(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Proceedings of the Asiatic Society of Bengal"

Nlr*. 



m 





.* 




?-.•* 



r-V 







:«!* 



'»* i» 



AS472 
.A8P7 



^/('ini^p^^M 



°i 













FOR THE PEOPLE 

FOR EDVCATION 

FOR SCIENCE 






LIBRARY 

OF 

THE AMERICAN MUSEUM 

OF 

NATURAL HISTORY 





PROCEEDINGS 



OP THE 



ASIATIC SOCIETY OF BENGAL. 

EDITED BT >w. ^ 

The Honorary jSecretaries. 




JANUARY TO DECEMBER, 

187 6. 

(With three plates and two woodcuts.) 



CALCUTTA : 

J^RINTED BY C p. jlvEWIS, ^APTIST ^ISSION PrESS, 

1876. 



\^- c^^ 



"^JL 



CONTENTS. 

— ^ — 

Page 

IVoeeediugs for January, 1876, 1-16 

Do. for February, including Annual Report and Remarks 

by the President, 17-46 

Do. for March, 1876,. 47-68 

Do. for April, „ ' 69-88 

Do. for May, „ 89-100 

Do. for June, „ 101-128 

Do. for July, „ 129-158 

Do. for August, „ 159-200 

Do. for November, „ 201-204 

Do. forDecember, „ 215-240 

List of Members of the Asiatic Society of Bengal on the 31st 

December, 1875, Appendix to February Proceedings, I 

Abstract Statement of Eeceii^ts and Disbursements of. the 
Asiatic Society of Bengal for the year 1875, Appendix to 

February Proceedings, XIII 

Index, 241-252 

Meteorological Observations for January to December, 1876. 




I 



\ 



J 



LIST OF PLATES AND V\^OODCUTS 

IK" 

PROCEEDINGS, ASIATIC SOCIETY OF BENGAL, foe 1876. 



PI. I (p. 14) Influence of Eosin on the photographic action of the Solar 
Spectrum upon the Bromide and Bromoiodide of Silver. 
'--PL II (p. 114) Khond War-axes. 
\^1. Ill (p. 184) Amphistoma hominis, a new parasite affecting man. 

WOODCUTS. 

'^ Page 91. Gold coin of Na9ir-uddin Mahmud Shah of Dihli. 
„ 185. Amphistoma hominis, longitudinal section. 



J 



ERRATA 



IN 



PEOCEEDINaS, ASIATIC SOCIETY OF BENGAL, foe 1876. 



Page 7, 1. 12 from below. Add — It is perhaps better to take raJclisTi in its usual mean- 
ing and translate, ' Akbar is that king whose steed passes &c.'. 
„ 70, last lino, for Tweena read Tween. 
„ 104, 1. 17, for W, 0. McGregor read W. McGregor. 



PROCEEDINGS 



OP THE 



ASIATIC SOCIETY OF BENGAL, 

For January, 1876. 



The Monthly General Meeting of the Asiatic Society was held ou 
Wednesday, the 5th January, 1876, at 9 o'clock p. M. 
T. Oldham, Esq., LL. D., President, in the chair. 
The Minutes of the last meeting were read and confirmed. 
The following presentations were announced — • 

1. From Dr. D. Brandis, a copy of " The Forest Flora of North- 
West and Central India." 

2. From Capt. J. Waterhouse, a copy of his " Report on the Opera- 
tions.connected with the Observation of the Total Solar Eclipse of April 
6th, 1875, at Camorta in the Nicobar Islands." 

3. From Rajah Jai Kishn Das, a copy of the Rig Veda Sanhita 
Bhashya by Pandit Dyananda Saraswati. 

4. From W. H. Dall, U. S. Coast Survey, through the Rev. C. H. 
Dall, a copy of a " Report on Mt. St. Elias." 

The President, seeing the Rev. C. H. Dall present, asked him to explain 
the objects of his son's paper — 

Me. DALt said : At the call of our President, I will say a few words 
of the pamphlet on the table. It details a careful re-measurement of one of 
the highest mountains in North America, Mt. St. Elias ; decidedly the 
highest in that north-western portion of tlie continent which Russia ceded 
to the United States in June 18G7, for about a million and a half sterling. 
Dr. Oldham has made kindly reference to what he is pleased to call the 
repeated indebtedness of this Society to the same donor, — a son of mine 
William H. Dall, Acting Assistant, United States Coast Survey, who is get- 
ting to be known as the explorer of Alaska (Uussian America), to the deve- 
lopment of which country he has devoted the best part of a dozen years. 
The Government have lefi him in sole charge of this survey and exploration, 
and have given him, besides other means and appliances of discovery, first 



2 C. H. Dall — Bemeasurement of Mt. St. JSlias. [Jan. 

one and then another vessel, the " Humboldt" and the " Yukon," specially built 
for the often dangerous work of sailing among unknown reefs and currents, 
and charting out (a dozen or more) good harbours, just now opened to com- 
merce. One test of the general success of this work is found in the fact 
that Alaska has already paid back more, I think, than twenty per cent, of 
its cost to the United States. I may here say that when I was leaving Ame- 
rica, less than three months ago, Mr. Dall gave me for this Society an 
Atlas of twenty-four new charts and maps of his, just published in good 
style, by the Coast Survey Department. These maps are coming to Cal- 
cutta, with other books, round the Cape. The Asiatic Society need hardly 
be reminded that the best surveys of the N. West coast of the American 
continent, antedating those of Mr. Dall, were made a century ago, — of course 
with instruments inferior to those we now possess, — by the faithful and able 
French explorer La Perouse. If I am rightly informed, he trusted mainly 
to observations taken with his quadrant or sextant ; and generally from the 
deck of his ship. Important changes and adjustments must come of the 
instruments and facilities of observation that are ours to-day. These make 
it no wise incredible that Mr. Dall's rectifications of latitude and longitude 
should have shifted the whole coast line from 3 to 5 leagues westward, for 
hundreds of miles; — added eight hundred square miles to British (the 
Hudson's Bay) territory, and done many other things besides lifting Mt. 
St. Elias from being " 13,000 feet high" to a clear elevation of over 19,000 
feet. The quarto pamphlet, of thirty-two pages, now on the table, records 
attempts to measure the mountain, as made by several travellers since the 
time of La Perouse, and gives the results of sixty-four observations of it, 
taken by Mr. Dall, with better instruments, on sea and shore. The final 
working out of these has been done, with extra care, at his present home, 
and for the last ten years his hailing-point, the Smithsonian* Institution in 
Washington, D. C. 

Thanking the Chairman for his call upon me, I do not doubt that it 
will encourage and cheer the author of this pamphlet to learn that his per- 
sistent sacrifice of home and society for science, natural and geographical, 
from his nineteenth year, has the approving sympathy of the President and 
Members of this Society. 

The following gentlemen duly proposed and seconded at the last 
jneeting, were balloted for and elected ordinary members — 

W, McGregor, Esq. 

Ottokar Feistmantel, Esq., M. D. 

The following are candidates for ballot at the next meeting — 

E. B. Shaw, Esq., late British Resident at Kashgar, proposed by 
Dr. J. Scully, seconded by Gapt. J. Waterhouse. 



1876.] Sir A. P. Pliayre — On Stone Weapons from Burma. 3 

Col. J. F. Teunant, E. E., Calcutta, for re-election, proposed by Col. 
Hyde, seconded by Capt. J. Waterliouse. 

G. E. Knox, Esq., C. S., Major H. H. Mallock, and Lieut. H. B. 
XJrmston, have intimated tlieir desii-e to withdraw from the Society. 

The President laid before the meeting a statement from the Council 
regarding certain proceedings in connection with the rejection of a gentle- 
man proposed by the Council for election as an Honorary Member, which 
was taken as read and ordered to be circulated to the members with the 
Proceedings. 

The following letter from Major-General Sir A. P. Phayre, K. C. S, I., 
K. C. B., Grovernor of the Mauritius, to Mr. Blochmann, was read — • 

Novemler 10th, 1875. 

My deae Sie, — I observe in the Proceedings of the Asiatic Society 
for June 1875, a paper by Mr. V. Ball on stone implements of the Burmese 
type found in the district of Singbhum. I beg to bring to your notice, 
that the stone weapons hitherto sent from Burma, have, I believe, all been 
found within the limits of the teri'itory, in the delta and valley of the 
lower Erawati, occupied from time immemorial by the Tailing or Mun 
people. The language of the Mun race of Pegu, is connected with that 
of the Ho or Munda people of Chutia Nagpur, called Kol. I beg on this 
subject to refer to my paper on the History of Pegu in the Society's 
Journal, Volume XLII of 1873. 

The form of the stone implements remarked on by Mr. Ball, tends to 
indicate a connection in race, or intercourse in pre-historic time, between 
the Kols and the Mun of Pegu. The supposed origin of these weapons as 
thrown to earth in the lightning flash, is, as remarked by Mr. Theobald, 
the same among both peoples. 

Mr. "Wood-Mason exhibited specimens and read descriptions of several 
new or little-known species of phasmideous insects, amongst which were the 
following : 

Fhihalosoma Westivoodi, n. sp. $, from Nazirah and Samagiiting, 
Asam. 

Lopaiohiis lolas, Westw., S ? , from Johore in the Malay peninsula. 

Lonclwdes Aiisteni, n. sp., S , from the Dikraug valley, Asam, 

Phi/Ilium Celeiicum, De Haan, 2 , from Karennee. 

JPJii/lIium siccijblii0)i, Lin., ? , from Mauritius. 

FhyUlam Wesiiooodi, n. sp., $ ? , from S. Andaman and Pahpoon. 

And of the following two new species of goliathideous beetles : 



4 Wood-Mason — Systematic position of Nexo Zealand ksk^(^^'^. [Jan. 

Heterorrhina Roepstorfii, $ ?, from S. Andaman. 

Seterorrliina annectans, $ ? , from Sikkim. 

Mr. Wood-Mason also exhibited specimens of a new species of fresh- 
water AstacidcB from New Zealand, for which he proposed the name AstU' 
coides tridentatios from the presence of three spines on the inferior edge of 
the rostrum, arranged and shaped like the teeth of a saw. He denied the 
existence of any special relationship between the New Zealand species of 
freshwater Astacidce and the marine genus Neplirops, from which they 
differed, as indeed did all freshwater crayfish whatsoever, in having the last 
abdominal somite freely movable upon the preceding, and in having, like 
the species of the genus Astacoides, no appendages to the first and the 
appendages to the second post-abdominal somite similarly constructed to 
those of the following ones even in the male. Under these circumstances 
and as the species referred to Faranephrops difi'ered less from those 
of Astacoides than these latter did from one another, and as, moreover, 
the latter name had priority,* he proposed, provisionally, to refer the New 
Zealand species of Astacidce to it. 

In continuation of his readings and translations of Arabic and Persian 
inscriptions, Mr. Blochmann exhibited the following from D i h 11, R o h t a s, 
and S a h a s r a m. The Dihli rubbings belonged to the batch received from 
Mr. Delmerick ; those from Eohtas were taken by Mr. J. D. Beglar and 
were given to the Society, together with two rubbings from Sahasram, by 
Major-General A. Cunningham, 0. S. I. 

I. 

From the Eauzah Mirza Muqim (vide Proceedings for December, 
1875), in the niche of the gate of the Dargah of Nizamuddin, south. Bu- 
iaH metre. 

/♦i*j j u^}^, ^'^Jj 1:^0 'i -Lr^ '^ * (♦"'^' Ls^ ^'^^- f*-^"* '^l3y 
^Lo c:*AS ^^J^ [j»^iij9 (j.5'(«» i^ji^ « ^xi ^ <X^j(iJt ^ ') dy^^ f;jt 

u^-^*^ .... ^ t^'^iy^ *^.^ 

^t *J^fj ^Cy^i i,^ J^ (• (^ # <^i\ ^'^»k ^ Sir' (^y^i *^ ^^^"^ 
^ i| AAJL) IjJjt («t^ ^XM j\ * <iot Sl'sU \s^j ^\i, &l^ijjO ^J] 

^ 1 ^ /T) »j K*u^ ^ «>>J^J j.j>/o aIjLj 

1. The boy Muqim, the slave of the living and eternal God, dwells ia this mauso- 
lenm which is full of bEss and beauty. 

* Astacoides, Guei-ia, ' Ecvuo Zoologique,' 1839, p. 109. 
Taramphrops, White, Gray's Zool. Miscellany, 1842, p. 78 ; and Dieffenbach's 
New Zealand, 1843, vol. II, p, 267. 



1876.] H. Bloclimann — DehnericVs Inscriptions from DilM. 5 

2. He has no thouglit nor fear of sin ; for the dweller of the highest paradise has 
taken his place (here). 

Composed hy ISTa-wedi, [written] by Husain. 

1. Those who dwell in the lane of vicinity [to Nizam's tomh], have gained for 
their object the desire of their heart. 

2. Doest thou know how they have obtained this high degree ? They have ob- 
tained it from Shaikh ISfizam AuliyS,. 

A. H. 969 [A. D. 1561-2]. Composed by Mir Nawedf of Nishaplr. 

II. 

From a tomb inside the enclosure of Nizamuddin, West. 1 ft. 3 in. by 
Si in. 

This tablet is erected in memory of the late E^hwajah Dost Muhammad, who has 
obtained forgiveness. He was killed in ... , , in 970. Written in the month of Qafar 
[October, 1562]. 

The illegible word may be ij^\j^, youth ; but it may also be a geogra- 
phical name. 

III. 

From outside Nizamuddin's tomb, West. 1 ft. 2 in. by 6 in. 

In the year 975 [A. D. 1567-8], the late Muhammad Amin Sultan was killed be- 
fore Chitor. 

Eegarding the siege of Chitor, vide the next inscription. . 

IV. 

From a tomb in a gumlaz near the Kadam Sharif. 1 ft. 2 in. by 7 in. 
II <iV1 *^-«* j^» ***^ jijji JL>^^«^ i^^^J '^-■iJ ki.}'^^. lyls^T »_,fy ^y>.yo 

The late Nawab A9af Khan [died] on Friday, 25 th Shaww^ 976 [12th 
April, 1269.] 

His biography will be found in my A'in Translation, I, p. 368. After 
the fall of Chitor (25th Sha'ban, 975), A9af Khan was appointed governor 
of the fort. The year of his death was hitherto unknown. 

V. 
From a tomb outside Nizamuddin, West. 1 ft. 1 in. by 6| in. Huhd'i 
metre ; but the nun in din (last line) is used as a nim i glmnnah. 



6 H. Blochmann — BelmericJc's Inscriptions from BUM. [Jais", 

1. "When 'Ala uddin Muhammad left and hastened from the perishable 
ahode towards paradise, 

2. All people searched for a chronogram, and my genius foimd one in the worda 
* 'Alauddin went to paradise'. 

This gives 982 H., or A. D. 1574. 

YI. 

From a tomb witliiatlie courtyard (calm) of Amir Khusrau's Dargali, S. 
1 ft. 2 in. by 6| in. 
II e^ib ci>^l«-w 4^ i>yi _i^ ^ ^U^* y ci.wa^j <Xi*s \jy^^ jj) Ji> m^^ ji>\^. J^^ vlr* 
Nawab Nazar Bahadur Khan was killed on the 'Ashtira day [lOth 
Muharram] of the year 982. 

This would be the 2nd May, 1574. Nawab Nazar Bahadur was killed 
in Orisa ; vide Km Translation, I, 374. Hence the memorial tablet ap- 
pears to bear a wrong year ; for Nazar Bahadur was killed in 983. 

VII. 

From an old Masjid near the Dihli Jail, within the enclosure of certain 
old walls, called ' Mahabat Khan ki Haweli' , on the road to Nizamuddin. 
A beautiful inscription, 3 ft. 6 in. by 2 ft. 4 in. The inscription was com- 
posed by the renowned F ai z i, the brother of Abul Fazl, for a mosque built 
by Shaikh 'Abdunnabi, the enemy of his father ; vide Abul Fazl's biography 
in my Ain Translation, I, p. XV, and p. 546. Metre, Kliafif. 

clbii/l j_ji ^JJSo il l^i/o 4j, &*o cySiK &*sj ^J^i tii 
cl^i^JIb *i*Ji>.A. J.A| i-i^ # ^^Kjs:^\ jS\j |*il«it i:i-« 
c lis Jit jaI/o J.*}\ i^jdjLK * j^jU.*J ts^^ '^^ k^ 

j^^mOJ ^ , Axis 

1. In the time of the greatest [a/ciarl Sovereign — May God perpetuate — 

2. A sacred mosque, the Ukc of which will not be foimd in the coimtries, was 
built 

3. By the Shaikh of Isl&m, the visitor of both pilgrimages, the Shaikh of the 
people of the tradition by consent, 

4. Shaikh 'Abdunnabi, the bestower of benefits,* the mine of knowledge, 
the source of advantages. 

5. F a 1 z i asked Genius for a chronogram for this building, and he answered, 
" The best of religious edifices". Written by 

* Jia'mdi, from na'md, a benefit, in allusion to his office as ^"■dr, or bestower of 
religious benefits and lands. 



1876.] H. Blochmann — IBeglar's Inscriptions from Bohtds, Bihar. 7 

This gives 983 H., i. e, A. D, 1575-6, or four years before ' Abduuiiabi's 
banisliment to Makkah. 

VIII. 

From a Mosque at Sarai Daud, near '"Chiragh i Dihli ', 1 ft. 2 in. by 
11 in. 

In tlie time of his Majesty JalaliiddiiiMuh.ammadAkbarBadisliah. 
The builder of the Mosque and the tomb is Chandan, [i. e.'] the Eunuch Sandal, son of 
'Alauddin, son of Alhiah, the sweetmeat-maker. A. H. 994 [A. D. 1586], at a cost of 
300 Eupees. 

Fort RoMa's, in South Bihar. 
Mr. Beglar took rubbings of the following inscriptions — 

I. 

From a loose stone from a Mosque, now in the palace of Eohtas, 1 ft. 
10 in. by 2 ft. 10 in. Metre, Kliafrf. 

j^\_ }] iJ^^j OA«jt ujUo^fij A^ * ^^it[M.'^M^ i^j'i^'^ e)'-^ jj 

1. A k b a r, the defender of the faith, is that king whose brow, in its loftiness, 
passes over the heaven. 

2. In the time of such a sovereign, who is obeyed by wild beasts and bu-ds, 

3. It occuiTcd to this Habash Khan to build a mosque for the sake of a 
benefit. 

4. The chronogTam of this high mosque was found in counting up the letters in 
JBuq'ah i Khair, ' a religious building'. 

This gives 987 H., or A. D. 1579. The lower margin, however, gives 
the words — * In the month of Kajab, 986', i. e., September, 1578. The 
margin on the top contains the creed, and the right and left margins the 
Koran verse, * A help from God, and a near victory, and give the glad 
tidings to the faithful'. 



8 H. Blochmann — Beglar's Inscriptions from Bohfds, Bihar. [Jan. 

II. 

From the inner entrance to tlie Palace of Rohtas. The letters are in 
beautiful JVasta'Ug^, and numerous arabesques and flowers are between the 
lines and the letters. The Persian inscription measures 6 ft. 1 in. by 1 ft. 
10 in. ; and the Sanskrit inscription on the left of it, 2 ft. 4 in. by 1 ft. 
10 in. Babu Rajendralala Mitra has promised to furnish a reading and trans- 
lation of the latter. The metre of the chronogram is ]SIuzara\ 

This cliTOiiogram (was written) in the time of Sultan Jalal uddin Mu- 
hammad Akhar Badshah. i Ghaz i, — may God perpetuate his kingdom and 
his rule ! 

1. When the firm gate of the edifice was completed, the gate of heaven ailed from 
envy. 

2. When the date of its erection appeared to Genius, he said, ' E a j a h Man 
Singh has erected a firm building.' 

Written on the 27th of the honored month of Eajah, 1005, of the Alfi Era. • 
The family priest (xyurohit) [was] Sri Dhar ; the Daroghah, Balbhadr the Brah- 
man ; the architect {fan^atgar), Ustad Mubarak. 

This is the first inscription that I have seen, in which the year is 
expressed in Alfi years — an invention of the emperor Akbar. As the 
' restorer of the millennium' and founder of a new faith, he declared that 
Islam had done its work, and ordered a history of the first millennium to be 
written, in which the years were counted from the death of the Prophet, 
instead of from the flight (Mj'raTi) to Madinah. The death of the Prophet 
was euphemistically designated ' rililaf , ' departure' ; but a manifest slur 
cast on Islam lay in the statement that Islam commenced with the death of 
the Prophet, as if his whole life belonged to what Muhammadan historians 
style ihQJdhiliyyat, or 'time of ignorance', i. e. the pre-islamitic period of 
Muhammadan history ; vide Kin Translation I, p. 195 ; and Prof. Dowson, 
in Elliot's History, V, on the Tarilcli i Alfi. 

The chronogram of the inscription is ambiguous, on account of the 
Jimnzah in ^J^. ; but as the date has also been expressed in numerals, it is 



1876.] H. Blochmann — Beglar's Inscriptions from Sohtds, Bihar. 9 

clear that the poet has taken it for half a yd, i. e., for ^ of 10, which is 
rather unusual. The words, without the hamzah, give 1000. 

As the Alfi reckoning ditfers from the Hijrah era by ten years and two 
months, the inscription belongs to the end of 1015 H , or the end of the 
first year of Jahangir's reign. And yet Akbar is mentioned as the reigning 
monarch ! We have thus mural evidence of the dissatisfaction which Man- 
singh felt at Jahangir's succession. 

III. 

The following Persian inscription conveys the same information as the 
preceding, but the date is expressed in Hijrah years. The reading is in- 
complete, as many of the letters appear to be broken. 

»_^Lkjt_>*» Ji )ic>.ix^ # \SsiS 'ip 

The 1st Zi Qa'dah, 1015 corresponds to 20th February, 1607, the very 
end of Jahangir's first regnal year. In this inscription, neither Akbar nor 
Jahangir is mentioned. The mention of Akbar in the preceding inscription 
was perhaps expected to be overlooked by people ; for few might be ac- 
quainted with the Alfi era. 

IV. 

From a Baoli and Dargah at the foot of Hill Rohtas. Four lines ; 
5 ft. 1 in. by 1 ft. The second line is ornamented with several rosettes, a 
duck, and a tiger. Several words in lines 3 and 4 are illegible. 
j-jf^A «*• fc-v^i^J (_5-jlii**J-* oa/o^xjw &S (^^jU jjt^^ib ,^1^=.. j$l^ i^^ij^ 
Ax^j ) .xj^^ iit^j jxti::^ J ;j-)lxj I] ^iiCS" J ^JMJ.•^ <xii^,j _, e>jtj.s:/o ji (^j\^^y j 

JU^ o^ cbj ^^^b J J.s:---*^ ?/j!>■^^ .. e^'^^j'i ^^T ^jI^ 

^yLiyOj ^JjIj^J J I • *1 <Si>>*o^^f jwj J»s^^ Arfj'J^ cijjUc ^^^•** J '^J^^^. V>^ > 



10 H. Bloclimann — CunningTici'm'' a Inscrij)i ions from Sahasrdm. [Jan. 

[It -was] in the reign of Shahjahan Padishah i Ghazi, that the excel- 
lent Nawab IkhlaQ Khan held the command of the fort with a man9ab of 3000 
horse and the faiydari of the region fi'om Makrain and Parganah Sir is and 
K u t u m b a h as far as Banaras, and the jagir tenure of Parganah C h a u n d and 
Parganah Mangror and Tilothu and Akbarpfir and Bilonjah and 
Bijaigar and Jap la, and that the meanest of God's slaves Malik "Wicjal, who 
was honored with the rank of a son, was the Daroghah of Fort Rohtas and Faujdar of 
Bijaigar in the neighbourhood of the Fort. In the course of time, a near relation 
died. Hence by God's grace it occurred to him [Malik Wi^al] that the house of the life 

to come at the time of and he built a chabutrah and a mosque .... a well 

and a garden towards the north and the south. And the beginning of the building 
[was made] on the 5th Rabi' II, 1056, and it was ready in Eamazan, 1057 [October, 
1647]. 

Parganahs S i r i s and Kutumbali border on the right bank of the 
Son; Tilothu is a small town on the left bank of the Son, N. E. of 
Eohtasgarh. Parganahs Bilonjah and Japla touch the right bank of 
the Son, and are separated from each other by the Koil River, which flows 
into the Son, S. of Rohtas. Mangror lies on the Karamnasa, Long. 83° 
17', Lat. 25° 3' (vide Beames, Elliot's Races of the N. W. P., II, 119), and 
adjacent to it, to the East, lies Parganah Chaund. Bijaigarh lies 
W. of Rohtas. Akbarpur and Makrain are the names of two adjacent 
parganahs in Maldah and extend along the Ganges opposite to Rajmahall ; 
but I do not know whether they are meant. 

Regarding the commandant of Rohtas, Nawab Ikhla9 Khan, I find 
two Amirs of that title mentioned in the Padishahnamah. One Ikhla9 
Khan was a son of Bayazid Beg, and was in 1012 appointed to Rohtas. 
He rose to a command of 2000 horse, and died about 1050 H., in the 13th 
year of Shahjahan's reign. He appears to be the IkhlaQ Khan who is 
mentioned in the inscription. The second Ikhla9 Khan was a grandson of 
Qutbuddin, Jahangir's foster-brother (Ain Translation, 1,197); his name 
was Shaikh Ilahdiyah. I do not find Malik 'Wi9al, the builder of the 
mosque, mentioned in the histories. 

Sahasra'm, South Bihar. 
- From a loose slab, found by General Cunningham at the foot of tlie 
Chandan Pir Hill, Sahasram. The name of the saint after whom the hill 
is called, does not occur in the biographical works on Muhammadan saints. 
Vide Buchanan. 

v_,lsj( j(>fi./* J ^^j^ ^^Lk ^J-ioj # ^jXjl^iw ^j.J<^tjj-^ 2U>jj(>,J 



1876.] J. Butler — On tlie Anrfdmi Kcigas. H 

1. During the reign of Shah NuruddinJah&ngir, at the time of K h a n 
S a r w a r, entitled ^afdar [Khan], 

2. 'All Akhar bmlt a weU and a mosque, so that the thirsty might hecome 
satisfied. 

3. When I searched for a chronogTam, genius said, ' [It was built] from obe- 
dience to God, the nourisher and giver.' A. H. 1022 [A. D. 1613]. 

The following inscription is quite modern, and records that Fakir ]\Iu- 
hammad Chaudhari, tobacco-seller, of the tribe of the sellers of vegetables, 
in 1211 Fasli, or 1218 H., [A. D. 1803], built or renovated the Dargah of 
Chandan Pir. 

•^♦^'*^^' J»^>*^t ^* *^l o"'^-' i^ CJ'^''^ i»>j'£^:^ a(fj^ .... ^^^lt,^ cysr^ 

The following papers were read — 

1. On tlie Angdnii Nagds and their Language. — By Ca^pt. J. Butler, 
B. S. C, Political Agent, Ndgct Hills. 

Capt. Butler's essay consists of an Introduction and four Chapters. 
Chapter I is historical and geographical ; Chapter II treats of the govern- 
ment, the manners and customs, and the agriculture of the Angami Nagas ; 
Chapter III gives an outline of the G-eology and Natural History of the 
country ; and Chapter IV contains a valuable outline of Angami Grammar, 
and a very complete vocabulary. 

Eight plates of vivid sketches by Lt. Woodthorpe, R. E,, accompany 
the paper. 

The essay will appear in No. IV of Pt. I of the Journal, for 1875. 

Colonel Thuilliee said with reference to Capt. Butler's interesting and 
instructive paper which had just been read, he regretted having to inform the 
meeting that he had received information from Lieut. Woodthorpe, R. E,, 
who was now with Capt. Butler, Political Agent, prosecuting the exploration 
of the whole of the Nag;i country south of the Brahmaputra, subtending the 
district of Sibsagar from Jaipur to Samaguting and south-west of the villages 
in the vicinity of Jaipur, laid down last season, that whilst the Survey Party 
were cautiouslv proceeding through a new track, not more tlian 20 miles 
from Golaghat, they were suddenly attacked on Christmas-day by Nagas be- 
tween the villages of Lakhuti and Pangti — where they were concealed in 
ambush in the high grass jungle, and not discernible even a few yards dis- 
tant, when Capt. Butler received in his right breast a spear-wound of a 
-severe character. 

This disaster compelled the survey party to halt for some time to 
afford assistance to the wounded officer and to allow the military guard 



12 J. Waterliouse — Use of Eosin in Fltotograplung tlie Spectrum. [J Air. 

under Lieut. -Col. Tulloch to come up and chastise the village of Pangti, 
which was effectually done on the following morning, the whole party re- 
maining encamped there afterwards. 

The precise cause for such an attack so near Golaghat;? is not yet 
known, but it would seem to indicate that the Nagas of the village of Ninu 
were not sufficiently punished for the terrible massacre committed there last 
season on Lt, Holcombe's party, or else that it is impossible to make these 
savages, inhabiting closely approximate villages, comprehend or realize the 
lessons which take place so close to them, so hostile are they even amongst 
themselves, one village with another in close proximity. 

He expressed a strong hope that the services of that intrepid explorer 
and excellent officer, Capt. Butler, might not long be lost to the Government. 
It would be almost a national calamity, if such a valuable officer lost his 
life under such circumstances. 

Capt. Butler was very ably supported by Lt. Woodthorpe, who 
had now obtained considerable experience amongst these hill-tribes, 
and it was to be hoped that this temporary disaster might not have the 
eflFect of preventing the present good policy of the Government of India 
from being carried out, until we had a thorough knowledge of the whole 
geographical situation round the British border of Asam, which has so 
long baffled all attempts at its investigation, but has now been declared so 
essentially necessary for all administrative purposes of that Province. 

The completion of our geographical knowledge of the tracts held by 
these hill-tribes between the British territory of Asam and Burmah, is 
absolutely essential to the depiction of the entire line of the British Eastern 
Frontier.* 

2. On the influence of Eosin on tlie PlwtograpMc Action of the Solar 
Spectrum upon the Bromide and Bromoiodide of Silver. — By Capt. J. 
Wateehotjse, Asst. Surveyor General of India. 

At the November meeting of the Society I exhibited some plates show- 
ing the action of tlie red rays of the spectrum on dry films of collodio-bro- 
mide of silver stained with a blue dye. I have since received from Berlin a 
sample of a new red dye called Eosin, and have obtained results on dry 
bromide plates stained with it, which are of particular interest from the fact 
that the photographic action of the spectrum on such plates is entirely 
different to its ordinary action on an inistained plate, i. e., instead of the 
maximum of action being in the indigo and violet it is in the green and yellow, 
as will be seen in the accompanying photographs and in fig. 5 of Plate I. 

* Since the meeting took place, the sad news of Capt. Butler's death on the 7th 
January has been received, and the Government G-azctte of the 22nd instant contains a 
handsome tribute to his character and worth. 



1876.] J. Waterhouse — TTse of Eosm in FhotograpMng the Spectriion. 13 

This effect is quite in accord with Dr. Vogel's theory, that the sensibility of 
dry collodio-bromide of silver films for any particular part of the spectrum 
may be heightened by staining them with a suitable dye which absorbs that 
part but not others ; but so distinct a change of position of the maximum of 
action from the indigo to the green has not, so far as I am aware, been 
observed before on films of bromide of silver, though Dr. Vogel has noticed 
it on films of chloride of silver stained with roseine. [Ber. Deut. Chem. 
Ges. 1874, p. 516.] 

The dye to which the name of Eosin has been given, from''Ews, the red 
of the morning dawn, is, according to Hofmann,* the pthalein of dibromre- 
sorcin, or tetrabromofluorescin, and is soluble both in water and alcohol, the 
solution being of a bright rosy-orange colour with a strong greenish-yellow 
fluorescence, tending to green in the watery solution and to yellow in the 
alcfbholie. Examined with the spectroscope, a weak watery solution shows 
a strong obscuration of the spectrum from below E to above F, with a 
strongly marked absorption band about E and h, and a second fainter band 
about and above F [Plate I, Fig. 2]. A weak alcoholic solution shows 
similar bands, but displaced more towards the red, the wide band beginning 
at h and extending to about one-third the distance between E and T), while 
the fainter band is below F (Fig. 3). 

Dr. Vogel has laid it down as one of the conditions of success in such 
observations, that the dye employed shall combine chemically with free iodine 
or bromine, and I was led to specially select this dye for experiment from 
an anticipation that it might prove particularly suitable for the purpose on 
account of its being a compound of resorcin, a substance which readily com- 
bines with bromine and particularly with iodine. 

The dry bromide plates experimented on were prepared in two ways — 
Xst. — By using bromised collodion coloured with the dye. This collodion 
showed no fluorescence and was of a bright golden colour inclining to orange, 
without any ti'ace of the beautiful rosy tint peculiar to the dye. This, 
however, was probably caused by acidity of the collodion, induced by long 
keeping, as a more neutral and fresher sample shows a fine yellow fluores- 
cence and rosy tint. Examined in the spectroscope the absorption bands 
were absent, or so faint as not to be distinguishable, an effect which is 
observed with an acid watery solution of the dye. The films given by 
this collodion were rather transparent and showed only a slight yellowish 
opalescence by direct transmitted light, but by reflected light, or laid on 
white paper they showed a distinct pink tint. Examined in the spectroscope, 
the peculiar absorption bands in the green were not perceptible. 

2nd. — By applying a watery solution of the dye to plates prepared with 
unstained bromised collodion after the free nitrate of silver had been removed 

* Bcr. Deut. Chem. Ges. VIII. 62, 146, quoted in Am. Jour. Arts, So. May, 1875. 



14< J. Waterhotise — ITse of ISosin in Pliotographing tlie Spectrum. [Jan. 

by thorough washing. These films were denser than the first and showed a 
deep orange colouration by transmitted and a strong pink by reflected light. 
Examined with the spectroscope no absorption bands were visible, and the 
spectrum was quite obscured above F. 

As already stated, the absorption spectrum of the dye shows well 
marked bands in the green, and according to Dr. Vogel's theory, this part of 
the spectrum should act with increased intensity on the divj bromide plates 
stained with the dj^e ; though the action on the plate may be expected to be 
nearer the red than the absorption band of the colour, in accordance with 
Kundt's law that when non -absorbent media are mixed with an absorbent 
substance, the absorption baud has no constant position, but is displaced 
towards the red, in proportion as the dispersion of the added non-absorbent 
medium increases. 

Dry plates prepared with the coloured bromised collodion and exposed 
for periods varying from 1 to 5 minutes, to the spectrum given by a minia- 
ture direct-vision spectroscope of about six inches focus, exhibit after develop- 
ment a much greater sensibility to the green rays than to the blue, indigo, 
or violet, the maximum of action being below E, extending to about half 
way to D, and then decreasing till all action ceases just about D. Above 
E the action gradually lessens nearly to F, beyond which is a wide band of 
decreased action extending more than half way to Gr, followed by faint but 
increased action extending for some distance beyond H into the ultra-violet. 
The increased action in the yellow and green is strongly marked by its con- 
trast with the very weak action in the blue, indigo and violet. 

On the dry plates prepared by immersion in a watery solution of the 
dye, the same general characteristics are observed, but the image is stronger 
and the band of maximum action somewhat more extended between E and D, 
towards D, at Avhich point the action ends almost abruptly (Fig. 5). The 
band of decreased action in the blue just above F and extending about half 
way to G is very clearly marked. The same decreased action accompany- 
ing increased sensitiveness for less refrangible rays, has been observed on 
plates stained with various dyes, but the cause has not yet been explained 
and further observation is required to elucidate the law regulating its occur- 
rence. 

It is worthy of note that traces of action in the green and yellow were 
distinctly visible on the plate before development, though nothing could be 
seen in the indigo and violet, as is usually the case. This is the only instance 
in which I have observed this effect, though several colours tried have given 
increased sensibility for the less refrangible rays. 

A reference to the diagrams in Plate I will show that these results are 
quite in accordance with Dr. Vogel's theory, and tend strongly to confirm- 
it. As, however, Dr. Yogel has stated his rule in general terms as applica- 



Proceedings, Asiatic Society of Bengal, 1876. 



Plate I. 



Aa BC D Eb F 



G 



H 



Fig. 1, Solar Spectrum. 




7ig. 2. Absorption. Spectrura of Eosin in weak Watery solution 



Kg. 3. Atsorptioji Spectrum of Eosm m weak Alcoholic solution 



1 














L , 








2 












1 i 
I 

! - 









Eig. 4. Absorption Spectrura of stained Bromised Collodion 
(1. yon- T^iyore^crnt.— ^. li'lunresoeni. ■ 




fig. 5. Spectrum, as photographed, on stained dry bromide plate 




Fig. 6. Absoiption Spectrum of stained bromo-iodised Collodion 



^■i^K> m 














^^^m- 














^^^^^^Kk'l ■ . ^ 












■■ h'iMm^^^m 



Fig- 7. Spectrum as photographed on stained wet bromo-iodide plate 




lil^i 




Fig". 8. Speotrvir.i as photographed on unstairied wet (-•lomo-iodide plate 



1876.] J. Waterhouse — Use of Eosin in PliotograpMng the Spectrum. 15 

ble to any colour,* experiments must be tried with various dyes before a 
conclusive decision can be come to. The results of such an examination I 
hope to lay before the Society on a future occasion. 

A further peculiarity of this d.jQ is that ordinary wet collodion plates 
prepared with bromo-iodised collodion containing it, exhibit a marked pro- 
longation of the photographic action of the spectrum in the green and yel- 
low, extending it beyond its usual limit of h, or at most E, nearly to D. 
The stained bromo-iodised collodion is strongly fluorescent and i-etains its 
rosy tinge. Examined with the spectroscope it shows two strong absorp- 
tion bands in the green. (Fig. 6.) 

The character of the photographic image of the spectrum, as obtained 
on the stained wet bromo-iodide plates, is entirely different from what it 
was in the dry bromide plates, and we have an image of fair density showing 
strong action extending from above Ha to a little below Gr, where there is 
an abrupt and distinctly marked band of lessened action extending to about 
half way between F and E, from which point the action decreases to its 
minimum between 5 and E, and again rises at E with a marked increase of 
action extending half way to D, whence it gradually decreases till it disap- 
pears about D. (Fig. 7.) The increase in the extent of the photographic 
action towards D will be seen by comparing Figs. 7 and 8, the latter of 
which shows the spectrum as taken upon an unstained wet bromo-iodide 
plate. 

It is noticeable that a band of decreased action is observed almost 
corresponding with the position of the space between the absorption bands 
of the dye, and further investigation may possibly show similar effects with 
other dyes. 

From this marked sensibility to the green and yellow rays of the spec- 
trum, it might have been anticipated that wet plates prepared with the eosin- 
stained collodion would have shown an increased sensitiveness for foliage 
and other coloured objects of a green or yellow tint, and might have proved 
of use in photographing coloured maps, paintings or other documents such 
as the Sanskrit MSS. written on yellow paper. On trying a landscape I 
found that the dye lessened the sensitiveness of the plate very considerably, 
and that the exposure had to be increased to about three times what was 
necessary for similar plates unstained. Even with this increase of exposure, 
there was little or no improvement in the detail of the foliage, but the image 
was much denser than usual and the shadows were particularly clean and 
■well defined. I also tried photographing bouquets of flowers and a stained 
glass window comprising red, green, yellow and blue, both with dry bromide 
and wet bromoiodide plates, but found that little practical advantage was to 

* See paper in Fogg. Annal. Vol. CI. p. -153, translated in Pliil. Mag. S. 4, Vol. 
47, p. 273. 



16 Library. [Jan. 

be gained by the use of the stained collodion, tbougli the plates did show 
some slight increase of sensitiveness for yellow. Fui'ther trials in copying 
letterpress on yellow, green and red papers have given similar results, and 
the only well-marked advantage of the stained plates for such work is the 
great increase of density combined with clearness of the shadows, which 
might be turned to useful account in cases where the increased length of 
exposure is of no consequence. 

From these results it will be evident that the photographic action of 
the spectrum is but a very slight index to the action of coloured objects, and 
that methods have yet to be found which will enable us to overcome many 
of the difficulties of colour still connected with the practice of photography. 
The observations, however, have their value in showing that the photogra- 
phic action of the spectrum is more extended than has usually been stated 
and further investigation may lead to some useful practical application of 
the principle of staining the collodion film. 



LiBRABT. 

Note. — It is proposed to adopt cm entirely new and improved arrange- 
ment of the Library List, commencing tvith tlie present volume of the Proceed- 
ings, but owing to delay in carrying out the new arrangement for the list of 
additions received in December, it could not be included in the present 
number of the Proceedings. The February number will therefore contain 
the additions to the Library during December and January. — J. W. 



PROCEEDINGS 



OF THE 



ASIATIC SOCIETY OF BENGAL, 

For February, 1876. 



TKe Annual Meeting o£ the Society was held on Wednesday, the 2nd 
February, 1876, at 9 o'clock p. M. 

T. Oldham, Esq., LL, D., President, in the chair. 

According to the bye-laws of the Society, the President ordered tha 
voting papers to be distributed for the election of Officers and Members of 
Council for 1876, and appointed Messrs. Pedler and Peterson, Scrutineers. 

The President then called upon the Secretary to read the Annual Re- 
port. 

Annual jR.eport for 1875. 

In presenting their Annual Report for 1875, the Council have once 
more the satisfaction of congratulating the Members on the continued pros- 
perity of the Society, as evinced by the increase in its funds, though the 
number of new members again shows a falling off. 

The number of members elected during the year under review, has been 
28, against 35 of the previous year. 

Dm-ing the year 1875, the Society sustained the loss of 25 ordinary 
members by withdrawal, 1 by removal and 3 by death, in all 29. The total 
number of ordinary Members was 346 at the end of the year 1874 and 345 
at the close of 1875, 

Of these 345 members, 65 are absent from India, of whom 50 are non- 
subscribing members, leaving a balance of 295 paying members, 113 of 
whom are Resident and 182 non-Resident Members. 



18 Annual Beport. [Feb. 

The table below shows the fltictuation of members diiring the last ten 
years. 



Year. 


Paying. 


Absent. 


Total. 


1866, 

1867, 

1868, 

1869, 

1870, 


293 
307 
294 
304 
266 
286 
279 
305 
312 
295 


Resident. 

124 
154 
159 
162 
134 
112 
105 
116 
127 
113 


Non-Resident. 

169 

153 

135 

142 

132 

174 
172 + 2 L. M. 
186 + 3L.M. 
184 + 3 L. M. 
179 + 3 L. M. 


Non- 
Paying. 

94 

109 

133 

138 

148 

160 

159 

53 

32 

50 


387 
416 
427 

442 
414 


1871, 

1872, 

1873, 


446 
438 

358 


1874, 


346 


1875, 


345 









Two Honorary Members were elected dviring the year. viz. : Prof. J. 
O. Westwood, of Oxford, and Dr. O. Bohtlingk, of Jena ; also two Asso- 
ciate Members, viz. : — Rev. J. D. Bate, Allahabad, and Manlavi 'Abdul 
Hai, Calcutta. 

Among those whose loss by death the Society have to regret, the Council 
have to record, of the ordinary members, the names of Lieut. -Col. T. C. 
Hamilton, Rangoon, J. H. Haworth, Esq., Calcutta, and Lieut. W. A. 
Holcombe, Assam, who was treacherously murdered by the Nagas, while 
on duty with the survey party in the Naga Hills. Of the Honorary 
Members, Dr. Ewald, and the Right Hon'ble Sir E. Ryan, Kt. ; an Associate 
Member, Sayyid Karamat 'Ali, and Dr. Wilson, of Bombay, Corresponding- 
Member-. The name of Munshi Niwal Kishwar has been removed from the 
list on account of non-payment of his subscriptions. 

Among the contributors to the pages of the Journal, the Council regret 
to annotmce the death of Mr. Thomas W. Beal of Agrah. He was for a 
long time employed as a clerk in the Sudder Board of Revenue at Allaha- 
bad and later at Agrah. In 1849, he published at Agrah his Mifidh-utta- 
wdriTcli, which is dedicated to Sir H. M. Elliot. A second edition (406 
pages, folio) was lithographed at Lakhnau in 1867. The book is a charm- 
ing collection of biographies of illustrious Moslems and Indian celebrities, 
and of choice chronograms, many of which were composed by the author 
himself. It contains, besides, numerous copies of Muhammadan inscrip- 
tions taken by the writer in his journeys in Upper India. The book is 
written in easy and elegant Persian, and shows that the author had a 



1876.] Annual Beport. 19 

profound knowledge o£ the MSS. sources of Indian liistory and tlie treasures 
of Persian poetry. 

Mr. Beal for several years forwarded to the Society readings of Mu- 
hammadan inscriptions from the neighbourhood of i^grah, which were pub- 
lished in the Proceedings of the Society for 1873, 1874, and 1875, and also 
allowed the Society to take copies of several rare and unique historical MSS. 
He had just been proposed for election as an Associate Member, when he 
died at Agrah, on 9th June, 1875, at the advanced age of eighty-one years. 

Though not members of the Society at the time of their death, the 
names of Col. S. E,. Tickell, and Capt. T. Hutton, both of whom were for- 
merly valued contributors to the Society's Journal, may be recorded among 
those of others who have passed away diiring the year. Col. Tickell was 
elected in November 1859, and remained a member of the Society till 
January 1865. During this period he contributed several valuable papers, 
chiefly on Indian ornithology and ethnology, among which may be men- 
tioned " List of Birds collected in the jungles of Borabhum and Dhol- 
bum ;" — "on the Oology of India, a deserijjtion of the Eggs also Nests of 
several Birds of the plains of India ;" — "Notes on the Heiima or Shendoos, 
a tribe inhabiting the hills north of Ai-acan." 

Capt. Hutton appears never to have been a member of the Society, 
but the general Index to the early volumes of the Journal shows a list 
of between twenty and thirty papers from his pen on various subjects 
connected with Natural History and Geology. 

Indian Museum. 

The Council continue to carry out the provisions of Act XVII, of 1866 
and transfer all Natural History and Archteological specimens, received by 
them, to the Trustees of the Indian Museum. 

The Trustees on the part of the Society were : — 

Col. H. Hyde, E. E., Col. J. E. Gastrell, Dr. S. B. Partridge, and Dr. 
T. E Lewis. 

Finance. 

Notwithstanding the decrease in the number of paying members, the 
Council are happy to report, that the Financial position of the Society con- 
tinues in a satisfactory state. 

The actual total receipts by subscriptions from members during the 
year under review amounts to Es. 9,760, exceeding the total receipts of the 
previous year, which were Es. 8,729, by Es. 1,031. 

The amount due from members on account of arrears of subscriptions 
has been reduced this year by Es. 448, leaving a balance of Es. 6,561 still 
to be collected, against Es. 7,009 in arrears in 1874. 

The Council take this opportunity of again earnestly urging upon mem- 



20 Annual Bepoi-i. [Feb. 

bers, the importance of punctual payment of their subscriptions, and the 
early paying up of all arrears. The outstandings of the Society have for 
many years amounted to a large sum, and though it is satisfactory to know 
that the loss imder this head is not increasing, it still causes a serious, defi- 
cit in the finances of the Society. 
The assets consistmg of — 

Government Securities, Es. 13,200 

Cash in hand, 160 9 4 

Balance in Bank of Bengal, 3,858 2 3 



amount to Es.... 17,218 11 7 



It is satisfactory to observe that during the last year, an additional 
sum of Es. 4000-0-0 has been invested in Government Securities, of which 
sum Es. 1,182-0-0 is the amount collected from admission fees during 1874. 

The following is a statement of the Eeceipts and Disbursements of the 
Society during the year — 

Eeceipts. 

1874. 1875. 

Subscriptions, Es. 8,729 3 9,760 15 

Admission Fees, 1,182 930 

Publications, 2,126 8 7 1,729 10 

Library, 412 12 6 411 14 

Secretary's Office, 23 12 9 24 15 6 

Vested Funds, 449 449 

Building, 4,800 4,800 

CoinFund, 

Sundries, 2,861 4 2 3,657 1 



Es. 20,584 9 21,763 6 7 



Balance in the Bank of Bengal, 1874, ... 6,856 12 2 

Cash in hand, 161 9 1 



Total, Es. 28,781 11 10 

DlSBTTESEMENTS. 

1874. 1875. 

Publications, Es. 7,440 11 8 7,373 2 1 

Library, 2,732 2 9 4,475 6 6 

Secretary's Office, 3,119 8 10 3,769 9 9 



1876,] Annual Beport. 21 

DiSBTJHSEMENTs, — contimied. 

1874. 1875. 

Vested Funds, 1,646 5 5 4,073 9 8 

Building, 919 13 10 1,008 12 7 

Coin Fund, 266 376 4 

Sundries, 1,228 7 7 3,686 3 S 



Rs. 17,353 2 1 24,763 3 



Balance in the Bank of Bengal, 3,858 2 3 

Cashinhand, 160 9 4 4,018 11 7 



Total, Rs. 28,781 11 10 



With reference to the above statement the Council would draw the 
attention of members to the satisfactory increase in the income of the So- 
ciety. 

The estimated income was put down at Es. 16,500 for the year 1875, 
The receipts realised, however, were Es. 21,763, shewing an increase of 
Rs. 5,263, on the estimate. On the other hand, the Expenditure during 
the year has exceeded the amount (Rs. 16,500) allotted in the budget 
estimate by Rs. 8,263 ; but as this sum includes Rs. 4,000 expended in the 
purchase of Governmenii Securities, the excess is in reality only Rs. 4,263, 
which was partly incurred on account of the Library, (the sum of Rs. 1,475, 
being spent in excess of the Budget estimate) and the increase of Esta- 
blishment expenses of the Society on the appointment of a new Assistant 
Secretary. Notwithstanding this excess, however, the expenditvire diu'ing 
1875, has been less than the receipts by Rs. 1000. 

The following is the Estimate of Income and Expenditure for 1876. — 

Income. 

Subscriptions, Rs. 9,000 

Admission Fees, 900 

Publications, 1,700 

Library, 400 

Vested Funds, , 600 

Building, : 4,800 

Sundries, 3,000 



Rs. 20,400 



22 Annual Beport. [Feb. 

Expenditure. 

Publications, Es. 8,000 

Secretary's Office, Librarian, &c., 5,500 

Building repairs, 500 

Coin Fund, 500 

Library, 2,000 

Sundi'ies, 3,000 

Balance, 900 



Es. 20,400 

Library. 

During 1875, tlie Library received an addition of 927 volumes, or parts 
of volumes. Of tbese, 44 have been presented by Grovernment, 39 presented 
by autbors, 289 purchased and 555 by exchange with otber Societies. 

Tbe Pbotograpbic Collection of the Society bas received several valua- 
ble additions during tbe course of tbe year, among wbicb may be noted a 
set of splendid photographs and lithographs illustrating the ruins of Boro 
Boudour in Java, received from tbe Batavian Society of Arts and Sciences, 
and for which a special vote of thanks was given ; a set of 67 photographs 
of the ancient Architectural remains of Chota Nagpiir presented by tbe 
Government of India, Home Department ; 49 photographs of the Ancient 
Temples at Barwa Sagar, Barauli, in the Jhansi district, and of Muham- 
madan buildings at Badaon and Kol from the GovSrnment of the N. W. P., 
and a set of 5 photographs of copper Sasanas from Dr. G. Biihler. 

Publications. 

There were issued in 1875, 10 numbers of the Proceedings, containing, 
together with the Meteorological Observations, upwards of 325 j)ages of 
letter-j)ress, illustrated by 5 plates. The Journal, Part I, of which 4 Nos. 
have been published, consists of 404 pages of letter-press, illustrated by 
26 plates. Of Part II, 3 Nos. have also been published, containing upwards 
of 200 pages of letter-press, illustrated by 10 well executed plates. An 
extra number of Part II, in 167 pages, containing a Catalogue of Mammals 
and Birds of Burmah by tbe late Mr. E. Blyth, with a Memoir and Portrait 
of the author, and an introductory preface by Mr. A. Grote, has just been 
printed in England, under the general editorship of Mr. Grote, to whom 
tbe Society is greatly indebted for the care and attention he has bestowed upon 
the work. The special thanks of the Society are also due to Lord Walden, 
for the large amount of time and labour he has devoted to the Catalogue 
of Birds which, by the valuable and copious note and additions be has made 
to it, has become a complete list of tbe Burmese species, as ascertained 
to date ; as also to Dr. J. Anderson, and Dr. Dobson, who have materially 



1876.] Annual Beporf. 23 

assisted in perfecting the work, tlie former by revising the Catalogue of 
Mammalia, the latter by editing the Catalogue of the CMroptera. 

Coin Cabinet. 

The additions to the Society's Coin Cabinet, made during 1875, consist 
of 32 silver, and 2 copper coins. Of these 25 silver and 2 copjoer coins were 
presented to the Society by Col. Stubbs, (17 silver, 1 copper) ; Mr. E. V. 
Westmacott, C. S., (4 rare silver coins struck by Mahmiid Shah I. of Ben- 
gal) ; Capt. Williamson, Garo Hills, (one uniqu.e silver Nara Narayan of Kiich 
Bihar, and one Bengal Datid Shahi) ; Babu Mohini Mohim Rai, (2 Bengal 
Nu^rat Shahis) ; and Mr. S. Km'z (one copper Lapeck). These coins 
were exhibited at the meetings held in March, June, and November, and 
several of them have since been published in the Joiu-nal. 

Seven rare Bengal silver coins were purchased (Proceedings, June, 
1875, p. 113). 

Stoliczka Memorial. 

The Council are happy to report that the subscriptions to the' Stoliczka 
Memorial Fund amount to Rs. 2,872, of which Rs. 2,680 have already been 
realised, besides £76 collected in England by the London Committee. As 
the amount subscribed was sufficient to cover the cost, the Committee have 
considered it desirable to obtain both a portrait and a bust of their late es- 
teemed Natural History Secretary and have solicited the co-operation of the 
London Committee in giving effect to this proposal. The London Committee 
have accordingly made arrangements with Mr. Dickinson of Langham Place 
for the painting of a kitcat jDortrait at a cost of 100 guineas, and they have 
commissioned Mr. Geflowski, a rising sculptor, to execute a bust, also at a 
cost of 100 guineas. It is expected that the model of the latter will be 
completed in March. 

The Council would take this opportunity of thanking Mr, Grote, Dr. 
Day, and other members of the London Committee for the valuable co- 
operation and assistance they have rendered in furthering the objects of the 
Fund by the collection of subscrijitions, the selection of artists, and the 
supervision of the work. 

Zoological Garden. 

From time to time dviring many years past the question of the esta- 
blishment of a Zoological Garden in Calcutta has received the attention of 
the Society, but from various causes nothing could ever be done towards 
carrying out a project of which the great desirability and importance have 
always been fully recognised by the Council. It is, therefore, most gratify- 
ing to record that His Honor the Lieutenant-Governor of Bengal has 
taken the matter in hand, and has assigned a large plot of groiuid at 



24 Antmal Heport. [Feb. 

Alipore which has been cleared and planted as a site for the Garden. Seve- 
ral animals have already been transferred from the collections of Mr. 
Schwendler and others, and upwards of Rs. 200,000 have already been col- 
lected in subscriptions towards the establishment of the Garden. The 
Council therefore hope that its ultimate success may now be looked upon 
as secured. 

Ofllcers. 

The Philological and Natural History Secretaries, Messrs. Blochmann 
and Wood-Mason, have retained charge throughout the year, of their re- 
spective parts of the Journal, and other duties of their Secretaryships. Capt. 
Waterhouse has continued to act as General Secretary dui'ing the year, 
with the exception of the months of March and April, when Dr. Lewis un- 
dertook the duties of General Secretary in Capt. Waterhouse's absence. 
The office of Financial Secretary and Treasurer was held by Col. J. E. Gas- 
trell until the month of May, when Capt. Waterhouse took temporary 
charge diuing Col. Gastrell's absence. 

Babu Pratapachandra Ghosha, late Assistant Secretary, having re- 
signed his appointment at the end of April last, Mr. G. S. Leonard was 
aj)pointed Assistant Secretary in his place ; and though the change involves 
some additional expense, the Council have every reason to believe that it is 
an improvement on the former state of things, and to be satisfied with the 
zeal and attention to his duties shewn by Mr. Leonard, who has commenced 
the preparation of an Index to vols. 24 to 43 of the Journal, and has also 
given attention to the preparation of the new catalogue of the Society's Libra- 
ry, though the progress of this most important work is greatly hindered by 
the crowded state of the rooms now occupied by the Society. It is, however, 
to be hoped that this cause of delay will soon disaj)pear. Babu Gopal 
Chunder Dutt, who was engaged in 1874 as an assistant in the Secretary's 
office, resigned his appointment at the same time as the late Assistant Se- 
cretary, and no other appointment has been made in his room. 

Munilall Bysak, Assistant Librarian ; Jado Bindo Bysak, Storekeeper ; 
and Babu Baddinath Bysak, have continued to do good service in their 
respective branches. 

Bibliotheea Indica. 
Arahic and Persian Series. 

Maulawi 'Aziz urrahman, of the Presidency College, Calcutta, has 
brought the edition of the Farhang i Rashidi to a close. This Persian 
Dictionary contains 703 pages quarto, in two volmnes. The work was com- 
piled towards the end of Shahjahan's reign, in 1064 H. , by Sayyid ' Abdurrashid 
of Tattah, in Sindh, one of the best grammarians and lexicographers that Lidia 
has produced. During the 17th and 18th century of our era, the study of 
Persian was zealously cultivated in India by both Muhammadans and Hin- 



1876.] Annual Report. 25 

dus, and numerous critical works on Persian lexicography, grammar, and 
idiom, were written. Among them, the Farhang i Rashidi holds a promi- 
nent place. The numerous Persian dictionaries which had before been com- 
piled and had more or less been eclipsed by Jamal uddin Injii's 'FarTimig i 
Jahdngiri, were now for the first time critically examined : Sayyid 'Abdur- 
rashid discovered in the older dictionaries a large number of words that 
never existed in the language and had found their way into the dictionaries 
through bad MSS. and careless copyists. Again, words had been entered 
into the older dictionaries with wrong meanings, because the passages in 
which they occurred had been wrongly explained." These and other defects 
were corrected by Sayyid 'Abdurrashid. His work forms thus the basis of 
Persian lexicography, and has been used as such by later writers, such as 
Arzu, Waris, and Tek Chand. The Society's edition of the Farhang will 
therefore be of the greatest use to European scholars. Maulawis Zulfaqar 
'All and 'Aziz urrahman, the editors, have not only carefully collated the 
several MSS. which the Society had placed at their disposal, but they have 
also added valuable notes from Sururl, Jahangiri, and the Siraj. The nu- 
merous quotations from Persian poets have in all cases been compared with 
those in the Jahangiii (where they are generally quoted at full length), and 
the editors have seen that they are given metrically correct. 

Of the Ai'abic biographical work, entitled ' the l9abah', no fasciculus 
was issued during last year ; but Nawab Muhammad (^iddiq Hasan Khan, 
Prime-Minister of Bhopal, has offered to the Society the loan of a complete 
copy of this rare work. On the receipt of the MS., the work will again be 
continued by Maulawi 'Abdul Hai, of the Calcutta Madi-asah. 

Major Eaverty has issued two more fasciculi (Nos. V and VI,) of his 
annotated English translation of the Tahaqdt i NciQiri, which brings the work 
down to the reigns of the first Muhammadan kings and governors of Ben- 
gal. 

Of the Aklarndmah, Maulawi 'Abdurrahim, of the Calcutta Madrasah, 
has issued two quarto fasciculi (Nos. Ill andIV), and has thus nearly com- 
pleted the j)ortion which is often called the first volume of the Akbarnamah. 
The work in consequence of an unfavourable notice of it in the History of 
India by Elphinstone, had hitherto been looked upon by European historians 
as a mere panegyric of the emperor Akbar, and therefore of little historical 
value. Native historians, on the other hand, have always considered it as a 
truthful account of the events of Akbar's reign and as a model of 
historical style. This correcter estimate of Abul Fazl's work has also lately 
bean adopted by Professor Dowson in his notes on the Akbarnamah (Elliot's 
History of India, Vol. VT). 



26 Annual Beport. [Feb. 

SansTcrit Series. 

Of the Sanskrit series fourteen fasciculi have been published during the 
year under report. These comj)rise portions of seven different works. The 
only work comj^leted is a translation of the Sahitya Darpana, a treatise on 
rhetoric which is held in high esteem by the Pandits of Bengal, and comprises 
a very full summary of all the leading works on the subject. It was origi- 
nally undertaken by the late Dr. Ballantyne, and about one hundred and 
sixty pages were passed through the press by him. On his retirement to 
Europe the work was left in abeyance for some time. The Council has 
every reason to be satisfied with the manner in which the present editor, 
Babu Pramadadasa Mitra, has completed the work. 

Reference was made in the last report to the materials collected by 
Babu Eajendralala Mitra for an edition of the Aitareya Brahmana of the 
Rig Veda. The work has since been sent to press, and two fasciculi have 
already been published. The Babu has also published two more fasciculi of 
his edition of the Agni Purana, which, it is exj^ected, will be completed in 
course of the current year. 

The necessity of printing the text of the Sama Veda Sanhita with all the 
prosodial and musical notes which occur in the different ganas, entails much 
tedious labour, both on the editor and the printer, and having due regard to 
accui'acy of printing, the work cannot be pushed on as rapidly as could be 
wished ; but the progress hitherto made has been steady and satisfactory. 
Four f asciciili were issued during the past year, and altogether one half of 
the work has been completed. 

Among the many commentaries extant on S'ankara's exposition of the 
Vedanta Aphorisms of Vyasa, the Bhdmati of Vachaspati Misra is held in 
great esteem by Indian scholars, and an edition of this work has been under- 
taken by Pandit Bala S'astrl, Professor of Hindu Law at the Benares Col- 
lege, and. the first fasciculus, comprising about one-fifth of the work, has 
lately been printed. The materials available for the work are ample, and 
under the able superintendence of the learned professor, they will be, the 
Council expect, most satisfactorily utilised. 

Professor Eggeling's edition of the old Sanskrit Grammar, the Katan- 
tra, the publication of the first two fasciculi of which was referred to in the 
last report, has advanced by two more fasciculi. It is expected the work 
will be completed in course of the current year. 

MSS. of the first part Hemadri's digest of Hindu civil and canonical 
law not being at the time accessible, the Comacil sanctioned the publication 
of the second part, and on the completion of it the editor, Professor Bhara- 
tachandra S'iromani has been engaged in carrying the third part through the 
press, and three fasciculi of it have already been issued. 



1876.] Annual Beport. 27 

The following is a detailed list o£ the works published in 1875 — 
Persian Series. 

The Farhaistg-i-Rashidi, bj Mulla 'Abdur Rashid of Tattah. 
Edited and annotated hy Maidaivt 'Aziz-ureahman", Presidency College. 
Nos. 317, 318, Fasc. XIII, XIV. 

The Akbarnamah, by Ajbul Fazl i Mubarak i 'Allami. Edited 
hy Maulawi 'Abdur Rahim, Calcutta Madrasah. Nos. 319, 320, Vol. I, 
Fasc. Ill, IV. 

The Tabaqat i Nasiri of Miwhaj i Siraj. Translated fro tn the Per- 
sian hy Major H. Gr. Ravertt. Nos. 310, 311, Fasc. V, VI. 

Sanskrit Series. 

The Agni Purana, a system of Hindu Mythology and Tradition. Edited 
hy Bdhu Rajendralala Mitra. Nos. 313, 316, Fasc. VII, VIII. 

The Mimamsa Darsana, with the commentary of Sayara Swamin. 
Edited hy Pandita Mahesachandra Ntataratka. Nos. 209, 240, 315, 
Fasc. X, XI, XII. 

The Sama Veda San^hita, ivith the commentary of Satana Acharya. 
Edited hy Pandita Sattatrata Samasramin. Nos. 321, 322, 323, 324, 
Fasc. II to V, Vol. II. 

The Chaturyarga ChiktamajSTI hy HemXdri. Edited hy Pandita 
Bharatacha^s^dra S'iromani. Nos. 326, 327, Vol. II, Fasc. I, II. 

The Katantra, with the commentary of Durgasi:S^ha. Edited, loith 
Notes and Indexes, hy Julius Eggeliistg. Nos. 308, 309, Fasc. Ill, IV. 

The Sahitya Darpana or Mirror of Composition, translated into 
English hy Bdhu, Pramadadasa Mitra. No. 330, Fasc. IV. 

The Aitareta Arantaka of the Rig Veda, with the commentary of 
Sayana Acharya. Edited hy" Bdhu RljENDRAL-iLA Mitra. Nos. 325, 
329, Fasc. I, II. 

The Bhamati, a Gloss on Sankara Achdrya's commentary on the Brah- 
masutras, hy Vachaspati Misra. Edited hy Pandita Bala S'astri, Pro- 
fessor of Hindu Law, Bandras College. No. 328, Fasc. I. 



List of Societies, Institutions, Sfc, with which Exchanges of Puhlications 
have heen made during 1875. 
Batavia : — Batavian Society of Ai'ts and Sciences. 
Belgium : — Geological Society of Belgium. 
Berlin : — Royal Academy of Arts and Sciences. 
Birmingham : — Institution of Mechanical Engineers. 
Bombay : — Royal Asiatic Society. 

: — Editor, Indian Antiquary. 

Boston : — Natiira] History Society. 
Bordeaux : — Bordeaux Academy. 



28 



Annual Report. 



[Feb, 



Buenos A3a'es : — Public Museum. 
Brussels : — Royal Academy of Sciences. 
Cherboui'g : — National Society o£ Natural Sciences. 
Calcutta : — Agricultural and Horticultural Society of India. 

: — Geological Survey of India. 

Christiania : — University. 

Copenhagen : — Royal Society of Northern Antiquaries. 

Cambridge : — University. 

Dacca : — Editor, Bengal Times. 

Debra Diin -. — Great Trigonometrical Survey. 

Dublin : — Royal Irish Academy. 

: — Natural History Society. 

Edinburgh : — Royal Society. 

Geneva : — Physical and Natural History Society. 

Konigsberg : — Physical and Economical Institution. 

Lahore : — Agricultural Society of the Panjab. 

Leipzig : — German Oriental Society. 

Liege : — Royal Society of Sciences. 

Leyden : — Royal Herbarium. 

Liverpool : — Literary and Philosophical Society. 

London : — Royal Society. 

: — British Museum. 

: — Royal Asiatic Society of Great Britain and Ireland. 

: — Royal Institution. 

■ : — London Institution of Civil Engineers. 

: — Royal Geographical Society. 

: — Museum of Practical Geology. 

■ : — Zoological Society. 

: — Statistical Society. 

: — : — Geological Society. 

• : — Linnean Society. 

: — Anthropological Institute. 

: — Royal Astronomical Society. 

: — Editor, Athenseum. 

: — Editor, Natui'e. 

: — Editor, Geographical Magazine. 

Lyon : — Agricultural Society. 
Moscow : — Society of Naturalists. 
Madras : — Government Central Museum. 

: — Literary Society. 

Manchester : — Literary and Philosophical Society. 
Munich : — Royal Academy. 



1876.] Annual Beport. 29 

Netherlands : — Eoyal Society. 

New Haven : — Connecticut Academy of Arts and Sciences. 

Oxford : — Bodleian Library. 

Paris : — Imperial Library. 

: — Anthropological Society. 

: — Asiatic Society. 

: — Geographical Society. 

: — ^Ethnological Society. 

Pisa : — Tuscan Society of Natural Sciences. 

Stettin : — Entomological Society. 

Stuttgardt : — Natm-al History Society of Wiirtemberg. 

St. Petersburg : — Imperial Library. 

: — Imperial Academy of Sciences. 

Stockholm : — Eoyal Academy of Sciences. 
Trieste :— Adriatic Society of Natural Science. 
Turin : — Academy. 
Vienna : — Imperial Geological Institute. 

■ : — Anthropological Society. 

: — Zoological and Botanical Society. 

: — Imperial Academy of Sciences. 

Washington : — Smithsonian Institution. 

: — Connnissioners of the Department of Agriculture. 

The Peesidekt said — He had now to ask the meeting to receive and 
approve the Report of the Council for the past year. In doing so, it seemed 
to him that there were just one or two points to which the attention of the 
meeting might more particularly be called. In the first place, it was satis- 
factory to see that the income of the Society had shewn a considerable 
increase during the year. But they must at the same time not conceal the 
painful fact that the amount of arrears due for unrealized subscriptions, &c., 
was by much too large. It was not due to any want of exertion on the part 
of the Treasurer of the Society. The accumulation has been one of long 
growth, and though the amount was reduced last year, still it is far too great 
to be satisfactory. 

Then as their funds had increased, a considerably larger siim than ori- 
ginally contemplated was devoted to the improvement and extension of the 
Library. This is, at present by far the most valuable portion of the Society's 
property, and though rich in many ways, it still calls for much exertion to 
extend and improve the collections. Progress has, he was thankful to say, 
been made in this direction, although nothing really satisfactory could be 
done until the Society had obtained more room to put out their books, and 
admit of their classification and arrangement, in such a way as shall render 
them accessible. 



30 Memarhs hy the President. [Feb. 

The Publications of the Society had maintained their character during 
the year. Although occasionally arrears in the issue of the parts un- 
avoidably occur, still they had on the whole been punctually given to the public. 
He considered this point of punctuality and regularity of issue one of the high- 
est importance, and that much in other ways should be sacrificed to it. Much 
progress had been made, however, and the Journal and Proceedings of the 
Society were now worthy of the high position which the Asiatic Society 
of Bengal had always held, as the first of non-metropolitan Societies of 
Science. The publications were well and sufficiently illustrated, well printed, 
and altogether highly creditable to the Secretaries who edited them. 

Another source of much gratification was that the Council, besides in- 
curring this additional expenditm'e, had been able to invest for the Society 
a considerable sum. He thought the importance of this could not be over- 
rated: the experience of every Association or Society, no matter what its object, 
shewed that times of depression or even difficulty will come ; and that unless 
the Society has in itself some means of maintaining itself during these un- 
favourable periods, the result may be very serious. In this way the posses- 
sion of a sufficient fund in vested securities, indej)endent of such temporary 
changes, acts like the heavy fly-wheel of a large engine ; by steadying the 
motion, and producing a continuity of the force, which produced that motion. 
He hoped this investment would be maintained until the Society had an income 
independent of the varying chance of subscriptions, sufficient to carry them 
over any such temporary difficulties as might occur. 

The Philological Secretary had told them, of the sound and valuable pro- 
gress made in the Oriental publications of the Society, and they have been 
indebted to the several editors of the books for their exertions. 

He would fail, however, in his duty did he not take this opportunity of 
saying how vastly indebted the Society were to their Honorary Secretaries 
and other officers. Though an officer of the Society himself, he was sorry to 
think that the very limited time at his disposal, from other more pressing 
occupations and also the state of his own health, had prevented his doing 
much for the Society. But this very fact enabled him to speak with greater 
force as to the untiring exertions of the Secretaries. At all times and on 
all subjects, they never ceased to work for the benefit of the Society. It 
would be in fact impossible for any but those who were, he might say, behind 
the scenes, to form an estimate of the amount of work which devolves 
on their officers, and of the readiness and earnestness with which it is not 
only undertaken, but carried through. And the Society certainly owes 
to their officers, the most grateful and hearty acknowledgments of their 
labom-s. 

He would now put to the meeting — That the report of the Council 
as now read be received and aj)proved. 

The motion was carried imanimously. 



1876.] 



Mection of Officers and Coioncil, 



31 



The Scrutineers reported 
Coxmcil for 1876 as follows :— 



the election o£ Oflficers and Members of 



President. 



S. I. 



Vice-Presidents. 



Secretaries Sf Treasurer. 



T. Oldham, Esq. LL. D. 

The Hon. E. C. Bayley, C. 

Bahu Eajendralala Mitra. 

Col. H. L. Thuillier, C. S. I. 

H. Blochmann, Esq., M. A. 

Capt. J. Waterhonse. 

J. Wood-Mason, Esq. , 

Dr. T. R. Lewis. 

Col. J. E. Gastrell. 

T. Oldham, Esq., LL. D. 

The Hon. E. C. Bayley, C. S. 

Bahu Eajendralala Mitra. 

Col. H. L. Thuillier, R. A., C. 

Col. J. E. Gastrell. 

L. Schwendler, Esq. 

H. Blochmann, Esq., M. A. 

Capt. J. Waterhouse. 

J. Wood-Mason, Esq. 

Dr. T. E. Lewis. 

J. O'Kinealy, Esq. 

Bahu Prannath Pandit. 

Dr. W. K. WaUer. 

E. Gay, Esq. 

C. H. Tawney, Esq., M. A. 

Messrs. Gay and Waldie were elected to audit the Annual Accounts. 



S. L 



y Members of Council. 



The Meeting was then resolved into an Ordinary Monthly General 
Meeting. 

Dr. T. Oldham, President, in the chair. 

The minutes of the last meeting were read and confirmed. 

The following presentations were annoimced — 

1. From the author, a copy of a paper " On the Age and Correlations 
of the Plant-Bearing Series of India, and the former existence of an Indo- 
Oceanic Continent," by H. F. Blanford, Esq. 

From Prof. Tacchini, Memoirs of the Italian Spectroscopic Society, 
No. 10, October, 1875. 

From M. Ph. Ed. Foucaux, a copy of " Le Eeligieux chasse de la com- 
munaute", a Buddhist tale, translated from the Tibetan. 

From His Royal Highness the Prince of Wales, a copy of the photo- 
lithographed edition of the " Mahabhashya," in six volumes. 



32 T. H. Hendley — Account of the Manodr BMls. [Feb. 

The following letter from Sir H. Bartle Frere, G. C. S. I., K. C. B., 
accompanying the donation, was read — 

GOYEENMENT HoiJSE, CALCUTTA. 
^rd January, 1876. 
Sib, — I am commanded by His Royal Highness the Prince of Wales 
to inform you that he has directed a copy of the " Mahabashya" to be 
forwarded to you for presentation to the Society. 

His Eoyal Highness hopes that the Asiatic Society will accept the 
book, as a souve7iir of his visit, and as a mark of His Royal Highness' high 
estimation of the great work the Society has done and is doing in promoting 
the study of all the important subjects to which the labours of the Society 
and its members have been for so many years directed. 

I am, Sir, 

Your obedient Servant, 

H. B. Feere, 
To the Secretary Asiatic Society, Calcutta. 

The Peesident drew the attention of the meeting to the six fine vo- 
lumes on the table, stating that they possessed special value from the fact 
that they were photolithographed facsimiles of original MSS., and he 
proposed that the special thanks of the meeting should be tendered to His 
Royal Highness for his considerate remembrance of the Society. 
The proposition was carried unanimously. 

From the author, a copy of a work entitled " Protection of Life and 
Property from Lightning", by W. McGregor. 

The following gentlemen, duly proposed and seconded at the last meet- 
ing, were balloted for and elected ordinary members — 

R. B. Shaw, Esq. 

Col. J. F. Tennant (re-election). 

The ioUowing is a candidate for ballot at the next meeting — 
Jas. Crawfurd, Esq., B. A., Under-Secretary to the Government of 
Bengal ; j)i'oposed by Dr. D. D. Cunningham, seconded by Capt. J. Water- 
house. 

The following papers were read — 

1. An Account of tJie Maiwdr Bhils. — By T. H. Hendley, Surgeon, 

Jaipur, Bdjputdnd. 
(Abstract.) 
Dr. Hendley gives in this paper an account of those members of the 
Bhil race who reside in the 'Hilly Tracts' of Maiwar (Udaipiir), where they 
have perhaps best preserved their individualities. He has been able to col- 



1876.] V.A.Smith — Popular Songs of BmideWiand. 33 

lect a good deal o£ information whilst residing among them as Sm'geon of 
the Maiwar Bhil corps. In the chapter on the religion of the Bhils, Dr. 
Hendley notices the caii'ns and stJidns, which are erected on the summits of 
high hills, and the curious reverence of the people for the horse, which, as 
Sir J. Malcom says, the Bhils worship and do not mount. Then follows a 
description of the customs observed at births, marriages and deaths, of the 
government and the agricultru'e of the tribe, and statistical tables contain- 
ing race measurements. The Bhil skull is but slightly dolicho-cephalic, and 
differs very much from the long thin- walled cranium of the jDui'e Hindu. 
The chapter on Language contains an outline of Bhil grammar, a vocabu- 
lary, and a list of proj)er nouns ; and the paper ends with specimens of 
Bhil songs. 

A plate of Bhil arms and ornaments wiU be published, with the essay, 
in No. IV. of Ft. I. of the Journal for' 1875. 

2. Popular Songs of the Hamirpw- Districi, BimdelTchand, North Western 
Provinces, — By Vincent A. Smith, B. A., C. S. 

(Abstract.) 

Mr. Vuicent Smith submits specimens of songs from Bundelkhand in 
honour of Hardaul, a son of the notorious Bir Sing Deo Bvuidela, Eaja of 
U'rcha, who was poisoned by his brother Jhajhar Sing. His ghost is wor- 
shipped in every village, and chiefly at weddings and in the month of 
Baisakh. Hardaid is also j^ropitiated with songs when storms appear. 

The Hindi of the songs is peculiar, and Mr. Vuacent Smith has pro- 
mised to favour the Society with other sjDecimens. 

The paper will appear in No. IV. Pt. I. of the Joiu-nal, for 1875. 



3'1 Library. [Feb. 



The following additions have been made to the Library since the meet- 
ing held in December last. 



1 Transactions, Proceedings and Journals. 

Presented hy the respective Societies or Editors. 

Berlin. Konigliche Akademie der Wissenschaften, — Abhandlungen aus dem 
Jahre 1874. 

• . , Monatsbericht, Juli und Aiigust, 1875. 

Feters. — Tiber die Entwickelung der Caeeilien. G. Kirchhoff. — XTber die sta- 
tionaren elektrischen Stromungen in einer gekriimmten leitenden Flache. 
Peters. — tTber zwei Gattungen von Eidechsen, Scincodypiis und Sphenoscincus. 

Birmingham. Institute of Mechanical Engineers, — Proceedings, June, July, 
1875. 

Crossley. Dr. F. W. — On Otto and Langen's Atmospheric Gas Engine and some 
other Gas Engines. G. H, Baglish. — On direct-acting Winding Engines for 
Mines. 

Bombay. The Indian Antiquary, — Vol. IV, Pt. 49. 

Sri Krishna Sdstri Talelcar. — Legendary Account of old Newasa. Br. A. B. 
Cohen Stuart. — Sacred Footprints in Java. J. G. Da Cunha. — Words and 
places in and about Bombay. Miss D. Lyall. — Taranatha's account of the 
Magadha kings, translated from Vassilief. S, Blochmann. — Inscriptions from 
Abmadabad. 

Buenos Aires. Academia Nacional de Ciencias Exactas existente en la Uni- 

versidad de Cordova, — Boletin, Entrega IV, 1875. 
Calcutta. Christian Spectator. — Vol. V, No. 55, January, 1876. 
Gravenhage. Bijdragen tot de Taal-land en Volkenkunde van Nederland- 
sch-Indie.— Deel, 8, Stukken 2, 3, 4. Deel 9, Stukken 1 to 4. 

Deel 8. Stukken, 3, 4. — Cankara akarya's Commentaar op de Aphorismen van den 
Ved^nta, Vertaald door Dr. A. Braining, met lene inleidung von Prof. H. Kern, 
(continued in Deel 9. Stukken 3-4.) 

• . Babad Tanah Djavri, in Proza, Javansche Geschiedenis van J. J. 

Meinsma, Erste Stuk. (Tekst). 
Leipzig. Deutsche Morgenlandische Gesellschaft, — Zeitschi-ift, Vol. 29, 
Heft II. 

0. Bohtlingh. — Katjajana oder Patangali im Mababhashja. F. Eiiclaert. — ^Aus 
Dschjlmi's Liebesliedem. A. D. Mordtmann. — Sassanidiscbe Gemmen. S. 



\ 



1876.] Library. 35 

Lefmami. — Zum Gathadialect. Br. H. Jmiohi. — Ueber tejas, vayn, aka^a, spe- 
ciell in der Vaicjeshika Philosophie. A. von Eremer. — Ein Freidenker des 
Islam. 

London. The Athenaeum. — Parts 572, 573, August, September, 1875. 

. British. Museum, — Catalogue of Marine Polyzoa in the Collection 

o£ the British Museum, Pt. Ill, — Cyclostomata. 
. Chemical Society, — Journal, Vol. XIII, August, September, and 



November, 1875. 

August. C. Griffin. — On a new method of supporting Crucibles in Gas-furnaces. 
W. S. Deering. — On some Points in the examination of Waters by the Ammn- 
nia method. G. H. Beckett, and C. A. Wright. — On the action of the Orga- 
nic Acids and their anhydrides on the Natural Alkaloids, Pt. IV. Action of 
Polybasic Acids on Morphine and Codeine. 

September. J. W. Thomas. — On the Gases enclosed in Coals from the South 
Wales Basin, and the Gases evolved by Blowers and by boring into the Coal 
itself. /. /. Coleman. — The effects of Pressure and Cold, on the Gaseous 
Products of the Distillation of Carbonaceous Shales. 

October, E. Warington. — Notes on the Chemistry of Tartaric and Citric Acid. 

. East India Association, — Journal, Vol. IX, No. 2. 

. Geographical Magazine, — Vol. II, Nos. 11, 12. 

No. 11. — Map of a part of Central Asia showing the Eoutes of the Russian His- 
sar Expedition, the Havildar, and the Mtdlah, 1874-75. H. P. Lerch. — A 
Glance at the results of the Expedition to Hissar. 

. Geological Society, — Quarterly Journal, Vol. XXXI, No. 123. 

Prof. Huxley. — On Stagonolepis Rohertsoni and on the Evolution of the Croco- 
dilia. 

. Institute of Civil Engineers, — Proceedings, Vol. 41, Pt. Ill, 

1874-75. 

C. Cohon. — Experiments on the Portland Cement used in the Portsmouth Dock- 
yard, Extension Works. Earthwork Experiments on the Sirhind Canal. 

. Linnean Society, — Journal, Botany, Vol. XIV, Nos. 77 to 80. 

No. 77. /. D. Hooker. — Contributions to the Botany of the Expedition of H. M. S. 

Challenger. 
No. 78. M. T. Masters. — Note on the Bracts of Crucifers. W. H. Colvill. — Some 
Observations on the Vegetable Productions and the Rural Economy of the Pro- 
vince of Bagdad. C. B. Clarke. — On Hieracium Silhetense, D. C. Notes on 
Indian Gentianacece. 
No. 79. /. B. Hooker. — Observations on some Indian Species of Garcinia. M. 
T. Masters. — Remarks on the Structiu-e, Afifinities, and Distribution of the 
genus Aristolochia, with Descriptions of some hitherto unpublished Species. 
Monographic Sketch of the Burioneae. J. G. Baker. — Revision of the Genera 
and Species of Asparagace<e. (Continued in No. 80.) 

. , Journal, Zoology, Vol. XII, Nos. 58 and 59. 

No. 58. /. G. Jeffreys. — On some Species of Japanese Marine Shells and Fishes, 
which inhabit also the North Atlantic. T. Buvidson. — Note on a new Species 



36 Library. [Feb, 

of Japanese Brachiopoda. Sir J. Lubbock. — Observations on Bees and Wasps. 
JE. G. Seeley. — Resemblances between the Bones of Typical liyittg Reptiles^ 
and the Bones of other animals. 
No. 59, T. H. Huxley. — On the Classification of the Animal King-dom. Sir J. 
Luhboek. — Observations on Bees, Wasps and Ants, Pt. II. 

London. Limiean Society, — Transactions, Vol. XXIX, Pt. 3, and Vol. XXX, 
Pts. 2, and 3. Second Series, Botany, Vol. I, Pt. I, and Zoology, Vol. I, Pt. I, 

Vol. XXX, Pt. 2. /. Miers. — On the Lecythidacem. Bev. 0. P. Cambridge. — 
Systematic List of the Spiders at present known to inhabit Great Britain and 
Ireland. Pt. 3. G. Bentham. — Revision of the Sub-order Mimosce. 
Zoology, Vol. I, Pt. I. W. K. Parker. —On. the Morphology of the Skull in 
the Woodpeckers {Picidce) and WrjTiecks {Yungidce). Dr. R. V. Willemoes- 
Suhm. — On some Atlantic (7rMs^acea from the "Challenger" Expedition. 

. , Proceedings, Session 1873-74 and Obituary Notices. 



. Natui-e,— Vol. 13, Nos. 313 to 320. 

. Eoyal Society,— Proceedings, Vol. XXIII, No. 163. 

Mev. A. E. Baton. — First Report of the Natui'alist accompanying the Transit- 
of- Venus Expedition to Kerguelen's Island in 1874. 0. Reynolds. — On Roll- 
ing Friction. T. R. Robinson. — Reduction of Anemograms taken at Armagh 
Observatory in the years 1857 to 1863. J. A. Broun. — On the power of 
the Eye and the ]\Iicroscope to see Parallel Lines. Prof. W. G. Adams. — The 
Action of Light on Selenium. S. E. Roscoe and B. Stewart. — On the Heat of 
Sunshine at London during the twenty-four years 1855 to 1874, as registered 
by Campbell's Method. Staff Commander, E. W. Creak. — On the Effects of 
Iron Masts on Compasses placed near them. 

. Royal Asiatic Society, — Joimial, Vol. VII, Pt. 2. 

T. W. Rhys Eavids. — Sigiri, the Lion Rock, near Pulastipiu-a, Ceylon ; and the 
Thirty -ninth Chapter of the Mahavansa. S. H. Eoivorth. — The Northern 
Frontagers of China. Pt. I. The Origines of the Mongols. Pt. II. The 
Origines of the Manchus. S. L. Poole. — Inedited Ai-abic Coins. E. T. Rogers. 
— Notice on the Dinai's of the Abbasside Dynasty. S. W. Bushell. — Notes 
on the Old Mongolian Capital of Shangtu. Rev. J. Long. — Oriental Proverbs 
in their Relations to Folklore, History, Sociology, with Suggestions for their 
Collection, Interpretation and Publication. Prof. J. Eowson. — Notes on a 
Bactrian Pali Inscription and the Samvat Era. E. Thomas. — Note on a Jade 
Drinking Vessel of the Emperor Jahangir. 

London. Eoyal Astronomical Society, — Monthly Notices. Vols. 32 — 35. 

Vol. XXXV, No. 1. — Preparations for the Observations of the Transit of 
Venus. Rev. J. J. Johnson. — Remarks on Ancient Chinese Eclipses. On cer- ' 
tain Phenomena seen during Eclipses of the Sun, and theu' bearing on the 
question of a Limar Atmosphere. Mr. Burnham. — A Fifth Catalogue of 71 
N ew Double Stars. Mr. Plwnmer. — Note on the Zodiacal Light. 

No. 2. — Letter from an Officer in the Merchant Navy on the Application of 
Corrections for change of Temperature to the Rates of two Chronometers dur- 
ing a voyags from Liverpool to Calcutta. Corrections to the Astronomer 



1876.] Library. 37 

Royal's Eeport on the " Preparations for the Ohservations of the Transit of 
Venus" Mr. Berthon. — The Equestrian Equatoreal. 

No. 3. Prof. Pritchard. — Ephemerides of 12 Close Cixcumpolar Stars suitahle for 
the determination of Azimuth Error. 

No. 5. Sir G. B. Airy. — On the Method to he used in Eeducing the Ohserva- 
tions of the Transit of Venus. 1874, Dec. 8. Accounts of the Ohservations 
of the Transit of Vemcs, as received from various Stations. Mr. Sartnup. — On 
the Application of Corrections for change of Temperature to the Bates of 
Chronometers at Sea. 

No. 6. A. V. Nnrsinga Row. — Ohservations of the Transit of Venus at Vizaga- 
patam. M. d'Abbadie. First Results of the Transit of Venus. Lwd Lindsay. — 
Account of Longitude Operations on the way from Mauritius homewards. 
Mr. Proctor. Photography in the Transit of Venus. 

No. 7. Lieut.-Col. Pennant. — On the Dimensions of Venus, as determined dming 
the recent Transit. Mr. Christie. — Note on the determination of the Scale 
in Photographs of the Transit of Vci/us. 

No. 8. -Col. Pennant.— On the Suspected Variahility of B. A. C. 740, 4166, and 
4193. 

. Eoyal Geographical Society, — Proceedings, Vol. XIX, No. 7. 

Carpenter. — Summary of Recent Ohservations on Ocean Temperature, made in 
the Challenger and Puscarora in relation to the Doctrine of a General Oceanic 
Circulation sustained hy Difference of Temperatm-e. 

. Statistical Society, — Journal, Vol. XXXVIII, Pt. 3, September, 

1875. 
. Zoological Society, — Proceedings, Pts. 2, and 3. Marcli to June, 

1875. 

Part 2. — A. H. Garrod. — On the Form of the Lower Larynx in certain 
Species of Ducks. Capt. J. Biddulph. — Letter from, addressed to the Secretary 
containing remarks on the "Wild Sheep met with dui-ing his recent journey to 
Yarkand. W. S. Flower. — On the Structure and Aflfinities pt the Musk-Deer 
[Moschus moschiferus.) Br. A. Giuither. — Second Eeport on Collections of 
Indian Reptiles obtained by the British Museum. A. G. Butler. — Descriptions 
of new Species of 8p)hingidce. Sir V. BrooJc. — On a new Species of Deer fi'om 
Mesopotamia. L. PaezanoivsJci. — Description d'une nouvelle espece de Coq 
de bruyere. J. S. Boiverbank. — A Monograph of the Siliceo-fibrous Sponges. 
Contributions to a General History of the Spongiadce. A. H. Garrod. — On the 
from of the Trachea in certain Species of Storks and Spoonbills. Lieut. E, J. 
Wardlaw-Ramsay. — Commimication fi-om, containing remarks upon his Gecinus 
erythropygius. M, J. Lechmere Guppy. — On the OcciuTence of Helyx coactiliaia 
in Trinidad ; with Remarks on the Distribution of the Land and Fresh water 
MoUusca of that Island. G. Gulliver. — Sketches of the Spermatozoa of Petro- 
myzon. 
Part 3. G. E. Poison. — On the Genus Scotophilus with Description of a new 
Genus and Species allied thereto. On the Genus Chalinolobus, with descrip- 
tions of a new or little-known Species. Descriptions of new or little known 
Species of Bats of the Genus Vesper ugo. W. V. Legge. — On the Breeding of 
cortaia Grallatores and Natatores in the S. E. of Coylon, with Notes on the 



38 Library. [Feb. 

Nestling-plumages of the same. P. L. Sclater. — Eemarks on some visits re- 
cently made to several Zoological Gardens, in Rotterdam, the Hague, Amster- 
dam, Antwerp and Ghent. On several rare or little-known Mammals now or 
lately living in the Society's Collection. A. Q. Butler. — Description of several 
new species of Indian Heterocerous Lepidoptera. Lieut.-Col. Beddome. — De- 
scriptions of some new Operculated Land-shells from Southern India, and Cey- 
lon. C. G. Banford. — Notes 'on the Wild Goat, Capra cecjragrus. G. Gulli- 
ver. — Ohservations on the Sizes and Shapes of the Eed Corpuscles of the 
Blood of Vertebrates, with Drawings of them to a uniform Scale, and extend- 
ed and revised Tables of Measurements. J. S. Bowerhank. — A Monograph of 
the Silico-fibrous Sponges. Sir V. Brook and B. Brook. — On the large Sheep 
of the Thian Shian and the other Asiatic Argali. 

London. Zoological Society, — Transactions. Vol. IX, Pt. 4. 

P. L. Sclater. — On the Curassows now or lately living in the Society's Gardens. 

. , Revised List of the Vertebrated Animals novy or lately- 
living in the Gardens of the Zoological Society of London. 

Moscovf. Societe Imperiale des Naturalistes de Moscou, — Bulletin, No. I, 
1875. 

M. Sermann. — Untersuchungen iiber die specifischen Gewichte fester Stoffe. 

Paris. Societe d'Anthropologie de Paris. — Bulletins, Tome 9, Fas. 4 ; Tome 
10, Fas. 3, 1875. 

. Societe de Geographie, — Bulletin, Novembre 1875. 

J. TJioulet. — Note sur les projections orthographiques. Dr. Harmand. — Lettres 
au Secretaire general descriptif de ses voyages dans le Cambodge. 

Paris. Journal Asiatique, — Septieme Serie, Tome V, No. 3j Tome VI, 
Nos. 4, 5, 1875. 

Tome V, No. 3. M. L. Feer. — E'tudes bouddhiques. Les Jatakas. M. le Marquis 
d'Servey de Saint-Denys. — Note complementaire sur Formose et sirr les ties 
Lieou-kieou. 
Tome YI, No. 5. M. E. Senart. — Essai sur la legende du Buddha, son caractere 
et ses origiues. M. D. Khanikof.- — Sur 1' emplacement de la ville d'Arta- 
coana. M. L. Feer. — E'tudes bouddhiques. Les J4takas. Deuxieme partie. 

Prague. K. K. Sternwarte, — Astronomische Magnetische und Meteorolo- 

gische Beobachtungen im Jahre 1874. 
St. Petersburg. Academic Imperiale des Sciences, — -Bulletin, Tome XIX, 
FeuiUes, 22—37 ; Tome XX, Feuilles 1—21. 

Tome XIX, Feuilles, 29 — 37. G. J. Maximowiez. — Diagnoses plantarum no- 
varum Japoniae et Mandshurise. B. Born. — Sur trois manuscrits persans 
nouvellement acquis par le Musee Asiatique. 
Tome XX, Feuilles, 1 — 13. G. Schmidt. — E'tudes Hydrologiques : YI, — La 
mer d'Aral et la mer Caspienne. YII, — La Dwina et la mer Blanche. 
Feuilles 14 — 21, A. Schiefner. — Les specimens de la langue toungouse recueil- 
lis par M. le Baron de Maydell, Melanges toungouses. B. Born. — Manu- 
scrits orientaux offerts en don au Musee Asiatique par M. le general Kauf- 
mann. 



1876.] Library. 39 

St. Petersburg. Aeademie Imperiale des Sciences, — Memoires, Vile, Serie, 
Tome XXI, Nos. 6—12, et Tome XXII, Nos. 1—3. 

Tome XXI, N"o. 10. Dr. W. Gruher. — Ijber die Infi-aorbitalkanale bei dem 
Mensclien iind bei den SaugetMeren. No. 11. Fr. Schmidt. — Tiber einige 
neue und -wemg bekannte Baltisch — Silurisciie Petrefacten. No. 12. JDr. 
A. Brandt. — Tiber die Eirobren der Blatta [Periplaneta) Orientalis. 

Trieste. Societa Adriatica di Scienze naturali, — BoUettino, Nro. 6, Ottobre, 

1876. 
Vienna. Kaiserlicbe Akademie der Wissenscbaften. — Sitzungsbericbte der 

Matb.-Naturwissenschaftlicben Classe. Band 68, Abtb. I, Heft. 3 — 5. 

Krasan. — Beitrage zur Pbysiologie der Pflanzen. v. Reuss. — Die fossUen Bryo- 
zoen des bsterreicbiscb.-imgarisch.en IMiocans. Oellacher, Terata mesodidyma 
von Salmo Salvelinus, nebst Bemerkungen iiber einige andere an Fiscben 
beobachtete Doppelmissbildungen. Fitzinger. — Die Gattungen der Familie 
der Hirscbe (Cervi) nacb ihrer natiirlicben Verwandtscbaft. Sckenk. — Die 
Eier von Baja quadrimaculata (Bonap), innerbalb der Eileiter. 

Band 68, Abtb. II, Heft. 3, 4, 5 ; Abtb. Ill, Heft. 1, 3, 4, 5. 

Abtb. II., Heft 4 and 5. MaeJc. — Pbj-sikaliscbe Versucbe iiber den Gleicbge- 
wicbtssinn des Menscben. Laptschinskij. — TIeber das Verbalten der rotben Blut- 
korpercben zu einigen Tinctionsmitteln und zur Gerbsaure. FLering. — Zur 
Lebre vom Licbtsinne. TIeber simultanen Licbtcontrast. Bietl. — TJntersu- 
cbungen iiber Tastbaare. Knoll. — TIeber Eeflexe auf die Atbmung bei Zufubr 
einiger fliicb tiger Substanzen zu den tmterbalb des Keblkopfes gelegenen 
Luftwegen, 

Band 69, Abtb. I, Heft 1—5 ; Abtb. II. Heft 1—5 ; Abtb. III. Heft 1—5. 

Abtb. I. Heft 1, and 2. Kurz. — TIeber androgyne Missbildimg bei Cladoceren. 
Meyer. — TIeber neue und ungeniigend bekannte Vogel von Neu Guinea und den 
Insebi der Geelvinksbai. Heft. 4. Wiesner. — Arbeiten des pflanzenpbysiolo- 
gischen Institutes der K. K. Wiener TIniversitat. TIntersucbungen iiber die 
Beziebiingen des Ficbtes zum Cbloropbyll. Heft. 3. Brauer. — Vorlaufige 
Mittbeilungen iiber die Entwicklung und Lekensweise des Zfj!;?'^;^-^* j»;-o- 
ductus. Boehm. — TIeber die Starkebilduiig in den Keimblattem der Kresse, des 
Rettigs, und des Leins. Meyer. — TIeber neue und ungeniigend bekannte Vogel 
von Neu Guinea und deu Insebi der Geelvioksbai. Heft. 5. Lelert. — TIeber 
den "Wertb und der Bereitung des Chitinskeletes der Aracbniden fiir mikrosko- 
piscbe Studien. 

Abtb.. II. Heft 5. Weidel. — TIeber das Clincbonin. Lang. — TIeber Glyceiia- 
KrystaUe. 

Abtb. III. Heft. Kratschmer. — Weitere Versucbe betreifs dor Behandlung des 
Diabetes melUtus. Weiss. — Beitrage zur quantitativen Bestimmung des Zuckcrs 
optiscbem Wege. 

Band 70, Abtb. I. Heft 1, 2 ; Abtb. II. Heft 1, 2 ; Abtb. III. Heft 1, 2. 



40 Library. [Feb. 

Abth. I. Heft. 2. Baygcrstein. — Ai-teiten des pflanzenphysiologischen Insti- 
tutes der Wiener Universitat. TJntersuchungen iiber das Vorkommen mid 
die Entstehung des Holzstoffes in den Geweben der Pflanzen. 

Abth. III. Heft 1, 2. Maly.. — Untersucbungen iiber die Gallenfarbstoffe. 

. Denkschriften, Yol. 33. 



Vienna. Kaiserliclie Akademie der Wissenschaften. — Philosopliisch — Histo- 
rische Classe. SitzmigsbericMe. Band 75, Heft. 1 — 3. Band 76, 
Heft. 1—3. Band 77, Heft. 1—4, und Band 78, Heft. 1. 

Band 77, Heft. 1, 2. Meyer. — Ueber die Mafoorscbe und einige andere Papua 

Spracben auf Neu Guinea. 
Band 78, Heft. 1. Ffizmaier. — Denkwiirdigkeiten von den Friicbten China's. 

■ . , Arckiv fiir Osterreichische GescHclite. Band 51, Heft. 2. 

Band 52, Heft. 1, mit Eegister zu den Biinden 1 — 33. 
. . , Denkschriften, Vol. 33. 



, Kaiserliche Akademie der Wissenschaften, — Almanach fllr 1874. 

. Die Culm-Flora des Mahriscli-Sclilesisclien Dacliscliiefers, von 

D. Stm-. 
. K. K. Geologisclie Eeichsanstalt, — Verhandlungen, Nos. 1 — 10, 

1875. 

No. 8. Br. E. Tietze. — Mittheilungen aus Persien. 

. , Jahrbnck, Band 25, Nos. I, II. 

, Anthi-opologische Gesellscliaft, — Mittheilungen, Band V, Nos. 1 



to 9. 



. Oesterreichische Monatsschrift fiir den Orient. Nos. 11, 12, No- 
vember, December, 1875. 

No. 11. JS. Belannoy, — Ein Black auf die ■wirthschaftlichen Zustande Indiens. 

Schifffabi'ts-Verkehr auf dem Suez Canal. 
No. 12. Dr. E. J. Folah. — Die Kiinftigen Emporien fiir Central-Asien. Thee- 
Production Britisch-Indiens. Bambus als Eohmateriale fiir die Papier-Fabri- 
cation. Dr. G. V. Scherzer. — Eine neue Phase des Suez Canals. 

. -Academia Csesarea. Tabulae Codicum Manuscriptorum prseter 



Grsecos et Orientales in Bibliotheca Palatina Vindobonensi Asservato- 
rum. Vol. VII. 
Yokohama. Deutsche Gesellschaft fiir Natur und Volkerkunde Ost-Asiens, 
— MittheHungen, Heft. 8, Sept. 1875. 

2 Books. 

Presented hy the Authors. 

BALrOTJE, Lieut-Genekal, Sir G. Trade and Salt in India free. 
Beames, John. A Comparative Grammar of the Modern Ai-yan Languages 
of India, Vol. II. 



1876.] Lilrary. 41 

BEA^^DIS, De. D. The Forest Flora o£ Nortli-West and Central India. 

Childees, R. C. a Dictionary of the Pali Language. 

Dall, W. H. Eeport on Mt. St. Elias, Alaska. 

DTA2s'A>rDA Saeaswati. Eig-Veda Sanhita Bhashya. 

GoDWce-AusTEK, H. H. Majoe. Description of a supposed new Acti- 

nura from the Dafla Hills. 
HEirarESSEY, J. B. N. Some Particulars of the Transit of Venus across the 

Sun, 1874, Deer. 9, observed on the Himalaya Mountains, Masiiri, at 

Mary- Villa Station. Notes Nos. I, II. 
. On the Atmospheric Lines of the Solar Spectrimi, illustrated by 

a Map drawn on the same scale as that adopted by KirchhofE. 
Speekgee, a. Die Alte Geographic Ai-abiens als Grundlage der Entwick- 

lunc^sg^eschichte des Semitismus. 
Wateehotjse, Capt. J. Report on the Operations connected with the 

observation of the Total Solar Eclipse of April 6, 1875, at Camorta in 

the Nicobar Islands. 
Watsois' J. FoEBES. — On the Establishment in connection with the In- 
dian Museum and Library of an Indian Institute, for Lecture, Enquiry, 

and Teaching. 

5 jVLlSCELLANEOUS PRESENTATIONS, 

A Grammar of the Dravidian Languages by Rev. R. Caldwell. 

The Secketaet oe Sxate eoe Ikdia. 
Catalogue of Sanskrit MSS. existing in Oudh. Fasciculus VII. 

DiEECTOE OP Public iNSXEUCTioisr tjs Otjdh. 
On the Aindra School of Sanskrit Grammarians, their place in the Sanskrit 
and subordinate Literatures, by A. C. Burnell. 

Basel Missiok Peess, Makgaloee. 
Records of the Geological Survey of India, Vol. VIII, Pt. IV, 1875. 

Depaetment op Revenue, Ageicultuee aistd Commeece. 
Report of the Director of the Central Park Menagerie, New York, for 1873. 

w. a. conklin, dieectoe. 

4 Periodicals Purchased, 

Berlin. Journal fiir die reine und angewandte Mathematik, — Band, 80, 

Hefte I, II, III, IV, 1875. 
Calcutta. Stray Feathers,— Vol. Ill, No. 5. 

A. Anderson. — On little or imknown Himalayan Oology. W. T. Blanford. 
Hypoeolius Ampelinus in Sind. Major A. le Messurkr. Additional Notes on 
the Avifauna of Sind. 

. Calcutta Review, — No. 123, January, 1875. 

A. Stephen. — India in the Seventeenth Centurj'. E. E. Fi>i7,: — The Hindu Cus- 
tom of" Sitting Dhama." The Bhagavad-Gita and Chiistianity, A. E, Gough. 



42 Library. [Feb. 

— Indian Wisdom — with a Sketch, of Indian Metaphysics. Capt. W. B. 
Birch.— The " Nine Islands" of the Malays. Editor.— i.Ix. E. Arnold's Gita 
Go^-inda. 

Giessen. Jaliresbericlit iiber die Fortschritte der Cbemie, — Heft. 3, fiir 

1873. 
Gottingeu. Gottingische Gelehrte Anzeigen, — ^Nos. 31 to 40. Nachrichten, 
Nos. 20 to 22. 

Benfey, — Avincena als persischer Lja-iker. 
Leipzig. Poggendorff's Annalen der Physik imd Cliemie, — No. XI, 1875. 

P. Siloic. — Ueher die Dielektricitatsconstanten der Fliissigkeiten. A. Achard. — 
Von Differential-Manometem mit zwei Fliissigkeiten. W. Beetz. — Ueher die 
Volta'sche Polarisation des Aluminiums. JF. CrooJces. — Das Radiometer. W. 
Eoltz, — Ueher einige neue elektrische Lichterscheinungen. 

London. Annals and Magazine of Natural History, — Vol. 16, Nos. 93, 94, 
95, 1875. 

No. 93. M. S. Fol. — On the Primary Origiaofthe Sexual Products. A. G. 
Butler. — Eevision of the Suhfamily Bericopuna of the Lepidopterous Family 
Arctiidm, with Descriptions of new Sj)ecies. S. J. Carter. — Notes Introduc- 
tory to the Study and Classification of the Sponc/idce. C. Semper. — Brief Oh- 
servations on the Anatomy of Comatula. A. Viscotmt Walden. — Description 
of a new Species of Pigeon from the Karen Hills. Br. A. Gunther. — De- 
scriptions of some Leporine Mammals from Central Asia. G. E. Bobson. — 
Description of a New Species of TajjJiozous fi-om Labuan. Br. T. Eimer, 
Lacerta muralis coerulea ; a Contribution to the Darwinian Theory. M. B. 
Sharpe. — Note on Cossypha pyrrliopygia, Hartlaub. 

No. 94. G. E. Bohsou. — Descriptions of new Species of Vespertilionidm. A. E. 
Verrill. — Notice of the Occiirrence of another Gigantic Cephalopod {Arckiteu- 
thisj on the Coast of Newfoundland, in December 1874. J. Anderson. — De- 
scriptions of some new Asiatic Mammals and Chelonice. M. E. Ferrier. — On a 
new intennediate Ty^De of the Sub-Kingdom Vermes, fPolyyordius (?) Schnei- 
der.) 31. J. Barrois. — On the Larval Forms of the Bryozoa. M. A. Villot. 
On the Migrations and Metamorphoses of the Marine Endoparasitic Tre- 
matodes. Bathybius, 

No. 95. W. T. Blanford. — Descriptions of New Mammalia fi'om Persia and Ba- 
Itichistan. Major H. S. Godwin- Austen. — Description of a supposed new 
Actimira from the Dafla Hills. G. E. Bobson. — Conspectus of the Sub-orders, 
Families, and Genera of Chiropitera, arranged according to theu- Natiu'al Affi- 
nities. 

•. London, Edinburgh, and Dublin Pbilosopbical Magazine, — Vol. 

50, Nos. 330, 331, 332, 1875. 

No. 330. S. A. Rowland. — On Kohlrausch's Determination of the Absolute 
Value of the Siemens Mercury Unit of Electrical Eesistance. M. Merriman. — 
On the Flexure of Continuous Girders. R. Mallet. — On the Origin and Me- 
chanism of production of the Prismatic (or columnar) Structure of Basalt. 
Sir W. Thomson. — On an Alleged Error in Laplace's Theory of the Tides. /. 



1876.] Library. 43 

Croll. — The "Challenger's" Crucial Test of the Wind and Gravitation Theo- 
ries of Oceanic Circulation. 

No. 331. JS. A. Rowland. — Studies on Magnetic Distribution. /. Croll. — The 

Wiad Theory of Oceanic Circulation. Objections examiaed. F. Guthrie. 

On Stationary Liquid "Waves. S,ev. 0. Fisher. — Sir. Mallet's Theory of 
Volcanic Energy tested. Dr. Fr. Pfaff. — Experiments on the Plasticity of 
Ice. 

No. 332. /. Kerr. — A new Relation between Electricity and Light : Dielectri- 
fied Media Birefringent. S, A. Roivland. — Studies on Magnetic Distribution. 
Sir W. Thomson. — General Integration of Laplace's Differential Equation of 
the Tides. S. F. Blanford. — On the Age and Correlations of the Plant-bear- 
ing series of India. W, Siemens. — On the Influence of Light upon the Con- 
ductivity of Crystalline Selenium. 

London. Numismatic Society's Journal, — Pt. II, 1875. 

F. W. Madden. — Jewish Numismatics ; being a supplement to the " History of 
Jewish Coiuage and Money in the Old and New Testaments," published in 
1864. 

■ Quarterly Journal of Microscopical Science, No. 60, October 1875. 

I). J. Hamilton. — On Myelitis; being an Experimental Inquicy into the 
Pathological Appearances of the same. W, R. MclSfab. — The Life-History 
of Fenicillium. Translated and abridged from Dr. Oscar Brefeld's " Botanis- 
che Untersuchungen iiber Schimmelpilze." Heft. II. Br. F. Klein. — Ob- 
servations on the Structure of the Spleen. C. S. Golding-Bird. — A Differen- 
tial Warm Stage. W. S. Poole. — A Double Staining with HfematoxyHn 
and .Aniline. Dr. E. Klein. — Note on a Pink-colom-ed Spirillimi (Spirillum 
rosaceum). F. Barwin. — On the Structui-e of the Proboscis of Ophideres ful- 
lonica, an Orange-sucking Moth. 
. . The Bii'ds of Asia. By J. Gould. Parts 25, 26, 27. 

Pt. 25. Pitta PoscJiii, Tardus Gouldi, Lophophorus I'lluysi, Chalcophasis Sclateri 
Meropogon Forsteni, Garriilax chinensis, Trochalopteron FJliotii, lanthocinda 
ocellata, I. lunulata, I. Ar'temisice, I. Austeni, Rhopophilus pekinensis, Phlogcenas 
tristigomata, Stachyris rufice^is, Orthotomus longicaudus. 

Pt. 26. Palceornis Calthropx, P. rosa, P. cyanoeephala, Parado.vornis Austeni P. 
Seudei, Ixus Sinensis, Calophasis Ellioti, Tetraophasis ohscurus, Columba rupestris 
C. leuconota, JEgithahis Consobrimis, Trochalopteron Blythii, Garrulax pieti- 
collis, ; Perierocotus eantonensis, Sylvia nana. 

Pt. 27. Podoces BiddulpM, P. Hendersoni, P. Panderi, P. hnmilis, Zobiophasis 
Bulweri, Fuplocamus lineatus, Pucrasia Barwini, Bicaum retrocinctum, Trochalop- 
teron Cineraeeum, T. virgatum, Garrulax Galbanus, Actinodura TFaldeni, Pyrr hu- 
la cineraeea, Montif ring ilia rujicollis, Silta nagcensis. 
. Society of Arts,— Journal Vol. XXIII, Nos. 1185 to 1199. 

No. 1185. — Silk Supply. Metallm-gy in Japan. 

No. 1189. — Silk Cultm-e in Australia. 

No. 1190. — The Saltpetre Deposits of Peru. The Geographical Congress and 
Exhibition at Paris. Utilisation of the Products of Maize. 

No. 1192. — SUk Culture in Australia. Indian Jute and Lac. Indian Glass. 
Japanese Damasked Metal Plates. 



4i4< Library. [Feb. 

No. 1193. — Food Preservation. The Progress of India. 
No. 1194. — Through Eail way to India. Metal Work among the Hindus. 
No. 1195. — Health and Civilisation. Coffee Disease in Dominica. ■ 
No. 1198. — Census of India. 

London. The Ibis,— 3rd Series, Yol. V, No. 19. 

W. V. Legge. — On the Birds of the South-eastern Suhdivision of Southern Cey- 
lon. JR. W. Morgan. — On the Nidification of certain South-Indian Birds. H. 
E. Dresser. — Notes on Severtzoff's " Fauna of Turkestan." A. Newton. — Note 
on Falceornis exsul. P. L. Sclater. — On Turdus Javanicus oi Movs&eld, and its 
allied form Tardus Schlegeli. R. W. Ramsay. — Ornithological Notes from the 
District of Karennee, Burmah. /. S. Gurney. — Notes on a " Catalogue of 
the Accipitres in the British Museum" by K. B. Sharpe. W. T. Blanford. — 
A letter from, on Sypocolius ampelinus. 

. The Westminster Eeview, — No. 96, October, 1875. 

The Baroda Blunder. 

. The Quarterly Review,— No. 278, October, 1875. 

. Edinbui-gh Review,— No. 290, October, 1875. 



Forest Management. 

The Academy,— Nos. 183 to 187, 1875. 



New Haven. U. S. The American Journal o£ Science and Arts, — Vol. X, 
Nos. 56, 57, 58. 

No. 56. E. S. Kolden. — Historical Note on the Observation of the Corona and 
Eed Prominences of the Sun. B. G. Wilder. — On a foetal Manatee and Ceta- 
cean, mth remarks upon the affinities and ancestry of the Sirenia. 

No. 57. S. SaugMon. — Mechanical Work done by a Muscle before exhaustion 
and on the " Law of Fatigue." R. S. Chittenden. — On some interesting 
Equine Calculi. J. W. Mallet. — Note on the Gases accompanying* Meteorites. 
A. E. Verrill. — Notice of the occurrence of another Gigantic Cephalopod 
{ArcMteuthis) on the coast of Newfoundland, in December 1874. 

Paris. Comi^tes Rendus, — Tome 71, Nos. 4 — 18, 1875. 

No. 4. M. J. Jamin, — Sur la distribution du magnetisme dans les faisceaux 
composes de lames tres-minces et de longueur finie. M. G. Plante. — Ke- 
cherches sur les phenomenes produits par des courants electriques de haute 
tension, et sur leurs analogies avec les phenomenes naturels. M. A, Renard. 
— ^Action de I'oxygene electrolytique sur la glycerine. 

No. 5. M. J. Jamin. — Sur les aimants formes pas des poudres comprimees. M. 
J. Bechamp. — Des microzymas et de leurs fonctions aux differents ages d'un 
memo etre. M. Arm, Gautier. — Sur la separation complete de rarsenic 
des matieres animales et sur son dosage dans les divers tissus. M. Ore. — Ob- 
servation d'un cas de nevralgie epileptiforme de la face, traitee par la section 
des nerfs nasal interne et nasal exteme, avec anesthesie produite par injection 
intra-veineuse de chloral. 

No. 6. M. Lorin. — Faits relatifs a I'etude des alcools polyatomiques propre- 
ment dits. Application a \in nouveau mode d'obtention de I'acide formique 
cristaUisable. M. Prosper Eenry. — Decouverte de la planets 148 faite a 



1876.] lAlmry 45 

rObservatoire de Paris. ,M. Arm. Gautier. — Conduite de I'appareil de Marsh. ; 
son application au dosage de 1' arsenic contenu dans les matieres organiques. 

No. 7. M. Th. du Moncel. — Neuvieme Note sur la conductibilite electrique des 
corps mediocrement conducteurs. Polarisation electrique des mineraux. M, 
J. M. Gaugain. — Quatrieme Note sur les precedes d'aimantation. 

No. 8. M. Le Verrier. — Comparaison de la theorie de Satiume avec les observa- 
tions. Masse de Jupiter. Tables du movement de Satume. 

No. 9. M, Faye. — Sur la formation de la grele. M. Th. du Momel, — Dixieme 
Note sux la conductibilite electrique des corps mediocrement conducteurs. 
M. de Mostaing. — Addresse la description d'une experience constatant I'effica- 
cite de la racine de garance pour la conservation des viandes non cuites. 

No. 10. MM. P. Desains et Aymonet. — E'tude des bandes froides des spectres 
obscurs. M. Th. du Moncel. — Onzieme Note sur la conductibilite electrique 
des corps mediocrement conducteurs. M. Braiilt. — Nouvelles cartes de Me- 
teorologie nautique, donnant a la fois la direction et I'intensite probables des 
vents. M. N. Severtzow. — Note h, propos d'une communication precedente 
de M. Faye, sur des observations faites pendant, un orage de grele dans I'Asie 
centrale. 

No. 11. M. J. 0. Watson. — Memoire sur les observations du passage de Venus 
faites a Pekin. M. 8. Cloez. — Note sur la matiere grasse de la graine de 
I'arbre a huile de la Chine. M. C, Susson. — Sur quelques reactions de I'hemo- 
globiae et de ses derives. 

No. 12. MM. P. et H. Gervais, — Sur une particularite anatomique remarqua- 
ble du Ehinoceros. M. Lecoq de Boishaudran. — Caracteres chimiques et spec- 
troscopiques d'un nouveau metal le Gallium, decouvert dans une blende de la 
mine de Pierrefitte, vallee d'Ai'geles (Pyrenees.) M. J. Chatin. — Sm' le deve- 
loppement et la structure des glandes foUares interieures. 

No. 13. M. Th. du Moncel. — Douzieme Note sur la conductibilite electrique des 
corps mediocrement conducteurs. M. G. le Bon. — Transformation du sang 
-en poudre soluble, proprietes chimiques, physiques, et alimentarres de cette 
poudre. MM. L. Mathieu, et V. Urbain. — Remarques concernant une Note de 
M. F. Glenard, sur la coagulation spontanee du sang en .dehors de I'orga- 
nisme. M. Meusel. — De la putrefaction produite par les bacteries en presence 
■des nitrates alcalins. 

No. 14. M. A. Mouchot. — Resultats obtonus dans les essais d'applications indus- 
trieUes de la chaleur solaire. M. G. Tissandier. — Siu' 1' existence de corpus- 
cules ferrugiueux et magnetiques dans les poussieres atmospheriques. 31, 
B' Arbaud-Blonzac. — Les orages de 1875. 

No. 15. P. A. Secchi. — Resultats des observations des protuberances et des taches 
solaires du 23 avril, au 28 juin 1875 (fin.) M. Burin. — De 1' analyse com- 
merciale des sucres, et de 1' influence des sels et du glucose siu- la cristaUisation 
du Sucre. 

No. 16. M. Th. du Moncel. — Treizieme Note sur la conductibilite electriqiie 
des corps mediocrement conducteiu-s. 

No. 17. M. de Magiiac. — Progres realise dans la qiiostion des atterrissages par 
I'emploi de la methode rationnelle dans la detei-mination des marches diui-nes 
des chi-onom^tres. M. A. Cazin. — Observations magnetiqvies faites h, I'ile 
Saint-Paul, en novembre et decembre 1874. M. J. A. Broun. — Note siu- les 
relations observeos h, Trevandrimi, entre les resultats des observations magneti- 
ques et la periode des taches solaires. 



46 Library. [Feb. 

No. 18. M. Th. da Moncel. — Quatorzieme Note sm' la coiiductibilit6 electrique 
des corps mediocrement conducteurs. M. Ghauveau. — De 1' excitation elec- 
trique unipolaire des nerfs. Comparison de I'activite des deux poles, pendant le 
passage des courants de pile. MM. V. Feltz et U. Sitter. — De I'apparition des 
sels biliaires dans le sang et les urines, determinee par certaines formes d'em- 
poisonnement. 
Paris, Revue et Magasin de Zoologie, — 3me Serie, N'os. 4 — 8, 1875. 

. Journal des Savants, — Juillet, Aoiit, Septembre, Octobre, 1875. 

Juillet. JBartJielemy SaintSilaire. — La langue et la Utterature hindoustanies de 

1850 a 1869 et 1874. 
Septembre.— / Bertrand. — tJranograpliie chinoise. 
Octobre. — M. M. Clievreul. — E'tudes sur les quinquinas. 
. Revue Critique d'Histoire et de Litterature, — ^Nos. 31 — 44, 



Juillet— Octobre, 1875. 

No. 31. Leland. — Decouverte de I'Amerique par les Buddhistes. 
No. 34 and 35. Burnell. — Elements de Paleograpbie Indienne. 
No. 36. Seal. — La Legende de Sakya Bviddha. /. de Goeje. — I'Ancien Ht de 

roxus. 

No. 44. Muir. — Cboix de sentences religieuses et morales, traduites du Sanskrit. 

. Revtie Arcbeologique, — Nos. 7 — 10, Juillet — Octobre, 1875. 

. Revue des Deux Mondes, — Tomes 10, 11. 12, Aout — Novembre, 



1875. 

Tome 10. — Les Progres de la Eussie dans I'Asie centrale et les ombrages de 
I'Angleterre. 

J, —Books Purchased. 

Beal, S. Tbe Romantic Legend o£ Sakya Buddba, from the Chinese. 

Childees, R. C. a Dictionary of tbe Pali Language, Pt. II. 

CowELL, E. B. A short Introduction to the ordinary Prdkrit of the Sans- 
krit Dramas. 

Daewiis', C. Insectivorous Plants. 

Elliot, Sie H., K. C. B. The History of India as told by its own His- 
torians, Vol. VI., ed. Prof. Dowson. 

GEASSMAlrar, H. Worterbuch zum Rig- Veda, 5 and 6 Lief rung. 

Haeeold, E. ton. Morgenlandische Porschungen. Coleopterologische 
Hefte XIII. 

Jevoks, W. Stanley. Money and the Mechanism of Exchange. 

Neumatee, De. G. Anieitung zu wissenschaftlichen Beobachtungen auf 
Reisen. 

Sims, R. Hand-book to the Library of the British Museum. 

Whitney, W. W. The Life and Growth of Language. 

Weight, T. The Celt, the Roman, and the Saxon ; a History of the early 
inhabitants of Britain. 

VoGEL, De. H. The Chemistry of Light and Photography in its applica- 
tion to Art, Science, and Industry. 



PROCEEDINGS 

OF THE 

ASIATIC SOCIETY OF BENGAL, 

For March, 1876. 



The Monthly General Meeting of the Society was held on Wednesday, 
the 1st March, at 9 o'clock p. m. 

T. Oldham, Esq., LL. D., President, in the chair. 

The minntes o£ the last meeting were read and confirmed. 

The following presentations were announced : — 

1. From the Government of India, Foreign Department, a copy of a 
*' Report of Mission to Yarkand, by Sir Douglas Forsyth." 

2. From Dr. T. H. Hendley, a copy of his " Guide to Jeypore." 

3. From the author, a coj)y of an " Address delivered to the Biolo- 
gical Section of the British Association," by P. L. Sclater. 

4. From Eaja Harendra Krishna Bahadui*, a copy of a work entitled 
" The Indian Press on the late Eaja Kali Kiishna Bahadur, K. G. S." 

5. From W. F. Blanford, Esq., a copj of the Atlas of Mining Indus- 
try accompanying Vol. Ill of the Eecords of the II. S. Geological Explora- 
tion of the Fortieth Parallel, by Clarence King. 

6. From Nawab Sayyid Siddiq Hasan Khan, Bahadur, of Bhopal, 
copies of the following works : — 

Ithaf-ulnubala il-muttaqln bi-ihyai maasir ilfuqaha ilmtdiaddisin ; 
Alhitta fi zikr il9ihah il-Sittah ; Taj uliqbal, Tarikh i riyasat i Bhopal 
(Persian) ; Ditto ditto, (Urdu) ; Luqtat id'ajalan ; Rihlat U99idiq ila-lbait 
il'atiq ; Qitf ul-samar ; Alintitjad ulrajih fi sharh ili'tiqad ilfahih ; HU9UI 
ul mamul miu 'ilm il-u9ul ; Iksir fi 11911.1 iltafsii*. 

7. From J. Wood-Mason, Esq., a collection of j^hotographs found 
among the effects of the late Dr. Stoliczka. 

The following gentleman, duly proposed and seconded at the last 
meeting, was elected an ordinary member. 
J. Crawfurd, Esq., B. A., C. S. 
The following are candidates for ballot at the next meeting ; — 



48 Nomination of Sonorary Menibers. [Maech, 

Mr- H. Wilson, Asst. Controller, P. W. Dept., proposed by Dr. E. W, 
Chambers, seconded by Mr. F. W. Peterson. 

Kumar Kanti Chandra Sing, of Paikpara, proposed by Maulavi Abdul 
Latif Khan, Bahadm-, seconded by Babii Bhuggobutty Charan Mullick. 

T. E. Coxhead, Esq., proposed for re-election by Mr. H. Blochmann, 
seconded by Captain J. Waterhouse. 

The following gentlemen have intimated their desire to withdraw from 
the Society — 

E. Stewart, Esq., on leaving India, Capt. T. B. Mitchell, Raja Haren- 
dra KJ.*ishna Bahadur. 

The Council reported that Capt. J. Waterhouse, and Mr. H. Blochmann, 
had been nominated Trustees of the Indian Musetmi on behalf of the Society, 
in the place of Col. Hyde, and Dr. S. B. Partridge, who had left the 
Council. 

The Peesident announced that the Cotxncil recommend Dr. Werner 
Siemens, and Col. Henry Yule, R,. E., C. B., as suitable persons for election 
as Honorary Members of the Society. 

The following were the grounds on which this recommendation was 
made : 

Dr. W. SiEMEE"S, the elder of two brothers both famous and distin- 
guished as practical physicists, has been from the first the most eminent 
and most useful of the pioneers of telegraphy. He first successfully intro- 
duced the covering of telegraph wire with gutta-percha and Indian-rubber. 
He recommended the first submarine telegraph through the Red Sea, in 
order to establish direct communication with India from Eui'ope. When 
this failed and telegraphing became so imperfect that letters often reached 
their destinations before messages, he promoted with immense zeal and 
energy the Indo-European line by land, which has since worked, and is work- 
ing so weU, that we have the London news of the evening before, in our 
morning papers. He has been more instrumental than any one else in 
making telegraphic commmiication with Europe perfect, and is acknow- 
ledged to have been by far the greatest improver and j^erfector of Telegra- 
phy in general, thus becoming the general promotor of the most beneficial 
scientific improvement of modem times. 

Colonel Henet Yule, R. E., C. B. has, since the year 184-2, been an occa- 
sional contributor to the Jonrnal of the Society. He was elected a member in 
July, 1856, and up to 1861, when he retired from the service, valuable pa- 
pers on the " Khasi Hills, and their People," " On the niins at Pagan on the 
IrraAvaddi," and on the " Buddhistic remains in Java," evidenced the inter- 
est which he took in the laboxu-s of the Society. He accompanied Major, 



1876.] Meciion of Committees. ' 49 

(now Sir ^Tthur) PLajre, in his mission to the Coiu't of Ava in 1855, and his 
jDrejDaration of the account of that mission, iUustrated largely by his own 
artistic pencil, and accompanied by excellent maps of ancient Burmah, ap- 
pears to have laid the foimdation of his unceasmg interest in the study of 
the Geography of Central Asia. The learned and valuable work on " Cathay 
and the Way thither," published by the Hakluyt Society, was followed by 
the masterly dissertation on one of the most puzzling questions of Central 
Asian geography, ^^refixed to the new edition of Wood's Journey to the 
Source of the Oxus. And his labours culminated hi the scholarly and ela- 
borate translation of Marco Polo's Travels, to the editmg of which he brought 
a mass of widely extended and careful research, and an amount of erudition 
and knowledge perfectly unequalled in any other recent contribution to 
literature. A second edition, greatly extended, was published during the 
last year. 

Other valuable papers by Col. H. Yule, have appeared in the pages of 
the Hoyal Geographical Society, London, Geographical Magazine, &c., and 
lie now stands confessedly one of the foremost scientific Geographers 
of the day, particularly with reference to the earlier geographical his- 
tory of China and Central Asia. 

In accordance with the rules of the Society these names would be hung 
up in the Meeting-Eoom of the Society until the next ordinary meetmg, 
when they would be balloted for. 

The Council reported that the f oUoAving gentlemen have been nominated 
by the Council to serve on the several Committees during the ensuing year. 

1876. 
Siib- CommUtee of Finance. 

Babu Eajendralala Mitra, LL. D. E. Taylor, Esq. 

E. Gay, Esq. Colonel J. F. Tennant. 

Library. 

The Hon. E. C. Bayley, C. S. I. C. H. Tawney, Esq., M. A. 
Babu Eajendralala Mitra, LL. D. Whitley Stokes, Esq. 

Colonel J. F. Tennant, E. E. W. T. Blanford, Esq. 

G. Nevill, Esq. ' C. H. Wood, Esq. 

A. Pedler, Esq. Dr. 0. Fcistmantol. 

Dr. Mohendralal Sircar. Dr. D. D. Cunningham. 

J. Geoghegan, Esq. Babu Prannath Pandit. 

Dr. W. K. Waller. W. S. Brough, Esq. 



50 



'Election of Gommiffees. 



[MARca-, 



Philology. 



The Hon. E. C. Bayley, C. S. I. 
Babu Rajendralala Mitra, LL.D. 
C. H. Tawney, Esq., M. A. 
Major-Genl. A. Cunningliam, C. 

S. I. 
J. Beames, Esq. 
F. S. Growse, Esq. 
Rev. K. M. Banerjea, LL. D. 



Babu Gaiir Das Bysack. 
Dr. Mohendralala Sirkar. 
Maulavi Abdul Latif Khan Babadur. 
Maulavi Kabiruddin Abmad Sahib. 
Babu Dijendra Nath Thakur. 
Whitley Stokes, Esq. 
Babu Prannath Pandit. 
Dr. G. Thibaut. 



Natural Sistory. 



G. NevUl, Esq. 

H. F. Blanford, Esq, 

V. Ball, Esq. 

H. B. Medlicott, Esq. 

Dr. O. Feistmantel. 

D. Waldie, Esq. 

A. O. Hume, Esq., C. B. 

Dr. D. D. Cunningham. 

Dr. J. Armstrong. 



