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Full text of "Proceedings of the ... annual meeting of the Baptist State Convention [serial]"

CDe iLibrarp 

of tt)t 

(3nft)et0itp of laottb Carolina 




Collection of /^ortli Carolintana 

CS8G 

1919 



UNIVERSITY OF N.C. AT CHAPEL HILL 



^ 



00032728950 
This hook must not 

he taken from the 

. Lihrary huildin^. 



ANNUAL 



OF THE 



North Carolina Baptist 
State Convention 

1918 



EALEIGH 

Edwards & Broughton Printing Company 

1919 



CONTENTS 

PAGE 

Associational Directory I75 

Associational Statistics \ 104 

Baptist Bible Institute 21 

Biblical Recorder, Report of Directors [Appendix D] 99 

Boards, List of 11-12 

Galling of Convention Endorsed 13 

Committees: 

Chaplains 31 

Enrollment 13 

Laymen's 35 

Memorials 37 

Ministers' Relief and Annuities 37 

Nominations 14, 16 

Place and Preacher Ig 

Press 30 

Program Next Convention 30 

Recommendations of IMission Board 20 

Seaside Assembly 30 

Social Service 30 

West Chowan Resolutions 30 

Constitution 5 

Consibitution Changes 20 24 

Convention Sermon I3 

Delegates, List of 38-44 

Directory Southern Baptist Convention 103 

Education — Report of Board of, [Appendix B] 74 

Enlistment Ig 

Historical Table of Convention 181 

Memorial Hour 3g 

Million Dollar Campaign 22, 31 

Missions, Report of Board of [Appendix A] 46 

Missionaries, List of 187 

New Pastors jg 

Officers : 

Convention 10 

Pastors' Conference 45 

Ordained Ministers, List of 192 

Organization j^3 -1^4 

Pastors' Conference 45 

Proceedings J3 

Reports : 

B- Y.P.U 58 

Biblical Recorder 99 

Board of Education 74 

Board of Missions 4g 

Foreign Missions 4g 

Home Missions 49 



4 CONTENTS 

I'AGK 

Laymen's work 35 

Memorials 36 

Million Dollar Campaign 22-24, 78-86 

Ministers' Relief Board 92 

Nominations 17 

Orphanage 95 

Place and Preacher 25 

Press 32, 35 

Program 14 

Recommendations of Board of Missions 26, 63-68 

Seaside Assembly 31 

Social Service 88 

State Missions 53 

Sunday Schools 61 

Temperance 91 

Treasurer 69-73 

Woman's Missionary Union 29. 56 

Resolutions: 

Chaplains 19 

Enlistment 18 

Motion Pictures 36 

Military Ti-aining 28 

Oxford College 25 

Press Committee 10 

Ridgecrest Southern Baptist Assembly 18 

Southern Baptist Sanatorium 33 

Thanks 34 

West Chowan 26 

Seminary Students 203 

Simpler Plan 7-9 

Standing Committees 10 

Statistics [Appendix El 103 

Active and Inactive Churches 178 

Associational 104 

Associational Sujmmary 173 

Baptist Colleges and Schools 177 

Statistical Summary ' 188 

Summary Denominational Statistics 184 

Sunday Schools 180 

Woman's Missionary Union 185 

Social Service, Report of Committees on [Appendix C] 88 

Ministers' Relief Board 92 

Orphanage 95 

Temperance 91 

Standing Committees 10 

Telegrams 17, 20, 21 

Trustees 11. 12, 21, 24 

Visitors 17, 20 

Welcome Address 13.16 



CONSTITUTION 



1. The Baptist State Convention shall be composed of three male 
representatives from each white Association in the State and one 
annual male representative appointed by the churches for every fifty 
dollars contributed to its funds, and of such male life members as 
have been made so by the payment of thirty dollars at any one time 
to the Treasurer for the objects of the Convention, and all the officers 
of the Boards of the Convention. No church shall have more than 
ten representatives. No one shall be a member of the Convention 
who is not a member in good standing of a Baptist church in fellow- 
ship with us, and no other life member shall be made. 

2. The primary objects of the Convention shall be to support Chris- 
tain education in the institutions fostered by the Convention; to 
educate young men called of God to the ministry and approved by 
the churches to which they belong; to encourage education among 
all the people of the State; to support the gospel in all the destitute 
sections of the State and of the Southern Baptist Convention; to 
send the gospel to the nations who have it not; to encourage the 
distribution and study of the Bible and a sound religious literature: 
to assist Baptist churches in the erection of suitable houses of wor- 
ship; to promote all agencies of social betterment; to encourage the 
proper care of indigent orphan children and destitute and aged 
ministers of the gospel, and to cooperate with the Southern Baptist 
Convention in all its departments of labor. 

3. This Convention shall meet annually, on Tuesday after the 
second Sunday in November. 

4. The officers of the Convention shall be a President, three Vice- 
Presidents, a Recording Secretary, a Corresponding Secretary, a 
Treasurer, an Auditor, and five Trustees. The President. Vice-Presi- 
dents, and Recording Secretary shall be elected by the Convention, 
after a nomination, in open meeting; other officers are to be elected, 
after nomination by a committee appointed for that purpose. The 
Corresponding Secretaries of the Boards of the Convention are to be 
elected as the Convention may determine. 

5. The President shall preside and enforce order in accordance 
with Dr. Kerfoot's Parliamentary Law. One of the Vice-Presidents 
shall preside in the absence of the President. 

6. The Recording Secretary shall record the proceedings, collect 
and preserve statistics of the denomination, and publish and dis- 
tribute the Minutes. 

7. The Treasurer shall receive all funds represented in the Con- 
vention; make public acknowledgment of the same each week 
through the Biblical Recorder; give his bond to the Trustees; for- 
ward, at least once a month, all contributions to their destination; 
at every meeting of the Convention make a full report of his receipts 



6 N. V. BAPTiaT UTATE CONVENTION 

and disbursements, and, on retiring from his office, turn over to his 
successor all moneys, papers, and books belonging thereto. 

8. The Trustees shall secure and hold the title to any and all prop- 
erty belonging to, or which may be acquired by, the Convention and 
take a sufficient bond of the Treasurer. The terms, conditions, and 
amount of the bond shall be fixed by the Trustees; and in case the 
Treasurer shall refuse or neglect to give his bond within thirty days 
after his election, the Trustees shall have power to elect a Treasurer. 
They shall report annually to the Convention. 

9. The Auditor shall, prior to each annual meeting of the Conven- 
tion, examine carefully all the receipts, disbursements, vouchers, 
papers, and books of the Treasurer, and his certificate to the facts 
in the case shall be attached to the Treasurer's report. 

10. The Corresponding Secretary shall solicit contributions to the 
objects of the Convention, assist the Board of Missions in the em- 
ployment and payment of missionaries, and labor to promote the 
cultivation and development of Christian benevolence. 

11. The Board of Education shall foster and promote all the edu- 
cational interests of the Convention. 

12. The Board of Missions shall encourage the churches to give 
liberally to all objects of the Convention; so far as the means at its 
disposal will allow, supply all destitute portions of the State with 
faithful and efficient ministers of the gospel; give pecuniary aid, as 
far as can be secured, for building houses of worship at proper points 
in the State, and in cases where pecuniary aid cannot be given, com- 
mend them to the beneficence of the churches; encourage the distri- 
bution and study of the Bible and a sound religious literature in the 
homes, in the churches, and in the Sunday Schools; encourage Sun- 
day School conventions and institutes; cooperate with the missionary 
and Sunday School work of the Southern Baptist Convention. The 
Board shall appoint of their number a committee of seven, to whom 
shall be committed the Sunday School work, and the nomination for 
approval by the Board of a Sunday School Secretary or Secretaries 
to prosecute the work within the bounds of the Convention. 

13. The Board shall be appointed annually, and report to each ses- 
sion of the Convention. 

14. The Convention year shall close October 31. 

15. The Boards of the Convention shall fix the compensation of 
their respective officers and that of the Treasurer and Corresponding 
Secretary of the Convention. 

16. If, for any reason, it shall be necessary to change the time or 
place of meeting of the Convention, the President and Recording 
Secretary of the Convention, and the Corresponding Secretaries of 
the several Boards shall be a committee with power to make the 
necessary change or changes. 

17. This Constitution may be changed or amended on any day but 
the last of any annual session of the Convention by two-thirds of 
those present when the vote is taken voting in the affirma,tive. 



SIMPLER PLAN 



A. Organization 

1. That the President, Vice-Presidents and Recording Secretary 
shall be elected by the Convention after a nomination in open meet- 
ing, other officers to be elected after nomination by a committee ap- 
pointed for that purpose. The Corresponding Secretaries of the 
Boards of the Convention to be elected as the Convention may de- 
termine. 

2. That the members of the Boards of the Convention and institu- 
tions affiliated with the Convention be distributed as far as possible, 
both as to territory and individuals. 

3. That the work of the Convention be classified under three heads, 
namely; Missions, Education, and Social Service, with a Board of 
Missions and Education to be known as the State Board of Missions 
and the State Board of Education; and a standing committee of five 
on Social Service. 

4. That each of these agencies shall report to the Convention in 
session each year the work done during the year, together with 
recommendations at the close of the report. 

5. That it shall be the duty of each agency to have its reports 
printed and ready for distribution on the first day of the Convention. 

6. That the Convention instruct the Boards to plan their work so 
as to avoid conflicts in presentation or collection as far as possible, 
and that special appeals for money be eliminated as far as expedient. 

7. That the Convention recommend to the churches and associa- 
tions that they cooperate with these agencies in their work. 

8. The Convention shall decide which agency shall undertake any 
given work. 

9. That individuals, churches, associations and companies desiring 
the assistance and cooperation of the Baptists in North Carolina, or 
any part of them, in any work not already fostered by the Convention, 
shall first present the question to the agency under which it should 
be properly placed. If the agency should refuse to take it up, it 
may be presented to the Convention under miscellaneous business or 
special order. 

10. That immediately after the preaching of the sermon, each 
agency shall have not more than 20 minutes to present its report in- 
general. 

11. That all work under each agency shall be considered in con- 
secutive sessions. 

12. That time shall be provided for spontaneous discussion. 



8 A*. C. BAPTIST STATE CONVENTION 

B. Board of Missions 

1. That the word "Sunday Schools" be stricken from the name 
of the Board, leaving as the name, "The State Board of Missions of 
the Baptist Convention." 

2. That the mission work of the Home and Foreign Mission Boards 
shall be done under the direction of the State Board of Missions, in 
such cooperative manner as the three Boards, or their Corresponding 
Secretaries may agree upon. 

■J. That 10 minutes be given for the distribution of reports of the 
Board of Missions, which report shall contain full information in 
Tegard to all departments of work committed to the Board. 

4. Such part of the time allotted to this Board as shall not be 
needed for the business of the Convention shall be given to the 
discussion of the several departments of our Mission work. 

5. A representative of each of the Boards, State, Home, and 
Foreign, shall have 30 minutes to present any special phase of the 
work of his Board. In addition to this, 60 minutes each shall be 
given the Sunday School and Sunday School Board, Baptist Young 
People's Union, Laymen's Movement, and Woman's Work. After 
the time allotted the several departments mentioned above shall have 
expired, the remainder of the time shall be given to free and spon- 
taneous discussion. 

6. At the third session of the time allotted to Missions there shall 
be an address, or addresses, on Missio7is by persons selected by the 
Corresponding Secretary of the Convention and the State members 
of the Home and Foreign Mission Boards. 

C. BoAKD OF Education 

1. Not more than 10 minutes shall be given for the distribution of 
the report, which report shall contain full information concerning 
all the work committed to the Board. 

2. That all reports from educational institutions connected with 
the Convention be made annually to the Convention in session 
through the Board of Education, allotting 30 minutes to the Corre- 
sponding Secretary to call attention to matters of special interest. 

3. That a representative of each of the colleges under control of 
this Convention shall have at least 30 minutes to present any matters 
pertaining especially to his institution, and that some one selected 
by the Board shall have 40 minutes to present matters pertaining to 
secondary schools. 

4. That the last session of the Convention devoted to Education 
shall be given for an address, or addresses, on Christian Education 
by persons selected by the Board. 

5. That the Board of Education be located in Raleigh. 



MINUTES OF kiESSION IDIS « 

D. Committee on Social Service 

1. Under the head of Social Service shall be presented reports on 
the Orphanage, Ministers' Relief Board, Temperance, and other mat- 
ters affecting social conditions of which the Convention should take 
cognizance, all of which shall be under the management of a stand- 
ing committee on Social Service. Two hours shall be given to the 
general subject, the time to be divided as per the following sug- 
gested scheme: 

2. A report on the Orphanage shall be prepared by the Trustees of 
the Orphanage, and they shall be given an hour for reading and dis- 
cussing the report, discussion to be arranged for by the General 
Manager. 

3. Report on the Ministers' Relief Board shall be prepared by the 
Ministers' Relief Board, and 35 minutes shall be given for reading 
and discussing this report, arrangement for the discussion being left 
with the Corresponding Secretary. 

4. A committee shall be appointed to report on Temperance, and 
other related subjects, and 20 minutes shall be given the committee 
in which to present this report. 

All reports shall be printed and placed in the hands of the Com- 
mittee on Social Service, in time to have them distributed on the 
morning of the second day. 



OFFICERS 



President 
B. W. SPILMAN Kinston 

VICE-PBESIDENTS 

E. F. WATSON Burnsville 

F. P. HOBGOOD, Jr Greensboro 

THEO. B. DAVIS Kinston 

RECORDING SECRETARY 

WALTER M. GILMORE Sanford 

TREASURER 

WALTERS DURHAM Raleigh 

AUDITOR 

F. H. BRIGGS Raleigh 

CORRESPONDING SECRETIARIES 

WALTER N. JOHNSON — Board of Missions Raleigh 

R. T. VANN — Board of Education Raleigh 

J. M. ARNETTE— Board of Ministers' Relief Baden 

IRTTSTEES 

W. N. JONES Raleigh 

W. J. BROGDEN Durham 

J. B. HARRISON Greensboro 

BENJAMIN SORGEE Asheville 

M. L. DAVIS Beaufort 



STANDING COMMITTEES 

Memorial — T. J. Taylor. J. A. McKaughan, R. L. Moore. W. Mar- 
shall Craig, E. L. Middleton. 

Order of Business — J. B. Weatherspoon, Walter N. Johnson. R. T. 
Vann, M. L. Kesler, Walter M. Gilmore. 

Press — T. W. Chainbliss, Archibald Johnson, John Jeter Hurt. 

Seaside Assemhly — John A. Gates, H. B. Parker, C. J. Hunter, C. H. 
Durham, Fred G. Battle, J. A. Sullivan, W. G. Hall, ex officio, J. J. 
Hurt, E. L. Middleton. 

Social Service — R. F. Beasley. Theo. B. Davis. E. McK. Goodwin, 
L. G. Cole, W. O. Riddick. 



BOARDS OF THE CONVENTION 



BOARD OF MISSIONS 

C. C. Cowan, W. O. Riddick, W. R. Bradshaw, W. A. Smith, T. H. 
King, J. B. Weatherspoon, I. M. Mercer, J. C. Turner, C. C. Smith, 
L. Johnson, W. A. Cooper, L. E. M. Freeman, J. M. Page. C. H. Dur- 
ham, J. A. Campbell, T. J. Taylor, Osoar Creech, W. G. Hall, C. W. 
Hlanchard, J. H. ]\Iatthews, E. F. Aydlett. 

Association AL Members — Alleghany, R. L. Doughton; Ashe, H. A. 
Eller; Beulah, C. M. Murchison; Brushy Mt., R. A. Spainhour; Bim- 
combe, A. E. Brown; Central, D. R. Green; Cumberland, John A. 
Gates; Flat River, R. H. Marsh; French Broad, R. L. Moore; Liberty, 
R. S. Green; Little River, E. H. Ballentine; Mecklenburg-Cabarrus, 
L. R. Fruett; New Found, R. H. Hipps; Pilot Mt., H. A. Brown; 
Sandy Creek, W. H. H. Dawhon; South Yadkin, M. J. Hendrick; 
St07ie Mt.. J. S. Kilby; Stirry, S. G. Burrus; Tar River, Ivey Allen; 
Tennessee River; J. S. Woodward; Three Forks, J. C. Horton; U?iion, 
J. W. Bivens; West Chowan, J. F. Cale; Yancey, B. B. Riddle. 

TRUSTEES OF WAKE FOREST COLLEGE 

For two years closing 1920— T. H. Briggs, W. C. Dowd, J. D. 
Elliott. F. P. Hobgood. Livingston Johnson, M. L. Kesler, Stephen 
Mclntyre. C. W. Mitchell, G. A. Norwood, Jr.. J. M. Parrott, Clarence 
H. Poe, R. E. Royall. 

For four years closing 1922 — E. F. Aydlett. J. A. Campbell, W, J. 
Ferrell, J. D. Huffham, G. E. Lineberry, R. H. Marsh, R. L. Moore, 
A. E. Tate, G. T. Stephenson, E. W. Timberlake, W. H. Reddish, 
M. L. Davis. 

For six years closing 1924— John T. J. Battle, R. D. Caldwell, C. M. 
Cooke, W. E. Daniel, Carey J. Hunter, John A. Gates, W. S. Rankin, 
T. H. King, R. T. Vann, A. D. Ward, E. Y. Webb, C. W. Scar- 
borough, V. O. Parker. 

TRUSTEES OF MEREDITH COLLEGE 

For term expiring 1919— John T. J. Battle, Samuel M. Brinson. 
A. G. Cox, Edward McK. Goodwin, Carey J. Hunter, Livingston 
Johnson, Frank P. Shields, Mrs. S. J. Everett. 

For term expiring 1921 — Joseph D. Boushall, S. R. Home, Benja- 
min F. Huntley, James Y. Joyner, Martin L. Kesler, Beeler Moore, 
William L. Poteat, Miss Bertha Carroll. 

For term expiring 1923 — W. R. Bradshaw, W. O. Riddick, Wesley 
N. Jones, Stephen Mclntyre, W. H. Weatherspoon, Robert H. Riggs- 
bee. Robert N. Simms. William A. Thomas, George T. Watkins, Z. M. 
Caviness. 



12 X. C. BAPTIST iSTATE VONVEXTION 

TRUSTEES OF CHOWAN COLLEGE 

W. D. Barbee, E. F. Aydlett, J. T. Bolton, E. Brett, D. R. Brittou, 
T. S. Crutchfield, A. W. Early, Josiali Elliott, A. A. Butler, L. P. 
Freeman, Thomas Gilliam, Lycurgus Hofler, W. J. Berryman, A. T. 
liivermon, Paul J. Long, J. H. Matthews, C. W. Mitchell, H. F. Shan- 
nonhouse, B. H. Ward, W. W. Sawyer, A. V. Cobb, John Green Stan- 
di, J. H. Stephenson, E. B. Vaughan, N. W. Britton, J. E. Vann, C. J. 
Ward, T. R. Ward, Uriah Watson, D. E. Williams, S. P. Winborne. 
Paul Fleetwood. 

TRUSTEES OF THE ORPHANAGE 

Elected in 1913 to serve till 1919— J. B. Stroud, F. P. Hobgood. 
W. A. Cooper, J. H. Oanady, C. C. Wright, and J. C. Whitty. 

Elected in 1915 to serve till 1921— B. W. Spilman, C. L. Haywood. 
John Schenk, S. J. Liipfert, J. A. Durham, and C. W. Mitchell. 

Elected in 191? to serve till 1923— J. M. Stoner, Frank Shields, 
Stephen Mclntyre. J. W. Noell, E. F. Aydlett, Thomas Carrick. 

MINISTERS" RELIEF BOARD 

A. L. Weatherspoon, A. B. Ca^vthon, R. H. Riggsbee, W. J. Brogden. 
J. Ben Eller, H. F. Brinson, R. E. Hurst, J. N. Cheek, J. T. Salmon. 

As.sociATE Members — W. C. Barrett, C. H. Durham, D. L. Gore. 
E. W. Timberlake. C. W. Carter, A. Johnson, A. D. Ward, J. M. 
Broughton. Jr., D. W. Fink. A. W. Cooke, A. H. Reemes. 

BOARD OF EDUCATION 

Ex officio — W. L. Poteat, Wake Forest; C. E. Brewer, Raleigh; 
J. B. Brewer, Murfreesboro. 

One- Year-Class — W. A. Ayers, Durham; T. W. O'Kelley, Raleigh; 
M. Leslie Davis, Beaufort; C. W. Blanchard, New Bern; E. F. Ayd- 
lette, Elizabeth City. 

Two- Year Class — W. N. Jones, Raleigh; J. J. Hurt, Durham; C. W. 
Mitchell, Aulander; C. H. Durham, Lumberton; J. B. Stroud, Greens- 
boro. 

Three-Year Class — C. J. Hunter. Raleigh; W. F. Powell. Asheville; 
N. B. Josey, Scotland Neck; J. B. Weatherspoon, Winston-Salem; 
W. F. Dowd, Charlotte. 



PROCEEDINGS 



NORTH CAROLINA BAPTIST STATE CONVENTION 



EIGHTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL SESSION 



Greensboro, Js^. C, January 14, 1919. 

The Eighty-eighth Annual Session of the North Carolina 
Baptist State Convention met in the auditorium of the First 
Baptist Church of this city at 1 o'clock this afternoon. 

After singing "My Faith Looks Up to Thee," led by W. R. 
White, and prayer by IL W. Baucom, W, M. Craig read 1 
Corinthians 3, and, after prayer by J. R. Moore and the sing- 
ing of "Trust and Obey," spoke on "Partnership with God." 

President John A. Gates called the Convention to order. 
After singing "My Hope is Built on Nothing Less," the fol- 
lowing committee on enrollment was appointed : W. G. Rid- 
dick, L. R. Pruett, J. S. Farmer, C. V. Brooks, and F. P. 
Hobgood, Sr. 

After making announcements, A. "\V. Cook introduced 
F. P. Hobgood, Jr., who, in a few words, welcomed the Con- 
vention to this city. The response was made by B. C. Hening. 

The Enrollment Committee announced the presence of 175 
messengers. 

Gn motion of C. H. Durham, the Convention endorsed 
and confirmed the calling of this session, which was post 
poned to this time from December 5-7, on account of the 
influenza epidemic. 

GRGANIZATIOISr 

John A. Gates stated that he would not allow his name to 
be presented to the Convention for reelection as President. 

B. C. Hening put in nomination for President of the Con- 
vention E. F. Aydlett, of Elizabeth City. B. W. Spilman 



14 N. C. BAPTIST STATE CONVENTION 

was nominated for the same position by J. J. Hurt. On mo- 
tion, nominations were closed, and the ballot was cast, result- 
ing in the election of B. W. Spilman, he havinii^ received 90 
votes and E. F. Aydlett receiving 55. W. C. Barrett and 
J. J). Moore were asked to escort the newly elected Presi- 
dent to the Chair. 

For Vice-Presidents, A. E. Brown offered the name of 
E. F. Watson, of Burnsville ; W. O. Riddick nominated F. P. 
Hobgood, Jr., of Greensboro; and C. M. Murchison nomi- 
nated Theo. B. Davis, of the Kennedy j\Ieniorial ITomo. On 
motion of A. A. Butler, nominations closed. On motion of 
T. J. Taylor, the Secretary cast the ballot of the Convention 
for these three brethren for Vice-Presidents. 

On motion of T. J. Taylor, Livingston Johnson cast the 
ballot of the Convention for Walter IL Gilmore as Record- 
ing Secretary. 

The Chair appointed the following committee to nominate 
the other officers of the Convention: C. H. Durham, Ivey 
Allen, C. M. Beach, J. S. Farmer, and A. Johnson. 

On motion of A. Johnson, the following report of the Pro- 
gram Committee was adopted : 

REPORT OF PROGRAM COMMITTEE 

Tuesday — Afternoon Session 

4:00 — Devotional Exercises — J. Clyde Turner. 
4:30 — Enrollment and Organization. 

Welcome Address and Response. (Five minutes each). 

Distribution and Explanation of Printed Reports. 

Tuesday — E\-ening Session 

7:00 — Devotional Exercises — J. D. Harte. 
7:30 — Announcement of Committees. 
7:40 — Welcome to New Pastors. 
7:55 — The Biblical Recorder. 
8:25 — Sermon— B. D. Gaw. 

Wednesday — Morning Session 

9:30 — Devotional Exercises — Martin W. Kuck. 
9 : 45 — Miscellaneous. 



MINUTES OF SESSION 191S 15 

SociAr, Seuvick 
10 : 10 — Temperance. 
10:30 — Ministers' Relief Board. 
11 : 00 — Orphanage. 

Education 

11:45 — The Seminary and the Baptist Bible Institute. 

Wednesday — Afternoon Session 

2:00 — Devotional Exercises — ^N. A. Melton. 

2:1.5 — Statement from the Schools as to their Fundamental Aims 

and Purposes. 
3:00 — The Junior Reserve Forces. 
3:15 — Reports from Associational Managers of the Million Dollar 

Campaign. (Two minutes each). 

Wednesday — Evening Session 

7:00 — Devotional Exercises — J. B. Weatherspoon. 
7 : 30 — 'Million Dollar Campaign — 

1. The Mission of the Christian School in the New Day. 

2. The Future of the Campaign. 

Thursday — ^Morning Session 

9:30 — Devotional Exercises— J. E. Kirk. 

9 : 45 — Miscellaneous. 

Missions 
10:00— State Missions. 
10:30 — Home Missions. 
11:00 — Foreign Missions. 
11:30 — A Worthy Mark for North Carolina Baptists in all Missions. 

Thursday — Afternoon Session 

2:00 — Devotional Exercises — ^F. M. Huggins. 

2:1.5 — Woman's Work. 

2:30 — Sunday Schools — ^North Carolina and Southern Baptist. 

3:00— B. Y. P. U. 

3:15 — Daymen's Movement. 

3:30 — Report of Memorial Committee. 

4 : 00 — Miscellaneous. 
Adjournment. 

Walter N. .Johnson, 
R. T. Vann, 
Roland F. Bearley. 
W. C. Barrett, 
Walter M. Gilmore, 

Program Committee. 



16 .Y. C. BAPTIST STATE COyVENTlOi^' 

L. Johnson called attention to two recommendations in the 
Social Service Report, which had heen distributed. J. D. 
Hiiffham protested against the Convention's departure into 
any other field than that of missions and education, and there- 
fore was opposed to endorsing the recommendations condemn- 
ing lynchings and racial injustices. 

R. T. Vann called attention to certain features of the re- 
port of the Board of Education, as did also Walter 'N. John- 
son certain features of the report of the Board of Missions. 

The Convention nrljourned, after prayer by Walter N. 
Johnson. 



TUESDAY — Evening Session 

C. D. Graves conducted the devotional exercises, "How 
Firm a Foundation" was sung. Prayer by S. A. Egerton. 
Special music by the choir. Brother Graves read Acts 
14:19-28, and after prayer by A. Johnson, discussed some 
phases of the missionary situation at present. 

The Chair appointed the following committees : 

To Nominate the State Board of Missions — W. C. Barrett, W. R. 
Bradshaw, E. L. Baskin, J. E. Kirk, E. F. Watson, J. E. Hoyle, E. L. 
Middleton. 

Place and Preacher — E. N. Johnson, V. M. Swaim, S. W. Bennett. 
W. A. Ayers, R. C. Campbell, G. N. Cowan, W. H. Moore. 

To Nominate Ministers" Relief Board — B. C. Hening, T. M. Green, 
C. A. Owen, H. R. Harward. A. E. Brown, T. D. Collins, C. J. Hlack. 

The Chair called to the platform L. Johnson, who pre- 
sented to the Convention and welcomed the following new 
pastors, who have come to this State since the last session : 
W. F. Watson, Washington ; Luther Tittle, Charlotte ; L. L. 
Carpenter, Greensboro; T. D. Collins, Louisburg; J. W. 
Veasey, Asheville; C. K. Turner, Biltmore; J. B. Weather- 
spoon, Winston-Salem; E. I. Olive, Dunn; M. L. l^uchjv.uin. 
Spruce Pine; C. A. Owen, Salisbury; C. E. Garten, Ashe- 
ville; J. F. Warren, New Bern; J. P. Gulley, Nashville; 



MIXUTES OF SESi^lOX IHIS 17 

W. E. Clark, Elizabeth City ; J. W. Kincheloe, Rocky Mount ; 
J. J. Taylor, Leaksville. • 

The Committee on Nominations brought in the following 
report, which was adopted: Treasurer, Walters Durham; 
Auditor, F. H. Briggs; Corresponding Secretary, Walter N. 
Johnson — Board of Missions; R. T. Vann, Board of Educa- 
tion; J. M. Arnette, Board of Ministers' Relief; Trustees, 
W. ]Sr. Jones, W. J. Brogden, J, B. Harrison, Benjamin 
Sorgee, M. L. Davis. 

The following visitors were recognized : X, L. Shaw, of 
Virginia ; C. J. D. Parker, of Danville ; J. R. Moore, of Fort 
Lawn, S. C. ; T. L, Blalock, of China ; William Lunsford, of 
Dallas, Tex. The Chair called the three Vice-Presidents to 
the platform. 

Editor Livingston Johnson presented the report of the 
Biblical Recorder, and spoke to his report. The Convention 
arose endorsing his positions taken in reference to present 
day conditions. J. S. Farmer, Business Manager of the 
Recorder, made some statements as to the business side of the 
jiaper. 

On motion of J. J. Hurt, the President was instructed to 
send a telegram of sympathy to Mrs. B. D. Gaw, whose hus- 
band recently fell a victim of influenza, .and who was to have 
preached the sermon on this occasion. After music, and 
prayer by I. M. Mercer, J. D. Harte preached the annual 
sermon, taking for his text Heb. 4 :14 — ''Seeing then that we 
have a great high priest, that is passed into the heavens, 
Jesus the son of God, let us hold fast our profession." 

After singing "Arise My Soul, Arise." C. C. Ha;sTiiore 
pronounced the benediction. 



WEDNESDAY— Morning Session- 

At 9.30 the devotional service was opened by singing "Come 
Thou Fount of Every Blessing." After prayers by Gilbert T. 
Stephenson and E. L. Baskin, M. W. Buck read Isaiah 6: 
2 



18 A'. C. BAPTIaT UTATE CONVENTION 

1-9, and emphasized the supreme need of the present hour. 
''My Jesus I Love Thee" was sung.' 

B. W. Spihnan introduced the following resolution in re- 
spect to the Southern Baptist Assembly at liidgecrest, which 
was adopted : 

SOUTHERN BAPTIST ASSEMBLY 

Whereas, the Baptist State Convention of North Carolina inau- 
gurated the movement w^hich resulted in the establishment of the 
Southern Baptist Assembly, and 

Whereas, the Southern Baptist Convention later voted its endorse- 
ment of the Assembly, and 

Whereas, the Southern Baptist Assembly now^ owns a very valu- 
able property located at Ridgecrest. North Carolina, and 

Whereas, the Assembly has conducted at Ridgecrest eaf^h summer 
during the past ten years a Summer School of Religious Education 
and Conferences on various lines of Christian activity, and 

Whereas, these summer gatherings have not benefited a very large 
number of our people by reason of the limited provision for enter- 
tainment now^ at Ridgecrest. and 

Whereas, there are in North Carolina within one hundred miles 
of Ridgecrest more than 800 Baptist preachers in addition to a much 
larger number of other Baptist church workers. Therefore, be it 

Resolved, 1. That the Baptist State Convention of North Carolina 
endorse the movement inaugui-ated by the Assembly to secure a fund 
of $100,000, one half of which is to be expended for equipment and 
one half to be an invested endowment. 

2. That we commend this work to our people and ask that the 
Baptists of North Carolina contribute at least $20,000 of this amount. 

3. That we commend to the State Board of Missions, the Ridge- 
crest Summer School of Religious Education, as an object of its 
beneficence. 

E. L. Middletou introduced the following resolution in 
reference to an Enlistment Campaign, which was ad<ipted : 

Whereas, during 1918 many conditions were abnormal, namely: 
The weather for the first two months was unprecedentedly severe. 
Conditions caused by the war in many ways interfered with regular 
activities. The fearful epidemic of influenza almost stopped all 
assemblies for over two months. 

And Whereas, some marked results are visible as follows: For 
three years baptisms have been decreasing. For two years Sunday 
School membership has decreased, and in the South thousands of 
schools have not even ordered literature for this quarter, and there 
is a marked decrease in the attendance on all our meetings. 



MINUTES OF SESSION J91S 19 

Therefore, in view of these conditions be it resolved by this Con- 
vention: 

1. That we appeal to all our people to reconsecrate themselves to 
the tasks of their respective churches, and- try in every way possible 
to carry forward the work of the churches and of the Kingdom. 

2. That the Executive Committee of the Board of Missions use the 
month of April, 1919, as enlistment month in our churches to the 
end that every church member may be personally appealed to for 
definite alignment with every church agency with which he ought 
to cooperate. 

3. That to each member be given a brief printed statement of the 
denomination's program, setting forth our claim for his loyal sup- 
port. 

Livingston Johnson read the following resolution, sent by 
J. W. Bailey, and, after a statement bv Y. I. Masters, of 
Atlanta, it was adopted: 

RESOLUTIONS REGARDING CHAPLAINS 

Whereas, under the War Department of the United States, a condi- 
tion has been brought about which makes the Roman Catholic 
Church to be directly represented in a sectarian way in our Army, 
while Protesitant churches as such are denied any representation 
whatever, and 

Whereas, this is unjust, un-American, and a grievous wrong in the 
eyes of all true Protestants and all lovers of American inatitutions; 
now, therefore be it 

Resolved, 1. That the Baptist State Convention of North Carolina 
does protest against this policy of a wrong against our country, her 
soldiers, her institutions, and her spirit; and an intolerable reflec- 
tion, whether intended or not. upon all Pi'otestant denominations. 

2. That a committee be appointed by this body with three 'pur- 
poses, as follows; 

(a) To present this protest to the President of the United States 
and to the Congress. 

(6) To devise and recommend a plan whereby any religious 
organization may be as freely and fully represented in our Army 
and Navy as any other may be. 

(c) To invoke the cooperation of other Protestant organizations, 
to the end that the present wrong may be righted, and, further, to 
the end that henceforth Christianity as held by the Protestant 
churches of America may be upheld fully and effectually among 
the armed forces of our country in peace and in war. 

(Signed) J. W. Bailey. 



20 N. C. BAPTIST STATE CONVENTION 

On motion of Walter N. Johnson, sections three and four- 
teen of the Constitution were changed so as to read: "This 
Convention shall meet annually, on Tuesday after the second 
Sunday in JSTovember," and "The Convention year shall close 
on October 31."' 

The Secretary read the proceedings of the two sessions 
yesterday. 

The Chair appointed the following committees : 

On Woman's Work — L. Johnson, G. V. Tilley. M. A. Adams, J. M. 
Arnette, R. J. Buffalo, J. M. Justice. 

On Recommendations of State Board of Missions — I. M. Mercer, 
G. L. Dowell, L. R. Pruett, J. A. Durham, A. A. Pippin, J. C. Owen, 
C. W. Blanchard. 

The following visitors and new ministers in the State were 
recognized: I. J. Van Ness, of the Baptist Sunday School 
Board at Nashville, Tenn. ; V. I. Masters, of the Home ^^ilis- 
sion Board, of Atlanta, Ga. ; L. T. Mays, of Ridgecrest, Cor- 
responding Secretary of the Southern Baptist Assembly; 
R. P. Ellington, of Virginia ; and A. A. Walker, of the First 
Baptist Church, New Bern. 

There being no one desiring to speak on the special order, 
Temperance, William Lunsford, of Dallas, Tex., spoke in ref- 
erence to the annuity feature of the Board of Ministerial 
Relief and Annuities. 

The Secretary read a telegram from the South Carolina 
Baptist Convention, now in session at Columbia, sending 
greetings. On motion, the Secretary was instructed to make 
suitable reply. 

