration of the pro- 
posed plan for a Home be postponed until the Grand 
Lodge was better prepared to undertake its execution, 
which was adopted. 

Action was taken against the spurious and pretended 
Grand Lodge of Ohio. 

The Grand Lodge of Tasmania was recognized. 

The Grand Master is to appoint a suitable number of 
brethren to attend the Fraternal Congress, but without 
compensation. 

Bro. Charles Inglesby again furnished a most concise 
and well written Report on Correspondence, almost en- 
tirely free from extracts. Colorado for 1890 is the subject 
of comment. A brief synopsis is given of Grand Master 



1 50 APPENDIX. 

Bridwell's official acts, and Bro. H. T. De Long is credited 
with having "delivered" an able and eloquent oration. 

Bro. William T. Branch of Abbeville was elected 
Grand Master, and Bro. Charles Inglesby re-elected Grand 
Secretary. 



SOUTH DAKOTA— 1892. 

Eighteenth Annual held at Sioux Falls, June 14, 1892; 
M. W. George A. Johnson, Grand Master. 

He reports the Craft in a prosperous and harmonious 
state, a fair increase in membership as well as greater pro- 
ficiency in the work. 

His correspondence had not been extensive. He 
reports six decisions, which were approved with one 
modification. 

He granted dispensations for three new Lodges. 

He refused to grant a dispensation for a Lodge to 
appear in Masonic regalia and parade with the G. A. R. 
on Memorial Day. He says: 

I did this because I think it is in conflict with the policy of Masonry to appear 
in public parade in Masonic clothing, except on occasions assigned by the Jaws 
and customs of the fraternity. I certainly was not actuated by motives of hostility 
to the G. A. R M or by a lack of reverence for Memorial day. I am a member of the 
O. A. R., and had three brothers who gave their services to their country in its 
hour of peril ; two of them giving their lives as sacrifices on their country's altar, 
one of whom fills an unknown, unmarked grave on a battle field. Could I be 
human and not hold Memorial day in greatest veneration ? It appeals to me with 
many cherished memories. 

He recommends that the Grand Lodge adopt a plan 
for the profitable investment of the money in the Widows' 
and Orphans' Fund, instead of permitting it to lie idle 
from year to year. 

He also recommended that in the event of an elective 
officer of a subordinate Lodge removing permanently from 
the jurisdiction, he be allowed to resign and the vacancy 
be filled by a special election. 

The Committee on Jurisprudence reported adversely, 
and the old law prevails. 

From the Grand Secretary's report we gather the fol- 
lowing items : 

At the last Grand Annual Communication the membership of this Jurisdiction 
was 3505. During the last year the increase has been 556; the decrease 886; the net 
increase 220; making the present membership S725; showing an average membership 
to the lodge of 46. 

Initiations, &71; Payings, 362: Raisings, 343; Admitted, 184; Dimitted, 244; 
Died, 31; S. N. P. D., 59; Reinstated, 28; S. U. M. C, 2. 



APPENDIX. I 5 I 

The Grand Treasurer reports the Widows' and Orphans' 
Fund $357.65, and Grand Charity Fund $63.15. Balance 
in General Fund $3,018.43. 

Action was taken against the spurious Grand Lodge of 
Ohio. 

The Committee on Ritual endorse the present system 
of instruction, and recommend that the Grand Lecturer 
visit at least thirty of the Lodges not visited by him the 
past year, and a sufficient amount be appropriated for the 
purpose; and their report was adopted. 

P. G. M. William Blatt gives the Craft one of his 
characteristic Reports on Correspondence, which have 
heretofore met with such favorable acceptance. In both 
his preface and conclusion he comments upon leading 
questions now before the Fraternity. Colorado for 1891 
has rather a brief review covering a single page. We quote 
his remarks on Grand Master Foster's decisions : 

The G. M. decided that a brother cannot completely sever his connection with 
the Fraternity. There ie no way by which he can be relieved of his obligations. 
This of coarse ie true Masonic principle, and we quote it simply in order to folly 
impress the doctrine upon our readers. The decision that the Master of a Lodge 
has no right to refuse admission to a member of the same in good standing, was 
reversed. Upon what ground pray? If he was intoxicated we agree; if not, we 
can't. 

Of the musical interlude he says: 

We envy both Temple Lodge and the G. L. of Colorado in the possession of 
such talent. In onr prairie jurisdictions, where "wind" has free sweep, oratory 
prevails at the expense of the sixth of the liberal arts. 

Our Report is thus favorably noticed: 

We can bat repeat prior verdicts, and pronounce it both an interesting and 
instructive paper, singularly judicious in the matter selected and consequently of 
great value to the reader. 

It all goes, Bro. Blatt, on the mutual admiration plan, 
with non-forfeiture of self-esteem in the above contingency. 

Bro. Harvey J. Rice, of Huron, was elected Grand 
Master ; Grand Secretary re-elected. 



TENNESSEE— 1892. 

Seventy-eighth Annual held at Nashville, January 27, 
1892; M. W. William S. Smith, Grand Master. 

He says that in no year has the Craft enjoyed greater 
harmony and more perfect tranquility. 

He has the mournful announcement to make of the 
death of two Past Grand Masters, Bros. Jonathan S. Daw- 
son and Benjamin R. Harris. 



152 APPENDIX. 

He granted thirty dispensations to elect and install 
or to install officers. 

He refused two dispensations to perform services at the 
graves of deceased brethren who had been previously 
buried. In this connection he says: 

I find no law forbidding each proceedings, bat I was of the opinion a Me- 
morial service held at some suitable place would be more appropriate than the 
performance of oar burial service at the grave. 

The Committee on Jurisprudence decided that no dis- 
pensations were necessary in such cases, the Lodges being 
the competent authority to decide what course should be 
pursued, being guided by the Edicts and official rulings in 
the Digest. 

Two dispensations were granted for new Lodges. 

He reports fourteen decisions which were approved, 
with amendments to Nos. 4 and 9. 

He visited twenty-nine of the Lodges, and laid two 
corner-stones, being those of a church and a public school. 

He issued a circular to the subordinate Lodges in be- 
half of the Masonic Widows 1 aud Orphans' Home and 
requesting that a liberal thank offering be made on St. 
John's Day. 

He calls attention to an "innovation:" 

There is within this Jurisdiction being practiced a funeral service which I 
consider to be an "innovation in the body of Masonry " and of recent date, and 
Subordinate Lodges are taking part therein. Against this I enter my solemn pro- 
test. It should not be tolerated in this Jurisdiction. 

It is the practice at some places for the Gommandery to take charge of the 
body of a deceased brother, and consign the same with another and different 
service from the one laid down in our Text Book, Subordinate Lodges joining in 
the same, forming the outside line at the grave. In the language of our Text Book, 
" the whole ceremony must be under the direction of the Master of the Lodge of 
which the deceased was a member ; " and further, " if the deceased was a member 
of a Chapter, Commandery or Consistory, a portion of the pall-bearers should be 
taken from these bodies severally." 

I think it is highly proper for the Commandery to accompany the remains to 
the place of interment, but in doing so, it should be only as an escort, and, upon 
arriving at the grave, they should take their places purely as a guard of honor, the 
Lodge forming on the inside and the W. M., or some one under his direction, con- 
signing the body. 

If it be the request of the deceased to be buried by another form or ceremony 
than the one herein alluded to, which is laid down in our Text Book, the Worship- 
ful Masters should not permit their Lodges to take part in the ceremonies. " The 
servioes arranged for the burial of the dead in our Text Book are adapted for all 
the purposes for which ceremonies of that character may be required." 

On the afternoon of the second day of the session the 
Grand Lodge held a Lodge of Sorrow to pay appropriate 
tributes to the memories of Past Grand Masters Dawson 
and Harris and P. M. Robert I. Chester. The record of 
these brethren is indeed one of which Tennessee Masons 
may be justly proud. 

The Committee on Fraternal Congress submitted a full 
report on the subject, detailing the various conventions of 



J 



APPENDIX. 153 

the kind since 1822; the report was concurred in and the 
following resolution was adopted: 

Rexrtved, That the M. W. Grand Master be authorized to appoint five delegates 
to represent Tennessee in a Fraternal Congress in Chicago, daring the World's 
Fair, if each a Congress shall be holden ; provided, and it is distinctly understood, 
that neither the action of said Congress nor of said delegates shall in any respect 
whatever be of any binding force upon the Grand Lodge or the Masons of Ten- 
neasee, and that the expenses of the delegates in attending said Congress shall not 
be a charge upon the treasury of the Grand Lodge. 

The Nashville Relief Board paid out for charity $546.32, 
distributed among 133 applicants from different jurisdic- 
tions. 

From the report of the officers of the Masonic Widows' 
and Orphans' Home we gather the following interesting 
details: 

The disbanaements are nearly $21,000, and the estimated cost of the bnilding 
being $28,000, leaves $7,000 yet to be paid oat. Of this amount we have nearly $2,000 
subscribed by Lodges and individuals. We are pledged to build this house by 
■voluntary subscriptions, and the $5,000 necessary to be raised mnst come in that way. 
With $21,000 collected and expended, and not a member of the Craft regretting it, 
could we be true Masons and not raise this amount ? From every Masonic heart 
the response comes. No! No! 

The brick work and the roof of the bnilding have been completed, and with land 
attachments, when the hoase is ready for occupancy, will be worth $40,000. It is 
situated in a most favorable location, and with handsomely improved grounds and 
boulevard, its value and importance will enhance each year, and daily grow in your 
affections. We have often endeavored to impress upon yon the fact that this band- 
some property belongs to the Masons of the State, by virtue of its charter and its 
purposes, as well as your contributions, and we repeat it again. 

At the last session of the Grand Lodge a tender was made of the property to 
your body, on terms to be agreed upon whenever this Grand Body places itself in 
such a condition that it can "constitutionally accept the trust and its attendant 
responsibilities." We make the same offer again to-day. In order to meet the 
constitutional objection to raising a sum for its support, an amendment was offered 
to the Constitution. What you have done with this important matter remains to 
be seen. Of one certainty, however, every well informed and right-minded brother 
is convinced, that the same energy, the same promptings to duty, the same compas- 
sion for the poor and the same devotion to principle and obligations that have 
built this magnificent Home are still alive, and will support it and cherish it as the 
tender child of Masonry. 

The constitutional amendment referred to was re- 
jected, the vote being 52 Lodges for, and 279 against its 
adoption. 

At this session there were pledges received from Lodges, 
$11,712, from individuals, $550, and the members placed 
8189.45 in cash upon the altar for the same purpose. 

And now we turn to P. G. M. George C. Connor's most 
valuable Report on Correspondence. It is enriched with 
his observations in England, Ireland, Scotland Germany 
and Italy, upon the subject of Masonry, largely written 
while fresh in mind and upon the spot, as he "traveled in 
foreign countries." We would gladly give the brethren of 
this jurisdiction his introduction and conclusion entire, did 
space permit, and were the cuts and illustrations acces- 
sible. Such Masonic object lessons are indeed rare. 



1 54 APPENDIX. 

Colorado for 1891 has critical consideration. Grand 
Master Foster's decisions are commented upon in this 
wise: 

1. A brother can not completely sever hie connection with the Fraternity; 
there is no way by which he can be relieved of his obligations. 

2. The W. M. of a Lodge has no authority to refuse to admit a member in good 
standing to his own Lodge. 

3. The regularly elected and appointed officers of a Lodge, with the exception 
of the Tyler, must be members, 

4. The absence of the letter of dispensation of a Lodge renders the meeting 
irregular and any work done illegal; and a candidate initiated when the letter of 
dispensation was absent is irregularly made, and should be healed before proceed- 
ing further. 

Grand Lodge disapproved No. 2, but gave no reason for so doing, and approved 
the others. Pity Committees do not give their reasons. 

Can not a Lodge sever a man's connection with Masonry by expelling him ? 
Does not that relieve him of his obligations to the Craft ? Of course it does not 
relieve him of his oath of secrecy, and no power on earth can. The decision 
quoted will not pass into universal law in that form. In our opinion it is too 
indefinite. 

Why strike out No. 2 ? No Master has such power. A Master may exclude a 
member from the Lodge room for an offense against law and authority committed 
in open Lodge, but he has no power to close the door in a brother's face before 
such offense is committed, nor for a longer period than the Communication at 
which offense was committed. After he has been excluded from the Lodge room 
the Master has power to keep him out during that Communication. Of course an 
appeal from such exclusion will lie. 

If Colorado has a law that gave authority for the view taken in No. 3, all weU 
enough, but it certainly is not the common law of Masonry. Every Lodge is 
bound to have a Tyler, and only a Lodge's members can fill offices therein. The 
proper course is for a Lodge to choose a Tyler, and the one chosen may be allowed 
by the Lodge to employ a qualified substitute ; but only by consent of the Lodge 
can even a substitute be appointed. 

The fourth decision is the general holding of the Craft, but like many other 
trifling matters, it is often exaggerated. The opinion expressed in Decision No. 9, 
under Kentucky (see this Report), is good sound law and ought to be received as 
the Common Law of the Craft, we think. 

The Kentucky decision referred to is as follows : 

The charter of the Lodge is the letter or warrant from the Grand Lodge, 
under the law in this Grand Jurisdiction, authorizing the Lodge to transact busi- 
neBB and do Masonic work. It must be bo far present as that the Master may know 
that it exists, and where it is, and be able to at once produce it if legally called for, 
or required to sustain the regularity and power to work of the Lodge. 

He pays his respects to the writer for his comments in 
last year's Beport.. He either purposely or opaquely 
mistakes our meaning and our good intention quite 
frequently, as for instance in the following: 

Of course it is a matter of much comfort to be able to quote the following 
from such a? superior source : 

" His conclusion, covering twenty-five pages in itself, is filled with valuable 
information, and his remarks upon leading questions are generally sound and weU 
considered, so far as we have had time to glance over them. The Symbols of Free- 
masonry with the accompanying illustration, has interested us greatly, and we shall 
study the article at our leisure." 

44 Sound and well considered, 11 even though only a glance was given them. 
They cost us years of reading and study and no little labor of composition. Hope 
they received more than a glance from onr less thoroughly equipped brethren of 
Tennessee. 11 

Superior source (which is sarcastic) is not quite 
fraternal, to say the least, Bro. Connor. We beg pardon 
for having inadvertently used the words " sound and well 



APPENDIX. I 5 5 

considered," instead of infallible. However, we will see 
that it does not occur again. 

Seriously, Bro. Connor, with the task of preparing our 
Digest awaiting us last year, we could not pay the close 
attention to those twenty-five pages which you think they 
deserved, but as intimated in the above paragraph, they 
were reserved for future study; that, with most authors, 
would be taken as an evidence of warm appreciation. We 
trust with this explanation it may be so regarded. 

We are glad, Bro. Connor, we had an opportunity to 
take you by the hand while in Denver. Our interview, 
brief though it was, we trust will result in a better under- 
standing and appreciation of each other. So mote it be! 

Bro. M. D. Smallman was elected Grand Master; Bro. 
John Frizzell re-elected Grand Secretary. 



TEXAS— 1891. 

Fifty-sixth Annual held at Houston, December 8, 1891; 
M. W. George W. Tyler, Grand Master. 

He thus pictures the condition of the Craft: 

The general awakening and revival of interest in the work of oar fraternity 
in all portions of the State is an occasion for congratulation and joy. The wide- 
spread interest and zeal of the brethren, the general desire to learn the work, the 
greatly increased number of bright Masons, the large attendance and splendid tone 
of the Lodges, the more rigid enforcement of discipline, and the number, character 
and Masonic attainments of those who are seeking oar fellowship— all these mark 
an era in oar progress and inspire new hope for the fatnre. Many Lodges have 
built new and substantial halls, others have refitted and refurnished their old ones. 
The finances of the Lodges are generally improving, does are more promptly paid 
and a great many non-affiliates are returning to their duties and becoming active 
workmen in the quarries. 

He pays a fitting tribute to the memory of P. G. M. 
Thomas R. Bonner. 

Seven dispensations were granted for new Lodges. 

This is the banner jurisdiction on corner-stone laying, 
twenty-four dispensations being granted to the Lodges for 
this purpose. The proposod structures were. eight Masonic 
Halls, four churches, five school buildings, five court 
houses, one armory and one round house of a railway com- 
jxiny. To the last we take exception, and think the G. M. 
erred in judgment in permitting the imposing ceremonies 
of the Craft to be so applied. 

He issued a circular letter to the Craft upon the sub- 
ject of the "abuse of the word * Masonic' for business pur- 
poses," induced by inquiries in regard to "The Masonic 
Mutual Benevolent Association of Fort Worth," a so-called 



I56 APPENDIX. 

insurance company upon the assessment plan which came 
to grief. 

His decisions number twenty-six which w r ere approved 
with three exceptions. 

He had granted permission in several instances to hold 
memorial services in honor of deceased brethren, who had 
not been buried with Masonic ceremonies, on account of 
bad weather or other unavoidable circumstances. He also 
recommends the appointment of a committee to prepare an 
appropriate ceremony for such occasions.. 

He devotes three pages to the consideration of charit- 
able contributions and the growing evil of begging cir- 
culars, etc. 

He cites the following as illustrations: 

Some Lodge* debited to solicit aid in this manner for building their Lodge 
halls, others for the relief of Masons or their widows or orphans. One Mason's 
widow desired to obtain, through her Jste husband's Lodge, in this way, money to 
go into the millinery business in a Western town, to which she had removed ; 
another to pay out a section of school land. One Lodge desired to supplement, by 
contributions from sister Lodges, the scanty earnings of the small farm of a 
Mason's widow, while the Lodge itself had, in cash and dues owing by the mem- 
bers, the snng little sum of $300 available for such purposes. Several Lodges had 
the misfortune to have their halls destroyed by fire and storms, and the first thought 
was, of course, to take up a collection among sister Lodges to enable them to 
rebuild. All of these various applications were duly considered and refused. 

* • * * * * 4- -:: * C $ 

There seems to be among the fraternity a total misconception of the plan and 
character of Masonic charity. To rush to the relief of our brethren—their widows 
and orphans— is our plain and solemn duty. Masons and Masonic Lodges seldom 
fail to relieve distress, to wait on the sick or to soothe the broken-hearted. But 
Masonry is not an " endowment " association. It does not undertake to provide a 
fund for tho maintenance and support of members and their families. There are 
societies that-do this, and they charge for it in proportion— such are the Knights of 
Honor and other modern insurance organizations. The. whole plan of Masonic 
charity is different. The prompt relief extended by the " Good Samaritan " is an 
example from which we draw our lesson of practical charity. In that case the 
relief was opportune, generous and abundant ; hut 1 do not understand that the 
"Good Samaritan'* undertook to support and care for the unfortunate victim 
throughout the balance of his days, or to furnish him capital with which to go in 
business. Our charity does not consist alone of money contributed. The poorest 
Mason on earth can and does lend a warm heart and helping hand to hie distressed 
worthy brother, and heals up the wounds of grief and anguish which the conflicts 
of life produce. 

$ * * * * * * 

Much more might be said, but enough. I believe the Grand Lodge ought to 
abolish absolutely the practice of soliciting contributions by circulars among the 
Lodges, add I recommend the adoption of a resolution to that end. 

• 

Grand Master Tyler ascertained by a personal investi- 
gation the status of Masonry in Mexico, and visited Mon- 
terey in the State of Nuevo Leon, Mexico, where, in 
conjunction with M. \V. Manuel M. Banche, G. M. of 
Coahuila, who had been appointed as a special commis- 
sioner by the Gran Dieta, he negotiated the " Treaty of 
Monterey," which both Grand Bodies have ratified. 

No definite knowledge has heretofore been attainable 
regarding the status of Masonry in Mexico. From the 



APPENDIX 157 

« 

very complete summary of Grand Master Tyler we repro- 
duce the more important facts: 

Availing myself of ail the sources of information at my command, I will now 
undertake to Rive a brief outline of the history of Freemasonry in onr neighboring 
Republic. 

The first appearance of organized Masonry in Mexico was some time between 
1320 and 1>25. The Scottish Kite came with emigration from Europe, and the York 
Kite was introduced from the United States by Bro. Joel R. Poinsett, then onr 
Minister Resident at the City of Mexico, and by others, three York Kite Lodges 
being chartered there by the Grand Lodge of New York. From the Masonry thus 
planted arose the " Supreme Grand Orient of the Mexican National Kite," which 
incloded both rites under its jurisdiction, and which is to be distinguished from 
the " Supreme Grand Orient of the Scottish Kite," hereinafter mentioned. The 
Mexican National Kite spread and flourished for a while, but having incurred the 
hostility of the government and of the priesthood, it was ordered suppressed, and 
thereafter existed only in the most absolute seclusion and secrecy. 

In 1£60 the Supreme Council of the Ancient and Accepted Scottish Kite was 
organized at the City of Mexico under authority from the Supreme Council of the 
Southern Jurisdiction of the United States, whose See is at Charleston, and its 
jurisdiction extended over all the Degrees of that rite, from one to thirty-three. 

Soon afterward there was a disruption or schism in the Supreme Council of 
Mexico, and the seceders organized the Supreme Grand Orient of the Scottish Kite, 
and, confining itself to the first three degrees, claimed to be the supreme authority 
in Symbolic Masonry in the Republic. This claim, however, was never conceded 
by toe Supreme (Council, and the latter body continued to assert its jurisdiction 
over the first three as well as over the higher degrees of that rite. Both contending 
parties went on establishing Blue Lodges throughout the Republic, and, from the 
voluntary union of the Lodges, thus established indiscriminately by each of thoHe 
powers, arose Grand Lodges in a number of the States, which assumed to them- 
selves the title of "' Free and Accepted Masons," asserted their independence of the 
two parent bodies, and claimed to be the supreme Masonic power within their 
respective State or Territorial limits, on the plan of the several Grand Lodges of 
the United States. Thus it happened a few years ago there were the Grand Lodges 
of the Federal District. Jalisco, Vera Cruz, Oaxaca, Vicente Guerrero, Lower Cali- 
fornia, Morelos, Tlaxcala. Aguas Calientes, etc., all claiming to be sovereign 
Masonic bodies, and, as such, they have sought recognition from foreign Masonic 
powers, and some of them were recognized by a few of the American Grand Lodges. 

In 1SJS9 a spirit of harmony seems to have taken hold of our Mexican brethren, 
inspired, no doubt, by the establishment of peace and freedom within their borders. 
Realizing that Masonry conld never prosper in the face of so many discordant 
elements and distracted interests, and, with a .view to the unification of the various 
governing bodies throughout the Republic, a treaty was made on the 24th day of 
December, 1889, by which the Supreme Council relinquished forever all claim of 
jurisdiction over the first three degrees, and the Supreme Grand Orient of the Scot- 
tish Rite and several of the State Grand Lodges disbanded their organization, and 
agreed to reorganize under one supreme governing body. 

This reorganization was made in a grand assembly of representatives or dep- 
uties from nearly all of the State and subordinate Lodges in the Republic, 
assembled after due notice, in the City of Mexico, on the 5th day of February, 1M0, 
and which remained in session for ten days, during which time they carefully 
considered the best plans for unifying the Fraternity and establishing it upon a 
permanent and prosperous basis, and finally perfected their organization under the 
name of the "Grand Symbolic Dieta of the United States of Mexico," and elected 
and installed the dignitaries and officers of the same, that of Most Respectable 
Grand Master being filled by no less a personage than General Porfirio Diaz, Presi- 
dent of the Republic, and that of Grand Secretary General by Dr. Ermilio G. 
Canton, both of them distinguished by their zeal and long devotion to Freemasonry. 
On the 10th of the following June the General Constitution of the Gran Dieta was 
adopted and promulgated, a copy of which, in the Spanish language, is herewith 
submitted for the information 01 the proper committee of this Grand Lodge. To 
facilitate their labors, I also submit herewith a translation of the same by Mrs. 
Tyler, who makes this contribution to these negotiations, in which she has l>eeome 
very ranch interested from having translated for me the numerous Spanish docu- 
ments received from time to time during the year. 

From this Constitution it will be seen that the Gran Dieta is the supreme gov- 
erning power for the whole Republic, and is composed of one deputy from each 
State Grand Lodge and from each subordinate Lodge throughout the Republic, 
and it issues all Charters for subordinate Lodges. There is a State Grand Lodge 
in each State, and some of them are designated by a fancy name and a number, as 
for instance, that of North Tamaniipas, which is called " Light of the Frontier, 
No. 14." These State Grand Lodges are composed of five delegates from each 
subordinate Lodge in the State, and have only a supervisory power over the Lodges 
within their jurisdictions, and all correspondence with the Gran Dieta is trans- 
mitted through them. The system seems admirably adapted to present conditions 



i 5 8 



APPENDIX. 



in Mexico, and was the happy conception af Bros. Diaz, Pambo, Canton, Bauche, 
and other distinguished Masons of that country. The time may come when the 
Independent State Grand Lodge system will be feasible there, bnt for the present, 
the Fraternity will prosper better under the guidance of a central governing 'power 
like the Gran Dieta. 

Under the impetus of this reorganization and unification of Masonic interests, 
and with the confidence inspired by the great names of its eminent promoters, the 
Fraternity has already been planted upon a solid foundation, and there could be no 
brighter outlook for a prosperous future. 

Nearly all of the particular lodges of the Republic, regardless of their former 
dependence, have transferred their allegiance to the Gran Dieta, its constituent 
Lodges now numbering about two hundred, and the membership aggregating about 
seven thousand. Of the former governing bodies, practically none exist except in 
name. The old Grand Orient of the Mexican National Kite consist* of only a few 
Lodges, and is recognized as regular Masonry by the Gran Dieta, because it whs the 
first Masonic organization of that country, and was identified with the introduction 
of both Kites— Scottish and York— and also because Benito Juarez, the elder, and 
many other men distinguished in connection with the restoration of the Republic 
were enrolled among its members. It seems to be preserved as a kind of souvenir of 
the past. The Grand Lodge of Vera Cruz, and also that of the Federal District, still 
maintain a precarious existence, the former consisting of only a very few lodges, as 
I am reliably informed, and the latter presenting the anomaly of a Grand Lodge 
(so called) without a single subordinate— the constituent Lodges of both these former 
powers having submitted to the jurisdiction of the Gran Dieta, and by which these 
struggling bodies are denominated as irregular and clandestine. 

All Lodges in Mexico practice the Scottish Rite, except Toltec Lodge, No. 520, 
in the City of Mexico, chartered in 1882 by the Grand Lodge of Missouri, and which 
will soon be allowed, at its own request, to pass under the jurisdiction of the Gran 
Dieta, if it has not already done so. At one time 1 wits of the opinion that we 
should not recognize a Foreign Grand Body of the Scottish Rite, and so expressed 
myself in a special report on Masonry in Mexico in 1887. when I was chairman of 
the Committee on Foreign Correspondence. While 1 still adhere to the general 
observations and recommendations of that report, which counseled delay in the 
matter of recognition as matters then stood, 1 have become better informed and 
have changed my opinion in regard to onr relations to the Scottish Rite; and since 
the Supreme Councils of Scottish Rite Masonry have declared many years ago that 
they will never interfere with Symbolic Masonry of any rite, but will leave the first 
three degrees to the control of independent governing bodies, created by the Lodges 
themselves, there is no rearon why Symbolic Matonry of the Scottish Rite should 
not be welcomed to the sisterhood of sovereign Grand Lodges. This Rite prevails 
in most of the Spanish speaking countries of both hemispheres. 

The Grand Lodge of Texas has for fifty years, by a standing resolution, per- 
mitted Scottish Rite Masons to visit and affiliate in our Lodges, and we have already 
recognized the Grand Lodge of "Colon and Cuba," which, if 1 mistake not, prac- 
tices the Scottish Rite. It is deemed immaterial to inquire whether the Supreme 
Council of the A. & A. Scottish Rite for the Southern Jurisdiction recognizes the 
Gran Dieta, for that would be in a sense, deferring or delegating to another Masonic 
power, of which we, as Master Masons, can know nothing, the function of deter- 
mining for us whom we should recognize, and when, too. that same power has 
formally relinquished all control of Blue Lodge Masonry of its own rite. But were 
it material to so inquire, it would be found that the Gran Dieta, though absolutely 
independent, resulted from the treaty of December 24, 1N89. between the Supreme 
Council of Mexico and the various bodies of Blue Lodge Masonry. and that the 
Supreme Council of Mexico originated from and has always been recognized by the 
Supreme Council of the Southern Jurisdiction. Our oniy inqniry should be, did 
the Gran Dieta originate from bodies of regular Masonry, and is it now independent 
anU supreme within its territory? Of all this there can now be no further doubt 
or question. 

As before stated, this treaty was formally ratified and 
official recognition accorded the Gran Dieta, whose repre- 
sentative, M. W. Jose Rossenberger, being present, was 
received with "Grand Honors" and most heartily welcomed. 

We have surrendered so much of our space to the above 
that we must omit reference to many other matters. 

Bro. Thomas M. Mathews submits the Report on 
Correspondence, as usual; Colorado for 1890 being the 
subject of fraternal review. Passing reference is made to 
the dedication of the Temple and the laying of the corner- 



APPENDIX. 1 59 

stone of the State Capitol. A brief synopsis is given of 
Grand Master Bridwell's address, "which, taken as a whole," 
he says, "is a practical, business-like paper, showing its 
author to have been a zealous workman." With his de- 
cisions he has no fault to find. He writes in warm praise 
of Bro. H. T. DeLong's oration, saying, in conclusion, 
u Its pure, ennobling thoughts, couched in native English, 
do honor to both head and heart of its talented author." 

Our Report is favorably commented upon, extracts 
being given upon "Physical Qualifications," "Cerneauism," 
"Progressive Ideas," etc., with which he is fully in accord. 

Bro. John Watson, of Clarksville, was elected Grand 
Master; Bro. W. F. Swain re-elected Grand Secretary. 



UTAH— 1892. 

Twenty-first Annual held at Salt Lake City, January 
19, 1892; M. W. William G. Van Home, Grand Master. 

He opens his address as follows : 

Times of growth are times of quiet, and leave little of importance to chron- 
icle. The peace and harmony which are so conducive to growth make the record 
of the passing year dull and uneventful. So smoothly for a twelve months past 
has run the current of Masonic affairs in Utah, that from that fact alone marked 
progress might be expected. And such is indeed the case. The roster of oar 
Brethren shows an increase of fifty-eight, or 10 65-100 per cent. 

He reports that, for the first time in many years, a 
dispensation had been granted for a new Lodge. 

As an evidence of harmony, not a single decision had 
been asked for. 

The difference upon the jurisdiction question with 
Nevada had been amicably adjusted. 

The Masonic Temple Association had been incorporated, 
a desirable site purchased opposite the new county and 
city building, and the stock largely subscribed for. 

He refers with pride to the charitable record of the 
Lodges in that jurisdiction. 

He closes with a hopeful view of the future outlook for 
Masonry in Utah. 

From the Grand Secretary's report we note a gain of 
fifty-eight, and the total membership 544, the largest over 
reported. The Lodges expended for charitable purposes 
$1,587.25; Corinne Lodge, with fifteen members, giving 
$110.55. 



l6o APPENDIX. 

From the Librarian's report we learn that, owing to 
the change made with the Public Library, the Masonic 
books have been piled in a " dark corner " and the book- 
cases stored in a warehouse, and Bro. Diehl himself occu- 
pies a room which, by a great stretch of the imagination, 
is called an office! But there is daylight ahead when the 
new Masonic Temple is completed — then Bro. Diehl will 
have a brand new office and a fine library-room, and once 
more emerge into the cheerful light of day. 

The following resolutions, adopted unanimously by the 
Committee on Library, explains the cause of the disposal 
of the public portion of the Library : 

Whereas, By the labors and contributions of the Masonic Fraternity of Salt 
Lake City, supplemented by generous aid from non-Masons of all classes, our 
Library has been bnilt np and so far maintained, with now abont 8,000 well selected 
volumes; 

Whereas, Oar Fraternity is unable to provide for the farther adequate growth 
of our said Library ; and, 

W11ERKA8, It is now proposed to organize a general " Library Association," 
without regard to political or sectarian affiliations, and provide for its permanent 
maintenance, provided said association may have our Library as a nucleus (except 
oar strictly Masonic books); and, 

Where as, It is further proposed to concede certain memberships in said As- 
sociation for this Grand Lodge, the Salt Lake Lodges, the Chapter and the Com- 
mandery, if desired by them or any of them. Therefore, be it 

Rt*olved % That this Grand Lodge in Annual Communication now assembled, 
approve of the proposition to turn the public portion of the Masonic Library over 
to a General Library Association, for the purposes aforesaid, and the Grand Lodge 
Library Committee is hereby authorized to finally arrange to transfer the said 
public portion of our said Library to such Public Library Association for the 
purposes aforesaid on such terms as to it may seem best. 

Utah has adopted a Grand Representative's jewel and 
is now in line with New York, Louisiana and some others. 
One hundred were contracted for, fifty-five of which are 
needed for present use. Some ten or fifteen will be pre- 
sented to Masonic Libraries, and the rest will be reserved 
for use as occasion shall demand. A cut of the jewel ap- 
pears in the volume. 

Action was taken against the so-called Grand Lodge of 
Ohio. 

Six delegates were appointed to attend the Fraternal 
Congress at their own expense. 

Bro. Christopher Diehl's Report on Correspondence is 
the attractive feature of the volume before us, being fully 
up to its usual standard of excellence. Colorado for 1891 
has a very appreciative review. A full synopsis is given 
of Grand Master Foster's address, and he reproduces two 
of his decisions, Nos. 8 and 10, but without comment. A 
page and a half are given to our report and a discussion 
upon the subject of degrees in reply to what we said last 
year upon that point. We have only room for the follow- 



APPENDIX. l6l 

ing, as recent discoveries have disposed of "much of his 
historical references: 

Bro. Greenleaf farther says : " Bro. Diehl, yon give some of your scholarly 
thoughts to oar symbolism, and consider why there mnst be three Degrees. " That 
is quite another thing. What mnst be now is not what was in the long ago. We 
admit that there ought to be three Degrees because speculative Masonry is taught 
by symbols. Youth, manhood, age; sunrise, meridian, sunset; past, present, 
future, etc. Everywhere three ; even Deity, according to the Christian belief, is 
threefold. In ancient symbolism and history the figure three is often met. It is 
also met in mythology. Zoroaster revered it, so did Confucius, so Mohamed. 
Christ arose from the grave three days after his crucifiction. The figure three ad 
infinitum. Everything, Nature itself, seems to be based upon it. And it is for 
that reason, if for no other, that symbolic Freemasonry ought to have three 
Degrees. It has them, but it had them not at the organization of the mother 
Grand Lodge in 1717, "the presence of Giants in those days" notwithstanding. 
Later Giants added the Fellow Craft and Master Degrees to the entered Apprentice 
Degree, and still later ones took the Royal Arch from the Master's Degree. The 
last act was a money making scheme. Have we caught your idea, Bro. Greenleaf ? 
If so, let us shake. 

Only partially, Bro. Diehl, we said : "The evidence must 
be sought in the internal structure of our system, and not 
in historical references, which are too often misleading." 
We had no idea at the time we penned the above that its 
truth would be so soon corroborated. You relied upon 
historical statements and references, the "old chestnuts" 
scattered through Masonic miscellanies and histories for 
the past three decades, and the result proved as we pre- 
dicted, that you would be mislead. You were emboldened 
to say as above, "it has them, but it had them not at the 
organization of the mother Grand Lodge in 1717, 'the 
presence of giants in those days' notwithstanding. Later 
Giants added the Fellow Craft and Master Degrees to the 
Enterered Apprentice Degree." Never! Bro. Diehl, you 
were never more mistaken in your life. And now for the 
proof. 

As Bro. L. H. Hertzveld wrote to Bro. J. G. Findel in 
1868. "A witness, whose honor and competence no can 
dispute, has risen from the tomb after more than one 
hundred years slumber, to testify to some historical facts." 

The historians had gone on making history out of whole 
cloth, and to suit their own conceptions, until a very large 
number of intelligent Masons had come to believe their 
"fairy tales " as Gospel truth ; but Dr. Manningham's 
letters have let in "new light," and proved conclusively, as 
admitted by Bro. Kobert F. Gould, "That before 1717 the 
now exist ing rituals have been worked." 

Dr. Thomas Manningham was Deputy Grand Master 
of England. On July 12, 1757, he wrote a letter to Bro. 
Saner, of the Provincial Grand Lodge of Holland, at the 
the Hague, in answer to his inquiries about a variety of 
Masonry called Scotch Masonry. In this occurs the fol- 

n 



1 62 APPENDIX. 

lowing paragraph among others equally convincing. We 
copy verbatim: 

These innovations are of very late years, and I believe the brethren will find a 
difficulty to produce a Mason acquainted with any such forms twenty, nay, tea 
years. My own father has been a Mason these fifty years and has been at Lodges 
in Holland, France, and England. He knows none of these ceremonies. Grand 
Master Payn, who succeeded Br. Christopher Wren, is a stranger to them, as is 
likewise one old brother of ninety, who 1 conversed with lately. This brother 
assures me he was made a Mason in his youth, and has constantly frequented 
Lodges until rendered incapable by his advanced age and never heard, or knew, 
any other Ceremonies or Words than those used in general amongst us; such forma 
were delivered to him and those he has retained. As to Knights of the Sword, 
Eagle, etc., the knowledge of them never reached his ears until 1 informed him of 
them. The only orders that we know are three: Master*, Fellow-Crafts, and Ap- 
prentices, and none of them ever arrive at the Honour of Knighthood by Masonry. 

The summing up by Bro. Hertzveld is as follows: 

1. No higher degrees than the first three belong to Pure and Ancient Free- 
masonry. 

2. The secrets of the first throe degrees were the same before 1717, as after it. 

3. The so-called high degrees were introduced after 1740. 

And now for Bro. Gould's comments: 

With the sole distinction, that in the third paragraph, for "after 1740", should 
be read " about 1740/' the axioms laid down by the Deputy Grand Master of 1752-56. 
are in exact harmony with the discoveries of modern Masonic science. But as 
many will listen to Dr. Manningham, who would turn a deaf ear to the utterances 
of even our most advanced students, a pause will be made, while the grounds on 
which his judgment is based, are inquired into. 

" The only Orders we know," observes the doctor, "are three:— Masters, Fellow 
Crafts and Apprentices." There were no more and no less. " My own father." he 
continues, "has been a Mason these fifty years." Acoording to this, Sir Richard 
Manningham must have been initiated about 1707, three years after Governor 
Belcher had gone through a similar ordeal, and two years before the remarkable 
allusion in the Tattler, toa" set of people," who have their signs and tokens like 
Freemasons. 

The "old brother of ninety, who was made a Mason in his youth," must have 
been admitted a member of the Society in the last quarter of the seventeenth 
century. 

The two brethren, whose testimony -as we have seen— was relied upon by Dr. 
Manningham, may, I think, be regarded without doubt by ourselves, as the witnesses 
of truth. 

The question, whether the secrets imparted to Masonic candidates in 1757 were 
the same as those existing at the close of the seventeenth and beginning of the 
eighteenth century, is such an exceedingly simple one that, in the case before us. 
the various canons above may be safely reduced to a single one, namely, whether 
the two witnesses called by Dr. Manningham are to be regarded as " persons of 
veracity?" 

If they are not, then- -and then only— shall we be justified in believing that Sir 
Richard Manningham and " the old brother of ninety," together with the founders 
and early members of the Grand Lodge of England (1711-1723) looked calmly on 
while the forms and ceremonies to which they had been accustomed were as sud- 
denly metamorphosed as it has become, to some degree, the fashion to assume. 

It should be recollected, moreover, that in 1717, when the younger Manning- 
ham first appears on the Masonic stage, neither Jacob Lam ball, Grand Warden, 
1717, or George Payne, G. M., 17 is, had retired from it. Indeed, he mentions the 
fact that the latter brother (whose death only occurred on January 3, 1757) had ex- 
tended to him his confidence with respect to degrees that had been worked in his 
time. 

We regard the above, Bro. Diehl, as convincing testi- 
mony, and so my statement still holds good : There were 
three degrees, and there were giants in those days! 

Bro. Watson N. Shilling, Grand Master; Bro. Christo- 
pher Diehl re-elected Grand Secretary. 



APPENDIX. 163 



VERMONT— 1892. 

The portrait of Bro. Marsh 0. Perkins, P. G. M. aiid 
Chairman on Foreign Correspondence, appears as a frontis- 
piece. 

Ninety-ninth Annual held at Burlington, June 15, 1892; 
M. W. Delos M. Bacon, Grand Master. 

His first thoughts are o the bright lights in Masonry 
that have been extinguished. He pays a splendid tribute 
to the memory of P. G. M. Henry H. Smith, with a record 
of his Masonic career. 

He submits a list of ten decisions. 

He refused dispensations as follows: To a Lodge to lay 
a corner-stone; to re-open a ballot after it had been passed 
three times at a previous communication, resulting in an 
adverse ballot, though not declared by the Master; to 
authorize a Past Master to preside at the annual meeting 
of a Lodge, in the absence of the Master and Wardens; to 
receive the petition of a rejected candidate within a year 
after such rejection. 

In the first of these, unless there were good reasons to 
the contrary, he might have made the W. M. his proxy, to 
open an occasional Grand Lodge. Why he refused to 
deputize the P. M. to preside is also rather vague. 

In regard to the Past Master's Degree, he concurs in 
the opinion of Grand Master Perkins, in 1889, which was 
to this effect: 

" A Master elect may not be legally installed without receiving the esoteric 
instruction attending the solemn induction to the Oriental chair of King Solomon 
in an assembly or convocation of actual Past Masters." 

" It is also recommended that the proper ritual be prescribed as soon as prac- 
ticable of the esoteric as well as of the exoteric ceremonies attending the installa- 
tion of a Master-elect into office." 

This ruling and recommendation was adopted, and a 
committee of three appointed to formulate the work and 
ceremony, but they have never organized. 

He recommends decisive action against the joint 
occupancy of Lodge-rooms which have been dedicated to 
Masonic uses. 

He reports having visited ten of the thirteen districts 
in that jurisdiction. 

The Grand Lecturer reports having visited all the 
districts except one, and his labors were productive of 
great benefit to the officers who attended the meetings. 
The G. M. was present, also, except on two occasions. 



164 APPENDIX. 

From the Grand Secretary's report we glean the fol- 
lowing figures: 

Number of initiates, 415 ; number passed, 416 ; number raised, 420 ; number 
admitted, 70 ; number reinstated, 26 : number dimitted, 161 ; number died, 149 ; 
number suspended, 66 ; number expelled, 4 ; present membership, 8,976 ; amount 
received for dues, $1,215.00 ; amount received for per capita tax, $1,796.60. 

The rebellious faction in Ohio, and their so-called 
Grand Lodge, were condemned. 

Action in regard to the Fraternal Congress was deferred 
until next Anuual. 

Kecognition was accorded to the Grand Lodge of 
Tasmania. 

The Committee on Bituals reported in favor of a new 
Masonic text book, they having already collected the 
material and partially completed its preparation. The 
Grand Lodge adopted the report, and the expense attend- 
ing its publication is to be paid by the Grand Treasurer 
upon approval by the Grand Master. 

The proceedings of the D. D. G. M.'s meeting, which 
was largely attended, is published in the volume. This 
was held on October 16, 1891. The addresses delivered by 
the Grand Lecturer, Grand Master and other distinguished 
brethren are filled with instructive matter of great value 
to Lodge officers and the Craft generally. 

The volume also contains the reports of the D. D. 
Grand Masters, which are full and comprehensive, show- 
ing at a glance the condition of the Lodges in their several 
districts. 

P. G. M. Marsh O. Perkins furnishes an able and in- 
structive Report on Correspondence, covering 124 pages. 
Colorado for 1891 receives fraternal consideration. He 
says Grand Master Foster's address "is a practical, com- 
mon-sense document, well expressed." 

He reviews his official acts with favorable comment and 
quotes from Bro. Bush's oration, which is pronounced 
" excellent." 

Grand Master and Grand Secretary re-elected. 



VIRGINIA— 1891. 

One hundred and fourteenth Annual held at Richmond, 
December 15, 1891; M. W. Bro. J. Howard Wayt, Grand 
Master. 

He congratulates the members of the Grand Lodge 
upon the fact that they had assembled in their own Temple, 



APPENDIX. 165 

and he records the sagacious, laborious and generous efforts 
of the Trustees, to whom they were indebted for this priv- 
ilege, and to whom were due the thanks of the Masons of 
Virginia. 

He reports peace and harmony and cordial relations 
with all other Grand Jurisdictions. 

He had granted seven dispensations for new Lodges. 

He laid the corner-stones of three structures — those of 
a Masonic Temple, a female institute and a court house. 

He commends the Masonic Home, and hopes that in 
the near future not only every Lodge, but individual mem- 
bers as well, will become interested in its proper endow- 
ment 

The Fifth edition of the Text Book being exhausted, 
he recommends the publication of a new edition. Most of 
the questions submitted have been answered by a reference 
thereto. A few, however, are reported, which were ap- 
proved. 

He had made official visitations to many portions of the 
jurisdiction, which would doubtless be productive of profit- 
able results. 

He is sound in his utterances, and stands by the old 
ways and customs of the Fraternity. We quote his words 
on this subject : . 

We do not expect to improve upon the principles of oar Order, or to declare 
new troths. We stand by the ancient Landmarks of our Fraternity, but we desire 
to throw brighter light upon the old troths, and to learn the better how to apply them 
to the practical realities df life. 

1 am proud to believe that there is now a strong devotion to the principles of 
Masonry, founded on an earnest conviction that onr institution is a powerful aid in 
subduing our passions and improving us in those virtues which adorn and solidify 
character. 

As we review the past, and remember how very ancient is our Order, we are 
forcibly struck by the permanent stability of Masonry. No other human organi- 
zation has so successfully defied, through long ages, all the mutations of time. 
Men die, empires fall, but Masonry, like the exerlasting hills, remains. Why, my 
brethren, is this ? it is because the corner-stone of our institution is the Word of 
God, that Great Light in Masonry, the Holy Bible. Without it there can bono 
Masonry, and this insures its growth, its prosperity and its permanency. 

1 have earnestly desired, in my administration as Grand Master, to adhere 
closely, as all my distinguished predecessors have, to the ancient usages, customs 
and Landmarks of Masonry. It is only by such a course that the stability of our 
Order can be maintained. 

The Masons of Virginia have long and justly been credited with marked con- 
servatism in thought and practice. 

We stand, my brethren, for the old ways and customs of Masons and will not 
consent to or countenance the introduction of any new methods into our fraternity. 

We learn that the total cost of the Temple to date, 
including lot, has been $157,419.57. 

From the various reports we learn that the Masonic 
Home has now eight boys as occupants, all of whom have 
living mothers. They are reported to be bright and intel- 



l66 APPENDIX. 

ligent. The expenses, including cost of improvement and 
repairs, were $3,179.77. The invested fund is $5,700.00. 

The following resolution was adopted: 

Resolved, That the Grand Master be requested to prepare for publication with 
the Annual Proceedings, an appeal to all the Lodges and brethren of this jurisdic- 
tion to contribute to the endowment and support of the Masonic Home. 

There are reports from forty-three of the forty-five 
District Deputy Grand Masters. 

No Report on Correspondence. 

An Historical Sketch of Rockingham Union Lodge No. 
27, from October 29, 1789, to October 29, 1889, read by 
Bro. J. Wilton, at its Centennial Anniversary, is published 
in the Appendix. 

Bro. William Henry Pleasants, of Hollins, was elected 
Grand Master; Bro. W. B. Isaacs re-elected Grand Secre- 
tary. 



WASHINGTON— 1891. 

Proceedings embellished with portrait of G. M. as a 
frontispiece. 

Thirty-fourth Annual held at Seattle, June 9, 1891 ; M. 
W. James E. Edmiston, Grand Master. 

He reports a prosperous condition of affairs in that 
jurisdiction. 

Eight dispensations were granted for new Lodges. 

He laid the corner-stone of a church at Spokane. 

He reports twelve decisions which were approved. 

He recommends certain forms, which are submitted in 
his address, for the taking of testimony of witnesses in 
Masonic trials who reside beyond the jurisdiction of the 
Lodge, the testimony being taken by commissioners. 
They were subsequently referred to the Grand Secretary 
to revise and report thereon at the next Annual. 

Resolutions were introduced upon the subject of a 
General Congress or Convocation of Masons to be held in 
Chicago as proposed, on the 24th of June, 1893. 

The matter was postponed until the next session. 

The Grand Lodge, during the session, laid the corner- 
stone of the new Masonic Temple in Seattle, in the presence 
of a large assemblage. The Grand Master was presented 



APPENDIX. 167 

with a beautiful gavel, the head of which was made of 
cedar from Mount Lebanon, and the handle of olive wood 
from the Mount of Olives. A silver trowel, beautifully 
engraved, was presented by St. John's Lodge, to be used in 
the ceremony. An eloquent oration was delivered by R. 
W. Bro. Joseph M. Taylor. 

From the Report of the Committee on Work and 
Returns we glean the following particulars: 

Total nnmber initiated, 384 ; total number passed, 334 ; total number raised. 
313 ; total number affiliated, 495, [ including those admitted in the organization of 
new Lodges.- Gb. Sec.] ; total nnmber reinstated, 17; total number deaths, 42 ; 
total number dim it ted, 130 ; suspended for nonpayment of dues, 62 ; suspended for 
U. M. conduct. 9 ; expelled, 2. Total number of Master Masons on roll, 3,419. £. 
A. 'son rolls, 156 ; F. C/s, 70 ; honorary members, M) ; indigent members, 12. 

The special committee appointed at the last Annual to 
procure photographs of Past Grand Masters, reported that 
they had secured eighteen and others had promised to fur- 
nish their photographs at that session. 

Bro. Thomas M. Reed resumes his old place on the 
tripod, from which he begged to be relieved last year, and 
his Report on Correspondence is the attractive feature of 
the volume. Colorado for 1890 receives due and fraternal 
consideration. Our style of opening does not please him 
however, he says: 

There is a good deal of pomp and glorification in this method of opening the 
Grand Lodge, and receiving its chief officer, and of course it is pleasing and tick- 
ling to the vanity of some, but — well, we beg to be excused, preferring the good 
old fraternal way of " meeting upon the level/' 

He regards Grand Master Brid well's address as a 
"forcible and well prepared paper." 

Like many others, he has his say on decision 6: 

44 A Lodge having suspended one of its members for non-payment of dues 
cannot in after years remit the amount and restore him to good standing. Sus- 
pended or expelled Masons are not worthy objects of Masonic charity/' 

The sweeping declaration in the above " decision " presents itself to our mind 
not only as unreasonable and illogical, but void as a stone of any element of 
"charity." 

Suspension, while it implies an arrest or forfeiture of all Masonic rights and 
privileges for the time being, does not mean complete exclusion from or Masonic 
death to the order, but carries with it the hopeful consideration of restoration. 
True * 4 charity (love) suffereth long and is kind." All men err, and erring, need 
repentance. Suspension frequently occurs from trifling causes, hasty fits of anger, 
excited by some private, social 4>r business troubles; imaginary grievances, often 
approximating insanity; but when calm reflection comes to the relief, and reason 
asserts her sway, manly sorrow and true repentance frequently follow. Shall the 
mere fact of a few dollars and- cents (wholly a mercenary consideration), which 
the unfortunate brother is nnable to pay, and which the Lodge is willing to remit, 
stop the Lodge in its good work from restoring the repentant brother to its fold 
and fellowship when in its judgment he is deemed worthy ? We think not. 

After quoting other decisions without comment, he 
proceeds as follows: 

M/.W.'.Bro. Bridwell gives us a chapter on "Ancient Landmarks," but we 
cannot see that any new light is thrown upon that subject. His first sentence pre- 
sents the status of the whole matter " in a nut shell/ 1 It is this: 



1 68 APPENDIX. 

The question has been discussed by many Masonic writers and has brought 
oat a variety of opinions as to what comprises the Ancient Landmarks of Free 
Masonry. 

In connection with the above, Bro. B rid well takes occasion to say that 

Freemasonry is not after the fashion of these times, nor is it the result of com- 
promise with any customs or views of any time. Masonic law has existed without 
change longer than any human law, and must continue unchanged, ever abiding in 
its pristine purity. 

We may not fully comprehend the Grand Master's meaning in the above quota- 
tion. He had just been referring to the unchangeable nature of the Landmarks. 
It would seem, therefore, from our brother's remarks that he considers Masonic 
law, Freemasonry, and the Landmarks as synonymous in the above references. 
The Landmarks— those fundamental standards that all can agree upon as such— are, 
of course, unchangeable. The principles of Freemasonry never change, but the 
methods of elucidating and teaching those principles have from the earliest periods 
of the history of the order changed, and continue to change. And so with respect 
to Masonic law, and it is simply rashness to say that it "has existed without 
change longer than any human law." 

*********** 

We believe, moreover, that Freemasonry is "fashioned" for and suited to this 
age as much as for " ye olden tyme." 

From our Report he selects " Grand Masters' Preroga- 
tives" for his review. After quoting our opinion, he 
says: 

It will be seen that Bro. Green leaf's views are somewhat modified from those 
entertained by some of the "inherent prerogative" advocates in that the Grand 
Master may be " held amonable to the Grand Lodge for the exercise of this power/* 
that the constitutions and immemorial usages of the craft required the Grand 
Master " to report all such acts for approval or disapproval, as the craft in its col- 
lective wisdom, might determine." 

Taking this sensible view of the Question and sifting it down to its very 
essence, we fail to see any more of the elements of " inherency" in the powers of 
the Grand Master than is by law given to any other chief officer in the exercise of 
the functions of his office in the control of men or bodies of men connected with 
and occupying subordinate relations to such chief officer. But we deny the com- 
monly asserted " inherent" or hereditary powers of a Grand Master. There is no 
proof that such powers ever existed. If they ever did exist, or exist now, he can 
exercise them, right or wrong, and is beyond the reach of, and amenable to no 
Masonic law. The proposition in our judgment is simply absurd. In the early 
history of the order no mention is made of any such inherent power ; and yet, with- 
out one single fact to justify the assertion, the dogma is held up by some as a 
something of imperishable, not to say immaculate, sanctity in Masonry. 

Bro. Thomas Amos was elected Grand Master; Grand 
Secretary re-elected. 



WEST VIRGINIA— 1891. 

The portraits of Grand Master Tavenner and P. G. 
Masters Charles J. Faulkner and William G. Bassett, ap- 
pear in the Proceedings. 

Twenty-seventh Annual held at Martinsburg, Novem- 
ber 10, 1891; M. W. John M. Hamilton, Grand Master. 

He says: 

The progress of the Order within this jurisdiction during the year has been 
such as to cause feelings of gratification to all its Craftsmen. The Subordinate 
Lodges with but one or two exceptions have been prosperous, and the best of feel- 
ing and fellowship has prevailed; and although the Order may not. and indeed has 
not increased its membership to the same extent that several of the more modern 
institutions claim to have done, yet it must be remembered that Masonry takes no 



APPENDIX. 169 

pride in the mere numerical strength of its membership, and it is with a feeling of 
satisfaction rather than of mortification that we admit that oar doors have 
remained closed against many, who were unworthy of the great honor which they 
sought. 

He had granted one dispensation for a new Lodge. 

He refused a dispensation for a Lodge to appear in the 
parade on the occasion of an Army reunion. 

He submits a long list of decisions, thirty in number, 
all but one of which were approved. 

He suspended one W. M. from office. 

He refers at length to the death of M. W. Bro. Cxeorge 
Baird, Past Grand Master, it being the first time in that 
jurisdiction that a Mason of his rank had fallen by the 
hand of violence. He refrains from any particulars in 
connection with his death or the circumstances surround- 
ing it, preferring to let the courts of the State pass upon 
the guilt or innocence of his slayer. He confines himself 
to his eminent services in Masonry. He was also called 
upon to pay a tribute to the memory of a second Past 
Grand Master, M. "VV. Charles H. Collier, who died two 
weeks later. He was for many years Grand Lecturer, and 
devoted patient labor to the ritualistic work. 

From the Report of the Grand Lecturer we quote the 
following, as the subject has been so often discussed in 
our own Grand Lodge. 

Most of oar sister jurisdictions have become aroused to the importance of 
having subordinate Lodges thoroughly instructed in the esoteric work, and have 
taken steps to secure that result. 

A large proportion of the Lodges in our State are in very bad condition as to 
their knowledge of the unwritten work, and while, no doubt, desirous of improving, 
they are either unable or unwilling to pay for the services of a competent Lecturer 
to instruct them. Under our present plan, the Deputy (f rami Lecturers do not 
visit the Lodges unless their services are called for, which is very seldom. It is, 1 
think, to be regretted, that it has not, for various reasons, been practicable to put 
into force a recommendation which has been repeatedly made, to practically con- 
solidate the offices of District Deputy Grand Master and Deputy Grand Lecturer. 

Were this done, the Lodges would have the benefit of at least one vinit a year 
from an officer competent to instruct them, and the Grand Master would have the 
benefit of a report on the practical working of each Lod^e from one thoroughly 

Qualified to judge. I mean by this no possible disrespect to our present District 
>epoty Grand Masters, but in the manner they are now selected no consideration 
is given to their knowledge of the work. 

From the Report of the Committee on Returns, we 
learn the present number of Lodges is 93, all making re- 
turns but one. Total membership, 4,528. Net gain over 
last year, 417. Expelled, 4. Expelled for unmasonic con- 
duct, 7. Suspended for non-payment of dues, 101. 

The Committee on Jurisprudence, in dissenting from 
decision No. 1 of the G. M., give utterance to some thoughts 
which are worthy of preservation. We frequently hear 
Masons declare that they will take the degrees over again 



I70 APPENDIX. 

rather than have any more trouble, in cases where Lodges 
have become extinct, and records burnt or lost, or where 
their diplomas from foreign countries are not recognized, 
etc. We have a case of this kind now in mind, where a 
Grand Secretary of a large jurisdiction, though written to, 
has not been able to give a certificate, the Lodge records 
having been destroyed. Many worthy brethren have 
talked with us, who have never been able to obtain any 
certificate or record whatever, although desirous of affili- 
ating, and, as remarked above, after years of futile effort, 
have declared they would willingly petition anew, and pay 
for the degrees again, in order to acquire their old Ma- 
sonic standing. Perhaps the case cited may be in the 
same category. 

The decision and comments are as follows : 

A non-affiliated Master Mason residing in the jurisdiction of Ohio, petitions a 
subordinate Lodge of that State for initiation and is rejected : Held, that he thereby 
waived his rights as n non-affiliated Mason, and voluntarily placed himself under 
the perpetual jurisdiction of Ohio. 

How a man who has once been made a Master Mason can forget that he is a 
Mason, and again petition for degrees, is inexplicable upon any other theory than 
that of paralysis of the brain— such a man must be a lunatic, and therefore not 
responsible for his conduct. But suppose him sane, and that being a non-affiliated 
Master MaBon, he presents a petition for initiation and is rejected, can the rejecting 
Lodge retain such perpetual jurisdiction over him as to prevent another Lodge 
from receiving bin petition for membership? Can he be said to have "waived his 
rights as a non-affiliated Mason?" The answer to these questions will doubtless be 
suggested by asking another: Can a Master Mason, under any ci ream stances, 
voluntarily divest himself of his obligations and his rights as a Mason, and become 
again one of the profane? Can he, by any act of his own, wipe out the past — oblit- 
erate every vestige of his Masonry— and place himself in precisely the position he 
occupied when he first sent a petition to the nearest Lodge? Certainly he cannot. 
44 Once a Mason, always a Mason," has become a familiar maxim. A Mason may, 
as the punishment of his own improper conduct, be expelled, but he is not thereby 
relieved from his obligations, lie may neglect to exercise his rights as a Mason, 
but he does not thereby destroy them. The committee is therefore of opinion, that 
in the case presented, the candidate cannot be held to have waived any right which 
he possessed. The circumstances are so anomalous as to suggest that there must 
have been some mistake about the matter, and that the petition was really a request 
for affiliation and membership, and not. for degrees. If it was a petition for mem- 
bership, of course the jurisdiction of the rejecting Lodge is not perpetual, as is 
correctly stated in the Grand Master's decision No. 2. If it was a petition for 
initiation, then it was a foolish net, but it did not divest the applicant of any righto 
he theretofore possessed, and no jurisdiction attaches to the rejecting Lodge. m This 
is the only case in which the committee asks leave to dissent from the decisions 
announced by the Grand Master. 

The Report on Correspondence is by P. G. M. George 
W. Atkinson, as usual. Colorado for 1890 is fraternally 
reviewed. Grand Master Bridwell is highly complimented, 
and his address pronounced an " excellent business paper." 
His remarks on " Landmarks " are quoted entire. Bro. H. 
T. DeLong's oration is referred to as "very short and 
practical." Our remarks on "Grand Masters' Preroga- 
tives" are given in full. 

Bro. Lewis N. Tavener, of Parkersburg, was elected 
Grand Master; Bro. George W. Atkinson re-elected Grand 
Secretary. 



APPENDIX. 171 



WISCONSIN— 1892. 

Forty-eighth annual held at Milwaukee, June 14, 1892; 
M. W. Bro. N. M. Littlejohn, Grand Master. 

He reports the past year one of the most peaceful and 
prosperous in the history of that jurisdiction. The in- 
crease in members has been the largest ever known, the 
net gain being over 500. Continuing, he gives us this 
pleasing picture : 

The ability and high character of those seeking admission to the Order give 
promise that Masonry will keep advancing until it stands in the front ranks as a 
power for good. I think there has never been a year since the organization of 
Masonry in our State, when so many substantial and commodious Masonic edifices 
have been erected and dedicated to virtue and universal benevolence. This fact 
evidences not only prosperity on the part of our constituent Lodges, but a devotion 
on the part of the members, that gives promise of a secure future for our beloved 
Order. From all parts of our jurisdiction come assurances that Masonry was never 
more prosperous — never so strongly entrenched in public opinion. 

Among the lamented dead, to whom he makes fitting 
reference, was Bro. Homer S. Goss, P. S. G. W. 

Nine decisions are submitted, all of which were ap- 
proved. 

He granted six dispensations for the formation of new 
Lodges. 

Sixty-four special dispensations were granted for 
various purposes. 

Four Lodges lost their Lodge rooms and furniture by 
fire ; also their Charters, except in one instance. 

He discusses the proposed amendments to the Consti- 
tution at considerable length ; also reviews the substance 
of the reports of officers, and closes his address with sen- 
sible suggestions as to the practice of Masonic principles 
in our daily conduct and lives. 

The membership is 14,498. Action was taken against 
the so-called Grand Lodge of Ohio. 

A design for a P. G. Master's jewel was adopted on the 
recommendation of the special committee appointed for 
that purpose, and the following resolution was adopted : 

Resolved, That the Grand Secretary be and is hereby authorized to procure one 
of these jewels for each of the Past Grand Masters who have not received a Past 
Grand Master's jewel from the Grand Lodge. 

Bro. Duncan McGregor again furnishes the Keport on 
Correspondence, filled, as usual, with interesting matter 
and incisive comments. It covers 70 pages. Colorado for 
1891 is fraternally reviewed. A brief synopsis is given of 



172 APPENDIX. 

Grand Master Foster's official acts. He thus notices a 
decision which was not approved : 

The W. M. of a Lodge has no aathority to refuse to admit a member in £ood 
standing to his own Lodge. This last mentioned decision was not concurred in by 
Grand Lodge, bnt the reason for such action is not given. We wonder what the 
reason could be. 

Bro. Fred King, of La Crosse, was elected Grand Mas- 
ter ; Bro. John W. Laflin re-elected Grand Secretary. 



WYOMING— 1891. 

Seventeenth Annual held at Rawlins, December 1, 
1891; M. W. Emile A. Abry, Grand Master. 

He reports the Lodges in a prosperous condition gen- 
erally. He is also able to report from personal observation 
that renewed interest and earnestness are manifested, hav- 
ing visited eight Lodges, and received reports from the 
other five. He urges the appointment of a custodian in 
order to secure uniformity of work. 

He had granted one dispensation for a new Lodge. 

The corner-stone of a public school at Sheridan was 
laid by proxy. 

He reports a list of decisions all of which were ap- 
proved. 

The committee to whom was referred the communica- 
tion of the Grand Lodge of Kentucky in reference to the 
Fraternal Congress, reported favorably thereon, recom- 
mending the appointment of six delegates, which report 
was adopted. 

Proper action was taken in regard to the spurious 
Grand Lodge of Ohio. 

A committee of five was appointed to recommend an 
"official work" to report at the next Annual. 

Bro. W. L. Kuykendall is the wide-awake writer of the 
Report on Correspondence. Colorado for 1890 receives a 
fraternal review of three pages. He comments upon 
Grand Master BridwelVs address, and approves of his acts 
generally, agreeing with him on decisions Nos. 6 and 13 
upon which he gives his own opinion as follows: 

If we are not mistaken the Grand Master has canght it from more than one 
quarter for number six. In our opinion the decision is right andjust from a gen- 
eral standpoint, for the reason that to hold otherwise would be offering a premium 



APPENDIX. 173 

for ndn-payment of dues. A suspended member was entitled to all the rights, 
benefits and privileges of his Lodge the same as other members, to the date of sus- 
pension for such non-payment. They paid their does for the same time he was 
delinquent. We see no good reason for an exception in behalf of those who in a 
majority of cases carelessly allow themselves to be suspended. 

Number thirteen agrees perfectly with number six, and is oar idea exactly of 
justice in both cases. We believe that neither should have any claims on the 
fraternity until payment of dues and restoration is effected in the one case, and in 
the other that the dimit should after one year be of no value whatever, except as 
evidence of former good standing for the purpose of affiliating or joining in a peti- 
tion for a new Lodge. 

Then again, on the subject of Landmarks, he shows 
that he has "progressive" tendencies. We have found 
in reading the earliest records of our fraternity that our 
fathers repeatedly enjoined the preservation of the ancient 
Landmarks, ancient customs and usages. This injunction 
is continually to be met with in the old charges and consti- 
tutions. If we moderns have progressed sufficiently to 
eliminate all of them except what can be counted on the 
fingers of one haud, as claimed by Bro. Kuykendall, is it 
not time to call a halt. Says Bro. Kuykendall: 

Our worthy brother next goes off in a lengthy discourse on Landmarks, and 
■ays there are twenty- five of them, which shows that he has only read after Bro. 
Mackey, who says that is the number sure and certain, upon which Bro. Simons 
sej s there are fifteen, and Bro. Morris comes forward and raises the latter to seven- 
teen, whilst a large number of others who have investigated the subject claim that 
they are very few in number. Now, we have heard of several hundred, for nearly 
everything is claimed as a Landmark if it bolsters up a certain view, and not a 
Landmark if in opposition. The number that have not been set aside in one way 
or another in this or that jurisdiction can be counted on the fingers of one hand. 

When our report is reached nearly one-half of his space 
is given to its consideration and he is not in accord with 
us upon a single point. He disagrees with us upon physi- 
cal qualifications, Grand Master's prerogative and even 
says the Constitution tinkers are the salt of the earth. We 
had occasion to touch up our brother on his progressive 
tendencies and disposition to adopt the good features of 
other secret organizations and engraft them upon Masonry. 
His reply covers half a page and we gladly give him a 
hearing: 

When he reaches Wyoming he gives this writer a good send-oft in his way. 
Think* we grow restive under the restraint of old laws and usages, and that we are 
a member of other organizations and desire to see Masonry adopt their good feat- 
ures, etc. The word " restive " is probably as good as any, and we believe that any 
law, old or new, should be changed, provided it does not endanger the existence 
and principles of Masonry, whenever it is found to be wrong in principle and Htands 
in the way of the greatest good to our fraternity, and clearly not in keeping with the 
Masonry of our time. We do not belong to that class who shut their eyes and insist 
that no law or regulation should be adopted that will be of material benefit, simply 
because another society has such a regulation. We have yet to see the Mason or 
member of any other society who is a saint or approached perfection in a very near 
degree. Neither do we believe the laws of either are divine, and yet. from the 
bstter-than-thou expressions heard now and then, we have been expecting some 
enthusiastic frater to claim saintly robes and the divinity of the law. A removal 
of the beam from the eyes so as to allow a little investigation into laws and regula- 
tions and an insight into what other organizations are accomplishing, would cause 
a change in the tune of those will not see. As to whether those who have and are 
investigating belong to other societies, is neither here nor there, neither is it 



174 APPENDIX. 

j material so long as they live ap to, advocate, and by their daily walk exemplify, as 

near as weak humanity may, the teachings of the Great Light in Masonry • and the 
undying principles of oar great institution. 

We have re-read our comments in our 1890 report, and 
see no reason to change or modify any opinion therein 
expressed. Our views have been endorsed by others as 
sound, and we are satisfied that Bro. Kuykendall, after 
further investigation, will arrive at a similar conclusion, 
not only on this question, but those of Landmarks, pre- 
rogatives and physical qualifications. On these questions, 
as well as that of our antiquity, the next few years will 
witness a return to the old faith. 

Bro. Perry L. Smith, of Rawlins, was elected Grand 
Master ; Grand Secretary re-elected. 



APPENDIX. I /5 



DIGEST OF DECISIONS. 

Compiled From Proceedings, Accompanying Report on 

Foreign Correspondence. 



ADVANCEMENT. 

A Brother who receives his First Degree in this jurisdiction, and 
removes to a foreign one, can not receive his Second and Third De- 
grees without the consent of the Grand Masters of both jurisdictions, 
obtained through the Grand Secretary, at the request of a Lodge in 
this jurisdiction. — [6. M. Canada, 1891. 

When an applicant for advancement is rejected, his second 
application must be made at a regular, and it may be voted upon at 
that meeting, unless reference is demanded by some Brother. — [G.M. 
Michigan, 1892. 

Statement. — A gentleman was duly initiated as an Entered 
Apprentice in Star in the East Lodge No. 880, under the jurisdiction 
of the Grand Lodge of England, on the island of Zante, Greece, in 
1871. He now petitions our Lodge for the Fellow Craft and Master 
Mason Degrees and membership therein, submitting a diploma or 
certificate signed by the officers and impressed with the seal of said 
Star in the East Lodge. 

Question. — Have we a right to receive his petition and confer the 
Degrees ? 

Answer. — Yes. If a Brother receives the Entered Apprentice 
Degree under the jurisdiction of any Lodge in the United States, I 
should, as a matter of practice and custom, *ask the consent of the 
Lodge that conferred that Degree, before receiving and acting upon 
his petition, and I think most of the Grand Lodges of this continent 
recognize the principle that the Lodge that receives a petition and 
confers the Entered Apprentice Degree, has exclusive jurisdiction 
over the material. They do not all hold to that doctrine, however, 
but this is a different case. The Grand Lodge of England does not, 
I think, hold to exclusive personal jurisdiction. They have Lodges 
scattered nearly all over the Eastern world, and, as in this case, they 
give certificates to a Brother when he receives the Entered Appren- 
tice Degree. That may be treated as a dimit. It may be so done in 
this case, and the Degrees conferred, if elected. — [G. M. Minnesota, 
1892. 



I76 APPENDIX. 

That a Lodge, under Dispensation, has not the right, while 
working under a Dispensation, to confer the Fellow Craft and Master's 
Degree on an Entered Apprentice of a Lodge extinct, although the 
applicant has resided within the jurisdiction of said Lodge twelve 
months.— [G. M. Virginia, 1891. 

A Lodge asked privilege of conferring the F. C. and M. M. 
Degrees on an E. A. Mason belonging to a Lodge U. D., and then 
claim him as a member. 

I decided this could not be done nor could he dimit from the 
Lodge until they were chartered — [G. M. Wyoming, 1892. 

AFFILIATION. 

An applicant for affiliation must reside within the jurisdiction of 
the Grand Lodge, and the Lodge with which he seeks to affiliate. — 
[G.M.California, 1891. 

A Lodge has the right to receive and consider the petition of a 
non-affiliate at any stated meeting, whether the petitioner was sick 
or well, and to take final action thereon at a subsequent meeting, if 
the petitioner was living at the time of such final action.— [G. M. 
Tennessee, 1892. 

BALLOT. 

There are only four cases in which the ball ballot should be 
used—for initiation, passing and raising, and for membership. — 
[G. M. Florida, 1892. 

The committee do not understand that the ball ballot is 
restricted to the four cases named by any Masonic law or usage. 
Undoubtedly a majority vote is sufficient for reinstatement, but that 
majority can be expressed by a majority of ball ballots as well as by 
a majority of hands. The Lodge has the right to designate the 
mode of voting in such cases as reinstatement, Masonic trials and 
others of a like nature. — [Jurisp. Com. Florida, 1892. 

A ballot is taken of application for membership. On exami- 
nation of the box the ballot is declared dark by all of the officers. 
After closing of the Lodge, it is ascertained that the wrong end of 
the box had been examined. Held that there bad never been a legal 
ballot taken, and a ballot could be ordered at the next Communica- 
tion of the Lodge on the same application. — [G. M. Georgia, 1891. 

The Grand Master is nowhere vested by the Grand Regulations 
with the power to authorize a ballot upon a petition at a special 
meeting, or without laying over for four weeks. The regulation 
which requires that a petition must be received and balloted upon 
at a stated meeting, and that it must lie over four weeks, cannot be 
legally evaded.— [G. M. Indiana, 1892. 



APPENDIX 177 

• 

Question. — Must every member present when a ballot is taken 
on an application for initiation vote, or can the W. M., for private 
reasons communicated to him, excuse a member from voting? 

Answer. — I hold that every member present must vote ; and the 
W. M., nor even a vote of the Brethren, can excuse anyone from 
voting. This rule, as well as the reasons on which it rests, are too 
well settled to require demonstration. — [G. M. Louisiana, 1892. 

When a petition has been received and referred, but before the 
committee report, the applicant removes from the jurisdiction, the 
Lodge can receive the report and ballot on the petition. — [G. M. 
Michigan, 1892. 

The Committee on Character having reported favorably, the 
W. M., if he considers it in the interest of his Lodge, can defer the 
ballot one month. — [G. M. Manitoba, 1892. 

" Upon a favorable report of the committee a ballot was spread 
upon the petition of a candidate, it was found clear and I declared 
him duly elected. After the Lodge was called off it was discovered 
there were no cubes in the ballot box ; ail the members present 
when the vote was taken expressed themselves satisfied with the 
result of the ballot if legal." Held the ballot legal. I thought it was 
a dangerous precedent to disturb the result of the ballot after it was 
declared by the W. M. I stated to the Master in case the cubes 
were left out purely by mistake, no greater blame than carelessness 
could attach to anyone ; but had they been left out by design, a 
Masonic offense was committed and the guilty party or parties, if 
discovered, should be severely disciplined by the Lodge. — [G. M., 
South Dakota, 1892. 

Modified as follows: When the W. M. discovered the total 
absence of dark ballots in the ballot box, after the ballot was had 
and its result declared, he should at once have ordered a new ballot. 

A Lodge can not reconsider its action in rejecting a petition for 
the Degrees at a subsequent meeting, but if objections are withdrawn 
a ballot may be again taken. — [G. M. Term., 1892. 

With regard to the fourth ruling, your Committee recommend 
its approval, if amended to provide that the withdrawal of the 
objection shall be announced in open Lodge, at a stated meeting ; 
that notice shall then be given that a new ballot will be had at the 
next or some subsequent stated meeting, and that all members of the 
Lodge shall be notified of the withdrawal of the objection and of the 
time appointed for a new ballot. — [Jurisp Com. Tenn., 1892. 

The result of a ballot upon an application for the Degrees or for 
affiliation, should be declared by the Master before the Lodge is 

12 



I78 APPENDIX. 

closed. Should the ballot be unfavorable to the petitioner, and the 
Master should omit to announce the result before the Lodge is closed, 
such omission on the part of the Master, although unwarranted, 
would not render the ballot void, but would operate as a rejection 
and should be so minuted by the Secretary. — [G. M. Vermont, 1892. 

Question — Can a subordinate Lodge ballot for and initiate an 
Entered Apprentice at a special Communication, provided his appli- 
cation has been duly presented at a stated Communication and has 
laid over for the space of one lunar month, and due notice has been 
given the members of the Lodge ? 

Answer -No ; the application must be received and balloted for 
at stated Communications of the Lodge. — [G. M. Virginia, 1S91. 

BURIAL. 

That it is the duty of a Lodge not only to attend and conduct 
the ceremonies at the burial of one of its members who had requested 
to be buried with Masonic honors, but to pay the reasonable expenses 
of the funeral, whether he died rich or poor.— [G. M. California, 1891. 

We agree that it is the duty of a Lodge to attend the funeral of 
a deceased member, and, if he requested it, to conduct the cere- 
monies ; to see to it in all oases that proper provision be made for his 
burial, and, in case of need, to pay the expense ; but we do not think 
it the duty of the Lodge to pay the funeral expenses, when the 
deceased has left a large estate. In such a case, it is the duty of the 
family to meet the expense, of the Lodge to bury him as a Mason 
should be buried.— [Jurisp. Com. Calif., 1891. 

The burial service is concluded when the grave i9 filled. After the 
burial of the body, it is too late to call upon the Masons to perform 
any burial service. 

The Master is correct in ruling out a resolution declaring it the 
duty of a Lodge to bury non-affiliates, and inviting non-affiliates to 
assist in the service. 

The burial of the dead is Masonic work, to be attended to while 
the Lodge is open, but it is never claimed that in order to Masonically 
inter a Brother it is Decessary to carry the Lodge Charter from the 
place of assembling to the grave..— [G. M. Kentucky, 1891. 

BY-LAWS. 

Question— Can a subordinate Lodge suspend temporarily one of 
its By-Laws, provided the suspension of said By-Law does not con- 
flict with the Methodical Digest or the Constitutions of Masonry ? 

Answer — No ; when the By-Laws of a Lodge are approved by 
the Grand Master, they become the laws governing the Lodge, and 
can not be suspended by resolution of the Lodge.— [G. M. Va., 1891. 



APPENDIX. 179 

CHARTER. 

A W. M. has no right to carry away the warrant of a Lodge, 
with the object of preventing the opening of the Lodge on the night 
of its regular meeting.— [G. M. Canada, 1891. 

If the charter is in the Tiler's room, preparation room or ante- 
room, in the same building, it would be present for all practical pur- 
poses. 

A Lodge cannot work without a charter. If the charter should 
be lost or destroyed the regular business of the Lodge must stop 
until the loss shall be supplied, but the Master must not neces- 
sarily have the charter in his pocket, nor must it hang in any 
particular place in the Lodge room, nor must it be actually present 
in the Lodge room itself in order to authorize the Lodge to work or 
transact any regular business It must be so far present as that the 
Master may know that it exists, and where it is, and be able to at 
onee produce it if legally called for, or required to sustain the regu- 
larity, and power to work, of the Lodge. — [G. M. Kentucky, 1891. 

CHARGES. 

The Junior Warden has, by direction of the Master, preferred 
charges. The accused requests the services of the Junior Warden 
as counsel, who is willing to render them. 

Question — Can he act ? 

Answer — No ; he cannot act in the dual capacity of accuser and 
counsel for the defense. 

Question — Can he withdraw the charges, in order that they may 
be preferred by some one else, and then act as counsel for the 
accused ? 

Answer. The withdrawal of charges is permitted in the discre- 
tion of the Master, but un-Masonic conduct may not be condoned 
simply upon the will of the informant. A Masonic offense is a blow . 
first at the welfare of the Lodge, and next at the body of Masonry. 
It therefore becomes the duty of the officers of a Lodge to defend 
their Lodge rather than the offender. As the Junior Warden is 
charged with the care of the Craft during the hours of refreshment, 
it becomes his duty when there are infractions of the law to notify 
the Lodge and prosecute the offender. As also he may succeed to 
the duties of the Master as presiding officer at trials, he should 
not accept the position of counsel for the defense. [G. M. Arizona, 
1891. 

A Lodge is acting within its rights in declining to receive 
charges against one of its members, when in its judgment such 
charges are upon their face frivolous or not based upon good 
Masonic reasons. This does not, however, debar the Brother 
making the charges from Appealing to the Grand Lodge at its next 



l8o APPENDIX. 

Annual Communication against the action taken by the rejecting 
Lodge— [<*. M. New Jersey, 1892. 

COMMITTEE ON CHARACTER. 

When a Committee on Character fails to report at the " next 
stated meeting," the Lodge may order a new committee ; the Master 
exceeds his authority when he orders said new committee to report 
without giving time for investigation ; and a committee reporting 
without satisfactory knowledge is derelict in Masonic duty. — [G. M. 
Indiana, 1892. 

CONFERRING DEGREES. 

None but a W. M. or a P. M. can confer or take any part in the 
conferring of the degrees. The charges and explanation of working 
tools and lecture on the tracing board in the first and second 
degree may, however, be given by the Wardens. — [G. M. Canada, 1891. 

CORNER-STONE. 

That I could not convene a Bpecial Communication of this 
Grand Lodge to lay one of four corner-stones of a church, the other 
three to be laid by church officials.— [G. M. Manitoba, 1892. 

DEGREES. 

The Degrees of Masonry, nor any of them, cannot be conferred 
upon more than one candidate at the same time, but the second 
section of the F. C. Degree may be conferred upon two or more 
together. — [G. M. Alabama, 1891. 

No Lodge can confer the Degree of Entered Apprentice upon a 
candidate at the request of a Lodge in another Grand Jurisdiction, 
unless a certificate in writing, under the seal of such Lodge, be pre- 
sented, stating that the candidate has been duly elected in the Lodge 
preferring the request, and asking that the Degree be conferred by 
our Lodge ; and no Lodge can confer the Degree of Fellow Craft or 
Master Mason for a Lodge in another Jurisdiction, unless the Lodge 
preferring the request shall certify, under its seal, that the candidate 
has been examined in open Lodge as required by our law, and elected 
to receive such Degree (or unless such Lodge shall certify that, 
under the laws of its Jurisdiction, one ballot elects the candidate to 
receive all of the Degrees, and that the candidate has made suitable 
proficiency, and that ail the requirements of said law have been com- 
plied with, and the candidate is entitled to receive the Degree which 
our Lodge is requested to confer, and this fact shall be further 
attested by the Grand Secretary of that Jurisdiction). — [Jurisp. 
Com. Missouri, 1891. 

DIM IT. 

A Lodge can not charge a fee for issuing a dimit. 

An elected and installed officer of a Lodge, having permanently 
removed from this Grand Jurisdiction, thereby vacating his office, is 



APPENDIX. l8l 

entitled to a dimit upon application therefor, under the regulations 
covering the granting of dimits. 

Any member of a Lodge, not at the time holding an elective 
office therein, against whom no charges are pending, and who is 
under no pecuniary liability to his Lodge, can not, by vote of the 
Lodge, be denied a dimit, if he prefer his request orally or in writing 
at any stated Communication pf the Lodge ; neither can the grant- 
ing of such dimit be deferred.— [G. M. Kansas, 1892. 

A dimit severs the relation between the Lodge and the dimitted 
member absolutely. To become a member of the same Lodge again, 
he must petition and file his dimit, the same as if he applied to any 
other Lodge. 

Application for dimit should be in writing, signed by the appli- 
cant, or made by the Brother in open Lodge — in either case noted of 
record. 

A Lodge can not require a Brother to give his reasons for apply- 
ing for a dimit.— [G. M. Kentucky, 1891. 

The Grand Master can not compel a Lodge to grant a dimit. — 
[G. M. Michigan, 1892. 

Question — A dimit was granted a number of years since to a 
member of a Lodge, but the Secretary neglects and refuses to give 
the usual certificate. The Brother, now desiring to affiliate, we are 
asked what course should be pursued to obtain a certificate of 
dimusion, or, failing in that, whether the Lodge, to which he is 
desirous of applying, can act without it ? 

Answer — If the Secretary will not give the certificate, the Grand 
Master should be applied to, and he will order the Lodge to see that 
it is done, but the Lodge with which the Brother is desirous of 
affiliating can not act without evidence that a dimit was granted. — 
[Jurisp. Com. Miss., 1892. 

An Entered Apprentice, who has violated our law by engaging 
in the saloon business, can not be granted a dimit. 

The dimit of an Entered Apprentice is, in reality, a waiver of 
jurisdiction, requiring unanimous consent, and is a certificate of good 
standing.— G. M. Missouri, 1891. 

A Lodge in rejecting a petition for membership has no right to 
mark the dimit which was filed with the petition with the word 
" rejected," or any other mark, but the dimit should be returned as 
filed —{G. M. Tennessee, 1892. 

The Secretary cannot issue a dimit without the previous action 
of the Lodge granting the same, entered of record. A Lodge, like 
any other tribunal keeping an official record, speaks by such record, 



1 82 APPENDIX. 

and that which does not appear of record, if it be proper to make a 
record thereof, is held not to exist, but this presumption may be 
rebutted by proof.— [G. M. West Virginia, 1891. 

DIPLOMAS -FOREIGN. 

Question — Mr. took his first degree in St. John's Lodge, 

Antigua, West Indies, in. 1869, his second and third in Palermo, 
Sicily, in 1870, by means of an interpreter. He holds written or 
printed vouchers regarding his first and second, but is doubtful about 
the third. Has visited Lodges, having passed examination therefor, 
including the third degree, and now wishes to affiliate with a certain 
Lodge under whose jurisdiction he now resides. Can the Lodge 
receive his petition for membership without other evidence than 
above quoted ? 

Answer — Invasion of jurisdiction is not involved, as we have no 
Masonic relation or Grand Lodge correspondence, either with 
Antigua or with Palermo. 

Conceding that he has by examination proved himself to be in 
possession of the work, my recommendation would be that he apply 
to the Lodge where he desires affiliation : his petition being balloted 
upon and found " clear," he should be reobligated in all the degrees. 
This, and signing By-Laws, will enable him to become a member, as 
though regularly " made " in the Lodge. 

After making the above decision a " voucher " from Mt. Lebanon 
Lodge, of Palermo, was placed in my hands. It is in Italian, and, 
without being an accomplished linguist, your Grand Master was 
enabled to translate it sufficiently to discover that it was in purport 
a diploma of a regular Lodge, acting under the authority of the 
'* Franco- Masoneria " of the Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite, to 
which the several Lodges of the Mediterranean and other localities 
owe allegiance. 

Between the years 1801 and 1864 there was a struggle in Italy 
between the English and Scottish Rite Masonry, and until 1867 
Lodges were permitted to work under either \ when the Grand 
Orient absorbed the other "councils." The Supreme Council at 
Palermo, with Garibaldi as Grand Master, was the Governing 
Masonic Body to 1872— covering the date of the diploma. -[G. M. 
Maine, 1892. 

DISCUSSION OF REPORT ON CHARACTER. 

The Grand Master, in Decision Xo. 1, says: "When the report 
of the Committee on Character is read in a Lodge there can be no 
discussion of the nature of the report or the character of the candi- 
date, but the ballot must immediately follow the report." So far as 
the discussion of the report is concerned, we believe the decision to 
be correct, but the committee is of the opinion that the character of 



APPENDIX. 183 

the candidate can be made the subject of discussion at any time 
after the reading of the report and before the spreading of the bal- 
lot The Committee on Character should report facts, not conclu- 
sions, and we hold that if a Mason can give additional facts that will 
aid the Lodge in coming to a correct conclusion as to the desirability 
of the material offered, that it is his duty to give such information. 
If it is information that will exonerate the candidate, justice to him 
demands that it be given ; and if it condemns him, justice to 
Masonry demands it. Generally the information should be given to 
the committee before the report is made, but the fact that the 
report is made should not shut off any additional light that may be 
thrown on the subject- [Jurisp. Com. Texas, 1891. 