S. Kurz, Esq. 
Dr. G. King. 
S. E. Peal, Esq. 
W. E. Brooks, Esq , 
Dr. J. Scully. 
Dr. W. Schlich. 
W. Theobald, Esq. 
R. Lydekker, Esq. 
W. T. Blanford, Esq, 



C. E. 



Physical Science. 



Col. H. L. Thuillier, C. S. I. 
H. B. Medlicott, Esq. 
H. F. Blanford, Esq. 

D. Waldie, Esq. 
A. Pedler, Esq. 

E. S. Brough, Esq. 

Dr. D. D. Cunningham. 
The Hon. J. B. Phear. 
A. Tween, Esq. 
W. Theobald, Esq. 
A. Cappel, Esq. 



The Hon. E. C. Bayley, C. S. I. 
Colonel J. F. Tennant. R. E. 
Babu Rajendralala Mitra, LL. D. 



T. S. Isaac, Esq., C. E. 

Colonel J. F. Tennant, R. E. 

Commander A. D. Taylor- 

V. Ball, Esq. 

Col. D. G. Robinson., R. E. 

Rev. F. Lafont. 

J. O'Kinealy, Esq. 

W. T. Blanford, Esq. 

C. H. Wood, Esq. 

Dr. J. Scully. 

Coins. 

Major-Genl. A. Cunningham, C. S. I. 
Major F. W. Stubbs, R. A. 
Rev. M. A. Sherrinar. 



The Secretary laid before the meeting a letter from the President and 
Secretary of the Committee, forwarding the i^rogramme of the 3rd Congress 
of Orientalists, pro230sed to be held at St. Petersburgh in the month of 



1876.] Oriental Congress at St. Petersliirgli. 51 

September next, and soliciting the support and presence of members of the 
Asiatic Society, and read tbe following extracts from the programme : 

" The Eussian Committee of organisation, acting in concert with the 
Permanent Committee of the 2nd Session in London have drawn tip the 
following regulations for the ensuing Session. 

"1. The International Congress of Orientalists will re-assemble for its 
8rd meeting at St. Petersbm-gh on the 1st September, 1876. The meeting 
will last for 10 days. 

" 2. The meeting will be chiefly devoted to subjects relating to Asiatic 
Russia. The subjects will be discussed in four sittings, the first of which 
will be taken up by Siberia (eastern and western), the second by Central Asia 
within Russian boundaries (comprising also the independent principalities 
of Ouzbekistan) ; the third by the Caucasus (with the Crimea and other 
countries in Eiu'opean Russia inhabited by an Asiatic population) ; the 
fourth by Trans-Caucasia (formerly Georgia and Armenia). 

" 3. At the three following sittings the Congress will consider the rest 
of Asia, divided into three groups : 1, Eastern Tm-kistan, Tibet, Mongolia, 
with Mantchouria and the Corea, China Proper and Japan. 2. India, Cis- 
and Trans-Gangetic, Afghanistan, Persian and the Indo-Chinese Ai'chi- 
pelago ; 3. Turkey, including Arabia and Egypt. 

" 4. The subjects which will be considered in these seven sittings will 
comprise the Cartography, Ethnography, Language, History and Literatm-e 
of the respective coxmtries. 

" 5. The two last sittings wiU be devoted to questions relating 1, to the 
Archaeology and Numismatics of the Eastern peoples generally, and 2, to 
their Religioiis and Philosophical Systems. 

" 16. A summary of all the papers and communications brought before 
the meeting in the Russian language, as well as of the discussions carried 
on in that language, will be published in the Report of the Congress, in 
French. 

" 17. The Committee will publish a list of the questions to be proposed 
for discussion at the Congress. Any jDcrson wishing to propose any special 
questions relating to the East are requested to submit them in writing to 
the managing Committee, or to one of its corresponding members, accom- 
panied by an abstract stating their opinions on these questions. It is only 
on this condition that the latter can be admitted for discussion. 

" 18. The International Congress of Orientalists at its 3rd meeting will 
only consider subjects of purely scientific hiterest ; consequently any com- 
munication or discussion on subjects bearing on the Christian religion or con- 
temporaneous politics, administration, commerce and industry or wliich may 
not be included in the above mentioned in-ograimue of the meeting, will be 
considered as out of place and at once vetoed by the President of the sitting. 



52 Oriental Congress ai Sf. Petershurgh. [Maecii, 

" 19. Papers or communications intended to be read at the sittings of 
the Congress may be sent direct to the managing Committee at St. Peters- 
burgh, or to its Corresponding Members, who have been directed to forward 
them to the Committee. 

" 20. The Committee will organise dm'ing the continuance of the Con- 
gress an Exhibition of objects relating to the antiquities, and actual condition 
of Eastern peoples. Foreign members of the Congress will be admitted as 
exhibitors. The cost of transit charges to and fro will be borne by exhibi- 
tors. 

" 21. Admission as a member of the Congress will be granted to any 
person of either sex, expressing a desire to take part in the labours of the 
Congress and paying the subscription of 10 shillings. On payment of the 
subscription a member's ticket will be given, which will give the possessor 
admission to all the sittings of the Congress and to the attached Exhibition, 
as well as a right to a copy of all the publications of the meeting of the 
Congress. 

" 22. Scientific Societies may also be inscribed as such on the list of 
members of the Congress, with the right of being represented by a special 
delegate. 

" 23. Persons not presenting their tickets of membership will not be 
admitted to the sittings of the Congress or to the Exhibition. 

"24. Immediately on their arrival at St. Petershurgh, the members of 
the Congress are requested to be good enough to proceed to the office of the 
Managing Committee to signify their presence, enter their residence, and 
obtain the rxdes of the meeting. 

" 26. The liberality of the Russian Government renders it unnecessary 
for the Committee to admit a separate class of donor members. The sub- 
serij)tions of members will be principally devoted to the publication of the 
proceedings of the meeting. But any donation of books, manuscripts, draw- 
ings, maps, objects of antiquity, art or curiosity, &c., vsdll be gladly received. 

"27. All scientific bodies and societies among whose members there 
may be some interested in Oriental studies, will be informed of the rules of 
the meeting and invited to take part in the proceedings of the Congress. 
No personal invitations will be issued. 

" 28. All foreign correspondence of the Committee of Management, 
excepting that relating to the Exhibition, will be conducted through the Pre- 
sident of the Committee, M. W. W. Grigorief (St. Petershurgh, Vasilievski- 
Ostrov, Volkhovskoi-Pereovlok, No. 6,) or the Secretary for Foreign corre- 
spondence, M. le Baron Victor de Rosen, Asst. Professor of Arabic at the 
University of St. Petershurgh (Fourchatskaya, No. 25). For any business 
relating specially to the Exhibition, application should be made to M. Pierre 
Lerch, Secretary of the Imperial Archaeological Conomission at St. Peters- 



1876.] R. Mitra — Human Sacrifices in Ancient India. 53 

b-urgli (Vassilievski-Ostrov, Grand Perspective No. 8), Avho is specially 
charged with, the organisation and management of the Exhibition. 

The following paper was read : — 
1. On Suman Sacrifices in Ancient India. — By Babtj Rajestdealala 

MiTEA, LL. D. 

(Abstract.) 

The author starts with the assumption that, however repulsive the 
idea of sacrificing human beings may be to modern civilization, it was not 
inconsistent with the different forms of religion which were current in pri- 
m.itive times. They all were founded on the belief of one or more superna- 
tm-al beings of great power who were easily offended, but who, at the same time, 
were amenable to the seductive influences of coaxing and peace-offering ; and 
all mantras, charms, prayers and sacrifices originated from, and were various 
forms of, coaxing and peace-offering. Human sacrifice was, in short, the 
natural result of assigning hxmian attributes to the Divinity, and it proceed- 
ed under different circumstances from anthropopathy, devotion, penance, 
rejoicings, vindictiveness, expediency, respect for the dead, necromancy, 
vows, and a desire to avert an evil or secure a coveted object by divine or 
supernatui'al intervention. To illustrate these points, the author quotes largely 
from different works showing that sacrifices of human beings were made 
by the Greeks, Romans, Egyptians, Assyrians, Chaldeans and ahuost all 
other ancient nations. He then discusses the true character of the story of 
S'unahsepha as given in the Vedas, and comes to the conclusion that the 
sacrifice there referred to was real and not typical, as supposed by AVilson, 
Rosen and other European orientalists. Extracts are then given from 
the White Yajur Yeda, the Taitiriya Brahmana, the Srautra Sutras of 
Apastamba and Katyayana, and the Kalika Purana to show the various 
phases through which the odious j)ractice of sacrificing human beings had 
passed in India. 

The Rev. Dr. K. M. Banerjea said : — The theory which Babu Rajen- 
dralala has propounded on the origin of human sacrifices in the world would, 
if discussed at large, lead to a theological debate not suitable at a place 
like this. I will therefore content myself with saying that I cannot assent 
to su.ch a dogma — certainly not . in the sweeping manner in which it 
has been propounded. I do not deny that human sacrifices have jDrevailed 
among most nations of the Avorld — but ])robably not in primitive times — 
nor among the Jews, as Jews, at any time. The offering of Isaac was a 
simple trial of faith, not followed by actual slaughter — nor Avas it in- 
dicative of an inhuman custom. The offerings to Moloch were professedly 
the consequences of lai)ses to open idolatry, and so far unJewish. But I 



54 K. M. Banerjea — Suman Sacrifices in Ancient India. [March, 

will confine myself to the proper subject of tlie paper as notified before- 
hand, viz.^ "Hiunan Sacrifices in Ancient India." I do not know in what 
Sense the learned essayist has used the term " Ancient India." I do not 
deny that human sacrifices have prevailed in the country, but that was 
long after the primitive Vedic period. My friend has referred to the 
Rig Veda, but he has admitted that the verses to which he has called atten- 
tion do not themselves conclusively prove the fact. But he seems to think 
that those verses, coupled with the comment of the Aitareya Brahmana, do 
prove his case. I beg to dissent from him. The case is that of S'unahsepha, 
btit, like Isaac, he was let off. It was not in effect a case of human sacri- 
fice. What it might have been in the intention is a question diflicult of 
solution. The difiiculty is raised in the Aitareya Brahmana itself, which my 
friend has adduced as his evidence. It speaks of Piorusha-medha. Now 
" j)urusha" is not synonymous with onan. It only means a person. We 
have in the Big Yeda the account of the sacrifice of ^^rimeval " purusha, 
begotten in the beginning," (puruslmm jatamagratali). We have also the 
Vedic dogma — " The Lord of the Creation offered himself as a sacrifice." 
I believe this dogma and the description of the sacrifice of the Primeval 
purusha proceeded from hazy recollections of the original revelation of " the 
Lamb slain from the foundation of the world." That is my belief but I 
vdll not discuss it here. So much for the word "purusha." Now as to 
the word onedha, my friend's own witness, the Aitareya Brahmana itself, 
used it in the sense of that part or essence of an animal body, which alone 
can be acceptably offered as a sacrifice, and it can he abstracted ivithout loss of 
life to the animal. The Aitareya Brahmana refers not only to the case of 
a Pt^ni/sha-medha, in which the person was dismissed alive, after the medlia 
had escaped from his body, but also to nimierous cases of animals which 
were prodiiced as victims, but released on the medha escaping from them, 
" Medha" is a peciiliar sacrificial term. It seems to correspond to the 
Hebrew me ha which, as an adjective, signifies y«i^, and is applied to sacrificial 
animals, such as sheep and lambs. The substantive form moha means onar- 
row. That is also the sense in which, according to the Inscriptions, the 
word mahe was used by the Assyrians. But, as the Aitareya Brahmana 
itself shows, the medlia can escape -without the animal being slaughtered. 
What this means I cannot readily say. It is certain, however, that the use 
of the term " purusha-medha" is little or no proof of the actual sacrifice of 
a man, much less of the existence of an inhuman custom or institution 
among our primitive ancestors. 

I do not deny that some time after the Vedic period such inhuman prac- 
tices did prevail as offerings to Sakti in her blackest form. I acknowledge 
also that solitary instances, rare in themselves, of a sort of religious suicide, 
may likewise be found, apart from offermgs to Kali, in the post-Vedic period, 
as in the case of Sarabhanga in the age of the Ramayana. 



1876.] E. C. Bayley — On Human Sacrifices in Ancient India, 55 

Tlie Hon. E. C. Batlet said that while he agreed with Dr. Banerjea 
that Babu Rajendralala had gone a good deal beyond what he proposed as 
the subject matter of his paper, and had travelled on to grouad which was 
possibly beyond the province of the Society, nevertheless Mr. Bayley thought 
that some at least of his propositions were not open to dispute. 

It was no dotibt true that human sacrifice was in many cases due to the 
desire of jDropitiating the Gods by the sacrifice of the sacrificer's dearest pos- 
sessions, as for example was the case in the well known history, curiously 
brought into prominence by the recent discovery of the " Moabite Stone," 
of Mesha, king of Moab, who sacrificed his son on the walls of his belea- 
guered city to obtain relief from the danger which pressed upon him. 

That this principle was carried also to the extent of inducing the sacri- 
fice of a man's own life to propitiate the Deity, was a fact of which con- 
temjDorary evidence might be had. Mr. Bayley had, on one occasion, ofiicial 
cognizance of a case in which an unfortunate Hindu, suffering terribly from 
leprosy, had caused himself to be buried alive, in the hope that by this act 
of self-immolation he might in a futui-e state of existence escape his terrible 
disease, and in which case two men were punished for assisting him thus to 
commit suicide. On the other hand some of the instances to which Babu 
Rajendralala had alluded, could hardly come under the head of sacrifice, such 
for example as the alleged destruction by the Emj)eror Napoleon the First, of 
the sick who embarrassed his army — there were many well known similar 
instances of wholesale and wanton destruction of human life, which certainly 
partook in no way of the character of sacrifice, as for examjDle, the massacres 
of his prisoners by Timur, near Dehli and elsewhere ; and, in very recent 
times, the story of the barbarous Turkoman who erected a pyramid of human 
skulls, and mui'dered the unfortunate Schlagintweit to obtain his head 
for the apex of it. It was not, however, Mr. Bayley's purpose to enter 
into the general questions raised, but rather to call the attention of the 
meeting to a fact which gave to the theories jDropounded a substantial existence 
and a local colouring,and which also would give a tolerably accurate and remote 
date for the practice of human sacrifice amongst a Hindu community. 

Twelve years ago Mr. Bayley had the honor to furnish to the Society 
a number of drawings of sculptures brought from the rums of Jamalgiri, 
near Peshawar, and which were of the class now known as Eusofzye sculp- 
tures. They were published, with a brief account of them, in the 21st Vo- 
lume of the Society's Journal, and opposite p. 621 of that volume would be 
found a lithograph* of a sculptm-e which Mr. Bayley believed undoubtedly 
to represent a human sacrifice. The originalf (which mifortmaately perish- 

* From a di'awing by the late Sir Herbert Edwardes. 

t It was cut in a coarse blue slatey limestone and was in imperfect preservation, four 
parts of the sui-face were scaled ofif as the drawing shows. 



56 E. C. Bayley — On Hitman Sacrifices in Ancient India. [Marcii, 

ed in the fire at the Indian Department of the Ciystal Pahice) was not in- 
deed found at Jamalgiri but at Peshawar, and was sent to him with most of 
the other sculptures by the late Lieutenant S. W. Stokes, of the Bengal 
Ai'tillery. But though not actually coming from the same place as the 
other sculj)tu.res, it clearly was of the same class, both in general character, 
design, and in many of the details, though of less skilful work and probably 
therefore of rather later date. 

The centre figure in the group (which contains four persons), is repre- 
sented with a closely shaven head. This is a frequent characteristic of 
figu.res in the groups of Eusufzye sculptures and is supposed, with much 
probability, by General Cunningham to indicate that the person intended to 
be represented as a Buddhist monk. In this instance this person is the vic- 
tim who is naked, and the others are represented in the act of binding 
hmi down to a kind of altar of open stone or brick work. Of the threefold 
cords, one is drawn across the victim's throat, another round his waist. The 
feet apparently are still free, but the sculpture was in this part imperfect. 
The victim is represented as struggling or remonstrating, and one of the 
other figui'es appears, while restraining his struggles with his left hand, 
to be in the act of striking with his right hand, in which apparently 
some weapon was figured. 

The dress of the other figures is that ordinarily shown on the Eusofzye 
sculptures and was, no doubt, the local costume of that day in the neighbour- 
hood of Peshawar, as indeed in some respects it still is. 

It would be safe, therefore, Mr. Bayley thought, to take this sculpture 
as representing the immolation of a ca])tive Buddhist monk by his Hindu 
enemies.* 

Probably from its general resemblance to other sculptures undoiibtedly 
Buddhist, it was of Buddhist origin, and was intended to represent the death 
of some early martyi* to that faith. 

But at any rate there seemed no reason to doubt that it represented 
an human sacrifice in a Hindu country, and that it is of early date. 

The only inscription yet found among the Eusofzye sculptui-es bears 
a date which both General Cvmningham and Professor Dowson concur in 
attributing to the middle of the first century of the Christian era. And 
it is safe at least to assign the bulk of the Eusofzye sculp)tures to this date : 
from internal evidence, Mr. Bayley would have been himself disposed to con- 
sider them of somewhat earlier origin, but no doubt Mr. Pergusson on the 



* An instance, that is to say, of tlie sacrifice of a human captive the firstfruits of a 
victory as Babu Eajendralala suggests either as an indication of gratitude or perhaps 
rather in this instance as it seems to me, the immolations of one regarded by the gods 
as hostile or in order to please or appease them. 



1876.] R. Mitra — On Human Sacrifices in Ancient India. 57 

same evidence, had before tlie discovery of the inscription assigned them to 
the commencement of the Christian era. 

The present sculpture might be two or three centuries later, or its infe- 
rior character might be partly due to its belonging to a minor class of 
building, as the inferior material used seemed to indicate. Still Mr. Bayley 
thoiight that it would not be safe to assign it to a later date than the 3rd 
or 4th century of the Christian era, and if his interj)retation of it were 
correct, it would suffice to prove the existence of human sacrifice among a 
Hindu race at least as early as the epoch at which he presumed it to have 
been executed. 

Babtj Rajendealala Mitea said, he was sorry that there should be 
a mistmderstanding as to what he had meant by the word " ancient." He 
Lad used the word in the sense in which historians generally employ it, 
namely, to indicate all time anterior to the 6th century of the Christian era, 
taking the period from the 6th to the 14th century to be the middle ages, 
and all after the last date to be modern. He was perfectly well aware that 
the practice of casting infants into the waters of the Hughli near Sagar 
Island was most probably of mediaeval origin, and in referring to it, his 
object was to point out, that what was common in the middle ages and 
modern days, was not in se improbable in earlier times, and not to adduce 
it as an instance of ancient usage ; though he strongly suspected that the 
sacrifice of S'unahsepha was the type on which the modern rite was founded. 

He was not, he admitted, sufficiently well up in Biblical learning to 
enter mto a discussion as to the true meaning of Abraham's offer of Isaac 
as a sacrifice, nor was he disposed to raise a polemical controversy ; but to 
his lay understanding, the offer, without any expression of compunction, 
was a remarkable fact, and certain it was that when the offer was made, 
there was no reservation, nor any prospect or hope of the offer not being 
accejDted, and in so far, the case was a parallel one to that of S'unahsepha. 
In the case of Jephtha, the rash vow to make a " burnt offering" was 
brought to its tragic close by the immolation of his own daughter, " while 
the Spirit of Jehovah," we are told, was upon him, and that clearly 
showed that the Jews could, and did, sacrifice hmuan beings in the name 
of religion. Doubtless there were many, passages in the Old Testament 
which reprobated " the shedding of imioceut blood," as in Deuteronomy 
xii, 31, and elsewhere, bvit they did not deter Jephtha. The legend of 
Jej)htha is supposed by some to be an adaptation of that of Iphigenia, but it 
does not alter the charge against the Jews. 

As regards the story of S'u.nahsepha, the Babu would, for the credit of 
his ancestors, gladly accept the European theory on the subject, if he. could, 
but he felt it impossible to reconcile the details of tlie story with its sup- 
posed symbolical character. A man has a hundred wives, but no children ; 



58 E. Mitra — On Human Sacrifices in Ancient India. [Maecb:, 

he prays the water-god Varuna for children, promising to give up the first- 
born to the god ; a child is born, and Varuna claims it ; the father evades 
fulfilling his promise under one pretext or another, until the child, grown 
up to man's estate, runs away from home to escape being sacrificed ; the 
god, disappointed, afllicts the father with dropsy ; the son, mindful of his 
filial duty, returns home to save his father, and, meeting a poor Brahman in 
the way, buys one of his sons for a hvindred head of cattle to offer him as a 
substitute ; and the victim ultimately escapes through the intei-vention of 
certain gods. Now, eliminate the element of danger from this story, and the 
di-amatic and sensational character of the whole would be at once destroyed. 
If the sacrifice were a symbolical one, why should the man fail to redeem 
his promise ? There would have been no harm done to his son by repeat- 
ing a fcAV mantras over him. The son had no reason to run away from 
home, and to buy a substitute ; and the substitute, a grown up man well 
versed in the detaDs of sacrifice, had no business to bewail his lot, to 
forsake, in disgust, his father who had sold him, and to become the adopted 
son of a stranger and a man of a lower caste. 

The Babu could not also subscribe to the interpretation of the word 
IPv/rusIiamedlia suggested by the Eev. K. M. Banerjea, as the S'atapatha 
Brahmana of the White Yajtu* Veda had defined it differently, and no one 
in the jDresent century could consistently adopt a different interpretation. 
The enquiiy was, as to what the Veda itself meant by the word, and not 
what covdd be made of it by the aid of philology. 

The story in the Aitareya Brahmana, which referred to the passing of 
that part of a man which was fit for offering succcessively to a horse, to an 
ox, to a sheep, to a goat, and lastly to the earth, was purely allegorical, and 
intended to eulogise the value of rice offering, and did not set aside the ani- 
mal sacrifices. The goat was never set aside, and yet it comes under the 
same category with the horse, which too, if the Vedas are to be at all be- 
lieved, at one time formed an imj)ortant subject of sacrifice. 

The President, in closing the discussion, expressed the obligation of the 
Society to Babii Rajendralala Mitra for his paper, as for the discussion it 
had elicited. Much had been said of the meaning of the word ' ancient,' 
and in every statement care was taken to give the date of the story or sculp- 
ture, referred to. To him, however, this seemed a matter of the most 
secondary importance. Human sacrifice had existed in this country and in 
others, from the earliest times, and were it not checked by the strong arm of 
the law, would exist to the jiresent day largely and comparatively widely. 
In truth, he was not aware of the existence of any race of human beings, 
among whom human sacrifice had not existed at some period of their his- 
tory. It had been said to-night that the Persians were an exception ; he 
must doubt it, and if there were no evidence of it among that people, this 



1876.] Accommodation of tTie SoGiety. 59 

must, lie thought, arise from the imperfection of the records, not from the 
absence of the custom. Our own ancestors, much as we were naturally dis- 
posed to plume ourselves on our humanity, unquestionably offered human 
sacrifices. And the natural conclusion, the inevitable conclusion, he thought, 
of the study of the history of the human race was, that this custom was 
not confined to any special times, was not a question of centuries, or of epochs 
but was in every case, a question of the state of co-ordinate civilization and 
thus might exist in one nation, or in one tribe or part of a nation, many 
centuries after it had disappeared from others. 

The President said, before the meeting closed, he was anxious to say 
a few words on a matter of very considerable importance to the Society. 
The Members were fully aware of the arrangements which had been made 
with the Government of India, by which the Asiatic Society was to have 
provided for it in the new Indian Mtiseum, apartments fitted for its accom- 
modation and use : also of the strict supervision, which the Society, as Trus- 
tees for the public, had seciu'ed over the valuable collections, which they 
handed over to the safe keeping of the Trustees of the New Museum. 
Then recently, the Government of India had found that the demands for 
s^jace in that building were more extended than had been supposed. And 
they have proposed that the Asiatic Society should give up their right to the 
rooms which had been appropriated for their use, and should accept in lieu 
thereof a sum of money supjDosed to represent the value of the house and 
premises now occupied by the Society, and which is their proj)erty. This 
house and premises would have been a certain source of steady income to the 
Society. A new Act of the Legislature was requisite for this purpose, and 
in the preparation of this Act some slight alterations had been introduced. 
The principal of them was, that the number of Trustees was increased, and 
the right of nomination of an additional Trustee was secured to the Society, 
making the nmnber to be nominated by that body five ; the President for 
the time being, and four other Members, instead of fom- as at j)resent. 

The same right of property in the collections handed over, and power 
of resuming these, in the event of the Museum not being maintained, were 
contained in the new Act, as in the former one. And practically the rights 
of the Society continue as they were. 

This jDroposal on the jDart of the Govermnent when submitted to the 
Council of the Society, received their unanimous assent, and they have ex- 
pressed their willingness on behalf of the Society to accept the terms. A 
Bill has been introduced into the Legislative Council, to legalize the pro- 
ceedings, and it is hoped, that before the close of the present month, it 
may be completed. The whole will then doubtless be formally laid before 
the Society. 

The meeting then adjourned. 



60 Library. [March, 



IBRARY. 



y 

The following additions have been made to the Library since the meet- 
ing held in Eebruary last. 



Transactions, Proceedings and Journals. 

Presented hy the respective Societies or Editors. 
Berlin. Konigliche Preussische Akademie der Wissenschaften, — Monats- 
bericht, September, October tmd November, 1875. 

Sept. and Oct. Fischel. — Kalidasa's Vikramorvaciyam nach. dravidisclien 
Handschriften. 

Birmingham. Institution of Mechanical Engineers, — Proceedings, July, 
Pt. II, 1875. 

T. N. Robinson. — On Wood-Working Machinery. Sir J. WJdtworth. — On Fluid 
Compressed Steel and Guns. 
Bombay. Bombay Branch of the Eoyal Asiatic Society, — Jom'nal, Vol. XI, 
No. 31, 1875. 

H. Fierce. — ^A Description of tlie Mekranee-Beloochee Dialect. Hon. Rao Sa- 
heb Y. N. Mandlik. — Sangamesvara Maliatmya and Linga-'svorsMp. J. G. 
da Cunha. — Memoir on the History of the Tooth-relic of Ceylon. E. Rehat- 
sek. — The suhjugation of Persia by the Moslems, and the Extinction of the 
Sasanian Dynasty. /. F. Fleet. — Old Canarese and Sanskrit Inscriptions re- 
lating to the Chieftains of the Siadavamsa. 

Bombay. The Indian Antiquary, — ^Vol. V, Pts. 50, 51, 52. 

Pt. 50. Frof. C. S. Tawney. — Metrical Translation of the Vairagya Satakam, 
or hundred Stanzas on Asceticism by Bhartrihari. W. F. Sinclair. — Notes on 
some parts of the Ahmudnagar CoUectorate. J. F. Fleet. — Sanskrit and old 
Canarese Inscriptions. M. J. Walhouse. — Archa3ological Notes. 

Pt. 51. J. T. Fleet. — -A Chronicle of Toragal. Sanskrit and old Canarese In- 
scriptions, contiaued, Nos. XI, XII. M. J. Walhouse. — Ai-cha3ological Notes. 

Pt. 52. Frof. 0. S. Taivney. — Metrical Version of Bhartrihari's Vairagya Sa- 
takam. /. F. Fleet. — Sanskrit and old Canarese Inscriptions. Nos. XIII, 
and XIV. /. Burgess. — The Dh4rasinva Eock Temples. Sir W. Elliot. — No- 
tice of a Sculptured Cave at TJndapalli in the Gantur District. /. W. M'Cr in- 
die, 31. A. — Translation of the Indica of Anian. 

Calcutta. Christian Spectator, — Vol. V, Nos. 56, 57, February, March, 

1876. 
. . Geological Siu'vey of India, — Palteontologia Indica, Jurassic Pauna 

of Kutch, Vol. I, 4. 

Dr. Waac/en. — The Cephalopoda (Anunonitidte). 
. . Memoirs,— Vol. XI, Pt. 2. 



Wynne. — Trans-Indus Salt Kegion, Kohat District. 

. Eamayanam, Pt. 5, No. 4. 

Dresden, Vercin f iir Erdkvinde, — Jahresbericht, XII. 



1876.] Library. 61 

Dublin. Eoyal Geological Society of Ireland, — Journal, Vol. IV, Pt. 2, 
1874-5. 

Geneva. La Societe de Physique et d'Histoire Natm-elle. — Memoires, 

Tome 24, Pt. I. 
Liverpool. Literary and Philosophical Society, — Proceedings, No. 29, 
1874-75. 

/. A. Picton. — On tlie Origin and History of the Numerals. Rev. TF. Kennedy- 
Moore. — Oriental Pantheism and Dualism. R. Leigh. — The Yang-Tse-Keang 
Eiver of Asia. 
London. Anthropological Institute, — Journal, Vol. V, No. 2, October, 

1875. 
. The Athenaeum, — Pts. 574, 575, 576, October, November, Decem- 
ber 1875, and No. 2521, February 1876. 
• . Geographical Magazine, — Vol. Ill, Nos. 1, 2, January, Febru- 



ary 1876. 

No. 1. Major S. Wood. — On former Physical Aspects of the Caspian. B, 
Ker. — Is it possible to imite the Black Sea and the Caspian ? 

No. 2. Introduction of the Cultivation of Caoutchouc-yielding Trees into Bri- 
tish India. Prof. H. H. GiglioU. — Dr. Beccari's Recent visit to 'New Gui- 
nea. 
. Geological Society, — Quarterly Jom-nal, Vol. 31, Pt. 4, No. 124, 



November 1875. 

S. F. Blanford. — On the Age and Correlations of the Plant-beariag Series of 
India, and the former Existence of an Indo-Oceanic Continent. Prof. Owen. 
On Prorastomus sirenoides. 

. ■ , List of Members of the Society, 1875. 

. Royal Asiatic Society, — Jotirual, Vol. VIII, Part I. 

JE. B. Coivell, and J. Eggeling. — Catalogue of Buddhist Sansla-it Manuscripts in 
the Possession of the Royal Asiatic Society. T. S. Blakesley. — On the Ruins 
of Sigiri in Ceylon. /. F. BicJcson. — The Patimokkha, being the Buddhist 
ofS.ce of the Confession of Priests. R. C. Childers. — Notes on the Sinhalese 
Language. No. 2, Proofs of the Sanskritic Origin of Sinhalese. 

. Eoyal Astronomical Society. — Monthly Notices, Vol. 36, Nos. I, 

II- 

No. 1. Spectroscopic Observations made at the Royal Observatory, Grccn\\dch, 
by the Astronomer Royal. Col. J. F. Tennant. — Note on a Successful At- 
tempt to support a Mercury Trough by a compact and casUy removable ar- 
rangement. Note on Prof. Pi-itchard's Ephemeris of Circmnpolar Stars. 

No. 2. Rev. S. J. Perry. — Manila Photographs of Transit of Venus. M. A^ 
Martin. — On the silvering of Glass by Inverted Sugar, for Optical Instruments 
and Exijcriuients. Prof. Zenger. — On Celestial Photography. Prof. Prit- 
chard. — Remarks upon two papers by Col. Tennant. 

•. Royal Society, — Philosophical Transactions, Vol. 164, Pts. I, II, 

Vol. 165, Pt. I. 

Vol. 164, Pt. I. L. Clark.— On a Standard Voltaic Battery. R. S. Ball.—Tw 
searches in tlie Djoiamics of a Rigid I'ndy by the aid of the Thoovy of Screws. 



C2 Library. [MAECn, 

S. N. Moseley. — On the Anatomy and Histology of tlie Land-Planarians of 
Ceylon, with some Account of theii' Hahits, and a Description of two new Spe- 
cies, and with Notes on the Anatomy of some European Aquatic Species. /. 
Tyndall. — On the Atmosphere as a Vehicle of Sound. Pt. II. F. A. Abel. — 
Contributions to the History of Explosive Agents. W. Roberts. — Studies on 
Biogenesis. /. Norman Lochyer. — The Bakerian Lecture. Eesearches in 
Spectrum- Analysis in Connexion with the Spectrum of the Sun, ISTos. Ill, 
IV, J. N. Lochyer and W. G. Hoberts. — On the Quantitative Analysis of cer- 
tain Alloys by means of the Spectroscope. H. F. £lanford.—Th.e Wiads of 
Northern India, in relation to the Temperature and Vapour-constituent of the 
Atmosphere. H. E. Roscoe. — On a Self-recording Method of Measuring the 
Intensity of the Chemical Action of Total Daylight. W. G. Williamson. — On 
the Organization of the Fossil Plants of the Coal measures. 
Vol. 165, Part I. F. R. Lankester. — Contributions to the Developmental His- 
tory of the Mollusca. Captain Noble and F. A. Abel.- — ^Researches on Explo- 
sives. Fired Gunpowder. J. B. N. Hennessey. — On the Atmospheric Lines 
of the Solar Spectrum, illustrated by a Map drawn on the same scale as that 
adopted by Kirchhoff. General Sir F. Sabine. — Contributions to Terrestrial 
Magnetism. Fr. F. Klein. — Research on the Smallpox of Sheep. Fr. H. 
Gunther. — Description of the Living and Extinct Races of Gigantic Land-Tor- 
toises. Pts. I and II, Introduction, and the Tortoises of the Galapagos Is- 
lands. 

London. Royal Society, — Proceedings, Vol. 24, No. 164. 

Frof. Wyville Thomson. — Report to the Hydrographer of the Admiralty on the 
Cruise of H. M. S., "Challenger," from June to August, 1875. /. Priestley. 
On the Physiological Action of Vanadium F, W. Pavy. — On the Production 
of Glycosuria by the Effect of Oxygenated Blood on the Liver. 

. , List of Members, 30th November, 1874. 

■ . , The Anatomy o£ the Lymphatic System. By E. Klein, 

M. D. 
. Institution of Civil Engineers, — Proceedings, Vol. 42, Pt. 4, Ses- 



sion 1874-75. 

G. F. Feacon. — The Systems of Constant and Intermittent Water supply and 
the- Prevention of "Waste, with special reference to the restoration of Constant 
Service in Liverpool. 

. Nature,— Vol. 13, Nos. 321 to 327. 



Mexico. La Sociedad de Geografia y Estadistica, — Boletin, No. 7, Tomo. II. 
Munich. K. B. Akademie der Wissenschaften, — Mathematisch-physikali- 
sche Classe — Sitzungsberichte, Heft. I, II, 1875. 

Heft. I. V. Pettenkofer — Ueber ein Reagens zur Unterscheidung der freien 

Kohlensaure im Trinkwasser von der an Basen gebundenen. 
Heft. II. v. Jolly. — Ueber die elektrische Influenz auf Fliissigkeiten von A. 
Wiillner. Voit. Ueber die Eiweisszersetzung im Thierkorper bei Transfu- 
sion von Blut und Eiweisslosungen von J. Forster. Beetz — Ueber das dop- 
pelte Maximum in der Haufigkeit der Gewitter wahrend der Sommermonate 
von W. V. Bezold. 



1876.] Library. 63 

Munich. K. B. Akademie der Wissenschafteu. — Pliilosophisclie, pMolo- 
gische mid Historisclie Classe — Sitzungsberichte, Band I, Heft. 2, 3, 
Band II, Heft. 1. 

Band I. Heft. 2. Trumpp. — Uber den Accent und die Ansspraclie des Persi- 

schen. 
Band II, Heft. 1. E. Schlacfintweit. — Die tibetisclien Handsclu'iften der Konigl . 
Hof-nnd Staatsbibliottek zu Miinehen. 

. , . Historische Classe, — Abhandlvmgen, Band 12, dritte 

Abth. Band 13, erste Abtli. 

Almanach fiir das Jabr 1875. 
-, Ueber die Beziebungen der Cbemie zni' Eecbtspflege, von 



Dr. L. A. Bucbner. 
Palermo. Soeieta degli Spettroscopisti Italian!, — Memorie. Dispensa 10, 
11, Novembre, Ottobre, 1875. 

Disp. II. T. Bredicliin. — Spectre des nebuleuses. Confi'onto fra il diametro 
solare meridiano e spettroscopico ricavato da osservazioni fatte dagli astronomi 
Secchi, Eayet, Doma e Tacchini. 
Paris. Jotu'nal Asiatiqne, — Sej)tieme Serie, Tome VI, No. 6, 1875. 

M. B. de Meynard. — Les Pensees de Zamaklischari, texte arabe, pliblie complet 
ponr la premiere fois avec une traduction et des notes. 

. Societe de Geograpbie, — Bulletin, Decembre 1875, Janvier, 1876. 

Janvier. V. A. Malte Brun. — I'Expedition polaii'e anglaise en 1875. Carte du 
detroit de Smith, pour suivre I'expedition polaii'e anglaise. VAhhe Armand 
David. — Second voyage d' exploration dans I'ouest de la Chine 1868 a 1870. 
Roorkee. Professional Papers on Indian Engineering, — 2nd Series. Vol. 
V, No. 19. 

F. JDejoiix. — Artificial Puzzolana made of Burnt Clay. Indian Railway Traffic. 
F. Cox. — The use of Concrete in India. IF. ParJcer. — Formation of a Harbour 
at Madi-as. 
Turin. E. Academia delle Scienze, — Atti, Vol. X, Dispensa 1 — 8, 1874-75. 

. Bollettiao Meteorologico ed Astronomico del Eegio Osservatorio 

della Eegia Universita di Torino, 1875. 
Vienna. Verein zur Verbreitung naturwissenschaftlicber Kenntnisse, — 
Scbriften Band 15, Jabrgang 1874-75. 
Toula. — Die Tiefen der See. 
Yokohama. The Asiatic Society of Japan, — Transactions, Vol. Ill, Pt. II. 
Captain Descharmes. — Itinerary of Two Eoutes between Yedo and Niigata. Capt. 
St. John. — An Excursion into the Interior Parts of Yomato Pro\'ince. J. S. 
Guhhins. — Notes of a Jomiiey from Awamori to Niigata and of a visit to the 
]VIines of Sada. C. II. Dallas. —The Yonozawa Dialect. 

■Books and Pamphlets. 
Presented hy tlie Authors, 
Blanford, H. F. On the Age and Correlations of the Plant-Bearing Se- 
ries of India, and the former Existence of an Indo-Occauic Continent, 



64 Library. [March, 

DiiTA JSTath Sen, Babtj. A Scheme for the School o£ Industry or Practi- 
cal Science, proposed to be established in Calcutta, from Funds raised by 
the Indian League, with Government Aid. 

ForcAUX, Ph. Ed. Le Eeligieus chasse de la Communaute, Conte Boud- 
dhique traduit du Tibetam, j^our la premiere fois. 

Godtths^-Attsten, Majob, H. H. Description of a supposed new StitJiora 
from the Dafla Hills, and a Mmla from the Naga Hills, with remarks on 
Fictorliis {Clirysomma) altirostre, Jerdon. 

Hexdlet, Dr. T. H. The Jeypore Guide. 

McGregor, W. Protection of Life and Property from Lightning during 
Thunderstorms. 

ScLATER, p. L. Address delivered to the Biological Section of the British 
Association, Bristol, Augiist 1875. 

Tasst, GARCEsr HE. La Langue et la Litterature Hindoustanies en 1875. 
Revue annuelle. 

jVLlSCELLANEOUS PRESENTATIONS. 

Report of a Mission to Yarkund in 1873, under command of Sir T. 
D, Forsyth, K. C. S. I., C. B. 

Government of India, Foreign Dept. 

Report on the Administration of Bengal, 1874-75. 

Annual Report on Emigration to British and Foreign Colonies, ending- 
March, 1875. 

Report on the Charitable Dispensaries under the Government of Ben- 
gal for the year 1874. 

General Report on Public Instruction in Bengal for 1874-75. 

GoVIiRNMENT OE BENGAL. 

The Indian Antiquary, Vol. V, Pts. 50, 51, 52. 

Government oe Bengal, Home Department. 
Rej)ort on the Administration of the Punjab and its Dependencies for 
the year 1874-75. 

Government op the Punjab. 
Report on the Administration of the N. W. Provinces for the year 
1874-75. 

Statistical, Descrij)tive, and Historical Account of the N. Western Pro- 
vinces of India. By E. T. Atkinson, B. A. 

Government of the N. W. Proyinces. 
Report on the Judicial Administration (Civil) of the Central Provinces 
for the year 1875. 

Chief Commissioner, Central Provinces. 
The Indian Press on the late Raja Kali Krishna Bahadur', K. G. S. 

Raja Harendra Krishna Bahaditr, 



1876.] Library. 65 

Accessions to tlie Indian Mnsexun from March, 1874, to Marcli, 1875, 
Curator's Report. 

TeUSTEES, IlfDLO" MrSETJM. 

Theory of the Moon's Motion. By Jno. N. Stoekwell, M. A. 

SitITHS02iriA2r LsrSTITTJTIOJT. 

Disquisition by the Pandits of Pooree on the Temple of Jagannatha. 

Babtt Pe,a]sts^atie Pajstjit. 

Periodicals Purchased. 

Berlin. Joiu'nal flir die reine nnd angewandte Mathematlk, — Band 81, 
Heft I. 

L. W. Thome. — Ziir Theorie der linearen Differeiitialgleicliimgen. L. Poch- 

hammer. — Beitrag zur Theorie der Biegimg des Kreiscylinders. A. Oberbecl: — 

Ueber stationare FlussigkeitsTDewegimgen mit Beriicksich-tigung der inneren 

Eeibiing. 

Calcutta. The Indian Annals of Medical Science,— Vol. XYIII, No. 35, 

January, 1876. 

. The Indian Medical Gazette,— Vol. XI, No. 3, March. 1876. 

— . Stray Feathers,— Vol. Ill, No. 6, 1875. 

J. Scully. — Fhasiamcs Shawi and Fhasianus insignis. R. B. Sliarpe. — Note on 
the Genus Bendropliila. Capt. E. A. Butler. — Notes on the Avifauna of 
Mount Ahoo and Northern Guzerat. 
Giessen. Jahresbericht liber die Eortschritte der Chemie ftir 1874. 
Gottingen. Gottingische Gelehrte Anzeigen, — Nos. 43. — 48, Nachrichten, 

No. 23. 
Leipzig. Poggendorff's Annalen der Physikund Chemie, — No. XII, 1875. 
N. KoJtlrausch. — Ueher Thermo-Elektricitat, Warme und Elektricitatsleitung. 
W. Sottz. — Einige weitere Versuche zur Verbesserung der einfachen Infiuenz- 
maschine. S. Morton. — Eine Bunsensche Lampe ohne Eiickschlag. 
London. The Academy,— Nos. 188 to 197, 1875-76. 

. Annals and Magazine of Natural History, — Vol. 16, Nos. 96 and 

97, 1875-76. 

No. 96. H. N, Moseley. — On a young Specimen of Pelagonemertes Eollestoni. 

Rev. 0. P. Cambridge. — On three new and ciuious Fonns of Arachnida. 
No. 97. Major S. H. Godwin-Austen. — Description of a supposed new Suthora 
from the Dafla Hills, and a Minla from the N&ga Hills, with remarks on Pic- 
torJiis [Chrysomma) altirostre, Jerdon. /. Wood-Mason. — On a gigantic Stri- 
dulatmg Spider. 
. London, Edinburgh and Dublin Philosophical Magazine, — 4th Series 



Vol. 50, Nos. 333, 334, 5th Series Vol. I, No. I. 

Vol. 50, Njo. 333. P. Bunsen. — Spectral, ^Vnalytical Researches. Dr. J. Kerr. — 
A new Eolation between Electricity and Light ; Dielcctrificd Media Bu'efi'in- 
gcnt. L. Schwendler. — On the General Theory of Duplex Telegraphy. 

No. 334. 11. 31. Bosanquet. — On the Polarization of the Light of the Sky. P. Bun- 
sen, — Spectral- Analytical Ecsearchcs. JV. Weston. — The Application of Phos- 
phorus to the " Poling" of Copper, 



66 Library. [March, 

Vol. I, No. 1. 0. mctvisufe— On Duplex Telegraphy. J, W. L. Glaisher— 
On the Representation of an Uneven Numher as a sum of four Squares, and as 
the sum of a Square and two Triangular Numbers. 8. S. Burbiiry.-r-Oia. the 
Second Law of ThermodjTiamics in connexion with the Kinetic Theory of 
Gases. T. S. Marvin. — On the Production of Spectra by the Oxyhydrogen 
Flame. Prof. M. Clausius. — On a new fimdamental Law of Electrodynamics. 

London. Numismatic Society's Journal, — Pt. Ill, 1S75, New Series, 
No. 59. 

H. C. Eay.—K Gold Coin of Abu Ishak Ibn Mahmud Shah Inchu. 8. L. Foole. 
Unpublished Coins of the Kakweyhis. 

. Quarterly Joiu'nal of Microscopical Science, — No. 61, January, 

1876. 

JE. R. Lanlcester. — Further Observations on a Peach or Eed-coloivred Bacterium. 
BacteritMn ruhescens. S. G. 8orlij. — On the Evolution of Hasmoglobin. 

. Quarterly Journal of Science, — No. 49, January, 1876. 

Eecent Chemical Eesearches. On the Coloui-uig of the Shells of Birds' Eggs. 

. Society of Ai-ts,— Joui-nal, Vol. 24, Nos. 1200 to 1208. 

No. 1202. A, Smee. — Proposed Heads of Legislation for the Eegulation of Sew- 
age grounds. 
No. 1205. J. L. W. Thudichwn, M. D. — On the Discoveries and Philosophy 
of Liebig, with special reference to their influence upon the advancement of 
Ai'ts, Manufactures and Commerce. Pts. I, II, III. 
No. 1206. The Cultivation of Useful Plants in India, — Opium in China. 

. The Westminster Eeview, New Series, — No. 97, January, 1876. 

New Haven, U. S. The American Jom'nal of Science and Arts, — Vol. X, 
No. 59. 

E, Parish. — Specific gravity Balance. 0. C. Marsli. — On the Odontornithes or 

Bii-ds with teeth. 
Weiske. — Use of Salicylic Acid ia Titrition. 
Paris. Comptes Eendus,— Tome 81, Nos. 19—26, 1875. 

No 19. M. A. Commaille. — Note sur le dosage de la cafeine et la solubilite de 
cette substance. M. Ore. De I'influence des acides sur la coagulation du 
sang. 
Uo. 20. M. Th. du Iloncel, — Quinzieme Note sur la conductibilite elec- 
tiique des corps mediocrement conducteurs. 21. P. Puchemin. — Emploi du 
nickel depose par voie electrique pom' proteger contre I'oxydation Ics aimants 
servant a la construction des boussoles. W. Fr. Glenard. — Sur le role de 
I'acido carbonique dans le phenomene de la coagulation spontanee du sang. 
No. 21. M. Ch. 8ainte-Claire Peville. — Sur la periodicite des grandcs mouve- 
ments de 1' atmosphere. M. P. Gervais. — Romarques stir les Balenides des 
mers du Japon a propos du crane d'un Cetace de ce groupe, envoye au Mu- 
seimi par le gouvemement japonais sm' la demande de M. Janssen. M. Ori. 
De Taction qu' exercent les acides phosphoriques monohydi'ate ct trihydrate 
sur la coagulation du sang. 
No. 22. M. G. Lombroso. — Du principe venencux que ronfenne le mais avarie, 
et de son appKcation a la pathologic et a la thcrapuuti<lue. M. Edm. Perrier. 
Sm- les vers do terre des iles Philippines ot de la Cochinchine. 



1876.] Library. 67 

Xo. 23. M. D. Mendelief. — Sur la temperature des couches elevees de I'atmos- 
phere. M. E. AUard. — Siu- la transparence des flammes et de 1' atmosphere 
et sur la visibilite des feux scintillants. M. P. Schutzenherger, — Recherches 
sur la constitution des matieres albuminoides. M. Signal. — Sur I'etat virulent 
du sang des chevaux sains, morts par assommement ou asphyxie. M. M. 
Treve et Durassier.—^T^ote sur la distribution du magnetisme a I'interieiu' 
des aimants. M. P. Carbonnier. — Mdification du poisson arc-en-ciel, de 
rinde. 
No. 24, M. J. Jamin. — Sur les lois de 1' influence magnetique. M. Janssen, — 
Note accompagnant la presentation de plaques micrometriques destinees aux 
mesures d'images solaires. M. Lortet. — Sur un poisson du lac de Tiberiade, 
le Chromis paterfamilias^ qui incube ses oeufs dans la cavite buccale. M. Jobert. 
Eecherches sur I'appareil respiratoire et le mode de respiration de certains 
Crustacees brachyures. M. A. Crova. — Sur I'intensite calorifique de la radia- 
tion solaire et son absorption par 1' atmosphere terrestre. 31. G. Tissandier. — 
Observations meteorologiques en ballon. 
No. 26. M, J. Jamiti. Formule de la quantite de magnetisme enlevee a un 
aimant par im contact de fer, et de la force portative. M. Bdm. Terrier. — Sui- 
la classification et la synonymie des Stelleiides. 
No. 26. Annual Address by M. Fremy, President of the Academy. 
Paris. Journal des Savants, — Novembre, 1875. 

. Reviie Ai'clieologique, — ^Nos. 11, 12, Novembre, Decembre, 1875. 

. - Revue Critique d'Histoire et de Litterature, — Nos. 45, 48, 50, 52, 

Novembre, Decembre, 1875. 

No. 48. Monier Williams. — La Sagesse des Hindous. 

Nos. 50, 51. Hymnes der Rig Veda, tr. p. Greldner et Kaegi, avecle concours 
de Roth, 

Eevue des Deux Mondes, Tome 12, Pts. Ill, IV, Decembre, 1875, 



Tome 13, Janvier, Pt. I, 1876. 

Tome 12, Pt. III. M. J. Mnet. — Les filateurs Anglais' et la culture du 
coton en E'gypte. If. A. Gcffro>j. — Une nouvelle histoire de I'ancien 
Client classique. 
Tome, 13, Pt. I. J/. G. Valbert. — L'Angleterre et le Canal de Suez. 
. Bevue et Magasin de Zoologie, — 3^ Serie, Nos. 9 — 11, 1875. 



Nos. 9 and 11, Fieber. — Cicadines d'Em-'ope, 

jBooKS Purchased. 

Fallon, S. W. A new Hindustani — English Dictionary, with illustrations 
from Hindustani Literature and Folk-Lore, Pts. I, II. 



PROCEEDINGS 

OF THE 

ASIATIC SOCIETY OF BENGAL, 

•For April, 1876. 



The monthly General Meeting of the Society was held on Wednesday 
the 5th April, 1876, at 9 o'clock p. m. 

Col. H. L. Thuillier, C. S. I., Vice-President, in the Chair. 

The minutes of the last meeting were read and confirmed. 

The following presentations were announced — 

1. — From Pandit Brahma- vatra Samadhyayi, a co-pj of Srimadvao*ata- 
tam, with commentary, Sridharasvami, Nos . 1 to 3 and 5 to 8, and a copy 
of the " Sama Veda Sanhita (Chanda Archika)". 

2. — Prom Dr. T. Oldham, several numbers of the Journal and Pro- 
ceedings. 

3.— From the Hon'ble E. C. Bayley, C. S. I., 9 volmnes of the 
Journal, and 7 of the Proceedings. 

4. — From the Marquis Doria, Genoa, Vols. 2 to 6 of the " Amiali 
del Museo Civico di Storia Naturali di Geneva. 

5. — From Dr. T. Oldham, two gold coins, forwarded by Mr. W. Bourne, 
and two copper coins. 

Mr. Blochmajsit said — The two gold coins, presented to the Society 
by Mr. Bom-ne thi-ough Dr. Oldham, were a Dutch ducat of 1818, and an 
old Venetian sequin, a facsimile of which was published by Mr. Burgess in 
his " Indian Antiquary", Vol. II, 1873, p. 213. Mr. Bourne's specimen, 
however, was no forgery. These coins were of interest from the fact 
that they had been obtained in the Jain temple of Baidyanath, near Deogarh, 
where they had been deposited as offerings by some j)ilgrims. 

The other two coins presented by Dr. Oldham are two small Muham- 
madan copper coins. The legend is scarcely legible : on one of them he 
could make out the name Ibrdhiin. Mr. Wynne, who obtained them from 
Dadji, Thakur of Nurrha, Ivachh, says they are pice of the coinage of 
the Rdja Vigo or Vigu, foimd 40 years ago at the ruins of Vigu Kot, 
half way between Banuio ke Bazar and Sindrl, near the Allah Band, the 
embankment in the Ran of Kachh formed during the earthquake of 1819. 



70 Mection of Honorary Memlers. [Apeil, 

6. — From Babu Rajendralala Mitra, LL. D., four leaves of an illu- 
minated MS. of the Kalpa Sutra of the Jains, about 400 years old. 

7. — From E. Gay, Esq. a copy of a work entitled " Purclias bis 
Pilgrimage, or Relations of the World and the Religions observed hi all 
Ages and Places." 

Mr. Blochmantst said this appeared to be a copy of the original edition 
of 1614 and would be a great acquisition to the Library. The Society 
were much indebted to Mr. Gay for this and former presentations of 
valuable and scarce works. • 

The following gentlemen, duly proposed and seconded at the last 
Meeting, were balloted for and elected ordinary members — 

Mr. A. Wilson. 

Kumar Kante Chunder Sing of Paikpara. 

Mr. T. E. Coxhead. 

Dr. Werner Siemens, Berlin, and Col. Henry Yule, R. E., C. B., pro- 
posed by the Council at the last Meeting as Honorary Members, were 
balloted for and duly elected. 

Before the commencement of the ballot, the Chairman said that per- 
haps the meeting might expect a few words of explanation as to the 
proposition submitted that evening for filling up the vacancies in the list 
of honorary members of the Society. The Council had given this subject 
their very careful consideration, and had much confidence in submitting 
for election the names of Dr. Werner Siemens and Colonel Henry Yule, 
C. B., Member of the Indian Council in London. The grounds on which 
the Council founded their recommendation of these gentlemen had been duly 
placed before the Society, and as the nomination had been ad^dsedly made 
after mature deliberation, the Comicil trusted that they would meet with 
the full support of the meeting and of the Society. 

The following are candidates for ballot at the next meeting. — • 

Surgeon Major A. F. Bradshaw, Surgeon to H. E. the Commander- 
in-Chief, proposed by Col. C. Dickens, R. A., seconded by Col. H. Drum- 
mond, R. E. 

Mr. John M. Lyall, proposed by Col. J. E. Gastrell, seconded by 
Capt. J. Waterhouse. 

Mr. A. M. Nash, M. A., Professor, Presidency College, Calcutta, pro- 
posed by Mr. H. Blochmann, seconded by Col. J. E. GastreU. 

The following gentlemen have intimated their desire to withdi-aw from 
the Society — 

Messrs. H. Williams, Chester Macnaghten, W. Theobald, Walter 
Bourne, A. Tweena (on leaving India), and Raja Harendi-a Ki'ishna 
Bahadui'. 



1876.] designation of tlie President 71 

The CHAiEMAisr said that he had to inform the meeting that in conse- 
quence of the departure from India of their esteemed and valued President, 
Dr. Thomas Oldham, the Council of the Society had considered it their 
duty to record their unfeigned regret at the great loss which the Society 
thus sustained by Dr. Oldham's departui-e on the severance of his connection 
with the Government service in this country. He was sure that the feel- 
ings and sentiments which unanimously actuated the Council would be 
shared in by the Meeting and the Society at large, and as this was the last 
occasion on which *an opportunity would present itself of considering the 
late President's long and valuable services, he felt great pleasure in thus 
prominently bringing before them, the mperfect tribute to Dr. Oldham 
which the Resolution of the Council attempted to convey. The Resolution 
was as follows : 

Resolved that the Council of the Asiatic Society record the feeling of 
unfeigned regret with which they accept Dr. Oldham's resignation of the 
post of President, a regret intensified by the disappointment of the earnest 
anticipations and hopes of the Council that Dr. Oldham's recent visit to 
Europe woiild have given him renewed strength and vigour, and have enabled 
him to pursue his eminently useful career in this country for some time 
longer. 

The Council cannot permit Dr. Oldham to leave them without an 
expression of their grateful recognition of his unceasing exertions to forward 
the interests and promote the welfare of the Society throughout the 25 
years of his Membership during which time he has been a Member of the 
Council for 14 years and four times President. 

The Council have at least the one source of gratification that Dr. Old- 
ham has remained with them long enough to see the accomplishment of 
one of the objects for which he has striven on behalf of the Society so long 
and so earnestly, and by which the financial condition of the Society is 
placed upon a permanently sound and prosperous basis and its power of 
usefulness. vastly increased. 

The Council trust that the change of climate Dr. Oldham is now com- 
pelled to seek will prove thoroughly beneficial and that, though from a dis- 
tance, they may still have for many years to come the benefit of the counsels 
and assistance they have learned to appreciate so fully. 

Colonel TnuiLLiER said, in recording these sentiments Dr. Oldham's 
old colleagues of the Council had only performed a grateful duty, which it 
was believed would meet with the most bearty response from the Society, 
on behalf of which he most cordially and sincerely bid Dr. Oldham farewell 
with every good wish for renewed lu'alth and continued usefulness and 
prosperity in his native country. 



72 Proposed Memorial to Dr. Oldham. [Apktj<, 

The motion of the Chainiian that the resolution of the Council be ac- 
cepted and confirmed by the Society was carried unanimously. 

Db. Datid B. Smith said — Mr. President, when I came here this 
evening I had no intention of speaking ; I find myself, however, strongly 
imj)elled to make a few remarks with reference to Dr. Oldham's retire- 
ment from India and from this Society. You have, Sir, this evening 
laid before us a Resolution of the Council of the Society, conveying 
an appropriate and graceful tribute to Dr. Oldham, yet I hope it may 
not be considered presumptuous in me to say that I think the Society 
would do itself honor by going a step ftirther, so as to have a last- 
ing: Memorial of Dr. Oldham, in this room where we are now assem- 
bled. Nearly a quarter of a century ago, when I was a student of Me- 
dicine, and a jDupil of that great Naturalist Edwaed Foebes (whose writ- 
ings and memory are still valued and cherished by men of Science), I well 
remember his often alluding, in his Lectures, to Dr. Oldham as one of the 
then foremost leaders of Geological Science. A quarter of a century has, I 
am sure you will allow, not detracted from his fame in this respect ; but I 
regret that I am altogether imable to dilate on this view of his charac- 
ter ; indeed I am ashamed to think how meagrely I must at present allude 
to it. For a good many years I have been a Member of this Society and 
during some of these years I have had the honor of acting on the Council. 
I feel sure that any one who has had the opportunities that I have had of 
judging of Dr. Oldham's good services to this Society must place a high value 
on them. A good man of business, careful, exact, regardless of too adverse 
criticism or of party spirit, he has, as its often re-elected President, ever 
had the interests of this Society closely at heart ; and I think that all of 
us who can appreciate his attainments, and who have observed his earnest 
interest in all Science, and his devotion to the good of this Society, must have 
felt that in him we have had a really strong and safe man at the wheel. 
I for one, Sir, should be very sorry to think that such a man should be 
allowed to pass away from our midst, without some permanent Memorial of 
him being in the possession of this Society. Whilst therefore I now speak 
un-preparedly and in a manner quite unworthy of my subject, I beg very 
strongly to suggest that it would well become the Asiatic Society of Bengal 
to have, in this room, some Memorial of Dr. Oldham ; and I hope that the 
Council, on behalf of the Society, may be pleased to take the initiative, so 
that we may, ere long, have a picture or a bust of the distinguished man 
who (I much regret to think) is amongst us this evening for the last time. 

The Chaieman" remarked that the proposals of the last speaker were 
most congenial to his own feelings, and he should hail with the utmost satis- 
faction any movement which would tend to give the Society a fitting Memo- 
rial of the late President who had done so much for the Society. As it 



1876.] Election of new Fresident. ' 73 

appeared to be tiiewish of the meeting that such a course should be pursued, 
he felt sure that the Council would take the necessary steps for raising 
by subscription among the members of the Society, a sufficient sum for a 
bust or portrait of Dr. Oldham to perpetuate his memory in the Society. 

The vacancy thus caused, had had the anxious consideration of the 
Council, and as it was found difficult to find a suitable successor to Dr. Oldham, 
from amongst gentlemen, who were altogether permanent residents in Cal- 
cutta, it had been determined to elect as President for the current year, the 
Hon'ble E. C. Bayley, C. S. I., who had kindly consented to act and to 
watch over the interests of the Society, although he of necessity must be 
absent from Calcutta for several months. 

The Council reported that in consequence of the approaching departure 
from India of Dr. Oldham, Colonel J. E. Gastrell, Messrs. L. Schwendler, 
E. Gay, and C. H. Tawney, they had nominated Col. J. F. Tennant, R. E., 
Pr. D. B. Smith, Messrs. H. B. Medlicott, T. S. Isaac, and W. T. Blanford 
as Members of the Council. Also they had appointed Mr. H. B. Medlicott, 
Treasurer of the Society, and Dr. T. E. Lewis as a Trustee of the Indian 
Museum on behalf of the Society in place of Col. J. E. Gastrell. 

The Chairman said that it was a great matter of regret that the 
Society was losing this year so many of its valued working members in con- 
sequence of their departure from India. To Colonel Gastrell, who was on 
the point of departure, and to Dr. Partridge who had already gone, the 
thanks of the Society were eminently due for very long and most impor- 
tant services rendered as Office-bearers. Colonel Gastrell, whose period of 
Government service had expired, had been a member of Council for 11 years 
out of the 17 years of his membership, and during 8 of these 11 years he had 
acted as Treasurer of the Society, a most responsible office, and it would be 
difficult to find a successor on the Council who would devote hunself more 
closely to the interests of the Society. Dr. Partridge also had been a valued 
member of the Council during 10 years of his membership, and had 
attended the meetings whenever the requirements of his professional duties 
would permit. Both these gentlemen, the Chairman was sure, left India 
with the best wishes and thanks of the Society, and he would therefore pro- 
pose that the thanks of the Society should be tendered to Col. Gastrell and 
Dr. Partridge for their long and valuable services to the Society, 

The motion was carried unanimously. 

The Chaiemajst then informed the meeting that the negociations with 
the Government of India on the subject of tlie future acconmiodation of the 
Society, had been actively pursued and completed since the last meeting, when 
a summary of the proposals of the Government was laid before the Society 



7i Accommodation of the Sooiefy. [Apeil, 

by their late President. The Government had paid the sum of Rs. 1,50,000 
as compensation to the Society for the abandonment of their claun to 
the accommodation in the New Museum Building, which was provided 
under Act XVII of 1866, and the Society would therefore continue to 
occupy their old premises. A formal Deed of Release had been drawn up 
by the Government Law Officers and had been signed on behalf of the Society 
by the whole of the Members of the Council present in Calcutta, in their 
collective capacity. A new Bill had also been drawn up and brought before 
the Legislative Council to meet the altered circumstances of the case. The 
Chairman thought the meeting wotild agree with him, in deeming these 
arrangements altogether satisfactory, and conducive to the real interests of 
the Society. The money had been invested to the best advantage in 5|- per 
cent. Government Securities,* and would form a capital yielding an income 
which would ensure the future prosperity of the Society and greatly facili- 
tate the successful management and working of its affairs. 

The Meeting were doubtless aware that the removal of the collections, 
and the long use the Trustees of the Museum had made of the present 
premises, had left the Society's projDerty in a very deteriorated state, and 

* Particulars of Grovermnent Securities purchased by the Asiatic Society of Bengal, 



deposited for safe 


custody 


in. the Bank of Bengal, April 3rd, 


1876. 








Register No. 






Description. 






Amoimt. 




8268 


b\ Per Ct.No. 


009505/7144 of 59/60 


Es. 


500 








8269 


5) 


)) 


003890/002922 of 


)) 


)) 


10,000 








8270 


11 


)) 


/4523 of 


11 


11 


800 








8271 


11 


)) 


007396/6078 of 


n 


11 


3,500 








8272 


11 


)) 


043655 of 


11 


11 


10,000 








8273 


11 


)) 


043654 of 


11 


11 


10,000 








8274 


11 


)) 


043653 of 


11 


11 


10,000 








8275 


11 


)) 


043652 of 


11 


11 


10,000 








8276 


11 


11 


043651 of 


11 


11 


10,000 








8277 


11 


)i 


043882/043538 of 


11 


11 


1,000 








8278 


11 


11 


043881/043537 of 


11 


11 


1,000 








8279 


1} 


11 


043535/042783 of 


11 


11 


1,000 








8280 


11 


11 


043534/ „ of 


11 


11 


1,000 








8281 


11 


11 


043894/043518 of 


11 


)) 


6,000 








8282 


11 


11 


040385/007484 of 


11 


11 


10,000 








8283 


11 


11 


040384/ „ of 


11 


11 


10,000 








8284 


11 


11 


040377/ „ of 


11 


11 


10,000 








8285 


11 


11 


040376/ „ of 


11 


11 


10,000 








8286 


11 


11 


040375 ' „ of 


)) 


11 


10,000 








8287 


11 


11 


038223/035082 of 


11 


11 


10,000 








8288 


11 


11 


029129/006278 of „ 

Total Rupees 


>j 


10,000 










1,43,800 









1876.] Accommodation of the Society. ■ 75 

it would now be absolutely essential to put the entire building into a state 
of thorough repair, and to effect such alterations and improvements, as 
were obviously necessary for furtherance of the objects of the Society and 
the increased comfort and advantage of its Members. 

To this end it would be necessary to expend some small portion of the 
new capital, so as to render the Society's Premises really efficient, conxEort- 
able and appropriate. A Sub-Committee had been appointed by the 
Council to suggest and superintend the carrying out of the required changes, 
and it was hoped that whatever might be determined on, would be carried 
out before the nest cold season. 

The Secretary then read the Deed of Release, as below, and the motion 
of the Chairman that the Meeting should accept and confirm the action of 
the Council was carried unanimously. 

Deed of Eelease. 

Dated this 30th day of March, 1876. 

The CoTHsrciL of the Asiatic Society oe Bej^gaI/. 

To the Secretary of State for Isdia in Coiotcil. 

W[}i% Jlntumture, made the thirtieth day of March, one thousand eight 
hundred and seventy six, Between Thomas Oldham, LL. D., President ; 
Babtj Rajendralala Mitra LL. D., The Honorable Edward Clive 
Bayley, C. S. L, C. S., and Colonel Henry Edward Landor Thuillier, 
R. A., C. S. I., (Vice-Presidents) ; Colonel James Eardley Gastrell, 

B. S. C, Louis Schwendler, Esquire, Henry Blochmann, Esquire, M. A., 
Captain James Waterhouse, B. S. C, James Wood-Mason, Esquire, 
Timothy Richards Lewis, Esquire, M. B., James O'Kinealy, Esquire, 

C. S., Babit Prannath Pandit, Walter Kerr Waller, Esquii-e, M.D., 
Charles Henry Tawney, Esquire, M.A., and Edward Gay, Esquire, 
M. A., Members of the Council of the Asiatic Society of Bengal of the 
one part, and the Secretary of State for India in Council of the other 
part, Whereas the said Asiatic Society of Bengal is a Voluntary Society the 
affairs financial and otherwise of which are regulated, administered and 
directed by a Council selected annually by the said Society. And Whereas 
upon the second day of February one thousand eight hundred and seventy- 
six, the said Tliomas Oldham, LL. D. Avas duly elected President of the 
said Society and Bdhu Hdj endraldla JMitra, LL. D., The Ilonorahle Edward 
Clive Bayley, C. S., C S. L, and Colonel Henry Edward Landor TlmiUier, 
M. A., C. S. J., Vice-Presidents, and Colonel James Eardley Gastrell, B. S. C, 
Louis Schvendler, Esquire, Henry Blochmann, Esquire, M. A., Cajptain 
James Waterhouse, B. iS. C, James Wood-Mason, Esquire, Timothy Bichards 
Lewis, Esquire, M. B., James O'Kinealy, Esquire, C. S., Bdhu Prannath 



76 Accommodation of the Society/. [Apeil, 

Pandit, Walter Kerr Waller, Esquire, M. D., Charles Henry Taioney, 
Esquire, M. A., and Edward Oay, Esquire, M. A., Council. And Whereas 
by Act XVII. of 1866, joassed by the Governor General 6£ India in Council 
it was amongst other things enacted that the Governor General in Council 
should cause to be erected at the expense of the Government of India a 
suitable btiilding in Calcutta to be devoted in part to collections illustrative 
of Indian Archaeology and of the several branches of Natural History, in 
part to the preservation and exhibition of other objects of interest, whether 
historical, physical, or economical, in part to the records and offices of the 
Geological Survey of India and in part to the fit accommodation of the 
Asiatic Society of Bengal, and to the reception of their Library, Manu- 
scripts, Maps, Coins, Busts, Pictures, Engravings, and other property. And 
it was also enacted that the said Trustees should have the exclusive pos- 
session, occupation, and control for the purposes of such trusts of the said 
building, other than those portions thereof which upon its completion 
should be set apart by the said Trustees for the records and offices of the 
said Geological Survey and for the accommodation of the said Asiatie 
Society and the reception of their Library, Manuscri]Dts, Maps, Coins, Busts, 
Pictures, Engravings, and other property ; And it was also enacted that the 
Coimcil of the said Asiatic Society should cause the collections belonging 
to such Society, and illustrative of Indian Archaeology and the several 
branches of Natural History, and all additions that might be made thereto, 
to be removed to and deposited in the said building at the expense of the 
Government of India as soon as the same should be completed as far to be 
in condition to receive the said collections, and that the said Society should 
continue to have the same exclusive right, property in, and control over their 
Library, Manuscripts, Maps, Coins, Busts, Pictures, and Engravings which 
they then possessed, and that the Council of the said Society should have the 
exclusive jjossession, occupation, and control for the purposes of the said 
Society, of those portions of the said building which should be set apart 
for the accommodation of the said Society and the reception of their 
Library and other property thereinbefore mentioned. And whereas in con- 
sideration of a sum of Rupees one hundred and fifty thousand to be paid 
to them by the Government of India the Council of the said Society has 
agreed on behalf of the said Society to relinquish and give up all right to 
the possession, occupation, and control secui'ed to them by the said Act of 
the portions of the said building which xmder the said Act were to be set 
apart for the accommodation of the said Society and the reception of their 
said Library and other property. Noio this Indenture loiinesseth that in 
pursuance of the said Agreement and in consideration of the sum of 
Rupees one-hundred and fifty thousand at or before the execution of these 
presents paid by the Secretary of State for India in Council to the parties 



1876.] moUczTca Memorial. 77 

hereto of the first part (the reeei|)t whereof they herehy acknowledge) . 
They the said parties hereto of the fio-st part for themselves and for the 
said Society do hereby release and for ever discharge the said Secretary of 
State for India in Council and his successors of, from and against all right, 
title and interest, claims and demands which the said Society has, or may 
have, to the possession, occupation and control secured to them under the 
provisions of Act XVII of 1866 of the Governor General of India in 
Council, or in any other manner of and over any portion or portions of the 
Indian Museum situate in Chowringhee Road, which under the said Act 
was or were to he set apart for the accommodation of the said Society and 
the reception of their Library, Manuscripts, Maps, Coins, Busts, Pictures and 
Engravings and other property. In witness lohereof Vae. said parties to these 
presents have heremito set and subscribed their hands and seals the day and 
year first above written. 

Signed, Sealed and Delivered by Thomas Oldham, (Seal) 

the above-named Tliomas Oldham, Eajekdealala Mitea, (Seal) 

IRdjendralala Mitra, Edward Olive E. C. Batlet, - (Seal) 

Bayley, Henry Edioard Landor H.E.L. Thuilliee, Col., R.A. (Seal) 
Thuillier, James JEardley Gastrell, James E. Gasteell, (Seal) 

Louis Scliwendler, Henry Blochnann, Loms Schwen'dlee, (Seal) 

James Waterhouse, James Wood- H. Blochmaishst, (Seal) 

Mason, James O'Kinealy, PrannatTi J. Wateehouse, (Seal) 

Pandit, Walter Kerr Waller, OJiarles James Wood-Mason, (Seal) 

Henry Tawney, and JEdward Gay, J. O'KrNEALT, (Seal) 

in the presence of Peannath Paistdit, (Seal) 

O. J, Melittjs, Waltee Keee Wallee, (Seal) 

Articled Olerh to Messrs. Berners Chaeles H. Tawiv'et, (Seal) 

and Oo., Solicitors, Oalcidta. E. Gat, (Seal) 

We do hereby certify that the above paper writing is a true coj^y of 

the Original Deed of Release of Avhich it purports to be a Copy, the same 

having been examined by us herewith. Dated this 1st day of April, 1876. 

O. J. Melitus, 
Art. Olerh to Messrs. Berners Sf Co., Sol., Oalcutta. 
Wm. D'Ceuz, 
Clerk to Messrs. Berners Sf Co. 

The Chaieman announced that Dr. S. B. Partridge and Col. Gastrell 
had become Life Members of the Society by paying the fee of Rs. 100 
imder the terms of Rule 14. 

The Seceetaet read extracts from letters from Dr. Day, Mr. 
Grote, and Dr. Dobson relating to the Stoliczka Memorial, and submitted a 
.statement of the account up to date. 



78 StoliezTca Ilemorial. [Apktl, 

From Me. F. Dat, dated lUh January, 1876. 

Dear Sir, — A meeting o£ the Committee of the Stoliczka Memorial 
Fund was held in London on Wednesday last (January 12th) when your 
letters o£ December were laid before it. 

It was annoimced that the sculptor Mr. Geflowski was stiU williag to 
undertake the bust at the terms formerly communicated by Mr. G-rote. 

It was unanimously resolved to place the execution of the bust in Mr. 
Geflowski's hands. 

Should there be sufficient funds there wiU be no difficulty in obtaining 
a pedestal of the description desired by the Calcutta Committee. 

'From Me. Geote, dated January \Mli. 

" Day and Duka met at my rooms here yesterday and we decided on giv- 
ing Geflowski the commission for Stoliczka's biist. He undertakes it for 
100 guineas of which I shall have to pay him a moiety on completion of 
his model. Geflowski's reputation is rising daily and he has been selected 
over the heads of Woolner and Noble to make the Fairbairn statue for Man- 
chester. This is a job of 850 guineas. As Day is leaving London he has 
asked me to do his share of the Committee's work. He insists on making 
no charge on the fund for his printing and other charges. I shall have to 
discount your bill on the Oriental Bank should Geflowski complete his 
model before the 25th March. This he will probably do, though his work 
will have to wait till Dickinson can sjDare the photos." 

" As regards the sums collected here, your memo, enclosed in said let- 
ter makes me out to have received £96, whereas I have only realised £76, 
apparently nothing more will be coming in here." 

" As to the pedestal, there wiU be no difficulty in providing one here if 
you can afford the expense. Lately I paid £18 for a pedestal, the freight 
i&c, would amount to perhajDS £5 more. Oldham, I should think, would sug- 
gest to you some local material which would connect his friend's name and 
memorywith his professional labours and which would be less costly than 
a pedestal dispatched from this country." 

From De. G. E. Dobson, dated 19t7i February. 

" As I came through London I saw Mr. Dickinson who is painting Sto- 
liczka's j)ortrait : it is nearly finished, so nearly that he had only to paint in 
some accessory things when I saw it.* I was much pleased with it, and I 
think the subscribers will also be well pleased. The bust I did not see, the 
model was not completed but soon will be, I will endeavour to go to town 
to see it. I would suggest that Woodbury or Carbon-type somewhat en- 
larged copies of the photograph from which the j)ainting is being made, be 

* In a letter just received from Mr. Grote, dated 30tli March, he says that the 
picture is finished and is undergoing visits of criticism from memhers of the Committee 
and other fiiends of Stoliczka. 



1876.] E.. B. Shaw — On the Glialcliah Languages. 79 

made and distributed one to every subscriber if tbe funds will admit. If 
they do not admit, then I propose that those who wish for an enlarged copy 
of that photograph printed in permanent pigments agree together to 
bear the expense of having it done. About 1200 copies Woodbury-type 
prints coidd be made for £5 ; certainly each copy would not cost threepence 
to each member." 

Account Statement Stoliczlca Memorial Fund. 
Total subscrij)tion realized in India, .. . ... .. Rs. 2,746 

„ unrealized „ ... ... ... „ 126 



Rs. 2,872 
Deduct Printing Expenses,... ... Rs. 112 15 

„ Remitted to London by draft, £150 „ 1,664 11 10 1,777 10 10 



English value of Balance available, at 1/9^, 
Total subscription in England, 
Remitted to England, 



Estimated cost of Painting with frame, 
packing and freight, ... ... £ 

Estimated cost of Bust, packing, and freight, „ 

Balance available for cost of Pedestal (£23), 
and permanent photographs, as suggested 
byDr. Dobsou, ... ... ... „ 6114 6 

£ 321 14 6 



in India, Rs. 1,094 5 


2 


...£ 95 14 
„ 76 

... „ 150 


6 




£ 321 14 


6 


140 
120 





The following papers were read : 
1. On the Ghalchah {WaJcM and SarikoU) Languages. — Bg R. B. Shaw, 
Esq., Political Agent, late on .special dutg at Kdshghar. 
(Abstract.) 

The author in this paper gives an account of the Ghalchah dialects, 
viz., those spoken by the tribes living in the valleys on the head- waters of the 
Oxus, north of the Hindu-Kush ; dialects which belong to the Persic branch 
of the Arian family ; and traces some radical affinities between them and the 
Dardu dialects spoken on the south of the Hindu-Kush Range, and which 
belong to the Indie branch. It is argued from these affinities that Ghalchahs 
and Dards must at one time have lived together not far from their })rosent 



80 J. Wood- Mason — New B,odent from Central Asia. [Afril, 

habitations and have formed part o£ one people who must have at that ear- 
ly period spoken a tongue neither distinctly Persian nor distinctly Indian, 
but containing in itself germs of both forms. 

As a chain of dialects connects on the one side the Dards with the 
Hindi speakers of the Panjab, and on the other the Ghalchahs with the 
Iranian populations of Central Asia and Persia, the two lines culminating 
and meeting at the Hindu-Kush watershed j it is suggested that per- 
haps they mark the tracks by which Indians and Persians migrated to 
their present seats ; and that Ghalchahs and Dards are perhaps the direct 
descendants of that portion of the Indo-Persic race which remained near 
its early home. Also that although the dialectic tendencies which 
resulted in the formation of the two distinct languages, Persian and Hindi, 
have operated on Ghalchah and Dardu respectively, yet the nautual resem- 
blances still subsisting between them indicate that the ancestors of the 
tribes speaking those dialects must have remained together till a later 
period than the other members of the two great branches of the Arian 
family, the Persic and the Indie. 

2. Description of a new 'Rodent from Central Asia. — 
£i/ James Wood-Mason, Esq. 

Nesokia Scullti. 

Fur fine and silky ; above pale fawn-coloured paling on the sides ; below, 
on the insides of the limbs, on the throat, lips, and cheeks, whitish : the hairs 
of the back bemg very dark slaty tipped with very pale favra, and those of 
the under parts much paler slaty tijDped with whitish. Face brownish grey. 
On the back, especially on the sacral region, some hairs longer but hardly 
coarser than the rest represent the coarse, flattened, spindle-shaped, grooved, 
and projecting bristle-like ones observed in Spalacomi/s ( = JVesokia) In- 
diaus and some other species : these hairs have a dark brown or blackish 
ring intervening between the slaty basal and the pale fawn apical portion. 
One or two of the vibrissas reach the bases of the ears, two or three of them 
are black to the tips, most of them are tipped with white, a fringe of short 
stiff silvery ones on the upper lips. Ears short, scarcely projecting beyond 
the fm', all but naked, being sparsely clothed with an inconspicuous lanugo. 
Hands and feet flesh coloured, with a scanty covering of short hairs. Tail 
without a smgle hair, shorter than the body, obscurely scaled, the scales 
arranged, as usual, in rings. 

The Turki name for the animal is ' Mioglii.'' 

Length from tip of the snout to the base of tail, . 168 millims. 

Length of tail, 132 „ 

,, „ ears (at back), ..... 12 „ 

Breadth „ „ (convex curvature), .... 11 „ 



1876.] F. S. Growse — Prologue to the Bdmdyana. 81 

Length of hand to tip o£ middle finger, ... 23 niillims. 
„ „ foot „ „ „ „ toe, ... 43 „ 

„ „ skull with incisors, . . . .48 „ 

Interzygomatic breadth (at posterior root of zygoma), 28 „ 

The first two of the above measurements were taken by Dr. Scully on 
the dead body of the animal and have been converted by me from English 
inches into millimetres. 

Hab. a single male specimen was captured on June 11th, 1875, at 
Sanju in Kashgharia, by Dr.. J. Scully, the author of a valuable contribution 
to our knowledge of the avifauna of Central Asia, and has since been 
presented by him to the Indian Miiseum. 

This species is at once distinguished from NesoJcia Huttoni and Spala- 
comys ( = Nesokia) Indicus of Peters* (which latter will in all probability 
turn out to be identical with one of the insufficiently described species of 
the genus) by the quality of the fur, by the totally naked condition and 
proportional length of the tail, by the greater length of the hands and feet, 
and by the greater size and breadth of the skull, mandible, and teeth. 

P. S. — In NesoJcia Huttoni the incisors are much broader and thicker 
in males than in females. 



8. The Frologiie to the Mdmdyamt of Tulsi Das. — By P. S. Geowse, 

M. A., B. C. S. 

(Abstract.) 

The author states in the preface that the Ram-charit-manas, common- 
ly called the Eamayana, of Tulsi Das of Soron, was commenced in 1575 A. D. 
at Ayodhya (Awadh). The work is not a Hindi translation of the an- 
cient Sanskrit Eamayana. The general plan and the management of the 
incidents are necessarily much the same, but there is a difference in the 
touch in every detail ; and the two poems vary as widely as any two dramas 
on the same mythological subject by two different Greek tragedians. 

The Prologue, of which Mr. Growse has given a translation, consists of 
54 dohas, and is a valuable resume of popular Hindu theology and metaphy- 
sics. Tulsi Das's vindication of himself against his critics is a curious fea- 
ture. They attacked him for lowering the dignity of the subject by cloth- 
ing it in the vidgar vernacular ; but though his defence did not please the 
professional Sanskrit Pandits, the book is in every one's hands. 

The translation of the Prologue is submitted ag a specimen of Mr, 
Growse's translation of the whole work, which is now in progress. 



* ' Uehor oinigo mcrkwiirdigc Niigethicre des Konigl. Zoologischcn Museums', 
Abhandl. der Konigl. Akad, der Wisscnscli., Ikrliu, 1860, p. 139 cl scqq. 



82 Library. [Apeil, 

Mr. Blochmann read several portions of Mr. Growse's paper. He said 
that the Prologue commenced, as usual, with an invocation of the Goddess 
of Sj^eeeh, to which he might compare the custom of Muhammadan Mas- 
nawi writers to add to the preface of epics a chapter on the ta'rif i suhhan, 
which custom had become de rigueur since the time of Nizami. He was much 
struck with Mr. Growse's translation of the 17th doha : it reminded him of 
the Bhagawat Gita controversy, and was an additional proof that religious 
thought repeats itself, and that it was not difficult to cull passages from 
Hindu works that bear the most striking similarity to passages of the New 
Testament, though the authors could not be supposed to have been acquaint- 
ed with Jewish or Christian writings. The passage he referred to was the 
following : 

There is one God, passionless, formless, uncreated, the universal soul, the supreme 
spirit, the all-pervading, whose shadow is the world ; who has hecome incarnate and 
done many things, only for the love that he bears to his faithful people, &c., &c. 

He hoped that Mr. Growse would have leisure and strength to complete 
the great — he might say, national — work which he had comaiienced. Mr. 
Growse was well known both for the extent of his researches in Hindi folk- 
lore and philology, and for the classical taste that pervades his translations ; 
and there was no one better qualified to bring out a faithful and truly read- 
able version of Tulsi Das's Eamayana than Mr. Growse. 

The reading of the following paper was postponed — 

On Ancient Asiatic Firearms. By Major General E.. Maclagan, E. E. 



Library. 

The following additions have been made to the Library since the meet- 
ing held in March last. 

Transactions, Proceedings and Journals. 
Presented hy the respective Societies or Editors. 
Berlin. Konigliche Preussische Akademie der Wissenschaften. — Monats- 
bericht, December, 1875. 

/SVe^wews.— Messung der Fortpflanzungsgeschwindigkeit, der Electricitat in sus- 
pendirten Drahten. 
Birmingham. Institute of Mechanical Engineers. — Proceedings, Novem- 
ber, 1875. 

W. Daniel. — On Mechanical Ventilators for Mines. C. Cochrane. — On the Ultimate 
Capacity of Blast Furnaces. 
Bordeaux. Societe de Geographic Commerciale de Bordeaux. — Bulletin, 
No. I, 1874-75. 



1876.] Library. 83 

Boston. Society of Natural History. — Memoirs Vol. II, Pt. Ill, Nos. 4, 
5, and Pt. IV, No. 1. 

Pt. IV, No. 1. G. R. 0. Sacken. — Prodrome of a Monograph, of the Tanbaniclce 
of the United States. 

-. Proceedings, Vol. XVI, Pts. 3 and 4, Vol. XVII, 

Pts. 1 and 2. 

Vol. XVI, Pt. 3. L. F. Pourtales. — Eemarks on Crinoids. J. A. Allen. — 
• Metamorphism produced hy the burning of Lignite Beds. T. 31. Brewer. — 

Hybridism among the Ducks. T. S. Stmt. — Deposition of Clays. 
Pt. 4. 8. Kneelcmd, M. D. — Evidence for and against the existence of the so 

called Sea-serpent. Saimiel Wells. — A simple Heliostat. 
Vol. XVII, Pt. 1. A. Sijatt. — Genetic Eolations of the Angulatida. J. G. 

Sunt., M. D. — Contents of Mastodon's Stomach. 
Pt. 2. J. D. Dana. — Metamorphism and Pseudomorphism. A. Hyatt. —Hollow- 
fibred Homy Sponges. F. W. Putman. — Mammoth Cave Fishes. A. Hyatt. 
— Two new G-enera of Ammonites. Biological Eolations of Jtu-assic Ammoni- 
tes. E. Eathbun. — Cretaceous Lamellibranchs from near Pemambuco, Brazil. 
Bombay. The Indian Antiquary, Vol. V, Pt. 53. 

J. W. M'Crindle. — Translation of the Indica of Arrian, (Continued): Br. 6. 
Biihler. — Inscriptions from Kavi. Dr. F. Kielhorn. — The Nitimanjari of Dya 
Dviveda. 
Calcutta. The Christian Spectator, Vol. V, No. 58, April 1876. 

. The Eamayanam, Pt. 5, No. 5. 

. Geological Survey of India. — Eecords, Vol. IX, Pt. 1, 1876. 

.Annual Eeport of the Geological Survey of India, and of the Geological Museimi, 
Calcutta, for the year 1875. W. T. Blanford. — On the Geology of Sind. 
Leipsic. Kunde des Morgenlandes. Abhandlungen, Band. V, No. 4. 

Zur Sprache, Literatiir, und Dogmatik der Samaritaner. 
London. Chemical Society, — Journal, Ser. 2, Vol. XIII, November and 
December, 1875, Ser. 2, Vol. XIV, January, 1876. 

Vol. XIII, Nov. A. W. JHofmann. — The Faraday Lecture : The Life-work of 
Liebig in Experimental and Philosophic Chemistry ; with Allusions to his 
influence on the Development of the Collateral Sciences and of the Useful 
Arts. 
December. /. G. Brown. — On the Agriciiltural Chemistry of the Tea Planta- 
tions of India. 

■ . The Geographical Magazine, Vol. Ill, No. 3, March, 1876. 

E. G. Ravenstein, — Cameron's Eoute fi'om Lake Tanganyika to the west coast 
of Africa. G. B. Mar/cham. — The Irrigation of Fiiozpur. B. Ker. — Tho 
World's future Coal Depot. 

. Nature,— Vol. 13. Nos. 328 to 332. 

. Royal Astronomical Society, — Monthly Notices, Vol. 36, No. 3. 

On a new form of Solar Eyepiece by INIr. Chi-istie. 

. lioyal Geographical Society — Proceedings, Vol. XX, No. 1. 

. Royal Society,— Proceedings, Vol. XXIV, No. 165. 

R. von Willenioes-Suhm, Ph. P). — On tho development of Lcpus fnscicnlaris and 
the Archizoea of Cu-ripcdia. — Preliminary Eemarks on the development of somo 
Pelagic Decapods. 



84 Library. [Apiiit,, 

London. Statistical Society.— Journal, Vol. XXXVIII, Pt. 4, 1875. 
Moscow. Societe Imperiale des Naturalistes de Moscou, — Bulletin No. 2, 
1875. 

R. Hermann. — Untersuchungen iiLer die specifisclieii GewicMe fester Stoffe. 
A. Becker. — Eeise nach. dem Magi Dagh, Schalbus Dag und Basardjusi. V. 
Ilotschoulskif. — Enumeration des nouvelles especes de Coleopteres rapportea 
de ses voyages. 
Palermo. Societa degli Spettroscopisti Italiani, — Memorie, Dispensa, 12, 
Decembre, 1875, and Dispensa, I, Grennaio, 1876. 

Dispensa 12, 1875. F. A. Secchi. — Recenti licerche intomo alia distribuzione del 
calore sul disco Solare. II nuovo Osservatorio di Calcutta. Bordi solari 
osservati da A. Secchi e P. Tacchini nel giugno e luglio, 1874. J. A. G. 
Oudemans.- — Sur une meillure methode pour faire les mesures heliometriques a 
I'occasion d'un passage de Venus sur le soleil. 
Dispensa 1, 1876. F. Tacchini. — Statistica delle eruzioni solari osservate a Pa- 
leiTao nel 1871. — Osservazioni Spettroscopiclie del sole fatte nel 1875 dal, 
prof. BrecUchin, direttore della Specola di Mosca. — Notizie di Calcutta. 
Paris. Societe de Geographic, — Bulletin, Fevrier, 1876. 

I'Ahbe Arniand David. — Second voyage d' exploration dans I'ouest de la Chine 
1868, a 1870, (suite). 
Pisa. Societa Toscana di Scienze Natural!, — Atti, Vol. II, fasc. I. 
Trieste. Societa Adriatica di Scienze Naturali, — BoUettino, Nro. 7, Decem- 
bre, 1875. 

Dr. B. Biasoletto. — L'acido rosolico come indicatore della quantita di acido car- 
bonico neir aria. Dr. Stenta. — Notizie risguardanti i bacini del Caspio e dell 
'Ai-al. 



EooKS AND Pamphlets 

Presented hy the Autliors. 

Atkestson, Edwin T. Economic Products of the North-Western Provin- 
ces, Pt. I, — Gums and Gum-Eesins. 

Beahamabea-TA Samadhtati. Samaveda Sanhita Kauthumi Sakha, Vol. 
I, Pts. 1 to 3. — Srimadbaghavatam, with Commentary. Sridharasvami, 
Pts. 1 to 3, and 5 to 8. 

PiCKEEnsTG, Charles, M. D. Chronological Observations on Introduced 
Animals and Plants, Pt. I. 

Theobald, W. Descriptive Catalogue of the Reptiles of British India. 

M.ISCELLANEOUS PRESENTATIONS. 

Report on the Food-grain Supply and Statistical Review of the Relief 
Operations ^n the Distressed Districts of Behar and Bengal during the Fa- 
mine of 1873-74. 

Report on the Financial Results of the Excise Administration in the 
Lower Provinces for the year 1874-75. 



1876.] Library. 85 

Report on the Land Revenue Administration o£ tlie Lower Provinces 
for the year 1S74.-75. 

GoveejS'ment of Bengal. 

General E,ej)ort on the Revenue Survey Operations of the Upper and 
Lower Circles for 1874-75, by Colonel J. E. Gastrell and Lieut.-Col. J. 
Macdonald. 

SUPEEHS'TEKDENT REVENUE SlIEVET. 

Synopsis of the Results of the Operations of the Great Trigonometrical 
Survey of India, Vol. VI, (dupHcate), by Col. J. T. Walker, R. E. 

Reventje Dept. Govt, of IjSodia. 
Report on the Judicial Administration (Criminal) of the Central Pro- 
vinces for 1875. 

Chief Commissioistie, Centeal Peovinces. 
Tagore Law Lectures, 1874-75. The Law relating to the Land Tenures 
of Lower Bengal. By A. Phillips, M. A. 

Registeae, Calcutta Uiote^sity. 

Fifty-sixth Annual Report of the Board of Public Education for the 
year 1874. 

Annual Report of the Board of Regents of the Smithsonian Institution 
for 1873. 

Contributions to the Annals of Medical Progress and Medical Educa- 
tion in the United States before and during the War of Independence, by 
Joseph, M. Toner, M. D. 

Report on the Chemistry of the Earth. By T. S. Hunt, LL. D. (4 
copies) . 

Memoir of C. T. P. von Martins. By Charles Ran, (4 copies). 

Smithsonian Institute. 

Monthly RejDorts of the Department of Agriculture for 1874. 

Dept. of Ageicultuee of the U. S. Ameeica. 

Purchas his Pilgrimage or Relations of the World, and the Religions 
observed in all ages and places discovered from the Creation unto this pre- 
sent, 1614, 

E. Gat, Esq. 

Ithaf-ulnubala il-muttaqin bi-ih3\4i maasir ilfuqaha ilmuhaddisin. 
Alhitta fi zikr il9ihah il-Sittah. Taj uliqbal Tarikh i riyasat i Bhopal (Per- 
sian), ditto ditto (Urdu). Luqtat xil'ajalan. Rihlat u99idiq ila-lbait 
il'atiq. Qitf iil-samar. Alintiqad uh-ajih fi sharh il-i'tiqad il9ahih. Hu^iil 
id mamul 'ilm il-u^iil. Iksir fi U9UI iltafsir. 

Nawab Sattid Slddiq Hasan Khan Bahadue, of Bhopal. 



86 Library. [April, 

Periodicals Purchased. 

B erlin. Journal f lir die reine iind angewandte Matliematik, Band 82, Heft II. 

L. Fuchs. — TJelDer die linearen Differentialgieicliuiigen zweiter Ordntmg welche 

algebraische Integrale besitzen, und eine neue Anwendung der Invarianten- 

th.eorie. T. Gaspaery. — Die KrummuiLgsmittelpmiktsflache des elliptischen 

Paraboloids. 

Bombay. Bombay Branch of the Eoyal Asiatic Society, — Vol. XI, No. 
32, 1875. 

Br. J. G. Buhler. — Additional Eemarks on tbe Age of the Naishadiya. J. G. 
Ba Cunha. — An Historical and Archaeological Sketch of the Island of Angedi- 
va. Eon. Mdo-Sdheb V. N. ManclUh. — Three "Walabhi Copper Plates with 
Remarks. 

Calcutta. Calctitta Eeview, — No. 124, April, 1876. 

. The Indian Medical Gazette,— Vol. XI, No. 4. 

. . Stray Feathers,— Vol. IV, Nos. I, II, and III. 

J. ScitUi/. — A Contribution to the Ornithology of Eastern Turkestan. C. T, 
Bingham. — Anastomics Oscitans. 

Gottingen. Gottingische gelehrte Anzeigen, Nos. 3, 4. Nachrichten. 
No. 25 and No. 1, 1876. 
No. I, Noldeke. — Karkemisch, Cixcesium, und andre Euphrat-Ubergange. 

London. The Academy,— Nos. 198 to 202, 1876. 

. Annals and Magazine of Natural History, — Vol. 17, No. 98. 

Prof. Allmcm. — Descriptions of some new Species of Hydroicla fi-om Kerguelen's 
Island. /. Wood-3Iason. — A Conspectus of the Species of Faratelpliusa, an 
Indo-Malayan Genus of Freshwater Crabs. M. E. Bugnion. — On the Vermi- 
nous Pneumonia of Domestic Animals. M. P. Carbonnier. — Nidification of 
the Indian Eainbow Fish. M. 0. Grimm. — On the Scientific Exploration of 
the Caspian Sea. Formation of Nitrites by Bacteria. 

. Concholo^ia Indica, — Pts. 7 and 8. 



No.- 7. Diplommatina. Paludomus. Helix. Megalomastoma. Eaphaulus. 
Streptaulus, HeUcina. Clostophis. Pterocyclos, including Spiraculum, &c. Craspe- 
dotropis. Jerdonia. Lagocheilus. Cyathopoma. Mychopoma and Ditropis. Navi- 
cella. Corbicula. Leptopoma. Pterocyclos. 

No. 8. Cyclophorus. Alycseus. Omphalotropis. Cataulus. Cyathopoma. 
Cremnoconchus. Sophina. Hypselostoma. Bulimus. Hehx. Planorbis. Amnicola. 
Bithinia. Viti-ina. Melania. Unio. Corbicula, Cyclas. Pisidium. Tricula. Acha- 
tina. Coilostele. Pupa. Streptaxis. Navicella. Neritina. Caniptoceras. Limnrea. 
Succinea. Helix. Clausilia. 

. . The Edinburgh Eeview,— No. 291, January, 1876. 

The Suez Canal. 
. The Ibis, 3rd Series, Vol. V, No. 20, October 1875 and Vol. VI, 



No. 21, January 1876. 

Vol. V, No. 20. W. V. Legge.—On the Birds of the South-Eastern Subdivi- 
sion of Southern Ceylon. B, Swinhoe. — On the contents of a second Box of 



1876.] Library. 87 

Birds from Hakodadi, in Nortliern Japan. Arthur, Viscount Walden. — Notes 
on Birds from Burma. Dr. N, Severtzoff. — Notes on some new Central Asia- 
tic Birds. 
Vol. VI. No. 21. R. Boivdler ShariJe. — Contributions to the Ornithology of 
Borneo. H. E. Dresser. — Notes on Sevei-tzoff's " Fauna of Tiu'kestan." 
London. The London, Edinburgh and Dublin Philosophical Magazine, 5th 
Series, Vol. I, No. 2. 

E. EcUund. — Experimental Proof that the Resistance to Galvanic Conduction is 
dependent on the Motion of the Conductor. 

■ . The Quarterly Review, No. 281, January 1876. 

Modem Methods in Navigation and Nautical Astronomy. 

. Society of Arts,— Journal, Vol. 24, 1209 to 1212. 

New Haven, U. S. The American Journal of Science and Arts, Vol. X, No. 
60, Vol. XI, No. 61. 

No, 60. S. P. Langley. — The Solar Atmosphere ; an introduction to an ac- 
count of researches made at the Allegheny Observatory. P. S. Storer. — 
Ammonia a constant contaminant of Sulj)huric Acid. 
No. 61. E, Loomis, — Contributions to Meteorology. H. A. Rotvland. — Stu- 
dies on Magnetic Distribution. 
Paris. Annales de Chiaiie et de Physique, 5me Serie, Vols. IV, V, VI. 

Vol. V. MM. P. Champion, S. Pellet, et M. Grenier. — Application de I'elec- 
tricite a 1' inflammation des foumeaux de mine, torpilles &c., et a I'industrie 
miniere. M. Boussingault. — 'Etudes siu' la transformation du fer en acier 
par la cementation. M. H. Miintz. — Siu^ les ferments chimiques et physiolo- 
giques. M. C. Dr. Jeannel. — Note relative a 1' influence des racines des vege- 
taux vivants sur la putrefaction. 

. Comptes Rendus, Tome 82, Nos. 1 to 4, 1876. 

No, 1. M. J. Jamin. — Sur la constitution interieure des aimants. M. Th. du 

Moncel. — Seizieme Note sur la conductibilite electrique des corps mediocre- 

ment conducteurs. M. A. Crova. — Eecherches sur la loi de transmission par 

I'atmosphere terrestre des radiations calorifiques du Soleil. 

No. 2. M. J. M. Gaugain. — Influence de la trempe sur I'aimantation. M. 

Gaumet. — Sur un telemetre de poche a double reflexion. 
No. 3. M. A. Miintz. — Transformations du Sucre de canne dans les sucres 
bruts et dans la canne a sucre. MM. Aimd Girard et Lahorde. — Sur I'inacti- 
vite optique du sucre reducteur contenu dans les produits commerciaiix. 
Paris. Journal des Savants, December, 1875. 

. Melanges d'Ai-cheologie Egyptieune et Assyrienne, Tome II, 

3e Fas. 



— . Eevue Archeologique, Janvier, 1876. 

— . Revue Critique d'Histoire et de Litterature. — Nos. 1 to 5, 1876. 

No. 1. Co well. — Introduction au Prakiit des di'amos. 

No. 5. Childcrs. — Dictionnaire de la langiio Pali. 
— . Revue des Deux Mondes, Tome 13, Pts. 2 and rS, 



PROCEEDINGS 



OP THE 



ASIATIC SOCIETY OF BENGAL, 

For M.AY, 1876. 



Tlie Monthly Greneral Meeting of the Society was held on Wednesday 
the 3rd May, at 9 o'clock, p. m. 

W. T. Blanford, Esq., Vice-President, in the Chair. 

The minntes of the last Meeting were read and confirmed. 

The following presentations were announced — 

1. From the Grovernment of India, Home Department, a set of photo- 
graphs of the paintings at the Adjanta Caves in the Bombay Presidency. 

2. From the author, a copy of a work entitled — " The Travels of 
Gruru Tegh Bahadur and Gruru Grobind Sing. Translated from the original 
Grurumukki by Sirdar Attar Sing, Chief of Bhadaur. 

3. From the author, a pamphlet entitled — " What is the correct term 
for God in Santhali ?" By the Eev. L. O. Skrefsrud. 

4. From the Manager, Basel Mission Book and Tract Depository 
Mangalore, a pamphlet entitled — " Ueber den Ursprung des Lingakultus". 
By F. Kittel. 

5. From Dr. J. Scully, a coj)y of his paper entitled — " A Contribu- 
tion to the Ornithology of Eastern Turkestan." 

The following gentlemen, duly proposed and seconded at the last Meet- 
ing, were elected ordinary members — 

Surgeon-Major A. F. Bradshaw, J. M. Lyall, Esq., A. M. Nash, Esq. 

The following are candidates for ballot at the next meeting. — 

Julius Behrendt, Esq., Professor, Dacca College, Dacca, proposed by 
Mr. H. Blochmann, seconded by Ca^^tain Waterhouse. 

J. F. Baness, Esq., Chief Draftsman, Surveyor Greneral's Office, proposed 
by Capt. Waterhouse, seconded by Mr. Blochmann. 

E.. Parry, Esq., Professor, Presidency College, Calcutta, proposed by 
Mr. Blochmann, seconded by Capt. J. Waterhouse. 



90 Coins from Kdshghar. [Mat, 

The following coins were exhibited at the meeting by Mr. Blochmann. 
(1) From Dr. J. Scully, 2 gold coins, 3 silver coins, 3 copper coins, 
from Kashghar, and sis pierced Chinese copper and brass coins, one of them 
large, about 1^ inch in diameter. 

Dr. Scully writes — ' The gold coins are called tilla [SIJs tild, gold] ; 
the Kashghar one is worth about Es. 5, and the Khoqand tilla about E,s. 
6-8-0. 

' The small Kashghar silver coins are called ' tanga', and 25 of these 
equal in value one tilla ; 5 tangas := 1 Rupee. 

' The large copper coin (Chinese) is not now in circulation in Eastern 
TurMstan ; it was said to equal four of the small Chinese copj)er coins. 

' The pierced Chinese copper coins are called ' Dachin' ; 25 of them 
= 1 tanga. They are the comnionest kind of coin met with in Kashgha- 
ria. The brass coins are also called ' Dachin', but are not now in circula- 
tion. The small Muhammadan copper coins are new ' Dachin', intended to 
supersede the old Chinese pattern.' 

Mr. BlochmajsTS" said — 

The Muhammadan gold, silver, and copper coins, presented by Dr. Scul- 
ly, have the following legends : 

Tlie Klwqand Tild — cy^s^ ^yLkl«) o.J|« j^ti^-j^l^j 

Bahadur Khan Sayyid Sultan Muhammad. 
(PA* "-^•J-ti-' ii->Jj.=>. &i.Jai»v>J(j|^ *rty^ 
Struck at the capital Khoqand, the pleasant. 

The Kdshghar Tild — I rs | ij^j^y-h <yi;Si ^^(kl.« 

Sultan 'Abdul 'Aziz Khan, A. H. 1291. 

Struck at the capital Kashghar, A. H. 1291. 

In both tilas, the legends are circular, and the margins have little 
crosses, dots, and arabesques. 

The Kdshghar Tanga. ^J^^_jij*-h <^•^■^ 
'Abdul 'Aziz Khan. 

Struck at Kashghar, the pleasant, A. H. 1291. 

The new Kdshghar I>achins. They have the same legend as the tanga ; 
but Kashghar has not the epithet of latif ' the pleasant'. The epithet is 
common on all Khoqand coins. 

The name of 'Abdul 'Aziz Khan, Sultan of Turkey, is given on the 
coins, because the present Ataliq of Kashghar does not feel strong enough 
to strike coins in his own name. 



1876.] 



Gold Coin of Ndgir-uddin Mahmud SMJi. 



91 



There is also a modern Persian silver piece among Dr. Scully's coins, 
which bears the legend — 

Sultan N'a9ir--uddiii Shah, the Kajar. 

Struck at Mashhad, the holy, A, H. 127*. 

(2.) From the Rey. M. Carleton, American Mission, Karnal, for exhibi- 
tion, a unique gold coin o£ Na9ir-uddin Mahmiid Shah (A. H. 614 to 664 ; 
A. D. 1246 to 1265). 

Mr. BLOCHMAJsnsr said — Mr. Thomas has remarked that the earlier kings 
of Dihli do not seem to haye issued many gold coins ; but no gold coin 
struck by Mahmud Shah appears to exist in the best coin cabinets. 

Mr. Carleton's coin has the same legend as the silver Mahmud Shahi 
in Thomas's chronicles, pi. II, 39, and p. 129. 




The weight is 168'45 grains. Both obverse and reverse have the same 
legend. 

Margi:n^ (on both faces) — ^'^ *.w. ^i ,_^l*j o;.«3.s-l &^-^}\ jjJ.A i_j^ 

The great Sultan Na^ir uddunya waddin Abul Muzaffar IMahmud, the son of the 
Sultan, 

In the time of the Imam Al-Musta'(,'im, the Commander of the Faithful, 
This coin {sikkah) was struck in the cajsital, Dihli, in 657 A.H. 
(3) The Society has also bought of Babu Omesh Chunder Banerjea, 
Godda, a gold coin, struck by Muhammad-bin-Tughluq in the name of the 
Egyptian Khalif Al-Mustakfi Billah, Dihli, 743, A. H. The coin weighs 
168"05 grains. 

The coin has been described by Mr. Thomas in Chronicles, p. 259. * 
Another specimen of the same year is in the cabinet of General Cunning- 
ham. 

* Where the word ^J is left out before ^JUb^^^ 



92 Muhammadon Inscriptions. [May, 

Mr. BLOCHMAinsr exhibited a further batch of Muhammadan Inscrip- 
tions. 

(1) From Mr. Delmerick's Dihli rubbings, three inscriptions of A.H. 
1012, 1063, 1068, of the reigns of Akbar, Shahjahan and Aurangzib. 
The first is taken frona the tomb of Mirza Muzaffar. 

(2) From Mr. Dehiierick's Hi9ar Firuzah rubbings, four inscriptions, 
dated 892, 927, 931, 944, H. 

(3) From Mr. F. L. Beaufort, C. S., a reading and translation of the 
inscription of a large cannon in the Jinsi-Topkhanah, Murshidabad. The 
gun was cast at Dhaka in A. H. 1017, or A. D. 1632. 

The test and translations of these inscriptions will be published nest 
month. 

Mr. Wood-Masow read the following extract from a letter from 
Mr. S. E. Peal of Sibsagar, Assam, 

" While out with an Assamese lately in the jungles, whistling for deer 
we came on a place all swamp and dug up by I^iffs looking for fisliy 

" Did you know this as a custom ? it seems (on enquiry) quite correct. 
Jackals also are destroying all the sugar-cane plantations about here. I am 
pestered for loan of guns or powder to shoot them. This is so bad west., i. e., 
Golaghat and Gauhati, that high fences have to be made to save the canes," 
and stated that the wild pigs of the Andaman Island repaired daily at low 
water to the sea-shore in search of Crustacea, fish, and other animals. 

Mr. "W. T. Blanpoed said that the carnivorous habits of wild pigs 
were well known. Mr. Peal has given us no details in this case, but he has 
doubtless satisfied himself that the ground he mentions was turned up by 
pigs in search of fish, and not of roots. The margins of tanks and of 
marshes are always found more or less dug up wherever wild pigs occur, 
but this is usually done in order to enable the animals to feed on the roots 
of water plants. 

Jackals are largely frugivorous, and often feed entirely on the fruit 
of the ber (Zizyplms) and their partiality for sugarcane has been noticed 
before. In fact many animals are far less exclusively herbivorous or carni- 
vorous in their habits than is generally suj^posed. 

The Council reported that they had elected Mr. W. T. Blanf ord, a Vice- 
President of the Society in the place of the Hon'ble E. C. Bayley, C. S. I., 
who had been appointed President. 

The Chairmajst announced that the Council had sanctioned the purchase 
of a selection from the Coins belonging to the late Colonel Guthrie, to the 
amount of Rs. 2000-0-0. 



1876.] E. Maclagaii — On Early Asiatic Fire Weapons. 93 

The CHAlEMAisr also announced to the meeting that steps -woukl be 
taken immediately for the thorough repair of the Society's premises. Some 
inconvenience woiild no doubt be felt, while the repairs were going on, but 
it was hoped that it would not be found necessary to interfere with the 
usual course of the meetings, or with the other business of the Society. 

The following papers were read : 

1. — On Early Asiatic Fire Weapons. — By Major- General R. IMACLAGiJf, 

E.. E., Secretary to the Government of the Panjab, P. W. D. 

(Abstract.) 

The introduction of this paper treats of the various kind of fii'e arrows 
used by the Grreeks and the Romans. The author then collects numerous 
passages from the historians of Asia and Africa regarding the use of petro- 
leum and naphtha for purposes of war. What we call ' Greek Fire' was 
nothing else but petroleum, and the Arabs have left us numerous recipes for 
warfii'e and fii-eworks, both liquid and di*y, most of which contained petro- 
leum, or one or all constituents of gunpowder. The preparation of Greek 
Fire has never been a secret, nor has the art ever been lost ; and only the 
difficulty of procuring it in Europe made its use a rare occurrence. It was 
extensively used by the Arabs in Sindh (690) ; at the sieges of Constantinople 
(717) and Thessalonica (901) ; in Egypt ; by Chingiz Khan, Timur, and 
even in England, where it was introduced by Edward I. ■ 

The noise accompanying the discharge of war-fire, consisting of jDctro- 
leum, and the use of long tubes for throwing it, has inclined many writers 
to refer the invention and application of gunpowder to early times ; and the 
Chinese have specially been mentioned as having been acqtiainted with the 
use of gunpowder long before it became general in Euroj)e. The ancient 
Hindus, too, are said to have been acquainted with it. General Maclagan 
shows that either assertion is utterly groundless. The extensive use of 
petroleum missiles was certainly due to the Ai'abs, and the introduction of 
gunpowder and artillery proceeded from Europe to the East. 

The paper concludes with a sketch of the progress of artillery up to 
the end of the 16th century in India, Persia, Burmah and China. 

The essay will appear in the first number of Pt. I of the Journal for 1876. 

2. — Were the Sundarhans inhalited in Ancient Times? — ByH. Beteeidge, 

Esq., B.C.S. 

(Abstract.) 

This paper contains several interesting notices on the condition of the 

Sundarhans in the 16th century, and an account of the journey, in November 

and December, 1599, of tlie Portuguese missionary Fonseca from Dianga 

(south of Chittagong) over Bakla (Kochiia in Baqirganj) to ' Ciaudecau', 



94 H. Beveridge — TJie Simdarhans in Ancient Times. [Mat, 

tlie king of wliich received liim kindly, and allowed him to build a cliurcli. 
The church built at Ciandeean, the author states, was the first ever erected 
in Bengal ; that of Chittagong was the second, and then came the chm-ch 
at Bandel, which was erected by a Portuguese named Villalobos.* 

Mr. Beveridge identifies ' Ciandeean' with Chand Khan, or Dhiimghat, 
the seat of Eaja Pratapaditya, in the 24-Parganahs, near Kaliganj. ' Chand 
Khan' was the old name of the property in the Sundarban, which Vikrama- 
ditya, Pratapaditya' s father, got from Daud Shah of Bengal. 

The description of the wood and rivers, the animals and scenery de- 
scribed by Fonseca, and the fact that he speaks of no towns, show that the 
Sundarban in 1599 was what it now is. 

The paper will be printed in No. I, of Pt. I, of the Journal for 1876. 

Mr. W. T. Blanpoed said — That any contribution to the history of 
the Sundarbans was of interest because of its bearing upon the theories of 
formation of river deltas. If Mr. Ferguson's views of the mode in which 
the delta of the Ganges has changed in late years be accepted, it is very 
improbable that the Sundarbans have, at any recent period, been higher 
above the water level, and consequently better suited for human habitation 
than they are at present. 

Mr. H. F. Blaistoed said — That there was good G-eological evidence 
of the Sundarbans having undergone depression : since excavations every- 
where in and around Calcutta and also at Kulna in Jessore showed that an 
old forest, indicated by stumps of trees with their roots in situ, exists at a 
depth of from 20 to 30 ft. ; at such a depth, that if the ground above were 
removed, the forest bed would be some feet below low water level. This 
forest is chiefly Sundri, a tree which now grows between tide marks, 
and the ground above is apparently a fresh water deposit. Nothing could 
be said as to the date of the submergence, whether it took place vpithin 
what are usually regarded historic times or earlier. 

Mr. H. Beverley enquired whether it was not the case that the 
cultivation of the Sundarbans was largely influenced by the action of the 
river-system of the lower Grangetic delta. Where there was a strong current 
of fresh water making its way to the sea, it was only reasonable to suppose 
that the salt water was thereby kept back somewhat and the laud rendered 
fit for habitation and capable of being cultivated. Now Mr. Westland had 
shown in his work on Jessore that for many years past the river-system of 
the delta had been gradually shifting eastwards, and it was the fact that at 
the present day the great body of the waters of the Ganges and Brahmaputra 
rivers emptied itself by the Megna which flowed to the east of the Baqirganj 

* But the keystone of the old Bandel church, said to have belonged to the original 
chiirch that was destroyed by Shahjahan's troops, bears the year 1599. The Editor. 



1876.] J. Wood- Mason — Neio PTiasmideous Insect from the Anclamans. D'S 

district. It was also a fact that in tliat district the margin o£ cultivation 
lay nearer the sea than either in the 2i-Parganahs or in Jessore. Starting 
from a point not many miles south of Calcutta, this margin extended almost 
in a straight line to within a few miles of the sea in the Baqirganj 
district. "Wherever there was a large river, cultivation would be found to 
encroach somewhat south of the line, but as a general rule its direction was 
as stated. When reporting on the census of 1872, Mr. Beveeley said, he 
had made special enquiries with reference to this subject, but he had 
failed to ascertain that in the districts of the 24-Parganahs and Jessore there 
had been any great increase of cultivation within recent years. At the 
same time if it could be shown (as indeed the nimierous old river-beds found 
in the Hugli, Nadia and Jessore districts seemed to indicate) that at 
some former time the main channel of the Ganges flowed thi'ough the Western 
Sundarbans, it was not impossible that the margin of cultivation, and conse- 
quently of j)opulation, may have lain further to the south in those parts than 
at present. Were we to suppose that by some change in the river-system, 
the Megna were now to lose half its volume of water, there could be no doubt 
that the salt water tides wotdd gain a corresponding influence, and a certain 
quantity of land in the neighbotirhood would again be thrown out of cultiva- 
tion and be depopulated. 



3. — Descrij^tion of a new Phasmideous Insect from the Andamans. — 
By J. Wood-Masok, Esq. 

The author describes, under the name of L. verrucifer, the two sexes of 
an insect belonging to the same little group as Loncliodes amcmrops, nodosus, 
hrevipes, tcniformis, Craioangensis, hifoliatus, &e., all species, like it, with 
the first tarsal joint of the fore legs elevated into a sharp foliaceous crest ; 
and states that loncliodes nematodes, an insect with short filiform antennae 
and long and simj^le first tarsal joint to fore legs, cannot be the male of L. 
Crawangensis, an insect with long setaceous antennae and foliaceous first 
tarsal joints, but that it must be the male of L. cunicularis, or of some 
closely allied form. 

This section of the genus Loncliodes is represented in India by one 
species only, the L. hrevipes, which is said to be a native of the Malabar 
coast, the fauna of which was largely comj)osed of representative Malayan 
forms. 

Mr. W. T. Blaiyfokd called attention to the large field for explora- 
tion still offered by the hills of Southern India and the forests near the 
Malabar coast. The wonderful collections of reptiles and land mollusks 
made l)y Colonel Beddome served to shew how much in all probability 
remained to be learned in other branches of Zoology. 



96 Librarij. [Mat, 



^ 



IBRARY, 



The following additions have been made to the Library since the meet- 
held in April last. 



Transactions, Proceedings, and Journals, 

'presented iy the respective Societies or^EcUtors. 

Berlin. Konigliehe Preussische Akademie der Wissenschaften, — Monats- 

bericht, Jannar, 1876. 
Bombay. The Indian Antiquary, — Vol. 5, Ft. 54. 

Bev. J. F. Kearns. — Atma Bodha Prakasika. L, Bice. — Two Kongu or Cliera 
Grants of A. D. 454 and 613. Br. F. Kielhorn. — Eemarks on the S'ikshas. 
Dr. S. Biihler. — Inscriptions from Kavi, No. 2. /. Muir. — Maxims and Senti- 
ments fi'om the Mahabhkrata. /. F. Fleet. — Sanskrit and old Canarese Inscrip- 
tions, No. XV. Bev. G. U. Pope. — Notes on the South-Indian or Dravidian 
family of Langaiages. 
Calcutta. The Christian Spectator, — Vol. V, No. 59. 

Edinburgh. Eoyal Society. — Transactions, Vol. 37, Pt. Ill, Session, 
1874-75. 

J. Lister. — A Contribution to the Germ Theory of Putrefaction and other Fer- 
mentative Changes, and to the Natm-al History of Torulae and Bacteria. 
A. Buchan. — On the Diurnal Oscillations of the Barometer. 

. . Proceedings, Session, 1874-75. 

C. G. Knott and A. Macfarlane. — On the Application of Angstrom's Method to 
the Conductivity of Wood. /. G. MaeGregor. — Note on the Electiucal Con- 
ductivity of Saline Solutions, B. Tennent. — The Theory of the Causes by 
which Storms progress in an Easterly direction over the British Isles, and 
why the Barometer does not always indicate real Vertical Pressure. 

Genoa. Museo Civico di Storia Naturale. Amiali, — Vols. II, III, IV, V, 

VI, 1872—74. 
London. The Athenaeum, — Pts. 577 and 578, January and February, 
1876. 

. Geological Society, — Quarterly Journal, Vol. 32, Ft. 1, No. 125. 

Frof. Oiven. — On a new Modification of Dinosaurian Vertebrae. S. Woodward. — 
On the Discovery of a FossU Scorpion in the British Coal-measures. On a 
remarkable FossU Orthopterous Insect fi'om the Coal-measures of Scotland. 

. Nature, Vol. 13, Nos. 333 and 336. 

■ . The Royal Society,— Proceedings, Vol. XXIV, No. 166. 

T. F. Thor^^e and A. W. Biiclcer. — On the expansion of Sea-water by Heat. 
Frof. W, G. Adams. — On the Action of Light on Tellurium and Selenium. 
Frof, 0. Beynolds. — On the Kefraction of Sound by the Atmosphere. /. Tyndall. 
— On- the Optical Deportment of the Atmosphere in reference to the Phenomena 
of Putrefaction and Infection. Copt. J. Waterhouse. — On Reversed Photo- 
graphs of the Solar Spectrum beyond the Eed, obtained on a Collodion Plate. 



1876.] Library;. 97 

London. Eoyal Astronomical Society, — Memoirs, Vol. 42, 1873-75. 

Lieut. -Col. J. F. Tennant, R. JE. — Eeport on observations of tlie Total Eclipse of 
the Sun on December 11 — 12, 1871, made by order of the Govt, of India, at 
Dodabetta, near Ootacamund. E. J. Stone. — The Total Eclipse of the Siin 
April 16, 1874. 

. . Monthly Notices, Vol. 36, No. 4. 

Report of the Council to the Fifty-sixth Annual General Meeting of the Society 
Notes on some Points connected with the Progress of Astronomy during the 
past Year. 

Eoyal G-eographieal Society, — Proceedings, Vol. XX, No. II. 



Livingstone East Coast Expedition. Lieut. Cameron's Arrival at the West Coast 
of Africa. Cameron. — Letters detailing the jommey of the Livingstone East 
Coast Expedition from Lake Tanganyika to the "West Coast of Afi-ica. 
Palermo. Societa degli Spettroscopisti Italiani, — Memorie. Disj)ensa 2 
e 3, Febbraio e Marzo, 1876. 

Disp. 2. P. Tacchini. — Macchie e facole al bordo, Osservazioni dirette e spettros- 
copiche fatte all osservatorio di Palermo nel 1874. — Magnesio al bordo osser- 
vato a Palermo nel 1874. 
Disp. 3. F. Tacchini. — Magnesio al bordo osservato a Palermo nel 1874. — Osser- 
vazioni spettroscopiche solari fatte a Palermo nel primo trimestr'e 1876. — 
Statistica delle eruzioni solari osservate a Palermo nel 1874. — Macchie solari 
osservate all'Equatoriale di Merz della specola di Palermo nel primo trimestre 
1876 da P. Tacchini, e tempo del passaggio del semidiametro solare determinato 
da G. Fe Lisa. 
Paris. Journal Asiatique. — Septieme Serie, Tome VII, No. I, 1876. 

M. J. Mold. — Sentences, maxim es, et proverbes mandchoux et mongols. — Archge- 
ological Survey of India. 

. Societe de Geographie, — Bnlletin, Mars, 1876. 

L'ahbd Arniand Favid. — Second voyage d' exploration dans I'ouest de la Chine, 
1868 a 1870 (siuteetfin). Romanetdii CaiUaud. — Origine du nom de Tong- 
King. 
Roorkee. Professional Papers on Indian Engineering, — 2ud Series. Vol. 
V, No. 20. 

Gapt. A. CunnincjUam. — Continuous Uniform Beams. /. G. Fouglas. — The Limit 
of Elasticity. 
Toronto. The Canadian Joiirnal of Science, Literature, and History. Vol. 
. XIV, No. VI, December, 1875. 

EooKS AND Pamphlets, 
presented hy the Authors. 
SiBDAE Attae SiNa. The Travels of Guru Tegh Bahadur and Guru Go- 
bind Sing. Translated from the original Gurmukhi. 
BuEaESS, J. Archasological Survey of Western India. No. 2 — Memoran- 
dum on the Antiquities at Dathoi, Ahmedabad, Than, Jmiagadh, Girnar 
and Dhank. No. 3 — Memorandum on the Eemains at Gumli, Gop, and 
in Kachh, &c. 
Scully, J. De. A Contribution to the Ornithology of Eastern Tiu-kcstan. 
Senaet, E'd. Essai sur la Legende du Buddha, son caractere et ses origiues. 



98 Library. [MaT' 

Miscellaneous Presentations. 

A New Hindustani-Englisli Dictionary. By S. W. Fallon, Ph. D. 
Pts. I, II. 

The Indian Antiquary, Yol. V, Pt. 54. 

The Junimoo and Kashmii* Territories. A Greographical Account. By 
F. Drew. London, 1875. 

GOTERKMENT OF InDIA, HoME DEPARTMENT. 

General Eei^ort on the Topographical Surveys of India and of the 
Sui'veyor General's Department for 1874-75. 

The Stteyetor Geisieeal op India. 
General EejDort on the Operations of the Great Trigonometrical Survey 
of India during 1874-75. 

The Superintendent of the Survey. 
Report on the Nagj)ur School of Medicine, Central Provinces for 1875. 

Chief Commissioner, Central Proyinces. 
Annual Report of the Three Lunatic Asylums, in the Madras Presi- 
dency dui-ing 1874-75, No. 49. 

GOYERNMENT OF MADRAS. 

Report of the United States, Geological Survey of the Territories. 
Yol. YI. 

Annual Report of the United States, Geological and Geographical 
Survey of the Territories, embracing Colorado, being a Report of Progress 
of the Exploration for the year 1873. 

List of Elevations principally in that portion of the United States 
west of the Mississij)pi River. By Henry Gannett. 

Birds of the North- West : a Hand-book of the Ornithology of the 
Region drained by the Missourie River and its Tributaries. By Elliott 
Cones. 

T. W. Hatden, U. S. Geologist. 

« 

Anecdota Syriaca, coUegit edidit explicuit. J. P. N. Land, Tomus 
Quartus. 

Prof. J. de Goeje, Letden. 
Ueber den Ursprung des Lingakultus in Indien, von. F. Kittel. 

Basel Mission, Book and Tract Depository, Mangalob. 

Periodicals Purchased, 

Berlin. Journal fiir die reine und angewandte Mathematik. — Band 81, 
Heft 3. 

Serrn. Hamburger. — Zur Theorie der Integration eines Systems von n linearen 
partiellen Differentialgleichungen erster Ordming mit zwei unabMngigen 
Tind n abhangigen Veranderlichen. 
Gottingen. Gottingische Gelehrte Anzeigen. — Nos. 5, 6. Do., Naehrichten, 
No. 2. 1876. 



1876.] Library. 99 

London. The Academy.— Nos. 203, 204 and 205, 1876. 

. Annals and Magazine of Natural History, — Vol. 17, No. 99. 

J. Wood-Mason. — On some new Species of Stomatopod Crustacea. On the 
Astacus modestus of Hertst. 
. The London, Edinburgh, and Dublin Philosophical Magazine, — 



5th Series. Vol. I. No. 3. 

W. Odling. — On the Formulation of the Paraffins and their Derivatives. S. 
M. Taylor.' — On the Relative Values of the Pieces in Chess. Br. F. Neesen. 
On the Attraction and Repulsion exerted by the Luminous and the Calorific 
Rays. M. Poggendorff. — 'On Crooke's Radiometer. 

. Numismatic Society's Journal, — Pt. IV, 1875. 

B, V. Head. — Metrological Notes on the Ancient Electi-um Coins struck be- 
tween the Lelantian Wars and the Accession of Darius. F. W, Madden. 
Jewish Numismatics, being a Supplement to the " History of Jewish coin- 
age and money in the Old and New Testament", published in 1864. 

. Society of Arts,— Journal, Vol. 24, Nos. 1213 to 1216. 

No. 1213. 8. Evans. — ^^Sole-leather Tanning, with some remarks on the Import 

of Hides and Cattle. Japanese Lacquer Ware. 
No. 1214. C. Magniao. — On the Commercial Aspects of the Suez Canal. 
,, 1215. Adjourned Discussion on Mr. C. Magniac's paper on the " Commer- 
cial Aspects of the Suez Canal." W. Saville Kent. — Aquaria, their Construc- 
tion, Management, and Utility. Paper from Bamboo. 
No. 1216. E. Seyd. — The fall in the Price of Silver ; its Consequences and 
their possible Avoidance. 
New Haven, U. S. The American Journal of Science and Ai-ts, Vol. XI, 
No. 62. 

W. B. Taylor. — On Recent Researches in Sound. F. E. NijjJier. — New Form 
of Lantern Galvanometer. 
Paris. Annales de Chimie et de Physique, — 5th Series. Tome VIL 
Janvier 1876. 

. Comptes Rendus. Tome 82, Nos. 5 to 9. 1876. 

No. 5. M. Tresca. — Compte rendu des experiences faites pour la determination 
du travail depense par les machines magneto-electriques de M. Gramme, 
employees pour produire de la lumiere dans les ateliers de M.M. Sautter et 
Lemonnier. M. B. Fr. Michel. — Note sur la methode a employer pom- I'essai 
des conditions de conductibilite des paratonnerres. 
No. 6. M. J. Gayat. — De, la conjonctivite granuleuse. Resume de deux mis- 
sions ayant eu pour objet 1' etude des maladies oculaires en Algerie. 
No. 7. MM. E. Mathieii et V. TJrbain. — Reponse a ime Note precedente de 
M. Arm. Gautier, relative au role de I'acide carbonique dans la coagulation 
du sang. M. Consti. — Sui- 1' origino ct la mode de generation des toui-billons 
atmospheriques, et sui- I'unite de direction de leur mouvement gjT:atoii-e. 
No. 8. M. Faye. — Remarques au sujct des lois des tempetes. 
No. 9. M. Schnctzler. — Sui- les propriotcs antiseptiques du borax. MM. E. 
Mathieu et V. Urbain. Reponse k la dcrniere Note de M. F. Glenard, relative 
au role de I'acide carbonique dans le phenomene de la coagulation spontanea 
du sang. 



1 00 Library. 

Paris. Joiu'nal des Savants, Janvier, Fevrier, 1876. 

. Eevue Archeologique. Fevrier, 1876. 

. Eevue Critique d' Histoire et de Litterature. Nos, 6 to 9, 1876. 

No. 7. Grassmann. — Glossaire du Rig Veda. 

No. 8. Warren. — Idees religieusea et philosophiques des Jainas. 
. Eevne des Deux Mondes. Tome 13, Pt, 4. Tome 14, Pt. I. 

Tome 13, Pt. 4. C. Martins. — Les preuves de la theorie de revolution en liis- 
toire natui'elle. 

EooKS Purchased. 

Bellew, H. W. Kashmir and Kashghar. A Narrative of the Journey of 
the Embassy to Kashghar in 1873-74. 8vo. London 1875. 