At the request of J. M. Arnette, of the Ministers' Relief 
Board, on motion, his Board and the Sunday Schools ex- 
changed places on the program. 

E. L. Middleton called attention to certain features in the 
Sunday School report. On motion of J. B. Weatherspoon, 
the recommendations in the report were adopted. 

I. J. Van Ness, Corresponding Secretary of the Baptist 
Sunday School Board, made an address on the work of his 
Board. 



MINUTES OF SESSION 1918 21 

After singing "My Faith Looks Up to Thee," the chair 
called to the platform Theo. B. Davis to preside during the 
discussion of Social Service. 

F. P. Hobgood, Sr., President of the Board of Trustees of 
the Thomasville Orphanage, presented for ratification the 
names of John Schenck, W. A. Cooper, Frank Shields, and 
C. C. Wright, succeeding as trustees of the Orphanage J. C. 
Scarboro, Juo. E. Ray, R. A. McFarland, and R. A. Spain- 
hour. Their election was confirmed. 

After calling attention to certain features of the report of 
the Orphanage, Superintendent M. L. Kesler presented W. F. 
Powell, ^ho addressed the Convention on, "The Child of the 
Ages." 

B. W. Spilman called attention to the necessity for com- 
pleting the chapel at the Kennedy Memorial Home, and other 
needs of that branch of the Orphanage. Theo. B. Davis, 
Superintendent of the Kennedy Home, spoke briefly of the 
work there. M. L. Kesler also called attention to gifts of 
a moving picture outfit, and money to provide a swimming 
pool next summer. 

B. C. Hening made the report on nominations of mem- 
bers of the Ministers' Relief Board, which was adopted. (See 
List of Boards.) 

On motion of L. Johnson, the Board of Education was 
authorized to provide $200 annually for the support of the 
students at the Baptist Bible Institute at ISTew Orleans. The 
request of that institution for $2,000 from !N'orth Carolina 
for permanent improvement and endowment was referred to 
the Board of Education for its consideration. B. W. Spil- 
man and L. T. Mays spoke in reference to the Baptist Bible 
Institute. 

George B. Eager, representing the Southern Baptist Theo- 
logical Seminary, addressed the Convention on the work of 
that institution. 

The Secretary read a telegram of greetings from the stu- 
dents at the Seminary, and was authorized to make suitable 
response. 



22 X. C. BAPTIHT STATE COXVEXTION 

The quartet of the Thomasville Orphanage sang "O Won- 
derful Words of the Gospel." 

M. A. Adams moved that the Chair appoint a committee of 
five to take under, consideration the feasibility of the Bap- 
tists sending a representative to the Peace Conference in 
Paris, and that this committee report to this body this after- 
noon. 

L. Johnson oli'ered a substitute to the motion to the effect 
that the matter be referred to the Home Board or Executive 
Conmiitt?ee of the Southern Baptist Convention to consider 
the advisability of sending such a delegate. 

After discussion by F, P. Hobgood, Jr., A. A. Blitler, L. 
Johnson, A. W. Cooke, T. W. Chambliss moved to table the 
matter indefinitely, which w^as done. 

On motion, the Convention expressed its endorsement of 
Superintendent M. L. Kesler's bringing the quartet of young 
ladies to the Convention, and expressed its appreciation to 
the young ladies for their music. 

On motion, the Convention adjourned, after the benediction 
by William Lunsford. 



WEDN^ESDAY— Afternoon Session 

N. A. Melton led the devotional exercises. "When I Can 
Read My Titles Clear" was sung. Prayer by J. W. Whitley. 
After singing "My Jesus I Love Thee," Psalms 90:12 and 
Matthew 28:19 were read and commented on by the leader. 
J. D. Huft'ham led in prayer. 

On motion of P. T. Vann, the speeches on the special order 
was limited to five minutes each. 

W. P. Cullom read his report as General Manager of the 
Million-Dollar Campaign for the Baptist schools of the State. 

R. T. Vann made the following report as Secretary-Treas- 
urer of the Million Dollar Campaign : Total amount received 
up to Saturday, January 11th, in cash, bonds. War Saving 
Stamps, and pledges, $156,869.98. Of this amount $20,- 



MINUTES OF SESSION WIS 23 

261.49 was iu cash; $32,969.50 was in bonds and War Sav- 
ing Stamps; $1,820.62 for Wake Forest College; $3,561: for 
Mars Hill College, and $500 for Winterville School. 

After a selection by the Thomasville Quartet, W. L. Po- 
teat spoke on "The Fundamental Aims and Purposes of 
Wake Forest College." 

On motion of J. J. Hurt, the address was requested for pub- 
lication in the Biblical Recorder. 

On motion, the time for the special order, "The Mission of 
the Christian School in the New Day," w^as extended 15 
minutes. 

As representatives of Meredith College, Miss Charlotte 
Ruegger rendered a violin solo, accompanied by Miss Frost. 
The Convention expressed its appreciation of the music by 
standing. 

W. R. Culloni read a communication from President J. B. 
Brewer, setting forth the fundamental aims and purposes of 
Chowan College. 

J. A. Campbell spoke in behalf of the denominational high 
schools, setting forth their aims and ideals. 

The Chair appointed T. E. Holding and F. M. Pickett to 
tabulate the following reports of the associational managers of 
the Million Dollar Campaig-n, which was the next order of 
business : 

Additional 

Manager and Association. Allotment. Raised. Expected. 

E. F. Aydlett, Chowan $55,000 $35,784 $ 

J. A. Beam, Beulah 12,000 10,830 750 

— . — . Britt, Brunswick 1,631 

C. C. Wright, Brushy Mountain 5,000 2,500 

Benjamin Sorgee, Buncombe 34,000 19,125 10,300 

A. I. Justice, Carolina 14,000 12,500 800 

F. A. Bower, Catawba River 12.000 3,600 

C. D. Graves. Central 68,000 50,725 9,000 

— . — . , Eastern 50,000 

C. A. Upchurch, Flat River 37,500 10,000 

J. C. Owen, French Broad 12,500 10,000 

J. A. McKaughan, Green River 12.000 5.356 425 

H. P. Brinson, Johnson 9,207 3,000 

— . — . , Haywood 3,000 



24 N. C. BAPTIST STATE CONVENTION 

Additional 

Manager and Association. Allotment. Raised. Expected. 

J. W. Suttle, Kings Mountain 36,000 36,000 800 

E. I. Olive, Little River 30,000 15,000 15,000 

L. R. Pruett, Mecklenburg-Cabarrus 16,000 20,000 

C. C. Smith ) ^, , „. 

TVT -.Tr T, , ^ Mount Zion 35,861 

M. W. Buck j 

T. B. Davis, Neuse-Atlantic 35,000 1,500 1,600 

J. C. Turner, Piedmont 60,000 35,000 - 

T. H. King, Pilot Mountain 57,500 39,865 7.300 

C. J. Black. Union 20,000 5,420 10,000 

Chas. Anderson, Roanoke 93,000 37,000 

L. R. Varser, Roberson 9,070 66,000 

D. J. Hunt, Sandy Run 23,000 3,971 5,000 

W. R. Bradshaw, South Fork 35,000 22,567 

W. H. Dodd, South Yadkin 32,000 12,000 6,000 

C. P. Williams, Surry 3,060 

T. J. Taylor, Tar River 48,000 9,000 10,000 

— . — . Turner, Tennessee River 2,084 

— . — . , Transylvania 4,000 3,000 

B. Sorgee, West Buncombe 1,800 

J. H. Matthew, W. Chowan 127,000 54,000 73,000 

— . — . , Western 1,200 

— . — . , Yadkin 1,000 5,000 

—.—. White, Yancey 15,000 7,000 8,000 

On motion of M. L. Kesler, the election of the following 
trustees of Meredith College was confirmed: Mrs. S. J. 
Everett, Greenville ; Miss Bertha Carroll, Raleigh ; and Z. M. 
Caviness, Raleigh. 

On motion of W. L. Poteat, the election of the following 
trustees of Wake Forest College was confirmed : M. L. Davis, 
Beaufort; V. O. Parker, Raleigh. 

C. J. Thompson, of Anderson, S. C, was recognized. 

T. W. Chambliss offered the following amendment to the 
Constitution, which was adopted: 

CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT 

Resolved, That if, for any reason, it should be necessary to 
change the time or place of meeting of the Convention, the President 
and Recording Secretary of the Convention, and the Corresponding 
Secretaries of the several Boards shall be a committee with power 
to make the necessary change or changes. 

Article 16 shall become article 17. 



MINUTES OF SESSION WIS 25 

Misses Eeiig-ger and Frost rendered "My Faith Looks Up 
to Thee." 

F. M. Pickett announced that, according to the tabulated 
report just made, $543,979 had been raised in cash, notes, and 
securities during the Million Dollar Campaign. 

G. B. Eager made a statement about the Correspondence 
Course of the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary. 

E. E". Johnson read the following report on Place and 
Preacher, which was adopted : 

PL(ACE AND PREACHER 

The Committee on Place and Preacher desires to report as follows: 
We recommend that the Convention refer to the Executive Com- 
mittee of the Board of Missions the location of the meeting place 
of the next Convention. 

We recommend Brother J. Clyde Turner as the preacher, and 
Brother George V. Tilley as the alternate, for the next session of 
the Convention. 

v. M. SWAIM, 

S. W. Bennett, 
R. C. Campbell, 
G. N. Cowan, 
W. H. MOOKE, 
E. N. Johnson, 

Committee. 
On motion, adojurned. 



WEDNESDAY— Evening Session 

J. B, Weatherspoon led the devotional meeting, reading 
selections from Isaiah, chapters 50 and 61, and discussing 
the theme "The Spirit and Task of the Servant of Jehovah." 
"He Leadeth me" and "Onward Christian Soldiers" were 
sung, and prayers were offered by A. A. Butler and the 
leader. Special music was rendered byxthe choir. 

T. H. King offered the following resolution in reference 
to Oxford College : 

OXFORD COLLEGE 

Resolved, that we hear with pleasure of the continued prosperity 
of Oxford College, its registration of boarding students being one 



26 A. C. BAFTIiST STATE t'OS VEXTIOX 

hundred aaid twenty-five, which is an increase of 25 per cent over 
any other year, and that we extend to President Hobgood our hearty 
God-speed in his work. 

On motion of S. T. Hensley, the order of business was so 
changed that the work of the B. Y. P. U., the Laymen's 
Movement, and Woman's Work were transferred from Thurs- 
day afternoon to this evening after the completion of the dis- 
cussion of the Million Dollar Campaign. 

On the announcement of the indisposition of Pastor J. C. 
Turner, by F. P. Hobgood, Jr., a motion expressing sym- 
pathy for brother Turner prevailed. 

I. M. Mercer offered the following report of the Com- 
mittee on Recommendations in the report of the Board of 
Missions : 

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON RECOMMENDATIONS IN THE 
REPORT OF THE BOARD OF MISSIONS 

We recommend that the suggestions of the B. Y. P. U. Committee 
and of the Sunday School Committee be adopted by the Convention, 
and that the eight items set forth in the Report of the Board of 
Missions as "Needs for Next Year" be adopted by the Convention as 
its instructions to the Board of Missions for the coming year. 

I. M. Mebcer, 

G. J. DOWELL, 

L. R. Prttett, 
J. A. Durham, 
A. A. Pippin, 
J. C. Owen, 

C. W. BLANCnARD. 

Committee. 

On motion of J. J. Hurt, members of the Board of Edu- 
cation were elected. (See List of Boards.) 

The Secretary read the following resolution, offered by 
J. H. Matthews, in behalf of the West Chowan Association, 
which was adopted : 

Whereas, the Christian denominations of North Carolina are con- 
tributing largely to the education of the people of our State, through 
their educational institutions; and, 



MINUTES OF SESSION WIS 27 

Whereas, the Bapti&t denomination is now undertaking to raise 
one million dollars for the endowment of its educational institutions 
in this State in order to increase their usefulness in the field of 
education, and to meet the ever-increasing demands of the educa- 
tional standard of the times; and. 

Whereas, the present educational policy of the State appears to be 
discriminatory against the Christian educational institutions, in 
that: First. Free tuition and other allowances are made by the 
State institutions to be paid out of the public treasury of the State, 
instead of being issued directly by the State to the student meriting 
the same, to be used as he may elect in any school he may desire to 
attend; and, Second. Students from some of the State schools seem 
able to secure special privileges in certificates, diplomas and posi- 
tions not open to students from the Christian educational institutions 
wiho have taken the same course of study and attained the same 
degree of proficiency; and, 

Whereas, we believe that the existence of Christian educational 
institutions, for the training of Christian manhood and womanhood, 
is essential to the life and good government of our people, as has 
been so clearly demonstrated by the non-Christian educational policy 
of the German Governnient, which has brought upon the world the 
horrors and crimes against civilization and humanity of the present 
worid war; and. 

Whereas, as a free, democratic, Christian people, we should request 
our great State to remove any existing discrimination in its school 
policy, and maintain equal rights and fair treatment to all of the 
schools of the State, both State institutions and Christian institu- 
tions alike, in order that all may work in harmony and love 
in the great task of educating every boy and girl in North Carolina. 
Now, therefore, be it 

Resolved, That the West Chowan Association hereby petition the 
Baptist State Convention, at its next session, to appoint a committee 
to investigate the present educational policy of the State with refer- 
ence to any possible discrimination against the Christian educational 
institutions of this State, or any failure in that policy to recognize 
these institutions as a part of the educational machinery of the State, 
and to formulate and devise such plans of procedure as in its judg- 
ment may be proper to remove such discrimination, should any be 
found to exist; and that said committee be empowered to take such 
action in the premises as it may deem proper. 

W. R. Ciillom was called to the Chair to preside during 
the further discussion of the Million-Dollar campaign, 

Luther Little delivered an address on "The Christian 
School in the ISTew Day." 



28 N. C. BAPTIST STATE CONVENTION 

R. T. Vann announced that the Wall brothers and other 
stockholders of the Liberty Piedmont Institute at Wallburg, 
after paying off the indebtedness of $15,000, presented the 
property of that institution, estimated to be worth $30,000, to 
the Board of Education. 

On motion of L. Johnson, which was amended by W. N. 
Johnson, and after some discussion by !M. L. Kesler and 
others, the property of the Liberty-Piedmont Institute was 
accepted with thanks, and the matter of making proper title 
was referred to the Executive Committee of the Board of 
Education. 

W. R. Cullom read a number of letters and telegrams an- 
nouncing gifts to the ]\Iillion Dollar Campaign. 

The Secretary announced that, adding to the amounr re- 
ported by the associational managers to have been pledged 
already, $543,979, the amount that these managers thought 
could be raised with reasonable certainty in their Associa- 
tions, $329,175, the grand total was $873,154, which puts 
the campaign within $126,846 of the goal. Only 39 of the 
65 Associations are represented in the above figures. 

Walter N". Johnson made a motion to the effect that we 
gather up the fruitage of the campaign for the next 30 days, 
and then wait until summer or fall and put on a campaign to 
raise an additional half million for our schools. The motion 
was carried. 

J. T. Albritton, a member of the family who gave $25,000 
to endow a chair of the Bible at Wake Eorest, was presented 
to the body, as was C. M. Wall, of Wallburg. 

The Convention stood in recognition of this being the 
birthday of W. R. Cullom, when that fact was announced. 

H. W. Battle of Virginia, and Chaplain Solomon of Camp 
Polk were recognized. 

John A. Oates offered the following resolution relative to 
military training, which was adopted : 

Resolved, that the Baptist State Convention of North Carolina 
hereby expresses its opposition to and disapproval of universal Mili- 
tary Training in America, either inside or outside the schools. 



MINUTES OF SESSION 1918 29 

B. C. Hening offered the following resolution, which was 
adopted: 

That the order of business be so amended as to begin the session 
tomorrow at 9:00 a. m. instead of 9:30, thus putting forward each 
topic 30 minutes, but granting to each the same length of time 
assigned it. and closing the Convention with the close of the morn- 
ing session. 

L. Johnson read the following report on Women's Work, 
which was adopted : 

WORK OF OUR WOMEN 

We, the members of the Baptist State Convention of North Caro- 
lina, wish to express to the members of the Woman's Missionary 
Union, our sincere appreciation of the great work they are doing 
for the advancement of the Kingdom of our Lord. 

We commend most heartily their methods of work. In their study 
about missions they are gaining valuable information which is im- 
parted to many of the male members of the churches; in having a 
definite aim there is before them a constant imspiration; in giving 
regularly they are setting a worthy example to the churches, and are 
demonstrating the effectiveness of the plan of systematic giving. 
Their pi'ayers bring down blessings from the throne upon the whole 
church, as their prayers and gifts go up together as "a memorial 
before God." 

We believe their method of contributing through their societies 
and crediting the contributions to the churches is, for the present at 
least, and possibly for all time, the best that could be devised. If 
the contributions were made through the church budget we fear it 
would destroy in large measure the enthusiasm which now charac- 
terizes most of the societies, and might result in the death of many 
of them. 

By the present arrangement they keep up their organization, and 
at the same time, are what their name implies, auxiliary to the 
Baptist State Convention. 

May the blessings of God continue to rest upon the work of our 
women is the prayer of this Convention. 

L. Johnson supplemented the report on Women's Work 
w^ith the following resolution: 

We, the members of the Baptist State Convention of North Caro- 
lina, hereby express to the Woman's Missionary Union of the State, 
our cordial appreciation of the great work they are doing for the 
advancement of the Kingdom of our Lord. 



30 N. C. BAPTIST STATE CONVENTION 

We commend most heartily their methods of work, and we are 
sure the time is not yet if, indeed, it will ever be, when these 
methods, which have proven so successful, should be changed. 

In their mission study our women are gathering valuable informa- 
tion which makes them intelligent as to the various mission fields 
and their needs, and this information is imparted to other members 
of the churches who do not take time to study missions; the definite 
aim set before them is a constant inspiration; their prayers for mis- 
sions call down blessings on the whole church; and the regularity 
with which they give is a demonstration of the value of systematic 
giving. 

Interest in the work is maintained by raising money in the socie- 
ties, and at the same time the church gets credit for the amount 
raised, as the money is turned over to the church treasurer. We 
believe that a change in financial methods whereby the members of 
the societies would contribute through the regular church budget 
would result in an abatement of interest, if not in the death of 
many of the societies. 

We pray God's blessings upon the women and their work. 

]\rissioiiary W. C. Newton was recognized. 

Secretary J, D. Moore presented J. C. Canipe and J. C. 
Owen, who spoke on the work of the B. Y. P. TJ., being fol- 
lowed with a prayer by A. E. Brown. 

W. C. Barrett read the report of the committee to nomi- 
nate the Board of IMissions, which was adopted. (See List of 
Boards. ) 

On motion of L. R. Pruett, the name of W. A. Smith is 
substituted in the place of his own in the above report. 

On motion of A. E. Brown, the thanks of the Convention 
is extended to Misses Reuager and Frost for their music. 

The Chair appointed the following standing committees : 

Order of Busmess — J. B. Weatherspoon, W. N. Johnson, R. T. 
Vann, M. L. Kesler, W. i\I. Gilmore. 

Committee on Social Service — R. F. Beasley, Theo. Ef. Davis, E. 
McK. Goodwin, L. G. Cole, W. O. Riddick. 

P7-CSS Committee — T. W. Chambliss, A. Johnson, John Jeter Hurt. 

Committee on Seaside Assembly — John A. Gates, H. B. Parker, 
C. J. Hunter, C. H. Durham, Fred G. Battle. J. A. Sullivan, W. G. 
Hall, ex officio: J. J. Hurt, E. L. Middleton. 

Committee on Resolution Offered by J. H. Matthews — J. H. Mat- 
thews. W. F. Powell, T. H. King. W. N. Jones, S. Mclntyre. 



MINUTES OF SESSION 1918 31 

Committee on Resolution Regarding Chaplains — L. Johnson, E. F. 
Aydlett, Luther Little, M. A. Adams, J. T. J. Battle. 

After a musical selection bj Misses Eeiigger and Frost, and 
the benediction by T. J. Taylor, the Convention adjonrned. 



THURSDAY— Morning Session 

The devotional service was opened at 9 o'clock by J. E. 
Kirk, After singing "N'earer, Still N"earer" and prayer by 
H. H. Morton, the leader read selections from Isaiah 41 and 
Mark 6:46-50, and commented on same. After singing 
"Trust and Obey," Oscar Creech led the prayer. 

On motion of L. Johnson, the motion adopted last night 
to undertake to raise an additional half million dollars for 
the Baptist schools of the State in the fall was reconsidered. 

Livingston Johnson moved that we complete the raising of 
the million dollars proposed for our schools exclusive of all 
expenses, and that the time limit for completing the cam- 
paign be left to the executive committees of the Board of 
Education and the Board of Missions. After discussion by 
L. Johnson, A. A. Butler, Jno. A. Oates, A. E. Brown, and 
R. T. Vann, the motion prevailed. 

Jno. A. Oates presented the following report on the Sea- 
side Assembly, which was adopted: 

REPORT OF BAPTIST SEASIDE ASSEMBLY COMMITTEE 

The fourth session of the Baptist Seaside Assembly v'as held at 
Wrightsville Beach in the summer of 1918 with an attendance out- 
side of Wilmington community of 367, not including children. 

We expended $1,246.62 for speakers, printing and incidental ex- 
penses and received $1,114.63, leaving a small deficit, which the 
Assembly will take care of from pledges or otherwise. 

This meeting grows in interest and usefulness. It is not just a 
summer outing, but a practical and unlifting meeting, combining in- 
spiration, instruction and healthful educational entertainment. 

Some of the very best speakers in our Baptist brotherhood in 
America were with us in 1918 and we have already secured the be- 
ginning of an unexcelled platform for 1919. 



32 X. C. BAFTI8T STATE CONVENTION 

We feel that the institution has already done great good and has 
ahead of it a large field of usefulness, which is not covered by any 
other agency of our denomination. 

We recommend that the same appropriation be made as last year. 
Respectfully submitted, 

Jiso. A. Oates, 
J. J. Hurt, 

E. L. MiDDLETON, 

C. V. Brooks, 

Executive Committee. 

W. C. Barrett made the following report of the Press Com- 
mittee, which was adopted: 

REPORT OF THE PRESS COMMITTEE 

We are glad to report that we have found the newspaper men of 
North Carolina to be among the most clever and accommodating 
men we have ever dealt with. 

The committee secured the services of Dr. Livingston Johnson to 
write two articles — one to be published in the weekly papers and 
the other in the daily papers. Eighty-five of the weekly papers of 
the State accepted the article and agreed to publish it a week before 
the regular time for the Convention to meet. The article for the 
daily papers was printed in a whole page display, together with 
pictures of several of our institutions, in a number of our dailies 
on last Sunday. The committee has not paid, or agreed to pay. any 
of these papers for publishing these articles, 

The committee secured the services of Bro. T. W. Chambliss to re- 
port the sessions of the Convention for the daily papers. He is 
reporting for 13 of the daily papers of the State. 

We have secured the services of Bro. Archibald Johnson to write 
a brief news digest of the Convention to be sent to the weekly papers 
of the State, which printed the article by Dr. L. Johnson, immedi- 
ately on the adjournment of this Convention. 

The actual expense of furnishing this matter to the papers will be 
about $200, the amount allowed by the Convention. 

The committee would suggest that the Convention instruct the 
officers, committees, and boards of the Convention to cooperate with 
the Press Committee, if continued, in furnishing the news of the de- 
nomination and convention to the papers of the State. 

Committee. 

The special order, State Missions, having arrived. Secretary 
Walter JST. Johnson opened the discussion, calling on Chap- 
lain A. O. Moore, Chaplain Holland and A. W. Baucom to 



M1XUTE8 OF SESSION IDIS 33 

speak. V. I. Masters made explanations with reference to 
Chaplains in the Army and N^avy. 

W, L. Poteat presented the names of trnstees of Wake 
Forest College, whose terms are to expire in 1921, for rati- 
fication by the Convention, which was done. (See List of 
Boards.) 

C. H. .Durham, Vice-President of the Home Mission Board 
in !N"ortli Carolina, M'as called to the chair to preside during 
the discussion of Home Missions, which was participated in 
by A. E. Brown and Victor L Masters. 

Walter ]Sr. Johnson presented the following resolution with 
reference to the Southern Baptist Sanatorium for Tuber- 
culosis in Texas, which was adopted : 

SOUTHERN BAPTIST SANATORIUM 

Whereas, a great many Baptists, including many ministers and 
members of their families, suffer from tuberculosis, and 

Whereas, tuberculosis is more prevalent in the South than in the 
Nation as a whole and is rapidly spreading on account of the war, 
and 

Whereas, the people of El Paso, Texas, have donated to the Bap- 
tists, and have deeded to the Home Mission Board 143 acres of land 
containing a magnificent administration or headquarters building 
erected by them at a cost of $65,000, and 

Whereas, the Southern Baptist Sanatorium intends not only to 
care for and treat tuberculous patients, but to conduct a continuous 
campaign against tuberculosis in the South by teaching people 
everywhere how to care for tuberculous patients, how to cure tuber- 
culosis at home and how to prevent it from spreading, and 

Whereas, many poor tuberculous people are now seeking admis- 
sion to this institution, which cannot receive them until equipment 
is secured for which purpose there are not now sufficient funds, and 

Whereas, the Southern Baptist Convention founded the Sana- 
torium and committed its work to the Home Mission Board and the 
Board is endeavoring to raise $250,000 for buildings and improve- 
ments, therefore, be it 

Resolved, that North Carolina State Convention give its hearty 
endorsement to the Southern Baptist Sanatorium; that we request 
our pastors and missionaries to solicit funds and take public offer- 
ings for it; our churches, Sunday schools, ladies', young peoples' and 
children's organizations to contribute to its work, and that offerings 
be forwarded to Superintendent H. F. Vermillion, El Paso, Texas. 
3 



34 X. C. BAPTIST STATE COXVENTIOK 

M. W. Buck offered the following resolutions of thanks to 
the host of the Convention : 

THANKS 

Whereas, the Baptists of Greensboro and the members of the First 
Church have opened their homes for our entertainment, and placed 
at our disposal every convenience for the transaction of the business 
of this Convention under most adverse conditions, due to a new 
outbreak of the influenza epidemic, therefore, be it 

Resolved, that we place on record our keen appreciation of the 
gracious cordiality that has greeted us on every hand, the gen- 
erous hospitality that has placed at our disposal every convenience 
and comfort for our entertainment, and every facility for the con- 
venient and efficient transaction of the Convention business. And 
be it 

Resolved, that we extend to this church and its beloved pastor our 
sorrow and sympathy because of the sickness that has laid him 
aside since the opening of the Convention. We assure church 
and pastor of our united prayers for his speedy recovery, and that 
for many years they may be engaged in the work of our Lord, with 
ever enlarging results, in this beautiful and prosperous city. 

E. L. ]\tidcIleton offered the following resolution of thanks 
to the Press Committee, which was adopted : 

Whereas, the Press Committee reports the hearty cooperation of 
the daily and w^eekly newspapers of the State and is evidence of their 
willingness to give the largest publicity to the w^ork of this Con- 
vention. 

Therefore be it resolved that this Convention does hereby express 
its appreciation of the service rendered the Haptist denomination by 
the newspapers of North Carolina and does in this resolution express 
its appreciation, and request the Press Committee to transmit a 
copy of this resolution to each of the papers. 

Resolved further, that thanks be extended to the Press Committee 
for its efficient w'ork. 

On motion of T. W. Chambliss, the name of W. O. Kiddick 
was substituted for that of A. E. Brovai on the Board of 
]\Iissions, he being already the Buncombe associational repre- 
sentative on that Board. 

On motion of W. C. Barrett, the Board of Missions is au- 
thorized to make any substitutes on the Board where it may 
be necessary. 



MINUTES OF SESSION 191S 35 

The subject of Foreign Missions was discussed by Weston 
Brunei-, Missionaries W. C. ITewton and T. L. Blalock. 

Walter IST. Johnson addressed the Convention on the topic, 
''A Worthy Mark for North Carolina Baptists : A Quarter of 
a Million Dollars for All Missions by April 30, 1919." This 
was follow"fed by prayers by W. C. Kewton, T. L. Blalock, 
K. T. Vann, and ^Y. X. Johnson. 

On motion of W. C. Barrett, $200 was appropriated for the 
use of the Press Committee for the next session. 

J. Y. Joyner, State Chairman of the Armenian Sufferers' 
Relief, addressed the Convention on the work of that organi- 
zation. 

J. M. Arnette, Corresponding Secretary of the Ministers' 
Eelief Board, presided during the consideration of the re- 
port of his Board, offering the following amendment to the 
Constitution of the Ministers' Relief Board, Article III, 
Section I, relative to aid to Baptist ministers and their 
widows so as to include: "or a missionary serving under the 
Home or Foreign Mission Boards and going out from this 
State." The amendment was adopted. 

J. M. Arnette offered a substitute to the last part of his 
printed report, which is appended to the report, and on motion, 
the substitute was adopted. 

William Lunsford, of Dallas, Texas, Corresponding Secre- 
tary of the Board of Ministerial Relief and Annuities of the 
Southern Baptist Convention, presented the work, of his 
Board. Remarks were made by C. C. Smith and J. J. 
Taylor. 

On motion of Walter I^. Johnson, J. D. Wilkins, of Greens- 
boro, was appointed to lead the Laymen's Movement in the 
State, with authority to associate with him such helpers as he 
may deem wise. 

T. J. Taylor read the following report of the Memorial 
Committee, which was adopted: 



36 A'. C. BAl'TlUT 8TATE COMEMIOX 

OUR DEAD 

Your committee recommend that the subjoined list of preachers 
who have died during the last year be published in the annual. 

Barnes, K., Proctorville; Beeker, S. J., Duke; Cade, Baylus. Le- 
noir; Cannon, W. 51., Elk Park; Duke, G. M., Mapleville; Emory. 
C. M., Southern Pines; Gaw, B. D., Durham; Grubb, J. A., Salisbury; 
Hale, F. D., Lexington; Hawkins, R. N., Shelby; Hilliard. S. C, 
Greensboro; Howard, A. T.. Saluda; Hoyle, J. A., Maiden; Kiraery, 

J. T. Albermarle; Limrick, L. P., ; Littleton. J. W. Alber- 

marle. :\Iatthews, J. R.. Aulander; Piatt, J. T., Ogden; Ray, Jno. E.. 
Raleigh; Sims, A. M., Raleigh; Taylor, J. A. Albemarle; Thompson. 
K., Kapps Mills; Walker, R. P., Wilmington. 

Your committee recommends that this hour be devoted to remem- 
bering tenderly our dead, who have wrought wisely and well, who 
have finished their course with joy and have entered into their re- 
^■^^^^- T. J. Taylor, 

Geo. T. Watkins, 
a. i. ju.stick. 

Committee. 

The following bretlireu paid brief tributes to the dead: 
H. W. Battle, J. J. Hurt to the memory of K. P. Walker and 
B. D. Gaw; J. A. Campbell spoke of S. J. Beeker; W. K. 
White spoke of S. C. Hilliard ; T. J. Taylor spoke of Baylus 
Cade and George M. Duke. 

The Secretary read a letter from F. M. Jordan, a veteran 
of the Cross and a free will offering was taken for Brother 
Jordan amounting to $30.52. 

The Secretary read a communication from Mrs. F. B. 
Ashcraft relative to protesting against American breweries 
being established in China. 

On motion, the report on Social Service was adopted as a 
whole. 

The following resolution, introduced by J. J. Hurt, Avas 
adopted, and on motion, W. C. Barrett, J. J. Hurt, and B. W, 
Spilman were appointed to bear the resolution to the General 
Assembly now in session : 

:\FOTION PICTURES 

Seeing that pictures have always entered largely into the forma- 
tion of character and the determination of morals; and 

Believing that the enchantment of motion pictures is here to 
stay; and 



2IINUTES OF SESSION WIS 37 

Deploring the tendency of film makers to send out pictures which, 
ridicule family relationships; which exalt the dime-novel type of 
heroism; and which positively shame all our senses of refinement, 
to say nothing of common decency, therefore be it 

Resolved, that this Convention, representing the nearly 300,000 
white Baptists of North Carolina, hereby respectfully petitions the 
General Assembly, now in session, to provide for a competent and 
adequate censorship of all the motion pictures which shall be ex- 
hibited hereafter within the bounds of our State. 

On motion, the report of the Board of Missions was adopted 
as a whole, as was also the report of the Board of Education. 
The Chair appointed the following standing committees : 

Memorial Committee — T. J. Taylor, J, A. McKaughan, R. L. Moore, 
W. Marshall Craig, E. L. Middleton. 

Committee on Ministerial Relief and Annuities — L. Johnson, J. M, 
Stoner, L. L. Leary. 

The Secretary read a letter of greetings from the First 
Baptist Church of Concord, which was unable to have a repre- 
sentative at the Convention. 

The Secretary announced the enrollment of 290. messengers 
to date. 

On motion, the reading of the proceedings of yesterday and 
today's sessions was dispensed with. 

On motion of B. C. Hening, the Convention adjourned at 
1 p, m., sine die, after a special prayer of thanksgiving to 
God by W. H. ICoore for raising Secretary Walter X. John- 
son up to health again from his recent serious illness. 

B. W. Spilmax, President. 
"Walter M. GiL:\roRE, Becording Secretary. 



LIST OF DELEGATES 



Bethel Hill — J. A. Beam, Roxboro. 
Milton— J. F. Davis. 
Roxboro — A. R. Foushee. 
Thompsonville — D. "W. Overby, Reidsville. 

BLADEN 

Bladenboro — R. E. Powell. 

BEUSIIY MOUNTAIN 

Xorth Wilkesboro, First— TS. E. Eller. 

BUNCOMBE 

Asheville, Calvery — A. E. Brown. 

Asheville, First — T. W. Chambliss, W. F. Powell. W. O. Rlddick. 

Asheville, French Broad — Joe. W. Veasey. 

Asheville, No7-th Asheville — J. C. Owen, Benjamin Sorgee. 

Asheville, West End — Charles Ernest Garten. 

Biltmore — C. K. Turner. 

Black Motintain — James M. Justice. 

2^exo Bridge — S. T. Hensley, Asheville. 

Ridgecrest — B. W. Spilman, Kinston. 

CALDWELL 

Lenoir — J. Edwin Hoyle. 
Globe— T. L. Blalock, Ledger. 

CAROLINA 

Hendersonville, First — A. I. Justice. 

CATAWBA KIVEB 

Drexel — C. A. Rhyne. 

Morganton, Fijst — F. A. Bower, E. McK. Goodwin. 



Mount 'Ver7ion — E. 0. Penny, Neuse. 

New Hope — R. Judson Buffaloe, Raleigh. R. F. D. 5; J. E. Green. 
Raleigh; Livingston Johnson, Raleigh. 

Raleigh, First — J. S. Farmer, W. N. Jones, J. Y. Joyner. Chas. F. 
Meserve, E. L. Middleton, T. W. O'Kelley, R. T. Vann. 



MINUTES OF SESSION 1918 39 

'Wakefield — D. D. Chamblee, A. A. Pippin. 

Wake Forest— W. R. Cullom, C. D. Graves, T. E. Holding, W. L. 
Poteat, J. L. Yearby. 

CHOWAN 

Ballards Bridge — A. A. Butler, Tyner. 

Elizabeth City, Blackivell Memorial — E. F. Aydlett, W. C. Clark. 

Elizabeth City, First — B. C. Hening, Preston S. Vann. 

Reynoldson — A. C. McCall, Gates. 

Saivye7-'s Creek — Geo. P. Harrill. 

CUMBERLAND 

Fayetteville, First — John A. Gates. 

EASTERN 

Calypso — George P. Britt, James T. Albritton. 
Delis. B. Wilson, Delwa3^ 
Warsaiv — K. W. Oawthon. 

FL.\T BI\'EB 

Dexter— W. H. Nelson, Jr., Oxford, R. F. D. 5; E. J. Green, Oxford, 
R. F. D. 5. 

Oxford, First — F. P. Bland, J. D. Harte, F. P. Hobgood. Charles 0. 
Mainor, B. W. Parham. 