DISMISSAL OF CHARGES. 

A Master should be at liberty to dismiss charges at any time, 
when satisfied that they do not set forth a Masonic offense. Any 
person aggrieved has a remedy by appeal. If charges are insuf- 
ficient, it is well to avoid the trouble and annoyance of a trial, and 
experience has shown that the determination of that question may 
be safely left to the Master. — Jurisp. Com. Mich., 1892. 

DOTAGE. 

There is no law fixing the precise age at which a man enters 
upon his dotage. Each member decides this question for himself 
when casting his ballot.— [G. M. Texas, 1891. 

DUGS OF NON-AFFILIATE. 

Question — Is a non-affiliate at liberty to pay dues to any Lodge 
he prefers, in order to entitle him to the rights, privileges and bene- 
fits, or must he pay to the Lodge under whose jurisdiction he resides? 

Answer — He must contribute an amount equal to the ordinary 
Lodge dues to the Lodge under whose jurisdiction he resides; in 
order to entitle him to participate in the benefits conferred by that 
Lodge, but he can petition any Lodge he pleases for membership. — 
[Jurisp. Com. Miss., 1892. 

ELECTION. 

The Tiler having been given an opportunity to vote, the election 
is not void because he refused to vote. In a case where he was 
inadvertently overlooked, and his vote would not changed the result, 
the election was held to be valid. — [G. M. Kentucky, 1891. 

INSTALLATION. 

It is constitutional to install any officer re-elected, but it is not 
necessary to do so. If deemed proper or advisable by the Lodge, it 
may be done.— [G. M. Georgia, 1891. 



1 84 APPENDIX. 

JURISDICTION. 

Question — One who was elected, but failed to come forward and 
take his Degree, moves into the jurisdiction of another Lodge, but 
44 very shortly" afterwards renewed his petition to the Lodge which 
once elected him, and was re-elected ; again failing to present himself 
for initiation, the Lodge now wishes to know where he is to petition, 
when he screws his courage up to the point of repeating the operation? 

Answer — To the Lodge under whose jurisdiction he now resides. 
Lodges, by the amendment adopted last year, now have perpetual 
jurisdiction only over rejected material, and lose it over elected candi- 
dates removing from their territorial jurisdiction. — [Jurisp. Com. 
Miss., 1892. 

A petitioner was elected to take the Entered Apprentice Degree 
in Lodge A., but moved away without being initiated. Four ye«rs 
afterward he petitioned Lodge B., in whose territory he now resides. 
Does Lodge B. have to apply to Lodge A. for a waiver of jurisdiction? 
Held that it does not. Lodge A., having neither rejected the peti- 
tioner, nor initiated him within the year from the date of his election, 
had lost its personal as well as its territorial jurisdiction over him. 
It is proper, however, that Lodge B., in the case stated, should cor- 
respond with Lodge A. and ascertain the facts. — [G. M. Texas, 1891. 

The decision of the Grand Master is supported by the decisions 
and practices of this Grand Lodge, but we can see no reason why 
the rejection of a candidate gives perpetual jurisdiction and his 
election does not, and we believe that the safer practice would be to 
take the broad position that when a vote is taken on the application 
of a man for initiation, that it gives jurisdiction to the Lodge so 
voting until it voluntarily surrenders it. The force of this position 
doubtless suggested itself to the mind of the Grand Master, for while 
he holds that jurisdiction does not perpetually attach by reason of 
the election of a candidate, upon whom it had failed for one year to 
confer the first Degree, yet he suggests that it would be proper for 
the second Lodge that desires to vote on his application to notify the 
first Lodge of its intention so to do, and ascertain the facts. — [Jurisp. 
Com. Texas, 1891. 

LAWS. 

The Masonic authorities of this Grand Jurisdiction must give 
the same interpretation and effect to the local laws and regulations 
of a sister Jurisdiction, as are given to them by the highest judicial 
authority of that Jurisdiction.— [G. M. West Virginia, 1891. 

LIQUOR TRAFFIC. 

There is no regulation of our Grand Lodge as to the liquor 
traffic ; none either for or against a Mason in that calling, or in any 



APPENDIX. 185 

other calling, unless there is immorality, a violation of Masonic law 
or the law of the land.— [G. M. Florida, 1892. 

The agent of a brewery, entrusted with the distribution of its 
product and the collection of its bills, is not eligible to receive the 
Degrees.— [G. M. Indiana, 1892. 

A member who engages in the saloon business is not guilty of a 
Masonic offence. The saloon business is a legalized business. — [G. M. 
Mich., 1892. 

Question — Can a druggist, who sells liquor by the drink, or in 
small quantities, be accepted in the Masonic Lodge ? 

Answer — If he sells by the driok, or in any other manner, for 
the purpose of furnishing a beverage, he is not eligible to the De- 
grees of Masonry. — [G. M. Washington, 1891. 

Under the regulations of the Grand Lodge a Lodge cannot act 
upon the petition of a general agent for a brewing company. The 
regulation applies to those engaged in selling intoxicating liquors 
to be used as a beverage as much as to those who keep a saloon. 

There are no regulations of this Grand Lodge which prohibit a 
member of a Lodge from opening and conducting a saloon, and a 
Lodge has no authority to suspend or expel a member thereof for 
engaging in the business of selling liquor. — [G. M. Wisconsin, 1892. 

lodge u. D. 

Question — Can a Lodge U. D. affiliate members or perform the 
funeral ceremony ? 

Answer — Yes. — [G. M. Washington, 1891. 

MASTER. 

A Master suspended from office is merely deprived of the pre- 
rogatives of presiding officer. He is not amenable to trial by the 
Lodge during the term for which he wa9 elected and installed. He 
is entitled to all rights of a member. — [G. M. Kentucky, 1891. 

A man who can neither read nor write cannot be installed as 
Master. — [Jurisp. Com. Mississippi, 1892. 

MEMBERSHIP. 

A new Lodge is organized. Among those claiming membership 
therein, but whose names do not appear on the application for dis- 
pensation or charter, are several Masons who had applied for dimits 
to their Lodges. They had paid the dues, but no action had been 
taken to grant dimit. Under this state of facts they had partici- 
pated in the organization of the new Lodge, and some of them were 
elected to office. Held illegal. They were not members of the new 



1 86 APPENDIX. 

Lodge until their dimite had been placed therein, and they affiliated 
in the regular course.— [G. M. Georgia, 1891. 

A Brother elected to membership in a Lodge cannot be admit- 
ted to the Lodge unless he is duly vouched for or has passed a satis- 
factory examination. — [G. M. Pennsylvania, 1891. 

MINUTES. 

An inquiry was received asking whether minutes of Lodge meet^ 
ings should be signed by the Worshipful Master. Held, the min- 
utes of the previous meeting should be signed by the presiding 
officer immediately after their approval at the next stated meeting. 
— [G. M. Ohio, 1891. 

The minutes of a Lodge are strictly private and no transcript of 
the same should ever be permitted to be made or certified for the 
purpose of influencing the action, in any given case, of any tribunal 
or society other than a Masonic tribunal and in accordance with 
prescribed regulations, as in appeals, etc.— [G. M. Texas, 1891. 

NON- PAYMENT OP DUES. 

A Junior Warden who is suspended for non-payment of dues is 
subject to the same rules as an ordinary member, and in addition 
loses his standing as J. W., in that he must serve twelve months as 
a Warden before he is eligible for the chair.— [G. M. Canada, 1891. 

1. That the non-payment of dues is not, properly considered, a 
Masonic offense, and that dropping from the roll is not a Masonic 
punishment. 

2. That a member can be debarred from membership for non- 
payment of dues, and that such is the law in this jurisdiction. ' 

3. That a brother who has been dropped from its roll of mem- 
bership by action of a lodge, and in accordance with its by-laws, has 
no rights whatever as a member of that lodge from the time of such 
action on the part of the lodge until he pays his indebtedness and 
again becomes a member, which, under the present law, he can do of 
his own volition within one year from the time of his being dropped, 
and after the expiration of that time by written application and 
favorable action by the lodge. 

4. That the Masonic status of a dropped member of a lodge is 
that of an unaffiliated Mason.— [Jurisp. Com. Dist. of C., 1891. 

A brother two years in arrears for dues is summoned to appear 
at a time stated and show cause why he should not be excluded 
therefor. Said brother, before the time specified, pays to the Secre- 
tary one year's dues and pays no further attention to the summons. 
He cannot be excluded or disciplined for disobeying the summons, as 
the Lodge has no case against him.— [G. M. Wisconsin, 1892. 



APPENDIX. I87 

NOTICE. 

Under the regulations of the Grand Lodge, every member of a 
Lrxlge is entitled to know who seeks membership in his Lodge. 

If a Secretary neglects to give the required notice, and a ballot 
should be taken on an application, it would be irregular and unlaw- 
ful.— [G. M. Penn., 1891. 

OBJECTION. 

Section 62, of the General Regulations, reads as follows : " Ob- 
jection to the advancement of a candidate after initiation will oper- 
ate to suspend the conferring of the degree until the next stated 
meeting of the Lodge ; when, should he have made suitable pro- 
ficiency and no further objection be interposed, the degree may be 
conferred. But to permanently stop a candidate from further ad- 
vancement at any time after his initiation, charges must be regularly 
preferred, a trial had and judgment of the court pronounced against 
him/' 

In explanation of the above I have ruled : That an objection 
made to the Worshipful Master privately is a valid objection under 
the law ; that a second objection may be received at the next stated 
meeting at the discretion of the Master ; but a further objection 
should not be entertained unless for the purpose of giving necessary 
time to the objecting brother, or brothers, to prepare charges. The 
Worshipful Master has a two- fold duty : to protect an initiate from 
an unfounded objection and to guard the Lodge against the advance- 
ment of an unworthy member. The objector to the advancement of 
an initiate should be warned that an objection, to be permanent, 
must be sustained by the judgment of the Lodge. — [G. M Indiana, 
1892. 

An objection has the same force as a black ball and the appli- 
cant must file a new petition and take the same course as an original 
petitioner. — [G. M. Michigan, 1892. 

Question — When one who is rejected by a Lodge and removes 
into the jurisdiction of another Lodge, renews his petition to the re- 
jecting Lodge, can he be elected over the objection of the Lodge in 
whose jurisdiction he now resides ? 

Answer— While the matter rests solely with the Lodge to which 
he petitioned, and which alone has jurisdiction, it would be a gross 
breach of Masonic comity for it to elect the party and confer a de- 
gree under such circumstances. If the objection be of a sufficiently 
grave character and properly sustained, the Lodge, or Master, who 
disregarded it, ought to be disciplined by the Grand Lodge, but it 
must be remembered that a mere difference of opinion as to the suf- 
ficiency of an objection, is a very different thing from disregarding 



1 88 APPENDIX. 

causes which would compel a rejection if known. Id the one case 
the Lodge would only be exercising the discretion with which it is 
vested and which it is bound to exercise reasonably, while in the 
other it would disregard facts, showing un worthiness, which if 
known would compel a rejection, regardless of the Bource from 
which the information comes. — [Jurisp. Com. Miss., 1892. 

No objection can be filed to the admission of a petitioner for 
initiation until after a ballot has been had.— [G. M. Ohio, 1891. 

The right to object to the advancement of an E. A. or F. C. in- 
heres to every member of a Lodge. — [Jurisp. Com. Oregon, 1892. 

PAST MASTER. 

If a brother, who is elected and installed as W. M., resigns and 
leaves the jurisdiction, the brother who is elected in his stead cannot 
be invested as a P. M. unless he has served as W. M. for twelve 
months. 

A brother, who is an M. M. of this jurisdiction, affiliates in a 
foreign jurisdiction and attains rank as a P. M. He cannot be re- 
turned as a P. M. on the roll of his Lodge in this jurisdiction. — [G. M. 
Canada, 1891. 

PENALTY. 

9 

A brother can not be deprived of any Masonic right except by 
ballot.— [G. M. Kentucky, 1891. 

Question — A brother having been tried ex parte and having re- 
moved from the jurisdiction of the Lodge, the sentence having been 
reprimand: can a dimit be granted before sentence, or can another 
Lodge be requested to execute the sentence ? 

Answer — It most certainly cannot. A dimit is a recommenda- 
tion to the Craft at large, and &n indorsement Mason ically of the 
brother bearing it. The presentation of a dimit is supposed to be 
prima facie evidence of the Masonic integrity of the one indorsed 
up to the time of issue. A sentence is a punishment for some 
offense committed. Until that sentence is executed the culprit can 
not be purged. Under civil law the culprit is held either under re- 
straint or bond until such execution of sentence. The bond of a 
Mason is his word and good intent. He must show that intent by 
appearing for sentence before he can ask the recommendation of his 
brethren. A Lodge must itself execute the sentence it has itself 
imposed. — [G. M. Arizona, 1891. 

PENAL, JURISDICTION. 

Every Lodge has penal jurisdiction over all Masons resident 
within its jurisdiction, concurrent with the Lodges of which they 
may be members. An offending brother being amenable to the juris- 
diction of both bodies.— [G. M. Vermont, 1892. 



APPENDIX. 189 

PETITION. 

The Grand Master should never be asked, in advance of presen- 
tation of a petition accompanying documents, what he will do or 
what his opinion would be if a dispensation should be asked for 
thereafter.— [G. M. Kentucky, 1891. 

Decision No. 3, construing Article 97 of the Constitution. Article 
97 of our Constitution says, " nor shall any petition for initiation be 
allowed to be withdrawn after it has been read before the Lodge." 
The petition then becomes the property of the Lodge and must be 
disposed of in a regular way. Reference to a committee then fol- 
lows, and but for the reading of Article 131 of the Constitution, which 
implies that ballots should only be taken on a favorable report, I 
should unhesitatingly rule that a ballot should be taken on the re- 
port, whether favorable or unfavorable. The weight of Masonic law 
in other jurisdictions is that way. The report of the committee 
should be disposed of by ballot in either event, but for the language 
of the last named Article. But at all events, I rule that in the case you 
report, viz : two of the committee reporting favorably and the other 
reporting unfavorably— that a majority makes the report, and that 
the report is favorable, and a ballot should be taken to dispose of 
the favorable report. — [G. M. South Carolina, 1891. 

When a petition for affiliation or for the degrees has been acted 
upon, the same petition cannot be used again. In case of a renewal 
it must be by a new petition signed by the petitioner himself. — 
[Jurisp. Com. Vermont, 1892. 

PHYSICAL QUALIFICATIONS. 

Drawing a pension does not of necessity imply that the bene- 
ficiary thereof is unsound in body to the extent of being barred from 
becoming a Mason. — [G. M. Arkansas, 1891. 

A brother, who has received the Craft degrees, and served in a 
Warden's chair, but who afterwards loses his right arm, is still eligible 
for W. M.— [G. M. Canada, 1891. 

The Entered Apprentice degree can not be conferred on one who 
wears a metal truss, unless he can temporarily dispense with it. The 
Lodge determines whether he is duly and truly prepared.— |G. M. 
Kentucky, 1891. 

An applicant who had lost one eye presented himself. Both on 
principle and the ruling of Past Grand Master Todd, 1871, 1 held it 
no disqualification. 

An E. A. lost his left hand above the wrist: could he advance? 

I held his case was not different from an original applicant, and 
held him disqualified.— [G. M. Louisiana, 1892. 



I9O APPENDIX. 

A petition should Dot be received from one who is physically dis- 
qualified. If received, and the Master becomes aware of the disqual- 
ification, he should simply refuse to continue the consideration of 
the petition, and order its return with the fees to the applicant. 

There is no reason why we should place an applicant who is 
physically disqualified under the ban of rejection. An election to re- 
ceive the degrees would not qualify him, and a rejection is not 
necessary to disqualify him.— [Jurisp. Com. Michigan, 1892. 

I am compelled by the decisions of four Past Grand Masters, as 
adopted by Grand Lodge, to decide that the loss of an eye, the other 
being good, disqualifies. I sincerely doubt the soundness of this law. 

A candidate who cannot kneel on both knees is disqualified. — [G. 
M. Michigan, 1892. 

An applicant for the degrees of Freemasonry is not debarred 
through having lost the index finger of his right hand. — [G. M. Mani- 
toba, 1892. 

There is no doubt that there are physical defects which should 
debar candidates from admission, but no man of religious and good 
moral character, health, and honorable surroundings, should be de- 
prived of an opportunity of admission, if his physical defect does not 
prevent him from complying with the requirements of Masonry. — 
IG. M. Ohio, 1891. 

41 We have an Entered Apprentice who is a man in every respect 
and good material. Since taking his first degree he was kicked by a 
horse on his right knee, which in consequence is stiff in the joint, 
and probably will always be so. He wants the remaining degrees. 
What shall we do?" Held that he was entitled to the degrees. — [G. 
M. South Dakota, 1892. 

A brother having lost his right arm near his shoulder since con- 
ferring the E. A. degree, I decided the Lodge had no legal right to 
confer the degrees, as said brother could not receive and impart the 
ritual.— [G. M. Tennessee, 1892. 

Question- "Can a man who has lost an eye be made a Mason?" 

Answer - Yes, provided the remaining eye retains its full power 
of sight.- [G. M. Washington, 1891. 

The edict of the Grand Lodge as to physical qualifications of 
candidates, adopted November 14tb, 1883, and reported in Long's 
Book of Masonic Law at page 42, is in derogation of the ancient reg- 
ulation requiring an applicant to be sound in limb and member ; 
and while it must be held as law in this jurisdiction until modified 
or repealed by the Grand Lodge, yet it must be given a strict con- 
struction, and if it is doubtful as to whether a particular candidate 
is within its provisions, the doubt must be resolved against him. 



APPENDIX. 191 

Upon an application for affiliation, the physical condition of the 
applicant addresses itself to the members of the Lodge as a matter 
of expediency, rather than to the Master as a question of Masonic 
law. 

In the case of a petition for initiation the above rule does not 
hold, as then the physical qualification of the candidate is a question 
of law ; or, perhaps, more correctly speaking, a mixed question of 
law and fact, which it is proper for the Master to determine upon 
the presentation of the petition, or as soon thereafter as practicable. 
-[G. M.West. Virg., 1891. 

A Lodge asked for my decision as to whether an applicant for 
the degrees of Masonry having only one eye was eligible. 

My decision was in the affirmative, on the ground that the loss 
of one eye could not, in my opinion, in any degree prevent him from 
observing the "beauties of Masonry." — [G. M. Wyoming, 1892. 

PRESENCE OF CHARTER. 

The authority to open and hold a Lodge is contained in its War- 
rant. If the Warrant is not openly displayed from the pedestal of 
the Worshipful Master, it is the right and duty of any member 
present to object to the transaction of any business. — [G. M. Penn., 
1891. 

RECONSIDERATION. 

It is in the power of a Lodge to reconsider a vote of guilty, 
at the same or the next succeeding meeting, by unanimous secret 
ballot, provided proper notice of such motion has been given.- - 
[G. M. Georgia, 1891. 

Statement — At a regular communication of the Lodge a warrant 
was authorized for a certain sum of money. At the third regular 
meeting thereafter a motion was made to reconsider the action of 
the Lodge in the matter. 

Question — Ought the Worshipful Master to entertain the mo- 
tion? 

Answer — No. Neither parliamentary or Masonic law would 
justify the reconsideration of a motion so long after it had been 
passed, and especially where money had been voted. — [G. M. Minne- 
sota, 1892. 

RESCINDING VOTE. 

Question — Can a vote be taken to rescind a vote passed at a 
prior communication of a lodge ? 

Answer — Yes. There is no doubt of the power of a Lodge to 
rescind its prior action, unless rescission would work injury to parties 
who had performed something on the faith of the vote sought to be 



n 



192 APPENDIX. 

rescinded, or unless the vote related to matters in respeot to which 
the law expressly declares there can be no rescission. — [G. M. Conn , 

1892. 

REFRESHMENT. 

A Lodge is in charge of the W. M. during the hours of labor; in 
charge of the J. W. when at refreshment. Masons are either at labor 
or refreshment. At ease or the right of the floor are improper terms 
and should not be used. — [G. M. Nebraska, 1891. 

REFRESHMENTS. 

Again the question of paying for refreshments has arisen— this 
time in a different form from which it has before taken. A Lodge 
owning its building, rents the same for various purposes, and desired 
to set apart the money received from such rents as a fund from which 
they could pay for refreshments. I determined that the money so 
received was the property of the Lodge, part of its revenue, and as 
such went into the Lodge treasury and could only be used for the 
purpose for which a Lodge was intended, that of charity, etc.— [G. 
M. California, 1891. 

REINSTATEMENT. 

When a member of a subordinate Lodge, who stands suspended 
for nonpayment of dues, pays up his dues in full, he is reinstated to 
membership without formal action of the Lodge. 

The reinstatement of a Mason indefinitely suspended restores 
him to membership, as well as to the rights and privileges of 
Masonry- [G. M. Alabama, 1891. 

A Lodge is liable to Grand Lodge for dues on all ^embers who 
have been suspended as soon as they are reinstated, including the 
period of such suspension. — [G. M. Canada, 1891. 

A Lodge cannot be compelled to reinstate a member, legally 
suspended for nonpayment of dues, upon payment of dues.- [G. M. 
Michigan, 1892. 

Question — " Must a brother, who has been suspended for N. P. 
D., petition the Lodge, in writing, for reinstatement?" 

Answer- -Yes, and he must pay all dues to date of suspension, 
unless same has been remitted, before the Lodge can receive his 
petition.- [G. M. Washington, 1891. 

RELIEF. 

It iB right, constitutional and commendable to use the funds of 
a Lodge for the relief of a destitute widow whose husband was not a 
Mason. — (G. M. Wisconsin, 1892. 



APPENDIX. 193 

RESIDENCE. 

The Ahiman Rezon requires an applicant for initiation and 
membership to state his "age, occupation, and residence" etc., in 
his petition. Giving his business address in lieu of bis residence is 
not a compliance with this requirement.— [G. M. Pennsylvania, 1891. 

Question- - u Can a railroad employee, subject to removal by rail- 
road authority at any time, claim his Masonic residence at any point 
on the line of the road where he may be located and employed, 
although his family may live at another place, provided he has been 
living under the jurisdiction of a Lodge twelve months?" 

Answer — No; the law applies to all alike. We have no special 
legislation in the interest of any one class. His political and family 
residence should be his Masonic residence, provided he lives under 
the jurisdiction of a Lodge twelve months.— [G. M. Virginia, 1891. 

RESTORATION. 

When an expelled Mason is restored to the rights and privileges 
of Masonry, but not to membership in the Lodge, he is entitled to a 
certificate showing him to be a Mason in good standing. — [G. M. Ala- 
bama, 1891. 

That it requires an unanimous vote to restore an expelled 
Mason ; that such vote only restores him to the rights and privileges 
of Freemasonry, and not to membership iri the Lodge unless that is 
also voted him ; that only the Lodge which expelled can restore, ex- 
cept that Grand Lodge can reinstate the member if it confirmed the 
expulsion. — [G. M. Rhode Island, 1891. 

I decided that a brother who was expelled by Alpha Lodge, 376, 
and was subsequently restored by said Lodge, was by said action re- 
stored to membership in the Lodge of which he was a member at 
the time of expulsion, viz., Coal Creek Lodge, 492. — [G. M. Tenn., 
1892. 

A brother suspended for non-payment of dues, and whose Lodge 
subsequently demises, may restore himself to good standing as a 
non-affiliated Mason by paying to the Grand Secretary the amount 
of his dues up to the date of the demise of his Lodge. This does 
not apply to Masons expelled for the non-payment of dues, nor to 
those suspended or expelled for un masonic conduct — [G. M. Texas, 
1891. 

REAL.. 

The seal of the Lodge should be attached to all receipts issued 
by the Secretary for degrees or Lodge dues.— [G. M. Oregon, 1892. 

SIDE DEGREES. 

Masonry is content with its own name and mission. It has no 
ambition to stand "sponsor " for any order of "Oriental Astrals," or 
"Association for the Relief of Plethoric Pocket Books." 

is 



194 APPENDIX. 

Let us deal fairly and frankly in this, as in kindred matters. If 
that which is " esoteric " in Masonry is displayed " upon the tables 
of money-changers," I fear that more than a few doves will be sold. 

The place for fictitious "side degrees of Masonry' 1 is outside 
even the " porch of the temple."— [G. M. Maine, 1892. 

SUMMONS. 

A summons is the most forcible writ known to Masonry. So 
long as he is a member of the Fraternity a Master Mason must obey 
this writ, whether non-affiliated, a member of the Lodge issuing the 
citation, or otherwise. Disobedience thereof would constitute one 
of the gravest of Masonic offenses. — [G. M. Kentucky, 1891. 

It is the duty of the Secretary of a Lodge to notify the members 
thereof of the meetings. It is improper to "summons" them to at- 
tend, except in those cases where summonses are required and have 
been lawfully ordered. — [G. M. Penn., 1891. 

While it is a part of the Tiler's duties to serve summons, yet 
service by the Secretary or any other Master Mason in good standing 
is good if properly shown. 

Delivery of a summons, by the Secretary of a Lodge, to a mem- 
ber, in a sealed envelope addressed to him is prima facia evidence of 
personal service on such member. 

But such prima facia case may be rebutted, upon the trial of 
such member for disobeying such summons, by his showing that he 
had inadvertently mislaid the envelope before opening it, and that 
he was not aware of the contents thereof.- {G. M. West Virginia, 1891. 

SUSPENSION. 

A brother who is a member of two or more Lodges and is sus- 
pended for any cause in one of these Lodges, even if in good standing 
in the others, is under suspension in all and cannot visit any Lodge 
in the jurisdiction. — [G. M. Canada, 1891. 

Suspension for non-payment of dues must be by ballot. 

' A brother can be suspended for non-payment of dues without 
fixing the period for which he shall stand suspended. Such sus- 
pension is not "indefinite," it is until the delinquent's dues are paid. 
The party alone can fix the limit by payment. — [G. M. Kentucky, 1891 . 

A brother, while insane, cannot be suspended for non-payment 
of dues, nor otherwise disciplined, nor dropped from the roll of the 
Lodge. His dues must also be paid to the Grand Lodge, and the 
financial distress of himself and his family should be relieved by his 
Lodge. Our charity is broad enough to bear his burdens for him 
while he is in that terrible state, which is worse than death itself. — 
[G. M. Texas, 1891. 



APPENDIX. 195 

TRIAL. 

The object of Masonic trials is that even and exact justice may 
be done, as well to the accused as to Masonry. AU proper light 
should be turned on. No technical rule governing the taking of evi- 
dence in the civil courts must be allowed to prevent all parts being 
plainly and clearly set forth. 

Either the W. M. or any member of the Lodge present has the 
right to ask questions for the objeot above stated, but this right 
should be exercised with prudence, and only when actually neces- 
sary. No colloquy or discussion of the evidence should be permitted 
during the taking of the same. — [G. M. Arkansas, 1801. 

1. The Worshipful Master presiding at the trial of a brother, 
has the right to stop the progress of the case, in order to have com- 
mittee take additional evidence of profane witness. The object of 
all Masonic investigation is to ascertain the exact truth of the cause. 

2. The trial of a brother is not illegal because the Worshipful 
Master presiding is related to the prosecutor. If any valid objection 
could be made to him for this cause, it should be presented before 
the trial begins. 

3. Only such rules are proper in Masonic trials as will enable 
the Lodge to reach the justice of the case, and, therefore, it is 
largely discretionary with the Lodge to fix the time and place of trial, 
length of Bitting, and to manage such details in its own discretion. — 
[G. M. Georgia, 1891. 

Discussion to a reasonable extent should be permitted, after the 
accused retires, which is a reasonable construction of the word 
"deliberate," and is not contrary to the practice of juries.- (G. M. 
Kentucky, 1891. 

We hold that where the alleged offences have been committed 
within the jurisdiction of a Lodge, it not only has the power to try 
the offender, though he belong to another jurisdiction, but can inflict 
any penalty upon him that it could upon one of its own members. — 
[Jurisp. Com. Louisiana, 1892. 

Question — When the W. M. causes charges to be preferred 
against a brother for reasons of a personal nature, can he preside at 
such investigation ? 

Answer — The Master undoubtedly has the right to preside in 
his Lodge at all meetings when present ; but in case of a trial, when 
the W. M. is a party personally interested, it is manifestly unjust 
and improper for him to preside and to act as judge and prosecutor. 
The proper course would be for the Master to call upon some Past 
Master, or, in the absence of such, the S. W. of the Lodge, to preside 
at the trial.— [G. M. Oregon, 1892. 



I96 APPENDIX. 

In a Masonic trial where a Commission is taking the evidence of 
a person not a Mason, the rule requires that such evidence be taken 
by written interrogatories. The accused has not the right to appear, 
either in person or by counsel, and orally cross-examine the witness. 
— [G. M. Wis., 1892. 

VOTE. 

A motion is before a Lodge and is voted on ; 20 members were 
present, the vote standing six for and four against. The W. M. de- 
clared the motion carried. I hold that this ruling was incorrect as 
in a Lodge voting is not optional. Every member present, unless 
excused by the Lodge, must vote.— [G. M. Canada, 1891. 

VOUCHER. 

Decision No. 5, that " If the Master of Lodge A vouches for a 
brother to the Master of Lodge B, under seal of Lodge A, and the 
brother so vouched for is known to. the Master of Lodge B to be the 
identical person, the evidence is good," does not meet with the ap- 
proval of your committee. The evidence is good, but not sufficient 
A Masonic diploma having seal and signature has never been held 
sufficient evidence upon which to admit a visitor, even though the 
identity of the applicant is established. The voucher must be com- 
municated in the presence of the person vouched for. 

This is a salutary rule and the only safe one. We cannot afford 
to let down the bars regarding the admission of visitors. — [Jurisp. 
Com. Mich., 1892. 

WAIVER. 

The vote on an application for a waiver of jurisdiction over a re- 
jected candidate should not be taken at same meeting when pre- 
sented, but the application should lie over and all resident members 
notified that such vote would be taken at the next stated meeting. 

It requires unanimous consent to grant such a waiver of juris- 
diction, and if through error the same is granted without the knowl- 
edge of an objecting brother or brethren, he or they have the right 
to make their objections to the Lodge to which the rejected candi- 
date might apply for the degree, and it is the duty of said Lodge to 
suspend further action in the case, the same as if the objection 
had been made by one or more of its own members. — [G. M. Arkan- 
sas, 1891. 

No general waiver of jurisdiction can be given. A Lodge can 
grant a waiver of jurisdiction only upon the formal request of the 
Lodge receiving the petition.— [G. M. Vermont, 1892. 

WIDOW. 

The widow of a brother who was unaffiliated at time of death, is 
not entitled to receive aid from the benevolent fund.— [G. M. Can- 
ada, 1891. 



APPENDIX. 197 

The widow haying married a profane, and having voluntarily 
abandoned the state of Masonic widowhood, can not demand assis- 
tance from the Craft. Aid may be voluntarily granted, but there is 
now no Masonic obligation to assist her. — ("G. M. Kentucky, 1891. 

W. M. FROM THE FLOOR. 

A good and bright member may be elected Master if there are 
no Master, Paet Masters, Wardens, or Past Wardens who are com- 
petent and willing to serve. Temporary appointment as Warden does 
not make him eligible, but he may be elected Master if there are no 
others who have filled the stations. — [G. M. Florida, 1892. 

The brethren of this jurisdiction, who may have occasion 
to consult the foregoing Digest, should bear in mind that 
the decisions are applicable only so far as they are in 
accordance with our Colorado law, or well established 
Masonic usage. A digest of this character is an "object 
lesson" in Jurisprudence to every Mason who desires to 
be well informed upon such questions. Nearly every 
decision and report quoted from above, has been approved 
by the Grand Lodge whose name appears in connection 
therewith; in many cases after prolonged discussion and 
most careful consideration. 



198 



APPENDIX. 



STATISTICS. 

We give the following interesting summary from the 
Maine, Louisiana and New York reports. 



From Bro. J. H. Drummond's Maine Beport: 



Members 

Raised 

Admissions, etc 

Ditnissions 

Expulsions 

Suspensions 

Suspensions, npt. dnes. 
Deaths 



Grand 
Lod 

189 



56 
54 



T «"^ LodSei Totals, 



1892. 

695,193 
42,417 



55 


25,609 


56 


20,263 


54 


476 


40 


845 


56 


14,250 


56 


10,463 



1891. 

56 
55 
54 
55 
52 
88 
55 
55 



1891. 



I 




678,648 

86,781 

22,065 

18,868 

872 

276 

13,573 

9,058 



56 
58 
58 
54 
58 
85 
54 
54 



Totals, 

1890. 



651,028 

34,450 

28,124 

17.438 

888 

350 

13,864 

8,947 



It is more complete than last year, as only one jurisdiction is 
wanting, and for that we have the returns made in 1891. 

The " Admissions " in Massachusetts include all the additions, 
as in that jurisdiction those receiving the third degree do not there- 
by become members, but are admitted by a separate vote. 

The gains are 66,343, ani the losses 45,797; net gain, 20,546; this 
is not precisely accurate, because South Carolina does not give the 
admissions and Virginia does not give the number raised; the total 
membership is 21,550 more than it was last year; this is 1,004 more 
than the net gain as reported; this difference is made up by the two 
items not reported. 

The large increase in the number of deaths shows the effect of 
"the grip" and indicates an increase in the mortality of the country 
of about fifteen per cent. 



APPENDIX. 



199 



From Bro. J. Q. A. Fellows' Louisiana Beport: 

Summary of work for the years 1887, 1888, 1889, 1890 and 1891— as reported in 
the statistical tables, in reports for 1887 to 1891,— inclusive, for the Grand Lodges 
of the United States and the Dominion of Canada. 



1891 



Total membership reported 683,081 

Total number raised > 89,396 



Total number affiliated . 
Total number restored . 
Total number died 



17,819 
6,726 
9,700 



Total number dim irted | 18,556 



Suspended for non-paym't dues. . 

8utpeuded and expelled for un- 

Masonic conduct 



13,814 

870 



1890 



660,172 

37,125 

17,940 

5,695 

9,065 

17,999 

13,630 

699 



1889 

625,755 

33,125 

15,862 

6,065 

8,912 

17,246 

14.239 

648 




608,261 

30,028 

14,874 

4,485 

8,415 

16,856 

15,305 

694 



1887 



607,024 

27,699 

14,275 

4,802 

7,981 

15,846 

13,218 

844 



From Bro. Jesse B. Anthony's New York Report: 



Grand Lodges 

Number of Subordinate Lodges 

Raised 

Affiliated 

Restored 

Died _' 

Dimitted 

Suspended for non payment of dnes 

Suspended and expelled 

Membership 



1889 



55 

10,709 

82,271 

14,066 

5,550 

8,811 

16,830 

18,542 

650 

629,084 



1890 

56 

10,817 

36,741 

15,688 

6,401 

8,848 

17,161 

18,876 

650 

648,861 



1891 



56 
11,029 
38,186 
14,893 

5,552 

8,873 

16,709 



1892 



595 
670,170 



56 
11,216 
43,345 
16,649 
5,900 
10.242 
20,086 



12,597 1 14,113 



717 
697,842 



Based upon the tables we find, in the Grand Lodges of the 
United States, that : 

The accession by new work has been 6 T y\r per cent 

The additions by affiliation and restoration 3^ per cent 

The losses by death are _ 1-fifa percent 

The losses from non-payment of dues equal 2^ per cent 
The net gain of the year (22,298) is equal to 3 T Vo- per cent 



200 



APPENDIX. 



In numerical standing, the most prominent rank in the following 
order : New York, Illinois, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Michigan, Massachu- 
setts, Missouri, Indiana, Texas, Iowa. 

The average of membership to each Lodge is greatest in the fol- 
lowing : District of Columbia (183), Connecticut (141), Massachusetts 
(140), Rhode Island (116), Maine (109), New Hampshire (109), New 
York (108), Pennsylvania (107). 

The jurisdiction having Liodgesof the largest membership are in 
the following order : Connecticut (576), Illinois (555), New York (546), 
Michigan (540), Colorado (531), Minnesota (525), Pennsylvania (453), 
California (442), Ohio (437), Massachusetts (432), District of Columbia 
(402), Rhode Island (401). 

The field, from a Master Mason standpoint, is worked the closest 
in the following jurisdictions. The largest proportion of Master 
Masons to population is shown in the following rank : 



Maine 31.97 

Vermont 38.02 

District of Columbia 40.28 

New Hampshire 45.18 

Nevada - 45.85 

Connecticut 48.13 

Florida 54.50 

Mississippi 64.32 



Arkansas 64.60 

Michigan 65.71 

Montana . 72.09 

Georgia 72.37 

Massachusetts 72.50 

Kansas 76.00 

California _ 76.31 

New York .79.15 



In Capitular Masonry, the jurisdictions which have done the 
largest percentage of work in the Master Mason field, are found in 
the following order : 



Rhode Island 2.02 

District of Columbia 2.51 

New Hampshire __2.81 

Massachusetts 2.87 

Nevada 2.91 

Wisconsin 3.05 

Illinois 3.19 

South Dakota 3.19 

Michigan 3.27 

Pennsylvania 3.30 

Colorado 3.36 

Connecticut 3.36 



California 3.40 

Iowa 3.48 

Minnesota .3.71 

Nebraska 3.83 

Vermont 3.88 

Maryland 4.00 

Oregon 4.01 

North Dakota 4.12 

Indiana 4.38 

Maine 4.40 

Kansas 4.61 

New York 4.68 



APPENDIX. 



20I 



In the Criptic Rite, based upon the Royal Aroh membership, the 
ratio of standing is in the following order : 



Texas 1.33 

Rhode Island 1.86 

Connecticut .._ 1.99 

North Carolina _.2.09 

Vermont 2.42 

New Hampshire — 2.56 

Indiana _ .2.74 

North Dakota. 2.96 

Ohio 3.58 

Louisiana 3.65 



Maine 3.88 

Michigan 4.00 

Kentucky 4.10 

South Carolina 4.15 

California _..4.")8 

Arkansas 4.61 

Georgia 4.94 

Minnesota _ 4.94 

New York 5.39 



Turning to the Chivalric Orders, we find that from those who 
have become Royal Aroh Masons, there have been created Knights 
Templars in the following proportions in order as given : 



Washington 1.40 

Kentucky 1.40 

Colorado 1.42 

Pennsylvania 1.42 

Virginia 1.47 

Rhode Island -1.47 

Massachusetts 1.49 

Maryland 1.50 

Missouri 1.53 

Delaware 1.55 



District of Columbia 1.55 

Minnesota 1.58 

Kansas -1.64 

Iowa 1.70 

New Hampshire 1.72 

Illinois 1.73 

Ohio 1.80 

California 1.82 

Nebraska 1.83 

New York 1.86 



The general average of all jurisdictions is as follows : 

Master Masons to population 1 to 87.10 

Royal Arch Masons to Master Masons 1 to 4.09 

Knights Templars to Master M aeons _ 1 to 7.36 

Knights Templars to Royal Arch Masons 1 to 1.80 

R.\ and S.\ Masters to Knights Templars 1 to 2.61 

R.\ and S.'. Masters to Royal Arch Masons 1 to 4.70 



The compilation of the above tables involved great 
labor upon the part of P. G. M. Anthony, and he has 
placed the Fraternity at large nnder very great obligations 
to him for the valuable information he has placed within 
their reach. 



202 APPENDIX. 



CONCLUSION. 

Our extended journey through fifty-five sovereignties 
of the Masonic realm is at length ended. With our notes 
of travel, taken en route, you are already familiar. Now 
that we are once more beneath the roof -tree # of our own 
jurisdiction, with the brethren of the household assembled 
about us, let us endeavor to picture the condition and 
prospects of our beloved institution generally, as presented 
to our view while upon our tour of inspection. 

What of Masonry? Favorable are the omens in the 
North, South, East and West Along the horizon a few 
clouds still linger here and there; let us hope they will 
soon dissolve and leave our blue expanse once more 
cloudless. 

One of the most important questions now before the 
Fraternity is: The Antiquity of Masonic Degrees. Under 
various headings in this Report we have had occasion to 
discuss this subject at considerable length, more especially 
under Iowa and Utah. Under the latter we have given 
the opinion of Bro. R. F. Gould, in connection with the 
discovery of the letters of Dr. Thomas Manningham, 
D. G. Master of England 1752-56, and also extracts from 
these very important letters. Heretofore Bro. Gould him- 
self has most strenuously maintained that Old Regulation 
XIII referred to two degrees only: "Apprentices and Mas- 
ters or Fellowcrafts." (Italics his. ) He had also written 
the following: "The Degrees of Ancient Masonry were 
two only, and those of Modern Masonry were the same in 
number — at least until 1723." 

We are rejoiced to know that he has seen proper to 
reverse his opinion. Prominent writers have for years 
reiterated the same views, having little patience with those 
who had the temerity to differ from them. And yet not a 
particle of evidence was ever adduced to show when such 
addition occurred. Bro. Gould, as shown above, once 
intimated that it must have been subsequent to 1723. 
There is no mention in the records of the Grand Lodge of 
England of any such addition. Upon no other subject did 
our Masonic ancestors exhibit such anxiety as upon that 
of innovations and the maintenance of the old customs and 
usages of the Fraternity. To have added a third degree 



APPENDIX. 203 

to our system, at any time since 1723, would have created 
sufficient stir to have left its impress upon the records of 
the Grand Lodge of England, as well as in contemporary 
Masonic writings. The very integrity of the Masonic 
system would thereby have been imperilled; for, once 
admit the right of the governing body of the Graft to add 
one degree, and others would necessarily follow. 

The discovery of the Manningham letters has happily 
settled the controversy for the present, at least, and 
demonstrated the existence of the three degrees during 
the last quarter of the seventeenth century. Thus one more 
link has been added to the chain of evidence that Masonry 
was a perfect system at the start The growth theory has 
always seemed to us untenable, in view of the fact that 
Masonry has, beyond question, met with greater losses 
than accessions during the past century. We refer, of 
course, to its structural beauties and features, and not to 
monitorial embellishments, of which there never has been 
a dearth. 

Sometimes, while discussing the antiquity of Masonry, 
one is suddenly confronted with the facetious inquiry: 
"Well! you don't go beyond the Temple, do you?" In the 
course of our reading, recently, we met with a tradition 
which does go considerably beyond; and, as it pleased us, 
we made it the subject of a poem, which we reproduce, 
trusting it may find favor with our readers: 

BEARING THE SHEAVES. 

Have you heard the tradition the rabbins have told 
Of the site whereon stood the famed Temple of old? 
Long ere stone had been laid how 'twas hallowed by love, 
And grew precious in sight of the Master above. 
'Twae aforetime possessed by two brothers, 'tis said, 
One of whom lived alone, while the other was wed. . 
In a primitive way they had planted their field, 
By uniting their labors and sharing the yield ; 
When the wheat had transmuted the gold of the sun, 
It was stacked near each home, and the harvest was done. 

When the elder had finished his evening repast, 
A fond glance toward his wife and his children he cast, 
As he mused o'er the blessings kind heaven had sent, 
What endearments were his, aye, what blissful content. 
Then he thought of his brother, uncheered in his life 
By the presence of children and sweet loving wife. 



204 APPENDIX. 

For his desolate lot he would recompense make — 
And thus pondered what kindness to do for his sake : 
"From my sheaves I will secretly add to his own, 
For his comforts are few who thus dwelleth alone.' 1 

As the shadows grew deep and the day-star declined, 

In his home sat the younger, these thoughts in his mind : 

I have none to provide for, my wants they are few, 

And I roam where I will when my labors are through, 

Careless, happy and free as a bird of the air, 

For I've none of the burdens my brother must bear. 

What a pleasure 'twould be, now the harvest is o'er, 

Could I stealthily aid him in basket and store ; 

He has many to feed, and is harassed by cares — 

I will add to his sheaves while he sleeps unawares. 

In the gray of the dawn each was filled with surprise, 

As his stack undiminished confronted his eyes. 

In the darkness once more their good deeds they repeat, 

In the mom, lo! what marvel — their stacks still complete. 

The third night on love's errand they venture again, 

Both resolved, on returning, strict watch to maintain. 

A dim figure approaching, each brother perceives, 

Then they twain come together both bearing their sheaves. 

In an instant they're locked in each other's embrace, 

With the look of a seraph o'erspreading each face. 

On the spot where thus met those two brothers of old, 
Rose the Temple, resplendent with cedar and gold. 
While love's spirit still lingered, its spell over all, 
From the workman in quarry to builder on wall. 
And thus linked loving hearts in a brotherhood vast, 
Which has silently threaded the centuried past, 
Mid the splendor of kingdoms or lone desert waste, 
Where the battle shout rose or where vines interlaced. 
Where the mount kissed the sky or in cavern of earth, 
Holding priceless the truth it received at its birth. 

Bearing succor to those in the direst distress, 

Bearing balm for their wounds, bearing bounty to bless. 

Bearing food for the hungry and shelter from storm, 

Bearing brightness to cheer, bearing raiment to warm. 

Bearing comfort to those who are sadly bereft, 

What its right hand may do never knoweth the left. 

Ever bearing some good, ever heeding eote cry, 

For by love, only love, can we mount to the sky. 

When the perfect day comes and true light each receives, 

May it fall on us all while we're bearing our sheaves. 



APPENDIX. 20S 

The recognition of the "Gran Dieta Simbolica de los 
Estados Unidos Mexicanos," by the Grand Lodge of Texas, 
is an event of much importance to Ancient Craft Masonry. 
Under Texas will be found a full account, bv Grand 
Master Tyler, of the successive steps which led to the 
formation of this national Grand Body. 

The Gran Dieta claims jurisdiction over symbolical 
Masonry, having no connection with Supreme Councils or 
Grand Orients, although the Lodges under its obedience 
all work the Scottish Rite ritual for the three degrees. 
There is but one Lodge in Mexico — Toltec No. 520, in the 
City of Mexico, chartered by the Grand Lodge of Missouri, 
which works the York Rite. 

Whether the action of the Grand Lodge of Texas will 
be followed by other jurisdictions remains to be seen. 

The movement of Kentucky in favor of a Fraternal 
Congress, to be held in Chicago during the World's Fair, 
has met with very general acceptance on the part of Grand 
Lodges, who believe much good may result therefrom; but 
all are decidedly opposed to any step looking to the organi- 
zation of a General Grand Lodge. 

Active efforts in the direction of organized charity, to 
which reference has been made in previous reports, show 
no signs of abatement. In nearly every jurisdiction some 
provision is being made, either for the establishment of a 
Masonic Home, or for the creation of a Grand Lodge 
Charity Fund. 

To our fellow reporters we return our sincere thanks, 
for their kindly treatment and expressions of good will. 

Fraternally submitted, 

LAWRENCE N. GREENLEAF, 

For fhe Committee. 



Returns of Lodges 





/ /C * < c < • * * 



RETURNS OF LODGES. 



GOLDEN LODGE No. 1, 

GOLDEN, JEFFERSON COUNTY. 
[ Communications first and third Mondays in each month.] 



OFFICERS. 



/^William Triplet, W. M. 
W. P. Benedict. 8. W. 
James Nankivell, J. W. 
Joseph G. Bcball, Treas. 
M. C. Kirby, Sec'y. 



Anderson, Joseph ^ 
Almond. F. W. 
Brown, W. H. 
Bates, M. L. 
Bunney, Robert 
Bellum, T. L. 
Blatter, John W. 
Bailey. Stephen 
Benjaman, J. E. 
Barter, William 
Barnes, John W. 
Cole. W. E. 
Clark, Charles T. 
Chapman. C. A. 
Chinn. Rolla W. 
Clongh, Aaron. 
Cooker. George C. 
Curry, W. H. 
Chauveriet, Regis 
Churches, John 
Courtney, George W. 
J Her. W. A. 
Dolleson. George W. 
Dyer, Fred. A. 
Eagleton, J. B. 
Klwood. A. 8 
Eskins. Peter 
Edwards, Jenkins 
Faragher, Robert 
Fuller, Stephen 
Fischer, Franz 
Goldsworthy, Richard 



MEMBKB8. 

Gilchrist, H. 8. 
Gowe, Thomas 
Grenier, James W. 
Heat ley, Ed. J. 
Henthorne, N. M. 
Hultman, August 
Harrison, D. E. 
Hendry, J. B. 
Higgins, John A. 
Hall, R. D. 
Halverhaut, Fred. H. 
Hartzell. James 
Hussey, William 
Irwin, W. H. 
Johnson, C. P. 
Jones, Latham W. 
Koenig. Nicholas 
Kendall, Phillip 
Kelley, James 
Kelley, W. J. 
Koenig, Rudolph 
Kimball, George K. 
Kelly, George 
Kelly, John P. 
Lake, C. W. 
Lake, Charles 8. 
Lanius, Paul 
Lambing, Harry L. 
Lees, David 
Lark ins, J. T. 
Morrison, George 
Martin, Peter ^. 



A. M. McCurdy. 8. D. 
Garry Kerr. J. D. 
Joseph Dennis. Jr., 8. S. 
P. C. Booton J. 8. 
Alexander Kerr, Tiler. 



Mann, Joseph 
McGonigal, George 
Mize, John 
Nicholls, John 
Opal, Martin 
Parker, John H. 
Porter, A. A. 
Parfet, C. E. 
Reeves, George W. 
Robinson, H. R. 
Rowe, David 
Roney, Alexander 
Smith, Benjamin F. 
Smith, W. L. 
Songer, John 
Stogsdail, D. R. 
Sams, A. L. 
Htepp. William 
Shrock, A. C. 
Seli, Krocket 
Stork, Bert F. 
Stanger, J. 8. 
Shilladay, Hugh 
Treffiesen, John 
Toll, John W. 
Titley, John W. 
Tost, C. F. 
Williamson, James 
WHde, Charles H. 
White, William 
Welch, C. C. 
Wells, A. L. i^* 



SUMMIT LODGE No. 2, 

PARKVILLE, SUMMIT COUNTY. 

[Ch( trier surrendered,] 



APPENDIX. 



209 



EOCKY MOUNTAIN LODGE No. 3, 

GOLD HILL, BOULDER COUNTY. 

Extinct. 



NEVADA LODGE No. 4 

BALD MOUNTAIN, GILPIN COUNTY. 
[Communication* second and fourth Saturdays in each month.] 



Alex. Aulsebrook, W. M. 
William Nichols. 8. W. 
Francis M. May hew, J. W. 
Isaac M. Parsons, Treas. 
J. W. Ratliff, Sec'y. ^-^ 



Ashbaugh, A. L~- 
Blight, 8. 8. 
Bolmnger, H. C. 
Clemens, Richard 
Caaley, Thomas E. 
Cannon, John W. 
Daniels. John 
Finlay, Wm. M. 
Fullerton, W. C. 
Hamor. D. A. 
Eager, Chas. 
Hyndman, M. B. 
Hendershott, J. D. 



OFFICERS. 



MEMBERS. 

Hicks, J. R. 
Hooker, D. 8. 
Hooper, John 
Jenkins, Thomas 
Jen kin. George 
Kline, P. A. 
Kobey, M. G. 
Kevelin, John 
Lewis, W. J. 
Lee, John 
Mills, Abraham 
Mortensen. N. C. 
Murphy, Patrick 



Wallace A. Merriell, B. D. 
C. L. Cooper, J. D. 
P. C. Hansen, 8. 8. 
George K. Tonn, J . 8. 
Thomas T. Warren, Tiler. 



Newlnn, Thomas 
Noonan, James 
Bachofsky, H. 
Rowe, George 
8parks, O. T. 
Standley. Joseph 
Skelly. Wm. 
Tucker, A. W. 
Thomas, James B. 
Topping* J* F. 
Visscher, Cornelias 
Wendt, Frederick 
Williams, Wm. W. 



DENVER LODGE No. 5. 



DENVER, ARAPAHOE COUNTY. 

[Communications fir st and third Saturdays in each month.) 



Anfenger, Louis 
Anstee, George 
Arnett, Wm. D. 
Allen, Quinoy 
Allen, George P. 
Acheson, Wm. J. 
Atchison, John 
Armstrong, George W. 
Appel, Simon 
Alien, Charles P. 
Abrama, D. Albert 
Anderson, Cooper 



OFFICERS. 



Frank Wheeler, W. M. 
Robert Hamilton, 8. W. 
Wm. L. H. Millar. J. W. 
Thomas Nicholl, Treas. 
James C. Johnston, Sec'y. 



MKMBEH8. 

Annis, Albert E, 
fAnnis, Emmet B. 
Adams, J ames F. 
Alexander, Archie 
Albers, Uifert 
Arthur, James W. 
Avrill, August 
Aldrach, Charles W. 
A Id ridge, Thomas B. 
Adams, Guy 
Abbot, Stephen S. 
Adamson, Charles P. 



Matt. Adams. 8. D. 
Frank E. McCann, J. D. 
Daniel J. Haynes, 8. 8. 
Wm. P. Quarterman, J. 8. 
Thomas Linton, Tiler. 



Byers, Wm. N. 
Barker, AriHelm II. 
Brewer, Gardner (i. 
Berry, Barnard 
Bigler, Jacob A. J, 
Bromwell, Henry P. H. 
Brown, William G. 
Bayles, Benjamin H. 
Bingham, lien jam in F. 
Boyer, John C. 
Baker, Albert J. 
Bryden, James t__ 



14 



210 



APPENDIX. 



Beau champ, Edward 
Boyer, Araoe L. 
Besser, George J. 
Brnbaker. Wm. A. 
Bassche, Cano A, 
Benton, Harry W. 
Borrow*. George 
Bond, William M. 
Batcher, James M. 
Bagley, Herman J. 
Butler, Calvin P. 
Bizby, Ed. 8. 
Bnshnell, George 
Boggs, James B. 
Biller, John 
Brown, James H. 
Bowman, George P. 
Brown, William J. 
Burnbam, Norman G. 
Barnes, Henry G. 
Brady, Wm. H. G. 
Bergstrand, Charles 
Barton, Archie A. 
Bingham, George 
Baily, George 
Bassett, William 
Blethin, Lanrens 
Beck man, Fred. 
Baker. Nathan A. 
Brewer. Charles M. 
Beck, John 
Beebe. John 
Ball, Lonis 
Bell, Fred. W. 
Barton, George 
Baeressen, H. W. 
Borqnin. Augustus 
Barker, William 
Belford, James F. 
Barchie, Harrie 
Bnckman. Gay, 
Birchett, Wm. I. 
Backley. S. Byron 
Bemis, D. M. L. 
Chaney, Silas W. 
Cooper, George T. 
Converse, George A. 
Conltharst. Alameth 
Castance, Harry B. 
Church, Frank 
Cordray, John F. 
Calvert, Wm. J. 
Cordingly..Alfred 
Combs, Wm.F. 
Croweli. Alfred N. 
Crandell, James H. 
Carlson. Oliver J. 
(Uark, William H. 
Cheesman, Walter 8. 
Cobb, Charles D. 
Clark, Elijah P. 
Cooper, Job A. 
Cook, Jeremiah J. 
Coan. N. Frank 
Craig, James 
Cronk, Alfred 
Cramer, Fred. 
Craig, Wm. H. 
Clemes, James H. 
Campbell, Lncien D. 
Crumb. James 
Cross, Jacob Cline 
Cohen, Henry N. 
Cnmmings, Robert 



MEMBEB8. 

Chase, Arthur 
Carter, Lawrence 
Cisler, Stephen A. 
Covert. William 
Cook, Lemuel 
Crawford, Wm. H. 
Cunningham, George 
Connor, James T. 
Campbell, William 
Dorsey .George D. 
Davis, William H. 
Downie, David 
DeCamp, Wm F. 
DeSellem, John 
Dorsey. Samuel C. 
Douglass, Thomas 
Daily, John L. 
Danielson, Frank 
Davie, Flavins N. 
Davis, Frank M. 
Duggan, Jsraes 
Daggan, Alex. 
Daggan, Hngh 
Dahnke, Fred. 
Detloff, August 
Depew, John F. 
DeSollar. Henry C. 
Dickey, Thomas J. 
Downie, Ed. R. 
Dry den. David 
Davy, Nelson 
Dickey, Jesse H. 
Dan bar. George 8. 
Davis. Henry W. 
Dow ling, John C. 
Davisson. Olie 
Downs, Frank M. 
Dennison, Henry L. 
Davis, Henry A. 
Davit*, Alfred 
Doling, David 
Dace, James 
Darden. Wm. 
Davis, Thomas 
Davy, John P. 
Dale, John P. 
Dunham. Robert M. 
Duthie, Alexander 
Evans, Wm. G. 
Evans, Evan 
Edwards, Wm. G. 
Eyler, Hugh L. 
Enmiston^A. A. 
Edwards, Thomas A. 
Edwards, Melvin 
Emanuel, Wm. H. 
Eisner, John 
Eckersen, Edward 
Fribourg, Theo. L. H. 
Fleischer, Jacob 
Fewlass, Robert 
Flatrey, John H. 
Failing, Henry H. 
Freund, Isaac 
F re wen, Frank 
Filby, Alfred 
Forey the, Alex. 
Flynn, Edward 
Foreman, James A. 
Faii-burst, Thomas 
Frink, Wm. R. 
Fallis. Jacob R. 
Fisk, Frederick 
Fredrum, John 



Frizelle, Horace 
Farrington. Wm. R. 
Francher, Frank 
Fewlass, John 
Find lay, Robert 
Francis, John R. 
Fleming, John G. 
Flintiiam, John W. 
Gregor, John 
Glandling. John 
Gilbert, John H. 
Greenhill, John 8. 
Groves, James R. 
Greenleaf, Laurence N. 
Gove. Carlos 
Gardiner, Wm. H. 
Godfrey, Walter 
Gray, William P. 
Groram. Fred. W. 
Gibbs, Wesley J. 
Green, George L. 
Graves. Walter 
Greenfield, Enos 
Graham, J a red B. 
Gaylord, Paul 
Goodman, John B. 
Gibb, William 
Grossmayer, Max. 
Goodenough, Ezra 
Gilstrap, Wm. H. 
Graves, Fred. W. 
Gray, Edmund 8. 
Geddis. Wm. 
Gray, David 
Gibbs, George W. 
Gutstall.Thomas 
Hyams, Isaac 
Hen rich. John 8. 
Hiester, Jackson 8. 
Hunter, Thomas 
Hill, Frank B. 
HeeterjWilliam R. 
Harp, William R. 
Hart, Charles N. 
Hermann. Augustus 
Haswell, Wm. 8. 
Hanauer, Abraham 
Henderson, John T. 
Heiser, Herman 
Harris, Francis M. 
Hippie. EleazerW. 
Hurst, Joseph 8. 
Hendey, Arthur 
Holt, Wm. T. 
Harrington, Benj. F. 
Hopkins, George M. 
Howe, James 8. 
Haas, Oliver 
Hardin, George W. 
Heasley, Charles K. 
Hat ton, Robert L. 
Hunt, Andrew 
Howe. Samuel 
Hardie, John F. 
Holmes, John 
Haynes, James 
Hansen. Julius 
Hittell, Benj. F. 
Holzman, Samuel L. 
Hartwell, Harold 
Heesler. Potter 
Hayes, Arthur 
Hyman, M. 
Hudson, James A. 



Hatbewai, Sherman 
Bar bet, Frank 

Hunter, Cod kilo D. 
Hubbard, Robert 



Jarde 111! Louis 
KmeBer, Charles 11. 
Kofau. L'barlaa E. 
Kinloy. Joseph B. 
Kinney, William 
Kinkel. Henry 
Kaator. Isidor 
Klock. John 1. 
Kimball, J 11 nine II. 
Kline. David 
Kisthardt. Jamb 



Kilpeirick, Jan.ee 

Londoner, ffolfo 
Liston, Martin 



Linton. Charles T. 
Lnthrop. Martin 
Lambert, Wm.T. 

LieSara. Witliara 
Leach, Robert E. 
Lee. Charles 8. 
Lloyd. William 
LiTetmore. Cbarlea 
Iamb, Charles Q. 
Lull, George B. 



Ladtu. Ai 



Lloyd. John M. 
Langton. Jnmm ( 
Las, John A. 



Mossier, Richard W. 
Metkle, William 
Morel and, John 



Middfebrook. John B 
Moore, John A. 
Monro, Duncan 
Monteline. W. W. 
Neff. (ieonse W. 
Nerin. Valentine T. 
Nioboll. Wm. J. 
Neill. Edward 
Neiln, Samnel F. 

HionoUa. Wm. H.J. 

Nell. Henri H. 
MoTTeJI Lonie P. 
Norlin. Ernest W. 
Neilwin. Christian 
Nook. Henri 
Nock, Thomas 
Olympus, John P. 
Oswald, Daniel C. 
Osborne. Robert 



Prinn, Willian 



Porter, 'William J. 

Price! EdwardV 
Pennook, Le.is E. 
Potter, Edwin B. 
Quinn, Thomas 
HoKen, H. Wesley 
Roberts, George T, 
Rose, Hamnel 
Raymond. Charles A. 
Rose. Walter M. 
Reid, William 
HiggB. Jos. a, 
Biddle, Herman C. 
Bundle, Thomas C. 
Ryan. John 
Rollins, Robert P. 
Ramsay, Lee 
Rankin, John F. C. 
Host. Eliao 
Roeder, Artolph 
Ridley, William 
Richards William H. 
Rogers, Wm. T. 
Roewen, (ieorge M. 
Ramus, Charles J. 
Roberts, James W. 
Ramsay, Jacob «. 
Roberts, John Ci. 
Stark, Albert J. 



Sopris, Richard 
Salomon. Hiram L. 
Sch inner, Adolph 
Shortridge, Wm, T. 
Bnepperd. Sydney A 

Storey, Albert 
Spnwoe. Wm.B. 
Somen, Ed. 
Spearin, Daniel A. 



Steele. Robert W. 



MeCann. Peter 
McMortrie, John A. 
McKay, SmiU. 
McCullongb. Ueonje 
McKeniie. Murdoch 



FTenderintat, Georae 
PBBbodV.SaTld Q. 



212 



APPENDIX. 



Smith, Charles 
Steuderaan, Theodore 
Sanford, Byron 
Searles, Frank M. 
Sawins, Alva H. 
Sheckells. Richard 
Semper, Charles 
8 peer, Albert S. 
Small, J amen 
Sutherland, Alex. 
Smith, Ed. H. 
Shields, Charles O. 
Seccombe, Samuel 
Stone, Lawrence 
Seerie, David 
Tibbeta, Wm. F. 
Taylor, James F. 
Tyler, George E. 
Tronnstine. Phillip 
Tall man, John 
Tritch, George 
Tattle, Herman B. 
Toovey, William 
Treat, Charles 



Taylor, Hugh 

Thompson, George W. 

Thompson. Wm. J. 

Tyler, William 

Tracy, Michael 

Trosper, Martin 

Tomlinson, John 

Tedford, James A. 

Thoreaa, Phillip 

Tucker, Cromwell 

Tritch, George, jr. 

Tyler, William l>. 

Turner, John. jr. 

Turner, Henry 

Tomlinson, Alfred J. 

Uhl. John 

Veatch, James C. 

Viancourt, Moses F. 

Watkins, Leonard K. 

Wallace, Thomas B. 
' Williams, Richard J. 
, Wise, Morris 

Webster. John W. 

Wolfe, William 



Whitehead, Wm. R. 
Williams, Ed. S. 
Watson. Richard 
Wolff, Alfred 
Watson, Henry W. 
Watson, Wm. C. 
Wadsworth, Harrison L. 
Wells, William 
Walker, Thomas C. 
Whitall, Thomas D. 
Williamson. Walter W. 
Willette, George W. 
Westlake, Charles H. 
Wilson, Walter 
Wickes, Charles P. 
Wooley, George H. 
Walker. BenJ. L. 
Waddell, Robert 
White, David 
Willetts, George, Jr. 
Younker, Jason T. 
York, Ernest P. 
York, Alex, M. 



CENTKAL LODGE No. 6, 



CENTRAL CITY, GILPIN COUNTY. 



[Communications second and fourth Wednesdays in each month.] 



OFFICKHS. 



Ambrose Bray. W. M. 
Ferdinand French, 8. W. 
Charles Ellis, J. W. 
Newton D. Owen, Treas. 
Richard Harvey, Sec'y. 



William B. Beall, 8. D. 
Abraham L. Kichey, J. D. 
William 0. Jenkins, S. & 
Henry Becker, J. 8. 
Bela I. Lorah, Tiler. 



Becker, Clayton F. l~ 
Barrett, George W. 
Bunney, John 
Blight, Joseph 
Best, John 
Borhight, Alonzo J. 
Budge, William 
Bennetts, Matthew 
Bush, Clayton W. 
Dunagan, J; J. 
Gilbert, Henry 
Gooch. Frederick T. 
Hawley, Henry J. 
Hastie. Robert 
Hore, Henry 
Harvey, William 
Jordan, John 



lOCMBKBS. 

Joyce, William 
Kruse, H. Jacob 
Kruse, Gnstave 
Lorah, Samuel 1. 
Lewis, Oscar 
Lawton, Frederick 
Mullen, Thorn aH 
Ma bee, George W. 
McFarlane, Andrew A. 
Miller. Christopher C. 
Nichols, Foster 
Price, Charles W. 
Potter, Thomas H. 
Polglase. John 
Parenteau, William H. 
Power, Roger F. 
Perrin, Edward 8. / 



Packard. John H. 
Queen, William 
Richards, Harry 
Richards, Joseph 
Sherman, Charles E. 
Sears, Nathan A. 
8 wain, Wilson 8. 
Teller, Henry M. 
Thomas, Morris 
Tolles. LarkinC. 
Trenoweth, Charles 
Trebilcock, William 
Updegraff. Joseph 8. 
Wisebart, Benjamin W. 
Williams, Edward W. 
Young. Frank C. a 



APPENDIX. 



213 



UNION LODGE No. 7, 

DENVER, ARAPAHOE COUNTY. 
[Communications second and fourth Saturdays in each month.'] 



OFFIOKB8. 



Leonard Cutshaw, W. M. 
Louis 0. Greenlee, 8. W. 
Harry Carr, J. W. 
Benjamin L. James, Treas. 
Henry W. Hannom, Sec'y. 



Calvin E. Reed, 8. D. 
John F. Dreecber, J. D. 
Orlando B. Scoby, 8. 8. 
Frank C. Goody. J. 8. 
•Thomas Linton, Tiler. 



Abel, George W. l_ 
Ackroyd. Eli 
AUinfe. E. T. 
Ames, Willard L. 
Anthony, Webb D. 
Anthony, Scott J. 
Anthony, Merrill P. 
Anderson, J. Wylie 
Apple, Henry 
Armstrong, J. K. 
Ashley, Eli M. 
Ashton, Alfred 
Atkinson, A. G. 
Austin, Percy 
Bailey, Edward L. 
Bailey, Joseph L. 
Bailey, Hiram L. 
Bailey, K. L. 
Baines, Joseph 
Baker, W. P. 
Baker. Edward W. 
Bsll,Jta»eC. 
Barker, W.J. 
Barrett, George 
Barry, James 
Barton, EUas B. 
Banra, Madison 
Bavis, L M. 
Beckbart, William E. 
Belson. B. W. 8. 
Beal, M. 8. 
Beggs. Robert H. 
Berkey, John M. 
Billings, Robert 
Billings, George N. 
Birney. F. L. 
Bixby. Fred. C. 
Blood, John H. 
Bleibel, Chsrles 
Booth, C. A. 
Bowen, Marion A. 
Bowen. Benjamin F. 
Bore*. E C. 
Bond, William 
Boneeteel, Samuel A. 
Bockfinger, Philip L. 
Bogne, Lnman M. 
Bracken, Thomas 
Bradbury, Charles F. 
Bradbury, Cotton C. 
Brevick. a. A. 
Bright, W. H. 
Bresnahan. John J. 
Brooks. Charles D. 
Brown. J. M. 

• Not a member. 



MEXBBB0. 

Brown, Robert A. 
Brown, J* 8. 
Brown, L. J. 
Brnnk, Thomas J. 
Bryant, W. A. 
Barn ham, George A. 
Bargdorf, Charles A. 
Barton, Alfred G. 
Bnttolph, E. K. 
Cable, George R. 
Came. Virgil M. 
Campbell, T. A. 
Campbell, Donald W. 
Campbell, Charles M. 
Carnthers. 8. 8. 
Carroll, Edward J. 
Carney, John C. 
Cardwell, George R. 
Carstarphen. Oney 
Case, Austin G. 
Cassell, Robert T. 
Caasell, W. J 
Cathcart, Thomas L. 
Charles, John Q. 
Chase, T. C. 
Chandler, Russell 
Chariot, A. C. 
Chivington, John M. 
Chrysler, C. B. 
Christen, William 
Clark, Ed. E. 
Clark. J. H. 
Clark, William 
Clarke, Clarence J. 
Cline, L. C. 
Clinton, Charles M. 
Cleaveland. John R. 
Cofield, J. B. 
Coffey, James W. 
Collier. George M. 
Colby, Ferris W. 
Collins, E. H. 
Colman, W. H. 
Conant, T. J. 
Conant. Eugene F. 
Cook, David J. 
Cool, Walter McD. 
Cooper, Cyrus E. 
Cooper, Edward R. 
Cooper, W. A. L. 
Cooper, Willis J. 
Cooper, William H. 
Cornforth, Joseph T. 
Cornwall, William T. 
Cort, Frank ^ 



Crater, George E. 
Crater, W. H. 
Craig, William Bayard 
Craig. William B. 
Cranston, Earl M. 
Crosky, A. B. 
CresBwell, John 
Cresswell, Joseph 
Cartis, Rodney 
Cummins, Fred. 
Culton, John J. 
Cutler, Herbert J. 
Dale, William W. 
Dane, George 
Davis, A. W. 
Davis, Sylvanus 
Davidson, David 
Davenport, William M. 
D'Autremont, John L. 
Dayton, W. L. 
Davey, John 
Diokton, H. C. 
Dietz. Henry 
Dillabaugh, John 
Dodge. James 
Donnellan, John T. 
Donnelly, Charles 
Downing, Jacob 
Dougan. David H. 
Doud, A. L. 
Dowson, Henry 
Duggan, George 
Durkee, Lafayette 
Durbin, Levi T. 
Edwards, N. H. 
Elbert, Samuel H. 
Elder, H. G. 
Ellis, Benjamin 
Ellis, Carleton 
Emery, Willis 
Emperor, William 
Emmiok, John C. 
Erdman, Otto A. 
Erdman. F. C. 
Evans, Noah H. 
Evans, J. Frank 
Evans, John 
Evans, Thomas 
Everitt, Charles M. 
Ewing. Josiah P. 
Ewens, W. W. 
Farmer, Fred. C. 
Parish, John B. 
Farnum,8. Vincent 
Fassett, J. W. ^ 



214 



APPENDIX. 



Faulkner, Ed. B. 
Ferguson, Daniel B. 
Ferguson, Charles A. 
Felker, William fi. 
Fisher, W. G. 
Fisher, Cyrus W. 
Finch, Marcus 
Finehart, Matt. E. 
Flanders, Leonard H. 
Fleming, James A. 
Fletcher, Donald 
Ford, Charles M. 
France, L. B. 
Fraser, John J. 
Fraser. Francis 
Franklin, Nelson 
Frederickson, J. C. 
Frederick, A. P. 
French ,8. M. 
Frost, Harry C. 
Fnrey, Charles L. 
Gair, Peter I. 
Garvey, John T., Jr. 
Garret son, E. W. 
Ganlt, John 
George, Samuel 
Gillette, Andrew W. 
Gird, Christopher C. 
Gleason. J. A. 
Gove, Aaron 
Goodwin. H. S. 
Graham, John W. 
Graham, David B. 
Grant, T.J. 
Grafton, W. H. 
Green, 8. 8. 
Green, J. H. 
Green, J. K. 
Green. Charles 0. 
Greenlee, Robert C. 
Greenlee. William E. 
Greiner, Hobert C. 
Gayer, Clarkson 
Gunsolas, J. T. 
Hager, Clarence E. 
Hall, W. W. 
Hall, Fred. F. 
Hall, A. P. 
Hall, J. P. 
Hallows Job J. 
Hamilton, W. F. 
Hamilton, George A. 
Hampton, J. W. 
Hard, Frank J. 
Hardy, 8. B. 
Hardy, Charles W. 
Harris, Arthur C. 
Harris, William 
Harkison, Charles T. 
Hart, J. W. 
Hart man, Henry 
Harlow, Skip I. 
Hattenbach, M. 
Hayman, Frank T. 
Henry, George 
Hicks, .James B. 
High. Fred. 8. 
Higgin, Albert 
Hill, W. C. 

Hildebrand, Robert B. 
Hitchcock, W.D. 
Hobbs, Charles M. 
Hoffer, John G. 
Hogle, Austin W. 



Hopson, C. M. 
Home, Henry 
Howard, Charles 
Howard, Henry 
Hoiaington, J. M. 
Honok, 8. C. 
House, G. W. 
Houghton, J.M. 
Huddart,john J. 
Huff, J. W. 
Huntington, G. W. 
Hurst, Harry R. 
Hard, Nathan 8. 
Hull, W. L. 
Huskins, George M. 
Hutchins, 8am uel A. 
Jrish, F. M. 
Ireland, F. W. 
Jennings, D. H. 
Jenner, C. W. 
Jenkins. 8. H. 
Johnson, P. C. 
Johnson, James 
Johnson, E. Walter 
Johnson, Christian 
Johnson, Peter 
Johnston, James 8. 
Jones, George A. 
Jones, J. W. 
Jones, Morton 
Jones, Henry C. 
Jolly, Henry F. 
Keith, O. P. 
Kellogg, George A. 
Killen, Bernard C. 
Kiefer, John 
Killie, Isaac L. 
Kinport, Jesse E. 
Kincaid, Kobert A. 
Kimball, George D. 
Kirkham, W. A. 
Kohlman, L. H. 
Kountze, Chas. B. 
Krake, H. E. 
Kroger, J. H. 
Kreuger. F. H. C. 
Kuner, Max 
LaDue. T. F. 
Lapp, John M. 
Lamont, W. A. 
Latimer, Vincent B. 
Lawrence, E. 8. W. 
Lee, William Scott 
Leimer, Charles F. 
Ijennon, John A. 
Lei ft, Joeeph 
Legge, Orr 
Letts, Charles J. 
Lewington, Fred. 
Light. Edward B. 
Lillyblade, August 
Lipscomb, Thomas W. 
Littlefield, Virgil A. 
Londoner, Julius 
Lord, Frank J. 
Lower, George W. 
Lloyd, David 
Lydston, James A. 
Lyon, William F. M. 
McBeth, John A. 
McCarty. A. J. 
McCormick, Samuel B. 
McClair, William 
McClanathan, Sydney 



McColloch, Charles 8. 
McFarland, Marvin D. 
McGill. P. J. 
Mcintosh, Charles J. 
McLauthlin, H. W. 
Mack, Frederick 
Marfell, Hiram 
Mark ham. Joseph H. 
Marsh, Orlando C. 
Marshall, Charles H. 
Martin, John H. 
Marx, Julias 
Meek, Albert E. 
Mentzer, Rufus 
Merriam, Harry C. 
Merriam, W. J. 
Merritt, George H. 
Measemer, W. 8. 
Meyers, Harry J. 
Meyers, Ferdinand 
Middaugh, W. H. 
Mignolet, John 
Millison, Elisha 
Miller. H. J. 
Miller, Dennett E. 
Miller, Thomas H. 
Morgan, J ames 
Morgan, Henry 8. 
Morehouse, Phillip E. 
Morrison, T. J. 
Muckler. Fred. H. 
March, George H. 
Myers, Julius H. 
Nance, Fred. W. 
Nelson, Christen 
Nesbit, James C. 
Nettleton.T. 8. 
Newell, Harris W. 
Newell, L. 8., Jr. 
Newkirk, George A. 
Nolds, Eiisha J. 
Norris, George C. 
Norton, 8. B. 
Norwood, Joshua 
Nye, W. N. 
CVBrian, Peter 
O'Brien, Simon 
Old, Charles 
OrviB. Joel W. 
Packard, Durand C. 
PaDelford, William 
Parker, James 
Parks, E. H. 
Parkhurst, L. W. 
Parsons, J. H. 
Patterson, Thomas M. 
Patterson, James 
Patton. Thomas J. 
Peabody, Lelon 
Peirce, William D. 
Pellenz. J. P. 
Pennock, Homer 
Perry, John W. 
Perry, George J. 
Peters, ('harles H. 
Phelps, Ed. P. 
Phillips, A. B. 
Phillips, Richard 
Phillips, J. Bevan 
Pierce, Ed. F. 
Pierce, John 
Pierson, R. K. 
Piper, W. B. 
Pitzer, Henry L. 



APPENDIX. 



215 



Pochin, J. L. 
Potter, Horace 
Potter, Charles A. 
Powell. Thomas B. 
Prackwinkel, William 
Qoinn, W. W. 
Uagland. John M. 
Reese, W. 8. 
Reilly, Charles J. 
Renshaw, James 
Reynolds. J. W. 
Rhoada, Aionzo G. 
Khoads, Harry F. 
Rice, Almond A. 
Richardson, Cyras G. 
Richardson. H. F, 
Riddeli, Phil. H. 
Rider, H. C. 
Robertson, N. 
Robinson, William F. 
Robinson, Ewing 
Roe, Robert 8. 
Rogers, Edmund J. A. 
Rogers, Ralph 
Rogers, B. W. 
Roney. Frank B. 
Rothwell. William J. 
Routt, John Li. 
Ryder, Andrew 
Rabican, James 8, 
Sanford, William H. 
8anford, George H. 
Scholtz. Edward L. 
Schmidt, Ed. A. 
Schuyler, J. N. 
Scattergood, Israel M. 
Scott, William R. 
8oott, George H. 
Scott, Francis M. 
Seaman, Sheridan 
Shanghnessy. James 
Sheridan. J . W. 
Shears, Thomas E. 
Shelton. F. D. 
Hhelton C. T. 
Shearer, J nines 
Shryock, Frank R. 
Simmons, J. B. 
Skinner. C. H. 
Slater. George G. 
Sleight, John J . 
Smith, C. C. 
Smith, P. T. 



Smith, Thomas L. 
Smith, C. J. 
Smith, Joseph H. 
Smith, Roland D. 
Smith, Irving G. 
Smith, Alfred J. 
Smedley, William 
SobolewBki.John A. 
Sonthgate, Walter 
Spangler, Michael 
Spalding, John F. 
Spalding, Frank B. 
Spanlding, Leland D. 
Spilman, B. F. 
Star buck, N. H. 
Starkweather, James C. 
Stebbina. Bert L. 
Stephens, William L. 
Stevens, Ralph E. 
Steinmetz, William D. 
Stenbouse, James 
Stewart, R. W. 
Stinson, Charles N. 
Stott, Jerre B. 
Strickler, J, M. 
Strong, Frank H. 
Sat ton, John C. 
Button. Roland 
Taggart, Charles D. 
Talbot, Ralph 
Tanspn, Robert 
Tanquary. N. Q. 
Tarr, George B. 
Tate, Daniel W. W. 
Terriberry, W. J, 
Thompson, Charles L. 
Thompson, William 8. 
Tim merman, John L. 
Tite, W. W. 
Todd, William D. 
Townsend, Orrin P. 
Tnfford, Walter H. 
Tucker, Francis M. 
Turner, L. A. 
Tynon, James 
Uzzell, Thomas A. 
Van Stone. Richard A. 
Vallie, Uplide 
Vosburg, N. O. 
Wagner. Andrew J. 
Wind, O. C. 
Waldo, William P. 
Walker, Charles 



Walley, John J. 
Wallace, John P. 
Walter, Christian C. 
Weaver, J. L. 
Weaver. George L, 
Weber, Louis 
Weatherhead, Charles E. 
Wei by, Arthur E. 
Welch, Albert L. 
Welch. George S. 
Weil, Solomon 
Weinhold, Frank M. 
Weiss, John G. 
Weethaver, J. B. 
Wheeler. Horace E. 
Wheeler, Franklin E. 
Wheeler, Byron A. 
Wheatley, Edward L. 
White W. A. 
Whittemore, Oliver A. 
Widney, Sam. W. 
Wilcox. C. M. 
Wilcox, 8. J. 
Wilbor, Jacob E. 
Wilder, Asa 
Wilson, William J. 
Wilson, Charles F. 
Wilson, Andrew D. 
Wilson, W. A. 
Williams, Fred. A. 
Williams, George T. 
Willoughby, E. A. 
Wire, Frank A. 
Wines, Horace G. 
Winne, Peter 
Winters, Alfred T. 
Wise, J. D. 
Witter, Daniel 
Wolfe, C. J. 
Wollaston, Theodore 
Wood, Francis G. 
Woodbury, A. J. 
Woodbury, 8. 8. 
Wright, George W. 
Wright, Charles B. 
Wright, George E. 
Wright, Aionzo 
Zeagler, John W. 
Zeitler, Charles 
Zinn, Solomon 
Zint, George W. 



EMPIEE LODGE No. 8, 

EMPIRE, CLEAR CREEK COUNTY. 
[Charter Surrendered.] 



MONTANA LODGE No. 9, 

VIRGINIA CITY, MONTANA. 
[Now Montana Lodge No. 2, under the Grand Lodge of Montana.'] 



2l6 



APPENDIX. 



HELENA CITY LODGE No. 10, 

HELENA CITY, MONTANA. 
[Now Helena Lodge No. 3, under the Grand Lodge of Montana.] 



BLACK HAWK LODGE No. 11, 

BLACK HAWK, GILPIN COUNTY. 
[Communications second and fourth Thursdays in each month.] 



OFFICEB8. 



James Richards, W. M. 
Ed. C. Hmrhee. 8. W. 
August J. Grutzmacher, J. W. 
William Mitchell, Treas. 
F. A. Rudolph, Sec'y. 



Brennen, John V^ 
Blake, Ed. 8. 
Backus, Wm. R. 
Ballard, F. W. 
Cowen, James 
Chatfield, Norman 
Donald, Wm. 
Fnllerton, Wm. 
Gilbert, John 
Hall, W. J. 
Hanson, August 
Hoi brook, Preston 



MEMBERS. 



Johnson, John 
Jeffrey, Richards 
Lowell, B F. 
McCammon, H. C. 
McLaughlin, Wm. 
McKinzie, Neil D. 
Mishler, Samuel 
Nelson, H. P 
Orahood, H. M. 
Pursel, John T. 
Powers, John H. 
Renfro, Clayborn ^ 



John Harlan. 8. D. 
Christopher Trothen, J. D. 
Charles G. Gray, 8. 3. 
William D. Lane, J 8. 
Peter D. Graham, Tiler. 



Bust, Wm. R. 
Rudolph, Wm. F. 
Rohlinjr, August 
Rudolph, John B. 
Richards. Wm. 
Bmitb, Alonzo 
8tebbins, H. H. 
Shipperd, James H. 
Swanholm, Swan 
Taylor, Alex. 
Wright, P. B. <-, 



WASHINGTON LODGE No. 12, 

GEORGETOWN, CLEAR CREEK COUNTY. 
[Communications second and fourth Saturdays in each month.] 



Samuel Hardy, W. M. 
John L. Carlson, S. W. 
Walter A. Garrett, J. W. 
Jessie M. Copeland, Treas. 
John H. Bennett. Sec'y. 



Anderson, George U- 
Parrett, George H. 
Barton. William E. 
Boyer, Henry 
Brownell, Ai. W. 
Baechner, Gustavo 
Butler, William H. 
Came, Henry 
Christie. William H. 
Cohen. Louis 
Cornish, Nicholas D. 
Cornish. Thomas 
Coster, John A. 
Czaruowsky, Henry 



OFFICERS. 



MEMBERS. 

Cliff, William N. 
Catren, Benjamin C. 
Dailey. James M. 
Eddy, Edward 
Ellis, William 
Fairley, Thomas 
Fillius, Jacob 
Filling, John 
Fish, Charles R. 
Forbes, Albert R. 
Forstrand, Peter M. 
Foster, Ernest Le Neve 
Gleason, Carlton T. 
Gay, James John * 



Henry Naah, 8. D. ^^ 
James W. McKelvy, J. D. 
William Hancock, Jr.. 8.8. 
Thomas. Bennett, J. 8. 
William H. Shigley, Tiler. 



Goetz, Valentine 
Grant. DeWitt C. 
Hanson, Conrad 
Harvat, Joseph 
Hansen. Chris. 
Hancock, William 
Hancock, James B. 
Johnson, Fred 8. 
Kelly, Samuel D. 
Kinney, Adrian R. 
Meyers, David 
Meyers, George 
Mills. George 
Monti, Joshua I— 



APPENDIX. 



217 



Morrison, John H. 
Mardock. Albert G. 
McCrimmon, Malcolm 
McGarvie. John 
Nelson, Albert 
Phillips, John M. 
Pollard, Adrian A. 
Roberta, Daniel 
Roberta, Lewis L. 



Rachofaky, D. Louie 
Sargent, George L. 
Simmons, Theodore F. 
Sites, George L. 
Slockett, Henry 
Smith, John 
Strom berg, John 
Stewart, William D. 
Swanson, August 



Thompson, Henry 
Twibell. Daniel 
Vader, Matthew H. 
Ware, William W. 
White, Absalom K. 
Wilson, David R. 
Woodward, David 
Ward, Jessie P. 
Williams, John H. 



EL PASO LODGE No. 13, 

COLORADO SPRINGS, EL PASO COUNTY. 
[Communications second and fourth Friday* in each month.] 



OFFICERS. 



John Williams, W. M. 
Henry G. Berry, 8. W. 
David H. Kice, J. W. 
L. C. Skinner, Trees. 
Eugene 8. Cohen, Seo'y. 



Aux, George *• — 
Ackerman, Sam. P. 
Armen trout, Abram 
Andre, Morris V. 
Armbruster, F. G. 
Bott, Anthony 
Bernard, S. M. 
RsalU John N. 
Barnes, Jus P. 
Boyd, A. H. 
Bonnett. W. M. 
Bates, Wm. H. 
Barrett, Golden 
Bell. J. W. 
Banning, Win. 
Boyer, Sam'l L. 
Beach, Walter P. 
Brinley, M. D. 
Brewster, Geo. P. 
Best, Wm. 
Britten. Ernest 
CroweR, Benj. F. 
Corman, Abram H. 
Qiapman. John W. 
Conger, Carlos W. 
Cochran,John 
Crosier, E. M. 
Dow. Francis E. 
Dillon, Chester H. 
Dickerman, Alton L. 
Davey. Will. 
Dwinnell, L. E. 
Dozier, Joseph 
DeCoursey, M. L. 
Davie, Robert P. 
Davie, W. A. 
Baton, £. J. 
France, Matt. 
Finley. Robert 
Fenn, ('has. H. 
Frost, Edward W. 
Fuller, H. A. 
File, John W. 



MEMBERS. 