BuEiS'ELL, A. C. Elements o£ South-Indian Palseography from the Fom-th 
to the Seventeenth Centu.ry, A. D. Being an introduction to the study 
of South-Indian Inscriptions and MSS. Quarto. Mangalore,.1874. 

Drew, Frederic. The Jummoo and Kashmir Territories. A Geogra- 
phical Account. Royal 8vo. London, 1875. 

Flugel, Felix, Dr. A Practical Dictionary of the English and Grerman 
and German and English Languages, 11th Edition, Pts. I and II. Svo. 
Leipzig, 1874. 

Helmholtz, Hermak, L. F. On the Sensations of Tone as a Physiological 
Basis for the Theory of Music. (Translated from the 3rd German Edi- 
tion by A. J. Ellis). Royal 8vo. London, 1875. 

LoMMEL, EuaENE, Dr. The Nature of Light, with a General Account of 
Physical Optics. Svo. London, 1875. 

Massoit, Charles. Legends of the Afghan Countries. In verse, with 
various pieces, original and translated. 8vo. London, 1848. 

Max MixLLER, F. Chii^s from a German Workshop, Vols. I, II, and IV. 
2nd Edition. Svo. London, 1875. ^ 

Smith, -W. Dr. A Latin-English and English-Latin Dictionary, based 
uj)on the works of Forcellini and Preund. Twelfth Edition. London, 
1874 Royal Svo., two Vols. 

Spiers, A. Dictionnaire General Anglais-Fran9ais, et Fran^ais- Anglais, 
24th Edition. Royal Svo. Paris, 1874. 

Va]!T Bekedes", p. J. Animal Parasites and Messmates, Svo. London, 
1876. 

Wheeler, J. Talbots. The History of India from the Earliest Ages, 
Vol. IV, Pt. I, Mussuhnan Rule. Svo. London, 1876. 

WiLSOX, A. The Abode of Snow. Observations on a Journey from 
Chinese Tibet to the Indian Caucasus, through the Upper Valleys of the 
Himalaya., 2nd Edition. Svo. London, 1876. 



PROCEEDINGS 



OF THE 



ASIATIC SOCIETY OF BENGAL, 

For June, 1876. 



The monthly General Meeting of the Society was held on Wednesday, 
the 7th June, 1876, at 9 o'clock, e. m. 

Babu Eajendralala Mitra, LL. J)., Vice-President, in the Chair: 

The following gentlemen, duly proposed and seconded at the last Meet- 
ing, were balloted for and elected ordinary Members — 
Julius Behrend, Esq. 
J. F. Baness, Esq. 
E. Parry, Esq. 

The following are candidates for ballot at the next meeting. — 

Lieut. F. W. Jarrad, R. N., Depy. Supt. India Coasts Survey, pro- 
posed by Mr. J. Wood-Mason, seconded by Dr. James Armstrong. 

D. Scott, Esq., C. E., proposed by Mr. J. Wood-Mason, seconded by 
Mr. W. T. Blanford. 

Ross Scott, Esq., C. S., of Muzaffanagur, proposed by Mr. F. S. Growse, 
seconded by Mr. Blochmann. 

Dr. D. O'Connell Raye, General Hospital, Calcutta, proposed by Dr. G. 
King, seconded by Capt. J. Waterhouse. 

Rev. Thos. Foulkes, Bangalore, proposed by Capt. J. Waterhouse, 
seconded by Mr. Blochmann. 

The Chaieman announced that Lord Lytton had been pleased to honor 
the Society by accepting the office of Patron of the Society, vacant by the 
resignation of Lord Northbrook. 

The Chairman said : " By the last mail from Germany the Council 
have received the melancholy intelligence of the death of Professor Christian 
Lassen, one of the oldest honorary members of the Society, and an oriental 
scholar of the liighcst attainments. Born in 1800 at Bergen in Norway, 



102 Deatli of Professor Lassen. [Jfne, 

Lassen retired to Germany in early youth, and passed the best part of his life 
as Professor of Sanskrit in the University of Bonn. He attained distinction, 
as a Sanskrit scholar more than half a centiu-y ago, and was elected an 
honorary member of this Society in 1831. With the characteristic leaning 
of the scholars of his adopted comitry, he first directed his attention to 
Hindu Philosophy, and, in 1832, published a Latin translation of the 
Sankhya Karika, which, though not so rigoroiisly exact as the English 
version subsequently prepared by Colebrooke, was still a work of great 
merit, and it brought him to prominent notice as an able, clear-headed, 
and pains-taking student of the Sanskrit language. In 1835, he published 
a Latin translation of the renovra.ed pastoral of Jayadeva, the Gitagovinda. 
He had, in this undertaking the advantage of Sir William Jones' English 
translation and the ductility of the Latin language — so much more allied 
in idiom to the Sanskrit than the English — in his favour ; nevertheless high 
praise was due to him for the ability and scholarship with which hp did 
such ample justice to the poetical imagery and richness of the original. 
The work is peculiarly oriental in its tone, feeling, form, and expression, 
and calculated to tax to the utmost the capacity of European translators. 
To English readers Dr. Arnold's new metrical version will convey an idea 
of Avhat the true character is of this " Indian Song of Songs," and how 
widely it differs from Western imagery and thought. In 1836, Professor 
Lassen published two works, one on some Persepolitan inscriptions, and 
the other a commentary on the Pentapotamia Indica ; both replete with 
the results of great learning and persevering research. The work on in- 
scriptions entailed enormous labour, as it was one of the earliest attempts at 
deciphering Persian cuneiform writing, but it was eminently successful. 
These were followed, in 1837, by an essay on the Prakrit dialects, the Insti- 
tutiones Linguce Fralcriticae, which first afforded to European scholars a 
clear insight into the natiire and character of those ancient vernaculars. 
Nothing has since been published to supersede that learned essay. His 
essay on the " Coins of the Indo-Scythian Kings," which brought together in 
a systematic form the numismatic researches of our James Prinsep, and 
enriched them with the results of his own enquiry and study, was a work of 
great interest, and the Society published an English translation of it by the 
late Dr. Roer, in our Journal for 1842-3. A Sanskrit Anthology for school 
use, an essay on the Vendidad, and a valuable dissertation on the island of 
Taprobane, were also among the several works which he published during 
the first half of this century, and which secured for him a high and honor- 
able place among the laboiu'ers in the vast field of oriental research. He 
was also a frequent contributor to oriental periodicals, and editor of the 
Zeltschrift f'.ir die Ktonde des Morgenlcmdes for several years. The most 
important work, however, which he published and which will make his name 



1876. J Mefund of Suhscriptions to the Fiddington 'Fund. 103 

to be honorably remembered for a long time, is bis Indische Altertlmmshunde. 
In it he brought the strictest rules o£ classical criticism and the Niebuhrian 
method of distinguishing the true from the false to bear on oriental learn- 
ing, and for the first time set in order the disjecta membra of ancient 
Indian history which his predecessors and contemporaries had brought to 
light. We may not assent to all his conclusions, and the materials he had 
to work upon were certainly not always the safest and most accurate ; but 
on the whole his work is a noble monmnent of his learning, and genius, — 
of his zeal, devotion, and unflagging industry. I am sure this meeting will, 
in common with Oriental antiquarians in every part of the civilized world, 
mourn the loss of so distinguished a scholar." 

Read the following letter from Mr. H. W. I. Wood, Secretary of tlie 
Piddington Fund, forwarding Ks. 586/1j as a refund of a moiety of contribu- 
tions to the Fund from the Asiatic Society. 

Sengal Ghamher of Commerce, Calcutta, 10th April, 1870. 
The Secretary of the Asiatic Society. 

Dear Sie, — The Committee of the Chamber of Commerce desire me 
to inform you that as the object for which a fund was subscribed in 1870 
for the benefit of the late Mrs. Piddington has been accomplished, they 
hold a surplus — as per memorandum at foot — which will admit of a refund 
of a moiety of contributions ; and they direct me to hand you the sum of 
Rupees 580/4, your receipt for which in annexed form will oblige 

Yours faithfully, 

H. W. I. WOOD, 

Secretary. 

MEMOEAlSrDUM OF THE PiDDINOTON VXTSTD ACCOUNT. 

Subscription from Saigon Chamber of Commerce, Rs. 100 

„ Madras, 470 

„ Colombo, 390 

„ Shanghai, 677 2 5 

„ Peninsular and Oriental Company, 100 O 

„ Asiatic Society, 1,172 8 

„ Calcutta Trades' Association, 500 

3,109 10 5 
Local individual subscriptions, 7,209 

10,078 10 5 
Interest on account with the Oriental Bank Corporation, 2,290 13 1 

Rs. 12,975 7 



104 Prevention of Accidents fr07n Lightning. [Ju^iTE, 

Paid Mrs. Piddington 100 Es. a month from 

May 1870 to date of decease in Sept. 1875, 6,500 

„ for funeral expenses, &c., 192 5 6 

„ for cost of a Monument, 537 8 

7,229 13 6 



Balance, Es. 5,745 10 



H. W. I. WOOD, 

Secretary. 

The Seceetaet said that the money had been deposited in the Bank 
of Bengal and that Subscribers to the Fund could receive on application a 
refund of half their contributions. A list of the subscribers would be 
found on the fly leaf of the Proceedings for May 1870. 

Mr. H. F. Blaistoed said that as a subscriber to the " Piddington 
Fund", he would propose for the consideration of other subscribers, that the 
residue of the Fund now in the hands of the Society should be made the 
nucleus of a permanent fund for pensioning old and deserving servants of 
the Society. 

Mr. V. Ball seconded the proposal. 

The CBA.IEMAN having put Mr. Blanford's proposal before the meet- 
ing, it was agreed that it should be referred to the subscribers for considera- 
tion. 

The Seceetaet laid before the Meeting a copy of a pamphlet by Mr. 
W. C. McGregor entitled " Protection of Life and Proj)erty from Lightning 
during Thunderstorms," and stated that Mr. McGregor, had very kindly 
offered to send 100 copies for distribution among members. The Secretary 
also read some extracts from a short paper by Mr. McGregor, on the same 
subject of which the following is an abstract : 

On tJie Prevention of Accidents hy Liglitning. 
The author commences by stating that although a century and a quar- 
ter has elapsed since Franklin proved by his kite experiment the similarity 
between atmospheric and frictional electricity, and showed that protection 
to life and property could be secured by artificial means, we still read 
announcements of churches and other public buildings, both in England 
and this country, being struck and iujui-ed by lightning, and two recent 
accidents of this kind are instanced, in one of which the steeple of the vil- 
lage church of Snettisham, near Sandringham, was destroyed, happily 
without loss of life ; and in the other, the Himalaya Hotel, Masuri, was 
struck, two natives being killed on the spot by the electric fluid in its pas- 



1876.] Prevention of Accidents from Lightning. 105 

sage, and otliers woiuided, considerable damage being also done to tbe Hotel 
and the property of the inmates. 

From the fact of no mention having been made of lightning condnc- 
tors being attached to these buildings, the author concludes that this means 
of artificial protection had not been adopted, and goes on to enqu.ire how 
far are Churchwardens, Hotel Proj^rietors and j)ersons in charge of other 
large or prominent buildings ju-'itified in endangermg the lives of theii' fel- 
low creatures by neglecting to adopt precautionary measui'es against acci- 
dents by lightning— a question which the author has fully treated in his 
jpamphlet referred to above. 

The avithor then gives a brief notice of what has been done in Europe 
with regard to the prevention of accidents from Hghtning and goes on to 
suggest that similar steps should be taken in India. 

At the present time very nearly all vessels carry a fixed Hghtning con- 
ductor as part and parcel of the vessel, instead of its being stowed away to 
be run tip to the masthead when required, as was done on the introduction of 
lightning conductors into the British Navy. The same principle should be 
carried out with reference to buildings. Dr. Mann, Mr. Preece, Cajitain 
Galton and others have pointed out that no building should be considered 
complete •without the necessary protection against Hghtning and there 
should be no difficulty in j^roviding this at the same time and in the same 
manner as the rain^iipes or gutters forming part of a building. 

In France, the Prefect of the Seine has appointed a Commission, com- 
prising several members of the Academy, to inspect and report upon the 
lightning-rods connected with the buildings of the Municipality of Paris. 
Their inspection wiU be annual and particular study will be made of cer- 
tain of the conductors with reference to the thunderstorms which pass 
over Paris. 

In England, a Committee has been formed under the auspices of the 
Meteorological Society of London for the purpose of encoui'aging and intro- 
ducing a proper system of protection against accidents by Hghtning and for 
supervising and reporting ujjon the means in existence. 

As a member of the Asiatic Society, the author asks if it is not a mat- 
ter of sufficient importance and within the scoi)e of its action to warrant 
the Society in taking some such steps for carrying out investigations and 
practical suggestions, within the limit.s of its operations. 

The author expresses his belief that the Government, through its Me- 
teorological office, would assist greatly the exertions of the Society, by 
allowing it to be f m-nished with data and information regarding accidents to 
life and property already reported and on record ; as also of the present 
means employed for guarding against snch accidents. The Press and the 
public can also assist with important information and co-operation ; and if 



106 International Oriental Congress, St. Petershurgli. [June, 

the matter can only be properly and practicably ventilated most useful 
results must follow. 

The author concludes by referring to a reprint, in pamphlet form, from 
the Quarterly Joiirnal of the Meteorological Society for October 1875, of a 
paper by Dr. E. J. Mann, F. R. A. S., entitled " Remarks on some practical 
points connected with the construction of Lightning Conductors", with the 
discussion thereon, as containing much interesting information on this 
subject. 

The Seceetart laid before the meeting a circular containing a list of 
the subjects for discussion, at the ensuing International Oriental Congress 
at St. Petersburg, as below. 
Questions ■pour etre discutees a la 3-e Session cho Congres international des 

Orientalistes, proposees par le Gomite-organisateur de cette Session. 

Peemieee seeie 

1. Les monuments historicpTCs nous apprennent que la Siberie pendant 
plus de 2,000 ans envoyait peuple sur peuple dans 1' Asie centrale : quelles 
etaient les circonstances qui y produisaient ce surci'oit de population et 
pourquoi cet accroissement et ces emigrations ont-elles cesse avec la con- 
quete de la Siberie par les Russes ? 

2. Le Chamanisme qui jusqu'a nos joiu's predomine chez les indigenes 
pa'iens de la Siberie, est-il le meme chez tons ? ou bien nous presente-t-il 
des differences selon la famille ethnographique a laquelle appartiennent ses 
adherents siberiens ? 

3. Nous voyons que presque tous les fondateurs de nouvelles mon- 
archies nomades dans I'Asie centrale octroient a leurs sujets leurs codes de 
lois particuliers. Quels etaient les motifs et le but de ces codifications 
successives, etant donnee I'uniformite bien connue des coutumes et du genre 
de vie de ces peuples nomades ? 

4. Y avait-il avant Djenguis-Khan un j)euj)le ou une tribu du nom 
de Mongol, oti bien le nom Mongol n'est-il qu'un nom dynastique adopte 
par Djenguis pour I'empire qu'il a fonde ? 

5. Quelles sont les preuves en faveur de I'opinion generalement ad- 
mise que les manuscrits turcs en c a r a c t e r e s Oaigours qui se trouvent 
dans les differentes bibliotheques de I'Europe, soient ecrits reellement dans 
la 1 a n g u e des Ou.igours, ces caractercs etant employes aussi par d'autres 
peuples turcs dans le temps auquel le manuscrits en question se raj)- 
portent ? 

6. Les renseignements sur les fetes amiuelles du Turkestan, oriental 
et occidental, que Ton trouve dans les annales officielles chinoises jusqu'au 
temps des Thans — jusqu'a quel point s'accordent-ils avec ceux d'el-Birouni 



1876.] Invasion of Bengal hy KuJottunrja. 107 

sur les calendi-iers des Kharizmiens, des Soghdiens (et en partie aussi des 
Tokhars) ? En quoi ces calendriers different-ils de celui de la Perse du 
temps des Achemenides, aussi bien que de celui des Sassanides ? 

7. Que savons-nous de I'ecriture soghdienne ? Quels sont les monu- 
ments, oil elle s'est conservee ? Est-il possible de determiner, ne serait-ee 
qu'aj)proximativement, I'epoque de son introduction dans la Transoxiane ? 

8. Jusqu'a quel point peut-on suivre dans les documents historiques 
les noms etbnograpbiques de " Sarte" et de "Tadjik"? Quelles con- 
clusions en pourrait-on tirer concernant la signification primitive et les 
acceptions successives de ces noms ? 

9. K quelles causes pom"rait-on attribuer la stabilite de la langue 
neoj)ersane qui du X™^ siecle jusqu'a nos jours n'a presque pas subi de 
changement quelque peu remarquable dans ses formes grammaticales ? 

10. Les nombreux noms propres elamites qui se sont conserves, nous 
jDcrmettent-ils d'en tirer des conclusions decisives quant a la nationalite des 
Elamites ? 

11. Peut-on determiner d'une maniere exacte sous le point de Tue 
etbnograpbique et geographique les noms "Rutenu" et"Cbeta", qui 
dans les inscriptions egyptiennes de la XVIII"^^ et de la XIX"^^ dynastie 
sont mentionnes comme les ennemis seculaires de ces deux dynasties ? 

12. Dans quel jom* apparait dans les inscriptions egyptiennes la po- 
pulation de la Palestine avant I'invasion des Hyksos ? 

13. Jusqu'a quel point les rapports mutuels des tribus arabes avant 
Mahomet peuvent-ils servir a eclaireir I'etat politique des tribus Israelites 
du temps des Jtiges ? 

14. Les donnees cbronologiques et topograjDhiques foiu-nies par les 
legendes des monnaies des dynasties musubnanes sont generalement consi- 
derees comme plus dignes de foi que celles des cbroniques et des autres 
monvunents non officiels : cette opinion est-elle parfaitement inattaquable ? 
et avons nous t o u j o u r s le droit de corriger les donnees des cbroniques a 
I'aide de celles des monnaies ? 

15. Quelles etaient les raisons qui au commencement du XP^*^ siecle 
firent cesser subitement le commerce entre I'Orient musulman et I'Euroiie 
septentrionale, commerce qui florissait sans interruption du VII"!^ au X""*^ 
siecle ? 

Dr. Ra-iendhalala Mitea read the following extract from a letter 
of Dr. Burnell, on the invasion of Bengal, in the 11th century, by the Chola 
king Kulottunga : 

Tanjore, 29fh AjyriJ, 1876. 

" My deae Sie, — I am just aljout to leave India for Java for two 
months, but I must tell you a discovery I have nude which will I know 



108 Invasion of Bengal ly Kidottunga. [ JiixE, 

interest yoii, as you have taken mncli trouble about the Pala kings of 
Bengal. 

" It is that in a Tamil inscription here, I have found that Kulottunga 
Cola states that in his 29th year* he conquered (!) Bengal (Vengala) and 
Mayipalan {i. e. Tamil for Mahipala). This 29th year = 1093 A. D., as 
Kulottunga began his reign in 1064 A. D. 

" The whole inscription is of immense importance for the chronology of 
the 11th century, as a vast number of countries (in India) are mentioned, 
and often the names of their kings. 

" Kulottunga was the greatest of the last Cola djaiasty, and it is quite 
possible that he may have attacked Bengal (already invaded by the Muham- 
madans) in order to revenge himself for a real attack on the South at the 
end (?) of the previous century as mentioned in the Buddal pillar inscription. 
Buddal is apparently mentioned in the inscription ; at least I can make 
nothing else of the word v (b)ottal which must be a proper name. 

" Kulottunga inherited the kingdom of Kalinga, so was not far from 
Bengal. 

" The whole inscription (which I hojoe to publish) throws great light on 
the sad state of S. India in the 11th century, owing to religious animosity ; 
it is easy, now to understand how the whole country fell a prey to the 
Muhammadans in 1311." 

The Chairman remarked that in the Rajshahi inscription, discovered 
by Mr. Metcalfe and published in the Society's Journal for 1867, mention 
was made of the founder of the Sena dynasty of Bengal having been a 
Dakshinatya, or a conqueror from the South who upset the Pala dynasty ; 
and from calculations subsequently made, it appeared that this founder, Adi- 
sm-a or Vira Sena, came to Bengal in the last decade of the tenth century. 
Now James Prinsep in his Chronological Tables had doubtingly assigned to 
Kulottunga an age between 800 and 1000 A. C, and if the later date could 
be accepted as the correct one, it would follow that the invasion referred to 
in the inscription was that which gave to Bengal the Sena dynasty, and that 
Vira Sena was a lieutenant of Kulottunga, who having conquered the coun- 
try, held it, originally in the name of his master, btit afterwards on his own 
account. This assumption, however, could not be defended, as the date of 
Kulottunga, according to Dr. Burnell's recent researches, was later by a 
century and a half, aiid it brought us to the time of Vijaya Sena. Curi- 
ously enough, the Rajshahi inscription says that Vijaya invaded the KaHn- 
ga country ; now that country at the time was a part of the Chola 
dominion, and we had thus two contemporary kings, each of whom claimed 
a victory over the other. On whose side the victory really lay, it was not 
easy now to determine, but the Rajshahi inscription was highly eulogistic, 
* This is tlie date of the gift, i. e. j'ear of reign. 



187G.] R. Mitra — Translations of Inscriptions from Bolitds. 109 

and in adverting to an invasion of the Western kings, the only fact on 
which it dwells is the stranding of a fleet of war boats on a sandbank, 
which it ^ioeticallj describes as the " ashes on the forehead of S'iva changed 
to mud by contact with the water of the Granges." This was done to give 
a happy turn to a sad failure, and the writer who could make so much of 
such an accident, would scarcely scruple much to change a defeat into a 
victory. Dr. Burnell thinks that the invasion mentioned in the Budal 
inscription might be the offence which Kulottunga retaliated ; biit it is not 
necessary to go so far for the first offence : both the inscriptions might be 
right, and it might be that one of them describes the invasion and the 
other the retaliation. What the ease really was could not be decided until 
after the publication of the whole of Dr. Burnell' s inscription. It was 
expected, however, that it would prove of much value in elucidating several 
doubtful points in the history of the two kings. 

Dr. Eajendkadala Mitra submitted translations of some Inscription;* 
from liohtas. 

No. 1. 
On the jamb of a gate in the Citadel, Rohtas. 

Transcript. 

^^^ \^«!:» ^^^(^) 

TransJation. 

" In the time of the Samvat year loQi, on Sunday the 11th of thu wax- 
ing moon in the month of Vaisaklia — on this day were born for a bright {?) 
career, first Muladala Sinlia and afterwards Muhidala Bhinui." 

The inscription is in the Hindi language, but both its spelling and 
grammar are frightfully corrupt. The last letter of the 3rd line is clear 
enougli, but tlie lirst letter of the 4th is doubtful. If wo read the two 
letters together witli what follows, we have roj/asa Hid, a word whicli I can- 
not explain. Omitting tlie first letter i/asa Hid means ' career of renown' ; 
the epithet, however, is not of much consequence. Who the worthies wore, 
whose birth is here recorded I know not. To the right of the inscription 
there is a figure (in outline) of the renowned hero of the lianuiyana, llauu- 
iiuin, armed with a clul). 

No. 2 is a du])licate of the last. 

No. 3. 

On thi- jamb of tlie noi'th gale, ('itadel, li(jhl:is. 



110 E. Mitra — Translations of Inscriptions from Rohtds. [June, 

Transcript. 

Translation. 

" The room of THra (the sage) Galunatha." 

The only doubtful word in this record is the first. It looks very like 
an adjective for the name ; if so in ordinary Hindi, it can mean quiet, 
peaceful, not given to much motion ; but it is a very unlikely one to be used 
in such a place. In Pali thera means a sage, an expounder, a teacher, and I 
am disposed to accept it here in that sense. It may, however, be a part of 
the name. 

No. 4, is a duplicate of the last. 

No. 5. 

Over the inner entrance to Palace, Eohtas. 

Transcript. 

Translation. 

" Salutation to Ganes'a. During the northern declension (of the sun), 
in the year -of the sea, (4), the arrow, (5), the flavours, (6), and the moon 
(1), Samvat 1654, (The date is given on the top of the line as shown in 
the transcript) on Monday, the 6th of the waxing moon in the month of 
Chaitra, the palace of the auspicious Mana, the great lord of the earth, on 
the hill of Eohitasva, the noblest of the race of hills, was rejDaired, during 
the government of S'ridhara, the purohita of the auspicious great king of 
kings (MaMrdjddhirdja the great king, Maharaja S'ri Mansin. The work 
was done by Madabala Bhatta. Eemember this." 

The only doubtful letter is the first of the name of the architect ; it is 
very like a bh, but as Bhadabala makes an unmeaning word, I prefer to take 
it for an m. The text is in Sanskrit, but the last sentence is in corrupt 
Hindi. I take it to be equivalent to Sniaran raMio. 

No. 6 is a duplicate of the last. 



1876.] H. Beverley — Some Bemlts of fhe decent Census of Oalcwtta. Ill 

No. 7. 
From a rock just outside of the right hand of Bagdad, west gate, 
Rohtas. 

T;^^3[^^^K'5Tifr»TT5it ^^4 ^fflrrf^^ fji<t% ^'^^TfTT ^\^^ ii 

(b) ^mr^ iTTSr^: II ^^T^^ f5f'!l^T^T'!lf^fs[fTTfV»TqTll?^ I 

Translation. 

" Om. In the Sah's S'aka year of ninety (90), and nine (9), and the 
sages, (7), and the Indras (14), and the lords of days (12), all added up, 
(132,) on the day of the festival of the conquest of Cujjid {Madana-vijaya) 
in the auspicious month of Chaitra, the eleventh of the moon, when the sun, 
Venus and Juj)iter were in Pisces. When Pratapa, the lord of the earth, 
had, by his glory, proficient in the recreation of trampling down the 
Yavanas, whitened the earth, this well {lit. piece of water) delightfully 
clear lite (the intellect of) wise men, was excavated in this noble hill by the 
auspicious Madhava. 

" This water, without turbidity, the agent for the wiping out of no 
small amount of sin, was made, even as own brother to his renown, by 
Madhava. 

" Even he, Madhava, made here this wide expanse (of water), sweet 
even as his own words, translucent like a great fountain. 

" In this sin-destroying, waterless spot was made, by Madhava, this 
well, a basin of invaluable water, even like the ocean, the great reservoir of 
the waters." 

Mr. H. Beveulet, C. S., made the following remarks regarding certain 
results of the recent Census of the Town of Calcutta. 

Though the tabulation of the returns was not yet completed, Mr. 
Beverley thought that a brief summary of some of the results ol)tainod might 
not be uninteresting to the members of the Society. It was well-known to 
those present that a census of the Town was taken in 1SG6, and again in 
1B72. The Census of 1S72 showed a large increase in the population of 



112 H. Beverley — Some Hesnlts of the Becent Cemus of (JaleuUa. [Jtt"N'E, 

the Town as compared with that of 1866 ; but doubts had been cast upon 
its accuracy and unfortunately the papers had been destroyed.. The recent 
census also showed a large increase over that of 1866, but not so large as 
that of 1872. Including Fort AVilliam and the Fort of Calcutta, the 
figures were for 1866,-377,921 ; for 1872,-117,601 and by the recent 
census 429,535. It should be mentioned that the fii'st two censuses were 
-taken in the month of January and the last in April. 

Excluding Fort William and the Fort, the popiilation of the Town 
l^roper was 109,036, and of this number 187,132, or 15-75 per cent., reside 
in pucka or brick-built houses. Unfortunately no information on this 
point was collected at either of the previous censuses, so that it is impossi- 
ble with any accuracy to trace the progress of the town in this respect. 
Mr. Simms in his survey of 1850 estimated that no more than 31'6 per 
cent, of the population dwelt in pucka houses, and even had he adopted the 
high average of 11 souls to each house given by the recent census, the per- 
centage would be raised to 10 only. Of course the high average referred 
to depended on the definition of a house, and even with regard to pucka 
houses, it was no easy matter to observe a uniform definition. The number 
of pucka houses would seem, however, to have increased of late years. In 
1850 Simms counted 13,120 ; in 1866 there were 16,022 ; the present returns 
give 16,896. This increase moreover is altogether in houses of two or more 
stories, the one- storied houses actually showing a falling off, due no doubt 
to a difference in the method of counting rows of shops. 

The average density of the population throughout the Town was 107 
persons to the acre, but the density varied in different p)arts from 211 in the 
Kakitola Ward to 24 in Chowringhee. 

One of the main objects for which the recent census was taken was to 
obtain a trustworthy basis for the calculation of a birth and death rate ; 
and he (JSIr. Severley) was of opinion that that object would be to a very 
large extent attained. A common argument against the accuracy of former 
censuses of Calcutta was the disproportion in the muuber of males and 
females in the Town. If this was a defect, it was one shared by the Census 
of 6th April last. Putting aside Fort William and the Port, the males on 
that date numbered 262,455 against 146,581 females only. 

In 1866 the males comp)osed 59 -^ev cent, of the total population.* 

1872 66 „ 

1876 64 „ 

Bvit what seemed to him (Mr. JBeverJey) a most remarkable fact w'as 

that, although the totals of the three censuses varied so considerably, the 

number of females in tlie Town remained nearly constant. Thus in 1866 

the females numbered 145,933 ; in 1872, 147,222 ; and in 1876, 116,581. 

* In Bombay the percentage is 62 per cent. 



1876.] H. Beverley — Some Mef^idts of ilie Eecent Census of Calcutta. 113 

This was a very striking result, and it was impossible to deny the conclusion 
that the variable element in the Calcutta population must be looked for 
among the males. This conclusion was borne otit by the statistics in regard 
to age, which showed that the excess in the number of males over females 
was mainly to be found between the ages of 20 and 60. Up to ten years 
of age, the males and females were nearly equal, the males being 26,216 
and the females 25,179 ; and over 60 years of age the males numbered 
9,85-i only, against females 10,774. But between the ages of 20 and 40, for 
instance, we found 134,820 males against 58,724 females. This clearly 
showed that the excess of m.ales, so far from being a flaw in the census, was 
simply due to the immigration of adult males for the piu'poses of trade or 
service. It was a variable and inconstant element, and sufficed to ex2:)lain 
both the imcertainty which hung about the population of Calcutta, and the 
absurdly low death-rate hitherto put forward. JSIr. Beverley trusted that, 
with these figures before him, the Health Officer would be in a j^osition to 
exhibit the vital statistics of this City in a new and striking light. 

As so many other gentlemen had to address the meeting that evening, 
Mr. Beverley would not detain them longer than just to ask them to bear 
in mind two things in regard to the late census : first, that it was merely a 
census of the Town proper, exclusive of the Subm'bs, and so did not show 
the entire population of the city as a whole ; and secondly that it was an 
enumeration of the sleeping and not of the day j^opulation. If the Suburbs 
were taken into account, Calcutta had a population of at least 800,000 
souls ; while the numbers that frequented the Town for business purposes 
during the day would considerably augment that figure. Madras with an 
area of 27 square miles, had a population of less than 400,000 souls ; Bom- 
bay, with 18^ square miles, 614,405. In point of mere numbers, there- 
fore, Calcutta still deserved to be regarded as the capital of the Indian 
Emj^ire. 

The Chairman said that the thanks of the meeting were due to Mr. 
Beverley both for the very interesting remarks he had made, and for the 
aJjility, care and forethought with which he had conducted the last Census of 
Calcutta. It was expected tliat the result woukl be much more satisfactory 
than that of all former attempts of the kind had been. The probknn of 
taking a census in India was an exceedingly difficult one. Subject races 
could not be expected to sympathise witli their conquerors in the hitter's 
attempt to collect statistical information about the domestic details of the 
conquered. There would invariably be apj^rchensions of fresh taxation, 
which tlie weak would always attempt to overcome by cunning. No amount 
of i^rotestation on the part of the conquerors, who have to meet the exi- 
gencies of a progressing state by devising new sources of revenue, will convince 
the people of their good faith. Even if the people believed in the good faith 



114 V. Ball — KTiond Weapons and Musical Instruments. [June, 

of their rulers for the time, they were intelligent enough to apprehend that 
exigencies might arise in future, which might make the facts collected bear 
heavily uj)on them. It was in the nature of weak, subject races to be shy 
and suspicious, and it was not easy to eradicate such feelings. Mistakes 
had also been made by the governors which were fatal to anything like accu- 
racy in the different censuses which had been taken. In 1872, the strongest 
protestations were made by Government that the Census then about to be 
taken had none but scientific objects in view ; but by an unfortunate coinci- 
dence a Bill was brought before the Bengal Council at the same time for 
legalising a Poll Tax in the towns and municipalities of Bengal ; and it was 
easy to conceive how the one operated on the other. Nor did the effect of 
this mistake end with the Census of 1872 ; for the memory of such coinci- 
dences was not easily effaced. The Chairman hoped, however, that the ample 
precautions taken by Mr. Beverley had prevented any very gross errors 
creeping into his returns, and that those returns will be found, within a 
small margin, reliable for all practical purposes. 

The Natural History Secretary (Mr. Wood-Mason) exhibited a com- 
plete dried specimen of the well-known Glass-rope Sponge (Synlonema 
Sieholdii), accompanied by its insej)arable 'chum' the Falythoa and referred 
those interested to the excellent account of the history of the species given 
by Professor Wyville Thomson in his ' Depths of the Sea.' The specimen 
was presented to the Society by G. G. Apcar, Esq. 

Mr. V. Ball exhibited a series of Khond weapons and musical instru- 
ments from the Tributary States of Sambalpiir, and said — 

The series of battle axes on the table (see Plate) exhibits the principal 
varieties of form used by the Khonds of the Southern tributary states of 
Sambalpiir. They were selected by me from the residue of a collection 
made by Capt. Bowie for presentation to the Prince of Wales. 

At the present time when the forms of weapons in use by different 
races in India and Africa are attracting much attention, the collection now 
exhibited is one of considerable interest. 

Besides the battle axes there are also some musical instruments. To 
one of these I would especially direct the attention of the meeting. No 
English name is exactly suited to its description. It is neither a harp nor 
a lyre, but to those instruments it is most nearly allied. It is made up of 
a number of reeds lashed together in a raft-like form ; of each reed, a portion 
of the cuticle is raised and upheld by slips of bamboo placed as bridges ; 
and it would appear that the instrument is capable of being tuned. It is 
played with the tongue of a little iron implement which bears a close 
resemblance to a jcws-harp. Even in inexperienced hands, the drawing 



Proceedings As. Soc. Bengal 187S. 



Plate II. 















10 



11 



12 



KHOND WAR-AXES 



one-tenth natural size. 



1876.] H. B. Medlicott — Note on a Meteorite from Raipur. 115 

of this tongue across the strings produces a pretty rippling sound. It is 
quite possible that in the hands of an accomplished performer a pleasing 
result might be produced. 

Last year Mr. Wood- Mason exhibited a one-stringed banjo made of 
bamboo from the Naga Hills. 

In it the principle of using for a string a small bundle of the fibres o£ 
the cuticle raised in situ, instead of any foreign material, was also em- 
ployed. 

Another instrument on the table is a sort of Banjo with one string of 
brass wire and a pumpkin attached as a sounding board. I have not met 
with the same form elsewhere. 

Mr. H. B. Medlicott exhibited a Meteorite from Eaipur, Central 
Provinces, and read the follo\ving note regarding it — 

Hecord of the Sitathali Meteorite ofMh March, 1875. 

In May 1875, Mr. H. Eead, the Deputy Commissioner of Eaipur, 
forwarded to the Indian Muse\im, Calcutta, a specimen of a meteorite that 
fell in Sitathali, of the Zamindari NaiTa, about 62 miles east of Eaipur in the 
Central Provmces. This would be about long. 82° 35' E., lat. 21° 15' N. The 
fall is stated to have occurred at about 11 a. M. In the letter announcing 
the presentation it is stated that a similar meteorite was said to have fallen 
at the same moment three-quarters of a mile distant from the first fall. A 
portion of this was also procured by Mr. Eead and, at the request of the 
Trustees, forwarded to the Museum. Both specimens were now exhibited to 
the Meeting. 

The most noteworthy circumstance of this fall is, that,- though foimd 
at such a distance apart, the two pairs most unmistakeably fit. They weigh 
respectively 2Ib8. oz. 430 grains, and Iflj. lOoz. 160gr. When united they 
form a lump of j)eculiar shape, resembling a quarter segment of an 
ovoid mass: — a principal convex surface, two secondary surfaces meeting this 
and each other nearly at right angles, haviag a length of 5^ inches, 
and a fourth, or basal surface of quadrant shape with a radius of 3 inches. 
This last is unfortunately for the most part an artificial fracture ; all the 
others having the usual black crust. There is a marked gradation of the 
glazing action : the main convex sm"face is the smoothest, though stiU 
betraying the granulation of the stone, and on it one can detect faintly, as 
it were the trail of the fused matter, as swept fi'om the surface by the 
resisting medium. The two principal secondary surfaces are slightly concave, 
and dimpled : although the fihn is about as thick on these as on the main 
surface, the roughness of the stone's texture is much less disguised, while 
on the flat and dimpled surface of junction of the two pairs the glazing 
film, though quite distinct, does not completely cloak the texture and colour 



IIG W. T. Blanfovd — Iron Arrow-liends from Sind. [June, 

of the stone. I think it is inferable that the aerolite was originally perhaps 
four times as large as these united pairs ; and that other portions of it must 
have fallen. Tjiis might easily have occm-red unnoticed, as the country is 
rather jungly. 

The character of the stone is of a common type : of a pale gray co- 
lour ; made up, in order of abundance, of steel-gray granules, those of clear 
yellow passing into ochrey granules, and of minute silvery specks, all in a 
whitish earthy matted matrix. 

The account of the fall obtained by the native Police officer is as fol- 
lows : it has the usual marks of fabrication — it is almost certain the aerolite 
must have fallen before the man could have heard the explosion. 

Translation of a Report made ly the Chief Gonstahle, Narra, dated 6th 
Marcli, heing an extract from Moznamcha of that date. 

Ghotan, Chamar of Mouza Singhampu.ri, made a report to the effect 
that at about 11 a. m. on Thursday the 4th March, 1875, a stone fell from 
the sky in Mouza Sitathali in Zamindari Narra, whereupon I despatched 
constable Kalamath to fetch the stone from that place, which is situated at 
a distance of 2 miles from Narra. The constable accordingly brought the 
stone together Avith one Shaikh Madar Baksh ; from whose statement it 
ajjpears that about the time above stated, a loud noise resembling the re- 
port of a cannon was heard, and on coming out of his house to see what 
was the matter, he observed an atmospheric disturbance in the southern 
direction of the village ; and the stone produced f eU. immediately after- 
wards with siich force that it was found buried 8 inches in the ground, at 
a distance of 100 paces from the village and 50 paces from the spectators 
themselves. 

The stone smells like gunpowder, and the day in question was stormy 
and attended with thunder. 

Narra is situated G2 miles to the east of Ilaipur. 

Mr. W. T. Blaistord exhibited some iron arrow-heads from Sind, and 
made the following remarks uj)on them : 

I am indebted for the specimens exhibited to Mr. H. E. Watson of 
the Sind Commission. The arrow-heads Avere found by natives amongst 
the limestone hills Avhich extend to the southward from the neighbourhood 
of Sehwan. No arrows are now used in any part of Sind nor have any of 
the Baluch tribes, who inhabit the country, any tradition of their former 
use. It may fairly be inferred that the heads now exhibited are of consi- 
derable age, perhaps some centuries old, for in so dry a climate as that of 
Sind, iron would rust very slowly. 

The forms of some of the arrow-heads ap]icar to me familiar and I 
think I liave seen similar shapes used amongst some of the aboriginal tribes, 



1876.] 'Proposed Registration of tJie Society. IV? 

but I cannot recollect amongst which, nor have I succeeded in finding 
figures of similar forms. Two are square bird-bolts, the others are three- 
edged, three of them having a conical or conoidal and one an elliptical 
longitudinal section ; in one the three sharpened longitudinal edges are 
concave ; none are distinctly barbed. The heads are about 2 to 1\ inches 
long, (those of the bird-bolts being shorter) and are furnished with a slender 
basal termination for fitting into the shaft. 

The Chairmajs" announced that the Council j)roposed to register the 
Society under Act XXI of 1860. 

The object of the Registration was to obtain for the Society a definite 
legal status as a corporate body, and they would at the same time secui-e the 
right of proceeding against defaulters in the Civil and Criminal courts. As 
the Society now possessed large vested funds, the Council considered it 
very desirable that this step should be taken. Under Section XVII of the 
Act it was laid down that no Society established previously to the j)assing 
of the Act, but not registered under Act XLIII, of 1850, should be registered 
under the Act unless an assent to its being so registered had been given by 
three-fifths of the members present jDersoually or by proxy, at some General 
Meeting convened for that purpose by the governing body. The question 
would therefore be brought up for vote at the next meeting and in the 
meanwhile a coj)y of the Act would lie at the Society's Rooms for the in- 
sj)ection of members wishing to refer to it. 

The Council reported that they have appointed Mr. John Elliott, 
M. A., and Mr. A. M. Nash, M. A., members of the Physical Science and 
Library Committees. 

The following papers were read : — 
1. On certain 'protracted Irregularities of Atmospheric Pressure in the 

Indian Monsoon-region, and their relation to Variations of the Local 

Bainfall.—Bij H. F. Blaneoed, Esq., F. G. S. 

(Abstract). 

Mr. Blantord said that the subject of the paper which he had to 
bring before the Society was one of considerable interest, not only on ac- 
count of its scientific bearings, but also, because in the validity of the views 
now put forward, lay our best hope of accomplishing the desired object of 
Meteorological Science, that of to some extent forecasting the conditions 
of a season's rainfall. 

It discussed two theses. First, that amid all the changes to wliich at- 
mospheric pressure is incessantly sul)ject, including the redistribution of 
pressure over the whole coimtry at the change of the monsoons, certain 
peculiar featiu'es tend to perj^etuatc or reproduce themselves ; that, never- 



118 H. F. Blanford — Protracted Barometric Anomalies. [June, 

theless, though of protracted duration, these peculiar features are not 
permanent. They characterise it may be a single season, or it may he 
two or more seasons in succession, and then disajDpear. Second, that 
these pecuHarities in the distribution of barometric pressure exercise an 
important influence on the rainfall, by affecting the course and velocity of 
the winds which bring the rain. The laws of this interdependence require 
a prolonged study, but in certain cases in which the barometric anomaly has 
been of unusual intensity, it has appeared that the rainfall of a season has 
been deficient under the lee of a region in which the pressure has been 
higher than usual relatively to the surrounding regions ; and that in the 
lee of a region of relatively abnormal barometric depression, the rainfall 
has been heavier than the average. This last relation, it was pointed out, 
coincides with the law of rainfall in Cyclones ; the heaviest rain being in 
advance of the storm vortex. 

The paper discusses the registers of pressure in Bengal, and the Bay, the 
Central and N. W. Provinces, for the seven years 1868-1874, the data being 
given in the form of Tables, shewing the total and relative barometric ano- 
malies of a mxmber of stations. The first of these tables shew how much 
the mean of the barometer readings of each month at each station ranged 
above or below the average of the seven years, for the same month and sta- 
tion. This difference is termed the total anomaly. In the second table, 
the total anomalies of certain pairs of stations are compared month by 
month, and it is found that as a general rule, the total anomaly of the 
one instead of oscillating sometimes above and sometimes below that of the 
other, remains higher or lower, as the case may be, for many months in 
succession ; and sometimes through one or two years. This difference is 
termed the relative anomaly. 

Some striking cases were described in which the relative anomaly has 
been of unusual intensity ; more especially in 1868, when the North West 
corner of the Bay of Bengal was the seat of a persistent barometric depres- 
sion ; and in 1873, when there appeared to be an unusual depression in the 
neighbourhood of the Nicobars and another in Oudh and the N. W. Pro- 
vinces. 

A number of barometric charts were exhibited, most of which, however, 
had reference only to Bengal and the neighboming Central and N. W. Pro- 
vinces. Until last year it was impossible to obtain data from other 
parts of India to compare therewith. The charts for the first eight months 
of 1875, shew the distribution of pressure, wind direction and temj)era- 
ture over the whole of India and the Bay of Bengal ; and it was pointed out 
that in the course of a few years such a series would afford the best possi- 
ble material for the further study of the problems now put forward. 

The paper will be published in full in the forthcoming number of the 
Journal, Part II. 



1876.] H. F. Blanford — Comparisons of Dew-point Temperature. 119 

2. An account of Experiments made in 1875 and 1876, in various ^;«rfs 
of India for the purpose of comparing the observed Temperature of the 
Deio-point toith that computed from the 'Psychrometer hy different 
methods of reduction. — By H. P. Blajstpobd, Esq., F. G. S. 

(Abstract) . 
This paper described tbe results of a series of experiments made at 
various stations in Madras, the N. W. Provinces and the Punjab, during 
the dry season, for the purpose of comparing the observed hygrometric 
state of the atmosj)here, as ascertained by the use of Regnault's hygrometer, 
with that computed from the readings of the dry and wet bulb thermome- 
ters. This comparison has long been a desideratum, since the formulae by 
which the vapour tension, &c., are computed from the temperatures of the 
air and of an evaporating surface, make certain assumptions which have not 
been sufficiently verified ; and although in the more humid atmosphere and 
low temperatures of Europe, the results of the formulae are found to agree 
fairly well with the direct observation of the dew-point, it is by no means 
certain that such is also the case in the dry hot climate of India. The 
results of the comparison have shewn that the psychrometric method is liable 
to many disturbing influences, but that on the mean of a large number of 
observations, the dew-j)oint computed by August's formula, with Eegnault's 
constants, from the readings of the dry and wet bulb thermometers, exposed 
under an open shed, agree fairlj'' well with the results of the direct dew-point 
determinations. Apjohn's formula gives a vapour-tension and humidity 
somewhat too high, and Glaisher's factors give too low a result in a damp 
atmosphere and too high in a di'y one. 

The paper will be published in full in the Journal Part II, No. 2. 

3. List of Bi7Hls collected on the expedition into the Bafla mils, Assam ^ 
together loith those obtained in the adjacent Burrang Terai. — By Major 

H. H. Godwin-Atjsten, F. E. G. S., F. Z. S. 

(Abstract) . 

Tho collection of which this paper is an account, was made by the 
author while in charge of the survey party attached to the force which, 
under Brigadier-General Stafford, C. B., penetrated during the winter of 
1874—75 into the Dafla Hills. 

The list shows that the author was tolerably successful, 29 birds (in- 
cluding two new forms) being added to those recorded in his previous 
pajiers on the avifauna of the N. E. Frontier, notwithstanding that he was 
only able to explore the small portion of the Eastern Himalaya extending 
from E. Long. 93° to Long. 9-1°, on Lat. 27° — a distance of about 60 miles, 
exclusive of the district of Durrang lying at the base of the hills. The hills 
of the Dafla country are described as clad from summit to base with dense 



1'20 V. Ball — On an Ancient KitcTien-Miilden near CttUach. [June, 

forest, the larger trees of which are covered with thick creepers ; and the 
ravines as filled with a luxuriant growth of bamboos, canes, screw-pines, tree- 
ferns, plantains, etc. The author expresses his regret at not having been 
enabled to penetrate beyond this region of dense, sombre forest into the 
higher and unknown ranges beyond, where, he feels confident, his success in 
all branches of zoology would have been far greater. Finally, he expresses 
his indebtedness to the ofiicers of the sm'vey and of the force, especially, 
to General StafEord, for assistance rendered and for the lively interest taken 
by them in the work ; and to Arthur Viscount Walden, for kind assistance 
in the identification and nomencature of the species. 

The jDaper -will be jDubhshed in the forthcoming number of the Journal, 
Part II, with coloui-ed illustrations of the two new species, Actimora Dafia- 
ensis and SiitJwra Daflaensis. 

Mr. W. T. Blajstfoed said — 

The paper by Major Godwin- Austen which has just been read is of 
great interest, as the author is the first natm'alist who has had an opportu- 
nity of investigating the zoology of the Himalayas east of Bhutan. It is 
a subject for great regret that he was not permitted to penetrate fm'ther 
into the country. It is impossible for us to tell what reasons may have 
existed for the singularly small results in the way of exploration which have 
resulted from most expeditions of late years, doubtless there were reasons, 
but it is most unfortunate that in the Dafla expedition, as in that to 
Yarkand, so Httle was done with the admu'able means which existed. At 
the close of the Dafla campaign, there was an overwhelming force in the 
country, there were ample means of carriage, and there were thoroughly 
competent officers. Major Godwin-Austen himself being an admirable 
example, who only asked to be allowed to go on, but nothing was done, and 
to this day peaks and mountain ranges within view of our own possessions 
are as thoroughly unexplored as if they were at the South Pole. 

4. On an Ancient KitcJien-Midden at Chaudioar, near Guttach. — 
By V. Ball, Esq., M. A., F. G. S. 

It is more with the object of j)utting on record a few facts in refer- 
ence to a discovery recently made on the site of the old city of Chaudwar, 
and of thus anticij)ating the possible promulgation of an erroneous view 
which the discovery at first gave rise to, than because the facts are of them- 
selves of much importance, that this note has been written. 

On my arrival in Cuttack last November I was informed that a block 
of laterite, raised in the quarries at Chaudwar, had been forwarded to the 
irrigation works at Marsagai where it was observed to contain fragments 
of pottery and to be, as a building stone, unsuited for the pui'pose to which 
it had been destined. Subsequently it was removed by Mr. Macmillan, the 



1876.] V. Ball — On an Ancient Kitchen-3Iidden near CuttacJc. 121 

Executive Engineer to Ms own house in Cuttack where he kindly gave me 
an opportunity of examining it, afterwards forwarding it to our Geological 
Museum where it may now be seen by any one interested in the subject. 

Although I could detect no very sharply marked line of demarcation 
between the portion of the block which contained the pottery and that 
which was free from any trace of it, still it was apparent that, in so far as 
this particular specimen was concerned, the layer of pottery was superficial 
in other words was on not in the laterite. 

It was evident that to fully understand the relations, a visit to the 
quarries was necessary, as, without seeing the rock in situ, no certain con- 
clusion could be drawn. On reaching Chaudwar, the site of old Cuttack, 
on the north bank of the Mahanadi, I found that throughout a considerable 
portion of the area occupied by the quarries, the cuttings, down to the sur- 
face of the laterite, disclosed sections of from one to three feet of a layer 
of broken pottery and bones, in fact, the remams of an ancient Kitchen- 
Midden. 

The base of this layer, the portion in contact with the laterite is fii-m- 
ly cemented by ferruginous matter ; but higher in the sections the deposit 
becomes looser and looser as it rises to the sui'face. 

In some cases the j)ottery is so fu-mly attached to the laterite that it 
cannot be detached without fracture. 

It is not, I think, necessary to suj^pose that the laterite was in a soft 
or only partially formed condition when the pottery was first thrown down 
upon it. The percolation of waters from above, more or less charged with 
organic matter, may have acted upon its upper sm-face in such a way as to 
cause the solution and subsequent deposition of the ferruginous matter 
which now includes and binds to the laterite the fragments of pottery. 

Had this been a hond-Jide case of the occm'rence of j)ottery in laterite 
it would have had an interest very much greater than it can be now said to 
possess. Although evidence, that of stone implements, has been found of 
the existence of man while one of the forms of laterite was being deposited, 
it still remains to be proved that man, so far advanced in knowledge of the 
arts as to manufacture 25ottery, lived in India at so early a period. 

As to the age of the deposit, the date of the founding of Chaudwar, 
the capital of Orissa, would only furnish a rough indication ; but even it is 
not certainly known. Mr. Beames puts it at probably 350 A. D., other 
authorities so far back as 23 A. D.* Either probably sufiiciently remote 
for the completion of the operations giving rise to the phenomena above 
described and which belong most distinctly to the, geologically speaking, 
j)resent jDcriod. 

* See on this subject Indian Antiquarj', February 1876, p. 55. 



122 V. Ball — Stone Implements from Orissa. [June, 

5. On Sto7ie Implements found in the Tributary States of Orissa. — 
By V. Ball, Esq., M. A., F. G. S. 

It seems to be not improbable that it will be possible, ere long, to trace 
with a considerable degree of accm'acy, the geographical distribution in 
India of those early races who employed stone in the manufacture of imple- 
ments and weapons. In the meantime, with this end in view, it is most 
important that all discoveries should be recorded. Since the year 1867> 
when a hst by me was published in the Proceedings, of the then known 
loeahties where stone implements had been found in India, the number 
of such localities has been nearly doubled. As of many of these there is 
no printed record, I have collected the information as far as possible and 
hope to be able to present shortly before the Society a list revised up to 
date. 

As an example of the interesting points which a comparison of the 
special character of these implements from different localities may some- 
times produce, I need only refer to Genl. Sir Ai'thm' Phayre's remarks* 
upon the implements of the Burmese type from Singhbhum, which I ex- 
hibited here last year. Sir A. Phayre shews that the part of Burma in 
which the stone implements occur — ^the valley and delta of the lower 
Erawati — is inhabited by a race called Mun whose language presents affini- 
ties with that of the Mundas of Singhbhum. Hence the probability of an 
early intercourse having existed, and possibly of an identity of origin be- 
tween these now widely separated peoples, becomes very great. 

The implements which I now exhibit belong to quite a difOerent type 
from those just mentioned. They are roughly chipped quartzite axes 
similar to those which have been found so abundantly in the Madras Pre- 
sidency and in smaller numbers in the Central Provinces and other parts of 
India. Excluding one of doubtful artificial character there are only four 
specimens. These I picked up on the surface at different localities in 
Denkenal, Ungul, Talchir, and in Sambalpiir. 

Denke7uil. The specimen from this locality is very rudely formed and 
has the point broken off by a recent fracture. It was found together with 
the debris from a laterite conglomerate ; and from the fragments of ferrugi- 
nous matrix still attached to its surface there can, I think, be little doubt 
that it was at one time imbedded in the laterite. The material is an opaque, 
slightly granular quartzite. 

Ungul. This specimen was found in the bed of a stream near the 
village of Kaliakota. Its shape, a broad oval, is unusu.al. The material is 
a vitreous quartzite. 

* P. A. S. B., Januar>' 1876, p. 3. 



1876.] 3. ^oodiM.!iiiOxi— Femoral BntsJies of t1ieM.2ini\([i£. 123 

Talchir. This specimen was f oiind on the surface near Hurichandpur. 
It is the best formed of the series. The material is a vitreous quartzite not 
inij)robahly derived from a vein. 

Smnbalpur. This specimen was found near Bursapali to the north of 
the locality well known village of Kudderbuga. It has a pointed wedge- 
shape. The material is a vitreous quartzite. 

6. On the femoral Brushes of the Mantidse and their Function. — 
By J. Wood-Mason, Esq. 

(Abstract) . 

The author states that, while recently examining a specimen of a spe- 
cies of Sierodulco from the Nicobars, his attention was arrested by two 
brightish oblong spots, situated one near the distal end of each of the fore 
femora and nearer to the lower dentate than to the upper entire edge of 
the joint ; and that on examining these spots more closely by the aid of a 
lens he had found that they were brushes of stiff hairs, all of which were 
directed away from the upper edge of the femur, some of which, namely, 
those forming the upper half of the brushes, were closely appressed to the 
surface and threw back the light strongly, and the rest of which projected 
almost straight out from it and were the stiffest of all. He had been un- 
able to find any account of these structiu'es in any entomological work to 
which he had access ; and neither M. de Saussure, who had recently pub- 
lished an admirable account of the external anatomy and habits of the whole 
family, nor Dr. Fischer, the author of the learned Latin work on the 
Orthoptera of Europe, had made any mention of them. These brushes 
occurred in a large number of Asiatic, Euro^jean, African, and Australian 
forms, and probably universally throughout the whole group, although he 
had examined none of the American species, which, however, were hardly 
likely to prove an exception to the rule. 

He finally discusses the probable fimction of the brushes, and con- 
cludes that they are used for cleaning the parts of the mouth after feeding, 
just as the pollen-brushes of bees are used by them for freeing their bodies 
from the pollen grains with which they have been powdered dm-ing theu- 
quest after honey. 

The paper will be published in the Journal, Part II. 

7. On the Geographical Bistrihution of Schizocephala, a Genus of Man- 
tidaj. — Bi/ J. Wood-Mason, Esq. 

(Abstract). 
The author states that so far from being a peculiarly African form, as 
it is considered to be by M. do Saussure in his recent monograph of the 



124 W. T. Blanford — On a neiv Cat from IE. Turhestan. [June, 

family, the remarkable genus SchizocepTiala is one of the most widely dis- 
tributed not only of Mantidce but of insects in India ; and, in support of 
his statement, gives a long list of localities from which he has received 
either perfect or immature examples of the (?) single species 8. hicornis, 
viz., the Karakpur hills in Behar, Devapm* and Chanda in the Central 
Provinces, Kaladgi in the Bombay presidency, Kachh, Ceylon, Murshi- 
dabad and Calcutta in Bengal, Pegu, &c. ; and quotes the old entomologist 
Stoll, who describes and figm-es examples from Tranquebar and China ; 
and Professor Westwood's ' Arcana Entom,' in which it is referred to as 
an Asiatic form. Finally, he concludes either that the locality given by 
M. de Saussure is erroneous or that that author's specimens, if really from 
South Africa, represent a second species of the genus. 

8. Description of a new Gat (Felis Shawiana) from Eastern Turhistdn, 
—By W. T. Blanpord, Esq., F. E. S. 

Mr. Blatstpoed said — The skin of a cat, which was amongst the 
collections made by Dr. Stohczka in Eastern Turkestan, was too imperfect 
to be satisfactorily identified. A much better specimen has since been 
brought by Mr. Shaw from the same country, and of this the skeleton has 
been kept, as well as the skin. It proves to be a new species resembling 
Felis (Ohaus) caudata, of Western Turkestan in colouration, but having 
a shorter tail and a differently formed skull. It is projoosed to name this 
cat after Mr. Shaw, to whom we are so largely indebted for om* knowledge 
of Yarkand and Kashghar. 

The description wiU be published in the forthcoming number of the 
Journal Part II. 

The reading of the follovnng papers was postponed — 

1. OjL the Physical Geography of the Great Indian Desert, with esper 
cial reference to the former presence of the Sea in the Indus Valley, and 
the Origin and Mode of Formation of the Sand-hills. By W. T. BLANroBD, 
Esq., F. R. S. 

2. Notes on the Inhabitants of the Nicobars. By F. A. de EoEP- 
STOEFF, Esq., Extra Assistant Superintendent Port Blair and Nicobars. 



1876.] Library. 125 



y 



IBRARY. 



The following additions have been made to the Library since the Meet- 
ing held in May last. 



Transactions, Proceedings, and Journals, 

presented hy the respective Societies or Editors. 
Berlin. Konigliche Preussische Akademie der Wissenschaften, — Monats- 
bericht, February, 1876. 

Siemens. — Uber die Abhangigkeit der electrischen Leitungsfahigkeit des Selens 
von Wanae und LicM. Peters. — Uber die Grundlagcn einer Ethnographie 
DeutscHand's mit besonderer Beriicksichtigung von Friesland. Zincken gen. 
Sommer. — Uber die genaue Darstellimg der Brechung eines Strahls durch. ein 
Linsensystem. 
Bombay. The Indian Antiquary, — Vol. 5. Pt. 55. 

C. Some. — Notes on villages in the Himalayas, in Kamaon, GarhwSl, and on 
tlie Satlej. D. F. KhaJchar. — Castes and Tribes in KacKh. /. F. Fleet. — 
Sanskrit and old Canarese Inscriptions, continued. Nos. XVI, XVII, and 
XVIII. Sir W. Flliot. — On some remains of Antiquity at Hanagal. Br. 
G. BuMer. — Two Inscriptions from Jhabapatban. Eev. F. Kittel. — The 
Wasberman Virasena : a Lingayta Legend. Rev. J. Cain. — Legends and 
Notes on Customs. 
Boston. American Academy of Arts and Sciences, — Proceedings. New 
Series, Vol. II, May 1874 to May 1875. 

S. S. ScucMer. — Historical Sketch of the Generic Names proposed for Butter- 
flies : A Contribution to Systematic Nomenclature. C. S. Williams. — In- 
tensity of Twilight. W. 0. Crosby. — Light of the Sky. E. C. Fickering and 
D. F. Strange. — Light absorbed by the Atmosphere of the Sun. 
Calcutta. The Christian Spectator, Vol. 5, No. 60. 

. The Indian Medical Gazette, Vol. XI, No. 6, June, 1876. 

. The Ramayanam, Pt. 5, No. 6. 

. Geological Survey of India (Records.) Vol. IX, Pt. I, 1876. 

W. T. Flan ford. —On the Geology of Sind. 
Cambridge, U. S. Illustrated Catalogue of the Museum of Comparative 
Zoology at Harvard CoUege, No. VIII. 

T. Lyman. — Oplduridae and Astro])hytidae^ including those di'edgcd by the 
late Dr. William Stimpson. 
Genoa. Museo Civico di Storia Naturalo, Annali, Vol. VII. 
London. The Geographical Magazine, — Vol. Ill, Nos. 4 and 6, April and 
May, 1876. 

No. 4. A. Vambery. — The Russian Campaign in Khokand. 
No. 5. The Island of Sokotra. E, MichcU, — Ferghana. M. Venyukof. — New 
MapS of Mongolia. 



126 Library. [Juke, 

London. Nature, Vol. 13, Nos. 335, 337 to 340, 1876. 
Palermo. Societa degli Spettroscopisti Italiani, — Memorie, Dispensa 4, 
Aprile, 1876. 

Ca2}t. J. Waterhouse. — On the influence of Eosin on the Photographic Action 
of the Solar Spectrum upon the Bromide and Bromoiodide of Silver. P. 
Tacchini. — Eruzioni solari osservate nel 1872. Osservazioni solari spettroscop- 
iche e dirette fatte all' Osservatorio di Palermo nell' Aprile 1876. A, Ricco. 
— Sulla trasparenza dell' aria. 

EooKS AND Pamphlets 

presented, hy the AutJiors. 

MiANSAKOF, M. BibliograpMa Cancasica et Transcaucasica : Essai d'une 

bibliograpHe systematique relative au Caucase a la Transcaucasie et aux 

populations de ces eontrees, Tome I and II, Eoyal 8vo., St. Petersbourg, 

1874-76. 
Skeepseijd, L. 0. Eev. Wbat is the correct term for Grod in Santbali ? 

Pamphlet, Benares, 1876. 
Taeini Pkosad Sen. History of Bijni Dynasty, 8vo., Assam, 1875, 

(3 Coj)ies.) 

Miscellaneous Presentations. 

A new Hindustani-English Dictionary. By S. W. Fallon, Ph.D., 
Pt. III. 

The Indian Antiquary, Vol. V, Pt. 55. 

GOVEEWMEKT OF IjTDIA, HOME DePAETMENT. 

Further Notes on the Eungpore Eecords. By E. G, Glazier, C. S., 
Vol. II. 

Annual Eeport on the Police Administration of the Town of Calcutta 
and its Suburbs for the year 1875. By Sir Stuart Hogg. 

Goveenment op Beng-al. 

Annual Eeport of the Civil Dispensaries for the Calendar year, 1873- 
74, No. 45. 

GOVEENMENT OF MaDEAS. 

Eeport on the Police Administration of the Central Provinces for the 
year 1875. 

Chief Commissionee Centeal Peotinces. 
Annual Eej)ort of the Trustees of the Museum of comparative Zoology 
at Harvard College iii Cambridge U. S., together with the Eeport of the 
Committee on the Museum for 1874. 

Teustees of the Museum. 
The complete Works of Count Eumford. 

Ameeican Academy of Aets and Sciences. 



1876.] Library. 127 

Annual Eeport o£ the Board of Regents of the Smithsonian Institute, 
showing the Operations, Expenditures and Condition of the Institution for 
the year 1874. 

Report of Explorations in 1873 of the Colorado of the West and its 
Tributaries. By Professor J. W. Powell, (2 copies.) 

Drilling in Stone without Metal. By Charles Rau. 

The Scientific Education of Mechanics and Artizans. By Professor 
A. P. Peabody. 

Smithsonian Institute. 

Periodicals Purchased. 
London. The Academy. Nos. 206 to 211, 1876. 

Books Purchased. 

Fallon, S. W., Dr. A new Hindustani-English Dictionary, with illustra- 
tions from Hindustani Literature and Eolk-Lore. Pt. III. 

Ffegttsson, J. History of Indian and Eastern Architecture : forming the 
third volume of the new Edition of the "History of Architecture." 
Royal 8vo., London, 1876. 

Maekham, Clements R. Narratives of the Mission of George Bogle, to 
Tibet, and of the journey of Thomas Manning to Lhasa, 8vo., London, 
1876. 

Manuscripts Purchased. 

Persian. 
Kulliyat-i-Anwari. Diwan of Riih-ul-Amin. Diwan-i-Na9ibi. KuUiyat- 
i-Khwajah Salman. Shahanshahnamah, a History of Muhammad and the 
four Khalifahs. Zafarnamah-i-Timuri, 1 Vol. Bahi'am o Bihruz. Jang- 
namah-i-Akbar Khan, or Akbarnamah. Tarikh-i-Amirnamah, by Mmishi 
Bishn Lai. Tarikh-i-'Alam-arai 'Abbasi, by Sikandar Beg, Vols. I and 11. 
Do. do., Vols. I and II. Iqbahiamah-i-Jahangiri. Muntakhab-ul-Tawa- 
rikh, by 'Abdul Qadir Badaonl.. Tarikh-i-Firuz Shahi, by Shamsuddin 
'Afif. Khula9at-uttawarikh, by Sujan Eai Khatri. Tarikh Nawab Sir 
John Malcolm, Vols. I and II. Farhang-i-Jahangiri, by Jamal-uddin 
Husain Inju. 

AraMc. 
Fath-ul-Bari, Sharh-i-Bukhari, 2 Vols. 

Urdu Lithographs. 
Mir-at-ul-Mulk, by Rahim Bakhsh. Badshahnamali, by Sadar. 



PROCEEDINGS 



OF THE 



ASIATIC SOCIETY OF BENGAL, 

For July, 1876. 



Tlie montlily General Meeting of the Society was held on Wednesday, 
the 5th instant, at 9 o'clock p. m. 

Babu Rajendralala Mitra, LL. I>., Vice-President, in the Chair, 
The Minutes of the last Meeting were read and confirmed. 
The following presentations were announced — 

1. Prom the Hmigarian Academy of Sciences, a bronze Medal stinick 
by the Academy in commemoration of the completion of its great 
Hungarian Dictionary, edited by the late G. Czuczor and J. Fogarasi. 

2. From Dr. Eajendralala Mitra, a copy of the " Atlas of Northern 
Antiquities." 

3. From the Secretary of State for India, a copy of a work enti- 
tled, " Primitive Tribes of the Nilagiris," by the late J. W. Breeks, M. C. S. 

4. From A. V. Nursingrow, Esq., a copy of the " Eesults of Meteor- 
ological Observations, 1875, taken at G. V. Juggarow's Observatory, Dabba 
Gardens, Vizagapatam." 

5. From J. Calvert, Esq., a drawing of an Ancient Temple at Jugget 
Sookh, Kulu Valley, and some lithographs of sculptures in Kidu. 

6. From Babu Nilcomal Basak, through Dr. Bajendralala Mitra, 
5 vols, of a MS. Sanskrit Dictionary, with 60 specimen pages, printed in 
Bengali, compiled by the late Babu Kasinatha Basak. 

The following letter from Dr. Eajendi'alala Mitra accompanied the 
donation — 

" I send herewith, for presentation to the Society, in the name of 
Babu Nilcomal Basak of Kalakar Street, Calcutta, five vokmies of a MS. 
Dictionary of the Sanskrit language, and also sixty specimen images of 
the same, printed in the Bengali character. The work was comj)iled by 
the late Babu Kasinatha Basilk who died about forty years ago. He 
was a distinguished Sanskrit and Persian scholar, and for his time a 
good English Avriter, having been in the habit of preparing briefs for 
barristers of the late Supreme Court of Calcutta. He was much re- 



130 Copper-plate Grant of GovindacTiandra of Kanauj. [JtrLT, 

speeted by his countrymen for liis learning, wealth and social qualities. 
The Dictionary is remarkable for being the first of its kind prepared by a 
native without European assistance or superintendence. It is alphabeti- 
cally arranged, fuller in vocables than the ' S'abdakalpadruma' of the late 
Sir Raja Radhakanta Deva, and gives the etymology of every word. In 
the last respect it is superior to both the ' S'abdakalpadruma' and the Dic- 
tionary compiled under the superintendence of the late Dr. Wilson. The 
work was completed in eight volumes, of which the 1st, 3rd, and 5th are 
lost. The second volume is devoted to the letter ^, the 4th to ^ to ^, the 
6th to qf to X, the 7th to ^ to "«[ and the 8th to '^ and ^. The codices 
seem to have been sadly neglected, and have suffered much from damp and 
the ravages of rats." 

7. From F. S. Growse, Esq., through Dr. Eajendralala Mitra, a copper- 
plate grant of Govindachandra of Kanauj, dated A. D. 1111, with tran- 
script and translation by Babu Durgarama Basu, B. A. and B. L. 
Dr. Eajendralala Mitra writes regarding it : 

" I send herewith a copper-plate grant, forwarded to me by J. Growse, 
Esq. of Mathura, for presentation to the Society. I send also a transcript 
and a translation prepared by Babu Dvirgarama Basu, B. A. and B. L., 
Pleader of the High Court, who undertook the decipherment of the record 
at my request, 

" The plate was accidentally turned up, in the year 1869, at a place 
called Rahan in the Etawa district, by a kachhi while digging in the- 
fields. It is quadrangular in shape, measuring across the middle 19| x 13 
inches, but the edges are slightly curvilinear. At the middle of the upper 
edge is rivetted a clasp holding a ring. 

" The record comprises 29 lines, extending lengthwise over the whole 
surface of the plate, except the last line, which terminates at about the 
middle, the space after it being filled up by the figures of a conchshell and 
an arrow.- The characters are of the Kutila type. 

" In its preamble and the imprecatory verses, the record is a counterpart 
of the several inscriptions of Govindachandra of Kanauj, already published 
in the Journal — the last by me in 1873. The dynasty is the same, and 
described in identically the same words. The subject, the grant of a plot 
of land measmung fom* ploughs, in the district of Kamaitha, to one Bhatta 
Brahmana Gugachandra of Bhatakabara, is also of little interest. But it 
bears the date, the 15th of the wane in the month of Pausha, Samvat 11G6, 
equal to A. C. 1111, when his father, Madanaptila, was still the 
reigning sovereign, which shows that he must have succeeded his father 
some time after A. C. 1111, and not between 1103 and 1117 of the 
Christian era, as conjectured by me in my paper of 1873 {Jourmil XLII, 
p. 316.)" 



1876.] Copper-plate Grant of Govindaclian&ra of Kananj . 131 

Transcript of a copper-plate Grant of Govindachandra of Kanaiij. 

2. fTTfc'^^: I f^WT ^TT^Kfl^^ ^^ W^: ^^t ^^ ^^ (^^) f^^T^ II SlB^# 

^T3T S1¥rr(s?fTqrr)3?'2l fT^f ^^^^il^^W II ^'^ W^ fTfT: ^ ^^ ^*TV?:gq-T 

4. -^^^Tflfw.- si;§-%T^fr^f^^'^^frrnFix:: ^^^^^^t ^^^'- 1 ^Wt("^T)^TTfTKsmTq- 

5. rj'^^Tfsr ^rf¥(f8i) fm#T(f5i#r)TT^%m%^^rsit^^Tf*r ^rfrqi^^irrTf^T- 

f*T; II rr^T?3T^r — 

•^^ ^^tf% ^^ II ^sItx:^:^! — 

10. T?[W: ^ T'^ f^«I^^ SlTf-^irr ^^i:^! II qTfl^IT^^TJT^ITiT^Tf^TrWq^^- 

11. qT^T^^TrrqTTlWfK*^^rTT5ITf^T:T^q^i}^x:qTiT?TT%^^^liT^5rqT^^^- 

^t^ Tr^^T'^'tflf^(^'^)q^Tf%frT^Trgnu(^)q3f^^^T^TJir1x^f« — 
13. qsj^fTffTj^^crTqffr ^'fitt(fK^(qrEin=f:qfr^)qi^^Tf^^Tf^q^qT^'t^ '^w^t- 
qqfrr ^^sj^fw '^ II ^^i^ f^f^^^»ff^f?icrT^jf rfr "^iwr^J i ^Trrrrrq^- 

J ■J s» 

15. ^rf^ I ^ffg(^nrr,") Jic^T -^f^ffTi? ^T^: II fff^s^ Ti^rfq h^tct^t qr^T)?)- 



132 Copier-plate Orant of GovindacTiandra of Kanauj. [JitlT) 

16. tiT^ '^^T^t 'W^f^J ^^iT^; 11 '9'^^T \ ^si^^^rer^Tqi^T^fJift^^'t^^ 

17. wT^T^^T^r^^f^wT I ^ \i.^t qr^^t^^ '^ti^ ^tr i ^^wwfrr^T'??! ^^- 
19. TTf3T5j^ qw^^if^i^^ II ^fWT'fi'iiT^ araiTqi^m Th^q^T^ i ^cT^^- 

qr^^^ici^w^^r ^frw4w^q(^q)^fr^ ^fr?^^?!?^ ^fq »r ^iii — 
^JiTTfkf'TJ I "^m ^^ ^^T ^rTT^i?! w^ w^T qr^ i ^^Tif 

25. qT^Tlt ^T ^T "W^W ^a?^t I ^ f^^T^t fff^T fqisf^: W^ ^T^f?r || 

26. ^w I Jirt^t ^^^^^ vr^T'^^'^i'^ i '^^^^^'^r^ifrr ^T^^Tww^a^ ii 
■^■^ ^^ f^^T q^f^r^r ^^t I ^qr^q »T^mf^f=^^f^wr 'tt^??'? — 

28. ^Tfl f^^fT 1 -^sIl^T^si^Tfq ^wfsT^rTT ^=H ^-^IT qr^cTf II ^T"^4T^ffr 

29. 3iT#^T^'S[^T f^^^^qj-i^ 3^':=5rt^^T¥^w^fw ii i^h^^w 'gi^^^- 

Translation of a copper-plate Grant of GovindacTiandra of Kanauj, dated 

A.D. 1111. 

1, Om : salutation to the suiDreme Spirit. May that agitation at the 
commencement of his dalliance with S'ri, when her hands rolled about on 
the neck and shoulders of eager and lustful Vaikuntha, be to your pros- 
perity. 



1876.] Copper-plate Grant of Goinndacliandra of Kaiumj. 133 

2. There was, in the dynasty of Gahai-abala, a king named Mahitala, 
who had conquered aU his enemies. Though he was not the S'esha, yet 
the serpent S'esha was gratified by placing into his hands the task of up- 
holding the immense weight of this earth. 

3. On the extinction of the two well known Khshatriya races descended 
from the sun and the moon, the Self born (Bramha), perceiving that the 
chanting of the Yeda was extinct in the whole universe, was inclined to 
incarnate himself on earth in order to reclaim the lost path of virtue as 
also the two celebrated Kshatriya races. 

4. He was then born in that dynasty, as king, Srichandi-a Deva, the 
best of kings, the dispeller of the gloom of impatient heroic enemies ; by 
whose glorious majesty was repressed the revolts of the siibjects of the 
imrivalled great kingdom of auspicious Gadhipm'a, which had been earned 
by the valour of his arms. 

5. Eepairing, as a protector, to Kasi, Kusika, Uttara Kosala, Indi-a- 
sthana and other places of pilgrimage, he marked the earth by the perfor- 
mance of a hvmdi'ed tula rites, in coui'se of which he repeatedly gave to the 
twice-born his o^vn weight in gold. 

6. His son was Madanapala ; that crest-jewel of the lords of the earth 
flourishes as the moon of his race. By the waters, which sparkled in jars 
at his coronation, the earth was washed clean of all the sinful dust of this 
iron age. 

7. When he went forth to conquer on the earth, sinking mider the 
overpowering weight of the footfalls of his maddened and careering ele- 
phants, high as lofty mountains, the serpent S'esha, crushed as it were by it, 
and having its crest-jewel fractured and thrust down into its bleeding moxith, 
for a time hid its face in its folds. 

8. From him descended, even as the moon issued forth from the 
ocean, the charming and beautiful Govindachandra, who has acquired as 
much fame as Eama, son of Dasaratha. He, by repeated battles, compelled 
Hanmiira, who was much dreaded for having broken the heads of the huge, 
intractable elephants of Gaura, to sue for peace. He, who was well skilled 
in conquering the earth and was a Kalpa briksha to beggars, flom'ished here 
to efface from his kingdom the footprints of the constantly neighing and 
careering horses. 

9. Sri Madanapala Deva, the highly revered, the great king over 
great kings, the chief lord, the devout worshipper of Siva, successor of the 
highly revered, the great king over great kings, the supreme lord, the 
devout worshipper of S'iva, Srichandra De^'a, the sovereign who by his arms 
carved the happy kingdom of Kannyakubja reigned victoriously. 

Govindachandra Deva, the son of this great king, commands and ac- 
quaints the inhabitants of the principal towns in the district or circle o£ 



134i Copioer-plate Grant of Govindacliandrn of Kanauj. [July, 

Eomaitha, and of the neigh bourliood, as also rajas, queens, priests, ministers, 
justiciaries, treasurers, physicians, astrologers, guardians of female apart- 
m.ents, and the owners of all sorts of properties. Kjiowing that all living 
beings are mortal and frail, and life, like a drop of water on a blade of grass 
subject to the influence of the wind and sun, is impermanent, and as unsteady 
as a drop of water on a lotus leaf, or like the bubble of water caused by 
rain di-ops, gone the moment after it is seen ; that the pleasm'es of the senses 
are transitory, and life is always passing ; being f m'ther assured by the other- 
wise conflicting Smritis and S'ruties that a gift of land secures eternal bles- 
sing, four ploughs of land in this village together with their soil and water, 
hiUs and rivers, orchards of mangoe, and madhuka trees, iron and salt mines, 
and with everything that is above and below that land, along with the power 
of inflicting punishment on the jDeople according to the nature of their offences 
and of realizing the rents of grass, leaves and mines, I grant, for the increase 
of fame and virtue of myself and of my parents, unto Bhatta Bramhana 
Gugachandra, son of Rilhi, grandson of Guga, inhabitant of Bhatakahara, 
of the Sankhayana Gotra, having Gautama, Abithatha and Angirasha for his 
threefold Pravara, and is well versed in S'ruti ; by this patent, with a pure 
heart, with hands consecrated by water and kusa grass ; for the period of 
the duration of air, water, earth and ocean, on this the 15th day of the wane 
in the month of Pausha, Samvat 1166, when the sun is under the influence 
of Eahu, having bathed with due ceremonies in the Yamuna at the bathing 
place called after the god Muraitha in Bhasatika, having offered libations 
of water to gods, men and my ancestors, ha^^ing worshipped the sun and 
then my god of special adoration, Mahesvara, with fivefold offerings, and 
having made full offerings to the fire. 

Knowing this you must render mito him, according to my commands, 
the twentieth part of all usufructs and taxes for justice, fragrant grass, salt 
and diamond mines and other taxes, whatever have to be given. No body 
should in- any way interfere with this. 

1. O Pm'andara, heaven is the reward of those who give away a 
conchshell, a homestead, an umbrella, choice horses, excellent elephants, 
lands, trees, and flowers. 

2. Both he who accepts lands and he who grants them are equally 
meritorious and dwell eternally in heaven. 

3. The earth has been enjoyed by many kings, including Sagara and 
others. To whomsoever belongs the earth for the time being, he enjoys the 
fruit (of such gifts). 

4. Whoever robs earth, whether given by himself or by others, be- 
coming a maggot, sinks with his parents into ordure. 

5. The donor of lands dwells in heaven for the space of sixty thousand 
years : the resumer and the abettor thereof are doomed to abide in hell for 
a like period. 



1876.] Registration of the Soeiefy. 135 

6. He who robs a cow, a gold piece, or a finger's breadth o£ land, 
dwells in hell until the dissolution of the universe. 

7. All the gifts of former kings are jDroductive of virtue, wealth and 
fame — how can he, who claims the name of goodness resLime them, which 
are to them but as emblems of vomited food ? 

8. With folded hands this is my prayer to all futiire sovereigns 
whether of my dynasty or of others, that they should never take any tribute 
from this village, not even a blade of durba grass. Those who wish to 
do their duty should, obedient to the mandates of sages, preserve intact 
my gift, (as long as) the wind blows and the sun continues to shine. 

Written by Tribhuvanapala, son of Thakkura Devanga, under orders of 
Gangeya. (Engraved ?) by Sunathakkura, son of Satehara. 

The following gentlemen, duly proposed and seconded at the last 
Meeting, were balloted for and elected ordinary Members — 
Lieut. F. W. Jarrad, E. N. 
D. Scott, Esq., C. E. 
Eoss Scott, Esq., C. S. 
Dr. D. O'C. Eaye. 
Eev. Thos. Foulkes, 
The following are candidates for ballot at the nest Meeting — 
J. Hector, Esq., Bank of Bengal, proposed by Dr. T. Anderson, se- 
conded by Mr. W. T. Blanf ord. 

Major 0. B. St. John, E. E., Superintendent Mayo College, Ajmere, 
proposed by Mr. W. T. Blanford, seconded by Mr. H. F. Blauford. 

P. T. Carnegy, Esq., Political Agent, Naga Hills, proposed by Caj^t. J. 
Waterhouse, seconded by Mr. H. Blochmann. 

Mr. C. T. Buckland has intimated his desire to withdraw from the 
Society. 

The Chairmak brought before the meeting the question of the Eegistra- 
tion of the Society under Act XXI of 1860, announced at the last meeting ; 
and on the proposal of the Council that the Society shotdd be so registered 
being put to the vote it was carried unanimously. 

Mr. Blociimantst laid before' the Meeting the following prospectus of 
the proposed new Edition of Tabari, by Prof. M. J. do Goejc of Leyden. 

The Peojected edition q]? Tabari. 
The ancioit Arabic chronicle has a very characteristic form. Each 
important fact is related, if possible, by an eye-witness or contemporary, 



136 -P>'o/. M. J. de Qoeje's new Edition of Talari. [ Jtjlt, 

whose account came Ao\y\\ through a series o£ narrators to the author. If 
he has obtained more than one account of a fact, with more or less imjaor- 
tant modifications, through several series of narrators, he communicates 
them all to the reader in extenso. Thus we are enabled to consider the 
facts from more than one point of view and to acquire a vivid and clear 
notion of them. 

In this style a universal history, from the Creation down to A. D. 915 
(302 of the Hidjra), was written by Tabari of Bagdad, an author whose 
veracity, accuracy and stu}3endous learning are justly eulogised by all, whe- 
ther Moslems or Christians, who consulted his work. The original work 
was very extensive, so that the author, who was 78 years old on concluding 
it, resolved to devote the remaining years of his life to its abbreviation for 
general use. (He died in the beginning of 924.) Still his history re- 
mained a very bulky work. According to my calculation, it will fill in 
print twenty large volumes in 8vo. Its great extent rendered compendiums 
for private circulation necessary ; they were generally employed and hence 
the original work became rare and only to be found in the great libraries. 
Of the best known abridgment made in 963 and written in Persian, Dr. H. 
Zotenberg gave a French translation, which has just been completed. The 
interest of this jDublication is incontestable, but it is far from indemnifying 
us for the want of the original work. For the Persian epitomator not only 
dropped a great m^any very interesting particulars, and modified here and 
there the facts, but what is most important is wanting : the different ac- 
counts of an event have been arbitrarily blended into one single narrative, 
or rather one, and not always the best series of traditions, has been follow- 
ed, and the acciu'ate statements regarding the transmission of the traditions 
from the first narrators down to the author have been altogether left 
out. 

"What the use of abridgments had begun, Timur and the decay of 
civihsatien all but completed. It is even now doubtful if a single copy of 
this great work is still in existence out of Europe. Prof. Sprenger was 
told in 1848 that two complete copies were to be found at Medina. An 
Indian friend of his, who not long afterwards went on a pilgrimage to 
Ai'abia undertook to inquire about them. As the libraries are closed in the 
sacred month, he could not even get sight of the volumes, but was informed 
that the work really existed. M. Kunik of St. Petersburg tells in his in- 
teresting Appendix to Dorn's Casj^ia that Gottwaldt induced two hadjis of 
Kasan to make researches about the existence of a cojiy at Medina. They 
brought home the vague information that a copy had existed, but as they 
were told, the volumes had been transported to Constantinople. I think 
the latter information less trustworthy than the former. To resolve this 
very important question, M. A. von Kremer of Vienna wrote to Sheikh 



1876.] Prof. M. J. de Ooeje's New Edition of Talari. 137 

Jusof Dili j a al-Khalidi at Jerusalem, who promised to procure the requi- 
site iuformatioii, and Prof. Koch of Schaffhausen wrote to the Sherif of 
Mekka. 

For the rest, parts of the work, mostly from different copies, are to be 
found in several libraries. Kopriilii-library in Constantinople possesses 8 
volumes, the British Museum 3, the Bodleian in Oxford 4, Berlin 6, Paris 
4, Leiden and Algiers each ,1. A provisional investigation afforded the 
satisfactory result, that it would be possible to restore a complete copy by 
help of all these dispersed volumes. From that moment, I firmly resolved 
to take the preliminary stej)s for preparing an edition of this niost import- 
ant work, and to see whether it would be possible, with the aid of others, 
to realise the jjlan. 

The fixst decisive measure was brought about by the late Professor Sta- 
helin of Basel, whose loss we had to deplore last summer. The 22nd December, 
1872, I received a letter from Prof. Socin, in which in the name of Stahelin 
a certain sum was placed at my disposal, if I should feel inclined to take 
the lead in preparing an edition of Tabari. This contribution (5000 
francs), together with a sum of 1500 guilders, placed at my disposal by 
the Minister of the Interior in the Netherlands, enabled me at once, with 
the assistance of Dr. Mordtmami, to get copied in Constantinople the fij-st 
part of the first volume and the parts that contained the years 37 — 40, 
51 — G4 and 158 — 302 of the Hidjra, and in London the second part of the 
fii'st volume. Thus a beginning could be made with the preparation of the 
text. To Dr. Barth of Berlin was assigned the part of the first section 
containing the pre-islamitic history up to the Sassanides, to Prof. Noldeke 
of Strassbm-g that containing the history of the Sassanides. Prof. Loth 
of Lei^Dzig undertook the edition of the life of Muhammad and the four 
" righteous" Khalifas, the latter part of wliich has been published by 
Kosegarten from the Berlin manuscript (1831 — 53). Prof. Thorbecke of 
Heidelberg took upon himself the first, and Dr. MuUer of Vienna the se- 
cond part of the history of the Omayades, Dr. Griinert of Leipzig the first 
part of the history of the Abbasides, whilst the latter part remained for my 
own share. PerhajDS it will be necessary to seek one or two more collabora- 
tors, some parts of the work being very extensive. 

Thus the task is portioned out, and the study of the text has com- 
menced. But before the whole can be fairly started, there is still a great 
deal to be done. The third part of the Constantinopolitan manuscripts 
has been copied, and one volume in London ; we have still to get copied 
the two thirds in Constantinople and the two remaining volumes in the 
British Museum. It will, too, be necessary to have the copies made in 
Constantinople once more collated with tbo originals in the Koprulii by a 
young Orientalist of capacity. If a copy of the work exists at Medina, we 



138 Bloclimaiin, — On a Silver Com of ShdhjaJidn II. [Jtjlt, 

neither can nor may do without it, but must have it copied. Then, though 
Messrs. Brill of Leiden proposed to publish the work at their costs, I 
think it very probable, that a contribution towards the expense of printing 
ought to be paid, especially as we must insist on two points, 1st, that the 
price of a volume of about 640 pages in 8vo. be not above S. 16 ; 2nd, that 
the printing be execxited at the rate of 3 sheets of 16 pages per fort- 
night. 

For these purposes a large sum of money is requisite. My learned 
friends. Prof. Dozy, in his letter to Mr. H. W, Freeland, of Chichester 
(printed in the Academy d. d. 27 Nov. 1875, p. 557), and Prof. Amari, in 
his letter to M. de Gubernatis (printed in the Rivista Europea), having in- 
voked the assistance of all who understand the importance of this publica- 
tion for the promotion of science, I feel myself justified in appealing to 
all who may deem the success of the enterprise an object worthy of their 
support. The work of Tabari is truly a mine of useful information for the 
historian. Even for pre-islamitic history it is not without value ; Prof. 
Noldeke calls its history of the Sassanides " a very precious source." How 
very highly Prof. Sprenger, the author of the Life and Doctrines of 
Muhammad, esteems the work, appears from a passage in one of his letters 
to me quoted by Prof. Dozy. Dr. Zotenberg says in his Preface, that es- 
pecially for the history of the Omayades, the work of Tabari is the princi- 
pal and richest source. The Russian historian M. Kunik deems the pub- 
lication of this work of " the father of Muhammadan universal history" so 
important, that he calls it a duty for the empire, which possesses the Cau- 
casus and reigns on the Shores of the Caspian, to provide for a complete 
edition of Tabari. 

The work is to be published in three parallel series, the first compris- 
ing the pre-islamitic history, the life of Muhammad and the reign of the 
four " righteous" Khalifas ; the second the history of the Omayades ; the 
third that of the Abbasides. In order to bring the parts printed as soon 
as possible into the hands of the student, it will be issued in half vo- 
lumes of about 320 pages. Every year one half -volume of each series will 
appear. 

M. J. De Goeje, 
Professor of Arabic, Leiden University. 
Leideis", Marcli 1876. 

Mr. BLOCHMAJsra" exhibited an ink impression of a silver coin of Shahja- 
han II, received from General Cunningham, C. S. I, The legend is as 
follows — 

Obverse — i | vr^ [ ^J^^ ] ^'ft 2*^-* C5J^^ jsl^^b i^JjUaj Is^ 

ReVEESE — ^^^rjj^ ^XJi>^s^| u^wi jj«.^Jl/eC>\*J;>c ,^_^^ Aa».| AX«» 



1876.] Blocliniann, — On a Silver Coin of ShahjaJidn II. 139 

Obverse. — The auspicious coinage of the victorious emperor Shahjahan (II). 
Eevee.se. — In the first year of the auspicious accession. Struck at A h m a d n a- 
gar-Farrukhabad. 

Mr. BLOCHMANisr said — A few monfhs ago, Mr. Delmerick forwarded to 
the Society a second list of -onpublislied coins, whicli will appear in No. Ill 
of this year's Journal. In it lie gives a gold coin of Shahjalian II, of 1173 
H., together with some interesting jjarticulars, to which I would refer the 
members. 

The name of this jDuppet king of Dihli is Muhiyy-ul-Millat (' reviver 
of the faith'). He is the son of Muhiyy-us-sunnat (' reviver of the law'), 
who was the son of Prince Kambakhsh. The latter was the favorite son of 
the emperor Muhiyy-uddin ' A'lamgir (Aurangzib) . In several histories 
and inferior MSS. Muhiyy-ul-MiUat is confounded with his father. Thus 
Beale in his Miftdh says that the name of Shahjahan II. was Muhiyy-us- 
sunnat ; and Grant Duff (Histy. of the Mahrattas, Bomb, edit., p. 311) 
calls him " a son", instead of " a grandson" of Kambakhsh. 

But Muhiyy-us-sunnat could scarcely have been ahve in 1173. He 
waa born before or about 1100 A. H. ; for we know from the M.adsir-i- 
^A'lamgiH that he received in 1107 a yaumiyyah, or daily stij)end, from 
Aurangzib, and that in 1114 he was made a Commander of 7000, with 200ft 
horse. 

MTohiyy-ul-Millat was raised to the throne of DihK, under the title of 
Shahjahan .II.,* on the 8th Eabi' II, 1173, by Ghaziuddin 'Imad-ul-Mulk 
(Mir Shihabuddin), who on the same day had murdered the emperor 'Aziz- 
uddin 'A'lamgir II. This took place when Ahmad Shah Abdali invaded 
the Panjab, and 'Imad-ul-Mulk had given out that the late emperor had 
carried on a secret correspondence with the Abdali. 'Imad-ul-Mulk, after 
a short time, had to leave the newly made emj^eror in Dihli, as Ahmad Shah 
had advanced to the Ganges, and to seek a refuge with Siiraj-Mall of Bhart- 
pur. Dihli was then occupied by the Marathas under Sadashiv Bhao, who 
for several months carried on negotiations with the Abdali. It was with a 
view to detach Shuja'-uddaulah, the Nawab-Vazir of Audh, from the invad- 
er, that the Bhao, on the 29th ^afar, 1174, deposed Shahjahan II., appoint- 
ing Mirza Jawan-Bakht, son of Shah 'Alam, regent for his father, and 
Shuja'-uddaulah Vazir of Hindustan. 

On the 6th Jumada II, 1174, Sadashiv Bhao was totally defeated by 
the Abdali at Panipat ; and before the year was over, Ahmad Shah had left 
India. 

Muhiyy-ul-Millat, therefore, was titular king from 8th Eabi' II, 1173, 
to 29th (^afar, 1174. The histories do not say Avhat became of him after- 
wards. In the list of Dihli emperors he is generally left out, because he 
* Ivaii'-ud-dauluh ulao had the tillo of yhiihjahiin 11. 



140 Blochmann, — On a Silver Coin of Shdhjahdn II. [July, 

was not recognized by Sliah 'Alam, the next emperor. 'Abdul- 'Aziz 
'Alamgir II had been killed on the 8th Eabi' II, 1173 ; and when the 
news reached his son Shah 'Alam in Patna, he celebrated on the 4th Juma- 
da II. his juh'is in the neighboiu-hood of Patna. But Shah 'Alam only- 
received the insignia of royalty from Shuja'-uddaulah on the 16th Zil- 
Qa'dah at Sarai Eaji, on the left bank of the Karamnasa ; and the coinage 
was only settled a few days after the 19th Zil-Hajj, 1174, at Jajmau, when 
the following legend was adopted — 

The shado-w of God's kindness issued his coinage over the seven reahns, the pro- 
tector of the religion of Muhammad, Shah 'Alam, the Emperor. 

This verse (metre, loiiff ramal) aj)pears also on the earlj^ coinage of the 
E. I. Company. 

General Cunningham's coin of 1174 may have therefore been struck at 
any time during 1174, as the coinage was in all probability continued after 
the deposition of Shahjahan II.* 

[Maasir-i-'Alamgiri ; Khizanah-i-'Amirah (under Alif) ; Maasir-ul-Umara {su6> 
Ghazi-uddin) ; Tah9ii'at-un-N'azmn, hy Sayjdd Muhammad-ibn-'Abdul-Jalil of Bil- 
gram (sub annis 1173 et 1174) ; Siyar-ul-Mutaakhkhii'in ; Tarikh-i-Muzaffari ; llif- 
tah-ut-Tawarikh.] 

I ti'anslate the following passage regarding Muhiyy-ul-Millat from the 
3Iulc1itagir-i-Sair-i-Sindustdn by Hakim Wahid-uUah — 

' Muhiyy-ul-Millat, Shahjahan II., son of Prince Muhiyy-us-sunnat, 
son of Mirza Kambakhsh, son of the emperor 'Alamgir, sat on the throne 
of the kingdom in 1173 after the emperor 'Alamgir II, as given in the 
following chronogram of his accession (metre, muzdra' -i-aJcJirah) — 

f^i^)jt 0.s->^J 0*la*.J ^^_y:^ iju^^'xi iiwjf ^ss'^ ^^.>t Sij^ ^s^ \j^a: 

1. When Mirza Muhiyy-ul-lIiUat, son of Muhiyy-us-sunnat satin grandeur on 
the throne of the Timurides, 

2. A voice from heaven for the sake of guidance said, ' Muhammad Shahjahan 
II, of nohle origin. 'f 

' It is known that when this king sat on the throne, Ahmad Shah Dur- 
rani marched with a large army on Dihli, and encamped near the Ghat- 
Hazari, where he fought with Jhanku Pao, the Maratha. He killed many 
leaders of the Marathas. 'Imad-ul-Mulk had fled to Fort Kumhir and 

* For Ahmad Shah Dui-rani's Indian coinage of 1173 and 1174, vide Proc. A. S., 
Bengal, for November, 1874, p. 208. 

t The last mi(;rd' gives 1168 ; but the head ('sarj of the word 'hidayat', or h, i. e. 
5, is to be added; hence we get 1173. 



1876.] W. T. Blanford, — Geography of the Great Indian Desert. 14;1 

found an asylum with Maharaja Siiraj-Mall of Bliai-tj)ur. Muhiyy-ul- 
Millat reigned for about a year. In 1174 H., lie was deposed during the 
invasion of Ahmad Shah Durrani.' 

The following papers were read — 
1. — On the JPhysical Geography of the Great Indian Desert, with special 

reference to the former presence of the Sea in the Indus Valley, and 

the origin and mode of formation of the Sand-hills. — By W. T. Blajs"- 

roED, Esq., F.E.S. 

(Abstract.) 

This paper commences with a notice of the wide geological distinc- 
tions which exist between the peninsula of India and the surrounding 
regions, and after pointing out how long these differences have j)revailed, 
how important the zoological pecuharities of India are, and how far they 
justify the conclusion that India was for a long period part of an Indo- 
Af rican continent or land area, to which Australia at one time must have 
been united, the author proceeds to call attention to the importance of 
investigating the border regions between the Indian peninsula and the sur- 
rounding countries. These border regions consist mainly of the Indo- 
Gangetic jDlain in which all older formations, and all traces of geological 
action are concealed beneath the deep alluvial deposit, and it is only in a 
few localities that portions of these regions are free froni the alluvial cover- 
ing. The Indian desert between the Indus vaUey and Rajputana is such a 
tract. 

A brief description is given of the 2:>hysical character and zoology o£ 
the desert ; it is shewn to consist of rather higher rocky ground about Jesal- 
mir and Balmir, and lower sandy tracts along the borders of Siud and 
towards Jodhpiir, especially in the Luni valley. The northern portion of 
the desert has not been visited by the author, but it is said to be sandy 
throughout. A very large portion of the area consists of sand-hills, which, 
on the borders of the Indus valley, are arranged in long ridges running ap- 
proximately from north-east to south-west, but elsewhere are less regular 
in form ; they have, however, always a steep face towards the north-east, 
and a long slope toward the south-west. At first the desert might be 
taken for a plain of marine denudation, but the jDhysical characters of the 
hills are opposed to this view ; the scarps seen being of subaerial origin. 

Between the sand-hills in eastern Sind are long jjools of water knoAvn 
as ' dhandhs,' of considerable depth. Those to the westward, the water of 
which is supplied from the Indus valley, are fresh ; to the eastward, Avhere 
the water is supplied by percolation through the sand from the freshwater 
" dhandhs," it becomes salter and salter, until in some lakes salt and gyp- 
sum crystals are found. In some of the brackish water lakes a well known 



142 F. A. de Roepstorff, — On tlie Inliabitants of the Nicolars. [ Jtjlt, 

inollusk Potamides (Pirenella) Layardi, H. Ad., was found living. This 
species is common in backwaters and salt lagoons on the Indian coast, and 
proves that the salt lakes in which it now lives were once in communica- 
tion with the sea. It is probable that in geologically recent times a great 
inlet ran from what is now the Rann of Kachh up the Indus valley for a 
distance of certainly more than 100 miles, and probably much further. 
The occurrence of great quantities of salt in the Liini valley south-west of 
Jodhptir, and the low elevation of the region point to the probability of 
another arm of the sea having extended in that direction, whilst it is possible 
that either from the south or north-west an inlet may have extended to the 
Sambhar Lake. 

It is further shewn that the great accumulation of sand in two tracts, 
one along the edge of the Indus alluvium, the other in a belt running north- 
ward from the lower Luni valley, also favoured the idea of former inlets of 
the sea in those directions, since the sand was originally in all probability 
derived from the sea coast, though a portion may have come from the Indus 
valley. The origin of the sand-hills is traced to the action of the south- 
west wind which blows with much force throughout the area in the hotter 
months of the year. The arrangement of the sand-hiUs in long ridges, parallel 
to the direction of the prevailing wind is shewn to be an anomaly difficult 
of explanation. Many of the sand-hiUs are of great antiquity and it ap- 
pears possible that the long ridges may be due to a process of wind denuda- 
tion, the intervening hollows having been swept clear of sand by the wind. 
The existence of sand-hills throughout the desert is simply the consequence 
of the want of any streams or rivers to wash the sand back again into the 
sea. 

2. Notes on tlie InTiahitoAiU of the Nicobars. — 5y F. A. de Roepstohpf,. 

Candidate of Philosophy^ Copenhagen, Extra Asst. Superintendent 

Port JBlair and Nicohars. 

[Eeceived May 12tli. Eead 5tli July.] 

It has for a long time been known that there existed in the interior of 
the island of Great Nicobar one or several inland tribes. They were con- 
stantly spoken of by the coast people and by the inhabitants of the other 
islands, but no Eiu-opean had ever seen them. Pastor Rosen, the Danish 
Resident at the Nicobars 1831-34, mentions them in his book on the Ni- 
cobars.* 

Admiral Bille describesf how he, with some of the officers of the expe- 
dition in two boats, went up the Galathea river and came " to a place, 

* Erindringer pamit Ophold pan de Nikobarske Oes, &c. ; KjoLenliavrL (Copenlia- 
geu) 1839. 

t Corvetten Galathea's Jordomseiling ; Kjobenhavn 1849, vol. I, p. 342). 



1876.] F. A. de Roepstorff, — On the Inhcibitants of the N'icohars. 143 

wliere the river formed a right angle, and where a big jungle-covered hill 
overhangs steeply the river. Behind this hill the river forms a little bay and 
in this we found three or foiir canoes fastened near land. We landed and 
climbed the hill sloj)e. We found the place carefully railed off from the 
river side, and inside this rail, which enclosed the whole hill, lay 7 or 8 huts, 
but all were left by the inhabitants. On the hill slope lay a fallen log with 
its crown resting on the other side of the valley, where the canoes were lying, 
like a bridge in the air. From the care with which the place had been railed 
off, one might think that these poor savages were afraid of being attacked 
and had kept this line of retreat open." (This alludes I beheve to the 
fallen log.) " But of whom were they afraid ? who were their enemies ? 
Captain Aschland, who had visited the same spot the day before, had found, 
that it had been just evacuated, that lire was still burning on their cooking 
places ; they could not possibly know of our approach — so that it could not 
be us they feared. It was hardly either against the coast people that they 
wanted to defend themselves, for it was quite apparent that these two 
peoples, although they live in the same island, which is only 28 miles long and 
12 to 16 miles wide at its very broadest, were quite ignorant of each other, 
so that the coast people spoke of the inland tribe as very forest-demons, 
who lived in the trees, eat frogs and snakes, which they caught by super- 
natural means, and altogether resembled very much the animals whose name 
they gave them, namely Orang-utangs. They assured us that they had 
neither houses nor canoes and now the first things we met were canoes and 
houses. Against whom were they thus keeping on the defence ? Was it 
possible that war with its wretchedness had found its way into the centre 
of the jtmgles of this little island, and that the coviple of hundi-ed people 
who live here, should try to destroy each other in this little place ? All 
these questions and conjectures thereon forced themselves on our minds as 
we wandered about in this little deserted village, whose only inhabitant we 
found enclosed in a sort of jDrison formed of a coviple of logs with sticks 
between. It was a pig who seemed famished, and to judge from this fact, 
the inhabitants had probably not been there for several days. That this 
establishment had recently been formed was evident from the fresh "state 
of the palisading and the poles on which the huts rested. We all agreed 
that the inhabitants must be in a higher state of civilisation than our 
friends the coast Nicobarese would allow to the forest-people. It is true 
that the huts were the most wretched specimens we yet had seen, there was 
hardly space for two i)eople to sit in them, much less to lie in them, but 
yet they were huts, and built on the same principle as those of the coast 
people, namely, raised from the ground on poles, which mode of construc- 
tion is however alwaj^s used by Malays when in swampy places. Several 
were merely small sleeping-jilatforms, with one side against the trunk of a 



144 F. A. de Eoepstorff, — On tJie InTiaMtants oftlie Nicobars. [July, 

tree and over wliicli for protection were sjDread dhunny and rattan leaves or 
sheets of bark for roofing. Such a sheet of bark also formed the substance 
of their cooking pot which stood on a stand formed of four little sticks 
with cross sticks, under which the fii-e was laid. ... We found some wooden 
spears and some pieces of cloth pressed from the cettis bark, but they were 
very ragged. On the ground were thrown some used caldeira fruits and 
in one of the huts we found a j)iece of prepared pandanus bread. Finally 
we found in the forest, close to the railing, a big tree that had newly been 
felled, from which we concluded that their tools must be pretty good. 
Everything seemed to show that the inhabitants of this establishment 
were of the same kind of people as the coast Nicobarese." 

I hope I may be excused this long citation, but in it is contained the 
only information that existed regarding these inland tribes. No one had 
ever seen these people ; but of their existence there could be no doubt. The 
conclusion by Admiral Bille that these people were something like the 
coast people, was however not adopted. Wallace, in his exhaustive work on 
the Malay Archipelago, includes the Nicobars in the Archipelago and con- 
cludes that there are nigritos at Great Nicobar. Professor Owen, F. R. S., 
when addressing the ethnological section of the Congress of Orientalists in 
London, 1874, says that fragments of the dwarf Nigrito stratum may be 
picked up — at the Nicobar Isles. When such an authority in science as 
Prof. Owen, beheves this, and Wallace, the great traveller of these parts, 
supposes that Nigritos are found here, it is time that this error should be 
corrected. Wallace meets Nigritos in the Malay Archipelago, Jagor describes 
them in the Philippines and fui'ther north are found the Andamanese, so 
it would form a link if they were also found in Great Nicobar. From an 
intimate knowledge with the Andaman islands I became quite convinced 
that no tribe of Nigritos in the same stage of existence (I dare not say civi- 
lisation) as the Andamanese could exist in the Andaman jungles. The 
Andamanese live quite close to the sea and wander along the shore getting 
their subsistence in shell fish from the coral reefs and in fish from the sea. 
Quite subsidiary is their hunting the pig. The 8us And. has increased in 
number since fields of sugarcane and grain have sprung up near the Settle- 
ment, but even now they are scarce at certain seasons and could never be 
relied on to supply a steady and regular subsistence ; and beyond the wild 
hog there is very little else to feed on. A few sour berries and perhaps 
eatable roots, but this latter I do not believe. The state of the jungle 
being such, I was a couple of years ago astonished at hearing it proclaimed 
that there should be an inland tribe quite close to the Settlement at Port 
Blair. Thousands of runaway convicts have trodden all over the jungles, 
and there is not, I believe, a spot where these luckless travellers have not been. 
Starvation brings them back and of all those that have returned, not one 



1876.] F. A. de EoepstorfE — Oji the IiiJiaBitants of the Nicobars. 145 

has brought a tale of such an inland tribe. This alone would make it very 
improbable that such a tribe did exist, but it appeared to me that there was 
also the objection to this tale, that they miist necessarily live near the 
fresh water streams and every one of these have been visited by the coast 
jDeojile. They were called Jaruwallahs, which is a Hindustani word for 
sweej)er. I never for a single moment believed in this tribe and it turned 
out to be a fable. In later reports the name was changed to Jarudawad- 
dahs, this being simply an Andamanese dress for their old name. 

The district in which it was supposed that this fabulous inland tribe 
lived was shifted constantly and I began to beheve that the whole affair 
was an invention, until at last the matter was inveS'tigated by Mr. Tuson, 
who told me that there was a Httle tribe, not friendly to our Andamanese, 
which lived on the southern sea-border of S. Andaman. Thus the theory 
of an inland Andamanese tribe of Nigritos was exploded. 

At Great Nicobar, on the other hand, it was quite certain that one 
or several inland tribes existed,, and I became quite convinced from my 
experience at the Andamans that whatever sort of people they were, they 
must live in a different way from our Andamanese, who yet Hve on the 
Kjokkenmioddinge stage. Then, in 1872, I was visited at Nancowry by 
some men of the coast people from Great Nicobar. Among them was a 
youth who had been, so they assured me, one of the inland tribe and had 
as a little boy come to the coast, where he had remained. . At tianes he still 
met his mother in the jungle but did not intend to return to his people. 

This Shombong,* so these people are called, was fairer than the other 
men and had small Mongolian eyes. He had quite a different appearance 
from his friends and reminded me at once of the people of Schowra, a little 
island to the N. W. of Nancowry. The inhabitants of Scho^vl■a are also 
in a very peculiar isolated position, on which I will later on have more to 
say. This Shombong knew a httle of the language of his tribe, and \vith a 
great amount of coaxing I got him to give me a few words. It was, however, 
getting dark and he was very frightened, so I had to let him go and thus 
I lost a chance of learning what I was so anxious to know. In a short 
vocabulary of mine of the dialects of these islands, I mentioned this strange 
visitor and what my conclusions were, but as the work was printed for official 
circulation the fact did not gain much publicity. It will be understood that 
I was anxious to visit the Great Nicobar and see these people myself. 
As there is the possibility of my not coming here again on duty, this one 
term was likely to be my last chance, and although I would not wish to 
visit these islands again, yet I should have left them with regret if I had 
not solved the mystery that was hanging about these inland tribes. I 

* Shorn means tribe, c. (/., Shoiu Pu = Cur NicoLuiian. 



146 F. A. de Eoepstorff — On the Inlialitants of the Nicolars. [July, 

therefore early in April started southwards and arrived at Pulo Condul on 
the morning of the 5th. I was very well received and took the occasion to 
tell my wish to my hosts. Their Kvely faces changed at once, and they de- 
clared that it was quite impossible. I then told them, that if it could not be 
done of course I would have to give it up, but that I in no way intended to 
stir from the house until I had seen and talked to a Shombong. My people 
then agreed to try. It so happened that just at this time a father with his 
son were down at the coast to get some tobacco from the coast people, but 
these two lived six miles away in a lonely and out-of-the-way swamp. All 
declared that they would run away if I came unawares upon them, so 
two men were sent off with a present of tobacco to them and to prepare 
them for my coming. After allowing them a start of two hours we fol- 
lowed, and as it was a very hot and calm day, the sis nailes went very slowly, 
but amongst other things I tried to elicit from my guides something about 
these people. They told me that the Shombong ate monkeys, that they 
devoured the python snake, and in fact any animal food they could get. 
That they, some twenty years ago, before a great earthquake that took 
place about that time, had lived a few miles from the coast opjjosite to Con- 
dul on Great Nicobar, but they then got into some difficulties with the 
coast people, and moved away further inland to some far ofE hills. They 
showed me both places from the sea. That there were three tribes. One 
at this (the north) end, one on the west coast and one south, on the 
Galathea river. That the one tribe on the west coast was now very 
sociable, and that I could easily visit them, as they were not afraid of 
foreigners, but would even go on board the Malay ships for tobacco. 
That the men went quite naked when at home and the women wore a short 
skirt of a cloth pressed from cettis bark, which the Shombongs make. That 
the Shombongs have fine gardens in which they cultivate yams and othei' 
roots. That they had no coeoanuts because the monkeys destroyed them, 
and that" they in fact had objections* to coeoanuts. 

That they married one man one woman and that marriage was always 
for life. This is, however, not the case with the coast j)eople where marriage 
is quite voluntary and can be broken off at any time. That none of the 
coast people had ever been to their place, and that in fact they woidd die if 
they did on account of the fever and evil spirits. That the Shombongs had 
great power over the elements, and had ver'y powerful sorcerers among them. 
That they were very fond of glass beads, but would not have such big beads 
as the coast people wore, only small ones. 

At last we arrived at the Ganges harbom* where there were many traces- 
of the earthquake they had spoken of, for a whole piece of land had sunk 
* The expression used was tjuit (tjit), which means religious or superstitious oh- 
ieetions. 



1876.] F. A. de Eoej)storff — On the Inhahitanfs of the Nicobars. 147 

into the sea. There were still some rotten logs standing oiit of the water, 
but these were nearly quite eaten through, and in another year I expect that 
this dead forest will be gone. 

It was low water when we arrived, and we found the canoe of the men 
that had gone before us, hauled up on some rocks near the innermost j)art 
of Ganges harbour. There one man and I got out and waded along the 
swamp towards oui* Shombongs. At last we approached a little open hut 
where the people that had gone before us were sitting. When we came 
up to them, they said that the two Shombongs had just before run into the 
jungle and that they were quite close by. The Nicobarese had insisted 
on my wearing a red cloth over my coat, so as not to frighten them, but 
yet they had fled. My disappointment was very great, and my guide ad- 
vanced into the jungle and called out to them. He turned to all sides 
caUing and after a little while we heard a reply. A long parley followed 
and I sent one man more to try and jDersuade them to come in. After a 
little while my guide called out to me to come quickly and to bring the 
presents I had brought. I ran of£ as qtiickly as I could, with my presents 
in my hands, and very soon I met my man. He was on the other side 
of a little running stream and came over, but appeared very much fright- 
ened, so my guide gently led him off to his hut and very soon I joined 
them. He stood leaning against a tree and was watching every move- 
ment of mine, just Hke a Avild beast, evidently afraid that I should throw 
myself upon him. My guide warned me to sit down and not to trouble him 
as he was afraid. So I sat down and began to write. He was a Mongolian, 
the small obKque eyes were quite a distinct featixre in his face. His nose 
was bent, but flat below. His mouth was not so prominent as is f ou.nd with 
the coast people. His teeth were small and well-fomied, but black. He was 
5' 8i" high. Has hair and eyes were black. The hair was hanging wildly 
down his face, cut off just above the ej^es, (the coast people have brown eyes). 
His forehead was high and well-formed, his ears not very big but bored. His 
legs were short and his feet and hands small. He was a good deal fau'er 
than the three coast people present. He wore a string rovmd his waist but 
badly tied, evidently put on for the occasion. After a Httle while we got 
into a conversation. He told me that his people did not eat either monkeys 
or the python, but lived on the produce of their gardens. That they had 
large plots under yams and G-unya. That they would also eat birds when 
they covild get them. That they snared ducks and pigeons. That they did 
not use bow and arrows, but spears. That the men went naked but that 
their women had little skirts of the cettis-bark. I enquired what sort of 
cooking pots they had, and he declared that they had none, but boiled their 
food in vessels made of the areca-bark, and as a proof he showed me his last 
meal. He hud been eating a couple of pudtly bii'ds {Demiegrctta sacra). 



148 F. A. de EoepstorfE — On tJie Inliahitants oftlte Nicohars. [July, 

I wanted him to take me to his place, hut though he seemed half willing, my 
guides made him afraid, and he stoutly refused, but proniised that he would 
go to his village and fetch me some spears, some cloth and also some of the 
produce of their gardens. He said he could not do it in less than four days ; 
and so foui' knots were tied on two sticks, he got one and we one. 

While we were talking, a pig walked up and he told me that this pig 
had followed him, like a dog would follow us, all the way from his home 
and went wherever he went. "We then left, and in consequence of our ar- 
rangement I had to wait four days before I could commence my return jour- 
ney. On the 4th day we started north for httle Nicohar, but I called in at 
his place. It was highwater and the canoe went close up to his little hut. 
I saw his pig in the old place and he was there. He brought me a magni- 
ficent yam from his garden and some other vegetables, three spears, of which 
one was made wholly of the wood of the areea, palm, and a piece of cloth. 
He told me that he had asked his people whether I could visit their place 
and that they were wilhng to allow me to come if I would bring my Avife. 
I gave him some presents for his wife, himself and his brother, who had 
come down this time with him. His brother was a little half -grown lad, 
who had his hair in the same way falhng down over his forehead. I could 
not do anything more in the matter, and after a little talk we parted. 

The result of my visit, I think, will be found to be, that the tribes 
that live in the interior of Grreat Mcobar are Mongolians and not Nigritos, 
that they subsist by cultivating land, that they have wooden spears and use 
the cettis cloth. They have no cooking pots but boil their food in vessels 
made ©f bark. 

This tallies in every detail with the description of the village seen by 
the members of the Gralathea expedition. My information was got from 
the tribe in the northernmost part of Great Nicobar ; the village they saw 
was right south, on the Galathea river, so that I do not think that there can 
be any doubt that these are the same people, although belonging to difEer- 
ent tribes. 

Before concluding, I would beg to call attention to another circumstance. 
The coast people and the Nancowry people are the same in aj^pearance, lan- 
guage, customs and ways of living. These j)eople are par excellence fisher- 
men. They dehght in fishing and all other work gives way to this passion. 
It is true that they cultivate land at Nancowry, though not at Great Mcobar, 
but that is quite a subsidiary means of support. When they make gardens, 
they only consist of little patches. Not so with people of Schowra. This 
little island is inhabited by a strong- built fair race of Mongolian origin. 
They five by cultivating the soil mainly, and by supplying the other islands 
with cooking pots. As fishermen they do not do much and their spears are 
only small imitations of those used by the Nancowry people. Their language 



1876.] F. A. de Eoepstorff — On tie InlialiianU of the Nicobars. 14:9 

is quite different in root and construction from the otlier dialects, and tlieir 
women do not use cloth as the Nancowry tribe, but fringed belts made of 
cocoanut leaves. This tribe and the Shombongs are possibly the remains 
of a race of Mongolians, who were peaceably settled on the Nicobar Islands, 
cultivating the land and perhaps in a higher state of civilisation. They 
were perhajDS attacked by the Malay race that is now living on the Nancow- 
ry grouj). They were driven away from the fertile alluvial soil which they 
cultivated and had to take refuge on the sterile Island of Schowra (there 
is no fresh water on Schowra) which they by care have made into a lovely 
garden. It resembles a park. ' Every available spot is cultivated and well 
kept. Some of this tribe were diiven south, and took refuge in the interior 
of Great Nicobar where they, shut off from the outer world, lead a miser- 
able existence, still tilhng the soil as did their forefathers. 

I have collected a great many words of the language of the Schowi'a peo- 
ple, but not very many of the inland race of Great Nicobar, not sufficient 
to ascertain by comparison, whether their languages might not be closely 
related. 

But I think it will be found that the (Shorn) Tatat of Schowra and 
the (Shom) Bong of Great Nicobar are the remains of what was once one 
people. 

Me. W. T. Blaitfoed thought that Mr. de Eoepstorff was misled by 
his experience of the Andamanese when he supposed that a Nigrito tribe would 
have any difficulty in sujDporting itself away from the coast. Possibly the 
Andaman islanders might starve tmder such circiimstances, but it is certain 
that Nigrito tribes are found far from the sea in the interior of the great 
Malay islands. They unquestionably exist in New Guinea,, and almost cer- 
tainly in the interior of Borneo, and they are said to be found in the Phil- 
lijiines and in the interior of the Malay Peninsula. It is very difficult for 
a civilized human being to understand how savages hve, or even to conceive 
what a marvelloiis variety of animal and vegetable productions, on which 
savage man, at any rate, can s\ibsist, are to be found in the forests of all 
tropical regions. Mr. Blanford believed that man could certainly find food 
wherever monkeys cotdd exist. 

The reading of the f oUoAving papers was postj)oned — 

1. On the physical explanation of the Inequality of the two semi- 
diurnal Oscillations of Barometric Pressure. By Henet F. Blanfoed, 
Esq., Mcteorolof/ical Reporter to the Govt, of India. 

2. The Cyclostomaceoe of the Dalla Hills, Assam. By Major H. H. 
Godwin- Austen, F. R. G. S., F. Z. S., &c., DepTj. Supt. Toi^ocjraplikal 
Survey of India, 



150 Lihrary. [July, 

3. Description of Botryodon, a new Genus of Muridce from Sind. 
Bj W. T. Blanfoed, Esq., F. E. S. 

4. Description of Ancient Dwellings and Tombs at Sut Kagen Dor 
and Dhamba Koh, near Gwadar in Makran, Balochistan. By Capt. E. 
Mockler, Political Agent, Cfwddar. 



h 



IBRARY. 



The following additions have been made since tbe Meeting held in 
May last. • 



Transactions, Proceedings, and Journals, 

presented hy the respective Societies or Editors. 

Berlin. Konigliche Preussische Akademie der Wissenschaften, — Monats- 
berichte. Marz 1876. 

Feters. — Tiber ein neues Argali Schaf, Ovis jubata, aus dem ostlichen Theile 
der Mongolei, im Norden von Peking. SelmJioltz — BericM betr. Versucbe 
Tiber die elektromagnetische Wirkung elektriscber Convection, ausgefiihrt 
von H. N. Eowland. 

Birmingham. Institution of Mechanical Engineers, — Proceedings. Janu- 
ary, 1876. 

E. SutcMnson. — On the mode of Erection of the large Iron Girder Eailway 
Bridge over tbe Eiver Dal in Sweden. 

Calcutta. Agricultural and Horticultural Society of India, — Journal, 
Vol. 5, Pt. II, N. S. 

S. E. Feal. — Note on Dr. Aleyboom's paper on "Eoest." Notes and Eeports 
on a Wax-yielding insect from Cbota Nagpore. 

Haarlem. Musee Teyler, — Archives, Vol. I. Ease. 1, 2, 3, and 4, Vol. II, 
Ease. 1 -to 4, Vol. Ill, Ease. 1 to 4, Vol. IV, Ease. 1. 

Vol. I, Fasc. 1 and 2. 5. S. M. von der WilUgen. — Memoire sur la determi- 
nation des longueurs d'onde du spectre solaire. 
Vol. Ill, Fasc. 1, 5. S. M. von der WiUigen. — Nouveau spectre de refi-action 
de la lumiere solaire. Fasc. 2, 5. 8, M. de von der WiUigen. — Sur les mesures 
naturelles. 

Leipsic. Deutsche Morgenlandische Gesellschaft, — Zeitschrift, Vol. 29, 
Heft. Ill und IV. 

Heffc. Ill und IV. Br. 8. Landauer, — Die Psychologic des Ibn Sina. Th. 
Noldehe. — Zur Topographic und Geschichte des Damascenischen G-ebietes und 
der Haurangegend. 0. BohtlingJc. — Das Verhalten der drei kanonischen 
Grammatiker in Indien zu den im Wurzelvcrzsichnise mit s// und n anlauten- 
dcn Wui'zcln, 8. Goldschmidt, — Bildungen aus Passivstiimmen im Prakrit. 



1876.] Library. 151 

F. Zingerle.—Vbev das syrische Buch des Paradieses von EbedjesiT, Metropo- 
lit von Nisibis. E. Kohler. — Die Pehlevi-Erzahlung von Gosht-i-Fryano und 
der kergisische Biichergesang " die Lerche." Dr. Ign. Goldziher. — Abu-1- 
Ala al-Ma'arri als Freidenker. C. Rice. — An Besitzer der Bombayer Ausgabe 
des Mahabbarata und der Calcuttaer Ausgabe der Siddbanta-Kaiunudi. 

London. Tbe Athenaeum. Pt. 579, March, 1876. 

. Geographical Magazine. Vol. Ill, No. 6, June, 1876. 

Pundit Nain Sing. Geograpbical Discoveries in Tibet. Tbe Abbe Armand 
David's Journey in Western Obina. R. Mitchell. — Fergbana. 

. Natui-e. Yol. 14, Nos. 341 to 344, 1876. 

. • Eoyal Astronomical Society. — Monthly Notices, Yol. 36, No. 5. 

Dr. Royston-Pigott. — Note on a Starlit Transit Eyepiece. Mr. Pogson. — Occul- 
tation of tbe Pleiades observed at Madras. Observations of tbe November 
Meteors made at tbe Eoyal Observatory, Greenwicb. Capt. Abney. — Prelimi- 
nary Note on pbotograpbing tbe least refracted portion of tbe Solar Spectrum. 
Royal Geographical Society. — Proceedings, Yol. XX, No. 3, 



1876. 

Goldsmid. — Capt. tbe Hon'ble G. Napier's Journey on tbe Turcoman Frontier 
of Persia. Margary. — Extracts fi-om tbe late Traveller's Diary : Hankow to 
Tali-fa. Extracts from bis subsequent Letters. Thomson. — Marco Polo's Six 
Kingdoms or Cities in Java Minor identified in translations from tbe ancient 
Malay Annals. 

. Eoyal Society.— Proceedings, Yol. 24, No. 167, 1876, 

Ch. S. Tomes, — On tbe Development and Succession of tbe Poison-fangs of 
Snakes. Prof. J. Thomson. — On an Integrating Macbine baving a new Kine- 
matic Principle. W. CrooJccs. — On Ecpulsion resulting from Radiation. PtSj 
III and IV. 

. Zoological Society. — Proceedings, Pt. 4, November and December, 

1875. 

Signor. L. M. d' Alhertis. — Letter from, giving some accoimt of several excur- 
sions into Soutbem New Guinea. P. JBlcckcr. — Notice sur VElopichthys dahu- 
ricus. W. T. Blanford. — Notes on tbe figiu-cs of Serpcstes ferrugincics and 
Ovis polii. On some Stags' Horns from tbe Tbian-Sban Mountains in Central 
Asia. M. H. Garrod. — Eeport on tbe Indian Elepbant wbicli died in tbe 
Gardens on Jixly 7th, 1875. Notice of a Memoir on tbe structure of tbe Ma- 
natee. G. E. Bobson. — A Monograpb of tbe Genus Taphozous, Geoff. Mr. 
Sclater. — Exbibition of, and remarks on tbe upper bom of a two-bomcd Ebino- 
ceros from tbe valley of tbe Brabmaputra. Br. A. Giinther. — Tbird Eeport 
on Collections of Indian Eeptilcs obtained by the British Musevun. W. Scla- 
ter. — Exhibition of, and remarks on a skin of Hypocolius ampelinus. Bp. S. 
Hanley. — Description of new Land and Freshwater Shells from India. Br. 
J. S. Boivcrbavk. — Further observations on Alcyoncellum speciosion, Quoy et 
Gaimard, and Jlyalonema mirabilv, Gray. A. G. Butkr. — Descriptions of 
several new species of Sphingidw. Br. 0. Finsch. — On a new Species of 
Crown-Pigeon. On PristorhamphHs irrs/eri, a new Genus and Species of Bird 



152 Library. [July, 

from tlio Arfali Moimtains, New Guinea. J. CaUivell, — Notes on the Zoology 
of Eodrigiiez. 
London. Zoological Society. — Transactions, Vol. IX, Pts. 5, 6 and 7. 
Ft. 5. W. K. ParUr.—O-D. ^githognathous Bii-ds. 
Ft. 6. J. B. Perrin. — On the Myology of Opisthocomus cristatiis. 
Ft. 7. W. C. MIntosh.— On British Annelida. On the Annelida of the " For- 
cupine" Expeditions of 1869 and 1870. 
Munich. Konigliche Bayeriscbie Akademie dei' Wissenscliaften. — Mathe- 
matiscli-Physikalisclie Classe. Abhandlungen. Band XII, 1st Abth. 
Band XII. S. V. Sehlagintioeit-SalcwilunsJci. — Die Fasse iiher die Kammlinien 
des Karakorum nnd des Kiinliin ia Balti, in Ladak und im ostlichen Tjjrki- 
stan. Nach tmseren Beobachtungen von 1856 nnd 1857, und deh neueren 
Expeditionen. 

. . . PhilosopMscli-Pliilologisclie Classe. Abhandlungen. 

Band XIII, 3rd Abtb. 
' . . Verzeicbniss der Orientalischen Handschriften der K, 



Ho£- und Staatsbibliotbek in Miincben. 
. . Die Hebrseiscben Handschriften der K. Hof-und Staats- 



bibliotbek in Miinchen, von M. Steinschneider. 
Palermo. Societa degli Spettroscopisti Italian!. — Memorie, Dispensa 5, 
Maggio, 1876. 

P. TaccMni. — Statistica delle eruzioni solari osservate a Falermo nol 1872. Mag- 
nesio al bordo osservato a Falermo nel 1875. Eotografie dello spetti'O sola- 
re fatte a Calcutta dal Cap. Waterhouse. 
Paris. Societe d' Anthropologic, — ^Bulletin. Tome IX, fasc. 6, Tome X, 
fasc. 4. 

Tome IX. Samy. — Sur les races sauvages de la peninsule malaise et en 
particulier sur les Jakuns. 

. Societe de Gr^ographie. — Bulletin, Avril, 1876. 

Stockholm. Kongl. Svenska Vetenskaps-Akademiens-Handlingar, Bibang. 
Bandet I, Nos. 1 and 2, and Bandet II, Nos. 1 and 2. 

Bandet I, No. 2. C Stdl. — Eecherches sur le systeme des Mantides. P. T. 

Clcve. — Examination of diatoms found on the surface of the Sea of Java. 
Bandet II, No. 2. C. Stdl. — Eecherches sur le systeme des Blattaires. Ee- 
cherches sur le systeme des Fhasmides. 

. . Ofversigt. Vols. 28 to 31. 

. . Lefnadsteckningar, Vol. I, Pt. 3. 

. . Handlingar, Vols. 9, 10 and 12. 

Vol. 10. C. Stiil. — Enumeratio Hemipterorum. Bidrag till en fortcckning 
bfver alia hittills kiinda Hemiptera jemtc systematiska meddclanden. A. G. 
Theorell. — Description d'un meteorographe enrcgistreiu' imprimcur construit 
aux frais du Gouvcrnement Suedois. 

. . . Meteorologiska lakttagclser. Bandet, 12, 13, 14. 

Viemia. Kaiserlicbe Akademie der Wissenscliaften. — Math.-Natm'vvissen- 
schaftliche Classe. Sitzungsberichte, Band 70, Abth. I, Heft, 3, 4, 5. 



1876.] Lilrary. 153 

Steindachner, — Tiber eine nene Gattung und Axi aus der Familie der Pleuronecti- 
den und iiber eine neue Thymallus Art. Ichthyologische Beitrage. 