FRENCH BROAD 

Gabriel's Creek and Juinter — Hughey O. Miller, Mars Hill. 
Mars Hill— J. R. Owen. 

GREEN RIVER 

Marion. First — G. A. Martin. 

Rutherfordton — M. L. Edwards. J. A. McKaughan. 

HAYWOOD 

Locust Field — M. A. Adams, Canton. 

JOHNSTON 

Clayton — R. H. Gower, A. C. Hamby 
Four Oakes — C. E. Stephens. 
Pisgah — John E. Lanier, Smithfield. 
Selma — R. R. Lanier. 
Smithfield — F. H. Brooks. 

KINGS MOUNTAIN 

Bessemer City — A. H. Sims. 

Cherryville — A. L. House. L. C. McDowell, D. F. Putnam. 



40 A". C. BAPTIST STATE COXVEXTIOX 

Kings Mountain~\V. R. Beach, D. F. Hord. 
Xetv Bethel— J. W. Suttle, Shelby. 
Shelby, Second — R. C. Campbell. 
Zion — A. E. Irvin, Shelby. 

LIBEnXY 

Abbotts Creek — Noah R. Teague, Kernersville, R. F. D. 

Lexington, First — C. W. Miller, R, E. White. 

Rich Fo7-k — Adrian J. Newton, Thomasville; J. Mills Newton, 
Thomasville. 

S toner's Grove — L. yi. Holloway, Southmont; O. E. Stoner, South- 
inont. 

Thomasville. First — Archibald Johnson, I. M. Mercer. 

Thomasville. Orphanage — L. AV. Bagley, F. B. Hamrick, M. L. Kes- 
ler. J. D. Newton. 

Wallhurg—G. C. Kirksey, C. INI. Wall. 

LITTLE UI\EK 

Bute's Creek — J. A. Campbell, Sidney A. Edgerton. 
Dunn, First — J. M. Lucas, Eugene I. Olive. 

MECKLEXnUi«!-C.\R.\URUS 

Chadwick — P. A. Hicks. 
Charlotte, Allen Street — R. D. Carroll. 

Charlotte, Fiist — I. W. Durham, J. A. Durham, Luther Little. 
Charlotte, Ninth Avenue — S. F. Conrad, L. R. Pruett. 
Charlotte, North Charlotte — J. D. Moose. 

Charlotte. Pritchard Memorial*—'W. F. Dowd, A. B. Hayes, F. D. 
Lethco, W. A. Smith. 

Concord. McGill Street—S. W. Bennett. 

Concord, West Concord — D. F. Helms. 

Oak Grove — J. P. Stroup, Pineville. R. F. D. 

:mitchell 
Sjyruce Pine — M. L. Buchanan, Bakersville. 

MOUNT ziox 

Burlington. First — Martin W. Buck. 

Chapel Hill—S. W. Andrews, E. L. Baskin. 

Durham, East — H. F. Brinson. C. W. Stallings, Durham, box 404. 

Durham, Edgemont — Chas. C. Smith. 

Durham. First — L. G. Cole. Chas. L. Haywood. R. T. Howerton, Sr., 
R. H. Riggsbee. 

Durham. Temple — W. A. Ayers, A. N. Hutchins. D. C. May. J. T. 
Salmon. 

Durham. West — J. Ben Eller. Clarence T. Poe. 



MINUTES OF SESSION WIS 41 

Graham — Lacy U. Weston. 

Hillsboro—J. H. Evans, S. W. Oldham. 

Mebaiie — J. C. Canipe. 

Mount Hermon — A. Edgar Lynch, Durham. 

Mount Pisgali — H. C. Sears, Morrisville, R. F. D. 1. 

Olive Chapel — W. S. Olive, Apex. 

NEUSE-ATI.ANTIC 

Ayclen — George J. Dowell. 

Cedhr Dell — Theo. B. Davis, Kinston. 

GoMshoro, First — ^George T. Watkins. 

Kinston, First — W. Marshall Craig, E. B. Lewis. 

Morehead City — H. W. Baucom, J. B. "Willis. 

Neic Bern, First — C. W. Blanchard, A. A. Walker. 

PEE nEE 
Ellerhe—T). P. Bridges. 
Hamlet — E. P. Pearce. J. I\I. Page. 

PIEBMOXT 

Ashehoro — C. G. Frazier. R. W. Prevost, D. E. Vipperman. 

Calvary — D. M. Moore, Reidsville. 

Greensboro. Ashcboro Street — W. Raleigh White. 

Greensboro. First — A. Wayland Cooke, T. B. Gaskins. F. P. Ho1> 
good, Jr., J. Clyde Turner, W. H. Wilson. 

Greensboro. Forest Avenue — J. M. Bloxton, L. L. Carpenter, Joseph 
S. Moore, H. Morton. 

Greensboro, Revolution — B. G. Whitley. 

High Point. First — A. E. Tate. 

High Point. Green Street— W. H. Wall, R. L. Winfrey. J. M. Mil- 
liard. 

High Point. West End — Jas. W. Rose. 

Reidsville. Fir.st — G. E. Barber. Elbert N. Johnson, J. C. Teachey. 

PILOT MOUNTAIN 

Brim's Grove — E. L. Smook, Pinnacle. 
Draper — Chas. M. Roberson. 
Deep Springs — T. B. Lindsay. Stoneville. 
Kernersville — T. C. McCulston, E. E. Snow. J. B. Stanley. 
Leahsville — ^W. H. Hagwood, J. J. Taylor. 
Madison — J. L. Shinn. 
Mount Airy, First — T. H. King. 

Mount Airy. Second — W. P. McCarter, C. C. Haymore. 
Spray — C. M. Beach, T. M. Green. H. A. Rome. 
Union Grove — C. A. Meadows. Kernersville; C. R. Smith. Kerners- 
ville; J W. Snoddy, Kernersville. 



42 -\. C. BAPTIiST ^iJAJi.' CUXVEMIOX 

Winston-Saletii, Brown Memorial — D. R. Boyles, J. A. Maddrey, 
S. W. Morrisett, Gilbert T. Stephenson. 

Winston-Salem, First— C. W. Barbee, R. B. Clodfelter, W. J. Con- 
rad, J. R. Fletcher, J. B. Weatherson, W. A. Wilkenson. 

Winst07i-Salem, North — W. O. Gilbert, W. T. Stewart. 

Winston-Salem, South Side — V. M. Swaim. 

Wi7iston-Salem, Salem — Fred N. Day, S. L. Naff. 

Winston-Salem, Waughtown — Richard K. Redwine. 

R.\LEaGH 

Avex — G. N. Cowan. 
Cary — Walter N. Johnson. 

Raleigh, Tabernacle — Weston Bruner, R. N. Childress. W. A. 
Cooper, J. D. Moore. 

ROANOKE 

Corinth — J. P. Gulley, Wake Forest. 

Farmville — J. E. Kirk. 

Greenville. Memorial — W. H. Moore. 

Nashville — Oscar Creech. 

Rocky Mount. First — J. W. Kincheloe. 

Scotland Neck — J. D. Huffham, Mebane. 

Sta7it07isl)urg — O. N. Marshall. 

Washington — W. F. Watson. 

WilUamsto7i Memo7-ial — J. F. Carter. 

Wilson. First — J. M. Kester. 

ROBESON 

Antioch—B. P. Patterson, Allington; J. P. Phillips. Allington. 
Lumberton, First — C. H. Durham. 
Marsh — J. Samuel Johnson. St. Pauls. 
Red Spi-ings — C. V. Brooks. 
Rennert — W. T. Covington. 

S.\NDY CREEK 

Cool Sp7-ings — J. H. Henley, Sanford. 

Gtivi Spri7igs — W. R. Stephens, Hope Mills. 

Jonesboro — W. I. Brooks. 

Loves Creek— R. P. Smith, Siler City, 

Mays Chapel — H. R, Harv.-ard, Moncure. 

Sanford— Walter M, Gilmore. 

Siler City—Y. M. Dorsett. 

SANDY RUN 

Cliffside—T). J. Hunt. 

Mount Pleasant — T. C. Holland, Mooresboro. 



MINUTES OF SESSION 1918 43 



SOUTH FORK 



Belmont, First — F. M. Huggins. 
Gastonia, East — J. W. Whitley. 
Gastonia, First — W. C. Barrett. 
Gastonia, South — W. A. Hough. 
Hickory, First — W. R. Bradshaw. 
Lincolnton, First — J. Abner Snow. 
Loray — G. P. Abernethy, Gastonia. 
Mountain Grove — Calvin Baker, Hickory. 
McAdensville — B. H. Waters. 
Mount Holly^^Chas. A. G. Thomas. 
Newton — Livingston T. Mays, Ridgecrest. 
Olivet Field — J. S. Connell. 
Providence — C. E. Beaver, Maiden. 

SOUTH MOUNTAIN 

Mount Ycrnon — S. A. Stroup, Lincolnton; J. J. Waldrop. Henry. 

SOUTH RIVER 

Salembnrg — Robert N. Butler, S. A. Howard. 

SOUTH YADKIN 

Chestnut Hill — J. L. Kirk, H. E. Russell. 

Cooleemee — W. L. Barrs. 

Mocksville — Walter H. Dodd, S. O. Rich. 

Mooresville, First — Chas. B. Austin. 

Salisbury, First — J. C. Durham, C. A. Owens, W. M. Sapp. 

Spencer — K. D. Stukenbrok. 

Statesville. First — G. V. Tilley. 

Trading Ford — P. W. Fry, Mocksville. 



Albemarle, West — T. F. Rogers. 
Baden, First — J. M. Arnette. 

TAR RIVER 

Louisburg — Ivey Allen, Trela D. Collins, T. W. Watson. 

Motmt Zion — John H. Harper. Louisburg. 

Warrenton — T. J. Taylor. 

White Level — D. B. Pearce. Castalia. 

TRANSYLVANIA 

Brevard — C. E. Puett. 



44 N. C. BAPTIST STATE VOXVEyTWX 

TUCKASEIGEE 

'Scotts Creek — W. N. Cook, Beta. 

VNIOX 

Faulks — E. C. Snyder, Wingate. 
Meadow Branch — C. J. Black, Wingate. 
Monroe, First— io\\n A. Wray. 

WEST tllOWAX 

Cashie — J. H. Matthews, Windsor. 

Mars Hill—N. H. Shepherd, Powellsville. 

Poioellsville — Josiah Brown, Colerain. 

WILMINGTON 

Wilmi7igton, First — John Jeter Hurt, John R. Hanby. 

YANCEY 

Burnsville—K. F. Watson. D. W. White. 

YADKI.V 

Forhush — S. F. Morton, 132 S. Spruce St., Winston-Salem. 

VI.S1T0RS 

H. W. Battle, Charlottesville, Va.; Miss Bertha Carroll, Raleigh; 
R. E. Clark, Rural Retreat. Va.; George B. Eager, Louisville, Ky.; 
R. P. Ellington, Pleasant View, Va.; Mrs. E. B. Haynes, Raleigh; 
William Lunsford, Dallas, Tex.; V. I. Masters, Atlanta; J. R. Moore, 
Fort Lawn, S. C; A. O. Moore. Scotland Neck; W. C. Newton. China; 
Mrs. J. R. Pace, Ridgecrest, E. D. Solomon. Camp Polk, Raleigh; 
C. J. Thompson, Anderson. S. C; I. J. A^an Ness, Nashville. Tenn. 

Associations represented 44 

Churches represented 185 

Delegates enrolled 290 



MINUTES OF THE PASTORS' CONFERENCE 



The twelfth annual session of the North Carolina Baptist Pas- 
tors' Conference met Tuesday morning at 9:45 o'clock, January 13, 
1919. in the auditorium of the First Baptist Church of Greensboro, 
with President W. S. Olive, of Olive Chapel, presiding. 

The Conference opened by the spontaneous singing of "Blessed 
Assurance." Owing to the very weak voice of the chairman, B. W. 
Spilman acted as spokesman for him. F. A. Bovver, of Morganton, 
lead the singing. Prayer was offered by A. E. Brown, of Asheville. 
After another song, prayer was offered by J. Edwin Hoyle, of Lenoir, 
and W. R. Beach, of Kings Mountain. 

W. S. Olive delivered an address on "A Quarter of a Century of 
Progress at Olive Chapel." 

After singing "Must Jesus Bear the Cross Alone," W. H. Moore, of 
Greenville, presented some thoughts on "The Value of the Practice 
of Tithing." J. R. IMoore, of South Carolina, responded with help- 
ful remarks. 

Announcements having been made by Chairman Stroud, of the 
Entertainment Committee. F. A. Bower, of Morganton, addressed 
the Conference on the subject, "Helpful Hints on Evangelism." 

J. M. Kester, of Wilson, used to good advantage the subject, "The 
Nature of and Value to the Minister of a Study of Biblical The- 
ology." 

On motion by S. T. Hensley, of Buncombe County, the Conference 
voted unanimously to request the address of W. H. Moore in printed 
form. 

At the session of Tuesday afternoon the Nominating Committee, 
composed of W. A. Smith, W. H. Dodd, and Oscar Creech, made the 
following report, which was adopted: For President, W. S. Olive. 
Apex; Vice-President, A. A. Butler, Tyner; Secretary, J. Edwin 
Hoyle, Lenoir. 

C. M. Murchison, of Yanceyville, moved that the Pastors' Confer- 
ence request the Baptist State Convention to appoint a committee to 
take under advisement the matter of a board of information with 
reference to bringing of churches and pastors together. After dis- 
cussion by W. A. Smith, A. E. Brown, and C. M. Murchison. T. J. 
Taylor, of Warrenton, moved that the resolution be laid on the table. 
which motion was adopted by the Conference. 

The treasurer reported $6.10 in the treasury, and was instructed 
by the Conference to settle programme expense bill of two dollars. 
On motion, Conference adjourned with prayer by T. J. Taylor, of 
Warrenton. 

W. S. Olive, President. 

J. Edwix Hoyle, Secretary. 



APPENDIX A 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF MISSIONS 



In this year of terrific changes throughout tlie world. God has 
preserved us and held us together in His work. With grateful hearts 
your Board of Missions herewith presents its report to the Eighty- 
eighth Session of the Baptist State Convention of North Carolina. 

With sad hearts we record the going home of Brother John E. 
Ray, longer and more closely associated with our Mission work in 
North Carolina than any man in its history. It was under his 
leadership largely that our work was reconstructed out of the 
collapse of the Civil War. After ceasing to be Corresponding Secre- 
tary of our Board of Missions be became President of the Board and 
was President when he died. We are grateful that the Lord gave 
him to work with us and for us so long and so faithfully. We are 
sad that now we have to carry on the work without his wise council 
and cheering presence. 

The Missionary enterprise is the largest undertaking of human 
history. The participation of Baptists in it is vital to the success 
of the undertaking as a whole. Did we not believe this, we would 
merge our identity into the general movement and disappear as a 
distinct denomination of Christians in the current annals of Mis- 
sions. But the conviction that we have a part vital to the whole 
undertaking nerves us to do a distinctive work. 

Southern Baptists have two Mission Boards. One charged with 
carrying on Mission work in our own country, the other charged 
with the responsibility of looking after our Mission work in all 
other countries: The Home Mission Board. Atlanta, Ga.; The 
Foreign Mission Board, Richmond, Va. 

North Carolina Baptists have a Board of Missions appointed for 
the task of keeping Foreign and Home Missions laid upon the hearts 
of our people and of administering the Mission work that we do 
within North Carolina. 

Your Board of Missions tries to be consistently faithful and 
aggressive alike in the interest of Foreign Missions, Home Mis- 
sions, and State Missions. 

FOREIGN MISSIONS. 

The Foreign Mission Board in its seventy-third annual report to 
the Southern Baptist Convention at Hot Springs, Arkansas, last 
spring, sounded the most cheering note in the history of our Foreign 
Mission work. The receipts in cash to current support were $852,- 



MINUTES OF SESSION 191S ' 47 

923.73; a gain of $294,362.26 in support of current work over any 
former year. For the first time in ten years there was no debt on 
our Foreign Mission Board, and contributions to all departments of 
our Foreign Mission work mounted beyond the million dollar mark. 

Two states this year for the first time in the history of our work 
passed the one hundred thousand dollar mark in contributions to 
Foreign Missions, Virginia and Texas. We want to see North Caro- 
lina come into the hundred thousand dollar column the very first 
moment possible. 

The situation on our Foreign Mission Fields is appalling and ap- 
pealing. The stroke of war has crushed the shells of the past. 
Mankind is aware of new anxieties and new possibilities. The 
world is looking for a new Master; Jesus Christ is the Lord of 
Democracy. We have suffered to accumulate a very large aggre- 
gate of necessities on the Mission Fields which we occupy. Our 
past successes are our present embarrassments, if we fail to enlarge 
our resources and our working force. 

Sympathetic individuals among us made directly aware of the 
trying situations on the Foreign Field show inclination to divert 
their contributions to designated points. This will tend to disin- 
tegrate our Foreign Mission work if it should develop too far. The 
only sane cure for this tendency is to give our Foreign Mission 
Board the means and the men to equip and man the needy situation 
of our entire field. 

The success of the Judson Centennial Campaign increases our 
need of resources. The Jvidson Centennial was not an effort to get 
"rid of the work but to get ready for it." 

The Foreign Mission Board has an Educational Department that 
is doing splendid work in multiplying Mission Study Classes through- 
out the Southland. This Class Study work is becoming more inten- 
sive each j'ear. Seven thousand six hundred and eighty-one copies 
of the text-book "Romance of Missions in Nigeria" were sold and 
used last year. 

There were 6,290 baptisms; we have now 464 churches, of which 
141 are self-supporting, with a membership reaching a total of 
53,629. We have 715 Sunday Schools, with 34,428 scholars; 482 
literary schools of all grades with 13,866 scholars. In our eleven 
Theological Training Schools were 302 students. The Theological 
Training School in Italy has been closed on account of the war. 
Our missionary physicians gave the amazing number of 104,271 
treatments during the year. Such are the figures, but how far 
short do they come of telling the real story! 

BIRD'S-EYE VIEW— WORK THROUGHOUT THE STATE. 

Africa. — Some of the darkest places have begun ta-respond to the 
missionaries in this backward continent. The city of Oyo is a 
notable example of this. Boys in considerable numbers are begging 



48 X. C. BAPTIST tiTATE COXVEXTIOX 

Missionaries to help them get an education. The troublesome ques- 
tion of polygamy is being settled in the churches. Self-support is 
growing as rapidly in the African churches as anywhere else on our 
Mission Field. There is great opportunity for Baptists in Nigeria. 
In this country they are building good graded roads. A form of 
civilization is coming — it ought to be Christian. 

Argentina had come sympathetically much closer to our country. 
During the year four of our battleships and four thousand of our 
sailors and marines were welcomed in the streets of Buenos Aires. 
The purchase of Once Church in this capital city through the help 
of the Judson Centennial puts work there in much better shape; 
the Argentine Baptist work has already developed three agencies 
for Mission work: The Local Mission Board, the Publication Board 
and the Theological Training School. 

Brazil is the China of the new world. Our Brazillian churches are 
growing in self-support. In the North Brazil Mission we have three 
times as many self-supporting churches as one year ago, and the 
number of church houses has been increased one-third during the 
year. The Rio Baptist College and Seminary enrolled 288 students. 
35 of whom are students for the ministry. 

China is still a standing challenge to Missionary faith and con- 
quest. Our Mission work in China is divided into Central China 
Mission, Interior China, North China, Packhoi and South China. 
Christian education is making a beautiful start in old China. Mr. 
Kwok at Hong Kong gave $22,000 to the Boys' Academy, and the 
Chinese have undertaken to raise $150,000 (Mexican) for the im- 
provement of the school. The China Baptist Publication Society, 
the Home Mission Board in South China and the growing number 
of self-supporting churches all about over the Mission Field of 
China gives us assurance that Christianity is getting rooted in this 
great slow country. 

Italy has felt the stroke of the world war more directly than any 
of our Mission Fields. Three of its most beautiful and valuable 
provinces were invaded by the Austro-Germans. Our Baptist people 
have done a good work among the Italian soldiers. They had twelve 
soldier halls where special work was done for the benefit of the 
Italian warriors for freedom. Some of our Italian Baptist pastors 
were called to arms. One became a captain, another an oflBcial on 
a war-ship while still another did his work in the aviation corps. 

Japan. — Japanese and Americans have been a little suspicious of 
one another during the last decade. The Ishii Lansing agreement has 
done much to clear up this suspicion. The Japanese feel them- 
selves to be thoroughly allied with the other nations in fighting 
for the safety of Democracy. Our Baptist paper '"The Christian, 
Church Record'' has probably a larger circultaiton than any de- 
nominational organ in Japan. 

Mexico is still topsy-turvy. It will take her some time to right 
herself up from her series of revolutions, but Roman Catholicism 



MINUTES OF SE8SI0N J91S 49 

has been dealt a blow from the Mexican Government from which 
it can never recover. Sad to say. many of its people have been 
shaken from their religious moorings. Now they are more willing 
than ever to hear the true pure gospel of Jesus. The Theological 
Training School at Saltillo is open. Twenty-one students are in 
attendance. 

The Womans' Missionary Union contributed last year to Foreign 
Missions, $232,966.68. 

The Judson Centennial fund is nearing completion. Last year 
ther« was given to the fund $153,205.69. 

HOME MISSIONS. 

The Home Mission Board presented this year its seventy-third 
annual report at Hot Springs. The current contributions to this 
object this year were nearly two hundred thousand dollars beyond 
those of last year. 

The changes incident to our participation in the "World War are 
stupendous and staggering. For the time immigration has well- 
nigh ceased, but conditions are being created that call for masterful 
treatment. Thousands upon thousands of workers in the ship-build- 
ing plants from Baltimore to Galveston constitute a new field, where 
our social and religious problems are going to be acute. A nitrate 
plant at Mussel Shoals, Alabama, has been built by the Government, 
and thousands of employees have moved in there. The town of 
Florence, adjacent, has more than doubled in population in the last 
few months. A similar condition exists around Nashville, Tennessee, 
where the great munitions plant, costing sixty or a hundi'ed million 
dollars, is being erected by the Government. These are but samples 
of mighty changes that are calling for immediate and heroic treat- 
ment by our Mission Boards. 

The Home Mission Board is cognizant of the strategic importance 
of taking care of our educational centers. The following is a 
demonstration of the statesman-like view that enters into the Home 
Board's conception of its great task in our Southern States: 

Our educational institutions must be strengthened and millions 
in endowment furnished. That is a specific field for education 
boards. But there is an equally great need for efficient church 
plants to rightly discharge our obligations to the students in our 
educational institutions. Ten million dollars in the next five years 
ought to be spent by Baptists in church building at these educa- 
tional centers. If the denomination would place in the hands of 
the Home Mission Board $500,000 a year for this work during the 
five years, we could stimulate the expenditure of $2,000,000 a year in 
addition by the local forces. In this way we would be prepared to 
put our religious convictions and life into our schools and especially 
into our State Schools, where sectarian religious instruction is for- 
bidden. At this point our mission boards and our educational boards 
4 



5U 



A'. C. BAPTlaT UTATK (JOSYEMION 



must have a sympathetic and cooperative program worth while, or 
the progress of our cause will be irretrievably impaired. 

Here is a summary of the year's work by the Home Board. 

SUMMARY OF YEAR'S WORK. 





.s 

*03 (D 

3 2 

II 


a 

1 


i 


Missionaries 


.S 








1 


>> 

a 


•1 




209 


20 

576 


•20 

748 


1,1541 43 
45.859 1,563 

5,074 

129,296 8.334 


67 


1,498 


Weeks of labor... . 






32 5' 106 






2,494 


6,299 


1.875^ lis'ooa 




36 

5,190 

110 




36 
5.190 
110 
302,420 
92 
35 
28 
537 

%n QS9! 


Number of pupils 




. 


1 










1 










286,501 9,843'i2.676 


Pastoral fields developed 




92 
35 
28 




1— . 










■ 1 










t 








537 
9,011 
2,275 
11,286 
1.095 








399 


6 
6 

12 


18,988 1.320 11.258 




16,867 
35.853 


1,419 , 20.567 

2,739' 1 M QdO 




377 






1,095 
213 








213 
505 
634 














505 












634 










2,182 

34.fi70 


2,182 










15,710 


50,380 



















•Seven additional workers, for limited periods, did a total of sixty weeks services. 
fAt least as many more have been baptized in their home churches. 



DEPARTMENTAL WORK 

Our work uuder the various departments without exception has 
made most gratifying progress during the year. 

The following are the regular departments of the Home Board's 
work. 

Cooperative Missions. — This continues to be the sympathetic, bind- 
ing and great cooperative feature of our work with the State Boards. 
We are keeping in close touch and fellowship with the work in the 
various states, and no one feature ot our endeavors has contributed 
quite so much towards cementing our Baptist people into one great 
sympathetic, cooperative body, thus making for the solidarity and 
mighty power of Southern Baptists as a great religious entity and 
force for the advancement of Christian civilization at home and 
abroad. 

The utmost cordiality and harmony prevail between our Home 
Board and the State Agencies with which we are doing this co- 
operative work. 

Enlistment. — In the very closest relations with our Cooperative Mis- 
sion work is our Enlistment Department, which gives peculiar em- 
phasis to tlie matter of enlistment and development as contrasted 



MINUTES OF SESSION 191S 51 

with, evangelism. It is the development of the implanted life and 
has for its aim the systematic and symmetrical training of our people 
in all Christian life and activity. Its value is set forth and some of 
the exhibited results under the special treatment of the subject 4n 
this report. 

Church Extension. — No subject merits more serious considerations 
of Southern Baptists than that of proper and ample facilities in 
church building for the prosecution of our Ohristian task. In no 
year has this department received such favor and cooperation from 
our people. While Ave have had only one worker, the superintendent, 
in the canvass for the completion of our Million-Dollar Church Build- 
ing Loan Fund, the results of the year's work show a splendid advance 
in cash and a large increase in pledges made for this work. 

We have one more year in which to conclude the great task of rais- 
ing the Million-Dollar Loan Fund. Our good women are to complete 
the work of raising their $325,000 of this amount. With the united 
cooperation of the brotherhood we are confident that at the next Con- 
vention we can report the work completed. 

Mountain Schools. — A heavy draft has been made by the World War 
on the man-power of all the schools and in large measure this has 
been the case with our Mountain Schools. The superintendent, how- 
ever, reports steady and encouraging progress with a well recognized 
increase in the finer elements of Ohristian development throughout 
the whole region w<here our schools are located. As a missionary 
evangelizing and developing agency our Mountain School System has 
been conspicuous. 

Cuba and Panama. — Never before has there been so hearty and 
sympathetic and so close relationship existing between the United 
States and the Latin Republicans from the Rio Grande to Cape Horn. 
This friendly and closer relationship opens to us in many respects 
the most inviting field out of our borders to be found anywhere under 
the sun. Immediately near us is Cuba and just beyond Panama where 
our work has been peculiarly blessed during this conventional year, 
as will be found in the reports from this Department. 

Publiciti/. — We have followed the instructions of the Convention in 
giving greater attention to publicity than ever before. Our denomi- 
national weeklies have been very cordial and considerate in giving 
large space for the presentation of our work in addition to their 
editorial support and championship. 

We have made use this year of advertising which has richly justi- 
fied the new venture. 

We have never made so wise and effective use of our books and 
tracts and other literature as we have done during the year. The 
new book, "The Call of the South," by the Superintendent of Publicity, 
is just out and is meeting with high and deserved favor. It treats 
in splendid fashion various phases of our work and its extensive 
circulation -will result in great good. 

f 



52 -V. C. BAPTIST STATE CONVENTION 

Foreigners, Indians and Negroes. — Immigration has largely ceased, 
but our work among the foreigners already in our midst needs far 
greater accentuation and the measure of success attending our work 
among the aliens is high warrant for prosecuting it with all diligence. 
The year's work has been solid and will abide. We are making true 
American citizens of these foreigners in pix>portion as we make- 
faithful and God-fearing Christians of them. 

We have begun new work among the Cherokee Indians of Western 
Northern Carolina and the remnant of Choctaws in Mississippi with 
gratifying outlook for the future. Our work among the PaAVTiees, 
Otoes. and Osages has been remarkably encouraging during the. year. 
Many conversions and baptisms are reported, as well as a higher 
standard of Christian life and ideals. The Lord is honoring the 
faithful labors of our missionaries in a striking manner. 

Negroes. — We continue our work for the Negroes in cooperative 
missions with the Home Mission Board of their National Baptist 
Convention, with special evangelists, and a number of theological 
teachers. These last mentioned are also giving large attention to 
conferences and institutes for the development and training of preach- 
ers and deacons and also for the uplift of the church membership in 
general among our colored brethren. We have hearty attestation 
from many sources of the value of this work. We must increase it, 
for the field is needy and inviting. 

Besides these regular departments the Home Board for the last 
year or two has been charged with some special obligations. It is 
fostering the Baptist Bible Institute in New Orleans, which recently 
came into possession of the splendid property of Sophie Newcomb 
College. The Home Board is also looking after our interest and our 
duty in a Negro Theological Seminary. The Home Board is doing 
a splendid work among the soldiers of our country and was entrusted 
with the responsibility of assisting our Government in finding and 
selecting chaplains out of our Southern Baptist ministry. A Tuber- 
culosis Sanatorium has also been established at El Paso in the main- 
tenance of which the Home Board has been given some definite ob- 
ligations. 

The women of the Woman's Missionary Union gave to Home Mis- 
sions last year $182,425.45. 

We urge all our people to subscribe for the Home and Foreign 
Fields which is a splendid monthly mission journal giving the facts 
of our Home and Foreign Mission work. No Baptist intelligently in- 
terested in our Home and Foreign Mission work would be willing to 
go a year without reading the reports of both these Boards in the 
Minutes of the Southern Baptist Convention. 



MINUTE8 OF SESSION 191S 53 

STATE MISSIONS. 

TRIBULATION OF THE YeIAK'S WOKK. 

Churches served 261 

Number Missionaries 159 

Conversions 1,627 

Baptisms 1.004 

Received by letter 1,469 

Total Sunday School enrollment 14,159 

Average Sunday School attendance 9,592 

Mission Study Classes 28 

Men in Mission Study Classes 66 

Houses of worship building 41 

Houses of worship built 4 

Churches organized 8 

Delegates attending denominational meetings 1,126 

Number business meetings this year 1,611 

Pastorate Conferences 121 

Every-meniber Canvass 159 

Sermons • 8,707 

For State Missions $ 4,054.03 

For Foreign Missions 3,102.53 

For Home Missions 2,551.85 

For Education 1,180.52 

For Sunday School Missions 406.63 

For Ministers' Relief 619.16 

For Orphanage 7,095.66 

Other objects 21.708.29 

Amount raised for all church expenses except pas- 
tors' salaries 31,772.18 

Amount paid on pastors' salaries 40,522.22 

The Board of Missions has seven departments of work. 

There is a decrease in many items of this tabulation, due to the 
fact that many fields of the Board have been vacant w^hose pastors 
have been serving in the Great War. Besides, our churches have 
been closed several weeks on aooount of the influenza epidemic. 

1. EVANGBXISM. 

This will always be our first work. "We have had working in 
this Department 159 men this year. There were 1,621 conversions 
and 1,004 baptisms. A sad fact — the number of baptisms drops again 
in this report. Why this decrease in conversions? Is it a cooling 
off of our evangelistic fervor, or is it due to the partial evangeliza- 
tion which we have been doing in the past; baptizing believers and 



54 X. C. BAPTIST STATE CONVENTION 

then neglecting the culture of our converts so that the claims of the 
Lord do not stand out in compelling demonstration in the life of our 
churches? 

It may be that this decrease is due to the fact that more of our 
churches have become self-supporting and hence fewer are getting 
aid from our Board of Missions, thus lessening the total of conver- 
sions and baptisms reported to our Board. Our success in the past 
may be diminishing the demand for aid to churches unable to sup- 
port themselves. If after a study of the question it develops that 
there is really a letting up of our evangelistic efforts, it would be 
well for our Board of Missions to employ a force of strong evange- 
lists in the State. 

We have part of the year cooperated with the Home Mission Board 
and the War Council of the North Baptist Convention in the support 
of Camp Pastor work in Camp Green and Fort Caswell. We appro- 
priated to this worthy cause $823.24, and there were reported from 
it 497 conversions and 29 baptisms. 

2. Church Building. 

Where the gospel draws the people together for fellowship and 
worship and woi'k in any community a house becomes necessary. 
Our Board of Missions in a limited way, is helping weak mission 
Churches to erect houses of worship. Last year we spent in this 
Department of our work $7,500. Next year we shall not be able to 
spend over $10,000 in this -n-x^rk. 

It is a growing conviction with us that our Board of Missions 
should not put money in church houses which do not provide Sunday 
School rooms for the teaching of God's word, and that we should be 
very cautious in helping to build houses not located with reference to 
the school of the community which they are to serve so that the 
teaching work of the church and of the day school may be coordinated 
in the life of the young generation. 

3. COLPORTAGE. 

This is a department of our work started this year. We have 
done $1,512.64 amount of business. Seven men have worked in this 
Department a part of the year. We are slowly building up a mail 
order system so as to supply at market price any book that any of 
our people might wish to secure. Price list may be had by applica- 
tion. It is the aim of the Board to employ men who will work in the 
capacity of both Missionary and Colporteur. For the work as Mis- 
sionary a salary is paid; for the work as Colporteur a commission is 
allowed and all Colporteurs are bonded. 

There are three lines along which we are going to work: 
(1) Selling Good Books. We do this through Colporteurs, or 
through mail orders. If you want any book on the market, write 
the Colportage Department, Board of Missions, Raleigh, N. C. 



MINUTES OF SESSION 191S 55 

(2) Distributing Free Tracts and Literature. It is easy to print 
free tracts, but the problem is to get them handed out to the readers. 

We think we have solved the problem. The Board of Missions 
prints a Bulletin each month. This is sent to the churches in clubs 
by Parcel Post at the rate of only $1 per dozen per year. Each copy 
of the Bulletin serves as a wrapper for a good free tract each month, 
and these are to be distributed in the churches. 

Let each church in this Association take a club of this Bulletin 
and Tract-Wrapper large enough to supply each family in its mem- 
bership, every month in the year. 

(3) Enlarging the Circulation of the Biblical Recorder. This Is 
at present the most vital thing in our Baptist work in North Carolina. 
Our Baptist State Convention can never outgrow the circulation of 
Its medium of communication. 

The Board of Missions is undertaking to aid the Biblical Recorder 
in getting 12,000 now subscribers. 

It is further urged that as an aid in increasing the Recorder sub- 
scriptions, that each church take a club of the Tract- Wrapper Bulletin 
which will carry each month to its membership an appetising flavor 
of the Recorder, and at least two good tracts each year on the work 
of the Recorder. 

Let's be in earnest about this business. One thousand new paid-up 
reading subscribers to the Recorder would perhaps be worth more 
to the cause in the end than $10,000 given directly to State Missions. 

We are unwilling for the Colportage opportunity in North Carolina 
to be monopolized by the Mormans, Christian Scientists and Russel- 
ites. We mean to do our part in this line of Christian service. It 
is our ideal to cover North Carolina with the work of these Colpor- 
teurs and to equip our Colportage Department to furnish anything 
in the book line that our Baptist people might desire to use. 

4. Mobile Schools. 

We had nine schools with 54 teachers and 545 students. Our plans 
for next year are much larger. We purpose to have about 60 of these 
Schools: Two series of them, one in (March) and the other in the 
summer. The work of these Schools is laid out on a five-year plan. 

We Baptists have made the expensive error of depending on large 
mass meetings and strong men to carry on the Lord's work. We 
need to follow the line of intensive work in small groups, this was 
the method of Jesus. Our country has recently shown that raw 
democracy can go into training and become efficient. Our Baptist 
churches must do likewise. We mean to push these schools until 
at least one Baptist in three is in touch with them. This means a 
large task is to be done. It will take hundreds of these schools and 
thousands of teachers. This work is barely begun. 