Fowler.Sam'l 
Guire, David C. 
Gustin, J. W. 
Giddings.E. W. Jr. 
Gillette^James 
Gaudy, Wm. H. 
Gilpin, Bernard Jr. 
Gerbardt, Paul 
Howbert, Irving 
Horn. Thomas G. 
House, Augustus 
Himebangh, John A. 
Hoagland. Wm. H. 
Hughes, Thomas 
Holmes. Geo. F. 
Hoag, Seeley H. 
Haggarty, C. C. 
HenrytO. E. 
Hezt, Thos. 
Henderson, Rob't L. 
Hall. Lavolette 
Harden. John M. 
Hatfield, 8 8. 
HiUis, William 
Hughes, W. H. 
Johns, Henry 
Jones, Allen D. 
Kerr, James H. 
Kern, J. W. 
Kershaw, Wm. 
Kelley, Albert W. 
Klttleman. John G. 
Kennedy, Geo. D. 
Love, Edwin ¥. 
Lamb, Henry W. 
Lawton, Andrew L. 
Leigh ton, Arthur 
Lawrence, Geo. W. 
Lincoln, Andrew G. 
McShane, David 
McTaviah.Neil 
McGuire, W. C. 
McLain, W. E. C- 



I. F. Peck, 8. D. 
George N. Beattie, J. D. 
J. M. Sellers. 8. B. 
P. P. Hoop, J. 8 
John Courter, Tiler. 



McCoy, Wm. R. 
McCreery. H. C. 
Martin, Frederick L. 
Murphy, John 
Mathews, Albert 
Mulholland. <J. V. 
Manning, Thos. E. 
Miller, John K. 
Muir, John W. 
Mills, Edward E. 
Millen, John M. 
Nichols, Willard S. 
Nichols, R. P. 
Osborn, Chester 
Pulver, Milton 
Potter. John 
Peery R. B. 
Pearcy.R. G. 
Pease, Louis A. 
Potter, J. Wilson 
Puffer, Lewis A. 
Pollen, Sam'l J. 
Popejoy. Lester W. 
Parker, N. E. 
Perkins, Frank A. 
Robinson, Fred. E. 
Reynolds, Jos. E. 
Reed, Wm. H. 
Roby, Frank F. 
Robertson, David B. 
Reid, Herbert 1 . 
Robinson, J. R. 
Reed, Raymond 
Rice,Wm.G. 
Robertson, John H. 
Reed. Verner Z. 
Smith. E. A. 
Strickler, Wm. M. 
Hpielman, David 
Shideler, Jacob 
Shideler, Thos. 
Sagendorf, A. 
Stiilmun, Jno. W. «- 



4 



\ 



218 



APPENDIX. 



Snyder, Lester M. 
Stovell, J. W. D. 
Smith, A. H. 
Sessions, S. E. 
Schmidt. Jacob 
Smith, Edward J. 
Sleeman, George 
Severy, James B. 
Stone, A. G. 
Smith, Henry C. 
Stubbe, Joe. L. 



Stam, J. W. 
Swope, C. H. 
Shideler, Wm. 
Still wagon, Chas. N. 
Taylor, Robert K. 
Tilton, Wm. F. 
Tucker, B. St. Geo. 
Thomas, Thos. E. 
Tibbetts, A. R. 
Thomas, Frank 
Titaworth, Geo. A. 



Taylor. Remic B. 
Turner, Clarence E. 
Vaox, Geo. P. 
Van Meter, Frank R. 
Woodbnrry, J. C. 
Weir, Jerome A. 
Wolfe, J. S. 
Welch, David L. 
Williams, W. J. 
Waters, Frank J. 



COLUMBIA LODGE No. 14, 

BOULDER, BOULDER COUNTY. 
[Communication* second and fourth Saturdays in each month.] 



OKFIOEHS. 



Chaa. S. Faorot, W. M. 
John L. Church, 8. W. 
Shep. L. Madera, J. W. 
George F. Chase, Treas. 
Chas. C. Bromley, Sec'y. 



Aotrey, Edward 
Ames, Leonard C. 
Adams, Geo. S. 
Anderson, Eric J. 
Anderson, David B. 
Anderson, D. C. 
Allen, H. W. 
Angove, (\ E. 
Allmon, Lee J. 
Ameter, Jacob 
Banks, F. B. 
Brown, 8. C. 
Budd, Sylvanos 
Bigger. R. A. 
Bentley. W. W. 
Burns, M F. 
Border. S. B. 
Bresnahan, Ed. 
Casady, Harry 
Carmack, T. K. 
Carmack, John T. 
Corson, W. A. 
Cullaoutt, J. J. F. 
Chambers, J. S. 
Connell, John 
Conwell. G. B. 
Conley. J. H. 
Davis, John 
Den ham, Thoa. 
Downer, 8. 8. 
Dodge, H. O. 
DaviB, Chaa. 
Ellingham, J. J. 
Eariiart, W. R. 
Em rick, A. J. 
Edwards, B. V. 
Foy, I) N. 
Foote, J. B. 
Fonda, 0. F. 
Fallen, Hiram 
Fairhurat, W. G. 
.Green, Henry 



MEMBERS . 

Gatterson. C. L. 
Glesner.C. E. 
Grand, J. C. 
Galasha, 8. 8. 
Hathaway, Mark 
Henry. 0. H. 
Harmon, G. D. 
Harris, Meyer 
Henry. A. T. 
Holatein, Geo. B. 
Haffner, Joseph 
Hermon, John 
Holt, M. J. 
H inkle, J. P. 
Han kins, J. C. 
Holbrook, C. M. 
Huet, William 
Herzinger, T. F. 
Hay ward, D. A. 
Hay ward. D. E. 
Hoyle. Edward 
Hutchinson, D. J. 
Heizelmnn, Frank 
Jonea, T. J. 
Johnson. Seymour 
Jester, W. H. 
Johnston, J. I. 
Johnson, T. C. 
Johnston, Frank 
Johnston, W. J. 
Jester, J. A. 
Kohler, F. W. 
Kohler, F. W., Jr. 
Kerr, David 
Kline, Marcos 
Kempton, James 
Knill, Thom as 
Kneale, C. A;. 
Lafferty, T. J. 
Leyner, P. A. 
Loyd, Joseph 
Lester, J. E. 



Ernest L. Guilford, 8. D. 
H. F. Armstrong, J. D. 
C. P. Pettengill, 8. S. 
C. B. Lawsha, J. S. 
Dan. A. Robinson, Tiler. 



Lowe, Theo. 
Lockwood, Fred 
Lefoe, Frank 
Lake, Geo. E. 
Luxon, Joseph 
Metcalf. Eli P. 
Maxwell, J. P. 
McCaslin, M. L. 
Mead, Marcos S. 
Meyring, Henry 
Minks, G. W. 
McAllister, Ira T. 
Metcalf, F. P. 
McClancy, Uriah 
Mulford, J. 8. 
McCall, N. H. 
Mcintosh, Lem 
Megorden, C. H. 
Monell, lm F. 
Monell, Henry 
Macky. A. J. 
Mitchell, Fred 
Nicholson, J. W. 
Nichols, D. H. 
North, J. M. 
Owen, Thos. R. 
O'Conner, Timothy 
Oliver, William 
O'Neill, J. M. 
Phillips, N. M. 
Poole, W. H. 
Rogers, Piatt 
Rowen, W. F. 
Robertson, G. B. 
Russell, C. A. 
Ricketts,C. 
Rhyno, T. F. 
Rhyno, J. A. 
Rhyno, Norman 
Sawdey, Edgar 
Simpson, J. H. 
8oothtand, Judson 



APPENDIX. 



219 



Smith, M. G. 
Sheets, H W. 
Samuels. H. ('. 
8trasberger, M. 
8peocer, C. L. 
Schroder, D. 
Safely, A. F. 
Steven*. K. W. 
Shires. Thos. 
8pangler. Geo. W. 
Seeley, W. L. 
Sanborn, C. W. 
Steinmetz, C. C. L— 



MEMBKRS. 

Thorn, 8. J. 
Turner, Chas. 
Trezise, J. G. 
Titcomb. J. S. 
Terry, W. K. 
Todd, 0. D. 
Van Riper, C. 
Viele, J. B.,Jr. 
Wilson, G. W. 
Whitney, G. H. 
Wood, G. P. 
Wharton, J. J. 
Wellman, 8. _ 



Williams, J. T. 
White, W.W. 
Walker. Ed. 8. 
Williams, James 
Wilson, J. L. 
Washburn, H. E. 
Williams, J. U. 
Williams, W. J. 
Williamson, P. L. 
Wilder, Eugene 
Yates, Isaiah 



MOUNT MORIAH LODGE No. 15, 

CANON CITY, FREMONT COUNTY. 
[Communications first and third Saturdays in each month,'} 



OFFIOKBS. 



D. A. Bradbury. W. M. 
Leroy C. Young, S. W. 
George H. KeUenberger, J. W. 
James U. Peabody, Treat*. 
James 8. Bowlby, Sec'y- 



Joseph T. Little, 8. D. 
Caleb J. Smith, J. D. 
A. E. Rudolph, S. S. 
Hunter Palmer, J. 8. 
John Gravestock, Tiler. 



Adair. George W. I— 
Alexander, A. F. 
Ailing, E.B. 
Andrea*. R. 8. 8. 
Apple, Charles 
Arlett, George H. 
Bandholt, John F. 
Barnard. L. C. 
Bethel, George H. 
Brinkley, John A. 
Boyce, William A. 
Bradbury, James M. 
Bridwell, William T. 
Bryant, Green M. 
Butler, Edward A. 
Calderhead. James 
Campbell. Thomas J. 
Cassidy, George R. 
Chapman, James P. 
Clapp, 8eth A. 
Collins, Charles M. 
Cornn, Daniel 
CoasletU Walter 
Costlow, Joseph 
Cox, Samuel M. 
Craig, Mills M. 
Craven, Thomas H. 
Craven, Ned C. 
Cross, Charles M. 
Cypert, 8. N. 
Davis, Llewelyn 
Davis, William J. 
Davis, Alonzo H. 
Davenport, Charles E. 
Dawson, John 
Dicker, Phillip 
Dobeon, James Y. 
Dry den, Adam 
Dudley. George E. 
Dufer, Charles E. 



MTCMBKRS. 

Earle, Henry 
Earle, George W. 
Eldred, L. E. 
Ellsworth, Frank M. 
Evans, James E. 
Frost, Charles 
Ford, Allen E. 
Fuller, John 8. 
Gordon, Thomas 
Gordon, William 
Gravestock, Henry T. 
Gray, Edward C. 
Haines, William B. 
Harding, Theodore M. 
Hatchett, C. H. 
Haskins, Chas. F. 
Hays, Phillip 
Hedges, Joseph 
Hill, Zeph. T. 
Hodges, Henry W. 
Hopkins, James R. 
Hood, John F. 
Hudson, William H. 
Hughes, James 
Humphreys, John 
Hunt, D. C. 
Hyde, J. L. 
Jameson, Allen 
Johnson, William E. 
Jones, Orville W. 
Jones, Lewis S. 
Jones, Benjamin F. 
Kent, John P. 
Kidder, A. A. 
Lawrence, Ad ley B. 
Lester, Jeff. W. 
Leroux, Owen F. 
Linn, H. W. 
Lobach, Edwin 
McClnre, William H. ^ 



McLelland, William H. 
McGeary, Albert M. 
McGrath, Miles 
McKiilip, lman C. 
McNeil, John 
McNeil, Charles 
Maxdon, C. W. 
Mayhew, William M. 
Miller, J. N. 
Miller, H. J. 
Milliken, C. M. 
Milsoin, Joseph W. 
Mitchell, George M. 
Morrison, Peter 
Morrison. Charles A. 
Nelson, Charles F. 
Nichols, Sylvester S. 
Nikirk, C. G. 
Northrop. J. V. 
Oliver, John Y. 
Palmer, Thomas D. 
Palmer, Thomas 
Parker, W. C. 
Pattee, David C. 
Patterson, Alexander 
Pauls, Charles 
Peabody, Jesse W. 
Pedley, Ephraim 
Phillips, George T. 
Phillips, William J. 
Price, Henry L. 
Ray nol da. Frederick A. 
Reed. R. L. 
Reed, A. R. 
Richards, Richard 
Richards, Rufus 
toe, George W. 
L. A. 

cafellow, Benjamin F. 
iry, John . 




220 



APPENDIX. 



Radd, Anson 
Rathban, Samuel A. 
Salmon, Elijah 
Sappington, Smith 8. 
Sartor. Augustus 
Sell, Franz 
Seelye, C. G. 
Shaffer, Benjamin F. 
Shaffer, George R. 
Sharer, Benjamin 
Shaver, George R. 
Snivel?, Charles 



MVMBKB8. 

Sim peon, D. J. 
Skeele, Fred H. 
Smith, Frank L. 
Smith, Robert 
Spreyer, Jacob 
Stewart, Robert C. 
Stover, W. H. 
8tratton, Thomas H. 
Thomas, Joel H. 
Thompson, William H. 
Thurston, Isaac 
Topping, Clark S. 



Trout, William H. 
Walker, Nathaniel O. 
Webster, Henry C. 
Wells, Thomas 8. 
Wells, Charles W. 
Whipple. Fred H. 
Willis, J. E. 
Williams, George T. 
Wilson, L. W. 
Witcher, T. 



CHEYENNE LODGE No. 16, 

CHEYENNE. WYOMING. 
[Note Cheyenne Lodge No. 1, under the Grand Lodge of Wyoming.] 



PUEBLO LODGE No. 17, 

PUEBLO, PUEBLO COUNTY. 
[^Communications second and fourth Mondays in each month.] 



OFFICERS. 



Walter L. Borland, W. M. 
Zerezo V. Trine, 8. W. 
George W. Gill, J. W. 
John D. Miller, Treat*. 
A. D. Wad ham 8, Sec'y. 



Adams, Walter G. *- 
Abrahams, Joseph 
Anderson, William H. 
Anderson, Joseph W. 
Allen, James 
Archbold, Edgar P. 
Barn dollar, Geo. R. 
Bartletr, Henry W. 
Berry, Jul ins 
Blake. Charles H. 
Bowman, Charles W. 
Bond, David K. 
Brown, Julius D. 
Bnrnam, Allen E. 
Burnam, C. W. 
Callaway, Joseph W. 
Campbell, Win. O. 
Chew, Edward R. 
Christianson, Albert D. 
Colvin, Perry 
Crow, John H. 
( 'ooper, Roll in C. 
Clark, John T. 
Cantrall, Joshua P. 
C lough, Worsnop 
Coulter, James W. 
De Rentier, James R. 
Dotson. Peter K. 
Dotson, Peter T. 



MKMBKR8. 

Downen, Thos. J. 
Drake, Edwin L. 
Dnke, James B. 
Dunbaugh, Frank M. 
Dunbauirh, George J. 
DaPuy, Henry B. 
Erdman, (Charles 
Erdman. Henry W. 
Farins, John R. 
Fairfax, Willis T. 
Fitch, Michael H. 
Fist, Emanuel 
Finn. John W. 
Gallup, Sam'l C. 
Gartley. Wilson P. 
Gannt, Richard H. 
Gerry, Melvin B. 
Gilbert, George 
Gillespie, David H. 
Grant, Angus A. 
Hart, Cornelius J. 
Hart, L. N. 
Hensel, Levi 
Hilburn, Milton H. 
Hobson, George H. 
Hall, George H. 
Heath, Ernest A. 
House. Bruce F. 
Hoy, Roland ^ 



Chas. W. Kessler, S. D. 
B. D. V. Reeve, J. D. 
John F. Bund bye, S. 8. 
Chas. E. (Sherrington, J. 8. 
John L. Hildreth, Tiler. 



Jamison, John B. 
Jenison, W. T. 
Johnston, Joseph W. 
Joy, James A. 
Keeling. Weldon 
Keith, Fordyce M. 
Koerner, Edward 
Lovern, James 
Lovett, ('lark E. 
Mazon, William 
Mayer, Peter 
Mc Murray, Wm T. 
McNutt, Clark C 
Mondabangh. Geo. W. 
Murray. Franklin 
Nash, Herman W. 
Newton, Whitney 
Patton, Augufttns B. 
Patterson, Sam'l J. 
Parr, William 
Reese, Charles A. 
Rice, James 
Savard, Peter 
Shepard, John V. 
Shoptaogh, Curtis A. 
Sloane. Theodore A. 
Smith James E. 
Smith, Hngh M. 
Smith, Oscar U. ^ 



APPENDIX. 



221 



Snyder, J. W. O. 
Sonneborn, Aaron 
Spencer, Allen C. 
Spratlen, Louie F. 
Spratlen, Frank P. 
Stanton, Irving W. 
Steele, Hannibal R. 
Stein, Charles C. 
Stone, George L. 



MXMBER8. 

Studzinski, Michael 
Thatcher, Malon D. 
Thombe. P. B. 
Thomas, Mark 
Tolman. Charles 
Troot, William H. 
Urmy, D. F. 
Van Hovenburg, D. M. 
Walter, Rudolph J. 



Wells, Frank A. 
Wilson, Paul 
Williford, Geo. W. 
Windle, John 8. 
Worth, Jehoida 
Zoeller, Philip 
Zieger, Thomas R. 



LAEAMIE LODGE No. 18, 

LARAMIE, WYOMING. 

[Xow Laramie Lodge No. 3, under the Grand Lodge of Wyoming.} 



COLLINS LODGE No. 19, 

FORT COLLINS, LARIMER COUNTY. 
[Communications first and third Wednesdays in each month.] 



OFFICERS. 



1 



Sael E. Clark, W. M. 
John F. Campbell, 8. W. 
George A. Webb, J. W. 
James T. Badrow. Trees. 
Levis (lark Moore, Hec'y, 



Anderson. Peter 
Arthur, James B. 
Arthur, James 8. 
Armstrong, Andrew 
Andrews, Chas. B. 
Annie, Frank J. 
Autre;, John M. 
Abbott, Albert D. 
Abbott, Frank D. 
Brown, John R. 
Barry, Alexander 
Bonghton, Jay H. 
Brown, James A. 
Battey, Samoel W. 
Burke, Richard 
Bos worth, Wm. P. 
Battey, Francis R. 
Beers. John 
Bear, John P 
Blackroer. Adrian 
Bailey, Wm. N. 
Bennett, Egbert J. 
Bennett, Isaac W. 
Buzzell, Horatio N. 
Barkley, Frank 
Birdsall, Sylvester H. 
Buck, Christian M. 
Bean, Avery 
Buffuni, Geo. W. 
Bottom, Bert C 
Buff nm, Geo. H. 
Bernheim, Wm. T. 



MEMBERS. 

Bohn, George H. 
Beach, Jerry T. 
Beach, David 
Bee, John 
Bennett, F. 0. 
Barnes, William 
Bristol, Judson H. 
Beals, John B. 
Campbell, Chas. A. 
Clinton, John C. 
Cuthbertson, James 
Carpenter, Harry A. 
Clark, Logan 
Chase. R. A. 
Davy, Thomas H. 
Dowd, Joseph 8. 
Davis, Chas. F. 
PuBois, James E. 
Day, James H. 
Day, Isaac 
Driscol. Wm. 
Doolittle, Emery E. 
Ellis, Alston 
Evans, Wm. C. 
Edwards, Alfred A. 
Gage, Thaddeus A. 
Garbutt, Edward N. 
Garbntt. H. Irving 
Galbraith. David R. 
Garmick, Thomas 
Giddings. Leander 
Greiner, Jackson M. 



Frank P. Stover, 8. D. 
John E. Davidson, J. D. 
James W. 8tnchelJ, 8. 8. 
John M. Hoffman, J. 8. 
Thos. H. Doolittle, Tiler. 



Handy, Harry P. 
Hanna, John C. 
Hamilton, Samael T. 
Helgerson, Ole 
Hoag, Addison N. 
Holtei, Andrew J. 
Holtei, Isaac W. 
Horner, Asa M. 
Henderson. John W. 
Hillyer, Wm. J. 
Hice, Albert H. 
Hi Her. Edgar G. 
Hall, Wm. 
Hall, Henry F. 
Hamilton, Andrew L. 
James, Maximillian 
Kibler, Francis 
Kinnison. Harry J. 
Love, Eph 
Love, Robert P. 
Loomis, Abner 
Loomis, Gay 
Lindenmeier, Wm., Jr. 
Lyon. Samael R. 
Lee, Ethan A. 
Lee, Harry A. 
Lane, Charles D. 
Learned, Porter D. 
Learned, Perry B. 
Lunn, John G. 
La Fever, Abram 
Lawrence, John W. 



222 



APPENDIX. 



Miner. Wm. B. 
McGinley, Andrew 
Mclntyre, Joaiah W. 
Montgomery, Thomas J. 
Mason, Wm. 8. 
Miller. Chas. P. 
McGregor, Rob. Roy 
Miller, John W. 
Matthews, John C. 
Moeman, Wm. 0. 
Newlon, Henry B. 
Newton, Thomas H. 
Parker. Charles V. 
Powers, Daniel L. 
Plaramer, Zar C. 
Peterman, Komeo C. 
Peterson, Henry C. 
Piatt, Henry C. 
Quinn, Thomas 
Reed, Egbert W. 
Robinson, Thomas M. 



Robertson, Thomas H. 
Ricketts, Philander 
Rugh, Christian 
Seckner, Stephen H. 
Scott. George F. 
Stover, Wm. C. 
Sherwood, Frederick W. 
Scott, Fa) ton N. B. 
Sheldon, Charles H. 
Sturdev&nt, Harvey F. 
Stranss, George K. 
Steoker, Michael 
Stephenson. Jefferson F. 
Smith, James 
Scott, Alexander W. 
Silcott, Wm. G. 
8mith. John Letford 
Sylvester, N. 
Hecord, (Portland R. 
8imms, James M. 
Stolbrand, Vasa E. 



Terry, Peter G. 
Tomlin, Alber B. 
Taft, Preston A. 
Ticknor, Alonzo A. 
Tedmon, Boliver S. 
Tedmon, Herbert E. 
Thomas, Frank N. 
Vandewaik, Martin 
Vollentine, Thomas W. 
Wills, Joseph R. 
Whitcomb. Elias W. 
Whedbee, BenjHmin T. 
Wild, Charles R. 
Watroos, Ansel 
Walch, Robert 
Webster, Stewart 
Whittington, Wm. E. 
Woodward, Charles N. 
Yoang, John W. 
Zwifel, John J. 



OCCIDENTAL LODGE No. 20, 

GREELEY, WELD COUNTY. 
[Communications second and fourth Fridays in each month.'} 



OFFICERS. 



Charles E. Stanley, W. M. 
Jesse S. Gale, S. W. 
John M. B. Petrekin, J. W. 
Rudolph H. Johns, Treas. 
Joseph A. Woodbury, Sec'y. 



Abbott, Eugene H. U 
Atkinson, James 
Atkinson, Thomas 
Armstrong, Richard 
Adams, Oscar H. 
Alcorn, John A. 
Abbott. Philo 
Bennett, Alonzo D. 
Brash, Jared L. 
Beetbam. James 
Bar bee, James S. 
Boltz, David 
Chi Ids, Francis L. 
Chi Ids, William J. 
Collins, Perry W. 
Cooke, John B. 
Carleton, Daniel H. 
(/amp, Charles A. 
DeVotie, Henry M. 
Davis, Joel E. 
Dinsmore, Thomas H. 
Daily, Thomas H. 
Doane, E. E. 
Donnell, Ed. D. 
Eaton, Benj. H. 
Ecker, Henry 
Freeman, James M. 
Fuller. Samuel G. 
Flower, James B. 
Frost, Frank P. 
Fallerton, W infield 8. 
Ferguson, Robert T. 
Gunn, George M. 



MEMBBR8. 

Garrigues, James E. 
Goodin, John A. 
Glazier, Irwin O. 
Henderson, Milton P. 
Hilton. Benj. W. 
Hall, Niagara W. 
Hall, Robert L. 
Huff smith, Peter 
Hallett, Samuel 
Hotchkis«, William A. 
Harper, Brainard D. 
Howard, Albert 
Hinckley, C. Benj. 
Hopper, William 
Irons. John F. 
Igo, Albert 
Johnson, Brace F. 
Law, Harvey M. 
Long. Lorenzo F. 
Luther, Samuel O. 
Moore. Joseph 
Macy, Thomas G. 
Matteson, Menzo C. 
McPherson, Jacob R. 
McMasters, Alex. G. 
Messenger, Francis C. 
Maltbie. Noah 
Mulford, Clarence H 
Monahan, Deane 
Miner, William A. 
Murray, Dennis 
May her, William 
Nichols, Frank R. L- 



Charles Heaton, 8. D. 
Alfred A. Howard, J. D. 
Jesse D. Landers, S. S. 
Daniel H. Barbee, J. 8. 
LeBarron Willard, Tiler. 



Neidie, J. Henry 
Preston, Alva D. 
Perkins. Geo. W. 
Plumb, Ovid 
Pollock. William P. 
Purdy, Sheldon R. 
Phillips, Thomas 
Ramsey, Allen 
Reid. John G. 
Randolph. Calvin 
Roberts, Walter J. 
Roger son, Horatio R. 
Seeley, Joseph H. 
Shu te, George M. 
Southard, Samuel H. 
Smith, George C. 
Steele, Robert 
Twom bley, Hurd W. 
Taylor, John A. 
Talbot, Nathaniel H. 
Thompson, Edward A 
VonGohren, Ludwig 
West, Henry T. 
Watson, Henry C. 
Wyman. George B. 
Wolaver, Jacob M. 
Williams, Henry M. 
Wasley, John. 
Wheeler, Charles H. 
Wilson, Dwight B. 
Wyatt, Louis L. 
Watson, Arthur C. 
Wyman, Horaoe L. 



APPENDIX. 



223 



ARGENTA LODGE No. 21, 

SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH. 
[Now Argenta Lodge No. 8, under the Grand Lodge of Utah.] 



WESTON LODGE No. 22, 

LITTLETON, ARAPAHOE COUNTY. 
[Communications first and third Saturdays in each month.] 



W. W. Chapman, W. M. 

F. W. Shuckhart. 8. W. 

G. E. Stuart, J. W. 
F. Comstock. Tress. 
E. Jull, Bec'j. 



Andre, Frank L. *-" 
Barclay, C. 6. 
Benedict, George M. 
Berry, B. J. 
Brown, I. D. 
Burtolette, John 
Comstock. Chas. 
Cobb, W. H. 



OFFICERS. 



MKMBEB8. 

Curtis. Henry H. 
Dorety, William 
Griffith, George 
Gregeaon, Wm. 
Hurlbut, H. H. 
Jnll, Sydney Percy 
Leach. Hiram S. 
Loatbam, Chas. G. 



D. 8. Weaver, 8. D. 
J. M. Barr. J. D. 
K. W. Candler. 8. 8. 
J. B. Markle. J. 8. 
J. J. Btnart, Tiler. 



Mackey, I. W. 
Manhart, Christian 
McAuliff, C. D. 
Shepperd, H. H. 
Steele, M. P. 
VanDeren, A.J. 
Wilder, George C. 
Wilson, Walter G. , 



ST. VRAIN LODGE, No. 23. 

LONGMONT, BOULDER COUNTY. 
[Communications first and third Saturdays in each month.] 



Willis A. Warner, W. H. 
Frank P. 8ecor, B. W. 
Charlea J. Gregg, J. W. 
Casaiua M. Brown, Treas. 
George E. Smith, Sec'y. 



Andrews, F.Y. 
Allen. F. E. 
Blore, W. B. 
Barns. Thos. E. 
Bardill. Conrad 
Belcher. Freeman 
Bailey, Ellas 
Butler, Thos. 
Baker, J. G. 
Barr, John C. 
Brown, George W. 
Butler, William 
Butler, Stephen 
Bartell, C. F. 
Baeeant. J. N. 
Blake, M. M. 
Breckel, W. J. 



OFFICERS. 



MKMBER8. 

Brown, W. W. 
Brown, J. V. 
Bailey, J. C. 
Burch, H. H. 
Buckley, John A. 
Carr, B. L. 
Chapman, J. E. 
Calkins, Carleton C. 
Coffman, J. D. 
Cay wood, L. D. 
Crossley, J. N. 
Coburn, W.T. 
Dell, George T. 
Demo, J. W. 
Downer, F. M. 
Dickson, L. H. 
Dietrich, L. H. / _ 



Charles H. Baker, 8. D. 
Frank B. Davis, J. D. 
Al. L. Gibson, 8 8. 
Amos Entwisrle, J. 8. 
Enoch J. Coffman, Tiler. 



Entwistle, Thoe. 
Ely. M. J. 
Feeler, Martin 
Ferguson, H. W. 
Foster, J. 8. 
Green, W. M. 
Griffith, R. G. 
Glover, George 
Gardner, C. H. 
Grant, J. Q. 
Ginrich, J. M. 
Hertha, John. 
Herron, O. F. 
Henderson, W. 8. 
Henney. L. B. 
Herron. I. L. 
Hamlin, O. T. L- 



224 



APPENDIX. 



Hockenberger, Wm. 
Henderson, A. M. 
Hall, I. F. 
Johnson, T. F. 
Johnson, W. Gay 
Jaynee, a. D. 
Jamee, W. E. 
Kauffman. A. 8, 
King, William 
Lykins, D. J. 
Leyner, J. George 
Marshall, O. W. 
Manners, Harvey 
Moore, 8. 
Miller, G. C. 
Newnam, E. B. 
Owen, J. F. 
Phelps, F. I. 



XXM8KB8. 

Phillips, George 8. 
Peck, U. L. 
Preston, A. M. 
Ramsay. John 
Ratliff, 8. G. 
Secor, Milo G. 
Spenoer, F. C. 
Stults, J. H. 
Sebern, George 8. 
81ifer, £. G. 
Small, Major 
Shoemaker, J. F. 
Schey. 8. 
St. Clair, J. A. 
Steppe, T. O. 
Stiles, H. C. 
Smith, Winton 
Stockton, T. R. 



Sullivan, N. C. 
Topliff, J.J. 
Tarr, A. L. 
Thorne, G. H. 
Wilson, J. L. 
Washbnrne, H. E. 
Webster, George 
White, Eben, 
Wyman. George 
Webb. W. H. 
Williams. Sam 
Wilson, M. J. 
Worthington, W. W. 
Wilson, Smith 
Zweck, Geo. 



EVANSTON LODGE No. 24, 

ENANSTON, WYOMING. 
[ Xow Evantton Lodge No. 4, under Grand Lodge of Wyoming.] 



DORIC LODttE No. 25, 

FAIRPLAY, PARK COUNTY. 

[Communications fir tt and third Saturdays in each month.] 



*A. Bergh, W. M. 
Jacob Adler, S. W. 
W. H. Dearing, J. W. 
Sam'l Cohen. Treas. 
Thos. H. Sheldon, Soc'y. 



OFFICERS. 



Ar tern as W. Shidler, 8. D. 
August L. Peterson, J. D. 
William 1 finger, 8. 8. 
Samuel Hay den, J. 8. 
John Ifinger, Tiler. 



Alden, Horace v* 
Bly, Thomas 
Bailey, Morton 8. 
Sevan, David 
Cole^ James M. 
Crosier, Edwin R. 
Dearing, Ruric T. 
Duffy, Thos. W. 
Dudley, George P. 
Fleming. Wm. H. 
(tray, John L. 
(rant, Wm. 
Hathaway, Curtis G. 
Hall. Assyria 
Hill, Charles L. 
Hewitt. George 
Hay den, Wm. W. 

* Since deceased. 



MKMBKK8. 

Hunter Wm. H. 
Hall, Lent. 
Jones, Wm. H. 
Keefe, Wm. M. 
King, A. J. 
Lax ton, Thomas 
Lichner, Geo. W. 
Link, James A. 
Laflin, Grant E. 
Murrow, J. H. B. 
MillH. Suydenliam 
McMillen, Samuel 
Miller, David F. 
Mahaney, Michael A. 
McManus, Peter F. 
Mety, Eben E. 
Peart, John . ^ 



Powless, Wm. N. 
Phelps, Charles L. 
Passmore, Florida F. 
Rhodes, John W. 
Rudowsky, Mat. 
Stark Wm. W. 
Schwartz, Sam'l B. 
Hykes, Jos. W. 
Scott, C. H. 
Treweek Wm. H. 
Thompson, James 
Walker, John Z. 
White, Ireal 
Willey,Thos.T. 
Wilkin, Chas. A. 
Weiner, Adolph w 



APPENDIX. 



225 



IDAHO SPRINGS LODGE No. 26, 

IDAHO SPRINGS, CLEAR CREEK COUNTY. 
{Communications first and third Wednesdays in each month.} 



OFFICERS. 



William L. Bash, W. M. 
John J. 8herwin, 8. W. 
Joseph E. Chester, J. W. 
Henry Phunmer, Treas. 
Peter L. Thorsan, Sec'y. 



Armstrong, John D. 
Arthur, Charles 
Barnard, Thomas 
Beighley, Henry B. 
BeU,Jo«iahH. 
Bishop, William 
Bailie, Arthur D. 
Chapman, John 
Comer. William 8. 
-Comstock, Allen H. 
Craze, William 
Ellis, David 
Ferguson, J. A. 
Gartz, Axel 
Hancock, William 
Harder, Harder F. 



Hocking, John 
Horn, Asa J. 
Huddleston, William 
Jackson, John M. 
Knoettge, Victor 
Lester, John B. 
McAekill, Daniel A. 
McClelland, Geo. E. 
Malcom, Andrew H. 
Martin, William H. 
Mays, Philetas B. 
Meyer, Herman H. 
Morgan, William 
Montgomery, J. H. 
Norman. William 
Patten, Geo. A. L— 



Elwood M. Moscript, 8. D. 
Albert H. Freestone, J. D. 
William Mitchell, 8. 8. 
Thomas Morgan, J. 8. 
Tiler. 



Paul, Henry 
Pront, James 
Roberts, John G. 
Smith, Samuel M. 
Stranb, Albert E. 
Theobold, Peter 
Thomas, Benj. B. 
Thomas, William H. 
Townsend, Willard L. 
Ulrich, Frederick 
Vivian, George G. P. M. 
Weeks, James G. 
Wellington, Thomas 
Wilkins, John A. 
Williams. Hunter 
Zeller, Ignatius i 



HUERFANO LODGE No. 27, 

WALSENBUBG, HUERFANO COUNTY. 
[Communications first and third Saturdays in each wxmth.] 



OFF1CEB8. 



Robert A. Qaillian, W. M. 
HenryBlickhabn, S. W. 

iUnfug, J. W. 
John B. Johnson, Treas. 
Charles O. Unfag, Sec'y. 



Bernstein, Maurice l_ 
Brodie, H. H. 
Barns, Robert 
Cohn, Louis 
Gapps, Samuel J. 
Clamant. William H. 
Carter, John D. 
Cort, Daniel T. 
Croker, Michael 
Cooper, Chae. M. 
Coots, Monroe J. 
Drnry, James 
Elxnire, George 
Forhan, T. J. 
Grantham, Thomas 
Harmes, William L. 
Hendren, Cornelius D. 

15 



MEMBERS. 

Hoffman, Joseph 
Hill, James 
Hill, Josiah M. 
Jackson,James T. 
Kearns, William H. 
Kunert, Oscar H. 
Levy, Alexander 
Lawther, Rodney T. 
Lawther, Thomas 
Lawther. Frank L. 
MacMullan, Charles 
Martin, Thomas F. 
McGnire, J. S. 
Mnir, David E. 
Provane, Joseph 
Pryor, Archie M. 
Polhill, Mark <_!__ 



John P. Kearns, S. D. 
Sig. Neumann, J. D. 
E. Eugene Moore, S. S. 
Fred E. Ramsey, J. S. 
Isaac Dailey, Tiler. 



Patterson, Joseph D. 
Qaillian, Asbury H. 
Russell, Joseph 
Sneddon, Henry 
Seabring. A. T. 
Sproull. Thomas 
Sharp, William T. 
Schnlze, Henry 
Sleicher, James M. 
Stevenson. C. H. 
Vasquez, Hiram W. 
Walsen, Fred 
Watchman. Thomas 
Whitman. Briggs M. 



Westley, Samuel 



C 



226 



APPENDIX. 



LAS ANIMAS LODGE No. 28, 

TRINIDAD, LAS ANIMAS COUNTY. 
[Communications first and third Tuesdays in each month.'] 



OFFICERS. 



D. K. Callaway, W. M. 
Frank D. Goodale, S. W. 
Jno. Hamphrey, J. W. 
L. H. Turner, Treas. 
T. C. Keating. Sec'y. 



Alexander, H. J. ^— 
Allen, Ed. L. 
Burnett, W. A. 
Burgess. Wm. 
Brown, S. V. B. 
Battles, A. L. 
Bridge, Jas. L. 
Bateman, Geo. C. 
Cam 1 in. H. C. 
Bell, Geo. W. 
Beshear, Michael 
Cornell, (feo. B. 
Clark, O. T. 
Collier, Thos. B. 
Collins, W. A. 
Carmichael S. 
Cunningham, Wm. B. 
Cook, R. G. 
Day, Jas. 8. 
Demmon, Isaac 
Ditch burn, Jas. 
Davis, Joe 
Ey sen hart, Paul 
Elliott, S. C. 
Espey, Hugh S. 
Funk, Z. E. 
Freudenthal, Leopold 
Gnnter, J. C. 
Gibson. W. T. C. 
Garry, Frank C. 
Horn, Lony 
Hamer, Thos. L. 
Houghton, Wm. 



HKMBEB8. 

Harbison, A. B. 
Hosick, A. V. 
I vers, Geo. 
Jaffa, Sam'l 
Jaffa, Sol. H. 
Jones, W. W. 
Jones, J. S. 
James, Geo. W. 
Jameson, Jas. G. 
Levy, Isaac 
Levy, Barney 
Leigntor, Henry W 
Lenhart, Michael 
Lane. (feo. A. 
Lawler, B. F. 
Lanius, Phil. 
Lewi 8, Thos. 
M ana bach, Abe 
Moore, Dave 0. 
Miller, D. K. 
McEwan, Jno. 
Morgan. J. E. 
Mahin, Wm. 
Malgrem. Alex. 
Murphy, J. G. 
McKinney, H. B. 
McMillan, Sam'l 
McAlliRter, Jas. 
Mitchell, Steve N. 
Niles, E. K. 
Noble, Dan. A. 
Nigro, Antonio 
Nolan, P. H. 



Ed. F. Nisbet, 8. D. 
H. E. Brown, J. D. 
Wm. Crofut. 8. 8. 
('has. A. Richardson, J. 8. 
8. D. Hays, Tiler. 



Osborn, E. W. 
O'Reilly. Hugh T. 
Purrington, R. H. 
Pearson, Henry L. 
Peterson, Adolph 
Peters, Wm. E. 
Ramey, J. F. 
San foid, Geo. R. 
South, W. L 
8hrjock, J. W. 
Stracy, Geo. 
Savage, W. J. 
Sm it hers, W. K. 
Sockman, A. H. 
Sayler, O. Leo 
Smith, James 
Smith, H. G. 
Stone, Dan. W. 
Simpson, I). W. 
Sherman, Henry 
Thompson, Geo. W. 
Taylor, Dan'l L. 
Thompson, D. J. 
Tweedle, Wm. 
Ullerick, Geo. W. 
Waggoner, Thop. S. 
Wilder, W. H. 
Williams, W. D. 
Wiley, A. 
Wilber. Chas. 
Widderfield J. W. 
Williams, Thomas 



DEL NORTE LODGE No. 29, 

DEL NORTE, RIO GRANDE COUNTY. 
[('onununicat ions first and third Wednesdays in each month.] 



OFFICERS. 



C. W. Campbell, W. M. 
E. R. Hoyt, 8. W. 
J. H. Hurghardt, J. W. 
L. D. Mercer. Treas. 
Chas W. Thomas, 8ec'y. 



H. M. Dyer, 8. D. 
Geo. A. Willis, J. D. 
Theo. Beninsky, 8. 8. 
Christian Keck, J. 8. 
John Cleghorn, Tiler. 



Arthnr, John A. l~ 
Bas9ett, Alden 



MEMBERS. 



Berlin, (feo. C. 
Bo wen, Thos. M. 



Baxter, J. H. 
Cross wy, J. J. 



/ 



APPENDIX. 



227 



Cochran, John M. 
Out. Joseph E. 
Cochran, W. H. 
Coakley, James 
Donning, Reuben 
Dolphin, Mathew 
Danes, James 
Elliott, Ezra T. 
Ewing, John, Jr. 
Franklin, Geo. W. 
Gardiner, James M. 
Good, Thomas A. 
Goodrich, A. 8. 
Gredig, Jacob 
Grossman, I. P. 
Heitler. Edward 4 



Haabroack, James E. 
Heywood. Don 
Manna, Martin 
Jenkins, Filmore 
Kerman, Gottfried 
Kayaer, Lee 
Matlos, Jos. 8. 
Middleton, Wm. 
Middaugh, Asa F. 
McKee, Milton 
Nisbett, Rob't C. 
Ostrnm, John 
Pool, John 
Patten, N. 
Rice, A. M. 
Beef, Joseph F. * — 



Kobrao, A. J. 
Richardson, Ed. F. 
Richardson, Wm. M. 
Raber, Fred. 
Redman, H. W. 
Scheidler, (iabriel 
Howard, Jackson 
Shaw, John H. 
Van Lien, Chas. D. 
Weiss, Henry 
Weiss, Adam 
Weiss, Loni 
Weiss, August 
Wilson, Adair 
Wingate, John W, 
Wellington, W. T. < 



KING SOLOMON LODGE No. 30, 

LAB ANIMAS, BENT COUNTY. 
[Communications first and second Saturday* in each month.) 



William E. Calrer, W. M. 
Silas G. Wright, 8. W. 
John A. Murphy, J. W. 
James E. Frost, Treas. 
Hubert Reynold*, Sec'y. 



Baldwin, Addison M. 
Bowman, William, B. 
Bowman, Joshua 
Boll. John W. 
Comer, George 
Cartter. Hosea B. 
Crawford, A. Paul 
Campbell John W. 
Campbell. Leroy M. 
Dameron. George M. 
GudgelJ, James R. 
Godwin, Thomas H. 



OFFICERS. 



MEMBERS. 

Gallaher, John O. 
Grossjohann, Ernst 
Holly « Hiram 8. 
Harry, Thomas 
Kellogg, Henry 
Keesee, Daniel 
Locher, Edward O. 
Neebitt, J ames P. 
Peterson, A he 
Price. Mark B. 
Rector, James M. 



8. D. 
James C Jones, J. D. 
James Hicks, 8. 8. 
Charles 8. Parsons, J . 8. 
Robert L. Lambert, Tiler. 



Robinson, Gerard 
Salsbury, George 
Bizer, Warren W. 
Boupeset. Fredrick P. 
Turpin, James H. 
Towers, William, A. 
Wyatt, Joseph N. 
Withers. William 
Weil, Jacob 
Warren, William 
White, Calvin O. I— 



SOUTH PUEBLO LODGE No. 31, 

PUEBLO, PUEBLO COUNTY. 
( Communications* first and third Thursdays in each month.'} 



OFFIOER8. 



B. H. Wartenbee. W. M. 
W. L. Hartman. 8. W. 
r. V. Marmaduke, J. W. 
H. N. Banks, Treas. 
B. J. Bruner, Sec'y. 



Adams. Alva *"*" 
Anderson. Edwin 
Allen, Alfred 



MEMBIR8. 

Ames, Harry 
Andrews, Fred J. 
Arnhieter, Leopold 



J. A. Stafford, S. D. 
L. E. Moses, J. I). 
J. H. Douglas, S. S. 
('. A. Black, J. S. 
James Stanch field, Tiler. 



Alden, W. ('. 
Baldwin, B. F. 
Is" Bachel, Roman 



228 



APPENDIX. 



Bailey, L. M. 
Banks, Henry C. 
Barkley, Henry 
Barkley .David W. 
Beatty. William C. 
Biancillo, Joseph 
Billington, Wm. H. 
Barton, J. Knox 
Bishop, John F. 
Bsioom, Wm. A. 
Bray ton, E. 
Barber, William 
Calkins, Frank M. 
Corwin, Richard W. 
Cox, George E. 
Cox, Charles 
Cox. Edward 
Craft, K. W. 
Crater, Gilbert 
Corkiah, Robert, Jr. 
Cameron, Peter 
Danforth, A. H. 
DeJersey, John T. 
Dioelbies, James H. 
Donegan, John 
Doaden, C. A. 
Daniel, S. T. 
Davis. Will B. 
Elwell,J.C. 
Eilenberg, C.J. 
Fisher, A. T. 
Fagard L George 
Frain, Lather S. 
Glenn, Edwin C. 
Getman, L. P. 
Qtabzell, Frank 
Graham, A. E. 
Gray. John 
Griffing, Willis 
Gordon, George 
Geottle.Charle* J. 
Grabb, E. P. 
Hanna, Joseph P. 
Harwood, William 
Hill, John A. 
Hills, Victor G. 
Hollis, William H. 
Hudson, Robert B. 
Hemy, Nelson B. 



Hathaway, E. W. 
Humphrey, William A. 
Hancock, W. W. 
Harpster, Geo. F. 
Hathaway, H. D. 
Hatchcraft, R. W. 
Henderson, B. F. 
Jones, James E. 
Jones, W. A. 
Kean, Michael 
Kelker, John 
Ketner, J. D. 
Klee, Ben. F. 
Knight, Harry 
King, A. T. 
Lam kin, Chas. H. 
Littler, Harvey 
Liddy. Phillip M. 
Mallaby, Oliver W. 
Mallory, Fred W. 
M artel 1, James P. 
Mason, A. D. 
McCabe, Mathew 
McKoe. John M. 
Mitchell, Thos. 
Maher, A. G. 
Moses, Wm. A. 
Mead, Robert A. 
Macanlay. Hugh G. 
Merrick, Frank G. 
McConnell, James A. 
Orman, James B. 
Olin, Ceylon E. 
Olin, Myron S. 
Paul, L. B. 
Pearson, John I. 
Peach, William 
Pochon, Joseph J. 
Richards, Norman P. 
Robinson. John T. 
Robinson, James H. 
Roesgen, Anton 
Roos, Christian B. 
Royal, Andrew 
Reese, William L. 
Rockwell. F. R. 
Shoup, Howard M. 
Sheffield. Wiley S. 
Scott, Henry W. 



Sleeper, John W. 
Seffene, Edward 
Sheldon, Marcelloa 
Sheriff, Samuel 
Shields, George A. 
ShiremanjJohn K. 
Shockey, William L. 
Shall, L. O. 
Simonds, Fred E. 
Stewart, Frank H. 
Strait, William W. 
Strait, Lewis B. 
Stinchfield, E. F. 
Streic hen berg, Geo. H. 
Sweeney, William H. 
Hhrock, Frank H. 
Steok, E. M. 
Stnbbs, Chas. 8. 
Smith, Yeland 
Bchrontc, 8. B. 
Thompson, Thos. 
Townsend, Wood F. 
Tatham, David H. 
Taylor, Cyrus F. 
Tinkle. W. W. 
Unwin, John 
Valentine, John R. 
VanBrunt, William 
Walley. Stephen 
Warfield, ('has. A. 
Wheeler, Orton H. 
Williams, Geo. A. 
Williams. M. 
Willmunaer, Robert 
Wilson, Christopher 
Wilson, D. M. 
Wing, A. W. 
Wingett, Geo. W. 
Wright. Roland A. 
Wiley, Alexander 
Wilson, M. G. 
Walpole, Nirorod S. 
Williamson, H. A. 
Wieland, E. K. 
Worm ley, Frederick P. 
Wadleigb, Frank A. 
Tohn, John M. 
Zumbram. M. M. 



OLIVE BRANCH LODGE No. 32, 

SAGUACHE, SAGUACHE COUNTY. 
[Communications Saturday , on or before the full moon in each month.] 



OFFICERS. 



J. W. Rambo, W. M. 
T. B. MacDonald, S. W. 
W. A. Johnson, J. W. 
Heino von Heimburg, Treae. 
Chas. S. Cornelias, Bec'y. 



MKMBEB8. 



Allen, B. F. V 
Ashley, John E. 
Baldwin, J. D. 



Beard. J. M.G. 
Bertschy, P. H. 
Bronaugh, W. A. 



Henry M. Mingay, 8. D. 
Charles B. Phillips/ J. D. 
William W.Iden, 8. S. 
Geo. W. Keesey, J. 8. 
Lee Fairbanks, Tiler. 



Burt, W. B. 
Charles, L. C. 
Clajton, E. B. 



APPENDIX. 



229 



Covert, W. I. 
Farrisgton, John 
Goff. Moses 
Gotthelf , Isaac 
Hartman, Charles 
Hamard, J.G. 
Hodding, B. W. 



Hopkins. H. L. 
McCree, P. M. 
Redman, J. H. 
Baffel, Thomas 
Bchwanbeck, L. B. 
Sensabaugh, O. F. 
Shellabarger, A. 



Snyder, William 
Bourgeon, W. H. 
Stevens, J. M. 
Sullivan .William 
Sqaires, W. B. 
Tarbell, Charles 



SAN JUAN LODGE No. 33. 

SILYEHTON, -SAN JUAN COUNTY. 
[Communications first and third Saturdays in each month.] 



OFFICERS. 



D. B. Davis, W. M. 
J. F.Clark. 8. W. 
Henry Meldrum, J. W. 
George U. Ingersoli, Treas. 
D. Umble, Bec'y. 



John Glanville, 8. D. 
Charles Thompson, J. D. 
John WoolcocK, B. 8. 
Patrick Harrison, J. 8. 
Thomas Berriman, Tiler. 



Aanear, Thomas i 
Annear. J. B. 
Am bold. B. A. 
Breao,M. 
Barrett, Johnson 
Brown, Frank B. 
Btylj, George W. 
Clase.Charlee 
Bay, J. L. 
Dyson. James 
Dnycldnck, Dudley 
Dick, Theo. 
finery. M. W. 
FraierjC. M. 
Grow, W. J. 
Grey. J. G. 
Gundersrm, C. A. 
Hodges, E. W. 
Higgs, Stephen 



Hendricks, E. B. 
Hollingswnrth, E. V. 
Hollis, R. W. 
Hinderer, F. H. 
Johnson, Chris 
Jenkins, Kicbard 
Kislingbory, George 
Kimball, D. D. 
Landberg, Verner 
Mathews, Oliver 
Montague. H. 0. 
Monroe, William 
McBurnie, Thomas 
McClure. Beth 
Mason, David 
Moyle, Matthew 
Neely. Robert 
Neely, T. F. u^ 



Niles, James 
Owens, Thomas 
Owens, James 
Ovens, Wellington 
Pierce, C. 8. 
Peterson. Simon 
Rapp, David 
Rogers, John 
Sickles, W. E. 
Snowden, F. M. 
Todd, W. P. 
Taft, B. A. 
Taggert, W. H. 
Wilson, Walter B. 
Wingate, F. A. 
Wallace, Joseph 
Wattere, Thomas 
Walter, E. W. i 



CRYSTAL LAKE LODGE No. 34, 

LAKE CITY, HINSDALE COUNTY. 
[Communications second Tuesday in each month.'] 



OFFI0KB8. 



David S. Hoffman, W. M. 
George Pirie, S. W . 
John L.. Kinsev, J. W. 
Louis Kafka, Treas. 
Carl Forberg, Sec'y. 



Geo. P. Blount, S. D. 
Joe S. Kirker, J. D. 
Wallace A. Allen, S. S. 
Chas. Schafer, J. S. 
Henry Collum, Tiler. 



Beam. Thos. L. < 
Beam, Jesse W. 
Dawson, Tim E. 



Dawson, Phillip G. 
Downs, Marcus E. 
Gunst, Chas. 



Hough. John S. 
Hilgenhaue, Chas. T. 
Henderson, John 



230 



APPENDIX. 



Hanson, Erasmus 
Hart, Amos C. 
Hamm, Peter M. 
Jardine, John M. 
Kayser, Cbas. 
Marshall Geo. W. 



MEMBERS. 

Manghan, John H. 
May, John M. 
Mullen, Joel K. 
McKenzie, Daniel 
McKenna, Thos.J. 
Natter, Preston 



Richards, Geo. J . 
Kalph, Francis A. 
Rogers, John H. 
Wallace, Ed. F. 
Weniberg, Cbas. L. 
Weniberg, Lonis , 



IONIC LODGE No. 35, 

LEADVILLE, LAKE COUNTY. 
[Communications first and third Thursdays in each month.] 



OFFICERS. 



Lntian Q. Hobbs, W. M. 
John F. Armington, 8. W. 
W. W. Coble, J. W. 
John C. Stilwell, Treas. 
Johnnie R. Champion, Sec'y • 



MEMBERS. 



Allen, Alpheus ^ 
Allen, Cyrus 
Allard, Russell G. 
Alien, William 
Augustine, W. R. 
Armstrong. Arthur E. 
Andrews, E. H. 
Braden, William 
Branch, Albert H. 
Baker, I.G. 
Bredin, William W. 
Bowden, Thomas 
Bradbury, George E. 
Becker, Barney 
Bowdish, R. (\ 
Beaudry, Fred. B. 
Bessey, Charles 
Balderston. George 
Broylen, Samuel 
Boyd, Lincoln 
Brockstedt, Marx 
Bowden, John 
Bowes, Gporge 
Brannen. W. F. 
Booth, John W. 
Chamberlain. Bayard 
Castles, J. B. 
Caley, Byron A 
Campbell, M. I). 
Collen. James 
Corbett, Thomas B. 
Cruiksbank, Randolph A. 
Craddock, Patrick 
Champion, Thomas J. 
Corwin, Herbert I). 
Congdon, William 
Cohn, Joseph 
Crespell, E. P. 
Cunningham, James B. 
('alien, L. L. 
Darnell, James K. 
Doughtey, J. W. 
Dexter, James V. 
D*»mor*e. Frank 
Dills, J. M. 
Davis. Win. A. 



Dooley, John M. 
Davis, Elias 
Dalton, E. P. 
Dale, William P. 
Danielson, A. M. 
Davis. Frank E. 
Elley, C. F. 
Ermey, George 
Fielding, Charles 
Fraser. William 
Fonders, H. C. 
Farrell, W. H. 
Greenfield, Charles T. 
GunnelJ, A. L. 
Givens, Mansfield 
Greenfield, George D. 
Goslin, Arthur M. 
Givens, Dan 
Gear, Loftus 
Hocking William 
Hookin, J. J. 
Hancock, Thomas 
Jans, Hans 
Kellogg, William 
Kidd, Caleb 
Keller man, Henry 
Kahn, Marx 
Lenhoff, John 
Leonard, Charles M. 
Morrell, Winters 
Musser. John W. 
Milner, William G. 
Morrison, Donald 
Mack, Jacob 
Morse, R. Q. 
Miller, Joseph 
Moyle. John 
Menser, Simon 
Murcray, George 
McMillen. Neil 
McCoy, W. W. 
McMillan, Roderick 
McG ready, Charles 
MoClnre, Thomas 
McMillan, Alex. 
McColl, John ^ 



John A. Ewing, S. D. 
George Tucker, J. D. 
Simeon J. Williams, S. S. 
August J. Bergstrom, J. S. 
Louis J. Neal, Tiler. 



Neil, John W. 
Nelson, James 
Noble, Louis 
Nordbtrom, John 
Ovens, Thomas 
Orphan, J. W. 
Peterson, Charles A. 
Powell. Herman 
Pomroy, Thomas 8. 
Pierce, Jeremiah N. 
Polkinghorn, William A. 
Phillips, William J. 
Pearce, William S. 
Rowland, Frederick J. 
Rockwell, James J. 
Roberts. William J. 
Roberts. Thomas G. 
Robins, Samuel 
Ramsey, George W. 
Stiglitz, Joseph 
Smith, A. A. 
Seaman, Uriah 
Sampson, Edward 
Shanks, W. W. 
Swedberg. John F. 
Sale. H. T. 
Steel, Ned 

Seccombe, James H. 
Street, Samuel 
Thompson, Thomas H. 
Trevorrow, William 
Trevorrow, Edwin J. 
Trevorrow. William E. 
Taylor, William O. 
Tupman, W. C. 
Vulpius. Herman 
Watson, Walter B. 
Watson, H. A. 
Weyand, I. S. 
Walker. Thomas F. M. 
Wiles, Edward W. 
Walley. M. B. 
Williams. John M, 
Warren, J. W. 
Walker. D. C. 
Wineman, W. C. u^ 



APPENDIX. 



231 



BOSITA LODGE No. 36, 

ROSITA, CUSTER COUNTY. 
[Communications first and third Tuesdays in each month.] 

OFFICERS. 



Wm. Kampf, W. M. 
James Shanks, 8. W. 
W. D. 8chool field, J. W. 
John L. Schwab, Treas. 
Sec'y 



Adams, Gay A. 
Bsogh, Maroelln* 
Carroll, Charles H. 
Oeager, John G. 
Daniels, R. N. 
Davie, L. E. 
Davis, Hush 
Donnelly, Lonis H. 
Hay, Thos. L. 



MEMBERS. 

Johnson. Abel 
Knight, L. W. 
Kreps, Jacob 
Kennedy, Wm. 
Largent, John 
Miller. H. E. 
McGilliard, Wm. P. 
Markley, Taylor 
McEniry, Thos. 



J. H. H. Low, 8. D. 

G. YY. Funderbark. J. D. 

B. 8. 

J. 8. 

August Koppe, Tiler. 



Matthews. C. G. 
Milton, Wm. 
Nelson, John 
Radcliff, W. H. 
Reppey, Wm. 
Thiel, Matthies 
Waltz, James 



OURAY LODGE No. 37, 

OURAY, OURAY COUNTY. 

{Communications first and third Saturdays in each month.] 

OFFICERS. 



W. W. Rowan, W. M. 
James K. Herring, 8. W. 
H. W. Kinne, J. W. 
M. 8. Corbett, Treas. 
Charles A. Sperber, Sec'y. 



Abbott, James W. U- 
Adams, Arthnr 8. 
Alexander Wallace B. 
Armstrong, Charles A. 
Alscbbach, Henry 
Altringer, Philip 
Anderson, Montford 
Ashley, William W. 
Barber, George 8. 
Bradley, George T. 
Bradley, J. F. 
Brown, J. 8. 
Bnschnian, F. W. 
Carney, Francis 
Call, James P. 
Clamp. James 
Colmar, Martin 
Copp, Henry 
Corson. Howe G. 
Davis, John A. 
Dnunmond .James A. 
Dnrrell. H. W. 



MEMBKK8. 

Farnan, W. M. 
Forrester, George B. 
Fonrrell,W. H. 
Gardner, John 
Geiger, William 
Griffin, John 
Haskins, Charles W. 
Henry, Lyman I. 
Hammon. Charles T. 
Hayes, William T. 
Haughey, E. T. 
Holaday, H. 8. 
Hoover, D. B. 
Hurl bar t, George R. 
Hatter. N. E. 
Jeffers, Albert 
Johnson, William H. 
Knapp, WillardP. 
Kiniey, Edward 
Klodt. Henry 
Kunz, 8. W. 
Law, .lames A. 



Chas. E. Rose, 8. D. 
John P. Carney, J. D. 
Rich Whinnerah, 8. 8. 
Peter L. Lawrence, J . 8. 
♦Thos. Hooey, Tiler. 



Lewis, F. E. 
Loring, Charles N. 
Mark, Milton H. 
May. Clarence 
Mackoy, Jam oh M. 
Martin. Isaac A. 
Mr Bride, Edward 
McFarlane, E 
McClennnn, J. M. 
Morgan, W. G. 
Miller, 8. W. 
Munn, Charles 
Murray. John A. 
Mock. Harry 
Neville, John J. 
Nutter, C. P. 
Nichols, Chauncey M. 
O'Connor, Thomas. 
Ohwiler, Jacob 
O'Neil, H.J. 
O'Neil, Jerry J. 
Perry, E. N. 



* Not a member. 



232 



APPENDIX. 



Philips, W. B. 
Parliamon, Ben E. 
Pierce, George G. 
Proudfoot, Robert 
Raddate, Emil J. 
Scott, J. F. 
Scott, P. H. 
Scott, George A. 
Scott, Ithamar B. 



MEMBE&8. 

Shultis-Roas T. 
Smith, V.Y. 
Stanton, Francis H. 
Sibbach.Fred 
Sholtz, William 
Sherman, W. Arthur 
Stevens, Theron 
Story, William 
Wallace, Joseph T. 



Waring, J. G. 
Watson, S. S. 
Walther, Amoa E. 
Wheeler, Walter F. 
Williams, J. P. 
Williams, Ralph 
Walsh, Harry H. 
Ward, Christopher A. 



SILVER CLIFF LODGE No. 38, 

SILVER CLIFF, CUSTER COUNTY. 
[Communications first and third Thursday* "» each month.) 



John A. Feist, W. M. 
Wm. T. Decker, S. W. 
Wm. J. Orange, J. W. 
Wm. C. Vorreiter, Treas. 
W. E. Brace, Sec'y. 



OFFICERS. 



L. F. Jackson, S. D. 
W. H. Owens, J. D. 
John Diets, S. S. 
Monroe Decker, J. S. 
J. E. Mercer, Tiler. 



Adams, B. C. 
Baker, D. M. 
Brewer, A. P. 
Barry. J no. S. 
Bradshaw, T. J. 
Foes, H. W. 
Howard, Ed. L. B. 
Leland, Theo. 



MEMBERS. 

Mitchell, Jno. J. 
Mitchell, Edwin 
Morrison, S. A . 
Phillips, Oeorge 
Rising, A. J. 
Shaeffer, J. T. 
Townsend, Hosea 



Ulah, H. J. 
Varcoe, F. J. 
Woodside, Wm. 
Walker, Alex. 
Walters, Artemas 
Walters, Price 
Waters, Stephen H. 



GUNNISON LODGE No. 39, 

GUNNISON, GUNNISON COUNTY. 
[Communications second and fourth Tuesdays in each month.} 



OFFICERS. 



Herman M. Webster, W. M. 
Henry C. Olney, 8. W. 
Truman W. Gray, J. W. 
Eugene P. Shove, Treas. 
James S. Lawrence, Sec'y. 



Winter S. Rainbow, 8. D. 
Hannibal 8. Martin, J. D. 
Henry C. Bartlett, 8. 8. 
Robert B. Lewis, J. 8. 
Henry Pnrrier, Tiler. 



Aikine, Osmer H. \s*^ 
Bailey, Radford C. 
Beck, Henry E. 
Biebel, Charles 
Biebel, Ferdinand E. 
Bleeker, John C. 
Bloch, Moses L. 
Brown, Ira 
Brown, Ira Ewert 
Brooks, Edward S. 
Burnett, Walker 
Coppinger, Mark 
Col born, Edward F. 
Cooley, Alfred 



MEMBERS. 

Coram, Jesse 
Cooper, William A. 
Davis, Willet C. 
Davis, William H. 
Dofflemyre, James A. 
Egan, John 
Estes, George H. 
Fine. William J. 
Flavin. Michael W. 
Getchell, Marshall P. 
Gollett, Alexander 
Grasmack, Louis 
Hammond, Charles M. 
Hamilton, Alexander 



Hatch, E. C. 
Hinkley, Louis J. 
Holloway, Herman 
Hogg, Herschel M. 
Hurley, David 
Hughes, Edward A. 
Hyzer, Abram E. 
Jennings, Nathaniel 
Lewis, Thomas J. 
Lindaner, Leopold 
Lightly, George W. 
Maloy, Edward N. 
Martenis, Nathan 
May, Isaac 8. 



APPENDIX. 



233 



Mclror, John J. 
McKee, Joseph C. 
Monahan, Michael 
Mnllin, Londin 
Purlin, John T. 
Parker, Charles A. 
Pomeroy, Hiram 
Prater, George A. 
Preston, James A. 
Roblee, Morgan A. 
8app, Dexter T. 
BeeOnger, Frederick A. 



Sills. Charles T. 
Sherwood, Clarence A. 
Smith, Frank C. 
Steele, Frank D. 
Steele, John A. 
Stewart, Charles L. 
Stephens, J. A. 
Tapecott. Henry C. 
Unrnh, Daniel 
Tidal, Philip 
Vidal, Regis 
Waterman, D. B. i. 



Watson, William 
Wallen, Elisha A. 
Webb, John 
Webster, Homer D. 
Weinberger, Nathan 
Weinberger. Simon 
White, William S. 
Wilson, Peter 
Wilson, Benjamin M. 
Winn, Charles F. 
Yonng, Larkin « 



PITKIN LODGE No. 40, 

PITKIN, GUNNISON COUNTY. 
[Communications second and fourth Saturdays in each month.'] 

officers. 



John F. Chrystal, W. H. 
Jonah C. Nisley, 8. W. 
George W. Eastman, J. W. 
James F. Chrystal, Trees, 
John F. Pearson, Sec'y. 



Brothers, John E. 
Ferry, Frank A. 
Pulton, William M. 



MEMBERS. 



H ox table, Thomas 
Pollock, William J. 
Sknes, Richard A. ( 



Frank E. Craig, S. D. 
Peter Hogne, J. D. 
John Roberts, S. S. 
A. H. Conroy, J. S. 
Angast F. Sommer, Tiler» 



Sanstrnro. Nils. O. 
Tatman, John C. u 



SCHILLER LODGE No. 41, 

DENVER, ARAPAHOE COUNTY. 
[Communications second and fourth Fridays in each month.] 



Bernard Hertzbach. W. M. 
Frank Walters, S. W. 
Frank Kratzer, J. W. 
Herman Wortman, Trees. 
Henry Schroeder, sec'y* 



Bitzer, Conrad u- 
Braderlin, Albert 
Bremer, Henry 
Brohm, Otto 
Broehne, Carl 
Brockroeyer, F. W. 
Candler, Adolph 
Dramm, Aogust 
Eberle,fr.C: 
Ell, Herman 
Ererman. F. F. 
Friedericn, Peter 

* Not a member. 



OFFICERS. 

i 



MEMBERS. 

Fischer, Emil 
Goebel, Martin 
Giesecke, Albert 
Hake, George 
Hnober, John 0. 
Hahn, Martin 
Karcber, J. B. 
Kisthard, Daniel 
Knhlman, D. H. 
Kinkel, Loais 
Kinkel, William 
Knoch, Chas. ^- 



Joseph Gregor. 8. D. 
Max Fischer, J. D. 
Alois Zerr, S. 8. 
Adam Kiemle, J. S. 
*Thom. Linton, Tiler. 



Levy, Sam'l 
Meininger, Emil 
Miller. Chas. F. 
Menscnke, Edwin H. 
Meyer, Max 
Maegley, Geo. L. 
Neef. Max 
Pfaff, John 

8 dentin, Herman 
ichter. Oswald 
Rinne, Ferd 
Rnchmann, Christ c 







234 



APPENDIX. 



MEMBERS. 



Roesch, Edward 
Schieck, Julias F. 
Steinke, Rob't M. 
Selbach, Emil A. 
Schmidt, Julias F. 
Siebott, Fred. 



Seibel.Gustav A. 
Utthoff, Danl 
Weber, Albert H. 
Walters, Leonard 
Weiaemnller, ('has. 



Weber, Jacob 
Wildersin, Bernard 
Zang, Phillip 
Zang, Adolph 
Zietz, Emil. 



CORINTHIAN LODGE No. 42, 

KOKOMO, SUMMIT COUNTY. 
[Communications first and third Tuesdays in each month.} 



OFFICKBfl. 



Andrew E. Chase, W. M. 
JohnW. Uightree, S. W. 
John H. Freeberg, J. W. 
Sumner Whitney, Treaa. 
Watson C. Tucker, Bec'y- 



Henry A. Becen, B. D. 
Andrew Becen, J. D. 
Erick Anderson, 8. 8. 
Tony Hennaky. J. 8. 
Jas. F. Boltz, Tiler. 



Anderson, J. P. L-" 
Anderson, Nels P. 
•Adrain Carl A. 
Berg, M. O. 
Brown, Geo. W. 
Carlson. G us F. 
Dayia, Charles 
Davis, D. T. 
Ewing, John W. 
Emmet. Dr. Robt. 
Grote, John H. 



MKMBKB8. 

Helstein. Andrew 
Johnson. A. B. 
Jenison, T. 
Johnson. O. J. 
Laskey, Wilber 8. 
Lindsey, William M 
McDonald, Alex. L. 
McConaghv, John 
Nelson, John 
Becen, Daniel A. 
Hose, Fred W. 



Bich, Benj. F. 
Smith, Walter C. 
Swanson, Oliver 
Smith, John W. 
Sjolin, Loui 
Wallein, Goat A. 
Wright, Charles 
Webster, D. B. 
Walle, John 
Woodford. J. W. 



EAGLE LODGE No. 43, 

BED CLIFF, EAGLE COUNTY. 
[ Communications first and third Mondays in each month,] 



OFFICERS. 



Geo. E. Simonton, W. M. 
A. G. Mays, 8. W. 
Wni. H. Evans, J. W. 
Patrick Tague, Treas. 
John L. Campbell, Sec'y. 



Cobb, Thomas L^ 
Collins, William 
Dugan, John R. 
Frost, A. S. 
Grune, Jay L. 
Gilbert, Elian 
Gilliland, Frank 
Hawley, T. H. 
Holm, Asher 
Hnghs, Frank 
Lewis, J. Ben. 



MKMBKR8. 

Livingston, W. W. 
ljewer, James 
Love, John W. 
I>eiby, C. H. 
Martin, Henry 
MalinH, A. F. 
McNichols, James 
McGraw, Robert 
McDonald, Alex. A. 
McLean, John 
Morehouse, D. W. 



H. W. Goodrich, 8. D. 
James Collins, J. D. 
G.J. DeLee. S. 8. 
Geo. A. Townsend, J. 8. 
L. E. Francis, Tiler. 



Montgomery, W. 8. 
Phillipps, C. K. 
RichareU, Jas. H. 
Squire, John F. 
Stanley, Jessie M. 
Schliff.WUliam 
Shaw, W. H. 
Webster, Thomas H. 
Williams. John W. 
Wolf, A. E. Ci " 



APPENDIX. 



235 



ALAMOSA LODGE No. 44, 

ALAMOSA, CONEJOS COUNTY. 
[Communication* first and third Thursdays in each month.] 



officers. 



John 8priesterBbach, W. M. 
William H. Hint, 8. W. 
Fred. W. Swanson, J. W. 
John Gerteisen, Trees. 
Geo. A. Willis, Sec'y. 



Bachus, Henry * — 
Brophy, James 
Bloodworth, Edward 
Bannister, Amos 
Bryant. Cbas. E. 
Ball. Charles M. 
Breckenstein, Charles H. 
Carroll, Walter D. 
Cole, A. C. 

Duddleson, Thomas J. 
Dixon, William H. 
Dnbeudorff, Horace H. 
Eekridge. L. Dow 
Eldodt, Nathan 
Eeles, John J. 
Eeles, William 
Fraser. W. D. 
Head, Lafayette 



MEMBERS. 

Homer, A. L. 
Hayt, Charles D. 
Hindis, Francis L. 
Hoyden, J. MaBon 
Hatfield. Charles 
James, Norwood A. 
John, Charles 
Johnson, Charles A. 
Lewis, Jessie H. 
Law, John 
Meloney, Ashmer 
Mclntire, Albert M. 
McOunniff, Thos. 
Mil liken, James 
Neilson, John 
Pirn, Thos. F. 
Putnam, E. E. 
Rhoades, Maihew 



John Frank, 8. D. 
Otto Weigand, J. D. 
a D. Carleton, 8. 8. 
C. W. Givens, J. 8. 
Alex. Warren, Tiler. 



Knshworth, William A. 
Kiley, L. 8. 
Kuby, A. B. 
Rogers, D. J. 
Schultz, James 
Smith, Joseph 
Smith, F. W. 
Stewart, Peter 
Scheffer. Isaac W. 
Springer, Arnold D. 
Shone, George H. 
Stollsteimer, F. F. 
Voll, Fred. 
Worcester, Fred. 
Warshaner, Fred. 
Warburton, G. 8. 
Yoang, William H. . 



BOULDER LODGE No. 45, 

BOULDER, BOULDER COUNTY. 
[Communications second and fourth Wednesdays in each month.] 



Richard H. Whitely, W. M. 
John H. Crary, 8. W. 
R. B. Gibbon, J. W. 
A. M. Sawyer. Treas. 
J. E. Bemos, Sec'y. . 



Bartlett, Reael (^ 
Bartlett, David 
Bergheim, J. 
Bradley, H. N. 
Brackett, J. R. 
Berry man, Edward 
Blake, G. B. 
Boell, V. Artie 
Carringer, H. A. 
Cowie, James 
Conger, A. L. 
Casey, William V. 
C'olvin, Clarence K. 
Dabney. Charles 
Dan ford, Thomas 

•Not a member. 



OFFICEBS. 



MEMBERS. 

Dennett, I. C. 
Fischer, P. W. 
Ferguson, E. G. 
Giffin, 8. A. 
Giffin, L. M. 
Gilbert, Richard 
Golds wort by, William 
Greene, O. F. A. 
Heilner, Samuel 
Hanus, Paul H. 
Harris, William 
Hiasey, M. W. 
HanBhrough, O. ('. 
HoJ stein, Harry C. 
Hubbard, J. E. , 



Fred White, 8. D. 
W. 8. Bellman, J. D. 
Samuel Geo. Knott, S. S. 
Chas. Hi tt master, J. S. 
*D. A. Robinson, Tiler. 



Hunter, A. M. 
James, Henry 
Jackson, Nelson 
Led better. W. F. 
McClure, George M. 
Moorhead, J. L. 
Moore, T. M. 
Martin, William 
Myers, J. L. 
Maxwell, M. N. 
Newton, Dawson 
Neiderberger, F. A. 
Nicholson, J. H. 
Nicholson, William H. 
Oleson, Lewis 



236 



APPENDIX. 



Oliver, George 8. 
Peterson, C. L. 
Pine, B. F. 
Pughe, Jobn 
Rogers, George 
Schriver, J.C. 
Streamer, F. M. 
Stokes, Chauncey 



Stewart, A. P. 
Sternberg. Jay 
Thompson, H. E. 
Thompson, H. C. 
Temple, E.J. 
Tucker, Thomas H. 
Tilton, C. H. 
Teal, George W. 



Tyler, Fred 
Tyler, Frank 
Van Deren, J. M. 
Van Dercook, J. H. 
Wallace, George 
Wolfer, Charles F. 
Waugelin, 0. H. 



DURANGO LODGE No. 46, 



DUBANGO, LA PLATA COUNTY. 



[Communications first and third Thursdays in each month,] 



OFFICERS. 



Charles S. Bntler, W. M. 
Charles H. Barton, 8. W. 
George V. Copp, J. W. 
Frank H. Young, Treas. 
John F. Hechtman, Sec'y. 



Elmer E. Sohalles, 8. D. 
Charles A. Pike, J. D. 
George Weaver, 8. 8. 
George N. Raymond, J. 8» 
O. J. Paine, Tiler. 



Allison,/. A. ^ 
Bayly, William 
Barnes, F. J. 
Brumley, John H. 
Boston, J. A. 
Butler, fl. C. 
Burwell, Blair 
Bowman /Thomas E. 
Carr. R. H. 
Camp, D. W. 
Cash, James 
Chapman, Wm. C. 
Cadwell, Henry 
Coston. John P. 
Chase, Fred. L. 
Corn forth, Arthur 
Carter, J . W. 
Carlson, John 
Carson, Robt. J. 
Dudley, Chas. E. 
Dnstin. Chas. L. 
Dow, Chas. E. 
Davidson, Wm. C. 
Darrah, Sam. M. 
Drake, D. K. 
De Cow, Duncan M. 
Edinanson, A. P. 
Folsom, W. H. C. 
Fassbinder, Peter 
Fisher, Geo. L. 
Frennd, Geo. 
Griffith, David 8. 
Goodrich. J. G. 
Guthrie, W. H. 
G allot ti, Frank 
Gilbert, Haden 
Goodman, H. C. 



MSMBKB8. 

Goodman, George 
Galbreath, O. S. 
Gerow, Philip 
Goode, Mack 
Hilliker, C. M. 
Hamilton, L. L. 
Hansen, John 
Harvey, W. H. 
Hoskinson, Chas. G. 
Kephart, Geo. W. 
Klingenaer, Meloher 
Kruschke, Isaac 
Right, W. N. 
La Count, W. H. 
Lewis^A. R. 
Lake, JF. R. 
Longnecker, Will T. 
Lynton, J. H. 
Lemmon. C. A. 
Miles. John 
May, Wm. M. 
Morse, John W. 
Morawetz, Albert 
Moore, Jas. J. 
Moore, Sanford W. 
Mclntyre, Donald 
McCloskey, M. J. 
Manzing, E. 
McCaffrey. Daniel J. 
McCluer. T. J. 
McNicholas, Robert 
Miller, N. C. 
McGrew, J. D. 
Nagengast, Nicholas 
Newman, Chas. 
Pingrey, 8. W. 
Parsons, J. L. ^- 



Peoples, E. T. 
Paquin, Louis 
Pearson, John 
Patterson, L. H. 
Peterson. Theo. E. 
Prewitt, Joe 
Rockwood, Thos. 
Russell, J. L. 
Roberts, W. W. 
Roberts, F. B. 
Rader, W. H. 
Sanford, J. C. 
Sheets, D. L. 
Summa, Jacob 
Shaw, D. J. 
Schrader. Harry 
Sumner, Geo. T. 
Schalles, ('has. 
Schutt, J. E. 
Scbiffer, Harry 
Turner, J. C. 
Thompson, 8. H. 
Thurston, R. G. 
Thorp. Geo. L. 
Will, F. J. 
Waters, J. H. E. 
Warren, W. D. 
West, Geo. E. 
Winters, W. R. 
Will, Frank H. 
Wade, Geo. H. 
Wood. Oscar C. 
Webb, John 
Williams. Chas. M. 
Walker. E. T. 
Wynn, John (\ 
Ware, Henry F. ^ 



APPENDIX. 



237 



BBECKENKIDGE LODGE No. 47, 

BRECKENBIDOE, SUMMIT COUNTY. 
[Communication* first and third Saturday* in each month.] 



OFTZOKB8. 



H. BL Elwood, W. M. 
Christian Kaiser, 8. W. 
H. L. Moyer. J. W. 
W. M. Enterline, Treas. 
H. L. Enterline, Sec'y. 



Arbogaet, B. A. 
Albee, A. F. 
Boylan.John 
Betis, Geo. L. 
Breeze, John M. 
Coyne, V. J. 
Carter, Ed. 
Doyle, W. E. 
Bngle, Peter 
Enterline, K. D. 
Eberlin. W. F. 
Foote, B. W. 



MEMBKK8. 

Grant, A. H. 
Hartman, John H. 
Hartman, George 
Ingram, J as. E. 
Joneman, F. W. 
Johnson, W. A. 
Lasher, W. J. 
Levy, Charles 
Litton, Henry 
Laws, A. C. B. 
Palmer, I. C 
Peckham, Wm. * 



A. H. Gresham, B. D. 
J. B. Conrad, J. D. 
M. F. Blodgett, 8. 8. 
M. E. Conrad, J. S. 
Wm. McAdoo, Tiler. 



Porter, Jas. H. 
Potter, W. A. 

Snick, Noah B. 
oby, John D. 
Rich, A. M. 
Stephenson, W. B. 
Schmeling, fiob't 
Stratton, J. H. 
Walker, C. A. 
Williams, John M. 
Watson, Geo. B. 
Ynst, E. C. _ 



GEORGETOWN LODGE No. 48, 

GEORGETOWN, CLEAR CREEK COUNTY. 
[Communication* second and fourth Thursdays in each month.] 



orirous. 



Stoat Hart, W. M. 
Fred P. Dewey, 8. W. 
Robert Neaman.J. W. 
Henry 8eifried, Treas. 
John H. Hasted, Sec'y. 



Herbert Gedney, 8. D. 
M. C Morgan, J. D. 
W. J. Faulkner, 8. 8. 
Frank L. Peck, J. 8. 
Z. E. Hart, Tiler. 



Allison, Frank H. ' 
Bollock, Chas. B. 
Billings, Ed. C. 
Billings, C. L. 
Case, Chas. 0. 
Collins, Rassell J. 
Duff, Wm. A. 
Edmonds, Root. R. 
Fletcher, Warren M. 
Graham, Frank 



MEMBERS. 

Hall, Geo. W. 
Miller, Hagh K. 
Hood, Wm. C. 
Jacobson, Chas. H. 
Mingle, James 
McCracken, Frank B. 
Marsh, Ed. R. 
Noyes, Harmon H. 
Parmelee, Ed. C. 
Pollard, Obe C. . 



Pollard, Chas. W. 
Phillips, John F. 
Perchard, James 
Reid, Anderson W. 
Roberts, Harry L. 
Snetzer, Jacob 
Sedgwick, R. A. 
Tibbitts, Chas. N. 
Twining. Hagh A. 
Willis, Bnshrod i 



*M« 



238 



APPENDIX. 



MOUNT PKINCETON LODGE No. 49, 

BUENA VISTA, CHAFFEE COUNTY. 
[Communication* second and fourth Thursdays in each month.] 



OFFIOBB8. 



Ernest Wilber, W. M. 
Frank B. Keyee. 8. W. 
W. W. Fay, J. W. 
M. J. Marks, Trees. 
James P. MacDade, Sec'y* 



Morton McBride, 8. D. 
John A. Feely, J. D. 
J. H. Cole. 8. 8. 
H. J. Van Wetering, J. 8. 
8. W. Wade, Tiler. 



Adams, George M. 
Bonney, J. M. 
Campbell, Kansom 
Crymble. Hugh 
Cole, J. E. 
Cole. O. W. 
Conuit, J. A. 
Cook, David N. 
Duncan, T. R. 
Ditmore. D. V. 
Drach, Geo. J. 
Elliott, C. 8. 
Fleet ford, James 
French, Thoe. K. 
Fletcher. W. W. 
Hessey, W. W. 



MEMBKB8. 

Halsey, J. 8. 
Libby, C. 8. 
Logan, Henry 
Logan, W. K. 
McBride, John 
McBride, 8. P. 
McKenzie, Wm. 
McKenna, Thomas 
Montrose, C. A. 
Merrlam, 8. D. 
Neibor, Joseph 
Orr, Gay A. 
Price, Chas. J. 
Pursell, A. K. 
Pearce, Kob't W. 



Soop, Fino A. 
8mith, Geo. L. 
Smith, Geo. W. 
Steele. W. B. 
Bcofieid, 8. H. 
Stuart, A. J. 
Scully, N H. 
Tate, Frank J. 
Thomas, E. E. 
Vickers, John 
Willis, W. D. 
Wilber, W. B. 
Willing, A. J. 
Wade, A. H. 
Wesfall, Geo. W. 



GARFIELD LODGE, No. 50. 



ERIE. WELD COUNTY. 



[Communications first and third Wednesdays in each month.] 



OFFICEB8. 



Joseph R. Powell, W. M. 
John E. Oakley, 8. W. 
Thomas Morgan, J. W. 
Joseph Mitchell, Treas. 
William Hurley, Sec'y. 



Frank D. Gilpatrick. 8. D. 
William Angove, J. D. 
William Nicholson, 8. 8. 
Joseph J. Morgan, J. 8. 
Theophilns Hopkins,Tiler. 



Allen, Mat hew \*^ 
Andrew, Thomas 
Barrowman, William 
Bowker, John 
Brown, William M. 
Barrows. Jotteph W. 
Bottenfield, Church 8. 
Botten field. Elmer E. 
DanielH, John E. 
Davis, David F. 
Douglas, Thomas 
Foreman, Frank E. 
Grenfell, George E. 
Hamren, Andrew 



MEMBERS. 

Jenkins, William D. 
Jones, Thomas R. 
Jones, Joseph D. 
Lambert. Fred 
Metcalf , George 
Mills, John G. 
McGraw, Leonard 
McKenna, Felix 
McCarsey, Charles 
McKissick, John 
McKiKRick. Oliver L. 
McNeil, William 
McCorry, Charles E. 
Padfield, William 



Paige. Thomas 
Plumb, Sylvester J. 
Kunge, Gustavus W. 
Sberratt, Charles 
Smith, Walter W. 
Smith, John W. 
Swanson. John B. 
Van Valkenbnrg, R. J. 
Vaughan, Enoch, T. 
Van Etten, William O. 
Wise, J. O. V. 
Withey, B. F. 
Young, M. E. *-~ 



APPENDIX. 



239 



LEADVILLE LODGE No. 51, 

LEADVILLE, LAKE COUNTY. 
{Communications second and fourth Fridays in each month.] 



OFFICERS. 



Samuel D. Nicholson, W. M. 
H. R. Pendery, 8. W. 
Chas. E. Dickenson. J. W. 
Chas. Harden, Jr., Treas. 
Geo. P. Brown, Sec'y. 



Allen Melville, 8. D. 
David La Salle, J. D. 
W. R. Johnson, 8. 8. 
H. M. Blakely, J. 8. 
John W. Coreer, Tiler. 



Angerman, Henry 1-— 
Bergeman, Jacob 
Boeticher, Charles 
Bnrnand, A. A. 
Bernheimer. Jacob 
Beattie, Robt. 6. 
Brooks, Cyrus W. 
Brown, Samuel M. 
Bissell, Julias B. 
Corser, Cieo W. 
Cook Geo. W. 
Chamberlain. Lewis J. 
Bretherton, Sidney E. 
Barnett, Hurry C. 
Bisbee, L. H. 
Cox. Wm. B. 
Cavender. (diaries 
Christian, Chas. J. 
Cain. Wm. J. 
Christie. Alexander 
Delay, Robt. L. 
Davis. Morgan 
Dongan, Geo. B. 
Dwight 8. M. 
Dickenson, Mm. M. 
Dennison, Chas. W. 
Eaton, Charles L. 
Fogle, A. 

Goddard. Lnther M. 
Gearhart. J. H. 
Galler, Wm. 
Gaskin, Wm. 
(railoway, Bradford 8. 
Haas, Meyer B. 
Haas, Samuel (J. 
Harvey, John 



MEMBERS. 

Hersey, J. Clarence 
Helton, Chas. T. 
HodgBon, Mark 
Hick*, Stephen 
Himdchen, Albert 
Helbeck, Gustav 
Poreaker, Wm. 
Hilton, John E. 
Hamilton. Herbert W. 
Jaycox, Thou. W. 
McNiven, Daniel 
James, W. H. 
Jones, David L. 
Joy, Walter J. 
Johnson, J. H. 
Kneale, Thos. 
Kneale, Wm. 
Krone, Jas. F. 
Lindsay, Joseph 
Ludwig, Henry 
Lartien, Neils 
Leask, John R. 
Lumsden, John 
Mater, Charles 
Marks, Rudolph 
Maxwell, John M. 
McCullum, Frank E. 
McComb, David P. 
McMillen, Wm. J. 
Miller, F. C. 
McDonald, Daniel D. 
Newman, Wm. H. 
Nicholson, Chas. 
Nowland, John 
Newell, Jas. W. t^ 



Officer, Frank H. 
Otterbach, Wm . L. 
Playford, Stephen M.. 
Peterson, Peter W. 
Parker, Jos. L. 
Reardon, Frank M. 
Russell, J as. 
Reed, Chas H. 
Robinson, Ben A. 
Rowel 1, Wm. 
Revett, Ben Stanley 
Sou they, Geo. 
Stockton, C. C. 
Smith, Joel W. 
Schoelkopf, Jacob F. 
Stickley, Benj. F. 
Shaw, Frank 
Stotesbury, John H. 
Salen, J. W. 
Steen, Wm. J. 
Thomson, Alexander 
Thompson, Willis L. 
Wheat, Lysander B. 
Whicher, John 
Whinnerah, Leonard 
Wilder, Sam'ID. 
Wildhoch, Lewis A. 
Whinnerah, Raymond 
Williams, John H. 
William?. Morgan H. 
Whelon, Robt. 
Watt, Job 
Woodward, E. C. 
Young, John Walter 
Voyes, W. L. . _ 



TIN CUP LODGE No. 52, 

TIN CUP, GUNNISON COUNTY. 
[ Communications first and third Saturdays in each month.] 