Band. 70, Abth. II, Heft. 3, 4, and 5 ; Abth. Ill, Heft. 3, 4, and 5. 
Band. 71, Abth. I, Heft. 1 to 5 ; Abth. II, Heft. 1 to 5 ; Abtb. Ill, 
Heft. 1, 2. 

Vienna. — Kaiserliche Akademie der Wissenscbaften. — Matb.-Naturwissen- 
scbaftlicbe Classe, Denkscbriften, Vol. 34. 

Seller. — TJntersucliungen iiber die Tunicaten des adriatischen Meeres. Bienger. 
Die Laplace' sche Methode der Ausgleichung von Beobachtungsfehlern bei 
« zahlreiclien Beobaclitimgen. Bittner. — Die Brachjiiren des Vicentinischen 
Tertiargebirges. 

\ . , Pbilosopbiseb-Historische Classe. — Sitzungsbericbte, 

Band. 78, Heft II and IIL 

PJiamaier — Denkwiirdigkeiten von den Insecten Cliina's. Goldziher. — Beitrage 
znr Literaturgeschichte der Schia nnd der Sunnitischen Polemik. 

Band. 79, Heft. I to III. Band. 80, Heft. I to III. 

Heft. I — II. Pfizmaier. — Denkwiirdigkeiten uns dem Thierreiche Cbina'a. 

Denkwiirdigkeiten von den Banmen Cbina's. 
Heft. III. Ffizmaier. — Japaniscbe EtjTnologien. 

Kaiserlicbe Akademie der Wissenscbaften, Almanacb fiir 1875. 
Arcbiv fiir Oesterreicbiscbe Gescbicbte, Vol. 52, Heft. II ; Vol. 53, 
I and 11. 

K. K. Geologiscbe Reichsanstalt. — ^Verbandlungen. No. II. 
Feistmantel. — Fossile Pflanzen aus Indien. 

. Jabrbucb, Band 25, Nos. 3 and 4, 1875. 

Das Gebirge um Hallstatt, eine Geologiscb-Palaontolo- 



Heft 







giscbe Studie aus den Alpen, 1 Tbeil., von E. M. v. Mojsvar, 

■ . Die Congerien-und Paludinenscbicbten Slavoniens und 



deren Faunen, von Dr. M. Neumayer und C. M. Paul. 

Edoks and Pamphlets 
presented hy the Authors. 

Cola, P. R. Undeveloped Wealth and State reproductive Works in India, 
The ways to prevent Famine and increase the Material Progress of India. 
8vo. London, 1876. 

GoDWiN-AusTEBT, Major H. H. Furtber Notes on the Rude Stone Mo- 
numents of the Khasi Hill Tribes. Pani])blet. 



154 liibrafif. [July, 

Godwin- Austen, Major H. H. On the Eiide Stone Monuments of certain 
Naga Tribes, with some Remarks on their Cnstoms, &c. Pamphlet. 

NuESiNGEOW, A. V. Results of Meteorological Observations taken at 
Gr. V. Juggarow's Obseryatory. Daba Gardens^ Vizagapatam, during 
1875. Calcutta. 1876. Pamphlet. 

M.ISCELLANEOUS PRESENTATIONS. 

An Account of the Primitive Tribes and Monuments of the Nilagiris. 
By J. W. Breeks. Eoyal Qto. London. 1873. 

Seceetaet of State eoe IndiaT 

On certain endemic Skin and other Diseases of India and Hot Climates 
generally. By Tilbui-y Fox, M. D. and T. Parquhar, M. D. Including 
Notes on Pellagra, Clou de Biskra, Caneotica, and Aleppo Evil. By 
H. Vandyke Carter, M. D. 8vo. London. 1876. 

GOTEENMENT OP IndIA, HoME DePAETMENT. 

Eepoi-t on Vaccination for 1874-75, No. 48. 

GOYEENMENT OE MadEAS. 

Report on the Lunatic Asylums in the Central Provinces for the year 
1875. 

Chiee Commissionee, Centeal Peoyinces. 
Atlas de I'Archeologie du Nord, rejDresentant des echantillons de I'age 
de bronze et de I'age de fer, piiblie par la Societe Royale des Antiquaires 
du Nord. 

De. Rajendealala Mitea, 

Periodicals Purchased. 

Calcutta. The Calcutta Review. No. 125, July, 1876. 
K. J. Raineij. — Jessore. 

. ■ The Indian Medical Gazette. Vol. XI, No. 7, July 1876. 

Giessen. Jahresbericht iiber die Fortschritte der Chemie f iir 1874, Heft. 2. 
Gottingen. Gdttingische Gelehrte Anzeigen, Nos. 7 to 14. Nachricten, 
Nos. 3 to 8. 

Benfey. — Die Quantitatsverschiedenlieites. in den Samhita imd Pada Texten 
des Veda. 
London. The Academy. Nos. 212 to 214, 1876. 

* . The Annals and Magazine of Natural Histoiy, Vol. 17, No. 100. 

0. Kahu. — Is there such a thing as Eozoon canadense ? A Microgeological Inves- 
tigation. A. Stuxbcrg. — On the Myriopoda from Siberia and Waigatsch 
Island, collected during the expedition of Prof. Nordenskiold, 1875. W. S. 
Flower. — Extinct Lemurina. M. Jousset. — On the Functions of the Glands of 
the Digestive Apparatus of Insects. M. E. Sechel. — On the Floral Glands 
of Farnassia palustris ; new Physiological Functions. 



1876.] Lihrctry. 155 

London, Conehologia Iconica. Pts. 326, 327. 

Pupa, Pupinidse. Gastrochsena. Teredo. Xylophaga. Navea, Fistiilana. 
. The Edinbnrgli Eeview, No. 292, April 1876. 

Lord Mayo's Indian Administration. 
. The London, Edinburgh, and Dtiblin Philosophical Magazine. 



5th Series, Vol. I, No. 4. 

lord S,ayleigli. — On Waves. F. U. Chase. — On th.e Eqnilitrating Forces of the 
Solar System, 1. Mass and Position. 
. Quarterly Journal o£ Science. No. 50, April, 1876. 

Conscience in Animals. Natm'e's Scavenger. The Newly-Discovered Force. 
Biological Controversy and its Laws. The Mechanical Action of Light. 
. Journal of the Society of Ai-ts. Yol. 24, Nos. 1217 to 1222. 

No. 1217. JE. SeycL — The fall in the price of Silver ; its conseqtiences and their 
possible avoidance, E. Warington. — The Manufacture of Citric and Tartaric 
Acids. 

No. 1219. Major-General Marriott. — The Land Eeventie of India. 

No. 1220. A. V. Sarcourt. — Some Methods of estimating the Illuminating 
Power and Puritj^ of Coal Gas. C. R. Markham. — The Cultivation of Caout- 
chouc-yielding Trees in British India. 

No. 1222. The Preservation of Timher. 

. The Palgeographical Society. — Facsimiles of Ancient Manuscripts. 

Oriental Series, Pt. 1, 1875. 
. The Quarterly Joiu-nal of Microscopical Science. No. 62, AjDril, 



1876. 

Br. E. Klein. — Ohservations on the Early Development of the Common Trout. 
{Salmo fario) J. Friestley. — Eecent Eesearches on the Nuclei of Animal and 
Vegetable Cells and especially of Ova. E. v- Beneden. — Contributions to the 
History of the Germinal Vesicle and of the First Embryonic Nucleus. S. 
R. 0. Sankey. — A new Process for Examining the Stinictui-e of the Brain. 
Dr. J. Foulis. — On the Development of the Ova and Structure of the Ovary 
in Man and other Mammalia. W. B. Carpenter. — On the Genus Astrorhiza 
of Sandahl, lately described as FLaeckelina by Dr. Bessels. Eelation between 
the Limit of the Powers of the Microscope and the Ultimate Molecules of 
Matter. 

. Quarterly Review. No. 282. April, 1876. 

. Westminster Review. No. 98. April, 1876. 



Munich. Coleopterologische Hefte. Vol. XIV. 

New Haven. The American Journal of Science and Arts. Vol. XL No. 
63. March, 1876. 

L. Trouvelot. — On the Veiled Solar Spots. /. B. Bana. — On the Damming of 
Streams by drift ice diu^ng the melting of the great Glacier. S. T. Barrett. 
— Description of a new Trilobito, Balinanites dentata. J. Lovcriiuj. — On a new 
Method of measuring the Velocity of Electricity. 

Paris. Annalcs de Chimie et de Physique, — 5th Series, Tome VII, Fevrier 
et Mars 1876, 



156 Library. [July, 

Fevrier. P.Bert. Influence del' air comprime surles fermentations. W, Spring. 
— Sur la dilatation, la chaleur specifique des alliages fusibles, et leurs rapports 
avec la loi de la capacite des atomes des corps simples et composes pour la 
clialeur, A. Girard et S. Morin. — E'tude des pyrites employees en France 
a la fabrication de I'acide sulfurique. M. Memel. — De la putrefaction produite 
par les bacteries en presence des nitrates alcalias. 

Mars. M. E. Edlimcl. — Sur la resistance galvanique. 31. G. Fleurij. — Recher- 
clies sur 1' inversion du sucre de canne par les acides et les sels. 
Paris. Comj^tes Rendus. Tome 82, Nos. 10 to 15. 

No. 10. M. T. Villarceau. — Transformation de 1' astronomic nautique a la 
suite des progres de la chronometrie. M. de Hostaing. — Note sur les proprietes 
antiseptiques de la racine de garance. MM. V. Feltz et E. Hitter. De Taction 
des sels bUiaires sur le pouls, la tension, la respiration et la temperature. 

No. 11. i!f. Ch. Andre. Sur le passage de Venus du 9 Decembre, 1874, M. G. 
Flante. Sur les aurores polaires. 

No. 12. M. LocJcijer. — Sur de nouvelles raiesdu calcium. M. Rouyaux. — Sur 
la conduite des chronometres. M. J. M, Gaugain, — Influence de la tempera- 
ture sur r aimantation. 

No. 13. M. T. Villarceau. — Influence des variations de pression sur la marche 
des chronometres. M.M. Becquerel et Edm. Becquerel. — Observations de 
temperature, faites au Museum d'Histoire Naturelle pendant I'annee meteoro- 
logique 1875, avec les thermometres electriques places dans I'air ainsi que 
sous des sols gazonnes et denudes. M. Th. Schlasing. — Sur les echanges 
d'anmioniaque entre les eaux naturelles et 1' atmosphere. 

No. 14. P. Secchi. — Sur le deplacement des raies dans les spectres des etoiles 
produit par leui' mouvement dans I'espace. 

No. 15. M. CI. Bernard. — Critique experimentale sur la formation du sucre 
dans le sang ou sur la fonction de la glycemie physiologique. M. Th. du 
Moncel. — Dixseptieme note sur la conductibilite electrique des corps medio- 
crement conducteurs. P. Secchi. — Sur le deplacement des raies dans les 
spectres des etoiles produit par leur movement dans I'espace. M. G. Plante. 
■ — Sur les taches solaires et sur la constitution physique du Soleil. M. A. Sar- 
tiaux. — Note sur I'emploi des machines magneto-electriques de M. Gramme, 
pour I'eclairage des grandes salles de chemins de fer. M. Th. Sehloesing. — Sur 
'les echanges d'ammoniaque entre les eaux naturelles et 1' atmosphere, 

• . Journal des Savants. Mars, 1876. 

■ , Revue Archeologique. Mars, 1876. 

■ . Revue Critique d'Histoire et de Litterature. Nos. 10 to 16, 

1876. 

No. 10, Arnold. — Le Gita-Govinda. Suart. — Cheref-ed-din Eami, Ents el 
Ouchchaq. 

No. 11. Pertsch. — Grammaire, Poetique et Ehetorique des Persans. 
• . Revue des Deux Mondes. Tome 14, Livraisons 2, 3 and 4, 1876. 

Liv. 2. M. G. Bousquet. La Religion au Japon. La rivahte du Shinto et du 
Bouddhisme, le dogme Chretien devant les philosophes Japonais. 
. Revue et Magasin de Zoologie, 1875, No. 12 ; 1876, No. 1. 

No. 1, 1876. Dr. F, Fieber. — Les Cicadines d' Europe. 



1876.] Lilrary.. 157 

Books Purchased, 

Aristold, S. E. The Indian Song of Songs. From the Sanskrit of the 

Gita Govinda of Jayadeva. With other original Poems. 8vo. London, 
1875. 
Baeth, Dr. J, Talab's Kitab Al-Fasih. Nach den Handschriften von 

Leiden, Berlin und Rom, herausgegeben mit kritischen und erlauternden 

Noten versehen. 8vo. Leipzig, 1876. 
BuBNOFP, E. Introduction a I'histoire du Budhhisme Indien. Deuxieme 

E'dition. 4to. Paris, 1876. ■ 
Caree, Leon". L'Ancien Orient. E'ttides historiques, religieuses et philo- 

sophiques stu* I'E'gypte, la Chine, I'lnde, la Perse, la Chaldee et la 

Palestine, dej)uis les temps les plus recules. 4 Vols. 8vo. Paris. 1875. 
CHEEBOicisrEATJ, Atjg. Dictiomiaire Arabe — Fran9ais, (Langvie ecrite.), 

2 Vols. 8vo; Paris, 1876. 
Ceeighton, H. The Ruins of Gour, described and represented ia 

eighteen views with a Topographical Map. Qto. London, 1817. 
Gfbeenatis, Angelo de. Storia dei Viaggiatori Italiani nelle Indie 

Orientali. 8vo. Livorno, 1875. 
HAH]sr, De. C. W. und Heeeich-Schaeeee, De. G. A. W. Die Avanzenar- 

tigen Insecten. 9 Vols. 8vo. Niiremberg, 1831. 
Haelez, C. de. Avesta, livre sacre des sectateurs de Zoroaster, traduit 

du texte. Tome I. Introduction. — Vendidad. Royal 8vo. Liege, 1875. 
JoLLT, Dr. Julius. Naradiya Dharmasastra or the Institutes of Narada. 

Translated for the first time from the unpublished Sanskrit original. 

8vo. London, 1876. 
LuDWiG, Alpeed. Die Philosophischen und Religiosen Ansehauungen 

des Veda in ihrer entwicklung. Pamphlet, Prag, 1875. 
Toenbeeg, C. J. Ibn-el Athiri Chronicon quod Perfectissimum inscri- 

bitur. Vol. XIV. 8vo. Lugduni Batavorum, 1876. 
VuLLEES, J. A. Firdusii Liber Regum qui inscribitur Schahname, vol. I. 

Ease. 1. 8vo. Lugduni Batavorum, 1876. 
WaHemutstd, De. Adolf. Handworterbuch der neu-arabischen und deuts- 

chen Sprache. Band I. 1st Abth. Heft 1 and 2 ; 2nd Abth. Heft. 1. 

and Deutschcn und neu — arabischen Sprache. Vol. I. 4 vols. 8vo. 

Giessen, 1870. 
'Wj\llace, Alfred Russel. The Geographical Distribution of Animals, 

with a study of the relation of living and extinct Faunnas, as elucidating 

the past changes of the Earth's surface. 2 vols. Royal 8vo. London 

1876. 
Weber, Albeectit. Akademische Vorlcsungon iiber Indi.^clie Litoratur- 

gcschichtc. Svo. Berlin, 1876. 



PROCEEDINGS 



OF THE 



ASIATIC SOCIETY OF BENGAL, 

For y\.uGusT, 1876. 



The monthly General Meeting of the Society was held on Wednesday, 
the 2nd August, 1876, at 9 o'clock, p. m. 

Mr. W. T. Blanford, F. E. S., Yice-President, in the Chair. 

The following presentations were announced — 

1. From Mr. O. Semper of Hamburg, a copy of " Archiv des Vereins 
der Freunde der Naturgeschichte in Meklenburg." 

The Chaiemajst said that Mr. Semper, in sending this donation, had 
expressed his wish to receive papers relating to Shells, MoUusca and the 
geographical distribution of animals and plants. 

From Cajit. J. Waterhouse, a series of 14 photozincographed plates 
of Inscriptions from Gaur and Panduah. 

Mr. Blochmann said : — 

The plates presented by Capt. "Waterhouse to the Society are a set of 
photozincogi-aphs taken by him of inscrij^tions from Gaur and Pancluah, 
the old Muhammadan cai^itals of Bengal. The originals of the plates were 
the rubbings which had been sent to the Society by General Cunningham, 
C. S. I., and Mr. E. V. Westmacott, C. S., and had been published with 
translations in the Journal for 1872, 1873 and 1874. The plates, it is 
hoped, will be j)ublished in the forthcoming Work on Gaur by the late Mr. 
Raven shaw. 

The following is a list of the inscriptions — 

PI. I. Two Inscriptions from the A'dinah Mosque, Panduah, built by 
Sikandar Shah, A. J). 1369. Published, Journal, 1873, p. 257. 

The inscriptions are most artistically out. 

PI. II. Inscrijjtion No. 4, from' Hilal's Mosque near the Fort of 
Mcildah. Mahmud Shah I., A. D. 1455. Journal, 1874, p. 294. 

Inscription No. 5, from the Chhota Dargah at Panduah. Mabuu'id 
Shcih I., A. D. 1459. Journal, 1873, p. 271. 

I'l. III. Inscription No. 5, from a Mosque at Panduah. Yusuf Shah, 
A. D. 1479. Joiu-nal, 1873, p. 276. 



160 Inscriptions from Oaiir. [Airairsr, 

PI. IV. Inscription No. 6, from a Mosque at Gaur. Yus\if Shah, 
A. D. 1480. Journal, 1873, p. 277. 

Inscription No. 7, from a Mosque at Graur. Firuz Shah II., A. D. 
1489. Journal, 1874, p. 299. 

PI. V. InscrijDtion No. 8, from a Mosque near Maldah, Firuz 
Shah II. Journal, 1874, p. 299. 

Inscription No. Sa., from a Mosque at Gaur. Mahniud Shah II. 
Jom^nal, 1873, p. 289. 

Inscription No. 9, from the Chhota Dargah at Panduah. Muzaffar 
Shah, A. D. 1493. Journal, 1873, p. 290. 

PL VI. Inscriptions Nos. 10 and 11, from Maldah. Husain Shah, 
A. D. 1494 and 1495. Journal, 1874, p. 302. 

PI. VII. Inscription No. 12, from Husain Shah's Madrasah at Gaur, 
A. D. 1502. Jom-nal, 1874, p. 303. 

Inscription No. 13, from a Gate at Gaur. Husain Shah, A. H. 910. 
Journal, 1874, p. 304. 

PI. VIII. Inscription No. 14, from Husain Shah's Mosque at Gaur, 
A. D. 1505. Journal, 1873, p. 294. 

Inscription No. 15, Husain Shah, A. D. 1505. Not published. 

PL IX. Inscription No. 16, from Shaikh Akhi Siraj's tomb at Gaur. 
Husain Shah, A. D. 1510. Journal, 1873, p. 294. 

PL X. Inscriptions Nos. 17 and 18, from a Gate and a Mosque at 
Gaur. Husain Shah, A. D. 1510 and 1512. Journal, 1873, p. 294, and 
1874, p. 305. 

PL XL Inscriptions Nos. 19 and 20, from a Gate of the Fort of Gaur 
and Daulat Nazir's Mosque near Maldah. Husain Shah, A. D. 1512 and 
1517. Joui-nal, 1873, p. 295, and 1874, p. 305. 

PL XII. Inscriptions Nos. 21 and 22, from Maldah. Nugrat Shah, 
A. D. 1524 and 1528-29. Journal, 1874, pp. 306, 307. 

PL XIII. Inscription No. 23, from the Qadam Rasiil at Gaur. NU9- 
rat Shah, A. D. 1530-31. Journal, 1872, p. 338. 

PL XIV. Inscription No. 24, from a Mosque near Maldah. Nufrat 
Shah, A. D. 1531-32. Journal, 1874, p. 308. 

Inscription No. 25, from a Mosque at Sa'duUahpiir, Gaur. Mahmud 
Shah III, A. D. 1534-35. Journal, 1872, p. 339. 



The following gentlemen, duly j)roposed sad seconded at the last 
meeting, were balloted for and elected ordinary members — 
J. Hector Esq. 
Major O. B. St. John. 
P. T. Carnegy, Esq. 



1876.] Repairs of the Sociefi/'s Pfemises. 161 

The following are candidates for ballot at the nest meeting : — 

Dr. H. Caylej, proposed by H. F. Blanford, Esq., seconded by W. T. 
Blanford, Esq. 

Major M. M. Bowie, Madras Staff Corps, Dy. Commr., Sambalpur, 
proposed by J. Wood-Mason, Esq., seconded by W. T. Blanford, Esq. 

Mr. George A. Grierson, C. S., Rangpiu*, proposed by the Eev. Dr. 
K. M. Banerjea, seconded by H. Blochmann, Esq. 

Mr. H. Beveridge, C. S., proposed by H. Blochmann, Esq., seconded 
by Capt. J. Waterhouse. 

The Chairmajs", on behalf of the Council, made the following statement 
regarding the correspondence published in the Introductory Note to Mr. 
C. B. Clarke's " Compositse Indicse." 

" With reference to the correspondence, and remarks thereon, pu.blished 
by Ml". C. B. Clarke as an Introductory Note to his recent work on ' Com- 
positse Indicfe,' the Council of the Asiatic Society deem it right to 
inform the Society, that Mr. Clarke's paper was declined on groimds which 
seemed to the Council least htu"tful to Mr. Clarke's feelings, although, 
unfortunately, the opposite effect was produced. Mr. Clarke's statement as 
to the cost of the extra number of the Journal containing the Blyth Cata- 
logues having been largely provided by Mr. Blyth's friends is entirely erro- 
neous. The only portion of the expense which was not paid by the Society was 
the photographic portrait of Mr. Blyth, which was presented to the Society 
by Mr. Loder, a relative. With this explanation the Council express their 
deep regret at the misunderstanding between themselves and a valued 
member of the Society." 

The CsAiiiMAisr laid before the Meeting the following Memorandum 
drawn up by the Council with reference to the arrangements they had finally 
made for the repairs and improvement of the Society's premises. 

Memorandum on the Pro])osed Alterations and JRepairs of the Society'' s 

Prem ises. 

At the General Meeting of the Society in April, the Chairman announ- 
ced that it was the intention of the Council to employ part of the money 
received from Government, in thoroughly repairing and improvino- the 
Society's premises. 

There has been more delay than' was anticipated in completing the 
arrangements ; but the Council have decided that the following works are 
necessary ; and as it was most desirable that they should be completed before 
the end of the recess, or as soon as possible after it, they have given orders 
for their being carried out, and they are now in course of execution by- 
Messrs, Mackintosh, Burn and Co. 



102 Bepairs of the Society's Premises. [AtrcursT, 

1. The Louse to be thoroughly rej^airecl inside and out. 

2. The rooms on the ground floor to be laid with asphalte. The pas- 
sages about the entrance and staircase to be paved with Chunar stone. 

3. Two rooms on the ground floor to be convei-ted into a retiring 
room and lavatory for the convenience o£ Members. 

4. The sky-light over the staircase to be enlarged and improved. 

5. The meeting-room and the rooms round it to be coloured. 

6. The floors of the three rooms, proposed to be devoted to the Libra- 
ry, to be propped up from below by iron pillars. 

7. The staircase to be improved by the substitution of iron raihngs 
and a substantial mahogany hand-rail for the present ones. 

8. The present portico, being very narrow and inconvenient, to be 
demolished, and a new enlarged portico to be built symmetrical with the 
entrance doorway, to which a new entrance door is to be put. 

9. Gas to be laid on in the entrance and public rooms. 
The cost of these repairs and alterations will be — 

General repairs and alterations, including asphalte for lower floor, fit- 
ting up retiring room, enlarging sky-light, propping up Library rooms, 

colouring meeting-room, and other minor items, Rs. 8,980 

Alterations to Staircase, 1,480 

New Portico and Entrance-door, 3,150 

13,610 
Gas and Fittings, 2,342 



Total, Rs. 15,952 



Messrs. Mackintosh, Burn have undertaken to execute the works in- 
cluded under the first three items for Rs. 13,000, so that the total cost 
will thus be reduced to Rs. 15,342. 

Besides these repairs and alterations which are necessary and urgent, 
the Committee of Repairs have recommended that the present boundary 
wall and godowns in Park Street should be demolished, and rej)laced by a 
neat half- wall and iron railing with two gateways and a durwan's lodge, 
a new range of servants' houses and latrine being built at the back of the 
house from the old materials. The cost of these alterations and additions 
is estimated by Messrs. Mackintosh, Burn at Rs. 6,167. 

There is no doubt that these proposed alterations of the boundary wall 
would be an immense improvement to the appearance of the Society's pre- 
mises, and as the present boundary wall is in a very bad state, the godowns 
inconvenient and useless, and there would in any case be the expense o£ 
repairing them, which is estimated at Rs. 857, the Council consider that it 



1876.] Repairs of the Society'' s Premises. 163 

would be desirable to carry out the changes proposed by the Committee ; 
but before deciding to spend so much money upon the mere improvement of 
the Society's premises, they feel themselves bound to refer the question for 
the vote of the general body of Members. 

The Committee of Repairs have also recommended that one or two 
shops should be erected in the vacant corner of the compound, at the junc- 
tions of Park Street and Chowringhee. This could be done at a cost of 
about Rupees 12,000, and as the site is a most favourable one for such a 
purpose, there is little doubt that a regular income of between Es. 200 and 
300 a month would be realised, (an offer of Es. 200 has already been 
received,) and that the erection of the shops would be a highly advantage- 
ous investment of part of the Society's caj)ital. 

If the shops were erected, there would be a reduction of about 
Es. 1,000 from the cost of the boundary railing. 

The ground on which it is pro]Dosed to build the shops is quite useless 
to the Society, except as a piece of garden, and it is so situated that it 
could be cut off without any inconvenience, nor would the presence' of the 
shops interfere in any way with the perfect privacy of the Society's pre- 
mises. 

In this case also the Council feel that, although the proposed investment 
would no doubt be advantageous, they cannot act without the consent of the 
general body of Mem.bers, and they therefore propose .to circulate this 
memorandum to all Members of the Society, for confii*mation of their 
action with regard to the urgent repairs and alterations, and for their vote 
with regard — 

I. To the erection of a dwarf wall and railings, and new servants' 
houses in place of the present boundary wall and godowns, at the estimated 
cost of Es. 6,167. 

II. To the investment of a portion of the Society's capital in the 
erection of a shop or shops, on a waste part of the Society's compound, at 
a cost of about Es. 12,000. 

These questions will be brought up for discussion at the November 
Meeting. 

Should all these proposals be adopted, the total cost of the alterations 
and repairs will be about Es. 33,000 ; but of this sum Es. 12,000 must be 
looked upon in the light of a reproductive investment, so that the amount 
actually sunk in repairs will be Es. 21,000, a sum well within that estima- 
ted and allowed for the piirpose, when tlie question of the compensation to 
be given by Government to the Society for its rooms in the New Museum 
bviilding, was considered. 

Besides the above expense for repairs, there will be some further ex- 
penditure, estimated at between Es. 5,000 and 6,000, for repairing the pic- 



164 Proposed Alterations in tlie Rules. [AuGtrsT, 

tui'e frames, new mats, punkahs, book-cases, furniture, &c., but the Coimcil 
believe tliat this may be met in great part from mcome mthout trenching 
further on the vested capital of the Society. 

It will thus be seen that the total expense of all the proposed repairs 
and alterations of the buildings and the further cost of furniture &c., is 
not likely to exceed Rs. 40,000. The amount of the Society's funded pro- 
perty at the present moment is Es. 1,58,000, besides about Es. 6,000 in 
floating account, so that should all the proposed improvements be adopted, 
there will remain to the Society at least Es. 1,20,000 invested in 5|- °/q 
Government Secui-ities and bringing in a regular income of nearly Es. 550 
a month, quite independently of subscriptions, besides 4 or 5,000 rupees 
available for the general purposes of the Society, Should the shops be 
built the income mil be increased to at least Es. 750, and if they are not 
built, to a little over Es. 600. 

The Council would take this opportunity of exj^ressing their indebted- 
ness to Mr. E. E. Bayne for the vakiable professional assistance he has 
rendered to the Society, as a member of the Committee of Eepairs, and 
particularly for the trouble he has taken in preparing detailed plans and 
estimates for the imjjrovements proposed by the Committee, though the 
Council regret that they have been unable to carry out Mr. Bayne' s beauti- 
ful designs, on account of the extra expense they would have involved. 

The Chaiemak announced that as the stock of copies of the Eules of 
the Society was nearly exhausted, the Council proposed to pubHsh a revised 
edition and had, with the assistance of a Committee, drawn up a circular 
showing the changes and additions it was thought desirable to make, 
with a statement of the reasons for the alterations proposed. The circular 
would be sent to the whole body of members, as provided under Eule 32 
(c), and the question would come up for decision at the November meeting. 

The following were the changes proposed — * 



Eule 1. Proposed Alteration. 

Name and Object. 

The Society shall he called, as heretofore, the Asiatic Society of 
Bengal and its objects shall be those described in the following language 
of the Founder, Sir William Jones : — " The bounds of its investigations will 
be the geographical limits of Asia, and within these limits enquiries will 
be extended to whatever is performed by man, or produced by nature." 

* Additions and changes are shown in italics. 



1876.] Proposed Alterations in tlie Rules. 165 

EuLE 2. Pro]Josed Alterations. 
Constitution. 

2. Tlie Society shall consist of Memhers of the three folloioing 
classes : — 

(a) Ordinary Members, the number o£ whom sball be xmlimited, and who 
shall be designated as Resident Ilembers, if they permanently dwell 
in Calcutta, or within 30 miles thereof ; as Non- Resident Memhers, if 
they permanently dwell loithin the limits specified in Rule 14 D ; and 
as Foreign Members, if they live permanently beyond those limits. 

(b) As at present. 

(c) As at present. 
Proviso. — As at present. 

3. Persons of all nations shall be eligible as Members of the Society. 

4. The administration, direction and management of the affairs of the 
Society shall be entrusted to a Council composed of the Officers of the 
Society, namely : a President, three Vice-Presidents, and one 'or more 
Secretaries, including the Treasurer, ivith as many other ordinary Members 
as shall with these officers mahe up a total of fifteen. 

Rule 3. Proposed additional Clause. 

Should titer e be no meeting during the recess months of September and 
October, the Council shall be empowered to elect candidates for ordinary 
Membership, loho shall have been duly proposed and seconded at the Meeting 
of the Society in August, or ivhose names may be received as candidates 
during the recess. Such candidates shall be hallotted for at the Meeting of 
the Council next succeeding that at tvhich their names and those of their 
proposers and seconders shall have been laid before the Council ; and during 
the interval between the two meetings these names shall be suspended in the 
Society's meeting Room as provided in Rule 3 ; and it shall be necessary for 
the due election of such candidates, that not less than two-thirds of the Mem- 
bers of Council present at the meeting shall vote in their favour. Such 
elections shall he reported and confirmed at the first general meeting of the 
Society after the Recess. 

Rule 5. A. B. C. Proposed Alterations. 

5. A. As at present. 

B. No person, although duly elected according to the foregoing Rules, 
shall be entitled to exercise the rights and privileges of Mcmbcrsliip, nor 
shall his name be entered in the list of Members, until he bus paid his 
admission fee and first quarterly subscription. 



166 Proposed Alter atiojis in the Rules. [AuausT, 

C. As at 231'esent. 

The preceding three rules shall he urittcn or printed on the letter of 
announcement of election sent to Members hy the Secretary imder Mule 4. 

ElTLE 9. A. Proposed Alteration. 

9. A. The subscription of Eesident Ordinary Members shall be 
Rs. 9* per quarter. 

Proposed Exiles for Compounding, 
to he added after Rule 9. 

I. Any member of the Society may, after he shall have paid his 
entrance fee, compound for the payment of all fixture subscriptions as a 
non-resident member, hy the payment in a single sum of Rs. 300. 

II. Any member already belonging to the Society may at any time 
compov/nd for his future subscriptions as a non-resident member by the 
payment of the above compounding fee, less Rs. 10 for each full annual 
subscription, of not less than Rs. 24, he may already have paid, whether as 
a Resident or non- Resident member. Provided always that under no cir- 
cumstances shall the composition be reduced below Rs. 100. 

III. Resident members who have already compounded for their non- 
resident subscriptions under the last rule, shall still be liable to pay a 
quarterly subscription equal to the difference between the Resident and 
non-Resident rates of Subscription, during such time as they shall remain 
resident. Such additional subscription to be chargeable under the provisions 
of Rule Q U. 

IV. Any member who compounds for his non-resident subscription, or 
who has already compounded for it, may also compound for all future 
additional subscriptions as a Resident member by payment of a sum eqtial 
to 10 times the yearly difference between the non-resident and resident 
subscriptions. 

Y. Any member who has compounded shall be entitled, lohile absent 
from India, to the privileges specified under Rule 14 C (as amended). 

EiiLE 13. A. B. C. Proposed Alterations. 

Cessation of Membership. 

13. A. When any ordinary member shall have omitted to pay the 

subscriptions of six successive quarters, the Council 

naS:'t'ntn"n? ^^-H <^ause a registered letter to be sent to him, 

of arrears. directed to his last known address, informing- him of 

* It is now Ks, 12. 



1876.] I'roposed Alterations in tJie Rules. 167 

the amount of tlie sums clue hy him and that unless they are paid loithin 
six months from the receipt of such letter, his name toill he struc/c off the 
list of Members. 

S. If he omit to pay the amount tvithin the time so limited his name 
shall he suspended as a defaulter at any Ordinary General Meeting and, tmless 
the a/mount he paid in the meantime, shall remain so suspended within the 
Society's huilding till the next Ordinary General Meeting when the 
Chairman shall declare such Memher to he removed from the Society 
for nonjyayment. This fact shall he notified in the Proceedings of the 
Society. 

Clause C. will remain as it is. 

EuLE 14. A. B. Proposed Rules. 

In the event of an Ordinary Memher leaving India, and of his inform- 
ing the Secretary hy letter that he desires to retain his privileges as an 
Ordinary Memher under Mule 7 (h), his subscription shall be Rs. 16 per 
unnwn, or 32 shillings, whilst absent from India. On the retibrn of such 
member to India he shall thereupon become liable to pay his original siob- 
scription as provided in Rule 10 -B. 

R. Any memher leaving India may compound for all future subscrip- 
tions under the provisions of Rule II of the new rules for compoun- 
ding. 

Proviso. — These rules shall not apply to members who are noio paying 
an annual subscription of Rs. 12 under Rule 14 A of the Rules of 
1869, or who shall have compounded for their subscription under that 
rule. 

C. Ordinary Members paying a subscription of Rs. 1^ per annum 
imder this rule shall not be competent to exercise the privileges specified in 
Rule 7 (e) and (g). Nor shall they have the right of voting under 
Mule 32. 

D. For the purposes of this rule members, in India shall be considered 
to include all those living in any part of India and its dependencies, includ- 
ing Aden, or in Ceylon and the Straits Settlements, or elsewhere betxoeen 
the parallels of Q0° and 100° E. Longitude, and from the Equator to 40*^ 
North Latitude. Members beyond these limits shall be considered Foreign 
Members. 

E. Same as present rule B. 

EuLE 15. Proposed Rules. 
Any Member may withdraw from the Society hy signifying his wish to 
do so by letter addressed to the Secretary. 

Any member who shall cease to be a member of the Society either hy 



168 Proposed Alterations in tlie Bitles. [Atigttst, 

forfeiture of Jiis claims under rules 13, 14 -S. micll^, or hy volxmtary 
withdrcnval shall eontiime liable to the payment of the quarterly subscrip- 
tion xmtil he shall have discharged all sims (if (iny) due by him to the 
Society and shall have returned all books or other property (if any) 
borrowed by him of the Society ; or shall have made full compensation for 
the same if lost, injtored or not forthcoming. 

Etjle 20 to be cancelled. 

EuLE 22. (/). Proposed Alteration. 

(f) To prepare and submit to the Annual General -Meeting a Report 
on the general concerns of the Society. Such report shall set forth the 
income and expenditure for the calendar year, the balance in hand, the debts 
and assets, the estimated income and expenditure of the succeeding year, 
jirosperity, or otherwise, of the Society, and the progress of the Library 
The Report shall also include an Abstract of theProceedings of the Cowicil 
during the year. 

EiTLE 22. Proposed Additional Clause (g). 

(^g) In conformity vnth the provisions of the Pegistration Act, 
No. 2^X.I of 1860, (Sections 9 and 10,J under which the Society has been 
registered, the Council shall be empowered, subject to the sanction of 
an Ordinary General Meeting, to take legal proceedings wider the Act for 
the recovery of any stwis due by members tvho, after receiving due notice of 
their liabilities, shall refuse to discharge them. 

Rule 26. Proposed Additional Clause. 

At the expiration of every Qtmrter the Treasui^er shall prepare a list 
of the names of those members who may be in arrears of their subscriptions 
for that or previous qimrters and shall submit it for the orders of the Coun- 
cil at the Council Meetings next before the General Meetings in February, 
May, August and November. 

Rule 28. C. Proposed Alteration. 

(c) The business of each Meeting shall be proceeded with in the order 
hereinafter prescribed in Rules 29 and 30, Clause (c) : provided always that, 
on ivritten notice being given to the President or one of the Secretaries, owt 
less than 48 hours before the hour of Meeting, a motion for the immediate 
transaction of urgent business may be made ; and if such motion be seconded 
and carried, this rule shall be suspended. 



1876.] Proposed Alterations in the Rules, 169 

Rule 28. 'Proposed Additional Clause after (c). 

With the exception mentioned in the last Pule, notice of motion an any 
matter of importance shall he given at the General Meeting preceding that 
on which the subject is to he disposed of in order that members who talce an 
interest in the question may have an opporttmity of informing themselves 
regarding it and expressing their assent or dissent ; and no motion of which 
notice has not been given shall he carried at the meeting at which it is pro- 
posed if the President or Chairman of the Meeting rules that it should he 
postponed. 

Rule 29. Proposed Alteration. 

The Society shall meet on the first Wednesday in each month excepting 
in Septemher and October bv,t the Council may, if they consider it desirable, 
appoint a meeting to be held as x^sual in one or both of those months. 

Etjle 32 (c). Proposed Alteration. 

(c) When any proposal is made respecting expenditure to a large 
amount, changes of organization, disposal of securities forming part of the 
Permanent Peserve Fund, amendment or alteration o£ the Rules, or gen- 
erally when any question arises which, in the opinion of the Council, should 
be referred to the whole body of Ordinary Members. 

Rule 33. Proposed Alteration. 

33. Any question referred to the votes of the whole body of Ordinary 
Members, shall be brought up at the Ordinary 

V te3°^^^ ^^ *^^^^ *^^ Monthly Meeting next after the close of one month 
from the issue of the voting papers. Ordinary 

Members j)resent at such Meeting, and who have not abeady sent in a 

voting paper, shall be permitted to fill in a voting paper at such Meeting. 

The ChaLrman shall appoint two Scrutineers, who shall proceed to examine 

the votes and report the result. 

Rule 34. Additional Pule proposed. 

Minutes of the Proceedings of every meeting of the Council shall he 
taken during their p>rogress by one of the Secretaries, or, in the case of their 
absence, by sot)ie member j^resent whom the Chairman shall appoint for the 
occasion. The minutes shall afterwards be circulated to the members present 
at the meeting for the purpose of ascertaining their correctness and then be 
copied fairly in a minute booh and read and signed by the Chairman at the 
next meeting of the Council. 



170 Proposed Alterations in the Bides. [Aiiairsr, 

Ettle 36 A to be cancelled. 
Rule 38. Projjosed Hides. 

I. Of tJw Funds of tlie Society now invested in Govt. Securities^ 
Us. 1,20,000 shall he considered as a Permanent Reserve Fund for the 
'benefit of the Society and it shall not he comj^etent to the Oouneil, or to any 
of the Society's Oncers, or to any Committee of the Society to sell or other- 
ivise alienate the said fimd or any portion of it without first recommending 
the sale or alienation in question to the Society and talcing the votes of the 
general hody of JSIemhers, as provided in Bides 82 and 33, and further such, 
sale or alienation shall only he lawful if carried hy a majority of not less 
than three fourths of the onenihers who have voted. And should any portion 
of the Permanent Fund he sold or alienated hy authority of the onemhers of 
the Society the remainder shall he preserved under this ride in the same 
manner as if the sum were intact. Bid this rule shall not apply to the 
temporary investments in Govt. Securities mentioned in the following 
rule. 

II. Tlie remaining Funds of the Society shall he lodged in the Bank 
of Bengal in the name of the Society. Any suoplus not reqidred for imme- 
diate expenditii/i''e shall he invested from time to time hy the Treasurer in 
the name of the Society as a Temporary Vested Fund ; hut no Government 
or other Securities forming part of this Fund shall he sold or otherivise 
disposed of hy the Treasurer or any Officer or Committee of the Society 
except hy special order of the Council. 

Ill Whenever the Temporary Vested Fund shall exceed the sum of 
Bs. 10,000 it shall he lauful to the Council, if they consider it desirahle, to 
transfer such excess to the Permanent Beserve Fund, and the provisions of 
Bide I shall apply to these additions exactly as if they had formed part of 
the original sum. 

IV. All sums received from Memhers as Admission or Compounding 
fees shall he regularly invested hy the Treasurer as soon as possihle after 
the receipt thereof and only the interest accfuing thereform shall he consi- 
dered available for the general expenditwi^e of the Society. Such investments 
shall form, and be treated as, part of the Permanent Beserve Fund under 
Bule I. 

V. All Securities and monies the property of the Society shall he 
lodged for safe custody in the Banh of Bengal. 

VI. Cheques drawn on the Banh for sums in excess of Bs. 500, 
shall he signed hy the Treasurer and counter-signed hy a Member of 
Council. 



1876.] UxMhition of Croohes' Badiometer ly Bev. Fr. Lafont. 171 

Peoposed New Rule (Miscellaiteous) . 

Alteration of the Bye-laws. 

When the introduction of aivy new Bye-law, or the alteration or repeal 
of any existing Bye-law, is recommended hy the Gov/ncil, or proposed hy ten 
or more ordinary Members, the Council shall cause to he sent to every 
member of the Society entitled to vote, a statement of the proposed changes 
and the reasons for them, with a view to the votes of the general body of 
M-embers being taJcen as directed in Bule 33. Brovided always that no 
change in the Bye-laws shall be valid toilless a majority of three-fourths 
of the Members who have voted shall be infavowr of the proposed changes. 

The CoTJJsrciL reported that in conformity with the wish expressed at 
the last meeting Mr. H. F. Blanford's proposal, that the refund of sub- 
scription to the Piddington Fund should be devoted to form a nucleus of 
a fund for the pensioning of old and deserving servants of the Society, had 
been referred for the decision of the subscribers at joresent in India, and 
that of 17 members addressed eight had replied agreeing to the proposal. 
The Council would therefore recommend that it should be adopted but 
with the proviso, that any subscriber who wished to reclaim his share 
should be at liberty to do so. 

The proposition was agreed to unanimously. 

The Council reported that in accordance with the vote passed at the 
last meeting, the Society had been registered under Act XXI of 1860. 

Also that they had elected Dr. J. Anderson and Lieut.' F. W. Jarrad, 
R. N., members of the Natural History and Library Committees. 

The Eev. Fathee Lafont, S. J., exhibited one of Crookes' Radiome- 
ters and said that he had made numerous experiments to ascertain 1st, whether 
the rotation was due to the impulse of the ether wave, and 2nd, whether they 
were due to the longer or to the shorter waves, to Heat rather than to Light. 
Having tried polarized heat and light, he thought the very slight acceleration 
produced, when the pilane of the waves was directed normally against the 
vanes, could not warrant the conclusion that the waves were the propelling 
agent. In his opinion, the result of his experiments on the second point 
was more definite and pointed to Heat as the principal moving agent. He 
might venture to say that the radiometer never moved except a change 
occurred in its temperature : if that tem2:)erature was increased, the little 
mill moved white faces forward ; if it was lowered, it moved black faces 
forward, or in the reverse direction. 



172 IJxhihition of Lower Jaw of Teiraconodon Magnum. [August, 

Father Lafont concluded from this that the radiometer was complete- 
ly useless as a photometer. As to the real cause or causes of its move- 
ments, he thought the subject required fm-ther study before a definite 
answer could be given. 

Mr. R. Ltdekker exhibited a portion of the lower jaw of Tetracono- 
don magnum, Falconer, from the Sewaliks, and said — 

The specimen exhibited is a portion of the lower jaw of this Hij^popo- 
tamoid : the animal was previously only known by two upper molars ob- 
tained by Falconer. The present specimen contains two tubercular molar 
teeth, and two large conical premolars, the latter far exceeding in size the 
former ; a condition unknown in any other mammal with which I am 
acquainted. 

The specimen was obtained by Mr. Theobald during the present year 
from the Sewaliks of the Panjab ; it will be found described in the forth- 
coming number of the ' Records of the Geological Survey of India.' 

Mr. W. T. Blaisteoed exhibited some di'awings sent to him by Cap- 
tain E. Mockler, Political Agent at Gruadar, representing ancient dwellings 
and tombs discovered by Captain Mockler at Sutkagen Dor and Damba 
Koh near Guadar in Makran (Baluchistan). The originals had been sent 
to the Royal Asiatic Society vdth a full account of Caj)tain Mockler's dis- 
coveries, of which a short notice was given to the meeting by Mr. Blanford 
who said : 

The two localities explored by Captain Mockler, are not far from the 
coast of Makran. The first of these, Sutkagen Dor (the bm'ut-up torrent, 
a name derived from the charcoal and ashes found in the neighbourhood) 
lies about forty miles north-west of Guadar : there is a modern stone fort 
constructed by Baluchis, but remains of ancient works also occur, the prin- 
cij)al being two dykes of large stones joining different hills together. Such 
works are found in other parts of Baluchistan and are known to the inhabi- 
tants as " Bahmani." 

Excavations at this place beside an ancient brick wall laid bare the 
walls of a small house, built of bricks, some of them vitrified, and sparingly 
cemented together with mud, and also of a stone house enclosing platforms 
paved with stone. This, Captain Mockler thinks, may have been a temple. 
Pottery, charcoal, bones, chiefly of fish, and flint knives were found both in 
the houses and in the soil around. A niimber of oblong stone enclosures 
were also met with, one wall sometimes above another and running in a 
different direction. Fragments of pottery, stone knives, bones and pieces 
of copper are abundant in these enclosures and below the foundations, and 
in several of them, earthen pots were discovered, about 2i feet high. 



1876.] Ancient Bioellings and Tombs in Baluchistdn. 173 

containing earth, stones, bones, (occasionally charred) teeth, charcoal, and 
•in one case a small stone knife. The contents, with the possible exception 
of the bones, appear to have been washed in by water. Besides the earthen 
pots, pieces of shell bracelets, stone cubes like large dice, stone and j)ottery 
beads, fragments of copper bracelets, grinding stones, and round stones like 
cannon balls were found in the enclosures. 

About 40 miles west of Sutkagen Dor is a place called Damba Koh or 
Dambani Koh (the hill of dambs, i. e., cairns). A range of hills is covered 
with little square stone enclosures 8 or 9 feet square at the base, each hav- 
ing a single door which usually faces up the hill ; a few, without apparent 
reason, have openings to the north, i. e. at right angles to the others. 
These enclosures were originally plastered over with mud and diminished 
in size above, but they are for the most part ruined and of many only a circle 
of stones remains. It is not clear whether these little enclosures were 
dwellings or tombs, but they were probably the latter. All contained ear- 
then pots originally and much of the pottery is coated with a green glaze. 

The country around the hills is a level of grey clay, and the bills con- 
sist of beds of similar clay tilted up and interstratified with limestone or 
calcareous sandstone, blocks of which are used for building. Two hills 
away from the main range are covered with ruins of stone hotises built very 
close together. Most of these contained several rooms, each from 15 to 20 
feet square. These ruius are probably the remains of the city, the inhabitants 
of which were buried in the " dambs." Details of the construction of these 
houses are given in the paper. Pottery, beads, &c., were found and a coin 
with some Greek letters still visible. The forms of the pottery discovered 
are different from those now used in Baluchistan. 

In the neighbourhood of one of the hills remains of a furnace were found 
which had apparently been employed for burning vitrified bricks. None of 
these were found in the houses, but it is supposed that a fine red earth 
which abounds is due to their decomposition. 

Remains of another city called Darmani ban exist 5 miles south-east 
of Damba Koh and consist of a number of lai-ge houses packed closely 
together on a solitary hill, and of " dambs" on the hills around. The latter 
are not so well preserved as at Damba Koh. Here also the remains of a 
furnace were found. Forty miles soiith of Damba Koh at a place called 
Jiini (or Junri) there are more " dambs", but they are, with rare exceptions, 
oval or circular, not square, and no . door could be found, though one may 
have existed on the west side which is always more ruined than the others. 
These dambs are on level ground, not on hills. In one a jwt with bones was 
found, and some fragments of iron, in otliers pottery, stones for sharpenino" 
knives, copper bracelets, and in one case a copper lamp, cornelian beads, 
ornaments, a lot of decomposed iron and bones. 



174! ExTiihition of forms of KYi\iYo^odi?i new to India. [AtrairsT, 

Six " dambs" were also examined at a place called Jati, 6 miles from 
Guadar, three of these contained human bones alone, others contained 
besides bones, pottery, iron, &c. 

Captain Mockler thinks that in all these dambs the bones were collect- 
ed after the body had decomposed, and were placed either in an earthen 
pot or on the gronnd, and that an earthen water pot and sometimes other 
pots, perhaps containing food, were added, as well as ornaments and weapons. 
No signs of cremation appeared, except at Sutkagen Dor, and at that place 
there are no dambs and the houses were probably made by a different peo- 
ple. Caj)tain Mockler concludes by saying that since his attention was 
first drawn to these antiquities, which have never before been noticed, he 
has heard of their occurrence in many parts of the country, and that he 
hopes to continue his researches into these and other remains. 

Mr. BiiANroED added that the account appeared to indicate remains of 
two different ages, as in the sets of buildings at Sutkagen Dor flint knives 
were found and but little metal, whilst remains of iron imjDlements and 
a Greek coin were found in those at Damba Koh. The remains of Cyclo- 
pean masonry occur throughout Baluchistan, and the walls appear chiefly 
to have been built in order to form dams to reservoirs of water. The vitri- 
fied bricks mentioned are found at all old cities in Sind such as Ai-iir and 
Braminabad. 

Mr. WooD-MASOisr exhibited specimens of a species of lapyx which he 
had recently found amongst the decaying leaves and fungi at the foot of a 
bamboo-clump in his own garden at Calcutta, and said — 

" This remarkable form of Arthropoda, which has not hitherto been 
met with in India or, indeed, in any part of Asia, is of the greatest interest 
as belonging to a group the members of which are considered by Sir John 
Lubbock to be the living representatives of a primaeval form from which 
the great orders of insects have all originated. Discovered many years ago 
in Algeria by M. Lucas, the eminent French entomologist, lapyx solifugus, 
the type of the group, was only made known to science in 1864, when Mr. 
Haliday described and figured it in the ' Transactions of the Linnean Society 
of London' ; in the following year it was submitted to a more careful exam- 
ination by Meinert, who detected a pair of rudimentary appendages on each 
of the seven anterior segments of the abdomen, just as in its allies, Campo- 
dea and Nicoletia, in which latter, however, all the abdominal segments ap- 
pear to be thus furnished. Four species of the genus have already been de- 
scribed, viz., lapyx solifugus, Haliday, from Algeria, Switzerland, and various 
parts of Italy ; I. Saussurii, Humbert, from Mexico ; I, gigas, Brauer, from 
Cyprus ; and I. Wollastoni, Westwood, from Madeira and an adjacent is- 
land. A fifth has now been discovered thoixsands of miles from the nearest 



1876.] ^xJiibition of new S2)ecies of Mantidiss. 175 

o£ these localities, in association with a large bright crimson-coloured species 
of Anoura, two species o£ Spring-tails, two or three PselajjJiidce, five or sis 
myriopods, amongst which a Polyxcnus differing from the Em-opean 
P. IfKjuTUS in having oiie instead of two pencils of silvery hairs at the end 
of the body, and a species of the very remarkable genus Scolopeiidrella 
especially merit attention. 

Mr. WoOD-MASOisr next exhibited some remarkable species oiMantidce, 
and said — 

These insects belong to that division of the family in which either 
the legs or some part of the body is provided with appendages, and to that 
section of it in which in males as well as in females the antennae are simple 
and setaceous and not j)ectinated, and I invite attention to some sexual 
differences presented by them which, I believe, have never before been 
noticed. 

In Sestias Brmmeriana, the head of the female is prolonged vertically 
in the form of a cone bilobed at its extremity, while in the opposite 
sex this great cone is represented by a mere tubercle, as in both sexes 
of the species belonging to the genus Creobrota ; the fore-femora, which 
are wanting in the specimen from which the species was described by Saus- 
sure, are equally conspicuous in both sexes, being very broadly oval, with 
their upper margins very strongly crested. 

In the next specimen to which I would draw attention, a small 
(22 mm. long) female insect brought from Pegu by Mr. Kurz and 
apparently allied to Sestias and Oxi/pilws hicingulata, DeHaan, the 
upper edges of the fore-femora are sharply crested, but not so greatly 
expanded ; the cephalic cone is bicuspid at the extremity and armed with 
two pointed cusps on each side ; the occijiut presents behind each eye a 
jjointed tubercle directed backwards ; the face is carinate, the keel of the 
' facial shield' terminating above in a stout conical tooth ; the two upper 
ocelli are surmounted by a i^air of long and slender conical spines ; the 
organs of flight do not nearly reach to the extremity of the abdomen, and 
the disc of the prothorax is armed with four sharp erect spiniforni 
tubercles. From the analogy of Hestias, I confidently expect that the male 
will prove to have its head similarly armed with a tubercle. I have named 
this curious insect Ceratommills Saussurii. 

I also exhibit the two sexes of an insect captured, the female by Mr. Peal 
in the Naga hills, and tlie male l:)y Dr. Cameron in the Bhutan Doars ; in the 
former the head is provided witli a h)iig and slightly tapering foliaceous 
frontal horn, truncated at the apex, longitudinally obtusely carinate in front 
and sharply crested behind, and nearly three times as long as the head is 
high ; in the latter this great foliaccous horn is reduced to little more than 
a tubercle only about half as long as the head is high. I have named this 



176 H.F. Blanford — Ineq^^Mlity of semi-cliiirnal Barometric Tides. [August, 

insect Phyllocrcmia WesUvoodi notwithstanding that the prothorax has 
no foHaceous expansions. 

Similar sexiial differences may be looked for in Fhyllocrania, Parabl- 
pliaris, and Sibylla, the males of which are still vmknown. 

In the FJiasmidce, we meet with apparently similar sexual differences, 
but in these insects the great reduction in size and thickness of body that 
has taken place in the males may well have effaced the horns and foliaceous 
lobes which after all are generally relatively not very greatly develojDed 
in the females ; we see the truth of this in the cases of the genus Pliyllium, 
wherein the foliaceous lobes of the abdomen and legs of the female are rela- 
tively very large and those of the male are consequently by no means in- 
appreciable, and in the case of LoncTiodes insignis, in which in males 
more than ordinarily stout the cephalic horns reappear in rudiment though 
they have disappeared in slenderer individuals. 

Mr. Wood-Mason also announced that he had ascertained by actual 
observation of living specimens belonging to several species that the 
femoral brushes described at a recent meeting are used by the JKantidce to 
keej) their eyes in a functional condition ; and that they are present in the 
young when they quit the Q%^. 

The following papers were read : — 
1. On tlie 'pliysical explanation of tlie Ineqtiality of the two semi-diurnal. 

Oscillations of Barometric Pressure. — By H. F. BLANroED, Esq., 

F. G. S., Meteorological Beporter to tlie Govermnent of India. 

(Abstract.) 

Mr. Blaistoed said that the paper he had to bring before the meeting 
dealt with a phenomenon which to observers in tropical countries is one of 
the most familiar and most regular in the whole range of Meteorological 
physics, but is, at the same time, one, on the explanation of which the 
greatest diversity of opinion prevails. 

It needs but to observe the rise and fall of the barometer for a day or 
two, in about any part of India, to learn the fundamental fact, that the 
atmospheric j)ressure undergoes daily, a double oscillation which is so 
regular in its occurrence, that except dming the passage of a cyclone it is 
scarcely ever masked by the irregular or not periodic variations. From 
between 3 and 4 in the morning the pressure begins to rise, slowly at first, 
afterwards more rapidly, and it attains its maximum generally between 9 
and 10 ; the exact hour varying at different seasons of the year. It then 
falls with great rapidity during 3 or 4 hours after noon, and attains 
the lowest pressure of the 24 hours about 4 or 5 p. m. Again a 



1876.] H. F. Blanford — Inequality of semi-cliurnal Barometric Tides. 177 

rise takes place till about 10 at night ; but this second maximum is 
somewhat less than that of the morning. Finally it falls, but less 
than in the afternoon, and reaches a minimum between 3 and 4 a. m. Such 
is the phenomenon as usually observed in Bengal, but it is subject to some 
local variations, both as to the time of the extremes and the relative and 
absolute amplitude of the oscillations. On hill stations 6,000 or 7,000 
feet above the sea, the afternoon minimum is generally not quite so low as 
the morning minimum, and the morning maximum occurs later. And, on 
the plains, the morning maximum occurs earlier and the afternoon minimmn 
later in the dry hot weather than in the rains ; at dry stations in the interior 
than at damper stations near the coast. It decreases in amplitude as we 
retreat from the tropics towards the poles, and in Europe it is always more 
or less masked by the greater irregular oscillations to which the atmospheric 
pressure is there subject. In the tropical Atlantic the rise and fall of both 
oscillations are nearly equal, and apparently less than on the land. 

The phenomenon is generally spoken of as the barometric tides, but it 
is clearly not a phenomenon of the same order as the oceanic tides, .since it 
is quite independent of the position of the moon, and has reference not so 
much to the position of the sun, as to the length of time he is above the 
horizon. Atmospheric tides there undoubtedly are, similar in general char- 
acter and origin to those of the sea, but these are not to be detected in the 
oscillations of the barometer, except as small residual phenomena, when 
readings are taken at different elevations and afterwards compared and 
reduced. 

The occurrence of the diurnal oscillations and their regularity was 
observed as long ago as the middle of the last century, and many hypothe- 
ses have been put forward to accomit for them. 

One of the earlier explanations was that of Kaemtz who referred them to 
the action of the smi's heat, in expanding the air and causing an overflow to 
East and West ; while the superincumbent mass of the atmosj^here is reduced 
to a minimum where the sun's heat falls most directly. But this wovdd fail 
to account for the double tide, and accordingly Sabine and Dove supposed 
that the whole iDhenomenon is composed of two distinct elements ; viz., a 
single oscillation, which was explained on Kaemtz's hypothesis ; the result 
of which, taken by itself would be to produce a minimum at the hottest 
time of day and a maxinumi at the coldest ; and a double oscillation which 
they referred to the varying tension of water vapour which has (in dry 
covintries at least) two maxima and two minima. This view was adopted 
by Herschell in his well known treatise, and also by Col. James in his 
Handbook of Instructions. But it was found when tested by observation, 
that it failed to explain the phenomenon. At Bombay, for instance, it 
was found that when the curve of vapour tension Avas subducted from the 



178 H. F. Blanford — IneqxmVdii of semi-diurnal Barometric Tides. [AuorsT, 

curve of the barometric oscillation, instead of leaving a single curve of one 
oscillation, a very irregular curve resulted, in which the double oscillation 
Avas still a very prominent feature. This, it was suggested, was a local pecu- 
liarity owing to the alternation of the sea and land breezes ; but it was 
speedily discovered that so far from being exceptional it was the general 
rule in all parts of India, and that the hypothesis of Dove and Sabine 
could in no way be made to suffice for the facts. 

Another view had been put forward independently by Broun of Tre- 
vandi'um and Lament of Munich, and had received support from 
Mr. Homstein of Vienna. This is that the element of the double oscilla- 
tion is an effect of either the Solar magnetism or electricity, and Mr. 
Hornstein had demonstrated that, in certain respects, the phenomenon 
shews a periodicity coi'responding to the frequency of sun-spots and 
auroras, and also of the period of the sun's rotation on his axis. 
Beyond, however, such coincidences, which seem to establish no more 
than that the phenomenon varies with certain solar phenomena and others 
which are known to vary with them, there appears to be little ground to 
assign the tides to magnetic rather than to thermal agency. 

Meanwhile Espy, Davies and Kreil had, as it ajjpears, independently of 
each other, drawn attention to one necessary consequence of the diurnal 
heating of the atmosphere, which had escaped the attention of Kaemtz, 
Dove and Sabine ; and which, whether affording a complete or only a par- 
tial exj)lanation of the oscillation, must cause a double diurnal oscillation 
such as is to be accovmted for. This is the increase of atmospheric pres- 
sm-e produced by the exjianding atmosphere in the forenoon, and that again 
produced by its contraction in the evening. It follows from elementary 
mechanical laws, that a mass of air resting on the ground and expanding, 
must exercise presstxre in excess of that due to its weight ; that this pressure 
will increase as the rate of expansion increases, will be constant when the 
rate of expansion is constant, and will fall as that rate decreases. Thus 
will arise an oscillation of j)ressure, similar to, and about coincident with the 
morning oscillation. As a jjartial verification of this coincidence, Mr. 
Blanford stated that he had found, on comparing the Calcutta diurnal 
curve of pressure with that of temj^erature, that the instant of the morn- 
ing maximum of the former falls less than half an horn* later than the in- 
stant of most rapid rise of the latter near the ground surface. 

In the evening, the contraction of the atmosphere in consequence of its 
cooling, will necessarily produce an increase of pressure, arising from the 
subsidence of the contracting atmosphere, and this seems a not impro- 
bable explanation of the evening maximum. It a2:)peared to be somewhat 
inexplicable that this suggested explanation has not received more attention 
at the hands of physicists. As put forward by Davies and Kreill it pi-esents 
some weak jjoints, but these are not essential. 



1876.] H. F. Blanford — Inequality of semi-diurnal Barometric Tides. 179 

On this hy]X)tliesis, since the two diurnal oscillations are due to differ- 
ent kinds of action, there would be nothing even apparently anomalous in 
the fact of their inequality. But, as a fact, the inequality of the two oscil- 
lations is greater on the land than on the sea, greater in dry than damp 
weather, and undergoes reversal between the plains and moiintains. As a 
distinct featiu'e of the whole phenomenon it deserves independent study. 

Pointing out that the whole oscillation may be considered as com.- 
pounded of a single and double oscillation, the former of which produces 
the inequality referred to, Mr. Blanford said that in discussing the diui'nal 
variation of the winds at Calcutta he had found that there was a diurnal 
single oscillation of the wind-direction coinciding in the hours of change 
&c., with the barometric single oscillation in question, and also a double 
oscillation of the wind bearing the same relation to the double barometric 
oscillation. Of these the first is the most important. The tendency of 
the wind is to blow from the West (the direction of the ordinary land- 
wind) during the day, and the opposite duiing the night. It is difficult 
to escajDe the obvious inference that the coincidence of a westerly- wind 
with falling pressure, and an easterly with rising pressure, both in the ease 
of the single and double oscillation is not fortuitous. 

If the diverse effects of the sun's heat when falling on land and water 
be investigated, it will be foimd that a greater pressiu-e will be generated 
over the former than over the latter. A given quantity of heat used w\) in 
the one case in heating dry air, in the other in charging it with vapour 
without heating it, will raise the pressure of the dry air 7\ times as much 
as that of the moist air. After allowing much for heat reflected, radiated 
&c., it still seems highly probable that a portion of this difference vrill remain 
outstanding, and thus will arise a diurnal inequality of pressure over land 
and sea, a pressure, however, due to the internal motion of the air and not 
to the quantity which exerts weight. The tendency of this will be to pro- 
duce a transfer of air from the land to the sea in the day, and a compensa- 
ting return current at night. 

That the amplitude of the day oscillations does depend to a great 
extent on the kind of work done by the sun's heat is evidenced by the small 
amplitude of the barometric curves in the rains as compared with those of the 
dry weather, at sea as compared with land, and on cloudy days as compared 
with clear days, which last fact was established by Kreil and Lamont. 

"Within the last few months a very elaborate summary of the data 
recorded in different parts of the world, bearing on the subject of the baro- 
metric tides has been published by Mr. Alexander Buchan. In re\dewing 
these data Mr. Buchan has drawn a conclusion as to the variation of the 
diurnal fall of pressure which at the first glance appears very paradoxical, 
but which falls in so admirably with the conclusions just described, that it 



180 H. H. Godwin- Austen — Cyclostomacece offJie Dafla Kills. [AuGirsT, 

has been the immediate occasion of the jDresent imper. Mr. Buchan has 
pointed out that the fall of pressm'e during the afternoon hours seems to 
depend much on the local distribution of land and water as well as on the 
position of the sun, the humidity of the air, and the direction of the wind, 
particularly considered as a land or sea wind ; and that while numerous 
illustrations could be adduced shewing a larger oscillation over the same 
region with a high temperatm-e and a dry atmosphere, than with a low 
temperature and a moist atmosphere there are some remarkable and striking 
exceptions. One of them is presented by the Mediterranean on the 
coasts of which sea, the amplitude of the oscillation is least, precisely at 
that season when the air is driest. Mr. Blanford remarked that this ap- 
parent anomaly is readily explained by the action abeady described. The 
inequality of the dimnial pressures generated over land and sea will be 
greatest when the sun's action is most direct ; when the solar rays, un- 
impeded by cloud, fall on the land in the one case, on the water surface in 
the other, and under such circumstances the transfer of air from land to 
sea during the day will be a maximum, and the dim-nal fall of pressure on 
the coast will be diminished by the local accumulation of air. 

It appears then in a high degree probable that a great part of the 
diurnal irregularity of the barometric tides is due to the transfer of air 
from land to sea and vice versa, and to a similar transfer which may be 
proved to take place between the plains and the mountains. But the phe- 
nomenon is very complex, and much study and labour are yet required to 
unravel its elements, consisting as they do, partly of elastic and reactionary 
pressure, partly of dynamic pressm'e, and partly of variations in the 
static pressure of the atmosphere. Till this shall have been done, and it 
shall be f otmd, after all, that heat and its effects are insufficient to exjilain 
the phenomenon, it seems premature to resort to magnetic and electrical 
phenomena for the explanation of the barometric tides. 

2. The Cyclostomacece of the Dafla Sills, Assam. — By Major H. H. 
Godwin-Atjsten, F. E. G-. S., F. Z. S. 

The present list is confined to the operculated land shells and includes 
33 species, of which eleven are described and figm-ed as new ; five were previ- 
ously known from Dai'jiliug ; thirteen are well-known Khasi and Naga Hill 
forms, and three or four extend to the Shan States. The Selicidce will 
form the subject of a second paper, in which the author hopes to be joined 
by Mr. G. Nevill. The most mteresting species described appears to be 
Mega loviastoma tanyclieihis. 

The paper, which is illustrated by one plate, will be published in the 
Journal Part II, No. 3, 1876. 



1876.] W. T. Blanford — Description of a neto Mouse from Sincl. 181 



3. Description of Velomjs Watsoni, a new species of Mouse from 
Sind.—By W. T. Blaotoed, F. E. S., &c. 

Amongst some small mammals and reptiles in spirit received from Mr. 
H. E. Watson of the Sind Commission, are two si^ecimens of a mouse from 
the southern extremity of the Khirthar range about 50 miles north-west of 
Kotri. At first from the very peculiar characters of the molar teeth, I 
was inclined to consider this animal a new genus, but, although the molars 
of adult Pelomys have not been described, those figured in Peters's ' Eeise 
nach Mozambique' being apparently scarcely worn, it appears highly pro- 
bable that in an older animal they would exhibit the peculiarities of the 
Sind rodent. In both species the upper mcisors are grooved, and the 
hallux of the fore-foot has a small teguliform nail. I propose to name the 
new species after Mr. Watson, to whom we are indebted for several addi- 
tions to the Sind fauna, both Dr. Day and Mr. Himae having been much 
aided by him when collecting in Sind. 

Delomys Watsoni, sp. nov. 

The fur is harsh and consists of very flat hairs each with a broad groove 
down one side : the general colour is brown, approaching that of a hare, 
above, dirty white below. The hairs are dusky grey at the base, then dark- 
er, tawny towards the ends on the back and sides, numerous longer 
hairs, either entirely black or Avith a black tip, being scattered through- 
out the back. Average length of hair on the middle of the back half an inch. 

Ears rounded, naked outside. Feet pale brown above, soles naked, 
toes 5 — 5, all with claws, the hallux of the fore foot rudimentary but fur- 
nished with a small flattened nail. Tail stout, rather shorter than the head 
and body, finely ringed, and thinly clad with short bristly hairs which are 
black above, tawny on the sides and below. 

The skull is typically murine ; the anterior palatine foramina (forami- 
na incisiva) very long, extending fully two-thirds the distance from the 
incisors to the molars. The incisors in both jaws are deep orange in front, 
the upper pair grooved, the lower smooth. The molars are three in number, 
on each side of each jaw, with deep folds of enamel arranged in semicir- 
cular lobes having their convex edges in front ; these lobes in the upper teeth 
are arranged in 3 longitudinal rows, in the lower teeth in two. The an- 
terior upper molar contains 7 lobes, the second 6, the hindmost 4, the 
anterior lower molar has 7 lobes, the second 5, the third 4, the posterior 
lobe in each of tlie lower molars being small and central. 



1S2 Lewis and McConnell — On a New Parasite affecting Man. [August, 

The following are the dimensions taken from a specimen in spirit. 

Total length of animal (an adult female) 

from nose to end of tail, 8"65 in. '219 met. 

Length from nose to anus, 4.55 „ "IIG „ 

Do. oftail, 4-1 „ -105 „ 

Do. of ear, 0-57 „ -014 „ 

Do. of skull, 1-22 „ -0305,, 

Breadth of do., 0-62 „ -015 „ 

A fuller description with figures of the skull, &c., will be given in the 
Journal of the Society. 

The occurrence of this African form in Sind in quite in accordance 
with other pecuharities of the fauna. The only other known species of the 
genus is P. fallax, Peters, from Mozambique. 



4. Amphistoma hominis : n. sp. A Neio Parasite affecting Man. — By 
T. E. Lewis, M. B., and J. F. P. McConnell, M. B. 

The parasite forming the subject of this paper has not, so far as we 
have been able to ascertain, been j)reviously described ; nor indeed have 
any species of the genus to which it belongs been, heretofore, foimd to 
affect man. 

The anatomical and other details here recorded are based on two dis- 
tinct series of dissections and observations : the earlier series of observa- 
tions were conducted in June 1871 in connection with specimens of the 
entozoon obtained from Dr. Joseph O'Brien of Gowhatty ; and the second 
series during the present year, on specimens which had remained unde- 
scribed for several years in the Pathological Museum of the Calcutta Medi- 
cal College. 

Eegarding the former sj)ecimens Dr. O'Brien in writing to one of the 
authors of this paper (T. E. Lewis,) says : — " I send to-day — 28th May, 
1871 — a small bottle containing some curious looking parasites found by 
Curran [Dr. E. H. Curran, since deceased] and I, in the intestines of an 

Assamese man who died of cholera We found them certainly, by 

hundreds ; they lay chiefly in the vicinity of the Ileo-colic valve, and 
numbers were turned out of the vermiform appendix. I have sent the 
vermiform appendix ; in it you will find two or three of the ' beasts' in 
situ. When the intestine was freshly opened they exactly resembled 
miniature snails and they appeared to stick on to the mucous membrane 



1876.] Lewis and McConnell — O71 a Neto Parasite affecting Man. 183 

of the gut by means o£ tlie pale sucker-like sm-face on the inferior portion 
of the body." On adding a solution of chloride of zinc to the specimens, 
" it had" the writer continues, " the effect of bleaching their coats and 
destroying the moist glistening appearance in which they formerly rejoiced." 
The coats of specimens thus treated, it may be remarked, became eventually 
grayish black. 

The specimens which had been preserved in the Medical College 
Museum, and which formed the basis of the other series of observations 
(by J. r. P. McConnell), were, strange to say, obtained from the intes- 
tines of a man who was also stated to have died of cholera. This of course, 
might have been a coincidence merely, or it might be that owing to the 
irritation set up on the mucous surface of the intestinal canal by the para- 
site cholera-like symptoms may have become developed in addition, possibly, 
to some other fatal form of disease in both cases. With regard to the first 
case it may be mentioned that cholera was very prevalent at the time at 
Gowhatty, but that no such parasites were found in other cases. 

The history of the specimens forming the second series of observations, 
and which were lodged in the Museum, is thus briefly recorded in the Cata- 
logue of the Medical College Museum : — 

" The ca3cum of a native prisoner who died from cholera in the Tir- 
hoot gaol hospital, with a number of peculiar and, probably, hitherto unre- 
cognized parasites, found alive in that part of the intestinal canal." " {Pre- 
sented hy Dr. Simpson through Professor JE. Goodeve) .^' 

With reference to this preparation, the following very interesting par- 
ticulars from the Annual Jail Report of Tirhoot for 1857 have been very 
kindly placed at our disposal by the Surgeon- General, Indian Medical De- 
partment. The prisoner, Singhesur Doradh, aged 30, was attacked with 
cholera on the 13th and died on the 14th July 1857. " Had not been in 
hospital previously, and was employed in cleaning the jail." 

The post-mortem examination was made three hours after death : — 
*' Colon externally livid, contracted ; contains a little serous fluid with flakes 
of mucus. Mucous membrane healthy except venous injection. In the 
c£ecum and ascending colon numerous parasites like tadpoles, alive, adher- 
ing to the mucous membrane by their mouths. The mucous membrane 
marked with numerous red spots like leech-bites from these parasites. The 
parasites found only in the csecum and ascending colon, none in the small 
intestines." This description is by Dr. Simpson, who adds, " I have never 
seen such parasites, and apparently they are unknown to the natives. 
They are of a red colour, size of a tadpole, some young, others a]iparently 
full grown, alive, adhering to mucous membrane, — head round, with circu- 
lar open mouth which they had tlie power of dilating and contracting. 
Body short and tapering to a blunt point." 



184) Lewis and MeConnell — On a New Parasite affecting Man. [Atjgust, 

The lithograpli (Plate III) which accomjjanies this preparation gives a 
very correct representation o£ the csecum with portion of the adjacent ileum, 
from the above case. It has been drawn to the exact size of the specimen as it 
now exists in the Medical College Museum. Several of the parasites have 
also been delineated. The majority were f oimd free, i. e. detached from 
the surface of the bowel, but others are seen to be still slightly adherent 
or entangled in the folds of the mucous membrane. The sohtary glands 
are seen to be throughout prominent and hypertrophied, a condition which 
although very common in cholera, aj)pears in this instance to have existed 
(and still persists) in a very remarkable degree, — probably on account of 
the great follicular irritation which these parasites by their presence, are 
likely to have excited. 

Jumphistoma Jiominis, sp. nov. 

The parasite belongs to the Trematode or Fluke order of Helminths and 
to the genus AmpTiistoina. We have endeavoured to refer it to one or 
other of the tolerably numerous species belonging to this genus but have 
not been able to find that it belongs to any hitherto described species, so 
have decided on naming it Amphistoma hominis. 

The sjDCcimens in our possession vary slightly in size, possibly owing to 
to the different mode of preservation — those which were obtained from the 
Assamese having first been treated with chloride of zinc and subsequently 
preserved in glycerine, whereas the other samples appear to have been pre- 
served in spirit throughout. Those of the former kind are of a grayish 
dark colour owing, as already stated, to the action of the zmc solution, whereas 
those of the latter are of a grayish yellow tint. Their greatest length 
varies frona the -|^ to -| of an inch (5 to 8 millimeters) and the greatest 
width, across the caudal sucker, from \" to -g-" (3 to 4 millimeters). Its 
form is somewhat difiicult to describe : Fig. 2 a in the Plate represents a 
ventral view of it ; fig. 2 6a dorsal, and figs, c and d lateral and semidorsal 
views — all sketched double their natural size. It may be roughly divided 
into an anterior and a posterior half, the length of the former being about 
half the transverse measurement of the latter. At the anterior extremity 
(slightly on its ventral aspect) the oral sucker is readily detected, and 
about y*2- of an inch below this sucker is the genital pore. The posterior 
half of the AmpMstovia is composed of a somewhat flattened, circular 
bursa, within which is placed the caudal sucker proper. The biorsa may 
be observed in different states of contraction in different specimens ; when 
flattened out, (as in figs, a and h, Fig. 2, Plate III) it measures about ^ 
of an inch transversely. In some specimens this pouch is seen to have 
become folded laterally, leaving merely a slit in the long direction of the 
parasite and almost hiding the sucker itself from view. 

The Caudal sucker is a fii*m cup-shaped organ composed of circular and 



"rtocec-dii;&-=; Asiatic Soc- Bengal. 1376. 



Plate III. 







Fig. 3. 



'•Jg;- '1. A portion of Inl-.estine sjit open, witn specimens of AM:PHIST0M.A HOMINIS 
adlierent.— natural sjze. 

l-'ig 2, a.-cl. A.MVHISTOMA UOMi-NIS m various positions x 2. 

^ig. 3. Ova ol Ditto X 65. 



1876.] Lewis and McConiiell — On a New Parasite affecting Man. 185 

radiating muscular iibres. Its orifice is about -^oi^ of an inch in transverse 
diameter, but yV when the measurement is taken from the outer margin 
of the rim forming the sucker. In the adjoining figure a vertical section 
of this sucker may be observed. 

In this drawing the anatomy of the entozoon may also be studied 
as viewed from the ventral surface. The parasite is represented as magni- 
fied 12 diameters. Commencing vdth the oral sucker («) we find it to 
consist of a transversely placed oval orifice, suii-ounded by a ring of 
muscular tissue and presenting in many specimens a slight, papilla-like 
prominence. The orifice leads to a bidbous heart- shaj^ed j)harynx — with 
the apex directed anteriorly (h). At the lower margin the Nervotis 
ganglia (c) may be recognised — the ganglia of one side communicating 
with those of the other by mieans of a comparatively strong cord passing 
transversely behind the oesophagus. Nervous filaments are given of£ which 
spread in all directions, of which the largest are the cords (Ji) which may 
be traced along the ventral sui'face. of the two intestinal canals. 




AMPHISTOMA. HOMINIS.--Lorif,'itudinal Section. xl2. 



The (EsOj}J/agus (d) is ^\" or ^y in length, bifurcates behind the geni- 
tal pore — generally a little above the level of this aperture, but sometimes 



186 Lewis and McConnell — On a New Parasite affecting Man. [AuGTJSr, 

below. As indicated in the figm-e (i), the two canals thus formed termi- 
nate csecally about opposite the middle-half of the caudal sucker. 

Closely attached to the canal on either side, and easiest seen when the 
dissection is conducted from the dorsal surface of the AmpJiistoma, are the 
main branches of the water-vascular system (Jc), with which numerous fine 
Ganaliculce may, in suitable specimens, be seen connected along the entire 
course of the main trunks. 

The Genital pore (e), as before stated, is situated about ^2" below 
the oral sucker. The orifice is surrounded by muscular fibres arranged in 
a circular and radiating direction. Into it open the two channels of the 
sexual apparatus of this hermaphrodite entozoon. The vagina (f) is, in mature 
specimens, filled with ova, and it measures near its exit-termination about 
jij" transversely. The convolution of the vagina and uterus occupy a great 
portion of the interior of the worm, to such an extent indeed is this the case 
that it is difiicult to prick the skin of the dorsal sui-face without witnessing 
the escape of ova by the rupture of some of the uterine convolutions. In 
front of these convolutions, as seen from the ventral aspect, is the ovarian 
portion of the reproductive apparatus (J) and closely adjoining are the 
lobulated testes (J) from which the vas deferens with its continuation the 
ductus ejaculatorius (g) may be traced. A double twist may generally be 
perceived to have formed along the course of this duct ; its width be- 
tween this spot and the genital pore is about -^jo" or about half that of the 
vagina at the same part. 

The ava Fig. 3, Plate III, have firm capsules, and are provided with 
the operculum common to the ova of flukes. The average measurements 
proved to be tto" in length by -g^-^" in diameter. 

The ramifications of the vitellogene ducts with the glandules may 
be perceived through the cutaneous covering of the parasite, presenting 
a dendriform arrangement (ji), especially distinct all over the surface of 
the lursa ; and their nxain ducts (on^ may be seen in some specimens 
directed towards the ovarian body. In addition to these glands the 
cutaneous envelope of the entire entozoon is seen to be plentifully supplied 
with glandulse, of varying size, but averaging about ^^~' ; interspersed 
amongst which are numerous minute cells averaging •o^o'o" ^^ "soVo" ^^ 
diameter, generally of hyaline ajopearance and not unlike the calcareous 
particles common to entozoa. They withstand the action of dilute hydro- 
chloric acid. 

With these remarks we conclude our description of the leading fea- 
tures in the anatomy of this new parasite and we trust it is sufficiently 
explicit to enable fviture observers to experience but little difficulty in 
identifying it. 



1876.] V. A. Smitli — Popular Songs of Bundelhhand. 187 

5. Popular Songs of Samirpur District in BundelkTiand. (Second 
Paper). — By ViNCEifT A. Smith, B. A., C. S. 
(Abstract.) 

This paper is in contimiation of the paper on Hardaul songs published 
in the Journal, Part I, No. IV, for 1875, and comprises the text and trans- 
lation, with a commentary, of twelve songs. 

These are all Caste Songs, that is to say, songs which describe or spe- 
cially refer to the occuj)ations and characteristics of the caste of the singer. 
The castes, specimens of whose songs are given, are (1) Sunar, (2) Luhar, 
(3) Barhai, (4) Kahar, (5) Nai, (6) Kol, (7) Nat, (8) Khangar, (9) 
Dumar, (10) Lodhi and (11) Teli, (two songs). The songs are various 
in character, some being little more than catalogues of goods made by or 
wares sold by the singer's caste-fellows, while others are satirical. 

The dialect of eleven of the songs is that of Maudha, the eastern par- 
ganah of the Hamirpur district ; one song. No. X, is a specimen of the 
Hindi spoken by the Lodhis of Parganah Panwari in the south-west of the 
district. 

It is believed that the verbal forms of these compositions are deserving 
of attention, and that the songs will be of interest as pictm*es of native 
society. 

6. N'ote on the use of the Radiometer as a Photometer. — By 
A. Pedlee, Esq., F. C. S., Lond. and Berlin. 

The discovery by Mr. Crookes of the so-called mechanical action of 
light has natm'ally attracted considerable attention, and has led to numer- 
ous experiments in this direction. The instruments which' are employed 
to shew this action of light may be conveniently divided into two classes. 
In the fii'st class, a light beam, generally of straw wdth pith ends, is suspend- 
ed in a vacuum tube by an exceedingly fine glass thread, and the effect of 
the beat and the light I'ays falling on either end is measured by the torsion 
of the thread. In the second class of instniments, which are called " Radio- 
meters or Light Mills," a vane with four arms of some light material is 
suspended on a fine steel point, such as a needle, resting in a cup of glass, so 
that the arms are able to revolve horizontally upon the centre point, in the 
same manner as the arms of an ordinary anemometer revolve. To the 
extremity of each arm is fastened a thin disc of light material, such as 
mica, which is silvered on the one side and blackened on the other, all the 
black surfaces facing the same way. The whole is enclosed in a thin glass 
globe which is exhausted to the utmost limit which can be produced by a 
Sprengel mercuinal pump. On exposing the instrument to light the vane 
revolves with a velocity proportional to the strength of the light. The 
former class of instruments is not so well suited for travelling as the latter, 



188 A. Pedler — On the use oftJie 'Radiometer as a Photometer. [August, 

and the experiments which are here described were performed with one 
of the second class of radiometers, which had been forwarded to me 
from England. In a jDaper " on the Mechanical Action of Light" by 
Mr. Crookes,* a few photometrical experiments with this instrument 
are given, and from them it is concluded that the radiometer is a perfect 
photometer. The author says " By this means Photometry becomes much 
simplified, flames the most diverse may readily be compared between them- 
selves or with other sources of light ; a standard candle can now be defiaied 
as one which at ce inches off causes the radiometer to perform y revolutions 
per minute, the values of a? and y having previously been determined by 
comparison with some ascertained standard ; and the statement that a gas 
flame is equal to so many candles may with more accuracy be replaced by 
saying that it produces so many revolutions." This conclusion being of 
great practical importance, and as the expei-iments on which it was based 
were very few in number, it appeared to be advisable that they shoiild be, if 
possible, confirmed by a more extended series of observations. For this 
purpose during the past six weeks, I have made a continuous series of 
measurements with this instrument, which do not however enable me to 
speak with great confidence in the radiometer as a photometer. 

The mechanical effect produced in a radiometer is admittedly the 
product of the two forces, light and heat, and as it is well known that the 
illuminating power of a gas jet or candle flame depends very essentially 
upon its temperature, I thought at first that it would be better when testing 
the radiometer photometrically to employ the total radiation from the 
flames. 

My first experiments consisted in observing the radiometer, which was 
placed at a fixed distance from a gas flame, at the same time that I was 
testing the gas flame by the old photometrical method of Bunsen. For this 
purpose the radiometer was placed inside the photometer, in which it has 
been kept during the whole of the experiments ; this photometer is entirely 
lined with black velvet, so that we have only to deal with the radiation 
from the hght itself, and the phenomena are not complicated by any radia- 
tion from extraneous sources, as would be the case if the experiments were 
performed in an open room. The distance of the radiometer from the gas 
jet in these preliminary experiments was 27"2 inches ; the gas-jet a standard 
argand one, burning 5 feet of gas per hour, and the observations of the 
radiometer arc here given in quarter revolutions, that is to say, the number 
of arms of the vane which pass a given spot in a given time. 

* Quarterly Journal of Science, July, 1875. 



1876.] A. Pedler — On the use of the Radiometer as a Fliotometer. 189 



lllmninating poiver of Gas-jet, in 
standard sperm candles hurn- 
inrj 120 grains per hour. 



1. 


1234 


2. 


12 04 


3. 


1010 


•4. 


11-48 


5. 


12-42 



Nii/inher of qitarter-revolutions of 
'Radiometer per minxde (at 
27*2 inches distance). 



35-7 
40-0 
29-0 
380 
35 

It will be seen that there .is here a general sort of agreement between 
the number of revolutions and the illuminating power, but that in one or 
two instances discrepancies occur. I therefore thought it better to extend 
the observations of the radiometer by altering the distances from the source 
of lio-ht. By doing this, it would also prove whether the mechanical effect 
produced could be brought under any definite law. I therefore arranged 
that the radiometer could be placed at the distances 10, 15, 20, 25 and 
30 inches respectively from the gas-jet, and made a series of observations 
of the rapidity of revolution, two and, in many cases, three measurements 
at each distance being taken. The results are given in the table below, 
and it will be again seen, that there are discrepancies between the illumina- 
ting power and the observed revolutions, and that also these discrepancies 
extend throughout the observations at the varying distances. 





lUuTTiinating 
power of 


Di^ 


tance of r 


adiometer fi-om g-as 


jet. 




lu inches 


15 inches. 


20 inches. 


25 inches. 


30 inches. 




gas-jet. 












- 


12-42 


135 


79-3 


44-25 


26-67 


19-67 




10-58 


162 


108-5 


66 


45-5 


27 




13-12 


162 


121-5 


75 


43-5 


29 




9 53 


152 


97 


60 


38 


25 




13-42 


154-67 


104-5 


64-5 


45-5 


29 




1306 


170-5 


109-5 


66 


43-5 


31-5 




11-86 


163 


112 


67 


46 


34 


Average, 


12-00 


157-02 


104-57 


63-25 


41-25 


26-45 






Practical .result, calculated to the rate 












of 10 per minute at 30 inches distance 


59-36 


39-53 


23-91 


15-59 


10-0 


Theoretical result, calculated according 












to law of inverse squares, 


90 


40-0 


22-5 


14-4 


10-0 



At the bottom of the table I have calculated the observed rate of re- 
volution, starting with a supposed unit of 10 quarter-revolutions, at the 
distance of 30 inches ; and it will be scon that these results agree very 
closely with those calculated according to the law of inverse squares ; that 
is to sa}'', the number of revolutions ofc" the radiometer will be inversely 



190 A. Pedler — On the use of the U%cUometer as a JPhotometer. [August, 



proportional to the square of the distance from the source of light. But 
it will also be noticed that there is one marked exception to the rule, and 
this is at a distance of 10 inches from the gas flame where the rapidity of 
revolution is great. Here the actual number of quarter-revolutions amount- 
ed to 59'36 per minute, whilst theoretically they should have been 90. 
Evidently when the radiometer is rotating rapidly, there must be an im- 
mense increase in the friction so as to reduce the rotation by one-third of 
the whole amount. There are also indications in the above table that when 
the radiometer is rotating very slowly, there is a considerable disturbance 
from the theoretical rate of revolution, probably showing that friction has 
much influence both when the rotation is slow and rapid. 

As the result of these observations was not very satisfactory in so far 
as the applicability of the radiometer to photometry is concerned, I aban- 
doned my former idea, that both the light and heat rays should be allowed 
to act upon the radiometer ; and a second series of observations was com- 
menced, in which the dark heat rays from the gas-jet were filtered off by 
passing the light through a glass cell one inch in thickness with parallel sides, 
which was filled with a saturated solution of alum. The method of obser- 
vation was similar to that before described, and under these circumstances 
it was found that the rapidity of the revolution of the vane fell very consi- 
derably ; this will be seen from a comparison of the following table with 
the preceding one. 

DarTc Seat rays cut offhy Alum solution. 





Illumina- 


Eadiometer in quarter-revolutions pei 


minute. 




ting power 














of gas-jet. 


10 in. 


15 in. 


20 in. 


25 in. 


30 in. 




14-30 


42-5 


24 


14-5 


8-5 


5-0 




13-30 


40 


22-5 


12-5 


8-0 


4-5 




15-52 


48 


26 


16 


11-5 


6 




13-10 


39-5 


23-5 


14-5 


9-5 


6 




13-76 


44-5 


31 


17 


9-5 


5-75 




12-79 


42 


24-5 


14 


8-5 


5-0 


Average, 


13-8 


42-75 


25-25 


14-42 


8-92 


5-37 


Calculated to 10 per min. 

at 30 inches distance, . . 

Theoretical, • 


} •• 


79-6 


47'0 


26-8 


16-6 


10 










90 


40 


22-5 


14-4 


10 




11-5 


25 


13-5 


8-5 


5 






9-1 


20-5 


11-0 


6 








9-56 


18-5 


13-0 


7-5 







The velocity of rotation has, it will be seen, fallen to about one-fourth 
of what it was previously, and this is due almost entirely to the absorption 



1875.] A. Pedler — On the use of the Ruliometer as a Pliotometer. 191 

of the dark heat rays by the cell of alum solution ; there is, of course, a 
certain loss of light by the use of the cell of liquid, and, in order to ascer- 
tain the amount of this, some experiments were made with the Bunsen pho- 
tometer, which gave as an average of several determinations, that a total 
loss of 8'6 per cent, of light occurred in the jmssage thi-ough the alum cell. 
This shews then that from two-thirds to three-fourths of the mechanical 
effect in the radiometer, is, in the case of a coal-gas jet, due to dark heat 
rays, and not to light rays at all. 

In this series of observations we again see a general agreement of the 
average of the results at the varying distances, with the law of inverse 
squares ; but when the experiments are examined in detail, it will be found 
that there are somewhat serious divergences from the theory, and that the 
discrej)ancies are still greater when the rapidity of the rotation is compared 
with the illuminating power of the gas-jet on the separate occasions. The 
differences between the illuminating powers and the velocity of revolution 
are more marked in this table than in the last, and I cannot help thinking 
that the value of the radiometer as a photometer has been much overesti- 
mated. 

Apparently from these experiments, Avhich, however, are fewer in num- 
ber than I should have wished, we must either beheve that the old jDrocess 
of jihotometry cannot be thoroughly depended upon, or that the radiome- 
ter does not yield absolutely constant results. Dm*ing the experiments I 
have made, there have been some instances in which I obtained some very 
cui'ious alterations in the rapidity of rotation of the radiometer with 
scarcely any apparent alteration in the external circumstances, these, how- 
ever, I cannot at present satisfactorily explain. Since making the above 
experiments I have received a paper by Mr. Crookes (published in the Pro- 
ceedings of the Royal Society, vol. XXIV, p. 27G) in which he proves, that 
different parts of the S2:)ectrum have very different actions on the rotation of 
the radiometer ; and as the light of coal gas varies from white to yellow, 
it is jjossible that the origin of the discrepancies between the radiometer 
and photometer may be due to the differences in colour of the light. There 
are, however, other photometrical instruments such as, " the Sugg Jet 
Photometer," and it is my intention to compare this instrvimcnt with the 
radiometer. During these experiments, I have of course not neglected to 
test the radiometer with the standard sperm candles, and even here I 
obtained somewhat discordant results. As an average of my determina- 
tions, I found that my radiometer, when placed at a distance of 10 inches 
fi'om a candle burning 120 grains of sperm per hour, made IS'2 quarter 
rotations per minute. The avei'age of the radiometer under the same cir- 
cumstances with a gas flame of 12-candle jxjwer was 15702 quarter-re volu- 
tion 3 according to the radiometer, thercfure, imdcr these conditions, the 



192 A. Pedler — On the use of tJie Radiometer as a Pliotometer. [August, 

illumiuatiug power of that gas flame would be only 8-6 candles, or about 
two-tbirds of the illuminating power as measured by the old process. 

It is, I think, evident from these experiments that it would be impos- 
sible to say that because a Radiometer rotated sixteen times as rapidly with 
one flame as it did with another, that the former flame possessed sixteen 
times the illuminating power of the latter ; for it must be seen that in work- 
ing mth either a very high or very low rate of revolution, there appears to 
be considerable disturbance due to the friction of the instrument. It is 
I believe possible, and even probable, that much better results will be ob- 
tained, by working the radiometer always to a fixed number of revolutions 
(say about 30 or 40 quarter-revolutions per minute) ; and by altering the 
distance of the flame until such rapidity is obtained ; in this way the fric- 
tion of the instrument would be reduced to a constant quantity, and the 
comparative luminosities could be judged by the squares of the distances. 
These observations to be conclusive will take a considerable time to carry 
through, but I hoj^e at some future j)eriod to lay them before the Society. 

Through the courtesy of the Eev. Father Laf ont I have been able to 
test a second radiometer of a similar construction, having blackened discs 
of an equal size, which are suspended in the same way on a glass j)ivot. 

I have found that it is a much more sensitive instrument than my 
own., but that the relative sensitiveness varies according to the velocity of 
rotation. Some of the comparisons are instructive, and are given in the 
table below ; No. 1, Radiometer being the one used in the former experi- 
ments, and No. 2, the instrument belonging to Father Lafont. 





Source of Light. 


Hadiometer, 
No. 1, 

Quarter- 
revolutions 


Eadiometer, 
No. 2, 
Quarter- 
revolutions 






per min. 


per mm. 


Standard Sperm Candle, burning 126 grains per hour, .. 
Gas Jet 13-76 candle power at 10 inches distance, 

„ „ „ „ 10 „ with alum cell inter- 

Tinsfifl 


19 
169 
74 
35-5 

44-5 

17 

18-5 

7 


34 
221 
119 
62 

73 


„ 9-56 


10 „ 


35 

32-5 

9 



It will be seen that these comparative experiments confirm what has 
been said before that radiometers at high and at low velocity of rotation 
give somewhat uncertain indications ; for instance at a high rate of revolu- 
tion No. 1 radiometer is about one-third less sensitive than No. 2 ; at a 



1876.] S. Kurz — O71 the Vegetation oftlie Nicolar Islands. 193 

medium sjDeed it is about one-half as sensitive, whilst at a very low speed of 
rotation the two become almost equally sensitive. So far as can be judged, 
the only difference between the two instruments must be in the amoimt of 
exhaustion ; but whether a more perfect vacuum will produce a more sensi- 
tive instrument or the contrary, I cannot pretend to say. The results here 
described, are of course, only applicable to the " Light Mill ;" but I should 
imagine that the other kind of radiometer, where the effect is measured by 
torsion, would probably give more constant results. I do not even now 
despair of the Radiometer being of some use in Photometry, although I 
very much doubt if it will ever supersede the old Bunsen method -wdth the 
standard candles. 



7. A SJcetch of the Vegetation oftlie Nicolar Islands. 
By S. KuRz, Esq. 

(Abstract.) 

The Nicobar Islands are geologically divisible into two groups, the 
the Southern, which belongs to the brown-coal formation, and the Northern, 
where alluvial deposits are pierced by plutonic rocks. This geological 
division coincides with the botanical one, at least in its broad features ; 
the islands of the northern group being characterized by extensive grass- 
heaths, while those of the southern group are forest-clad to the very suumiit. 
The vegetation divides into the following five groups : — 

1. The mangrove-forests, which grow on the swampy alluvium at the 
debouchure of the rivers. 

2. The beach forests, which occupy the calcareous sand of the beaches 
and are the chief zone in which not only the cocoa-nut palm grows but on 
which the Nicobarese build their huts. 

3. The troj)ical forests, growing on different strata. Of these, two 
varieties are for the j)resent sej^arated : 

a. The coral-reef -forests, which grow on the upraised coral-lands ; 

And 

1). The true tropical forests, growing on plutonic rocks and polycistina- 
clay. Those growing on polycistina clay are alone fully treated, while those 
on plutonic rocks and on calcareous strata had to be omitted for several 
reasons. 

4. The grass-heaths. These occupy the hillocky plateaux of the 
islands of the Northern group and offer many peculiarities. 

5. The marine vegetation, which is restricted to a few phanerogamic 
plants, while seaweeds and other algae arc abundantly represented. 

Cultivation is little represented on these islands and, therefore, not 
separately treated, but the botanical constituents of the forests are given 



194 Beport of Siih-Committee on Compoiincling Fee. [Atjgust, 

in full, a list of the plants of these islands being appended, which contains 
more than 600 species of phanerogams and ferns. 

Finally, the author expresses his thanks to Prof. Dr. Pelzeln, Director 
of the Vienna Museum, for forwarding to Calcutta for his examination the 
botanical collections made during the visit of the Austrian frigate ' Novara' 
to these islands. 

The paper will be published in full in the Journal, Part II, No. 3, 
1876, with illustrations. 

Mr. W. T. Blajstfoed said that the circumstance of the Nicobar 
collections of plants made dui'ing the Novara Expedition having been en- 
trusted to Mr. Kurz for determination and description shewed the apjire- 
ciation felt in Germany for Mr. Kurz's botanical labours, and that the 
Seciety were indebted to Mr. Kurz for his having presented to them the 
first resvilts of his study of the collections in question. 

'Report of the second Htib-Committee npfointed hy the Council to ^consider 
the qioestion of the introduction of a Compounding Fee for Memheo^s of 
the Asiatic Society of Bengal, 

The Sub-Committee having carefully considered the earlier papers on 
the subject, as well as the Report of the Sub-Committee appointed in 1875, 
with the remarks of the Council thereon ; is of opinion 

I. With reference to the Amount of the Compounding Fee — 

That it should be calculated on the basis of the subscriptions paid by 
JVon-resident Members, and should be such a sum as will, with the interest 
accruing from it annually at 4 °/o, be sufficient to meet the expense incurred 
by the Society during the average lifetime of a member compounding on 
entering the Society between 25 and 30, the expectation of life being about 
29 years. 

The Sub-Committee believe that the siim of Rs. 300 is the lowest that 
will fulfil these conditions, and they wotdd therefore recommend that this 
sum be fixed as the compounding fee for a non-resident member. 

II. With reference to the Compounding Fee for Resident Members — 
The opinion of members of Council and others who have considered 

the question before has been generally in favour of one single compounding 
fee for resident and non-resident members, but the only reason given has 
been the inconvenience and complication that would arise by having two 
compounding fees, one for resident and another for non-resident members. 

As the Society is at present constituted the Sub-Committee consider 
that some difference must be made between the rates of compounding for 
resident and non-resident members, and that the best way of avoiding the 
difficulty of two fees will be to provide that Resident Members who may 



1876.] Report of Sub-Committee 071 GompoiincUnf/ Fee. 195 

have already compounded or "wisli to compound, sliall, in addition to the 
comiDounding fee they would pay as non-resident members, pay the differ- 
ence between the non-resident and resident subscriptions ; and it may be 
remarked that the first rules for compounding passed by the Council in 
1872 were based on this principle. 

One of the chief inducements for a member to compound is that he 
may be free from the necessity of I'emitting his periodical subscriptions 
when away from the head-quarters of the Society. The proposed rule 
would meet this completely for all non-resident members, whether in this 
country or in Europe, while the trouble to Resident Members of paying the 
extra subscription when in Calcutta would be very slight indeed. 

The Sub-Committee would fm'ther observe that by calculating the com- 
pounding fee on the non-resident rate, it can be fixed at a much lower sum 
than if it covered resident as well as non-resident subscriptions ; and 
they believe that the rules they now propose will thus be much fairer for 
all classes of members and also make the compounding fee independent 
of any future reduction in the resident rate of subscription. 

The Sub-Committee have the less hesitation in making this proposal in 
opposition to the general opinion previously expressed, because they believe 
that a similar principle obtains in other scientific societies where the mem- 
bers are classed as resident and non-resident, as well as in some clubs. 

III. With reference to the Reduction of the Compoimding Fee by 
Length of Membership — 

The Sub-Committee are of opinion that some such provision would be 
desirable, and indeed only equitable to those members who having already sub- 
scribed to the Society for many years, might be desirous of compounding 
for future subscriptions. And it appears also desirable that members who 
join the Society at an early age, and therefore are likely to find the full 
amount of the compounding fee more than they can afford to pay, may have 
an 02:)portunity of compounding at a reduced rate when they can better 
afford to do so. 

The Sub- Committee believe that this object can most conveniently be 
gained by making a reduction in the compounding fee in proportion to the 
number of anntial subscriptions already paid ; and they would therefore recom- 
mend that the compounding fee to be jiaid by members ah-eady belonging 
to the Society should be a reduction, from the full compounding fee, of Rs. 
10 for each full annual subscription of 24* Rs. already paid, exclusive of the 
extra contribution 2)a,id by Resident members. 

IV. With regard to the alteration of Rule 14 A., so far as it relates 
to the commutation of subscriptions by members leaving India — 

The Sub-Committee believe that the rules they now propose for reduc- 
ing the compounding fee in proportion to the length of mcmbersliip in the 



196 Report of Suh-Committee on Compounding Fee. [Aitgust, 

Society will amply meet the requirements of members leaving the country 
for good, and they would therefore propose that the provisions of Rule 14, 
A. laying down a composition of Rs. 100 be rescinded. 

V. With reference to the Investment of the Capital acquired by 
Compounding Fees — 

The Sub-Committee quite agree with the general opinion expressed 
upon this point by the Council and the former Sub-Committee and would 
recommend that the capital realised from Compounding Fees shall in each 
instance be regularly invested by the Treasurer as soon as possible after 
receipt, and shall not be available towards the current expenses of the 
Society ; but that the interest may be applied to the general purposes of 
the Society. 

On these grounds the Sub-Committee would recommend the introduc- 
tion of the following rules : * 

I. Any member of the Society may, after he has paid his entrance 
fee, compound for the payment of all future subscriptions as a Non-resident 
Member by the payment in a single sum of Rs. 300. 

II. Any member already belonging to the Society may at any time 
compound for his future subscriptions as a non-resident member by the 
payment of the above compounding fee, less Rs. 10 for each full annual 
subscription of Rs. 2^ he may have already paid, exclusive of the extra 
contribution of a resident member. 

III. Resident members wishing to compound shall, in addition to the 
compounding fees calculated as above, be liable in all cases to pay a quarter- 
ly subscription equal to the difference between the Resident and Non- 
Resident rates of subscription, during such time as they shall remain resi- 
dent. Such additional subscription to be chargeable under the provisions 
of Rule 9 E. 

IV. The amounts realised by Compounding Fees shall in all cases be 
regularly invested by the Treasurer as soon as possible after receipt thereof ; 
and only the interest accruing therefrom shall be considered available for 
the general expenditm-e of the Society. 

V. In Rule 14 A. instead of the words " commutable into a single 
payment of Rs. 100" the following should be substituted " commutable 
into a single payment under the provisions of rule II (of these rules)." 

Sd. R. Tatlok. 

J. O'KlNEALT. 

J. Wateehouse. 



* These rules though adopted in principle have been modified by the Eule Committee, 
as will he seen at p. 166. Ed. 



1876.] Library. 197 



y 



IBRARY. 



The following additions have been made to the Library since the 
Meeting held in July last. 

Transactions, Proceedings, and Journals, 

presented hy the respective Societies or Editors. 



BerKn. Konigliche Preussische Akademie der Wissenschaften. — Monats- 
berichte. April, 1876. 

Fapadopulos. — Beitrage zur insdiriftlichen Topographie von Klein-Asein. 
Bombay. The Indian Antiquary. Vol. V, Pt. 56, July, 1876. 

Dr. F. Kielhorn. — Eemarks on the Sikslias. Prof. M. Williams. — 'Sraddha 

Ceremonies at Gaya. Br, G. Biihler. — Grants from ValabM. F. S. Growse. 

— Translation of an Episode in the 1st. Book of the Kamayana of Tulsi Das. 

Rev. F. T. Cole. — The Rajmahal Hillman's Songs. 

Brussels. L'Academie Royale des Sciences, des Lettres et des Beaux- Arts 

de Belgique. — Memoires couronnes et autres memoires, Tomes 24, 25 

26, 1875. 

Tome 24. M. Melsens. — Note historique sur J. B. van Helmont a propos de la 
definition et de la theorie de la flamme. Opinions des anciens chimistes et 
physicians sur la chaleur, le feu, la hmaiere et la flamme dans leurs rapports 
avec les idees et les travaux de van Helmont. A. Ferret/.— 'Sote sur les trem- 
blements de terre en 1870, avec supplement pour 1869. Note sur les trem- 
blements de terre en 1871, avec supplements pour les annees anterieures de 
1843 a 1870. 
Tome 25. M. F. Mansion, — Theorie des equations aux derivees pai-tiellcs du 
premier ordre. /. C. Houzeau. — Resume de quelques observations astrono- 
miques et meteorologiques faites dans la zone surtemperee et entre les tropiques. 
Tome 26. A. Gilkinet. — Memoire sur le polymorphisme des champignons. 

. . . Memoires couronnes et Memoires des savants etran- 

gers. Tome 38, 1874. Tome 39, 1876. 

Tome 38. Br. J. F. JSfuel. — Eecherches sur Tiimervation du coeur par le nerf 
vague, faites au laboratoire physiologique d' Utrecht. 

. . Memoires. Tome 41, Pts. I, II, 1875. 

Pt. I. F. Flateau. — Eecherches sur les phenomenes de la digestion chez les in- 
sectes. 

. . Bulletins, 2nd Serie, Tomes 37, 38, 39, 40 ; 1874, 1875. 

. . Annuaire pour les annees 1875 et 1876. 

Notices Biographiques et Bibliographiques, 1874. 



Calcutta. Geological Survey of India. Becords, Vol. IX, Pt. 2, 1876. 

Br. 0, Feistmantel. Notes on the Age of some Fossil Flora in India. F. 
LydeJcker. — Description of a Cranium of Stegodon Ganesa, with notes on the 
sub-genus and allied forms. H. B. Medlicott. — Note upon the Sub- Himalay- 
an Sciies in the Jamu Hills. 



198 Library. [August, 

Leipsic. Der Deutsche Morgenlandischc G esellscliaft, — Abhaudlungen, 
Band VI, No. 1. 

M. I'Abbe P. Martin. — Chronique de Josue le Stylite, ecrite vers Tan 515. 
London. The Athenaeum,— Pt. 580, April, 1876. 

. Natm-e,— Yol. 14, Nos. 345, 346, 347, 1876. 

. Geological Society,— Qt. Journal, Vol. 32, No. 126, May, 1876. 

. The Eoyal Society,— Proceedings, Vol. 24, No. 168. 

Dr. JJ. Pritchard. — The Organ of Corti in Mammals. C. S. Bate. — On the De- 
velopment of the Crustacean Embryo, and the Variations of form exhibited in 
the LarvtB of 38 Genera of Podophthalmia. G. Meldrum. — On a Secular Va- 
riation in the Eainfall in connection with the Secular Variation in amount of 
Sun-spots. 
The Royal Astronomical Society, — Monthly Notices, Vol. 36. 



No. 6, August 1876. 
. The Statistical Society.— Joui-nal, Vol. 39, Pt. I, March 1876. 



J. Dun. — The Banking Institutions, Bullion Eeserves, and Non-Legal-Tender 
Note Circulation of the United Kingdom Statistically investigated. 31. H. 
Grant-Duff. — Opening Address of the President of the Department IV, " Eco- 
nomy and Trade," of the National Association for the Promotion of Social 
Science at the 19th Annual Congress held at Brighton in October, 1875. 
Pisa. Societa Toscana di Scienze NaturaU. Atti. Vol. I, fas. 3. 
Eurki. Professional Papers on Indian Engineering, — Vol. 5, No. 21, 
2nd Series, July 1876. 

Experiments on Strength of Indian Cements. Drainage of Madras. 
Vienna. Der Anthropologische Gesellschaft, — Mittheilungen. Band V. 
Nr. 10. 

Miscellaneous JPresentations. 
Caldwell, Rev. Robert. A Comparative Grammar of the Dravidian 
or South Indian Family of Languages. 

Home Depaetmeistt, Governmekt of India. 
PiLCHEB, Suegeon-Majoe J. G. Report of the Sanitary Commission 

for Bengal, for 1875. 
Beatson, De. J. PuLLAETON. Report on the Calcutta Medical Institu- 
tions, for 1875. 
Rej)ort of the Calcutta Court of Small Causes, for 1875-76. 

GOYEENMENT OE BeNGAL. 

Report on the Administration of the Madras Presidency during the year 

1874-75. 

GOVEENMENT OP MaDEAS. 

BuHLEE De. G. Report on Sanskrit MSS. 1874-75. 

GOVEENMENT OF BoMBAY. 

Atkinson, Edwin, T. Statistical Description, and Historical Account of 
the North- Western Provinces of India, Pt. I, — Agra Division. 

GOVEENMENT OF THE N. W. PeOVINCES. 



1876.] Library. 199 

Report on the working o£ the Government Charitable Dispensaries in the 

Central Provinces for the year 1875. 
Report on the working o£ the Registration Department in the Central Pro- 
vinces for the year 1875-76. 
Report, with the Chief Commissioner's Review, on the Stamp Revenue of 
the Central Provinces for the year 1875-76. 

Chief Commissiokee, Centeal Peovinces. 
Rej)ort of the Operations for 1875 of the British Indian Association. 

The Hont. Sect., Beitish IndiajS^ Associatiois". 



Periodicals Purchased. 

Gottingen. Gottingische Gelehrte Anzeigen, Xos. 15 to 18 : Nachrichten 
No. 9, 1876. 

Die Aechtheit der moabitisclieii Alterthiinier gepriift von Prof. E. Kautzsch 
und Prof. A. Socin in Basel. 
London. The Academy, Nos. 215 to 219, 1876. 

. The Aimals and Magazine of Xatm-al History, Vol. 17, No. 101, 

May 1876. 

Br. A. Giintlier. — Notes on the Mode of Propagation of some Ceylonese Tree- 
Frogs, with Description of two new Species. Description of a new Frog from 
North-eastern Asia. 

. The London, Edinburgh, and Dublin Philosophical Magazine, 

Fifth Series, Vol. 1, No. 5. 

jB. Sabine. — On a Method of Measiu'ing very small Intervals of Time. 0. J. 
Lodge, — On some Problems connected with the flow of Electricity in a Plane. 
J. M. Gaugain. — The Influence of Temperature on Magnetization. 

. The Messenger of Mathematics, No. 60, New Series, April, 1876. 

W. M. Sicks. — Practical Method of modelling the "Wave Surface. 
. The Numismatic Society's Journal, Pt. I, New Series, No. 61, 



1876. 

The Journal of the Society of Arts. Nos. 1223 to 1226, 1876. 



No. 1 223, Capt. B. Galton. — On Sanitary Progress in India. 
No. 1224, Health and Sewage of Towns. 

No. 1225, W. T. Thornton. — Irrigation works in India with special reference 
to their Eemunerativeness. 
New Haven. The American Journal of Science and Arts, Vol. XI, No. 
64, April, 1876. 

N. W. Wright. — On the Gases contained in Meteorites. S. Ncwconib. — Review of 
Croll's Climate and Time with especial reference to the Physical Theories of 
Climate maintained therein. 
Paris. Annales de Chimie et de Physique, 5th Series, Tome VII, Avril, 
1876. 

M. Eug. Tisscrand. — De Taction dii froid sur le lait et les produits qu'on en 
tire. 



200 Library. 

Paris. Comptes Eendiis, Tome 82, Nos. 16—19, 1876. 

No. 16. M. Faije. — Sm- 1' orientation des arbres renverses par les tornados ou 
les trombes. M. Marie-Davy. — Note sur 1' ozone de I'air atmosplierique. 

No. 17. M. Bou&singault. — Sur la vegetation des plantes depourvues de cMo- 
rophylle. M. Dauhree. — Experiences faites pour expliqner les alveoles de 
forme arrondie que presente tres-frequemment la surface des meteorites. M, 
L. Larbe. — Note relative a un fait de gastrotomie pratiquee pour extraire un 
corps etranger (fourcliette) de I'estomae. M. Th. Scliloesing. — Sur les echan- 
ges d' anmioniaque entre les eaux natiu'elles et 1' atmosphere. 31. Marey. — 
Des variations electriques des muscles et du coeui' en particulier, etudiees au 
moyen de I'electrometre de M. Lippmann. M. Ch. Braine. — Sur la recherche 
chimicolegale de rarsenic. M. Bertot. — Procede pour prendre I'empreinte des 
plantes. 

No. 18. M. L, Smith. — Eecherches sur les composes du carhone pur dans les 
meteorites, M. Bouchotte. — Sur la transmission des courants electriques par 
derivation au travers d'une riviere. 

No. 19. M. L. Pasteur. — Note sur la fermentation a propos des critiques sorde- 
vees par les Brs. Brefeld et Trauhe. 31. Th. Sehloesing. — Sur les echanges 
d'ammoniaque entre 1' atmosphere et la terre vegetale. M. J. Bogiel. Ana- 
tomie du coeur des Crustaces. 
■ . Journal des Savants, Avril, 1876. 

Bavet de Courteille. — Dictionnaire arabe-fi'ancjais. 
. Melanges d'Archeologic Egyptienne et Asspnenne. Tome III, 



Fas. I. 



— . Eevue Archeologiqne, Avril, 1876. 
-. Eevue Critique, Nos. 17, 18, 19, 1876. 
No. 19. /. Budst. Taluhs Kitah al Fasih. 
— . Eevue des Deux Mondes, Tome 15, Pts. I, II, 1876. 

Pt. I. 31. L. Simonin. — Les applications industrielles de la chaleur solaire : la 
machine de Toui's. M. E. Blanchard. — La voix chez I'homme et chez les 
animaux. 
Pt. II. 31. R. Badau. — La constitution physique du Soleil d'apres de recentes 

recherches. 
— . Eevue et Magasin de Zoologie, 3me Serie, Tome 4, No. 2, 1876. 



jBooKS Purchased. 

Andeeson, John, De. Mandalay to Momien : A Narrative of the two 
Expeditions to Western China of 1868 and 1875 under Colonel Edward 
B. Sladen, and Colonel H. BroAvn. Eoyal 8vo. London, 1876. 

BoHTLiNGK, O. De. Zur Kritik und Erklarung verschiedener indischer 
Werke. 8vo. St. Petersburg. 

HoOKEE, J. D. De. The Flora of British India, Vol. I. Eoyal 8vo. Lon- 
don, 1875. 

ScHUTZENBEEGEE, P. On Fermentation. 8vo. London, 1876. 

The Oriental Sporting Magazine, from June, 1828 to June, 1833, Vols. 
I and II. Eoyal 8vo. London, 1873. 



PROCEEDINGS 



OE THE 



ASIATIC SOCIETY OF BENGAL, 

For November, 1876. 



The Monthly General Meeting of the Society was held on Wednesday, 
the 15th. November, at 9 o'clock p. m. 

H. BLOCHMAisrisr, Esq., M. A.^j in the Chair. 

The minutes of the last Meeting were read and confirmed. 

The following presentations were announced : — 

1. From the Government of India, Foreign Dept. — 

(1.) Memorandum descriptive of the route between Sohar and El 
Bereymee in Oman, with route map. By Lieut. -Colonel S. B. Miles, Poli- 
tical Agent, Muscat. 

(2.) Report by Surgeon C. T. Peters on the Hot Sjwings of Boshei", a 
town about 18 miles from Muscat. 

2. From the Government of Bengal, a copy of Dr. W. W. Hunter's 
Statistical Account of Bengal, in 5 volumes. 

3. From the Eight Hon'ble the Secretary of State for India, a 
copy of " The Commentaries of th.e great Afonso d'Alboquerqas, second 
Viceroy of India," by W. de Gray Birch, published by the Hakluyt 
Society. 

4. From the author, a copy of a work entitled " Notes on the History 
and Antiquities of Chaul and Bassein," l)y J. Gerson da Cunha. 

5. From the author, a work entitled, " The District of Bakarganj 
its History and Statistics," by H. Beveridge, C. S. 

G. From the author, a work entitled, " The Geographical Distribu- 
tion of Animals and Plants. Pt. II, Plants in their wild state," by Dr. 
C. Pickering. 

7. From M. Garcin de Tassy, a copy of his work entitled " Allegories, 
recits poetiques et chants populaires traduits de I'Arabe, du Persau, do 
* 'Hindoustani, et du Turc." 

8. From Nawab Nizam-ud-Daulah, former Diwan of Jodlipiir Ivdj, a 
opy of a Avork entitled " Gulistiin-i-Lughat wa Shabistilu-i-Nukat." 



202 Election of Memhers. [Nov. 

9. From Prof. P. Tacchini, a copy of his lleport on the Observation 
of the Transit of Venus at Muddapur in Lower Bengal'. 

The following gentlemen, duly proposed and seconded at the last Meet- 
ing, were balloted for and elected ordinary members — 

Dr. H. Cayley. 

Major M. M. Bowie. 

Mr. George, A. Grierson. 

Mr. H. Beveridge. 
The following are candidates for ballot at the next Meeting — 

1. Mr. J. C. Macdonald, Superintendent of Terai Perganahs, N. W. P., 
proposed by Mr. S. White, seconded by Capt. J. Waterhouse. 

2. Captain E. Mockler, PoHtical Agent, Gwadar, proposed by Mr. 
W. T. Blanford, seconded by Mr. H. Blochmann. 

3. Lieut. G. S. Rodon, Royal Scots, Ranikhet, N. W. P., proposed by 
Capt. J. Waterhouse, seconded by Mr. H. Blochmann. 

4. Colonel G. B. Malleson, C. S. I., proposed by Dr. D. B. Smith, 
seconded by Mr. R. H. Wilson, C. S. 

5. W. T. Webb, Esq., proposed by Mr. A. M. Nash, seconded by 
Mr. H. Blochmann. 

The following gentlemen have intimated their desire to withdraw from 
the Society : — 

Mr. E. A. Carrington. 
Capt. E. W. D. La Touche. 
Mr. J. Hector. 

The Chaiemai^ announced that the Council had appointed Dr. J. Ander- 
son a Member of the Council in the place of Col. J. F. Tennant resigned. 

The Chaiemaist laid before the Meeting the memorandum of the Council 
with reference to the repairs of the Society's building and the erection 
of shops, published in the August Proceedings, (p. 163,) which had 
been circulated to all the members of the Society for their votes on the 
two following propositions : 

I. The erection of a dwarf wall and railings, and new servants' houses 
in place of the present boimdary wall and godowns, at the estimated cost 
of Rs. 6,167. 

II. The investment of a portion of the Society's capital in the 
erection of a shop or shops, on a waste part of the Society's compound 
at a cost of Rs. 12,000. 

And said that the votes of the meeting would now be taken, ^nd it 
wotdd be necessary to appoint two Scrutineers to examine the votes. 



1876.^ Bepairs, Sfc, of the Society^ s Premises. 203 

Messrs. Gribble and Waldie kindly undertook the office of Scrutineers 
•and, after examination of the votes, rejDorted that, of 76 voters, all were in 
favour of Proposition I ; and that there were 58 ia favour of Proposition II 
and 18 against it. 

The Chaieman di'ew attention to rule 33 of the Society's Bye-laws, 
and said that as the proposition was not one of alteration of the rules both 
propositions were carried. 

Before and after the voting there was considerable discussion as to the 
propriety and desirability of erecting shops, and also on the desirability of 
giving an oj)portunity for the discussion, at a general meeting of the So- 
ciety, of such questions as were then before the meeting, before circulating 
them to the general body of members. It was felt that under the present 
rules the Resident Members of the Society had no opportunity of discussing 
proposals emanating from the Council, and the votes of the non-resident 
members decided all such questions. It seemed therefore useless bringing 
them before a meeting at all. 

In the course of the discussion, Mr. H. F. Blanpoed proposed the 
following resolution : 

" That this meeting do not approve of the erection of shops on a portion 
of the Society's compound, and recommend the Council not to act on the 
power now vested in them by the general votes of the members." 

Mr. E. H. Wilson seconded the resolution. 

The Chaieman explained that the proposal for erecting the shops had 
not originated with the Council, but as it was for the advantage 
of the Society the Council had thought it desirable to place it before the 
general body of members. It would not, however, be obligatory on the 
Council to erect the shops in consequence of the vote. 

Dr. D. B. Smith then proposed the following amendment : 

" That the Council shall act in conformity with the powers vested in 
them by the general vote of the Society if they consider it neces- 
sary." 

After some further discussion, Mr. Blanford withdrew his motion on 
the understanding that the question of the erection of the shojjs would 
receive further consideration by the Council, and that they would not be 
erected unless it was really necessary to increase the income of the Society 
by that means. 

Dr. Smith thereu]ioii withdrew his amendment. 

The Chaieman then laid before the meeting the proposed alterations in 
the Rules and commenced taking them one, by one with the object of 
making a few verbal alterations that had been suggested by absent mem- 
bers or might be suggested at the meeting. 



204 



Changes in tJie Rules. 



[Nov. 



Some of the members present objected to this method on the ground 
that a large majority having ah'eady sent in their votes in favour of the 
rules as proposed by the Council, it would only be a useless waste of time 
going throiigh them seriatim, as no alteration made by the meeting would 
be valid. It Avas therefore decided that the votes of members present should 
be taken for the rules as they stood. 

Messrs, Gribble and Waldie again undertook the office of Scrutineers 
and reported the result as follows : 





For. 


Against. 


N'o Vote. 


Total. 


Eule 1, 


73 





3 


76 


Eule 2, fa.) 


71 


1 


4 


76 


(h.) 


72 





4 


76 


(c.) 


72 





4 


76 


Eule 3, (addl. clause), ... 


65 


6 


5 


76 


Eule 5, A. 


71 





5 


76 


„ B. 


71 





5 


76 


" c. 


70 


1 


5 


76 


Eule 9, A. 


62 


10 


4 


76 


Compounding Eules, Clause 1, .. 


70 


2 


4 


76 


„ „ 2, 


71 


1 


4 


76 


„ „ 3, 


71 


1 


4 


76 


„ ,, 4, 


70 


2 


4 


76 


„ „ 0, 


71 


1 


4 


76 


Eule 13, A. 


67 


5 


4 


76 


B. 


66 


6 


4 


76 


C. 


68 


4 


4 


76 


Eule 14, A. 


70 


2 


4 


76 


B. 


70 


2 


4 


76 


„ c. 


71 


1 


4 


76 


„ D. 


70 


2 


4 


76 


„ E. 


71 


1 


4 


76 


Eule 15, ... 


69 


4 


3 


76 


Eule 20, . ... 


67 


3 


6 


76 


Eule 22, (f.) 


70 


3 


3 


76 


Eule 22, (addl. clause (/.) 


63 


7 


6 


76 


Eule 26, (addl. clause), 


67 


4 


5 


76 


Eule 28, ic) 


65 


5 


6 


76 


Eule 28, (addl. clause after c.) 


65 


5 


6 


76 


Eule 29, ... 


70 


1 


5 


76 


Eule 32, (c.) 


69 





7 


76 


Eule 33, ... 


69 


2 


6 


76 


Eule 34, ... 


67 


3 


6 


76 


Eule 36, A.... 


69 





7 


76 


Eule 38, Clause 1, 


71 


1 


4 


76 


„ „ „ 2, 


71 


1 


4 


76 


o 
„ „ „ o. 


71 


1 


4 


76 


4 


70 


2 


4 


76 


5) )) )> '^1 


71 


1 


4 


76 


„ ,, ,, o, 


72 





4 


76 


New Eule, (Miscellaneous,) 


66 


2 


8 


76 



1876.] Library. 205 

The CHAiR"M:A]sr annotinced that all the j)roposed changes in the Society's 
Bye-laws had been carried. 

Mr. H. F. Blatstoed gave notice that in accordance with Rule 29, Clause 
(f/) he would move at the next meeting the following addition to the 
present rule 33 : 

" If the qu.estion to he submitted to a general vote be one falling imder 
Section c of Rule 32, it shall, in the fii-st instance, be submitted for dis- 
cussion at an ordinary monthly meeting, and the votes of the members 
present shall be taken whether the proposal shall be recommended or other- 
wise. A full report of the discussion shall be circulated with the voting 
j)apers." 

The following communications have been received : — 

1. Fifth List of Birds from the N. E. Frontier of India. By Major 
H. H. Godwin-Austen. 

2. Descriptions of new Species of Blattidce belonging to the Genus 
Fanosthia. By J. Wood-Mason. 



¥ 



IBRARY. 



The following additions have been made to the Library since the 
Meeting held in August last. 

Transactions, Proceedings, and Journals, 

j^resentcd hij the respective Societies or Editors. 



Calcutta. The Calcutta Journal of Medicine, Vol. VIII. ISTos. 1 to 3, 1876. 
Bombay. The Vedarthayatna, or an attempt to interpret the Vedas, 
Nos. 4, 5. 

, The Indian Antiquary. Vol. V., Pts. 57 and 58. August and 

September, 1876. 

Pt. 57. E. Rehatselc. — The twelve Emams. Rev. J. F. Eearns. — Silpa Sastra. M. 
J. Walhouse. — Arclia;olog-ical Notes. Dr. F. Kielhorn. — On the Mahabhashya. 
Sir W. Elliot. — On the Noubat. G. H. Johns. — Notes on some little-kno%\'n 
Baudha excavations in the Puna CoUoctorate. 
Pt. 58. Prof. Koarn's versions of some of the Asoka Inscriptions. <?. Biihler. 
— A Grant of Chittarajadcva MahuiuanJalesvara of the Konkana. 

. Bombay Branch of the Royal Asiatic Society. — Journal, Vol. 

XII., No. 33., 1876. 

/. F. Fleet. — Sanskrit and old Canarese Inscriptions relating to the Yadava Kino-s 
of Devagiri, edited from the originals, with translations. Bhan Ddji. — Re- 
port on some Hindu Coins. Er. 0. Ma rc/tcuvlti.— On a pro-historic Monument 
of the Western Coast of India. 



20G Library. [Nov. 

Berlin. Konigliclie Pretissisehe Akademie der "VVissenscliaften — Monats- 
bericht. Mai 1876. 

Schott. — Uber gewisse ThieniamerL mit besonderer EiicksicM auf das sogenannte 
tatarisclie Sprachengebiet. 
Cherbourg. Societe Nationale des Sciences Naturelles de Cherbourg, — 

Memoires. Tome XIX. 
London. The Anthropological Institute, — Journal, Vol. 6, No. 1, July, 1876. 
A. TF. Franks. — On stone Implements from Honduras. S. II. Hoivorth. — The 
Ai-ian Nomades. E. B. Tylor. — Eemarks on Japanese Mythology. 

. The AthencEum,— Pts. 581 and 582, May and Jixne, 1876. 

. The Geographical Magazine, — Vol. Ill, Nos. 7 and 8. 

No. 7. Fr. Ad. de Edejistorff. — The Andaman Islands. 

No. 8. The Basin of the Ob and Yenisei Rivers. Frof, II. S. Giglioli. — Dr. 
Beccari's thii'd -sdsit to New Guinea. 

. Nature, Vol. 14, Nos. 348 to 354, 1876. 

. Eoyal Astronomical Society, — Monthly Notices, Vol. 36, Nos. 

7 and 8, 1876. 

No. 7- Major Falmer. — On recent American Determinations of Geographical 
Positions in the West Indies and Central America. Mr. Duiikin. — Note on the 
discovery of four Minor Planets, (160) Vna, (161), (162), and (163). 

• . Eoyal Geographical Society, — Journal, Vol. 45, 1875. 

E. I. Oxenham. — On the Inundations of the Yang-tse-kiang. G. B. MarhTiam. 
— Travels ia Great Tibet, and trade between Tibet and Bengal. Major S. 
Wood. — Notes on the Lower Amu-darya, SjT-darya and Lake Aral, in 1874. 

. . Proceedings, Vol. XX, No. 4, 1876. 

Elias. — ^Visit to the Valley of the Shueli, Western Yunnan. MarJcham. — Afghan 
Geography. Stone. — Pecent explorations in the interior of New Guinea from 
Port Moresby. Description of the Country and Natives of Port Moresby and 
neighbourhood, New Guinea. D'Albertis. — Remarks on the Natives and Pro- 
ducts of the Fly River, New Guinea. 