56 -V. C. BAPTIST STATE VONVENTIOX 

5. Woman's Missionary Union. 

It has been thirty-two years since the Woman's Missionary Union 
presented to the State Convention its first report. Year by year our 
interest in mission work has increased and has sho\vn itself by 
greater activity and larger gifts, so that instead of the thousand dol- 
lars given in 1886, we report this year a total of $63,101.76. The work 
that our Union has endeavored to accomplish has been largely edu- 
cational — not so much a matter of securing gifts for our mission 
enterprises — but a matter of training our women and children in 
mission thought and activity, and, by so doing, laying a foundation 
for larger things in the years to come. 

We have 1,557 societies, 193 having been added to our roll the past 
year. Our work is organized in fifty associations. Forty-seven asso- 
ciational meetings were held during the year, at which nearly 800, 
societies were represented. Thirty-three of these meetings were 
attended by ofl5cers of the Union or members of the Executive Com- 
mittee. 

The annual meeting of the Union was held in Asheville. March 
26-29, at the beginning of the great German drive last spring. Not- 
withstanding the anxiety and stress of the hour, and the fact that 
many mothers had sons leaving for the camps at that time, these 
things were put aside for a few days and the thoughts of all were 
centered on the spiritual side of life. A new knowledge of God's 
plan for each individual life seemed the desire of every heart. 

Other meetings attended by officers during the year were the South- 
ern Baptist Convention, the Seaside Assembly at Wrightsville, the 
Woman's Missionary Union Conference at Ridgecrest, and the En- 
campment at Virginia Beach. Eleven thousand six hundred and 
fifty-two miles were traveled. In addition to this, the associational 
superintendents reported 9,000 miles traveled in their work, making 
a total of 20,652 miles. 

The following is a statistical and financial report of the year clos- 
ing February 28, 1918: 

STATISTICAL REPORT. 

Personal letters 941 

Circular letters 8,458 

Postals 2,436 

Programs 8,469 

Minutes 1.729 

Manuals and Year Books 2,406 

Mite Boxes 1.257 

Report Blanks 9,901 

Envelopes 41,627 

Leaflets and Tracts 52,439 

Total letters and literature 129,663 



MINUTES OF SESSION 1918 57 



tbeasuree's report. 



To Foreign Missions $ 15,626.54 

To Christmas Offering 5,799.83 

Total Foreign Missions $ 21,426.37 

To church Building Loan Fund 4,517.63 

To Home Missions 10,982.43 

To Home Mission Offering 1,445.57 

To Home Mission Boxes 2,955.74 

Total to Home Missions 19,901.37 

To State Missions 12,614.90 

To Louisville Training School 6,995.83 

To Sunday School Board 200.93 

To Margaret Educational Fund 107.21 

To Expense Fund 694.10 

20,612.97 

I 

Total $ 61,940.71 

To Judson Centennial 1,161.05 1,161.05 

Grand Total $ 63,101.76 

In the beginning of our work, there was sincere and persistent 
opposition to any organization of the women in our churches. This 
has been largely overcome, as we have endeavored to work always 
as an auxiliary organization and under the direction of our State 
Board of Missions and our denominational leaders. To the pastors 
of the State who have given us their loyal cooperation and sympathy 
in all our plans, we owe an everlasting debt of gratitude which we 
gladly acknowledge, and we give them credit for much that has been 
accomplished. The danger that lies before us in the larger day 
that is dawning in missionary work, is the tendency that we see 
from some sources to absorb the missionary society in the general 
plans of the church. 

For evidence that the present plan of work is a safe and successful 
one, we refer you to the records of the past thirty-two years with 
their gifts of more than $600,000. and their proportionate expense of 
less than 41/2 per cent. That the day may come speedily when all our 
people have the interest of the kingdom of our God so at heart that 
they will give of their means, their time and their prayers without 
special organizations and appeals, is greatly to be desired, but as 
yet, in our judgment that day has not arrived. Therefore we ask 
from the brotherhood of our Baptist State Convention a larger 
interest in our efforts to organize and train the women and chil- 
dren of our churches in mission thought and giving. 



58 X. C. BAPTIST STATE CONVENTION 

There are 145,000 women in our churches. Twenty-five thousand 
of these are already at work in our societies. If these 25,000 workers 
contribute $63,000 a year to mission objects, what may we not ex- 
pect when we reach, with the aid of our pastors, our unenlisted 
women! 

In the midst of world confusion and strife, the work of our 
Union had gone steadily forward, so that we see today not only our 
aims for the year realized, but a general state of development not 
hitherto reached by our societies. We are moved to exclaim with 
the apostle, "Thanks be unto God who glveth us the victory." 
Respectfully summitted, 

Mrs. Wesley N. Jones, President. 

Miss Bertha Carroll, Cor. Sec.-Treas. 

Mrs. J. S. Farmbib, Recording Sec. 

Mrs. R. N. Simms, Y. W. A. Sec. 

Miss Elizabeth N. Briggs, Junior Stipt. 

6. B. Y. P. U. 
our status. 

1. Time of Testing. During the past year, our Baptist Young 
People's Unions have passed through the refiner's fire. They have 
given to the cause of World Freedom many of their very best young 
men, not a few of whom will never return from France. To meet 
the condition thus thrust upon them, the personnel of oflBcers and 
members underwent readjustments; young women very often sup- 
plied vacancies; and, under the inspiration of the ideals and the 
self-sacrificing spirit of the young men who went away, new re- 
cruits were found to fill up the gaps in the ranks. The epidemic 
quarantine followed, with its season of suspension and enforced in- 
activity, during which time, however, many of the young people 
kept up such work as could be done privately and at home. The 
indications are that, now, notwithstanding, but because of the strain 
and stress of the times, the B. Y. P. U.'s have a vigor and a prospect 
unsurpassed in the history of our work. 

2. Num'ber of Organizations. But the number of new unions has 
not, therefore, increased proportionately to the progress in this re- 
spect during the year preceding. The machinery has not ceased 
but the operators have had to supply parts and repair damages 
rather than reel off the output and products. The fact that there 
has been even a slight increase in the number of unions during 
the year and the actual demise of so few, betokens the husbanding of 
strength which will mean a large and healthy growth in the years 
just ahead. 

3. General Organizations. There are well organized city unions in 
Asheville, Charlotte, Winston-Salem, Greensboro, Durham, Raleigh, 
and Wilmington. Mars Hill College has a general union composed 



MINUTES OF SESSION 191S 59 

of the four organizations among the students. Plans have been laid 
for the organization of county unions which could not be carried 
out because of the quarantine. "We have reached the limit of our 
possibilities in the number of city-wide unions with perhaps one 
exception; and most of these are now arranging campaigns to ex- 
tend the work to county boundaries. 

4. A-1 Unions. It has been impossible to secure such reports, 
since the epidemic, as would enable us to state the number of 
Standard, or A-1, Senior and Junior organizations in the State at 
this time. Records have been suspended, as were the meetings 
themselves. However, there seems to be quite as many on the Honor 
Roll as last year, allowing for the omission of the weekly and the 
average attendance requirements in the standard for the period of 
the epidemic. This showing is highly creditable to the young peo- 
ple of the State. 

5. Schools and Colleges. Again, it is our pleasure to report a 
fine showing by our Baptist schools and colleges, with organiza- 
tions ranging in number from one to four in each of them but one, 
and with a steady increase of A-1 Unions among the number. 

6. Finances. A summary of the expenses of the Department ap- 
pears in the report of Treasurer Walters Durham, and need not be 
reproduced here. We should say, however, that the item of expenses 
includes office rent, stamps, stationery, printing, office supplies and 
traveling expenses of the secretary. 

OUR WORK. 

1. The Office. As heretofore, all office work has been done by the 
secretary without clerical help and at such times when he was not 
engaged in the field. It consisted chiefly in routine correspondence, 
the distribution of B. Y. P. U. literature, the B. Y. P. U. Convention 
program together with the publication and mailing of the Conven- 
tion Minutes, the supervision of Unions by means of reports sent 
out, received, collated and filed, and supplying weekly material for 
the page in the Biblical Recorder. 

2. The Field. During the year, the secretary has been in the field 
174 days, visiting 112 different points, traveling 7,535 miles and mak- 
ing 183 lectures, addresses, etc. This is slightly less than the pre- 
vious year's record, due to the closing of many churches during the 
months of December and January last on account of bad weather, 
the quarantine of October this year which annulled practically a 
full month's engagements, and the Million-Dollar Campaign for 
Christian Education in November to which the secretary gave his 
services in company with the other employees of the Board. 

3. The Convention. The Ninth Annual B. Y. P. U. Convention was 
held in the city of Winston-Salem, June 11, 12 and 13, 1918. Not- 
withstanding the absence of a host of young men who had been 
regular in attendance, the number of delegates was quite up to the 



60 .Y. C. BAPTIHT STATE COXVEXTIOX 

average for the two previous sessions. Of the 300 young people pres- 
ent, fully two-thirds had never before attended a general Baptist 
gathering of any sort. The outstanding feature of the Convention 
was the spirit of Loyalty, to which the young people gave expression 
in Resolutions which have been published and widely appreciated 
by the Baptist Brotherhood. The Tenth Convention is to be held 
at Asheville, June 10, 11 and 12, 1919. 

4. Ti-aining Schools. Four City Training Schools for B. Y. P. U. 
workers, each lasting a week, have been held during the year. Pro- 
grams for two others were not carried out because of the quarantine 
in October. The secretaiT had the assistance of Mr. Arthur Flake, 
of Baldwyn, Miss., in all of them, and that of Miss Sadie Tiller, of 
Murfreesboro. Tenn.. in one. 

A( KNUWLEDGMEXTS. 

We desire to acknowledge our obligations: 

1. To the Baptist Sunday School Board, of Xashville, for the ap- 
propriation of $500 made to the State Board in consideration of our 
work; and for the presence of ^Ir. Flake and Miss Tiller at the 
several City Training Schools. 

2. To the State Board of Missions for an appropriation sufficient 
to meet urgent necessities; and to Secretary Walter N. Johnson for 
the warm-hearted cooperation which he has given us in our work. 

3. To the B. Y. P. U.'s of the State who have expressed their 
fealty by offerings to our cause, and in other ways have responded 
so splendidly to leadership in the Lord's work. 

4. To Dr. Livingston Johnson, Editor, and the Biblical Recorder, 
for excellent editorial commendation of the Baptist Young People's 
Union, and for the special Department of the paper allotted to our 
use. 

RECOMMENDATIONS. 

We wish to recommend most earnestly: 

1. That our pastors make definite plans for the enlistment of their 
young people in some phase of local church work, such as the con- 
duct of prayer meetings or a Sunday night service, and worship 
exercises in private homes or elsewhere as the need and oppor- 
tunity may exist. 

2. That the workers in our churches consider for themselves, and 
urge upon their young people, the necessity of attending the insti- 
tutes, or schools, in the State Board's system, to be held during the 
coming year; to the end that they may take part in and get the 
advantage of the definite B. Y. P. U. training which will be afforded. 

3. That in the campaign for an increased circulation of the Bibli- 
cal Recorder, the young people be drafted for service; and especially 
in the effort which is to be made among the B. Y. P. U.'s of the 
State early next year. 



MINUTES OF SESSION J91S 61 

4. That the B. Y. P. U Study Courses, dealing with practical 
church affairs, receive more careful and extended attention, in order 
that our people may be more thoroughly informed in Baptist be- 
liefs and practices. 

5. That the appropriations made to the Department by the State 
Board and the Unions of the State last year be continued. 

7. Sunday Schools. 

The most eventful year in a thousand years is closing. It has 
been a year of stress and strain, and uncertainties — a year of untold 
horrors and unequaled sorrows. A year for the accumulation of 
great wealth, and a year of the greatest destruction of wealth. 
Christian people have looked on these things with varying opinions 
and emotions. Some see God speaking to his people in chastise- 
ment for their good. Others see in these providences only mystery. 
May God help us to see Him in it all, working out His Glory and 
our good. 

PRESENT CONDITIONS. 

A church member is kept on the rolls though a thousand miles 
away, and absent from the church for years. A member of a Sun- 
day School is dropped from the rolls in from thirty to ninety days 
after he ceases to attend. With the unprecedented weather the first 
two months of this year, the epidemic the last two months of the 
year, and at least 10,000 of our young men from our Sunday School 
in the Army and Navy, we show a loss in membership of 7,170. We 
now have 2.125 Sundays Schools with a membership of 212,841. 
There are reported seventy-two branch schools. It seems 2,053 
churches have schools and 138 have none. At least half of these 
138 are entirely inactive — no pastor and no meeting of any kind. 
We look with confidence, and hope for a great increase in member- 
ship in 1919. 

ACTI\^TIES OF THE SECRETARY. 

1. Field Work. The secretary had never before planned for so 
much time in the field, but the extremely cold weather, with snow, 
and coal shortage, annulled many engagements from December 10, 
1917, to February 10. 1918. Then again his institutes and associa- 
tions from October 10th to November 10th were annulled on account 
of the epidemic. In spite of these conditions he personally reached 
eighty-five churches in thirty-six associations, speaking and con- 
ducting Normal Classes 193 times. 

2. Office Work. The routihe work of attending to a growing gen- 
eral correspondence was done. This ought to be developed until 
every Sunday School worker shall feel free to discuss his problems 
with our department of the Mission Board. 

The campaign of education through free tracts was pressed 
through the year. It is safe to say 20.000 of these tracts were 



62 X. C. BAPTIST STATE CONVENTION 

used. Any woi'ker, anywhere, can get this valuable help for the 
asking. The superintendents and pastors were circularized when- 
ever any definite work in the denominational program called for it — 
Missionary Day, Children's Day, Go to Sunday-School Day. etc. 

3. Teacher Trainino. We are glad at any progress and especially 
in making the work of the Sunday School more eflficient. To date 
we have in the State 4,852 Normal Diplomas, 663 Red Seals, and 195 
Blue Seals. This is a gain respectively of 380, 105 and 24. These are 
the smallest gains we have made in several years. The fact that al- 
most everything is abnormal, is the only way we can account for 
this departure from normal gains. Our colleges and schools did far 
better than our churches. T^ey broke all records except one year, 
and the "falling-down" of one institution accounts for that. 

Still there is ground for encouragement. Only two states in the 
South have more diplomas than we, and we are steadily gaining on 
one of these. 

4. Standard Sunday/ Schools. Last year we had eighteen of these. 
They are our Annual Honor Roll. They are as follows: Apex, Bells, 
Buies Creek, Belmont First, Cedar Falls, Coats, Centerville, East 
Lumberton, Hebron. High Point-First, Immanuel. Mars Hill. Olive 
Chapel, Orphanage, Pullen Memorial and Spring Branch. There 
ought to be, and there could be with a little effort, at least fifty 
schools on this list. 

5. Baptist Seaside Assembly. Our Secretary has been General 
Secretary of this body from its organization. The fourth annual 
session last summer was a marked success. The attendance was not 
so large as last year, but the program was more comprehensive than 
ever before, and we have never before had such sustained interest 
and marked spirituality. We are trying to make this a real part 
of our system of Christian Education. A distinguished visitor says 
it must become our general post graduate institution. It is the 
earnest desire of the secretary and your committee that there shall 
be an assembly equally as effective at Ridgecrest. 

RURAL INSTITUTES. 

In January, 1918. the Sunday School Board. Nashville, Tenn.. 
appropriated $5,000 to the several states to be used in rural insti- 
tutes, supplementary to the regular work done hitherto. This 
money was to be duplicated by the states. Our work was laid out to 
use .$700 — one-half coming from the Board. The actual cost was 
$593.68. The entire amount would have been used, but for the 
canceling of nine institutes on account* of the epidemic. 

When the associations met the appropriation had not been made, 
so there was no provision for them. There was some difliculty in 
fitting so many new meetings into the denominational machinery. 
Next year there ought to be no difficulty in locating, and holding 
these institutes. 



MINUTES OF SESSION 1^)18 ft3 

The Secretary made all engagements. He attended every institute 
possible. Thoroughly competent help was secured. The number 
of institutes held by each is gi,ven as follows: Dr. L. E. M. Free- 
man, 11; Rev. E. F. Sullivan, 8; Rev. W, S. Olive, 4; Rev. R. H. 
Herring. 3; Rev. S. C. Hilliard, 1; Rev. G. A. Martin, 5; Rev. Benj. 
Sorgee, 2; Rev. W. N. Cook, 3; Rev. E. L. Baskin, 2; Prof B. P. 
Marsbanks, 1; Prof. H. T. Hunter, 5; Secretary E. L. Middleton, 
IS;. As far as possible there were two teachers at each place. 

The entire Division I of the Normal Manual was taught in every 
place as far as it was possible. Every effort was made to secure 
Normal Classes in the churches represented, and all the schools 
were urged to take a religious census and grade the schools. 

This year there were forty-one institutes held. This work will be 
enlarged next year. We want to reach at least one hundred centers 
with the work. 

FINANCES. 

Our people at last are showing a willingness to support this work 
liberally. The total receipts for the year have been $3,962.35. Of 
this $850 was given by the Sunday School Board, and $3,112.35 by 
our churches and Sunday Schools. This is $461.26 more than in 1917, 
and $1,162.02 more than 1916. Liberal offerings on Children's Day 
and an extra $350 from the Board made most of the increase. The 
disbursements this year have been $3,503.45. This leaves a balance 
of $458.90, besides a balance from last year. See treasurer's report. 
We are now in a financial condition to make marked advances in 
the work for 1919. 

RECOMMENDATION.S. 

1. Former plans and policies must be pressed as follows: Pastors 
must be definitely enlisted in the work of their schools. Officers 
and teachers must be trained. Thousands of the 190,000 unenlisted 
church members must be reached. Church houses must be built or 
remodeled to secure class-rooms. Equipment must be purchased. 
The schools must be graded and otherwise adequately organized. 

2. We recommend the committee be instructed to secure an asso- 
ciate worker to begin as early after March 1, 1919, as is practical. 

3. The Rural Campaign shall be enlarged as follows: (1) The 
cooperation with the Mission Secretary in holding fifty or more 
workers' schools; (2) The holding of at least fifty other rural insti- 
tutes, and (3) The use of an Elementary Worker for three months. 

4. At least ten City Training Schools should be held, using help 
furnished by the Sunday School Board and other voluntary and 
paid workers. 

5. There should be enlargement of the study of Sunday School 
Pedagogy in our colleges and schools, as far as this can be done, 
without overcrowding the present curricula or displacing other es- 
sential subjects. Is it asking too much to urge every high school 



64 N. C. BAPTIST STATE CONVENTION 

graduate to secure the diploma with at least two book seals, and 
every college graduate to secure a Blue Seal Diploma? 

6. We recommend the work planned on a $5,000 basis with $1,300 
of this coming froin the Sunday School Board, and $3,700 from our 
own people. 

L. E. M. FREEMAN, Chairman. 

E. L. MiDDLETON, Secretary. 



NEEDS OF BOARD NEXT YEAR. 

1. Emphasize Volunteer Work. Field work in our Baptist churches 
is always expensive and is sometimes confusing. We have made a 
fundamental discovery in our Baptist work this year: One hundred 
men who have volunteered for a specific work can meet together for 
two or three days and go over the work to be done at less cost to 
the denomination than the salary and expenses of one traveling 
representative. Volunteer service is of the essence of New Testa- 
ment Christianity and modern democracy. We shall depend more 
and more on volunteer services to get our State Convention work 
presented in our associations and churches. In this way we widen 
and deepen the sense of participation in our work on the part of our 
men and women. Every section of our State is brought into self- 
sufficiency for its tasks in the larger cooperative work of North 
Carolina Baptists. 

2. Increased Pastoral Suiyport. The inadequate support of our pas- 
tors is the sorest spot in our Baptist life. It is working out two 
paralyzing results in our work. First, it is forcing ministers to di- 
vide their time and thought between the ministry of the gospel and 
some secular make-shift to get a living. In the second place, it is 
forcing these one-half time pastors to scatter out their services as 
pastor into four, six and even eight churches. 

The hour has come for our Board of Missions to throw all the 
weight it can into this deplorable situation. Your Board can ap- 
proach this task in two ways. First it supplements by appropria- 
tion the salaries of the pastors in some of our weaker churches. In 
the second place, it needs to work through some of the stronger 
pastors as volunteer enlistment workers, to get indifferent strong 
churches to increase the support of their pastors. A very small 
amount spent to pay the expenses of this volunteer service will in- 
crease pastoral support thousands of dollars. 

From 1913 to 1918, says the United States Bureau of Labor, retail 
food prices have increased 69 per cent. Clothing likely advanced in 
cost at about the same rate. The salaries of pastors have not in- 
creased more than 10 per cent in the same time. Hundreds of pas- 
tors have not had a cent of advance. This is really a serious matter. 

3. Accommodate Between Convention Work and Budget Churches. 
We concur with the Foreign Mission Board in the following advice 



MIJ^'UTES OF SE 88102^' 191S 65 

to budget churches: "We would recommend that, in putting on the 
Budget System in any church, no pledge be given the church mem- 
bership that special collections will not, under any circumstances, 
be taken. Here are some reasons for this suggestion: (1) There 
are some members in all churches who will not do their work by 
any common system, and those who will not give systematically 
through the budget are excused from all financial responsibility, if 
no supplemental method is used for reaching them and inducing 
them to do their duty. (2) Very few Christian men and women will 
subscribe at the beginning of the year the maximum of their ability 
and duty. (3) Increased prosperity or unanticipated income from 
one source or another is likely to be enjoyed by some members of 
every church during the year, and this additional income increases 
the financial obligations of those who enjoy it. (4) TTie Christian 
life of many people is helped by thank-offerings, and every Christian 
should be given the opportunity by his church of thus expressing 
his grateful love to God and expanding his own religious nature. 
(5) Emergencies arise in the care of the church property or church 
poor and in our mission enterprises. No man can anticipate these, 
and yet such emergencies create most solemn obligations. The wis- 
dom of this position has been recognized by the state secretaries 
vho have had large experience and observation concerning church 
and denominational finances, and they have unanimously offered 
their opinion to the denomination in resolutions which embody sug- 
gestions similar to the above. 

"We would, therefore, recommend the church budget but with 
three conditions: (1) That, in putting it into operation, a most 
thorough canvass of the church be made with the endeavor to get 
every member of the church enlisted, and that this canvass be re- 
peated annually; (2) that in making up the budget the unique and 
unequalled necessities of isrissions be taken into consideration and 
a due proportion of the budget be requested of every member for 
this greatest of all Christian enterprises; (3) that the pastor be 
left free and unembarrassed to ask for special offerings and thank 
offerings at such times only as either local or general denominational 
enterprises imperatively require. In this way the Budget System 
can be made a useful method in any church, but otherwise it may 
stand in the way of full Christian development and the best care of 
a great Christian enterprise like Missions at times when it is im- 
periled. 

"A word of admonition is offered to pastors whose churches have 
adopted the Budget System, namely, keep up the habit of preaching 
missionary sermons and provide missionary addresses for your peo- 
ple. Education must not be neglected. If the Budget System causes 
the pastor to dispense with missions in the pulpit, the mission spirit 
will gradually die out of his church. The older people need to have 
the fires of missionary enthusiasm rekindled month by month, and 
5 



66 -Y. C. BAPTIST STATE CONVENTION 

successive companies of young people must be instructed in this im- 
portant phase of Christian service, need and opportunity." 

We need to get our churches so developed into the sense of steward- 
ship and the habit of regular giving that the regular offerings of our 
people will automatically care for all the regular work of the Con- 
vention. Besides the regular offerings for regular objects of the 
Convention, we should have at least one heavy drive every year for 
a special object-and two would be better than one. The special 
drives keep the budget churches from getting into hard grooves; they 
pull people up to their maximum efforts; they develop concert of 
action throughout the whole State; new objects inevitable in the 
growth of our work are thus taken care of; repeated a few times, 
they become regular objects of the Convention if it is necessary to 
make them so. 

We have two classes of churches: budget churches and non-budget 
churches. Both of these must have a calendar for the regular ob- 
jects of the Convention. In the budget churches it is a calendar of 
emphasis for each object; in the non-budget churches it is a sched- 
ule of appeals for the different objects. 

One object at a time before our people and all the field forces of 
all the agencies of our Convention pressing each object at its time, 
should be an essential part of our plan for each year. 

4. Make Our Board Smaller and More Effective. Our Board of 
Missions now has 135 members — 70 Convention members and 65 
Association members. We have found out by experience that this is 
entirely too large. If they all attended it would be a small session 
of the Convention itself. But only a few attend the board meetings 
and the attendance is largely confined among those members living 
near the domicile of the board. This tends to localize the repre- 
sentation of our Baptist State Convention in the administration of 
our mission work. 

This year the board appointed committees or commissions on the 
following matters: Executive Committee. Evangelism, Sunday 
Schools, B. Y. P. U., Country Work. City Work, Colportage, Negro 
Work. Mobile Schools for Pastors and Workers, Work with Soldiers. 
Student Work, Church Buildings. Factory Work, Summer Assemblies. 
But the members of these various committees were so scattered over 
the State that there has been no meeting of most of them and no 
full meeting of any of them, as there was no arrangement to pay 
the traveling expenses of the members. 

It is our conviction that an improvement of this embarrassing 
situation could be made by the appointment by the Convention of 
only 21 members of the Board of Missions, so scattered over our 
territory as to represent all sections of the State; that the Conven- 
tion authorize the board to pay the expenses of these 21 Convention 
members of the Board at regular and emergency meetings of the 
board, and that the Convention ask the associations to pay the ex- 



MINUTES OF SESSION 1918 67 

penses of their members of the Board; that the committees of the 
board may be selected by the board among any members of the Bap- 
tist State Convention, with a view to convenient meeting places, 
provided a Convention member of the board is chairman of the 
committee. 

5. Begin Work With Our Negro Baptists. 

The committee to which was referred the matter of our work 
among the negroes begs to report that the consideration which they 
have given to this matter has led them to the feeling that we are 
doing entirely too little along this line. The Home Mission Board 
of the Southern Baptist Convention is doing some very commendable 
work of this kind, but our own State Board is doing practically 
nothing. Some years ago our State Board co-operated with the 
Home Mission Board and the American Baptist Home Mission 
Society and the colored Baptists in holding what were called New 
Era Institutes in several sections of the State, which we are in- 
formed accomplished considerable good. There has never been a 
time in our history when an effort put forth by our white Baptists 
to help the negro Baptists in their work would have been more 
opportune than it would be now. There is a large need for more 
and better work among the negroes, and the conditions which will 
follow the close of the war will make this endeavor more highly im- 
portant in every aspect than at any preceding time. We believe that 
a spirit of Christian interest and helpfulness manifested through a 
wise and discreet worker would yield most gratifying results, and 
we recommend that the board shall appropriate a sum for use from 
month to month during the next calendar year in paying a portion of 
the salary of a well trained and consecrated colored preacher and 
teacher who could give a portion of his time to teaching in the Theo- 
logical Department in Shaw University and the remaining portion 
to work among the negro Baptist churches throughout the State; 
such worker to be chosen by, report to, and be under the joint control 
of our State Mission Board and the colored board contributing to 
his salary. We understand that such an arrangement is feasible, 
that the services of such a man can be had at a reasonable salary, 
that the need for him to assist in the Theological Department at 
Shaw University is urgent, and that his field work would be grate- 
fully received and be fruitful in a large way for the denominational 
good. Respectfully submitted, 

November, 1918. R. N. Stmms, Chairman. 

6, Piit More Business Metlwd Into Our Mission Work. It would 
be well to make the Treasurer of the Baptist State Convention also 
Office Secretary of the board and furnish him a bookkeeper. By 
these means we can open an account with each Baptist church in 
North Carolina and with other parties where desirable. We can 
send a receipt to the remitter of each contribution to the work of 



6& -V. C. BAPTIST STATE COyVEXTWX 

our Convention and publish total receipts of each object each week 
in the Biblical Recorder. This -will also open the way for us to pub- 
lish the Treasurer's report as part of the statistics of the Convention 
if we should deem it advisable to do so. 

This arrangement will also enable us to give more careful and 
detailed attention to the matter of annuities and bequests. 

7. See 2\orth Carolina Mission Field as a ^Vholc. The work of 
your Board of Missions is now being administered in such a way 
that we cannot treat our State as a whole in planning its work. 
Instead of one field, we are supplying about forty different fields; 
for most of our resources are consumed in mission v/ork within 
about forty of our more active associations. 

We need to make a careful Baptist map of North Carolina by 
counties and plan our State Mission work each year more in the 
light of the facts of the life of our whole State. It is acutely neces- 
sary for us to get into shape to concentrate more of our force on the 
destitute sections and the strategic points in our State. 

If the Convention will set your board free in this matter to spend 
at least $65,000 this year to the best advantage of our State as a 
whole, we shall feel under obligations to appropriate it about as 
follows: $30,000 for mission work within the associations, $12,500 
for mission work in the State at large, $2,000 for Colportage, $10,000 
for Church Building. $3,000 for Volunteer Enlistment and Mobile 
Schools, $7,500 for Administration. 

8. Set a Worthy Mark. If v.'e come up in North Carolina to what 
the Southern Baptist Convention is asking us to do for Home and 
Foreign Missions our figures for next year will be. Foreign Missions 
$100,000, Home Missions $75,000, State Missions $75,000, total 
$250,000. 

A Mission Drive this spring for a quarter of million dollars should 
be put on. This undertaking will put our Baptist work into tune 
with the big things of our time. This is our ideal; let us strike 
for it. 

Our minimum figures must not fall below the following: Foreign 
Missions $90,000. Home Missions $65,000, State Missions $65,000, 
total $22'0,000. With less than this our work will suffer painfully. 
We must not fall below it. 

But better than this, let us strike for a quarter of a million for 
missions this year. We can raise it. if we love Christ one-half as 
strongly as we have hated the Kaiser. Now is the time to get our 
Lord's work out from under a chronic debt. A heavy stroke of this 
kind now will lift it to the cash basis. 

Awaiting Instmctions. Your Board of Missions asks the Conven- 
tion to instruct it as to what it shall undertake to do this year about 
these needs. The Lord is wonderfully opening the way for us to 
move onward, upward, outward. 

RoBT. N. SIMMS. President. 

Walter N. Johnson, 

Corresponding Secretary. 



MINUTES OF SESSION 191S 



69 



REPORT OP TREASURER 

1 

Balance Sheet 

Walters Durham, Treasurer, in account current with the 

Baptist State Convention of North Carolina, Nov. 27, 1918. 



Debit 


Cbedit 




12 State Missions- $13,576.20 




$ 138.12 


98 B. Y. P. U 


219 .74 




649 .96 


227 Colportage 


228.43 


219 Sunday School Missions 


1,101.71 
7.29 

3,049.00 

311 .72 

2.25 


204 Cash in Commercial Na- 
tional Bank -.. 


18.905.74 


115 Ministerial Relief Fund 

189 Church Bld^. and Loan Fund 
181 Bible Fund 


Totftl 








Total 


$19,492.03 


?19,492.03 








_ .__ _ 



November 27, 1918. 



I have examined the books of Walters Durham, Treasurer of the 
Baptist State Convention, and I find them to be correct as to receipts 
and disbursements and all disbursements supported by proper vouch- 
ers. I also find that proper remittances have been made to the 
Foreign and Home Mission Boards. 

November 27, 1918. F. H. Briggs, Auditor. 



State Missions 

Balance as per statement Nov. 29, 1917 (Minutes, p. 70) . . 

Amount received 

To Walter N. Johnson, salary Cor. Secretary. . .$ 2,183.40 

Walter N. Johnson, traveling expenses 663.53 

Miss Carroll, salary Cor. Secretary W. M. U. 1,000.00 

Stenographer and record keeper 1,072.00 

Ofl5ce expense 901.69 

Printing 986.54 

Postage, W. M. U 279.00 

E. L. Middleton, salary Statistical Secretary 350.00 

Seaside Assembly 500.00 

Error in acknowledgments 132.52 

Checks, "No Good" 104.79 

Rents 310.00 

Walters Durham, salary as Treasurer 330.00 

Interest 276.57 

F. H. Briggs, salary as Auditor 25.00 

J. D. Moore, salary 2,050.00 

Wake Forest Church 1,045.30 

Books bought 153.00 



$21,238.38 
47,723.98 



70 N. C. BAPTIST STATE CONVENTION 

Money borrowed 1,000.00 

W. M. Gilmore, salary 75.00 

Printing, W. M. U 209.20 

' Colportage 500.00 

Church building 5,534.26 

General mission work 35,704.36 

Balance 13,576.20 

Total $68,962.36 $68,962.36 

November 27, 1918. 

3 

FoBEiGN Missions 

Balance as per statement Nov. 29, 1917 (Minutes, p. 70) . . $ 689.76 

Amount received 64,701.36 

To Walter N. Johnson, salary Cor. Secretary. . .$ 316.67 

Walter N. Johnson, traveling expense 30.45 

Miss Carroll, salary Cor. Secretary W. M. U. 100.00 

Stenographer and record keepers 110.00 

Office 101.85 

Error in acknowledgment 106.24 

Rents 62.00 

Printing, W. M. U 7.60 

Printing 263.90 

Foreign Mission Board 63,398.51 

Balance 893.90 

Total $65,391.12 $65,391.12 

November 27, 1918. 

4 

Home Missions 

Balance as per statement Nov. 29, 1917 (Minutes, p. 71) . . $ 594.50 

Amount received 46,540.13 

To Printing. W. M. U $ 84.65 

Walter N. Johnson, traveling expense 21.60 

Miss Carroll, salary Cor. Secretary W. M. U. 100.00 

Stenographer and record keepers 110.00 

Printing 381.00 

Office expense 50.95 

Walters Durham, salary Treasurer 30.00 

Error in acknowledgments 90.61 

Home Mission Board 45,715.86 

Balance 549.96 

Total $47,134.63 $47,134.63 

November 27. 1918. 



MINUTES OF SEiiSION WIS ^ 71 

5 

Education 

Balance as per statement Nov. 29, 1917 (Minutes, p. 71) . . $ 550.93 

Amount received 9,789.38 

To Vouchers paid R. T. Vann, Treasurer $10,478.43 

Balance 138.12 

Total $10,478.43 $10,478.43 

November 27, 1918. 

6 
Sunday School Missions 

Balance as per statement Nov. 29, 1917 (Minutes, p. 71) . . $ 642.81 

Amount received 3,962.35 

To E. L. Middleton, salary S. S. Secretary $ 1,741.67 

E. L. Middleton, traveling expense 290.00 

Office expense 200.90 

Rents 162.00 

Printing 270.77 

Stenographer 176.02 

Postage 40.00 

Rural institutes 622.09 

Balance 1,101.71 

Total $ 4,605.16 $ 4,605.16 

November 27, 1918. 

7 
Baptist Young People's Union 

Balance as per statement Nov. 29, 1917 (Min- 
utes, p. 71) $ 69.10 

Amount received $ 317.87 

To J. D. Moore, traveling expense! 256.81 

Rents 60.00 

Office expense 26.10 

Printing 125.60 

Balance 219.74 

Total $ 537.61 $ 537.61 

November 27, 1918. 

8 
Ministerial Relief Board 

Balance as per statement Nov. 29, 1917 (Minutes, p. 72) . . $ 1,154.99 

Amount received 6,438.18 

To Vouchers paid R. H. Rigsbee, Treasurer $ 4,544.17 

Balance 3,049.00 

Total $ 7,593.17 $ 7,593.17 

November 27, 1918. 



72 A". C. BAPTIHT H'lAIE iOXVEXTIOX 

9 
Stude.nts' Alu Fund 

Balance as per statement Nov. 29, 1917 (Minutes, p. 72) . . $ 50.00 
To Voucher paid R. T. Vann, Treasurer $ 50.00 

Total $ 50.00 $ 50.00 

November 27, 1918. 