OFFICERS. 



James W. Forrest, W. M. 
William H. Harris. 8. W. 
James K. Reed. J. W. 
('has. E. Whitfield, Tress. 
Ansel F. Pettingill. Sec'y. 



Frank B. Massey, 8. D. 
John W. Ander»on, J. D. 
Jerome Noakes, 8. S. 
Benj. C. Gray, J. S. 
William W. Roof, Tiler. 



APPENDIX. 



Ackereon. Archie E. 



Dunn, Edward 



Foreman, Charles 
Klaaber, Sim"" ■< 
Mad in, Beni. 



BDi. F. 

ob 1 t L. 



LOVELAND LODGE No. 53. 

LOYELIND, LAR1MEK COUNTY. 
[Communication* second and fourth Thursday* in rack monflt-l 



uis o. n oourun, a. n 
__orl« Maxwell. J. W. 
Thomas Cross. Treas. 
Lyman Porter, ttec'y . 



John Peterson, 8. D. 
WliliamJ.Croebi.J.D. 
Walter L. Thorndyta, S£ 
John Weslerdoll, J.B. 
William A. Bean. Tike. 



Benson, Aaron 8. 
Burke, John J. 

Busunell, Carlton C. 
Bartholf, Frank Q. 
Bond, (Torn el ins H. 
Bailey, Manilrnu M. 
Bengiton. A. P, 
Chad bourne. Horace 
Carrier, Edwin H. 
(Carlson, Align st 
Chambers, Jomee K. 



Diokerson, Hoielle K, 
Dennis, George W. 
firilBth, Albin 
Goodwin, Erank C. 
Han kiim. W. A. 
Kemptoo, George W. 
Kiilim, Lee J. 
Larson, Swan N. 
Middleion. Joseph B, 



Quisle/. Jem 
Randall. Charles N, 



STERLING LODGE No. 54, 

bTEBLlN(i, LOGAN CODNTV. 

ufic'ir on Saturday on or before full moon in each nifftds-I 



Arthor W. Warren, W. H. 
J.i:. Killen, H. W. 
Samnelb 1 . Rohnek.J. W. 






Joseph J. Weir. 8. D. . 
Bartlatt H. Taylor, J. D 

J.: 


J 

EllfHr- 


Hicks, James A 
Judd, Leroy M. 
Kins, James M. 
McAlpine. Alein 
McLaoshlin.Ri 
Letts, Fred. C. 
Lewis, Frank S. 


nder D. 


Propat, Sidnes II- 
Propat, W. C. 

Ramsey, John Vf. 
Rowland. John 
Hcott, J. S. 
Smith, Martin H. 
Wynkoop, John v 



APPENDIX. 



MESA LODGE No. 55, 

GRAND JU1JCTION, MESA COUNT*. 
[CoHi**aicatUnu firgt pnd third Thwtdat/i in each month] 



OraoD Adam. Jr., W. M. 

rwiBiE Miu'hnii.s. w. 

Jacob fL Rhw.J.W. 
Trveodore II. Jones, Tihi. 
William A. Marab, bee'j. 



* llliam A. Uinfa, Sec'j. , j( 

A ........ 

Bocklio. JtmH W. P. M.jWolden. William H 
Btu.1Ih.jiI, William R. JRannan, Eward W. 
Biuiirj«. William 8. TtiuttmTj. John A. 



Bernard K. Kennedy, a. 1 
Benjamin F. Jay, J. D. 
Virgil E. Nelwm. B. M. 
.lame* W hitter. .1.8. 



Crawford, fhomaa H 
4^non. B-nton 
<>*i«. Arebig H. 
i «**eU. <"harl«i V. 
< touo, , Datld R. 
CoDttnar. (Jennie A. 

IWkiI. Boa? L. 
DockeU. Joseph A. 



Uftrriaon. JohnH. 
Innia. William 
KiniralHj. Darwin P. 
Kipp. Bert L. 
Krnaen. Norman J. 
Lane. Hqpire G. 
Lomaden. John J. 

Lofton! Abel M. 
Moblej. Itiehard D. 
Mover. Al. 

>v.renoeM.,P.M. 
Mann. John B. 
Morlarily, Frank A. 
McMallin. Samuel G. 



McKay. Dnnean 
Mg Arthur, Daniel 
McDowell, J. B. 



TELLUBIDE LODGE No. 56, 

TELLUBIDE, 9AN MIGUEL COUNTY. 
mication* MConil and fourth Saturday in eaih > 



(nark* F. Painter, W. M. 



andma. Osnr^TS. 
aadem. Gnaiaf 
alien. Arthur W, 
Brown, Jamea L. 
HafaoB, Jaoai H. 
hViraaon, Gnttaf 
Datli*. William K. 



v,auipuHU. agnngta 
Coetigan. George P. 
Croealer. Churls* E. 
Cerrotbe™. George B. 
< ornow. Thomas 
Culler, Jamea U. 



Dills. Edmond E. 
Emer*. Charles E. 
Fitzgarrald Htephen 



If 



lir 



242 



APPENDIX. 



Kellock, Andrew 
Lay, Henry C. 
Miller, Charles W. 
Murphy, A. Patrick 
Morrison. A. K. 
McKee. Joseph W. 
McDanieL, O. A. 
Nixon, Joseph 



North way, John 
Oderfield. Edwin 8. 
Olson, John 
Phillips, John M. 
Pillmore. Joseph W. 
Proose, Richard 
Richards. Michael 
Rankle, Edwin E. 



8chiebel. 8. L. 
Symes. Fred. M. 
Stacker, William H. 
Thomas, Oris C. 
Watson, Charles 8. 
Willongbby, Thomas 
Wearing, George 
Wilkinson, Thorn m J. 



SALIDA LODGE No. 57. 

8ALIDA, CHAFFEE COUNTY. 
[Communication* second and fourth Saturday* in each month.] 



OFFICERS. 



William G. Siason, W. M. 
Theodore Martin, 8. W. 
William CummingB, J. W. 
Jason Oillett. Trees. 
O. W. McGovern, Bec'y. 



C. G. Johnson, & D. 
J. A. Davidson. J. D. 
S.O Hervey, 8.8. 
L. F. Cornwall, J. ft. 
L. Witmer, Tiler. 






/Arterberry, George 
Archer, A. G. 
Andrews, W. B. 
Area berg, F W. 
Am hereon, B. 
Blades, J. W. 
Barnes, J. E. 
tinrghardt, H. J. 
Brice, Alex. 
Boncher, E. T. 
Bel den, E. H. 
Bowen, I. H. 
Brown. J. B. 
Brash, F. W. 
Crater, George 
Carpenter, C M. 
Cowell, T. W. 
Crylie, H. E. 
DeRemer. B. H. 
Daey, A. F. 
Delage, Gid 
Disman, Ben 
Dobbie, A J ex. 
DeWeese. J. W. 
Eddy, John A. 
Klafsoo, Fred. 
Frey, Loain 
Freeman, W. H. 
Gaerin, M.J. 



MKMBERS. 

Hathaway, A. T 
Harrington. O. E. 
Hively, E. W. 
Jackson. F. A. 
Jones, A. W. 
Knight, E. H. 
Kern, George 
Kahn. Felix 
Lee, William D. 
Lee, Thomas H. 
Lttswell, J. O. 
Miller, M. K. 
Montgomery, G. A. 
Mitchell, H. W. 
McKinney. G. M. 
McCoy, J. B. 
May, (.'. M. 
Morgan, 8. M. 
Meacham, A. 8. 
Norris, H. A. 
Nye, A. T. 
Newlove, B. C. 
Newman. W. M. 
Orton, Elias 
Oleson, Gast. 
Ohl. John W. 
Pedrick, Z. A . 
Pender, J. F. 
tPiper, George 



Patterson, W. J. 
Robertson. W. E. 
Roller, W W. 
Rogers, F. J. 
Rose. A. K. 
Bedford, J. 8. 
Roland, M. J. 
Stevens, C. C. 
Seelinger, 8. W. 
Bhemley, J. R- 
8honyo, M. V. 
8mith, M. M. 
Smith, Thomas 
TwitchelJ, N. R. 
Tenbrook, E. W. 
Tencate, A. A. 
Thayer, E. A. 
Van Meter, 8. 
Wood, J. W. 
Wood ring. C. L. 
Wood. F. W. 
White, H. L. 
Williams, E. E. 
Weddrip. G. C. 
Woods. J. T. 
White, W. D. 
Wanham, Henry 
/Yates, Wm. D. 



APPENDIX. 



243 



CRESTED BUTTE LODGE No. 58, 

CRESTED BUTTE, GUNNISON COUNTY. 
[Communication* every Tuesday evening.] 



OFFICERS. 



Frank E. 8onger, if. M. 
Thomas Starr. 8. Vf. 
frank Young, J. V- 
C. J. Kramer. Ini, 
Bdirard W. GLUdKSec'y. 



Y.CT 



Angus, Wm. 
Conning. B.W. 
Carlisle, R. G. 
Catart. Wm. W. 
Dariajfanj. 
Bhn, Henry 
fogetrom, John 
Fors,Chas. 
Foster. The*. 
Grossbeck. Erbine 
Griffiths,]}. 
Hen worth. J. 
Barron. Alex. 



Henaman. Chaa,B. 
Johnson, G. 
Knight, Wm. M. 
Koontz^John 
Lloyd, W. E. 
Lloyd, R. 
Murray, Wm. J. 
Miner. Danl. V. 
McCoort. J. 
Miller, W. M. 
Murphy, Mark 
McCulloogh, Henry 
«Maloy, Wm. J. 



Harry C. Wright, 8. D. 
Thomas Swan, J. D. 
W. H. Spoon, & S. 
Looia Glick, J. S. 
R. G. Bvans, Tiler. 



Moyer, Sam'l L. 
Metaler, 8. 8. 
McKay. Geo. W. 
Pyle, Warren P. 
Robinson. Jas. K. 
Roes, John 
Spencer, Sam'l P. 
Shaw, John 
Same, Alfred E. 
Temple, Geo. W. 
Williams, Geo. H. 
Wilson, Richard B. 
Wheeler, N. 0. 



LA VETA LODGE No. 59. 

LA VETA, HUERFANO COUNTY. 
[Communication* flr*t and third Saturday* in each month.] 



OFFICERS. 



fennel Todd, W. M. 
Joan R. Orson, 8. W. 
William A. Springer, J. W. 
Peter VerrifF, Tree*. 
Ourer Bemen, Sec'y. 



Mdams, John 
games, John 8. 
Boon*. James B. 
gojle. Wm. T. 
fertch. Wesley P. 
Gent, Solomon 
Hanold.Laben 



MEMBERS. 

Hughues, Nathan 
Kinkaid. Joseph K. 
Mack, Chas. W. 
Morton, John H. 
McDonald, Alex. 
«Morton, Andrew W. 



Chaa. L. Martin, 8. D. 
Henry Daigre, J. D. 
John Gommer, 8. 8. 
Ransom A. Haj es, J. 8. 
F. L. Martin, Tiler. 



Morbut, Geo. F. 
Phillips, Albert 
Poee, William Roden de 
Smith, William E. 
Strange, Samuel L. 
flTracy. J.D. 



240 



APPENDIX. 



MEMBERS. 



Ackerson, Archie £. 
Brown, Henry 
Clements, Daniel N. 
Dennenbaur, Leven 
Dunn, Edward 



Foreman, Charles 
Klaaber, Simon J. 
Martin, Beni. F. 
Nevins, Rob t L. 
Sweeney, John , 



Stewart, John J. 
Thomas, Alex. M. 
Terney, John 
Whitelaw, George H. 



LOVELAND LODGE No. 53. 



LOYELAND, LARIMER COUNTY. 
[Communications second and fourth Thursdays in each month.] 



OFFICEB8. 



Clarence J. Chapman, W. M. 
Loais 8. Woodruff, 8. W. 
Chorlee Maxwell, J. W. 
Thomas Cross, Trees. 
Lyman Porter, Sec'y* 



Allen. Oswald •— 
Ansell, J. W. 
Alford, George W. 
Benson, Aaron S. 
Burke, John J. 
Bushnell, ( larlton C. 
Bartholf, Frank G. 
Bond, Cornelius H. 
Bailey, Mandren M. 
Bengeton, A. P. 
Chad bourne, Horace 
Currier, Edwin M. 
Carlson, August 
Chambers, James K. 



MEMBEBS. 



Diokerson, Rozelle E. 
Dennis, George W. 
Griffith, Albin 
Goodwin, Erank C. 
Hankins. W. A. 
Kempton, George W. 
Kelim, Lee J. 
Larson, Swan N. 
Middle ton, Joseph B. 
Mc A nelly, Jefferson 
Martin, Nels 
Nelson, Nels P. 
O'Hara, Patrick 
Puntney, John M. i 



John Peterson, 8. D. 
William J. Crosby, J. D. 
Walter L. Thorndyke, 8.8. 
John Westerdoll, J. 8. 
William A. Bean, Tiler. 



Palmer, J. Harvey 
Quigley, Jerry 
Randall. Charles N. 
Sutherland, William B. 
Sullivan, William W. 
Scott, Charles P. 
Straight. Allen 
Smith, Frank S. 
Smith, Clarence L. 
Smith, Obadiah 
Shallenberger, Herman G . 
Van Bramer, Volley 
Weaver, David A. 
Weldon, George 



STERLING LODGE No. 54, 

8TEBL1NG, LOGAN COUNTY. 
{Communications on Saturday on or before full moon in each month,] 

OFFIOEBS. 



Arthur W. Warren, W. M. 
J. E. Killen, 8. W. 
Samuel B. Kobuck, J. W. 
H. C. Sherman, Treas. 
Smith A. Burke, Sec'y. 



Joseph J. Weir, 8. D. 
Bartlett M. Taylor, J. D. 

8.8- 

J. 8. 

George H. Wilson, Tiler. 



Adams, Jefferson D. 
Austin, William B. 
Armour, Edward E. 
Cramer, Joseph 
Desellem, Wesley 
Foust, Thomas D. 
Oriffis, James B. 
Hicks, John L. 



MEMBKB8. 

Hicks, James A. 
Judd, Leroy M. 
King, James M. 
Mc Alpine. Alexander D. 
McLaughlin, Ed. C. 
Letts, Fred. C. 
Lewis, Frank 8. ,- 



Propst, Sidney R. 
Propst, W. C. 
Ramsey, John W. 
Rowland. John 
Scott, J. H. 
Smith, Martin H. 
Wynkoop, John u* 



APPENDIX. 



241 



MESA LODGE No. 55, 

GRAND JUNCTION, MESA COUNTY. 

j 
[Communication! flrat find third Thursdays in each month.] 



OFFIOKRB. 



Orson Adams, Jr., W. M. 
Charles E. Mitchell. S. W. 
Jacob H. Rice, J. W. 
Theodore M. Jones, Treas. 
William A. Marsh, Sec'y. 



Backlixu James W. P. M 
Broadbent. William R. 
Binning, William S. 
Baldwin. Charles W. 
Banister, William H. 
Boll, Herman H. 
Blakeslee, Merril W. 
Barnhoase, Thomas E. 
Barton, Joseph A. 
Coleman, Shepherd W. 
Cook, Arthur P. 
Crawford, Thomas B. 
Canon, Benton 
( Traiff. Archie K. 
Caswell, Charles F. 
Crosby, David R. 
Coartney. George A. 
Cornet to, Joseph 
Daridson. Rael L. 
Ducketf, Joseph A. 
Bobbie, Henry 
DeLong, Horace T., P. M 
Durham. Henry A. 
Eaton. Robert A. 
Ela, Wendell P. 
Flavin, Thomas 
Fisher, Edward T. 



> 




MEMBIBS. 

>lden, William H. 

annan, Eward W. 

atterry, John A. 
Grant, Alonzo C. 
Hanson, William E. 
Haslett, Plum B. 
Hammond, Wm, I. 
Harrison, John 8. 
lnnis, William 
Kingsley, Darwin P. 
Kipp, Bert L. 
Krnsen, Norman J. 
Lane, Squire G. 
Lnmsden, John J. 
Lay ton, James A. 
Lay ton, Abel M. 
Mobley. Richard D. 
Moyer, Al. 

Miller, Lawrence M., P. M. 
Mann, John B. 
Moriarity, Frank A. 
McMullin, Hamael G. 
Mc Arthur. J. N. 
McCane, Addison, J. 
McKay, Dnncan 
Mc Arthur, Daniel G. 
McDowell, J. B. . 



Bernard K. Kennedy, S. D. 
Benjamin F. Jay, J. D. 
Virgil E. Nelson. S. S. 
James Whittey. J. 8. 
James Nelson, Tiler. 



McGinley, William 
Nichols, J. Clayton, P. M. 
Ostenson, Olin E. 
Powelson, Benjamin F. 

Suinn, Wm. J., P. M. 
ice. Wm. A. 
Roberts, Wm. H. 
Roberts, David 
Rnder, John D. 
Record, Sanford P. 
Ross, Henry W. 
Steele, Charles W. 
Shaffer, William E. 
Stewart. Lem T. 
Snyder, Benjamin J. 
Hiebert, Mathias 
Siebert, Jacob C 
Smith, Frank 8. 
Shields, John 
Thorpe, John T. 
Violet. William H. 
Wharton, Alvin T. 
Wheeler, George 
Williams. Evan B. 
Weaver, Charles W. 
Williams, Charles R. «-* 



TELLTJBIDE LODGE No. 56, 

TELLURIDE, SAN MIGUEL COUNTY. 
[Communications second and fourth Saturdays in cavh month.] 



OFFICER 8. 



Charles F. Painter, W. M. 
William T. March, 8 W. 
Thomas H. Ballard. J. W. 
James Johnstone, Treas. 
John L. Haines, Sec'y. 



W. A. 8tevenpon. 8. D. 
Henry R. Goff, J. D. 
Dan M. McLeod, 8. H. 
Comma P. Rock. J. 8. 
Alex. M. Ballard. Tiler. 



Andras, Georgelj. 
Anderson. Gostaf 
Allen, Arthur W, 
Brown, James E. 
Bishop, James H. 
Brickson. Gostaf 
BeatUe, William R. 

16 



MEMBERS. 

Bristow, James 
Campbell, Kenneth 
Costigan, George P. 
Crossley, Charles E. 
Carrnthers, George B. 
Carnow, Thomas 
Colley, Jam^s M. 



Dills, Edmond E. 
Emery, Charles E. 
Fitzgarrald Stephen R. 
Giannini, Maurice 
Gordon, Winford H. 
Gillespie. Robert H. 
Hunter, Lewis 



242 



APPENDIX. 



Kellock, Andrew 
Lay, Henry 0. 
Milier, Charles W. 
Murphy, A. Patrick 
Morrison, A. K. 
McKee. Joseph W. 
McDaniel, O. A. 
Nixon, Joseph 



North way, John 
Oderfield, Edwin S. 
Olson, John 
Phillips, John M. 
Pillmore, Joseph W. 
Proose, Hi chard 
Richards. Michael 
Rnnkle, Edwin E. 



Bchiebel. 8. L. 
Byrnes. Fred. M. 
Stacker, William H. 
Thomas, Oris C. 
Watson, Charles 8. 
Willoughby, Thomas 
Wearing, George 
Wilkinson, Thomas J. 



SALIDA LODGE No. 57. 

8ALIDA, CHAFFEE COUNTY. 
[Communicationi tecond and fourth Saturday* in each month.] 



OFFICERS. 



William G. Sisson, W. M. 
Theodore Martin, 8. W. 
William Cummings, J. W. 
Jason Gillett. Trees. 
G. W. McGovern, Bec'y. 



C. G. Johnson, 8. D. 
J. A. Davidson, J. D. 
8.0 Horvey, 8. 8. 
L. F. Cornwall, J. 8. 
L. Witmer, Tiler. 



/Arterberry, George 
Archer, A. G. 
Andrews, W. B. 
Arenberg, F W. 
Amberson, R. 
Blades, J. W. 
Barnes, J. E. 
Barghardt, H. J. 
Brice, Alex. 
Boucher, E. T. 
Belden, E. H. 
Bowen, I. H. 
Brown. J. B. 
Brash, F. W. 
Crater, George 
Carpenter, (\ M. 
Cowell, T. W. 
Crylie, R. E. 
DeHemer. B. H. 
Doey, A. F. 
Delage, Gid 
Disman, Ben 
Dobbie, Alex. 
DeWeese, J. W. 
Eddy, John A. 
RlafsoD, Fred. 
Frey, Louis 
Freeman, W. H. 
Gaerin, M.J. 



MEMBERS. 

Hathaway, A. T 
Harrington. O. E. 
Hively, E. W. 
Jackson. F. A. 
Jones, A. W. 
Knight, E. H. 
Kern, George 
Kahn. Felix 
Lee, William D. 
Lee, Thomas H. 
Laswell, J. 0. 
Miller. M. K. 
Montgomery. G. A. 
Mitchell, H. W. 
McKinney. G. M. 
McCoy, J. B. 
May. (.'. M. 
Morgan, B. M. 
Meacham, A. 8. 
N orris, H. A. 
Nye, A. T. 
Newlove, B. C. 
Newman. W. M. 
Orton, Elias 
Oleson, Gust. 
Ohl, John W. 
Pedrick, Z. A. 
Pender. J. F. 
i^iper, George 



Patterson, W. J. 
Robertson, W. E. 
Holier, W W. 
Rogers, F. J. 
Rose, A. R. 
Radford, J. 8. 
Raland, M. J. 
Stevens, C. C. 
Seelinger, 8. W. 
Bhemley, J. R. 
Shonyo, M. V. 
Smith, M. M. 
Smith, Thomas 
Twitchell, N. R. 
Tenbrook. E. W. 
Tencate, A. A. 
Thayer, E. A. 
Van Meter, 8. 
Wood, J. W. 
Woodring. C. L. 
Wood. F. W. 
White, H. L. 
Williams, E. E, 
Weddrip. G. C. 
Woods. J. T. 
White, W. D. 
Wauhom, Henry 
*¥ates. Wm. D. 



CRESTED BUTTE LODGE No. 58, 

CHESTED BUTTE, GUNNISON COUNTY. 



Frank E. flongar, W. M. 
Thorna* Starr. 8. W. 
Frank Yuu n%, J. V" 



Carlisle. H. 0. 
CbItsk. Wm. W. 

Ellis. Himry 
Engatrom. John 
Fort., (has. 
Poster. Ihw. 
Groaabeck, Erbine 
Griffiths. D. 



Harrj C. Wrinht, 8. D. 

Thomas Bwan. J. D. 
W. H. Spoon. S. S. 
Louis Olick. J. B. 
B. C. Evan*. Tiler. 



Robinson . Jaa. K. 



Wheeler, N. C. 



LA VETA LODGE No. 59. 
LA VETA, HUERFANO COUNTY. 

[Camniwiicntfoiu Jtrft and third Saturday! in each month.'. 



Samnel Todd. W. M. 
John B. Olson. S. W. 
William A. Bprbwer, J. W. 
Peter Verliff, Tree*. 



^haa. L. Martin 



Ransom A. Hat 



Barnes. John S. 
Boone, James B. 
Bojle, Wm. T. 
Burteh. Waaler P. 
(ient, Solomon 
Hanold. Laben 



Hnehnee, Nathan 
Klofaud. 7<mmL K, 
Hack. ('hue. W. 
Morton, John H. 
McDonald. Ale.. 
•Murtou. Andrew W. 



244 



APPENDIX. 



8PAE LODGE No. 60, 

ASPEN, PITKIN COUNTY. 
[Communication* second and fourth Thursdays in each month.] 



OFFICERS. 



Frank H. Denman, W. M. 
James McMarray. 8. W. 
David F. Goodall, J. W. 
Louis A. Stone, Treas. 
Daniel George, Sec'y. 



^Armstrong. Chas. S. 
Anderson, Robert Y. 
Albert, George W. 
Augustine, George W. 
Brown, David K. C. 
Back master, Joseph A. 
Boesch, Herman 
Baders, Dominick 
Brown, James L. 
Burke, Cha*. M. 
Beardsley, Francis 
Baldy, John P. 
Cowenhoven, Henry P. 
Crosby, George. F. 
Canning. John K 
Clark, Walter p. 
Connor, James C. 
Chaloux. Frank 
("arson, Zachy T. 
Cox, William J. 
Cress, Edward H. 
Croft, Richard A. 
Connor, George T. 
Chauslor, Nathan J. 
Deane, Josiah W. 
David, D«vid 
Dodg*n, William 
David, laaac 
Davip, Thomas E. 
Dickins>o, Frank T. 
Eastman, Honj. M. 
Eogland. Paren 
Evans. William 8. 
Freeman, Jason E. 
Fisher, Richmond H. 
Fiulny, Stephen H. 
Garnick, George 



MKMBEH8. 

Greener, John H. 
Gillespie, Henry B. 
Gillen, Edward A. 
Geary, Mortimer J. 
Hardin*, Herbert L. 
Hunt, Fred A. 
Harrod, Joseph C. 
Hun kins, Ennign L. 
Harding, John F. 
Hopkins, Alfred 
Hal ton, John C. 
Jennings. John 
Jacobs, Charles H. 
Johnson, John F.. 
Jones, Harry Ellsworth 
Johns, John W. 
Kelly, James 
Kunz, Daviii 
Kalfun, John W. 
Lux, Peter 
Lawrence, Levi 
Lewis, Noah D. 
Myer, William B. 
Moore, Charles L. 
Moore, George F. 
Moser. George H. 
Mitchell, James 8. 
Martin, George T. 
Mills, David A. 
Miller, Riley 
Mnir, John W. 
McMurchy, William 
McCormaok, 8amuel 
McKenzie. Archibald 
McCree, Cal 
MicMillan, John F. 
^McDonald, John R. 



George C. Vickery, B. D. 
» J. D. 

Alex. Mcintosh, 8. 8. 
Chas. W. Clawson. J B. 
Martin V. Krapf, Tiler. 



O'Hara, John T. 
. Plumb, Porter 

Parker, Hiram F. 

Peterson, Samuel 

lieese, Charles 

Rucker, Thomas A. 

Robinson, McKinney 

Robinson, Hid ward 8. 

Richards, John W. 

Ruse, Joseph 

Root, William B. 

itobinson. Andrew J. 

♦Ryan, Michael D. 

Ross, George 

Slagle, James E. 

Shepard, Frank A. 

Shilling, Arthur B. 

Shafer, George H. 

Sanborn, Charles O. 

Smith, Erick 

Smith, Lyndon 8. 

Turner, Robert 

Thomas, Charles H. 

Varney, Andrew J. 

Vincint, John M. 

Wei I man. Luther C. 

Wright, J. Amos 

Williams, William 

Wardeli, John B. 

Wagner, Adam R. 

White, John W. 

Williams, John R. 

Watson, David M. 

Wilson. Aristus E 

Weakley, William L. 
^Warner, Henry E. 



HARMONY LODGE No. 61, 

DENVER, ARAPAHOE COUNTY. 
[Communications first and third Mondays in each month.] 



OFFICERS. 



L. W. Grant, W. M. 
E. J. Proctor, 8. W. 
W. E. McParlin,J. W. 
< ). P. Jones, Tr«a*». 
W. S. Root, Sec'y. 



G R. Vickror, 8. D. 
(J. W.Hart, J. D. 
J. W. Hanford, 8. 8. ^ 
T.J. Fegan, J.8. 
♦Thomas Linton, Tiler. 



* Not a member. 



APPENDIX. 



245 



Adams, William 
Brinkley, R. V. 
Backus, J. J. 
Blaine, J. £. 
Burroughs. A. 8. 
Barkhaosen. J. H. 
Beless, F. W. 
Beg**, W. A. 
Brownson, Thoe. E. 
Barghart, 6. N. 
Bowey, William 
Brotsman, F. W. 
Bowen, A. 8. 
Birtschy, F. P. 
ConJ, B. J. 
Howell, C. W. 
Cole, 8. M. 
Comb. Henry 
Cinnamon, David 
Christopher, E. 
Cbarpiot, O. J. 
Campbell, J. M. 
Dunn, W. H. 
Duncan, J. H. 
Dnggan, J. V. 
Fuhrman, Joshua 
FogJe, John 
Foot, Geo. T. 
Funcheon, George 
Freeman, J. J. 



MBMBSBS. 

Griffin, George 
Gibbs, Lafayette 
Gordon, J. K. 
Hntchens, C. F. 
Harris, M. M. 
Hill. Geo. W. 
Hart, Chas. A. 
Hind, B. B. 
Kisthard, W. H. 
Kelly, Henry 
Kennedy, Leo W. 
Knox, James A. 
Miller, Alexander 
Moses, Elmer 
Marks. W. H. 
Merrill, Samuel 
Mason, J . W. 
Miller, J. L. 
Moody, B. H. 
Mason, Cha*. R. 
McKenzie, Jesse 
Mc Andrew. Robt. 
O'Hara, W. J. 
Oyler. John 
Phillips, 8. L. 
Parker. J. H. 
Pace, Frank 
Purdy, E. H. 
Perry. A. R. 
Reed, William 



Bice. J. W. 
Bice, ('has. A. 
Roes, O. B. 
Hterling, M. L. 
Stringham, Fred 
Smith, J. C. 
Seemlier, Peter 
Smith, John C. 
Smith, W. G. 
8chnefplin, H. F. 
Straiton, Albert 
Servey, G. L. 
Scharman, George 
Shnltz, H. G. 
Snider, Jacob A. 
Summers, W. H. 
Terrell, A. B. 
Tait, William 
Tankersley, E. D. 
Thorpe, G. W. 
Thornton, J. J. 
Toeusmier, Theodore 
Thompson, R. A. 
Udell. G. N. 
Witter, G. D. 
Watters, Thomas 
Wilson, Abram 
Wilson. Walter 
Wildy, C. W. 
Young, William 



DELTA LODGE No. 62, 

DELTA, DELTA COUNTY. 
[Communications second and fourth Mondays in each month.] 



OFFIOEB8. 



Abram C. Butler, W. M. 
Lewis CAW, 8. W. 
Thomas H. McGanahan, J. W. 
George Stephan, Treas. 
Christian O. Anderson, Sec'y. 



Allen H. Wise, S. D. 
Adam Wishart, J. D. 
R. 8. Kelso, 8. 8. 
E. L. Kellogg. J. S. 
Amos R. Howard, Tiler. 



<Amesbary. Albert E. 
Alexander. William 
Blachley. Andrew T. 
Brown, Warren D. 
Browning, Angus A. 
Crotser. William H. 
Eetee. Oscar 
Crleason, William 



MKHBBR8. 

Forrest, Richard 
Hall, Edward E. 
Hammond, Henry 
Hotchkiss, Andrew M. 
Ingersoll, Harry H. 
Johnson, M. J. 
King, Alfred R. 
jAJees, John F. 



Spurling. Stonewal J. 
Scott, Walter 
Teachout, Henry 
West, Henry T. 
Wise, Douglas 
Whelan, William A. 
(Worth, Lewis W. 



246 



APPENDIX. 



MONTROSE LODGE No. 63, 

MONTROSE, MONTRO8E COUNTY. 
[Communication* first and third Tuesdays in each month.] 



OFFICERS. 



E. D. Bestor, W. M. 
A. L. Bonney, 8. W. 
J. F. Krebs, J. W. 
A. Johnson, TreaB. 
W. A. Cassell, Sec'y. 



^Anderson, G. E. 
Agard, W. K. 
Bell, J. C. 
Blake. R. H. 
Boot, William 
Clark, N. G. 
Cowgill. John 
Craine, Wm. 
< Ratlin, F. D. 
Chapman, F. A. 
Diehl, R. C. 
Davis, N. 8. 
Ealer, J. W. 
Erwin, Chas. E. 



MEMBERS. 

G«hr, Panl 
Hail, L. N. 
Hotchkira, Preston 
Hirt, Chas. 
Killian, J. B. 
McConnelJ, C. E. 
McClare, J. E. 
McNeill, F. A. 
O'Neill, James 
Overhiser, Geo. P. 
Payson, Aaron R. 
Robinson, W. W. 
Smith, Geo. H. 
Stewart, Lincoln 



J.C. Marsh, 8. D. 
J. W. Owens, J. D. 
J. F. Kyle. 8. 8. 
J.W. Tripler, J. 8. 
Chas. Campbell, Tiler. 



Smith, Chas. B. 
Slaven. J. E. 
Stongh, Geo. A. 
Shirlen. H. A. 
8homan, 8. 8. 
St. Clair, F. P. 
Sydenham, A. 
Tarbell, Harry 
Upton, William 
Wolff, B. J. 
White, John A. 
Wood, Geo. D. 
^Wambeganze, Wm. 



EUCLID LODGE No. 64. 

LA JUNTA, OTERO COUNTY. 

[Communications second and fourth Wednesdays in each month.] 



officers. 



B. F. Haskins, W. M. 
V. Albera, 8. W. 
(\ F. Kendall. J. W. 
John Johnson, Treas. 
R. A. Steen, Sec'y. 



J. W. Manley, S. D. 
B. J. Foxworthy, J. D. 
J. B. Sherman, B. 8. 
W. W. Chandler. J. 8. 
Harry Loomis, Tiler. 



*flverill, Wallace 
Blasdel, J. V. 
Best. H. 
Barr, George 
Barnes, Albert 8. 
Chopper, i. F. 
Campbell, H .C. 
Donovan, J. W. 
Deabenport, E. E. 
Espey, Frank F. 
Foxworthy, Alexander 



MEMBERS. 

Gardner. J. B. 
Grant, E. W. 
Hart, D. W. 
Hicks, J. M. 
Johnson, Harry 
Kilgore, George A. 
Koehler, W. C. 
Levitt, William T. 
Lyon, John M. 
Liggett, 8. W. 
^Miller, A. W. 



Marshall, E. 
Morrow. John 
Nelson, J. M. 
Pegan. P. C. 
Paulsen, A. H. 
Phillips, R. 
Sella, P. 

Timmis, Richard 
Wood, J. 0. 
Wood. F. D. 
^oods, J. T. 



APPENDIX. 



247 



GLENWOOD LODGE No. 65, 

GLENWOOD SPRINGS, GARFIELD COUNTY. 
[Communications ft rtt and third Thursdays in each month.] 



OFFIGKB8. 



W. 8. Parkison, W. M. 
Frank P. Monroe. 8. W. 
Harry E. Van Seckel.J. W. 
Rarnette T. Napier, Tress. 
W. H. Bradt, Sec'y. 



F. A. Atkinson, 8. D. 
W. H. Trnmbor, J. D. 
Tho's Kendrick, 8. 8. 
Ernest Schuster, J. 8. 
Marcellns Monroe, Tiler. 



^-Arnold, Grant 
Bern an, John W. 
Beatty, Theodore A. 
Bnrcham, Frank 
Gaboon, Graham 
Gornforth, Henry H. 
Chamberlain. Will A. 
Clark, John M. 
Clark. L. G. 
Da rand. Chas. W. 
Dynes, Ward B. 
Darrow, Chas. W. 
Ewing, Fred O. 
Feeler, John H. 
Fanning, John B. 
Grenemeyer, W. G. 



MKMBBHS. 

Hodges, James L. 
Hollett, Henry W. 
Harris, Henry H. 
Kamm, Henry H. 
Lee, Chas. A. 
Love. Joseph 
Meecham, James G. 
MooltoDjGeo. H. 
Maltby, Wm. E. 
Morley. H. K. 
Nnckolls, Geo. H. 
Pond, Samuel 8. 
Pierce, Roes C. 
Kilter. John W. 
<oRice, Geo. A. 



Rice, Archie A. 
Rees, David W. 
Ross, James W. 
Sleeper, Ernest L. 
Smith, Angost H. 
Swan, Joseph 8. 
Stevenson, Archie M. 
Shepherd. Frank A. 
Scott, R. P. 
Stobangh, William H. 
Taaghenbangb, J. Frank 
Tillery, Wilson H 
Thomas. Treherne W. 
Wood, Setb H. 
—-Ward, Levi 



EUREKA LODGE No. 6(5, 

COAL CREEK, FREMONT COUNTY. 
[Communications first and third Fridays in each month.) 



OFFIOKBB. 



William M. Bridges, W. M. 
Alfred D. (xarrett, 8. W. 
John C. MoCreery, J. W. 
Thomas Jack, Trees. 
Robert B. Hanna, Seo'y. 



^Allan. David 
Bald. James 
Campion. Edwin 
Calmett. Henry 
Davis, David K. 
Donaldson. Robert 
Edwards, David T. 
Fisher, Richard 
Gailinger, Albert 
Griffith, Phillip 
Garrett, Daniel N. 
Hadden, George 
Harrison. James 
Irwin, John 8. 
Kyle, John 
Killian, Harvey 



MKMBEBH. 

Kelman, Samnel C. 
LaFevre, Charles 
Locke, Henry 
Lewis, Moses E. 
Lloyd, Henry 
Long, John 
Milliken, Robert 
McDaniels, J. H. 
Mitchell, William 
McCart, James 
Moore, Hiram N. 
Pople, Roger 
Patterson, John A. 
Robertson, Joh n 
^Richards, Richard H. 



Thomas C. Davis, 8. D. 
N. F. (Mark, J. D. 
Max Morganstein, S. S. 
Benjamin Beach, J. 8. 
David Powell, Tiler. 



Richards, Thomas M. 
Sweeney, James K. 
Smith, Edward 
Thickens, John 8. 
Taylor, Charles 
Wilson, George 
Williams, Charles E. 
Walton, Joseph 
Williams, Morgan 
Williams, Joseph P. 
Walters, Manchester 
Warner, George 8. 
Walters, J. WT 
Wilbar, W. P. 
^Yonng, Hugh 



248 



APPENDIX. 



OASIS LODGE No. 67, 

FOKT MORGAN, MORGAN COUNTY. 
[Communication* first and third Fridays in each month,] 



OFFICIB8. 



M. N. Wagner, W. M. 
James F/Devin, 8. W. 
John F. Arbackle, J. W. 
H. M. Patnam , Treas. 
Tyler D. Heiskell, Sec'y. 



Geo. W. Dereham, 8. D. 
F. L. Simpson, J. D. 
F. H. Anderson, 8. 8. 
Mark B. Gill, J. 8. 
F. M. Bimpeon, Tiler. 



£-Rrown, John £. 
Brnner, James H. 
Bark, James H. 
Barnes, M. E. 
Brown. Walter T. 
Barr, George W. 
Clatworthy, W. H. 
Chapman, W. B. 
Charches, John 
Curry, James P. 
Dingman, Frank J. 
Dunlap, G. A. 
Dailey.I). H. 



MEMBKBB. 

Farnswortb, Jos. B. 
Haff, John L. 
Heioith, Adam 
Handy, R. M. 
Jones, James H. 
Kinkel, Charles W. 
Knox, Archie 
Knearl, William 
Lowe, M. E. 
Lowe, B. W. 
Marvin, W. A. 
/.McMillan, Edson A. 



Makepeace, T. R. 
Pyott, H. G. 
Parsons, C. A. 
Redfield, Geo. S. 
Robinson, Geo. W. 
Rickel, W. W. 
Sinton, W. B. 
Btamm, Henry 
ScovilJe. C. W. 
Tattle, M. I. 
Warner. Geo. W. 
^•Wilson, A. L. 



MANITOU LODGE No. 68, 

MANITOU, EL PASO COUNTY. 
[Communications first and third Fridays in each month.] 



OFFICERS. 



Hudson H. Aldrich, W. M. 
Charles H. Frowine, 8. W. 
Edward E Nichols, Jr., J. W. 
Heory M. Ogilbee, Treas. 
John C. 8. Weills, Sec'y. 



lAdaros, Charles 
Baker, George W. 
Barker, Charles W. 
Cable, Hiram 8. 
Caldwell, Samuel C. D. 
('aid well, Hamuel H. 
Connelly, P. Joseph 
Cook, Willis L. 
Carran, Edward F. 
Curtis, Fred 8. 
Dash wood, Richard E. 
Dillon, Michael 
Dyer, Leonidas B. 
Ellis, Edward L. 



MEMBERS. 

Emick, Uriah H. 
Francisco. Henry, 8. 
Frizzell, William 
Grafton, Homer H. 
Greene«Jo8eph W. 
Green, Henry F. 
Hutchinson, Joseph C. 
Jones, Beat H. 
Leddy, Michael 
Lenders. Hermon 
Lewis, Albert G. 
Lotz, Ernst M. 
Miller, Henry F. 
^Newton, James E. 



Charles ty. Elerick, 8. D. 
H. Sherman Traeadale, J.D. 
Alonzo B. Hatchinson,S.S. 
Eugene Shine. J. 8. 
Jas. D. Turner, Tiler. 



Nichols,lEdward E., 8r. 
Rand, John L. 
Rodgers, Charles 8. 
Rnpp, Daniel H. 
Sawfn, Walter D. 
Simington, John 
Smith John H. 
Snider, George W. 
Snyder, Homer B. 
Thompson. Thomas W. 
Ward, Horace M. 
Weidenmaier, John 
/Woods, Earl L. 



APPENDIX. 



249 



WINDSOR LODGE No. 69, 

NEW WINDSOR, WELD COUNTY. 
[Communications first and third Tuesdays in each month.] 



officers. 



James McGrader, W. M. 
Harrison Teller, 8. W. 
Adam Hahn. J. W. 
William W. Kennedy, Treas. 
James W. Thomson, Sec'y. 



^Blair, William 
Cnlhaon, John N. 
Coke. Samuel L. 
Dickersou, William 
Dickereon, Saninel D. 
Focbt, William M. 
Fowler, Alva B. 



MEMBERS. 



Law, Lorenzo D. 
Loveland, Hevillo 
Leybonrn, Myron H. 
McNeil, Henry F. 
Midleton. John T. 
Newell, James S. 
-Peterson, William H. 



Otis Hill. S. D. 
Levi E. Dickereon, J. D. 
Charles T. Tool. 8. 8. ^ 
Isaac N. Dickereon, J. S. 
Ernest V. Minckwitc, Tiler 



Howard, Joel 
Howe, James 
Severance. David E. 
Springer, John H. 
Williams. William E. 
^JVood, TantantB. 



LOGAN LODGE No. 70, 

JULEBBURG, SEDGWICK COUNTY. 
[Communication* Second and Fourth Fridays in each month.) 



OFFICERS. 



Christ Johnson. W. M. 
George B. Stead man. 8. W. 
Joseph F. Gauss, J. W. 
B. Matthew Krampanitzky, Treas. 
Thomas J. Maguire, Sec'y. 



Haines, Charles C. 



Pratt, Charles H. 
Thorn pkins. Engine 



Albert 8. Avery, S. D. 
Jacob Brant. J. D. 
William H. Wallace. S. S. 
Peter J. Gerhart, J. 8. 
Horace L. Fist, Tiler. 



Sweet, John B. 



WBAY LODGE No. 71, 

WKAY, YUMA COUNTY. 
[Communications second and fourth Saturdays in each month.] 

OFFICERS. 



James N. Counter, W. M. 
AbertJ. White, 8. W. 
John W. Zepp, J. W. 
William R. Hays, Treas. 
David Sisson, Sec'y. 



4-Blnet, John 
Boyd, James M. 
Burns, Richard E. 



MEMBERS. 



Combs, Thomas 
Caster, George W. 
<£isk, F K. 



Charles E. Ware, S. D. 
William C. Grigsby, J. D. 
Lewie T. Wright, S. S. 
Elisha J. Bales, J. 8. 
Alonzo M. Coatou, Tiler. 



Griffin, John A. 
George, Harry 8. 
ciiroves, Thomas B. 



250 



APPENDIX. 



Gillespie, John D. 
Harry, L. D. 
Hendrie, Isaac F. 
Hendrie, Harry 
Hoagland, Henry C. 
Horn, Albert W. 
Klaffh. Howard 
McClelland, J. 8. 



McKee. H. J. 
Miller, James A. 
Mitchell, John C. 
Murdock, Alonzo D. 
Murdock, Daniel A. 
Nonamaker, George R. 
Parish, E. M. 
Pettys, Walter 



Piper. George C. 
Rawalt, Benjamin F. 
Rawalt, Jonas K. 
Robison, Thomas M. 
Smith, Rankin 
Sholta, Charles 
Vaughn, Bnos H. 



GRANADA LODGE No. 72, 

GRANADA, PROWERS COUNTY. 

[Communications Saturday on or before full moon in each month and tiro tceeks 

thereafter.'} 



OFFIOBRS. 



C. 1. Hutchins.W. M. 
Jacob Mendenhall, 8. W. 
F. D. Hnsee, J. W. 
H. A. Petta, Trean. 
C. L. McPherson, Sec'y. 



J. W. Snlivan. 8. D. 
D. W. Robinson, J. D. 

J. 8. 

8 8 
F. L." HayeV, filer. " 



^-Goodale, M. L. 
Hall, T. M. 



McCammon, J. H. 
Perry, Wilbur 
£_£toan, Robert 



Tate, F. M. 
^Wilcox, Osker 



MONTE VISTA LODGE No. 73, 

MONTE VISTA, RIO GRANDE COUNTY. 
[Communications second and fourth Tuesdays in each month.} 



OFFICERS. 



Ira J. Bloomfield. W. M. 
Wm. A. Packard, 8. W. 
A. R. Von Egidy, J. W. 
("has. Ydren, Treas. 
Win. H. Carter, Sec'y. 



Jas. 8. Campbell, S. D. 
Grant Karr, J. D. 
W. W. Turk, S. S. 
bandy O. Tosh, J. S. 
Chas. W. Chaney, Tiler. 



*Anu8troug, Thos. J . 
Bntterfield, Henry A. 
Black more, Geo. L. 
Brackenridfte, Robt. G. 
Chapman, N. II. 
Cramp, Jno. W. 
Cole ; Owen V. 
Collins, John H. 
Darnell, Dav. O. 
Edwards, Eli A. 
Ewinp. Henry B. 



MKXBBBB. 

Eversole. Edward E. 
Hunter. M. P. 
Hack, Chas. 
Gallaher. Harry C. 
Kipper, John I . 
Kerr, Edward E. 
Kelley, James A. 
Loy, Jacob. Jr. 
Merriman, Chas. A. 
Mallitt, Wm. H. 
*-ttabin, John D. 



Olson, Charles 
Pridham, Henry E. 
Page, Wiu.K. 
Stevenson, Jesse 
Streap, Eugene L. 
Sampson, George P. 
Shakspeare, Charles N. 
Wallace, Robert B. 
Willey, Wm. W. 
£3ook, Win. D. 



APPENDIX. 



251 



AKRON LODGE No. 74, 

AKRON, WASHINGTON COUNTY. 
{Communication* first and third Wednesdays in each month.] 



OFFICERS. 



Loui* C. Stephenson, W. M. 
John B. Fisher, 8. W. 
John W. Moore, J. W. 
Isaac X. McCne, Tree*. 
John H. Geiszel, Hec'y. 



Fred W. Smith. 8. D. 
Creed F. MiddJecoff, J. D. 
William Little, 8. 8. 
Richard C. Ferry J. 8. 
George Ball, Tiler. 



H3ender, Joseph J. 

Bee, Ephraham C. 

BagJey. George 

Bonfory. Welle B. 

Colvin. William R. 

Dole, John F. 

Dsrn, A. J. 

Ehrod, leom 8. 

Elder, Charles £. 

Flanery. Charles E. 

Hart, Lester 
«flealey, Andrew J. 



MEMBERS. 

Hordy, Fred 
Jones, William C. 
Johnson, Adam J. 
King, Robert 
Kimball, Charles N. 
Lewis, Charles 
Miller, Leroy L. 
Muntzing. August 
Potter, Virgil A. 
Phelps. Bart E. 
'-Pack. John C. 
Pendleton, Granville 



_ ow 

N^ Si r 

 In 



Robinson Stoton A. 
8kelton, William T. 
Schenk. William C. 
Shonerd, David 
Spanlding, William I. 
Swarm, F. M. 
myth, Charles G. 
ttle. George 
Vaughn, Edwin 
Wind, Paulson 
Watson, Alexander A. 
Zook, Ephannon 



ST. JOHN'S LQ|5gE No. 75, 

ROCKY FORD, OTERO COUNTY. 
{Communications first and third Thursdays in each month.] 



OFFICERS. 



EliasW. Kearby, W. M. 
Wm. B. Cobin, S. W. 
Edwin J Smith, J. W. 
Adam O. (Corner. Treas. 
Win. C. Steele, Sec'y. 



Talmai F. Godding, S. D. 
Joseph M. Hendricks, J.D. 
Emory Robb, S. S. 
Wm. H.Clark, J. S. 
Bloomfield U. Dye, Tiler. 



Uladger, MUton 
Brown, John Jay 
Bradley, Lafayette E. 
Boraon. Thos. J. 
Clark, Wm. P. 
Denton, Wm. C. 
Fenton, W. E. 
Ganger, John E. 



MEMBERS. 

Green, Marshall Z. 
Godding. John E. 
Gillette, Walter D. 
Hale, Ira D. 
Hendricks, Lavender N. 
Lambert, James M. 
Maxwell, Henry I. 
/ £padfield, Berger 



Potter, James W. 
Pearce, James B. 
Rudolph, PiasO. 
Rudolph, Wm. M. 
Russell, Asahel 
Reynolds, Chas. 
^atrous, Frank L. 



?.-. 



252 



APPENDIX. 



COLORADO CITY LODGE No. 76, 

COLORADO CITY, EL PASO COUNTY. 
{Communication* first and third Tursdays in each month} 



OFFICERS. 



Wm. Lincicum, W. M. 
A. H. Dibble, 8. W. 
Jno. W. Neirwmter, J. W. 
Chas. A. Crane. Treas. 
W. A. George, Sec'y. 



Robert Biers. 8. D. 
B. L. Beynow. J. 1>. 
M. J. Millis, 8. 8. 
R. Greenougb. J. 8. 
M. Spankowslcy, Tiler. 



t^Allen, Amos 
Briscoe, R. 8. 
Bennett, W. G. 
Brayman, F. E. 
Bollier, Chas. 
Chandler, H. C. 
Craig, Wm. 
Craig. Edwin 
Condit, P. M. 
Delaney, Jas. 
Donn, E. J. * 

Edwards, Tbos. 
GrifFeth. Richard 
Gard, J. 8. 
Godfrey, C. R. 



MEMBERS. 

George. Alvah 
Humphrey, A. L. 
Hawks, H. 8. 
Heap. Finley 
Jones, Ed. T. 
Kissel, Isaac 
Kline, D C. 
Kneller. Harry 
Koritzky, Abe 
Kerr, Geo. W. 
Lyne, Jno. fc>. 
Madison, Fred. B. 
Murphy, Wm. 
Mathews, Jas H. 
^McCarthy, John 



Michie, Wm. 
McCoach, John 
Mc Id tyre, Jo. H. 
Melton, J. H. 
Oliver, D. H. 
Potter. D. B. 
Bouther, J. H. 
Stephen, Jno. B. 
Smith, J. Frank 
Tyroff, A. W. 
\\ itnsatt, Wayne 
Wimeatt, G. Wheeler 
Williams, O. B. 
iWattmejer, Ed. 



BURLINGTON LODGE No. 77, 



BURLINGTON, KIT CAR80N COUNTY. 



\ Communications first and third Saturdays in each month.] 



OFFICERS. 



Hiram Wilson, W.M. 
Cameron A. Gillette, S. W. 
Michael Higginp. J. W. 
William Parke, Treas. 
George B. Bent, Sec'y. 



J. G. Mark Scott, S. D. 
J. W. RenfoJd,J. 1). 
John M. Willis, 8. S. 
May nurd E. Cooke, J. 8- 
E. R. Wallace, Tiler. 



Ridelman,Samnel 
Clement, Hem an W. 
Chalmess, William D. 
Carnahan. David 
t&aves, John W. 



MEMBERS. 

Gilmore, Charles A. 
Hubbard, Robert L. 
Lemeux, E. T. 
Marshall. Jered 
•Meyers, George W. 



Price, Trevorius G. 
Roberts, J. Carnelian 
Thomas, Franklin F. 
^Wilcox, Alva N. 



APPENDIX. 



253 



BRIGHTON LODGE No. 78, 

BRIGHTON, ARAPAHOE COUNTY. 
[Communication* second and fourth Thursdays in each month.] 



OFFICERS. 



Andrew Y. Craig, W. M. 
Herbert O My rick, 8. W. 
Dewey W. Strong, J. W. 
William H. Ball, Treas. 
James W. McGregor, Bec'y. 



Beardsley, Gideon L. 
Bromley. Emmet A. 
Carmichael, Daniel F. 
Dana, Corbin A. 
Gorman. Harvey E. 
Hogarth. Wra. 
tHaett, Chaa. 
Kearney, Frank E. 



MKMBEB8. 



Kidder, Willard C. 
Lakin, James H. 
Lewis, Thomas A. 
McMartrie, Thomas 
McNeill, Jacob B. 
Mon*on,T. L. 
/-Parker, Fred. B. 
Redfield, Gideon P. 



Wallace W. Parrish, 8. D. 
Charles 8. 8tewart, J. D. 
Harmon B. Pearce, S. S. 
Walter Gregory. J. 8. 
Julias F. Held, Tiler. 



Snyder, C. D. 
Springfield. James H. 
Twombly, John C. 
Twombly, Geo. W. 
Williamson, Abraham 
Win bourn, Thoe. C. 
£-4Killiams, Joseph C. 



RICO LODGE No. 79. 

RICO, DOLORES COUNTY. 
[Communications second and fourth Tuesdays in each month.] 



F. L. Thompson, W. M. 
8- M. Ransom, & W. 
Lewis Clark. J. W. 
J. Murray Til ton, Treas. 
Henry Klingender, Bec'y. 



^Anderson. Chris. 
Barlow. G. 8. 
Barlow. Alex. J. 
Bmaghton, J. N. 
Chinn, K. P. 
Doyle, W. H. 
Derby. W. H. 



OFFICERS. 



MZMBKB8. 

Habermann, Louis 
Hood, A. F. 
Kennedy, A. E. 
l^ewis, T. J. 
Meyer, B. 
Meredith, Joseph 
<*forrieb, W. C. 



F. R. Lewis. 8. D. 
John Ganlt, J. D. 
J. P. London, 8. 8. 
W. A. King, J. S. 
, Tiler. 



Parshall.W. W. 
Reid.J. N. 
Swickhimer. David 
Smith, C.B. 
Thompson, Jnlios 
^Winkfield, J. W. 



RIO BLANCO LODGE No. 80, 

MEEKER, RIO BLANCO COUNTY. 
[Communications second and fourth Saturdays in each month."] 

OFFICERS. 



A. C Monlton, W. M. 
H. H. Eddy, 8. W. 
James Lyttle, J. W. 
Charles S. Attix, Treas. 
David Smith, Bec'y. 



F. W. H. Pfeiffer, 8. D. 
William H.Clark, J. D. 
Thomas Baker, 8. S. 
John A. Watson, J . S. 
Harry Niblock, Tiler. 



254 



APPENDIX. 



*~Booth, Charles A. 
Coon, Marcue 
Critchlow, Arthur B. 
Foote, Theodore 
Johantgen, Frank N. 



Niblock, John J. 
Pierce, Robison 
Peterson, Henry C. 
Sherman, Edward £. 
tgheridan, Frank E. 



Wear, Samuel P. 
Welch, William H. 
Walbridge. Lewie B. 
^Williams, Arthur L. 



HOLYOKE LODGE No. 81, 

HOLYOKE, PHILLIPS COUNTY- 
[Communications first and third Fridays in each month] 



OFFICERS. 



Ralph E. Webster, W. M. 
Frank M. Smith, S. W. 
Charles B. Timberlake, J. W. 
Ira W. Waits, Treat*. 
Wm. C. Robinson, Sec'y. 



H. Sutherland , 8. D. 
J. M. Cnllis. J. D. 
John E. Kidd, 8. S. 
Chas. F. Gustasen. J. 8. 
John W. Wash. Tiler. 



^Baker, Andrew J. 
Blair, K. R. 
Boggs, Henry C. 
Bryant, James 
Blakeley, George F. 
Clark, George E. 
Clemmons, Wm. 
Copp, M. D. 
Dakan, Eugene S. 
Donovan, Herbert L. 



MEMBERS. 

Ellis, George R. 
Fleming, Abner B. 
Gathrie, Ammi F. 
Higenbotham, John 
Jones, Abraham L. 
Killen, Samuel M. 
MoCarty. Charles S. 
McPherrin Emmet N. 
Pickett, Cassias M. 
*-Peck, S. Z. 



Pollock, Albert B. 
Soheunnemann, Gustav 
Sivereon, Martin 
Snyder, Mahlon A. 
Vernam, Thomas C. 
Vierson, L. 8. 
Wartenbee. Edgar 
Williams, James R. 
West, Asa B. 
^Weaver, Gade 



CARBONDALE LODGE No. 82, 



CARBONDALE. GARFIELD COUNTY. 



[Communications first and third Wednesdays in each month.} 



OFFICERS. 



Marshall H. Dean, W. M. 
Frank E. Sweet, 8. W. 
Charles Lehow, J. W. 
James N • Bennett, Treat*. 
William M. Dinkel, Sec'y. 



Samuel B. Eubanks, S. D' 
Jacob Sonners, J. D. 
James T. Dalton, S. 8. 
Oscar Ittlfwon, J. S. 
John H. Mnrfitt, Tiler. 



*"Brackney, Alphonzo 
Campbell, J as. W. 
Dankin, Michael 
Fishel, Chae. W. 



MEMBER8. 

Fields, Michael B. 
Girdner, William L. 
HiU, Benj. B. 
•Milner, George T. 



O'Leary, Edward 
Phillips, George A. 
Robinson, Albert 
Uteheu, Chas. H. 



APPENDIX. 



255 



BERTHOUD LODGE, No. 83. 

BERTHOUD, LARIMER COUNTY. 
[Communications second and fourth Saturday* in each monlh.] 



OFFICERS. 



John R. Miner. W. M. 
Fred A. Crane, 8. W. 
Harrison K. Hankins, J. W. 
John F. Hartford, Trees. 
Charles R. Blackwell, Sec'y. 



Harvey J. Parrish, 8. D. 
Albert A. Knott, J. D. 
Cornelias Clark. 8- 8- 
Jaroes H. McClnng, J. 8. 
James M. Davie, Tiler. 



transom. William T. 
Barner, William F. 
Barnard. WiUiam 
Brown, Arthur F. 
Clark. William 
Cox. Roberts. 
Davis, F. Irving 
Eidson, James L. 
Eidson. William 



MKMBEB8. 

Ferguson, Horace W. 
Ferguson, James M. 
Fairbairn, Andrew 
Gregg, James B. 
Hubbell. Richard M. 
Hallett, William L. 
Harris. George M. 
Lynn, W. T. 
stills, William L. 



Newell, William T. 

Of*born, Daniel O. 

Stockwell, Elijah J. 

Smoke, Orrie H. 

Stryker, Cornel ios V. 

Thornton, John J. 

^-Thornton, Wilbnr R. 

• Who well, John W. 



TEMPLE LODGE No. 84, 

DENVER, ARAPAHOE COUNTY. 
[Communication* first and third Thursdays in each month.] 



OFFICERS. 



Frank I.Smith, W. M. 
ClayM. Van, 8 W. 
Joseph C. Dresser. J. W. 
Chas. W. Lehman, Treas. 
tSdgar R. Dow, Sec'y. 



<Abbott,J. M. 
Angel I, Frank B. 
Appel, M. 8. 
Axtsll* Thomas 
Barton, Charles H. 
Barchinell, Wm. K. 
Browne) I, H.A. R. 
Baker, Henry A. 
Blair. Charles H. 
Barker. Matthew C. 
Bell, Miller A. 
Barner, Royal 8. 
Coombs. Thomas C. 
Collins, Thomas H. 
ConcHt, E. C. 
Carleton, J. H. 
Hoffman, Hnrlbort B. 
Clark, James L. 

♦Not a member. 



HKMBEHS. 

Chandler, Charles P. Jr. 
Clinton. Sidney C. 
Davis, Joel 
Davis, Charles 8. 
Daniel, George W. 
Davis, A. B. C. 
Davis, William C. 
Eastman, Clyde J. 
Fetter, Harry H. 
Forsyth, Robert B. 
Graves, Clarence M. 
Griswold, Wm. E. 
Harrison, Felix A. 
Holzmon. Joseph 
Huntley, Fenwick W. 
Homans, Wm. H. 
Hamilton. M. Grant 
<-Hanna, Thomas 



Chas. W. Everett, 8 D. 
Henry E. Canzone. J. D. 
FredW. Ripley, 8. 8. 
Chas. L. Dow, J. 8. 
•Thomas Linton, Tiler. 



Joseph i, Simeon A. 
Jones, George A. 
Johnsoii, Arthur A. 
Jorge own, Albert P. 
Jndd, William J. 
K el ley, James A. 
Kelley, Robert 
Levering, Frank H. 
Lee, Henry N. 
Lewis, Henry A. 
Leonard, Percv A. 
Myers, James N. 
Metcalf, Fred A. 
Martin, Harry D. 
Martin, Herman H. 
Mellen, Herbert F. 
Morgan, William 
4iorgan, Samuel J. 



' ; t 



256 



APPENDIX. 



Ma 8 man, William A. 
Martin, Lndolph P. 
MoCabe. Charles M. 
Newell, Benj. F. 
Pierce, William R. 
Perkins, Edward K. 
Rich, Charles E. 
Hoas, J. Leaek 
Root, George H. 
Rees, Rees D. 



MEMBERS. 

Salomon, Adolph Z. 
Stephens, Joseph N. 
Selleck, WilJard C. 
Simmonds, George ' 
Btidger, George 
Thomas. Frederick 
Tyson, Robert 
Taylor, Charles M. 
Traver, Norman L. 
Van Baon, W. 8. 



Wright, Wm. D. 
Wills. Edmund D. 
Woods, Henry A. 
Williams, John C. 
Weltmer, Wm. F. 
Wright, Frank O. 
Week, Edward 
Weiant, Enos T. 
Wood worth, Harry A. 
Woodworth, Henry C. 



ACACIA LODGE No. 85, 

COLORADO SPRINGS, EL PASO COUNTY. 
[Communications second and fourth Wednesdays in each month,} 



OFFICERS. 



M. 8. Rafield, W. M. 
W. R.Coe.B. W. 
C. H. Dudley, J. W. 
Geo. W. Walker. Treas. 
J. N. Green, Sec'y. 



A. B. Brisbin, S. D. 
R. D. Manson, J. D. 
W. R. Barnes, S. S. 
F. W. Howbert. J. S. 
*C. H. Dillon, Tiler, 



sVAtkinson, L. S. 
Atkinson, J. W. 
Briggs, Geo. A. 
Bennet, C. D. 
Casser, C. 
Doogherty, E. 
Ellison. J. M. 
Evans, C. K. 
Gates, H. K. 
Hunt, A. H. 
Hale. F. A. 



•Not a member. 



MEMBERS. 

Knerr, W. A. 
Lowe, L. P. 
Maltby, 8. F. 
May bury, J. F. 
McLain. C. H. 
Pieroe, W. A. 
Randall, G. H. 
Stubbs, C . E. 
Smith, F. S. 
Steele, W. S. 
4£4mon, M. 



<Turnball, Geo. B. 

Walter. E. R. 

Wood, W. W. 

Wilson, H. E. 

Warren, M. F. 

Woolley, E. r». 

Wills, H. LeB. 

Wellington, Q. J. 

WoodsSde, W. P. 

Woodworth, 1. J. 
*Zobrist, C. L. 



HIGHLANDS LODGE No. 86, 

HIGHLANDS, ARAPAHOE COUNTY. 
[Communiccttions first and third Fridays in each month.] 



OFFICERS. 



George F. Lewis, W. M. 
John M. Shannon, S. W. 
Lather H. Wygant, Jr., J. W. 
Theodore H. Thomas. Treas. 
Franklin P. Mannix, Sec'y. 



MEMBERS. 



HSrines. William Edward 
Boyd, James Hamilton 
Blake, Charles T. 



Benson, B. S. 
Beard. Harry A. 
Carroll, Peter 



Allison Stocker. S. D. 
Thomas H. Wygant, Jr. 
John H. Carbaagh, 8. 8. 
Alderson A. Blakely. J. 8. 
Thomas C. Bradford, Tiler. 



Griffith. E. M. 
Goss, W. F. 
4*atshall, S. P. 



APPENDIX. 



257 



Harbour, B. B. 
Harsh, A. D. ' 
Harsher, H. J. 
Kent, E. A. 
Kennedy, 8. B. 
Kellog*. C. M. 
Kooken, B. H. 
Lee, D. R. 
McKinney^W. C. 
Motel, TO*.^. 
" r, H. J. 



Northrop, Geo. C. 
Neil, J. N. 
Ochiltree, Hugh 
Palmer, F. M. 
Parks, J. 
Pence. C. J. 
Bnssellt J. J. 
Rhoads, J. M. 
Smith, Marshall 
Stevens, Lamont O. 
Stevens, Geo. G. 



Soars, P. J. 
Snyder, E. H. 
Warren, A. H. 
Wiley, Falemon 
Whittemore. Amos 
Wood. L. H. 
Woodbury, B. W. 
Yankee, W. H. 
Zell,J.F. 



ORIENTAL LODGE No. 87, 

DENVER, ARAPAHOE COUNTY. 
[Communications first and third Wednesdays in each month.'] 



OFFICERS. 



Henry M. Forman, W. M. 
Alonzo F. Yiok Boy, 8. W. 
Jerome A. V takers. J. W. 
WUliam B. Trnfant, Trees. 
James P. Evans, Sec'y. 



Darius A. Barton, S. D. 
William F. Larimer, J. D. 
Robert W. English, S. S. 
Samuel B. Grimehaw, J. S. 
•Thomas Linton, Tiler. 



Ackerman, William 8. 
Arnold, Ed. G. 
Arthur, Edwin F. 
Atkins. WilliamS. 
Atwooo. George N. 
Bacon, Asa M. 
Barnes, John D. 
Bartels, Gnstave C. 
Blood. James H. 
Bohm, Henry 
Bonner, Sherman G. 
Bristol, Harlon P. 
Brown, Charles E. 
Barns, John J. 
Campbell. Jndson G. 
Carson, J. Harry 
Chamber! in, Alfred W. 
Chase, John 
Coe, EarlB. 
Coe, Fred E. 
Coe. William H. 
Cole, E. Merritt 
Darby Samuel E. 
De Mange. Frank M. 
Donoan, Ranitan J. 
Drinkwater, J. H. 
Elliott. Victor A. 
Eetee, Milton 
Feldhanser. Philip 
Field, WUliam W. 
Fillmore, John 8. 
  -i. 

* Not a member. 



MEMBERS. 

Fischer, Ferdinand C. 
Freeman, Edward L. 
Freeman, William B. 
Qlendinning. Jobn G. 
Gravett, John A. 
Grissom, Eagene 
Hangs, Frank J. 
Heath, Andrew B. 
Herrington, Cass E. 
Hinnan, William H. 
Hoghes, Josiah 
Josselyn, Benage 8. 
Kellogg, George C 
Kramer, George W. 
Kreige, John A. 
Kroning, George B. 
Lawrence, David 
Lawrence, Mortimer J. 
Lawrence' M. Lyman 
Lehman, Edward W. 
Levering, Frank D. 
Macon, William P. 
Malone, Booth M. 
Manly, George C. 
Marean, Willis A. 
Mayo, Dudley D. 
McGaffey, Albert B. 
McFarland. Finlay L. 
Mills, W. F. R. 
Morrison, William B. 
Murphy, Edward B. l 



Nickerson, William M. 
Oliver, Adam N. 
Owen, William R. 
Patterson, Edward G. 
Pead, John W. 
Pearson, Bobert N. 
Pillsbury, Charles H. L. 
Piatt. James H. 
Randolph John A. 
Reynolds, Charles, H. 
Schrader, Frederick C. 
Schroter, Sidney 11. 
Shattuc, Smith M. 
Smutzer. Frederick C. 
Smylie, Frank W. 
Snead, Bnssell H. 
Sneve, Anthony 
Standart, Frederick W. 
Taisey, Charles H. 
Thompson, Bobert D. 
Treen, Rupert DeG. 
Varian, E. Philip 
Vickers, Frank C. 
Vick Boy, Joseph G. 
Wiest, Newton 
Willson, Fred J. 
Woodbnry, Thornton 
Wright, George F. 
Wright, John C. t- 



17 





§« £*tera<nriam. 




SACKED 




TO THE MEMORY 




OF THE 




SIXTY-SIX BELOVED DEAD 




OF 




OUR OWN JURISDICTION. 




1892. 




©ut jF.itfjrr fiulcs. 


"Death c 


alls our loved ; how hard, while lingenrtg here. 


To Iocs 


ccrr ! pc".r r -'n.st'!.ip wtih those s:i dear: 


How of 


reluctanily °ur white lips say, 




Our Father rules." 


■■Not eve 


r thus : froni out yon starry sphere 


Corrjerti 


a voice unto the listening ear, 


Calling 


our souls, mid cares astray, 


Unro rh 


1 happier life for which we pray ; 


Where 


11 shall Kh^w. as earth mists disappear. 




Our Father Rules!" 



APPENDIX. 265 



1 



266 



APPENDIX. 



DIMITTED. 



MAMS 



Clinton, 8. C 

Sowell, John 

Daris, IraW 

Bohm, Henry 

V takers, Jerome 

Patterson, Edward 

Morrison, W. B 

McGaffey. A. B 

Coe, William H 

Oliver, A. N 

Bristol, Harlan P 

Barton, D. A 

Heath, A. B. 

Standart. Frederick 

Wright, John C 

Lawrence, M.J 

Shattuc. 8. M 

Carbanffh, John H 

Pence, Charles J 

Lee, David K 

Stephens, George C 

Mey erring, Wm. H 

Uhland,Frank 

Beach, Elam C 

Tracy, George J.. _ 

Weil, Herman I 

Hall, Frank 

Hall, Alfred C 

Whitehead, Augustus H . 

Parker, Hiram F 

Brown, Charles E 

Brine*, William E 

Coe, Fred. E 

Coe, Earl B. 

Chamberlain, A. W 

DeMange, F. M 

Evans, James P 

English R. W 

Freeman. Ed. L 

(tlendeoning. John G. .. 

Kramer, George W 

Kroenig, G. R 

Kellogg, George C 

Lehman, Edward W 

Man ley, George C. 

Mayo, D. D 

Marean, W. A. 

Ochiltree, Hugh 

Parks, James 

Randolph. John A 

Schroder, Fred. C. 

Schroter, 8. H 

Shannon, John M 

Smutzer, Fred C 

Thompson, R. D 

Trufant, W. B 

Thomas, Theo. H. 

VickRoy.A. F 

Vickere, Frank C 

Woodbury, Roger W. ... 

Wygant, L. H. Jr 

Wygant, T. H. Jr 

Hubl)ell, Stephen 



LODGE 



1 
4 

4 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 



DATI 



April 

December 

January 

September 

September 

September 

September 

September 

September 

September 

September 

September 

September 

September 

September 

September 

September 

September 

September 

September 

September 

January 

January 

September 

September 

October 

October 

October 

October 

January 

September 

September 

September 

September 

September 

September 

September 

September 

September 

September 

September 

September 

September 

September 

September 

September 

September 

September 

September 

September 

September 

September 

September 

September 

September 

September 

September 

September 

September 

September 

September 

September 

September 



18,1* 
26,1* 
8,01 
15,01 

15,1* 
15,1*1 
15,01 
15,1811 
IS, UK 
19. MB 
IS. MB 
15,10 
111* 
15, EH 
15,10 
15,10 
15,1* 
15,1* 
15, M 
15,1* 

is. m 

i,i* 

2, IS 

9,10 



14,01 

28,1* 

Sim 

a, m 

*B 

15,1*1 
15,10 

15, 1M 
15, « 

15,01 

15, 10 
15. 10 

15,10 
15, 10 
15.01 
15,01 
15,01 
15,01 

Sin 
is, m 

15.10 
15,10 
15, 10 
15,1» 
15,10 
15.10 
15,10 

15, *¥ 
15,1« 

15,10 

15,1? 
38,10 



APPENDIX. 



267 



DIMITTED— Continued. 



NAME 



Parker, CV 

Jaum,W.T. 

Jarvie, James D 

DnTi^aajnnelT 

McFarlajod, Pinloy L 

Booth, W.W 

Atkinson, William 

Cteaveland. J. A 

HalL BL Channing 

Rack, John 

Hockinxs v Wm. M 

Clark. Thomas () 

Humphrey, Horace 

Wiley, Paiemon 

Morrison, Robert B 

Aaa.N.B 

Ellison, James M 

Stnbhs. Cassias E 

WoodLWm.W 

Scheie*, J.F 

Doebler, George W. 

Ramsey, J. p 

Rodney. 8. H. .. 

Ortstifer, W. A 

Thompson, Gay V 

8pMth,W.rL.„ 

mnef.JL* 

Andrews, E. 

»ake,F.O 

Clark. W.B 

Daries. John G 

Ma. Lewis 8. 

Petro,F.H 

Robinson. L. W 

WtB*ett,W.6 

Hopping, Samuel 

onow, Henry 

ftnith, Samuel B 

Board, Gregory 

Wayne, Francis H. M.._. 

gtrafton. Harris 

Kracaw. Charles E. 

Black. George A 

Cprbin, James 

Moody, Charles A, 

htterson, Benjamin W.. 

Ross. John O 

Monicel. J.W 

Gassy, James G 

5#dd,M.a 

Wilson, H. E. 

ftunnson. William T 

gorn.WilbwF 

Wilson, Alex. H 

Arthur, Charles 

Thompson. T.W 

Pontinz, George B. 

Vinton, John W. 

Bandy, J.C 

{hwet.RT 

fiwwn,J.W 

ftnn, George 

Jalker,8.L. 

Wanton. Ben. 

Dmni*,8am 



LODGE 



7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 

11 
11 
11 
11 
11 
12 
12 
IS 
13 
13 
13 
IS 
13 
13 
13 
14 
14 
14 
14 
14 
15 
15 
15 
15 
15 
15 
17 
17 
19 
10 
ID 
19 
19 
20 
20 
20 
20 
20 
22 
22 
22 
23 
26 
26 
28 
30 
30 
31 
31 
32 
33 
83 
35 
35 
35 
35 



DATE 



September 

September 

January 

January 

January 

February 

February 

March 

April 

December 

March 

June 

July 

September 

October 

Jane 

September 

September 

September 

December 

December 

February 

February 

July 

February 

December 

December 

December 

July 

November 

September 

November 

September 

November 

October 

October 

April 

February 

April 

October 

October 

March 

February 

March 

Jannary 

January 

Jane 

December 

February 

September 

September 

June 

January 

June 

March 

January 

December 

September 

September 

January 

March 

August 

May 

March 

June 



26, 1891 
26, 1891 
23, 1892 
23, 1892 

23, 1892 
18, 1892 
13, 1892 
12, 1892 

9, 1892 

24, 1891 
10, 1892 

9, 1892 
28, 1892 
15, 1891 

10, 1891 

25, 1892 
15, 1891 
15, 1891 
15, 1891 

11, 1891 

25, 1891 

12, 1892 
12, 1892 

8, 1892 

18, 1892 

26, 1891 
7, 1891 

26, 1X91 

23, 1892 

7, 1891 

5, 1891 

21, 1891 

5, 1891 

7, 1891 
17, 1891 
26, 1891 

11, 1892 
17, 1892 

6, 1892 

7, 1891 
21, 1891 

2, 1892 

12, 1892 
25, 1892 

8, 1892 

8, 1892 
10, 1892 

6, 1890 

17, 1891 
15. 1*91 
15, 1891 

15, 1892 

20, 1892 

21, 1892 

19, 1892 
30, 1892 

3, 1891 
3, 1891 

12, 1891 

16, 1892 
5, 1892 

18, 1892 
5, 1892 

17, 1892 
2, 1892 



258 APPENDIX. 

YAMPA LODGE No. 88, 

CBAIG, ROUTT COUNTY. 
[Communications first and third Mondays in each month.] 

OFFICERS. 

J. M. Darnall, W. M. » W. W. Wayman, 8. D. 

F. B. Ranney, 8. W. Wm. Taylor. J. b. 

J. L. Tower, J . W. Matt. Johnson, 8. S. 

L. H. Breeze, Treae. 8. M. Dowden, J. 8. 

J. D. Tower, Sec'y. R. H. Buchanan, Tiler. 

MEMBERS. 

Brazel, G. C. Ranney, A. M. Seymour, C. A. 

Forkner, T. A. Ranney, C. A. {^* Whetatone. J. M. L^ 

Green, R. H. 



CHARTERED IN 1892. 



TRINIDAD LODGE No. 89, 

TB1NIDAD, LAB ANIMAS COUNTY. 
Dispensation issued May 4, 1891. 

John B. Herahey, WV.M.\, from Hiram Lodge No. 105, Buffalo, New York. 
Dimit dated September 26. 1890. 

Alexander B. Taylor. S.\W.\, from King David Lodge No. 407, Altoona, Iowa. 
Dimit dated August 27, 1890. 

Loren H. Roberts, J.'.W.'., from Alpha Lodge No. 12, Fort Gibson, Indian 
Territory. Dimit dated December 20. 1890. 

Will D. Cnlley, from Morning Star Lodge, No. 159, Jefferson, Iowa. Dimit 
dated August 13. 1889. 

Alexander Sneddon, from Lodge Douglas No. 409, Bo'ness. Scotland. Dimit 
dated August 17, 1888. 

James E. Durden, from McCook Lodge No. 135, McCook, Nebraska. Dimit 
dated March 3. 1891. 

Richard A. Greenfield, from Brilliant Lodge No. 438, Creston, Iowa. Dimit 
dated February 24, 1888. 

Geo. P. Johnson, from Eginton Lodge No. 490, Williamsburg, Kentucky. 
Dimit dated February 5. 1885. 

Matthew H. Moore, from Carolina Lodge No. 141, Ansonville, North Carolina. 
Dimit dated February 7, 1890. 

Henry 8. Barr, from Westport Lodge No. 52, Westport, Indiana. Dimit dated 
November 17. 1888. 

Wm. B. Smith, from James F. Taylor Lodge No. 169, Hallville, Texa*. Dimit 
dated December 8, 1883. 

Charles Fritz, from Evanston Lodge No. 4, Evanston, Wyoming. Dimit dated 
February 12. 1*91. 

Michael H. Murphy, from Chapman Lodge No. 2, East Las Vegas, New Mexico. 
Dimit dated February 5, 1891. 

Dispensation continued October 17, 1891. 
Charter granted September 20, 1892, to all the above brethren except Michael H. 

Murphy \ and to 

Cecil W. Brown, from Trinidad Lodge, U. D. 

Carlos H. Blake, from Trinidad Lodge, U. D. 

William S. Keeney, from Trinidad Lodge, U. D. 

James E. Wallace, from Trinidad Lodge, U. D. 

Samuel H. Schuyler, Jr., from Trinidad Lodge, U. D. 

John R. Espey, from Trinidad Lodge, U. D. 

Orin M. Baker, from Trinidad Lodge, U. D. 

Daniel T. White, from Trinidad Lodge, V. D. 

James W. Nichols, from Trinidad Lodge U. D. 

Robert A. Bush, from Trinidad Lodge, U. D. 

John F. Ldnthnrst, from Symbol Lodge No. 432, Fonda, Iowa. Dimit dated 
May21,189L 

James K. Stephens, from Saratoga Lodge No. 216, Saratoga, Kansas. Dimit 
dated June 4. 1891. 

Lorin E. Wade, from South Pueblo Lodge No. 81, Pueblo, Colorado. Dimit 
dated July 16, 1891. 

Benjamin F. Wooding, from Chenoa Lodge No. 292, Chenoa, Illinois. Dimit 
dated May 12, 1891. 

William P. Swaine, from Rising Star Lodge No. 429, Center Point, Texas. Dimit 
dated January 4, 1890. 

Robert J. Still well, from Kinderbrook Lodge No. 383, Kinderbrook, Illinois. 
Dimit dated January 1, U91. 

Alexander Pollock, from Coalport Lodge No. 574, Coalport, Pennsylvania. 
Dimit dated September 28, 1891. 

William V. 8tevens, from Houghton Lodge No. 218, Houghton, Michigan. 
Dimit dated February 24, 1892. 



26o APPENDIX. 

William Thompson, from Habbell Lodge No. 92, Habbell, Nebraska. Dimit 
dated May 14, 1882. 

John M. Carroll, from Alabama Lodge No. 837, Hunteville, Arkansas. Dimit 
dated July 2, 1892. „ _. , 

Emanuel Sugerman, from Fidelity Lodge No. 51, Ithioa, New York. Dimit 
dated October 10. 1891. 

Frank H. Ross, from Temple Lodge No. 170, Garden Grore, Iowa. Dimit 
dated July 9, 1892. 

Reuben C. Luesley, from £1 Paso Lodge No. 130, El Paso, Texas. Dimit dated 
May 6, 1891. 



LAMAR LODGE No. 90, 

LAMAR, PROWERS COUNTY. 
Dispensation granted February 22, 1892, 

Emil F. Seeberger, W.'.M.'., from Webb Lodge No. 275, Meade, Kansas. Dimit 
dated February 14, 1891. 

Peter 8. Lynch, 8.*. W.\, from Evening Star Lodge No. 43, Winterset, Iowa. 
Dimit dated October 8, 1886. 

Amos N. Parrish, J.'.W.'., from Rosita Lodge No. 36, Rosita, Colorado. Dimit 
dated Dec. 28, 1889. 

James B. Traxler, from Xenium Lodge No. 207, Mt. Pleasant, Iowa. Dimit 
dated September 10. 1891. 

George W. Butler, from Seaman Lodge No. 126, Milan, Missouri. Dimit dated 
Oct. 17, 1891. 

James A. Woodcock, from Antiquity Lodge No. 252, Moravia, Iowa. Dimit 
dated Feb. 28, 1885. 

Charles C. Goodale, from Evening Star Lodge No. 43, Winterset, Iowa. Dimit 
dated April 7, 1887. 

J. Will. Marker, from Zeradetha Lodge No. 184, Wheatland, Iowa. Dimit 
dated November 17, 1890. 

Perry McMillan, from Hardin Lodge No. 44. Mt Sterling, Illinois. Dimit 
dated August 15, 1885. 

Charles D. Ford, from Nezinscot Lodge No. 101, Turner, Maine. Dimit dated 
August 29, 1887. 

Andrew Kornman, from Onega Lodge No. 188, Onega, Kansas. Dimit dated 
February 21, 1887. 

Charter granted September 20, 1891, to above brethren, and 

Frank J. Holmes, from Lamar Lodge, U. D. 

L. Wirt Markham, from Lamar Lodge, U. D. 

William C. Markham, from Lamar Lodge, U. D. 

William J. Johnston, from Lamar Lodge, U. D. 

Clemens B. T norm an, from Lamar Lodge, U. D. 

Welly (\ Gould, from Lamar Lodge, U. D. 

Morton Strain, from Lamar Lodge, U. D. 

Morton J. Underwood, from Lamar Lodge, U. D. 

Benjamine B. Brown, from Lone Star Lodge No. 403, Denison, Texas. Dimit 
dated February 2, 1892. 

Daniel Keesee, from King Solomon Lodge No. 30, Las Animas, Colorado. (No 
dimit.) Certificate Sept. 15, 1892, that he is in good standing and that his dues are 
paid to Sept. 16, 1892. 

T. M. Hall, from Gem Lodge No. 429, Paton, Iowa. Dimit dated Jan. 3, 1891. 



LAFAYETTE LODGE No. 91, 

LAFAYETTE, BOULDER COUNTY. 

Dispensation granted February 23, 1892. 

John M. Van Deren W.\ M.'., from Boulder Lodge No. 45, Boulder, Colorado. 
Dues paid to September 27. 1K92. 

John H. Simpson, S \ W.\, from Columbia Lodge No. 14, Boulder, Colorado. 
Dues paid to September 1, 1K92. 

_ David F. Davis, from Garfield Lodge No. 50, Erie, Colorado. Dues paid to 
Sept. 1, 1H92. 



APPENDIX. 26l 



William N. Hathaway, from Oasis Lodge No. 07, Port Morgan, Colorado. 
Dimit dated February 0, 1892. 

Gnstare W. Range, from Garfield Lodge No. 50, Brie, Colorado. Ones paid to 
September 1,1892. 

Thomas C. Paige, from Garfield Lodge No. 50, Erie, Colorado. Does paid to 
September 1, 1892. 

Frank fi. Foreman, from Garfield Lodge No. 50, Erie, Colorado. Does paid to 
September 1, 1892. 

Jeaae M. Compton, from Elk Point Lodge No. 8, Elk Point, South Dakota. 



Dimit dated February 10, 1892. 

William O. Van Btten, from Garfield Lodge No. 50, Erie, Colorado. Does 
paid to September 1, 1892. 

Joseph D. Jones, from Garfield Lodge No. 50, Erie, Colorado. Does paid to 
September 1. 1892. 

Elmer E. Bottenfield, from Garfield Lodge No. 50, Erie, Colorado. Dues paid 
to September 1,1892. 

Charter granted September 20, 1892, to all the above except David F. Davit, with 

John M. Van Deren, W.'.M.'. 

John H. Simpeon, 8/.W.\ 

Goetaye W. Range, J.'.W.'., and to 

Willard J. Carnsen, from Lafayette Lodge, U. D. 

Angost Beam, from Lafayette Lodge, U. D. 

John Carrathera, from Athole Lodge No. 15, Halifax, Nova Scotia. Dimit 
dated Jan. 23, 1802. 

William D. Jenkins, from Garfield Lodge No. 50, Erie, Colorado. (No Dimit.) 
Certificate Jane 2, 1892, that he is in good standing and that his does are paid to 
September 1, 1882. 

John N. Holmes, from Windsor Lodge S22, , Illinois. Dimit to J. 

Newton Jlolmee. dated October 2, 1877. Also from Hobbieville Lodge, U. D. (no 
location and no seal) dated September, 15, 1888. 



OUR FRATERNAL DEAD. 



NAME 



Bainbridge. William 

Smith, W. 8 

Fribourg, Eugene 

Gehrke. Herman 

Butler, Manlove G 

Grossmayer. Nathan 

South worth, Dixon L.._. 

Bruderlin, Erail 

Bowera, William H. H... 

Davidson, James 

Martin, Caleb J 

Stewart, A. Malcom 

Benson, 0. 8 

Knight, Alfred 

Tread way .James R 

Corey, J. B 

Tallman. Jacob 

Hoppe, Ashton F 

Green, John 

McFarran, James H. B .. 