. . Eoyal Society. — ^Proceedings, Vol. 24, No. 169. 

Er. J. IV. lecjcje. — An raquii-y into the cause of the slow Pulse in Jaundice. 
Statistical Society. — Journal, Vol. 39, Pt. II., June, 1876. 



Er. F. J. Mouat. — On International Prison Statistics. The Census of British 
India of 1871-72. 
Moscow. Societe Imperiale des Natiu'alistes de Moscou. — Bulletin, Nos. 3 

et 4, 1875. 
Munich. Konigliche Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften. — Philo- 
sophisch-Philologische und Historische Classe. Zitzungberichte^ Band. 
II, Heft III, 1875. 

E. Schlaginticeit. — Die geographische Vcrbroitung der Volkssprachen Ostindiens. 
Palermo. Societa degli Spettroscopisti ItaHani. — Memorie, Dispensa 6^, 
e 7*, Luglio e Giugno, 1876. 

Disp. 6. P. Tacchini. — Osservazioni solari spettroscopiche e dirette fatte all'- 
osservatorio di Palermo nel mese di maggio 1876. 



1876.] Library. 207 

Disp. 7. -P. Tacchini. — Osservazioni solari spettroscopiche e dirette fatte all'os- 
servatorio di Palermo nei mesi di Giugno e Luglio 1876. A. Serjneri. — La 
luce zodiacale studiata nelle osservazioni di G. Jones. 
Paris. Societe de Geographie. — Bulletin, Mai et Juin, 1876. 

Juin. B. T. Saniy. — Note sur les collections d'Mstoire naturelle reciieillies par 
M. le Dr. Harmant pendant son voyage au Camtodge. 
Prague. K. K. Sternwarte zu Prag. — Astronomische, Magnetisclie und 

Meteorologische Beobaclitungen im Jahre 1875. 
ScliafEhausen. Schweizerisclie Entomologische Gresellscliaft. — Mittheilun- 

gen, Vol. IV, Heft No. 9, 1876. 
St. Petersburgh. I'Academie Imperiale des Sciences de St. Petersbotu'g — 
Tableau general nietbodiqvie et alpbabetique des matieres conteuues dans 
les publications de I'Acadeniie depuis sa fondatiou. l^^^ partie. 
Trieste. Societa Adriatica de Scienze naturali. — Bollettino, No. 1, 
Annata II. 

■pooKS AND Pamphlets 

presented hy the AutJiors. 

Beveeidge, H. The District of Bakarganj, its History and Statistics. 
8vo., London, 1876. 

Gebson da CtWHA, J. Notes on the History and Antiquities of Chaul and 
Bassein. 8vo., Bombay, 1876. 

GABCiisr DE Tasst, M. Allegories, recits poetiques et chants popiilaires 
traduits de I'Arabe, du Persan, de I'Hindoustani et du Turc. 2nd Ed. 
Eoyal 8vo., Paris, 1876. 

Peanistath Saeaswati, Paiodit. " Annexation versus Equity," a Letter. 
Calcutta, 1876. 

Webee, a. De. Indische Studien, Vol. 14, Pts. I, II, III, 8vo., Leip- 
zig, 1875. 

M.ISCELLANEOUS PRESENTATIONS. 

The Yajar Veda Sanhita. Nos. 13 to 21. 

A new Hindustani — English Dictionary, by Dr. S. W. Fallon, Pt. IV. 

1876. 
Papers relating to the Selection and Training of Candidates for the 
Indian Civil Service. 

HoarE Department, Goteenment of Iicdia. 
A Statistical Account of Bengal, Vols. I to V, by Dr. W. W. Hunter. 

Goveenment of Bekgal. 
Report on the Administration of the Madras Presidency dui-ing the year 

1874-75. 
Annual Eeport of the Madras Medical College. Session 1874-75. No. 47. 

Goveenment of Madeas. 



208 Library. [Nov. 

Archaeological Survey o£ Western India, No. 5. Translations of Inscrip- 
tions from Belgaum and Kaladgi Districts in the Report of the First 
Season's Operations of the Archaeological Survey of Western India, by 
J. F. Fleet, Esq., C. S., and of Inscriptions from Kathiawad and Kachh, 
by Hari Vaman Limaya, B. A. 
Eeport on Sanskrit MSS. 1874-75, by Dr. G. Biihler. 

Government of Bombay. 
Report on the Gaols of the Central Provinces for the year 1875. 
Report, with the Chief Commissioner's Review, on Education in the Central 

Provinces, for the year 1875-76. 
Report, with the Chief Commissioner's Review, on the Forest Adminis- 
tration of the Central Provinces for the j^ear 1875. 
Annual Report of the Sanitary Commissioner of the Central Provinces for 
the year 1875. 

Chief Commissioner, Centeal Provinces. 
Records of the Geological Survey of India. Vol. IX. Pt. 3, 1876. 

Department of Revenue, Agriculture and Commerce. 
The Ramayana, Vol. V, Nos. 7 and 8. 

Babu Hem Chandra Bhattacharjea. 
Minutes of the Annual General Meeting of the Trustees of the Indian 
Museum, for the year 1875-76. 

The Trustees of the Indian Museum. 
The Economic Museum. A paper read by the Hon. Mr. J. B. Phear 
before the Bengal Social Science Association on the 24th July, 1876. 

The Secretary Economic Museum. 
Haas, Ernst, Dr. Catalogue of Sanskrit and Pali Books in the British 
MuseTim. 

The Trustees of the British Museum. 
Stenzler, a. F. The Institutes of Gautama. 

The Sanskrit Text Society. 
Catalogus Codicum Latinorum Bibliothecse Regime Monacensis, Tomi, II, 
Pars. II. 

Acade'mie Royale des Sciences de Munich. 
El^ziMiESKi, A. DE B. Specimen du Divan de Menoutchehri, poete Persan 
du 5™® siecle de I'Hegu'e. 

M. C. ScHEFEE, Paris. 

Periodicals Purchased. 

Berlin. Jovirnal fur die reme und angewandte Mathematik. Band 82, 
Heft 4. 

Samburger. — Ziir Theorie der Integration cincs sj'stems von n linearen partiellen 
Differentialgleichungen erster Ordnung mit zwei unabhangigen und n 



187G.] Lilrary. 209 

atMngegen Veranderlichen. M. E. Le])scliitz.- — Generalisation de la theorie 
du rayon osculateur d'une surface. Max Simon. Ganzzahlige Multiplication 
der ellij)tischen Functionen in Verbindung mit dem Schliessungs problem. 
Calcutta. The Indian Annals of Medical Science, Vol. XVIII., No. 36. 
July, 1876. 

Drs. T. R, Leiois and D. D, Cunningham. — The Fungus Disease of India. 

. The Indian Medical Gazette, Vol. XI, Nos. 8 and 9, 1876. 

. The Calcutta Eeview, No. 126, October, 1876. 

Prof. A. E. Gough. — Ancient Indian Metaphysics. 
Giessen. Jahresbericht liber die Fortschritte der Chemie fiir 1874, Heft 3. 
Gottingen. Gottingische gelehrte Anzeigen, Nos. 19 to 24 : Nachrichten, 

No. 10, 1876. 
Leipsic. PoggendorfE's Annalen der Physik xind Chemie, Nos. 1 to 8, 
1876. 

No. 6. F. Siloio. — Ueher die Dielektricitatsconstante der Fliissigkeiten. 
No. 7. F. KoMramch. — Experimental-Untersuchung uber die elastische Nach- 
wirkung bei der Torsion, Ausdehnung, und Biegung. G. Berthold. — Notizen 
zur Geschichte des Eadiometers. S. Sehnlioltz. — Bericht betrefifend Versuche 
iiber die elektromagnetische Wirkung elektrischer Convection. 
No. 8. B. Finkener. — Ueber das Radiometer von Crookes. Gramme. — Ueber 
eine magneto-elektrische Maschine mit continuii'lichem Strom, 
London. The Academy, Nos. 220 to 225, 1876. 

. The Annals and Magazine of Natural History. — Vol. 17, No. 

102 and Vol. 18, No. 103, June, July, 1876. 

No. 102. W. B. CarjJenter. — Notes on Otto Hahn's " Microgeological Investiga- 
tion of Fozoon canade)ise." A. G. Butler. — Preliminary Notice of new species 
of Arachuida and Myriopoda from Rodriguez, collected by Messrs. G, Gulliver 
and H. H. Slater. Frof. C. Semper. — On the Identity in Type of the Annelids 
and Vertebrates. M. A. Giard. — Note on the Embryogeny of the Tunicata 
of the Group Lucim. A. Agassiz. — On Hackel's Theory (Allseogenensis) of 
the Genetic Connexion between the Gergonidce and JEginidce. M. N. Johj. — On 
the Embryogeny of the Fphemerm, especially that of Falingenia virgo. Oliv. 
M. J. B. Schnetzler. — Protection of Herbaria and Entomological Collections 
from Insects by means of Sulphide of Carbon. Frof. F. B. Wilson. — Silica 
of Grasses and other Plants carried up as Diatoms or other Siliceous Grains 
and not in Solution or as Soluble Silicates. 
No. 103. Fr. G. Lindsstrom. — Oti ih.o ASlmiiQa oiihe AntJiozoa Tabulata. J.W. 
Daioson. — Fozoon canadense, according to Hahn. F. A. Smith. — Descriptions 
of two new species of OpMocoma. Br. N. Severtzoff. — The Mammals of Turkes- 
tan. Fr. S. A. Nicholson. — Supposed Laurcntian Fossil. /. JFood-Mason. — 
Description of a new Rodent ' fi'om Central Asia. Frof. F, M. Funcan. — On 
the Animal of Millcpora alcieornis. G. C. Wallich. — Deep-sea researches. 

. The Ibis,— Vol. VI, No. 22, April, 1876. 

S. E. Fresscr. — Notes on Scvcrtzoff's " Fauna of Turkestan." FE. Scebohm and 
/. A. H. Brown. — Notes on the Birds of the Lower Petchora. /. K. Gurncy. — 
Notes on a " Catalogue of the Accijiitrcs in the British Musemn, by E. B. 
Sharpe. F. F. Sclatvr. — On Recent Oruilhological Progress in New Guinea 



210 liilrary. [Nov. 

T. Salvadori. — On Sericiilus xantliog aster, Schl. and Xanthomelus aureus. 
(Linn). Notices of recently pnblislied. Omitliological works. 

London. The London, Edinburgh, and DubUn Philosophical Magazine, 
Fifth Series, Yol. I, Nos. 6, 7, 8. 

No. 7. Prof. G. Tscherniak. — The Formation of Meteorites and Volcanic Agency. 

L. Sclnvendler. — On the General Theory of Duplex Telegraphy. 
No. 8. R. S. M. Bosanquet. — On a new Form of Polariscope, and its appli- 
cation to the Observation of the Sky. Mev. E. Allay. — Remarkable Atmos- 
pheric Phenomena in Ceylon. 

. Journal of the Society of Ai-ts.— Nos. 1227 to 1234., 1876. 

No. 1227. Health and Sewage of Towns. F. J. Bramivell. — Eail way safety 

appliances. 
No. 1228. Dr. G. Birdwood. — Competition and its effect on Education, with 

especial reference to the Indian Civil Service. 
No. 1232. Indian and Colonial Museum. 
No. 1233. Lightning Conductors. 

. Quarterly Journal of Microscopical Science. — No. 53, July, 1876. 

G. Thin. — On the Formation of Blood-vessels as observed ia the Omentum of 
young Rabbits. On the structure of Muscular Fibre. J. F. Bell. — ^An 
Account of the Recent Researches into the History of the Bacteria, made by 
and under the direction of Prof. Cohn. E. R. LanJcester.—l^oie on Bacterium 
rulescens and Clathrocystis roseo-persicina. W. Archer. — Resume of Recent 
Contributions to our knowledge of " Freshwater Rhizopoda." Pt. I. Silio- 
zoa. F. Darwin. — The Process of Aggregation in the Tentacles of Drosera 
rotundifolia. F. R. Lanhester. — Remarks on the Shell- gland of Cyclas and the 
Flanula of Linnaeus. S. N. Moseley. — Note on Mihakowics's New Method of 
Imbedding. 

. The Quarterly Eeview. No. 283, July, 1876. 



Lord Macaulay. The Orkneys and Rude Stone Monuments. 
— . The Quarterly Journal of Science, — No. 51, July, 1876. 
Zoological Eecord, Vol. XI, 1874. 



New Haven, U. S. — The American Journal of Science and Arts. — Vol. XI, 
Nos. 65 and 66, May and June, 1876. 

No. 65. /. Trowbridge. — On the effect of Thin Plates of Iron used as Armatures 

for Electro-Magnets, and a new form of Induction Coil. 
No. 66. G. A. Young. — Note on the Duplicity of the " 1474" line in the Solar 
Spectrum. /. L, Smith. — Researches on the solid Carbon Compounds in 
Meteorites. L. Trouvelot, — Physical Observations on Satui-n. R. W. McFar' 
land. — Ciirve of Eccentricity of the Earth's Orbit. M. C. Lea. — Notes on the 
Sensitiveness of Silver Bromide to the Green Rays as modified by the Presence 
of other Substances. 

Paris. Annales de Chimie et de Physique, — 5"^^ Serie. Tome VIII, Mai 
et Juin 1876. 

Mai. M. Botissingaiilt. — Influence de la terre vegetale sur la nitrification des 
matieres organiques azotees employees comme engrais. M. A, Muntz. — Re- 
cherches sur les fonctions des champignons. 



1876.] Lihrary. 211 

Juin. M. A. Glenard. — Eecherclies sur I'alcaloide de I'ipecacuanlia. M. E. R. 
Amagat.— 'SiQch.eTch.es snr I'elasticite de I'air sous de faibles pressions. M. 
Bertin. — Sur le radiometre de Crookes. 
Paris. Journal des Savants. Mai, Jnin, 1876. 

Juin. MM. B. Saint-Hilaire. — Inspection archeologique de I'lnde. 

. Revue Ai'cheologique. Mai, Juin, 1876. 

. Eevue des Deux Mondes, — Tome 15, Nos. 3 et 4 ; Tome 16, No. 

1, 1876. 
. Eevue et Magasin de Zoologie, — 3^ Serie, Tome 4, Nos. 3 et 4. 



1876. 

Fieber et Rieber. — Cicadines d'Europe. 
. Comptes Eendus,— Tome 82, Nos. 20—26; Tome 83, No. 1, 



1876. 

No. 20. M. H. Debray. — Sur la presence du selenium dans I'argent d'affinage. 
M. Bofjiel — Sur le cceur des Crustaces. M. Bedoin, — Sur les proprietes 
antiseptiques du borax. 
No. 21. M. A. Angot. — Sur les images photographiques obtenues au foyer des 
lunettes astronomiques. M. A. Girardin. — Note sur quelques proprietes phy- 
siques des eaux communes. M. S. de Luca. — Sur le plomb contenu dans cer- 
taines pointes de platine employees dans les paratonnerres. M. Onimiis. — Mo- 
difications dans les piles electriques rendant leur construction plus facile et 
plus economique. M. Th. Schloesing. — Sur la fixation de I'azote atmospherique 
par la terre vegetale. M. G. Carlet. — Sur I'anatomie de I'appareil musical 
de la Cigale. 
No. 22. M. A. Ledieu. — Examen de Taction mecanique possible de la lumiere. 
E'tude du radioscope de M. CrooJces. M. W. de Fonvielle. — Sur le radiometre 
de M. Crookes. M. Ch. Barney. — Sur la tbeorie de la periodicite undecennale 
des taches du Soleil. — M. Ore. — Anestbesie par la metbode des injections 
intra-veineuses de cbloral. Amputation de la cuisse ; insensibilite absolue ; 
sommeil consecutif pendant six heures ; guerison sans aucun accident. 
No. 23. M. A. Bedieu. — Examen de Taction mecanique possible de la lumiere. 
E'tude du radioscope de M. Crookes. M. Ed. Becquerel. — Eapport siu- plusieurs 
memoires de M. Allard, relatifs a la transparence des flammes et de Tatmos- 
phere et a la visibilite des pbares a feux scintillants. M. A. Angot. — Sur les 
images pbotograpbiques obtenues au foyer des lunettes astronomiques. M. R. 
F. Michel. — Sur les inconvenicnts que ijresente Temploi d'lm cable en fils de 
cuivre comme conducteur de paratonnciTC. M. P. Cazeneuve. — Metallisation 
des substances organiques, pour les rendre aptes k recevoir les depots galva- 
niques. 
No. 24. M. CI. Bernard. — Critique experimcntale sur la glycemie (suite). Des 
conditions physico-cbimiques et pbysiologiques k observer pour la recherche 
du Sucre dans le sang. M. Th. du Moiicel. — Sur les transmissions electriques 
a travers le sol. M. Tacehini. — Nouvellcs observations relatives a la presence 
du magnesium sur le bord du soleil. 
No. 25. M. CI. Bernard. — Critique experimentale sur la glycemie (suite). M. 
A. Bedieu. — Examen des nouvellcs methodcs proposecs pour la recherche do 
la position du navire a la mcr. M. J. B. Tholozan. — La peato en Asio et en 



212 Xiibrary. [Nov. 

Afrique en 1876 : mesures propliylactiques. M. J, M. Gaugain. — Influence 
de la temperature sur I'aimantation. M. Woillez. — Sur le spirophore, appareil 
de sauvetage pour les asphj^es, principalement pour les noyes et les enfants 
nouveau-nes. 

No. 26. 31. G. A. Him. — Sur le maximum de la puissance repulsive possible des 
rayons solaires. M. A. Ledieit. — Nouvelles considerations experimentales sur 
le radiometre de M. CrooJces. M. F. Boileau. — Proprietes communes aux canaux, 
aux rivieres et aux tuyaux de conduite a regime \uiiforme. M. J. L. Smith. — 
Sur I'arragonite observee a la surface d'une nieteorite. Sur les combinaisons 
de carbone trouvees dans des meteorites. M. A. Souzeau, — Sur I'emploi du 
cUorure de calcivmi dans Tarrosage des chaussees de nos promenades et de 
nos jardins publics. MM. V. Felts et F. Fitter. — Eechercbes experimentales 
sur Taction de 1' aniline, introduite dans le sang et dans I'estomac. 

No. 1, MM. Fasteur et F. Joubert. — Sur le fermentation de 1' urine. M. Th. du 
Moncel. — Troisieme Note sur les transmissions electriqties a travers le sol. M, 
A. Ledieu. — Examen des nouvelles metbodes proposees pour la recbercbe de la 
position du navire a la mer. F. Secchi. — Nouvelle serie d' observations sur les 
protuberances et les taches solaires. M. A. Cornu. — E'tudes de pbotographie 
astronomique. M. G. LeclancM. — Nouvelle pile au peroxyde de manganese. 
M. 0. Famoiseaif. — Sirr une nouvelle metbode de substitution du chlore et 
du brome dans les composes organiques. M, JE. Jacquemin. —^echerdhes de la 
fuchsine dans les vins. M. G. Tissandier. — Analyse micrograpbique compara- 
tive de corpuscules ferrugineux atmospberiques et de fi-agments detaches de la 
surface des meteorites. M. G. FLayem. — .Des caracteres anatomiques du sang 
dans les anemies. 

Books Purchased. 

HooKEE, J. D. De. Himalayan Journals : or Notes of a Naturalist in 
Bengal, the Sikkim, and Nepal Himalayas, the Khasia Mountains, &c. 
Vols. I and II. 8vo. London, 1854. 

Thomas, E. Records of the G-upta Dynasty. Illustrated by Inscriptions, 
Written History, Local Tradition, and Coins. Royal 4to. London, 1876. 



List of Sanskrit and other Manuscripts and LitJiograpJied works purchased 

for the Society. 

SansJcrii MSS. on Paper Pothies. Subjects. 

1617. Dharmadhvavabodha. By Nimbaditya, Smriti. 

1618. S'ilpa S'astra. By Sutra-man dana, Art. 

1619. Prayaschitta-viveka, Smriti. 

1620. Ch'handogya-bhashya, Veda. 

1621. Vrihad-dharma-purana, Purana. 

1622. Anumana-didhiti, Nyaya. 

1623. A.mrita-vindupanishad, Vedanta. 

162-i. Narayanopanishad, „ 



1876. Library. 213 

1625. Shat-prasni, Yedanta. 

1626. Nrisinha-tapani-upanisliad, Piirvarddha, „ 

1627. Nrisiriha-tapani-tipanisliad, Uttararddlia, „ 

1628. i^tharvana Tapanyupamshad-bMshja, „ 

1629. i^tharvana-ptu'va-tapanyupanisliad, „ 

1630. Nrismha-tapanyupanishad-bliashya, „ 

1631. Taittiriya Sanhita, Veda. 

1632. Samagri-pratibandha-vichara, Smriti. 

1633. Bhatti Kavya, in Bengali Character, Poem. 

1634. Nyaya-pakshata, Nyaya. 

1635. Mathiui Chintamani, „ 

1636. Anumana Chintamani, „ 

1637. Chintamani-rahasya, „ 

1638. Kevalanvayi-rahasya, „ 

1639. S'abda-pramanya, , „ 

1640. Pramanyavada-tika, „ 

1641. Anumana-didhiti, „ 

1642. Nyaya-tatts^a-bhashya, „ 

1643. Pramana Khanda, „ 

1644. A Nyaya work. (Unnamed) 

LitliograpJis received on lOtTi March, 1875. 

1645. Laghu-sabdendu-sekhara, Grammar. 

1646. Praudha-manorama, „ 

1647. Jagadisi Pancha-lakshana, Tippaul, Nyaya. 

1648. Mathm-i Pancha-lasana, Ti^jpani, „ 

1649. Visva-guna-darsana, Poem. 

1650. Yavana- jataka, Astronomy. 

Sanskrit IfSS. on Palm-leaved Potliies. 

1651. Katantra Parisishta Tika, Grammar. 

1652. Tithi Tattva, .' Smriti. 

1653. Daya Tattva, „ 

1654. S'raddha Tattva, „ 

1655. Pratishtha Tattva, „ 

1656. Asaucha-nirnaya, „ 

1657. „ „ (duplicate,) „ 

1658. Karma-vipaka, „ 

1659. Smriti-tattva, „ 

1660. Dasamaskandha Tika, Punina. 

— 61. Vishnu Pui-ana, ,, 

—62. Ayurveda, Medicine. 

— 63. Chaitanya-chandi'odaya, Drama. 



214 Lilrary. 

1864. Eaghava-pandaviya and Kiratarjuniya, Poem, 

— 65. Yidvan-moda-tarangini, Philosophy. 

— 66. Kshxidi'a Kavyani, Poems. 

— 67. Dhatu-rtipa, Etymology. 

— 68. A Work on Nyaya, 

— 69. A Work in a ruined state, 

— 70. A Telugu work, 

SansJcrit MSS. on Palm leaves. 

— 71. Santi-sataka Tika, Poems. 

— 72. Siirya S'ataka Tika, „ 

— 73. S'ankara's Atma-tattva-viveka, Vedanta. 

— 74. Dhananjaya-Adjaya Tika, Poem. 

— 75. Pingala Ch'handa, Versification. 

— 76. JSTitya Dui-gapnja, on the daily worship of Dni-ga, Smriti. 

— 77. Prayaschitta-nirnaya, „ 

— 78. Kautuka-sarvasva Nataka, Drama. 

— 79. Trikanda-kosha Tika, Lexicon. 

— 80. Ayodhya-mahatma, Purana. By Umapati Sarma, (on paper.) 

— 81. S'ahdarnava. By Eaghumani. Sanskrit Dic- 
tionary in 5 Vols. Much decayed. 

— 82. Aitareya Aranyaka, Veda in 5 Parts. 



PROCEEDINGS 



OF THE 



ASIATIC SOCIETY OF BENGAL, 

For December, 1876. 



The Monthly General Meeting of the Society was held on Wednesday, 
the 6th instant, at 9 o'clock p. M. 

The Hon. E. C. Batlbt, C. S. I., President, in the Chair. 
The minutes of the last meeting were read and confirmed. 
The following presentations were announced — 

1. From Prince Rama Varna, First Prince of Travankor, a copy of 
the Eeport on the Census of Travankor for 1874-75. 

2. From Professor C. Schefer, of the Ecole des langues Oi'ientales vi- 
vantes, Paris, a valuable collection of Oriental Works, partly published 
by the professors of the Ecole, the particulars of which will be found in the 
Library List. 

The following gentlemen, duly proposed and seconded at the last 
meeting, were balloted for and elected ordinax*y members — 

J. C. Macdonald, Esq. 

Capt. E. Mockler. 

Colonel G. B. Malleson, C. S. I. 

W. T. Webb, Esq. 

Lieut. G. S. Rodon. 

The following is a candidate for ballot at the next meeting — 

Kumara liadha Kishore Deb, Juvraj of Hill Tiperah, proposed by 
Mr. T. E. Coxhead, seconded by Capt. J. Waterhouse. 

In pursuance with the notice given at the last meeting, Mr. H. P. 
Blanford i3roposed that the following addition be made to Rule 33. 

" If the question to be submitted to a general vote be one falling 
under Section (c) of Rule 32, it shall in the first instance be submitted for 
discussion at an ordinary monthly meeting, and the votes of the members 
present shall be taken whether the proposal shall be recommended or 



216 JProposecl addition to Bule 33. [Deo. 

otherwise. A full report of the discussion shall be circulated with the 
voting papers." 

In the absence of Mr. E. H. Wilson, Dr. Waldie seconded the 
proposal. 

Mr. Blanfoed said that the object of the addition he proposed 
was to ensure the discussion of important questions at a general meeting 
of the Society before they were circulated for the votes of the general 
body of members. He understood that there was an impression that 
he intended to stop the reference of such qiiestions to the whole body of 
members in the case of the vote of the meeting being against it — but such 
was not his intention, and in such a case it would still be open for the 
Coimcil to circulate the qtiestion for the votes of non-resident members, 
but accompanied by a report of the discussion at the meeting. 

Capt. Wateehouse said — ^that while quite agreeing with the principle 
of Mr. Blanford's proposal, he thought that the addition to the rule 
might be worded differently, so as to indicate definitely the procedm-e to 
be adopted in order to ensure the discussion at a general meeting before the 
circulation of the voting papers, because at present all such questions were 
brought before a general meeting before being circulated. With reference 
to the proviso that a full report of the discussion should be circulated 
with the voting papers — he thought it was impracticable, unless the 
services of a short-hand writer were engaged for the purpose, and even 
then it might involve a great deal of useless printing. A short statement 
of the objections, would, he thought, be better. He would therefore 
propose the following amendment : 

" If the question to be submitted to a general vote be one falling under 
Clause (c) of E-ule 32, the Council shall cause to be sent to every Eesident 
Member, at least 48 hours before a general meeting, a printed circular, 
setting forth the nature of the proposal to be brought forward and the 
reasons for it, in order that it may be duly discussed at the meeting ; 
and should the general sense of the meeting be opposed to such proposal, 
a statement of the objections raised against it shall also be circulated with 
the voting paj)ers." 

Mr. Blochmann seconded the amendment. 

Mr. Blajstoed objected to the amendment on the ground that it did 
not provide for the discussion of the question before the issue of the voting 
papers. 

After some further discussion the Peesident observed that the object 
of the original motion and of the amendment seemed to be much the same, and 
that perhaps before the nest meeting Mr. Blanford and Capt. Waterhouse 
could arrange between themselves as to the form the additional rule should 
take, and the Council would then circulate it to the Society in the usual 
way. 



1876.] OldJiam Memorial. 217 

The President announced, on the part of the Council, that with 
reference to what passed at the last meeting regarding the erection of shops 
on a waste portion of the Society's comjjound, the Council had resolved 
that in anj case the shops should not be built on the site proposed, at 
the corner of Park Street and Chowringhee, though they reserved the 
power of building them at the other corner in Park Street if the interests 
of the Society should require it. 

Colonel Thuillieb said — With reference to what had just been an- 
nounced by the President, as to the intention of the Council in regard to 
the projjosed erection of shops on a portion of the Society's ground in the 
south-east corner of the compound in Park Street, he desired to bring to the 
notice of the j^resent meeting his very emphatic protest against the dis- 
posal of any of the ground belonging to the premises of the Society for 
the erection of shops with a street frontage, as a financial speculation. 

He considered the question of shoj)s in such a desirable situation, and 
in close contact with the Society's house, altogether prohibitory on many 
accounts, entailing, as such erections undoubtedly would, an unending source 
of inconvenience and difficulty in harboui'ing natives of inferior description 
about the premises, and in entirely spoiling the fine frontage towards the 
Maidan and Park Street, which, when properly opened out by the contem- 
plated improvements, would necessarily afford to the house they were so 
fortunately situated in, the superiority of aspect and prominence which it 
required and deserved. 

The erection of shops as a speculation on the part of the Society, he 
deemed utterly foreign to the position, character, and objects of the Society ; 
and their erection in such close vicinity to the house, in such a confined 
compound, would obstruct light and ventilation, and be a terrible eyesore 
and annoyance when built. 

Understanding that the sense of the previous meeting was entirely in 
accordance with his views on this very important question, he entreated the 
Council to weigh it well before acceding to it their support — he had there- 
fore entered his protest on the minutes of Proceedings of the last Council 
meeting, against the measure, and he earnestly trusted nothing of the sort 
would be actually undertaken to the detriment of the real interests of the 
Society. 

The President announced that subscriptions to the amount of Rs. 910 
had been received for the proposed Meuioi'ial Bust of Dr. Oldham, a 
further sum of about Ks. 600 was still required, and it was hoped that 
subscriptions to this amount Avould be received. 

The Presto RXT laid before the meeting a copy of the revised Rules 
and stated that a few alterations had been made iu the wording of some 



218 Postponement of Meeting. [Dec. 

o£ tlie rules as passed at the last meeting, in accordance witli the sugges- 
tions made by members when the j)roposed changes in the rules were 
circulated ; but as these alterations in no way affected the spirit or 
substance of any of the rules, the Council thought it was txnnecessary to 
again circulate them for the approval of the Society, and they would 
therefore be printed off and issued immediately. 

The President also announced that as the fii'st Wednesday in January 
would fall on the 3rd during the holidays, when probably many members 
would be out of Calcutta, it was proposed that the meeting of the Society 
should be postponed till the 10th instant. 

Col. Thuillier suggested that the 17th would be a better day, and 
it was therefore agreed that the meeting should be postponed till that 
date. 

The President announced that the Council recommend the election of 
Dr. J. Muir, as an Honorary Member of the Society in the room of the 
late Prof. C. Lassen. 

The following were, the grounds upon which this recommendation 
was made : 

Mr. John Muir, D. C. L., LL. D., Ph. D. was elected a member of this 
Society in July 1837, and up to 1854, when he retired from the country, 
took a deep interest in the labours of the Society. He was an occasional 
contributor to the Jom'nal of the Society, and attracted considerable at- 
tention by his contributions on Sanskrit Literature and Philosophy to the 
pages of the Benares Magazine. His life of Jesus Christ, in Sanskrit verse, 
established his reputation as a profound Sanskrit scholar. Since his retire- 
naent from India, he has been most assiduously engaged in oriental research- 
es, and his essays in the Journal of the Royal Asiatic Society of Great 
Britain attest the success with which he has prosecuted them. His great 
work, however, is his " Sanskrit Texts," in the five volumes of which he 
has brought together the matm-ed fruits of a long life of patient reading 
and research, and an amount of learning and critical acumen which place 
him in the foremost rank among the oriental scholars of the day. His 
generous gift towards the founding of a Sanskrit chair in the University of 
Edinbm'gh and the prizes given by him for essays on Indian Philosophy, 
and a translation of the Vedanta Sutras also deserve honourable mention. 

Mr. H. F. Blaneord exhibited two series of synoj)tical weather charts 
of India, illustrating the atmospheric conditions which preceded and led up 
to the remarkably heavy rainfall at Allahabad on the 30th and 31st 
July, 1875, and that at Delhi, Eohtak, Gm-gaon, &c,, on the 8th and 9th 
September in the same year. 



1876.] H. F. Blanford — Synoptical Weather Charts. 219 

The charts exhibited were the first of the kind which had ever been 
constructed for India, or indeed which it had ever been possible to construct. 
They showed the distribution of pressui'e, and the direction of the wind over 
the whole of India at 10 o'clock in the morning of each day ; the jiressiu-e 
being shown by isobars, or Hues of equal ^iressure at the sea level, for each 
twentieth of an inch of the barometer, and the winds by arrows, certain 
marks on which indicated the aj)proxunate mean velocity of the wind on the 
day in qiTestion. The first series of charts extended over twelve days, wz'^. 
from the 20th July to the 1st August ; and the second over eight days, from 
the 2nd to the 9th September.' The general character of the phenomena 
illustrated was similar in the two cases. A barometeric depression was appa- 
rently generated in Orissa or possibly in the North-West corner of the Bay : 
(there was no direct evidence pointing to a marine origin, and although, in 
the absence of any observations at sea, it could not be positively afih-med 
that the formation took place over the land, such was at least the more 
probable view) . Ai"0und this depression, the winds blew sj^ii-ally inwards, 
forming what may be termed a land cyclone. The velocity was in no case 
very high, and the barometric gradients were in general moderate, but in other 
respects the conditions were similar to those of a cyclone. From Orissa, 
the depression moved westwards towards Nagpore, and then somewhat 
northward. That which was formed in Orissa on the 25th July, entered 
the Gangetic valley, and coalesced with the depression which had its seat 
in that region throughovit the rainy season ; and on the 30th and 31st 
the depression became very intense over Allahabad, and api^arently lasted 
for at least a day after the heavy fall of rain, which was registered at 13 
inches. 

The depression in the early i^art of September moved rather to the 
North-West, and on the 8th and 9th was very intense on the i^lateau be- 
tween the Narbada and the Ganges, and in the upjier part of the latter 
valley, especially over Sagar and in the neighbourhood of Delhi. 

Mr. Blanford thought it probable that these land cyclones Avere not ex- 
ceptional featm'es of the meteorology of the rainy season, but were only 
somewhat exaggerated instances of the state of things that accomjxanies 
every general burst of rainfall at that season. If so their further study 
would certainly throw much light on the conditions that determine the dis- 
tribution of the rainfall. 

The Hon'ble E. C. Batlet exhibited the folloAving silver coins : 
No. 1. A coin of the city of Tarsus in Cilicia, struck under the Dy- 
nasty of the Seleucidan kings : according to the Due do Luyncs, a coin of 
the birthplace of St. Paul. In bad jnx'scrvation, but rare. 

Obverse. A seated figure of the god " Baal-Tars", with a defaced 



220 E. C. Bayley — Sassanicm and Partliian Coins. [Dec. 

monogram in front, and faint traces of Plioenieian letters behind the head, 

Beverse. Lion " passant" to the left, over it the Greek letter r. 
Sassanian Coins. 

No. 2. A coin of Khusrau Parwiz of Persia. Struck in his seven- 
teenth year (?) 

Mint very doubtful, coin imperfect. 

No. 3. A do. struck at " Saham" in the thirty-sixth year (?) ; better 
preservation. 

No. 4. According to Thomas, a coin of Yarahran (Bahram) , the fourth 
king of Persia, but in bad preservation and of rude execvition. 

Partliian. 

No. 6. Apparently a coin (according to Mianut) of Arsaces the 
seventh. 

No. 7. As above — Arsaces the ninth. 

Nos. 8 to 17. There are local Parthian or sub-Parthian types, ex- 
amples of which are given in Wilson's ' Ariana Antiqua.' These legends are 
only in Arsacidan Pehlvi, but very little progress has been made in their 
decipherment and their precise attribution is yet undetermined. There will 
l^robably be some information regarding them in the new work on Parthian 
coins now about to issue in the revised Marsden series, I should like to see 
them again when that appears, but have no leisure to work at them now. 

There are two types, one with a head on either side, the reverse of the 
other bears a fine altar with a single ' mobid', or priest. 

Also the following gold coins belonging to J. E. Eeid, Esq., C. S., 
Jaunpru'. 

No. I. Kanisliha or Kanerlce. 

Ohv. King sacrificing, with right hand at an altar ; spear in left hand. 

Legend — 

■ PAONANOPAO 
KANHPKI KOPANO 

Mev. Figm-e four-armed of Ugra = Siva, and fawn. Legend — OKPO 
= Ugra (0PK02 orcus). 

No. II. Obverse as in No. 1. Reverse — female figure with a peculiar 
pronged instrument in right hand. 

Legend NANA. 

("Nana" or " Nauaca" is a Sythian goddess and a very old deity. 
Nana = Anaitis = Anahid = Diana (Cunningham). 

No. III. Oh verse as in No. 1. Beverse — Figure as in No. II, but 
mth sword in girdle and a half moon on the head. 

Legend NANAPAO. 

(Kao, honorific title.) A fine coin. 



1876.] H. B. Medlicoit—JucJescf/eri Meteorites. 221 

No. IV. Oiverse as in No. I, king (?) helmeted, witli nimbus and 
sj)ear in right hand. Sword in girdle. 

Legend OPAArNO " Orlagno" ; meaning not yet known. 



The Seceetaet exhibited some si^ecimens o£ Meteorites recently 
fallen in India and read some remarks upon them by Mr. H. B. Medlicott. 
Becorcl of tlie Juclesegeri Meteorite of IQtJi Felruary, 1876. 

The meteorite was sent to the Indian Museum by the Chief Commis- 
sioner of Mysore. It fell in the bed of the tank of Judesegeri village in the 
Chittanhalli hobh of the Kadaba Taluk, on the evening of the 16th 
February, 1876. The position is about Lat. 12° 51' N., Lon. 76' 48' E, 

The pieces sent weigh in the aggregate 1 lb. 9 oz. 136 grains. They 
are all more or less broken, forming jarobably a small portion of the total 
fall. There is nothing remarkable in their appearance : they contain 
nodules of triolite ; but for the rest they have the pale grey colour and 
granular texture of the most common variety of meteoric ston'e. The 
specific gravity is 3 '63. 

The circumstances of the fall are related as follows : — 

Judesegeri stone — Report of the Deputy Gommissioner of TumTcur. 

" The find is entirely due to Mr. Assistant Commissioner Woodcock, 
who, having received reports from all his Police stations in the Kadaba 
Taluk of the meteor being seen, and the general imj)ression that it had 
fallen close to each, instituted a vigorous search, and it then transpired, 
that a Tigalar, who was that night sleeping in a hut in his garden, heard, 
after seeing the meteor, a thud in the earth, not far distant, as of a heavy 
body falling. In the morning he discovered the stone buried several 
inches deep in the bed of the adjoining tank ; but under the impression 
that it contained gold it had unfortunately been smashed and changed 
hands before the fragments now sent were eventually recovered. It is 
" alleged to have smelt strongly of sulphm- when found." 

" I observe from the local papers that the meteor was seen at Bangalore, 
and supposed to fall in the Roman Catholic Cathedral compound. I 
myseU saw it at this station (Tiimkur), it was observed at Kallambelle and 
Sira ; at the former place it is reported to have been accomj^auied by a. 
slight shock of an earthquake, and a great noise, which latter was also 
distinctly heard at Tiimkur almost immediately following the fall of the 
meteor, and apparently being a direction from north to south ; and I have 
also learned from Major Armstrong that the meteor was observed by him at 
Chitaldroog nearly at the same time as visible in this District and at Ban- 
galore ; the whizzing sound of the falling meteor was, however, apparently 
only heard in the western Taluks of this District." 



222 H. B. Medlicott — JSfagerid Meteorite. [Dec. 

^Record of the Nagerid Meteorite, ofTlnd April, 1876, 

Nageria is in the Fathabad parganah o£ tlie Agrah district, Lat. 
27° 3' N., Lon. 78° 21' E. The fall occurred about an hoiu* and a lialE after 
sunrise on the 22nd Oct. 1876. The specimen was sent by the Archaeologi- 
cal Society of Agrah to the Asiatic Society of Bengal and forwarded to the 
Indian Museum. An account of the circumstances of the faU, drawn up 
by the Tahsildar, was also received. This is appended as a sample of a re- 
spectable native official's thoughts on the subject. 

Considering that a mass estimated as weighing 26 lbs., is stated to have 
fallen, it is very unsatisfactory that so small a portion should have been 
secured for museums where these objects can be appreciated. 

The total quantity received weighs only about 300 grains. It is a 
very friable stone ; of an unusual whiteness, greenish gray granules in an 
abundant, white, almost powdery matrix. The film of fusion is thicker 
than is generally the case, it has a brilhant black surface. The sp. gr. is 
3-12. 

Nagerid stone — TaJisUddr'' s Meport. 

" About an hour and a half after daybreak there was a great whizzing 
noise, as if a great bird rose : then a ball fell and immediately broke ; the 
sound of its fall reached a great distance. From the inspection of the place 
it aj)peared that this ball fell in the middle of field No. 253. A large hole 
2 feet in circumference and diameter 8 inches and depth 8| inches, was 
made. The land on the spot is very hard. From the inspection of the 
spot it further appears, that when it fell, it was broken into many fragments, 
which flew to a great distance. Arguing from the weight of the fragments 
and the depth and circumference and diameter of the hole it seems, that the 
ball m\ist have weighed nearly 13 seers ; and considering the hardness of 
the ground it would appear that it fell straight on the ground from a great 
distance, 'and with great force. From the sha|)e of the hole, it seems, that 
the ball fell perpendiciilarly from above. And as the ball was of very hard 
substance, and crumbled away, it must have fallen from a very great dis- 
tance." 

" Sometimes a substance in the bright j^hosphorus, which we in India 
call broken stars, takes fire and falls. But as this ball fell in the day, it 
cannot be discovered whether it was bright or not. Sometimes European 
people seat themselves in balloons and ascend, and put stones, &c., in the 
balloon ; and when the balloon grows heavy, throw out the stones, &c., to 
lighten it, and it then ascends further. It is just imaginable that some 
aeronaut may have flung out the stone. But I never saw a stone like this. 
In short, there are many doubts in the matter, but there is no doubt on 
this point that the ball fell from above on to the ground, and that the peo- 



1876.] H. H. Godwin-Ansien— Birds from N. JE. Frontier of India. 223 

pie who remained on earth had nothing to do with it. The fragments of 
the ball are white and dark inside, like the dregs after sifting lime and 
plaster, and outside it is black, like a lacquer ; and it is not clear what it is. 
There are no trees, &c. where the ball fell." 

The following papers were read : 

1. Fifth list of Birds from the Sill Ranges of the N. E. Frontier of 
India. By Major H. H. Godwin-Austei^, F. E. G. S., F. G. S., &c. 

The j)resent list, which adds 36 species, bringing up the record of birds 
from the Eastern districts and hill-frontier to a total of 528 species, in- 
cludes birds, principally from the Muuipur Hills, obtained by Messrs. Ogle 
and Robert in the field-season of 1873-74, in the Eastern Naga Hills, by 
Mr. A. W. Chennell, and in the Khasi HiUs, by the author himseli: in 1875. 
All the new forms except two, which are here for the fii-st time made 
known, were described in a joint paper by Viscount Walden (now Marquess 
of Tweeddale) and the author, in ' the Ibis' for 1875 ; these descriptions 
are repeated in full. 

The paper concludes with some short additional notes on the birds of 
the lists previously communicated by the author to the Society's Joui-nal. 

The pa|)er will appear in Journal Part II, No. 4, for the current year, 
and will be illustrated by three colom-ed plates, two of which are by the 
author's own hand. 

2. Contributions toioards the knowledge of the Indian Fossil Flora. 
On some Fossil Plants from the Bamuda Series in the Baniganj Coal- 
field, collected hy Mr. J. Wood-Mason. By Db. 0. Feistmaxtel. 

Mr. Wood- Mason has lately brought a very fine collection of fossil 
plants from the Raniganj coal-field, and at his request I have undertaken 
the examination and description of these interesting remains. 

Although the Geological Museum possesses large collections from the 
same coal-field, as well as from all other locaHties, Mr. Wood-Mason's 
collection is yet very valuable, containing as it does not only several 
perfectly new, but also better specimens of the known forms. 

The Eaniganj coal measures belong to the great series of rocks which 
are classed as the Damuda Series, and they are the top group of this seiies. 
These Damudas, together with the Panchot group, form the lower portion 
of the whole plant-bearing system, for which it is now better to adopt the 
name Gondwana System, as there occur in it not only plants, but animals 
also. 

Mr. Wood-Mason's collection is especially of value for estimating the 
age of this series, which from a stratigraphical point of view may well be 
divided into three or four groups, but which from a palaeontological point of 



224 0. Feistmaiitel — Fossil Plants from Banirjanj Goal-field:. [Dec. 

view constitutes a single formation, to which besides the w^hole Panchet 
group is in the closest relation. 

In some preliminary notes on the Indian fossil flora published in a 
recent number of the Eecords of the Geological Survey of India,* I have 
attempted to show that all the plant-bearing beds from the Kach-Jabalpur 
group down to the Talchir group are the representatives of the Eui'opean 
Jm-a-Triassic systems, merely on palaeontological grounds, such as the best 
known palaeontologists, from Brongniart, Sternberg, Lindley, and Hutton, 
down to those of the present day, have established them ; and these observa- 
tions on the Indian flora are ali-eady ^^artly approved at home. 

From the occiu'reuce of the genus Glossopteris (which is so very fre- 
quent here in India in the Damudas and in the upper portion of the Aus- 
tralian coal-measures, but which occurs also rarely in the lower coal-measures 
of the same country), our Damudas were for some time compared with these 
Australian lower coal-measures, which contain scarcely anything but the 
remains of animals of lower carboniferous age ; and the two were therefore 
considered to be of the same age. But while our Damuda Series contams 
in no part the least trace of a marine animal, or even of a Fauna, which 
permits of any comparison with the Australian coal-strata, it contains on the 
other hand a very numerous Flora which has all its connections in Europe, 
and this in the mezozoic strata in general and in the Trias in particular. 

The same age must be assigned also to the upper Australian coal- 
measures (Wianamatta, Hawkesberry, Victoria, Queensland, Tasmania, &c., 
Upper Newcastle Coal-beds), and with these only can om* Damuda flora be 
compared. Glossopteris makes its appearance as a genus rarely in Australia 
at a time when carboniferous animals lived in the sea, but it sui-vived and 
became more abundant after these carboniferous strata had been deposited, 
i. e., when the carboniferous animals were extinct, i. c, when another period 
of life had begun. 

I have shown these relations in the last number of the Eecords (IX. 4). 

Mr. Wood-Mason's fossils exhibit again throughout the most iimnis- 
takeable characteristics of a mesozoic flora. 

a. Ferns with net-venation, of which Sagenopteris and Glossopteris 
are examples. 

h. Ferns Avith parallel venation, passing out from the midrib at right 
or slightly acute angles, and forked — Taeniopteris (and I am sm-e the 
present paper will not fail to make the mesozoic and triassic age of the 
Damudas still more evident, as in the whole flora there is not a single form 
which could justify a view of an age lower than Triassic ; this of coui'se 
can be only stated as regards the homotaxis.) I cannot here discuss all 
the previous literatm-e of the subject. This will be done in detail in my 

* Vol. IX, 2, 3. 



1876.] 0. Feistmantel — Fossil Plants from Baniganj Goal-field. 225 

paper in tlie Journal, and it may be siilficient to point out here only the most 
imjiortant facts. 

I have determined altogether 14 species of fossil plants in Mr. Wood- 
Mason's collection ; amongst these are 7 new species and amongst these 
again 2 new genera. 

Represented are the orders of IJq^uisetacecB and Fllices. 
Amongst the Eqiiisetacece, which on the whole are very frequent in 
the Damuda Series, were especially represented: Sphenophyllum Trizygia, 
Ung. This was formerly named Trizygia speciosa by Royle, later men- 
tioned as Sphenophyllmn speciosiom by McClelland, and finally established 
as Splienoph. Trizygia by linger. It is distinctly characterized by the 
number and position of the leaflets in the articulations. There are invariably 
6 leaflets only, which, considered according to their size, form three pairs, 
(therefore Trizygia^ and are placed on one side of the articulation. 
Figures of this interesting fossil have been published altogether twice only 
by Royle and McClelland, but as the work of this latter author is very little 
known, I give two more figures with my paper. The same species occurs 
also in the Barakm' group. 

The second fossil I describe from the Equisetacece is the famous 
Vertehrarla, which to date is not yet quite satisfactorily explained. The 
first reasonable explanation was given by Sir Ch. Bunbury, who considered 
it to be the rhizome or roots of an equisetaceous plant, as he supposed 
of Phyllotheca, which means, in another sense, of 8chizonem'a, most of 
the so-called Phyllotheca being states of this genus. Since that time 
nothing positive has been pronounced a,bout this fossil. Mr. Wood-Mason's 
collection contains several nice specimens, amongst which one which 
shows quite certainly the equisetaceous nature of this fossil, exhibiting 
perfectly distinctly 2 or 3 articulations Avith ribs not alternating in the 
articulation, but quite opposite, as is generally the case in the Triassic 
Eqiiisetaceae of Europe. The Australian Vertehrarla is, as far as it is 
described, different from ours. 

Besides these equisetaceous plants the most frequent in the Damudas 
is a representative of the well-known Triassic genus Schizoneura which 
I have called S. Gondioanensis, and which is very near to Schizoneura 
paradoxa, Sch., of Europe. A good many af the stalks generally called 
Phyllotheca belong to this genus, although a true Phyllotheca, in Zigno's 
sense, occurred too. Phyllotheca iy a mesozoic genus. In Australia it is 
frequent in the Upper Newcastle Beds, and I have lately discovered a form 
almost identical with Phylloth. equistifuriiils, Zign. 

But amongst the Eerns are the most interesting forms. 

Of the Sphenopterides I have described a Sphenopteris polymorpha, so- 
called from the variations of form whicli it exhibits according to the size or 



226 0. Feistmantel — Fossil Plants from Baniganj Coal-field. [Dec, 

age of the specimens. I think Mr. McClelland's Pecopt. affinis is to be 
placed here. The same form occurs also in the Barakur group near 
Cuttack. 

Of the Pecopterides there occurred two pinnae representing two species, 
which, however, belong to the same group of mcsozoic ferns, viz. to the 
group of the Aletdwpteris Wltithyensis, Gopp, which Schimj^er first indicat- 
ed, but for which Saporta more recently advocates the genus Cladoplilehis, 
Bgt. These two species are : — 

Aletliopteris Lindleyana, found in fructification, is closely analogous to 
the AlethojJt. indica from Eajmahal and to the true Aletliopt. Whitlyen- 
sis known as yet only from L. Oolite and Lias. This sjDecies we have also 
in the Kach and Jabalpur groups. 

Besides these two species, there occurred a perfectly new type of Peco- 
pterids which is A^ery closely connected with the hving Pliegopteris ; in the 
fossil flora it belongs to the geniis Aletliopteris, so that I describe this very 
fine form as Alethopt. pliegopteridoides. 

The Taenio]oterides are of especial interest, as being represented by just 
such forms as exhibit very well the mesozoic character of the flora, and as 
establishing the connection between the Lower and Upper Gondwanas. 

The Taeniopteris danaeoides, of which McClelland figured two speci- 
mens, is the same as that which Eoyle called Glossopt. danaeoides, but 
which has not been mentioned since the piiblication of McClelland's paper, 
although it has occurred. Mr. Wood-Mason collected many specimens 
of this species, and assures me that it is very frequent at Eaniganj. 
According to the new classification of the Taeniopterides, these forms 
fi'om Eaniganj belong to Schimper's subgenus Macrotaeniopteris. Another 
big TaeniopteHs was also met with, but the specimens of it are in so frag- 
mentary a condition that I cannot describe it. 

Amongst the Taeniopterides, I place the new genus Palaeovittaria : a 
splendid- specimen contains about ten leaves of a fern, the shape of which 
resembles that of Sagenopteris ; the midi'ib vanishes towards the apex ; and 
the veins are not areolated, but pass out at a very acute angle from the 
midrib towards the margin and are forked. In these respects the fossil 
fern agrees, according to Mr. Km-z, only with the living Vittaria, so that I 
establish it as new genus Palaeovittaria calling the species Palaeov. 
Kurzi. Nowhere in the whole coal-measures has anything like it yet been 
met with. 

The order I^ictyopterides, including all ferns with net-venation, is 
also richly represented. The most interesting is a new genus which I call 
Pelcmnopteris : the shape of the leaf is arrow-like, there are three chief 
veins, and the other veins form areoles. This fossil fern has a very close 
resemblance to Pteris sagittaefolia and to Hemionitis cordata, Eoxb., but 



1876.] O. Feistmantel — Fossil 'Plants from Bcmiganj Coal-field. 227 

to wliicli of them it should more correctly be brought nearest, cannot be 
well decided, as ovx fern exhibits no fructification. Seonionitis has a 
fructification along the secondary veins, while Pte. sagittaefolia has o£ 
course a marginal fructification. It is a very remarkable fossil, and 
I call the species after Mr. Wood-Mason. 

Another very marked fossil is a species of the genus Gangamopferis, 
a form intermediate between Olossopteris and Cyclopteris, that is to say, 
it has no midrib ; and the veins radiate towards the margins, and are not 
forked, as in Cyclopteris, but. form areoles. Formerly, some forms of this 
genus with narrow net-venation were described as Cyclopteris, but only lately 
have their true relations been determined and explained by Mr. McCoy in his 
Prodrome. From the Damudas I have already described 2 species ; this 
from the Eaniganj field is a third, and I name it Qangamopt. Whittiana, 
after Mr. Whitty of Kurhurbali. It has very wide hexagonal and poly- 
gonal areoles. Amongst living forms, AntTopliyiijm comes nearest to it, 
and of this the varieties without midrib. Ganganopteris is a mesozoie 
genus. 

Of the genus Glossopteris, I have first to mention Glossopteris angtisti- 
folia, a species which was first described by Brongniart but has since not 
been recognized ; Mr. Wood-Mason has brought several specimens of it 
which are more complete than those Brongniart had : they show the apex, 
show well that the venation was incorrectly drawn by Brongniart, and 
show besides this a marginated margin, Avhich perhaps indicates the fructifi- 
cation — which would therefore be fructification Pteridis. This is the most 
important point in this Glossopteris, and we have thus three different 
fructificating states of Glossopteris : Kamthi, Australia, Rq,niganj. 

Besides this Gl. angustifolla, there oeciu's very commonly at Eaniganj 
a form which is equally frequent throughoiit the whole Damudas. I name 
it Glossopt. communis. It is of various dimensions, sometimes very large, 
with the midrib distinct, and the secondary venation very narrowly 
arculated. The thorough examination of the Glossop>terides should yield 
altogether a great many species. 

That this genus occurs in Australia in the lower portion of the coal- 
strata also, does not affect the question of the age of oiu- Damudas ; if 
such considerations were allowed weight, we woiild be obliged, for instance, 
to consider the Salt Range Trias as carboniferous, merely on account of 
the i:)resence of the genus JBelleroplion, or vice versa. 

I have now only to mention a Sagcnopteris from the Eaniganj field, 
which is described as Sagenopt. polyphylla : it is again a fern with net- 
venation, and it belongs to a genus which in Em*ope is mesozoie and Ilhastic. 

Besides these plants brought by Mr. Wood-Mason there are not many 
moi'e species known from this coal-field altogether. 



228 H. H. Godwin-Austen— Helicid8e/;'0wj Dafla Rills. [Dec. 

The following conclusions can be drawn : — 

1. Mr. Wood-Mason's collection proves again that the Eaniganj 
group contains a Flora only. 

2. A comparison of this Series can be made only with corresjionding 
Series and not with strata in Avhich marine animals are j)redominant. 

3. All the 2ilants brought by Mr. Wood-Mason show excellently the 
mesozoic liahitus of the fossil flora as the illustrious Brongniart has esta- 
blished it in his excellent paper, and especially in his ' Tableau des genres 
des vegetnux foss. 

The paper, which is illustrated by eight plates, will be published in the 
Journal Part II, No. 4, for the current year. 

3. On tlie Helicidse collected diiring the Expedition into tlie Dajla- 
Hills, Assam. By Major H. H. Godwin- Afstek. 

The present list contains nearly all the species of Selicidce that were 
obtained by the author during the expedition of 1874-75, a few species only 
still remaining undetermined ; these will be worked out, and the novelties 
amongst them described by Mr. G. Nevill from the series presented by the 
author to the Indian Museum. 

The paper, which will a|)pear in the forthcoming number of the Jour- 
nal, Part II, is illustrated by a coloured plate of the animals and their shells 
from the author's own pencil. 

4. On the Development of the Antennce in the Pectinicorn Mantidse. 

By J. Wood-Mason, Esq. 
(Abstract.) 
The author shows that, down to the last change of skin but one, no dif- 
ference is to be detected between the two sexes of Oongylus gongylodes either 
in the form or in the proportionate length of the antennae, which in both 
male and female are identically the same simple and setaceous structures, con- 
sisting of two distinct basilar segments followed by a multitude of very 
short and ill-defined flagellar ones ; but that shortly after this event these 
appendages in the male commence to thicken throughout that portion of 
their length Avhich in the perfect insect is bipectinated, so as eventually to 
acquire a compressed spindle-shaped form ; that this thickening is the out- 
ward manifestation of the growth going on beneath the outernaost layer of 
chitinous membrane (last shin), which, at an early date, ^9«r^ j?«ss«* withthe 
formation of the new antenna, tends to separate of£ from the rest, 
and thereafter serves as a capsule or sheath wherein the two series 
of pectinations are developed by a process of budding from the antennal 
segments between the basal 5 and the apical 12 — 15 ; that as the pecti- 
nations grow they press upon so as to distend the walls of the sheath, 



1876.] Lihrary. 229 

completely obliterating all traces of its previous segmentation ; and that if 
tlie sheath be carefully dissected away when distention of its walls has 
proceeded almost to the biu'sting point (last moult), the completely bipec- 
tinated antenna of the adult male is disclosed, but with the teeth of each 
comb all glued and compressed together and with the two striated plates 
thus formed apposed to one another at their free ends, so as to enclose a 
compressed spindle-shaped cavity. 

The reading of the following papers was postponed — 

1. On an Imperial Assemblage at Delhi 3000 years ago. By Dr. 
Kajendralala Mitra. 

2. On Himalayan Glaciation. By J. F. Campbell, Esq. 



y 



IBRARY. 



The following additions have been made to the Library since the 
Meetino- held in November last. 



Transactions, Proceedings, and Journals, 

presented hjj the respective Societies or JEditors. 

Agra. The Archaeological Society of Agra. — Proceedings, January to 

June, 1876. 
Berlin. Konigiich Preussische Akademie der Wissenschaften, — Monats- 
bericht. Jvmi, 1876. 

Fetcrs. — Tiber die von S. M. S. Gazelle gcsammelten Saugcthiere aus den Ab- 
theilungen der Nager, Hufthiere, Su-cnen, Cetaceen, und Beuteltbicre. 
Birmingham. Institution of Mechanical Engineers. — Proceedings, Nos. 2 
and 3, 1876. 

No. 2. W. A>iclerso)i. — Description of the Ogi Paper Mill, Japan. 
Bombay. The Indian Antiquary, — Vol. V, Pts. 59 and 60, October and 
November, 1876. 

Pt. 59. Prof. C. S. Tawncij. — Metrical Translations of the Yau-agya Satakam. 
Kdshindlh Trimbah Telauff. — The Saukaravijaya of Anandagiii. Bcv. J. F. 
Kcarns. — Silpa Sastra. Rev. G. U. Fope. — Notes on the South-Indian or l)r;i\i- 
dian Family of Languages. G. FLornc. — Notes on a Tibet Tea])ot and on the 
Tea used therein, licv. J. Cain. — The Bhadrachallam and Eekapalli Talukas 
Godavari District, South India. 
Pt. 60. Frof. C. II. Tawney. — Metrical Translation of Bhartrihari's Vairii"va 
Satakam. W. F. Sinclair. — Notes on some Caves in the Karjah Taluka of 
the Thana CoUectorato. I)r. J. M/iir. — Kiishnti's opinion of unl'uii- fi"htin<>-. 
Ma-vims and Senthucnts from the Mahabhai'ata. 



230 Libranj. [Deo. 

Buenos Ayres. La Academia Naeional de Ciencas exactas existente eii la 

Universidad de Cordova, — Acta, Tome 1, 1875. 
Calcutta. Geological Survey o£ India, — Records, Vol. 9, Pts. 2 and 3. 

Pt. 2. Br. 0. Feistmantel. — Notes on the age of some Fossil Floras in India. 
R. Lydeklcer. — Description of a Cranium of Stegodon Ganesa, with, notes of the 
sub-genus and allied forms. S. B. Medlicott. — Note upon the Sub-Himala- 
yan Series in the Jamu (Jamoo) Hills. 
Pt. 3. Br. 0. Feistmantel. — Notes on the age of some Fossil Floras in India. 
W- T. Blanford. — Note on the Geological age of certain groups comprised in 
the Gondwana Series of India, and of the evidence they afford of distinct 
Zoological and Botanical Terrestrial Eegions in Ancient Epochs. Th. W. BT. 
Sughes. — On the relations of the Fossilferous Strata at Maleri and Kota near 
Sironcha, Central Provinces. B. Bydehhcr. — Notes on the Fossil Mamma- 
lian Faunas of India and Burma. 
Leipzig. Die Deutsche Morgenlandische G-esellscliaft, — Zeitschrift, Band 
27, Heft. I, II, IV; Band. 29, Heft. I ; Band 30, Hefte I und II. 

Band 27, Hefte I und II. Th. Aufrecht. — TJeber die Paddhati von 9ai''^^gadhara. 
K. Simly. — Streifziige in das Gebiet der Geschichte des Schachspieles. Ed. 
Sachaii. — Zur Erklarung von Yendidad I. 
Heft IV. C. SandreczJci. — Ein Beitrag zur Kenntniss der Arabischen Sprache in 
ihrer gegenv^artigen Fortbildung. A. Boehtlingk. — Einige Bemerkungen zu 
den von Th. Aufi.-echt veroffentlichen Spriichen aus (^arugadhara's Paddhati. 
B. Spiegel. — Zur Erklarung des Avesta. BL. Schanz. — Indischer Eegenten- 
spiegel. 
Band 29, Heft I. A. Bastian. — Die Verkettungstheorie der Buddhisten. Th. 
Nbldehe. — Zm' Geschichte der Araber im 1. Jahi-h. d. H. aus syrischen Quel- 
len. M. I'Abhe Martin. — Discours de Jacques de Saroug sur la chute des 
idols. 
Band 30, Heft I. Jul. Oppert. — TJeber die Sprache der alten Meder. A. F. 
Bott. — Chemie oder Chymie. A. von Kremer. — Philosophische Gedichte des 
Abul-l-'Ala' Ma'arri. IB. Suhschmann. — Ueber Aussprache und Umschrei- 
bung des Altarmenischen. V. Garathausen. — Ueber der griechischen Ur- 
sprung der Armenischen Schrift. W. Bacher. — Sa'di-Studien. S. BLubseh- 
mann. — Iranisch-Armenische Namen auf karta, kert, gird. 
Heft II. S. Jacohi. — Beitrage zur indischen Chronologie. 
London. The Athenasum.— Nos. 2545 to 2548 and Nos. 2552 to 2558, 

1876. 
■ . The Geographical Magazine, — Vol. Ill, Nos. 9 and 10. Septem- 
ber and October, 1876. 

No. 9. An Itinerary from Aksu to Yarkand and Ladak. The Statistical Sur- 
vey of India. Sosnooski's expedition thi-ough China and Mongolia. 
No. 10. Bavid Ker. — A Peep into Kokau : or from Djizak to Tashkent, via, 
Khodjent. 
. Geological Society, — Qt. Journal, Vol. 32, No. 127, August 



1875. 

Brof. W. Boyd BawJcins. — On the Mammalia and Traces of Man found in the 
Kobia-Hood Cave. Mr. G. T. Bettany. — On the genus Mery cochwrus, with 



1876.] Lilrary. 231 

Descriptions of two new Species. Prof. Seeley. — On the Posterior Portion of 
a Lower Jaw of Lahyrinthodon (L. SavisiJ from the Trias of Sidmotith. Mr. 
E. T. Newton. — On two Chimferoid Jaws from the lower fine sand of New 
Zealand. Frof. Oiuen. — On Evidences of Theriodonts in Permian Deposits 
■ elsewhere than in S. Africa. Mr. SulJce. — On a modified Form of Dinosaur, 
ian Ilium. 

London. The Linnean Society, — Journal, Zoology, Vol, 12, Nos. 60 — 62, 
and 63. 

Nos. 60 — 62. Frof. Allman. — Diagnoses of new Genera and Species of lEydroida, 
T. S. Cobbold. — On the supposed Earity, Nomenclatui'e, Structure, Affinities 
and Source of the large human Fluke {Bistoma crassiim, Busk.) S. G. See- 
ley. — Similitudes of the Bones in the JEnaliosauri'a. F. S. Welch. — The Ana- 
tomy of two Parasitic Forms of the Family Tetrarhynchidce. A. G. But- 
ler. — Kotes on the Lepidoptera of the Family Zyganidce with descriptions of 
new Genera and Species. 
No. 63. J. Andersoti. — On the Cloacal Bladders and on the Peritoneal Canala 
in Chelonia. Sir John LubhocJc. — Observations on Ants, Bees, and "Wasps. 

. . Botany, Vol. 15, Nos. 81 to 84. 

No. 81. G. Bentham. — Notes on the Gamopetalous orders belonging to the 
Campanulaceous and Oleaceous Groups. /. H. Gilbert. — Note on the Occur- 
rence of " Faiiy- Kings." Extract fi'om a letter from Mr. J. Gammie to Dr. 
Hooker. G. Dickie. — Notes on the Algas from the Island of Mangaia, South 
Pacific. H. C. Sorby. — On the Characteristic Coloiiring-matters of the Red 
groups of Algfe. 
No. 82. G. Dickie. — Alym collected by H. N. Moseley at Simon's Bay, at Seal 
Island, at Marion Island in 40 fathoms, at Heard Island, 250 miles S. of Ker- 
guelen. Fev. M. J. Berkeley . — Enumeration of Fungi collected during the 
Expedition of H. M. S. " Challenger" with a Supplement. S. N. Moseley. — 
Fui-ther notes on the Plants of Kerguelen with some remarks on the Insects. 
On the Diatomaceous gatherings made at Kerguelen's Land. The Musei and 
FLepaticce, Notes on Plants collected and observed at the Admiralty Islands, 
March 1875. 
No. 83. Frof. Oliver. — Note on a Collection of North — Celebes Plants made by 
]VIr. Eiedel of Gorontalo. G. Kiiiy. — Note on a Sport in Faritaim tricuspe, G. 
Don. /. G. Baker. — On the Polynesian Ferns of the " Challenger" Expedi- 
tion, Frof. FL. G. Feichenbach. — On some Orchidacem collected by IMi-. 
Moseley of the " Challenger" Expedition, in the Admiralty Islands, Ternato, 
and Cape York, one of which forms the Type of a new Section of the Genua 
Dendrobium, G. B. Clarke, — On Edgaria, a new Genus of Cucurbitaceee. 
Botanic Notes from Darjoeling to Tonglo. 

. The Linnean Society,^— Transactions, Zoology, Second Series, 



Vol. I, Pts. 2 and 3. 

Ft. 2. J. D. Macdonald. — On the external Anatomy of Tanais vittatus, occur- 
ring with Limnoria and Chelura terebrans in excavated Pier-wood. TV, G. 
Mcintosh. — On Vakncinia Armandi, a Now Ncmertean. 

Pt. 3, Dr. Collinywood. — On 31 Species of JMarinc Planarians, collected partly 
by the late Dr. Kelaart, F. L. S. at Triucomalce and partly by Dr. Colling- 



232 liibrary. [Dec. 

wood, F. li. S. in the Eastern Seas. W. K. Parker. — On the Structure and 
Development of the Bird's Skull. 

London. . Botany, Second Series, Vol. I, Pts. 2, and 3, 

Pt. 2. Eev. G. Eenslow.— On.i'h.Q Oxigm. oi the prevailing Systems of PhijllO' 

taxis. J. Miers. — On the Barringtoniacem. 
Pt. 3. F. Ciirrey. — On a Collection of Fungi made hy Mr. Sulpiz Kurz, Cu- 
rator of the Botanic Gardens, Calcutta. A. W. Bennett. — Preliminary Note 
on the rate of Growth of the Female Flower-Stalk of VaUisneria spiralis, 
Linn. On the Growth of the Flower -Stalk of the Hyaciath. F. Darwin. — 
On the Hygroscopic Mechanism by which certain Seeds are enabled to bmy 
themselves in the ground. 

. Linnean Society, — General Index to the Transactions ; Vols. 26 

to 30. 
. . Proceedings of the Session 1874-75, President's Address 



and Obituary Notices. 

. Natxxre, Vol. 14, Nos. 355 to 365, and Vol. 15, No. 366, 1876. 

. Eoyal Society, — Proceedings, Vol. 24, No. 170, Vol. 25, No. 



171. 

Vol. 24, No. 170. Frof. W. Thomson. — Preliminary Eeport to the Hydro- 
grapher of the Admu-alty on some of the Eesults of the Cruise of H. M. S- 
" Challenger" between Hawaii and Valparaiso, and on the voyage of the 
" Challenger" from the Falkland Islands to Monte Video, and a Position ia lat. 
32° 24' S. long. 13°o' W. J. Murray. — On work done on board the " Challen- 
ger." S. N. Moseley. — On the true Corals dredged by H. M. S. " Challenger." 
Dr. R. von Willembes-Szihm. — On Observations made during the earlier part of 
the voyage of H. M. S. " Challenger." On Crustacea observed diu-ing the 
Cruise of H. M. S. " Challenger" in the Southern Sea. J. Y. Buchanan. — 
On work (Chemical and Geological) done on board H. M. S. " Challenger." 

Vol. 25, No. 171. F. S. B. Frangois de Chaumont.- — Supplementary Note on the 
Theory of Ventilation. /. Thomson. — On the Origin of Windings of Eivera 
in Alluvial Plains with Remarks on the Flow of Water round Bends in Pipes. 
G. J. Romanes. — On the Modification of the Excitability of Motor Nerves pro- 
duced by Injury. W. D. Niven. — On the Calculation of the Trajectories of 
Shot. J. A. Broun. — On Simultaneous Variations of the Barometer in India. 
Supplementary Note on Simultaneous Barometric Variations. Frof. W. G. 
Williamson. — On the Organization of the Fossil Plants of the Coal-measures. 
Royal Geographical Society, — Proceedings, Vol. 20, Nos. 5 and 6. 



No. 5. Sir S. C. Rawlinson. — Address at the Anniversary Meeting. 
No. 6. Shaw. — A Prince of Kashghar on the Geography of Eastern Turkistan. 
Moscow. Societe Imperiale des Naturalistes de Moscou, — Bulletin, No. 1, 
1876. 

V. Kessler. — Ein neuer russischer Flusskrebs, Astacus colchictts. R. Ludwig. — 
Fossils Pflanzen aus der Steinkohlenformation im Lande der Donschen Kosa- 
ken. A. FLudendorff. — •Beitrag zur Kenntniss der Siisswasser-CladocerenEuss- 
lands. .S. Otcen. — On Fetrophryne granulata, Ow., a Labyi'inthodont. 

Palermo. Societa degli Spettroscopisti Italiani, — Memorie, Dispensa 8, 
Agosto, 1876. 



1876.] Library. 233 

Paris. Journal Asiatique, — 7tli Serie, Tome 7, Nos. 2 and 3. 

No. 2. M. J. Halevy. — Nouvelles considerations sur la syllataire cimeiforme. 

. Societe de Geographie, — Bulletin, Juillet, Aout, Septembre, 1876. 

Juillet. V. A. Malte-Bnm. — Voyage en Eussie au Caucase et en Perse, dans 

la Mesopotamie, le Kurdistan, la Syrie, la Palestine, et la Turquie, par M. le 

chevalier Lycklama a Nijeholt. 
Aout. J. B. Paqueri. — Itineraire de Marco Polo a travers la region du Pamir 

au XIII® siecle. I'Abbe Besgodins, — Le cours superieur des fleuves de 1' Indo- 

Chine. 
Septembre. VAhhe Besgodins. — Notice sur le Thibet. 

PhiladelpMa. The Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia, — Pro- 
ceedings, Pts. I, II, and III, 1875. 

Pt. 1. /. Leidy. — On a Fungus in a Flamingo. Notes on some Parasitic 
Worms. Remarks on some Marine Ehizopods. Remarks on Elephant re- 
mains. B. B. Willard. — Effects of Cold on Iron. E. B. Cojoe, — On the 
Homologies of the Sectorial Tooth of Camivora. The Feet of Batlienodon, 
S. C. Chapman. — On the Disposition of the Great Omentum in Cynoce]yhalus 
porcarins, &c. 

Pt. II. E. B. Cope. — On Fossil Lemurs and Dogs. On the Antelope-Deer of 
the Santa Fe Marls. On some new Fossil Ungulata. The Phylogeny of the 
Camels. On an Extinct Vulturine Bu'd. C. N. Pierce. — Living organisms 
in the Pulp Cavity of Teeth. T. Median. — Influence of Nutrition on Form. 
S. R. Roberts. — Compressed Peat. /. Willcox. — On the Flight of Grasshop- 
pers. Wm. M. Gabb. — Genesis of Cassidaria Striata, Lam, 

Pt. III. /. Leidy. — Quercus heterophylla. T. Meeh'an. — Natural Hybrids : 
Quercus heterophylla. Hybrid Juglans ; Hybrids of Pyrns Sinensis. Quercus 
heterophylla. I£. C. Chapman. — On TricUocephalus affinis, Dies. On the Castor 
Glands of the Bever. Observations on the Structure of the Manatee. E. B. 
Cope. — On the supposed Camivora of the Eocene of the Rocky Mountains. 
J. Willcox. — On Mineral Localities in N. Carolina. 

Eoorkee. Professional Papers on Indian Engineering, — Vol. V, No. 22, 
1877. 

Railway in Johore. Construction of Lightning Conductors. Fin-ther Notes on 
Indian Cements. 
Salem, Mass. The American Naturalist, — Vol. 8, Nos. 1 to 2, and 4 to 13, 
1874, Vol. 9, Nos. 1 to 12, 1875. 

. The Peabody Academy of Science, — Memoirs. Vol. 1, No. 4. 

Stockholm. Kongl. Svenska Vetenskaps Akademiens Handlingar, — Bihang 
Bandet 3, Hiifte 1. 

H. Theel. — Recherches surle Phascolion (Phascolosoma) Strombi (Mont.). E'tudes 
sur Ics Gcphjaicns incrmcs des mcrs do la Scandinavio du Spitzbcrg ct du 
Grocnland. 

. . Ofversigt, Vol. 32, 1875. 

. . . Handlingar, A^ol. 11, 1872. 

C. Stiil. — Enumcratio Jlemipterorum, Bidrag till en fbrtcckning ofver alia hittills 
kiinda llomiptcra jcmtc systcmatiska meddelanden. F. A. Smitt. — Floridun 



234 Library. [Dec 

Bryozoa collected by Count L. F. de Pourtales, G, 0. Sars. — Beskrivelse af 
syv aye Cumaceer fra Vestindien og det Syd-Atlantiske Ocean. Om Cumaceer 
£ra de store Dybder i Nordishafvet. S. Loven. — E'tudes sur les Ech.iiioidees. 
. ■ . Meteoroloo-iska Jakttae-elser i Sverigrc, Vol. 15 ,'1873. 



Vienna. K. K. Zoologiscli-botanisclie Gesellschaft, — Verhandlungen, Band 
25, 1875. 

. K, K. Geologische Eeielisanstalt — Jahrbuch, Band 26, No. 1, 

1876. 

I>r. R. V. Drasche. — Weitere Bemerkimgen iiber die Geologie von Reunion und 
Mauritius. Dr. E. V. Neminar. — Die Krystallfonn des Barytocolestins. 
. . Verhandlungen, Nos. 1 to 6, 1876. 



■ . Anthropologische Gesellsctiaft, — Mittheilungen, Band V. 

. Verein zur Verbreitung Natui'wissenscbaftlicber Kenntnisse in 

Wien, Schriften, Band 16, 1875-76. 
Washington. The United States Geological and Geographical Survey of 

the Territories, — Bulletin, Nos. 5 and 6, Vol. II, No. 1. 

EooKS AND Pamphlets 
presented hy AiotJiors. 

BrEMEiSTEE, De. Heemak. Die fossilen Pferde der Pampasformation. 

Folio, Buenos Aires, 1875. 
' . Description Physique de la Eepublique Argentine d' apres des 

observations personneUes et E'trangers. Tome 1, 8vo, Paris, 1876. 
DAiiii, W. H. Report on Mount Saint Elias, Mount Fairweather, and 

some o£ the adjacent Mountains. Pamphlet. 
• . Report of Geographical and Hydi-ographical Explorations on the 

coast of Alaska. Pamphlet. 
■ . Harbours of Alaska and the Tides and Currents in their Vicinity. 



Pamphlet. 

From the- Rev. Mr. Dall, 24 Maps of new surveys of North-Western 
America. 

GoDWiK-AusTEN, Major H. H. and Aethue, Viscount Walden. Descrip- 
tion of some supposed new Sj)ecies of Birds. Pamphlet. 

HuEEO Peesatjd Chatteejee, Babu. Observations on Rent Law. Pam- 
phlet. 

PiCKEEnsTG, Chaeles, M. D. The Geographical Distribution of Animals and 
Plants, Pt. II. Plants in their wild state. Folio, Salem, Mass., 1876. 

Tacchiki, p. II Passagio di Venere sul Sole dell' 8-9 Dicembre 1874, 
osservato a Muddapur nel Bengala. 4to. Palermo, 1875. 

Tatloe, William, B. A. Notice of Recent researches on Sound. Pam- 
phlet. 

Thomas, Edwaed. Bactrian Corns and Indian Dates. 



1876.] Lihranj. 233 

Miscellaneous Presentations. 

Memorandum descriptive of the route between Sohar"and El Bereymee 
in Oman with route Map prepared by Lieutenant-Colonel S. B. Miles, Pol. 
Agent, Muscat. 

Report on a visit to the Hot Springs o£ Bosher and Ghullas in the 
Kingdom of Oman by Surgeon C. T. Peters, M. B. 

FOEEIGN DePT., GoVEEIOIEIirT OP LsDLA.. 

Eeport of the Proceedings of the Second International Congress of 
OrientaHsts held in London, 1874. 

The Indian Antiquary, Vol. V, Pts. 59 and 60, October and Novem- 
ber, 1876. 

Fallon", S. W. Dr. A new Hindustani-English Dictionary, Pt. V, 
Sept. 1876. 

The Yajur Veda Sanhita, Nos. 22 and 23. 

Home Dept., G-oteenment of Iitoia. 
Report on the Census of Travancore, 1874-75. 

Prince Rama Vaena of Teavancoee. 
Report on the Police of the Lower Provinces of the Bengal Presiden- 
cy for the year 1875. 

Geant, J. G. Dr. Annual Rej)ort on Emigration from the Port of 
Calcutta to British and Foreign Colonies for 1875-76. 

Govbenment of Bengal. 
Repoi*t on Public Instruction in the Madras Presidency for 1874-75, 
No. 51." 

Annual Report of the Madras Medical College, Session 1875-76, No. 53. 

Goteenment of Madeas. 
Report on the Administration of the Central Provinces for the year 
1875-76. 

Report on the Administration of the land Revenue Department of the 
Central Provinces for the half year ending 30th September, 1875. 

Report on the Excise Revenue in the Central Provinces for the year 
1875-76. 

Chief Commissionee, Centeal Peottnces. 
Records of the Geological Survey of India, Vol. 9, Pts. 2 and 3. 

Dept. of Revenue, Ageicultttre and Commerce. 
A Catalogue of Sanskrit MSS. existing in Audh discovered from the 
1st January 1875 to 31st March, 1875. 

DiEECTOE OF Public Insteuctton, Audh. 
ScnwENDLEE, L. Instructions for the Electrical Testing of Lines and 
Offices, Pts. II and III, Section II, with Appendix. 

Offg. Die. Gknl. of Telegraphs in India. 



236 Xiibrary. [Dec. 

The Commentaries of tlie Grreat Afonso D'Alboquerque, second Viceroy 
of India, by W. de Gray Birch, published by the Hakluyt "Society. 

The Right Hon'ble The Seceetart oe State eoe Ikdia. 

Voyage autour du Monde sur la Fregate Suedoise L' Etigenie, execute 
pendant les Annees 1851-53 sous le commandement de C. A. Virgin. Phy- 
sique III. 

L' Acade'mie Eotale des Sciences a Stockholm. 

Annual Report of the Director of the Mint to the Secretary of the 
Treasiuy for the fiscal year ended June 30fch, 1875. 

Sixth Annual Report of the Trustees of the Peabody Academy of 
Science for the year 1875. 

Peabodt Academy oe Sciekce. 

Descriptive Catalogue of the Photographs of the U. S. Geological Sur- 
vey of the Territories for the years 1866 to 1875, inclusive. W. H. 
Jackson, Photographer. 

F. V. Hatden, U. S. Geological Sfrtet. 

Report of the Director of the Central Park Menagerie. 

Director of the Museum. 

Gulistan-i-Lughat wa Shabistan-i-Nukat. 

Nawab ISTizam-ud-Daulah, late Diwan oe Jodhpue. 

Droit Musulman, Recueil des lois concernant les Musulmans Schyites. 
Par A. Querry, Tome 1 and 2, (Dupl.) 

Dictionnaire Turc Oriental, destine principalment a faciliter la lecture 
des ouvrages de Baber, d' Aboul-gazi et de Mir-Ali-Chir-Nevai. Par M. 
Pavet de Courteille. 

Grammaire de la Langue Chinoise, orale et ecrite. Par Paul Perny, 
M. A. 

Dictionnaire Fran9ais-Latin-Chinois de la Langue Mandarine parlee. 
Par Paul Perny, M. A. 

Appendice du Dictionnaire Fran^ais-Latin-Chinois de la Langue Man- 
darine parlee. Par Paul Perny, M. A. 

Dictionnaire Geographique, historique et litteraire de la Perse et des 
contrees adjacentes. Par C. Barbier de Meynard. 

Extrait de 1' histoire des Mongols de Raschid-Eldin. (Texte Persan.) 

Histoire des Sultans du Kharezm, par Mirkhond. 

Prolegomenes des Tables Astronomiques D'Uloug-Beg. Par M. L. P. 
E. A. Sedillot. 

Histoire des Sassanides, par Mirkhond. (Texte Persan.) 

Vie de Djenghiz-Khan, par Mirkhond. (Texte Persan.) 

Extraits D'Ali-Chir. (Texte Turc Oriental.) 

Lettres et Pieces Diplomatiques ecrites en Malay, recueilHes et publiees 
pour servir d'exercises de lecture et de traduction, Fasc. 1. 



1876.] Library. 237 

Eeformes Necessaires aux etats Musulmans, Essai par le General 
Klieredine, Tunis. 

Peof. C. Schefek, 

Periodicals Purchased. 

Banaras. A new Hindustani-Englisli Dictionary by Dr. S. W. Fallon, Pt. 

V. 1876. 
Berlin. Journal fiir die reine \md angewandte Mathematik, Band 82, 
Heft. 1. 

G. Erdmann, — UelDer mistetige Lbsungen in der Variationsreclmxmg. Th, 
Eeye. — TJeber lineare Systeme und Gewebe von Flaclien zweiten Grades. 
Calcutta. The Indian Medical Gazette, Yol. 9, No. 11, 1876. 
Cambridge. The Messenger of Mathematics, No. 65, 1876. 

E. B. Elliott. — Note on a class of Definite Integrals. /. W, L. GlaisJier. — On 
a Numerical continued Product. 
Gottingen. Gottingische Gelehrte Anzeigen, Stiicke 26 to 34, und Nach- 
richten, Stiicke 11 to 16, 1876. 

NachricMen, Stiick 13. Benfey. — Jajhjliatis. Eigveda, V. 52, 6. 
London. The Academy,— Nos. 226 to 235, 1876. 

• . The Annals and Magazine of Natui'al History; — Vol. 18, Nos. 

104 and 105, 1876. 

No. 104. A. G. Butler. — On a small collection of Lepidoptera from Cape York 
and th.e south-east coast of New Guinea. G. E. Eobson. — Observations on 
Dr. Severtzoff's " Mammals of Turkistan." P. S. Abraham. — Notes on some 
Genera of Nudibranchiate Mollusca, "witb Notices of a new Genus and of some 
hitherto imdescribod Species in the collection of the British Museimi. Dr. 
N. Severtzoff. — The Mammals of Tm-kistan. H. J. Carter. ■ Parkeria inferred 
to have been a species of Ilydractinia. M, A. Giard. — On a new kind of 
Tsorospermia (Lithocystis SchneideriJ, parasitic in Echinocardium cordatum. 
Prof. 0. C. Marsh. — Notice of a new Suborder of Pterosaur ia. 
No. 105. A. Steelcer. — The Development of the Ova of Chthonius in the Body 
of the Mother, and the Formation of the Blastoderm. Br. N. Severtzoff. — 
The Mammals of Turkistan. S. J. Carter. — Descriptions and Figures of 
Deep-Sea Sponges and their Spicules, from the Atlantic Ocean, dredged upon 
board H. M. S. "Porcupine" chiefly ia 1869. /. C. Schwdte.— On fke 
Structure of the Mouth ia Sucking Crustacea. G. E. Bobsoii. — ■Monograph of 
the Asiatic Chiroptera and Catalogue of the Species of Bats in the collection of 
the Indian Museum, Calcutta. 

The Chemical News,— Yol. 33, Nos. 811 to 866, and Yol. 31, Nos. 



867 to 876. 

Vol. 34, No. 875. M. Gicibourt.— 'Notice on the Oil of Wood. 

. The Journal of Botany,— Yol. Y, Nos. 157 to 165. 

No. 167. II. F. Ranee. — On an Asiatic Ceidrolepis — On the HuskL^ss Walnuts 
of North China. S. C. Sorby. — On the Colouring Matter associated \n\ih. 

ChloropJiyll, 



238 Library. [Dec. 

No. 1'58. S. Kurz. — On the Species of GUjcosmis. S. F. Sance. — Two new 
Hongkong Orchids. 

No. 159. W. G. Smith. — New and Eare Hymenomycetons Fungi. J. G. 
Bake): — On Two New Amaryllidacece from Natal. On the Genus Syringodea, 
Hook. fil. W. B. Semsley. — The Apetalous Fuchsias of South America with 
Descriptions of four new Species. A. H. Church. — Some Contributions to 
Plant- Chemistry. 

Nos. 160 and 161. Prof. A. de Bary. — Researches into the Natui-e of the Po- 
tato — Fungus, Phytophthora infestans. 

No. 163. W. B. Semsley. — Notes on some Chinese Plants, with Descriptions 
of a few New Species, H. F. Sance. — On a Mongolian Grass prodiicing In- 
toxication in Cattle. 

Nos. 164 and 165. S. F. Sance. — Corolla Pierreana ; sive Stu'pium Camhodia- 
narum a. cl. L. Pierre horti hot, Saigonensis praeposito lectarum Eclogae, 
Pev. J. M. Gromhie. — New Lichens fi'om the Island of Rodi-iguez. 
. Journal of the Society of Arts,— Vol. 24, Nos. 1235 to 1242. 



Nos. 1235, and 1236. W. M. Williams. — Ii-on and Steel Manufacture. 

No. 1237. On the Amalgamation of Iron and of some other Metals. 

No. 1238. New Galvanic Battery. 

— . Medicinal Plants,— Pts. 1 to 11, 1875 and 1876. 
— . The Numismatic Chronicle,— Pt. II, 1876. 



F. W. Madden. — Jewish Numismatics. 
New Haven. The American Journal of Science and Arts, — -Vol. 12, Nos. 
67 and 68, July and August, 1876. 

No. 67. F. Loomis. — Contributions to Meteorology, being results derived from 
an examination of the Observations of the U. S. Signal Service, and from other 
souices. W. G. Farlow. — On a Disease of OKve and Orange Trees, occurring 
in California in the Spring and Summer of 1875. G. B. Grinnell. — On a new 
Crinoid from the Cretaceous formation of the West. 
No. 68. B. G. Wilder. Note on the development and homologies of the anterior 
brain-mass with Sharks and Skates. A. S. Kimball. — On some of the changes 
in the Physical Properties of Steel produced by Tempering. Z. M. Muther- 
furd. — A Glass circle for the Measm-ement of Angles. 

Paris. Annals de Chimie et de Physique, — Tome 8, 5™^ Serie, Juillet at 
Aout. 1876. 

Juillet. M. C. Bernard. — Critique expeiimentale sur la formation de la matiere 
sucree dans les animaux. M. Berlin. — Sur le radiometre de M. Crookes. 

. Comptes Rendus,— Tome 83, Nos. 2 to 9, 1876. 

No. 2. P. Secchi. — Nouvelles remarques sur la question du deplacement des 
raies spectrales du au mouvement propre des'astres. M. Ledieu. — Bxamen des 
nouveUes methodes proposees pour la recherche de la position du navire a la 
mer. M. Bazin. — Experiences de mesurage de vitesse faites a Eoorkee (Inde 
Anglaise) par M. Allan Cunningham. M. G. Sayem. — Des caracteres anato- 
miques du sang dans les anemies. M. S.-Ch. Bastian. — Influence des forces 
physico-chimiques sur les phenomenes de fermentation. 
No. 3. M. L. Pasteur. — Note sur la fermentation des fruits et sur la diffusion 
des germes des levui-es alcooliques. Note sur 1' alteration de I'ui-ine a propos 



1876.] Lilrcmj. 239 

d'mie CommtLnication du Dr. Bastian de Londres. M. du Moncel. — Quatrieme 
Note stir les transmissions electriques a travers le sol. M. C. Susson. — Ee- 
cherche et dosage de la fuclisine et de I'arsenie dans les vins qui ont subi une 
coloration artificielle par la fuchsine. M. G. Sayem. — Des caracteres anato- 
miques du sang dans les anemies. M. A. Bechamp. — Sur les microzymaa 
vesicaux comme cause de la fermentation ammoniacale de 1' urine a propos 
d'une Note de MM. Pasteur et Jonbert. 

No. 4. M. Edm. Beequerel. — Sur 1' observation de la partie infra-rouge du spec- 
tre solaire an moyen des effets de phosphorescence. M. A. Bechamp. — Sur la 
theorie de la fermentation et sur I'origine des zymases a propos d'une Note de 
MM. Pasteur et Joubert. M. Larrey presente de la part de M. Minich un 
Memoire, " Siu- la cure antiseptique des plaies et sur I'emploi d'une nouveau 
mode de pansement. 

No. 5. M. Til. du Moncel. — Cinqiueme Note siu- les transmissions electriques 
a travers le sol. M. Normand. — •'Sur la maladie dite " diaiThee de Cochin- 
chine." M. IE. Ch, Bastian. — Note sur la fermentation de I'urine a propos 
d'une Communication de M. Pasteur. M. Tyndall. — Observations relatives 
aux opinions attribuees par M. Bastian a M. Tyndall a propos de la doctrine 
des generations spontanees. 

No. 6. M. L. Pasteur. — Sur 1' alteration de I'urine. Eeponse a M. Bastian. 
M. Normand adi^esse sur Note relative au Nematoide dont la presence parait 
etre la cause de la diarrhee de Cochinchine. M. Kouzeau. — Sur le dosage do 
I'acide carbonique contenu dans les eaux (eaux d' irrigation, de drainage, de 
sources, de rivieres, &c.,) M. Ad. Carrot. — Sur un nouveau precede de recherche 
qualitative et de dosage de la potasse. 

No. 7. MM. Paoli et de Pietra-Santa adressent une serie de documents concer- 
nant leurs travaux sur les maladies par ferment morbifique. 

No. 8. M. Bourhouze. — Eegulature electriquc pour entretenir le movement du 
pendule. 

No. 9. M. Th. du Moncel. — Sixieme Note sur les transmissions electriques a 
travers le sol. M. L. Fautrat. — De 1' influence des forets de pins sur la quan- 
tite de pline que re(,'oit une contree siu- I'etat hygrometrique de I'air et sur 
I'etat du sol. 
Paris, Journal des Savants, — Juillet, 187G. 

MM. B. Saint-Hilaire. — Inspection archeologique de I'lnde. 

. Eevue Archeologique, — Vol. VIII, Aout. 1876. 

. Revue des deux Mondes, Vol. 16, Livraison 2, 3, 4, Vol. 17, Livrai- 

son 1, 1876. 

Vol. 16, Liv. 2. M. R. Eadau. — Les routes de I'avcnii- a travers I'Asie et les 
giscmcns houHlers de la Chine. 

Liv. 3. M. le Comte G. d'Alviella. — La IMission de I'Angleterre dans I'lndc, 
progrea moral et materiel do la colonio. M. M. Chevalier. — La nouvcUe depre- 
ciation de I'argent et le double etalon. 
. lievue Critique. Nos. 29 to 32, 1876. 



No. 31. Burnell.—'L' dcolo Aindi-a de grammaiiicns hindous. 
— . llovuc et Magasin de Zoologie. Tome 4<, 3« Scrie, No. 5, 1876. 
Fiebcr et, Iticbcr. — Cicadines d' Euiope. 



240 Ziihrary. 

Trieste. Societa Adriatica de Scienze naturali — Bollettino No. 2, Annata 2. 
StossicJi. — La " Theoria Gastraea," de Haickel. Br. C. Marchcsetti. — Recordi 
d'un "viaggio alle Indie orientali. Profili della flora indiana. Un nuovo 
documento preistorico trovato nell' India. 

jBooKS Purchased. 

Beenstein, Julius, The five senses of Man, 8vo. London, 1876. 

Douglas, R. K. Transactions of the Second Session of the International 
Congress of Orientalists held in London in September 1874, Royal Svo. 
London, 1876. 

GrOEDOisr, LiEUT.-CoLONEL, T. E. The Eoof of the World being the Nar- 
rative of a Journey over the Jiigh Plateau of Tibet to the Russian Fron- 
tier and the Oxus Sources of Pamir, Aio. Edinburgh, 1876. 

GwiLT, Joseph. An Encyclopaedia of Architecture, Historical, Theoreti- 
cal and Practical. Revised, with alterations and considerable additions, 
by Wyatt Papworth. New Edition, Svo. London, 1876. 

Haeckel, Eejstst. The History of Creation : or the Development of the 
Earth and its inhabitants by the action of Natural Causes. A popular 
exposition of the doctrine of Evolution in general, and of that of Darwin, 
Goethe, and Lamarck in particular. The Translation revised by Profes- 
sor E. Ray Laukester, 2 volumes, Svo. London, 1876. 

OsBOEN, R. D. Islam under the Arabs, Svo. London, 1876. 

Saint-Maetik, ViTiEis" DE. Etude sur la Geographie et les pojxilations 
primitives du Nord-Ouest de I'lnde, d'apres les hymnes Vidiques 
precedee d'un aper9u de I'etat actuel des etudes sur I'lnde Ancienne, Svo. 
Paris, 1S60. 

Whitakee, W. The Geological Record for 1874. An account of works 
of Geology, Mineralogy, and Palseontology, published during the year, 
Svo. London, 1875. 

White, Gilbeet. Natural History and Antiquities of Selborne, with 
notes by F. Buckland, and a chaj)ter on Antiquities by Lord Selborne, 
and New Letters, 2 volumes. Royal 4to. London, 1876. 

Wood, Heebeet, Major, R. E. The Shores of Lake Aral, Svo. London, 
1876. 

WooDWAED, B. B. and W. L. R. Cates. Encyclopsedia of Chronology, 
Historical and Biographical, Svo. London, 1872. 

WuESTENEELD, F. Das Gcograpliische Worterbuch des Abu-'Obeid 'Abdal- 
lah-ben-'Abd-el-'Aziz el-Bekri, Band 1, Hiilfte 1, Svo. Gottingen and 
Paris, 1876. 



INDEX 



TO 



PROCEEDmaS, ASIATIC SOCIETY OF BENGAL, 
FOK 1876. 



Abdul Latif Khan Bahadur, Maulawi, Member of Phil. Committee, 
Aborigines. The Angami Nagas, 11 ; Maiwar Bhils, 
Accommodation of the Society u.nder New Museum Act, 
Account, abstracts of, 
Agni Purana, ... ... 

Aitarey a Aran y aka, 

Akbarnamah, ... ... ... ' 

Alethopteris Lindleycma, Indica, Whithjensis, 2inA phegopteroides, 
Ampliistoma lio minis, 



Anderson, (.J. Dr.), elected Member of Committees and Coimcil, 171, 202 

Angami Nagas and their language, on the, ... - ... 11 

Aimual Meeting, 1876, and Eeport of the Council, ... 17 

Anoura, ... ... "... ... 175 

Antenna, Development of the, in Pectinicorn limit idee, ... 228 

Apcar, (G. G. Mr.), presentation by, of a Ilyalonema SieholdU, ... 111< 

Armstrong, (J. Dr.), Member, Natural History Committee, ... 50 

Arthropoda, wQ-w io l\\(\.m, ... ... ... 17-1< 

Ai'row heads, iron, from Sind, ... ... ... 116 

Asiatic Fire Weapons, on early, ... ... 93 

Astacidce, from New Zealand, On the systematic position of the, ... 4* 

Astacoides tridentatus, ... ... ... ib. 

Atmospheric Pressure, Irregularities of, in the Indian Monsoon region, 117 

Bull, (V. Mr.), Member of Committees, ... ... 50 

„ exhibits Khond weapons, and musical instruments 

from Sambalpur, ... ... 114 

,, On an Ancient Kitcben-midden at Chaudwai", ... 120 

„ On Stone Implements found in Orissa, ... 122 



Page 

50 

32 

59,73 

siii. 

27 

ih. 

ib. 

226 

182 



242 Index. 

Page 

Banei-jea, (K. M. Eev.,) Member of Philological Committee, ... 50 

„ „ on Human Sacrifices in Ancient India, ... 53 

Baness, (J. T. Mr.), election of, ... ... 101 

Bayley, (The Hon'ble E. C), Member of Committees, ... 49, 50 

,j „ on Human Sacrifices in Ancient India, 55 

J, „ elected President, ... ... 73 

„ „ exhibits Cilician, Sassanian, Parthian, 

and Scythian coins, ... 219 

Beames, (J. Mr.), Member of Philological Committee, ... 50 

Behrendt, (J. Mr.), election of, ... ... 101 

JBelemnopteris, ... ... ... ... 226 

Bengal, Invasion of, by the Chola King Ktilottunga, . . . 107 

Beveridge, (H. Mr.), elected an ordinary Member, ... 202 

„ Were the Sundarbans inhabited in Ancient Times ? ... 93 

Beverley, (H. Mr.), on the Sundarbans, ... ... 94 

„ „ on the Census of Calcutta, ... ... Ill 

Bhamati, ... ... ... ... 27 

Bhils of Maiwar, ... ... ... 32 

Bibliotheca Indica, Eeport on, ... ... ... 24 

Birds, from Dafla Hills and Darrang Terai, List of, 119, 223. 

Blanford, (H. F. Mr.), on the Sundarbans, ... ... 94 

„ „ on the residue of the Piddington Fund, ... 104 
,, „ On certain protracted Irregularities of At- 
mospheric Pressure in the Indian Mon- 
soon Region, and their relation to vari- 
ations of the Local Rainfall, ... 117 
J, „ An atcount of Ex]3eriments made in 1875 
and 1876 in various parts of India for 
the pm'jDOse of comparing the observed. 
TemjDerature of the Dew-point with that 
computed from the Psychrometer by 
different methods of reduction, . . . 119 
J, „ On the physical explanation of the inequality 
of the two semi-diurnal Oscillations of 
Barometric Pressure,... ... 176 

„ „ on synoptical weather charts, ... 218 

Blanford, (W. T. Mr.), Member of Committees and Council, ... 49, 73 

„ „ remarks on the habits of Wild Pigs, . . .' 92 

,, „ election of, as Vice-President, ... ib. 

■ „ „ on the Sundarbans, ... ... 94 

„ „ exhibits some iron arrow-heads from Sind, 116 



Index. 2i3 

Fage 
Blanford, (W. T. Mr.) Description of a new cat (Felis Sliawiana) 

from Eastern Turkistan, . . . 12^! 
„ „ on tlie Physical Geography of the Great 
Indian Desert with special reference 
to the former presence of the Sea in 
the Indus Valley and the origin and 

mode of formation of the Sand-hiUs, . . . 141 

„ „ on the Inhabitants of the Nicobars, ... 119 
„ „ exhibits di-awings by Capt. E. Mockler, 
Guadar, of Ancient Dwellings and 

Tombs near Guadar in Baluchistan, . . . 172 
„ „ description of Felomys Watsoni, a new 

species of mouse from Sind, .,, 181 

Blochmanu, (H. Mr.), nominated Trustee of the Indian Museum, .. . 4S 
„ „ readings of Arabic and Persian Inscriptions 

from Dihli, E-ohtas, and Sahasram, ... 4 

„. „ remarks on a silver coin of Shahjahan II, ... 139 

„• „ on Dr. Scully's coins from Kashghar, ... 90 

„ „ on coins presented by Dr. Oldham, ... 69 

Bourne, (Walter Mr.), withdrawal of, ... ... 70 

Bowie, (M. M. Major), election of, ... ... 202 

Bradshaw, (A. F. Sui-geon-Major), election of, ... ... 89 

Brooks, (W. E. Mr.), Member, Natural History Committee, ... 50 
Brough, (R. S. Mr.), Member of Committees, ... ... 49, 50 

Buckland, (C. T. Mr.), Avithdrawal of, ... . ... 135 

Burnell, (Dr.), on the Invasion of Bengal by Kulottunga, ... 107 

Butler, (J. Capt.), on the Angami Nagas andtheii* language, ... 11 

„ „ death of, ... ... ... 12 

Bye-laws, proposed alterations of the, ... 164, 203, 205 

Bysack, (Gaur Das, Babu) , Member of Philological Committee, ... 50 

Cappel, (A. Mr.), Member of Physical Science Committee, ... ib. 

Carnegy, (P. T. Mr.), election of, ... ... 160 

Carrington, (R. A. Mr.), withdrawal of, ... ... 202 

Cat, new, from Eastern Turkistan, ... ... 124 

Cayley, (H. Dr.), election of, ... ... ... 202 

Census of the Town of Calcutta, results of, ... ... Ill 

Ceratomantis Scmssurii, ... ... ... 175 

Chaturvarga Chintamani, ... ... ... 27 

Coin Cabinet, Report on, and Committee, ... ... 23, 50 

Coins, Chinese and Muhammadan, from Kashghar, ... 90 

„ copper from Vigu Kot, Kachh, ... ... 69 



244 Index. 

Page 

Coins, gold, old Dutcli and Venetian, from Baidyanatli Temple, ... 69 

„ gold, struck by Muhammad-bin-Tughluq, ... ... 91 

„ gold, unique o£ Na^ir-uddin Mahmud Sliah, ... ih, 

„ silver, of Shahjalian II, ... ... ... 139 

„ Sassanian, Parthian, Cilician, and of Kanishka, 219, 220 

Committees, nomination of, ... ... ... 49 

Composiice Indicce, Statement by tbe Council with reference to Mr. 

C. B. Clarke's Introductory Note to his, ... ... 161 

Compounding Fee, Eeport on introduction of, ... ... 194 

Congress of Orientalists, programme of 3rd, ... ... 50 

Coiincil, election of, ... ... ... 31 

„ Memorandum on the Repairs of the Society's premises, ... 161 

„ resolution on Dr. Oldham's resignation of the Presidentship, 71 

„ on Mr. C. B. Clarke's " Com^wsitcB Indic<s'\ ... 161 

„ on the rejection of a Honorary Member, ... ... 3 . 

Coxhead, (T. E. Mr.), election of, ... ... 70 

Cra\vfurd, (J. Mr.), election of, ... ... 47 

Creobrota, ... ... ... ... 175 

Cunningham, (A. Major- General), Member of Committees, ... 50 

„ „ exhibits a coin of Shahjahan II., 138 

„ ,, Inscriptions from Sahasram, &c. 10 

Cunningham, (D. D. Dr.), Member of Committees, ... 49 

CycZosi^OHiffcm of the Dafla Hills, Assam, ... ... 180 

Dall, (C. H. Rev.), on Measurement of Mt. St. Elias, Alaska, ... 1 

Damba Koh, Makran, ancient dwellings and tombs at, ... 173 

Darmani ban, near Damba Koh, ... ... ih. 

Day, (F. Dr.), letter relating to the Stoliczka Memorial, ... 78 
Deed of Release by the Council on receipt of Rs. 150,000 from 

Government, ... ... ... 75 

Denkenal, Stone implement from, ... ... 122 

Desert, Physical Geography of the Great Indian, ... ... 141 

Dijendra Nath Thakur, (Babu) Member of Philological Committee, 50 

Dobson, (Dr.), letter relating to the Stoliczka Memorial, ... 78 
Durgai'ama Basu, (Babu) translation of a copper-plate grant of 

Govindachandra of Kanauj by, ... ... 130 

Elliott, (J. Mr.), Member of Committees, ... ... 117- 

Eosin, influence of, on the Photographic Action of the Solar Spec- 
trum upon the Bromide and Bromoiodide of Silver, ... 12 
Farhang-i-Rashidl, completed, ... ... ... 24 

Feistmantcl, (Dr. 0.), election of, ... ... 2 

;, „ Member of Committees, ... ,,, 49 



Index. 245 

Page 
Feistmantel, (Dr. 0.), on Fossil Plants from tlie Damudar Series in 

the Eaniganj coal-fields, ... 223 

Felis (Ghaus) caudata and Slicnviana, ... ... 124 

Finance, Report on, and nomination of Committee, ... 19, 49 

Foulkes, (Thos. Eev.), election of, ... ... 135 

Gangamo'pteris Whittiana, ... ... ... 226 

GastreU, (J. E. Col.), Life Member of the Society, ... 77 
„ „ vote of thanks to, for long services rendered 

to the Society, ... ... ih. 

Gay, (E. Mr.), Member of Finance Committee, ... ... 49 

„ „ resignation of membership of Comieil, ... 73 

Geoghegan, (J. Mr.), Member of Library Committee, ... 49 

Ghalchah (Wakhi and Sarikoli) Languages on the, .. 79 
Glossopteris communis^ ... ... 224, 227 

„ cmgustifolia, ... ... ... ih. 

Grierson, (G. A. Mr.), election of, ... "... 202 
Godwui- Austen, (H. H. Major), List of Birds collected diu-ing the 

expedition into the Dafla 
Hills, Asam, together with 
those obtained in the adja- 
cent DiTrrang Terai, . . . 119 
„ „ On the Cgclostomacea of the 

Dafla Hills, Asam, ... ISO 
„ „ Fifth list' of Birds from the N. 

E. Frontier, • ... 223 
„ jj Oil the HelicidcB collected du- 
ring the Dafla Expedition, 228 
GongyJus gongylodes, ... ... ... ih. 

Govindachandra of Kanauj, copj)er-plate grant of, ... 130 

Grote, (A. Mr.), letter relating to the Stoliczka Memorial, ... 78 

Growse, (F. S. Mr.), Member of Philological Committee, ... 50 

„ „ the Prologue to the Kamayana of Tulsi Das,... 81 

„ „ presentation b}^ of a copper-plate grant of 

Govindachandra of Kanauj, ... 130 

Guadar in Baluchistan, ancient dwellings and tombs near, ... 172 

Hamirpur District in Bundelkhaiid, Popular Songs, 33, 187 

Hector, (J. Mr.), election of, ... ... ... 160 

„ ,, withdrawal of, .. . ... ... 202 

jgr«:'//c<Vfe, from the Dafla Hills, ... ... ... 228 

Jleviionifis cordata, ... ... ... 226 

Sestias £nmneriana, ,., ... ... 175 



246 



Index. 



Seterorrhina annectans, ... .,, 

„ Roepstorjli, 

Ilierodula, 

Human Sacrifices in Ancient India, 

Hume, (A. 0. Mr.), Member, Natural History Committee, 

Hyalonema Sieholdii, 

lajjyx gigas, Saussurii, soHfugus, and Wollastoiii, 

l9abali, 

Indian Museum Act, on proposed changes in the, ... 

„ negociations with Government of India for 

abandomnent by the Society of accom- 
modation in the. 

International Oriental Congress at St. Petersbiu'g, List of Questions 
to be discussed, ... ... 50, 

Isaac (T. S. Mr.), Member of Coimcil and Committees, 

Inscri2:)tions from the Eaiizah MIrza Muqim, Dihli, 
„ from Nizam-uddin, Dihli, 

„ from a tomb in a gamhaz near the Kadam Sharif, Dihli, 

„ from the courtyard of Amir Ivhiisrau's Dargah, 

„ from an old Masj id near the Dihli Jail, 

„ from a Mosque at Sarai Daud, near Chiragh-i-Dihll, . . , 

„ from Eohtas, ... ... 7, 8, 

„ from Chandan Pir Hill, Sahasram, ... 

„ from Mr. Delmerick's Dihli rubbings, 

„ from Mr. Delmerick's Hi§ar Firuzah rubbings, 

„ from F. L. Beaufort, C. S., inscription on a Cannon in 

the Jinsi-Topkhanah, Murshidabad, 
„ from Gam' and Panduah, photozincographs of, 

Jarrad, (F. W. Lieut. E. N.), election of, 

„ „ Member of Committees, 

Kabiraddin Ahmad, Mania wi, Member of Phil. Committee, 

Katantra, ... ... ... 

Khond weapons and Musical instruments from Sambalpur, 

King, (G. Dr.), Member of Natural History Committee, 

Kitchen-midden, On an ancient, at Chandwar, near Cuttack, 

Knox, (G. E. Mr.), withdrawal of, 

Kumar Kante Chunder Sing, of Paikpara, election of, 

Kulottmiga, Chola King, invasion of Bengal by, ... 

Km-z, (S. Mr.), Member of Natural History Committee, 

„ Sketch of the Vegetation of the Nicobar Islands by,. 

Lafont, (F. Eev.), Member of Physical Science Committee, 



Fage 

4i 

ih. 

123 

53 

50 

114 

174 

25 

59 



73 

106 

73, 50 

4j 

5 

ih. 

5, 6 

ih. 

7 

9, 109 

10 

92 

ih. 

ih. 
159 
135 
171 

50 

27 
114 

50 

120 

3 

70 
106 

50 
193 

50 



Index. 247 

I'age 

Lafont, (F. Eev.), exhibits a Crookes' Eadiometer, ... 171 

Lassen, Professor C. death of, ... ... ... 101 

La Toiiche (E. W. D. Capt.), withdrawal of, ... ... 202 

Lewis, (T. R. Dr.), Trustee of the Indian Museum, ... 73 
„ and McConnell, (J. F. P. Dr.), On AmpMstoma 

7iommz5, a new Parasite affecting Man, ... 182 

Library, additions to, ... 31,82,96,125,150,197,205,229 

„ Report on, and Committee, nomiaation of, ... 22, 49 

Lightning, prevention of accidents from, ... ... 104 

List of Societies, &c., exchanging publications, ... ... 27 

Lonchodes amaurops, Austeni, hifoliatus, hrevipes, Craioangensis, 
cunicularis, insignis, nematodes, nodosus, uniformis, and verru- 

cifer, ... ... ... ... 3, 95 

IJopajjlius lolas, ... ... ... 3 

Lyall (J. W. Mr.) election of, ... ... .... 89 

Lydekker (R. Mr.) exhibits jaw of Tetraconodon magnum, ... 172 

„ „ member of Natural History Committee, ... 50 

Lytton, Lord, accepts the office of Patron of the Society, ... 101 

Macdonald (J. C. Mr.) election of, ... !.. 215 

Maclagan (R. Maj or- General) , on Early Asiatic Fire Weapons, ... 93 

Macnaghten (Cherter Mr.) withdrawal of, ... ... 70 

Maci'otcdniopteris, ... ... ... 226 

Mahabashya, copy of, presented by Prince of Wales, ... 32 

Malleson, (G. B. Col.), election of, ... ... 215 

Mallock (H. H. Major), withdrawal of, ... • ... 3 

MantUlce, On the femoral brushes of, and their Use, 123, 176 

„ Remarkable, ... ... ... 175 

„ Development of Antennae in Pectinicorn, ... 228 
McConnell (J. F. P. Dr.), see Lewis and McConnell. 

McGregor, (W.Mr.), election of, ... ... 2 

„ on the Prevention of Accidents from Lightning, 104 

Medlicott, (H. B. Mr.), exhibits Meteorites from Raipur, &c., 115, 221 

M „ Member of Council, ... ... 73 

„ „ appointed Treasurer of the Society, . . . ib. 

„ „ Member of Committees, .. . ... 50 

3Icgalo)nastoma iamjclieilus, ... ... .., ISO 

Members, list of, during 1875, Appendix XL, ... ... xii. 

Meteorites, ... ... ... 115^ 221 

Mini;insa Darsana, ... ... .,, 27 

MitcliL-U (T. B. Capt.), withdrawal of, ... ... 48 

Mockler (E. Capt.), election of, ... ... ... 215 



248 



Index. 



Matendralal Sircar, (Dr.), Member of Committees, 
Muhammud-bin-Tughluq, coin o£, 
Muliiyy-iil-Millat, prince of Dihli, 
Muir, (Dr. J.), proposed Honorary Member, 
Nayir-uddin Mabmud Sbab, unique gold coin of, ... 
Nasb, (A. M. Mr.), election of, ... 

„ „ Member of Committees, 

Natural History Committee, Nomination of, 
Nephrons, 

NesoJcia HvMoni and Scully i, 
Nevill, (G. Mr.), Member of Committees, 
Nicobar Islands, A sketcb of the vegetation of the, 
Nicobars, Notes on tbe Inhabitants of the, 
Officers, rejjort on, and election of, 

O'Kinealy, (J. Mr.), Member of Physical Science Committee, 
Oldham, (T. Dr.), Memorial to, 
Oxypilus hicingulata, 
I'alcsovittarla Kiurzi, 
JBalytlioa, 
ParcMepliaris, ... 
Faraneplirops, . . . 
Parasite, On a new, affecting Man, 
Parry, (E,. Mr.), election of. 
Partridge, (S. B. Dr.), Life Member of the Society, 

„ „ vote of thanks to, 

Peal, (S. E. Mr.), letter on Wild Pigs eating fish, 

„ „ Member of Natural History Committee, 

Pedler, (A. Mr.), Member of Committees, 

5, „ „ on the Radiometer as a Photometer, 

Felomys fallax and Watsoni, 
Phasmideous Insects, New or little-known, 

Phayre, (Maj.-Genl. Sir A.), on Stone Implements from Burma, 
Phear, (The Hon. J. B.), Member of Physical Science Committee, 
Pliihalosoma Westwoodii, 
Philological Committee, nomination of, 
PliijUium Celchicum, siccifolium, and Westwoodi, 
J?lnjUocrania JFestivoodi, 
Fhyllotlieca, 

Pliysical Science Committee, nomination of, 
Piddington Fund, ... ... 103 

Plants, Fossil, ... 



Page 

49, 50 

91 

139 

218 

91 

89 

117 

50 

4 

80, 81 

49 

193 

142 

24, 31 

50 

72, 217 

175 

226 

114 

176 

4 

182 

101 

77 

73 

92 

50 

49 

187 

181, 182 

3 

95 

50 

3 

50 

3, 176 

ib. 

225 

50 

104, 171 

.. 223 



Index. 249 

Page 

Polyxenus la gurus, ... ,.. ... 175 

Prannath Pandit, (Babu), Member of Committees, ... 49 

Fteris sagittcsfolia, ... ... ... 226 

FselapJiidcs, ... ... ... ... 175 

Publications by the Society, Eeport on, ... ... 22 

Radiometer, note on the use of the, as a Photometer, ... 187 

„ remarks on, by the Eev. Fr. Lafont, ... ... 171 

Raja Harendra Krishna Bahadur, withdrawal of, ... ... 48, 70 

RajendralalaMitra, (Dr.), Member of Committees, ... 49 

„ on Human Sacrifices in Ancient India, ... 53 
„ on the Invasion of Bengal by the Chola King 

Kulottunga, ... ... 107 

„ on Inscriptions from Rohtas, ... ... 109 

„ on a Kanauj copper-plate grant, ... 130 

Ram-charit Manas, the Hindi Ramayana, ... ... 81 

Ramayana of Tulsi Das, Prologue to the, ... ... ii. 

Raniganj, Fossil plants from, ... ... ... 228 

Raye, (D. O'C. Dr.), election of , ... ... 135 

Read, (H. Mr.), report on the Raif)ur meteorite, ... ... 115 

Registration of the Society under Act XXI of 1860, 117, 135, 171 

Eeid, (J. R. Mr.), gold coins from, ... ... 220 

Repairs to the Society's Premises, ... 93,161, 202 

Robinson, (D. G. Col.), Member of Physical Science Committee, ... 50 

Rodent, new, from Central Asia,.,. ... ... 80 

Rodon, (Gr. S. Lieut.), election of, ... • ... 202 

Roepstorff, (F. A. de, Mr.), Notes on the Inhabitants of theNicobars, 142 
Rules, alterations in the, ... ... 164,203,215,217 

Sagenopteris poJyphylla, ... ... 224, 227 

Sahitya Darpana, ... ... ... 27 

Sama Veda Sanhita, ... ... ... ih. 

St. John, (D. B. Major), election of, ... ... 160 

Sambalpiir, stone implement from, ... ... 123 

Scliizoccphala licornis, Geographical distribution of, ... ib. 

Scliizoneura Gondivanensis, ... ... ... 225 

„ paradoxa, ... ... ... 225 

Schlich, (W. Dr.), Member of Natural History Committee, ... 50 

Schwendler, (L. Mr.), resignation of membershij) of Council, ... 73 

Scully, (J. Dr.), Member of Committees, ... ... 50 

„ ,, presents Coins from Kiishghar, ... ... 90 

Scolopendrella, ... ... ... 175 

Scott, (lloss., Mr.), election of, ... ... ... 135 



250 



Index. 



Fage 

Scott, (D. Mr.), election o£, ... ... - ... 135 

Shahjahan II., silver coin of, ... ... .... 139 

Shaw, (R. B. Mr.), election of, ... .. ... ... 82 

5, on the Glialcliali Languages, .. . . . ... 79 

Sherring, (M. A. Eev.), Member of Coin Committee, ... 50 

Shombongs, aboriginal tribe of Nicobars, ... ... 145 

Shops, erection of, in the Society's Compound, ... ... 217 

Siemens, (Werner Dr.), proposed as an Honorary Member, ... 48 

„ „ elected an Honorary Member, ... 70 

Sitathali, near Raipur, C. P., meteorite from, ... ... 115 

Smith, (D. B. Dr.), elected Member of Council, ... ... 73 

„ (Y. A. Mr.), Popular Songs of Hamirpur District, 33, 187 

Spalacomys Indicus, ... ... ... 80 

Splieiiophyllum Trizygia, ... ... ... 225 

Sphenopteris polymorpha, ... ... ... ib. 

Stewart, (R. Mr.), withdrawal of, ... ... 48 

Stokes, (W. Mr.), Member of Committees, ... ... 49 

Stone Implements found in the Tributary States of Orissa, ... 122 

„ from Bm-ma, Note on, by Sir A. Phayre, ... 3 

Stoliczka Memorial, ... ... ... 23, 77 

Stubbs, (F. W. Col.), Member of Coin Committee, ... 50 

Sundarbans, whether inhabited in Ancient Times,... ... 93 

Sutkagen Dor, Makran, ancient tombs and dwellings at, ... 172 

Tabaqat-i-Na9irI, ... ... ... 25 

Tabari, projected new edition of, ... ... 135 

Taeniopteris DcmcBoides, ... ... ... 226 

Talchir, Stone implement from, ... ... ... 123 

Tawney, (H. Mr.), Member of Committees, ... ... 49 

„ „ resignation of membership of Council, ... 73 

Taylor, (A. D. Commander), Member of Physical Committee, ... 50 

„ (R.Mr.), Member of Finance Committee, ... 46 

Tennant, (J. F. Col.), Member of Committees, ... ... 49 

„ „ „ re-election of, ... ... 82 

„ „ . „ of Council, ... ... 73 

„ „ rei5ignation of Membership of Comicil, ... 202 

Tetraconodon magnum, ... ... ... 172 

Theobald, (W. Mr.), Member of Committees, ... ... 50 

„ ■ „ withdrawal of, ... ... 70 

Thibaut, (G. Dr.), Member, Philological Committee, ... 50 

Thuillier, (H. L. Col.), on Capt. Butler, ... ... 11 

Trizygia speciosa, ... ... ... 225 



Index. 251 

Page 

Tidsi Das, Ramayana of, ... • . . . ... 81 

Tween, (A. Mr.), Member of Physical Science Committee, ... 50 

„ „ withdrawal of, ... ... 70 

Ungul, stone implement from, ... ... ... 122 

Urmston, (H. B. Lieut.), withdrawal of, ... ... 3 

Vertehraria, ... ... ... ... 225 

Waldie, (D. Mr.), Member of Committees, ... ... 50 

Wales (H. R. H. Prince of), presents copy of Mahabashya, ... 32 

Waller, (W. K. Dr.), Member of Library Committee, ... 49 
Waterhouse, (Capt. J.), on the influence of Eosin on the Photographic 

Action of the Solar Spectrum upon the 

Bromide and Bromoiodide of Silver, ... 12 

„ „ Trustee of the Indian Museum, ... 48 

Webb (W. T. Mr.), election of, ... ... 251 

Wild Pigs eating Fish, note on, by Mr. S, E. Peal, ... 92 

Williams, (H. Mr.), withdrawal of, ... ... 70 

Wilson, (A. Mr.), election of, ... ... ... ^"5. 

Wood-Mason, (J. Mr.), New Phasmideous Insects, and new Geto- 

niidce, exhibited by, ... ... 3 4 

„ „ A new species of Astacoides, exhibited, mth 

remarks on the systematic position of 

the New-Zealand ^5;f«c/f7te, by, ... 4 
„ „ Description of a new Eodent from Central 

Asia, by, ... ... so 

„ „ Species of Ia_pyx, ScoJoi)endrella,. etc. ex- 
hibited by, ... ._ i7_jj 

„ „ On the femoral Brushes of the Ilantidce and 

their use, ... 123^ 176 

„ „ On some Eemarkable J[Z?m^i(?«, ... 275 

„ „ Description of a new i^hasmideous insect, ... 95 

. J, „ Fossil Plants from Raniganj, .^. 223 

„ „ On the Development of the Antennas in the 

Vecihucovn Mantidw, ... 228 

Wood, (C. H. Mr.), Member of Committees, ... __ 49 

Wood, (H. W. J. Mr.), letter regarding Piddington Fund, ... 103 

Yule, (Henry Col.), proposed as an Honorary Member, ... 43 

„ election of, as Honorary Member, ... 70 

Zoological Gai'den, Calcutta, ... ... _ 23 



Meteorological Obserni/ious. 



Abdracl of the Results of the Hourly Meteorological Observations 

taken at the Surveyor GeneraVs OQice, Calcutta, 

in the mouth of January 1876. 

LuUtude 22° 38' \" North. Longitude 88° 20' 34'^ Eust. 

Height of tbe Cistern of tlie Standard Barometer above tlie sea level, 3 8.1 1 feet. 

Daily Means, &c. of tlie Observations and of tbe Hygroinetrical elements 

dependent tliereon. 





o ^ 


Eauge 


of tbe Barometer 




Bange 


of tbe Tempera- 




■^ ^ ^ 
^^'l-^ 


du 


ring tbe c 


!i.y. 




ture durijig tbe day.. 




















Date. 
















e^S 








^ ^ 










i oi^ 


]\rax. 


Min. 


Diff. 




Mux. 


Min. 


Diff 












^^ 










Indies. 


Inebes. 


Indies. 


Indies. 


o 


o 


o 


o 


1 


30.016 


30.094 


29.957 


0.137 


67.4 


76.5 


59.6 


16.9 


2 


.018 


.094 


.969 


.125 


66.9 


77.3 


58.3 


19.0 


3 


.014 


.106 


.965 


.141 


67.0 


77.5 


57.6 


19.9 


4 


29.909 


.065 


.943 


.122 


68.7 


76.3 


63.8 


12.5 


5 


.995 


.072 


.934 


.138 


66.1 


74.9 


69.5 


15.4 


6 


30.018 


.095 


.962 


.133 


66.7 


76.4 


58.4 


18.0 


7 


.017 


.103 


.955 


.148 


67.9 


76.6 


60.0 


16.6 


8 


29.969 


.053 


.886 


.167 


68.9 


78.4 


59.8 


18.6 


9 


30.004 


.088 


.941 


.147 


70.2 


80.2 


64.0 


16.2 


iO 


.065 


.147 


30.014 


.133 


68.1 


78.4 


60.0 


18.4 


11 


.062 


.144 


.005 


,139 


66.0 


76.6 


58.5 


18.1 


12 


.028 


.114 


29.961 


.153 


64.0 


74.4 


.56.0 


18.4 


13 


.018 


.097 


.963 


.134 


63.5 


75.5 


54.8 


20.7 


U 


.055 


.124 


.998 


.126 


64.9 


76.7 


54.5 


22.2 


15 


.086 


.174 


30.035 


.139 


65.5 


76.5 


56.0 


20.5 


\^ 


. .015 


.136 


29.974 


.162 


65.2 


76.6 


65.8 


20.8 


17 


.009 


.090 


.947 


.143 


67.7 


79.5 


57.0 


22.5 


18 


29.975 


. .046 


.920 


.126 


70.4 


82.0 


62.0 


20.0 


19 


.948 


.020 


.885 


.135 


71 '.4 


82.0 


62.6 


19.4 


20 


.937 


.024 


.856 


.168 


71.5 


81.0 


64.5 


16.5 


2L 


.965 


.053 


.9(;6 


.147 


69.4 


77.8 


63.0 


14.8 


22 


.908 


29.998 


.838 


.160 


67.3 


78.3 


57.2 


21.1 


23 


.841 


.920 


.763 


.157 


69.9 


80.4 


62.4 


18.0 


24 


.837 


.920 


.779 


.141 


71.3 


82.3 


62.5 


19.8 


25 


.847 


.933 


.780 


.153 


71.4 


80.5 


64.0 


16.5 


26 


.841 


.914 


.771 


.143 


67.4 


74.3 


62.8 


11.5 


27 


.844 


.920 


.788 


:]32 


64.7 


73.5 


56.3 


17.2 


28 


.868 


.934 


.818 


.116 


65.9 


76.3 


67.5 


18.8 


29 


.879 


.958 


.816 


.142 


68.5 


80.0 


58.0 


22.0 


30 


.895 


.972 


.842 


.130 


69.3 


80.5 


60.0 


20.5 


31 


.903 


.971 


.850 


.121 


70.2 


82.0 


59.7 


1 ^-^-^ 



The Mean Height of tlie Barometer, as lilcewise tlie Dry and Wet Bulb 
Thermometer Means are derived, from the hour]} observations, made at the 
several hours during the day. 



ii Meieorolog'tcal Ohserrailons. 

A/js/ract of Ike Ih^sul/s of the Ihmrlij Meteorologuud Observations 
taken at the Siirvei/or General's Office, Calcutta, 
in the month of Januanj 1876. 



D;iily Mejiiis, ^^c. of tlie. Observafions and of the Kj'gronietrical elements 
dependent thereon. — (Coufiniied.) 



Date 




> 
o 

c3 


'o 


p 

> 
o 


<o 


f-l 

a 



"43 


, o3 Cm 
> 

■^ 9. 

bB,0 


I Weight of 
required for 
e saturation. 


ree of Humi- 
tnpiete sacu- 
eing unity. 




« o 


pq 


(a 

a 


^ 




l5 f1 


p, 


br rO 

S s s 




^ 


p 


O 


p 


^ 


^r" 


-^ 


^ 




o 


o 


o 





Inches. 


T. sr. 


T. gr. 




1 


62.0 


5.4 


57.7 


9.7 


0.4185 


5.35 


2.04 


0.72 


2 


59.9 


7.0 


54.3 


12.6 


.432 


4.78 


.50 


.66 


3 


60.9 


6.1 


56.0 


11.0 


.458 


5.07 


.23 


.70 


4 


62.1 


6.6 


56.8 


11.9 


.470 


.18 


.51 


.67 


5 


60.0 


6.1 


55.1 


11.0 


.444 


4.93 


.17 


.69 


6 


61.1 


5.6 


56.6 


10.1 


.467 


5.17 


.06 


.72 


7 


63.3 


5.6 


57.8 


10.1 


.486 


.37 


.14 


.72 


8 


63.6 


5.3 


59.4 


9.5 


.513 


.64 


.10 


.73 


9 


64..5 


5.7 


59.9 


10.3 


.521 


.73 


.32 


.71 


30 


61.2 


6.9 


55.7 


12.4 


.453 


.01 


.54 


.66 


11 


58.8 


7.2 


53.0 


13.0 


.414 


4.59 


.49 


.65 


]2 


55.8 


8.2 


48.4 


15.6 


.354 


3.93 


. .72 


.59 


13 


55.3 


8.2 


47.9 


15.6 


.318 


.87 


.68 


.59 


14 


57.8 


7.1 


52.1 


12.8 


.401 


4.46 


.39 


.65 


15 


68.0 


7.5 


52.0 


13.5 


.400 


.43 


.55 


.64 


16 


■ 58.1 


7.1 


52.4 


12,8 


.405 


.50 


.41 


.65 


\7 


62.9 


4.8 


59.1 


8.6 


.508 


5.61 


1.85 


.75 


18 


64.1 


6.3 


59.1 


11.3 


.508 


.58 


2.52 


.69 


19 


63.6 


7.8 


57.4 


14.0 


.480 


.26 


3.09 


.63 


20 


63.2 


8.3 


56.6 


14.9 


.467 


.12 


.26 


.61 


21 


60.3 


9.1 


53.0 


16.4 


.414 


4.56 


.30 


.58 


22 


59.1 


8.2 


52.5 


14.8 


.407 


.50 


2.87 


.61 


23 


62.6 


7.3 


56.8 


13.1 


.470 


5.17 


.81 


.65 


24 


63.4 


7.9 


57.1 


14.2 


.475 


.21 


3.12 


.63 


25 


63.0 


8.4 


56.3 


15.1 


.462 


.07 


.28 


.61 


26 


56.5 


10.9 


47.8 


19.6 


.346 


3.82 


.57 


.52 


27 


55.1 


9.6 


47.4 


17.3 


.342 


.80 


.00 


.56 


2S 


58.6 


7.3 


52.8 


13.1 


.411 


4.56 


2.50 


.65 


29 


61.5 


7.0 


55.9 


12.6 


.456 


5.03 


.62 


.66 


30 


60.7 


8.6 


53.8 


15.5 


.425 


4.68 


3.15 


.60 


31 


62.9 


7.3 

1 


57.1 


13.1 


.475 


5.22 


2.83 


.65 



All the llygronieirieal elements are eompiited by tl>e Greenwich Constants. 