10 

JUDSOX Memobial 
Balance as per statement Nov. 29, 1917 (Minutes, p. 72j . . $ 179.26 
To Voucher paid Foreign Mission Board $ 179.26 

Total $ 179.26 $ 179.26 

November 27, 1918. 

11 
Wake Fobest Church Building Fu.\d 

Balance as per statement Nov. 29, 1917 (Minutes, p. 72) . . $ 6.25 
To Voucher paid State Missions $ 6.25 

Total $ 6.25 $ 6.25 

November 27, 1918. 

12 
Home Mission Building Fund 

Balance as per statement Nov. 29. 1917 (Minutes, p. 72) . . $ 236.57 
To Voucher paid Home Mission Board $ 236.57 

Total $ 236.57 $ 236.57 

November 27, 1918. 

13 
Bible Fund 

Balance as per statement Nov. 29. 1917 (Minutes, p. 72) . . $ 113.94 

Amount received 212.79 

To Vouchers paid Miss Carroll, Treasurer $ 324.48 

Balance 2.25 

Total $ 326.73 $ 326.73 

November 27, 1918. 

14 

Margaret Fund 

Balance as per statement Nov. 29, 1917 (Minutes, p. 73) . . $ 81.67 

Amount received 150 17 

To Vouchers paid Miss Carroll, Treasurer $ 224.55 

Balance 7.29 

Total $ 231.84 $ 231.84 

November 27. 1918. 



MI^^UTES OF SESSION 191$ 73 

15 

Church Building Fund 

Balance as per statement Nov. 29, 1917 (Minutes, p. 73) . . $ 1,217.28 

Amount received 8,843.61 

To Vouchers paid Home Mission Board $ 9,749.17 

Balance 311.72 

Total $10,060.89 $10,060.89 

November 27, 1918. 

16 

COLPORTAGE 

Amount received $ 1,512.64 

To Vouchers W. N. Johnson $ 1,741.07 

Balance 228.43 

Total ; $ 1.741.07 $ 1,741.07 

November 27, 1918. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Walters Durham, 
Treasurer Baptist State Convention. 



APPENDIX B 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF EDUCATIOiN 



In presenting their annual report, your board beg to felicitate you 
on the happy conditions under which we meet. "We are emerging 
into health from a pestilence that walked in darkness and wasted 
at noonday, and from the gory horror of a world war into a condition 
wherein we trust righteousness and peace have met together. Abun- 
dant harvests have enriched our fields and showers of grace have en- 
livened our churches. Pestilence and war have measurably sobered 
and broadened us as a people, so that amid the deepening shadows 
we sought the face of God in contrition and prayer, and in the day 
of triumph we filled His courts with praise. And withal, in spite of 
unprecedented demands upon the beneficence of our people, they 
have not been unmindful of the claims of our^own regular objects 
and have contributed generously to their support. All glory to God 
for His distinguishing mercies. 

In launching the Million Dollar Campaign last January, the Board 
of Education decided that its regular work should continue uninter- 
ruptedly; at the same time, while contemplating that its Correspond- 
ing Secretary should devote the most of his time to the larger cam- 
paign, they made no special provision for prosecuting the regular 
work. So this work during the year has been incidental, and what 
has been accomplished in that line has been due mainly to previous 
organization rather than to special efforts of the secretary. In 
spite of this neglect and the pressure occasioned by the larger cam- 
paign, the contributions to the regular work up to the 1st of October 
were more than 40 per cent above those at the corresponding date of 
the previous year; the loss in contributions during October and 
November was over $3,000, due partly, no doubt, to the closing of 
nearly all of our churches for so long, and partly to the absorption 
of most of the amounts usually designated to local schools (amount- 
ing to $2,100) into the million-dollar fund. Hence, the small debt 
which we must report this year, while somewhat annoying, is in no 
way discouraging. On the other hand, we have reason to be grateful 
that it is no larger. 

The collections for the year amounted to $9,789.38, and the dis- 
bursements to $10,164.30. Taking into account the small balance 
from last year, this leaves a debt of $153.60. 



MINUTES OF SESSION WIS 76 

STATISTICS FOR 1917-18. 

Our fourteen high schools employed during the year 97 teachers, 
and enrolled 1,858 students. The three colleges employed 81 teach- 
ers and enrolled 907 students. For details, see Table of School Sta- 
tistics, page 177. 

This statement shows a net loss of 150 students in the colleges, 
which was accounted for in part, no doubt, by the unusual conditions 
during the past year. 

On November 11th the Yancey Collegiate Institute suffered the 
loss by fire of its main building, valued at $9,000. This loss was 
all the more serious at this time because of the excessively high cost 
of rebuilding, which must be done at once. 

Through the generosity of Brethren George and Charlie Wall, the 
debt of the Liberty-Piedmont Institute, located at Wallburg, has been 
canceled and a deed in fee simple for the splendid plant, which is 
valued at $25,000, has been turned over to the Board of Education. 

NEEDS OF THESE INSTITUTIONS 

In the high schools the demand is constantly growing for adequate 
laboratory equipment, stronger teaching forces, and better dormitory 
accommodations. "We must recognize the patent fact that with the 
rapid improvement in the comforts and conveniences of so many of 
our homes, it will be impossible to hold our young men and women 
in schools which cannot, at least to a reasonable extent, duplicate 
those accommodations. 

And the disparity betw^een the salaries of our teachers and those 
offered by the institutions maintained by the State is steadily in- 
creasing every few years; so that what ought to be generous and 
mutually helpful rivalry between these two sets of institutions 
threatens to become ruinous competition. This fact does not argue 
that the State should pay less, but that we must pay more. 

EDUCATION DAY 

It is earnestly hoped that our pastors and Sunday School workers 
will take seriously to heart the annual observance of Education Day 
in our Sunday Schools on the fourth Sunday in June. This is the 
day which the Educational Commission of the Southern Baptist Con- 
vention, its Sunday School Board, and the Convention itself, have 
asked our churches to make a permanent day in their annual calen- 
dars, and whose observance in some practical way they are striving 
to promote. They are doing this because it is their deep conviction 
that no other policy or agency of the Convention promises larger 
results for the Kingdom of God in the no distant future. Dr. Gambrel 
says: "The Teacher-Training Course instituted by the Sunday School 
Board is the most important enterprise launched by Southern Bap- 
tists in many years." But whence are the teachers for the futifre 



76 N. C. BAPTIST STATE CONVENTION 

to be secured if not from our schools? And what better means have 
we of turning our people for their educational groundwork to our 
own schools than some sort of plan that will put and keep these 
schools on the minds and hearts of our young people? While our 
schools and colleges in no sense are factories for the manufacture of 
preachers and lay-workers, they are in a very z"eal sense the canton- 
ments in which the recruits for the King's army are drilled. This, 
and not the raising of money, is the main purpose of Education Day; 
the only money asked for is the regular collection of the Sunday 
Schools on that day. All necessary literature is furnished free of 
cost. 

In the high schools are 55 young men preparing for the ministry. 
62 in Wake Forest, of whom 45 are on our board, and 26 in the Semi- 
nary, of whom 25 are receiving aid; six young women in our two 
colleges last year were preparing for service on the mission field. 

A WORTHY EDUCATIONAL PROCinAJI FOR SOUTIIKK.X BAPTISTS 

At the session of the Southern Baptist Convention in 1918, the 
Educational Comission recommended, and the Convention resolved, 
that "we Southern Baptists undertake a five-year program for the 
raising of $15,000,000 for our Baptist educational institutions in the 
South, to be distributed among our colleges and high schools, and 
our theological seminaries and training schools at Louisville and 
Fort Worth." 

At a special session of the commission in Atlanta, September 11th. 
the committee appointed to confer with the officials of the Woman's 
Missionary Union reported that a conference had been held with the 
president of that organization, at which a most satisfactory pro- 
gram was agreed on. At this same session the committee appointed 
to recommend an equitable distribution of the $15,000,000 recom- 
mended that $3,000,000 of the proposed $15,000,000 be given to those 
objects which have a South-wide appeal, and that the Woman's Mis- 
sionary Union be requested to raise one-half of this sum, or $1,500,000. 
The committee also recommended that the Baptist Bible Institute 
recently established in New Orleans be added to the list of bene- 
ciaries mentioned above. 

At this same session of the Commission it was resolved that "the 
commission is thoroughly committed to the general policy that junior 
colleges and preparatory schools are of vital importance to the suc- 
cess of our denomination as a Kingdom force, and we express the 
opinion that they should share adequately in the distribution of 
funds to be raised in our general campaign." 

By way of preparation for this great movement, the commission 
recommended that steps be taken to liquidate in all the states all 
existing debts against the schools and colleges. 

It may interest and stimulate us to remember that in such an 
enterprise we are but trying to- keep step with other great religious 



MIM'TEti OF SEiHSlOK WIS 77 

bodies. Our own Baptist brethren of the North are now prosecuting a 
campaign for six million dollars for their educational institutions 
outside of the amounts given to Chicago University, and have already 
raised four million. The Methodists of the South are endeavoring to 
raise for their institutions, in a campaign beginning the coming 
May, $32,000,000 in the South and $20,000,000 more in the North. 
And the Presbyterians of the South are at work on a $3,000,000 
program. 

OUR MIIXION-DOLLAB CAMPAIGN 

In obedience to instructions by this Convention at its last ses- 
sion, your Board of Education promptly set about forming plans 
for launching and conducting a campaign to raise one million dollars 
for our Baptist schools and colleges in North Carolina, to be divided 
among our institutions as follows: 

$300,000 for Wake Forest; 

$300,000 for Meredith; 

$150,000 for Chowan; 

$250,000 to be invested for the benefit of our high schools. 

It may be well to state here that the Board has adopted the policy 
that when necessary to invest money for permanent improvements in 
any of our hi^h schools, the trustees of the institutions concerned 
shall give the Board a mortgage on the property for the amount 
loaned it, to be closed only if and when such schools shall cease to 
function as Baptist schools. 

Tbe first act of the Board was the appointment of a Central Cam- 
paign Committee, consisting of T. W. O'Kelly, W. N. Jones, Carey J. 
Hunter, Weston Bruner, R. N. Simms, Livingston Johnson, W. N. 
Johnson, and C. E. Brewer, w^ith the power to take all necessary 
steps for the successful prosecution of the campaign. This commit- 
tee selected Bro. C. J. Thompson as Financial Secretary for the cam- 
paign, and R. T. Vann as General Manager and Treasurer. Brother 
Thompson served with wisdom and energy until June, when, on 
account of weakening health and other considerations, he resigned 
to accept service in another state. The committee then laid hands 
on W. R. Cullom for this work; and in view of its tremendous 
significance to our denomination, he expressed his willingness to 
undertake it. From the same consideration the Wake Forest 
Board of Trustees granted him leave of absence for two years, that 
he might devote his whole time to the great task. Meanwhile, it 
had become apparent that the Financial Secretary ought to be the 
actual director of the campaign, so that Dr. Cullom was elected 
manager and R. T. Vann retained as treasurer, with the under- 
standing that he should co-operate with Dr. Cullom as far as prac- 
ticable in connection with his regular work for your board. With 
your permission. Dr. Cullom will now submit his report. 



78 .Y. C. BAPTIST STATE CONVENTION 

REPORT ON MILLION-DOLLAR CAMPAIGN 
(June 1, 1918, to Jan. 15, 1919) 

By \V. R. Cui.xx)m, General Manager 

As general manager of the Million I>oIlar Campaign for our Bap- 
tist schools in North Carolina, I have been asked to write the story 
of this movement since June 1st, when I became General Manager. 
Its origin, initial organization and progress up to that time, has 
been written by Dr. Vann, the Secretary of the Board of Education 
and the Secretary and Treasurer of this Campaign. The barest out- 
line only of this story will be attempted here. The fuller story of 
it will be known only when the records of Heaven are unfolded and 
made manifest. 

Swapping horses amid stream is said to be a bad policy. Such 
a transaction is not calculated to l>e very pleasant for the horses: 
nor would it presumably be very safe for the owners of the horses. 
The Million Dollar Campaign, however, has broken all precedents, 
rules, maxiums, and traditions, and has made its way over moun- 
tains of difficulties, through valleys of trial, and in the midst of 
handicaps on all sides and from all sorts of sources such as have 
not been seen before in the Heavens above, nor in the earth beneath, 
neither in the waters that are under the earth. To specify fully 
would be out of the question. 

On May 11, 1918, Dr. Vann told me in an incidental way that 
Brother C. J. Thompson would give up his connection with the cam- 
paign the last of May. Several men were suggested as his succes- 
sor. They were all good men, and any one of them would have filled 
the place most worthily. The only specific suggestion that I made 
was that the committee should employ one of the strongest laymen 
of the State for this important task. On May 19th, Dr. Vann wrote 
me at Wake Forest that I was the unanimous choice of the com- 
mittee to carry on the great work that Brother Thompson was laying 
down. Brother Thompson himself made a special visit to Wake 
Forest to talk the matter over with me. The announcement of the 
committee's wish came to me as a summons from a clear sky, but it 
seemed to me on the spot to be the voice of God; nor have I had 
cause to doubt for one moment since that this first impression was 
correct. 

On June 1st, your humble servant sat in the office at campaign 
headquarters (recently vacated by Brother C. J. Thompson). He 
was alone, and the loneliness was intense. He raised several ques- 
tions with himself. Among them was this: "What am I here for?" 
After thinking over that question for a little, he took his pencil and 
began to write. Here is what was written: 

KOl'R Ants OF THE CAAtP.VlGN: 

As I enter this morning upon the campaign for our schools at the 
request of the Central Committee, there are in my mind four things 
which I should like to see brought to pass through it. 



MINUTES OF SESSION 1918 79 

1. Raise the niillion dollars and so provide for our schools a physi- 
cal basis for meeting the unprecedented opportunities that are com- 
ing before them. 

2. Place our schools on the hearts of our people in such a way 
that the product of these schools M'ill be in deed and in truth the 
children of our prayers, of our hopes, of our heart's best love. 

3. Cultivate the soil in such a way as to leave the field richer for 
future harvests than it is at present. 

4. Give such an interpretation of the principles and ideals of Jesus 
as to make them clear, vital and regnant in the hearts of just as 
many people as possible. 

A second question was, "How can these aims be realized?" Here 
George Boone's double-header came to mind, viz: HAVE FAITH 
and BE FAITHFUL. The feeling was strong that "Except the Lord 
build the house, they labor in vain that build it." In response to 
this feeling a Prayer League was organized at once. This has grown 
until it has in it a goodly number of the best people in the land, 
and many others have belonged to it in fact whose names are not 
recorded in the central office. In seeking to carry out the second 
part of the motto in question, seven and a half months of hard work 
has been done; and a host of good men and women along with many 
dear children have had a noble part in doing this work. 

SE\-EBAL CONFERENCES 

After floundering around a while, trying to get his bearings, it 
became apparent to the General Manager that a few conferences 
would be necessary in order to touch hands and hearts with at least 
a few people over the State. Various things kept us from holding 
these conferences until September. The first one was held at 
Hickory, September 5th and 6th, and the second at Wilson, Septem- 
ber 12th and 13th. These conferences helped greatly toward accom- 
plishing the ends for which they were designed. At the close of 
the Wilson Conference, the conviction was strong that we should 
put on an intensive campaign at once, and seek to secure the mil- 
lion dollars mainly in Government securities by the time our Con- 
vention should meet, December 3d to 6th. Our Central Committee 
met in Raleigh on the same afternoon that the Wilson Conference 
adjourned. After a thorough discussion, the following action was 
taken: 

"Campaign Committee met in Recorder oflBce September 13th. 
President O'Kelly, Brewer. Hunter, .Johnson. Bruner, Vann, and Cul- 
lom, also Gilbert T. Stephenson by invitation and W. M. Gilmore. 
Brother Stephenson presented the plan for raising our million dol- 
lars by appealing for Liberty Bonds and W. S. S. in an intensive 
campaign to be closed by the meeting of the Convention. On mo- 
tion of Dr. Bruner the committee voted to press the campaign by 
appealing for Liberty Bonds and W. S. S. 

"On motion of C. J. Hunter, it was voted that we attempt to com- 
plete the campaign not later than December 31, 1918. On motion 
of Dr. Bruner the matter of perfecting plans for such campaign was 



80 N. C. BAPTIST STATE CONVENTION 

referred to the Advisory Committee heretofore appointed, C. E. 
Brewer, W. N. Johnson, L. Johnson, Cullom. and Vann. Voted that 
subscriptions in Bonds and W. S. S. be accepted at face value." 

Immediately following this action, arrangements were made to 
hold a conference in Raleigh. September 24th and 2.5th. The Raleigh 
Conference did much for our campaign -along three lines: 

1. It clarified the spirit and purpose of the campaign in the minds 
of those in attendance. 

2. It quickened and broadened the interest in our task. 

3. It helped us greatly in formulating and marking out a definite 
plan of organization for the campaign. 

The plan of organization agreed on was very simple. The cen- 
tral office, with the general executive officers for the whole State, 
was to be located in Raleigh. In each association there was to be 
an associational manager. In each church in a given association, 
there was to be a church manager and as many canvassers as 
might seem wise in each church. It was agreed, furthermore, that 
the month of October should be given to a campaign of educntion. 
and that the month of November was to be the time for reaping 
the harvest. The Campaign of Education was to proceed along 
three lines: 

1. A conference on the work of the campaign was to be held in 
each association in the State. 

2. An effort was to be put forth to have a public discussion of 
the campaign in each church in the State. 

3. There was to be a state-wide distribution of literature explain- 
ing and setting forth the claims of the campaign. 

The conferences were held in many of the associations; associa- 
tional organization was perfected in most cases; the printing presses 
began to work day and night on literature, and everything was in 
readiness to proclaim the beginning of one of the most important 
movements ever inaugurated by the Baptists of North Carolina. 
And then, almost on the very stroke of the clock, when we were 
ready to begin, practically every church in the State was ordered 
by the health authorities to close its doors indefinitely. 

IXFLUENZ.V 

The story of what followed is too well known to call for comment 
here. Nothing comparable to it has ever been seen amongst us. 
It was enough to paralyze completely any effort that was not backed 
by Omnipotence. Be it said to the everlasting credit of the North 
Carolina Baptist leaders that out of the hundreds of letters that 
came to the central office during these trying days, the number 
that even hinted at anything like pessimism was negligible. Most 
of our people seemed to feel that God was trying our faith, and 
that we must not be found wanting in the day of trial. Our helpers 
seemed to have caught of the spirit of the motto suggested above: 



MINUTES OF SESSION WIS 81 

they had faith and were faithful. Nor was either their faith or 
their faithfulness unrewarded. The manifestation of God's pres- 
ence, special help, unfailing guidance and leadership in the cam- 
paign have been so clearly and beautifully manifest that to doubt 
were almost blasphemous. Numerous incidents of a most convinc- 
ing character could be cited but space forbids. 

With very few exceptions, wherever the campaign has been put 
on w^itli any sort of faithfulness and enthusiasm, the response has 
been all that we could expect, and even more. A good man in East- 
ern North Carolina told the General Manager early in tlio summer 
that if he could bring the Baptists of North Carolina to make up 
their minds to do this thing, it was done already. It really looks 
as if our people have made up their minds thoroughly to do it. 

From all that has been said here, it is clearly evident that our 
campaign has been a walk by faith and not by sight. We have been 
compelled to feel our way along one day at a time; but in the end 
the triumph of God's grace and help will be the clearer and more 
glorioits on this account. If our schools, in the use of this million 
dollars, do not seek to plant the principles of Jesus moro firmly in 
the hearts of their pupils than ever before, the curse of Heaven will 
surely come upon them to such an extent that their candle-stick 
will be removed. 

SPECIAL MENTION — CHURCHES 

Very early in his work the General Manager began to cherish the 
hope that some half dozen churches might be found in the State that 
would raise $20,000 or more each for the campaign; twenty churches 
and individuals that would give $10,000 or more each; and at least 
a half a hundred churches and individuals that would give $.5,000 
or more each. Of course it was hoped that literally hundreds of 
churches and individuals would give from $1,000 to $4,00!» each, and 
that ALL THE REST, would give according to their light and ability. 

At the present writing it is altogether impossible to make any- 
thing like an accurate estimate of the extent to which our hone has 
been approximated. The Convention wall probably not be surprised 
to learn that we have met many surprises in the matter of the 
amount undertaken by different churches. Some have gone beyond 
what we had expected of them and some have done otherwise. 
Enough has been learned, however, to know that at least five 
churches have set their goal at $20,000 or more. These churches 
are: Raleigh, First Church; First Church Winston-Salem; First 
Church, Asheville; tlje churches at Scotland Neck and Lumberton. 
We sincerely hope that these churches may realize fully the task 
they have set before them, and that one or two other churches may 
see their way to take their places in this column. In trying to find 
out which churches have undertaken $10,000 or more, we have heard 
so far only of Wake Forest, Wilson, First Church, Blackwell Me- 
morial, Elizabeth City, Raleigh Tabernacle, Greensboro, First 
6 



82 .V. C. BAPTI8T STATE CONVENTION 

Church, and Wilmington, First Church. No doubt many others will 
take their places in this column as the campaign goes on. A goodly 
number of our town, village and country churches have set their 
goal at $5,000 or more, and are working most heroically and success- 
fully towards its realization. A large number of other churches 
have set their goal at smaller amounts, but in many cases they are 
showing a greater spirit of heroism and sacrifice than some that 
give more. 

Quite a good many churches have been compelled by peculiar and 
most trying circumstances to defer their canvass for the work of 
this campaign. Let all such know that it is not yet too late to fall 
in line, and it is hoped that they may be able to take the matter 
up at once and that they may do the thing that is worthy of them. 

SPECIAL MENTION — SCHOOLS 

The offerings by the schools themselves have been surprisingly 
large and beautiful. Meredith, Mars Hill, Round Hill, Sylva; Fruit- 
land, Boiling Springs and Buie's Creek have been heard from so far. 
Others are ready to put on the canvass at once, and will be heard 
from a little later. 

It will probably be in place to make mention here also of the 
special efforts that are being put forth by the Alumnae of ?*Ieredith 
and of the Alumni of Wake Forest to endow a special chair in their 
respective institutions. This is a most praiseworthy purpose on 
their part, and those in charge of this million dollar campaign feel 
disposed to do all in their power to encourage and help them. 

The collections in these schools show one thing most conclusively, 
viz., that whatever may be the thought of others, these schools them- 
selves believe most profoundly in their own God-appointed mission. 

SPECIAL MENTION — INDIVIDUALS 

The author of this report is loath to make special mention of any 
person or persons in this connection. Many have labored most 
beautifully and helpfully, and their names and their deeds are 
written deeply in the hearts of those who stand at the headquarters 
of this movement. In this connection it is nothing but simple justice 
to say that in bringing us to undertake a short, intensive campaign, 
rather than a campaign drawn out over several years, Gilbert T. 
Stephenson, of Winston-Salem, was the central figure. His 
work also in helping to perfect our organization and in conducting 
the campaign among the churches has been as gerenous and as help- 
ful as it was unselfish and beautiful. 

At the Wilson Conference, September 6th, Secretary Walter N. 
.Tohnson said he was willing that even State Missions should be 
side-tracked for the time being to bring to pass the great thing that 



MINUTES OF SESSION WIS 83 

we were setting before us. His great personality and everything 
connected with his office from that day to this, have been at the 
command of our campaign. 

Our Home IVIission Board in Atlanta, very generously loaned to 
our work J. C. Owen from October 1st to this date. Dr. Owen 
has served as assistant manager in a most helpful way. His work 
has been mainly in the western part of the State. To our Home 
Mission Board, and to Dr. Owen, our committee feel that they owe a 
debt of gratitude, which will grow bigger as the deeper significence 
of our campaign shall become more apparent. 

In beautiful cooperation with, and under the skillful management 
of Walter M. Gilmore, our publicity director, the Biblical Re- 
corder, Charity and Children, the great dailies and most of the week- 
lies of the State, have lent themselves in a most helpful way toward 
the promotion of the interests of our campaign. In this action, 
these papers have shown that they are ready to join hands with and 
help on a movement whose fundamental purpose is the moulding 
of the highest type of manhood and womanhood. For this service, 
we are deeply grateful, and shall be glad to join with these papers 
in the future to help them in every possible way to achieve the 
highest and holiest ends of their existence. 

Several individuals among our associational managers and other 
special helpers deserve to be singled out and placed before this Con- 
vention as people whose very names will forever stand out in the 
memory of those at the head quarters of our movement as the very 
synonym of faithfulness and of unselfish devotion to the work of 
our Lord's Kingdom. One can readily see, however, how that such 
mention would hardly be in place here. When we think, moreover, 
of those who have gone to and fro with us and for us, as special 
interpreters and advocates of our work, the denomination should 
forever hold them in grateful remembrance. The pastor of the Wake 
Forest Church, the president and members of the faculty at Wake 
Forest, a large number of our pastors and laymen, not to speak of 
those in the Recorder building and in the city of Raleigh, have ren- 
dered a service at this point whose value cannot be estimated. 
Within the respective associations where the campaign has been 
put on, the call for special help on the part of the associational 
manager has met a response which has meant everything to our 
campaign. Nor should we forget to mention with the deepest grati- 
tude, the many noble women who have labored so beautifully with 
us in the Lord. 

The beautiful sacrifice and earnest deeds of all these have been a 
labor of love and such sacrifices and such deeds call for a love and 
recognition in return which should be cumulative with the passing 
years. 

Many others might well be brought in here for special mention 
Their name is legion; their deeds are golden; they themselves are 



84 A-. C. BAPTIHT STATE CONVENTION 

far better than their weight in gold. One name further, however, 
shall be mentioned in closing this part of our report. That is the 
name of Thos. W. Bickett. Governor Bickett's help with voice and 
pen has done much to show many of our people that the work of this 
campaign was worthy of their best efforts. We wish to assure Gov- 
ernor Bickett, and the great State of North Carolina which he so 
worthily represents, that the schools on whose behalf he has so 
kindly helped us will find even greater pleasure in the future in 
serving our commonwealth because of this attitude and these kindly 
deeds of its chief executive. 

SPECIAL GIVEUS 

When we come to single out special givers, we are greatly em- 
barrassed. Many of the greatest sacrifices have been made by those 
whose contributions can be counted in dimes rather than in dollars 
At the same time, those of us who cannot give so largely as others 
in actual amount, rejoice greatly that there are those amongst us 
who can give in thousands of dollars to this great cause, and we re- 
joice still more that they find it in their hearts to do so. In the 
Eastern Association, one good family is proposing at the request 
of the general manager, to give $25,000, to be combined with $25,000 
to be raised by the association, and the whole sum to be used for 
the endowment of the School of the Bible in Wake Forest College 
as a memorial to their honored father, the lamented John T. 
Albritton. A good man in the Sandy Run Association is proposing 
to place $5,000 at Wake Forest and $5,000 at Meredith to establish a 
permanent fund in each of these schools, the income from which 
shall be used to support a young man and a young woman, re- 
spectively, from Rutherford County in these two colleges. One good 
man in the Chowan Association is putting $10,000 into the work of 
this campaign. Several brethren in the Central Association, and one 
good man and his wife in the Pilot Mountain Association, are put 
ting $5,000, respectively, into this work. A still larger number are 
establishing one or more scholarships in one of these schools. Among 
these may be mentioned a good man in Person County, who is estab- 
lishing two scholarships at $2,000 each — one at Wake Forest and ^he 
other at Meredith. A good brother and his wife of the Asheboro 
Street Church, Greensboro, are giving $2,000 to establish a scholar- 
ship at Meredith. The same is true of another good man and his 
wife of the Tabernacle Church, Raleigh, who are giving $2,000 to 
establish a scholarship at Meredith. Messrs. C. M. and G. W. Wall, 
of Wallburg, have paid off the indebtedness on the Wallburg School, 
and are turning over to the denomination unencumbered a property 
conservatively estimated at $35,000. 

Many others have given largely and sacrificially. As said before, 
no doubt many of the smaller gifts represent the greater sacrifice. 
The earth is richer and heaven will be sweeter because of the 
beauty and fragrance of such sacrifice. 



MINUTES OF SESSION 1918 85 



OUB LATEST MOVE 

In the early days of Ms work, the General Manager thought he 
saw the Importance of getting the children of our Sunday schools to 
line up with the work of this campaign. Three purposes were 
thought of in this connection: 

1. Of course, some financial help for our campaign was expected. 
This, however, was an entirely minor consideration. 

2. It was thought that the children who might he brought to throw 
themselves into the work of this great task would feel forever after- 
wards that they were a part of the work of God's Kingdom. 

3. It was thought that scores and hundreds of these children, who 
might line up with us in this work, would at once form the purpose 
in their hearts to attend these schools some day, and through the 
influence of these schools in their lives would become potent and 
important factors in the work of the Kingdom. As in the case of 
just about everything undertaken in connection with the work of 
this campaign, this phase of its work had to meet many hindrances 
and difficulties before it could get started. Through the indispen- 
sable help of Misses Briggs and Carroll, however, "The Junior Re- 
SEG\-E Force of the Million Dollar Campaign" was launched in the 
month of December. The angle of approach is through the Sunday- 
school, and equipment for this work has been mailed to the Baptists 
Sunday school Superintendents of the State. If the future of our 
boys and girls is important, then the aims and purposes of this cam- 
paign with and for the children are equally important. It is too 
soon yet to know how this phase of our work is being received by 
our people. It is our sincere hope that the discussions of this mat- 
ter here in the Convention may do much to bring those in attendance 
of the Convention, to see and appreciate the deeper significance of 
this phase of our task. It is hoped, also, that those who may come 
to see the meaning of this work here may become earnest heralds 
for it all over the State on their return home. 

FUTURE OF THE CAMPAIGN 

The last sentence above suggests at once that we do not consider 
our campaign completed. How could it be in the light of what has 
been hinted at in this report? What then shall we say as to the 
future? One or two significant things must be borne in mind when 
we are feeling for the answer to the question of our future. One 
fact is that the soil among the Baptists of North Carolina has been 
pretty well plowed up on behalf of this campaign. North Carolina 
Baptists have been brought to think about the place of their schools 
in their work as they have never done before. To let up in our 
work just now, would be little short of tragic. Another fact which 
must be kept in mind is that our regular mission work must not be 
side-tracked longer. In view of these two considerations, we would 
recommend : 



86 N. C. BAPTIST STATE CONVENTION 

1. That the Convention request those conducting this campaign 
throughout the State, to do what they can in the way of reaping 
where they have sown during the next thirty days. 

2. That after the date specified the officers of the campaign give 
their attention to matters that are more or less general, and not 
press the intensive feature of the campaign during the months when 
the One Mission Drive is on. 

3. It is understood that a spirit of reciprocity shall prevail among 
the oflScers of this movement toward the regular work of our Mis- 
sion boards. 

In closing this report, we would once more make grateful acknowl- 
edgment of the many and unmistakable tokens of God's favor and 
help in the midst of what otherwise would have proven to be in- 
superable difficulties. We would also express the deep and un- 
shakable conviction that He who hath begun a good work in us and 
amongst us will finish the same to the glory of His own great name, 
and to the perpetual blessing of all those who wait upon Him and 
who serve while they wait. 



r .910l9d 9/TOb 

riA .oi§Bi:t 3o Jto 
rr noiaaim ifili/go'i 
j'labisiioo ov/J oaer. 



MINUTES OF SESSION 191S 87 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT FOR REGULAR WORK 

Balance November 20, 1917 $ 221.32 

Receipts as per Biblical Recorder 9,789.38 

Total $ 10,010.70 

Disbursements 

Disbursements as per vouchers to: 

Ministerial students at Wake Forest $4,107.45 

Ministerial students at S. B. T. Seminary. . 1,500.00 
Student volunteers at Meredith and Chowan 

colleges 279 60 

Buie's Creek 20.00 

Wingate 392.67 

Dell 631.00 

King's Mountain 66.50 

Stamps 74.56 

Check and receipt book, letter heads, etc. . . 29.75 

Office rent 85.00 

Stenographer 125.01 

Traveling expenses 85.04 

Education Day programs, express, etc 263.87 

Items (drayage, type ribbons, etc.) 3.85 

Salary of secretary 2,500.00 10,164.34 



Deficit $ 153.64 



Raleigh, N. C, March 20, 1918. 
This is to certify I have carefully checked the account of R. T 
Vann, Treasurer Board of Education, and find the receipts and 
disbursements correct as shown by the above statement. 

F. H. Bkiggs, Auditor. 



APPENDIX C 



REPORT OF SOCIAL SERVICE COMMITTEE 



Christianity has in these last years begun to recognize its duty to 
society. While the paramount duty of the churches has always been, 
and is now, that of giving the gospel to the world, they cannot do 
that supreme work effectively if they neglect their duty along the 
lines of social service. 

In the following report is considered the work that is being done 
by the State for the social betterment of its people, a work In which 
all Christians should feel a vital interest. Then comes consideration 
of Prohibition, for which our people have always stood, and in whose 
progress they rejoice. The report of the Ministers' Relief Board 
follows. This is strictly denominational, and should appeal to all 
our churches. The last item in this report is the informing facts and 
figures in regard to our Orphanage at Thomasville. 

THE CHURCH AND SOCIAL WORK 

The war and its effects present to the Christian churches questions 
of profound interest and importance. The upheavals of~war are 
about to subside into conditions of peace that present new standards. 
By universal agreement, organized Christianity should bear in- 
creased responsibilities. Jesus is still the Light of the World, but, 
as never before, the churches must concern themselves with carrying 
the light into all the recesses of modem life. Everywhere men are 
saying that the challenge to the church differs in character and 
magnitude from other times. In character, the challenge to the 
church is to offer a more satisfying ministration to all human needs. 
In magnitude, the challenge is to carry this ministration to every 
individual life and to more fully inject the Christian spirit into 
government, industry, and every other branch of organizaed society. 

No one will deny that love is the condition, service the expression, 
and the enlargement of the individual life the aim of Christ's mis- 
sion. Whenever and wherever an indictment is brought against the 
churches it is upon the ground of a real or alleged failure to properly 
and fully interpret this mission. The indictment is being brought 
more insistently and more generally today than ever before. 

Over and over it has been said from platform and in print that 
the soldiers will never again be interested in the churches, and that 
the masses will be more than ever aloof. The implication is that 
Christianity has outgrown the organized churches; and that man- 
kind must look beyond them for an adequate interpretation and ap- 



MINUTES OF SESSION IDIS 89 

plication of Christianity to the needs of everyday life. If the 
churches cannot meet and nullify this charge, they certainly cannot 
hold or extend the moral and spiritual leadership of the people. The 
world is about to begin reorganization upon a new basis. It is a 
golden and fateful moment for Christians and organized Christianity. 
Our Southern churches, still possessing an intimate and influential 
relation to the masses, should seize the moment of increased responsi- 
bility and opportunity for leadership in injecting the Christian 
principle into every phase of life and organized society. 

The first phase of this duty is to back up the attempt to organize 
the world upon a new basis of love and permanent peace. The 
President of the United States has declared that "The brotherhood of 
mankind must no longer be a fair but empty phrase; it must be 
given a structure of force and reality." 

The Prime Minister of England has said, concerning the principles 
of peace: "Are we to lapse back into the old national rivalries, 
animosities and competitive armaments, or are we to initiate the 
reign on earth of the Prince of Peace? It is the duty of liberalism 
to use its influence to insure that it shall be a reign of peace." 

These utterances, of the two leading statesmen of the world, are 
a striking example of the persuasive force with which the spirit of 
Christianity has been penetrating into all human relationships. Can 
organized Christianity be less enthusiastic, less earnest, less insist- 
ent, than political liberalism for a reign of peace and a destruction 
of the military spirit everywhere? The impulse to peace and right- 
eousness in the world is a Christian impulse; and organized Chris- 
tians should not be justly charged with not keeping up with the 
general Christian impulse. 