Whipple. Loai8 

Lush, William F 

Ivey, James 

Ashby, Joseph T 

Clelland, James 

Cooper. Adam D 

Shepard. W. E 

Davis, Charles M 

Tramble^James H 

Roberts, Edward 

Olson, Charles N 

Killgore, John 

Keablea>Erastas K 

Yocum, William T 

Graham, James, M 

White, Mel vinS 

Doss, Samuel 

La Tourette, J. A. M. 

Shafner, N.J 

Sexton, S. R 

Thomas, Thomas 

Kirkendall, 8. E 

Cowan, David 8 

Donnelly, John J 

Paugh, James 

Frank, David 

Leitzman, Charles 

Pearson, Hollis K 

Bnrrell, Harvey M 

Hubbard, Winfield 8. ... 

Russell, Owen D 

Christie, Thomas 

Byers, John S 

Girard, Jaseph B 

Engstrom, John 

Reinhart 8. D 

Worthington, R. H 

Spencer, James R 

Thompson, 8. M 

Ferguson, George 

Lock, T. C. 8 

Robb, Thomas A 

Clifford, Perrin W 

Barnett, W. G 

Monck, Isaac N 

Frink, John W 



LODQ* 



DAT! 



April 28, 1882 
July 18, 1892 

September 5. 1891 
September 13, 1891 
8eptemb'rl9, 1891 
October 4, 1891 
October 7, 1891 
May 7, 1892 

July 10, 1892 

December 4, 1891 
August 1, 1892 
December 19, 1890 
November 1, 1891 
December 8, 1891 
December 25, 1891 
January SI, 1892 
October 19, 1891 
December 18, 1891 
August 9, 1892 
Snptemb'r29, 1891 
February 15, 1892 
April 11, 1892 
December 12, 1891 
March 18, 1892 
February 17, 1892 
May 7, 1892 

March 8, 1892 
March 20, 1892 
December 4, 1891 
December 15, 1891 
March 27, 1892 



August 

January 

April 

June 

July 

June 

February 

March 

August 

December 



24, 1892 

6,1892 

.. 1892 

11, 1892 

27, 1892 

28, 1892 
1, 1892 

15, 1892 
81, 1892 
1891 



DeoemberlB, 1891 

January 17, 1892 

March 20, 1892 

Jan nary 16, 1892 

April 9, 1892 

February 5, 1*92 

May 28, 1892 



April 

December 

October 

April 

Novemb'r 

May 

February 

May 

December 

March 

July 

October 

October 

December 

April 

March 

February 



15, 1892 

7, 1891 
28, 1891 

8, 1892 
15, 1891 
20, 1892 

17, 1892 

18, 1882 
18, 1891 
14, 1892 
80, 1892 
17, 1891 
17, 1891 

7, 1891 
10, 1892 
28, 1892 
26, 1892 



APPENDIX. 



265 



EEINSTATED. 



HAMX 



LiTeaey. John 

Kline, Joseph 

Tracy .George J. 

Weil, Herman I 

Hall, Frank 

Whitehead, Augustas H.. 

Bright, W. H 

Jones, Henry C». 

Badolph, John B 

Powers, John H 

Aas,N. H 

Ramsey, J. P 

Andrews, E 

Smith, W. H 

Haines, William B 

Robinson, L. W 

Skeele, Fred H 

Webster. Henry G. 

Phillips, Thomas 

Boss, John 

Comstock. Charles 

Beshoar, Michael 

Daris, Joseph... 

Day, James 8. 

Sherman, Henry 

Eilanberg, C. J 

Schrontz, ft. B 

Wadleigh, Frank A 

AdamSjGeo. S 

Scott, William T 

Jennings, Nathaniel 

BaUeyTBadfbrd C 

Hint, William H. 

Pennington, J. L 

Courtright. George A 

McMOlen, William J 

Miller, A. W 

Richards. Thomas M 

gtamm, Henry 



LODGE 



5 
5 
6 
6 
6 
6 
7 
7 

11 
11 
12 
IS 
14 
14 
15 
15 
15 
15 
20 
20 
22 
28 
28 
28 
28 
81 
31 
31 
36 
89 
39 
39 
44 
46 
46 
51 
64 
66 
67 



DATE 



August 10, 
August 10 
September 9 
Septem'r 23 
October 14 
October 14 
Septem'r 21 
August 27 
December 19, 
December 19 
Jane 11 

February 12, 
December 7 
December 7 
July 2 

October 17 
June 4 

July 2 

October 3 
May 13 

March 19 
May 17 

May 3 

Septem'r 13 
October 6 
February 18 
June 16 

April 7 

December 2 
March 4 
August 8, 
August 19 
Novemb'rl9 
June 1 

January 21 
February 12 
December 9, 
August 19 
May 6 



1892 
1892 
1891 
1891 
1891 
1891 
1891 
1892 
1891 
1891 
1892 
1892 
1891 
1891 
1892 
1891 
1892 
1892 
1891 
1892 
1892 
1892 
1892 
1891 
1891 
1892 
1892 
1892 
1891 
1892 
1892 
1892 
1891 
1892 
1892 
1892 
1891 
1892 
1892 



266 



APPENDIX. 



DIMITTED. 



MAMK 



LODGE 



DATE 



Clinton, 8.0 

Sowell, John 

Davie, Ira W 

Bohra, Henry 

Tickers, Jerome 

Patterson, Edward 

Morrison, W. B 

McGaffey, A. B 

Coe, William H 

Oliver, A. N 

Bristol, Harlan P 

Barton, D. A 

Heath, A. B. 

Standart, Frederick 

Wright, John C 

Lawrence, M.J 

Shattuc, B. M 

Carbaugh, John H 

Pence, Charles J 

Lee, David K 

Stephens, George C 

Meyerring, Wm. H 

U hi and .Frank 

Beach, Elam C 

Tracy, George J 

Weil, Herman I. 

Hall, Frank 

Hall, Alfred C 

Whitehead, Augustus H. 

Parker, Hiram F 

Brown, Charles B 

Brine*, William E 

Coe, Fred. E 

Coe, Earl B 

Chamberlain, A. W 

DeMauge, F. M 

Evans, James P 

English R. W 

Freeman. Ed. L. 

Glendenning. John G. ... 

Kramer, George W 

Kroenig, G. B 

Kellogg, George C. 

Lehman, Edward W 

Manley, George C. 

Mayo, D. D._ 

Marean, W. A _ 

Ochiltree, Hugh 

Parks, James 

Randolph. John A. 

Schrader, Fred. 

Hchroter, 8. H 

Shannon, John M 

Hmntzer, FredC 

Thompson, R. D 

Trnfant, W. B 

Thomas, Theo. H 

VickRoy,A. F 

Vickers. Frank (\ 

Woodbury, Roger W 

Wygant, L. H. Jr 

Wygant, T. H. Jr 

Hubbell, Stephen 



1 

4 
4 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
7 
7 
i 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 



April 

December 

January 

September 

September 

September 

September 

September 

September 

September 

September 

September 

September 

September 

September 

September 

September 

September 

September 

September 

September 

January 

January 

September 

September 

October 

October 

October 

October 

January 

September 

September 

September 

September 

September 

September 

September 

September 

September 

September 

September 

September 

September 

September 

September 

September 

September 

September 

September 

September 

September 

September 

September 

September 

September 

September 

September 

September 

September 

September 

September 

September 

September' 



18, 1802 
26, 1882 
23, 1881 
15, 1881 
15, 1881 
15, 1881 
15, 1881 
15, 1881 
15, 1881 
15, 1881 
15, 1881 
15, 1881 
15. 1881 
15, 1881 
15, 1881 
15, 1881 
15, 1881 
15, 1881 
15, 1881 
15, 1881 
15, 1881 
2, 1882 
2, 1892 
9, 1881 
8, 1881 

14, 1881 
28, 1881 
28, 1881 
28, 1881 
28, 1881 

15, 1881 
15, 1881 
15, 1881 
15, 1781 
15, 1891 
15, 1881 
15, 1881 
15, 1881 
15, 1881 
15, 1891 
15, 1881 
15, 1881 
15, 1881 
15, 1881 
15, 1891 
15, 1881 
15, 1881 
15, 1891 
15, 1881 
15, 1881 
15, 1881 
15, 1881 
15, 1881 
15, 1891 
15, 1881 
15, 1881 
15, 1881 
15, 1881 
15, 1891 
15, 1891 
15, 1881 
15, 1881 
26, 1881 



APPENDIX. 



267 



DIMITTED— Continued. 



NAM* 



Parker, C V 

Jenison, W.T 

Jarv is, James D 

Davis, Samuel T 

McFarland.Finley L. . . . 

Booth. W. W 

Atkinson, William 

Cleaveland, J. A 

Hail. E. Channing _ 

Track, John 

Hoekinga w Wm. M 

Clark, Thomaa () 

Humphrey, Horace 

Wiley, Paiemon 

Morrison, Robert 8 

Aas, N. H 

Ellison, James M 

Stabbe, Cassiue £ 

Wood, Wm.W 

Scholea, J. F 

Doebier, George W 

Ramsey, J. P 

Rodney. 8. H 

Ortaeifer, W. A 

Thompson, Gay V 

Smith, W.H 

Barney. Jt. 8 

Andrews, E. 

Blake, F. O 

Clark. W. B 

Davies. John Q 

Frain. Lewis 8 

Petro, F. H 

Robinson. L, W 

Wingett,W.G 

Hopping, Samuel 

Snow, Henry 

Hmith. 8amnel B 

Board, Gregory 

Wayne, Francis H. M... 

Btratton. Harris 

Kracaw, Charles E. 

Black, George A 

Corbin, James 

Moody, Charles A 

Patterson, Benjamin W. 

Ross. John C 

Monical, J.W 

Casey, James G 

Raneld, M.8 

Wflaon, H. E 

8ampson. William T.... 

Horn.WilbwF 

Wilson, Alex. H 

Arthur, Charles 

Thompson. T. W 

Pontifix, George B 

Vinton, John W 

Bandy, J. C 

Sweet. E.T 

Brown, J. W. 

Thomaa, George 

Walker, 8. L. 

At an ton. Ben 

Dinnis,8am 



LODGE 



7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 

11 
11 
11 
11 
11 
12 
12 
IS 
13 
13 
13 
18 
13 
13 
13 
14 
14 
14 
14 
14 
15 
15 
15 
15 
15 
15 
17 
17 
19 
19 
19 
19 
19 
20 
20 
20 
20 
20 
22 
22 
22 
23 
26 
26 
28 
HO 
30 
81 
31 
32 
33 
83 
35 
85 
35 
35 



DATE 



September 

September 

January 

January 

January 

February 

February 

March 

April 

December 

March 

June 

July 

September 

October 

June 

September 

September 

September 

December 

December 

February 

February 

July 

February 

December 

December 

December 

July 

November 

September 

November 

September 

November 

October 

October 

i April 

I February 

1 April 
October 
October 

, March 
February 
March 
January 
January 
June 

December 
February 

1 September 

1 September 

1 June 

; January 

1 June 
March 
January 
December 
September 

i September 
January 
March 
August 
May 
March 
June 



26, 1891 
26, 1891 
23, 1892 
23, 1892 

23, 1892 
13, 1892 
13, 1892 
12, 1892 

9, 1892 

24, 1891 
10, 1892 

9, 1892 
28, 1892 
15, 1891 

10, 1891 

25, 1892 
15, 1891 
15, 1891 
15, 1891 

11, 1891 

25, 1891 

12, 1*92 
12, 1892 

8, 1892 

18, 1*92 

26, 1891 
7, 1891 

26, 1891 

23, 1892 

7, 1891 

5, 1891 

21, 1*91 

5, 1891 

7, 1891 
17, 1891 
26, 1891 

11, 1892 
17, 1892 

6, 1892 

7, 1891 
21, 1891 

2, 1892 

12. 1892 
25, 1892 

8, 1892 

8, 1892 
10, 1892 

6. 1K90 

17, 1891 
15. 1891 
15, 1891 

15, 1892 

20, 1892 

21, 1892 

19, 1892 
30, 1892 

3, 1891 
3, 1891 

12, 1891 

16, 1892 
5, 1892 

18, 1892 
5, 1892 

17, 1892 
2, 1892 



268 



APPENDIX. 



DIMITTED— Continued. 



NAME 



Adams, Geo. 8. 

Taylor, Charles 

Donellan, W. J 

Begbie, A. L 

WUterding, H.J 

Vorhau, Thomas J. .. 

Brown, Thomas C 

Jordan, 8am uel 

Jenks, William 

8ohluter, Emeet 

Scott, William T 

Shores, Cyras W 

Lees, John F 

Kink aid, John 

Thomas. C. H 

White, L.C 

Johnson, Dryden 

Rowley, Charles A. E. 

Blackmore, G. L 

Gendrean, Charles A. . 
Courtrigbt, George A. 

Pennington, J. L 

Whetstone, James M. 

Daniels. H. H 

Brash, F. W 

Wood,G. S 

Croft, Edward A 

Eli, Mortimer J 

Marshall, John 

Thompson. E. A 

Kostitch.S.T 

Harker, O. H 

Campbell, J. W 

Sneve, Anthony _ 

Burohinell, Wm. K... 

Criss, James D 

Ehrman, Henry 8. ... 

Gntshall, T.O 

Wright, A. W 

Leonard, P. A 

Payne, Job C 

Pollock, James C. ... 

Lowry. H.N 

Overheiser. G. P 

Gibson, John 

O'Connor, J. C 

Rhepard, William M. 
Jones, Arthur E. 



Shuenhaut. M. C. 
Condit, Philip M. 



Condit, James A. 

Purdy, George A 

Ashley, W.W 

Parliman, B. E. 

Siramonds. George... 
Sohiebel, Charles.... 

Johnson, A.J 

Stees, Reuben 

Bine, T.J 

Cookrell, W. S 

Hill, George H 

Kendrake, George W. 

Eaton, Brace G 

Babcock, William S.. 
Williams, F. A 



LODOB 



SO 

86 
87 
87 
87 
89 
89 



89 
39 
39 
39 
89 
43 
43 
44 
44 
44 
46 
46 
46 
47 
49 
49 
49 
50 
50 
50 
50 
51 
51 
51 
51 
51 
52 
52 
54 
54 
55 
55 
56 
57 
57 
58 
59 
60 
60 
61 
62 
02 
62 
68 
63 
08 
68 
64 
65 
65 
65 
65 
69 
69 
70 
71 



DAT! 



December 
January 
February 
April 
April 
September 
September 
September 
December 
Jan nary 
April 
May 
March 
Jane 
March 
January 
September 
December 
January 
September 
February 
July 
January 
December 
February 
February 
December 
December ' 
December 
December 
Janaary 
November 
September 
May 

September 
April 
August 
February 
April 
June 
October 
November 
January 
January 
May 

September 
December 
.April 
January 
January 
January 
March 
February 
February 
September 
September 
January 
November 
March 
April 
July 
June 
June 
October 
November 



2, 1891 

19, 1892 

6, 1892 
2, 1892 
2. 1892 
8, 1891 
8, 1891 

8, 1891 
22, 1891 
26, 1802 

26, 1892 

24, 1892 
22. 1892 

14, 1892 
21, 1892 

4, 1892 

4, 1891 

17, 1891 

7. 1892 

17, 1891 

18, 18»2 

21, 1892 
2, 1892 

10, 1891 
12, 1892 

25, 1892 
16, 1891 
16, 1891 
16, 1891 
16, 1891 

22, 1892 

27, 1891 
16, 1*90 

20, 1892 

15, 1891 
2, 1892 

20, 1892 
6, 1K92 

9, 1S92 
10, 1892 

15, 1891 

28, 1891 
9, 1892 
9, 18S2 

24. 1892 

26, 1891 
24, 1891 
28, 1892 

18, 1S92 
1, 1892 

1, 1892 
4, 1892 

16, 1892 
16, 1892 

2, 1891 

2, 1891 
IS, 1892 

19, 1891 

3, 1892 

21, 18«2 
21, 1892 

27, 1892 
27, 1892 

23, 1891 
14, 1891 



APPENDIX. 



269 



DIMITTED— Concluded. 



NAME 



Hinz.A,F 

Dalrympla, F.J 

Mamng. E. M 

MjBT%, J. L 

Cuffing, J. 15 

Broderick, A 

HcMichals, James L. 

Price, Louis H 

Crawford. W.C 

Horbst. Frank 

Lewis, Henry A. 

Coldren, Bart 

Willetts, George Jr. . 

Thorn peon. A. F 

Gardner, W.C 

Swisher. D. J 

Brown, Fred K 

Barlow. Jesse E 

King, bamnel K. 

Moch, FredG 

Neal, W.Scott 

Saltan, J. D 

Middaoirh.C. F 

Hall. Charles 

Foroham, Ernest E. . 

Dermond, ImL 

Li™tt, Holland L. . . 
Randall, J. L 



LODGE 



71 
71 
72 
72 
72 
72 
73 
78 
73 
74 
74 
74 
74 
75 
76 
76 
77 
77 
77 
77 
77 
77 
79 
H> 
80 
81 
83 
85 



DATS 



December 

March 

September 

September 

November 

Jnly 

March 

June 

August 

December 

September 

Jane 

January 

February 

January 

November 

February 

February 

November 

November 

November 

November 

March 

December 

December 

September 

February 

November 



12, 


1891 


26, 


1892 


12, 


1891 


12, 1891 


14, 


1891 


2, 


1892 


8, 


1892 


4, 


1892 


24, 


1892 


2, 


1891 


2, 


1891 


15, 


1892 


20, 


1892 


4. 


1892 


4, 


1892 


5, 


1891 


27, 


1892 


27, 


1892 


9, 


1891 


9, 


1891 


9, 


1891 


9, 


1891 


22, 


1892 


26, 


1891 


26. 


1891 


18, 


1891 


14, 


1892 


25, 


1891 



270 



APPENDIX. 



SUSPENDED. 



NAME 



Nicholson, James 

Martin, Charles H. ... 
Matheson, Alexander. 

Marshall, John. 

Morrison, Thomas C . . 

Wardell, Irving F 

Harvey, W. C 

Ellis, A. L 

Bradfield, Z 

Tyrell,N\ J 

Drumro, H. A. 

Tilney. R. H 

Casey, Robert 

St. Clair, J. F.T 

Moore, Samuel E 

Patton, David... 

Jones, Marshall F 

Locke, John E 

Richards, Anthony P.. 

White, A.J 

Lett, William H 

Hardy. John D 

Livingstone, W. R 

Abbott, O. B... 

Bloom, John W 

Cornell, 8. B. 

Day, James S 

Frankel Barauol 

Floyd, W.J 

Lucas, Thomas B 

Petrie, Henry 

Sherman, Henry 

Swallow, G. R 

Thompson, J. J 

Willey. D. W 

Walsh, W. M 

Waggoner, D. J 

White, Man in,.. 

Boyd, John 

Fullerton. James 

Hansam, John 

Hackett, Thomas 

Fleming. 8. H. 

Darley, M. A. 

Harlow, J.N 

Pan*, A. F 

Sivyer, A. L 

Koontz, B. F. T 

Waller, Marion S 

McAllister, Charles E. 

Bailey. Radford C 

Fnchs, Fred 

Pilz, John 

Frisbee, B. H 

McCiorg,J. H 

Thompson, A. R 

Thompson. C. H 

Thorn, Frank 

Taggart, J. M 

Nathan. Nat 

Price, D. G 

Cnmraings, P. L 

Middleton, J. F 

Bockhonse. ('. ('. 



LODGE 



DATS 



6 


August 


12 


February 


12 


April 


12 


April 


12 


April 


13 


January 


IS 


September 
July 


14 


14 


July 


14 


July 


14 


July 


14 


July 


14 


July 


14 


July 


19 


September 


19 


February 


19 


February 


19 


February 


19 


February 


19 


February 


19 


February 


26 


June 


26 


May 


28 


September 


28 


September 


28 


September 


28 


September 


28 


September 


28 


September 


28 


September 


28 


September 


28 


September 


28 


September 


28 


September 


28 


September 


28 


September 


28 


September 


28* 


September 


28 


September 


82 


September 


82 


September 


33 


May 


35 


August 


35 


August 


35 


August 


37 


January 


37 


March 


39 


May 


»9 


May 


39 


May 


39 


October 


41 


March 


41 


March 


43 


April 


43 


April 


43 


April 


43 


April 


43 


April 


43 


April 


44 


January 


44 


January 


47 


November 


49 


July 


49 


July 



24, 1882 
27, 1892 
23, 1892 
23. 1882 
23, 1892 

8, 1892 

25, 1891 
23, 1892 
23, 1892 
23, 1892 
23, 1892 
23, 1892 
23, 1892 

23, 1892 
16. 1891 

3, 1892 
3, 1892 
3, 1892 
3. 1892 
a, 1892 

3, 1892 
1. 1892 

4, 1892 
U 1891 
1, 1891 
1, 1891 
1, 1891 
1, 1891 
1, 1861 
1, 1*91 
1, 1891 
1, 1891 
1, 1891 
1, 1891 
1, 1891 
1, 1881 
1. 1891 
1, 1891 
1. 1891 

12, 1891 
12, 1891 
7, 1892 
19, 1892 
19. 1892 
19. 1892 
in, 1892 
19, 1892 

24, 1892 
24, 1892 

24, 1892 

27, 1891 
11, 1692 
11, 1892 
18, 1892 
18, 1892 
IS, 1892 
18, 1892 
18, 1892 
18, 1892 
21, 1892 
21, 1892 

7, 1891 

25, 1892 

28, 1892 



APPENDIX. 



27I 



SUSPENDED— Concluded. 



NAME 



Clarke, Daniel 

Blaine, W. H 

Cook, E. N 

Masters, E. D 

Maltby. 8. L. 

McKenzie, A. D. ..... 

Weir, A. J 

Bosh. J. J. 

Connors, J. W 

Cannon. F. P. 

Hill, J. J 

Johnson. W.H 

Strand, H. K. 

Ehrbart, J. B 

Chamblin, A. K 

Tarnbu.il, Robert 

McElroy, John 

Young, John L 

Petrie. J. B 

German, L 

Martin. G. A 

Wfoe.G.B 

Mitchell, Peter 

Richards. Thomas M. 

Walters.. W. C 

Bowles, Thomas H... 
Reppetoe, James £... 
Cobb, Henry 



LODGE 



49 
49 
52 
52 
52 
52 
54 
55 
55 
55 
55 
55 
55 
58 
58 
58 
58 
58 
59 
59 
59 
59 
61 
66 
73 
73 
74 
76 



DATE 



Jaly 

Jaly 

August 

Aagast 

Aagast 

Aagast 

October 

Aagast 

Aagast 

Aagast 

Aagast 

Aagast 

Aagast 

Jane 

Jane 

Jane 

Jane 

Jane 

Aagast 

Aagast 

Aagast 

October 

January 

Aagast 

Aagast 

Aagast 

March 

Jaly 



28, 1892 

28, 1892 

20. 1892 

20, 1892 

20, 1892 

20, 1892 

17, 1891 
1*, 1892 

18, 1892 
18, 1892 
18, 1892 
18, 1892 
18, 1892 
14, 1892 
14, 1892 
14, 1892 
14, 1892 
14, 1892 
18, 1892 
27, 1892 
27, 1892 
10. 1891 
18, 1892 

5, 1*92 

24, 1892 

24, 1892 

16, 1892 

7, LS92 



EXPELLED. 



NAME 



8ommer, Morris 

Fowler, Grayson R.. 

Phillippi, Fred 

StnlU, LafeW 

Adams, James 

Lambert, Ed., Jr. ... 
Hopkins. Barton.... 



LODOE 


DATE 
March 


2H, 




7 


1892 


13 


January 

September 

Jaly 


8, 


1*92 


14 


26, 


1891 


19 


«, 


1892 


46 


September 


3, 


1891 


46 


January 


21, 


1892 


65 


Jannary 


14, 


1892 



272 



APPENDIX. 



EXEMPT FROM GRAND LODGE DUES. 



BEING OVER SIXTY YEAR8 OF AGE. 



NAME 



Blatter, William 

Churches, John 

Chinn, RollaW 

Dollison, George W.. 

Eskins. Peter 

Etaood,, A. 8 

Harrison, D. E. 

Hendry, J. B 

Higgins, John A. 

Kelly, James 

Kimball, George K... 

Kirby,M.C 

Lees, David 

Mann, Joseph 

Morrison, George 

Opal, Martin 

Honey, Alexander 

Reeves .George W . . . . 

Rowe, David 

Porter, A. A 

Smith, B. P 

White, William 

Mills, Abraham 

Arnett, William D. . . 

Atchison, John 

Apple, Simon 

Bassett, William 

Bingham, B. F 

Barnham, N. G 

Brewer. Gardiner 

Byere. W. X. 

Bigler, Jacob A. J — 
BromwelUH.P. H... 

Barker, A. H 

Cook, Lemuel 

Cammings. Robert . . 

Covert William 

Cook, J.J 

Dace. James 

Dahnke. Fred 

Davis, Frank M 

Davie, Nelson 

Danbar, Geoege 

Danielson, F. M 

Freund, Isaac 

Failing, H. H. ....... 

Foreman, James A. .. 

Gray, David 

Gray, William P 

Gove, Carlos 

Greenfield. Eqos 

Hittel, Benjamin 

Henderson, John 

Hester, William R. . . 
Hatten, Robert L. ... 

Johnson, Theron 

Linton, Thomas 

Kisthard, Jacob 

Merry, John C 

McNamee, Allen 



IiODOK 



1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
4 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
* 
5 
5 
5 



5 
5 
a 
5 
5 



5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 



NAM* 



Nichols, W.H.J 

Nock, Thomas 

Nevatt, Isaac 

Osborne, Robert 

Porter, W.J. 

Perkins. G. W. 

Riggs, J.8. 

Sem per. Charles 8 

Shortridge, William P. 

Bopris, Richard 

Stndeman, Theodore. . . 

Tibbets, William F 

Tritch, George 

Williams, Ed . S 

Berry, Barnard 

Boyer, Amos L 

Bern is, D. M. L. 

Backman, Guy 

Daily, John L 

Hubbard, Robert 

Langton, James C 

Lee, John A 

Peabody.D. G 

Potter. E. B 

Rose, Samuel 

Salomon, H. Z 

Schinner, Adolph 

Taylor, James F 

Tamer, Henry 

Whitehead, William R. 

Kline, Joseph 

Hastie, Robert 

Harvey, Richard 

Mullen, Thomas 

Tolles, Larkin C 

Pernn, Edward 8 

Teller, Henry M 

Ailing, E.T 

Anthony, 8. J 

Ash ton, Alfred 

Ashley, E. M 

Barker. W.J 

Barrett, George 

Bailey, J. L 

Berkey, John M 

Billings, George X 

Bradbury, C. C 

Brown, Robert A 

Brown, J. S ._ 

Barnham, G. A 

('able, George... 

Campbell. D.W 

Charles, J. Q 

Chivington, John M. . . 

Clarke, C.J 

Collins, E. H 

Cofield, J. B 

( 'rater, George E. , 

Dane. George 

Davidson, David 



LODOK 



5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
6 
6 
« 
6 
6 
6 

* 

7 

4 
4 

7 

4 

7 

^ 

i 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 



APPENDIX. 



273 



EXEMPT FROM GRAND LODGE DUES. 

(Continued.) 




Davis, A. W 

Downing, Jacob 

Dorkee, Lafayette ._ 
Donnelly, Charles. . . 

Evans, John 

Elbert, 8. H 

Emery, Willis 

Bmperor, William.. 

JSmmickv Joh o C 

Fassett, J. W 

Felker, William B. . 

France, L. B 

Gair,PeterI 

Green, J. H 

Green, 8. 8 

Greenlee, R.C 

Gnneolns, J. T 

Bright, William H. . 
Harris, Arthur C. . .. 

Hattenbach, M 

hill, W.C 

Hoisington, J. M 

Hone. Henry 

Hall, W. L 

Hatching, S. A 

Johnson, Peter 

Johnston, James 8.. 
Koontse, Charles B. 

Knner, Max 

LaDoe.T. F 

Leiff. Joseph 

Lennon. John A. . . . 

Light, E.B 

Londoner, Julius. .. 

Martin. John H 

MarfelL Hiram 

Mentzer, Rnfns 

Millison, Elisha 

Morehouse, P. E. 

Meyer, Ferdinand. . . 
Nelson, Christian... 

Nettleton, T. 8 

Norton, H.B 

Parker, James 

Pa Delford, William . 

Pennock, Homer 

Pierce, John 

Pitier,H. L 

Pochin, Joseph L. . . 

Benshaw, James 

Bider, H. C 

Richardson, C. 6 

Boott, John L. 

Bnbican, James 8... 

Sanford, G. H 

Scott, Francis M 

Scott, William R.... 
opealdinft. John F. . 
Smedley, William... 

Strickler, J. M 

80 1 ton, John C 

Taggart, CD 

Thompson, C. L. 



LODOK 



t 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
1 
7 
7 
7 
7 
t 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 

*» 

i 
7 

^ 

i 

7 
7 
7 
7 

7 

7 

i" 
1 

7 

7 

4 

7 

7 

7 

7 

7 

7 

7 

7 

7 

7 

7 

7 

7 

7 

I 

f 
I 

*• 
I 

7 



NAMK 



Tynon, James 

Yosbnrg, N. O 

Walley, John J. 

Weil, Solomon 

Whittemore, O. A. 

Wilcox, C. M 

Witter, Daniel 

Willoaghby, E.A.... 

Woodbaryt A. J 

Wright, George W... 
Graham, Peter D.... 
Taylor. Alexander. . . 
Christie, William H. 
Morrison, John H... 
Sargent,, George L. 
Fish, Charles R.. 



Bott, Anthony 

Bell. J. W 

Dillon, C. H 

Finley, Robert 

Fuller, H. A 

Hall, Lavalette 

Lincoln, A. G 

McShane, David 

Martin, F. L. 

McTavish, Neil 

Pulver, Milton 

Peery, R. B 

Smith, E. A. 

Woodbary. J. C 

8tiliman,J.W 

Conger, C. W 

France, Matt 

Shideler, Jacob 

Van Riper, C 

Wilson, George W 

Leyner, P. A 

Smith, M. G. 

Jones, T.J. 

Megorden, C. H 

Nichols, D. H 

Davis, John 

McCaslin, M. L. 

Denham, Thomas 

Hoyle, Edward 

Mnlford, J. S 

Earhart, W. K 

Carmack,T. K 

Cypat, S. N 

Graveetock, John 

Palmer, Thom as 

Richards, Richard 

Rndd, Anson 

Rudolph, A. E 

Clapp, SethA 

Dawson. John 

Dake, James B 

Dotson, Peter K 

Hildreth, John L 

Hilbnrn, Milton H, 

Lovern, James 

Patterson, B. J _. 

Van Hovenbarg, D. M. 



LODOK 



7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
ll 
11 
12 
12 
12 
12 
13 
18 
13 
13 
13 
13 
13 
13 
13 
13 
13 
13 
13 
18 
13 
18 
13 
13 
14 
14 
14 
14 
14 
14 
14 
14 
11 
14 
14 
14 
14 
14 
15 
15 
15 
15 
15 
15 
15 
15 
17 
17 
17 
17 
17 
17 
17 



18 



274 



APPENDIX. 



EXEMPT FROM GRAND LODGE DUES. 

( Continued. ) 



NAME 



Whedbe, Benjamin 

Peterson, H. C 

Armstrong, Andrew . 

Lyon, 8. R 

Matthews, J. C 

Henderson, J. W 

Beach, David 

Loom is, Abner , 

8herwood, F. W 

Arthur, James B 

Powers. Daniel L. . . . 

Arthor James 8- 

Day, Isaac _ 

Sylvester, N 

Buzzell,H. N 

Stranss, George H — 

Abbott, Philo . 

Beetham, James 

Chi Ids, Francis L. ..'. 
Carle ton, Daniel H... 

Davis, Joel E 

Flower, James B 

Hilton, B. W 

Moore, Joseph 

Messenger, F. C 

Maltbie, Noah 

Plnmb, Ovid 

Pollock, William P. . 

Ramsey Allen 

Von Gohren, Ludwig 

West, Henry T. 

Wyman, Horace L. . . 

Curtis, Henry H 

Van Deren, A. J 

Comstock, F 

Bertolette, John C.„. 

Bailey, J. C 

Moore, S. 

Manners, Harvey 

Peck, U. L 

Ferguson, H. W. 

Chapman, J. E 

Stile*. H. C 

Hamlin. O. T 

Brown, W. W 

Gardner, C. H 

Smith , Winton 

Botler, Stephen 

Zweck, George 

Blore, W. R 

Webster, George 

.Henderson. W. 8 

Stults, J. H 

Slifer, E. G 

Hendren, C. D 

Qaillian, A. H 

Cornell, G. B 

Hays, S.D 

Lawler, B. F 

Pearson, H. L 

Ramey, J. F 

Sock man, A. H 

South, W. L 



LODGE 



19 
19 
19 
19 
19 
19 
19 
19 
19 
19 
19 
19 
19 
19 
19 
19 
20 
20 
20 
20 
20 
20 
20 
20 
20 
20 
20 
20 
20 
20 
20 
20 
22 
22 
22 
22 
23 
23 
23 
23 
23 
23 
23 
23 
23 
23 
23 
23 
23 
23 
2:) 
23 
23 
23 
27 
27 
28 
28 
28 
28 
28 
28 
28 



NAME 



I 



8anford, G. R 

Turner, L. H 

Wiley, A 

Widderfield, J. W 

Scheidler, Gabriel 

Goodrich, A. S 

Bowman, Joshua 

Nizer, Warren W 

Fugard, George 

Gray, John 

Griffing, Willis 

Kelker, John 

Richards, Norman P. 

Wilson, D. M 

Stancbtield, James 

Allen. Alfred 

Royal, Andrew 

Hutchcraft. R. W 

Wormley, F. P 

Wing, A. W 

Williams. M 

Bart, W. B 

Charles, L. C 

Snowden, F. M 

Collurn, Henry 

Smith, A. A 

Kahn, Marx 

Warren, J. W 

dispell, K. P 

C/olman. Martin 

Scott, J. K 

Oliwiler, Jacob 

Baker, D. M 

Woodaide. William... 

Hammond, CM 

Hatch, E.C , 

Mullin, Load in 

Waterman, D. B 

Geisecke, Albert 

Candler, Adolph 

Zang, Phillip 

Gnentin ; Herman 

Wildersin, Bernard... 

Chase, Andrew E 

Cobb, Thomas 

Collins, William 

Head , Lafayette 

Pirn, Thomas F 

Stokes, Chauncey 

Wallace, George 

Do.bney, Charles 

Tucker, Thomas H.._. 

Hilliker, C. M 

Dudley, C. E 

Lewis, A. R 

Paine, O. J 

Will, F.J 

May, William M 

Dnstin, Charles L.... 

Elwood,H. H 

Carter, Ed 

Collins, R. J 

Hall, G. W 



LODGE 



28 
28 
28 
2K 
29 
39 
80 
30 
31 
81 
31 
31 
31 
31 
31 
31 
31 
31 
31 
31 
31 
32 
32 
33 
34 
35 
35 
35 
35 
37 
37 
37 
38 
3» 
39 
39 
39 
39 
41 
41 
41 
41 
41 
42 
43 
43 
44 
44 
45 
45 
45 
45 
46 
46 
46 
46 
46 
46 
46 
47 
47 
48 
48 



APPENDIX. 



275 



EXEMPT FROM GRAND LODGE DUES. 

( Concluded. ) 



SAME 


LODOK 

48 
49 
49 
49 
49 
49 
49 
50 
50 
51 
52 
53 
53 
54 
54 
54 
55 
55 
57 
59 
60 
60 
60 
61 
62 
62 
63 
64 
64 
65 
65 
68 
68 


NAME 


LODGE 


Twining, Hugh A. 


Dickereon, William 

McNeil, Henry F. 

Nnnamaker. G. R 

Coston, A. M 

Parrish, E. M 

Pettys, Walter 

McKee. H.J 

Blnst, John _ 

Fisk, F. K 

Wilcox, Osker _.. 


69 


Cook, D. N 

Logan, Henry 

Montrose, C. A. 

Wade, S.W 

Fletcher, W.W 

Halsey, J. S 

Jenkiros W. D 

Van Valkenborg, R. J 

Corser, John W 


69 
71 
71 
71 
71 
71 
71 
71 
71 


Gray. B. O 


72 




baffle?. Georsre __. 


74 


Smith, Obadiah 


Jones, William C 

Robinson. 8. A 

Little, William... 

Rossell, A 

Clark, W.P 

Bnrson, T. J 

Dunton,W. C 

Godfrey, C.R 

Miilis,M. J 

Blakeley, George F _. 

Mills, William L 


74 


Taylor, B. M 

Cramer, Joseph _. 

Mobley, Richard D 


74 
74 
75 
75 


McArthnr. J. N 

Phillips, Albert. 

Cowenhoven, H. P 

Wellmnn. L. C 

Mnir.Jobn W 

Rosa. O. P 

Brown, Warren D 


75 
75 
75 
75 
76 
76 
80 
81 


Crotaer, William H. 


83 


White, John 

Fozworthy, Alexander 

Wood, J.T 


Fergnson. Horace W 

Newell, William T 


88 
83 


Wright, Frank O 


84 


Kendrick, Thomas 

Wood,SethH 


Lehmen, Charles W 

Woodworth, Henry C 

Cole, E. Merritt 


84 
84 


Dillon, Michael 


87 


Nichols, K. E., Sr 







276 



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APPENDIX. 283 



LAWS 



OF 



FREEMASONRY 



IN 



COLORADO 



CONTENTS. 



[Reference to Sections: C — Constitution; i?— By-Laws.] 

C B. 

Affiliation _ _. 80 

Appeals _ _ _. 110 

Balloting 63 

Charters and New Lodges 2fi 

Conferring Degrees _ ._ 74 

Dimits _ _ _ 85 

Dispensations _ 19 

Elections to Office _ .. 42 

Grand Lodge Representation _ 40 

Grand Master. 12 

Grand Secretary _ 22 

Grand Treasurer _ _ 21 

Installation _ 11 

Installations .. 4-5 

Intemperance 125 

Jurisdiction _ 51 

Miscellaneous .. 126 

Non-Affiliates .. 83 

Non-Intercourse 123 

Non-Payment of Dues _._ _ _. 112 

Objections after Ballot 71 

Officers Elected and Appointed _ 7 

Officers and Members _ 2 

Other Officers 23 

Pay to Members 5 

Penalties... 106 

Petitions _ _ 55 

Powers of Grand Lodge 5 

Qualifications of Grand Officers. 10 

Quorum.. 4 

Rejections.. _ 68 

Reports, Returns and Dues __ 35 

Representation _. ._ 1 

Restoration _ 117 

Rules of Order _ _ _. 6 

Session Committees _ _._ _. 3 

Standing Committees ._ 4 

Summons __ _ 90 

Time and Place of Meeting _ 3 

Title _ 1 

Trials. 93 

Wardens .._ _ _. 49 



CONSTITUTION. 



PREAMBLE. 



We, the Grand Lodge of Ancient Free and Accepted 
Masons of Colorado, in order to form a more perfect fra- 
ternal nnion, provide for and promote the general welfare 
of the Craft, do ordain and establish this Constitution: 



TITLE. 



Section 1. The name of this Grand Lodge shall be 
" The Most Worshipful Grand Lodge op Ancient Free 
and Accepted Masons of Colorado." 



officers and members. 



2. The officers and members of this Grand Lodge, and 
their rank and title, shall be as follows: 



The Most Worahipfu 
The Right Worshipfu 
The Right Worehipfu 
The Right Worshipfu 
The Right Worshipfu 
The Right Worshipfu 
The Right Worshipfu 
The Right Worshipfu 
The Right Worshipfu 
The Right Worshipfu 



Grand Master. 

Deputy Grand Master. 

Senior Grand Warden. 

Junior Grand Warden. 

Grand Treasurer. 

Grand Secretary. 

Grand Chaplain. 

Grand Orator. 

Grand Lecturer. 

District Deputy Grand Masters. 

Grand Marshal. 



The Right Worshipfu 

The Worshipful Senior Grand Deacon. 

The Worshipful Junior Grand Deacon. 

The Grand Stewards. 

The Grand Tiler. 

Together with snch Past Grand Masters and Past 
Deputy Grand Masters as are members of subordinate 
Lodges in this jurisdiction, and the Masters and Wardens, 
or their proxies, of each chartered Lodge in this jurisdic- 
tion. 

TIME AND PLACE OF MEETING. 

3. The annual Communications of the Grand Lodge 
shall be held in the city of Denver, on the third Tuesday 
of September in each year. The hour of meeting shall be 
10 o'clock a. m. 



288 APPENDIX. 



QUORUM. 



4 The representatives of at least three chartered 
Lodges under this Grand Jurisdiction shall be necessary 
to constitute a quorum, and the Grand Lodge shall not be 
opened until such number be present, but a smaller num- 
ber may meet and adjourn from day to day, until a consti- 
tutional quorum shall be present. 

POWERS OF THE GRAND LODGE. 

. 5. By the ancient constitutions and the usages of 
Freemasonry, this Grand Lodge is the Supreme Masonic 
authority in Colorado. It has original and exclusive juris- 
diction over all subjects of Masonic legislation, and appel- 
late jurisdiction from the decisions of subordinate Lodges. 

6. It has the power to enact laws and regulations for 
the government of the Craft, and of altering and abro- 
gating them, to establish and preserve a uniformity of 
work and lectures, to issue charters for New Lodges, and 
to suspend and revoke them for unmasonic conduct; and 
all the powers it may exercise, it may delegate as in its 
wisdom and discretion it may deem best, unless specially 
prohibited. 

OFFICERS ELECTED AND APPOINTED. 

7. At each Annual Communication of the Grand 
Lodge there shall be elected by ballot, from among the 
Brethren who are constitutionally eligible thereto, a Grand 
Master, a Deputy Grand Master, a Senior and a Junior 
Grand Warden, a Grand Treasurer and a Grand Secretary. 
The Senior Grand Warden shall appoint a Junior Grand 
Deacon, the Junior Grand Warden shall appoint two 
Grand Stewards, and the Grand Master shall appoint all 
the remaining officers of the Grand Lodge. 

8. On all questions arising in the Grand Lodge the 
Grand Officers, together with such Past Grand Masters 
and Past Deputy Grand Masters as may be present and 
are members thereof, and the Masters and Wardens of 
each subordinate Lodge, or their regularly constituted 
proxies, shall each be entitled to one vote; but in no case 
whatsoever shall a member, by virtue of any proxy, or 
authority, cast more'than three votes. 

9. A majority of all the votes cast at any election of 
officers shall be necessary to elect. 



APPENDIX 289 

QUALIFICATIONS OF GRAND OFFICERS. 

10. No brother shall be eligible to the office of either 
Grand Master, Deputy Grand Master or Grand Warden, 
who has not been duly elected, installed and presided over 
a subordinate Lodge; neither shall he be eligible to any 
office unless he is a member of a subordinate Lodge under 
this jurisdiction. 

INSTALLATION. 

11. The officers of the Grand Lodge, elected and 
appointed, shall be annually installed, and shall perform 
their respective duties until their successors in office are 
duly elected and installed, and no officer shall be installed 
by proxy. 

- THE GRAND MASTER. 

12. The Most Worshipful Grand Master shall have 
and enjoy all the powers and prerogatives conferred by 
the ancient constitutions and the usages and landmarks 
of Freemasonry. 

13. He may cony en e the Grand Lodge in special 
Grand Communication on any emergency which, in his 
judgment, may require it. 

14 He has the power to convene any subordinate 
Lodge within this Grand Jurisdiction, preside therein and 
inspect its work. 

15. It is his duty to require from all subordinate 
Lodges a strict conformity to the established rules, regula- 
tions and landmarks of Freemasonry. 

16. For good cause he may suspend the functions of 
any subordinate Lodge until the next Communication of 
the Grand Lodge. 

17. His decisions on all questions relative to the Craft 
shall be final, unless reversed by a vote of the majority of 
the Grand Lodge. 

18. The granting and rejecting of all petitions for 
dispensations shall be solely within the province of the 
Grand Master. 

19. He has the command of all other Grand Officers 
touching the duties and ministration of their several offices, 
and may call on any and all of them, at any time, for advice 
and assistance in all business relative to the Craft. 

19 



29O APPENDIX. 

20. In case of his death, absence or inability to act, 
the powers and duties of his station, for all regular and 
necessary purposes, shall, for the time being, devolve upon 
the Deputy Grand Master, the Senior Grand Warden, or 
the Junior Grand Warden, in the order herein named. 

GRAND TREASURER. 

21. The Grand Treasurer shall have charge of all the 
funds and securities of the Grand Lodge, and it shall be 
his duty to attend all communications of the Grand Lodge, 
and report annually ( or whenever requested by the Grand 
Master or Lodge) the condition of the finances; to pay all 
warrants drawn on him authorized by the Grand Lodge, 
signed by the Grand Secretary, which warrants he shall 
cancel when paid; to keep all funds under his control in 
some repository, and if deposited in bank, to take receipt 
therefor in the name of the Grand Treasurer of the Grand 
Lodge of A. F. and A. M. of Colorado; he shall not be 
authorized to loan out funds in his possession, except as 
ordered by the Grand Lodge, or on the approval of the 
Grand Master. In making his annual report he shall 
accompany it with vouchers for all moneys paid out by 
him during the year, and the actual cash, certificate of 
deposit, certified check, or other like evideuce, that the 
cash balance, as shown by the report, is in the actual 
possession of the Grand Lodge; he shall give bonds with 
good and sufficient sureties, in the penal sum of five 
thousand dollars, conditioned on the faithful discharge 
of the duties of his office, the bond to be approved by the 
Grand Lodge or Master, which bond shall be deposited 
with the Grand Master for safe keeping, and finally turn 
over to his successor in office all funds and property in his 
possession belonging to the Grand Lodge. 

GRAND SECRETARY. 

22. The Grand Secretary shall atteud at all Commu- 
nications of the Grand Lodge, and duly record its pro- 
ceedings, and shall receive and accurately account for, and 
promptly pay over to the Grand Treasurer, all the funds 
and property of the Grand Lodge, from whatever source, 
taking his receipt for the same. He shall keep a record 
of the returns made by the subordinate Lodges, and ex- 
amine said returns so as to report thereon at each annual 
communication. He shall receive and preserve all peti- 
tions, applications, appeals and other documents; sign, 
certify to and duly seal all instruments of writing erna- 



appendix: 291 

nating from the Grand Lodge; conduct the correspondence 
of the Grand Lodge, under the direction of the Grand 
Master; and report annually to the several Grand Lodges 
in correspondence with this Grand Lodge, the names of 
the Grand Officers elected. He shall, at each annual 
Grand Communication, make a report to the Grand Lodge 
of moneys received and paid over to the Grand Treasurer, 
of failure or want of punctuality on the part of subordi- 
nate Lodges in paying dues and making proper returns, 
and of such other matters as, in his judgment, may require 
the action of the Grand Lodge. He shall, in due time, 
previous to each annual Grand Communication, furnish 
each subordinate Lodge with blank returns and with such 
instructions in regard to them as the rules and regulations 
of the Grand Lodge may require. He shall also prepare 
and forward to each Lodge under D ispeusation, thirty 
days previous to the annual Grand Communication, full 
instructions for its guidance in making returns and peti- 
tioning for charter. He shall, thirty days prior to the an- 
nual meeting of the Grand Lodge, communicate with the 
proper officials of the different railroads centering in Den- 
ver, and endeavor to secure concessions on railroad fares, 
and tickets good from the Saturday prior to the Saturday 
subsequent to said annual meetings, and notify the differ- 
ent Lodges of the rate secured. He shall cause the Con- 
stitution, By Laws and standing resolutions of this Grand 
Lodge to be published annually, with the proceedings. 
He shall give bond, with good and sufficient sureties, in 
the sum of five thousand dollars, conditioned on a faithful 
discharge of the duties of his office, the bond to be satis- 
factory to the Grand Lodge or Master, and which shall be 
deposited with the Grand Master for safe keeping. He 
shall be ex officio Librarian, and perform the duties pre- 
scribed in Section 80 of the Constitution, and for his 
services shall be paid the sum of twelve hundred dollars as 
salary for the year ending with this Communication of the 
Grand Lodge, and each succeeding year thereafter, payable 
quarterly by warrants drawn upon the Grand Treasurer. 

OTHER OFFICERS. 

23. The Grand Chaplain shall attend the Communi- 
cations of the Grand Lodge and lead in devotional exor- 
cises. 

24 The Grand Orator shall prepare an address upon 
the subject of Masonry, to be delivered to the Grand 
Lodge at its annual Communication. 



2Q2 APPENDIX. 

GRAND LECTURER. 

"25. It shall be the duty of the Grand Lecturer to 
impart the esoteric work of this jurisdiction to the District 
Deputy Grand Masters, and also the officers of subordinate 
Lodges who may request him so to do, and who shall visit 
him for that purpose; he may also convene and conduct 
Lodges of Instruction at such times and places as he may 
deem proper. The Grand Lecturer, with the District 
Deputy Grand Masters, shall exemplify the esoteric work 
of all the degrees before the Grand Lodge, on the evening 
of the first day of its Annual Communication, unless the 
time may be required by the Grand Lodge for other 
busiuess. He shall receive as compensation the sum of 
three dollars per day for each day actually spent in the 
discharge of the duties of his office, and actual traveling 
expenses, to be paid by the Grand Lodge. 

DISTRICT DEPOTY GRAND MASTERS. 

26. The Masonic jurisdiction of the Most Worshipful 
Grand Lodge of Ancient Free and Accepted Masons of 
Colorado, shall be divided into four Masonic Districts, 
each of which shall be under the charge of a District 
Deputy Grand Master. 

27. The several Masonic Districts shall be designated, 
and District Deputy Grand Masters appointed and assigned, 
by the Most Worshipful Grand Master, immediately after 
his installation. Xo brother, who is not a Past Master of 
a subordinate Lodge in this jurisdiction, and a member of 
a subordinate Lodge in this jurisdiction, shall be eligible 
to the appointment of District Deputy Grand Master. 

2S. It shall be the duty of each District Deputy Grand 
Master to obtain and thoroughly commit to memory the 
esoteric work of this jurisdiction, as imparted by the Grand 
Lecturer, as soon as practicable after his appointment; to 
make an official visit to every subordinate Lodge in his 
district at least once in each year, and, upon the occasion 
of such official visits, he shall require the exemplification 
of the esoteric work, by the regular officers of the Lodge, 
upon a candidate or substitute, and correct all inaccuracies 
in such work; to examine the books and records of each 
Lodge, and see that they are properly kept; to ascertain 
the state and condition of the Lodges; to see that the 
officers of the Lodges strictly comply with the established 
rules, regulations and landmarks of Freemasonry, and the 
Constitution, By-Laws and Edicts of this Most Worshipful 



APPENDIX. 



293 



Grand Lodge; to make a detailed report of his doings, and 
of the general condition of the Lodges and of Freemasonry 
in his district, with such particulars and recommendations 
as he may deem necessary and proper, and transmit such 
report to the Graud Master at least two weeks prior to the 
Annual Communication of the Grand Lodge, or whenever 
required by the Grand Master; and to perform such other 
duties and services as may be deputed or intrusted to him 
by the Grand Master. 

29. The District Deputy Grand Masters shall each re- 
ceive the sum of three dollars per day for each day actually 
spent in the discharge of the duties of their office, and 
actual traveling expenses, to be paid by the Grand Lodge. 

30. The Grand Marshal shall proclaim the Grand 
Officers at their installation, introduce the representatives 
of foreign Grand Lodges and distinguished visiting breth- 
ren and conduct processions of the Grand Lodge. 

31. The Grand Deacons shall perform the duties in- 
cidental to their respective offices. 

32. The Grand Stewards shall have immediate super- 
intendence, under the direction of the Junior Grand War- 
den, in the provisions to be made on all festive occasions. 

33. The Grand Tiler shall guard the door of the 
Grand Lodge on the outside, report all persons claiming 
admission, and see that none enter but such as are duly 
authorized and properly clothed. He shall have all the 
rights and be entitled to all the honors of other Grand 
Officers, except the right to vote. 

34. The Librarian shall have the care of all the books 
purchased or donated to the library of this Grand Lodge. 
Whenever any donations shall be made to the library fund 
the donation shall be credited to the donor in a book to be 
kept for that purpose by the Grand Secretary, and the 
money so donated shall be for the purchase of books only. 
The Grand Master and Grand Secretary are authorized to 
purchase additional books for the library from time to 
time, as they may think proper, and draw upon the library 
fund to pay for the same. 

35. This Constitution can only be ameuded by pro- 
posing the change in writing at an annual Grand Commu- 
nication; and if, after reference to and report by a com- 
mittee, it shall be concurred in by a vote of three-fourths 
of the members present, it shall be from that time a part 
of this Constitution. 



BY-LAWS 



PERTAINING TO THE GRAND LODGE. 



REPRESENTATION. 

Section 1. Every subordinate Lodge in good standing 
within the jurisdiction of this Grand Lodge shall be 
entitled to be represented in this Grand Lodge by its 
Master and Wardens, or their proxies appointed by them- 
selves, and who shall be members 'of the Lodge they are 
appointed to represent; and each Lodge shall be entitled 
to three votes upon all questions before the Grand Lodge. 

2. No representative shall be entitled to a seat in this 
Grand Lodge until the dues of his Lodge are paid, and the 
Grand Secretary's receipt obtained, and the returns of the 
Lodge delivered to the Grand Secretary, as required by 
sections 30 and 38 of these By-Laws. 

SESSION COMMITTEES. 

3. At each annual Communication of the Grand Lodge, 
as soon as practicable after its organization, the Grand 
Master shall appoint the following named committees, of 
three members each: 

1. A Committee on Credentials, whose doty shall be to examine the credentials 
of all Masons claiming the right of membership, and report their names and 
Masonic connection to the Grand Lodge. 

2. A Committee to Examine Visiting Brethren, whose duty shall be to 
examine all visitors not properly vouched for. and report their respective nMnwt, 
addresses and Masonic connection to the Grand Lodge. 

STANDING COMMITTEES. 

4. Before the close of each annual Communication 
the Grand Master shall appoint standing committees, of 
three members each, for the ensuing Masonic year, as 
follows : 

1. On Masonic Correspondence, whose duty shall be to examine the corres- 
pondence and documents from other Grand Lodges in correspondence with this 
Grand Lodge, and report at the next annual Communication whatever may seem of 
sufficient importance and interest. 

2. On Masonic Jurisprudence, whose duty shall be to examine and report npon 
all questions, documents and papers requiring investigation and decision npon 
points of Masonic law. 



APPENDIX. 



295 



3. A Committee on Returns and Work of Lodges, U. D., and on Petitions, 
whose doty it shall be to examine the By-Laws, Records of the Work, and the Re- 
turns of Lodges, U. D.. and to make report to the Grand Lodge if, or not, in their 
opinion, charters shooid be granted to such Lodges, and if so, reporting the names 
of ail the proposed charter members. Also to examine all petitions for change of 
location, or for change of name, and report on the same to the Grand Lodge. 

4. A Committee on Appeals and Grievances, whose duty Bhall be to examine 
and report upon all appeals, memorials and petitions in relation to any matter of 
cam plaint within this jurisdiction which shall come before the Grand Lodge. 

5. A Committee on Finance, Mileage and Per Diem, whose doty shall be to 
examine and report on all accounts and financial matters to them referred, and to 
make a full report before the close of each annual Grand Communication, on the 
financial condition of the Grand Lodge. Also, to ascertain the sums to which each 
officer and representative is entitled on account of traveling expenses and per diem, 
and report the same to the Grand Lodge. 

PAY OF MEMBERS. 

5. The Grand Officers, members of the Committees on 
Correspondence, Jurisprudence, Returns and Work, Ap- 
peals and Grievances, and Finance, Mileage and Per Diem, 
and the officer # highest in rank, or in the absence of offi- 
cers, the representative highest in rank from each Lodge, 
under this jurisdiction, shall be allowed their actual trav- 
eling expenses (railroad, stage or other fare) going and 
returning from their place of residence, computed by the 
nearest traveled route, and three dollars per day for each 
day's actual attendance at the Grand Lodge; provided, 
no one shall draw mileage or per diem both as Grand 
Officer and representative; provided further, that in case 
of absence from any regular session of the Grand Lodge 
(except in case of sickness or other unavoidable cause), 
without the permission of the Grand Master, or Grand 
Lodge, all claim to payment or compensation, under this 
section, shall be forfeited. 

Each of said standing committees may, at the call of 
the Grand Master, meet at least one day prior to each an- 
nual Communication, and consider any matters presented 
by the Grand Master, so as to be ready to report at the 
opening of the session. 

RULES OF ORDER. 

6. The Grand Master shall take the chair every day 
at the hour to which the Grand Lodge shall have called off. 

7. During business the members are required to 
keep their seats and observe strict order and decorum; and 
no member shall leave the hall or absejit himself from the 
service of the Grand Lodge unless he has permission, or 
be sick or unable to attend. 

8. No member shall be permitted to speak more than 
twice upon any subject, unless to explain, without permis- 
sion from the Grand Lodge. If any member is twice 



296 APPENDIX. 

called to order at a communication for transgressing these 
rules, and is guilty of a third offense of the same nature, 
the presiding officer shall peremptorily order him to leave 
the Graud Lodge; and he may, further, be amenable to 
reprimand, suspension or expulsion, as the Grand Lodge 
shall deem proper. 

9. When a question is put, it shall be the duty of 
every member present to vote, unless for good cause the 
Grand Lodge shall excuse him; but no member shall vote 
upon any question in the event of which he is personally 
interested. 

10. No motion shall be entertained until it is sec- 
onded; and no debate shall be had thereon until it is 
stated by the chair. 

11. Every motion shall be reduced to writing, with 
the name of the mover endorsed thereon, if the chair or 
the Grand Secretary desire. 

12. When a question is under debate no motion shall 
be received but to lay on the table, to commit, to amend, 
or to postpone indefinitely, which several motions shall 
have precedence in the order in which they are here ar- 
ranged. 

13. Any member may call for the division of a ques- 
tion, which shall be divided if it comprehends questions so 
distict that one being taken away the rest may stand en- 
tire for the decision of the Grand Lodge. A motion to 
strike out and insert shall be deemed indivisible. 

14. When a motion has once been made and carried 
in the affirmative or negative, it shall be in order for any 
member in the majority to . move for a reconsideration 
thereof. 

15. All unprivileged questions shall be propounded in 
the order in which they are moved, except in filling up 
blanks, when the largest sum and longest time shall be 
put first. 

16. No report shall be received from a committee un- 
less the same be reduced to writing and signed by a ma- 
jority of the members thereof. 

17. No committee shall sit during the session of the 
Grand Lodge without special permission. 

18. The journal shall be read and approved before the 
final close of each annual Grand Cummunication. 



APPENDIX. 297 



PERTAINING TO SUBORDINATE LODGES. 



DISPENSATIONS. 

19. No dispensation for the formation of a new Lodge 
shall be granted except upon the petition of at least eight 
Master Masons, in good standing, each of whom shall sign 
his full name and state the Lodge to which he belongs. 
In addition to such general information as maybe necessary 
for the Grand Master, the petition shall specifically set 
forth: The name of the town and county; the estimated 
population of the town; what additional towns or territory 
will be included in the proposed jurisdiction; that the 
material is sufficient to sustain a healthy and reputable 
Lodge; that all of the petitioners reside within the pro- 
posed jurisdiction; that they have at their disposal suitable 
quarters for the practice of Masonic rites; if the expenses 
incident to a new Lodge have been donated, or if they are 
to be paid at a future time by the Lodge; that they will 
conform to all the orders of the Grand Master, and the 
laws and regulations of the Grand Lodge; and shall present 
the names of suitable brethren for appointment as Master 
and Wardens. 

20. The petition shall be accompanied by the minimum 
fee of forty dollars, and by a recommendation from the 
nearest chartered Lodge, certifying to the truth of the 
statements contained in the petition, and that the brother 
named for Master is qualified to open and' close a Lodge, 
and to confer the three degrees. 

21. The petition shall also be accompanied by evidence 
of the standing of all the signers, as follows : If from 
Lodges beyond this jurisdiction, by dimits; if from within 
this jurisdiction, by dimits or certificates from the Lodge 
Secretaries that the brethren are under no charges and 
have paid dues to the time of the next annual Commu- 
nication of the Grand Lodge. 

22. Existing membership shall only be disturbed when 
a charter follows a dispensation, in which event they shall 
immediately cease in the old and begin in the new Lodge; 
and it shall be the duty of the Master of the latter to see 
that the several Lodges interested are promptly notified of 
the changes. 



298 APPENDIX. 

23. Each Lodge under dispensation shall be governed 
by the By-Laws pertaining to subordinate Lodges, as 
adopted by the Grand Lodge, and at the next annual Grand 
Communication shall forward to the Grand Secretary its 
dispensation, returns of all work, record of proceedings, 
proposed By-Laws, and one dollar for each Mason raised- 
(See Decisions 90 and 101.) 

24 No Lodge shall do any work out of the regular 
order, unless by dispensation from the Grand Master; and 
any Lodge working under dispensation shall return the 
same to the Grand Master with an endorsement of the 
action had thereon. 

25. A petition from a Lodge to the Grand Master for a 
dispensation shall set forth fully the emergency, and if 
for other purposes than a new Lodge, shall be accompanied 
with a fee of five dollars, which shall be paid to the Grand 
Secretary for the library fund. 

CHARTERS AND NEW LODGES. 

26. Charters shall be granted by the Grand Lodge at 
a regular annual Communication, and under no circum- 
stances shall the power to issue be left discretionary with 
the Grand Master or any other officer. 

27. No charter shall be granted except the Lodge 
shall have worked under dispensation to the satisfaction 
of the Grand Lodge, and shall have regularly conferred 
the three degrees. 

28. Charters shall only be granted upon the written 
petition of the brethren named in the dispensation and 
those raised by its authority, together with such others as 
present dimits to the Grand Lodge, and may have received 
the unanimous endorsement of the Lodge U. D. ; provided, 
That, if through absence or sickness, any eligible signa- 
tures are omitted, the names may nevertheless appear in 
the charter. 

29. Petitions for charter shall propose the name of 
the Lodge and nominate for Master and Wardens; never- 
theless the Grand Lodge may substitute others in lieu 
thereof. 

30. No new Lodge shall pay a stated salary to its 
Secretary, but may allow him such percentage of Lodge 
moneys collected as in its judgment is proper for all his 
services. 



APPENDIX. 299 

31. The minimum fee for the issuance of a charter 
shall be twenty dollars. 

32. It is not in the power of a majority of the members 
of a Lodge to surrender the charter, so long as seven 
Master Masons, members thereof, continue to work under 
it, according to the ancient Landmarks of Masonry. 

33. The Grand Lodge shall recall any charter of a 
Lodge which fails to meet for twelve consecutive months. 

34. Whenever any charter of a Lodge shall be 
destroyed, stolen or surreptitiously taken and detained, 
or becomes so defaced as to be unfit for use, without the 
fault of the Lodge or Master, it shall be lawful for the 
Grand Master to order another to he issued, which shall 
set forth the members and officers named in the charter 
lost, detained or destroyed, the Grand Communication at 
which it was granted, the names of the Grand Officers 
attached thereto, and the circumstances of its loss, 
destruction or detention; and shall be signed by the Grand 
Master and attested by the Grand Secretary under seal of 
the Grand Lodge, without fee. 

REPORTS, RETURNS AND DUES FROM CHARTERED LODGES. 

35. Each Lodge shall, immediately after its annual 
installation, report to the Grand Master and Grand Secre- 
tary tbfc names of its Master, Wardens and Secretary. 

36. Each chartered Lodge shall transmit to the Grand 
Secretary, at least twelve days prior to the first day of each 
annual Grand Communication, returns of all work done 
from the last return to and including the thirty-first day 
of August of that year. 

37. Each Lodge shall pay to the Grand Secretary, as 
Grand Lodge dues, the sum of one dollar for each member 
less than sixty years of age, and specify in the returns the 
names of the members exempt. ( See Decision 125. ) 

38. Grand Lodge dues are hereby made payable at the 
time of making the annual returns of work. If any Lodge 
neglect or refuse to pay at the time specified, and shall 
persist, for the period of sixty days, without giving reasons 
satisfactory to the Grand Master, it shall be his duty to 
suspend the functions of such Lodge, until the next stated 
communication of the Grand Lodge. 

39. Whenever Entered Apprentices or Fellow Crafts 
neglect for a period of two years to pass examination upon 



300 APPENDIX. 

their proficiency, and take the next degree, their names 
shall be dropped from the reports of the Lodge, but they 
still shall remain available working material for said 
Lodge. 

GRAND LODGE REPRESENTATION. 

40. It is the duty of the Master to see that his Lodge 
is represented at all Annual Communications of the Grand 
Lodge, and if any Master fails so to do, he shall furnish 
the Grand Lodge with his excuse therefor. 

41. The Grand Lodge may order suspended or forfeited 
the charter of any Lodge which fails for two successive 
years to be represented at the Grand Lodge Commu- 
nications. 

ELECTIONS TO OFFICE. 

42. No brother shall be declared elected to office 
without having received a majority vote of all the members 
present. 

43. It is at variance with the spirit of Masonry to 
electioneer for or make nominations for offices, and it is 
hereby strictly prohibited. 

44. No election for officers shall take place in a Lodge 
U. D., but such as are not designated in the dispensation 
shall be filled by order of the Master. 

INSTALLATIONS. 

45. No Lodge shall hold a public installation without 
a dispensation. 

46. A re-elected Master may, if necessary, hold over 
without re-installation. 

47. All the officers of a newly-chartered Lodge must 
be installed by the Grand Master or his representative. 
No officer shall be installed by proxy. 

48. The Past Master's degree is not essential for instal- 
lation, but when conferred, none but actual Past Masters 
can be present. 

WARDENS. 

49. In the absence of the Master of a Lodge, Wardens 
may preside and confer degrees; but in the absence of all, 
a Lodge may only be opened by the Grand Master or his 
representative. 



APPENDIX. 30I 

50. Service as Warden in a Lodge, U. D., does not 
constitute eligibility to election as Master in a chartered 
Lodge. 

JURISDICTION. 

51. Unless otherwise specified, Lodge jurisdiction 
shall extend by air line one-half way to surrounding 
Lodges. 

52. Two or more Lodges in the same town or city 
shall exercise concurrent jurisdiction except when other- 
wis provided. 

53. Each Lodge having concurrent jurisdiction with 
another Lodge or other Lodges, shall immediately notify 
the same of any application it may receive for the degrees. 

54. Mount Princeton Lodge No. 49, and Tin Cup 
Lodge No. 52, shall exercise concurrent jurisdiction in 
the towns of St. Elmo and Hancock. 

PETITIONS. 

55. No subordinate Lodge shall act upon a petition 
for initiation unless the applicant has resided within the 
jurisdiction of that Lodge during the preceding twelve 
months. [See Decisions 82, 95 and 113.] 

56. After a petition is regularly received and entered 
upon the minutes, it shall not be withdrawn. [See De- 
cision 103. ] 

57. Subordinate Lodges shall act upon no petition for 
initiation or membership, unless the same shall have been 
laid over one lunar month. 

58. Subordinate Lodges shall act on no petition for 
initiation from an applicant who lives nearer another 
Lodge, without first obtaining the unanimous consent of 
the latter, at a regular meeting, which consent shall be ex- 
pressed by ballot. 

59. Subordinate Lodges shall receive no petition for 
affiliation, unless accompanied by a dimit or a certificate 
of good standing from the Lodge of which the petitioner 
was last a member. [See Decision 103. J 

60. Whenever a candidate who has been elected fails 
to appear for initiation within three months, or give satis- 
factory reasons, the money which accompanied his petition 
shall be forfeited, and in order to become a Mason he must 
renew his petition. 



302 APPENDIX. 

61. A brother having received a portion of the de- 
grees and desiring the remainder in another Lodge, shall 
first obtain the unanimous consent of that which conferred 
the degrees already received, and which consent shall be 
determined by ballot. His petition to the other Lodge in 
regular form, stating the additional facts, and accompanied 
by the said permission, may then take the usual course. 
[See Decision 65.] 

62. No Subordinate Lodge shall ballot upon a petition 
until report has been made by a committee to the follow- 
ing details concerning the character of the petitioner: 

1. What is hi9 age? 

2. Is he married or single? 

3. If married, is he living with his wife? 

4. What is his occupation, and where is he employed? 

5. Is he physically qualified for admission? 

6. What is the character of his company and associates? 

7. 1 8 he addicted to the intemperate use of intoxicating liquors? 

8. Does he gamble? 

9. Does he habitually use profane or indecent language? 

10. Has he licentious or immoral habits? 

11. Is he a law-abiding citizen? 

12. Does he possess sufficient education and intelligence to un- 
derstand and value the doctrines and tenets of Masonry? 

13. Has he ever made previous application for degrees? And 
if so, where and when? [ See Decision 37-1 

BALLOTING. 

63. No ballot shall be spread except at a regular Com- 
munication, unless by dispensation. 

64. In balloting for candidates, all members of the 
Lodge present shall vote. 

65. The ballot shall be spread for each degree, and 
shall be unanimous upon the moral, intellectual and Ma- 
sonic qualifications of the applicant. 

6f5. After the ballot has been examined, first by the 
Wardens and finally by the Master, the result shall be de- 
clared by the latter, unless a single negative vote appear, 
in which event he may order it respread, the result of 
which shall be absolutely final, subject to no reconsidera- 
tion, under any circumstances whatsoever, nor can it be 
set aside by the Lodge, Master, Grand Master, or even the 
Grand Lodge. 

67. No Mason shall divulge the character of his vote 
upon the petition of any candidate. 



APPENDIX. 3°3 

REJECTIONS. 



(58 A rejected candidate for the degrees shall not be 
JSedtitSu twelve months thereafter by another Lodge 
without the unanimous consent by ballot of that «nicn 
rejected him. 

69 Lodges may provide by by-law the time that shall 
elapse between a rejection and another application. 

70. Secretaries of Lodges shall report no rejections 
for initiation or affiliation. 

OBJECTIONS AFTEB BALLOT. 

71 Advancement to the degrees may be stayed at any 
time, for good reasons, by the Lodge or Master. 

72 Objection by a member in good standing to the 
i t ,itktion of an elected candidate shall have the same effect 
™n unfavorable ballot Such objection, when made, 
SJTbe Sorted to the Lodge at the ^tre^lar commu- 
nication and the fact of such objection shall be entere l or 
record wfthout the name of the brother objecting. The 
candidate shall then be declared rejected, ^h»W 
r^tnrnwl as in other cases of rejection, Such objection 
shall IhSe no other or greater force than an unfavorable 
ballot. , 

7<t Objection to the advancement of a brother, made 
bv memEgood standing, shall stop all further pro- 
e^irTgs unlil the objections be withdrawn or otherwise 
dSosedof or the objector's membership ceases, ^lien 
fn c rob ection is made, the fact and the name of the 
 ohJpctine brother shall be entered of record. 

J Se LodJe may, at a regular Communication, upon two 
weeks' notict to the objecting brother, take up and try 'the 
r u fficien?v of the objection, and if deemed sufficient, al 
fc, for dL?ees unconferred shall be at once returned, and 
htiancSdSe s\all not be advanced until the objection is 
withdrawn or the objector's membership ceases. If the 
^b Son is deemed insufficient, the candidate may be 
advanced. ( See Decisions 74 and 7.). ) 

CONFERRING DEGREES. . 

74 No Lodge shall confer any degree upon a candi- 
,W unless he bi a perfect man, having no maim or detect 
n his body that maunder him incapable of learning the 
art and becoming perfect in the work. 



3O4 APPENDIX. 

75. No candidate shall receive, without dispensation, 
more than one degree on the same day, nor until he has 
passed a satisfactory examination in open Lodge on the 
last degree received. 

76. No Lodge shall confer the first section of any 
degree on more than one candidate at the same time. 

77. No Lodge shall confer a degree upon any non- 
resident citizen without first obtaining consent from the 
proper jurisdiction. 

78. The making of a Master Mason constitutes the 
brother a member of the Lodge in which raised, except 
when done at the request of another Lodge. Signing the 
By-Laws, though desirable, is not essential. 

79. No Lodge shall confer the three degrees for less 
than thirty dollars, to be paid in advance. 

AFFILIATION. 

80. No petition shall be received for affiliation except 
from a former member, until the petitioner has visited the 
Lodge; and the ballot shall not be spread upon such 
petition until after a visit subsequent to its reception. 

81. No Lodge shall admit to membership any brother 
who shall be exempt from any of the duties, obligations 
and privileges required by the Constitution, regulations 
and landmarks of Masonry. 

82. No Lodge having a membership of less than three 
hundred shall collect a fee for affiliation. 

NON-AFFILIATES. 

83. Non-affiliation is cause for discipline, and all non- 
affiliates, who have not made application for membership 
within one year, may be deprived of all the rights and 
benefits of Masonry, after charges, trial and conviction. 

H4. The conduct of non-affiliates shall subject them to 
discipline by the Lodge within whose jurisdiction they 
reside. If there be two or more Lodges in the place, 
jurisdiction shall be exercised only by the oldest. 

DIMITS. 

85. No Lodge shall grant a dimit except upon written 
application, which shall lie over until the next regular 
Communication, when, if no charges have been preferred, 



APPENDIX. 305 

and the dues of the brother have been paid, the dim it 
shall be ordered and issued. 

86. No elective or appointed officer shall be dimitted 
during the period for which he has been installed. 

87. Members of extinct Lodges are entitled to Grand 
Lodge certificates on application, and upon paying all 
arrearages due the Lodge to which they belonged. 

88. A dimit dates from the Lodge record when the 
same was granted, and membership ceases with that date, 
even if the certificate be not issued. 

89. Upon the election of non-affiliates, their dimits or 
other certificates of former membership shall be cancelled 
by the Secretary. 

SUMMONS. 

90. A summons issued by a Subordinate Lodge, or 
the Worshipful Master thereof, must be written or printed, 
and under the seal of the Lodge. ( See Decision 107. ) 

91. No summons need contain other matter than a 
requisition to attend the Lodge. 

92. Every Master Mason is bound to attend the Lodge 
requiring him, on being summoned. 

TRIALS. 

93. Any member of a Subordinate Lodge is subject to 
the discipline thereof, excepting only the Worshipful 
Master. 

94 No Mason shall be deprived of any Masonic right 
except after due charges, trial and conviction. 

95. Charges must be signed by the accuser (by the 
Junior Warden or other member, if ordered by the Lodge) 
and be presented at a regular Communication ; whereupon 
the accused shall be furnished with a copy and summoned 
to plead thereto. 

96. If the plea be not guilty, the Lodge shall then de* 
termine if the trial shall be by the Lodge or a commission 
of its members; except that in case of a suspended Mason 
undergoing trial for a new offense, the testimony shall 
only be taken by a commission. If trial be by the Lodge, 
it shall fix the time, and the accused be notified thereof. 

97. All such trials shall be in the highest degree at- 
tained by the accused, and upon its conclusion both he 

20 



304 APPENDIX. 

75. No candidate shall receive, without dispensation, 
more than one degree on the same day, nor until he has 
passed a satisfactory examination in open Lodge on the 
last degree received. 

76. No Lodge shall confer the first section of any 
degree on more than one candidate at the same time. 

77. No Lodge shall confer a degree upon any non- 
resident citizen without first obtaining consent from the 
proper jurisdiction. 

78. The making of a Master Mason constitutes the 
brother a member of the Lodge in which raised, except 
when done at the request of another Lodge. Signing the 
By-Laws, though desirable, is not essential. 

79. No Lodge shall confer the three degrees for less 
than thirty dollars, to be paid in advance. 

AFFILIATION. 

80. No petition shall be received for affiliation except 
from a former member, until the petitioner has visited the 
Lodge; and the ballot shall not be spread upon such 
petition until after a visit subsequent to its reception. 

81. No Lodge shall admit to membership any brother 
who shall be exempt from any of the duties, obligations 
and privileges required by the Constitution, regulations 
and landmarks of Masonry. 

82. No Lodge having a membership of less than three 
hundred shall collect a fee for affiliation. 

NON-AFFILIATES. 

83. Non-affiliation is cause for discipline, and all non- 
affiliates, who have not made application for membership 
within one year, may be deprived of all the rights and 
benefits of Masonry, after charges, trial and conviction. 

S4. The conduct of non-affiliates shall subject them to 
discipline by the Lodge within whose jurisdiction they 
reside. If there be two or more Lodges in the place, 
jurisdiction shall be exercised only by the oldest. 

DIMITS. 

85. No Lodge shall grant a dimit except upon written 
application, which shall lie over until the next regular 
Communication, w r hen, if no charges have been preferred, 



APPENDIX. 305 

and the dues of the brother have been paid, the dim it 
shall be ordered and issued. 

86. No elective or appointed officer shall be dimitted 
during the period for which he has been installed. 

87. Members of extinct Lodges are entitled to Grand 
Lodge certificates on application, and upon paying all 
arrearages due the Lodge to which they belonged. 

88. A dimit dates from the Lodge record when the 
same was granted, and membership ceases with that date, 
even if the certificate be not issued. 

89. Upon the election of non-affiliates, their dimits or 
other certificates of former membership shall be cancelled 
by the Secretary. 

SUMMONS. 

90. A summons issued by a Subordinate Lodge, or 
the Worshipful Master thereof, must be written or printed, 
and under the seal of the Lodge. ( See Decision 107. ) 

91. No summons need contain other matter than a 
requisition to attend the Lodge. 

92. Every Master Mason is bound to attend the Lodge 
requiring him, on being summoned. 

TRIALS. 

93. Any member of a Subordinate Lodge is subject to 
the discipline thereof, excepting only the Worshipful 
Master. 

94. No Mason shall be deprived of any Masonic right 
except after due charges, trial and conviction. 

95. Charges must be signed by the accuser (by the 
Junior Warden or other member, if ordered by the Lodge ) 
and be presented at a regular Communication ; whereupon 
the accused shall be furnished with a copy and summoned 
to plead thereto. 

96. If the plea be not guilty, the Lodge shall then de* 
termine if the trial shall be by the Lodge or a commission 
of its members ; except that in case of a suspended Mason 
undergoing trial for a new offense, the testimony shall 
only be taken by a commission. If trial be by the Lodge, 
it shall fix the time, and the accused be notified thereof. 

97. All such trials shall be in the highest degree at- 
tained by the accused, and upon its conclusion both he 



308 APPENDIX. 

"By order of Lodge No. , A. F. and A. M., 

I hereby charge Bro. with unmasonic conduct in 

neglecting to pay Lodge dues from the day of 

to the day of 

"Dated ,18— 

" Junior Warden." 

114 Examination shall be in open Lodge, and the 
testimony of the Secretary as to the indebtedness and 
requests for payment shall be sufficient evidence for the 
prosecution. Nevertheless, the Lodge may exercise such 
clemency as to it may seem proper, according to the cir- 
cumstances of each case. 

115. The only penalty for conviction under charges 
for non-payment of dues shall be reprimand or indefinite 
suspension from all the rights and benefits of Masonry; 
but reprimand shall not be inflicted for a second offense. 

116. Payment of dues to the date of suspension for 
non-payment shall restore to good standing without further 
action by the Lodge. 

RESTORATION. 

117. In case the decision of any Lodge suspending or 
expelling a brother shall be reversed by the Grand Lodge, 
such brother shall be restored to all the rights and priv- 
ileges as a Mason and a member of the Lodge. 

118. No expelled Mason shall be restored to the priv- 
ileges of Masonry except by a vote of the Grand Lodge, 
and such restoration shall not reinstate him to Lodge 
membership without the unanimous consent of the mem- 
bers thereof. 

119. An application to reinstate an expelled Mason 
must in all cases be accompanied with a recommendation 
from the Lodge by which he was expelled, provided sxich 
Lodge be still in existence. 

120. Restoration after definite suspension shall take 
place at the expiration of the time specified in the sen- 
tence without further action. 

121. Restoration after indefinite suspension, except 
for non-payment of dues, shall be by action of the Lodge 
at a regular meeting, after due notice to the Lodge of at 
least one lunar month, and must be by the same majority 
of the members present as required for inflicting the pun- 
ishment. 



APPENDIX. 3O9 

122. A Mason heretofore dropped from the rolls for 
non-payment of dues may be restored to membership by a 
majority vote of the members present at any stated Com- 
munication, on the payment of all arrearages to the date 
of being stricken from the roils. 

NON-INTERCOURSE. 

123. Lodges are authorized to use their discretion, 
according to circumstances, as to recognizing as Masons 
any residents of the jurisdiction who may, during such 
residence, have received the degrees elsewhere. 

124 All Masons belonging to Lodges in this jurisdic- 
tion are forbidden to knowingly hold Masonic intercourse 
with any Mason belonging to a Lodge chartered by either 
the Grand Orient of France or the Grand Lodge of Ham- 
burg, and any Brother doing so shall be subject to the 
highest Masonic penalties. 

INTEMPERANCE. 

125. It is hereby made the imperative duty of all 
Lodges to restrain, as far as possible, the Masonic crime 
of intemperance, by trial and punishment, as the case may 
require, and to exclude from Lodge and ante-room all in- 
toxicating liquors; and for the faithful performance of 
these duties they will be held strictly accountable to the 
Grand Lodge. It shall be unlawful to initiate or affiliate 
any person engaged in the sale of intoxicating liquors. All 
Masons are therefore fraternally advised to refrain from 
engaging in the liquor traffic. (See Decisions 40, 51, 62 
and 86. ) 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

126. It shall not be lawful for a Lodge to hold Com- 
munications on the Sabbath day for any purpose whatever, 
except to attend the funeral of a Mason. 

127. The delivery or teaching of any Masonic work 
not authorized, or which has not received the sanction of 
the Grand Lodge or its lawful authority, is forbidden. 

128. Upon the demise of any Lodge the Secretary and 
Treasurer of the same shall, within three months, trans- 
mit to the Grand Secretary all the books, papers, jewels, 
furniture, funds and other property of the Lodge so de- 
mised. 



310 APPENDIX. 

129. The Grand Master is authorized, at the request 
of a Lodge, to change its location or place of meeting, but 
such request must be made at a regular Communication, 
after notice given in open Lodge at least one lunar 
month before action is taken by the Lodge. 

130. Honorary membership gives the right to speak 
in Lodge, but not to vote. It can not be conferred on a 
regular member of a Lodge by the same body. ( See De- 
cision 46. ) 

131. Lodges and Committees on Charity shall require 
from applicants for assistance evidence of good standing 
before granting the same, and in the event such applicant 
shall prove to be an impostor or unworthy, such fact, with 
a full description of the impostor, shall be immediately re- 
ported to the Grand Secretary, whose duty it shall be to 
forthwith send notice of the same to all Lodges in this 
jurisdiction and to the Grand Secretary of all the juris- 
dictions immediately adjoining. 

132. Objection by a member present at a meeting of 
his Lodge to the visit of a Brother at that Communication 
shall exclude the visitor. 

133. Changes in Lodge By-Laws shall only be opera- 
tive after approval by the Grand Master. 

134. The Master of each subordinate Lodge in this 
jurisdiction shall cause to be read in open Lodge, within 
two months after its receipt, the General Proceedings of 
the previous annual Communication, and within two 
months after the annual election, the Constitution, By- 
Laws and Decisions, and in each case to immediately ad- 
vise the Grand Master of their compliance herewith, 

135. These By-Laws, pertaining to Grand or subordi- 
nate Lodges, can only be amended by proposing the 
change in writing at an annual Grand Communication; 
and if, after reference to and report by a committee, it 
shall be concurred in by a vote of two-thirds of the mem- 
bers present, it shall be from that time a part of these By- 
Laws. 



DECISIONS. 



APPROVED BY THE GRAND LODGE, EXCEPT SUCH AS HAVE BEEN 

RENDERED INOPERATIVE BY OB INCORPORATED 

IN OTHER LEGISLATION. 



By R. W. Woodbury, 1879. 

1. In the absence of law upon the subject, the burial of a 
suicide may be left to the discretion of the Master. 

2. A subordinate Lodge can, in the absence of law upon the 
subject, use its discretion as to renting its Lodge room to other 
societies. (See No. 76.) 

3. A second examining committee should not be appointed for 
the same visitor on the same evening, without an explanation to the 
Master from the first committee, and satisfaction on his part that 
injustice has been done. 

4. The W. M. has the right to refuse admission to members of 
his Lodge during the progress of work which will be disturbed by 
their admission. 

5. The Grand Lodge Proceedings sent to subordinate Lodges 
are the property of the Lodges, and not of any officers or members 
thereof. 

6. The choice of Master is one of the privileges of the brethren, 
and the request to elect a W. M. from the floor should come from the 
Lodge and not the Master. 

By B. L. Cabr, 1880. 

7. It is contrary to Masonic usage for the " Tiler "to sit in the 
Lodge room after the ceremony of opening is finished, the outer door 
to the ante-room being securely locked. It is a Landmark of 
Masonry that every Lodge should be " tiled." The Tiler's place is 
** outside the door." 

By L. N. Greenleaf, 1881. 

8. Either of three Lodges located in towns equidistant is com- 
petent to recommend a petition for a new Lodge, provided the others 
acquiesce ; otherwise, the oldest chartered Lodge to have the 
precedence. 



3 1 2 APPENDIX. 

9. This Grand Lodge as yet exercises no control over the intro- 
duction of the Order of the Eastern Star. 

10. Master Masons raised in a Lodge U. D. have all the rights 
and privileges of those named in the dispensation. 

1 1. Lodges U. D. can not grant dimits. 

12. A member of a Lodge U. D. can not withdraw his dimit 
filed with the petition for dispensation ; it is part of the record. 

13. An Emergent Grand Lodge can not be opened by proxy in 
another locality during a communication of the Grand Lodge 
proper. 

14. The signature of the W. M. is not essential to the validity 
of a dimit, if signed by the Secretary and under seal. 

By R. A. Qcillian, 1882. 

15. It is competent for a Lodge to receive a petition for affilia- 
tion from a Master Mason who had been raised in a jurisdiction that 
required the signing of the By-Laws as a condition precedent to 
becoming a member, and who has failed to sign the By-Laws, and 
who was not claimed by the Lodge that made him a Mason as a 
member ; but the application for affiliation should be accompanied 
by a certificate from the former Lodge, setting forth the facts in the 
case. 

16. A petition for dispensation to confer the degrees out of the 
regular order should be made by the Lodge and under seal, but it is 
discretionary with the Grand Master to pass upon the sufficiency of 
an application by the Master. 

17. An applicant for Masonry sent in his petition to the Lodge 
in whose jurisdiction he then resided. His petition was received and 
referred to a committee, who reported that he had established a 
business at another plaqe, and the day after his petition was received 
his family removed out of the jurisdiction of the Lodge. I held that 
it was competent for the Lodge to proceed with the case, and, if 
found worthy, to confer the degrees. 

By J. H. Peabody, 1885. 

18. A candidate who has been rejected for advancement to the 
second or third degrees may, in the absence of any By-Law of the 
Lodge, re-apply to the Lodge for examination and advancement at 
the next subsequent stated meeting, and at each succeeding one 
thereafter, so long as the " black ball " shall appear, and no objections 
are filed against him. 

19. A member of a Lodge, after being elected to an office, can 
decline to be installed. 

20. Negroes, if free born, are entitled to Masonic recognition, if 
made in regular Lodges. So-called " Colored Lodges " are held as 



APPENDIX. 3 1 3 

irregular, and therefore persons belonging to them are not recog- 
nizable as Masons. 