Meteorological Observations 



in 



Abstract of the Results of the Hourly Aleteorological Observations 

taken at the Surveyor General's Office, Calcutta, 

in the month of January 1876. 



Houi-ly Means, &c. of tlie Observations and of tLe ll^'grometrical elements 

dependent tliereon. 



Hour 









JRange of the Earonieter 

for eacli hour during 

tlie month. 



Max. 



Min. 



Diff. 



n^ 




^ 


^ 


pq 


4.:^ 




<a 


t>- 


a 


p a 1 


fl 




CO 


JA 


t-1 


H 


r^t 





IJcinge of tlie Tempera- 
ture for each hour 
durino" the nionlh. 



Max. 



Min. 



Diir. 





Inches. 


Inches. 


Indies. 


Inches. 





Mid- 












uigiit. 


29.972 


30.082 


29.836 


0.246 


63.7 


1 


.964 


.071 


.832 


.239 


63.1 


2 


.955 


.069 


.822 


.247 


62.4 


3 


.945 


.061 


.810 


.251 


61.8 


4 


.941 


.058 


.802 


.256 


61.2 


5 


.952 


.071 


.816 


.255 


60.6 


6 


.966 


.064 


.833 


.231 


60.0 


7 


.988 


.101 


.858 


.243 


597 


8 


30.015 


.133 


.887 


.246 


61.3 


9 


.039 


.172 


.914 


.258 


65.7 


10 


.044 


.171 


.914 


.260 


69.9 


11 


.024 


.156 


.891 


.265 


73.1 


Noon. 


29.993 


.122 


.865 


.257 


75.1 


1 


.958 


.087 


.814 


.273 


76.6 


2 


.931 


.066 


.781 


.285 


77.5 


8 


.914 


.046 


.765 


.281 


78.0 


4. 


.907 


.039 


.764 


.275 


76.8 


6 


.909 


.043 


.763 


.280 


75.3 


6 


.920 


.036 


.771 


.265 


71.9 


7 


.939 


.058 


.793 


.265 


69.6 


8 


.957 


.077 


.808 


.269 


68.0 


9 


.970 


.093 


.822 


.271 


66.8 


10 


.977 


.093 


.832 


.261 


65.5 


11 


.975 


.082 


.839 


.243 


64.7 



68.4 
68.7 
68.4 
67.5 
67.0 
66.8 
66.0 
65.0 
66.7 
71.0 
74,0 
77.0 



79.0 
81.0 
82.0 
82.3 
81.0 
79.6 
75.5 
73.3 
71.5 
70.4 
70.0 
69.0 



58.2 
57.3 
56.5 
56.0 
55.5 
55.2 
55.0 
51.5 
56.6 
61.4 
65.0 
68.5 



70.5 
72.3 
73.5 
73.5 

73.0 
71.5 
67.6 
65.1 
63.0 
61.8 
60.5 
59.0 



10.2 
11.4 
11.9 
11.5 
11.5 
11.6 
11.0 
10.5 
10.1 
9.6 
9.0 



8.5 
8.7 
8.5 
8.8 
8.0 
8.1 
7.9 
8.2 
8.5 
8.6 
9.5 
10.0 



The Mean Height of the Barometer, as likewise the Dry and Wet Bulb. 
Tliermometer Means are derived from the observations made at the several 
hours during the mouth. 



IV 



Meteorological Ob.se nuitio^is. 



Absl.r<icl of file liesnJts of the Ihinrli/ Meteorologhal Ohserrafions 

taken at the Snrre//or General's OJjice, Calcutta, 

in the month of January 1876. 



IfouH}' Means, Ac. of the Ob.serrations and of tlie Hygrometrical elements 
dependent thereon. — (Continued). 





u 




'o 


ft 


O 

o 


Vapour 
of air. 


ght of 
ed for 
ation. 


Humi- 
satura- 

y- 




r^ 


« 




<» 


O 


«« -ti 




-^ -u 


Hour. 




> 
o 






o O 

-|J,0 


1 — 1 ^ 


gree o 
mplete 
ng uui 




^ 2 


;3 

>-> 


■4^ 

S3 
p. 

a 








dition 
apour 
mplet 


-SSI 




^^ 


P 


o 
O 


ft^ 


^^ 






^ - 








o 


o 





Tiiches. 


T. gv. 


T. gr. 




^lid- 

igl.t. 


60.0 


8.7 


56.7 


7.0 


0.469 


5.22 


1.37 


0.79 


1 


59.6 


3.5 


56.4 


6.7 


.464 


.17 


.30 


.80 


2 


59.1 


3.3 


56.1 


6.3 


.459 


.14 


.19 


.81 


3 


5S.7 


3.1 


55.9 


5.9 


.456 


.10 


.11 


.82 


4 


58.2 


3.0 


55.5 


5.7 


.450 


.04 


.06 


.83 


5 


57.6 


3.0 


54.9 


5.7 


.441 


4.94 


.04 


.83 


6 


57.0 


30 


54.3 


5.7 


.432 


.85 


.02 


.83 


7 


56.6 


3.1 


53.8 


5.9 


.425 


.77 


.05 


.82 


8 


57.6 


3.7 


54.3 


7.0 


.432 


.84 


.28 


.79 


9 


59.5 


6.2 


54.5 


11.2 


.435 


.83 


2.19 


.69^ 


10 


61.4 


8.5 


54.6 


15.3 


.437 


.81 


3.17 


.60 


11 


61.6 


11.5 


52.4 


20.7 


.405 


.43 


4.36 


.50 


oon. 


62.0 


13.1 


52.8 


22.3 


.411 


.47 


.87 


.48 


1 


62.5 


14.1 


52.6 


24.0 


.408 


.43 


5.34 


.45 


2 


62.6 


14.9 


52.2 


25.3 


.402 


.37 


.Q7 


.44 


3 


62.9 


15.1 


52.3 


25.7 


.404 


.37 


.82 


.43 


4 


62.4 


14.4 


52.3 


24.5 


.404 


.38 


.45 


.45 


5 


63.2 


12.1 


54.7 


2C.6 


.438 


.76 


4.64 


.51 


6 


63.7 


8.2 


57.1 


14.8 


.475 


5.20 


3.28 


.61 


7 


63.0 


6.6 


57.7 


11.9 


.485 


.33 


2.57 


.68 


8 


62.4 


5.6 


57.9 


10.1 


.488 


.38 


.15 


.71 


9 


al.7 


5,1 


57.6 


9.2 


.483 


.34 


1.92 


.74 


10 


60.9 


4.6 


57.2 


8.3 


.476 


.28 


.70 


.76 


11 


60.5 


4.2 


57.1 


7.6 


.475 


.27 


.53 


.78 



All the Hygrometrical elements are computed by the Greenwich Constants* 



Meteor olog icn I Obserra lions. 



Abstract of the Results of the llourlfj Meteorological Observations 
taken at the Surveyor General's OJice, Calcutta, 
in the month oj' January 1876. 

Solai- Eadiation. Woatlior. >fcc. 





u 








-^ d 




O o 




CO -.3 




. si 1 


4) 


Mas 

radi 



<S> It 

br. > . 

=5 S-^. 



Wind. 



^ c: 1:3 



Pre vail ins: 



P I ^ -^ General aspect of tlie Sky. 



rt "*" Ci3 ■ direction. m % 

-Hr-, I CL, 






Ij 130.4 

! 

2i 125.0 

3 132.0 

4j 142.5 

5j 126.4 

6j 128.0 

7J 130.0 

8! 131.0 
9 133.4 



10 



135.0 



11 131.9 

12 132.0 

13 132.0 
U' 132.0 



130.0 
131.0 

136.0 



Indies lb 

s s w&sw 



E N E & N by W 

[& S by W 
E S E, W by N 

N W& N N W 

[& s w 

N N W, N by E 
SE,NE&WSW 
NE, SW&WNW 

S S E & S S W 

SSW,N&NWE 

NNE&N N W 



NNW&WNW 

N by E & W N W 

S S W & N by W 

SW,SE&WSW 
SSW, N&Wby S 
S W, W & S S W 

s s w & s w 



Miles 

47.6 B to 4, \i to 7, A. M. B to 11 
p. M. Sli^litly foggy from Mid- 
night to 2 A. M. 

76.1 B to 7 A. M., ^i to 3, B to 11 
p. M. Sliglitly foggy at 8 & 
9 p. M. 

81.1 I _B. Slightly foggy at Mid- 
night & 1 A. H. 

115.2 I \_i to 2, O to 5, Vi to 7 a. m., 
B to 2, \_i to 4, B to 11 p. M. 

128.7 I B. Slightly foggy from 7 to 

!iop. M. 

64.3 I B to 1, ^^i to 4, B to 11 p. m. 
Slightly foggy from 7 to 9 p. m. 

77.6; B to 5 A.M., \i to 6, B to 11 
p. M. Foggy from 7 to 10 p. m. 

77.6 B to 12, \_ito4, Btollp. M. 
104.6 B to 2, \i to 6, B to 11 p. m. 
Foggy from 5 to 8 a. m. & 9 to 

11 p. M. 

100.8 B to 6 A. M., \i to 6, S to 9, 
B to 11 p. M. Slightly foggy 
at Midnight, 1 & 8 A. M. & from 

'8 to 11 P.M. 

95.1 [ \i to 4, B to 11 p. M. Foggy 
at Midnight. 

107.3 : B to 1, \i to 7, B to 11 p. ji. 
! Foggy from 8 to 10 p. m. 

95.1 B. Slightly foggy from 4 to 
8 A. M. &'at 8 & 9 p. M. 

63.4 B. 

79.1 B. Foggy from 7 to 11 p. jr. 
39.8 _B. Slightly foggy from Mid- 
night to 4 A. M. & 9 to 11 p. nr. 

45.2 B to 10 A. M., v_i to 4, B to 
11 p. M. Foggy at Midnight & 
from 4 to' 8 A. M. 



\ iCirri, — i Strati, ^'i Cumuli, \_i Cirro-strati, '^ i Ciimiilo-strati. \/N_i Nimbi, 
Vi Cirro, — cumnli-B clear, S stratoni, O overcast, T thunder, L lightning, 
E. rain, D, drizzle. 



VI 



Meteorological Observations, 



Abstract of the Results of the Hourly Aleteoroloyical Observations 

taken at the Surveyor General's Ojjice, Calcutta, 

in the month of January 1876. 



Solar Ivadiation, Weather, ifcc. 





;h 


4j 4) 




c o 


hr. > . 




5 g-^ 




CO --3 

C3 


o'^ 1 


4) 


m'^S 


«d 2 


ft 


ra CIS 


p-i r-H 



Wind. 



Prevailing 
direction. 



I CO aS O 
' !h ft ,<» 



General aspect of tLe Sky. 





135.7 
134.0 
136.0 
132.0 

132.0 
133.8 

136.0 
.25! 136.0 

26 120.0 



125.0 
122.5 
134.8 



30 136.0 
31' 137.0 



Indies 



S W & W 

w s w & w 
s w 

N N E & W by N 
WS W& S S W 

ssw, wsw&w 

[Sby W 
S W, W S W & 
V\^ & S by W 

[W N W 
N N E, N W & 

W & W N W 

N N W & S S W 

S by E & S S W 
[W by N 

S S W, W S W & 
S, S W&S S W 



lb 



Miles. 
87.2 
100.2 
118.5 
121.7 

56.3 
111.0 

103.0 
118.6 

160.6 

153.8 

66.0 

66.2 

54.2 
82.5 



B. Foggy from 3 to 8 a. m. 

B. 

Bto 3, \ito 6, B to 11 P.M. 

B. yiiglitly foggy from 8 to 

10 p. M. 
B. 

B. Foggy from Midnight to 

8 A. M. 

B. 

B. Sliglitl}^ foggy from 1 to 

4 A. M. 

B to 5, \i to 7 A. M., Misty 
to 2, B to 11 p. M. 

B. Sliglitly foggy from 8 to 

11 p. M. 

B. Slightly foggy at 6 & 7 

A. M., & 7 & 8 P. M. 

B to 11, '^i to 6, B to 11 p. M. 

B. 
B. 



\i Cirri, — i Strati, /^i Cumuli, v_i Cirro-strati, '^i Cumulo-strati, v^_i Nimbi, 
Vi Cirro-cumuli, B clear, S stratoui, O overcast, T thunder, L lightning 
E. rain, D. drizzle. 



Meteorological Observations. vii 

Abstract of the Results of the Hourly Meteorological Obserruliovs 
taken at the Surveyor General's Office, Calcutta, 
in the month of January 1876. 

Monthly Eesults. 



Iiu-lies. 

Mean heififlit of tlie Barometer for the month ... ... ... 29.965 

Max.lieia^litof the Barometer occurred at 10 A.M. on the 15th ... 30.174 

Min. lieiglit of tlie Barometer occurred at 5 p. m. on the 23r(l ... 29.768 

Extreme range of the Barometer during the month. ... ... 0.4] 1 

Mean of tlie daily Max. Pressures ... ... ... ... 30.044 

Ditto ditto Min. ditto ... ... ... ... 29.904 

Mean daily range o^ the Barometer during tlie month ... ... 0.140 



Mean Dry Bulb Thermometer for the month ... ... ..', 67.8 

Max. Temperature occurred at 3 p. M. on the 24th ... ... 82.3 

Min. Temperature occurred at 7 A. M. on the 14th ... ... ... 54.5 

Extreme range oi the Temperature during the month ... ... 27.8 

Mean of the" daily Max. Temperature ... ... ... ... 78.0 

Ditto ditto Min. ditto, ... ... ... ... 59.6 

Mean daily range o1 the Temperature during the montli ... ... 18.4 



Mean Wet Btilb Thermometer for the month ... ... ... 60.6 

Mean Dry Bulb Thermometer above Mean Wet Bulb Thermometer 7.2 

Computed Mean Dew-point for the month ... ... ... 54.8 

Mean Dry Bulb Thermometer above computed mean Dew-point ... 13.0 

Inches. 
Mean Elastic force of Vapour for the month ... ... ... 0.440 



Troy grain. 
Mean Weight of Vapour for the month ... ... ... 4.85 

Additional Weight of Vapour required for complete saturation ... 2.63 
Mean degree of humidity for the month, complete satui'ation being unity 0.65 

o 
Moan Max. Solar radiation Thermometer for the month ... ... 131.9 



Inches. 
Bained no days.^Max. fall of rain during 24 hours ... ... Nil 

Total amount of rain during the month ... ... ... Nil 

Total amount of rain indicated by the Gauge* attached to the anemo- 
meter during the month ... ... ... ... ... Nil 

Prevailing direction of tlie Wind ... S. S. W. & S. W. 

* Height 70 feet 10 incbos above ground, 



vni 



Mffec) oloijical Ob-^errafiinn. 



^ 



J^ 



-5 ^ 



r-5 C3 



r^ C« 



"Ai'M'il 



•UO UIHJ£ 



■Ai\S["Ai 



i-INrHrti-l(jq 05 ,-i 



CO l?0C0CO«(NN0-5cOcOi-li-l rH 



I i-H i-H r-l rH 0-1 tn 



COWCOO^COl— I -"^ COTff-^CCl 



CO i-IO)CDU5COkOUSU5(n 



'A\ 'S 



■UO ure 



'■yR 















(—1 


•^O^i-iCO-^COCOi-Hi-l 












(MOqCOpjNO^fflOlO^CO-"* 




u3iO'^i>eococoo5 






l-H CO 


lO 


■^rH(Mrtp-li-lr-Hi-l01 












i-io]miocoioio^coff> 


iH 


COri(J>00t>CC(MCTO5 




•^ 


lO ->* lO tS CO ■* CO T* W CO 


O 


CDt-CCSI-^cecDCD-^OilO;! 



■UO Ull!JJ 



05 OOt-t^lO-^NOli— I 05 CO I— li— I OlTfllO'^CDOOOdl 



•ao urej£ 



■no niTjjj; 



UlTJ^ 



: g[ "s ■'K 

•uo niuy; 



"s ^q -a 



05 


i-l Ol 


^ 




rH CO CO CO tP r}( 










'"' 




r-l 


'"' 


I-H rH 


r 1 




1-li-li-lrH.Ht-IOIi-HT-IOli-l 


rH 




- 1 


- -| 


d 


i-(i-li-HiHi-l^0505 






■-I 


S 










05 


rli-li-l 1— i-irHOIi-l 






I-H r-. 05 



I-H 05 i—( rH I-H 



•fr -isT T>r 



•UO niTj^ 

■a"*js[ 



05 C^ 05 CO rH 



TITB^ 



■JT'^-M 



•no uiTj'j]- 



•uo uiBlT 



i-H 05 05 &lO505i-IO5O5O505eO 05 



rH rHrHrHrH0505rH 



rHrHrHrH0505rHrHrHi 



1—\ CO rH 05 CO 



l05CO'^»050»>00050rH O 



rH05C0-*l0CDt»0005OrH 



Meteorological Observations. 



IX 



Abstract of the Results of the Ilonrl// Meteorological Observations 

taken at the Snrvei/or General's Ojjice, Calcutta, 

in the mouth of February 18?'6, 

Latitude 22° y;3' \" North. Lonoitude 88° 20' Sr Ensfc. 

Heij^litof tlie Cistern of tlie SLiiulanl Uaroinetcr above the sea level, 3 8.11 feet. 

Daily Means, &c. of the Oi)servatioiis iiiid of the Jl3'gronietrieal elements 

(lepeiuleiifc Lliereon. 





o ^ 


I?ange 


3f the I5arometer 




I'aiige 


of the Tenipeva- 




'-< O *J 


during the c 


UJ. 




tnre <. 


liiving- the 


; d<iy„ 












^1 








Date. 






















d ^ 










1 c.« 


IMax. 


Min. 


Diff. 


5 S, 


Max. 


Tdin. 


Di{F 




Inches. 


Inches. 


Inches. 


Inches. 











o 


1 


29.915 


29.992 


29.869 


0.123 


72.8 


82.8 


G6A 


16A 


2 


.918 


.994 


.854 


.140 


74.2 


84.5 


67. 5 


17.0 


3 


.928 


30.008 


.880 


.128 


75.4 


84.3 


69.9 


14.4 


4 


.908 


.063 


.914 


.119 


09.5 


77.5 


63.5 


14.0 


5 


.991 


.084 


.921 


.163 


05.5 


7o.0 


58.4 


16.0 


6 


30.007 


.093 


.947 


.146 


64.7 


75.0 


55.3 


19.7 


7 


29.997 


.070 


.950 


.120 


61.2 


70.0 


64.4 


21.6 


8 


30.014 


.110 


.989 


.121 


06.8 


79.0 " 


57.0 


22.0 


9 


.060 


.143 


.996 


.147 


67.5 


79.9 


50.5 


23.4 


iO 


29.970 


.051 


.894 


.157 


08.5 


80.8 


57.6 


23.2 


U 


.901 


29.971 


.848 


.123 


72.4 


86.5 


60.9 


25.6 


12 


.9J.7 


30.008 


.894 


.114 


74.8' 


88.4 


63.5 


24.9 


13 


.966 


.012 


.913 


.129 


75.3 


88.0 


. 66.2 


21.8 


U 


.902 


29.978 


.821 


.157 


75.6 


88.5 


63.5 


25.0 


15 


.817 


.892 


.751 


.141 


77.6 


90.0 


68.5 


21.5 


16 


.828 


.917 


.772 


.145 


78.7 


89.2 


72.0 


17.2 


17 


.791 


.867 


.737 


.130 


77.3 


87.5 


09.0 


18.5 


18 


.827 


.887 


.778 


.109 


75.5 


87.0 


69.5 


17.5 


19 


.935 


30.026 


.838 


.188 


71.8 


79.4 


66.0 


12.9 


20 


.980 


.002 


.920 


.142 


70.2 


81.0 


62.0 


19.0 


21 


.912 


.000 


.817 


.153 


71.2 


82.5 


62.0 


20.5 


22 


.871 


29.951 


.804 


.147 


72.8 


83.5 


63.0 


20.5 


23 


.789 


.870 


.710 


.160 


77.1 


86.0 


70.5 


16.0 


24, 


.772 


.812 


.707 


.135 


78.4 


87.0 


72.5 


15.0 


25 


.878 


.963 


.821 


.142 


73.9 


82.0 


66.0 


10.0 


26 


.911 


30.019 


.892 


.127 


73.8 


85.0 


63.2 


21.8 


27 


.929 


29.999 


.8(i3 


.136 


75.7 


86.5 


68.5 


18.0 


28 


.812 


.917 


.7cSl 


■.136 


78.0 


87.5 


71.0 


10.5 


29 


.810 


.885 


.761 


.134 


80.2 


90.0 


74.0 


lO.O 



'Die Mean Height of the I3aronieter, as likewise the Dry and "Wet ilulb 
Thcnnonieter i\reans are dei'ived, from the Jiourly observations, made at the 
several hours during the day. 



X Meteorulogical Ohservulions. 

Abstract of the Results of the IlourJi/ Meteorological Ohservafiont 
taken at the Snrrei/or GeneraVs OJjice, Calcutta^ 
in the month of Fehruarij 1876. 



Dai I J TMeans, ka. of tlie Ohserrnlions and of Mie jr3'grometi'ical elt-nients 
dependent tliereon. — {Continued. ) 





u 


-ti 


-ti 


^ 


o 


i.^ 


O o Pl 


'? i . 




g 


<» 




<1> 

p 

a) 


01 

o 
u 


P, (j3 

05 ttj 

> o 






Date. 


pi 
W . 


4) 
O 


P 


o 


^2 




1 f-l ID 


0.2 bC 

01 p, d 








O 

P. 

g 

Q 




(V) t- 




53 ^ ^ 
PI '^^ 
O O p, 


fcr. cP 




% 


p 


o 


p 


^ 


^r- 


< 


^ 




o 





o 


o 


Fnclies. 


T. g.-. 


T. gv. 




1 


66.8 


6.0 


62.0 


10.8 


0.559 


6.11 


2.60 


0.70 


2 


68.8 


5.4 


65.0 


9.2 


.617 


.75 


.34 


.74 


3 


68.0 


6.9 


63.7 


11.7 


.591 


.43 


3.00 


.68 


4 


58.6 


10.9 


49.9 


19.6 


.372 


4.10 


.78 


.52 


5 


51.5 


11.0 


45.7 


19.8 


.322 


3.57 


.41 


• .51 


6 


51.2 


10.5 


45.8 


18.9 


.323 


.60 


.20 


.53 


7 


54.7 


9.5 


46.1 


18.1 


.327 


.63 


.06 


.51 


S 


57.5 


9.3 


50.1 


16.7 


.375 


4.11 


.12 


.57 


9 


57.8 


9.7 


50.0 


17.5 


.373 


.13 


.29 


.56 


10 


59.7 


88 


52.7 


15.8 


.409 


.52 


.13 


.59 


11 


63.1 


9.3 


55.7 


16.7 


.453 


.96 


.61 


.58 


12 


65.1 


9.7 


58.3 


16.5 


.491 


6.37 


■ .89 


.58 


13 


65.7 


9.6 


59.0 


16.3 


.506 


.51 


.89 


.59 


U 


65.9 


9.7 


59.1 


16.5 


.508 


.52 


.96 


.58 


15 


" 69.2 


8.4 


63.3 


11.3 


.581 


6.33 


.74 


.(;3 


16 


71.2 


7.5 


65.9 


12.8 


.636 


.88 


.53 


X^(^ 


17 


67.9 


9.4 


61.3 


16.0 


.516 


5.92 


4.06 


.59 


18 


70.5 


5.0 


67.0 


8.0 


.659 


7.17 


2.29 


.76 


19 


63.1 


8.7 


56.1 


15.7 


.459 


5.03 


3.42 


.60 


20 


59.7 


10.5 


51.3 


18.9 


.390 


4.29 


.76 


.53 


21 


60.5 


10.7 


51.9 


19.3 


.398 


.38 


.92 


.53 


22 


61.3 


8.5 


57.5 


15.3 


.481 


5.27 


.41 


.61 


23 


71.5 


5.6 


67.6 


9.5 


.672 


7.29 


2.63 


.71 


21 


71.9 


6.5 


67.3 


11.1 


.'om 


.21 


3.10 


.70 


25 


60.6 


13.3 


51.3 


22.6 


.390 


4.25 


4.76 


.47 


26 


65.0 


8.8 


, 58.8 


15.0 


.503 


5.48 


3.50 


.61 


27 


70.1 


5.6 


66.2 


9.5 


.612 


6.98 


2.53 


.73 


2S 


73.0 


5.0 


69.5 


8.5 


.715 


7.74 


.45 


.76 


29 


72.4 


7,8 

! 


66...a... 

1 


. 13.3 


.657 


.09 


3.79 


.65 



All tlic Hj'gi-oineU-icul clemeuts are computed by the Greenwicli Coustants. 



Meteorological Observations 



XI 



Abstract of the Results of tlie llonrlj/ Meteorological Olservationt 

taken at the Sarveijor General's Office, Calcutta, 

in the month of Fehrnary 1876. 

Houfly Means, <&c. of the Observations and of the Ifygrometrical elements 

dependent thereon. 





o =« 


J?ange of the Barometer 


•B 


Eange 


of the Tempera- 




•+2 0) . 


for each liour diiriiig 
tlie montli. 


E3 ^^ 


ture for each hour 
duriiie" the month. 


















Hour. 


















4J -^ 


Max. 


Min. 


DifF. 


s 


Max. 


Min. 


DiOT, 












tin 










Inches. 


Indies. 


Indies. 


Indies. 








o 


o 


Mid- 


















night. 


29.916 


30.086 


29.735 


0.351 


68.5 


75.0 


59.2 


15.8 


1 


.907 


.072 


.730 


.342 


67.9 


75.0 


58.0 


17.0 


2 


.895 


.064 


.717 


.347 


67.3 


74.8 


57.5 


17.3 


3 


.885 


.057 


.707 


.350 


66.8 


74.5 


56.8 


17.7 


4 


.881 


.046 


.714 


.332 


66.3 


74.4 


56.0 


18.4 


6 


.894 


.063 


.725 


.338 


65.8 


74.3 


• 55.5 


18.8 


6 


.911 


.076 


.747 


.329 


65.4 


74.2 


55.0 


19.2 


7 


.931 


.095 


.771 


.324 


65-2 


74.0 


51.4 


19.6 


8 


.957 


.120 


.807 


.313 


66.8 


75.4 


57.5 


17.9 


9 


.979 


.141 


.824 


.317 


70.8 • 


77.9 


63.0 


14.9 


10 


.990 


.143 


.842 


.301 


74.5 


80.5 


66.0 


14.5 


11 


.978 


.128 


.830 


.298 


77.9 


84.3 


69.0 


15.3 


Noon. 


.951 


.091 


.813 


.278 


80.1 


86.6 


70,5 


16.1 


1 


.918 


.060 


.780 


.280 


81.9 


88.0 


73.0 


15.0 


2 


.887 


.027 


.739 


.288 


83.1 


89.4 


74.0 


15.4 


3 


.867 


.007 


.728 


.279 


83.8 


90.0 


75.0 


15.0 


4 


.860 


29.996 


.713 


.283 


83.4 


90.0 


74.4 


15. G 


5 


.860 


30.005 


•710 


.295 


81.9 


89.0 


73.0 


16.0 


6 


.868 


.018 


•714 


.304 


78.1 


85.4 


69.5 


15.9 


7 


.882 


.044 


• 726 


.318 


74.9 


82.0 


67.0 


15.0 


8 


.901 


.066 


•748 


.318 


72.8 


79.5 


64.2 


15,3 


9 


.915 


.080 


•757 


.323 


71.3 


78.5 


62.5 


16.0 


10 


.925 


.092 


•774 


.318 


70.2 


77.0 


61.0 


16.0 


11 


.922 


.096 


•754 


.342 


69.3 


77.3 


60.4 


16.9 



The Mean Height of the Barometer, as likewise the Drj' and Wet Bulb. 
Thermometer Means are derived from the observations made at t'he several 
hours during the month. 



sii Meteorological Olservafions. 

Abstract of the Results of the llonrly Meteorological Ohservatiom 

iaicen at the Surveyor General's Oflce, Calcutta, 

in the month of February 1876. 



Hourly Means, &c. of tlie Obserrations and of tlie Hygrometrical elenients 
dependent tliereon. — (Gont'inned) . 


























0) 




^ 


~o 


c .^ 




p i 






^ 


"o 


P 




^J o 


P P 

1^ m k> 




r.Q 


o 


. 


m 


o 


t+_j 4J 


•SI '-^ '-3 


^<-. ... -^^ 


Hour. 




o 


P 


> 
o 


CO 


O O 




fc/, S fl 


' 


t 2 


-3 

p 


p. 

a 

o 
O 


P^ 


pa 




■2 o P' 


.^8J 
S--.2 




o 


o 


o 





Indies. 


T. sr. 


T. gr. 




Mid- 


















iiiglil.. 


64.6 


3.9 


61.5 


7.0 


0.550 


6.07 


1.58 


0.79 


1 


64.2 


3.7 


61.2 


6.7 


.544 


.01 


.50 


.80 


2 


63.8 


3.5 


61.0 


6.3 


.541 


5.99 


.38 


.81 


3 


63.-1 


3.4 


60.7 


6.1 


.536 


.93 


.33 


.82 


4 


63.0 


3.3 


60.4 


5.9 


.530 


.88 


.27 


.82 


5 


62.6 


3.2 


60.0 


6.8 ■ 


.523 


.80 


.24 


.82 


6 


62.2 


3-2 


59.6 


5.8 


.516 


.73 


.22 


.82 


7 


61.8 


3.4 


69.1 


6.1 


.508 


.64 


.27 


.82 


8 


62.0 


4.3 . 


59.1 


7.7 


.508 


.62 


.64 


. .77 


9 


63.8 


7.0 


5S.2 


12.6 


.493 


.41 


2.79 


.66 


10 


64.6 


9.9 


57.7 


1(3.8 


.485 


.27 


3.91 


.57 


11 


65.1 


12.8 


56.1 


21.8 


.459 


4.97 


5.19 


.49 


Noon. 


64.9 


15.2 


54.3 


25.8 


.432 


.66 


6.18 


.43 


1 


65.3 


16.6 


53.7 


28.2- 


.423 


.55 


.89 


.40 


2 


65.7 


17.4 


53.5 


29.6 


.421 


.51 


7.35 


.38 


.3 


65.7 


18.1 


53.0 


30.8 


.414 


.42 


.68 


.37 


4 


65.2 


18.2 


52.5 


30.9 


.407 


.36 


.60 


.37 


6 


65.8 


16.1 


54.5 


27.4 


.435 


.68 


6.76 


.41 


6 


67.1 


11.0 


59.4 


18.7 


.513 


5.54 


4.68 


.54 


7 


66.4 


8.5 


60.4 


14.5 


.530 


.77 


3.51 


.62 


8 


65.7 


7.1 


60.0 


12.8 


.523 


.72 


2.99 


M 


9 


35.3 


6.0 


60.5 


10.8 


.532 


.84 


.49 


.70 


30 


65.2 


5.0 


61.2 


9.0 


.544 


.99 


.06 


.74 


11 


65.0 


4.3 


61.6 


7.7 


.552 


6.07 


1.76 


.78 



All tli'D Hygforaetrical elements are computed b)' the Greenwicb Constants. 



Meteorological Ohservaiions, 



Xlll 



Abstract of the Besulls of the llonrlij Hileteorologual Ohservatiom 

taken at the Surveyor GeneraVs Office, Calcutta, 

in the month of Februarij 1876. 

Soliu- I'adinlioii, Wcaflief. &c. 





*^ 












r— • 


a 




o 


o 




m 


"rt 




V, 
si 




"rt 


•^ 


p 


% 


•rt 



53 O • 



Wind. 



ci ^ 2 ! Prevailing 
"5 "T^ i direction. 






General aspect of tlie Sky. 



Inches [by S 

11 J36.5 ... S W, S SW&W 



138.0 

135.0 

132.0 
136. 
13ii.4 

130.4 

132.2 

134.2 



10 135.8 



\\ 



138.5 



12 137.8 

13 138.0 

14 137.0 

15 135.5 

16 137.5 

17 134.0 
18i 133.5 



1.58 



S W & S by W 

S S W & N by E 

N N E, N & N W 
NNW,NW&SW 
SW,NE&WSW 

s w& s s w 

S W & Variable 

w & s w 

S W & S by W 
S by W & S S W 



s s w & s w 

S S W & W by S 
S W & S by W 

[& s w 

S by W, S S W 
Variable 

S S W & Variable 
Vai'iable 



0.2 



6.5 



Mile. 

79.6 B to 4, Scuds to 8, \i to 
10 a.m., 13 to 12, v_i to 1. B to 
lip. M. Foggy from Midnigbt 
to 4 A. M. at 7, 8 & 11 p. M. 

95.1 I O to 10 A. M., B to 11 p. M. 
IFoggy from Midnight 'to 4 a. m. 

118.6 ! S'to 2, O to 8 A. M., B to 11 
p. M. Foggy from 7 to 11 p. m. 

121.8 i B. 

] 60.4 ! .■'3. Slightly foggy at 8 .fe 9 p.m. 

1U5.0 ! B. to 1, \i to 5, B to 11 p. M. 

Slightly foggy from 8 to 11 p. m. 

84.3 i B. Foggy from Midnight to 

6 A. M. & 8 to 10 P.M. 

81.0 I B. Slightly foggy from 9 to 
ill p. jr. 

75.7 ! B to 4, \i to 6. B to 11 p. m. 
iSlightlv foggy from Midnight 
to 6 a."m. &. at 9-& 10 p. M. 

61.1 I -B to 11 A. M., \i to 11 p. M. 
Slightly foggy at 6 & 7 A. m. 

lOS.l B to 11 A!M.,\i to 1, Bto5, 
\i to 8, B to 11 p. M. Slightly 
foggy at 1 & 2 & from 5 to 

■7 A. M. 

134.7 Chiefly B. 

89.7 B. Foggv from 4 to 7 a. m. 
& at 10 cfe'ii p. M. 

72.0 B to2, \i & v_i to 8 A. M., 
B to 12, \i to 4, B to 11 p. M. 

150 7 B. 

107.0 B to 1, S to 8 A. M., B to 11 

p. jr. 
113.6 B. 

94.1 Bto 1, \i to 3 A. M , ^i to 3, 
O to 11 p. M. T from 3 J to 6 & 
at 10 p. M. L at 5}, 10 & 1 1 p. m. 
']{. from 3.^ to 7 k U to lOJ- p. m. 



\iCirri, — i Strati, ^ i Cumuli, \_i Cirro-; 
Vi Cirro, — cumuli-B clear, S stratoni 
E. rain, D, drizzle. 



strati. '^-i Cumulo-strati,\^_i Nimbi, 
overcast, T thunder, L lightning, 



XIV 



Meteorological Obserraliofis. 



Abslracl of the Nesiill.<i of the Ihnirli/ Meteorological Observations 

taken at the Snrvei/or General's OJjice, Cahutia, 

ill the month of Feljniarij 187G. 

Sol;ir ]\;idi!ition. Wcatlior, Ac. 



o o 



tr. ^ . 

o'^ 3 



Wind. 



Prevailing 
direction. 






>^ :^ I General aspect of the Skr. 

rt o 
P .13 



39 127.0 



20 

21 

22 



134.8 

136.0 
134.0 
23 133.7 



24 

25 

26 
27 

28 
29 



136.8 

136.0 

132.6 
135.3 

138.0 
135.2 



Inches 
1.35 



N E, N & N N W 

s w & w s w 

S W & N W 
S W & S by W 
S by W & S S W 

S by W & S W 

N N W, W & S 

W by S A W 

S W & S by W 

S by W,S SW & S 
S !S W & S W, 



0.2 

0.2 
6.3 

0.2 



0.2 
0.2 



Miles. 
145.2 

115.6 

109.2 
118.6 
160.4 

231.9 

161.2 

98.0 
68.5 

169.5 
238.6 



O to 9 A. M., Vi to 2, B to 
1 1 p. SI. Foggy from 8 to 11 p. m. 
R from 2i to 3| a. m. 

13. Slightly foggy from 7 to 
9 p. M. 

B to3, ^ito6, B to 11 p. M. 

B. 

B to2, O to 10 A.M., \_i to 
4, \i to 7, S to 11 p. M. Foggy 
from 3 to 5 A. m. Sheet L on 
N E at \\\ p. M. 

B to 4 A. M., v_i to 6, B to 
11 p. M. 

B to 7, \i to 9 A. M., B to 5, 
\i to 7, B to 11 p. M. 

B. 

Chiefly B. Foggy from 2 to 

8 A. M. 

Chiefly B. 

rf\ to 7 A. M., B to 11 p. M. 



\i Cirri, — i Strati, ><\ Cumuli, v_i Cirro-strati, ^i Cumulo-strati, v^i Nimbi, 
Vi Cirro-cumuli, B clear, S stratoni, O overcast, T thunder, L lightning 
U. rain, D. drizzle. 



Meleorological Observations. 



XV 



Abstract of the Jiesults of the llourti/ Meteoroluri'ical Observations 
taken at the Sarvei/or GeneraVs Office, Calcutta, 
in the month oj February 1876. 

Monthly Eesults. 



Mean lieiglit of tlie Barometer, for tlie moiitli 
Max.lieigiitoftlie Barometer occurred at IOa.ii. on tlie 9tli ... 
Min. lieiglit of tlie Barometer occurred at 3 a. m. on the 24th 
Hxtveme range of tlie Barometer during the month 
Mean of the daily Max. Pressures 
Ditto ditto Min. ditto 
Mean daity range of the Barometer during the mouth ... 



Indies. 
. 29.912 
. 30.143 
. 29.707 
. 0.436 
, 29.990 
. 29.850 
. 0.140 



Mean Dry Bulb Thermometer for the month 

Max. Temperature occurred at 3 & 4 p. m. on tlio loth & 29th 

Min. Temperature occurred at 7 a. m. on the 7th 

Extreme range of the Temperature during tlie month 

Mean of tlie daily Max. Temperature 

Ditto ditto Min. ditto, 
Mean daily range of the Temperatiu'e during the month ... 



o 

73.1 

90,0 
54.4 
35.6 
83.9 
64.8 
19.1 



Mean Wet Bull) Thermometer for the month 

Mean Dry Bulb Thermometer above Mean "Wet Bulb Thermometer 

Computed Mean Dcn^-poiut for the month ... 

Mean Dry Bulb Thermometer above computed mean Dew-point 



Mean Elastic force of Vapour for the month 



64.5 

8.6 

57.6 

15.5 

Indies. 
0.483 



Troy grain. 
Mean Weight of Yapour for the month ... ... ... 5.27 

Additional Weight of Yapour ref[uirod for complete saturation ... 3.52 
Mean degree of humidity for the month, complete saturation being unity 0.60 



Mean Max. Solar radiation Thermouieter for the month 



o 
135.0 



Eaiucd 2 days, — ]\Tax. fall of rain during 24 hours 

Total amount of rain during the month 

Total ainountof rain indicated by the Gauge* attached to the anemo- 

meLor during the month 
Prevailing direction of the Wind ... S. W. k S. S. W. 



Inches. 
. 1.58 
2.93 

2.45 



* ileijjlU 70 feet 10 iachcs nbovo grouud, 



XVI 



Meteorological Observations. 



^ 






V 












^^ 


*p 


T-! 


s 


p 


a^ 


o 


u 


^ 




o 


ci 







o 


r^ 


rO 


ti 


ni 


rn 


C^ 




C3 




^ 


ts 


o 


u 


tS 




a 


i-; 


cb 




^ 


Co 


■•? 


^1 







p. 


H 


u 


>^ 


t-1 


p 


p 


(/7 


r^ 




w 


i=l 


■^ 


Ol 


rJ=l 


W 


■fac 




H 


-(J 


o 


a 




rd 


O 


-1 





O o ^ 



« ^ 






J^ 



fcd 



'k. 



« r^ 



c^ 



^ 



H 



■uo UlUJJ^ 






■AV -iSI -xSE 


-- 


rt 1-1 CI CI 07 CO CI r-1 r-H 


-< 


.-<ClrHr-lr-(r-.rt^.-(05 


•uo uiTjjj; 




• A\ -M 




1-1 i-< r-1 t-. -51 0-1 


^ 


t~ rfl C-l CC CO CO CO CI r-l r-. 



•UO nii;j[ 



:av 

•uo U1L,'J£ 



C-1 r-^ CO CO CI I 



■uo U1UJ£ 

■Ai'S-Ai 



•uo UU:jJ[ 



•uo uitJjj; 



'iVi Aq •§ 



•uo uiBjj; 

:s__ 

•uo UITJJJ^ 





rH CO CO « 


(M 


rH IQ CO »> CO CI f-l 




^ 


I-H CI rH Ol rt — . rH ^ 


'-' 


CI C) CO C^ CI CI CI r-( rt rH 



CJT3< T? COffl-^r-iCCOCldi 



-* i:Dj>t>cDi>Ccccooaoco -"i" u5-<Ticocooo5t^-*-*c-5-5i 



CO C5a5C31>OCDa500COCOTjl lO i-li— .C'llO<y>CC«DC0lOO5Q0 



CD lOSDCOCOO^G-lr-iO^COi-li-l 1-1 i-.C0r-lrHr-iCJ00a>GJa3 



CO 1-1 CJ CJ ca CI CI CO CI CI 



r^ CI rt 1-1 



•uo uroji; 



"UO UjtJJJ^ 



■51 -S -[.I 



•uo UII!J[ 



•s -iq -iL 



•UO un!|[ 



■y[ 




•uo uti.'jj; 

•51 -JsT 



•no uiv}£ 



•uo uii!'}i; 



"51 -^'q "xSI 



•uo un!}X 



\N[ 



1— t-< .-I CI ^ 



r-H 1-. p-l Cl CI 



rH rH CI CI CO 



T-. CI CO -* 'C tt t^ 5C' "^ - '-' S 



?i r.. ■* ic cc t^ OC' oi o ' 



Meteorological Obsenalions. 



xvu 



Abstract of the llesnlls of the Hourly Meteorological Ohservalions 

taken at the Sarvei/or General's 0§ice, Calcutta, 

iu the month of March 1876. 

Liititiide 22° 33' \" Norili/ Long-itude 88° 20' 3i''' East. 

Heii^litof tlje Cisteni of tlie Standard Barometer above tlie sea level, 18.11 feet. 

Dailj Means, &c. of the Observations and of tbe Ifygrometrical elemeiits 

dependent tliereon. 





O ^ 


Eange 


af tbe Barometer 


3 ^ 


Eange 


of tlie Tempera- 




Wrgo 
^ PR 'M 


during tbe c 


aj. 


pq S 

fig 


ture during tbe diiy. 


Date. 






















^ V 










Max. 


Min. 


DilF. 




Max. 


Miu. 


Diff 




Indies. 


Fncbes. 


Indies. 


Indies. 











o 


1 


29.839 


29.918 


29.761 


0.157 


78.2 


85.2 


71.5 


13.7 


2 


.835 


.902 


.776 


.126 


76.7 


83.2 


69.0 


14.2 


3 


.838 


.902 


.782 


.120 


72.7 


79.7 


67.5 


12.2 


4 


.851 


.907 


.801 


.106 


76.8 


86.0 


69.0 


17.0 


5 


.881 


.906 


.820 


.116 


79.0 


86.5 


74.0 


12.5 


6 


.8-12 


.910 


.762 


.118 


78.7 


85.5 


73.6 


11.9 


7 


.831 


.899 


.780 


.119 


79.3 


86.6 


• 73.7 


12.9 


8 


.890 


.970 


.827 


.113 


77.9 


86.0 


70.5 


15.5 


9 


.925 


30.016 


.85(5 


.160 


78.2 


87.5 


71.5 


16.0 


iO 


.917 


.020 


.855 


.165 


78.3 


86.3 


73.5 


12-.8 


11 


.901 


29.965 


.819 


.M6 


77.8 ■ 


87.5 


71.5 


16.0 


12 


.929 


30.005 


.880 


.125 


77.2 


85.6 


70.5 


15.1 


13 


.952 


.033 


.901 


.129 


79.5 


87.6 


73.0 


14.6 


U 


.873 


29.961 


.789 


.172 


81.2 


89.7 


74.5 


15.2 


15 


.813 


.891 


.716 


.145 


81.3 


89.5 


74.0 


15.5 


\^ 


.776 


.812 


.667 


.175 


81.2 


92.0 


73.0 


19.0 


17 


.833 


.907 


.787 


.120 


82.8 


91.3 


77.0 


14.3 


18 


.883 


.967 


.832 


.135 


82.2 


90.2 


75.5 


14.7 


19 


.869 


.911 


.795 


.119 


82.5 


91.3 


75.5 


15.8 


20 


.902 


.973 


.811 


.129 


83.0 


92.5 


75.7 


16.8 


21 


.890 


.972 


.808 


.164 


83.3 


92.5 


76.5 


16.0 


22 


.807 


.876 


.721 


.152 


83.9 


92.2 


77.8 


14.4 


23 


.703 


.789 


.577 


.212 


85.1 


93.0 


79.5 


13.5 


21 


.660 


.738 


.592 


.146 


85.5 


95.0 


79.2 


15.8 


25 


.698 


.777 


.626 


.151 


81.2 


95.0 


75.0 


20.0 


26 


.711 


.806 


.678 


.128 


81.3 


91.2 


77.0 


17.2 


27 


.778 


.851 


.722 


.129 


81.3 


92.4 


80.0 


12.4 


28 


.773 


.836 


.697 


.139 


83.5 


92.0 


77.6 


14.4 


29 


.751 


.807 


.681 


.126 


81.9 


93.5 


78.5 


15.0 


30 


.712 


.778 


.638 


.140 


85.5 


95.5 


76.7 


18.8 


31 


.076 


.732 


.601 


.128 


84.9 


93.5 


78.5 


15.0 



Tbe Mean Height of the Barometer, as lilcewise the Dry and Wet Bulb 
Thermometer I\[eans are derived, from the liourl}- observations, made at tbe 
several hours during the day. 



XVUl 



Meleorological Ohservatiojis. 



Abstract of the .Results of the Uonrli/ Meteorological Observations 

talcen at the Surveijor GeneraVs Opce, Calcutta , 

in the mouth of March 1876. 



Daily Means, Ac. of tlie Obsei'vations and of tlie ITygrometrical elements 
dependent thereon. — (Continued.) 



Date. 




0) 

o 


PI 
I 


p 


o 

O 

O 
'-(J 
CO 


p,rf 


1 Weight of 
reauired foi* 
e saturation. 


ree of Humi- 
mplete satu- 
eing unity. 




0) <o 


-Q 


Ti 


^ 


C3 ^ 


'C l^ 


■=* b "a? 


tj-J Oris 




^1 




pi 
Pi 

1 






l5 f^ 


PI P!^ 
O O p, 


Ol "^ f-( 




^ 


P 


o 


p 


^ 


^.s 


<\ 


^ 




o 


o 


o 


o 


1 Inches. 

1 


T. gr. 


T. gr. 


1 


1 


74.8 


3.4 


72.4 


6.8 


0,785 


8.50 


1,75 


'• 0.83 


2 


73.0 


3.7 


70.4 


6.3 


.736 


.00 


.80 


.82 


3 


69.9 


2.8 


67.7 


5.0 


.674 


7.39 


.29 


.85 


4 


72.0 


4.8 


63.6 


8.2 


! .695 


.55 


2.28 


.77 


5 


74.8 


4.2 


71.9 


7.1 


.773 


8.36 


.14 


.80 


6 


75.1 


3,6 


72.6 


6.1 


.790 


.56 


1.85 


.82 


7 


71.8 


7.5 


6(15 


12.8 


.648 


7.00 


3.59 


.66 


8 


G8.3 


9.6 


61.6 


16.3 


.552 


5.97 


4.19 


.59 


9 


71.7 


6,5 


67.1 


11.1 


.661 


7.16 


3.09 


.70 


]0 


73.3 


5.0 


69.8 


8,5 


.722 


.81 


2.47 


.76 


11 


73.7 


4,1 


70,8 


7,0 


.746 


8.09 


.04 


.80 


12 


72.9 


4,3 


69.9 




.725 


7.87 


.08 


■ .79 


13 


71.5 


8,0 


65.9 


13,6 


.636 


6,86 


3.80 


.64 


14 


75.3 


5.9 


71.2 


10,0 


.756 


8,13 


.08 


.73 


15 


. 70.8 


10.5 


63.4 


17,9 


.586 


6.29 


4,95 


.56 


}Q 


76.7 


4.5 


73.5 


7.7 


.814 


8.76 


2.45 


.78 


i7 


74.9 


7,9 


69.4 


13.4 


.713 


7.66 


4,09 


.65 


18 


72.4 


9.8 


65.5 


16.7 


.628 


6.74 


.80 


.58 


19 


73.4 


9,1 


67.0 


155 


.659 


7.07 


.57 


.61 


20 


74.1 


8,9 


67.9 


15.1 


.679 


.28 


.54 


.62 


21 


77.4 


5,9 


73,3 


10.0 


.809 


8.66 


3.27 


.73 


22 


78.9 


5,0 


75.4 


8.5 


.865 


9.26 


2,87 


.76 


23 


78.7 


6.4 


74,2 


10.9 


.833 


8,89 


3,68 


.71 


21 


74,8 


10,7 


67,3 


18.2 


.606 


7.10 


6.62 


.56 


25 


73.3 


10.9 


65,7 


18.5 


.632 


6.75 


.49 


.55 


26 


77.2 


7.1 


73.2 


12.1 


.781 


8.34 


3,94 


.68 


27 


78.7 


5.6 


74.8 


9.5 


.819 


9.07 


.21 


.74 


28 


78.5 


5.0 


75.0 


8.5 


.854 


.14 


2.86 


.76 


29 


7cS.6 


6.3 


74.2 


10.7 


.832 


8.89 


3,60 


.71 


30 


7G.2 


9.3 


69.7 


15.8 


.720 


7.68 


5.04 


.60 


31 


79.0 


5.9 


74.9 


10.0 


.851 


9.09 


3,40 


.73 



All the H3gi'ometrical elements are coin]>uted by tlie Greenwidi Constants. 



Meteorological Observations 



XIX 



Abstract of the Results of the llourh/ 'Meteorological Observations 

taken at the Snrve//or General's Office, Calcutta, 

in the month of March 1876. 



Tlourly Means, Ac. of tlie 01)servafcions and of the HygvomeLrioal elemenfca 

dependent tlH-reou. 



Hour. ^ ^o 



Jtange of tlie ]];u-oiiieter 

for encli lionr during 

tlie inoiitli. 



7=^ . \ 3{<inti;e of tlie J empera- 
pq 2 ture tor cacli liouv 

g during the iiionlli. 

u o j- ^ — . 

fi a I ; 



Max- 



Mi n. 



Di(r. 



Max. 



Mil). 



DilL 





^-5 


















Inches. 


Fnclies. 


filches. 


filches. 











o 


Mid- 


















night. 


29.83i 


29.941 


29.670 


0.271 


77.2 


81.3 


69.0 j 


12.3 


1 


.823 


.030 


.655 


.275 


76.9 


81.0 


68.6 , 


12.4 


2 


.812 


.913 


.644 


.269 


76.6 


81.0 


68,2 ! 


12.8 


3 


.802 


.914 


.637 


.277 


76.3 


8().5 


68.0 1 


12.5 


4 


.803 


.926 


.637 


.289 


75.9 


80.5 


67.8 ! 


12.7 


5 


.814 


.948 


.61.8 


.300 


75.6 


80.0 


67.5 i 


12,5 


6 


.833 


.067 


.655 


.312 


75.2- 


80.0 


67.5 1 


125 


7 


.857 


.988 


.68 I, 


.304 


752 


80.0 


67.8 ■ 


12.2 


8 


.878 


30.002 


.712 


.290 


76.7 


81.4 


68.4 


13.0 


9 


.803 


.025 


.728 


.297 


79.7 ■ 


84.0 


71.7 1 


12.8 


10 


.81)7 


.033 


.732 


.301 


82.4 


87.5 


73.7 , 


13.8 


11 


.888 


.022 


.721 


.301 


84.7 


91.0 


7'6.0 ! 


15.0 


Noon. 


.862 


29.999 


.696 


.303 


86.6 


93.5 


78.0 


15.5 


1 


.835 


.988 


.662 


.326 


88.0 


94.4 


78.8 


15.6 


2 


.803 


.950 


.625 


.325 


88.8 


95.0 


79.1 


15.9 


3 


.779 


.928 


.602 


.326 


89.3 


95.3 


79.7 


15,6 


4 


.764 


.913 


.502 


.321 


89.0 


95.5 


79.5 


16.0 


6 


.7fil 


.913 


.588 


.325 


87.9 


93.8 


78,5 


153 


6 


.770 


.910 


•577 


.333 


85.3 


91.3 


73.0 


18.3 


7 


.784 


.017 


• 602 


.315 


82.5 


87.5 


74.6 


12,9 


8 


.806 


.914 


.62i) 


.315 


80.7 


86.0 


73.0 


13.0 


9 


.827 


.946 


•6 15 


.301 


79.5 


84.5 


71.5 


13.0 


JO 


.837 


.9 1:8 


• 681 


.267 


78.3 


83.5 


70.0 


13.5 


11 


.839 


.959 


.68L 


.278 


77.6 


83.0 


69.0 


14.0 



The Mean ffeight of the Earonieter, as lilcewi.se the Dry and Wet Bulb. 
Therinoinelcr j\roans are derived from the observations imule at tiie several 
hours durinfi; the month. 



XX 



3[eleoroIogical Olservations. 



Ahslract of iJie liesnlls of the IlourJf/ Uleleorological Olseyvaliom 

taken at the Snrvet/or General's Office, Calcutta, 

in the month of March 1876. 



Jloui-ly Means, &c. of the Observations and of tlie Ilygrometrical elements 
dependent thei'eon. — (Contbnted). 





A 

a 


<» 


'o 




o 


1^ 
P,S 


ght of 
ed for 
ation. 






rQ 


m 




Cl 


o 


'^ +3 




'j-, .. -1^ 


Hour. 


-9 

pq 


o 


l> 
o 


'-+3 


O O 




gree o 
mplete 
ng uni 




5n ° 


-9 

pq 


-4-5 

a 


t>» o 




1 =« 




Mean de 
dity, CO 
tion bei 




^a 




o 
O 


fi^ 


^.^ 


^r- ■ 


^kS 

















Tnclies. 


T. gr. 


T. gr. 




Mid- 


















liiglit. 


74.6 


2.6 


72.8 


4.4 


0.795 


8.64 


1.31 


0.87 


1 


74.5 


2.4 


72.8 


4.1 


.795 


.64 


.22 


.88 


2 


74.3 


2.3 


72.7 


3.9 


.792 


.61 


.16 


.88 


3 


74.2 


2.1 


72.7 


8.6 


.792 


.61 


.08 


.89 


4 


74.0 


1.9 


72.7 


3.2 


.792 


.63 


0.94 


.90 


5 


73.9 


1.7 


72.7 


2.9 


.792 


.63 


.85 


.91 


6 


73.4 


rs 


72.1 


3.1 


.778 


.48 


.89 


.91 


7 


73.2 


2.0 


71.8 . 


3.4 


.771 


.40 


.97 


.90 


8 


74.0 


2.7 


72.1 


4.6 


.778 


.41 


1.36 


.86 


9 


74.7 


5.0 


71.2 


8.5 


.756 


.15 


2.57 


.76 


10 


74.9 


7.5 


69.6 


12.8 


.717 


7.69 


3.92 


m 


11 


74.7 


10.0 


67.7 


17.0 


.674 


.21 


5.21 


.68 


Noon. 


74.4 


12.2 


67.1 


19.5 


.661 


.03 


6.11 


.54 


1 


74.9 


13.1 


67.0 


21.0 


.659 


6.99 


.69 


.51 


2 


7o3 


13.5 


67.2 


21.6 


.664 


7.03 


.97 


.50 


3 


75.5 


]3.8 


67.2 


22.1 


.661 


.03 


7.18 


.50 


4 


75.1 


13.9 


66.8 


22.2 


.655 


6.94 


.14 


.49 


5 


75.5 


12.4 


68.1 


19.8 


.681 


7.25 


6.39 


.53 


6 


75.6 


9.7 


68.8 


16.5 


.699 


.45 


5.19 


.59 


7 


75.0 


7.5 


69.7 


12.8 


.720 


.72 


3.92 


.66 


8 


74.7 


6.0 


70.5 


10.2 


.739 


.97 


.C7 


.72 


9 


74.4 


5.1 


70.8 


8.7 


.746 


8.05 


2.61 


.76 


10 


74.3 


4.0 


71.5 


6.8 


.763 


.26 


,02 


.80 


11 


74.4 


3.2 


72.2 


5.4 


.781 


.46 


1.61 


.84 



All the Hygrometrical elements are computed by the Greenwich Constants. 



Meteorological Observations, 



Abstract of the Jiesnlls of the llonrh/ Meteorological Observations 

taken at the Snrvei/or General's Oj/'ice, Calcutta, 

in tJie month of March 1876. 

Solar Ikadiafiou, Weatlier. SiC 





u 








TT fl 




O o 




aj,3 




. d 


p 


Max 
radi 






Wind. 



Prevailing 
direction. 



S ^ .-^ ■ General aspect of tlie Sky. 



m -r- o 



P^ 



fi i: 



o Tnclics 
132.0 1.53 S W k S 



1 

2 125.0 0.16 

[ 

3 131.0 O.GO 



137.5 
111.0 

130.1; ... 
135.0 0.1 C 



135.0 
137.5 



10 131.0 

11 1410 



13 



135.5 
139.2 



1.00 



12 135.0 0.01 



II) Mile. 
8.0 : 165.3 



S & S W 2.0 



139.1 



S E & S S E I 2.2 203 



s & s w 

[S s w 

S by W, S W & 



S S w & s 



118.1 
101.6 

98.5 



S E & E N E 0.2 110.3 



Tar; able 

S ct \v 

S l)y ^^^ Sc S S W 

S by \V 

S W et S S \\ 



S SW. NE.t?; E 
S W & \\ S W 



121.5 

85.8 



1.8 1 85.7 
... 117.0 



86.3 
10-). 2 



O to 7 A. Ji., ^i to 6, B to 
11 p. M. T, L & E from 5 to 7 
A. M., D at lOf A. jr. 

S to 1, v_ito6, VsitolOA. .Ar., 
-i to 3, O to 6, \-i to 8, O to 
11 p. M. T, L& E aPter inter- 
vals from 3 to 11 p. Ji. 

O to 5, r,_ i to 8, O to 11 A. M., 
"i to 5, -^-i to 8, 13 to 11 p. m. 
L from Midnight to 2 a. sr. at 
7 & 8 p. M. T & II from Mid- 
night to 2 at 10 A. M., 5 & 6 p. jr. 

13 to 9 A. 31., ^i to •!■, \i to 6, 

ii to 11 p. II. 

B to 4, S to 8 A. 31., ^i Jk Vi 
to 5, B to 11 p. 31. Foggy from 

5 to 8 A. 31. 

B to 3 A. 31., ^i Si Vi to J. V_i 
to8.Vitollp.3i. T.i(iLatlUp.3i. 

O to 7 A. 51., B to 11 p. 31. T 

at Midnight &, 1 a. 3i., L from 
Midnight to 5 a. 3I., 11 at Mid- 
night & 4 A. 31. 

B. 

B to 5, ^i to 10 A. 31.; 
12, v_i to 3, B to 11 p. 31. 

B to 5, ^i to 11 A. 31., 
8, B to 11 p. 31. 

B to 5, Vi to 9 A. it., -i to 4, 
O to 8, Vi to 11 p. 31. T, L k 
li from 5. J to 8 p. 31. 

Vi to 6 A. 31., r^i to 3, \i to 
5, B to 8, \i to 11 p. 31. Light 
11 at 2 a. 31. 

B to 4, \i to 0, B to 11 p. sr. 

B to 5, \_i to 11 A. 31., -i to 
7, B to 1 1 p. 31. Sheet L on S 10 
at 7 p. M. 



B tc 



vi to 



\i(Jirri, — i Strati, '' i Cumuli, \_i Cirro-strati, ^ i Cunudo-strali, ^/N_i jN^iiubi, 
Vi Cirro, — cumuli-B clcai', S stratoni, overcast, T thunder, L lightning, 
E. raiu, D, drizzle. 



XXll 



Meteorological Of/servoiions, 



Abstract of' the Uesulls of the Hourly Meleorological Observations 

taken at the Survei/or Ge)ierat's Office, Calculla, 

in the month of March 1876. 

Solar Iladi.ition, Wonflier, &.c. 





■^ 


a; <0 




"z -4 


tf; > . 
















TO -.2 

7i 


o'^ i 


«J 


Vi'io 


Ciif 2 


53 

p 




Pi --1 



Wind. 



Prevailing 
direction. 



General aspect of tlie Sky. 



ti; « rt o 



15 

id 

1 

i 
I 

17 

18 

1!'! 
1^0, 

21 

22 

I 

23! 

2i: 

25' 

I 
SG 

27 



142.0 
Ml. 4. 

1-10.0 

138.0 

141.0 
141.2 

141.0 

140.0 

142.0 
U3.0 

143.0 
142.0 
140.0 



Illclii'Si 



2S 140.8 



0.54 



s w & :\ N w 
s s w 

S bj w & s 

S by W 

s w 

S ^^^ & 6 s w 

s w 

s w & s 

s s w & s w- 

S,N W&WbyS 

W S W & S S W 
S by W & S 
S by W & S 

S by W & S 



lb ,:\Iiles.j 

... I L05.4 j Sends to 3, Vi to 6 a. m., B 

to 11 p. M. 

20.0 109.5 I S to 1, B to 5, Scuds to 8, B 

j jto 11 A. M., '-itoS. Bto 11 p. jr. 

I iHiuh wind at 6 p. m. Hails at 

1 Isfp. M. Lat 7 & 8 p. II. T&ll 

from 4 to 6 p. ir. 

112.1 I S to 3. Vi to 5, ^i to 8 a. m., 

B to 11 P.M. 

SQ.Q'' B to 3, \_ito 6 A.M., \i to7, 

B to 11 p. M. 

... I 83.0 I B to 3, \i to 6, B to 11 p. m. 

0.2 j 97.5 j B to 7 A. M., \i to 7, B to 11 

I p. M. Slightly foggv at 6 A. sr. 

0.2 ! 130.7 ! B to 11 A. m., v_i to 2, \i to 

j 7, B to 11 p. M. 

... I 137.8 I B to 4, \i to 6, B to 8, '"i to 

10 A. M., ^_.i to ], \i to tl, rs\ to 

l8. B to 11 P. M. Sheet L on E 

I from 6f to 8 p. m. 
129.5 i B to 6, Xi to 8, ^i to 4, \i to 

6, B to 1 1 p. M. 
105.8 Scuds to 3. B to 11 a. m., \ i 

jto 7, B to 11 p. M. Slightly 

foggy at 6 & 7 A. M. 
108.0 i B to 2 A. M., \i to 1, B to 

11 p. M. 
106.0 I B to 3, S to 8 A. M., \i to 7, 

B to 11 p. M. 
169.3 I B to 1, S to 7, ^i to 11 a.m. 
j\i to 11 p. M. Sheet L on N E, 
from 6 1 to 8 p. M. 
0.8 161.9 \i to 10 A. M., ^i to 2, S to 
6, \i to 9, B to 11 p. M. T at 
5 p. M. Sheet L from 7 to 11 
p. M. D at 5.5 p. M. 



xi Cirri, — i Strati, ^i Cumuli, \_i Cirro-strati, '^i Cumulo-strati, v^i Nimbi, 
^^i Cirro-cumuli, B clear, S stratoni, O overcast, T thunder, L lightning 
i{. rain, D. drizzle. 



Meteorological Olservafions. 



xxiu 



Abstract of the Results of the Uourli/ Meteorological Observations 

taken at the Surveyor General's Office, Calcutta, 

la the mouth of March 1876. 

Solar Radiation, Weather, <&c., 



29 





o o 


s a 


tt > 








CO -x^ 


^ c3 r: 







Wind. 



Prevailing 
direction. 






General aspect of tlie Skj- 





144.0 



ilncljcs.] 
) 0.0] 



S & S S W 



30 141.0 0.17 S S W & S 



1.2 



31 141.0 



SbvE, S.tS S W 



Miles 
167.8 Oto 1,E to 6 A. M.,Vi fo 12, 

'i to 4, \i to 7, B to 11 r. m. 

T at If A. M Sheet L from 2 to 

4 A. M., Light Iv at If a. m. 
\i to 5, Vi to 10 A. M., B to 

3, \i to 8, O to 1 1 p. M. L from 

7 to 11 p. M. T between 8 & 9 

p. M. \i at 9| p. M. 
144.5 I ■»} to 5 A. Ji., \i to 4, B to 

11 p. M. 



170.0 



\i Cirri — i Strati, '"i Cumuli, V_i Cirro-strati, -^ i CJiimulo-strati ^^_i iN'imb, 
Vi Cirro-Ciimuli. H clear, S stratoni, overcast, T thunder, L lightiniiifi; 
Pi ruin, iX dri/izlo. 



xxir Meteorological Obsercatious. 

Ahatract of the llesulls of the llourli/ Meteorological Olservations 

taken at the Siirvei/or General's 0[jice, Calcutta, 

in the month of March 1876. 

Monthly Hesults. 



Indies. 

Mean lieit(lit of tlie IBarometer for tlie montli ... ... ... 29.825 

Mas. lieiglifcof the 13aroiiiet;ei- oecurredat 10 A. m. on tlie 13tli ... 30.033 

Mill. Leiglifc of the Baronieter occTiri-ed at 6 p. m. on the 2Si'd .., 29.577 

2<!xtreme range o'i the Earonieter during the month ... ... O.4o6 

Mean of the daily ]Max. Pressures ... ... ... ...29.899 

Ditto ditto J\rin. ditto ... ... ... ... 29.756 

Mean dailg range of the IJarometer during the luontli ... ... 0.143 





Jlean 'nr3" Bulb Tliermometer for tlie month ... ... ... 81.1 

]Max. Temperature occurred at 4 p. m. on the 30th... ... ... 95.5 

IMin. Temperature occurred at 5 & 6 a. m. on tlie 3rd ... ... 67.5 

E.vtrenie range o^ the Temperature during the month ... ... 28.0 

Mean of the daily Max. Tem])erature ... ... ... ... 89.6 

Ditto ditto jMin. ditto, ... ... ... ... 74.5 

Mean dailg range of the Temperature during the month ... ... 15.1 



]\rean Wet Bull) Tliermometer for the month ... ... ... 74.6 

Mean Dry Bulb Thermometer above Mean Wet Bulb Thermometer 6.5 

Computed Mean Dew-point for the uionth ... ... ... 70.0 

Mean Dry Bulb Thermometer above computed mean Devi'-point ... 11.1 

Inches. 
Mean IClastic force of Yapour for the month ... ... ... 0.727 



Troy grain. 
Mean Weight of Va.pour for the month ... ... ... 7.82 

Additional Weight of Vapour required for com])lete saturation ... 3.35 

Mean degree of humidity for tlie month, complete saturation being unity 0.70 

o 
Mean Max. Solar radiation Thermometer for the month ... ... 138.6 



Inches. 
Bained 10 days, — Max. fall of rain during 24 liours ... ... 1.53 

Total amount of rain during the month ... ... ,,. 4.36 

Total amountof rain indicated by the Gauge* attached to the anemo- 
meter during the month ... ... ... ... ... 3.74 

Prevailing direction of the Wind ... S. S. W. & S. W. 

* Ujin^Ut 73 fjtft 10 iackcs above gi'ound, 



XXV 



Meteor oloijical Observations, 



^ 



2Q 



?. ^ 



? Hi 



• S fcf 



•no UIB-JJ 



"AiM'^ 



•UO UlTJ 



™a 



ff> i-lr^'#(N(M(Ni-l 



•110 upy; 



•Ai "S 



•UO urej£ 



'Ai. "S 'S 



•UO uiBy; 



rH N (M CO « 



r— U3 CO (M IH (M (M r-i I-l I-l 1-1 



CO -* 1> !> in lO CO 'SI 1> 00 00 O us Ol "* l> lO 00 CX3 01 rH i-H Ol 1-1 



1> 03 00 lO CO CO 1> J> ■^ CO <N <M lO lO lO CO U3 CD t- OS I© «0 00 t~ 



•UO niu^ 



■UO ureg; 



•UO u;u}£ 



•UO UlUJJ 



■a 's •ar 



•UO UIT3JJ 



0-5 's ^q -a 



•ao uiw)Y 



t§ 



•K ^q -a 

•no uiT)!]; 



C~ 05 J> 00 Oi —I 03 >0 •* -^ -"31 r-l i-H i-l US T}t (M CO O 00 *> 1> 



~fi (M03'*'<*(M'^iOI>(NrHC0 \a (MODCOUS(MCOCDl>00CDO3 



a'OJ l-IOKMr-Irt rH i-HlH 



W i-< 1-1 I-l rH Ofl rH r-( 



. r-( CO r-( 1-1 <M (N iH r-l rH OJ iH « 



'^^ rH 



(NrHrHCOlO'^CO'^COG^i— • 



■fr -^ -51 



•no uiB'y; 



•5r'jsr 



"no ui'B'}]; 



r-l rH Ot 1-1 CO rH IM i— 1 (M 



i-l(NCOrJIU5CDt~aOOsOrH g rHCMCOrHUSCOt^OOOlOi-l 



rH rH O 



Meieorological Observed lOiis. 



XX Vi 



Abstract of the Ihsull-s of the Uonrl// ]\leteorologicut Obserrat'ions 

taken at the Snrve//or General's 0[jlce, Calcutta, 

in the month of April 1876. 

Lafit.ule 2-2° 3;i' Y Nortli. Longit.icle 88° 20' ^M' East. 

HeiVIit of tlie Cistern of tlie Standard Barometer al)ore tlie sea level, 1 8.1 1 fee!;. 

Daily Means, itc. of tlie Oi)servations and of tlie jrygrometrical elements 

dependent thereon. 





- O i^ 


Eange of tlie Barometer 
during the day. 


Dry Bulb 
mometer. 


Eange 
ture ( 


of the 'IVnipera- 
luring the day. 


Date 




j 


















^ 










fl « 


Max. 


Min. 


DilF. 


^ S 

Oj -^ 


Max. 


Min. 


DifF 












%^ 










Tnclies. 


Inches. 


Tnclies. 


Inches. 


O 


o 





o 


1 


29.705 


29.769 


29.638 


0.131 


85.1 


94.4 


78.5 


15.9 


2 


.761 


.832 


.698 


.134 


84.2 


93.5 


79.2 


14.3 


3 


.834 


.921 


.769 


.152 


84.8 


93.2 


77.5 


15.7 


4 


.799 


.877 


.725 


.152 


85.3 


93.4 


79.5 


13.9 


5 


.779 


.841 


.723 


.121 


85.3 


93.7 


79.5 


14.3 


6 


.797 


.866 


.727 


.139 


86.1 


94.7 


79.0 


15.7 


7 


.803 


.874 


.729 


.145 


85.8 


96.0 


■ 78.5 


17.5 


8 


.770 


.853 


.696 


.157 


86.1 


97.8 


78.3 


19.5 


9 


.710 


.787 


.W9 


.168 


87.2 


99.5 


79.5 


20.0 


iO 


.684 


.756 


.601 


.155 


87.2 


97.8 


81.2 


16.6 


11 


.684 


.747 


.595 


,152 


86.1 . 


94.6 


80.0 


M.6 


12 


.706 


.786 


.614 


.172 


83.6 


91.8 


74.0 


17.8 


13 


■ .708 


.749 


.614 


.105 


80.5 


91.2 


73.5 


17.7 


U 


.674 


.733 


.611 


.122 


85.8 


93.4 


80.5 


12.9 


15 


.673 


.740 


.608 


.132 


86.6 


94.5 


80.0 


14.5 


\^ 


.718 


.784 


.662 


.122 


88.0 


96.0 


82.5 


13.5 


17 


.671 


.750 


• .576 


.174 


87.2 


97.5 


80.4 


17.1 


18 


.612 


.675 


.538 


.137 


86.6 


94.0 


80.0 


14.0 


19 


.708 


• .778 


.639 


.139 


86.8 


94.5 


80.6 


13.9 


20 


.731 


.805 


.651 


.154 


86.3 


94.4 


80.0 


14.4 


21 


.707 


.780 


.639 


.141 


8().4 


96,3 


79.0 


17.3 


22 


.6i5 


.709 


.548 


.161 


87.0 


96.3 


79.7 


16.6 


23 


.610 


.682 


.556 


.126 


87.5 


95.1 


82.0 


13.1 


21 


.638 


.6!)2 


.586 


.106 


87.5 


95.6 


82.0 


13.6 


25 


.684 


.755 


.627 


.128 


87.0 


94.0 


81.5 


12.5 


26 


.666 


.726 t 


.589 


.137 


88.0 


9().5 


82.0 


14 5 


27 


.664 


.733 


.612 


.121 


87.6 


96.4 ■ 


81.3 


15.1 


28 


.720 


.793 


.664 


.129 


87.4 


96.0 


81.5 


14.5 


29 


.764 


.812 


.708 


.131 


86.6 


94.5 


80.0 


14.5 


30 


.747 


.824 


.669 


.155 


85.9 


94.8 


77.8 


17.0 



The Mean Height of the Barometer, as likewise (lie Dry nnd Wet Bulb 
Thernioineter iMeans are derived, from the hourly observations, made at the 
several liours during the day. 



xxvu 



Meteorological OLservafions. 



Ahslracl of the Jiesiills of the ILnirlt/ Aleteoroto/jical Otjservatf07is 

taken at the Snrvei/or General's Office , Calcutta, 

in the month of Aj)ril 1876. 



Daily MeitiiH, Si^c. of the OI)serv!iiioiis !ind of tlie IfygfomeLrieal eleiiieiits 
dpixMident thereon. — (Co)d'niued.} 





u 


+j 


H-i 


!s 


o 


g.b 


o o rf 


. JL, 


^ 


Bale. 




l> 
o 


"3 

o 


IB 
> 
O 


(B 

o 


p, rf 


'-" o 

£. ''-' H 

R- O' rf 


B 
"o 


* to 

2' 9 




<Li <a 


^ 


•-d 


r^ 


^ u 


'S r^ 


"^ i! S 


fcr. 


o-^ 








-(J 
pi 

1 






^8 


O o p, 


Pi 

0; 






15^ 


p 


6 


p 


^ 


S" 


-^ 


^ 






O 


O 


o 





liiclie.s. 


T. gr. 


T. gr. 






1 


79.0 


6.1 


74.7 


10.4 


0.846 


9.05 


3.52 




0.72 


2 


79.5 


4.7 


76.2 


8.0 


.887 


.51 


2.73 




.78 


3 


76.8 


8.0 


71.2 


13.6 


.756 


8.07 


4.39 




.65 


4 


74.9 


10.4 


67.6 


17.7 


.672 


7.17 


5.47 




.57 


6 


76.9 


8.4 


71.0 


14.3 


.751 


8.02 


4.62 




.63 


6 


76.9 


9.2 


70.5 


15.6 


.73^ 

.69" 


7.87 


5.08 




.61 


7 


75.6 


10.2 


68.5 


17.3 


.39 


.41 




.58 


8 


77.5 


8.6 


71.5 


14.6 


.763 


8.13 


4.82 




.63 


9 


79.3 


7.9 


74.6 


12.6 


.843 


.96 


.41 




.67 


30 


79.7 


7.5 


75.2 


12.0 


.860 


9.15 


.22 




.68 


11 


79.8 


6.3 


75.4 


10.7 


.865 


.22 


3.73 




.71 


32 


77.4 


6.2 


73.1 


10.5 


.803 


8.60 


.43 




.72 


}3 


75.8 


4.7 


72.5 


8.0 


.787 


.49 


2.49 




.77 


34 


78.6 


7.2 


73.6 


12.2 


.817 


• .72 


4.11 




.68 


35 


. 80.9 


5.7 


77.5 


9.1 


.925 


9.86 


3.28 




.75 


36 


77.2 


10.8 


70.7 


17.3 


.744 


7.90 


5.78 




.58 


17 


79.6 


7.6 


75.0 


12.2 


.854 


9.09 


4.28 




.68 


18 


80.0 


Q.Q 


76.0 


10.6 


.882 


.39 


3.75 




.72 


19 


79.6 


7.2 


75.3 


11.5 


.862 


.17 


4.04 




.69 


20 


78.8 


7.5 


73.5 


12.8 


.814 


8.67 


.35 




.67 


21 


78.7 


7.7 


73.3 


13.1 


.809 


.61 


.45 




.66 


22 


80.2 


6.8 


76.1 


10.9 


.885 


9.42 


3. 87 




.71 


23 


80.5 


7.0 


76.3 


11.2 


.890 


.48 


4.01 




.70 


21 


81.2 


6.3 


77.4 


10.1 


.922 


.81 


3.68 




.73 


25 


80.6 


6.4 


76.8 


10.2 


.905 


.63 


.66 




.73 


26 


81.0 


7.0 


76.8 


11.2 


.905 


.61 


4.07 




.70 


27 


80.6 


7.0 


76.4 


11.2 


.893 


.51 


.01 




.70 


28 


80.4 


7.0 


76.2 


11.2 


.887 


.45 


.00 




.70 


29 


79.1 


7.5 


74.6 


12.0 


.843 


8.98 


.16 




.68 


30 


78.2 


7.7 


72.8 


13.1 


.795 


.48 


.39 




.66 



All the Ifygfometrical eleiuents are computed by tlie Greenwich Constants- 



Meteorological Ohservations. 



xxvni 



Abstract, of the llesnlts of the llourlt/ Meteorolog'tcal Oliservatiuus 

talcen at the Sarvei/or General's Office, Calcutta, 

in the mouth of April 1876, 



Hourly Means, &c. of tlie Obsei'vations and of tlie jrjgromelrical elements 

dependent thereon. 





-o^ 


ilange of Mie Barometer 


pQ 


I?ange 


of the 'JVmpera- 






for eitcli hour during 
the month. 


^H 


ture for each hour 
during tlie niontli. 


Hour. 








^ o 

p a 












Max. 


Min. 


DifF. 




Max. 


Min. 


DifF. 




^1 


















Indies. 


Inches. 


Inches. 


Inches. 


o 


o 


o 


o 


Mid- 


















niglit. 


29.720 


29.819 


20.609 


0.210 


82.0 


84.0 


74.5 


9.5 


1 


.710 


.810 


.601 


.209 


81.6 


83.8 


74.1 


9.7 


2 


.700 


.806 


.596 


.210 


81.2 


83.6 


73.9 


9.7 


3 


.691 


.805 


.574 


.231 


80.8 


83.5 


73.7 


9.8 


4 


.690 


.811 


.572 


.239 


80.5 


83.2 


73.7 


9.5 


6 


.706 


.830 


.585 


.245 


80.0 


83.0 


■ 73.5 


9.5 


6 


.724 


.845 


.608 


.237 


79.8 


82.5 


73.5 


9.0 


7 


.746 


.872 


.(Si 


.231 


80.7 


84.0 


74.8 


9.3 


8 


.766 


.900 


.656 


.244 


83.2 


86.0 


79.5 


6.5 


9 


.778 


.919 


.671 


.248 


86.1 


88.5 


82,8 


5.7 


10 


.778 


-.921 


.661 


.260 


88.9 


91.6 


85.5 


6.1 


11 


.767 


.907 


.647 


,260 


91.1 


94.0 


87:4 


6.6 


Noon. 


.748 


.884 


.626 


.258 


92.7 


96.0 


87.3 


8.7 


1 


.728 


.860 


.602 


.258 


93.9 


98.0 


90.5 


7.5 


2 


.691 


.827 


.573 


.254 


M..6 


99.5 


89.0 


10.5 


3 


.671 


.793 


.5()3 


.230 


94.6 


98.5 


86.0 


12.5 


4 


.653 


.780 


.544 


.236 


93.9 


97.8 


79.0 


18.8 


5 


.645 


.709 


.538 


.231 


92.3 


90.0 


77.7 


18.3 


6 


.652 


.771 


.548 


.223 


90.0 


92.5 


81.4 


11.1 


7 


.673 


.788 


.573 


.215 


86.6 


89.0 


81.8 


7.2 


8 


.694 


.810 


.580 


.236 


84.9 


86.7 


82.0 


47 


9 


.716 


.829 


.599 


.230 


83.8 


8o.5 


82.0 


3.5 


10 


.728 


.844 


.616 


.228 


82.9 


85.0 


77.0 


7.5 


11 


.727 


.829 


.613 


.216 


82.2 


84.5 


74.0 


10.5 



The Mean IFciglifc of the Barometer , as likewise the Dry and Wet Bulb 
Thcnnonicter i\Ieans arc derived from the observations made at the several 
hours during tlie month. 



XXIX 



Meteorological Ol/servaf loirs. 



Abslr<icl' of /he liesnHs of Ihe Ilunrl// ULeleorolog'ical Olservai'ioM 

taken at tJie Snrve/jor General's OJjice, Calcutta, 

in the month oj A^prll 1876. 



Houfly Moans, <fec. of the Observations and of the Hygrometrical elements 
dependent thereon. — (Continued). 









Point. 




rce of 




ght of 
ed for 
ation. 






r^ 


a> 


a) 
P 


m 


o 


■^-1 u 




'-" . *-" 


ffonr. 


-3 

pq 




o 


'^5 
o 
'■+3 


o, O 

'-' -t-H 


^-2 


o 2-2 






pi 


-0 




w3 




^3 cij'S 






vS a 


o 


o 
O 




^^ 




^^ " 


^^i"^.'-^ 





o 


o 


o 





ruches. 


T. gr. 


T. gr. 




Mid- 


















nitrlil. 


78.7 


3.3 


76.4 


5.6 


0.893 


9.60 


1.87 


0.84 


1 


78.0 


3.1 


76.3 


5.3 


.890 


.59 


.75 


.85 


2 


78.2 


3.0 


76.1 


5.1 


.885 


.53 


.68 


.85 


3 


78.0 


2.8 


76.0 


4.8 


.882 


.50 


.57 


.86 


4 


77.8 


2.7 


75.9 


4.6 


.87* 


.47 


.51 


.86 


5 


77.6 


2.4 


75.9 


4.1 


.879 


.49 


.32 


.88 


6 


77.5 


2 3 


75.9 


3.9 


.879 


.49 


.26 


.88 


7 


78.1 


2.6 


76.3 


4.4 


.890 


.61 


.43 


.87 


8 


79.0 


4.2 


76.1 


7.1 


.885 


.50 


2.39 


.80 


9 


79.7 


6.4 


75.2 


10.9 


.860 


.16 


3.79 


.71 


10 


79.7 


9.2 


74.2 


14.7 


.832 


8.82 


5.22 


.63 


li 


79.5 


11.6 


72.5 


18.6 


.787 


.30 


6.67 


.56 


Noon. 


79.5 


13.2 


71.6 * 


21.1 


.766 


.05 


7.58 


.51 


i 


79.5 


14.4 


70.9 


23.0 


.748 


7.85 


8.37 


.48 


2 


79.3 


15.3 


70.1 


24.5 


.729 


.64 


.91 


.46 


3 


79.2 


15.4 


70.0 


24.6 


.727 


.61 


.94 


.46 


4 


78.7 


15.2 


69.6 


24.3 


.717 


.52 


.70 


.46 


5 


79.3 


13.0 


71.5 


20.8 


.763 


8.03 


7.47 


.52 


6 


79.6 


10.4 


78.4 


16.6 


.811 


.57 


5.93 


.59 


7 


78.8 


7.8 


74.1 


12.5 


.830 


.83 


4.31 


.67 


8 


78.6 


6.3 


74.2 


10.7 


.832 


.89 


3.60 


.71 


9 


79.0 


4.8 


75.6 


8.2 


.871 


9.33 


2.77 


.77 


10 


78.9 


4.0 


76.1 


6.8 


.885 


.50 


.29 


.81 


11 


78.7 


3.5 


76.2 


6.0 


.887 


.54 


.00 


.83 



All the irygrometrical elements are computed by the Greenwich Constants. 



Meteorological Observations. 



XXX 



Abstract of the Results of the llourli/ Meteorological Otjservations 

taken at the Surveyor General's Ojjice, Calcutta, 

in the mouth of Ajjril 1876. 

Solar IJadiatiou, Weather, &c. 

Wind. I 





Max. Solar 
radiation. 


br. > . 

rH r-t 


<0 

p 



Prevailing 
direction. 



P ^ .-^ General aspect of tlie Sky. 



Oj 


>. 


t>. 


^^ m 












c: 


O 


^ S 


fi 


"15 


^ 




1 — 



1 143.2 



2 141.0 



3 139.7 



141.0 



139.0 



141.5 
7 1 144.0 
8: 144.0 
9 147.0 



10 
11 



144.0 
143 8 



12 136.7 



13 141.0 



14' 140.0 
lo' 144.2 



Inches 



0.13 



0.04 



0.03 



s & s s w 
s s w 

S W^& ^"ariable 

SSW,WbjS&S 

S S W 
Variable 

s s w & s w 
s w & s 

s s w & s 

s s w & s 

s 

S S E & S 

S by W & N 
S by W & S S W 



1.0 



2.0 



2.0 



o:4 



Miles. 
138.5 



151.0 

115.3 

123.6 

80.8 

110.0 

75.7 
105.5 
225.8 

219.2 

193.2 

2G3.4 

305.7 

157.1 
15S.1 



\i to 1, B to 10 A. M., v_i to 

4, S to 11 p. M. L from 5| to 
8 p. M. T & D betvreen 5 & 6 
p. M. 

S to 6 A. M., ^i to 5, \i & 
v_i to 8, B to 11 p. M. Jj from 
6 1 to 8 p. M. T & Iv between 4 
& 5 p. M. 

\ito 1, B to 6, \i to 8 a. m., 
B to 1 , Vi to 3, \i to 6, B to 
11 p. M. 

B to 5, \i to 9 A. M., B to 
11 p. M. 

B to 1, Scuds to 6 A. M., B 
to 9, \i to 11 p. M. 

B. 

B. 

B. 

Scuds to 4 A. M., B to 8, ^i 

to 11 p. M. 

^i to 4, \i to 6 A. 51., B to 
11 p. M. 

Scuds to 4, \i to 7, ^i to 10 
A. M., \-i to 3, \i to 11 p. M. 
Sheet L from 7 to 9 p. m. 

B to 4, Vi to 8 A. jr., ^i to 

5, O to 11 p. M. T at 9} p. M. 
L from 8 to 10 p. M. Light II 
l)ct\vcen 9 & 10 p. M. 

\i to 2 A. M., ^i to 1,0 to 
1 p. jr. T from 2 to 5 p. m. L 
from 3.]- to 9 p. m. Light 1{ be- 
tween 3 & 4 p. sr. 

Scuds to 4, Vi to 8, a. u. ^i 
to 12, B to 11 p. M. 

B to 5 a. m., '^i to 11 p. ji. T 
at 7 P. M. L at 7 & 8 p. ji. 



\iCirri, — i Strati, '^i Cumuli, \_i Cirro-strati, ^ i Cumulo-strnii, N/^ i Nimbi, 
Vi Cirro-cumuli, B clour, S straluui, O overcast, T ihuudcr, L lightning, 
R. rain, D. drizzle. 



XXXI 



Me.teorolog\cal OLserraiioiis. 



Abstract of the Jlesults of the llonrh/ 'Meteorological Observations 

taken at the Sarvei/or General's Office, Calcutta, 

in the mouth of April 1876. 

Solar Eadiation, Weather, &c. 





u 


aj <a 




53 ,-. 


^^' fe • 




'o o 


en Or^ 




02 •■s 

£3 




« 


kr5 


^'^^ 


p 




^:^'^ 



Wind. 



Prevailing 
directioi). 



aj 


t*^ 


_>> 








t5 "^^ 






PM 




►^ 



General aspect of the Skj. 



16 144.0 



145.0 
143.0 



■19 143.0 
20 143.0 



21! 143.0 
22 145.0 



23 142.5 

24 143.0 

25 142.0 



2^ 



145.5 



27 147.0 

28 146.0 
29! 144.5 
SO 144.5 



Inches 



S S W & Variable 
S S W &S W 

ss w 

s& sw 
s&sw 

s, s s w & s w 

S by W & S S W 

s s w & sw 

s s w & s w 
s s w 
s s w 



s s w 

SW& s s w 

s s w 
s s w & s w 



lb Miles. 
151.1 

133.3 

2.1 i 259.6 



0.8 
1.0 



n to 9 A. M., E to 11 
^i to 5, B to 9, 



262.8 
369.3 



0.8 153.4 
0.8 222.9 



1.2 
1.2 

1.9 
0.6 



0.4 
1.2 
1.6 
1.8 



320.7 
358.2 
311.4 

288.8 



295.9 
214.9 
289.3 
255.7 



O to 4, 

p. M. 

B to 1 1 A. M.. 

Scuds to 11 p. M. 

Scuds to 7 a. m., 13 to 5, -^i to 
7, Sends to 11 P.M. Sheet L 
from 7 to 10 p. M. 

'-i to 2, 13 to 7 A. M., '^i to 4, 
v_i to 6, B to 11 p. M. 

B to 3, S to 8, B to 11 p. M. 
Sheet L on N at 7 p. M. D at 
6^ p. M. 

B to 3, \i & ^i to 11 p. M. 

B to 6, \i to 10 A.M., B to 2, 
-i to 4, \i to 8, O to 11 p. M. 
Sheet L on N at 8 p. ji. 

S to 3, v_i to 7, Scuds to 10 

A. M., B to 11 p. M. 

B to 4, Scuds to 11 A.M., B 
to 9, Scuds to 11 p. M. 

ScikIs to 10 A. M., ^\ to 2, B 
to 9, S to 11 p. M. 

S to 1, B to 4, Scuds to 10 
A. M., \_i to 2, B to 8, Scuds to 

11 p. M. 

Chiefly B. 
Chiefly B. 
B. 
B. 



\i Cirri, — i Strati, ^i Cumuli, v_i Cirro-strati, '~^ i Cumulo-strati, v^i Nimbi, 
Vi Cirro-cumuli, B clear, S stratoni, O overcast, T thunder, L lightning 
E. rain, D. drizzle. 



Meteorological Observations. 



xxxu 



Abalruct of the Tie,snlls of llie llourlu Meteorological Ofjuemitiavs 
taken at the Sarve/jor General's OJlce, Calcutta, 
in the monlh of April 1876. 

MoNTHTT IJusur/rs. 



JTean lieii(1it of tlie Enrometer for tlie iilonth 
Sfax. lieiglit. of the Barometer occurred at 10 a. m. on tlie 3rcl... 
Mill, heiglit of the Barometer occurred at op. m. on tlie IStli 
^Extreme range of the Barometer during the month 
]\leaii of the daily IMax. Pressures 
])itto ditto j\riii. ditto 
Mean Jailg range of the Barometer during the luontli 



Inches. 


.. 29.712 


.. 29.92L 


.. 29.538 


. 0.383 


.. 29.782 


.. 29.642 


.. 0.140 



]^Tean Dry Bulb Thermometer for the month 
IMax:. Temperature occurred at 2 p. m. on the 9th ... 
jMin. Temperature occurred at 5 & 6 a. m. on the ]3tli 
l^lxtreme range of the Temperature during the month 
Menu of the daily INFax. Temjierature 

Ditto ditto ]\rin. ditto, 
Mean da'dy range of the Temperature during the month 



INTean Wet Bulb Thermometer for the month 

IMean Dry Bulb Thermometer above Mean Wet Bulb Thermometer 

Computed Mean Dev^^-point for the month 

Mean Dry Bulb Thermometer above computed mean Dew-point 



Mean Elastic force of Fapour for the montli 



86.2 
99.5 
73.5 
2(3.0 
95.0 
79.6 
15.4 



78.8 

7.4 

73.6 

12.6 

Inches. 
0.817 



Troy grain, 
lyfean Weight of Yapour for the month ... ... ... 8.70 

Addilioiuil Weight of Vapour retjuired for com])lete saturation ... 4.29 
Mean degree of humidity for the month, com[)lete saturation being unity 0.67 



Mean Max. Solar radiation Thermometer for the montli 



o 
143.0 



Kaincd 5 days, — jNIax. fall of rain during 21 liours 
Total amount of rain during the month 
Total amountof rain indicated by the Gauge* attached to the anemo- 
meter during the month 
Prevailing direction of the Wind ... S. S. W., S. .t S. W 



Indies. 
. 0.13 
. 0.20 



0.14 



* i[cig]it 70 foi-t 10 iuchos iibovo grounj, 



XXXUl 



j\[('feoroh>(jical Olserraru 




Meteoi'o'Uxjlcal Olscrvallons. 



SXXIV 



Abdract of Uie HesuUs of the ITourl/j Meleorological OlservaliouB 

taken at the Sarvei/or General's QlJice, Calcutta, 

in the vionlh of Maij 187'6. 

LutiLucle 22° 33' \" Noi-ili. Long-jtude 88° 20' 31/'' Ensfc. 

Heiglitof tlie Cistern of the Standard Barometer above tLe sea level, 18.11 feet. 

Daily Means, Slc. of tlie Observations and of the Kygrometrical elements 

dependent thereon. 



^ 



Date 



-1-3 -u . 

-( D -tJ 

'S Prf 
f^ P-, O 



lka]!f;e of the Earonieter 
during the day. 






Eange of the Teni]iera- 
ture during the day^ 



Max. 



Min. 



Diff. 



Max. 



Min. 



Diff. 





Inches. 


Inches. 


Inches. 


Indies. 








o 


■ 


1 


29.669 


29.741 


29.578 


0.160 


86.9 


97.0 


80.4 


10.0 


2 


.607 


i .663 


.520 


.137 


87.4 


91.4 


82.0 


12.4 


3 


.6.50 


1 .705 


.590 


.109 


88.9 


96.9 


83.7 


13.2 


4 


.618 


1 .cm 


.563 


.133 


85.6 


89.5 


82.3 


7.2 


5 


' .628 


.707 


.561 


.143 


87.3 


94.3 


82.0 


12.3 


G 


.594 


.673 


.511 


.162 


88.2 


96.0 


82.9 


13.1 


7 


.601 


.061 


.549 


.115 


88.2 


96.0 


• 82.4 


13.0 


8 


.630 


.690 


.565 


,125 


89.1 


96.5 


83.0 


13.5 


9 


.670 


.727 


.602 


.125 


89.1 


96.6 


81.2 


12.1 


iO 


.663 


.716 


..587 


.129 


89.1 


90.9 


82.5 


11.4 


11 


.611. 


.726 


.503 


.163 


88.9 


•98.5 


81.9 


16.6 


12 


.613 


.701 


.525 


.179 


88.9 


97.5 


82.0 


• 14.9 


13 


- .060 


.713 


.588- 


.125 


86.9 


96.7 


79:5 


17.2 


11 


.680 


.738 


.585 


.173 


87.2 


97.5 


76.5 


21.0 


15 


.629 


.698 


.527 


.171 


81.1 


94.9 


75.5 


19.4 


10 


.611 


.676 


.551 


.125 


83.1 


94.5 


77.0 


17.5 


17 


.681 


.752 


.593 


.159 


81.5 


94.5 


70.5 


18.0 


18 


.721 


.800 


.652 


.118 


85.1 


91.4 


70.7 


17.7 


19 


.690 


.763 


.612 


.151 


87.9 • 


94.8 


82.5 


12.3 


20 


.678 


.712 


.621 


.121 


81.1 


8S.0 


81.0 


7.0 


2L 


.723 


.786 


.661 


.125 


88.8 


98.5 


80.4 


18.1 


22 


.733 


.795 


.661 


.134 


88.3 


90.0 


82.5 


13.5 


23 


.083 


.749 


.(502 


.147 


8S.I 


95.4 


82.5 


12.9 


21 


.0.59 


.726 


.611 


.115 


83.8 


92.0 


78.0 


11.0 


25 


.075 


.739 


.612 


.127 


84.7 


92.7 


78.0 


11.7 


20 


.688 


.731 


.615 


.086 


83.3 


91.6 


78.0 


13.6 


27 


.683 


.726 


.612 


.114 


82.4 


90.6 


77.0 


13.6 


28 


.619 


.698 


.568 


•130 


83.6 


91.4 


78.5 


12.9 


29 


.598 


.017 


.520 


.127 


85.3 


91.0 


79.8 


11.2 


30 


.587 


.611 


.509 


.132 


87.1 


95.8 


80.0 


15.8 


31 


•593 


•612 


•517 


•125 


87-3 


96.8 


82-3 


11-5 



The Mean Heiglit of the Barometer, as lilcewise tlicDry and Wet Bulb 
Thermometer Means are derived, from the hourly observations, made at the 
toveral hours during (lie doy. 



XXXV 



Meteorological Ol-sena ilons. 



Abstract of the llesidls of the llonrhj ^leteorotoijical Oljservat'ions 
taken at the Surveyor General's Ojfiee, Calcutta, 
ill the mouth of May 1876. 



Dail_y IMeaiiH, &,c. of the Ohservalioiis and of flie Jr3'groinetrical elements 

de|ieiKleiit tliereon. — {Cuiil'tnued.) 





u 


-4-3 


-t-i 


fe: 


o 




o o d 


'S i . 








o 


ft 

(13 


0) 


P. b3 

> o 






Date. 




o 


CD 


o 


c2 
.2 

33 






p c 1> 








-1-2 
P( 

g 

Q 


j5 

, o 
^•■Ph 






«« s-i S 


<1> TS M 




^ 


ft 


o 


p 


^ 


^•'- 


-^ 


^ 







o 


o 





Fiiclies. 


T. gp. 


T. gr. 




1 


79.1 


7.8 


71.4 


32.5 


0.838 


8.91 


4.34 


0.67 


2 


80.9 


6.5 


77.0 


10.4 


.910 


9.69 


3.76 


.73 


3 


81.1 


7.8 


76.4 


32.5 


.893 


.47 


4.57 


.6^ 


4 


79.4 


6.2 


75.1 


30.5 


.857 


.13 


3.63 


.72 


5 


79.8 


7.5 


75.3 


12.0 


.862 


.17 


4.24 


.68 


6 


81.0 


7.2 


76.7 


31.5 


.902 


.56 


.20 


.70 


7 


81.2 


7.0 


77.0 


11.2 


.910 


.67 


.09 


.70 


8 


81.4 


7.7 


76.8 


12.3 


.905 


.59 


.53 


.68 


9 


81.5 


7.6 


76.9 


12.2 


.908 


.62 


.50 


.68 


30 


81.3 


7.8 


76.6 


12.5 


.899 


.52 


.60 


.^1 


H 


81.0 


7.9 


76.3 


12.6 


.890 


.44 


.60 


.67 


32 


80.4 


8.5 


75.3 


3 3.6 


.862 


.14 


.90 


.65 


33 


79.6 


7.3 


75.2 


31.7 


.860 


.15 


.10 


.69 


34 


80.5 


6.7 


76.5 


30.7 


.896 


.54 


3.83 


.71 


35. 


78.1 


6.0 


73.9 


30.2 


.824 


8.83 


.38 


.72 


36 


78.6 


4.5 


75.4 


7.7 


.865 


9.28 


2.58 


.78 


3 7 


79.5 


5.0 


76.0 


8.5 


.882 


.43 


.92 


.70 


38 


80.0 


5.1 


76.4 


8.7 


.893 


.55 


3.02 


.76 


39 


82.3 


5.6 


78.9 


9.0 


.967 


10.28 


.36 


.75 


20 


79.9 


4.2 


77.0 


7.3 


.910 


9.75 


2.46 


.80 


21 


79.5 


9.3 


73.9 


14.9 


.824 


8.74 


5.26 


.62 


22 


82.1 


6.2 


78.4 


9.9 


.952 


10. JO 


3.70 


.73 


23 


82.7 


5.4 


79.5 


8.6 


.986 


.47 


.25 


.76 


23, 


80.2 


3.6 


77.7 


6.1 


.931 


9.98 


2.12 


.83 


25 


79.7 


5.0 


76.2 


8.5 


.887 


.49 


.93 


.76 


1^ 


79.2 


4.1 


76.3 


7.0 


.890 


.55 


.38 


.80 


27 


78.1 


4.3 


75.1 


7.3 


.857 


.21 


.40 


.79 


28 


79.5 


4.1 


76.6 


7.0 


.899 


.63 


.40 


.80 


29 


80.7 


4.6 


77.5 


7.8 


.925 


.88 


.76 


.78 


30 


82.0 


5.1 


78.9 


8.2 


.967 


10.30 


3.03 


.77 


31 


82.2 


5.1 


79.1 


8.2 


.973 


.36 


.05 


.77 



Ail llic irygi'omctrical elemeuts are computed bj tlie Greeuwicli CoiisUuits 



Meteorolorj'iml OLserralluns. xxsvi 

Abstract of the llesnlts of tli^ llonrli/ Meleorolog'ical Olserrat'ions 
talceJi at the Surveyor General's 0_[]ice, Calcnlla, 
in lh€ monlh of Miiy 1876. 



.Hourly Means, e^c. of tlie 01)servations and of the Ifjgromelrica] elements 

dependent thereon. 





r. . *^ 


JJange 


if the Eiirometev 


:B 


njiinge 


of tlie 'Tempera- 




i2 S . 


for euch hour c 
the month 


tiring 


n 2 


tnre 
durii 


for esudi liour 
g tlie month. 


Hour. 
















ca-— 1 CO 


Max. 


Min. 


DifF. 


PI ^ 


Max. 


Min. 


DifF, 












1^ 










Inc-hes. 


Inches. 


Inches. 


Inches. 


o 


o 


o 


' o 


Mid- 


















night. 

1 


29.G62 


29.757 


29.569 


0.188 


82.5 


85.8 


76.7 


9.1 


.fiol 


.717 


.579 


.168 


82.2 


85.5 


77.0 


8.5 


2 


.616 


.739 


.574 


.165 


82.0 


85.2 


77.0 


8.2 


3 


.639 


.732 


.563 


.169 


81.7 


85.0 


77.0 


8.0 


4 


.638 


.722 


.572 


.150 


81.4 


84.8 


77.0 


7.8 


5 


.652 


.739 


.586 


.153 


81.2 


84.5 


77.0 


7.5 


6 


.666 


.745 


.602 


.113 


81.3 


84.5 


76.6 


7.9 


7 


.688 


.772 


.626 


.146 


82.6 


85.5 


77.6 


7.9 


8 


.703 


.782 


.640 


.112 


85.0 


88.5 


79.8 


8.7 


9 


.709 


.800 


.641 


.159 


87.7 


91.0 


82.0 


9.0 


10 


.707 


.797 


.635 


.162 


89.9 


93.4 


83.0- 


10.4 


11 


.693 


.790 


.626 


.164 


91.6 


95.7 


84.4 


11.3 


Noon. 


.680 


.782 


.598 


.184 


92.8 


97.2 


85.5 


11.7 


1 


.659 


.765 


.579 


.18(5 


93.6 


98.0 


83.0 


15.0 


2 


.632 


.729 


.551 


.178 


91.1 


98.0 


86.6 


11.9 


3 


.610 


.700 


.521 


.176 


9 1 .0 


98.5 


81.0 


14.5 


4 


.591 


.676 


.513 


.163 


92.9 


98.5 


78.8 


19.7 


5 


.581 


.670 


.509 


.161 


91.1 


98.2 


78.0 


20.2 


f) 


.601 


.()75 


.511 


.161 


88.6 


95.5 


78.5 


17.0 


7 


.622 


.716 


.529 


.187 


85.9 


91.3 


76.5 


11.8 


8 


.612 


.755 


.538 


.217 


81.8 


88.4 


76.5 


11.9 


9 


.6(;i 


.752 


.572 


.180 


83.9 


87.0 


76.0 


11.0 


]0 


.673 


.7(i3 


.601 


. 1 ()2 


83.3 


86.0 


75.5 


10.5 


11 


.608 


.762 


.592 


.170 


82.9 


85.8 


76.5 


9.3 



The Mean Height of the Barometer, as likewise the Dry andWet 33ulb 
Tliermomcter Means are derived from the ohservutions made at tLe seTeral 
hours during the month. 



SXXVIL 



Meieoroloij ica I Olserva f'luu s: 



Abslracl of iJie liesitll-'i of (he llonrJi/ Meteorological Olservaltons 

iaJceii al iJ/e Snrre/joi- General's Office, Calcnlla, 

ill llie monlli of 2Iaij 1876. 



J f curly Means, &c. of tlie Observations and of the ITygromctrical elements 
dependent thereon. — (Continued). 





u 

o 




.9 


^ 


o 


k> o 


o o • 


'h h 






i? 


'o 


p 


<D 








r^ 


<D 


. 


<D 


^O 


l4-i 4J 


■r; r^ Sh 


'■*-' ... •^ 


Hour. 




> 
O 




> 

o 


c3 . 


O o 












o 
P. 

a 


Is 


7~\ ^ 




5^^ 






^a 




o 
O 




^^ 




^k8 















o 


riiches^. 


T. gr. 


T. gr. 




Mid- 






. 












liiglit. 


79.0 


3.5 


76.5 


6.0 


0.896 


9.63 


2.01 


0.83 


1 


79.0 


3.2 


76.8 


5.4 


.905 


.73 


1.81 


.84 


2 


79.0 


3.0 


76.9 


5.1 


.908 


.76 


.71 


.85 


3 


78.9 


2.8 


76.9 


4.8 


.908 


.76 


.61 


.86 


4 


78.8 


2.6 


77.0 


4.4 


.910 


.81 


.46 


.87 


5 


78.8 


2.4 


77.1 


4.1 


.913 


.84 


.37 


.88 


6 


79.0 


2-3 


77.4 


3.9 


.922 


.93 


.31 


.88 


7 


79.8 


2,8 


77.8 


4.8 


.934 


10.03 


.65 


.86 


8 


80.7 


4.3 


77.7 


7.3 


.931 


9.96 


2.57 


.80 


9 


81.2 


6.5 


77.3 


10.4 


.919 


.78 . 


. 3.78 ■ 


.72 


10 


81.8 


8.1 


76.9 


13.0 


.908 


.60 


4.86 


.()6 


11 


82.1 


9.2 


76.9 


14.7 


.908 


.56 


5.53 


.63 


I?0011. 


82.7 


10.1 


76.6 


16.2 


.899 


.46 


6.2G 


.60 


1 


72.7 


10.9 


76.2 


17.4 


.887 


.33 


.75 


.58- 


2 


82.7 


11.4 


75.9 


18.2 


.879 ■. 


.23 


7. Hi) 


.57 


3 


82.6 


11.4 


75.8 


18.2 


.876 


.20 


.07 


.57 


4 


82.4 


10.5 


76.1 


16.8 


.885 


.30 


6.47 


.5<> 


5 


81.5 


9.6 


75.7 


15.4 


.873 


.22 


5.75 


.(;2 


«i 


80.2 


8.4 


75.2 


13.4 


.860 


.13 


4.79 


.Wy 


7 


79.4 


6.5 


74.8 


11.1 


.81-9 


.06 


3.81 


.70 


8 


79.4 


5.4 


75.6 


9.2 


.871 


.31 


.15 


.75 


9 


79.2 


47 


75.9 


8.0 


.879 


.42 


2.71 


.78 


JO 


79.3 


4.0 


76.5 


6.8 


.896 


.61 


.32 


.81 


21 


79.1 


3.8 


76.4 


G.o 


.893 


.58 


.21 


.81 



All tlie Hygrometrical clement,s arc computed by the Greeimit-b Constants. 



Meleorolutjical Observations. 



XXXV lU 



Abstract of the liesnlts of the Hourly Meteorulogh-al Observations 
taken at the Sarve/jor General's 0[]ice, Calcutta, 
in the montli of May 1876. 

Solar IJailiatioii, Weallier, &c. 





fcr, t> . 

r— 1 rH 



Wind. 



Pre railing 
direction. 



>^ .-w j General aspect of the Sky. 






o luclies 
l' 144.0 1 ... 

2 141.0 I ... 

3 IJo.O, ... 
i 

4 110.0 ' 0.12 



5: 142.4 : 0.08 



6 1J8.0 
7, 143.0 



8 147.0 
9j 142.0 

10 142.5 

11 149.0 

12 148.0 



13' 144.5 
14' 147.0 



0.38 



s s w & s 

S S W & S S E 



II) Miles. 
1.81 337.8 
3.9 I 426.2 



S & S S W I 2.0 ' 399.6 



S S W 



7.3 



396. 



S & S S E 5.2 382.8 



S .^ S S E 
a S E .<t S 



S S E ct S S W 

S, E & S S W 

S ].)y E & S 

s & s s w 
s s w .t s 

S S E .1 S S W 

s & s w 



1.0 1 219.9 
1.2 I 440.0 



1.0 294.1 
257.6 
0.7 I 230.3 



0.8 



219.6 



4.2 276.9 



5.0 



32G.0 



214.4 



B. 

13 to 5, Vi to 11 A. M, Sciid,s^ 
to 3, Vi to 11 p. M. 

V-i to 6, B to 11 A. M., Vsi to 
11 p. M. 

Vi to 6 A. M., O to -12, Vi to 
5, S to 9, O to 11 p. M., Tat II 
A. M. Sheet L on N W from 7 
to 9 p. M. Slight li at 11, 12 
& 1 p. M. 

O to 5 A. M., '"i to 12, v^i to 
2, \i to 9, '^i to 11 p. M. T, L 
Si Eat 3 & 4 A. M. 

rvi to 6 A. M., \i to ] 1 p sr. 

Sciids to 3, \i to 7, Scuds to 

10 A. M., "^•i to 5, \i to 9, Scuds 
to 11 P. M. 

Clouds of difTcrcnt kinds. 
Sheet L on N E-at 7 & 8 p. 11. 

S to 5 A. M., ^i to 4, \i to 9, 
S to 11 p. M. L on jN" at 7 P. m, 

S to 4, \i to 10 A. M., '^i to 
1., \i to 11 p. M. Sheet L on 
::^ E from 7 to 9 p. M. 

\i to 7, ^i to 10 A. M., v_i to 
5, S to 9, \i to 11 p. II. 

B to 1, Vi to 11 A. jr., B to 
1, \i to 3, B to 6, O to 11 P.M. 
T at 7 p. M. L from 6j to 10 
p. M. 

\i to 7 A. M., ^i to 5, S to 

11 p. M. 

B to 6 A. M., '"i to 5, O to 11 
P. SI., T, L & li from 6 to 10} 

p. M. 



\i Cirri, — i Strati, "^i Cunudi, \_i Cirro-strati, ^-i Cnmulo-strati, VN.iJNimbi, 
Vi Cirro-cumuli, B clear, S stratoni, O overcast, T thunder, L lightning, 
E. raiuy D. drizzle. 



Meteorological OhscnaHoiis. 



Abslraci of the liesnlfs of lite llonrl// ]\lcleorulo(/ical Olservaf'ions 

taken at the S/irvej/or General's OJ/ice, Calcutta, 

in the moulh of Ma// 1876. 

Sohir Eadintion, Weaflier, &c. 



P 
15 

16 

17 

18 

19 

20 

21 
22 

23 

21. 

25 

2G 



^ 


a. <o 


c o 


- c-^ 


S3 


6'^ 1 






t^'5 


Ci^ ^ 


t-^ 5 


--M..O 


r=i 


r-t -H 



Wind. 



Prevailing 
direction. 



c3 O 

p y> 



General aspect of tlie Sky. 





143.0 


IllclleSi 

1.05 


141.0 


0.17 


138.3 


O.oG 


143.0 


... 


142.2 


... 


124.0 


0.05 


IJG.O 
14.4.0 




144.5 




131.5 


0.13 


138.8 




141.0 


0.33 



5 SSW& Variable 
^^ariable 

s s w & s 
s s w & s 

S S E & S S W 
S E & S 
S & S W 

s & s s \v 
s & s s w 

S AEbjS 

E by S & "\^ariablo 

S S E & E 



lb Miles. 
9.8 2GG.6 



0.5 



4.1 



1.4 

0.5 



230.8 

206.9 
184.1 
214.8 

244-4 

169. 4 
176.7 

275.5 

295.0 



110.1 
1.9 110.2 



O to 3, S to 5, v_i to 10 A. M.. 

i to 8, O to 11 P.M. T&L 
from 7 to 10 p. M. 11 from 9 to 
11 p. M. 

O to 6, \i to 11 A. 51., ^i to 
3,0 to 11 P.M. Tat 1 & 2 a.m. 
L from Midnight to 3 a. m. & 
'at 7 & 8 p. M.' E at 2 a. m. & 
between 6 & 7 p. m. 

S to 5 A. M., \i & '^i to 6, 
O to 11 p. M. T, L & E from 6| 
to 9 p. M. 

Oto 2, ^i to 10 A.M., '"i to 4, 
\i to 7, B to 11 P.M. Sheet L 
on N from 8 to 10 p. m. 

B to 7 A. M., .^i to 3, B to 7, 
S to 11 p. M. Sheet L on W at 
8 & 9 p. M. 

\i to 7, O to 11 A. M., S to 
11 p. M. L on E at 4 a.m. 
Litjht E at 2i & 3f a. m. 

Chiefly B. 

\i to 7, ^i to 10 A. M., Vi to 
1, '^i to 7, B to 11 P.M. 

Clouds of different kinds. 
Sheet L on N at 7 p. M. 
! Sends to 7 A. M., ^i to 12, O 
to 11 p. M. T from 12 to 4 & at 
6.7 P. M. L from 3.5 to 10 p. m. 
Slii,Hit E at 12, 1. -i&L 4 p. m. 

O to 8 A. M., \i to 6, S to 
11 p. M. Sheet L from 8 to 

11 p. M. 

S to 3, V_i to 9 A. M., ^i to 4, 
\_ito 9, O to 11 p. M. T at 3 
p. M. L on S at 10 & 11 p. m. 
IE at If & 3 p. M. 



\i Cirri, — i Strati, ^i Cumuli, \ i Cirro-strati, -^i Cumnlo-strati, Vv-i JNimbi, 

Vi Cirro-cumuli, B clear, S stratoni, O overcast, T thunder, L lightning 
E. rain, D. drizzle. 



Meteorological Ohservafions. 



xl 



Ahslracl of the llesnlts of the Honrlij Meteorological Oljservatlous 

taken at the Snrve//or General's Office, Calcutta, 

in the month of Maij 1876. 

Solar Eadiatiou, "Weather, &c., 





, 


o o 




^ d 


be t> 




c3 o r-; 










S^ 


:i.r ki 




t2 cs 


rH 1-1 



Wind. 



Prevailing 
direction. 



27 141.0 
281 142.5 

29 147.2 
dO 148.0 
31 152 .0 



ilncbc 



0.06 



E W E & S E 

S E, E & S 

E S E & S E 

S & SE 
S & S by W 






1.3 



ce o 
ft > 



Miles 
174.0 

133.7 



102.5 

88.1 

102.1 



General aspect of the Sky. 



O to 3, Vi to 8 A. M., ^i to 
Up. m. 

S to 6, O to 9 A. M., ^i to 6, 
Vi to9, B to 11 P.M. . Tat 9^, 

10 A. M. & 1 p. M. 

Bto7 A. M., '"i to 7, B to 11 
P.M. T & E between 5 & 6 p. m. 

B to 4 A. M., '^i to 5, v_i to 8, 
B to 11 p. M. 

B to 4, ^_i to 7 A. M., ''i to 8, 
B to 11 p. M. T at 4 p. M. 



\i Cirri — i Strati, '^i Ciiinuli,\_i Cirro-strati, -^i Cunnilo-strati, ^•v-i Nimbi, 
Vvi Cirro-CuiiHili. B clear, S .stratoni, O overcast, T thunder, L lij^Utuiu,:-, 
11. ruin, D. drizzle. 



xli Meteor oloijical Od-serfaf/ons. 

Jbslracl of (he Bemi/ls of (lie llourit/ Ileleoroloylcdl 0bserra/'i<jv8 
taken at, the Sttrvefjor General's O/Jiee, Calcut/a, 
ill Ihe month of 31a// 1876. 

MONTULY IvKSUI/rS. 



Indies. 

Mean lieiirlit of tlie Barometer for tlie nioiitli ... ... ... 29.653 

Max.lieighfcof the liai'onieter occurred at 9 a. m. on tlie IStb... ... 29.800 

]\Jiu. lieiglit of tlie Barometer occurred at 5 p. M. oil the 30tli ... 29.509 

Sxtreme range of the Barometer duriug the month ... ... 0.291. 

Mean of the daily Max. Pressures ... ... ... ...29.716 

Ditto ditto IJin. ditto ... ... ... ... 29.580 

Mean daiJt/ )-ange oi the Barometer during the mouth ... ... 0.136 



o 

Mean Dry Bulb Thermometer for tlie montli ... ... ... 86.5 

Max. Temperature occurred at 2, 3 & 4 p- m. ou the lltli& 21st ... 98.5 

Min. Temperature occurred at 10 p. M. on the 15th. ... ... 75.5 

Extreme range of the Temperature duriug the montli ... ... 23.0 

Mean of the daily Mas. Temperature ... ... ... ... 94.8 

Ditto ditto Min. ditto, ... ... ... ... 80.4 

Mean dally range oi the Temperature during the montli ... ... 14.4 



Mean Wet Bull) Thermometer for the month ... ... ... 80.4 

Mean Diy Bulb Thermometer al)ove Mean TVet Bulb Thermometer 6.1 

Computed Mean Dev\"-point for the month ... ... ... 76.7 

Mean Diy Bulb Thermometer above computed mean Dew-point ... 9.8 

Inches. 
Mean Elastic force of Vapour for the month ... ... ... 0.902 



Troy grain. 
Mean Weight of Vapour for the month ... ... ... 9.60 

iidditional Weight of Vapour required for complete saturation ... 3.50 
Mean degree of humidity for the month, complete saturation being unity 0.73 

o 
Mean Max. Solar radiation Thermometer for the month ... ... 142.0 



Inches. 
Ivaincd 10 days, — IMax. fall of rain durijig 24 hours ... ... ].0o 

Total amount of rain during the month ... ... ... 2.93 

Total amount of rain indicated by the Gauge* attached to tlie anemo- 
meter during the month ... ... ... ... ,,. 2.14 

Prevailing direction of the Wind ... S. & S. S. W., 

* IlcigUt 70 feet 10 ioelics above ground. 



:lii 



Meieoroloffical Ol^ervat'ions. 



^ o 
V S 






li) 




ri3 


r^ 


w 




TJ 




O 




a 


Ki 






ic 


i= 


6 




^ 


tS 


• 




oi 


fl 


C3 






^ 


<>2 




-»-3 


rt 








o 


•♦^ 




f*l 


'■+-' 


to 






PL, 










»V 


H 


^ 


l>~, 


^ 




!3 


ri 


"K» 


& 


o 






CO 


A 










o 


« 


H 




^ 



5 w 






ID 



rO 









el 



t>i 



"b ^ 



•UO XilCJI 



•uo niB-jj 



•no na"}j 



•uo UITJJJ 



•a's 



•no niBjj 



•uo uiiJ'ji; 
•no nil)}]; 



•uo uitJj]; 



•.NT A "g 



•uo uiujx 



•no mo^ 

"51 'M/XT 
•no utiiji; 

•no uiu^x 



W 



iHrHt-li-l CO COWCO'ffltM i-HrH r— 



•tH lO CO >0 £0 !>• lO >a CO 1— iccijl OS ©(MMOSO^el CC,-^ 05 i-H 



(M CO^COCCt-I r-fCOrHffllM CO rH.-Hl-(COr-l CSl-HCOC-IOl 



-* 05 C5 O Oi t-O 01 00 J> CO OS US t- CO CD >-l CO 00 OS « CO t~ — I 



^ 




(M CO CO CO ■* CO -^ 1-4 i-H 


iH 


i-i I-H ,-1 ,-H -* CO CO 


_, 


T-H 


'-' 


I-H --H 




cocodusw-^coindrHCj 


I-H 


l?lCOl-HCOrHCOCOt>.lOCOlO 



-H ClCICOCOlOCOCOCOIJJtHrH ©5 i-^ r-i ■<-< rH •^05'— -*CO 



I ^ ,H r-l r-H CI m 1 



Ir-Hi-HiHCSr-ICOrHCl 



1 -P <0 CO t^ 00 OS O I-H 



O rH'MCO'^*»OCOfr^OOOSOi-H 

O rH rH 



r 



Meleoi'ological OLservatious. 



xliii 



Abdracl of the liesnlls of the Ilourli/ Meteorological Observations 

taken at the Surveyor General's Office, Calcutta, 

in the month of June 1876. 

LuLitude 2S° 33' V Nortli.' Long-itiule 88° 20' W East. 

Height of tlie Ci«tern of tlie Standard Barometev above the sea level, 18.11 feet. 

Daily Means, &c. of the Observations and of tlie lij^grometrical elements 

dependent thereon. 



Date 



tj-. 






o 


a) 




-t3 






^ 




-^ 


br 


a 

o 




0; 


t^ 


hH 


pq 


O 


^ 


<x> 


CO 


Ol 


r^ 


■s 


^ 







Eange of the Barometer 
dviring the day. 



Max. 



Min. 



DiiF. 



ba 
id ^ 



Eange of \]\e Tempera- 
ture during the day. 



Max. 



Miu. 



Diff. 



1 

2 
3 

4 
5 

6 

7 
8 
9 

iO 
11 
12 
13 
11 
15 
16 
17 
18 
19 
20 
21 
22 
23 
21 
25 
20 
27 
28 
29 
30 



Inches. 


Inches. 


Inches. 


29.632 


29.691 


29.562 


.648 


.715 


.576 ' 


.637 


.696 


.554 


.614 


.677 


.517 


.594 


.693 


.492 


.601 


.664 


.544 


.588 


.643 


.533 


.583 


.630 


.492 


.565 


.601 


.522 


.575 


.616 


.535 


1 .588 


.656 


.533 


! .597 


.696 


.531 


i .633 


.679 


.573 


.595 


.650 


.524 


.553 


.612 


.498 


.541 


.584 


.477 


.571 


.626 


.518 


.581 


.637 


.500 


.520 


-.586 


.427 


.469 


.534 


.401 


.471 


.554 


.418 


.455, 


.493 


.403 


.501 


.576 


.439 


.560 


•650 


.513 


.603 


.654 


.540 


.609 


.650 


.653 


.627 


.675 


.572 


.553 


.613 


.469 


.466 


.512 


.389 


.440 


.482 


.375 



0.129 
.139 
.142 
.160 
.201 
.120 
.110 
.138 
.079 
.081 
.123 
.165 
.106 
.126 
.114 
.107 
.108 
.137 
.159 
.133 
.136 
.090 
.137 
.137 
.114 
.097 
.103 
.144 
•123 
.107 



87.5 
87.1 
88.4 
89.7 
89.0 
84.9 
86.6 
81.2 
84.7 
86.7 
86.3 
86.8 
86.7 
87.5 
87.3 
88.5 
83.3 
83.0 
81.4 
81.7 
81.3 
81.8 
83.8 
81.1 
85.3 
81.3 
85.3 
86.1 
87.4 
88.2 






o 


97.5 


81.5 


95.4 


82.1 


97.0 


82.0 


98.2 


82.5 \ 


97.6 


80.0 i 


92.0 


78.5 1 


91.7 


• 80.6 


90.0 


75.5 


92.5 


76.0 


92.5 


82.0 \ 


93.0 


80.2 ! 


93.4 


79.0 


93.3 


80.5 


93.4 


81.2 


92.5 


82.5 


91.8 


84.0 1 


93.7 


77.1 


89.6 


77.9 : 


91.2 


78.3 


88.4 


78.0 ; 


88.0 


78.8 


86.0 


79.0 ' 


88.8 


78.5 j 


93.3 


77.8 1 


1 93.0 


79.4 \ 


i 89.8 


79.5 1 


' 91.0 


82.0 1 


93.0 


80.S ! 


91.7 


82.8 i 


j 96.5 


83.5 j 

1 i 



16.0 
13.3 
15.0 
15.7 
17.6 
13.5 
11.1 
14.5 
16.5 
10.5 
12.8 
14.4 
12.8 
12.2 
10.0 
10.8 
16.6 
11.7 
15.0 
10.4 
9.2 
7.0 
10.3 
15.5 
13.6 
10.3 
9.0 
12.2 
11.9 
13.0 



The Mean Height of the Barometer, as likewise flic Dry and Wet Bulb 
Thermometer Menus are derived, from the hourly ob-scrvalions, made at (he 
several hours during tlie day. 



xliv 



Meteorological OLservations 



Abstract of the liesiills of the llonrlij Meteorolngical Oh&ervations 
taken at the Snrvei/or General's Office, Calcntta, 
in the month of June 1876. 



Daily Means, &c. of tlie Observations and of tlie Hygrometrical elements 
depeiulent tliereon. — (Conliuued.) 



Date. 


gi 


Dry Bulb above Wet. 


g 

p 

« 

p! 
P. 

a 

o 
O 


1 

Dry Bulb above Dew 
Point. 


Mean Elastic force of 
vapour. 


Mean Weight of Vapour 
in a Cubic foot of air. 


Additional Weight of 
Vapour required for 
complete saturation. 


Mean degree of Humi- 
dity, complete satu- 
ration being unity. 










o 


o 


Indies. 


T. gr. 


T. gr. 




1 


82.2 


5.3 


79.0 


8,5 


0.970 


10.31 


3.18 


0.76 


2 


81.9 


5.2 


78.8 


8,3 


.964 


.27 


.06 


.77 


3 


82.4 


6.0 


78,8 


9,6 


.964 


.23 


.61 


.74 


4 


85.1 


4.6 


82.3 


7.4 


1.077 


11.42 


2.95 


.80 


6 


82.1 


6.9 


78.0 


11.0 


0.940 


9.97 


4.11 


.71 


6 


79.4 


5.5 


75.5 


9.4 


.868 


.29 


3.20 


.74 


7 


81.3 


5.3 


78.1 


8.5 


.943 


10.04 


.10 


.76 


8 


78.7 


2.5 


76.9 


4.3 


.908 


9.78 


1.43 


.87 


9 


81.7 


3.0 


79.6 


5.1 


.989 


10.58 


.84 


.85 


]0 


82.3 


4.4 


79.7 


7.0 


.992 


.57 


2.61 


.80 


31 


81.3 


5.0 


77.8 


8.5 


.934 


9.95 


3.07 


.76 


32 


82.0 


4.8 


79.1 


7.7 


.973 


10.36 


2.85 ■ 


.78 


33 


81.0 


5.7 


77.6 


9.1 


.928 


9.89 


3.29 


.75 


34 


81.9 


5.6 


78,5 


9.0 


.955 


10.16 


.33 


.75 


35- 


83.4 


3.9 


81.1 


6.2 


1.037 


11.04 


2,37 


.82 


36 


83.3 


5.2 


80.2 


8.3 


.008 


10.71 


3.17 


.77 


37 


80.8 


2.5 


79.0 


4.3 


0.970 


.42 


1.51 


.87 


18 


80.4 


2.6 


78.6 


4.4 


.958 


.30 


.52 


.87 


19 


81.1 


3,3 


78.8 


5.6 


.964 


.31 


2.00 


.84 


20 


80.1 


1.6 


79.0 


2.7 


.970 


.44 


0.93 


.92 


21 


79.7 


1.6 


78.6 


2.7 


.958 


.32 


.92 


*.92 


22 


79.9 


1.9 


78.6 


3.2 


.958 


.32 


1.08 


.91 


23 


80.5 


3.3 


78.2 


5.6 


.946 


.13 


.97 


.84 


24 


80.3 


3.8 


77.6 


6.5 


.928 


9.93 


2.28 


.81 


25 


80.3 


5.0 


76.8 


8.5 


.905 


.65 


.99 


.76 


26 


80.7 


3.6 


78.2 


6.1 


.946 


10.13 


.15 


.82 


27 


81.6 


3.7 


79.0 


6.3 


.970 


.37 


.27 


.82 


28 


82.2 


3.9 


79.5 


Q.Q 


.986 


.51 


.44 


.81 


29 


83.9 


3.5 


81.8 


5.6 


1.060 


11.26 


.19 


.84 


30 


84.2 


4.0 


81.8 


6.4 


.060 


.26 


.50 


.82 



All the Hygrometrical elements are computed by the Greenwich Constants. 