Again, not only must Christians and churches in their organized 
capacity insist that international relations be based upon peace, 
justice and good will, but they must stand insistently for a domestic 
fabric, whose warp and woof shall be determined by the principles 
of justice and equality and the sacred right of every human being to 
living conditions that will enable him to reach that degree of devel- 
opment of which he is capable. We cannot force men to be good by 
legislation, and should not seek to try, for that has been a failure; 
but we can help them to be good by removing conditions which tend 
to make it easy for them to be bad and hard to be good. This is not 
a union of church and state. It is an insistence that the principles 
of Christ should be manifested in a Christian commonwealth. 

Mankind is reaching out with longing for better things, a longing 
whose scope and purpose are not yet fully defined. Where should it 
look with more confidence and hope for leadership than to the 
Christian churches? ^ 

One by one the standards of paganism bequeathed from ancient 
society have fallen before the never-ending insistence of the Christian 
doctrine of the value and sacredness of the individual human being. 



^ 



90 .V. C. BAPTIST STATE CONVENTION 

It is nothing less than the continued triumph of this principle that 
has stamped this war with the character of a war to end war itself. 
Hence, we have seen during the war that spiritual exaltation 
which accompanies only the willingness to sacrifice everything, even 
life itself, in a supreme test of service. 

The same principle of the sacredness and value of the Individual 
human being will as inevitably lead men on to reconstruct the social 
and economic fabric as it is now leading us on to reconstruct inter- 
national relations. The church must lead or follow the movement. 
If it leads it will save its organized life by having lost it in the 
service of humanity. If it follows it need not expect to occupy more 
than a subsidiary place in modern life. 

Our churches are the most powerful and the most ready agents to 
work for human betterment in North Carolina. They must co- 
operate with every other agency whose purpose and tendency is bet- 
terment. In every community the local churches should see that 
w^hatever of ministry is lacking at any time should be supplied as 
far as is in their power. Then they must stand for and work for 
certain policies which modern thought has come to regard as the 
minimum which should exist in a Christian state. All these cluster 
about the inevitable and insistent demand for a recognition of the 
dignity and sacredness and possibilities of the individual human 
soul and a realignment of social relationships and contacts in the 
light of that principle. Among these conditions are: 

1. Easier economic conditions. This stands back of and involves 
the integrity and safety of the home, the safety of women and chil- 
dren, the eradication of vice, immorality and all anti-social condi- 
tions. The man who labors must have better surroundings and a 
more adequate distribution of the returns of labor. Want or the fear 
of want should not forever stare a large part of our population in 
the face. 

2. Conservation of physical health, including public health and 
sanitary measures, hospital facilities, public nurses, the eradication 
of vice diseases, bad housing, and kindred evils. 

3. A more perfect fulfillment of educational requirements, includ- 
ing a more helpful contact of the schools with the problems of 
living. 

4. A better conservation of child life, which will comprehend a 
wiping out of what is known as juvenile delinquency and neglect, 
and shall rescue every child from a life of shame and neglect and 
find means for moral and physical growth. 

5. A more just distribution of work and play, Including a con- 
demnation of all parasites, whether rich or poor, a systematic means 
of amusements and recreation for our people, free from commercial- 
ism, and so universal and appealing that vice-producing amusements 
and vicious idleness will tend to disappear. 



V 



MINUTES OF SESSION WIS 91 

6. Better care for the dependent and unfortunate classes, including 
a more thorough support of the State institutions for the insane, the 
feeble-minded, and kindred institutions, as well as such measures as 
tend toward prevention. 

7. An improvement of our way of dealing with prisoners and per- 
sons charged with offenses. This involves a radical change in our 
court procedure, one in which the emphasis shall be placed upon the 
question of why the offense was committed, and a recognition of the 
fact that it is due more often to ignorance and weakness than other- 
•\^ise, and should be treated accordingly. The administration of 
state and local prisons should be based upon a recognition of this 
fact, for it is the key to preventing more offenses. We are not yet 
looking our so-called problem of crime straight in the face. 

No Christian and no church can stand for less than these broad 
outlines for his community and state, and all should stand for more. 

When John the Baptist sent to Jesus to ask if He were the real 
Christ or whether another might be looked for, the messenger was 
told to report to John the things that were being done for the people 
and let that stand as the testimony to the presence of the real Master. 
What is being done for mankind is still the test of the presence of 
Jesus. 

PROHIBITION 

Prohibition sentiment is growing stronger in the State every year, 
as it is throughout the whole country. The Prohibition Amendment 
which is being voted on by the several states will certainly be rati- 
fied, and national prohibi'.ion will follow. 

The great need in North Carolina is law enforcement. We havf- 
all the prohibition laws necessary to make North Carolina a dry 
State in fact as well as in name, but we should have some additional 
machinery to make the excellent laws we have effective. The Col- 
lector of Internal Revenue for the Government stated in his report 
some time ago that one-third of the illicit distilleries captured in the 
United States were located in North Carolina. TTiis is very unen- 
viable advertising that is being given for our State, and every citizen 
should deplore it. 

The Trustees of the Anti-Saloon League recommend the following 
legislation as in their judgment necessary to meet the situation in 
this State: 

1. That the Prohibition Amendment to the Federal Constitution 
be ratified. 

2. That the State office of Prohibition Commissioner be established. 

3. That an "Ouster Law" be enacted, so that we can get rid of 
those officers whose duty it is to execute the law, but who do not 
do it. 

4. That the manufacture of wine and cider as beverages be pro- 
hibited. 



92 N. C. BAPTIST STATE CONVENTION 

5. That our shipping laws be made so as to harmonize with the 
National anti-shipping laws. 

6. Tliat the sale as beverages of bitters, extracts, and other pro- 
prietary medicines, commonly used instead of liquor, be prohibited. 

REPORT OF THE MINISTERS' RELIEF BOARD 

Men say no more beautiful things about any class of their fellows 
than they utter when thinking of the aged minister. This report 
cannot be made more interesting or helpful than by quoting the 
words of two men who are deeply concerned about ministerial relief. 

Dr. E. W. Sikes in his stirring address on this subject before the 
Convention at Goldsboro began and ended with the striking words 
which follow: 

"The day after Lee signed the articles of surrender at Appomattox, 
the troops marched down in front of the Federal columns and stacked 
their guns. The Federal officer had ordered his men to 'carry arms' 
as a mark of respect to the Confederates. "When the guns were 
stacked, each color-bearer walked up and laid his folded colors upon 
the arms and wept. Each brave Federal felt a thrill of sympathy, 
for he knew how well each color-bearer loved the colors he had borne 
aloft through the storm and strife of many a hard-fought battle. 
These aged ministers, whom this board aids, have been the color- 
bearers of the denomination. They love the colors, but age compels 
them to fold them. With sad hearts they lower them. . . . 

"There are two great phases of social work in the denomination: 
the Orphanage and the Relief Board. Together they suggest the 
heroic figure of ^neas who, when Troy had fallen after the siege by 
Agamemnon, took his young son Ascanius by the hand and his aged 
sire Anchises upon his back and fled from the ruined Trojan city to 
the banks of the Tiber and there builded a newer, nobler, and greater 
Troy. So let the Baptist denomination, carrying its aged and lead-- 
ing its orphans, march out from the past and build greater for the 
future. 

"What is done, must be done quickly. Daily they drop from the 
ranks. In the gloaming they sit and sing: 

" 'Lead, kindly light, 

Amid the encircling gloom, 

Lead thou me on; 

The way is dark and I am far from home, 

Lead thou me on.' 

. "But they are not far from home! Just across they see the shin- 
ing shore, and soon their frail barks will touch the sand. 

" 'On that far-away strand. 
Where the birds ever sing, 
And nothing can ever grow old.' " 



MINUTES OF SESSIOX IHIS 93 

Brother A. L. Phipps of Durham, who has for years been connected 
with this board and is now its efficient president, in a recent most 
excellent report on Ministerial Relief before the Mt. Zion Association, 
makes an argument that should find response in the heart of every 
thinking man among us. Mr. Phipps says, in part: 

"Thie appeal for aid for aged and infirm ministers has been, in a 
large measure, based upon sympathy. In so far as this motive tends 
toward warming and softening our hearts toward these worn-out 
servants of God, the appeal should continue. But there is another 
appeal, that of justice. The American people are beginning to real- 
ize that when a man has spent his best years in the service of an 
organization he has the right to receive support therefrom when his 
fruitful years are passed. Are our churches to fall behind corpora- 
tions, railroads, and governments in awakening to a realization of 
what is just to those who have faithfully served?" 

This board has been in existence for twenty-eight years, and has 
brought aid to one hundred and twenty-three needy ministers. 
There are now thirty-seven beneficiaries. Contributions to this 
work are increasing gradually year by year with but little effort to 
bring it to pass. This board, however, is ready to put forth more 
effort that the funds may be increased more rapidly, whenever the 
Convention may deem it wise to give us such instruction. 

Because of some changes in the plan itself of the Board of Relief 
and Annuities, of which we were not aware when our report was 
passed upon, and because of its ratification by so many States since 
then, we offer as a substitute the following for the latter part of our 
report beginning "The Southern Baptist Convention," etc. 

Whereas, the Southern Baptist Convention at its last session held 
at Hot Springs, Arkansas. May, 1918, did launch a comprehensive 
plan for worthy Baptist ministers, their widows and orphan chil- 
dren, and did create a general Board to conduct and operate the same, 
which Board is located at Dallas, Texas, and whereas, said plan 
looks to the cooperation of the States, and whereas, the Board is 
now seeking that cpoperation at the hands of the State Convention: 

Resolved, that this Convention does hereby approve of the efforts 
of the Southern Baptist Convention to solve the problem of Minis- 
terial Relief within the bounds of our Southern Convention territory, 
and that this Convention appoint a committee of three representa- 
tive men to act in this matter, with the State Ministers' Relief 
Board, and does hereby authorize and instruct them to take up with 
the Board of Ministerial Relief and Annuities of the Southern Bap- 
tist Convention the Ministerial Relief work and devise a plan for 
the conduct of the work in this State, and that such report be made 
to the next session of the Convention. 

Respectfully submitted, J. M. Abnette, 

Corresponding Secretary. 



94 N. C. BAPTIST STATE CONVENTION 

Tbeasubeb's Report Baptist Ministerial Relief Board 



1917 
Dec. 3 


Ba 
W. 
W. 
In 

36 

37 
39 
38 
38 


Receipts 
lance 






$ 5,820.34 


fc 1918 
June 19 

1^1919 
Jan. 14 


Durham, Treasurer 

Durham, Treasurer 




$ 3.389.18 
3,049.00 




«reat, Permanent Interest-be 
Total 


;aring Fund 


6,438.18 
1,091.61 


















S 13.350.13 




Disbursements 

Beneficiaries 

Beneficiaries - 




1917 
Christmas 

1918 
1st Quarter 


$ 231.05 

912.75 
987.75 
950.25 
940.25 




2d Quarter 


Beneficiaries 






3d Quarter 


Beneficiaries . 






4th Quarter 


Beneficiaries 








Printing, postage, express, 
cidentals 


envelopes, and in- 


S 4,022.05 

237. 20 








Permanent Interest-bearing 
Balance 


r Fund 




2,146.05 








6,944.83 




Total 












S 13,350.13 














1 



PERMANENT INTEREST-BEARING FUND 



1917 




Dec. 


3 


1918 




Dec. 


1 



Reported ..I $ 22,049.99 

Received 2,146.05 



Total $ 24.196.04 



Sundry loans S 21,821.85 

Balance ' 2.374.19 



Total ' $ 24,196.04 



Respecfully submitted, 

R. H. RiGGSBEE. 

Treasurer. 
Examined, found correct and hereby approved. 

W. J. Brogdex, 
.January 15, 1919. Auditor. 



MINUTES OF SESSION IDIS 95 

THE THOMASVILLE BAPTIST ORPHANAiGE 

Perhaps no object of our Convention has so little need of a report 
to this body on the Orphanage, for Charity and Children, its organ, 
throughout the year has borne the message of its doings and experi- 
ences into every corner of the State. 

Stated in figures, these are the facts: 

Number of children at Thomasville, 450; at Ken- 
nedy Home, 75 525 

Children received since November 15, 1885 1,890 

Daily cost for support of each child 40c. 

Monthly cost per child $12.12 

Monthly cost per child five years ago $8.35 

Annual cost per child $145.44 

Daily cost for support of 525 children $210.00 

Annual cost for the support of 525 children $75,356.00 

Net income from printing office $6,006.08 

Profit from Kennedy Home farm $5,321.83 

Farm and dairy products consumed $11,399.49 

Gallons of milk consumed last year 30,595 

Current fund ending June 15, 1918 $83,058.99 

Permanent improvements at Thomasville $3,842.83 

Permanent improvements at Kennedy Home $6,838.35 

There have been a few changes in our working force which should 
be noted: 

Mr. C. H. Baugh, after two years of faithful service, has given up 
his position on the farm, and Mr. J. R. Black has taken his place. 

At the Kennedy Home, Rev. G. L. Merrell retired from his work 
January 1, 1918. We owe a note of thanks to Mr. and Mrs. Merrell 
for their devoted service. They are both now at Thomasville. 

Rev. Theo. B. Davis was selected to take the place at the Kennedy 
Home. The work there is difficult, but he is rapidly getting his 
hands on the details of a most difficult position. 

Mr. J. T. Edmunds has been secured to take charge of the farm 
there. 

After long delay the Hardee Building has been completed and is 
occupied by the boys. TTie chapel is not yet completed. It is closed 
in and the school rooms are nearly ready to be occupied. All the 
funds raised for that purpose have been used, and more. The prices 
of materials and carpenters have been almost prohibitive. More 
money must be raised before the work can be taken up. All previous 
calculations of costs must be revised. Surely by the spring we can 
see the way clear to complete this much-needed equipment. 

It is with profound sorrow we record the death of several of our 
best friends. Mrs. W. L. Kennedy, after a long and painful illness, 
fell on sleep. She lived to see the completion of the cottage which 



at; K. v. BAPTIST STATE CONVENTION 

she built, but not to see it occupied. Mrs. M. P. Huette, after four- 
teen years of faithful service as matron, was suddenly called to her 
reward. She is the first woman to die in the service of the Orphan- 
age during its history. We have had an unusual loss in the death 
of three of our oldest and most honored trustees: Hon. John C Scar- 
borough, who from the beginning had much to do in shaping the 
course of the institution; Brother John E. Ray, for many years an 
inspiring member of the board; and Brother John C. Whitty, who, 
in addition to the building he gave, has been a most helpful friend 
in every way. These were indeed the three beloved Johns. We 
sorrow at their going and treasure their memory. 

All things considered, we have unusual grounds for gratitude to 
God for the blessings which have crowned the year. Never before 
have our people responded so cheerfully and so liberally, and they 
have done it without special appeals. The "One Day's Work" thank 
offering last fall surpassed anything we have ever had, and the regu- 
lar contributions have held up better than ever, and that in the 
midst of war appeals. The late meeting of this Convention enables 
us to report the returns from the Thanksgiving season of the present 
year. To all ordinary appearances it was the gloomiest possible 
prospect. On Thanksgiving Day the weather was against us, and 
on account of the influenza a majority of the churches have been 
closed ever since. How these Thanksgiving offerings were gotten 
together in many of our churches would make an interesting and 
inspiring story. This goes to show that people will give in spite of 
diflBcuIties, if they want to do it. The amount is larger by ten thou- 
sand dollars than it was a year ago at this time. 

Our final health record has been good, and yet we have to report 
two epidemics. We passed through the last severe winter without 
the usual scourges of the season. Later, we had 132 cases of measles, 
but without any serious complications. And we have just now 
passed through a most fearful scourge of influenza. There were 
at least 475 cases, children and grown people, and not a single death. 
The heroic effort and cheerful spirit of our workers, and of the chil- 
dren as well, through all these trying days and nights deserve the 
highest praise. A new chapter in Orphanage history has been made, 
the unwritten story of women's devotion to children not their own. 
Many of them, exhausted by the effort to relieve the little sufferers, 
were themselves stricken by the same disease. Some going back to 
nursing too soon fell, the second time, at the post of duty. The entire 
institution was turned into a hospital and all the well were nurses. 
While they were "never-to-be-forgotten" days of trials, we emerge 
from it all with a finer bond of sympathy. This means that our 
school work has been interrupted. But our system is elastic, and 
the break can be mended by the end of the year without serious 
damage. Teachers have been hard to secure. The lure of Govern- 
ment work has done much harm, for some left us. giving little heed 



MINUTES OF SESSION liUS 97 

to contracts entered into in good faith. Really efficient workers are 
not easily found. Nothing can be more delightful than our work at 
the Orphanage with workers of character and ability, and the cheap- 
est money we ever spend is that spent for really efficient men and 
women to handle these great and difficult situations. This leads to 
the suggestion that we cannot maintain a high order of work with- 
out paying the price. To do work for dependent children that is not 
of that order falls little short of being a crime. There are two 
things to be emphasized. The first is, that we must adjust ourselves 
to the fact that this work is worthy of our best effort and for that 
reason will call for increasingly large sums of money. "We have put 
our hands to the plow and cannot turn back. 

The other is, that we are devoting ourselves mainly to only one 
hemisphere of the great task. We are taking care of dependent 
children with little thought or effort to prevent the supply of them. 
We are pressing into the Orphanage children who have mothers, 
strong and well, physically, mentally and morally able to care for 
them. Under present conditions there seems to be no help for it. 
But it ought not so to be. Such a mother ought to be helped to hold 
her children together, in an unbroken home. She will care for them 
without a salary; and besides, she is the divinely appointed guard- 
ian of her children. The mother who is hopelessly broken in health, 
or the one unfit in character, presents a question of an entirely dif- 
ferent nature. Your General Manager has urged before the North 
Carolina Conference for Social Service the serious consideration of 
this matter. Now, if we, as a denomination, are to be leaders in 
thought and leaders in action, we must so relate ourselves to exist- 
ing agencies of public welfare as to bring our strength to bear on this 
the most badly handled task of social service. If there is no ade- 
quate existing agency, we must help to make one. Excellent breth- 
ren, in their mistaken zeal, urge that these children should be sent 
to the Orphanage for the better training they may receive here. 
Some of this zeal should be expended in devising ways and means 
for preserving such homes intact. The Board of Charities and Public 
Welfare is working out a measure to be presented to the present 
Legislature, by which worthy mothers may be aided in caring for 
their children. This effort is worthy of the most careful and earnest 
consideration of our people. If the State can, in the schools for the 
Deaf and Blind and in some institution for the hopelessly crippled, 
care for the physically defective, and in the Caswell Training School, 
the Jackson Training School, and in the Industrial School for Girls, 
care for the mental and moral defectives, it is not unreasonable to 
conclude that the existing institutions maintained by the different 
Christian denominations and benevolent orders could soon ade- 
quately care for all other dependent children of the State. At 
7 



98 X. C. BAPTIST STATE CONVENTION 

least this report would most earnestly call attention to these broader 
phases of the study of child-welfare. Baptists have led the way in 
the care of children eligible to the orphanages; they should also take 
a large share in this suggested task scarcely begun. 

M. L. Keslek, 
General Manager. 

In closing this report there are two evils to which we feel it out 
duty to call attention: 

1. The prevalence of that form of lawlessness known as Lynch 
Law should be discountenanced and denounced by all good citizens. 
We believe the officers of the law should do everything within their 
power to apprehend and bring before the courts those who engage in 
this form of lawlessness, and that the courts should mete out to such 
violators the full penalty of the law. 

2. The second evil is the tendency on the part of juries in certain 
sections of the State to fail to convict violators of the law, no matter 
what the crime, or how strong the evidence. This is especially true 
if the prisoner at the bar is a white man charged with an offense 
against a negro. While we recognize that there are social distinc- 
tions that exist between the races, we believe that before the law all 
men should be equal, and that no guilty man should escape punish- 
ment because the man against whom he commits an offense belongs 
to another race. 



APPENDIX D 



REPORT ON BIBLICAL RECORDER 



Once more the Biblical Recorder comes to the Convention to ren- 
der an account of its stewardship. As the organ of the Convention, 
the paper is glad to report to the lx)dy to whose interests it gives its 
best efforts. 

THE KUSINESS SIDE 

By a very happy arrangement, and one that is unique in the his- 
tory of religious journalism, the Convention is not burdened with 
the financial support of the paper. Individuals subscribe for the 
paper but they receive the worth of their money, and the Recorder 
is in no sense an object of charity or benevolence. While the Con- 
vention is not burdened with the finances of the paper, it does have 
a part in its management. It has an equal voice with the directors 
in the election of the editor. This might be called representation 
without taxation. 

Financially all papers have had a struggle for the past two years. 
This is especially true of religious papers. The price of paper has 
increased two hundred per cent since the war began, while printers' 
wages have advanced fifty per cent. All material used in making a 
paper has advanced in price greatly, thus making it much more ex- 
pensive to get out a paper than formerly. As a result, many papers 
have suspended publication, and five Baptist papers in the South, 
which were privately owned, were taken over by the Conventions 
because the owners were not able to meet the expense of publication. 

The Recorder Company has been able to issue the Recorder and 
ends the year in fair financial condition. 

We found it necessary at the beginning of the year to reduce the 
size of the paper, as other papers of the South were forced to do. 
The matter of reduction was presented to the Convention at its last 
session and we were very much gratified at the way in which the 
proposition was received. While we have been somewhat handi- 
capped for lack of space we have tried to make up in quality for 
what the paper lacked in quantity. It is our purpose to increase 
the size of the paper as soon as our finances will permit. Mean- 
time, we shall print twenty or twenty-four pages from time to time 
as necessity may require and thus relieve the congestion. 

We are asking our Women's Missionary Societies to make Janu- 
ary and February Recorder months, and we are hoping to receive a 
list of new subscribers from every society in the State. An honor 
roll is being published and it will be interesting to see the list grow 
from week to week. 



100 N. C. BAPTIST STATE CONVENTION 

We are under obligation to Secretary Walter N. Johnson for the 
excellent work he has done for the Recorder. At the associations 
which convened last fall he urged that each church attempt to se- 
cure one new subscriber for every twenty of its members. A num- 
ber of churches have responded and as a result a goodly number of 
new names have been added to the Recorder list, and this is only 
the beginning. 

Owing to the epidemic, which prevailed last fall, many of the asso- 
ciations failed to meet and others held one-day sessions. This made 
it impossible for the Recorder to secure the usual number of re- 
newals and new subscribers at these important annual meetings. 
For this reason we most earnestly urge the pastors to request their 
people to renew. We wish very much that an active member of each 
church would undertake to secure renewals and new subscribers. 
This is a fine opportunity to render a very valuable service to the 
Kingdom. 

POLICY OF THE PAPER 

It is with the policy of the paper that the Convention is chiefly 
concerned. It could not and should not command the support of the 
Convention or the churches if it failed to carry out the policies of 
the Convention. 

It is not only the duty, but the pleasure, of the editor to use the 
Recorder for the promotion of the things for which the Convention 
stands and which it has taken under its fostering oare. All the 
representatives of the several departments of our work are invited 
to present the claims of their respective departments through the 
columns of the paper. It is not possible for us to publish all that is 
sent us by the various agencies of the denomination, as these are so 
numerous that all the space in the Recorder would be taken if we 
printed all; but we try to give to each its proportionate amount of 
space, always giving preference to matters of immediate and press- 
ing importance. 

The expressed will of the Convention on denominational matters, 
is the law that controls the paper. No matter what the views of 
the editor may be on matters of denominational policies, when the 
Convention expresses itself that becomes the end of controversy, 
and the Recorder will do its utmost to aid in carrying out the meas- 
ures adopted by the Convention. As we understand it, that is the 
function of an organ; it is the mouth-piece of the organization which 
has adopted it. 

In all other matters, and upon all other questions than those of a 
denominational character, or which will affect the denomination, 
the editorial columns will express the honest opinions of the editor. 
He alone is responsible for the views expressed, and in no sense 
assumes to speak for the denomination. He hopes that in expressing. 



MINUTES OF SESSION 1918 - 101 

opinions on any general religious principle, he will express the 
views of Baptists, but there may be room, even among Efaptists, for 
honest difference. 

On questions of vital importance, the editor feels that the Recorder 
should have and express opinions without stopping to think whether 
or not they will strike a popular chord. There are many vital ques- 
tions before the Avorld now, the importance of which has been accen- 
tuated because of conditions brought about by the war. If the 
religious papers do not stand against Catholic aggression it will go 
on unimpeded. There is undoubtedly a well-organized and concerted 
effort to destroy denominationalism, and substitute therefor a spine- 
less, inert organization, of which the Y. M. C. A. will probably be 
the directing force. Union of church and State is another question 
which has loomed large on the horizon in these last days. All these 
have an important bearing on our denominational life, and their 
discussion is necessaiT to keep our people informed. 

In discussing current topics, the editor expresses his honest opin- 
ion without regard to the opinions of persons, or the probable effect 
on parties. As an individual the editor has political convictions, 
but as editor of the Recorder he knows no party and will not allow 
the paper to be used in the interest of any party. Those in public 
positions will be commended when special commendation is merited, 
and criticised, if their acts are such as to make criticism seem to the 
editor to be necessary, and this -will be done regardless of what the 
political affiliations of the public officer may be. 

DOCTRINAL DISCUSSION 

For over a year the editor has intended to write a series of edi- 
torials on doctrinal subjects, but the columns of the paper have been 
so crowded that we have not been ^ble to give space to it. We have 
determined, however, to make space for these editorials beginning 
about the first of February. It is the purpose of the editor to dis- 
cuss, first the great vital doctrines upon which evangelical denomi- 
nations are agreed, and then to present those that are more dis- 
tinctively denominational. We are urging the importance of stand- 
ing by our denominational principles, when numbers of our young 
people especially, do not know what those principles are. They need 
to be informed before they can have a proper appreciation of the 
things for which Baptists stand. 

In presenting our distinctive doctrines the editor will have due 
regard for that spirit of fraternity that should characterize all re- 
ligious discussions. While showing the points of difference between 
Baptists and other denominations, he will remember that others 
have a right to their opinions, and he will gladly recognize them as 
brethren who love the same Lord whom he loves, and who are try- 
ing honestly to extend His Kingdom in the earth. 



102 -V. C. BAPTIST UTATE CONVENTION 

CONCLUSION 

In concluding this report we wish to say that the Recorder con- 
ceives it to be its mission to stand for the truth as it has been re- 
vealed to us in the word of God, and to use its influence to the 
utmost in extending the teachings of God's word to the ends of the 
earth. We ask the aid of all our brethren and sisters in increasing 
the number of subscribers to the Recorder, thereby enlarging its 
usefulness. 

Livingston John.son, Editor. 

J. S. Fahmer, Business Manager. 



APPENDIX E 



STATISTICS AND OTHER DATA 



Compiled by E. L. Middleton 
Statistical Secretary of the Conv'ention 



DIRECTORY OP THE SOUTHERN BAPTIST CONVENTION 
Organized May 8, 1845 



Officers for Session 1917 — President, J. B. Gambrell, Dallas, Tex.; 
-Secretaries, O. F. Gregory, Baltimore, Md., and Hight C. Moore, 
Nashville, Tenn. 

Foreign Mission Board, Richmond, Va.- — President, William EUy- 
son; Corresponding Secretary, J. F. Love. 

Home Mission Board, Atlanta. Ga. — President, John F. Purser; 
Corresponding Secretary, B. D. Gray. 

Sunday School Board, Nashville, Tenn. — President, Wm. Luns- 
ford; Corresponding Secretary, I. J. VanNess. 

Southern Bajitist Theological Semiyiary, Louisville, Ky. — President, 
E. Y. Mullins; Treasurer Students' Aid Fund, B. Pressly Smith. 

Woman's Missionary Union (organized May 14, 1888), auxiliary to 
the Convention. Headquarters at Baltimore. Miss Kathleen Mal- 
lory, Corresponding Secretary. 

The next meeting of the Convention will be held in Atlanta, Ga., 
May 14. 1919. 



104 



:v'. C. BAPTIST STATE CONVENTION 





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143 



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145 



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ACTIVE AXD INACTIVE CHURCHES 



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Sunday School Statistics in All Associations for Convention Year 
Ending November 19, 1918 




Associations 



Alexander. 
Alleghany. 

Anson 

Ashe 

Avery 

Beulah 

Bladen* 

Brier Creek. 

Brunswick* 

Brushy Mountain. 

Buncombe. 

Caldwell. 

Cape Fear-Columbus. 

Caiolina. 

Catawba River. 

Central 

Chowan 

Cumberland. 

Dock* 

Eastern 

Elkin 

Flat River. 
French Broad. 
Green River. 
Haywood* 
Johnston. 
Kings Mountain. 

Liberty 

Liberty-Ducktown. 
Little River. 

Macon 

Mecklenburg-Cabarrus. 

Mitchell* 

Montgomery. 

Mount Zion. 

Neuse- Atlantic. 

New Found' 

Pee Dee. 

Piedmont. 

Pilot Mountain. 

Raleigh. 

Roanoke. 

Robeson. 

Sandy Creek. 

Sandy Run. 

South Fork. 

South Mountain. 

South River. 

South Yadkin. 

Stanly 

Stone Mountain. 
Stonv Fork*. 

Surrv 

Tar River. 
Tennessee River- 
Three Forks 
Transylvania* 
Tuckaseigee. 

Union 

West Buncombe. 

West Chowan 

Western North Carolina. 

Wilmington 

Yadkin 

Yancey 



Totals 2,191 2,125 288,970 212,841 

*1917. 



2,395 9,565 



HISTORICAL TABLE OF THE CONVEXTIOX 



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A. C. BAPTIHT UTATE VOSVEMION 




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HISTORICAL TABLE OF THE CONVENTION 



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WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 



Contribu- 

Associations and Superintenclents. Societies, tions. 

Ashe 3 $ 12.50 

Beulah— Mrs. C. M. Murchison, Yanceyville 25 678.59 

Bladen 9 145.61 

Brushy Mountain— Mrs. I. J. Myers, N. Wilkesboro. . 4 124.05 

Brunswick — Mrs. J. L. Simmons. Shallotte 25 299.50 

Buncombe — Miss Annie L. Logan. Asheville 34 3,006.50 

Caldwell— Mrs. J. A. Boldin, Lenoir 16 226.40 

Cape Fear-Columbus— Mrs. J. L. Memory, Whiteville 9 323.10 

Carolina— Mrs. J. F. Brooks. Hendersonville 22 287.86 

Catawba River — Mrs. J. Ernest Erwin, Morganton.. 8 339.48 

Central — Mrs. Jessie Earnshaw, Wake Forest 52 3,888.76 

Chowan— Mrs. E. M. Sawyer, Belcross 61 2,409.81 

Cumberland— Mrs. D. C. Rogers. Hope Mills 29 885.98 

Dock— Miss Syntha Ward, Bug Hill, R. F. D 1 (New) 

Eastern — Miss Macy Cox. Magnolia 60 1,679.25 

Flat River— Mrs. John Webb. Oxford 42 1,464.67 

French Broad — Mrs. R. L. Moore, Mars Hill 4 111.45 

Green River — Miss Clara Morris, Union Mills 18 245.97 

Haywood — Mrs. J. R. Morgan, Waynesville 13 953.06 

Johnston County— Mrs. Ef. A. Hocutt, Clayton 51 1,300.99 

Kings Mountain— Mrs. W. R. Beach, Kings Mt 50 1,046.52 

Lib.-Ducktown — Mrs. Nora C. White, Murphy, R. 2.. 1 4.00 

Liberty— Mrs. S. D. Swain, Lexington 18 839.07 

Little River— Miss Mattie Bain, Coats 19 858.77 

Macon — I\Iiss Bertha Moore. Franklin 4 41.00 

Meck.-Cab.— Mrs. J. D. Withers, Charlotte, R. 12 38 3.397.14 

Mt. Zion— Mrs. C. L. Haywood. Durham 60 3,726.58 

Montgomery— Mrs. W. L. Wright, Troy 17 238.69 

Neuse-Atlantic— Mrs. C. W. Blanchard, New Bern. . . 52 2,349.01 

Pee Dee — Mrs. L. L. Henry, Wadesboro 36 2,073.85 

Piedmont — Miss Mabel Clarke, Greensboro 30 2,156.07 

Pilot Mountain— Mrs. J. J. Roddick, Winston-Salem. 45 2,631.09 

Raleigh — Mrs. W. L. Griggs. Cary 48 2,101.18 

Roanoke — Mrs. W. E. Daniel. Weldon 62 3,455.04 

Robeson— Mrs. R. D. Caldwell, Lumberton 92 2,938.57 

Sandy Creek— Mrs. P. H. St.Clair, Sanford 42 1,318.40 

Sandy Run— Mrs. J. R. Moore, Forest City 37 729.06 

South Fork— Mrs. H. B. Moore. Gastonia 45 2,024.33 

South River— Mrs. C. S. Royal. Salemburg 20 360.83 

South Mountain 1 10.75 

South Yadkin— Mrs. C. S. Cashwell, Statesville 40 1.447.18 



l&ti .V. C". BAPTIST STATE COXVEXTION 

Contribu- 

Associatlons and Superintendents. Societies, tions. 

Surry — Mrs. J. H. Tharpe, Elkin 4 46.81 

Stanly — Mrs. J. M. Mauney, New London 6 140.15 

Tar River — Mrs. W. W. Parker, Henderson 73 1,479.69 

Tennessee River— Mrs. J. L. Gibson, Bryson City. . . 8 130.25 

Three Forks — Mrs. D. F. Horton, Vilas 8 92.37 

Tuckaseigee — Mrs. C. L. Allison, Sylva 6 114.51 

Transylvania — Miss Myrtle Gillespie, Calvert 11 6.72 

Union — Mrs. D. B. Snyder, Monroe 16 627.87 

Wilmington — Mrs. E. P. Brock, Wilmington 40 1,298.24 

West Chowan — Miss Una White, Severn 126 4,659.64 

Western' N. C. — Mrs. W. E. Wilson, Murphy 8 83.93 

Yadkin — Miss Delia Woodhouse, Boonville 18 122.44 

Yancey — Mss Loretta Stout, Bumsville 3 67.02 

Totals 1560 $61,940.71 

To Judson Centennial 1.161.05 

Grand total $63,101.76 



STUDENTS IX TRAINING SCHOOL, LOUISVILLE, KY. 

Miss Mary Warren, Buie's Creek; Miss Annie Fountain, Tarboro; 
Miss Valleria Green, Ridgecrest; Miss Rose Goodwin, Elizabeth 
City; Miss Vonnie Lance, Asheville; Miss Eugenia Morrison, Flat 
Rock; Miss Vera Ruth, Salisbury; Miss Hallie Sorrell, Raleigh, 
R. 6; Mrs. J. M. Adams, Raleigh; Mrs. A. R. Phillips, Dalton; Mrs. 
B. 0. Meyers, Plymouth; Mrs. R. K. White, Conway; Mrs. V. H. 
Harrell, Eure; Mrs. C. F. Hudson. Morganton; Mrs. T. B. Sieber- 
man, Greensboro. 



FOREIGN MISSIOKARIES 187 



NORTH CAROLINA MISSIONARIES OF THE FOREIGN MISSION 
BOARD OF THE SOUTHOERN BAPTIST CONVENTION. 

Xame and Location. Bate of Going Out. 