21. An applicant with one leg five inches shorter than the other 
is ineligible for initiation. 

22. A person who has lost the use of his right arm is ineligible 
for initiation. 

By George Wyman, 1886. 

23. Part payment of dues, pending charges for non-payment, 
does not invalidate charges. 

24. The Tiler, if a member of the Lodge, has the same rights as 
if inside the door. 

2-5. A Lodge receiving a waiver of jurisdiction from some other 
Lodge, has authority to proceed or waive jurisdiction in favor of a 
third Lodge. 

By Albert H. Branch, 1887. 

26. A person having lost the little finger of the right hand is 
eligible for the degrees. 

27. A brother can be elected to office whether present or 
absent, but must be installed in person. 

28. The laws of the State of Colorado provide for Masonic 
Lodges holding real estate. A Lodge should not incorporate to hold 
real estate or other property, as it would be in violation of Masonic 
law and usages. 

29. A brother having received the E. A. Degree in one Lodge, 
and applies for membership and advancement in another — his former 
Lodge having waived jurisdiction and certified to the fact that they 
conferred said degree — one ballot only is necessary in the Lodge to 
which said brother so applies, before receiving the F. C. Degree, 
provided said ballot is clear; the ballot being spread upon the moral, 
intellectual and Masonic qualifications of the applicant. 

By George K. Kimball, D. G. M., 1887. 

30. The issuing of duplicate dimits is prohibited. Upon proper 
proof of identity and of the loss or destruction of the original diinit, 
the Secretary of the Lodge granting the dimit, with the approval of 
the Worshipful Master, may issue a certificate to the effect that on 
such a day a dimit was granted to Brother A. B., cause the Lodge 
seal to be affixed and presented to the applicant. 

31. A notice of suspension or expulsion of a brother from a 
Lodge, not having the seal of the Lodge attached, and no reason 
given for not using seal, should not be considered official. 

32. A brother living within the jurisdiction of one Lodge can 
affiliate with another Lodge in another jurisdiction. 



314 APPENDIX. 

By the Grand Lodge, 1887. 

33. A waiver of jurisdiction in case of a brother seeking to join 
in the organization of a new Lodge is improper. If he resides in the 
place where the new Lodge is to start, he is competent to join in the 
request for a dispensation. Not joining therein, and yet desiring to 
become a charter member, the law provides the way. 

34. No rule can justly apply to all cases as to what evidence 
shall be required from a visitor before examination. Masters of 
Lodges should satisfy themselves in their own way. 

35. Masonic Burial, of Non- Affiliates. — A Lodge requested 
to act should use its discretion according to the circumstances. The 
non-affiliate, possessing no inherent right to the service of the 
Lodge, the favorable disposition of the brethren should be substan- 
tially unanimous, of which the Master should be satisfied by ballot 
or otherwise. Strong objections by members to the burial of a non- 
affiliate should not be lightly waived. 

By George K. Kimball, 1888. 

36. Charges can be preferred by a member of any Lodge against 
a member of any other Lodge. 

37. A man's residence is where his family resides. 

38. The questions required to be answered on the petition to be 
made a Mason, having been answered by the petitioner, it rests with 
the Lodge to determine the validity of such answers. 

39. An unfavorable ballot cannot be reconsidered on any grounds. 

40. Grand Lodge By-Law No. 125, does not refer to druggists 
selling liquor for medicinal purposes. 

41. As to physical qualifications, I decided that the Lodges 
themselves are the better able to judge of the material brought up 
for the building of the Temple, and calling their attention to the old 
Landmarks. 

42. An installed officer has no right to demand excuse from 
serving in his official capacity when present. Should an installed 
officer refuse to serve when present, you can prefer charges against 
him for unmasonic conduct. 

43. A dispensation cannot be issued to elect and install another 
in place of an officer so refusing. 

44. The Worshipful Master has authority to fill a vacancy caused 
by the contumacy of any officer. 

45. A written objection from a member of a Lodge before ballot 
is sufficient to prevent the degree being conferred on a candidate for 
the First Degree. 



APPENDIX. 3 1 5 

46. A Lodge may elect as honorary members brethren of other 
jurisdictions. (See By-Law 150.) 

47. A Lodge has power to try for offenses any of its members 
wherever they may reside; also all Masons resident or sojourning 
within its jurisdiction, whether affiliated or non-affiliated; but when 
a member of another Lodge, resident in its jurisdiction, commits an 
offense, Masonic courtesy requires that when practicable complaint 
be made to his own Lodge. If that fails to act, then it may proceed 
to try him itself. 

48. It requires seven Master Masons to open a Lodge. In order 
to transact business these seven must be members of the Lodge. 
For work it is not necessary that all should be members of the Lodge. 

49. A brother cannot sign the petition for membership, or the 
degrees for another brother. 

50. It is not necessary to open a Lodge on the First Degree 
when it is known that there is no work on the First and Second 
Degrees. 

By William D. Todd, D. G. M., 1888. 

51. That not merely is it unlawful to initiate or affiliate any 
person engaged in the sale of intoxicating liquors, but that a Mason, 
a member of any of our Lodges, who may have started in the busi- 
ness subsequent to the recent action of the Grand Lodge, was amen- 
able to the charge of unmasonic conduct, and subject to such penalty 
as might be inflicted, after due trial and conviction. (See By- 
Law 125.) 

By the Grand Lodge, 1888. 

52. An unfavorable report is not recognized as a dark ballot. 

53. That the actual traveling expenses of the Grand Master or 
his duly appointed representative, while visiting Lodges, be paid by 
the Grand Lodge, and that the Grand Secretary be authorized to 
draw warrants on the Grand Treasurer for the same from time to 
time. 

54a. Resolved, That this Grand Lodge recognizes no degrees in 
Masonry except those conferred under the regulations of the Grand 
Lodges of the various States and Territories of the United States 
and the governments throughout the world. It admits the following 
named organizations, and none other, to be regular and duly consti- 
tuted Masonic bodies, namely : The General Grand R. A. Chapter of 
the United States, the Grand R. A. Chapters of the several States 
and Territories of the United States and the R. A. Chapters and other 
bodies under their jurisdiction, the General Grand Council of Royal 
and Select Masters of the United States, the Grand Councils of Royal 
and Select Masters of the several States and Territories of the United 



3 16 APPENDIX. 

States and the Councils under their jurisdiction, the Grand Encamp- 
ment of the United States, the Grand Commanderies of the several 
States and Territories of the United States and the Commanderies 
under their jurisdiction, the Supreme Councils of the Ancient and 
Accepted Scottish Rite for the Northern and Southern Jurisdictions 
of the United States, of which Henry L. Palmer and Albert Pike are 
Sovereign Grand Commanders respectively, and the various bodies 
under their jurisdiction. (See No. 04.) 

546. The committee, on bringing before this Grand Lodge some 
plan looking to the establishment of a Masonic Widows' and Orphans" 
Home, made the following report, which was adopted : 

First — We recommend that the funds be raised by setting aside 
twenty-five per cent, of our present surplus, and twenty -five per 
cent, of the annual income of this Grand Lodge, until a sufficient 
amount of money has been raised for the establishment of said 
Home. 

By William D. Todd, Grand Master, 1889. 

55. One who has served as Master or Warden anywhere in a 
chartered Lodge is eligible to election here as Master. 

oCy. That the Master of a Lodge indefinitely suspended and sub- 
sequently re-instated i6 restored to all the rights of a Past Master. 

57. That all re-elected officers must be re-installed, except as to 
the Master, and even as to him if practicable. 

58. That a petition for a dispensation for a new Lodge must be 

accompanied by the recommendation of the nearest Lodge in an 
air-line. 

59. That a ballot found white by the Wardens and Master, but 
one of the members at once rising and stating he had cast a black 
ball, must be declared dark. 

60. That the loss of the sight of an eye by accident, not impair- 
ing the other, does not render a candidate ineligible. 

61. That a rejected candidate for affiliation can re-petition at 
once and as often as he may desire. 

62. That one engaged in the business of selling intoxicating 
liquors, though not conducted by him personally, or in this State, is 
ineligible for the degrees. (By-Law 125— Decisions 86-115-123.) 

By the Grand Lodge, 1889. 

63. Question: Can we bury a Brother with Masonic honors 
where six or eight of the pall-bearers are not Masons ? 

Answer: No. Masonry is absolute. In answer to correspond- 
ence arising out of this, I replied : When Masonic ceremonies are 
called for, none but Masons in good standing can take part. On such 



APPENDIX. 317 

occasions the Lodge is regularly convened, none being admitted but 
those duly qualified and having permission. The Lodge is not called 
off, but proceeds to the house, church, or wherever they may be 
called, take charge of the body (and when they have done so, no one 
except he be a Mason is admitted), repair to the place of deposit, per- 
form their rites and return to the Lodge room, and the Lodge is 
closed in form. The Lodge is a Lodge from the time it is opened 
until it is closed. (Kimball, 1888, approved by Grand Lodge, 1889.) 

64. "At the last session of this Grand Lodge it placed on record 
a resolution declaring what degrees in Masonry it will recognize ; 
and your committee are of the opinion that no so-called Masonic 
bodies, other than those mentioned in that resolution, can be consid- 
ered, in any sense, ' Masonic Bodies ' in this State. 

"Your Committee are of the opinion that that resolution should 
be sufficient to prevent any good Masons, paying allegiance to this 
Grand Lodge, from hereafter becoming members of any bodies 
claiming to be Masonic, other than those mentioned in that reso- 
lution." (See No. 54 a.) 

65. Resolved , That the clause, " take the usual course " at the 
end of Section 61, of By-Laws, be interpreted to mean that the 
written petition of the applicant be referred to an investigating 
committee of three members, which committee shall submit a report 
within one lunar month, as in the case of other petitions for the 
degrees. 

66. Under Section 98 the question of guilt or innocence is to be 
decided by ballot, and a two- thirds vote is necessary to convict. 
Under Section 99 the degree of punishment must be determined by 
a two-thirds vote of the Lodge, whether it be expulsion, indefinite or 
definite suspension or reprimand, and the Lodge having convicted a 
Brother of Masonic offense would be guilty of a gross neglect of its 
Masonic duties should it fail to inflict one of the punishments pro- 
vided by Section 106, and one which, upon a regular appeal, would 
subject the Lodge to discipline. 

67. Resolved, That M. W. Bro. H. P. H. Bromwell, Past Grand 
Master of Illinois and at present a member of Denver Lodge No. 5, 
at Denver, Colorado, be and he is hereby declared duly elected as 
an honorary member of this M. W. Grand Lodge. 

By W. T. Bri dwell, 1890. 

68. A committee appointed by a Lodge to collect testimony can 
exclude from its meetings ail brethren not directly interested in the 
matter. 

69. A brother having served a Lodge as Warden is eligible to 
election as Master, but aside from this occupies no higher place in 
the Lodge than any other member. 



3l8 APPENDIX. 

70. In the absence of general law on the subject, each Lodge 
has the right to limit the time before which a rejected applicant may 
apply again ; but, in the absence of any law, he may apply at any 
time. 

71. Expulsion by a Lodge is from all the rights, privileges and 
benefits of Masonry, and is final unless reversed by the Grand Lodge. 
The Lodge should send notice of such action to other branches of 
the Order of which the expelled was a member. 

72. A brother having received one or more degrees and removes 
from the Jurisdiction of the Lodge which received him, remains the 
material of that Lodge, regardless of where he may go. 

73. A Lodge having suspended one of itB members for non-pay- 
ment of dues, cannot in after years remit the amount and restore 
him to good standing. Suspended or expelled Masons are not 
worthy objects of Masonic charity. 

74. To determine the sufficiency of an objection after ballot, 
have the case heard by your Lodge in accordance with Section 73, 
Grand Lodge By-Laws. A unanimous vote will be necessary to 
entitle the candidate to advancement, the objector not being per- 
mitted to vote. (See By-Law 73.) 

75. Objections to the advancement of a candidate after ballot 
should be investigated by the Lodge. It is optional with the Master 
to order charges preferred and entered into a formal trial, or he can 
order an investigation without the formality of charges. (See By- 
Law 73.) 

76. It is contrary to Masonic custom for Masons to lease their 
Lodge room for dancing or any other secular purposes. * * * A 
Masonic Lodge room is a sacred place and should be regarded with 
the same degree of respect whether the Fraternity own the building 
or lease it. 

77. A person having lost the first joint of the thumb or the first 
three fingers of his right hand is ineligible to be made a Mason. 

78. The Tramp Mason. — Lodges should be informed as to the 
worthiness of such applicants before lending assistance. In all such 
cases where actual necessity is not manifest it is not charity to give. 

79. A Mason carrying a dimit in this jurisdiction more than one 
year, without petitioning for affiliation, has no legal claim on the 
Fraternity. 

80. There is no law requiring a Masdn to state his reason for 
applying for a dimit. He enters the Lodge of his own volition and 
cannot be compelled to remain a member should he elect otherwise. 

81. A certificate of good standing is not sufficient evidence for 
a Lodge to admit a visitor upon. If his regard for Masonry is not 



APPENDIX. 3I9 

sufficient to prompt him to acquire a sufficient degree of Masonic 
intelligence to make himself known, he does not merit recognition. 

82. A Lodge cannot entertain a petition from an applicant who 
has not resided twelve months within its jurisdiction. This is pro- 
hibited by Grand Lodge By-Law No. 55. 

83. Question: Has one Mason the right to go on the witness- 
stand in a criminal case and attempt to impeach the testimony of 
another Mason without first informing him that he would do so ? 
Answer: If the first witness had testified falsely, and by such 
testimony attempted to defeat the end of justice, it would be the 
duty of the second witness to expose such testimony ; but ' if the 
testimony of the first witness was correct, the second witness was 
guilty of gross unmasonic conduct, and he should be dealt with 
accordingly. 

84. Question : A Mason commits homicide, is tried by the court 
and acquitted. Can we accept this as sufficient, or should the Lodge 
hold an investigation? Answer: Yes. The Lodge should take 
cognizance of the matter regardless of the action of the court. 
Courts may err through prejudice, releasing the guilty and punishing 
the innocent. This does not afford an example for a Masonic Lodge 
to pattern after. (See No* 110.) 

85. Lodges desiring to hold real estate should consult Laws of 
Colorado, session of 1879, pages 110 and 111. 

By The Grand Lodge, 1^0. 

86. By-Law 125 was construed to include all persons engaged in 
the business of selling intoxicnting liquors, and to all others in any 
business, selling intoxicating liquors as beverages. (See 62-115-123.) 

By E. L. N. Foster, 1891. 

87. A brother having received the E. A. degree in another 
jurisdiction, is their material, and the F. C. and M. M. degrees can 
only be conferred on him in one of two ways : 

First — The Lodge which conferred the first degree can make a 
request to another Lodge to confer the remaining degrees, when no 
ballot should be taken as to the qualifications of the candidate, but a 
majority vote of the Lodge to do the work would be proper, the 
candidate could then become a member of the Lodge making the 
request, and the fee should be paid to it. The Lodge, however, 
should require proficiency in each preceding degree before confer- 
ring the next. 

Second — The Lodge can ask waiver of jurisdiction, which being 
granted, the candidate can petition in the regular way, setting forth 
the additional facts, accompanied by a certificate of the Lodge that 
conferred the first degree. 



320 APPENDIX. 

88. A request for waiver of jurisdiction must be made before 
ballot. 

89. A brother can not completely sever his connection with the 
Fraternity ; there is no way by which he can be relieved of his 
obligations. 

90. Lodges U. D. can not collect dues, as they have no By-Laws. 
They are governed by the Grand Lodge By-Laws. 

91. The W. M. of a Lodge has authority to discharge an inves- 
tigating committee when it fails to report, but it should only be done 
in exceptional cases ; it is better to give the old committee further 
time. 

92. A Lodge is not legally compelled to pay the funeral expenses 
of a brother, even though one of its own members, but can dispense 
its charity in the way it deems best. 

93. The W. M. of a Lodge errs in refusing to allow a member 
to examine the Lodge records. 

94. A Lodge can not appear as such, to escort a Commandery of 
Knights Templars performing funeral services. If Master Masons 
attend a funeral as a Lodge, they must have charge of the ceremonies. 

95. Section 55, Grand Lodge By-Laws, refers to petitions for 
initiation only. 

96. As no colored Lodges have been recognized in this jurisdic- 
tion, it is improper to permit the use of our Lodge rooms to install 
the officers of so-called colored Lodges. 

97. The regularly elected and appointed officers of a Lodge, 
with the exception of the Tiler, must be members. 

98. The absence of the letter of dispensation of a Lodge renders 
the meeting irregular, and any work done illegal. 

99. A candidate initiated when the letter of dispensation was 
absent, is irregularly made, and should be healed before proceeding 
further. 

100. It is unnecessary to obtain a permit from the Grand Master 
for a Past Master to install the regularly elected officers of a Lodge. 

101. The geographical jurisdiction of Lodges U. D. is the same 
as that of chartered Lodges. 

102. When it is discovered that a petitioner for the degrees re- 
sides without the jurisdiction of the Lodge which received his petition, 
the fact should be spread upon the minutes, and, provided a waiver 
of jurisdiction can not be obtained, the petition and fee should be 
returned to the petitioner, with the information that if he desires 
the degrees he must apply to the Lodge in whose jurisdiction he 
resides. 



APPENDIX. 321 

By John M. Maxwell, 1892. 

103. Grand Lodge By-Law No. 56 covers petitions for affiliation, 
and as a dimit is made a part of the petition for affiliation under 
Grand Lodge By-Law No. 59, the dimit cannot be returned to the 
petitioner unless his petition should be rejected. 

104. No authority is vested in the Grand Master to appoint offi- 
cers of a subordinate Lodge to act during the temporary absence of 
the officers of the Lodge. 

105. Only those whose names appear in the Dispensation and 
those raised under it, can vote upon petitions for the degrees in 
Lodges U. D. 

106. An annual election in a subordinate Lodge held at any 
other time than that designated by the By-Laws of the Lodge is ir- 
regular and void, unless such election is held by virtue of a Special 
Dispensation, granted by the Grand Master. 

107. The Secretary of a Lodge has no authority to issue sum- 
monses for any purpose, unless instructed so to do by the Worshipful 
Master, or the Lodge. 

108. The election to the Mastership of a brother ineligible to 
hold that office, unless by Special Dispensation granted by the Grand 
Master, is irregular and void. 

109. A Lodge having elected a member to the office of Senior 
Warden, upon the refusal of the brother to be installed, cannot at a 
date subsequent to the date for its annual election, elect any one else 
to that office, except by Special Dispensation, granted by the Grand 
Master. 

110. It is the duty of a Lodge to proceed with the trial of a 
brother charged with a Masonic offense, regardless of the action, or 
non-action of the courts of the State. (See No. 84.) 

111. A brother having made application to his Lodge for a 
dimit, can withdraw his application at any time before the Lodge has 
taken action upon it. 

112. A Junior Warden can not prefer charges in his official 
capacity, except by order of the Lodge. 

113. A Lodge U. D. cannot act upon a petition for initiation un- 
less the applicant has resided within the jurisdiction of the Lodge 
U. 13. during the preceding twelve months. (See By-Law 55.) 

114. A man who has lost the left hand at the wrist, is ineligible 
to be made a Mason. 

115. A Lodge cannot entertain the petition of one who is acting 
as the agent of a brewing company, and as such, selling bottled beer 
by the barrel. (See Nob. 62, 86 and 123.) 

21 



322 APPENDIX. 

116. The doctrine of " perpetual jurisdiction " is not recognized 
in this jurisdiction. 

117. For good and sufficient reasons a subordinate Lodge may 
suspend its regular communications, and it is not necessary to have 
the Grand Master's permission therefor. 

118. A brother bringing himself within the requirements of 
Grand Lodge By-Law No. 85, is entitled to a dimit, although he has 
failed to pay an assessment levied by the Lodge, and the W. M. of 
the Lodge should not refuse to sign or withhold the dimit. 

119. A man who is deformed by one leg being shorter than the 
other, is not eligible to receive the degrees in Masonry. 

120. A man who has lost the first two fingers of his right hand, 
is not eligible to receive the degrees in Masonry. 

121. A "physically defective" man, being very lame, is not 
eligible to receive the degrees in Masonry. 

By the Grand Lodge, 1892. 

122. It is clearly the duty of the Master of a Lodge to suspend 
from office an officer of his Lodge for unbecoming or unmasonic con- 
duct, in advance of charges and trial for such conduct. 

123. It is unlawful to receive the petition to be made a Mason 
of a man engaged in selling liquor on commission. (See Nos. 62, 86 
and 115.) 

124. A Masonic apron should be of white leather only. We 
recommend that the presentation of the apron in the First Degree 
be an actual presentation, and that it be made the duty of the 
Secretary of the Lodge to inscribe or have inscribed upon the under 
side of it the name of the brother receiving it, together with the date 
of his initiation, to which shall be added the date of his passing and 
raising when the same shall have been accomplished. 

125. That hereafter, in making the annual returns, the Secre- 
taries of all the Lodges be required to report the ages of all the mem- 
bers. (See By-Law 37.) 



GENERAL INDEX TO LAWS. 



Bxvkbxnces to Szotiohs : C— Constitution ; B— By-Laws ; D— Decisions. 

C. B. D. 
Absence forfeits pay 5 

of Grand Master provided for 20 

of Master provided for 49 

Accused, absence of , at trial 104 

and accuser may be present at trial 101 

Accuser to sign charges 85 

Admitting to membership 81 

Admission to membership may be refused 4 

Advancement, application for 18 

may be stayed 71 

objection to 72 

Affiliate, where a Brother may 32 

who can not _ 125 

Affiliation after expulsion _ 118 

fee for, prohibited 82 

petition for 59 15 

regulated 80 

Ages of members to be reported 125 

Air-line jurisdiction 51 

Amendments to By-Laws 135 

to Constitution 35 

Animal Communication 8 

dues from Lodges... 37 

election, when void... 106 

report of D. D. G. Masters 28 

report of Grand Treasurer.. 21 

report of Grand Secretary 22 

returns of Lodges 36 125 

Appeals, Committee on 4(4) 

Appeal, when taken 110 

if decision is reversed 105 

must be in writing Ill 

Appellate jurisdiction of Grand Lodge 5 

Appellant to give notice Ill 

Application after rejection 69 

for dimit may be withdrawn Ill 

Appointed officers, in Grand Lodge 7 

in Lodges under dispensation 44 

installation of 11 

Approval of journal 18 

Apron, described _ 124 

Assessment, failure to pay 118 

Ballot, cannot be set aside 66 

disclosing one's own _ 67 

for affiliation 80 

forbidden until 62 

for each degree 65 



326 



APPENDIX. 

C. B. Z>. 



Dimit of non-affiliates to be cancelled 89 

can not be withdrawn 12 

issuing duplicate profcfbHed _ 30 

how granted 85 

Lodges nnder dispensation can not grant 11 

signed by 14 

with petition for new Lodge 21 

over one year old 79 

Discipline, non-payment of does cause for r 112 

who subject to 93 

Disclosing ballot forbidden 67 

Dispensation, for new Lodge granted by 18 

to new Lodge, how granted 10 

special when not granted 4 

most be present 9* 

to elect officers 109 

District D. G. Masters 27 

duty of 25-28 

payof 29 

who eligible 27 

Districts, Masonic 26 

Division of question IS 

Divulging result of trial 109 

Donations to library fond 34 

Doable pay not allowed ! 5 

Dropped from roll, restoring those heretofore 122 

Druggists selling liquor 40 

Dues, Grand Lodge, when payable 88 

part payment of 23 

Lodges U.D. cannot collect 90 

Duplicate charters, when issued _ 34 

Duty of Grand Master 15 

of Master of new Lodge 22 

Duties, members not exempt from 81 

of Grand Secretary 22 

of Grand Treasurer 21 

Eastern Star, Order of 9 

Eight petitioners necessary for dispensation 19 

Elected officers installed annually 11 

can decline 19 

Election, annual, when roid 106-109 

of brother ineligible, yoid 108 

of candidates 65 

of Master from the floor 6 

of officers reported 35 

• of officers 27 

majority votes necessary 42 

in Grand Lodge 9 

Elections in Lodges under dispensation prohibited 44 

who may vote at _ 8 

Electioneering for office 43 

Elective officers 7 

Eligibility for office 10 

Emergent Grand Lodge cannot be opened tt 

Entered apprentice failing to pass examination 39 

Evidence of standing of petitioners 21 



I 



APPENDIX. 327 

C. B. D. 

Rumination of ballots 66 

for advancement 75 

Examining committee, second, not to be appointed 91 

Exclusive jurisdiction of Grand Lodge 5 

Exemplification of work by Grand Lecturer 25 

by Lodges 28 

Exempt from Grand Lodge dues 37 

Expenses of new Lodge 18 

Expelled Mason, how restored 119 .. 

when decision is reversed llfl 

Expulsion includes _ — 107 

notice of , given 109 71 

vote necessary for 99 

who amemable to. 8 

Expulsions published with proceedings 107 

Extinct Lodges, duties of officers of 128 

members of.. ._ — . 87 ._ 

Failure of Lodge to be represented 41 

topaydnes 38 

Fee for affiliation prohibited 82 

for charter 31 

for degrees 79 

for dispensation 20 

for special dispensation 25 

forfeited, when 60 

Fees from Lodges nnder dispensation 23 

when returned 73 

Fellowcraft failing to pass examination _ 39 

Filling blanks 15 

Finance, committee on 4(5) 

Forfeiture of fee paid 60 

France, Grand Orient of _ 124 

Funerals, when held 126 

expenses, who to pay 92 

Grand Lodge, adjourns 4 

is supreme authority 5 

may suspend charter 6 41 

may delegate its powers 6 

jurisdiction of 5 

composed of 2 

quorum at._ 4 

vote of officers of 8 

powers of 6 

style of 1 

may reverse decision of Grand Masters 17 

grants charters 26 

may name officers in charter _ 29 

shall recall charters 33 

dues to 87 

dues, when payable 38 

of Hamburg 124 

proceedings, property of 5 

Grand Master, powers and prerogatives of 12 

may convene special 13 

may convene subordinate Lodge 14 



3 28 APPENDIX. 



C. B. D. 

Grand Master, doty of. 15 

may suspend functions of Lodge 16 

may command other officers 19 

may grant dispensations 18 

and Grand Secretary may purchase books 34 

can change location of Lodge 129 

cannot appoint temporary officers 104 

to approve change in By-Laws 13S 

to designate Districts 27 

decisions final 17 

absence provided for 20 

traveling expenses to be paid 53 

Grand Chaplain, duties of 23 

Grand Deacons, daties of SI 

Grand Lecturer, duties and pay of 25 

Grand Librarian, Grand Secretary is 22 

duties of 34 

Grand Marshal, duties of 30 

Grand Officers, title of 2 

elected and appointed 7 

have one vote each 8 

qualifications of 10 

installed annually 11 ... 

pay of 5 

Grand Orator, duties of 24 __ 

Grand Orient of France 124 

Grand Secretary, daties of and salary 22 

when new trial ordered 106 

and Grand Master to purchase books 84 

to give notice of impostors 131 

Grand Stewards, daties of 32 

Grand Tiler, rights and daties of S3 

Grand Treasurer, duties of 21 

Grand Wardens act as Grand Master 20 

Granting dim its 85 

Guilt, how determined 98 

Grievances, Committee on 4(4) 

Hamburg, Grand Lodge of 124 

Hancock, town of , under jurisdiction of 54 

Healing, when required 99 

Honorary membership - 1B0 46 

Incorporate, Lodges should not 28 

Impostors to be reported 131 

Initiated, who can not be 125 

who should be healed 99 

Initiation fee, when forfeited 60 

Installation by proxy forbidden 11 47 

of officers 11 .... 100 

public forbidden 45 

of re-elected Master 46 

of officers of newly chartered Lodge 47 

of Master 48 

Intemperance a crime 125 . 

Investigating Committee may be discharged 91 

Irregular Work 24 96 

Issuing of Charters 36 



APPENDIX. 329 

C. B. D. 

Journal to be read 18 

Junior Grand Warden acts as Grand Master 20 

Junior Warden, cannot prefer charge*, except 112 

Jnrisdiction of Lodges 55 101 

of Lodges U. D 113 

how waived 58-61 

waiver of 25 

over non-affiliates 84 

OTer petitioners 17 

E. A's and F. C's 72 

over E. A's, how gained 87 

perpetual not recognized 116 

Jurisprudence, Committee on 4(2) 

Legislation, power of Grand Lodge over 5 

Lecturer, Grand, duties of 25 

librarian. Grand, duties of 34 

Library fond, donations to 84 

fees paid to 25 

Liquor seller, ineligible for degrees 62-123 

defined 86 

Liquor selling cause for discipline 125 51 

Liquors excluded 125 

Location of Lodge, how changed 129 

Lodge By-Laws can regulate applications 18 

can try f or off enses 47 

cannot act as escort 94 

not legally compelled to pay funeral expenses . 92 

cannot be opened unless 49 

changing by-laws 183 

demiseof : 128 

dues must be paid _ _ 2 

dues, part payment of 23 

duty of, on appeal 110 

failing to meet 1 38 

failing to inflict punishment 66 

functions of , may be suspended 15 38 

granting charity 131 

how opened 50 

jurisdiction 51 47 

may stop advancement _ 71 

may issue summons 90 

may be convened by Grand Master 14 

must conform to established rules 15 

not act on petition unless 55 

not act on petition unless 57 

represented in Grand Lodge by 1 

must be represented in Grand Lodge 40 

room, renting of 2 

shall pay dues 37 

to determine as to trial 96 

to determine guilt and punishment 100 

to report officers elected 35 

room not to be leased 76 

waiving jurisdiction 25 

Lodge, Under Dispensation, appointed officers in 44 

can not elect officers 44 



330 APPENDIX. 

C. B. D. 

Lodge Under Dispensation can not grant dimits 11 

can not collect dues 90 

how governed 23 

jurisdiction of 101-113 

not chartered except 27 __ 

whorotesin 105 

Lodge, cannot receive petition of 115-128 

colored __ _ 20-76 

concurrent jurisdiction of 52 

having concurrent jurisdiction, daties of 58 

desiring to hold real estate 85 

of instruction 25 

may suspend regular communications, 117 

to be visited by D.D.Q. Masters..... 28 

to proceed with trial 110 

under dispensation, committee on 4(3) 

Loss of charter provided for 34 

Majority can not surrender charter 32 

of votes necessary in elections 9 42 ._ 

Masonic correspondence, committee on 4(1) 

degrees recognized 54 

districts 26 

by whom designated 27 _ 

jurisprudence, committee on 4(2) 

rights, how lost 94 

year ends 36 

Masonic Widows 1 and Orphans' Home 54 

Marshal, Grand, duties of 30 

Masons made in Lodge under dispensation 10 

witness against Masons 83 

can not completely sever connection 89 

Master, choice of 6 

exempt from Lodge jurisdiction 93 

may appoint proxy 1 

may issue summons 90 

may fill vacancy 44 

may refust to admit visitors 4 

may stop advancement 71 

may suspend from office ^ 122 

nominated in petition for charter 29 

of new Lodge, qualifications for " 20 

of new Lodge, duty of 22 

qualifications of 50 

re-elected, installation of 46 57 

signing dimits 14 

service as, anywhere, eligible to election 55 

suspended and re-instated 56 

to see his Lodge represented 40 

Meetings of Grand Lodge _ 3 6 

Members of Grand Lodge 2 

have one vote 8 

may be refused admission 4 

dutiesof 7 

must vote 9 

must vote 60 

to speak but twice 8 



APPENDIX. 331 

C B. D. 

Members may examine records OS 

Membership necessary to hold offioe 10 

how disturbed 22 

how gained _ 78 

how gained after expulsion 118 

Minutes to be reed 18 

Motion moat be seconded 10 

must be in writing 11 

Motions while questions are under debate 12 

Mount Princeton Lodge No. 40, jurisdiction of 54 

Neglect to pay Grand Lodge dues 88 

Negroes, recognition of 20 

New Lodges, dispensation for 18 

New petition, when required _ 60 

New trial, if ordered, duty of Grand Secretary 105 

Nominations for offioe prohibited 4S 

Non-affiliates, conduct of 84 

Non-affiliation, cause for discipline 88 

Non-intercourse, discretion used by Lodges 128 

with France and Hamburg 124 

Non-payment of dues, cause for discipline 112 

form of charges for 118 

trial for 114 

penalty for 115 

Non-resident petitioners 58 .: 

Notice to Lodges haying concurrent jurisdiction 58 

Objection after ballot 72 74 

before ballot 45 

entered of record 73 

to yisitors 182 

to advancement 75 

Obligation, cannot be relieved of 89 

Officers can not dimit 86 

elected, can decline 19 

elected, and appointed 7 

installed, can not refuse to serve 42 

must be members 97 

Officers of Grand Lodge 2 

of Lodge may be suspended from office 122 

refuse to be installed 109 

to exemplify work 28 

under dispensation appointed 44 

of new Lodges recommended 19 

of new Lodges, who may install 47 110 

pay of , in Grand Lodge 5 

re-elected must be installed 57 

Opening of Grand Lodge, quorum for 4 

Orator, Grand, duties of 24 

Order, members must keep 7 

Original jurisdiction of Grand Lodge 5 

Orphans' Home 546 

Pall-bearers must be Masons 68 

Part payment of dues 23 

Past Grand Master member of Grand Lodge 2 

Fast Deputy Grand Master member of Grand Lodge 2 



332 APPENDIX. 

C. B. Z>. 

Past Master's degree not essential 48 

Pay of members of Grand Lodge 5 

Pay of Grand Lecturer 25 

Payment of dues after suspension 116 

Per diem, committee on 4(5) 

Personally interested cannot vote 9 

Petitions for change of name or location 4(3) __ 

Penalties enumerated 106 

Penalty for non-payment of dues 115 

Percentage allowed Secretary of new Lodge _ 30 

Perpetual jurisdiction 116 

Petition for affiliation 59 15 

for affiliation 80 82 

for charter 28 

for dispensation must set forth 19 

for dispensation, how recommended 20-58 

for initiation cannot be withdrawn 56 

for part of the degrees _ 61 _ 

for special dispensation 25 16 

of liquor seller 115-123 

of non-resident 58 

not acted upon unless _ 55 82 

when acted upon 57 

when returned 1.. 102 

who cannot sign _ 49 

Physical qualifications 74 21-22 

Physical qualifications 26-41 

Physical qualifications 60-77 

Physical qualifications . _ 114-119 

Physical qualifications .^ 119-121 

Place of Annual Communication _ 8 

Powers of Grand Lodge 5-6 

and prerogatives of Grand Master 12 

Presentation of apron 124 

Proceedings of Grand Lodge, property of Lodge 5 

of trials, when furnished 105 _. 

to be read 134 

Proxy installation forbidden 11 47 

Proxies, who may give 8 1 

qualifications for _ 1 

Public installation forbidden 45 ... 

Punishment, majority necessary to inflict 99 

Purchase of books 34 

Qualifications of Grand officers 10 

of candidates 60 21-22 

of candidates 74 26-41 

of candidates 77 60-61 

of candidates 125 77-114 

of candidates 119-120 

of candidates 121 

of Grand Secretary 22 

of Grand Treasurer 21 

of proxies 1 .__ 

of Master of new Lodge 20 

of witnesses 102 



APPENDIX. 333 

C. B. D, 
Question* may be divided ^ 13 

to be answered by Committee on Character 62 88 

Quorum in Grand Lodge _ 4 

in Lodge 48 

Rank of grand officers 2 

Reconsideration of vote 14 

Recommending new Lodge 8 

Recommending new Lodge 20 

Recognition of residents receiving degrees elsewhere 128 

Records, who may examine 28 98 

Refusal to pay Grand Lodge dues 38 

to be installed 109 

Rejected candidates re-applying 68 70 

Rejected candidates re-applying 18 

Rejection of candidates not reported _ 70 

Removal after petitioning 17 

Renting of Lodge rooms 2 

Report of Grand Secretary 22 

of Grand Treasurer 21 

of Lodge Elections 35 

Reports of committees most be in writing' 16 

of Committee on Character, contents of 62 

unfavorable, not a dark ballot.. 52 

of District Depnty Grand Master 28 

Representatives to Grand Lodge, qualifications of 2 

pay of 5 

Repaimand, who amenable to _ 8 

how given 108 

vote required for 99 

Residence of petitioners for dispensation 19 

of petitioners for initiation 55 37 

Restoration after suspension for non-payment of does 116 73 

by action of Grand Lodge 117 

of expelled Masons 118 

of expelled Masons 119 

after definite suspension 120 

after indefinite suspension 121 

of those stricken from roll 122 

Returns to be examined by Grand Secretary 22 

and records of Lodge under dispensation 23 

of Lodges, under dispensation. Committee on 4(3) 

most be made 2 

when to be made 36 

what to contain 125 

Rights of Masons raised in Lodges nnder dispensation 10 

of Tiler 33 .... 24 

Seal required on official notices 31 

Secretary, Grand, duties of and salary 22 

of new Lodge, salary prohibited to — 30 

Second to motion nec e ss a ry 10 

ballot, when allowed 66 

Senior Grand Warden acts as Grand Master 20 

Session committees 3 

Special Committees, who may call 13 

Standing Committees 4 



334 APPENDIX. 

C. B. D. 

Stewards, Grand, duties of 82 

St. Elmo, town, under jurisdiction of 54 

Subordinate Lodges, who represents 1 

Suicides, burial of 1 

Summons, who may issue 90 107 

what to contain 91 

must be obeyed 92 

Surrender of Charter 32 

Suspended, who may be 8 

from office, who may be 122 

Suspended Masons, restoration of 120 

Suspended Masons, restoration of 121 

Suspension, notice given of, and published in proceedings 109 

Tote required for 99 

Teaching of unauthorized work 127 

Temporary officers of Lodge 104 

Testimony taken by commission 96 

to be taken in writing 100 

to be taken in writing 103 

Timeof annual Communication _ S 

Title of Grand Lodge i 1 

Grand Officers 2 

Tiler, Grand, duties and rights of 88 

place of 7 

rights of -. 24 

not necessarily a member 97 

Tin Cup Lodge No. 52, jurisdiction of 54 

Traveling expenses of members paid 5 

Treasurer, Grand, duties and qualifications of 21 

Transgressing rules 8 

Trial, commissioners to fix time of 100 

in civil or criminal courts 84 

Lodge to fix time of 96 

to be by Lodge or commission 96 

may proceed if accused is absent 104 

not affected by courts 110 

Trials, how held 97 

for non-payment of does 114 

Two or more Lodges in same town have concurrent jurisdiction 52 

Unanimous ballot necessary 65 

Unauthorized work 127 

Unprivileged questions 15 

Unworthy applicants for charity 131 

Use of Lodge room 96 

Vacancy in Grand Mastership provided for 20 

Verdict, how arrived at 98 

Visit Lodges, D. D. G. Master must 28 

Visitor, objection to 132 

Visiting brethren, committee on 3(2) 

Visitors, evidence required of 34 

Vote, Grand Tiler not entitled to 88 

honorary members cannot 180 

in Grand Lodge, who may 8 

members most 9 



APPENDIX. 335 

C. B. D. 

Vote iieoessary to inflict penalties 99 

reconsidering of 14 

those interested cannot 9 

who may, in Lodge U. D 106 

Votes, in Grand Lodge 1 

members cannot cast more than three 8 

necessary for election 9 

Grand Lodge 1 

necessary to amend Constitution 35 

necessary to amend By-laws 135 

Waiver of jurisdiction 25-8S 

when required 61 

request for, when made 88 

Waiving jurisdiction, how expressed 58 

Warden, Grand, act as Grand Master 20 

Wardens, may appoint proxy 1 

nominated in petition for charter i 29 

in Lodges under dispensation 50 

may preside 49 

place occupied by 89 

Withdrawal of petition forbidden 56 

Witnesses, accused and accuser present at examination of 101 

qualification of 102 

Work, Grand Lodge to establish 6 

out of regular order 24 

to be exemplified in Grand Lodge 25 

to be exemplified in Lodges 28 

when illegal 98 

Written petition for Charter required 28 

Working material for Lodges 39 



FORMS. 



PETITION FOE MEMBEKSHIP. 



To the Worshipful Master, Wardens and Brethren of ..Lodge 

No.—,A.F.d;A.M. 

The Petition of the subscriber respectfully represents that 
he is a Master Mason in good standing, and was formerly a 

member of Lodge No , in the town of 

under the jurisdiction of the Grand Lodge of 

- - , from which he has regularly withdrawn, 

a certificate of which from the Secretary of said Lodge accompanies 
this, his petition, and he now prays admission as a member of your 
Lodge, if found worthy. 

His place of residence is _ By 

occupation he is a . His age is 

years. 

Dated. __ , A. D. 18... 

Recommended by 



> 



Master qs„„-j 
Masons. St ^ ned 



' Endorsed on the back as follows : 

Petition op _ _ for Membership. 

Received , 18---, and referred to Brethren 

_^_ _ Report due , 18 

Ballot had 18..- Result _ 

The committee to whom was referred the petition of Brother 

, beg leave to report that they have duly 

considered the same and have carefully and diligently inquired into 
the standing and character of the petitioner, and find him to be 

worthy, and recommend that the prayer of his petition be 

granted. 

Given under our hands this day of , A. D. 18 



» Committee. 



APPENDIX. 337 



PETITION TO BE MADE A MASON. 



To the Worshipful Master, Warden and Brethren of... Lodge 

No..-,A.F.<5b A.M 

The Petition of the subscriber respectfully represents that hav- 
ing long entertained a favorable opinion of your ancient institution, 
he is desirous, if found worthy, of being admitted a member thereof, 
If accepted, he pledges himself to a cheerful obedience to all the 
requirements of your By-Laws, and to the established rules and reg- 
ulations of the Fraternity. His age is _ . years ; his occupation 

is that of a ; his residence 

Dated at _ , this day of A. L. 58... 

Recommended by 



» Master Masons 



The following questions are also required to be answered in writing by the 
petitioner, and the answers annexed to said petition : 

Where were you born? 

How long have you lived in Colorado? 

How long have you lived within the jurisdiction of this Lodge ? 

Have you ever applied for the degrees of Masonry, and, if so 
when and in what Lodge? 

Do you believe in the existence of one ever-living and true God? 

Do you know of any physical, legal or moral reason which should 
prevent you from becoming a Freemason? 

Are you engaged in any manner in the liquor traffic ; and do you 
agree not to become so engaged in the future? 

On the back of the petition shall be the following : 
Petition for initiation of Mr Recommended 

by - 

Petition received , 18_._ Referred to 

Report due , 18. .. Report received 

,18... Ballot had 

18... Result 



22 



33^ APPENDIX. 



REPORT OF COMMITTEE. 



Hall op Lodge No t A. F. & A. M. 

To Worshipful Master, Wardens and Brethren of said Lodge ; 

Your Committee, to who was referred the petition of Mr. 

_ for initiation, find in answer to the below 

interrogatories as follows: 

1. What is his age? 

2. Is he married or single? 

3. If married, is he living with his wife? 

4. What is his occupation and where is he employed? 

5. Is he physically qualified for admission? 

6. What is the character of his company and associates? 

7. Is he addicted to the intemperate use of intoxicating liquors? 

8. Does he gamble? 

9. Does he habitually use profane or indecent language? 

10. Has he licentious or immoral habits? 

11. Is he a law-abiding citizen? 

12. Does he possess sufficient education and intelligence to un- 
derstand and value the doctrines and tenets of Masonry? 

13. Has he ever made previous application for the degrees? and, 
if so, where and when? 

14. State any other facts of value to the Lodge io arriving at a 
correct conclusion. 



Given under our hands this day of. 

A. D. 18. ... 



1 



► Committee. 



APPENDIX. 339 



SUMMONS. 



Hall, op Lodge No , A. F. & A. M. 

Colorado 18 



Brother. 



By order of W. M., you are hereby sum- 
moned to attend a Communication of Lodge No 

A. P. A A. M., on - evening, the day of 

A. L. 58 , at o'clock, at the usual place 

of meeting. 

Witness my hand and the seal of said Lodge this 

day of — A.L.58 

Secretary. 



Endorsed on back as follows: 
SUMMONS. 

To Bro 

Service — I have served the within summons by 

Witness my hand this day of A.L.58 



CHARGES FOR NON-PAYMENT OF DUES. 



By order of Lodge No , A. F. & A. M. f I hereby 

charge Brother with unmasonic conduct in 

neglecting to pay Lodge dues from the day of _ 

to the day of 

Bated _ A. D. 18. 



Junior Warden. 



340 



APPENDIX. 



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APPENDIX. 341 



PETITION FOR DISPENSATION. 



To M. W. _ Grand Master of Masons in Colorado : 

We, the undersigned, being Master Masons in good standing, 
having the prosperity of the Fraternity at heart, and desirous of 
exerting our best endeavors to promote and diffuse the genuine 
principles of Freemasonry, respectfully represent that we are desir- 
ous of forming a new Lodge in County, 

Colorado, to be named Lodge; that the 

estimated population of said _ is.. ; that 

the towns of __ will be 

included in the proposed jurisdiction ; that the material in the juris- 
diction is sufficient to sustain a healthy and reputable Lodge ; that 
all the petitioners are residents within the proposed jurisdiction ; 
that they have at their disposal suitable quarters for the practice of 
Masonic rights ; that the expenses incident to said new Lodge (have 
been donated) (are to be paid at a future time by said Lodge); they 
therefore pray for letters of dispensation empowering them to 
assemble as a regular Lodge and discharge the duties of Masonry in 
a regular and constitutional manner, according to the forms of the 
Fraternity and the regulations of the Grand Lodge. 

They have nominated and do recommend Bro _ to 

be the first W. M.; Bro to be the first S. W., and 

Bro to be the first J. W. 

If the prayer of this petition shall be granted, they promise a 
strict compliance to the orders of the Grand Master and the Consti- 
tution, laws and regulations of the Grand Lodge. 

Dated 




NAKK. LODGE. NO. LOCATION OF LODGE. 



These signatures most give all the names of each petitioner in full % and the 
name, number and location of the Lodge from which they hold dim its or certifi- 
cates. Petitioners from other than Colorado Lodges mast present dimits. Those 
from Colorado Lodges most either present dimits or certificates that their does 
are paid np to the next meeting of the Grand Lodge. 



34 2 APPENDIX. 



RECOMMENDATION FOR NEW LODGES. 



Haul op Lodge, No A.F. & A. M.J 

, Colorado, ,18... ) 

At a regular Communication of said Lodge, on even- 
ing, , 18 , the following, among other 

proceedings, were had and entered of record: 

Bro offered the following preamble 

and resolution, which was adopted: 

Whereas, Brothers (those named in the 

petition) have requested this Lodge to recommend their petition to 
the M. W. Qrand Master for a dispensation to establish a Lodge 

at ,in the county of and State 

of Colorado, under the name of Lodge U. D.,with 

Bro as W. M., Bro as 

S. W.,and Bro. .' as J. W.; and 

Whereas, The Brother named for Master in said petition has 
exemplified the work before this Lodge, and this Lodge is fully 
advised as to all matters relating to said petition; therefore, 

Resolved, That this Lodge does hereby recommend the M. W. 
Grand Master to grant the prayer of said petition, and does hereby 
certify that the statements contained in said petition are true, and 
that the Brother therein named for Master is qualified to open and 
close a Lodge and to confer the three degrees. 

I, Secretary of said Lodge, do 

hereby certify that the above is a correct transcript from the records 
of said Lodge. 

Witness my hand and the seal of said Lodge at 

Colorado, this day of , A. D. 18 



[seal,] Secretary. 



t 



APPENDIX. 343 



PETITION FOE CHAETEE. 



To the W. M. Grand Lodge of Colorado : 

The undersigned respectfully represent that on the day 

of , A. L. 58 , a dispensation was issued by the 

Grand Master for the formation of a new Lodge at , in 

the County of _, Colorado, by the name 

of _ Lodge; that on the day 

of ..next ensuing, said Lodge was opened and organized, 

and has sinoe continued successfully to work during the period 
named in said dispensation, as will appear from its records and 
returns, herewith presented; and that it is the earnest desire of the 
members of said Lodge that its existence may be perpetuated. 

They therefore pray that a charter be granted to said Lodge, by 

the name of... Lodge, with such number as the Qrand 

Lodge may assign it, and recommend that Bro be 

named therein as Master; Bro as Senior 

Warden, and Bro as Junior Warden; 

promising, as heretofore, strict obedience to the orders of the Grand 
Master and conformity to the Constitution, laws and regulations of 
the Grand Lodge. 

We herewith submit a copy of our proposed By-Laws. 
Dated at , this , 18. .. 

[Names.] 



This most be signed by each petitioner, giving all their names in full. All 
whose names appeared in the dispensation, and all raised in the Lodge while work- 
ing under the dispensation, are eligible to petition for charter. Should it be 
impossible to obtain the sign at area of all, their names should be given beneath the 
■ignatares, with a statement why they have not been formally signed, and a certifi- 
cate from the Master added, that it is their wish to become charter members; and 
should any non- affiliate Masons, not named in the dispensation, wish to become 
charter members, they may do so; Provided, They shall have received the unani- 
mous endorsement of the Lodge under dispensation; expressed by ballot. The 
dimits of snch must be forwarded with this petition. 



fr ' 



(L 



>•• 






^ 



344 



APPENDIX. 



COMMISSION TO CONSTITUTE A NEW LODGE. 



Office of the M. W. Grand M aster. 

,18— 

To all whom these presents may concern, 

And especially to Bro 

Whereas, On , 189.., a Charter was 

granted by the M. W. Grand Lodge of Colorado, A. P. & A. M., 

to Lodge No , located at , Colorado; 

and, 

Whereas, Being myself unable to attend to constitute said 
Lodge, and reposing full trust and confidence in the wisdom and 

discretion of Bro , I do hereby appoint him 

as my proxy to convene and organize said Lodge at its hall, in the 
town aforesaid, to fully constitute, solemnly consecrate and dedicate 
said Lodge, to whom a Charter has been granted and issued by the 
M. W. Grand Lodge, and to install the officers named in said Charter 
and to give the Lodge such instructions as to the laws and regula- 
tions of this Grand Lodge as their circumstances seem to require. 
And he is further required, immediately after the performance of the 
said duties, to make return of this commission, and of his proceedings 
under the same, together with a list of the officers installed by him, 
to the Grand Secretary, at his office in 

Given under my hand and seal, this day of 

18..., at , Colorado. 

Fraternally, 



Grand Master. 



r 



' / 



•}V^ 



r 



PROCEEDINGS 



OF THE 



M. W. Grand Lodge 



OF 



A. F. & A. M. OF COLORADO, 



AT THE 



33d Annual Communication 



HELD AT 



Denver, September 19 and 20, 



A. D. 1893— A. L. 5893. 



Ordered that these Proceedings be read in each Lodge. 

— See Sec. 134 of By-Laws. 



DENVER, COLORADO: 

W. F. Robinson & Co,, Printers, 

1893. 



( 



THENEWYORK 

PUBLICLIBRARY 



TILOEN FOUNDATION*. I 

- 897 JnPAvn OFFICERS, 1893-1894. 



JETHRO C. 8ANFORD, Durango G. M. 

WM. L. BU8H, Idaho Springe ^ D. G. M. 

WM. D. PEIRCE, Denver 8. G. W. 

GEORGE W. ROE, Pueblo J. G. W. 

FRANK CHURCH, Denver G. Treas. 

ED. C. PARMELEE, Masonic Temple, Denver G. 8ec. 

ANDREW ARMSTRONG, Fort Collins G. Chaplain 

FRANK P. SECOR, Longmont G. Orator 

CROMWELL TUCKER, Denver G. Lecturer 

WM. W. ROLLER, Salida , G. Marshal 

HORACE T. DeLONG, Grand Junction S. G. D. 

HARRY E. WILSON. Colorado Springs J. G. D. 

GEORGE F. LEWI8, Highlands , 8. G. S. 

WALLACE A. MERRILL, Bald Mountain J. G. 8. 

THOMAS LINTON, Denver G. Tiler 



COMMITTEE ON JURISPRUDENCE. 

ROGER W. WOODBURY Denver 

WM. D. TODD Denver 

JAMES H. PEABODY... Canon Citj 



COMMITTEE ON CORRESPONDENCE. 

L. N. GREENLEAF Denver 

JOSEPH W. MILSOM Caflon Citj 

ANDREW KELLOCK Telluride 



The Thirty-fourth Annual will be held in Denver, Tuesday, 
September 18th, 1894. 



PROCEEDINGS 



OF THE 



GRAND LODGE OF COLORADO 



AT THE 



Annual Communication, 

Held September 19th and 20th, 1893. 



Denver, Tuesday, Sept. 19, 1893. 

The M. W. Grand Lodge of A. F. and A. Masons of 
Colorado, commenced its Thirty-third Annual Communi- 
cation at Masonic Temple, in Denver, on the third Tues- 
day of September, 1893, at 10 o'clock a. m. 

The Grand Lodge was opened in ample form by the 
M. W. Grand Master, with prayer by the Grand Chaplain, 
the following Grand Officers and other members occupy- 
ing their respective places: 

GRAND OFFICERS. 

WM. D. WRIGHT (84) G. M. 

JETHRO C. 8ANFORD (46) D. G. M. 

WM. L. BUSH (2(5) 8. G. W. 

WM. D. PEIRCE (7) J. G. W. 

FRANK CHURCH (5) G. Tbkas. 

ED. C. PARMELEE (48) G. Sec. 

R. J. VAN VALKENBURG (50) G. Chaplain 

T. B. MacDONALD (32) G. Orator 

CLAY M. VAN (84) G. Lecturer 

HENRY T. WEST (20) D. D. G. M. 

JOHN WILLIAM8 (13) ..I). D. G. M. 

GEO. W. ROE (151 D. D. G. M. 

WM. W. ROLLER (57) G. Marshal 

JUDSON E. COLE (49) S. G. D. 

HORACE T. DsLONG (55) J.G. D. 

ANDREW KELLOCK (56) S.G.8. 

THOMAS LINTON 5) _ _ G. Tiler 

And representatives from 80 chartered Lodges (all but 
Xos. 64 and 80). 



4 PROCEEDINGS OF THE [1893 

COMMITTEES APPOINTED. 

The M. W. Grand Master appointed the following com- 
mittees: 

ON CREDENTIALS. 

GRAND SECRETARY (48), 
JOSEPH W. MILSOM (15), 
H. J. VAN WETERING (49). 

TO EXAMINE VISITING BRETHREN. 

MATT ADAMS (5), 
J. F. DRESCHER (7), 
C. E. REED (7). 

REPORT ON CREDENTIALS. 

The Committee on Credentials presented their report, 
which, with others from said committee, showed the fol- 
lowing Grand Officers, Permanent Members, Representa- 
tives from Lodges and Grand Representatives present 
during the session. 

GRAND OFFICERS. 

WM. D. WRIGHT (84) G. M. 

JETHRO C. 8ANFORD(46) D. G. M. 

WM. L. BU8H (26) 8.G. W. 

WM. D. PEIRCE (7) J. G. W. 

FRANK CHURCH (5) G. Tbkas. 

ED. C. PARMELEE (48) G. Sec. 

R. J. VAN VALKENBURG (50) G. Chaplain 

T. B. MaoDONALD (32) . , G. Orator 

CLAY M. VAN (84) G. Lecturer 

HENRY T. WEST {'20) D. D. G. M. 

JOHN W1LLIAM8 (13) D. D. G. M. 

GEORGE W. ROE (15) D. D. G. M. 

WM. W. ROLLER (57) ..G. Marshal 

JUD80N E. COLE (49) ...8. G. D. 

HORACE T. DeLONG (55) J. G. D. 

ANDREW KELLOCK (56) S. G. S. 

THOMAS LINTON (5) G. Tiler 

PERMANENT MEMBERS. 

Past Grand Masters 

JOHN M. CHIV1NGTON (7), 
ARCHIBALD J. VAN DEREN (22), 
WEBSTER D. ANTHONY (7), 
HARPER M. ORAHOOD(ll), 
CORNELIUS J. HART Q7), 
ROGER W. WOODBURY (86), 
BYRON L. CARR (23), 
LAWRENCE N. GREENLEAF (5), 
FRANK CHURCH (5), (Grand Treasurer.) 



[1893 



GRAND LODGE OF COLORADO. 



ANDREW 8AGENDORF (13), 
JAMES H. PEABODY (15), 
GEORGE WYMAN (23), 
ALBERT H. BRANCH (35), 
GEORGE K. KIMBALL (1), 
WILLIAM D. TODD (7), 
WILLIAM T. BR1DWELL (15), 
EBXEST LxXEVE FOSTER (12), 
H. P. H. BROWN ELL (5). (Honorary.) 



EEPEESENTATIVES FKOM LODGES. 



5AXXOFLODOB. 

Golden City No. 1, 

GoldeD. 

Nevada No. 4 

Bald Mountain. 



Denver No. 5 



ben 



▼er. 



Central No. ft, 

Central City. 

Union No. 7, Denver. 

Black Hawk No. 11. 
Black Hawk. 

Washington No. 12, 
Georgetown. 

El Paso No. 13, 
Colorado Springs. 

Colombia No. 14, 

Booider. 

Mount Moriah No. 15, 
Canon City 

Pueblo No. 17. 

Pneblo. 

Collins No. 19, 

Fort Collins. 

Occidental No. 20. 

Greeley. 

Weston No. 22 

Littleton. 

St. Vrain No. 23, 

Longmont. 

Doric No. 25. 

Fairplay. 

Idaho Springs No. 26, 
Idaho springs. 

Haerfano No. 27, 

Walsenbarg. 

Las Animas No. 28, 
Trinidad. 



[Those present in Italics.] 

( Wm, P. Benedict W. M.. 

I John H. Parker S. W._ 

( Nicholas Koenig J. W.. 

! Francis M. Mayhew W. M. 
Wallace A. Merrill S. W. 
Charles L. Cooper.. _.J. W. 

( Robert Hamilton - W. M. 

4 Wm. L. H. Millar 8. W.. 

(Matt Adam* J. W.. 

( Ferdinand French W. M.. 

\ Charles Ellis 8. W._ 

(Wm. B. Beall J. W.. 

! Lewis C. Greenlee W. M.. 
Calvin E. Reed w. W._ 
John F. Drescher J. W.. 

I James f. Richards W. M.. 

< Norman Cbatfield 8. W.. 

(A. F. Grntzmacber J. W.. 

( John L. Carlson W. M.. 

< Walter A. Garrett 8. W.. 

(Henry H.Nasb J. W.. 

I Henry G. Berry W. M.. 

< David H.Rice 8. W.. 

[Raymond Reed J. W.. 

( John L. Church W. M.. 

•< Bhep. L. Madera S. 

( Ernest L. Guilford J. 

! Joseph W.Milsom W. 
Geo. H. Kellenberger 8. W. 
Henry L. Price • J. W._ 

(Frank A Wells W. M.. 

\ Charles W. Keesler 8. W.. 

(Bishop D. V. Reeve J. W.. 

( Frank J. Annis _W. M.. 

\ George A. Webb 8. W._ 

(Frank P. 8tover J. W.. 

XChnrlenE Stanley W. M.. 

< John M. B. Pelrekin 8. W.. 

( Charles Heaton .J. W.. 

( W. W. Chapman W. M._ 

\l.M. Barr 8. W.. 

( C. D. McAuliff. J. W._ 

( Frank P. Secor W. M.. 

< Charles J. Gregg .8. W._ 

( Frank B. Davis J. W.. 

( John Z. Walker W. M._ 

AJacob Adler 8. W._ 

(A. L. Peterson J. W.. 

John J.Sh^rwin W. M._ 

Joseph E. Chester 8. W._ 

Wm. Mitchell J. W._ 

Charles O. Unfug W.M.. 

FredUnfng 8. W._ 

JohnP.Kearne J. W.. 

S Frank D. Goodale W. M._ 
John Humphrey _ S. W._ 
Harry B. McKinney J. W._ 



PBOXIKP. 

N .Koenig. 
A T . Koenig. 



R. Harvey. 
R. Harvey. 
R. Harvey. 



.John L. Carlson. 



W.. 
W.. 
M.. 



...Geo. S. Adams. 



...J. T. Little. 



...F.A. Weils. 



.Jos.R. Wills. 
.A. Armstrong. 
.A. Armstrong. 



. C. E. Stanley. 
C. E. Stanley. 



F. P. Secor. 



C. O. Unfug. 
C. O. Unfug. 

.Frank V. Goodale. 
Frank D. Goodale. 



<> 



PROCEEDINGS OF THE 



[1893 



NAME OP LODGE. 



Del Norte No. 29. 

Del Norte. 

King Solomon No. 30, 
Las Animas. 

Booth Paeblo No. 31, 
Pneblo. 



George A. Willis W. H . 

Jared H. Burghardt 8. W... 

James H. Baxter J. W._ 

Silas G.Wright.. W. M... 

John A. Marphy S. W... 

Thomas Harry J. W... 

William L. Hartman. W. M.. 

Richard J. Bruner 8. W... 

. Frank G. Mirrick J. W... 

/x,. o „ k Mrt QO (J. W. Rambo W. M... 

Ohve Branch No. 32.) WiUiam yy. Iden 8. W.. 

Saguache. } Heino von Heimburg J. W... 

a»T, t„«« v„ «w (E. W.Hodges W -JS" 

SanJuanNo 33, ) J. F.Clark 8. W... 

8ilverton.^ He Mpldrnm j. w.. 

David 8. Hoffman W. M... 

George J. Richard 8. W... 

John L. Kinsey J. W... 

John F. Armington W. M. . . 

Wm. W. Coble 8. W.. 

, George Tucker J. W... 

t James Shanks W. M... 

X Charles G. Matthew* 8. 

( August Koppe J. 

w • 



PROXIES. 

. E. R. Hoyt. 
.E. R. Hoyt. 
.E. R. Hoyt. 
That. Harry. 
Thos. Harry. 



Crystal Lake No. 34, 
Lake City. 

Ionic No. 35. 

Leadville. 



. R. J. Bruner. 
. Wm. W. Iden. 

.Wm. W.Iden. 

D. Umbell. 

LK Umbell. 
. D. Umbell 
.Chas. A. Gunst. 

Chas. A. Gunst. 
.Chas. A. Gunst. 



Rosita No. 36, 



.John F. Armington. 
.C. G. Matthetcs. 



Rosita. 



W. 
W. 
M. 



{James K. Herring W. M 

Ouray No. 37, Ouray. \ Charles W. Haskins 8. W 

/ George C. Pierce J. W 



Silver Cliff No. 3*, 

Silver Cliff. 

Gunnison No. 39, 

Gunnison. 

Pitkin No. 40, 



i John Dietz W. M. 

-; Will J. Orange 8. W. 

L.F.Jackson J. W. 

Eugene P. Shove W. M.. 

Walker Burnett 8. W. 

Alexander Gullett J. W.. 

John F. Chrustal W. M. 

o.-»ut_ -s George W. Eastman 8. W.. 

PltWn -?JohnC.THtman J. W.. 

u usn - w~ ii ( Bernard Herzbach W. M. 

Schiller No. II, ) Frank WaJter j$. W\ 

Denver.^ Jo8eil|l Grwor J# w> 

,, . ... v ... ( John H. Freeberg W. M. 

( onnthian No. 42, ) j w# w oodtord y s. W. 

kokonio. ] Samner Whitney J. W. 

f- i m~ io ( Geo. E. Simonton W. M.. 

LagleNo.43, > Alfred G. Mays S. W 

Red Cliff. I William H . jf van8 j. w. 

Wm.H. Hirst W. M. 

Fred W. Swanson 8. W. 

8. D. Carelton J. W. 

Wm. V.Casey W. M. 

R. R. Gibbon 8. W. 

Frank A. Neiderberger J. W. 

(Geo. V. Copp W. M. 

rwo„„« 3 Elmer E. Sohalles 8. W. 

Durango. ^ Joseph Prewi tt. J. W. 

u- ~\—-iA„~*i~ j7 ( Wm. M. Enter! ine W. M. 

Breckenridge , No. 47, ) R L M s w 

Breckenndge. } H > L< Rn \ erline J. W. 



.Jos. K. Herring. 

.Jos. K. Herring. 

Will J. Orange. 



. Walker Burnett. 

. Henry C. Olney. 

.John F. Chrystal. 
.John F. Chrystal. 



Alamosa No. 44, 

Alamosa. 

Boulder No. 45, 

Boulder. 

Durango No. 46, 



Georgetown No. 48, 
Georgetown. 

Mt. Princeton No. 49, 
Buena Vista. 

Garfield No. 50, Erie. 

Leadville, No. 51, 

Leadville. 

Tin Cup, No. 52, 

Tin Cup. 



Fred P. Dewey W. M.. 

Robert Neuman 8. W.. 

Resell J. Collins J. W.. 

C. 8. Libby W. M.. 

W. W. Fay 8. W.. 

H.J. Van Wetering J. W._ 

Joseph R. Powell W. M.. 

Frank D. Gilpatrick 8. W.. 

Wm. Nicholson J. W.. 

Henry R. Pendery W. M.. 

Charles E. Dickenson S. W.. 

DavidLaSalle J. W.. 

Frank B. Massey W. M.. 

J amen K. Reed S. W.. 

Wm. W. Roof J. W.. 



P. Teague. 
. P. Teague. 
.P. Teague. 

~.C. Walrich. 
H. H. Dubendorff. 

'. Wm. H. Nicholson. 

.Arthur Cornforth. 
.Chas. Nrtcman. 
.Arthur Cornforth. 
. H. L. Enter line. 



.J. F. Phillips. 

W. C. Hood. 

J. F. Phillips. 
.Frank B. Keyes. 



R.J. Van Valkenburg 
R.J. Van Valkenburg 



.L. H. Bisbee. 
.A. A. Burnand. 

F. B. Massey. 
. F. B. Massey. 



1893] 



GRAND LODGE OF COLORADO. 



If AXI OF LODGE. 

LoTeland, No. 53, 

Loveiand. 

Sterling No. 54, 

Sterling. ) 

Mesa No. 55, \ 

Grand Junction. ) 

TellorideNo. 

Telluride. 



Salida No. 57, 

SaJida. 

Crested Butte No. 58, \ 
Crested Butte. / 



.56, J 
aliunde. } 



.) 



U Veta No. 50, 

LaVeta 



Spar No. 60, Aspen, \ 

Harmony No. 61, S 
Denver. ) 



Delta No. 62, Delta 



■j 
.{ 



Montrose No. 63, 

Montrose 

Euclid No. 64, \ 

LaJunta. I 

Glenwood No. 65, 
Glenwood Springs 

Eureka No. 66, 

Coal Creek. 



-I 
-1 



Oasis No. 67. J 

Fort Morgan. | 

Manitou No. 68, 

Manitoa. 






Windsor No. 69, 

Windsor. 



Logan No. 70, J 

Jnlesbarg ) 



Wray No. 71, Wray 



■i 



Granada No. 72, 

Granada. 

Monte Vista No. 73, 
Monte Vista. 



Akron No. 74, Akron. 

St. John's No. 75, 

Rocky Ford. 

Colorado City No. 76, 
Colorado City. 



Chaa. N.Randall W. 

Clarence L. Smith S. 

John S. Peterson J. 

James B. Killen W. 

Sam B. Robnck S. 

Smith A. Burke J. 

Orson Adams Jr W. 

Charles E. Mitchell S. 

John D. Reeder J. 

Wm. T. March W. 

David N. McLeod 8. 

C. P. Rock J. 

Theo. Martin W. 

C. G. Johnson 8. 

J. A. Davidson J. 

Thermo* Starr W. 

('has J.Kramer 8. 

John Koontz J. 

Alex McDonald W. 

John Ohon 8. 

T. J. McEniry J. 

James McMurray W. 

John F. Harding S. 

David Kanz J. 

E.J. Proctor W. 

FrankS. Pace 8. 

D. P. Jones J. 

A. C. BatJer W. 

T. H. McGranahun S. 

M. J. Johnson J. 

Geo. H.Smith W. 

J. F. Krebs _ 8. 

J.W.Owens J. 

Not Represented. 

D. W. Rees W. 

Fred A. Atkinson 8. 

That. Kendrick J. 

A. D. Garrett W. 

J. C. McCreery 8. 

Benj. Beach J. 

Geo. W, Warner W. 

J. F, Arbuckle 8. 

Geo. W. Dereham J. 

H. H. Aldrich _...W. 

W. L. Cook 8. 

W. D. 8awin J. 

Harrison Teller W. 

Adam Hahn 8. 

William W, Kennedy J. 

Geo, D. Steadman W. 

John F. Gauss 8. 

Albert 8. Avery J. 

John W. Zepp W. 

William C. Grigsby 8. 

Charles E. Ware J. 

C. L. McPherton W. 

F. D. Hess 8. 

D. W. Robinson J. 

Eli A. Edwards W. 

Jesse Stephenson 8. 

G, P. Sampson J. 

John B.Fisher W. 

Isaac N. McCae 8. 

John F. Dole J. 

E. W. Kearby W. 

W. B.Gobin 8. 

E. J. Smith . J. 

Wayne Wimaatt _ W. 

P.M. Condit 8. 

Richard Griffith J. 



PROXIES. 

M. — J.J, Burke. 

W J. J. Burke. 

W J.J.Burke. 

M 

W 

W 

M\__.FPto. A. Marsh. 

W H. T. DeLong. 

W Wm. A, Marsh. 

M 

W C.F. Painter. 

W Andrew Kellock. 

M. Geo. W. McGovern. 

W 

W 

M 

W.____ 

W 

M 

W 

W 

M 

W Daniel George. 

W James McMurray. 

M. «. 

W 

W 

M 

W Geo. Stephen. 

W 

M 

W Geo. H.Smith. 

W Geo. H.Smith. 

M Thos. Kendrick, 

W Thos. Kendrick. 

W 

M Wm. M. Bridges. 

W Wm, M. Bridges, 

W Wm. M. Bridges. 

M 

W 

W 

M 

W 

W 

M 

W 

W 

M 

W 

w 

M 

W 

w 

M 

W 

w 

M 

w 

w 

M 

w 

w 

M 

w 

w..___ 

M John McCoach. 

W John Mc Coach. 

W John McCoach. 



8 



PROCEEDINGS OF THE 



[1893 



NAME OF LODGE. PROXIES. 

n n ~is n ~f An w rt 77 ( c - A. Gillette W. M 2>. H. Jonee, 

Bnri, ^^^n.k.^^---- : -- :::::::: -l «:--:»•*'— 

Bright™ no ts J£^£™^ ."-;.;-;;;I- &...7 & u *"*"• 

Bn * nton - (Walter Gregory J W 

(J. P. Landon W. M 

r{~ a v a 7o »«,*«, -\S. W. Ransom 8. W Lewis Clarke. 

Bico No. 79, Rico. | w w Parshall J. W J. P. London. 

Rio Blanco No-fiD^ j No BetnruB or Due8 . 

n Alirft L oNn o, ( Frank M. Smith W. M 

Holyoke No. ^81, J chaB# B> Tim berlake 8. W 

Holyoke I Herbert L. Sutherland J. W 

Carbondale No 8^ j &£&;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;:;;£ . £ 

Carbondale. } w M DinWe j w M H Deaiu 

RoFttiAt^i ifl rt an { F. Irving Davia W. M 

Berthoud No. ©, J H ieo ^ K Hankine 8. W 

BerthoQcL l Harvey J. Parish J. W 

T Am «vi A KLr. ftj { day Ji. Fan W. M 

Temple No. 84 J j<Jp»C. Drawer 8. W 

uenver. i chat w Everett J. W 

a~o~; d Kr, s& \ Wm. R. Coe W. M 

^^SV, H'™r»«» lCH. I>«dley 8. W £T. E. WUeon. 

Colorado Springs. ) Ira j Woodworth J. W 

Highlands nc j£l S^&SSr^/::::::::^ *::::: 

Highlands.} Theodore H% Thoma8 j. w 

n~;**.<-«i v^ «7 (AlonzoF. Vick Rcy W. M 

Oriental No. 87 ] JeronieA . vickert 8. W 

Denver. ; Dariug A fiarton j w s.D.C.Hay*. 

\ F. B. Ranney W. M W. F. Teagarden. 

v„ mn « v« an r»«.;„ 1 C. A. Seymour 8. W W. F. Teagarden. 

lampa No. 88, Craig. 1 M att Johnaon J. W.._._ W. F. Teagarden. 

T^^iA^A m« qo {John B Hernhey W. M 

Trinidad No. 89, } Win. V. Steveni 8. W 

Trinidad - ( John R. Eepey J. W 

T.. mA .N,> on { Charle* C. Qoodale W. M 

LamarNo.90. 3 Peter 8. Lynch 8 W,.... 

L,amar - / Amos N. Parrish J. W 

i ^.#». A «* A w«. qi {J.M.VanDeren W. M. 

Lafayette No 91 J j H Simpson H. W 

Lafayette - ( G. W. Runge J. W .... 

GRAND REPRESENTATIVES. 

E. L. N. FOSTER (12) Alabama 

JOHN W. SLEEPER OH) Arizona 

JAMES H. PEABODY (15) California 

BYRON L. CARB (23) Canada 

GEORGE WY MAN (23) Connecticut 

GEORGE WYMAN (23) Delaware 

W. D. WRIGHT (84) District of Columbia 

R. W. WOODBURY (86) Florida 

C.J. HART (17) Georgia 

A. H. BRANCH (35) Idaho 

H. M. OBAHOOD (11) Indiana 

A. A. BURNAND(51) Indian Territory 

W. D.TODD (7) _ Louisiana 

ED. C. PARMELEE(48) Maine 

J. C. 8 AN FORD (46) ...Manitoba 

W. D. PE1RCE (7) Maryland 

L. N. GREENLEAF (5) Michigan 

FRANK CHURCH (5) Mississippi 

ED. C, PARMELEE (48) Missouri 



1893] GRAND LODGE OF COLORADO. 9 

W.T.BRIDWELL(15) Nevada 

H.P.H. BROMWELL(S) _ New Brunswick 

G.K. KIMBALL (1) New Hampshire 

L. N. GREENLEAF (5) New Mexico 

C. TUCKER (5) New South Wales 

H.T. BELONG (55) North Dakota 

ED. G. PARMELEE (48) Oregon 

W.D.TODD (7)  Pennsylvania 

A. 8AOENDORF (13) _ Quebec 

W.L. BUSH (26) , 8outh Dakota 

ED. C. PARMGLEB (4S) '. Vermont 

W.W. ROLLER (57) Washington 

H.M.ORAHOOD(11) West Virginia 

W. D. ANTHONY (7) , _ Wisconsin 

GRAND REPRESENTATIVES. 

The Representatives of other Grand Lodges near this 
Grand Lodge were called to the East, and fraternally wel- 
comed by the Grand Master. 

Past Grand Master W. D. Anthony responded in his 
usual happy manner. 

GRAND MASTER'S ADDRESS. 
The Grand Master delivered the following: 

Brethren of the Grand Lodge: 

Invoking the blessing of Deity upon your labors, I bid you 
fraternal welcome to the Thirty-third Annual Communication of this 
Grand Lodge. To you, your brethren in this jurisdiction have, for 
the time being, committed the welfare of this great fraternity. That 
from the lessons of the past we may gain wisdom and inspiration for 
the task before us, it may be well to first consider Masonry from that 
broader view in which the world is its field of operations. 

It is an undeniable proposition that what we call human pro- 
gress is but the result of certain progressive ideas which, first having 
their birth in the minds of men, gradually enter into laws and usages, 
until they are practically carried out in the affairs of men. And 
here, in this beautiful temple of Masonry — situate in what is doubt- 
less the world's most marvelous illustration of the rapid but sub- 
stantial growth of a modern city — addressing a body composed of 
the best representatives of the citizenship and Masonry of the Cen- 
tennial State, it would be pleasant and profitable to trace briefly the 
history of Masonry from its remote beginning, with a view to 
determine what has been the effect and influence of the teachings of 
Masonry upon the progress of mankind. 

For this purpose and in this connection, the great unsettled 
question of the antiquity of Masonry scarcely needs to be considered. 



10 PROCEEDINGS OF THE [1893 

For it is universally conceded to be the oldest of all existing fra- 
ternal organizations. There can be no question, that in substantially 
its present form, Masonry has witnessed the wondrous change and 
progress of the world during at least the last two centuries, and that 
it had its origin in an old world, controlled from time immemorial by 
old systems and old ideas. 

The political and social system existing when Masonry had its 
birth, may be described as haying had a king at one end of the string 
and a slave at the other, while between these two extremes were 
innumerable class distinctions, based merely upon the accidents of 
birth and station. Broadly speaking, this old world was divided into 
two classes — an aristocracy born to govern, a people bound to obey. 
The world fully acknowledged the Divine right of kings. In return 
for loyal services, for unquestioning obedience to existing authority, 
and from motives good, bad and indifferent, the king created noble- 
men at his royal whim and pleasure. The State, or the civil power, 
was based on tradition and relied on force. 

As to matters spiritual and religious, in the days when Masonry 
began its mission, the feature most open to objection from our 
Masonic standpoint was the unholy partnership which usually existed 
between Church and State. Under an ecclesiastical system which 
had prevailed in the civilized world for many centuries, religion, 
based on dogma, asserted in matters spiritual an authority as 
despotic as that claimed by the State in matters civil and political. 
As against this despotism of the church it was well understood that 
freedom of conscience and opinion, when tending in any way toward 
freedom of worship, could not consistently or with safety be per- 
mitted to assert itself. The true secret of the partnership between 
Church and State, was perhaps a mutual recognition by the ruling 
powers, of the necessity of being able to compel obedience to author- 
ity. As the result of such partnership — intended to perpetuate and 
enforce obedience to despotism and dogma — history tells us that by 
way of example the political reformer sometimes lost his head, the 
religious reformer was occasionally burned at the stake. 

Education was confined to the privileged few. The masses, 
taught by prevailing systems that blind obedience to authority was 
in itself a virtue, had not yet awakened to even a faint conception of 
the rights of man. 

Such were the political, social and religious conditions in which 
Masonry had its origin. In such a world — on such poor soil, this 
ancient institution began to sow in the minds of men what may well 
be called seed ideas. These ideas were simple in themselves. They 
were embodied in Masonry's fundamental doctrine of the common 
fatherhood of God, the brotherhood of man. 



1893] GRAND LODGE OF COLORADO. 11 

Kings were sometimes its Grand Masters. Titled noblemen and 
blue-blooded aristocrats knelt at its altars, and assumed its obliga- 
tions, and recognizing the social conditions in which it had its origin, 
to the born slave its doors were absolutely and forever closed. But 
in teaching the common brotherhood of man, it taught as a logical 
deduction, the equality of men. And when, in its own beautiful 
symbolic language it began to teach men to " meet upon the level, 1 ' 
Masonry was sowing in the minds of men, seed, which in the provi- 
dence of God, by the progress of mankind, wsb bound to ripen into 
the republic. 

No atheist could enter its door, but humbly professing a belief 
in the unseen God, the first great cause of unerring and immutable 
laws, no further religious test was required. 

This is that broad religion upon which all other religions must 
necessarily rest, and as to which all reverent men, however widely 
they may differ in their theological views, can reverently agree. 
This, therefore, is the region of truth, the religion of humanity, the 
religion of Masonry. Upon this basis Masonry was able to harmon- 
ize good men of all religious creeds and opinions, and send them 
forth from its lodge rooms with the lesson of toleration upon their 
lips. The logical deduction of such liberality led easily to the doc- 
trine of the right to worship God according to the dictates of the 
individual conscience. 

From the beginning, Masonry was conservative. It taught loy- 
alty to existing governments. It disclaimed all interference with 
politics and religion. 

But beyond and above the wisdom of man were the designs 
drawn upon the trestle board for the uplifting of humanity. An 
irrepressible conflict — a war between old and new systems and ideas 
had begun. The old ideas, grown strong with the lapse of centuries* 
appealed to tradition and custom. The new ideas appealed to reason, 
justice and the innate sense of the rights of man. In this great 
battle of ideas, liberty, fraternity and equality, as taught by Masonry, 
broadened into something more than abstract theories and empty 
forms of speech — they seemed likely to enter practically into human 
affairs. Freed and sheltered by Masonic obligations from the over- 
shadowing influence of political and ecclesiastical power, the mani- 
fest tendency of these ideas was to awaken in the minds of men that 
intelligent discontent so essential to all we now call progress. As a 
result, Masonry was soon recognized as a menace to controlling sys- 
tems in Church and State. It became the object of political and 
ecclesiastical persecution. Centuries of old systems had produced 
conditions which could not readily be overthrown. Forced into 
prominence in the weary and unequal struggle, Masonry, in some 



12 PROCEEDINGS OF THE [1893 

portions of the old world, had indeed a rough and rugged road to 
travel. 

The discovery of a new world had opened up in all directions 
new possibilities for man. The old ideas in government took posses- 
sion here — the State was represented by a distant king. Old and 
intolerant ideas in religion so far prevailed, that some who crossed 
the ocean seeking liberty of worship, denied that liberty to others. 
But the new world welcomed the* adventurous and oppressed of every 
race, and blending and harmonizing their distinctive differences, the 
composite nation which resulted seemed in itself to illustrate the 
possible ultimate unity — the perfect brotherhood of man. Trans- 
ferred to the western hemisphere, the great battle of ideas was con- 
tinued, under more favorable conditions. Masonry found here a 
congenial home. To Masonry in the new world, at this important 
period, reverently and with truth may be applied the text: " Behold, 
a sower went forth to sow." In broader fields, on more productive 
soil, it sowed these seed ideas. Men caught the underlying spirit, 
the symbolic meaning of its lessons, and looked forward for greater 
light — for a newer and better order of things. The new world 
became the theatre of what, in ultimate consequences to mankind, 
are conceded to be the greatest events in history. 

The story of " the days that tried men's souls " is a record of 
which Masonry may well be proud. The first overt act of resistance 
to taxation was when in the twilight of a December day in 1773, a 
band of patriots, disguised as Indians, threw overboard the tea in 
Boston harbor. Masonic records of colonial times are said to estab- 
lish the fact that the act was committed by a body of Masons, who 
left a Masonic lodge room for that purpose. 

The famous midnight ride of Paul Revere was in April, 1775- 
His cry of alarm aroused the farmers to prepare for the battle of 
Lexington — the first conflict of the War of Independence. Long- 
fellow writes: 

"And yet, through the gloom and the light. 

The fate of a nation was riding that night; 
And the spark struck ont by that bleed in his flight, 

Kindled the land into flame with ita heat." 

He did his work, and served the great cause with freedom, 
fervency and zeal, for Paul Revere was a Mason, and afterwards 
became Grand Master of Masons in the State of Massachusetts. 

July 4, 1776, after a long and solemn debate over the conse- 
quences of the act, the members of the first Continental Congress, 
pledging to each other their lives, their fortunes and their sacred 
honors, attached their signatures to a simple scroll. That scroll was 
the Declaration of American Independence. It was drafted by 



1893] GRAND LODGE OF COLORADO. 13 

Thomas Jefferson, a Mason, and fifty- two of its fifty-five signers were 
Masons. 

Benjamin Franklin, then Master of a Masonic Lodge in Phila- 
delphia — in many respects the wisest and greatest man of his day — 
was a member of the committee afterwards appointed to draft the 
Constitution of the United States. 

The first President of the Republic, the immortal Washington, 
was a Mason. He took the oath of office with his hand resting upon 
a Bible which had just been taken from a Masonic altar. As Grand 
Master of Masons just one hundred years ago yesterday, he laid the 
corner-stone of the capitol at Washington. His pictured form, 
clothed Masonically, looks down upon us from its honored station 
just above the Grand Master's chair as I now address you. It 
decorates the wall of nearly every Masonic Lodge room in the land. 
By universal consent of civilized men, he is the largest figure in all 
merely human history, and his name stands first upon the roll of 
Masonry's illustrious dead. Acting now upon a suggestion originally 
made to me by the chairman of our Committee on Jurisprudence, I 
respectfully recommend the appointment of a committee to report at 
this session with a view to the holding of a national Masonic 
memorial celebration at the tomb of Washington, at Mount Vernon, 
on the centennial anniversary of his death, December 14, 1899. The 
report of such -committee, together with the action of this Grand 
Lodge thereon, would then be presented to all other Grand Lodges 
in the United States for such action as they may think best. Should 
the suggestion happen to meet with their approval, as such Grand 
Lodges meet annually, it would not give too much time in which to 
properly consult and make suitable arrangements for such a cele- 
bration. 

Lafayette, the friend of Washington, acting as Grand Master of 
Masons, laid the corner-stone of Bunker Hill Monument. 

Of two widely divergent schools in politics, which for a century 
in our history have struggled for the mastery, Jefferson and Ham- 
ilton were the respective founders. Masonry, addressing itself to 
good men upon the broad basis of brotherhood alone, lifts them 
above the petty differences of politics to breathe the purer atmos- 
phere of patriotism. Jefferson and Hamilton both were Masons, 
and both were members of Washington's cabinet. 

Between the outspread wings of the eagle on the now much dis- 
cussed dollar of the fathers, we read a motto of Masonry. 

The pure principles of Masonry entered into the fundamental 
law of the Republic. The Constitution abolished class distinctions, 
and all titles of nobility — severed all connection between Church and 
State, and provided that no religious test should ever be required as 
a qualification for office. 



14 PROCEEDINGS OF THE [1893 

There was flung to the breeze a new flag, which became the 
world's symbol of light and hope for man. Thus beautifully some 
one has given to the world a poetical conception of what might have 
been the origin of the American Flag : 

" The goddess of liberty dipped her brash 
In the azare hae and the crimson flash 

Of the sky at the sunset hour ; 
And on a field of spotless white 

She drew a square of blue and stripes of red : 
And as it fluttered to the breeze, 

She sprinkled it with stars 
And prayed that it might ever wave 

Over a people free and brave." 

Outwardly that flag is indeed bright with all the brilliant hues 
of heaven itself. But the patriotic American, with mind illumined 
by Masonic teachings, looks beyond and through what greets the 
external eye, and beholds it radiant also with the inward and spirit- 
ual beauty of the idea of liberty — the American and Masonic idea — 
which it represents and symbolizes. 

Masonry, as a pioneer, having blazed the trail along the pathway 
of human progress for centuries, had at last found a home in the 
west — the Genius of Masonry and the Genius of the Republic were 
one and the same. The great designs drawn by the Grand Archi- 
tect upon the trestle board, became manifest to men. The world saw 
the ripening harvest of these seed ideas sown centuries before, and 
all humanity rejoiced. These ideas— now symbolized by the Stars 
and Stripes, were clearly destined to make thrones totter, break 
shackles from the limbs of slaves, make free the human mind, and 
supplant old systems everywhere. Rising to its splendid opportunity, 
Masonry had invoked the spirit of civil and religious liberty, and the 
American Republic with its manifest destiny was the result. The 
great battle of ideas had been won. 

I am pleased to report that at least so far as Masonry is con- 
cerned, the year just closed has been a prosperous one in this Grand 
Jurisdiction. We have had a satisfactory increase in membership, 
and peace and harmony prevail. 

Our relations with sister Grand Lodges could not well be more 
harmonious, in proof of which it gives me pleasure to report that no 
complaint of any sort has been made to me during the past year. 

NECROLOGY. 