Meteorologlca I OlsenaUons. 



xl^^ 



Abstract of the Results of the ITonrl// Meteorological Olserrafions 
taken at the Stirveyor General's Office, Calcutta, 
ill the month of June 1876. 



Hourly Means, kc. of tlie Observations and of tlie Hygromelrical elements 

dependent thereon. 





^^ 


Eange 


3f the Bfironieter 


f2 


IJnnge 


of the Tempera* 






for each hour during 
the month. 




ture 
durii 


for each liour 
ig tlie month. 




















Hour. 




. 




ft a 










§m3 


Max. 


Min. 


DilF. 




Max. 


Min. 


DifF. 




a| 








0) rl] 










Inches. 


Inches. 


Inches. 


Inches. 








o 


o 


Mid- 


















nif^lit. 


29.584 


29.679 


29.467 


0.212 


82.2 


86.0 


76.0 


10.0 


1 


.572 


.660 


.462 


.198 


82.0 


85.6 


76.0 


9.6 


2 


.560 


.646 


.434 


.212 


81.9 


85.4 


76.5 


8.9 


3 


.551 


.612 


.414 


.228 


81.7 


85.2 


77.0 


8.2 


4 


.519 


.635 


.428 


.207 


81.6 


85.0 


. 77.0 


8.0 


5 


.558 


.645 


.447 


.198 


81.5 


84.8 


77.5 


7.3 


6 


.572 


.659 


.455 


.204 


81.7 


85.3 


78.0 


7.3 


7 


.587 


.685 


.458 


.227 


82.7 


86.5 


78.8 


7.7 


8 


.600 


.708 


.473 


.235 


84.7 


88.5 


79.0 


9.5 


9 


.607 


.715 


.467 


.248 


86.7 


90.5 


79.6 


10.9 


10 


.605 


.700 


.479 


.221 


88.1 


93.0 


7 9-. 7 


13.3 


11 


.599 


.689 


.465 


.224 


89.5 


95.5 


80.5 


15.0 


Noon. 


.585 


.666 


.439 


.227 


90.9 


96.3 


80.5 


15.8 


1 


.567 


.643 


.421 


.222 


91.1. 


97.7 


79.8 


17.9 


2 


.546 


.639 


.404 


.235 


91.3 


97.8 


78.5 


19.3 


3 


.526 


.616 


.387 


.229 


91.1 


98.2 


77.5 


20.7 


4 


.511 


.597 


.375 


.222 


90.1 


98.0 


78.0 


20.0 


5 


.507 


.577 


.375 


.202 


88.7 


96.5 


78.0 


18.5 


6 


.518 


.595 


.390 


.205 


87.5 


93.5 


78.0 


15.5 


7 


.5 to 


.615 


.412 


.203 


85.7 


91.5 


77.4 


14.1 


8 


.561 


.611 


.433 


.208 


84.8 


89.6 


76.5 


13.1 


9 


.5S3 


.669 


.466 


.203 


84.0 


88.0 


76.5 


11.5 


10 


.5i)6 


.6i)3 


.466 


.227 


83.2 


87.0 


76.2 


10.8 


11 


.596 


.696 


.468 


.228 


82.5 


86.4 


75.5 


10.9 



The Mean Height of the Barometer, as likewise the Dry and Wet Bulb 
Tliermometer Mcaus are derived from the observations made at the several 
hours during the mouth. 



XlVi 



Mei carol o(j\cal Ohservallons. 



Abstract of the Jlesnils of Ike llonrJi/ Alelcorologlcal Ohservatiotis 

taken at tlie Surveyor Genercd's Office, Calcutta, 

in the mouth of June 1876. 



ILourly jMeans, &c. of tlie Observations and of the Hygrometrical elements 
dependent tliereon. — (Continued). 















;_, 












'o 


P 


o 

o 
f-l 


P.ce 
>- o 


° P A 

"S 2 






rQ 


<a 


. 


<o 


o 


«*-! JJ 


*^ ^ 1^ 


^ .. -^ 


Hour. 


-(J . 


/2 


P 


> 
o 


O 

CO 


O O 

bf) o 
'53 1q 








5^ o 




at 

pi 
P< 

g 


















o 
O 


p^ 






:^-2 


<U .,-1 -^ 




o 











Tiiclies. 


T. gr. 


T. gr. 




Mid- 


















jiiglit. 


79.0 


2.G 


77.8 


4,4 ■ 


0.934 


10.05- 


1.49 


0.87 


1 


79. G 


2.4 


77.9 


4.1 


.937 


.08 


.39 


.88 


2 


79.7 


2.2 


78.2 


3.7 


.946 


.17 


.27 


.89 


3 


79,7 


2.0 


78.3 


8.4 


.949 


.22 


.15 


.90 


4 


79.8 


1.8 


78.5 


3.1 


.955 


.29 


.05 


.91 


5 


79.8 


L7 


78.6 


2.9 


.958 


.32 


0.99 


.91 


6 


80.0 


1-7 


78.8 


2.9 


.964 


.38 


.99 


.91 


7 


80.6 


2.1 


79.1 


3.6 


.973 


.45 


1.27 


.89 


8 


81-4 


3.3 


79.1 


5.6 


.973 


.40 


2.02 


.84 


9 


82.2 


4.5 


79.5 


7.2 


.986 


.51 


.67 


.80 


10 


82.7 


5.4 


79.5 


8.6. 


.986 


.47 


3.25 


.76 


11 


83.3 


6.2 


79.6 


9.9 


.989 


.48 


.81 


.73 


Noon. 


83.8 


7.1 


79.5 


11.4 


.986 


.43 


4.46 


.70 


1 


84.2 


6.9 


80.1 


J 1.0 


1.005 


.60 


.37 


.71 


2 


84.2 


7.1 


79.9 


11.4 


0.998 


.54 


.52 


.70 


3 


84.2 


6.9 


80.1 


11.0 


1 .005 


.60 


.37 " 


.71 


4 


83.6 


6.5 


79.7 


10.4 


0.992 


.51 


.03 


.72 


5 


83.0 


5.7 


79.6 


9.1 


.989 


.50 


3.46 


.75 


(3 


82.4 


5.1 


79.3 


8.2 


.979 


.42 


.07 


.77 


7 


81.4 


4.3 


78.4 


7.3 


.952 


.17 


2.63 


.80 


8 


81.0 


3.8 


78.3 


6.5 


.949 


.14 


.32 


.81 


9 


80.6 


3.4 


78.2 


5.8 


.946 


.13 


.01 


.83 


10 


80.0 


3.2 


77.8 


5.4 


.964 


.03 


1,86 


.84 


11 


79.7 


2.8 


77.7 


4.8 


.931 


. .00 


.64 


.86 



All tlxe irygroraetric&l elements are computed by the Greenwich Constants. 



Meieorolofjical Olservations. 



xl 



vu 



Abstract of the liesnlls of the Hourly Meteorological Observations 
taken at the Sarveyor General's Office, Calcutta, 
in the month of June 1876. 

Solar Eadiatiou, Weather, ifec. 



Max. Solar 
radiation. 


1-^ ,-\ \ 



Wind 



Prevailing 
direction. 













OJ 

u 


>. 


>. 


y. 


'rf] 




'3 






Cl 


o 


% 


0) 


fi 


'oJ 




^ 




t^ 



General aspect of the Sky. 



] 


150.0 


Inches 


2 


152.0 


... 


3 


149.0 




4 


148.5 




5 


145.0 


0.03 


6 


142.0 




7 


142.0 


002 


8 


135.0 


1.3G 


i) 


146.0 


0.02 


10 


141.0 


0.03 


11 


144.0 





S & S E 

S S E & S 

S & S S W 
S & S S W 

S S W & S 

S S E & S 

S by W & S S E 

S s w & s 
s & s s w 

E by S, S S W& S 



lb 


Miles. 




116. S 




117.5 


1.2 


120.4 




162.9 


1.4 


196.4 




175.9 


0.8 


185.0 


8.1 


177.7 


1.7 


197.7 


7.2 


302.3 


2'. 8 


285.7 



\i to 2, v_i to 5, \i to 7 a. m. 
^i to 7, \ito 9, B to 11 p. m. 
T at 4 p. M., D at 5 & 7 p. m. 

B to 6 A. M., '"i to 3, O to 5, 
^i to 9, \i to 11 p. M. T at 
3 p. M. 

\ito 2, B to 5, \i to 7 a. m., 
^i to 3, \i to 8, S to 11 p. M. 
T at 2 p. M. D at 9f a. m. 

\i to 7 A. M., -^i to 4, \i to 

11 p. M. 

\ito 5,V,i to 8,0 to 11 p. m. 
Tat9&10p..M. Lfrom6fto 

10 p. M. Light E at 8|, lOf & 

llj p. M. 

O to 7 A. M., \i to 1, S to 7, 
O to 9, Vito 11 p. M. Sheet L 
on W at 10 & 11 p. M. 

\i to 3 A. M., O to 9, V-vi to 

11 p. M. L at 8, 10 & 11 p. M. 
Light E at 9 & 10 a. m. & 9t p. m, 

b to 6, V-i to 10 a.m., O to 
11 p. M. T at 11 & 12 & from 7 
to 9 p. M. L from 7 to 9 p. m. R 
after intervals. 

O to 9 A. M.. '^i to 2, S to 4, 
O to 11 p. M. Sheet L on W at 
8 p. M. Light E at Midnight & 

?>h A. M. 

O to 6, Vi to 8 A. ST., \i to 5, 
S to 7, O to 11 p. M. T bet^veen 
8 & 9 p. M. L from 8 to 10 p. m. 
Light E at 7fi- p. m. 

is to 4, Vi to 10 A. M., -^i to 0, 
B to 8, O to 11 p. M. Sheet L 
on W at 8 P.M. D at IH- p.m. 



\i Cirri, — i Strati, '^i Cumuli, v_i Cirro-strati, '^ i Cumulo-strati, X/^i Nimbi, 
Vi Cirro-cumuli, B clear, S stratoui, O overcast, T thunder, L lightning, 
E. rain, D. drizzle. 



xlviii 



Meteorological Ohservafions. 



Abstract of the Results of the llourli/ j\[eteorological Observations 

taken at the Sarveyor General's Office, Calcutta^ 

in the month of June 1876. 

Solar Eadiation, Weatlier, &c. 





u 


Qi <U 




o o 

si 


tr-^ • 






<D 


M tS 


rt tti i:-i 




C3 d 





Wind 



Prevailing 
direcfciou. 





1 




Daily 
Velocity. 



General aspect of the Sky. 



12 139.5 



13 



15 



18 
19 

20 
21 



140.0 



14 142.5 



135.0 



112.0 
14L.0 



125.0 

148.7 

136.0 
126.8 



Indies 
0.10 



0.02 



0.03 

im 

0.20 
2.01 

0.27 
2.43 



SbyW,S&SSE 



S & S S W 



S S W 



S S W & S 



S by W & S 



S,EbyN&NNW 
S W & Variable 

s s w & s 



lb Miles. 
2.0 297.8 



1.4 



2.3 



7.2 



0.2 
2.U 



1.9 



304.1 



341.6 



332.3 



239.5 

2:ii.o 



128.2 
93.8 

133.2 

149.8 



B to 7 A. M., '-^i to 3, \i to 7, 
B to 9, O to 11 P.M. Tat 11 
p. M. L from 8| to 11 p. m. R 
between 10 & 11 p. m. 

O to 4, V,i to 8 A. M., \i to 7, 
S to 11 p. M. T at Midnight, L 
at Midnight, 1 a. m. & from 8 
to 10 p. M. Light E at Midnight, 

I & 2 p. M. 

O to 9 A. M., Vi to 6, V\_i to 
8, O to 11 p. M. Lfrom 7 J to 

II p. M. D at 8f, 9|, 10^ & 11 

p. M. 

O to 12, S to 11 p. M. Sheet 
iL from 7j to 10 p. M. Light R 
at Midnight, 2 & 6f a. m. 

S to 1, O to 6 A. M., S to 11 p. M. 

O to 4, Vi to 11 A. M., O to 
11 p. M. T from 11 A. M. to 4 
p. M. L at 1 p. M. E from 12f 
to 7f p. M, 

S to 4 A. M., Vi to 12, O to 8, 
B to 11 p. M. Sheet L on S at 
11 p. M. Slight E from 12^ to 
2i & at 5 p. M. 

S to 3, Vi to 6, \i to 8 A. m., 
^1 to 3, O to 11 p. M. T be- 
tween 4 & 5 p. M. Sheet L at 
Midnight, 1 a. m., 10 & 11 p. m. 
E at 4 & from 6h to 10 p. m. 

\i & ^i to 4 A. M., O to 12, 

i to 4, O to 11 p. M. Slight E 
from 6 J to 11 A. M. 

Chiefly O. T from 3 to 9 p. M. 
L from 6 to 8 p. M. R nearly 
the whole day. 



\i Cirri, — i Strati, ^i Cumnli, v_i Cirro-strati, ^ i Cumulo-strati, v\_i Nimbi, 
W Cirro-cumuli, B clear, S stratoni, O overcast, T thunder, L lightning, 
R. rain, D. drizzle. 



Meteorological Ohservations. 



xlix 



Abstract of the Results of the Hourly Meteorological Ohservations 

tahen at the Stirveyor General's Office, Calcutta, 

in the month of June 1876. 

Solar Eadiation, Weather, &c., 







o o 




^ d 


be t- 




c3 o r-: 






=3-^^ 

O '^ p 


P 




^ r-i 



"Wind. 



Prevailing 
direction. 






cS o 



Inches 
22j ... 1.13 



23' 135.7 



24' 145.0 



25, 145.0 



26 



145.6 



146.0 
144.5 

29 146.0 

30 141.5 



0.16 



0.06 



0.04 



0.38 



ft 

S S W & S W 0.5 



s w & w 

s s w & s w 

S E & S by E 

s w & s 
s & s s w 

S & S S E 

S & S by W 

S by E 



1.3 



Miles 
180.1 



190.3 
165.6 

100.1 

86.3 

84.3 
153.7 
120.7 
133.5 



General aspect of the Sky. 



O. Sheet L at 8 & 11 p.m. 
R at 1, 6, 8 & 9 A. M. & 7i & 

11 p. M. 

O to 11 A.M., S to 6, O to 11 
P.M. T & L at Midnight & 
from 6| to 11 p. M. Slii^ht R at 
Miduight, 6 A. M. & from 8^^ to 
10 p. M. 

O to 4, W to 7, B to 10 A. M., 
'"i to 4, O to 6, S to 11 p. M. L 
from Midnight to 3 a. m. & 8 to 
10 p. M. D at- Midnight, 1 & 3 

A. M. 

S to 4 A. M., V,i to 2, O to 7, 
v_i to 9, S to 11 p. M. L be- 
tween 10 & 11 p. M. D at ^, 4 

& 11 P.M. 

\_i to 4, Vi to 8,0 to 10 a. m., 
i to 7, "^i to 11 p. M. T & L 

at Midnight & 6 p. m. Light E 

at 6 p. M. 

S to 1, O to 4, \_i to 9 A. M., 
i to 6, v_i to 11 p. M. Light R 

at 2 p. M. 

13 to 7 A. u.,r^\ to 11 p. M. T 

& L at 6i p. M. D at 6i- & 8| 

p. M. 

B to 5 A. M., ^i to 4, S to 7, 
.i to 11 p. M. T at 4 J". M. L 

on W at 8 p. m., D at 4 & 6 p. m. 
S to 4, \i to 7 A. M., '--i to 5, 

\i to 8, S to 11 p. M. R from 4^- 

tO 5r p. M. 



\i Cirri — i Strati, '^i Cinnnli,v_i Cirro-strati, ^^-i Cumulo-strati, \^N_i Nimbi, 
Vi Cirro-Ciimuli, B clear, S stratoni, overcast, T thunder, L lightning, 
II. rain, D. drizzle. 



^[y] 



Meteor olog'tcal Ohscnal'ions. 



Alalracl of the He&nUs of tlie llourli/ ]i[eleoroIoglcal Ohservaliois 
taken at the Sarvei/or General's O/Jlce, Calcutta, 
in the month oj June 1876. 

Monthly Eesults. 



Indies. 

Mean lieiglit of llie Barometer for the month ... ... ... 29.5(H> 

Max.heiglitof the Barometer occurred at 9 a. m. on tlie 2ud ... ... 29.715 

Miu. height of the Bai'ometer occurred at 4 & 5 p. m. ou the 30th ... 29.375 

jlxtreme runqe of tlie Barometer during the moutli ... ... 0.340 

Mean of the daily Max. Pressures ... ... ... ..,29.625 

Ditto ditto Miu. ditto ... ... ... ... 29.499 

Mean dally range ol the Barometer during the mouth ... ... 0.12(3 



o 

Mean Dry Bulb Thermometer for the montli ... ... ... 85.6 

Max. Temperature occurred at 3 P' m. on the 4th,,. .,, ... 98.2 

Miu. Temperature occurred at 11 p. M. ou the 8tli ... ... 75.5 

Extreme range oi tlie Temperature during the moutli ... ... 22.7 

Mean of the daily Max. Temperature ... ... ... ... 92.8 

Ditto ditto Miu. ditto, ... .., ... ... 80.1 

Mean daily range oi the Temperature during the mouth ... ... 127 



Mean Wet Bulb Thermometer for the month ... ... ... 81.5 

Meau Dry Bulb Thermometer above Mean Wet Bulb Thermometer 4.1 

Computed Mean Dew-point for the mouth ... ... ... 78.6 

Mean Dry Bulb Thermometer above computed mean Devr-point ... 7.0 

Inches. 
Mean Elastic force of Vapour for the month ... ... ... 0.958 



Troy grain. 
Mean Weight of Vapour for the month ... ... ... 10.23 

Additional Weight of Vapour required for complete saturation ... 2.53 
Mean degree of humidity for the month, complete saturation being unity 0.80 

o 
Mean Max. Solar radiation Thermometer for the month ... ... 141.0 



Inches. 
Eaincd 26 days, — Max. fall of rain during 24 hours ... ... 2.J3 

Total amount of rain during the month .., ... ... 9,32 

Total amountof rain indicated by the Gauge* attached to the anemo- 
meter during the month ... ... ... ... under repair. 

Prevailing direction of the Wind ,., ... S. & S. W., 

* Height 70 i'cct 10 inches above ground. 



Mefeorolngicfil OLservafinns. 






^ 




K 


'C 










S; 






C 


?_ 




ri^ 


r^ 























>. 


ti 


o 




"^ 












?23 




^ 


"^ 


<Ki 






M 

O 










"SS 






p! 






f-H 


o 


1^ 




f-- 


^ 


ft 




C3 


P, 










•-ic 


H 


!-i 


t^ 


W 


1-1 


';J 


C 




u 




C3 


C^ 








O 












k 


i= 


s 


H 


t;j 


^ 


K 


c3 






O 


C3 


^ 






>■, 


o 


<a 


^ 


T-! 


r— ^ 










^u-. 


_ ^ 


'J 


t? 


^H 




O 


» 


^ 


o 


a 


«3 


P! 


> 


C 


cc 



•r '^ 

c= a 

I' 5 



•uo iin;^j; 
JJAM-JsL 

•uo UlCJI 
•uo UlBJJ^ 

^•Ai :n;_' 

•uo u|u;[ 
■Ai'WAV 

"UU Ull!J[ 

'& ^'q-AV 

•uo un'.\Y 

"Ai 

•uo Un!{£ 

js ^'q -AV^ 
•uo urej[ 

^AVS-Ai' 
•no unjy; 








1-1 rH 




rt r-( 




rH ,-H 


^ ^ 


^ ^ ^ 










ffl 




^ 


- 1 






'-' 


1 












'^ 




^ 




rH rHi-. 


1 




i-H 


'-' 


rH ^ 


- 1 








« -H 




,-< r-l — 1 — 1 ^ 




rH ff] .— rH r*l 


■A\ -S 
•no uvayi 

;a\.;s 's 

•uo umji; 

•uo Ul«|[ 

'S 
•no niu^j 

•uo uiu}]; 

•uo Ulti}J 


"Tl -# Tj CO CO ^ r-< (MOl Ofl 0^ 


<M 


CO(MrH0ilrHi-li#ffJCOC<IX> 


t-lrH W '-I'-l 


"-• 


i-( N iH CO 


•>S<<©>O<©i©-^(M'?N0ie0 


(M 


lO 00 O 00 l> 1>'C* CO CO lO CO 

rH 




^ ^ ,.4(N 




■^ 1^ 1-1 rH 


IM 


cq (M CO (M CO OS !>. CO ei CO 


CO 


CO CO ffl (M C« (M CO fSi •<* CO 




^ ■ 1-1 ff) ^ -H 




^ r-l (M (M oq rH 


co<Mr-'OJ-<coaoffi!r)i>co 

■ r-i r-l I-H 1-H rH 


-* 


CX31>OOaOrHasff)-^(MC30D 


rH 1-1 






^■■* 


■>*<MNCOCO-^'^'-<(S^rH 


(Ml 




=« 


.-1 rH 




•rH rH (M ^ rH 


"c. 


r-(ffJ(J5(M-H'*'*«>C0ff)C» 


r-l 


^coiHcocoini^iMrH 05 


;z; 






rH rH 1-1 


•no u!i!j[ 

•uo UlliJI 




i-li-li-KMi-li-liH Cq 


■"^ 


<N <M <M rH rH CO r-. ^ rH 




1-1 








.^ ^ ^ i-H ^ 






. , 


•s'A'qjr 
•uo un!}j 

•no vLva^i 

•uo UIH'Jf 

•[>f •jvi; 'Ji 




■ ^ ^"^H — 1 -H IN 


'-' 


- - ._ 


' ..-^'^ 1 




iH rH 




ffj N rH '-I 1 


— 1 




'"' 


iH 


rH^O, _ 


~ -^ 1 




"^ 1-1 ■-< 


rH 




•uo unt'jf 

•uo UW}[ 
•Ull Ultl)[ 

•5! ^q*N 

•uo UIDH 

\ _._: >?-. 

3 

c 

W 




^ 




•" 




-< 




"^ 




' 












. 


— :: 1 




t-l rH 






■ 1 


■-( 








3 


^ ff\ m -^ 'o '€■ t^ <x> a ''^ ^ 




^ M ■?:> -* to 'O 1-^ 00 -^i o f-t 



Meteorolo(jica I Ohserr, t {ion s. 



Hi 



Ahdracl of the llesnlls of the Ilonrlij Meteorological Oljuei vatious 

taken at the Siirve//or General' .s O/Jice, Calcutta, 

in the month of Julij 187G. 

LiiLiiude %-r 33' \" Nortli. Loiio-iiude 88° 20' 3-r EiKst. 

Heiglifcof tlie Cistern of tlie Standard Earoineter al)ove tlie sea level, ]8.1 ] feet. 

Daily Means, &c. of the Observations and of the jr3'<;rotnetrical elements 

dependent thereon. 





o ^ 


llan f^e 


of the Bcironieter 




'Ihmt^e 


of the Tempera- 






'du 


ring the c 


ay. 


n S 
>- % 


ture t 


luring the day. 




















Date. 
















ri^2J 








c £< 










■D r^ is 


Mas. 


Min. 


Diff. 




Max. 


Min. 


Di(F. 




Inches. 


Inches. 


Inches. 


Inches. 





o 





o 


1 


29.4.18 


29.515 


29.377 


0.138 


88.7 


95.5 


83.5 


12.0 


2 


.452 


.516 


.384 


.132 


83.8 


87.5 


80.2 


7.3 


3 


.476 


.533 


.438 


.095 


81.6 


81.5 


78.6 


5.9 


4 


.496 


.542 


.411 


.101 


82.3 


85.6 


79.2 


6.4 


5 


.482 


.533 


.417 


.116 


84.3 


88.0 


81.5 


6.5 


6 


.521 


.585 


.476 


.109 


85.1 


89.7 


82.0 


7.7 


7 


.511 


.574 


.483 


.091 


84.7 


86.5 


• 83.0 


3.5 


8 


.514 


.559 


.452 


.107 


81.0 


82.6 


78.5 


4.1 


9 


.441 


.493 


.374 


,119 


81.6 


86.0 


79.0 


7.0 


iO 


.489 


.582 


.423 


.159 


83.3 


89.0 


80.0 


9.0 


11 


.551 


.599 


.511 


.088 


82.5 


86.2 


80.5 


5.7 


12 


.521 


.584 


.467 


.117 


83.4 


87.8 


80.0 


7.8 


13 


.513 


.556 


.456 


.100 


8-1.3 


90.6 


80.3 


10.3 


14 


.529 


.568 


.483 


.085 


83.2 


87.4 


80.5 


6.9 


15 


.517 


.563 


.454 


.109 


81.7 


86.8 


79.0 


7.8 


\iS 


.474 


.537 


.398 


.139 


81.3 


85.5 


79.5 


6.0 


17 


.410 


.481 


.391 


.087 


80.0 


81.8 


79.0 


2.8 


]8 


.429 


.495 


.377 


.118 


78.2 


80.4 


77.0 


3.4 


19 


.534 


.639 


.452 


.187 


78.9- 


80.8 


77.0 


3.8 


20 


.622 


.666 


.573 


.093 


82.8 


87.6 


78.0 


9.6 


21 


.585 


.610 


.507 


.133 


83.4 


88.9 


79.5 


9.4 


22 


.532 


.581 


.456 


.128 


83.5 


88.4 


79.3 


9.1 


23 


.457 


.514 


.392 


.122 


81.3 


89.8 


81.5 


8.3 


21 


.461 


"515 


.408 


.107 


83.6 


89.0 


80.4 


8.6 


25 


.496 


.533 


.458 


.075 


83.9 


88.5 


80.0 


8.5 


26 


.482 


.527 


.414 


.113 


83.3 


87.5 


79.5 


8.0 


27 


.468 


.530 


.416 


.114 


83.0 


88.5 


81.2 


7.3 


28 


.451 


.506 


.377 


.129 


81.1 


83.6 


78.8 


4.8 


29 


.480 


.551 


.438 


•113 


80.3 


81.2 


76.4 


7.8 


30 


.534 


.579 


.487 


.092 


82.6 


86.0 


80.0 


6.0 


31 


.571 


.616 


.517 


.099 


82.3 


85.6 


79.8 


5.8 



TIic Mean IToight of the Barometer, as likewise tlie Dry and Wet Bulb 
Tlicrmonieter Means arc derived, from the hourly observations, made at iLe 
scverul hours duriug the day. 



liii 



Meteor olog ica I Ohserva tions. 



Abstract of the Results of the Tlonrli/ Meteoroh'glcal Observations 
taken at the Surveyor General's OJjice, Calcutta, 
in the month of July 1876. 



Diiilj Means, <fec. of tlie Observations and of tlie Hygroraetrical elements 
dependent tliereon. — (Continued.) 



Date, 






^ 



^ 



rJ3 






o 



fi 



P 






o o 



c3 



^•- 



O o d 

■3-5 g 

r— I ^ <15 

O O p, 






^ 



o^ he 
0) p, d 

f-' « 5S 



OJ 

^ 



^ ft 

















Indies. 


Gr. 


Gr. 




1 


83.9 


4.8 


81.0 


7.7 


1.034 


10.96 


3.00 


0.79 


2 


81.6 


2.2 


80.1 


3.7 


.005 


.75 


1.35 


.89 


3 


80.3 


1.3 


79.4 


2.2 


0.983 


.58 


0.76 


.93 


4 


80.4 


1.9 


79.1 


3.2 


.973 


.47 


1.11 


.90 


5 


81.6 


2.7 


79.7 


4.6 


.992 


.61 


.Q7 


.86 


6 


82.3 


2.8 


80.3 


4.8 


1.011 


.80 


.77 


.86 


7 


81.4 


3.3 


79.1 


5.6 


0.973 


.40 


2.02 


.84 


8 


79.7 


1.3 


78.8 


2.2 


.964 


.40 


0.74 


.93 


9 


79.8 


1.8 


78.5 


3.1 


.955 


.29 


1.05 


.91 


]0 


80.4 


2.9 


78.4 


4.9 


.952 


.21 


.72 


.86 


11 


80.5 


2.0 


79.1 


3.4 


.973 


.47 


.17 


.90 


12 


80.8 


2.6 


79.0 


4.4 


.970 


.42 


.54 


.87 


13 


80.7 


3.6 


78.2 


6.1 


.946 


.13 


2.15 


.83 


14 


80.7 


2.5 


78.9 


4.3 


.967 


.39 


1.50 


.87 


15 


79.9 


1.8 


78.6 


3.1 


.958 


.32 


.05 


.91 


16 


79.6 


1.7 


78.4 


2.9 


.952 


.25 


0.99 


.91 


17 


78.6 


1.4 


77.6 


2.4 


.928 


.03 


.78 


.93 


18 


76.9 


1.3 


76.0 


2.2 


.882 


9.56 


.69 


.93 


19 


77.5 


1.4 


76.5 


2.4 


.896 


.71 


.76 


.93 


20 


79.6 


3.2 


77.4 


5.4 


.922 


.91 


1.84 


.84 


21 


80.2 


3.2 


78.0 


5.4 


.940 


10.09 


.87 


.84 


22 


80.3 


3.2 


78.1 


5.4 


.943 


.12 


.88 


.84 


23 


81.7 


2.6 


79.9 


4.4 


.998 


.69 


.59 


.87 


24 


80.5 


3.1 


78.3 


5.3 


.949 


.18 


.85 


.85 


25 


80.8 


3.1 


78.6 


5.3 


.958 


.28 


.85 


.85 


26 


80.5 


2.8 


78.5 


4.8 


.955 


.25 


.68 


.86 


27 


81.0 


2.0 


79.6 


3.4 


.989 


.63 


.19 


.90 


28 


80.0 


1.1 


79.2 


1.9 


.976 


.52 


0.65 


.94 


29 


78.7 


1.6 


77.6 


2.7 


.928 


.01 


.90 


.92 


30 


79.7 


2.9 


77.7 


4.9 


.981 


.00 


1.68 


.86 


31 


79.6 


2.7 


77.7 


4.6 


.931 


.00 


.58 


.86 



All tlie llygrometrical eicmeuts are computed by tlie Greeuwicli Coustants. 



Meteorological Oiserrafiom. 



liv 



Abstract of the Results of the Ilourlij Meteorological Ohservat'ions 
taken at the Surveyor General's OJjice, Calcutta, 
in the month of July 1876. 



Hourly Means, &c. of tlie Observations and of tlie Hygrometrical elements 

dependent thereon. 







Hour. 



I?a.nge of the Barometer 

for each hour during 

the mouth. 



Max. 



Min. 



Diff. 



rO 








^ 


^ 


m 


4-:> 




O) 


►>. 


a 







fia 


PI 








r^i 





Eange of the Tempera- 
ture for each hour 
during the month. 



Max. 



Min. 



DiCf. 





Inches. 


Inches. 


Inches. 


Inches. 





Mid- 












night. 


29.523 


29.633 


29.440 


0.193 


81.4 


1 


.510 


.620 


.433 


.187 


81.2 


2 


.497 


.612 


.417 


.195 


80.9 


3 


.485 


.604 


.38S 


.216 


80.7 


4 


.476 


.600 


.395 


.205 


80.5 


5 


■ .484 


.613 


.408 


.205 


80.3 


6 


.497 


.629 


.419 


.210 


80.3 


7 


.512 


.6J.8 


.431 


.217 


80.9 


8 


.525 


.654 


.439 


.215 


81.9 


9 


.533 


.664 


.449 


.215 


83.0 


10 


.531 


.666 


.454 


.212 


81.1 


11 


.524 


.661 


.449 


.212 


85.3 


Noon. 


.513 


.652 


.435 


.217 


85.6 


1 


.499 


.629 


.414 


.215 


85.4 


2 


.482 


.615 


.397 


.218 


85.2 


3 


.466 


.603 


.383 


.220 


85.1 


4 


.454 


.584 


.374 


.210 


84.9 


5 


.450 


.579 


.377 


.202 


84.4 


6 


.462 


.573 


.391 


.182 


83.7 


7 


.483 


.589 


.403 


.]86 


82.7 


8 


.503 


.609 


.420 


.189 


82.2 


9 


.523 


.627 


.412 


.185 


81.9 


10 


.539 


.639 


.455 


.184 


81.7 


11 


.538 


.636 


.419 


.187 


81.5 



86.0 
85.5 
85.1 
84.6 
84.2 
84.0 
83.8 
84.5 
86.5 
89.0 
91.0 
92.8 



93.8 
93.8 
95.0 
95.5 
95.5 
95.0 
90.6 
88.5 
86.8 
86.8 
86.5 
86.5 



78.2 
78.0 
77.2 
76.8 
76.4 
76.4 
77.0 
77.0 
77.4 
77.5 
78.0 
78.5 



78.5 
78.0 
80.4 
79.4 
79.0 
78.8 
77.5 
77.5 
77.0 
77.3 
78.0 
78.0 



7.8 

7.5 

7.9 

7.8 

7.8 

7.6 

6.8 

7.5 

9.1 

11.0 

13.0 

14.3 



15.3 

15.8 

14.6 

16,1 

16.5 

16.2 

13.1 

11.0 

9.8 

9.5 

8.5 



The Mean Height of tlie Barometer, as likewise the Dry and Wet I3ulb 
Tiicrmometer Means are derived from the observations made at tlie seTeral 
Lours during the mouth. 



lY 



. \Ieh'Oi\. log. cal Olserraiions^. 



Abstract of the liesnUs of the llonrli^ Meteorological Ohservalions 

iahen at the Survei/or General's Ofjice, Calcutta, 

in the month of Julij 1876. 



Hourly Meanfs, &c. of tlie Observations and of tlie Hygrometrical elements 
dependent tliereon. — (Continued) . 



Hour. 







Point. 


ft 


o 
o 




rO 


<U 


^ 


a> 


o 


t+-( 4J 


^ 


> 


> 




O O 


o 


QJ 


o 




-►^ ,o 


-♦J . 

-J 


pq 


1 

p< 




GQ 

ei . 


far: o 


^^ 


p 


o 
O 


fi^ 


^^ 


^.S 











Mid- 






niglit. 


79.9 


1.5 


1 


79.7 


1.5 


2 


79.6 


1.3 


3 


79.4 


1.3 


4 


79.3 


1.2 





79.3 


1.0 


6 


79.3 


10 


7 


79.G 


1.3 


8 


80.1 


1.8 


9 


80.5 


2.5 


10 


80.9 


3.2 


11 


81.3 


4.0 


Noon. 


81.4 


4.2 


1 


81.3 


4.1 


2 


81.3 


3.9 


3 


81.3 


3.8 


4 


81.1 


3.8 


5 


80.9 


3.5 


6 


80.5 


3.2 


7 


80.1 


2.6 


8 


79.9 


2.3 


9 


80.0 


1.9 


10 


79.9 


1.8 


11 


80.0 


1.5 



78.8 
78.6 
78.7 
78.5 
78.5 
78.6 
78.6 
78.7 
78.8 
78.7 
78.7 
78.5 



78.5 
78.4 
78.6 
78.6 
78.4 
78.4 
78.3 
78.3 
78.3 
78.7 
78.6 
78.9 



2.6 
2.6 
2.2 
2.2 
2.0 
1.7 
1.7 
2.2 
3.1 
4.3 
5.4 
6.8 



7.1 
7.0 
G.6 
6.5 
6.5 
6.0 
5.4 
4.4 
3.9 
3.2 
3.1 
2.6 



Iiiclies. 

0.964 
.958 
.961 
.955 
.955 
.958 
.958 
.961 
.964 
.961 
.961 
.955 



.955 
.952 
.958 
.958 
.953 
.952 
.949 
.91^9 
.949 
.961 
.958 
.967 



Gr. 

10.38 
.32 
.39 
.31 
.31 
.34 
.34 
.37 
.38 
.33 
.31 
.21 



.21 
.17 
.23 
.23 
.17 
.19 
.18 
.20 
.20 
.35 
.32 
.41 



■S 2 

3^ " 



-< 



Gv. 

0.89 
.89 
.73 
.73 
.67 
.57 
.57 
.73 

1.06 
.49 
.90 

2.43 



.55 
.51 

.38 
.34 
.32 
.12 

1.89 
.52 
.34 
.09 
.05 

0.90 



w 






^ 



0.92 
.92 
.93 
.93 
.94 
.95 
.95 
.93 
.91 
.87 
.84 
.81 



.80- 
.80 
.81 
.81 
.81 
.83 
.84 
.87 
.88 
.91 
.91 
.92 



All tlie Hygrometric&l elements are computed by the Greenwich Constants'. 



Meleorological Observations . 



Ivi 



Abstract of the liesulls of the llunrli/ Meteorological Ohservat'wus 
texlcen at the Surveyor General's OQice, Calcutta, 
in the month qj Jnl)/ \^1Q. 

Solar Eadiation, Weather, kc. 



fi 



Max. Solar 
radiation. 


« 0) 

tr. > . 

r— 1 1—1 I 



Wind. 



Prevailing 
direction. 



CD 


t-. 


t^ 


^ ^ 










^ t» 


crt 


o 




fi 


o 


PM 




> 



General aspect of tlie Sky. 





] 153.0 



127.5 

141.0 
135.0 

130.0 



135.0 
142.2 

140.0 



Inches 
5.41 
1-25 
O.OG 



0.40 

0.40 
0.10 

0.07 
0.70 



S & S E 
ENE,NE&SW 

s s w & s 

S & S hjW 
S by W & S 

s & s s w 

S W & S hy W 

[Si s w 
S by \^^ 'w s w 

E & Yariablo 

S by E & S 

[by E 
S, S by TV & S 

S by ]C & S . 



1.0 



0.3 



Miles. 
139.0 

162.2 
201.6 
181.5 

215.8 

207.8 

132.3 

80.4 

89.1 
155.1 

202.4 
116.1 



^i to 4, 



S to 4, \i to 1 1 A. M. 
^i to 9, '^i to 11 p. M. 

Chiefly O. T & L from 1| 
to 8 p. M. E at If & from 7 
A. M. to 10 p. M. 

O to7, S to 11 P.M. T at 3 
p. M. R from 1 to 9| a. m. &, at 
3 p. M. 

S to 3, O to 7 A. M., S to 11 
p. M. Light E from 5j to 7f 

A. M. 

S to 5, Vi to 8 A. M.. '"i to 12, 
S to 2, O to 7, S to 11 p. M. 

S to 4, Vi to 6, \i to 8 a. m.,. 
S to 1, O to 9, S to 11 p. M. 
T at 3f & 4 p. M. L on S at 

7f P. M. 

S to 2, O to 6, Vi to 9 A. M., 
O to 2, S to 5., O to 11 p. M. 
D at 5 A. M. &. 1 p. M. 

S to 5 A. M., O to 11 p. M. T 
at 8 A. M. Slight 1{ after inter- 
vals from 6 A. M. to ] 1 p. m. 

O to 2, ^i to 6, S to 11 p. ir. 
Slight E after intervals. 

S to 6, O to 8 A. M., -^i to 7^ 
B to 1 1 p. m: Slight E from 7 
to 81 &at Uf A. M. 

O to 2, \_i to 5, Vi to 9, '"i 
toll A.M., O to 5, S to 11 p. M. 
Light E at Midnight, of A. M., 
12, 2, & 3 p. M. 

S to 6, O to 8 A. M., ^i to 7, 
B to 11 p. M. Tat 121 p. M. E 
at 7 A. M. .^ 8.^ p. M. 



\i Cirri, — i Strati, ^i Cumuli, \_i Cirro-strati,'^- i Cnmulo-strati, \^J Nimbi, 
Vi Cirro-cumuli, B clear, S stratoni, overcast, T tluuulcr, L lightning, 
K. rain, D. drizzle. 



Ivii 



Meieoroloiju-al OLserrafions. 



Abstract of the Ixesnlts of tJie llourJt/ Meteorological Observations 

taken at the Sarvei/or General's Ojjice, Calcutta, 

in the vionth of Jnlij 1876. 

Solar Ecidiation, Weatlier, &c. 





^ 


OJ «5 




o o 


br. fc- . 




5 s-^ 




CO -.3 

03 


(5 =* 5 


<D 


H'S 


c tti t< 


P 




1— 1 -—I 



Wind. 



Prevailing 
direction. 



^ 



fm 






General aspect of tlie Sky. 



ilnclies 
13 141.0 



14 



20 

21 

22 
23 



127.5 



15 130.6 

16 130.0 

17 



140.0 
140.0 



1.14 

0.22 
0.20 



0.48 
2.11 



1.04 



139.5 
140.0 i 0.49 



24 140.0 0.11 



S by E & S 

S S E & S 
S S W & S W 

S S W & S W 

s s w & s w 



s s w & s w 
s s w & s 



S by W & S S \T 

s s w 
s s w& s 

S by E & S 
E & S E 



Miles. I 

113.3 I Vi to 3, Scuds to 6, Vi to 
18 A. M., -i to 6, S to 11 p. M, 
Sheet L on N from 7| to 9 p. m. 
!D at 3 & 4i P. M. 

140.2 j S to 7 A. M., -i to 12, O to 4, 

5 to 7, ^— i to 11 p. M. Sheet L 
on N at 2 a. m. D at 12i p. m. 

129.6 1 v_i to 4, O to 10 a. m., '"i to 
12, S to 11 p. M. Sheet L on S 
at 11 p. M. E, from 6 to 8|- a. m. 

6 1 to 4| p. M. 

71.2 I O to 11 A. M., '"i to 6, O to 
111 p. M. Sheet L on N at Mid- 
Inight. Slight E after intervals. 

153.1 j S to 3 A. M., O to 7, v_i to 9, 
|0 to 11 p. M. Slight E after 
intervals from 4 a.m. to 4^ p m. 

1 6 1 . I O . SI i ght'^E after i n ter val s . 
6.0 191.7 O to 1, S to 6 A. M., O to 11 
Ip. M. T at 1 p. M. E from 7 
'a. m. to 9 p. M. 

198.0 I O to 5 A. M., S to 12, \i & 
v_i to 7, B to 11 p. M. Sheet L 
'on S W at 11 p. M. 

191.0 1 \i to 6, Scuds to 9 a. m., "^i 
to 5, O to 11 p. M. T at 9 p. m. 
|L at Midnight & 9 p. m. E 
after intervals from 2 to 8 p. m. 

112.7 i O to 2, v_i to 5, \i to 9 A. M., 
pi to 7, B to 11 p. M. 

64.3 I \i to 6 A. M., ^\ to 7, B to 
11 p. M. T between 2 & 3 p. m. 
E after intervals from 12 to 6 
p. M. 

1.6 - 178.4 B to 3, \i to 6, Scuds to 9 
A. M., '~'i to 5, \i to 8, S to 11 
p. M. E at llf A. M. & 12h p. m. 



\i Cirri, — i Strati, oi Cumuli,\_i Cirro-strati, -"^ i Ciimulo-strati, Vv_i Nimbi, 
Vi Cirro-cumuli, B clear, S stratoui, O overcast, T thunder, L lightning, 
E. rain, D. drizzle. 



Meteorologlca I Ohserva (ion s . 



h 



Abstract of the Results of the llourlij Meteorological Ohservations 

taken at the Survey/or General's Office, Calcutta, 

in the month of Jul// 1876. 

Solar Eadiation, Weatliei', &c., 







Oj (V) 




o o 


brj > 




Gua 
abo 
und 


<D 


h;3 


=j.-^ 2 


P 







Wind. 



Prevailing 
direction. 



25 139.5 

26 141.0 



27 

28 

29 
30 

31 



139.0 



126.5 



Inches. 
0.22 



0.37 

0.27 

1.17 

1.78 
1.06 

0.28 



E by S & S 

SSE,S&SbyW 

S by W, S & S E 

S E & S by W 

S by E & S S W 
S W & S S W 

S W & S by W 



ft 

0.8 



1.7 

2.2 
0.5 

1.2 



General aspect of tlie Sky. 



Miles 
231.0 



145.3 

116.5 

61.4 

89.2 
250.5 

171.3 



5 to 1. O to 6 A.M., -i to 11 
P.M. Slight R at 2h, 6 a. m., 
12i& l|p. M. 

6 to 1, \ito 7, Oto 10 a.m., 
^i to 7, \i to 11 p. M. R at 
Midnight, 5, 8 a.m., 1 & 3 p. m. 

S to8 A. m., ^i to 12, O to 5, 
S to 11p.m. Tfroml^toSp.M. 
L at 9 p. M. li from 1 to 4 p. m. 

S to 6 A. m., O to 11 p. M. 
Sheet L on W at Midnitjht. R 
from 7f A. M. to 5 & at S\ p. m. 

O. E after intervals from 
Midnight to 6 P. m. 

O to 8 A. M., Sto 4, O to 11 
p. M. R from Midnight to 3, at 
7, 8 A.M. & 2| p. M.' 

O. Slight 11 after intervals. 



\i Cirri — i Strati, '^i Cumuli, \_i Cirro-strati, <^\ Cumulo-strnti, Vv-i JN'iiubi, 
Vi Cirro-cumuli, B clear, S stratoui, O overcast, T thunder, L lightuiag, 
E. rain, D. drizale. 



lix 



.Mett'oroJog'ical Ohiervalions. 



Abstract of (lie lit^snlln of the Ilourli/ Meteorological Observatiotia 
taken at the Siirvei/or General's Office, Calcutta, 
in the mouth of Jul^ 1876. 

Monthly IIesults. 



IMeaii ]ieii;lit of tlie I3ru-onieter for tlie raojitli 
Max.lieiglitof the Baronvler occurred ;it 10 a. m. on tlie 20t]i 
Miu. height of tlie E; . meter occurred at 4 p. M. ou the 9th 
^Extreme range of the i • rometer during the mouth 
Mean of the daily Isln::. Pressures 

Ditto ditto Mir ditto 

Mean daily range of tlw Barometer dui'iug the mouth ... 



Inches. 
. 29.500 
. 29.666 
. 29.374. 
. 0.292 
, 29.555 
. 29.442 
. 0.113 



Mean Dry Eulb Thermometer for the month 
Max. Temperature occurred at 3 & 4 v. M. on the 1st 
luin. Temperature occurred at 4 & 5 a. m. on the 29th 
JExtreme range of the Temperature during the month 
Meau of the daily Max. Temperature 

Ditto ditto Min. ditto, 
Mean daily range of the Temperatiu'e during the month 





82.7 
95.5 
76.4 
19.1 
86.8 
79.8 
7-0 



Mean Wet Bull) Thermometer for the month 

Mean Dry Bulb Thermometer above Mean Wet Bulb Thermometer 

Computed Mean Dew-point for the month 

Meau Dry Bulb Thermometer above computed mean Dew-point 



Mean Elastic force of ^^'apour for the montli 



80.3 
2.4 

78.6 
4.1 

Inches. 
0.958 



^ Grain. 

Lc.m Weight of Yapour for the month ... ... ... 10.30 

Additional Weight of A'apour required for complete saturation ... 1.42 
Mean degree of humidity for the mouth, couiplete satui'atiou beiiig unity 0.88 



Mean Max. Solar radiation Thermometer for the mouth 



o 
137.1 



Inches. 
3Rained 26 days, — Max. fall of rain during 24 hours ,., ... 5.41 

Total amount of rain during the month ... ... ... 19.39 

Total amount of rain indicated by the Gauge* attached to the anemo- 
meter during the month ... ,,. ... ... xnidcr repair. 

Prevailing direction of the Wind ... ,., S, S S W. & S. W. 



* Height 70 feet 10 inclies above groimd. 



Ix 



Meleoroloyical Ohsenall 



1 



,^ 












^ 


o 




% 


r^ 






-*-5 


• 


St 


^ 




o 


u 


(3 



^ 




rO 


rO 


w 




n3 




c-i 




a 


ci 






i^ 


Is 


O 






-Ti 






C3 


rt 


ci! 








t; 


<<} 




■-3 


"f^ 


10 




c5 





>o 




t>i 


-*-* 


5 




03 


c3 










"U 


t/1 






fi«' 


H 




>i 


^1 






fZJ 


1^ 


tJ 




C3 


'-0 


t/j 


7! 






H-i 





r^ 


■♦0 


tH 




^ 



3 W 



■to 
ft? 



^ o 



■uo 11 in}]; 

•110 Ull!}£ 



■7^ 



•uo uiuji; 

•uo UIT!J[ 



•AViSL'Ai 

■uo UIU}[ 

•no uivfj 



■AV 



•uo un!2[ 

•uo uiiijj; 
•AVS'AV 




•AV ^"'l 'S 



•uo uixjy; 



•no uiv.ij 



•uo un^jf 
•uo uj-Bjx 



/■" ■ ■ 1 








r-H r-( 


1 








OJ r-i 






""* 










^ 


rH I— 1 












^ ^ 


'•^ 


i-{ 






r^^ 


■-' 








1 


'-' 




r-l 


'"' 


T 


'-' 




'-' 




I— ( |H ^-^ 


Cfl 




r-l iH 


^ 


ffl (M to ffl 


0-1 i-< r- 1-1 




cflfHi-i (Moicowei-^'gi 


■-I 


CO -^SWCOC^NlNCO <M 


to 


ffl!Mt0C-l-^e0c0-*O|-HCD 


t~ 


t^t^'St'OOO^lO-^COffl 



I— I.— ISOOO>-ICOCOCOCO>-l'H 
~CD CC t~lX) '(500 1> O 05 »0 00 



rHi-lCO(M^i-li-l. 0-1 i-l 

CO -^ CO^lSrccTlcTlO'*^' ■*"«?" 



lOCOlOCOt-'^'^'OCOlOtM "H -^(M-^Ni 



I O OS t~-* 'ii ■^" 



d 


f-l<M W rH 


^ 


l-H 01 i-H Ol rH rH (M 


•^ 


ooi>-<?cococo>ncocOt-i 


TJH 


10 CO t» t^ t- 03 r-< tJ( c-l CT 


m 


rH.-lr-l^(SOq<?)<M 




'"' 7* 


^O^"" 


CO ■* CO 10 m CD CO w t-t 




0-1 01 rH rH rH C5 01 rH 



;jrs 

•uo u!i5T[ 

•uo Ujlijf 

•uo un!)[ 

•CIO «I1!}[ 

•uo u\vy[ 
■5r 'NT "51 



•uo uiu^j; 
•no un!j[ 
•uo uni7[ 

•:>[ -^ "M 

•uo nw}[ 

•M 



^ C^,-, rH-HrH01(M0^rHffJ <-* rHrHO^IrHrH 



rH rH 01 rH 



,-lrH,-(0101rHrHCOrH-*CO rH ffl 01 ffl 01 rH rH ffj r- rH rH 



I 01 rH CO rH rH 01 



T-i 01 ^' 



01 01 •-I rH -H 



rt ,_, rt ^ ,_! ,_| OJ 



rH 01 rH 01 rH ff» 



<i"* 



•5 rH 01 CO "* 10 CO t- CO en 2 jrj 



rH 04 CO -^l 'O CO t^ CO ■?> O r-l 



1^ 



MeieoroJoijlcal Ohsiirvatlous. 



Alslracl of ll/e Jlesnlls of the Iloarli) Mefeoroloijlcal OhsenaLlous 

taken at the Sitrve//or GeueraVs Office, Calcutta, 

in the moulh <f August 187G. 

Latitude 22° 38" V Noi-tli. Long-itude 88° 20' '6\!' East. 

llciiflitof tlie Cistern of (lie Staiidartl Earonieter a1)0ve tlie sea level, 18.1 1 feet. 

Daily Means, Ac. of tlie Oi)servatioiis and of the Jfygronietrical elements 

dependent thereon. 





-j OJ tJ 


Eange of the Barometer 
during tlie (hiy. 


Dry Bulb 
mometer. 


JJange 
ture c 


of theTe 
uring tlic 


mpera- 
day. 


Date. 






















pi ^1 












Max. 


]\Iin. 


Diir. 




JMax. 


Min. 


Di(f 




Fnclies. 


Tnches. 


Inches. 


Fnches. 


o 


o 





o 


1 


29.605 


29.080 


29.549 


0.131 


83.0 


88.5 


80.0 ' 


8.5 


2 


.m'^ 


.082 


.575 


.107 


82.7 


90.3 


77.7 


12.0 


3 


.053 


.708 


.580 


.122 


82.9 


89.8 


77.5 


12.3 


4, 


.006 


.716 


.025 


.091 


80.6 


87.0 


78.0 


9.0 


5 


.000 


.715 


.590 


.119 


83.1 


87.3 


80.2 


7.1 


6 


.009 


.078 


.534 


.144 


83.2 


89.0 


78.5 


10.5 


7 


.580 


.025 


.539 


.086 


81.4 


81.4 


79.3 


5 1 


8 


.612 


.071 


.505 


.100 


82.1 


87.5 


78.5 


9.0 


9 


.071 


.733 


.023 


,110 


84.9 


90.7 ■ 


81.0 


9.7 


iO 


.088 


.752 


.013 


.139 


84.4 . 


88.8 


81.2 


7.0 


11 


.014, 


.074 


.511 


.133 


84.3 


88.7 


80.5 


8.2 


12 


.51.2 


.59() 


.473 


.123 


83.2 


88.8 


■78.8 


10.0 


13 


.522 


.5(53 . 


.479 


.084 


81.4 


83.5 


78.0 


4.9 


14 


.572 


.032 


.525 


.107 


80.2 


83.2 


78.0 


5.2 


15 


.589 


.057 


.502 


.155 


81.5 


80.5 


77.5 


9.0 


Ifi 


.520 


.579 


.446 


.133 


81.0 


85.0 


80.0 


5.0 


17 


.479 


.521 


.422 


.099 


81.9 


87.0 


79.5 


7.5 


18 


.408 


.520 


.390 


.124 


82.5 


80.5 


80.3 


0.2 


1!) 


.500 


.595 


.400 


.135 


82-. 2 


87.2 


80.0 


7.2 


20 


.591 


.073 


.535 


.138 


82.0 


88.0 


8O.0 


7.1. 


21 


.031 


.090 


.579 


.111 


82.6 


80 5 


79.0 


7.5 


22 


.001 


.707 


.599 


.108 


82.5 


87.1 


80.5 


0.6 


23 


.(;()! 


.709 


.598 


• 111 


83.2 


89.5 


80.0 


8.5 


21 


.070 


■729 


.028 


.101 


82.5 


87.4 


79.0 


7.8 


25 


.072 


.718 


.000 


.118 


83,2 


90.7 


78.5 


12.2 


2G 


.r.90 


.748 


.()30 


. .118 


83.6 


89.8 


80.2 


9.(5 


27 


.710 


.773 


.0 15 


.12S 


81.0 


90.5 


80.5 


10.0 


28 


.718 


.781 


.028 


.150 


85.3 


91.5 


80.5 


11.0 


2i) 


.074 


.738 


.578 


•loo 


85.8 


92.(r 


81.8 


10.2 


30 


.591 


.052 


.51 »5 


.147 


«5.5 


90.0 


82.5 


8.1 


31 


.501 


.500 


.417 


.143 


81.9 


90.5 


81.5 


9.0 



The Mean Height of the Baronieler, as likewise the Dry n)id Wet Bulb 
Thormonietcr Means arc derived, from tii.' hourly observations, made at the 
several hours during the day, 



Ix 



Meteorological Olservatlons. 



Abstract of the Results of the JTonrl// Meteoroloffical Observations 
taken at the Snrve//or General's OJjice, Calcutta, 
in the month of Awffust 1876. 



Daily Means, &c. of Uie Observations aiul of tlie irygrometrical eleraeitfes 
dependenb thereon. — ( Continued. ) 





u 


-4-3 


H-3 


^ 


o 




o o d 


"3 








.3 

"o 




o 
o 


p, b3 

> o 


=w o 


0.^ 


Date. 




o 




o 


c2 

o 






<D p, d 




0) o 


r.Q 


•n 


rJ^ 


_i -A 


Q) .O 


<^ b S 


fcj-J O r^ 




Ol Pi 




P. 

a 

Q 


3 .i 






O O p, 






^, 


p 


O 


fi 


^ 


^.- 


<i 


^ 




O 


o 


o 





rnclies. 


Gv. 


Gv. 




1 


79.5 


3.5 


77.0 


6.0 


0.910 


9.77 


2.05 


0.8^ 


2 


79.4 


3.3 


77.1 


5.6 


.913 


.80 


1.92 


.84 


3 


80.3 


2.6 


78.5 


4.4 


.955 


10.27 


.52 


.87 


4 


79.1 


1.5 


78.0 


2.6 


.910 


.13 


a.88 


.92 


5 


79.9 


3.2 


77.7 


5.1 


.931 


.00 


1.86 


.84 


6 


80.2 


3.0 


78.1 


5.1 


.913 


.12 


.77 


.85 


7 


79.6 


1.8 


78.3 


3.1 


.919 


.22 


.05 


.91 


8 


80.1 


2.0 


•78.7 


3.4 


.961 


.35 


.16 


.90 


9 


81.5 


3.1 


79.1 


5.8 


.973 


.40 


2.09 


.83 


]0 


80.9 


3.5 


78.4 


6.0 


.952 


.19 


.12 


.83 


31 


80.9 


3.4 


78.5 


5.8 


.955 


.23 


.05 


.83 


}2 


80.8 


2.4 


70.1 


4.1 


.973 


.45 


1.44 


.88 


13 


79.& 


1.5 


78.8 


2.6 


.961 


.38 


0.89 


.92 


34 


78.5 


1.7 


77.3 


2.9 


.919 


9.02 


.96 


.91 


35 


79.1 


2.4 


77.4 


4.1 


.922 


.93 


1.38 


.88 


36 


80.3 


1.3 


79.4 


2.2 


.983 


10.58 


0.76 


.9;^ 


37 


80.6 


1.3 


79.7 


2.2 


.992 


.68 


.76 


.93 


18 


80.9 


1.6 


79.8 


2.7 


.995 


.69 


.95 


.92 


39 


80.4 


1.8 


79.1 


3.1 


.973 


.47 


1.07 


.91 


20 


80.3 


1.7 


79.1 


2.9 


.973 


.47 


.00 


.91 


21 


80.1 


2.5 


78.3 


4.3 


.919 


.20 


.48 


.87 


2-2 


80.7 


1.8 


79.4 


3.1 


.983 


.56 


.08 


.91 


23 


81.0 


2.2 


79.5 


3.7 


.986 


.57 


.32 


.89 


21 


80.2 


2.3 


78.6 


3.9 


.958 


.30 


.34 


.89 


2o 


80.3 


2.9 


78.3 


4.9 


.919 


.18 


.71 


.86 


26 


80.5 


3.1 


78.3 


5.3 


.919 


.18 


.85 


.85 


27 


80.6 


3.4 


78.2 


5.8 


.916 


.13 


2.04 


.83 


28 


81.2 


4.1 


78.3 


7.0 


.919 


.14 


.50 


.80 


29 


81.3 


4.5 


78.1 


7.7 


.943 


.06 


.77 


.78 


30 


81.3 


4.2 


78.4 


7.1 


.952 


.17 


.55 


.80 


31 


80.9 


4.0 


78.1 


6.8 


.913 


.08 


.41 


.81 



All the Ifygrometrieal elemeuts are computed by tlie Greenwich Coiistauts. 



Meteorological Ohservaiions. 



Ixiii 



Abstract of the Results of tlie Hourly Meteorological Ohservations 

taken at the Survej/or General's OJice, Calcutta, 

in the month of August 1876. 



Hourly Means, &c. of the Observations and of tlie Hygrometrical eleinents 

dependent tlicreon. 



Hoar, 



"s s 



^1 



Eange of tlie liaronieter 

foreaeli lioui* diiriug 

the montli. 



Mas. 



Mill. 



Diff. 



rO 








rj 


^ 


m 


u 




(D 


t>- 


a 


fii 1 


rt 






^ 


ferH 


H 


r^ 





Eange of tlie Tempera- 
ture for each lionr 
during the month. 



Max. 



Min. 



Diff. 



kCid- 
ight. 

1 

2 

3 

4 

g 

6 

7 

8 

9 
90 
11 



Noon 
1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 

10 
11 



Inches. 


Inches. 


Inches. 


Inches. 


o 


29.fi37 


29.735 


29.503 


0.232 


81.3 


.626 


.727 


.494 


.233 


81.1 


.612 


.719 


.472 


.247 


80.9 


.601 


.720 


.461 


.259 


80.7 


.596 


.730 


.451 


.279 


80.4 


.606 


.740 


.460 


.280 


80.2 


.620 


.750 


.474 


.276 


80.2 


.632 


.758 


.490 


.268 


80.0 . 


.616 


.779 


.495 


.284 


81.7 


.656 


.781 


.497 


.287 


83.0 


.655 


.781 


.506 


.275 


81.1 


.047 


.708 


.491 


.274 


85.3 


.632 


.742 


.490 


.240 


85.9 


.009 


.719 


.461 


.253 


80.4 


.588 


.69 1 


.410 


.251 


87.0 


.568 


.65 1 


.405 


.219 


86.6 


.556 


.650 


.400 


.250 


85.7 


.553 


.615 


.396 


.219 


8 L9 


.563 


.663 


.407 


.256 


8 1.2 


.582 


.687 


.129 


.258 


83.2 


.607 


.7<n) 


.461 


.218 


82.5 


.627 


.735 


.18 1 


.251 


82.2 


.(iJ,5 


.7 IS 


.493 


.255 


81.7 


.639 


.752 


.48A 


.268 


81.4 



83.7 
83.3 
83.0 
82.6 
82.5 
82.5 
82.5 
83.0 
81.2 
86.0 
87.7 
89.3 



SO.O 
90.5 
91.5 
92.0 
91.5 
8S).2 
88.0 
86.0 
85.5 
85.0 
81.3 
81.0 



78.5 
78.5 
78.3 
78.3 
78.0 
77.5 
77.7 
78.2 
78.0 
78.0 
79.2 
80.0 



81 .0 
80.1 

81). 5 
79.3 
78.5 
78.5 
80.2 
78.8 
78.8 
79.4 
77.5 
78.0 



5.2 
4.8 
4.7 
4.3 
4.5 
5.0 
4.8 
4.8 
0.2 
8.0 
8.5 
9.3 



9.0 

10.1 

11.0 

12.7 

13.0 

l(t.7 

7.8 

7.2 

6.7 

5.(5 

6 8 

0.0 



Tiie Mean Height of the Caroincter, as likewise tlio Dry and Wet IJulb 
Tlierinomcter Means arc licrivcd from the obscivations made at the scvcrul 
hours duriiig the mouih. 



Ixiv 



Metcovtlog. cal Olservafions, 



Abstract of the TiesnJts of the IIoyjIi, Meteorolog'tad Ohscrvalioiis 
taken at the Snrveijor GeneraVs Office, Calcutta, 
in the month of August 1876. 



IIoui'lj Means, &c. of tlie Observations and of the Hygrometrical elements 
dependent tliereou. — (Continued). 





er- 






^ 


^+-1 
o 


Yapour 
of air. 




a 




S 


^ 


'o 


P 


O 


"^ o 






rJO 


<o 


P 


<a 


o 


=j-< w 


■TT, ^ u 


V-- -^ -^ 


Hour. 




> 

O 


> 


o 

CO 

=3 . 


O O 

'53 |o 




o 2-a 






3 


Pi 










■SSJ 

S -^ o 




<U r-l 




o 
O 








:5^ s 






o 





o 





liK-lies. 


Gr. 


Gr. 




Mid- 


















niK'it 


79.8 


1.5 


78.7 


2.6 


0.961 


10.35 


0.89 


0.92 


1 


79.7 


1.4 


78.7 


2.4 


.961 


.37 


.80 


.93 


2 


79.5 


1.4 


78.5 


2.4 


.955 


.31 


.79 


.93 


3 


79.3 


1.4 


78.3 


2.4 


.949 


.24 


.80 


.93 


4 


79.2 


1.2 


78.4 


2.0 


.952 


.27 


.67 


.94 


5 


79.1 


1.1 


78.3 


1.9 


.949 


.24 


.64 


.94 


6 


79.1 


11 


78.3 


1.9 


.919 


.24 


.64 


.94 


7 


79.4 


1.2 


78.6 


2.0 


.958 


.34 


.47 


.94 


8 


79.7 


2.0 


78.3 


3.4 


.949 


.22 


1.15 


.90 


9 


80.3 


2.7 


78.4 


4.6 


.952 


.21 


.61 


.86 


10 


80.6 


3.5 


78.1 


6.0 


.943 


.10 


2.11 


.83 


11 


- 81.3 


4.0 


78.5 


6.8 


.955 


.21 


.43 


.81 


Noon. 


81.3 


4.6 


78.1 


7.8 


.943 


.06 


.81 


.78 


1 


81.6 


4.8 


78.2 


8.2 


.946 


.09 


.97 


.77 


2 


81.8 


5.2 


78.7 


8.3 


.961 


.24 


3.05 


.77 


3 


81.7 


4.9 


78.8 


7.8 


.964 


.27 


2.87 


.78 


4 


81.1 


4.6 


77.9 


7.8 


.937 


.00 


.80 


.78 


5 


81.1 


3.0 


78.4 


6.5 


.952 


.17 


.32 


.81 


6 


809 


3.3 


78.6 


5.6 


.958 


.26 


1.98 


.84 


7 


80.6 


2.6 


78.8 


4.4 


.964 


.36 


.53 


.87 


8 


80.2 


2.3 


78.6 


3.9 


.958 


.30 


.34 


.89 


9 


80.3 


1.9 


79.0 


3.2 


.970 


.41 


.10 


.91 


10 


80.0 


1.7 


78.8 


2.9 


.964 


.38 


0.99 


.91 


11 


79.9 


1.5 


78.8 


2.6 


.964 


.38 


.89 


.92 



All the irygrometricRl elements are conii'utcd l>j the Grccnwith Constants. 



Ileteoroloijical Ohscrialions. 



Ixv 



AhslracI of I lie liefnills of I he I to ml// Meleorologlcal Ohst'iraliuns 
tcikeii at Ike iSarvejjor Geiienii's Office, CulcnUa, 
in I he nioulh oj Atigud 1876. 

Solai- IJadiation, Weatlier, ki. 






•WiJID. 



Prevailiiic; (4 ^ 

direelion. t:n £ 



^ .-^ General aspect of tlie Slcy. 

C3 c 



o III flies 
: 140.0 \ 0.00 



148.0' 0.40 



140.0 ' 2.15 



135.0 2.21 



140.0 



139.8 0.00 



110.0 



1.02 



130.3 
141.0 
130.0 1 0.0 i 



s s w & s w 



S W & S S W . 3.9 



Miles. 
99.0 



104.4 



S S W & S by W' 1.4 93.3 



by W&SSWi 1-8 121.2 



s s w & w s w 

S W & AV S AV 

W S AV & S S W 

S & S by W 

a A S by W 

S & S J<] 



1.2 



72.0 

08.8 

05.5 

57.7 
31.7 
50.0 



S to 1. '~i to 3, 

T at Midnight. 

3. J to 5 p. M. 

1 A. M. & from 
M. E from jMidnigbt 
A. M. & from 3.T to 



O to 11 A. M., S to 11 p. II. 

Light E at Miduight, 1, 2, 
A.M., 4| & 10 p. M.' 

O to 9, Vi to 11 A. M., \i to 1, 
'"i to 4, O to 11 p. M.T & L from 
5| to 11 p. M. E from 3 to 8 
A. M., Or to 7j & at 11 p. m. 

O to 8, \i to 11 A. M., -i too, 
S to 7, O to 1 1 y. M. T & L 
from 71 to 11 p. M. E from 
Midnight to 5 a. M. & 9w to 
11 p. M. 

O to 10 A. ii. 

to 11 p. M. 

1 A. M. & from 
L at Miduight, 
8 to 11 p. ' ^ 
to 5 at 8 

7 p. M. 

O to 4, Vi to 9 A. M., <->i to 0, 

to 11 p. M. T at 7.T p. M. L 
at Midnight, 11 & 8 p". m. D at 

1 A. M. & 9 p. M. 

O to 8 A.M., Vvi to 12, -i to 0, 
O to 11 P.M. Tat llf P.M. Lat 
7, 9 & llf p. M. E at 3, 4|, 
Qh A. M. Si, from 9] to 11 p. m.' 

O to 1, Vi to 7 A. M., O to 4, 

5 toG, ^i to 8, S to 11 p. M. T 

6 L at Midiiiglit, E at Midnight 
& 1 & from 9 A. M. to 3 p. m. 

O to 2, - i & \i to 11 p. M. D 
at 1 Si 9 A. M. 

\i to 2, Vi to A. M., '-i to 5, 
\i to 11 p. M. 

\i to 7 A. M., '"i to 7, S to U 
P. M. Tat I.\ r. M. Light E at 

8 p. M. 



\i Cirri,— iSf rat 
Vi Cirro-ciiiiuili, 
K. rain, P. drizz 



I, "i Cumuli, \_i Cirro-strali, ^ i Cunnilo-slnili, ^/> i IS imbi, 
n flcar, y «lratoni, O uvcrca.st, T lliundor, L lightning, 



ixvi 



Meteorological Olscrraiions, 



Abstract of the Results of the llonrli/ Meteorological Ol^ervaii-om 

taken at the Surveyor General's OJj'ice, Calcutta^ 

in the month of Augnst 187'6. 

SoltiT Uadiation, Weatlier, &c. 





;-i 


(B <B 




o o 


!=»■■ fc • 




5 °n=! 




QQVS 

53 


6^ s 


flj 


^j^ 


cd 2 


P 







WlKD. 



Prevailing 
direction. 



^ 



Ph 



o3 O 



General aspect of tlie Sky. 



HI 




142.0 


IllclieS| 

0.32 


12 


135.6 


1.59 


13 


... 


0.75 


14 


111.5 


0.34 


15 


136.0 


2.16 


16 


... 


4.75 


27 


130.8 


l.«S 


18 




0.78 


19 


135.8 


0.34 


■20 


136.4 


0.12 


21 


136.3 


0.21 



S E & S by E 

s s w 
s s w & s w 

S W & W by S 

S W & WbyN 

w s w 

S & variable 

E & E S E 

S E & S by E 

S, & S S E 

S E, S & S by E 



lb 



0.8 



0.-2 



1.0 



0.2 



Miles. 
97.3 "^i to 2, v_i to 5 a. m., ^i to 7., 

5 to 11 P. M. E from 7f to 9| 

p. M. 

r 9.7 Vi to 1, \i to 7 a. m., ^i to 5, 

to 11 p. M. T at 5 p. M. E at 
12i&from 4to lOp. M. 

130.3 6 to 3, Vi to 5 a. m., O to 11 
P.M. E after intervals. 

170.3 I O to 11 A. M., S to 5, O to 11 
,p. M. T & L from Midnight to 

2 A. M. E from 2| to 10 a. m. & 
7 to 8 p. M. 

139.4 i O to 11 A. M., ^i to 7, O to 
[11 p. M. E from H to 5, at 10^ 
'a. m. & from 8 to 10^ p. m. 

71.5 ; Chiefly O. E from 5J to S, 

11 A. M. to 1 & 7s to 11 p. M. 

67.6 j O to 10 A. M., S to 2, O to 5. 
\i to 8, S to 11 p. M. T at Mid- 
nigbt & 1a.m. L from Midniglit 
to 2 at 5 A. M. & from 6h to^ 1 1 

1 p. M. _ E after intervals from 
'Midnight to 4 p. m. 

119.1 i O to 2, S to 7, \i to 11 p. M. 
iT at Hi A. M. & 12 p. M. E from 
5| A. M. to 12 & at 10 p. M. 

149.6 O to 8, -i to 10 a. m., S to 4, 

\i to 7, S to 11 p. M. T at 2h & 

3i P. M. S]i<,'ht E after intervals. 

93.2 \i & \-i to 3, O to 7 a. m., Vi 

6 ^i to 12, O to 3, S to 6, \i to 
•9, O to 11 p. M. T at 12| p. M. 
jL on N at 10 p. M. E from 1 to 

3 p. M. 
88.6 O to 8, ^i to 10 a. m., O to 2, 

"i to 7, 13 to 11 P.M. E at<;, 
in A. M. & 2 p. m. 



\i Cirri, — i Strati, ^i Cumu]i,\_i Cirro-strati, '^ i Ciimulo-strali, v^_i Kimbi, 
Vi Cirro-cumuli, B clear, S stratoui, O overcast, T tliuuder, L lightning, 
R. rain, D. drizzle. 



i 



Meteorological Oiservations. 



XYU 



Abstract of the Results of the Tlourlij Meteorological Observations^ 

taken at the Snrveijor General's Office, Calcutta, 

in the month of August 1876. 

Solar Eadiation, WeatLer, &c., 







O O 




^ d 


b£ > 




rt o_: 




o o 




1 

ft 




d^ 2 



Wind. 



Prevailing 
direction. 



CM 



^ .if 



General aspect of tlic Sty. 



o Indies., ]h 

22 140.9 1.6) S S E & S 0.3 



23 



24 



26 
27 



138.8 



143.0 



25 140.0 



145.0 
142.5 



28 141.0 



29 142.0 
30, 143.0 



31 



142.0 



0.94 S S E & S E 
0.32 S E & S by E 

1.42 SbyE,SE&EbyN 
0.18 S E & S by E 
0.26 S by E, E, & S 
S & S W 

SW.ESE&SbyW 
S by W 

0.02 SbyW,NE&SE 



Miles 

80.0 





39.0 


... 


89.8 


0.7 


68.9 


4.0 


90.3 


1.8 


73.3 


... 


62.9 


• • • 


40.2 


0.5 


69.1 



62.5 



B to 5, ^i to 8, O to 10 A. jr., 

i to 1,0 to 4, ^i to 11 P.M. T 
after intervals from 9 J a. si. to 
7 P. M. L at 7 p. M. H 'after in- 
tervals from 8 A. M. to 8|- p. m. 

v_i to 2 A. u., ^i to 1, O to 7^ 
v_i to 11 P.M. T & L at 3|p. M. 
R from 2 1 to 6^ p. m. 

O to 9 A. M., '^i to 5, S to 11 
p. M. T at 12| p. M. Slight E 
after intervals from 5 to 9 a. m. 
at 121 & 6| P.M. 

B to 2, \i to 4, Vi to 7 A. M., 
'^i to 2, O to 5, S to 11 P.M. T, 
L & R from 2j to 5^ p. m. 

\i to 8 A. M., ^i to 2, O to 7, 
\i to 11 p. M. T from 2^ to 4| 
p. M. Eat Ij & 3.V p. M. 

\i to 3, B to 7 A. M., '"i to 8, 
v_itollp. M. Tat5&6p.M. 
Rat 12i&4p.M. 

B to 7 A. M., -^i to 7, V— i & 
\i to II P.M. T at 5 P.M. Sheet 
L on E from 7r to 11 p.m. D at 

4 J P. M. 

'^i to 2, \i & v_i to 7 A. M., /^i 
to 11 P. SI. 

\i to 7 A. M., ^i & \i to 8, 
W to 11 p. M. T at 6f p. M. L at 
4 a. m., 6| Sc 11 p. M. 

■^i to 6, Vi to 10 A. M.. r^i to 

3,0 to 7, S to 11 p. M. Tat 3.fc 
11 p. M. L from Midnight to 4 
A. M. & G'l to 11 p. M. R at 3, 7 
& 11 p. M. 



\i Cirri — i Strati, '^i Cumuli, \-_i Cirro-strati, -^-i Cumulo-strati, \^-i Nimbi, 
Vi Cirro-cumuli, B clear, S stratoui, O overcast, T thunder, L lightning, 
K. raiu, D. drizzle. 



Ixviii Meteorological Ohservalioiis. 

Abslraet of the Ixesnlts of the Hourly Meteorological Observations 
taken at the Snrvei/or Generates Oj/ice, Calcutta, 
in the month of August 187G. 

^Monthly Hicsui.ts. 



Indies. 

Mean lieii^'lit of tlie IJnromcter for t1ie montli ... ... ... 29.013 

Max.lieiglit.oft.liel3im)nieteroccuiTechit 9 a. m. onllie28lli ... 29.781, 

Min. lieii^lit of tlie IJaronioter occurred at 5 p.m. on tlie 18tli ... 29.89G 

JUa'freme range o( tlie Enronieter during tlie montli ... ... 0.388 

JVJeauof the daily JNTax. Pressures ... ... ... ... 29.070 

Ditto ditto jMin. ditto ... ... ... ... 29.518 

Mean daily range of the Barometer during the moiitli ... ... 0.122 



Mean Dry Eulb Thermometier for the month ... ... ... 83.0 

Max. Temperature occurred at 3 p. M. on the 29th ... ... 92. (t 

Min. Tempei-ature occurred at 5 a. m. & 10 p. m. on the 3rd & IStli ... 77.5 

l<!xtreme range o^ the Temperature during the mouth ... ... 14.5 

Menu of the daily Max. Temperature ... ... ... ... 88.2 

Ditto ditto Min. ditto, ... ... ... ... 79.7 

Mean daily range oi the Temperature during the month ... ... 8,5 



Mean Wet Bull) Thermometer for the month ... ... ... 80.3 

Mean Dry Bidb Tliermometer above Mean Wet Bidb Tliermometer 2.7 

Computed Mean Dew-point for the month ... ... ... 78.4 

Mean Dry Bulb Thermometer above computed mean Dew-point .... 4.6 

Inches. 
Mean Elastic force of Yaponr for the month ... ... ... 0.952 



Grain. 
Mean Weight of Yajiour for the month ... ... .,, 10.21 

Additional Weight of A^apour required for complete saturation ... 1.61 
Mean degree of humidity for the month, complete saturation being unity 0.86 



Mean Max. Solar radiation Tliermometer for the month ... ... 137.5 



Indies. 
Eaincd 28 days, — Max. fall of rain during 24 hours ... ... 4.75 

Total amount of rain during the month ... ... .., 24.85 

Total amount of rain indicated b}' the Gauge* attached to the anemo- 
meter during the month ... ... ,,. ... ... 22 52 

Prevailing direction of the Wind ... ... S— S E & ?? S W 

* Ileii^lil 70 foct 10 iiiclics above ^vouud. 



Meleorological Olservalions. 



^ 
% 



CO 



fc(, 


•r-H 


c 


t/: 










b 


i5 




c 


r^ 


rO 


n^ 




^ 


cc 


i? 


i? 


%^ 


•XJ 


Cu 


« 



^5^ 


H 


f^ 


W 


1^ 


f3 


tci 


P 
») 


r^ 


S 


W 




O 


Ph 






> 


« 
» 


W 


be 



? ^ 



& ^ 



^ ^ o3 






^ 



t^ 



% 



fti 



^ 
^ 



1= S 







•uo U1U}[ 

•g M "a 

•uo uiujx 







a 


•uo 


UITJJI 


•K 


A'q 


■5[ 


•no 


unvjj 


'51 


•w 


"51 


•uo 


ure}[ 




51 


K[ 


•uo 


U1X!}£ 


■51 


•M 


•M 


•U( 


Ul 


M 


"51 

•uo 


Ull 


•K[ 



c^ 












rH rt 








rH 








■-IrH^ 






^ 


rHrHrH 




'-' 








•-^ 




(M 




rH 








<N 




CO r-H 








■-^ 




--< 
















(N 01 (M 








--^ 




'-' '-' 








'-' 




'-' 




i-H 1-1 r-l iH 


i-l 


'-' 




i-l i-( 






^ 


G* (M ffj (M -H 










T-l 




'-' 


(?l(MrH<M(MCMi-li-( 


'-' 


'-' 




'-' 


~W^ 


ffl 1-1 


« 


1-1 1-1 




1-1 




r-l rH r-lSfl 


COO0COIM(M(NrHrH r-l 


tM 


<?J(Mrt)i-(ffl<?l(MCM'— i-IIN 


'-• 




(M 


(M CI 1-1 1-1 




1-1 


'-' 


cq (M IM (M rH 



-^COCO-^SOOicOCOlOCOCO <M lM'Jl(MrHCO^kOI0'*C0C0 



rH rH (M (yi <M (M rH 



Tjl TJl'ilCO-^jl-^lO^COO-lrHCC •* -^COOl^CDlOrillOCDlOlO 



■-^ 


rH (M rH rH rH N rH 




rH r- rH (M 


in 


CO'^IOCONITO^'NWCOCM 


<y> 


C0C0C0(MlO'^»O-*C0-^C0 




rH ff) CM rH 




rH rH CO rH rH r-i 


-* 


CDlOlOiOiOUSCOCOOT'*"* 


(M 


CO ■* CO CO lO lO ■* -^ U3 -^ 



t-\ -*C0!NU5rHC0US^>OC0C0 



^ ^ ^ rH rH i-i rH^d (M 0» rH 

~W~0^"CON (M CO (M CO Ofl rt CO >n ffl Oi N CO rn rn IM IM 



•^ eO'*-*oco>acou3coiO'^ 'O cococo-dicO'5'coiO'<*-^co 



-* Ol -* ffl (>J 



I rH -^ rH (M 



I r-H rH (M (M rH (M N 



CT CO CO C-) 1 



I CO ■* 'O '-0 t~ 00 Ol O rH 



C-1 CO ■•* 'O «0 t~ 00 05 ' 



Meteorological OLservations. 



Ixx 



Abstract of the liesnlfs of the Hourly Meteorological OLservations 

taken at the Sarvej/or General's OJlce, Calcutta, 

in the month of Sej^temher 1876. 

Latitude 22° 38' \" North. Longitude 88° 20' 3J/' E;ist. 

Height of the Cistern of the Standard Barometer above the sea. level, 18.11 feet. 

Daily Means, &c. of the Observations and of theHygroiuetrical elements 

dependent thereon. 







Eange of the Barometer 




E an ge 


of the Tenipera- 




-. O li 


during the d 


ay. 


fig 


ture ( 


uring the 


day., 


Date. 
















c3 ^ 








f^ s^ 










Max. 


Min. 


Diff. 




Max. 


Min. 


Difif. 












^^ 










Inches. 


Inches. 


Inches. 


Inches. 


o 


o 


o 


o 


1 


29.456 


29.550 


29.389 


0.161 


80.2 


82.5 


78.0 


4.5 


2 


.587 


.682 


.508 


.174 


78.8 


80.5 


77.0 


3.5 


3 


.675 


.722 


.631 


.091 


80.5 


87.0 


77.5 


9.5 


4 


.675 


.724 


.618 


.106 


82.7 


86.0 


80.0 


6.0 


5 


.690 


.748 


.622 


.126 


83.2 


86.7 


80.5 


6.2 


6 


.719 


.767 


.657 


.110 


85.0 


90.5 


81.2 


9.3 


7 


.720 


.780 


.663 


.117 


84.1 


88.8 ■ 


82.3 


6.5 


8 


.676 


.729 


.617 


.112 


82.5 


89.0 


81.0 


8.0 


9 


.656 


.712 


.586 


.126 


83.0 


88.0 


80.6 


7.4 


iO 


.652 


.713 


.578 


.135 


84.2 


90.0 


80.0 


10.0 


11 


.644 


.697 


.561 


.136 


84.0 


90.0 


81.0 


9.0 


12 


.611 


.m% 


.533 


.133 


82.9 


87.0 


80.5 


6.5 


13 


.609 


.662 


.540 


.122 


83.1 


88.3 


80.2 


8.1 


U 


.653 


.706 


.587 


.119 


85.0 


92.0 


79.5 


12.5 


15 


.685 


.721 


.634 


.087 


81.0 


90.5 


80.5 


10.0 


16 


.715 


.768 


.671 


.097 


82.3 


85.5 


79.5 


6.0 


17 


.723 


.783 


.615 


.138 


84.1 


89.2 


80.0 


9.2 


18 


.726 


. .782 


.671 


.111 


83.7 


89.4. 


80.5 


8.9 


19 


.764 


.827 


.707 


.120 


83.4 


89.4 


80.5 


8.9 


21) 


.773 


.819 


.700 


.119 


82.5 


88.6 


80.5 


8.1 


21 


.704 


.768 


.626 


.142 


84.0 


90.2 


80.0 


10.2 


22 


.663 


.710 


.613 


.097 


83.4 


88.4 


80.8 


7.6 


23 


.702 


.761 


.652 


.109 


82.5 


86.5 


80.0 


6.5 


21 


.753 


•822 


.701 


.121 


82.5 


88.0 


78.0 


10.0 


25 


.775 


.829 


.712 


.117 


82.9 


89.0 


78.5 


10.5 


26 


.777 


.827 


.709 


.118 


83.1 


88.4 


79,2 


9.2 


27 


.814 


.873 


.773 


■ .100 


82.1 


88.4 


79.0 


9.4 


28 


.859 


.916 


.796 


.120 


82.2 


88.8 


78.9 


9.9 


29 


.881 


.919 


.792 


.157 


83.1 


88.0 


78.5 


9.5 


80 


.826 


.898 


.744 


•154 


83.2 


88.7 


78.8 


9.9 



Tlie Mean Height of the Barometer, as likewise the Dry and Wet Bulb 
Thermometer ]\Ieans are derived, from the hourly observations, made at the 
several hours during tlie day. 



]: 



Meteoro log 'ica I Olser rations. 



Abstract of lite Jxesulls of the ILiurli/ Meteorological Observations 
taken at the Snrvei/or GeneraVs OJjice, Calcutta, 
in the vionth of Sejotemier 1876. 



Diiilj Means, Sic. of Llie OI).seiTatioiis and of tlie Hygromefci-ical elements 
dopendent t.liereon. — (Conliuued.) 



Date. 



H 

pq 



^ 



^ 



^ 



pq 



fi 



f^ 


(» 


^ 


^ 


a 


^ 


w 


c3 


^ 


ri:j 






-tJ 


[i 


p. 


pq 



o 



P 






o.tl 

P, c3 

C3 =^ 



o o 

if '-2 

"" d 



o o d 



■S-:= F? 



^ 



O O p, 



-t1 



w 




■3 


o 


CD 


be 


Ol 


p 


a 


^ 


Fi 


(X> 


bn b-Q 








■+3 


Cl 




fTl 


0) 


^ 


U 



;^ 

















Fnclies. 


Gi-. 


Gv. 




1 


78.6 


1.6 


77.5 


2.7 


0.925 


9.98 


0.90 


0.92 


2 


77.9 


0.9 


77.3 


1.5 


.919 


.94 


.50 


.95 


3 


79.0 


1.5 


77.9 


2.6 


.937 


10.10 


.88 


.92 


4 


80.6 


2.1 


79.1 


3.6 


.973 


.45 


1.27 


.89 


5 


80.6 


2.6 


78.8 


4.4 


.964 


.36 


.53 


.87 


6 


81.3 


3.7 


78.7 


6.3 


.961 


.29 


2.24 


.82 


7 


81.4 


2.7 


79.5 


4.6 


.986 


.55 


1.66 


.86 


S 


80.7 


1,8 


79.4 


3.1 


.983 


.56 


.08 


.91 


9 


80.8 


2.2 


79.3 


3.7 


.979 


.51 


.31 


.89 


10 


80.9 


3.3 


78.6 


5.6 


.958 


.26 


.98 


.84 


11 


80.8 


3.2 


78.6 


5.4 


.958 


.28 


. .89 


.85 


12 


80.3 


2.6 


78.5 


4.4 


.955 


.27 


.52 


.87 


13 


80.4 


2.7 


78.5 


4.6 


.955 


.25 


.61 


.86 


14 


. 80.3 


4.7 


77.0 


8.0 


.910 


9.73 


2.80 


.78 


35 


80.5 


3.5 


78.0 


6.0 


.910 


10.07 


.10 


.83 


]6 


79.9 


2.4 


78.2 


4.1 


.946 


.17 


1.41 


.88 


17 


81.0 


3.1 


78.8 


5.3 


.964 


.34 


.87 


.85 


18 


80.9 


2.8 


78.9 


4.8 


.967 


.37 


.70 


.86 


19 


80.7 


2.7 


78.8 


4.6 


.964 


.34 


.62 


.87 


20 


80.3 


2.2 


78.8 


3.7 


.964 


.36 


.28 


.89 


21 


80.9 


3.1 


78.7 


5.3 


.961 


.31 


.86 


.85 


22 


80.7 


2.7 


78.8 


4.6 


.964 


.34 


.62 


.87 


23 


80.3 


2.2 


78.8 


3.7 


.964 


.36 


.28 


.89 


2i 


79.9 


2.6 


78.1 


4.4 


.943 


.14 


.50 


.87 


25 


79.5 


3.4 


77.1 


5.8 


.913 


9.80 


.99 


.83 


26 


80.0 


3.1 


77.8 


6.3 


.934 


10.03 


.83 


.85 


27 


79.3 


2.8 


77.3 


4.8 


.919 


9.88 


.63 


.86 


28 


79.2 


3.0 


77.1 


5.1 


.913 


.82 


.72 


.85 


29 


79.4 


3.7 


76.8 


6.3 


.905 


.71 


2.15 


.82 


30 


78.6 


4.6 


75.4 


7.8 


.863 


.28 


.61 


.78 



.All tbe Hygrometrical elements are computed hj the Greenwich Constants. 



Meteorological Ohser cations. 



ixsii 



Abstract of the llesults of the llourli/ Meteorolog'ical Ohsercutioiis 

taken at the Surveyor General's OJlce, Calcutta, 

iu the mouth of Septemlier 1876. 

.Hourly Means, &c. of tlie Observations and of tlie HygromeLrical elements 

dependent thereon. 





o «^ 


Uauge 


of the Barometer 


pO 


Eange 


of the Tempera- 




32^ 


for eacli hour during 
the month. 




ture for each hour 
duriiii>' the month. 










p a 




^ 




Hour. 


















Max. 


Min. 


Diff. 




Mux. 


Min. 


Diif, 




l2 <" 


















Indies. 


Inches. 


Inches. 


Inches. 








' 





Mid- 


















uij^lit. 


29.718 


29.895 


29.491 


0.404 


81.1 


83.0 


78.0 


5.0 


1 


.707 


.885 


.465 


.420 


80.9 


82.8 


78.1 


4.7 


2 


.695 


.880 


.458 


.422 


80.6 


82.8 


77.7 


5.1 


3 


.686 


.879 


.450 


.429 


80.4 


82.6 


77.5 


5.1 


4 


.680 


.878 


.442 


.436 


80.2 


82,5- 


77.5 


5.0 


5 


.693 


.888 


.416 


.442 


80.1 


82.5 


77.5 


5.0 


6 


.707 


.905 


.453 


.452 


80.0 


82.3 


77.0 


' 5.3 


7 


.726 


.921 


.453 


.468 


80.6 


82.8 


77.8 


5.0 


8 


.745 


.940 


.454 


.486 


82.8 


84.7 


78.4 


6.3 


9 


.754 


.949 


.462 


.4S7 


81.0 


86.2 


79.5 


6.7 


10 


.754 


.949 


.488 


.461 


85.7 


88.0 


• 80.5 


7.5 


11 


.743 


.933 


.464 


.469 


86.4 


89.4 


79.2 


10.2 


Noon. 


.725. 


.911 


.457 


.451 


86.7 


90.7 


80.5 


10.2 


1 


.698 


.873 


.414 


.429 


86.8 


91.5 


79.8 


11.7 


2 


.673 


.843 


.423 


.420 


86.4 


92,0 


77.5 


14.5 


3 


.654 


.820 


.400 


.420 


85.7 


91.6 


78.2 


13.4 


4 


.646 


.802 


.393 


.409 


85.4 


92.0 


79.0 


13.0 


5 


.651 


.809 


.389 


.420 


81.2 


87.8 


79.5 


8.3 


6 


.664 


.826 


.399 


.427 


83.4 


86.5 


79.5 


7.0 


7 


.687 


.865 


.410 


.425 


82.8 


85.4 


79.5 


5.9 


8 


.712 


.881 


.484 


.397 


82.3 


84.7 


78.5 


6.2 


9 


.733 


.898 


.509 


• .389 


81.9 


84.0 


78.5 


5.5 


10 


.742 


.909 


.532 


.377 


81.6 


83.5 


78.5 


5.0 


11 


.738 


.900 


.550 


.350 


81.3 


83.5 


78.0 


5.5 



The Mean IFcight of the Barometer, as likewise the Pry and Wet Bulb 
Thcruiometer j\Icans arc derived from the observation.^ made at the several 
hours during Ihe month. 



Ixxiii 



Meh'ordoQ cal Ohservatiovs. 



Abstidct of the liesuUs of the llorjl^ Meteorological Ohseniat'ions 
taken at the Snrveijor General's Office, Calcutta, 
in the month of September 1876. 



Hoiu-ly Means, &.c. of tlie Observations and of tlie Ilygrometrical elements 
dependent thereon. — (Continued). 









i 


^ 


o 


^.6 




2 b 




^ 


^ 


o 


p 


o 
u 


^ o 








r^ 


<» 


o 

p 


<o 


o 


tM io 


'li^ ?H 1h 


'-" .,s -"^ 


Hour. 




> 
o 

-^ 


> 
o 


o 

Ml 


O O 


^2 


o 2'3 

(B <U f3 

far S fn 




^ 2 


pq 




la 


1 §' 




r1 S-( t-* 

-.13 g P< 


■SS| 




^a 


5h 


o 

o 


P^ 
























Fiiclies. 


Gr. 


Gr. 




Mid- 


















night. 


79.6 


1.5 


78.5 


2,6 


0.955 


10.29 


0.88 


0.92 


1 


79.5 


].4 


78.5 


2.4 


.955 


.31 


.79 


.93 


2 


79.3 


1.3 


78.4 


2.2 


.952 


.27 


.74 


.93 


3 


79.2 


1.2 


78.4 


2.0 


.952 


.27 


.67 


.94 


4 


79.1 


1.1 


78.3 


1.9 


.949 


.24 


.61 


.94 


5 


79.0 


1.1 


78.2 


1.9 


.916 


.21 


.63 


.94 


6 


79.0 


10 


78.3 


1.7 


.949 


.24 


.57 


.95 


7 


79.6 


1.0 


78.9 


1.7 


.967 


.43 


.58 


.95 


8 


80.3 


2.0 


78.9 


3.4 


.967 


.41 


1.17 


.90 


9 


80.9 


3.1 


78.7 


5.3 


.961 


.31 


.86 


.85 


10 


81.3 


4.4 


78.2 


7.5 


.916 


.09 


2.71 


.79 


11 


81.3 


5.1 


77.7 


8.7 


.931 


9.92 


3.14 


.76 


Noon. 


81.2 


5.5 


77.9 


8.8 


.937 


.98 


.20 


.76 


1 


81.3 


5.5 


78.0 


8.8 


.910 


10.01 


.20 


.76 


2 


81.1 


5.3 


77.4 


9.0 


.922 


9.83 


.23 


.75 


3 


80.7 


5.0 


77.2 


8.5 


.916 


.77 


.03 


.76 


4 


80.6 


4.8 


77.2 


8.2 


.916 


.79 


2.89 


.77 


5 


80.5 


3.7 


77.9 


6.3 


.937 


10.01 


.20 


.82 


6 


80.3 


3.1 


78.1 


5.3 


.943 


.12 


1.84 


.85 


7 


80.1 


2.4 


78.7 


4.1 


.961 


.33 


.42 


.88 


8 


80.1 


2.2 


78.6 


3.7 


.958 


.30 


.28 


.S9 


9 


79.9 


2 


78.5 


3.4 


.955 


.29 


.15 


.90 


10 


79.7- 


1.9 


78.4 


3.2 


.952 


.25 


,09 


.90 


11 


79.6 


1.7 


78.4 


2.9 


.952 


.25 


0.99 


.90 



All the Iljgronietric&l elements are computed bj the Greenwich Constants. 



Meteorological Observations. 



Ixxiv 



Abstract of the llesults of the Hourly Meteorological Observations 
taken at the Surveyor General's Office, Calcutta, 
in the month of Sejjtember 187G. 

Solar Eadiation, Weather, &c. 





Ma,x. Solar 
radiation. 


tr. > . 


Wind. 


General 


aspect 




p 


Prevailing 
direction. 


Max. 
Pressure 

Daily 
Yelocity. 


of the Sky. 



138.2 

125.0 

139.2 
142.0 

139.0 

136.2 

136.5 

M2.0 
146.0 



Inches 
1.83 



1.18 
1.16 



0.61 



2.01 



0.91 



E & S E 

S E & S S E 
S by E & S 



S by E & S S W 

[& S S K 

S by E, S S W 

S S E & S 



S S E & S by W 



S by W & S 



S W & Yariablc 



[l)y W 
S W, E by S & S 



E & S 



Ih 
1.7 



0.2 
1.3 



1.2 



Miles: 
157.C 



217.8 
121.0 

95.0 
59.8 
41.1 

23.6 

30.4 

31.0 

32.0 
59.8 



O to 3, \i to 6, O to 11 p. M. 
T at Midnight. L at Midnight 
i& 1 A. M. II nearly the whole 
day. 

O. T at 4J A. M. E after in- 
tervals. 

O to 9 A.M., ^ito 12,0 to 11 
p. Ji. T & L at 2 & 3 A. M. R 
from Midnight to 7 a. m., 12| 
to 3 & 5 to 7 k p. 31. 

"^i & \i to 7, O to 9 A. u., S 
to 9, V,i to 11 p. M. 

Vi to 8 A. M., ^i to 1, S to 9, 
V>i to 11 p. M. T at 3| & 4 p. m. 

Vi to 8 A. M., ^i to 6, O to 8, 
^_i to 11 P.M. T & Lat 6 & 7 
p. M. D at 7 P. M. 

S to 4, \i to 7. A. 31., ^i to 4, 
O to7, \ito 11 p. M. TatSf, 
6 & 7 P.M. L from 6^ to 8 p. m. 
Eain from 10.| a. m. to 12 & 2| 

to 7 P. M. 

\i to 8, '^i to 11 A.M., O to 1, 
-^i to 3, O to 5, \i to lip. M. 
T from Hi a. m. to 1 & at 3^ 

P.M. 

\i to 1, v_i to 6, '"i &, \i 
11 A. M., ^i to 3, O to 6, \i 

1 p. M. T at 3i & li p. M. 
at 4 P. M. 

\i to 7 A. M., '^i to 4, S to 11 

M. T at 3.f V. M. Sheet L 
from 7 to 9 p. M. 

\i & v_i to 6, Vi to 9 A. u., 
^i to 2, S to 6, \i to 11 p. M. 
Lat 7, 8& 11 r. m. D at 3 & 

p. M. 



to 
to 



■^ i Cirri, — i Strati, '^i Cumuli, v_i Cirro-strati,^- i Cumulo-strati, \/^i Nimbi, 
Vi Cirro-cumuli, B clear, S stratoui, overcast, T thunder, L lightning, 
]{. rain, D. di-izzle. 



Ixsv 



Meteorological Oh^erval'ious. 



Abstract of the Results of the Hourly Aleteorological Olservalious 

taken at the Surveyor General's Office, Calcutta^ 

in the monlh of Sejjtemljer 1876. 

Sohir Eadiation, Weather, &c. 





^1 


<D « 




o o 

CO --B 

S3 


6 '^ § 


aj 


k ^ 


«d 2 


P 


C3 d 


M^ 



Wind. 



Prevailing 
direction. 



). 










(D 




t>^ 


M 


^ 


(>> 






r/! 








C/J 


CJ 


O 


r4 


;h 


p 


0) 




PM 




t> 



<^^ General aspect of the Sky. 






Inches 


136.0 


0.04 


148.0 


0.21 


141.0 






0.16 




0.86 


f^ 


0.10 


o 




o 
O 


0.07 






0.31 




0.05 



E & S E 

E S E, E & S E 

E & S E 
E bj S & S E 
E S E & S E 

E by S & S 

SbyE,SE&SSE 

S & S S E 
S & S by W 



lb 
0.8 



0.4 

1.2 
2.0 
1.0 



0.4 



1.6 



Miles. 
136.6 



108.1 

102.7 
108.4 
145.8 

105.1 

102.0 

58.0 
87.0 



B to 5, Scuds to 9 a. m., ^i 
to 6, B to 11 p. M., Tat Hi A.M., 
12 & 3 P.M. Sheet L on Wat 
8 & 9 p. M. Light E at 10| a. m. 
& 3 p. M. 

B to 3, S to 10 A.M., ^ito 12, 
^i to 7, B to 11 p. M. Tat 3f, 
4| & 5| p. M. Sheet L on N W 
from 7 to 10 p. m. E from 4 to 
5f p. M. 

\i & v_i to 9 A. M., "^i to 12, 
i to 7. B to 11 p. M. Sheet L 
on N W at 11 p. m. 

B to 4, Vi to 8, v_i to 10 a. m., 

i to 4, V^i to 6, \i to 8, B to 
11 P.M. Tat 2 P.M. Eat 21 P.M. 

B to 1, S to 8, ^i to 11 A. M., 
O to 3, S to 7, B to 11 p. M. T 
at 3i p. M. E at 3|, 4| a. m., 12 

3 p. M. 

B to 4, \i to 8 a. m., ^i to 7, 
B to U p. m. T at H p.m. Slight 
E after intervals from 9| a. m. 
to 4| p. M. 

B to 1, \i to 7 A. M., ^i to 4, 
\_i to 7, B to 11 p. M. T at 2 
p. m. Sheet L at Midnight & 1 
A. M. Slight E after intervals 
from 12f to 4| p. m. 

B to 6 A. M., ^i to 11 p. M. T 
from 12 § to 3 p. m. L at 9 & 10 
p. M. E from If to 3f Si at 7| 

p. M. 

S to 5 A. M., \i & -i to 12, O 
to 6, Scuds to 9, B to 11 p. m. T 
from llf A. M. to 1 p. M., Sheet 
L on W at 5 a. m., Light E at 
12^ p. M. 



\i Cirri, — i Strati, ^i Cumuli,v_i Cirro-strati, -^ i Cunmlo-strati, Vv_i Isinibi, 
Vi Cirro-cumuli, B clear, S stratoni, O overcast, T thunder, L lightning, 
E. rain, D. drizzle. 



Meteorological Ohservafions. 



Ixx 



Abstract of the Results of the Ilonrl// Meteorological Oljserrat'ions 
taken at the Survey/or General's Office, Calcutta, 
in the month of September 1876. 

Solar Eadiation, Weatlier, &c., 







(l> o 




o o 


tr. t> 




C5 =^ 5 


«i 


e^ 


d^i E 


P 


gs 


-H rH 



Wind. 



Prevailing 
direction. 






P 13 



General aspect of the Sky. 





. 


Inches. 


21 




... 


22 




... 


23 




0.06 


24 




0.42 


25 




0.04 


26 






27 


o 

O 


0.16 


28 




0.02 


29 




... 


30 







S by W & S 
S & S by E 

SSE,SE&SbyE 

s & w s w 



0.04 SSE.WbySASW 



w s w & s 



NNW,S&ESE 



E S E & S 

S & S by W 
S by W & S 



ft 



1.3 



0.2 



Miles 
60.9 

91.8 



139.1 
107.1 

62.1 

45.5 

80.4 

77.9 

98.9 
97.2 



B to 5, \i to 8 A. 31., ^i to 3, 
\i to 9, B to II p. M. 

B to 5, \i to 8 A. M., '^i to 3, 
O to 6, ^i to 8, B to J.1 p. M. 
kSheet L at 7 & 11 P. Ji. D at 
11 A. M. 

\i to 1, O to'5, \i to 9, r^i to 
11 A. jr., S to 7, \i to 9, B to 
11 p. H. Light E at 12 p. m. 

O to 5, Vi to 9 A. M., ^i to 1, 
S to 8,0 to 11 P.M. Tat 10 P.M. 
L from 6i to 10 p. m. E at I, 
3i A. M., 9f, lOi & 11 P. M. 

O to 1,' S to 6 A. M., '"i to 9, 
\i k ^_i to 11 p. K. Sheet L 
on W at 2 a. m. Light E at 
Midnight & 9 p.?m. 

v_i to 2, Vi to 7, O to 10 A.M., 
i to 4, S to 11 p. M. Sheet L 
from 6 to 11 p. m. D at 7 p. m. 

Bto 5, \ito 10 A.M., '^i to 1, 
to 3, r^i to 9, B to 11 p. m. T 
at 1 & 3 p. M. Sheet L at l^ 
A. M. & from 7 to 9 p. m. Shght 
R at 1 A. M., 2, 5, 7.^ & 8 p. m. 

B to 3, \i to 9 A. M., '^i to 5, 
'^i to 7, B to 11 p. M. Light E 
;it 5 p. M. 

B to 7 A. M.. r-\ to 4, \i to 11 
p. M. T at 12J P.M. D at 12 p. m. 

\i & v_i to 2, B to 7 A. M., 
^i to 4, v_i to 6, \i to 8, Vi 
to 11 p. M. D at 11} p. M. 



\i Cirri — i Strati,'^! Cumuli, \_i Cirro-strati, ^ i Cnmulo-strati, Vv-i Nimbi, 
Vi Cirro-cumuli, B clear, S stratoni, O overcast, T thunder, L lightning, 
R. rain, D. drizzle. 



Ixxvii Meteorological Ohservat'wns. 

Abslracl of (he. Besulls of the Hourly Aleteorological Observations 
taken at the Surveyor General's Office, Calcutta, 
in the month of 8e])tember 1876. 

Monthly Eksults. 



Indies. 

Mean lieiglit of the Barometer for tlie month ... ... ... 29.705 

Max.Iieightoftlie Barometer occurred at 9 & 10 a. m. on tlie 29th ... 29.9J9 

Min. heiglit of tlie Barometer occurred at 5 p. m. on tlie 1st ... 29.389 

Extreme range oi tlie Barometer during the month ... ... 0.560 

Mean of the daily Max. Pressures ... ... ... .., 29.764 

Ditto ditto Min. ditto ... ... ... ... 29.641 

Mean daily range oi the Barometer during the month ... ...* 0.123 



o 

Mean Dry Bulb Thermometer for the month ... ... ... 82.9 

Max. Temperature occurred at 2 & 4 p. m. on the 14th ... ... 92.0 

Min. Temperature occurred at 6 A. M. on the 2ud ... ... 77.0 

Hxtreme range oi the Temperature during the month ... ... 15.0 

Mean of the daily Max. Temperature ... ... ... ... 88.1 

Ditto ditto Min. ditto, ... ... ... ... 79.8 

Mean daily range of the Temperature during the month ... ... 8.3 



Mean Wet Bulb Thermometer for the month ... ... ... 80.1 

Mean Dry Bulb Thermometer above Mean Wet Bulb Thermometer 2.8 

Computed Mean Dew-point for the month ... ... ... 78.1 

Mean Dry Bulb Thermometer above computed mean Dew-point ... ,4.8 

Inches. 
Mean Elastic force of Vapoxir for the month ... ... ... 0.943 



Grain. 
Mean Weight of Yapour for the month ... ... ... 10.12 

Additional Weight of Vapour required for complete saturation ... 1.G7 
Mean degree of humidity for the month, complete saturation being unity 0.86 

o 
Mean Max. Solar radiation Thermometer for the month ... ... 139.1 



Inches. 
Uained 25 days, — Max. fall of rain during 24 hours ... ... 2.01 

Total amount of rain during the month ... ... ,.. 10.26 

Total amountof rain indicated by the Gauge* attached to the anemo- 
meter during the month ... ... ... ... ... 8.91 

Prevailing direction of the Wind ... ... S, S by E & S S E 

* HcigLt 70 feet 10 inches above ground. 



Meleorulocj'tcal Ol!sercalio)LS. 



25 






« 



tq 



'^ 






Is 'S 



3 -^ 



P>5 



[5 



•^ 


• « 


^ 


s 


t 


g 


<u 




;J 


tti 


m 


fl 










rO 




>» 


Oi 





■uo uivjj; 
•110 ui\i;£ 



•uo U1UJ£ 
•uo U1I!J£ 



•A i".LSI"Ai 
•UO U1UJ£ 



•uo UIVJ£ 



•uo uiijy; 

_:a^qiAi 

•uo U[UJ£ 

■Ai'S-AV~ 



•uo u;uj£ 




IrHffl CO (M05(Mi-lCO(M- 



C-l 1-1 i-l rt C! 0« i-H , 



r-1 r-1 r-li-lffJi-li-l<M 



•UO u;b'j£ 



■s Mjy:_ 

•uo UH!}[ 



'y: 

•uo uib;£ 
•UO uiujj; 

■a -^ "[ii 




Odi-ICO r-1 ""Jl CO CO ■* 55 1-1 



(M 0« f-l 



CO u3-^COCOCiJ-^IOCOi— I 1—1 US N'^COlOOJ'^Til-^'^COCO 



1—1 1— I CO CO f— I C-l 



t, CO^t^COt^lOTJiTlliOOi-* O t»t>OaU3O0000031>03t-. 






C'lO -^jl-^COWCN-^-^COCOO^CO ■^ (MMi-<-^iXH>C0US»OtJI 



^ 


1-1 OJ r-l 1-1 




1-1 <MO<»i-l (?»i-l i-li-l 


-. U3 


Tlt^inOO-^COCOWiH CO-* 




1-1 O) t- (M CO 1* U3 »0 CO CD 


<H 


r-1 1-11-1 




1-1 r- CM 1-1 r-1 1-1 


-* 


'*5'1 iNCOCO-^'^/MO^ 


<M 


rHC0'-<(Miyir-I.HlO-<#®>O 



(M Ol <M CO 1 



lIMrMCOr-lCO CO O^C* 01-CO 



(N(MCO<MCOO)CO'<*COCO(>J 



« (N r-1 r-1 r-1 



'-' 


r-<r-lCO<N<MCO-*C'3U3-* 


CO 


lO CO ■* <H r-1 r-1 r-1 




r-1 r-l 




r-1 r-1 




r-1 r-1 (M <M r- 




(M r-1 rH 




r-1 r-1 rH 








r-\ rH r-1 CI tM 


« 


rHr- 



l(MCOTjliOCOt>00050r-l O rH01CO-*'0 5Dt>00060r-( 



Meteorological Ohservaiions. 



Ixxix 



Abstract of the Results of the Ilourli) Mtleorolocjical Observations 

taken at the Surveyor GeneraVs OJfice, Calcutta, 

in the month of October ]876. 

Latitude 2^° 33' V North. Longitude 88° 20' 31/^ East. 

Height of the Cistern of the Standard Barometer above tlie sea level, 18. 11 feet. 

Daily Means, &c. of the Observations and of the jrygronietrioal elements 

dependent thereon. 





o ^ 

-4J +^ . 


Eange 


3f the Barometer 


"3 ^ 


I^jinge 


of the Tempera- 






dii 


ring the d 


ay. 




ture ( 


luring the day. 


Date. 
















^PP'M 








^ r! 










i 2!^ 


Max. 


Min. 


Diff. 


SJ 


Jla.v. 


I\iin. 


DifF 












^^ 










Inches. 


Inches. 


Inches. 


Inches. 





o 


o 





1 


29.751 


29.807 


29.686 


0.121 


82.7 


87.7 


79.3 


8.4 


2 


.803 


.849 


.753 


.096 


82.8 


88.0 


80.0 


8.0 


3 


.852 


.911 


.815 


.096 


82.1 


85.7 


80.7 


5.0 


4 


.850 


.904 


.785 


.119 


83.3 


88.5 


79.4 


9.1 


5 


.857 


.919 


.797 


.122 


84.3 


89.8 


79.7 


lO.l 


6 


.858 


.941 


.819 


.122 


80.7 


83.5 


77.0 


6.5 


7 


.810 


.866 


.743 


.123 


78.4 


79.8 ■ 


76.8 


3.0 


8 


.726 


.786 


.666 


.120 


79.9 


84.0 


75.8 


8.2 


9 


.665 


.728 


.595 


.133 


81.7 


87.5 


77.0 


10.5 


10 


.702 


.821 


.601 


.220 


79.3 


82.0 


77.4 


4.6 


11 


.866 


.933 


.786 


.147 


78.5 


83.2 


74.5 


8.7 


12 


.906 


.960 


.853 


.107 


80.1 


84.8 


7G.2 


8.6 


13 


.901 


.957 


.845 


.112 


79.8 


84.5 


■77.0 


7.5 


U 


.913 


.970 


.869 


.101 


79.7 


84.5 


74.5 


10.0 


15 


.942 


.998 


.881 


.117 


81.2 


87.5 


75.8 


11.7 


16 


.975 


30.039 


.92 i 


.115 


81.1 


86.6 


76.0 


10.6 


17 


.992 


.062 


.935 


.127 


80.9 


87.0 


75.5 


11.5 


18 


.979 


.051 


.931 


.120 


81.3 


87.0 


76.5 


10.5 


19 


.964 


.032 


.905 


.127 


81.4 


87.5 


77.0 


10.5 


20 


.970 


.037 


.917 


.120 


79.5 


86.2 


74.5 


11.7 


21 


.975 


.030 


.931 


.099 


78.5 


84.0 


74.0 


10.0 


22 


.967 


.027 


.923 


.104 


78.0 


84.4 


72.0 


12.4 


23 


.966 


.032 


.907 


.125 


77.8 


81.3 


72.5 


11.8 


24 


.970 


•031 


.921 


.110 


77.4 


83.5 


72.7 


10.8 


25 


.962 


.023 


.908 


.115 


77.5 


81.6 


70.5 


14.1 


26 


.952 


.020 


.882 


.138 


77.8 


84.5 


72.0 


12.5 


27 


.920 


29.988 


.861 


• .127 


77.8 


81.2 


72.5 


11.7 


28 


.901 


.952 


.854 


.098 


77.7 


81.8 


71.5 


13.3 


29 


.902 


.969 


.831 


.135 


78.5 


8().0 


72.0 


14.0 


30 


.862 


.914 


.806 


•108 


77.9 


81.5 


75.3 


6.3 


31 


.703 


.820 


.558 


.262 


73.8 


7G.5 


70.5 


6.0 



The Mean Height of tlie Barometer, as lilcewise the Dry and Wet Bulb 
Thermometer I\reans are derived, from the hourly ohserratious, made at the 
several hours during the day. 



Ixx 



Meteorological Observations. 



Abstract of the Results of the Hourly Meleorolagical Observations 

taken at the Purveyor General's Office, Calcutta, 

in the month of October 1876. 



Daily Means, ha. of the Observations and of tlie Hygrometi-ical elements 
dependent thereon. — (Cu)i tinned. J 





u 


-ij 


-jj 


^ 


o 


§.b 


o o (=1 


'S s 






1 




ft 

o 




t> o 


ill 




Date. 




o 
o 


P 


o 


.2 












rQ 


tJ 


rO 


rS '^ 


'S ^ 


s ^ s 


bfj OrS 




^1 

go 


-3 


o 

1' 


9 ^• 
P 






a ^ 

o O p, 

< 


,5 " rt 




o 


o 


o 





Indies. 


Gr. 


Gr. 




1 


79.3 


3.4 


76.9 


5.8 


0.908 


9.74 


1.98 


0.83 


2 


79.1 


3.7 


76.5 


6.3 


.896 


.63 


2.12 


.82 


3 


79.2 


2.9 


77.2 


4.9 


.916 


.85 


1.66 


.86 


4 


80.1 


3.2 


77.9 


5.4 


.937 


10.06 


.87 


.84 


6 


80.2 


4.1 


77.3 


7.0 


.919 


9.84 


2.44 


.80 


6 


78.4 


2.3 


76.8 


3.9 


.905 


.75 


1.29 


.88 


7 


77.3 


1.1 


76.5 


1.9 


.896 


.71 


0.60 


.94 


8 


78.2 


1.7 


77.0 


2.9 


.910 


.83 


.95 


.91 


9 


77.9 


3.8 


75.2 


6.5 


.860 


.24 


2.13 


.81 


10 


76.9 


2.4 


75.2 


4.1 


.860 


.30 


1.29 


.88 


11 


75.9 


2.6 


74.1 


4.4 


.830 


.00 


.35 


.87 


12 


77.0 


3.1 


74.8 


5.3 


.849 


.17 


.67 


.85 


13 


76.8 


3.0 


74.7 


5.1 


.846 


.14 


.61 


.85 


14 


75.5 


4.2 


72.6 


7.1 


.790 


8.53 


2.19 


.80 


15 


■ 76.5 


4.7 


73.2 


8.0 


.806 


.68 


.53 


.77 


16 


76.3 


4.8 


72.9 


8.2 


.797 


.59 


.58 


.77 


17 


75.8 


5.1 


72.2 


8.7 


.781 


.40 


.70 


.76 


18 


76.4 


4.9 


73.0 


8.3 


.801 


.62 


.62 


.77 


19 


76.1 


5.3 


72.4 


9.0 


.785 


.45 


.82 


.75 


20 


74.2 


5.3 


70.5 


9.0 


.739 


7.98 


.68 


.75 


21 


71.8 


6.7 


67.1 


11.4 


.661 


.16 


3.19 


.69 


22 


71.2 


6.8 


66.4 


11.6 


.646 


.00 


.19 


.69 


23 


71.4 


6.4 


66.9 


10.9 


.657 


.12 


.01 


.70 


21 


71.4 


6.0 


67.2 


10.2 


.664 


.20 


2.81 


.72 


25 


70.6 


6.9 


65.8 


11.7 


.634 


6.87 


3.17 


.68 


26 


71.4 


6.4 


66.9 


10.9 


.657 


7.12 


.01 


.70 


27 


71.9 


5.9 


67.8 


10.0 


.677 


.33 


2.80 


.72 


28 


71.8 


5.9 


67.7 


10.0 


.674 


.31 


.79 


.72 


29 


72.5 


6.0 


68.3 


10.2 


.OSS 


.45 


.90 


.72 


30 


74.1 


3.8 


71.4 


6.5 


.761 


8.23 


1.93 


.81 


31 


71.2 


2.6 


69.4 


4.4 


.713 


7.80 


.18 


.87 



All the Hygrometrical elements are comimted by the Greenwich Constants. 



Meteorological Observations. 



Ixxxi 



Abstract oj the Results of the Hourly Afeteorological Olservatiojis 

taken at the Surveyor General's Office, Calcutta, 

in the month of October 1876. 



-Hourly Means, &c. of tlie Observations and of tlie Hygrometrical elements 

dependent thereon. 





o ^ 








brj w .^ 


our. 


an Hei 
Barom 
32° Fa 






^-3 



I?ange of tlie Barometer 

for eacli liour during 

the month. 



Max. 



Min. 



DiiT. 



03 r1 



Ivange of the Tempera- 
ture for each hour 
during the month. 



Max. 



Min. 



DilF. 





Inches. 


Inches. 


Inches. 


Inches. 


o 


Mid- 












niglit. 


29.895 


29.995 


29.659 


0.336 


77.7 


1 


.882 


.988 


.622 


.366 


77.3 


2 


.870 


.979 


.610 


.369 


77.0 


3 


.859 


.968 


.608 


.360 


76.6 


4 


.858 


.965 


.601 


.364 


76.2 


5 


.872 


.989 


.622 


.367 


75.9 


6 


.890 


30.002 


.651 


.351 


75.7 


7 


.908 


.027 


.681 


.346 


76.2 


8 


.928 


.052 


.708 


.344 


78.2 ■ 


9 


.939 


.062 


.715 


.347 


80.2 


10 


.938 


.060 


.705 


.355 


81.9 


11 


.924 


.043 


.688 


.355 


82.7 


Noon. 


.900 


. .021 


.658 


.363 


83.0 


1 


.872 


29.998 


.633 


.365 


83.8 


2 


.8U) 


.967 


.607 


.360 


81.2 


3 


.837 


.955 


.595 


.360 


84,2 


4 


.831 


.935 


.598 


.337 


83.7 


5 


.839 


.937 


.611 


.326 


82.9 


6 


.81.8 


.955 


.610 


.345 


81.2 


7 


.8(57 


.965 


.615 


.350 


80.3 


8 


.884 


30.000 


.580 


.420 


79.4 


9 


.896 


.019 


.558 


.461 


78.8 


10 


.900 


.000 


.570 


.430 


78.3 


11 


.897 


.001 


.561 


.440 


77.9 



83.0 
82.5 
82.0 
81.5 
81.2 
81.0 
81.0 
81.9 
83.3 
85.5 
87.7 
88.2 



89.8 
88.8 
89.6 
88.6 
88.5 
88.5 
85.5 
84.8 
84.3 
84.0 
83.5 
83.0 



74.0 
73.5 
73.0 
72.5 
72.0 
71.0 
70.5 
71.5 
74.5 
75.2 
76.0 
76.5 



75.5 
74.6 
74.0 
72.5 
71.6 
71.5 
71.0 
71.0 
70.5 
70.5 
70.8 
71.0 



9.0 

9.0 

9.0 

9.0 

9.2 

10.0 

10.5 

10.4 

8.8 

10.3 

11.7 

11.7 



14.3 
14.2 
15.6 
16.1 
16.9 
17.0 
14.5 
13.8 
13.8 
13.5 
12.7 
12.0 



The Mean Height of the Barometer, as likewise the Pry .ntid Wet Bulb 
Thermometer Means are derived from the observations made at the several 
hours during the month. 



Ixxxii 



llett'on log. cal Olservations. 



Abstract of the liesnlts of the Ilocrly Meteorological Olservations 
taken al the Surveyor General's Office, Calcutta, 
in the month of October 1876. 



Hourly Means, &c. of tlie Observations and of tlie Hygrometrieal elements 
dependent thereon. — (Co7itinued) . 















^ 














p 


o 
o 


> O 


-^ 2 


is 




rQ 


o 


. 


(» 


o 


•^M 4J 


■^ Ph tn 


V-l ^s -^^ 


Hour. 


pq 


o 


P 


o 


'43 


O O 




o «-3 

(D «> PJ 




i^ 5r! 


rO 


Ti 


rO 


c3 . 


'S 1q 


^2 


brS fl 






pq 


(X) 
P. 

a 






^5 








as 




o 
O 


P^ 




OJ rj 

















o 


Indies. 


Gr. 


Gr. 




Mia- 


















iiiglit. 


75.3 


2.4 


73.6 


4.1 


0.817 


8.86 


1.24 


0.88 


1 


75.0 


2.3 


73.4 


3.9 


.811 


.80 


.18 


.88 


2 


74.8 


2.2 


73.3 


3.7 


.809 


.77 


.12 


.89 


3 


74.6 


2.0 


73.2 


3.4 


.806 


.77 


.00 


.91 


4 


74.3 


1.9 


73.0 


3.2 


.801 


.71 


' 0.95 


.90 


5 


74.1 


1.8 


72.8 


3.1 


.795 


.66 


.91 


.91 


6 


74.0 


1-7 


72.8 


2.9 


.795 


.66 


.85 


.91 


7 


74.4 


1.8 


73.1 


3.1 


.803 


.74 


.92 


.91 


8 


75.3 


2.9 


73.3 


4.9 


.809 


.75 


1.50 


.85 


9 


75.8 


4.4 


72.7 


7.5 


.792 


.54 


2.34 


.79 


10 


76.1 


5.8 


72.0 


9.9 


.776 


.33 


3.11 


.73 


11 


76.2 


6.5 


71.6 


11.1 


.766 


.22 


.50 


.70 


Noon. 


75.7 


7.3 


70.6 


12.4 


.741 


7.95 


.87 


.67 


1 


75.9 


7.9 


70.4 


13.4 


.736 


.89 


4.21 


.65 


2 


75.9 


8.3 


70.1 


14.1 


.729 


.81 


.43 


.64 


3 


75.5 


8.7 


69.4 


14.8 


.713 


.62 


.62 


.62 


4 


75.6 


8.1 


69.9 


13.8 


.725 


.76 


.31 


.64 


5 


75.7 


7.2 


70.7 


12.2 


.744 


.98 


3.81 


.68 


6 


76.1 


5.1 


■72.5 


8.7 


.787 


8.47 


2.74 


.76 


7 


76.3 


4.0 


73.5 


6.8 


.814 


.78 


.13 


.81 


8 


75.9 


3.5 


73.4 


6.0 


.811 


.76 


1.86 


.83 


9 


75.5 


3.3 


73.2 


5.6 


.806 


.71 


.73 


.83 


10 


■ 75.4 


2.9 


73.4 


4.9 


.811 


.78 


.50 


.85 


11 


75.3 


2.6 


73.5 


4.4 


.814 


.83 


.33 


.87 



All the Hygro2ietrical elements are computed by the Greenwich Constants. 



Meteorological Observations. 



Ixxxiii 



Abstract of the Results of the Hourly Meteorological Observations 
taken at the Surveyor General's Office, Calcutta^ 
in the month of October 1876. 

Solar Eadiation, Weather, &c. 



O o 



br. > . Wind. 
cs o i-d 

S-^ 9 I 

j5 ^ g I Prevailing 

'S'tO , direction. 

^1^ I 



12 OC' I -r-. O 



^ 9 



c3 o 



General aspect of tlie Sky. 





w 


Inches 


] 






2 


... 




3 


... 


0.03 


4 


... 


0.71 


5 




... 


6 


u 


0.35 


7 


o 


1.59 


8 


o 
O 


1.10 


9 


... 




10 


... 


0.C2 


W 


... 


0..1.2 


12 


... 


0.10 


13 


... 


... 



S by W & S S W 

[& E by N 
S S E, W IN W 

E by jy, N & N W 



N W & N N E 

NNE & E 

E & S 

E N E & E 

E by N & E 

E S E & S E 
S S E &S 

S E & Variable 

S E & S S W 

S S W & S by W 



1.2 

C.4 

1.0 
2.2 



Miles. 
182.9 



83.9 

88.5 

66.3 

69.0 

82.6 

63.8 
155.4 

143.4 

306.2 

147.6 
41.7 
37.1 



\i & \_i to 10 A. M., ^ito 11 
p. M. T from 8 to 10| p. m. L 
from 6| to 9 p. m. D at 9 p. m. 

\i to" 3, O to 6, Vsi to 10 a.m. 
^i to 4, Vi to 7, \i toll p. M. 

V,i to 8 A. M., '^i to l', O to 4, 
Sto6, Vi to 11 P.M. Tat 2 P.M. 
Light E at lOf a. m. & '2\ p. m. 

\i to 8, -i to 11 a. m. 6 to U 
\i to 6, B to 8, \i to 11 p. m. 
T at 12^- p. M. IJ at 12 &1 p.m. 

\i to 9 a. m., ^i to 5, v_i to 7, 

5 to 11 p. M. Sheet L on E. 
from 65- to 9 p. M. D at 3 J p. m. 

\ito 8, S to 10 a. m. O toll 
p. m. 1\ between 11 a. m. & 12,. 

6 fk-om 4 to 9 f p. M. 

Chiefly O. T at lOf a. m. R 
nearly the whole day. 

O to 5, \i to 10 a.m. S to 12,. 
-"i to 6, O to 11 p. M. T at 4 & 
lOf A. M. L on W at 8 p. m. E 
after intervals. 

\i to 1, Vvi to 5, O to 11 p.M* 
Sheet L between 7 & 8p.m. 
R at 11 p. M. 

O to 6, Vi to 9 A. m. S to 5, 
O to 11 p. M. T between Mid- 
night & 1 A. M. L at 1:} A. M. R 

at^ Midnight 2, 3, 5| & 10 a. m. 

O to 10 A.M., '^i to 1, Vi toG, 
B to 1 1 P.M. R from 2 to 7:1 a. m. 

B to 2, Vi to 10 A.M., r^i to 7, 
B to 11 P. M. R at 11 A. M. 

B to 2, Vi to 7, S to 10 a. m., 
Vi to 6, \i to 11 P.M. D at 12.^ 

P. M. 



\i Cirri, — i Strati, ^i Cunmli, \_i Cirro-strati, ^ i Ciumilo-strati. \/-^ i Nimbi, 
Vi Cirro-cumuli, B clear, S stratoni, O overcast, T thunder, L lightning,. 
E. rain, D. drizzle. 



Ixxxiv 



Meteorological Ohservat'ions. 



Abstract of the llemUs of the Hourly Meteorological Ohservatio7is 

taken at the Surveyor General's Office, Calcutta, 

in the month of Octoher 1876. 

Solar Eadiation, Weatlier, &c. 





Fh 


(D O 




o o 


6 '^ § 


oj 


^<^ 


S 42 ^ 


P 




"A*^ 



Wind. 



Prevailing 
direction. 



P4 



General aspect of the Skj. 



19 

20 

21 
22 
23 
24 
25 

26 

27 
28 



.1=1 
O 



Inches 
0.44 W by S & S W 

s w& s s w 
S S w& s w 
s w& s s w 

s s w& w 



0.04 



w& s w 

N by E & N by W 

N by W & N N W 
N N W & N by E 
NNW&NbyW 
KbyW&WN W 

WN W&NNW 

N W & W by N 
WbyN&WNW 

WNW&NNW 



Miles. 
70.2 



54.2 
47.8 
40.5 

36.5 

44.4 

68.3 
91.3 
101.1 
120.2 
63.2 
72.1 

45.4 

34.7 

26.3 



B to 1, ^i to 4, \_i to 11 
A. M., B to 11 V. M. II between 
3 & 4 A.M. 

B to 8 A.M., v_i to 1, r^\ to 4, 
B to 11 p. M. 

B to 10 A. M., '"i to 4, B to 

11 p. M. 

Bto 8, \i to 11 A.M., B to 4, 
^_i to 7, B to 11 p. M. Sheet L 
on W at 7 p. m. 

B to 7, \i to 10 A. M., ^i to 
4, B to 11 p. M. Slightly foggy 
at 9 p. M. 

B to 9 A. M., ^i to 6, S to 
11 p. M. Light E between 7 & 
8 p. M. 

B to 10 A. M., i-a to 4, B to 
11 p. M. 

B to 10 A. M., ^i to 5, B to 
11 p. M. 

B to 10 A. M., '"^i to 4, \i to 
6 B to 11 p. M. 

B to 10 a. m., ^i to 4, B to 

11 p. M. 

B to 4, Vi to 6 A.M., ^i to 3, 
B to 11 p. M. 

B to 10 A. M., ^i k v_i to 4, 
B to 11 P.M. Slightly foggy 
at 6 & 7 A. M. 