Bryan, R. T., Shanghai. China 1885 

Britton, T. C, Soochow, China 1888 

Britton, Mrs. T. C, Soochow, China 1888 

Bostick, Rev. G. P., Pochow, China 1889 

Crocker, W. E., Chinkiang, China 1899 

Greene, Mrs. G. W., Canton, China 1891 

Lanneau, Miss Sophie, Soochow, China 1907 

Newton, W. C, Hwanghien, China 1903 

Tatum, E. F. Shanghai, China 1888 

Herring, D. W., Cheng Chow, China 1885 

Dozier, Mrs. C. K.. Fukuoka, Japan 1906 

Justice, J. M., Buenos Aires, Argentina 1908 

Mclntyre, Miss Lila, Cheng Chow, China 1908 

Bryan, Miss Catherine, Yangchow, China 1908 

Hamlet. Mrs. P. H., Soochow, China 1909 

Tipton, Mrs. W. H., Wuchow, China 1909 

Bostick, Rev. W. D., Fochow, China 1910 

Bostick, Mrs. W. D., Pochow, China 1910 

Cox, Miss Laura Virginia, Guaymas, Mexico 1910 

Leonard, Rev. C. A., Laichowfu, China 1910 

Willingham. Mrs. Foy Johnson, Kokura, Japan 1911 

Hipps, Rev. J. B.. Shanghai. China 1913 

McMillan, Rev. H. H., Soochow, China 1913 

McMillan, Mrs. H. H., Soochow, China 1913 

Johnson, Miss Pearl, Shanghai, China 1915 

Bostick, Miss Attie. Tai-an-Fu, China 1916 

Anderson, Mrs. John T., Yangchow, China 1916 

Gallimore, A. R.. Yangtak, China 1918 

Braun, M. L.. Kaifeng, China 1918 

Kraun, Mrs. M. L., Kaifeng, China 1918 



STATISTICAL SUMMARY 



I am closing my eleventh annual report as Statistical Secretary. 
Twenty-eight associations with a membership of 137,016 were due 
to meet after the outbreak of the epidemic of influenza. Some of 
these failed to meet. Others met for one day only. I have re- 
ceived more or less complete reports from fifty-seven associations — 
all except the Bladen, Brunswick, Dock, Haywood, Mitchell, New- 
found, Stony Fork and Transylvania. It might be said that the 
Haywood and Newfound met in August, but all efforts to get re- 
ports failed. All the others were due to meet after the outbreak of 
the epidemic, and we do not know whether or not they met. We 
are using 1917 data for all these as well as from many churches 
in other Associations. 

Dr. Lansing Burrows, the veteran Statistician of the Southern 
Baptist Convention, in writing me said, "Hitherto I have been ex- 
pected to make brick without straw. This year they will not even 
give me clay." Our clerks are doing better than this in North 
Carolina. We have used available data to make the report as acciir- 
ate as possible. I give the data below for the busy reader who does 
not have time to "dig through" more than eighty pages of facts. 

CHURCHES AND MEMBERSHIP 

We have 2,191 churches in 65 Associations. The membership is 
288,970. This is a gain of 28 churches and 5,875 members. Several 
small churches disappear from the rolls in the associational minutes. 
About 40 new churches appear for the first tiine. 

BAPTISMS 

This year we report 13.268 baptisms. In such a year when every- 
thing was at such high tension and so uncertain this seems a good 
record. This number is 696 fewer than last year, 2,833 fewer than 
in 1916. and 4,635 fewer than in 1915. This year only 1.431 churches 
report any baptisms with 760 showing no evangelistic work. This 
is over one third of our churches that passed an entire year with no 
additions by baptism. 

CONTRIBUTING AND NOX-CONTRIBUTIXG CHURCHES 

When we make our averages, we consider the "do-nothing" 
churches along with the active ones. A subsequent paragraph will 
show what the contributing churches are doing for the several 
objects. When we study these non-contributing churches, remember 
I have included those whose 1917 membership was used, those with 



STATISTICAL SUMMARY 189 

no membership reported, and those that failed to report to their 
Association, but did report to me on blank postcards sent out. It 
would be fair to add 70 or 80 to the first group and subtract the 
same from the last one. 

We give the number of churches that gave to the several Conven- 
tion objects, and those that did not. The first is the number of 
churches contributing to the several objects, and the last those re- 
porting nothing. 

To some Convention object. 1,854 — 337; to State Missions. 1,615— 
576; to Home Missions. 1,563—628; to Foreign Missions, 1.565—626; 
to Sunday School Missions. 680—1,511; to Orphanage. 1,694—497; 
to Christian Education. 840 — 1.351; to Ministers Relief, 1,005 — 
1,186. 

CONTRIBUTING TO CONVENTION OBJECTS 

The Amounts reported for Convention objects are as follows: 
State Missions, $66,572.61; Home Missions, $53,473.92; Foreign Mis- 
sions, $69,228.65; Sunday School Missions, 5.426.03; Orphanage, 
$87,088.20; Christian Education. $25,500.28; Minister's Relief, $7,- 
747.94; Total $315,037.63. This- is a gain of $60,351.96. 

It is clear to most people that the above amounts are for Associa- 
tional years ending from May to November. It also includes money 
for Associational Missions, money sent to the orphanage and that 
sent direct to Home and Foreign Boards in Atlanta and Richmond. 
With this statement no one would expect these totals to agree with 
the totals of the Convention Treasurer whose fiscal year closes 
November 20th. 

ASSOCIATIONS LEADING 

We give first and second places in each item. Number of churches: 
Roanoke. 64; Pilot Mt. 63. Membership of churches: West Chowan, 
12.829; Chowan. 11.949. Baptisms: Mt. Zion. 593; Pilot Mt., 572. 
Number of Sunday Schools: West Chowan, 68; Tar River, 65: En- 
rollment of Sunday Schools: West Chowan, 8.535; Chowan, 8,434. 
Contributions to State Missions: Roanoke, $4,955.16; Mt. Zion, 
$4,376.88. To Home Missions: West Chowan. $3,947.51; Pilot Mt., 
$3,115.26. To Foreign Missions: West Chowan, $4,819.20; Pied- 
mont. $4,629.37. To Sunday School Missions: Buncombe, $440.71; 
Mt. Zion. $429.69. To Orphanage: West Chowan. $8,351.66; Roa- 
noke, $5,912.36. To Christian Education: Pee Dee, $4,540.56; Cen- 
tral. $2,600.26. To Minister's Relief: Roanoke $495.06; Robeson, 
$470.27. To all objects: West Chowan. $23,148.24; Roanoke, $19,- 
306.11. 

PER CAPITA CONTRIBUTIONS 

For all Convention objects the per capita is $1.09. This is a 
gain of 19 cents during last year. The average of those who give 
would be at least $2.50. Twenty-four Associations have an average 



190 N. C. BAPTIST STATE CONVENTION 

of over $1.00 per member as follows: Pee Dee, $3.67; Piedmont, 
$2.72; Roanoke, $2.42; Central, $2.40; Robeson, $2.06; Raleigh, 
$1.96; Neuse-Atlantic, $1.88; West Chowan, $1.80; Buncombe, $1.75; 
Mt. Zion, $1,74; Pilot Mt, $1.50; Flat River, $1.38; South Fork, $1.38; 
Beulah, $1.32; Wilmington, $1.32; Eastern, $1.25; Cumberland, $1.21; 
Mecklenburg-Cabarrus, $1.17; Chowan, $1.12; Liberty, $1.12; South 
Yadkin, $1.10; Tar River, $1.07; Sandy Creek, $1.04; Johnston, $1.01. 

OTHER AVERAGES 

The average church membership is 132. Of the 1,431 reporting 
baptisms, the average is slightly over 9. The number of church 
members for each baptism is 22. Of the contributing churches to 
Convention objects the average is as follows: State Missions, 
$41.22; Home Missions, $34.21; Foreign Missions. $44.24; Sunday 
School Missions, $7.98; Orphanage, $51.41; Christian Education, 
$30.36; Minister's Relief. $7.71; All objects, $169.92. 

SUNDAY SCHOOLS 

There are now 2,125 Sunday Schools. This seems to be a loss 
of 26, but the number of branch schools reported is 41 fewer than 
last year. It seems 2,053 churches now have schools, 138 have 
none, and that there are 72 branch schools. The membership is 
now 212,841. This is a loss of over 7,000. It is quite sure this i«. 
accounted for by the number of our young men in the war. From 
Baptist homes in our State, there are now at least 20,000 j'oung 
men in the army and navy. Surely half these were in Sunday 
School before leaving home. Then again nearly one-third of the 
Sunday Schools were suspended on account of the epidemic when 
church letters were prepared. For data regarding gains and losses, 
finances, teacher training, etc.. see full report from the Secrcetary to 
Board of Missions and general statistical table. 

BAPTIST YOUNG PEOPLE'S UNIONS 

The B. Y. P. U's of the State seem to have maintained their num- 
bers and efficiency during the year, despite the quarantine. But 
little advancement could be made. The number of Senior and 
Junior organizations stands around 500, with a total membership 
estimated at 15,000. There are seven cities in each of which a 
well organized "City Union" exists, and the B. Y. P. U. flourishes 
in practically all of our Baptist Colleges and Secondary schools. 
The Ninth Annual B. Y. P. U. Convention was held at Winston- 
Salem, June 11 to 13. 1918, at which 35 Senior and Junior organiza- 
tions reported A-1. 

COLLEGES AND SCHOOLS 

Our fourteen high schools employed during the year 97 teachers. 
and enrolled 2,247 students. The three colleges employed 81 teach- 



STATISTICAL SUMMARY 191 

ers, and enrolled 907 students. The value of property and endow- 
ment is $1,491,690. For details, see table of school statistics. 

WOMJAN'S WORK 

The work of the Woman's Missionary Union is growing steadily. 
There are now missionary societies in 54 of our Associations, and 
in 51 of these the work is conducted by Associational Superintend- 
ents. Forty-six Annual Associational W. M. U. Meetings were held 
during the past year, 33 of which were attended by W. M. U. officers 
or their representatives. Eleven thousand six hundred and fifty-two 
miles were traveled by officers of the Union, and 9,083 by the super- 
intendents in the interest of missions. 

The Union is now composed of 1,560 societies, 210 having been 
organized during the past year. There are now 841 women's socie- 
ties, 209 Y. W. A's. and G. A's., 59 R. A. Chapters and 451 Sunbeam 
Bands. Approximately 30,000 of the 150,000 women and children 
in our churches have been enlisted in our societies, and the ulti- 
mate aim is to enlist every one. 

Last year the societies reported nearly 5,000 subscriptions to Home 
and Foreign Fields and to Royal Service, and a large number to the 
Biblical Recorder. 

During 1918 the contributions were the best in our history, the 
total being $63,101.76. Twenty Associations reached their appor- 
tionment and 30 made a 10 per cent gain over the previous year. 
The increase ranged from 10 per cent to 45, 63, 97 and 207 per cent. 
Three 1,000-dollar Memorials have been pledged to the Church Build- 
ing Loan Fund, and forty 500-dollar Memorials. 



LIST OF ORDAINED MINISTERS 



Those Marked Thus * are Pastors. 

A year ago we prepared a new list from all available sources. 
This year we have carefully revised that list with 1918 reports from 
fifty-seven Associations and 1917 rolls of the other eight. 

In making these changes we have added 148 new names, changed 
160 post offices and erased more than 150 names because of deaths, 
removals from State and for lack of any information this year. 

Following the regular list, you will find a list of pastors in army 
service, a list of ministerial students and a list of those who have 
died. 

Of course there are many errors yet. but we have tried to make 
the list correct. Over 600 churches change pastors every year. This 
makes it impossible to keep the list up-to-date. Send me any cor- 
rections that ought to be made. 



*Abee, O. A.. Connely Springs. 
*Abernethy, G. P., Gastonia. 

Abernethy, R. B., Hilderbran. 
*Absher, J. M., Offen. 

Adams, G. W., N. Wilkesboro. 

Adams, D. A., Hays. 
*Adams, J. Q., Charlotte. 

Adams, J. J.. Whiteville. 
*Adams, J. Z., State Road. 
*Adams, M. A.. Canton. 

Alderman, J. M., Delway. 

Allan, John, Burnsville. 
♦Allen, J. I., Dillon. S. C. 
*Allison, E., Etowah. 
*Anderson. Chas., Scotland Neck. 
*Arledge, J. B.. Saluda. 

Arledge, T. W., Harris. 
*Arnette, J. M., Badin. 

Arnold, J. M., Riverside. 

Arnold, J. N., Highlands. 

Arrington, C. C, Brim. 
*Arrington, T. P.. Waynesville. 

Arrington, W. F., Siloam. 
*Atkins, R. E.. Morrisville. 
*Atkinson, J. W., Neuse. 
*Atkinson, L. J.. New Bern. 
*Austin. B. F., Taylorsville, R. 4. 
*Austin, D. M.. Charlotte. 
♦Austin, C. B., Mooresville. 

Austin. J. H., Hamlet. 
*Avery, W. B., New Bern. 
*Ayers, W. A., Durham. 
*Avscue, J. E., Greenville. 



♦Ballard. W. H.. Buckner. 

Ballard, L. D.. Mt. Ulla. R.F.D. 
♦Ballard. .J. M., Alexis. 
♦Bain, G. A., Dunn. 
♦Baker. T. J., Turkey. 
♦Bangle, L. A., Cherryville. 
♦Bangle, P. W., Lincolnton. 

Banks, W. J., Independence, Va. 

Barber, W. E., Asheville, R. 4. 

Barker, J. N., Austin. 
♦Barker, M. H., Murphy. 
♦Barker. "W. F.. Grassy Creek. 

Barnes, D. C, Barnesville. 
♦Barnes, J. H., Raleigh. 
♦Barnes. S. B.. Merry Hill. 
♦Barnes, W. H., Salemburg. 
♦Barrett. W. C, Gastonia. 
♦Barrs, W. L., Cooleemee. 
♦Baskin. E. L.. Chapel Hill. 
♦Bass. .T. H.. Roxboro. 
♦Bassett, J. B., Pineville. 

Baucom. H. W.. Smithfield. 
♦Beach, W. R.. Kings Mountain. 
♦Beam. .1. A.. Woodsdale. 
♦Beaver, C. E.. Maiden. 
♦Beaver, E. A.. Suit. 
♦Beaver. J. T., Burnsville. 
♦Beck. A. L. Balsam. 
♦Beck. J. H.. Ivanhoe. 
♦Bell. J. W., Faison. 
♦Belton, J. O.. Mt. Airy. 
♦Benfield. J. G.. Morganton, R. 2 
♦Bennett. .1. C. Candler. 
♦Bennett, J, P., Andrews. 

Bennett. S. C. Bridgewater. 



ORDAINED MINISTERS 



193 



*Bennett, S. W., Concord. 
Belts, J. D., Fuquay Springs. 
Betts, S. J., Raleigh. 
Biddle, J. T., Asheville. 
*Biggs, W. O., Elm City. 
*Bilbro, W. L., Maysville. 
*Binkley, J. N., Harmony. 
Bishop, W. J., Judson. 
Bivens, J. A., Wingate. 
Black, J. C, Ledger. 
*Black, C. J., Wingate. 
*Black, J. F., Kannapolis. 
*Blackburn, Coy, Piney Creek. 
♦Blackburn, J. F., Judson. 
♦Blackburn, C. S. Henderson- 

ville. 
♦Blackman, N. D., Goldsboro. 
Blackwell, W. M., Flat Rock. 
Blalock, J. C, Ledger. 
♦Blalock, J. G., Weldon. 
*Blalock, T. L., Ledger. 
*Blanchard, C. W., New Bern. 
*Blackenship, J. M., Paint Gap. 
*Blanton, J. C, Kings Mt. 

Blanton, W. A., Rutherfordton. 

Blanton, J. H., Fayetteville. 

Bledsoe, T. F., Dobson. 

Blevins, C, New Life. 
♦Blevins, J. A., Hays. 
♦Blevins, S. L., Whitehead. 
♦Blevins, T. E., New Life. 
♦Bobbitt, N. W., Littleton, 
♦Bomar, E. E., Hendersonville. 
♦Booker, A. V., Raleigh, R. 4. 
♦Booth, J. H.. Rose Hill. 
♦Boney, L. B., Wilmington. 

Bostick, W. M., Biscoe. 
♦Bower, F. A., Morganton. 

Boyd, J. P., Morven. 
♦Bradshaw, W. R., Hickory. 
♦Bradburn, S. J., Marshall. 
♦Bradley, J. A., Marshall, R. 3. 
♦Bradley, W. L., Etna. 
♦Bradley, W. T., Stocksvile. 

Branson, R. N., Asheville. 
♦Branton, J. S., Solola. 

Brandon, S. 0., Jonesville. 
♦Brendle. J. A., Franklin. 

Brewer, W. S., Hays. 

Bridges, S. A., Forest City. 
♦Bridges, B. M., Boiling Springs. 
♦Bridges, D. P., Ellerbe. 
♦Bridges, J. D., Lattimore. 

Briggs, S. C, Ivy. 

Briggs, J. W., Balfour. 
♦Brinson, H. F., E. Durham. 

Brisson, W. L., Richardson, 
R. 1. 

Brisson, W. M., Dublin. 
♦Bristow, S. F., Washington. 



Britt, N. F., Bolivia. 
♦Britt, P. T., Bolivia. 
♦Broadwell, X. L., Selma. 
♦Brooks, C, v., Red Springs. 
♦Brooks, E. M., New London 
Brooks, J. N., N. Wilkesboro. 
Brookshire, J. L., Henderson- 
ville. 
Brown, Asa, West Riverside. 
♦Brown, Chester, Black Mt. 
♦Brown, D. S., St. Paul. 
♦Brown, A. L., Beaufort. 
fBrown, A. E., Asheville. 
Brown, G. W., Boone. 
♦Brown, H. A., Winstou- Salem. 
♦Brown, H. J., Young Harris, Ga. 
Brown, S. F., Trap Hill. 
Brown, R. L., Crozer Seminary. 
♦Brown, W. V., Cycle. 
♦Brown, T. L., Lewiston. 
♦Bruner, Weston, Raleigh. 
♦Bryant, H. G., Creedmoor. 
♦Bryant, J. W., Boonville. 
♦Bryant, W. B., Finley. 
♦Bryson, A. C, Balsam. 
Buchanan, Alfonza, Hawk. 
Buchanan, Charlie. Toecane. 
Buchanan, H. B., Glen Ayre. 
♦Buchanan, John, Roaring River. 
♦Buchanan, M. L., Spruce Pine. 
♦Buck, Martin, W., Burlington. 

Bumgardner, A. P., Casar. 
♦Bumgarner, B. V., Taylorsville. 
♦Bumgarner, G. Z., Taylorsville. 
♦Bumgarner, W. J., Taylorsville, 

R. 5. 
♦Bunn, D. T., Spring Hope. 
Burcham, G. M., Elkin. 
♦Burcham, John, Roaring River. 
♦Burchfield, G. F., Murphy. 
Burger, G. F., Murphy. 
♦Burkett, R. M.. Theta. 
♦Burris, C. C, Ansonville. 
Burris, I. C. Stanfield. 
♦Burrus, G. E., Rockford. 
♦Burrus, L. W., Boonville. 
♦Butler, A. A., Tyner. 
♦Byrd, J. T. Roaring River. 
♦Byrd. R. L.. St. Pauls, R. 2. 
♦Byrum, J. T., Winston-Salem. 
♦Byrum, W. J., Creswell. 

Caldwell, J. C. West End. 

Cain, W. H., Elizabethtown. 
♦Caldwell, C. A., Morganton. 
♦Cale, W. P., Tyner. 
♦Cale, J. F., Roxobel. 
♦Cale, D., Potecasi. 

Calhoun, T. J., Medlin. 



tSupt. Mountain Schools. 
13 



194 



N. C. BAPTIST STATE CONVENTION 



Calloway, Jas. N., Jefferson. 
♦Calloway, J. H., Round Peak. 
*Camp, W. G., Shelby, R. 3. 

Campbell, B. F., Morehead City. 
♦Campbell, .J. A., Euies Creek. 

Campbell, O. P., Crozer Semi- 
nary. 
♦Campbell, J. E., Gastonia. 

Campbell, Neal, Thaxton. 
♦Campbell, R. C, Shelby. 
♦Campbell, W. P., Chadboum. 
♦Campbell, W. T., Cardenas. 
♦Canlpe, J. C, Mebane. 
♦Carlton, A. L., Warsaw. 
♦Carlton, W. E., Baldwin. 
♦Carlton, W. F., Wilbar. 

Carpenter, L. L., 
♦Carrick, Thos., High Point. 
♦Carroll, R. D., Charlotte. 
♦Carson, J. T., Willetts. 
♦Carter, Henry, Garland. 
♦Carter, A. D., Garland. 
♦Carter, J. F., Williamston. 
♦Carter, W. H., Hertford. 

Carter, V. M., Patterson. 
♦Carter, J. R., Long, S. C. 
♦Cashwell, C. S., Statesville. 
♦Cashwell, C. H., Wake Forest. 
♦Cashwell, R. N., Lumberton. 
♦Cashwell, T. L., Cornelius. 
♦Caudle, Zeb. Wingate. 
♦Caudle. T. A.. Yadkinville. 
♦Cawthon, K. W.. Warsaw. 
♦Chaffin, A. C, Cerro Gordo. 

Chambers, Canie, Asheville. 

Chambliss, T. W., Asheville. 

Champion, R. C, Landrum, S. C. 

Cheek, C. W., Dockery. 

Cheek, Frank, Whitehead. 

Chilton. J. W., Mount Airy. 
♦Chronister. H. B., Maiden. 
♦Church. E. W., Old Fort. 
♦Church, W. N., Summitt. 
♦Church, G. H., Statesville. 

Church, J. W., Summitt. 
♦ Clark, D. J., Elizabethtown. 

Clarke, F. B., Whitehead. 

Clark, M. L.. Morganton. R. 1. 
♦Clarke, Jas. A., High Point. 

Clark. L. S.. Candler. 
♦Clarke, G. W., Elizabeth City. 
♦Clemmons. A. W., Bolivia. 
♦Cleveland. W. C. Arden. 

Clifton. R. L., Fayetteville. 
♦Cloer, George, Franklin. 
♦Cobb, J. W., Lumber Bridge. 
tCochran, G. E., Wake Forest. 

Coffey, Robert. Hayesville. 
♦Cogdill, J. R.. Trust. 
♦Cole, E. D., Copper Hill. Tenn. 



t Professor Wake Forest College. 



♦Coleman, W. A., Boardman. 

Colley, J. D., Asheville, R. 4. 
♦Collins, Alex, Mt. Airy. 
♦Collins, F. T., Ahoskie. 
♦Collins, T. D., Louisburg. 
♦Colston, J. F., Potecasi. 

Comer, J. R., Asbury. 
♦Comer, W. T., New Castle. 
♦Connell, J. S., Catawba. 

Conrad, S. F., Charlotte. 

Comer, N. H., Yadkinville. 
♦Cook, C. C, Toecane. 
♦Cook, H. H., Hamer, S. C. 
♦Cook, J. H., Casar. 

Cook, R. L., Addie. 

Cook, W. F., Rich Mountain. 
♦Cook, W. N.. Beta. 
♦Cooper, W. F., Doughton. 
♦Cope, C. M., McGuire. 
♦Coram, R. P., Boonville. 
♦Copeland, J. E., Hertford. 
♦Corey, A., Jamesville. 
♦Corn, James, Paint Fork. 
♦Corn, J. W., Marshall, R. 3. 
♦Corn, J. P., Zirconia. 
♦Corn, Judson, Brevard. 
♦Corn, R. P., Hendersonville. 
♦Cornsilk, A., Robbinsville. 
♦Cothren, Grant. Lomax. 
♦Cothren. T. J., Havesville. 

Couch, J. H.. Chapel Hill. 

Cowan, Duff, Green's Creek. 
♦Cowan, G. N.. Apex. 

Cox, R. E.. West Durham. 

Crabtree, A. W., Boiling Springs. 

Crabtree. W. A., Hamlet. 
♦Craig. W. M.. Kinston. 
♦Crawford, L. H.. Argura. 
♦Creech, Oscar, Nashville. 

Crews, R. W., Germanton. 
♦Crismon. C. E.. High Point. 
♦Crisp, E. D., Lenoir, R. 4. 

Crisp, J. F., Morganton, R. 2. 

Crisp. J. M., Chambers. 
♦Crisp, John, Lenoir, R. 4. 
♦Crisp, S. M., Japan. 

Crisp, Oscar, Stecoah. 
♦Crisp, T. J., Conetoe. 
♦Croom. H. M.. Catawba. 
♦Cross. R. D.. Boone. 
♦Crutchfield, T. S., Roanoke 

Rapids. 
tCullom, W. R., Raleigh. 

Cunningham, H. A., Bryson 
City. 

Currant, J. M.. Houstonville. 
♦Currin, J. B., Oxford. 

♦Dailey, L. E., Lumberton. 
♦Daniel, P. S., Winterville. 

tManager Endowment Campaign. 



ORDAINED MINISTERS 



195 



*Davis, A. C, Marshville, R. 2. 

Davis, A. W., Webster. 

Davis, John A., Grayson. 

*Davis, J. F., Milton. 

*Davis, J. B., Northside. 
*Davis, J. G., Wake Forest. 
*Davis, M. P., South Mills. 
*Davis, Q. C, Albemarle. 
*Davis, R. Lee, Hiddenite. 
tDavis, T. B., Kinston, R. 3. 

Davis, W. H., Hendersonville. 

Davenport, J. E. M., Pineville. 

Day, Fred N., Winston-Salem. 
*Day, T. J., Warrensville. 
*Deaton, D. E., Henderson. 
*LeLancy, J. C, Greensboro. 
*DeLoatch, B. F., Fairview. 
♦Denny, W. E., Grassy Creek. 

Denny, G. L., Grassy Creek. 

Denton, J. R., Dysartsville. 

Devault, J. R., Asheville. 

Devenny, J. V., Lawndale. 
*Deitz, T. F., Bryson City. 
*Deitz, R. N., Green's Creek. 

Deitz, J. S., Double Shoals. 
*Dills. .J. N.. Letitia. 
*Dixon, L. R., Ore Hill. 
*Dobson, J. H., Atkinson. 
*Dodd, W. H., Mocksville. 
*Dorsett, H. G., Carrboro. 
*Dorton, M. L., Concord. 

Dove, A. H., Clarkton. 
*Dowd. W. C, Cosma. 
*Dowell, Geo. J., Ayden. 
*Dowell, C. L., Franklinton. 

Downs, Posey E., Casar. 
*Downey, J. W., Woodland. 
*Drake, T. A., Nebo. 
*Draughn, T. S., Crutchfield. 

Duckworth. C. C. Brevard. 
*Dugan, J. T., Bethel. 

Duncan, J. W., Gilreath. 

Duncan, H. J., Roseboro. 
♦Duncan, J. M., Mt. Olive. 
*Duncan, V. E., Belhaven. 
*Dunnegaji, W. E., Gorman. 
*Dupree, J. E.. Pine Level. 
*Durham, C. H., Lumberton. 

*Early. B. G.. Kinston. 

Eatman, T. J., Stockville. 

Ebeltoft. T. W., Shelby. 
*Edwards. F. C, Swannanoa. 
♦Egerton. S. A., Buies Creek. 

Edwards. C. E., Norlina. 
♦Edwards, W. L., Bald Creek. 

Edwards. W. S.. Ronda. 
♦Eggers. R. C, Zionville. 
*Elam, W. A., Lilesville. 
*Eller, J. Ben, West Durham. 



tSupt. Kennedy House. 



*Eller, W. H., Greensboro. 

Eller, A. J., Wilbar. 
*Eller, J. F., Vilas. 

Elliott, Pat, Tuskeegee. 
♦Elliott, Josiah, Hertford. 
♦Elliott, J. S., Knottsville. 

Elsom, P. G., Hendersonville. 

Ensley, T. T., Mars Hill. 

tFarmer, J. S., Raleigh. 

Farnor, J. S., Kittytown, Tenn. 

Farnor, R. E., Kittytown, Tenn. 

Farthing, C. S., Sugar Grove. 
♦Farthing, J. H., Sweet Water. 

Felts, N. M., Jennings. 

Fiddler, F. L., High Point. 
♦Fields, C. F., Elkin. 

Flanders, W. N., Henderson- 
ville. 
♦Fleming, J. M., Lumberton, R. 5. 
♦Fogleman. T. W., High Point. 

Foster, J. A., Call. 
*Fox, J. K.. Sawmills. 

Francis, George, Ewart. 

Franklin, James, Mineapolis. 

Freeman, A. J., Bladenboro. 

Freeman, F. M., Bostic. 

Freeman, Ira, Bostic. 
♦Freeman, H. R., Cherry Springs, 

S. C. 
♦Freeman, L. E. M., Raleigh. 
♦Fry, F. W., Mocksville. * 

♦Fulbright, J. O., Carthage. 

Fuquay, S. W., Eagle Springs. 

♦Gardner, F. M., Southern Pines. 

Gardner. W. M., Valley. 
♦Garner, R. N., Spurgeon. 
♦Gay, R. L., Columbia. 
♦Garrett, F. B., Hiawassee, Ga. 
♦Garten, C. E., Asheville. 

Gheens, J. R.. Belmont. 

Gibbs, J. A., Qualla. 
♦Gillespie, J. C, Oakboro. 
♦Gillespie, J. T., Linwood. 
♦Gilmore. W. M.. Sanford. 

Glenn, W. H.. Glen. 
♦Glidewell. C. W., Stoneville. 

Goforth, S. S., Lovelace. 
♦Gold. W. M.. Ellenboro. 

Goode, J. M., Boiling Springs. 
♦Goode, W. E.. Roxboro. 
♦Goodrich. A. L., Kelly. 
♦Gordon. R. R., Proximity. 
♦Gorenflo. I. H.. Hot Springs. 
♦Gouge, J. A., Wing. 
♦Gragg, E. M., Vilas. 
♦Graham, T. J., Brock. 
♦Gray, J. J., Etowah. 
♦Graves, C. D., Wake Forest. 

{Business Manager Biblical Recorder. 



196 



N. C. BAPTIST STATE CONVENTION 



Graves, W. T., Ogden. 
♦Green, B. P., Mooresboro. 
♦Green, D. A., Dark Ridge. 

Green Edmon, Sands. 
♦Green, J. H., Warne. 
♦Green, Levi, Hopkins. 
♦Green, J. R., Jacksonville. 
♦Green, R. W., Greens Creek. 
♦Green, S. H., Warne. 
♦Greene, S. M., Clarissa. 
♦Green, T. M., Spray. 

Gregory, C. C, Buckner. 
♦Grice, J. B., Asheville. 

Griffith, S. N., Murphy. 
♦Griffin, Gaston, Birdtown. 
♦Griffin, N. H., Big Laurel. 
♦Griffin, W. M., Alexander. 
♦Griggs, W. L., Gary. 
♦Grindstaff, Isaac. Toecane. 

Gulledge, J. G., Marshville, R. 5. 
♦Gulley, .T. P., Nashville. 
♦Guy. T. Sloan. Zebulon. 

Gwaltney, J. P., Hiddenite. 
♦Gwaltney, J. S., Morganton. R.5. 

Gwaltney, L. P., Stony Point. 

♦Hackney, J. A., Greensboro. 

Hackney, J. D., Franklinville. 
♦Haevner. Vance, Maiden. 
♦Hagaman, J. P., Morganton, R.4 
♦Haire. P. H.. Fleetwood. 
♦JIaight, "W. R., Winsdor. 
♦Haigler, R. M., Wingate. 

Hall, A. J., Bryson City. 

Hall, J. H., Mt. Airv. 

Hall, H. S.. Canton, R. 1. 
♦Hall, W. M., Cataloochee. 

Hall. E. O., Forney. 
♦Hall, J. W., Micaville. 
♦Hall. L. P., Warne. 
♦Hall, L. W., Mineapolis. 
♦Hall, S. W., Winston-Salem. 
♦Hall, W. A., Cattaloochee. 
♦Hall, W. G.. Wilmington. 
♦Hamby, A. C, Waerram. 

Hamilton, L. C, Etowah. 
♦Hampton, J. C. Hayesville. 
♦Hampton, N. S.. Blowing Rock. 
♦Hamrick. B. M.. Rutherfordton. 
♦Handy. E.. Dehart. 
♦Hare, Frank, St. Pauls. 
♦Harper. J. H.. Louisburg. 

Harrelson. John. Clarendon. 

Hannon. S. E.. Carthage. 
♦Harrell. E. J., Shiloh. 
♦Harrill, I. D.. Boiling Springs. 
♦Harrill. Z. D.. Ellenboro. 

Harrill. H. D.. Forest City. 
♦Harrill, G. P.. Bellcross. 

Harris, Edwin R., Burnsville. 



♦Harris, D. P., Clinton. 
♦Harris, J. M., Morganton. 
♦Harris, J. P., Macon. 

Harris, J. W., Canton, R. 1. 

Harris, Ralph, Albemarle. 
♦Harris, J. S., Oakboro. 
♦Harris, M. L, Hudson. 
♦Harris, T. C, Harris. 
♦Harte, J. D., Oxford. 

Hartsell, J. W., Cameron. 
♦Hartsell, Paul, Semora. 

Hartsell, P. G.. Oakboro. 
♦Hartsell, W. H.. Durham. 

Harward, Geo. Morrisville. 

Hayes, A. B., Hays. 
♦Hayes, T. M., Nathan's Creek. 
♦Haymore, C. C, Mount Airy. 
♦Haynes. J. H., Mount Airy. 
♦Haynes, J. M., Clyde. 

Haynes, W. L., Rutherfordton. 

Haynes, W., Asheville R. 1. 
♦Hedgepeth, L P., Lumberton. 
♦Hedgepeth. R. A., Lumberton. 
♦Hellard, E. F., Winston-Salem. 
♦Helms, D. F.. Concord, R. 6. 
♦Hembree, Chas. A., Murphy. 
♦Henderson, G. T., Bryson City. 

Henderson, J. K., Wilmington. 

Henderson, G. W.. Spencer. 

Henderson, I. N.. Hubert. 
♦Hendrix, J. T., Darby. 
♦Hening, B. C. Elizabeth City. 

Henley, J. M., Sanford, R. 3. 
♦Hensley, S. T.. Asheville. R. 5. 

Henson. Joseph. Green Mt. 

Herman. P. E.. Shulls Mills. 
♦Herring, R. H.. Mt. Olive. 
♦Hester, C. R., St. Pauls. 

Hewitt, D. L., Shallotte. 

Hickman, G. T.. Winnabow. 
♦Hicks, P. A.. Chadwick. 
♦Hildreth, J. H.. Fayetteville. 
♦Hilbum, D. H., Bladenboro. 

Hilburn. R. M.. Bladenboro. 

Hildebran, I. M.. Hickory. 
♦Hill, .T. W. P.. Lincolnton. 
♦Hill. W. E., Wake Forest. 
♦Hilliard. J. M.. High Point. 
♦Hines. H. B., Spring Hope. 

Hinson. E. F., Elkin. 
♦Hipps, R. H., Asheville. 
♦Hobbs, L. M.. Durham. 

Hocutt, J. D., Ashton. 
♦Hocutt. J. E., Nashville. 

Hocutt, R. L., Wendell. R. 1. 
♦Hodge. J. L., Rutherfordton. 

Hodge. J. F., Salisbury. 

Hoffman. R. E.. Salisbury. 
♦Hodges. G. L., Blowing Rock. 
♦Hogan, K. W., Waxhaw. 



ORDAINED MINISTERS 



197 



♦Hogshed, W. D., Birch. 
*Hogue, H. J., Wesser. 
♦Holcomb, W. B., Mooresville. 
*Holbert, J. S., Tryon. 
♦HoUeman, J. M., Apex. 

Holloman, W. A., Jonesville. 
♦Holland, C. P.* Toecane. 

Holland, T. C. Mooresboro. 
♦Hollaway, L. M., Southmount. 
*Hollowell, W. H., Kelford. 
*Honeycutt, H. H., Maxton. 

Honeycutt, R., Clinton. 
*Hood, T. J., Goldsboro. 

Hooker, W. H., Asheville. 
♦Hoppers, W. L., Whitehead. 

Hord, A. T., Gary. 
*Horne, C. B., Mints. 
*Horner, K. C., Mebane. 
*Horner, W. R., Turtletown, 
Tenn. 

Hough, Willis, Cabarrus. 
*Hough, W. A., Gasitonia. 
♦Howard, A. T., Saluda. 

Howard, J. R., Mooresville. 
♦Howell, A. H., Gastonia. 
♦Howell, J. D., Beulahville. 
♦Hoyle, J. E., Lenoir. 
♦Hubble, D. S., Park Mountain. 

Huffham, J. D., Mebane. 
♦Huggins, F. M., Belmont. 
♦Huggins, W. M., Autreyville. 

Hughes, S. A., Valley. 