Two of the most distinguished members of this Grand Lodge — 
Past Grand Master Robert A. Quillian and Past Deputy Grand 
Master Richard Sopris, have answered to the final summons, and 
been called away during the year just closed. Their names, which 



1893] 



GRAND LODGE OP COLORADO. 15 



bad grown familiar to ua in the list of permanent members of this 
body, must now be transferred to the roll of our illustrious dead. 
Upon the announcement of the death of Past Grand Master Quillian, 
I caused the following memorial tribute to be issued : 



( Gband Lodge of Colorado, A. F. a A. M. 

-J Grand Master's Office. 

( Denver, Colorado, Jaunary 4. A. D. 1893— A. L. 5803 

To the Masonic Fraternity of the State of Colorado, and all Grand Lodges in 
fraternal intercourse: 

It becomes my painful duty to officially announce the death of 

Past Grand Master Robert A, Quillian, 

which occurred, after a very brief illness, at his home in Walsenburg, Colorado, 
on the morning of December 8th, 1802. 

Born May 5th, 1842, at Dahlonega, Georgia, he was made a Mason in that 
jurisdiction, becoming a resident of Colorado in 1873, and being naturally a leader 
among men, soon occupied a prominent position in the community. 

He took an active interest in church matters, and, at once a devout Chris- 
tian and a zealous Mason, his life and character bore testimony to the fact that 
Masonry, instead of being antagonistic to, folly recognizes the necessity for, and 
is ever ready to co-operate with all other well meaning agencies for human good. 

A splendid school building, erected nnder his administration while a member 
of the local School Board, is his enduring testimonial of time and ability freely 
given to the promotion of educational affairs. 

He was a member of the Constitutional Convention in 1876, which framed 
our present State Constitution, afterwards became a member of the State Legis- 
lature, and occupied other important civil positions, all of which he filled with 
credit to himself and to the satisfaction of the people who thus honored him. 

He was the first Worshipful Master of Huerfano Lodge No. 27, A. F. & A. M., 
in 1874, has since been frequently honored by re-election, and there could be no 
better proof of bis continued strong hold upon the esteem and affection of the 
brethren who knew him best, than the fact that at the time of his death he occu- 
pied the same station. His moral and Masonic worth being promptly recognized 
in the Grand Lodge, he in due season attained Masonry's most exalted station, 
serving as Grand Master in this jurisdiction during the year 1881, and wearing the 
purple of our great fraternity honorably and well. At the time of his death he was 
Grand Representative of the Grand Lodge of Cuba, near this Grand Lodge. 

So that it may with truth be said of our illustrious brother, that in religious , 
educational, civil and Masonic affairs he took an active and prominent part in 
helping to make the splendid history of his adopted State. Our brother has gone 
** from his labors here on earth to eternal refreshment in the paradise of God/' 
and, in the concluding words of a local obituary notice, 'Met us who remain, 
emulate his virtues, so that at the end of life's warfare our memories may be 
crowned with like esteem. 1 ' 

It is ordered, as a token of respect to the memory of our beloved and dis- 
tinguished brother, that the foregoing be read and spread upon the records in all 
the Lodges in this Grand Jurisdiction at the first stated meeting after its receipt, 
and that the altar, lights and jewels be draped in mourning for a period of thirty 
dayB. 

Fraternally, 

WILLIAM D. WRIGHT, 

Grand Master. 
Attest: 

ED. C. PARMELEE, 

Grand Secretary. 



16 PROCEEDINGS OF THE [1893 

We extend to the families and friends of these distinguished 
brothers, our sincere sympathy in the great loss they have sustained. 

ILLUSTRIOUS DEAD OF OTHER GRAND JURISDICTIONS. 

I present a list of Grand Officers And Past Grand Masters who 
have been "called hence" during the year. 

De Witt Clinton Dawkins, five times elected Grand Master of 
Masons of Florida, died October 5, 1892. 

William Taylor Allen aged 64, Grand Treasurer of the Grand 
Lodge of Virginia, died October 6, 1892. 

Donald W. Bain, Grand Secretary of the Grand Lodge of North 
Carolina, died November 17, 1892. 

Thomas McFadden Patten, Past Grand Master of the Grand 
Lodge of Oregon, died November 29, 1892. 

Edwin Dwight Hillyer, died December 11, 1892, Past Grand 
Master of the Grand Lodge of Kansas. 

Rev. George J. MoCandless, Grand Chaplain of the Grand Lodge 
of Michigan, died March 9, 1893. 

John Henry Brown, Past Grand Master and Grand Secretary 
of the Grand Lodge of Kansas, died March 2, 1893. 

Roderick L. Dodge, died on May 31, 1893, in the eighty-fifth year 
of his age ; Past Grand Treasurer of the Grand Lodge of Arkansas. 

John H. Hubbs, Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of Masons in 
Nevada, died in the city of San Francisco on May 10th, 1893, aged 
41 years. 

Logan H. Roots, Past Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of Ar- 
kansas, died on the 30th day of May, 1893, in the fifty-third year of 
his age. 

A. W. Downer, died July 12, 1893; Grand Tiler of the Grand 
Lodge of Tennessee. 

Richard Briggs, Most Worshipful Grand Master of the State of 
Massachusetts, died July 29, 1893. 

William Power Innes, died in the city of Grand Rapids, August 
2, 1893, aged 67 years ; Past Grand Master of the state of Michigan. 

Zelotes H. Mason, Past Grand Master of the state of Florida, 
died August, 1893. 

I recommend that the usual action be taken in these cases\ ex- 
tending sympathy to our Sister Grand Lodges, and by appropriate 
resolutions doing honor to the memory of these eminent Masons. 

DECISIONS. 

1. A Lodge, as such, has no authority to attend funeral ser- 
vices held at a church in connection with other societies, the remains 
of the brother to be afterwards shipped away for burial. 

-2: After a portion of the E.\ A.*, degree had been conferred 
upon a candidate, it was discovered that he had lost the first two 






1893] GRAND LODGE OF COLORADO. 17 

joints of the forefinger of his right hand. He was returned to the 
preparation room, proceedings stopped, and the matter submitted to 
the Grand Master. I held that, having in view all the circumstanoes 
of the case, he could be made a Mason. 

3. A Lodge in this jurisdiction can not act upon, or in any way 
recognize, a dimit from a Lodge chartered by the Grand Lodge of 
Hamburg. (See By-Law 124 ) 

4. Question, Can a Lodge, having opened on regular meeting 
night, Tuesday, be then called from labor to refreshment, to meet 
again the following Monday at the sound of the gavel in the East? 

Answer. No 

5. A Lodge can try a brother after his term of office has expired, 
for a Masonic offense committed while he was Worshipful Master. 

6. In a case where defective hearing compelled a candidate to 
resort to an artificial device to enable him to hear a whisper: Held, 
that the Lodge was better able to judge of his qualifications in that 
respect. 

7. Question. Is a stockholder in a brewery, a corporation mak- 
ing and selling beer, eligible to receive the degrees in Masonry under 
our laws, the person not being in any way actively connected with 
the business of making or selling the beer, but owning the stock 
only as an investment? 

Answer. No. 

8. A brother having died while regularly under suspension for 
non-payment of dues can not afterwards be reinstated by his Lodge. 

9. Any prior arrangement or understanding by which a candi- 
date is to have the fees paid for the degrees in Masonry refunded to 
him, is un masonic. 

10. In a Masonic trial the Lodge is not governed by technical 
rules of evidence. Any thing properly tending to throw light upon 
the facts and bring out the truth should be admitted in evidence. 

11. A Grand Master as such cannot properly interfere with or 
undertake to settle business differences between individual Masons. 

12. In the case of a brother known to be unable to pay, his 
Lodge may remit and release him from payment of Lodge dues. 

13. A brother past sixty years of age, in the absence of any 
Lodge by-law governing, is not exempt from Lodge dues. 

14. In the absence of the Master, the Senior or Junior Warden 
being present, may, through courtesy or from any cause in the dis- 
cretion of the Warden, request a P. M. to open as well as preside 
over the Lodge. 

15. In case of an applicant who had lost the first three fingers 
of his left hand, calling attention to Grand Lodge By-Law No. 74 
and to the ancient Land Marks and Regulations of Masonry, left 
the Lodge to be the judge as to the physical qualifications. 



18 PROCEEDINGS OP THE [1893 

It). It requires a vote of the Lodge to empower the Secretary to 
issue dimits in all cases, and the Liodge record should state the facts. 

17. When a brother, against whom no charges are pending, pays 
all Lodge dues, and regularly makes application for a dimit, a written 
objection by an individual brother is not a bar to the issuance of such 
dimit. If the matters he bases his objections on are serious enough 
to warrant such course, and if the objecting brother wishes to prefer 
charges, he should be given reasonable opportunity to do so. 

18. Upon the petition of an unmarried man, stating that he was 
and had for years been a resident within the jurisdiction of the 
Lodge, he was duly elected and received the E. A. degree. After- 
wards, and because it appeared that the petitioner had made a 
homestead filing on land within its jurisdiction, which homestead 
he had also claimed as his residence, a second Lodge claimed him as 
its material. The first Lodge so far conceded such claim as to have 
turned over the initiation fee to the second Lodge, which latter Lodge 
I was advised expeoted to confer the second degree on said appli- 
cant, at the time the matter was submitted to me. Held: That 
the applicant in his petition having claimed his residence within its 
jurisdiction, and being still an actual resident there, said first Lodge 
having acted in good faith was entitled to the initiation fee, and the 
applicant was its material, and if permitted to proceed further, the 
remaining degrees should be conferred upon him by said first Lodge. 

19. A Lodge in this jurisdiction, before proceeding with trial, 
in case of a brother belonging to a Lodge in another jurisdiction, 
should notify his Lodge, and afford it ample opportunity to be 
represented in any proper way if it so wishes, in the trial of one of its 
members. 

20. The word " finding," as used in Section 100 of Grand Lodge 

By-Laws, means a finding of the different facts, which, in the opinion 

of the Commission, seem to be established by the evidence, the 

Lodge having the sole right to determine upon said finding of facts, 

the question of guilt or innocence. 

21. It would be improper for a brother who must be a wit- 
ness upon the trial, to Berve as one of the commission to whom the 
case is referred, and thus be in the position of passing judgment upon 
the merits of his own testimony. 

22. Lodge having opened on the first degree, and having work in 
that degree fully prepared, may proceed with initiation before open- 
ing on the third degree, or may open on the third and afterwards 
reopen on the first for the purpose of work. 

23. In a case of a brother who having received a portion of the 
degrees, and having a waiver of jurisdiction from the Lodge which 
conferred the same, now petitions another Lodge for the remainder 
of the degrees. Held : That Grand Lodge By-Law No. 55, which 



1893] GRAND LODGE OF COLORADO. 19 

requires that the applicant should have resided within the juris- 
diction of the Lodge for the preceding twelve months, should govern 
as in the case of- an original petition. 

24. In a case where five brothers signed charges, as Grand 
Lodge By-Law Section 95. provides that charges " must be signed by 
the accuser," and Section 97 further provides that at the conclusion 
of the trial both the accused and acccuser shall retire. Held : 
That if the case submitted should be carried to a conclusion in its 
present shape, the five brothers who have signed such charges could 
not be permitted to vote upon the final determination of the case. 

DISPENSATIONS FOR NEW LODGES. 

October 8. I granted a dispensation to fifteen Master Masons, 
at Denver, to form and open a Lodge to be known as East Denver 
Lodge, U. D., with Brothers John C. Fulton as W. M., Charles T. 
Hilton as S. W., and T. N. Worth as J. W. This petition was recom- 
mended by Denver Lodge No. 5. 

February 9. I granted a dispensation to seventeen Master 
Masons, at Denver, to form and open a Lodge to be known as South 
Denver Lodge, U. D., with Brothers I. S. Elrod as W. M., D. Cinna- 
mond as S. W., and A. W. Bush as J. W. This petition was recom- 
mended by Denver Lodge No. 5. 

March 14. 1 granted a dispensation to fifteen Master Masons, at 
Oreede, to form and open a Lodge to be known as Amethyst Lodge, 
U. D., with Brothers M. P. McArthur as VV. M., Frank Shimer as S. 
W., and W. C. Wescott as J. W. This petition was recommended by 
Del Norte Lodge No. 29. 

April 12. I granted a dispensation to twenty-seven Master 
Masons at Pueblo, to form and open a Lodge to be known as Silver 
State Lodge, U. D., with Brothers George W. Roe as W. M., Andrew 
Park as S. W., and John J. Willard as J. W. This petition was 
recommended by South Pueblo Lodge 

July 3. I granted a dispensation to twenty -one Master Masons 
at Cripple Creek, to form and open a Lodge to be known as Mount 
Pisgah Lodge, U. D., with Brothers W. S. Montgomery as W. M., F. 
P. Moulton as S. W., and R. P. Davie as J. W. This petition was 
recommended by El Paso Lodge No. 13. 

OTHER DISPENSATIONS. 

November 25. To Manitou Lodge No. 68, to publicly install its 
officers on St. John's Day, December 27. 

November 25. To Yampa Lodge No. 88, to publicly install its 
officers on St John's Day, December 27. 

November 30. To Union Lodge No. 7, to examine as to their 
proficiency, ballot upon their petitions for advancement, and if 



20 PROCEEDINGS OP THE [1893 

elected, confer the Third Degree upon two Fellow Crafts, at a special 
communication of said Lodge to be held November 30. 

November 30. To Oriental Lodge No. 87, to examine as to their 
proficiency, ballot upon their petitions for advancement, and if 
elected, confer the Third Degree upon four Fellow Crafts, at a special 
communication of said Lodge to be held December 2. 

December 7. To La Veta Lodge No. 59, to publicly install its 
officers on St. John's Day, December 27. 

December 9. To Idaho Springs Lodge No. 26, to publicly install 
its officers on St. John's Day, December 27. 

December 12. To Union Lodge No. 7, to examine as to their 
proficiency, two Entered Apprentices and two Fellow Crafts — to 
ballot upon the petitions of all said brothers for advancement, and if 
elected, confer the Second Degree upon said Entered Apprentices 
and the Third Degree upon said Fellow Crafts, at a special communi- 
cation of said Lodge to be held December 12. 

December 14. To Oriental Lodge No. 87, to publicly install its 
officers December 14. 

December 17. To Corinthian Lodge No. 42, to elect and install a 
Senior Warden and Treasurer at the regular communication of said 
Lodge December 20. 

December 23. To Brighton Lodge No. 78, to elect a Worshipful 
Master from the floor. 

December 23. To Brighton Lodge No. 78, to publicly install its 
officers on St. John's Day, December 27. 

January 3. To Rico Lodge No. 79, to elect a Worshipful Master 
from the floor, and to install its officers at the regular communication 
of said Lodge, January 10. 

January 3. To Las Animas Lodge No. 28, to examine as to his 
proficiency, ballot upon his petition for advancement, and if elected, 
confer the Third Degree upon a Fellow Craft, at a special communi- 
cation of said Lodge to be held January 4. 

January 3. To Crested Butte Lodge No. 58, to install its Treas- 
urer-elect at its regular communication January 10. 

January 10. To Burlington Lodge No. 77, to install its officers at 
a special communication of said Lodge to be held January 14. 

January 13. To Sterling Lodge No. 54, to elect and install a 
Secretary, and to install its Senior Warden and Junior Deacon at its 
regular communication to be held January - — . 

January 21. To Golden City Lodge No. 1, to elect and install a 
Treasurer at its regular communication to be held February 6. 

February 9. To Temple Lodge No. 84, to examine as to his 
proficiency, ballot upon his petition for advancement, and, if elected, 
to confer the Third Degree upon a Fellow Craft, at a special com- 
munication of said Lodge on February 9. 



1893] GRAND LODGE OP COLORADO. 21 

May 10. To Mount Princeton Lodge No. 49, to install its Junior 
Warden elect at its regular communication to be held May 11. 

May 11. To Holyoke Lodge No. 81, to examine as to their pro- 
ficiency, ballot upon their petition for advancement, and, if elected, 
confer the Second Degree upon two Entered Apprentices, at a 
special communication of said Lodge to be held May 12. 

May 17. To Holyoke Lodge No. 81, to examine as to their pro- 
ficiency, ballot upon their petition for advancement, and, if elected, 
confer the Third Degree upon two Fellow Crafts at a special com- 
munication of said Lodge. 

July 26. To Rico Lodge No. 79, to examine as to his proficiency, 
ballot upon his petition for advancement, and, if elected, confer the 
Third Degree upon a Fellow Craft at a special communication of 
said Lodge to be held August 14. 

August 14. To Amethyst Lodge, U. D., to examine as to his 
proficiency, ballot upon his petition for advancement, and, if elected, 
confer the Fellow Craft Degree upon an Entered Apprentice at a 
communication of said Lodge to be held August 15. 

August 27. To Mount Pisgah Lodge, U. D., to examine as to 
his proficiency, ballot upon his petition for advancement, and, if 
elected, confer the Fellow Craft Degree upon an Entered Apprentice 
at a communication of Baid Lodge to be held August 31. 

DISPENSATIONS REPOSED. 

October 12. To permit a Lodge to participate in a local civic 
parade on Columbian Day, October 21. 

October 13. To permit a Lodge to confer the F. C. and M. M. 
degrees on a candidate at the same communication. 

December 23. To permit a Lodge "to confer the Second and 
Third degrees on a brother as soon as he can make himself proficient 
in the preceding degrees," the refusal being for the reason that a 
special dispensation should "be for a fixed date and for a definite 
purpose on that date." 

December 30. To permit a Lodge to receive and act upon a pe- 
tition for initiation when the petitioner, (a railroad man and subject 
to frequent removals) had been a resident within the jurisdiction of 
the Lodge, less than one year. 

January 19. I declined to grant a dispensation to eight Master 
Masons for a new Lodge at Yuma, because this being the minimum 
number, and at least seven members of the Lodge being required by 
our law to transact any Lodge business, I did not feel warranted un- 
der all the circumstances, in launching a new Lodge with so scant a 
membership. 



22 PROCEEDINGS OF THE [1893 

LODGES CONSTITUTED. 

On October 29, with the assistance of B. W. Brother A. J. Van 
Daren, R. W. Brother Eugene Grissom, our Junior Grand Warden 
and other brethren, I constituted Lafayette Lodge No. 91, at Lafay- 
ette, and installed its officers. 

COMMISSIONS. 

I issued a commission under date October 5, to W. Brother B. F. 
Haskins of Euclid Lodge No. 64, to constitute Lamar Lodge No. 90, 
at Lamar, Prowers County, and install its officers. 

I issued a commission under date October 10, to R. W. Brother 
Robert A. Quillian to constitute Trinidad Lodge No. 89, and install 
its officers. 

I issued a commission under date December 23, to R. W. Brother 
John M. Maxwell, to act as my deputy in conducting a double in- 
stallation to install the officers of Ionic Lodge No. 35, and Lead- 
ville Lodge No. 51, at Leadvilie, on the evening of St. John's Day, 
December 27. 

I issued a commission under date of June 26, to W. Brother 
Samuel Todd, as my representative and in the name of the M. W. 
Grand Lodge, to conduct the ceremony of dedicating a Hall to be 
used for a Masonic Lodge room at La Veta, Colorado, which duty 
was performed on the evening of June 27. 

CHANGE OF QUARTERS. 

The following Lodges have been granted permission to change 
their places of meeting : 

October 5. Euclid Lodge No. 64, at La Junta. 

October 5. San Juan Lodge No. 33, at Silverton. 

February 4. Crested Butte Lodge No. 58, at Crested Butte. 

June 29. La Veta Lodge No. 59, at La Veta. 

July 10. Akron Lodge No. 74, at Akron. 

July 10. Breckenridge Lodge No. 47, at Breckenridge. 

July 10. Crested Butte Lodge No. 58, at Crested Butte. 

BY-LAWS APPROVED. 

November 19. Approved amendment to by-laws of St Vrain 
Lodge No. 23, changing the date fixed for the annual election of 
officers. 

December 8. Approved amendments to Sections 2 and 3 of Ar- 
ticle 5 of by-laws of Ouray Lodge No. 37. 

January 21. Approved amendment to by-laws of Oriental Lodge 
No. 87, granting life membership upon payment of one hundred 
dollars in dues. 

February 18. Approved amendment to by-laws of Lamar Lodge 
No. 90, regulating fees for degrees. 



1893] GRAND LODGE OF COLORADO. 23 

March 1 . Approved amendment to by-laws of Loveland Lodge 
No. 53, providing that no petition from a rejected candidate shall be 
received until after the expiration of six months from date of rejec- 
tion. 

April 12. Approved amendment to by-laws of Pueblo Lodge No. 
17, providing that no petition from a rejected candidate shall be re- 
ceived until after the expiration of six months from date of rejection. 

May 25. Approved a complete Code of by-laws adopted by Gun- 
nison Lodge No. 39. 

June 30. Approved amendment to by-laws of Denver Lodge No. 
5, providing that all petitions for membership shall be accompanied 
by a fee of ten dollars. ( Grand Lodge By-Law 82 ) . 

August 24. Approved a complete Code of by-laws adopted by 
Sterling Lodge No. 54. 

September 6. Approved amendment to by-laws of Idaho Springs 
Lodge No. 16, having reference to the preservation of the inviolable 
secrecy of the ballot 

LAYING CORNER-STONE. 

On October 21, Columbian Day, I convened the Grand Lodge 
in emergent communication at Salida, and according to the ancient 
usages of the craft, laid the corner-stone of the high school building. 
The loyal brethren of Salida Lodge No. 57, had made careful pre- 
paration for the event and were out in force. Salida Commandery 
No. 17, Knights Templar, courteously furnished an escort for the 
Grand Lodge. The day being pleasant, and a public holiday, the 
citizens generally, with music and banners, were present to witness 
the ceremonies, and in laying the corner stone of a building dedicated 
to human enlightenment, Masonry was able to do its proper work on 
this occasion under the happiest auspices. A brief address was 
delivered by the Grand Master. 

RECOMMENDATIONS. 

Grand Lodge By-Law 116 provides that '* payment of dues to 
the date of suspension for non-payment shall restore to good stand- 
ing without further action by the Lodge," while Section 122 
provides that "a Mason heretofore dropped from the rolls for 
non-payment of dues may be restored to membership by a majority 
vote of the members present at any stated communication, on the 
payment of all arrearages to the date of being stricken from the 
rolls." 

There is a real or apparent inconsistency here which gives rise 
to confusion and ought to be remedied. 

Section 84 of Grand Lodge By-Laws provides that the conduct 
of non-affiliates shall subject them to discipline by the Lodge within 



24 PROCEEDINGS OF THE [1893 

whose jurisdiction they reside. If there be two or more Lodges in 
the place, jurisdiction shall be exercised only by the oldest. As this 
law by its terms applies to non-affiliates only, to prevent doubt and 
confusion, it should, by some proper amendment, be expressly made 
to govern also in case of a Mason residing here but retaining Lodge 
membership in another jurisdiction. 

On October 5, at the request of our Grand Treasurer, I wrote to 
the Worshipful Master of Del Norte Lodge No. 29, and Alamosa 
Lodge No. 44, asking what those Lodges could do as to payment of 
their indebtedness to this Grand Lodge. So far as I am aware, no 
attention was paid to my communication. 

It is probable that the loans in the first instance were not made 
on strictly business principles, but that the higher and nobler 
principles of Masonry entered largely into the transactions. No 
doubt these Lodges intend to and will fully meet their obligations 
as soon as circumstances will permit, and I recommend that mutual 
effort be made to put these matters in the best shape possible for 
some more satisfactory report to the Grand Lodge at its next annual 
communication. 

Fortunately, beyond an ample sufficiency to defray its current 
expenses, a Grand Lodge of Masons does not need money. And 
having in view the financial stringency now so generally prevailing, 
and the pressing calls for Masonic charity they are likely to have 
upon them for alt available funds during the coming winter, I recom- 
mend, if the condition of our treasury will warrant us in doing so, 
that we now remit to all subordinate Lodges the whole or at least a 
portion of their Grand Lodge dues for the current year. 

As you have already been advised, and pursuant to the law as 
enacted at our last communication, I appointed Brothers Henry T. 
West, John Williams, George W. Roe and Lawrence M. Miller to act 
as District Deputy Grand Masters in their respective districts, until 
the present communication of this Grand Lodge. The warm 
approval of all the brethren in their several districts now endorses 
the judgment of the Grand Master in the first instance, and con- 
vinces me that these appointments could not well be improved upon. 
Their reports, and also the report of our Grand Lecturer, as made 
to me, will be submitted during this communication. Unquestion- 
ably, from the intelligent and faithful performance of the duties 
assigned them, much good has resulted to the Lodges in this juris- 
diction during the year just closed. Still the system does not appear 
to be an entirely satisfactory one. So far as the interference with 
his own regular business is concerned, a brother competent to 
properly instruct them might almost as well be called on to visit all 
the lodges in the jurisdiction as to visit one-fourth of them. 
While if anything approaching to exact uniformity of work is what 



1893] GRAND LODGE OP COLORADO. 26 

we seek, manifestly it is more likely to be attained by the work of 
one man than by the work of five men, as under our present system. 
And it is largely at the suggestion of the present incumbents above 
named, that I now respectfully recommend that the law providing 
for District Deputy Grand Masters be repealed, and that the former 
law be so amended as to provide that the Grand Lecturer shall be 
required to visit each Lodge in this Grand Jurisdiction at least once 
daring the year, and fixing his compensation therefor. 

October 18, pursuant to resolution adopted at our last annual 
communication, I had the honor of naming the following delegation 
to attend the Fraternal Congress of Masons in Chicago in August, 
1893, viz.: Henry M. Teller, P. G. M.; Roger W. Woodbury, P. G. M.; 
William T. Bridwell, P. G. M.; Byron L. Carr, P. G. M.; Ed. C. Par- 
melee, Grand Secretary ; Charles T. Harkison, P. M., and the present 
Grand Master. Each of these distinguished brothers accepted his 
appointment with evident pleasure, and with perhaps a single excep- 
tion each personally assured me of his intention to be present at the 
proposed congress. The fact that the Fraternal Congress has 
passed into history unrepresented by a single delegate from the Cen- 
tennial State is mentioned simply as a remarkable illustration of 
how the pressure of ordinary affairs incident to the times have inter- 
fered with such usally pleasant duties. 

CONCLUSION. 

To quote from the report of my immediate predecessor, "at least 
one-half of my entire time during the past year has been devoted to 
Masonic matters/' is I thick but a moderate statement of the fact in 
my own case. The writer personally realizes that the same general con- 
ditions which left us unrepresented at the Fraternal Congress, have 
much enhanced the burdens of the office for the incumbent during 
the past year, and for whatever seems amiss, is inclined to believe that 
Masons generally are broad and generous enough to make all neces- 
sary allowances under the circumstances. To my own great personal 
disappointment, my official visits have been necessarily limited to 
such outside Lodges as were within easy range of Denver, and to 
which I have made hurried special trips. This portion of my duties 
was to me a labor of love, in pleasant contrast to the laborious clerical 
work involved — the correspondence incident to the office, being as 
my predecessors are well aware, but partially indicated by the formal 
official report herewith submitted. I have fallen short of what I 
would have liked to accomplish, but my only desire has been to do 
the best I could in all important matters for the welfare and dignity 
of the Craft. It is a consoling reflection, that Masonry, which less 
than any other institution on earth, depends on men or leaders — has 
the strength to survive and the generosity to overlook any errors on 



2ti PROCEEDINGS OF THE [1893 

the part of those who may be called from its ranks to serve for the 
time being in this most honorable but arduous station. I return my 
grateful thanks to the officers and members of this Grand Liodge, 
who by your kind favor, in the tenth year of my Masonic life, con- 
ferred upon me the greatest honor in your gift, and which, under all 
possible circumstances, I shall always regard as the highest honor of 
my life. I specially thank the members of our Committee on Juris- 
prudence, Past Grand Masters R. W. Woodbury, W. D. Todd, and 
James H. Peabody, to all of whom I have freely applied for counsel 
on important matters, and under whose wise guidance, I am satisfied 
that Masonry in this jurisdiction could never materially err. To my 
brethren generally throughout the jurisdiction, I now express my 
gratitude for their fraternal courtesy and loyal support. 

And now, my brethren of the Grand Lodge, may heavenly 
wisdom illumine your minds, as you enter upon the important work 
which awaits you. 

WILLIAM D. WRIGHT, 

Grand Master, 

ADDRESS REFERRED. 

On motion the address was referred to a special com- 
mittee for division and reference. 

P.\G.\M.\ GEORGE K. KIMBALL (1), 
P.'.G.-.M.-. A. 8 AG EN DO RF (13), 
BROTHER W. W. ROLLER (57), 

were appointed said committee. 

REPORT. 

The committee afterwards presented the following, 
which was adopted : 

To tlie Most Worshipful Grand Lodge A. F. <£ A. M. of Colorado: 

Your committee, to whom was referred the address of the M. W. Grand Mas- 
ter for division and reference, present the following report: 

1st. That so much thereof a* refers to deceased brethren of this and other 
jurisdictions be referred to a special committee of three. 

2d. That so much thereof as refers to decisions, dispensations, suggestions 
and recommendations, and proposed amendments to the By-Laws of the Grand 
Lodge be referred to the Committee on Masonic Jurisprudence. 

3d. That so much thereof as refers to other Grand Lodges be referred to the 
Committee on Correspondence. 

Fraternally eabmitted, 

GEORGE KIMBALL, 
WM. W. ROLLER, 
A. 8AGEXDORF. 



1893] 



GRAND LODGE OF COLORADO. 27 



NECROLOGY. 



P.\G.\M.\ L. N. GREEXLEAF (5), 
BROTHER L. C. GREENLEE (7), 
BROTHER C. E. REED (7). 

were appointed said special committee. 

The committee afterwards presented the following re- 
port, which was adopted by a unanimous vote: 

To the Moat Worshipful Grand Lodge of Colorado: 

Your Special Committee, to whom was referred that portion of the Grand 
Master's address relating to deceased brethren of this and other Grand Jurisdic- 
tions, would respectf ally report : 

A brief year ago and our hearts were filled with gratitude to our Heavenly 
Father for baring mercifully spared the lives of our members through a long 
■cries of years. To-day our hearts are bowed in sorrow and overshadowed by the 
Death Angers wings, who has borne away two of our most beloved and honored 
members : Past Grand Master Robert A. QailJian and Past Deputy Grand Master 
Richard Sopris. 

We can only briefly refer to the great services rendered by these distinguished 
brethren to Masonry and the State : 

Brother Robert A. Quiilian was born at Dahlonega, Georgia, on May 5th, 
1342, where he was educated a lawyer and admitted to the bar of his native State. 
Removing to Colorado, he settled at Walsenborg, Huerfano county, in May, 1873, 
where be at once became prominent as a citizen, taking an active part in aU public 
affairs. He soon attained eminence as a leading member of the bar of Southern 
Colorado, and filled many positions of public trust with honor and distinguished 
ability. We regret that we are not in possession of complete data as to his 
Masonic record. He was Worshipful Master of Huerfano Lodge, U. D., in 1871, 
and upon the granting of the charter, in 1875, became its first Master. He had 
repeatedly been elected to the same office, his terms aggregating upwards of ten 
years of service. At the time of his death he was again serving as Worshipful 
Master. In 1877, he was elected J.G. W., of the Grand Lodge, and S. G. W. in 1*78. 
In 1879 and 1880 he served as D. G. M., and in 1881 was elected Grand Master. 

He died, after a brief illness, at his home, on the morning of December 8th, 
1892. leaving an estimable wife and four children to mourn his untimely loss. He 
was buried at Walsenburg, by the Lodge of which he was Master, with the solemn 
and impressive ceremonies of the fraternity. 

We who were wont to meet him within these tiled recesses at each recurring 
session of the Grand Lodge, will ever recall his genial pressure and kindly smile, 
and treasure as a priceless inheritance his manly virtues and noble traits of 
character. 

Jtesolued, That a page in our Proceedings be suitably inscribed to his 
memory. 



Brother Richard Sopris was one of the oldest members of this Grand Lodge, 
and a voritable father of Masonry in Colorado. 

He was born in Bucks county, Penn., June 26, 1813, and spent his boyhood 
days upon a farm. He was married on June 5, 1836, to Miss Elizabeth Allen, of 
Trenton, N. J., and the same year removed to Indiana, and was ever after iden- 
tified with the growing West. He was a canal and railroad contractor for many 
yean. He came to Colorado in 1858, and was one of the original shareholders of 
the town of Auraria. He was one of the founders of Auraria Lodge, and, we 
believe, its first W. M., and when this Lodge was merged into Denver No. 5, he 



28 PROCEEDINGS OF THE [1893 

Btill continued to take an active interest in its welfare. He was elected J. G. W. 
of the Grand Lodge in 1862 ; Grand Treasurer, 1865, 1866, 1867 and 1868, and Deputy 
Grand Master in 1869. In 1865 he was elected King in Denver Chapter No. 2. 
He was a charter member of Colorado Commandery No. 1, and its first Captain 
General, serving as such in 1866, 1867 and 1868, and was elected Generalissimo in 
1869. He took a leading part in the development of the resources of Colorado, 
and was intimately connected with its military, civic and social history. He died 
at his home in Denver on April 7th, 1893, leaving an aged wife, five sons and a 
daughter to mourn his loss. He was buried under the auspices of Denver Lodge 
No. 5, Colorado Commandery No. 1, K. T., acting as escort. The Pioneer Society, 
of which he was Past President, headed the procession. 

With the solemn and impressive ceremonies of the fraternity, his body was 
consigned to its final resting place in Riverside cemetery, in the presence of a 
large assemblage of Masons, his family and friends. 

Resolved, That a page in our Proceedings be suitably inscribed to his 
memory. 

To the subordinate Lodges of this jurisdiction, who mourn the loss of zealous 
and beloved craftsmen, we extend our heartfelt sympathy. While it is impossible 
to particularize in this connection, we are not unmindful of the noble part they 
have borne in the upbuilding of our symbolical Temple ; therefore 

Resolved, That a page in our Proceedings be suitably inscribed to their 
memory. 

As we turn our thoughts to other Grand Lodges and contemplate the sad 
memorials which have been placed in our hands, we realize that they, too, mourn 
the loss of honored and distinguished brethren, many of whose names have become 
familiar throughout the Masonic world. With but few exceptions, they belong 
to the past generation of active Masonic workers, who are rapidly entering the 
shadow of the dark valley, to awake in the glories of the " Morn Celestial." 

Resolved, That to the Grand Lodges of Arkansas, Florida, Kansas, M 
chusetts, Michigan, Nevada, North Carolina, Oregon, Tennessee and Virginia, 
extend our fraternal sympathy for the irreparable loss they have sustained in the 
death of Active and Past Grand Officers during the past year ; also * 

Resolved, That a page in our Proceedings be inscribed to the Memory of 
Deceased Brethren in other Grand Jurisdictions. 

So it will be with us all, dear brethren, when we have laid down oar working 
tools of life, we shall only be remembered by what we have done. 

" Fading away like the stars of the morning, 
Losing their light in the glorious sun — 
Thus would we pass from the earth and its toiling, 
Only reme.ubered by what we have done. 

Shall we be mise'd tho' by others succeeded, 
Reaping the fields we in spring-time have sown ? 

No, for the sower* may pass from their labors, 
Only remembered by what they have done. 

Only the truth that in life we have spoken, 

Only the seed that on earth we have sown. 
These shall pass onward when we are forgotten, 

Fruits of the harvest and what we have done." 

Fraternally submitted, 

LAWRENCE N. GREEN LEAF. 
L. C. GREENLEE. 
CALVIN E. REED. 



1893] GRAND LODGE OF COLORADO. 29 

BROTHER FREDERICK KRAMER. 

R. W. Grand Treasurer of all of the Grand Bodies of 
Masonry of Arkansas, was introduced by P. G. Master 
Can* and given a cordial welcome by the Grand Lodge. 

Brother Kramer returned thanks in a short speech. 

APPEALS. 

The Grand Secretary presented the papers in the fol- 
lowing cases and they were referred to the Committee on 
Appeals and Grievances : 

ALBERT M. STRATTOX, ) 

HARMONY LODGE No. 61. \ 



IRA J. BLOOMFIELD, 
MONTE VISTA LODGE No 



. 73. ) 



P. G. M. Harper M. Orahood was appointed to fill va- 
cancy on said committee. 

The Grand Lodge was called to refreshment until 2 
o'clock. 



FIRST DAY— Second Session. 



Tuesday, Sept. 19, 1893, 2 o'clock p. m. 

Grand Lodge resumed labor. 
Grand Master Wright in the East. 



30 PROCEEDINGS OF THE [1893 

REPORT OP THE GRAND TREASURER. 
The following report was read and referred to the 
Finance Committee : 

FRANK CHURCH, Ghand Tbkabubeb, in account with 

GRAND LODGE, A. F. A A. M., Colorado. 

GENERAL FUND. 

1892 

Sept. 19. To balance, as per Report 1892 $ 5,839 88 

Oct. 25. Grand Secretary 175 00 

1893. 

Sept. 7. To Grand Secretary _ 2,500 00 

Sept. 9. Grand Secretary 397 00 

Sept. 12. Grand Secretary 1,112 00 

8ept. 18. Grand Secretary 300 00 

Sept. 16. Grand Secretary 388 00 

Sept.18. Grand Secretary 42 00 

By Warrant No. 566 $ 

Warrant No. 567 

Warrant No. 568 

WarrantNo. 569 

Warrant No. 570 

WarrantNo. 571 

Warrant No. 572 

WarrantNo. 573 

Warrant No. 574 

WarrantNo. 575 

WarrantNo. 576.... 

WarrantNo. 577 

Warrant No. 578 

WarrantNo. 579 

Warrant No. 580 

Warrant No. 5Sl 

WarrantNo. 58i 

Warrant No. 5H3 

Warrant No. 5X4 

Warrant No. 5N) 

Warrant No. 5H7 

Warrant No. 5RH _ 

Warrant No. 5*9 

Warrant No. 590 

Warrant No. 591 

Warrant No. 592 .___,. 

To balance 

$10,253 83 

LI BR ART FUND. 
1892. 

Sept. 19. To balance, as per Report 1S92 $ 909 40 

1*93. - 

Sept. 1*. By Warrant No. 585 $ 18 50 

To balance 890 90 



5 89 14 


200 00 


200 00 


100 00 


1,508 95 


60 00 


895 00 


39 50 


14 25 


5 80 


2 t 20o 00 


300 00 


101 60 


45 00 


50 80 


46 65 


300 00 


81 55 


133 08 


94 15 


39 90 


83 40 


5 52 


300 00 


40 65 


300 00 


3,068 89 


$10,253 83 






I 909 40 $ 90940 



MASONIC WIDOWS* AND ORPHANS* FUND. 

1892 
Sept. 19. To balance, as per Report 1892 $ 2,604 15 

1893. 
Sept. 18. To balance... $2,604 15 



1893. 
Sept. 19. To total balance, $6,563.94. for which find check and Touchers for dis- 
bursement*, and the note belonging to the Grand Lodge, $2,500.00, 
interest paid to August 2, 1890; also three notes belonging to the 
Grand Lodge, am on n ting to $2,500.00; also Warrant No. 682, of 
Denver Lodge No. 5, for $536.00, and Warrant No. 526, of Union 
Lodge No. 7, for $ 473.00. 

FRANK CHURCH, 

Grand Treasurer. 



1893] 



GRAND LODGE OF COLORADO. 



31 



REPORT OF THE GRAND SECRETARY. 

The following was read and referred to the Finance 
Committee : 

To the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge : 

September 21, 1892, Charters were issued to : 
Trinidad Lodge No. 89, at Trinidad. 
Lamar Lodge No. 90, at Lamar. 
Lafayette Lodge No. 91, at Lafayette. 

LIBRARY FUND. 



I have drawn warrants on this fund : 
For Books purchased 



$ 



18 50 



GENERAL FUND. 

I have drawn warrants on our Grand Treasurer, as follows : 

52ft Ed. C. Parmelee, Grand Secretary, Balance Contingent Ex pen see, $ 39 14 

527 Ed. C. Parmelee, Grand Secretary, Contingent Expenses 200 00 

528 L. N. Greenleaf , Correspondent 200 00 

529 Thoe. Linton, Grand Tiler, Services 100 00 

570 Grand Treasurer. Pay Boll 1,508 95 

571 P. B. Gaylord & Co., Insurance 60 00 

572 W. P. Robinson & Co., Priming 895 00 

578 L. M. Miller, D. D. ti. M 89 50 

574 John Williams, D. D.G.M _ 14 25 

575 H.T. West, D. D. G. M 5 80 

576 TheH. Bohm Co., Jewels 2,200 00 

577 Bd. C. Parmelee, Salary _ :XX) 00 

578 John William*, D. D.G.M 101 61 

579 Ed. C. Parmelee. Book Case 45 00 

580 John Williams, D. D. G. M 50 80 

581 H.T. West, D. D. G. M 4« 65 

582 Ed. C. Parmelee, Salary 300 00 

583 H. T. West, D. D. G. M: HI 55 

584 L. M. Miller. D. D. G. M 138 08 

58ft H.T. West, D. D. G. M 94 15 

587 John Williams. D. D. G. M _ 39 90 

588 Geo. W. Koe, D. D. G. M 83 40 

580 H.T. West, D. D G. M 5 52 

500 Ed. C. Parmelee, Salary _ 300 00 

:m John Williams, D. D. G. M 40 65 

592 Ed. C. Parmelee, Salary 300 00 

$ 7,184 94 

I have received : 



DUES RETURNED BY LODGES FOR 1892, PAID SINCE LAST REPORT. 



HO. 



LODGE 



98 Roeita 

55 Mesa 

42 Corinthian 



LOCATION 



Roeita 

Grand Junction . 
Kokomo 



WHIN PAID 



September 23, 1892 
September 6, 1893 
September 9, 1893 



AMOUNT 



33 00 
1 00 
1 00 



32 



PROCEEDINGS OF THE 



[ 1893 



CHARTER FEES COLLECTED. 



NO. 


IjODOB 

Trinidad 


LOCATION 


WHEN PAID 


AMOUNT 


89 


Trinidad 


September 21, 1892 
September 21, 1992 
September 21, 1892 


$ 20 00 


90 


Lamar 


Lamar 


20 00 


91 


Lafayette 


Lafayette 


20 00 











DISPENSATION FEES FROM NEW LODGES. 



NO. 



LODGE 



LOCATION 



WHEN PAID 



Cripple Creek ' , July 10, 1898 



AMOUNT 



$ 4000 



DUES RETURNED BY SUBORDINATE LODGES FOR 1893. 



NO. 



1 
4 

5 
6 
7 
11 
12 
13 
14 
15 
17 
19 
20 
22 
28 
25 
26 
27 
28 
29 
80 
31 
32 
33 
34 
35 
36 
37 
38 
39 
40 
41 
42 
43 
44 
45 
46 
47 
48 
49 
50 



LODGE 



Golden City... 

Nevada 

Denver __, 

Central 

Union 

Black Hawk.. 

Washington 

El Paso 

(Columbia 

Moant Moriah 

Pueblo 

Collins 

Occidental 

Weston 

St. Vrain 

Doric. 

Idaho Springs. 

Huerfano 

Las Animas. ... 

Del Norte 

King Solomon. 
South Paeblo. 
Olive Branch.. 

San J nan , 

Crystal Lake.. 

Ionic 

Kosita 

Onray 

Silver Cliff... _ 

Gannison 

Pitkin 

Schiller 

Corinthian 

Eagle 

Alamosa __ 

Boulder 

Dnrango 

Breckenridge . 
Georgetown ... 
Mt Princeton . 
Garfield 



LOCATION 



WHEN PAID 



Golden 

Bald Mountain ... 

Denver 

Central City 

Denver 

Black Hawk 

Georgetown 

Colorado Springs . 

Boulder 

Canon City 

Pueblo 

Fort Collins 

Greeley 

Littleton 

Longmont 

Fairplay 

Idaho Springs 

Walsenburg 

Trinidad 

Del Norte 

Las Animas 

Pueblo 

Saguache 

Silverton 

Lake City 

Lead vi lie 

Koeita 

Ouray 

Silver Cliff 

Gunnison 

Pitkin 

Denver 

Kokomo 

Red Cliff 

Alamosa 

Boulder 

Dnrango 

Breckenridge 

Georgetown 

Buena Vista 

Erie 



Sept 

Sept. 

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Sept. 

Aug. 

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19, 1893 

6, 1893 

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7, 1893 
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7, 1893 
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14, 1893 
25, 1893 

7, 1KBS 

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9, 1893 

11. 1893 
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29. 1893 

7, 1H93 

7, 1893 

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2. 1S98 

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Dura for ISM 

Charter fee* 

Diaparuaeion feee 



iii PROCEEDINGS OF THE [1893 

I have paid: 

1892. 

Oct. 25. Frank Church, Grand Treasurer $ 175 00 

1808. 

Sept. 7. Frank Church, Grand Treasurer 2,500 00 

Sept. 9. Frank Church, Grand Treasurer S97 00 

Sept. 12. Frank Church, Grand Treasurer 1412 00 

Sept. 13. Frank Church, Grand Treasurer 800 00 

Sept. 16. Frank Church, Grand Treasurer 888 00 

Sept. 16. Frank Church, Grand Treasurer, (Lodge Warrants) 1,000 00 

Sept. 18. Frank Church, Grand Treasurer 42 00 

Total $ 5,923 00 

Balance on hand 845 00 

$ 6,268 00 

For an itemized statement of contingent expenses of this office 
see pages 133 and 134 of ledger. It showB that I have expended 
$46.64 more than the appropriation. 

BOOKS RECEIVED. 

Besides the usual exchanges of other Grand bodies we have 
received the following bound volumes : 

History of King Solomon's Primitive Lodge No. 91, Troy, New 
York; from the author, Brother Jesse B. Anthony, P. G. M. 

History of Free Masonry in Quebec, by Brother J. H. Graham, 
P. G. M., from Grand Lodge of Quebec. 

Volume 3 History of Free Masonry in New York, by Brother 
C. T. MoClenachan. 

Book of Constitutions, Grand Lodge of Missouri, 1892. 

Proceedings of the Grand Lodge of Arkansas, Illinois, Kentucky, 
Missouri, Texas and Virginia for 1892; and of Indiana, Iowa, Louisi- 
ana, New Jersey, Oregon and Vermont for 1893. 

MAGAZINES RECEIVED. 

I have received the following Masonic publications in exchange 
for our proceedings : 

American Tyler, Detroit, Michigan. 
Australasian Keystone, Melbourne, Victoria. 
Freemason, Sydney, New South Wales. 
Masonic Advocate, Indianapolis, Indiana. 
Masonic Chronicle, Columbus, Ohio. 
Masonic Chronicle, New York City. 
Masonic Constellation, St. Louis, Missouri. 
Masonic Journal, Portland, Maine. 
Masonic Review, Cincinnati, Ohio. 
Masonic Token, Portland, Maine. 
Master Mason, Minneapolis, Minnesota. 
Orient, Budapest, Hungary. 
Royal Craftsman, Plain field, New Jersey. 
Rough ABhlar, Richmond, Virginia. 



1893] GBAXD LODGE OF COLORADO. 35 

Square and Compass, Denver, Colorado. 

South Australian Freemason, Adelaide, South Australia. 

Trestle Board, San Francisco, California. 

Voice of Masonry, Chicago, Illinois. 

And odd numbers of several others. 

LODGES DELINQUENT. 
Akron No. 74, Rio Blanco No. 80, 

have not made returns or paid dues. 

Xos. 19, 20, 22, 25, 28, 29, 31, ?5, 38, 39, 40, 41, 43, 53, 58, 60, 72, 73, 
76, 77, 78, 79, 81, 83, 84, 85, 87 and 91 did not make returns and pay 
duee within the time prescribed by our laws. 
Manitoa No. 68, 

has made returns but has not paid dues. 

Most of the Lodges report it impossible to give the ages of all 
their members. Nob. 42, 43, 44, 46, 47, 57, 63, 64 and 84 only give the 
ages of those exempt. Nob. 28, 39, 41, 45, 56, 67, 69, 76, 77, 79, 83, 90 
and 91 do Dot give the ages of any. 

No. 74 made returns and paid does daring first day's session. No. 80 made 
returns and paid does September 27, 1893.— Grand Secretary, 

ERRORS NOTED IN RETURNS. 

Crested Butte No. 58, claims rebate for dues paid 1891-1892 on 
a brother reported as a member, but who was dimitted November 
4, 1890. 

Montrose No. 63. Dates of meetings not given ; no dates given 
to those dimitted or suspended. L. E. Davis, reputed as a member, 
is nothing to show when or how he gained membership. Returns 
for 1892 showed fifty-one members. Recapitulation this year com- 
mence with fifty-two. The returns were seat back for correction 
September 5, 1893, and returned to me this morning but errors are not 
corrected. 

Logan No. 70, reports C. L. McComas as a member. He was re- 
ported in 1891 as suspended and has not been reported as reinstated. 
They had fourteen members as per last report. Recapitulation 
now says number last year fifteen. My letters regarding same 
remain unanswered. 

St. John's No. 75, do not account for Nicholas Rodgers in list of 
members. He is reported admitted. Andrew Nichols reported; 
nothing to show when or how he gained membership. Sent back 
September 6, 1893, for correction and have not been returned. * 

LODGES UNDER DISPENSATION. 

Rob Morris Lodge, U. D., has made returns, paid dues, returned 
its dispensations and books and presents a petition for charter. 



* Returns received October 10, 1893, errors corrected, bnt balance of one 
dollar dues not paid. 



36 PROCEEDINGS OF THE [1893 

South Denver, U. D., has made returns, paid dues, returned its 
books and presents a petition for charter. It has not returned its 
dispensation. There may be other Lodges U. D., if so, the Grand 
Secretary has not been notified of the fact. 

Fraternally submitted, 

ED. C. PARMELEE, 

Grand Secretary. 

MAXITOU LODGE Xo. 68. 

On motion of Brother 0. T. Harkison (7), it was voted 
that a Lodge Warrant of this Lodge be accepted in pay- 
ment of their dues and the Lodge given representation at 
this session. 

ANNUAL ELECTION. 

Brothers Matt Adams (5), Cromwell Tucker (5), Wm. 
L. Hartmann (31) and Wm. T. March (56) were appointed 
to collect the votes. 

The voting resulted in the election of 

JETHR0 C. SANF0RD (46 1, Durango G. M. 

WM. L. BUSH (26), Idaho Springs D. G. M. 

WM. D. PEIRCE (7), Denver 8. G. W. 

GEORGE W. ROE (»:>), Pueblo J. G. W. 

FRANK CHURCH (5j, Denver G. Trees. 

ED. C. PARMELEE (4*), Masonic Temple, Denver G. Sec. 

PAST GRAND MASTERS' JEWELS. 

Brother F. I. Smith (84) presented the following re- 
port which, on motion of Brother T. H. Thomas (86), was 
adopted, and the bill for half-tone of jewel was ordered 
paid. 

Denteb, Colorado, September 19, 1^93 

To the Most Worshipful Grand Master, Wardens and Brethren of this Thirty- 
third Grand Lodge of Colorado : 

In accordance with a resolution passed by this Most Worshipful Grand Lodge 
at its Thirty-second Annual Communication, viz: to purchase and present to each 
of its P. G. Masters an appropriate jewel as a memorial, having complied with the 
spirit and we trust the letter of the resolution, the committee begs to submit the 
following report : 

The committee purchased and presented twenty-two jewels, a description of 
which, as near as is possible to give, is this: The jewel is about five and one-half 
inches long; the upper portion shows a bar, with the name of the recipient in raised 
gold letters; suspended from the bar are two Columns, representing the Pillars of 
the Porch, denoting Strength and Establishment; between the Column* rests a 
circle of gold, showing the Point within the Circle; on the Top rests the Holy 



38 PROCEEDINGS OF THE [18SKJ 

Scriptures; attached to the bottom is the All-Seeing Eye; suspended from the 
Column* hangs a circle of wreath gold, on the face of which rests the Square and. 
Compcuseit the Sun being represented in the center of the circle; the head of the 
compasses is set with a diamond and the center of the son with a moonstone; the 
jewel is made of solid gold; the design is intended to form a beautiful, perfect and 
complete whole. 

The following (with inscription on back of jewel showing date of service as 
M. W. G. Master) have been the recipients, viz.: 

Brother J. M. Chiyington. Aognst, 1861, to November, 1882. 
Brother Henry M. Teller, November, 1863, to November, 1864; October, 1SJ7, to 
September, 1873. 

Brother A. J. Van Deren, October, 1864, to November, 1865. 
Brother Webster D. Anthony, September, 1S73, to September, 1875. 
Brother Oren H. Henry, September, 1875, to September, 1876. 
Brother Harper M. Orahood, September, 1876, to September, 1677. 
Brother Cornelias J. Hart, September, 1*77, to September, 1878. 
Brother R. W. Woodbury, September, 187S, to September. 1870. 
Brother Byron L. Carr, September, 1879, to September, 1S80. 
Brother Lawrence N. Greenleaf, September, 1880, to September, ix*l. 
Brother, Robert A. Quillian, September, 1881, to September, 1882. 
Brother Frank Oh arch. September, 1882, to September, 1883. 
Brother Andrew Sagendorf, September, 1*8:1, to September, 1NS4. 
Brother James H. Peabody, September, 18S4, to September, 18&5. 
Brother George E. Wyman, September, 1885, to September. 1SH6. 
Brother Albert H. Branch, September, 1886, to September. 18*1. 
Brother George K. Kimball, September, 18*7, to September, INS*. 
Brother William D. Todd, September, 18H.S, to September, 1889. 
Brother William T. Bridwell, September, 18S«, to September, 1890. 
Brother E. L. N. Foster, September, 1890, to September, 1891. 
Brother John M. Maxwell, September, 1891, to September, 1892. 
Brother William D. Wright, Septembsr, 1892, to September, 1893. 

Before the completion of the jewels, Bro. P. G. Master Robert A. Qaillian hail 
been summoned to the Supreme Grand Lodge above, and the jewel bearing hie name 
was duly presented to his widow. 

In conclusion, the committee desires to express its appreciation of the wisdom 
and suggestions received from several members of this Grand Body; also to thank 
the manufacturers, the personnel of the Henry Bohra Jewelry Company, Denver, 
for their assistance, courtesy and patience. 

Fraternally submitted, 

HENRY M. FURMAN, 
FRANK I. SMITH. 
JAMES B. McCOY. 

Committee. 

BROTHER GEORGE W. MEYERS. 

Brother B. F. Rawalt (71) offered the following, which 
was referred to the Committee ou Jurisprudence: 

Resolved, That the Grand Secretary deliver the dimit of Brother 
George W. Meyers to Burlington Lodge No. 77, A. P. & A. M., and 
the name of Brother Meyers be entered on the records of said Lodge 
as a member thereof. 



1893] GRAND LODGE OF COLORADO. 39 

ROBERT H. NEVITT. 

P. G. Master L. N. Greenleaf (5) offered the following, 
which was adopted: 

Resolved, That the Grand Master be empowered to heal Robert 
H. Nevitt, and restore him to membership in Durango Lodge No. 46, 
with the consent of said Lodge. 

PROPOSED AMENDMENTS TO BY-LAWS. 

Brother J. W. Milsom (15) offered the following. Amend 
Sections 116-121 and 122 of the By-Laws so that they will 
read as follows: 

Sec. 116. An application for restoration after indefinite suspen- 
sion for non-payment of dues shall not be received until all dues 
are paid to the date of suspension. 

Sec. 121. Restoration after indefinite suspension shall be by 
action of the Lodge at a stated communication, after due notice to 
the Lodge of at least one lunar month, and must be by a two-thirds 
vote of the members present. 

Sec. 122. A Mason heretofore dropped from the rolls for non- 
payment of dues (without trial), shall be restored to good standing 
without further action of the Lodge, upon the payment of all arrear- 
ages to the date of being so dropped. 

And the same were referred to the Committee on Juris- 
prudence. 

The Grand Lodge was then called to refreshment until 
8 o'clock p. M. 



FIRST DAY-Third Session. 



Tuesday, Sept, 19, 1893, 8 o'clock p. m. 

Grand Lodge resumed labor. 
Grand Master Wright in the East. 

REPORT OP GRAND LECTURER. 

The Grand Lecturer, Brother Clay M. Van (84). pre- 
sented his report, which was referred to the Committee on 
Jurisprudence. 



40 PROCEEDINGS OF THE [1893 

REPORTS OP DISTRICT DEPUTY GRAND MASTERS. 

Brother Henry T. West (20), D. D. G. M. District No. 1, 
Brother John Williams (13), D. D. G. M. District No. 2, 
Brother George W. Roe (15), D. D. G. M. District No. 3, 
presented their reports. 

The report of Brother L. M. Miller (55), D. D. G. M. 
District No. 4. was read by the Grand Secretary. 

On motion, the reports were referred to the Committee 

on Jurisprudence. 

APPEALS. 

During the session the papers in the appeal of 

F. A. JOHNSON, ) 

UNION LODGE No. 7, J 

were filed and referred to the Committee on Appeals and 
Grievances. 

BILLS OP DISTRICT DEPUTY GRAND MASTERS. 

Brother T. H. Thomas (86) offered the following, which 
was adopted: 

Resolved, That the expenses which District Deputy Grand Mas- 
ters are to receive shall include their hotel bills as well as railroad 
and stage fare, etc., and their bills for the past year shall be allowed 
and paid accordingly. 

The Grand Lodge was called from labor to refreshment 
until 10 o'clock to-morrow morning. 



SECOND DAY-First Session. 

Wednesday, Sept. 20, 1893, 10 o'clock a. m. 

Grand Lodge resumed labor. 
Grand Master Wright in the East. 

ORATION. 

The Grand Master introduced Brother T. B. MacDon- 
ald ( 32), Grand Orator, who delivered the following: 



1 



1M3] GRAND LODGE OF COLORADO. 41 

Most Worshipful Grand Master and Brethren : 

Masons trace their fraternal lineage, like a thread of purest gold, 
back through the ages, beyond the Norman conquest, beyond imper- 
ial Rome, back to the great temple,} with Solomon, king of Israel and 
monarch of wisdom, as their founder. If the master's lecture in the 
third degree be true, Masons beheld the wonders of Assyria and 
lived amidst the mysterious magnificence of Egypt. They walked 
the streets of Alexandria more than three thousand years ago, side 
by side with those illustrious people, who are now mummies in a 
glass case at the Smithsonian Institute, who excite curiosity in other 
museums, or remain in the peaceful seclusion of innumerable sar- 
cophagi still undiscovered. More than one thousand years before 
the germ of the Roman Catholic church appeared in the world, this 
fraternity was an active organization. It existed more than one 
thousand years before Christ walked this anxious earth upon that 
mission of love which led to the unspeakable anguish of the cross. 
Masons listened to the eloquence of Cicero and heard the philippics 
of Demosthenes pronounced against the ambitious Macedonian. 
Masons shared in the glories of Greece, the commerce of Carthage 
and the military supremacy of Rome. Every important event which 
has happened in this world from the death of Sardanapalus down to 
the birth of the leader of the Four Hundred has been witnessed by 
a Mason, It would seem that the antiquity of the order is beyond 
question ; but a controversy is constantly going on between the 
Brethren upon that point. Some members of the fraternity, having 
anchored their faith to the gravity with which our esoteric work is 
conducted, believe in the great antiquity of the order with a faith 
which is commendable in this age of widespread infidelity. The man 
who lives in the glow of our advanced civilization, may not be pro- 
found, he may not be a wiser man than his immediate predecessor in 
the "Flood of Years," but in him faith has been minimized and every 
part of the brilliant domain of modern thought is guarded by senti- 
nels who permit nothing to pass within the lines unchallenged. 

In these times of unbelief, when no doctrine is received as au- 
thentic because of its ancient respectability, when Religion is under- 
going such transformation in face and form as to appear a new creat- 
ure to each succeeding generation, when learned Doctors of Divinity 
question the plenary inspiration of the Scriptures with such ardor as 
to expose themselves to the charge of heresy, when a Roman Cath- 
olic priest has, for a time at least, defied the Pope to follow in the 
footsteps of Mr. Henry George, when nothing in art, in politics, in 
religion is accepted as genuine until it has been first tested by such 
reasoning power as this generation may possess, it is certain that the 
truth of our symbolism and the antiquity of our order will be chal- 
lenged. But what harm shall be done if the challenger shall prove 



•42 PROCEEDINGS OF THE [18^3 

that we cannot go back to the great temple for our origin, or even 
beyond the century immediately preceding the one in which we now 
live. 

This order, if it be worthy of life, must have in it some vital 
merit which makes it a power for good in the world, and if that merit 
be not in it all the antiquity of Adam can do it no good. There is 
something in great antiquity, without a doubt, which appeals to the 
minds of men with mysterious power. Even Aristocracy, that social 
deformity, born of an unholy embrace between human vanity and 
human imbecility, burns its choicest incense at the Altar of An- 
tiquity. 

It is true that the man who has no ancestors, who amasses 
wealth by any means will, if the golden tide rise high enough, be 
cast upon those enchanted shores made brilliant with the gracious 
presence of the nineteenth century aristocrat, where he will receive 
welcome and standing based upon the amount of money he is each 
year willing to devote to the pursuit of pleasure. But true aristoc- 
racy, like costly wine, must have about it the flavor of great antiquity. 
Your man of sensibility, if he happens to be in a cemetery, is not 
attracted by the pompous white tombstone, which rears its new born 
6plendor aloft in the sunlight, bidding for the observation of the cas- 
ual visitor. He turns from the showy mass to some stone, dim with 
age, beaten by storms and perhaps covered with moss, which marks 
an ancient grave and, with studious patience, tries to decipher the 
brief history of the human dust beneath the mound. It is natural 
for men whose minds are illumined by the many colored light of 
imagination, to feel a solemn interest in the daily lives of ancient 
men, and we who are Masons look with modest pride upon our ven- 
erable institution, because we know it to be older than the societies 
which surround us. Still the modern world is the world for most 
of us. 

It is true of course that books are issuing from the press, written 
by able men, in which the idea of the degeneracy of modern man. 
which means the degeneracy of the modern world, is advocated with 
more or less power ; but I can accept no such doctrine. Mr. Tenny- 
son has taken the opposite view of human destiny, in the following 
exquisite language : 

" Yet I doubt not thro* the ages one increasing purpose runs, 

And the thoughts of men are widened with the process of the sons.*' 

The process of humanity has, I believe, been compared to the 
rise of the tides of the sea. The tide rises not in one smooth regular 
wave, but by a succession of waves, each rising higher than the one 
that preceded it, and then falling back into the great ocean. Even 
so did the great nations of antiquity, like waves in the rising tides of 
the sea, rush in succession up the shining shores of progress, only to 



1893] GBAND LODGE OF COLORADO. 43 

recede into the chaotic ocean of humanity, whence they emerged, 
but each of these national waves rose higher than the one that pre- 
ceded it, and the progress of humanity, has been the progress of a 
perpetually rising tide. 

Such being my belief in the destiny of the race, if some individ- 
ual shall be able to prove that our order is of modern origin I shall 
not, like Niobe, weep so copiously as to become a fountain. 

The great monarch of Israel, builder of the temple, prince of 
ancient wisdom, Solomon in all his glory, who lived in the midst of 
splendors, was the one central, superb figure of a gorgeous and semi- 
barbaric age. 

Let us take, as the representative of the present age, that type 
of American manhood, Abraham Lincoln, to whom the Master so 
feelingly alluded yesterday. He was a man of even temper, of purest 
patriotism, of exalted character, of superb judgment, of exquisitely 
balanced mind, of intense energy and indomitable courage. Perhaps 
he was not a man of genius, for he was deficient in some of the 
characteristics of that remarkable class. He was not eccentric, he 
was not mentally one sided, he was not the victim of a partial 
development of powers. He could do an ordinary duty in an ordinary 
manner. In him no one quality towered so high above the others as 
to appear a giant among dwarfs ; his every good quality was giant 
standing colossal in the pure white light of perfect common sense* 
the " rarest gift of God to man." His memory, adorned by almost 
every virtue known to humanity, will be held in grateful veneration 
while there remains on earth a breast fit to harbor an American 
heart. With Abraham Lincoln as the representative of this age and 
of the modern world I have no fear that dishonor will fall upon our 
fraternity if it be proven that it is modern in its origin. 

Masonry advocates charity, and charity in the abstract at least, is 
worshipped in the order. If a Mason in the pursuit of wealth or fame is 
avaricious or oppressive, he is so in violation of every precept of the 
fraternity. The first lesson taught an entered apprentice upon his 
entrance into the Lodge is one well calculated to inspire in his breast 
sympathy for the brother on life's highway who finds himself con- 
fronted by the keeper of the gate demanding toll when he has noth- 
ing with which to satisfy the demand. When upon strict search the 
unfortunate finds himself entirely destitute, it is not for a Mason 
who may be standing near to make merry over his distress. He 
should remember the indulgent treatment extended to him by the 
Lodge upon a similar occasion and, if possible, he should imitate that 
conduct in his own dealings with the unfortunate. Charity has been 
canonized in our order. Her sweet face, her golden hair, her voice 
vibrant with nature's softest music, her sympathetic eye, her disposi- 
tion excessive in its bounty, all these things have been recited in our 



44 PROCEEDINGS OF THE [1893 

order in varying phraseology, and all Masonic voices join in the 
chorus of her praise. Charity is not only given the blessings peculiar 
to herself ; she unites in her person the best qualifications of her 
two glorious sisters, Faith and Hope. When Charity stretches forth 
her hand and, with boundless love in her heart, lifts up the fallen 
one, she looks upon him with the serene eye of Faith, she speaks to 
him with the voice of Hope and, as the music of that voice falls upon 
his ear, plans once dead become quick, again the future spreads before 
him like a pleasant plain covered with flowers and in the golden 
distance Ambition waveB her welcome and he follows her command* 
ing form beyond the pleasant plain and up the mountain side. It is 
true that there is much senseless eulogy of Charity by men who have 
no sympathetic feeling and consequently no power in Charity. We 
write a little essay on Charity and in it incorporate quotations from 
the bible and the poets and, having read it to our wife and helpless 
offspring until they cry " enough," we tie a red ribbon around it and 
take it down to the Ix>dge and read it to the brethren. It is wonder- 
ful the sense of relief that pervades us after we have eliminated that 
gem from our system, and it is wonderful the blessed peace that falls 
upon our domestic circle when we have delivered ourself of that 
essay. The children no longer flee at our approach, the smile comes 
back to the face of our wife and the dog comes home again. 

We pass out of the Lodge after our little effort, and, on our way 
home, while we are still breathing the smoke of the incense which 
the brethren have burned for us, while we are moving along through 
the chill air wrapped in pleasant thoughts and a warm overcoat, 
with our heart swollen to an unnatural size by love for suffering 
humanity, with our own eloquence faintly sounding in our ears like 
music dying on the water, we see a child with hungry eyes, with famine 
in her form and distress written all over her, clothed in rags and bitten 
by the keen teeth of the frosty wind. And we, who have been sing- 
ing the praises of Charity with such wondrous eloquence that the 
brethren have risen up and called us blessed, we who have praised 
her smile, and her face, and her voice, and her hair, and all the 
members of her body which our knowledge of anatomy would permit 
us to enumerate, we who have been so exalted by the magic of our 
own voice that our heart hath grown within us like a toy balloon, 
" That our subdued eyes, albeit unused to the melting mood, drop 
tears as fast as the Arabian trees their medicinal gum/' I suppose we 
who have been so eloquent and sympathetic go down into our pockets 
for money or in some other way tender our service to the unfortunate 
child. No, of course not. We cross to the other side of the street 
and curse the luck which brought such an object between ub and our 
pleasant thoughts. The symbolism of Masonry is indeed beautiful, 
and to many of us, in our worship of Charity in her abstract form, 



1893] GRAND LODGE OF COLORADO. 45 

cherish her as a symbol and forget to practice her virtues. Charity 
is not an inhabitant of the brain. The atmosphere of logic is too 
cold for her and her chosen residence is in the genial warmth of a 
loving heart. 

Our order strives, almost in vain, to keep the true spirit of 
charity alive in our hearts. When we leave the Lodge we go to our 
office and proceed to play the part of a small financial Caesar. We 
do, it is true, compel the world to render unto Caesar the things that 
are Cesar's ; but we are not so fast in rendering unto God the things 
that are God's, and his poor receive too little of our beneficial atten- 
tion. The leper throws her mantle over her face crying "unclean, 
unclean." The poor man does not need to shout his poverty. This 
generation sees it and conveys its substance around him by a cir- 
cuitous route, for it is surely better to suffer from extra locomotion, 
than to lose any portion of our wealth. 

We were told here yesterday afternoon lhat fifty-two out of the 
fifty-five signers of the Declaration of Independence were Masons. 
This alone should be glory enough for one fraternity. The Declara- 
tion of Independence was a bold measure and a wise one. By the 
Americans it was received in a whirlwind of enthusiasm. The 
patriots lost their senses ; they were for the time drunk with national 
pride. Ringing bells and glad voices and roaring cannon filled the 
living air with the music of freedom, for out of the hideous womb of 
fratricidal war came a nation young indeed and weak, but animated 
by the indomitable spirit of liberty. Fiom the signing of the Declar- 
ation of Independence down to the present time the progress of this 
country has been a triumphal march. Obstacles have indeed risen 
in her path, but they have been swept aside by the impetuous valor 
of her people and to-day she moves along in her career of glory 
toward a future resplendent with every promise of prosperity. Her 
brightest hope, her most precious treasure reside in a brave and gen- 
erous people who present a united front to the nations of mankind, 
ready to pour out the last drop of their blood in defense of that 
bright banner, which is the recognized symbol of the power and glory 
of this Republic. And my brethren, during the eventful years which 
have passed since the fourth of July, seventeen hundred and seventy- 
six, many changes have taken place in this nation, but the tempor- 
izings of the constitution upon the questions of human liberty have 
been swept away and this Republic is now governed by those 
sentiments of human freedom and human equality, which are ex- 
pressed with such burning eloquence in the Declaration of Indeperd- 
ence. In the United States of America, liberty has at last found a 
home strong enough to nourish and defend her mighty spirit, and in 
the heart of our political system she has erected a temple which 
cannot be destroyed until the Great Republic lies dead upon the con- 



46 PROCEEDINGS OF THE [1893 

tinent. It may well be a source of pride to Masons that so many of 
the order signed the Declaration of Independence, that sublime 
instrument which contains so many of the teachings of our fraternity. 
When we meet in the Lodge we meet as brothers and submit to 
the beneficent rule of the Prince of Peace. In the Lodge harmony 
is supreme, and we listen to the voice of the Master raised in praise 
of Friendship, Morality and Brotherly Love. But when the Lodge 
closes, we pour out into the street and as if by magic become arro- 
gant and intolerant. A brother is then to us a brother if he happens 
to be on our side of the controversy. I understand that most of our 
labor organizations are based so far as their secret business is con- 
cerned upon Masonry. I have no words of criticism against these 
organizations. It is to my dim vision a glorious thing, the organiza- 
tion by labor into societies for the uplifting of men who earn their 
daily bread by daily toil of the human body ; and if the societies 
have adopted any part of our esoteric work they have displayed 
signal judgment in the work of selection. In the great battle now 
being fought between* labor and capital members of our fraternity 
are fighting, some on one side and some on the other. Our brethren 
on the side of the masses tell us that all over this broad land labor 
is organizing into well drilled and disciplined batallions capable of 
meeting on the political battlefield the choicest cohorts of monoply. 
They tell us that labor clad in the shining armor of a good cause has 
entered into the first campaign of a war which will not cease until 
white winged Peace returning shall behold Labor prostrate beneath 
the feet of Capital or standing triumphant in the sunlight of pros- 
perity, in a happy country under benignant laws which secure to each 
toiler just compensation for his labor. In such, contest this Lodge 
as a body can take no part ; but it throws its influence insensibly 
toward the side that is right. Every utterance in this Lodge which 
falls from the lips of an earnest brother in advocacy of the sublime 
precepts of Masonry, is certain to fall into good soil in some brain 
and heart and, as the teachings of this order make toward righteous- 
ness, a brother who is earnest will depart from the Lodge, feeling in 
hiB heart a desire to do something for the betterment of the race. 
We are just passing through a period of fire and flood. It is not my 
intention to say anything concerning the controversy between the 
sections of our common country, which can be construed as an attack 
upon either. I desire to use the misfortune which seems about to 
descend upon us as an illustration of the capacity of people to look out 
for number one. The West is wrong or the East is wrong, and at the 
bottom of that wrong is human selfishness. I wonder if Masons, who 
are taught in the Lodge the value of friendship and brotherly love 
are, in these times of distress, mindful of a brother's welfare, or are 
they pursuing with conscientious devotion the pathway of their own 



1893] GRAND LODGE OF COLORADO. 47 

prosperity even though that pathway lead them over the ruins of a 
brother's fortune. A tidal wave of misfortune has swept over this 
country and men who had reached the summit of prosperity and 
were looking, with complacent pity on us who toiled far below have 
been engulfed. Poor and rich have been swept from their feet by 
the waters of adversity and the land is full of desolation. Happy is 
the man who has builded unto himself an ark and strong indeed is 
the ark that outrides the storm. When we look around us upon the 
angry world from the sanctuary of the Lodge and see the proud man 
scornful and oppressive, and the poor man suffering and children 
crying for bread we " No longer misunderstand the grave or its occa- 
sion." We see in it the place where all men must be stripped to 
depart from the world naked, and humiliated. 

God sent us into this world naked, and naked not in the flesh 
merely, but in worldly possessions as well. He does not make a king, 
He sends no man into the world with a crown on his head ; He sends 
into this world no merchant prince, no Dives. All children come into 
the world poor and helpless. All distinctions of wealth and class are 
man created. But when the time comes for man to leave the world 
he finds that the same mysterious law that brought him into it poor, 
at the grave reduces him to penury. His exit from the world may 
be magnificent ; a nation may weep over his remains. His body may 
lie in state in some marble capitol, guards in gorgeous uniforms may 
surround it, solemn music may add its imposing harmony to the 
occasion. But these things are only the works of man. When the 
soul takes its flight from the body it goes into the next world with- 
out gold or silver coin, stripped of its petty aristocracy and those 
numberless trivial distinctions which we pursue with such perturba- 
tion of spirit here below. 

The soul standing on the threshold of heaven outside the golden 
gate, knocking in all humility for admission, will hear those words 
which all Masons have heard before, solemn in their intensity : "Who 
comes here ? Is he worthy and well qualified ? Duly and truly pre- 
pared ? " And when that eternal threshold has been crossed and the 
soul stands for the first time before the supreme architect of the 
Universe, it will stand before him in the full splendor of perfect 
light, not ashamed of its nakedness, without earth's wealth and dress, 
without the gaudy trappings of our earthly vanity, without gold or 
silver coin, and devoid of all metallic substances, with nothing to 
recommend it to the favor of the divine judge save such intrinsic 
merit as it may possess. 

REPORT ON CORRESPONDENCE. 
Brother L. N. Greenleaf (5) presented the report on 



48 PROCEEDINGS OF THE [1893 

Correspondence, which was ordered published with the 
jjroeeedingB. (See appendix.) 

GRAND LODGE OF OKLAHOMA AND NEW ZEALAND. 

Brother Greenleaf (5) also presented the following, 
which, on motion, was adopted : 

To the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge of Colorado: 

Your Committee on Correspondence would respectfully submit the following 
report: 

We have had under careful consideration the application of the Grand Lodge 
of Oklahoma for recognition. We find that it was organized on November 10, lt<92, 
with the full consent and most hearty approval of the Grand Lodge of Indian Ter- 
ritory, from which the ten Lodges forming the new Grand Lodge held their charters. 
All the proceedings in connection with its formation were regular and strictly in 
accordance with \fasonic law and usage. Your committee, therefore, recommend 
the adoption of the following resolution: 

Resolved, That the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge of Colorado extends a most 
cordial and fraternal greeting to the Grand Lodge of Oklahoma, organized under 
such happy auspices, and hereby recognizes it as the supreme Masonic authority in 
its jurisdiction and as one of the fraternal chain of regular Grand Lodges. 

In the matter of the renewed application of the Grand Lodge of New Zealand 
for recognition, deferred, upon our recommendation, until this Communication of 
the Grand Lodge, your committee submit the following: 

Our latest information is dorived from a circular, dated Auckland, August It, 

1*93, issued by order of the Grand Master, M. W. Brother Malcolm Niccol, to correct 

certain false statements regarding that Grand Lodge, written by a correspondent in 

that Colony and published in American Masonic journals. From this circular we 

glean the following facts, which it is claimed cannot be controverted: 

English Lodges joined 42 

Scotch Lodges joined 36 

Irish Lodges joined 9 

New Lodges opened 9 

Making a total of eighty-six Loigas on the roll of the Grand Lodge of New 
Zealand on January 1, 1*93. Since then, two more Lodges of the Scotch Constitu- 
tion have thrown their lot in with the movement, and three new Lodges have bean 
opened, making in all ninety -one Lodges, but as an English and Scotch Lodge 
amalgamated, the actual numerical record is ninety Lodges. The total number of 
Lodtfe* of other Constitutions does not exceed fifty. 

From the Proceedings of the Annual Communication held at Auckland, April 
2S, ls&i, we note that upon calling the roll of the eighty-nine Lodges, the officers 
and members of twenty six Lodges, numbering 131, were present. A large number 
of telegrams and letters were received from Grand Officers and taem hers apologising 
for their absence. Other meetings have been held when a majority of the Lodges 
were not represented, either by their officers or by proxy. This is contrary to the 
law as observed by many of our American Grand Lodges. The Grand Master himself 
in his address calls attention to this matter, and says: 

"Strong efforts should also be made to secure more representative attendances 
at Grand Lodge Communications. I would like to see it enacted that no business 
shall be transacted by Grand Jjodge unites a majority of the Lodges are repre- 
sented, either personally or by regularly accredited proxies/' 

He also quotes the following figures, showing the progress which they have 
made: 

"in April, 1890, Grand Lodge was inaugurated, with forty-one Lodges on its 
roll; in April, 1391, this number had increased to seventy-three; in April, 1892, it 
had reached seventy-eight; to-day we have eighty-nine. The number of members 
in the different years above stated was 12:16, 2193, 2*97, 3090." 



18113 J GBAND LODGE OF COLORADO. 49 

From the published returns, eighty of the Lodges paid Grand Lodge does for 
the rear ending December 31, 1*92, thus disposing most effectually of the false asser- 
tions to the contrary, which have been mailed to America. 

The Grand Master visited forty-one Lodges, traveling 6000 miles by steamer, 
rail and coach, and spent two months of his time in this laudable work, and 
rejretted that he conld not visit others. The Grand Lodge distributed $780 in 
charity last year, and has to its credit a Charity Fund of over $2500. It is out of 
debt, and has a comfortable balance to the credit of its General Fund. It has 
demonstrated its claim to our consideration, and we are not in sympathy with those 
who are striving to thwart its progress. 

We have advocated delay in previous years that we might be more fully 

advised. No valid reason for farther delay now exists; we therefore recommend 

the adoption of the following resolution: 

Resolved. That the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge of Colorado hereby recog- 
nizes the Grand Lodge of New Zealand as a sovereign and independent Grand Lodge, 
and cordially welcomes her as such into the fraternal circle of Grand Lodges. 

Fraternally submitted, 

LAWBENCE N. GHBENLEAF, 

BENJAMIN F. RAWALT, 

IKA L. HERKON, 

Committee. 

RE POUT OX RE VURS6 AND WORK-CHARTERS GRANTED. 

The Committee on Returns anil Work presented the 
following, which was adopted on motion of Brother T. H. 
Thomas (86), and charters ordered issued as therein recom- 
mended, to 

Rob Morris Lodge No. 92, Denver, Arapahoe county, 

South Denver Lodge No. 93, South Denver, Arapahoe county, 

Amethyst Lo3ge No. 91, Creede, Mineral county, 

Silver State Lodge No. 95, Pueblo, Pueblo county, 

Mt. Pisgah Lodge No. 96, Cripple Creek, El Paso county. 

To the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge: 

Your Committee on Returns and Work have examined the returns of the sev- 
eral lodges under dispensation, so far as they have been presented; also the records 
of the tame, and the code of by-law* adopted by each, and respectfully report an 
follows: 

South Denver Lodge, U. D. 

SOUTH DENVER, ARAPAHOE COUNTY. 

It appears from the records of this Lodge that the first meeting was held 
February 13, 1893, onder the authority of a dispensation. That they have held 
regular meetings every week since, the last four meetings being presided over by 
X. W. Grand Master W. D. Wright. No dispensation is recorded and none returned , 
bat the Grand Master reports that he issued one and that it has been lost or mislaid, 
and for that reason he took charge of the work in person. 

While the Grand Master has the undoubted right to take this coarse, yoar 
committee wonld not recommend it as a precedent, but would deem it the better 
coarse to issue a duplicate, should such a case again arise. 

The records are fairly well kept. 

The returns show that there were eighteen petitioners for dispensation; that 
thirteen have been raised and nine elected to charter membership, making forty 
members in all. 



50 



PROCEEDINGS OF THE 



[1893 



We recommend that a charter be granted to this Lodge, under the name of 

SOUTH DENVER LODGE NO. 93, 

With 

Brother IsomS. Elrod W. M. 

Brother David Cinnamond S. W. 

Brother Azel W. Bush J. W. 

And the following members : 

James Annand, John W. Bacon, 

John Q. Brown, John S. Babcook, 

Robert H. Barrows, Phillip N. Chandler, 

Willisford Dey, Marvin M. Elliott, 

Otis M. Farwell, Herbert L. Ganliner, 

Harrison H. Given, Aogost J. Gnmlick, 

William T. Harris. August S. Hart, 

John Hartman, Sylvanns O. Hervey, 

Benjamin B. Hoadley, Warren W. Moore, 

Jerry Minor, George W. Pratt, 

James A. Pearsall, MattR. Root, 

Orlando W. Richardson, Frank H. Raymond, 

Frank C. Rugg, Edward W. Robinson, 

Edward C. Sjetje, George Bimington, 

Fred S. Sweet. Moses Stone, 

John T. Thorpe, George E. Tack, 

Guss E. Vote, George W. Weaver, 

Edward W. Warren, William N. Williams. 

We recommend that the by-laws be approved as amended by your committee. 

Rob. Morris Lodge, U. D. 

DENVER, ABAPAHOE COUNTY. 

Dispensation isHaed October 8th, 1892. 

The records fail to set oat the dispensation under which the Lodge has 
worked, and in other respects they are rather crudely kept. The records show the 
character of the reports of the committees on character as "favorable" or 
"unfavorable." This practice is wrong, and should not prevail. The record 
should show only that the report was made. 

The returns show sixteen petitioners for dispensation, thirty-two initiated, 
thirty passed, thirty raised ; admitted to charter membership, five. Total mem. 
bership, fifty-one. 

Your committee have made some slight emendations to the By-Laws as 
adopted by the Lodge to make them conform to the Grand Lodge By-Laws, and 
recommend that they be approved as amended. These By-Laws conform mors 
nearly to Masonic law than any other code your committee have yet examined. 

We recommend that a Charter issue to this Lodge under the name of 

ROB. MORRIS LODGE, NO. 92, 
With 

Brother Edward F. Hoffman W. M. 

Brother Charles T. Hilton 8. W. 

Brother Thomas N.Worth J. W. 

And the following named brethren : 

John C. Fulton, Clarence J. Cheeney, 

William Mundell, Benjamin Gray, 

Albert L. Stack, John Carlson, 

George T. Hamilton, William Belden, 

Willis A. Sherwood, William 8- Ammon, 

Lucien B. Vick Roy, Lewis 8. Snapp, 



1893] 



GRAND LODGE OF COLORADO. 51 



William H. Perry, Isaac W. Eppler, 

William R. Bell, Joseph H. Alter, 

John T. Phillips, Adni A. Young, 

Albert L. Little, Robert Brace, 

Harry C. Holder, Thomas H. Duggan, 

Daniel M. Murphy, Thaddeus H. Martin, 

Charles Martin, Howard W. Slack, 

James B. Moulton, Harry 8. Gilchrist, 

Payton J. Keech, Joseph 8. Douglass, 

Samuel C. Boganwright, John A. Davison, 

John F. Ensign, James M. Davis, 

Clinton L. Jenkins, John Swanney, 

George N. Cary, Charlee.H. Watkine, 

Joseph F. Brogley, Jacob T. Pender, 

Pan! H. Carrow, Daniel B. Kisthard, 

William 8. Winslow, Max Fischer, 

Erail H. Selbaoh, John K. Armstrong. 

Yoar committee are informed by Brother Stack, Secretary of said Lodge, 
that the (limits of Brothers Bark low and Stabler have undoubtedly been handed 
to the Grand Master, but they do not appear among the papers, and the names are 
for that reason left off the list. We recommend that the Grand Secretary be 
authorized to add their names to the Charter if the proper credentials are filed 
with him before this Charter is issued, 

Amethyst Lodgr, U. D. 

CREEDS, MINERAL COUNTY. 

Dispensation issued March 21, 1893. 

The records are very complete, and neatly and accurately kept. 

The returns are not correct in every particular, but from the entire record of 
the case we find that there were fifteen names on the dispensation; six raised; three 
admitted to charter membership; one petitioner withdrawn, leaving a total mem- 
bership of twenty-three. One of these presents no voucher showing his right to 
membership, and his name is left off the list. 

The By-Laws, with a few verbal changes, are in accordance with Masonic law, 
and we recommend their adoption as amended by your committee. 

We recommend that a charter issue to this Lodge, under the name of 

AMETHYST LODGE NO. 94, 
With 

Brother Marshal P. McArthur W. M. 

Brother Frank Shimer S. W. 

Brother Walter C. Wescott J. W. 

And the following members: 

George Sonthey, Charles M. Morrison, 

Richard Irwin, Clarence D. Hall, 

August H. Whitehead, George W. Kohn, 

Thomas Sharpe, George K. Smith, 

Washington I. Covert, Will H. Spnrgeon, 

Edward Higgins, Curtis J. Smith, 

Nimrod F. Beer, Robert B. Soper, 

Henry Allenby, John A. Atkinson, 

Findley Frazee, Alexander N. Simpson, 

Thornton H. Thomas. 



52 PROCEEDINGS OF THE [ 1893 

Silver State Lodge, U. D. 

PUEBLO, PUEBLO COUNTY. 

Dispensation iesued April 12, 1893. 

The returns show twenty-eight names on the dispensation; four raised, and 6ix 
admitted to charter membership. 

The records are not so neatly kept as to meet the approval of the committee; 
they fail to show in each instance that the minates of the preceding meetings were 
approved, bat this fact is endorsed across the face of the preceding meeting; this 
system should be changed. In other respects, they fairly show the business 
transacted. 

The By-Laws, with very slight verbal changes, are in strict accordance with 
Masonic law, and we recommend that, as so changed by your committee, they be 
approved. 

We recommend that a charter issue to this Lodge, under the name of 

SILVER STATE LODGE NO. 95, 
With 

Brother George W. Roe W. M. 

Brother John J. Willard S. W. 

Brother Charles W. Willett J. W. 

And the following members: 

Andrew Parke, E. W. Hathaway, 

Edward E. Hnbbell, J. D. Chamberlain, 

William G. Fraser. Frank E. Sage, 

Hen M. Wilson, L. P. Hill. 