B to 10 A. M., '^i to 5, B to 
11 P. M. Slightly foggy from 8 
to 11 P. M. 

B to 9 A. M., ^i to 5, B to 11 
p. M. Slightly foggy from 8 to 

10 p. M. 

B to 5, \i to 11 A.M., "^i to 4, 
\i to 6, B to 9, \i to 11 p. m. 

Slightly fogi^^y from 9 to 11 p. m. 



\i Cirri, — i Strati, ^i Camuli,\_i Cirro- 
Vi Cirro-cnmnli, B clear, S stratoni, 
E. rain, D. drizzle. 



strati, ^ i Cumnlo-strati, Vv_i Nimbi, 
O overcast, T thunder, L liglitning, 



Meteorological Ohservations. 



Ixxxv 



Abstract of the Resxdts of the Hourly Meteorological Ohservations 
taken at the Surveyor General's Office, Calcutta, 
in the month of October 1876. 

Solar Eacliation, Weatlier, &c.. 





. 


0; a;, 




^ d 


tr; > 




Ci O r-^ 






j;^^ 
O ^ 3 


n 


1^ 





Wind. 



Prevailing 
direction. 






General aspect of tlie Sky- 



?,9 


u 




<B 




•n 


30 


o 




C4H 




O 




j -f 


31 


O 



Inches 



0.40 



N N W&NbyW 

[E by N 

N by W, S S E & 



N E 



ft 



12.0 



Miles 
24.0 

42.7 



215.7 



\i to 2, S to 6 A. M., \i to 
11 p. M. 

^i to 1, S to 7, O to 11 A.M., 
V,i to 4, O to 11 p. M. D at 

11^ A.M. 

O. Higbwind from llj a. M. 
to 11 p. M. Sliglit K from 4 
A. M. to 11 p. M. 



\i Cirri — i Strati, '"i Cumuli, v_i Cirro-strati, ^i Cumxilo-strati, Vv-i Nimbi 
Vi Cirro-cumuh, B clear, S stratoui, O overcast, T tliundcr, L li'-UtniiiL'' 
11. rain, D. drizzle. " 



Ixxxvi Meteorological Observations. 

Abstract, of the Results of the Hourly Meteorological Observations 
taken at the Surveyor General's Office, Calcutta, 
in the mouth oj October 1876, 

Monthly Hesults. 



Indies. 

Mean lieiglit of tlie Barometer for tlie month ... ... ... 29.883 

Max. lieiglit of tlie Barometer occurred at 9 a. m. on the 17tli.,. ... 30.062 

Min. height of the Barometer occurred at 9 p. m. on the 31st ... 29.558 

JSxtveme ranqe of tlie Barometer during the mouth ... ... O.SOJi 

Mean of tlie daily Max. Pressures ... ... ... ...29.948 

Ditto ditto Min. ditto ... ... ... ... 29.822 

Mean daily range of the Barometer during the mouth ... ... 0.126 



o 

Mean Dry Bulh Thermometer for the month ... ... ... 79.7 

Max. Temperature occurred at Noon on the 5th ... ... ... 89.8 

Min. Temperature occurred at 6 a. m. 8 & 9 p. m. on the 25th & 31st ... 70.5 

Extreme range o^ the Temperature during the mouth ... ... 19.3 

Mean of the daily Max. Temperature ... ... ... ... 85.0 

Ditto ditto Min. ditto, ... ... ... ... 75.4 

Mean daily range oi the Temperature during the month ... ... 9.6 



Mean Wet Bulh Thermometer for the month ... ... ... 75.4 

Mean Dry Bulh Thermometer ahove Mean Wet Bulb Thermometer 4.3 

Computed Mean Dew-point for the month ... ... ... 72.4 

Mean Dry Bulh Thermometer above computed mean Dew-point ... 7.3 

Inches. 
Mean Elastic force of Vapour for the month ... ... ... 0.785 



Grain. 
Mean Weight of Vapour for the month ... ... ... 8.48 

Additional Weight of Vapour required for complete saturation ... 2.24 
Mean degree of humidity for the month, complete satux-ation being unity 0.79 

o 
Mean Max. Solar radiation Thermometer for the month Out of order 



Inches. 
Eained 16 days, — Max. fall of rain during 24 liours ... ... 3.59 

Total amount of rain during the month ... ... ... 5.80 

Total amount of rain indicated by the Gauge* attached to the anemo- 
meter during the month ... ... ... ... ... 5.09 

Prevailing direction of the Wind ... ... S S W, S W & N N W 

* Height 70 feet 10 inches above ground. 



Meteorological Ohservations. 



Ixxxvii 



^ 



6 









« 




03 


u 


8 








H 


U 


>i 




I-) 


f:! 


d 




r) 


o 


m 


to 


01 


r::1 




•§ 




"5) 


o 
is 


<i> 


w 


kJ 


d 


•<i 




•4J 


o 


o 


'^ 




^ 


« 


^ 




f1 


^ 




^ 


CS 


5>» 




Is 


M 








O 






i=l 


^ 


S« 








O 




CO 




<U 




>-. 


rt 


^ 




03 








C»-( 


-t 


* 




O 


fel 


!> 




U 




a 




0) 


Id 


o 




,a 


o 


tq 




a 


m 






d 


>-, 






pj 


cS 


■^s 






n-, 


"^^ 




0) 




*?:> 




^ 


O 






tc 


u 


•,;^ 




o 


O) 








riJ 








a 

d 
d 






•uo nreji; 

■uo UIBJI 



"iii. 'xSI "-NL 



•uo uiB}]; 



•-Ai "xNE 



•uo ureif 



■.vi'xSr'Ai 



•uo uiiiy; 
'K ^q 'M 



■no ure^ 




•uo uiuy; 



•uo UITJJJ 



•uo uiTjy; 

■s 



•uo uiBji; 



•a '^q "s 

•uo uiuy; 



•uo UIBJJ 



•a's 



•uo urejj 



■5r •« ^a^ 



•uo UIt'J[ 



•s M -a 



■uo niu)j 



CO CO CO « (M ^ C-1 I— ( r-H 01 ^ 



OrHTJICOCOCOCO"*'^ 



COCOCOCOCOCOCOl — I 



lO(MCOOJCO^-*-*-*Ttl-^ 



INlMff5!M(M(N(MCO.-lf-li-H 



CM !M CI CO Ol ^ . 



T?CO(>)i-((MCOC0(N(M'I5(M 



I— I ■— ( (M rH 1— I tH l-l 1 



01ff)C0Ol(Mffl(NCfl-*C0f— 



^ ^ ■^ rH CO ^3^^ ^ lO ^ CO 



COCOCOCOCOCOCOCO^CO^ 



Ol O-l « -* CO CO CO (M (M 01 M 



(NO'l^c-l^r-lrH.-l.-l 



t-H 01 !M --I rH (?J i-l C-T r^ 



COr-lrlCO— ((M5flr-iei 



.-( r-IC-^COi— li— (.— l-HiH I— Id 1—1 



55 C-l '-I >-< ■ 



I T-H <M « (M (M 03 c;j 



r-l r-l 11 .-H ^ ffj . 



"il 



ire^I 



"w 'iq -a 



•no ureji; 



•a -^ 'sr 



•uo um^j 



•uo UIB}[ 

la^fq'N: 

•uo niDJY 
■.NT 



I CT r^ Tj 01 , 



Ol --I 01 .-H CO -^ Cfl O) OJ 01 . 



COrH.— i-H^r-l.-l^ OICJ 



i-H OINi-IOlOlfflffJOICO 



ff) I-l rH — C iH 

~rH CO 00 i-H -H C* Ol "r-TT-l >-l~ 



r-lOI-^OJCOin 1—1 O101-*C0r-li 



1— rHi-lrH0J0101-Hi-l'*-<? 



1-1 r-l -H i-H ffl i-H 0<l 





r-l 


i-HrHiHrHrHi— li-l WrHiH 


(S 


i-H 0^ (N 


1-1 




rH 










rt Tfl nH rH e>i 


i-H 


rH tJI 05 CO 





iijjco-^'O'-or^oooJO'^ o 

rt F— I o 

fc5 



r-l01C0'i'«0CDt^Q0<SlOi— I 



Meteorological Ohservaiions. 



ixxxviii 



Abstract of the Hesults of the Ilourlij Meteorological Ohservatioiis 

taken at the Surveyor General's Ojjlce, Calcutta, 

ill the month of November 1876. 

Latitude 22° 33' \" Nortb. Longitude 88° 20' 31." East. 

Heiglifcof the Cistern of fclie Standard Earometer above tlie sea level, ]8.]1 feet. 

Daily Means, &c. of tlie Observations and of the Hj'grometrical elements 

dependent thereon. 







Eange 


of the Barometer 




I'ange 


of the T 


?mpera- 






during the c 


aj. 




ture ( 


luring the day. 


Bate 


^Ǥ- 


















i^'^^ 


Max. 


Min. 


DilF. 




Max. 


Min. 


Diir. 




1^ 








^^ 






j 




Inches. 


Inches. 


Inches. 


Inches. 











o 


1 


29.722 


29.853 


29.514 


0.339 


75.9 


82.4 


72.0 


10.4 


2 


.896 


.961 


.810 


.121 


77.1 


84.0 


71.0 


13.0 


3 


.937 


30.005 


.894 


.111 


77.1 


83.4 


72.0 


11.4 


4 


.946 


.006 


. .900 


.106 


76.4 


83.6 


71.0 


12.6 


6 


.956 


.025 


.904 


.121 


74.8 


82.7 


68.0 


14.7 


6 


.929 


29.987 


.876 


.111 


74.5 


81.7 


68.0 


13.7 


7 


.952 


30.003 


.902 


.101 


74.5 


83.0 


66.7 


16.3 


8 


.977 


.048 


.934 


.114 


74.8 


82.0 


67.2 


14.8 


9 


.957 


.025 


.897 


.128 


75.2 


82.7 


68.5 


14.2 


30 


.903 


29.960 


.820 


.140 


75.6 


82.0 


70.5 


11.5 


•11 


.909 


.978 


.858 


.120 


75.4 


83.7 


69.5 


14.2 


12 


.936 


.991 


.891 


.100 


74.8 


83.8 


■67.9 


15.9 


13 


.932 


30.001 


.872 


.129 


73.5 


82.0 


66.7 


15.3 


14 


.855 


29.926 


.783 


.143 


73.2 


80.8 


68.0 


12.8 


15 


.852 


.918 


.797 


.121 


72.5 


80.3 


66.0 


14.3 


16 


.939 


30.010 


.888 


.122 


71.4 


79.5 


64.0 


15.5 


17 


.9(57 


.031 


.900 


.131 


71.7 


80.5 


63.9 


16.G 


18 


.967 


.047 


.902 


.145 


72..6 


81.5 


65.0 


16.5 


19 


.959 


.034 


.889 


.145 


73.2 


82.8 


65.5 


17.3 


20 


.978 


.042 


.926 


.116 


73.0 


81.0 


66.0 


15.0 


21 


30.014 


.098 


.938 


.160 


73.0 


81.0 


66.5 


14.5 


22 


29.972 


.010 


.906 


.134 


73.2 


•81.2 


65.0 


16.2 


23 


.815 


29.927 


.779 


.148 


71.9 


74.5 


69.5 


5.0 


24 


.830 


•920 


.768 


.152 


70.3 


73.5 


66.7 


6.8 


25 


. .952 


30.034 


.856 


.178 


71.9 


75.2 


69.8 


5.4 


26 


30.008 


.080 


.946 


.134 


72.8 


80.5 


68.0 


12.5 


27 


.005 


.081 


.959 


.122 


74.0 


81.7 


69.2 


12.5 


28 


.028 


.093 


.969 


.121 


71.0 


79.5 


65.5 


14.0 


29 


.023 


.096 


.957 


.139 


68.3 


77.0 


61.5 


15.5 


30 


.009 


.081 


.931 


.150 


67.1 


76.5 


59.8 


16.7 



The Mean Ifeight of the Barometer, as likewise the Dry and Wet Bulb 
Thermometer Means are derived, from the hourly observations, made at Ike 
■several hours during the day. 



Ixxxix 



3Ieteorologlcal Olservations. 



Abstract of the Results of the Hourly Meteoroh'gical Olservations 

taken at the Surve^oP General's Office, Calcutta, 

in the month of November 1876. 



Daily Means, &c. of tlie Obsei-vations and of the Ilygroraetrical elements 
dependent tliereoiK — (Continued.) 





u 


-J' 


-^2 


^ 


o 




O o f3 


■p P 




a; 




.9 

'o 
Ah 


P 


0) 

o 


P, c« 

> o 


^ o 




Date 




o 


P 


t> 
o 


=2 

o 

00 


"^ 9. 




C^ be 
tu P, P 




4) O 


^ 


-Tj 


r^ 


a ^ 


'S -P 


■^ ^ S 


bfj O rP 




g o 





P. 

a 


9 ti 






P f:J^ 
O O p, 


^ ^^ P 




^ 


p 


O 


p 


^ 


^.. 


<^ 


^■ 
















Tnclics. 


Gr. 


Gr. 




1 


71.3 


4.6 


68.1 


7.8 


0.6«4 


7.43 


2.14 


0.78 


2 


72.0 


5.1 


68.4 


8.7 


.690 


.48 


.44 


.75 


3 


71.9 


5.2 


68.3 


8.8 


.688 


.46 


.46 


• 75 


4 


70.7 


5.7 


66.7 


9.7 


.653 


.09 


.63 


.73 


6 


67.9 


6.9 


63.1 


11.7 


.580 


6.31 


.95 


.68 


6 


67.0 


7.5 


61.7 


12.8 


.554 


.03 


3.15 


.66 


7 


67.6 


6.9 


62.8 


11.7 


.574 


.26 


2.92 


.68 


8 


67.9 


6.9 


63.1 


11.7 


.580 


.31 


.95 


.68 


9 


68.6 


Q.Q 


64.0 


11.2 


.597 


.50 


.87 


.69 


10 


69.8 


5.8 


65.7 


9.9 


.632 


.88 


.60 


.73 


11 


68.1 


7.3 


63.0 


12.4 


.578 


.3a 


3.13 


.67 


32 


67.4 


7.4 


62.2 


12.6 


.563 


.13 


.13 


.66 


n 


66.1 


7.4 


60.9 


12.6 


.539 


5.88 


.02 


.66 


14 


66.9 


6.3 


61.9 


11.3 


.557 


6.09 


2.73 


.69 


35 


65.4 


7.1 


59.7 


12.8 


.518 


5.67 


.m 


.66 


]6 


64.2 


7.2 


58.4 


13.0 


.496 


.43 


.92 


.65 


37 


65.1 


Q.Q 


59.8 


11.9 


.520 


.69 


.74 


.68 


18 


66.3 


6.3 


61.3 


11.3 


.546 


.99 


.67 


.69 


39 


66.2 


7.0 


60.6 


12.6 


.534 


.83 


.99 


.66 


20 


65.3 


7.7 


59.1 


13.9 


.508 


.55 


3.21 


.63 


21 


65.0 


8.0 


58.6 


14.4 


.499 


.46 


.30 


.62 


22 


66.1 


7.1 


60.4 


12.8 


.530 


.80 


.02 


.66 


23 


69.5 


2.4 


67.6 


4.3 


.672 


7.38 


1.10 


.87 


24 


68.6 


1.7 


67.2 


3.1 


.604 


.31 


0.77 


.91 


25 


70.1 


1.8 


68.7 


3.2 


.097 


.6i 


.84 


.90 


26 


70.0 


2.8 


67.8 


5.0 


.677 


.41 


1.30 


.85 


27 


68.6 


5.4 


64.8 


9.2 


.613 


6.71 


2.33 


.74 


28 


63.5 


7.5 


57.5 


13.5 


.481 


5.28 


.97 


.64 


29 


60.3 


8.0 


53.9 


14.4 


.426 


4.71 


.89 


.62 


30 


60.0 


7.1 


54.3 


12.8 


.432 


.78 


.54 


.65 



All tlie ny^a'onietricul elements arc computed by tlic Greenwich Constants. 



Meteorological Ohservcdlons. 



xc 



Abstract oj the Itesnlts of the Ilonrlt/ Meteorological Observations 

taken at the Surveyor General's Office, Calcutta, 

in the month of November 1876. 



.Hourly Means, &c. of the Observations and of tlie Ifygrometrical elements 

dependent thereon. 



Hour. 



o 






-t2 


U 

0) 


♦.2 


tr 


<u 


^ 


« 


a 

o 

u 


o 

CO 






01 





I?a,nge of the Barometer 

for each hour during 

the month. 



Max. 



Min. 



DilF. 



rO 








pi 


Va 


pq 


4-^ 




CD 


>> 


1 


p a 1 





0) 




^ 


% 


H 



Ihmge of the Tempera- 
ture for each hour 
during the month. 



Max. 



Mi 



Diff. 





Inches. 


Inches. 


Inches. 


Indies. 








Mid- 














night. 


29.937 


30.053 


29.528 


0.525 


70.3 


74.4 


1 


.927 


.030 


.514 


.516 


69.7 


74.0 


2 


.918 


.024 


.523 


.501 


69.2 


73.1 


3 


.909 


.009 


.553 


.456 


68.7 


72.9 


4 


.910 


.007 


.597 


.410 


68.2 


72.6 


5 


.925 


.020 


.640 


.380 


67.7 


72.5 


6 


.943 


.035 


.682 


.353 


67.4 


72.5 


7 


.9G3 


.060 


.712 


.348 


67.6 


72.5 


8 


.985 


.085 


.748 


.337 


70.3 


76.1 


9 


30.003 


.098 


.782 


.316 


73.3 


77.5 


10 


.001 


.093 


.791 


.302 


75.7 


80.0 


11 


29.981 


.076 


.797 


.279 


77.5 


82.0 


Noon. 


.953 


.050 


.776 


.274 


78.9 


83.0 


1 


.921 


.008 


.753 


.255 


80.0 


84.0 


2 


.900 


29.981 


.742 


.239 


80.6 


84.0 


3 


.889 


.971 


.738 


.233 


80.6 


84.0 


4 


.887 


.969 


.746 


.223 


79.4 


83.3 


5 


.897 


.980 


.751 


.229 


78.0 


82.5 


6 


.912 


30.000 


.777 


.223 


75.8 


79.5 


7 


.929 


.018 


.792 


.226 


74.3 


78.5 


8 


.917 


.035 


.806 


.229 


73.1 


77.0 


9 


.959 


.050 


.814 


-.236 


72.3 


76.2 


10 


.907 


.062 


.826 


.236 


71.4 


75.5 


11 


.961 


.065 


.818 


.247 


70.7 


75.0 



63.6 
63.2 
63.0 
62.0 
60.0 
60.0 
60.0 
59.8 
61.0 
64.8 
68.2 
70.0 



71.5 
72.8 
73.3 
73.5 
73.4 
72.6 
70.0 
68.4 
67.0 
66.2 
65.0 
64.0 



10.8 
10.8 
lO.l 
10.9 
12.1 
12.5 
12.5 
12.7 
15.1 
12.7 
11.8 
12.0 



11.5 

11.2 

10.7 

10.5 

9.9 

9.9 

9.5 

10.1 

10.0 

10.0 

10.5 

11.0 



The Mean Height of the Barometer, as likewise the Dry and Wet Bulb 
Thermometer Means are derived from the observations uiudo at the several 
hours during the month. 



XCI 



Meii 'ort log. cal Oisena t'lons: 



Abstract of the Results of the Ilo'crly Aleleorological Olservations^ 
taken at the Surveyor General's Office, Calcutta, 
in the mouth of Novemher 1876. 



Ifoui'ly Means, &c. of tlie Observations and of the Ilygrometrical elements 
dependent tliereon. — (Continued). 





CD 


rC> 


a> 


^ 


o 


m 


rQ 


-ij . 


C« 


(U M 


,:a 


3 a 





S^ o 


t>i 







o 
p- 

g 

o 
O 



^ 


o 




p 




k> o 


0) 


o 


"+- +J 


> 




O O 


o 




-t^ ,o 


r^ 






C3 




b/'O 


r^ 


rt . 


'S 3 








p^ 


s^ 


^•- 



O o 



^' 



<1 



t^ o 



o 
ai 



far. a « 



Mid- 
niglit 

1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 
10 
11 



Ifoon 

1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 
30 
11 



67.0 
66.6 
66.2 
65.8 
65.3 
64.9 
64.6 
65.0 
66.4 
67.2 
68.0 
68.3 



68.3 
68.4 
68.7 
68.4 
68.0 
68.5 
68.9 
68.7 
68.4 
67.9 
67.4 
67.0 



3.3 
3.1 

3.0 
2.9 
2.9 
2.8 
2-8 
2.6 
3.9 
6.1 
7.7 
9.2 



10.6 

11.6 

11.9 

12.2 

11.4 

9.5 

6.9 

5.6 

4.7 

4.4 

4.0 

3.7 



64.4 
64.1 
68.8 
63.5 
68.0 
62.7 
62.4 
62.9 
63.3 
62.3 
62.6 
61.9 



60.9 
60.3 
60.4 
59.9 
60.0 
61.8 
64.1 
64.8 
64.6 
61.4 
64.2 
64.0 






Liclies. 


Gr. 


5.9 


0.605 


6.66 


5.6 


.599 


.59 


5.4 


.593 


.54 


5.2 


.588 


.48 


5.2 


.578 


.39 


5.0 


.572 


.33 


5.0 


.567 


.27 


4.7 


.576 


.37 


7.0 


.584 


.42 


11.0 


.565 


.17 


13.1 


.570 


.20 


15.6 


.557 


.03 


18.0 


.539 


5.82 


19.7 


.528 


.69 


20.2 


.530 


.71 


20.7 


.521 


.60 


19.4 


.523 


.65 


1G.2 


.555 


6.01 


11.7 


.599 


.51 


9.5 


.613 


.69 


8.5 


.609 


m 


7.9 


.605 


.63 


7.2 


.601 


.60 


Q.7 


.597 


.56 



Gr. 

1.42 
.34 

.27 

.21 

.19 

.13 

.12 

.07 

.66 

2.67 

3.31 

4.01 



.65 
5.12 

.30 

.41 
4.97 

.18 
3.03 
2.48 

.13 
1.95 

.75 

.62 



0.82 
.83- 



84 
84 
85 
85 
86 
80 
70 
65 
60 



.56 
.53 
.52 
.51 
.53 
.59 
.68 
.73 
.76 
.77 
.79 
.80 



All tUe Hygrometricalolemeuts are computed by the Greenwich Constants., 



Meteorological Observations. 



xcii 



Ahstraet of the Results of the Hourly Meteorological Observations 
tebken at the Surveyor General's Office, Calcutta, 
in the month of November 1876. 

Solar IJadiation, Weather, kt. 





Max. Solar 
radiafcion. 


fcr > . 

cs o ■-d 

r— 1 1— 1 





Wind. 



Prevailing 
direction. 





.i. 


y^ s 






C3 a; 


rt o 




fl -Z 


PM 


> 



^ General aspect of tlie Sky. 



10 

II 

12 

13 

14 

15 
16 
17 



137.7 

135.0 

132.5 

132.5 

128.0 

130.5 
137.8 
130.0 



Inches lb i Miles. 

W N W & W 14.0 434.1 



W by S & W 
NE,W&WbyS 



[&NN W 
Wby S, WSW, 



I^ N W & N W 

N W & W N w 
WNW&NbyW 
N N W & W by W 

WbyN&NNW 



N Is^ W& W N W 
WN W&N 

I^ & N by W 

N by W, N by E 

N & W 

W & AV S W 

W S W & N 



88.9 
76.6 

33.0 

80.2 

99.3 
90.3 

77.2 

60.2 

79.8 

63.7 

89.3 

134.3 

179.0 

186.8 
87.4 
60.5 



O to 9, Vi to 11 A. 51. \_i to 2^ 
B to 11 p. M. Slightly foggy at 8 
& 9 p. M. D at Miduiglit & 1 a. m. 

B to 4, VvitO 10 A. M., r^itO 3, 

W to 9, B to 11 p. M. 

B to 5, Vsi to 7, \i to 10 a. 5r. 
^i to 4, v_i to 6, B to 9, ^i to 
11 p. M. Slightly foggy from 8 
to 11 P. M. 

\i to 1, B to 10 A. M., ^i to 
2, \i to 6, B to 11 P.M. Slightly 
foggy from 5 to 7 a. m. 

B to 10 A.M., "~i to 1, \i to 
6> B to 11 p. M. 

B. 

B. 

B to 4, \ito6, Bto 11 p. M. 
Slightly foggy from 8 to 1 1 p. ar. 

B to 4, Vi to 8 a. m., Bto 2, 
\i to 6, B to 11 p. M. Slightly 
focgy from Midnight to 2 a. m. 
& at 10 & 11 P.M. 

B to 6 a. m., \i to 1, Vi to 8,. 
\i to 11 p. M. 

\i to 2, W to 5, \i to 7, B 
to 11 a.m., \i to 5, B to 11 P. M. 

B to 6 a. m., \i to 6, B to 
11 p. M. 

B to 3 

11 p. M. 

\i to 3 
B lo 11 r 

B. 

B. 

B. Sli.,'htly foggy at 6 & 7 
A. M. it from 7 to 10 p. m. 



A. M., \i to 0, B to 
S to 8 A. M., \i to 5,. 

M. 



\i Cirri, — i Strati, '^i Cumuli, v_i Cirro-strati, ^ i Cuniulo-strati, Vs_i Nimbi, 
^rA Cirro-cumuli, B clear, S stratoui, overcast, T thuudcr, L liglituing, 
E. rain, D. drizzle. 



XCIU 



Meteorological Ohserrafions. 



Abstract of the Results of the Hourly Meteorological Observations 

taken at the Surveyor General's OJJice, Calcutta, 

in the vionth of JSfovember 1876. 



Solar Eadiation, TVeatlier, &c. 





t-t 


0) aj 




o o 


^f'^ ■ 






OJ 


M ^ 


«d2 


P 


^g 


il^ 



Wind. 



Prevailing 
direction. 






Ph 



cS O 

P '13 



General aspect of the Skj. 



19 

20 



24 



25 



26 



27 



28 

29 
30 





1340 


Inclies 


135.0 
1340 


... 


130.0 
135.0 






0.17 


95.0 


0.02 


126.4 


... 


124.0 


... 


125.0 




130.0 
127.5 





N,NbyE&WSW 



S W & N by E 
E by N & N by W 



N by W & N 

N by W & N N E 

NE&NNE 



N&N NE 

[& N by W 

N N E, W N W 



[WNW 
N by W, N W & 



W&N N E 



Nby W&NNW 

N N W 

N N W & N 



lb 



1.6 



0.3 



1.2 



0.8 



Miles. 
54.1 



79.9 
91.0 

206.7 
150.1 

159.0 
290.8 
191.4 

100.8 

92.2 

111.0 

153.3 

130.7 



B to 11 A. M., \i to 5, B to 

11 p. M. Shglitly foggy at 8 & 
9 p. M. 

B. 

B to 10 A. M., ^i to 12, B to 
11 p. M. Slightly foggy from 5 
to 7 A. M. 

B. 

B to 4 A. M., \i to 2, v_i to 7, 
O to 11 p. M. D at Hi p. M. 

O to 4, S to 9, Vi to 11 p. M. 
Light li from 8J to 11 A. m. & 
at 3 & 4 p. M. 

W to 7 A. M., O to 7, S to 9, 
\_i to 11 p. M. D at 7i, 9 A. M. 
& 3 p. M. 

B to 3, O to 9 A. M., '^ito 12, 
O to 7, B to 11 p. M. Slightly 
foggy from 5 to 7 a. m. & at 10 
& 11 p. M. Light B at 5, 6, 7 

& 9 A. M. 

B to 3, O to 10 A. M., --i to 5, 
B to 11 p. M. Slightly foggy 
at Midnight, 1 & from 6 to 8 
A. M. & 7 to 9 p. M. 

B to 5, Vi to 8, B to 11 a.m., 
v_i to 3, B to 9, Vi to 11 p. m. 
Foggy from 7 to 10 p. m. 

Vi to 2 a. m., B to 11 p. M. 
Slightly foggy at 9 & 10 p. m. 

B. Foggy from 8 to 10 p. ii. 

B. Foggy at 7 p. m. 



\i Cirri, — i Strati, ^i Ciimuli,\_i Cirro-strati, -^ i Ciimulo-strati, Vv_i I»fimbi, 
Vi Cirro-cumuli, B clear, S stratoui, overcast, T thunder, L lightning, 
R, rain, D. drizzle. 



Meteor logica I Ohserva lions . 



xciv 



Abstract, of the llesnUs of the Hourly Meteorological Ohservatiom 
taken at the Sarvejjor General's OJjice, Calcutta, 
in Ike month of November 1876. 

Monthly IIesults. 



Mean lieii^lit of tlie Earometer for tlie month 
!Max. ]iei2;lit of tlie Barometer occurred at 9 a. m. on tlie 21st ... 
Blin. height of the Earometer occurred at 1 a. m. on the 1st 
m.rtreme range of the Earometer during the month 
Mean of the daily Max. Pressures 
Ditto ditto Min. ditto 
Mean daitg range of the Barometer during tlie month 



Inches. 
. 29.938 
. 30.098 
. 29.514 
. 0.584 
. 30.010 
. 29.873 
. 0.137 



Mean Dry Bulb Thermometer for the month 
Bfax. Temperature occurred at 1, 2 & 3 p. M. on the 2nd 
Min. Temperature occurred at 7 a. m. on the 30th ... 
F.xtreme range of the Temperature during the month 
Mean of the daily Max. Temperature 

Ditto ditto Min. ditto, 
Mean daily range of the Temperature during the month 



o 
73.3 

84.0 
59.8 
24.2 
80.8 
67.3 
13.5 



Jifean Wet Bulb Thermometer for the month 

Mean Dry Bulb Thermometer above Mean Wet Ecdb Thermometer 

Computed Mean Dew-point for the month 

Mean Dry Bulb Tliermometer above computed mean Dew-point 



Blean Elastic force of Vapour for the month 



67.2 

6.1 

62.3 

11.0 

Inches. 
0.565 



Grain. 
Mean Weight of Yapowr for the month ... ... ... 6.17 

Additional Weight of Yapour required for complete saturation ... 2.67 
Mean degree of humidity for the month, complete saturation being unity 0.70' 



Moan Max. Solar radiation TheiTnometer for the mouth 



o 

129.8 



Indies. 
Eaincd 5 days, — INTax. fall of rain during 24 hours ... ... 0.17 

Total amount of rain during the month ... ... ... 0.19' 

Total amount of rain indicated by the Gauge* attached to the anemo- 
meter during the month ... ... ... ... ... 0.11 

Prevailing direction of the Wind ... ... ... N & N IN' J>f 



* ndKlit 70 fcot 10 iuclics above frruund. 



xcv 



Meteorological Ohser vat ions. 



■^ 
^ 



6 
d 



(*> 


m 




« 


H 
Hi 


fS 


to 


ti 


o 


o 


H 


ri 




Ph 


QJ 


>^ 






?5 


N 


hr 




i-i 




>U 


W 


cS 



s ^ •§ a 



S r^ 



o 


- tn 


-1-= 


« 


cS 


rid 

o 




«+-! 


--I 


.^ 


O 


t: 




^ 




S 


o 


d 



^ 



f^ 



^ 



br. 


fH 


fl 


OJ 


6: 
45 


rO 


a 







m 




(U 








r^ 




cS 




H 





•uo UIt!J£ 




'-' 




1 


•uo uiuy; 

•uo uiL'y; 

[AA^K 

•uo umy; 


^ 


lOlOlO'*COCO®-*<©rH 


« 


CO CO CO ■* -^ ■<* CO ■* ■* 1 




I'D 


lOCDCDCDJOUSlOtO^TjHiH 


'-' 


rH-!^Tjl-<#CO'*^-^>Ol0 10 1 




'"' 


i-l.-li-li-lr-li-lr-(MnHCOI> 


00 


lOCO-^lOrHrHrHrHrHrHrH 1 




•uo uiujj; 


CO 


(MC«ffIiMC0eOCOcOC0i-i 


CO 


rH ^ lO (M tJI ■"^ -* rS T^ CO CO 1 




'-' 


^^^Hr^-^l-4r^^-^0■^.-^ 


c^ 


(M (MIMrHrHrHrHrHrH 1 


■no u]V}i 




'Ai 
•uo uiuy; 

'S M "Ai 
•uo uiuy; 

•Ai,-S -AV 


ffj 


(MNNCSNmoaffii-icoco 


T-t 


■(MCOCO'^rH(MO^<N(MCqoq 1 




'-' 


-G<!(M<f5W(NIUIM(MC<l 




------- 1 




'"' 


f— <r— It— ti— trHr-HrHiH(MCOC0 


CO 


CO -^ CO rH rH rH rH rH rH rH rH 1 




•uo urejj; 


•uo viv.li 






CO 


., 




•uo ui-Bj]; 






'AA ^'q 'S 

•uo nrey; 

■s 


T—J 




r-1 


•no uiujj; 


m • 


ci 


■a M "s 

•uo na'^ 


■^t-i 




•a 'S -s 








1 


•uo nrejj 






■a's 




•uo ui-b'jj; 




t-l i-l 




1 


■a -s 'a 




•uo urej[ 


•s ^"q -a 






•uo UIVJJ 

•a 






•no ureij; 


'K H "a 

•uo ni'U'jj; 


rH 




1-H 


- 


1 


■a 'K "a 




iH iH l-H 




,-1 5-1 


•no uiujj; 

•a-M 

■HO uiujj; 




rH rH rH 




^ 


C-1 


1-1 C-1 r-H rH r-l i-H r-l rH r-H CM -^1 


Cl 


CQ r—i r-^ r-i i—i ClrHrH 




r-t 




rH 


■a 'iSr -M 


^ 


rH rHrHrH rHCOUS'* 


rH 


COCONCOl-H-a-^'^COCOCO 


•no uiujj; 

_iaiq_:js[ 

•uo nwj-jj; 


■-^ 


,-{ 7-t 






■"^ 


rH rH rH (J1 -* -* CO Cl (M C<1 


rH 


(MrH rHrHrHr-HrHOl 


iH rH rH j 


•n: 


1> 


coinioio-'ii'^i-iO'icO'*"* 


*> 


lOrH>OlO001>l>J>lS><rH> 


o 


'3 


rH0^IC0'<*l0!01>000iOrH 


O 


rH(NCO-*V05D»>00050rH 



Meteorological Ohserrations. 



XCVl 



Abstract of the liesnlfs of the JIou.rJ/j Bleteorulinjical Ot/!<err<ttiuvs 

taken at the Snrveijor Geiierat's Ojjice, Calcutta, 

in the month of December 1876. 

Lutiliicle 2;i° '.y-y V NorLlK Loi.o-itude 88° 20' 31" Enst. 

Hei^Iifcof tlie Cistern of the Staiuljii'd JJaronieter above tlie sea level, 18.11 feet. 

Daily IMeans, A.c. of the Oi).servatioi)s ami of the Il3'groine(rical eleiiienls 

dejieiwlciit thei'eoii. 





o ^ 


T\i\]\s;(' 


of the Ba 


roiiieter 




IJan.t^e 


of tlieTt 


^nipera- 




-; O ti 


(iuriii<; the ( 


!"y- 


^1 


tnve ( 


luring th 


e (lay.. 




i it!" 
















Date 


j\raK. 


Min. 


Diff. 


I\rav. 


l\Iin. 


Di(F 




ruches. 


Inches. 


1 riches. 


Inches. 





o 


o 


o 


1 


30.012 


30.091 


29.910 


0.154 


66.4 


74.9 


58.7 


]6.2 


2 


29.i)92 


.071 


.928 


.116 


64.2 


72.4 


57.5 


: 11.9 


3 


30.021 


.106 


.970 


.136 


61.1 


71.0 


55.5 


18.5 


4 


.019 


.101 


.960 


.111 


65.0 


75.5 


56.5 


19.0 


5 


.OiJ. 


.097 


.985 


.112 


66.4 


76.5 


57.5 


19.0 


6 


.123 


.191 


30.057 


.131 


67.8 


77.5 


60.3 


17.2 


7 


.148 


.23! 


.086 


.115 


66.9 


77.0 


59.0 


18.0 


8 


.066 


.150 


29.983 


.167 


67.2 


76.5 


59.5 


17.0 


9 


.041 


.118 


.981 


,137 


67.0 


7(i.O 


58.8 


17.2 


iO 


.078 


.167 


30.025 


.112 


67.9 


77.5 


60.5 


17.0 


11 


.063 


.128 


.002 


.126 


67.8 


77.5 


60.6 


16.9 


12 


.058 


.142 


29.980 


.162 


68.0 


77.2 


.60.0 


17.2 


13 


.031 


.105 


.978 


.127 


68.1 


77.9 


60.5 


17.4 


11 


.025 


.101 


.971 


.130 


67.2 


77.0 


58.8 


18.2 


15 


.057 


.166 


30.000 


.166 


65.8 


75.5 


58.0 


17.5 


16 


.035 


.111 


29.975 


.136 


65.3 


75.0 


57.5 


17.5 


17 


.008 


.0(57 


.916 


.121 


66.0 


75.5 


57.7 


17.8 


18 


.027 


.099 


.971 


.125 


66.6 


75.5 


58.5 


17.0 


19 


20.996 


.061 


.935 


.126 


68. 4 


76.6 


62.0 


14.6 


20 


30.021 


.100 


.965 


.135 


67.4 


75.0 


60.8 


14.2 


21 


.081 


.151 


30.033 


.118 


65.8 


71.8 


58.0 


16.8 


22 


.084 


.156 


.014 


.112 


65.6 


71.5 


58.0 


16.5 


23 


.099 


.16() 


.052 


.114 


66.3 


75.5 


59.0 


16.5 


2-1 


.104 


.166 


.019 


.117 


67.1 


76.0 


59.7 


16.3 


25 


.103 


.168 


.040 


.128 


67.7 


76.8 


61.0 


15.8 


26 


.097 


.171 


.032 


.139 


68 3 


78.0 


60.0 


18.0 


27 


.102 


.187 


.011 


.146 


68.7 


78.0 


60.5 


17.5 


28 


.081 


.151 


.021 


.127 


(i8.9 


78.0 


61.3 


i(;.7 


29 


.081 


.153 


.031 


.122 


68.7 


78.0 


61.0 


17.0 


30 


.118 


.195 


.067 


.128 


67. () 


76.1 


61.3 


15.1 


31 


.097 


.177 


.025 


.152 


65.2 


73.8 


57.5 


16.3 



Tiie jMcan Ifeiifht of the IJaronioter, as likewise the Dry and Wet IJtilb 
Thernioineter Means are derived, from the liourly observations, made at the 
several hours durinj^ tlie day. 



JCCVll 



Meteor olog ica I Ohserva f ion's. 



Abstract of tJ/e Re.s/ilts of the llonrli/ ]\[eteoroli>g}cal Ohserva trons 

laJcea at the Siirvej/or General's Ojjice, Calcutta, 

in the vivvth of Decemljer \'^1%. 



Pally Means, &c. of tlie 01)servaf ions and of tlie iryg.ronietrical elenienlfS 
dependent thereon. — (Cuit/i.'iited.j 



Bate. 


a> 
H 

"3 
pq 


t> 

o 
,o 


'o 
Ph 


p 

> 
o 

,a 

r3 


o 


o .a 
p, rf 

'^ 9. 
■■^ '-2 

'bl) o 


O o rt 
=M o 

^ S^ CD 


ree of Hunu- 
mpiete satu- 
eing unity, 




dj o 


^Q 


■X) 


rQ 


rt ^ 


'Sj ,5 


=^ ^ If 


fcf O r^ 






'3 
pq 


P. 
1 


pq.g 


^ o 

PI g- 

0) t> 


^ Pi 


O O p, 


^ t>'..2 
p 1.^ w 




^ 


fi 


6 


ft 


^ 


^- 


-4 


^ • 




o 


o 








Fnclie.s. 


Gv. 


Gi: 




1 


50.5 


6.9 


54.0 


12.4 


0.428 


4.74 


2.43 


0.6-6' 


2 


5(3.0 


7.6 


49.8 


14.4 


.371 


.13 


.56 


.62- 


3 


57.7 


6.4 


51.9 


12.2 


.398 


.44 


.23 


.67 


4 


58.6 


6.4 


53.5 


11.5 


.421 


.68 


.19 


.6^ 


6 


co.o 


6.4 


54,9 


11.5 


.441 


.88 


.29 


.68 


6 


G0.6 


7.2 


54.8 


13.0 


.440 


.85 


.63 


.65 


7 


60,7 


6.2 


55.7 


11.2 


.453 


5.02 


.26 


.69 


8 


61.4 


6.8 


56.8 


10.4 


.470 


.20 


.15 


.71 


9 


61.4 


5.6 


56.9 


10.1 


.472 


.21 


.09 


.71 


JO 


61.5 


6,4 


56.4 


]].5 


.464 


.11 


.40 


.6» 


Jl 


61.8 


6.0 


57,0 


10.8 


.473 


.22 


.26 


.70 


J2 


61.2 


6.8 


5o.S 


12.2 


.455 


.03 


.50 


.67 


53 


61.0 


7.1 


55.3 


12,8 


.447 


4.94 


.61 


.65- 


J4 


. 60.6 


6.G 


55.3 


11.9 


.447 


.95 


.40 


.6-7 


]5 


5S.5 


7.3 


52.7 


13.1 


.409 


.55 


.49 


.65- 


36 


57.4 


7.9 


51.1 


14.2 


.388 


.31 


.62 


.62 


17 


59.3 


6.7 


53.9 


12.1 


.426 


.73 


.35 


.67 


38 


61.2 


5,4 


56.9 


9.7 


.472 


5.21 


.00 


.7^ 


39 


62.7 


5.7 


58.1 


10.3 


.491 


.42 


.20 


.71 


20 


61.0 


6.4 


55.9 


11.5 


.456 


.04 


.35 


.68- 


21 


59.5 


6.3 


54.5 


11.3 


.435 


4.83 


.21 


.69 


2^2 


58.9 


6.7 


53.5 


12.1 


.421 


.68 


.32 


.67 


23 


60.1 


6,2 


55.1 


11.2 


.414 


.93 


.22 


.69 


21 


60.7 


6,4 


55.6 


11.6 


.452 


5.00 


.32 


.68- 


25 


61.6 


6.1 


56,7 


11.0 


.469 


.17 


.29 


.69' 


26 


62.2 


6,1 


57.3 


11.0 


.478 


.27 


.33 


.69 


27 


62.6 


6.1 


57.7 


11.0 


.485 


.3-4 


.36 


.69^ 


28 


63.1 


5.8 


68.5 


10.4 


.498 


.49 


.25 


.71 


29 


63.0 


5.7 


58.4 


10.3 


.496 


.47 


.22 


.71 


SO 


60.5 


7.1 


51.8 


12.8 


.440 


4.85 


.59 


.6<T 


31 


58.2 


7.0 


52.6 


12.6 


.408 


.53 


.38 


.66 



A\ Die lfyg,ro!netrifal elements are computed by the GveeiiMieh Cojistanta. 



Meteorological Oiservaiions. 



XCVlli 



Abstract of llie Resnlts of the llonrli/ Ifeleorological Oh^ervat'iont 

taken a-t the Surveyor General's Office, Calcutta^ 

in the month of December 1876. 



Hourly Means, &c. of tlie Observations and of the Jfjgrometrical elements 

dependent tliereon. 



Hour. 



o 






-4J 




♦J 


br 


tU 


-j:^ 




o 


o 
00 


0) 


01 





JRange of the Barometer 

for eacli liour during 

the mouth. 



Max. 



Min. 



Diff. 



(51 

il 



3?ange of the Tempera- 
ture for each hour 
duriui>- the month. 



M-AK. 



Min. 



DilF, 





Inches. 


Inches. 


Inches. 


Inches. 


Mid- 










night. 


30.065 


30.161 


29.993 


0.168 


1 


.055 


.148 


.981 


.167 


2 


.0-16 


.136 


.971 


.165 


3 


.036 


.123 


.963 


.160 


4 


.033 


.lis 


.973 


.140 


5 


.048 


.141 


.982 


.159 


6 


.066 


.1-57 


. .991 


.166 


,7 


.086 


.181 


30.008 


.173 


8 


.112 


.208 


.026 


.182 


9 


.135 


.230 


.061 


.169 


30 


.136 


.231 


.057 


.174 


11 


.116 


.211 


.034 


.177 


Noon. 


.085 


.177 


.013 


.164 


1 


.016 


.125 


29.967 


.158 


2, 


.024 


.108 


.910 


.168 


3 


.008 


.090 


.928 


.162 


4 


.006 


.093 


.928 


.165 


5 


.013 


.103 


.940 


.163 


6 


.030 


.119 


.962 


.157 


.7 


.046 


.139 


.973 


.166 


8 


.063 


.158 


.989 


.169 


9 


.076 


.170 


30-008 


. .162 


10 


.080 


.181 


.013 


.168 


11 


.076 


.175 


.005 


.170 



63.1 

62.4 
61.8 
61.2 
60.6 
60.0 
59.5 
59.3 
61.9 
66.2 
69.6 
■72.4 



74.2 

75:2 

76.0 
75.9 
74.6 
73.0 
69.8 
68.1 
66.8 
65.5 
64.5 
63.7 



65.0 
64.5 
64.0 
63.5 
63.0 
62.5 
62.2 
62.0 
64.7 
69.0 
72.5 
74.8 



76.8 
77.0 
77.8 
78.0 
76.7 
75.5 
72.4 
70.2 
69.5 
68.0 
67.0 
66.0 



59.4 
58.8 
68.0 
57.3 
56.7 
56.0 
55.5 
65.5 
59.8 
63.4 
66.5 
68.7 



70.0 
71.0 
72.0 
72.4 
71.5 
60.7 
66.0 
64.5 
63.5 
62.5 
61.5 
59.9 



5.6 
5.7 
6.0 
6.2 
6.3 
6.5 
6.7 
6.5 

4:9 

5.0 

6:0 

6.1 



6.8 
6.0 
5.8 
5.G 
5.2 
5.8 
6.4 
5.7 
6.0 
5.5 
5,5 
G.i 



The Mean Height of the Barometer, as likewise the Dry and Wet Bulb 
Thermometer Means are derived from the observations made at the several 
liours duriug the montli. 



XCIX 



Meii'ort logical Ohservations. 



Ahatrnct of the Jiesnlh of Ihe Jhmrl?/ Meteorological Ooservulions 
laken al- llie Sarvej/or GeneraVs Office, CalciiUa, 
ill Ihe month of December 1876. 



JEoui-ly Means, <fec. of tlie Observations and of the Ilygrometrical elements 
dependent thereon. — (Continued). 









Point. 




o 
o 


K- O 


ght of 
ed for 
ition. 


in 


Hour. 




O 


P 


o 


o 


O O 




S g'bC 

tj. S PI 






9 


a 






3« 


III 


.§8 J 




^a 




o 
O 


ir 0-1 






:^-s 


M 'Ti :^ 










o 


o 


Indies. 


Gv. 


Gv. 




Mid- 


















niglit. 


59.7 


3.4 


56.6 


6.5 


0.467 


5.21 


1.26 


0.81 


1 


59.1 


3.3 


56.1 


6.3 


.459 


.14 


.19 


.81 


2 


58.5 


3.3 


55.5 


6.3 


.450 


.04 


.17 


.81 


3 


58.0 


3.2 


55.1 


6.1 


.444 


4.98 


.12 


.82 


4 


57.5 


3.1 


54.7 


5.9 


.438 


.91 


.07 


.82 


5 


57.0 


3.0 


54.3 


5.7 


.432 


.85 


.02 


.83 


6 


56.6 


2-9 


54.0 


5.5 


.428 


.80 


0.98 


.83 


7 


56.6 


2.7 


54.2 


5.1 


.431 


.84 


.90 


.84 


8 


58.1 


3.8 


54.7 


7.2 


.438 


.90 


1.33 


.79 


9 


60.0 


6.2 


55.0 


11.2 


.442 


.91 


2.21 


.69 


10 


61.6 


8.0 


55.2 


14.4 


.445 


.91 


.99 


.62 


11 


62.4 


10.0 


54.4 


18.0 


.434 


.74 


3.86 


.55 


Noon. 


62.7 


11.5 


54.6 


. 19.6 


.437 


.76 


4.33 


.52 


1 


62.7 


12.5 


53.9 


21.3 


.426 


.65 


.72 


.50 


2 


62.9 


13.1 


53.7 


22.3 


.423 


.61 


.99 


.48 


3 


62.9 


13.0 


53.8 


22.1 


.425 


.62 


.95 


.48 


4 


62.3 


12.3 


53.7 


20.9 


.423 


.62 


.58 


.50 


5 


62.7 


10,3 


54.5 


18.5 


.435 


.75 


.01 


.54 


6 


62.8 


7.0 


57.2 


12.6 


.476 


5.23 


2.72 


.66 


7 


62.4 


5.7 


57.8 


10.3 


.486 


.37 


.18 


.71 


8 


61.8 


5.0 


57.8 


9.0 


.486 


.38 


1.88 


.74 


9 


61.3 


4.2 


57.9 


7.6 


.488 


.40 


.58 


.77 


10 


60.6 


3.9 


57.5 


7.0 


.481 


.35- 


.41 


.79 


11 


60.1 


3.6 


56.9 


6.8 


.472 


.25 


.34 


.80 



i 



All the Hygrometrical elements are computed hy the Greenwich Constants. 



Meteorological Observations. c 

Abstract of the IlesuUs of the llourlij MeteoroUxjical Oljservations 
taken at the Siirveijor General's Office, Calcutta, 
111 the month oj Becemljer 1876. 

Solar Eadiation, Weatlier, &c. 





CO -2 


Ea,in Guage 

1| ft. above 

Ground. 


p 



Wind. 



Prevailing 



>^ ."ti j General aspect of the Sky. 



P^i 



.— o 
C3 O 



10 
11 

12 

13 

14 

15 
16 



127.0 

]25.8 
126.0 

124.0 

127.5 

121.0 

126.8 
125.0 

121.0 

125.8 
126.0 



127.2 
129.5 

128.0 

127.0 
123.0 



Inches 



N & N W 

N W 
N W & WN W 

W N W 

[W s w 

W by N, W & 

WSW&NNW 

N N W, N N E 
NN W&WNW 

WNW&WbyN 



W by N & N N E 
NNE,N&NbyE 



[N N W 
N by E, N W & 



W&NN W 

N N W & N by E 

N by E & N by W 

NN W 



0.4 



1.0 



Miles. 
141.8 

110.1 

80.4 

59.3 

65.3 

74.9 

137.3 
131.0 

75.4 

68.1 
99.8 



103.4 

82.8 

68.0 

114.5 
187.8 



B. Slightly foggy from 8 to 
10 p. M. 

B. Foggy from 8 to 11 p. m. 

B. Slightly foggy from Mid- 
night to 4 A. M. & 7 to 11 p. M. 

13. Slightly foggy fi-om 7 to 

10 p. M. 

B. Slightly foggy from 5 to 
8 A. M. & at 7 & 8'p. M. 

B. Slightly foggy at 7 & 

8 A. M. 

B. 

B to ]1 A. M., V_i to 1, \i to 
5, B to 11 p. ai. 

B to 11 A. M., v_i to 3, \i to 
5, B to 11 p. M. Slightly foggy 
from 5 to 7 a. m. & 8 to 11 p. sr. 

B. Slightly foggy from Mid- 
night to 2 A. II. & 7 to 1 1 p. M. 

B to 5 A. M., \i to 4, B to 11 
p. M. Slightly foggy at Mid- 
night & 1 A. M. & from 8 to 

11 p. M. 

B to 5 A. M., \i to 6, B to 11 
p. M. Slightly fog^y at Mid- 
night & 1 A. M. & from 8 to 11 
p. M. 

B to 4, \i to 6, B to 9 a. jr., 
\i to 5, B to 11 p. M. Slightly 
foggy at Midnight, 1, 5 & 6 a. m. 
& from 8 to 11 p. m. 

B to 5, \i to 7, B to 11 p. sr. 
Slightly foggy at Midnight & 
L A. M. & from 8 to 11 p. m. 
_ B. Slightly foggy from Mid- 
night to 2 A. M. 

B. 



\i Cirri, — i Strati, "^ i Cumuli, — i Cirro-strati, ^ i Cuniulo-strati, ^/-^.i Nimbi, 
Vi Cirro-cumuli, B clear, S stratoni, O overcast, T thunder, L lightning, 
E. raiu, D. drizzle. 



I 



■CI 



Meieorologica I Observation's. 



Abstract' of the Ilasnlts of the Hourly Meteorological Olservatio'm 

taken at the Surveyor General's Ojjlce, Calcutta, 

in the month of December IST-G. 

Solar Eadiation, Weather, &c. 





u 


m 01 




o o 
02 -.3 




aj 


H'5 


cd 2 


P 




a^'^ 



Wind. 



Pre vail HI g 
dii'ectioa. 



■M =:! 



A^ 



> 



Gei^ral aspect of the Sky. 



17 122.5 



18 
19 

21 



■22 
23 

24 

25 

26 
27 

■28 

29 
30 
31 



118.5 
129.0 
125.2 

124.9 



123.0 
124.0 

123.4 

124.0 
126.7 
125.0 

128.0 

127.0 
126.5 
121.0 



Inches 



]N &KNE 

NNE& S S W 

SSE, SE&NNW 

NbjW 

NbyW&NbyE 



NbyE 

n&:nne 

N N E & N by W 

IT by W 

N by W & N N E 
JM by W & IS" 

IT & NNW 

NNW&NbyW 
N -"by W & W W 
IS &NN W 



lb 



Miles. 
181.1 

67.6 

59.3 

87.9 

87.8 



96.8 
147.8 

138.0 

124.9 

108.9 
^7.1 

67.6 

64.4 
104.5 

98.5 



B. Slightly foggy from V to 

10 r. M. 

B to 11 A. M., v_i to 6, B to 

11 p. M. 

B to 1 A. M., Vi to 7, B to 

11 p. M. 

v_i to 1, Vsi to 10 A.M. v_i to 
5, B to 11 p. M. Slightly foggy 
from 8 to 11 p. M. 

B to 2 A. M., \i to 6, B to 
11 p. M. Slightly foggy from 
Midnight to 2 a. m. & 7 to 9 p.m. 

B to 12, v_i to 5, B to 11 p. u. 

B to 6 A. M., \i to 12, \_i to 
5, B to 11 p. M. 

B to 11 A. M., r^i to 4, B tO 

11 p. ir. 

Chiefly B. 

Bto 1, Wto7, B toll P.M. 

Bto 12, \_ito 3, B to 5, Vi 
to 8, B to 11 p. M. 

B to 5 A. M., Vi to 2, B to 
11 p. M. 

B. 

B. 

B. 



\i Cirri, — i Strati, ^i Oumuli,\_i Cirro-strati, "^ i Cumulo-strati, Vv_i Nimbi, 
Vi Cirro-cumuli, B clear, S stratoni, overcast, T thunder, L lightning, 
R. rain, D. drizzle. 



Metleorological Odservaftons: eii 

Ahstracl. of Ike liesulls of the Hourly MeleoroUxj'ical Ohserrnlhuis 
taken at the Snrvei/or General's Ojfice, Calcutta, 
in the vwnth of 3ecember 1876. 

Monthly IIes-ults. 



Indies. 

Mean lieit^lit of tlie Unrometer for tlie Tiiojitli ... ... ... 30. OH^" 

Max. ]ieis:^litof t.lie JJiiroiiieter occwrredjit 10 &. M. oia (lie 7fcli ... 30.231 

Mil), lieiglit of tlie Earonieter oceiirretl at 3& 4 p. m, oh tlie 2nd ... 29.928' 

j^xlreme range Q^ tlie 13aroineter duriiig tl*e iwoiith ... ... ().3o3 

Mean of tlie daiily IMax. Pi-essui-es ... ... ... ...30.137 

])itto (Titko Dirin. ditto ... ... ... ... 30.002" 

IMean Jail 1/ range 0^ tlie Iktrometer during the nionlih ... ... 0.135 



Mean Dry Bnlli Tliermometer for the montli ... ... ... Gfi.Q' 

j\Inx. Tempera tm-e occurred at 3 p. M. on tlio 26tli, 27tli, 28tli & 29tli 78.0 

Min. Temperature oec-nrred at 6 & 7 A. m. on the 3rd ... ... 55. .5 

lHj'treiiie i-aiige o( the Temperature during the month ... ... 22.5 

Mean of the daily Max. Temperature ... ... ... ... 7(5.1 

. Ditto ditto ]\fin. ditto, ... ... ... ... 59.2 

Mean daily range of the Teroperature dm-ing the mouth ... . ... 16. 9 



Mean Wet 13nll) Thermometer for the month ... ... ... 00.4 

Mean Dry Bull) Thermometer al)ove IMeaii "Wet 13tilh Thermonu^ter 6.5 

ComjMitcd Mean Dew-])oint for the month ... ... ... 5-5. '2 

Mean Dry 13nlb Tlierniometer above computed mean Dew-jioint ' ... 11.7 

Inches-. 
Mean ICIastic force of Yapomr for the uionth ... ... ... ().4.-J5 



Grain. 
Mean Weight of l^ajtnur for the month ... ... ... 4.9;^ 

iiddiiional Weight of A'aponr ve((uired for com))lete saturation ... 2.35 
Slean degree of humidity for the uionth, complete .saturation being unity 0.6S 

o 
Mean Mux. Solar ra;diation Thermometer for the month ... ... 125.1 



Inches. 
l?ained no days, — Tllax. fall of rafn during 24 hours ... ... IVil 

Total aninunt of rain drrring the month ... ... ... JS'il 

Total amountof rain indicated by the Gauge* attached to the anemo- 
meter during the month ... ... ... ... ... Nil 

Prevailing direction of the Wind ... ... N N W, N by W k N 

* llcij^lil 70 ft'cl 10 iiicLes ubovo gromul. 



cm 



Ileleorological Ohservalions. 








t= 


'R 








J3 


r^ 


2 


o 


--a 


cc 








o 


is 


is 


^ 


C3 


' U 




i=l 


Is 


^ 












A> 


-4-i 






CS 


"5 




P-< 


o 


55 


>■. 





p 2 



i « 



Is 



pi 

o 



^ .2 a 



(^3 


>-, 


rt 


^ 


■-C 


^ 

O 


^ 


o 


Is 




;-! 




;^ 


OJ 


a 


t^ 


rO 


o 


•s 


S 


M 






>^ 


xi 


fl 


53 



'k. 



(2^ 



^ 



^ fl 



H 




J>- 


X 1> CO XI CO lO lO lO CO ^ 


CO 


COnHTjICOlOlOlOlOCDCDeO 




o 


CO -* lo in lo lo lo "* lo CO c» 


^ 


C0COJ>COl>J>it>t->>>t~t> 




CO 


CMOTOlCOCOCOCOCOC^COrH 


■* 


i>;ot^-*cccocococococo 



"UO UIUJ£ 

•UO luuj]; 
■AV 



•UO UIVJ]^ 

•UO un.'j£ 

•|IO U1I!J£ 



C-) CT C4 01 (M 01 C-1 (N (M <M 0-1 51 01 CO ^ 01 01 TO CO CO CO (M (M f« 



01 (M 01 0"J Ol .-H i-l ^ t 



■-H rH r-l .-( r-( r-. 01 01 Ol 



i-( r-. rl Ol 01 01 Ol Ol 01 Ol 01 



"Al ■« 

•110 Ul^MJ^ 



;Ai 's •« 

"UO UIDJJ^ 



■^Vi ^'q -s 



•UO u;i;j£ 

_'S 

■UO un!j]; 




•no urejj 

'M -i'q 11 



•UO iini^f 



"UO uniji 

•5r -.NT 



■UO UllIJ^ 

T'f -isL WT 



•UO Uji!}j; 

■UO un!'}!' 

"M 



Ol ^ 'i' CO 



CO COCOCO-^COOIOICOt^t^CD to 0101i-l01COlOlOlO-*-*eO 



^ •^-*C0-Hi-lrHO1.-l.-IO1. 






ffl 0lTjllolOlOt-CDJ>TjlC0'SI 1> OSOOlO— 'COi 



oico^'ocor^oooso^ o r-ioico-*iocDt~ooasOfH 



f-1 t-H O 



[appendix.] 



LIST OF MEMBERS 



OF THE 



ASIATIC SOCIETY OF BENGAL, 

On the 31ST December, i8j6. 



LIST OF ORDINARY MEMBERS. 



The * distinguishes Non-Subscribing, the f Non-Eesident Members, 
and the J Life-Members. 



N. B. — Gentlemen who may have changed their residence, since this list was 
drawn up, are requested to give intimation of such a change to the Secretaries, in 
order that the necessary alterations may be made in the siibsequent edition. Errors 
or omissions in the following list should also be communicated to the Secretaries. 

Gentlemen who are proceeding to Europe, with the intention of not retm-ning to 
India are particularl}^ requested to notify to the Secretaries, whether it be their de- 
sire to continue as members of the Society, otherwise, in accordance with Rule 40 of 
the Bye-laws, their names will be removed fi'om the list at the expiration of three 
years from the time of their leaving India. 



Date of Election. 






1860 Dec. 


5. 


Abdul-Latif Khan Bahadur, Maulawi. 


Calcutta 


1868 Sept. 


2. 


fAdam, E,. M., Esq. 


Agra 


1860 July 


4. 


tAhmad Khan Bahadiir, Sayyid, c. s. i. 


Benares 


1872 April 


8. 


fAhsan-xiUah, Nawab. 


Dacca 


1860 April 


4. 


tAitchison, J. E. T., Esq., m. d. 


Jullundur 


1866 Jan. 


17. 


*Allan, Lieut.-Col. A. S. 


Europe 


1871 June 


7. 


t Alexander, J. W., Esq. 


Darbhanga 


1860 Oct. 


3. 


Amir Ali Khan Bahadur, Nawab. 


Calcutta 


1874 June 


3. 


Amir Ali, Sayyid, Esq. 


Calcutta 


1865 Jan. 


11. 


Anderson, Dr. J., p. l. s. 


Calcutta 


1872 June 


5. 


t Anderson, A. Esq. 


Fatehgarh 


1875 June 


2. 


Apcar, J. G., Esq. 


Calcutta 


1875 Feb. 


3. 


Armstrong, J,, Surg., B. Army. 


Calcutta 


1871 Sept. 


6. 


*Atkinson, E. T., Esq., c. s. 


Etirope [ana. 


1869 Feb. 


3. 


fAttar Singh Bahadur, Sirdar. 


Bhadour, Ludi- 


1870 Feb. 


2. 


tBaden- Powell, B. H., Esq., c. s. 


Lahore 


1873 Aug. 


6. 


tBadgley, Capt., W. F. 


Shillong 


1859 Aug. 


3. 


Balaichand Sinha, Babu. 


Calcutta 


1865 Nov. 


7. 


tBall, V. Esq., M. A., Geol. Survey. 


Geol. S. Office 


1860 Nov. 


1. 


Banerjea, Rev. K. M., ll. t). 


Calcutta 


1876 June 


7. 


Baness, J. F., Esq. 


Calcutta 


1869 Dec. 


1. 


*Barker, B. A., Esq., M. A. 


E urope 


1873 March 5. 


*Barclay, G. W. W., Esq., M. a. 


Europe 


1860 July 


4. 


Batten, G. H. M., Esq., c. s. 


Calcutta 


1859 May 


4. 


Bayley,E.C.,The Hon. Sir, b.c. s., K. c. s.i. 


Calcutta 


1873 Feb. 


5. 


Bayne, li. li., Esq., B. A. 


Calcutta 


1864 Sept. 


7. 


fBeames, J., Esq., B. c s. 


Cuttak 


1841 April 


7. 


*Beaufort, F. L., Esq., b. c. s. 


Europe 



Date of Election. 

1876 June 7 
1867 July £ 
1862 Oct. 6 

1872 Aug. 
1876 Nov. 
1864 Nov. 

1874 Nov. 

1875 July 

1873 Dec. 
1857 Mar. 
1859 Aug. 
1873 Aug. 
1873 April 
1864 April 

1876 Nov. 
1868 Jan. 



7. 
15. 

2. 

4. 

7. 

3. 

4. 

3. 

6. 

2. 

6. 
15. 
15. 



1876 Mav 4. 
1860 March 7. 
1872 June 5. 
1871 Jan. 
1866 Nov. 
1874 April 
1871 iSept. 



1869 Jan. 
1863 June 

1873 Mar. 
1876 Aug. 
1860 Jan. 
1876 Nov. 15. 

1875 April 4. 
1868 Aug. 
1872 Dec. 

1874 Aug. 

1875 June 

1871 Sept. 
1868 Feb. 

1872 Aug. 
1874 Nov. 

1876 Mar. 
1868 Dec. 

1876 April 5. 
1874 March 4. 

1873 Aug. 6. 

1874 July 1. 

1847 June 2. 
1870 May 4. 



20. 
3. 
5. 
2. 
3. 



tBehrendt, J., Esq. 
Belletty, N. A., Esq. 
*Bernard, C. E., Esq., c. s. 
Beverley, H., Esq., c. s. 
fBeveridge, H., Esq., c. s. 
Bhudeva Mukerjea, Babu. 
Bbagabati Charn Mallik, Babu. 
tBlack, F. C, Esq. 
Blackburn, J., Esq. 

Blanford, H. F., Esq., a. b. s. m., f. g. s. 
fBlanford, W. T., a. e. s. m., f. r. s., f. a. s 
fBligh, W. G., Esq. 
fBlissett, T., Esq. 

Blochmann, H., Esq., m. a. 
fBowie, Major, M. M. 
fBoxwell, J., Esq., c. s. 
fBradsbaw, A., Sui-geon Major. 
tBrandis, Dr. D. 
*Brooks, W. E., Esq., c. E. 

Brough, E. S., Esq. 
fBrowne, Col. Horace A. 
Bruce, W. D., Esq., c. E. 
tBuckle, H., Esq. 

tCadell, A., Esq., b. a., c. s. 

*Campbell, Sir Gr., K. c s. I. 

fCappel, A., Esq. 

tCarnegy, T. P., Esq. 

fCarnac, J. H. iiivett, Esq., B c. s. 

Cayley, H. Dr. 

Chambers, Dr. E. W. 
tChandramohan Gosvami, Pandit. 
tChard, liev. C. H. 
fCliennell, A. W., Esq., Topi. Survey. 
tChennell T., Esq. 
tChisholm, R. F., Esq. 
tClark, Lieut. -Col. E. G.,Bengal Staff Corps 
*Clutterbuck, Capt. F. St. Quiutiu. 
fConstable, A., Esq. 

Crawfurd, J., Esq., c. s. 
fCooke, J. E., Esq. 
tCoxhead, T. E., Esq. 
fCrombie, A., Esq., m. d. 

Cunningham, D. D., Esq., m. b. 
fCowan, Capt. S. H., B. s. c. 



Patna 

Calcutta [ces 

Central Provin- 

Calcutta 

Rang25ur 

Chinsurah 

Calcutta 

Hamiri^ur 

Calcutta 

Calcutta 

Geol. S. Office 

Mathura 

Dacca 

Calcutta 

Sambhalpur 

Dumka 

Sin^la 

Simla 

Eiu'ope 

Calcutta 

liangoon 

Calcutta 

N. Arracau 

Ban da 

Europe 

Simla 

Assam 

Ghazipiu" 

Calcutta 

Calcutta 

Gauhatti 

Thayetmyo 

Shillong 

Dibriigbar 

Bombay 

Khcrl, Oudh 

Eurojje 

Lucknow 

Calcutta 

Madras 

Tipcrah 

Rangoon 

Calcutta 

Ai'rah 



*Dalton, Col. E. T., c. s. t.. Staff Corps. | Europe 
fDamant, G. H., Esq., c. s. i Cacliar 



Date of Election. 



1873 

1871 
1861 
1869 
1856 

1871 
1870 
1872 
1869 
1873 
1864 
1862 
1853 
1870 
1875 
1859 
1875 
1874 
1867 
1871 



Dec. 3. 

Jan. 4. 

Nov. 6. 

April 7. 

June 4. 

July 1. 

Feb. 2. 

Aug. 7. 

Oct. 6. 

Jan, 8. 

July 6. 

May 7. 

Sept. 7. 

May 4. 
March 3. 

Sept. 7. 
March 3. 

July 1. 

June 5. 
March 1. 



1870 March 8 
1863 May 6 
1874 Dec, 

1871 Dec. 
1846 Jan, 
1859 Nov. 
1871 Oct, 
1863 Oct. 



1859 Dec. 7. 
1851 May 7. 
1863 Jan. 15. 
1876 Jan. 5. 
1876 July 

1868 May 

1869 Sept. 
1872 Dec. 
1875 Jan. 
1861 Feb, 
1869 Oct. 



5. 
6. 
1. 
4. 
6. 
6. 
12. 



1863 June 

1871 Nov. 
1873 July 
1869 Sept. 
1867 Sept. 



fDames, M. L., Esq., c. s. 

Daukes, F. C, Esq., c. 8. 
fDavies, The Hon'ble E. H., c. s. i., b. c. s. 
*Day, Dr. F., r. l. s., f. z. s. 
fDeBourbel, Major E., Eoyal Engrs. 

Deane, Capt. T. 
tDeFabeck, F. W. A., Esq., i. m. Service. 

Dejoux, P., Esq. 
fDelmerick, J. Gr., Esq, 
fDennys, H. L., Esq. 

Devendra Mallik, Babu. 
fDhanapati Singh Dughar, Eai Bahadur. 

Dickens, Col. C. H., e. a., c. s. i. 
fDobson, G. E., Esq., B. A., M. B., r, L. s. 

Dodgson, Walter, Esq. 
fDouglas, Col. C, E. A. 

Douglas, J., Esq., Govt. Telg. Dej^t. 

Drummond, Col. H., E. E. 
fDuthoit, W., Esq., c. s. 

Dvijendranath Thakur, Babu. 

^Edinburgh, H. E. H. The Duke of. 
fEdgar, J. W., Esq., c. s. i., B. C. s. 
fEgerton, The Hon, E, E., c. s., c, s. i, 

Elliot, J., Esq., M. A. 
*Elliot, Sir Walter, late M. c. s. 
*Elliot, C. A., Esq., B, c. s. 
tEvezard, Col. G. E. 
*Ewart, J., Esq., M. D, 

Fath All, Maulawi, 
*Fayrer, Sir J., k. c. s. I. 
fFedden, Francis, Esq., Gaol. Survey. 

Feistmantel, O., Esq. m. d., Geol. Survey, 
tFoulkes, The Eev. Thos. 
fField, C. D., Esq., m. a., c. s. 
t Fisher, J. H., Esq., c. s. 
*Forbes, Major J. G., e. e. 
tForbes, Capt. C. J. F. S., Depy. Comr. 
fForest, E., Esq., c. E. 
*Forlong, Lieut. -Col, J. G. E., M. s. c. 
*Forsyth, Sir T. D., K. c. s. i., c. B. 
fFoster, J. M., Esq., M. E. c. p. 
t Eraser, Capt. E. 
*Fryer, Major G. E. 

Fyi'e, The Eev. W. C. 



1873 Dec. 3. f Gamble, J, S., Esq. 



DeraGhaziKhan 

Calcutta 

Lahore 

Europe 

Lucknow 

Calcutta 

Deoli 

Calcutta 

Delhi 

Sambalpur 

Calcutta 

Azimganj 

Calcutta 

Europe 

Calcutta 

Lucknow 

Calcutta 

Calcutta 

Mirzapur 

Calcutta 

Europe 

Darjiling 

Lahore 

Calcutta 

Europe 

Europe 

Puna 

Europe 

Calcutta 

Europe 

Karachi 

Calcutta 

Bangalore 

Burdwan 

Chindwara 

Arrah 

Shvvegyeen, B. 

Dehra [Burmah 

Europe 

Europe 

Nazira, Assam 

Bushire 

Europe 

Calcutta 

Pankabari, Dar- 
jiling 



Date of Election. 



1871 Aug. 

1874 July 
1859 Aug. 
1862 Feb. 
1867 Sept. 
1867 Dec. 
1859 Sept. 

1875 July 
1869 Feb. 
1861 Feb. 



1872 Nov. 


6. 


1862 July 
1869 July 

1875 July 

1863 Nov. 


2. 

7. 
7. 
4. 


1866 June 


6. 


1876 Nov. 


15. 


1861 Sept. 
1873 Aug. 


4. 
6. 


1861 Feb. 


6. 


1871 Jan. 


4. 


Jan. 


6. 


1864 Dec. 


5. 


1871 Jtine 


7. 


1867 July 


3. 


1869 April 3. 
1861 March 1. 


1861 Feb. 


2. 


1859 Oct. 


6. 


1874 Jan. 


7. 


1875 March 8. 


1875 Aug. 


4. 


1868 Aug. 


5. 


1872 Dec. 


4. 


1868 Nov. 


4. 


1873 Jan. 


8. 


1863 Jan. 


15. 


1866 Feb. 


7. 


1867 Aug. 


7. 


1873 March 5. 


1866 Jan. 


17. 


1870 Jan. 


5. 


1870 June 


1. 


1868 April 


1. 


1872 Dec. 


,4. 



fGangaprasad, Munshi. 
fG-ardner, D. M., Esq. 
+ Gastrell, Col. J. E. 
tGraurdas Baisak, Babu. 
fGauvain, Capt. V. 
*Gay, E. Esq., m. a. 
*Geoghegan, J. Esq., b. c. s. 
fGirdlestone, C. E. R., Esq., c. s. 
fGiriprasad Singh, Tbakiu-. 

Godwin-Austen, Major H. H., r. z. s., 
p. B. a. s., Topographical Stu-vey. 

Gordon, C. B. P., Esq. 
fGordon, Robert, Esq., c. E. 
fGordon, J. D., Esq., c. s. I., c. s. 
fGouldsbury, J. K. E., Esq. 
fGowan, Lieut. -Col. J. Y. 

Gribble, T. W., Esq., b. c. s. 

Grierson, G. A., Esq., c. s. 
fGriffin, L. H., Esq., b. c. s. 

Girischaudra Sinha, Rajah. 
fGrowse, F. S., Esq., m. a., b. c. s. 

Gimendranath Thakur, Babu. 
*Gunn, J.S.,Esq.,]M.B., Surg., Bengal Army 
fGurucharan Das, Babu. 

Habiburrahman, Maulavi. 
tHacket, C. A., Esq., Geol. Survey, 
majberlin, The Rev. C. 
tHarachandra Chaudhiui, Babu. 
fHarrison, A. S., Esq., B. A. 
*Haughton, Col. J. C., c. s. i. 

Heintze, C, Esq. 
tHendley, Dr. T. H. 
fHewitt, J. F. H., Esq., c. s. 
tHobart, R. T., Esq., c. s. 
*Hoernle, Rev. A. F., ph. d. 
fHolroyd, Major W. R. M. 
JHoustoun, G. L., Esq., r. a. s. 
fHowell, M. S., Esq., c. s. 

Hoyle, G. W., Esq. 
fHitghes, T. H., Esq., a. e. s. m., r. a. s. 
tHughes, A. J., Esq., c. E. 
tHughes, Captain W. G., M. s. c. 
fHume, Allan O., Esq., c. B., c. s. 
*Hunter, W. W., Esq., ll. d., c. s. 
*Hyde, Col. H., n. e. 

flbbctson, D. C. J., Esq., c. s. 



Moradabad 
Azamgarh 
Europe 
Birbhum 

Eiu'ope 
Europe 
Nepal 
Allighar 

Calcutta 

Calcutta 

Henzada 

Bangalore 

Montgomery 

Euro^De 

Calcutta^ 

Rangpur [jab 

Kapurthala,Pan- 

Calcutta 

Mathura 

Calcutta 

Europe 

Krishnagar 

Calcutta 

Geol. S. Office 

Europe [singh 

Sherpur,Maimau- 

Allahabad 

Europe 

Calcutta [na 

Jaipur, Rajputa- 

Motihari 

Allahabad 

Europe 

Lahore 

Europe 

Bulandshahr 

Calcutta 

Geol. S. Office 

Barrack pur 

Arracan 

Rajputana 

Europe 

Europe 

Karnal, Pan jab 



Date of Election 


1SG6 March 7. 


1871 March 8. 


1853 Dec. 


7. 


1874 Feb. 


4. 


1876 July 


5. 


1865 June 


7. 


1873 Aug. 


6. 


1866 Feb. 


7. 


1862 March 5. 


1867 Dec. 


4. 


1873 Dec. 


3. 


1873 April 


2. 


1875 Nov. 


3. 


1869 April 


7. 


1871 May 


3. 


1861 Dec. 


4. 


1875 April 


7. 


1874 Dec. 


2. 


1867 Dec. 


4. 


1867 March 6. 


1862 Jan. 


15. 


1875 Dec. 


1. 


1876 AprU 


5. 


1860 May 


5. 


1859 Dec. 


7. 


1870 July 


6. 


1869 June 


2. 


1873 Feb. 


5. 


1864- Nov. 


2. 


1866 Jan. 


17. 


1869 July 


7. 


1876 May 


4. 


1875 Jan. 


6. 


1870 April 


6. 


1866 June 


6. 



flrvine, W., Esq., c. s. 

Isaac, T. S., Esq., c. e. 
flsvariprasad Singh Bahadur, Raja. 

t Jackson, Dr. C. J. 

Jarrad, Lieut. F. W., E. N. 
fjaykissen Das Bahadur, Eaja, C. s. i. 

Jogeshachandra Datta, Babu. 
t Johnson, W. H., Esq. 
* Johnstone, Major J. W. H. 
*Johnstone, Lt. Col. J. 
fJohore, H. H., Maharaja of, k. c. s. i., 

*Jones, F., Esq., c. s. 
fJones, S. S., Esq., B. A., C. S. 

Kablruddin Ahmad, Maulawi. 

Kaliprasanna Grhosh, Babu. 
fKempson, M., Esq., M. A. 
fKerr, Ralph, Major, Lord. 
fKhudabakhsh Khan, Maulawi. 

King, G.j Esq., M. B. 
tKing, Capt. H. W. 

King, W., Jr., Esq., Greol. Survey of Lidia. 

Knight, J. B., Esq. 

Kantichandra Sing, Kumara. 

Kui'z, S., Esq. 

*Leonard, H., Esq., M. a., c. e. 
fLethbridge, E., Esq., M. A. 
*Leupolt, J. C, Esq., c. s. 

Lewis, T. R., Esq., M. B. 

Locke, H. H., Esq. 
fLow, J., Esq., Gr. T. Survey. 

Lyall, C. J., Esq., B. A., c. s. 

Lyall, John M., Esq. 

Lydekker, R., Esq., Geol. Survey of India. 
JLyman, B. Smith, Esq. 



Macdonald, Lieut. -Col. J., b. s. c. 
1876 Dec. 6. fMacdonald, J. C, Esq. 
1873 May 7. *-Mackay, W., Esq., c. e. 

1873 Dec. 3. | McLeod, K., Esq., M. d. 

1848 April 5. fMaclagan, Major-General R., K. E., E. B. 

a Tji -pi -p ("J. g 

1867 July 3. *Macnainara, Dr. C. 
1S68 Dec. 2. fMacauliffe, M., Esq., c. s. 

1874 Jan. 7. fMagrath, C. F., Esq., c. s. 



Fatehgarh. 

Calcutta 

Benares 

Muzaf£arp\ir 
Calcutta 
Cawnpore 
Calcutta 
Patna 
Europe 
Almora 
New Johore, 
Singapore 
Europe 
Sasseram 

Calcutta 

Calcutta 

Allahabad 

Mathura 

Patna 

Calcutta 

P.&OCo.'sOffice 

Geol. Surv. Office 

Calcutta 

Calcutta 

Calcutta 

Europe 

Krishnagar 

Europe 

Calcutta 

Calcutta 

B. Burmah 

Calcutta 

Calcutta 

Calcutta 

Japan 



Calcutta 
N. W. P. 
Europe 
Europe 

Lahore 
Europe 
Jhelum 
Boffra 



Terai 



Date ol Election. 

1867 
1867 
1876 
1852 
1872 
1869 
1874 
1873 
1873 
1875 
1876 
1860 



April 3. 

April 3. 

Dec. 6. 

Nov. 3. 

Nov. 6. 

July 7. 

Aug. 5. 

July 2. 

Aug. 6. 

April 4. 

Jan. 5. 
Marcli 7. 



1871 Sept. 
1870 July 

1874 May 

1875 Aug. 

1876 Dec. 
1874 July 
1867 Marcli 6 
1854 Dec. 6 
1854 Oct. 11 



1862 July 2. 



1876 May 
1865 Feb. 

1871 Jan. 

1872 May 
1869 July 



Mahendralal Sirkar, Dr. 

Mainwaring, Lieut. -Col. Gr. B. 

Malleson, Col. Gr. B., c. s. i. 

Manickjee Eiistamjee, Esq. 
tMan, E. H., Esq. 
fMarkham, A. M., Esq., c. S. 
* Marsh, Capt. H. C. 
fMarshall, C. W., Esq. 
tMarshall, Lieut;-Col. W. E. 

McConnell, Dr. J. F. P., Prof. Med. Coll, 
fMcGregor, W., Esq., Supt. I. Telegraph. 
fMedlicott, H. B., Esq., m. a., p. g. s. Supt, 

Greol. Survey. 
tMiles, Major S. B. 
*Miller, A.'B., Esq. 
tMinchin, F. J. V., Esq. 
tMinchin, Lieut.-Col. C. C. 
tMockler, Capt. E., Pol. Agent. 
tMolesworth, W. G., Esq., c. E. 
*Montgomerie, Major T. G., E. e. 

Morris, The Hon'ble G. G., B. c. s. 
*Muir, Sir W., K. c. s. i., b. c. s. 

*Napier of Magdala, Baron, General, G. c 
s. I., G. c. B. 

Nash, A. M., Esq. 

Nevill, G., Esq., c. M. z. s. 
*Newton, Isaac, Esq. 
fNiranjan Mukerji, Babu. 
tNm-sing Eao, A. V., Esq. 



1871 July 5. IfOates, E. W., Esq., c. E. 



1874 Oct. 4. 
1851 June 4. 
1873 Aug. 6. 



1864 
1873 
1876 
1862 
1871 
1867 
1860 
1868 
1873 
1869 
1864 
1865 



March 2 
Aug. 6 
June 7 
May 7 
Dec. 6 



March 6. 



Feb. 1 

Nov. 4 
Aug. G 
July 7 
March 2 
Sept. 6 



O'Kinealy, J., Esq., c. s. 
*01dham, T., Esq., ll. d., f. e. S. 
Olpherts, W. J., Esq. 

Palmer, Dr. W. J. 

Parker, J. C, Esq. 

Parry, E., Esq. 
JPartridge, S. B., Esq., m. d. 
tPeal, S. E., Esq. 
fPearimohan Mukerji, Babu, Ji. A. 
*Pearse, Lieut.-Col. G. G. 
fPearson, C. E., Esq., m. a. 

Pedler, A., Esq. 

Pell, S., E.sq. 
tJ'c'llcw, F. H., Esq., c. S. 
fPeppc, T. E., Esq. 



Calcutta 

Calcutta 

Calcutta 

Calcutta 

Port Blair 

Allahabad 

Europe 

Berhampui" 

Simla 

Calcutta 

Akyab 

Calcutta 

Muskat 

Europe 

Ask a, Ganjam 

Bahawalpiu* 

Gwadur 

Simla 

Europe 

Calcutta 

Eiu'ope 



Europe 

Calcutta 

Calcutta 

Europe 

Be.naras 

Vizagapatam 

Pegu 
Calcutta 
Eiu'ope 
Calcutta 

Calcutta 

Calcutta 

Calcutta 

Europe 

Sil:)sagar, Assam 

Uttarpara 

Europe 

liawul Pindeo 

Calcutta 

Caknitta 

Hooghly 

Eanclii 



Date of Election 

1868 May 
1835 July 
1864- Nov. 

1869 Feb. 
1875 Feb. 

1868 April 
1872 Dec. 

1869 Feb. 
1874 Dec. 



1874 Dec. 
1876 July 
1860 Mar. 

1871 July 

1872 April 
1868 April 
1863 April 
1874 May 
1865 Feb. 
1876 Dec. 
1870 Jan. 



1871 Dec. 

1872 Feb. 
1870 May 

1873 Jan. 
1870 -May 
1869 Feb. 
1876 July 
1876 July 

1874 Jtdy 
1876 Feb. 
1860 July 

1863 April 

1872 Aug. 

1864 Sept. 

1875 Feb. 

1865 July 
1874 June 
1864 Mar. 



1856 Mar. 5. 
1871 June 7. 
1837 Feb. 1. 



Peterson, F. W., Esq. 
fPhayre, Major-G., Sir A. P.,K. c. s. i., c. B. 
*Phear, Tbe Hon'ble J. B. 
fPickford, J., Esq., m. a. 
t Porter, W. J., Esq. 

fPramathanath Kay, Raja. 

Prannatb Sarasvati Pandit, M. A., B. l. 

Pratapacbandra Gbosba, Babu, B. a. 
fProtberoe, Capt. M. 

EajendralalaMitra,Babu,IiaiBabadurLL.D. 

Eamakrisbna Das, Babu. 

Eanianatb Tagor, Tbe Hon. Mabaraja, 
c. s. I. 
tRam Das Sen, Babu. 

Eaye, D. O'Connell, Esq., m. d. 
fPeid, H. S., Esq., c. s. 
fEeid, J. E., Esq., c. s. 
tEicbards, Dr. V. 

Eobb, G., Esq. 
fEobertson, C, Esq., c. s. 
*Eobinson, Col. D. G., E. E. 

Eobinson, S. H., Esq. 
tEodon, Lieut. G. S., Eoyal Scots. 
*Eoss, Alexander G., Capt., Staff Corps. 



*Samuells, Capt. W. L., B. S. c. 
fSasbagiri Sastri, M., B. A. 

Satyanand Gbosbal, Eaja. 

Schlegel, F., Esq. 
tScblicb, Dr. W. 
*Scbwendler, L., Esq. 
fScott, D., Esq., c. E. 
fScott, E., Esq., c. s. 
t Scully, Dr. J. 
tSbaw, E. B., Esq. 
fSbelvertou, G., Esq. 

fShowers, Lieut. -Col. C. L. 
fSkrei'srud, Eev. L. O. 

fSladen, Lieut.-Col. E. B. 
*Smidt, J., Esq. 

Smith, D. Boyes, Esq., m. d. 
fSmith, V. A., Esq., c. s. 
fSpearman, Caj^t. H. R. 



Calcutta 
Mauritius 
Eiirope 
Madras 
Sbwegyeen, B. 

Burmab 
Digapati 
Bbawanipur 
Calcutta 
Port Blair 

Calcutta 
Calcutta 

Calciitta 

Berbanipur 

Calcutta 

Allahabad 

Azimghar 

Goalundo 

Calcutta 

Mirzaptu' 

Europe 

Calcutta 

Eanikhet 

Europe 



Euroj)e 

Madras 

Calcutta 

Calcutta 

Darjiling 

Europe 

Cuttak 

Muzaffarnagur 

Nej)al [mir 

(Ladak) Kash- 

Waltair, near 

Vizagapatam 
Amballa 
Santhal Mission 

EampurHaut 
Arracan 
Europe 
Calcutta 
Hamirpur 
Amherst 



IZ 



Date of Election. 


1872 July 
1863 Sept. 

1875 July 

1876 Aug. 


3. 
2. 

7. 
2 


1861 Sept. 
1869 Feb. 


4. 
3. 


1859 Mar. 


2. 


1858 July 
1864 Aug. 


7. 
11. 


1865 Sept.' 
1865 April 
1874 Mar. 


6. 
5. 
4. 


1860 May 


2. 


1876 Feb. 


2. 


1875 June 


2. 


1869 Oct. 


6. 


1875 Nov. 


3. 


1847 June 


2. 


1865 July 
1871 April 
1861 June 


5. 
5. 
5. 


1872 July 

1873 April 
1863 May 


3. 
2. 
6. 


1869 June 


2. 


1873 April 


2. 


1860 May 
1864 Feb. 


2. 
3. 


1864 April 


6. 


1870 June 


1. 


1871 Feb. 


1. 


1869 Aug. 


4. 


1865 Nov. 


1. 


1861 May 
1875 April 


1. 

7. 


1863 Oct. 


7. 


1865 May 


3. 



fStephen, Carr, Esq. 
fStewart, E. D., Esq. 
*Stewart, M. O., Esq. 
fSt. John, Major 0. B., E. E. 

Stokes, Whitley, Esq., c. s. i. 
Strachey, The Hon'ble Sir J., K. c. s. r. 
Stubbs, Lieut.-Col. F. W., Eoyal ArtH- 
lery. 
fSutherland, H. C, Esq., B. C. S. 
Swinhoe, W., Esq. 

*Tawney, C. H., Esq., m. a. 

Taylor, R., Esq., c. s. 

Taylor, Commander A. D., late Indian 
Navy. 
fTemple, The Hon. Sir R., Bart., k. c. s. i., 
B. c. s. 

Tennant, Col. J. F., E. E., p. E. s. 
fThibaut, Dr. G. 
fThomson, A., Esq. 
tThomson, R. Gr., Esq., C. s. 

Thuillier, Col. H. L., s. A., c. a. r, r. e. s. 
*Tolbort, T. W. H., Esq., c. s. 
*Trefetz, Oscar, Esq. 
fTremlett, J. D., Esq., M. A., C. s. 
tTrevor, W. S., Lieut.-Col., E. E. 

Timibull, R., Esq. 
fTyler, J. W., Esq., M. D. 

fUdaychand Dutt, Babu. 
Umesh Chunder Dutt, Babu. 

*Yanrenen, Lieut. Col. A. D.,.B. c. S. 
tVerchere, A. M., Esq., m. d. 
fVijayarama Gujapati Raj Munnia Sultan 

Bahadm', Maharajah Mirza Vijayana- 

gram. 
tVrindavanachandra Mandala, Babu. 

*Waagen, Dr. W., Geological Survey. 

Wahid All, Prince Jahan Qadr Muham- 
mad Bahadur. 

Waldie, D., Esq., F. G. S. 
* Walker, Col. J. T., E. E., r. E. S. 

Wall, Dr. A. J., B. Medical Service. 

Waller, W. K., Esq., M. B. 

Waterhouse, Capt. J., B. s. C. 



Ludianah 
Raniganj 
EurojDe 
Ajmir, Mayo 

College 
Calcutta 
Calcutta 
Ishapur near 

BarrackjDur 
Backergunge 
Calcutta 

Europe 

Calcutta 

Calcutta 

Bombay . 

Calcutta 

Benares 

Faizabad 

Sirsa 

Calcutta 

Eiu'ope 

Etu'ope 

Muzaffargarh 

Indor 

Calcutta 

Agra 

Faridpur 
Calcutta 

Calcutta 
Agra 



Benares 
Balasor 

Europe 

Garden Reach 

Calcutta 

Europe 

Calcutta 

Calcutta 

Calcutta 



Date of Election. 


1874 July 
1876 Dec. 


1, 
6. 


1869 Sept. 
•1867 Feb. 


1. 
6. 


1862 Oct. 


8. 


1873 April 

1875 Feb. 


2. 
3. 


1867 Aug. 


7. 


1873 May 
1867 Jan. 


7. 
16. 


1876 April 
1870 Aug. 


5. 
3. 


1866 Mar. 


7. 


1867 July 
1874 Mar. 


3. 

4. 


1870 Jan. 


5. 


1873 Aug. 


6. 


1869 Sept. 
1868 June 


1. 
3. 


1867 Mar. 


6. 



1825 Mar. 


9. 


1821 „ 


6. 


1826 July 


1. 


1835 May 


6. 


1847 Sept. 


1. 


1847 Nov. 


3. 


1848 Feb. 


2. 


1848 Mar. 


8. 


1853 April 


6. 


1858 July 


6. 


1859 Mar. 


2. 


1860 „ 


7. 


1860 Nov. 


7. 


1860 „ 


7. 


1860 „ 


7. 


1860 „ 


7. 


1868 Feb. 


5. 


1868 „ 


5. 


1868 „ 


5. 


1868 „ 


2. 


1871 „ 


7. 



Watt, Dr. George. 

Webb, W. T., Esq., m. a. 
*Westlanc], J., Esq., c. s. 
fWestmacott, E. V., Esq., B. A., c. s. 

Wheeler, J. T., Esq. 
t White, E., Esq., c. s. 
fWhiteway, E. S., Esq., c. s. 
fWilcos, F., Esq. 
fWilliams, Gr. E. C, Esq., c. S. 
fWilliamson, Capt. W. J. 

Wilson, Alexander, Esq. 

Wilson, E. H., Esq., c. S. 
*Wise, Dr. J. F. N. 
tWoocl, Dr. J. J. 

Wood, C. H., Esq. 

Wood- Mason, J., Esq., Indian Museum. 
tWoodthorpe, Lieut. E. Gr., E. E. 

Yadulal Mallik, Babu. 
Yatindramohana Tagore, The Hon'ble 
Maharaja. 
fYogendranath Mallik, Babu. 



HONOEAEY MEMBEES. 

M. Garcin de Tassy, Memb. de I'lnstitut. 

Sir John PhilHppart. 

Count de Noe. 

Professor Isaac Lea. 

Col. W. Munro. 

His Highness the NawabNazim o£ Bengal 

Dr. J. D. Hooker. 

Professor Henry. 

Major-Gen. Sir H. C. Eawlinson, k. c. b. 

B. H. Hodgson. 

The Hon'ble Sir J. W. Colvile, Kt. 

Professor Max MiiUer. 

Monsieur Stanislas Julien. 

Edward Thomas. 

Dr. Aloys Sprenger. 

Dr. Albrecht Weber. 

General A. Cunningham, c. s. I. 

Professor Bapu Deva Sastri. 

Dr. T. Thomson. 

A. Grote. 

Charles Darwin. 



Hughli 

Calcutta 

Eiu'oj)e 

Diuajpur 

Calcutta 

Bijnour 

Muttra 

Purulia 

Banda 

Garo Hills 

Calcutta 

Calcutta 

Europe 

Eanchi 

Calcutta 

Calcutta 

Naga Hills 

Calcutta 

Calcutta 
Andul 



Paris 

London 

Paris 

Philadelphia 

London 

Murshidabad 

Kew 

Princeton 

London 

Eiu'ope 

Europe 

Oxford 

Paris 

London 

Bern 

Berlin 

India 

Benares 

London 

London 

London 



U.S. 



I 



XI 



Date of Election. 


1872 Feb. 


1. 


1872 June 


5. 


1875 Nov. 


3. 


1875 „ 


3. 


1876 April 


5. 


1876 „ 


5. 



1844 Oct. 


2. 


1856 Jiuie 


4. 


1856 „ 


3. 


1856 „ 


4. 


1856 „ 


4. 


1859 „ 


4. 


1857 Mar. 


4. 


1858 „ 


3. 


1859 Nov. 


2. 


1859 May 


4. 


1860 Feb. 


1. 


1860 „ 


1. 


1861 July 


3. 


1862 Mar. 


5. 


1863 July 


4. 


1866 May 


7. 


1866 „ 


7. 


1868 „ 


5. 



1865 May 
1874 Feb. 

1874 April 

1875 Dec. 
1875 „ 



Sir G. B. Airy. 
Professor T. H. Huxley. 
Dr. 0. BohtHngk. 
Professor J. 0. Westwood. 
Yule, Col. H., E. E., c. B. 
Siemens, Dr. Werner. 



CORRESPONDING MEMBERS. 

Macgowan, Dr. J. 

Kramer, Herr A. von. 

Porter, Rev. J. 

Schlagintweit, Herr H. von. 

Smith, Dr. E. 

Tailor, J., Esq, 

Nietner, J. Esq. 

Schlagintweit, Herr R. von. 

Frederick, Dr. H. 

Bleeker, Dr. H. 

Baker, The Rev. H. 

Swinhoe, R., Esq., H. M.'s Consul. 

Gosche, Dr. R. 

Mm-ray, A., Esq. 

Barnes, R. H., Esq. 

SchlagintAveit, Prof. E. von. 

Sherring, Rev. M. A. 

Holmboe, Prof. 



ASSOCIATE MEMBERS. 

Dall, Rev. C. H. 
Schaiunburgh, J., Esq. 
Lafont, Rev. F. E., s. J. 
Bate, Rev. J. D. 
Maulawi Abdul Hai, Madrasah. 



London 

London 

Jena 

Oxford 

London 

Berlin 



Europe 

Alexandria 

Damascus 

Munich 

Beyrout ' 

Bussorah 

Ceylon 

Giessen 

Batavia 

Eiirope 

E. Malabar 

Amoy 

London 

Ceylon 
Munich 
Benares 
Christiania 



Calcutta 

Calcutta 

Calcutta 

Allahabad 

Calcutta 



LIST OF MEMBEES WHO HAVE BEEN ABSENT FEOM INDIA 
THEEE YEARS AND UPWARDS.* 

*Mule 40. — After the lapse of 3 years from the date of a Member leaving 
India, if no intimation of his wishes, shall, in the interval have been 
received by the Society his name shall be removed from the list of 
Members. 
The following Members will be removed from the Member List of the 

Society nnder the oj)eration of the above Rule. 

Date of leaving India. 

Clutterbuck , Capt. F. St. Quintin, January 1873. 

Ganvain, Capt. V., July 1873. 

Haeberlin, the Rev. C, August 1873. 

Pearson, C. E., Esq., M. A., January 1874. 



LOSS OF MEMBERS DURING 1876. 
Bt Retirement. 



C. Macnaghten, Esq. 

W. Bourne, Esq. 

G. E. Knos, Esq. 

Major H. H. Mallock. 

Lieut. H. B. Urmston. 

W. Theobald, Esq. 

H. C. Williams, Esq. 

A. Tween, Esq. 

E. Stewart, Esq. 

T. B. Mitchell, Esq. 

Eaja Harendra Krishna Bahadur. 

J. Wilson, Esq. 

C. T. Buckland, Esq. 

Capt. E. N. D. La Touche. 

Capt. G. S. Pratt. 

J. Hector, Esq. 

E. A. Carrington, Esq. 



By Death. 

Ordinary Members. 

Butler, Capt. J., b. s. c. 
Willson, W. G., Esq. 
Atkinson, W. S., Esq., M. A. 
Heeley, W. L., Esq., b. a., c. s. 
Brown, R., Esq., m. d. 

Milman, R., d. d., the Right Rev., Lord Bishop of 
Calcutta. 



Rajkot College. 

Calcutta. 

Banda. 

Calcutta. 

Panjab. 

Calcutta. 

Chanda. 

Calcutta. 

Calcutta. 

Assam.. 

Calcutta. 

Bankipur. 

Calcutta. 

Assam. 

Euroj)e. 

Calcutta. 

Calcutta. 



Samaguting. 

Calcutta. 

Euroj)e. 

Europe. 

Manipur. 



Calcutta. 



1 



XUl 



Sonorary Mevihers. 

Prof. C. Lassen. 

Prof. Jules Mohl. 

Dr. Eobert Wight, {died in 1873.) 



Corresponding Members. 



Haug, Dr. M. 
Foucaux, M. F. H. 



Bonn. 
Paris. 
London. 



Munich. 
Paris. 



1 



[appendix.] 



ABSTRACT STATEMENT 



OP 



RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS 



or THE 



Asiatic Society of Bengal 



FOE 



THE YEAR 1876. 



STATEMENT, 
Ahstract of the Cash Account 



EECEIPTS. 



Balance of 1875. 

In the Bank of Bengal, viz. 

Account of Stoliczka Me- 
morial Fund, . . Es. 812 5 

Account of Asiatic Society 

of Bengal, .. .. 3,045 13 



Casli in hand, . . 

Admission Fees. 
Eeceived fi-om Members, 

Subscriptions. 
Eeceived from Members, 



3,858 
160 



800 



9,009 1 9 



Publications. 
Sale proceeds of Jotu-nal and Procee- 
dings, 
Sntscription to ditto, 
Eefund of Postage Stamps, . . 
Ditto of Printing charges, . . 


409 

1,056 

15 

54 






14 

9 




6 
6 


LlBEARY. 

Sale proceeds of Books, 
Eefund of Freight, 
Ditto of Postage 


280 

23 

8 


3 

12 
10 




6 


Secretaky's Office. 
Saving of Salary, . . 
Eeceived fine, &c.. 
Ditto Commission on Purchase of 

Stamps, 
Sale proceeds of two Wooden Casks, . . 
Eefund of Cart and Cooley hire. 


36 
2 

6 

1 

13 


5 

8 

9 

11 

6 


3 
3 

9 





Vested Funt). 

Eeceived from the Secretary of State 
for India on account of abandon- 
ment by the Society of all claims to 
acconmiodation in the New Museum 
building, . . . . _ . . 1,50,000 

Interest on the Government Securities 

from the Bank of Bengal, .. 8,573 

Sale proceeds of 5^ per cent. Government 

SecuritiesNos. 043894, 043518, 189, 60, 6,000 



1876. 



1875. 



4,018 11 7 



800 930 



9,009 1 9 9,760 15 



1,535 8 1,729 10 



312 9 6 411 14 



60 8 3 



24 15 6 



Caixied over Es. 1,63,573 15,736 7 1 



I 



No. 1. 

of the Asiatic Society for 1876. 



DISBUESELIENTS. 
Publications. 1876. 1875. 



Ditto repairing glass cases, 

Ditto Freight, . . 

Ditto Insiiffieient and Bearing Postaj 

Ditto a Teakwood Double Ladder, 

Ditto Petty charges. 

Secretary's Office. 
Paid General Estal)lishinent, 
Ditto Secretary's Establishment, 
Ditto Purchase of Postage Stamps, 



1,605 


11 





5,381 


9 


6 


3 


4 


3 


281 








24 


11 





153 


6 





6 









Paid Freight for sending Journal and 

Proceedings, .. .. 168 9 

Ditto Lithographing and Engraving- 
charges, &c.. 
Ditto Printing charges, . . . . 

Ditto Commission on Collecting Bills, . . 
Ditto Purchase of Postage Stamps, 
Ditto Packing charges. 
Ditto Paper for Plates, 
Ditto Journal Binding, 
Ditto Printing charges for a Catalogue 

of Mammals and Birds of Burmah for 

Journal Part II, No. 1 of 1875 (£62- 

4-6 @ Is. 2cl. per rupee), . . . . 711 2 3 

Ditto overland carriage on parcels of 

lithographed Plates, from England, . . 42 2 

Ditto Major H. H. Godwin-Austen for 

printing and coloring Plates of Naga 

Hill Views, Dafla Shells, &c., 
Ditto Petty charges, 

LlBEARY. 

Paid Salary of Librarian, . . 

Ditto Establishment, 

Ditto Commission on Collecting Bills, . , 

Ditto Tjanding charges. 

Ditto Book Binding, . , 

Ditto Salary of Punkha Bearer, 

Ditto Subscription to the Calcutta Ee 

view, 
Ditto ditto to the Medical Gazette, 
Ditto ditto to Stray Feathers, 
Ditto Purchase of Books 

through Messrs. Triib- 

ner & Co., .. .. 177 9 6 

Ditto ditto of ditto through 

IMessrs. Friedlander and 

Sohn, .. .. 172 14 6 

Ditto ditto of ditto in 

Calcutta, .. .. 306 9 2 



499 


9 





16 


14 


6 


1,800 








136 











1 


3 


10 


3 


3 


408 


2 





38 


5 


3 


16 








15 








11 









657 


1 


2 


23 








5 


1 


5 


3 


1 





12 








26 


8 


3 


397 


8 





1,658 








124 









8,893 14 6 7,373 2 1 



3,161 7 7 4,475 6 6 



Carried over, lis. 2,179 b 12,055 G 1 



RECEIPTS. 

Brought over, Es. 1,63,573 

Interest on ditto from 30th. 
November to 12th De- 
cember, 1876, being 12 
days @ 5J per cent., . . 

Premium on ditto @ 1-14 
per cent., . . 



1876. 
15,736 7 1 



1875. 



9 2 8 



93 12 



102 14 8 



BXJILDIXG. 

Eeceived from the Eight Hon'hle the 
Secretary of State for India fr'om 1st 
December, 1875 to 21st April, 1876, 
@ Es. 400 per month, 



PiDDiNGTON- Pension Fund. 

Eeceived by Transfer from 

the Pidd'ington Fund, . . 586 

Deduct Refund to Capt. 
W. J. A. Wallace, of half 
his subscription, , . 



4 



8 



Subscription Eeceived from W. T. Blan- 
ford, Esq., to the Fund, . . 

Ditto Interest on the Government Secu- 
rity of Es. 500, 

Dr. Oldham Memorial Fund. 
Eeceived Subscription to the Fund, 

Miscellaneous. 
Fund Account, . . . . 

O. P. Fund, 

Conservation of Sanscrit MSS., 
W. Irvine, Esq., 
M. S. Howell, Esq., 
Capt. W. L. Samuells, 
C. W. Marshall, Esq., 
The Eev. C. H. Chard, 
J. W. Edgar, Esq., 
Money Lai Bysack, 
Jadubindo Bysack, 
T. W. H. Tolbort, Esq., . . 
Messrs. Triibner & Co., 
Capt. C. J. F. Forbes, 
W. W. Hunter, Esq., 
L. Schwendler, Esq., 
H. Blochmann, Esq., 
Q. Nevill, Esq., 



1,63,675 14 8 449 



1,920 



Dr. Stoliczea Memorial Fund. 
Eeceived Subscription to the Fund, .. 181 

Piddington Fund. 
Eefund by the Committee of the Chamber 
of Commerce of the moiety of Subscrip- 
tions to the Fund, fr'om the Asiatic 
Society (Es. 1,172), .. .. 586 4 



578 4 



25 



27 8 



156 








1,040 


7 


6 


1,086 


5 


9 


1,000 








10 


12 








9 





5 


13 





3 


7 








6 





4 


11 





67 


13 





493 


10 


6 


3 


6 





4 


6 


6 


5 








1 


8 





9 


7 





9 








6 


11 


9 



1,920 4,800 



181 1,350 



586 4 



630 12 



156 



Carried over, Es. 3,753 6 1,82,886 5 9 



DISBUESEIMENTS. 



Brought over, Es, 

Paid Insufficient and Bearing Postage, 

Ditto Meeting charges. 

Ditto Commission on Suhscription collected, 

Ditto Salary of Mali, 

Ditto Printing charges, 

Ditto Pension to Islam Khan, 

Ditto Fee to the Bank of Bengal for 
Stamping cheques, 

Ditto Stationery, . . 

Ditto Binding Letter files, . . 

Ditto Advertising charges, . . 

Ditto Subscription to the Calcutta Di- 
rectory, . . . . 

Ditto ditto to the Army List, 

Ditto Carpenter for open- 
ing and fixing glass cases, 24 14 

Ditto ditto for repaii'ing 
Book Shelves, Meeting- 
Table, &c., . . . . 28 2 



Ditto to the Collector of 
Stamps Revenue of Cal- 
cutta for Stamping the 
Memorandum of Associa- 
tion of the Asiatic Society, 

Ditto Registration fee for 
ditto, . , 



16 



50 



Ditto a copy of Indian Postal Guide, 
Ditto Petty charges. 

Ditto Ticca Cooley for removing Books 
and Shelves, &c., 

Furniture and Fittings. 
Paid a Teak-wood Table for Duftery, 
Ditto three Teakwood Packs, 
Ditto a Teakwood large Glass Case, 
Ditto Repairing and fixing 

Cane Matting in four 

rooms, .-. .. 298 

Ditto Supplying and fixing 

New Cane Matting, .. 1,146 10 



Ditto a dozen of Teakwood rattan-back 

Arm-chairs, . . 
Ditto a pair six branches Gaselier, 

Vested Fund. 

Paid Purchase of 5^ per cent. Govern- 
ment Security through Bank of Bengal, 

Ditto Interest on ditto. 

Ditto Premium on ditto. 

Ditto Commission on ditto, 

Ditto ditto on Collecting Interest 
on Government Securities, 

Ditto ditto on Selling Govern- 
ment Security of Rs. 6,000, 



2,179 8 

4 14 

128 11 

54 14 

72 

198 15 

36 



3 
58 

6 
43 

14 
12 



1,44,800 

2,716 

3,025 

376 



53 



66 



1 








65 


3 


3 


78 


6 





14 








183 








253 









1.444 10 

67 4 
400 



21 6 8 



12 12 1 



1876. 
12,055 6 1 



1875. 



3,075 8 3,769 9 9 



2,361 14 



Carried over, Es. 1,50,952 12 10 17,492 12 1_ 



RECEIPTS. 




1876. 




Brought over, Rs. 


3,753 


6 


1,82,886 5 


9 


Dr.'a. Thibaut, 


27 


6 







The Hon'ble 0. R. Lindsay, 





11 







H. W. Dashwood, Esq., . . 





12 







Babiillah Duftery, 


10 










Dr. T. H. Hendley, 


19 


10 







E. V. Westmacott, Esq., . . 


3 


4 







S. Kiu-z, Esq., 


122 










C. Grant, Esq., 





11 







M. L. Dames, Esq., 





3 







Lt.-Col. J. Bm-n, 


2 


10 







The Government North- Western Pro- 










vinces, . . . . . . 


13 


8 







B. Quaritch, Esq., 


128 


14 







Lt.-Col. Lord R. Kerr, 


2 










V. A. Smith, Esq., 


2 


7 







J. Beames, Esq., 


20 










r. S. Growse, Esq., 


2 










H. F. Blanford, Esq., 


3 


4 


9 




A. S. Harrison, Esq., 


3 










Col. W. E. MarshaU, 


1 


15 







W. Stokes, Esq., ... 


1 


14 







J. G. Delmerick, Esq., 


1 










Col. H. L. Thuillier, 





3 







Braj Bhushan Das, 








3 




The Hon'ble Sir E. 0. Bayley, K. C. S. I., 


1 


8 




A TOO q 


n 



1375. 



Carried over, Rs. 1,87,008 8 9 



DISBUESEMENTS. 1876. 1875. 

Brought over, Rs. 1,50,952 12 10 17,492 12 1 
Paid ditto Brokerage on ditto 

ditto, ' .. .. .. 6 4 

Ditto Fee for renewing Government 

Securities, , . , , . . 3 



Building. 

Paid House rate, . . , . 372 

Ditto Police and Lighting rate, . , 276 

Ditto Water rate, ^ .. ,. 213 13 6 

Ditto making Drawing of the Asiatic 

Society's Premises, .. .. 13 14 

Ditto J. B. Norton, Esq., for supplying 

and fixing Gas Pipes, . , . . 762 6 

Ditto ditto 96 Jets for ditto ditto with 
Pipe and Cocks complete in the Meet- 
ing room, . . . . . . 401 6 

Ditto Messrs. Mackintosh, Burn & Co., 
in part payment for repairing the 
Society's Premises, .. ., 8,000 



1,50,962 10 4,073 9 8 



Coin Fund. 
Purchase of Silver Coins, , . . . 39 

Ditto of two Gold Coins, .. .. 41 10 

Paid Cooley and Cart for bringing a 

Coin hox from the Mint, . . . . 7 

Ditto Banghy Expense for sending a 

packet of Gold Coins to "W. Campbell, 

Esq., Beerbhoom, . . 

Ditto fee for getting Money Order, 
Ditto Insufficient Postage on Packet of 

Gold Coin, , , . , 

Dr. Oldham Memorial Fund 
Paid Printing charges, 370 Copies of 

Circular, 
Ditto Advertising the List of Subscribers 

to the Fund, . , 

Dr. Stoliczka Memorial Fund. 
Remitted to A. Grote, Esq., London, 3 

overland Money Orders Nos. 143 to 145, 

dated 10th July 1876, @ £ 10 each, . . 395 3 3 

Ditto ditto 2 Overland Money Orders Nos. 

161 and 162, dated 17th July 1876, 

@ £ 10 each, . . . . 263 7 6 






4 




p 


4 





4 


11 





14 


8 



PiDDiNGTON Fund. 

Refunded to Capt. W. J. A. Wallace, 
being half his Subscription to the above 
Fund, .. .. •.. 8 

Paid by Transfer to the Piddington Pen- 
sion Fund, . . . . . . 578 4 



Piddington Pension Fund. 
Paid to the Bank of Bengal for Purchase 
of 5-i- per cent., Government Security 
No. 047143— 021980, of 1859-60, .. 500 



10,039 7 6 1,008 12 7 



81 13 376 4 



25 8 



658 10 "9 1,738 14 4 



586 4 



Carried over, Rs. 500 1,79,846 8 2 



RECEIPTS. 
Brought over, lis. 



1876. 1875. 

1,87,008 8 9 



Carried over, Rs. 1,87,008 8 9 



XSUl 



DISBUESEMENTS. 



1876. 



1875. 



Brought over, Es. 50O 1,79,846 8 2 



Paid Interest on ditto from SOth. Nov. 1 875 
to 7tli September, 1876, being 9 montbs, 



and 7 days @ oj per cent., 




21 2 


6 




Ditto Premium on ditto @ 1^ 


per cent., 


22 8 







Ditto Commission ditto @ J per cent., . . 


1 5 


9 




Eefunded to E. Taylor, Esq.. 


, half his 








Subscription to the Fund, 


. , 


15 







Paid Commission on Collecting Interest 








on Government Security, 


. .. 





7 


560 10 


Miscellaneous, 








Paid donation towards a Zoological Ex- 








ploration of Tenasserim, .. 




500 







Fund Account, . . . . 




1,130 







0. P. Fund, 




86 5 


9 




Earth Current Account, 




18 







Lt.-Col. C. C. llinchin, 




1 







J. Beames, Esq., 




1 9 







Capt. E. Fraser, 




8 







M. MacauliflFe, Esq., 




3 12 







J. G. Dehnerick, Esq., 




10 







F. S. Growse, Esq., 


fr. 


3 U 







Money Lai Bysack, 




116 14 


6 




Jadubindo Bysack, 




445 12 







The Government North Western Pro- 








vinces, 


, , 


8 5 







Major W. E. M. HoLroyd, . . 




2 4 







L Schwendler, Esq., 


. , 


9 7 







G. NeviU, Esq., 


, , 


6 11 


9 




Dr. G. Thibaut, 


, , 


26 2 


6 




Dr. F. Keilhorn, 


, , 


1 2 







J. W. Edgar, Esq., 


, , 


1 15 







Dr. T. H. Hendley, 


, . 


19 10 







G. H. Damant, Esq., 


, , 


12 







Capt. C. J. F. S. Forbes, . . 


• • 


3 12 


9 




L. H. Guffin, Esq., 


, , 


1 7 







Lt.-Col. J. Burn, 


, , 


50 10 







S. Km'z, Esq., 


, , 


122 







The Hon'ble E. Lindsay, 


, , 


11 







C. Grant, Esq., '. . 




1.1 







H. W. Dashwood, Esq,, 


, . 


11 







Maulavi Syad Jamadali, 




11 







M. Sashagiri Sastri, , , 


, , 


11 







H. H. the Rao of Kutch, . , 




11 







V. A. Smith, Esq., 




1 11 





, 


Major H. H. Godwin- Austen, 




2 12 







"W. Stokes, Esq., 


, , 


1 14 







BabuUah Duftery, 




10 







W. Irvine, Esq., 


■ > • 


6 it 


6 




W. J. Porter, Esq., 




4 







Major-Goncral A. Cunningham, 


c. s. i.". 


8 







The Hon'ble Su- E. C. Bayley, 


C. S. I., 


1 8 







C. J. Lyall, Esq., 




1 







W. McGregor, Esq., 




2 7 


6 




C. E. E. Girdlestone, Esq., , . 




1 9 







The Rev. F. Foulkes, 


, , 


1 2 







E. Lotlibridgo, Esq., 




3 







Eaja Joykisscn Doss, 




b 







Carried over, Es. 


2,597 6 


3 1,80. 


,106 'J 



EECEIPTS, 1876. 1875. 

Brouglit over, Es. 1,87,008 8 9 



s. 1,87,008 8 9 



Examined and found correct, 
Datid Waldie, 
H. H. GoDwiN-AusTEN, Major. 
Asiatic Society's Rooms, 

Calcutta, Jan. 1st, 1877' 



DISBURSEIMENTS. 



Brought over, Es 



Lt.-Col. L. E. Kerr, 
Col. H. L. ThuilHer, 
M. L. Dames, Esq., 
Dr. J. Sciilly, 
H. F. Blanford, Esq., 
E. H. Man, Esq., 
Dr. T. R. Lewis, 
Dr. V. Eichards, 
A. S. Harrison, Esq., 
Md. Khodabux Khan, 
W. T. Blanford, Esq., 
H. Buckle, Esq., 
A. Anderson, Esq., 
E. B. Shaw, Esq., 

Balance. 

In the Bank of Bengal, viz. 

Account of Stoliczka Memo- 
rial Fund, . . 

Account of Dr. Oldham 
Memorial Fund, 

Account of Piddington 
Pension Fund, 

Account of Asiatic Society 
of Bengal, ... 



, Es. 2,597 


6 


3 





4 








3 








15 





2 








14 


5 


6 





3 








4 








5 





2 


10 








10 





4 


6 








11 








1 





9 


11 






334 10 5 



130 8 



70 11 2 
3,213 13 2 



Cash in hand, 



3,749 10 
218 6 



1876. 
1,80,406 9 



1875. 



2,633 14 9 1,947 5 4 



3,968' 1 
Es. 1,87,008 8 9 



Examined and found correct, 
Datid Waldie, 
H. H, GoDwiN-AusTEN, Major. 



STATEMENT, 
Abstract of the Cash Account , 



EEOEIPTS. 



Balance of 1875. 
In the Bank of Bengal^ viz. 
Dr. J. Mim-, .. ., 898 10 

O. P. Fund, .. .. 3,364 8 6 



Casli in hand, 



4,263 
144 



Custody or Omental "Works. 
Saving of Salary, 
Ditto Fine, 

Asiatic Society of Bengal, . .' 

Bahu Braj Bhushana Das, 

Basel Mission Book Tract Depository, 

T. W. H. Tolbort, Esq. , . . 

Babu Pratapa Chandra Grhosha, 

Sheoprasad Sadur, 

Adhur Sing Goiir, 

Gopal Eao Hurry, Esq., 

Capt. "Gr. A. Jacob, 

Ramjeebun Mookerjea, 

Venkata Krishna Modeller, 

Framjee Cowasjee Institute Native General 

Library, Bombay, 
Pandit Chandra Kant Tarkalankar, 
Babu Kaliprasad, . . 



30 




1876. 



1875. 



Oriental Publications. 
Received by sale of Bibliotheca Indica, and 

by Subscription to ditto, ., .. 2,441 11 9 

Ditto Refund of Postage and Packing, 65 9 6 
Ditto Commission on Purchase of Pos- 
tage Stamps, . . . . 8 



4,407 9 11 



Government Allowance. 
Received from General Treasury at 500 Rs. 

per month, .. 6,000 

Ditto ditto Additional grant for the pub- 
lication of Sanskrit Works at 250 Rs, per 
month, .. 3,000 



2,507 13 3 2,872 6 3 



86 5 


9 


49 10 


6 


5 1 





5 14 





30 14 


3 


2 7 





5 





3 





1 





15 





11 





6 2 





1 2 





12 15 






9,000 9,000 



30 14 3 



2 2 9 



219 8 6 293 5 5 



Carried ovci, Rs, 16,105 13 11 



I 



No. 2. 

Oriental Puhlication Fund, 1876 



. DISBURSEMENTS 


. 






1876 






187 


5. 




Oriental Publications. 






















Paid Packing charges, 


. , 


11 


12 

















Ditto Postage Stamps, 


, . 


137 


8 

















Ditto Freight, 


, . 


85 


6 

















Ditto Advertising charges. 




202 


1 

















Ditto Commission on Sale of Books, &c., 


33 


12 

















Ditto Coolies for removing Books and 




















Shelves, &c., 


, . 


47 


5 

















Ditto Ticca Duffcery for arranging 


Biblio- 




















theca Indica, 


, , 


9 


4 

















Ditto Carpenters' -workmanship and 


supply- 




















ing Rafters for Racks, 


, , 


36 


2 

















Purchase of three Teakwood Racks, 


, , 


183 




















Ditto Petty charges, 




7 


11 


9 
























753 


13 


9 


774 


1 





Custody of Omental "Works. 










Paid Salary of the Librarian, 


, , 


600 




















Ditto Establishment, 


. , 


724 




















Ditto Fee for Stamping Cheques, 


. , 


3 


2 

















Ditto Banghy Expenses, 


. . 





10 

















Ditto Book Binding, 




1 




















Ditto Packing charges, 


. . 


3 




















Ditto Petty charges. 


.. 


1 






























1,332 


12 





1,291 


2 







"■"■ 








Library. 






















Paid Purchase of MSS., 


.. 


70 






























70 








6 


6 


6 












Catalogue of Sanskrit MSS. 






















Paid Salary for Cataloguing Sanskrit 


MSS., 


420 






























420 








360 








Copying Manuscripts, 










Paid Copying MSS,, 


.. 


16 


6 


6 
























14 


6 


6 


157 





3 












AfN-I-AKEARf. 






















Paid Editing and Printing charges, 


.. 


445 






























445 








96 








GoBHILfVA GrIHYA Su'TRA, 










Paid Printing charges, 


.. 


224 




















Ditto Postage, 







13 



























224 


13 





140 


-• 





Sahitya Darpana. 













Paid Printing charges, 


.. 


418 






























418 











6 





Akbarnamah, 










Paid Editing charges. 


. . 


192 






























192 








688 








Sama Veda, 










Paid Editing and Printing charges. 


.. ' 


2,100 


8 



























2,100 


8 


9 


1,220 


10 
















Carried over, Rs. 6,971 6 



EEOEIPTS. 1876. 1875. 

Brought over, Rs. 16,165 13 11 



Rs. 16,165 13 11 



Examined and found correct. 
David Waldie, 
H. H. Godwin-Austen, Major, 
Asiatic Society's Rooms, 
Calcutta^ Jan, Xst^ 1876. 



XXIS 



DISBTJESEIIENTS. 1876. 

Brought over, Es. 5,971 6 



Biographical Dictionary of Persons 
WHO KNEW Muhammad. 
Paid Editing and Printing charges, 
Ditto Copying charges, . . . . 



710 8 
127 8 



1,220 



AlTAREYA ArANYAKA. 

Paid Editing and Printing charges, . , 1,536 11 9 

Chaturvarga Chintamani. 
Paid Editing and Printing charges, 

TABAQAT-I-!N'A9mi. 

Paid Printing charges, . . 

Ditto Freight, 

Ditto Postage and Cooley, 

Bhamati. 
Paid Printing charges, 
Ditto Freight, 
Ditto Postage and Cooley, 

TaittirIya S.\nhita. 
Paid Editing and Printing charges, 

Kamandaki Nitisara. 
Paid Editing and Printing charges. 



838 



1,079 10 6 
5 
11 



498 

16 6 

13 3 



334 10 



Asiatic Society of Bengal, 

Babu Braj Bhushan Das, 

Basel Mission Book and Tract Depository, 

Babu Bhaiya Lala, 

Adhur Sing Gour, 

Eamjeebun Mookerjea, . . 

Venkata Krishna Modeliar, 

Framjee Cowasjee Institute Native General 

Library, Bombay, 
Eutton Lala, . , 

Gopal Eao Hurry, 



320 

1,086 5 9 

52 13 6 

5 10 

5 3 

5 

30 

11 



5 6 



515 9 3 



334 10 



320 



3 
6 




1875. 



25 



1,536 11 9 353 



1,220 610 



Balance. 
In the Bank of Bengal, viz 
Dr. J. Muir, 
0. P. Fund, 

Cash in hand, . , 



898 10 
2,140 12 10 



3,039 6 10 
113 12 4 



2 12 



1,191 3 615 4 6 



3,153 3 2 

Es. 16,165 13 11 

Examined and found correct. 
David Waldie, 
II. H. GoDwtN-AusTEN, M^jor. 



STATEMENT, 
Conservation of Sanskrit MSS., in Account 



Cr. 

1876. 

Balance of 1875, Es. 4,370 11 

Keceived from the Government of Bengal, the amount sanc- 
tioned towards the Conservation of Sanskrit MSS., being 
2nd Half of 1875-76, 1,600 

Ditto ditto 1st Half of 1876-77, 1,600 

Sale proceeds of 47 copies Notices of Sanskrit MSS., 47 

Refund of the amount fi'om Dr. Eajendralala Mitra, paid 
on the 14th September, 1875 for purchase of Sanskrit 
MSS 1,200 

Ditto Dr. from ditto ditto paid on the 8th September, 

1876 for purchase of Sanskrit MSS., 1,000 

Ditto of Postage Stamps, '.... Oil 

Eeceived from Babu Nil Komul Banerjea in Deposit, 4 

5,447 15 



Es. 9,817 15 11 

Examined and found con-ect. 

David Waldie, 
H. H. GoDWiN-AusTEN, Major. 
Asiatic Society's Eooms, 

Calcutta, Jan. \st, 1876. 



^ 



NO. 3. 

Current with the Asiatic Society of Bengal • 



Dr. 



Paid Salary for preparing Catalogiie of Sanski-it MSS., 360 

Ditto ditto for Translating the Sanskrit Catalogue, .... 240 U 

Ditto ditto for Travelling Pandit, 5o0 

Ditto Banghy expenses, 2 4 

Ditto Printing charges of Notices of Sanskrit MSS. Vol. 

III. Part III. and Vol. III. Part IV., 687 8 

Ditto Contingent charges for Travelling Pandit, . 510 6 

Ditto Travelling Allowance for ditto ditto, 169 14 

Ditto Purchase of Sanskrit MSS., 800 10 

Ditto Copying charges of Sansla-it MSS., 91 4 

Ditto yellow paper for copying ditto, 7 8 

Ditto Fee to the Bank of Bengal for Stamping Cheques, 19 

Ditto Purchase of Stationery, 9 10 

Ditto Packing charges, 3 6 

Ditto Freight for sending Notices of Sanskrit MSS. to 

Messrs. Triihner and Co., 42 10 

Ditto Postage Stamps, 2111 6 

Ditto Messrs. T. Black and Co. for preparing 13 plates and 
Lithographing and Coloring 510 copies of each of the 

ahove plates for Notices of Sanskrit MSS., 367 3 

Ditto Dr. Eajendralala Mitra, as an advance on account 
of Travelling expenses for a Tour in search of Sanskrit 

MSS., 1,000 

Ditto Librarian, his Salary from May 1875 to April 1876, 150 
Ditto Dr. Eajendralala Mitra, for Travelling expenses 
to Patna, Benares, &c. including Railway fare, Carriage 

hire, &c., 346 10 

Ditto Present hy way of Commission to Pandits and others, 36 
Ditto Packing Cases, Charges of Packing, Cooley, Boat- 
hire, and Railway fare for MSS., 13 3 6 

Ditto for Copying and Purchase of 138 Copies of MSS., 1,609 4 

Ditto Loan, to the Asiatic Society of Bengal, 1,000 o 

Ditto Petty Charges, , 7 9 6 

Ditto Salary for Bearer, 84 

Balance of 1876. 

In the Bank of Bengal, 2,146 10 5 

Cash in hand, 3 14 6 



1876. 



7,667 7 



2,150 8 11 



Ks. 9,817 15 11 



Asiatic Society's Rooms, 

Calcutta, Jan, \st, 1876. 



Examined and found correct. 

David Waldie, 

II. II. GoDWix-AuSTEX, Mfy'or. 



d 

h 

w 
w 

h 

h 
m 



o 

■^ 
o 
o 

'^ 

OS 



•to <a 

-+0 
■50 



^ 



00 (M O O 
O lO o o 
00 (M O O 

^ r-H 
CO CO 



CM ^ O O 

CO CO CO 1>- 
CO CO 1— I 



o o 

O O 

o o 
o o 

00 o 

o o 



O 05 
O 05 






cS ■ 






O Pi OJ 



O U 



H 



t-^ CD 



S Fl 

Ph *'~< 



,-1—1 



« 



Ph 



^ OJD 



FMpq P^ 



xn 



O 



I 



, o 

:^ 

:.a 



ra fH o 



S =§ S f;^ 

O 3 



rial 

fl 02.2 

-g " '^ o 
5 05 g rt OjyQ 

d g .3 



CD c3 "^ 



§ S 



! d 

\ do 



CO o 

CO o 

C3 O 



05 CO 

^ ,-1 



d 



o o 
o o 



lO 



05 03 O 
t^ OS 05 



00 t^ oq 

lO O 'O 
CO CO 1-1 



CO 

o o 
o o 
o o 



OS OS o 
i-H CO 05 



CO . 



CO t^ (M 

t— CO CD 
Cd VO i-l 



O 03 r^ 



1=1 r^ 



So 


d 

o 


d T3 


1/J 




d 


<D o 




^.^ 


Ph 


^fi 






. . ^ > ^ . 

'5 f3 oj d oj 



p:! 



o 

p . 



p^ 



a 



.g 



^ 



H 

n £ 

p a 



p^ 



o O 



■^ 
g 

^ 

f^ 






CO 

d 

w 

<: 

h 






•r-i 



CO 

5^ 



e 
^ 









Co 

•hi 



O O O o 

o © o o 

O O ©CO 
00 

O o o o 

o o o o 




I— -■ < <j 
fH Ph oc 52 °C o o 03 



:.2l 



o «s o 
o -* o 



o o o 

1>- lO 



o •* © 

O CO © 



O C5 © 

lO lO © 
t^ CD © 




;^0 
PM 



0^ 



S -f* 






•J ' 



AMNH UBRARY 



100027206 



) 



I- 



1^ s 



»'• 



m 




% 



.r 




#^j 



;*^ 



mjiP^