Humphrey, D. B., Lumberton, 
R. 2. 
♦Humphrey, J. L., Lumberton 
R. 2. 

Humphrey, W. A., Fayetteville. 

Hunnycutt, C. C, Locust. 

Hunnycutt, G. A., Porter. 
♦Hunnycutt, R. N., Porter. 

Hunnicutt, W. A., Swannanoa. 

Hunt, A., Bostic. 
♦Hunt, D. J., Cliffside. 
♦Huntley, F. J., Bear Wallow. 
♦Huntley, M. M., Rutherfordton. 
♦Huntley, S. F., Fletchers, R. 2. 

Hurst, W. T., Manndale. 
♦Hurt, J. J., Wilmington. 

Hutchinson, C. 0., Asheville. 
♦Hutchinson, E. J., Wadesboro. 

Hutchinson, J. H., Raleigh. 
♦Hyde, J. L., Chambers. 

Hyde, H. H., Andrews. 

♦Ingram, B. C, Llnwood. 

Ingle, E. B., Asheville. 

Israel. L. Y., Candler. 
♦Ives, S. A., Pine Bluff. 

Ivery, G. C, Granite Falls. 



tEditor Biblical Recorder. 
§Secretary Sunday School Union. 



♦Ivery, E. S., Greensboro. 
♦Irvin, A. C, Shelby. 

Jackson, Elbert, Campobello, 
S. C. 

Jackson, H. P., Elkin. 

James, R. H., Oakboro. 

James, W. C, Mt. Airy. 
♦Jarvis, N. T., Roaring River. 
♦Jennings, S. S., N. Wilkesboro. 

Jester, J. R., Booneville. 
♦Jinks, L. D., Neuse, R. 1. 
♦Jenkins, J. L., Parkton. 
♦Johnson, C. H., East Bend. 

Johnson, E. M., Johnson City, 
Tenn. 

Johnson, C. R., Mooresville. 

Johnson, T. C, Mooresville. 

Johnson, C. H., East Bend. 

Johnson, J. S., St. Paul. 
♦Johnson, E. N., Reidsville. 
♦Johnson, D. L., Elizabethtown. 
♦Johnson, E. O.. St. Pauls, R. 1. 
♦Johnson, G. H., Enfield. 
♦Johnson, L. L., Delway. 
fJohnson, L., Raleigh. 

Johnson, G. L., Badin. 
♦Johnson, J. H., Judson. 
JJohnson, W. N., Raleigh. 
♦Johnson, W. 0., Siler City. 

Johnson, W. R., Cedar Creek. 

Jolly, J. R.. Jonesville. 

Jones, E. J., Tryon. 
♦Jones, Lee J., Ledger. 
♦Jones, L. J., Marion. 

Jones, W. J., Lattimore, R. 1. 
♦Jones W. J., Salemburg. 

Jones, T. A., Rutherfordton. 

Jones, T. J., Newland. 

Jordan. P. M., Selica. 
♦Jordan, J. A., N. Wilkesboro. 
♦Jordan. J. R., Spies. 
♦Joyce, J. A., Sandy Ridge. 
♦Joyner, A. V., Waynesville. 
§Justice, A. I., Hendersonville. 
♦Justice, T. B., Morven. 
♦Justice, J. M., Black Mountain. 

^Kesler, M. L., Thomasville. 
♦Kester, J. M., Wilson. 
♦Keller, O. A., Cameron. 

Keller. John, Beech Creek. 
♦Key, W. H., Mertie. 
♦Kincheloe, J. W., Rocky Mount. 

King, H. B., Matthews. 
♦King. J. D., Wampler. 
♦King, L. C, Lenoir. 

King, R. W., Burnsville. 
♦King, T. C, Hendersonville. 

tSecretary Board of Missions. 
fGeneral Manager Orphanage. 



198 



N. C. BAPTIST STATE CONVEX TI ON 



*King, T. H., Mount Airy. 
*Kinsland, J. L., Franklin. 
*Kirksey, G. C, Wallburg. 
*Kirk, J. E., Farmville. 
*Kirk, J. L., Salisbury. 
*Kirk, J. T., Clemmons. 
Knight, T. M., Alexander, R. 1. 
♦Kuykindall, W. J., Asheville. 

*Lamb, H. P., Columbia. 
♦Lambert, J. J., Birdtown. 
*Lanier, J. E., Smithfield. 
♦Lanier, R. R., Selma. 
♦Lanier, Hardy, Wilmington. 
♦Lanning, Jeff, Denton. 

Lanning, T. D., Leicester. 
♦Lassiter, A. G., Star. 

Laughridge, B. H., Maiden. 
♦Lawhon, W. H. H., Carthage. 
♦Ledford, A. M., Otto. 
♦Ledford, C. A., Newland. 
♦Ledford, E. G., Topton. 

Ledford, M. D., Hayesville. 

Lester, John, Ela. 

Lewis, John, Southern Fines. 
♦Lewis, M. L., Hayesville. 

Lindsey, D. S., Judson. 
♦Lineberry, R. B., Colerain. 
♦Liner, J. R., Asheville. 
♦Liner, H. G.. Landrum. S. C. 
♦Linney, W. E., Wilkesboro. 
♦Little, Luther. Charlotte. 

Little, J. W., Charlotte. 

Livingston, E. A., Mt. Gilead. 
♦Lockerman, W. D., Clinton. 
♦Long. James, Aulander. 

Long. J. H., Old Dock. 

Long. T. C, Laurel Springs. 
♦Lory, J. A., Burnsville. 
♦Love, Hoyle, Denton. 
♦Lowdermilk, D. P., Marion. 
♦Lowe, A. E., Noland. 
♦Lowe, C. G.. Whaleyville, Va. 

Lunsford, W. R., Marble. 
♦Lyon. T. M., Traphill. 

♦McCall, A. C, Gates. 
♦McCall. S. B.. -Horse Shoe. 
♦McCann, Levi, Dimmette. 
McCarson, J. L., Henderson- 

ville. 
♦McCarter, W. P., White Rock. 
♦McClure. W. B.. Alexis. 
♦McCoy. D. C. Etna. 
♦McCracken. R. P.. Franklin. 
♦McCurry. J. H., Asheville, R. 4. 
♦McDufRe. J. F.. Chapel Hill. 
♦McElreath. F. M., Leicester. 
♦McFalls, W. T., Candler, R. 2. 



♦McFarland, R. W., Flag Pond, 

Tenn. 
♦McFee, P. T., Hot Springs. 
♦McGee, J. F., Culberson. 

McGinnis, J. J., Vilas. 

McGougan, C. P., Lumber 
Bridge. 
♦McGregor, S. S., Nashville. 
♦McGuire, V. V., Durham. 
♦McKaughan, J. A., Rutherford- 
ton. 
♦McKinney, C. H., Bakersville. 
♦McLendon, A. L., Winston- 
Salem. 
♦McMahan, W. F., Old Fort. 
♦McManus, O. W.. Gibson. 
♦McNeill, M., Wilkesboro. 
♦Mace, R. G.. Belmont. 

Manee, H. H., Southern Pines. 
♦Manley, A. J., Bosnian. 

Marcus, M. A., Fontana. 
♦Marion, J. G., Mount Airy. 
♦Marley, H. C, China Grove. 
♦Marr, W. W., Franklin. 
♦Marsh, A., Marshville. 

Marsh, R. H., Oxford. 
♦Marshall, O. N., Stantonsburg. 
♦Marshall. J. J., ;Macon. 
♦Martin, C. F., Murphy, R. 2. 
♦Martin, C. H., Polkton. 
♦Martin, G. A., Marion. 
♦Martin. J. L., Gorman. 

Martin, W. N., Leicester. 

Mashburn, A. B., Nealsville. 
♦Mason, J. A., Hendersonville. 
♦Massingale, J. C. Argura. 
♦^latheney, J. R., IVIooresboro. 
♦Matheson, W. B., Robbinsville. 

Mathis. B., Robbinsville. 

Mathis. B. H., Jonesville. 

Matthews. B. H., Swansboro. 

Mathews, T. H.. High Point. 

Maxwell. C. N., Asheville. 
♦May, G. W., Rocky Mount. 
♦May. S. S., Yadkinville. 

Mays. L. T. Asheville. 

Meadows, W. C, Poor's Knob. 
♦Meigs, J. C. Wingate. 
♦i\Ielton, A. G.. Cordova. 
♦Melton, N. A., Hendersonville, 

R. 2. 
♦Mercer, I. M., Thomasville. 

Mercer. I\I. V., Lumberton. R. 2. 

Merrill, G. L., Apex. R. 4. 
♦Merritt, R. P.. Smithfield. 

IMeserve, C. F.. Raleigh. 

Metcalf, W. W., Paint Fork. 
♦Michael. W. H.. Trade. Tenn. 

Middleton. J. B.. Saluda. 
♦IMiller, Alexander, Jackson. 



ORDAINED MINISTERS 



199 



Miller, Chester, Black Mountain. 

Miller, D. L., Hudson. 
*Miller, Ed. O., Obids. 
*Miller, H. Reed, Littleton. 

Miller, H. D., Marshall. 
♦Miller, H. O., Mars Hill. 
♦Miller, I. C, Stony Fork. 
♦Miller, J. R., Fairmont. 
♦Miller, Lee, Beng. 

Miller, M. D., Triplett. 

Miller, R. V., Hendersonville. 
♦Millican, C, Bug Hill. 
♦Mills. G. T., Wendell. 
♦Mintz, J. A., Shalotte. 

Mitchell, E., Osbornville. 

Mitchell, 0. B., Pittsboro. 
♦Mitchiner, J. F., Franklinton. 
♦Mizell, J. C, Bolivia. 

Moore, R. A., Red Springs. 
tMoore, J. D., Raleigh. 
♦Moore, W. G., Boiling Springs. 
♦Moore, W. H., Greenville. 

Morgan, E. J., Candler. 
♦Morgan, F. M., Flats. 
♦Morgan, J. F., Hendersonville. 
♦Morgan, S. L., Henderson. 
♦Morgan, S. J., Jr., Biltmore. 

Morgan, S. J., Sr., Stocksville. 
♦Morris, B. E., Wake Forest. 
♦Morris, D. P., Norwood. 
♦Morris, W. A., Hendersonville. 
♦Moose, J. D., N. Charlotte. 

Morton, H., Greensboro. 
♦Morton, S. F., Winston-Salem. 
♦Morton, W. B., Louisburg. 

Moss, W. v.. Kings Mountain. 
♦Moss, W. R., Asheville, R. 4. 
♦Mull, W. B.. Toecane. 

Mulkey, J. L., Grandview. 

Mullis, G. L., Mount Holly. 
♦Mumford, E. F., Oriental. 
♦Murchison, C. M., Yanceyville. 
♦Murray, J. T., Winston-Salem. 
♦Murray, L. B., State Road. 
♦Myers, C. H., Sharpesburg. 
♦Myers, T. C. Yadkinville. 
♦Myers, W. W., N. Wilkesboro. 

♦Naff, S. L., Winston-Salem. 

Nanney, J. F., Pensacola. 

Nash, C. H., Greensboro. 
♦Naylor, M. W., Dunn. R. 1. 

Neaves, J. M., Weaversford. 
♦Neilson, A. J., Fletcher. 

Neisser. H. L.. Connelly Springs. 
♦Nelson, E. R., Henderson. 

Nelson, J. A., Uree. 
♦Nester, J. W., Brim. 

Newton, J. D., Thomasville. 
♦Newton, I. T., Whiteville. 



tB. Y. P. U. Secretarj'. 



♦Nicholson, W. H., Oakland. 

Norman, M. A., Addie. 
♦Nobles, J. W., Middlesex. 
♦Norris, C. H., Holly Springs. 

Norris, H. W., Holly Springs. 

Norris, John, Boone. 
♦Norville, C. S., Elldn. 

♦O'Kelley, T. W., Raleigh. 
♦Oldham, S. W., Hillsboro. 
♦Olive, E. I., Dunn. 
♦Olive, W. S., Apex. 
♦O'Neill, G. G., Rutherfordton. 

Orr, G. W., Millsaps. 
♦Overby, D. W., Reidsville. 
♦Owen, C. F., Waynesville. 
♦Owen, C. A., Salisbury. 
tOwen, J. C, Asheville. 
♦Owen, J. H., Argura. 

Owen, J. L., Glenville. 
♦Owen, J. R., Mars Hill. 

Pace, J. R., Ridgecrest. 
♦Page, J. M., Hamlet. 

Page, W. M., Fayetteville. 
♦Padgett, Rush, McAdenville. 

Pait, D. E., Carkton. 

Palmer, R. L., Beech Creek. 
♦Pardue, A. T., Roaring River. 

Parham, J. T., Leicester. 

Parham, S., Asheville, R. 5. 
♦Parker, L. A., Winston-Salem. 

Parker, W.. Cowarts. 
♦Passmore, G. W., Postell, Tenn. 
♦Pasmore, P. H., Duvall. 

Patton, R. L., Morganton. 
♦Paul, E. A., Davis. 

Peek, I. T., Gneiss. 

Peele, Herbert, Elizabeth City. 
♦Peele, R. E., Clarksville, Va. 
♦Pennill. W. A.. Zionville. 

Pendergrass, J. R., Franklin. 
♦Peterson, C. D., Clinton. 

Peterson. Alex., Ingold. 

Pennington, G. M., Park, Va. 
♦Phillips, G. C, Bear Creek. 

Phillips, J. B., Hudson. 

Phillips, J. L.. Mortimer. 
♦Phillips. J. W., Hemp. 
♦Phillips. M. B., Round Peak. 
♦Phillips, N. B.. Harnardsville. 

Phillips, T. B., Charlotte. 

Pickens. J. M., Alexander. 
♦Pierce, E. S., Manteo. 

Pilkerton, G. J.. Judson. 

Pilkerton. J. M., Wilbar. 

Pipes, J. C, Mars Hill. 
♦Pipnin. A. A.. Wakefield. 
♦Pipkin, Howard, Mount Olive. 

Pitman, Reuben, Ledger. 

JEvangelist, Home Board. 



200 



N. C. BAPTIST STATE CONVENTION 



Pittman, S. M., Frank. 
*Pleminons, B. B., Trust. 

Plemmons, James. Candler. 
*Plybon, C. T., Roxboro. 
*Poe, J. W., Laurel Bloomery, 
Tenn. 

Ponder, J. S., IMarshall, R. 2. 

Ponder, R. D., Buckner. 

Ponder, S. L., Buckner. 
*Pool, D. W., Stony Point. 
tPoole, F. K., Wake Forest. 
♦Porter, A. H., Rennert. 

Porter, W. M., Warrensville. 

Poston, F. H., Waco. 
*Poteet, J. H., Clarkton. 
*Potts. W. T., Highlands. 
*Powell, R. E., Rowland. 
*Powell, W. F., Asheville. 
*Fowers, J. L.. Gulf. 

Praether, F. L., Concord. 
*Pratt, R. N.. Hendersonville. 
*Preslar, M. D. L.. Wingate. 

Pressley, W. W., Erlanger. 
♦Prevatt, John, Lumberton, R. 6. 
♦Prevatte, J. E., Jennings. 
*Prevatt, F. A.. Lumberton, R. 1. 
♦Price, J. L., Wake Forest. 

Fridgen, W. D., Fuquay, Spgs. 

Proffitt, M. S., Democrat. 
♦Pruett, J. B., Hickory. 
*Pruett, J. C. New Life. 
*Pruette, L. R., Charlotte. 
*Pruett. W. M., Hazelwood. 
*Puet. C. E., Brevard. 

Pugh. J. M., Randleman. 
♦Putnam, D. F.. Cherryville. 

♦Queen, A. C Wolf Mountain. 
Queen, Thomas. Balsam. 

♦Ratliff. Wm.. Birdtown. 
♦Ray, J. B., Roaring River. 
♦Ray. G. L.. Fensacola. 
♦Raymond. F. B.. Como. 
♦Reaves, Jere, Nelson. Va. 

Rector. J. A.. Drexel. 
♦Reddish, W. H.. Wadesboro. 
♦Redfern, R. D.. Peachland. 

Redmon. G. R., Biltmore. R. 3. 
♦Redmond. T. E., New Hope. 
♦Redwine, R. K.. Winston-Salem. 

Reece, .1. V.. Warne. 

Reese, A. V.. Hendersonville. 
♦Reid, C. B.. ivrt. Pleasant. 
♦Rhyne. C. A., Drexel. 
♦Rhyne, C. Q., Lowell. 
♦Rhyne, S. A., Hickory. 
♦Revis. W. A.. Cooner Hill, Tenn. 

Rice. Pete. Revere. 
♦Rice. G. P., Judson. 



♦Richardson. W. C, Wilson. 

Rickman. R. P., Franklin. 
♦Riddle, B. B., Pensacola. 
♦Riddle, H. L., Culberson. 
♦Rimer, W. W., Lincolnton. 
♦Rivenbark, W. B., Ramsuer. 

Roach, T. H.. Marion. 
♦Robbins, T. S., Buffalo Cove. 

Roberts, E., Rutherdfordton. 
♦Roberts, L. C, Marshall. R. 3. 
♦Roberts, T. C, Marshall, R. 2. 
♦Roberts, T. F., Alvarado, Va. 
♦Robertson, W. P., Leicester. 

Robinson, H. S.. Shallotte. 
♦Robinson, Wyatt, Lunday. 
♦Rogers, A. T., Tabor. 
♦Rogers, J. L., Hamilton. 
♦Roland, John E.. Smokemont. 
♦Rollins, B. F., Harmony. 
♦Rollins, G. W., Benson. 
♦Rose. J. W., High Point. 
♦Rosser, W. O., Whitakers. 
ARoyall, W. B., Wake Forest. 
♦Ruppe, J. T., Rutherfordton. 
♦Rush, J. W.. Statesville. 
♦Russell. W. J., Albemarle. 
♦Russell, W. R., Albemarle. 

♦Sasser, Lonnie, Wake Forest. 
♦Sasser, T. M., Oakboro. 
♦Sawyer, E. F., Elizabeth City. 
♦Scarborough, C. W., Franklin, 
Va. 

Scott, E. W., Canton. R. 1. 

Scott, J. J., Orrum. 

Sears, D. R., Siler City. 
♦Sears. H. C, Morrisville. 

Sebastiann. A. T., Hays. 
♦Sebastian. G. W.. Hays. 

Sellers, D. C, High Point. 
♦Sentelle, R. A.. Waynesville. 
♦Setzer, A. W.. Maiden. 
♦Setzer, Albert, Lenoir. 

Sexton, J. H., Asheville. 

Sexton, S. M., Hot Springs. 
♦Shaver, J. M., Lenoir. R. 2. 
♦Shaw. F. W.. Randleman. 

Sheets. David. Glen. 

Shelton. Clark. Proctor. 
♦Shepherd. N. H.. Powellsville. 
♦Shinn. ,T. L.. Mayodan. 
♦Shope. J. M.. Yellow Creek. 
♦Short. R. G.. Mnrion. 

Silvers, H. G., Havesville. 
♦Simmons, F. L., Morganton. 
♦Simmons. J. E.. Moore's Springs. 
♦Simmons, J. W., Mount Airy. 
♦Sims. A. H., Bessemer City. 

Simpson, J. S.. Unionville. 



fProfessor Bible, Wake Forest College. tProfessor, "Wake Forest College. 



ORDAINED MINISTERS 



201 



♦Sinclair, J. W., Forest City. 
♦Sinclair, W. F., Horse Shoe. 

Sisk, C. T., Bryson City. 

Sisk, I. G., Winston-Salem. 

Sitton, John, Balsam. 
♦Slattery, J. J., Hendersonville. 

Slaughter, G. W., Robbinsville. 

Sluder, M. M., Asheville, R. 4. 
*Smiley, J. S., Bryson City. 
* Smith, A. B., Hayesville. 
*Smith, Chas. C, Durham. 

Smith, J. A., Mars Hill. 

Smith, J. F., Austin. 
♦Smith, J. H., Cherokee, S. 0. 

Smith, J. T., Westfield. 

Smith, J. W., Clayton. 
♦Smith, L. P., Hickory. 
♦Smith, R. L., Rockwell. 

Smith, T. G., Marshville. 
♦Smith, W. A., Charlotte. 
♦Smoak, E. L., Pinnacle. 
♦Snow, J. A., Lincolnton. 
♦Snyder, E. C, Wingate. 
♦Snyder, Joel S., Fayetteville. 
♦Snyder, J. W., Concord. 

Snypes, M. V., Nebo. 
♦Solesbee, A. S., Franklin. 
♦Soots, L. P., Stoneville. 
♦Sorgee, B., Asheville. 
♦Sorrels, A. P., Union Mills. 

Sowerby, H. D. D., Charlotte. 
♦Sparks, A. F., Ledger. 

Sparks, J. A., ElizabetMon, 
Tenn. 

Sparks, J. Y., Ledger. 

Spauldlng, J. H., Allen. 
♦Speight, T. T., Windsor. 
♦Spencer. J. 0., Grassy Creek. 

Spencer, J. E., Rosemary. 

Spencer, W. S., Hickory. 
tSpilman, B. W., Kinston. 
♦Sprinkle, A. J., Weaverville. 
♦Staley, T. E., Troy. 
♦Staley, W. F., N. Wilkesboro. 
♦Stallcup, J. B., Franklin. 
♦Stallings, T. C, Rockwell. 

Stamey, J. W., Spruce Pine. 
♦Stamps, M.. Louisburg. 
♦Stancil. W. D., Kenly. 

Stanley, C. S., Chadbourn. 
♦Stanley, N. A., Price. 
♦Stanley, G. W., Mollie. 
*Stanbury, J. S.. Marble. 

Staton, M. M., Saluda. 

Stephenson, R. S., Raleigh. 

Stepp, W. P., Saconon. 
♦Stevens, C. E., Four Oaks. 
♦Stevens, W. R., Wake Forest. 
Stewart, J. L., Clinton. 



♦Stone, J. T., Shallotte. 
♦Strickland, W. H., Proximity. 

Stringfield, P. C, Mars Hill. 

Stringfield, O. L., Mars Hill. 
♦Stroud, I. G., Seven Springs. 
♦Stroup, S. A., Lincolnton. 
♦Stukenbroke, K. D., Spencer. 

Styke, L. C, Bina. 
♦Styles, B. B., Mars Hill, R. 1. 
♦Sullivan, J. A., Wilmington. 

Summey, J. A., Ansonville. 
♦Suttle, J. W., Shelby. 

Swain, E. L., Shallotte. 
♦Swain, V. M., Winston-Salem. 
♦Swift, Wellington, Reese. 

Swink, Amos, Connelly Springs. 

Sykes, P. G., Conway. 

Tate, R. J., Fingerville, S. C. 
♦Tate, W. T., Caroleen. 

Taylor, Alexander, Green Mt. 
♦Taylor, C. L., Maysworth. 
♦Taylor, J. J., Leaksville. 

Taylor, J. W., Whitsett. 
♦Taylor, T. J., Warrenton. 
♦Teague, A. E., Belmont. 

Teague, G. C, Taylorsville. 
♦Teague, J. L., Cleveland. 
♦Teague, J. U., Louisburg. 
♦Teal, C. M., Forest City. 

Teeter, E. D., Stanfleld. 

Tew, D. W., Clinton. 
♦Tew, J. O.. Roseboro. 
♦Thomas, I. W., Lenoir. 
♦Thomas, J. C, Bandana. 
♦Thomas. C. A. G., Mt. Holly. 

Thomasson, J. A., Buck Shoal. 

Thomasson, J. H., Hampton- 

ville. 
♦Thompson, L. S., Washington. 

Thompson, W. M., Lilesville. 

Thorn, J. B.. Bostic. 

Thorn, J. L.. Rutherdfordton. 
♦Tilley, Geo. V., Statesville. 
♦Tipton, S. D., Burnsville. 
♦Todd, J. K., Mtollie. 
♦Todd, N. J., Windsor. 
♦Townsend, B., Raeford. 

Trivett, J. S., Fleetwood. 
♦Trivett, G. W., Sugar Grove. 
♦Trivett, Roscoe. Trade, Tenn. 
♦Truett, G. W., Sugar Grove. 
♦Truett, Thomas, Murphy. 
♦Truett, W. J., Judson. 

Tucker, Geo., Pilot Mountain. 
♦Turner, C. J., Biltmore. 
♦Turner, E. W., Limerock. 
♦Turner, J., Clyde, Greensboro. 



202 



N. C. BAPTIST STATE CONVENTION 



Turner, W. M., High Point. 
*Tyner, T. J., Whiteville, R. 1. 

♦Underwood, J. M., Wehutty. 
*Upchurcli, C. A., Oxford. 
*Usry, E. G., Oxford. 

tVann, R. T., Raleigh. 
♦Vernon, T. L., Tarboro, R. 4. 
Vestal, M. M., Jonesville. 
*Vesey, 'J. W., Asheville. 
♦Vinson, T. J., Gneiss. 
♦Vipperman, D. E., Asheboro. 
♦Vipperman, J. H., High Point. 
♦Vipperman, J. L., Dallas. 
♦VonMiller, R. M., Wilson. 

Wade, J. H., Asheville R. 5. 
*Waff, W. B., Pittsboro. 

Wainboth, M. M., Asheville, R. 3. 
♦Waldrop, J. J., Henry. 
♦Walker, A. A., New Bern. 

Walker, G. B., Reddles River. 
♦Walker, G. C, Mill Spring. 

Walker, J. E., Swan Station. 
♦Walker, J. M., Campobello, S. C. 
♦Walker, M., Swan Creek. 
♦Walker, W. H., Morganton. 
♦Wall, W. H., High Point. 

Wallace, W. R., Rocky Mount. 
♦Walton, M. C, Roxboro. 
♦Warren, J. F., New Bern. 
♦Washburn, D. G., Shelby, R. 4. 

Watkins, John, Solola. 
♦Watkins, Geo. T., Goldsboro. 

Watson, T. D., Ocona Lufty. 
♦Watson, W. F., Washington. 
♦Watts, F. C, Purlear. 
♦Watts, J. W., Patterson. 
♦Weatherman, J. G.. Jennings. 
♦Weatherspoon, J. B., Winston- 
Salem. 

Weaver, G. H., Nebo, 

Weeks. J. J., Nokina. 
♦Wells, E. L., Edenton. 
♦West, Algia, Andrews. 
♦West. W. E., Rocky Mount. 
♦Weston, E. L., Burgaw. 
♦Weston, L. U., Graham. 

Wethers. J. B., Shelby. 

Wharton, George, Mars Hill. 
♦Wheeler. D. M., Bambo. 

Whisnant. E. S.. Morganton. 

Whitaker, H. C, Andrews. 

Whitaker, J. W., Johnson City, 
Tenn. 
♦White, D. W., Burnsville. 



White, J. A., Taylorsville. 
♦White, R. E., Lexington. 

White R. T., Conway. 
♦White, W. R., Greensboro. 
♦Whitley,. B. G., Greensboro. 

Whitley, E. A., N. Wilkesboro. 
♦Whitley, J. W., Gastonia. 
♦Wiggins, A., Judson. 
♦Wilcox, A. G., Brinkleyville. 
♦Wilcox, A. W., Mooresville. 

Wilcox, B. I., Shulls Mills. 

Wilcox, Joseph, Beng. 
♦Wild, J. M., Marshall. 

Wilder, G. C, Tunis. 

Wilhoit, G. O., Ansonville. 
♦Williams, A. J., Rusk. 

Williams, C. C, Spring Hope, 
R 2 
♦Williams, J. G., Spies. 
♦Williams, L. J., Roseboro. 

Williams, J. H., High Point. 
♦Williams, L. R., Maiden. 
♦Williams, O. P., Bryson City. 

Williams, S. J., Canton. 

Williams, W. 0., Yellow Creek. 
♦Willis, J. B., Morehead City. 

Willis. W. W.. Fairmont. 

Willoughby, R. A., Lumberton, 

R. 1. 
♦Wilson, James, Bostic. 
♦Wilson, J. B., Cherokee, S. C. 

Wilson, J. F., Cheoah. 
♦Wilson, J. H., Almond. 
♦Wilson, L. A., Zionville. 
♦Wilson, L. C, Watauga Valley, 

Tenn. 
♦Wilson. S. B., Delway. 

Wilson, T. G., Flats. 

Wilson. T. O., Cane River. 
♦Wilson. W. E., Murphy. 
♦Wilson. W. H.. Greensboro. 
♦Woodard, J. M.. Almond. 

Woodard, W. C, Almond. 
♦Woodruff, I. C. Dimmet. 

Woodruff, W. A.. Fleetwood. 
♦Woodall, W. H.. Asheville. 

Woodson, C. J., Shelby. 
♦Wooten, F. T.. Chadbourn. 

Worley. S. G., Canton, R. 1. 
♦Wray. John A., Monroe. 
♦Wright. N. L., Rutherfordton. 

♦Yearby. I. L.. Wake Forest. 

Yonce, D. A., Lookout. 

Yonce, J. L., Franklin. R. 3. 
♦Young, L. J., Higdonville. 



[•Educational Secretary of State Convention. 



MINISTERIAL STUDENTS 



203 



PASTORS IN ARMY SERVICE 

(With last Post Office.) 



Blanchard, H. N., Greenville. 
Baucom, H. W., Morehead City. 
Baucom, W. T., Aberdeen. 
Bennett, I. L., Roxboro. 
Benton, Bruce, Rockingham. 
Burrell, W. R., Williamston. 
Carpenter, L. L., Morrisville. 
Carter, A. G., Rosemary. 
Carroll, J. R., Winterville. 
Ellis, J. A., Dunn. 
Gentry, J. J., Asheville. 
Hester, J. M., Roxboro. 



McKenzie, J. M., Rocky Mount. 
Moore, A. O., Southport. 
Padgett, L. B., New Bern. 
Roberson, C. M., Draper. 
Ross, Clarence, Durham. 
Spruill, G. E., Troy. 
Stevens, C. H., Wake Forest. 
Swain, H. L., New Bern. 
Sentelle, R. E., Tarboro. 
Tunstall, G. T., Oxford. 
Wheeler, C. C, Lincolnton. 
Williams, W. W., Bryson City. 



MINISTERIAL STUDENTS 



As a new feature we publish the names and home postoffice of 
young men in our Seminary, Wake Forest and High Schools. 



Theological Seminary, Louisville, Ky. 



Adams, J. M., Raleigh. 
Andrews, V. L., Bear Creek. 
Belch, I. E., Maxton. 
Blackman, L. E., Princeton. 
Blalock, Jesse, Severn. 
Bray, B. F., Jr., Hertford. 
Brickhouse, R. E., Creswell. 
Byrd. C. E., Morrisville. 
Coggins, L. v.. Bear Creek. 
Davis, W. R., Lumberton. 
Hall, R. F., Kerr. 
Harrell, V. H., Eure. 
Hester, H. I.. Whiteville. 
Hudson, C. F., Morganton. 



Hudson, E. V., Forest City. 
Hudson, S. F., Dunn. 
Keaton, T. C, Murfreesboro. 
Meyers, B. O., Plymouth. 
Moffitt, W. A., Moffitt. 
Nix, W. v., Zirconia. 
Olive, L. B., Apex. 
Phillips, A. R., Dalton. 
Powell, J. C, Warsaw. 
Siebermann, T. B., Greensboro, 
Stuart, E. R., Newton. 
Sullivan, E. F., Wadesboro. 
White, R. K., Conway. 
Yates, Kyle M., Apex. 



Wake Fokest College. 



Allen, T. C, Skipwith, Va. 
Arnold. H. L., Neuse. 
Beck, A. L., Asheville. 
Black, A. M., Asheville. 
Bunn, J. H., Spring Hope. 
Brandon, S. O., Elkin. 
Camp, W. G., Wake Forest. 
Cashwell, C. H., Wake Forest. 
*Chaplin. A. L., 
Clark, L. S., Candler. 



Collins, W. K., Boiling Springs. 

Elliott, P. L., Robbinsville. 

Earp, G., Knightdale. 

Everett, J. R., Macclesfield. 

Feezer, F. C, Linwood. 

Fogleman. T. W., High Point. 
*Gupton. B. L., 
*Gresham, N. E.. 

Gulley, J. P., Nashville. 
*Glosson, S. C, 



204 



N. C. BAPTIST STATE CONVENTION 



Harrill, B. H., Rutherfordton. 
*Hauser, O. H., 

Herring, R. A., Cheng Chow, 
China. 

Herring, Gordon, Cheng Chow, 
China. 
*Hill, D. B., 
*Honeycutt, W. E., 

Howard, Chas. B., Salemburg. 

Hurley, D. T., Millboro. 
*James, R. W., 

Kinnett, A. D., Spartanburg, 
S. C. 

Moore, A. C, South Boston, Va. 
*Moore, W. D., 

Morris, B. E., Wake Forest. 

Murry, J. G., Morganton. 

Nance, G. B., Boardman. 

Nanney, Grady, Union Mills. 

Newton, I. T., Jr., Whiteville. 
*Nixon, J. R., 

Old, Jas. Y., South Mills. 

Perry, C. C, Wingate. 



*Phillips, C. D., 

Ponder, E. L., Mars Hill. 

Potts, E. H., Pineville. 

Price, J. L., Wake Forest. 
♦Rhodes, G. B., 
*Royall, C. N., 

Stephens, A. P., Boardman. 

Sasser, L., Wake Forest. 

Simonds, J. D., Colerain. 

Smith, R. L., Stanley. 

Sowers, Wade A., Linwood. 

Stafford, I. K., Elizabeth City. 

Stroup, H. M., Pineville. 

Stephens, W. R., Hope Mills. 

Stephens, R. G., Holly Springs. 

Todd, N. J., Wake Forest. 

Trueblood, E. J., Elizabeth City. 

West, B. P., Warsaw. 
♦White, P. E., 

Whitley. W. W., Oakboro. 

Willis, E. G., Davis. 

Wood. A. B., Gaffney. S. C. 

Woodard, F. T., Mocksville. 

Yearby, I. L., Wake Forest. 



Mabs Hill College. 



Berry, Corum, Granite, Falls. 
Berry, Russell, Granite Falls. 
Corpening, Albert, Zebra, Mo. 
Hill. J. E., Chappell, S. C. 
Howell, W. M.. Mars Hill. 
Ingle, E. H., Asheville. 
Jenkins, Shuford. Noland. 
Lamm, S. L., Spring Hope. 
Moretz, W. L., Brookside. 
Morrison, A. W., Maxton. 



Muckle, Coy, Paris, Ark.' 
Parker, J. B., Monroe. 
Perry, C. C, Northside. 
Piper, J. C, Mars Hill. 
Rogers, Archie, Lillington. 
Royal, C. N., Salemburg. 
Smith, J. A., Blythewood, S. C. 
Styles, J. K., Brock. 
Tritt, B. B., Belmont. 



Bute's Creek Academy. 



Alderman, J. B., Dunn. 
Autry, Gerald, Orange. 
Floyd, S. C, Fairmont. 
Gravitte, O. C, Mill Creek. 
Harrell, I. S., Sunbury. 
Johnson, Alton, Lillington. 



Lamb, S. N., Tarboro. 
Moody, J. L., Siler City. 
Onsley, J. B., Buie's Creek. 
Page, W. M., Lillington. 
Page, J. T., Wade. 



*No home post office given. May be addressed Wake Forest, N. C. 



OUR DEAD 



Barnes, K., Proctorville. 
Beeker, S. J., Duke. 
Cade, Baylus, Lenoir. 
Cannon, W. M., Elk Park. 
Duke, G. M., Mapleville. 
Emory, C. M., Southern Pines. 
Grubb, J. A., Salisbury. 
Hale, F. D., Lexington. 
Hawkins, R. N., Shelby. 
Hilliard, S. C, Greensboro, 
Hoyle, J. A., Maiden. 
Kimery, J. T., Albemarle. 
Limrick, L. P., 
Littleton, J. W., Albemarle. 
Piatt, J. T., Ogden. 
Sims, A. M., Raleigh. 
Thompson, K., Kapps Mills. 
Walker, R. P., Wilmington.