Ephriam M. Jackson, John Lewis, 

Richard W. Ellis, H. C. Gordon, 

Miles McGrath. Charles E. Davenport, 

Walter Cosslett. Charles Walker, 

Alexander T. Stewart, C. W. Reeoe, 

Edwin C romp ton, James Hughs, 

William M. Zimmerman, Alexander McGregor, 

John W. Gnynn, Oliver P. Kimmel, 

Frank Singer, J. H. H. Lowe, 

Robert Burns, William Lawson, 

George F. Patrick, Daniel R. Greene, 

W. H. Alleman, A. Jackson, 

Charles A. Lannen, J. M. Meales, 

A. P. Niles. 

In preparing the report upon this Lodge your committee were unable to learn 
the full christian names of many of the members. 

Section 19, of our By-Laws is very plain on this subject and should be 
observed, and we recommend that the same rule be enforced in the returns of 
Lodges. 

Mount Pisgah Lodge, U. D. 

CRIPPLE GREEK, EL PASO COUNTY. 

Dispensation issued July 3, 1893. 

The records of this Lodge are models of neatness and excellence. 

The returns show twenty signers of the dispensation; nine initiated; four 
passed, and one raised; two petitions now in the hands of a committee. 

The By-Laws, with slight emendation, are in strict accordance with Masonic 
law, and we recommend that they be adopted as amended by your committee. 



1893] 



GRAND LODGE OF COLORADO. 58 



We recommend that a charter issue under the name of 

MOUNT PI8GAH LODGE NO. 96, 
With 

Brother Willis S. Montgomery W. M. 

Brother Frank P. Mo al ton S. W. 

Brother Robert P. Davie J. W. 

And the following named members: 

William Mellen, Green Martin, 

John Knox Burton, Will Helm, 

Jacob C. McCoy, Edwin Isham, 

David S. Hull, James T. Neall, 

John W. Asbnry, James A. Kelley, 

George P. Brewster. George G. Shaver, 

Hiram Wilson, Harder F. Harder, 

Ellis Serjeant, Victor G. Hills, 

James M. Stanley, Henry L. Shepherd, 

Your committee have been subjected to great vexation and delay in making 
this report, on account of the fact that many of the papers required were not on file 
in the Grand Secretary's office and were not handed to your committee until after 
the Grand Lodge convened; several of the lodges under dispensation, not having been 
furnished with blanks by the Grand Secretary, he not knowing of their existence, 
had mada no returns of the work dona, and your committee were compelled to call 
upon the officers present to compile such returns or to wade through the records 
themselves for the purpose of finding out the necessary data. 

Tour committee have also discovered several cases wherein the signers of 
petitions for dispensations and charters have failed to send in the necessary dimits 
or receipts for dues, as required by the Grand Lodge By-Law No. 21; in some of 
these cases the necessary vouchers have been handed in to the committee and filed 
with the papers, and in others the names have been left off from the list of charter 
members. Your committee have earnestly endeavored to correct all errors of this 
kind, and if any should be discovered hereafter, your committee feel that the 
responsibility for the same will not rest upon your committee. 

Your committee would strongly urge upon the Grand Master the importance 
of calling this committee together at least one day prior to the annual session of 
the Grand Lodge, in order that its work may be done and reported early in the session. 

Fraternally submitted, 

B. L. CARR, 

W. T. BRIDWELL, 

ERNEST LE NEVE FOSTER, 

Committee. 

JURISPRUDENCE. 

The Committee on Jurisprudence presented the follow* 
iiig report, which was adopted : 

To the Moat Worshipful Grand Lodge of Colorado: 

Your Committee on Jurisprudence have carefully considered the various 
matters submitted to them, and respectfully report: 

Their approval of the decisions of the Grand Master numbered from one to 
twenty-four, inclusive, with the following explanations and exceptions, viz.; 

That while it be eminently proper that subordinate Lodges determine the 
eligibility for the degrees of the candidates, that they must, nevertheless, always 
be governed by the spirit of the By-Law which provides that he must not be 
"incapable of learning the Art and becoming perfect in the work. 11 



54 PROCEEDINGS OF THE [1893 

The decision No. 12, "that the Lodge may remit and release a brother from 
the payment of Lodge dues on knowledge of his inability to pay," is approved, with 
the modification that there be no By-Law of the Lodge prohibiting each action. 

No. 28, which declares that an Entered Apprentice desiring to take the remain- 
ing degrees in a Lodge other than the Lodge conferring the first degree, most reside 
in the new jurisdiction twelve months before applying, is disapproved. The 
committee should report, in this connection, that a part of them had advised 
the Grand Master to the contrary at a preceding date and may, therefore, have been 
instrumental in the rendering of this decision. 

The Grand Master's recommendations relative to an apparent inconsistency 
between By-Laws 116 and 122, may be taken in connection with proposed changes 
introduced by Brother J. W. Milsom. Before recommending the adoption of the 
proposed amendments, the committee will explain that the former practice of this 
jurisdiction was to drop members from the rolls for non-payment of daes without 
formal charges. That easy method of severing Lodge membership doubtless some- 
times was made the means of getting rid of brethren who were deemed undesirable 
for other causes than non-payment of dues. At the time of the revision of the By- 
Laws, about eight years ago, No. 122 was inserted, requiring action by the Lodge 
before the restoration of a dropped member as a means of protection to the former. 
It is probable that the necessity no longer exists, and the committee are, therefore, 
willing to assent to the proposed changes, and hereby approve the same. 

By-Law No. 84. The recommendation of the Grand Master that By-Law No. 

M, relating to the trial of non-affiliates, be made more general, meets the approval of 

the committee, and they recommend that said By-Law be amended so as to read: 

Sec. 84. The conduct of all Masons shall subject them to discipline by the 
Lodge within whose jurisdiction they reside, unless the offender should hold mem- 
bership in another Lodge in the same place. 

We recommend that the Grand Secretary deliver the dimit of Brother George 
Meyers to Burlington Lodge No. 77, who has been carried as a member and daes 
paid since the issuance of the charter, and that his name be entered upon the records 
of said Lodge a»a member thereof. 

Recurring again to the By-Laws, your committee beg leave to suggest that 
the interdiction against the Grand Lodges of Hamburg and the Grand Orient of 
France were enacted so many years ago that few of our members now know the 
cause thereof. For obvious reasons, therefore, we suggest that the standing Com- 
mittee on Foreign Correspondence be directed to report at the next Annual Com- 
munication of this Grand Lodge if the causes of interdiction still exist, with their 
recommendations thereon. 

Your committee have considered the matters referred to them relating to the 
office of District Deputy Grand Masters, and fraternally report: 

The end sought to be gained by the adoption of sections 25, 26, 27, 28 and 29 of 
the Constitution has not, in our opinion, been attained in the past, and we believe 
will not be in the future, while the expense attending the dissemination of the 
esoteric work of this jurisdiction by this method has been largely in excess of the 
actual good accomplished; we therefore recommend that section 25 of the Constitu- 
tion be amended so as to read as follows: 

4 "It shall be the duty of the Grand Lecturer to impart the esoteric work of this 
jurisdiction to the officers and members of subordinate Lodges, when called upon 
so to do; he may also convene any Lodge within this jurisdiction for the purpose 
of instructing them in the work, and may require the officers thereof to exemplify 
the work upon a candidate or substitute, and correct any inaccuracies in such work. 
He shall make a detailed statement of all his official acts and doings to the Grand 
Lodge at its Annual Communication, together with such particulars and recom- 
menaations as he may deem necessary. He shall receive as compensation the sum 
of three dollars per day for each day actually spent in the discharge of the duties of 
hiH office, and actual expenses, to be paid by the Grand Lodge." 

We further recommend that section 2 of the Constitution be amended by 
striking from the list of officers of this Grand Lodge the words "The Right Wor- 
shipful District Deputy Grand Masters/ 1 and that sections 26, 27, 28 and 29 of the 



1893] 



GRAND LODGE OF COLORADO. OO 



Constitution be entirely stricken oat, and that sections 90 to 35, inclusive, of the 
Constitution be numbered to correspond with these amendments. 

We woald also farther recommend that hereafter the proposed Worshipful 
Master of any new Lodge, before receiving the recommendation of any other Lodge 
for a dispensation, shall present to that Lodge a certificate from the Grand Lecturer 
that he is proficient in the esoteric work of this jurisdiction, in addition to the 
other reqoirements. 

We farther recommend that the reports of the Grand Lecturer and District 
Deputy Grand Master be filed . 

Fraternally submitted, 

R. W. WOODBURY, 
W. D. TODD, 
J. H. PEABODY, 

Committee, 

The committee also presented the following report : 

Dbnycb, Colo., September 20, 1893. 
To the Most \Vor*hipful Grand Lodge of Colorado: 

The standing Committee on Jurisprudence, to which was referred the sugges- 
tions and recommendations of the Most Worshipful Grand Master, respectfully 
report, that they have considered that part relating to a proper memorial observ- 
ance of the centennial of the death of Worshipful Brother George Washington, 
which took place on the fourteenth day of December, 1799. The committee believe 
that public recognition of the services and characters of the great and good has a 
salutary influence upon the lives of others, particularly the young, stimulating 
them to emulation, exalting their own efforts and ennobling their characters. 
A due observance of the centennial of Washington's death would revive public 
interest in, and disseminate knowledge of his virtues, and in the pioneer work of 
the fathers of the Republic who laid the foundations of our national government. 

We are taught, as Masons, to be true to the government of the country under 
which we live; and in a broader sense than mere loyalty, we should be true to the 
principles which underlie its system. These principles were instilled into the 
American heart by fortitude, prudence, justice, hardship, adversity, perseverance, 
unselfishness and toil, and the best manhood to-day comes from the same sources 
of strength. As citizens, we cannot too often present this truth to those who are 
striving for fame and influence through paths which are less noble; and we cannot 
present it through a grander character than that Master Mason on whom was be- 
stowed the loving title of " First in War, First in Peace and First in the Hearts of 
his Countrymen." 

Tens of thousands of good men had their favorable attention directed to 
Masonry, because it embraced principles and truths which were deemed worthy of 
the loyalty of George Washington, and we are proud that it was so in his day, and is 
so still. 

We believe the Grand Lodges of the United States will like to unite for the 
purpose of doing honor to his memory, and that the proposition thereto will be 
especially appropriate from the Grand Lodge of the State which was admitted to 
the American Union on the hundredth anniversary of the independence of the 
colonies which Washington did so mnch to secure. 

We, therefore, approve the Grand Master's suggestion and recommend the 
following, viz.: 

That a committee of three be appointed to present the subject to the several 

Grand Masters and Grand Lodges of the United States and request: 

I. The appointment of a committee of one from each Grand Jurisdiction, 
with one alternate, to serve through all the arrangements, in order to save confusion 
by annual changes. 



56 PROCEEDINGS OF THE [1893 

II. That the committee from this Grand Lodge arrange by correspondence 
with the committees from sister Grand Lodge*, for a place of meeting of said 
committee at some early day subsequent to the next Annual Grand Communica- 
tion of each of said Grand Lodges. 

III. That the committee from this Grand Lodge be recommended to Buggeet 
memorial services and suitable addresses at the tomb of Washington, at Mount 
Vernon, at which all the Grand Masters of the United States be present, with their 
subordinate officers and other members. 

IV . That the committee representing the Grand Lodges report in detail their 
recommendations for the memorial to their respective Grand Lodges for approval, 
before the same be actually undertaken. 

Because of the number of Grand Lodges, and the irregular periods of their 
Annual Communications, this process will consume three or four years at least, 
which will leave barely two years in which to perfect the final arrangements. 

Fraternally submitted, 

R. W. WOODBURY, 
W. D. TODD, 
J. H. PEABODY, 
Committee on Jurisprudence 

The report of the committee was unanimously adopted, 
and 

B. W. WOODBURY, 
W. D. WRIGHT, 
W. D. TODD, 

Were appointed on behalf of the Grand LwUje of Colo- 
rado, to present the matter to other Grand Lodges and 
Grand Masters of other Grand Jurisdictions. 

APPEALS AND GRIEVANCES. 

Past Grand Master Orahood (11) presented the follow- 
ing report. After considerable discussion, on motion of 
Past Grand Master Carr (23) the appeal was referred to 
the Committee on Appeals and Grievances to report at the 
next session of this Grand Lodge. 

IN THE MATTER OP THE APPEAL OP FREDERICK A. JOHNSON FROM 
SENTENCE OP EXPULSION BY UNION LODGE NO. 7. 

The Committee on Appeals and Grievances respectfully report. Oar Grand 
Lodge By-Laws, Section 110 provides : 

All Masons have the right to appeal from the decision of Subordinate Lodges 
to the Grand Lodge any time before the next Annual Communication of the tirand 
Lodge, in which case the Lodge shall furnish the Grand Lodge and the accused 
with an attested copy of its proceedings on the trial, and such testimony in its pos- 
session as he may require. 

Sbo. Ill- All appeals shall be in writing and filed with the Grand Secretary, 
and the appellant shall give the other party reasonable notice thereof. 

On the day preceding this Annual Communication two members of this 

committee called on the Grand Secretary and made inquiry* for the appeal and 

papers in this case, for the purpose of examining the same, preparatory to making 

a report to this grand body. The Grand Secretary replied that nothing had been 

filed with him. These inquiries were also made of Brother Calvin E. Reed, S. W., 

of Union Lodge No. 7, and of the Secretary of said Lodge, and your committee 

were again informed that no appeal had been taken. No papers were received by 



1893] GRAND LODGE OF COLORADO. 57 

the committee pertaining to an appeal in this case until late in the evening of the 
nineteenth inat. At this time Brother W. W. Anderson, acting as attorney for 
Brother Johnson, placed in our hands the record of this case from Union Lodge 
No. 7, which we present herewith and ask that the same be filed. 

We are informed by the Grand Secretary that no appeal was filed with him 
until after the opening of the Grand Lodge on the nineteenth inst. 

We have a letter from Brother P. T. Smith, dated at 10 o'clock a. m., 
September 19th inst., in which he says, up to that time no notice of appeal had 
been served on him. 

There is a large mass of testimony and papers which we are nnable, in the 
limited time we have, to examine caref ally. We have, however, examined the same 
for the purpose of finding what action, If any, has been taken for the purpose of 
appealing to this body. From snch examination we find nothing in the way of 
taking or perfecting an appeal as required by the By-Laws above quoted. 

It is, therefore, our opinion that no appeal has been taken or perfected in 
this case, and that the same should be dismissed. 

In the papers submitted to us we find some letters and other papers received 
from the Grand Secretary of (Connecticut. Brother Johnson was a member of a 
Lodge in Connecticut, and we have examined these papers carefully, as we desire 
to pay all proper respect to our esteemed sister jurisdiction of Connecticut. But 
we do not see that these papers in any way or manner affect the case, but are 
merely a request that this Grand Lodge give this case careful consideration, to the 
end that Brother Johnson may have a fair and impartial trial. 

With our views we do not see how anything further can be done, except to 
dismiss, because the appeal has not been properly taken. We feel sure the Grand 
Lodge of Connecticut will be satisfied with this action. 

Respectfully, 

H. M. ORAHOOD, 
GEO. F. LEWIS, 
W. L. H. MILLAR. 

The Grand Lodge was then called to refreshment until 
2:15 oVlock P. M. 



SECOND DAY-Second Session. 



Wednesday, Sept. 20, 1893, 2:15 o'clock p. m. 

Grand Lodge resumed labor. 
Grand Master Wright in the East. 

REPORTS ON APPEALS AND GRIEVANCES. 

The following was adopted on motion of Brother J. E. 
Cole (49): 

IX THE MATTER OP THE APPEAL OP IRA J. BLOOM FIELD FROM SEN- 
TENCE OP EXPULSION BY MONTE VISTA LODGE NO. 73. 

We have examined all the paper* and evidence in this case, and while thero 
may be wme irregularities shown in the proceeding**, wo are convinced that the 



— ii i  



5b' PROCEEDINGS OF THE [1893 

accused had a fair trial, and we recommend that the action of the Lodge be 

approved and affirmed. 

Respectfully, 

H. M. ORAHOOD, 
GEO. F. LEWIS, 
W. L. H. MILLAR. 

The following was adopted on motion of Brother B. F. 
Kuwait (71): 

IN THE MATTER OF THE APPEAL OF A. M. STRATTON FROM SENTENCE OF 
EXPULSION BY HARMONY LODGE NO. 61, A. F. ft A. M. 

Your Committee on Appeals and Grievances have carefully examined the 

papers in this case. Upon consideration of the whole case, we recommend that 

the action of Harmony Lodge in the trial and expulsion of A. M. Stratton be 

affirmed. 

Respectfully, 

H. M. ORAHOOD. 

GEO. F. LEWIS, 

W. L. H. MILLAR. 

MONITOR AND CEREMONIALS. 

Past Grand Master William D. Todd (7) offered the 
following, which was adopted: 

Whereas, The committee heretofore appointed to prepare a 
Monitor and Ceremonials for use in this jurisdiction have not com- 
pleted their labors, therefore be it 

Resolved, That said committee be discharged and that Past 
Grand Master Brother H. P. H. Bromwell be appointed a committee 
of one to prepare a working Monitor and Ceremonials for dedication 
of halls, constituting new Lodges, installation of officers, laying cor- 
ner stones and a burial service, and that he be allowed the sum of 
two hundred dollars for his services. On the completion of the same 
and after its approval by the first four officers of this Grand Lodge, 
the Most Worshipful Grand Master shall direct the Grand Secretary 
to have the same stereotyped and published. After publication, the 
Grand Secretary shall deliver five copies to each Lodge in this juris- 
diction, one copy to each Grand officer and permanent member of 
this Grand Lodge, and one copy to each of our sister Grand Lodges, 
and that the Grand Secretary be authorized to sell surplus copies 
to the brethren at cost. 

REPORTS OF FINANCE COMMITTEE. 

The following were presented : 

Denver, Colo., September 20, 1893. 
To the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge of Colorado: 

We beg to report that we have examined the accompanying report of the 
Grand Treasurer, showing balance due September 19, 1892, and receipt* and dis- 
Imrsementa from that date up to September 19, 1893, we find an amount of $1,009.00, 



1893] 



GRAND LODGE OF COLORADO. 59 



covering warrants of Denver Lodge No. 5, and Union Lodge No. 7, not taken up 
by the Grand Treasurer ae a cash deposit by the Grand Secretary, and fearing some 
confusion might result in the future we have taken the liberty of correcting the 
report to show this item as a cash receipt, and of increasing the balance doe by the 
Grand Treasurer a corresponding amount. The balance reported by the Grand 
Treasurer is $3,068-89, and should show, by adding the amount $1,009.00 in question, 
a balance of $4,077.80, as available cash on hand in the general fond. With this ex- 
ception, we find the report correct. We have examined the notes held by the Grand 
Treasurer and find that the note of $2,500.00, given by the brethren of Alamosa 
Lodge is more than two years past due, and that interest has not been paid since 
August 2, 1900, the balance on interest account being $525.00, np to August 2, 1893. 

The note of $500.00, given by Del Norte Lodge No. 29, given on September 22, 
1&0, payable on or before one year after date, is now two years past due, and 
interest on same, amounting to $70.00, is also past due. The note of same Lodge, 
given on same date for $1,000.00, payable on or before two years after date, is now 
one year past due, and interest on same amounting to $140.00, remains unpaid. 
The note of $1,000.00. given by same Lodge on same date, payable on or before three 
years after date, is doe September 22, 1893, and interest on same amounting to 
$140.00, remains unpaid. Payment of these three notes at maturity, with interest 
thereon, is guaranteed by Chas. W. Thomas, cashier, presumably of the Del Norte 
Bank. We are not advised regarding the present financial standing of this bank, 
and therefore bring the matter to the attention of the Grand Lodge for such 
action as it may consider necessary. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

C. T. HARKISON, 

DAVID SWICKH1MEB, 

CROMWELL TUCKER, 

Finance Committee. 



Which was adopted. 



Denver, Colo., September 20, 1893. 
To the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge of Colorado: 

We would recommend that the sum of $200 be appropriated for the chairman 
of the Committee on Correspondence for preparing the report. 

We would also recommend that the following amounts be paid: Thomas Lin- 
ton. $25; Employes of Temple building, $90, to wit: Janitor $14, Elevator $10, Fire- 
man $8; and that warrants be drawn on the Grand Treasurer for thet*e amounts; 
also, that $200 be appropriated for postage and contingent expense*. 

Fraternally submitted, 

C. T. HARRISON, 
DAVID SWICKH1MER, 
CROMWELL TUCKER, 

Finance Committee, 

Which was adopted, and warrants ordered drawn as therein 
recommended. 

Denver, Colo., September 20, 1893. 

To the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge of Colorado: 

We have examined the report of the Grand Secretary, in connection with the 
voochers, receipts, warrants, ledger and other papers submitted to us, and find that 
the time at our command is not sufficient in which to make an accurate check, so 
ae to enable us to make a final report; we would respectfully suggest that this mat- 
ter lie referred to a special committee of three, to act in conjunction with the Grand 



(50 PROCEEDINGS OF THE [1898 

Secretary, so that a proper and detailed report may be submitted to the Grand 
Lodge at its next meeting. 

Fraternally submitted, 

J. T. HABKISON, 
DAVID 8WICKH1MEB, 
CROMWELL TDCKEB, 

Finance Committee. 

Which was adopted, and Brothers 

WM. D. TODD (7), 
MATT ADAMS (5), 
CLAY M. VAN (84), 

Were appointed said special committee. 

Said committee met in the Grand Secretary's office 
October 5, 1893, and, after examining the books and vouch- 
ers, made the following 

REPORT. 

Denver, Colo., October 5, 1393. 
To the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge of Colorado: 

Your special committee appointed to examine the financial part of the Grand 
Secretary's report, have examined the same and find it correct as submitted. 

WM. D. TODD, 
CLAY M. VAN, 
MATT ADAMS. 

The following was adopted: 

PAY ROLL. 

The Finance Committee submitted the following report, 
which was adopted, and a warrant ordered drawn as 
therein recommended : 

Denveb, Colo., September 20, 1893. 

To the Most Worshipful Grand Lodtje of Colorado: 

In fulfillment of the duties required of us, under Section 5, of the By-Laws, 

we beg to report that we have carefully examined into the amounts due the several 

representatives attending this session of the Grand Lodge for per diem and actual 

traveling expenses, and would respectfully recommend that a warrant be drawn on 

the Grand Treasurer for $1,6*8.60, and that he be directed to pay the brethren 

named below the amounts to which they are entitled : 

Per 
Title. Xatne. diem. 

G.M... W.D.Wright $ 6 00 

D.G. M Jethro C. Sanford 6 00 

8. G. W W. L. Bush 6 00 

J. G. W W. D. Peirce 6 00 

G. Treas Frank Church 6 00 

G. Sec Ed. C. Parmelee 6 00 

G. Chaplain R. J. Van Valken burg 6 00 

(J. Orator T. B. MacDonald 6 00 

G. Lecturer CM. Van 6 00 

D. D. G. M Henry T. West 6 00 

D. D.G. M John Williams 6 00 

D. D.G. M George W. Roe 6 00 

G. Marshal W. W. Roller....: 6 00 

S. G. D J. E. Cole 6 00 



Traveling 




expenses. 


Total. 




$ 600 


$ 32 10 


38 10 


2 35 


8 35 




600 




600 




600 


1 35 


7 35 


10 00 


16 00 




600 


2 40 


845 


3 50 


950 


5 60 


11 60 


11 20 


17 20 


7 20 


13 20 



1*93] 



GRAND LODGE OF COLORADO. 61 



Per Traveling 

Title. Name, diem, expenses. Total. 

J.G.D H.T. DeLong 8 00 27 90 SS 90 

8.G.8 Andrew Keilock 6 00 29 45 35 4ft 

r»-niH~ ~> ) R. W. Woodbury 6 00 6 00 

uZE?Z!%JZ fW. D.Todd 6 00 6 00 

Jurisprudence. V Jame8H . Peabody 6 00 7 20 18 20 

r^-itt**** ) L. N. Greenleaf 6 00 6 00 

/T^SJffSJJIl fB. F. Rawalt 6 00 23 60 29 60 

correspondence. ^ , L Herron . 6 00 2 00. 8 00 

Committee on (Geo. F. Lewis 6 00 6 00 

Appeals. S W. L. H. Miliar 6 00 6 00 

Committee on ) B. L. Carr 6 00 6 00 

Returns and V W. T. Bridwell 6 00 7 20 13 20 

Work. E.L.N. Foster BOO .... 6 00 

r^Mitf^im ) C. T. Harkieon 6 00 6 00 

iK2£2 VD.Swickhimer 6 Of) 6 00 

finance. J G Tucker 6 00 6 00 

No. 1 N. Koenig 8(10 90 6 90 

4 W.A.Merrill 6 00 2 50 h 50 

3 Robt. Hamilton 6 00 6 00 

6 R. Harvey 6 00 2 55 8 55 

7 L. C.Greenlee 6 00 6 00 

11 J. P. Richards 6 00 2 30 8 30 

12 J. L. Carlson 6 00 3 30 9 30 

13 ..Henry Berry 6 00 3 50 9 50 

14 J. L. Church 6 00 160 7 60 

15 J.W. Milsom..... 6 00 7 20 13 20 

IT F.A.Wells 6 00 5 60 1160 

19 J.R.Wills 6 00 3 35 9 35 

20 C. E. Stanley 6 00 2 80 8 80 

22 W.W. Chapman 6 00 100 7 00 

23 F. P.Secor 6 00 2 00 MOO 

25 J. Z. Walker 6 00 10 90 16 90 

26 J.J. Bherwin 6 00 2 35 8S5 

27 CO. Unfug 6 00 9 15 15 15 

28 F. D. Goodale 6 00 10 85 16 85 

29 E. R. Hoyt 6 00 19 65 25 65 

30 Thomas Harry 6 00 16 00 22 00 

31 _..W. L. Hartman.... 6 00 5 6u 1160 

31 W.W.lden 6 00 2185 27 35 

:a D. Unbell 6 00 32 10 38 10 

34 Cbas. Gunst 6 00 16 20 22 20 

35 J. F. Armington 6 00 12 00 19 64) 

36 C.G.Matthews : 6 00 13 70 19 70 

37 ...J. K. Herring 6 00 24 70 30 70 

38 W.J.Orange 6 00 13 70 19 70 

39 Walker Burnett 6 0(1 1175 17 75 

40 J. F. Chrystal _ 6 00 13 75 19 75 

41 B. Hertzbach 6 00 6 00 

42 J.HFreeberg 6 00 15 60 2160 

43 P. Teague 6 00 1160 17 60 

44 W.W. Hirst 6 00 17 40 23 40 

45 W.V.Casey 8 00 160 7 60 

46 A. Cornforth 6 00 32 10 38 10 

47 H. L. Enterline 6 00 7 10 13 10 

48 J.F.Phillips 6 00 8 30 9 30 

49 W.W. Fay 6 00 7 20 13 20 

51 H. R. Pendery 6 00 13 60 19 60 

52 F. B. Maseey 6 00 17 10 23 10 

53 J.J.Burke 6 00 2 75 8 75 

54 S.A.Burke 8 00 5 60 1160 

55 W. A. Marsh 6 00 27 90 33 90 

58 W.T.March 6 00 29 45 35 45 

57 _.G. W. McGovern 6 00 1120 17 20 

58 T.Starr 6 00 17 75 23 75 

59 A. McDonald _ 6 00 10 15 16 15 

61) J. Mc Murray 6 00 14 40 20 40 

61 E. J. Proctor 6 00 6 00 

82 Geo. Stephen 6 00 23 80 29 Hi 

63 Geo. H. Smith 6 00 2125 27 25 

85 T. Kendrick 6 00 19 40 -.5 40 

68 W. M. Bridges 6 00 7 20 13 20 

67 G.W.Warner 6 00 3 80 9 80 



62 PROCEEDINGS OF THE [1893 



No. 



Title. 

68 

71 


JVu me. 

H. Teller 

J. W. Zepp 


Per 
diem. 

600 

6 00 


Traveling 
expenses. 

390 

13 30 

14 55 
18 65 

5 40 

12 15 
3 70 

15 SO 

30 60 

13 40 

14 40 
260 
3 50 

37 35 

10 85 

13 fcO 

1 60 

8 60 

840 

30 25 

8 70 


Total. 

990 
19 20 


72 

73 


C. L. McFherson 

Jesse Stephenson 


6 00 

600 


20 55 
24 65 


74 

75 

76 

77 


J. B. Fisher 

E. W. Kearbj 

D. H.Jones 


6 00 

6 00 

6 00 

600 


11 40 

18 15 
970 

19 SO 


78. _• ... 

79 

81 

82 


S. M. Stauffer 

J. P. Landon 

F. M. Smith 

F. E. Sweet 


6 00 

600 

6 00 

6 00 


600 
36 60 

19 40 

20 40 


83 

85 

86 

87 


F. I. Davis 

W. R.Coe 

L. H. Wygant 

A. F.YickRoy 


600 

6 00 

600 

6 00 


860 
9 50 
6 00 
6 00 


88 

89 

90 _. 

91 


W. F. Teagarden 

J. B. Herehey 

C.C. Goodale 

J. M. Van Deren 


6 00 

600 

600 

6 00 


43 35 

16 85 

19 

7 60 


68 

70....:.. 
80 


H. H. Aldrich 

O. B. Steadman 

James Lyttle _. 


600 

6 00 

600 


960 
14 40 
36 25 


64 


J. W. Manley 


3 00 

$ 657 00 


11 70 




$1,030 00 


$1,688 60 



We find that no returns or dues have been received from Lodge No. 80, bnt 
as Brother Lyttle assures ns that the same has been forwarded by registered letter* 
and furnishes a good excuse for the delay in so doing, we have included his ex- 
penses and per diem, and recommend that they be paid. 

0. T. HARKISON, 
DAVID SW1CKHIMEK, 
CROMWELL TUCKER. 

Finance Committee. 

•The returns and dues of No. 80 were not mailed until September 25, five days 
after the Grand Lodge closed.— Grand Sec bet art. 

MASONIC WIDOWS' AND ORPHANS' FUND. 

Brother A. F. Vick Roy offered the following, which 
was adopted: 

Resolved, That the Finance Committee place the amount right- 
fully due the Masonic Widows' and Orphans' Fund to their credit 
und loan the amount to best advantage through the Grand Treas- 
urer. 

Brother Matt Adams moved that the Grand Treasurer 
transfer to the Widows' and Orphans' Fund the amount 
now due said fund, either in money or such securities as 
are now in his possession. 

E. D. BARKLOW. 

On motion of Brother H. T. De Long the name of E. 
D. Barklow was ordered placed in the charter of Bob 
Morris Lodge No. 92. 



1893] GRAND LODGE OF COLORADO. 63 

APPOINTED OFFICERS. 

The following list of appointed officers was rend by 
the Grand Secretary : 

ANDREW ARMSTRONG (19), Fort Collins G. Chaplain 

FRANK P. 8ECOR (23), Longmont G. Orator 

CROMWELL TUCKER (5), Denver G. Lkoturrk 

WM. W. ROLLER (57), Salida G. Marshal 

HORACE T. DrLONG (55), Grand Janction 8. G. D. 

HARRY E. WILSON (85), Colorado Springs J. G. D. 

GEORGE F. LEWIS (86), Highlands 8. G. 8. 

WALLACE A. MERRILL (4), Bald Mountain J. G. 8. 

THOMA8 LINTON (5), Denver G. Tiler 

INSTALLATION. 

Grand Master W. D. Wright installed Brother Jethro 
C. Sanford Grand Master elect, who installed the other 
elected and appointed officers, excepting the Grand Treas- 
urer, who was absent. 

SPECIAL APPROPRIATION. 

On motion of Brother W. D. Wright (84) it was voted 
that one day's pay be allowed Brothers Geo. F. Lewis and 
W. L. H. Millar, members of the Committee on Appeals 
and Grievances. 

COMMITTEES. 

The Grand Master appointed the following standing 
Committees: 

ON JURISPRUDENCE. 

ROGER W. WOODBURY M) Denver 

WM. D. TODD (7) Denver 

JAMES H. PEABODYU5) Canon City 

ON CORRESPONDENCE. 

LAWRENCE N. GREELEAF(5) Denver 

J08EPH W. M1LS0M (15) Caflon City 

ANDREW KELLOCK (56) Telluride 

ON RETURNS AND WORK OF LODGES, U. D. 

BYRON L. CARR (28) Longmont 

ALPHONSE A. BURNAND (51) _ LeadviUe 

FRANK D. GOODALE (S8) Trinidad 

ON APPEALS AND GRIEVANCES. 

W. D. WRIGHT (HI) Denver 

W. T. BRIDWELL (15) Canon City 

MARSHALL H. DEAN (82) Glenwood Springs 



64 l'ltOCEEDINOR OF THE [1893 

OX FINANCE, MILEAGE AND PER DIEM. 

CHAliLta T. HAKKfSON (Tj Depver 

T. B. MAd DONALD (32) _ Alamoan 

CHARLES O. UNFUli (S7) , Walwntmrg 

GRAND SECRETARY'S REPORT. 
Thi' tirniul Secretary presented the following supple- 
mental report which was referred to the special commit toe 
heretofore appointed: 

To the Mat Warthipfut Grand Lodge of Colorado: 
Sines mj fnrnior report 1 hiivo rscpi voil tor 

LIBRARY FOND, 

OF Grand Master Wright for tl Special Diapenaations |13T. <■" 

GENERAL FUND. 

Ddh o( Akron Lodge No. 71 ..--• « HO 

Dow of Mt. Piegah Lodge, U. D.. 1 <*i 

Dnea or Boolder Lodgo No. S, balance 100 

Of Grand Master Wright __ _ *>* M IK » 

Total - __ *an ai 

ED. C. FARM BLEB. 

Grand Secretary. 

CLOSED. 
The minutes were read and approved, nud the Thirty- 
third Annual Communication of the M.\ W.\ Grand 
Lodge of A. F. & A. M, of Colorado was closed in ample 
FORM. 

.IKTHRO C. SANFORD, 

Grand A faster. 



Grand Secretary. 



APPENDIX. 



REPORT OF CORRESPONDENCE. 
DIGEST OF DECISIONS. 
RETURNS OF LODGES. 
STATISTICAL TABLES. 
CONSTITUTION AND LAWS. 
FORMS. 



Report on Correspondence. 



To the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge of Colorado: 

Your Committee on Correspondence herewith submits 
the following report: 

We shall not indulge in any prefatory disquisitions 
upon questions which, at the present time, are promi- 
nently before the fraternity, preferring to leave such dis- 
course for our conclusion, after the field has been more 
fully surveyed. Our usual Digest of Decisions will be 
found at the end of our review. Also, a summary of the 
doings and final conclusions of the Fraternal Congress, an 
assemblage which has kept the fraternity upon the tiptoe 
of conjecture for the past two years. 

We have followed the same general plan outlined by us 
in former reports, as giving at a glance all desired facts 
and information regarding the doings of our sister Grand 
Jurisdictions. 

We have received from the Grand Secretary the proceedings of the following 
Grand Lodges, fifty-nine in all, some of them being for two years: 

Alabama 1802 New Jersey 1893 

Arizona 1892 New Mexico 1892 

Arkansas 1892 New South Wales 1892 

California 1*92 New York 1893 

Canada 1892 North Carolina 1893 

Connecticut 1893 North Dakota 1893 

Delaware ..1892 Nova Scotia 1892 

District of Colombia 1892 Ohio 1892 

Florida 1*93 Oklahoma 1892-1S93 

Georgia 1892 Oregon 1893 

Idaho 1892 Pennsylvania 1892 

Illinois 1892 Prince Edward Island 1893 

Indiana 1893 Quebec 1898 

Indian Territory 1892-1893 Rhode Island 1892 

Iowa 1893 Scotland 1893 

Kansas 1893 South Australia 1H93 

Kentucky 1892 South Carolina. __, 1892 

Louisiana. 1H93 South Dakota 1893 

Maine 1893 Tasmania 1893 

Manitoba 1893 Tennessee 1893 

Maryland 1892-1893 Texas 1892 

Massachusetts 1892-1893 Utah 1893 

Michigan 1893 Vermont 1893 

Minnesota 1*93 Victoria 1893 

Mississippi 1893 Virginia 1892 

Missouri _ 1892 Washington 1892 

Montana 1892 West Virginia 1892 

Nebraska 1892 Wisconsin 1893 

Nevada 1892-1893 Wyoming 1892 

New Hampshire 1893 

British Columbia and New Brunswick have failed to reach your committee. 



68 appendix. [1893 



ALABAMA— 1892. 

Seventy-second Annual held at Montgomery, Decem- 
ber 6, 1892. 

Grand Master Geo. M. Morrow delivered his second 
annual address which was characterized by those lofty and 
noble sentiments which marked his former effort He 
pays splendid tributes to the memories of Past Grand 
Masters David Clopton and Miles J. Greene, the latter 
Grand Secretary at the time of his death, having filled 
that office since 1888. 

The past year seems to have been one of great pros- 
perity in that jurisdiction, nineteen dispensations for new 
Lodges having been granted, while six which had forfeited 
their charters were granted dispensations to resume work. 

Seven corner-stones were laid in person or by proxy, 
being those of three schools, two Lodge buildings, a 
church and an atheneum. 

P. G. M. John H. Leathers, of Kentucky, was a 
visitor, being received with the usual honors. In acknowl- 
edging the cordial reception extended to him, he directed 
the attention of the Grand Lodge to the great work being 
done in Kentucky through its Masonic Widows' and 
Orphans' Home, and commended this agency of benefi- 
cence to their earnest consideration. 

The special committee on Masonic Home, appointed at 
the last session, presented their report, which was adopted. 
The subject is presented under ten sub-divisions and pro- 
vides for the establishment of the "Masonic Home of Ala- 
bama" in the near future. Nine directors are to be 
appointed, and the G. M. and all P. G. Masters are to be 
ex-officio members of said Board. They are to set in 
motion such plans and agencies as may be most desirable 
and make a full report of their doings at the next Annual. 

The committee on the proposed General Masonic Con- 
ference, to secure uniformity of work, etc., reported 
adversely, being of the opinion that such a result could 
not be accomplished without reducing the ritual to writ- 
ing, which would involve a violation of obligation. Report 
adopted. 

The Report on Correspondence by P. G. M. Palmer 
J. Pillans, covers 152 pages of original and selected matter 
which shows the result of long experience. We regret to 
learn that our brother suffered from ill health during most 



1893] appendix. 69 

of the time while engaged in its preparation. Fifty-two 
proceedings of Grand Lodges are reviewed, Colorado for 
1891 receiving fraternal consideration. He says Grand 
Master Poster very properly declined to allow the laying 
of the corner-stone of a hotel, agrees with him in his rul- 
ings though the Grand Lodge did not in two instances. 
He commends Brother Bush's oration as excellent. 

We note that a list of rejections, both for inititiation and 
advancement, appears in the appendix and they are thus 
made a matter of history. With all due deference to the 
motives that may have prompted such a course, we deem 
it unwise as well as unjust to those whose names appear in 
this connection, and who in some instances must have been 
rejected through no fault of their own or defect of 
character. 

Brother Francis L. Pettus was elected Grand Master ; 
Brother H. Clay Armstrong was elected Grand Secretary 



ARIZONA— 1892. 

Eleventh Annual held at Phoenix, November 15, 1892, 
M. W. Alex. G. Oliver, Grand Master. 

He thus pertinently refers to transient brethren and 
their calls for relief : 

Lodges in this jurisdiction are often called upon by visiting brethren from a 
distance for relief, and as the cost of living is far greater here than in Eastern 
States, we are therefore compelled to charge more for due* to bear the burden of 
relief for the sick than would otherwise be necessary. Hence, looking at Masonry 
in Arizona from a business standpoint, we receive very few affiliated members, 
considering the total number who coma among us; but when sickness or distress 
overcome them, an alarm is made at our outer door for assistance, and we have 
never turned away a worthy destitute brother. 

This brings to my memory an incident of my youth. I was desirous of visit- 
ing: and viewing the great cataract* of the St. Lawrence To do so, I gained per- 
mission from a lumber company to pass through the rapids upon one of the rafta. 
While sailing upon smooth waters our raft turned quickly into the surging rapids. 
Directly ahead was a large rock or island, on the top of which stood a ttoman cross; 
tome it seemed we would bs "dashed to pieces; all the men on the raft, strangers to 
me, knelt and prayed, making the sign of the cross upon their breaHts, the water at 
this time being up to our knees. Safely we parsed the threatened danger, and those 
rough river men again returned to their "don't care" habit. 

This is the case loo often with a number of our members, who. while in peace 
and prosperity, think merely of the present, and only kneel when danger iH immi- 
nent, or ask onr aid when in need, and have no time to spare for our Order when 
sailing in smooth waters, but perchance find more pleasant enjoyment in amusing 
theraaelvos elsewhere than by spending an hour in the Lodge room. 

The Grand Lodge appropriated $350 for a set of 
Jewels. 

Six P. G. Masters were appointed as Delegates to the 
Fraternal Congress. 



70 APPENDIX. [1893 

Brother Morris Goldwater submits a brief Report on 
Correspondence, covering a page and a half, acknowledging 
the receipt of the proceedings of sister jurisdictions, ana 
intimating that the number of their members who read 
the report is too small to justify the expenditure, the cost 
of printing in that jurisdiction being much iarger in 
proportion to their finances than it is in many others. 
Whenever there is a craving for this mental pabulum 
again, the committee will supply it "smoking hot," as 
usual. We trust it may be soon. 

Brother John M. Ormsly was elected Grand Master ; 
R. W. Brother George J. Roskruge re-elected Grand 
Secretary. 



ARKANSAS— 1892. 

Fifty-third Annual held at Little Rock, November 15, 
1892, M. W. Brother C. A. Bridewell, Grand Master. 

He congratulates the brethren upon the fact that the 
Grand Lodge, which has been a wanderer for fifty years, 
is now enabled to meet in its own home, the new Masonic 
Temple, a picture of which appears as a frontispiece. 

He had granted dispensations for four new Lodges, 
revived three, arrested the Charters of two and suspended 
one W. M. from office. 

He submits a list of eight decisions, five of which were 
approved, one disapproved and two modified. 

The reports of the D. D. G. Masters embodied in his 
address are concise, reporting the exact condition of the 
Lodges in their respective Districts. The majority are 
prosperous, but some are sleepy, indifferent, etc. 

He refers in fitting terms to the sudden death of 
Brother George L. Kimball, Grand Senior Deacon, which 
occurred at Concord, N. H., in August last. 

Brother A. F. Maberry, Grand Orator, delivered an 
interesting address. 

On the second day of the session the ceremonies of 
the dedication of the new Masonic Temple took place, 
under the auspices of the Grand Lodge. They were very 
impressive, and upwards of a thousand persons were 
present. 

The oration of Brother A. B. Grace was of a high order 
of merit. 



J 



1893] APPENDIX. 71 

Brother Sam. H. Davidson presents a concise and 
well written Report on Correspondence. Two pages are 
devoted to a review of Colorado for 1891. 

He styles Grand Master Foster's address an "exclu- 
sively business paper," and gives a summary of his official 
acts and decisions. He bestows warm praise upon Brother 
W. L. Bush's oration, which, he says, is full of Masonry, 
and expressed in beautiful language. 

Brother R. J. Laughlin, of Bentonville, was elected 
Grand Master ; R. W. Fay Hempstead re-elected Grand 
Secretary. 



CALIFORNIA— 1892. 

Forty-third Annual held at San Francisco, October 11, 
1892, M. W. William Johnston, Grand Master. 

From his opening sentence we select the following: 

More than a thousand years ago, the dwellers upon that little peninsula in the 
Netherlands between the North and the Zuyder-Zee, built against the ocean their 
bulwarks of willow and mad. Faithfully have their descendants adhered to the 
letter and spirit of the Frisian league: for each year the patient, industrious peasant 
giro* so much of his time from the cultivation of his soil and the care of his child- 
ren, to stop the breaks the elements have made, and replace the willows which 
insects have eaten, that he may keep the land Mb fathers rescued from the waters, 
and bid defiance to the waves that roar unceasingly, as if demanding back the broad 
fields which man has taken from their domain. As di ligentl y let us strive to cherish 
and perpetuate the rich inheritance handed down to us by our ancient brethren, 
and as patiently labor to shield and protect it from the incursions of infidelity, 
envy, discord and dissension. With unceasing vigilance let us beware of the 
"break in the dyke." 

His address, with few exceptions, is confined strictly to 
a record of his official acts. His report of the condition of 
the craft shows that it is prospering generally. He had 
made quite a number of official visits, upon which occasions 
we note that the conferring of the third was the distinctive 
feature. 

He submits a list of thirteen decisions, one of which 
was disapproved, the others with modifications in a few 
instances were approved. 

We referred last year to the custom of granting dispen- 
sations to reballot on the petitions of rejected candidates. 
It seems to have led to trouble in the following instance: 

On the thirteenth of February I issued a dispensation to Speranxa Italiana 
Lodge No. 219, to reballot on the petitions of three rejected candidates. The meet- 
ing under dispensation was held on the twentieth of the same month, the applicants 
were elected, and two of them were initiated on the same evening. Soon after I 
received reliable information that several notices of the meeting to be held on the 
twentieth bore the poet-mark of the twenty-first. I reprimanded the Master for 
each a serious violation of the Constitution and ordered him to reconvene his 
Lodge, give due and timely notice to all its members and again to order a ballot 
upon the applicant who had not received the first degree. 



72 appendix. [1893 

He laid the corner stone of the new City Hall at Wood- 
land. 

He refers to a clandestine organization claiming to be 
a body of Masons which has existed for some time in the 
city of Los Angeles. It had made overtures to the regular 
Lodge in that place, asking how and upon what terms its 
members could be healed, recognized and allowed to effect 
a regular organization. The letter was forwarded to him 
and he replied as follows: 

Such members of that organization as had received the degrees in a regularly 
constituted Lodge of Masons coald be healed, and after being healed woald be in a 
condition to ask for and receive a dispensation to form a regular Lodge; bat that 
those members who received their degrees in that or any other clandestine Lodge 
are not recognized as Masons, and caunot be so recognized until they have received 
the degrees in a just and legally constituted Lodge. 

He had granted four dispensations for the formation of 
new Lodges. 

From the report of the Grand Secretary we learn that 
there are now 250 Lodges in that jurisdiction, with a mem- 
bership of 16,767, being a net gain for the year of three 
Lodges and 505 members. 

The Masonic Board of Belief of San Francisco, during 
the thirty-seven years of its existence, has expended $300,- 
688.80. 

The Grand Lecturer, Brother E. C. Hare, presented a 
full record of his doings, embodying in his report those of 
the District Inspectors. The condition of the Fraternity, 
as a whole, appears to be prosperous. He had made over 
fifty official visits and exemplified the work in a large num- 
ber of the Districts, besides devoting 175 days to instruction. 

The Grand Dieta of Mexico preferred its request for 
recognition, but action was deferred until further informa- 
tion could be obtained. 

The Grand Lodge declined to join in the Fraternal 
Congress. We quote the following from the report of the 
Committee on Jurisprudence, which was concurred in: 

It is especially stated that this ''Fraternal Congress" is to be in no sense "a 
general Grand Lodge," that is, it shall have no power to do anything that shall be 
of binding obligation upon anybody. If it were proposed to give it each power, 
we should be opposed to it, and as it is not to have *ny power we are unable to me 
what good coald be accomplished by it, except to allow the delegates to interchange 
friendly sentiments, and have a good time. We therefore recommend that this 
Grand Lodge do not join in the proposed Fraternal Congress. 

The Grand Lodge, upon the recommendation of the 
same committee, refused to authorize the Lodges of that 
jurisdiction to set aside and use five per cent, of their in- 
come for social purposes, upon the ground that Lodge 



1893] appendix. 73 

funds are for current expenses and charitable purposes 
only. 

The Trustees of the Masonic Widows' and Orphans' 
Home reported that they had perfected their organization, 
and that the subscriptions already pledged amounted to 
nearly $45,000. The Grand Lodge appropriated $10,000, 
to be available whenever the Board of Trustees and the 
Grand Master deem it necessary in the establishment or 
maintenance of said charity. 

The annual oration was delivered by W. Brother Reuben 
H. Lloyd. It is one of the most sensible and practical 
efforts we have read for some time, covering eleven closely 
printed pages, yet filled with suggestions and advice upon 
those matters connected with the Lodge welfare with which 
the Craft ought to be familiar. His conclusion is as follows: 

i. 

The true basis for Masonic faith is the building up and establishing a close, 
friend I j relation between the members of the Lodge. 

2. 
To accompli nh this, an intimate social communion must be established 
amongst tbe members. 

3. 
To bring the latter event about, the meetings of the Lodge* must be made 
both pleasant and attractive to all the members; and 

LASTLY. 

None should be admitted bat those whose society would be likely to be agree- 
able to the othpr members of the Lodge, who of their own volition seek admission, 
and are naturally inclined to favorably receive Masonic doctrines, desiring mem- 
bership aione because they are ambitious to do their share towards humanizing and 
elevating their race. 

Take these propositions home with yon, study them well, and I think yon will 
come to the conclusion that when they are strictly adhered to, you will have full 
Lodge meetings, and when they are violated, you will open to empty benches. 

The Grand Lodge continued its appropriation of $1200 
per annum for the support of its first Grand Master. Jon- 
athan Drake Stevenson, who is now ninety- two years of 
age. 

The Report on Correspondence was written by Brother 
William H. Edwards. It is his maiden effort and we ex- 
tend to him a hearty welcome as one of the guild. It cov- 
ers 131 pages in which the proceedings of 54 Grand bodies 
are very ably reviewed. Colorado for 1891 receives frater- 
nal notice. Quotations are made from Grand Master 
Fosters address and twelve of his eighteen decisions repro- 
duced ; but without comment. He epitomizes the busi- 
ness of the session into less than a page. 

Brother Charles R. Gritman of Napa was elected 
Grand Master ; R. W. Brother George Johnson re-elected 
Grand Secretary. 



74 appendix- [1893 



CANADA— 1892. 

Thirty-seventh Annual held at London, Ontario, July 
20, 1892. M. W. Brother J. Ross Robertson, Grand Master. 
His record of official visitation has seldom, if ever, been 
equalled, and we give it as well as his sensible remarks in 
connection therewith : 

While words ottered from this Grand East may find their way to the member- 
ship, either in the printed record of the Grand Lodge or through the medium of 
the press, there can be bat one opinion, that to keep in loach with the heart of ths 
Craft, to strengthen the mystic tie of sympathy, personal contact, the commons of 
voice with voice, the interchange of thought with thought, visits to the brethren in 
their own homes — in their Lodge rooms — are essential. With this object in 
view, I have, daring the past two years, visited every Lodge once, and many twice, 
of the 348 on the register of this Grand Jurisdiction, making 131 visits in 1890-91. 
and 232 in 1S91-92. in all 363 visits, covering about twenty-three thousand miles of 
travel, and ten months of actual time occupied in the work. At these meetings I 

Save general addresses on ("raft work, lectures embracing all periods of Craft 
istory from the earliest date, at the same time affording the brethren an oppor- 
tunity of inquiry on matters of which they desire information in connection with 
either oar esoteric or exoteric work. The attendance was large and representative, 
and might be fairly taken as including two-thirds of the entire membership. 

He says the meetings of lodges in every district, with 
but few exceptions, are held regularly, and yet the attend- 
ance is not at all in proportion to the membership. He 
had carefully examined this feature personally and was 
convinced that the average monthly attendance of the 
entire membership of that jurisdiction does not exceed 
twenty per cent. After explaining that fully twenty per 
cent, of the membership reside out of the jurisdiction of 
their lodges, and that probably the same j)ercentage can- 
not attend, owing to temporary absence, it would leave 
forty per cent, presumably indifferent to their Masonic 
duties. 

In discussing this subject he offers the following by 
way of explanation : 

In this aze there are so many avenues for fraternal intercourse through 
organizations of a beneficial charaoter. formed in response to the vital needs of 
mankind, in which thousands of those in our fold are affiliated, we may not, there- 
fore, go out of our way to find reasons why organizations suffer from non attend- 
ance. Men are but human, and home, social and business duties are elements in 
the routine of life which with justice reqaire attention if we desire, as we un- 
doubtedly shoald, to fulfil our duties in the army of industrials, who have obliga- 
tions, not only at the family circle, bat who as citizens of a great empire am 
identified with everything that will advance the cause of humanity. 

He had granted three dispensations for new Lodges 
and refused a like number. 

He warns the Craft against wearing Masonic clothing 
upon improper occasions, such as balls, concerts, picnics 
and excursions. 

He deals with the corner-stone question without gloves, 
especially when it is used as a drawing card by church 



1893] appendix. 75 

organizations and other associations. Says he in conclu- 
sion: 

In no other jurisdiction on earth has the corner-stone ceremony been rendered 
so common as in Canada. The latest scheme, however, which has developed and 
is now in fall workinjc order— it may be patented foranght I know — is the qnad- 
rople corner-stones. Three of these stones are laid by members or adherents of the 
church, and the Craft is " graciously permitted " to lay the fourth. Now 1 yield to 
no man in my reverence for things sacred. I recognize Masonry as the exemplifica- 
tion of the Christianity tanght by Him who, eighteen centuries ago, with the 
music of His footsteps turned sorrow into joy, and gave us the message from the 
Master, bat I. without hesitation, draw the line and hold my pen when asked to 
summon the Grand Lodge to act as an annex for a purpose which, however appro- 
priate, yet when taken part in by the Craft, cheapens an impressive ceremony, 
lowers the dignity of the Craft, and drags it in as the side-show to capture the little 
spare cash the spectators have left, before they have even time to recuperate from 
the exhausting results of their regular contributions. 

He also refers to the approaching Centennial of the 
Craft in that jurisdiction and the steps that have been 
taken for its proper observance. He also comments upon 
the great success that has been achieved by the Masonic 
Relief Association of the United States and Canada. 

He was the first, we believe, to advocate a Fraternal 
Congress, and now that it is an assured fact recommends 
the appointment of a delegate. 

The subject of Grand Lodge benevolence is also 
thoroughly reviewed and the many abuses that have crept 
into their system are laid bare. Of the applications for- 
warded in 1891 and 1892 no less than fifty-two are reported 
as not requiring relief. In most of these cases grants had 
been made for several years, in some of them they ought 
never to have been made, and in the majority, though relief 
was required when the application was first made, the 
grants ought to have been discontinued years ago. The 
estimate of the amount thus wrongly expended ranges 
from $12,000 to $20,000. Many of those who obtained 
relief, so the examiner reported, said they did not require 
it but parties insisted upon taking in their applications, 
telling them they were entitled to it and might as well have 
it. Many widows were found living in comfortable circum- 
stances, and some in comi>arative affluence, who had been 
the recipients for years of the Grand Lodge benevolence. 

The reports of the District Deputies are very full and 
complete and fill a large portion of the proceedings. 

The Grand Lodge of New Zealand was recognized. 

The Centennial Committee appointed by the Grand. 
Master presented their report and recommended a sub- 
scription to the Guarantee Fund of $1000, but the Grand 
Lodge refused to adopt their report. 

Brother Henry Robertson is the writer of the Report 
on Correspondence as usual. Colorado for 1891 receives a 



76 appendix. [ 1893 

brief review of three-fourths of a page. He quotes Grand 
Master Foster's remarks on the state of the Craft and the 
report of the Committee on Foreign Correspondence rela- 
tive to the spurious Grand Lodge of Ohio. 

Brother J. W. Gibson of Hamilton, was elected Grand 
Master; Brother J. J. Mason re-elected Grand Secretary. 



CONNECTICUT -1893. 

One Hundred and Fifth Annual held at New Haven, 
January 18, 1893, M. W. Hugh Stirling, Grand Master. 

The frontispiece contains the portraits of the following 
brethren : W. E. Hyde, P. D. G. M.; William W. Price. 
P. S. G. W.; John G. Root, Grand Treasurer, and George 
Lee, Past Grand Treasurer. 

The opening ode was written by Grand Secretary 
Wheeler, who for some years has contributed such pro- 
ductions and which have attracted wide notice. The 
present one is up to his usual high standard and the vein 
does not yet appear to be worked out. 

The Grand Master reports continued prosperity. The 
Grand Lodge of Iowa having discontinued the system of 
Grand Representatives, the commission of their repre- 
sentative near that Grand Body was terminated. The 
" over the hill to the poor-house " episode, reported by us 
last year, did not terminate as we supposed, but was sup- 
plemented by some very exciting incidents before it was 
finally adjusted. The Grand Master reports that St. 
John's Lodge No. 6, petitioned for a re-hearing, that he 
declined to grant it because he could not reverse the sen- 
tence and edict of the Grand Lodge. The Lodge held a 
meeting on June 2, 1892, reconsidered their former vote and 
decided not to pay Old Well Lodge. Not only this, but 
the W. M. permitted rebellious resolutions to be presented 
and discussed, withdrawing allegiance. When summoned 
by the Grand Master to show cause why he should not be 
suspended from office, he appealed to the civil court and 
got out an injunction against the Grand Master restrain- 
ing him from suspending him. This was in June and the 
demurrer of the Grand Master, "that the court had uo 
jurisdiction," was sustained December 1. On November 
15, charges were prefered against the W. M. and another 
brother by the Junior Grand Warden. The Charter of the 



1893] appendix. 77 

Lodge was arrested on November 25, and on December 5 
overtures were made by the W. M. looking to a settlement. 
On December 15 the Grand Master convened the Lodge 
and restored its Charter, the Lodge having paid $192.35 
to Old Well Lodge as ordered. The W. M. apologized for 
all his illegal acts and expunged from the record the 
rebellious resolutions. He was then reprimanded by the 
Grand Master by order of the Grand Lodge and thus this 
unpleasant matter was, we trust, definitely settled. 

The Grand Lodge expelled Brother B. W. Maples, of 
St. John's Lodge No. 6, for having published in the public 
press defamatory, abusing and insulting articles con- 
cerning the Grand Master and members of the Grand 
Lodge. 

By way of contrast to the above dark picture we throw 
in the following bright tints from the report of the Com- 
mittee on Charters. It is certainly unique : 

To ike Mo$t Worshipful Grand Lodge of Connecticut: 

Grand Master and brethren, we are not posing as martyrs, 

In offering the report of the Committee on Charters, 

Bat yet we do think that our brethren and neighbors 

Shoald give as dae credit for our arduous labors ; 

For we are the men the Grand Master appointed, 

8et apart, consecrated and duly anointed 

To attend to that business ; but he very well knew 

There was nothing at all for the committee to do ; 

And we speak bat the truth (for a lie, we abhor it.) 

When we say that he knew we were jost the men for it. 

He showed Stirling good sense, as one plainly can see, 

In selecting Morgan, Bassett, Hart, Rowland and Lee. 

Now in order to be sore that no one feel slighted, 

We gave oat dae notice, and all were invited 

To come in before qb with their prayer? and petition?, 

And make known in full their wants and conditions. 

We repaired to our room and with oar feet elevated, 

Pat on oar wise looks and patiently waited. 

The odor of "seed leaf " oar olfactories met, 

And the detestable fames of a vile cigarette ; 

The stench of the thing made us all tired, 

And each one was glad when the nuisance "was fired." 

For some time we waited, when, no one appearing, 

We gave him a full and impartial hearing ; 

And when he had gone without jar or confusion 

Very rem came to an unanimous conclusion. 

And it is our opinion that, according to law. 

The petitioner is entitled for leave to withdraw, 

And we recommend, after a full deliberation, 

Our discbarge from its farther consideration. 

We think we have none of our duties omitted. 

All of which is herewith fraternally submitted. 

The Report on Correspondence is by Brother Joseph 
K. Wheeler, as usual. It covers 170 pages, and is a com- 
plete review of all matters worthy of note. Colorado for 
1891 receives due attention. He condenses what was done 
into half a page, and devotes a page and a half to extracts 
from our report In commenting upon our membership, 



78 appendix. [ 1893 

he says : '' Wait another decade, then make comparison. 
The grand old fraternity is yet in its infancy." 

W. M. Samuel Bassett, of New Britain, was elected 
Grand Master; Brother Wheeler re-elected Grand Sec- 
retary. 



DELAWARE— 1892. 

Eighty-sixth Annual held at Wilmington, October 5. 
1892, M. W. Nathaniel F. Wilds, Grand Master. 

After extending the usual congratulations, under the 
head of "Our Dead," he makes feeling allusion to the 
death of their Grand Secretary, William S. Hayes, on 
May 24, at the age of 67 years, and who for twenty -four 
years performed the duties of that office with signal ability 
and fidelity. He also records the death of Brother Robert 
Jump, who was 89 years of age, and for sixty-seven years 
a devoted Mason, the oldest in that jurisdiction, and 
perhaps the oldest in this country. 

He reports having visited all the Lodges in the juris- 
diction, with two exceptions. All the Lodges report an 
increase of membership, and are in a more prosperous 
condition • than for many years, the net increase being 
fifty-three. 

He recommends that the Committee on Work be con- 
tinued for the purpose of revising and perfecting the 
same ; also that the same committee prepare the work of 
the Past Master's Degree, so that uniformity may here- 
after be observed in the installation of Masters-elect 

The Grand Lodge appropriated from its Grand Charity 
Fund $25 each to the two hospitals in Wilmington. 

The right of visit is most emphatically declared to be 
an inalienable right, and the gauntlet is thrown down to 
Pennsylvania in the following resolution : 

Resolved, That the right of visitation being a Masonic land mark, and 
therefore inalienable from every Mason in good standing, this Grand Lodge enters 
its mo«t solemn and earnest protest against the action of the Bristol Lodge No. 
25, of Bristol, Pennsylvania, supported by the Grand Master and Grand Lodge of 
Pennsylvania, in denying the right of visitation to Brother Francis L. Carpenter, 
of Oriental Lodge No. 27, of this Jurisdiction, he being in good standing Mason- 
ically. 

Brother L. H. Jackson presents, in a concise and at- 
tractive form, the proceedings of fifty-two Grand Lodges. 
Colorado for 189 L receives a brief but fraternal review. 
Brother Bush's oration is stvled excellent, and from it a 
short extract is made. 



1893] appendix. 79 

Brother John B. Book, of Clayton, was elected Grand 
Master; Brother Benjamin F. Bartram, of Wilmington, 
Grand Secretary. 



DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA— 1892. 

Eighty-second Annual held at Washington, November 
9, 1892. M. W. Fred. G. Alexander, Grand Master. 

He says that peace and harmony have prevailed in the 
Lodges with a single exception, and that they are generally 
prosperous. 

He submits further letters in the Iowa matter respect- 
ing the recall of the commission of Brother Edward A. 
Guilbert, to which we referred in our last Report. These 
little episodes between Ohio and Tennessee, Iowa and the 
District of Columbia, New York and the Indian Territory 
foreshadow the end of the Grand Representative system in 
the near future, unless it should cease to bear evil fruit. 

He had visited nearly all the Lodges in the District 
and witnessed the conferring of the degrees; he found that 
they had attained a high standard of excellence. He rec- 
ommends an increase in the salary of the Grand Secretary 
to enable him to devote his entire time to the duties of the 
office. 

We quote the following decision in regard to waiver as 
viewed by West Virginia and that jurisdiction respectively. 
A former resident of Piedmont, W. Va., who had resided 
in Washington for three months, desired to petition for the 
degrees and wrote to the Lodge in the former place for a 
waiver of jurisdiction. The Lodge replied that it could 
not waive jurisdiction at his request, that the Lodge and 
not the applicant is the proper one to ask for the waiver of 
jurisdiction. The matter being referred to the Grand 
Master, he decided as follows: 

"The Constitution of the Grand Lodge of the District of Columbia, Section 
27, Article XX., says: 

•* * Every .Lodge is prohibited from receiving the petition for the degrees of 
any one not a resident of this District for a period of twelve months next pre- 
ceding the date of his application, without first having received the consent of the 
Lodge nearest his place of residence under seal, where personal jurisdiction is 
constitutionally claimed. 1 

" First. The spirit of this law is the proper one when it is considered that it 
is very indelicate and nn- Masonic for any Lodge to seek, or even have the appear- 
ance of seeking, the material of a Bister Lodge. 

** Second. How can a Lodge know that an applicant wishes a relinquishment 
of jurisdiction unless by a personal application from himself ? 

" No Lodge in self-respect will lower its dignity by such an application for 
a waiver if it rightfully considers its position in the Masonic world. 

"* Third. By this cours*, all possible entanglements with other jurisdictions 
will be avoided on account of making Masons of those not legitimately belonging 
to any given Masonic jurisdiction." 



80 APPENDIX. [1893 

He refused to grant a dispensation to elect a Senior 
Warden in place of a brother who was reelected but de- 
clined to serve, deciding as follows: 

The brother referred to was elected and installed at a previous election to 
serve ontil his successor should be duly elected and installed. He was re-elected, 
but refused to serve; although he refuses to serve, he is, nevertheless, Benior 
Warden for the ensuing Masonic year, so long as he holds residence in the District, 
and the only alternative for you is to fill the office each meeting with a brother 
pro tern. 

At the Installation Communication on December 27 his 
decisions were all approved, and the salary of the Grand 
Secretary increased by $500. 

The Report on Correspondence is from the facile pen 
of Brother William R. Singleton as usual. The first twenty- 
one pages are devoted to a review of the Grand Represent- 
ative question in all its varied lights and shades, with ex- 
tracts from proceedings of Grand Bodies to show the prac- 
tice that prevails in each. Colorado for 1891 receives a 
fraternal review. Extracts are made from Grand Master 
Foster's address, and several of his decisions are quoted 
with approval. Of decision No. 2 he says: 

A request for waiver of jurisdiction must be made before ballot. A Lodge 
has no right to receive the application of a brother, the material of another Lodge. 

Our rule requires the waiver to accompany the petition. We regret that the 
Grand Lodge did not approve of the words In italics after " ballot/ 1 

Of decision No. 9 ? which our Grand Lodge failed to 
approve, he says: 

No. 9. " The Worshipful Master of a Lodge has no authority to refuse to 
admit a member in good standing to his own Lodge. 1 * 

It seems to us that the Grand Master was correct. A Worshipful Master has 
the potoer to keep such a member out of his own Lodge, but there is no Masonic 
authority for his action. He is amenable to the Grand Lodge for his conduct, 
and if he can justify himself the Grand Lodge may hold him blameless. Members 
have inalienable rights, which neither a Lodge, a Worshipful Master, a Grand 
Master, nor a Grand Lodge can lawfully deprive them of, and among them is the 
fii-bt, viz., a seat in their own Lodge. 

Under Maine he continues the discussion of the ques- 
tion of Grand Masters prior to 1717, and he gives some 
historical information regarding the Twelve Great Liveried 
Companies. We quote the following as of interest: 

The societies of Masons and Free Masons are seldom mentioned in the 
history of the Twelve Great Liveried Companies, among the many companies 
other than these twelve that are very often spoken of in connection with them, but 
it does most plainly appear that the general features of all were alike, and that 
the art, craft, or mystery of the Masons or Free Masons, and their brotherhood, 
livery, etc., were like those of the other companies. 

The rank of Governors and Legislators was attained by decrees. The first 
degree was "Apprentices of the Craft/ 1 none of which, by the ordinance, were to 
take waves or work journey-work.* The second degree was Freemen^ sometimes 
called Yeomanry, sometimes Bachelors. They were jpresented and were admitted 
to work by journeys or journey-work (day work ). They entered into bond not to 
work with any foreigner or non-Freeman, but with Freemen only of the craft. The 



8931 APPENDIX. 81 



third degree was " Householders." The fourth degree was the livery or clothing 
* i. *.. such as wore a gown and hood), and this livery or clothing it was which were 
called "the Fellowship/* The fifth degree was Warden, which office also had 
two steps: first, Young Warden; second. Second Warden. The third, or Upper 
Warden, was Matter. 

♦Joarney, from French jour (day); i. e., day work. 

Several pages are devoted to the subject, and he con- 
cludes as follows: 

Not in a single instance do we find the mention of a Qrand Master of any of 
these guilds, corporations or companies. 

It now remains for those who say there were Grand Masters, to mention 
when, where, and who were such, or else for ever hold their peace. 

Brother L. C. Williamson was elected Grand Master; 
Brother W. R. Singleton was re-elected Grand Secretary. 



FLORIDA— 1893. 

Sixty-fourth Annual held at Jacksonville, January 17, 
1893. 11. W. Angus Patterson, Grand Master. 

He congratulates the Grand Lodge upon the fact that 
after sixty- three years of wandering, they were enabled to 
meet in their own beautiful Temple. The corner stone was 
laid one year ago and the completed structure is far beyond 
their expectations. 

He pays a beautiful tribute to the memory of Brother 
D. C. Dawkins, Grand Secretary, who died October 5, 3892. 
He was also Grand Master in 1860-61-62-66-68. In 1869 
ho was elected Grand Secretary, and held that office con- 
tinuously until his decease. 

He had issued ten dispensations for new Lodges. He 
rejKjrts having issued a very large number of special dis- 
pensations for various purposes. 

While reporting the withdrawal of Iowa's Grand 
Representative, he takes occasion to refer to the lxistory of 
the system and what it was designed to accomplish, he is 
favorable to it as one of the best systems of fraternal inter- 
course. 

He submits a list of decisions which were approved, 
with the exception of five. 

He had visited several of the Lodges and nearly all of 
them were visited by the District Deputy Grand Masters; 
with but two or three exceptions all were in a flourishing 
condition. 

The corner-stones of two court houses and a church 
were laid by proxy, while that of the government building 
at Tallahassee was laid by him in person. 



82 appendix. [1893 

He recommended a number of changes in their Regu- 
lations, among others the following: 

A change that will define indefinite suspension. The way it is now admin- 
istered in some Lodges, it is worse than expulsion. There should l>e some limit 
beyond which an indefinite suspension should not go. If the cause of suspension 
continues for a time, the offender should be expelled. If it does not continue, he 
should be restored, and not held suspended for ten years or more, when a Lodge, 
in whose jurisdiction he resides, petitions for his restoration. 

On the second day of the session at High Twelve, the 
new Temple was formally dedicated by the Grand Lodge 
according to ancient custom and usage. The oration by 
W. Brother R. H. Weller, D. D., Grand Orator, was a 
masterly production. We glean the following historical 
retrosx>ect: 

It is now 127 years since the erection of the first Lodge in this jurisdiction. 
In the year 1768, the Grand Lodge of Scotland issued a warrant for a Lodge at St. 
Augustine, of which Provincial Govornor James Grant became Master; he was 
also appointed Provincial Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of the Southern Dis- 
trict of America. This Lodge becoming dormant and losing its charter, on January 
3, 1778, the Grand Lodge of England granted a warrant, numbered 204, for a new 
Lodge. About the same time there was a St. Andrew's Lodge, in West Florida, of 
whose origin and history little is known, except that a memorial from it was read 
in the Grand Lodge of Pennsylvania on July 8, 17S3. In the same year a warrant 
was granted by the Grand Lodge of South Carolina, numbered 56, to Pensacola. 
During the Spanish occupation of the Territory, these Lodges were suppressed— 
the Horn an Catholic authorities being then, as now, bitterly opposed to Free Ma- 
sonry. In 1820, there was a revival of work, and on June ft), the Grand Lodge of 
South Carolina warranted the Lodge of " Floridian Virtues," at St. Augustine, the 
Lodge of "Good Intentions," at Pensacola, "Eaperanza Lodge," at St. Augustine. 
These also became extinct, and the Grand Lodge of Georgia issued warranis for 
the erection of San Fernando Lodge, at St. Augustine, and Jackson Lodge at 
Tallahassee. December 20, 1828, the same Grand Lodge warranted Washington 
Ixxlge, at Quincy, and Harmony Lodge, at Mariana, July 6, 1830. Three of these 
Lodges organized the Grand Lodge of the Territory of Florida, the first Territo- 
rial Grand Lodge in America. 

Between the lines of this brief sketch, we read the pathetic story of many 
noble lives spent in the anxieties, trials l straggles and dangers of frontier times. 
With but faint encouragement and but little expectation, but hopeful through it 
all, of a better consummation, one by one still seeking light, they fell by the way- 
aide, and passed through the open gates from labor to refreshment, in that light 
which is eternal. Peace to their ashes, and lasting honor to their memories! 

There is no Report on Correspondence. Brother W. 
A. McLean explains the reason of its omission and says: 

In due time, however, we will be justified in enjoying the luxury of dispensing 
Masonic light by sending forth appropriate Reports, and thereby enjoy the blessed 
privilege of giving as well as receiving. 

M. W. Marcus Endel of Gainesville, Grand Master; 
R. W. Albert J. Russell, Jacksonville, Grand Secretary. 



GEORGIA— 1892. 

A portrait of the Grand Master, John S. Davidson, 
appears as a frontispiece. 

One Hundred and Sixth Annual held at Macon, 
October 25, 1892. 



mni] APPENDIX. 83 

The Grand Master's address is an able present men t of 
his official acts and a commentary upon such matters as 
will uplift and strengthen Masonry in that jurisdiction. 
It covers twenty-five closely printed pages, and contains 
many eloquent passages. In his opening remarks, he 
thus likens Free Masonry to the Gulf Stream : 

When the waters of life are cold, we find it warming them with its touch. 
When the air of Jife is chill, we find its breath driving off the icy influence, and 
when the soil in barren, we discover its warmth giving vigor and vitality to the 
heavy clods. Like this same Gulf Stream it is the wandering summer of existence. 
Never still, never idle, never satisfied, it wanders everywhere that man may have 
the blessings of its influence and receive the benefactions it carries for all 
humanity. And in its labors it is so gentle, so solicitous of bis well-being, so tender 
in its ministrations, that it may well be designated as the summer of all effort for 
the alleviation of sorrow and the perfecting of man in every work that is good. 
And, finally, like that same great stream, after all its labors covering every clime 
and mingling with every people, it is still full of warmth and sunshine, the blessed 
expression of unchanging and universal benevolence. 

He submits a list of thirty- two decisions, all of which 
were approved. Thirteen dispensations were granted for 
new Lodges, and a very large number of special contin- 
gencies and other purposes. 

He reports the increase in membership 1200. 

He relates the following incident in connection with 
the extinguishment of the Grand Lodge indebtedness : 

Under the resolution adopted at your last Communication all the redeemed 
bonds were destroyed by the Finance Committee, save one. At my suggestion, 
that was cancelled and framed, and hangs in the Grand Lodge Hall, bearing this 
inscription : "This is the last bond paid by the Grand Lodge of Georgia, of the 
debt incurred for the building of this Temple. Ordered framed at Jubilee Com- 
munication, October A. L., 5891, A. D., 1891, as a memento mobi, and a warning. 11 

Fitting tributes are paid to the memories of R. W. 
Brothers S. A. Barders, P. J. G. "VW, and Arthur I. Leet, 
P. S. G. W. A memorial page is also inscribed to the 
memory of R. W. Reuben Jones, the newly-elected Senior 
Warden, who died four days after the close of the session. 
He takes strong ground against the practice of conferring 
degrees out of time, and is desirous of having the right 
repealed. He recommends that the Committee on Juris- 
prudence frame an edict prohibiting the granting of such 
dispensations altogether, or else clearly defining the cases 
in which it is permissible. He does not believe the Grand 
Master possesses an inherent right to exercise such 
authority. The Committee on Jurisprudence, after con- 
sidering the matter, reported the following resolution, 
which was adopted with the report : 

Resolved by the Grand Lodge of Georgia, That no one shall be ballotted for, 
for the degree*, or the degrees of Entered Apprentice, Fellow Craft, or Master 
Mason be conferred by any Lodge in this jurisdiction, except in accordance with 
the By-Laws of the Lodge entertaining said petition, and no dispensatien to ballot 
for or confer either of the three degrees ont of time shall be granted. 



84 appendix. [1893 

The Grand Lodge listened to two very eloquent 
addresses by Brothers Henry Banks, Jr., and J. I. Adams. 
The subject chosen by the former, "Let Your Light 
Shine,'* was most admirably handled, and enforced a 
lesson which should be frequently repeated. 

The Report on Correspondence was the joint produc- 
tion of Brothers B. H. Bigham, W. E. Mumford and W. S. 
Ramsay. Colorado for 1891 receives a fraternal review at 
the hands of Brother Bigham. His beginning is "slightly 
mixed." It is as follows : 

Thirty-first Annual Communication, Denver, third Tuesday in September, 
1M91. Senior Wardens and Junior Warden allowed. Eighty-four Lodges. 

When shouldn't they be allowed ? 

M. W. John S. Davidson Grand Master, and R. W. 
Brother A. M. Wolihin, Grand Secretary, both re-elected. 



IDAHO -1892. 

Twenty-fifth Annual held at Boise, September 13, 
1892. M. W. John H. Myer, Grand Master. 

The silver anniversary of the Grand Lodge furnishes 
a text for the following bit of history : 

Twenty-five yearn ago, at Idaho City, then the most important town in Idaho, 
the representatives of four chartered Lodges and one under dispensation met and 
organized the Grand Lodge of Idaho. 

No better place could have been selected for such a purpose. There, sur- 
rounded by everlasting hills, the trees on which never lose their foliage, and within 
whose depths are stores of precious metals, which then were, and ever since hare 
been, pouring out a steady stream of wealth, the Grand Lodge of Idaho entered 
upon its career for good or evil. That our mission has been a beneficial one we 
believe, and we are willing to lie judged by our fruits. 

In a great many respects the surroundings of the Grand Lodge have been 
very favorable. No people can pride themselves on having a finer climate than that 
of ours, and the sky of sunny Italy was never brighter than the sky which for years 
has arched over the members of the fraternity of Idaho. Those who formed the 
G rand Lodge were not weaklings ; coming as they did from nearly every jurisdic- 
tion in the Union, they were a representation of the universality of Masonry. What 
they so well begun and have so well continued in the past, it is our duty to now 
maintain and in the future continue. 

For a quarter of a century the Grand Lodge of Idaho has been a factor among 
the Grand Lodges of the world. Many of those who were its promoters have crossed 
the dark river and gone from sight forever. Some few are left, in a short time 
their deeds, too, will be but a memory, and their faces and forms a recollection. 
Venerable Masons are they— valuable to us because of their knowledge and experi- 
ence in Masonry. May they be spared to assist in our counsels and deliberations 
for years to come, and may their last days be as peaceful and quiet as some of their 
earlier years were full of danger and adventure. 

He submits a list of eleven decisions, all of which 
were approved with one exception, his construction of 
their law in this instance being correct, but the committee 
believed the law as it then stood was contrary to long es- 
tablished usage, and they submitted an amendment to the 



1893] 



APPENDIX. 85 



Grand Lodge By-Laws. The case decided was the fol- 
lowing : 

A. B. is elected to receive the degrees of Masonry, and is about to be initiated; 
a member of the Lodge makes objections; the Worshipful Master informs the 
objecting brother that in order to arrest a candidate in his progress it would be 
necessary for charges to be preferred. Charges are preferred, trial had, and the 
candidate acquitted by a two-thirds vote. Certain brethren still object, and say 
they cannot fraternize with the candidate if he is made a Mason. 

Question: Is the Worshipful Master compelled to confer the degrees of 
Masonry upon a man who will destroy the peace and harmony of the Lodge, not- 
withstanding the fact that he has been acquitted of the charges preferred against 
him? And does it take a two-thirds vote to arrest the progress of a profane? 

He decided as follows : 

Inasmuch as Article XV., Section 3, of our Grand Lodge By-Laws makes no 
distinction as to the stage of progress the applicant has reached after a clear ballot, 
and does not require a conviction to arrest progress, the applicant now in question 
is entitled (unless an appeal be taken) to receive the degrees of Masonry forthwith. 

Amendment offered by the Committee on Jurisprudence. 

Amend Section 3, Article XV., Grand Lodge By-Laws, by adding thereto the 
following: "Provided further that at any time before his initiation, if objection be 
made by any member of the Lodge, he shall not receive the degree of Entered 
Apprentice Mason until such objection be removed, no charges being required 
before initiation." 

This was read once and lays over till next session, 

He granted four dispensations for new Lodges. 

From the Grand Secretary's report we learn that the 
increase in membership was 216 the past year, the total 
membership 941. 

The Grand lodge voted to affiliate with the General 
Masonic Relief Association. 

The sjjecial committee on New South Wales, etc., pre- 
sented a strong and vigorous report, w r hich their Grand 
Representative vainly endeavored to soften, but which the 
Grand Lodge adopted in its entirety. We quote the fol- 
lowing which will be a surprise to the brethren of Colorado : 

We are not prepared to recommend a reversal by this Grand Lodge of its 
actions at the last Annual Communication. It was in evidence before this Grand 
Body at a former communication that what purported to be the secret or esoteric 
work of Masonry was published in book or pamphlet form, and thus made public. 
Such pamphlet or publication reached us from what we consider an authoritative 
source. Under the circumstances, and with such evidence before us, we repudiate 
any such body issuing such publication as unmasonic, and not entitled to recogni- 
tion by this Grandf Lodge. We would further recommend that the Grand 
Secretary of this Grand Lodge, under the direction of the Grand Master, com- 
municate with the United Grand Lodge of New South Wales, and learn from them 
whether or not such publication, containing what purports to be the secret or 
esoteric work of Masonry, was published or issued by authority of Baid United 
Grand Lodge of New South Wales, and report the result of such correspondence at 
the next Annual Communication of this Grand Lodge. 

The same committee recommend an investigation of 
the truth or falsity of the statements containing serious 
charges against the Grand Lodge of the Federal District 
of Mexico. 



86 appendix. [1893 

Some twenty biographical sketches of Past Grand 
officers are published with the proceedings. 

Brother Charles C. Stevenson presents a concise re- 
view of the proceedings of other Grand bodies, Colorado 
for 1891 receives a brief, yet fraternal notice of half a page. 

Brother Isaac C. Hattabaugh of Masco w, was elected 
Grand Master. Brother James H. Wickersham re-elected 
Grand Secretarv. 



ILLINOIS -1892. 

An Occasional Communication of the Grand Lodge 
was held at Chicago on November ft, 1891, for the xmrpose 
of " leveling the cape-stone" 1 of the New Masonic Temple, 
the corner stone of which was laid upon the same day oik* 
year previous. It was a gala occasion and the exercises 
took place in the presence of an immense throng of spec- 
tators. M. W. John C. Smith acted as proxy for the Grand 
Master. 

The Grand Orator, Rev. Brother H. W. Thomas 
delivered an appropriate oration. Of the great antiquity 
of Masonry he thus discourses in his opening remarks: 

The Masonic Fraternity is a great fact. That it has been long in the world is 
not doubted, bat how long is not certainly known. It ifc older than Mohammf- 
danism, older than Christianity. It was old when the soldiers of Ceesur landed on 
the shores of Great Britian ; old when Alexander carried the civilization of Asia to 
Europe. It antedates Rome, Athens, the year of Oonfncias. Buddha, David and 
Solomon, and oar brothers of the long ago may have laid the foundations of the 
pyramids of Egypt. 

Side by side throagh the slow centuries it has journeyed with Jndaiam, and 
has seen thrones and empires rise and fall, and repnblics born, bat throagh all ite 
essential principles have never changed, and to-day where civilization is there 
Freemasonry in. On its altars the snn never sets. 

Fifty-third Annual was held at Chicago, October 4, 
1892, M. W. Monroe C. Crawford, Grand Master. 

He reports a year of great activity among the Masons 
of that jurisdiction. Dispensations were granted for 
eleven new Lodges. 

Five Schools of Instruction were held during the year 
all of which he attended, and is thus prepared to speak of 
them from personal observation. The attendance was 
large, the brethren anxious to perfect themselves in the 
work, and the Craft of the entire jurisdiction was benefited 
thereby. 

He laid six corner stones in person and one was laid 
by proxy, as was the cape-stone of the Masonic Temple at 
Chicago. Seven Masonic Temples and Halls were dedicated. 



1893] appendix. 87 

three in person and four by proxy. Seventy-two special 
dispensations were granted for various purposes. The 
charter of a Lodge which had not held a meeting for two 
years was arrested. He had been called upon to answer 
hundreds of (luestions which an examination of the Con- 
stitution and By-Laws would have determined. 

He pays appropriate tributes to the memories of two 
Past Grand Masters, Hanuan G. Reynolds and Thomas J. 
Pickett. 

He issued a dispensation to the constituent Lodges of 
the jurisdiction to participate in the celebration of the 
completion of the World's Columbian Exposition. 

From the Grand Secretary's report we learn that the 
net increase during the year was 2132, and that the 
present membership is 46,021. Eleven Lodges in Cook 
County have a membership ranging from 301 to 558. 
Denver Lodge No. 5. of this jurisdiction, has a membership 
of over 600, and Union No. 7 of Denver nearly that 
number. Seven Lodges in Chicago and Cook County con- 
ferred from 103 to 180 degrees each during the year, the 
latter number was by Hermosa Lodge, V. D. 

Past Grand Masters Henry Robertson of Canada, and 
Milton J. Hull of Nebraska, were visitors during the 
session and were welcomed and received with the Grand 
Honors. 

The composition of the Grand Lodge at this session 
was as follows: 

Grand Officers _. _ 19 

Past Grand Officers » 

District Deputies 26 

Representatives of other Grand Lodges 33 

Members of Committees 46 

Representatives 740 

Past Masters 3 

Total 878 

N amber of Lodges represented 668 

Brother Joseph Bobbins, of the Committee on Corres- 
pondence, reported adversely upon the application of the 
Grand Lodge of Italy for recognition. The application 
was also declined in 18S9 for the reason that it was not an 
independent body, but one of the constituents of a Grand 
Orient. From the New York committee, which reached 
the same conclusion, Brother Bobbins quotes the fol- 
lowing: 

We find that the Grand Orient is composed of a " Sapreme Council of the 
Thirty-third dejrree of the Scottish Rite ? and the Symbolic Grand Lodge for the 
Symbolic Rite," and section 12 of their General Constitutions declares that 



88 appendix. [1893 

" Masonic sovereignty lies with the Masonic people as a whole and is exerted for 
the government of the first three degrees by the ordinary or extraordinary legisla- 
tive or constitutive assemblies composed of the representatives of all the Lodges 
of both rites, active and regularly working." Section 17 provides that "charters 
for the Lodges of both rites are granted exclusively by the Grand Orient." 

"This " the committee farther says, "folly confirms the opinion of your com- 
mittee as expressed last year, that this Grand Orient iB a conglomerate body, com- 
posed of a ' Supreme Coancil of Thirty-third degree of the A. and A. 8. Rite and 
the Symbolic Grand Lodge of the Symbolic Rite/ and is the governing body of 
Lodges of the first three degrees in either or both rites." 

His conclusion is thus given: 

The hybrid character of the governing body thus disclosed, and utter lack of 
a so-called Grand Lodge, emasculate to the degree that it cannot even isaoe in its 
name charters for its alleged offspring, makes it unnecessary to disease the congen- 
ital disability of the Lodges themselves in order to arrive at the conclusion that the 
so-called Grand Lodge of Italy is not a body that can be recognized by the Grand 
Lodge of Illinois. 

The Committee on Lodges U. D., expressed themselves 
in the following language which all true Masons will 
endorse : 

Your committee cannot close this report of their labors without calling atten- 
tion to the excessive, and as we believe, unhealthy growth, of certain Lodges work- 
ing unde